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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01680
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: June 16, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01680

Full Text


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TODAY & Wednesday morning
HJI Partly cloudy. Scattered
9 3 thunderstorms. Chance
Y' of rain 30 percent.
" O PAGE A4


114


ISSUE 313


AG rules on barn exemption


SHEMIR WILES
swiles@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Florida Attorney General Bill
McCollum issued a formal opin-
ion4 Monday backing the'Citrus
Cdunty Attorney's Office on the
belief that Sen. Charlie Dean's
barn structure can be considered
a residence.
In April, assistant county attor-
ney Gregg Brennan formally
asked McCollum for an opinion


about whether Dean's barn,
which was built on farmland he
owns, is exempt from the Florida
Building Code and county zoning
regulations.
Brennan posed two questions:
* "Does the term 'residential'
in section 604.50, Florida
Statutes, require that persons re-
side in the dwelling on a full-time
basis in order to remove the
building from the exemption for
nonresidential farm building
under this section?"


* "Regardless of whether a
building Is determined to be'res-
idential,' does the county have
the authority to enforce its zoning
regulations regarding the con-
struction of the building on land
classified as agriculture under
section 193.461, Florida Statutes,
if those regulations do not limit
the operational activity of the
bona fide farm operation?"
In McCollum's response to
Brennan's first question he wrote
"that the term 'residential' ...
does not require that persons re-
side in the dwelling on a full-time
basis in order to remove the
building from the exemption for
See BARN/Page A4


Special to ile Chronicle
The state attorney's office ruled that state Sen. Charlie Dean's barn can
be considered a residence, although no persons live there on a full-time
basis. Dean built the facility without getting permits.


Veterans


praise


local VA


facility

Clinic hasn't
hadproblems
SHEMIR WILES
S* swiles@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Raymond Raphael is a 100 per-
cent disabled World War II vet-
eran.
He suffers from a countless
number., of aliments, including.
post-traumatic stress disorder and
damaged eardrums from explo-
sions. He also is
l National batt 1 i ng
' facilities prostate cancer.
plagued Since he left
by flaws the Army in
PAGEA2 1946, he has
PAGE A2 been to many
VA clinics in his
time, but Raphael considers the
community-based VA outpatient
clinic in Lecanto to be the best
"I'm treated with respect,"
Raphael said, "and without
: lay"
The first outpatient clinic
opened in July 2000 in Inverness.
With only two doctors and 3,000
square feet of room, the clinic
soon outgrew its space.
"It was so small, t ey couldn't
handle the people," R phael said.
Fred Daniels, chai man of the
Citrus County Vetera s Coalition,
ageed, /
With about 26,00 veterans in
Sthe county, Daniels aid the two
doctors couldn't hale the work-
load and he hear a lot of com-
plaints from !veterans about
having to wit for months before
being able to see a doctor.
To expand services to a growing
veteran population, the clinic
See VETERANS/Page A2


Trotting along


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.'.' . , . . .
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.-- - - -'


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Seventeen-year-old Malerle Bramlett negotiates her way across Main Street In downtown Inver-
ness late Monday morning on her horse, Boogie. Like the other pedestrian foot traffic, the teen
waited at the crosswalk for the light to change before heading to McDonald's for lunch.


Details

sketchy

in deadly

shooting

Victim's children
were in car at

time of incident
TAYLOR PROVOST
Chronicle
The Citrus County Sheriff's
Office released new informa-
tion regarding Sunday after-
noon's fatal shooting in
Homosassa.
According to a report from
Heather Yates, spokeswoman
for the sheriff's office, Shane
Huse, 34, was shot and killed
by his neighbor Oscar Delbono,
53, outside his home on Bil-
lows Lane. Deputies re-
sponded to a call that came in
at 12:54 p.m. regarding the on-
going dispute between neigh-
bors that resulted in the
shooting.
The report said Delbono
fired multiple shots, but the
exact cause of death is still un-
known pending a report from
the medical examiner.
Huse's two children, both
under the age of 5, were in
Huse's vehicle in the driveway
at the time, but it is unclear if
they witnessed the incident.
Yates said the Department of
Children and Families was no-
tified of the incident.
Yates said that the two men
had argued about Huse's dogs
on prior occasions, though po-
lice could not say that was the
exact cause of Sunday's dis-
pute.
Officers did not take Del-
bono into custody following the
shooting and the sheriff's of-
fice is still investigating the in-
cident.


-laca nonprofit gets $70K to fund summer program


Deadline to register

for camps is Frday
CHERI HARRIS ..
charris@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Thanks to a $70,000 grant from
Kids Central and a local non-
profit agency, 60 local children
will have the chance to expand
their horizons this summer.
Andrea "Katrice" McCray,
founder and executive director
of the Community Action Foun-
dation of Citrus County, said the


deadline for the Prevention En-
richment Summer Program
grant was May 15 and she
learned May 19 that her grant
had been approved. '
That grant makes the Commu-
nity Action Foundation of Citrus
County's Spirit of Excellence
Summeri" Youth Leadership
Academy a reality.
The goal of the program is to
expose local youths to a variety of
experiences in order to encour-
age them to make better choices.
McCray said the summer pro-
gram, which is free for partici-
pants, will include local
activities such as kayaking, snor-


*WHAT Comu...ny A. Dali Museum in St. Petersburg,
S WHAT-: Community Action MOSI (the Museum of Science
Foundation's Sumrmer Youmth and Industry), and a tour of Tal-
Spirit of Excellence Summe 4 anas , stat cuanpitaiuof
Le . ip Aca.emy. ., She said the program, geared
0 WHEN: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for middle-schoolers and high-
Monday through Friday, June schoolers ages 11 through 16, will
22 through July 31. start Monday and continue from
0 REGISTRATION DEADLINE: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through
Friday. . Friday through July 31.
I REGISTER: www.cafcc.net, The deadline to apply for the
camp is Friday and those inter-
keling and golfing Monday ested in participating should reg-
through Thursday. On Friday, ister online at www.cafcc.net,
field trips will take participants Participants should' bring
to destinations such as the lunches Monday through Thurs-
Kennedy Space Center, the Uni- day.
versity of Florida, the Salvador , McCray said she was ecstatic to


receive funding for the program.
"We've never had anything like
that in Citrus County that pro-
vides that exposure. It's been a
big boost for the community," she
said. "Parents are thrilled."
Other Community Action Foun-
dation events slated for the sum'-
mer include Summer Splashes
from 4 to 8 p.m. Saturday and July
18 in Copeland Park in Crystal
River The event Saturday will
feature fried chicken and fish
from Oysters Restaurant, as well
as a water slide, music and fam-
ily goody bags. The July 18 Sum-
mer Splash will be a luau. There
is no charge for these events,


Comics ......................... C6
S. Editorial .......................... A
bHoroscope ..................... C5
Lottery Numbers ............ B4
1,ottery Payouts .........,,BG
Movies ......................... C6x
'Obituaries , ,,... ............. A5
Stocks ............................ A6
TV l..l tlnmBr ...................... (,


Gator-huntin' grandmother
"A girl's work is never done," says only female state-employed trapper./Page C?

Shuttle lau ch NASA slates5:40 am. liftoff Wednesday./Page A3

Help, doc Obama asks MDs to support health care reform,/Page A10

HoaIre voice Woman's chronic problem linked to tooth,/Page C3


SStocks fall
Tumbling commodity
prices, strong dollar
help sink market mo.
mentum /Page A8


'.l Iill i i ll 'III I I


IP~ ~'-


'ii
N


State official's ruling leaves final
decision up to county leaders


mb







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A2 TUESDAY. TUNE 16. 2009


VETERANS
Continued from Page Al

moved to a new location on
Marc Knighton Court in
Lecanto, which is also the for-
mer Brown Schools facility.
The 9,999-square-foot clinic
offers 17 spacious examina-
tion rooms and currently has
seven primary care doctors on
a staff that
serves more
than 6,600 vet- It a
erans. David me eve
Gilner, adminis-
trative officer at I go t
the Lecanto
clinic, said they People
are also work-
ing on expand- area sh
ing the clinic noud
into another P
part of the we hav
building, which
will add 3,000
square feet The F
addition will
allow more local
room for the us
specialty serv-
ices the clinic provides, which
.include mental health services
and nutrition. It is expected to
be completed in 10 months.
Daniels said the move to
Lecanto made a tremendous
improvement in customer
service. He said the lab work
they perform is very organized
and he never has to wait more
. than 15 minutes to be seen by a
doctor. Gilner said the clinic
has signs informing patients if
they have been waiting for
more than 15 minutes, to ap-
proach the window.
"We don't want people wait-
ing," he said.
Daniels also said the nurses
and doctors are friendly and
he likes the fact he has the op-
portunity to really talk about
his medical needs with some-
one without feeling -rushed.
The staff is also good about re-
turning phone calls, Daniels
added.
He said the problem with
the national and statewide VA
clinic system is paperwork
and computer issues. At the
Lecanto facility, he doesn't run
into those issues.
"I would rate it higher than
the VA clinic system through-
out the'state," Daniels said.
Daniels said he would love
to see a dental program added
and other outpatient services
so he doesn't have to visit the
hospital in Gainesville that
ofte'hping f m ," h
!"'! i'YWe'rehoping for more," he


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said. "It's an ongoing project"
Raphael also touted the ex-
cellent customer service at the
clinic. He never has had to
wait more than 30 days to see a
doctor, he said. And if he does-
n't visit the clinic for a few
months, he said the staff calls
him to see how he's doing
"Where else can you get
that?" he said.
Raphael loves it so much he
has sent letters to state repre-
sentatives to
encourage
amazes them to look at
r t the Lecanto
ry time clinic as a
there. model for fu-
ture commu-
in this nity-based
outpatient clin-
ould be ics. He said he
of what believes it
f what would a bless-
e. ing to other vet-
erans in the
state to have a
Raymond similarly run
Raphael facility in their"
il veteran who town.
es local clinic. Gilner said
they receive at
least a dozen positive letters a
month from satisfied veterans,
not to mention the accolades
they receive from veterans
when they are at the clinic.
"It amazes me every time I
go there," Raphael said. "Ped-
ple in this area should be
proud of what we have."


VA inspections show continued flaws


Associated Press


WASHINGTON - Fewer
than half of Veterans Af-
fairs centers given a sur-
prise inspection last month
had proper training and
guidelines in place for com-
mon endoscopic proce-
dures such as
colonoscopies - even after
the agency learned that
mistakes may have exposed
thousands of veterans to
HIV and other diseases.
The findings, from the
VA's inspector general and
obtained by The Associated
Press, suggest that errors in
colonoscopies and other
minimally invasive proce-
dures performed at VA fa-
cilities may be more
widespread than initially
believed.
The report is slated to be
released today at a hearing
before a House Veterans
Affairs subcommittee, in
which VA officials are
scheduled to take ques-
tions. Rep. Harry Mitchell,
D-Ariz., who will chair the
hearing, on Monday called
the situation a "damaging
blow to the trust veterans
place in the VA."
Mitchell said in a state-


Associated Press
Gov. Charlie Crist, center, talks to George Manter, a vet-
eran getting treatment at the Miami. Veterans Hospital,
early last week, as he toured the hospital. The hospital was
one of three that required some patients to get additional'
blood tests after having colonscopies at the center.


ment he wants to learn
what the VA is doing to pro-
tect those potentially ex-
posed and about what
changes have been put in
place to prevent similar
mistakes.
The random inspections
were conducted May 13-14
at 42 VA medical centers
around the country. They
found that just 43 percent
of the centers have stan-


dard operating procedures
in place and have properly
trained their staffs for
using endoscopic equip-
ment.
The investigation comes
months after the discovery
of a mistake at Murfrees-
boro, Tenn., led to a nation-
wide safety campaign at
the VA's 153 medical cen-
ters calling attention to po-
tential infection risks from


improperly operating and
sterilizing the equipment
Along with Murfrees-
boro, the agency has said
mistakes were identified at
a Miami center and at an
ear, nose and throat ctinic
in Augusta, Ga. In February
the agency started warning
about 10,000 former pa-
tients at those facilities,
some who had colono-
scopies as far back as 2Q003,
to get blood tests for HIV
and hepatitis.
The VA says the chance
of infection is remote. As of
Friday, the VA reported
that six veterans takingthe
follow-up blood cheeks
tested positive for HIV 34
tested positive for hepatitis
C and 13 tested positive for
hepatitis B. But there is no
way to prove whether the
infections came from'WA
procedures, and some ex-
perts say most or all ofkthe
infections probably already
existed.
The VA has acknowl-
edged that the mistakes
were caused by human
error. Agency spokes-
woman Katie Roberts' did
not immediately respond to
a request for comment on
the report.


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Page A3 - TUESDAY, JUNE 16,2009


,TATE &


L LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
'THE STATE

Orlando
J Four bodies found,
in suburban.house
A man fatally shot his wife
and two children and killed
himself in a home in a gated
community in suburban Or-
lando, authorities said Mon-
day.
! The family members were
identified as John Dillon
Wood, 41; Cynthia Wood, 40;
teir daughter, Aubrey Wood,
�12; and their son, Dillon
Wood, 10.
Investigators say the
deaths appear to be a triple
murder-suicide and that they
"don't believe there's any-
body running around out
there who did this."
', Heathrow is an unincorpo-
rated suburb about 20 miles
northeast of Orlando.
�Hearing-impaired man
paved from fire by dog
A hearing-impaired man is
crediting his service dog with
saving his life from a fire.
, Darrin Weeks said his dog'
Roscoe jumped on the bed
nday to wake him after a
e broke out in the building
Shis Orlando duplex.
P' Weeks ran next door,
Ivoke his neighbor and
lulled him out of the fire.
V Weeks was not injured in
ie blaze, although emer-
ency crews'treated his
neighbor for smoke inhala-
gon ..
" The fire is under investiga-
tion.

Tallahassee
FSU president
stepping down
Florida State University
President T.K Wetherell will
tell the school's trustees this
week that he wants to retire.
Two school officials close
to Wetherell told The Associ-
ated Press on Monday that
he will inform the school's
Board of Trustees on
Wednesday. They asked not
to be named because they
aren't authorized to make the
announcement.
| A former star football
player at Florida State, Weth-
erell became president at his
alma mater in January 2003.

Miami Beach
'Man on vacation shot,
killed by officer
A Virginia man was fatally ,
}hot while on Vacation by a
Miami Beach police officer,
but the victim's family says po-
lice stopped the wrong man.
? Police were looking for a
man Who was reportedly
wNalking with a guh early Sun-
day morning when an officer
approached 29-year-old
Husien Shehada from
Woodridge, Va. The officer
and Shehada exchanged
words and a confrontation
ensued, although police
'would not release details.
--From wire reports


:Clarification
(A story on Page A3 of Sat-
Ntilla crew rescues stranded
tourists," requires clarifica-
tin. John Davis said it was
tet Magic Manatee Marina
tt did maintenance on his
'at before the engine mal-
{uhctioned. He did say, how-
ever, Magic Manatee fixed
his boat once he came back
ashore. Davis called the
oner and staff of the marina
super and helpful."


Correction
Information on Page A3 of
Sunday's edition about the
*WomenHeart of Nature


Qgast (the National Coalition
d4 Women With Heart Dis-
ease) misstated the support
group's meeting schedule.
The group will not meet again
until September, but offers
Online and telephone support.
Contact Martha at 341-0614
drbowmania48@yahoo.com,
or visit www.womenheart.org.


Launch Wednesday?


NASA will try

for 5:40 a.m.

Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL - NASA
will try to launch space shuttle
Endeavour again Wednesday,
after repairing a hydrogen gas
leak that thwarted the first at-
tempt
Top officials decided Monday
to bump an unmanned moon
mission so Endeavour could
have another shot at flying to
the international space station.
The delayed moon mission is


NASAs first in a decade and is
critical to the space agency's
long-term effort to return hu-
mans to the lunar surface.
The Atlas V rocket had been
scheduled to blast off Wednes-
day with a pair of lunar probes
- a moon-mapping orbiter and
a craft meant to crash into a
shadowed crater at the moon's
south pole.
That launch is now scheduled
for no earlier than Thursday; it
would slip to Friday if the shut-
tle countdown proceeds trou-
ble-free into early Wednesday
The launch is scheduled for
5:40 a.m. Wednesday. Forecast-.
ers put the odds of good


weather at 80 percent.
Endeavour and its astronauts
will deliver and install the last
piece of Japan's space station
lab and drop off hundreds of
pounds of food for the six space
station residents. Five space-
walks are planned.
The space shuttle Endeavour
sits on Launch Pad 39-A hours
after being scrubbed due to a
hydrogen leak Saturday,
morning at the Kennedy Space
Center in Cape Canaveral.
Seven astronauts are again
scheduled to lift off Wednesday
on a trip to the international
space station.
Associated Press


Chomping for cheer camp


MATTHEW BECK/Cnronicle
Phoenix Biancamano, 5, enthusiastically goes through part of a new cheer routine Monday morning at the Cit-
rus High School Kids Cheer Camp. The camp, for cheerleaders ages 4 to 11, will go on through Thursday during
the morning hours inside the high school gymnasium. Citrus High junior varsity and varsity cheerleaders will
teach their younger counterparts a cheer, chant, dance, a stunt and how to tumble. The camp will conclude with
a parent showcase beginning at 11:30 a.m. Thursday. For information about the camp, call Debbie at 726-2241.




Apply online for Community Education Grants


Special to the Chronicle lated issues pertaining to
conservation, protection
Community members "and preservation. Funded
who wantto make a positive 'by the district's Basin
impact on the water' re- Boards, the program is in-
sources in their area may tended to motivate commu-
apply online for a Commu- nities to get involved in
nity Education Grant from watershed protection
the Southwest Florida through various activities
Water Management District and educational formats.
The goal of the district's Grant recipients may re-
Community Education ceive up to $5,000 to help
Grant program is to actively fund their water resources
engage adults in water-re- education projects.


To apply, visit the dis-
trict's Web site at Water-
Matters.org/communitygran
ts. The electronic applica-
tion allows applicants to
save, review and change
portions of their proposal
before submitting. Grant
applications are due Aug.
21, 2009.
Potential projects should
provide education on any
or all of the following is-
sues: water quality, water


conservation, flood protec-
tion, natural systems and
watersheds. Examples of
past projects include
stormwater pond restora-
tions, cleanup, watershed
education fairs and show-
erhead exchange programs.
The projects must take
place between March 1 and
July 31,2010. .
To discuss project ideas,
call Robin Grantham at
(800) 423-1476, ext.4779.


County BRIEFS

C.R. 488 now has
stoplight at U.S. 19
Motorists should be aware
that the blinking traffic light at
U.S. 19 and County Road 488
will change to a fully functioning
traffic, light on Thursday.
The change that morning is
part of the improvements on
U.S. 19 to help the traffic going
in and out of the Progress En-
ergy complex at shift changes.
The company paid for the im-
provements.
Hospice agency
changes name
Hemando-Pasco Hospice
will officially change its name
HPH Hospice (HPH) this week.
Inverness Walmart
refitting for shoppers
The Inverness Walmart plans
to hire about 70 temporary em-
ployees to help with its exten-
give renovation project.
"We listened to our cus-
tomers and are redesigning the
store to make shopping at Wal-
mart even easier,' said Larry
Gamble, store manager.
Every department will be up-
dated, including all-new shelv-
ing, signing, flooring and
product assortment. The store
also will feature a new layout
designed to make shopping for
everyday items easier and
faster by aligning the products
customers purchase the most.
The project began June 7
and is expected to be complete
by Aug. 12.
Apply now for
July 3 pageants
Applications are now being
accepted for the inaugural Little
Miss and Mr. Sparkler and Miss
Firecracker pageants, which
will be part of the Patriotic
Evening on Friday, July 3, at
Liberty Park in Inverness.
The Little Miss and Mr.
Sparkler pageant has the Miss
Sparkler division for girls 7 to 9
years and four divisions for girls
and boys: 0 to 11 months; 12 to
23 months; 2 to 3 years; and 4
to 6 years.'
The Miss Firecracker Pag-
eant has three divisions: 10 to
13 years; 14 to 17 years; and
18 to 29 years.
One winner and four runners
up will be selected in each divi-
sion.
Registration begins 3:30 p.m.
Friday, July 3, with the pag-
eants beginning at 4.
For information, call 249-
7174 or visit www.MissFire
cracker.org.
-From staff reports


Study shows clean energy jobs grew in past decade


Associated Press


MIAMI - Renewable energy out-
paced job growth nationally during
the past decade, although the oppo-
site was true in Florida, according
to a report from the Pew Charitable
Trusts.
The report, detailed in a confer-
ence call Monday, says jobs in clean
energy grew 9.1 percent nationally
between 1998 and 2007, almost,
triple the overall job growth rate.
But in Florida, the state's overall
job growth rate was 22.4 percent,
nearly triple the rate of those in
clean energy.
Lori Grange, deputy director of
the Pew Center on the States, said
those numbers indicate the state's
economy did exceedingly well over
that period in general, not that the
clean energy sector was doing worse.


Living Green Expo set Friday


Special to the Chronicle
Numerous exhibitors partici-
pate in the Florida friendly "Liv-
ingGreen Expo 2009" from 10a.m.
to 2 p.m. Friday at the Citrus
County Extension office in
Lecanto.
The office is next to the county
Leca n to Government Building at
3650 W. Sovereign Path. Take
Saunders Way off County Road
491 to get to Sovereign Path.
The University of Florida/Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural Sci-
ence (UF/IFA.S) Citrus County

"Certainly, the overall economy
grew at a much faster clip," she
said. "That said, 7.9 percent ain't


Extension is hosting the expo,
which will focus on saving money
while protectingthe environment,
protecting water quality conserv-
ing water and preventing pollu-
tion.
Admission and parking are free.
Attendees will be able to visit
green technology displays, such as
a pervious concrete demonstra-
tion, and they can sign up for an
energy audit
Organizations interested in
being sponsors or exhibitors
should contact the Citrus County
Extension office at 527-5700.

chopped liver."
By 2007, about 31,122 Floridians
were employed in clean energy


jobs, ranking sixth for total clean
energy jobs in the nation.
The report divides clean energy
jobs into five categories: clean en-
ergy, training and support, energy
efficiency, environmentally friendly
production, and conservation and
pollution mitigation.
Conservation and pollution miti-
gation, which includes the recycling
sector, accounted for 65 percent of
all clean energy jobs.
The report's most recent data
came from 2007. Since then, an eco-
nomic downturn, changed govern-
ment policies and new technologies
have altered the landscape, though
Grange said federal stimulus
money for renewable energy and
increasing private investment are
good signs the clean energy sector
won't be hit as hard as other job
markets.








TUESmmY, JUNE 16, 2'


GIrTJS OUNlY ( , HRONICLII


r'no


State BRIEFS


Four charged with
kidnapping Scout
HAWTHORNE - Four peo-
ple arrested for holding a 12- q
year-old against his will and
forcing him to drink urine at a
Boy Scout camp have been dis-
missed from the scouting pro-
gram, anr official said Monday.
Jack Sears, district executive
and CEO of North Florida Boy
Scouts, said that officials are
"gravely disappointed" and that
the actions do not represent the
values of scouting.
Kidnapping charges were
filed Friday against 21-year-old
Wendell leid and three juve- -
niles, two who are 16 and one."
who is 15. The juveniles were
*turned over to the Florida De- .
apartment of Justice. Jail records


do not show if Reid has an at-
tomey. He's being held without
bond in the Putnam County
Jail.
Reid was attending Camp
Shandsas one of the adults
from Ocala, Sears said.
The incident was apparently
over remarks made by the vic-
tim earlier in the week, the sher-
iffs office reported.
The incident came to light
when the victim alerted a scout-
master about the attack, who
notified camp officials. They
called authorities under the pro-.
gram's "Yell and Tell" policy on
inappropriate behavior, said..4
Seais; who caWlethe attabWan
isolated incident. '.
'The health and safety ofdall
scouting members is our-top pri-
ority," he said.


BA N However, McCollum went property to entertain busi-
BAI N' on to say that enforcing the ness clients.
Florida Building Code in State law allows construc-
Continued from Page1 'any case is a call the county tion of nonresidential build-
must make. ings on agricultural
nonresidential farm build- In response to the second property without local
ing under this section when question, McCollum wrote buildingpermitsand County
.the structure is clearly de- "that the county has the au- Development Services Di-
isigned for residential use. thority to enforce its zoning rector Gary Maidhof said
"In light of the above, it regulations regarding the thebarnqualified fortheex-
appears that the term "resi- construction ofa building on emption because no one
dential dwelling" may in- land classified as agricul- 'lives there on a full-time
elude facilities that are ture ... if those regulations basis.
occupied for living pur- do not limit the operational However, Brennan dis-
poses, even though such oc- activity of the bona fide farm -agreed and wrote a letter to
cupancy is on a temporary operation." .McCollum stating that the
basis. To conclude other- Questions initially rose "structure "superficially
wise would mean that a when Dean built a tWo-story looks like a barn." He also
structure, or part thereof, structure on property that 'said because it is situated
clearly designed for resi- has an agriculturalc.elassifil-, near the Withlacoochee
dentialusecould avoid com- cation from the- Citrus River, some people wonder
pliance with the state's County .Property Ap- if it edmplies 'with county
building codes simply by praiser's Office. Dean said-. zoning laws regarding via-
claiming that the structure his working barn is exempt' terfront setbacks.
would not be used full-time, from building . permits As for setbacks, McCollum
Such a conclusion would ap- through the Righttpo Farm opinion states: "Since a set-
pear to be inconsistent with Act; however: the structure back requirement for build-
the-underlying polices for_ includes two bedrooms,. a. ing-construction-we'ld not-
adoption ofa uniform build- bathroom and a kitchen. necessarily limit a farm's
-ing code to protect public Dean said he allows his chil- operation, this office stated.
health, safety and welfare." dren and grandchildren to thatsuch a restriction would
IVIcCollum added. stay there and he uses the- apply to such constructioni"


Man rescued after
falling from ship
ST. PETERSBURG -A man
found clinging to a buoy after
falling from a cruise ship in St.
Petersburg has been rescued.
According to the Coast
Guard, 46-year-old Larry Miller
told them he went overboard
from-the Carnival Inspiration
early Monday morning while it
was returning to the Port of
Tampa. He was found a few
hours later clinging to a buoy
near the Sunshine Skyway .
Bridge in the St. Petersburg
area. He was transpo.,td to ,
Bayfront Medical Cenerwith
minor injuries.
The case remains under in-
vestigation. - wie -
*;" : . - From -wire reports.i


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic battery arrests
* Christopher Alan Heifer, 43, of Crystal
-River, at 4:30 a.m. Thursday on a charge of do-
mestic battery. No bond.
* Stanley W. Haner, 57, of Homosassa, at
midnight Thursday on a charge of domestic bat-
tery. According to the arrest report, Haner threw a
41-year-old woman down p flight of stairs, from
the inside of a residence to the outside. The
woman also told police that Haner punched her in
the nose during an argument. No bond.
* Michael J. Miller, 43, of Homosassa, at 2:17
p.m. Saturday on a charge of domestic battery.
According to the arrest report, Miller pushed a
woman into a row of vending machines at the Ho-
mosagsa Walmart. No boD" . ... ......
* Charles Grau, 52, of Hemando, on a charge
of aggravated domestic battery. accordingg to the
arrest report, Grau started verbally assaulting a
.woman-after they retumedebome from a birthday-
party. He then began punching her with a closed
fist, resulting in a 2- to 3-inch long cut that required
stitches. The woman was transported to Citrus
Memorial Health Center for treatment. No bond.
* Edward Raymond Englehart Jr., 25, of Ho-
rosassa, at 3:07 p.m. Sunday on a charge of do-
mestic battery. No bond.
* Robert M. Zuniga, 39, of Inverness, at 4:46
p.m. Sunday on a charge of domestic battery. Ac-
cording to the arrest report, Zuniga threw a
wooden miniature staircase at a woman, striking
her on the stomach. No bond.
* Jamie Lee Hoyt, 31, of Floral City, at 11:38
p.m. Sunday on charges of domestic battery and
battery. According to the arrest report. Hoyt
pushed, struck and choked a woman working be-
hind the counter at 41 Beverage in Floral City, be-
cause she thought the woman was flirting with her
boyfriend. The boyfriend told police Hoyt had hit
him in the face at the Irru Family Social Club after
he told her about speaking to the woman at 41
Beverage. No bond.
DUI Arrests
'* John Edwin Cantwell, 66, of 4401 N. U.S.
19, Crystal River, at 7:15 p.m. Sunday on a
charge of driving under the influence. According
to the arrest report, Cantwell had a blood alcohol
concentration of .152 percent; the legal limit in
Florida is .080 percent. Bond $500.
.. Steven Thomas Doherty, 22, of 4610 E.
'Stber Lane, Floral City, at 3:47 a.m. Monday on
charges of driving under the influence, second of-
fense in nine months; driving while license sus-
pended, canceled or revoked and resisting an-
officer without violence. Bond $11.500.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER

NA -'ia 7 n nA L- 7 7


96 75 0.30 " 86 79 NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Ecus e daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 93 Low: 70 - -
P. artly sunny with scattered
thunderstorms


.--- W . WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
;,- - High: 94 Low: 70
. .7, Partly sunny with scattered thunderstorms


THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
a .,High: 94 Low: 70
�. .. - . Partly sunny with scattered thunderstorms


ALMANAC


'ZOW fT�hPEMTOK


*City
Daytona Bch.
Ft Lauderdale
Fon Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
ts
Is


, MARIN" OUTLOOK
West winds from 5 to 15 knots. Seas Gulf water
1 to 3 feet. Bay and inland waters a temperature
light chop. Partly sunny with a slight
chance of showers and thunderstorms
today. na
Taken at Aripeka
. , - :

Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacbochee at Holder - 28.75 28.79 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.68 . _33Z. - .39.25
Tsala Apepka-lnvemess 35.11 35.09 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.46 37.46 42.40
L 6el; i' ,oriedr in M eel 6r3D ' 6 level FIGO lagu lu W 13i esi . aire .r,?] ,n, ? 3 rx f.:.- i r i.:.o a i e an.
3nnui 10u0lod rnid h r.as 3 43-Die':ent ichrancei l bi uig eQualed or .-':-d,5.u a , One yc e i, Thi 0313 i:
orin ,ra i.i ir, r SOulhwesi Fion, W3i1i Marie,,neri Oliarl l 3e an. ubeciI l .) ie�loiu, Ir, n'. .vel
vvill 1i' ulitri cl r irn Un e n led S ti e l-fie i "ji ,ui ,', be 1iabI t1i, 3" )'d i TiO. , ri,'.: "i; , u iv i er. ' ,i , I
tril J3ata if yOu nJvu a ny que iu ris u noula:d 0in 5IA e HydrOlu i,4.I D lh i .ia n,,r. at 13 ,i ?9 .'� 1

. THE NATION


4' .~ ~ - -
- . A'4 -


TEMPERATURE* DEW POINT
Monday 96/73 Monday at 3 p.m. 71
Record 100/64 . ITY
Normal 90/70 HUMIDITY
Mean temp. 85 Monday at 3 p.m. . 54%
Departure from mean +5 POLLEN COUNT**
PRECIPITATION* 0.00n. Trees, grasses and weeds were all
Total for the month 2.79 n.# light. .
Total for the year 21.51 in.# "*Light -. :,iy I rme ii rg,i Aill S.lnw .,wmsp. y
Normal for the year 20.12 in. toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness, # corrected values symptoms, Hfeavy - all allergic will experience
UV INDEX: 12 symptoms.
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, AIR QUALITY
7-n k.k In , --------AIR QUALIT


/-9 mgn, iu+ very nign
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Monday at 3 p.m. 29.98
-' -,,"r SOLUi
DATE DAY MINOR
IM(
6/16 TUESDAY 12:28
6/17 WEDNESDAY 1:12


CELESI



ff21 Jrti


, e BURN
Today's Fire Danger Rating
For more information call Florida
more information on drought condo
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fi

WATER
The current lawn watering restriction fo
allow residents to water once a week. I
addresses ending In 0 or 1, or A through
or F through J can water Tuesdays; add
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can wa
Properties under two acres In size may
and properties two acres or larger may


*From mouths of rivers
City HIgh/Lo
Chassahowitzka* 12:30 p[7:4
Crystal River" 10:51 a/5:0
Withlacoochee* 8:38 a/2:56
Homosassa"* 11:40 a/6:4


Tuesi
w


IE Monday was good with pollutants City
in. mainly particulates . .. . . Albany
.Albuquerque
MAR TABI.B. Asheville
- Atlanta
I MAJOR MINOR MAJOR Atlantic.City
MORNING) AFTERNOON) Austin
6:42 12:52 7:03 Baltimore
7:23 1:35 7:47 ' Billings
Birmingham
Boise
rIAl. OUTLOOK . - .Bston
Buffalo
- SUNSET TONIGHT 831t PM Burlington, VT
SUNRISE TOMORROW...............6:32 A.M. Charleston, SC
MOONRISE TODAY 33 A M Charleston, WV
iY 15 MOONSET TODAY 2 217 PM Cnarione
:Cincinnati
CONDITIONS . ; . ..elad
. . .. . . .1- , ., -�.-..,. Columbia, SC
is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban. Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For Dallas
editions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Denver
re_weather/kbdi Des Moines
SDetroit
. . . El Paso
RING RUL S.-- Evansville, IN
S Harrisburg
r the unincorporated areas of Citrus County Hartford
For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents, Houston
ih E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or3, Indianapolis
dresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water Jackson
r 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses Las Vegas
water Fridays. Little Rock
y only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day Los Angeles
only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day. Louisville
TIDES . .. Memphis
TIDES Milwaukee
Minneapolis
"At King's Bay "**At Mason's Creek Mobile
day Wednesday Montgomery
High/Low High/Low - High/Low Nashville


46 a ---/8:58 p
08 a 11:38 p/6:20 p
i a 9:25 p/4:08 p
5 a --/7:57p


1:17 a/8:44 a 1:19 p/10:11 p
11:40 a/6:06 a - /7:33 p
9:27 a/3:54 a 10:54 p/5:21 p
12:27 a/7:43 a 12:29 p/9:10 p


KEY TO COND
f.fair, h-hazy;
rs'raln/snow I
asIsnow; tsatl
02009 Weathe


Monday Tuesday
H LPcp. FcatH L
74 53 .48 pc 76 56
86 57 s . 90 63
82 .59 .23 tS 79 .63
84 67 tsf- 90 71
74,55 po 70 59
99-74 sr 100 72
81 61 pc 77 62
73 54 .03 ts 80 56
91 68 ts 92 73
72 56 .48 ts 80 59
_�62 57--- pc 64--53 -
76 55 pc 79 59
73 55 .68 pc 78 57
90 71 .31 ts 84 73
832 62 ts 83 66
86 66 . .ts 79 64
81 53 ts 70 59 -
82 63 .01 tS 82 66
76 5 .pc 79 61
'91 70 ts 87 70
82 61 pc 83 64
62 54 .15 pc 73 49
96 76 pc 98 76
74 50 .06 ts 84 59
78 63 ts 78 63
78 56 s 78 62
99 70 s 98 71
79 67 .05 ts 82 69
82 56 pc 77 60
72 56 .01 pc 73 54
98 75 s 95 76
79 65 ts 80 63
93 73 s 96 73
90 70 pc 85 68
93 75 ts 93 72
71 60 c ' 67 61
81 68 .87 ts 83 72
91 73 ts 95 75
78 57 ts 69 56
81 62 ts 72 60
93 74 s 97 73
98 70 pc 96 73
84 68 .30 ts 86 70
ITIONS: c.cloudy; dr=drtzeo;
pc=partly cloudy; r.rain;
mix; sunny; shlshowers;
thunderstorms; w.windy.
r Central, Madison, WI.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
TUESDAY

Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 94 74 s 96 75
New York City 72 57 .50 pc 74 58
Norfolk , 76 64 .01 ts 78 65
Oklahoma City 94 71 .15 ts 97 73
Omaha - 78 64 .02 ts 83 65-
Palm Springs 90 64 pc 90. 69
Philadelphia 79 60 .05 pc 78. 61
Phoenix 97 72 pc 98 75
Pittsburgh 81 55 pc 82 62
Portland, ME 59 55 .04 .pc .66 50
Portratnt, Ore 77 57 pc 76 58
Providence, R.I. 69 53 .01 pc 69 52
Raleigh 85 68 ts 76 63
Rapid City 79 53 ts 79 55
Reno 73 52 p& 79 53
- Rochester, NY 73 '55 :.20 pc 79 58
Sacramento. 81 56 s 87 59
St. Louis - 77 66 1.86 ts 82 70
St. Ste. Marie 74 45 s 76 53
Salt Lake City 74 49 ts 74 58
San Antonio 10277 s 100 75
San Diego 72 62 c 68 62
San Francisco 64 57 pc 68 55
Savannah 93 73 ts 90 72
Seattle 73 54 pc 72 54
Spokane 78 58 pc 81 58
Syracuse 74 55 .17 pc 79 58
Topeka 89 66 .69 ts 87 68
Washington 82 66 pc 80 64
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 105 Alice, Texas LOW 30 Leadville, Colo:

S ORLDCTIES


TUESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 85/78/ts
Amsterdam 61/52/sh
Athens 91/72/pc
Beljing 92/66/s
Berlin 78/56/sh
Bermuda 81/75/ts
Cairo 95/72/s
Calgary 80/50/sh
Havana 87/77/ts
Hong Kong 86/80/ts
Jerusalem 85/72/s


Lisbon 68/56/sh
London 61/50/sh
Madrid 79/62/pc
Mexico City 80/55/ts
Montreal 75/60/pc
Moscow 73/50/pc
Paris 68/54/pc
Rio 71/60/pc
Rome 91/57/s
Sydney 61/49/sh
Tokyo 78/55/s
Toronto 77/58/s
Warsaw 72/57/sh


For the RECORD


dr ! C I T R U ' - " C 0 U N T Y



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@1
JJNE Jf


my


Other Arrests
* Jeremiah Allen Culbertson, 29, of 7 N. Jef-
ferson St., Beverly Hills, at 8:13 p.m. Saturday on
a charge of possession of drug paraphernalia.
Bond $500.
* Adam Edell Wilder, 26, of 6848 W. Arter St.,
Crystal River, at 9:25 p.m. Saturday on a charge
of driving while license suspended, canceled or'-
revoked, habitual offender. Bond $2,000.
* Jason Mathew Reams, 19. of 2225 E.
Celina Dr., Inverness, at 9:58 p.m. Saturday on a'
charge of aggravated battery on a pregnant vic-.-
tim. Bond $5,000. .
* Keithan Ricardo Johnson, 21, of 12217'
Derickson Terrace, Dunnellon, at 12:59 a.m. Sun-"
day, on a warrant, on charges of aggravated bat-
tery on a pregnant victim, resisting an officer
without violence and aggravated assault with a
deadly-weapon-without intent to kill. Bond $500.
* Sheila Marie Vecchione, 20. of 9290 SW
203rd Ave., Dunnellon, at 12:58 a.m. Sunday on
a charge of resisting an officer without violence.;
Bond $500. -
* Laurel Jane Berryman, 39, of 5855 W.
Woodlawn St., Dunnellon, at 12:19 p.m. Sunday
on charges of aggravated battery and violation of'
probation for original charges of selling cocaine.,
and resisting an officer with violence. Bond
$10,000.
. Traske C. Johnson, 18, of 972 N.E. Eighth
Ave., Crystal River, at 5:54 p.m. Sunday on
charges of burglary and grand theft. Bond $5,000.
* James A. Kenyon, 19, of 7055 W. Gator
Lane, Crystal River, and Brandon Miles'
Scrivener, 18, of 3092 N. Oakland Terrace, Crys- '
tal River, at 6:56 p.m. Sunday on a charge of af-.
fray. Bond $.500.
' * Dominic Lapastina, 24, of 177 S.E. 16th
Ave., Gainesville, at 2:30 a.m. Monday on a.
charge of felony violation of probation for an orig-
inal charge of possession of cocaine. No bond.
Burglaries
SA burglary, reported on June 12, occurred
approximately at midnight to an unoccupied struc-
ture in the 8600 block of W. Miss Maggie Drive,
Homosassa.
* A burglary occurred at approximately noon
on June 11, to a conveyance in the 3100 block of
Calais Terrace, Homosassa.
MA burglary, reported on June 12, occurred at'
approximately 11 p.m. June 11, to a conveyance,
in the 3500 block of N. Tamarisk Avenue, Beverly
Hills." ----
MA burglary occurred sometime between June
5, at unknown time, and June 12 at 3:30p.m., to.
-a conveyance in the 600 block of N. Country Club
Drive, Crystal River.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wthltiesip


Morris
Bonds, 83
Morris Bonds, 83, passed
away on Saturday, May 30,
2009, at Citrus Memorial
Hospital, Inverness, FL.
Professional services are
entrusted to New Serenity
Memorial Funeral Home &
Cremation Svcs., Inc.
352/563-1394.

Mattie
Campbell, 95
Mattie Campbell, 95,
passed away on Tuesday,
June 9,2009, at Manatee Me-
morial Hospital, Bradenton,
FL. Professional services
are entrusted to New Seren-
ity Memorial Funeral Home
& Cremation Svcs., Inc.
352/563-1394.

Josephine'
Coppola, 87
BEVERLY HILLS
Josephine M. Coppola,
beloved- wife of Carmen,
passed away on Saturday,
June 13, 2009.
A native of New York, Jo
and Carmen lived in Bev-
erly Hills, FL, since 1985.
We hold a special place in
our hearts for Jo, a loving
and devoted wife, sister-in-
law, aunt and friend.
Survivors include her
husband of 65 years, Car-
men C. Coppola; three sis-
ters-in-law, Ruth Keating,
Long Island, NY, Catherine
L. Ryan, Queens, NY, Esther
Coppola, Long Island, NY;
and several nieces and
nephews.
Services will be held at
11:00 AM Wednesday, June
17, 2009, at Fero Funeral
Home. Burial at Fero me-
morial Gardens, Beverly
Hills, FL. Visitation will be
,held from 6:00-8:00 PM
Tuesday,. June 16, 2009, at
the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be made to Her-
nando-Pasco Hospice, 3545
N. Lecanto Highway, Bev-
erly Hills, FL 34465.
Arrangements by Fero Fu-
ineral Home, 5955 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills, FL 34465; (352) 746-
4551.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.





Alfred Falk, 83'
HOMOSASSA
Our heavenly Father re-
ceived our dear husband,
father and friend Alfred E.
Falk on June 5,2009, in Ho-
mosassa, FL. Al was born on
November 28, 1925, in
Elcho, Wisconsin. He gradu-
ated from the University of
Missouri, and was a Navy
veteran who served with
distinction and honor in
WW II. He was a lifetime
member of the Elks, worked
with the Scouts and loved
the sports world, especially
his "Cubbies."
Al is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 62 years, Margie,
and 5 children; Stephen,
Barbara, Robert, Janice and'
Jeanne; 12 grandchildren
and 4 great-grandchildren.
A memorial service will
be held at the First.United
Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa, FL on Friday, June
26 at 2 p.m. In lieu of flow-
ers, memorials may be given
to Hospice of Citrus County
and First United Methodist
(hur-c' in Homosassa,
Florida.
,Sign the , , t , '
www.chronicleop1lin.cqm.






Erwin Goetz, 34
INVrNESS
SErwin E. Goetz, age 94, of
Inverness, died Monday,
June 1, 2009, at Citrus Me-
morial Hospital in Inver-
ness. Arrangements are
under the care of the Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home with


Crematory, Inverness.
S74164

BROWN
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY
"c :- - "" . nI, i,, ,,L , I'

(352)
, 795-0111


lo , T.fl


JGUIDEUNES
* The Citrus County Chronicle's policy permits both free
and paid obituaries.
* Obituaries must be submitted by the funeral home or
society in change of arrangements.
* Free obituarie -can include: Full name of deceased;
age; hometown/state; date of death; place of death;
date, time and place of visitation and funeral services.
* A flag will be included for free for those who served in
the U S. military. (Please note this service when sub
emitting a free obituary.) Additionally, all obituaries will
be posted online at www.chronicleonline.com.
* Paid obituaries are printed as submitted by funeral
homes or societies.
* Paid obituaries may include tiie information permitted
in the free obituaries, as well as date of birth: parents'
names; pre-deceased and surviving family members.
year married and spouse's name (date of death, if
pre-deceased by spouse); religious affiliation; biogra
phical information, including education, employment,
military service, organizations and hobbies; officiating
clergy; interment/inurnment; and memorial contribu.
tions.
* Area funeral homes with established accounts with the
Chronicle are charged $8.75 per column inch. Non-
local funeral homes and those without accounts are
required to pay in advance by credit card, and the cost
is $10 per column inch. Small photos of the de-
ceased's face can be included for an additional
charge.
* Additional days of publication or reprints due to er-
rors in submitted material are charged at the same
rates.
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next
day's edition.
* E mail obits@chronicleonline.com or fax 563-3280.
* Phone 563-5660 for details.


Leon Gentry, 66
Leon Gentry, 66, passed
away on Tuesday, May 19,.
2009, at University Commu-
nity Hospital, Tampa, FL.
Professional services are
entrusted to New Serenity
Memo'-4"1 'h:ral Home &
C. Qmation Svcs., Inc.
352/563-1394.





John 'Jack'
Gootee
OCALA
Mr. John William "Jack"
Gootee died on June 14,
2009. Hewas born on Staten
Island, New York He moved
to Ocala from Atlanta in
1969. During his lifetime he
served in the Air Force dur-
ing the Korean Conflict,
worked with IBM for 20
years. w'as a Building Con-
t actor, Stock Broker, Owner
of Office Buildings andisold
Insurance for MetLife. He
traveled extensively after
he retired and loved the
game of Golf and Boating
and Fishing. He was a mem-
ber of the Elks Club, Lions
Club, Knights of Columbus,
Chairman of the Munroe
Regional Medical Center
Hospital Board on two dif-
ferent occasions, Past Pres-
ident of the Downtown
.Development Commission.
Jack was a swimming in-
structor, Referee for High
School Football and a Tutor
for the Marion Literacy.
He is survived by his wife,
Sara Connell Arnette, Three
Daughters, Leonie Rushing
of Ocala, Stephanie Roberts
of Ocala and ,Meredith
Alaynick of Riverview,
Florida; Two Step Sons,
Marshall Wellen of Ocala
and Louis Connell Wellen of
Castleberry, Florida; Two
Sisters, Helen Brown of
Jackson, New Jersey and
Elizabeth Roebker of Ocala;
and Seven Grandchildren
and One Great-Grandchild.
Funeral Services will be
held at 11 AM Thursday,
June 18, 2009, at First
United Methodist Church
-"th P v Allen Johnson of-
ficiating. For those .ho
wish, may make contribu-
tion to the Arnette House,
2310 NE 24th Street, Ocala,
FL 34470 or Hospice of Mar-
ion County, PO. Box - 160,
Ocala, FL 34478.
Roberts Funeral Home of
Dunnellon isin-rge of all
arrangement f
Sign the guest book at
www.ch .iiciconl! e.con




"Your Trusted Family-Owned
I Funeral Home Since 1962" I


* Burial -
* Cremation
* Pre-Planning
ur.nEral DrEctor i
C i,.m r, Strr.kl:nd & Torm L ice
1901 SE HWY. 19
, CRYSTAL RIVER -
352-795-2678
iYWstricklandf neralhomeiCom


Steven
Metzger, 59
HERNANDO
The Service, of Remem- i
brance for Mr. Steven Louis
Metzger, age 59 years, of
Hernando, will be held 2:00
PM, Tuesday, June 16, 2009,
at the Inverness Chapel of'
Hooper Funeral Homes
with Bishop Richard Samp-
son officiating. Interment
'will follow at Memorial Gar-
dens, Beverly Hills. Friends
may call from 1:00 - 2:00
PM at the Inverness Chapel.
He was born January 19,
1950, to Arthur and Dorothy
Metzger in Queens, New
York Mr. Metzger moved to
Hernando in 1975 from Or-
lando. He was a member of
the Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints,
Lecanto; past president of
the Hernando Democratic
Club; an avid New York1
Yankees fan; an Umpire for|
the Inverness Little League.'
loved.Elvis movies arid al-
bums; and was a collector of
lighthouses. Mr. Metzger
will be remembered as a'
loving husband and father,
who enjoyed working with
children but still having
time to be a jokester.
He was predeceased by
his mother, Dorothy Metzger
(April 23, 2008), and a
brother, Louis Alfred Met-
zger (August 7, 2001). Sur-
vivors include his wife of 37
years, Sandra; a daughter.
Mrs. Dorothy Shelton, Sum-
merville, SC; father, Arthur
H. Metzger; brother, Arthur
H. Metzger Jr., Macungie,.
-PA; 2 sisters, Lillian,
Thomas, Mt. Pleasant, SC,.
and Mary Ferrin, Mesa, AZ.
Sign the guest book at:
www.chronicleonline.com.

211 INFORMATION
* Dial 211 for health and
human resources.


. E. 2)avi
Funeral Home With Crematory
CHARLOTTE COPPEDGE
Services: Thurs. 2:00 pm
Florida National Cemetery
JAMES "PAT" McDAVID
Services: Thurs. 11:00 am - Chapel
Burial: Oak Ridge Cemetery
MARY J. WESLEY
Private Cremation Arrangements
726-8323 !






S-^





� ..

SStuart Randall Koon
8/5/54 - 6/16/08
1 iss you now more than ever before
S it, I trust God will open a door
And show me how to go on without you
To give me some hope and comfort me too
For you were my life, I loved you so dear
And it breaks mu heart to not have you near
But, life goes on and I will too, I just wish
It wouldn't go on without you.
All Mu Love Forever & Always,
,- ". '' , < Io in g w il e 1 ' ', t! ;, ,; 'j, n r il ' -
ly^ .-.^._ ._. I&


Doctors' boos demonstrate


tough road ahead for Obama


RICARDO
ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Associated Press writer

WASHINGTON - Barack
Obama isn't used to hearing
boos.
For all the young presi-
dent's popularity, the re-
sponse he got Monday from
doctors at an American
Medical Association meet-
ing was a sign his road is
only going to get rockier as
he tries to sell his plan to
overhaul the nation's health
care system.
The boos erupted when
Obama told the doctors in
Chicago he wouldn't try to
help them win their top leg-
islative priority - limits on
jury damages in medical
malpractice cases.
But what could they ex-
pect? If Obama announced
support for malpractice lim-
its, that would set tripL
lawyers and unions --major
supporters of Democratic
candidates -- on the attack.
Not to mention consumer
groups.
Every other group in the'
health care debate has a
wish list and a top priority.
Insurers don't want compe-
tition from the government.
Employers don't want to be
!told they have to offer med-
ical coverage to their work-
ers. Hospitals want to stave
'offMedicare cuts. Drug com-
panies want to charge what'
the market will bea .
Obama can't give all of
them what they want. In-
stead, he's got to figure
what's just enough to keep
as many groups as possible
on board - without' alienat-
ing others. It's a fine line for
him - and sometimes for
them.
"It's a coalition issue,"
said Robert Blendon of the
Harvard School of Public
Health, an expert on public
opinion and the politics of
health care. "No major
group is able by itself to sink
health reform. But if num-
ibers of them come together
for different reasons, it could
really hurt the direction the
president wants to go in."
The doctors were only


ANewsNALYSIS


Obama's first house call.
He'll be making his case to
the other groups - and to
the nation at large - in an
increasingly energetic cam-
paign to get a bill passed by
the end of his first year in of-
fice.
AMA insiders shouldn't
have been surprised by
Obama's upfront refusal to
consider malpractice caps.
The' group couldn't get
that idea passed by a Re-
publican Congress and pres-
ident a few years ago. Some
states have such curbs, but
anyone who can count votes
knows the chances for na-
tional limits are slim to none
with Democrats in charge of
Congress.
Instead, Obama left the
door open to some kind of
compromise on malpractice.
.... The president said he's
willing to explore alterna-
tives to taking doctors to
court. In the past, he sup-
ported special programs in
whihh hospitals and doctors
are encouraged to admit
mistakes, correct them and
offer compensation. Studies
have shown the approach
can work, because doctors'
refusal to acknowledge mis-
takes is one reason many
families file suit
, Doctors have special rea-
sons to be wary of the presi-
dent's plans to overhaul the
health care system.
Not long ago, doctors' de-
cisions were rarely ques-
tioned. Now they are being
blamed fqr a big part of the
wastefuLnsfiending in the na-
tion's $2.'"llion health care
systeri ties have shown'
that as ~ ch as 30 cents of
the U.S. health care dollar
may be going for tests and
procedures that are of little
or no value to patients.
The Obama administra-
tion has cited such findings
as evidence that the system
is broken. Since doctors are
'the ones responsible for or-
dering tests and procedures,
health care costs cannot be
brought under control un-
less they change their deci-,
sion-making habits.


"Change is scary," said
Dartmouth University's Dr.
Elliott Fisher, a doctor
turned costs researcher "I
think there is a fear of loss of
autonomy, that someone is
going to tell you what to do."
Fisher collaborated on re-
search that showed wild dif-
ferences in health care
spending around the coun-
try - and no signs of better
health in the high-cost
areas.
But Obama did not blame
the doctors. Instead, he tried
to woo them, much as he has
done with recalcitrant for-
eign leaders.
"It's the equivalent of in-
ternational diplomacy. He's
got to make them feel like
it's possible to have dialogue
about what the future looks
like," said Blendon. "I think
he's starting out with the
AMA, but before the sum-
mer's over he's going to
reach out to a lot of the other
groups."
Obama assured the doc-
tors that his plan would pro-
vide them with objective
information on what treat-
ments work best, with new
computerized tools to better
manage their patient case
loads, and with support for
harried solo practitioners to
form networks.
He promised that Wash-
ington would not dictate
clinical decisions. And he
asked the doctors to imagine
a world in which nearly
every patient has insurance
coverage and they can de-
vote their full attention to
the practice of medicine.
"You did not enter this
profession to be bean-coun-
ters and paper-pushers,"
Obama said. "You entered
this profession to be healers
- and that's what our health
care system should let you
be."
That line got him an ova-
tion.


Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
reports on health care
policy for The
Associated Press.


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02009Cosk,nia i Ed 4 A r,nu.,I F',',era,, I i., ,-p*'1 ' .~3.;orJune 3.2C09 jr.J. ,ubjetI otizii,,C'tIlvttauirpolie.
Min~imum c~peni 4. 1. . I.- ,. . ' ,,.ci L,'r,,t be u:E- nc"I Ifl ormt n i'r.tvh Dr - jthi',' di~crt-sed special
Szi !'. . AlLy tar ealy wiidr,d.ii.,i PubIl icundi and i't'ar,,.atinl ~.,r,L r ..i..j vi~gib


TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2oog AS


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Member

:jw C.4-,
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As .f..i - ... .. .-A ,nnQ


STOCKS


AG UESDi~AY,JIJUNEi16), 2009


THuE M vWARKETdin iINREV.11IEWY


MIVOST ACTIVE ($1 on~' S EIi : Here are mthe 825 mos active stocks on the New York SIocK Exchange, 765
Name Vtol O Lat Name Voj _J Last Ch most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 moAs active on ine Amen-
BkofAn 3293071 13.33 -.39 PSCruc . 201750 4.57 -.16 PwShs 0001035599 3590 - 75 can Stock Exchange Tanies show name, pr,.:e and ret mange
SPDR' 1994813 92.90 -2.18 Hemisphrx 55626 2.73 +.06 HuntBnk 816670 4.52 +.37 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
DirxFinBull 1511954 9.74 -.81 NovaGldg 48311 4.76 +.13 Microsoft 636823 23.42 +.09 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
Citigrp 1340552 3.37 -.10 Oibandsg 41770 1.10 -.14 Intel 592291 15.98 -.33 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
DirxFinBearl283622 4.68 +.33 CavalierH 33014 2.71 . +.48 Cisco 467997 19.36 -.55 Chg: Loss or gain forthe day, No change Indicated by...
GAINERS - GAINERS ''AINERS Stock Footnotes: dd - Issue has been called for redemption by company. d - New 52-week
GAINERS (2 on MOR) GAINERS 2 MORE) AINERS $2 o MOREl low.dd-Loss In last 12 mos.ec-Company formerlylisted on theAmericanExchange's
Name __Lslt _ Chg_%Chfg Name Last _ Chg _%.Ca_ Name alas _-iChg_ EorgingCTr, pa',,Markoiplac, r .iT...:3ryr>]T, lf.:,miNa ailalarn suphL.s
Sra.1)35 2353 -148 8 +262 Aerosnc 588 .*263 .80.9 JazzPhrm 4.56 +1.92 +72.7 r,rn. qut.;calonr,. ,Sik wai . ew.eicu.VinIr,; ., ri, 52-.e,. r..ir.0.3 1.I.
KVPhmAIf 2.86 +.52 +22.2 Velocity s 4.78 +1.63 +51.7 MagyarBc 7.45 +2.45 +49.0 I*a..e, u,,c.1ry iromm ne og.rl irang asiog, Pi .T-a os P r.Ptefre,.., .; K-
NwcstlpfD 3.35 +.60 +21.8 CavalierH 2.71 +.48 +21.5 QEPCo . 3.16 ,+1.01 +47.0 H.:i rJaeCAi6.IiiT,er.iuiou.In ..:ep;r.a;.:.- . g R :.gr. . r.uy curny a. . :pc,:il.ea epr,, s.
KV PhmB If 5.00 +.70 +16.3 CagleA 4.40 +.68 +18.3 HanmiFnd 2,00 +.52 +35.1 Sic rs :p ri at ien 20 pri.',i[ ,h,,ire a iafi y6ar , Trase wil be, .,nies i ,,r,. rir,
ResrceCap 3.89 +.42 +12.1 PSBMetDS 40.11 +4.24 +11.8 NwCentBcp 7.00 +1.74 +33.0 a..:-:V p .iusx ..j . ren air,,u ,1r i warra r n�i ,si. ar prr, se, t ei.w u.- N,
5 .ei r i .igr n U.iii Ircilu .i'g] rroie than on r. e urrT, "i . T'eanr '' .,ku,:y ' r.It -
LOSERS (52 OR mORE) LOSERS ($2 O MORE) : LOSERS 152 OR MORE) erier -, ,r r6g reorgazd uuer tre t.r. rup cy oi Appes Inr, ,,l r.I r m r,anma
Name La__ Chg_%Chg Name Last Cng %Chg_ Name Last Chg_�'Cng_ Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
Oi-Dri 14.28 -4.48 -23.9 GreenHntr 2.14 -.36 -14.4 LodgeNet 4.68 -1.22 -20.7
VirginMh 3.58 -.66 -15.6 Merrimac 10.35 5 1.65 -13.8ColBnkg 10.36 -2.24 -17.8
HorizLns 4.14 -.73 -15.0 TianyinPn 2.90 -.44 -13.2 SmtStBCA 6.00 -1.30 -17.8
BlueUnx 2.83 -.48 -14.5 Gainscors 14.16 -1.84 -11.5 SalaO)ywi 2.73 -.58 -17.5 52-Week Net % YTn
Ambac2-03 7.00 -1.17 -14.3 GenMoly 2.47 -.32 -11.5 IntegElec 8.39 -1.76 -17.3 High Low Name . Last Chg Chg Ch


456 Advanced
2,616 Declined
70 Unchanged
3,142 Total issues
7 New Highs
3 New Lows
4,549,389,606 Volume


DIARY
139 Ao,arnced
423 Declined
55 Unchanged
617 Total issues
9 New Highs
2 New Lows
143,666,196 Volume


DIARY
561
2,146
123
2,830
14
10
2,130,075.912


12,369.23 6,469.95Dow Jones Industrials
5,329.34 2,134.21Dow Jones Transportation
528.07 288.66Dow Jones Utilities
9,209.97 4,181.75NYSE Composite
2,374.65 1,130.47Amex Index
2,485.00 1,265.52Nasdaq Composite
1,370.63 666.79S&P 500
14,009.18 6,772.29Wilshire 5000
764.38 342.59Russell 2000


YTD YTO
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AK Steel .20 1.1 ... 18.32 -1.61 +96.6 Lowes .36 1.8 14 19.66 -.19 -86
AT&T Inc 1.64 6.7 12 24.63 -.38 -13.6 McDnids 2.00 3.5 15 57.78 -.58 -7.1
AlliedCap ......... 3.31 -.04 +23.0 Microsoft .52 2.2 14 23.42 +.09 +20.5
BkofAm .04 .3 18 13.33 -.39 -5.3 Motorola ... ... 6.48 -.25 +46.3
CapCtyBk .76 4.7 32 16.19 -.86 40.6
Citigrp ..... 3.37 -.10-49.8 Penney .80 2.8 13 28.15 -1.01 +42.9
Disney .35 1.4 13 24.25 -.81 +6.9 ProgrssEn 2.48 6.8 12 36.67 -.58 -8.0
EKodak .. 12 2.79 -.16-57.6 RegionsFn .04 .9 ... 4.33 -.12-45.6
Embarq 2.75 6.3 9 43.84 +.01 +21.9 SearsHIdgs ...... 60 66.82 -2.11 +71.9
ExxonMbl 1.68 2.3 10 72.81 -.97 -8.8 Smucker 1.40 3.2 14 43.47 -.63 +.3
FPLGrp 1.89 3.3 13 56.49 -.90 +12.2 SprintNex . ...... 5.34 +.05+191.8
FairPoint . ...... , 1.20 -.05-63.4 rimeWrnrs .75 3.0 ... 25.40 -.60 +13.9
FordM ......... 5.93 -.18+159.0
GenElec .40 3.0 8 13.15 -.36 -18.8 UniFirst .15 .4 11 37.82 -.25 +27.4
Home 90 3.8 17 23.85 -.30 +3.6 VerizonCm 1.84 6.2 13 29.73 -.19-12.3
Intel .56 3.5 20 15.98 -.33 +9.0 WalMart 1.09 2.2 14 48.46 -1.38 -13.6
IBM 2.20 2.0 12107.62 -.59 +27.9 Walgrn .45 1.5 15 30.47 -.71 +23.5


D % 52-wk
g % Chg


8,612.13 -187.13 -2.13 -1.87/-29.81
3,218.02 -143.40 -4.27 -9.02-37.63
350.36 -7.95 -2.22 -5.50 -33.05
5,967.26 -181.35 -2.95 +3.65 -34.34
1,585.00 -38.00 -2.34+13.41 -31.51
1,816.38 -42.42 -2.28 +15.18 -26.60
923.72 -22.49 -2.38 +2.27 -32.09
9,467.40 -234.03 -2.41 +4.18-31.98
511.83 -15.00 -2.85 +2.48 -30.90


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing
me Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadpwcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include
the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-
tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name
of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


