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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01673
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: June 9, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01673

Full Text

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** AUTO**SCH 3-DIGIT 326
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORYI 1) I2

Where's the Magic? Orlando find, 17S007 -

C IT R US CO U N T Y


position /B


Court stalls Chrysler deal


Justice Ginsburg

blocks sale to Fiat

Associated Press
NEW YORK - Chrysler's five
weeks of breakneck-speed bank-
ruptcy proceedings came to a
screeching -but possibly tempo-


rary - halt Monday, when a
Supreme Court justice delayed
its sale of assets to Italy's Fiat
The move could derail the gov-
ernment's ambitious plan for the
U.S. automaker to blaze a path to
profitability without the burden
of many of its debts.
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg
issued a stay just a week before
Chrysler says the government-
backed sale must go through.


* GM puts brakes on its
medium-duty truck*
line./Page A2
E If deal is OK'd,, Fiat Group
SpA will shake up Chrysler
management./Page A2

After June 15, Fiat could walk
away from the deal and leave the
struggling U.S. automaker with


little option but to liquidate.
It was unclear late Monday just
how long the stay-wou Id last, or if
the high court planned to take up
the case.
Chrysler said it had no com-
ment until it receives further in-
formation from the court.
Ginsburg said in her one-sen-
tence order 'that the sale is
'stayed pending further order,"
indicating that the delay may only


be temporary. Ginsburg could de-
cide on her own whether to end
the delay, or she could ask the full
court to decide.
A federal appeals court in New
York approved the sale Friday,
but gave opponents until 4 p.m.
Monday to try to get the high
court to intervene. Ginsburg is-
sued her order minutes before
the deadline.
See STALLS/Page A2


A peach of a deal


DAVE SIGLERIChrofilcle
The season tr fresh Georgia peaches is getting started and the first roadside vendors are starting to show up along State Road 44. Wes-
ley Reid offered a few tomatoes along with a lot of large, firm peaches hitting the market. Prices are still a little high, but the quality of the
fruit promises a peachy summer.




Board to consider retirement pan


MIKE WRIGHT,,
mwright@chrofiicleonline.com
Chronicle
Citrus County commissioners,
today will consider an early retire-
ment incentive program that could
save about $120,000.
Eight current empl yees who
are eligible by ageorye of serv-
ice have indicated an i terest in
the program.
Also, three employees ho lost.
their jobs in layoffs maI partici-
pate.
The incentive program would
pay health insurance for up to two


years for retiring employees.
County officials say the plan is a
way to reduce the county budget
Human Re-
sources Director * WHAT: Ci
Sherry Anderson Commiss
said in a memo to 0 WHEN: 1
commissioners that
of the eight employ- 1 WHERE:
ees who want to par- 110 N. A
ticipate, six of them
have jobs that would u ON THE,
need to be refilled www.cler
by someone else,
The board meets at 1 p.m. at the
county courthouse in downtown In-
verness.


itr
ic


n
1
W
k.


The agenda includes:
* Commissioner Joe Meek will.
ask board members to direct
County Administra-
rus County. tor Brad Thorpejto
on meeting. head up a visioning
p.m. today, and strategic plan-
ning process for
courthouse, commissioners.
opka Ave., A proposal to
Inverness. defer for 50 years,
fEB: $80,000 in impact
citrus.fl.us. fees for an afford-
able-housing apart-
ment complex project in Beverly
Hills.
* A 6:30 p.m. public hearing to


consider an atlas amendment and
planned development overlay for
SanderSon-Henigar Eiterprises.
The request is to change two lots in
Timberlane Estates from residen-
tial to professional offices. The ap-
plicant wants to build a parking lot
for adjacent offices.
* At 2:30 p.m., Bob Clifford, ex-
ecutive director of the Tampa Bay
Regional Transportation Authority,
will provide a TBARTA update.
*At 3:45 p.m. Randy Welker, ex-
ecutive director of the Citrus
County Economic Development
Council, will present the EDC's
quarterly report


Group


aims to


collect


history

Fort Cooper hosting

Flag Day event
SHEMIR WILES
swiles@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
There are fewer World War II
and Korean War veterans with
'each passing year.
Before long, all that will be left
are the stories and memorabilia
passed from generation to gener-
ation.
Ken Hughes, a part-time park
ranger at Fort Cooper State Park.
and Beverly Gentry, a member of
the Fort Cooper chapter of the
Daughters of the American Rev-
olution (D.A.R.), both believe the
time has come to try to capture
this important history and pre-.
serve it for the future. That is why
the two have teamed to partici-
pate in the Library of Congress'
Veterans History Project.
According to the Library of
Congress' Web site,.the Veterans
History Project collects, pre-
serves and makes accessible the
personal accounts of American
war veterans so that future gen-
erations may hear directly from
veterans and better understand
the realities of war.
"It's for posterity's sake," Gen-
try said.
During Saturday's Flag Day
program at Fort Cooper, mem-
bers ofthe local D.A.R. will be on
hand collecting contact informa-
tion for veterans and veterans'
See HISTORY/Page A4


Packed a enda for monthly school board meet

The Meeting \ approval regardingthe approximately Assistant Principal Robert Hermann
$10 million, 640-student-station Crystal as Pleasant Grove Elementary as-
T he Citrus County River Primary School renovation proj- sistant principal for the 2009-10
School Board will me ect. This is the second phase in the de- school year. Also, Forest Ridge
t 3 .m. today at the sign process; there are three phases in- Elementary Principal Donnie
'T at3 p.m. today e At , tthe design process that requirejoard Brown is recommending board
District Services Center, 1007 approval. members approve Fbrest Ridge
W Main St., Inverness. ' *Appo"lnlm6ectofficial: Su- Elementary resource teacher


Learn More
Log onto www.citrus.kl2.fl.us and
click on the "School Board" link to view
the agenda or call 726-1931, ext 2206.
, While students and staff members are
on summer break, Citrus County School
Board members must work to prepare
for the 2009-10 school year
Here's some information about the is-
sues board members are scheduled to
vote on at today's monthly meeting:
* Crystal River Primary renovation
project An architect hired by the school
board will present design documents for


perintendent of Schools Sandra."Sam"
Himmel is recommending board mem-
bers approve Hernando Elementary
Principal Belinda Woythaler as the.dis-
trict's coordinator of certification and
professional standards for the 2009-10
school year.
* Appointment of principal: Himmel
is recommending board members ap-
prove Pleasant Grove Elementary Assis-
tant Principal Laura Manos as the
Hernando Elementary principal for the
2009-10 school year.
* Appointment of assistant princi-
pals: Himmel is recommending board
members approve Citrus High School


Brendan Bonomo as Forest
Ridge's assistant principal for
the 2009-10 school year to re-
place Julie Kelsay, who will be
the district's coord i nator of ex-
ceptional student education for
the 2009-10 school year.
. Increase in school break-
fat/lunch prices: Roy Pistone II, the
school district's food services director, is
asking board members to approve price
increases for paid and reduced-price
breakfast and lunch in order to generate
revenue for the school district's food' "
and nutrition services department The
proposed price increases are 10 cents


for elementary and secondary paid
breakfast, 15 cents for elementary and
secondary paid lunch, 20 cents for ele-
mentary and secondary reduced-price
breakfast and 15 cents for elementary
and secondary reduced-price lunch.
-Ken Iynn McHale, Chronicle


Com ics ..........................C8
Crossword ......................C7
Editorial ................ A8
Horoscope ...................... C7
Lottery Numbers ........B4
Movies ................ ... C8
Obituaries ...... ........... A5
Stocks ......... ...........A6
TV Listings.................C7


Colum- J
nist Brian
Bisson --.
writes about a re-
stored 1957 Chevy Bel Air
Sport Coupe - one of the fa.
mous "TriFives."/Page D2


Diabetic doctor
Crystal River internist deals with Type 1 diabetes./Page Cl

INO SCM Group warns of calls./Page A3

Health NOteS move to temporary home./Page A9

CrosSfre Congress fights over funding troops./Page A10A








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


J~&IUS ,JUNADEU Y, Z



Former. N.H. Senator joins state race.


Smith joins crowded field that

includes Gov. Charlie Crist


Associated Press

SARASOTA - Former
New Hampshire Republi-
can Sen. Bob Smith for-
mally announced his run
for Florida's open U.S.
Senate seat Monday, two


months after filing the
legal documents.
Smith, who has lived in
Sarasota for seven years
after serving two terms as
U.S. Senator from New
Hampshire, was sitting on
the sidelines and ready to


retire, but became frus-
trated "as a true conserva-
tive with the direction the
country was going," said a
spokesman, Carl Grooms.
Smith filed the papers
with the Federal Election
Commission and the state
on April 13, but never made
a proper announcement to
the press, according to
Grooms. "He wanted to
make sure the media was


well aware that he
was in the race and
he was serious,"
Groom added, re-
ferring to Monday's
announcement.
Republicans
seeking the seat are
Gov. Charlie Crist Bob5
and former House
Speaker Marco Rubio. U.S.
Rep. Kendrick Meek is the
top Democratic candidate


s


|. for the seat Repub-
7 lican Mel Martinez
is leaving after one
term.
Smith was
elected to the New
Hampshire House
..l" in 1984 after two
*mith unsuccessful cam-
paigns and then
was elected to the Senate
in 1990.
In a span of a few


months, Smith also ran for
president, dropped out of
the Republican party, be-
came an independent,
ended his presidential
campaign and returned to
the GOP
Before entering the polit-
ical scene, the Navy vet-
eran was a teacher and a
baseball coach, a school
board chairman and owner
of a real estate agency


Van lands in ditch


.-. _ .-. i. . , . 2.. ..-..,* . � ...: ,
, . , -; :"-?'
-. . .-,' .:


h -~ -' - ,.,-. A, -


ROCHELLE KAISER/For the Chronicle
A woman traveling northbound Monday on U.S. 19 crossed the center line into the southbound lane then Into a ditchnext
to Bell Villa Motel In Homosassa. Nearby residents heard what they thought was an explosion and called 911. The uniden-
tified driver was unconscious when EMT arrived and was airlifted to Tampa General Hospital. Deputy Todd Cridland turned
the investigation over to Florida Highway Patrol.


STALLS
Continued from Page Al
Despite the aggressive ob-
jections of a trio of Indiana
state pension and construc-
tion funds that own a small
part of Chrysler's. secured
debt, the automaker has
moved swiftly through the
Chapter 11 process.
The Auburn Hills, Mich.,
company received bankruptcy
court approval for the sale just
a month after filing for bank-
ruptcy protection and had
been expected to emerge from
court oversight when the sale
closed.
Chrysler's ability to speed
through the process has par-
,tially been a result of the in-
volvement of the Obama
administration's auto. task
force, which provided $4.5 bil-
lion in bankruptcy financing
and helped negotiate a deal
between the company's stake-
holders.
Under a deal brokered inr
the days leading up to
Chrysler's April 30 Chapter 11
filing, Fiat will receive up to a
35 percent stake in the new
company created by the sale,
in exchange for sharing the
technology Chrysler needs to
create smaller, more fuel-effi-
cient vehicles.
The United Auto Workers
union will get a 55 percent
stake that will be used to fund
its retiree health care obliga-
tions, while the U.S. and Cana-
dian governments will receive
a combined 10 percent stake.
, Meanwhile, the au-
tomaker's secured debthold-
ers would get $2 billion in
cash, or about 29 cents on the
dollar, for their combined $6.9
billion in debt. Some of 'the
debtholders balked at the
deal, saying as secured
lenders they deserved more.
Group of investment firms
that held about 4 percent of
Chrysler's secured debt filed
an objection to the sale shortly
after the automaker's Chapter
11 filing, but the group later
dissolved, saying it didn't have
enough members to mount an
effective challenge.
Later on, the Indiana funds,
represented by the same law
firm as the dissident
debtholders, filed their own
objection and eventually ap-
pealed to the 2nd U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals and the
Supreme Court They claim
the sale unfairly favors
Chrysler's unsecured stake-
holders such as the union
ahead of secured debtholders
like themselves.
The funds also are chal-
lenging the constitutionality
ofthe Treasury Department's
use of money from the Trou-
bled Asset Relief Program to
supply Chrysler's bankruptcy
protection financing. They say
the government did so with-.
out congressional authority.


Source: Changes coming

in Chrysler management


Associated Press

DETROIT - If the sale
of Chrysler LLC's assets to
Fiat Group SpA is cleared
by the Supreme Court, the
Italian automaker will
shake up Chrysler manage-
ment. and change the com-
p any's culture, according
oa senior Obama admin-
istration official.
The management
changes will go deeper
than the previously an-
nounced departure of CEO
Bob Nardelli and Vice
Chairman Tom LaSorda, as
Fiat CEO Sergio Mar-
chionne takes control of
the company's day-to-day
operations, said the offi-
cial, who requested
anonymity because the
changes have not been
made public.
"It's going to go beyond
just a couple of people,"
the official said. "I think
you're going to see a differ-
ent way of operating and
organizing the company.
That'll be partly names and
faces, it'll be partly how the
organization functions."
The official would not
say specifically what
changes would be made.
but said Fiat's management
team is one of two in the

The funds hold about $42.5
million, or less than 1 percent,
of Chrysler's $6.9 billion in se-
cured debt They bought it in
July 2008 for 43 cents on the
dollar.
Consumer groups and indi-
viduals with product-related
lawsuits also are contesting a\
condition of the Chrysler sale
that would release the com-


world with expertise in fix-
ing a. troubled automaker.
with the other at the com-
bined Renault-NissaL-
Fiat was "pretty darn
broken" before current
management turned it
around, the official said.
'They made a pretty im-
presswe series of changes
and put the company in a
much stronger position,"
the official said. "What we
got was the expertise that
Fiat brings to the party as to
how one actually turns
around one of these mon-
sters."
Fiat will try to get
Chrysler to respond faster
to market changes, be less
hierarchical with a flatter
organizational chart, and
make the product "the cen-
ter of the universe." the of-
ficial said.
Management changes
will likely come soon after
the sale is cleared, but
changing culture will take
time, probably months, the
person said..
Nardelli is slated to
leave Chrysler once the
sale is final, and LaSorda,
the former CEO when
Chrysler was owned by
Daimler AG, retired after
the automaker went into
bankruptcy protection.

pany from product liability
claims related to vehicles it
sold before the asset sale to
Fiat
Compensation for such
claims would have .to be
sought from the. parts of the
company not being sold to
Fiat. But those assets-have
limited value and it's doubtful
that there will be anything


available to pay out
Chrysler also is working to
reduce its ranks by 789 deal-
ers, or about 25 percent, as
part of its cost-cutting actions.
But the ' move, which still
needs- bankruptcy court ap-
proval, is being challenged by.
a group representing more
than 300 dealers, as well as in-'
dividual dealers.
'A hearing on the motion
that began Thursday with the
testimony of about a dozen
dealers is scheduled to con-
tinue Tuesday with argu-
ments. U.S. Judge Arthur
Gonzalez is expected to rule
after arguments conclude.
The appeals come as Con-
gress scrutinizes the Obama
administration's restructur-
ing of Chrysler and General
Motors Corp. The Senate
Banking Committee said it'
planned to call Ron Bloom, a
senior adviser to the auto task
force, and Edward Mont-
gomery, 'who serves as the
Obama administration's di-
rector of recovery for auto
communities and workers, to
a hearing Wednesday.
Sen. Christopher Dodd, D-
Conn., the committee's chair-
man, planned to review the
use of TARP funds to help the
auto companies and look at
whether taxpayers will re-
ceive a return on their invest-
ment
GM and Chrysler execu-
tives faced questions last
week from Congress over the
elimination of hundreds of
dealerships as part of the
companies' reorganizations.


GM ending its


medium-duty


truck line


Associated Press

DETROIT - After un-
successfully trying to find
a buyer for four years,
General Motors Corp. is
giving up on its medium-
duty truck business, saying
that it will wind down
manufacturing by the end
of July
That means GM will stop
making the GMC Topkick
and Chevrolet Kodiak
commercial trucks at its
Flint, Mich., Assembly
Plant by July 31. The plant
employs 2,100 people but
also makes Chevrolet Sil-
verado and GMC Sierra
pickups.
Company spokesman
Jim Hopson said 398 peo-
ple work on the medium-
duty assembly line, and
GM is, working with the'
United Auto Workers
union to determine what,
happens to them.
"We'll continue to try
our best to keep the em-
ployment levels as high as
possible," he said.
The factory last year
made more than 22,000
medium-duty trucks for
GM and Isuzu Motors Ltd.,
and almost 73,000 pickups.
Hopson said GM will
work with dealers to sell
down the remaining Ko-
diak and Topkick inven-
tory over the next 18
months or so.
The DMAX factory in.
Moraine, Ohio - a joint
venture between GM and
Isuzu; - also will be af-
fected. The plant near
Dayton makes engines for
the Topkick and Kodiak,
as well as for pickups and
heavy-duty trucks. GM
says the staffing of that
plant, which employs 544,
is under review.
"It will be a minimal im-
pact," said plant spokes-
woman Courtney
Strickler, noting that most
of the DMAX engines are
made for heavy-duty vehi-
cles. She said she did not
know how many employ-
ees will be affected.
Medium-duty trucks
normally are built for com-
mercial use such as dump
trucks and tow trucks.
GM's main U.S. competi-
tors in the segment are
Navistar. International
Corp., Isuzu, Freightliner,
Volvo. Truck, Peterbilt,
Kenworth and Mack


T82787


Hips go. Knees go.


The only question is where will you go?


Don't let pain
interfere with your
everyday activities.
* Fracture Care
* Sports Medicine
* Hand Surgery
* Total Hips and Knees
+ Shoulders
* Arthroscopic Surgery


R Crane
Couch, D.O.
-Citrus Bone and Joint Specialists * orthopedic Surgery
Reclaiming Lives
Offices in Lecanto & Ocala
Lecanto 746-0654
Ocala 237-9298
3264 W. Audubon Park Path, Lecanto
4600 SW 46th Ct., Ocala


Staff privileges at Citrus Memorial Health System,
Seven Rivers Medical Center, and West Marion Community Hospital


Hopson said the market
segment has been hit hard
by the economic down-
turn. Sales dropped 30 to
40 percent from 2007 to
2008 and have dropped by
a similar percentage so far
this year.
"We definitely are being
affected by the economic
conditions just like every-
one else," he said.
GM hasn't been compet-
itive in the global medium-
duty business, CEO Fritz
Henderson said at an
event to unveil a new bat-
tery lab at the automaker's
Warren Technical Center.
"We're a one-truck com-
pany in a global truck
world," he said. "We com-
pete with companies that
have a full portfolio of
them on a global basis. In
the end we just couldn't
make it work"
Dealers will be given up
to 18 months to sell their
remainiing products; Hop-
son said.
GM has 470 dealers that
sell medium-duty trucks,
129 of which sell them ex-
clusively, spokeswoman
Susan Garontakos said. All
Swill get letters Monday n6-
tifying them of the deci-
sion, she said. Many of the
dealers sell heavy-duty
trucks or other GM vehi-
cles, she said.
GM in December 2007
signed a tentative deal
with truck and engine
maker Navistar to sell the
medium-duty business,
but the deal fell through.
The company also was in
negotiations with Isuzu
but couldn't reach a'deal.
"We just never could get
to a level of agreement
that was mutually benefi-
cial to both a buyer and
General Motors," Hopson
said.





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Page A3 - TUESDAY, JUNE 9. 2009



TATE&


CLOCALHL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE COUNTY


Inverness


Boat ramp reopens at
North Apopka Avenue
The boat ramp on North
Apopka Avenue in Inverness
has reopened following
weeks of steady rainfall.
The ramp opened this past
weekend after being closed
in mid-May due to low water
levels. While Lake Hender-
son remains at below-aver-
'age water levels, conditions
have improved due to heavy
rainfall.
Levels are sufficient for
smaller vessels to be
launched at the facility. City
staff will continue monitoring
* the situation to see if condi-
tions improve further.
Boaters are still advised to
-use caution.

Crystal River








Fort Island Trail Park
Pavilion area closing
The Fort Island Trail Park
Improvement Project is al-
most complete, bputsome.
work.still needs to be done,
on the improvements to the
pavilion side of the park. The
park is off County Road 44
along the Crystal River about
two-thirds of the way to Fort
Island Gulf Beach Park.
The improvements require
that the pavilion side be
closed briefly for paving. That
side of the park will be closed
all day Tuesday, June 23,
with an anticipated reopening
midday Wednesday, June 24.
The boat ramps and park-
ing lot adjacent the ramps will
remain open throughout the
time that the other side of the
park is closed.
Call Citrus County Parks
and Recreation at 527-7677
during business hours.
-From staff reports
----------------------
'IDOL'
SPECULATION
�.Are you the next
American Idol?
* Auditions for the
2010 season of
"American Idol" will
be July 7 to 9 at the
Amway Arena in Or-
lando.
E If you're planning to
try your luck at a
shot at the title, we
want to know and fol
low your journey.
* Contact Nancy
Kennedy at nkennedy
@chronicleonlne
.com or call her at
564-2927.


Clarification
An article that appeared on
Page Al of Saturday's edi-
tion, "Boys & Girls Clubs sites
open Monday," needs clarifi-
cation. The county's fire pre-
vention inspectors conduct
' .fire inspections and issue
'certificates of occupancy.

Correction

Due to reporter error, a
story on Page A3 of Sunday's
edition, "Seven Rivers gradu-
ates 25," contained incorrect
'information.
Inverness Christian Acad-
emy class Valedictorian Ash-
ley Emrick's name was
misspelled.
The Chronicle regrets the
error.


Two aim for A.G. post


State Sen. Gelber to run for Florida

attorney general against Sen. Aronberg


Associated Press


TALLAHASSEE - State Sen. Dan
Gelber, who recently dropped out of
the race for U.S. senator, said Monday
he's running for Florida attorney
general.
The Miami Beach lawmaker's an-
nouncement will set up a Democratic
primary race next year against an-
other state senator from South
Florida, Dave Aronberg of
Greenacres in Palm Beach County.
Gelber said he tried to talk Aron-
berg into running for another open
Cabinet post, but their discussions


broke off last week
"It is what it is," Gelber said. "We
tried to avoid it Obviously we could-
n't"
Gelber said attorney general is the
best fit for him because of his back-
ground. Now in private law practice,
he's had supervisory duties as a fed-
eral prosecutor focusing on civil
rights, corruption and narcotics
cases. He also served as chief coun-
sel and staff director for the U.S. Sen-
ate's investigations committee,
focusing mainly on terrorism and do-
mestic security.
He was elected to the Senate last


year after eight
years in the House,
the past two as Dem-
ocratic leader.
Gelber said he
planned to compare .
his legal back-
ground and leader-
ship experience Dan Gelber
with that of Aron- D-Miami
berg, a former assis- Beach.
tant attorney
general who also worked for the U.S.
Treasury Department on interna-
tional money laundering. He's now
in private practice.
"I expect it'll be a high-minded
race," Gelber said.
Another potential Democratic can-
didate is former state Sen. Rod Smith
of Gainesville, who ran for governor


in 2006 but lost in the
primary.
Jim Lewis, a Fbrt
:' Lauderdale lawyer
, who once served as
an assistant state-
wide prosecutor, is
' the only Republican
Dave who has filed for the
Aronberg attorney general
D-Greenacres. race. Lt Gov. Jeff
Kottkamp has said
he'll also likely join the race.
The seat became open when the
Republican incumbent, Bill McCol-
lum, announced he would run for
governor That was after Gov. Charlie
Crist declined to seek re-election so
he could run for the U.S. Senate seat
being vacated by Republican Sen.
Mel Martinez.


Groups join forces to beautify Citrus County


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Members of the Kings Bay Rotary Club, Keep Citrus County Beautiful and Crystal River Public Maintenance Department planted new crepe myr-
tles Friday at Hunter's Spring Park as a part of the revitalization of the popular spring-fed swimming park in Crystal River.


Seniors vs. Crime warns


of sweepstakes scam


Special to the Chronicle


"Your name has been selected as the
winner of the Winner's International
Sweepstakes. We are a marketing com-
pany hired by Winner's International of
Las Vegas, Nevada, to process your win-
nings." This is what your
caller or e-mailer wants
you to believe. They then
go on to tell you to send
$2,000 through Western
Union to an offshore bank , . -
so they can release your win-J
nings; which, by the way, total
more than $1.5 million.
Sound too good to be true?
You are right - it is. The
caller, however, is very per-
sistent, calling one gentleman six times de-
manding he send them $2,052.
To keep from becoming a victim of this
scam and others, take these simple steps:
i Hang up if you do not know who's on
the other end.
Delete all emails from people you do
not know.
( If the caller persists in calling give
them another number to call; our


Fraud Line. You can say something like
this; "I'm sorry it seems we have a bad con-
nection can you call me back on my other
line? My number is 249-9139 Then hang
up.
If you receive an e-mail, letter or
phone call from someone claiming
y_ you have won something or
asking for money and you
are not sure what to do
call our Fraud Line and
1 we will be happy to take
a look at what you have
and help you determine if it is a
scam.
"Remember if it sounds too
good to be true, it probably
is" says Sheriff Dawsy "and
remember to share with your
family, friends and neighbors information
you learn about scams currently in our
area."
If you have a problem or need assis-
tance, call 249-9139, or visit 4093 N.
Lecanto Highway Beverly Hills, next to
Sal's Italian Restaurant.
Hours are 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday. No appoint-
ment needed.


Carvers exhibit open


at Heritage Museum


Special to the Chronicle
The Old Courthouse Her-
itage Museum has opened its
latest exhibition in the John
Murray Davis Rotating
Gallery, titled Historic Citrus
County Structures in 3-D.
Wood carvings come in all
different shapes, sizes, from
different types of woods and
are made with many differ-
ent types of tools. Wood carv-
ing is as old as Biblical times.
There are many wonderful
historic sites still standing in
Citrus County. Many are not
Come see how the Nature
Coast Carvers Club members
have captured the essence of
these historic buildings in
the form of woodcarvings
and wood burnings. This art-
work will be on display along
with historic photographs
inset into interpretative pan-
els of each building repre-
sented in the artwork
Meet the carvers from the


* WHAT: Historic Citrus
County Structures in 3-
D woodcarving exhibit.
* WHERE: Old
Courthouse Heritage
Museum, Inverness.
* HOURS: 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Monday to Friday.
* CALL: 341-6436.
* MEET: 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday.

Nature Coast Carvers Club,
many of who donated their
time and talents to bring the
Historic Citrus County Struc-
tures in 3-D exhibit to the
museum, from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday. Learn more
about their craft during open
demonstrations at the His-
toric Courthouse.
Regular museum hours
are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday
to Friday; the library/
archives hours are 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. Monday to Friday.
For information, call 341-
6436.


State BRIEFS


Florida planning
amendment nears ballot
TALLAHASSEE - A petition drive
that would give voters a say in the de-
velopment of their communities may
soon start losing signatures.
To prevent that, sponsors of the
Florida Hometown Democracy amend-
ment Monday asked the state Supreme
Court to expedite a decision on a new
law that lets signers take back their sig-
natures.
Unofficially, the initiative has enough
signatures to get on the 2010 ballot if
the justices agree with an appellate
court and strike down the law.
But that decision must come before
June 22. That's when some of the sig-


natures start becoming invalid because
they were collected more than four
years ago - their maximum "shelf life."
The amendment would require voter
approval of changes to local compre-
hensive plan.
Signing scheduled for
horse helmet law
LOXAHATCHEE - Florida's gover-
nor is scheduled to sign a bill requiring
children younger than 16 to wear a hel-
met while riding a horse on public roads.
The bill signing is scheduled Monday
for a park in Loxahatchee. It's named for
Nicole Homstein, a 12-year-old Palm
Beach County girl who died in 2006
after being thrown from a horse she was
riding. She was not wearing a helmet.


Homstein's family has tried since
2007 to get similar legislation passed.
Under the bill (H.B. 169), any person
who allowed a child to ride a horse with-
out a helmet would be fined $500.
Broward sheriff: Budget
cuts could close jail
FORT LAUDERDALE - Broward
County Sheriff Al Lamberti says budget
cuts could close a jail.
Closing the 1950s-era, low-security
stockade would save the county $9.4
million. Its 430 inmates would be trans-
ferred to the county's four other jail facili-
ties.
County commissioners say the jail
could be mothballed but available to re-
open if needed.


The commissioners won't decide
whether to dose the jail until Septem-
ber.
The county faces a $109 million
deficit.
Lawn worker pronounced
dead of lightning strike
CORAL SPRINGS - Officials say
lightning struck and killed a lawn-care
worker in South Florida.
Coral Springs Fire Rescue
spokesman Lt. Mike Moser said an
emergency call was received just before
2 p.m. Monday afternoon.
The man was pronounced dead at
the scene. His name was not immedi-
ately available.
-From wire reports








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ad# u,~3AY,,JUJNE 9, LUU5


State BRIEFS


$170,000 dog park opens
in St. Petersburg
ST. PETERSBURG - St. Petersburg of-
ficials have opened a new dog park, the
city's largest, at a cost of $169,220.
Kenwood Dog Park, which opened Sat-
urday, will likely be the last new park in the
area for some time.
A 1999 referendum established a $14.4
million fund dedicated for parks and recre-
ation, but City Council members invested
the principal in the stock market. In April
the fund was worth just $12.3 million.
The new 3-acre park was originally pro-
posed by council Chairman Jeff Danner
who wanted to spend nearly $250,000 to
create the park on a stretch of land under
Interstate 275. The price was much more
than the approximately $20,000 it had
cost to add a dog area to existing parks,
but Danner said that's because it was a


HISTORY
Continued from Page Al

families who would be willing
to participate in the project
Veterans of all wars are in-
vited to participate, including
veterans from the current Iraq
and Afghanistan conflicts and
women veterans.
Veterans and families can
share their stories and memo-
ries through personal narra-
tives that will be recorded. In
addition, photographs, di-
aries, letters, drawings, post-
cards and other personal
memorabilia can be collected
for the project
After being carefully assem-
bled,-Geitfrysaidthey would
send everything off to Wash-
ington, D.C., where it will be-
come a part of the Library of
Congress.
"It'llbe available to the pub-
lic and it won't be lost forever,"
Hughes said.
Gentry said she became in-
terested in doing such a proj-
ect because her brother put


together a display for their fa-
ther, who is a World War I vet-
eran. Subsequently, the local
D.AR. chapter received a
brochure from the national
DAR. asking the chapters to
support the Veterans History
Project
With Flag Day approaching,
Gentry said local chapter
members thought it would be
-a great idea-to collect infor-
mation about veterans during
the Fort Cooper Flag Day pro-
gram since a large number of
veterans are usually in atten-
dance. Hughes said he had
learned about the program
after his wife returned with
brochures about it from her
trip to Washington, D.C.
He said he canvassed the


brand new space.
Police recover baby
and stolen car
ST. PETERSBURG - Police have re-
covered a stolen car and a baby who was
in the back seat when the car was stolen
from in front of the child's house in west
Florida.
Authorities said the baby was left on the
doorstep of a house whose residents
called police and the 11-month-old baby
boy was returned to his parents Monday.
Police say the car was abandoned about
two miles away from the house.
Authorities say two suspects have been
detained for questioning. Their names
have not been released.
The baby's mother, Kara Lane, said she
had put her son in the back seat of the car,
which was parked outside their front door,
and went back inside to get his diaper bag


and her two daughters, ages 3 and 4. That
is when someone got in the driver's seat
and drove off.
Man threatens mom with
sword, faces charge
PORT ST. LUCIE -A Florida man was
arrested after authorities say he threatened
his mother with a 3-foot sword.
Matthew A. Beider, 23, was arrested by
the Port St. Lucie Police Department. An
arrest affidavit says Beider took the sword
out of its sheath and threatened his mother
with it. She called 911, but the phone went
dead before she could provide dispatchers
with information, allegedly because Beider
disconnected power to the home.
Officers who arrived found Beider hiding
in a nearby vacant lot. He was arrested but
posted $12,500 bond and was released
from the St. Lucie County Jail on Sunday.
- From wire reports


rate with the Citrus County
Historical Society so they can
use the historical society's
video equipment to record the
veterans' oral histories. Addi-
tionally, Hughes said if the vet-
erans believe their homes are
not suitable to be recorded in,
he hopes they will be able to
conduct some of the inter-
views in quiet rooms at the
local libraries.
Hughes said he hopes the
project will take off and the
response to the initiative will
be positive. Though all veter-
ans can contribute, Gentry
said it's very imperative to
capture the stories and mem-
ories of World War II veterans
before they're no longer able
to remember or no longer liv-
ing.
"We're losing some of our
older vets," Hughes said.
"This should have been done
a long time ago."
For more information about
the Library of Congress' Vet-
erans History Project, visit
www.loc.gov/vets and for more
information on how to partic-
. ipate, call Gentry at 637-2771.


county to see if anyone else
was doing it and found noth-
ing. Then the D.AR ap-
proached him about Flag Day,
and he said it felt like fate
brought them together
"It was like d6jA vu,"
Hughes said.
Approximately nine ladies
will be at the Flag Day cere-
mony seeking out anyone in-
terestedin-participating in the
program. Later, Gentry said
they would set up a place, day
and time to interview veter-
ans. A series of questions will
be asked about subjects such
as when the veterans joined
the military and in which
branch of they served.
Hughes .hopes the local
DAR. will be able to collabo-


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI Arrest
* Michael David Powers,
24, of 5015 Whispering Pines
Lane, Mascotte, Fla., at 5:13
p.m. Saturday on a charge of
boating under the influence.
Reports said Powers was
speeding through a no-wake
zone in the Homosassa River.
His blood alcohol level was .133
percent; the legal limit in Florida
is .08 percent. Bond $500.
Domestic battery
arrests
* Antwan Marcus Brown,
24, of 312 Pleasant Grove
Road Apt. 3, Inverness, at
12:18 a.m. Monday on a charge
of aggravated battery on a
pregnant woman. Reports said
Brown hit a woman, who is four
months pregnant, during an ar-
gument. No bond.
* Robert J. Stewart, 19,
Beverly Hills, at 5:45 p.m. Sun-
day on charges of domestic
false imprisonment and resist-
ing an officer without violence.
Reports said Stewart would not
allow a woman to leave his res-
idence. He struggled with
deputies as they handcuffed
him and then banged his head
on the passenger window of the
patrol car. No bond.
* Fredrick James Brown,
49, Homosassa, at 6:44 p.m.
Saturday on charges of felony
domestic battery, possession of
drug paraphernalia and pos-
session of less than 20 grams


of marijuana. Reports said
Brown poked a woman in the
eye several times during an ar-
gument. No bond.
Other arrests
* James John Crockett,
28, Lecanto, at 1:17 p.m. Satur-
day on charges of dealing in
stolen property and unlawful
sexual conduct with a person
16 or 17 years of age. Reports
said Crockett is accused of
stealing an ATV and having
consensual sex with a 17-year-
old girl. Bond $10,000.
* Anthony B. Cremona, 28,
of 6845 W. Country Club Drive,
Homosassa, at 9:27 p.m. Sat-
urday on a charge of being a
fugitive from justice. Cremona
was arrested on a warrant from
Maine. No bond.
* Uriah John Griffin, 24, of
3829 S. Cedar Terrace, Ho-
mosassa, at 4:33 a.m. Sunday
on charges of possession of a
controlled substance, resisting
arrest without violence, and vi-
olation of probation on a previ-
ous fleeing and eluding charge.
No bond.
* Helen Holmes, 44, of
6649 Channel Drive, Hemando,
at 12:59 a.m. Monday on a
Monroe County warrant charge
of grand theft. Bond $1,500.
* Phyllis May Sullivan
Williams, 51, of 1672 S. Ca-
nary Terrace, Inverness, at 9:38
a.m. Monday on a Marion
County warrant charge of driv-
ing with a suspended/revoked
license. Bond $1,000.


ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests made by the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriffcitrus.
org and click on the Public Informatron link, then on
Arrest Reports.
* Watch the "Arrested Developments" show from the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office at www.chronicle
online.tv.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northwest winds from 5 to 15 knots.
Seas 1to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters
a light chop. Slight chance of after-
noon thunderstorms today.


91 70 0.00 87 68 0.10

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusivedaily

, TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 91 Low: 69
Mostly sunny and hot with a few
late showers
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
High: 92 Low: 70
Mostly sunny and hot with a few late showers

THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
. High: 92 Low: 72
Mostly sunny and hot with a few late showers

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Monday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11


89/68
97/62
90/69
79
+0

0.01 in.
2.65 in.
21.37 in.
18.42 in.


DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m. 72
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m. 72%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees, grasses and weeds were all
light.
*Light - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.


-0-2-minimal, 3-4.Iow,-56.moderate, AirR-UALI1
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Monday was go
Monday at 3 p.m. 29.99 in. mainly ozone.
SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MII
(MORNING)
6/9 TUESDAY 7:19 1:07 7
6/10 WEDNESDAY 8:12 2:00 8


TY ..
aod with poll



NOR Mi
(AFTERNOI
:44
:36


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
O O SUNSET TONIGHT........
SUNRISE TOMORROW
. MOONRISE TODAY.......
JUNE 28 JUifL7 MOONSET TODAY.........


utants



MAJOR
ON)
1:32
2:24


...8:28 P.M.
...6:31 A.M.
.10:19 PM.
...7:52 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS


Today's Fire Danger Rating Is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof,com/flreweather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week, For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
-orF through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending In 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending In 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays,
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay
Tuesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka' 8:12 a/3:24 a 6:50 p/2:59 p
Crystal River* 6:33 a/12:46 a 5:11 p/12:21 p
Withlacoachee" 4:20 a/10:09 a 2:58 p/11:07 p
Homosassa"* 7:22 a/2:23 a 6:00 p/1:58 p


***At Mason's Creek
Wednesday
High/Low High/Low
8:45 a/3:57 a 7:27 p/3:36 p
7:06 a/1:19 a 5:48 p/12:58 p
4:53 a/10:46 a 3:35 p/11:39 p
7:55 a/2:56 a 6:37 p/2:35 p


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts


Gulf water
temperature


81�
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.96 28.94 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.74 3..76 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 35.22 35.21 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.53 37.53 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


AST FOR 3:00 P.M.
TUESDAY


City
Albany
Albuqi
Ashevi
Atlanta
Atlanti
Austin
Baltim
Billing
Birmln
Boise
Boston
Buffali
Burling
Charle
Charle
Charlo
Chicag
Cincin
Clevela
Colum
Colum
Conco
Dallas
Denve
Des M
Detroit
El Pas
Evansv
Harris
Hartfo
Houste
Indian
Jackso
Las Ve
Little I
Los An
Louisv
Memp
MilwaL
Minne
Mobile
Montg
Nashv


- - Monday Tuesday
H L Pcp. FcstH L
Y 74 54 sh 66 53
uerque 81 56 pc 80 58
ille 82 58 1.18 ts 85 58
S 84 67 pc 90 69
cCity 81 61 ts 76 63
94 69 pc 95 75
ore 84 64 ts 82 66
s 56 38 .01 sh 64 44
sgham 87 65 pc 91 69
74 52 .01 pc 79 52
n 67 61 sh 58 51
0 66 51 .12 ts 76. 54
gton, VT 67 45 sh 61 51
ston, SC 84 69 .86 ts 86 72
ston, WV 85 59 .08 ts 85 64
tte 86 63 ts 91 66
go 80 52 .45 pc 71 55
nati 84 62 pc 83 62
and 80 62 .03 pc 75 53
nbiaSC 89 68 ts 93 68
ibus, OH 86 64 .08 pc 82 59
rd, N.H. 74 54 sh 55 50
94 73 pc 95 74
r 69 41 pc 73 50
Aoines 72 63 .20 pc 72 58
t 74 57 .22 pc 74 54
o 93 69 pc 93 69
ville, IN 84 66 pc 86 65
burg 86 63 ts 85 63
rd 77 62 sh 68 57
on 93 69 pc 92 74
apolis 82 67 pc 80 59
on 88 66 .02 pc 92 72
egas 89 68 pc 77 61
Rock 88 70 pc 91 70
ngeles 69 61 pc 68 59
rille 84 67 pc 88 66
bhis 87 70 ts 91 74
ukee 72 48 1.22 pc 65 49
apolis 57 50 .42 pc 67 54
S 88 62 pc 92 72
gomery 93 68 pc 93 69
ille 87 65 ts 90 68


Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 87 72 pc 91 75
New York City 75 66 ts 76 62
Norfolk 84 64 ts 87 69
Oklahoma City 88 66 pc 92 70
Omaha 67 55 .11 ts 72 57
Palm Springs 89 67 pc 87 63
Philadelphia 84 66 ts 84 66
Phoenix 93 74 pc 89 71
Pittsburgh 81 61 .13 ts 82 57
Portland, ME 73 55 sh 57 48
Portland, Ore 72 57 .01 pc 74 55
Providence, R.I. 77 61 sh 65 55
Raleigh 91 66 ts 91 69
Rapid City 57 35 ts 60 43
Reno 79 47 pc 77 53
Rochester, NY 65 50 .01 ts 78 54
Sacramento 80 54 s 77 52
St. Louis 86 67 .21 pc 83 65
St. Ste. Marie 55 42 .35 pc 60 42
Salt Lake City 73 52 ts 69 56
San Antonio 94 73 pc 95 76
San Diego 70 63 pc 67 60
San Francisco 65 56 pc 59 51
Savannah 82 70 .13 ts 90 71
Seattle 73 53 pc 75 53
Spokane 61 46 .09 pc 73 51
Syracuse 75 54 .01 ts 75 54
Topeka 78 61 .07 ts 77 61
Washington 85 66 ts 84 68
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 101 Wink, Texas LOW 27 Leadville, Colo.

WORLD CITIES


TUESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 91/79/pc
Amsterdam 64/46/sh
Athens 93/71/s
Beijing 86/64/pc
Berlin 73/52/sh
Bermuda 79/69/ts
Cairo 99/73/s
Calgary 64/41/sh
Havana 88/76/ts
Hong Kong 87/78/ts
Jerusalem 90/70/s


Lisbon 68/55/c
London 58/47/sh
Madrid 72/47/s
Mexico City 87/56/pc
Montreal 64/51/sh
Moscow 69/51/sh
Paris 68/51/sh
Rio 75/64/pc
Rome 80/60/pc
Sydney 63/49/sh
Tokyo 78/63/c
Toronto 70/50/pc
Warsaw 77/59/sh


^ K G 1_0 i- &


(C U N T Y -


(HR ONICLLE
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Main switchboard phone numbers:
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residents, call toll-free at 1-888-852-2340.
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Ave ,
A \I \ Meadowcrest
N Blvd.*

S n St Courthouse
STo mpkins St. . square

5. I -N
^a>N"O N


Who's in charge:
Gerry Mulligan .................... ............ ......................... Publisher, 563-3222
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Neale Brennan .... Promotions/Community Affairs Manager, 563-6363
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* WHAT: Fort Cooper State Park's Flag Day program.
* WHERE: Fort Cooper State Park, 3100 S. Old Floral
City Road, Inverness.
* WHEN: From 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday
* INFO: Call 726-0315 or 586-2504.


ci15AE 2


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
@2009 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


I


. ... .............
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... . . . . . . . . . . . ..........................


Aid TT.....VAV .,,.( ) n 2nnc)







TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 2009 AS


CnIRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Sharon
Baldwin, 67
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sharon K. Baldwin, age
67, of Crystal River, FL, died
Sunday, June 7, 2009, at the
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center in Crystal
River.
Graveside funeral serv-
ices will be Wednesday,
June 10, 2009, at 2 p.m. from
the Crystal River Memorial
Cemetery. Strickland Fu-
neral Home, Crystal River,
FL.

Tina Joyce, 46
BEVERLY HILLS
Tina Marie Joyce, age 46,
of Beverly Hills, FL, died
Sunday, June 7, 2009, at the
Hospice House of Citrus
County in Lecanto, FL.
Private cremation ar-
rangements are under the
care of the Strickland Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory, Crystal River, FL.

Melody
Potter, 55
ATOKA, TENN.
Melody Elaine Potter, 55,
of Atoka, Tenn., died Friday,
June 5, 2009, at the home of
her mother in Crystal River,
Fla., under the care of Hos-
pice of Citrus County.
Private cremation ar-
rangements are under the
care of the Strickland Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory, Crystal River, FL.

OBITUARIES
* The Citrus County Chron.
icle's policy permits
both free and paid obit
uaries.
* Obituaries must be
submitted by the fu-
neral home or society
in charge of arrange.
ments.
* Free obituaries can in-
clude: Full name of de-
ceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
* A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
* Additionally, all obituar-
ies will be posted online
at www.chronicleonine
.com.
* Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes or soci-
eties.
* Paid obituaries may in.
clude the information
permitted in the free
obituaries, as well as
date of birth; parents'
names; pre deceased
and surviving family
members; year married
and spouse's name
(date of death, if pre-
deceased by spouse);
religious affiliation; bi-
ographical information,
including education,
employment, military
service, organizations
and hobbies; officiating
clergy; interment/in-
urnment; and memorial
contributions.
* Area funeral homes
with established ac
counts with the Chroni-
cle are charged $8.75
per column inch. Non
local funeral homes
and those without ac-
counts are required to
pay in advance by
credit card, and the
cost is $10 per column
inch.
* Small photos of the de-
ceased's face or larger
photos can be included
for an additional
charge. Logos indicat-
ing membership in cer.
tain organizations, if
provided, may also be
included for a separate
charge.


* Additional days of pub-
lication or reprints due
to errors in submitted
material are charged at
the same rates.
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
* E-mail obituaries or
queries to obits@
chronicleonline.com
* Fax to 563.3280.
* Phone 563-5660 for
details.


Sell San Quentin prison?


Inmates don't

want to leave

Associated Press

SAN QUENTIN, Calif. - It's
some of the most prized waterfront
land in the country, a large piece of
rich and beautiful property sitting
right on San Francisco Bay, and the
owner has proposed selling it to
raise needed cash.
But many of the current resi-
dents don't want to leave, and up-
rooting them would be costly
The property in question is San
Quentin State Prison, a maximum-
security penitentiary where some
of the state's toughest inmates have
access to a variety of programs
such as tennis and drama, thanks to
the many prison volunteers who
live in the Bay Area.
"Some places you go for punish-
ment," said inmate John Taylor, a
catcher for the prison baseball
team, the San Quentin Giants.
"Here, it's more rehabilitation. I
just don't know why the governor
would want to shut us down."
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has
proposed selling the 432-acre
prison and several other state-
owned properties and using the
proceeds to help ease the state's
$24.3 billion budget deficit.
It is widely assumed that any
buyer would be interested prima-
rily in the land. Developers might
tear down all or some of the prison
to make way for condos or other
projects.
Taylor, who is 35 and serving up
to life for murder, had done nearly
10 years in three other state pris-
ons before he asked for a transfer
to San Quentin two years ago.
The prison is a collection of
buildings constructed during the
Gold Rush, including some with
fanciful, fortress-like touches such
as the crenellations normally seen
on medieval castles. There are also
more modem, square buildings.
Taylor's duties include fighting
weeds in the courtyard.
"This is the first place visitors
see when they come in," he said.
"We want it to look good."
Prison volunteers come from
around the Bay Area and include
professional artists, graduate stu-
dents and professorsat nearby uni-
versities, including the University


Associated Press
Worker housing Is shown May 20 In the foreground at San Quentin prison in San Quentin, Calif. San Quentin, with
5,300 Inmates, is blessed by its proximity to San Francisco and the wealth of civic-minded residents who offer
the prison their services for free. But it is also one hot piece of property. The fortress-like complex, built in 1852,
occupies some of the most prized waterfront land in the country, in rich and beautiful Marin County. Every few
years, someone proposes shutting down the prison and selling off the land at market rate. Most recently, It was
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, staring down a $15.4 billion budget gap for the fiscal year beginning July 1 that
has ballooned to $24 billion after the resounding defeat of five ballot measures in a May 19 special election.


of California at Berkeley and San
Francisco State University. Others
are retirees. Most are experienced
teachers in their field.
San Quentin currently has 5,300
inmates and holds California's
death row, a unit that has ex-
panded beyond 600 occupants
since a federal judge deemed the
cramped gas chamber unaccept-
able and halted all executions.
The state recently spent more
than $164 million on new medical
facilities at the prison and has bud-
geted $356 million for a new com-
plex to house condemned inmates.
The land San Quentin occupies
- only a 10-minute drive from the
Golden Gate bridge - could fetch
an estimated $2 billion even in a
down economy. The state could net
$1 billion after construction of a
new prison elsewhere.
The California Department of
Corrections and Rehabilitation has
started an analysis of what it would
take to sell the property, said
spokesman Seth Unger.
Previous legislative efforts to


close the prison and sell its land
have all stalled, largely because
doing so would lead to more prison
overcrowding while a new facility
was being built. The politically
powerful prison guard union has
also lobbied against the idea.
Jared Huffman, a state Assembly
Democrat from San Rafael, the city
closest to the prison, has proposed
converting the 40- to 50-acre parcel
reserved for the new death row
into a "transit village" with a deep
water ferry terminal.
"This is a simple plan for San
Quentin that's very doable for that
part of the property," Huffman said.
But inside the walls of San
Quentin, talk of a sale is seen as a
threat to the prison programming
that depends on volunteers.
The programs include a Shake-
spearean drama program, football,
baseball, basketball, soccer and
tennis teams, and the Prison Uni-
versity Project, which offers in-
mates classroom instruction that
leads to associate's degrees.
Should San Quentin close, the


university project would certainly
shut down.
"We would probably try to recon-
stitute it at another prison, but it
would take a long time," said Jody
Lewen, the program's founder and
executive director.
San Quentin is no summer camp.
Inmates live two to a 4-by-9-foot
cell.
The intake center, with 2,700 in-
mates, has spilled over into a gym,
where 300 inmates await their as-
signments to other prisons. And
there are prison gangs, too.
Still, during one recent visit, the
tennis team was practicing. And in-
mates with clear natural talent
worked in a studio on art projects
commissioned by the prison.
"The prison is unique," said
Vinny Nguyen, 31, who is serving 25
years to life for murder.
"We're surrounded by a lot of
universities, and we get a lot of
help and contact from the outside.
It makes us want to be positive.
That would all be destroyed along
with San Quentin."


For Colbert in Iraq, tonight's Word is 'haircut'


Associated Press

CAMP VICTORY, Iraq -
Wearing a camouflage suit
and tie, Stephen Colbert took
his show to Baghdad to en-
tertain U.S. soldiers in Iraq.
For openers, President
Barack Obama appeared by
video to thank the troops.
"You're welcome," the
mock pundit answered.
"I wasn't talking to you,"
the president deadpanned.
To the roaring approval of
hundreds of troops at Camp
Victory, on the western edge
of Baghdad, Colbert taped
the first of four episodes of
"The Colbert Report," in
which he plays a pompous,
blustering conservative TV
host
His first guest was the tow-
ering, bald Gen. Ray
Odierno. When Obama and
the U.S. commander sug-
gested Colbert had to look
like a soldier in order to be a
soldier, the general took an
electric razor to Colbert's
perfectly parted cable-news
coif.
The four shows are being
taped in the domed marble
hall at Saddam Hussein's
former Al Faw Palace are to
air this week starting Mon-
day on Comedy Central.
Colbert has promoted the
trip for weeks, but only
vaguely because the military
urged caution. Instead, the
pundit introduced segments
with a jaunty theme: "Where
in the World and When in
Time is Stephen Colbert
Going to Be in the Persian
Gulf?"
At Camp Victory, Colbert
was in typical, cluelessly ego-
tistical form. He showed a
clip pretending that he him-
self didn't know his destina-
tion until he got off the
plane and somebody threw
a shoe at him.
In another skit, he ar-
rived at Fort Jackson, S.C.,
in a stretch limousine for
"the full 10 hours" of basic
training, then struggled to
do push-ups and sit-ups
while a drill sergeant
barked at him.
And, concluding that the
six-year war in Iraq must be
over because nobody's talk-


Associated Press
Comedian Stephen Colbert, from the Comedy Central tele-
vision program, gets a military-style haircut Sunday from
Gen. Raymond Odierno, Commander of the Multinational
Corps, Iraq, during the taping the first of four shows at
Camp Victory in Baghdad, Iraq.


ing about it anymore, Colbert
said he would take it upon
himself to make it official:
"By the power vested in me
by basic cable, I officially de-
clare we have won the Iraq
war!"
(To bolster his point, he of-
fered a list of successes, in-
cluding finding weapons of
mass destruction - "easier
than we thought" - and told
the troops Obama should de-
ploy them to General Mo-
tors.)
Odierno gently took issue
with the self-sure pundit's
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suggestion the war had
ended.
"We're not quite ready to
declare victory," he said.
"Things are moving forward
but again, it's about bringing
long-term stability."
Colbert, who sat at a desk
propped up by sandbags
painted to make up an Amer-
ican flag, responded by ask-
ing Odierno if he can bring
long-term stability to the
United States when he's
done in Iraq.
The 45-year-old come-
dian, who traveled to Iraq

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from Kuwait on Friday on
board a military transport
plane, has said he decided
make the trip when he no-
ticed economic news cover-
age was eclipsing reports
from Baghdad.
"It must be nice here in
Iraq because I understand
some of you keep coming
back again and again," he
joked. "You've earned so
many frequent flier miles,
you've earned a free ticket to
Afghanistan."
He also joked about the
economic crisis, congratulat-
ing one soldier in the audi-
ence who recently got his
college degree while serving
in Iraq for being the only
2009 graduate able to land a
job.
Former Republican presi-
dential candidate Sen. John
McCain, chided by Colbert
throughout the campaign for
his advanced age, made a
surprise appearance, thank-
ing the troops in a video for
their service and reminding
them to clean their muskets,
Many celebrities have vis-
ited Iraq to entertain the
troops. But Colbert's series
- "Operation Iraqi Stephen:
Going Commando" - marks
the first time anyone has
broadcast a taped, non-news
talk show fully produced and
broadcast from Iraq as part
ofa USO tour.
USO senior official John
Hanson said the production
faced a major setback when
a sandstorm grounded the
crew on Saturday, forcing it




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* www.uso.org
* www.colbertnation
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* www.donorschoose.org

to cancel plans for an outing.
Both the character and the
real Colbert are ardent sup-
porters of the troops. He has
raised hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars for the Yel-
low Ribbon Fund, which
helps injured service mem-
bers and their families, and
is a board member of
DonorsChoose.org, which is
raising money for the educa-
tion of children of military
parents.
Colbert planned the trip
after former Assistant De-
fense Secretary Bing West
suggested it last summer fol-
lowing an interview "The
Colbert Report" The show
sent about 30 production
workers, about a third of its
regular staff, to Iraq.
Troops in the audience
said they enjoyed Colbert's
equal opportunity humor.
"Definitely the highlight
was seeing him sacrifice his
hair," said Spc. Ryan
MacLeod, 35, of Greenville,
S.C.


0 Denny Dingier, A.C.A
Audioprosthologial
M. DIv., BC-HIS


211 S. Apopka Ave., Inverness
www.lnvernessHearing.com










*,.d,.v imp0 s200c


ADU L'iiOUAY, JUNE 9, MU5


STOCKS


CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


M 'C TI 1 lOR ME) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are Ite 825 most acdre stocks on the New York StocK Exchange, 765
Name Vol00 Las t Cn Name Voll00) Last Ch kame Volloo Las Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most achve on the Amen-
-W 7r-2747537 " 342 -04 -rrmi sprLrv 183281 305 .32 :wShsuO '66 3,67 -11 can Stock Excnange Tables show name. price and net change
olAr, 2408556 1206 * 20 PSCrudeDLn137706 4.59 +.11 Microsoft 484694 22.05 -.09 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (nrt abbrevia.
$RPD '2027256 94.16 -.39 NthgtMg 33043 2.12 -.08 Inteli 431259 15.92 ... ion) Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of eacr, letter's list
DitFi1Bear1769445 '4.40 -.07 GoldStrg 28740 2.00 -.06 Cisco 416686 19.87 Last: Price st.ck was trading at wnen exchange closed ior Ine day
OixFi'Bull 1542482 10.43 +.14 NovaGld g 24656 5.05 -.11 Orace 342828 20.87 +.16 Chg: Loss or gain for the aay No change indicated by
GAIRS ('4 .E) GAINERS ($2 a moRE) ' AINEFRSO R ($2 O I MORE) Stock Footnoles: ,c lsue hau Dean called lor eaemrpt.on Dy c rrinopary a - Nea 532 i.
AlRSlowRE) GAINERS 2 RMOE) AINERS - os n a 12 mos ac - Corpar, ormaery ri simor. re Am iaicar Eychargae
Name Last Chq %Ch .Nama Last CChq %Cho Name Last Cl h EC rrnrgri C.-nMparny Metlace I. - fepporm y anp Irrra ao n a ur[,plu liE.
SLM.Cp . 793 1 32 *200 Mew lmac 12688 283 .282 PmBrc 980 B 3 10 +4~ 3 ,Ergquaification n. -lkocwais anew asu'altheila.lyear Tr i.e52weakihaihIndrlowhg-.
LDKSolar 10.83 +1.52 +16.3 Ballanty 2.12 +.26 +14.0 Angiotch g 2.37 +.67 +39.4 ures date onty Irom e Dtegmning of trsaing p.- Praferred sOc. wasue pr- Prlerarnc'e pp
MacGly 10.98 +1.39 +14.5 UnivTravn 11.13 +1.18 +11.9 Amertnspf 11.86 +3.20 +37.0 alder o aa insidliments of parCnase price ri- R.gniiODu y seCurnyala paeiApce :-
Lithiaot 9.21 +.92 +11.1 UraniumEn 2.47 +.26 +11.8 AtiCure 3.78 +.99 +35.5 Stock ha plt iy at l3eat 20 percent eiirr. tIne ail yea a.. Trades .1al re seafnifed , r. ir.6
MSEihgy12 17.50 +1.74 +11.0 Hemisphrx 3.05 +.32 +11.7 MFRI 8.04 +1.96 +32.2 stoC.i is ieauao -Wnen altlnnulaed at- Warramn awii.r.g apurchase 01 iloc u.t w
52 week nigh ur. - Urni including more tan on se.ui r.iy .I. O.T.pany .r, bantiJupf.'- .,r l -.
LOSEGS ($2ORflMO E) LOSERS (,2 OR MO) *.OSERS 52 OR MORE) si.arship or beingreorganizd dunaer tira ankruplcyla* Appearsir,.urot l ine, ,,am
Name Last Cnq Cnq Name Lasi Chq %.Chq .Name Last Chqg Cng Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
BrMSqpf 400.00-124.50 -23.7 Geolkinetics 12.92 -1.93 -13.0 CmtyShBk 2.19 -.81 -27.0
FresM pr 32.00 -5.50 -14.7 SilvrcpMgn 3.47 -.41 -10.6 PerfumanIlf 2.78 -.63 -18.5 I
PdrmepfB' '3.00 -.50 -14.3 Velocityrs 2.30 .25 -9.8 AlliancB 2.66 -.59 -18.2
Sealy;rt . 2.25 -.33 -12.8 ProspMed 2.61 r.24 -8.4 Edgewater 2.48 -.42 -14.5 52-Week Net % YTE
MirantwtB' 206 -28 -120 Banrog 2.20 ,;-.20 -8.3 Verisgn 19.90 -3.29 -14.2 High 'Low Name Last Chg Chg Ch
S19 RR08 R6469 O95Dw Jones Industrials 8.764.49 +1.36 +.02


DIAFy I
Advanced 1 121 Advanced
Declined 1,912 Declined
Unchanged 110 Unchanged
Tolaliss s 3,143 Total issues
New"I.ght 1 10 New Highs
New Lows , 1 New Lows
kV5urIE 4,415,929,749 Volume


DIAFR


y
233 Advpnced
326 Declinea
58 � Unchanged
617, Total issues
12; New Highs
3 - New Lows
157,972,966 Volume


DIARY
1.055
1.663
157
2,875
42
5
1,954,763,219


5,492.95 2,134.21Dow Jones Transportation
528.07 288.66Dow Jones Utilities
9,408.76 4,181.75NYSE Composite
2,379.19 1,130.47Amex Index
2,549.94 1,265.52Nasdaq Composite
1,404.05 666.79S&P 500
14,339.97 6,772.29Wilshire 5000 -. -.
764.38 342.59Russell 2000


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AKSteel .20 1.1 ... 17.40 -.23+86.7 Lowes .36 1.8 14 20.11 +.07 -6.6
AT&Tlnc 1.64 6.7 12 24.40 -.16-14.4 McDnIds 2.00 3.4 15 58.72 -1.15 -5.6
AlliedCap ......... 3.19 -.19 +18.6 Microsoft .52 2.4 13 22.05 -.09 +13.4
BkofAm .04 .3 16 12.06 +.20 -14.3 Motorola ......... 6.44 +.20 +45.4
CapCtyBk .76 4.5 33 16.93 -.07 -37.8
Citigrp .04 1.2 ... 3.42 -.04 -49.0 Penney .80 2.8 14 29.01 -.04 +47.3
Disney .35 1.4 13 25.33 +.38 +11.6 ProgrssEn 2.48 7.0 12 35.53 -.15 -10.8
EKodak .. 12 2.83 +.02 -57.0 RegionsFn .04 1.0 ... 4.07 +.07 -48.9
Embarq 2.75 6.4 9 43.28 +.29 +20.4 SearsHIdgs ...... 63 70.15 +.68 +80.5
ExxonMbl 1.68 2.3 10 73.17 +.20 -8.3 Smucker 1.40 3.2 14 43.78 +.32 +1.0
FPLGrp 1.89 3.4 13 55.37 +.29 +10.0 SprintNex ......... 4.96 -.15+171.0
FairPoint ......... 1.21 -.09 -63.1 TimeWrn rs .75 2.9 ... 25.91 +.61 +16.2
FordM 6.38 +.02+178.6
GenElec .40 2.9 9 13.56 +.02 -16.3 UniFirst .15 .4 11 36.07 -.21 +21.5
HomeDp .90 3.7 17 24.56 +.39 +6.7 VerizonCm 1.84 6.3 13 29.28 +.03 -13.6
Intel .56 3.5 20 15.92 ... +8.6 WalMart 1.09 2.1 15 50.81 -.26 -9.4
IBM 2.20 2.0 12107.49 +.25 +27.7 Walgrn .45 1.4 15 31.30 +.47 +26.9


D% 52-wk
ig % Chg
-.14-28.63


3,338.85 -11.13 -.33 -5.61-37.27
342.49 -2.11 -.61 -7.62-33.97
6,068.56 -14.08 -.23 +5.41 -33.67
1,611.25 +1.53 +.10+15.29-31.26
1,842.40 -7.02 -.38 +16.83-25.09
939.14 -.95 -.10 +3.97 -31.03
9,632.96 -22.28 -.23 +6.01 -30.78
524.79 -5.57 -1.05 +5.07 -28.62


S T UST S &F

Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Cnronicle. Attn. Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

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Ihe name of01 the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

lual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

ol ime tund. Siaff will not provide real-time quotes.


NEWYORK~STOKECAG


Name Las- Chg BU&TOp 21.93 +.52 Chicos 9.99 +.01
BHP BiUILt 58.73 -1.56 Chimera 3.36 -.01
BHPBiplc 49.13 -129 ChinaUni 14.46 -.56
BJiSvcs 15.23 -.09 Chubb 41.17 -.03
ABBLtd 16.12 -.39 BMC Sit 34.89 -.34 CindBell 2.86 -.08
AESCorp A 1.24 -.07 BPPLC 51.35 +.99 COrp 3.42 -.04
AFLAP 933 80 +.28 BRT . 3.59 ... Ciigrp pfP 21.22 +1.38
AGLes 30.91 +.34 BakrHu 38.67 -.4 CleanH 56.02 +.12
AKStIeI 17,40 -.23 BalCp 44.20 +.56 ClifsNRs 28.37 -.73
AMBA 20435 +.14 BcoBrades 15.26 -.02 Clorox 53.77 +.83
AMR I 4,68 -.34 BooSantand 10.73 -.07 Coach 26.83 -.09
ASA Ud 65.90 -95 BkofAm 12.06 +.20 CocaCE 17.47 +.04
AT&Tc 2.140 -.16 BkNYMel 28.54 +.32 CocaCID 49.38 -.06
AU n T 0 70 -.09 Barclay 18.35 -28 Coeuris 13.93 -.86
AXA 80.35 4.02 BarickG 36.5 +.51 CohStSliy 11.53
Aarons 33.16 +.28 Baxter 46.52 -.78 ColgPal 70.88 -.02
Ablab' 44.73 -25 BaytexEg 17.00 -.31 CollBMrd 14.40 -.20
AberFt 7.2 +4.41 BkectDck 67.24 -.08 ColBgp 1.22 -.04
Accenlre ; "t -83 Belo 2.12 +.21 Comerica 21.66 -.09
AdamsEx 8'59 -'.04 BestBuy 38.64 +1.20 ComtSco 24.96 -.42
AMD 461 .,02 BigLots 24.10 +.38 Con-Way 33.06 -.11
AdvSei 301 ... Biovail 11.95 +.05 ConAgra 19.76 -.08
A r l 363 -.07 BtkH~sbCp 22.71 +.08 CpnocPhil 45.02 +.03
Ar.' 24,09 -1,31 BIkDebtStr 2.92 -.08 Cnseco 2.49 -.07
AI.�7 19.64 -.26 BIkEnhC&l 13.08 +.14 ConsolEngy 40.08 -.3,
A. g 68.08 +72 Blackstone 11.08 +.16 ConEd 35.81 +.03
Agrimg 4.94'4 -.:46 BekHR 15,7B -29 ConstellA 12.43 +.22
Airl0rod 8141 -.82 Blocdsr .98 -.05 ConstellEn 27.23 . 16
AirTr 886 -.32 BlueChp 2.52 -.03 CtLArB 9,3 -3 4
AcatqAL .D69 4 05 Boeing 52.83 +.18 Cnvrgy i6', -.05
Alma I 0'7 , -17 Borders 4.08 -26 Coming -5.3 -.05
Alggy 1 -.52 BorgWam 34.31 -.69 Co ta 16.20 -.04
ch 3988 -103 BostBeer 30.13 -.39 CovenbyH 17.68 -61
Alltei 26,96 -.21 BosProp 50.43 +.11 Covldien 35.65 -.28
,a i.BGH 10.46 +,07 BostonSd 9,41 -.13 Cummins 35.94 -.30
A r,.LIo 757 -.02 Brandyw 7.19 -15 voSenils 8.79 -06
AlliBem 21239 f.02 rMyq 19.76 -.17 194161
AlliedCao '319 -1 BrkdAsgs 17.91 -.33 ,
Aldish 5,6.55 -'C' BrklidPrp 783 -.06 DCTIndI 4.20
Alsta te 25 a . 33 Brunswick 4.30 -.31 DJIADianm 87.74 -.17
~ .i.pr,iPR: 66l -.07 Buckeye 42.59 -.65 DNPSect 7.86 -.05
Tr,.s 171 +,18 BurgerKng 16.87 +.05 DPL 21.96 +-13
AirrChi 2'? -1i13 8urNSF 76.89 +.31 DRHorton 9.66 .+.45
rinirF, '127 -.03 CBRBlis 7.92 -.12 DTE 31.220 -.29
AT.ref, 2r' -601 CBLAsc 7.56 +.20 Daimler 37.69 -.096
, >OwL .3-7t2 -.36 CBSB 8.68 -.05 Damden 34.16 I-.77
ArnA'er, 2; +4.08 COHEngy 43.23 +.04 DeViy 46.31 +..47
AEg 1O6ut 15 -429 CIGNA 21.27 -1.57 DeanFds 18.29 -.04
AEP i 263' -,4 CrrTGp 3.19 -.05 Deere 45.80 -.67
A .u 1 25,5 +.70 CMSEng 11.71 -.07 DelMnte 8.18 -.02
Ai p . 166 -05 CSlnds 19.52 +.29 DeltaAr 6.72 -.30
AmSIFP3 8J 4, +,16 CSX 34.53 +.59 DenburyR 16.32 -.62
t. ,ruw. 29:71 -.18 CVSCare 30.78 +.59 DeutschBk 65.92 -1.04
Arr.,WvoP i 176 +,33 CabotO&G 35.08 -.51 DBGOldDL 20.90 -.06
4,m.0,a 3304 +;46 CalDive 8.46 . +24 DevelDiv 5.77' +.17
Anpee a54 -111 CallGolf 7.28 -.20 DevonE 63.90 82
Ampheol 3.29 -190 Calpine 11.87 -.63 DaOffs 88.41 1.17
Anadarko 086 23 .14 Camnecgs 27.00 -.22 OamRk 7.75 +.13
tAoakq,, 24 ... Cameron 29.89 -.38 DIanaShIp 15.74 -.37
t.�i-,l9a C9.80 +,85 CampSp 28.91 +.14 DirxnBuldl 10.43 +.14
AnnTaylr 71:1, -26 CdnNRyg 43.90 +.35 DirxRnBear 4.40 -.07
Annaly* t ! '4i +,03 CdnNRsg 57.20 -.52 DirxSCBear 21.30 +.69
Aonorp , ?6i6 +128 CapOne 23.44 -.67 DirxSCBuH 31.00, -.92
-. acna h '04 +.78 CapySrce 4.37 +.15 DirxLCBear 33.80:, +.30
tpir. 1086, +,15 CapMpfB 13.34 +.05 DirxLCBul 36.32 -.37
,qua*, '16160 +.13 CardnlHIth 30.52 -.28 DirxEnBear 18.64: +.09
ArcelorMit 33175 -1.24 CarMax 13.70 +124 DixEnBull 36.72 -.09
Archpal | 18:42 -.03 Camrnival 25.00 -.56 Discover 9.18 -.23
ArchDon . 27,91 . C.. Cateipiar 38.57,-;+10 Disney, 25.33' +.38
AsrowE' 22;61 -.41 Celanese 21.63 +.42 DomRescs 31.76 -.26
AtvMerfth i h 56 -.16 Cemex 10.15 -.25 DonlieyRR 14.05 ;+,19
Ashand . 28:58 -,64 Cemigpfs 14.13 -24 Dover 35.50 . -.19
AsdEstat, 6468.. -,25 CenterPnt 10.15 +.16 DowChn . 16.95 '-.61
A u.6i & , 24,3' -.54 Centex 8.68 +24 DuPont 2621 -.79
S 24' I +.21 CntyTal 31.89 +.20 DukeEngy �CO - W
nptr. .i 1784,1 -'40 ChampEh .48 -.03 DukeRfty ,64 -3'
Avaloay "6337,.! -i3, Checkpnt 15.36 -.13 Dyegyp ?,I, -1
Avissrg '!4tl1: 25 � ChesEng 22.92 -.36 EM p ai.I -
Avon.. 21'i[ -.11 Chevron 69.58 +.21 EOGRes T',u . i14


EastChm 41.47 -1.57
EKodak 2.83 +.02
Eaton 48.64 +.57
Ecolab 37.58 +.18
Edisonlnt 29.84 +.05
EPasoCp 9.83 -.12
Elan 7.99 -.37
Embarq 43.28 +29
EmersonB -35.15 -.05
EmpDlst: 16.03 -.20
EnbrEPtrs 40.76 -.98
EnCana 54.37 -28
EnPro 19.74 +1.02


ENSCO 39.08 +.43
EntMgy 73.50 -.67
EqtyRsd 24.74 +.10
EcelM 9.34 -.47
ExcoRes 14.24 -.28
Exelon 47.45 -1.01
ExterranH 18.02 -.28
ExxonMbi 73.17 +20
FMC Corp 51.30 -1.64
FMCTech 40.88 -1.14
FPLGrp 55.37 +29
FairchldS 7.17 +.32
FamrlyDlr 30.74 -.12
FannieMaeh .69 -.01
FedExCp 56.46 -.65
FedSignl 8.51 -25
Fearelgs 16.31 -.69
Fero 3.80 -.18
FdlNRFin 1322 +20
FidNInfos 20.14 , -.06
FstHorizon 12.91 +.12
FTActDiv 10.18 -.02
FfTrEnEq 9.05 -.02
rEngy. 36833 -.80
Rowsemne 80.90 -1.24
Rluors 51.50 -1.40
FootLockDr 11.24
FordM 6.38 +.02
Foresta". 23.40 -.26
ForestOil 18.95 -.18
Fortress 4.08 -.12
FortuneBr ,36.70 +.17
FdtnCoal 28.21 -.12


FredMach 1 .73 -.03
FMCG 56.48 -.68
FronterCm 7.15 -.02
FrontierOll 14.79 -.19


GATX 25.95 -.67
GabelllET 5.01 -.00
GabHlthW 5.14 +.01
GabUtil 6.93 +.02
GameStop 24.33 +.44
Gannett 4.30 +.08


Gap 16.73 +10
GanoShIp 23.64 -.78
GenDynam 6R.46 +.01
GanBec 1.56 +.02
GenMills 5422 +2.06
Genwotnh 6.43 -.24
GaPw8-44 25.10
Gerdaus 11.22 -.26
GlaxoSKIn 33.31 +.28
GoldFLtd 12.03 -.18
Gokldpg 36.17 +.07
GoldmanS 148.35 -.66
Gooddich 54.04 -.70
Godyear 12.71 -.23
Grafrech 11.54 -22
GtPlalnEn 15.55
Griffon 9.82 -.16
GpTelevisa 17.69 +.36
Gang 23.73 +.08
Gaty .38 +.09
Guess 28.37 -.23
HCP Inc 23.76 +29
HRPTPrp. . 4.89.' :-,10v
HSBC 4224 +.14
HSBCcap 3.74 -.16
Hallibrn 2.80 -.02
HanJS 11.26 -.19
HanPtDv2 7.70 -.15
Hanesbids 17.54 -.54
Hanoverlns 37.03 -.33
HaFeyD 17.03 -.44
HamnonyG 10.91 -.10


HartiOFn 14.78 -.11 ShRaMO 68.69 -.49


HatfdFn 14.79 -.11
Hasbro 25.37 -.03
HawaiiS 18.49 -.29
HltCrREIT 35.95 +.25
HItMgmt 5.40 -.02
HlIthcrRty 18.04 +.07
HealthNet 14.54 -.66
Heckmann 4.27 +,18
HedaM 2.96 -.16
Heinz 36.61 -.09
HellxEn 11.26 -.04
HalinTel 8.50 -.11
Hertz 6.74 -.05


Hess 57.77 -1.40
HewlettP 37.41 +.14
Hexcel 13.08 -.48
HighwdPrp 23.43 -.16
HameDp 24.56 +.39
Honda 29.68 +.08
Honwillnt 35.67 -.05
HospPT 15.805 -.30
Hostiotls 9.52 -.04
HovnanE 2.58 -.12
Humana 29.91 -1.05
Huntsmn 6.32 -.08
IAMGIdg 1021 +.15
ICICI Bk 31.31 -1.31
IMSHlh 11.94 -.12
INGPrRTr 4.06 +.01
iSAstla 16.61 -.24
iShBraz 55.63 -.26
iSCan 22.77 -.01
iShRHK 14.34 -.26
iShJapn 9.33 +.05
ISh Kor 35.32 -.39
iShMex 36.85 -.52
iShSing 9.27 -.21
iSTaiwn 10.42 -.30
iShSilvers 14.76 -.25
iShCh25s 38.55 -.49
iSSP500 94.48 -.38
iShEMtlds 33.09 --.52
iShSPLAs 35.77 -.32
iShB20T 89.61 -.23
iSEafe 47.19 -.10
iSRMCVs 29.64 -.10


iShRsMd 66.69 -.49
iShC&SRI 39.62 -.05
iSRIKV 48.58 -.28
ISR1KG 41.72 -.25
iSRuslK 51.59 -.17
iSR2KG 57.72 -.43
IShR2K 52.57 -.63
IShREst 35.01 -.13
iShFnSv 47.11 +.39
IShFnSc 44.23 +.19
iShSPSm 45.85 -.61
iShBasM 46.32 -.72
iStar 287 -.10


ITTCorp 45.82 -.18
Idacorp 24.33 -.15
ITW 38.97 -.06
Imabon 9.38 -.35
IngerRd 22.77 -.01
IngrmM 17.18 -.45
IntegrysE 28.40 +.13
IntBnlEx 118.11 +3.25
IBM 107.49 +.25
InUGame 16.86 -.16
IntPap 14.72 +.24
Interpublic 5.74 +.04





Jhnil 8.34 -.24
Invesco 17.57 +.190
IJnMtC. . 11.43 -.3705
JauUniMup 10.732 +.07

JPMorgCh 1435.39 +.8423
Jabil 8.34 -.24
JKCobsEng 42.72 96,-.90
Kiyd.:.rn 3'55.63 -.304


KAEigTR 17.42 -.81
Kellogg 44,52 +.74
KeyEngy 5.94 -27
Keyorp 5.46 +.03


KimbClk 52.78 +.37
Kimo 12.28 -.12
KIndME 52.66 -.44
KlngPhrm 9.59 -.12
Kinrossg 18.63 +.06
Kohls 46.25 +.28
Kraft 26.59 -.04
KrispKrm 3.45 -.18
Kroger 22.44 -.51
LDKSolar 10.83 +1.52
LG Display 12.42 -.01
LLE Roy hI .60 +.03
LSICorp 4.19
LTC Prp 21.55 -.36
LaZBoy 3.14 -.05
Ladede 33.80 +.27
LVSands 9.96 -.05
LearCorp 1.22 -.02
LeggMason 23.90 -.07
LeggPlat 16.26 +.54
LennarA 8,87 +.42
LeucNal 21.70 -.38
Lexmark 16.81 -.42
LbtyASG 2.79 +.01
UllyBi 34.10 -.67
limited 12.81 -.11
UncNat 19.32 -.25
Undsay 33.77 -.72
UeydBkg 4.98 -.42
LockhdM 85.85 -.32
Loews 27.92 +23
Lorillard 67.59 -1.47
LaPac 4.26 -.18
Lowes 20.11 +07

M&T Bk 49.02 +.58
MBIA 6.12 -.16
MDU Res 18.73 -.14
MEMCO 19.51 -.28
MFA FncI 6.59 -.05
MCR 8.04 -.06
MGIC 4.83 -.22
MGMMir 7.31 -.21
Macerch 20.73 +.02
Macquarh 3.59 -.01
Macys 12.77 -.04
Madecos 6.58 -.02
Magnalg 36.40 +.34
Mantowoc 6.57 -.30
Manufflgs 21.41 -.03
MarathonO 32.45 +.75
MarinerEn 14.59 +.07
MktVGold 41.30 -.03
MktVRus 23.45 -.68
MarlntA 24.55 +.03
MarshM 20.03 +24
Marshlls 6.58 +.12
MStewrt 3.45 +.01
Masco 10.75 +.04
MasseyEn 23.16 -.67
MastarCrd 165.97 -1.71
Mattel 16.16 -.19
McDermlnt 21.68 -.40
McDnlds 58,72 -1.15
McGrwH 30.95 +.20
.: .:,,. 4141.1 -
M:] 39.98 - I"

MedcoHth 44.90 -,-.23
Medtric 33.72 -.23
Merck 25.93 -.14
Metavnte 26.77 -.02
MetUfe 32.78 +1.33
MetroPCS 14.36 +.20
MicronT 5.30
MldAApt 37.07 -.11
Mdas 10.75 .+27
Millipore 66.67 +.69


Mirant 16.13 -.22


Migrant 16.13 -22
MOlsCoorB 45.33 -.42
MoneyGrm 1.57 -.01
Monsanto 82.79 +.81
Mood 28.71 -.23
Morgtn 1.39 +.42
MSEmMkt 11.12 -.23
Mosaic 51.76 -1.37
Motorola 6.44 +.20
MurphO 58.54 -.46
NCRCorp 12.27 +.11
NRGEgy 22.09 -.17
NV Energy 10.30 -.04
NYSE Eur 29.47 -.36
Nabors 18.13 -.20
NatFuGas 34.28 -.05
NatGrd 44.78 -.30
NOilVarco 37.88 -.08
NatSemi 13.95 +.31
NewAmnrs 7.01 -.04
NJ Rscs 35.57 +.46
NY CmrtyB 10.51 +.20
NewellRub 11.39 +.03
NewfdExp 35.68 -.50
NewmrtM 44.66 -.18
NwpkRsIf 3.19 -.07
Nexeng 24.56 -.08
NiSource 11.11 +.17
Nicor 34,06
NikeB 58.00 -.29
NobleCorp 35.34 +.03
NobleEn 64.23 +.27
NokJaCp 15.30 +.08
Nordstrm 21.15 +.06
NorflkSo 40.94 +24
NoestUt 21.12 -.11
NorthropG 48.70 +.32
NSTAR 30.86 -.13
Nucor 46.76 -.77
NvFL 11.69 +.04
NvIMO 12.36 -.04
NvMulSI&G 5.52 -.04
NuvQPf2 6.05 -.03
OGEEngy 26.26 -.28
OcdcPet 68.33 +.10
OfficeDpt 5.0 8 +.02
OilSvHT 107.39 -.35
OldRepub 10.39 -.01
Olin 13.38 -.29
Omnicom 32.29 -.30
ONEOK 29,79 +.26
ONEOK Pt 49.30 -.45
OshkoshCp 13.96 -.14
OwensCom 13.18 -.18


PG&ECp 37.48 -.11
PNC 43.38 +1.36
PNM Res 9.51 -.04
PPG 44.29 -.75
PPLCorp 32.48 -.64
PallCorp 26.85 +.25
ParkDd 4.98 -.09
ParkerHan 47.53 -.26
PatriotCs 8.39 -.26
P. iE 34.22 -1.14
Pr,'..'r,) 8.43" :+.02
P.rear i, 15.24- -:-r.40
PennWstg 13.40 -.14
Penney 29.01 -.04
Penske 14.72 +.07
PepBoy 8.42 +.33
PepcoHold 12.88 -.23
PepsiBott 33.04 -.37
PepsiCo 54.15 -.73
PepsiAmer 26.29 -.35
Prmian 12.63 +.02
PetroCg 42.60 -.66


AMEeRIC8A-0 UtniCehXCH12 +0


Name Last Chg

AAFF.iA.: 5 R,02
A.fSirtC i1t h ;'I.h
AdjoreAra w001~0
Advs 13 01'O
AiE.vcsRr4 214 -07
ArsiieC 907 .05
Ara.Ok ;235 -t,3
Aii4.Mi 1 .10

A.tnaireP 1-71 -.1
r!. iG 145 -216


Nare t Chg


A-Pover 1,.68 -.51
ACM, � re f I56 +,02
C Tel , 784 +.25
AMAGPh 3 i0 -1.34
APACGO . '.,26
ARCAblon .07 -50
ASMI 2d. 204, .7045
ATPO&G 688 4.16
ATS! ed 2.98 *,06
AVI B1o 161 +402
Aas..m 36 +.00
A .red 743 +,13
AtmedPh 34.1 ' -.13
AO,,iah 26.01 +.05
,,.-t,,4B 5.. 18:76 -.02
Acrom I' 7 : 11
Ad teo 271 -1,0s
Ao 1 217 -861
Adtran 2075 -19
AdveBattey 3 1 .06

Advn 61 .0o
Atymekt 921 .1
7,33 -.1
A alrts 22: -i:0
At.,dra1 21.60 -.58
Akom o0 -,03
AWldla : i" -.32
Aleidorfs X 54 -.68
,11,,rTleh 129 -.11
emer 8 55 +.05
Alkegianfr .16 -1.92
AliosThera 7.39 +.18
AlaiplM 13.09 -,31
Almoat~am 27.28 -88
AJnylamP 20.86 -1,78
AltaiNao 903 -.04
AiTeriC'Q. 168'1 +23
I.tl1PpmT. 45 +.01
Alvaron: 3105 -.20
Amazon 86.36 -1.20
Amadly |32.01 -.24
i i i',34 +.01
ACU .d 83 -.01
A itd 15.91 -.08
Am 0 86.01 -1,08
AnCaslno 1951 -.89
Argn 50.92 +.03
A T 46 -&09
Arnyrn 149 +.39
Anad 437 -.13
Arnad Ph 1' +.14
,', '456, f02
Aniaynta 90 .01
Andrsons 21? - .93
Anesai h .41 +.05
Angleth g 27 +.67
A rlaA 14,42 -33
Ansys ! 32.71 -.55
Angncs 206 -.17
ApogeeaE l 13.B9 -.25
Apollogop AS i +2,20
Ap6olenv 65' -.10
Apple tnc 14j 85 -.82
ApldMtll 10;86 -.12
AMCC; 7.41 -.04
ApldSig 215,62 +.01
ArchCOep 6.8,04 -1.18
AranPhm I 4.94 +1.00
,',,.i , , | 8,19 -.08
]i,l,,ll 1,63 +.17
'INl,. li, | 10,25 -.09
'irii l 11, 82 -.29
;,rrlil 'M ' 'a- +.11
Arni, 12 3P +,03
inT,.l .'333 -.27
,,- ,.M,l,,i 764 +.20
,*Iiro ,1 20,A., -.48
A 441B8. 1380 446
.in air n 3I2h +1148
Artiii.'ril ' 86 fw
AllasAir 24,42 -1 86
Alla�Am 18,47 -12
1 i; i .i


ApolloGg .43 -.02
ArcadiaRs .63 +.02
AsiaSpcSit 9.55
AUrizong 4.28 -.02
Axesstel .40' +.12
BMBMunai 1.43 -.05
BPWAcqwt .15 +.06
BPZRes 6.83 -.09
BarcAIG36 38.20 -.28
BarcGSOil 24.74 +.07
BrolndiaTR 50.18 -2.50
BootsCts 1.32 -.04
CdnSEng .80 -.01
CanoPet 1.36 -.14
CalSci .49 -.13


Atmel 3.98 +.12
ArtiCure 3.78 +.99
Audvox 5.61 -.37
Authentdth 1.15 -.03
Autodesk . 22.03 -.14
AutoData 38.28 -.27
Aunillum 25.89 +1.47
AvoctCp 15.29 -.51
Aware 2.60 +.07
Axcelis .54 -.04
AxsysTech 53.44 -.01
BEAemro 16.21 -.60
BGCPtrs 3.25 -.17
BOK 40.87 +.72
Baldu Inc 303.90 -.17
Bankrata 29.54 -.38
BareEscent 9.34 -.51
Barzel Inds .28 +.06
BasinWater .41 +.05
BeaconPw .76 -.04
BeacnRg 16.31 -.10
BeasleyB 234
BebeSts 7.48 -25
.BedBat 29.19 -.01
BioDIlvryf 62- -.37
Biocryst 4.07 -.11
BioFormM 2.13 -.02
Biogenldc 51.83 -.29
BioMarin 13.60 +.07
Blopurersh .24 -.03
BlueCoat 15.49 -.31
BobEvn 32.20 -.31
BostPrv 4.80 -.20
BrigExp 3.70 -.18
Brighlpnt 6.22 -.06
Broadcom 25.82 +.36
BrcdeCm 7.34 -.13
BrooksAuto 4.73 +.14
BrukerCp 7.96 -.05
Bucyrus 30.46 -2.47
BuffaioWW 35.53 -.56
CAInc 17.62 +.11
CDCCpA 1.49 -.06
CH Robins 52.90 +.40
CMEGrp 331.37 -2.40
CTC Media 12.00 +21
CVB Fnd 6,52 +.07
Cadence 5.81 -.16
CdnSolar 15.22 -.48
CapCtyk 16.93 -.07
CpstnTrb .70
viCaraust .08 -.011
Crdismg 4.05 +.25
CarerEd 21.02 +.14
Cardzo 19.13 -.99
CarverBcp 5.25
Caseys 26.05 -.45
Casuaala 2.34 -.16
CatalystH 23.43 +.53
CatrayGen 10.07 -.02
CaviumNet 16.01 -.11
Beyond 18.51 +.32
Celgene 44.01 -.34
CellGensh .64 +.08
CeilTerrsh 1.71 +.08
CendCom 8.37 -.01
CentEuro 28.84 -1.31
CEurMed 21.18 -22
CenlAI 621 -.14
Cephln 58.62 +1.53
Cepheid -9.96 -.15
CeragonN 6.54' +.29
Cemer 58.21 +.71
Changyoun 38,70 -.10
ChrmSh 4.00 -.11
CharlInds 22.43 -1,89
ChkPoint 23.78 -,10
Cheesecake 17.34 -.23
ChildPlace 30.77 +.11
ChinaArch 1.47 -.12
ChinaBAK 3.09 -.02
ChinaDir 1.66 +.08
ChHoust.d 4.10 +.77
ChinaMed 24.09 -.71
ChinaPS6 2.61 -.06
ChIlnSun 4.69 +.08
ChchllD 38.94 -.43
ClonaCorp 10.61 -.16


CFCdag 11.99 -.06
CheniereEn 3.98 -04
ChinaGmn 7.50 -
CIghGIbOp 11.04 -03
CoffeeH 385 ' 8
CortexPh 27 -
Crmosshglf 23 '-c


DenisnMg 1.83 -.01
DuneEngy ' I
EVInMu2 -2'4 -u06
EVLtdDur "-7i -05
EldorGldg 9-; - ,
Elxihram �) * 01


CInnFin 24.14 +.02
Cintas 22.77 -.06
Cirrus 423 +.16
Cisco 19.87
CitzRep 1.11 -.07
ChrixSys 31.64 -.33
Clearwire 4.46 ;-.14
ClIckSfOt 4,66 '-.18
CogentC 8.52 ".01
Cogent 11.07 ,11
CognzTech 27,09 .,14
CogoGrp 6.88 .02
Colnstar 29.37 .54
ColdwihC 5.17 +.17
ColumLab 1.16 -.05
Comarco 1.84 -.06
Comcast 14.35 +.24
Com I 13.68 +.36
CncBMO 31:24 +.40
CommSys 11.08 +.08
CommVtt 15.09 -.51
CompDivHd 8.61 +.11
Compuwre 7.49 -.13
Comtech 30.46 +.05
ConcurTch 31.71 -.10
Conexantrs 1.15 +.02
Conmed 16.49 +.07
ConsolCm 10.72 -.06
ConvOrgan 1.57 L.02
Copart 33.81 -S8
CodnthC 15.89 ' . 26
CorpExc 2120 401
CousBksh 2 - 03
Costco 47.53 -.11
Cottgeai 42.89 d+.02
CowenGp 722 ;.11
CrackerB 31.07 -.79
Crae Inc 29.70 -.19
Crocs 3.16 -.14
CrosslexE 4.92 +.25
CrosslxLP 4.16 +.06
Ctrip.com 44.34 -.05
CuboltPh 17.67 -.57
CuraGenh 1.40 +02
CybrSsce 14.11 +.15
Cydacel .88 +.03
CypraBio 7.65 -.09
.82 ' +.28
3.02 +.07,


Daktronics 7.31 +.03
DataDom 32.57 r-.02
DeckOut 65.12 +1.47
decodGenh .42 (.03'
Dellnc 12.28 +20
DfaPtr 2.27 -.04
Dndreon 25.11 -.63
Dennys 2.36 -.13
Dentsply 29.10 -.41
DexCom 557 +.12
DigRiver 3920 -.92
Diodes 15.84 +.16
DirecTV 22.75 .94
DOscCmA 23.25 -.23
DiscLabs 99 .
DishNetwk '6 1l +'.14
DflrTree 4j481 -.09
DrmWksA 6884 -.01
DressBam 16.52; -.06
drugstore 1.959 -.11;
DryShips 7.10 i!, +.02;
DyaxCp 2.13 . +26
DynMatl 22.14 -.56
Dynavax 1.57 -.07
EmTrade 1.45 -.031,
eBay 17.64 -.20
ev3inc 9.16 -.05
EagleBulk 6.04 -31
EaglRkEn 3.47 -.08
7.96 -.03
EstWstBcp 7.91 +.04
Edcpsys 16.59 +.43
EdBauer .47 -.01
EdgePet .64 -.03
EduDv 5.21 -.32
EleclSd 9.92 -.04


BIswthFd 5.69 +.03
Endvlnt 1.64
EndvSilvg 1.95 -.12
EverGlryn 2.50 +.07
EvglncAdv 8.34 -.03
RaPUSI 12.80 -.03
FrkStPlp 13.52 +.12
FroU9. 4.00 . -.10

GasomEngy .39 -.01
GastarEg .41 +.01
GenMoly 2.79 -.19
GoldStfg 2.00 -.06
GranTtrag 3.15 -.12
GrtBasGg 1.63 +,02


Hemisphrx 3.05 +.32
HicksAcwt .06 +.01
ighldAcq 9.68 -.01
A Global .06 +.00
ImpOigs 40.04 -27
IndiaGC 1.44 -.04
Intelays .6544


JavelnPh |.23 -.05
Keegang g .64 +.38
adlatz ,164 .0

MadCatzg .38 +.02


Merrnimac 12.88 +2.83
Metallco 2.64 -.10
MetroHlti 1.91 -.07
MdwGold g .89 +.20
Minefndg 8.65 -.01
NBRESec 1.99 -.08
Nevsung 1.41 -.07
NDragon .16 -.01
NwGoldg 2.63 -.04
NAPallg 2.36 -.11
NDynMng 8,05--.14
NthnO&G 7.87 -.40
NthgtMg 2.12 -.08
NovaDelP .42 +,07
NovaGld9 5.05 -.11


NASDA . ..NATIO AL ARE


EectArts 22.17 -.83
Emcore 1.17 -.06
EmisTechh 1.05 -.28\
Encormh .26 -.04
EndoPhrm 16.75 -.50
Endocareh 1.23 +.33
EngyConv 17.02 -.14
EngyXXI .72 -.02
Entegrs 3.08 -.08
Entrust 1.83 -.01
EpiCepth .87 -.03
EpIcoS 5.54 +.06
Euinix 71.76 -4.15
EncsTelsa 8.98 +.04
Eumnet 18.15 +.20
EvrgrSr 1.84 -.06
Exelixis 4.90 -.08
E.xdeTa 5.25 -.51
Expedla 16.06 -.62
Expdlnfl 33.44 -.66
ExpScripts 64.38 +1.05
ExtmNet 1.69 -.15
Ezcorp 12.93 -.17
F5 Netwks 33.34 -.60
FURS 24.01 -.49
Fastenal 34.63 +.44
FiberTowr .68 -.06
FithThird 725 +.12
Fndlnst 13.69 -.55
Rnlsar .82 -.01
FInUnie 7.59 -23
FstCashFn 16.78 -.04
FMidBc 8.16 -.14
FstNIagara 11.93 -.03
FstSolar 183.97 +1.87
FstMerit 17.19 +.08
Fsev 45.89 +.09
Rextm 4.13 +.03
FocusMda 8.38 -.14
ForcePro 924 -.12
FormFac 19.52 -.24
Fossil Inc 23.30 -.65
FosterWl 27.12 -.85
Fredsinc 13.59 -27
FreeSeas 3.06 -21
FrontFnd 1.37 -.09
FuelCell 4.06 +.07
FultonFnd 5.62 +.06
E Ing 16.41 +.8-

GFIGrp 6.55 -.20
GMXRs 15.72 -.81
GSIGrpit 1.11 -.02
GTSolarn 6.00 -30
Garmin 22.76 -.33
GenProbe 42.64 -.90
GenaeraWf .27 -.03
GenBiotch .75 -.06
Genopnx 28.16 -123
Gentex 13.10 -.31
Gentivah 15.84 -34
GenVec .89 +.07
Genzyme 59.76 -.94
GeoEye 21.91 -.16
GeronCp 7.12 +.29
GIgaMed 6.16 -.14
GileadSd 44.49 -.09
Globlind 6.99 +.09
Globalstar 1.71 -.03
Google 438.77 -5.55
GreenMtC 93.54 +212
Gymbree 36.80 -.49
HLTH 11.82 -.17
HMNFn 5.28 -.32
HSNIncn 11.67 -.10
HSWInd .20 -.05
Halozyme 7.77 -.08
HansenNat 33.49 +1.13
Harmonic 5.91 -.09
HarrisStrA 6.01 +.17
HawHold 5.70 +.03
HlthTronce 1.50 -.06
HrtndEx 15.50 -.09
HScheln 45.10 -20
HercOflsh 4.71 +.12
Hibbett 18.63 +.03
HimaxTch 3.49 +.22


HokuSci 4.01 +.44
HollsEden .72 -.04
Hologic 13.49 -.17
HorsehdH 7.91 -.12
HotTopic 7.51 +.20
HubGroup 22.96 -.67
HudsCily 12.61 -.25
HumGen 2.73 -.09
HunUJB 32.07 +.09
HuntBnk '4.14 +.06
Hurrayl 3.46 +.26
Hythlamh '.41 -.03
lAOCnters 16.21 -.10
Idexxtabs 44.46 -.61
IPCHoid 26.97 -.96
ShNdqBio 9.72 -.30
IconPLCs 21,10 +.45
IconixBr 15.41 +.02
Ilrninaas 37.93 -.79
[max Carp 7.31 -.33
Immersn 4:71
Immucor 15.68 -.16
ImunoGn 8.15 -24
Impaxtb n 7.55 +25
Incyte 3.42 -.42
Ininera 10.01 +.07
Inlomat 17.08 -20
Info= sT 3622 +.18
Ihibexh .48 +.03
Insmed 2.03 +.16
nItlgDv 5.55 -.11
Intel 15.92
Interacfrt 1521 -.06
Intefrig 25.67 -.32
InterNAP 337 +.10
InBcsh 10.70 +.04
InlrSpdw 2626 -.06
Intersi 12.13 -.05
Intuit 28.11 +,22
ISurg 152.49 -3.52
Isis 15.07 -.06
IsleCapd 11.92 -.56
lrmn 59.51 +2.23
IvanhoeEn 1.70 -.03

j2GIobal 22.90 +.12
JASolar 5.15 +.02
JDSUniph 6.04 -.06
JackHenry 18.97 -24
JacddnBox 26.56 -.90
Jamba 1.08 +.03
JamesRiv 21.81
JelBlue 4.26 -.10
JoesJeans .62 +.03
JonesSoda 1.04 +.01
JosphBnk 39.18 -.54
JoyGb , 39.81 -.82
JnprNtwk 23-0 -.40
KLATnc 2643 -.06
Kendae 14'3 +.52
Kenexa '3.86 +.39
KeryxBioh 1.35 +.27
Kirhlands 8.90 -.66
KnghtCap 18.22 -.39
KratosDef .78 +.06
Kuicke 425 -.25
LKO Corp 15.80 -26
LSIIndlIf 5.09 -.13
LTX-Cred .61
LaJdlPhh .39
LamnResirch 25.40 -A
LamarAdv 17.49 -.37
Landstar 3880 +.14
Late 2.03 -2.01
LawonSfi 5.68 -.12
LeapWriss 32.02 -.45
Leve3 1.14 -.02
UbGIobA 13.54 -.02
UbGIobC 1335 -.05
UbtyMintA 5.77 -.12
LbMCapA 14.54 -.06
LIbMEntA 2429 +.60
UfeTech 38.81 -.42
UfePtH 28.43 +.54
LlhirGold 24.20 -.14
Uncamr 91.12 +.54
UncE 43.07 -1.35


UnearTch 23.32 -.01
Unktone 2.66 -.19
UnnEngy 19.98 +.04
LodgeNet, 5.56 -.33
Logitech 14.48 -.58
LookSmart 1,33 +.03


MAPPhm 10.95 ...
MBFnid 10.13 -.26
MDRNAH 1.54 +.14
MGE 31.94 -.25
MTS 22.30 -.42
MaomnSold 22.52 -.32
MagelnHI 31.88 +.41
MaldenH 5.84 +.12
Majescoh 2.03 -.02
ManTech 42.11 +2.77
MannKd 8.08 +1.02
MarvallT 1121 -.16
Masimo 25.10 -.32
Ma*tixSv 12.32 -.44
Mattson 1.29 -.07
MaxCapital 16.46 -.49
Maximltgn 16.07 +.40
MaxwrT 11.74 -.33
Medarex 7.15 -.28
MedAssets 15.84 -.06
MedcAcIn 11.55 +.41
MediCo 7.47 +24
MedisTech 78 - 'T.54
MeioCrwm 5.94 +.15
MentGr 5.11 -.09
MercadoL 23.71 +.09
MesaAirh .13
Metabash .79 +.43
Methanx 12.86 -.03
Microchp 21.77 +.03
Micromet 4.95 +.33
MicrosSys 27.94 -.12
MicroSemi 14.29 -.13
Microansoft 22.05 -.09
Micrvisn 2.83 +.03
MiddleBk 1.84 +27
Milicom 57.04 -2.34
Misonix 2.19 -.02
MobileMini 14.60 -.09
Molex 16.56 -.28
MonPwSys 19.98 -.12
Mylan 13.58 -.12
MyiadGs 36.05 -.99
NflHIdg 19.47 -.46
NPS Ptm 3.78 +.20
NasdOMX 21.42 -.58
Natlnstru h 23.39 +09
NatPenn 5.60 +.09
NektarTh 6.47 -.27
NetlUEPS 13.54 -.55
NetServic 9.38 -.06
NetApp 18.98 +,16
Netease 37.49 -.45
Netflix 38.81 -.38
NtSoout 9.00 +.03
Neurogenh .33 -.03
NeutTand 29.65 -1.22
NewsCpA 10.42 +.18
NewsCpB 11.72 +.17
NexMed .33 -.01
Nextwaveh .37 -.04
NobilyH 9.50 -.25
Nordson 41.08 -1.62
NAGalvs 7.40 +.75
NorTrst 5538 +.07
jNthifdLb .11 -.01
NovtlWrls 10.15 -.79
Novavax 2.74 +.14
Novell 4.11 -.01
Novlus 17.62 -.39
NuHorz If 3.90 +24
NuVasive 41.39 -.39
NuanceCm 1329 +.13
Nubitn21 h .29 -.02
Nvkdia 10.77 -.06
NxStageMd 4.85 +.35
ORelyA h 37.92 +.17
OSI Phrm 3021 -.52
OceanFri 1.73 -.06


Oilsandsg 1.14 -.04
On2 Tech .47 +.04
OrsusXel .94 +.03


Palafin .31 -.02
ParaG&S 1.58' -.07
PetroRes .74 -.10
PionDrill 6.01 -.01
PSCrudeDS n75.58 -1.07
PSCrndeDLn 4.59 +.11
ProceraNt .70 +.04
Proliance .21 +.05
PyramldOs 8.14 -.48
Rentech .59


Odaro .82 +.00
Oculus 4.26 +.21
OdyoMar 1.98 +.14
OldDomFh 30.47 +.22
Omniture 12.38 -.19
OmnMsn 10.74 +.17
OnAssIgn 3.89 +.15
OnSmcnd 6.58 +.12
OncoGenxhn 24.75 -.23
Onstreamh .30 +.03
OnyxPh 24.94 -.45
OpenTxt 34.36 -.13
OptimerPh 14.10 +.17
optXprs 19.05 -.26
Oracle 20,87 +.16
Orexigen 3.88 -.30
Orthfx 24.90 -.29
Orbhovta 4.66 +.27
Osdenlf .40 -.01
Of+erTall 20.16 +.01
--ZEEo--
PDLBio 7.43 +.27
PF Chng 33.85 +.07
PMCSra 7.68
Paccar 34.44 +24
Paoerlnt 2.62 +,18
PacCaeB 4.81 -.03
PacEthan .51 -.02
PacSunwr 3.75 -.44
PaetecHIl 3.22 -.23
PalnTher 5.30 -.08
Palm Inc 12.16 -.84
PalmrM 17.74 +1.01
PanASIv 21.50 -.58
PaneraBrd 52.05 -.53
ParagShip 5.05 -.41
ParamTch 11.85 -.44
Parexel 13.02 +.12
Patterson 20.32 -.12
PattUTI 13.93 -.23
Paychex 27.56 -.11
PnnNGm 31.66 -.44
PeopUtdF 15.62 +.01
Peregrine h .81 +.06
PeectWld 22.63 -.73
Perrigo 2626 -.13
PetrosDev 18.17 -.10
PetsMart 21.41 +22
PharmPdt 20.51 +.08
PhaseFWd 14.67 +.51
Polycom 2038 -.13
Poniardh 4.88 +.13
Popular 2.55 -.08
Power-One 1.43 -.11
PwShsaQQQ 3.67 -.11
Powrwav 1.59 -.03
Presstek 1.86 -.07
PriceTR 42.54 +.47
priceine 11628 -.04
PdvateB 21.68 +.13
PrognicsPh 5.32 -.'o
ProspctCap 927 +.01
ProspBcsh 28.72 -.05
PsychSol 20.87 -.12
PureCye 2.90 -.04
QIAGEN 17.49 -.30
Qtogic 13.70 -.20
Qualcom 45.37 -.03
QuaittySys 49.81 -.52
QuantFuel .71 -.01
QuestSft 13.86 -.13
Questcor 4.70 -.02
Quidel 14.09 -.44
RFMicD 2.87 -.11
Rambus 14.59
Randgold 70.85 +2.31
RGSolar 3.98 +.78
RealNwk 2.77
RedRobin 18.65 +.31
RegentC h 25 +.06
RentACt 1999
RschMotn 81.95 -.75
RexEnergy 6.70 -.87
Riverbed 21.66 +.14
RosettaR 9.49 +25
RossStts 39.75 +.39
RoyGId 44.10 +.02