N * YRKSTOKECANG


Name Last Chg BJSvcs 15.01 -.68 ChinaMble 51.29 -1.69
BMCSft 34.68 -.71 ChllnaUni 14.49 -.74
BPPLC 49.85 -135 Chubb 39.78 -1.04
-BRT 359 -.01 CindiBel 2.82 -.15
ABBLId 15.94 -.70 BakHu 4034 -138 Ctgrp 3.37 -.10
AESCorp 10.08 -.61 BalCo 4211 -.89 CleanH 55.38 -1.24
AFLAC 31.62 -1.19 BcoBrades 15.15 -68 I ClitsNRs 26.12 -2.49
AGLRes 31.20 -.11 BooSantlnd 1095 -.45 Clor 55.98 -.41
AKSteel 18.32 -1.61 BkofAn 13.33 -.39 Coach 26.83 +71
AMBPr 1 -16.00 -.03 CocaCE 17.04 -.14
AMR 4.43 -.12 BkNYMe 28.46 -.56 CocaCI 48.11 -.78
ASALtd .62.50 -2.68 Barclay 18.09 -1.18 Coeurrs 11.18 -1.35
AT&Tlnc 24.63 -.38 BarrickG 32.90 -1.09 Con,.iU 11.86 +.10
AUOpton 9.95 -. Baxter 48.31 -122. CCiPa 69.96 -1.42
AXA 19.08 -1.10 Ba E 17.16 -73 13.50 -.35
AbILab 44.73 -.69 Berkley 2251 -.33 CodBgp .. 1.03 -.05
AberFt 27.05 -.53 BestlBuy 38.68 +,11 Comen 21.80 -.83
Aocenture 31.72 +.25 BitLots 22.52 -.16 CmdMdls 16.31 -1.17
AdamsEx 8.44 -.23 BIoMedR 9.85 -.55 ComScop 24.21 -.82
AdvAuto 41.49 +.25 BIkHilsCp 22.88 -.27 CmtyHlt . 25.88 +.09
AMD 4.26 -.21 BkDebtSfr 287 -.10 Con-Way 32.20 -.83
AdvEngy 5.27 -.54 BlkEnhC&i 12.59 -.31 ConAgra 18.64 -.82
Aeopostl 34.79 -.30 Blackstone 11.33 -.28 ConocPhil 43.10 -1.27
Aetna 22,53 -.44 BockHR 15.18 -.51 Conseco 2.17 -.23
Agilent 18.89 -.47 Blskbs"r .82 -.05 ConsolEnigy 39.21 -2.60
AgWicog. 52.52 -1.58 BlueChp 2.51 -.03 ConEd 36.56 -,52
Agriumg 48.20 -1.94 Boein 49.52 -192 ContellA 13.01 -42
AirTran 5.36 -04 Bordens 3.32 -48 ConstellEn 26.70 -.53
AcatelLuc 2.69 -.15 BorgWam 32.82 -1.26 CtIIrB 8.91 -.18
Aloa 1121 -.78 BosBee 28.33 -.44 Cnvt:ys 9.13 -.15
AllegTlh 39.43 -2.45 B:.:P. 48.54 -2.39 Coming 15.74 -.15
Allergean 44.67 -1.61 Bs.,.. -9.00 -.37 CotOp .5.24 -.20
Allete 28.15 -.37 BoydGm 8.70 -58 OovanteaH ,16.55 -.53
AlliData 45.32 -2.96 Brandyw 684 -.20 CoventyH 16.4 -.73
AIIBGIbHi 10.29 -.29 Brinker : 16.02 -32 Covldien 35.41 -64
AliBlnco 7.50 +.02 BrMySq 19.42 -.39 CrownHold 22.69 -.56
AliBem 21.20 -1.29 BlI8dAsgs 17.33 -:21 Cummins 34.02 -1.47
MAiedCap 3.31 -.04 BrkildPrp 8:03 -.64
Aldlrish 622 -.65 Brunswick 4.08 -24
Allstate 24.35 -.50 Buckeye 42.84 -.21 DCTnd 413 -.26
AlphaNRs 27.55 -2.29 BungeLtu 374 -2,66 DJIlADiamn 86.49 -1.82
Altria 16.55 -.09 BuiNSF ,3:5 -4,11 JONP k'i 8.02 -.02
AmbacF 1.15 -.07 CBRFJbla 8% . -.83 DPL 22.16 -.35
Aeren 24.08 -.32 CBLAsc 5.94 -.32 DRHodo 9.39 -.18
AMovilL 37.59 -.87 CBSB 7.81 33 DE 31.24 - -
AmAxleh 3.59 -.36 CHEngy 43.60 -1.19 Dalmler 35.94 -
AEagleOut 14.17 -.39 CIGNA 20.40 -.49 Danaher 61.85 -.92
AEP 27.36 -.64 CITGp 2196 -.17 Darden 33.87 +.07
AmExp 25.23 +.07 CMSEng 1; 11 -.19 Dea',. ' 18.8 -.56
AmIntGp 1.53 -.08 CSSInds' 1 4 -.17 -,'e� 43.10 -1.67
AmOdiBio 4.91 -.05 CSX 3 ; -2.35 L8 ,d 8.66 +21
AmSIP3 8.72 -.07 CVSCaie 29.98 -.37 , ., 6,10 -.30
AmTower 29.88 -.55 -.amw.l, . 19.04 +.13 CDenbuiR 16.30 -.67
Americdt 12.57 -.70 :: i,,raG 34.66 -93 D ais, 61.42 -4.98
Amerigas 33.11 -.05 CallGolf 5.78 -.22 , CiTei 10.95 -.38
Amepdrise 24.78 +.46 Calpine . 11.05 -.77T o,, lo 5.09 -.47
Anadarko 49.35 -1.22 Caecogs 25.82 -1.55. D,.,,E 63.69 -1.84
AnalogDev 25.00 -.40 Cameron 30.15 -1.28 ,D,.l. 90.04 -1.67
AngogldA 35.79 -.91 CampSp 28.62 -.48 Dco-g 16.76 -.49
AnnTaylr 7.22 +.02 CdnNRsg 55.058 -2.82 DiiiRnI 35.18 -1.73
Annaly 14.54 -.26 CapOne 23.40 -.54 D.rF..n8ui 9.74 -.81
AonCorp 36.42 -.57 CaptlSrce 4:.30 -.05 - nFir.Bea 4.68 +.33
Apache 82.02 -2.18 CapMpB .13.40 +.05 DiaSBear 22.64 +1.68
Aptnv . 9.78 -1.14. :,a. IHiTr ..,Ji? -8. Dir.SCB3ill 28.71 -2.49
AquaAm 16.96 -.20 :.5i fA i I - ;9 D,nLCBer 35.17 +2.38
ArcelorMit 32.781 -2.31 :.ri.al' 23.16 -'01 DntLC ull 34.63 -2.69
ArchCoal 17.32 -1.38 Cateirpillar 36.12 -1i . Dr,,-.&, 18.41 +1.17
ArchDan 27.90 -.81 Celanese 23.24 - i Dir.Ere., 36.66 -2.87
Ashland 26.33 -1.03 'Cemex 10.30 -1.04 Discover 9.48 +.18
AsdEstlat 6.24 -.14 -.-�T,- .i: 14-5 -62 Di-ney ,?45 -8i
AstraZen 42.84 -.50 I-r.iJP.I in1 I. - . w0 :-iP 4 - "
ATMOS. 2484 -'a '.-r. 0,,. 6 *- 0 ' O.:,wagr. 19' J4
Aulan.mi ' l -'i -4; Crt.rryTl 1Q * i OE)mrtI 9t -4'
AvalonBay 57.90 -3.30 ChampEh 4.t -: ' ,eKCr.TI. iF . -6i,
AvisBudg 4.79 -.29 Cre.ur, 14 ) - 9 DuPor,, 259 -1 7W
Avon" 25.72 -.89 r.sE.E, ' 6 -6 O DulEEry i145 -.22
BB&TOp 22.60 -.54 Chevron 71 'i -159 OqRiry i 67 -.73
BHPBilIl 57.48' -2.73 1 ChicoS' ' 93 -12 Dyngy 2-J7' -.20
BHPBiIlpc 47.51 -2.05 Chimra' J; -'i


EMCCp 1298 -.28 FrolMach .66 -.04 HawaEiB 18.77 -.48 iSR1KG 41.17 -.77 Keycorp 5.95 -.17 Millipore 66.42 -1.06 PepsiAmer 26.60 -24 Raytheon 45.00 -.31
EOGRes 76.25 -1.37 FMCG 55,14 -3.37 HItCrREIT 34.41 -1.49 ISRuslK 50.89 -1.23 KimbClk 51.42 -1.31 Mirant 16,23 -1.13 Prmian 12.99 -.59 RItyInco 21.75 -.73
EastChm 39.53 -1.12 FrcnderCm 6.91 -.12 1HiMnt 5.07 -.07 ISR2KV 47.32 -1.17 Kimo' 10.39 -.96 MitsuUFJ 6.25 -.44 PoCg 41.73 -2.32 RedHat 28.59 -.20
EKodak 2.79 -.16 ei l 1Hil .Rhy 16.22 -1.14 jiSR2KG 56.88 -1.50 KJndME 51.0 -.24 MobileTel 40.78 -.94 Petrohawk 24.48 -.69 RgcyC" 34.50 -2.11
Eaton 47.07 -2.11 HealthNet 12.94 -.47 iShR2K 51.36 -1.42 KingPhrm 9.60 -.37 MoneyGrmn 1.65 -.10 PetrbrsA 33.93 -1.42 RegBkHT 66.83 -2.09
Ecolab '38.14 -.55 HeclaM 287 -.23 iShREst 33.13 -1.56 K4nrossg 17.26 -.41 Monsanto 84.97 -1.57 Petobras 4215 -1,80 RegionF 4.33 -.12
Edsonint 31.67 -.82 GATX 23.62 -1.18 Heinz 35.59 -.73 iShFnSv 46.55 -1.11 Kohls 45.65 -94 Moodys. 26.48 -1:86 Pfizer 14.13 -.63 ReneSola 6.60 +.01,
ElPasoCp 9.98 -.42 GabelliET 4.63 -.38 HelinTel 8.17 -.21 iShFnSc 43.20 -1.14 Kraft 25.26 -.68 MorgStan 28.40 -1.30 PhilipMor 42.89 -.63 Repsol 2a,31 -1.00
Ban 7.60 -.56 GabHithW 5.01 -.07 HelmPayne 33.58 -1.34 iShBasM 45,45 -2.06 KrispKrmnn 3.26 -.18 MSEnMkI 10.92 -.50 PiedNG 24.80 -.64 RepubSvc 22.82 -.67
Eml.arq 43.84 +.01 GahUtil 6.64 -.14 Hertz 6.48 -.78 iStar 2.84 -.19 Kroger 21.29 -.43 Mosaic 53.12 -2.36 PimcoSrat 8.86 -.09 ReteilHT 78.31 -1.33
EmirsbnEIn 34.07 -1,0O GmreStop 23.67 -.45 Hess 57.71 -1.87 Idacoip 24.95 -.29 LDK'Solar 11.92 -.58 Motomla 6.48 -.25 PioNtl 28.03 -1.25 RetailVent 3.16, -.07
EmpDIst 16.32 -.02 Gainett 4.10 -.12 HewlettP 37.08 -.68 ITW 36.86 -1.22 LLERoyhit .55 -.05 MurphO 57.87 -2.33 PitnyBw 21.59 -.47 Revionrs 5.19 -.23
EnbrEPtrs 40.67 .-.16 Ga 16.11 -.26 Hexcel 10.98 +.04 Imnaton 8.78 -.26 LSICorp 4.63 -25 NCIBId 2.68 -.28 PainsEx 30.49 -1.54 ReyndAn 36.55 -1.13
SC___ LTCPrp 20.35 -.61 NCRCorp 12.33 -.41 PPlumCrk 31.81 -2.30 RiteAidlh 1,44 -.10
LaZBoy 3.64 -.02 NRGEgy 23.2fR-1.16 Polisn 30.97 -.73 RobtHalf 22.03 -.47
LabCp 62.20 -.16 NVEnerigy 10.76 -.05 PoloRL 54.10 +.65 RockwlAut 31.85 -1.59
Laclade 33.16 -1.17 NYSE Eur 28.34 -1.47 PoePrp , 14.2 -.8 RockCl 44.01 -129
S LVSands 8.05 -1.05 Nabors 17.38 -.91 Potash 111.34 -4.67 Rowan 21.71 -1.48
C 44 0LaSaileH 13.07 -1.13 NatFuGas 34.69 -1.00 PwshDB 23.39 -.46 RICarb 12.64 -1.07
LearCorp 1.38 -.55 NatGid 43.53 -.87 PSAgri 26.39 -.93 RoyI Sh1A 51.97 -244
LeggMLson 24.93 +.99 NOiVlyco 37.53' -1.16 Praxair 72.52 -272 IRoyc 8.55 -.7
- ---- -Ea IWnn= ULennarA 7.62 -.36 NatRetPrp 16.78 -.43 PrecDril 5.52 -.41 Roce o ifB2.0i 4-.
toLemarasco 15.79 -.48 NatSe 1366 +07 Prideln 25.86 -.60
LbtyASG 2.79 -,04 NatwHP 25.69 -1 56 PrnFnc 19.48 -1.41
SU*btProp 23.22 -1.17 Navios 4.57 -22 ProShtS&P 65.59 +1.61 SAIC 17.89 -26
FREE at 375 Upscale Utyali 32.96 -1.33 NewAmnrs 7.10 -.0 PrUShS&P 55.10 +2.47 SAPAG 40'23 -126
limited 12.51 -.30 WRscs 35.20 -.58 ProUtrow 30.11 -1.26 SCANA 31.06 -.29
Locations from Perry ncNat 15.83 -1.92 YCinyB 10.81 -.13 PrU ShDow 46.43 +1.84 SKTIc 15.57 -.29
Lindsay 33.58 -1.39 NewellRub 13.62 -.18 ProUitQQ 37.10 -1.67 SLoreen 23.34 -1.7
to Pasco LockhdM 82.07 -.70 NewfldExp 35.74 -.2 PrUSthQQQ 33.15 +1.31 SLMCp 8.16 -53





r-4 Nok n *ia QCp -1 FP ro U lt & 32.4 4 -1, 6 d 3 6 9 - . 9
Loews 27.48 -.55 NewmtM 41.58 -1.13 ProUtSP 26.44 -1.38 ,r--,L 91.10 -1.07
AN ew Each MAonth Lrillard 668.00 -1.75 NwpkRsIf , 3.28 -18 ProUShL20 55.49 -1.10 -,,:r, 11.78 36
LoM es 4.49 -.19 Noesteg 29.69 -1.318 PrUShChI 2.5 1204 +.83 ,ndRia 18.85 -.43
Emai -Hom es, Land, Rentals NiSoure 1124 -.1 oUISEM 21.2 +1.42 rb 1926 -.76
fNicor- 34.55 -.7 PioUShlRE 19.75 +1.60 SpdrRed 27.57 -.53
M&TBk 47.27 -1.59 NikeB 55.94 -.67 P - 16.48 4.6 +76 S Pdro et . 0 .914 -2.65
SAffordableMBA 5.34 -.51 99Cet 13.67 36 jr 41.56 +2 TMCrO 7.59 -.53
EC 5327 -230 GeDyam 5808 -1.68 HighdPrp 21.54 -1.13 IngerRd 22.33 -3 M s 1 - N &G ProShM 17.73 +1.49 Safewy 2.55 -.71



Exo 1Res5 -.55 G93o7 13.5 -.6 Hm, I 23.85 -3 In.8Gam 157.9 -.2 MaOtos NobleCoip 353 -37 - Pb85 4.3 -7 3 ivht g 25 9 -8
MEMC 9.9 -1..45 +29 NoaCp 1496 -.72 P tRE. 3.67 -.25 Slic 25.79 -.48
S- A T A . MFAFRsd 6.45 -.10 NordsuOm 20.38 -.39 PrUftO&G 30.92 -1.40 Skude 38.93 .-.92
FMCCor 5105 -140 GoMCR 8.02 +05 NmanS 143.01 -263 392CBk 29.82 -132 Invesco 1774 -.99 97 -04 -2 ProUlt 4.23 -25 Sak 4.33 -.01
8MC .49 -.31 Noestlkl 392194 -ia02 ProUBasM 19.46 -.1,66 SJuanB 17.35 -25






MC FPLG 5 4.49 -.31 NoestUt 21.94 -.18 ProU SR2K 42.37 +2.02 SandRdge 1049 -.52
Email ad copy an 764 -39 G photos to: 5 1 3 am5 M GMMir 6.53 . 60 14 Nothrop '174 .9 PUsR2ies 12.7 -24 Samt 1.4 -.
renews-pam0 charternet MSCIInc 23.55 -.37 NSTAR 31.00 -.45 ProUitR2K 19.9 -1.07 SanoriL 31.47 -1.76






, 759 -66 Gpevisa 17.33 -.30 ShHK 1382 .37 PMorgCh 34.00 -1.13 . -9 RRIEngy 5.4 -40 SouthnCo 8301486 -.15
re es 1633 - Ga Macerich 18.13 1. Nucor 45.75 -1 75 ProctGahk 51.335 -15422 SatyaCo 28944 -.2






Fero 343 -14 GuamtyFn .35 -.04 ShKor 35.24 -1.31 ab 7.29 -.26 Mc it 22.153 -17 PNF 6 -.2 Ra2corp 60.58 -99 SwstAi . 648 -.
NFin 1318 -18 Guess 25.72 -.74 hShMex .3671 -1.03 anusCap 12.20 -.08 M - P 9- . RangeRs 46.35 -.46 SwsnEngy 43589 -.64
dNna 53.27 -2.307 HCPGe ynac 2158.0 -1.682 HighwdPrp 21.54 -1.1340 JengerRd 22.3307 -.73 Mcs . -.1 PPNMO .7 8 -.21 P RamesFn 17.50 -.25 SpecraEn 17.16 -.34







s n 176 -33 HR Prp 4.36 a 112 -.48 -.61 N MuISi&G 7 -18 Rayoner 37.0451 -.40 SpinlNex 59. -1.6+05








F -.5 3 . - p IS S1 - a Es
EnPro 19.25 -55 Gen3 lc 13.15 .39 Hl 23.85 -.30 BngonM 17.09 -.29 Madsos 7.07 -.31 NuP2 5:82 8 25 Pro g .53 21.45 -.18
ENSCO 39.39 -1.42 GeriMills 14.04 -.88 H7-. ' ,,iSsd 33.92 -1.49 -, ,:E 28.39 -.67 M na 3.2 -298 En 27.52 -. r r 5.48 - The5 Serem ainder of the -.
Etprgy 76.24 -2.00 Genworth 6.33 -.40 HispPT 1374 -92 i u.n 113.089 -3.02 ManguirePr 1.67 +50 . g,167.08 -189 Prden 36.60 -.5 Senlent 23.64 -.12


















Ept2.72 -1. 1 9 HalyD 1 1 :57 .06B-.0 17 +1 ado 348 -94 Met5 i 2a . -1.5 P.85-1014 NYSE listings can be -
tR 22.72 -1.19 Gsa- .44 2506 -.01 HoSotle .39 -.79 IBM 107.62 -.59 Manitowoc 6.17 -.19 Officept 4.57 -.23 PSEGpfA 69.06 - Sidea 23.72 -1.36
Esteedr 32.68 -1.25 Gedas 10.47 -.72 HovnanE 2.40 -.15 InlCoal 43.25 -1 Monitgs 20.83 -.99 OISHT 108.61 -3,13 .-3 u Silvhenext page. -
FdnCoal 249.1320 -.36 Haro n 324.64 -.9045 SRHumanKV 4287.920 -121 InKeyame 1576 -4 MAAptnO' 31.58 -.84 Olin 1247 -42 64 -2 Si92 ,
Exelon 49.19 -1.39 GoldFt3d 11.27 -1.3 Huntsmn 6.72 +.05 IntPap 15.17 -.64 Mkt old 37.97 -1.57 Omnicom 31.81 -.4 PPr 4.60 -.85 Skechers 9,53 -.059
EFlonMbl 72.81 -.97 24oidnrg 13.01 -2.53 IAMGIdg 9.25 -.60 Interpublic 5.65 -. MVRus 22.73 -127 ONEOK 29.62 38 Quanltev 8 22.39 -1.32 SmtAO 29.98 -1.22,
FPLGrp 56.49 -.90 GoJArcnS 150.94 -2.426 l BIHt 29.82 -1.32 Inveo 17.74 00 MarlntA 22.97 -1.04 ONEOKRP 48,63 -.28 Quester 38.21 -.70 Smtnfl 29.53 -1.12
F Pa r S 76.4 9 -.9 Goc year 11.87 52.4 2 IMSHIth 13.55 +.26 IronMtn- 27.38 -.57 MersM 26.19 -.45 OshkoshCp 14.00 -1.8 kiRs 1227 -.24 SmithlF 11.18 -.74
Fairpl 7.64 - G y 11.87 -.54 ING 10.37 -.68 ftauUnlMuit 15.85 -.78 Marshlls 5.19 -.14 OwenoCor 10.96 - Quikslrw 206 -.31 S7 ucker 43.47 -.3"
FamlyDir 28.82 -.67 GrafTech 11.75 -.89 iSAsla 16.86 -.79 fMao6.123-.51 5.-.14 Owensllm -12.96 -98
FennleMa e h .61 -.05 G tP ',inEn r 15.66 -.25 iShB raz 5461 - 2.27M aSew ot 3 .05 -.22 -1i - R P8W es tt83 .B5 .2 -.34_.0 So nebysm e 13 . 338 -17.61
FeaoEi.. ' 52.01 -2.38 aGrifon . 8.48 -.76 �SCan 22.12 -.91 9.Masco n 9.68 -25.3
F 7.59 -.66 GpTelevisa 17.33 -.30 ighHK 1382.37 JPMorgCh 34.00, -1.13 MasseREn 22.38 -2.39R 1PM 15.04 -.50 SoJilnid 34.33 -.51
Ferrefl, 16.33 -.11 GuangRy 24.99 .53 iS 8 7 MasterCrd 166.47 -.59 PG&ECp 37.41 63 RRIEngy 15.46 -.40 SouthnCo 30.14 .41
Ferro 3.43 -.14 GuaetyFn .35 -.04 iSh Kor 3524 -1.31 Jabil 7.29 -.26 Mattel 15.80 -.48 PNC 40.56 -.78 Ranorph 160.58 -.99 SwstArn2, 6.48 -.i13n
FdNRn 13.18 -.18 Guess 25.72 -.74 iShMex .36.71 -1.03 JanusCap 12,20 -.08 McDermlnt 22,11 -1.17 PNMIRes 9,12 -.37 RanoeRs 46.35 -.946 SwstdEngy 43.89 -.64
FidNInfos 20.03 1.07 HCP Inc 21.59 -1.82 !ShSing 9.06 -.40 Jefferies 22.07 -.16 McOnlds 57.78 -.58 PPG 43-98 -1.15 RamesFn 17.50 -.25 SpectaEn 17.168 -.34
FstHodzon 12.76 .33 HRPTPrp 4.36 -.28 iSTaiwn 9.67 -.48 JohnJn 54.75 -1.31 McGrwH 30.54 -1.45 PPLCorp 32.27 -103 Rayon 17.0 -2. Spdclse 1 .34
FTActDIv 11.13 -.52 HSEOC, 43.51 -1.78 i1hK . 1243 -44 JohnsnCf 2087 -70 McKesson 41.51 -1.47 Pac 2.97 -.83 Rayoier 37.04 -240 SpiiNe 5.34 +0o5
FtTrEnEq 8.95 -.14 HSEC.cap 24.30 +.09 iShSilvers 13.83 -.80 JonesApp 11.52 +.32 Mechiel 8.83, -1.29 PallCorp 26.55--.59
F,,: Enr~ -39.41 -1.07 Hasintnto 23.15 -.84 iShCh255s 38.23 -1.33 JonesLL 33.67 -.97 ModcoHItht- 43.84r .-1.11 PatriotCs 98.92 -.94
nwi : 514- -2,38 "J" 11.15 +-09 iShDJTr 57.92 -2.49 KBHonle 13.24 -.85 .',:,, 5.990 -.34 PeabdyE 33.49' ,-21.7 6Yo
Fx.L. i 10. 1t -.02 " 7.66 -.11 iSSP500 93.18 -2.21 KBRInc 19.06 .33 .I.-tfh :I, 17 -1.45 Pengrlhg- 8.23 L-50
F-,34M 5.93 -.18 Hanesbrds 17.17 -.22 iShEMkts 32.53 -1.21 KKRFn. 1.09 -.12 % �4% -1.12 PennVaRs 14.25 - The rem ainder of the
Fn.atn 22.68 -1.,37 Hanoverlns 36.28 -.14 iShSPLAs 35.4 -1.34 KCSou0In 16.96 -.98 ,,IO1"an1 :. 7 -.01 PennWstg 13.38 . -.59
r Er.... 19.48 33 HwleyD 16.11 -.57 ,iShB20T 90.78 +.81 Kaydon 34.28 -.94 MetUfe 29.90.--1.18 Penney 28.156 -1.01 NYSE listings can be
Forlness 285 -.10 HarmonyG 10.44 .4 iSEafe 4.69 -1.74 KAEngTR 18.27 -.50 MetroPCS 14.53 -.28 PepBoy 9.71 +,01
Fortune 36.21 -.82 HartldFn 11.50 -1.45 iSRMCVs Wi.0 -.83 Kellogg 43.45 -1.10 MoronT -5.32 -.15 PepHok 13 118 -.35 found on the next page.
FdtnCoal 29.2o -236 Hatro ,24.64 -.45 iSR1KV 47.90 -1.28 KeyEngy 6.41 -.34 MidAApt 35.16 -1.33 PepsiBott 33.00 -.57
WMias 10.30 -.36 PepsiCo 52.88 -.77


A a R5 aTOKXHNG


Name Last Chg BPZRes 6.24 -.36
SBarcUBS3 38.13 ,-1.01
Barc'SOil 25A.4 -.61
AbdAsPac 5.55 -09 BrclndiaTR.. 5022 -1.77
AdmRsc 17.78 +08 I Etrr .1.38, -05



AmO&G 1.13 -.16 . C.'A:. .4. +05
ApoltoGg .42 -.04 CFPda. 12.08 -,03
AslSpcSit 9.56 ... r,,r,,Er. 3.64 -.15
Augusta g 2.05 -24 , Cr..-.rrn 7.75 -.42
Auzriong 3.99 -.15 ChNEPetn 5.862
BMBMunai 1.43 +.01 I ChinaShen 1.62 -.32


ClfudeRg .81 -.06 EnterAcq 9.73 -.01 GrtBasGg 1.61 -.04
Cigh kCt, Ii,91 -;; I E-lncAdv 8.09 -.34 Greerintr 2.14 -.36.
C ,r iieP' 5 - , aPU 12.76 -.35 Hemisphrx 2.73 +.06
Cronssr. 21 -W FrkStPrp 12,89 -.41 HooperH .57 -.01
Gra~th a -.6 .0L Fnjnt a 3.9 - [A Global .06 -.00
SsmpOilgs 40.01 -1.27
Denri:r.Ma 1.78 -.3 GHLAcwt .60 intelSys 76
DuneEy '16 -.02 GascooEngy .38 -.03 'ftesRyyg 343 -.
EviinMu:i 116 e -.07 Gastarg e.4 0 -.0317 -
EVLiaDur 12.50 -.33 GenMoly 2.47 -32
EldorGldg 828 -.51 . GeoGloblR 1.28
BixirGam .19 -.02 GlbCons ' 9.64 JavelinPh 124 -.01
EflswthFd 5.55 -.11 GbEnHd .15 -.I KBL HAcq 7.78
Endvdnt 1.54 -.11 GoldStrg 1.91 +-02 M, 1 3.361 -.12
EndvSvlg 1.78 -.15 GranTrrag 3.44 -.07 ,':.a.I',- ' Il11 -.01


Merimac 10.35 -1.65
Metalico 3.41 -.26
MetoHth 1.88 -.10
Mdwroldg .66 -.11
Minefndg 7.71 -.78
Nevsung 1.42 -.09
NDraon '16 -.02
NwGoldg 2.51 -.27
NAPallg 2.46 -.11
NDynMng 7.49 -.37
NtnO&G 7.59 -.31
NthgtM g 2.10 -.12
NovaDelP .33 .


NovaGldg 4.76 +.13
NMuHiOp 10.50 -.35
Oilsandsg 1.10 -.14
On2Tech ".43 -.03
DrsusXe .88 -.06

PacRim .27 -.02
Palan ,35 +.02
ParaG&S 1.42 -.12
PetroRes .73 +.04
PhrmAth 2.14- -.01
PionDrill 6.23 -.24
PolyMetg% 1.54 -.16
PSCrudeDS 71.56 +379
PSCrudeDL 4.57 -.16


PyramidOs 7.10 -.53 .USGeoth 1.70 -.15
Rentech .61 -.02 USGold 2.36 -23
RexahnPh 1.11 +.05
Rubicono 280 -.18 Uluru .20 +.00
UnivTravn 11.14 -.54
SeabGldg' 25.46 -1.41 Uranerz 1.48 -12
$ilvrcpMgn 3.18 -.35 UraniumEn 2.79 +.16
Sinovac 4.12 +.29
SofttBmds .89 -.00 E 5
TanzRyg 3.40 -.22
Taseko 1.80 -.17 VantageDrl 2.00 -.01
Telkbnet .13 ... VistaGold 2.05 -.24
Tengsoo .69 -.02
TdanAcq 9.53 +.02 Westdd 9.(5 -.74
TrianAcwt .19, +.04 WilshrEnt 1.62 +.01


:NA 3e5 NafON ARKT


Name Last Chg Asdvox 5.65 -.32
- Aulodesk 21.31 -.93
u ,. 26.94 -6079
A-Power 13.09 +.22 AvanirPhm 1.55 24
ACMoorelf 3.89 -.44 AzaTch 09 -.02
ADC Tel '8.23 -.04 Aware ' 2.50
AMAGPh 50.47 -2.81 ' l .50 ',50
APACCSML Hi 47 -.22 AxsysTech 53.61 +.06
ASMLHid 2081 -.47 6 Ar. 15.95 -.37
ATr O&G 8.04 -.20 fidiEer .,i 3t42 1 :-
ATSMed 2.95 -.02 B f . c 2921)
AVIlBo 1,37 -.12 B r' ra e - 189
.Aasrom .35 -.01 BeEs 8 a -40
Abtlomed 7.71 -.45 Barz..ia ill -04
Accuray 7.83 -.17 Bei.rWatr 35 -.,)3
AordaTh 26.53 +1.00 BE.acc.Pw 103 . 01
AdivPwh .73 +09 BEcr,pj 14.2 - 32
AcivsBz s 12.39 -.58 31 12 -6
Acmiom 12.00 -.19 m 714 -
Adaptec 2.57 -.06 BedEbm .tN9 -.07
AdobeSy 28.82 -1.33 .E8 5: -.94
Adlran 19.85 -.39 9..Onr i 683 +,07
AdvBattery 3.82 -.42 8b ,rys 4.' -. 07
AdvantaA .56 -.04 y 9.na. 0 ' -1.19
AdvantaB .62. -.07 6,ar.r. .15,0 +.22
AEtemag 2.21 +.41 Boper;h .26, -.04
Aei 6.-10 -.54 BobEvn ' 29.77 -.83
AgFeed 6.10 -1.06 BostPrv 4.92 -.09
AkamiT 22.12 -.74 BdgExp 3.93 -.23
AkeenaSh 1.47 -.11 Broadcom 26.07 -.23
Akom .99 -01. BrdwindEn 9.00 -1.42
Aldila 3.16 +.15 BrcdeCm 7.43 -.37
Aledxons 37.84 -1.45 BrkneB 9.50 -.36
AlignTech 10.46 -.652 BrukerCp 8.41 +.05
Alkerm 9.10 -18 Bucyrud 28.54 -1.50M
AllegiantT 37.80 -2.31 BuffaoWW 32.97 +.11
AllosThera 8.12 +06 CAInc 17.42 -.321
AllscriplM 13.97 -.12 CDCCpA 1.55 -.11
AlnylamP 21.71 -.86 CH Robins 51.06 -1.36
AltairNano 1.02 -.03 CMEGrp 331.58 -9.35
eramCpIN 16.50 -25 CTCMOda 11.45' -.61
AltsPhm .59 +.04 CVB End 8622 -26
Alvaorn 3.14 -03 CadencePh. 8.37 -.60
Amazon 83.18. -.90 Cadence 6.04 -.27
Amnedisys 29.16 -1.93 Cal-Maine 24.13 +1,23
AmerBioh .24 -.03 Car.Sai 13.15 -1.47
AmCapUd 428 +,53 C-,.dla 1.00 -.17
AmerMed 16.02 -.34 Ca pCBk 1619 . -86
AmSupr,. 25.84 -1.95 Cpstfnrb 1.15 -:05
AmCasIno 17,50 -.72 CardloNet 17.63 -.61
Amgen 49.44 -.96 CareerEd 20.68 -.63
AmkorTIf 4.69 -.18 Caeizo 10.51 -.01
Amyfin 11.64 -.29 CarverBp -5,00 -.25
AnadigO 4.16 - -13 Casey .,25.25 -.18
AnadysPh 2.04 -.14 CasualMal 2.26 -.11
Anlogic 37.52 +.48 CatlyslH 22.42 -.11
Analysts .67 -.06 CathayGen 9.84 -.53
Andrsons 28.83 -.96 CaviumNet 16.40 -.15
,Angiotchig 1.97 +.07 Cbeyond 16.11 -.63
AngloAm 13.83 -,38 Celgene 42:23- -1.00
Ansys 31.81 -1.26 CellGensh .47 -.04
Anlgncs 2.06 -.09 CeolTherrsh 1.61 +.18
ApoloGrp 63,62 -.79 CentlCom 8.35 +.03
Apololnv 6.90 +.09 CentEuro 28.80 -2.46
Apple Inc 136.09 -.88 CEurMed 20,.60 -.95
Mac l 11.10 -.13 CentGardif 9.93 -.58
C 7.49 -.26 CenGrdA f 9.12 -67
ArchCap 57,65 -.74 CentAl 7.45: -36
ArcSight 17.83 -.77 Cephin . 56:68.- . 5
ArenaPhm 5.47 +.48 Cepn e 9.37 -67
AxesCap 7.79 -.05 Cwayn 19.42 -M08
AiadP 1.76 -.10 Coerer 58.58 -48
Aribalnc 10.33 -.27 Changyoun 38.61 -',,4
AriesMar .82 +.02 ChrmSh 373 -
ArkBest 28.65 +.14 Chartlndc 20.02 -2.31
AnnHId 5.,39 -.10 ChkPoint 24.01 -.08
Arris 12.29 -.38 Cheesecake 16,29 -.20
ArtTech 3.41 -.23 ChildPlace 29,48 -.70
ArubaNet 7.18 -.40 Chir Aich 162 - is
Asialnfo 19.68 -1.65 ChiraBAK 330 -25
AspenBio 1.93 -.17 CtilnaDr 183 -41
AsscdBanc 13.86 -.18 COneousLO 440 -.19
athenahlth 33.06 -.72 CndneMo 2355 -.86
Atheros 18.81 -.17 ChlnaPS 24 * -23
AitasAlr 24.09 -.58 CoraEin 5 - .244
AtlasAm 18.80 -.94 CineCEd 347 -98
A.in el 3893' -.13 i Cnnie. l?788 -232


Chrch . 36.47 -1.82 Entrust 1.84
ClenaCorp 10.01 -.18 EnvoyCapg 1.60 +04
CinnFiRn 23.47 -.37 .EpiCpt h .97 +,.01
Cintas L'49 -.45 Equinix 69.92 -1.68
Cirrus 45? -.07 EdicsnTel 9.16 -.43
Cdir. 1936 -.55 Euronel 19.41 -.03
CiWIzPi 1.10 -,06 EvrgrSlr 2.38 -24
.iin.,j; 33.52 -.58 Exar 7.01 -.21
Clearwire 4.24 -.35 Exelbds . 4.86 -.10
ClickSft 4.64. -.35 ExideTc 4.27 -.40
C:et 10 6. -.30 Expedla 16.50 -.33
Cogr.r Ten 81 -.98 Expdlntl: 32.87 -1.38
CogoGrp 610 -.90 ExpScripts 61.18 -1.74
Coir. 76' -.,75 EnNet 1.75 +.01
C=ai.a 60i +14 Ecop . 10.64 -.35
Cor rac. 195 -,19 F5Netwks 34.47 -.65
CorbRxr, 86 -.07 FCStone 4.77 -.11
Curincas 1362 -.53 FLIRSys 24,30 -.34
CcnspO li39 - .54 Fastenal 33.43 -1.38
Cm J 7303 -1.42 FiberTowr .58 +.01
CwthBio h, .67 -.05 FIlThird 7.57 -.46
Corin,T,5,, 9.80 +.08 Fncllnst 13.52 -.44
Coirrtpi&H 818 -.37 Finisar .77 -.08
Compuwre 7.24 -.19 FinUne 7.02 -.14
Comtech , 30.02 -1.04 FstCashFn 16.08 -.09,
ConcurTch 30.01 -.79 FMIdBc 7.21 -.25
Conexantrs 1.40 +.06 FstNiagara 11.62 -.31
Conled 16.05 -.36 FstSolar 178.98 -4.82
ConvOrgan 1.41 -.08 FstMerl 16.74 -.38
Copart 34.42 -.04 FIsef 46.20 -.46
CodrinthC 15.26 ' -.15 Rextm 4.20 -.20
CorusBksh .32 -.02 FocusMda 7.09 -.44
Costco 46.33 -.70 ForcePro , 7.56 -1.16
CrackerB 27.36 -.72 Fortress wt .01
Creeinc 28.53 -.21 ForwrdA 22.85 -.68
Crocs ,3.99 +.04 Fossil Inc 22.87 -.25
GrosstexE 5.19 -.21 FosterWhil 26.95 -1.62
Crucel 23.04 +.16 FreeSeas 2.88 -.31
Chip.com 41.85 -2.69 FrontFncl 1.40
CubIsPh 17.11 -.19 FuelSysSol 21.76 -271 '
CuraGenh 1.34 -.05 FuelCell 4.39 -.20
CybrSe 13.99 -.86 FultonFnd 5.26 -28


DadaDon 32.87 -.63
DpySlar .90 -.08 GFIGrp 7.02 -.26
DeckOut 68.78 -2.63 GMXRs 15.08 -1.17
Dellino 12.87 -.52 GSICmmro 13,78 -.43
DItaPIr 227 -.16 GSIGrpif 1.04 -.10
Deltek 4.28 .,. GT Solarn 6.08 -.81
Dndreon 25.52 -.0B Garmln 22.02 -.92
Denny 2.22 -.08 GenProbe 41.73 -1.46
Denrsply 28,90 -.80 GenBlotch .63 -.14
Depomed 2.65 -.05 Gentex 12.97 -.33
DexCom 6.36 +.14,, GenVec .85 -.09
DIgRiver 38.68 -1.32 I.Genzyme 55.62 -3.14
DirecTV 22.35 -.42 GeronCp 6.64 -.21
DIscCmA 21,72 -.40 GigaMle 5.53 +.14
DiscALabs 1.27 +.30 1 GleadSd 43,93 -1.01
DishNetwk 14.80 -.53 GlaeclerBc 15.03 -.50
DlrTree 42.37 -.92 Globllnd 6.79 -.29
DrriWksA 27.77 -.96 GluMobile 1.49 +.28
DressBam 14.46 -,42 Google 416.77 -8.07
DryShlps 6.72 -.32 GreenMtCs 57.30 -3.13
DynMal 20.02 -1.08 GulfpodE 7.41 +.25
Dynvax 1.63 -.03 Gymbree 35.33 -.33
1.e81 -.16 HLTH 11.84 -.08
eBay :17.40 -.40 HMN Fn 5.25 +.01
eticalm 17.02 -07 HMSHId 37.30 +.48
eswcMh 5.68S -39 HanmIFnr 2,00 +.52
evjlno 9.31 ' .13 HansehMed 4.96 -.14
EaglelIn 5.92 -28 HansenNat 30.68 -.57
Eagi RIE,, 3.50 -.12 HarlyNat 4.87 -37
EnhiL,., 7.69 -.08 Harmonlc 6.65 +.04
EstWstBcp 7.54 -.34 HarrisStrA 6.33 -.03
Edi -.50 HawHold 5.35 -36
Eduer 6 +.02 HindEx 14.80 -.23
EdgePet .60 -,05 HSchein 44.00 -.81
EduDt 480 HerOCjflsh 5.12 -21
Ele ,"IS 1077 +U5 HaSi-.a 17.40 -.27
EleclAri 2137 -56 i,r..TchI- 3,58 +.05
Empire 123 -10 HwuSe 285 L.20
E90P1hn 1728 . -43 I 5Nc."', 56 -'04
S 17183 -69 rlieh 838 -62
I 71 - 02 I HToi 7.37 . 2?
I Erlego ir3i - 20 ' iH,'i.uo 2085 -1.57


HudsCity 12.90 -.27 LookSmart 1.358 +.10 OlympSI 24.58 -1.80 TICmSys 6.74 -.26
HumGen 2.60 -.29 luluemn 13., -40 Omniture 12.99 -.48 Tellab s 5.76, -.06
HuntJB 31.16 -.91 Omnsn 10.80 -.38 SBACom 23.45 -.61 TerreStar , .96 +.02
HuntBnk 4.52 +.37 OnAssgn 4.17 +.09 SEIInv 18.17 -.33 TesseraT 25.04 -.75
Hydrognccs .60 -.05 MAPPhm 11.21 +1.12 OnSmcnd 6.77 -.09 SMFEngh .43 +.08 TetonEgy .36 -.03
IAC Interts 1629 -.12 MCGCap 2.50 OnyxPh 25.23 -.90 STEC 18.02 -.71 Tetrac 27.87 -63
ICOPwtB .09 +.01 MDRNAH 1.63 -.28 OpenTxt 35.67 -.68 SVBFnGp 29.07 -.97 Tevahc 47.60 .
ICOPgh .44 -.01, MGE 32.74 -.07 OpnwvSy 2.30 -.07 SalixPhm 10.05 +.18 TevaPhrm 47.8 -.88
IdexxLaos 45.3 -1.20 MIPSTech 3.09 -.06 optXprs 16.35 -.32 SanderFm 48.00 +.30 TexRdhsA 10.70 -.53
IPCHold 28.14 +.39 MRVCmhit. .59 +.03 Oracle 20.22 -.63 SanDisk 15.07 -.48 Thoratec 25.01 -.50
IPCS Inc 14.46 -.47 MTS 21.19 -.43 Orthfx 24.75 -1,00 Sanmina .63 -.04 3Com 4.70 -.33
IShNsdqBlo 68.72 -1.68 MacrvsnSol' 22.85 -.15 Orthovta 5.26 -.23 Sapient 5.89 +.25 TibcoSft 6.34 -.19
IconPLCs 21.59 +.19 MagelnHI 30.41 -.93 Oscientlf .25 -.02 Satconh , 1.72 -.04 TiVoInc 11.31 -.13
Issnixolr 15,17 -.30 MagelPt 1.12 -.12 ' OterTal1 21.20 -.59 SavientPh 9.27 +.01 TractSupp 39.36 -.54
Illumlnas 37.18 -.90: MnTech 42,09 -1 09 ScShnitzer 58.23 -3.46 TmblN 21,54 -
Immuowr 15.68 -.38 MannKd 8,38 +49 Schwab 17.84 -.24 TriQulnt 5.92 +13
Imunoqn 7.89 -.38 Martek 21.91 -.76 PDLBio 7.75 -.16 SdGames 18.09 -1.06 TrueReig 2145 48
Imunmnd 2.40 -.10 MervellT 12.47 +.14 PFChng 31.99 +,27 SeagateT 9.34 -.20 TreRel 21.45 -.48
Incyle 3.16 -.17 Masimo 25.10 -.72 PMCSra 7.67 -,09 SearsHIdgs 66.82 -2.11 TrstNY 5.91 -.15
Infinera 10.07 -.05 MaxCapital 18.59 -.20 PSSWrld 16.86 -.09 SeataGen 9.26 -.16 Trustmk 19.60 -.11
Informal 17.32 -.22 Maximltgn 16.31 -.20 PacWstBc 13.98 -.97 SecurBk .63 +.15 UAL , 3.73 -.10
InfosysT 35.52 -1.60 MaxwIlT 11.90 -.49 Paccar 31.58 -1.69 Selectvlns 12.88 -.41 UCBHIIf 1.53 -.12
InsitTc 15.06 -.39 Medarex 7.13 -.15 Pacerlnti 2.43 -.20 Semtech 16.43 -.41 USCncrt 2.04 -.02
Insmed 2.15 MedAssels 17..75 -.19 PacCapB 4.18 -.37 Sepracor 15.58 -.65 UTiWrldwd 11.53 -.43.
IntegLfSci 25.19 -1.11 MedicAcin 11.61 -.28 PacEthan .44 -.05 Sequenom 4.81 +19' UTStrcm 1.73 -.20
IntgDv 6.26 -.22 MediCo 7.14 -.38 PacSunwr 3.44 -.13 Shanda 54.40 -3.03 Umpqua 8.51 -.27
Intel 15.98 -.33 MedisTech ,38 ... PaetecHid 2.91 -.28 Shire 39.08 -1.57 UtdCBksGa 7.02 -1.19
InteractBik 14.57 -.20 MelcoCwn 4.40 -.55 Pal Inc 14.12 -.46 ShufflMstr 5.25 -.15 24.85 + 19
InterDig 24,81 -.65 MentGr 5.12 -.17 PanASIv 20.95 -1.09 SiRFTch 4.14 -.46 Utd -85
Interface 6.14 +.10. MercadoL 24.05 -1.08 PaneraBrd 50.53 -.95 SigmaAkd 48.89 -1.46 UtdOnn 6.54 -.21
InterMune 12.16 -.18 MergeHIth 3.48 -.40 pany 16.98 -.91 SignatBk 26.09 -1.01 USEnr 2.53 -.04
InlBcsh 10.8 -.01 MeridBsl 20.67 +.32 ParagShip 4.32 -.24 SilganHId 47.00 -1.65 UdTrp . 3.06 -1.88
IngSpdw 26.13 +.10 MessAlrh .11 -.01 PaPet 2.11 -.10 Silicnlmg 2.46 -.09 UnivFor 29.80 +39
InterntCap 5.82 -.25 Metabash .63 +.01 ParamTch 12.13 -.17 SilcnLab 37.99 +13 UraniumR 1.49 -.17
Intersil 12.74 -.28 Methanx 13.74 -.33 Parexel 12.82 -.35 SilicnMotn 3.84 -.31 UrbanOut 21.11 -47
Intuit 27.81 -.83 Microchp 22.53 -.22 PrtnrCm 1.80 -120 SIcnware 6.24 -.50
IntSurg 159.28 -7.23 Micromet 4.38 -.36 Patterson 19.77 -.69 SilvStdg 19.92 -2.03
InvBncp 8.14 -.34 MKrosSys 26.58 -1.12 PattUTI 13.85 -.44 Sina 29.15 -1.00 VCAAnt 24.85 -.70
Isis' 14.35 -.93 MicroSemi 14.73 -.59 Paychex 27.26 -.31 SidusXM .33 -.02 VaiVisA 1.49 -.01
lsleCapr, 11.02 -.83 Microsoft 23.42 +.09 PnnNGm 28.53 -.43 SlollSoft 7.73 -.09 ValueClick 12.05 -.12
Itron 58.32 -248 Micrvlsn 2.86 -.14 Penwest 2.70 +.24 ,SkyWest 9.72 -.28 I
nhN 1: -10 MillerHer 15.16 -.22 PeopUtdF 1532 -.14 SkywksSol 10.05 -.21 VOandaPhm 11.14 -.48
Millcom 55.59 -2.56 reneh ,90 -.04 SmilhWes 4.74 -.21 Vadan 38.15 -127
Miasonti 2.08 -.04 'PeretWld 24.35 -92 SmithMicro 9.80 +.22 VadanSemi 24.4 -.36
JASolar 5.24 -.43 ModusUnk 6.63 406 Per 25.86 -.60 Sohu.cm 65.91 -.67 Veecolnst 11.27 -.76
JDS Uniph 6.08 -.04 Molex 15.92 64 PetMed 1483 +32 Solefaun 7.05 -.867 Verenium .73 -.06
JackHenry 18.62 -.47 MonPwSys 22.17 -.18 etroDev 19.09 -.60 SonicCorp 8.85 +.01 Verisigh 18.33 -91
JacklnBox 24.14 -.49 MonroMut 24.87 PetsMrt 20.89 -19 .Sonus 1.94 -.05 VerixPh 30.95. -.58
Jamba 1.19 -.05 Myan 13,06 -.56 PhrmPdt 2225 -.40 SouMoBc 9.64 -.11 c -al 2.66 -.06
JamesFlv 19.65 -1.88 MyriadGs 35.48 -.52 PInnaclFn 14.13 -.30 SouthFnd 1.80 -.05 VirgnMdah 8.54 -.12
JazzPhrm 4.56 +1.92 MyIadPwl 6.05 . s 2252 -42 SptnMot 10.25 -.9 VirPhrm 5.94 -02
JetBlue 4.14 -,06 NTge 15,64 +.89 Plexus ,,.98 -4207 SpectPh 6.15 +.32 Virhl 5,4 -02
JosphBnk 33.95 +.09 Nldg 20.18 -.80 PluPowerm 21.18 +.27 StaerSur 2.05 -13 inhna 5.52' -.63
JoyGibl 38.05 -2,33 NPSPhm 4,49 -.12 PolCom 17.81 -14 Staples 20.82 -.31 VistaPrt 41.79 -1.46
JnprNtwh 23.68 -.19 NasdOMX 21.13 -.62 Poular 2.63 +.81 -04 Starulk 4.41 -28 vus 5.64 -.40
KLATno 25.50 -.38 Natlnstruh 23.23 -.22 Populawer-One 1.53 -02 StarSclent 4.36 -.12 Volcano 13.14 -.14
Kendle 13.89 -2.17 NatPenn 4.88 -.24 Power-Oe 1.53 -.02 Starbuck 14.12 -.43 WPTEnth 1.08 -.10
KeiayxBn 1.05 -.09 NektarTh 5.92 -.31 Powwa 1.60 -.02 StarentNet 22.64 -.41 WamerChi 12.44 -.55
KiQands 8.68 -.34 NetServ 9.17 -42 Prestek 1.6 -03 Stlynam 15.24 -.92 WarrenR 2.51 -.07
KnghtCs4 17.24 -.13 NetLogc .99 -.33 Prtek 1.68 - StemCells 1.5 -.01 WashFed 130 -.11
Kulicke 3.79 -.36 NetApp 19.82 -.32 eTR 41.97 -1.19 encce 4928 -.41 Webeaese 1887 .58
LJIn1t 1.95 -.20 Netease 35.04 -,71 le 111.05 -426 We 6.44 :-.29 . -.
LIKQCorp 15.87 +.11 Netfix. 38.16 +.32 P nP 5204 -22 S.IFWA 375 -.17 Wettv 1824 -.79
LSI IndIf 4,34 -.41 NtScout 9.29 -.29 f ca .04 -.01 StewEnt 488 -.15 Weath .62 +.02
LaJoilPhh .27 -,10 Neurogenh ' .28 -.03 Prospca 9.34 -03 SuccessF 9.27 '-.18 WetSeal 3.29 -.11
Labophng 2.10 +.05 NeufTand 24.05 -1:39 psyhSol 19.79 -24 SumTotal 4.76 -.01 WhitneyH 11.14 -36
LamResich 24.76 -.88 NewsCpA 9.81 -.60 u A 00 2.90 -01 SunHtIhGp 8.01 -.45 WholeFd 19.51 -.93
LamarArdv 16.84 -.93 NewsCpB 11.06 -.67 17.49 -.71 SunMcro 9.28 -.02 WindRvr 11.45 -.01
Landstar 36.02 -1.26 NexMed .35 +.02 leo'ing 213 -. SunPowerA 30.30 -1.60 Wnnn-Dixe 14.19 -.12
Lattice 2.04 -.02 NobityH 9.50 ... 135 -39 SusqBnc 5.90 -.37 WonderAuto 9.38 -1.12
LawsnSit 5.23 -.40 NorTrst 54.18 -1.01 Qualcort 44231 -1.74 Sycamore 3.46 -.05 WdwrdGov 20.43 -1.14
LeapWnr;s 32.17 -1.36 NovtIrls 9.72 -.13 OQuantFel 75 -.0 Symante 16.12 -.37 W 15 18
LevA3 1.49 -.05 Novavax 2.71 -.19 uestSft 3.86 -.30 Symetricm 5.93 -.06 dA p 18.75 -.45
Lb- tLr 14.81 -.32 Novell 4.03. -.12 Ouestor 4.54 -.21 Synaptcss 37.65 -.81 WrightM 15.89 -.88
LibGlob, 14.70 -.21 Noviu 17.42 -.81 RFMIcD 3,59 +,02 Synopsys 19.37 -.35 Wynn 34.99 -2.42
UbtyMnlirA 5.76 -.17 NuHodzit 3.76 -.05 Rambus 19.13 +1.74 Syrnis 18.62 -,58 XOMA 1.03 +.11
UbMEn"H 24.19 -.51 NuVasve 41.44 -1.20 R i 66.05 -1.62 SynthEngy 1.11 -.09 Xinx 20.40 -51
UleTedl 39.09 -.96 NuanceCm 13.59 -.66 279 -.16 Synoum 2.08 -.16 Xtent 1.29 +.10
UfePIH 26.92 -.46 NuriSys / 13.55 -.50 Regenm 15.32 -1.04 TSInA 8.84 -.56 YRCWwde 2.40 -.15
UhirGold 22.82 -.93 Nvodia 11.32 -.19 RentACt 18.74 -.34 TDAmeritr 17.90 +.36 Yahoo 16.40
Uncare 19.99 -.60 02Micro 4.95 +.31 RepubAir 4.75 -.34 TFSFnd 10,97 -.13 ZebraT 23.06 -.04
UncEdSV, 17.32 -.16 OReItyAh 35.67 -.37 RschMon 80.38 -264 THQ 7.58 -.90 pn 11.40 -1.05
UncEl 38.95 -1.93 OSI Prm 28.33 -.99 RigelPh 11.54 -.35 twtelecorn 1126 -.40 Zhars 4 0 .04
Ur.raTd 2302 -.49 OceanFit 1.60 -05 Riverbed 22.47 -.57 TakeTwo 7.64 -36 zonp .46 +.20 4
is ,O6 -2 odaro .80 -.05 toaettaR 9.34 -.50 TarnRes 14.89 -.88 Oic 14.96 +2
Lfi,. 1'. -.38 O 4. -.17 RossSir 39.06 -.37 421 -.25 ZxCorp 1.62 -.07
Le.M . 1 468 -1,22 OdvsMar 1.85 -.04 RoyGid 41.81 -.83 TechData 3125 +.02 Zoltek 11.53 -.61
Logilech 13,99 -.6? OldDomF 30.09 -.16 Ryanair 28.05 -1.34 Tekelec 16.46 -.59 Zoran 10.93 -.33


Yesterday Pvs.Day


3.7640
1.2297
.3770
1.9225
1.6450
1.1184
561.70
6.8364
2017.50
19.05
5.3163
35.90
5.6090
.7138
7.7502
197.71
47.569
10065.00
3.9110
98.24
.7095
1500.50
3.5055
13.4035
1.5581
6.3304
2.991
3.19
30.9713'
1.4488
8.0225
1246.40
7.6570
1.0793
32.78
34.09
1.5315
3.6725
23.1696
2.1473


British pound, expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate - 0.50 0.50
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.16 0.19
6-month 0.29 0.345'
5-year 2.71 2.92
10-year 3.71 3.88
30-year 4.55 4,63


^ FUTURES

Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweat Crude NYMX Jul09 70.62 ,-1.42
Corn Mg: OBOT Ju09 406 -192
Wheat CBOT Jul09 "5751/4 -9112
Soybeans CBOT Jul09 1197 -481/
Cattle CME Aug09 80.82 -.78
Pork Bellies CME Ju09 58.90 +.45
Sugar (world) NYBT Jul09 14.86 -.34
Orange Juice NYBT Jul09 78.15 -4.35

SPOT
Yesterday Prs Day
Gold tiroyoz. spoL) $92690 $951.70
Silver tr[O: s 1,poI) 14UU 14
Coppeoi pournidl N. 215 - .t'7217'
Platinum (troyoz., spot1213l.7U $1244.uu
NMER = New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT =
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-,
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


Argent
Australia
Bahrain
Brazil
Britain
Canada.
Chile
China
Colombia
Czech Rep
Denmark
Dominican Rep
Egypt
Euro
Hong Kong
Hungary
India
Indnsia
Israel
Japan
Jordan
Lebanon
Malaysia
Mexico
N. Zealand
Norway
Peru
Poland
Russia
Singapore
So. Africa
So. Korea
Sweden
Switzerlnd
Taiwan
Thailand
Turkey
U.A.E.
Uruguay
Venzuel


3.7630
1.2619
S.3770
1t9533
1.6292
1.1337
565.00
6.8373
2014.50
19.49
5.4025
36.00
5.6094
.7253
7.7505
204.62
47.610
10115.00
3.9510
97.65
.708Ej
1501.50
3.5286
13.4065
1.5879
6.4648
2.994
3.29
31.2881
1.4604
8.1090
1257.40
7:8740
1.0928
32.96
34.14
1.5519
3.6725
23.1696
2.1460


CIRus CouNTY (FL) CMHRONIC


DIARY


Aaanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
- New Highs
New Lows
Volume


I


A









..........N.. I U........IES USAY UN 6,20


Name NAV Chg
*'AIM Investments A:
ChartAp 12.81
.Constp 17.53
HYdAp 3.49
!IntIfGrow 20.99
k SelEqty r 13.46
AIM Investments B:
"CapDvB t 9.82
'AIM Investor Cl:
t Energy 32.02
Utilities 13.18
Advance Capital I:
Balancp 12.29 -.19
r RetInc 7.71 +.02
,Alger Funds B:
SmCapGrt 4.27 -.11
fAlllanceBern A:
,BalanAp 11.94 -.18
GIbThGrAp 53.36 -1.98
*IntValAp 11.02 -.44
' nSmCpGrA 19.65 -.44
SAlllanceBern Adv:
LgCpGrAd 18.24 -.43
AllanceBern B:
PGIbThGrBt 46.68 -1.74
, GrowthBt 17.38 -.38
SSCpGrBt 16.02 -.36
AllIanceBern C:
SCpGrCt 16.10 -.36
Alllanz Instll MMS:
cNFJDvVI 8.91 -.22
SmCpVl 20.33 -.50
Allanz Funds A:
NFJDvVIt 8.82 -.22
SmCpVA 19.45 -.47
Allianz Funds C:
GrowthCt 17.35 -.38
TargetC t 9.41 -27
Amer Beacon Instl:
LgCaplnst 14.15 -.37
Amer Beacon Inv:
LgCap inv 13.47 -.35
SAmer Century Adv: "
EqGroAp 15.37 -.39
-Amer Century Inv:
Balanced 12.57 -.19
Eqlnc 5.82 -.10
Growthl 18.20 -.40
Hertagel 13.09 -.36
n IncGro 18.21 -.45
IlntDIsc 6.99 -.28
4r IntlGrol 7.98 -26
" NewOpp 4.64 -.18
OneChAg 9.00 -.19
'OneChMd 9.14 -.16
SrRealEstl 10.22 -.56
S Ultra * 15.87 -.36
Valuelnv 4.32 -.10
SVista 11.43 -.32
American Funds A: :
AmcpAp 13.64 -.29
'AMutlAp 19.64 -.40
;BalAp 14.09 -.21
BondAp. 11.11 +.03-
'CapWAp 18.90 -.07
CaplBAp 42.05 -.79
,CapWGAp 28.06 -.90.
EupacAp 31.39 -1.13
FdlnvAp 27.26 -.80
GovtAp 13.87 +.05
GwthA p 23.06 -.55
HITrAp 9.22 +.01
HilnMunA 12.54
IncoAp 13.24 -.21
�' InlBdAp 12.81 +.03
ICAAr, 21.75 -.49
uTEBAp 14.79 1.
NEcoAp 18.41 -.48
NPerAp 20.65 -64
NwWddA 38.62 -95,
STBAp 9.90 +.01
SmCpAp 24.88 -.61
TxExAp 11.44
WshAp 20.89 -.52
American Funds B:
BalBt 14.05 -:21
SCapBB t 42.01 -.78
-CpWGrBt 27.88 -.89
GnrMhBt 22.30 -.53
SIncoBt 13.13 -,20
ICABt 21.67 -.49
Ariel Investments: :
Apprec 25.10 -.67
Adel 27.00 -.76
'Artio Global Funds:
IntEqIlr 25.45 -.86
"IniiEqA 24.86 -.85
IntiaiA1 10.24 -.36
inLEq ilr 10.30 -.36
*Artisan Funds:
.Int 16.49 -.54
F MidCap 21.00 -.55
SMidCapVal 14.46 -.33
"LSCapVal 11.31 -.31
Baron Funds:
Asset 37.65 -.95
Growth 33.92 -77
SmCap 15.60 -.36
rBernstein Fds:
IntDur 12.32 +.03
.DivMu 14.02
NYMu 13.78. +.01
TxMgdlntl 12.50 -.54
IntlPort 12.45 -.54
EmMkts 21.50 -.74
�BlackRock A:
AuroraA 12.65 -.32
CapDevAp 12.30 -.30
EtryD; 13: 40 -33
GIAPAr inq; - :"
r.Yln,.A ' 6 'it . '

BlackRock B&C:
GIAICt 14.85 -.24
SBlackRock Instl:
BaVil 19.07 -.52
GIbAleocr 15.96 -.27
Brandywine Fds:
BlueFdn 18.80 -.40

HiYlIYn 5.31
Buffalo Funds:
.m.Cia 19.22 -27
CGM Funds:
I Focus n 25.84 -.68
. Mui,', 22.02 -.28
R-ulay.n 14.83 -.74
CRM Funds:
I MdCpViI 20.52 -.52
SCalamos Funds:
j Gr&lncAp 24.39 -.49
GrwthAp 35.80 -.84
GrowthCt 32.95 -.77
Calvert Group:
* Incop 14.38 +.04
ntEqAp 11.67 -.38
Munlnt 10.25
SoalAt p 21.73 -.25
SocBd p 14.45 +.03
TxF U 9.43
TxFLgp 15.38
TxFVT 15.30 +.01
Cohen & Steers:
RltyShrs 32.94 -1.78
Columbia Class A:
Acorn t 18.87 -.50
21CntryAt 9.19 -.24
MarsGrAt 14.13 -.33
Columbia Class Z:
- Acorn Z 19.43 -.51
AcommntZ 27.15 -.64
. lntBAZ 8.17 +.03
SIntTEBd 9.91
I LgCprdxZ 17495 -.44

bValRestr 33.96 -1.19
IntiCorEqn 8.34 -.30
USCorEql n 7.59 -.19
USCorEq2n 7.45 -.20
DWS Invest A:
SCommAp 12.21 -.43
*DrHiRA 24.75 -.61
MgdMunip 8.52 -.01
StirGovSecA 8.50 +.04
DWS InvestS:
CorPslInc 9.82 +.02
EmMkln 9.40 -.01
EmMkGrr 13.37 -.45
EuroEq 18.65 -.82
GNMAS 14.94 +.07
GIbBdS r 9.72 -.02
GIbOpp 25.60 -.66
GIbIThem 17.01 -.48
' Gold&Prc 15.86 -.56
_ GrolncS 11.71 -.30
'HiYldTx 11.04 -.01
I lntTxAMT 10.96
I .Inti FdS 37.45 -1.50

MgdMuni S 8.53 -.01
MATFS 13.7.1 -.01
j SPSoS 12.31 -.30
Davis Funds A:
NYVenA 25.19 -.59
Davis Funds B:
NYVenB 24.16 -.56
Davis Funds C &Y:


- NYVenY 25.47 -.59
-NYVenC 24.32 -.57
p.Delaware Invest A:
IDiver lncp 8.49 +.01
I TrendAp 10.68 -.32
' TxUSAp 10.49
SDelaware Invest B:
I ,SelGrBt 18.05 -.47
' Dlmenslonal Fds:
-' EmMCrEqn13.75 -.51
'EmMktV 23.73 -1.00
IlntSmVan 12.54 -.35
TUSLgCon 27.21 -.67
j USLgVan 13.74 -.42
USMicron 8.63 -.26
SUSSmall n13.17 -.38
SUSSmVa 15.31 -.48
IntlSmCon 11383 -.27
iErgMktn 21.29 -.66
Fixdn 10.28
IntVan 13.8, -.60
Glb5Fxlnc n 10.94 +.02
,2YGIFxd n 10.20
�'1.DFARIEn 12.18 -:6
' Dodge&Cox:
1,,Balanced 54.16 -1.10
'I .Income 12.46 +,04
I InlfStk 25,56 -.93
Stock 77.64 -2.28


Pharn n 8,53 -.25 HIt 4.51 +.01
Retail n 35.42 -.51 John Hancock A:
Softwrn, 57.14 -.78 BondAp 13.07 +.04
Techn .55.37 -1.34 RgBkA 11.85 -.30
Telcm n 34.32 -.74 StdrnAp 5.69
Trans n 29.03 -129 John Hancock B:
UtiGron 38.80 -.93 StrlncB 5.69 -.01
Wireless n 6.08 -.15 JohnHancock Cl 1:
Fidelity Spartan: LSAggr 8.82 -.26
Eqldxonvn 32.83 -.80 LSBalanc 10.20 -.16
ExtMkInn 24.63 -.64 LSConsrv 11.13 -.05
500lnxlnvrn63.87 -1.55 LSGrwth 9.69 -.21
Intllnxlnvn 27.98 -1.00 LSModer 10.43 -.10
TotMktlnvn 26,15 -.64 Keeley Funds:
Fidelity Spart Adv; SmCpVaA p 16.47 -.56
EqldxAdn 32.83 -.80 Lazard Instil:
IntAdrn 27.98 -1.00 EmgMktl 14.19 -.31
50oAdrn 63.87 -1.55 LazardOpen:
TotMktAdrn26.15 -.64 EmgMkOp 14.39 -.31
First Eagle: Legg Mason: Fd
GIbIA 34.74 -.62 SplnvCp 19.18 -'.56
OverseasA 17.39 -.25 VatTrCp 29.18 -.76
First Investors A Legg Mason Ptrs A:
BIChpAp 16.47 -.36 AgGrAp 74.13 -2.02
GloblAp 4.92 -.15 ApprAp 10.62 -.22
GovtAp 11.02 +.04 HilncAt 4.91
GrolnAp 10.42 -.24' InAICGAp .6.51 -.28
IncoAp 2.19 +.01 LgCpGAp 18.35 -.38


igest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq Talies snoi
ue (NAV) ana aaiy net cnenge.
il fund and family.