RivieraH .81 -.07
Rujbicn a 2.63 +.02

SeabGld g 28.43 +.42
SecAmwt .05 +.02
SilvrcpM gn 3.47 -.41
Sinovac 3.29 +.16
SulphCo 1.02 -.01
TanzRyg 3.74 +.04
Taseko 1.84 -.05
Telkonet .13
TrianAcwt .16 -.04
US Geoth 1.93 +.20
US Gold 2.46 +.02
Uluru .22 +.03


Rvanair 29.69 -1.15

SBACom 23.92 -.39
SEI Inv 17.16 -.30
SPSS 33.82 -.13
STEC 19.12 +.54
SVBFnGp 28,73 -.44
SanderFm 48.53 +.45
SanDisk 15.58 -.09
SangBio 3.93 -.29
Sanmlna .67 -.01
Sapient * 5.39 +.10
SavilentPh 6.79 -.41
Sawls 13.11 -.48
Schnitzer 54.50 -2.03
Schwab 18.308 -.04
SciGames 18.90 -.17
SeaChange 7.48 -.29
SeagateT 8,86 +.05
SearsHidgs 70.15 +.68
SealtGen 10.03 -.31
Selectvlns 13.94 -.01
Samtech 16.06 -.15
Senonyx 1.76 +,16
Sepracor 16.02 -.37
Sequenom 3.35 -.18
Shanda 61.64 -.62
Shire 40.92 -.73
SiRFTch 4.25 -.04
SigmaAld 49,94 +.36
SiganHld 47.25 +.05
Silicnlmg 2.46 +.03
SilcoLab 36.04 +.53
Slacnware 7.07 -21
SilvStdg 22.13 -.23
Sina 33.37 +.14
SioiusXM .35 +.01
SkyWest 10.35 -.38
SkywksSol 9.74 -.07
SmartBal 8.18 +.08
SmithWes 4.91 +.13
SmithMicro 10.03 -.59
Sohu.cn 66.90 -1.10
Solarfun 7.90 -.24
Somaxon 1.15 -.25
SonicCorp 9.44 -.28
SonicSolu 2.61 +.42
Sonus 2.13 -.10
SouMoBc 926 +.01
SpartnMot 10.64
SpectPh 5.20 +.22
Staples 20.42 +.19
StarBulk 4.60 -.38
StarSdent 4.85 -.10
Starbucks 14.97 -.12
SlarentNet 22.35 -.10
StODynamn 14.63 +.06
StemCells 1.70 -.05
Sl icyde 49.47 -.61
SterBcsh 6.96 -.06
SIaiFWA 3.95 -.16
StewEnt 4.68 -.18
SunMicro 9.21 +.04
Sunesish .47 -.11
SunOpta 2.17 +.13
SunPowerA 29.89 -1.68
SunPwBn 26.60 -2.23
SuperWell 8.73 -.29
SusqBoc 6.58 -.10
Swtch&DIt 12.48 -.91
Sycamore 3.46 -.10
Symantec 16.15 +.10
Symebticm 5.85 +.02
Synaplicss 336.79 -.62
Synerget 1.43 '+.23
Synopsys 19.41 -.02
Synovis 19.07 +.39
SynthEngy 1.43 -.18
Syntroleum 2.32 -26
TBSIntIA 9.44 -.55
TDAmeritr 19.21 +.39
TFSFndc 11.34 +.17
THQ 8.02 +.48
twtelecom 12.10 -.06
TakeTwo 8.44 -.09
TaleoA 18.30 +.37
TargGene h .40 -.05


UtdRefEwt .12 +.02
UnivTravn 11.13 +1.18
Uranerz 1.45 +.06
UraniumEn 2.47 +.26


VantageDd 1.65 -.08
VistaGold 2.19 -.07
Westmrd 9.60 -.33
WilshrEnt 1.61 +.01
YM Bi og .64 +.06


TASER 4.49 -.19
TechData 32.43 -.70
Tekelec 17.02 -.01
TICmSys 6.96 -.06
TeleTech 13.71 +.33
Telikh 1.04 -.06
Tellabs 5.96 +,13
TerreStar 1.00 +.03
TesseraT 26,26 -.77
TetraTc 27.25 +.25
TevaPhrm 47.78 +.01
TexRdhsA 11.88 -.43
Theravnoe 13.85 +.05
Thrmogn .77 +.04
thinkorswm 10.91 +.11
Thoratec 23.83 -.94
3Comr 5,02 +03
TiboSflt 6,67 -.11
TitanMach 15.04 -1.39
TiVo Inc 10.77 +.12
TridentMh 2.05 -.06
TrmbleN 21.12 -.08
TdQuint 5.13 -.06
TrueRelig 23.67 +.02
TrstNY 5.90 +.16
Trusrnk 19.48 +.23
UAL 4.65 -.39
UCBHIf 1.44 -.01
USCncrt 2.15 -.03
UTiWkdw 12.00 -.37
UTStrnc 2.32 -.11
UltaSalon 11.56 +.04
Umpqua 8.53 -.13
UtdNIrF 25.89 -.44
UldOnln 6.93 -.10
USEnr 2.13 +.05
UnivDisp 10.15 -.16
UnlvFor 31.92 -.91
UraniumR 1.55
UrbanOut 21.06 -.20

VCA Ant 25.75 +.05
ValenceTch 2.05 -.01
VaIVisA .80 +.02
ValueClick 11.62 +.34
VandaPhm 13.06 +.16
VaianSemi 24.69 +22
Veecolnst 11.28 +28
Verenium .71 +.04
Versign 19.90 -3.29
VertxPh 30.80 +.02
Vecal 2.25 -.08
VirgnMdah 8.64 -24
ViroPhm 5.96 -.14
VistaPrt 39.96 +.47
Vvws 5.49 -.05
Volcano 13.13 -.29
WamerChil 12.89 -.10
WarrenRs 2.40 +.01
WashFed 13.31 +.13
WemerEnt 19.30 -.13
WetSeal 3.42 +.05
WhitneyH 11.70 +.03
WholeFd 21.20 +.04
WrndRvr 11.69 +.06
WdwrdGov 22.21 -91
WIdAccep 20.12 +.16
Wynn 38.93 -1.67
XOMA 1.18 +.12
Xilinx 21.13 +21
XinhuaSpt .72 -.06
Xtent 1.40 -.55
YRCWwde 2.63 -.12
Yahoo 16.19 -.45
Zla rs .55 +.02
ZonBcp 14.32 -.15
Zollek 11.35 -.32
Zoran 11.56 +.28


Petrohawk 24.98 -.21
PetbrsA 34.60 -.25.
Petrobras 43.22 -.04
Pfizer 14.31 -.20
PhilipMor 44.53 +.43
PiaedNG 24.41 +.68
PlmcoStrat 9.05 -.13
PloNtri 27.75 +.15
PitnyBw 22.35 +.02
PlainsEx 30.00 -.49
PlumCrk 34.84 -.15
Polaris 32.77 -.19
Pol RL 55.86 -.53
PostPrp 15.69 -.75
Potash 111.94 -1.69
PwshDB 23.83 -.06
PSAgo 27.55 -.40
Praxalr 75.42 -.44
PrecDril 5.80 -.12
Pddelnt 24.96 -.53
PdnFnd 22.15 -.08
ProShlS&P 64.68 +.31
PrUShS&P 53.53 +24
ProUIDow 30.98 -.16
PrUIShDow 45.24 +.23
ProUltOOQ 38.75 -.30
PrUShQQQ 31.81 +.20
ProUltSP 27.26 -.22
ProUShL20 57.29 +.35
PrUShCh25 12.61 +.35
ProUIISEM 20.62 +.61
ProUShtRE 17.95 +.19
ProUShOG 16.62 +.07
ProUShtFn 39.97 -.08
ProUShtBM 17.45 +.80
ProUtRE 4.17 +.06
ProUltO&G 30.82 -.08
ProUltFn 4.26 +.04
ProUBasM 20.13 -.61
ProUSR2K 40.56 +.83
ProUltR2K 20.50 -.41
ProUlltCrude 12.95 +.I11
ProDtGam 53.14 -.04
ProgrssEn 35.53 -.15
ProgsvCp 16.80 +.22
ProLogis 9.20 +.03
ProvETg 5.27 -.07
Prudent 40.10 -.85
PSEG 31.92 -.47
PSEG pfA 69.06
PubStrg 66.27 -.21
PulteH 9.05 +.25
PPrIT 4.78 -.09
QuantaSvc 24.26 -.03
QtnmDSSh .86 -.10
Questar 33.35 +24
QksilvRes 11.29 -.18
Ouiksilw 3.62 +.13
QwestCm 3.93 -.24
RPM 15.20 +.04
RRI Engy 5.42 -.17
RadioShk 14.50 -.14
Ralorp 60.72 +.16
RangeRs 45.31 +.08
RJamesFn 17.21 +.17
Rayonier 39,83 -.31
R Fyir-,..,, J a" -"
Hir,.h',. _''


Argent
Australia
Bahrain
Brazil
Britain
Canada
Chile
China
Colombia
Czech Rep
Denmark
Dominican Rep
Egypt
Euro
Hong Kong
Hungary
India
Indnsia
Israel
Japan
Jordan
Lebanon
Malaysia
Mexico
N. Zealand
Norway
Peru
Poland
Russia
Singapore
So. Africa
So. Korea
Sweden
SwitzerInd
Taiwan
Thailand
Turkey
U.A.E.
Uruguay
Venzuel


RedHat 19.84 -.08
RegalEnt 11.76 -.09
RegBkHT 67.74 +.60
RegionsFn 4.07 +.07
ReneSola 6.71 +.50
Repsol 22.52 -.45
RepubSvc 22.48 -.52
RetailHT 81.15 +.72
RetailVent 3.41 +.19
Revion rs 5.04 -.05
ReynldAm 38.53 -.41
RiteAidh 1.64 -.10
RokwlAut 32.94 -.64
RockColl 46.45 -1.63
Rowan 22.19 -.24
RytCaorb 14.88 -.40
RoyDShIA 54.45 +.04
Royce 8.69 -.06
Royce pfB 22.94 +.02



SAIC 18.35 -.59
SAPAG 42.55 +.28
SCANA 30.42 +.01
SKTIcm 15.41 -.18
SLGreen 25.70 -.81
SLM Cp 7.93 +1.32
SpdrGold 93.56 -.15
SpdrHome 12.40 +.13
SpdrKbwBk 18.66 +.17
SpdrWilRE 37.21 -.23
SpdrKbwRB 19.96 -.15
SpdrReti 28.51 +.01
SpdrMeM 39.51 -.73
Safeway 20.44 -.16
SJoe 25.85 -.65
Slude 39.48 -.97
Saks 3.82 +.07
Salesforce 38.71 -.42
SJuanB 17.29 -.36
SandRdge 10.20 -.40
SaraLee 9.07 +.07
Satyar 2.72 +.01
SchergPI 23.54 -.26
Schlmbig 57.33 +.06
SealAir 19.63 -.11
SemiHTr 21.20 +.09
SempraEn 47.32 +.68
Sensient 23.86 -.28
ShawGrp 29.71 +.09
Sherwin 54.87 +.62
SiderNac 24.83 -.09
SilvWhtng 10.18 -.19
SimonProp 53.87 +.36
Skechers 9.62 -.12
SmithAO 31.09 -.65
Smihlnt 29.22 -.38 .
SmfithF 12.01 +.02
Smucker 43.78 +.32
SoJlerlnd 34.29 +22
SouthnCo 28.82 -.09
SthnCoppys 22.79 -.23
Swst/Ar 6.82 -.06
SwslnEngy 42.57 +.19
SpectraEn 16.64 +.14
I F -1F


The remainder of the
NYSE listings can be
found on the next page.




Yesterday Pvs Day


3.7560
1.2582
.3770
1.9548
1.5978
1.1185
565.40
6.8341
2064.50
19.34
5.3333
35.95
5.5985
.7162
7.7512
205.51
47.074
10035.00
3.9690
98.36
.7090
1501.50
3.4955
13.2918
1.5917
6.4211
2.981
3.25
30.9358
1.4546
8.0787
1247.40
7.8003
1.0862
32.62
34.23
1.5407
3.6720
23.2499
2.1473


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.50 0.50
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-25
Treairuds


3-month 0.19 0.15
6-month 0.345 0.29
5-year 2.92 2.54
10-year 3.88 3.71
30-year 4.63 4.57


-^ FUTURES


Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Jul09 68.09 -.35
Corn CBOT Jul 09 435 -9
Wheat CBOT Jul09 598 -25
Soybeans CBOT Jul09 1232V2 +7
Cattle CME Aug09 80.62 -.53
Pork Bellies CME Jul09 61.90 -.80
Sugar (world) NYBT Jul09 15.37 -.16
Orange Juice NYBT Jul09 88.20 -2.20

SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $951.70 $978.60
Silver (troy oz., spot) $14243 $1 5.b5
Copper (pound) $2.24/U $2.310
Platinum (troy oz., spot)41244.UU0 122U.b
NMER = New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT =
Chicago Board ofTrade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


3.7590
1.2702
.3771
1.9708
1.6045
1.1183
568.45
6.8383
2092.50
19.42
5.3619
35.95
5.6059
.7199
7.7514
205.72
47.524
10025.00
3.9783
98.40
.7083
1501.50
3.5215
13.4605
1.6178
6.4465
3.005
3.25
31.4051
1.4572
8.1643
1247.40
7.8616
1.0917
32.87
34.38
1.5590
3.6714
23.2499
2.1476


* FREE at 375 Upscale
Locations from Perry
to Pasco

* New Each Month

- * Homes, Land, Rentals

SAffordable Prices


CALL TODAY I

Email ad copy and photos to: 2-563-5592
renews-pam@charter.net 352-563-5592


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C...... CONT (F)CRNCEBSNS


A 3


Name NAV Chg
AIM Investments A:
ChartAp 12.72
Const p 17.53
HYdAp 3.44
IntlGrow 20.78
SelEqtyr 13.48
AIM Investments B:
CapDvB t 9.74
AIM Investor Cl:
Energy 31.16
Utilities 12.75
Advance Capital I:
Balancp 12.36
Retlnc 7.62
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGrt 4.36
* AlllanceBernm A:
* BalanAp 12.12
GIblhGrAp 54.78
IntlValAp 1123
SmCpGrA 20.03
AlllanceBem Adv:
LgCpGrAd 18.65
AlllanceBem B:
GIbThGrBt 47.94
Growths t 17.64
SCpGrBt 16.33
AlllanceBern C:
SCpGrC t 16.41 ...
Allianz Instl MMS:
NFJDvVI 9.03 ...
SmCpVl 20.99
Alllanz Funds A:
NFJDvVIt 8.94
SmCpVA 20.07 ...
Allianz Funds C:
GrowthCt 17.54
TaigetCt 9.60
Amer Beacon Instl:
LgCaplnst 14.37
Amer Beacon Inv:
LgCap Inv 13.68
Amer Century Adv:
EqGroAp 15.65
Amer Century Inv:
Balanced 12.69
Eqlnc 5.88
Growth 18.47
Heritagel 13.38
InoGro 18.52
IntDisc 7.22
IntfGmrol 8.11
NewOpp 4.86
OneChAg 9.14
OneChMd 9.25
RealEstI 10.97
Ultra 16.25
Valuelnv 4.40
Vista 11.76
American Funds A:
AmcpAp 13.92
AMutlAp 19.79
BalAp 14.23
BondAp 10.99
CapWAp 18.81
CapIBAp 42.44
CapWGAp 28.61
EupacAp 3212
FdlnvAp 27.78
GovtAp 13.80
GwthAp 23.48
HITrAp 9.07
HilnMunA 12.68
IncoAp 13.31
IntBdAp 12.74 ...
ICAApx 22.08
UTEBAp 15.00
NEcoAp 18.87
NPerAp 21.16
NwWridA 39.28
SSTBAp 9.87 ...
SmCpAp 25.25
TxExAp 11.59
WshA p 21.22
American Funds B:
BalBt 14.19
CaplBBt 42.40
CpWGrBt 28.43
GrwthBt 22.71
IncoBt 13.20
ICAB tx 2200
Ariel Investments:
Apprec 25.35
Ariel 27.63
Artio Global Funds:
IntlEqI r 26.01
IntJEqA 25.41
IntEqllAt 10.48
IntEqll I r 10.54
Artisan Funds:
Intl 16.83 ...
MidCap 21.39
MidCapVal 14.85
SCapVal 11.70
Baron Funds:
Asset 38.58
Growth 34.84
SmCap 16.03 ...
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 12.23
DivMu 14.14
NYMu 13.90
TxMgdlntl 12.79
IntlPort 12.73
EmMkts 22.18
BlackRock A:
AuroraA 13.04
CapDevAp 12.62
EqtyDiv 13.61
GIAIAr 16.05
HiYlnvA 5.91
IntlOpAp 26.24 ...
BlackRock B&C:
GIAICt 15.00
BlackRock Instl:
BaVlI 19.24
GIbAIocZr 16.12
Brandywine Fds:
BlueFd 19.16
Bmdywn 19.35
Brinson Funds Y
HiYldlIY 5.23
Buffalo Funds:
SmCap 19.42
CGM Funds:
Focus 26.84
Mutt 22.32
Realty 15.78
CRM Funds:
MdCpVeI 20.86
Calamos Funds:
Gr&lncAp 24.57
GrwthAp 36.59
GrowthCt 33.68
SCalvert Group:
Incop 14.23
IntIEqAp 11.75
Munlnt 10.33
SodalAp 21.85
SocBdp 14.35
SocEqAp 25.64
TxF Lt 9.49
TxFLgp 15.60
TxFVT 15.42
Cohen & Steers:
RtyShrs 35.15
Columbia Class A:
AcornMt 1 19.35
21CniryAt 9.42
MarsGrAt 14.60
Columbia Class Z:
Acorn Z 19.93
AcomlntZ 27.92
� CoreBdZ 10.10
IntBdZ 8.07
IntTEBd 10.04
LgCpldxZ 1826
MarsGrZ 14.83
MdCpVIZp 9.15
ValRestr 34.68
DFA Funds:
InttCorEq 8.54
USCorEql 7.79
USCorEq2 7.66
DWS Invest A:
ComnrnAp 12.45
DrHiRA 25.20
MgdMuni p 8.66
StrGovSecA 8.48
DWS Invest S:
CorPslinc 9.76
EmMkln 9.35
EmMkGrr 13.77
EuroEq 19.06
GNMAS 14.88
GIbBdSr 9.69
GIbOpp 25.88
GIblThem 17.20
Gold&Prc 16.99
GrolncS "11.95
HiYtdTx 11.23
InfTxAMT 11.10
Int FdS 38.07
LgCoGro 22.03
LatAmrEq 38.36
MgdMuniS 8.67
MATFS 13.94
SPF50S 12.52
Davis Funds A:
NYVenA 25.71
Davis Funds B:
NYVenB 24.66
Davis Funds C &Y:
NYVenY 25.99


SNYVenC 24.83
Delaware Invest A:
Diver Incp 8.39
TrendAp 11.05
TxUSAp 10.59
Delaware Invest B:
SelGrB t 18.76
Dimensional Fda:
EmMCrEq 14.32
EmMktV 24.83
IntSmVa 12.68
USLgCo 27.83
USLgVa 14.06
US Micro 8.96
US Small 13.64
USSmVa 15.92
IntlSmCo 11.91
SEmgMldkt 21.90
Fixd 10.28
IntVa 14.30
Glb5Fxlnc 11.00
2YGIFxd 10.28
DFARIE 13.16 ...
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced 54.41
Income 12.32
IntlStk 25.92


I


Paper 21.33
Pharm 8.72
Retail 36.28 ...
Softwr 57.48
Tech 56.16
Telcm 34.54
Trans 30.32
UtilGr 38.28
Wireless 6.12
Fidelity Spartan:
Eqldxlnv 33.39
ExtMkIn 25.24
500lnxlnv r 65.47
Intllnxlnv 28.35
TolMkilnv 26.63
Fidelity Spart Adv:
EqldxAd 33.39
50OAdr 65.48
TotMklAdr 26.63
First Eagle:
GIbIA 35.17
OverseasA 17.46
First Investors A
BIChpA p 16.69
GloblAp 5.02
GovtAp 11.00
GrolnAp 10.68


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed'on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name. Name of mutual funO and family
NAV. Nel assei value.
Chg- Net change in price of NAV.
Data based on NAVs reported Io Lipper by 6 p m Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
Stock 78.55
Dreyfus:
Aprec 29.04
CorVA 18.73
Dreyf 6.45
DrSOO1nt 26.55
EmngLd 13.93
GrChinaA r 36.91
HiYldA p 5.85
LgCStkAp 17.14 ...
MunBd r 10.78
StralValA 2123
TechGroA 20.00 ...
Driehaus Funds:
EMIdGr 23.38
Eaton Vance CIA:
ChinaA p 18.80
AMTFMBI 9.02
MutCGrA 5.86
InBosA 4.79
LgCpVal 14.26
NatlMun 8.85
SpEqtA 10.43
TradGvA 7.43
Eaton Vance CI B:
HlthSBt 8.30
NaOMBIt 8.85
Eaton Vance CI C:
GovtCp 7.42
NatlMCt 8.85
Evergreen A:
AstAllp 10.07
Evergreen C:
AstAllCt 9.76
Evergreen I:
SIMunil 9.63
FBR Funds:
Focuslnv 34.70
FMI Funds:
LgCapp 11.88
FPA Funds:
Nwlnc 11.00
FPACres 2221 ...
Fairholrne 25.43
Federated A:
AmLdrA 10.73 ...
MidGrStA 25.66
KautmAp 3.86
MuSecA 9.64
FederatedInstI:
KaufmnK 3.86
TotRetBd 10.30
Fidelity Adv FocT:
EnergyT 27.14 ...
HtCarT 15.38
Fidelity Advisor A:
DivlntlAr 12.60
Nwlnsghp 14.42
StrinA 10.87
FIdelity Advisor I:
Divintl 12.79
EqGrt 39.08
Eqlnl 17.78
IntBdl 9.94
Nwlnsgt 14.56
Fidelity AdvisorT:
BalancT 11.74
DivGrTp 825
DynCATp 12.94
EqGrTp 36.75
EqInT 17.52
GrOppT 2292
HilnAdTp 7.33
IntBdT 9.92
MulncTp 1220
OvrseaT 14.22
STFiT 8.76
Fidelity Freedom:
FF20= 10.55
FF2010 11.15
FF2015 925
FF2020 10.95
FF2025 9.00
FF2030 10.64
FF2035 8.77
FF2040 6.10
Income x 9.98
Fidelity Invest:
AggrGrr 13.63
AllSectEq 10.08
AMgr50 12.17
AMgr70r 1229
AMgr20rx 11.00
Balance 1424
BlueChGr 30.10
CAMun 11.46
Canada 43.52
CapAp 17.72
CapDevO 7.47
Cplnc r 6.90
ChinaRg r 23.47
CngSx 365.09
CTMunr 11.17
Contra 48.71
CnvSc 17.92
DisEq 17.83
Divlntl 23.73
DStkO 10.41
DivGth 19.02
EmrMk 17.71
Eq Inc 32.76
EQII 13.76
ECapAp 14.97
Europe 24.90
Exchx 251.42
Export 16.50
Fdel 24.69
Fifty r 12.97
RtRateHi r 8.85
FrInOne 21.04
GNMA 11.20
Govtlnc 10.57
GroCo 56.61
Grolnc 13.62
Highlncr 7.31
Indepn 16.12
InProBd 10.80
IntBd 9.52
IntGov 10.64
IntmMu 9.94
IntlDis c 25.49
IntSCp r 14.65
InvGrBd 10.78
InvGB 6.55
Japan 9.75
JpnSm 7.52
LgCapVal 9.95
LCpV1r 8.29
LatAm 39.73
LevCoStk 1820
LowPr 26.50
Magelln 54.39
MDMur 10.60
MAMun 11.46
MegaCpStk 7.35
MI Mun 11.59
MidCap 18.46
MNMun 1123
MtgSec 10.13
Muniinc 12.06
NJMunr 11.16
NwMktr 13.47
NwMill 20.30
NYMun 12.46
OTC 36.66
OhMun 11.34
1001ndex 6.82
Ovrsea 2722
PcBas 17.19
PAMunr 10.55
Puritn 14.06
RealEx 14.40
StIntMu 10.49
STBF 8.94
SmCaplndr .78
SmlICpSr 1220
SEAsia 22.12
StkSIc 18.34
Stratlnc 9.70
StrReRt r 7.70
TaxFrB r 10.41
TotalBd 9.76
Trend 45.60
USBI 10.69
Utility 12.29
ValStrat 1724
Value 45.44
Wridw 13.59
Fidelity Selects:
Air 23.81
Banking 12.83
Blotch 58.57
Brokr 4120
Chem 60.55
ComEquip 17.00
Comp 32.72
ConDis 15.40
ConStap 52.61
CstHo 24.71
DfAer 53.92
Bectdr 29.83 ...
Enrgy 38.62 ...
EngSv 51.49
Envir 13.57
FinSv 51.44
Goidr 3823
Health 86.11
HomF 9.35
Insur 32.72
Leisr 58.94
Material 41.98
MedDI 32.65
MdEqSys 20.15
Multmd 25.41
NtGas 28.63


LSModer 10.44 ..
Keeley Funds:
SmCpValAp 17.13
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 14.51
Legg Mason: Fd
SplnvCp 19.68
ValTrCp 30.15
Legg Mason Ptrs A:
AgGrAp 75.55
ApprAp 10.84
HilncAt 4.83
InAICGAp 6.71
LgCpGAp 18.67
MgMuAp 15.04


Name NAV Chg | Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg


Name NAV Chg
IncoAp 2.17
MATFA p 11.35
MITFAp 11.77
NJTFAp 12.60
NYTFAp 13.98
OppAp 18.35 ...
PATFAp 12.70
SpSitAp 16.47
TxExA p 9.58
TotRtAp 1221
ValueBp 5.45
Firsthand Funds:
Tech Val 25.66
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUS p 8.95
ALTFA p 10.77
AZTFAp 10.41
Ballnuvp 35.68
CalinsAp 11.62
CA IntAp 11.01
Car FAp 6.61
COTFAp 11.15
CTTFA p 10.45
CvtScAp 10.96
DblTFA 10.91
DynTchA 20.45
EqncA p 12.63
Fedlntp 11.13
FedTFAp 1126
FLTFAp 11.09
FoundAlp 8.47
GATFAp 11.48
GoldPrMA 33.87
GrwthA p 32.00
HYTFAp 9.22
HilncA 1.69
IncomAp 1.77
InsTFAp 11.43
NYITFp 10.74
LATFA p 10.77
LMGvScA 10.36
MDTFAp 10.71
MATFAp 11.12
MITFA p 11.61
MNInsA 11.97
MOTFAp 11.49
NJTFA p 11.52 ..
NYlnsAp 10.61
NYTFAp 11.24
NCTFAp 11.68
OhiolAp 1223
ORTFAp 11.41
PATFA p 9.88
ReEScA p 8.30
RisDvA p 24.41
SMCpGrA 23.77
Stratlncp 9.05
USGovAp 6.56
UtlsAtp 9.85
VATFAp 11.20
Frank/Tmp Fmk Adv:
GIbBdAdv p ..
IncmneAd 1.77
Frank/Temp Fmk B:
IncomeBt 1.77
Frank/rTemp Frnk C:
FoundAlp 8.34 ...
InconmCt 1.79
FrankTrremp Mil A&B:
BesacnA 9.69
DiscA 24.05
QualfdAt 15.32
SharesA 16.24
Frankr/Temp MtI C:
DiscC t 23.83
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 17.23
ForgnAp 5.37
GIBdAp 11.90
GrwthAp 13.87
WorddAp 11.62
FrankTrrempTmp Adv:
GrthAv 13.88
Frank/TenmpTmp B&C:
DevMktC 16.83
ForgnC p 5.26
GIBdCp 11.92
GE Elfun S&S:

S&S Inc 1028
S&SPM 31.83
TaxEx 11.31
GMO Trust ll:
EmMkr 9.85
For 10.34 ..
IntlntrVI 18.30
USQftyEq 16.63
GMOTrust IV:
EmCnDt 6.91
EmrMkt 9.80
IONtGrEq -IL:
IntllntrtV ' "8
GMOTrust VI:
EmgMktsr 9.81
StrFxlnc 15.50
USQRyEq 16.63
Gabeill Funds:
Asset 33.62
Gateway Funds:
GatewayA 23.71
Goldman Sachs A:
HiYiedA 6.03
MdCVAp 23.69
Goldman Sachs Inst:
HiYield 6.04
MidCapV 23.88
Harbor Funds:
Bond 11.73 ..
CapAplnst 2726
Intllnvt 43.87
Int r 44.28 ...
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppA p 25.70
DivGthA p 14.64
Hartford Fds C:
CapApCt 23.06
Hartford Fds L:
GrwOppL 19.05
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 30.25
Div&Gr 15.05
Advisers 15.10
Stock 29.61
TotRetBd 10.02
Henderson Glbl Fds:
IntOppA p 18.03
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrilOrig 10.96
SelLgVOrig 17.13
HussmnStrGr 13.0066
ICON Fds:
Energy 16.01
HLthcare 10.83
ISI Funds:
NoAmp 7.44
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 19.36
AssetStAp 19.80
AssetStrYp 19.83
GINatRsAp 16.09
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBd A 10.72
MCpValp 15.85
JPMorgan Select:
HBSMkNep 16.11
JPMorgan Set CIs:
CoreBd 10.71
HYldBd 6.76
lntmTFBd 10.74
IntrdAmer 16.88
ShtDurBd 10.68
TxAwRRet 9.75
USLCCrPIs 14.96
Janus:
Balanced 21.52
Contrarian 11.08
Enterpr 38.69
FadTE
FlxBnd 9.76
Fund 21.58
FundaEq 16.00
Gl UfeSci 17.74
GiTechr 11.29
Grlnc 24.56
Orion 7.93
Ovseasar 35.90
PrkMCVInv 16.90
Research 2027
ShTmBd 2.98
Twenty 52.73
Ventur 34.57
WddW r 34.73
Janus Adv S Shre:
Forty 26.67
JennlsonDryden A:
BlendA 12.44
HighlncA 8.77
HiYtdAp 4.56 ...
Ut8lityA 7.55
JennlsonDryden B:
GrowthB 11.96
Hi3ldBt 4.56
John Hancock A:
BondAp 12.88
RgBkA 11.85
StrlnAp 5.65
John Hancock B:
StrlncB . 5.66
John Hancock C11:
LSAggr 9.02
LSBalanc 10.27
LSConsrv 11.08
LSGrwlh 9.83


EmMktS 23.71
Eqlnc 17.50
Eqlndex 25.40
Europe 11.86
GNMA 9.58
Growth 22.61
Gr&ln 15.07
HthSdi 20.83
Hiield 5.57
IntlBond 9.19
IntDis 29.80
IntlG&I 10.36
IntlSIk 10.30


Legg Mason Ptrs B:
LgCpGB t 17.12
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 19.52
Int 12.03
SmCap 17.06
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 11.56
StrincC 11.92
LSBondR 11.52
StrIncA 11.86
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 10.45
InvGrBdCp 10.39
InvGrBdY 10.46
Lord Abbott A:
AfilAp 8.68
AIValA 9.31
BdDebAp 6.47
MidCpAp 10.87
MFS Funds A:
MITA 14.69
MIGA 10.99
HilnA 2.78
MFLA 9.14
TotRA 11.77
UtIA 12.51
ValueA 18.07
MFS Funds B:
MIGB 9.92
GvSc B 9.86
HilnB . 2.79
MulnB 7.96
TotRB 11.76
MFS Funds Inst:
IntlnEq 1326
MainStay Funds A:
HIYdBA 5.04
MaInStay Funds B:
CapApBt 20.52
ConvBt 11.86
GovtBt 8.44
HYldBBt 5.02
InrEqB 9.94 .:.
SmCGBp 9.58
TotRtBt 12.96
MaIrs & Power:
Growth 5429
Managers Funds:
Bond 21.43
Manning&Napier Fds:
WidOppA 6.61
Marsico Funds:
Focus p 12.85
Matthews Asian:
India r 13.13
MergerFd 14.81
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 9.00
TotRIBdl 9.00
Midas Funds:
Midas Fd 2.97
Monetta Funds:
Monetta 11.07
Morgan Stanley A:
DivGthA 11.82
Morgan Stanley B:
DivGtB 11.92
GIbDivB 8.47 ...
StrasB 15.62
MorganStanley Inst:
InUEql 1127
MCapGrd 22.80
Munder Funds A:
IntemtA 17.92
MunderFunds Y:
MCpCGrYr 18.81
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 9.80
DiscZ 24.34
QualldZ 15.43
SharesZ 16.36
Neuberger&Berm Inv:
Focus 14.98
Geneslnst 32.18
Intir 12.19
Partner 19.34
Neuberger&Berm T:
Genesis 33.50
Nilholas Group:
HilncI 8.36 ..
Nich 34.16
Northern Funds:
HiYFxInc 6.38
SmCpldx 5.82 ....
Technly 9.87
NuveenCIA:
LtMBAp 10.63
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 8.65
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 27.67
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 22.62
Global 16.01
Int I r 13.34 ...
Oakmark r 29.11
Select r 18.75
Old Mutual Adv II:
Tc&ComZ 12.07
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 6.31
GIbSMdCap 10.97 ..
NonUSLgCp8.00 .
Oppenhelmer A:
AMTFMu 5.70
AMTFrNY 9.83
CAMunlA p 6.76
CapApAp 33.13
CaplncAp 6.97
ChmplncAp 1.65
DvMktAp 22.58
Disc p 3621
EquityA 6.69
GlobA p 43.44
GIbOppA 21.25
Gold p 28.35
IntBdAp 5.95
MnStFdA 24.46
MSSCAp 14.41
MidCapA 10.93
PAMuniAp 9.33
StrlnAp 3.54
USGvp 8.64
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 5.67
AMTFrNY 9.84 ...
CplncBt 6.86
ChmplncBt 1.65
EqutyB 6.22 ...
StrincBt 3.55
Oppenheimer C&M:
IntlBdC 5.93
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.09
RoMu Ap 14.09
RcNtMuA 621
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.60 ..
TotRtAd 10.31
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlIAsset 10.78
ComodRR 7.45
DevLcMkr 9.10
Divlnc 9.32
EmMkBd 9.33
FrgnBd 9.36
HfYId 7.53
InvGrCp 10.17
LowDu 9.75
ModDur 10.04
RealRet 9.99
RealRtnl 10.14
ShortT 9.60
TotRt 10.31
TRII 10.00 .
TRIll 9.01 .
PIMCO Funds A:
LwDurA 9.75
RealRtAp 10.14
TotRIA 10.31
PIMCO Funds C:
RealRtCp 10.14
TotRICt 10.31
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 10.31
Pamassus Funds:
Eqtylnco 20.24
Pax World:
Balanced 18.18
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 34.82
PIoneer Funds A:
CullenVal 14.39
BondAp 8.48
EurSelEqA 19.54
InValA 16.62
MdCpGrA 10.39
PionFdAp 30.19
TxFreAp 9.48
ValueA p 9.06
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYtdBt 7.50
Fioneer Funds C:
HiYIdCt 7.58
Price Funds Adv:
Eqinc 17.47 " ...
Growth p 22.45
PrIce Funds:
Balance 15.33
BIChip 27.35
CABond 10.29
CapApp 15.59
DivGro 17.67
EmEurp 12.54


GrTxStr 11.08
Grwth 10.86
Gr&lnc 10.82
IncStk 9.12
Inco 11.41
Intl 17.97
NYBd 10.91
PrecMM 27.73


Japan 6.39
LatAm 34.06
MDShrt 5.24
MDBond 9.98
MldCap 39.23
MCapVal 16.62
NAmer 23.58
NAsia 12.85
New Era 37.90
NHoriz 20.79
N Inc .82
NYBond 10.67
OverS SF r 6.44
PSInc 13.19
RealEst 10.59
R2010 12.35 ...
R2015 925
R2020 12.51
R32025 9.01
R2030 12.73
R2035 8.91
R2040 1268
SoTec 17.69
ShtBd 4.71
SmCpStk 22.03
SmCapVal 25.15
SpecGr 12.66
Specln 10.82 ...
TFInc . 9.45
TxFrH 9.66
TxFrSI 5.46
USTInt 5.78
USTLg 11.69
VABond 11.16
Value 16.88
Principal Inv:
BdMtgIn 8.66
DIscLCInst 9.56
LgCV3In 7.86
LgGrin 5.88
LT2030n 8.73 ...
LT20201n 8.97
SAMBalA 10.13
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.12
AZTE 8.63 ...
CATxA p 7.31
Convp 14.61
DvrlnAp 6.64
EqlnAp 11.51
EuEq 15.25
GeoAp 9.66
GIbEqtyp 6.95
GrInAp 9.97
GIblHithA 39.20
HiYdA p 6.29
HiYId In 4.97
IncmAp 5.60
IntGrln p 7.73
InvAp 9.41
NJTxAp 8.88
NwOpAp 35.78
PATE 8.70
TxExAp 8.03 ...
TFInAp 14.25
TFHYA 10.40
USGvA p 1341
GIblUtlA 9.99
VstaAp 7.30
VoyAp 15.47
Putnam Funds B:
DvdnBt 6.59
Eqlnct 11.39
EuEq 14.61
GeoBt 9.56
GIbEqt 6.29
GINtRst 14.67
GrInBt 9.78
GIblHIthB 33.09
IHYldBt 6.27
HYAdBt 4.89
IncmBt 5.56
IntGrInt 1 7.65
InUNopt 11.18
InvBt 8.47
NJTxBt 8.87 ..
NwOpBt. 31.28
TxExBt 8.04 ...
TFHYBt 10.42
USGvBt 13.35
GIblUtilB 9.94
VistaBt 6.20
VoyBt 13.19
RS Funds:
IntGrA 12.84
LgCAIphaA 30.85
Value 17.06
Rainier Inv Mgt:
SmMCap 21.71
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 7.08
RiverSource A:
BalanceA 7.93 ...
DispEqA p 4.07
DEI 7.32
DivrBd 4.52
DvOppA 5.71 ...
Growth 19.53
HiYdTEA 4.04 ...
LgCpEq p 3.01
MCpGrA 7.59
MidCpVIp 5.24
RiverSource I:
TNEmgMkt 6.90
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 11.31
MicroCapl 11.01
PennMul r 7.85
Premierd r 13.96
TotRetl r 9.29
ValSvct 8.55 ...
VlPISvc 9.59
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 9.36
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 9.30
SEI Portfolios:
CoreFxA 9.16
IntlEqA 6.77
LgCGroA 15.94
LgCValA 12.18
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 15.39
Schwab Funds:
HthCare 12.03
1000lnvr 27.93
1060Sel 27.90
S&P Inv 14.62
S&PSel 14.67
S&PlnstSI 7.48
SmCplnv 13.87
Selected Funds:
AmShD 30.96
AmShSp 30.96
Seligman Group:
ComunAt 30.77
FrontrAt 7.81
GIbSmA 9.68 ...
GIbTchA 14.15
HYdBAp 2.28 ...
Sentinel Group:
CormSAp 23.59 ...
Sequoia 98.42
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 3328
SoundSh 24.47
St FarmAssoc;
Gwth 42.90
Stratton Funds:
Dividend 16.40
Multi-Cap 29.17
SmCap 34.07
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBI 9.53
TCW Funds:
TotRetBdl 9.43 ...
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bondlnst 9.74 ...
Tamarack Funds:
EntSmCp 14.89
Templeton InstI1:
ForEqS 16.39
Third Avenue Fds:
nstir 13.25 ...
RIEstVI r 16.93 ...
Value 40.43
Thomburg Fda:
IntValAp 21.16
IntValue I 21.65
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.09
Incom 7.26
Trenssmerlca A:
lexlncp 7.56
TA IDEX A:
TempGlbAp 20.71 ..
TrCHYB p 7.42
Turner Funds:
SmICpGr 21.64
Tweedy Browne:
GlobVal 17.39
UMB Scout Funds:
Intl 23.71
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 17.50
ChinaRag 7.53
GIbRs 7.25
Gid&MIs 13.46
WidPrcMn 13.97
USAA Group:
AgvGt 24.16
CABo 9.58
CmstStr 17.45
GNMA 9.90


Opptylnv 26.10
Westem Asset:
CorePlus 9.17
Core 9.40
William Blair N:
GrowthN 8.42
IntlGthN 15.42


Chronicle staff do not provide
financial advice or real-time
quotes on stocks or funds.
Consult a financial adviser.


Market drops,







yo-yos back


S&Pldx 14.13
SdTech 8.65
ShtTBnd 8.70
SmCpStk 8.95
TxEt 12.30
TxELT 12.15
TxESh 10.43
VABd 10.46
WdGr 13.59
VAUC:
MdCpldx 13.81
Stkldx 19.50
Value Line Fd:
LrgCo 13.26
Van Kamp Funds A:
CATFA p 15.86
CapGro 9.02
CmstAp 11.19
CpBdAp 5.88
EqlncAp 6.64
Exch 350.46
GrInAp 14.22
HarbAp 12.85
.HiYldA 8.42
HYMuAp 8.37
InTFAp 15.60
MunlAp 12.18
PATFAp 14.77
StrMunlnc 9.38
US MtgeA 12.36
UtilAp 15.61
Van Kamp Funds B:
EnterpB t 10.49
EqlncB t 6.52
HYMuBt I 8.37
MulB 12.16
StrMunlnc 9.38
USMtge 12.30
UOIB 15.52
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdml 17.26
CAITAdm 10.59
CALTAdm 10.66
CpOpAdl 56.02
EMAdmrr 27.23
Energy 102.46
ExplAdml 44.18
ExtdAdm 27.09
500Adml 86.98
GNMAAd 10.54
HlthCr 42.38
HiYIdCp 4.92
InfProAd 23.51
rIBdAdml 10.16
ITsryAdml 11.26
IntGrAdm 44.98
ITAdml 13.17
ITGrAdm 8.83
LUdTrAd 10.89
LTGrAdml 8.06
LTsyAdml 10.84
LTAdml 10.62 ...
MCpAdml 59.80
MorgAdm 39.51
MuHYAdm 9.81' ...
NJLTAd 11.32
NYLTAd 10.69
PrmCapr 50.70
PALTAdm 10.70
STsyAdml 10.75
STBdAdml 10.23
ShtTrAd 15.85
STFdAd 10.79
STIGrAd 10.11
SmrCAdm 2276
TxMCap r 4627
TtBAdml 10.02
TStkAdm 23.13 ..
WellslAdm 44.37
WelftnAdm 43.94
Windsor 33.46
WdsrllAd 35.04
Vanguard Fds:
AssetA 18.92
CALT 10.66
CapOpp 24.25
Convert 10.93
DivdGro 11.56
Energy 54.56
Eqlnc 15.49
Explr 47.47
FLLT 10.93
GNMA 10.54
GlobEq 13.13
Groln c 20.16
GrthEq 7.76
HYCorp 4.92 ...
HlthCre 100.40
InflaPro 11.97
IntfExpir 11.41
IntiGr 14.14
IntlVal 25.94
IGrade 8.83
ITTsry 1126
LfeCon 13.77
UfeGro 16.94
Ufelnc 12.46
UfeMod 15.77
LTlGrade 8.06 ...
LTTsry 10.84
Morg 12.74
MuHY 9.81
Mulnt 13.17
MuLtd 10.89
MuLong 10.62
MuShrt 15.85
NJLT 11.32
NYLT 10.69 ...
OHLTTE 11.63
PALT 10.70
PrecMfis r 16.27
PnscpCor 9.99
Prmcp r 48.85
SelValur 13.04
STAR 15.42
STIGrade 10.11
STFed 10.79
STTsry 10.75
StratEq 12.61
TgtRetInc 9.82 ...
TgRe2010 18.50
TgtRe2005 10.10
TgtRe2025 9.87
TgtRe2015 10.08
TgRe2020 17.56
TgRe2030 16.64
TgtRe2035 9.94
TgtRe2040 16.27
TgtRe2045 10.28
USGro 13.78 ...
USValue 7.74
Wallsly 18.31
Weltn 25.44 ...
Wndsr 9.91
Wndsll 19.74 ..
Vanguard Idx Fds:
500 86.96
Balanced 17.25
DevMkt 8.01
EMkt 20.70
Europe 21.78
Extend 27.08
Growth 2271
ITond 10.16
LgCaplx 17.29
LTBnd 10.77
MidCap 13.18
Pacific . 8.69
REITr 11.33
SmCap 22.75
SmlCpGth 13.86 ...
SmlCpVl 10.88
STBnd d 10.23
TotBnd 10.02
Totlln-l 12.11
TotStk 23.12 .
Value 15.93
Vanguard eInst Fds:
Ballnst 17.26
DvMkldnst 7.94
Eurolnst 21.79
Extin 27.09
Grwthlst 22.72
IntProlnst 9.58
Instldx 86.42 ...
InsPI 86.42 ...
TotlBdIdx 50.33 ...
InstTSgldx 20.89
InsTStPius 20.89 ...
MdlCplst 13.21
Paclnst 8.70
SCInst 22.77
TBIst 10.02
TSInst 23.13 .
Valuelst 15.94 :
Vanguard StIgnal:
500Sg1 71.65
ITBdSig 10.16
MldCpldx 18.88
STIdIdx 10.23
TotBdSgl 10.02 ...
TotstkSgl 22.32
Vantagepolnt Fds:
Growth 6.55
Victory Funds:
DvsStA 11.98
Waddell & Reed Adv:
Assets p 7.64
CorelnvA 4.23
DivOppAp 11.46
DCiOppCt 11.36
ScTechA 7.88
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 25.46
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStkZ 13.71


Associated Press

NEW YORK - Investors
might be worried about the
soundness of the market's.
rally but they're also wor-
ried about missing it
Stocks reversed steep
losses in the final hour of
trading Monday to end little
changed. The Dow Jones In-
dustrial average recovered
from a 130-point slide to end
up a little more than a point
The market spent much of
the day falling along with
commodities prices, but
then regained ground as
commodities came off their
lows. A retreat in metals
prices pressured the stocks
of companies including alu-
minum maker Alcoa Inc.
and Freeport-McMoRan
Copper & Gold Inc. Com-
modities tend to rise along
with investors' belief in an
economic recovery, and fall
when pessimism sets in.
But volume on the stock
market was light, and
Stephen Carl, head of equity
trading at The Williams
Capital Group in New York,
said that made the market
susceptible to quick
changes in direction. With
fewer players trading
stocks, it takes relatively
less action to nudge the
market from one direction
to another.
"On light volume they're
just kind of looking for any-
thing" to move stocks, Carl
said.
As Monday's trading
wound down and prices
were recovering, many in-
vestors piled back in. Some
financial stocks were among
those that recovered as in-
vestors waited to see which
banks will be allowed to
repay government bailout


Market watch
June 8, 2009

Dow Jones +1.36
Industrials 8,764.49

Nasdaq " -7 .0 ...
composite 1,842.40

Standard & -o.09
Poor's 500 939
939.14

Russell
2000 524.79

NYSE diary
Advanced: 1,113
Declined: 1,892
Unchanged: 112
Volume: 4.48 b

.'Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 867
Declined: 1,469
Unchanged: 98
Volume: 1.85.b

SOURCE: SunGard AP

money. The government
may issue that list as early
as today.
Traders said the day's
jagged, motions signal that
the market is still trying to
determine whether to pro-
ceed with a three-month
rally that has lifted the Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 index 38.8
percent from a 12-year low
on March 9.
"There's a growing sense
of confusion as to when ex-
actly this decline, in the
economy will end and what
kind of expansion will come
on the heels of it," said
Joseph Battipaglia, market
strategist for the private
client group at Stifel Nico-
laus & Co.
By day's end, the Dow was
up 1.36, or less than 0.1 per-
cent, at 8,764.49. The Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 index
slipped 0.95, or 0.1 percent,


Rates rise at T-bill auction


Associated Press, ; was the highest since 0.370 turbulence in financial mar-
percent on April 13. kets struck with force.
WASHINGTON - Inter- The discount rates reflect A better-than-expected
est rates on short-term that the bills sell for less reading on labor market
Treasury bills rose in Mon- than face value. For a conditions last week bol-
day's auction. Rates on six- $10,000 bill, the three-month' stered the view that the re-
month bills hit the highest price was $9,995.20, while a cession is starting to ease.
level since mid-April., six-month bill sold for The Labor Department said
The Treasury Depart- $9,982.56. That would equal the number of payroll jobs
ment auctioned $31 billion an annualized rate of 0.193 lost in May totaled 345,000,
in three-month bills at a dis- percent for the three-month the smallest monthly de-
count rate of 0.190 percent, bills, and 0.350 percent for crease since September.
up from 0.150 percent last the six-month bills. Separately, the Federal
week Another $31 billion in Rates on various types of Reserve said Monday that
six-month bills was auc- Treasury securities have the average yield for one-
tioned at a discount rate of been rising as investors be- year Treasury bills, a popu-
0.345 percent, up from 0.290 come more convinced that lar index for making
percent last week " the worst of the recession is changes in adjustable rate
The three-month rate was over That has lessened the mortgages, edged up slightly
the highest since those bills flight to safety that drove up to 0.50 percent last week
averaged 0.195 percent on demand for Treasury securi- from 0.49 percent the previ-
May 4. The six-month rate ties beginning last fall when ous week.


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NEWYORK-STOCK-EXCHANGE


Name Last
SPMid 107.83
SP Mads 27.40
SP HlhC 25.51
SP CnSt 23.71
SP Consum2423
SP Engy 51.99
SPDRFnd1241
SPInds 23.79
SP Tech 18.23
SP Uo 26.95
Standex 10.98
StarwdH 25.562
StaleStr 47.41
Steris 25.08
Sbker 40.02
SturnRug 11.85
SubPpne 42.34
SunCmts 15.00
Suncorgs 33.84
Sunoco 27.97
SunstnHO 5.80
Suntech 16.94
SunTrst 17.35
Supvalu 16.92
SyOMIvus 3.04
Sysco 23.71
TCFFnd 13.63
TECO 11.50
TJX 30.80
TawSemi 10,21


Talbots 5.00
Tal smEgs 1529
Target 40.98
TataMotors 10.47
Tedkes g 17.56
TelcmNZ 8.13
Te[MexLs 1629
Templelnld 13.81
Tenaris 3020
TenetHlh 3.56
Tennecoh 8.00
Teppco 2929
Teradata 23.42
Teradyn 7.01
Terex 14.62
Terra 26.80
TerraNtro 110.83
Tesoro 15.68
TetraTech 9.73
Texinst 19.77
Textron 12.01
Therfash 1.02
ThermoFis 39.66
ThmBet 32.16
3MCo 60.69
Tirany 29.63
TWCable rs 3225
TimeWmrs 25.51
Tlimken 18.44
TianMet 10.74
ToddShph 15.10
ToUBros 17.60


TorchEn f
Trchmrk
TorDBkg
Total SA
TOWlSys
TransAtH
Transocm
Travelers
Tredg
TrContw
TycoElec
Tycolnl
Tyson
UBSAG
UDR
UIL Hold
USAkwy
USEC
UniFirst
UnilevNV
UnionPac
UtdMicro
UPS B
UtdRntais
US Barncrp
US NGsFd
US OFd
USSteel
UtdTech
UtdhthGp
UnumGrp


ValeSA 19.57 +.07
Vale SApf 16.85 +.14
ValeanPh 23.41 -.01
ValeroE 18.24 +.03
VangTSMs 47.34 -.13
VangREIT 33.81 -.63
VangErmgs 32.42 -.48
VarianMed 35.92 -.26
Vedren 23.37 -.09
Ventas 31.15 +.07
VedriaEnv 29.63 -20
VerizonCm 29.28 +.03
ViacomB 22.95 +.32
VimpelCm 12.59 -.94
Visa 69.80 +52
V 6.05 -.35
one 18.17 +.12
Vomado 49.40 +.67
Votorantm 11.84 -.31
WGLHold 31.33 +.08
Wabash 1.40 -.06
WalMart 50.81 -26
Walgrm 31.30 +.47
WalterEn 33.76 +.63
WsteMInc 27.96 -.32
Wealflntl 20.26 -.37
WelnRIt 15.75 -27
WellPoint 46.14 -1.67
WellsFargo 25.39 +67
WendyArby 4.10 +.07


WestarEn 17.85
WAstEMkl 10.06
WslAMgdH 4.98
WAstlnfOpp 11.41
WDi glIf 23.81
WstnRefin 8.37
WstnUnion 17.15
Weyedr 34.10
Whdpl . 43.21
WilmCS 5.24
WmsCos 17.01
WmsPtrs 18.55
WmsSon 13.32
Windstrm 8.35
Wimnbgo 7.90
WiscEn 40.39
Worhgtn 14.18
Wyeth 43.94
Wyndam 12.23
XLCap 10.93
XTO Engy 40.51
XcelEngy 17.54
Xerox 7.10
Yamanag 10.72
YingtGm 15.28
YumBmds 35.74
Znmmer 42.71
ZweigT] 3.45


2009 A7


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


to 939.14, and the Nasdaq
composite index fell 7.02, or
0.4 percent, to 1,842.40.
Monday marked the ar-
rival of Travelers Cos. and
Cisco Systems Inc. in the
Dow, replacing Citigroup
Inc. and General Motors
Corp. Travelers rose 47
cents to $43.92, while Cisco
was unchanged at $19.87.
Commodities have been
rallying in recent weeks on
optimism that a pickup in
manufacturing would in-
crease demand for raw ma-
terials like copper, silver
and oil. But that confidence
eroded for much of Monday,
making for erratic trading
on Wall Street as investors
turned against companies
whose business is to pro-
duce commodities and basic
materials.
Commodities also fell as
the dollar strengthened. A
stronger dollar reduces the
appeal of assets like com-
modities; the dollar's
strength in the latter part of
2008 contributed to the col-
lapse in commodities
prices.
Alcoa fell 17 cents to
$10.77, while Freeport-Mc-
MoRan slid 68 cents to
$56.48.
Light, sweet crude fell 35
cents to settle at $68.09 per
barrel on the New York
Mercantile Exchange, while
gold for August delivery lost
$10.10 to settle at $952.50.
JPMorgan Chase & Co.
rose 84 cents, or 2.4 percent,
to $35.39, while American
Express Co. rose 70 cents, or
2.8 percent, to $25.65.
Bond prices fell. The

yield on the 10-year note, a
widely used benchmark for
home mortgages, rose to
3.89 percent from 3.84 per-
cent late Friday.


BUSINESS










Page A8- TUESDAY, JUNE 9,2009



PINION


Jo "Collecting more taxes than is absolutely
necessary is legalized robbery."
Calvin Coolidge, 1872-1933


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


TIGHTEN THE BELT


Hold the line



on property



tax rates


he taxable value of prop-
erty in Citrus County is
falling.
That's important for both
personal and public reasons.
On the personal side, a drop
in the taxable value of property
means that home
and .land values
are decreasing. THE I1
While that may Dropping
not be important valid
if you don't plan
on selling your OUR 01
home, land or
business, it is very Hold oft
important to resi- millag
dents who came incr(
here within the
last five years and purchased
homes when values were
higher.
In some cases, residents now
have mortgages that are higher
than the current value of their
homes. The result of that value
decrease can be seen every
week when the Chronicle pub-
lishes notices of home foreclo-
sures.
The result of the value de-
crease can also be seen in the
centers of local government.
When the values of homes and
property decrease, the amount
of money government can
raise by levying the same tax
millage also drops. In the case
of Citrus County, the assessed
value dropped 8 percent. In
both Inverness and Crystal
River, the value dropped 9 per-
cent.
What that means is that our
local governments have two


The real world
Welcome to the real world, Cit-
rus County. Brad Thorpe's salary
and benefits are low compared to
some of the counties in
the state of Florida. 0
Check Lee County.
Thanks, ma'am
This is a big "thank
you" to the lady at Lowe's
in Inverness that found j
my purse in my shopping "
cart that I had forgotten.
And I want to thank the C A
employees of Lowe's 56-
themselves for putting iI
the purse in a safe until I
got there. In this day and age, it
really, really makes you feel good.
God bless the woman that found
my purse. Thank you.
Summer streets
No sidewalks - very true. Sum-
mer is here and the people walk-
ing their dogs - I'm guilty, I walk
mine. But I seen a man walking
his dog and its tongue was as
long as its tail and I couldn't tell
if it were coming or going and the
man looked just about as bad.
But I have to walk mine on the
street, for his nails. But if I see a
car coming either way, I get off
the street. And also, it's summer.
time, the street's hot now. Take
your shoes off. Burn their little
feet; burn yours, too.
Starved for smokes
What's up now again with these
cigarettes going up again? What's
going on here? I've been smoking
for 45 years and I could never
quit. This is crazy. I'll buy a pack


choices. They can either raise
the tax rate on property to gen-
erate the same amount of rev-
enue as last year, or they can
figure out how to reduce
spending by the prescribed
amount.
Neither option
is all that attrac-
SSUE: tive, but most
property local and state
es. businesses have
been faced with
'INION: the same dilemma
for the past year.
on any Most businesses
e rate have figured out
,ase. how to survive
and continue with
fewer dollars. The ones that
could not adapt have ended up
closing their doors.
No one wants to advocate a
reduction in government serv-
ices, but at the same time it is
impossible to support raising
property taxes on local home-
owners and businesses.
Too many people have lost
their jobs, lost their homes or
lost their businesses for gov-
ernment to consider demands
for a higher percentage of
taxes. Instead, our expectation
is that local government will
figure out how to do more with
less.
Homeowners and businesses
have had to cut back. Our local
government needs to do the
same thing.
When it comes time to certify
tax rates for 2009-10, we urge
our elected officials to be sen-
sitive and hold the line.


of cigarettes before I buy a meal.
So thanks for helping me and my
family starve.
Plantation Inn status


-0579


I'm an employee of the
Plantation Inn and Golf
Resort Restaurant. I'd just
like to make it clear that
the Plantation Inn is not
closing any time soon. We
are going through a fore-
closure and that just
means we're changing
ownership. We are good
to go. Everything's still
operational and we're still
serving great food and the
hotel is still open.


All-county team
All-county football. The Chroni-
cle should consider naming the
All-county football team at the end
of the football season, say around
the Thanksgiving or Christmas
holiday. Waiting 'til June of the fol-
lowing year, even after spring foot-
ball, is questionable.
Friend of the Freezer
I just want to say that the
Freezer is providing a good serv-
ice, food and entertainment to the
people, and a place for people to
gather. Charlie Dean only provided
for himself. I don't know why
everybody's down on the Freezer...
Soap suds
This is to soap fans - just a lit-
tle levity: Please don't tell me that
the Mary Jane character on "The
Young and the Restless" is a rein-
carnated Sheila character. Just a
laugh.


Bush's Hispanic nominee


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........................................ publisher
Charlie Brennan .......................................... editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ...................................managing editor
Cheri Harris.................................... features editor
Curt Ebitz........................................ citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ................................... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson ..................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


n
1


U nless some-
thing entirely
unforeseen
happens, confirmation W
hearings for Supreme
Court nominee Sonia :
Sotomayor will be a
lovefest for the Democ-
rats who run the Sen-
ate Judiciary Com-
mittee. There will be Byroi
much talk about So- OTi
tomayor's historic op- V01
portunity to become VOI
the first Hispanic on
the high court, about her inspir-
ing background and about the
sterling qualifications she would
bring to the job. Sotomayor will
have the majority party strongly
on her side, and odds are things
will end happily for her.
For some Republicans, how-
ever, it will be hard to avoid
thinking back a few years, to a
confirmation hearing that didn't
end happily at all. In 2001, Presi-
dent George W Bush nominated
former Justice Department
lawyer Miguel Estrada to a seat
on the federal court of appeals. In
that instance, as today, the nomi-
nee was a Hispanic with a com-
pelling story and impressive
qualifications. And some of the
very people who are today prais-
ing Sotomayor spent their time
devising extraordinary measures
to kill Estrada's chances.
Born in Honduras, Estrada
came to the United States at age
17, not knowing a word of Eng-
lish. He learned the language al-
most instantly, and within a few
years was graduating with honors
from Columbia University and
heading off to Harvard Law
School. He clerked for Supreme
Court Justice Anthony Kennedy,
spent time as a prosecutor in
New York, and worked at the Jus-
tice Department in Washington
before entering private practice.
Estrada's nomination for a fed-
eral judgeship set off alarm bells


among Democrats.
There is a group of
left-leaning organiza-
tions - People for the
American Way,
NARAL, the Alliance
for Justice, the Leader-
ship Conference on
Civil Rights, the
NAACP and others -
York that work closely with
IER Senate Democrats to
promote Democratic
CES judicial nominations
and kill Republican
ones. They were particularly con-
cerned about Estrada.
In November 2001, representa-
tives of those groups met with
Democratic Senate staff. One of
those staffers then wrote a memo
to Democratic Sen. Richard
Durbin, informing Durbin that the
groups wanted to stall Bush nom-
inees, particularly three they had
identified as good targets. "They
also identified Miguel Estrada as
especially dangerous," the staffer
added, "because he has a minimal
paper trail, he is Latino, and the
White House seems to be groom-
ing him for a Supreme Court ap-
pointment They want to hold
Estrada off as long as possible."
It was precisely the fact that
Estrada was Hispanic that made
Democrats and their activist al-
lies want to kill his nomination.
They were determined to deny a
Republican White House credit,
political and otherwise, for put-
ting a first-rate Hispanic nomi-
nee on the bench.
Durbin and his colleagues did
as they were instructed. But they
had nothing with which to kill the
nomination - no outrageous
statement by Estrada, no ethical
lapse, no nothing. What to do?
They brainstormed. Estrada had
once worked in the Justice De-
partment's Office of Solicitor Gen-
eral, right? (Appointed under the
first President Bush, Estrada
stayed to serve several years under


LETTERS= to the Editor


Apologize for views
I have a question. Why does
the Chronicle publish Dr. Dixon's
outrageous slurs against hard-
working American families? Why
does the Chronicle find it accept-
able to publish irrational insults
against thousands of people liv-
ing and working in Citrus County
- people for whom the Chroni-
cle is ostensibly their "home-
town" newspaper!
People who pay taxes here.
People whose children attend
school here. People who are just
as educated as Dr. Dixon. People
whose lives are just as produc-
tive as Dr. Dixon's. People who
volunteer on community proj-
ects here, yet find themselves
being repeatedly bashed by ig-
norant and generalized assump-
tions prominently displayed as
facts within the pages of your
newspaper. Just who do you and
Dr. Dixon think you are? Is the
Chronicle part of the "Democ-
rats aren't really Americans
crowd." Is that who you are?
The contemptuous assump-
tions coloring Dr. Dixon's view of
fellow citizens who politically
disagree with him are debased.
I find it offensive that you
allow him to so often hurl his in-
sults directly into the faces of so
many of your readers. Decency
might make a refreshing change.


OPINIONS INVITED
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

Although I won't hold my
breath waiting for one, I deeply
feel that both the Chronicle and
Dr. Dixon owe the citizens and
Democratic voters of Citrus
County a full apology for the out-
rageous slurs against Americans
published in your paper.
If this practice is the Chroni-
cle's view of the aspirations of
conservatism - then may God
and the citizens of this country
forever protect America from
such destructive views of civil
society.
Shame on you all. You debase
America.
Corrie Jarrett
Dunnellon
Editor's note: Dr Dixon is a
community columnist who regu-
larly contributes his opinions to
the Chronicle. As with all colum-
nists, the opinions expressed are
not the official views of the
Chronicle. Columnists are pub-
lished in an effort to stir debate


about the important issues fac-
ing our community and country.
The official opinions of the
newspaper's Editorial Board are
clearly marked and presented
each day on the left-hand side of
the Opinion page.

Burning is backwards
Went out to my back porch to
enjo myy morning coffee and the
cool morning fresh air.
Achhh! The burn ban has been
lifted. "WHY?" I ask. This is the
21st century. Why are we still
burning rubbish, vegetation,
trash... in our back yards? With
all the concern of global warm-
ing, air pollution, carbon re-
lease, etc., why do our county
commissioners allow this prac-
tice to continue? The burn ban
was in effect for many months.
People had almost been weaned
off the habit, and then they lift
the ban. I can't even open my
windows and now must run the
air conditioning because of the
acrid smoke that fills the neigh-
borhood. We already know what
happens when open burning is
allowed. Or have the idiots that
regulate the burn ban forgotten
already? Come on people, this is
the 21st century, make the burn
ban permanent
Bill Watkins
Chassahowitzka


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Clinton.) That office decides which
cases the government will pursue
in the Supreme Court, right? And
that process involves confidential
legal memoranda, right? Well, why
don't we suggest that there might
be something damaging in those
memos - we have no idea
whether there is or not - and de-
mand that they be made public?
Durbin and his colleagues
knew the Bush Justice Depart-
ment would insist the internal
legal memos remain confidential,
as they always had been. It wasn't
just the Bush administration that
thought releasing the documents
was a terrible idea; all seven liv-
ing former solicitors general, Re-
publican and Democrat, wrote a
letter to Judiciary Committee
chairman Patrick Leahy begging
him to back off.
But the Democrats didn't back
off. They had a new, very serious
question to ask: What is Miguel
Estrada hiding?
The answer was nothing, of
course. But the strategy worked.
Democrats stonewalled Estrada's
nomination, and, after losing con-
trol of the Senate in 2002, they
began an unprecedented round
of filibusters to block an entire
slate of Bush appeals-court nom-
inees, Estrada among them. The
confirmation process ground to a
halt. More than two years after
his nomination was announced,
Estrada, tired of what appeared
to be an endless runaround, with-
drew his name from considera-
tion. Instead of being on the
federal bench, he is now in pri-
vate practice in Washington.
And that was how Democrats
treated the last high-level His-
panic court nominee. Think
about that when you watch their
lovefest with Sonia Sotomayor.

Byron York is chief political cor-
respondent for The Washington
Examiner.


u

P
�F
ff

e









CITRUS GOUNIY (FL) ~HJ ~flNICtF HEALTH & LIFE TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 2009 A9


* Orientation training with
Hospice of Citrus County, 9
a.m. to noon Wednesday at
the Inverness office, 326 S.
Line Ave., Inverness.
The class provides an
overview of hospice philosophy
and history.
To register for this class or to
request training for your group,
call Marcey Mast, Hospice of
Citrus County Volunteer Pro-
gram manager, at 527-6613 or
e-mail mmast@hospiceofcitrus
county.org.
* LifeSouth bloodmobile
schedule. To find a donor cen-
ter or a blood drive near you,
call 527-3061. Anyone 16 or
older who is in good health and
weighs at least 110 pounds is
eligible to donate.
0 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. today,
Subway, 2639 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
* 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednes-
day, Subway, 4089 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills.
* 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday,
Citrus County Detention Center,
2604 W. Woodland Ridge
Drive, Lecanto.
* 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday,
Big Lots, 445 W. Highlands
Blvd., Inverness.
0 8 a.m. to 1 pim. Sunday,
Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., Inver-
ness.
* 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday,
Subway, 6748 Gulf-to-Lake
- Highway, Crystal River.
�* 011 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday,
June 16, Walmart, 3826 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
* Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center's health edu-
cation programs are in the com-
munity room, second floor of
the Medical Offices Building
(across the street from the hos-
pital) unless otherwise noted.
Call 795-1234 or visit
www.srrmc.com to register.
* Grief.Support Group: 2:30
p.m. Tuesday. Workbook pro-
'vided. Call (800) 486-8784 to
register. Fiee.
* Balance screening: 11:15
a.m. to noon, first and third
Wednesday monthly, Seven
Rivers Rehab & Wound Center,
1675 S.E. U.S. 19, in the Crys-
tal River Shopping Center. No
appointment needed. Call 795-
0534. Free.
* Pre-Surgery Ortho Camp:
1 p.m. June 15. Learn about
pre- and post-surgery exer-
cises, knee' ahdd-ip precautions
and adaptive equipment. Call
795-0534 to register. Free.
* Diet therapy for diabetes:
6 p.m. Tuesday, June 30. Free.
* Parkinson's Exercise
Group: 10 a.m. Wednesday,
July 1, 15, 29 andAug. 12
(four-class program) teaches
Parkinson's patients and their
caregiver therapeutic exercises.
Take-home instructions also
provided. Free.
* Childbirth-related educa-
tion from the Women's & Fam-
ily Center. To make an
appointment, call 795-BABY
(2229).
. Seminar on "Reducing
Healthcare Cost" will be con-
ducted by Michelle McColley,
Bach Flower therapist, Master
Herbalist and certified natural
health professional, 11 a.m.
Saturday, June 20, at Doctor Vi-
tamin Store, 3930 S. Suncoast
'Blvd., Homosassa, in the Publix
shopping center. Call, as there
is limited seating: 628-7036.
L* "Gift of dyslexia" two-


hour lecture by Ronald D.
Davis, 7 p.m. Thursday, June
18, Clarion Hotel & Conference
Center, (Busch Gardens) 2701
E. Fowler Ave., Tampa. Pre-
registration: $8 or $16 per fam-
ily; at door; $10 or $20 per
family. Call Randee Garretson
at (813) 956-0502, e-mail
randee.garretson@verizon.net
or register online at: www.ronda
vislectures.com/June09/fl.html.
* "Stress & Becoming a
Healthy You" seminar, 1 to 3
p.m. Friday, June 26, Swenson
Hall at Joy Lutheran Church,
7045 S.W. 83rd Place at State
Road 200, Ocala, by Terrie
Hardison, executive director of
Alzheimer's & Dementia Al-
liance for Education'& Support
Inc.
* SPRING HILL-- Health
Matters Home Care has a Reg-
istered Nurse available to do
free speaking engagements
for your group, club, church or
organization. Call (352) 686-
4493 or (352) 686-5593.
* The Citrus Team of Her-
nando-Pasco Hospice (HPH)
and its not-for-profit Homecare
affiliate, HPH Homecare, pro-
vide ongoing education to Cit-
rus County residents about
their many programs, services
and volunteer opportunities.
There is no charge for a
speaker and the solicitation of
funds is never involved. Educa-
tional materials are provided at.
no charge. Call Wendy Hall,
community liaison, at 527-4600.
* The Lighthouse for the
Visually Impaired offers serv-
ices to Citrus County residents.
Workshops will include learning
skills, such, as managing medT
ications, money identification,
using adaptive equipment,
home management (safe cook-
ing and house-keeping), use of
magnification equipment for
reading and managing mail and
much more. All workshops are
free.
Call (866) 962-5254 or 527-
8399 The workshops will from.
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday at
the Center for Independent Liv-
ing of North Central Florida at
3774 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Lecanto, across from Cowboy
Junction.
* The Center for Independ-.
ent Living of North Central
Florida in Lecanto offers free
Social Security workshops, SSI,
SSDI, Medicare and Medicaid.
All questions are answered the.
third Wednesday monthly from
10 a.m. to noon. Call for reser-
vations, 527-8399.
* SHINE (Serving Health In-
surance Needs of the Elders) is
a free program where volun-
teers assist clients with
Medicare, Medicaid, private
health insurances, long-term
care options, benefit and claim
issues, prescription drug assis-
tance programs and much
more. To receive assistance to
solve health insurance prob-
lems or inquire about becoming
a volunteer, call 527-5956 and
a SHINE counselor will contact
you.
* Citrus Hearing Impaired
Program Services in Crystal
River, provides assistance with
hearing aids and devices
needed to enhance the quality .
of life for deaf, hard of hearing
and speech impaired individu-
als. Call 795-5000 (voice) or
795-7243 (TTY) to find out
more about this program.
CHIPS is open from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. Monday through Friday.


Health NOTES

SO YOU KNOW
* Health Notes are usually found in today's Health & Life
section. Find more support groups/Page C9


Support GROUPS

* Scleroderma Support
Group organizing for North
Central Florida. All persons in-
terested, call Melba Withrow'at
746-7752.
* Citrus County Continuity
of Care Council meets at 10
a.m. the second Wednesday
monthly at Nature Coast
Lodge, 279 N. Lecanto High-
way, Lecanto. Call Ann Grant,
president, at 563-0880.
* Look Good ... Feel
Better, a free two-hour session
for women undergoing radiation
or chemotherapy, at 3 p.m. the
second Wednesday monthly at
the Cancer & Blood Disease
Center, Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the
fourth Wednesday monthly at
the Robert Boissoneault Oncol-
ogy Institute, Lecanto. Call Mil-
dred Roseberry (746-7212) or
the American Cancer Society
(800) 395-LOOK (5665) to reg-
ister.
* Emotions Anonymous
12-step support group, noon
the second and fourth Thurs-
days monthly at Central Ridge
Library, 'Forest Ridge Boulevard
and Roosevelt, in Beverly Hills.
Call Meg at 527-2443.
* Suicide support group
for any adult who is trying to
cope with complex feelings of
grief, shock, confusion, anger
and guilt due to the impact of
suicide by a family member or
friend; 6:30 p.m. the.second
Thursday monthly at the Her-
nando-Pasco Hospice Office,
3545 N. Lecanto Highway, Bev-
erly Hills. Free. Call Wendy Hall
at 527-4600.
* SPRING HILL - Care-
giver Support Group, 4 to 5 .
p.m. second Thursday monthly
at the Florida Cancer Institute
- New Hope's Spring Hill Cen-
ter, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite
203 in the Medical Arts Building
next Spring Hill Hospital. Call
Dorothy Hiller, MLT, support
group facilitator,' at (352) 688-
7744.
* SPRING HILL - Spinal
Cord Injury support group, 5
p.m. second Thursday monthly
in the gym at HealthSouth Re-
habilitation Hospital. Call Dee
Hardee at (352) 592-7237.
* NEW PORT RICHEY-
"Community Chatterboxes"
is a support group to assist indi-
viduals suffering from commu-
nication deficits (i.e., aphasia,
apraxia, dysarthria, etc.) as a


result of a Cerebral Vascular
Accident or other neurological
disorders. The group meets
from 3 to 4 p.m. every other
Thursday (June 11) at Commu-
nity Hospital Health Care Cen-
ter, 5400 School Road, New
Port Richey. Caregivers and
spouses are encouraged to at-
tend. Call (727) 845-0757.
* Friends of the Blind
meets from 9 a.m. to noon the
second Friday monthly at the
Church of the Nazarene in Her-
nando. Call Butch Shultz at
344-2693 or Bob Johnson at
563-1890.
* The North Central
Florida Post-Polio Support
Group will be on "summer va-
cation" during the months of
June, July and August. Regular
programs will resume on Sept.
13 at the Collins Health Re-
source Center, 9401 S.W. High-
way 200, Building 300, Suite
303, Ocala. Web site: PostPo-
lioSupport.com. Carolyn Raville.
(352) 489-1731.
* Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization, serving Central
Florida, offers monthly support
group meetings. Public is in-
vited.
. 2 p.m. Tuesday, June 16,
Highland Terrace, 700 Medical
Court E., Inverness. Call Ellen
Mallon or Valerie Taylor at 860-
2525.
The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganizatiod branch office in Cit-
rus County is open from 10,
a.m. to 2 p.m. the second Mon-
day monthly. Call the Citrus
County community service rep-
resentative Ellen Mallon at 860-
2525.
* Beyond Grief Support
Group, Christian-based meet-
ing for people who have lost
someone through death, 1:15
p.m. the third Tuesday monthly
at the ministry complex room
behind the SunTrust Bank in
Meadowcrest, off Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Call
Betty Jo at 628-2933 or the
church office at 795-8077.
* Head and Neck Cancer
Support Group meets 11 a.m.
to noon the third Wednesday
monthly at the Robert Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute,
522 N. Lecanto Highway,.
Lecanto, north of State Road
44. Call Dr. Patrick Meadors,
(352) 342-1822.
Organizations
* Support group meetings
are in the CMHS Administration


SInverness



FLAG DAY

Ceremony

June 14 ~ 7 p.m.
Inverness Government Center
212 W. Main St., Inverness
The City of Inverness invites you to
celebrate National Flag Day on Sunday,
June 14, 2009. The ceremony will begin
at 7 p.m. at the Inverness Government
Center and will feature Local Veteran
Color Guard displays, musical and vocal
patriotic tributes. You are encouraged to
)ring lawn chairs, your friends and family!
,For more information call
726-2611 or visit our Web site
at www.inverness-fl.gov


CIL to speak to FFRA
Special to the Chronicle

Persons with disabilities and their families often face
challenges that most people never imagine. But we are
fortunate to live in Citrus County, where the Center for
Independent Living has an office in Lecanto. The center
offers services in the areas of advocacy, independent liv-
ing, information and referral, peer support and em-
ployment. All of these services are offered at no cost to
the consumer
Cathy Jackson, ,program coordinator, is the guest
speaker at Friday's meeting of FFRA (Families and
Friends Reaching for the Abilities) at the Key Training
Center, 130HeightsAve., Inverness. Social time and busi-
ness meeting begin at 9, followed by a speaker at 10 a.m.
'The public is invited to the monthly meetings of
FFRA. There is usually a speaker on topics of interest to
the disabled community . Call Ron Phillips at 382-7819, or
Stephanie Hopper at 344-0288. i


Building unless otherwise indi-
cated.
* ACS Man to Man
Prostate Support and Educa-
tion Program meets in the
conference room at the Robert
Boissoneault Oncology Institute
at 522 N. Lecanto Highway in
the Allen Ridge Medical Mall.
Spouses and caregivers are
welcome, Call 527-0106.
* Bariatric Support Group:
6:30 p.m. every three months,
Cypress Room. Call Claudia
Blotz at 697-0051 or Bette
Clark at 860-0383.
* Breast Cancer Support
Group: noon the second Fri-
day, Robert Boissoneault Can-
cer Institute. Call Judy Bonard
at 527-4389..
* Citrus Cancer Support:
4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday,
cafeteria meeting room. June
16: Chemotherapy Drug Up-
date, CMHSpharmacist. Call
Carol at 726-1551, ext. 6596 or
ext. 3329.
* Cancer Support: 3 p.m.
last Thursday, Cancer Treat-
ment Center. Call 746-1100.
* Diabetes Support Group:
11:30 a.m. the fourth Wednes-
day, Cypress Room. Call Carol
McHugh at 341-6110.
* Hospice of Citrus
County support groups for
2008. Free, but reservations
suggested. Call Jonathan
Beard at 527-2020.
* Caregiver support group, 1
p.m. second and fourth Monday
monthly at the Citrus County
Community Center, 2804 W.
Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto.
* Newly Bereaved Work-
shop, 1 p.m. Thursday at the
Hospice of Citrus County Clini-
cal Office, 326 S. Line Ave., In-
verness.
* Grief support group, 11


a.m. Tuesday at Our Lady of
Grace Parish Life Center, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
* Grief support group, 1 p.m.
Tuesday at the Hospice of Cit-
rus County Clinical Office, 326
S. Line Ave., Inverness.
* Grief support group, 10:30
a.m. Saturday at First United
Methodist Church, 831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
*. Christian-based grief sup-
port group, 1:15 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Gulf To
Lake Ministry Complex, 1506
N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River.
* Social support group; 10
a.m. Tuesday at Crystal Para-
dise Restaurant, 508 N. Citrus
Ave., Crystal River.
* Social support group, 3:30
p.m. Friday at Joe's Family
Restaurant, 911 W. Main St.,
Inverness.
* LIFT luncheon (for widows
and widowers), 11:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club, Her-
nando. Call Teddi Holler at 746-
6518 for reservations and
details. -
0 Parents support group, a
chapter of Bereaved Parents of
the.USA, 7 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at First
Presbyterian Church, 1501 S.E.
U.S. 19, Crystal River.
* Alzheimer's Association-
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter
support groups:
* Cedar Creek at Kings Bay
Assisted Living Residence, 231
N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, 3
p.m. first Thursday monthly.
Call Wendy Hall at 527-4600.
* Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 U.S.41t.
S., Inverness, 11a.mifirst
Tuesday monthly. Call Wendy'
Hall at 527-4600.


Humane Society of Citrus County I\,/
Board of County Commissioners -
Citrus Countv Animal ServiceP c , "s :" r,


Call by June 6 for Reservation 352-341-2222
No Reservation? Come at 11 a.m. - 1st come 1st served
(while 'supplies last) FOR THOSE IN NEED


FORT COOPER STATE PARK
WANTS YOU
to come and celebrate

FLAG DAY


$8,000 Tax Credit





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TuEsDAY, JUNE 9, 2oog A9


HEALTH & LIFE


RONICLE


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHR,


b










N jPage A10 -TUESDAY, JUNE 9,2009



N ATION


&
CITRUS COUNT


WORLD


Y CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Yum yum!


Associated Press
Tori Hall feeds a giraffe a
cracker Monday at the
Cincinnati Zoo in Cincin-
nati, Ohio.


Broken ankle fails
to stop nominee
WASHINGTON -
Supreme Court nominee
Sonia Sotomayor hobbled
through a packed day of
meetings on Capitol Hill Mon-
day after breaking her ankle
in an early morning airport
stumble, then boarding a
flight from New York to Wash-
ington to visit senators who
will vote on her confirmation.
The federal appeals court
judge, who has been keeping
a busy set of appointments
with lawmakers, tripped while
rushing for her plane at New
York's LaGuardia Airport. The
White House said she suf-
fered a small fracture to her
right ankle.
Sotomayor made the
meetings with senators de-.
spite her injury. She entered
the Capitol for a meeting with
Sen. Charles E. Grassley, R-
Iowa, on crutches, wearing a
white cast covered at the foot
with a black soft bootie.
Asked how she was feeling,
Sotomayor said, "I feel fine,
thank you."
Sen. Mary L. Landrieu, D-
La . signed Sotomayor's cast
during their session. Her fel-
low Louisianan, Republican
Sen. David Vitter, had a bag
of ice and a pillow on hand
when the judge arrived at his
office, telling her to "please
be seated and relax."
"I hope you all note that
some Republicans are empa-
thetic too," Vitter quipped to
reporters.

WorldBRIEFS

Election


Associated Press
A supporter of Iranian re-
formist candidate Mir Hos-
sein Mousavi, wearing
stickers on his face show-
ing Mousavi, smiles Mon-
day in Tehran, Iran.

China requires
PCs to block porn
BEIJING - China is re-
quiring personal computers
sold in the country to carry
software that blocks online
pornography and other Web,
sites, potentially giving one of
the world's most sophisti-
cated censorship regimes
even more control over the
Internet.
The software's developer
said the tool would give par-
ents more oversight. Jinhui
Computer System Engineer-
ing Co., which won a govem-
ment contract to develop the
software, was compiling a
database of sites to block.
Although porn sites are ini-
tially targeted, the software
could be used to block other
Web sites, too. Parents can
also add their own sites to
the blocking list, said Zhang
Chenmin, general manager
of Jinhui.
"If a father doesn't want his
son to be exposed to content
related to basketball or drugs,
he can block all Web sites re-
lated to those things," Zhang
said.
-From wire reports


Searchers find Air France wreckage


U.S. Navy to help

find black boxes

Associated Press
RECIFE, Brazil -A large tail sec-
tion ofa jetliner bearing Air France's
trademark red and blue stripes was
recovered from the Atlantic Ocean
Monday, helping narrow the hunt for
"black boxes" that; could explain
what brought down Flight 447.


And some high-tech help is on the
way - two U.S. Navy devices capa-
ble of picking up the flight
recorders' emergency beacons far
below on the ocean floor. What
caused the Airbus A330-200 to
plunge into the middle of the ocean
on May 31 with 228 people on board
might not be known until those
black boxes are found.
Searchers must move quickly to
find answers in the cockpit voice
and data recorders, because
acoustic pingers on the boxes begin
to fade 30 days after crashes


While large pieces of plane de-
bris - along with 24 bodies - have-
helped narrow the search, it
remains a daunting task in waters
up to 1.5 miles (2.5 kilometers) deep
and an ocean floor marked by
rugged mountains.
"Finding the debris helps be-
cause you can eliminate a large part
of the ocean,". said U.S. Air Force
Col. Willie Berges, chief of the U.S.
military liaison office in Brazil and
commander of the American mili-
tary forces supporting the search
operation.


Caught in crossfire


',


'4
'I'.


- ..~ '~jt~"
F,


4,



'S


Associated Press
U.S. Marines from the 2nd Marine Expeditionary Battalion walk through the sand Monday in Afghanistan's
Helmand province. Some 7,000 of the new U.S. troops ordered to Afghanistan are. fanning out across the
dangerous south on a mission to defeat the Taliban insurgency and to change the course of a war claiming
American lives at a record pace.

Political infighting stalls bill funding Afghanistan war


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President
Barack Obama's penchant for last-
minute demands, and a rebellion
by liberal allies over his efforts to
block the release of detainee abuse
photos, have combined to sidetrack
his bill to pay for an expanded war
in Afghanistan, as well as continu-
ing military operations in Iraq.
The $100 billion measure is
awaiting a House-Senate confer-
'ence committee after winning
easy approval last month in both
chambers, but an emerging com-
promise on the bill has become
caught in the crosscurrents com-
ing from both Obama's left and
right on Capitol Hill.
The firestorm over detainee
photos comes as Obama needs lib-
erals more than ever, since House
Republican support has evapo-
rated over the White House's de-
sire to include a new $108 billion
U.S. line of credit to help poor
countries deal with their own col-
lapsing economies.
About 50 House liberals op-
posed to the war voted against the
bill last month when the measure
passed on a 368-60 tally. But even
though liberals such as Rep. Bar-
ney Frank, D-Mass., can stomach
reversing course and vote for the
war money, they're drawing the
line at Obama's bid to exempt de-
tainee abuse photos from the
Freedom of Information Act
The upshot is that the adminis-
tration faces a choice: Drop the
line of credit.to the International


Marines take fight to Taliban


Associated Press


CAMP LEATHERNECK,
Afghanistan - Teams of
builders worked through dust
storms Monday to expand a base
for a brigade of U.S. Marines
now fanning out across southern
Afghanistan to change the
course of a war claiming Ameri-
can lives faster than ever before>
Some 10,000 Marines have
poured into Afghanistan in the
last six weeks, Ihe military said
.Monday, transforming this once
small base in the heart of the
cou ntry's most violent province,
Helmand, into a desert fortress.
The statement to embedded
journalists was the first confir-
mation that the military has
fully deployed the first wave of
21,000 additional troops Presi-,

Monetary and win back Republi-
cans, or give into the liberal revolt
and quit using all means to block
the release and publication of
photos detailing harsh treatment
of terrorism detainees.
"It's a bill-killer, especially if the
administration wants IMF (fund-
ing)," Frank said of the FOIA ex-
emptions the White Houses wants
for the detainee photos. "I've con-
veyed that"
The imbroglio pits liberals like
Frank against the Senate, led by
Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and Joe


dent Barack Obama ordered to
Afghanistan this year to help
stanch an increasingly violent
Taliban insurgency.
The 2nd Marine Expedi-
tionary Brigade, normally
based at Camp Lejeune, N.C.,
will battle the Taliban , as well
as train and fight alongside
Afghan security forces..
"This is where the fight is, in
Afghanistan," said 1st Sgt.
Christopher Watson, who like
many of the troops was most re-
cently deployed in Iraq. "We are
here to get the job done."
While the insurgency is active
across much of the country, its
stronghold remains in Hel-
mand. The Taliban has become
entrenched in Helmand be-
cause of a lack of international
and Afghan troops.

Lieberman, I-Conn., who added a
provision to block release of addi-
tional photos of detainee abuse to
the war funding measure.
Obama originally supported re-
leasing the photos but has re-
versed course - citing the need to
protect U.S. service members -
and is fighting an American Civil
Liberties Union effort to win re-
lease of further detainee abuse
photos in court. The White House
is fighting hard behind the scenes
to keep the Graham-Lieberman
measure in the bill.


U.S. might negotiate for reporters


N. Korea

sentences two

to 12 years

Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea -
The sentencing of two
American journalists to 12
years' hard labor in North
Korea on Monday sets the
stage for possible negotia-
tions with the reclusive na-
tion for their release -
perhaps'involving an envoy
from the United States.
New Mexico Gov. Bill


Richardson, who helped
win the release of Ameri-
cans from North Korea in
the 1990s, said he was
"ready to do anything" the
Obama administration
asked. Another possible
negotiator, if the U.S. gov-
ernment approved, is for-
mer Vice President Al
Gore, who founded the TV
venture that both reporters
work for.
A senior Obama admin-
istration official said
Richardson and Gore had
been in contact with the
White House and State De-
partment about potential
next steps, including possi-
bly sending an envoy to try


to negotiate the release of
Euna Lee, 26, and Laura
Ling, 32, both of whom
work for Gore's Current TV
channel.
But the official stressed
that no decisions had been
made on how to proceed
and said neither Gore nor
Richardson had been
asked to go. The official
spoke on condition of
anonymity due to the diplo-
matic sensitivity of the sit-
uation.
Asked Monday if the
United States will send an
envoy to the North, Secre-
tary of State Hillary Rod-
ham Clinton said the
Obama administration is


"pursuing- every possible
approach that we can con-
sider in order to persuade
the North Koreans to re-
lease them and send these
young women home."
I She stressed that the re-
porters' case and Washing-
ton's efforts to punish
North Korea for its recent
nuclear test are "entirely
separate matters."
"We think the imprison-
ment, trial and sentencing
of Laura and Euna should
be viewed as a humanitar-
ian matter," Clinton said.
"We hope that the North
Koreans will grant
clemency and deport
them."


But ocean currents over the eight
days since the disaster have pushed
floating wreckage far and wide,
complicating the search, Berges
said. "In the sense that as the debris
drifts away, you're not sure exactly
where the black boxes or other
parts of the aircraft are on the bot-
tom of the ocean."
The U.S. Navy has helped locate
black boxes in difficult situations
before: pings from an Adam Air jet
that crashed Jan. 1, 2007, off In-
donesia's coast were picked up 25
days later by a navy team.


Right


wins big


in Euro


elections

Experts cite

anger, turmoil
Associated Press
LONDON - A volatile
mix of apathy, anger and
economic uncertainty trans-
lated into gains for extreme-
right parties in European
parliamentary elections, in-
cluding the first seats won
by the all-white British Na-
tional Party.
The party, which does not
accept nonwhite members
and calls for the "voluntary
repatriation" of immigrants,
won two of Britain's 72 seats
in the European Parlia-
ment, gaining ground in
economically battered
areas that once were strong-
holds of the left-wing
Labcrho _:i. 2 t :
Ana lysts said advances by
the far right were driven in:
part by voters' desire to pun-,
ish mainstream parties for'
the recession, and by con-
cerns about burgeoning im-
migration within the bloc of
27 countries that stretches
from Ireland to the edge of
Asia. Low voter turnout of
43 percent also played a
role.
As voters deserted left-
wing parties in droves, cen-
ter-right parties were the
biggest winners in races for
the 736-seat EU legislature
and conservative nationalist
parties made gains, as well.
Right-leaning govern-
ments came out ahead in
Germany, France, Italy and
Belgium, while conserva-
tive opposition parties won
in Britain, Spain and Bul-
garia. The parties praised
the results as a continent-
wide vote against govern-
ments' stimulus spending
and corporate bailouts.
They pledged restrained
government spending, push-
ing instead for bureaucracies
to quickly use money they've
been given for job creation
projects like expanding
broadband networks and up-
grading gas pipelines.
Many Socialists ran cam-
paigns that slammed center-
right leaders for failing to
spend enough to stimulate
faltering economies, but vot-
ers did not embrace their
cause.
In The Netherlands, Geert
Wilders' anti-Islamic Free-
dom Party won 17 percent of
the votes, taking four of 25
seats and becoming the coun-
try's second-largest party in
the European Parliament
Wilders' popularity has
grown in recent months as
he cast himself as a cham-
pion of free speech follow-
ing a Dutch court's order
that he be prosecuted for
hate speech. He has called
Islam's holy book, the
Quran, a fascist text
Austria's Freedom Party,
which also campaigned on
an anti-Islam platform,
more than doubled its share
of the vote to 13.1 percent
Hungary's Jobbik party -
an anti-immigration group
that wants police to crack
down on what it calls "Gypsy
crime" - won three of the
country's 22 seats and al-
most 15 percent of the vote.


Ye-










Section B- TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 2009


PORTS


Tiger Woods
one of few in
U.S to watch
Federer win
French Open./
.Page B5


0 Auto Racing/B2
E MLB/B3-B4
M TV, Lottery/B4
0 NHL/B5
0 Tennis/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Lakers look to make Magic vanish


Associated Press


ORLANDO - Kobe Bryant has
changed his look
Gone is the teeth-baring, nose-
flaring, eyes-on-the-prize scowl
that the Los Angeles Lakers star
showed again and again in Game
1 of the NBA finals. The intensity
diminished after Game 2, his ex-
pression morphing into one of re-
lief and sheer luck
Abotched layup by Magic rookie
Courtney Lee is perhaps the
biggest reason why these finals are
not tied and why Bryant isn't smil-
ing even with his team up 2-0. That
level of seriousness might be
cause for Orlando to grimace.
The Magic nearly returned
from Los Angeles with the best-
of-seven series tied. Instead,


* WHO: Los Angeles Lakers at
Orlando Magic
* WHAT: Game 3
* TV: 9 p.m., ABC
* SERIES: Lakers lead 2-0

they're down 2-0, and now Bryant
has a promise for Game 3 on
Tuesday night
"We're about to kick it up," he
said. "You'd better believe it.
We're close. You see what I'm say-
ing? This is the finals. We're going
to be ready to go."
See FINALS/Page B5


Associated Press
The Orlando Magic are down 2-0 In their best-of-seven series with the
Los Angeles Lakers. Game 3 Is tonight in Orlando.


'em


in


ROCHELLE KAISER/Beacon eanor
Family and friends gather around Mike Muckenfuss (third from the right), this years winner of the 25th annual Cobia Big Fish Tournament.
The Cobia, weighing 38.54 pounds, was brought In on Saturday during the two-day tournament.

Mike Muckenfuss big winner at 25th annual Cobia Big Fish Tournament


COBIA

Mike Mukenfuss.*.............................38.54 pounds

Stacey Haney....................................26.60 pounds

Skip Gandy.......................................26.54 pounds

Jeremy Reed....................................24.20 pounds

Drew Burns......................................23.98 pounds

GROUPER

Ben Mercer.....................17.08 pounds

Mark Wachtler..................................15.10 pounds

TROUT

Christopher Rand...............................4.02 pounds

Mike Wingrove...................................3.42 pounds


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Stacey Haney, of Land 0' Lakes, watches Gator MacRae weight her
26.60-pound cobla Saturday afternoon during the 25th annual Cobia
Big Fish Tournament at MacRae's in Old Homosassa.


Run! Rays leads revival of stolen bases

TB has success rate ofover 84percent


Associated Press
ST. PETERSBURG - The
Tampa Bay Rays offer no apolo-
gies for being modern-day ma-
rauders.
Carl Crawford & Co. are rip-
ping and running, leading a re-
vival of the stolen base and
showing no signs of slowing
down. The rest of a once-plodding
American League is trying to
keep pace.
"We like to put pressure on the
other team," Crawford said. "We
don't like to wait around for the
Tampa Bay's Carl Crawford steals
second base under a high throw
to the Royals' Alberto Callaspo
on June 2 In St. Petersburg
Associated Press


big home run, even though we
can do that"
With major league leader and
four-time AL steals champions
Crawford, B.J. Upton and Jason
Bartlett showing the way, the
speedy Rays are well on their
way to swiping more bases than
any other team for the second
straight year.
Their 91 steals entering Mon-
day were 26 more than the near-
est challenger, as well as the most
in the AL after 58 games since
Rickey Henderson and the 1982
Oakland Athletics had 100, and
tops in the majors at the same
point in a season since the 1991
Montreal Expos had 94.
What's surprising, though, is
See RAYS/Page B5


Summer Football Camp
The Gators Athletes Associa-
tion in partnership with Citrus
County Parks and Recreation is
conducting a three-day football
camp this summer.
The camp will run from July
27-29 from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. at
Central Ridge Park.
Boys and girls ages 8-16 are
invited to participate. If registered
by July 1, the camp fee is $110.
Those who register after July 1
will pay $125.
Participants will have a chance
to work on their football skills with
former University of Florida foot-
ball players and former NFL play-
ers. Coaches from Citrus,
Lecanto and Crystal River will
also be on hand.
Work with players such as
Scott Armstrong from the Univer-
sity of Florida, Kevin Carter of the
Dallas Cowboys and Greg Cleve-
land, who played for the both
Tampa Bay and St. Louis.
Many other players will also
be participating. Contact the Cit-
rus County Parks and Recre-
ation office at 527-7677 for
more information.




Backlash


brewing

Fans not happy

after Kyle Busch

smashes trophy
Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Kyle
Busch has always bucked the sys-
tem, embracing the notoriety that
comes with being NASCAR's
newest bad boy.
He doesn't care if race fans dis-
like him - and boy, do they ever
- and he makes
no apologies, for
knocking people
out of his way en
route to Victory
Lane. His rejec-
tion of conform-
ity is genuine,
and Busch does
everything he Kyle
can to avoid Busch
being grouped as smashed
just another po- guitar trophy.
litically correct
NASCAR driver shilling for a
sponsor
So if he's aware of the growing
backlash surrounding his guitar-
smashing celebration after a Na-
tionwide Series win at Nashville,
it's doubtful Busch even cares.
But this time, even his most ar-
dent supporters wonder if Busch
went too far.
See, it wasn't just any guitar
that Busch whacked three times
against the ground before tossing
the chipped" steel instrument
aside. No, it was a revered Gib-
son Les Paul guitar that had been
hand painted by longtime
NASCAR artist Sam Bass and has
become the symbol of Nashville
Speedway.
Bass initially said he was
stunned Saturday night to see
Busch climb from his car, accept
the trophy, then attempt to de-
stroy it But he had softened after
speaking to Busch in Victory
'Lane, where the driver ex-
plained that Nashville had frus-
trated him for so long, he had
promised his crew that if he ever
claimed one of the coveted gui-
. tars, he'd smash it and share the
pieces with the entire team.
On Monday, however, Bass told
NASCAR Scene he was heart-
broken to see Busch destroy the
trophy
"It was stunning, absolutely
stunning to see that thing de-
stroyed within seconds of him
getting it," Bass told Scene. "It's
his trophy, he can choose to do
with it what he wants. But I'm not
going to lie about it. If he had
asked me, 'Hey, I'm thinking
about destroying that trophy gui-
tar whenever I win it, what do
you think?' Of course I would
have told him, 'No! Please don't
Let us give you a prop guitar.'"
Busch's celebration was not
meant to be disrespectful toward


Bass, the speedway, sponsors or
fans. Instead, it was sincere emo-
tion from a driver who had flirted
several times with victory at
Nashville, only to come up empty
in seven previous tries.
After finally breaking through
for a dominating win, the smash-
ing of the guitar was, in Busch's
See BUSCH/Page B4


eeli









D A .JAI, T UEl Y, ADS E.U. 9, U 0 0CTUSCUT5-HOIL



Anderson tames Late Model field


AUTO RACING


LARRY MACMILLAN
Special to the Chronicle
With an all-day rain
threatening to wash out the
Citrus County Speedway
race card fortunately some-
body found the faucet and
turned off the wet weather
allowing for a full race card
to run that included a 50-lap
Late Model feature. Despite
the weather outlook the
Super Lates brought some
of Florida's best to chal-
lenge the 3/8th mile oval and
provided the fans with a
great racing show.
Eighteen of the 19 regis-
tered Super Late Models
went on the clocks to set up
the lineup for the 50-lap fea-
ture. Eight of the top 10
qualifiers ran in the 13-sec-
ond bracket on a green race
track due to all the rain
washing off any rubber that
may have built up. Wayne
Anderson picked up the
$200 bonus for running fast
time at 13.728 just .008 of a
second faster than Scott
Grossenbacher who for-
merly held a track record.
The top ten pulled pills
for starting positions and
Kyle Maynard won the pole
with Dale Sanders taking
the outside pole. When the
green flag flew Sanders
launched his racer to the
point and looked like he
may have a chance to have a
great finish until lap 11
when he apparently had his
rear end go away on him
taking him out for the night
Todd Brown took over the
top spot and had everything
under control until lap 26
when Herb Neumann made


Super Late Model Feature
50 Laps-19 Cars
1. #84 Wayne Anderson - Wltdwood - 1st
Season Win
2. #7 Raymond Lovelady - Lakeland
3. #23 Todd Brown - Lake Panasolfkee
4. #98 Herb Neumann Jr - Inverness
5. #123 Rusty Ebersole-?
Fast Qualifier - #84 Wayne Anderson -
13.728 Seconds -
Street Stock Feature
20 Laps-15 Cars
1. # 4 Jay Wittotn - Beverly Hilis - 2nd
Season Win
2. #97 Tim Quick - Lecanto
3 4007 Mark Fallows - Crystal River
4 P98 Buuba Marione - Floral City
5 #31 Tom Polhs - Daae City
Ssl Heal Winner - #5 Herb hoetler - Floral
CRy

his way from ninth to a side
by side battle for second
with Scott Grossenbacher.
Coming off turn four both
cars got together and turned
around into the infield
sending both to the rear of
the pack for the restart mov-
ing eighth starter Anderson
and seventh starter Ray-
mond Lovelady up to chase
down the leader Todd
Brown. Anderson and Love-
lady made the pass on the
leader and went on to finish
with Anderson, Lovelady,
Brown, Neumann and Rusty
Ebersole rounding out the
top five. The next five spots
went to Donny Williams,
Scott Grossenbacher,
Patrick Mennenga, Dave
Pletcher and Jeremy Gerst-
ner all in the lead lap.
Fifteen Street Stocks
made for an exciting
evening with Jay Witfoth
turning up the rpm's for a
heat win and logging his
second win of the season


2nd Heat Winner - #4 Jay Witoth
Mini Stock Feature
20 Laps- 13 Cars
1. #37 Brandon McSwain - Aubumdale -
1st Season Win
2. #7 Clint Foley- Dunnellon
3. # 1 George Neumann- Inverness
4. #44 Michael Lawhorn - Claremont
5. #51 Chris Harvey - Belleview
ist Heat Winner - #32 Steven Smith - Inver-
ness
2na Heat Winner - 7 Clint Foley
Pure Stock Feature
20 Laps-19 Cars
1. #51 Curtis Flanagan - Inverness - 2nd
Season Win
2 #44 Glen Colyer - Homosassa Springs
3 #33 Bill Ryan - Busnnell
4 I#39 John Drye - Inverness
5 411 Mathea Harms- Biookiville

from his seventh starting
spot over Tim Quick who
was looking to make it three
wins in a row Saturday
night. Dr. Mark Fallows
known as Dr. House in the
pits came out of his sixth
starting spot to take the lead
early in the race and man-
aged to hold onto the lead
until the final few laps when
he got into an accident that
could have ended his night
This closed the lead that he
had built up on the restart
and Jay Witfoth managed to
make the pass in the final
few laps being chased by
Quick who had to settle for.
second. Rounding out the
top five were Mark Fallows,
Tom Bubba Martone and
Tom Potts. Herb Hoefler
took the win in the first heat
. Thirteen seems to be the
magic number for a starting
field for the Mini Stock ac-
tion. Working on the 11th
week of their season Clint
Foley came into the night as


1st Heat Win - #51 Curtis Flanagan
2nd Heat Win - #39 John Drye
V8 Thunder Stock Rookies
20 Laps -17 Cars
1. #51 Levi Roberts- Hernando- 3rd Sea-
son Win
2. #411 Matt Harris - Brooksville
3. #30 Thomas McKay- Loxahatchee
4. #41 Tara Wilder- Floral City
5. #45 Scott Werstein - Belleview
No Heat Races
Mini Cup Feature
20 Laps-17 Cars
1. #07 Jacob Calloway
2. #20 Brady Marshall
3. #37 Rick Cline
-4. #48 Carlos Pinto
5. r24 MiK6e Holl
isl Hel Winner - #20 Bray Marshall
2na Heal Winner - 907 Jacob Calloway

the favorite to watch as he
was intent on logging his
fifth win of the season in his
new ride. Brandon Mc-
Swain had other ideas as he
came offthe pole and had 12
cars chasing him from the
green flag to the checkered
flag for his first win at Cit-
rus. Foley got into early
trouble that sent him to the
rear of the pack where he
started anyway but he man-
aged to come right back up
through the traffic but just
couldn't reel in McSwain
and had to settle for second
at the finish line.
George Neumann gave
him a good race for the po-
sition but had to settle third
followed by Mike Lawhorn
and Chris Harvey w.ho was
celebrating his high school
graduation Friday night
with a top five finish. Steven
Smith and Clint Foley took
the heat wins.
Tommy Smith's win
streak came to an end last


Citrus County Speedway Results - 6/7/09


week but his brother
Ritchie won and was not in
the Bounty Hunt so four
cars signed up for this
week's bounty. All the cars
in the hunt had to start at
the rear of the 19-car field
so they all had plenty of traf-
fic to move through for the
win. Tommy Smith and Cur-
tis Flanagan were definitely
the fastest cars on the track
but Tommy got passed by
Flanagan and apparently
there was some reason for
Smith to pull out of the race
with four laps to go that
ended the Bounty Hunt with
Flanagan making his third
motor of the year do the job.
Glen Colyer came off the
pole and set the pace for
most of the race while the
back of the pack made their
way through all the heavy
traffic.
One caution came out
when Colyer was tagged
coming off turn four and
pushed into the infield. He
got his spot back for the
restart and that's when
Flanagan managed to get
around him for the lead and
the win with Glen holding
out for second. Bill Ryan has
signed up for the bounty
hunt ever since it was
started and he managed to
make his way from 18th to
third when the checkers
flew. John Drye finished
fourthafter winning the sec-
ond heat with Mathew Har-
ris having his best finish of
the year in fifth. Flanagan
also took home the win in
the first heat
Levi Roberts may have
had a graduation of his own


EARN $25 IN THE CHRONICLE'S NASCAR CONTEST



CONTEST RULES
SPick the winner of this Sunday's
Lifelock 400 at Michigan. In the event
that more than one contestant picks
I the same driver, the tie will be bro-
ken by guessing the average speed of
. the race.
0 The closest contestant to the actual
average speed, over or under, will be
declared the winner If there is no win-
- . .ner one week the $25 prize will carry
over to the following week making that
week's race contest worth $50.
SYobu may enter as many times as
you like but every entry form MUTST
be an original entry form from the
Citrus County Chronicle. No copies
will be permitted.
0 Please include your name, address
and telephone number on the printed
entry form. DON'T FORGET TO SUP-
PLY YOUR TIEBREAKER SPEED.
SYobu may drop offor mail entries to our
Meadowcrest office at 1624 N. Meadow-
td. .......Associated Press crest Blvd. Crystal River, FL. 34429. All
Associated Press Tony Stewart celebrates with champagne in Victory Lane after winning entrees MUST be in the office no later
Tony Stewart crosses the finish line to win the NASCAR Pocono 500 the NASCAR Pocono 500 auto race on Sunday at Pocono Raceway in than 5 p.m. on Fiday, June 12.
auto race on Sunday at Pocono Raceway in Long Pond, Pa. Long Pond, Pa.,


Back-toback
Congratulations again to
Lynda Hinson, who for the
second straight week, is
our $25 winner.
Hinson correctly
guessed Tony Stewart as
the winner of the Pocono
500. Hinson had a tiebreak
speed of 141 mph. The ac-
tual average speed of the
race was 138.515 mph.


r -----------------------------------------------mm------------



NASCAR CONTEST ENTRY FORM




DRIVER'S NAME YOUR NAME PHONE NUMBER

TIEBREAKER: (Guess what you think the average speed of the race will be):

You may mail your entry to Citrus County Chronicle, c/o John Coscia, Sports editor,

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL, 34429. All entries must be received by 5 p.m. on June 12.
L_----------------------------------------------------------------------


GOOD BYE

TO LAWN DAMAGING CHINCH

BUGS & MOLE CRICKETS!
Service for Annual Lawn Program
* Service inspections consisting of every month.
* Minimum of 6 Insect sprays per year.
* 3 fertilizers per year consisting of
environmentally sound slow release fertilizer.
* Weed Control.
* Fungicide Application included. J
* Shrub Programs Available.
" Free follow-ups anytime during the year.
GUARANTEED TO BEAT OUR COMPETITOR'S PRICES


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* Best of the Best 7 years
* Established & Trusted Since 1998
406 NE let Street, Crystal River, FL
www.citruspest.com
Email: info@citruspest.com


OPEN

WHEEL

MODIFIED
SATURDAY, June 13t
RACING BEGINS 5:30
PURE STOCK
V8 THUNDER STOC
MINI STOCK
SPORTSMAN
FIGURE 8
4 CYL BOMBERS


SDONT MISS OUT ON THE


TcExitement
GRANDSTAND ADMISSION:
Adults $13 Racetrckkbated
Senior Citizens and Students (12-17) $9 2 lmessouia,
D Children 11 & Under $7; Children under 42" $4 onus y, 41 at he
Family Pack: $30c AMCu
(2Adults & 2 Children)
hAdPIT ADMISSION:
PM Children
11 &Under $2
K ni..


in the V8 Thunder Stock
class as he rolled through
traffic from his 14th starting
spot to Victory Lane for his
third feature win of the sea-
son which will probably
move him up from the rookie
division to the Pure Stock di-
vision. This will probably
also make a car change for
him since his car is also the
one that Curtis Flanagan
runs in the Pure Stock divi-
sion. He will probably move
into the No. 31 which is his
brother Austin's car. Matt
Harris Sr. according to the
registration held out for sec-
ond while Thomas McKay
locked onto third after run-
ning into trouble early in the
race. Tara Wilder and Scott
Werstein rounded out the
top five.
The Reutimann Series
2009 Mini Cup Cars brought
17 cars to put on a competi-
tive show. Jacob Calloway was
top shoe again with a win in
the second heat and having a
20-lap match race with Brady
Marshall who one the first
heat. The two of them
swapped the lead on several
occasions with Marshall
holding out for second. Sev-
eral battles were going on be-
hind the leaders for position
and Rick Cline Jr. won out in
the race for third over Carlos
Pinto and Mike Holt
Saturday night will see
the return of the Open
Wheel Modifieds who
haven't raced in a month
and they will be joined by
the Modified Pro Figure 8's,
Sportsman, Mini Stocks,
Pure Stocks, V8 Thunder
Stocks and 4 Cylinder
Bombers.


col


Onus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 2009 B3.