ieof NAV. "
reported to Upper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


11


CapAppn 15.82 -.21
DWGron 17.38 -.39
EmEurp 12.30 -.41
EmMktS n 23.00 -.69
Eqlncon 17.31 -.46
Eqlndex n 24.97 -.61
Europe n 11.69 -.45
GNMA n 9.59 +.03
Growth n 22.05 -.49
Gr&lnn 14.83 -.34
HIthScin 20.44 -.51
HiYield n 5.64 -.01
IntlBond n 9.21 -.04
InlDis n 29.92 -.57
Ini G&I 1027 -. 38


w the fund name sell


Name NAV Chg
Dreyfus:
Aprec 28.52 -.67 Hera are the 1.000 big
CorVA 18.49 -.49 price or Net Asset Val
Dreyf 6.34 -.16
Drso01nt 26.10 -.64 Name: Name of mutu
EmgLd 13.31 -.40 NAV: Net asset value.
GrChinaA r 35.42 -.92
HiGdArp 5.89 Chg: Net change in pd
LgCStkA p 16.81 -.43 Data based on NAVs
MunBd r 10.67
StratValA 20.95 -.58 Name NAV Chg
TechGroA 19.82 -.41
Driehaus Funds: MATFAp 11.23
EMklGr 22.30 -.67 MITFAp 11.62
Eaton Vance CIA: NJTFAp 12.45
ChinaAp 18.19 -.54 NYTFAp, 13.80
AMTFMBI 8.86 -.01 OppAp 17.93-.41
MultiCGrA 5.78 -.15 PATFAp 12.59
InBosA 4.86 SpSlAp 15.93 -.38
LgCpVal 1.92 -.34 TxExA P 9.46
NatIMun 8.71 ToIFIAp 12.09 -.14
SpEqtA 10.23 -.25 ValueBp 5.35 -.13
TradGvA 7.41 +.01 Firsthand Funds:
Eaton Vance CI B: Tech Val 25.55 -.37
HthSB t 8.22. -.20 Frank/Temp Frnk A:
NaiMBIt 8.71 AdjUSp 8.95
Eaton Vance Cl C: ALTFAp 10.70 +.01
GovtCp 7.40 +.01 AZTFAp 10.34 +.01
NatfMCt 8.71 Ballnvp 34.80 -.95
Evergreen A: CallnsAp 11.50 +.02
AstAlp 10.02. -16 CAIntAp 10.88 +.01-
Evergreen C: CalfFAp 6.55 +.01
AstAICt 9.71 -.15 COTFAp 11.07 +.01
Evergreen : CTTFAp 10.37
SiMunit 9.57 -.01 CtScApx 10.84 -.26
FBR Funds: DblTFA 10.81 -.02
Focuslnv 34.32 -.52 DynTchA 19.98 -.47
FMI Funds: EqlncApx 12.56 -.31
LgCappn 11.72 -.26 FedntFAp 110.920 +.01
FPAFunds: FedTFAp 11.20 +.02
Nwlnc 11.02 +.01 FLTFAp 11.01 t+.1
FPACresn 22.23 -.17 FoundAlp 8.41 -.16
Fairhome 24.75 .78 GATFAp 11.40 +.02
F oe 24.75 -.78 GodPrMA 31.66 -1.29
FederatedA: GrwthAp 31.13 -.79
AmldrAx 10.56 -29 HYTFAp 9.16 +.01
MidGrStA 25.19 -.61 HiIncA 1.71
KautmAp 3.81 -.07 ncornmAp 1.80 -.01
MuSedA 9.52 Ins'TFAp 11.34 +.01
Federated Insti: NYITF p 10.60 +.01
KauTonK a81 -.08 LATFAp 10.67 +.01
TotRetBd 10.38 +.b4 LMGvScA 10.37 +.02
Fidelity Adv FocT: MDTFAp 10.65 +.01
EnergyT 26.91 -.91 MATFAp 11.01 +.01
HItCarT 14.99 -.41 MITFAp 11.55 +.01
Fidelity Advisor A: MNInsA 11.85 +.01
DMnlAr 12.34 -.47 MOTFAp 11.44 +.01
Nwlnsghp 14.12 -.27 NJTFAp 11.43
StrinA 11.01 .. NYlnsAp 10.52 +.01
Fidelity Advisori : NYTFAp 11.20 +.02
Divlnifn 12.53 -.47 NCTFAp 11.61 +.01
EqGrIn 38.08 -.83 OhiolAp 12.13 +.01
EqIlnn 17.56 -.49 ORTFAp 11.33 +.01
IntBdIn 10.04 +.02 PATFAp 9.80 +.01
Nwlnsgtln 14.25 -.27 ReEScApx 7.73 -.46
Fidelity Advisor T: RisDvAp 23.77 -.55
BalancT 11.67 -.17 SMCpGrA 23.40 -.56
DivGrTp 8.11 -.25 Stratlncp 9.13 +.02.
DynCATp 12.60 -.39 USGovAp 6.58 +.02
EqGrTp 35.81 -.78 UtlsAp 10.01 -.18
EqInT 17.29 -.49 VATFAp 11.13
GrOppT 22.33 -.56 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
HilnAdTp 7.45 -.03 GIbBdAdvp
IntBdT 10.02 +.02 IncmrneAd 1.79 -.01
MulncTp 12.10 +.01 Frank/Temp FrnkB:
OviseaT 13.92 -.52 IncomeBt 1.80 -.01
STFiT . 8.78 +.01 Frank/Temp Fmk C:
Fidelity Freedom: FoundAlp 8.28 -.16
FF2000n 10.55 -.05 IncornCt 1.82 -.01
FF2010n 11.10 -.15 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
FF2015n 9.20 -.13 BeacnA 9.59 -.18
FF2020n 10.86 -.19 DiscA 23.91 -.26
FF2025n 8.92 -.17 QualfdAt 15.14 -.18
FF2030n 10.52 -.23 SharesA 15.98 -.32
FF2035n 8.66 -20 Frank/Temp Mti C:
FF2040n . 6.03 -.14 DiscCt 23.69 -.26.
Income 9.99 -.05 FrankfTempTempA:
Fidelityinvest: DvMktAp 17.02 -,47
AggrGrrn 13.26 -.36 ForgnAp 5.24 -.19
AlISectEq 9.91 -.26 GIBdApx 11.75 -.06
AMgr50n 12.09 -.16 GrwthAp 13.64 -.41
AMgr7Orn 12.14 -25 WorIdAp 11.42 -.32
AMgr2Orn 11.02 -.04 FrankrrempTmpAdv:
Balancn 14.15 -.21 GrthAv 13.65 -41
BlueChGrn 29.34 -.70 Frank/TempTmp B&C:
CAMunn 11.32 +.01 DevMktC 16.61 -.47
Canadan 42.7 -1.53 ForgnC p 5.13 -.18
CapApn 17.26-.53 GBdCpx 11.77 -.05
CapDevOn 7.31 -.19 GE Elfun S&S:
Cpnc rn 7.02 -.01 S&S Inc 10.36 +.04
ChinaRgr 22.41 -.86 S&SPM 31.33 -.74
CngSn .363.09 -6.65 TaxEx 11.22 +-01
CTMunrn 11.05 +.01 TGEnstlFunds:
Contra n 47.68 -.94 ntE 9.47 Funds:
CnvScn 18.24 -.34 nIEq 9.47 -.27
DisEqn 1'7.56 -.39 GMOkTrust I: 33
DivIntl n 23.25 -.85 EmMkr 9.59 -.33
DivStkOn 10.19 -.27 For 10.17 -.37
DivGthn 18.69 -.57' IntlntrVI 1826 -.60
EmrMkn 17.19 -.58 Quality 16.34 -.36
Eq Inon 32.32 -93 GMOTrust IV:.
EQIln 13.59 -38 EmrMkt 9.54 -.34
ECapAp 14.67 -860 IniCorEq 23.68 -.78
Europe 24.37 -1.02 In/UGrEq 17.42 -.48
Exchn 248.34 -4.20 IntllntrVI 18.25 -.60
Exportn 16.01 -.41 GMOTrustVI:
Fideln 24.18 -.60 EmgMktsr 9.55' -.33
Fiftyrn 12.60 -.44 Quality 16.35 -.35
FItRateHirn 8.94 +.01 StrFxInc 15.62 +.03
FrrnOnen ?074 -.46 Gabelll Funds:.,.
GMUArI, i_". +.04 Asset 32.85 -.88
ao.tlr.c - 1u ci +o.03 .Gateway Fundie,
' �.7r'-" 7 -1:25" GatewayA 23.87 - "0
Grolncn I;3 -.31 Goldman Sachs A:
Highincrn - ... HiYieldA 6.09 +.01
Indepnn 1-" -.47 MdCVAp 23.38 -.59
InProBd n 10.83 +.01 Goldman Sachs Inst:
IntBdn 9.61 +.02 HiYield 6.10 +.01
IntGovn 10.70 +.03 MidCapV 23,56 -.60
IntmMusn 9.87 +.01 Harbor Funds:
IntlDiscn 25.08 -.94 Bond, 11.86 +.04
IntlSOprn 14.69 -.34 CapAp/lnst 26.68 -.55
InvGrBd 10.87 +.03 Intllnvt 43.01 -1.64
InvGBn 6.60 +.02 Intlr 43.41 -1.66
Japan n 9.81' -.31 Hartford Fds A:
JpnSmn 7.78- .T - CpfAppAp 24.90 --"'
LgCapVaIn 9.80 -.26 DivGthAp 14.42 -.36
LCpVI r n 8.14 -.22 Hrtford Fds C:
LatArnn 39.13 -1.31 CapApCt 22.39 -.71
LevCoStkn 17.95 -.53 Hartford Fds L:
LowPrn 25.82 -.59 GrwOppL 18.83 -.42
Magelln n 53.39 -1.39 Hartford HLS IA:
MDMurn 10.51 +.01 CapApp 29.50 -.93
MAMunn 11.34 +-01 Div&Gr 14.82 -.38
MegaCpStkn7.25 -.18 Advisers 15.02 -.24
MIMunn 11.49 +.01 Stock 2921 -.76
MidCapn 18.00 -.56 TotRetBd 10.14 +.03
MNlMunn 11.10 +01 Henderson GIbl Fds:
MtgSecn 10.17 +.04 IntOppAp 17.67 -.57
Munllncn 11.96 +.01 Hennessy Funds:
NJMunrn 11.04 +.01 CorGrllOdg 10.80 -.36
NwMktrn 13.64 -.01 SelLgVOrg 16.96 -.42
NwMilln 19.78 -.57 HussmnStrGr 13.00 +.08
NYMunn 12.35 +.01 ICON Fds:
OTC n 35-97 -.88 Energy 15.82 -.59
OhMunn 11.22 +.01 Hftcare 10.37 -.29
100Ilndex 6.72 -.15 IS] Funds:
Ovrsean 26.59 -1.04 NoAmrnp 7.46 +.01
"PcBasn 17.10 -.43 Ivy Funds:
PAMunrn 10.46 +.01 AssetSCt 19.01 -.46
Purifnn 13.96 -.19 AssetStAp 19.45 -.47
RealEn *13.44 -.80 AssetStrlr 19.58 -.47
StIlntMu n 10.44 : GINatRsAp 15.75 -.58
STBFn 8.06 +01 JPMorgsnACass:
iSmCaplndr 1.39 -.36 CoreBdA 10.83 +05
SmliCpSrn 12.07 -.31 MCpVutp 15.55 -.40
Stia S n 1.4 -. JPMorgan Select:
S I n 1 40 4 n --.4 1
;SrReRg r n 7. -7.5 0 JPMorgsn Sel Cls:
S Core Bd 10.82 +.04
TotalBd n 9.85 +`02 H-iY/dn 6.85
Trendn 44.64 -1.09 IlntroTFBdn 10.62' ""
USnin 10'76 5 W dd`0 10.62
SBnsn 1743 . IntrtAmern 16.63 -.42
Utlityn 12.43 -.23 ShtDurBdn 10.72 ,+.01
Va/Stratn 16.77 -.53 TxAwRRetn 9.64 -.01
Value n 44.19 -1.39 USLCCrPIsn14.73 -.36
Wddw n 12.29 -45
Airn 22.01 -.75 Ba/anced 21.40 -28
Banking n 12.88 -.37 Contrurian 1092 -.35
Blotch n 57.52 -1.36 Entlerpr 37.72 -1.0
Chem n 59.53 -1.71 Fiond en. .0
ComFquipn6.71 -8 Funda 21.12 -.50
Comp n .14 -.5 G lfeSi 17.45 -.45
ConDispn 14.89 -128 GiTecr 11.17 -.27
CstHon 24.11 -.66 Oro 7.78 -.20
Eler"n 30.36 -1 50 Orseusr 34.82 -1.32
Enrtgn 36.30 130 PrkMCVInv 16.59 -.40
Enrgyn 51.44-1730 Research 19.81 -.56
Envirn 13.35 -31 STTmd 25.9 91
RnSvn 49.95 -1:93 Twenty 51.19 -1.26
Golden 35.65 -120 Venlur 34.12 -81
Heuh n 53.95-2`2' WddWr 34.20 -.86
HomF n 9.17 -.21 Janus Adv S Shra
Insur n 31.43 - Forty 26.01 -.82
Leasr n 55.79 -1.26 JennlsonOryden A;
Materiain 40.82 -1,40 BlendA 12.17 -.31
MedDIn 30.82 -.77 HightncA 8.69
Mstmndn 24.94 -71 U -18
NIGas n 28.54 -.96 JennlsonDryden B:
Paoern 19.93 -70 r"hB 1!.70/ -24


Name NAV Chg
MgMuAp 14.93 +.02
Legg Mason Ptrs B:
LgCpGBt 16.82 -.35
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 19.59 -.58
Intl . 11.92 -.36
SmCap 16.58 -.51
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 11.77 +.01
Str/ncC 12.14
LSBondR 11.73 +.01
StrincA 12.09
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 10.60 +.02
/nvGrBdCp 10.53 +.02
InvGrBdY 10.60 +.02
Lord Abbett A: ,
AffilAp 8.51 -.22
AIIVaIA -9.04 -.27-
BdDebAp 6.52 -.01
MidCpAp 10.61 - -29
MFS Funds A:
M[TA 14.38 - '
MIGA 10.77 - �
HilnA 2.81
MFLA 9.09 +.01
TotRA 11.69 -.14
UtlA 12.52 -.32
ValueA 17.76 -.41
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 9.72 -.22
GvScBn 9.88 +.03
HilnBn 2.82
MulnB n 7.89 +.01
ToIR Bn 11.68 -.15'
MFS Funds Instt:
InltEqn 12.93 -.48
MaInStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.12 +.01
MainStay Funds B:
CapApBt 2022 -.44:
ConvBt 11.82 -.18
GovtBt 8.50 +.04
HYIdBBt 5.10 +.01
IntlEqB 9.87 -.22
SmCGBp 929 -.22
TotRtBt 12.90 -.13
MaIlrs & Power:
Growth 52.88 -1.43
Managers Funds:
Bondn 21.87 +.11
Mannlng&Napler Fds:
WidOppA 6.48 -.21
Marsico Funds:
Focus p 12.51 -.28
Matthews Asian:
AsianG&l 13.53 -23
India r 12.47 -.33
PacTiger 15.23 -.39
MergerFd 14.94 -02
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 9.07 *
TdtRtBdl 9.07. .
Midas Funds:
M.1 isF- ' ,"6 - Il
Monena Funds:
r.orrn.ai', rl"*3 - 3"
Morgan Stanley A:.
DivGthA 11.59 -.29
Morgan Stanley B:
DivGtB 11.69 -.29
GIbDivB 8.35 -.22
yi 6 15 64
MoiganStanley Inst:
Er.T.M.I ,, I -53
IntlEqIn 11.22 --.32
MCapGrln 2227 -.64
Munder Funds A:
InterftA 17.42. -.37
Munder Funds Y:-
MCpCGrYrn18.49 -.39
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 9.70 -.18
DiscZ 24.21. -.26
QualfdZ 15.26 -.18
SharesZ 16.11, -.32
Neuberger&Berm Inv:
Focus 14.76 -.36
Genesinst 31.56 -.85
Inllr 12.05 -.33
Partner 19.07 -.61
Neuberger&BermTr:
Genesis 32.85 -.88
Nicholas Group;
HilncIn 8.42 -.03
Nichin 33.55 -.64
Northern Funds:
HiYFxInc 6.41
SmCpldx 5.62 -.16
Technly 9.71 -.21
Nuveen CI A:
LtMBAp 10.55
Nuveen Ci R:
IntDMBd 8.55
Oak Assoc Fds:,
in,,l", oG ,'C," .).i -
Oaimark Funds I:
E.r l.-.'.:r ' 8 -
i l 1' I 1 4l - 1
C.k,' rr. l, : 7. "! -j .
Select r 18.61 -.41
Old Mutual Adv II:
Tc&ComZ 11.90 -27
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 629 -.04
GlbSMdCap 10.86 -.21
'konnpLqC p'75' -.21
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 5.62 +.01
AMTFNY 9.71 +.01
CANAr I. f li4 +.01
C.ap pAp K32 -.71
CapIncAp 6.96 -.05
ChmplncAp '67 * ir
DvMktAp -'95 -56
Discp : 35.36 -.77
EquityA 6.58 -.15
GlobABp 42.45 -1.45
GIbOppA 20.72 -.71
Gold p 26.53 -121
IntBdAp 5.94 -.04
MnStFdA 24.02 -.59
'MSSCAp 13,.5 -.43
MidCapA 10.74 -.22
PAMun/Ap 9.26 +.01
"StrlnAp '3 .e
USGvp 10-3 +.04,
Oppenheimer B: ,
AMTFMu 5.59
AMTFrNY 9.71
CplncBt 6.85 -.04
ChmpIncBt 1.67
EquityB 6.11 -.15
StrncB t 3.57 -.01
Oppenheimer C&M:
IntlBdC 5.92 -.04
Oppenheimer Roch:
LdNYA p 3.06
RoMuAp 13.92 +.01
RcNtMuA 6.13
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.63 +.01
TotRtAd 10.39 ,+.04
PIMCO Insti PIMS:
AIIAsset 10.85 -.03
ComodRR 7.44 -.15
DIvlInc 9.42 +.02
EmMkBd 9.34 +.02
FrgnBd 9.45 +,05
HiYId 7.63 -.01
InvGrCp 10.34 +.05
LowDu 9.81 +.02
ModDur 10.12 +.03
RealRet 10.04 +`01
RealRtnl 10.19 +.01
ShortT 9.63 +.01
TotRt 10.39 +.04
TRII 10.10 +`04
TRIll 9.08 +.04
PIMCO Funds A:
LwDurA 9.81 +.02
ReasRtAp 10.19 +.01
TotRtA 10.39 +.04
PIMCO Funds C:
RealRtCp 10.19 +.01
TotRtC t 10.39 +.04
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 10.39 +.04
Parnaesus Funds:
Eqtylnoon 20.01 -.44
Pax World:
Balanced 18.15 -.28
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 34.08 -.64.
Pioneer Funds A:
CullenVal 14.16 -.35
BondA p 8.56 +.02
In/lValA 16.28 -.51
MdCpGrA 10.23 -.27
PionFdAp 29.67 -.83
TxFreA p 9.35
ValueA p 8.95 -.22
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYIIBt 7.60 -.05
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYdC t 7.68 -.05
Price Funds Adv:
Eqlnc 17.27 -.45
Growthpn 21.90 -.49
Price Funds:
Balancen 15.22 -.24
BIChip n 26.72 -.58
CABondn 10.17


Stocks drop sharply.


Associated Press

NEW YORK - Bad eco-
nomic news and doubts
about the market's ability to
rally dealt stocks a huge set-
back
The Dow Jones industri-
als fell 187 points Monday,
their biggest drop since
April 20. All the major mar-
ket indexes fell more than 2
percent.
Trading volume was light,
suggesting an absence of
buyers rather than a flood of
sellers rushing to dump
stocks, but the pullback
nonetheless was another
sign that the market's spring
rally has stalled.
The slide began in Asia
and Europe and spread to
the U.S. as a strong dollar
pushed commodities prices
sharply lower. Stocks of en-
ergy and materials producers
have been lifting the market
in the past month so the drop
in prices left stocks without
an important leg of support.
The Dow fell 187.13, or 2.1
percent, to 8,612.13, and re-
turned to a loss for the year.
The broader Standard &
Poor's 500 index tell 22.49,
or 2.4 percent, to 923.72. and


Market watch
June 15. 2009

Dow Jones
Industrials 8,612.13

Nasdaq '
composite 1,816.38

Standard & -. ...
Poor's 500 923.72

Russell *
2000
2000 511.83

NYSE diary
Advanced: 457
Declined: 2,601
Unchanged: . 72
Volume: . 4.7 b
Nasdaq diary
AcfVanced: 440
Declined: 1,897
Unchanged: 75
Volume: 2.08 b

EOuL'AC: Su.Ga.-' AP

the Nasdaq composite
index fell 42.42, or 2.3 per-
cent, to 1.816.38. Both in-
dexes still are showing a
gain for2009..
Overseas trading was in-
fluenced by the dollar,
which rose against most
other major currencies fol-


lowing weekend comments
from Russia's finance min-
ister, Alexei Kudrin, that the
greenback likely would re-
main the world's reserve
currency.
Investors have been wor-
ried in recent weeks that
foreign governments would
seek to spread their reserve
cash holdings beyond the
dollar. That would cut into
demand for the currency.
Commodities including
oil tend to be a hedge
against a weak dollar. So,
when the greenback is
stronger, investors feel less
need to protect themselves
against it and they start sell-
ing commodities. That in
turn tends to pull down the
stocks of basic materials
producers who profit from
higher prices.
In corporate news, Gold-
man Sachs lowered its rat-
ing on Walmart Stores Inc.
to "Neutral" from "Buy,"
seeing few catalysts ,that
could push the stock higher.
The retailer fell $1.38, or 2.8
percent, to $48.46.
In other trading, the Rus-
sell 2000 index oftsmaller
companies fell 15.00, or 2.9
percent, to 511.83


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
IntlStk n 10.14 -.33 S&Pldx 13.90 -.33
Japan n 6.49 -.05 ScTech 8.51 -.19
LatAmn 33.78 -1.19 ShtTBnd 8.74 +.02
MDShrtn 5.23 . SmCpStk 8.58 -.22
MDBond n 9.88 +.01 TxElt 12.14
MidCapn 38.29 -.98 TxELT 12.02
MCapValn 1P.26 -.45 TxESh 10.40
NAmern 23.01 -.56 VABd 10.37
NAsian 12.45 -.27 WidGr 13.30 -.42
New Era n 37.26 -1.39 VAUC:
NeHw rzn 20.31 -.46 MdCpldx 13.48 -.36
NIncn 8.89 +.03 StkIdx 19.18 -.47
NYBond n 10.57 ... Value Line Fd:
OverS SF rn 6.36 -.22 LrgCon 12.97 -.26
PSIncn 13.14 -.14 Van Kamp Funds A:
RealEstn. 9.87 -.50 CATFAp 15.63
R2010n 12.25 -.18 .CapGro � 8.79 -.21
R2015n 9.16 -.16 CrstAp 10.99 -.29
-R2020n -12.36- -24- CpBdAp 5.99 ".03
R2025n 8.88 -.19 EqlncAp 6.55 -.12
.RnfWr, 12.53 -.29 Exch 345.98 -9.06
R2Ot/r, 8.76 -.22 GrInAp 13.94 -.38
Ac:.,-, 12.47 -.30 HarbAp 12.69 -.16
.51-:r. 17.70 -.27 HiY[dA 8.51 ...
i. r,..n 4.73 ... HYMuAp 8.26
SrmCpStkn 21.37 -.52 InTFAp 15.41
SmCapValn24.38 -.63 MunlAp 12.04
SpecGrn 12.43 -.32 PATFAp 14.63
Specinn 10.86 -.04 StrMunlhc 9.29
TFIncn 9.34 .. USMtgeA 12.40 +.04
TxFrHn 9.58 ... UtiLAp 15.70 -.30
TxFrSt n 5.43 Van Kamp Funds B:
USTIntn 5.81 +.02 EnterpBt 10.21 -.25
USTLIgn 11.81 +.09 EqlncBt 6.42 -.12
VABondn 1.04 ... HYMuBt 8.28
Valuen 16.66 -.42 MulB 12,02
Principal Inv: StrMunlnc 9.28
BdMtgIn 8.73 +.03 USMtge 12.34 +.05
DiscLCInst 9.41 -.22 UtilB 15.63 -.31
LgCV3 In 7.73 -.19 Vanguard Admiral:
LT2030ln 8.61 -.19 BalAdmIn 17.12 -.23
LT2020ln 8.67 -.16 CAITAdm n 10.44
Putnam Funds A: CALTAdm nlO.52 .
AmGvAp 9.34 +.02 CpOpAdln 55.61 -1.22
AZTE 8.55 ... EMAdmrrn26.46 -.93
CATxAp 7.21 ... Energyn 101.57 -3.27
Convp 14.58 -.16 ExplAdmln 43.19 -1.05
Dvr/nAp 6.73 ... ExtdAdmn 26.33 -.75
EqlnAp 11.42 -.26 500AdmIn 85.53 -2.07
EuEq 15.01 -.62 GNMAAdn 10.57 +.03
GeoAp 9.65 -.13 HithCrn 41.50 -1.07
GIbEqtyp 6.88 -.20 HIYIdCpn 4:97 +.01
GrinAp 9.83 -.24 InlProAdn 23.57 +,01
GIblHIHhA 38.39 -1.02 fTBdAdmln 10.30 +.05
HiYdAp 6.39 +.01 ITsryAdmln11.34 +.04
HIYIdn 5.04 ... IntGrAdmn 44.09 -1.65
IncmAp 5.72 +.03 ITAdmIn 12.99
IntGrlnp 7.62 -.29 ITGrAdmrn 8.96 +.04
InvAp 9.29 -.23 LtdTrAdn 103 . ..
NJTxA p 8.80 ... LTGrAdmln .826 +.08
NwOpAp 35.12 -.78 LTAdmIn 10.49
PATE 8.62 +.01 .MCpAdmi n 58.53 -1.71
TxExAp .7.96 +.01 MorgAdm n 38.85 -.87
TFInAp 14.10 ... MuHYAdmn9.69
TFHYA 10.30 ... NYLTAdn 10.55
USGvAp 13.66 +.05 PrmCaprn 49.96 -1.29
GIblUiA. 9.94 -.26 PALTAdmn 10.58
VstaAp 7.13 -.27 ,T!.,A.i1ri..I1 +.01
VoyAp 15.26 -J)i E.a ,i.,Th2i;] +.02
Putnam Funds B: ShtTrAd n 15.83
DvrinBt 6.68 ... STFdAdn 10.82 +.02
Eqinct 11.30 -.26 STIGrAdn 10.18 +.02
EuEq 14.37 -.60 SmCAdm n 22.00 -.64
GeoBt 9.55---.13 TxMCaprn 45.48 -1:10-
GIbEqt 6.22 -.18 TtIBAdmIn 10.09 +.03
GINIRst 14.45 -.55 TStkAdrn 22.71 -.56
GrInBt ' 9.66 -.24' WellslAdm n44.48 -.38
GIblHithB 32.40 -.86 WellinAdmn43.75 -.67
HiYIdBt 6.37 +.01 Windsorn 32.86 -.85
HYAdBt 4.96 ... WdsrilAd n 34.64 -.84
IncmB 5.68 +.03 Vanguard Fds:
IntGdrnt 7.54 -.29 AssetAn 18.71 -.34
IntlNopt 11.06 -.36 CALTn 10.52
InvBt 8.36 -.21 CapOppn 24,07 -'.53
NJTxBt 8.79 ... Convrt . 10.85 -.13
NwOpBt 30.69 -.68 DiidGron 11.36 -27
TxExBt 7.96 +.01 Energyn 54.09 -1.74
TFHYBt 10.31 -.01 EqIncn 15.29 -.38
USGyBt 13.59 +.05 Expirn 46.41 -1.12
GIbIUtilB 9.89 -.25 FLLTn 10.81
VistaBt 1 6.05 -.23 GNMAn 10.57 +.03
VoyBt 13.01 -.35 GlobEqn 12.85 -.41
RS Funds: Grolncn 19.74 -.46
IntGrA 12.70 -.45 GrthEq n 7.60 -.18
LgCAIphaA 30.48 -.66 .HYCorp n .4.97 +.01
Value 16.66 -.40 HIthCre n 98.31 -2.54
Rainier Inv Mgt: InflaPro n 12.00 +.01
SnrMCap 21.18 -.54 IntlExplrn 11.37 -.28
RidgeWorth Funds: InitGrn 13.86 -.52
LCGrStkAp 6.94 -.16 InlotlValn 25.46 -.99
RIverSource A: ImGrade n 8.96 +.04
BalanceA 7.87 -.14 ITTsryn 11.34 +.04
DispEqAp 4.00 -.10 ULifeConn 13.73 -.13
DEI 7.19 -.21 LUfeGron 16.71 -.37
DivrBd 4.56 +.01 Ufelncn 12.48 - (J
DvOppA .5.64 -.16 UfeModn 15.64 - ?4
Growth 19.18 -.41 LTIGraden 8.26 + .:"
HiYd'TEA 3.99 .LTTsryn 1Q.964 + 0
L..4.i"nt [., 2.95 '-.08 Morgn, 12.53 --8
4Cp : ' 74 - ^4 MuHYh ?9.69
Lb/pi ,pv. / 12 - I Maloin 12.99
RIverSource I: MuLtdn 10.83
TNEmgMktn6.70 -.26 MuLongn 10.49
Royce Funds: MuShrt n 15.83
LwPrSkSvr 10.88 -.41 NJLTn 11.17
MicroCapl 10.78 -.34 NYLTn , 10.55
PennMulr 7.61 -22 OHLTTEn 11.49
Premier 13.58 -.41 PALTn 10.58
TotRell/r 8.99 -.24 PrecMtlsrjn 15.87 - '.4
ValSvct 8.34 -.22 PrmcpCobrn 9.86 --L"
VIPISvc 9.32 -.30 Prmcprn 48.14 -1 5c
RussIell Funds S: SelValurn 12.73 -32
-StiratBd - '9.48-+.U3T STARr -- 15.34' "- -
Rydex Advisor: STIGrade n 10.18 +4 -
NasdaqAdv 9.07 -21 STFedn 10.82 +0.
SEI Portfolios: STTsryn 10.77n + '
CoreFxAn 9.26 +.03 StnraEqn 12.23 -Y
IntlEqAn t 6.67 -.21 TgtRetlncn 9.81, -C.
LgCGlrA n 15.59 -.36 ,TgRe2010 18.39 -
LgCValAn 11.97 -30 TgtRe2005n10.07 -
SSgA Funds: TgtRe2025 n 9.75 - .
EmgMkt 15.01 -.46 Tgte2015n10,0 + ."
Schwab Funds: TgRe2020 n17.40 -
HIthCaro 11.75 -.33 TgRe2T30n16.41' - V
G1000nvr 27.46 -.66 TgtRe2O35n 9.79 - :
loOSa/ 27.43 -.67 TgtRe24Onl6.03 -
S&P Inv 14.38 -.34 TgtRe2045nlO0.13 -4
S&PSeo 14.42 -.35 USGron 13.48 - .j
S&PlnstSI .7.36 -.17 US Valuen 7.59 - +0
SmCpnv ,132.38 -.39 Wllslyn 18.36 -
Selected Funds: Wel tnn 25.33 - 3:
AmShD 30.30 -.71 Wndsr n 9.74 -
AmShSp 30.30 -.71 Wndslln 19.51 -4-
Seligman Group: Vanguard Idx Fds:
ComunAt 30.57 -.53 500 n 85.51 -20"
FrontrAt 7.64 -.19 Balanced n 17.12 -
GIbSmA 9.55 -.24 DevMktn 7.91 - )
GIbTchA 14.04 -.29 EMkItn 20.12 -.
HYdBdAp 2.30 Europe n 21.37 -.
Sentinel Group: Extend n 26.32 -
ComSAp 23.26 -.55 Growthn 22.31 -.4
Sequolan 97.51 -1.70 ITBndn 10,30 +.05
Sit Funds: LgCaplxn 17.00 -.42
hd ve 278 -47 LTBnd n 10.97 +.09
LrCpr 32.78 74 MidCap n1290 -.38
Sound Shore: Pacificn 870 - 23
SoundShore24.12 -.62 RErTn 10.56 -.59
St FarmAssoc: SmCapn 21.99 -.64
Gwth 42.31 -1.04 SmlCpGthnl13.48 -.36
Stratton Funds: SmICpVI n 10.45 -.33
Dividend 15.33 -.73 sTBndn 10.28 +.02
Multi-Cap 28.65 -.95 TotBndn 10.09 +.03
SmCap 32.91 -.76 Tot/llnin 11.92 -.44
SunAmerlca Funds: ToStknm 22.70 -.56
USGvBt. 9.62 +.06 Valuen' 15.69 -.42
TCW Funds: Vanguard Instl Fds:
TotRetBdl 9.48 Ballnstn 17.13 -.23
TCW Funds N: DvMklnst n 7.85 -.29
ToRIBdNp 9.82 ... Eurolnstn 21.38 -.91
TI1AA-CREF Funds: ExtInn 26.34 -.75
Bondlnst 9.81 +.04 Grwthlst n 22.32 -.48
Tamarack Funds: . InlProlnst n 9.60
EntSmCp 14.51 -.37 lnstldxn 84.98 -2.06
Templeton Instil: InsPIn 84.98 -2.06
ForEqS 16.02 -.49 "TotlBdidxn 50.69 +.18
Third Avenue Fds: InstTStldx n 20.51 -.51
Int/ir 13.28 -.36 InsTStPlus n20.51 -.51
RIEstVIr 16.73 -.26 MidCplstn 12.93 -.38
Value 38.75 -1.16 Paclnstn 8.71 -.23
Thornburg Fds: SCInstn 22.01 -.64
IntValAp 20.82 -.59 TBIsIn 10.09 +.03
IntValuel 21.30 -.60 TSlnstn 22.71 -.56
Thrlvent Fds A: Valuelstn 15.70 -.42
HiYld 4.12 ... Vanguard Signal:
Incom ' 7.37 +.03 500Sgln 70.65 -1.71
TraneamerlcaA: ITBdSign 10.30 +.05
Flex/ncpx 7.68 +.01 MidCpldxn 18.48 -.54
TAIDEXA: T SBdtdxn 10.28 +.02
TempG/bAp2o.20 -.62 TotBdSgIn 10.09 +.03
TrCHYB px 7.50 -.01 TotkSg/gn 21.92 -.54
Turner Funds: Vantagepolnt Fds:
SroICpGrn 21.32 -.55 Growthn 6.42 -.16
Tweedy Browne: Victory Funds:
G/obVal 17.24 -.30 DvsStA 11.77 -.29
UMB Scout Funds: Waddell & Reed Adv:
InU 23.37 -.74 AssetSp 7.51 -.18
US Global Investors: CorelnvA 4.16 -.10
AIIAm 17.07 -.46 DivOppAp 11.28 -.27
ChinaReg 7.15 -.25 D0.OppCt 11.20 -.28
'G/bRs 7.13 -.28 OcTechA 7.86 -.15
kei&M/ls .12.63 -.49 Wasatch:
WidPrcMn 13.25 -.53 SmCpGr 24.72 -.55


Drawing to be held June 30, 2009. Coupon will appear with instiucitons in Senior Style on June 20 2009.
*G.h cad gooA d 10o 6 rn.nrths Nc, redeemable Icor cash.


NEYR TOKECANG


Name Last Chg
SPDR 92.90 -2.18
SPMid 106,11 -2.62
SP Mal/s 27.08 -.94
SPHlthC 24.84 -.79
SP CnSt 22.95 -.57
SPConsum 23.38 -.48
SPDEngy 52.09 -1.42
SPDRFnd 12,17 -.32
SP Inds 22.87 -.72
SPTech 18.19 -.19
SP Uil 27.61 -.57
StdPac 2.15 -.24
Standex 10.10 -.21
StaFdHtl 23.33 -1.09
StateStr 46.27 -1.29
Steris . 24.53 -.65
Sterie 13.24 -1.47
StoneFngy 8.32 -.37
SsratHotels 1.44 -.11
Styker 39.35 -1.45
SturmRug 11.50 -.42
SubPpne 41.50 -.65
SunCmts 14.19 -.41
Suncorgs 33.13 -1.84
Sunoco 26.16 -.27
SunsbtnH 5.61 -.25
Suntech 17.84 -.33
SunTrst 16.32 -.37
Supvalu 15.87 -.51
Synovus 3.69 +.09


Sysco 22.82
TCF Fnd 13.27
TECO 11.86
TJX 30.38
TaiwSemi 9.46
TalismEgs 14.95
Target '40.11
TataMotors 9.66
TeckResg 17.18
TelcmNZ 8.06
TelMexL 15.82
Templelnld 12.97
TbnetHth 3.17
Teppco 29.50
Teradyn 7.00
Terex 13.69
Terra 27.09
TerraNitro 102.34
Tesoro 14.69
TearaTech 9.41
TexInst 21.13
Texn/on 10.95
Theragenh 1.10
ThenroFis 40.42
ThmBet 30.81
ThomCrk/g 11.05
3MCo 59,31
Tiffany 26.32
TW Cable rs 30.83
TiefWm ris 25.40
Tfmkan 18,35
TItanMet 10.31


ToddShp h 16.62
TolBros 1726
TorchEnlf. .3.92
Trdhmrk 3726
TorDBkg 5022
Total SA 54.75
TotalSys 13.78
Trnuso 80.66
Travelers 42.56
Tredgar 13.38
TriConI 9.27
TycoElec 1926
Tycolnti 26.94
Tyson 12.67
UBSAG 13.94
UDR 10.60
U1L Hold 21.69
USA/ry 2.61
USEC 5.46
US . 10.75
UlfraPg 48.15
UniFirst 37.82
UmlevNV 24.18
UnlonPac 51.60
Urisysh 1.36
UtdMro 2.49
UPS B 49.00
US Banorp 17.82
USNGsFd 15.71
USOilFd 38.52
USSteel 37.10
UtdTech 54.72


.-Ut Gp 23.51 -.70
.Unwim~r 16.68 -.18

ValeeSA 1924 -.82
SValeSApf 16.60 -.66
SvaeanrtPh 2.45 -.54
v fadroE 1731 -.30
VangTSMs 48.68 -1.11
VargREIT 32.12 -1.60
VangEmgs 31.78 -1.19
VaralenMed 36.10 -1.74
Vacen 23.51 -.29
Venlas 28.57 -1.68
VeoiaEnv 29.51 -1.71
VeDzonCmn 29.73 -.19
ViacomB 22.62 -.94
VIOmelm 12.08 -.81
Vsea 64.43 +.07
VW 7.06 +.46
Vodane 18.46 -.54
Vomado 46.30 -2.24
VuLdcanM 46.00 -1.20
WGLHold 31.66 -.37
WSPHold 6.80 -.49
Wabash 1.27 -.64
WalMart 48.46 -1.38
Wagmrn 30.47 -.71
WalferEn 34.56 -1.63
WsteMIc 28.13 -.47
Weanthfl 22.06 -59
WetinR 13.67 -1.13


WelPoint 45.73
WellsFargo 24.71
WendyArby 3.92
WestarEn 18.17
WAstEMkt 10.18
WstAMgdHi 4.96
WAsilnfOpp 11.39
WDigi ff 24.87
WstnRefin 8.15
WstnUnion 16.78
Weyeru h 32.70
Whrpl 42.65
WitmCS 5.20
WrmsCos 16.69
WmsPIrs 18,25
WmsSon 12.25
Windstrmn 8.43
Winnbgo 6.89
WiscEn 40.20
Wodhgs 13,77
Wyeth 43.95
Wflndam 11.34
XLCap 11.04
'tC',E,,]v 42.19
*"',I.. 17,85
6,90
Yaomanag 9.00
Yinglrni 13.16
YunimBmds 34,54
Zrnmt 40.56
ZwoqTli 3.35


--- -


Beverly Hills



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USAA Group: Wells Fargo Adv:
AgvGt 23.53 -.54 CmStkZ 13.47 -.33
CABd 9.44 ... Opptylnv 2.89 -.4
CmstStr 17.37 -.27 Wells Fargo Insti:
GNMA 9.91 +.03 UlStMuln p 4.77 -.01
GrTxStr 10.92 -.11 Western Asset:
Growth 10.62 -.24 CorePus 9.13 +.02
Gr&lnc 10.61 -.28 Core 9.49 +.01
IncStk 8.93 -.22 William Blair N:
Inco 11.56 +.03 GrowthN 8.33 -.19
IntIl 17.54 -.65 IntlGthN 15.12 -.46
NYBd 10.79 ... Yacktman Funds:
PrecMM 265.81 -1.19 Fundp 12.08 -.30


real-time quotes on stocks or funds.
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BUSINESS


TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009


RTI US COUNTY ( CHR LE


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Page A8 - TUESDAY, JUNE 16,2009



OPINION


S'. 'Paced with w )at is rig t, to leave it
undone shows a lack of courage."
Confucius, 551-479 B.C.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan......................... ................. publisher
Charlie Brennan .........................editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ................................managing editor
Cheri Harris.....................................features editor
Curt Ebltz.......................................citizen member
Mac Harris .............................:.........citizen member
Cliff Pierson ............................... guest member


Founded
by Albert M.
Williamson


"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. ".
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


EVERYONE'S PROBLEM




Stagnant



homes call for



cooperation


A couple of neighbors in which case
Citrus Springs are expe- produce su
S.jLriencing a nightmare. Slow prop
The nightmare includes bugs... to the level
and rats ... and stench. for action
What caused the nightmare? Health offi
The foreclosure of a neigh- Stagnant
boring home.
After the renter
nioved out several .. TlHE l-iSU-:
months ago, . Mairi tqna r6f "
things went from .fore e dsed.olmes.,
bad to really bad.
The concerned -
neighbdrs helped . . ..... .
to keep the lawn' . i.' ug.f' i
trimmed even be-_' should s frot
fore the residence 'thr.ilw6'r.
was vacated by a '
renter; then they
hauled rubbish out of the banks that
house after the renter left. homes - c
The neighbors also helped to ofstate -
maintain the chemi-
calsg in the, swim- . Cod Enfrflnent
m ing pool, but after . '2 -
the electricity was. ,
shut off, the pool. .Erordnnier ,
pump was disabled. He5275.295.
leaving the water to -
_stagnate and nmos- M Mosquito Control
qut't es to breed. - 52-'7478.
As evidence of"
bugs and rat -infestation be- and other
came apparent, the do-gooders Mosquito C
set off flea bombs inside the officials, re
residence and took other steps tatives, nei
to try to curtail the deteriora- would be a
tion of the structure and its im- rmove.
pact on those nearby. The sit
Despite their best efforts. Springs de
-there are restrictions on what teriorating
they can do as "the mold is come a thr
slowly taking it over" and the and welfai
odor of propane seeps into the are also
ai - _County'S
With the bank that owns the hence oure
home falling to take any cor- Simplifyi
rective action, the neighbors known wh
were hopeful county govern- can take w
ment might be able to step in. step. Iden
Unfortunately, there are limits steps that c
to what the county can and will pie bureau
do. ures can b(
Ifthere are structural issues, good next s
like a missing door or col- pressure
lapsed roof, the county can banks would
make repairs and put a lien on This is n(
the house. by county
However, county officials say given the se
they can't cut grass, as that and unwill
would enhance the value of rectify sucl
private property, and they can't to be done
enter a house to address prob- paying cit
lems with rodents unless they mares like
have a warrant to enter, in in Citrus S


Based on law
in response to the article by :
Leonard Pitts regarding
Sotomayor as a judge f
!candidate: First of all, if 0
you look at her back-
ground and her history,
she has a history of mak-
ing judicial decisions and
court decisions based on
her personal opinion. .
Somebody sitting on the
bench in the Supreme CAL
Court is supposed to 563
make decisions based on u56 -
the law, and that is it. By
whatever the Constitution says, is
what you go by, not your personal
opinion or how you're interpreting
what the Constitution says ...
Historical landmark
This is in reference to the old
bait shop, Lassiter's Grocery Store
and Deli in Lake Hernando. It is


.


they would need to
.pporting evidence.
pane leaks don't rise
of threat necessary
by Environmental
cials.
swimming pools
where mosquitoes
breed can be
stocked with inos-
quitq-eating 'fish,
but that's about it.
With home fore-.
closures beitg so
widespread, un-
doubtedly this
scenario is being
played out
throughout the
county Yes, 'the
Foreclosed on the
oftentimes from'out
Ire the rightful .nti-
ties to. rectify, the
probiblms but, if the
Citris.Springs."ase
is i!'icative, that
Wont .. haten.
Given the real of
the circumstances,
a cooperative initia-
i -e involving
county government
-oncerned parties -
Control, state health
eal estate represen-
ghbors, the courts -
genuinely proactive

uation in Citrus
monstrates that de-
g homes ha4v be-
eat to health, Safety
re. Such situations
a threat to Citrus
housing market.
economy.
ing and making
at steps neighbors.
would be a first good
ntifying additional
would be taken if sim--
cratie or legal meas-
e altered would be a
step. Helping to bear
on the responsible
Id also be good, too.
)t a problem created
government, but
cope of the problem
ingness of others to
h issues, more needs
to protect good tax-
tizens from nlight-
the one playing out
springs .


presently zoned commercial-, It's
established in 1952 and graffdfa-
thered in before zoning was estab.
lished in Citrus County.
JND We, the citizens of Her-
nando, support the old
FF bait shop. We can buy
fishing poles, tackle and
bait, and fish off the old
dock. Like many have
over the last 62 years
that grew up there, the
citizens of Hernando are
moving forward to estab-
)579 lish it as a historical land-
mark. My personal view is
not to view one person's
view; it's not the view of the com-
munity that grew up there. As for
the music - we love it.
The owners restrict the music to
only gospel, country and western
and jazz. The atmosphere is very
peaceful and great. Thank you,,.
owners, for all your hard work


Daniels a hit with GOP


You might not
have noticed,
but there has
been a Mitch Daniels
boomlet in Republican
political circles lately.
The governor of Indi-
ana has been men-
tioned as a possible
2012 contender by ac
number of well-con-
nected pundits, he's
been featured on the
cover of National Re-
view, and GOP leaders


Byron
OTH
VOICE


selected him to give a recent Sat-
urday radio address.
It's a lot. of good exposure if
you're looking to raise your na-
tional profile. But why Daniels?
And why now?-
'"It shows you how slim the
pickings are,", Daniels told me
Wednesday, after he spoke at
"Making Conservatism Credible
Again," a panel discussion in
Washington, D.C., sponsored by
the Hudsoin'Institute and the
Bradley Foundation. Lest anyone
read that as a dismissive take on
the current Republican leader-
ship, Daniels added, "I think
.you'll see new sprouts flowering
up more quickly. than you'd ex-
pect."
That's probably not what Re-
publican hopefuls like Mitt Rom-
ney. Mike Huckabee Sarah Palin
and others \aiit 1, nleal Butt
.Daniels believes a new crop of
potential presidential candidates
is on the way - arid he insists
that he wop't be one ofthem. "I've
oily eyer u-n for and held one of-
rice," says Daniels. who was
elected governor in 2004 and re-
-elected last year. "It's the last one
I'mn going to hold," '
There's no doubt Daniels is an
iritrigulfig prospect A former cor-
porate executive and foundation


head, he was George
W Bush's ,first budget
chief, serving from
2001 to 2003. Going
home to Indiana, he
not only was elected
governor on his first
try; he won a second
term last November by
18 points - at a time
York when a Democratic
IER presidential candidate
won Indiana for the
CES first time in 44. years.
In victory, Daniels at-
tracted a lot of Democratic votes,
and 20 percent of the African-
American vote. He inherited a
deficit and turned it into a sur-
plus. And he has a huge job-ap-
proval rating - almost 70
percent.
Daniels' stock with the national
party began rising, as the full ex-
tent of last November's damage
began to sink in. His reputation
has gone up still more as his per-
formance with Indiana's econ-
omy continues to shine amid
national financial calamity.
Then came May 10, when
Daniels gave the commencement
speech at Butler University in In-
dianapolis. Facing graduates
born in the late 1980s, Daniels de-
livered a round house co.ndenina-
tion of the selfishness of the
baby-boomer generation and a
call for today's young people to
live more responsibly than their
elders
":Al our lies. it's been all about
us," Daniels, who recently turned
60. said of his generation. "We
were the "Me Generation' We
wore T-shirts that said 'If it feels
good, do it.' The year of my high-
school commencement, a hit song
featured the immortal lyric "'Sha-
la-la-la-la-la. live for today.'
":As a generation.we did tend to


live for today," Daniels contin-
ued. "We borrowed and splurged,
and we will leave you a stagger-
ing pile of bills to pay. It's been a
blast; good luck cleaning up after
us."
Daniels' words struck the
hearts of self-loathing boomers
throughout the conservative com-
mentariat. Come 2012, wrote
William Kristol, "maybe the na-
tion will be ready to elect a
boomer president who disdains
his own generation, and urges
younger Americans to reject
boomer vanities and self-indul-
gence in the name of freedom
and greatness." A contender was
born.
So Daniels is hot - well, as hot
as a Republican possibility can
be at this moment But press him
all you like, and he'll swear he
won't run for president. In Wash-
ington Wednesday, Daniels de-
scribed staying out of the race as
an almost moral obligation.
"A lot of what we have tried to
do in this adventure has been to
resolutely live up to our words,"
Daniels said. "I would like to
leave my state a little less cynical
than we found it because a group
of people came and went and re-
ally did what they said. And this
is one of those things. I said I was
going to serve four years, I'm
going to serve four years, do my
best at it, and not be on the make
for something else, as many peo-
ple in public life appear to be."
It would be hard to walk away
from words like that But don't be
surprised if some Republicans
try to talk Mitch Daniels out of his
promise.

Byron York is chief political cor-
respondent for The Washington
Examiner


SLETTERS / to theEditor
---- $ to r


I would like-to thank all of my
neighbors on Laurel Cherry
Court in Sugarmill Woods who
brought me flowers, and gave
their concern and sympathy to
me and my family during this
* devastating ordeal which re-
cently brought my name to the
attention of all media;
I would like to thank the
Chronicle for not publishing my
name.
As far as the St Petersburg
Times, the local television crews
and their ilk, I have no com-
mtent; I will be in touch with the
FBI to pursue their absolute
cruelty in releasing my son's and
my name and photos to their re-
spective news carriers.
I can assure all of you, that ab-
solutely none of you are safe,
When my telephone rang off the
hook last Monday (after the inci-
dent at the Holocaust Museum),
each reporter that called asked
for me by name and I can,:again,
assure you that all of the media
from Los Angeles to New York
/contacted me for a statement. I
asked each and every one of
them riot to use my name. Most
of them did not Just the "local"
media chose to do so.
,. Yes, I was married to this man,
but have been divorced from
him for over 30 years; thus, why
pick on me?
On Tuesday and Wednesday,
my family were prisoners in our
;own home: Truck after van after


car of reporters all swarmed in
the street, took photos of our
home and did everything they
could to get a photo and/or state-
ment
Again, none of you are safe.
You are in a databank and noth-
ing you say or do is sacred.
My son appeared on "Good
Morning, America" on Monday,
June 15, to be interviewed re-
garding this incident
If you would like to read his
statement to ABC news, just go
to http://abc.go.com and follow
the prompts. It will convey to
you his thoughts on this matter.
Again, I thank all of my friends


here in Sugarmill and elsewhere
for their calls and concerns for
and on behalf of me, my son and
family
Thank.you, again. It meant
more than you can possibly real-
ize considering what we have
been through with the media
this week I am so sorry my
neighbors had to deal with this
ludicrous and uncalled-for
swarm against us.
Pat Taylor Sadowski
Homosassa


Speaking truth
I have long been a reader of
Dr. Dixon's column. I admire his
factual comments, all based on
truth. If it were not for Dr.
Dixon's column I probably would
not purchase the Chronicle.
I say this after just reading a
letter as submitted by a Corrie
Jarrett titled, "Apologize for
views." This appears to be a very
simple case of "truth hurts."
Dr Dixon has no cause to apol-
ogize simply because he does not
share (Ms. Ja'rrt' -;) views! I thank
my God that there are still people
with backbone like Dr. Dixon.
For those readers familiar
with the story as written by Hans
Christian Anderson, "The Em-
peror's New Clothes," Dr. Dixon
would be the one who speaks up
with truth and states, "The Em-
peror is naked!"
Terry Davey
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


OPINIONS INVITED
1l The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the editorial board of the newspa-
per.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
" not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* All letters must be signed andiin-
cl lde a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
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will be printed; phone numbers
will not be published or given out.
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* Letters must be no longer than
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limited to three letters per month.".
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
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LunwaneaattU I&enion 1


1 1


.,7:. A . $,. t
, oc








Crnm's COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE OPINION TLFSDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 A9


Pondering patina
This is in reference to the
new courthouse dome that
they're restoring. It was my
understanding that when
they restore something for
the historical value, they're
supposed to do it back to
the original. So wouldn't the
original actually be a shin-
ing copper top, not the
patina that takes years to
age and get back that won-
derful look to it? I mean if
you're going to leave the
patina because it's a richer,
better look, that's fine. But
then they should have left,
when they had windows that
were put in at a later date,
the white windows that used
to be in the courthouse that
were more ornate instead of
the flap windows that they
have now. Anyway, it's just a
thought.
Thanks to CDS


Just reading in
today's paper (that).
the Boys and Girls
Clubs sites will be
open Monday for
the kids during
summer. That's
great for the kids
that will be able to
pay the $60 a
week. Lord have
mercy on the ones
that have more
than one child. I


LS


563-C


don't even know how they'd
be able to afford it. Thank
goodness for CDS, who
helps make day care afford-
able for our children. I don't
know what people in Citrus
,County would do without af-
fordable day care ... funded
by CDS ... Have a great
.summer.
These people
I'd like to respond to the
person in Sound Off about
the commissioners. He
made some sly remark, a
snide rema it the
commission .-. knowingf
about removing or lifting the


to the Editor =


burn ban. I don't know, he
said wherever he lives, in six
days he hasn't seen rain
and it's all still dry. I don't
know...This is the same kind
of people that burn
jyND their trash, they
clean their yard,
A111 but as soon as the
work is done, they
don't want nobody
Else doing it. Same
people that squab-
ble and moan
about people, these
newcomers coming
579 down and taking
S over, etc. These are
the same very peo-
ple that moved here a few
years ago themselves and
they seem to complain
about every single thing
that they could possibly
think of.
Rethink position
In response to the
Freezer: I believe the sup-
porters of the Freezer fail to
recognize that the business
and the people, the patron-
age, impose upon the
landowners on their perime-
ter. These people have the
right to a private, quiet liv-
ing on their own property
with no damage to their


property, people urinating
in their yard, destroying the
property. Before the Freezer
was there, that did not
occur. So if these people
wanted to have the same
thing happen to their pri-
vate castle, and that envi-
ronment imposed upon
them every night of the
week, keep your position.
But it's not right.
Learn truth
The person sounding off.
about President and Mrs.
Obama going to New York at
taxpayers' expense is
wrong:
The Obamas reimburse
the government for all per-
sonal travel. In today's crazy
world, the First Family can


hardly be expected to hop
on the shuttle between D.C.
and New York. Learn the
truth before you spew more
hatred against our presi-
dent.
Complain, complain
I don't understand some
people. They live in the
country and they complain
about a dog barking. What
the heck do they want? They
complain about people
burning something. The guy
complains because he can't
find a good steak.
He lives up North and he
comes down to Florida -
no good steaks. These peo-
ple need to really, really get
a life. I really feel sorry for
them ... -


Sin cae fo th
adlscn1yas
Ski cre6ip
A s yur ocor


Side effects
As an 86-year-old
woman in very good
health trying to find a way
in my last years on earth
to lessen my pain of fi-
bromyalgia, I have tried
being in touch with "the
powers that be" in the
FDA. I have discussed the
naked problem of pharma-
ceuticals in this country.
In my quest for informa-
tion, pain relief, etc., I do
not expect a cure will be
found immediately, or in
the near future, given the
shortage of funds for re-
search at this time in our
besieged country. How-
ever, with so much effort,
time and monies spent by
pharmaceutical compa-
nies, why does no one
seem to understand that
sick people are not ex-
pecting immediate cures?
No, we merely need relief
from whatever ailment is
causing unbearable pain.
I suggested to the FDA
that the side effects-
should be capped, and not
so fraught with so many
dangerous side effects
that will, and have, killed
many Americans - dis-
claimers notwithstanding.
My unasked-for advice
to all.pharmaceutical com-


panies is this: Take more
time, and try harder and
harder to release only
those medicines that are
not so lethal with side ef-
fects, that can be labeled
as "bordering on the crimi-
nal." Then maybe people
will be saying "God bless
the pharmaceutical com-
panies" instead of cursing
and thinking the worst of
medicines and doctors and
companies that give the lie
to doctors, who are sworn
under the Hippocratic
Oath to "first do no harm."
Get to work
Gina Musick
Inverness
Lack of respect
I find it very difficult to
understand why our presi-
dent would publically
mourn the death of an
abortion doctor, one who
has killed thousands of ba-
bies, (many in the third
trimester), but not say a
word about an American
soldier gunned down by a
Muslim terrorist within
our borders! His lack of
understanding and re-
spect for our brave men
and women is despicable.
Dave Riffey Sr.
Homosassa


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TuF.sDAY, JUNE 16, 2oog A9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OPINION


I


Mirad









Page A10 - TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009


& WORLD
C ITRus C O U NTY C HRO NICL it - . ir . .ri i , i - ... -m . .. . ..... .. .......


Nation BRIEF


Rates on -month
T-bllle hit 2009 low
WASHINGTON - Interest
rates on six-month bills
Treasury bills have fallen to
the lowest level this year,
The Treasury Department
on Monday auctioned $30 bil-
lion In six-month bills at a dis-
count rate of 0,290 percent,
down from 0.345 percent last
week, Another $31 billion In
three-month bills was auc-
tioned at a discount rate of
0.160 percent, down from
0.190 percent last week.
The six-month rate was the
lowest since they sold for
0.250 percent on Dec. 29,
2008. The three-month rate
was the lowest since the bills
sold for 0.150 percent on
June 1.
The discount rates reflect
that the bills sell for less than
face value. For a $10,000 bill,
the three-month price was
$9,995.96, while a six-month
bill sold for $9,985.34. That
would equal an annualized
rate of 0.162 percent for the
three-month bills, and 0.294
percent for the six-month
bills.
Separately, the Federal
Reserve said Monday that
the average yield for one-
year Treasury bills, a popular
index for making changes in
adjustable rate mortgages,
rose to 0.56 percent last
week from 0.50 percent the
previous week.

World BRIEFS

Seriously


Associated Press
Paul McCartney poses for
photographs Monday in
London while his daughter
Mary gives him rabbit ears,
during an event to launch a
new food campaign enti-
tled "Meat Free Monday."
The campaign encourages
people to try and help slow
climate change by having
one meat-free day a week.

9,758 abducted
In six months
MEXICO CITY-A survey
by Mexico's National Human
Rights Commission shows
that thousands-of mainly
Central American migrants
crossing the country to reach
.the United States are kid-
napped for ransom every
year.
The commission says an
estimated 9,758 migrants
were kidnapped in Mexico
between September and
February, mainly by drug
gangs but some migrants re-
ported that authorities were
involved.
The survey presented
Monday said the victims were
released In exchange for ran-
soms ranging from $1,500 to
$5,000.
U.S. to stick to Iraq
withdrawal date
BAGHDAD -The top U.S.
commander In Iraq said Mon-
day.that he remains "ab-
solutely committed" to pulling
back all combat troops from
urban areas by the end of the
month, as provided for In a
U.S.-IraqI security agreement.
Gen, Ray Odlerno said a
limited number of advisers
and trainers will remain In the
cities to work with Iraqi secu-
rity forces, leaving unan-
swered questions about how
many U,S. troops would re-
main and where they would
be located,
"We will not get Into any
specific numbers, but It Is a
very small number," Odlerno
said,
-Prom wire reports


Obama lobbies physicians


President gets

skeptical response

to health care plans

Associated Press
CHICAGO - President Barack
Obama bluntly told doctors Monday
he opposes their highest legislative
priority - limiting malpractice
awards - and got a smattering of
boos from an audience he was here to
court for his health care plan.
Vigorously defending the plan to
reshape the nation's health care
system and extend coverage to mil-
lions who don't have it, he also took
on "naysayers," "fear-mongers" and
other critics who he said are falsely


portrayIng his effort as a big step to- hometown to deliver one of the
ward a national government pro- longest speeches of his presidency
gram. to the annual meeting of
Without offering * Ana lsis of the American Medical As-
specifics, Obama did tell health care sociation, painting the
the doctors that "excessive pitfalls need for change in dire
defensive medicine" con- terms,
ducted out of fear of law- Page AS Oba ma declared the na-
suits should be curbed, tion's current health care
A senior administration official system, with its ever-rising costs
said Obama is open to offering some and inconsistencies in care, a "tick-
sort of lawsuit protection for doctors ing time bomb" for the federal
but did not want to get into how - or budget. "If we do not fix our health
even telegraph his support for the care system," Obama said, "America
concept - in this speech intended may go the way of GM - paying
more as a broad approach. The offi- more, getting less, and going broke."
cial spoke on condition of anonymity He warned interest groups, lob-
to more freely discuss the presi- byists and others against using "fear
dent's behind-the-scenes strategy, tactics to paint any effort to achieve
One week into a newly aggressive, reform as an attempt to socialize
personal campaign to turn his medicine."
health-care goal into reality by the GOP Rep. Tom Price of Georgia -
end of the year, Obama flew to his a former orthopedic surgeon - re-


Huge protests grip Iran


S Asociated Press
Hundreds of thousands of supporters of leading Iranian opposition presidential candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi
turn out Monday to protest the results of the election at a mass rally in Azadi (Freedom) square in Tehran,
Iran. Mousavi claims there was voting fraud in Friday's election.

At least one person killed in shooting at opposition rally


Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - In a massive
outpouring reminiscent of the Is-
lamic Revolution three decades
ago, hundreds of thousands of
Iranians streamed through the
capital Monday, and the fist-wav-
ing protesters denounced Presi-
dent Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's
claim to victory in a disputed
election.
Standing on rooftops, pro-gov-
ernment gunmen opened fire on
a group of protesters who had
tried to storm the militia's com-
pound. One man was killed and
several others were wounded in.
the worst violence since the dis-
puted election Friday.
Angry men showed their bloody
palms after cradling the dead and
wounded who had been part of a
crowd that stretched more than
five miles supporting reform
leader Mir Hossein Mousavi.
The huge rally reinforced what


has become increasingly clearer
since the election: the opposition
forces rallying behind Mousavi
show no signs of backing down.
Their resolve appears to have
pushed Iran's Islamic establish-
ment into attempts to cool the ten-
sions after days of unrest.
Police and other security forces
stood by quietly - some sitting on
stoops with their batons and
shields resting behind them as
the marchers swallowed the
streets in parts of Tehran. Esti-
mates put the turnout at hun-
dreds of thousands overflowing
the square, where crowds of
200,000 have filled the plaza in
the past.
Mousavi made his first public
appearance since the polls
closed, and, he launched his
claims that the vote was rigged to
re-elect the hard-line president.
Brief clips of the march were
shown on state television in an
extremely rare nod to anti-gov-


emrnment attacks.
"Respect the people's vote!"
Mousavi cried through a hand-
held loudspeaker in Azadi, or
Freedom, Square - where Iran's
leaders hold military and politi-
cal gatherings.
It appeared that Iran's ruling
clerics had opened the door for
the demonstration - even giving
it news coverage - in a possible
bid to avoid more street clashes
and seek some breathing room in
the growing confrontation.
But a single moment could
change all that. Gunfire erupted
from a compound used by the
Basij, a volunteer militia linked to
Iran's powerful Revolutionary
Guard. An Associated Press pho-
tographer saw at least one,
demonstrator killed and several.
others with. what appeared to be
serious injuries. The protesters
had tried to storm and set fire to
the compound on the edge of
Azadi Square.


acted pre-emptively to Obama's
speech by accusing him of seeking a
"government takeover" of health
care, Speaking to reporters on a
conference call organized bythe na-
tional Republican Party, Price said
a committee that Obama's adminis-
tration has established to study the
effectiveness of various medical
treatments would turn into a "ra-
tioning board" to overrule doctors
and deny patients care,
Addressing the doctors ip
Chicago, the president said for the
first time publicly that his health
care overhaul, including covering
the almost 50 million Americans
who have no insurance, would cost
about $1 trillion over 10 years.,
"That's real money, even in Wash-
ington," he said. "But remember:
That's less than we are projected to
have spent on the war in Iraq."