East Division Central Division West Division
W 1. Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away W L Pct GB WCGB "L10 Str Home Away W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
New York 34 23 .596 - - 7-3 W-2 18-11 16-12 Detroit 31 26 .544 - - 5-5 L-1 17-11 14-15 Texas 33 23 .589 - - 6-4 W-1 18-9 15-14
Boston 33 24 .579 1 - 6-4 L-1 '18-8 15-16 Minnesota 28 30 .483 3% 51h 4-6 L-2 21-12 7-18 Los Angeles 28 27 .509 41h 4 5-5 L-2 14-12 14-15
Toronto 32 27 .542 3 2 5-5 W-1 21-10 11-17 Chicago 27 31 .466 4% 61h 4-6 W-1 15-16 12-15 Seattle 28 29 .491 5� 5 7-3 W-2 16-14 12-15
Tampa Bay 29 30 .492 6 5 6-4 L-2 16-11 13-19 Kansas City 24 32 .429 62 8%2 1-9 L-1 15-15 9-17 Oakland 25 30 .455 7� 7 7-3 W-6 14-13 11-17
Baltimore 24 33 .421 10 9 3-7 L-5 16-13 8-20 Cleveland 25 34 .424 7 9 4-6 W-1 12-14 13-20

East Division Central Division West Divisionr
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Philadelphia 33 22 .600 - - 8-2 W-1 12-14 21-8 Milwaukee 33 24 .579 - - 6-4 L-1 16-9 17-15 LosAngeles 39 20 .661 - - 5-5 L-1 22-8 17-12
NewYork 30 25 .545 3 - 5-5 W-1 17-9 13-16 St. Louis 31 27 .534 21� 2 3-7 L-4 19-15 12-12 San Fran. 29 27 .518 81 1Y 6-4 L-1 18-9 11-18
Atlanta 27 28 .491 6 3 4-6 W-1 13-15 14-13 Chicago 28 26 .519 312 1� 6-4 W-1 16-10 12-16 SanDiego 26 30 .464 11Y2 41 3-7 L-1 18-11 8-19
Florida 28 31 .475 7 4 6-4 W-1 14-17 14-14 Cincinnati 29 27 .518 3� 1Y2 3-7 L-1 14-14 15-13 Arizona 25 32 .439 13 6 5-5 W-1 12-19 13-13
- Washington 15 40 273 18 15 2-8 L-1 9-20 6-20 Pittsburgh 26 30 .464 6/2 41 5-5 L-1 15-11 11-19 Colorado 25 32 .439 13 6 6-4 W-5 9-14 16-18
" .... Houston 25 30 .455 7 5 7-3 W-1 14-17 11-13


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Detroit 9, LA. Angels 6
N.Y. Yankees 4, Tampa Bay 3
Toronto 4, Kansas City 0
Texas 6, Boston 3
Cleveland 8, Chicago White Sox 4
Oakland 3, Baltimore 0
Seattle 4, Minnesota 2
Monday's Games -
Detroit 5, Chicago White Sox 4,1st game
N.Y.Yankees 5, Tampa Bay 3
Toronto at Texas,late
Chicago White Sox 6, Detroit 1, 2nd game
Minnesota at Oakland, late
Today's Games
Kansas City (Bannister 4-3) at Cleveland
(CI.Lee 3-6), 7:05 p.m.
Seattle (Vargas 2-0) at Baltimore (Bergesen 2-
2), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Jer.Weaver 5-2) at Tampa Bay
(J.Shields 5-4), 7:08 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (A.Burnett-4-2) atBoston (Beckett
6-2), 7:10 p.m.
Toronto (Tallet 3-3) at Texas (D.Mathis 0-0), 8:05
p.m.
Detroit (Willis 1-3) at Chicago White Sox
(Buehrie 6-2), 8:11 p.m.
Minnesota (S.Baker 3-6) at Oakland (Bre.An-
derson 3-5), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Kansas City at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Seattle at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
LA. Angels at Tampa Bay, 7:08 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Toronto at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:11 p.m.
Minnesota at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Chicago Cubs 6, Cincinnati 3,14 innings
Atlanta 8, Milwaukee 7
N.Y. Mets 7, Washington 0
Houston 6, Pittsburgh 4
Colorado 7, St. Louis 2
Arizona 9, San Diego 6,18 innings
San Francisco 3, Florida 2
Philadelphia 7, LA. Dodgers 2
Monday's Games
Colorado 5, St. Louis2- .
Florida 4, San Francisco 0
Pittsburgh at Atlantalate
Arizona at San Diego, late
Today's Games
Cincinnati (Cueto 5-3) at Washington (Zimmer-
mann 2-3), 7:05 p.m. -
Philadelphia (Happ 4-0) at N.Y. Mets (J.Santana
7-3), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Ohlendorf 5-5) at Atlanta (D.Lowe 6-
3), 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis (C.Carpenter 4-0) at Florida (Jo.John-
son 5-1), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Lilly 6-4) at Houston (Moehler
2-3), 8:05 p.m.
Colorado (Hammel 2-3) at Milwaukee (Looper
5-3), 8:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Cain 7-1) at Arizona (Buckner
2-1), 9:40 p.m.
San Diego-(C.Young-4-4)-at-LA. Dodgers
(Billingsley 7-3), 10:10 p.m. ...
Wednesday's Games
Cincinnati at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Colorado at Milwaukee, 8:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
San Diego at LA. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.


Man pleads not guilty in pitcher's death


Associated Press

SANTAANA, Calif. -The
man charged with killing
Los Angeles Angels pitcher
Nick Adenhart and two oth-
ers in a drunken-driving
crash pleaded not guilty
Monday to three counts of
murder as relatives of the
victims looked on.
Andrew Thomas Gallo
also pleaded not guilty
through his
attorney to
three other
fe l on y
charges and
one misde-
meanior in
connection
with the
April 9 colli- Nick
sion that oc- Adenhart
curred just died in April 9
hours after 6ar crash.
Adenhart
pitched six scoreless in-
nings in his season debut
The 22-year-old Gallo
watched from inside a secu-
rity enclosure as defense at-
torney Randall Longwith
entered the pleas before an
Orange County Superior
Court judge. About 15 mem-
bers of Gallo's family were
'in court
While waiting for Gallo to
appear, 24-year-old Jon Wil-
hite, the lone member of
Adenhart's group to survive,
began to sob. Wilhite, who
had critical injuries in the
wreck, was embraced by
friends and family.
Longwith said later in an
interview that he will seek a
change of venue because he
believes Gallo cannot get a
fair trial in Orange County,
home of the Angels and the
California State University,
:t-llerton,;baseball teamJbor
which Wilhite had played.
The attorney noted that in
another courthouse where
Gallo made a previous ap-
pearance, an Angels poster
was in the hallway leading
to the courtroom. " :


Associated Press
Andrew Thomas Gallo, 22, right, consults with his attorney in Orange County Superior Court Monday in Santa Ana, Calif.
The man charged With killing Los Angeles Angels pitcher Nick Adenhart and two others in a drunken driving crash pleaded
not guilty Monday to three counts of murder as relatives of the dead and one survivor looked on.


Longwith also said there
have been death threats
against Gallo and himself
via the Internet, phone and
in a letter
"I think people are vent-
ing and it's just evidence of.
the passion people have in
this case. I don't think it's a
true threat," he said, noting
lie had notbroughat it to the
district attorneys attention.
Deputy District Attorney
Susan Price disputed the
need for moving the case.
"We don't believe that the
defendant will be any more
prejudiced in this county
than in any other county,"?


said Price, who was flanked
by the victims' family mem-
bers at a brief news confer-
ence outside the courtroom.
All the, families declined
to comment after the hear-
ing. Some family members
wore T-shirts and large but-
tons emblazoned with pho-
tos of their children.
Price, said Gallo faces a
mandatory minimum sen-
tence of 45 years to life in
prison if convicted of the
three second-degree mur-
der charges. If convicted of
all charges, the minimum
would be 54 years and eight
months to life.


Police have said Gallo
had nearly triple the legal
blood-alcohol level when
the minivan he was driving
ran a red light in Fullerton
and broadsided the silver
Mitsubishi Eclipse carrying-
Adenhart and three friends
to a dance club to celebrate
his success.
. The impact spun around
both vehicles, and one then
struck another car but that
driver was not hurt, police
said.
Gallo fled on foot and was
captured about 30 minutes
later, police said.
The 22-year-old Adenhart


died in surgery at the Uni-
versity of California, Irvine
Medical Center. Another
passenger, 25-year-old
Henry Nigel Pearson of
Manhattan Beach, and the'
driver, 20-year-old Courtney
Frances Stewart of pia-
mond Bar, died at the scene.
Stewart was a student at
nearby Cal State Rillertorb
where she was a cheer-
leader in 2007-08. Pearson,
who played high school
baseball with Wilhite, was
a graduate of Arizona
State University and was
pursuing a law degree
when he died.


MLB LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-ISuzuki, Seattle, .356; Youkilis,
Boston, .349; AdJones, Baltimore, .346;
VMartinez, Cleveland, .344; MiCabrera, Detroit,
.340; MYoung, Texas, .336; Morneau, Min-
nesota, .335.
RUNS-Damon, New York, 46; Scutaro,
Toronto, 46; Pedroia; Boston, 45; Crawford,
Tampa Bay, 44; Morneau, Minnesota, 44;
BRoberts, Baltimore, 43; Bay, Boston, 42; Ad-
- Jones, Baltimore, 42; Kinsler, Texas, 42.
RBI-Bay, Boston, 55; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 55;
Momeau,Minnesota_ 52jTexeira, NewYork, 51;
Kinsler, Texas, 44; TorHunter, oIsiAngeles,-43;.
NCruz, Texas, 42; CPena, Tampa Bay-42Z.-
HITS-AHill, Toronto, 78;VMartinez, Cleveland,
78; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 77; ISuzuki, Seattle,
77; MYoung, Texas, 74; Morneau, Minnesota,
73; Ellsbury, Boston, 71; AdJones, Baltimore, 71.
HOME RUNS-Teixeira, New York, 18; NCruz,
Texas, 17;CPea Tampa Bay, 17; Bay, Boston,
16; Dye, Chicago, 15; Kinsler, Texas, 15;
* Momrneau, Minnesota, 15.
" STOLEN BASES-Crawford, Tampa Bay, 34;
" Ellsbury, Boston, 23; Figgins, Los Angeles, 21;
BUpton, Tampa Bay, 17; Abreu, Los Angeles,
15; Bartlett, Tampa Bay, 14; Span, Minnesota,
12.
PITCHING -Halladay, Toronto, 10-1; Greinke,
Kansas City, 8-2; Slowey, Minnesota, 8-2;
Wakefield, Boston, 7-3; Verlander, Detroit, 6-2;
Pettitte, New York, 6-2; Buehrle, Chicago, 6-2.
STRIKEOUTS-Verlander, Detroit, 97;
Greinke, Kansas City, 91; Halladay, Toronto, 88;
Lester, Boston, 85; FHernandez, Seattle, 79;
Garza, Tampa Bay, 68; Beckett, Boston, 68.
SAVES-Fuentes, Los Angeles, 15; Papelbon,
Boston, 14; MaRivera, New York, 14; Jenks,
Chicago, 13; FFrancisco, Texas, 12; Nathan,
Minnesota, 11; Sherrill, Baltimore, 11; Rodney,
Detroit, 11.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Tejada, Houston, .354; DWright,
New York, .345; Pence, Houston, .342; Beltran,
New York, .342; Hawpe, Colorado, .337;
HaRamirez, Florida, .330; Ibanez, Philadelphia,
.329; CJones, Atlanta, .329.
RUNS-lbanez, Philadelphia, 46; Pujols, St.
Louis, 44; AdGonzalez, San Diego, 41; Zim-
merman, Washington, 41; Braun, Milwaukee,
39; Hudson, Los Angeles, 39; Utley, Philadel-
phia, 39; Victorino, Philadelphia, 39.
RBI-Fielder, Milwaukee, 54; Ibanez, Philadel-
phia, 54; Pujols, St. Louis, 51; Howard, Philadel-
phia, 47; Dunn, Washington, 44; AdGonzalez,
San Diego, 43; Hawpe, Colorado, 43.
HITS-Tejada,, Houston, 80; Hudson, Los An-
geles, 73; Ibanez, Philadelphia, 72; Zimmer-
man, Washington, 72; HaRamirez, Florida, 70;
Pence, Houston, 69;-F-Sanchez..Pittsburgh, 69;
DWright, NewYork, 69. ..
HOME RUNS-AdGonzalez, San Diego, 22;
Ibanez, Philadelphia, 19; Pujols, St. Louis, 18;
Dunn, Washington, 17; Howard, Philadelphia,
17; Fielder, Milwaukee, 15; Bruce, Cincinnati, 14;
Reynolds, Arizona, 14; ASoriano, Chicago, 14.
STOLEN BASES-Bourn, Houston, 19;
DWright, NewYork, 14; Kemp, Los Angeles, 13;
Pierre, Los Angeles, 13; Morgan, Pittsburgh, 12;
Reynolds, Arizona, 12;Taveras, Cincinnati, 12.
PITCHING-Marquis, Colorado, 8-4; Cain, San
Francisco, 7-1; JSantana, New York, 7-3;
Billingsley, Los Angeles, 7-3; Arroyo, Cincinnati,
7-4; Broxton, Los Angeles, 6-0; Gallardo, Mil-
waukee, 6-2.
STRIKEOUTS-Uncecum, San Francisco, 95;
JVazquez, Atlanta, 93; JSantana, New York, 89;
Billingsley, Los Angeles, 85; Peavy, San Diego.


Tigers, White Sox
split doubleheader
CHICAGO - Jose Contreras al-
lowed one hit in eight strong innings in
his return to the majors Monday night,
getting his first win in nearly a year as
the Chicago White Sox beat the Detroit
Tigers 6-1 to earn a split in their day-
night doubleheader.
Alexei Ramirez, Scon Podsednik
and Jim Thome homered for the White
-Sox in the second game after Detroit
won the opener 5-4 as Brandon Inge hit
a go-ahead RBI single in the ninth.
Contreras (1-5), officially recalled
from Triple-A between games, ruptured
his Achilles tendon last August. He
made a quick recovery but struggled
when he returned this season and on
May 10 was sent to Charlotte, where he
made five starts.
The 37-year-old Contreras allowed a
two-out double to Clete Thomas in the
first and had two stretches of 11
straight batters retired in earning his
first win since June 27,2008. He
walked one and struck out three.
Chicago'sthree homers came off
Detroit's Jeremy Bonderman (0-1), who
was making his first major league ap-
pearance since June 1,2008 and was
activated from the disabled list between
games. Bonderman had surgery June
30 last year to correct a condition that-
caused a blood clot in his pitching arm.
He lasted four-innings plus, gave up
eight hits and was charged with six
runs.
Ramirez homered in the first,
Podsednik hit his first of the season in
the second and Thome drove out the
551st of his career, a two-run shot in
the third for a 4-0 lead.
Marcus Thames homered off re-
liever Matt Thornton in the ninth for De-
troit's lone run.
In the opener, Inge singled home the
- go-ahead run shortly after an error on
Chicago third base h JbshFiseld9'ih'a
loss that had White Sox manager Ozzie
Guillen fuming.
"I was basically just trying not to
strike out' Inge said.
Miguel Cabrera reached on Fields'
error with one out. Thames followed
with an infield single off shortstop
Alexei Ramirez's glove.
Inge then grounded a single into left
field off Scott Linebrink (2-3), scoring
pinch-runner Josh Anderson from sec-
ond base.


Game 1
Detroit Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Grndrscf 5 0 1 1 Pdsdnklf 4 1 2 0
Polanc 2b 4 01 0 AIRmrz ss 5 .1 ".
Ordonzrf 5 1 2 0 Dyerf 4 1 2 2
MiCarrIb 4 0 0 0 Thome dh 3 0 1 0
JAndrs pr-If 0 1 0 0 Konerk'lb 2 1 1 2
Thams dh 3 01 0 Przyns c 3 00 0
Inge3b 4 1 2'.2 Getz2b 4 0 1 0
Rabum f-1b 4.1 1 0 Fields 3b 4 0 0
Everettss 5 .1 2 1 Wisecf 4 0 00
Sardinhc 2 0 0 1 .
Totals 36 510 5 Totals 33 4 9 4
Detroit 020 011 001-5
Chicago 100 020 010-4
E-Pierzynski (3), Fields (8), Al.Ramirez (5).
DP-Detroit 2, Chicago 1. LOB-Detroit 12,
Chicago 8.2B-Inge (9), Raburn (3). 3B-Getz
(2). HR-Dye'(15), Konerko (8). SB-Polanco
(2), Getz (6). S-Sardinha. SF-Sardinha, Kon-
erko.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
Galarraga 62-3 7 3 3 4 3
SeayH,11 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
ZumayaW,3-OBS,2-3 1 1 1 1 1 1
RodneyS,11-11 1 1 0 0 0 0
Chicago
Richard 42-35 3 3 5 4
Carrasco 31-33 1 1 0 5
Linebrink L,2-3 1 2 1 0 0 0
WP-Seay, Richard. Balk-Richard.
Umpires-Home, Bill Miller;. First, Jim Joyce;
Second, Brian Runge; Third, Derryl Cousins.
T-3:01. A-24,408 (40,615).


SDetroit

JAndrs If
Thams ph
Polanc 2b
Thoms rf
MiCarr dh
Gmdrs cf
Inge 3b
Raburn lb
Laird c-
Santiag ss
Totals
Detroit
Chicago


Game 2
Chicago


ab rhbi
3 00 0
1 1 1 1
4 00 0
4 01 0
3 00 0
3000
2 0 0, 0
3 00 0
3 00 0
3 00 0
29 1 2 1


Pdsdnk If
AIRmrz ss
Dye rf
Wise rf
Thome dh
Konerk lb
Bckhm 3b
Getz 2b
BrAndr cf
RCastr c
Totals


ab r h bi
4 1 1 1
4 23 1
4 23 0
0 00 0
3 1 2 3

3 000
4 00 0,
4 00 0
2 000
32 6106


000 000 001-1
112 020 OOx-6


DP-Detroit 1. LOB-Detroit 2, Chicago 5.2B-
Thomas (6), Dye (6). HR-Thames (1), Podsed-
"nik'f), 'ArRa tirez (5), Thome.(10).
IP H RERBBSO


Detroit
Bonderman L,0-1
Miner
N.Robertson
Lyon.
Chicago
Contreras W,1-5
Thornton


8 1 0 0 1 3
1 1 1 0 0


Bonderman pitched to 3 batters in the 5th.
Umpires-Home, D.J. Reyburn; First, Brian
Runge; Second, Derryl Cousins; Third, Jim
Joyce.
T-2:18. A-30,809 (40,615).


Rockies 5, Cardinals 2 Marlins 4, Giants 0


ST. LOUIS - Jason Marquis took
the NL lead with his eighth win and
Troy Tulowitzki homered for the first
time in nearly a month, helping the
Colorado Rockies complete their first
sweep in St. Louis with a 5-2 win over
the Cardinals on Monday.
The last-place Rockies won their
season-high fifth in a row - four at
Busch Stadium - under new man-
ager Jim Tracy. St. Louis has lost a
season-worst four straight.
Clint Barmes had a pair of RBI sin-
gles for his sixth consecutive multihit
game and Brad Hawpe doubled and
had a sacrifice fly in the Rockies' first
sweep of the year.,
Colorado last swept the Cardinals
in July 1994, winning four straight at
Mile High Stadium. The Rockies im-
proved to 7-4 since Tracy took over
when Clint Hurdle was fired.
Marquis (8-4) allowed two runs in 6
2-3 innings against the Cardinals, for
whom he won 42 games from 2004-06
but never pitched in the postseason.


Colorado
ab rhbi
Fewlercf 3 2 1 0
Barmes2b 4 0 2 2
Helton lb- 4 02 1
Hawpe rf 4 01 1
Street p 0 00 0
Stewart 3b 5 0 0 0
Tlwtzkss 3 1 1 1


St. Louis.

Schmkr 2b
Rasms cf
Pujols lb
Ludwck rf
Duncan If
YMolin c
TGreen 3b


ab r h bi
3 00 0
4 0 1 0
4 00 0
4000
4 0 1 0

2 0 0


CGnzlzIf 4 0 1 0 Thurstn ph-3b 2 00 0
PPhllps c 4 01 0 BThmp p 2 00 0
Marqus p 3 1 1 0 DReyes p 0 00 0
RFlors p 0 00 0 Motte p 0 00 0
S.Smith ph 1 1 1 0 TMiller p 0 00 0
Corpasp 0 0q 0 Ankiel ph 1 00 0
SpIrghs rf 0 00 0 C.Perez p 0 00 0
Hwksw p 0 0 0 0
BrRyanss 3 1 2 1
Totals 35 511 5 Totals 33 2 6 1
Colorado 001 021 010-5
St. Louis 001 000 100-2
E-Schumaker (3). LOB-Colorado 9, St. Louis
5. 2B-Hawpe (17), Y.Molina (5). 3B-Br.Ryan
(2). HR-Tulowitzki (6). SB-S.Smith (3),
Br.Ryan (5). CS-Barmes (4). SF-Hawpe.
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
Marquis W,8-4 62-3 6 2 2 1 4
R.FloresH,4 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Corpas H,4 1 0 0 0 0 1
Street S,9-10 1 0 0 0 0 1
St. Louis
B.Thompson L,0-2 41-3 5 3 3 3 2
'D.Reyes 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Motte 1 3 1 1 0 1
T.Miller 1 1 0 0 1 2
C.Perez 1 2 1 1 0 1
Hawksworth 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by B.Thompson (Barmes). WP-Mar-
quis, B.Thompson.
Umpires-Home, Bill Welke; First, Tim Welke;
Second, Jim Reynolds;Third, Angel Hernandez.
T-2:36. A-36,748 (43,975).


MIAMI - Sean West did not allow a
hit until the seventh inning in his fourth
career start and Brett Carroll hit his first
career home run to help Florida Marlins
beat Randy Johnson and the San Fran-,
cisco Giants 4-0 on Monday night
West (1-11 allowed one baserunner
- a leadoff walk to10 Andres Torres in the
third - through the first six innings.
Edgar Renteria then lined a single to left
,on West's first pitch of the seventh.
West gave up two hits, one walk and
struck out six in eight innings.
The left-hander, a 6-foot-8 Houston
native, missed the entire 2007 season
after undergoing shoulder surgery.
Johnson (5-5), pitching on short rest,
four days after he earned career victory
No. 300 at Washington, allowed three
runs, seven hits, three walks and struck
out five in five innings.
Carroll hit a three-run homer in the
second to give the Marlins a 3-0 lead.
He also singled and tripled for the Mar-
lins, who earned a split of the four-
game series. Leo Nunez pitched a
scoreless ninth.
After Dan Uggla a single and Ronhy
Paulino walked, Carroll sent Johnson's
90 mph fastball over the left-field score-
board.
San Francisco's Aaron Rowand went
0-for-4 and had his hitting streak ended
at 17 games.


San Francisco Florida
ab rhbi
Rownd ocf 4 0 0 0 Coghln
Renteri ss 4 0 2 0 Nunez |
Winn rf 4 00 0 Helms"
BMolinc 4 0 0 0 HRmrz
Sandovl lb 3 0 1 0 Cantu 1
Uribe 3b-2b 3 0 0 0 Uggla 2
Torres If 2 0 0 0 C.Ross
Burriss 2b 2 0 0 0 RPauln
Aurilia ph-3b 1 0 0 0 BCarril
RJhnsnp 1 0 0 0 Westp
Schrht ph 1 0 0 0 De Aza


If
3b
ss
b
2b
cf
c
rf

ph-lf


ab r h bi
4 01 0
0 00 0
4000
4 0 1 1
4 020
2 1 1 0
3000
3 1 1 0
423 3
3 00 0
0 00 0


JMillerp 0 0 0 0
Whitsd ph 1 0 0 0
MValdzp 0 000
Totals . 30 0 3 0 Totals 31 4 9 4
San Francisco 000 000 000-0
Florida 030 001 00x-4
DP-San Francisco 1. LOB-San Francisco 4,
Florida 11. 3B-B.Carroll (1). HR-B.Carroll (1).
SB-Torres (3), Coghlan (3). SF-Ha.Ramirez.
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
Ra.Johnson L,5-5 5 7 3 3 3 5
J.Miller 2 2 1 1 2 1
M.Valdez 1 0 0 0 1 1
Florida
WestW,1-1 8 2 0 0 1 6
Nunez 1 1 0 0 0 1
HBP-by J.Miller (Uggla). WP-Ra.Johnson.
Umpires-Home, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Gary
Cederstrom; Second, Jim Wolf; Third, Brian
O'Nora.
T-2:32. A-12,068 (38,560).


Yankees 5, Rays 3
NEW YORK -Andy Pettitte
and another barrage of home
runs at the new Yankee Sta-
dium carried New York to a win
that started what figures to be a
challenging week.
Pettitte recovered from two
wild outings, Johnny Damon hit
a tiebreaking hometun in the
sixth inning and the Yankees
defeated the Tampa Bay Rays
5-3 Monday night.
Mark Teixeira, Nick Swisher
and Derek Jeter also homered
for the Yankees, who got all
their runs on longballs as Andy
Sonnanstine allowed a career-
high four. Tampa Bay's Gabe
Kapler hit his first home run of
the season.
/ There have been 105
homers in 29 games at the $1.5
billion bandbox, a,sharp in-
crease from the 160 last sea-
son at the original Yankee
Stadium. It was the 10th five-
homer game at the new ball-
park.
Damon broke a 3-3 tie in the
sixth with a drive to right off
Sonnanstine (4-6), and Jeter
chased him with a leadoff drive
in the eighth.
Tampa Bay NewYork
ab rhbi ab rhbl
BUptoncf 4 00 0 Jeterss 4 1 1 1
Crwfrdlf 4 0 2 0 Damonl f 4 1 1 1
Longori3b 3 00 0 Teixeirlb 3 1 1 1
C.Penalb 3 00 0 ARdrgz3b 3 00 0
Zobrist2b 2 1 1 0 Cano2b 3 1 1 0
Dillon dh 4 00 0 Posadac 3 00 0
MHrndc 4 1 1 1 HMatsudh 2 00 0
Kapler rd 4 1 1 2 Swisher rt 3 1 2 2
Brigncss 3 0 0.0 Gardnrcf 0 0 0 0
Joyce ph 1 00 0 MeCarrcf-rf 3 00 0
Totals 32 3 5 3 Totals 28 5 6 5
Tampa Bay 000 300 000-3
NewYork 120 001 01x-5
E-A.Rodriguez (3). DP-Tampa Bay 2, New
York 1. LOB-Tampa Bay 7, New York 2. HR-
Kepler (1), Jeter (8), Damon (12), Teixeira (18),
Swisher (12).
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
Sonnanstine L,4-6 7 6 5 5 2 1
Choate 1-3 0 0 0 1 1
Isringhausen 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
NewYork
PettitteW,6-2 6 5 3 2 3 7
HughesH,1 1 0 0 0 0 1
CokeH,3 1 0 0 0 1 1
Ma.RiveraS,14-15 1 0 0 0 0 1
Sonnanstine pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by Pettitte (C.Pena). WP-Pettitte.
Umpires-Home, Tim McClelland; First, Andy
Fletcher; Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Scott
Barry.
T-2:34. A-44,706 (52,325).










B4 TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 2009


For the record

Florida LOTTERY


CASH 3 (early)
6-3-0
CASH 3 (late)

PLAY 4 (early)
5-7-0-9
Florida Lottey PLAY 4 (late)
Here are the winning 9 - O - 9 - 9
numbers selected FANTASY 5
Mondayin the 11 - 17 - 32 - 34.- 35
Florida Lottery:

On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
MLB BASEBALL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Los Angeles Angels at Tampa Bay Rays
NBA PLAYOFFS
9 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) Finals Game 3 - Los Angeles
Lakers at Orlando Magic
WNBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Seattle Storm at Indiana Fever
NHL PLAYOFFS
8 p.m. (2,8 NBC) Stanley Cup Final Game 6 -
Detroit Red Wings at Pittsburgh Penguins


MOVES
Monday's Sports
Transactions
BASEBALL
American League ,
CHICAGO WHITE SOX-Recalled RHP
* Jose Contreras from Charlotte (IL). Optioned
LHPWesWhisler to Charlotte. "
DETROIT TIGERS-Activated RHP Jeremy
Bonderman from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP
Ryan Perry to Toledo (IL).
TEXAS RANGERS-Exercised a contract
option to retain manager Ron Washington for
the 2010 season.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS-Claimed RHP
'Blaine Boyer off waivers from St. Louis.
FLORIDA MARLINS-Assigned RHP Hay-
den Penn outright to New Orleans (PCL).
SAN DIEGO PADRES-Activated RHP Mike
Adams from the 60-day DL Sent INF Chris Burke
outright to Portland (PCL). Recalled RHP Edwin
Morenoand LHP Wade LeBlanc from Portland.
Optioned LHP Joe Thatcher to Portland. Placed
RHP Luis Perdomo on the 15-day DL.
American Association
FORT WORTH CATS-Released C Freddy
Carmona.
GRAND PRAIRIE AIRHOGS-Signed OF
Chad Gabriel.
PENSACOLA PELICANS-Released LHP
Dan Smith.
ST. PAUL SAINTS-Signed RHP Mark Mori-
arty.
Can-Am League
SUSSEX SKYHAWKS-Signed 1B John
Urick.
United League
SAN ANGELO COLTS-Released RHP
Brian Wilburn.
: FOOTBALL
'Canadian Football League
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS-Signed QB
Richie Williams. Released QB Darrell Hackney.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ANAHEIM DUCKS-Signed RW Mike Brown
to a two-year contract extension.
ATLANTA THRASHERS-Re-signed F Marty
Reasoner.
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS-Signed LW Rob
Klinkhammer, D Jonathan Carlsson, D Brian
Connelly and G Alec Richards.
NASHVILLE PREDATORS-Signed F Triston
Grant to a one-year contract.
* COLLEGE
ARMY-Named Shandrika Lee-Gerch
women's assistant basketball coach. *
AUBURN-Ndmed Edgard da Gama ea Silva
Filho assistant volleyball coach.
CONNECTICUT COLLEGE-Named Kenny
Murphy men's soccer coach.
DAYTON-Named Ricardo "Kiki" Lara men's
assistant soccer coach. -- .
GETTYSBURG-Named Stuart Pradia
meh's assistant basketball coach.
INDIANAPOLIS-Named Jason Warthan
wrestling coach.
LSU-Announced men's basketball FTasmin
Mitchell withdrew from the NBA draft.
MUHLENBERG-Named Mike Kocsis
wrestling coach.
NJIT-Named Matt Friel men's assistant soc-
cer coach.
SAINT XAVIER-Upgraded men's volleyball
to a varsity sport for the 2009-10 season.
BASEBALL
NCAA Division I
Super Regionals
(Best-of-3)
The visiting team plays as the home team in
Game 2; a coin flip-determines home team for
Game 3


BUSCH
Continued from Page B1

mind, nothing more than an
exorcising of demons.
Only nobody else sees it
that way.
"I've got a lot of respect
for Sam Bass and those peb-
ple at Gibson that make.
those beautiful trophies,"
said three-time Nashville
winner Carl Edwards. "You
definitely will not see me
smashing one of them." -
Brad Keselowski, either.
So thrilled to earn one of the
guitars last June, he carried
it all over the garage during
post-race inspection and
then fell asleep cradling it
during the plane ride home.
His JR Motorsports team
has the photos to prove it.
But the 24-year-old Busch
doesn't think like that, and
the big picture often es-
capes him. His antics used
to be attributed to a lack of
maturity, which ultimately
cost him his job at Hendrick
Motorsports two years ago
this week


At Dick Howser Stadium
Tallahassee, Fla.
Friday, June 5: Arkansas 7, Florida State 2
Saturday, June 6: Arkansas 9, Florida State
8, Arkansas advances
At Qxford-University Stadium
Oxford, Miss.
Friday, June 5: Mississippi 4, Virginia 3,12 in-
nings
Saturday, June 6: Virginia 4, Mississippi 3
Sunday, June 7: Virginia 5, Mississippi 1, Vir-
ginia advances
At Alex Box Stadium
Baton Rouge, La.
Friday, June 5: LSU 12, Rice 9
Saturday, June 6;: LSU 5, Rice 3, LSU ad-
vances
At Goodwin Field
Fullerton, Calif.
Friday, June 5: Cal State Fullerton 12,
Louisville 0
Saturday, June 6: Cal State Fullerton 11,
Louisville 2, Cal State Fullerton advances
At UFCU Disch-Falk Field
Austin,Texas
,Saturday, June 6:Texas 10, TCU 4
Sunday, June 7: TCU 3, Texas 2
Monday, June 8: Texas 5, TCU 2, Texas ad-
vances
At McKethan Stadium
Gainesville, Fla.
Saturday, June 6: Southern Mississippi 9,
Florida 7
Sunday, June 7: Southern Mississippi 7,
Florida 6, Southern Mississippi advances
At Boshamer Stadium
Chapel Hill, N.C.
Saturday, June 6: North'Carolina 10, East
Carolina 1
Sunday, June 7: North Carolina 9, East Car-
olina 3, North Carolina advances
At Packard Stadium
SS y Tempe, Ariz.
Saturday, June 6: Arizona State 7, Clemson 4
Sunday, June 7: Arizona State 8, Clemson 2,
Arizona State advances

BASKETBALL
WNBA Standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE


Washington
Atlanta
Connecticut
Detroit
Chicago
New York
Indiana


L Pct
01.000
1 .500
1 .500
1 .500
1 .000
1 .000
2 .000


WESTERN CONFERENCE


Minnesota
Seattle
Phoenix
Los Angeles
San Antonio
Sacramento


W L Pct
2 01.000
2 01.000
1 01.000
1 1 .500
0 1 .000
0 2 .000


Sunday's Games
Washington 77, Atlanta 71
Connecticut 66, New York 57
Minnesota 96, Indiana 74
Seattle 80, Sacramento 70
Monday's Game'
Detroit 81, Los Angeles 52
Today's Game
Seattle at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Washington at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Lofs Angelerst Minnesota 8 pm
f&, 'ir.:.rk 3 Pnoer,, 1) pm .


After landing on his feet
at Joe Gibbs Racing, he
seemed to smooth his rough
edges and settle into his
own skin while rolling to 21
victories and leading the
Sprint Cup Series standings
for most of the regular sea-
son. But when his champi-
onship hopes crumbled in
the opening Chase to the
championship race, "it be-
came clear Busch is still a
work in progress.
And there have been
some rough patches' this
season, too. He embar-
rassed his crew by abandon-
ing his car on the race track
after they cost him a Na-
tionwide win at Bristol, and
after any sort of setback he's
stormed out of tracks with-
out commenting several
times.
That edge is the. essence
of the Busch, and it's what
makes him one of
NASCAR's best drivers.
Without it, he maybe
doesn't win as often or per-
haps loses the hunger to
race in every event he can
find. With it, he offends peo-
ple at every turn.


After pitcher Strasburg,




draft appears wide open


Associated Press

NEW YORK - With his
100 mph fastball, Stephen
Strasburg has all but elimi-
nated any mystery about
which player will be picked
first by the Washington Na-
tionals in the baseball draft
Tuesday night.
Barring a big surprise, the
suspense begins at No. 2.
"Oh, it's a terrific drop-
off," Los Angeles Angels
scouting director Eddie
Bane said. "You don't want
to admit that, but this guy,
like everybody said, is a
once-in-a-lifetime guy."
While Strasburg was
striking out overmatched
college hitters at San Diego
State, major league teams
spent the spring sorting
through the best of the rest,
including North Carolina
slugger Dustin Ackley, Mis-
souri right-hander Kyle Gib-
son and high school
outfielder Donavan Tate.
New general manager
Jack Zduriencik and the
Seattle Mariners pick sec-
ond, followed by San Diego,
Pittsburgh and Baltimore.
But'once Strasburg comes
off the board, it's a fickle
class of prospects that's
drawn mixed reviews.
"I think it's a more unpre-
dictable draft than any I've
been involved with," Rays
scouting director R.J. Harri-
son said. "Usually it gets
down to about the middle of
the first round where you
get the first 'oooh,' where
they took that guy there. I
think the ooohs and aaahs
could start earlier."
Tampa Bay had the top
pick each of the past two
years, but the defending AL
champions won't make their
first selection Tuesday until
No. 30.
Teams like the Padres, Pi-
rates and Orioles will be
looking to snap up future
stars who can help turn
around their franchises, just
as Tampa Bay did,.with a
string oftop-10 picks over the
past decade.
"It's an opportunity to in-
fuse new talent into the or-
ganization," 'said Mike Hill,
general manager of the
penny-pinching Florida Mar-
lins. "Obviously for a club
like us, it's very important"
And some of these kids
aren't too far from the big


Associated Press
San Diego State University's Stephen Strasburg is expected to
go No. Ito the Washington Nationals tonight in the MLB Draft.


leagues.
Gordon Beckham became
the fourth member of last
year's draft class to reach
the majors when he was
called up by the Chicago
White Sox last week
David Price, Rick Por-
cello and Matt Wieters were
all selected in 2007.
Maybe that's one.reason
the baseball draft seems to
be gaining more attention.
Only a few years ago, the en-
tire event was held in vir-
tual obscurity via
conference call.
David Wright recalled,
hustling home from a high
school exam and 'listening
on the Internet as the New
York Mets made him the
38th pick in 2001.
"Made it hoine just in
time -to. hear my 'name
called," Wright said. "Some-
thing I'll never forget."
Now, the top prospects
can watch on television as
the baseball draft goes
prime time for the first time.
With commissioner Bud
Selig announcing picks
from the podium, the first


round will be broadcast live
by MLB Network from its
New Jersey studios begin-
ning at 6 p.m.
The only thing missing is
a Green Room stuffed with
antsy prospects wearing
flashy suits.
"I've noticed that there's
interest in the draft this
year that there never has
been. And most of it's be-
cause of Stephen," Bane
said. "You've got a guy, in
there who throws 102 mph
- legitimately - so I guess
that has something to do
with itt"
Bane and the Angels have
five of the first 48 selections,
some as compensation for
losing f aree agts Mark
'*- ixeira, Fra .isco Rq-
dT-iguez and Jon Garland.
The Nationals are the
first team to own a pair of
picks in the top 10. They get
the 10th choice as compen-
sation for failing to sign
their selection at No. 9 last
year, Missouri pitcher
Aaron Crow.-
After pitching for the Fort
Worth Cats in an independ-


ent minor league, Crow ij
back in the draft pool and
could be a high pick again.-.
Right-hander Tanner
Scheppers went a similar;
independent route. He was,
drafted 48th overall by Pitts-
burgh last year after a,,
shoulder injury sidelinedF
him at Fresno State, but the-
Pirates didn't sign him. ",
"You have to draft a lot of,
pitching to come up with,
pitching," said Logan White;.
Los Angeles Dodgers assist,
tant general manager, scouts .
ing. "You have to be willing
to take the risk on a pitcher;
not be squeamish, and hope.
you project him right But a,
lot of people are squeamish
because of the injury factor."'
In addition to the Nation4-
als and Angels (Nos. 24 and.,
25), three other teams have,'
multiple first-round picks"
Seattle (2 and 27), Colorado
(11 and 32) and Arizona (16(
and 17).
The first night of the draft
will consist of 111 picks;*
completing the first there.
rounds and compensation"
slots. There will be 4 min-
utes between first-round se-a
elections, then 1 minute after'
that.
Rounds 4-50 will be held
by conference call over the-
following two days. o o
"There's some good,
power arms. Good high
school position players,'V
Rays executive vice presi-'
dent of baseball operations
Andrew Friedman said":
"One of the weaker parts is.
probably college position
players. But there's a lot of'
depth really in high school,.
from the pitching and posi-�-
tion player side."
Of course, signing these"
prospects can be more diffi-
cult than choosing between
them, and the current econ-
omy could cause teams to!
shy away from players,
thought to be seeking the'
biggest bonuses.
Clubs have until Aug. 15 to
sign their picks, otherwise,
they lose their rights.
So the real challenge fob
Washington will be inking
Strasburg, because agent;
Scott Boras is sure to re-:
quest. a record contract -r
perhaps worth approxi-
mately $50 million.
Ready to play ball?
"It's a big game of,
chicken," Bane said. ,


Daly fails to get through qualifying


Duval makes

U.S. Openfield


Associated Press

GERMANTOWN, Tenn. -
John Daly makes his return
to the PGA Tour this week
His return to the U.S.
Open will have to wait at
least another year.
In his first time competing
in America since the PGA
Tour 'lifted his six-month
suspension, Daly managed
only four birdies over 36
holes of a U.S. Open quali-
fier Monday. He shot 1-over
143 and didn't come close to
getting one of 13 spots avail-
able ir Tennessee.
"My feet are tired," Daly
said after politely declining
an interview with a Mem-
phis TV station.
Daly was awarded a spon-
sor's exemption for the St.
Jude Classic, which starts
Thursday, and he took one
positive out of two mediocre
rounds at Ridgeway (70) and
Germantown (73). At least it
helped him make the transi-
tion from playing in Europe.
"Being over there for five
weeks, the greens are so
much slower there and I
wasn't used to the speed," he
said later. "I haven't putted
on Bermuda greens in a long
time. Boy, talk about not
even sniffing a putt."
He'll have to change his
clothes when he gets back
on the PGA Tour, though.
One of the charms of U.S.
Open qualifying is that all
players are allowed to wear
shorts. Daly stood out on this
steamy day, wearing knee-
length shorts with a blue-
and-white checkered
. pattern. But he looked slim-
mer than he has in years
after a stomach surgery in


Associated Press
John Daly chips onto the 13th green during a qualifying
round for the U.S. Open golf tournament on Monday in Ger-
mantown, Tenn..


February that limits his ap-
petite. Daly said he weighed
218 pounds when he
checked on Sunday
The 13 qualifiers in-
cluded J.P Hayes, J.J. Henry,
and Casey Wittenberg, a for-
mer U.S. Amateur finalist
who grew up -in Memphis.
Greg Kraft earned the final
spot in a 6-for-1 playoff
among all PGA Tour play-
ers, getting through on the
second extra hole.
The Tennessee sectional
had mostly PGA Tour play-
ers, with an even larger field
in Columbus, Ohio, for those
who, played the Memorial.
Among those qualifying
were David Duval, amateur
Rickie Fowler of Oklahoma


State for the second straight
year, and 50-year-old Tom
Lehman, who once played in
the final group four straight
years in the U.S. Open.
Davis Love III, who moved
up to No. 45 in the world a
week too late, failed to qual-
ify. Also missing out in Ohio
was U.S. Amateur champion
Danny Lee, who turned
down his spot at Bethpage
by turning pro.
Daly attracted a crowd
of nearly 300 people, who
followed him down the
fairway, waiting for some-
thing to cheer. There were
no big numbers, except for
a double bogey when his
tee shot sliced onto the
road, and there were not


enough birdies. ,
The tour suspended Daly
for a series of off-course in-'
cidents that led to the wrong'
kind of publicity, particu-
.larly a photo of Daly from a'
North Carolina jail after hd
spent the night to get sober."
The U.S. Open will bd'
held June 18-21 at Bethpage
Black, a public course in
New York where Tiger.
Woods was the only player tq
break park when the U.S;
Open was held there seven
years ago. Daly finished 27
shots behind, including one
round in the 80s, and he'
wanted desperately to get
back
In other sectional qualify
ing:
- Matt Kuchar hustled
out of Ohio on Sunday and'
got home to Atlanta in time*
to win one of three spots. "
- Bronson Burgoon of
Texas A&M continued art
amazing two weeks by earn-
ing one of two spots at
Northwood Club in Dallas.'
Two weeks ago, it was Bur"
goon's wedge from deep
rough to within inches that'
gave the Aggies the NCAAK
championship.
- Brad Faxon missed'
qualifying by two shots id-
Purchase, N.Y, where Kevin'
Silva of New Bedford, Mass.,.
earned one of four spots. '
Most of the PGA Tour'
players were either in Ten-"
nessee or Ohio. Some didn't'
make it to the first tee. Jerry
Kelly withdrew in Ohio,
while Scott Verplank and,
Steve Elkington were among
those who pulled out iri
Memphis.
Michael Letzig, whore
played with Tiger Woods in'
the final round at the Memo;
rial and had a front-row seat
to Woods' victory, could not
get a flight to Memphis in;
time and had to withdraw
the qualifier.


QTRUS C�umy (FL) CHRoNicLE


SPORTS









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Pens in another 3-2 hole


Detroit can win

Stanley Cup

tonight in Pitt.
Associated Press

PITTSBURGH - The series
score is the same, so is the oppo-
nent and the location, yet this
Game 6 has a distinctly different
feet to the desperate Pittsburgh
Penguins. 7i
Back home after a 5-0 drub-
bihn in Detroit on Saturday, the
Penguins face the prospect
tonight of watching the Detroit
Red Wings skate around with the
Stanley Cup at their home rink
for the second straight year.
"All we know is it's 3-2 for
them," Penguins goalie Marc-
Andre Fleury said after Mon-
dayis practice. "It doesn't matter
if we lost 2-1 or 5-0. All that mat-
ters is it's 3-2, and we've got to
focus on the next one no matter
what it is. We're just going to try
to play our game, and we should
be all right Pittsburgh P
"J] really believe it's not over I the Detroit F
really look for that Game 7, but at
the same time we've got to be Game 6 and
ready to just play the game and dent. We're
not worry about it." to go. We kn
Pittsburgh trailed the Red but it's the
Wings 3-2 in the career and
finals in 2008, but ON THE TUBE
the. Penguins N THE TUBE
were coming off Who: Detroit Red Wings
an , emotional at Pittsburgh Penguins
triple overtime
victory in Detroit N What: Game 6
thaa made Game 0 TV: NBC, 8 p.m.
6 necessary. E Series: Detroit leads 3-2
Now they are
trying to shake
off a rout that ended a two-game Capitals on t
winning streak built at home. the second r
"Mentally, I think we're in a ing a 2-0 seri
different situation," forward home loss in
Max Talbot said. "Last year it "This yea
was 3-1. We tried to battle back higher con:
and it felt so hard to come back captain Sid
and win three games in a row. the Red Wir
This year it was 2-2 and we play seen a lot be
good at home. way we've p
"We're coming back for a that experie


RAYS
Continued from Page B1

the AL as a whole is on pace to
outsteal the National League for
the .first time since 2001. That's
only happened three other times
in the last 20 years (1989, 1992
and 1998).
The Rays are most responsible
for the trend.
"They know we're going to
run," Upton said. "You can't say
there's no stopping it, but the bot-
tom line is we're going to run any
time we get a chance."
Manager Joe Maddon turned
his young, hungry team loose
during Tampa Bay's improbable
run to the World Series a year
ago. The AL champions are cre-
ating even more havoc on the
basepaths with a stolen base suc-
cess rate of just over 84 percent
thisyear.
Crawford, who tied the modern
majpr league single-game record
with six against Boston on May 3,
entered Monday night's game
against the New York Yankees
with more steals (34) than 15



FINALS
f' Continued from Page B1

For all the bravado, the Lak-
ers can be careless, a team with
holes and an inability to finish
off an opponent as a champion
must. They let Houston extend a
series despite the absence of
, Yao; Ming. Denver outmuscled
and. outhustled a Lakers team
that seemed to lose its enthusi-
asmn until Game 6 of the confer-
ence finals.
Los Angeles believes those
days are over
"We're playing tougher," for-
ward Pau Gasol said. "We under-
stanld what it takes to go get the
championship."
This is a franchise closing in
on its 15th title. It is facing Magic
team still searching for its first fi-
nals victory. Bryants insists this
is ng time to get comfortable.
"What's there to be happy
about?" he asked. "The job's not
finished."
T�he Magic have had their
shots - one in particular - to
change the series.
Lee missed a wide-open, alley-
oopilayup that would have won
Game 2 at the fourth-quarter
buzzer Sunday night. It was an-
other chapter in a long history of
Magic misery, one that now has
them 0-6 in finals games.
Call it the "alley-oops." This
mistake, however, might hurt the
most
Orlando has been able to come
back from seemingly every
heartbreak this season - in-


Associated Press
enguins goalie Marc-Andre Fleury practices on Monday in Pittsburgh. The Penguins will play
led Wings tonight in Game 6 of the Stanley Cup finals. The Red Wings lead the series 3-2.


d the guys are confi-
looser. We're ready
now it won't be easy,
biggest game of our
we definitely don't
want to have the
same feeling as
last year."
The Penguins
will be facing
elimination for
the second time
in these playoffs.
They blew out
the Washington
the road in Game 7 of
round after overcom-
ies deficit and then a
n Game 6.
r's series there is a
fidence," Penguins
tney Crosby said of
igs matchup. "We've
better results with the
played. We'll draw on
ence - more so the


results when we've played our
game and the success we've had
with it. We'll take that more
from this series than we would
last year's."
Topping the Red Wings with
the Stanley Cup in the house
poses a much greater task. De-
troit is playoff-tested and adept
in sealing the deal. The Red
Wings are 3-1 this year in games
they could eliminate opponents.
They had won 13 straight
Game 6s in which they had the
chance to end a series and ad-
vance before the Anaheim Ducks
stayed alive in this year's second
round. The Red Wings came
home and finished them off in
seven games.
"Last year we were riding
high," defenseman Hal Gill said.
"Right now we're coming in and
we have a job to do. We have to
hold serve right now. It's going
to be a big game and we have to


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays' Jason Bartlett (8) steals second base as the ball
gets away from Florida Marlins' shortstop Hanley Ramirez, left, in the
second inning on May 24 In Miami.


teams. The closest team to the
Rays in the NL was the New York
Mets with 56.
Upton and Bartlett, hitting .373
before being injured, also are in
the top 10 in steals.
Still, Tampa Bay is not a team
that thrives on speed alone. Car-
los Pena and Evan Longoria are
among the league leaders in
homers and RBIs, and the team's
ability to force mistakes with ag-

juries, four last-second losses in
the playoffs and series deficits in
two rounds. But this could be too
tough a challenge. Only three
teams have won a title after los-
ing the first two games in the fi-
nals, most recently Miami over
Dallas in 2006.
"We've just got to go home and
take care of business," Magic
center Dwight Howard said.
"The Lakers did a good job of
protecting their home, and now
it's our turn to do the same thing.
We've been in some tough situa-
tions. We've just got to fight our
way out."
Magic coach Stan Van Gundy
led the Heat to start that 2005-06
season before stepping aside. He
was still on the Heat payroll
helping Pat Riley from afar.
"Dallas never won another
game," Van Gundy said. "You
know, series can change."
The Magic would need quite a
turnaround. Their backcourt has
been dreadful. Rafer Alston and
Jameer Nelson, who returned
for the finals after being out
since early February because of
shoulder surgery, were so incon-
sistent that Van Gundy benched
them for most of the fourth quar-
ter to have 6-foot-10 forward
Hedo Turkoglu run the point
The Magic had 20 turnovers,
just 22 assists and no true ball-
handler to make the Lakers pay
for double-teaming Howard.
With Nelson coming off the
bench in place of reliable re-
serve Anthony Johnson and Al-
ston having already said hie
wasn't pleased with his minutes
in Game 1, Van Gundy might face


gressive baserunning has helped
both sluggers.
With Upton, Crawford and the
Rays' other basestealing threats
constantly on the move, Longoria
is seeing fewer breaking balls
and feasting on fastballs at the
plate. Opposing teams also are
reluctant to pitch around the 2008
AL rookie of the year because of
Pena's potent bat
The 27-year-old Crawford has


be ready for it.
"Last year we were pretty ex-
cited that we got to this point,
and we wanted to go out there
and get another one. Now we
feel like we're entitled it. We
should go out and take it"
If they do, Game 7 will be in
Detroit on Friday night. And if
trends mean anything, the odds
are in the Penguins' favor. The
home team has won each of the
first five games in the series -
the third time that has happened
in the finals since 1978.
"I don't think we didn't have
their attention before, and now
they need a 5-0 loss to get-the at-.-
tention," said Penguins coach
Dan Bylsma. "We're in a differ-
ent situation than we were last
year Guys in that room have felt
what it's like to lose in a final
and have that with them and un-
derstand that. We now fully un-
derstand where we're at."


the best stolen base percentage in
AL history, including 34-for-37
(91.9 percent) this year, and his
83.6 percent career success rate
ranks third all-time behind Tim
Raines and Eric Davis.
He's on pace to swipe a career-
best 95. That would be the most in
the majors since Vince Coleman
stole 109 for the St Louis Cardi-
nals in 1987. Only two AL players
- Ichiro Suzuki (56 steals in 2001)
and Chone Figgins (62 in 205)
have led the majors since Hen-
derson won the last of his 12 AL
stolen bases titles in 1998.
Crawford scoffs at the notion
that he could wind up stealing
100.
Even though Maddon encour-
ages the Rays to be aggressive,
with the manager noting "there's
only a few red lights," Crawford
feels the quest take a toll on his
legs, particularly with Tampa Bay
playing more than half its games
on artificial turf.
"The body takes such a bang-
ing, I probably wouldn't be able to
walk come September. I don't
ever say what a person can't do,
but I definitely think 100 is a lit-
tle out of reach," he said.


Associated Press
Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant (24) falls to the floor as Or-
lando Magic forward Hedo Turkoglu (15) defends during the second
half of Game 2 of the NBA finals on Sunday in Los Angeles.


another dilemma.
"We were just trying to see if
we could get somebody out there
who would make shots off of the
double teams and off the pick-
and-rolls and things like that,"
Van Gundy said. "I thought our
guys fought hard, but we couldn't
make enough plays. And the 20
turnovers crushed us."
The Lakers know the Magic,
too, could change in a moment
One of the streakiest teams


in the league all season, Or-
lando has shot well at home. It
plays with a carefree attitude,
and Bryant says that's reason
to be wary.
"This is a very loosey-goosey
team we're playing against," he
said. "You seen some of the shots
they hit Those are tough shots -
supposed to be tough shots. For
them it's like shooting fish in a
barrel. They're just thinking
about Game 3, and so are we."


Woods


followed


Federer's


title run

HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press

PARIS - As of about noon Mon-
day, Roger Federer hadn't received
a congratulatory call from Rafael
Nadal, the man he succeeded as
French Open champion.
Who did touch base? Who did
send along good wishes when Fed-
erer won his first title at Roland Gar-
_ros to complete a career Grand Slam
and tie Pete Sampras' record of 14
Grand Slam titles?
None other than Federer's pal
Tiger Woods, another man who owns
14 major championships. Yes, Woods
showed up to the driving range a lit-
tle later than usual Sunday before
playing the final round of the Me-
morial. He watched Federer win in
his fourth trip to the French Open
final, and they chatted afterward.
"I was pulling for him. I was as
nervous as can be for him," Woods
said after rallying from a four-shot
deficit to win in Dublin, Ohio. "I was
yelling at the TV the whole deal."
It's a shame more people in the
United States weren't watching,
too. NBC's coverage of Federer's 6-
1, 7-6 (1), 6-4 victory over Robin
Soderling at Roland Garros drew a
1.8 overnight rating - meaning
fewer than 2 percent of homes with
televisions in the country's largest
markets tuned in. The CBS broad-
cast of Woods' victory drew a 3.6
overnight rating.
Sampras was among those who
caught some of Federer's perform-
ance on television. Home in Los An-
-geles, he also saw parts of Federer's
earlier matches at this French Open.
"I watched enough to see that he
maybe wasn't at his best and went
through some tough matches that
the great ones always find a way to
win - and on a surface that is his
least favorite," Sampras said. "He
just dug deep."
Like Woods with a golf club in his
hands, Federer with a racket is
something special to behold. Good
as they are, both are constantly look-
ing for ways to improve: After re-
cently deciding to try drop shots
more often, Federer earned five
winners off them against Soderling.
"For a few years, there was prob-
ably three or four areas of his
game that were arguably the best
in the word, from movement to
forehand to shot selection to net
game," said Andre Agassi, one of
the other five men to have won
each of tennis' major tournaments.
"He just has it all."
Like the 33-year-old Woods, the 27-
year-old Federer gets called the
"greatest to ever play," even though
his career has years to go.
Like Woods, Federer is talented
and innovative, someone who not
only is capable of dominating a sport
but also of changing the way oppo-
nents play and train.
"Roger made everybody play bet-
ter He made every tennis player in
the world be better, if they want to
play with him," said Guillermo Vilas,
who won four Grand Slam titles in
the 1970s. "That's why everybody
learns new shots and works differ-
ently: 'Roger's doing this, we have to
do the same.'"
Like Woods, Federer does a good
job of blocking out potential distrac-
tions. One example: Federer's father
wasn't in the stands at Court
Philippe Chatrier on Sunday, having
returned to his hotel because he
came down with a virus.
Like Woods, Federer knows how
legacies are built
"For me," Federer said Monday,
"it's about the majors, really, right
now."
Federer lost to Nadal in the three
previous French Open finals, and
the Swiss star acknowledged feeling
the pressure to come through this
time after Nadal lost to Soderling in
the fourth round. Federer knew his-
tory would view him differently if he
could finally win in France.
"It's going to take time for me to
realize what I just did," Federer told
The Associated Press. "I might see
things very differently right now. I
don't know. But at the moment, I'm
just so happy I'm so proud that I was


able to come through after so many
years coming so close."
Woods and Federer share a man-
agement agency and sponsors.
They've filmed commercials to-
gether. They've shown up to see the
other compete in person.
And they've become friends,
aware that no else in the world re-
ally knows quite what it feels like to
be Tiger or Roger.
"It's just truly remarkable when
he gets it going. He just hits shots
that nobody else can hit," Woods
said. "It's fun to watch."
Got that, America?


Howard Fendrich covers tennis
for The Associated Press. Write to
him athfendrich@ap.org


TuEsDAY, JUNE 9, 2009 B5


SPORTS


CirRus CovNTY (FL a


IL











E Page B6 - TUESDAY, JUNE 9,2009



ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE
'Hangover'lingers,
tops at box office
LOS ANGELES - It
turns out Hollywood's
weekend hangover is big-
ger than expected.
The Warner Bros. com-
edy "The Hangover" drew
bigger audiences than
earlier projected to raise
its weekend ticket sales to
$45 million, about $1.8
million more than the stu-
dio estimated Sunday.
That made it the No. 1
draw for the weekend in-
stead of Disney and Pixar
Animation's "Up," which
came in second with $44.3
million. Sunday studio es-
timates had "Up" edging
'The Hangover" by about
6$1 million.
It's rare that the first-
and second-place movies
on Sunday flip-flop when
final numbers come out
Monday. But strong atten-
dance Sunday allowed
"The Hangover" to pull
ahead.

Rapper avoids
more jail time
PHOENIX - Rapper
DMX will not have to
serve any more jail time
in Arizona despite his
food tray


rapper,
whose
real
wname is
Earl Sim-
DMX melons
was sentenced .Monday to
supervised probation by
Maricopa County Supe-
rior Court.
Authorities say that
while Simmons was
jailed for an earlier of-
fense, he took a meal
from a tray and became
upset and threw the food
when told he could n't
have it Simmons
pleaded guilty in May to
attempted aggravated as-
sault in the incident-
Simmons had been
serving a sentence after
pleading guilty to felony
charges of theft. drug
possession and a misde-
meanor charge of animal
cruelty.
He'll be allowed to
serve his probate ion and
undergo drug counseling
in Florida, where he
plans to return.
He says he
is ready to
continue work
on a new album.

Tony ratings
post increase
NEW YORK - Tony
Awards organizers can be
pleased about a winning
night at the television
turnstiles.
Broadway's big night
was seen by 7.45 million
people.
Nielsen
Media
Research
says
that's a6


Neil Patrick
Harris



crease lion

Eyear'ton John's show
awaTony Award for best mu-



sical, and the three
young men who play the
lead role will share the
best actor prize. Neil
Patrick Harris was the
host of Sunday's show,
which was held at Radio


City Music Hall. Angela
Lansbury, Marcia Gay
Harden and Geoffrey
Rush also took home tro-
phies.
Nielsen said it was the
biggest audience for the
Tonys in three years, the
second biggest since 2003.
-From wire reports


THE SHOWS




MUST GO ON


Hollywood labor

drama likely to

fizzle today
RYAN NAKASHIMA
AP business writer
- LOS ANGELES
T he cred its a re about to
roll on a contract
drama involving actors
in Hollywood's biggest
movies and TV shows, a fight
that has left them bitterly d i-
vided and further behind than
they started.
The Screen Actors Guild
will count ballots today sent to
120,000 members on a new
contract The vote followed in-
vective-laced infighting and
drawn-out talks that failed to
achieve goals set by SAG's
now-replaced leaders to im-
prove compensation for
movies and TV shows that run
on the Internet.
Hollywood actors seem split
for and against the deal, while
those based in New York are
largely in favor The outcome
could depend on the votes of
the vast majority of SAG mem-
bers who are mostly actors
witLhout work.
Either result would have lit-
tle short-term effect, because
throughout
thedis-
pute, ac-


tors have continued to work
under the conditions of their
old contract A strike threat
diminished after moderates
ousted the leadership of SAG
in a boardroom coup early
this year.
But a rejection of the con-
tract risks driving the union


into irrele-
vance. Already,
ABC, CBS, NBC.
and Fox have
ordered new pi-
lots and shows
heavily under
contracts with a
smaller actors
union, AFTRA.
It ratified a sim-
ilar contract
deal nearly a
year ago, giving
studios cer-
tainty that SAG
actors without a
contract could
not.
SAG's new
contract, if ap-
proved, immedi-
ately raises the
minimum pay of
actors by 3 per-
cent and an-
other 3.5
percent in the
second year of
the deal. But ac-
tors lose out on
thlie raises they
wou Id have got-
ten over the
past year.
The studios
had run an on-
line wage clock
showing the
amount SAG ac-


SUMMAf
* LONG-RUN]
DRAMA: Ay
last contract
the Screen P
is set to cou
on a new de
lywood TV a
producers.I
tions led to
the union ar
ouster of its
* THE DEAL:
120,000 SA
got ballots f
contract. Th
would raise
mum pay fo
members bi
improve cor
for movies a
shows that
Internet.
* AT STAKE:
be few shor
fects from a
rejection of
Actors have
ing under th
their old cor
rejection of
tract risks d
into irreleva
raising the
smaller actc
AFTRA.


tors had given up by failing to
cut a deal last June. when
the old contract ex-
pired. The clock would
have hit nearly $79 mil-
S lion by Tuesday
SAG was able to win a
* concession: The new con-
tract will expire on June
30,2011, about the same
time as those of other
unions, allowing SAG to
maintain the future threat of a
joint strike. That expiration
date had been one of the final
points of contention.
"I think everyone was very
weary of not having a contract
and of hearing the rhetoric in-
creasingly heated up on both
sides of the equation," said
actor Adam Arkin, who was
elected to the Guild's board
last fall.
The sides he referred to
were not the Hollywood pro-
ducers and the actors. They
were the two warring factions
within the Guild itself.
AFTRAs ratification of a
deal last July quickly set two
SAG camps at each others'
throats.
Some actors protested the
SAG leaders' hardline negoti-
ating tactics. James Cromwell,
a former SAG board member,
accused the Guild of holding
the town "hostage," especially
when other actors, directors
and writers had signed a pact.
"Let's get what we can get,"
he pressed at the time.
Unite for Strength, the fac-
tion to which Arkin belongs,
put together a coalition that
this year fired executive di-
rector Doug Allen, muzzled
L President Alan Rosenberg
and installed David White


as interim executive director
Rosenberg, part of the op-
posing camp, called Member-
ship First, continues to
campaign hard against the
deal and has called for a strike
vote, but he no longer speaks
on behalf of the Guild. He has
also been denied access to the
running tally of
votes that is usu-
RY BOX ally shared with
NING the president on
year after its contract votes.
t expired, Rosenberg
Actors Guild blamed critical
int the votes voices within
nal with Hol- the Guild - in-
nd movie eluding Tom
The negotia- Hanks and
infighting in George Clooney
nd the - for causing di-
s leadership. vision among ac-
tors and for the
About long delay in
G members comingto a
for the new
ie deal deal, one that he
the mini- calls "the worst
the mini deal we've ever
ut would not been presented
npensation w ith."
ensatioV "I don't take
run on the responsibility
for how long
these negotia-
There would tions have
t-term ef- taken. I hold
approval or those who at-
the deal. tacked us since
been work- before these ne-
ie terms of gotiations began
tract. But a forthat,"he
the coiving SAG said. "Every-
riving SAG thing else I'll
profile of a take credit or
prs union, blame for."
But as talks
languished
under his watch,
the rival AFTRA union gained
from the uncertainty, even
though its contracts are now
slightly more expensive than
SAG's because its 3.5 percent
raise in minimum pay in the
first year already kicked in.
Of the 30 TV shows that were
picked up by broadcast net-
works this spring, like ABC's
"Modern Family" or Fox's
"Brothers," 25 were AFTRA
deals and just five were SAG, a
reversal of last season when 19
were SAG and three were
AFTRA.
Although about 44,000 actors
are members of both unions,
SAG's diminished relevance
on TV shows may be perma-
nent because union represen-
tation cannot be changed
midway. That means that as
current shows are replaced by
new ones, SAG's hold may fur-
ther erode.
SAG still maintains exclu-
sive jurisdiction over feature
films. The Alliance of Motion
Picture and Television Pro-
ducers, which represents the
studios, declined to comment
Sam Freed, an actor and
president of the Guild's New
York division, said the real
problem began more than a
year ago, when bickering
prompted AFTRA and SAG to
negotiate their major studio
deals separately for the first
time in nearly three decades.
Now, he said, the deal will
give the Guild two years to re-
group and analyze the rev-
enues that are to be gained
from Internet distribution of
TV shows and movies. As for
what happens if actors do not
ratify the deal, he said, '"Ask
President Rosenberg."


Midler marks 100th show in Las Vegas


Associated Press

LAS VEGAS - Bette Mi-
dler admits it takes a little
work to keep her Las Vegas
Strip show fresh - espe-
cially now that it's hit its
100th performance.
The entertainer marked
the 100th milestone of "The
Showgirl Must Go On" at the
Caesars Palace Colosseum
on Sunday. She said focus
was the key to keeping her
song-and-sass act from "be-
coming a little like Ground-
hog Day, not a lot like


Groundhog Day, but
a little."
"I have to be in a
concentrated place. --
Otherwise, I forget -
what I'm doing
there," she said.
The Sunday per-
formance kicked off Bette
a four-week run at
the Caesars Palace Colos-
seum; Midler has another
100 shows left on her con-
tract
The challenge, she says, is
keeping up the pace during
weeks off.


"I try to keep my
weight down so I
don't have to redo my
costumes every time
I come back, which is
really the hardest
part," she said.
The busy schedule
Midler has kept her from
closely following the
political debate stirring up
many in her fan base.
On the gay marriage de-
bate, Midler said: "I watch
from time to time. To tell you
the truth, I'm not on the front
lines, I'm in the zone."


She later added: "But I'm
all in favor of gay marriage. I
think it's fabulous."
She said she praised the
president for his work pro-
moting organic food through
the White House garden. Mi-
dler has long been an advo-
cate for community gardens
through her New York
Restoration Project
Midler, a fellow Hawaiian,
also gave the president a gift
for his daughters: a bedaz-
zled ukulele. "He looked at it
like he'd never seen such a
thing before."


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Powerball: 2
Power Play: 3
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 2 $200,000
Lotto: 6 - 24 - 26 - 28 - 31 - 50
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 50 $6,403.50
4-of-6 3,440 $75.50 -
3-of-6 72,409 $5
Fantasy 5: 2 - 9 -16 - 31 - 36
5-of-5 1 winner $257,212.58
4-of-5 345 $120
3-of-5 10,550 $11

INSIDE THE NUMBERS-
* To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with.
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777. "

Today in
HISTORY__
Today is Tuesday, June 9,
the 160th day of 2009. There
are 205 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On June 9, A.D. 68, the
Roman Emperor Nero com-,.
mitted suicide.
On this date:
In 1940, during World War
II, Norway decided to surren-
der to the Nazis, effective at
midnight.
In 1953, 94 people died
when a tornado struck
Worcester, Mass.
In 1954, during the Senate-
Army Hearings, Army special
counsel Joseph N. Welch be-
rated Sen. Joseph R. Mc-
Carthy, asking: "Have you no.
sense'of decency, sir?"
In 1969, the Senate con-
firmed Warren Burger to be
the new chief justice of the
United States, succeeding
Earl Warren.
In 1973, Secretariat be-
came horse racing's first Triple
Crown winner in 25 years by
winning the Belmont Stakes.
In 1980, comedian Richard,.
Pryor suffered almost fatal
bums at his San Femando
Valley, Calif., home when a
mixture of "free-base" cocaine
exploded.
In 1986, the Rogers Comn-.
mission released its report on
the Challenger disaster, criti-
cizing NASA and rocket-
builder Morton Thiokol for
management problems lead-
ing to the explosion that .
claimed the lives of seven as-
tronauts.
Ten years ago: After 78
days of intense NATO
airstrikes, Yugoslav and West-".
em generals signed a pact '.
clearing the way for a Kosovo
peace plan.
Five years ago: The body
of Ronald Reagan arrived in '
Washington to lie in state in
the U.S. Capitol Rotunda be-
fore the 40th president's fu-
neral.
One year ago: A growing'.
number of supermarkets and
restaurants yanked three vari-
eties of tomatoes from their
shelves and dishes amid con-
cem about a 16-state salmo-
nella outbreak. Retail gas
prices rose above $4 per gal-
lon.
Today's Birthdays: Gui-
tarist-inventor Les Paul is 94.
Former World Bank president
and former defense secretary
Robert S. McNamara is 93..
Actress Mona Freeman is 83.
Sports commentator Dick V-
tale is 70. Author Letty Cottin'
Pogrebin is 70. Rock musician
Jon Lord is 68. Mystery author
Patricia Comwell is 53. Actot-


Michael J. Fox is 48. Actor -
Johnny Depp is 46. Actress
Gloria Reuben is 45. Actress
Michaela Conlin ("Bones") is
31. Actress Natalie Portman is
28.
Thought for Today: "Next
to the slanderer, we detest the
bearer of the slander to our,
ears." - Mary Catherwood,
American novelist (1847-
1901).


r









Section C- TUESDAY, JUNE 9,2009



H HEALTH


HEi




&CIT CNTY CHRONICLE
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


... .. . N iam A


ALTH NOTES
ages A9, C9



FE


i Lillian Yai
Yai Knipp
/Page C2
m Shalyn
Barker/ 6


World Blood Donor Day is Sunday


Special to the Chronicle
. Sunday is a special day for blood
donors all over the world - it's
World Blood Donor Day.
"Honoring those who donate helps
raise awareness of the vital impact
whatt they give. And for LifeSouth
Community Blood Centers, this an-


nual reminder comes at an impor-
tant time, because they frequently
face shortages in the summer
months, when school is out and reg-
ular donors are traveling. Donors
may stop by the center or blood mo-
bile on Sunday to help:
* Lecanto Center: 1241 S. Lecan-
to Highway; 527-3061; open 10 a.m.


to 4 p.m.
* Blood mobile: Walmart Super
Center, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness; open 2 to 5 p.m.
Donors are used to getting cook-
ies and cold drinks and T-shirts as
special thank-you gifts, but on this
Sunday there will be one more spe-
cial gift. To mark World Blood


Donor Day, Nexcare has provided
blood centers across the country
packages of "Give" bandages to give
to donors to mark the occasion.
. Donors must be at least 17, or 16
with parental permission, weigh a
minimum of 110 pounds and be in
good health to be eligible to donate.
A photo ID is also required.


Diabetic doctor


Physician lives

the medicine

hepractices
NANCY KENNEDY
nkennedy@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle


NOTABLE COMPANY
Celebrities with diabetes:
* Nick Jonas (Jonas Brothers band), Type 1.
* Jay Cutler, Chicago Bears quarterback, Type 1.
a Halle Berry, actress, Type 2.
M Randy Jackson, "American Idol" judge, Type 2.
* Patti LaBelle, singer, Type 2.
* Anne Rice, author, Type 1.
* Mike Huckabee, former Arkansas governor, Type 2
(which he reversed after losing 100
pounds). _m


Obstructive sleep


apnea and C-PAP


O bstructive sleep
apnea affects
about 20 million
to 30 million people in
the U.S. Obstructive
sleep apnea means that
you stop breathing re-
peatedly throughout the
night and this is caused
by a collapse of the air-
way, resulting in poor
sleep quality and also
puts patients-at risk for
high blood pressure and
heart problems.


Dr. Deni
EAR, I
& THF


The usual mechanism is a col-
lapsed airway secondary to extra
tissue such as. a large tongue, an
elongated soft palate and uvula
and sometimes decreased muscle


tone.' This prevents air
from getting through the
S mouth down to the lungs
where it does its jobs.
Many people who
have pb~~~ptiv e sleep
apnea do not realize that
they have that condition
and in a lot of instances
other people witness it
s Grillo before the patient even
NOSE realizes what is going on.
ROAT It usually manifests in
_ the form of noisy breath-
ing or snoring.
Other factors that suggest ob-
structive sleep apneajnu ay-
time sleepi and choking or


See GRILLO/Page 04


had the mumps.
"It's rare, but mumps can
cause (this type of diabetes)," he
said.
He was told 1i6 needed five or
six insulin injections a day. Type
1 diabetes is a condition where
the body's immune system de-
stroys the pancreatic cells that'
make insulin, the hormone
needed to regulate blood glu-
cose.
"There's no other way to treat
Type I diabetesexcept with in-
sulin," Tawfik said.
Today Tawfik wears an in-
sulin pump, which is the size of
a beeper and holds three days'
worth of insulin and delivers it
via a catheter placed under the
skin.
According to the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention,
in 2007 there were 23.6 million
people (8 percent of the popula-
tion) in the United States with
diabetes, an increase of 13.5 per-
cent since 2005. Type 1 diabetes
accounts for between 5 percent
and 10 percent in adults.
Type 2 is the more common
form, and usually begins as in-
sulin resistance when the cells
stop using insulin properly As
the need for insulin increases,
the pancreas loses its ability to
produce it
Tawfik said most of his pa-
tients with diabetes have Type
2. Most,often, he said; Type.2'di-
abetes is'associated with obesity
and a e prevented with
weight loss and exercise.
Also, in the insulin-re-
sistance or pre-diabetes
stage, the drug met-
formin (trade name
Glucophage) is often
prescribed as an anti-
diabetic drig.
"It helps stop the pro-
See DIABETIC/Page C4


Problem foods in Western diet
There are several problem juries are inflicted within the body,
foods in the Western diet be- especially the lungs. When a
sides sugar and sugary foods. smoker quits, those injuries are
They include white stopped, and if the in-
flour. saturated and juries have not reached
trans fats, meats high in an irreversible stage, the
saturated fats, and . body heals amazingly
processed foods that are well.
high in various combina- Most people do not re-
tions of such foodstuffs. alize that unhealthy
Two reasons why foods also cause micro-
these foods are prob- injuries in the body that
lematic are that they're can eventually result in
seriously deficient in chronic disease. A top
vital nutrients, or they Dr. Ed Dodge heart surgeon who has
cause inflammatory in- PASSION done more than 5,000
jury to the body, or both. PA coronary artery by-
I explored the problem FOR HEALTH passes says these arter-
of nutritional deficien- ies are inflamed
cies previously, so let's look at the internally, as if they have been
subject of inflammatory injuries, rubbed with sandpaper daily
There are many examples of Things like high blood pressure,
things we do to injure our bodies smoking, high cholesterol and high
internally. Smoking is a prime ex-
ample in which repeated micro-in- See DODGE/Page C2


Dr. C. Joseph.
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY


Summer

skin

safety
The good weather's
finally here, and
we're all eager to
get out in the sun and
fresh air. Spending time
outdoors is part of a
healthy, active life. But
whether you enjoy tennis,
golf, hiking, gardening, or
running, take some pre-
cautions when you're out
in the sun this summer.
More than 1 million
skin cancers are diag-
nosed each year in the
United States. That's
more than cancers of the
prostate, breast, lung,
colon, uterus, ovaries and
pancreas combined. And,
yes, we certainly have our
fair share here in Citrus
County. Most skin cancers
are caused by too much
exposure to ultraviolet
(UV) rays. Much of this ex-
See BENNETT/Page C2









Dr. Sunil Ganrdhi
CANCER &
BLOOD
DISEASE


Chemo


helps


lung


cancer
rs. Smith has
been my patient
for many years.
She presented with short-
ness of breath and a cough
more than one year ago. A
chest X-ray showed multi-
ple lung nodules. The
biopsy of the lung nodules
showed metastatic adeno-
carcinoma, a form of lung
cancer, also known as
NSCLC.
This is an incurable
cancer. My patient was
still very optimistic. We
started her on chemother-
apy in our office as an out-
patient She tolerated the
See GANDHI/Page C2


World-class heart care

just inches from home.

Undergoing open-heart surgery is a lot less stressful when you don't have to travel far from home.
Citrus Memorial Heart Center is located right here on the Nature Coast and we provide the
same amazing care as big-city hospitals. In fact, since January 2004, more than 1,200 patients
have trusted us for open-heart surgery. It may be because we use the most sophisticated technology,
,, or maybe it's because we have some of the most knowledgeable cardiovascular physicians and staff.
Whatever the reason, we're going to continue to grow and heal even more hearts.
S " For more information, call the Heart Center at 352-344-6416


CITRUS MEMORIAL SAOF


TAM


i


t








UESDAYr.., TUN ,, 0 fllHm m&LinCTUCONY()CRNIE


New journey after graduation

H ello again! As we begin polished professional.
the month of June, many Keep good company around
will be closing a chapter you. We are all a product of our
of their lives to open a new one. environment. Make sure to ob-
Graduation, new schools, new serve your surroundings. Highly
beginnings. successful people "hang" with
This month I have just a few the same caliber of character. If
tips to help you begin your new you choose to "hang" in the
journey: wrong environment, it will surely
m Always present yourself in a distract your vision and your ac-
confident manner. Learn to Lillian complishments will suffer. There
speak. clearly, use eye contact, Yai Yai Knipp is a time and place for every-
posture and a winning smile. YA YAN thing. Make good choices and
Take courses that will build choose a path that fits your vi-
character as well as intellectual STYLE sion.
strength. I once heard a tremendous
Use organizational skills that will keep statement of wisdom: If you see yourself in
you focused and on track As you mature in the position you wish to be in, wearing the
life, organization will be a vital task for suc-
cess. Learn good habits now to become a See YAI YAI/Page C5


BENNETT
Continued from Page C1

posure comes from the sun,
but some may come from
manmade sources such as
tanning beds.
The good news is that
there is a lot you can do to
protect yourself. Follow
these practical steps, and
they will provide the best
protection when used to-
gether. When you are out in
the sun, wear clothing to pro-
tect as much skin as possible.
The ideal sun-protective fob-
rics are lightweight, comfort-
able, and protect against
exposure even when wet
And wear a hat A hat with at
least a 2- to 3-inch brim all
around is ideal to protect
your neck, ears, eyes, fore-
head, nose and scalp. Under
that hat, wear a good pair of
sunglasses. Invest in a pair of
wrap-around sunglasses
with at least 99 percent UV
absorption to block damage.
ing UVA and UVB light
I am sure you all know the
importance of sunscreen.


GANDHI
Continued from Page Cl

treatment well. After four to
five months of chemother-
apy, we did a PET/CT scan
in our office. Her cancer
completely disappeared.
This is called complete re-
mission. This is very good
news for the patient At this
time, she had two options; ei-
ther maintain the remission
with different chemotherapy
or stop treatment and restart
chemotherapy when the can-
cer comes back
Recently in our ASCO
meeting in Orlando, there
was a report on this subject
Dr. Chandra Belani from
Hershey Medical Center in
Pennsylvania reported on
and eagerly awaited trial.
The study involved 663 pa-
tients with stages IIIB/IV
NSCLC treated with four cy-
cles of chemotherapy that
had resulted in at least sta-
ble disease as best re-
sponse. The patients were
randomized to pemetrexed
(Alimta) at 500 milligrams
per square meter every 21
days or to placebo.
The! preliminary analysis


DODGE
Continued from Page Cl

blood 'sugar can all be fac-
tors in such arterial inflam-
mation.
Whenever one gets any
kind of injury, external or
internal, the body responds
with many cellular and se-
cretory changes in its efforts
to heal the injury. These
changes are called inflam-
matory responses. They are
characteristic of the intense
work the body does to heal
any kind of injury. C-reac-
tive protein (CRP) is one
measure of such inflamma-
tion.
With acute injuries, the
body's healing is usually
successful, so inflammation
subsides fairly quickly With
chronic diseases, the situa-
tion is different. Ongoing
micro-injuries to the body's
tissues keep the body's in-
flammatory processes at
work in a never-ending bat-
tle. CRP levels are consis-
tently high in arthritis,
coronary artery disease,
and many others.
� Underlining the negative
impact of problem foods, Dr.
John McDougall says that
more than 75 percent of our
chronic diseases are "due to
repeated injuries from the
fork and spoon." Though
other preventive specialists
may not say it so colorfully,


Experts recommend prod-
ucts with a sun protection
factor (SPF) of at least 15.
The SPF number represents
the level of protection
.against UVB rays provided
by the sunscreen; a higher
number means more protec-
tion. Be sure to read the
label before you buy.
Use 1 ounce of sunscreen
(a palmfull") to cover your
arms, legs, neck, and face.
For best results, apply it
about 30 minutes, prior to
going out in the sun, and
reapply every two hours,
even more if you are swim-
ming or sweating. Don't for-
get to protect your lips by
using a lip balm with SPF
And don't skip it just be-
cause it looks overcast out-
side. UV light still comes
through on hazy days, and
often some of the most se-
vere burns occur on these
days. Also, avoid certain
times of the day if possible.
UV rays are most intense
during the middle of the day,
usually between the hours of
10 a.m. and 4 p.m. It's best to
plan your outdoor activities
outside that timeframe, if


of overall survival demon-
strated a statistically signif-
icant advantage in favor of
pemetrexed maintenance
therapy in patients with
nonsquamous histology, as
the median overall survival
was 14.4 months vs. 9.4
months with placebo. There
was no survival advantage
with squamous cell lung
cancer patients.
Until now, the standard of
care in metastatic NSCLC
has been to give about four
months of chemotherapy
and then hold the treat-
ment All these patients ex-
perience cancer recurrence
and progression. At that
time, different chemother-
apy is started. This study
suggests that we start
chemotherapy with Alimta
and continue it until the pa-
tient has disease progres-
sion. The disadvantage is
obvious that the patient gets
chemotherapy for longer
duration. At the same time,
the advantage is also obvi-
ous. These patients live
longer. Also because Alimta
is a mild chemotherapy and
is well tolerated, quality of
life is not much affected.
This is the first time it is
clearly shown that continu-


most agree that lifestyle is.
responsible for more than
75 percent of our chronic
diseases.
Unfortunately, much of
Western medicine is fo-
cused more on treating the
symptoms of these diseases
than in preventing them in
the first place. As a result,
Americans pay a high price
for medications and treat-
ment for high blood pres-
sure, high cholesterol, high
blood sugar and other pre-
ventable health problems
instead of improving their
lifestyles.
As Dr McDougall suggests
in his May 2009 newsletter,
the solution to much
chronic disease is easy to
prescribe: "Stop the re-
peated injuries." As he also
says: "Identifying the source
of these injuries is easy. Un-
healthy foods and 'bad
habits' (are) at the root of
human maladies. The real
challenge is in changing
lifelong behaviors."
I agree. The goal in this
series of articles is to help
people find ways of chang-
ing from self-damaging to
more beneficial lifelong
habits. If improving your
health outlook interests you,
please stay tuned!

Dr Ed Dodge is a retired
physician now living in
Texas. Visit his Web site,
www.passionforhealth.info.


possible.
Finally, and I have said
this in many columns, there
is no such thing as a safe tan.
Don't fall victim to the the-
ory that tanning salons are
safe. They are not. Tanning
lamps give out UVA and fre-
quently UVB rays, as well.
Both UVA and UVB rays can
cause serious long-term skin
damage, and both contribute
to skin cancer. My advice is
simple: If you need a tan,
gradually develop it without
a burn, skip the tanning bed,
and if you need a quick tan,
try a bronzing lotion or self-
tanning cream.

Dr C. Joseph Bennett is a
board-certified radiation
oncologist, past president
of the Citrus County Unit of
the American Cancer
Society and a member of
the Board of Directors and
Executive Committee of
the Florida Division of the
American Cancer Society
Contact him at 522 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
FL 34461 or e-mail
cjbennett@rboi.com.

ing chemotherapy with Al-
imta beyond the initial four
months improves survival
by more than 50 percent.
This is definitely an impor-
tant breakthrough in lung
cancer treatment. This will
significantly alter lung can-
cer treatment
My patient was started on
Alimta almost eight months
ago. She is tolerating it well
and her cancer remains in
complete remission.

Dr Sunil Gandhi is a
hematologist and
oncologist He is the
volunteer medical adviser
of the Citrus Unit of the
American Cancer Society.
Send questions or
comments to 521 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
FL 34461 or e-mail to
sgandhi@tampabayrrcom
or call 746-0707

WWW.


LendEars
.-- .comR












Participants
sought
for study of
Ziga Hearing Aid
invention.
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hearing aid fittings through
�009 Resound research grant.
Free candidate screenings
open to public.
June 8 -12












700 S.E. 5th Terrace
Crystal River, FL |
Call 795-5700


Medication's journey


through the human body


Q What happens to a
* medication after I swal- :
* low it?
A. A lot of things happen to a J.
drug after a person swallows it.
Once it reaches the stomach,
some of the drug could be lost as
it moves through the gastroin-
testinal tract Many digestive en-
zymes and bacteria in the
stomach and intestines can break Richard ]
down drugs. In addition, medica- ASK
tions can interact with foods and PHARI
beverages in the gastrointestinal
tract, which may reduce or in-
crease the amount of drug that gets ab-
sorbed into the bloodstream.
Once the drug is absorbed, it travels to the
liver via the portal vein. In the liver most of
the drug changes (metabolism) take place.
Drugs are primarily metabolized in the liver
by a number of enzymes that can make the
drug more active, less active or even toxic.
Whatever remains of the medication after
metabolism in the liver then enters the vein
in the liver that carries blood from the liver
to the heart (hepatic vein). The heart then
pumps the drug molecules out into the gen-


Hoffmann
STHE
M/ACIST


eral circulation, which carries
the drug throughout the body to
its eventual target site(s) in the
body and to other locations as
well.
Any medication that remains
after traveling through the blood
circulatory system eventually
goes back to the liver via the he-
patic artery, where additional
metabolism can occur. The body
ultimately gets rid of (excretes)
the metabolized medication,
which is made more water-solu-
ble in the liver via the kidneys


into the urine.
Some of the metabolized drug might also
pass back from the liver into the digestive
tract through bile and end up in the stool.
Some medications may also leave the body
in saliva, sweat, exhaled air or a motheF's
breast milk

Richard Hoffmann has been a
pharmacist for more than 20 years. Send
questions to him at 1135N. Timucuan
Trail, Inverness, FL 34453.


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7hee s~ens hw nt bm eafumd y te FW& rugAdmn~mm.Thispmductisnot intended to diagnov ,enM cure orpmmwt anY d&oes


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HEALTH & LIFE


C2 T E 9 2009


I








rrruS rVrr ) uYn r, TUSDY-JNE9N209


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,ing the very first day. And since
^researchers believe Apatrim works
yto suppress appetite, most people
,can eat what they want and still lose
.weight.*
"By suppressing their appetite,
,most people will consiume fewer cal-
fories which can lead to weight loss,"
"said Dr. Joseph Dietz, Director of
jHealth Science, Research & Devel-
eopment for PatentHEALTH. "Con-
sumers should always keep in mind
that there is no substitute for proper
'diet and exercise when it comes to
,losing weight."*

�Impressive clinical results
Apatrim's active ingredient has a
-known ability to help control hunger
pangs. ,This allows people to eat the
foods they want and always seem to
be craving because they'll just want
to eat less.*
The U.S. clinical study was con-
ducted in Los Angeles. The study
included healthy, overweight indi-
viduals between the ages of 31 and
73. The caloric intake and level of
exercise was not disclosed.
The participants were instructed
not to change the food they were eat-
ing and not to add any exercise. Spe-
cifically, no changes to their daily
routine; just take the recommended
'dosage 30-minutes before lunch and
dinner.
A remarkable 100% of the partic-
-ipants taking Apatrim as directed
either lost weight or inches off of


M POPULAR PILL: Allison Garwood (front) and Renee Pellegrini pick up a bottle of the breakthrough weight loss supplement called Apatrim� at the pharmacy.
An amazing 100% of the participants in the U.S. clinical trial got results taking Apatrim and its popularity is soaring. Consumers can call 1-866-964-2349
to have Apatrim shipped directly to their homes.


their waistline during the 4 week
clinical study. Those losing weight
lost an average of 5 times more than
study participants who were taking
the placebo pills.*
Some participants experienced
fabulous results, losing as much as 8
lbs and up to.3 inches off their waist-
line. These amazing results were
achieved without changes in life-
style. All they did was take the pills
as instructed.2*

Professional support
Industry trends along with pro-
fessional's support in the weight
loss and fitness industries indicate
that Apatrim is the real thing. This
amazing pill is being recommended
.to companies and clients across the-
country.
Mark Loy, a personal trainer has
had some of his clients use Apatrim
with great success.)
"When I'm working with my cli-
ents I can control what they're eat-
ing," said Loy. "But when they leave
they're on their own and that's when
the tendency to cheat comes into
play," he continued.
"I heard about Apatrim so I
checked out the facts then decided
to try it as a part ofmy training pro-
gram," Loy said.
"It's really helped some of my
clients to control their eating. I've
watched people get some amazing
results while taking Apatrim," said
Loy. "Sign me up, I'm a believer."2
Dr. Joseph Dietz was impressed


with the quality of the clinical
trials as well as the U.S. patent
(#7,060,308). This patent protects
the proprietary method of extract-
ing the active ingredient. This pro-
cess is what the developing scien-
tists believe is the key to the active
ingredient's effectiveness.
"When I read the clinical results,
the U.S. patent and all of the other.
scientific support I immediately
knew we needed to use this weight
loss compound," said Dietz.
"The results are real; Apatrim is a
great product that's been shown to


help people lose weight."*

Where to get it
All of the national retail pharmacies
including Walmart, CVS/pharmacy,
and Walgreens have placed orders
for Apatrim.
There have been some reports
of out-of-stocks, so to make it eas-
ier for people to get it right away a
Regional Health Hotline has been
put in place for the next 48 hours.
Starting at 8:00am today, all consum-
ers have to do is call 1-866-964-2349 and
ask for Dept. AP4512; orders will be'


filled on a first-come, first-served
basis.
"For those people who call the
hotline to have Apatrim shipped
directly to their homes, we guarantee
they'll get product and they can also
qualify for a direct-to-home discount,"
said Ken Geis. "But this discount is
only available through the hotline for
the next 48 hours," he said.
So for those who choose not to call
or miss the deadline you may have
to pay more for Apatrim or possibly
run the risk of not finding it at the
drug store.


Drug stores load up with powerful joint pill


Sales skyrocketing; news of its amazing results spread across the U.S.


By G.W. Napier
Universal Media Syndicate
UMS -Consumers can't seem
to get enough of it and drug
'stores are selling it as fast as
they can get it.
"Unbelievable, that's all I
can say," said Darla Miller,
.!Operations Manager for
.PatentHEALTH the company
.that developed the break-
through joint supplement.
' Miller was referring to the
fact that in just one day a drug
store chain sold 2,000 bottles
of the powerful joint health sup-
plement called Trigosamine*.
"We've already shipped over
500,000 bottles of Trigosamine
and sales just keep growing,
it's been crazy," said Miller.
Scientists have developed
this amazing oral tablet that
doesn't require a prescription
-and is taken only once a day.
: It's so impressive that one
,key ingredient has the abil-
'ity to retain fluid up to 1000
times its own weight; this
helps increase lubrication for
*the joints allowing them to
move with ease.*
Trigosamine's key ingredi-
ent is Hyaluronate also called
HA-13 which is the building
'block of "natural joint fluid,"
medically known as synovial
fluid.
This joint fluid reduces fric-
tion in the joints allowing for
'effortless motion. It not only


lubricates the joints, but it also
acts as a comfortable shock
absorber.
"As we age, the body's nat-
ural production of this fluid
declines and this can force
the bones in our joints to
grind together which can re-
sult in nagging discomfort,"
said Dr. Joseph Dietz.1
"Using Trigosamine is like
taking a can of oil and applying
it directly to your joints," said
Dr.Dietz.*
Trigosamine combines HA-13
with the essential blend of glu-
cosamineandchondroitinwhich
have been clinically shown to
help build healthy cartilage in
the joints allowing for increased
flexibility and range of motion.*
A clinical study conducted
by the United States govern-


ment found that glucosamine
and chondroitin, similar to
those found in Trigosamine,
had a 79.2% effective rate for
those with moderate to severe
joint discomfort.'*
But it's the results that
make this joint supplement so
impressive.
'"We get messages from con-
sumers all the time telling us
how great Trigosamine works
for them," said Miller.
"Everybody wants it," added
Miller.
"CVS/pharmacy was one
of the first ones to order
Trigosamine and they've load-
ed up their shelves. We've re-
ceived reports that show they
have some inventory left,"' said
Miller.
"And to make it easier for people


who can't find Trigosamine or
don't want to go to the store,
we've set up a National Order
Hotline so they can have it de-
livered directly to their home,"
said Miller.
"We'll be offering a direct
delivery discount .for the
next 72 hours, and consumers
should know they can't get
this discount at drug stores,"
she added.
Otherwise those living in
the local area that miss the
deadline won't be able get
the discount. They'll have to
go to their local drug store to
try and get Trigosamine and
may be hard pressed to find
it. S

Or, visit us online at:
www.trigosamine.cdm


* HEALTHY JOINTS: X-rays reveal joints that have the proper amounts of
synovial fluid to lubricate the joints. HA-13, one of Trigosamine's key ingre-
dients is a component of synovial fluid.


Local Readers Discount Deadline M .. 1 f
You may be able to find Trigosamine at CVS/pharmacy since they have received . i , -
shipments. If you want Trigosamine shipped directly to your home and would like . - -.T - - -7. r -*'r
the local readers discount, call the National Order Hotline listed below before the
72-hour deadline expires. Otherwise you'll have to get Trigosamine at the drug
store and may run the risk of not being able to find it.
Begin Calling at 8:00AM TODAY
1-800-924-2109
Approval Code: TG8670
Discount Ends in 72 hours
1. Dr. Joseph Dietz, PhD currently conducts full time research for PatentHEALTH, LLC. as Director of Health Science, Research Development. ALMOST GON
2. Statements herein are based upon published public Information and do not Imply affiliation, sponsorship or endorsement of ALMOST GONE: Sales of the joint pill Trigosamine are soaring which could
Trigosamine by the United States Government, lead to out of stocks as shown in this photo illustration. Consumers unable to
I THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE. TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. find it can call 1-800-924-2109 and have it shipped directly to their homes.


Here's how to guarantee you get it:
-"To riake it easy for people to get, Apatrim quickly,,the corrmpany has set up a Regional Health Ho.thie.
Follow the instructions listed below to ha.'e Apatrim shipped directly to, your home or you can check your
local drug store to see if they have it in stock. For consumers who call the hotline, advise the operator
that you want Apatrim shipped directly to your home so they can see if you qualify for the direct-to-home
shipping discount.
Regional Health Hotline; 48-hours only
Consumers can begin calling promptly at 8:00am today. The hotline will be available for the next 48
hours. Call 1-866-964-2349 and ask for Dept. AP4512. All orders will be processed on a first-come,
first-served basis.
Retail Pharmacies:
National chains across the country that h3ae ordered Apatnmrn include Walmart, CVS/pharmacy and
Walgreens. All of these chains have confirmed that they have received their initial shipments of Apatrim
and are working to make certain they have stock available. Consumers not able to find Apatrim at their local
pharmacies can call the hotline and have it delivered directly to their homes. You may also qualify for a special
discount.
On the web: www.apatrim.com,,.,..T LC )A.'.4
.: : jFil.r.'HL'E H LI.C PJ'3 :Fi' *F 4aR.i
1. Primary study-based on 26 participants over a 4-week :period. Participants were directed not to add any exercise
or change eating habits. Participants level of caloric intake and exercise were not measured or disclosed. 2. Individu-
al results may vary. 3. Mark Loy is a personal trainer and fitness consultant to PatentHEALTH, he is remunerated for his services.
*THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOTBEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.


TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 2009 C3


� s Coury (FL) Clai E


I











Denture dilemmas diagnosed by diligent dentist


I have received
many questions
about what can be
done to help various
situations people have f
with their dentures. In
most cases, it was a
loose and moving lower
denture. But there
were a few who ques-
tioned the ability to eat Dr. Fi
things like lettuce with Vasc:
dentures. SOUND
Many people have
problems eating lettuce
with dentures because of the way
their teeth come together and the
efficiency with which their teeth
chew. I thought I would spend
some time answering these ques-
tions and, I hope, help-some of the
denture-wearers out there.
... The best way to get a denture to


i


--fit is to get a good im-
pression of the jaw and
gums in the first place.
The patient does not
, commonly think this of,
but the reality is that
i' ' P without a good impres-
* sion you cannot have a
good model, and no
matter what type of lab
rank you use, you will get a
mini denture that does not
BITES fit as well as it could.
- The other thing that
is important is the rela-
tionship between the upper and
the lower jaws. If this relationship
is not precise you will have a lot of
movement in your dentures - es-
pecially the lower ones.
Another important factor is the
lab that you use. If the lab does not
pay attention to. the details, the


-denture would not turn out as well
as it should. All of the dentist's
hard work is for nothing.
Dentistry, in general, deals with
many steps.
If any of you visited the dentist
recently, you might remember
how many different steps the den-
tist took to complete a procedure.
My father has always taught my
brother and me that anything
worth doing is worth doing the
right way from the start If the den-
tist pays 100 percent attention to
the details and the lab does not
follow the same principles, you
are not going to end up with a
good end result
Since there are so many steps in
dentistry, you could imagine how
your end result might be if five out
of 10 steps were not paid attention
to meticulously.