Afghan


fight


gets ne


general

Associated Press
KABUL - Gen. Stanlk
McChrystal, a former tc
special operations cor
mander, took charge f
nearly 90,000 U.S. and N
troops in Afghanistan da
Monday, telling them thef
must protect Afghan civilians
from all kinds of violence.,
McChrystal takes over thi
Afghan campaign at a criti-
cal moment: violence, troop
levels and U.S. military"
deaths have all hit record
highs, and President Hamfd
Karzai has increased pre�-
sure..tniU.S.-forces to pre-
vent civilian deaths. .
Seeking to shake up the
direction of the war, De-
fense Secretary Robeyt
Gates sent McChrystal to
lead the 42-nation effort 9i
Kabul in the middle of U.f.
Gen. David McKiernar's
two-year assignment, effe�-
tively ending the career of a
four-star general whom M�-
Chrystal called a fellowv
soldier and friend." i
McChrystal is expected tb
take a more unconventional
approach to the increas-
ingly violent'campaign itn
Afghanistan, relying O,
decades of experience wit
special operators - elite
military units like Navy
SEALs and Army's Delta
Force that carry out danger-
ous and secretive missions.
Speaking before several
hundred troops at a cere-
mony filled with colorful
flags and a military band' at
a heavily fortified base in
central Kabul, McChrystal
said the international mfs-
sion "must recapture the ex-
citement and inspiration,
that ignited this country"
after the 2001 fall of the Til-
iban regime.


California looks to cut legal aid for poor


Public defense
Workloads for public defenders
have Increased due to an Influx of
oases and the spiraling recession.
U.S. misdemeanor cases

2006


U.S. PUBLIC DEFENDERS
Approximate time per case
20,00 cases. ..... .....




0 7 70 120 360
MINUTES
Law school debt, in thousands
Private $88
W lihiPublic $57
Averasalary
- $46,000
s0URCI: National Agooilation of AP
Orminal Defenee Lawyers


Associated Press
Lawyers for the poor, who
say they already are
stretched to the breaking
point by huge caseloads and
dwindling staff, face layoffs
across the country as local
governments slash spending
in these hard economic
times,
Nowhere is the threat to
public defenders more ap-
parent than in California,
the state with the biggest
population - at 38 million-
and the largest deficit -
$24.3ibillion and counting.
There's far more at stake
than cutting jobs, say prose-
cutors and defense lawyers
alike, Eliminating attorneys
for the indigent may actu-
ally cost more money than it
saves.
Unlike any other public
service, court-appointed
counsel cannot be scaled
back, According to the Con-


stitution, every criminal de-
fendant, rich or poor, gets
one. If the defendant can't
pay, the government does,
And if public defenders
aren't available, private at-
torneys must be hired, at
rates costing at least twice
as much and often more.
* "Counties can't just say
'I'm not going to pay,"' said
San Francisco Public De-
fender Jeff Adachi, who's
locked in a very public fight
with Mayor Gavin Newsom
over a recent directive to
cut the defense lawyer's
budget by nearly $2 million.
Adachi said his office
would be' devastated and
would have to fire 15 to 20
attorneys, about 20 percent
of his staff,
Then, he said, "The whole
system would begin to fail,"
Defendants would sit in
jail longer, increasing incar-
ceration costs, Adachi said.
Cases would be delayed


while private attorneys get
up to speed, creating bigger
clogs in a legal pipeline that
barely trickles now.
Adachi's current budget is
nearly $24 million - "less
than half what the police
and sheriff's departments
spend in overtime," he notes.
Slashing it would mean
farming out 6,000 cases to
private lawyers, ranging
from misdemeanors to
felonies, That would cost $3
million to $4 million, Adachi
estimates, or up to twice as
much as the cut itself,
"It's robbing Peter to pay
Paul," he said, because, in-
evitably, it's the county gen-
eral fund that has to pay the
extra costs - the same fund
that pays for his office, "It's
really shortsighted."
Sacramento County has al-
ready laid off 18 staffers, and
will give pink slips to 29 at-
torneys if it doesn't Jet a fls-
cal break quickly. Los


Angeles County Public De-
fender Michael Judge said ie
doesn't know how much will
be cut from his office, which
employs about 600 attorneys
and is the state's largest indi-
gent defense system. I
California counties are
particularly troubled as they
head toward a July 1 budget
deadline for new fiscal year.
Their local revenues have
tanked, thanks to huge drops
in sales tax and property tax
incomes caused by busi-
nesses closing and home
loan foreclosures,
The problems are far
from unique to California,
Minnesota eliminated the
jobs of 53 public defenders,
or about 12 percent of the
staff. Last summer, the of-
fice stopped representing
parents involved in child
welfare cases, referring
them instead to counties,
which hired private
lawyers.








Section B-TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009


SPORTS


Breaking point?
Texas' lead is shrinking
. and its hitters are slumping./
TRY C OPaNge B3


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Auto Racing/B2
E MLB/B3
0 TV, Lottery/B4
N Briefs/B4-B5
0 The Game/B5
0 Boxing/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Cal State Fullerton eliminated from CWS


LSU, Arkansas

look to avoidfirst

loss in Omaha
Associated Press
*z OMAHA, Neb. - Virginia
,trumped another ace.
', The Cavaliers beat All-Ameri-
tan Daniel Renken and Cal State
'aullerton 7-5 on Monday, extend-
ing their first appearance in the
collegee World Series and elimi-
'hating the Titans.
' Just two weeks ago, Virginia de-
feated San Diego State star and
*No. 1 overall draft pick Stephen


Strasburg in the regionals.
Virginia scored four times
against Renken in the second in-
ning, and he was finished in the
sixth after allowing a season-high
six runs.
"To put up four runs on an All-
America pitcher ,j
like Renken is a Today's
great inning for us
and, believe me, I * 2 p.m. Nor
wanted more," vs. Souther
Cavaliers coach M 7 p.m. Arizo
Brian O'Connor vs. Texas
said.
The Cavs did get
more, which was a good thing for
them because Fullerton had the
winning run at the plate in the
ninth inning before Virginia se-
cured its first win in Omaha.


Virginia (49-14-1) next plays the
loser of Monday night's game be-
tween Arkansas and LSU. Fuller-
ton (47-16) has lost five straight in
the CWS.
Renken (11-3), who had gone at
least eight innings in 10 of his pre-
vious 11 starts, was
Games taken out after
Franco Valdes' two-
h Carolina out double in the
n Mississippi sixth. NickRamirez
a State came on and gave
up a pair of RBI
singles that made it
a four-run game.
"I'm pretty upset with myself
today for falling behind on counts
and not sticking to my game plan,"
Renken said. "It was inexcusable
See CWS/Page B4


Associated Press
Cal State Fullerton right fielder Gary Brown dives for, but misses, a sin-
gle by Virginia's Danny Hultzen that scored two runs In the fourth Inning
of a College World Series elimination game on Monday In Omaha, Neb..


Future looks bright,


,' .Associated Press
Orlando Magic center Dwight Howard sits in the locker room after the Magic's 99-86 loss to the Los Angeles Lakers in Game 5 of the NBA
'finals on Sunday night in Orlando. The All-Star core of Howard, Rashard Lewis and Jameer Nelson should remain Intact next season.

'Magics'All-Star trio ofHoward Lewis and Nelson should remain in Orlando
r n


i, , Associated Press


. ORLANDO- The parades
down nearby Walt Disney World,
9he kind where confetti flies and
,,smiles flow - the ending Or-
�lando Magic fans have long
,waited for - will be reserved for
other teams this year.
Championship celebrations
here are never for the home
team.
. The Magic overcame injuries,
came back from almost
every obstacle and re-
turned to the spotlight to
--'nake only their second
Appearance in the NBA
Finals, but the best sea-
L'%on in franchise history
,bnded with a thud.
.- An NBA title trophy
was handed out for the
5Tirst time in Orlando, Nei
?'and it left quickly with missed
Athe winners. The Los 2009 F
'kAngeles Lakers headed with i
home with their 15th
championshipp Monday, leaving
. the Magic still searching for
their first
4f "We did a lot of things that no-
body in this room besides me
'-'and my teammates and a couple
other staff members believed we
would d do," Magic center Dwight
"'Howard said. "So there's no
:heed for us to hold our heads."
' This may only be the begin-
niig for the Magic.
n' Their All-Star core of Howard,
�'Rashard Lewis and Jameer Nel-
son are signed long term and
,�.'


should remain intact along with
most of the key players to this
season's run. Nelson, whose
premature comeback in the fi-
nals was mostly .a flop, is ex-
pected to make a full recovery
by training camp.
But for everything the Magic
accomplished this season, they
remain a work in progress. Their
dependence on the 3-point shot,
inconsistency at point guard -
which they hope Nelson's return
can resolve - and late-
game collapses were
their downfalls.
All that aside, Orlando
truly believes the pieces
are in place to win a title
and just needs time and
experience to grow. Al-
ready, the Magic are
veer using their finals loss as
son motivation the same way
most of the Lakers did when
layoffs they were eliminated by
jury. Boston a year ago.
"You can learn ,a lot
from losing, Sometimes you've
got to lose to win," Howard said.
The biggest question this off-
season for the Magic is with
Hedo Turkoglu.
He has a player option for next
season, but Orlando's 30-year-
old starting forward from Turkey
has said he will likely opt out of
the last year of his contract to be-
come a free agent. Turkoglu
would make about $7.3 million
next season in the final year of a
See BRIGHT/Page B4


Orlando Magics' Rashard Lewis (9) is currentty under a long-term con-
tract and was a key player in the team's run to the 2009 NBA finals.


NASCAR


opening


its doors

More foreign autos

could make splash

in Sprint Cup series
Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Fans
cringed and teams shuddered
when NASCAR opened its doors
to Toyota, the first foreign au-
tomaker to enter a sport built
around American cars.
Competitors feared that a
deep-pocketed company with its
free spending and technological
savvy would run wild over the
loyal supporters of Detroit's Big
Three manufacturers. Longtime
fans simply couldn't stomach a
Japanese car racing side by side
against:their red, white and blue
models.
It's now been five years since
Toyota eased into NASCAR in the
third-tier Truck Series -- three
since the automaker graduated
into the premier Sprint Cup Se-
ries - and a foreign brand didn't
bring the sport to a halt Nor did
it ruin the racing. If anything, its
improved both the competition
and overall health of the industry.
Now, NASCAR says it is willing
to consider other foreign au-
tomakers.
BMW, Honda, Hyundai, Nissan,
and Mercedes-Benz all have
.manufacturing plants inside the
U.S. - the same criteria Toyota
met when NASCAR accepted
the automaker into NASCAR in
2002 - and Volkswagen is
building a facility in Tennessee.
approach NASCAR about com-
ing on board, and chairman
Brian France is apparently will-
ing to listen;
"We're the pre-eminent place
in North America for car manu-
facturers to build their business
with an auto racing group,"
France said before Sunday's
race. "We remain that and clearly
there's some companies that are
going to look at opportunities that
may not have even been there in
the past that could be presented
in the future."
That his comments came at
Michigan International Speed-
' way - a short drive from the
home offices .of Ford, GM and
Dodge - probably didn't sit well
with those in NASCAR.
But on what grounds can any
American automakers object to
NASCAR allowing more manu-
facturers into the sport?
Chrysler and GM are in Chapter
11 bankruptcy protection, and
the restructuring plans have
led to cutbacks in each auto rac-
ing budget
Dodge flagship owner Roger
Penske says it's been business as
usual for his team since
Chrysler's filing. But Richard
Petty Motorsports cut salaries
across the board and laid off at
least nine employees last week as
it prepares for significant short-
falls in Dodge funding.
Then came GM's decision late
last week to end its support of
teams in the lower-tier Nation-
wide and Truck Series, a cutback
that slashes the bottom lines at
race teams owned by Dale Earn-
hardt Jr., Kevin Harvick and
every organization not run by a
big-time NASCAR star. The pull-
out leaves Toyota as the only
manufacturer supporting teams
See NASCAR/Page 84


I
Ir
I I


t
rn
!o







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Foster tops 21-car Modified field


LARRY MACMILLAN
Special to the Chronicle

Seven local divisions put
on a super racing show for
the fans with 119 race cars
registered to provide the
fans with an action packed
night of tight finishes and a
couple of first time winners
for the season in Victory
Lane.
Twenty-one Modifieds
turned up the RPM's and
spent 40 laps chasing pole
sitter David Foster in his
first modified ride at Citrus
County Speedway and be-
came the eventual winner
with his flag to flag win. It
didn't go easy for him and
several cautions flags moved
some of the heavy hitters to
within striking distance of
snatching that checkered
flag away from him.
Richie Smith put on
plenty of heat when he
moved from fourth to sec-
ond on the final laps to
chalk up another' top-five.
finish in the division. Je-
remy Gerstner locked onto
Foster from the get go and
was able to hold off Kyle
Bookmiller, who was in the
hunt right to the checkered
flag.from his fifth starting
position. Billy Bechtel-
heimer and Curtis Neu-
mann put on a side-by-side
battle for fifth for at least 10
laps with Bechtelheimer
finishing about a half car
length ahead of Neumann.
Point Leader Robbie
Cooper moved from his 12th
starting spot to finish sev-
enth followed by Tommy
Schnader, Keith Lilley and
Bobby Blake, who motored


Open Wheel Modified Feature
40 Laps -21 Cars
1. #4 David Foster - Wildwood - 1st Season Win
2. #42 Richie Smith- Hemando
3. #27 Jeremy Gerstner-Wesley Chapel
4. #03 Kyle Bookmiller-Valrlco
5. #6 Billy Bechtelheimer- Dover
1st Heat Winner- #19 Tommy Schnader-St. Petersburg
2nd Heat Winner- #11 Mark Nelson - Clearwater
Sportsman Feature
20 Laps-18 Cars
1. #88 . Bobby Ervien - St Petersburg - 2nd Season Win
2 # 17 MiKe Bell - Brooksville
3 #t5 Joey Canerelli - St. Petersburg
4. #100 RonHeara - ?
5 #55 Emie Reed - Lecanto
Sst Heal Winner- 80 Howard asteen
2nd Heal Winner - -115 Joey Cartereli
Mini Stock Feature
20 Laps -12 Cars
1. A 7 Clint Foley - Dunnellon - 5th Season Win
2. #98 James'Eliis-Brooksvilie
3. #20 Travis Hoefler - Floral City
4 #51 Cnns Harvey - Belleview
5 M44 Mike Lawrom - Claremoni
lst HeatWinner - #9Mark Powers-Hemanao
2na Heal Winner - #44 Mike Laihom
4 Cylinder Bomber Feature
20 Laps - 16 Cars
1. #47 Richara Kuhn - Ocala - 4m Season Win


from 19th to finish 10th
after having problems in
the heat races that could
have ended his night. Heat
winners were Tommy
Schnader, Mark Nelson and
Robbie Cooper,
A surprising 18-car
Sportsman field made for
another exciting night and
introduced the fans to some
new talented names and
faces. One newcomer,
Howard Osteen, immedi-
ately made an impression
with a win in the first heat
and rookie driver Joey Cat-
terelli followed up the win
in the second heat. All 18
cars took the checkered flag
with 2008 points'runner up'
Bobby Ervien launching off
the pole position and set the


2. #71 Sonya Heater- Homosassa
3. #22 'Bobby Richardson- Lecanto
4. #26 Nathan Florian - Homosassa
5. #21 Phil Edwards - Crystal River
1st heat Winner - #22 Bobby Richardson
2nd Heat Winner- #26 Nathan Florian
' Pure Stock Feature
20Laps-21 Cars
1. #24 Tommy Smith - Hemando - 6th Season Win
2. #51 Curtis Flanagan - Inverness
3. #39 Sport Wilson* Floral City
4. #33 Bill Ryan- Bushnell
5. #34 Chad Markand- Bushnell
1st Heat Winneru-#51 Curtis Flanagan
2nd Heal Winner - w24 Tommy Smith
Figure 8 Feature
20 Laps-13 Cars
1. #94 Charlie Meyer- Pinellas Park - 1st Season Win
2. #39 RoDbie Hage - Si Petersburg
3. #27 John Baranauskas- St Petersburg
4. #14 Wayne Calkins - St Petersburg
5 # 3 Clifford Rousseau - SI Petersburg
V8 Thunder Stock Rookies
20 Laps -18 Cars
1 #7 Arden Franklin - Hernando - 3rd Season Win
2 #99 Cody Stickler -
3 N51 Levi Roberts - Hernando
4. #31 Austin Roberts - Hemando
5 #411 Randy Werwsein - Bellavie '


pace from flag to flag for his
second win of the season.
Mike Bell locked onto
Ervien's rear bumper and
stayed there all the way to
the finish line while Joey
Catterelli turned in his sev-
enth top-five finish for the
season and is now tied with
Ervien for the division point
lead. Rounding out the top
five were Ron Heard and
Ernie Reed who survived
an early spin but retained
his spot on the restart.
In week 12 of the Mini
Stock point season Clint
Foley was back on track
with his new black ride
after having to settle for a
second-place finish, last
week rand logged his fifth
win out of six weeks in the


new car Jim Curry held off
the 12-car field from the
pole before he looped it and
had to go to the rear of the
field on the restart That put
James Ellis on the point be-
fore Foley worked his way
through traffic to make the.
pass, taking the win and put-
ting some more cushion in
his point lead. Ellis had to
settle for second just ahead
of fifth starter Travis Hoe-.
fler. Chris Harvey locked
down fourth from his sixth
starting spot followed by
Mike Lawhorn who is chas-
ing Foley for the point lead.
Heat winners were Mark
Powers and Lawhorn.
Richard Kuhn seems to
be intent on backing up last
year's championship with


Citrus County Speedway Results, 6/13/09


another in 2009 as he
started 15th in the 16-car 4
Cylinder Bomber feature
and made his way through
traffic, made the pass on
outside pole sitter Sonya
Heater and she held the
lead for the first 15 laps of
the 20-lap main event hold-
ing off the rest of the field
for a second-place finish.
This was Richard's second
win in a row. Rounding out
the. top five were Bobby
Richardson and Phil Ed-
wards. Richardson also won
the first heat race and
Nathan Florian locked down
his third heat win of the sea-
son in the second heat.
Tommy Smith got back in
the win column in the Pure
Stock division after losing
the Bounty Run to Curtis
Flanagan last week. Smith
started eighth this week in
the 21-car field rather than
in the rear as he had in the
past five weeks and wasted
no time going to the front
and letting the rest of the
field know who is boss. In
the final five laps it was 19th
starter Curtis Flanagan giv-
ing the leader some heat to
deal with to hang onto his
lead and logging his 6th win
of the season. Flanagan had
to settle for second when the
checkered flag flew plus the
pair shared heat wins. Sport
Wilson was driving in his
first race in over a year in
John Drye's racer and ran a
solid third ahead of Bill
Ryan and Chad Markland.
Thirteen Figure 8 cars
made 40 passes through the
intersection and they spent
their evening chasing the
grand old man of the former


EARN $255 IN THE CHRONICLE'S NASCAR CONTEST


Chronicle
Chronicle sales :representative Trista Stokes, left, presents Jim
Bums with a check for $25 for correctly guessing David Reutimann
as the winner of the Coca-Cola 600.


Chronicle advertising director John Provost, right, presents Lynda Hin-
son with a check for $50 for correctly guessing two consecutive
NASCAR race winners. Hinson pegged Jimmie Johnson as the winner
of the Autism Speaks 400 and Tony Stewart in the Pocono 500.


CONTEST RULES
* Pick the winner of this Sunday's
Toyota/Save Mart 350 at Sonoma. In
the event that more than one con-
;testant picks the same driver, the tie
will be broken by guessing the aver-
age speed of the race.
* The closest contestant to the actual
"average speed, over or under, will be
declared the winner If there is no win-
ner one week the $25 prize will carry
over to the following week making that
week's race contest worth $50.
* You may enter as many times as
you like but every entry form MUST
be an original entry form from the
Citrus Count' Chronicle. No copies
will be permitted.
* Please include your nane, address
and telephone number on the printed
entry form. DON'T FORGET TO SUP-
PLY YOUR TIEBREAKER SPEED. :'
* You may drop offor mail entries to our .
Meadowcrest office at 1624 N. Meadow- a
crest Blvd, Crystal River, FL 34429. All ,
entrees MUST be in the office no later
than 5 p.m. on Friday June 19.


Winner once again
Congratulations to
Aubrie.Cioe whofor the,
second time will take
home the $25 prize.
Cioe correctly guessed
Mark Martin as the winner.
of Sunday's Ufelock 400.
Cioe had a tiebreak
speed of 154 mph. The
actual average speed of
the race was 155.491.


gp --a---mm mm mm mm. .mm m mmu-------------- -----------------



'NASCAR CONTEST ENTRY FORM
I .I l i o*


DRIVER'S NAME YOUR NAME PHONE NUMBER

TIEBREAKER: (Guess'what you think the average speed of the race will be): ____

You may mail your entry to Citrus County Chronicle, c/o John Coscia, Sports edito'

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL, 34429. All entries must be received by 5 p.m. oh June 19. 1
I: .1i
L----------------------------------------------- --------------------------





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Email: info@citruspest.com


"A' team at Sunshine
Speedway Charlie Meyer. .
Charlie came off the pole
and set the pace from flag to
flag but got slowed down
after the first lap that saw
Robbie Aaron and Neil
Herne get together putting
Herne on his top and Rob-
bie out for the night with a
broken radiator and front
end damage. On the restart
Charging Charlie kept up
the pace and picked up his
first win in quite a while
much to the approval of thg
fans. Robbie Hage motored,,
his way from 10 to second ,
when the checkers flew folh,
lowed by ninth starter Johp.
Baranauskas, Wayne,,
Calkins and Clifford.
Rousseau who started 12th,-,
The V8 Thunder Stock'
Rookies put on quite a show
with 18 cars taking the,
green flag. Sixth starter
Cody Stickler, 12th starter
Arden Franklin, 14th starter
Austin Roberts and 16th
starter Levi Roberts put onv"
a final five-lap show in the'
run for the flag that had the
fans on their feet right to the
finish line. When the see-v
saw battle was over Ardep
Franklin took his third win
of the season over Cody�
Stickler followed very
closely by Levi Roberts and
Austin Roberts who were,
side by side at the finish
line. Rounding out the top',
five was Randy Werstein. I'
Saturday's race card wil'
feature the Street Stocks,'
Pure Stocks, V8 Thunder'
Stocks, 4 Cylinder Bombers;'
Desoto Champ Karts and
the Mini Cup Cars.


AUTO RACING


B2 TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009


tat7 wo


, P










HRONICLE _ - --v--- -----


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) C


& fBoston
New York
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Baltimore-


LNL


Philadelphia
New York
Florida
Atlanta
Washington


INTERLEAGUE
Sunday's Games
-E
N.Y.Yankees 15, N.Y. Mets 0
Florida 11,Toronto 3
Balt-iore 11, Atlanta 2
Philadelphia 11, Boston 6
Pittsburgh 6, Detroit 3
TamRa Bay 5, Washington 4
Chid9go White Sox 5, Milwaukee 4
Kanas City 7, Cincinnati 1
Chicago Cubs 3, Minnesota 2
L.ABodgers 6, Texas 3
Colorado 7, Seattle 1
LA.-Angels 6, San Diego 0
San Francisco 7, Oakland 1
Houston 8, Arizona 3
Clevyland 3, St. Louis 0
:. Monday's Games
.Milwaukee at Cleveland, late
L.A.,Angels at San Francisco, late
Today's Games
Milwaukee (Gallardo 6-3) at Cleveland (Sowers
1-3)',:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 4-2) at Baltimore (Guthrie 4-
6), 7-5 p.m.
Tordrlto (R.Romero 3-3) at Philadelphia
(Harels 4-2), 7:05 p.m.
Wasbington (Martis 5-1) at N.Y. Yankees
(Sabathia 5-4), 7:05 p.m. *
Atlanta (Jurrjens 5-4) at Cincinnati (Harang 5-'
6), 7W0 p.m.
Florida (Volstad 4-6) at Boston (Wakefield 8-3),
7:10.p.m.
Chi.ago White Sox (Danks 4-5) at Chicago
Cubs. (Zambrano 4-2), 8:05 p.m.
Houston (W.Rodriguez5-5) at Texas (Millwood
, 6-4),8:05 p.m.
Arizena (D.Davis 3-7) at Kansas City (Meche 3-
s), 810-p.m.
'Pittsburgh (Maholm 4-2) at Minnesota (Perkins
1-3),-8:10 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 7-2) at St. Louis (Wainwright
6-4y, 8:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Niemann 5-4) at Colorado (De La
Rosa 2-6), 8:40 p.m. .
Seattle (F.Hernandez 6-3) at San Diego (Cor-
reia 3-4), 10:05 p.m.
Oakland (Braden 5-5) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw
3-5), 10:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (E.Santana 1-3) at San Francisco
(J.Sanchez 2-6), 10:15 p.m.
S Wednesday's Games
Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
LA. Angels at San Francisco, 3:45 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Cincinnati,' 7:10 p.m.
Fi.'r,.Ja i BouB. c.r, 7 i,'pm i'
Houston at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Arizona at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Detroit at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
'Seattle at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Oakland at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.


Rang


Team's lead

shrinking as

hites slump

Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas -
That hole in the middle of
the Texas lineup is getting,
harder to ignore, no matter
how much the. AL West-
leading Rangers insist they
can win without injured
slugger Josh Hamilton.
While the Rangers have
reached mid-June as the di-
vision leader for the first
time in 10 years, their hit-
ters are slumping and their
lead shrinking.
"It's not that we're down-
playing missing Josh. We're
a good team without him,
we're a good team with
him," Ian Kinsler said. "We
have won without him and
we need to continue doing
that until he gets healthy. We
can't sit around and blame
our offensive woes on that"
But their June swoon
does directly correspond
with Hamilton's second trip
to the disabled list this sea-
son. The center fielder who
bats third last played May
31. He is recovering from
surgery last week to repair
a tear in his abdominal mus-
cle and expected to be out
another month.
Before a day off Monday,
Texas was 2-4 on its current
homestand and hit .197 with
14 runs in that stretch
against Toronto and the Los
Angeles Dodgers. -"
The Rangers (35-27) were
held to one run twice and
scoreless another game.
The Los Angeles Angels
have moved within 2 1/2
games, the slimmest margin
in three weeks.


lrs beginning to struggle


Associated Press
Texas Rangers second baseman lan Kinsler, top, is unable to reach the throw from catcher
Jarrod Saltalamacchia as Toronto Blue Jays' Marco Scutaro (19) advances to second on a
wild pitch by Kevin Millwood in the eighth inning on June 1. in Arlington, Texas.


"We're not panicking string of 24 consecutive
when it comes to. our of- scoreless innings last week,
fense," Michael Young said. including back-to-back
"We know we'll make ad- shutout victories at home for
justments .... We'll get there. the first time in 29 seasons.
We're confident. It's a mat- But they won one of those by
ter of time." the smallest possible mar-
The last time the Rangers gin, 1-0 when they scored on
led the division in mid-June a sacrifice fly.
'was 1999, the season they Texas is hitting only .223
won the last of their three AL . with 39 runs and a 5-7 record
West titles. They were 7Y1/2 so far in June.
games back by this point a "Everybody kind of needs
year ago, and a whopping 28 to take it upon themselves to
games behind in 2001. ......""try to be a leader and make
There are 100 regular something happen," out-
season games left, and fielder David Murphy said.
things are out of whack for That has been a struggle
a team long,known for po- lately for several of the
tent offense and miserable everyday players. ,
pitching. Kinsler, the leadoff hitter
Rangers pitchers had a whose torrid start included a


6-for-6 game with a cycle
April 15 that had him third
in the majors with a .474 bat--
ting average, has dipped all
the way to .260. He was 4 for
33 the last eight games.
Young was in an'O-for-17
slump, two at-bats short of
the longest drought in his ca-
reer that includes five 200-
hit seasons, before an RBI
Single on Friday night. While
still hitting .316 overall, he is
3 for 24 (.125) during the
holdestand. - -
Andruw Jones, whose
playing time has increased
with Hamilton out, also had
an 0-for-17 skid before hit-
ting two home runs this
weekend against the Los
Angeles Dodgers. (Add a


homer Jones hit in a spring
training game against the
Dodgers and he has three in
three games against them
this year, after three
homers in 75 games for
them last season.)
Since nine homers in a 15-
game stretch, Nelson Cruz is
6 for 33 with one homer the
past nine games. He had
three of those hits in one
game.
Chris Davis has hit .303 (10
of 33) the past 10 games, but
the 23-year-old first baseman
is hitting .208 overall and on
a record strikeout pace. His
majors-high 92 strikeouts in
59 games includes 22 Ks his
last 13 home games.
"We're all confident,"
Kinsler insists. "We know
we're capable. We've just got
to move on."
The Rangers did go 9-4
when Hamilton missed 13
games earlier this season
with a strained ribcage
muscle after crashing into
an outfield wall while mak-
ing a catch. He got hurt
again when he ran into an-
other wall making another
catch less than a week
after returning from the
first DL stint.
Hamilton, who hit .304
with 32 homers and an AL-
high 130 RBIs last season,
was hitting .240 with six
homers and 24 RBIs in 35
games when he got hurt
again. But the Rangers de-
pend on him for more thap
just his bat.
"There are some intangi-
bles that come with him
being on the field, whether
it's leadership or defense'
base running," Murphy said.
"He brings so much to our
team and so much to the
game that we're easily a bet-
ter team with him on the
field and with him in the
lineup."


-MLB LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-ISuzuki, Seattle, .360; VMartinez,
Cleveland, .339; Youkilis,' Boston, .331;
Morneau, Minnesota, .329; Figgins, Los Ange-
les, l326; AdJones, Baltimore, .324; MiCabrera,
- Detroit, .320; Rolen, Toronto, .320.
RUNS-Damon, New York, 49; CPena, Tampa
Bay, 49; Morneau, Minnesota, 48; BRoberts,
Baltimore, 48; Scutaro, Toronto, 48; Figgins, Los
-Angeles, 47; Pedroia, Boston, 47.
RBI-Bay, Boston, 61; Longoria, Tampa Bay,
58; Morneau, Minnesota, 54; Teixeira, New
York, 54; TorHunter, Los Angeles, 51; CPena,
Tampa Bay, 48; Lind, Toronto, 45; VMartinez,
Cleveland, 45.
HITS-ISuzuki, Seattle, 87; AHill, Toronto, 86;
VMartinez; Cleveland, 82; Morneau, Minnesota,
82; .rawford, Tampa Bay, 81; Jeter, New York,
79; ,ano, New York, 77; Figgins, Los Angeles,
77; Young, Texas, 77.
.DOUBLES-Lind, Toronto, 22; -Longoria,
Tampa Bay, 21; BRoberts, Baltimore, 21; MY-
ounr Texas, 21; Byrd, Texas, 19; Markakis, Bal-
timore, 19; Scutaro, Toronto, 19.
HOIME RUNS-CPena, Tampa Bay, 20; Teix-
eira' New York, 20; Bay, Boston, 17; NCruzi,
Texais, 17; TorHunter, Los Angeles, 16;
Momfeau, Minnesota, 16; Branyan,.Seattle, 15;
Dye, Chicago, 15; Kinsler, Texas, 15.
PITCHING -Halladay, Toronto, 10-1; Slowey,
Minnesota, 9-2; Greinke, Kansas City, 8-2;
Wakefield, Boston, 8-3; JerWeaver, Los Ange-
les,' 7-2; Verlander, Detroit, 7-2; Beckett,
Boston, 7-3.
STRIKEOUTS-Verlander, Detroit, 106;
Gre'nke, Kansas City, 97; Lester, Boston, 96;
Halladay, Toronto, 88; FHernandez, Seattle, 84;
Beckett, Boston, 81; ABurnett, New York, 74;
JerWeaver, Los Angeles, 74.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-DWright, New York, .364; Tejada,
Hoiston, .344; Beltran, New Y'rk, .344; Hawpe,
Colorado, .337; HaRamirez, Florida, .330; Pujols,
St. Ilouis, .329; Sandoval, San Francisco, .325.
RUkS--lbanez, Philadelphia, 51; Pujols, St.
LoUis, 50; Utley, Philadelphia, 46; AdGonzalez,
San Diego, 43; Victorino, Philadelphia, 43;
Braun, Milwaukee, 42; Reynolds, Arizona, 42;
We h, Philadelphia, 42; Zimmerman, Wash-
ington, 42. �
RBl-Ibanez, Philadelphia, 59; Pujols, St.
Louis, 57; Fielder, Milwaukee, 56; Howard,
Phildelphia, 51; Hawpe, Colorado, 47; Dunn,
WaShington, 45; Helton, Colorado, 45;'
Re olds, Arizona, 45.
HI $ Tejada, Houston, 87; DWright, New
York, 82; Hudson, Los Angeles, 78; Ibanez,
Phila'delphia, 78; FSanchez, Pittsburgh, 78;
HaRamirez, Florida, 77; Zimmerman, Wash-
ington, 77.
DOUBLES-Tejada, Houston, 23; FSanchez,
PittSburgh, 22; Hawpe, Colorado, 21; Beltran,
New. York, 20; AdLaRoche, Pittsburgh, 20;
Hasamirez, Florida, 20; Hudson, Los Angeles,
19;flowand, San Francisco, 19; DWright, New
York, 19.
HOME RUNS-AdGonzalez, San Diego, 22;
lbanez, Philadelphia, 22; Pujols, St. Louis, 22;
f' Ho ard,/Philadelphia, 19; Dunn, Washington, 17;
F Reyolds, Arizona, 17; Bruce, -Cincinnati, 15;
Fieter, Milwaukee, 15; Utley, Philadelphia, 15.
PITCHING -Cain,'San Francisco, 9-1; Billings-
Sleyjos Angeles, 9-3; Marquis, Colorado, 8-4;
JSctana, New York, 8-4; Lilly, Chicago, 7-4;
DLowe, Atlanta, 7-4; Duke, Pittsburgh, 7-4.
STIJIKEOUTS-JVazquez, Atlanta, 105; Lince-
cum, San Francisco, 103; JSantana, New York,
94; Billingsley, Los Angeles, 93.


Baseball Today
SCOREBOARD
Today, June 16
Tampa Bay at Colorado (8:40 p. . EDT).The
Rockies try to set a franchise record with their
12th straight win.
STARS
Sunday
-Cliff Lie indian.s iC.,l a no-hiiter irio tihe
eigrir inning and inir,,shed win a trree.rAne'r as
Cleveland beat St.'Louis 3-0.
-Jonathan Broxton, Dodgers, earned his,
16th save in 18 chances in Los Angeles' 6-3 win
over Texas. He's pitched 32 innings this season,
allowing only 11 hits while striking
out 53.
-Jered Weaver, Angels,
pitched a five-hitter for his first ca-
reer shutout, leading Los Angeles
past San Diego 6-0.
-Matt Cain,. Giants, threw a
four-hitter for his seventh straight
victory In San Francisco's 7-1 win
over Oakland.
-Ronny Paulino, Marlins, hit Cliff
two home runs - his first career
multihomer game - in Florida's took nc
11-3 win over Toronto. ' nto the
-Brad Bergesen, Orioles,
pitched a five-hitter for his first ca-
reer complete game in Baltimore's 11-2 win
over Atlanta.
-Ryan Theriot, Cubs, hit a game-winning
single in the bottom of the ninth inning to lift
Chicago past Minnesota 3-2.
CLIFF'S EDGE
Cliff Lee took a no-hitter into the eighth in-
ning against St. Louis before Yadier Molina dou-
bled off the right-field wall to lead off the inning.
Lee allowed just two more hits in Cleveland's 3-
0 win over the Cardinals.
WHAT'S WRONG?
New York Mets ace Johan Santana was bat-
tered in the .worst start of his career, giving up
nine runs in three-plus innings during a 15-0
loss at Yankee Stadium. The left-hander said
he's OK after back problems last month, and
pitching coach Dan Warthen said Santana's re-
cent blister had healed.... The control problems
for Detroit's Dontrelle Willis continued when he
walked eight in 3 2-3 innings at Pittsburgh. He
has walked 18 in 11 innings.
PITCH-AND-HIT
Boston ace Josh Beckett hit his third career
home run, connecting against Philadelphia. His
last homer also came at Citizens Bank Park, on
May 20, 2006. ... Chicago White Sox starter
Mark Buehrle hit his first career home run in a
5-4 win at Milwaukee. �
SLUMPS
Toronto's Vernon Wells has gone 137 at-bats
without a home run, the longest drought of his
career.... Atlanta's Chipper Jones is hitless in
21 at-bats. His worst skid was an 0-for-23 rut in
2000.... Cincinnati's Willy Taveras is hitless in
his last 32 at-bats. That's the longest drought
by a Reds position player since Denis Menke
went 0 for 33 in 1973.
SHUTOUTS
The Yankees' 15-0 romp was their most-lop-
sided shutout at home since Aug. 4,1953, when
they beat Detroit by the same score.


SHUT DOWN-
Angel. reherer cot r,,ealds will have sea-
son erdjing surgery Tuedia1y on his injured left
trine A Col,d .-lup man for mie AL We.il icha'
pioni in [he pasi re irugglei ins year bel.,r
going on the disabled list May 27.'
, , NIGHT AND DAY
: Kansas City'sBrian Bannister is3-0 with a 0.90
ERA ,n irhree ahernoon r ansr. trIS ~'01n HC 's
15-1 n 26 career a,y gamer bul 3-25 at night.
SEEING STANLEY
Sidney Crosby and several members of the
Pittsburgh Penguins brought the Stanley Qup to
PNC Park on Sunday.
SPATS
Mets closer Francisco, Rodriguez
shouted at Yankees reliever Brian
Bruney in left field during batting
practice and the two were separated
by teammates. The dispute came
one day after they exchanged barbs
through the media.
SPEAKING
"Today was a terrible day and
that's about it." - Mets ace Johan
Lee Santana after a 15-0 loss to the New
-hitter YorkYankees.
)eighth SEASONS
inday. June 15
1902 - Corsicana beat
Texarkana 51-3 in a Texas League
game. Nig Clark of Corsicana took advantage of
the small park and hit eight homers. Some tele-
graph operators, thinking there was a mistake, re-
ported the score as 5-3. ,
1925 -The Philadelphia Athletics went into
the last half of the eighth inning trailing 15-4 and
scored 13 runs to defeat Cleveland 17-15.
1938 -Four days after no-hitting the Boston
Braves, Johnny Vander Meer of the Cincinnati
Reds pitched his second straight no-hit game, de-
feating the Dodgers 6-0 in the first night game
played in Brooklyn.
1952 -The St. Louis Cardinals, down 11-0 en-
. tearing the fifth inning, came back for a 14-12 tri-
umph overthe NewYorkGiants in the first game of
a doubleheader and set a National League record
for best comeback.
1963 - San Francisco's Juan Marichal pitched
a no-hitter against the Houston Colts for a 1-0 vic-
tory, the first Giants no-hitter since Carl Hubbell's
in 1929.
1976--The Pittsburgh Pirates and Houston As-
tros were 'rained in" at the Houston Astrodome
as 10 inches of rain fell on the city. Only mem-
bers of both teams were able to make it to the
stadium. Umpires, fans and stadium personnel
were unable to make it through the water.
1980 - Cleveland Indian Jorge Orta col-
lected six hits, a double and five singles, and
scored four times in a 14-5 triumph over the
Minnesota Twins. Toby Harrah had seven RBIs.
1992- Jeff Reardon broke Rollie Fingers'
career save mark of 341 when he preserved a
1-0 victory for the Boston Red Sox with one
scoreless Inning against the New York Yankees.
2002 - A double in the fifth inning of Texas'
4-0 loss to Houston gave Rafael Palmeiro 1,000
career extra-base hits. He became the 25th
major leaguer to reach that mark.
Today's birthdays: Tim Lincecum 25; Jeremy
Reed 28; Tony Clark 37; Andy Pettitte 37.


Isringhausen out
for Season
ST, PETERSBURG -Tampa Bay
Rays reliever Jason Isringhausen will
miss the rest of the season after tear-
ing a ligament in his surgically repaired
right elbow.
The 36-year-old right-hander was
injured while throwing a pitch during:
the.eighth inning of Saturday night's
victory over the Washington Nationals.
AnrMRI exam Monday found a tear of
the ulnar collateral ligament.
Isringhausen, who missed part of
last season with the St. Louis Cardinals
following elbow surgery, will undergo
Tommy John surgery to repair the cur-
rent damage. He was 0-1 with a 2.29
ERA in nine appearances this year.
The Rays placed Isringhausen, who
has 293 career saves, on the 60-day
disabled list on Sunday.
Ramirez drops to 6th
in NL All-Star voting
NEW YORK - Suspended slugger
Manny Ramirez has dropped to sixth
among NL outfielders in latest fan voting
for starting spots in the All-Star game.
The Los Angeles Dodgers star is
serving a 50-game penalty for violating
baseball's drug policy. He is eligible to
return July 3, and the All-Star game is
11 days later in St. Louis.
Philadelphia's Raul Ibanez leads NL
outfielders with 1,897,905 votes in re-
sults released Monday. He is followed by
Milwaukee's Ryan Braun (1,667,029),
the Mets' Carlos Beltran (1,367,412)
and the Cubs' Alfonso Soriano
(1,340,669). Philadelphia's Shane Vic-
torino moved into fifth with 1,116,524
and Ramirez was sixth at 999,800.
Ramirez hit .348 with six home runs
and 20 RBIs in 27 games before he
was suspended May 7.
Yankees' Marte to
resume trowg pg
NEWYORK -Yankees reliever
Damaso Marte will resume his throw-
ing program at the team's minor league
complex in Tampa, Fla., after he was
examined by Dr. James Andrews in
Birmingham, Ala.
The team said Andrews concurred
with the evaluations of Yankees physi-
cian Dr. Christopher Ahmad and Mets
medical director Dr. David Altchek,
who diagnosed the left-hander with
weakness and tendinitis in his pitching
shoulder.


Asccaled Press
Hal Woodeshick, who pitched for the expansion Houston
Colt A45s.during an 11-year career In which he was an All-
Star and part of a baseball World Series championship team,
died Sunday in Houston, the Astros said. He was 76.


Former MLB pitcher


Woodeshick dead at 76


Associated Press

HOUSTON - Hal Wood-
eshick, who pitched for the
expansion Houston Colt.45s
during an 11-year career in
which he was an All-Star
and part of a World Series
championship team, has
died. He was 76.
Woodeshick died Sunday
in Houston, the Astros said.
He was *.set by health
problemsMf6 a long while.
Known as. a durable re-
liever, Woodeshick went 44-
62 with 61 saves and a 3.56
ERA with Houston, Detroit,
Cleveland, Washington and
St Louis. He posted the sec-
ond victory in Houston his-
tory and la4r jed the NL
with 23 saves in 1964.
"Woody was a very signif-


icant pitcher," Astros presi-
dent of baseball operations
Tal Smith recalled Monday.
"He was a closer when the
role was a lot different than
it is now."
Woodeshick had a quirk
on the mound, too: While he
had an excellent pickoff
move to first base, he had
trouble throwing there after
fielding comebackers, The
problem -became so pro-
nounced he eventually trot-
ted toward the bag before
making a soft toss.
The left-hander made his
big league debut with De-
troit late in the 1956 season,
starting against the potent
New York Yankees. He.lost,
but his first career strikeout
victim was future -Hall of
Famer Yogi Berra.


East Division
GB WCGB
2 -
5 3
5 3
11 9

East Division
GB WCGB
4 V1,
6 3Y�
6Y 4
20 17Y2


Central Division
GB WCGB
- -
3 5
4� 6�
5V2 7T
6 8


Detroit
Minnesota
Chicago
Kansas City
Cleveland


Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Chicago
Pittsburgh
Houston


West Division
GB WCGB
2� 3
5% 6
8 %8


Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland


W
Los Angeles 42
Sarn Fran. 34
Colorado 31
San Diego 28
Arizona 27


Central Division
GB WCGB
� 1
212 3
2� 3
4 4�/2
4 41�


Home
17-14
19-15
14-14
17-12
17-12
16-18


West Division
GB WCGB
7 -
10� 3�4
13 6
15 8


Away
19-13
13-19
19-18 .
9-23
13-14


TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 B3


MMOR LEAGuE BASEBALL


,-/Kv nwt . ..r- .. .. .. .


F I
10-
31
jr









Od UESD~l3.AY, JUINE 10s., �LUUJ


GOLF
PGA Tour
Through June 14
Scoring Average
1, Tiger Woods, 68.88.2, David Toms, 69,44,
3, Brian Gay, 69.52.4, Steve Stricker, 69.56.5,
Tim Clark, 69.59.6, Sean O'Har, 69.74.7, Jim
Furyk , 69.75. 8, Kenny Perry, 69.79. 9 (tie),
Luke Donald and Jason Day, 69.82.
Driving Distance
1, Bubba Watson, 313.2.2, Robert Garrigus,
309.0.3, Dustin Johnson, 307.9.4, Gary Wood-
land, 307.3.5, Nick Watney, 302.7. 6, Brandt
Jobe, 302.3. 7, Scott Plercy, 301.6. 8, J.B.
Holmes, 300.9. 9 (tie), Charley Hoffman and
Harrison Frazar, 300.6.
Driving Accuracy Percentage
1, David Toms, 74.74%. 2, Joe Durant,
72.64%. 3, Brian Gay, 72.35%. 4, Tim Clark,
72.14%.5, Scott Verplank, 71.68%.6, Scott Mc-
Carron, 71.58%. 7, Bart Bryant, 71.21%. 8,
Mark Brooks, 70.36%. 9, Paul Goydos, 70.17%.
10, Jeff Klauk, 69.99%.
Greens In Regulation Pct.
1, John Senden, 71.40%. 2, Sean O'Hair,
71.11%.3, Briny Baird, 70.65%. 4, Brandt Jobe,
70.51%. 5, Camilo Villegas, 70.08%. 6, Jay
Williamson, 69.66%. 7, K.J. Choi, 69.01%. 8,
Steve Marino, 68.95%. 9, Dustin Johnson,
68.93%. 10, Steve Stricker, 68.89%.
Total Driving
1, Lucas Glover, 69.2, Mathew Goggin, 77.3,
Jonathan Byrd, 78. 4, John Senden , 79. 5,
Robert Allenby, 81.6, Boo Weekley, 86.7, Bill
Haas, 88.8, Kenny Perry, 98.9, Emie Els, 99.
10, DavidToms, 100.
Putting Average
1, Luke Donald, 1.697.2, Geoff Ogilvy, 1.710.
3, Steve Stricker, 1.713. 4, Rory Sabbatini,
1.716. 5, Charlie Wi, 1.717. 6, Joe Ogilvie,
1.719.7, Tim Clark, 1.722.8, Kevin Na, 1.724.
9, Brian Gay, 1.725.10, Mike Weir, 1.726.
Birdie Average
1, Geoff Ogilvy, 4.48.2, Dustin Johnson, 4.47.
3, Anthony Kim, 4.41.4, Sean O'Hair, 4.40. 5,
Paul Casey, 4.29.6 (tie), Steve Stricker and Tim
Clark, 4.22. 8, Tiger Woods, 4.21.9, Nick Wat-
ney, 4.19.10, Charley Hoffman, 4.17.
Eagles (Holes per)
1, Bubba Watson, 62.3.2, Nick Watney, 86.4.
3, Dustin Johnson, 88.2.4, Davis Love III, 94.0.
5, Tag Ridings, 97.2.6, Phil Mickelson, 105.0.7
(tie), Tiger Woods and Ryan Palmer, 108.0.9,
Chris Stroud, 110.3.10, Relief Goosen, 111.0.
Sand Save Percentage
1, David Mathis, 69.70%. 2, Kevin Na,
65.56%. 3, Luke-Donald, 64.47%. 4, Brian Gay,
63.64%. 5, lan Pouter, 63.46%. 6, Webb Simp-
son, 62.96%. 7, Brad Adamdnis, 62.50%. 8,
,Ben Curtis, 60.98%.,9, Mike Weir, 60.76%. 10,
Jerry Kelly, 60.56%.
Ail-Around Ranking
1, Sean O'Hair, 252. 2, Tim Clark, 293. 3,
Charlie Wi, 298.4, David Toms, 302.5, Kenny
Perry, 323.6, Dustin Johnson, 328.7, Camilo
Villegas, 333. 8, Nick Watney, 337.9, Stephen
Ames, 346.10, 2 tied with 349..
PGATOUR Official Money Leaders
1, Geoff Ogilvy (12), $3,319,045. 2, Zach
Johnson (15), $3,305,441. 3, Phil Mickelson
(11), $3,250,731. 4, Tiger Woods (7),
$3,246,813.5, Steve Stricker (13), $3,117,036.
6, Sean O'Hair (13), $3,047,542:7, Kenny Perry
(14), $2,776,705.8, Brian Gay (15), $2,740,535.
9, Nick Watney, (13), $2,587,386: 10, Paul
Casey (8), $2,560,610.
LPGA Tour
Through June 14
Scoring
1, Lorena Ochoa, 70.0286.2 (tie), Cristie Kerr
and Yani Tseng, 70.1522.4, Angela Stanford,
70.1538. 5, Paula Creamer, 70.4474. 6, Ji Yai
Shin, 70.5366.7, Suzann Pettersen, 70.6000.
8, Song-Hee Kim, 70.6279.9, Anna Nordqvist,
70.6842.10, In-Kyung Kim,; 70.7209.
Rounds Under Par
1, Angela Stanford, .744.2, Cristie Kerr, .717.
3 J Va, Snn, 707 4.'ran, Tenrg 652.5, Paula
Creamer," 632 6. Micr.eile We, .629. 7, In-
Kyung Kim, .628.8, Al Miyazato, .615.9, Lind-'
sey Wright, .605.10, Song-Hee Kim, .605.
Eagles
1, Yani Tseng, 8.2, Angela Stanford, 7. 3,
Cristie Kerr, 6.4, 9 tied with 5.
Greens in Regulation
1, Paula Creamer, .802. 2, In-Kyung Kim,
.756.3, Wendy Ward, .745.4, Yani Tseng, .738.
5, JiYai Shin, .735.6, Brittany Lang, .729.7, An-
gela Stanford, .726. 8, Karrie Webb, .725. 9,
Suzann Pettersen, .719. 10, Lindsey Wright,
.718.
Top 10 Finishes
1, Angela Stanford, .700.2, Cristie Kerr, .583.
3, Lorena Ochoa, .556. 4 (tie), Suzann Pet-
tersen, Yani Tseng, Paula Creamer and Ai
Miyazato, .500.8, Song-Hee Kim, .455.9 (tie),
In-Kyung Kim and Eun-Hee Ji, .364.
Driving Distance
1, Vicky Hurst, 275.3.2, Yani Tseng, 273.8.3,
Brittany Lincicome, 273.7. 4, Jee Young Lee,
273.5. 5, Michelle Wie, 272.1.6, Karen Stup-
ples, 271.4.7, Suzann Pettersen, 270.8.8, Brit-
tany Lang, 267.3. 9 (tie), Angela Stanford and
Sophie Gustafson, 266.5.
. Sand Saves
1, Carri Wood, .833. 2, Mindy Kim, .750. 3,
Cindy Rarick, .625.4, Marcy Hart, .600.5 (tie),
In-Kyung Kim and Maggie Will, .571.7, Marisa
Baena, .556. (tie), Leta Lindley and Rus-
samee Gulyanamitta, .545.10, Amy Hung, .529.
Birdies
1, In-Kyung Kim, 183.2, Suzann Pettersen,
180.3, Yani Tseng, 179.4, Cristie Kerr, 176.5,
Song-Hee Kim, 171. 6 (tie), NaYeon Choi, Jee
Young Lee and Katherine Hull, 162. 9, Ji Yai
Shin, 155.10, Brittany Lang,'151.
Driving Accuracy.
1, Mi Hyun Kim,'.836.2, Seon Hwa Lee, .833.
3, Paula Creamer, .832.4, Ji Yai Shin, .831.5,
Kimberly Hall, .821.6, Anna Nordqvist, .819.7,
Marcy Hart, .813.8, Jimin Karig, .800.9, Brandi
Jackson, .798.10, Euh-Hee Ji, .796.
Putting Average Per Round
1, Leta Lindley, 13.07.2, Jane Park, 16.29.3,
Laura Davies, 16.73. 4, Russamee Gulyana-
mitta, 17.00.5, Lorena Ochoa, 17.11.6, Brandi
Jackson, 17.40.7, Inbee Park, 17.44.8, Seon
Hwa Lee, 17.95.9, Louise Friberg, 17.96. 10,
Paula Creamer, 18.42.
Putts Per Green (GIR)
1, Ashleigh Simon, 1.71.2, Song-Hee Kim,
1.73.3 (tie)', Natalie Gulbis and Allison Hanna-
Williams, 1.74.5 (tie), In-Kyung Kim and Hee-
Won Han, 1.75.7,7 tied with 1.76.
Champions Tour
Through June 7
Charles Schwab Cup
1, Bemhard Langer, 1,162 Points. 2, Michael
Allen, 720.3, Larry Mize, 672.4, Loren Roberts,
625. 5, Keith Fergus, 570. 6, Mark O'Meara,
541.7, Nick Price, 493.8, Joey Sindelar, 489.9,
Gene Jones, 471.10, Andy Bean, 465.
Scoring Average
1, Bamhard Langer, 69.03.2, Joey Sindelar,


69.77.3, Andy Bean, 69.82.4, Jay Haas, 69.87.
5, Gene Jones, 69.97.6, Mark O'Meara, 70.00.
7, Fred Funk, 70.05.8, Dan Forsman, 70.13.9,
Eduardo Romero, 70.14.10, John Cook, 70.26.
Driving Distance
1, Tom Purtzer, 308.3. 2, Steve Thomas,
304.3. 3, Sandy Lyle, 299.1.4, Keith Fergus,
295.0.5, Dan Forsman, 291.3.6, Phil Blackmar,
290.7. 7, Gil Morgan, 289.9. 8, Eduardo
Romero, 288.8.9, Bernhard Langer, 287.5.10,
R.W. Eaks, 286.4.
Driving Accuracy Percentage
1, David Edwards, 78.95%. 2, Allen Doyle,
77.78%. 3, Hale Irwin, 76.90%. 4, Blaine Mc-
Calllster, 76.57%. 5, Bruce Fleisher, 76.49%. 6,
John Morse, 74.73%. 7, Scott Hoch, 74.49%. 8,
Larry Mize, 74.11%. 9, Leonard Thompson,
73.98%. 10, Bob Gilder, 73.81%.
Greens In Regulation Pct.
1, Bernhard Langer, 76.54%. 2, Dan Fors-
man, 76.13%. 3, John Cook, 75.00%. 4, Tom
Kite, 74.26%. 5, Gil Morgan, 73.61%. 6, Bobby
Wadkins, 73.50%. 7, Tom Purtzer, 72.82%. 8,
Jeff Sluman, 72.59%. 9, Larry Mize, 72.45%.
10, 2 tied with 72.22%,


For the record


SFlorida LOTTERY


CASH 3 (early)
i- 9 3- 7
CASH 3 (late)
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PLAY 4 (early)
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Here are the winning 4-5-2-3
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On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
MLB BASEBALL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Marlins at Boston Red Sox
8 p.m. (WGN) Chicago White Sox at Chidago Cubs
8:30 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Colorado Rockies
NCAA BASEBALL - COLLEGE WORLD SERIES
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Game 7 - UNC vs. Southern Mississippi
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Game 8 --Arizona St. vs. Texas


Total Driving
1, Bernhard Langer, 25. 2 (ti, T Loren
Roberts, 1.758. 9, R.W. Eaks, 1.759. 10, Ed-
uardo Romero, 1.760.
Sir Haas, 4.23.3, Andy Bean, 4.18.
4, Eduardo Romero, 4 14 5, Genre Jones.
4.03. 6 (tie), Brad Bryant Dan Forsman and
Joey Sindelar, 3.97.9, eitr. Fergus, 3 88 10,
John Cook, 3.84.
Eagles (Holes per)
1,. Jerry Pate, 69.0. 2, Gene Jones, 77.1.3,
R.W. Eaks, 90.0. 4 (tie), David Edwards and
Keith Fergus, 99.0. 6, Steve Thomas, 100.8.7
(tie), Bemhard Langer, Mark O'Meara and Joey
Sindelar, 108.0.10, Larry Nelson, 120.0.
Sand Save Percentage
1, Loren Roberts, 73.47%. 2, Mark McNulty,
67.44%. 3, Jerry Pate, 62.86%. 4, John Morse,
62.16% 5, Mike McCullough, 60.53%. 6 (tie),
Larry Nelson, Mark O'Meara and Mike Reid,
60.00%. 9, Fulton Allem, 59.38%. 10, Nick
Price, 58.82%.
All-Around Ranking
1, Bernhard Langer, 84. 2, Mark O'Meara,
146. 3, Eduardo Romero, 147,4, Andy Bean,
153.5, Joey Sindelar, 154.6, John Cook, 156.
7, Gene Jones, 159.8, Larry Nelson, 174. 9,
Loren Robers, 175.10, Jeff Sluman, 176.
AUTO RACING
Sprint Cup Schedule
Feb. 7 - x-Budweiser Shootout (Kevin
Harvick)
Feb. 12 -x-Gatorade Duel 1 (Jeff Gordon)
Feb. 12 - x-Gatorade Duel 2 (Kyle Busch)
Feb. 15 - Daytona 500 (Matt Kenseth)
Feb. 22 - Auto'Club 500 (Matt Kenseth)
March 1 - Shelby 427 (Kyle Busch)
March 8 - Kobalt Tools 500 (Kurt Busch)
March 22 - Food City 500 (Kyle Busch)
-March 29 - Goody's Fast Pain Relief 500
(Jimmie Johnson)
April 5 - Samsung 500 (Jeff Gordon)
April 18 - Subway Fresh Fit 500 (Mark
Martin)
April 26 - Aaron's 499 (Brad Keselowski)
May 2 - Crown Royal Presents the Russ
Friedman 400 (Kyle Busch)
May 9 - SouuihErn 500 (Mark Mart;n)
May 16 - x-Sprint Showdow-, (Sai Hor-
nitii Jr.)
. May 16 - x-NASCAR Sprint All-Star Race
(Tony Stewart)
May 25 - Coca-Cola 600 (David Reutimann)
May 31 - Autism Speaks 400 (Jimmie John-
son)
June 7 - Pocono 500 (Tony Stewart)
June 14 - LifeLock 400 (Mark Martin)
June21 -,Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma,
Calif. :
June 28 - Lenox Industrial Tools 301,
Loudon, N.H.
July 4 - Coke Zero 400 Powered By Coca-
Cola, Daytona Beach, Fla.
July 11 - Li UfeLock.com 400, Joliet, III.
July 26 - Allstate 400 at The-Brickyard, In-
dianapolis
Aug. 2 - Pennsylvania 500, Long Pond, Pa.
Aug. 9 - Heluva Goodi Sour Cream Dips at
The Glen, Watkins Glen, N.Y.
Aug. 16- Michigan 400, Brooklyn, Mich.
Aug. 22 - Sharpie 500, Bristol, Tenn.
Sep. 6 - Pep Boys Auto 500, Hampton, Ga.
Sep. 12 - Chevy Rock &-Roll 400, Rich-
mond, Va.
Sep. 20 - Sylvania 300, Loudon, N.H.
SSep. 27 - Dover 400, Dover, Del.
Oct. 4 - Price Chopper 400, Kansas City,
Kan.
Oct. 11 - Pepsi 500, Fontana, Calif.
Oct. 17 - NASCAR Banking 500, Concord,
N.C.
Oct. 25 - TUMS Fast Relief 500, Mar-
tinsville, Va.
Nov. 1 - AMP Energy 500, Talladega, Ala.
Nov. 8 - Dickies 500, Fort Worth, Texas
Nov. 15 - Checker O'Reilly Auto Parts 500,
Avondale, Ariz.
Nov. 22 - Ford 400, Homestead, Fla.
x-non-points race

BASEBALL
College World Series
At Rosenblatt Stadium
Omaha, Neb.
Double Elimination
Saturday, June 13
Arkansas 10, Cal State Fullerton 6
LSU 9, Virginia 5
Sunday, June 14
Arizona State 5, North Carolina 2,10 innings
Texas 7, Southern Mississippi 6
Monday, June 15
Virginia 7, Cal State Fullerton 5, Cal State
Fullerton eliminated
LSU 9, Arkansas 1
Today's Games'
Game 7 - North Carolina (47-17) vs. South-
ern Mississippi (40-25), 2 p.m.
Game 8 - Arizona State (50-12) vs. Texas
(47-14-1), 7 p.m.
Wednesday, June 17
Game 9 - Virginia (49-14-1) vs. Arkansas
(40-23), 7 p.m.
Thursday, June 18
Game 10 - Game 7 winner vs. Game 8
loser, 7 p.m.
Friday, June 19
Game 11 - LSU (53-16) vs. Game 9 winner,
2p.m.
Game 12 - Game 8 winner vs. Game 10
winner, 7 p.m.
Saturday, June 20
Game 13- Game 6 winner vs. Game 9 win-
ner, 2 or 7 p.m., If necessary
Game 14 - Game 8 winner vs. Game 10
winner, 7 p.m., if necessary
NOTE: If only one game is necessary, it will
be played at 7 p.m.
� Championship Series
Best-of-3
Monday, June 22: Game 11 or 13 winner vs.
Game .12 or 14 winner, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, June 23: Game 11 or 13 winner vs.
Game 12 or 14 winner, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, June 24: Game 11 or 13 winner
vs. Game 12>or 14 winner, 7 p.m., if necessary


MOVES
Monday's Sports
Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS-.Signed 1B Ben
Carlson, RHP Brent Brach, LHP Kirk Wetmore
and INF Kyle Smith.
National League
HOUSTON ASTROS-Agfeed to terms with
RHP Tanner Bushue, RHP Brallon Wikoff, RHP
Justin Harper, RHP James MacDonald, RHP
Mark Jones, RHP Robert Dopovan, RHP Bren-
den Stines RHP Scott Migi, OFTelvin Nash, OF
Ryan Humphrey, OF Brian Kemp, OF Julio Mar-
tinez, OF Jackson Hogue,,SS BrandonWikoff,
SS Ben Orloff, LHP Mike Modica, LHP Travis
Smink, C David Williams, tB Ronald Sanchez,
1B Nicholas Stanley, 2B Barry Buteraand 3B
Aaron Bay.
.ST. LOUIS CARDINALS-Agreed to terms
with OF Virgil Hill, 1B Alan Ahmady, LHP Pat
Daugherty, 3B Matt Carpenter, OF Ross Smith,
1B David Washington, 1B Jonathan Rodriguez,
C Anthony Garcia, C Travis Tartamella, RHP
Scott Schneider, C Matthew Adams, RHP.Keith,
Butler, RHP. Josh Squatrito, OF Christian
Beatty, RHP Johnathan Fulino, LHP Justin Ed-
wards, LHP Daniel Calhoun, SS Tyler
Bighames, RHPTravis Lawler, S$ Devin Good-
win, RHP David KIngton, RHP Andrew Moss,
RHP Justin Smith, 3B Richard Racobaldo, LHP
John Durham, RHP Jesse Simpson, RHP Cale
Johnson, RHP Aaron Terry, LHP Manuel De La
Cruz, LHP Kyle Heim, RHP Michael Thompson
and RHP Jason Novak.
WASHINGTON, NATIONALS-Agreed to
terms with RHP Trevor Holder, SS Michael Tay-
lor, RHP Taylor Jordan, OF Justin Bloxom, RHP
Patrick Lehman, OF Naoya Washiya; SS Sean
Nicol, RHP Frank Corolla, 3B Jack Walker, LHP
Mitchell Clegg, RHP Dustin Crane, C Dianison
Boekhoudt, LHP Evan Bronson; RHP Rob
Wort, OF Jay Sierra and RHP Kyle Morrison.
Midwest League
QUAD CITIES RIVER BANDITS-An-
nounced SS Niko Vasquez was transferred to
Batavia (NYP). - '
American Association
EL PASO DIABLOS-Signed INF Edwin Mal-
donado and Cardoza Tucker. Released INF
RobdrtoMejia and RHP Mark Michael.
FORT WORTH CATS-Signed RHP Matt
Gibbs and RHP Ryan Trytten.
GRAND PRAIRIE AIRHOGS-Traded LHP
Vinnie DeChristofaro to Southern Maryland (At-
lantic) to complete an earlier deal.
LINCOLN SALTDOGS-Signed RHP Joshua
Giles. Released LHP Vince Davis.
SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS-Released INF
Brandon Jones.
SIOUX FALLS CANARIES-Signed OF
Jared Lemieux.
ST. PAUL SAINTS-Released LHP Adam
Cox. Signed INF Stephen Derrick.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS-Announced G
Royal Ivey declined the player option on his con-
tract for the 2009-10 season, making him an un-
restricted free agent.
Women's National Basketball Association
DETROIT SHOCK-Announced the resigna-
tion of coach Bill Laimbeer. Named Rick Mahom
coach. Announced assistant coach Cheryl
Reeve will keep her title and become the team's
general manager. ,
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL-Suspended Arizona TE Ben Patrick
four games for violating the league's substance
abuse policy. *
ATLANTA FALCONS-Signed OL Jeremy
Newberry.
DENVER BRONCOS-Signed WR Brandon
Lloyd.
NEW YORK JETS-Signred RB Shonn
Greene to a four-year contract. Signed LB Brock
Christopher. HOCKEY
National Hockey League
BOSTON BRUINS-Signed general man-
ager Peter Chiarelli to a contract extension.
CAROLINA HURRICANES-Agreed to
terms with coach Paul Maurice on a multiyear
contract. Announced Ron Francis will return as
associate head coach and take on the title of di-
rector of player personnel.
OTTAWA SENATORS-Announced presi-
dent and CEO Roy Mlakar will leave effective
June 30. Promoted chief operating officer Cyril
Leader to president. Named Erin Crowe execu-
tive vice-president and chief financial officer. An-
nounced general manager Bryan Murray will
add executive vice-president to his duties.
PHILADELPHIA FLYERS-Announced the
retirement of D Darian Hatcher and named him
player development coach.
American Hockey League
CHICAGOWOLVES-Signed F Patrick Galivan.
ECHL
READING ROYALS-Acquiredthe rights to
F Kyle Rank and D Joey Ryan from Cincinnati
to complete an earlier trade. Sent F Erik Felde
to Johnstown to complete an earlier trade.
VICTORIA SALMON KINGS-Acquired F
Andy Brandt from Gwinnett to complete an ear-
lier trade.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
COLUMBUS CREW-Traded M-F Pat Noo-
nan to Colorado for a 2010 first-round draft pick
and allocation money.
United Soccer League
VANCOUVER WHITE CAPS-Fined D Wes-
ley Charles and F Charles Gbeke an undis-
closed amount for "unsportsmanlike behavior"
in a June 12 game against Miami.
COLLEGE
CONNECTICUT-Announced freshman F
Ater Majok withdrew from the NBA draft.
FLORIDA-Named Jan Dowling women's
golf coach.
GEORGE MASON-Extended the contract
of athletic director Tom O'Connorthrough 2013.
GEORGIA TECH-Announced sophomore F
Gani Lawal withdrew from the NBA draft.
ILLINOIS STATE-Named Bo Durkac and
Billy Mohl assistant baseball coaches.
IPFW-Announced the retirement of softball
coach Keith Fisher.
LEBANON VALLEY-Named Brianne Tier-
ney women's lacrosse coach.
NOTRE DAME-Announced junior F Luke
Harangody withdrew from the NBA draft.
WEST CHESTER-Flred women's golf
coach Mike Thompson.


Sports BRIEFS


Crackers keeping
winning in Cooperstown
The Florida Crackers base-
ball team continued its winning
ways on the second day of the
Cooperstown Field of Dreams
Tournament in New York.
The Crackers clipped North
Alabama, 5-4, with the help of
two home runs. Jesse Lepore,
who finished second in a home
run derby a day earlier, had one
and Brooks Brasher had the
other.
Later in the day the Crackers
cruised past Ohio to the tune of
12-5. Cory Weiand and Trent
Johnson both homered in the
contest.
The Crackers are now 4-0 in
the tournament and will put
their perfection on the line
today against the Lousianna
Falcons.
Fawe says he is
considering playing
NEW YORK - Brett Favre


NASCAR
Continued from Page Bl

in either of those series.
But GM's cost-cutting
could also reach the Cup se-
ries as early as this week,,
and every., Chevrolet-sup-
ported team has got to be on
edge as owners wonder just
how much cash might van-
ish from the 2009 budget.- ....
Never mind the flashes of
muscle shown by Toyota the
past year, Chevrolet is still
the top player in NASCAR
with great success spread
among a diverse lineup of
teams and drivers. Chevy
teams have won 13 of the
last 16 Cup titles, and Mark
Martin's victory Sunday was
its eighth in 15 races this
season.
There were 14 Chevy's in
the 43-car field Sunday, and
six of the 12 drivers cur-
rently qualified for the
Chase for the championship


BRIGHT
Continued from Page B1

$36 million, six-year deal.
The 6-foot-10 Turkoglu
provides all kinds' of
matchup problems for op-
ponents, and his rare size
and ballhandling skills have
made him the player the
Magic run their offense
through when it counts the
most. That earned him the
nickname "Mr. Fourth Quar-
ter" from teammates, who
said they hope the Magic
find a way to keep him.
"I hope he stays. If I don't
convince him, I might have
to go to Turkey and kidnap
him," Lewis joked.
Backup center Marcin
Gortat will be an unre-
stricted free agent and
likely get a contract worth
well more than the $770,00
he made this season, mean-
ing Orlando likely will not
be able to retain him. Gen-
eral manager Otis Smith has
said he would like to keep
both, but that would require
moving a few players to
clear salary cap space or go
over the luxury tax.
The Magic might have


cws
Continued from Page B1

for me. Virginia is a good
team, but I made them look
a lot better. That's my fault.
I'll come back next year
and prove I shouldn't have
done that."
Dustin Garneau's two-run
homer off Virginia starter
Robert Morey put Fullerton
up 2-0 in the second inning.
Virginia took the lead for
good in the bottom half by
scoring four times.
Keith Werman, the Cava-
liers' ninth-place hitter, sin-
gled home the tying run and
Danny Hultzen hit a two-
run single past diving right
fielder Gary Brown..
Werman continued his
key hitting in the College
World Series, going 2 for 4
and driving in two runs. The
140-pound freshman is 6 for
9 with two doubles and
three RBIs in two CWS
games.
"Keith Werman is win-
ning over the hearts of peo-
ple here in Omaha,"
O'Connor said. "He's a spe-
cial gutty player who comes
up big again today."
Hultzen said he and his
teammates drew confidence
from beating Strasburg.
"A guy like Stephen Stras-
burg is a different case be-
cause he could be the best


says he is considering coming
out of retirement for a second
time and the only team he has
talked to about a return to the
NFL is the Minnesota Vikings.
Favre appeared on the new
HBO show "Joe Buck Live" in
his first public appearance
since retiring from the New York
Jets in February.
The three-time NFL MVP
said Monday night he had sur-
gery 2 1/2 weeks ago on his
throwing arm. He says the doc-
tor who performed the surgery
on his biceps told him it would
take four to five weeks for the
NFL's career leader in touch-
down passes to know if the pro-
cedure was a success.
Favre says he has had con-
tact with the Vikings, but "noth-
ing more than are you
interested."
AP source: Wild hire
Todd Richards coach
MINNEAPOLIS - The Min-
nesota Wild have hired San


are GM-supported. If that
money dries up, particularly
before the end of the sea-
son, it will have wide-rang-
ing effects on the
competition.
There would be no way
for Richard Childress Rac-
ing to revive its slumping
program before the end of
the year, and. Juan Pablo
Montoya would, have an ex-
tremely difficult time mak-
ing his first Chase. Tony
Stewart's bid to become the
first driver/owner to win a
championship since the late
Alan Kulwicki would be-
come much harder, and
many longtime loyalties to
Chevrolet could be tested.
So why shouldn't
NASCAR let more manufac-
turers into the sport? Two of
the three current partici-
pants are struggling to pay
the bills, and Ford isn't ex-
actly on stable ground. Even
mighty Toyota has taken a
hit this year, and as the only
player in Nationwide and


some wiggle room.
They have four point
guards on the roster with
Nelson's return. Nelson will
begin next season as the
starter, and Orlando will
have to determine if it wants
to try to move Rafer Alston
or keep him as the backup
iriplace of reliable reserve
Anthony Johnson. Tyronne
Lue also is still on the roster.
Whatever happens, it's
hard for the Magic to look
back on this season with,
anything but positive mem-
ories. They were the come-
back team all season.
Nelson went out with a
shoulder tear in February
that seemed to wreck the'
Magic's season, then Alston
was acquired at the trade
deadline to keep their title
hopes alive. Orlando lost on
two buzzer-beaters in the
playoffs, twice rallied from
a series deficit, won a Game
7 in Boston to eliminate the
defending-champion Celtics
and knocked out MVP Le-
Bron James and the top-
seeded Cleveland Cavaliers.
But Orlando blew chances
in Games 2 and 4 to lose in
overtime against the Lakers,
then were forced to try to be-
come the first time in finals

college pitcher ever,"
Hultzen said. "But we pre-
pare for each starting
pitcher the same way."
iFllerton, 21-9 in NCAA
tournament elimination
games since 1999, tried to
come back against closer
Kevin Arico in the ninth.
Joey Siddons had an in-
field single and Christian
Colon reached on an error
before Brown's RBI single.
Arico struck out Josh Fell-
hauer, but then Virginia
shortstop Tyler Cannon's
backhand flip to Werman
pulled the 5-foot-7 second
baseman off the bag as he
tried to get the forceout, al-
lowing another run to score.
Cannon redeemed him-
self moments later when
Khris, Davis grounded to
him. This time Cannon
made a perfect flip to Wer-
man for the final out
Virginia used five pitch-
ers, with Andrew Carray (9-
1) getting the win .after
taking over for Morey in the
fifth. Carraway allowed
four hits in 2 2-3 scoreless
innings.
"He did a nice job, be-
cause the game was on the
ropes a little bit when he
came in," O'Connor said.
"They had momentum
working, and he calmed us
down. That's what your sen-
ior veteran players do."
O'Connor, who grew up in
the Omaha area and pitched


Jose Sharks assistant Todd
Richards to be their next head
coach.
A person with knowledge of
the hire confirmed the hiring
Monday to The Associated
Press, speaking on condition
of anonymity because an ofi-
cial announcement had not
been made.
Richards spent one season
with the Sharks after two years
as head coach of Pittsburgh's
top farm club while new Wild
general manager Chuck
Fletcher was an assistant GM
for the Penguins.
Richards is from the Min-
neapolis suburb of Crystal. He's
a former defenseman for the
University of Minnesota who.
played briefly for the Hartford -
Whalers and spent several'
years in the minors before turn-
ing to coaching.
He's the second coach in the
team's nine years. Jacques
Lemaire resigned in April.


Trucks, the company will
likely have to reconsider
spending money on those
series.
France needs to make de-
cisions based on the long-
term health of the industry,
and worrying about
rankling fans who only buy
American can't be a consid-
eration. With sponsorship
opportunities dwindling,
many teams are hanging on
by a thread. They need
money and they need man-
ufacturer support, and with-
out it, they'll. eventually
vanish from the NASCAR
landscape.
The automakers' current
economic woes will eventu-
ally jeopardize everything a
NASCAR fan wants: full
fields- competitive racing
and exciting drivers to
cheer every weekend. By
opening the industry. to
more foreign. automakers,
NASCAR could take a sig-
nificant step toward stabi-
lizing the future of the sprt-


history to rebound from a 3-
1 series deficit That was one
rally that fell short.
"I don't know if you can
console anybody. It's very,
very difficult," Magic coach
Stan Van Gundy said. "I feel
the same way they did this
year. They were, a;- great
group to work with. They
busted their (butt) all year,
and attitude-wise and stuff
they were great"
But the road doesn't seem
like it will end here for this
Magic team.
Unlike when Shaquille
O'Neal bolted for Los Ange-
les after the '96 season - a
year after the Magic were
swept in the finals by Hous-
ton - and left the franchise
decimated, Orlando. has
tried to build a long-term fu-
ture around Howard. "He
was the NBA's defensive
player of the year after lead-
ing the league in blocks and
rebounds this season, and at
only 23 years old, he seems
well on way to being a dom-
inant center for years, to
come.
"I've got a great feeling
that we'll have a chance to
be back," Howard kaid.
"There's no doubts inIqny
mind about that"

for hometown Creightoo in
the 1991 CWS, said the GCvs
showed poise in responding
to Saturday's 9-5 loss to LSU
in their opener.
"They've handled all.this
with an unbelievable
amount of maturity,"; -he
said. "First time here; I
thought we' played a really
good ball game on Saturday
night. Bouncing back today
is pretty special."
LSU 9, Arkansas
OMAHA, Neb. - Mikie>
Mahtook, Austin Nola and 9
Blake Dean homered and LSU
stayed unbeaten at the College
World Series with a 9-1 victory
over Arkansas on Monday ;
night.
The No. 3-seeded Tigers'.
(53-16), who have won 12 ,
straight, are off until they pla,
the Razorbacks or Virginia op
Friday. Awin in that game
would send LSU to next wee's
best-of-three finals.
Arkansas (40-23) and Vir-
ginia meet Wednesday in an
elimination game.
Razorbacks starter Brett Eib-
ner (5-5) was knocked out in
the second inning after allowing
four runs, TJ Forrest held LSU
scoreless until the sixth, when
the Tigers added five more..
LSU's Louis Coleman (14,2)'
allowed a run in thb first. Dahiel
Bradshaw came on to start the
seventh, and Nolan Cain '.
pitched the ninth.


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLc


SPORTS


aD Tur..Ti .n, Tv. *TN 120 09











A x W ;Citrus County
S.^ ." Parks & Recreaton


YOUR GUIDE TO CITRUS COUNTY COMMUNITY SPORTS

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Summer
Football Camp
The Gators Athletes As-
sociation in partnership with
'Citrus County Parks and
Recreation is conducting a
*three-day football camp this
summer..
- The camp will run from
July 27-29 from 8 a.m. until'
56 p.m. at Central Ridge
,Park.
Boys and girls ages 8-16
are invited to participate. If
registered by July 1, the
camp fee is $110. Those,
who register after July 1 will
pay $125.
Participants will have a
chance to work on their
football skills with former
University of Florida football
players and former NFL
players. Coaches from Cit-
rus, Lecanto and Crystal
,River will also be on hand.
. Work with players such
.as Scott Armstrong from the
University of Florida, Kevin
,Carter of the Dallas Cow-
boys and Greg Cleveland,
-who played for both Tampa
.Bay and St. Louis.
Many other players will
also be participating. Con-
-tact the Citrus County Parks
'and Recreation office at
527-7677 for information.
Men's Summer
Flag Football
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation is getting
geared up for men's sum-
mer flag football. There will
be two leagues, a Monday
.night and a Wednesday
night league.
If you are interested in
.putting a team in this
league sign-ups will be held
from June 15-19. It's $50 to
sign a team up. The league
fees are based off of the
number of teams signing-
up. League fees are due
June 26 and the following
"week will be the first Mon-
day night and Wednesday
, night games. For more in-*
formation call 527-7677.


Play like a champion


S '... . I 'Special to the chronicle
Sponsors like Beef 'o' Brady's make it possible for teams like the 'Stingers' to sweep the league and become the cham-
pionship winners for the co-ed softball spring season. Does anyone know where Tina Keegan is?




Individual players still needed,


Special to the Chronicle league fee cost on June 19.
League fees are determined
Hey Citrus County! Parks by the amount of teams reg-
and Recreation is hosting istered. On average, with six
several sports program this teams joining, league fees
summer and are in need of could be around $300.
single players. Men's soft- , Depending on balls and.
ball, coed softball and coed awards the price could fluc-
kickball are looking for tuate. So far, there are
players. Teams are in seven teams interested in
search for consistent devout playing for this summer
players that will show up for league which will be held
every game. Sign-up now on Monday nights at 6:30,
because spots will fill up 7:30, and 8:30 at Bicenten-
fast. If you are interested in nial Park in Crystal River
putting in a team: and starts June 22.
Sign up for men's softball. . Co-ed softball sign-ups are
'Itb $50 to' register a team. "from June 15-19 and it is aset
Teams will be notified of the fee of $250 per team. Co-ed


softball is a recreational
sport and is played on Tues-
day and Thursday nights.
However there are currently
seven teams interested in
this league so every game
night there will be a sched-
uled bye. Games are at 6:30,
7:30, and 8:30. This league
plays at Bicentennial Parkin
Crystal River and' starts on
June 23.
Co-ed kickball sign-ups
are from June 15-19 and it
has a set fee of $150 to enter
a team. Co-ed kickball is a
creative, laid back, yet fun
sport for any type of athlete
that may range from never


being involved in a sport to
an all star. Kickball is funny'
and brings friends and fam-
ily together. It is only played
on Wednesday nights at 6:30,
7:30, and 8:30 at Bicenten-
nial Park in Crystal River.
Any single players inter-
ested in any of the afore-
mentioned sports please
call Jennifer Worthington at
527-7677
Any teams interested in
registering a team can stop by
the Parks and Recreation Ad-
ministrative Office located on
Hwy 491 or call 527-7677. Ouri
office is open Monday-Friday
from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m.


Sharks to hold
golf tournament
The Crystal River
Sharks youth football and
cheerleading benefit golf
tournament will be held
Saturday, June 27 at El Di-
ablo Golf and Country
Club. Shotgun starts at
8:30 a.m. Entry fee is $50
per player, $100 for a hole
sponsor, or $250 for a four-
some and a hole sponsor.
There are unbelievable
prizes for a hole-in-one on
all par 3's, including a brand
new GMC truck, a brand
new Harley Davidson mo-
torcycle, a brand new car
and $10,000 cash!
Gift cards will be
awarded to the winning
teams and many door and
raffle prizes including auto-
graphed baseball and foot-
ball memorabilia will be
given out. Also as an added
bonus, celebrities from the
Tampa Bay Bucs are
scheduled to play in the
tournament.
Over 100 players partici-
pated last year and this
year is expected to sell out
so secure your group's
spot today. All proceeds
will go to the Crystal River
Sharks to help fund many
needs, such as sponsoring
children.
This tournament is one of
the most enjoyable of the
year. Come out for a great
time and to help out the
kids. Catered bbq lunch will
be provided as well as cold
beverages.
For more information
please contact Dan Baldner
at coachdan10@gmail.com.
564-1223, or Chon Casey
at 400-0824.


Mayweather injured;


July fight postponed


LennoxLewis

enters Hall
3 Associated Press

'LAS VEGAS - Floyd,
'Iayweather Jr. has dam-
aged cartilage in his ribs
and will stop training for his
comeback fight until a doc-
4or says he can resume.
.'Richard Schaefer, chief
executivee of Golden Boy
'Promotions,,told The Asso-
ciated Press on Monday
that Mayweather has been
'i tremendous pain since
-sliffering the injury during
trainingg on Thursday.
. "He tried to work through
it He really did not want to
.postpone the fight, but it
',ame to the point where he
Could barely sit," Schaefer
said. "He could not train, he
:could not move and there
Avas really not much of a
choice. "
Mayweather(39-0, 25 KOs)
vwas scheduled to fight Juan
Manuel Marquez (50-4-1, 37
KOs) on July 18 at the MGM
Grand in Las Vegas.
.'. Schaefer said both fight-
,ers have committed to
?scheduling and a Sep-
tember date has been men-
tioned. But promoters and
the fighters won't agree to
a date without the OK of
doctors.
,, Mayweather's ribs are not
Broken, and the former five-
. division champ plans to
g'ee a doctor this week,
Schaefer said. He said he
did not know exactly how
Mayweather damaged his
cartilage.
"'J "Right now he cannot go
and train, he cannot work
&dut, he cannot run, he cannot
,Ihit the heavy bag and the
0'peed bags and jump ropes
and all these kinds of
:things," Schaefer said. "He
,,definitely will need some ad-
critional training but again,
Floyd is such an amazing


athlete- and really on top of
his game - that I think it will
be' relatively easy for him to
get right back into it"
Cartilage connects the ribs
to the sternum, and can tear
away after direct blows to
the chest, other trauma or
particularly violent coughs
and sneezes.
Dallas Cowboys quarter-
back Tony Romo injured his
rib cartilage during the
team's season ending game
at Philadelphia last year, a :
disastrous 44-6 loss in which
Romo fumbled, was sacked
and benched. Coach Wade
Phillips said a flare-up of the
pain caused Romo to col-
lapse in the shower after-
ward.
Mayweather and Marquez.
were scheduled to fight at a
catch-weight of about 143
pounds, eight more than
Marquez has ever fought and
the lightest weight for May-
weather since 2005.
Mayweather hasn't boxed
since knocking out Ricky
Hatton in December 2007.
He was slated to fight a re-
match with Oscar De La
Hoya but instead abruptly
retired last June, while still
considered the sport's
pound-for-pound king.
Now, many believe Manny
Pacquiao holds that title
after he beat De La Hoya
and Hatton in fewer rounds
than Mayweather.
It's possible that May-
weather and Pacquiao will
eventually meet in the ring
if Mayweather beats Mar-
quez first
But promoter Bob Arum
also wants to set up a Pac-
quiao-Miguel Cotto fight in
November, the earliest
Cotto can get back into the
ring after the welter-
weight's win over Joshua
Clottey on Saturday.
Cotto won by decision but
left Madison Square Gar-
den in New York with a big
gash over his left eye that
required six stitches.


Lennox Lewis inducted
into Hall of Fame
CANASTOTA, N.Y. - In a
sport many view for its vio-
lence, Lennox Lewis said Sun-
day he wanted to be
remembered for making it a
"sweet science, a magical
dance" as he was inducted
into the International Boxing
Hall of Fame.
"Our sport is usually looked
at as a brutal, savage sport,"
-Lennox told hundreds of fight
fans.gathered for the hall's 20th
annual induction ceremony.
"I see it as a sweet science,
a magical dance. For me, I just
wanted to live up to that, and
keep the dignity and the hu-
manistic aspect and the posi-
tiveness of it ... so that people
will remember that's. What I did
for boxing," Lewis said.
A towering presence at 6
feet 5, 250 pounds, Lewis dis-
played a nimbleness never be-
fore seen in a fighter his size.
The 43-year-old Lewis retired
in 2003 with a record of 41-2-
1, including 32 KOs, and en-
tered he hall in his first year of
eligibility. .
Also among the 14 in-
ductees Sunday were Ameri-
can bantamweight champion
Orlando Canizales and South
African junior lightweight cham-
pion Brian Mitchell.
Posthumous honorees in-
cluded middleweight champion
William "Gorilla" Jones, welter-
weight champion "Mysterious"
Billy Smith and middleweight
champion Billy Soose in the
Old-Timer Category. Nine-
teenth-century American
heavyweight champion Tom
Hyer was recognized in the Pi-
oneer Category.
Lewis lived in England until
age 12 when his family moved
to Canada. He began fighting
as an amateur at age 15.
Lewis said it was because of
his mother that he became in-
terested in boxing.


AP, others sue NCAA,
FSU on records law
TALLAHASSEE - The As-
sociated Press and other
Florida news organizations are
suing the NCAA and Florida
State University, saying they vi-
olated open govemment laws
by not making public corre-
spondence about an academic
cheating scandal at the school.
The 21-page lawsuit was
filed Monday in Leon County
circuit court.
The dispute is over a re-
sponse the NCAA gave Florida
State on its appeal of sanctions
resulting from an academic
cheating scandal. The school
would be stripped of wins in 10
sports, including football. That
would seriously hurt Bobby
Bowden's, bid to become col-
lege football's all-time win-
ningest coach.
Florida State President T.K.
Wetherell said he wouldn't be
doing his job if the school didn't
get sued occasionally. The
NCAA didn't immediately re-
spond to a request for com-
ment.
Kentucky top scorer
Meeks to go pro
LEXINGTON, Ky. - Ken-
tucky top scorer Jodie Meeks
has decided to leave the Wild-
cats and remain in considera-
tion for the NBA draft.
Coach John Calipari posted
Monday on Twitter that Meeks
had called to let him know
about the decision. The school
also released a statement.
"I want to thank the fans and
the city of Lexington," Meeks
said in the statement. "They
have been great and I will al-
ways be a Kentucky Wildcat. I
feel comfortable with my deci-
sion and I'm confident in my
ability. My family and I talked
over the weekend and decided
this was the best decision."
Wake Forest's Teague
staying in NBA draft
RALEIGH, N.C - Wake
Forest star Jeff Teague is stay-
ing in the NBA draft, ending his
college career after just two
seasons.
Teague announced in April


Sports BRIEFS
he would declare for the draft
but not hire an agent, allowing
him the option of returning to
school for his junior year. But
.coach Dino Gaudio said
,Teague told himrn shortly before
Monday afternoon's deadline tc
withdraw that he would stay in
the draft.
Teague is the second sopho
more to declare from the
Demon Deacons, joining for-
ward James Johnson.
Teague led the Demon Dea-
cons (24-7) at about 19 points
per game, helping them earn a
No. 1 ranking in January before
being upset in the first round o'
the NCAA tournament. Teague
was a second-team all-Atlantic
Coast Conference pick.
The draft is June 25.
Jets sign 3rd-round
pick RB Greene
FLORHAM PARK, N.J. -
The New York Jets have
signed third-round draft pick
Shonn Greene to a multiyear
deal.
The bulldozing running bacl<
-out of Iowa was the first pick of
the third round after the Jets
traded up to select him.
Greene rushed for a school-
record 1,850 yards and 20
touchdowns, and was selected
the Big Ten's offensive player
of the year.
He could provide a comple-
ment to Thomas Jones and
Leon Washington, or provide
insurance if negotiations go
awry with Jones.
With the signing Monday, th
Jets have inked all three of
their draft picks, including qual
terback Mark Sanchez and of-
fensive lineman Matt Slauson.
Champions golfer Greel
has leg amputated
JACKSON, Miss. - Cham-
pions Tour golfer Ken Green
had his lower right leg ampu-
tated because of severe in-
juries caused by a car
accident.
Green's agent Kevin
Richardson says doctors re-
moved the leg on Monday at a
hospital in Jackson, Miss. He
said Green is resting and in
good condition.


Green's leg was injured in a
fatal accident June 8 in east
Mississippi that killed his
brother, William Green, and his
girlfriend, Jean Marie Hodgin.
Richardson says the golfer
will go through rehabilitation
and be fitted for a prosthetic
limb. He says Green hopes to
play golf again and has set a
goal of retuming to competi-
tion.
Italy beats U.S. 3-1 at
Confederations Cup
PRETORIA, South Africa -
New Jersey-born Giuseppe
Rossi scored twice in the sec-
ond half and Daniele De Rossi
had a goal, leading Italy over
the United States 3-1 Monday
night in its opener at the FIFA
Confederations Cup.
The U.S. played a man short
after Ricardo Clark was ejected
in the 33rd minute for a late
tackle on Gennaro Gattuso, but
went ahead eight minutes later
when Landon Donovan con-
verted a penalty kick for his
American-record 40th intema-
tional goal.
Rossi, who spurned the U.S.
national team program to play
for Italy, entered in the 57th
minute and tied the score a
minute later with a 30-yard shot
after stripping the ball from
Benny Feilhaber.
Brazil beats Egypt 4-3
on late penalty kick
BLOEMFONTEIN, South
Africa - Kaka converted a
90th-minute penalty kick, and
Brazil opened its defense of
the Confederations Cup with a
4-3 victory over Egypt.
The South American cham-
pions opened a 3-1 lead on
goals by Kaka in the fifth
minute, Luis Fabiano in the
12th and Juan in the 37th,
overcoming a fifth-minute goal
by Mohamed Zidan. But Egypt
beat goalkeeper Julio Cesar
twice in a minute, tying the
score on goals by Mohamed
Shawky in the 54th and Zidan
JDAi, w -w-w aw--
Ahmed Al Muhamadi was
ejected for using his arm to
block Lucio's shot on the goal
line, and Kaka made the
penalty kick.


B.-WE









E Page B6- TUESDAY, JUNE16, 2009



NTE-RTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE --

'Sopranos' star
engaged to singer
NEW YORK - "So-
pranos" star Drea de
Matteo and her longtime
boyfriend, country
singer
Shooter
Jennings,
are en-
gaged.
Amnan-
da Silver-
m man,
publicist
Drea for de
de Matteo Matteo,
says Jen-
nings
proposed
to the 37-
year-old
actress at
his con-
cert in
Utica,
Shooter N.Y, last
Jennings Thursday.
Silver-
man says Jennings took,
'de Matteo by surprise
when he called her to
the stage to pop the
question.
The couple have an 18-
month-old daughter, Ala-
bama.
In an update on Twit-
ter, Jenningi says: "I'm a
lucky man. I'll never for-
get Utica."

Pitt, family give
$1M to hospital
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. '-
Brad Pitt and his sib-
lings lave given $1 mil-
lion to help a Missouri
hospital open a new pe-
diatric cancer center
that will
be named
for their
mother.
Pitt
and his
siblings'
families,
Dougand
Brad Pitt Lisa Pitt
and Rob
and Julie Neal, gave the
money to St. John's Hos-
pital in Springfield, Mo.,
on Saturday in honor of
their mother's passion
for children's issues.
The hospital is open-
ing the Jane Pitt Pedi-
atric Cancer Center this
*summer in the town.
where Pitt and his sib-
lings grew up. The dona-
tion will pay to hire the
only pediatric oncologist
and hematologist in the
southwest Missouri re-
gion.
The new center will
make St. John's one of
six affiliates of St Jude's
Children's Research in
Memphis, Tenn., mean-
ing the center will be
able to participate St.
Jude's clinic research
trials.

Boyle pulls out
of performance
LONDON.'- Internet,
singing sensation Sustan
Boyle has pulled out of a
singing engagement with
the
"Britain's
Got Tal-
ent" live
tour.


man for
Boyle
Susan told
Boyle Britain's
sociation that the 48-
year-old singer was..
advised to rest on Sun-
day.
* The Scottish singer,
whose first appearance
on the talent show had
millions of YouTube hits,
few weeks ago for ex-
haustion after finishing
second in the competi-
" tion.
The church volunteer
was due on stage for a


matinee and evening
show at the Manchester
Evening News Arena,
but did not perform.
She received standing
ovations at the tour's
previous shows in Birm-
ingham and Sheffield.
- From wire reports


Showtime's newest series has drawn big audiences,.

but nurses have been their biggest critics. Does the

network need to provide' Nurse Jackie' with a little...


Did Showtime

hope nurses would

hate latest series?
DAVID BAUDER
AP television writer
- NEW YORK
E die Falco's star charac-
ter in Showtime's
"Nurse Jackie" snorts
drugs, steals money,
forges an organ donor's
card, has sex on the job with a
pharmacist and flushes a severed
body part down the toilet - and
that's just in the first episode.
Little wonder, then, that some
real-life nurses are distressed by
the new series.
But if you're an executive at
Showtime, trying to grab attention
in a crowded television world
where you're usually overshad-
owed by pay cable competitor
HBO, is it better to have
nurses love your series or
hate it?
Early returns suggest
the latter "Nurse Jackie"
had the biggest audience
of any series premiere
in Showtime's history i
As soon as those rat-
ings were in, Showtime
ordered production of a
second season to follow
its current 12-episode ,,
run.
When the lights went
up after one ofthree
screenings of the show
that Shoirne held for -
some nurses be-
fore the Q


debut, the first thing Barbara Crane
said was how appalled she was.
"I don't know what they wanted
from us," said Crane, a nurse in the
intensive care unit at St Catherine
of Siena Medical Center
in Smithtown, N.Y., and
president of the National WH
Federation of Nurses. "Nu
"I have no clue what the Jack
screening Was supposed ' WHI
to be about," she said. 10::
"They couldn't think that Mor
those of us in the most
ethical profession - and
we are the most ethical profession
- that we could possibly find that
entertaining"
The series' entire first season
had already been completed. Crane
suspected Showtime held the
screening to foment buzz, maybe a
few headlines of rage, to distin-
guish "Nurse Jacekie" from .
"Hawthorne," a TNT series pre-
miering today with
JadaPinkett
Smith as the
head of
nurses at
a Vir-
ginia
hos-


tivenurses.
A Showtime executive said there
was no attempt to solicit contro-
versy. But it's better than having a
show that's ignored, said
"spokesman Stuart Zakim.
"It's entertainment," he
AT: ' said. "We expect that all of
rse, our shows will hit a bone
kie. or hit a chord. It's part of
EN: what we do on premium
30 p.m. television. We try to take
days. subjects and treat them in
a way that can't be done
on regular television."
Buzz is vital for premium net-
works that make its money off peo-
ple, who order subscriptions.
Showtime makes its money from
people who order subscriptions,
and is in 17 million homes, roughly
15 percent of homes with TV.
Nurses are by no means unani-
mously against the series. Zakim
said Showtime screened "Nurse
Jackie" for a group of emergency
room nurses at New York's Roo-
sevelt Hospital and more than four
in five said they enjoyed it and
would recommend it to a friend.
Diana Mason, writing on an
American Journal of Nursing blog,
said she hadn't seen a nurse por-
trayed on television with such
smarts, fierce dedication to her pa-
tients and human contradictions
since Hot Lips Houlihan on "M-A-
S-H." One person posted a re-
sponse calling everyone involved
in the series brilliant, while an-
other said she was highly of-
fended.
Tina Gerardi, chiefexecutive of-
ficer of the New York State Nurses
Association, applauded some of
the realism ofFalco's character
She was cheered by a scene where
the nurse upbraided a young doc-
tor for ignoring her warnings
about a patient who later
died, then thought its ef-
fectiveness was instantly
negated when the doc-
tor grabbed Jackie's
breast.
Gerardi said she's
b worried that a nega-
S tive character would
discourage people
from joining the pro-
fession.
Her association
. was also torn on
i .' _ : how to respond to
its concerns. Even-
tu ally it wrote to
Showtime re-
questing a dis-
claimer be put on
the series (Show-
time refused).
. . Gerardi posted
1 Bthe exchange of
letters on the asso-
ciation's Web site
but did little else to
draw attention to
them.
"Negative publicity
is publicity." she
said. "We didn't
want to drag peo-
ple to the show."
Edie Falco por-
trays Jackie
Peyton in the
Showtime
original se-
ries "Nurse
Jackie."
Aso,,aled
Press


Engvall 'nervous' about hosting CMT awards


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES - Bill En-
gvall is a comedian, a sitcom
star and a member of the
Blue Collar Comedy Tour. So,
hosting this week's CMT
awards should be a piece of
cake.
Or not
"I haven't been really nerv-
ous about a 'gig in a long
time," Engvall said in a ie-
cent interview. "You don't
want to be the guy who made


people say, 'Oh, remember
the year when Engvall did it?
Ugh.'"
Engvall, 51, also has his
own CMT-show agenda. He
said he's looking forward to
meeting Def Leppard, who
are nominated for their col-
laboration with Taylor Swift,
because he admired the band
in his youth. He's also eager
to reconnect with old friends
like Trace Adkins and Brad
Paisley.
The CMT awards will air


live at 8 p.m. today on CMT
from the Sommet Center in
Nashville, Tenn.
Country music fans were
among Texan Engvall's earli-
est supporters, and they've
stuck with him. Since 1996,
eight of his comedy albums
have hit the Billboard coun-
try charts, the last being
2007's "15 Degrees Off Cool."
Engvall said his continuing
popularity with country
music lovers has to do with
the "family attitude that I put


out there, because that's a lot
of what country is. Of all the
music genres, I would say it's
probably the most family."
Engvall's TBS comedy se-
ries, "The Bill Engvall Show,"
begins its third season on
July 18. He's taping a special
for Comedy Central, and is on
a standup comedy tour
"It's fun being. Bill Eng-
vall," he said. "I think people,
if they could crawl in my skin,
would see that I'm just having
the time of my life right now."


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
N Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

SUNDAY, JUNE 14
Fantasy 5:4 - 19 - 27 - 29 - 35
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 201 $555
3-of-5 6,768 $24
SATURDAY, JUNE 13
Powerball: 13 - 16 - 20 - 35 -441
Powerball:6
Power Play: 4
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 3 $200,000:,
5-of-5 PP 1 winner in Okla. -
Lotto: 9- 14- 25- 28- 33- 40
6-of-6 1 winner $34 million
5-of-6 58 $5,653.50
4-of-6 3,967 $67
3-of-6 79,366 $4.50
Fantasy 5: 3-6- 14- 18-24
5-of-5 2 winners $126,174.80%
4-of-5 493 $82.50
3-of-5 13,312 $8.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
I To verify the accuracy,
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num.
bers printed above with"
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
*www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777..'


Today in
HISTORY=
Today is Tuesday, June 1.6,
the 167th day of 2009. There
are 198 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight: .
On June 16, 1858, as he.i
accepted the Illinois Republi? .
can Party's nomination for
U.S. Senate, Abraham Lin- ' -
coin said the slavery issue
had to be resolved, declar-
ing, "A house divided against -'
itself cannot stand."
On this date:
In 1897, the government
signed a treaty of annexation
with Hawaii.
In 1903, Ford Motor Co.
was incorporated.
In 1932, President Herbert
Hoover and Vice President
Charles Curtis were re-nomi-
nated at the Republican na-
tional convention in Chicago..,
In 1933, the National In-
dustrial Recovery Act be-
came law. (It was later struck
down by the-Supreme
Court.)
In 1958, the Supreme
Court, in Kent v. Dulles, ruled
that artist Rockwell Kent
could not be denied a pass
port because of his commu-
nist affiliations.
In 1959, actor George
Reeves, TV's "Superman,"
was found dead of an appar-
ently self-inflicted gunshot
wound in the bedroom of his
Beverly Hills, Calif., home; he
was 45.
In 1963, the world's first fe-
male space traveler, I I
Valentina Tereshkova, was,
launched into orbit by the Sb-''
viet Union aboard Vostok Six.
Ten years ago: Vice Pres-
ident Al Gore formally
opened his candidacy for the
Democratic presidential nom-
ination.
Five years ago: Rebuffing
Bush administration claims,
the independent commission
investigating the Sept. 11 at-
tacks said no evidence ex-
isted that al-Qaida had strorig
ties to Saddam Hussein.
One year ago: Tiger
Woods, playing on an injured
knee that later required sea-
son-ending surgery, won an
epic U.S. Open after a 19-hole
playoffwith Rocco Mediate.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
Bill Cobbs is 74. Author Erich
Segal is 72. Author Joyce
Carol Oates is 71. Country
singer Billy "Crash" Craddock
is 70. Actress Joan Van Ark is
66. Actor Geoff Pierson is 60.
Boxer Roberto Duran is 58. '
Actress Laurie Metcalf is 54.
Model-actress Jenny Shimizu
is 42. Actor James Patrick
Stuart is 41. Actor John Cho


is 37. Actress Olivia Hack is,
26. Singer Diana DeGarmo
("American Idol") is 22.
Thought for Today: "Not
to know is bad. Not to want to
know is worse. Not to hope i�-
unthinkable. Not to care is
unforgivable." - Nigerian
saying.


I








Section C -TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009


HEALTH


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


FE


1AN^M A . ...A ,
S.Douglas
Stephenson
/Page C2

0 Shalyn
Barker/C4


Juliu


Florida woman
rescues good ol'
boys from reptiles
MITCH STACY
Associated Press writer
TAMPA
Zhe 8-foot alligator opens
its jaws wide and hisses in
the dark at Julie Harter,
who takes a few steps
closer and dangles a lasso just
like the kind rodeo cowboys use.
Cornered against a chain-link
fence in a suburban garbage truck
parking lot, the beast issues a gut-
tural growl, warning the lady with
the rope - the only woman out of
40 or so trappers licensed by the
state - to keep her distance.
With her auburn hair pulled
back in a ponytail and a gold alli-
gator pendant dangling from a
chain around her neck, Harter
comes off as kind of a cross be-
tween Reba McEntire and Dog
the Bounty Hunter. Southern-
sweet but sturdy and tough as
gator hide.
The 47-year-old grandmother is
used to snide, under-the-breath
comments from good ol' boys and
doubters when she gets out of the
truck They shut up when she
hops on a big gator's back, grabs
the snout and wraps it tight with
black electrician's tape.
The gator in front of her at this
moment is going to be a little
tricky. The corner is dark and lit-
tered with junk, and she can't get
close enough to use her usual
tool: a catchpole with a re-
tractable wire loop on the end. So
out comes the lasso.
On the third toss, Harter rings
the gator's head, yanks the rope
tight around its neck and drags
the thrashing creature to the mid-
dle of the paved lot The garbage-
truck guys who've been watching
scatter like little kids on the play-
ground.
It's 9 p.m., the tail end of a day
that Harter started 14 hours ear-
lier at her other job, working with
special education students at a
Central Florida high school.
"A girl's work is never done,"
she says, climbing into her big


the


MITCH STACY/Associated Press
Julie Harter, Florida's only female state-employed alligator trapper, tapes the mouth of a 4-foot alligator caught
recently at a pond near an apartment complex in Oldsmar.


black Ford truck with the "Lady
Gator Trapper" license plate.
About 1.3 million wild alligators
live among 18 million people in
the Sunshine State. With drought
and development shrinking their
habitat, the large reptiles in-
evitably wander into back yards,
highways, swimming pools and
parking lots.
Nuisance trappers working for
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission cap-
tured nearly 10,000 alligators last
year, slaughtering most of them.
Harter and a helper took 346 of
them from her territory around
Tampa.
The state doesn't pay trappers,


but they get to keep the alligators,
which are a protected species.
There is a market for the meat,
but the real money is in the hides,
which can bring $40 a foot. Some
years, catching gators is more
profitable for Harter than her
teaching job.
A native Floridian, she learned
how to catch alligators from her
trapper husband, Billy. They were
together nine years until he was
killed in a 2003 helicopter acci-
dent.
She spent weeks in bed crying
after he died. Then somebody
from the state called and asked
her to apply for his trapping con-
tract. She says she did it because


she liked the work and was good
at it, not because Billy did it.
She'll acknowledge, though,
that doing the work he loved has
helped her manage pain that is
still so raw it brings tears without
warning.
"This has kind of kept me at-
tached," she says in a quiet mo-
ment. "It's helped with the grief."
She said she still hears Billy's
voice in her head: "Be careful.
Treat every alligator like it was
the first you ever caught."
She's never been bitten nor
even had a close call, she says.
The same day Harter was
See GATOR/Page C3


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY

Progress

in cancer

battle
Cancer death rates
are falling steadily,
according to the
American Cancer Soci-
ety's annual cancer statis-
tics report, Cancer Facts
& Figures 2009, recently
published in the Society's
CA: A Cancer Journal for
Clinicians. This is an an-
nual report on the state of
cancer care in the United
States.
The drop is driven in
large part by better pre-
vention, increased use of
early detection practices
and improved treatments
for cancer.
Cancer death rates
dropped 19.2 percent
among men during 1990 to
2005 and 11:4 percent
among women during
1991 to 2005. Cancer inci-
dence rates are also on
the decline, decreasing
See BENNETT/Page C3


Dr. Sunil Gandhi
CANCER &
BLOOD
DISEASE


Swallowing and voice

problems of the elderly


As baby boomers approach 65
years of age, we are going to
see all sorts of changes in
our health care needs
and there is going to be
a specific focus on geri-
atric medicine.
Problems with voice
disorders and swallow-
ing dysfunction are
probably going to be '
some of the most comrn-
mon problems that we
see in elderly patients, Dr. Den
Statistics suggest that DrOI
there is impairment of EAR,
swallowing and/or voice & TH
quality noted in about 50
percent of jhe general publie
Problemsriasociated with speech
and swallowing issues in the eld-
erly can lead to all sorts of prob-
lems with the airway causing
bronchitis and pneumonia and


i


coughing, as well as malnutrition
and other health issues\ These
types of problems directly affect
the quality of life and
also affect social inter-
action and can lead to
social introversion,
Many of us get to-
gether socially for din-
ners, which leads to lots
of conversation and in-
teraction, which is very
healthy. Problems with
swallowing and speech
s Grillo could affect that drasti-
NOSE cally. Thus, we see many
ROAT problems with de-
creased quality of life,
depression and even so-
cial withdrawal related to these
types of throat problems.
Despite having easy access to
medical care, many times swallow-
See CRll I.0/Pagp 03


Calf, crew socks do


not cause swelling


I-am often surprised by how
many patients-I-see who cut
their socks, stockings or elastic
in their hose above the ankle. I
have seen it so many
times, and often asked
patients why they cut the
elastic. They invariably
reply that they cut their f_.
socks or stockings to pre- <
vent them from causing
swelling in their legs.
This is not the case,
however. So e folks
even wear shoes too Dr. Davi
large or cut their shoes BEST
for the same reason.
These folks are ex'pe- FORW
riencing edema, Edema
is soft tissue swelling from the ac-
cumulation of watery fluid called
lymph in the lower extremity,
Edema can be caused by many
things, such as varicose veins, renal


insufficiency, thrombosis or clot,
injury, vein harvest for cardiac en-
darterectomy or bypass, lymph
node dissection, and congestive
heart failure to name a
few. The most common
cause of swelling which
podiatrists observe in
the office is due to
chronic venous insuffi-
S ciency, commonly re-
. ferred to as poor vein
I. circulation or varicose
veins, Vein harvest for
Raynor cardiac bypass and
edema from congestive
FOOT heart failure are also
VARD commonly seen, but to a
much lesser degree.
Classically, patients
who cut their shoes or stockings
have venous insufficiency. Patients
with venous Insufficiency describe
See RAYNOR/Page C3


Ginger

reduces

nausea
One of the most
dreaded side ef-
fects of cancer che-
motherapy is nausea and
vomiting. Fortunately, with
modern advances in che-
motherapy and anti-nau-
sea medications, this side
effect is much less com-
mon. Still, it is fairly com-
mon for patients to inquire
about anything they can do
to cut down the chances of
nausea or vomiting.
A new study presented
at a recent American So-
ciety of Oncology meeting
shows the beneficial ef-
fect of ginger to prevent
chemotherapy-induced
nausea and vomiting.
The study included
chemotherapy patients
who had experienced nau-
See GANDHI/Pop C3


World-class heart care

just inches from home.

Undergoing open-heart surgery Is a lot less stressful when you don't have to travel far from home.
Citrus Memorial Heart Center Is located right here on the Nature Coast and we provide the
same amazing care as big-city hospitals. In fact, since January 2004, more than 1,200 patients
have trusted us for open-heart surgery, It may be because we use the most sophisticated technology,
o, r maybe It's because we have some of the most knowledgeable cardiovascular physicians and staff.
Whatever the reason, we're going to continue to grow and heal even more hearts.
For more Information, call the Heart Center at 352-344-6416

CCITRUS MEMORIAL
"ua )


d
r i


ty








: Em &ACIRSCNE(F), CRNIL


Single-payer mental health insurance needed


ne reliable indicator of
health care quality in any
nation is life expectancy
Unfortunately, life expectancy in
the U.S. ranks in the bottom quar-
tile of a list of 29 indus-
trialized nations,
according to the Organi-
zation for Economic Co-
operation and
Development Many of
these same 29 nations
also increased their in-
vestment in mental
health services while,
during the same period,
the U.S. slashed its ex- F. Do
penditures for psychi- Steph
atric and mental health MATTE
services. THE
Mentally ill patients
have been dumped into
our communities poorly prepared
for them. Thousands of the. men-
tally ill have joined the street peo-
ple in many of our cities, and,
reminiscent of Elizabethan Eng-
land, the county jail has become
the primary community facility for
housing most mentally ill people in
the United States.
More than 45 million U.S. citi-
zens now lack any kind of health in-
surance, and millions more have
very inadequate coverage in the
policies they now carry. Among
those with incomes below the fed-
eral poverty line, a third had no
health insurance.
Statistics show that amongAmer-
icans who are inadequately in-
sured, a significant number are
sicker and die younger than those
who have insurance. It is no mys-
tery why this is happening in this
country. Because the insurance in-
dustry so thoroughly dominates our
health care system, the basic con-
cept, purpose and system of health


insurance is defined by them.
The U.S. subscribes to a business
model of health insurance that de-
fines insurers as commercial enti-
ties. Private insurers maximize
profits by mainly limit-
ing benefits or by not
covering people with
health problems. Like
all businesses, their goal
is to make money.
Under the business
L model, the greed of ca-
sual inhumanity is built
in and the .common
good of the citizens and
uglas nation is ignored. Ex-
enson cluding the poor, the
'RS OF aged, the disabled and
MIND the mentally ill is sound
business policy since it
maximizes profit. In
most other developed countries,
however, the aim of health insur-
ance is simply to promote a social
service for universal access to af-
fordable health care for all citizens,
and not to generate profits for
stockholders, CEOs and other pri-
,vate business entities.
The U.S. is the only advanced
country in the world with a health
care system based on avoiding sick
people.
Mental health treatment services
in general and talk therapy in par-
ticular have been negatively ef-
fected by insurance and drug
company domination of the U.S.
health care system. Talk therapy in-
cludes psychotherapy, psycho-
analysis, counseling, marriage
therapy, family therapy, group ther-
apy, psycho-educational groups, ad-
diction treatment groups and
programs, parent training groups,
anger management programs and
many others.
There are dozens of effective


means to deal with human distress
that involve talk between qualified
professionals and people seeking
help. Talk therapy is not one-size-
fits-all. It is focused on emotional
problems in relationship with one-
self or others.
Insurers, with their focus on
profit, seek to spend as little as pos-
sible on your mental health care.
Talk therapy sessions have been
drastically cut by insurers. Privacy
has been invaded and is no longer
assured. Your choice of therapist is
no longer under your control.
Likewise, drug companies with
profit motive want to sell you drugs.
Drug and insurance companies
often view talk therapy and quali-
fied practitioners as a threat to
their control over the health care
system. These companies insist
that mental health. problems are
due to "biological imbalances"
which require only expensive med-
ications.
A systematic campaign to dis-
credit the value and competence of
talk therapists exists when drug
and insurance companies assert,
for. example, that most types of
long-term therapies are not "evi-
dence based." Insurance coverage
for talk therapy has, in fact, steeply
declined since the mid-1980s, from
6 percent to 2 percent of all insur-
ance payments. People seeking talk
therapy increasingly must pay for
those services out of-pocket.
Many people with emotional and
psychological problems make good
progress with talk therapy or with
a combination of talk therapy and
medication. While drugs can, in-
deed, be helpful, they alone do not
"cure" emotional distress and
sometimes have uncomfortable
side effects. Certainly there are bi-
ological aspects to many emotional


and psychological problems, but bi-
ology is not the only cause (or cure)
for these conditions.
Consumers of health care serv-
ices do not have to be intimidated
into accepting inadequate mental
health treatment Citizens have a
right to demand effective clinical
service. Tell your health care plan
that you want adequate access to
qualified talk therapists if you have
emotional, addiction or marriage
and family problems. Let your em-
ployer or human resources depart-
ment know that you want a solid
mental health benefit that also in-
cludes comprehensive talk therapy
services.
We now have more than two
decades of experience with the
conversion of mental health care
into a business. Our health care is
being rationed, its care guidelines
determined by profitability and se-
crecy decided in private corporate
boardrooms. To realize large prof-
its demanded by Wall Street in-
vestors, our health system must
attract the healthy and turn away
the sick, disabled, the poor, many of
the old, and the mentally ill.
A 1997 study by the New England
Journal of Medicine showed that a
large number of Medicare HMOs
engaged in favorable selection by
"cherry picking" healthier individ-
uals. Since 1987, the number of
uninsured in the U.S. has grown by
a million each year.
Our mental health care system
needs to get private health insur-
ance out of it Little of value is of-
fered by private insurance when 15
percent to 25 percent of the health
care dollar is-skimmed off for profit
and overhead. If, for example, the
existing Medicare program is now
extended to all citizens, universal
coverage for both mental and phys-


ical health is possible while
strongly containing costs.
The transition to full enrollment
in Medicare, for example, could be
achieved by gradually dropping the
eligibility age over five to 10 years.
Any losses in phasing out private
health insurance industry jobs
could be well offset by job gains in
other American industries, espe-
cially since they would no longer be
saddled with such high health in-
surance costs as is now the case.
Medicare is much more efficient
than private insurance, with over-
head now less than 4 percent More
importantly, it cannot deny care to
those who need it the most, and ad-
ministration by a single-payer pub-
lic entity makes controlling
program costs more possible.
Nobel Prize recipient Bernard
Lown, M.D., of the Harvard School
of Public Health sums it up nicely:
"One may only hope that Winston
Churchill's quip will soon be real-
ized: 'You can always count on
Americans to do the right thing,
after they have tried everything
else.' The United States has tried
any number of bad solutions for
providing its people with health
care. Long overdue is the recogni-
tion that medicine is a necessary
social service that should be acces-
sible to all citizens."

E Douglas Stephenson, LCSW,
LMFT, BCD, has provided
private psychotherapy and
counseling services in Citrus
County since 1990. He is a
graduate of the University of
Chicago and was on the faculty of
the University of Florida
Department of Psychiatry Office
in Meadowcrest Doctors Park,
Crystal River, 795-7070.


Health NOTES


* "Wound Care and Hyper-
barics: How Diving Saves
Lives" free seminar, 6 p.m.
today at Southern Woods Golf
Club at 1501 Corkwood Blvd., in
Homosassa, sponsored by Cit-
rus Memorial Health System.
Health information and re-
sources will be available. To reg-
ister, call 726-1551, ext. 1559.
* "Straight Talk Medicine,"
hosted by Dr. Jeffery Kinnard
and co-hosted by Dr. Emily
Tovar, on WYKE at 8 p.m.
today and at 3 p.m. Thursday.
This weeks' guest is Dr. Ar-
mando Rojas, M.D., of Genesis
Women's Center, discuss
'Weight Management For
Healthy Living." Call Kathie
Henderson at 503-7091. Up-
coming shows are listed at
www.kinnardchiropractic.com.
* Free computerized spinal
screening by Dr. Russell
Lewandowski from 11 a.m. to 1
p.m. Wednesday at the Inver-
ness Natural Food Store on
State Road 44. Questions? Call
726-0888.
* Seminar on "Reducing
Healthcare Cost" will be con-
ducted-by Michelle McColley,
Bach Flower therapist, Master
Herbalist and certified natural
health professional, 11 a.m.
Saturday at Doctor Vitamin
Store, 3930 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa, in the Publix shop-
ping center. pall, as there is
limited seating: 628-7036.
* LifeSouth bloodmobile
schedule. To find a donor cen-
ter or a blood drive near you,
call 527-3061. Anyone 16 or
older who is in good health and
weighs at least 110 pounds is
eligible to donate.
0 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. today,
Walmart, 3826 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
* 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednes-
day, Domino's Pizza, 213 High-
lands Blvd., Inverness.
* 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thurs-
day, Publix, Inverness Regional-
Shopping Center.
* 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday,
Sweetbay Supermarket, 1202
W. Main St., Inverness.
* 2:30 to 6 p.m. Saturday,
St. Scholastica Catholic
Church, 4301 W. Homosassa
Trail, Lecanto.
0 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
Walmart, 3826 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.


* 10 a.m. to4 p.m. Synd
Walmart Supercenter, 2461
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inver
ness.


lay,
W.
r-


* 11 a.m. to-6 p.m. Monday,
Subway, 723 N.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
* 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday,
June 23, Walmart Supercenter,
2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
SPRING HILL - "Aortic
Valve Replacement" commu-
nity education series by Ravi
Sharma, M.D., of Oak Hill Hos-
pital, 5 to 6:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, June 24, at Heritage Pines
Country Club, 11524 Scenic
Hills Boulevard, Spring Hill._
Dinner will be served. Reserva-
tions are required: call 628-
6060 in Citrus.
* Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center's health edu-
cation programs are in the com-
munity room, second floor of
the Medical Offices Building
(across the street from the hos-
pital) unless otherwise noted.
Call 795-1234 or visit
www.srrmc.com to register.
* Balance screening: 11:15
a.m. to noon, first and third
Wednesday monthly, Seven
Rivers Rehab & Wound Center,
1675 S.E. U.S. 19, in the Crys-
tal River Shopping Center. No
appointment needed. Call 795-
0534. Free.
* Diet therapy for diabetes:
6 p.m. Tuesday, June 30. Free.
* Childbirth-related educa-
tion from the Women's & Fam-
ily Center. To make an
appointment, call 795-BABY
(2229).
* Diabetes classes are of-
fered from 9 to 10 a.m. Mon-
days at the Citrus County
Health Department in Lecanto.
Classes are free. No registra-
tion is required.
* What is diabetes? - June
29.
* Meal planning - July 6.
*' More about meal plans -
July 13.
* Medications and monitor-
ing - July 20.
* Sick days - July 27.
* Avoiding complications -
Aug. 3.
Call Lynece Hand, R.N., 527-
0068, ext. 278 or Carol Burke,
R.D., 726-5222.
Support GROUPS

* Scleroderma Support
Group organizing for North
Central Florida. All persons in-
terested, call Melba Withrow at
746-7752."
* Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganizatidn, serving Central
Florida, offers monthly support


group meetings. Public is in-
vited.
* 2 p.m. Tuesday, June 16,
Highland Terrace, 700 Medical
Court E., Inverness. Call Ellen
Mallon or Valerie Taylor at 860-
2525.
The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization branch office in Cit-
rus County is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. the second Mon-
day monthly. Call the Citrus
County community service rep-
resentative Ellen Mallon at 860-
2525.
* Beyond Grief Support
Group, Christian-based meet-
ing for people who have lost
someone through death, 1:15
p.m. the third Tuesday monthly
. at the ministry complex room
behind the SunTrust Bank in
Meadowcrest, off Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Call
Betty Jo at 628-2933 or the
church office at 795-8077.
* Head and Neck Cancer
Support Group meets 11 a.m.
to noon the third Wednesday
monthly at the Robert Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute,
522 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, north of State Road
44. Call Dr. Patrick Meadors,
(352) 342-1822.
* SPRING HILL- Look
Good Feel Better Support
Group, 3:30 to 5 p.m. third
Wednesday monthly at the
Florida Cancer Institute - New
Hope's Spring Hill Center,
10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203,
in the Medical Arts Building
next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call
Peggy Dome, R.N.,at (352)
688-7744.
* Alzheimer's caregivers
support, 5:15 p.m. the third
Thursday monthly at the Mem-
ory Unit at Barrington Place,
2341 W. Norvell Bryant High-
way, Lecanto, 34461, for care-
givers and their dementia
patients, by the Citrus team of
Hemando-Pasco Hospice. Din-
ner served to patients while
caregivers attend the 5:30 p.m.
support group meeting. Free.
Call Wendy Hall at 527-4600.
* If interested in a day pro-
gram and support group for
Alzheimer's and dementia pa-
tients, call 344-5228 for more
information.
* The Fibromyalgia Sup-
port Group of the First United
Methodist Church of Ho-
mosassa meets the first and
third Thursday in the confer-
ence room of the administration
building at the church. For in-
formation, call 628-4083.


Accepting New OB/GYN Patients
Saturday Appointments Available '

Rose Mary Sobel, MD - Board Certified OB/GYN, FACOG
Jackie Duncan,ARNP - NCC Certified in Women's Health


Cnfsta[( ver Women's ffeafth Center

6151 N. Suncoast Blvd.,Suite IC.* Ne.xttoSeven Rivers RegionalMedicalCeniter O
Mon.-Fri.8:30 AM.- 4:30 P.M. Sat.9:00 AAl.- 12Noon (352) I7 "V0 / 1O


* The Ostomy Support
Group of Citrus County meets
at 2 p.m. the third Sunday
monthly in, the Cypress Room
on the first floor in the Citrus
Memorial Health System's Ad-
ministration's Annex Building,
across the street from the Med-
ical Offices Building at 131 S.
Citrus Ave., Inverness. Call Mel
or Betty at 726-3802, Sally at
637-2055 or Frank at 341-
0005. E-mail: OSGofCC@
yahoo.com.


SO YOU KNOW
* Look for more Health
Notes on Page C7.

n SPRING HILL-
Leukemia/ Lymphoma Sup-
port Group, 5 to 6:30 p.m. the
fourth Tuesday monthly at the,
Florida Cancer Institute - New.
Hope's Spring Hill Center,
10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203
in the Medical Arts Building
next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call


Jeff Haight, R.N., support group
facilitator, at (352) 688-7744.
* Look Good ... Feel
Better, a free two-hour session
for women undergoing radiation
or chemotherapy, at 3 p.m. the
second Wednesday monthly at
the Cancer & Blood Disease
Center, Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the
fourth Wednesday monthly at
the Robert Boissoneault Oncol-
ogy Institute, Lecanto. Call Mil-,
dred at 746-7212, or (800)
395-LOOK (5665) to register.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HEALTH & LIFE


C runson JUNE 16 20 9


i


IA









Cmri.'~ (?OFINTY (FL) CHRONICLE Hiuim & LIFII TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 C3


Q I heard about a new oral
* drug for diabetes. What
* can you tell me about it?
A. The FDA recently approved
Cycloset bromocriptinee) for the
treatment of type 2 diabetes as an
adjunct to diet and exercise.
Bromocriptine, the active ingredi-
ent in Cycloset, has been used at a
higher dose for many years to treat
Parkinson's disease. It is classified Richard
as a "dopamine agonist," a drug ASK4
that mimics the action of dopa- PHARI
mine, which is in short supply in ____
Parkinson's disease due to a lack
of dopamine-producing cells in the brain.
Cycloset is a completely new idea for the
treatment of type 2 diabetes, which repre-
sents about 90 percent of all cases of diabetes.
The development of Cycloset for treating di-
abetes was based upon laboratory studies
that showed brain dopamine activity to be
low in metabolic disease states like diabetes.
Additional studies in diabetic animals
have also shown that treatment with a
dopamine agonist such as bromocriptine
acts in the brain to "reset" the biological


BENNETT
Continued from Page C1

1.8 percent per year among
men from 2001 to 2005 and
0.6 percent per year from
1998 to 2005 among women.
Now, many of you may
wonder if a drop of such a
small percentage is really
that great Realize that a
drop of 1 percent or 2 per-
cent per year may sound
small, but as this report
shows, that adds up' to
650,000 cancer deaths
avoided over 15 years. And
because the rate continues to
drop, it means that in recent
years, about 100,000 people
.each year who would have
died had cancer rates not de-
clined are living to celebrate
another birthday. That is un-
deniable evidence ofthelife-
saving progress that we as a
country must dedicate our-
selves to continuing.
ACS researchers estimate
that there will be about
1,479,350 new cancer cases
and about 562,340 cancer
deaths in 2009. For all can-
cers diagnosed from 1996 to
2004, the five-year relative
survival rate is 66 percent, up
from 50 percent in 1975 to
1977. That increase reflects



GANDHI
Continued. from Page C1

sea during any previous
treatment cycle and who
were scheduled for at least
three additional cycles. Pa-
tients were randomized to
receive 0.5 gram, 1 gram, or
1.5 grams of ginger daily or a
placebo. Both the placebo
and ginger were given as
capsules.
Nausea was assessed dur-
ing a baseline chemotherapy
cycle and at two subsequent
cycles on treatment/placebo.
Patients reported their nau-
sea level in the morning, af-
ternoon, evening and at
night, using a seven-point
scale, (one represented no
nausea, and seven repre-
sented extreme nausea).
Patients started the gin-
ger or placebo three days
before the start of each
cycle and continued for
three more days, for a total



GRILLO
Continued from Page C1

ing and voice problems are
-left unchecked and as, a re-
sult people, suffer the im-
pairment and isolationism
that is not necessary if it were
properly evaluated and
treated. Any time a person's
voice does not work properly,
it interferes with communi-
cation, which interferes with
socialization and it could
* lead to isolation.
Swallowing problems,
which tend to be a little bit
lower in occurrence than
voice problems, usually af-
fects the intake of solid foods
as opposed to liquids. This
can have a devastating effect
on a patient's nutrition, en-
ergy levels and overall well-
being. Despite the impact of
these problems, there is a sig-
nificant number of people
who do not seek out care and
put up with the symptoms.
This is quite unfortunate as
most of the problems are
treatable. Many of the pa-
tients who do not seek out
care feel that these problems
can be just a normal part.of
aging and tend to write offthe
issue. In some instances, they


F
M


clock neurochemistry that im-
proves the metabolism of glucose
in people with type 2 diabetes.
However, in order to do this, the
bromocriptine (Cycloset) needs to
t _ be taken once daily early in the
morning about two hours after
waking up.
Cycloset can be used alone or
in combination with oral anti-dia-
loffmann betic agents. It is not as potent as
THE other anti-diabetic agents, but
1ACIST works in a completely new way to
lower blood glucose (sugar) levels.
� The most common side effects of
Cycloset include nausea, dizziness, fatigue
and headache. In order to help prevent these
side effects, the dosage of Cycloset needs to
be increased slowly over several weeks. Per-
haps this novel new drug therapy for type 2
diabetes will lead to further discoveries in
the future.