Still another thing that is im-
portant to the outcome is the ma-
terial you use. As with anything
else, dentistry has materials that
range from low to high grade.
What would happen if you used
grade 5 materials and did not pay
attention to five out of the 10
steps?
I could go on and on with this
type of thought, but I think you get
the idea.
All of the steps are important
and any one step left out or missed
can result in a failure.
It is just not worth it - my fa-
ther is right - do it right the first
time!
On the topic of eating lettuce
with dentures: There is. a type of
tooth and bite relationship that
works especially well for this. It
involves using a special tooth that


has a bar in it that can cut through
the lettuce very efficiently.
I never really believed it until I
started using it My patients came
back to me for a routine oral can-
cer screening and they would tell
me how they can now eat lettuce
- something that they couldn't do
with their with their old teeth.
Please realize that I do not use
this type of tooth exclusively, but
there are times when that type of
tooth is indicated.
I hope this has helped those of
you who have denture problems.

Dr. Frank Vascimini is a
Homosassa dentist Send your
questions to 4805 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 or
e-mail them to him at info@
masterpiecedentalstudio.com.


DIABETIC
Continued from Page C1

gression toward full-blown
diabetes, and people live
longer that way," Tawfik
said.
Are you at risk for dia-
betes?
The American Diabetes
Association urges all Amer-
icans to know and then
lower their risks for Type 2
diabetes. Risk factors in-


GRILLO


Continued from Page Cl


gasping for air. Patients fre-
quently wake up tired, have
a headache and are irrita-
ble. If left unchecked, it can
aggravate and/or cause
problems with blood pres-
sure, heart disease and even
bring on events as serious as
heart attacks and strokes.
If one suspects a sleep
disorder such as obstructive
sleep apnea, a sleep study is
-done todetermine how seri-
ous it is and then treatment
is implemented.
One of the most common
treatments is what we call
positive airway pressure.
Positive airway pressure
provides a flow of 'air


clude:
* More than one parent
or sibling with Type 2 dia-
betes, high blood pressure
or cardiovascular disease.
* Obesity or overweight
(body mass index - BMI -
above 25).
* More fat around the
waist than hips' ("apple"
shape).
* Gestational diabetes
when pregnant.
* History of polycystic
ovary syndrome.
* Hispanic, African-


through the nose and mouth
that keeps the airway from
collapsing, thus patients can
breathe freely while sleep-
ing and obtain the rest they
need without waking fre-
quently. Positive pressure
therapy is noninvasive and
can be used on almost
everyone regardless of age,
size and medical condition.
The most common type of
positive airway pressure de-
vice is C-PAP, which pro-
vides a continuous flow of
air.
There is also another type
. of device-call Bi-PAP, which
has two levels of airflow and
is sometimes used in more
severe cases of obstructive
sleep apnea. The benefits
are obvious, increasing en-
ergy and sleep quality, low-
ering blood pressure and


American, Asian or Native
American descent
*. Abnormal cholesterol
levels. HDL ("healthy") cho-
lesterol level under 35
and/or a triglyceride level
over 250.
M History of vascular dis-
ease..
* Age 45 or older in-
creases risk.
To prevent.(or delay) the
onset of Type 2 diabetes,
here are some simple steps
to take:
* If you're overweight,


decreasing the risk of stroke
and heart attack
Patients sometimes take a
while to adjust, but once
they realize the benefit, it is
almost impossible to sleep
without the device; they feel
so good.
Using a C-PAP or Bi-PAP
does take a little bit of ad-
justing and there is a learn-
ing curve. But problems are
generally easy to correct.
The masks used, as well as
other equipment including
heat and humidification can
be added and adjusted to
.the patient's comfort level.
Providers can easily
make these modifications so
the patient remains compli-
ant and uses the device.
Compliance is very impor-
tant. Once the diagnosis has
been made, the treatment


lose weight. Even a loss of
10 to 15 pounds can make a
difference. According to
ADA findings, a 5 percent
tolO percent reduction in
body weight produced a 58
percent reduction in dia-
betes.
* Eat a low-fat, low-carbo-
hydrate, high-fiber diet.
* Exercise.
* If you smoke, quit.
M Test for high blood glu-
cose. A simple fasting
plasma glucose (FPG) blood
test reveals your risk


needs; to continue every
night and not be skipped to
realize the maximum bene-
fit.
C-PAP and Bi-PAP are
very important but they do
not do away with other
things that are helpful for
obstructive sleep apnea
such as diet and lifestyle
changes including weight
loss, a good sleep environ-
ment, which is dark, cool
and devoid of TV and also
avoidance of. foods and
medications that can be se-
dating or agitating that
could affect the patient's
sleep hours.

Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO,
is an ear, nose and throat
specialist in Crystal River
Call him at 795-0011.


Healthy blood glucose: FPG
less than 100. Pre-diabetes:
FPG between 100 and 125.
Diabetes: FPG more than
125.
* Lower your blood pres-


sure. Healthy blood pres-
sure: below 120/80. Early
high blood pressure: be-
tween 120/80 and 140/90.
High blood pressure; 140/90
or higher.


LTCno
Newclens. nl. . .. .on. erpeso. . . .li ,onl
wi0
th copn Not ali wih ay oheroffr."xp.6/3/ 1


" Lose 2-5 lbs. per week**
" No pre-packaged meal's
" No calorie counting
" Doctor developed program
" No strenuous exercise
" Personal one-on-one counseling
" Dra matica I ly. increase your
fat burning metabolism
" Registered dietician on staff
-Medical doctor, on staff .
- Licensed Clinical Social Worker
on staff


581-0609TUCRN

NOTICE OF PUBLICUEARING,
TO ENACT AN ORDINANCE
AMENDING THE CITY OF INVERNESS
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF INVERNESS, FLORIDA:,.
NOTICE IS HEREBY' GIVEN that, pursuant to Sections 163.3161
through 163.3215, Florida Statues, comments, objections and
recommendations regarding the following described proposedamendment
to the (City of Inverness Cdmpreh6nsive Plan will be considered at public
hearings 'on the, dates and time provided below. The public hearings will
be held in the ' Inverness Governmental Center located at 212 West Main
Street, Inverness, Florida.

First Reading of Ordinance 21009- 663
Tuesday, June 16, 2009 at- 5: 30 PM

Final reading and adoption of Ordinance 2009- 663
Tuesday, July 7, 2009 at 5:30 PM

ORDINANCE NO 2009- 663

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE CITY OF INVERNESS
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, ORDINANCE NUMBER 98-568, AS
AMENDED, BY REVISION OF THE CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT,
ELEMENT, APPENDIX'A - CITY OF INVERNESS CAPITAL
IMPROVEMENT. SCHEDULE AND FISCAL ASSESSMENT
(AMOUNTS IN DOLLARS) AS PRESENTED. BELOW; PROVIDING
FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR INCLUSION INTO THE
CODE OF ORDINANCES; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.

These public hearings may be continued to one or more future dates. Any
interested party shall be advised that the dates, times and places of any
continuation of these public hearings shall be announced during the public
hearings and that no further notice regarding these matters will be
published, unless said continuation exceeds six calendar weeks from the
date of the above referenced public hearings.

At ' the aforementioned public hearings, all interested parties may appear to
be heard with'the respect to the proposed large-scale amendments to the
City's Comprehensive Plan. Copies of the proposed amendments to the
City's Comprehensive Plan are available for public inspection at the
Inverness Governmental Center, located at 212 West Main Street,
Inverness, Florida, during regular business hours. Any person requiring
reasonable * accommodation to participate in this meeting should contact
the City Clerk at (352) 726-2611 at least three days in advance so
arrangements can be made.

All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at
the above referenced public hearings, they will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such purpose, they may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. 7WD14


PAID ;-.L)'.-ERTiSEr.lErjT


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


HEALTH & LIFE


C4TUESDAY. IUNE 9, 2009


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if you want to finally put an end to your
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I


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Over 20 Years in Business ...
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"Individual results may vary.


re you' embarrassed.by the way your
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More effective and unlikeanythin.g else, the
unique Miracle Plus formulation is specially
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two powerful ways: through the bloodstream
and by penetrating deep below the nail bed.
'With this powerful, two-fold action, Miracle
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That means, with Miracle Plus you can get
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finally grow healthy, clear, attractive new
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Cn'Rr;s COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE HEALTh & LIFE TuitsoAx', JUNE 9, 2009 C5


YAI YAI
Continued from Page C2

attire, being the leader of a
great organization, wearing
the hat of success, if you can
really "see" yourself in that
position, you will surely be
there.
As you conquer your vi-
sion and become a polished
professional, remember the
balancing scales of integrity,
perseverance and spiritual-
ity, keeping God the center
of your being.
As life's journey takes you
through humps, bumps and
sunny days, you need to be
prepared for each unique
sensation. Keep your spirit
strong and your attitude




EULITE TRAVELLEWS PLUS
Accepting Medicare, Medicaid
and Most Insurances
*If you qualify








co00teT
& 0owev






MobilityNC.
Family Owned & Operated '
599 SEU.S. Highway 19, Crystal River
564-MM 14


As life's journey takes you

through humps, bumps and sunny

days, you need to be prepared for

each unique sensation.


positive! Whichever path
you choose, do it with all of
your heart. Know that the
heart of a person is where
dreams become reality. Give
thanks for your many tal-
ents, use them well and
enjoy the fruits of your hard
work Good luck!


The Dream Society








Gim bod Rumen


Lillian Yai Yai Knipp is an
internationally trained hair
designer, make-up artist,
skin-care specialist,
fashion.designer and Citrus
County business owner. A
former model, modeling
agency owner and fitness
instructor, she can be
reached at
yaiyaistyle@hotmail.com.


Gold Sponsor Silver Soonsor




Love Chevrolet Ice Cream DR


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Proudly presents the



And I Mile Fun Walk
Friday July 3rd, 2009
5:30 p.m. Registration & Packet Pick-Up
6:30 p.m. 5K Race
6:35 p.m. 1 Mile Fun Run/Walk & Kiddie Run
Liberty Park 300 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL

Entry Fee: Register on-line:www.active.com
$15 Pre-registered (received by July 1st)
$13 CCR Club Members & Dream Society Members
$20 Race Day Registration ,(All Athleies)
Contact: Citrus Road Runners (352) 637-2475
Email: info@citrusroadrunners.org


574-0609 TUCRN

2008 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report

City of Inverness

We're pleased to present to you this year's Annual Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you
about the quality water and services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a
safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually
improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources.

Source Water Treatment
We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Three well systems pump water from the Floridan
Aquifer. The water Is aerated, disinfected with chlorine, has fluoride added for dental advantages, and is dosed
with a polyphosphate compound to assist in distribution system iron and corrosion control.

A Source Water Assessment Report Is Available from the Florida DEP
In 2008 the Department of Environmental Protection performed a Source Water Assessment on our system.
The assessment was conducted to provide Information about any potential sources of contamination in the
vicinity of our wells. There are 2 potential water contaminants identified for this system with moderate
susceptibility levels. The assessment report is available on the FDEP Source Water Assessment and
Protection Program website at www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp.

Constant Water Quality Monitoring Is Required

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain
contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably
be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public
health. Note that the presence of contaminants does not necessarily Indicate that the water poses a health risk.
The City of Inverness routinely monitors the drinking water quality according to Federal and State laws and
regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of water system monitoring
for the time period January 1 to December 31, 2008. Any data obtained before January 1, 2008, and presented
In this report represents the most recent testing required by Federal and State requirements.
Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants,
septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic chemicals, such'as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban
stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban
stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
(D) Organic chemicals, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial
processes and petroleum production and can also come from gas stations, urban.stormwater runoff, and
septic systems.
(E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and
mining activities.
More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental
Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.
Terms and Definitions
In the data tables below, ydu may find unfamiliar terms and abbreviations. To better understand theseterms,
we've provided the following definitions:
Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL. The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.
MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
Action Level (AL). The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
requirements that a water system must follow.
Initial Distribution System Evaluation (IDSE). An important part of recent regulations is referred to as the
Stage 2 Disinfection Byproducts Rule (DBPR). The IDSE is a one-time study conducted by water systems to
identify distribution system locations with high concentrations of two types of chlorinated organic compounds:
trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAA5s). Water systems will use results from the IDSE, in
conjunction with their'Stage 1 DBPR compliance monitoring data, to identify compliance monitoring locations to
meet the Stage 2 DBPR sampling and analysis requirements.
Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level or MRDL. The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water.
There is convincing evidence that'addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal or MRDLG. The level of a drinking water disinfectant below
which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of
disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
Millirem Per Year (mrem/yr) - measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
"N/A" - Non-Applicable: Does not apply.
"ND" stands for "not-detected" and indicates that a tested substance was not found through laboratory analysis.
Parts Per Billion (ppb) or Micrograms Per liter (pg/1). This measurement means there is one part by weight of
a substance in every 1 billion parts by weight of the water sample.
Parts Per Million (ppm) or Milligrams Per liter (mg/1). This measurement means there is one part by weight of
a substance in every 1 million parts by weight of the water sample.
Parts Per Trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (nanograms/I) - one part by weight of analyte to 1 trillion parts by
weight of the water sample.
Picocurie Per Liter (pCi/L). A measurement of the radiological (radioactivity) Quality of the water.
Treatment Technique (TT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.
Radiological Contaminants _


Contaminant and Unit of
Measurement


Dates of
sampling
(moJvr.)


Inorganic Contaminants
Contaminant and Unit of Dates of sampling MCL Violation Level Range of MCLG MCL Likely Source of
Measurement (|mo.yr.) Y/N Detected Results Contaminaton
Discharge of drilling
Barium (ppm) 2/2008 N . .0046 N/A 2 2 metal refineries; erosion
of natural deposits
'* Erosion of natural
deposits; discharge from
fertilizer and some
Fluoride (ppm) 2/2008 N 0.96 0.89/0.96 4 4.0 factories. Awhichpromote
strong teeth when at
optimum levels between
0.7 and 1.3 ppm
Residue from man-made
Lead (point of entty) (ppb) 2/2008 N 1.6 N/A N/A 15 ollon such as ndpaint
S lead pipe, and solder
Salt water intrusion,
Sodium (ppm) 2/2008 N 15 N/A N/A 160 cachin from soil

Lead and Copper (Tap Water)
Contaminant and Datesof AL 90th to. o t MLG (AL
Measurement (moJ.yr.) Y/N Result Lofelsapg iL)
Corrosion of household plumbing systems;
Copper (tap water) 9/2008 N .33 0 1.3 1.3 erosion of natural deposits; leaching from

Lead (tap water) (ppm) 9/2008 N 0.1 0 0 15 Corosion of n ing systems,

Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection By-Products


582-0609 TUCRN

NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN ORDINANCE

TO AMEND COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

GENERALIZED FUTURE LAND USE MAP (GFLUM)

AND LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE ATLAS (LDC)

The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners (BCC) proposes to adopt the following by
ordinance:

2009 2nd Large Scale Cycle Comprehensive Plan Amendments

Comprehensive Plan Amendment 09-01 - Department of Development Services
CPA-09-10 - Chapter Five Infrastructure Element
An update of the Capital Improvement Projects listed in the Potable Water and Wastewater sub-
eleiments. An update to Appendices B, C, D' & E to include newly acquired potable water and
wastewater facilities., "

Comprehensive Plan Amendment 09-13
CPA-09-13 - Clark A. Stillwell for Citrus Mining and Timber, Inc.
A request for a text amendment to the Future Land Use Element of the Comprehensive Plan to add a
new land use district known as the Port District. The new district will allow for master planned
waterfront development that could include residential, commercial, and industrial uses.

Comprehensive Plan Amendment 09-14
CPA-09-14 - Clark A. Stillwell for Citrus Mining and Timber. Inc.
Re-designation of approximately 545 acres from Industrial District (IND), Conservation District
(CON), Extractive District (EXT), and Transportation/Communication/Utilities District (TCU) to Port
District and Transportation/Communication/Utilities District (TCU) op the Generalized Future Land
Use Map (GFLUM). Location: Sections 08.09, 10 & 11.Township 17 South,Range 16 East. Further
described as parcel 13000 in 16E17S10, a portion of 11000 in 16E17S09 a portion of 11100 in
16E17S08. (Including the areas known as parcel 10000 and parcel 13200 in section 16E17S10) The
subject property lies north of the Florida Barge Canal and west of US 19 (Inglis area). (The complete
legal description is on file with the Departmeht of Development Services.)

Comprehensive Plan Amendment 09-15
CPA-09-15 - Clark A. Stillwell for River Lodge Resort. LLC
Re-designation of approximately 170 acres from Industrial District (IND), Low Intensity Coastal and
Lakes District (CL), and Public/Semi-Public Institutional District (PSI), to Recreational Vehicle Park
(RVP) and Coastal and Lakes Commercial (CLC) on the Generalized Future Land Use Map
(GFLUM). Location: Section 11,. Township 17 South. Range 16 East. Further described as Parcel
10000, Parcel 14310, and Parcel/42300. The property is located at 13150 W. Foss Groves Path to the
east of the existing River Lodge Resort RV Park. (Inglis Area) (The complete legal description is on
file with the Department of Development Services.)

Comprehensive Plan Amendment/Atlas Amendment 09-11
CPA/AA-09-11 - R. Blair Commons for Seven Rivers Presbyterian Church
Re-designation-of approximately 22 acres from General Commercial (GNC) and Professional
Services/Offices (PSO) to Public/Semi-Public/Institutional (PSI) on the Generalized Future Land Use
Map (GFLUM), and from General Commercial (GNC) and Professional Services/Offices (PSO) to
Public/Semi-Public/Institutional (PSI) on the Land Development Code Atlas Map (LDCA). Location:
Section 32, Township 18 South. Range 18 East and Section 05. Township 19 South. Range 18 East.
Further described as Lot 22, Lots 13-16, Lots 23-27, Lots 32-39 of unrecorded Gaynor Subdivision in
Section 05,Township 19 South, Range 18 East; and Parcel 22300 in Section 32, Township 18 South,
Range 18 East; a portion of which property is known as Seven Rivers Presbyterian Church, 4221 West
Gulf to Lake Highway. (Lecanto Area) (The complete legal description is on file with the Department
of DeVelopment Services.)

The public hearings on the Ordinances will be held on Tuesday, June 23,2009 at 5:15 p mn., in Room
100, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida.

Interested parties may appear at the hearing and be heard regarding the proposed amendment. The
BCC will hold the public hearing on the following date:


LOCATOR MAP

















A copy of the proposed Ordinances and supporting materials are available for public inspection and
copying between the hours of 8:00 am., and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, at the Community
Development Division, Suite 140, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461. For more
information about this application, please contact a Planner at the Department of Development
Services (352) 527-5239. Information regarding the Land Development Code or Comprehensive Plan
is available on the internet at http://www.bocc.citrus fl.ds (Click on the Community Development
link).

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with respect to any matter considered,
at this hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and for such purpose, he or she may
need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes all testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at the hearing because of a disability or physical
impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N.
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6565, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before
the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.

Chairman
Board of County Commissioners
Citrus County, Florida e7s51


Alpha emitters (pCi/L) 6/2008 . N
Radium 226 + 228 or 62
combined radius (pCi/L) 6/200 N


For bromnate, chloramines, or chlorine, the level detected is the the highest running annual average (RAA), computed quarterly,
Ci n. ', .'.. r . I ..ii ., " . i .l .'.I'. . . ., .', ._ .. ri nl ,: -lvel detected is the highest Rl AA, computed
. ,i >. , i ., , . , I II .., i . . . II t * I 1 i.,'. , .. . r.. ...r _ quarterlyor is the average ofall samples Eaken
during the year if the 'sysen.m rnonitors less fretucnIlly than qcartr0ly. Range ' ResUlsis th range ofindividual sample results towe.st
highest) for all monitoring locations, ntcuditg Initial iisiaibutio i System Evaiuation (IDSI) ,tstts its well sIs Stage 1 compliance results,

Disinfectant or Dtof MCLor Range MCLG
Coutanant and Data ofn MD Level
ontao nt and sampling I RDL Level ofr or MCL or Likely Source of Contamination
Unit of (mo.yr.) Violation Detected Results MRDL MRDL
Measurement YN

Chlorine (ppm) 12/2008 N 1.14 0.7/1.6 N/A MCL - 4.0 Water additive to control Microbes
2/2008-
(Hloacetic Acids 4/2008- Y 78 68-88 NA MCL= 60 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(five) (HAA5) (ppb) 8/2008-
11/2008 _________
2/2008-
TTHM [Totalu 2008-
trihalomethanes] 82008 Y 82.5 55-110 NA MCL = 80 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(ppb) 11/2008 ____
As noted above by the results of Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection By-Product Monitoring, the City of
Inverness water has exceeded the MCL for Total Trihalomethanes (THMs) and the five Haloacetic Acids (HAA5s).
TTHM and HAA5's. In May of 2008, the city signed a consent order with the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection for violation of the maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for THMs and HAA5s.
Haloacetic acids (five) (HAA5): Some people who drink water containing haloacetic acids in excess of the MCL
over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
TTHM's [Total Trihalomethanes]: Some people who drink water containing trihalomethanes in excess of the MCL
over many years may experience problems with their liver, kidneys, or central nervous systems, and may have an
increased risk of getting cancer.
As part of the consent order; the city agreed to continuous quarterly sampling, analysis, and if necessary, public
notification for exceedances of THMs or HAA5s. The city IS also working with engineering and operational firms to
identify possible treatment and operating procedures to reduce the levels into compliance with State and Federal
standards.

What About Bottled Water?
In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of certain
contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations
establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health.
Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some
contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.
More Information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by ceiling the Environmental
Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

Health Issues and the Safe Drinking Water Hotline
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-
compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone
organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system'disorders, some elderly, and infants can be
particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care.
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other
microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

If You Have Questions
If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility please contact the Inverness
Department of Public Works at 352/ 726-2321. For billing inquires please contact the Finance Department at (352)
726-5016. We encourage our valued customers to be informed about their water utility.


The City of Inverness staff work around the clock to provide quality water to every
tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect our precious water sources,
which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our children's future. o,,at


TuEsDAY, JUNE 9, 2009 CS


HEALTH & LIFE


RriC us County (FL E


r-













COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News h ?

Junior Golf Camp
taking enrollment
Junior Golf Camp at Citrus
Hills is enrolling children ages
5 to 17. The program will be
offered for $110 and includes
free summer golf member-
ship (Wednesday to Aug. 24),
discounted adult play card,
golf shirt, Monday team
scramble, and pizza and
soda each day of the camp.
Junior Golf Camp will be
comprised of two different
sessions. Participants may
select five consecutive
Wednesday 9 to 11:30 a.m.
beginning this week, or select
five consecutive Thursdays
5:30 to 8 p.m. beginning this
week. Call 746-4425 for infor-
mation.
CRUG slates
monthly meeting
Crystal River User's Group
(CRUG) will have its monthly
meeting at 6 p.m. Wednes-
day at the Crystal Oaks club-
house.
CRUG will have Jim Behu-
niak as presenter at the June
meeting. Behuniak offers his
time to help local business
owners bring their busi-
nesses into the 21st century.
The topic of the June presen-
tation will be "How to use the
Internet to increase profits in
today's tough economic
times."
Behuniak will discuss his
usage of DNN to develop
local business portals bring-
ing local businesses the
power of using the Internet to
cut expenses while increas-
ing profits.
Coffee and refreshments
will be served at 6 p.m. with a
short meeting at 6:30, fol-
lowed by the presentation. All
meetings are free to the public.
Council to host
guest speaker
Bob Knight, director of the
Citrnis County Water Re-
sources, will speak at the
Wednesday Citrus County
Council meeting. The council
meets at 9 a.m. at the Lions
Club in Beverly Hills. The meet-
ing is open to the public and
questions are welcome. Coffee
and doughnuts will be served.
Public invited
to FFRA meeting
Cathy Jackson, Center for
Independent Living program
coordinator, is the guest
speaker at the Friday meet-
ing of Families and Friends
Reaching for.the Abilities.
(FFRA) at the Key Training
Center, 130 Heights Ave., In-
verness. Social time and busi-
ness meeting begin at 9 a.m.,
followed by a speaker at 10.
The public is invited to the,
monthly meetings of FFRA.
For more information, call Ron
Phillips at 382-7819, or Steph-
anie Hopper at 344-0288.
Lions to have
annual dinner
The Annual Installation and
Awards Dinner of the Crystal
River Kings Bay Lions Club
will be at 6 p.m. Friday at
Oysters Restaurant in Crystal
River. All visiting Lions are in-
vited. For reservations, call
Ruth Levins, president, at
795-3006.

Pet sPOT. T

Put 'em up


Special to the Chronicle
This little visitor to Rick
Taylor's living room win-
dowsill feeder in Lecanto
might be thinking, "Hey!
You want a piece of
me? Put up your dukes!"


Afro-American Club Scholarships


Date night a



much-deserved


delight


There comes a time in
the lives of all new
parents' when they
look forward to one thing
and one thing only: date
night. It's that one special
night that you get to have
with your husband after
having a baby - and boy, are
you ready for it
Of course, taking care of
Graham is a blessing, but I
was excited to clean the
drool off me and
not smell like
spit-up to enjoy a
youthful night
with Patrick And s
because this was
my second time
in attendance at a
husband-and-
wife post-baby
date night, I knew Sh
by the end of din- Shalyn
ner, I would be FQP.R.. .
more than ex-
cited to smell like that "Lit-
tle Man's" spit-up again.
We decided to not go far -
Outback would do. Our date
wasn't really about anything
but us being a party of two
instead of four.
After I dropped the kids
off at my mother's, I came
home to get ready in peace. I
did things that I hadn't done
in ages such as take a long,
hot shower without peeking
out at my son in his bouncer
every five seconds. Or
maybe my favorite part was
applying the lotion, makeup,
and shaving! Or maybe get-
ting ready with real music in
the background instead of
songs from Yo Gabba Gabba.
All you moms who carry a
diaper bag instead of a
purse know what I am talk-
ing about.
Or perhaps the best part
was just walking out to the
car. Yes, there is nothing
more liberating, more care-
free and puts you in a better
mood than not having to
carry out of the house a car.-


F


rier with a 12-pound baby, a
stroller, a diaper bag, a 4-year
old, five Barbie dolls, and a
portable V-Tech - and don't
forget the cell phone, my wal-
let and Emmy's drink cup.
Anyway, I very freely
walked out the car with
Patrick that evening. We
were so excited. We listened
to loud music all the way
there, especially the new
and very up-to-date songs I
had downloaded
for my classes at
the studio: We
jammed out
thinking that we
-i were "young"
again. (I know 'we
still are, but not as
young as we once
were!)
Once we got to
Barker Outback, we
PLATE vowed not to
speak about the
kids, or even call them,
which was very hard because
by then I was ready to create
my own line of spit-up per-
fume. But we spoke about all
kinds of stuff: mostly
Patrick's days on his winning
brigade volleyball team
while he was in Kuwait
On the way home, tired of
trying to be young and cool, I
told Patrick I couldn't wait to
see my "Tootsie Roll" and
my "Little Man."
He wholeheartedly agreed
and asked me what I wanted
to listen to on the way home.
"Can you just put on some
Journey?" I said.
Being a twosome is great,
but the two we were before
doesn't compare to the four
we are now.

Shalyn Barker resides with
her husband, Patrick,
daughter, Emmy, and son,
Graham, in the Beverly
Hills area. She can be
reached at
citrusamom@yahoo.com.


Singles club on hiatus


Special to the Chronicle
Manatee Singles and So-
cial Club has discontinued
meetings for the summer


months. The. next meeting
will be at 1:30 p.m. Saturday,
Sept. 19, at the Beverly Hills
Community Building. For in-
formation, call 860-0518.


Service distinguishes Rotarian


Special to the Chronicle
Rotarian Paul Slosberg was awarded the Distinguished Service Award during the annual
Rotary District Conference in St. Augustine. Slosberg is one of only 50 Rotarians world-
wide to have earned this prestigious recognition for his ongoing service above self.
Slosberg serves as a member of the Rotary Club of Central Citrus.



GFWC makes impact


in Levy County


Members of the Crystal River
1 Woman's Club attended the
Florida Federation of Women's
Clubs (FFWC) District 5 Workshop held in
Keystone Heights last week.
The annual event is an opportunity for the
clubs to learn about projects en-
dorsed by FFWC and its six de-
partments: Education, Arts,
Conservation, Public Affairs,
Home Life and International Af-
fairs.
We share ideas, procedures
and concepts that make it possi-
ble to meet the mutual needs of
those within our district, the
Federation and beyond.
Members of Crystal River Ruth:
Woman's Club who shared with AROUI
the district members included COMM
Liz Davis, vice president, who
gave a presentation on their on-
going Women Veterans Appreciation
Luncheon and Ruth Levins, leadership
chairwoman, who gave the devotional.
Others attending from Crystal River were
Helen LeFave, treasurer, and Holly Oder,
parliamentarian.
The Roll Call of Clubs, a popular seg-
ment of the district meeting, gave an op-
portunity for the club presidents to share
some of their most successful programs
and projects. Some of these were festivals,
fashion shows, yard sales, jewelry sales,
"Stop and Shop".. with vendors renting
clubhouse space for the day, gifts to a pe-
diatric ward, antiques show, Habitat For
Humanity volunteering, a baby shower and
counseling for new mothers, Ronald Mc-
Donald House, donating books to schools,
an artisan boutique, book sales, hoedown
barbecue, duffle bag project, arts and
crafts making, computer classes, tutoring,


library volunteers, "Travels by Sara"
monthly presentations, and the FFWC
president's project Heifer International.
Teri Breman, Cedar Key Woman's Club,
shared with the group, the use of the Gen-
eral Federation of Women's Clubs (GFWC)


Levins
ND THE
UNITY


Grant for Women's. Health Is-
sues, that her club made. They
have provided an educational
documentary DVD about geni-
tal HPV that is available in the
local library, health department
and schools, along with inform-
ative pamphlets.
Approximately 20 million
Americans are currently in-
fected with HPV Nearly 6 mil-
lion new cases are predicted
each year.
HPV can be prevented by a
vaccine for four of the types of
HPV that cause most cervical


cancer and genital warts. The vaccine is
recommended for 11- and 12-year-old girls
and for girls and women 13 to 26 who have
not yet been vaccinated or completed the
vaccine series.
Through the efforts of the Cedar Key
Woman's Club the vaccine is now available
in the Levy County area.
For more information, contact the Cen-
ters for Disease Control and Prevention at
www.odo.gov/std or by calling (800) 232-
4636 or the American Health Association
National HPV and Cervical Cancer Pre-
vention Resource Center at (800) 783-9877.


Ruth Levins participates in a variety of
projects around the community Let her
know about your group's upcoming
activities by writing to PO. Box 803,
Crystal River, FL 34423.


* Submit information at least t.Awo weeks before the event. U Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submissin of timely mater ial is appreciated, but Crystal River; by faxat 563-3280; or e-mail to
multiple publicatiors..:anrot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once


Special to the Chronicle
The Afro-American Club of Citrus County presented the 2009 scholarship recipients at its final meeting May 4. The awards were presented in mem-
ory of club members Donald Bell, Marguerite Pinkston and William Covington. Front row, from left, are: Brianna Williams, Krisha Mayne and Amy
Green. Back row, from left, are: Lakesha Harrison, De Ondre Scott, JT Hutcherson and Ardine Spivey. Hutcherson, 2009 recipient of a Bill Gates
award, which will cover all of his college expenses, relinquished his award back to the AACCC to be used for another deserving student.
.










TUESDAY EVENING JUNE 9., 2009 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: HolIday Helh
c D I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 I 10:30 1100 11:30
WEMHll NBC i 19 I119 News (N) NBC News Entertainment AccssHwood NHL Hockey Stanley Cup Final Game 6-- Detroit Red Wings at Pittsburgh Penguins. (In Stereo Live) News (N) Tonight Show
I BBC World News Nightly Business The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer (N) The New Science of Learning: Brain Fitness for Kids The Brain Fitness Program Chemical, physical and Suze Orman: Women & Money (In
Rge PBS 3. 3 14 6'G'm- eport(N) ~l(In Stereo) Children and learning.(InStereo) functional change in the brain.G' Stereo)'G'm
(WUFl) PBS 5 -- 5 5 16 BBC News Business Rpt. The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer Rock, Rhythm and Doo Wop (In Stereo) 'G' s Roy Orbison Tavis Smiley (N)
U NBC 8 8 8 News (N) NBC Niahtl Entertainment Extra (N)'PG'H NHL Hockey Stanley Cup Final Game 6 - Detroit Red Wings at Pittsburgh Penguins. If necessary. From the News (N) Tonight Show-
S8 8 8 8 8 8News ('G' Tonight (N)PG'Mellon Arena in Pittsburgh. (In Stereo Live) Conan O'Brien
0News N) (In World News- Jeopardy! (N) Wheel of Fortune Jimmy Kimmel NBA Countdown NBABasketball Finals Game 3- Los Angeles Lakers at Orlando Magic. From Amway Arena News (N) (In
NW(Inw ABC J 20 20 20 20 S Gibson 'G's 'G'm Live )'14' N in Odrlando, Fla. (In Stereo ULive) 9 Stero
0 News CBS Evening Dr. Phil (In Stereo) 'PG' s NCIS A criminal is bent on stealing The Mentalist Murders at a financial 48 Hours Mystery (In Stereo)'PG' News Late Show With
(OWS) CBS 10 10 10 10 10 10 News-Couric government secrets. '14'm firm's wilderness retreat.'14' David Letterman
FOX - 13 -13 News (N) i TMZ (N)'PG'iN The Insider (N) House "Luc Thirteen" Thirteen has Mental "Book of Judges" (N) (In News (N) . News (N) SB TMZ (In Stereo)
S1PG' abaddate. 14' Stereo) (PA)'14's 'PG'_
im A ABC -- 11 5News (N) ABC Wld News Entertainment Inside Edition Jimmy Kimmel NBA Countdown NBA Basketball Finals Game 3--LosAngeles Lakers at Orlando Magic.Pure Passio News
Richard and Lindsay Roberts 'G' Kenneth Hagin Jr. Day of Salvation Word of Dwight Keith Life TodayWithI Bay Focus The 700 Club 'PG' Pure Passion Jewish Voice
amiF IND M 2 2 2 2 22 22 'G's Excellence , James Robison
S- ews (N) World News- Wheel of Fortune Jeopardyl (N) Jimmy Kimmel NBA Countdown NBA Basketball Finals Game 3 -- Los Angeles Lakers at Orlando Magic. From Amway Arena News (N)
(1WET) ABC & 11 11 11 11 Gibson 'G's 'G's Live (N) '14' s_ in Orlando, Fla. (In Stereo Live) as
Family Guy Family Guy '14' m Frasier"Frasier- Frasier"Roz, a Law 6 Order Crnimnai Inierni But ** "Homegrown" 11998 Comedy-Drama) Billy Bob Thomton Hank Si1i Standang Still Standing
(B U) IND 12' 12 'PG's Lite"'PG'ls Loan"'PG' Nolt Forgonrer" i '14 Azaria Pot Tarmers try 10o sell their crop after their patron dies. 'R PG As PG
UM MNT ED 6 6 6 6 9 Deal or No Deal Deal or No Deal Every-Raymond Every-Raymond Street Patrol Street Patrol Jatl~a J3il ~i Trhal 70sSros That 70sShow Sernield PG' Seinfel PG'
(i mM TBN M 21 21 21 Assembly-God The 700 Club 'PG' s -Pastor Barber Power of Praise Manna-Fest'G' Variety Thompson Variety Claud Bowers This Is Your Day Tims Ministries
Two and a Half The Kin of The Simpsons Two and a Half 90210 "We're Not in Kansas Hitched or Ditched "Don't Hate the The King of According to Jim According to Jim South Park'14's
M CW 4 4 4 4 12 1 Men'14' i Queens PG' 'PG' a Men'14' is Anymore" (in Stereo)'14' s Player" (N) (In Stereo) n Queens PG 'PG i 'PG s
FAM 16 16 1 6 TV20 News WatchTheTruth Your Citrus Every Day is Straight Talk ovieGuideTV Paid Program the Streets Gillete World SLighter Side of TV 20 News Your Citrus
(1WO-X FOX 1 '13 13 7 7 TMZ (N)'PG' King of the Hill The Simpsons The Simpsons House "Lucky Thirteen" '14' Mental "Book of Judges" (N) '14' FOX 35 News at 10 (N) a News (N) Seinfeld 'PG' -
( HI UNI ( 15 15 15 15 15 1Noticias 62 Noticiero Univ Las Tontas No Van al Cielo Cuidado con el Angel Mafiana es Para Siempre Aqul y Ahora Noticias 62 Noticiero Univ.
[ON I MON 17 Reba 'PG's- Reba 'PG'o Family Feud [Family Feud Boston Legal "Rescue Me"'14' Boston Legal '14' i Boston Legal '14' s Lifestyle Lift Paid Program
( 54 48 54 54 25 27 CS'.Miami"Speed Kills"'14' CSI- Miami "Death Eminent"'14' The First 48'14' s The First 48'14' a The First 48 '14' S The First 48 '14' I
f E5 55 64 55 55- - * "Commando"(1985, Action Arnold Schwarzenegger.'R' * "FueLies"(1994) Amoid Schwarzenegger. A man lives The double life of a spy and a family man. *. -"Starsky& Hutch" (20041
LN 52 35 52 52 19 21 Unaed and 1Uri:ul4i 'a Naturai World PG i - Waie Wars rin Stereoi, i |Venom 9i i S1 aKe bies 'G , II Srhoulan'i Be Alive PG , Whale Wars In Slereol'14
IND) 96 19 96 196 1 W068& Park BETs Top 10 Live PG , ** "Scary Movie" (2000) ShawnWayans Premiere. iR , College H. i Welcometo ** "Scary Movie"
6 519 1 PReal BHouseveso LJersey RG RealHousewives of Jersey Real Hou.ewives ol Jersey Real Housewives o Jersey IRea3 HouSCewves or Jersey Real Housewives of Jersey
* } ._ _ 27 61 '27 27 - Grilled2061'R' IRENO 911"14 Scrubs i4- Scrubs 14' Daily Snow Colibern Report Soulr Park: MA Scuri, Pa3r. MA Soul Parl MA' ISouin Parm: MA' Daily Show Colben Rep)d
S98 45 98 9 28 37 Nanrny 911 Mad.a-ike mother ii, Eleme MaKeover Home Edii:.n Crawford-Smih lFamily 'PG ia i* National Lampoon's Vacaton"(1983)ChevyCnase. R "National Lampoon'sVacation"
(' E 43 42 43 43 Mad Morey Kudlow Report CTIBC Reports Secres or ihe Knigrt Or, he Money Mad Money
(IS 40 29 40 40 41 46 Situation Room-Wolt Bitzer Lou Dobbs Tornghtl I' Campbell Brow"n No Bias, ro Bull Larry King Live (Nil PG , Anderson Cooper 360 PG i
46 40 46 2 5 Phineas-Ferb IZack & Cody Han. Montana Han. Montana ven3 (2000) Jge einho S :. Phineas-Ferb Wizards-Place Han. Montana Zack & Cody That's So Raven
P _ _ 33 27 33 3 21 17 ! SportsCenter (Live)NFLve Live (N) SponsCenter Spe:ial (Lv'el Basebaii Tonight Live) 9 1polsCenter ILvi 'ii
34 28 34 34 43 49Around the Hom Interruption WNBA Basketball Seattle Storm at Indiana Fever. (Live) Billiards: WPBA Billiards: WPBA Billiards: WPBA Pacific Coast
- 95 70 95 95- Choices-Face Conversion Daily Mass: Our Lady Mother Angelica-Classic Reigious Catal. The Holy Rosary Threshold of Hope'G' Christ in City Religious Order
29 52 29 29 0 28 My Wife-Kids My Wife-Kids That '70s Show That'70s Show America's Funniest Home Videos . America's Funniest Home Videos America's Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club 'PG' s
44 37 44 Special Report With Bret Baler (N)FOX Report With Shepard Smith The O'Reilly Factor (N) Hannity(N)On the Record-Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor
(EoD 26 56 26 26 , Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Challenge Good Eats IGood Eats Food Detectives Ace of Cakes Chopped Good Eats 'G' Unwrapped'G'7
(iED 35 39 35 35 Sponri Stories Rays Livei (Live) MLB Ba.sertall Los Angeles Angels o Anaheim at Tampa Bay Rays ISubt.ect Il Blackoull Livel irnside Ire Ray | The Final Score Best Damn Sports Show Period
3X 30 60 30 30 51 **XXX"(2002, Action) Vin Diesel, Asia Argento 'PG-13' ** "Rocky Balboa"(2006) Sylvester Stallone. Premiere 'PG' Rescue Me'Control i) 'MA Rescue Me Corilrol MA
1 ,-67 Gcif Central Top 10 iayng Lessons inside PGA The Approach Tol0p 10 10 10 (I) ' Top 10 Top 10 |Piaying Lessons The Approac, |Golf CGenral
39 58 39 39 45 54 MA-H PG' MA-SHPG' MA'SH 'PG' MA-S'H PG Golden Girls Gclden GiNrs " Accidental Friendship" 2008, Drama) Chandra Wilson E. Murder Sne Wrote 'G '
S** "Kit Kiftredge: An American GIrl"(2008, My Lie in Ruins **s The Sisterhoodofthe Traveling Pants 2" (2008. Comedy-Dramal A Taste of True Chns Rcck VKillithe Messen er The comic, performs in
2 2 Comedy-Drama) Abigail Breslin (In Stereo)'G' i 1sti Look Amber Tamblyn, Alexis Bledel (in Stereo) PG-13'B i1,Bioc.1 Alan Ball Souir Atrica (In bSteeol MA m
( 23 57 23 23 42 52 Designed to Sei IE.reme Livng House Wortnn? House Hunters My First Place IMv Firsi Place IHouse Hunters Bang Buc.k ~House Hurlers The Slagers G income Prperry My First Place
NITi 51 25 51 51 32 42 Ciies of Ire Underworld PG Modern Marvels Carbon"PG' Seven Signr ol the Apocalypse Prophecy or Armageddon PG . Lile Alcer People (ID PG ' Mega Disasiers PG ',
^IFE 24 38 24 24 31 Less-PertI- Less-Perfet Reba PG s |Reba 'PG a Reba 'PG Reba 'PG ' I "Abducted"(2007, Drama Sarah Wynter. Andrew Walker 'NFR' s Will & Grace Wi & Grace
"For the Love of a Child"(2006 Drama) Pen Gil pin, TenriPolo. Sara "While the Children Steep"' 2007 Suspense) Gail O'Grady. William R. "Deadly Whisperes"(1995, Dramal Tony Danza, Pamela Reed, Ving
LMN 50 O'Meara and Yvonne Fedderson found Childhelp USA 'NR'r c, [Moses. A live-in baby siner hatches a plan to harm a mother tj'R s Rhames Police suspect father in daughter's murder. [F
S* "The Bourne Ultimatum" (2007. Action) Matt **A "A.L: Artfficialintelligence"(2001, Science Fiction) Haley Joel Osmen An android * 'Exit Wounds" (2001) Steven Seagal. A cop Co-Ed
(DSB 3 3 Damon, Julia Stiles (In Stereo 'PG-13' 1L boy embarks on a journey to discover its true nature (In Stereo) PG-13 ra encounters corruption in Detrofts roughest precinct R Corriderhal 3
M(S p -- 429 41 42 42 The Ed Show Hardball 'vi Countdown W.tn Kein Oibermarnn The Racrel Maddow Sricw Counidown Wirh Keilh Olbermann The Raceni Maddow Show
( - 97 66 97 97 39 Made in Siereol PG' Male in Siereol 'PG' Real World-Road Rules Paris Hilons My flew BFF 'Q Pars H lions My NJew BFF INi Paris Hitors My few BFF ',,
NGC 65 44 53 Explorer PG Dog Whisperer G' Secrets of ine Slar Disc 'PG' Egypt Unwrapped N11)'PG E.,pinrer (1l 'PG' Secrels o Ire Star DIs: 'PG
28 36 28 28 35 25 Drake S Josh Drake & Josh Carly Y7 -n, i|Carly Y7 ', SpongeBc.b |SpongeBob . Home Improve iHome Improve George Lopez |George Lope: The ary PG ITre anny 'PG .
44 1 Ton & Dear, Home Tori & Dean Home Tori & Dean Home lToi Dean Home Ton & Dean Honme Ton & Dean. Home
"* A Lobster Tale" (2006) Colm Meaney A New *\'l"Radlo Days"(1987 Mia Farrow Boy's life and * "In Love and War" 11996) Sandra Bullock Ernest Hemingway finds **'. The Mission"(1986| Robert
62 England lobstean finds magc moss *ogarette gir's story recall wartime radio love in Italy during World War -I (In Stereo) 'PG-13' i De Niro 'PG ars
IFI - 31 59 31 3126 29 Siargale SG-I -"Ned' "PG' Siar Trek Enterprise PG' Star Trek. Erirpre PG'I. Star Tre, Enreripn.ri.e PG Lo i ECW VLivel i'14 LV"Bitten" (2007 Jason Mewes. R'
(F_ f 122 112 122 1221 Unique Whips Pimp My Ride Pass Time Pimp My Ride IP,rip My Ride Drag Race High Drag Race High Super Bivesi Super Bikes' Prrip My Ride Pass Time
(SPI 37 43 37 37 27 36 CSI Crime Scene Invesi.gation CSI Cnme Scene invesigaor, CSI. Crime Scene Investigalicr UFC Unleashed PG Jesse James s a Dead Manr 14 UFC 99 Countdown FranHin
MWis 36 3 36 31 36 36 Pieasure Boarer Fishing rthe Flas Addicv Fisring Hemingway Sa1irwaler Jour Florida Sport Ship Shape TV Spo.:n Firing Global Crail Powerboating Hemingway Galors Debul
(- S ) 49 23 49 9 16 19i Every-Raymond Frends PG Seirieid'PG Seinteld 'PG Family Guy 14 Famiy Guy 14 Family Guy l- Family Guy PG Trhe Ohlce - Tre Office 14 Se.nleld'PG Serirteld'PG
--** "The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp"11943. Drama) Roger **** "High Noon"(1952 Westeml Gary Cooper., ..* . "OMahomal"r1955, Musical) Gordon MacRae. Shirley Jones, Rod Steiger An adap-
S53 30 35 Lvesey Boer War subatern becomes coloel, has three lovers.'N Grace KelFy Katy Jurado 'tR' Kr latnon ot the Rodgers and Hammerstein Broadway ht. G ']
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S 50 46 50 50 29 30 What N 0110 Wear 'PG's Say ies-Dress ICake Boss PG Jon & Kale IJon & Kaie 18 Ki.d-Couni |IS Kids-Count Lrlile Couple Iltle Couple Jon & Kale |Jon & Kare
ti-- T}n 48 33 48 48 31 34 Bones -Mummy in ire Maze' 14' Bones In Stereol '14 Hii Thre Closer 14'Q Law S Order 'lliegail '1' Law & Order 'Angelgrove '14 Saving Grace MA 'S
i 9 54 9 9 44 Bizarre Foods Z.mmern Bizarre Foods-Zrrmern Bizarre Foods. Zmmern Bizarre Foods-Zmmer, Bizarre Foods-Zimrrmern Bi-arre Foods Zimmein
25 55 25 25 98 98 Cops'14' Cops'14's operation R Operation Repo Opperation Repo Operation Repo Hot Pursuit'14' Hot Pursuit'14' Most Shocking'14' Forensic Files Forensic Files
(I-M 32 49 32 32 34 24Little House on the Prairie'PG' Andy Gdffith Any Griffith Roseanne'G' RoseannePG' foseanne'PG' Roseanne'PG' Roseanne'PG' IRoseanne'PG' Roseanne'PG' Roseanne'PG
filUA 47 32 47 47 17 18 House "Love Hurts"'14'i House "Adverse Events"'14' House "Distractions"'14'Bi House "Que Sera Sera"'PG' House Dr. House treats a nun.'14' Law & Order: Special Victims Unit I
140 69 117 117 Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Women Behind Bars ia Women Behind Bars Is Women Behind Bars (N) as Women Behind Bars ai
-W.~tU 18 18 " 181 20 Becker'PG' Becker'PG Amenr's Funnest Home Video * * "Uncle Buck" (1989) John Candy (In STereol PG'r' WGhr News at hnre ih) B . Scrubs'14' Scrubs'14'


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Asrsn.
SWill Rogers said, "The Republi-
cans have their splits right afteran
election, and Democrats have
theirs just before an election."
Bridge players sometimes select
a line of play right after finding out
about a suit split
. In this deal, you are in four
spades. West cashes three club"
tricks, then shifts to a heart. You try
dummy's queen, but East covers
with the king. After taking your ace,
how would you continue?
If you are not playing two-over-
one game-force, discuss with North
what his potential rebids would
mean. Would three spades be forc-
ing, or game-invitational? There
,are arguments both ways. (I like
forcing, not being fond of landing
-on a pinhead and being tempted by
a game bonus even if we are over-
bidding.)


====== Bridge=====

North 06-09-09
A Q. 6
Q 7
* K Q 10-4 3
4 10 8 5
West East
A 9 2 4' 8 7 3
� 10 8543 � KJ 9
* 72 * J986
S AK Q 6 1 9 4 2
South
A K J 10 5 4
VA 6 2
* A5
, J 7 3
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1 A Pass 2* Pass
2 NT Pass 4 A All pass
Opening lead: 4 A

You have two heart losers that


must be discarded on diamond'
winners in the dummy But before
you can take those discards, you
must draw trumps. Since the spade
'break is critical, find out about that
first
Play a spade to dummy's ace,
then return a spade to your jack If
someone shows out, cash your
spade king, spade 10 and diamond
ace, then play a diamond to
dummy's queen and call for the
king, hoping the jack appears to es-
tablish dummy's 10. (This is a bet-
ter line for four diamond tricks
than a second-round finesse of-
dummy's 10.) However, when
spades prove to be 3-2, cash your
diamond ace, play a diamond to the
queen, ruff a diamond high in your
hand, return to dummy -with a
spade, and take the two high dia-
monds, pitching your heart losers.
Your 10 tricks are five spades,
one heart and four diamonds.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
PLEEX I


PRUMAK


EW JUMBLE NINTENDOwww.j
GONNIG


jmble.com/ds


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


0- 0




CF


Sj -I Now arrange the circled letters
ito form the surprise answer, as
. suggested by the above cartoon.-

Answer here: THE ".A J
(Answers tomorrow)


ACROSS 37 Arctic sight
39 Hits hard
Tire pressure 40 Yale athlete
meas. 41 Quaker
Subside pronoun
Fell on - ears 42 Bloke's "You
Coffee bet!" (hyph.)
dispenser 45 Slow down
Prompted 49 Olden times
Prevail upon 50 Eurasian range
Everest or K2 52 Female deer
Fibber, plus 53 Quark's home
Preside at tea 54 Muddy up
Computer lan- 55 Gorilla
guage 56 Badgers
Up and about 57 Urban trains
Concealed 58 Cousteau's
Pentagon VIP domain


24 Repair-bil item
27 Got stuck
30 Friendly
nation
31 Commuter
vehicles
32 Alehouse
34 Lyric poem
35 Berry products
36 Payroll
deduction


DOWN
Woman's shoe
Sp. miss
Quaint
hotels
Rich/pastry
Manufacture
"Luck - -
Lady"


Answer to Previous Puzzle
Z ~ EN OG E A A
ABED BAIL RIP
PARALEGAL I RE
SYDNEY INDEX
USS GPA
STUBS JASPER
OGLE DUDE GUM
P BEGS ZANE
FABLES SIDED
TAM TAN
INCUR RANDOM'
FE'E INFURIATE
SAD NEIIL AB IT
ORE GQOR YMSSE


7 Fooling
8 Romantic deity
9 Flu symptom
10 Ancient plant
13 Chinese parade
features


19 Bok-
21 Sunset
colors
24 Thai
neighbor
25 Swit co-star
26 Roquefort hue
27 Himalayan
monk
28 Homer opus
29 Canvasback
31 Diverse
33 - -relief
35 Sudden shock
36 Racer A.J. -
38 Alters a skirt
39 Beach finds
41 Fall behind
42 Meg or Nolan
43 Pinch
44 Shipboard
quaff
46 Ponderosa
son
47 Roundup gear
48 Venison
51 Canape topper


Dear Annie: "Worried in defensiveness and accusing the
Virginia"'said her fiance spouse ofbeing-the problem. The
drove, with a female co- end result of this manipulation is
worker to put air in to convince the
her tires, and that they wronged spouse that
text and e-mail often. she's simply insecure
You told her to keep an - which is exactly
eye on the'situation, ,'. what "Virginia" ques-
but the' evidence of tioned. This woman
misconduct was would do well to re-
"flimsy." I believe you think her fiance's de-
missed the most im- votion to her when'he
portant evidence - is not concerned with
her comment that her emotional pain. -
when she confronted Been There, and Even
him, he became defen- He Agrees With Me
sive, saying he did ANNIE'S , Dear Been There:
nothing wrong and MAILBOX We don't disagree, al-
she's blown it out of though again, not ex-
proportion. actly "evidence."
Annie, anyone who has lived Here's another view:
with a cheating spouse can tell Dear Annie: If "Virginia" is
you that the first sign of guilt is worried about text messages,


phones calls and vehicle assis-
tance, my advice to HIM is to run.
I am a married 47-year-old man
who works with two beautiful fe-
male assistants in their 20s. I
would think nothing of helping
them, vith their cars, and we fre-
quently text and phone each
other. My wife refers to them as
my "daytime wives," and I assure
you our relationship is nothing
but professional. Relationships
are built on trust - True Love in
Bakersfield, Calif.