Richard Hoffmann has been a pharmacist
for more than 20 years. Send questions
to him at 1135 N. Timucuan Trail,
Inverness, FL 34453.


improvements in both early is due to the efforts of the
detection and tremendous ACS to lower our exposure to
strides in the treatment of tobacco.
the many diseases we call According to the report,
cancer prostate, lung and colorectal
Decreases in deaths from cancers account for about
lung, prostate and colorectal half of all cancer diagnoses
cancer accounted for nearly among men; in women,
80 percent of the decline in breast, lung and colorectal
death rates among men. cancer account for about half
While there has been a great of new cancer cases. .To-
deal of debate over screen- gether, these cancers account
ing for some cancers, such as for almost half of the cancer
prostate cancer, the numbers deaths among men and
do not lie. women.
Screening leads to early Black men have an 18 per-
detection, early detection cent higher incidence rate
leads to early treatment, and and 36 percent higher cancer
this treatment leads to better death rate compared to
survival rates. The decreases white men, according to the
in breast and colorectal can- report Black women are less
cer made up 60 percent of likely than white women to
the decrease among women. get cancer, but when they do
Again, screening is critical. get it, they're more likely to
Those numbers suggest die from it
early detection practices, Overall, a great report, but
using colonoscopy to catch we still have a lot of work in
colon cancer early, mammo- front of us.
grams to catch breast cancer
early and the PSA test to
catch prostate cancer early Dr C. Joseph Bennett is a
are working, and also reflect board-certified radiation
improvements in treatment oncologist past president
The decline in the lung can- of the Citrus County Unit of
cer death rate among men is . the American Cancer
due to drops in tobacco use, Society and a member of
and the lung cancer death the Board of Directors and
rate among women has stabi- Executive Committee of
. lized after increasing for ,. the Florida.Division of the
'many decades. Much of this American Cancer Society


of six days. All patients re-
ceived standard anti-nausea
drugs; 644 patients were
randomized. The patients
had different types of can-
cer, including breast, lung or
gastrointestinal tract
Their results showed that
all doses of ginger signifi-
cantly reduced nausea more
than the placebo, .with the
0.5 gram and'1.0 gram doses
having the greatest effect
That dose is the equivalent
of 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of
ground ginger.
It is possible that other
products that contain ginger
may have the, same effect,
but it must contain at least
1/4 teaspoon of ginger Some
products have ginger as fla-
vor only and that will not
.help. Some products also
contain sugar and that may
affect the efficacy of ginger.
As per Wikipedia, "In the
United States, ginger is used
to prevent motion and
morning sickness. It is rec-
ognized as safe by the Food


are correct, but it certainly
does not hurt to be checked
out Despite the information
about this in the press, Inter-
net and TV patients also feel
that there is no possible way
that their problem could be
corrected and that is the ex-
cuse that they use for not
seeking out help. It is possi-
ble that the medical commu-
nity should focus more on
this problem and dissemi-
nate information better /
Other issues that patients
frequently cite is expense,
time and difficulty traveling,
particularly if they no longer
drive as issues of being seen
and treated for voice and
swallowing problems. If they
behave in this manner and,
tend to write themselves off,
this can lead to increase in
depression, anxiety and so-
cial withdrawal, which re-
sults in poor quality-of life.
Problems with speech and
swallowing are very preva-
lent and need to be ad-
dressed as they can be signs
of significant medical prob-
lems and the impact they
have on quality of life is fir-
reaching. The key right now
is educating the population
that health care providers,
both primary care and spe-
cialists, can provide some an-


and Drug Administration
and is sold as an unregu-
lated dietary supplement"
Researcher Dr Julie L.
Ryan of the University of
Rochester Medical Center
could not define the exact
mechanism of action for
how ginger works. Other re-
search suggests it may be "a
potent anti-inflammatory
agent in the gut"
At the. same time, this is
really a nice study where a
common food spice, in this
case, ginger, really helps re-
duce the side effects of
chemotherapy. As far as we
know, it does not reduce the
efficacy of chemotherapy.

Dr Sunil Gandhi is a
hematologist and
oncologist He is the
volunteer medical adviser
of the Citrus Unit of the
American Cancer Society
Send questions to
sgandhi@tampabay.rrcom
or call 746-0707.


swers and relief so that pa-
tients may benefit
I would like to thank the
American Academy of Oto-
laryngology and Head and
Neck Surgery for the infor-
mation provided in this arti-
cle.

Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO,
is an ear, nose and throat
specialist in Crystal River
Call him at 795-0011.


Longtime abscess in tooth

might be cause of hoarse voice


I thought I would write about one of my
patients this week It is an interesting
story that may be able to help some of
my faithful readers. I have known this pa-
tient for about seven years.
In the past year, she had developed a
hoarse voice for which she had
seen multiple doctors. Two of
these doctors were ear, nose
and throat specialists. After all
of her examinations and tests,
nothing was found. They had 0.
put her on a steroid to see if that A
helped. It did help a little.
One weekend my phone rang.
It was this patient with a severe .
toothache on an upper tooth. I Dr. F
prescribed her some antibiotics Dr. I
and pain medication and saw Vasc:
her Monday morning. My clini- SOUND
cal, or visual, examination led
to nothing. After taking and reviewing an
X-ray, I saw what looked like a recurrent
abscess on a tooth that had root canal ther-
apy about 10 years ago. Since the antibi-
otic was helping, I kept her on it and
referred her to the endodontist, or root
canal specialist, that I use. He agreed with
me that there was an abscess associated
with this upper molar.
The treatment of choice for such a tooth
is called an apicoectomy. An apicoectomy
is basically a surgical procedure in which
the dentist removes the infection at the tip
of the tooth and seals the root canal space
from the bone. This is done in the office
and usually takes about an hour. When I
received my report from the specialist he


told me that not only was the infection in
the jawbone, but it had invaded the sinus
significantly. As usual,.he did a thorough
job and the patient recovered completely
Last week, I saw this patient for a rou-
tine examination along with her cleaning.
I had noticed that her voice was
significantly better. I asked her
what she had done to finally see
some improvement and she
told me that as soon as things
had healed from the apicoec-
, tomy, her voice had continually
gotten better. This was the first
time in my 20 years of dentistry
i that I have seen something like
rank this. It is pretty routine to see a
tirank sinus infection clear up once a
imini tooth problem is addressed, but
1 BITES never something like this.
Because of this, I called the
endodontist and discussed it with him. He
told me that he had only seen something
like this one time in the past. In that case,
a patient's.sinus headache had cleared up
after years of trying other treatments.
I am not here to tell you to run to your
dentist if you have a situation like this.
However, if you have tried everything else,
you might want to at least talk with your
dentist. You river know.

Dr. Frank Vascimini is a Homosassa
dentist Send your questions to 4805 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446
or e-mail them to him at info@
masterpiecedentalstudio.com.


I've been living it, sleeping it,
dreaming about it. You could say
I'm paranoid.
Melissa Ainsworth
Tampa resident whose daughter encountered an alligator.


side and there it was, just a
few feet away.
"I've been living it, sleep-
ing it, dreaming about it,"
Ainsworth says. "You could
say I'm paranoid."
After catching the gator
on a hook baited with beef
lung, Harter drags it
ashore, tapes the mouth
shut, binds the legs and
drags the thing by the tail
out to the truck.
This one is 6 feet, 3
inches - "a nasty
teenager," Harter says. Be-
fore she puts it in thecage

pressure of any stocking or
the: resistance to stretching
of shoegear forces the col-
lection of fluids to seek the
path of least resistance.
Gravity pulling the fluid
down toward the ground
and the resistance of stock-
ings or shoes to expansion
will cause fluid to collect
above a shoe near the an-
kles if socks are not worn,
or above the elastic of
stockings if worn. The
stockings or shoes are
doing the exact opposite of
what folks who cut their
shoes or stockings think
the hose or sh6es do.
Cutting of shoes or stock-
ings actually increases the
amount of fluid the legs
and feet collect. Proper
treatment of most cases of
edema usually includes the
use of graduated compres-
sion stockings. However,
patient compliance of com-
pression stockings is his-
torically poor due to a
myriad of complaints and
excuses.
Compression hose
should never be used if a
patient has active conges-
tive heart failure, or if they
have not used stockings


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with the others, she chats
with folks who have gath-
ered with their cell phone
cameras. She lets some of
the kids touch the alliga-
tor's rough black hide.
Ainsworth hugs her and
calls her a hero.
"Girl power!" Ainsworth
shouts as. Harter climbs
back in her truck
The alligator lady, in-
specting her freshly pedi-,
cured toenails for damage'
as. she exchanges work
shoes for the preferred flip-'
flops, just smiles.

'and have severe swelling
with a past history of con-
gestive heart failure. The
application of compression
in these instances can put
one into congestive heart
failure due to volume over-
load of the heart.
N
David B. Raynor, DPM, is a
podiatrist in Inverness
and can be reached at
726-3668 with questions or
suggestions for future
columns.

WWW.


LendEars
.corn


GATOR
Continued from Page Cl

called to rescue the
garbage-truck guys, she
didn't even change out of
her flip-flops to snag a 4-
foot alligator from a
woman's front door step.
This one apparently wan-
dered away from a neigh-
borhood pond in one of the
many newer subdivisions
that sprawl north of Tampa.
At the next stop, Melissa
Ainsworth nearly hugs Har-
ter just for showing up.
An alligator has been
crawling out of the pond in
back of her house and sun-
ning in the yard.
The. other day,
Ainsworth's 5-year-old
daughter wandered out-


RAYNOR
Continued from Page Cl

classic symptoms of mini-
mal to no swelling when
they first arise in the morn-
ing, but they notice in-
Screased swelling as the day
goes on. Fluid is leaking
from the veins into the tis-
sues, and gravity pulls the
fluid down toward the toes
as the patient stands and
sits throughout the day. A
glass filling with water
from bottom to top and not
vice versa is an appropriate
analogy
Patients are correct in
that they see and experi-
ence their legs and feet
swelling, but the shoes and
stockings are not causing
the swelling by "cutting off.
circulation." The phenom-
ena occurring is actually
the stocking or shoe
demonstrating the edema
or swelling by preventing
the collection of fluid or
distention of tissues by ap-
plying pressure to the ex-
tremity where the garment
touches the leg or foot.
The application of elastic


700 S.E. 5th Terrace
Crystal River, FL
Call 795-5700


Diabetes drug taken orally


TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 C3


HEALTH & LIFE


RTIC us CouNTY (FL E


Fi
-il
D


Participants
sought
for study of

Ziga Hearing Aid
invention.
Free audiology exams and
hearing aid fittings through
2009 Resound research grant.
Free candidate screenings
open to public.
June 15 - 19











Page C4 - TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

- AARP offers
safety refresher
True or false? If the traffic
light ahead is green when
you first see it, you should in-
crease your speed so you
make the green light before it
turns yellow.
Take an AARP Driver
Safety class as a refresher.
Check with your insurance
carrier to ask if you are enti-
tled to an insurance discount.
Course fee is $14, for
AARP members $12.
To register for a class, call
the listed instructor.
False: You should not in-
crease speed, always pro-
ceed with caution and be
prepared to stop.
Crystal River,
Homosassa area
* June24 and 25:9 a.m.
at First United Methodist
Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw
Ave., Homosassa. Call Frank
Tobin at 628-3229.
Beverly Hills
and Lecanto
* July 15 and 17: noon at
Our Lady of Grace Catholic
Church,,6 Roosevelt Blvd.
Call Matt Curley at 746-7916.
* July 18 and 25:10:30
a.m. at Central Ridge Library,
425 W. Roosevelt Blvd., Bev-
erly Hills. Call Kathie Lund at
527-4853.
Inverness, Hernando
* July 7 and 8: 9 a.m. at
Citrus Memorial Health Sys-,
tems Share Club Auditorium,
comer of Grace and Osceola,
Inverness. Call Chauncey
Benedict at 795-5107.
Ozello race
proves popular
The Ozello Adventure
Race that was co sponsored
by the Kiwanis Club of Cen-
tral Ridge-Crystal River and
the Chronicle was success-
ful. The triathlon attracted
108 racers from all around
'the state to the small island of
Ozello.
The three-part race fea-
tured kayaking, bicycling and
running. It was fun to watch
108 kayaks splashing
through the water.
The award ribbons were
presented in age and gender
along with team competition.'
Each competitor was given a
souvenir T-shirt with the peli-
can cartoon called "Ozzie"
and lunch.
Kiwanis club members
were stationed throughout
Ozello prepared to provide
assistance. Sixteen Key Club
members were also on hand
from Crystal River High
Sch .i,
Tl e funds derived from the
event will sponsor this year's,
scholarships for graduating
seniors of Crystal River High
School. Barry Schwartz said
that we need to limit the com-
petition next year to a maxi-
mum of 150 racers. "That's all
Ozello can handle!"
New groups
forming in Inglis
* Inglis Single's Group will
meet the third Friday monthly
for singles 18 and older.
There will be a social from 7
to 9 p.m. Friday at the Inglis
Community Center.
* The Writer's Club will
'meet from 7to 9 p.m. the
second Thursday monthly at
the Inglis Community Center,
starting July 9.

Pet SPOTLIGHT

Petite pals


Special to the Chronicle
Chihuahuas MIAmore and
Charity are the loving
companions of Jan John-
son in Inverness.


t the ripe age of 4,
Emmy had still been
.Aswimming with her
floaties on. She hates when
I pour water on her head to
wash her hair in the tub, and
when she does put her face
underwater, she
holds her nose.
A few months
ago we went on a
trip to St. Augus- .
tine. We went to
the pool at the re-
sort and Emmy, as -
usual, brought
her floaties and
Barbies to play
with. When we Shalyn
got there, there FULL i
was a little girl
younger than
Emmy swimming like a fish.
Emmy tried to get the little
girl to play with her, but She
was more interested in
swimming.- As Emmy
watched her, I knewlit was
time for her to learn how to
swim.
A few weeks later, I signed
Emmy up for swim lessons
at the college in Ocala. I
knew that parents weren't
allowed in and I knew that
rule would be best for Emmy
and me.
The first drive up for the
lessons, Patrick went with
me. It was pouring rain that
afternoon and Patrick
couldn't believe they would
still have lessons in that
kind of weather But' I in-
sisted that we press on, d'riv-
ing 35 mph up State Road
200.
"Why don't, we just stop
and swim in one of the pud-
dles!" he protested. I told
him that you had to show up
to receive the make-up class.
When we arrived, I hur-
riedly got Emmy dressed
and took her to the pool en-
trance. A teenage worker
quickly whisked her away
and a few other mothers in
the lobby saw my panic.
"Don't worry," one told
me, "that's what they do."
They didn't have classes
long that day (in fact, Emmy
didn't even get in the pool)
because of the weather, but
when the director came out
to speak to the parents, I was
immediately called out by
the director for being five
minutes late. She's a.tough
cookie, but as Emmy's swim
coach, I wouldn't have it any
other way. We are poten-
tially dealing with an activ-
ity that might one day save
her life.
The next day, I was sure to
leave home in time, even if
there was another torrential
downpour Emmy was once
again whisked onto the pool
deck, as I participated in the


crazed parents' activities. ,
As all the kids are brought
onto the pool deck, the par-
ents run around to the side
of the pool, looking for a
hole in the mesh and fence
to peek through to see their
children. I was no
exception. Thank-
fully, a mom I
knew at the pool,
who was a previ-
ous attendee,
gave me her hole
- a nice-sized rip
through which I
could see Etimy
perfectly
Barker The first day,
PLATE she cried the en-
tire time. As she
would jump into.
the water, I could see her
crying so hard that she was
having trouble breathing. At
the end of the class, I came
into the pool deck to pick
her up and she cried once
again when she saw me. All:
the way home, she begged
me not to go back
But the next day, Emmy
didn't.get her wish and off
we went to the pool. That
day, Emmy hit a huge emo-
tional milestone - and real-
izing that she could learn to
swim, became very proud of
herself.
"I am so proud 'of myself"
she boasted and cried when
I saw her at the end of class.
Still the next day, she told
me she had a bad cough and
couldn't go swimming.
"Sowwry!" she said. But
once again, Emmy's plan to
not attend class didn't work,
and that day she had a spe-
cial one-on-one swim lesson
with the director. She did
great!
After that day, I had no
problems with her going to
class. At the end of her two
weeks, I took her to Chuck E.
Cheese's with a dance friend
who was also taking lessons.
And that weekend, we went
camping at Fort Wilderness,
where she debuted to every-
one her new skills.
Emmy now swims floatie-
free, underwater, and can
find the edge of the pool. I
am so proud of her and my-
self. It was hard to watch her
suffer at first, making her do
something she didn't want to
do. But now, seeing her con-
fident and knowing that she
feels that accomplishment
makes it all worth it

Shalyn Barker resides with
her husband, Patrick, and
children Emmy and
Graham, in the Beverly
Hills area. She can be
reached at
citrusamom@yahoo.com.


Donation
for Junior
Statesman

The Rotary Club of Crystal
River recently gave Crystal
River High School student
Kimber Chewning $1,030 to-
ward the cost of attending
the Junior Statesman Founda-
tion course at Yale Univer-
sity. From left are: Rob-
Johnson, Rotary Club presi-
dent; Chewning; Keith Taylor,
Rotary Club secretary.
BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle


Two stages take the



spotlight for sound


Entertainment oppor-
tunities abound all
around our commu-
-nity. Two new performing
arts seasons are in the
works at the Cit-
rus Art Center
and the Curtis
Peterson'Audito-
rium, two of the
very best acousti-
cally correct fa-
cilities. .
Volunteers per-
form at the Art
Center Theatre
and professional Ruth
entertainers are AROUJ
engaged by the COMM
Central Florida
Community Col-
lege Foundation to perform
at the Curtis Peterson Audi-
torium for their Performing
Arts Series.


A myriad of volunteers, in
addition to the players,
make. the performances
possible and memberships
are vital to the Art Center
Theatre. To join, to volun-
teer or to purchase single
or season tickets, call 746-
7606.
Last season's "A Grand
Night For Singing," di-
rected by Stacy Griffis with
musical direction by Sally
Robb, was an astounding
success for the Art Center
Theatre. Featuring the clas-
sic hits from world-
renowned musicals,
including "The Sound of
Music," "State Fair,"
"Carousel," "Oklahoma,"
S"South Pacific" and "The
King And I," it truly was a
grand night, not only for
singing, but for remember-
ing events in our lives that
the songs evoked.


A' celebration of the
music of famed Richard
Rogers and Oscar Hammer-
stein, it included a 30-mem-
ber production team, which
supported cast
members Jon
Govoni, ' Stacy
Griffis, James
Caskey, Allyson
Govoni, Dan
Caskey, Ashlyn
Gibbs, Dennis
Love, Sharon
Vetter and Lisa
Emerspn.
Levins It was a gift of
ND THE love to the com-
IUNITY munity ... a play
telling the love
stories of' the
nine characters with glee-
ful opportunities for solos,
duets, trios as well as group
performances.
We thrilled to the likes of
"Oh, What A Beautiful
Morning" from "Okla-
homa," as the story began to
enfold. With stunning cos-
tuming and authentic set
designs, the cast and crew
brought theater in its finest
to the sheer delight of the
audience. Other favorite se-
lections included "Every-
thing's Up to Date in
Kansas City," a duet, and
Griffis' solo "It Might As
Well Be Spring."
One of the most hilarious
offerings in the 20 years of
CFCC's PerformingArts Se-
ries was their March per-
formance 'of "Laughing
With the Legends" featur-
ing music, comedy and the-
ater from the fabulous '50s.
It was a blast from the past
that we so loved. There
were so many unforgettable
legends in that high school


and college era of mine.
With singing, dancing, au-
thentic costuming, comedy
skits and audience partici-
pation, the legends came
alive in fabulous imperson-
ations.
Starring the husband and
wife team of Joey McDon-
ald' and Brian Gurl, it was
amazing to watch the two
transform themselves with
a quick change of a cos-
tume, body language and
in-deptiLpersonification.'
Coming alive once more,
this, fast paced extrava-
ganza included the likes of
Liberace, Elvis, Jerry Lee
Lewis, Donnie and Marie
Osmond, Lucille Ball, Mari-
lyn Monroe and tributes to
Roger Williams on piano;
we were spellbound by the
likenesses to the stars we
revere.
Oft times, impersonators
break the hearts of loyal
fans of legends. Rather than
impersonate, the Gurl and
Gurl husband and wife duo
paid tribute to the legends
for their memorable incom-
parable contributions to the
art form of performance.
For season or single tick-
ets to the CFCC Performing
Arts Series, call 746-6721,
ext. 1416 in Lecanto and
support the Foundation
Scholarship mission for the
Ocala and Citrus Cam-
puses.
---*---
Ruth Levins participates
in a variety ofprojects
around the community.
Let her know about your
group's upcoming
activities by
writing to PO. Box 803,
Crystal River, FL 34423.


Crime
Watch
Recently, Tom
Davis, Crystal
River airport
manager, was
the guest
speaker at the
Citrus Crime
Watch meeting
in the Emer-
gency Opera-
tions Center in
Lecanto. From
left are: Mike
Richie, Citrus
County Sheriff's
Office, and
Davis.
RUTH LEVINS/Special
to the Chronicle


I


II
]J


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 563 3280; or e-mail to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes.to run no more than once.


Swim lessons a


workout for


tykes, parents


!












TUESDAY EVENING JUNE 16, 2009 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D I F H "6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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(Mj) 98 45 98 98 28 37 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Music Awards Red Carpet CMT Music Awards 2009 (In Stereo Live) .The Singing Bee (N) (In Stereo) Music Awards
43 42 43 43 Mad Money Kudlow Report CNBC Reports Cruise Inc: Big Money Made in China, Profit . [Mad Money'
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46 40 46 46 6 5 Prnmeas-Fert. |Zaci~& Cody Wizards-Place IHan Moniana * *"SpyKids 3:Game Over" (2003) PG' Wizards-Place Wizards-Place |Han Moniana Zack& Cody That s So Raven
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(Ni 44 37 44 44 32 Special Report With Bret Baler (N) FOX Report With Shepard Smith The O'Reilly Factor (N) Ia Hannity (N) On the Record-Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor
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EliNFiL 35 39 35 35 Sports Stories Marlins Livel MLB Baseball Florida Marlins at Boston Red Sox. From Fenway Park in Boston. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) , Inside Marlins |The Final Score Best Damn Top 50 Special
LED 30 60 30 30 51 *' "Walk the Line" (2005. Biography) Joaquin Phoenix 'PG-13' * "My Super Ex-Girlfriend" (2006 Uma Thurman 'PG-13' |Rescue Me -Mickey (NI MA Rescue Me Mickey MA
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t(HITv) 23 57 23 23 42 52 Designed to Sell |E.reme Living House Worth? |House Hunters My First Place My First Place House Hunters |Bang Buck House Hunters The Stagers 'G' Income Property My First Place
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PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
In yesterday's deal, East could
see that to defeat a five-diamond
contract, the defenders had to take
one spade and two hearts.
In this deal, though,' there is
more than one possibility for the
required number of defensive
tricks.
South is 'in four: hearts. West
leads a fourth-highest club four:
three, king, nine. How should East
plan the defense?
South has a textbook vulnerable
weak-three opening: a good seven-
card suit and some 6-10 high-card
points. North raises to game, more
in hope than expectation, but
maybe he could silence the oppo-.
nents.
Note that five of a minor is down
only two, which is a reasonable sac-
rifice if four spades is making..
East should realize that the de-


Bridge

North 06-16-09
, AAK J 10 9
V A 6 2
*J 10
4 J 10 3
West East
4 Q 7. 8 6 5 3
V 3 'V 5 4
* Q 98 5 4 * A732.
4 Q8742 4 AK6
South
A 4 2 .
V K QJ 10 9 8 7
SK 6
9 5
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
3 V Pass 4 V All pass

Opening lead: 4 4


fense isn't getting a major-suit trick
And there are two chances for four
minor-suit winners: two diamonds
and two clubs, or one diamond and
three clubs. But how does East
know which way to turn?
After winning with his club king,
East cashes the club ace and looks
closely at West's card.
If West plays a higher club than
the four, showing that he led 'from a
four-card suit, East should cash his
diamond ace, then play a third
club, confident that his partner will
take the rick with his queen. Re-
member, leading a low card guar-
antees an honor in that suit.
Here, though, West plays the club
two at trick two, indicating that he
led from a five-card suit. Now East
shifts to a low diamond.
If West has the king, any play
works, but if West has the queen
and South the king, East must put.
South to a guess.


ACROSS 37 Kind of race
38 Informal parent
Wrecker's job 39 Galaxy unit
London park 40 Sushi fish
Balance-sheet 41 Desktops
guru 42 Block,
Bewildered as a stream
response 44 Large home
Female 47 Daniel or Pat
relative 51 Sugar substitute
Gam or Rudner 55 31-day mo.
Queen 56 Pigment
beater 57 Droop
Abated 58 Cable movie
Grain channel
Revise 59 NNW
Strong alkali opposite
Grain crop 60 Planets, to
Sidewalk eatery poets
Sudden 61 - Nimitz


thought
29 Food steamer
32 Is sorry about
33 Stare stupidly
34 Unrefined
metal
35 Vase
36 Cry of dismay
(2 wds.)


DOWN
Unfreeze
Ow!
Roller coaster
cry
Too quick
"The King and


Answer to Previous Puzzle ,
G.PIS CIRO1 P S I11
RIA W WIR I NIG AR T
AISA HIU G ER R T E
M ONMMIE S ATE A M
OTIT Q TSmm
OURS XT LE D



D B JON D E NERS
D B DI OD EP P

WKST DREER


I" name
Means of ID
List ender
Sweet liqueur
Conifer
Nefertiti's god


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


14 Sum
17 Arctic canoe
19 Pub pints
,22 Ice skating
figures'
23 Say another
way
24 Filth
25 Mystique
26 Manage for
oneself
28 Andrews
or Wynter
29 Got threadbare
30 Aloud
31 Frat-party
orders
36 Muppet grouch
37 Promo tape
41 Car tag
43 Eggs on
44 Wine cask
45 Osiris'
beloved
46 Some hosp.
workers
48 Diamond Head
site
49 Small lumps
50 Freud's
concerns
52 Couple
53 Atmosphere
54 Sammy Sosa's
org.


Dear Annie: I'm a 15-year- with her again and be trusted. It's
old girl whose mom is her important that she be a part of my
worst enemy. Mom and I life. What can I do? - Concerned
haven't really con- Daughter
nected over the past . Dear Daughter. Re-
few years. We drive lationships between
each other crazy, and teenage girls and their
both of us say hurtful mothers can be com-
things like, "I don't plicated, and some-
care about you" or times the reason is
"You are ruining my because you are too
life." much alike, reacting
Lately, things have in similar ways when
gotten worse. She 7) upset or angry. Try to
doesn't trust me at all. find a calm moment to
She reads my e-mail talk to Mom. Tell her
and text messages, and ANNIE'S you love her. Say that
hovers when my MAILBOX she is important to
boyfriend is around..I. you, and ask how you
have an older brother , can make your rela-
who has a great relationship with tionship closer. She was once a
Mom. I really want to get along teenage girl and may have a more


comprehensive idea of the chal-
lenges facing you. But you can
also remind her of how difficult
it is to navigate through these
years, and a closer, less discor-
dant bond would help. You also
can discuss this problem with
your school counselor, close rela-
tive or a friend's mother.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. E-mail annies
mailbox@comcastnet or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, PO. Box
118190, Chicago, IL 60611. To
find out more aboutAnnie's
Mailbox, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
wwwcreatorsconm.


Today's HOROSCOPE


Birthday: In the year ahead, there's a
strong possibility that you will enter into a
partial partnership arrangement for an
explicit purpose. Even though the al-,
liance will have limitations, it will be an
extremely meaningful one, spilling over
into the social realm.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - The
biggest enjoyment you get out of life is
doing fun things with fun people, so stick
to this game plan. If you are reclusive,
you will waste what could be a great day.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) --Although
things can get a trifle testy or competitive
at times, challenges could turn out to be
fun, so don't duck out of a contest should
one arise. Face up to it squarely.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Consider a sit-
uation not merely in the context of what
is occurring now but what the future
might bring. If you look ahead, you'll be
better prepared.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Your best


avenue for gain appears to come from a
partnership arrangement, not a solo en-
terprise. Look for a venture of this ilk if
you're not already in one.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - It's possible
that your mate's conclusions might be
more valid than yours, so don't hesitate
to discuss things that are bothering you.
You'll be surprised at what your spouse
thinks up.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - The zeal
you display while attending to your as-
signments will inspire others to follow
your example. If you want to attract
helpers, do your job in front of others.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -
There's a good chance you could end up
having to choose between delegating a
matter to another or handling the project
.yourself. You will do the better job.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - Outside
demands might vie for your attention, but
your family's interests should be the pri-


mary concem. Keep your priorities in
order, or you could experience regrets.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19).--Take
care with regard to offering unsolicited
advice, even if you feel what you have to
say could be helpful. Your comments
might be interpreted as interference.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - Your in-
nate tendency of being a caring, un-
selfish individual who is always looking
out for the interests of others will be
quite prevalent. However, don't be afraid
to look out for yourself, too.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - Spend
some quality time on projects or endeav-
ors that can advance personal interests
and not merely what others want from
you. It's a period where you can do
something for yourself.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - Just be-
cause yesterday might not have gone
well for you, don't negatively prejudge
people or situations.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek .
Unscramble these four Jumbles, C
one letter to each square, A < - " L
to form four ordinary words. '' I've answered the Z
ball for 30 years
NUKKS >. I1


@2009 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved. A) I
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NEWJUMBLENINTENDOwww.Jumble.comIds HF WA5 ---- E
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to form the surprise answer, as..
suggested by the above cartoon. '2

Answer: . + .
(Answers tomorrow)


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12 F
13 (
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16
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24 '
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6-16


� 2009 by NEA, Inc.


TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 CS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "My sister's expecting a baby, and I don't know if I'm going to
be an uncle or an aunt." - Basketball's Chuck Nevitt
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Cimus CouNTy (FL) CHRONICLE Hi~Aim & Liri TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 C7


* Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization, serving Central
Florida, offers monthly support
group meetings. Public is in-
vited.
* 10 a.m. Thursday, June
25, Woodland Terrace, 124 W.
Norvell Bryant Highway, Her-
nando. Call Pam Pepitone at
249-3100.
The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization branch office in Cit-
rus County is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. the second Mon-
day monthly. Call the Citrus
County community service rep-
resentative Ellen Mallon at 860-
2525.
* Emotions Anonymous
12-step support group, noon
the second and fourth Thurs-
days monthly at Central Ridge
Library, Forest Ridge Boulevard
and Roosevelt, in Beverly Hills.
Call Meg at 527-2443.
* SPRING HILL - Stroke
Support Group, at noon on the
fourth Thursday monthly at
HealthSouth Rehabilitation
Hospital in the private dining
room. Call Pam McDonald at
(352) 346-6359.
* BROOKSVILLE - Look
,Good Feel Better Support
Group, 3 to 5 p.m. Thursday,
June 25, in the conference
room at Florida Cancer Institute
- New Hope, 7154 Medical
Center Drive, Spring Hill.
Reservations are required, call
:Mary Capo at (352) 596-1926,
ext.150.
* Homosassa Springs
Area Cancer Survivors'Sup-
port Group at 1 p.m. monthly
at First United Methodist
Church. Call Anna Cooley, 382-
4132, or Earl Cadaret, 382-
1923.
* The regular Celiac Sup-
port Group meeting for June
27 will be held at a local restau-
rant. There will be no meeting
at the library this month. We will
dine on Italian food entrees in-
cluding homemade pizza. Reg-
ular menu items will be
available for non-celiac rela-.
tives and friends if they would
like to attend. For reservations,
call Mary Lou Thomas at 628-
9559 prior to Friday, June 19.
* Fibromyalgia Support
Group, 1:30 to 3 p.m. the last
Saturday monthly at B&W Rex-
all Drugs, Inverness. Call Ada
Fox at 637-3364.
* SPRING HILL - Am-
putee Support Group, 7 p.m.
the last Monday of every month
at,HealthSouth Rphabilitation
Hospital in the private dining
room. Call Eva Baker at (352)
592-7232.
* National Osteoporosis
Foundation Citrus County
Support Group, 1 p.m. the last
Tuesday monthly at the Citrus
County Resource Center, 2804
W. Marc Knighton Court,


Lecanto. Call Laura Henderson
of Gulfcoast Spine Institute at
341-4778.
* WomenHeart of Nature
Coast (the National Coalition of
Women With Heart Disease)
will not meet again until Sep-
tember, but offers online and
telephone support. Contact
Martha at 341-0614 or e-mail
bowmania48@yahoo.com, or
visit www.womenheart.org.
* Free Breastfeeding Sup-
port Group meets from 10
a.m. to noon the first Thursday
monthly at Nature Coast Birth
Center in Crystal River. Call
564-4224.
* Alzheimer's caregiver's
support group, 3 p.m. the first
Thursday monthly at Sugarmill
Manor, 8985 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa, hosted by the Cit-
rus team of Hernando-Pasco
Hospice. Free. Call Wendy Hall
at 527-4600.
* "Connections" fireside-
discussion-style support group,
(727) 343-0600 or www.well-
springoncology.org.
* Families Against Multiple
Sclerosis Support Group
meets 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at 302 S. Line Ave. In-
verness, for families, friends.
and anyone affected by MS.
Call 341-3740.
* Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization, serving Central
Florida, offers monthly support
group meetings. Public is in-
vited.
* 2:30 p.m. Monday, July 6,
Crystal Gem Manor, 10845
Gem St., Crystal River. Call
Coral Price at 794-7601.
The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization branch office in Cit-
rus County is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. the second Mon-
day monthly. Call the Citrus
County community service rep-
resentative Ellen Mallon at 860-
2525,
* OCALA- The Alz-
heimer's and Memory Disor-
ders support group of Ocala, 3
to 5 p.m. the first Monday
monthly at the Medical Office
Building at West Marion Com-
munity Hospital, 4600 S.W.
46th Court, second-floor Com-
munity Room. Call (352) 401-
1453.

Organizations
* Support group meetings
are in the CMHS Administration
Building unless otherwise ihdi-
cated.
* Bariatric Support Group:
6:30 p.m. every three months,
Cypress Room. Call Claudia
Blotz at 697-0051 or Bette
Clark at 860-0383.
* Breast Cancer Support
Group: noon the second Fri-'
day, Robert Boissoneault Can-
cer Institute. Call Judy Bonard
at 527-4389.


- Support GROUPS-


* Citrus Cancer Support:
4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday,
cafeteria meeting room. June
16: Chemotherapy Drug Up-
date, CMHS pharmacist. Call
Carol at 726-1551, ext. 6596 or
ext. 3329.
* Cancer Support: 3 p.m.
last Thursday, Cancer Treat-
ment Center. Call 746-1100.
* Diabetes Support Group:
11:30 a.m. the fourth Wednes-
day, Cypress Room. Call Carol
McHugh at 341-6110.
* Hospice of Citrus
County support groups for
2008. Free, but reservations
suggested. Call Jonathan
Beard at 527-2020. -
* Caregiver support group, 1
p.m. second and fourth Monday
monthly at the Citrus County
Community Center, 2804 W.
Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto.
. 0 Newly Bereaved Work-
shop, 1 p.m. Thursday at the
Hospice of Citrus County Clini-
cal Office, 326 S. Line Ave., In-
verness. o
* Grief support group, 11
a.m. Tuesday at Our Lady of
Grace Parish Life Center, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
* Grief support group, 1 p.m.
Tuesday at the Hospice of Cit-
rus County Clinical Office, 326
S. Line Ave., Inverness.
* Grief support group, 10:30
a.m. Saturday at First United
Methodist Church, 831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
* Christian-based grief sup-
port group, 1:15 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Gulf To
Lake Ministry Complex, 1506
N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River.
* Social support group, 10
a.mn. Tuesday at Crystal Para-
dise Restaurant, 508 N. Citrus
Ave.,, Crystal River.
* Social support group, 3:30
p.m. Friday at Joe's Family
Restaurant, 911 W. Main St.,
Inverness.
* LIFT luncheon (for widows
and widowers), 11:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club, Her-
nando. Call Teddi Holler at 746-
6518 for reservations, details.
* Parents support group, a
chapter of Bereaved Parents of
the USA, 7 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at First
Presbyterian Church, 1501 S.E.
U.S. 19, Crystal River.
* Alzheimer's Association-
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter
support groups:
* Cedar Creek at Kings Bay
Assisted Living Residence, 231
N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, 3
p.m. first Thursday monthly.
Call Wendy Hall at 527-4600.
* Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41


S., Inverness, 11 a.m. first
Tuesday monthly. Call Wendy
Hall at 527-4600.
Weekly meetings
* Anorexia and bulimia
anonymous 12-step support
group meets at 5:45 p.m. every
Monday at the Yana Club, 147
N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River
(behind the police station). For
more information, call Char-
maine at 422-3234.
* Independent Living
Skills, Peer Support and Lit-
eracy workshops, 9 to 11:45
a.m. Monday at the Center for
Independent Living of North
Central Florida, 3774 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Lecanto. Call
Cathy Jackson at 527-8399.
* Beverly Hills Community
Church Community Support
Group, a 12-step program,
meets at 6 p.m. Tuesday in
the fellowship hall, 88 Civic Cir-
cle. Free. All are invited. Call
the church at 746-3620 or Meg
at 527-2443.
* Hernando-Pasco Hospice
presents free grief support
programs, 2:30 p.m. Tuesday
at Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center for anyone who has
experienced the sudden loss of
a loved one. Registration re-
quired. Call (800) 486-8784.
* Celebrate Recovery, 7 to
9 p.m. Friday at Seven Rivers
Christian School in rooms
216/217 of school building C.
Dinner available before the
meeting from 6 to 7 p.m. for $3
donation and a coffee house
after. Call SRPC at 746-6200.
* Celebrate Recovery, 7
p.m. Wednesday and Fridays
at the Christian Recovery Fel-
lowship Church, 2242 W. State
Road 44. Call 726-2800.
* Celebrate Recovery at
Gulf to Lake Church Ministry
Complex, West Gulf-to-Lake
Highway in Crystal River. Din-
ner at 6 p.m. Friday, followed
by large- and small-group time
and a Coffee Caf6 at 9. Call
795-0649.
* Beverly Hills Gay and
Lesbian Support Group
meets weekly. Free, open to L
everyone:
Group organizer is Pame-
laRae and co-organizer is
Wayne Thomas. Call Pame-
laRae at 560-3247'for direc-
tions and details.
* Citrus Abuse Shelter As-
sociation (CASA), 1100 Turner
Camp Road, Invemess, offers
two free weekly women's do-,
mestic abuse support groups:
* 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday.
* 10:30 a.m. to noon'
Wednesday.
Child care available.
Call CASA at 344-8111.


* Overcomers Group for
people recovering from addic-
tions to drugs, alcohol or other
out-of-control habits meets at 8
p.m. Monday at the Sanctuary,
7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Call Paul at 628-2874.
* Dunnellon Life Recovery
group for adults where addic-
tion, compulsion and co-depen-
dency issues are dealt with, at
7 p.m. Monday at Rainbow
Springs Village Church, 20222
S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnel-
Ion. Call Char at (352) 465-
1644 or Nancy at (352)
794-0017.
* Al-Anon groups meet reg-
ularly in Citrus County. Call
(352) 697-0497.
* Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S.
41.
* Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m.
Tuesday, St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S. Sun-
coast Blvd.
* Last Resort AFG: 11:30
a.m. Wednesday, First United
Methodist Church, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road, Inver-
ness.
* Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unity Church of Cit-
rus County, 2628 Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
* Courage AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
Open meeting. Call Victoria at
503-3961.
0 Crystal River AFG: 11:30
a:m. Thursday at YANA Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
* Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday, St.
Margaret Episcopal Church,
114 N. Osceola Ave., Inver-
ness.
* Beginners AI-Anon: 10
a.m. Sqturdays at Yana Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
* Alcoholics Anonymous:
If you drink, and want to stop,
call Alcoholics Anonymous Na-
ture Coast Intergroup at 621-
0599. Web site:
www.ncintergroup.com.
N AC Group meets at 7 p.m.
.Tuesdays at Church Without
Walls, 3962 N. Roscoe Road,
Hernando. Call Laverne at 637-
4563. Web site: www.alcoholics
forchrist.com.
* Overeaters Anonymous.
Call 746-7749 or 341-0777.
* 3 p.m. Monday at the
senior center (VA building) on
County Road 491, Lecanto.
Call Delores, 746-5019.
* Noon Thursdays at Our
Lady of Grace Parish Hall, 6
Roosevelt Blvd, Beverly Hills.
Call Francisca, 746-7749.
* "Circle of Love"' 1 p.m.
Thursday at Our, Lady of


SO YOU KNOW
* Look for more Health
Notes on Page C2.


Grace Church, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call 746-
7749, 726-9112 or 341-0777.
* 7 p.m. Friday at Our Lady
of Grace Parish Hall, 6 Roo-
sevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call
Carolyn, 341-0777.
* CEA-HOW, for people who
have an eating disorder, at
noon Wednesdays at the First
Presbyterian Church, 206
Washington Ave., Inverness.
-Call Judi M..at 726-5882.
* Reiki clinic meets from 7
to 9 p.m. most Wednesdays at
the Beverly Hills Community
Center, 1 Civic Circle, Beverly
Hills. Call Ann ThonQn at 795-
5116 or Kristi Kobler at 628-
5537.
* Narcotics Anonymous:
* Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Mon-
day and Saturday, Lions Den,
U.S. 41, Floral City.
* It Works How and Why, 7
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Saturday and noon Sunday,
YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh
St., Crystal River.
* Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m.
Thursday, First Christian
Church, Grover Cleveland
Boulevard, Homosassa.
* Recovery on the River, 8
p.m. Monday and Friday,
Lecanto Church of Christ, State
Road 44 and County Road 491,
Lecanto; 8 p.m. Sunday 797 S.
Rowe Terrace, Lecanto, east of
County Road 491 and State
Road 44. .
Narcotics Anonymous is not
affiliated with any of the meet-
ing facilities listed. Information
line: 382-0851.
* Narconon provides an-
swers to drug addiction, pro-
vides free assessments,
evaluation and referral services
to treatment facilities. When
continuing relapse is occurring,
call (800) 468-6933 or visit
www.stopaddiction.com.
* Depression and Bipolar
Support Alliance of Citrus
County at 7 p.m. Thursday in
Bailey Hall, First Lutheran
Church, 1900 State Road 44
W., Inverness. Doors open at 6
p.m. Call 503-3262. The Na-
tional DBSAAssociation's num-
ber is (800) 826-3632.
* The Encouragers Sup-
port Group helps people deal
with depression, anxiety, bipolar
and more. Weekly meeting.
Call 628-3831 or 637-3196.
* SPRING HILL - Parkin-
son's Tai Chi Group, 2:30 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday in the pri-
vate dining room at Health-
South Rehabilitation Hospital of
Spring Hill. Call Charissa .
Haffner at (352) 346-8864.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


1I~:. ~


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa:(32 53565 1 ol re:(88 522401Em i: lsifes~honce.lnecm.Iwest. wwcroileninao


48 yr old Male, 5'9",
185 Ibs., smoker, wants
Female companion
between ages 35 & 50,
Interested in sports,
social drinking, enjoys
life. Call 352-287-1902


SINGLE MALE 69
Looking for 65-70
female, nonsmoker,
who enjoys, dancing,
fishing & camping
(352) 726-5559


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for your junk car,
truck or van
(352) 634-5389
FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale, Hshold.
& Furniture Items
Call 352-476-8949


3 pure white female
Kittens 1 blk./wht male.,
& pure white Mother
Cat. 613-2822
Excell. Home for any
unwanted birds, poultry
U-R unable to care for
726-9874
FREE FURNITURE
Casual pine sofa and
chair with end tables.
You pick-up.
(352)527-2572
FREE HORSE MANURE
All natural feed. You
come and get It. Easy
.access. (352) 527-9530
FREE Horse
Manure, U Haul
(352) 249-1127
HAVE SOMETHING TO
GIVE AWAY?
Place your
ad 24 hrs a day.
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
1 Select Place an Ad
2 Create an Account
3 Select Cust. type
4 Select Heading of
Special Notices
5 Select Free
6 Create Ad
PIT BULL
Red Nose fem. 3 y.o.
Inside dog, house bro-
ken, great with other
animals & kids
(352) 726-8945
Scrap metal, broken
trampoline. Needs
springs & new top. 527
4287.


mi
Blackberries
Organically drown.
U-pick, open daily,
8A./12P. $3.50 per pd.
9333 Hwy 48 Floral City.
Sweet Corn @ Bellamy
Grove, located 1.5 mi.
east on Eden Dr. from
Hwy. 41, Inverness.
Conch peas, blackeyes,
butter beans, water-
menlons .(3 5 726.-678


Calico Kitten
Has collar & leash
attached. Lost in
vicinity of S. Smith Ave
behind Humane Society
in Inverness on Sat. 6/13
(352) 628-3582
GOLDEN RETRIEVER MIX
Female. Lost at Bingo
hall In Dunnellon, 6/12.
352-489-1098.
LIGHT GRAY & WHITE
LONG HAIRED CAT
Female, name Cleo. 9
yrs old. Pine Ridge
Bronco & Yuma.
352-249-7789
Orange Tabby Cat
Male, lost in the Holiday
Heights/Hwy. 488. area.
(352) 422-5296
SMALL POODLE
Multi color, male.
Name is Elvis.
Homosassa off Cardinal
Lane. 352-697-0976


BLOND & WHITE LAB
Female, Seven Rivers
Presbyterian Churchi
352-746-9503
Dog, BIk. lab with red
collar - young male
Hernando area
341-4452
Parrot, small and
green. Call to Identify
464-4248


1arb * Malz
Fhoto grapi
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits
Indoor or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed


" Bank Probate
Divorces /Evictions
. 352-613-3674


PRECIOUS PAWS
RESCUE, INC.
352-726-4700
See adoptable pets
on our website
www.recliouspaws
Visit our Pets every
Saturday
at Petsupermarket
Inverness 10-1pm
& Crystal River Mall
Sat June 20th 10-1pm
or call us.






www.adoota
rescued netcom
View available pets on
our website or call
(352) 795-9550
Adoption Locations
Crystal River Mall
June 6th 11-3pm
Pet Supermarket
. Invemess&
June 13th, 20th &
29th... 11-2pm


CAT
ADOPTIONS


Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A till 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4
Ali'Cats and Kittens are
altered, tested for Fe-
line Luk and Aids. Up to
date on
vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofspha.org.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant Ave.
Comer of 44 and Co-
nanl.
Look for the big white
building with the bright
paw prints.


Reg'd HOME DAYCARE
Citrus Springs - Summer
Program/Planned Cur-
riculum. 352-422-7904
/us out @ zoomcitrus.6om






ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT






$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com



Widow Wants
Female Companion
Over 60 to share lovely
home on 2 acres.
Share utilities.
352-220-6100


Fishing Partner Wanted
You tow, and I pay gas
and bate for boat
(352) 425-4795
Looking to Rent
Large House
or Facility
to accommodate
up to 18 people,
Nov. 21- Nov.28
For extended
Family Reunion'
In Crystal River Area
Call 802-758-2017
or email
lconnor@gnavt.net
NANNY/BABYSITTER
Will take care of
your children.
Call 352-613-0300


Two Cemetary Plots
Dunnellon Memorial
Gardens for sale.
Delores (352)789-0107 or
Uz at (352)274-3958


A FREE Report of Your
Home's Value
www.naturecoast
livinu.not

Yonr world first.
Every Day
k(Nas LEds
Classifleds


Personal
BBeauty
a





Pe
COSMETOLOGY
er Ut
BARBER
S0
ESTHETICS/
SPA TRAINING
Nail Technology
MassageV
Therapy

claisos;.s
July 27. Sept 8. Oct
19, Nov 30, 2009
Cosmetology Niqhts
July 27, Oct. 19, 2009
Massage DaVs
Aug. 31.
Dec.14,2009
Massage Niqht,
Aug. 31. 2009
Massacie Weekends
July 11. 2009
Barbering NiqhLs
Sept 8, Nov 30. 2009
93% of our
Graduates passed
the NCETMB
the I st time!
SKIN & NAIL Classes
Weekly - Days
& Nights
(727) 848-8415
BENE'S
International School
of Beauty. Barber &
Massage Therapy
7027 U.S. Hwy. 19
New Port Richey,
FIL 34652 J


TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 C7


HEALTH & LIFE


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


AA


I [ 1











C8 TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009


BE A CNA
One week Prep Course
Train & test with us.
GETYOURCNA.COM
341-PREP (7737)

BECOME A CYIA
For Career and
Test Preparation
Call 352-564-8378


Certified
Medical Assistant

Needed 30-40 hrs.
weekly. Must be able
to work quickly &
accurately.
Prior Medical office
experience req'd
Competitive wages.
Email resume to
resumes110764
@vyahoo.com


CNA
Medical office exp.
Required. Full time
with benefits, For
busy medical office.
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2512


CNA PREP & TEST
EZ Learning Services
Day & Evening Classes
352-382-EASY; 586-2715
/ us out zoomcitrus.com

CNA TEST PREP
Now Offering Day & Eve.
Classes Free CPR training
w/enrollment. New classes
begin every 3 wks
341-2311
Scholarships Available

Dental/
Surgical Assistant
For an oral surgery
practice, In Lecanto &
Sprlnghlll.
Experience a must
Email Resume to:
maryamoli@
yahoo.com -
or Fax 352-527-8087


GYN OFFICE IN
CRYSTAL RIVER
LOOKING FOR:
Cert. Medical Asst.
Receptionist - Billing
Dietician
Cert. Nursing Asst.
Proactive, 1 year
exp. In Medical Of-
fices. Knowledge In
medical software
Please send resume:
mredrick@earthlink.net
or fax 352-564-8201


Medical Assistant
Experience needed.
Please send resume
,to P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447


NOW HIRING
Experienced,
Caring &
Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
H-.:.u , & L I.. r.
Fie -iale .Cnecuils
offered. $10.00/hr.
CALL LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885



Nurse Practitioner
or,
Physician Assist.
For Busy Medical
Office. Full time
with Benefits,,
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2512


Ready for a More
Rewarding
Therapy Career?

The homecare industry
Is revolutionizing
healthcare in
America, and Gentiva
Home Health is
leading that evolution
with exceptional
care, innovative
solutions and
uncompromising
service. Due to rapid
growth, the LECANTO
team Is now hiring
for the following
positions:

PT & OT


your career

Commit to us.
We'll commit to you.
Sign on Bonus
Available
call Maoa Wolfe at:
1-877-623-2350 or emaill
mala.wolfe@
gentiva.com
Or visit
careers.genriva com
EOE '-






Cypress Creek
Juvenile Offender
Correctional Facility
* In Lecanto
is looking for a
Licensed Mental
Health Therapist.
Qualified applicants
should have knowl-
edge of adolescent
psychopathology.
and mental health,
substance abuse and
Suicide screenings.


Must be able to pro-
vide comprehensive
clinical assessments,
treatment planning
and individualized
mental health/
substance abuse
therapeutic Interven-
ltions. Requirements:
Must possess a
license: (LCSW,
LMHC) from the state
of Florida, Master's
degree from an
accredited college
or university In the
field of counseling,
social work, psychol-
ogy, rehabilitation,
special education,
or In a related human
services field Is
preferred.
Apply In person at
Cypress Creek
2855 W. Woodland
Ridge Dr. Lecanto
or Fax resume to
352-527-2235


SHIFT
MANAGERS

Wanted, Come join
our Team, Inverness.
Apply in person or at
www.pizzahut.com
PIZZA HUT: 726-4880

F/T Exp'd LINE
COOK PANTRY

Excellent benefits
Paid vacation
Bring resume.
Apply In person only
Wed. - Fri. 10:30-5:00
@ Sugarmill Woods
Country Club
IDouglas St.
Homosassa Riverside
Resort Now hiring
SERVERVERS * COOKS
BAR TENDER
BOAT CAPT USCG Lic.
Master for Narrated River
Tours.
E-mail qualifications and
contact info to
personnel@
riversideresorts.com
or fax 352-628-5208 for
appt.
Location information at
www.riversideresorts.com



Salesperson

Familiar with doors and
trim. Fax resume to
352- 489-0709
SGN Wireless
AT&T

Authorized Retailer
store in
Citrus County Is
looking to fill full time
sales position
Please E-mail
resume to: resume
@sgnwireless.com
TIMES ARE HARD
NEED TO EARN
$$ MONEY $$?
352-560-7065: 560-7029



CHIEF ENGINEER
F/T, prefer hotel exp.
MAID & LAUNDRY
PERSON
Fax or email
resume 352-563-1112:
gsm.crystalriverf@gmail.c
om
GUNSMITH
Knowledge of all types
of firearms. Part-time
Background check
352-564-0001
Hiring Experienced
A/C Installer
Must be certified, have
own tqols & valid D.L.
Honest & dependable.
Must have min. 2 yrs
exp. Please call
860-2522
or fax resume 860-0757
P/T COUNTER HELP
w/mechanical
knowledge.
P/T or F/T MECHANIC
Call 352-726-3539





APPOINTMENT
SETTERS
**-A***
Up For A Challenge?
Serious minded
individuals will earn
great $$$ setting appts
for our very busy local
company. Call Steve
@ 352-628-0254













































Restaurant For Sale a
An established .
profitable franchise in
Crystal River. $239K.
(352) 746.6596


tart UpTeIecommun
cation Company
SAVE BIG $$$ ON
CELL PHONES, WIRELESS
CARRIERS, HOME SE-
CURITY & SATELLITE TV.
352-560-7065: 560-7029


25x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry Door. 2 Vents.
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.795. INSTALLED
30x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$14.995. INSTALLED
35x50x12(3:12 pitch)
Roof overhang,
2-10x10 Rollup Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$29.995 Installed
+ Fl. Engineered Plans
* A local Fl Manufact.
+ Meets or exceeds
Florida wind codes.
+ Conc/Inst by others.
+ Many sizes available
+ We specialize In
Commercial Buildings
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC1256991
www. metal
structureslic.com



BIRDSEYE MAPLE
Dresser w/mirror $300.
Matching WASH STAND
$275; Other antiques
also available. Call
352-382-2433
Snooker Billiard table,
12x6, '30's mahogany.
Beautiful cond., $3,500
(352) 637-5816



Thurs. Estate Auction
June 18 Sale- 4PM
Great selection of turn.,
Many decorated pcs.
Huge Sports Card
collect., Tools, toys.
Always an adventure
dudleysauction.com
AB1667-AU2246 12%BP




A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
4 2 Ton $780.00
4 2-1/2Ton $814.00
4 3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Free Del. Lic.#CAC
057914 746-4394
ABC Briscoe Appl.
Refrig., washers, stoves,
Serv. & Parts
(352) 344-2928
Dishwasher, Whirlpool,
Quiet Partner 3, White,
$50.00
Stove, Whirlpool
Smooth Top. White
$150.00 726-9151
KENMORE WASHER
Heavy Duty, works
great! $100;
(352) 270-3527
Refrigerator
Small, 20"D. X 33.5"H -
X 20"W. White, 2 yrs. old.
$75.00 (352) 382-3110
WASHER & DRYER
; GOOD COND.- PR. $85
352 746-1819
WHIRLPOOL WASHER &
DRYER Super capacity.
2yrs old, perfect
condition. $475.
352-489-1486



Thurs. Estate Auction
June 18 Sale- 4PM
Great selection of turn.,
Many decorated pcs.
.Huge sports card col-
lect., Tools, toys.
Always an adventure
dudleysauction.com
AB1667-AU2246 12%BP



COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
New & Used systems
upgrades. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
www.rdeeii.com
Word Processor,
Smith Corona
$20.
(352) 465-2271



SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Bik w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30kin-
vested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815



8 FT FINISH MOWER
needs some work
$200.00 352-628-3736



Pre Owned Furniture
Unbeatable Prices
NU 2 U FURNITURE
Homosassa 621-7788
BLUE COUCH
w/2 recliners on end.
Good condition. $135
RECULINER w/massager.
$200/obo.
352-795-7513
Broyhill sofa & love seat
in perfect cond. $500 for
set. (352)341-1896
China Cabinet - dk.
wood, antique $150.00
Dinette Table, Tile top,


It. wood, no chairs
$20.00 726-9151
Curio Cabinet
White wood, glass door.
Modern design, 80" x 30"
x 13", 4 shelves, mirrored
back, w/light. Exc. cond.
$175. (352) 382-3322


heavy duty metal,
decorative frame w/
Regal Mattress. Like
new, in non-smoking &
pet free home. $100
Call (352) 795-7474
DINETTE SET W/4
CHAIRS Chromecraft
white formica table
(42x60) with 4 rolling,
cushioned chairs. Cush-
ions are cream, peach
and light green. $250.
Call 527-6509
Dinette Set,
Chromecraft, 42 x 60"
Table, w/ 4 caster
chairs, ood cond.
(352) 341-1857
Entertainment Center
Wood, 3 tiered, 60" LX
16" W X 24" H. $75.
(352) 637-2881
FLEX STEEL SET
Love seat, 2 wing back
chairs & ottoman.
Upholstered In neutral
floral print, good cond.
All 4 pieces $225.
352-382-7042
Living Room Set
off white palm trees,
$300.00
Designer bags, dunny
and burke
352-220-4634
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30; Full
$40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
Queen Size Bed
W/frame & all bedding,
$220. Obo. 2/four
drawer chests. $35.
each. (352) 249-6800
RATTAN TABLE
glass top, w/4 new
chairs $400
(352) 563-0595
Sofa & Coffee Table $150
for both. (352) 560-3314
Sofa bed,
7 months old,
color blue, $450.
(352) 637-5903
Sofa,
dark green
$75. very good cond.
(352) 382-1502
Used Office Desk
$185 OBO.
Used Office Chair
$85.OBO
Call 352.201.2073
Wood Dining Room Set
w/extra leaf & 4 chairs.
$350. Obo. Coffee table
& side tables, glass top
and wood. $120. Obo.
(352) 249-6800
Word Processeor
Brother, $25. Obo.
(352) 637-2881
YOUR FURNITURE
DONATIONS
* SUPPORTS THE PATH
HOMELESS SHELTER
Call (352) 746-9084



Craftsman
7HP self propelled
w/ bagger 21" cut
Can be seen at
1148 N. Foxrun Terr./Inv.
$190 (352)419-6144
Craftsman Lawn Tractor
& edger, 17.5 hp, 42" w/
grass catcher, elec. start,
auto transmission $550;
Edger/trimmer $125
(352) 382-3057
Entertainment
Center, Solid cherry,
includes Sanyo 31" flat,
screen tv. 76" X 36".
$175. (352) 410-0891
Kubota Garden Tractor
Diesel, 12 HP, PTO,
4' Woods, mowing deck.
Mod. B-6000. $1,100
Obo.(352) 447-0572
Lawn Mower
Yardman, 13.5 HP, 38"
cut, Hydrostatic, auto.
trans., well maintained,
runs great. $6300. OBO
746-0737
Lawnmower, Riding
Yard Machine MTD,
8hp, 30" cut, new
battery, runs good.
Attachments Incl.
$250.00 465-0190
RIDING LAWNMOWER
runs & mows good
$350.
(352)601-5053
Toro
42" Cut, 17H,
Zero turn cut,
$550.
(352) 422-0584
TROYBU[LT 21"
Self Prop, Electric start,
Like new, ext.
warranty. $175
352-601-7086



BEVERLY HILLS
Moving Sale, 6/10
thru 6/19. 7A./?.
218 S. Lincoln Ave.




Let us pay YQL. to
cut your 5+ acre
bahia field for sod!





Armature Radio Equip.
Silent key, for a list email


Bedroom Set KingSZ
7 pcs. Contemporary
style very nice $500.
Amanda Commerical
qualify dryer $150.
aft 9am(352) 621-0213
DeVilbiss
Electric Generator
'5,250 Watts, 120\240V
10HP Gasoline $275.
(352) 628-6537


Act Now -


ITS FREE

Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad for FREE on
our all new


CLASSIFIED SITE.
5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 Items totaling less than
$100.00 each.
Go to:.
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an Ad in the top right
hand comer.
LADIES CLOTHING
casual to business
sz 2-12....Complete
Queen Comforter set
Incl designer pillows
shower curtain &
draperies. Spring colors
(352) 489-0976
Let us pay YQJL to
cut your 5+ acre
bahia field for sodi
Circle T Sod
352-400-2221


Photography
"Melissa Fields"
specializing in
weddings, events,
group & individual
portraits, professional
portfolios, live concerts.
call for special price
(352) 220-4124
POOL COVER 16X32 on
reel. Easy to operate.
Cost $250 asking $125
CURIO 2-plece Burled
wood. Beveled glass
doors. 8 drawers. $250
352-637-6310
SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149 & up
Wave Runner Bimini's
352-563-0066
/us out zoomcitrus.com
Shed
8' X 10', Wood frame,
aluminum siding. One
window, 4' wide door,
3yrs,. old. $1,000.
(352) 860-1097
TRUCK BEDLINER
shortbed out of 2001
F250 Ford,no tailgate
liner $50.00
352-628-3736 -
USED TIRES Michelin
P235-70R-16 set of four
good condition $100.00
352-628-3736
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT




r-A



$$ SAVE $$

* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com




Hospital Bed
Hlllron Bed, computer-
ized air mattress, the
Cadillac of hospital
beds, $900.00
352-447-5595
SWING-A-WAY
Wheelchair lift.
$700/obo.
WHEELCHAIR Manuel,
new. $75/obo.
352-637-1153
WHEELCHAIR
Manual, used very little.
$65.
HOSPITAL BED all elec.
$75. 352-344-5135



"THE REVENUER"
Buy & Sell
Vintage coins/currency
352- 302-8159
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676



A-R15 W/Scope
Ammo, 4 mags.
Consider part in trade.
$1,350. (352) 746-1417
Browning 12 gauge
Grade 1 model 425
O&U, 32" barrels,
beautiful wood, $1,750
obo Ruger Red Label.
12 gauge, O&U
w/chokes, $800 obo
(352) 726-9369
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Gun Case
For travel, aluminum, air
line approved, 53" x 4.5".
$60.00(352) 746-4879
LADIES RALEIGH
MOUNTAIN BIKE
21-spd, 26". MAN'S
RALEIGH 21-spd, 26".
Uke new. $135 ea.
352-382-2433
PRIVATE COLLECTOR
Buying Guns,.
Ammunition&
reloading supplies
(352) 586-7516
SHELTI AIR HOCKEY
TABLE
SFull size, 85"x45". Hardly
used, good cond. $350.
352-503-7308
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238
WEIGHT BENCH +
WEIGHTS Weldenpro
weight bench plus
weights $125.00
352-628-1669



'03 CARGO MATE
Enclosed CAR HAULER.
20 x 8.5, ramp/side
door, dual axle, elect
brks., mint $4200 obo
Steve (352) 503-6542
CAR HAULER
'06, 32 Ft. Dominator XT.
By Classic C. Trpl.
axels. $14,200. Like
new.(352) 835-4273
Cargo Trailer
'09, Brand new, 7' x 14'.
V-nosed w/ramp. $3,300
(352) 476-8907
Utility Trailer
* 4' x 6', Tilt bed, no
tailgate, $275.00
Go Kart, single seat
$250.00
726-9151



KOLCRAFT BABY
SWING. $35
SOOTHING VIBRATING
BABY CHAIR. $10
352-637-0511




PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!


Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad



WANTED OLD
LION EL TRAINS
Collector Top Prices
Pald, (352) 795-3970


CLASSIFIED



IM=


KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
Shih Tzu Puppies
pure bred, born 4/6/09,
2 boys B&W, 2 girls
black, $400./$550. par-
ents on premises, 1st
shots & health cert.
352-637-3956
horstman52@msn.com
Shlh-Tzu Puppies
2 New Liters Home
raised w/ love. All shots
Included. $300+
3902 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827
(305) 872-8099
Yorkie,
AKC female,
housebroken, crate
trained, very sweet; 3
years old. $600.00
726-9151



DOG CAGE
30x23x21, divided hag a
tray, elect collar for
small dog$75.00
(352) 344-5334
LARGE ANIMAL CAGE
I ,:for r Cri., pi-
j, ..r.. .:r ,i.:.s, n: J.
wideX4' hlghX8' long.
$75. 352-637-4145
ORGANIC
FERTILIZERS
For hay, pastures & all
growers. $40 per acre '
Dealer's Wanted, Call
Rob (352) 585-2758.



Hen w/Chickens $25.
Egyptian Fayomis sold
as pairs only $20.
assorted Roosters $6.ea
(352) 697-9187
TIMOTHY ALFALFA HAY
20 Bales $8.00 each
352-726-3093



2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Util. incl.
'clean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
(352) 628-9759
2/2 SNOWBIRD OASIS
$600 mo. + $600dep.
Lawn, Water, Sewer,
Garb. Inc. 352-746-7595
CRYSTAL RIVER
CLOSE TO
POWER-PLANT

2/1 Partially
furnished,
washer/dryeron 1/2
acre, clean, quiet, no
dogs. $500.+ Sec.

INGLIS
CLOSE TO
POWER PLANT

2/1 Apartment,
partially furnished,,
washer/dryer,
clean & quiet. No dogs.
$600.+ Sec.
(352) 447-0333

DUNNELLON
Close To Power
Plantll 2/2 Carport, on
3 fenced, wooded lots.
Furn., fla. rm. scm'd
patio, wsh./dry. Nearby
river dock access.
$750. Mo. F/LUS.
(772) 486-0070

HOME-N-LAND
New home on 1/2
acre. 3/2 1500sqft. 10
yr. warranty, sodded
lawn, paved Rd. Get
. your stimulus check
($8,000) cash back
only $665/mo. W.A.C.
Own your own home!
CALL (352) 621-9183
HOMOSASSA
1& 2 Br furn & Unfum .
In beautiful park w/pool.
No Pets. 352- 628-4441
Homosassa
2/1, scrn prch No pets.
$100/wk. 352-613-2333
HOMOSASSA 55+
2/2 Stonebrook
Estates
Unfurnished, Car Port.
Pool, Club house.
.Boat & RV storage
$595. Mo.
(352) 422-7887
HWY 488
Extra Clean 2/2, lrg.
fenced yd. scrn. pr.,
carport, $500 mo.+ dep
no pets. 352-795-6970
INVERNESS
1st Month Freel
Waterfront 55+ Park, 1BR,
1BA $350. 2 BR, 1BA, $450,
also fully furn., Incl water
& grass mowing.
352-476-4964


AKC, CHINESE CRESTED
PUPS, champion sired
9 weeks old, h/c,
1 male femS250 -$450
(352) 795-0336
BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219
BLACK LAB PUPS
AKC, OFA. Beautiful
block heads. Home
raised, H cert. $800
352-489-1879; www.
quailmeadowlabs.com
Chihuahua
AKC Male, 16 weeks,
fawn, applehead,
gorgeous pupi $350.
637-1111
CHIHUAHUA PUPS
All boys, 3 mos. short
hair, 1st shots/h/c,
starts @$175.00
(352) 341-4021
COCKER SPANIEL
9 mth old male.
All shots. Must find a
new home due to
owners illness. $150.
352-628-5085







EXOTIC HIPPIE
BUNNY RABBITS

For Sale
New small breed, Hip-
pies $25.- $35 ea.
All colors, baby
bunnies 2 to 3.5 Ibs.
New Zealand Breeders
$20 each. 5.5-8 Ibs
352-621-0726
Cell 13521 422-0774


(2) NEW 2005 Incredible
Price! Rsales/Rentals
avail w/lease - Pet ok.
&idljabl 352-628-2090




POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - RV SITES
Waterfront homes
Weekly private rooms
352-628-0011



CHASSAHOWITZKA
2/2 waterfront DW $600
2/2 furnished DW $700
2/I carport - $500
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $900
Agent, 352-382-1000

I Mayo Drive
Apartments .
U| nits Available |
from $395. mo.
1 (352) 795-2626
- - -m m ,


2/2 Split plan on 1/2 acre.
No pets.$550., Mo.
Fst./Lst. (352) 634-1764
INVERNESS 2/1
RENT OR RENT
TO OWN
Spacious DW, beau-
tifully renovated.
Fenced lot & country
setting. CHA,
covered parking.
screened porch,
laundry room. New
paint, carpet & tile.
$650 rent + $300 dep.
Rent to Own w/$600
dep & $650 - Includes
taxes & Insurance.
No credit check just
job verification.
4235 Quiver Terr..
863-860-5292
INVERNESS
2/1 Scm. Prch. Fenc'd
yrd,Fst./Lst./Sec.$475.
No pets (352) 726-4842
JUST REMODELED
2/2 -$575; 2/1- $550
3/3 -$600. 352-584-3348
COUNTRY
SETTING
2/2 in Country Setting.
$500/mo. + $500 Sec. No.
pets. For application Call
Lee at 352-250-0664 or
800 -692-4162.




HOMOSASSA
RIVER FRONT
2/1.5 - $850/mo.
"+ utilities. Large dock
352-422-3338

NEW 2009 2/2, large
rooms, appliance
pkg. 2x6 construction
10 yr. warranty, must
seel $37,900 includes
A/C & heat, steps,
skirling on new padi
352-621-9182
Palm Harbor 3/2
Singlewlde
Introductory Model
$299/mo wac. 10
models to choose from
On Your Lot
Call John Lyons
1-800-622-2832 ext.210
Walden Woods Village
3 Bedroom /3 bath,
carport, Lrg. eat in kit,
liv.,din. rm., Scrn'd la-
nai, outside storage.
Exc. loc. Avail. June.
$56,400(352) 382-0681




BANK FORECLOSURE!
3/2 approx. 1300 sqft
on 1/2 ac. fenced
back yd, scrn room,
work shop, concrete
drive on paved road.
Private but close to
town I Hbme In great-
conditioni $3,000
down, $565/mo.
W.A.C. Call to view.
(352) 621-9181
crystal river 2/2,sw,on
1/2acre new
carpet&stove very clean
10x14 workshop $35000
o.b.o.813-792-1355
, Crystal River
4/2, on 5 acres, 15 X 30
family rm. w/wet bar,
fireplace, walk in closets,
lease w/option. $850.
Mo. (352) 465-8346
Floial City
: 22 DW or. 3 5 - .:,r .
acres. Withlacoochee
Forest area great for
horse riding.Priced to
sell. (352) 341-6281
(352) 634-0787
(352) 634-1290.
HOMOSASSA
3/2- 1999 remodeled
2000+sqft. Owner
financing. $675/mo
352-302-9217
Homosassa, 3BR, 2BA
doublewide on 1/2
acre MOL, remodeled,
owner finance $63,500.
$5,000 down, 8% int.
$560 mo. or discount
for cash (352) 726-9369
INGLIS '95 SW
211%, onl', ac. Private,
. wooded,covered deck,
garage w/work shop,
new vinyl shed. All apple.
include Some furnishings.
$49,9001 Cash price.
$45,000, or lease opt.
$10,000 Dwn. & $500..
Mo. (352) 419-5777
(352) 476-9005



BUSHNELL
2/1 part. remodeled
Adult park, Lot Rent
$1.95/mo $5,500 obo
(352) 457-1550
I'M A LONELY MOBILE
2 bdrm home In a
beautiful park In
Homosassa. Brand new
kit, bath, livrm, tile firs.
A/C . I need someone to
love me. Only $15K, will
talk. At night I see all the
lights on in the other
houses and I stay dark &
alone. Please come &
love me. Call Robert
* 352-249-6239.
INVERNESS
55+ Waterfron't Park,
1BR, water Inci., A/C
$3,500 + $270 ma. log
rent. Fully turn., financ-
Ing avail 352-476-4964 "
LECANTO
Senior Park. roomy
2 bedrm 1.5 bath, fully
furnish, move In ready
Very Nice $7500
(352) 634-4329
MELODY PARK 55+
Inverness 2/1, Move In
cond.appliances Incl.
$13,000 obo.lot rent
$265/mo Lve mess
(352) 637-4823
MOSS MOBILE PARK
lot #23, 1/1 ,cha,
Screened room. Totally

fim (352) 201-0903
WEST WIND VILL 55+


Pinewood Villas
Is now Accepting
applications for our
1,2, 3 BR Apts.
Located in Bronson
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-486-2612
Or Apply Tues & Thur
7291 NE 92nd Ct. #17,
Bronson, Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity


NATURE COAST
Crystal River:
2/2 home $650

FumrnishedHomes:
2/1 -$1000
1/1 -$1200
2/1 - $1800 W/F
2/2 - $1500 W/F

The Islands/Condos:
2/2 - $1200 and up
furnished
Port Paradise:
2 & 3/2 WF w/dock
Several units to
choose from
Fully furnished

2/1 Apartments:
$550 to $575

Homosassa:
3/2/2 - $775
3/2/2 - $850
Citrus Srings:
3/2/2 - $950
Visit our website:
www.c2 Inaturecoast.c
am
or call 352-795-0021




J W, M *o Runa. EaO,,
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
Pritchard Island
3/2/1 Villa- $875
ArborLakes
3/2/2 - $800
Inverness
2/2/2- $700
3/2/2- $750
2/1/1 - $595
2/2/1 - $625
3/2/1 - $895
2/2/1 Villa- $695
1&2 Bd Apartments
starting at $400
2/12/I1- $600
2/12/I- $600
Lecanto
'/I Apartment- $3A5
.See our website:
www.Jwmortonreal
estate.com
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
352-726-9010

River Links Realty
352-628-1616

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $900.
CRYSTAL RIVER
WF 3/2/2 $1075
4/2/2 $1050
HOMOSASSA
Duplex.1/1 $350.
2/1 $495/up
Homes 3/2/2 $675.
Sugarmlll Wds ;/2/2
Condo or Villa $625.
3/2/2 Villa $800




FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT I Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
GOBBLER ROAD
Studio w/wash. tiki hut,
Boat, no deps. $450mo.
352-341-1277





BEDRM8MS,
Starting @ $425/mo
Laundry on premises.
352-465-2985


4th OF JULY SPECIAL
$76 MOVES YOU INI
2 BEDROOMS
STARTING AT $450.
352-257-8048

Citrus County
Rentals
(352) 634-5499

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, % OFF FIRST
Mo.(352) 263-6321
Duplex 2/1
Rent $550/mo. Option
to buy. Owner
finance, low down,
easy terms!
CHA, W/D hook-ups,.
city limits, spotless
(352) 422-3217
HOMOSASSA 2/1
CHA, New paint, car-
pet, tile. No pets. $525
Incis H20. 352-563-2114
INGLIS VILLAS.
Is now accepting
applications for our
1,2,3 BR Apts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Crys. Riv.
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: MW, F
. 33 Tronu Drive
Inglis Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity

2INVERNESS
2/ITri-plex, Great Loc,
clean & roomy. No
smoke/no pets $500
Mo. Fst/Lst/Sec.
352-341-1847

LECANTO
1 Bedroom
(352)746-5238
613-6000/613-5974

ONE MONTH FREE!
LECANTO newer 2/2
duplex, all kitchen appli-
ances, patio, W/D
hook-up, nice yard,
Exc. Cond. $625
(352) 634-1341


Extra Irg. 2/2/1 Lakeside
Community, pool, dock,
no smoke, restricted
pets. $600 mo. + sec.
(866)637-2631 TOLL FREE



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1Y2, $575. Mo.
W/D, Downtown
352-400-5300


?' T "s I;, 9t'8 6
L t~.:8El6|T Z S 9




9.
_�:i S; 9 ? 6 1|T8|




9 �- S tb-iEC4 6 1

99 7
i7' T E 6S 98 S �' Z _


Lrg 2/2, C/H/A, screen
porch, water Incl. $550.
F/L/S, 352-746-4191
352-697-5900
RAINBOW
GARDEN
APARTMENTS

Affordable living for
seniors 62 and up
and disabled individ-
uals. Located @
11850 Rainbow
Garden Circle.
Dunnellon, Fla.
Rental Assistance
Available to those
who qualify. 1 & 2
Bedrooms
Available with
Central Heating &
AC, Blinds, carpeting,
stove, refrigerator.
TDD Hearing
Impaired number:
1-800-955-8771
"This Institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer."
(352) 465-3309








RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS
Affordable living for
senl6rs 62 and up
and disabled Individ-
uals. Located @
2151B N. River Reach
Cir., Crystal River.
Rental Assistance
Available to those
who qualify. 1 & 2
Bedrooms
Available with
Central Heating &.
AC, Blinds, carpeting,
stove, refrigerator.
TDD Hearing impaired
number:
1-800-955-8771
SThis institution Is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer."
(352) 795-8024









INVERNESS
2/1 - All new floors,
nice setting. $500;
2/2- Large rooms,
completely tiled,
screen lanal, very
.quiet & private. $600.
Washer dryer,
hook-ups.
727-446-5871
352-344-0238






SAct Now -

PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad
We Have Rentals
Starting at $425/mo +
Many others
LANDMARK
REALTY
352-726-9136
Kathy or Jane
311 W Main St. Inv




HERNANDO
Office, on 3/4 acre.
Busy intersection, great
for sheds, boats, sales.
$835. Mo.(352) 637-7117



Beverly Hills
Parkslde Village, 55+,
1/1.5/1 & Scrn. room, all
redone, nonsmoker,
$560. F/L/S 422-7653
CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Townhome, turn.
(352) 613-5655
CITRUS HILLS
Home, Villa, Condo
GREENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-5921
(888) 446-5921
areenbriarrental.com
Citrus Hills
New A/C, new rugs, Unf.
2/2, use of pool, patio,
W/D, carport, No Pets
$699 (718) 833-3767






FREE RENT!
SUMMERHILL
AT


Limited Timel
Call agent for
details.
352-563-5657
/ out zoomcitrus.com

INVERNESS 2/2/1
Whispering Pines Villa
Washer & Dryer,
community pool.


Small pe. Pets only. $600.
mo. 352-220464-273154
INVERNESS
2/2/2/ Cypress Cove


INVERNESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
781494

SudIOKU ****-* 4puz.oom


27 li4


25 . 1
517 _----__


----2- -











34 2



-9 8_.. ..... "-.. 3-2 -


Fill in the squares so that each row column. and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9


2/1, $550 mo. + dep.
C/H/A (352) 464-2716
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lrg, 2/2 C/H/A, Nice
$585/mo., includes,
lawn, garbage, water,
Move in with $900.
No dogs 352-726-9570
Duplex 2/1
Rent $550/mo. Option
to buy. Owner
finance, low down,
easy terms
CHA, W/D hook-ups,.
city limits, spotless
(352) 422-3217
HOMOSASSA
2/1 w/carport $550 mo.
+sec.; 2/2 w/ fam. rm &
carport $650 + sec.
Both remodeled
(352) 746-3228
HOMOSASSA
New, 2/2, Rent
w/option to buy. 1300
sq. ft. w/d hk. up, fans,
blinds, refr., stove,
microwave, tile, carpet.
$750. month
(352) 592-0893
INVERNESS 2/2
LIKE ,Nswl WID
$600mo 352-563-2118
ONE MONTH FREE!
LECANTO
Newer 2/2 duplex, all
kitchen appliances,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341




LECANTO 1/1
Log Cabin CHA, n/pets
$475 + 1st, Ist.sec. Wtr.
Garbg. inc. 352-746-3073,


GREAT AMERICAN
REALTY
Invernes
X-Lrg 2/2/2 all utilities.
2/2 Condo main-free
BIGI Like new 3/2/2
Studio Apts.all utilities.
Beverll illsy
Very Nice 2/2
Oakwood Vill. 3/2/2
3/2 Great area
Citrus Springs
3/2/2 Newer home
2/2 Duplex
Adorable 1/1 & 2/1
Hemando
Brentwood 3 & 2 bd
Townhouses
Very Nice 1/1
2/2 with Pool
Brand New 4/22/2/
3/2 Mobile waterfront
352-637-3800
www.choosegar.com


-INVERNESS

Immaculate
Newer Homes

3/2/2, Back Porch,
$800. Mo., no pets.
212/1 Patio Home
close to shops, '
$700 Mo.
2/2/2 + Fla. room
adult 55 + com., pet
ok. $750. Mo.

2/2/2 Fenced yard, out
building, avail Aug. 1
st. $700. Mo.
(352) 344-2500
(352) 464-2508


BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2 w/Fla Rm. All new
Inside, $850/mo F/Sec
121 W. Sugarberry Ln.
(352) 746-3228

SUNSET VILLAS
Senior Community
Chiefland Fl.
Accepting
Applications for
1 .& 2 BR ATS
Please Apply
M, W, F, 8am-12p
124 SW 14th Ave.
(352) 493-0220
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.!




Citrus Hills
Townhouse 212y/1.
Terra Vista Club incl.
$1,000 Mo + util.
(516) 991-5747

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2 Waterfront Furn.
8 rm. house on Lake
Russo, boat ramp &
private dock. $1,200
Mo. RV. sight also
avail. $350.Mo.
(850) 566-4195

HERNANDO
River Lakes Manor
3/2.5/2 Scm'd patio,
CHA, washer/dryer.
$750. Mo., fst./lst. + sec.
(352) 322-0149
INVERNESS
1st Month Freel Water-
front 55+ Park, 1BR, 1BA
Incl. water & mowing
$475. 352-476-4964

JV&
LM= *s


UGARMILL
WOODS
2/2/2 Just off U.S. 19
Quiet $850. Mo. F/US.
(352) 212-7716.




2 to 4 Bedrooms
RENT TO OWN- NO
CREDIT CHECKII
Low Downi
352-484-0866
iademission.com
BEV. HILLS/Cit. Sprg
2/1, Bev. Hills $650./mo.
2/1/2Cit. Spgs$700./mo
352-422-2225
BEVERLY HILLS
I BD w/fla. rm. +
bonus rm.$600/mo
All FIRST FREE Month
30 S. Desoto 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1 Carport $525
2/2/1 End porch, patio
$675 (845)282-3504
BEVERLY HILLS
15 S. Desoto 2/1/1
w/fl rm. $599 mo. (352)
697-1907; 527-8432
BEVERLY HILLS 2/1
38 S. Jeffrey. Nice, no
pets 575+. 628-0033
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1.5 + Fm Rm $650
9 N. Wadsworth
352-795-1722
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/1
Large master suite,
stainless steel appl.
Large lanai. Lease,
+ Dep. No Pets $800.
Mo. (352) 697-3133
CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 3/2/2, Near Sch.
$875. mo 352-628-0731
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800/mo
795-6299 697-1240
CRYSTAL RIVER
Rent or Rent to Own
$699. Move-in Special
3/2. Lrg Fam. Room.
Tiled, spotless,
fenced, Pets OK,
Copeland Park
352-527-0493
352-427-7644
DUNNELLON
3/2/1, Rainbow Lks Est.
remodeled, Like new
1/4 Acre. fenced,
wd. floors encl. porch.,
Close to Rainbow River
downtown & schools,
$835 mo. (561)719-8787
(561) 575-1718 affr 7pm
DUNNELLON
3/2/1, Rnbow Lks Est.
remodeled, 1/4 Ac.
fenced, encl. porch.,
Close to Rainbow. River
dwntwn & schis, $875.
mo. (561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718
GOLFER'S DREAM
Home 3/2/2
3000 sft ,
$850 (908) 322-6529
HOMOSASSA
Bev. Hills, or SMW
Beautiful, 3/2,pass 2/2
Lease Oat .Flexible
Financing 352-795-0088


CLASSIFIED




INVERNESS
2/2, Modern, light
& bright. S650/mo.
F/L/S/352-634-1141
INVERNESS
2/2/1, pet ok. $650.
Mo. (813) 973-7237
INVERNESS
2/2/2 Detached home,
Royal Oak upgrds,
clubhouse, pool, lawn
serv, WD. $800/mo.
incls. cdble /water
949-633-5633
INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
4/2/2 or 3/2/2 Starting
at $790 (352) 341-1142
(352) 601-2615

INVERNESS
Spacious 3/t/2
Newer construction
conveniently
located. Corner lot,
screen porch.
$825 monthly.
Call Kathy or Janet
at 352-726-9136.

TERRA VISTA
3/2/2, Newly built,
gated community,
washer/dryer, lawn care,
free golf & club
membership
included. $950. Mo.
HUDSON
3/2/2 Vaulted ceilings,
eat in kitchen, split
bedroom, washer/
dryer, & community
pool included.
Screened patio, fenced
� back yard.
$850. Mo.
Mark Fredrick
(813) 215-3446
Charles Rutenberg
REALITY




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2.5 $1,200 Mo.
Garbage and lawn
maintence included.
1st & Sec; Lease, Pets?
(352) 795-0207
(352) 212-4981

POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - Waterfront
homes, Wkly priv. rms,
RV lots. 352-628-0011
WATERFRONT APTS. 1/1
Rent Incl. water, sewer
& trash. 1st & sec. No
pets: Avail. now. $650/
mo. (352)563-5004 .



CRYSTAL RIVER
Priv. Bath $150. a wk,
Incis everything
352-634-0708




CITRUS SPRINGS
Roomates wanted to
share 4 BR house near
schools. (352)
270-9256


TUESDAY, JUNE 16; 2009 C9


CRYSTAL RIVER
$75 wkly/lst/L. Incls
utils. & satellite.
352-563-1465/212-1960
HOMOSASSA
Half the house, Kit. Priv..
Free Cable, /2 Electric
$500/ mo 352-503-3343




2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Util. incl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
(352) 628-9759




AGENTADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50
Ad includes 20 lines of copy
w/ photo.

Picture Perfect Homes
NEW HOMES START-
ING.At $75,000 On
Your Lot
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic # CBCO59685

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to
advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
'discrimination.
" Familial status
includes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
People securing
custody of children
under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all .
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the.
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



I .
me.mr; . "! ,!


100% MORTGAGE
LOAN "
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
*Low income applicants
can quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or No credit
OKAY
*recent bankruptcy
OKAY*
CAll TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
*Credit and income
restriction apply'
Florida licensed mort-
gage lender










Duplex 2/1
Rent $550/mo. Option
Ito buy. Owner
finance, low down,
easy termsI
CHA, W/D hook-ups,.
city limits, spotless
(352) 422-3217





2/1.5. carport
Newly Remodeled
$65K (352) 527-3559
352-257-1777

3/2/2 For Sale or Rent
Citrus Springs Newer
Home, low/dn, easy
terms 352-840-3324

ATTENTION!!
BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
$39,900. Delivered
and Set, $0-Down
Land/Home $650. mo.
Repos Available
Kinder
Mobile Home
(352) 622-2460










5770 N EIIKCAM BLVD
Mitch Underwoood
Dipomat II,' 05,
3 bedrm, office,
3 bath. 2 car garage
formal DR. Living rm.
famrm 3,611 s.f undrf.
solar hted pool
breakfast bar, eat-In
ki. Many uoarades
on acre $314,900
(352) 527-7404


FOR SALE BY OWNER
88 SJ Kellner, Bev. Hills
2/2%'2, FP, Call Anytime
OPEN. HOUSE on
SUNDAYS 11A-3P
$118K, 352-746-6093



4/3, Pool, 2.1/2 acre
farm,2-stall barn, $198k
NO Owner Financing
2875 E. Timberwood Ct.
(352) 302-0951


2 to 4 Bedrooms
RENT TO OWN- NO
CREDIT CHECK!!
Low Down!
352-484-0866
jademission.com

4+Acres, Canal front
3/2 large garage/
workshop +bonus
efficiency apt.
REDUCED TO S175KI
(352) 560-0019




By Owner $85,500.
8725 Gospel Island
3BR, 90 x 120 fenced
Lot, If Interested
Call 726-3238
to see Inside,
Furniture Included

FORECLOSURES
EVERYWHERE!
RATES-R-LOW!
BUY NOW!


I Pine Rid -9d


Citrus County Home
Inspections
$75. Any house in
June. (352) 978-8403

DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Repairing gas & diesel
engines. No job too big
or small. 352-228-2067




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd
friendly serve. Lowest
aJtes Free est.
352-860-1452

All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
COLEMAN TREE SERV.
Trim & Removal. Lic.
Ins. FREE EST. Lowest
rates. 352-270-8462
check out zoomcitrus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
Bobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272











OSBORNE'S
LawndTree/Shrub
Quality Work Free Est.
LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins





Richard Mills Tree Serv
Trim, haul, top,
removal, Free Est
Reasonable Rates
(352) 398-9881
Richard Mills Tree Serv
Trim, haul, top,
removal, Free Est
Reasonable Rates
(352) 398-9881



AFFORDABLE TUTORING
K-5, Exp. teacher
Flexible times.
410-0446




At Home Computer
Repairs & custom
computers.
Call (352)228-7823
COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 M. SE. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839


---- ^- -1

REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch*Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 58



Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
work fully coated. 30 yrs.
Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-795-6533
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All InL/ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996







INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Huipchick Lic./lns.
(352) 726-9998



PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
27 yrs. exp. Certified
Best prices/guaranteed
352-220-9435
check out zoomcitrus.comns
SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149 & up
Wave Runner Bimlnl's
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcitrus.com



AT YOUR HOME
Mower & Generator
Repair. 352-220-4244
Lc#99990001273
DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Gas / Diesel Engines
No iob too bia or small.
352-228-2067

Mower Repair,
Hernando. Pick up &
delivery, Don Mead
352- 400-1483

usout M 3
jm ut


SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149 & up
Wave Runner BImini's-
352-563-0066 .
/ us out zoomcitrus.com



OUTREACH SENIOR
COMPANION
SERVICES
Affordable, quality
Senior Care.
Companions, .
Homemakers, Sitters.
Licenced, Bonded &
Insured Ceall toll free
1-877-803-1608
www.outreachsenlor
companlon.com
LUc #231103
PRIVATE DUTY CARE
Specialty: Quality of life
FI. St. Uc./Bonded, Ref.
Lee (352) 201-4565



SnSEE THROUGH
Window Washblng
All Aspects (352)
489-4189; 322-0962
/ us out zoomcitrus.com



CHILDCARE 24/7
In my home, Inverness.
Newbornm to 5 years.
$4. per hr. or $20. per
day. (352) 201-7886
Reg'd HOME DAYCARE
Citrus Springs - Summer
Program/Planned Cur-
riculum. 352-422-7904
/us out @ zoomcitrus.com



ROGERS Construction
New Homes & All
Construction (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872
Schnettler
Construction, LLC.
Renovations,room
additions,decks, barns,
garages,various home
repairs. (352)637-4629
cell 352-266-6756
Uc. & Ins CBC1253348


The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing In handi-
cap. L/c/lns.#2441.,
352.634,1584





BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Tooll
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM


SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla rms,
windows, garage scrns
(CBC1257141) 628-0562




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Inst FREE
EST (352) 586-2996




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable, Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
Lic. 5863 (352) 746-0141

Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Malnt/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too smalllRell able ,ins.
0256271352-465-9201

" NATURE COAST
HOME REPAIR I
& MAINT. INC.
W Offering a Full I
Range of Services
www.naturecoast
Shomereoalr.com
Lc,. 2776/Ins.,
352-634-5499
VIsa/MC/Dlscover

ALL HOME REPAIR
painting, drywall
Malley's Home Maint
220-9486 (110259169)
/ out zoomcitrus.com








FAST! AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs
Free Est., Llc#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable, Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
Lic. 5863 (352) 746-0141


1st Choice --.
PEST CONTROL, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE


H ME OR LAWN'
: PRhOBLEMS =
6all 1503-68
Owner/Operaslors ,
Uoyd Smith * Bill Bledenstein * JIm
75442 5340W. Glenbrook St.


ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699
SALTMARSH
ELECTRIC
Comm/Resid. & Sign
Lighting. CR13012391
352-344-3810
/ us out zoomcltrus.com



FAST AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs
Free Est., Llc#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *



C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/201-1422



Expert Repairs & Sales
All types of flooring.
Lowest rates. MItch, Jr.
352-341-0909, 25yrs



PAVING & SEAL COAT
VIGLIONE LLC-//lic/Ins
www. TAR-MAX.com
Free Estf3521726-3093



Aaron's Fence 24/7
Will beat any legitimate
price. Lic. & Ins. Free
Est. (352) 795-7373

ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing,.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub
,Quality Fence Work Free
Est. LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lie (352) 400-6016 Ins


AAA ROOFING
Free est. 30 yrs exp.
352-563-0411
John Gordon Roofing
For a hole in your roof
or a whole new roof.
Free est. 352-795-7003




BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Estimates
Lic#2579/lns, 257-0078
Decorative concrete,
Landscape curbing
River rock resealing
344-4209 (Lic.6960)
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack repair,staining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
P 352-464-3967 u
Quality Concrete Serv.
Layout to Lentil
ALL TYPES, Tractor
352-726-2383, Llc#2567
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services
40 Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768
W. F. GILLESPIE CONST.
Lic. #CRC1327902
(352) 344-0009
www.wfglllesple.com




A Cutting Edge
Tile Job
Showers. Firs etc
(352) 422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




All AROUND TRACTOR
Londclearing,
Hauling, Site Prep,
Driveways. Uc. & Ins.
(352) 795-5755


Dirt, Rock, Stone Drive-
ways & Tractor work
341-2019 or 257-1562
*TOP SOIL SPECIAL*
3 Yd -$60/ 5 Yd $85
10Yd $175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436



All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/us out zoomcitrus.com
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, HaulingSite
Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins795-5755
Ck out zogmcitrus.com
Pasture mowing, lots
acreage, commercial.
$18. per acre & up.
(352) 978-8403



D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
Bobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272





Lawn Care, Sod, Plugs,
LandscapingSprinklersPresJ
Wsh.15yrsexp.
Lie. & Ins.(352)270-1150


SERVICE





r #1 Absolute
Lowest Price' I
I Guaranteed |
S Barker's Lawn
Service Monthly or
Per cut rate
(352) 232-8166 I

#1 AGAIN! Pro Tech
Lawn Service. Family
owned & operated.
Serving central Citrus
Cty since 1999. Call
for free estimate
302-7800 - Lic/Ins.
Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Soecials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
check out zoomcltrus.com


I POL/PVES


Installations by
Brian CBC1253853
7�e oa1t &ted d a rM(ftMties l
352-628-7519
r w Siding,
Soffir &





www.advancedaluminum.info


DUN-RITE LAWN SERV
Lic & Ins Clean up,,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681
check zoomcitrus.com
HEDGE TRIMMING,
HAULING(ANY KIND),
LAWN MOWING,
MULCH. FREE ESTI-
MATES. 352-344-9273
OR 352-201-9371
INVERNESS AREA
Mow,trim, beds,
FastReoonse since
1991 352- 422-5978
/ zoomcltrus.com
Lawn Care 'N' More
Mow, clean up
brushes, beds
Friendly Service since
1991
Residential/Commri
(352) 726-9570
out zoomcitrus.com
Lawn Care, Sod, Plugs,
Landscaping,SpdnklersPresJ
Wash. 15yrs exp.
Lic. & lns.(352)270-1150
MOWING & TRIMMING
Residential/ East citrus
county area.
352-302-151 1;341-5182
OSBORNE'S
Quality Work - Free
Est. LOWEST RATES
352-400-6016 Lic/Ins
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166



EVERCLEAR POOL
SERV. & Maint.
Concrete Pools Only
(352)344-5122
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
" 352-464-3967 i




MOBILE RV i
r -g
SERVICE
WE COME TO YOU
Motor Homes I
5th WhIs/Rv's
Master Tech
352-586-5870
Storage Available




WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard


r .umtgap..y
"Melissa Fields"
specializing in
weddings, events,
group & individual
portraits, professional
portfolios, live concerts.
call for special price
(352) 220-4124


barb i Mat
PFotograpIh
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits. Indoor
or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed





Circle T Sod Farms.
Ins.
Tired of your dead
lawn?
Replace it with
Bahia. Delivery
Avail (352)400-2221

Lawn Care, Sod, Plugs,
dsap i lersPres/
Wsh. 15yrsexp.
Lic. & Ins.(352)270-1150

LAWN RESTORATION
All types of Grasses
Low maint Lawns Avail.
J & J Sod 352-302-6049


Service for A/C, Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator & Morel

* CallAnytime * Same Day Service
* 42 Years ExperiencE

5 = 1 One Man
I'll' 9-1- Low
Serving Citrus and Overhead
Marion Counties Low
352-445-0072 Prices
Doc Johnson #RAw007081


YOU'LL THIS!
For Sale By Owner 2
bedroom. 2 bath. 1 car
garage home at 9260 E.
Alvada Lane in beautiful
Inverness Golf & Coun-
try Club Community.
Features skylight, lanai
& sprinkler system.
Asking $145,000. Call
(352)637-5876.
For Sale, By Owner
3BR 3BA, Pool, 16x24
workshop, close to
school, hosp., library,
WTI, 518 Poinsettia, Ave.
(352) 860-0878
Uke Country Living?
3/2/2 custom built 2005
Famrm. 18x24 sports
pool w/scr end. 6x6
jaccuzzi, wood firs.
wood burning Flrepl
Wood cabinets &
granite counter tops,
15K back up house
gen. privatel.25 acres.
4439 Stallion Ln. In The
Ranches asking $239k
OBO (352) 573-0029

RealtySelect
Citrus.comn


Floral City
Homes I


Crystal River
Homes


I Professional I










C1I0 TUESDAY, JUN 16, 2009


Ia.16 � LaughlngStock Internotional InoJdist, by UPF Inc., ;2009

"The zoo has decided not
to press charges."
781490


3/2/2, Uving Rm. Din-
ing & Fam. Rm., eat in
Kit, scrn, back porch,
fenced back yrd,, Lrg,
15 x 30 above ground
pool w/attach. deck.
new roof, Insulated
windows, $139,500
5901 W WOODSIDE DR
(352) 563-0093
CONNELL HEIGHTS
2/2, Great Rm, vaulted
cell. open kit, b/bar,
fenced back yrd.
scrn,. por,, new apple's,
1600 sf,(mol) 6172W.
Pine Cir/C.R. Pdriced to
Sell (352) 795-9603
Crystal River Mini
Ranch
.412.5/2 on 2 acres, up
to 5 horses allowed,
$29,000 down, owner
financing @ 6%. Will
trade for equity.Realty
USA (800) 559-4231

RealtySelect
Citrus.com I


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

RealtySlect

(352) 795-1555




2 BR, 2 Bath, 1 car
garage, very nice,
$3,500 down & $450
mo. with average
credit. (352) 726-9369


$8000 Tax
Credit
for fkrst .flt home
buyers ,If you have
not owned a home In
3 years. Call for Info
Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
Kellers WIlliams Rity


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI
Your SATISFACTION
Is Mg Futurall
(352) 886-8921
or (382)798.0123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC


O)uLiandlo ANSia I
ullHun IdllnB I.aul,




$174,9 00, Reduedl
3/2/2 Deodk
w/fireplace, dock
83-341-8611


FREE HOME
BUYERS
Seminar like none
other June 23rd
6pm /RSVP
$8,000


Plantation Realty. Inc
(352) 795-0784
Questions about
the new $8000 tax
credit? Don't miss
this seminarillll
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner
HERNANDO
WATERFRONT HOME ON
LAKE TSALA APOPKA
Open lakefront fenced
S2/2 home & garage
with 108' of waterfront,
boat dock, boat slip &
sun deck, Owner
finance $155,000.
(352) 465-3674
3684 Diamond Circle
Willola Heights
HOMOSASSA
3-story stilt. 3/3, Next to
head spring. 163' wfrt,
dock/slip. Brand
new/unoccupied.
*2 frpls, granite. $579K
727-808-5229

must sell!
Inverness
MUST SELL QUICK
UNIQUE CUSTOM
HOME ON 1 ACRE ON
CANAL TO LAKE
TSALA POPKA. 3,323
sq. ft LIVINGI 30'
ATRIUM. 3 BED/2.5
BATH. 2-CAR GAR-
AGE. LIVE OAKS..
NEEDS TLC. PRICED
TO SELLI ONLY
$194,500. CALL
MYRIAM @ KELLER
WILLIAMS REALTY of
CITRUS COUNTY.
352-613-2644

RealtySelect
Citrus.comrn


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Re* yilect

(352) 795-1555



LOOKING FOR HOMES
OR MOBILES & LAND
Purchase, lease, mort-
gage assumptions, take
odver payments + cash,
Any location, price, con-
dition, foreclosure, late on
payments okay,
1-727-992-1372



HOMOSASSA 3,45 acres
dead end road two
streets from hwy 19 btwn,
C,R& Horn, 30000,00 or
20% wlth financing
352-228-1789



7 Rivers aolf & C;C,
priv. member owned.
corner loet 1 a (mol)
$30K (013) 760-9364 or





JET IKI'S
'04, Kawasakl's,
TX.00 & BITX.1Pll,
under 0 hr., 5TI7 far

lea iDo
& Traller, new
motor, real foot
12,8000 abo

leaDeeoo DI
02,ea cond3 seater,
blu/whito,2 stroke
130hp, 71 hri 130 ml,
486-SOmrnph 08800
(362) 79-.974



1903 17 llylvan
Bow rider bimlmlnl loap
Boat & trallor
88hp, Yamaha mator
Good $3ood, 00
(322) 344-0467
18FT PONTOON
Boat, fully redone, very
nice, 38HP Marc, runs
good, $2,900 will deliver
$8001 Police
Impounds for salel
Cars from $600
500-308-9B813 x 7374


Big 13 Ft. haul,
2 seats. Approx, 375-400
HP. 8 blade warp drive.
2-1 reduction gear box.
Used 100 hrs.+ Tr,
$18,500 Invest. Sell
for $10,000 firm,
(352) 302-4535
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cublc Inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
Aluminum Boat
1Oft, Trailer, 8HP
Johnson, needs tuned
$600
(352) 795-6792
AQUA SPORT'05
175 Osprey, 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual
batt. w/switch, bimlnl,
easy load trailer. Low
hours.$9,990
352-860-0277 r
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
9.900QL352-746-5856
AQUA SPORT
2000; 225 Explorer 24'
Cuddy cabin: 225'
Johnson Ocean Pro.
Loadmaster tandem axle
trailer. Exc. cond.
$14,500.352-403-7377;
352-221-5230' '
AQUA SPORT
'86 25FT.Cuddy Cabin.
W/twin '06 Optlmax
150hp & double
axle trailer. $16,900
(352)257-1355
BASS TRACKER 04
PT 175 Special Edition,
50hp Merc. gal trail,
many Xtra's $7,750
Call for Info
(813)-293-0392 cell
BOSTON WHALER
14' w/ 40 hp Johnson,
Everything works good
$1600 (352) 302-0033
Deck Boat
95' 19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ ra-
dio & fishfinder. New Bat-
tery switch. 2 batteries,
power pk. -,
prop/hub.$6,000
(352) 726-0838
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras
$13,500/obo.a:,"
(352)489-9640
GULF TO LAKE MARINE
New,Used & Service
Brokerage. We pay $$
for clean used boats
(352) 527-0555
HURRICANE'
'01, Deckboat; 20ft.,
115HP,R 4strke Yamaha,
w/'trlr. $11,200, will
trade (352) 503-3778
HYDRA - SPORT
'90, 26' (New '08 c/c-,
t-top, -gas tank -wiring
* '99 250 Merc. on r
bracket '05 traller,many
upgrades exc cond.
$14,900 (352) 586-1754
Kayaks
1 for $400
2 for $600, Includes
2 paddle. & life vests
(352) 186-5190
KEY WEST & FORD
06/2020cc/98Expeditlon
Yam4stk150/5.4L
4x4EBRed Together
$32600 or $26000 Boat
(352)586.-8717
OSPREY
1994 - 18ft, CC, bay boat.
88 HP Evinrude, Garmin
GPS/recorder $4000,
362-.21-4711
PISCES
14FT, fiberglass boat
with rust proof traillr
rand many goodlies,
$795, (382) 726-6913
PONTOON '08
Sweetwater 21fl, 26 hours,.
90hp Yamaha.
$16,00., Many Extras
382-803-6797
PONTOON
'08, Sun Tracker, 18ff,
60H More, mtr, w/trlr,
less than 10hra, use,
$11,000 (362) 795-8413
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T80
TLRC Englno Like Now
40hrs, Playpn Cover
Bort.B=Boty, extras
11,0009 ($) 2.0621
PRO-LIN 221
WALKAROUND 1999
g00 HPi Mercury w/9,9 HP
Johnion kleker,$12k
ab, Cal Kurt t Patee'
Pier o62-796-6067

19tt,C T--tp, 11 HP
More optl Max, alum
traller, Many extra's
*17,000 32-417.-1731

'00 10 8PT.,/0, Loaded.
lsa,8 Pka, 116 Pt 4 �trk,
Yam, 100 hrs, Bim. lap,
Bal 1Bffef(8B3 a330-I3
'02 * 16ft, 0BHP Mercury,
Center Consoie, trolling
motor,, B-top, trailer,
94800, 32-m-..7766

99-.202 W/A Cuddy
Cabin 10HP Pore, 1-,
Lead tandem Trl, lleo-
tronlot, well kept, must
sei 6950,32- 726-1489
WELL6RAPT
1987, 260 Sportsman
28', Gas eng,, 30" draH,
200 hp I/O, alum,
traller.Se,000
(382) 344B881
1987, 280 Sportsman,
28', Gas eo,, 30" drat,
280 hp I/O, alum,
lraller$, 8,000
(352) 344.-881


23'L, 6'W, '02 150H
Evin. mtr, w fuel enj. like
new, trir. w/brks
$85,995 352.489.3661



22 FT. Minnie Winnie
1993, Clan C, 16 mpg,
dependable, like new
small V-6, sleeps 6
$7,300 (362) 863-9964
'02 Cedar Creek 5th
Wheel 29ft, 2-sildes,
queen bed,bath/shower,
low mileage, loaded,
good cond, $16,800
(352) 746-4969
'02 Cedar Creek 5th
Wheel 29ft, 2-slides,
queen bed,bath/shower,
low mileage, loaded,
good cond, $16,800
(352) 746-4969
05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E338B
1 slide, 1000 Wets,
Inverted, central van,
26inch, TV,$30,S00,
Or reasonable offer,
(362) 469-6835
'87 Coachman C-Clan
Clean & Good cond.,
Like new brakes & tires,
350 Motor, 71k miles
$3,900 obo (352)
503-7304
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 36 K MI,.
Dual air. $37,700 Obo,
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
* AUTO, EOA *
DONATIONS
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
(352) 795-.921
* Tax Deductible *

CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
conslgnmentuse.org
CHEVY '86 Class C
Very good cond. Less
than 50k ml. No genera-
tor. $4,000. Call anytime.
(352) 446-6329
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 3T2 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane New
deal. 30Q, class A motor
home, 31% Aft., 22k mi.
V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed,
etc. Saturn tow incl.
$35,000. (352) 397-5007
GULF STREAM
BT Cruiser 03, 22' fully
loaded, ready to travel
$27,500....
(352) 341-1297
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool, .
clubhouse etc. Can be
moved $26,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
Holiday Rambler
'03, By Monico, 300
, Cummins, 2 slides,
under warranty
mint cond. $69,900.
(352) 445-9155
H61lday Rambler
Admiral Motor Homne 36'
2 slides, 340hp, gas eng.
'all options transf ext.
warr. $51,900
352 795-3970
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
eel, Class C. Good mpg,
low ml, 1, slide, loaded.
$52,995. 352-464-0371
Keystone 07
Big ky 5th Wheel' Prem.
Pkg 340RLQ every option.
Center Island Kit. incis
sep.W/D, added 2nd a/c in
bedroom
Price to Sale $52K firm
352-794-3068
PACE ARROW
', 04, 38' 3 SLIDES
1 21k mi fully loaded
3 tv's $92,500 obo
352-302-0743



$5001 Police,
Impounds for sale
Cars from $800
800-366-9813 x 7374
'88 FORD MOTORHOME
Class-C, 67k ml.,
roof-alr-generac
Ex. tires a brakes
$4k obo 362-422-3033
'93 LARGE STARCRAFT
Popup. New factory
canvas, floors, walls &
tires., A/C, toilet. $4995
firm, 352-746-2027
AEROLITE
2007, 21 FT.,
$12,000 obo
(362) 616-3666
-BONAIR '01
19FT. 6th wheel. Qn bed,
mlerowave, Irg refrig.
Like new. $6,900,
362-489-3661

Travel Triller,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(382)302.0773

07 Joy Flight
28' usad twie, smells &
leaks new, grgon clean,
ips e $1,00 (32)
500.7481

5th Wheel, 2000 hxeel.
lent. Photos at
httli;/ploaawBb,geog|I,o




'O0 6th wheel, 3 sldes
lke new,93E),000,
Truck avail ale for latow
j m '


32' sleeps 8, used
once 11,o00
(382)66-9614
SunValley
09, Apaohe, sllde ln
aComegr, fully equip.
qn, , bed, fits, ff truck
bed, 610,600 abo
382-798-511



5 Truck Toppers
$200.00 for all.
(362) 464-0220
Truck Topper/
ARI Brand Bedoover
Toyota Tacoma, dbl,
cab, ilver, $600,00
excel, cond, obo
382-302-3199
WANTED
Partl or Car for a 98
GooTracker of Suzuki
Sldeklok(382) 798-0446


CLASSIFIEDS



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-964t
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Car from $500
800.-36-9843 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800.366.9813 x 7374
Buying Junk Cars
Running or Not
Cash Paid, $160 & Up
(352) 771-6191
CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 401.4518
conslgnmentusa,org
CAS1 BUYER
Buvina Used Cara
Twaks & Vans
For used oar lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564,6333



1997 MAZDA MIATA
Convertable, Fun &
dependable, Porche
Red, new top, 36mpg,
S-speed, A/C, new tires.
Mint $6,700 362)
563-9964
$5001 Police
Impounds for salel
Care from $500
800-366-0.9813 x 7374
ACURA
2004, TSX Certified, Low
Miles, Like New
Only $289 mo
1-800-733-9138
BMW
'03, 745 LI, NAV, black,
sun roof, all options $29K
Mint
(352),740-2696
BUICK.
'03 LE SABRE, V-6,
4dr, custom. Loaded
81K. MI, 1 owner, clean.
Car Fax, $6,790
(352) 270-9292
BUICK'4 .
CUSTOM CENTURY
LOADEDI35k miles, 1
owner retiree, garaged
$7700. 352-628-0698
Cadillac
2003 CTS, Like New,
All the Extrasl
Priced to SelllI
1-800-733-9138
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715
CHEVY '01
Cavalier, 4-dr, auto,
cold a/c. 110K ml,
Exq,. cond. $2,950
352-341-0004
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Conv. rare
auto, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
black, dependable.
$5200 352- 563-0615
CHRYSLER '04
Sebring Conyv. 345K ml.
excellent cond. white
w/tan top, Illness
forces sale $9500
(352) 726-7765
CHRYSLER
"06 Sebrlng Convertable
$12,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
CHRYSLER '07
Town & Country
HANDICAP EQUIPPED
Barely driven. Only
60 miles. Cost $53K:
Asking $33K/obo.'
Call 352-726-9111.
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail,
US19, Across Airport
1 (352)461-4518
conslgnmentusa.org
CORVETTE
02, Z06,
Black, low mi., over
30 mpg hwy. $24,400.
(352) 613-5355
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,aonly 4,076 mil
les on this rare silver on
silver on sliver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are on
this gorgeous vette,
Over $2,000 In
aftermarket parts
Included, Your's
for only, $48,000.
352-270-3193
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, auto,
SHW CAR
$11,500 or will trade for
truck. 352-563-6428
FORD
'00 Focus, 4 dr, AC,
Auto. New tires & brakes
runs great,30 mpg.
$S,980.(32) 302.9217
FORD
2004, Ranger X-Cab
Automatic w, Cop
Only$199?prmo
1.00-738-9136
- 55FORD
2006, Taurus Lather,
Sunroof & More, Take
Over Ponts $1619 mo
1.-600.733-.91
HONDA
'08 CIviO, (17,9 6
Cosal Volvo,.
(3) 6729 9
HONDA -
2006, Civic IX, 2 Dr
* Coupe, Saoerlfloe
1reot6Mllsage

CR.V AWO, Low mlles,
WADEB Mint oend,
Oirag0d,0!,B0/8be
3ga,7411,4ia

3007 antoa Po� LI
AWD, aetfory Warranty
Only 9249 me
1100o73a-9ia,1


HYUNDAI
2006, TIburen Only 600
Mile1 Must 0iill Take
over fpint 9249 m
1-100-7l-1II1

2006, Town Caf Ltd
81g l@frl�, Low Mile
Mut Selll Only 822,986
1.100-73-19103
LINCOLN '94
2-drsun roof, 131k ffl,
white, Well maintained,
12000.6 (I) 621.74101

LINCOLN 98
Town car, good cond,
a/c, 4 dr., oreot green
01700 (382) 746-4161
MAZDA
'0S M2 1 3dan,
$12,05.1
ODals Volvo,
(3S2) 80-789
UN DAMIATA-
MXB,2000 SILVER/TAN,5
SPEED, 68500
OBO,727-308-6051
MERCEDES
'OB .-350, $36,,06,
Coals Volvo,
(382) 820-7290


CITRus COUNmY (FL) CHRONICLE


2006, E-Class, Chrome
Wheels, Loaded Must
See at $25,988
1-800-733-9138
MGB
Convertible 1977, 57k ml,
Blue, many xtras
Excellent Condition
$10,500 (352)628-0281
MITSUBISHI
'03, Dlamante LS, excel.
cond. Always serviced,
Fully equip, Priced be-
low Kelly BB, $7,900,
362-362-5702
NISSAN
'07 Versa,
$11,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
PONTIAC
1969 Catalina, runs
good, new parts &
polnt,$2000,obo
(352) 465-0960
SUBARU '99
Legacy Wagon
Low rnmiles, good cond.
Price below KBB $4,000,
352-344-8932
SUZUKI
'07 Forenza. 30K ml,
w/IOOk warr. ,igai.
w/touch scr nayv,
$12,800, 352-613-6813
TOYOTA
'06 Corolla,
$11,995 Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 ml.
warranty, $19,000
(352) 697-3428
TOYOTA
'07 Camry,
$16,995 Ocala Volvo,
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'07 FJ Cruiser.
$23,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
2002 Camry XLE Lthr,
Mnroof, loaded, 1 Own
Low miles, $199 mo,
wac 1-800-733-9138
TOYOTA
2003 Camry LE, Beauty,
Low Miles Only $8995
or $169 mo, wac
1-800-733-9138
TOYOTA SUPRA '89
All original, red, 79k ml.,
6 cylinder, all power,
targa roof. Original
owner. Garaged, $6,999
(352) 726-3427
VOLKSWAGON
'08 Beetle, $15,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLKSWAGON
'08 Jetta, $13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-40,
$15,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-60, $16,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-80,
$16,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC-90,
$20,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
0 1 ~0
$16,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 V-70
$21,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S-80
$19,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VW
2005, Beetle Conv Ltd *
Turbol Powder Blue
Don't Miss thlsi $249
mo 1-800-733-9138



1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's
Dream. $3500/obo
352-228-0597
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, auto, May
trade In part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door sedan. 6
cyl auto, $9,500. Will con-
sder trade for travel trailler
of equal value.(352)
628-4053
AMC
'81, Concord,
very restorable, $300,
(382) 489-3608
BUICK 67
RIVIERA, 430 wildcat
motor, 86k ml, amfm,
a/c, tltl whl, elect seats,
very good cond, $8000
(382) 527-3961
CADILLAC
76, Eldorado
cop vertiflble
88 600.
(382) 798-8413
CHEVY
'9 Claosic C10 8HT BD
380/350 AC, PS,
$16K or trade
(382) 746.9212
EL CAMINO '81
301 Auto, All new
mfia~ H tl 4" roload
heed. 13,250,

aM El Damino
'B4, 1awner, law
mile, 00 00/obe orf will
enedeCar trade,


167, The real deal, elder
reeleratlln.jul out of
otomro 18Br trade
31al) 206��


'70 XJOC Rare coupel
Sliver, new palnlw
03K ml, li900 obo
(0l1) (17421

'77, New Int. & seats.
Need to be Install. Extra


CONSIGNMINT USA
*Cleon Sate Auto's*
Financing Avail,
U819, Aarou Airport
(382) 461-4518
consignmentua.org


7i14NM


WORDY GURDY. TRICKY RICKY KANE


1. Capricorn's watercraft (1)


2. Confiscate green pod veggies (1)
I I I I I I I I
3. Admonish a groom's partner (1)


4, Sets up actor Gandolfini for a.fal


I- I I


5, Closer looking glass (2)


6, First-year wager taker (2)


7. Botchine uD beings a fill-in teacher


Every answer is a rhyming
] pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
they will fit In the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
syllables In each word. Towin
] $10, send your original rhymes
with your definitions to this
11(1) newspaper, All entries become
the property of UFS, Inc.
0 2009 United Featue Syndicate, Ino,
LZ Thand $10 to
Jevaye Bruner of
Van Nuy, CA for #5,
mB Send your entry to
this newspaper.
2r (2)7


WHOMYV O11VA 0'SIflua50d14110 8 SHOW SISS1109MLYO
-1Osmysw~ auamesiais lo


DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awe-
some Heml-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit," Loaded
every special feature. Sr,
own, gar. kept., 27K ml,
$40K
Invested Sale $21,750
See online ad photos
www.autotrader.com/atca
John (352) 726-1076
DODGE RAM '0.0
Std cab, rare 5spd, hemi,
V8, a/c, 25mpg, new 22"
rims & tires, Dependable
$3700. 352-563-0615
FORD 04
Ranger, X-cab, Exc. cond
38k mi, SLASHED THE
PRICE $97K to $8,500
(352)746-3919
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serv. van. 41K MI./5.4L.
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serv. body/dble lock drs.
$20,000 Obo.,
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
'06 F 250 Lariat, Diesel,
.Super tow pkg. 4 wheel *
drive, lots of chrome.
$17,000(352) 628-6985
FORD
2003, F150 XLT, Crew
cdb 4x4, 50k Mi. $12,990
or $219 mo, wac
Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
FORD '94
F250 300 6cyl. 5-spd.,
Cold air. 163K miles.
Work truck.
$1500. 352-341-0004
TOYOTA
2006, Tundra, 32k mlles,
Bedliner & More $13,990
or $249 mo, wac
Jenklns Mazda
1-800-714-9813



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CHEVY
'04 Trailblazer EXT LS
LOADED 6-disc CD &
DVD, 3rd row. Leather.
47K Mff Retaill$38K
$12,500.(352) 527-0456
CHEVY
BLAZER '99 LS 4dr.
126k ml. loaded, great
cond. sunroof, $4k obo
352-422-0065
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
ml., loaded., dual air & ex-
haust, Exc. Cond. $6,000
obo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl
drive, class 3 hitch, Orig
owner. Great shape &
price. $8,750.
352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
GMC ENVOY
Red,'03, 60k ml.,
On-Star, tow package
5-passenger, $10,500
obo (352),527-3445
GMC SUBURBAN
1993 4 WD, 454 rebuilt
eng,, new transm.,
great tires, good cond,
$2,900 obo
(382) 201-1413
HYUNDAI
'07 Santa Fe, $19,9958.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 820-7299
HYUNDAI
2004, Santa Fe Low MI,
One Owner Nice Equip
$8990 JenkIns Mazda
1-800-714-9813
HYUNDAI
2008, Entourage, Pwr
Doors, Leather, DVD
& Morel Call for details
Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
KIA SPORTAGE '01
Runs & looked great, Ilo,
wind,, looks, near new
tires, hooks, breaks,
battery & timing belt
$2,780 (382) 8866-746
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 58 AM,. Silver
W/bloek Int, Loaded,
57KMI. Like new .Ask
$118.BK, (352)459-7674
TOYOTA
2004, RAV4, R Cond,
Law MI, 1 Own, $11,990
S or$219mo,woae,
Jenklns Meada
1-600-714-9613



15001 Pollce
Impounds for salel
Cars from $100
100-360.6013 x 7174
TOYOTA
'06 Toaama, oRul, LIp,
4 X 4, leaded., 0. ml.
>19,100,(136) 1n.5001-



CHEVY
'64 Hendicap ad Van.
Low Ml. 14,110 Obo,

CHRY8LER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
76K, MI, All ower,
Leather, rear err new t(I
rae, & brakes, 17,491,
(352) 467-,072
ECONOLINE
'01 Van White, regular
or hand control ,
Wheelchair agc., w/lift,
*4200 (352) 341-7796
MAZDA
'08 Mazda 8 Van,
$14,90B,.
Oasisa Volvo,
(382) 829-7299


Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800.366-9813 x 7374
Pontiac
'97 Tron Sport Montana
163K, Extended, 7pas-
senger $18.00, OBO
(352) 270-3770
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT







$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
- ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY
352-422-6956


'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains &
tows heavy loads.
$3200/or trade.
352- 563-0615
Crystal River



2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900ml. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. Hi pert.
Over $43,000 In receipts.
17k ml. $10,900
352-563-0615
Crystal River
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-306-9813 x 7374
CHOPPER 3/4 SCALE
08 Uke new, 200cc Elec
* start, disc brks, alum
whis, & more must see
$1200,
(352) 212-6497
HAR.EY
'96 Sporster 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
, pipes,chro. Ex. clean
, $4,850.(352) 637-5143
Harley Davidson
'06, Road King Classic
low mi., blk cherry, Inpl,
helmets/trvl luggage
$14,000 (352) 382-0907
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80",
completely serviced,
good shape. Ex.
access. $5,395. obo
OUX9.IQU*7IUr- 9AUlflO


96 Heritage Soft tall, red
many extras $9600, call
evenings (352) 746-�113

H-D, SOFTAI,
'02 6 Spd, 8,700 Mi.
124-8 & 8 EVO, Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(362) 746-3069
HONDA 02
11 00ccSarbara, 1OK
ml. custom exhaust &
seat, lots of Xtras $4500
obo 352-613-5641
HONDA
2002, VTX, Retro Model'
1800 cc, $10,000 Incids,
new tune up & two
new tires, 4,000 mll
352-586-5190
HONDA 2007 Shadow
600 Deluxe Powder blue,
3,600 miles, passenger
backrest and slipstream
windshield. $4,500 OBO.
352-795-9829
HONDA '95
80CC Elite Scooter
Seats 2, 2400 miles, exc
cond. Title for fast sale.
$750. Ed 352-212-3468
Honda CRF 450R
2005, dirt bike,
excel. condition.
$2500.00
563-1989 / 422-0502
HONDA
.Shadow Arrow 06,
garage kept, not in rain,
floorboard $6200 obo
(347)223-7269 aft 3:30
KAWASAKI
'00, ZRX 1100
CC,15K. Mi. Very
fast, many extra s.
$4k obo.
(352)621-3764
SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, BIk w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chr6me oo max, Thsa
bid boy Is not forth
faint of heart.$30k
invested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more Info.
352-302-2815
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low.
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500. obo
(352) 527-0679
TITAN
'00 Phoenix, TRM.
Ferrari red, 8K. mL. Like


885-0616 TUCRN
2009-CP-369 Doris L. Pickering Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
File No, 2009-CP-369
Probate Division
In Re: Estate of DORIS L, PICKERING,
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Doris L. Pickering,
deceased, File Number 2009-CP-369, Is pending In the
Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which Is 110 N, Apopka Ave, Inverness,
Florida 34460. The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below. ,
All Interested persons are required to file with this
court, WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE, any claims against the estate, Each
claim must be In writing and must Indicate the basils for
the claim, the name and address of the crdiRtor or his
agent or attorney, and the amount claln ed, If the
claim is not yet due, the dote when It will become due
shall be stated, If the claim Is contingent or unliqul-
dated, the nature of the uncertainty shall be stated. If
the claim is secured, the security shall be described,
The claimant shall deliver a copy of the claim to the
clerk who shall serve a copy on the personal represent-
ative. All claims not so filed will be forever barred
Publication of this Notice has begun on 6/9/2009,
Personal Representative:
/s/Rlchard V. Pickering
116 Peck Hill Road
Johnston, RI 02919
Attorney for Personal Representativoe
//J, Patrick McElroy Florida Bar No,: 052712
P Box 1811, Hernando, FL 34442 (352) 637-2303
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 9 and 16,2009,

1116-0616 TUCRN
PfO,.Ruie 400-1. ,603 400- 1,608
S400.1l,6 40D I,68P,MA,C,
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE: The �outhwost Florida
Water Manaogement oDltrift is prop@ilng to amena the
fallowing rue 4B 0D1,603, 409-1,606, 400-1,6081,
1OD .1 9, F6A,C,
lummoe of Prepesed Rules The Distriet proposes to
amend ts rules for the praoaesing of permit applloo
tlong, Following ree@lpt of a permit appileatlon and
any rfaue.t by staff for addfilonal Informatlon (RAI
n@eoafy to emplete the@ applicleatolen, current Dlsfrit
rule allow appIloants 30 days to submit isuh addtleonal
� Informaotln, Amendments to Rule 4001.603, A PA.,
will allow appileants 90 days to repeond to Distrit RAls
and requests for alariflootlon of addilltonal Information
3ubmttea In support of a pafrm eappllaation, Amend'
mentu al0o lnolud@ adoptlen of e new Applileant Trans-
ffiltal Pefm ftr opplleant to list what addliltlenel Infaf
matlen s bein g ubpmltted In u pport of a permit r opll-
eatlan and to advice whether the submittal complete
their aopllaatlon, Proposed amendments also provide
that Ifan appllation remain Incomplete for more
than 365 days, staff may lsuse a notlce of reposed
oaenay action to deny the permit pplloateion, The
propasod denial will beaeoma fnal unless the applicant
request thot the applooatlen be referred to the Gav-
eming BSoard far agnay action, amend or withdraws
the apilloatlon or petfltlon far an admonlIfatlve hear-
na. Miner olaflfyna amendments are made to Rule
40 1603, FAC, ule 40D-1,608, FA,C., oeneeomin
content of application s10 repealed. Rule 40D-1,68,
PAC,, 61 amended to Ilt the newly adopted Applicant
Tranmitttal Form,
THE PERSON TO BE CONTACTED REGARDING THE PRO-
POSED RULE AND A COPY OF THE PREUMINARY DRAFT
OF IT IS: Martha A. Moore, enor Attfforny, Office of
General Counsel, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksvlle, PL
34604.6899, (382) 796-7211, extensIon 4660,
Theo ltrit does not dilorlmlnate on the basis of dlIabll-
ity Anyone requiring reasonable aooofmodaotlon
mnould contact Dianne Lee, (352) 796-7211, ext, 4667;
TDD only: l.800-231-6l03,
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronlole,
June 16, 2009.


fir kA)m









June 16, 2009






PAGE 2
A weekly advertising supplement of the Citrus County Chronicle
S..- Autos, Trucks, RVs, ATVs, Motorcycles, Campers & More!


Four Outstanding

Outdoor Activities

Your Family

Will Love

(ARA) - This summer, with more
people spending vacation time close
to home, there's renewed interest in
family activities in the great out-
doors. Whether it's hiking, biking or
trying something completely new,
Mother Nature can bring a family to-
gether like few other things can.

Here are some outdoor activities that are
sure to get your family pumped up:


1. Hike or climb with a guide.
With a bit of Internet research it's easy to find a local
hiking trail and make a day of it, but have you ever
thought about taking it to the next level and using a
guide? Guides can be a great \way to get to those litile-
known places that can be hidden gems. You'll hit some
trails you might not normally attempt and guides can pro-
vide you with plenty of information about the local fauna
and flora.

Want a bit more adventure? Sign the family up to
learn how to rock climb. Guides take groups out and pro-
vide climbing instruction and safety equipment. You and
your family will learn about climbing techniques and
then take a stab at the beginner level. This is a great way
to learn teamwork and strengthen the family spirit.

2. Have a cruising adventure.
Few things get people more excited about being out-
doors than zooming through the woods on a side-by-side
utility vehicle. Make a day of it by packing a lunch and
hitting the trails.

Side-by-sides, like the Polaris RANGER RZR, are
perfect for family fun because of their ability to hold mul-
tiple passengers. Unlike ATVs where a person must
straddle the seat, side-by-sides have the driver and pas-
senger sit next to each other so it feels more like a car.
The RANGER RZR is a 50-inch trail capable vehicle
that holds two people and has many advantages such as
automatic transmission for easy driving, independent rear
suspension for a smooth ride, and four-wheel drive to
conquer all types of terrain.

Check with your local and state regulations before hit-
ting the trails with a side-by-side, be sure your driver is
at least 16 years of age and passenger is 12 years old or
older, and always wear appropriate safety gear including
a helmet, goggles, and long sleeves and pants to ensure
a safe and enjoyable ride.

3. Camp the day away.
Camping is no longer a cliché summer activity.
Increased interest at state and national parks could be due
to the affordability of campsites for families who want a
quick vacation without the expense. Never taken the fam-
ily camping before? Try a one or two-day trip just to get
your feet wet.
Some gear is necessary, whether you have your own
or borrow it from another nature lover. Make sure you
pack a tent (with assembly instructions), sleeping bags,
campfire food, eating utensils and some bug spray just in
case. Firewood for a bonfire should be available for pur-
chase at the park. Many modem campsites do have run-
ning water for dishes and showering, but you'll probably
want to pack drinking water just to be safe.

4. Rent a canoe for a day trip.
Whether you're floating along a beautiful river or ex-
ploring the different inlets of your favorite local lake, ca-
noeing can show you nature in a new and fun way.
Canoe rentals are usually pretty affordable and often
come with lifejackets for the trip. Some places will even
bring you up river so you can have an easy journey
downstream back to you car. Take the kids, bring a pic-
nic lunch and pick your favonte spot along your journey
for a break. It's an easy way to spend some quality time
with your family while being surrounded by our natural
environment. Couny of.4R4conten,


S ts. 'lts secret that sales of gas-
slurping full-size pickup trucks
have taken an abrupt nosedive.

High pump prices have buyers scrambling for
smaller and more efficient conveyances. But for
those of you who absolutely need the size and
hauling capability of a full-size pickup, there's
hope in the the form of the gasoline-electric
CheTrolet Silverado Hybrid. ( . a.a


Hybrid models are popular within the
Toyota and Honda camps and are finally
beginning to attract Detroit's attention.
Both Ford and Chrysler are installing hy-
brid power teams in a few of their models,
while General Motors is rapidly moving
into full-scale hybrid mode, especially
when it comes to big-and-thirsty sport util-
ity vehicles.
For the 2009
modeL. year, . .,
Chevrolet's comer- ..:, ;
stone model, the
Silverado, (along
with its GMC , n .-
Sierra pickup coun-
terpart) will be the
first light-duty pick-
ups to go hybrid.
Chevrolet actu- It looks like every c
ally tried this direc- lot because it is lik
tion a couple of ado on the lot, save
years ago, building a tric motor and chain
so-called "mild" hy-
brid consisting of a
starter generator that allowed the engine to
shut down and instantly refire in stop-and-
go traffic. The savings and emissions re-
ductions were minimal and the vehicle
barely registered with shoppers.
This time out, the Silverado employs
what's called a two-mode hybrid system,
which means it can operate using either the
two 60-kilowatt electric motors only, or
with the gasoline engine combined with
electric motors. The advantages of in-
stalling this "full" hybrid technology,
which was jointly developed with Chrysler
and BMW, is that the truck can operate at
speeds up to 30 mph without the gas en-
gine while carrying cargo and/or towing
up to 6,100 pounds.
At this time the only Silverado Hybrid
model is the 1500-senes (half-ton) four-
door crew cab short-box outfitted with a


oth(
keic
e go


332-horsepower 6.0-liter V8. Buyers have
their choice of rear- or four-wheel dri\ e.
The 300-volt ruckel-metal hydride bat-
tery pack located beneath the rear seat is
recharged by capturing the energy gener-
ated when braking. But it's actually only
one of a trio of built-in fuel savers. The V'8
powerplant also does its share by shutting
down half of its eight cylinders i(to from
each bank of four)
S, , : -- while~.esting or
during light-load
conditions. GMNI has
F. previously used
V8s equipped with
Similar fuel-man-
agement tricks in
its trucks and pas-
senger cars, but the
ler Silverado on the Silverado Hybrid's
every other Silver- electric motor en-
>r an elaborate elec- ables the gas engine
ng system. to operate in tour-
cylinder mode for
much longer peri-
ods.
The third leg in the Hybrid's stool is the
unique and complex electrically variable
transmission (EVT) - which also houses
the twin electric motors - that provides a
nearly infinite range of gear ratios. The
EVT also features four fixed gear ratios
that can be manually selected using steer-
ing-column-mounted controls. The latter
is used during highway cruising or when
hauling heavy loads.
Other Hybrid-specific components in-
clude a unique exhaust system and
resonator, 18-inch low-roll fng-
resistance tires and elec-
trically operated (as
opposed to belt-dri-
ven) air condition- -
ing and power -
steering units that & :


help reduce drag on the engine,
Accompanying the low-rolling resist-
ance tires, which usually have higher air
pressure and don't soak up the bumps all
that well, are specially tuned shock ab-
sorbers plus an added hydraulic body
mount to help smooth out the ride.
The rear-wheel-drive Hybrid produces
an estimated 21 mpg in city driving and 22
mpg on the highway, numbers that dip
only slightly to 20/20 city/highway mpg
for 4x4 units. That, claims Chevrolet, rep-
resents up to 40-percent improvement m
city fuel economy and a 25-percent im-
provement in overall consumption com-
pared to non-hybrid crew cabs equipped
with the smaller 5.3-liter V8. The high-
way-rating improvement is small (only
one or two mpg higher), but note that, at
5,640 pounds (5,880 for 4x4 models), the
Hybrid weighs close to 500 pounds more
than regular crew cabs. Also bear in mind
that the gas engine does most of the work
on the highway.
Silverado Hybrid pricing has not yet
been announced, but you can expect at
least a $3,000-$3,500 price bulge over a
similar well-equipped non-hybrid. That's
a good chunk of change, but it might not
take long for this eco-rig to pay for itself,
especially if gas prices remain high and if
your travels involve regular urban driving.
That's where the Hybrid could really perk
up your mileage and keep your
money in your
wallet.


Everyone loved

the Silverado
when gas was

$2.50 a gallon.
The Hybrid version nfeans
you can still love your
Silvorado at $4 a gallon.


f
^








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


B 5 .SDmA 0 JUN 16 2U

rfri cllRITAI i ikiI i;7 jEo4rjih LeiI


SUNDAY
* Citrus County Retreads meet for breakfast at 8 a.m. Sunday at the restaurant at
rear of B&W Rexall Drugs, Inverness.All makes and models of motorcycles welcome.
Ride follows.
WEDNESDAY
* Inverness"Big Dogs" motorcycle club meets for breakfast at 8 a.m.Wednesdays
at rear of B&W Rexall Drugs. Ride follows, all bikes welcome. Call J.R. and Rachel Har-
ris at 726-6128.
THURSDAY
* Gold Wing Road Riders Chapter FL1-R of Dunnellon meets at 6:30 p.m. on the
second, third and fourth Thursday of each month at McDonald's in Dunnellon.
Monthly gathering is the first Thursday at the Charlie Horse Restaurant, 20049 E.
Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon,6 p.m. to eat and 7:30 to meet. Call chapter director
Bruce Schlimme at (352) 465-1228.
* Gold Wing Road Riders Association Chapter T of Inverness kick tire at 6 p.m.
Thursday at Burger King parking lot, comer of U.S.41 and S.R.44 East Call directors
Rachel,JR Harris at 726-6128 or Ken and Jackie Smith at (352) 476-7151.
FRIDAY
* Nature Coast Mustangs meets at 7 p.m. Friday at the Wendy's on U.S. 19 in Ho-
mosassa across from the wildlife park. Bring your car and enjoy a fun evening. Call
Bob at 860-2598.
* The Wanderers Club meets from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at the parking lot of the
Beall's Department Store on State Road 44 West of Inverness. Bring your old car and
have fun with other car enthusiasts. Call Frank at 212-2966 or visit wandererscar-
clubofinvernessfl.com.
SATURDAY
* Free Wheelin' Sertoma Club motorcycle club meets at 9 a.m.Saturdays"on the
road." Call Rainer Jakob at 726-7903 for destinations.
* Nature Coast Retreads meets at 8 a.m.Saturdays at Harrington's Restaurant,4135
S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. A ride follows. All styles of motorcycles are welcome.
Call Jacque at 637-4693 or Dave at 628-2401.
* Citrus County Cruisers car club invites you to its cruise-in from 6 to 9 p.m. Sat-
urday at Kings Bay Plaza (next to Wendy's) in Crystal River. Canned goods are col-
lected for local charities. Call Jim Moran at 527-0024 or Lester Barnes 628-7021.
* Citrus County Speedway: JUNE 20: Street Stock, Pure Stock,V8 Thunder Stock,
4 Cylinder Bombers, Desoto Champ Karts, Mini Cup.Any additional questions please
contact the speedway at (352) 726-9339.

Send us your automotive and
auto club events information to
wheels@chronicleonline.com


II)
BY BRIAN BISSON
WHEELS
Like most antique or classic car enthu-
siasts Jack Fletcher is no stranger to restor-
ing older cars. He has worked on cars
since his high school days.
Over the years he has restored a '57
Chevy back in the 1960s. Then, when
money was a little short in the '70s, he .
built a '23 T-Bucket that didn't come out
very good. However, he decided to build
a second '23 T- Bucket in 2001 with much
better results.
"It took over one year to build, and I felt
it was done right," he said.
If my memory serves me right he also
mentioned something about speed and
tickets.
Then along came the '39 four-door
Chevrolet. About four and a half years ago
the car was found
H in Tennessee. He
has been restoring


1939 Chevy 4-door


it for the past three and a half years. "I like.
the line the car has.
Plus, I also wanted a four door car," ex-
plained Fletcher.
The car was put on a trailer and trans-:
ported to Inverness where it started its!
transformation to a very showy classic car.,
Fletcher said, "The body was in good:
shape but we proceeded to dismantle the.
whole car, piece by piece, right down to
the bare frame. All in which was sand--
blasted. In the end 3400 pounds of sand.
was used to sand blast the body. fenders,:
doors, hood, grill. Once the sandblasting-
had been completed, all the parts were-
hauled off to Georgia where his brother-
in-law did all the paint and body work.
"While my brother-in-law was busy
taking care of the body and paint v'.rk ,
gave me time, and the room, to do what-
ever work that had to be done to the
frame," said Fletcher. "I installed a Mus-
tang II front end with rack and pinion
along with a Ford 8.8 rear end assembly.


both with disk brakes. The transmission is
a 700R4 automatic. The Corvette engine'
is the combination of '93 -'95 year 350:
parts with a roller cam topped off with ear-,
lier tuned port injection, including air con-:
ditioning, using a serpentine bell system.
By the time I had everything installed and
ready to go my brother-in-law had all the"
parts ready to be brought back for the as-,
sembly process."
Just as an example of
the quality of the engine
work, Fletcher drove the
car 1.385 miles round trip
to Knoxville, Tenn. He was
pretty proud of the fact that
the gas mileage was 19
mpg running at an average
'" " to 80 mph.
th. engine e the
car has a nun cr of other
unique features. The exceptional interior
is highlighted by the "59-'60 Chevy dash.
with tilt steering wheel.


Most trunk lids open up as most trunk
lids do. But this one opens to the side.
There will be no bumps on the head from
this trunk lid.
Just recently retired at age 70. Fletcher
is not currently a member of any car club
but loves to show and drive his '39 Chevy.
"I'll drive it, enjoy it and if someone of-
fers a lot of money for it, I will sell it and
build another one."

i U Malabe you 're a restora-
lion enthusiast and have some
stories or memories to share.
Perhaps you own a muscle,
classic or vintage car that is
y),our pride and joy. Feel free to
call 563-3291, or e-mail Brian
.4. Bisson at bbisson@achroni-
cleonline.com. IWe would like to
get some pictures and possibly
a story fobr our 1i7teels section so you can sit
back and enjoy a ride down Alemory Lane.


The exceptional interior is

highlighted by the '59-'60 Chevy

dash with tilt steering wheel.


D 2' i..,-..... t r. ,,- li ")no n


II,, I






()ntus COUNlY (FL) CHRONICLE TUFSDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 D3


~Th


MERCURY


OF CRYSTAL RIVER


SAME People

dM NO 1-76 r�


ANNA CRUZ
SALES


RICK PETRO
SALES


RONTESAR
SALES


same Location


RICK HAMMOND
SALES


BOB KELLY
SALES'


JIM PRESTON ROY BROWN
SALES MANAGER SALES MANAGER


We Welcome All Owners
p ._� _ 1,i 1V^ ,


~w I ~..N~QLt'J I


or Yc


SSal
rr~


s&


MERCURY


Service
LIT!?'


'04 CLUB WAGON
s17 900
^A*-I31


'07 FORD FOCUS
s$9_o900


'04 F150 4X4
$5.900


'07 FORD FOCUS WAGON
sI 2_900


'05 HONDA CRV 8 FORD RANGER XLT SUPER CAB '07 NISSAI
S6,900 5 SE
$169900, $151950 $17 1


106 MERCURY MILAN PREMIER '05 FORD ESCAPE LTD., AWD
s12,950 s9, 50


'04 FORD F150 XL
WorjrP ri7jr. ,:,n' omi'er
sT 950


'03 BUICK RENDEZVOUS I '04 FORD EXPLORER
I 7.950 I 8.950


'05 DODGE CARAVAN
s7.950


'03 MUSTANG GT '06 HONDA ACCORD
9,950 S13 950


ONA EX '07 FORD RANGER SPORT
50 $10,950


'03 FORD ESCAPE AWD
$9,950


I1 MERCURY SABLE WAGON LS
47,000 miles, loaded
$8.950


OF CRYSTAL RIVER
OF CRYSTAL RIVER


29 minute OIL CHANGE
or it's REE
11111,11011--FREE,.


TOLL FREE 1-877-795-7371
Hwy. 19 N. * Crystal River
Sales Hours: Mon-Fri 8:30 AM to 7 PM Sat 8:30 AM to 5 PM
Parts & Service: Mon-Fri 8 AM to 5:30 PM; Sat 8 AM to 4 PM


~" * f Available withl reseirvalon Tuesday through Friday.
SAMust present or mention ad at ime of write up.
Includes five quarts of Motorcraft synthetic blend motor oil, oil filter and free multi-
point inspection priced at $23.50 plus tax. Extra charge for additional quarts of oil
priced at $2.53 per auart plus tax. Expires 06/30/09


I I


PHIL JONES
SALES


'06 TOYOTA
15,
'V6 L


RY XLEI


Needs


$9,9


795-7371


Crystal
River Mail
� I


Tur.sDAY, JUNE 16, 2oog D3


Ci-mus CouNiy (FL) CHRONICLE


N C 0,






'III


LI1


'11l


H


"You must know what your
trade is worth, no matter
where you plan to buy..."


i-i 'I I U I : I 2 I ~ ki I I ~' I I I


i . loll A:


,illI


41114


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFOAND SPECIALPRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 6132
$16,988* or $299* mo.

2009 MURANO



FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 2148
$19,988 or $352 mo.


CRYSTAL


937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD., HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext. 1
crystalautos.com
"All Prices/Payments exclude tax, tag, title, dealer ads and dealer fee ($599.50). Price/Payments include $2000 down (Cash or Trade Equity), owner loyalty, rebates and all factory incentives (must Qualify). Payments are at 7.99 A.P.R. for 72 Months for model years 2006-2009 ,
and 7 70 A PR for 6R months fnr model vaars 00.2-005R W A . All nrinr sales a xrluded and may restrict stock Not responsible for tvnoaraohical errors. Cannot be combined with other offers. *Vehicles are re-owned and pictures are for illustration Durposes only.


LFO TUESDtAY, JUN E lb, U, �'J


gIve


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2009 ALTIMA


2009 VERSA


FREE 24 HRRECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFOAND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 6112-
an n A t -AEnt


2009 ROGUE


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2149
=16,988' or '299 mom


2009 TITAN
FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFOAND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 6110
S. 8,988 or $335t mo.


RA T.,.,-., i..v . 1 "n1n2 c


I


A Fill








GIlHUS A V UNi . IJA lA \ " .R iiri- . 0T S__Y.-J-NE- 16,-2009---


What You Need



to Know Before



Buying a Car


(ARA) - Auto sales plunged to a 26-year low at the beginning
of the year, which is why many car makers are offering incentives
to entice consumers back to the auto market.
But before jumping into the market, you should gain a clear
understanding of your credit and financial profile to know what
you qualify for and if it's the right time for you to buy a car.
. "Through a simple check of their credit reports and scores,
many consumers are likely to find that they're in a solid position
when it comes to cashing in on these troubled-economy car
deals," says Lucy Duni, vice president of consumer education at
TrueCredit.com by TransUnion. "At the same time, it's impor-
tant for consumers to set their limits based on their credit position
and their overall finances, because there are many costs associ-
ated with making a car purchase, including regular maintenance
fees and insurance."
TrueCredit.com is offering simple tips to guide consumers on
the road to making a smart car purchase:
Tip 1: Rev-up your report knowledge.
Review your credit report on an ongoing basis to ensure it ac-
curately reflects your credit history. Your history will dictate your
credit scorq and your score affects your loan rates. Always know
where you stand by signing up for TrueCredit Messenger, a free
application that is downloaded to your desktop and lets you know
when there's been a critical change to your report.
Tip 2: Make necessary tune-ups.
Whether or not you're in the market for a new car now, keep
a close eye on your credit report. If you spot something that does-
n't look right, you should first contact the creditor involved. If


that doesn't solve the problem
or if the issue doesn't involve a
specific credit or loan account,
contact the appropriate credit-
reporting company directly. If
you have significant issues with
your reports, consider delaying your purchase until those issues
are resolved to help you get the best rate available.

Tip 3: Protect Yourself.
Your credit behavior influences more than just your loan rate.
It often plays a role in determining the monthly insurance pre-
miums for your home and car. If you're getting ready to shop for
insurance, TrueCredit.com Insurance Scores let you see ahead of
time how you'll likely be viewed, allowing you to take proactive
steps to improve your own credit health that could result in lower
premiums.

Tip 4: Make an age-defying purchase.
Decide if you want to buy a new. or used car. Buying a used'
car can save you a heap of money if you do your research. Since
new cars generally depreciate 10 to 35 percent during the first
two years, it's a good idea to check the depreciation rate on the
car you're interested in by looking up the current price and the
price for the same car made two years earlier. On the other hand,
many of the factory incentives are on new models, so you may
get a better deal witli a new car right now. It's important to shop
around to find the best deal for you.


Courtles ofARAcontent
Tip 5: Luxury vs. economy -- calculate how
much you can afford.
Before you decide that a car is right for you, it's a good idea
to evaluate your balance of debts and assets to see how much you
can really afford. Also determine if you have a trade-in or down
payment to help you pay for the car. These assets can help you ne-
gotiate a better rate with lenders and can be especially important
if you have problem credit.
Tip 6: Navigate your options.
When you're ready to talk to lenders it's a good idea to shop
m ound for the best available interest rate. Visit your local bank or
credit.union to discuss applying for an auto loan. Financing with the
car dealer can sometimes be more expensive, so pricing out your op-
tions is a good idea. And don't worry. Shopping your loan with mul-
tiple lenders over a several weeks will generally have the same net
effect on your credit reports as checking only with one lender.

For more tips on managing your credit,
visit www.GoTrueCredit.com.


How to Reduce the Costs


of Owning Your Car


Dollar-stretching Spring Auto


Maintenance Advice


(ARA) - With economic factors chal-
lenging, many consumers are making
tough financial decisions, including post-
ponting or canceling plans to buy a new ve-
hicle. The typical vehicle on American
roads is now a record nine years old, ac-
cording to a recent report by R. L. Polk &
Co. As any vehicle ages, routine mainte-
nance and upkeep become increasingly im-
portant not only for a vehicle's longevity,
but also for its efficiency and safety.
After their homes, most Americans' sec-
ond-largest financial investment is their ve-
hicle, so helping it stay in good working
order for as long as possible should be a top
priority. But, because money is tight, many
motorists today may be reluctant to spend
on services or maintenance that they think
can be put off at least for the short term.
Such decisions, however, could potentially
shorten the life of a vehicle, decrease its
fuel efficiency or even put drivers and their
families at risk.


To be prepared for the
changing weather and
road conditions pf
spring, here's a simple

checklist of tips
motorists should per-
form to help keep their
vehicles running
longer, safer and
more cost-effectively:

Check that Tread: The economy has
forced many to postpone tire purchases, but
with unpredictable wet spring weather
ahead, now is not the time to have low
tread on your tires. The lower the tread
depth the less traction you will have on wet
roads and the greater the distance you will
need to stop. Advances in tire technology
are helping deliver a new generation of
moderately priced tires that offer the all
season traction and long treadwear con-
sumers have come to expect, but with en-
hanced rolling resistance to help save
money! on gas. For example, the proprietary


tread compound used in Goodyear's new
Assurance Fuel Max tires helps save 2,600
miles worth of gas over the life of a set of
tires.
Watch for Inflation: As temperatures
change, so can tire pressure. Ptoper tire in-
flation is essential for increased automotive
safety, optimum driving performance and
significant cost savings, including better
fuel mileage. Tires should be inflated to the
vehicle manufacturer recommendations
printed on the vehicle door placard or in the
glove box and should be checked monthly.
Over-inflation can lead to premature or ir-
regular tire wear and under-inflation re-
duces a vehicle's fuel efficiency by an
average of 3.3 percent.
Breathe Free: Replacing a dirty air
filter can increase a vehicle's life ex-
pectancy and fuel efficiency by reducing
the strain on the engine, especially during
warmer months. Over the winter months,
salt, sand and other impurities may build
up in a vehicle's air filtration system and
could be robbing it of as much as 10 per-
cent in fuel efficiency.
Keep it Clean: Your car, truck or SUV
has likely just weathered the harsh condi-
tions and corrosive elements associated
with winter, including freezing rain, snow,
ice, sand and salt. Keeping it clean will
help protect your investment from the
chemicals and dirt- that may attack your
car's finish and undercarriage. Be sure to
use quality cleaners and waxes specifically
designed for handling a car's finish as reg-
ular dish, soap will actually break down
your wax and could harm the underlying
paint.
Keep it Flowing: Oil is the lifeblood
of your engine, helping to keep it running
efficiently and effectively. Over the win-
ter, you or your mechanic may have
changed the viscosity of the oil in your car
(especially in colder climates), but in the
warmer weather, you'll get less protection
as things heat up. Not sure what oil to use?
Defer to a professional or use the grade of
motor oil recommended by the vehicle
manufacturer to achieve optimum engine
protection and fuel efficiency.
For more helpful car care advice or in-
formation on tires for cars, light trucks,
SUVs and more, visit your local Goodyear
retailer or' ' go online to
www.goodyeartires.com.


(ARA) - Automobile insurance
rates, maintenance and repair costs
and vehicle ownership expenses con-
tinue to rise. Gasoline reached record
high prices in 2008 and the U.S. En-
ergy Information Administration ex-
pects fuel prices to rise again in the
future. Thankfully, you don't have to
alter your driving habits or buy a new
car to get some relief. Here are some
quick, inexpensive and easy ways to
save money with your car.

Get slick to reduce maintenance costs and to
save fuel. U p,.' i iLn I .: .:..: .:'ii., d.1J ,'I nin.:de'rn iih1
performance ni.i.t.r oil- an nulj .c ., re3rolgjulg ] iI-
provement to :,'.n! ':r' 'ucl *. ..' in'., jni engine lit
For instance, ind-pendcide itd -. lb.:n ,.:< umlnied i.,iu
Royal Purple motor oil improves fuel economy by as
much as 5 percent and significantly reduces engine wear.
Using high performance synthetic motor oil, as opposed
to conventional oils also allows for more miles between
oil changes, reducing maintenance costs and the amount
of time spent on maintefiance. You'll pay a little more
for premium motor oil but the savings in fuel and re-
duced maintenance costs more than make up for the
higher price. You can find out more about at www.roy-
alpurple.com.

Reduce your insurance costs by doing your
homework. One of the simplest ways to reduce insur-
ance cost is simply to shop around. Prices vary from
company to company, so it pays to do your homework.


Get at least three price quotes. You can call companies
directly or access information on the Internet. Your
state's insurance regulator may also provide price com-
parisons. Other ways to reduce insurance costs can be
found by visiting the U.S. Insurance Information Insti-
tute's Web site.

Mind the air to save money on fuel. The U.S. En-
ergy Department reports that under-inflated.tires can in-
cliC.,N fuel . njuiiipi.irn by up to 3 perceift One study
estimates that 50 to 80 percent of the tires rolling on U.S.
roads are under inflated. Astonishingly, we could save
up to 2 billion gallons of gas each year simply by prop-
erly inflating our tires.
Secondly, a clogged air filter can increase fuel con-
sumption by as much as-10 percent. Air filters keep im-
purities from damaging the interior of the engine, so
replacing dirty filters will save gas and protect your en-
gine. More tips to save money on fuel are available at
www.fueleconomy.gov.
An astute driver can save hundreds of dollars a year
on automotive expenses without buying a new car or
changing lifestyle. All it takes is a little time and re-
search, and the good sense to choose better performing
products.
Courtesy of"ARAcontent


Simply upgrading
to the right high
performance motor oil
can improve fuel
economy.


44'i .


Courtesy ofARAcontent


TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2oog DS


rrrjTt.q rnriNTY (Fl,) CHRONICLE -








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


D6 TUnA, JUN~vi~~P 16,2009


Back to


Basics at



the Pump



(ARA) - For most drivers, filling up at the pump is an
automatic routine. But considering that cars are typically
one of our largest investments, it's important to remember
the way we take care of them can mean the difference be-
tween trouble-free driving and costly repairs.
Dr. FuelGood is Sam Menunolb. an ASE certified auto
technician and automotive expert for Shell, who has the fol-
lowing advice on the best care for your car:
A big part of engine maintenance is making sure you se-
lect the -right type of gasoline for your vehicle. Not only is
it essential to use the recommended octane (regular,
midgrade or premium gasoline), but it's also important to
make sure your fuel has enough cleaning agents to protect
your engine. Let's get back to the basics to help you better
understand what you're putting into your car.

Octane
You probably associate octane with the number you see
at the pumps (the higher the number the more premium the
fuel), but the technical explanation for octane is the meas-
ure of the fuel's ability to resist "engine knock." If you use
a lower octane rating in an engine designed to use higher
octane fuel, "engine knocking" might occur, causing the
9.ar to shudder and lose performance. Most modem elec-
itronic engine management systems can sense this knocking
and make adjustments to prevent serious engine damage,
but downgrading to a lower octane can mean reduced per-
formance and lower fuel economy.
Since not every car is the, same, different vehicles re-
quire different octane gasoline. The vehicle manufacturer's_
recommendation for the appropriate octane level is listed
in your owner's manual. Some vehicles may even have the
octane requirement noted on the fuel gauge or the fuel filler
cap. If your vehicle's engine is designed to run on regular
grade unleaded gasoline, that's all it should require. How-
ever, using octane above the recommended level will not
harm the engine. If you are experiencing engine knocking
in an older car that recommends low octane, using a higher
octane grade may help correct the problem (however, it's
also recommended to have your car serviced). If you have
a performance or luxury vehicle that requires a higher oc-
tane level, I recommend you use the rating specified in
order to achieve optimal engine performance.

Cleaning Agents
The enemy of engine performance and efficiency is en-
gine "gunk," oir harmful carbon deposits. T/he gunky build-
up is the result of various chemical processes that occur
during engine operation, creating a build-up of residue on
intake valves and fuel injectors. This gunk acts like a
sponge, absorbing and trapping gasoline which can result in
decreased engine performance.
Some of the world's top automakers - Audi, BMW,
GM, Honda, Toyota and Volkswagen - recognize that cur-
rent Environmental Protection Agency minimum detergent
requirements do not go far enough to prevent engine gunk
and ensure optimal engine performance. To try to raise the
bar on fuel quality, these auto manufacturers designated the
voluntary TOP TIER Detergent Gasoline Standards to help
-drivers avoid lower quality gasolines.
Choosing a gasoline for your vehicle is like choosing a-
meal for your body - healthy choices can make a differ-
ence. Fortunately, preventing engine gunk is easy. Shell re-
cently introduced TOP TIER-certified Nitrogen Enriched
Gasolines, containing a unique, patented cleaning system
designed to seek and destroy engine gunk left by lower
quality gasolines. The new Nitrogen Enriched formula
helps protect and clean critical,engine parts in both con-
ventional and modem engines.
No matter what octane level is required for your vehicle,
I recommend you always use a high-quality gasoline that
meets TOP TIER standards. Industry research confirms that
a clean engine can result in better fuel efficiency, reduced
emissions and overall optimal engine performance.

The Bottom Line
While most engines will work regardless of the fuel
grade or quality, it's important to understand that using a
higher quality gasoline can be a simple step to help main-
- tain your engine and its vital components. In today's tough
economy, American drivers are concerned about protecting
the health of their vehicles. Not all gasolines are the same
- the differences in product quality are real. To keep over-
all costs down, there is no substitute for preventive main-
tenance.
.For more information, about Shell Nitrogen Enriched
Gasoline and fuel tips, .visit www.passionate-
experts.shell.com. Courtesy ofARAcontent


ACROSS
4. Don't let inis slip
7. Term for understeer
8. 'Tne owner gets tricked, the car
gets tricked out"
12 Esteem replacement
14. "Drop' the ride height
15. Wheel suppo01s
17. Option available in 1929
20. Get online in your car
21. Rolls convertible
22 Audi wagon
26 Shelby plant locale
27 Diagnostics slang
32. Manuat-trans slang
34. Remove before dueling


35 Passenger-seat term
36. Zero-emissions motor
37. A Brazilian Kla'
39. Aussie car brand
40, Hall pickup hall cm
42. Hyundai's Sedona
46 Jaguar founder
47. Pistons drop in here
48. Air or oil
49. Small yellow-Iruck maker
50. Popular top option, once
51. This is a bumper-to bumper
feature
52. Fender
53, Tire noise
54. Arm or panel


COPYRIGHT WHEELBASE COMMNCATION'S


The Safe Way to Drive Youngsters'


Passion for Speed


(ARA) - Just one day after the premier of "Fast & Furi-
ous," a movie that spotlights the world of street racing, a
mother and her 2-year-old child died in Charlotte, N.C.,
when their vehicle was caught in the middle of an appar-
ently illegal street race. A 13-year-old passenger in one of
the racing vehicles also died, and the driver of that car now
faces three murder charges, police say.
It's the kind of tragedy
that illustrates the need to get
young would-be racers to
pursue their interests safely -
offthe streets and on a secure .
track instead, says Steve
Meade, a top Denver, Colo., 4 .
radio personality known as
"Willie B." Meade co-stars
on SPEED'r "PINKS All
Out" drag racing lifestyle se-
ries, which will premier its
third season in July. Steve Meade, a top Denver,
Meade himself witnessed Colo., radio personality
a similar tragedy as a young known as "Willie B" co-
man when he watched an il- stars on SPEED's "PINKS
legal street race go .awry. All Out" program and advo-
Years later, the. experiencecates teaching young,
would-be racers how to
inspired him to participate in safely pursue their passion.
the Colorado Highway Pa-
trol's "Take It to the Track" program, a drive to encourage
street racers to race on private tracks instead of public
roads.
"When a young person is about to participate in a street
race, they're always going to have that one momerit of re-
flection when they think 'Should I really be doing this,'"
Meade says. "We want to catch them in that moment and let


them know that there is a safe alternative."
The premier of the third "Fast & Furious" move may,
well inspire some young drivers to think they can race like
actor Vin Diesel's character, narrowly escaping death and
avoiding harm to innocent bystanders. Meade hopes "Take
It to the Track" will help aspiring racers to realize the dif-
ference between fiction and reality, and pursue their inter-
est in a safer setting.
"If a young person has that desire to race, they're going
to find a way to do it," Meade says. "If there's no safe al-
ternative for. them, they're going to race on the street."
Parents who see the drive to race in their teens and
young adult children. should take steps to"help ensure their
passion is fueled in a positive, safe environment, Meade
says. If the community has a local race track, parents can
contact managers to see if a drag racing program is avail-
able. If not, they should encourage the track to found one.
Local law enforcement can also be a resource for estab-
lishing and supporting safe racing programs in communi-
ties,. he notes.
Fast cars and racing are an integral part of the American
psyche, Meade says. Millions of Americans avidly follow
NASCAR racing and millions more are classic car devo-
tees, collectors or just enjoy working on cars in their spare
time.
"If your child has 'that passion for cars and racing, you
either help and encourage him to do it the right way, or you
risk finding out about it by a knock on the door in the mid-
dle of the night telling you that-he's been involved in an il-
legal race or worse," Meade says.
"PINKS All Out" airs 9 p.m. EST Thursdays on SPEED.
To learn more about the "Take it to the Track" campaign, go
to www.csp.state.co.us.
Courtesy ofARAcontent


Affordable, Comfortable Camping for All


(ARA) - Every year, families across the
country head outdoors to enjoy quality time to-
gether and appreciate the wonders of nature -
but sometimes the idea of "roughing it" is not as
enjoyable for certain members of the family.
You might assume an RV is the only way to
bring the comforts of home to the campsite.
Fortunately, thanks to modern technology, gen-
erators give you a great way to bring along
those extra amenities and comforts without the
expense associated with renting, purchasing or
even driving your RV.
Generators can give your camping adven-
ture the comforts of home while their low noise,
small size and light weight - the lightest mod-
els currently weigh-in at a mere 40 to 50 pounds
- make them a pleasure to use and easy to
transport regardless of whether you're camping
with a minivan, SUV or your standard pick-up
truck. Even without an RV, a generator can sup-
ply the comforts and necessities of home along
with some not-so-necessary items like lamps,
microwaves, radios, hair dryers and even a TV
and gaming system for the kids. Simple and
easy to transport and operate, with a generator
you'll have the comfort and convenience of
electricity and you're ready to roll.
One of the newest generators in this portable
category is the EF2000iS from Yamaha Motor
Corporation, U.S.A. Designed specifically for
easy transport and a variety of uses, it is perfect


for the campsite. If you have a larger appliance
you can't live without, the EF2000iS also
comes with a parallel-use function which allows'
two units to plug into each other for double the
output, while maintaining the maximum porta-
bility of two light weight generators to provide
the power of one large, heavy generator.
"The EF2000iS is the .ideal lightweight
camping companion," says Colin Iwasa, power
equipment sales manager at Yamaha. "At 2000
-watts, it is all the power you need to run small
electric appliances. More importantly, it is
quiet, versatile and can run for up to eight hours
on less than a gallon of gas. It's even powerful
enough to run your refrigerator, television and
some lights at home if you have a power out-
age."
Of course, it is always important to use gen-
erators responsibly and safely, especially
around the campsite. To keep your family safe,
Yamaha provides a few guidelines for proper
generator operation:
* Never use a generator indoors or in par-
tially enclosed areas. A portable generator uses
a combustion engine just like your car, which
produces toxic, poisonous carbon monoxide ex-
haust gases. Set it up outdoors in a well-venti-
lated, dry area away from any car or trailer
windows, doors and other air intakes.
* Read the manufacturer's instructions for
safe operation prior to use. This booklet comes


with your generator. Additional copies are avail-
able at your local dealership.
. * Keep generators away from fires and never
fuel the generator while it's running. Fuel liq-
uids are flammable and dangerous if ingested,
so store them far away from your family's com-
mon areas and open flames. Fuel can also be
sparked by a running generator, so turn off the
engine before refueling.
* Use a carbon monoxide detector. Running
generators create carbon monoxide, one of the
most hazardous side effects of generator use. To
be safe, install a carbon monoxide detector in
your trailer or, if camping outdoors, keep the
generator far away from any tents or enclosed
spaces.
* Avoid electric shock. To prevent electric
shock, never touch the generator with wet
hands. Also, do not operate a generator in rain
or snow in order to keep the generator dry.
* Watch out for hot engines and mufflers.
Avoid placing flammable materials near the ex-
haust outlet during operation, and keep any gen-
erator at least three feet away from buildings or
other equipment to avoid overheating. Always
carry the generator by its handles.
As long as it's operated safely, a generator
can help make you and your family a little more
comfortable while "roughing it" under the stars
- and you'll look forward to many more trips
to come, Courtesvy o ARAcontent


WELCOME to International AutoCross.
a puzzle dedicated to the automobile enthusiast'
AutoCross will test your I T E R N A 7
knowledge of cars, brand namrpes and
auto-related people from all over the world. Good luck!





fn * n 6 1. Auto/lawn mower inventor
2 Vave type
3 Tire necessity, once
5 Cavalier replacement
6 Transfer or crank
9 Q45, G35X, QX56 models
10. International sport-ute
11. Early Porsche nickname
13 Dauphine or Caravelle
16 Chevy Inline six
18 One Honda sport-ute
S19. Waxwork
23. Critical wheel measurement
24 Todropagear
25 Box protector
28 Champagne size or Dodge
model
29 Bright-white headlamps
30. Suspension type
31. A shock's home
33 Pro driver
38. ak.a. straight" six
41 Fender surround
43, Helps for good reception
44 Former Dodge compact
45 _ highway
47. Battery holds this










Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009 D7
U I


Steering


-'.3 ~


'." "


STRESSED?

Q. My 2000 Cadillac Eldorado has a crack in the door panel where the armrest is. Do you
think I can get Cadillac to replace it? This is an all-in-one-piece panel and it shouldn't break
from normal wear and tear. I am the original owner and have less than 35,000 miles on this
very well cared-for ear. They have told me my extended warranty will not cover it and that
the panel costs $625, plus $125 in labor.
A. Hmmm. It sounds like a stress or pressure fracture. I would never discourage anyone
from contacting a car maker - especially when it's a high-end vehicle - when something
fairly unusual happens. But truthfully, I doubt you'll have much luck. It's an 8-year-old car,
and although the mileage is extremely low, if I were on the receiving end of that call from
you, I'd be wondering how such a thing happened. Do you use the armrest as a sort of
booster-support when you exit the car? Got a dog that uses that as a perch? Or a very big
dog who perched on it only a couple of times? None of that could be considered "normal,"
as the armrest was constructed to act as nothing more substantial than a shelf for a minimal
weight. Of course, it's possible that you did nothing to contribute.to the crack, and there was
a manufacturing problem that showed itself with time. -But I'm afraid that given the age of
the car, you've got no choice but to pop for the $750.'


Q. The manual for my 2007 Honda Accord.practically ignores the issue of how many
miles or months to go between oil changes. It suggests following the "symbols" that appear
on the odometer that inform what maintenance is needed. When I called the dealer to ask
whether my 7-month-old Accord with 2,900 miles is overdue for a change, he said my
odometer shows 50 percent and I can wait until it shows 15 percent or lower. Any comment
on this?
A. If your recent driving is any indication, you're a low-mileage driver, clocking only
about 100 miles a week or less (and when you're ready to sell that vehicle, you should def-
initely get a top-dollar reward). Listen to your dealership - and the information your car is
giving you. Your vehicle is, through the miracle of technology, doing an accurate reading
of the quality of your oil. While you may have abided by a set schedule in the past, that ap-
plies to the majority of the driving public. However, even though oil degrades over time even
in the absence of high mileage on the odometer, you're clearly not doing any, of the things
that age oil more quickly, like jack-rabbit driving or hard driving during hideously hot days,
f6r example. Worry not. Just be prompt when the car says, "change my oil."


MSRP

Alarm

Front Leg Room

Wheelbase

Length, Overall

Min Ground Clearance

Epa Fuel Economy Est - City

Cruising Range- City

Displacement


$20,220

Standard

42.5 In.

105.9 In.

182 9 In

8.3 In.

22 MPG

349.80 Mi.

2.7U-Tbd-


2009 Nissan 2008 Toyota Rav4 2008 Honda
Rogue Fwd 4dr, 4-Cyl CR-V
Fwd 4dr S 4-Spd At (Natl) 2wd 5dr Lx


$20,700

Not Available

41.3 In

103.1 In.

177.9 In.

7.3 In.

20 MPG

306.00 Mi.

2.4L/144

166 @ 5800

161 @ 4200

Not Available

Not Available


SAE Net Horsepower @ RPM 1 107 @ 6000


$21,500

Available

41.8 In

104.7 In.

181.1 In.

7.5 In.

21 MPG

333.90 Mi.

2.4L/144

166 @ 6000

165@ 4000

Not Available

Not Available


SAE New Torque (@ RPM

Continuously Variable Trans

Front Tow Hooks


175 @ 4400

Standard

Standard


2009 NISSAN ROGUE
FOR FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING

800-584-8755 ext. 2149



$ 6,988 or$299*mo,






CRYSTAL




NI SSAN

FASTEST GROWING NISSAN DEALER IN FLORIDA

937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD., HOMOSASSA
crystalautos.com


800.584.8755 Ext, 1
" 1 ,4',.,- ,.,, , " :" ,,,, j I 1.) L ' 1: . F f i ,T ., ,', ,',:, i ,:.lr, , , , f,. i,) IIh ,lI ,l I 1'} ''' *. 'l| , 1r , ) ,l : ;. ',,: , L." : ': 1C I'I IIIifn ', . ., ' , 1 F F
" , I a I O a c,, ,.,.,- , ,, . , 1 . ..' ' . 0 . 78j2 4 5


To palace an ac. call c563-5966


II J-~i.Itcmc~ti ~'~
~Z11assificds _____I


- h~ssif7e~Is
J - I~i


c~,~Iiw.e
~4II
7h e' Time


- . - .0


JET SKI'S
'04, Kawasaki's,
STX-900 & STX-15F,
under 60 hrs., $7,500 for
both. (352) 476-3548 .
Sea Doo
& Trailer, new
motor, real fast
$2,800 obo
.352-794-3669
SeaDoo GTX Dl
02,exc cond3 sweater,
blu/white,2 stroke
S130hp, 71 hrs 130 ml.
45-50mph $5500
(352) 795-5974



AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
AQUA SPORT'05
175 Otprey, 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual
bait: w/switch, bimini,
easy load trailer. Low
hours.$9,990
352-860-0277
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
I9.900.352-746-5856
BASS TRACKER 04
PT 175 Special Edition,
50hp Merc. gal trial.
many Xtra's 7,750
Call for Info
(813)-293-0392 cell
BOSTON WHALER
14 ' w/ 40 hp Johnson,
Everything works good
$1600 (352) 302-0033
Deck Boat
95'19 Ft: Slyvan, w/ra-
dio & fishflnder. New Bat-
tery switch. 2 batteries,
power pk.
prop./hub.$6,QOO
(352)726-0838
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras!
$13,500/obo.
(352) 489-9640
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
115HP,4strke Yamaha,
w/ trr. $11,200. will
trade (352) 503-3778
HYDRA - SPORT
'90,26' New'08 c/c-,
t-top, -gas tank -wiring
'99 250 Merc. on
bracket '05 trallermany
upgrades exc cond.
$14,900 (352) 586-1754
KEY WEST & FORD
05/2020cc/98Expedition
Yam4stk150/5.4L
4x4EBRed Together
$32500 or $26000 Boat
(352)586-6717


PONTOON '08
Sweetwater 21ft. 25 hours.
90hp Yamaha.
$16,500. Many Extras
352-503-6797
' PONTOON
'08, Sun Tracker, 18ft,
50H Merc. mtr, w/ trier,
less than lOhrs. use,
$11,000 (352) 795-5413
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras $12,000
(352) 628-0281
PRO-LINE 221
WALKAROUND 1999
200 HP Mercury w/ 9.9 HP
Johnson kicker,$12k
obo. Call Kurt at Pete's
. Pier 352-795-6067
PROLINE SPORT '06
19ft, CC,T-top, 115HP
Merc Optic Max, alum
trailer. Many extra's
$17,000. 352-527-8738
SEA PRO
'00 19 FT. C/C. Loaded.
Elec. Pkg. '115 FI 4 Strk.
Yam. 100 hrs. Bim. top.
Best offer(352)533-3093
SUNDANCE SKIFF
'02'- 16ft, 30HP Mercury.
Center Console, trolling
motor,, a-top, trailer.
$4500, 352-422-7765
T-CRAFT
23'L, 6W, '02 150H
Evin. mtr. w fuel enj. like
new, trlr. w/brks
$5,995 352-489-3661



22 FT. Minnie Winnie
1993, Class C, 16 mpg,
dependable, like new
small V-8, sleeps 6
$7,300 (352) 563-9964
'02 Cedar Creek 5th
Wheel 29ft, 2-slIdes,
queen bed,bath/shower,
low mileage, loaded,
good cond. $16,800
(352) 746-4969
05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
26inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
'87 Coachman C-Class
Clean & Good cond.,
Like new brakes & tires,
350 Motor, 71k miles
$3,900 obo (352)
503-7304
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 36 K Mi.
Dual air. $37,700 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
CHEVY '86 Class C
Very good cond. Less
than 50k mi. No genera-
tor. $4,000. Call anytime.
(352) 446-6329


'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane New
deal. 30Q, class A motor
home, 31% ft., 22k mi.
V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed,
etc. Saturn tow incl.
$35,000. (352) 397-5007
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. Io
great RV Park, pool,
clubhouse etc. Can be
moved $26,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$52,995. 352-464-0371



'88 FORD MOTORHOME
Class-C. 57k mi.,
roof-air-generac
Ex. tires & brakes
$4k obo 352-422-3033
'93 LARGE STARCRAFT
Popup. New factory
canvas, floors, walls &
tires. A/C, toilet. $4995
firm, 352-746-2027
AEROLITE
2007, 21 FT.,
$12,000 obo
(352) 516-3665
BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig.
Like new. $8,900.
352-489-3661
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778



1997 MAZDA MIATA
Convertable, Fun &
dependable, Porche
Red, new top, 36mpg,
5-speed, A/C, new tires.
Mint $5,700 352)
563-9964
ACURA
2004, TSX Certified, Low
Miles, Like New
Only $289 mo
1-800-733-9138
BUICK '04
CUSTOM CENTURY
LOADEDI 35k miles, 1
owner retiree, garaged
$7700. 352-628-0698
Cadillac
2003 CTS, Like New,
All the ExtrasI
Priced to Sell]
1-800-733-9138


CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715
CHEVY '01
Cavalier, 4-dr, auto,
cold a/c.' 110K mi,
Exc. cond. $2,950
352-341-0004
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Cony. rare
auto, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
black, dependable.
$5200 352-'563-0615
CHRYSLER '04
Sebring Cony. 34,5K ml.
excellent cond. white
w/tan top,' Illness
forces sale $9500
(352) 726-7765
CHRYSLER
'06 Sebring Convertable
$12,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 mi-
les on this rare silver on
silver on silver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are on
this gorgeous vette ,
Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
included, Your's
for only, $48,000.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE
'80, Stirgray, white, auto,
SHOW CAR!
$11,500 or will trade for
truck. 352-563-6428
FORD
'00 Focus, 4 dr. AC,
Auto. New tires & brakes
runs great,30 mpg.
$3,950.(352) 302-9217
FORD
2004, Ranger X-Cab
Automatic w. Cap
Only $199 per mo .
1-800-733-9138
FORD
2006, Taurus Lather,
Sunroof & More, Take
Over, Pmts $189 mo
1-800-733-9138
HONDA
'08 Civic, $17,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
HONDA
2008, Civic EX, 2 Dr
Coupe, Sacrifice
Great Mileage
1-800-733-9138
HONDA '99
CR-V AWD, Low miles,
LOAD&ED Mint cond.
Garaged. $6,900/obo
352-746-4160
HYUNDAI
2007, Santa Fe GLS
AWD, Factory Warranty
Only $249 mo
1-800-733-9138


HYUNDAI
2008, Tiburon, Only 600
Miles! Must Sell! Take
over pmts $249 mo
1-800-733-9138
LINCOLN
2008, Town Car Ltd
Sig Series, Low Mile
Must Selll Only $22,986
1-800-733-9138
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well maintained.
$2000. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
MAZDA
'08 MZ 3 Sedan,
$12,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MAZDA
MIATA 2001, silver/tan,
5 speed, 85K ml. $5700
obo(352) 410-6724.
MAZDA MIATA
MX5,2000 SILVER/TAN,5
SPEED, $6500
0B0,727-365-5951
MERCEDES
'08 E-350, $38,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
Mercedes
2006, E-Class, Chrome
Wheels, Loaded Must
See at $25,988
1-800-733-9138
MITSUBISHI
'03, Diamante IS, excel.
cond. Always serviced.
Fully equip. Priced be-
low Kelly BB. $7,900.
352-382-5702
NISSAN
'07 Versa,
$11,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
SUBARU '99
Legacy Wagon
Low miles, good cond.
Price below KBB $4,000.
352-344-8932
TOYOTA
'06 Corolla,
$11,995 Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 mL
warranty. $19,000
(352) 697-3428
TOYOTA
'07 Camry,
$16,995 Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'07 FJ Cruiser.
$23,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
2002 Camry XLE Lthr.
Mnroof, loaded, 1 Own
Low miles, $199 mo.
wac 1-800-733-9138


TOYOTA
2003 Camry LE, Beauty,
. Low Miles Only $8995
or $169 mo, wac
1-800-733-9138
TOYOTA SUPRA '89
All original, red, 79k ml.,
6 cylinder, all power, ,
targa roof. Original
owner. Garaged, $6,999
(352) 726-3427
VOLKSWAGON
'08 Beetle, $15,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLKSWAGON
'08 Jetta, $13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-729.9
VOLVO
'06 S-40,
$15,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-60, $16,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-80,
$16,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC-90,
$20,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 S-40
$16,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 V-70
$21,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S-80
$19,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VW
2005, Beetle Conv Ltd
Turbol Powder Blue
Don't Miss this $249
mo 1-800-733-9138



'53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, auto, May
trade in part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door sedan. 6
cyl auto. $9,500. Will con-
sider trade for travel trailer
of equal value.(352)
628-4053
BUICK 67
RIVIERA, 430 wildcat
motor, 86k ml. amfm,
a/c, title whi. elect seats,
very good cond. $8000
(352) 527-3961
CADILLAC
'75, Eldorado
convertible
$8,500.
(352) 795-5413


EL CAMINO '81
305 Auto, All new
interior, & paint. Crager
mags & tires. 4" raised
hood. $3,250.
(352)341-3613.
GTO
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint;
63K mi., $8,900 obo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
trans. & parts. $4,000.
(352) 621-0126
THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$12,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122



DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awe-
some Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded
every special feature. Sr.
own, gar. kept., 27K mi,
$40K
invested Sale $21,750
See online ad photos
www.autotrader.com/atca
rid/at-f3fd39f
John (352) 726-1076
DODGE RAM '00
Std cab, rare 5spd, hemi,
V8, a/c, 25mpg, new 22"
rims & tires. Dependable
$3700. 352-563-0615
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
sery. van. 41K Mi./5.4 L.
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serv. body/dble lock drs.
$20,000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
'06 F 250 Lariat, Diesel,
Super tow pkg. 4 wheel
drive, lots of chrome.
$17,000(352) 628-6985



CHEVY
'04 Trailblazer EXT LS
LOADED/* 6-disc CD &
DVD, 3rd row. Leather.
47K mi. Retails $38K
$12,500.(352) 527-0456
CHEVY TAHOE
02,4x4, exc. cond
tow pkg. seats'8,
$9,999 .(352) 527-6909
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air & ex-
haust, Exc. Cond. $6,000
obo
(352) 344-0505


Escape, 89kmi, 4whl
drive, class 3 hitch, Orig
owner. Great shape &
price. $8,750.
352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
GMC ENVOY
Red,'03, 60k mi.,
On-Star, tow package
5-passenger, $10,500
obo (352) 527-3445
GMC SUBURBAN
1993 4 WD, 4,4 rebuilt
eng., new transm.,
great tires, good cond.
$2,900 obo
(352) 201-1413
HYUNDAI
'07 Santa Fe, $19,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
KIASPORTAGE '01
Runs & looks great. Elec.
wind., locks, near new
tires, shocks, breaks,
battery & timing belt
$2,750 (352) 586-5746
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG. Silver
W/black int. Loaded,
57K.Mi. Like new .Ask
$18.5K. (352)489-7674



TOYOTA
'05 Tacoma, SR-5, 6sp.
4 X 4, loaded. 30K. mi.
$19,800.(352) 382-5055



CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872
ECONOLINE
'01 Van White, regular
or hand controls.
Wheelchair acc., w/lift,
$4200 (352) 341-7798
MAZDA'
'08 Mazda 5.Van,
'$14,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
Pontiac
'97 Tran Sport Montana
163K, Extended, 7 pas-
senger $1800. OBO
(352) 270-3770



HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains &
tows heavy loads.
$3200/or trade.
352- 563-0615
Crystal River


2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900mi. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. HI pert.
Over $43,000 in receipts.
17k mi. $10,900
352-563-0615
Crystal River
HARLEY
'96 Sporster 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes,chro. Ex. clean
$4,850.(352) 637-5143
Harley Davidson
'06, Road King Classic
low ml., blk cherry, incl.
helmets/trvl luggage
$14,000 (352) 382-0907

Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80",
completely serviced,
good shape. Ex.
access. $5,395. obo
.352-746-7655; 726-4109
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 Mi.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
HONDA 02
1100cc Sarbara, 10K
mi. custom exhaust &
seat, lots of Xtras $4500
obo 352-613-5641
HONDA 2007 Shadow
600 Deluxe Powder blue,
3,600 miles, passenger
backrest and slipstream
windshield. $4,500 OBO.
352-795-9829
SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, BIk w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carini handle bars.
Chrome to max, ThIs
bad boy Is not for the
faint of heart $30k
invested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815
SUZUKI'04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
TITAN
'00 Phoenix, TRM.
Ferrari red, 6K. mi. Like
new, $11,000
(352) 489-7674


PIE"


TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2oog D7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


.............. ----/ w






D8 TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009


JENKINS HYUNDAI


WHIY BUY HIIYINDAI...
, *-


c~HYfLnDRI


Assu


rance


AMERICA'S BEST WARRANTY'
10 YEAR/100,000 MILE
POWERTRAIN LIMITED WARRANTY
' See dealer for LIMITED WARRANTY details.


5 Year / 60,000 Mile
Bumper To Bumper Coverage
5 Year Unlimited Miles
24 Hr Roadside Assistance


Q44


2009
SONATA

$13,9871


&


agwUf=


2009
SANTA FE GLS

017,990


#26403


2009 *$0 Q1
ACCENT GS G$OPUUi


2009 I
ELANTRA GLS
cmns04


'11,989


2009
2009 $16 985
TUCSON GLS p
103t "UAAiwmi&


#15313. #44403


2009 $239Mm0
ELANTRA TOURING 0 O
, " 36 iBnthleaset
EUT __


2010 (9fiO
GENESIS COUPE 5 0E mO
..,. . , 36In elo aset


2009
GENESIS


$399moe
36mnIlLeaset


J,te'd V' rrth I rtin Oir of the Year
- Detroit Auto Show


Advertised prices are plus tax, tag and $599 dealer fee, are before any dealer installed options and include all available manufacturer rebates & incentives. Vehicles subject to prior sale. All offers with approved credit and some cannot be combined. *Expected range for most
drivers, your actual mileage may vary depending on how you drive and maintain your vehicle. -** On the Accent. As listed on Monroney sticker., t Genesis Coupe lease, $259 per mo, $1999 down, Genesis lease, $399 per mo, $2599 down, Elantra Touring lease, $239 per mo,
$2499 down; all 36 mo. leases. A Accent purchase $169 per mo. at 7% APR for 84 mos. Some offers may require financing thru HMFC., tt Must be 18 years or older. No purchase necessary. See us for full rules & regulations. Photos are for illustration purposes only.


WE'LL DOUBLE YOUR CASH ANDIOR TRADE EQUITY UP TO A TOTAL OF $5000


LIST PRICE ........*7,990
YOUR CASH OR TRADE -2,500
DOUBLE ............. 2,500

1993 Mazda 626 $990
H9224B.................................... $ 9
2001 Mercury Sable $1,990
H9452C ................................ . I*


2000 BuIck Centu $1,990
H8480A...................... .........
2001 Chrysler Sebring $1,990
PH2398A..................;...........
.1996 Honda Civic $1,990
H8604A.. . .
1997 Chrysler LHS $2,990
PH2362B.. . '. ^ "... ..
2002 Chrysler VoyI ' $2,990
H9477A............................
2002 Mercury Sable $2,990
H8472A ..............................
1999 Honda Accord $2,990
H9098B ..............................
1999 Volkswagenjetta $2,990
H9446B..............................
1998 Honda Civic $2,990
H9490A..............................


Avaiabl On re-. O ndVeils


Vehicle


Isl


Come
With


2000 Toyota Camy ............ $2,990
H9545A ....................
2003 Ford Taurus $2 990
PH2350B................................. $ 2,990
2000 Chrysler Sebring $2,990
PH2401A ................................ . ,


2001 Hyundai Santa Fe
H9497A ............... ........ -
2001 Chevrolet Malibu
H9233B ................ ............
2001 Pontiac GrAnd Prix
H8590A ................................
1999 Toyota Camry
H9344A................................
2000 Chrysler 300M
H9483B......... .......................
2005 Hyundai XG350
H9480A................................


$3,990
$3,990
$3,990
$3,990
$3,990
$3,990


200II.1.ZeyhI�Uu


LIST PRICE ...... *lO.S00
YOUR CASH OR TRADE ... *2,5oo
DOUBLE ............ *2,500
YOU PAX 1@0"^
2001 Mercury Sable $3,990
H9060B . ................................
2061 Dodge Ram $500 .. $3,990
H8425B. . ........... .............o w
Pr..... �h o waftn rin' , ,n. Mh traflt W n.


All prices are plus tax, tag & $599 dealer fee. All offers are with approved credit. Vehicles are subject to prior sale. Cash doubling comes in the form of price reduction. Offer not available on vehicles with reduced price already marked on the windshield. Limit 1 trade-in per purchase. Jenkins Hyundai will double your
cash and/or trade up to $2500 for a total of up to $5000. Programs subject to change without notice. t Qualifying vehicles must have 48,000 miles or less and have been manufactured within the last 48 months. See dealer for complete details. * Excludes Audi, BMW, Jaguar, Mercedes Benz, Saab, Porsche & Volvo.


p &eI^M*r'W^owu " | , WhniYduDod Arn-lignment & Tire Rotatioif'$ SAS
PMce PA Shou SSuppnesS Disposal Fean
Pfeiase lmPdpresent ufunam 0oon igndce wer0e-up. Epa OJf3f. T)9' ' Pie P*1cP SWop SupI6 . & DSaNoa Fee. h
I Pla.i .iJp edprartnt cacp.,n op.Ir, ser,.sa ar,rusp iOp 107,'19
Jenkins Hyundai - 1602 SW CollegeRd * SR 200 * Ocala I I Jenkins Hyundai 1602 SW College Rd * SR 200 * Ocala ,
------------ r-------- r------------.--------------- 7.:--'-------------------------- -- I-------------------------- -------------------------------------------- -E*-


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fuel I L
Efficient m


Value


#62423


(jR) HYunDR, THE INTELLIGENTLY CHOICE
0 E- -3


- .. .. ..................................


-RAY


1999 TOYOTA
CAMRY 11


L-






Cimus C'OUNIY (FL) CHRONICLE TUESDAY, Jur'~r 16, 2009 D9


Ife i PreOwnedf'Sfiefgter


hgL~evyI w1dfe1cton


#9930J 4DR AUTO, V6
30 MPG!
26.888 I


" MH5694 #H5638 1IH5689 #56




MiU0182 #H15700 #1H 5�70 3 #H15696


IH5353 56#H5633

LiANN


02 PIRD0 liUdliER
#9890. EXT CAB. AUTO V6,
LOWPRICE'
$7488


AMibe on all new 2008 and 2009 Accords, Civics, & Odyssey models 2.90% APR financing for 24-36 months or 3.90% APR
financing for 37-60 months available to customers who quality for the AHFC Super Preferred credit tier. See dealer for details.
For well qualified buyers. Not all buyers may qualify Higher rates apply for buyers with lower credit ratings.


New 2009 Honda
CIVIC P SEDAN


Tm/bl7, Price .................$16,329
Cash or Trade Equity. -2,000


On AIH New Aveo, Cobalt, MIfi ,
Impala, HHR, Traverse & Sil~veadds!
Monthly payment $16.67 for every $1,000 financed.
Some customers will not qualify. Not available with other offers.
See dealer for details. Take delivery by 6/16/09.


Hew 2010 Honda
INSIGHT LX HYBRID


1r,'V IwomaUc.
Price ....................$19,888 nology,
sr e E ui m Air Cond. & Much,
Cash or Trade Equity. -$2,0m0 Much MoGM


..my HfE fiaW U


Hew8 9 oaf
FRT
5 Deor Sedan


New '09 Honda
ACCORD
LX Sedan


New'09 Honda
CRV 2WD
LX Sport Utlly


Price......................... $15,674 Price......................... $20,359 Price... .............$20,448
Cash or Trade Equity....- $2,000 Cash or Trade Equity....- $2,000 Cash or Trade Equity....- $2,000



Model GE29E, Model CP2639EW, Model RE339EW,
Automatic, Air Cond., Automatic, Air Cond., Automatic, Air Cond.,
Power Package, Power Package, Cruise, Power Package,
AM-FWCD SideAirbags Cmise, Tilt


ltT MI LGnoE w

-T*g*T G 2219 S. Summst Bid.
.LIn i omosassa

!)ir -LoveH-atm_

;',,'Al preowned prices are wiSf 000 cash down or trade equity. *All prices plus tax, tag and $449 administrative
fee..In stock units only, all options at retail price. " 36 month closed end lease, 12,000 miles er year, 20 per
mile over limit, plus tax, tag and fees. $2699 cash due at signing on Civic, Accord, CR-V and Element. $2799
*due at signing on Fit and Insight. $2999 due at signing on Odyssey, Pilot and Ridgeline. Offers expire 6-16-09.


Automatic Transmission, PW, PL, Cruise,. ilt, CD, PW, PL, Cruise, Tilt, CD,
Air Conditioning, 4 Door! Air Conditioning! Air Conditioning, Automaticl


29 MPG!


Ons 29 MPG!


S'll LOVE ng
Business WI Us!


-wW on Highway 44 West

fmm^h -3523.1 -0

-ITV Mev aEesTVonI

* All prices include $2,000 cash or trade equity plus tax, tag and $449 administrative fee. Prices
include all rebates & GM owner loyalty. Pictures for illustrative purposes only. Offers expire 6-16-09.


... - A VAN
R--VOLUTIO


F -J~'bJM


#10017 4DR.25S,
LEATHER WHITE'
$7,844


"Sim


Tur�smy, JuNr 16, 2oog D9


Onus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE








it


IN


H


"You must know what your
trade is worth, no matter
where you plan to buy..."


~i~~:ii~ii


ILT


4111;


/ 2008 RAM


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2182
$12,988 or $229* mo.
2008 CARAVAN


FREE 24HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 3131
$10,988* or194 mo.
2006 RAM


FREE 24HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITHINFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 4143
p9,988 or i 76. me.
2005 TRAILBLAZER


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE-WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 2180
$8,988' or '168' mo.
2004 RANGER


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2175
'5,988' or '112' mo.
CRYSTAL


937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext. 1
crystalautos.com


' 2008 IMPALA


FREE 24HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2155
11i,988 or $211 o.N
2007 SILVERADO
� -"- "1I---^" .fO g^ 1"'


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext.2171
11,988 or'211 me.
2006 GRAND CARAVAN


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2185
$7,988'or 140' mo.
2005 TOWN & COUNTRY


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584-8755 Ext. 2179
$6,988* or 131* mo.
2004 RAM


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2174
$6,988* or '131* mo.
CRYSTAL
Jeep .
1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
2077 HWY. 44 W.
INVERNESS
800-584-8755 Ext. 1I
- crysfalauitos.com .


2008 F150


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 2189
1 2,988* or 229mo
2007 CAMRY


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ex. 2187
1 2,988 or 2291 mo.
2006 F150


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2184
9,988' or$176* mo.
2005 SILVERADO


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2178
'8,988' or '168' mo.
2004 FRONTIER


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 6133
$6,988* or'131* mo.
CRYSTAL
RE=VOLWTION
1035 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext. I
1 crystalautos.com ,


"All Pices/Payments exclude tax, tagi title, dealer ads and dealer fee ($599.50). Prdce/Payments Include $2000 down (Cash or Trade Equty), owner loyalty, rebates and all factory Incentives (must Qualify), Payments are at 7.99 A.PR. for 72 Months for model years 2006-2009 o
and 7.70 A.PR, for 66 months for model years 2002-2005 W.A.C. All prior sales excluded and may restrict stock. Not responsible for typographical errors. Cannot be combined with other offers. 'Vehicles are pre-owned and pictures are for illustration purposes only.


1m10 Tfriu.l n I 16. 1 2nno9


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ESnAY, JUNE 10, ZVUY


I VW I UE!


,-� �i I I


11 1111