Annie's Mailbox is written by'
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. E-mail anniesmail-
box@comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, PO. Box
118190, Chicago, IL 60611.


Todays HOROSCOPE


Birthday: In the year ahead, your
dreams can be realized with help from
the past. All those hard knocks you took
served to teach you many tricks of the
trade that can now bring much success.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Do not try
to squirm out of handling your responsi-
bilities, because someone who is watch-
ing your performance will do something
to bolster your career.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - What you
say and to whom you say it could be re-
sponsible for bringing two unrelated fac-
tions together for a common purpose
that will benefit a lot of people.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Completing a
distasteful task will actually provide a
solid sense of achievement and do more
for your psyche than most things; it'll
even prove to be pleasurable.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Find a little
time to take care of a neglected social


obligation, because something good will
come out of it. Besides, anything you do
with this person will turn out to be fun.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -At this time,
financial trends could be moving in your
favor. However, this doesn't mean you
should gamble on funds not yet earned.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - You put
passion and enthusiasm into anything
you believe in. Use these two marvelous
attributes to inspire hope in the hearts of
those who need encouragement.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - It
might be one of those rare days when
co-workers and colleagues seem to be
available exactly when you need them,
without being asked.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - Since
you are in a lucky cycle where most
things are going your way, you'll be en-
couraged to go after something you've
been reluctant to tackle.


Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - Both
hard work and a bit of luck will combine
to clear up a recently bungled situation.
Once you have your mind and muscle
on a plan of action, Dame Fortune will
make an appearance.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - Concen-
trate on those hopes that might be tough
to accomplish, because you could have
a better-than-average chance of suc-
cessfully realizing a dream.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - It might
not be easy to speak up when a friend is
saying something that is unjustified or
unreasonable. But if you do talk, you'll
think more of yourself.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -Although
the competition might try to make you
think it has the upper hand, if you.are
fearless, you will come out ahead in the
long run, especially when negotiating
something meaningful.


4
7
11
12
14
15
16
17
18

23
23


� 2009 by NEA, Inc.


TUESDAY, JUNF 9, 2009 CT


ENTERTAINMENT


C<._-F c n� m- M"/�>. /II' /rrifit�T�/rr R?








T-XUESDAYl, JU.NE , ~'~.


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


-THE FUEt-COMPRNH DtN'YOVEfR-1NO WONDERTH-E9 DIDNrThUNDIER-I
CvlPBE tiS,ELI�i- '900PAID 8TFWWD )oURCOMPLftINT.-IT
THEi-R EBiu-fbujiE1C. 1 THIS 13 n SIAISRIG T lRDO NCOrVTMI.
TME CREDIT BRLRriCE.


Beetle Bailey


I CAN FEEL IT, FAYE. YOU ALWAYS YOU BUILD THINGS R OH, HOW I WEEP FOR YOU PLEBS ANM
THIS IS GONNA BE OUR DO THIS, HIL... UP SO MUCH WE 8 YOURSMALL DREAMS.
BEST SUMMER EVER! - -- CAN'T HELP BUT BE FUNNY, I DON'1
DISAPPOINTED. WHY SEE ANY TEARS
i NOT JUST BE HAPPY LET ME FIX THAT.
S THAT IT'S SUMMER? -


Dilbert


The Born Loser


LOOK-l KERE.'5 k4N'T M> 4NTED';NA% UIktROUSe-


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


The Grizzwells


Blondie


"There's Henry, poor guy. Remember,
. whatever you do, don't ask
about the divorce."


Doonesbury Flashback


Big Nate


Ario and Janis


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"The Hangover" (R) 12:10 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 5:10
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Land of the Lost" (PG-13) Noon, 2:30 p.m., 5
p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Drag Me To Hell" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 2:50 p.m.,
5:15 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Up" (PG) 12:15 p.m., 2:45 p.m., 5:15 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10 p.m.
"Night at the Museum II" (PG) 12:05 p.m., 2:35
p.m., 5:05 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Terminator Salvation" (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:25
p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:05 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Hangover" (R) 12:10 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 5 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes.
"Land of the Lost" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 3:10 p.m.,


5:30 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Drag Me To Hell" (PG-13) 12:40 p.m., 3 p.m., 5:15
p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Up" (PG) 12:05 p.m., 2:20 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7 p.m.,
9:30 p.m.
"Night at the Museum II" (PG) Noon, 12:30 p.m.,
2:25 p.m., 2:55 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 5:20 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 9:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Terminator Salvation" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 2:50
p.m., 5:25 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Angels & Demons" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:05
p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Star Trek" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20
p.m., 10:15 p.m.


Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


Local RADIO


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious
WXCV-FM 95-3 Adult Contemp.
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix


WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious
WKTK 97.3 FM News Talk'
WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies
WIFL-FM 104.3 Adult Mix


WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: N equals B
I'


"ECKYCZHFAVZFAKV AH IALB Z YCBJAF


YZCJ: AF'H Z IKF KU URV RVFAI TKR


MBF FXB NAIl."


- BVMIAHX ZYFKC


YXCAHFKEXBC EZCLBC

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I just love being alive, and I love people, and I find something
wonderful every day." - Bea Arthur
(c) 2009 by NEA, Inc. 6-9


Peanuts


Cathy


Betty


Today's MOVIES


--------------


OTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE,


COMICS


CS 9 2009








(3imus COuNTY (FL) CHRONICLE HEALTH & LifE Iti SDAY, J1~NI- 9, 2009 C9


* SPRING HILL- Look
Good Feel Better Support
group, 3:30 to 5 p.m. third
Wednesday monthly at the
FPlorida Cancer Institute - New
lope's Spring Hill Center,
10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203,
iii the Medical Arts Building
next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call
Peggy Dome, R.N., support
group facilitator, at (352) 688-
7744.
* Alzheimer's caregivers
support , 5:15 p.m. the third
Thursday monthly at the Mem-
4ry Unit at Barrington Place,
3341 W. Norvell Bryant High-
Way, Lecanto, 34461, for care-
divers and their dementia
patients, by the Citrus team of
I lemando-Pasco Hospice. Din-
Ser served to patients while'
(aregivers attend the 5:30 p.m.
Support group meeting. Free.
'all Wendy Hall at 527-4600.
* If interested in a day pro-
gram and support group for
lzheimer's and dementia pa-
tents, call 344-5228 for more
information.
0 The Fibromyalgia Sup-
ort Group of the First United
ethodist Church of Ho-
osassa meets the first and
ird Thursday in the confer-
nce room of the administration
building at the church. All are
welcome to join us. For more
information call 628-4083.
* NEW PORT RICHEY -
Lymphedema support group, 3
to 4 p.m. third Thursday
monthly meetings at Florida
Cancer Institute - New Hope's
center at 8763 River Crossing
Blvd., New Port Richey, Call
Community Hospital's Outpa-
tient Healthcare Center at (727)
845-0757.
- 0 The Ostomy Support
Group of Citrus County meets
it 2 p.m. the third Sunday
monthly in the Cypress Room
)n' the first floor in the Citrus
Memorial Health System's Ad-
ninistration's Annex Building,
cross the street from the Med-


ical Offices Building at 131 S.
Citrus Ave., Inverness. Call Mel
or Betty at 726-3802, Sally at
637-2055 or Frank at 341-
0005. E-mail: OSGofCC@
yahoo.com.
* Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization, serving Central
Florida, offers monthly support
group meetings. Public is in-
vited.
* 10 a.m. Thursday, June
25, Woodland Terrace, 124 W.
Norvell Bryant Highway, Her-
nando. Call Pam Pepitone at
249-3100.
The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization branch office in Cit-
rus County is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. the second Mon-
day monthly. Call the Citrus
County community service rep-
resentative Ellen Mallon at 860-
2525.
* The regular Celiac Sup-
port Group meeting for June
27 will be at a local restaurant.
There will be no meeting at the
library this month. We will be
dining on Italian food entrees
including homemade pizza.
Regular menu items will be
available for non celiac relatives
and friends if they would like to
attend. For more information
and.reservations, contact Mary
Lou Thomas at 628-9559 prior
to June 19.
* Fibromyalgia Support
Group meets 1;30 to 3 p.m. on
the last Saturday monthly at
B&W Rexall Drugs in Inver-
ness. Call Ada Fox at 637-
3364.
* Homosassa Springs
Area Cancer Survivors' Sup-
port Group at 1 p.m. monthly
at First United Methodist
Church. Call Anna Cooley, 382-
4132; or Earl Cadaret, 382-
1923.

Weekly meetings
* Anorexia and bulimia
anonymous 12-step support
group meets at 5:45 p.m. every
Monday atithe Yana Club, 147


N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River
(behind the police station). For
more information, call Char-
maine at 422-3234.
* Independent Living
Skills, Peer Support and Lit-
eracy workshops, 9 to 11:45
a.m. Monday at the Center for
Independent Living of North
Central Florida, 3774 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Lecanto. Call
Cathy Jackson at 527-8399.
* Beverly Hills Community
Church Community Support
Group, a 12-step program,
meets at 6 p.m. Tuesday in
the fellowship hall, 88 Civic Cir-
cle. Free. All are invited. Call
the church at 746-3620 or Meg
at 527-2443.
* Hernando-Pasco Hospice
presents free grief support
programs, 2:30 p.m. Tuesday
at Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center for anyone who has
experienced the sudden loss of
a loved one. Registration re-
quired. Call (800) 486-8784.
* Celebrate Recovery, 7 to
9 p.m. Friday at Seven Rivers
Christian School in rooms
216/217 of school building C.
Dinner available before the
meeting from 6 to 7 p.m. for $3
donation and a coffee house
after. Call SRPC at 746-6200.
* Celebrate Recovery, 7
p.m. Wednesday and Fridays
at the Christian Recovery Fel-
lowship Church, 2242 W. State
Road 44. Call 726-2800.-
* Celebrate Recovery at
Gulf to Lake Church Ministry
Complex, West Gulf-to-Lake
Highway in Crystal River. Din-
ner at 6 p.m. Friday, followed
by large- and small-group time
and a Coffee Cafe at 9. Call
795-0649.
. Beverly Hills Gay and
Lesbian Support Group
meets.weekly. Free, open to
everyone. Group organizer is
PamelaRae and co-organizer is


Wayne Thomas. Call Pame-
laRae at 560-3247 for direc-
tions and details.
* Citrus Abuse Shelter As-
sociation (CASA), 1100 Tumer
Camp Road, Inverness, offers
two free weekly women's do-
mestic abuse support groups:
* 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday.
'* 10:30 a.m. to noon
Wednesday.
Child care available.
Call CASA at 344-8111.
* Overcomers Group for
people recovering from addic-
tions to drugs, alcohol or other
out-of-control habits meets at 8
p.m. Monday at the Sanctuary,
7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Call Paul at 628-2874.
* Dunnellon Life Recovery
group for adults where addic-
tion, compulsion and co-depen-
dency issues are dealt with, at
7 p.m. Monday at Rainbow
Springs Village Church, 20222
S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnel-
Ion. Call Char at (352) 465-
1644 or Nancy at (352)
794-0017.
* Al-Anon groups meet reg-
ularly in Citrus County. Call
(352) 697-0497.
* Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S.
41. .
* Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m.
Tuesday, St. Benedict -
Catholic Church, 455 S. Sun-.
coast Blvd.
* Last Resort AFG: 11:30
a.m. Wednesday, First United
Methodist Church, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road, Inver-
ness.
* Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unity Church of Cit-
rus County, 2628 Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
* Courage AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
Open meeting. Call Victoria at


Support GROUPS


503-3961.
* Crystal River AFG: 11:30
a.m. Thursday at YANA Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
* Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday, St.
Margaret Episcopal Church,
114 N. Osceola Ave., Inver-
ness.
* Beginners Al-Anon: 10
a.m. Saturday at Yana Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
* Alcoholics Anonymous:
If you drink, and want to stop,
call Alcoholics Anonymous Na-
ture Coast Intergroup at 621-
0599. Web site: www
.ncintergroup.com.
* AC Group meets at 7 p.m.
Tuesday at Church Without
Walls, 3962 N. Roscoe Road,
Hemando. Call Laveme at 637-
4563. Web site: www.alcoholics
forchrist.com.
* Overeaters Anonymous:
Call 746-7749-or 341-0777.
* 3 p.m. Monday at the
senior center (VA building) on
County Road 491, Lecanto.
Call Delores, 746-5019.,
* Noon Thursdays at Our
Lady of Grace Parish Hall, 6
Roosevelt Blvd, Beverly Hills.
Call Francisca, 746-7749.
* "Circle of Love" 1 p.m.
Thursday at Our Lady of
Grace Church, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call 746-
7749, 726-9112 or 341-0777.
* 7 p.m. Friday at Our Lady
of Grace Parish Hall, 6 Roo-
sevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call
Carolyn, 341-0777.
* CEA-HOW, for people who
have an eating disorder, at
noon Wednesdays at the First
Presbyterian Church, 206
Washington Ave., Invemess.
Call Judi M. at 726-5882.
* Reiki clinic meets from 7
to 9 p,m. most Wednesdays at
the Beverly Hills Community
Center, t Civic Circle, Beverly
Hills. Call Ann Thonen at 795-
5116 or Kristi Kobler at 628-
5537.


Ci]hroic[e


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa: 35) 6-555 1 ol re:*88) 5-240 1*mal casi0ed hrnil0 ln*gm w b0t: wwchonceolie 0o


1 48 yr old Male, 5'9",
185'lbs., smoker, wants
Female companion
between ages 35 & 50,
interested in sports,
social drinking, enjoys
life, Call 352-287-1902



U$TOPDOLLAR$$
Paid for Junk Vehicles
JW. 352-228-964
$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for your junk car,
truck or van
(352) 634-5389'
r CASH PAID all
vehicles.Trades welcome
Used PARTS avail
352-628-9118'
WANTED
Junk Lawn Mowers
& Power Equip.
Free Pick-up (352)
564-80141601-5053
/Us outzoomcitrus.com



4 2 Free Kittens
Tabby
(352) 726-4710
Excell. Home for any
unwanted birds, poultry
U-R unable to care for,
726-9874
FREE LAB MIX
House trained, 7mths
old, male.
352-563-0964



Blackberries
L Organically Grown.
U-pick, starting May
26th. Sat.& Tues.BA./3P.
$3.50 per pound.
9333 Hwy 48 Floral City.


nweetCorn@Bamy
Grove, located 1.5 mi.
east on Eden Dr. from
Hwy. 41, Inverness. Wa-
termelons, cantaloupes,
squash & peppers.
(352) 726-6378



Jack Russell/
Chihuahua mix, male,
tan w/spots, all paws
white, Rio Visa Area
(352) 266-8334



Mixed Breed
Female, black w/brindle
coloring. Found at 7
Rivers Medical Center.
6/6. (845) 300-1487
White MALE TERRIER
found in Citrus Springs
(352) 464-1399



I was wondering If
anyone would like to
donate a car to a
severely handicapped
man who can't walk
I foot. Wife can drive.
Goes to Dr's every 3
weeks. Wife goes
every other week.
Taxi's getting
expensive.
(352) 527-1925
thank you In advance
would be much
appreciated
PRECIOUS PAWS
RESCUE, INC.
352-726-4700
See adoptable pets
on our website
www.oreclousoaws
florida-com
Visit our Pets every
Saturday
at Petsupermarket
Inverness 10-1pm
& Crystal River Mall
Sat June 20th 10-1pm
or call us.


F Bank Probate
I Divorces /Evictions
352-613-3674

OI - .. ,1


arb * Mak
hotograpb9
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits
Indoor or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed






www.adoota
rescued oetcom
View available pets on
our website or call
(352) 795-9550
Adoption Locations
Crystal River Mall
June 6th 11-3pm
Pet Suoermarket
Inverness
June 13th, 20th &
29th... 11-2pm

ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT







$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com


Reg'd HOME DAYCARE
Citrus Springs - Summer
Program/Planned
Curriculum.
352-422-7904
/us out @ zoomcltrus.com
W - U


Come see
our
adorable cats and,
kittens that are-
available for
adoption. -
We are open
10:00 A till 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4
All Cats and Kittens are
altered, tested for Fe-
line Luk and Aids. Up to
date on
vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofspha.ora.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant Ave.
Corner of 44 arid Co-
nant.
Look for the big white
building with the bright
paw prints.



I DO HOUSE CLEANING &
CHILD CARE FOR YOU
Reasonable rates
(352) 621-0238
B-E----I

FOUNTAINS MEMORIAL
Homosassa $1200 (well
below mkt value) obo
MIchelle (352)628-2555
Two Cemetary Plots
Dunnellon Memorial
Gardens for sale.
Delores (352)789-0107 or
Liz at (352)274-3958


A FREE Report of Your
Home's Value
www.naturecoast




' Beauty Salon
Booth Rental, $80wk
Be your own boss
Come & Join a
team(352) 637-2602





































BE A CNA
One week Prep Course
Train & test with us.
GETYOURCNA.COM
341-PREP (7737)
BUS Y DOCTOR
OFFICE
N^0L
Front Desk,
Bllllng,Collections &
CPT Codes, P/T,
NO Benefits
Fax Resume To:
352-795-0803


BUSY GYNECOLOGIST
OFFICE Looking for:
Physician Assistant
Exp. In Gynecology,
Mln. 5 yrs exp. Proactive
Please send resume to:
mreduick@earthllnk.net

CNA
Medical office exp.
Required. Full time
With benefits, For,
busy medical office,
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2512
CNA PREP & TEST
EZ Learning Services
Day & Evening Classes
352-382-EASY; 586-2715,
/*us out zoomcitrus.com
Diamond R idge Health
& Rehab Center
We are currently
accepting applications
for an RN Unit Manger
for our long term Units.
Also accepting
applications for O.T.
Department for full time
& part time. Please
apply within.
2730 W. Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto.

NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County
RN/LPN
PRN positions are
available for all shifts.
Must have a current
nursing license.
Long-term care ex-
perience preferred.
CNA
Full-time positions are
available, -
3 p.m. - 11 p.m.
'and 11 p.m. - 7 a.m.
Must have current
state certification.
Long-term care ex,
perience preferred.
We offer competitive
' pay In a
mission-driven
environment.
Apply In person to
Hannah Mand.
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln.
Lecanto, FL 34461
www.LCCA.com
EOE/M/F/V/D
Job #9394



C4a


Ready for a More
Rewarding -
Therapy Career?,
The homecare industry
Is revolutionizing
healthcare In
America, and Gentiva
Home Health Is
leading that evolution
with exceptional
care, innovative
. solutions and-
uncompromising
service. Due to rapid
growth,,the LECANTO
team is now hiring
for the following
positions:
PT & OT
SWork one on one
with clients "
* Be able to advance
your-career
Commit to us.
We'll commit to you.
Sign on Bonus
Available
call Mala Wolfe at:
1-877-623-2350 or email
mala.wolfe@
gentiva.com
Or visit
careers.gentiva.com
EOE



REHAB
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County
PT * PTA * OT
COTA * SLP
Full-time, part-time
and PRN positions.
A current license is
required.
Join our
patient-focused
rehab team, and
receive great pay
and benefits including
comprehensive medi-
cal, dental and life
Insurance, 401 (k) and
paid time off.
Apply In person to
Karen Kanter.
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln.
Lecanto, FL 34461
www.LCCA.com
EOE/M/F/V/D
Job # 9452



f 4# 1


Now Offering Day & Eve.
Classes Free CPR training
w/enrollment. New classes
begin every 3 wks
341-2311
Scholarships Available
Granny Nannies
Seeking Experienced
CNAIHHA & Live ins.
Call 352-560-4229
GYN OFFICE IN
CRYSTAL RIVER
LOOKING FOR:
Cert. Medical Asst.
Receptionist - Billing
Dietician' .
Proactive. 1 year
exp. In Medical Of-
fices. Knowledge in
medical software
Please send resume:
mredrlcklearthlink.nel
or fax 352-564-8201
LPN/CNA
For Physician's Office.
Phlebotomy exp pref'd.
Coall 352-563-0835



Cypress Creek
Juvenile Offender
Correctional Facility
In Leconto is looking
for a Ucensed Mental
Health Therapist,
Qualified applicants
should have knowl-
edge of adolescent
tsychopatholdgy
and mental health,
substance abuse and
suicide screenings.
Must be abil to pro-
vide comprehensive
clinical assessments,
treatment planning
and Individualized
mental health/
substance abuse
therapeutic Interven-
tions. Requirements:
Must possess a
license: (LCSW,
LMHC) from the-state
of Florida, Master's
degree from an
accredited college
or university In the
field of counseling,
social work, psychol-
ogy, rehabilitation,
special education
or in a related human
services field Is
preferred.
Apply In person at
Cypress Creek
2855 W. Woodland
Ridge Dr. Lecanto
or Fax resume to
352-527-2235


FACILITATOR
Shared Service
Alliance of Citrus Co.
Is seeking a
Professional Facilita-
tor that provides,
admlnistratilve
support and reports
to the SSA Board. This
Is a Part time annual
contract position,
min. AA degree req..
Bachelors preferred
Salary $15,000-$20,000
based on exp./
education. No Bene-
fits. Send Resumes to:
Brad Thorpe
Citrus Co. Courthouse
2nd Floor
110 N. Apopka Ave
Inverness Fl. 34450
THE WILLISTON
PIONEER SUN
NEWS

PART TIME
OFFICE
COORDINATOR
Applicants must have
excellent customer
service skills, basic
computer knowledge,
be a skilled typist and
highly organized. This
position requires selling
and typing classified
advertisements,
maintaining circulation
database and newspa-
per sales, providing
excellent customer
service both internally,
externally, and basic
accounting functions.
This position is 24-29
hours per week with
occasional additional
hours to cover for
vacations, illness, etc.
Applications can be
picked up at the Wil-
Ilaston Pioneer Sun
News Office at 28
N.W. First Ave., Willls-
ton, FL., (across from
the Post Office) or
email cover letter and
resume to
tmarks@ssmcitlzen
corn.Qualified
Applicants must
undergo a drug
screen. EOE


t-R3r


* Narcotics Anonymous:
* Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Mon-
day and Satu'rday, Lions Den,
U.S. 41, Floral City.
* It Works How and Why, 7
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Saturday and noon Sunday,
YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh
St., Crystal River.
* Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m.
Thursday, First Christian
Church, Grover Cleveland
Boulevard, Homosassa.
* Recovery on the River, 8
p.m. Monday and Friday,
Lecanto Church of Christ, State
Road 44 and County Road 491,
Lecanto; 8 p.m. Sunday 797 S.
Rowe Terrace, Lecanto, east of
County Road 491 and State
Road 44.
Narcotics Anonymous is not
affiliated with any of the meet-
ing facilities listed. Information
line: 382-0851.
* Narconon provides an-
swers to drug addiction, pro-
vides free assessments,
evaluation and referral services
to internationally recognized al-
ternative and traditional treat-
ment facilities. When continuing
relapse is occurring, call (800)
468-6933 or visit www.stopad
diction.com.
* Depression and Bipolar
Support Alliance of Citrus
County at 7 p.m. Thursday in
Bailey Hall, First Lutheran
Church, 1900 State, Road 44
W., Inverness. Doors open at 6
p.m. Call 503-3262. The Na-
tional DBSAAssociation's num-
ber is (800) 826-3632.
* The Encouragers Sup-
port Group has been helping
people deal with depression,
anxiety, bipolar and more for
more than 15 years. Weekly
meeting. Call 628-3831 or 637-
3196.
* SPRING HILL - Parkin-.
son's Tai Chi Group, 2:30 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday in the pri-
vate dining room at Health-
South Rehabilitation Hospital of
Spring Hill. Call Charissa
Haffner at (352) 346-8864.


_4s

IL 89


Tui7sDAY, JuNF. 9, 2009 C9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HEALTH & LIFE










CIO TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 2009


Programmer
Analyst
The Citrus County
School District Is
seeking a highly
qualified individual to
assist in the support
and maintenance of
our financial
information systems.
IBM System 15
and COBOL
experience desired.
For more
information go to
www.citrus.k12.fl.us or
call 352-746-3437. EOE


M/C Sales Person

Experienced &.
Motivated. Fax Resume
Tues-Sat to
(352)795-4956

NOW HIRING
SALES PERSONAL
TOP $$$ PAID
Exp. preferred but
will train. Benefits,
company vehicle.
A apply In Person
Bray's Pest
Control
3447 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Inverness
(352) 746-2990







APPOINTMENT
SETTERS

Up For A Challenge?
Serious minded
individuals will earn
great $$$ setting appts
for our very busy local
company. Call Steve
@ 352-628-0254

HELP WANTED
SELLING CATHERINE
ROSE SKIN CARE. To'
family & friends. 50%
comm. Have fun mak-
ing $$$! 1-800-314-2945


Citrus County Home
Inspections
$75. Any house in
June. (352) 978-8403

DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Repairing gas & diesel
engines. No job too big
or small. 352-228-2067

NEED A RIDE ?
Will run errands, or drive
you to appointments. Call
Steve. (352) 527-1559




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd
friendly serve. Lowest
rates Free est.
352-860-1452

All Ttactor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
COLEMAN TREE SERVE.
Trim & Removal. Lic.
Ins. FREE EST. Lowest
rates. 352-270-8462
check out zoomcjtrus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
Bobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272









OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Work Free Est.
LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED/
Lic (352) 400-60161ns
R WRIGHT TreeService
Tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.&. Uc
0256879 32-341 -6827





Richard Mills Tree Serv
Trim, haul, top, ,
removal, Free Est
Reasonable Rates,
(352) 398-9881
Richard Mills Tree Serv '
Trim, haul, top,
removal, Free Est
Reasonable Rates
(352) 398-9881


Computers


At Home Computer
Repairs & custom
computers.
Call (352)228-7823
COMPUTER DOCTORS
112 MI. 8,E. Inv, Walmart
Computer alesl/rpair
X-Box 380(352)344-4839

ON.SITE
COMPUTER
SERVICE
352-341-4150


TELEMARKETER

Regional Builder
seeking telemarketer
for working large
prospect database.
No cold calling. Late
aftemoon, evening
and weekend hours
with flexible schedule
Salary and bonuses.
Fax resume to
352-746-7707





P/T TENNIS

Local Tennis Club,
in need of Part time
counter help. $7 hr.
Flexible hrs. a plus
This Is a smoke free
facility. Call 249- 115








- Classes


REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-1728




Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
work fully coated. 30 yrs.
Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-795-6533
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996,








INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




RENEE'S MOBILE
WASH-N-WAX. We
come to you. Serving
Citrus Cty for 8 years.
352-446-0209




PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
27 yrs. exp. Certified
Best prices/guaranteed
352-220-9435
check out zoomcitrus.com












AT YOUR HOME
Mower & Generator
Repair. 352-220-4244
Llc#99990001273

DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Gas / Diesel Engines
No iob too big or small.
352-228-2067

Mower Repair,
Hernando. Pick up &
delivery, Don Mead
352- 400-1483


I Professio


The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel'
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




OUTREACH SENIOR
COMPANION
SERVICES
Affordable, quality
Senior Care.
Companions,
Homemakers, Sitters.
Licenced, Bonded &
Insured Call toll free
1-877-803-1608
www.outreachsenlor
companlon.com
Uc #231103
PRIVATE DUTY CARE
Specialty: Quality of life
Fl. St. Lic./Bonded, Ref.
Lee (352) 201-4565




-.SEE THROUGH
Window Washing
All Aspects (352)
489-4189; 322-0962
/ us out zoomcitrus.com




Reg'd HOME DAYCARE
Citrus Springs - Summer
Program/Planned Cur-
riculum. 352-422-7904
/us out @ zoomcitrus.com




FAITH DEAN'S Cleaning
Family Busn. Since '96
Free Est. LIc# 6159
Insured. (352) 341-8439
Cell 476-4603




Affordable CABINETS
& COUNTER TOPS
New & Remodel
352-586-8415




QUALITY CRAFTED
BUILDERS New, Renova-
tions & Commercial
15 Yrs In Citrus County
352-726-5507
ROGERS Construction
New Homes & All
Construction (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872


1st Choice, -
PEST CONTROL, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE


LAWN GOT

PROBLEMS?

Call 503-68 21
Owner/Operators .
Llowid Smillh - Bill Blodeu stIen Jim Cl'ry
704M0 6L4U W. Gll(3 nrook St.


General
Help
MARINE
MECHANIC
Immediate
Opening
Factory Certified
Outboard
Mechanic
All benefit
Call Randy
(352) 79 5-3552 or
Steve (352) 302-584011


Schnettler
Construction, LLC
Renovations,room
additions,decks, barns,
garages,various home
repairs. (352)637-4629
cell 352-266-6756
Uc. & nsCBC1253348.




SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla rms,
windows, garage scrns
(CBC1257141) 28-Q562




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lie. & Ins. FREE'
EST (352) 586-2996



"HOME REPAIRS"
Painting, power wash
jobs bfg,'& small
(Eng,/ Spanlsh)746-3720
" us at zoomcitrus.com
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable, Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
LIc. 5863 (352) 746-0141
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
r NTuRE COAST
HOME REPAIR
& MAINT. INC.
- Offering a Full
Range of Services
www.naturecoast
homerepair.com
LiUc 2776/Ins.,
352-634-5499
Visa/MC/Dlscover

ALL HOME REPAIR
painting, drywall
Malley's Home Maint
220-9486 (lic0259169)
/ out zoomcitrus.com








FAST AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs
Free Est., Lic#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *


7----


m


Senior Saviours
Monthly Maintenance
Service. �
A must for ONLY
$40.00 a Month!
Call 352-342-9911!
www.SeniorSaviours.co
m




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable, Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
Lic. 5863 (352) 746-0141
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife,
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699
SALTMARSH
ELECTRIC
Comm/Resid. & Sign
Lighting. CR13012391
352-344-3810
/ us out zoomcitrus.com



FAST AFFORDABLE!
RELIABLEI Most repairs
Free Est., Llc#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *



C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264 /201-1422



PAVING & SEAL COAT
VIGLIONE LLC-l/c/lns
www. TAR-MAX.com
Free Est(3521726-3093



Aaron's Fence 2417
Will beat any legitimate
price. Lic. & Ins. Free
Est. (352) 795-7373
ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279
OSBORNE'S
LawnfTree/Shrub
Quality Fence Work Free
Est. LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins


Restaurant For Sale
An established
profitable franchise In
Crystal River. $239K.
(352) 746-6596



Candy Franchise for
sale. All stock and
HUGE territory $30k.
NO ROYALTY FEES
call Lori 352-422-3701.









25x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry Door, 2 Vents,
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.795. INSTALLED
30x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$14.995. INSTALLED
35x50x12(3:12 pitch)
Roof overhang,
2-10x10 Rollup Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$29.995 Installed
+ Fl. Engineered Plans
+ A local Fl Manufact.
* Meets or exceeds
Florida wind codes.
+ Conc/Inst by others.
* Many sizes available
+ We specialize In
Commercial Buildings
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
www. metal
structuresllc.com



Captured German
Propaganda film, 1941, In
original cardboard
German container.
Serious inquiries only.
(352) 560-3263



HOT TUB/SPA
by Hot Springs, very
nice cond. works exc.
- 4 people, Bargain $500
(352) 795-9187




A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
' Wholesale Prices
4- 2Ton $780.00
4 2-?2 Ton $814.00
4 3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Free Del. Uc.#CAC
057914 746-4394


A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



AAA ROOFING
Free est. 30 yrs exp.
352-563-0411
John Gordon Roofing
For a hole in your roof
or a whole new roof.
Free est. 352-795-7003



BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Estimates
Lic#2579/Ins, 257-0078
Decorative concrete,
Landscape curbing
River rock resealing
344-4209 (Lic.6960)
SFather & Son
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack repair,staining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
- 352-464-3967 i
Quality Concrete Serv.
Layout to Lentil
ALL TYPES, Tractor
352-726-2383, LIc#2567
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services
40 Yrs Exp. crcO58140
344-3536; 563-9768
W. F. GILLESPIE CONST.
Lic, #CRC1327902
(352) 344-0009
www.wfglllesple.com
----- I^


A Cutting Edge
Tile Job
Showers. Firs etc
(352) 422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone Drive-
ways & Tractor work
341-2019 or 257-1562


ABC Briscoe Appl.
Refrig., washers, stoves.
Serv. & Parts
(352) 344-2928

NEW ECOQUEST
FRESH AIR PURIFIERS
Does a whole house.
Great for pets,allergies,or
asthma. $400
352-419-6100




Thurs. Estate Auction
June 11 Sale- 4PM
Sportsman's Estate MIB
Case XX knives. Long
guns. Riding mower,
coins, housefulls of fum.
& acc, Ant. & Collect.
dudleysauction.com
AB1667-AU2246 12%BP




CHICAGO Compound
Mitre & Chop Saw $150;
Brand new air tools
includ.air chisel & 2-ton
chain hoist $100
(352) 560-3263

MAKITA 10" MITER
SAW
Excellent condition $75.
Stand tools available
also. Call 527-6425

STIEL CHAINSAW MS250
18 Inch $250;
STIEL CHAINSAW D12
AVP 14" $160
(352) 560-3263




Mr. Coffee,
12 cup, programmable,
coffee maker as new
$30
. (352) 560-3677




4 FT, 114" Well Points
New, made In USA,
$75.
(352) 341-1871







COMPUTER AND
BUSINESS EQUIP-
MENT including:-
Upgraded computer
with 15 inch monitor,
internet ready asking
$150.00; HP 3330 Laser,
Fax,Scanner,Copier,
with toner cartridge
cost new $650.00 asking
$150.00; DELL docking
station $25.00; printer
table $5.00, large '
speakers $10.00. Call
Bob 352-564-1717


All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,
Hauling, Site Prep,
Driveways. Lic. & Ins.
(352) 795-5755
*TOP SOIL SPECIAL*
3 Yd -$60/-5 Yd $85
lOYd $175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436




All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/us out zoomcitrus.com
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, HaulingSite
Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins795-5755
Ck out zoomciltrus.com
Pasture mowing, lots
acreage, commercial.
$18. per acre & up.
(352) 978-8403




D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
Bobcatwork fill/rock
















SGuaranteed
Barker's Lawn �
Service Monthly or I
i Per cut rate
352) 232-8166

#1 AGAIN Pro Tech
Lawn Service. Family
owned & operated.
Serving central Citrus
Cty since 1999. Calf
for free estimate
302-7800 - LIc/Ins.

Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Soecials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
check out zoomcitrus.com
DUN-RITE LAWN SERV
Lic & Ins Clean up,,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681
check zoomciltrus.com


.~ ,,,*,.,,~,,,I
.I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
New & Used systems
upgrades. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
www.rdeeii.com
GATEWAY LAPTOP
Computer, Windows XP,
15.4" screen, $250
(352) 560-7465



SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Blk w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This
bad bov is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
.Call for more info.
352-302-2815



42" TILE & CEMENT
Table w/3 benches,
$400. 23" Cement Table
w/2 benches, $150 or
both for $500.
352-796-9350
PATIO SET
1 table w/4 chairs and
side table. $100
352-601-3654




V THIS OUT!
1950's Pedestal table
35x35size Four chrome
burgundy vinylchairs
$150.00. 1930's Duncan
Phyfe drop leaf table &
chairs $450.00
352-746 0513
Antique Pine
Cabinet 2 side drawers
one top drawer $200
Depression Glass $200.
(352) 465-7139
Corner Curio
5 shelf with light.
Dark wood
6'6" high. $80.00
527-8742


Curio Cabinet
White wood, glass door.
Modern design, 80" x 30"
x 13", 4 shelves, mirrored
back, w/light. Exc. cond.
$175. (352) 382-3322
Dining Room set,
Med. brown wood, inlc. 4
chairs, leaf, glass top,
excel. cond. $150. obo.
Dinette Set
Beige, glass top, 4 chairs.
$125. (352) 489-2953
DRESSER Cherry with
Pediment, bifolding mir-
ror, 65" W x 34" H, 18" D
excel. cond. $100.
352-527-8176
or 352-212-6918
Dual Rocker/Recliner
La Z boy Brown Leather
4 yrs. new $325.,
2 Swivel Rockers
1 peach, 1 blue, $65.
ea. (352) 382-0022
LEATHER LOVESEAT
AND SWIVEL ROCKER
cream color, barely used.
$395.00. Two Palm Paint-
ings, large,matted,framed
orig.$300 each $125.00
both 352-697-5779
Love seat $50.
oval coffee table
cherry finish $25.
(352) 527-1069
MAPLE DESK
5-drawer w/computer
chair. $65
352-601-3554
Mirror 40" X 54",
bevelled glass, framed,
$125. Broyhill coffee
table, all wood, $125
(352) 527-8978
MOVING SALE,
Living Rm., Dining Rm.
Family Rm. Furniture
(352) 249-9160
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30; Full
$40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
SOFA
3-cushions, gold color
w/wood trim. $75.
352-746-6029
SOFA BED,
cream color,
excellent condition,
slipcover, $700
(352) 344-0172
Sofa, tapestry, soft col-
ors, ball & claw feet,
gently used, $375
(352) 527-8978
TABLES
Maple end table, $15
White patio coffee table,
$10
352-382-0022 "
YOUR FURNITURE
DONATIONS
SUPPORTS THE PATH
HOMELESS SHELTER
Call (352) 746-9084



4 x 8 Trailer
side rails, $150.obo
Craftsman, weed eater
& hedge trimmer, like
new $150 obo
352-860-1426 Iv msg.


LawncarelLandsCaping
Covering all your lawn care
needs. Detailed work.
746-6410 Lic/Ins.
HARRY EVERSON'S
LAWN & MAINTENANCE
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
(352) 302-2585
V us at zoomcitrus.com
HEDGE TRIMMING,
HAULING(ANY KIND),
LAWN MOWING,
MULCH. FREE.ESTI-
MATES. 352-344-9273
OR 352-201-9371
INVERNESS AREA
Mow.trim, beds,
Fast Reponse since
1991 352- 422-5978
V zoomcitrus.com ,
Lawn Care 'N' MOre'
Mow, clean up
brushes, beds
Friendly Service since
1991
Residential/Commi
(352) 726-9570
out zoomcitrus.com
MOWING & TRIMMING
Residential/ East citrus
county area.
352-302-1511;341-5182
OSBORNE'S
Quality Work - Free
Est. LOWEST RATES
352-400-6016 Lic/Ins
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
SClean up, Lic. & Ins,
(352) 797-3166



EVERCLEAR POOL
SERV. & Maint.
Concrete Pools Only
(352)344-5122
POOL BOY SERVICES
TotalPool Care
Decorative Concrete
a 352-464-3967 0
-------I


MOBILE RV
SERVICE
WE COME TO YOU m
SMotor Homes I
S 5th Whls/Rv's
Master Tech
S 352-586-5870
SStorage Available




WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard


U.--

CRAFTSMAN 21"
MULCHING
LAWNMOWER
6.75horsepower, $85 firm
352-201-2764
Craftsman
Riding Lawn Mower, 18
'/2HP, new engine, has
deck, elec. start, needs
transmission work
$299. (352) 746-7044
HAND GARDEN PLOW
Stainless steel frame.
24" wheel. Like new.
$40. 42" CONCRETE
WAGON WHEEL. $40
352-563-5386
LAWNMpWER AND A
COMPUTER PRINTER
Weedeater brand gas
mower,used 6 times, $45
- Dell 4 in 1 printer, 4 yrs .
old, $40 Call 860-2045
Riding Mower
Murray 42" cut, $500.
Obo.(352) 795-4421




INVERNESS
Wed & Thurs 8-3
9734 E. Mpnica Ct.
LECANTO
FrI 6/5- 6/30 9-4pm
5429 W. Shady Knoll PI
MOVING SALE
MOVING SALE
Table saw china
hutch, book case,
couches &more
(352) 489-6641




Let us pay YQOL to
cut your 5+ acre
bahia field for sodl
Circle T Sod
352 400-2221



Commercial Paper
shredder, SEM, $35
(352) 726-5372
DEHUMIDIFIER
A-1 condition, 8 quart
capacity, Prevents
mold. $15
BAR CLAMPS -set of 5.
Professional quality.
$10. 352-746-1108


.Act Non E


ITS FREE
Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad for FREE on
our all new
CLASSIFIED SITE.
5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 Items totaling less than
$100,00 each.

Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an Ad in the top right
hand corner.


Profesina


Photography
"Melissa Fields"
specializing in,
weddings, events,
group & individual
portraits, professional
portfolios, live concerts.
call for special price
(352) 220-4124


5arb . MaIz
photographs

Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits. Indoor
or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed





ELITE PAVING &
SEAL COATING
All types - Res/Comm
352-302-3030 LIc/lns
/us out zoomcltrus.com





Circle T Sod Farms.
Inc.
Tired of your dead
lawn?
Replace It with
Bahia. Delivery
Avail (352)400-2221

LAWN RESTORATION
All types of Grasses
Low maint Lawns Avail.
J & J Sod 352-302-6049


Service for A/C, Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator & More!

* CallAnytime * Same Day Service
| * 42 Years Experience

One Man
Low
Serving Citrus and Overhead
Marion Counties LOW

352-445-0072 Prices
Doc Johnson #RA00670s1


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One"!l
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM


rmlutoalap-Y
"Melissa Fields"
specializing in I
weddings, events,
group & individual
portraits, professional
portfolios, live concerts.
call for special price
(352) 220-4124
POWERMATE 4,000w
generator converted
to propane $250
(352) 564-1390
RAINBOW RIVER
CLUB MEMBERSHIP
Transfer fee only.$200.
(352) 489-3544
WET/DRY VACUMN
Ridged 9 gallon. $75
352-746-1447
WHIRLPOOL CUSTOM
Series 14.1'cu Fridge
Very good cond $50.
Cordless drill
Powergllde 12V
charger & case $15.
Mccullock Chain saw
16" $20. New Sears Sa-
ber Saw companion
$15.00 (352) 344-8795

ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT








$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com




SWING-A-WAY
Wheelchair lift.
$900/obo.
WHEELCHAIR Manuel,
new. $125/obo.
352-637-1153


F ww~titer 0m
ctu choil


HURRICANE READY
Generac Generator
4,000/6,000 watts, electric
start, like new, used for
only 4 hrs $400
(352) 795-9399
Let us pay YOU to
cut your 5+ acre
bahia field for sod!
Circle T Sod
352-400-2221


vacareower air
$600; Invacare Walker
$50 (352) 795-4421




"THE REVENUER"
Buy & Sell
Vintage coins/currency
352- 302-8159
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676



Treadmill Exerciser
Uke new, $275
(352) 344-8927



8 ft Pool Table
w/ bar & bar light, sticks &
rack, excel. cond., clear
glass & reg. pool' balls
$700. (352) 476-8577
AK-47, Model GP1975,
NIB, black synthetic
collapsible stock,
threaded barrel, bayo
lug, w/ access & ammo
$1,000 (813) 789-0592
Crystal River Area.
AMMO 357mag, 3 -50
Round boxes, FMJ $30
per, 357 mag 2-50 Round
boxes, JHP $40 per
(813) 789-0592
Crystal River area
'AMMO 40cal, 300 .
rounds, $200.
(813) 789-0592
Crystal River area
AMMO 45 cal., 300
rounds, $200; 9mm,.
400 rounds $160.
(813) 789-0592
Crystal River Area
Boat Battery Duralast
Marine 27 DP-DL
100Amps, $50.
Gun Cabinet 8 gun HD
steel cab, new In box
$75. (352)270-1775
BOW FLEX Ultimate
Complete + all manuals
& charts. $295
(352) 586-5746
Concealed Weapons
. Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
LADIES GOLF CLUBS
Square 2, Woods 1/3/5.
Irons 4-11, chipper,.
putter & bag. Petite
graphite shafts. Exc.
$125. 352-746-3143
POOL TABLE
Perfect Father's Day
Gift. Slate wileather drop
pockets. Extra stools,
racl% etc. S650 obo.
(352) 270-8121
Thurs. Estate Auction
June 11 Sale- 4PM
Sportsman's Estate MIB
Case XX knives. Long
guns. Riding mower,
coins, housefulls of tum.
& acc, Ant. & Collect.
dudleysauction.com
AB1667-AU2246 12%BP


Minis
F


I POOLS/PAVERS I


I ALUMINUM I









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


CHASSAHOWITZKAitrusHis
2/2 waterfront DW $600 CRYSTAL RIVER Townhouse 2/21/2/1.
2/2 furnished DW $700 AUTO REPAIR Terra Vista Club incl.
2/1 carport - $500 SHOP FOR $1,000 Mo + until.
SUGARMILL WOODS LEASE. (516) 991-5747
3/2/2 furnished $900 8 Bay Auto Center CRYSTAL RIVER
---- Agent, 352-382-1000 includes all lifts. Great 2/2 on canal. $900. Mo.
location, great rates. Fst.I Lst. + $300. Sec.
CIP18886475111 (352) 622-4387
(407) 647-5111 CRYSTAL RIVER
NATURE COAST HERNANDO 3/2/2 Waterfront Furn.
NATURE COAST Office, on 3/4 acre. 8 rm. house on Lake
SfCrystalRiver Busy intersection, great Russo, boat ramp &
for sheds, boats, sales private dock. $1,200
2/2 home $650 $835. Mo(352) 637-7117 Mo. RV. sight also
�_$8__.__o.(__)_637-7__ avail. $350.Mo.
Furnished Homes: (850) 566-4195
1/1 - $1200 HERNANDO
2/1 - $1800 W/F Attention Progress
2/2 - $1500 W/F CITRUS HILLS Energy Contractors
2/2, Townhome, turn. Furn. 2/1, on Canal,
The Islands/Condos: (352) 563-5655 Util. incl. o smoki/ .pets
2/2 - $1200 and up (352)5635655 $1,200. mo+. depq.
furnished CITRUS HILLS (352) 560-7747
2/2- $120 anHome, Villa, Condo
Port Paradise: GREENBRIAR RENTALS HOMOSASSA
2 & 3/2 WF w/dock (352) 746-5921 3/2/1 Nearly new. Off of
Several units to (888) 446-5921 Rock Crusher Road,
choose from greenbrlarrental.com near school. Well furn.
6-9 0 LaughingStock International IncJdist. by UFS Inc , 2009 Fully furnished & clean. Great cond.
Citrus Hills Lease with Option to
"J2/1 Apartments: New A/C, new rugs, Unf. purchase. $950.
"Just a little exploratory surgery. $550 to $575 2/2, use of pool, patio, Month. + electric
W/D, carport, No Pets 5640 Irving Court
781496 Homosassa: $699 (718) 833-3767 (352) 563-2776
3/2/2 - $775
-'.-II1 BR Mobile, 55+ water-
go s CitrusSdnasfront park, Incd. water
R Shlh-Tzu Puppies 3/2/2 - $950 $475 352-476-4964
Buying Guns, 2 New Liters Home SETTING Visit our website:
Ammunition& raised w/ love. All shots 2/2 in Country Setting. www.c21naturecost,.c FREE RENT!
reloading supplies included. $300+ $500/mo. + $500 Sec No. a SMMERHILL
(352) 586-7516 3902 N. Lecanto Hwy pets. For application Call or call 352-795-0021 UMMERHILL
WE BUY GUNS Beverly HIlls, FL Lee at 352-250-0664 or AT 2 to 4 Bedrooms
On Site Gun Smithing (352) 270-827 800 -692-4162. MEADOWCREST REDIT O OCHECKiWN-NO
(352) 726-5238 (30) 872- 9 Luxury Cond6s Low Down!
1 F Limited Time! 352-484-0866
SilCall agent for iademission.com
Foreclosures, Dealer PROPERTY details. BEV. HILLS/Cit. Sprg
'03 CARGO MATE DOG CAGE Repo's & Short Sales MANAGEMENT 352-563-5657 2/1, Bev. Hills $650. mo.
Enclosed CAR HAULER. 30x23x21, divided has a Singles, Doubles, / out zoomcitrus.com 4/1, Cit. Sprgs $700. mo
20 x 8.5, ramp/side tray, elect collar for Modulars Pritchard Island 352-746-0330
door, dual axle. elect small dogS75 00 LOW Interest Rates 3/2/I Vlla -875 INVERNESS BEVERLY HILLS
brks., mint $4200 obo (352) 344-5334 On Your Lot Arbor Lake Extra Irg. 2/2/1 Lakeside 11/1/ Fia rm, $525
Steve (352) 503-6542 1-800-622-2832 3/2/2 -$800 Community, pool, dock, 2/2/1 End porch, patio
4X8 ENCLOSED TRAILER Handyman nveness no smoke, restricted $675 (845)282-3504
Excellent condition. Special DW3/2 /2/2 $700 pets. $600 mo.+ sec. BEVERLY HILLS
New tires & lights. $500 Special, DW 3/2 3/2/2 -$0 (866)637-2631 TOLL FREE - 1E S tH/LLS
352-746-4703 Hen w/Chlckens $25 Needs TLC, Carport 2/1/I - $595 _----- 15 S. Desoto 2/1/1
Egyptian Sayomissold Good Location, 2/2/I - $625 _ 1 w/fl rm. $625 mo. (352)
CAR HAULER as pairsonly $20. near shopping/fishing 3/2/1-$895 s 697-1907; 527-8432
'06, 32 FL Dominator XT. assorted Roosters $6.ea $35,0 obo Call 2/2/I Villa- $695 BEVERLY HILLS
By Classic C. Trpl. (352) 697-9187 Owner 352-795-3397 1&2 SBd Apartments 2 BD Houses staying @
axels. $14,200. Like starting at $400 CITRUS SPRINGS $575. All central a/c,
new.(352) 835-4273 RHODE ISLAND REDS INVERNESS 2/11/1- -$600 NEW 2/2. Duplex in a All RST FREE Month
Assorted Bantams, 55+ Waterfront Park, Beverly Hills nice private area close to FIRST FREE 352-422-7794nth
Polish, Ducks & Quail 1BR, water nc. A/C 2/ V2/- $600 shopping & schools.352-422-7794
Starting at $2. $3,500 + $270 mo. lot t Water &sewer included BEVERLY HILLS
352-795-6381 rent. 352-476-4964 1/I Apartment- $395 $600/mo. 1st & last. 2/1.5 fam rm, porch,
SNEW 2009 2/2, large See our webste: Mike 352-558-4477 shed. New carp. & tile
, _rooms, appliance wwwjwmoronrmal dishwsh c/h/a $650 mo.
- A�-pkg. 2x6 construction estate.com CITRUS" SPRINGS .86 S. Lincoln 795-7374
10 yr. warranty, must Jennifer Fudge Newer 3/2/1 BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, FURN MH seel $37,900 includes Cheryl Scruggs Large master suite, 2/1/1 Fl. Rm., W/D, CHA
PLACE YOUR AD Homosassa, Utl. Incl. A/C & heat, steps, 352-726-9010 stainless steel appl. New: Paint, Carpet,
24hrs A DAYAT OUR clean, quiet park. skirting on new pad Large lanai. Lease, refrig., blinds, 795-9060
ALL NEWEBIZ CITRUS short/long term. $695 352-621-9182 'River Links Realty + Dep. No Pets $800. BEVERLY HILLS
CLASSIFIED SITEt . (352) 628-9759 Mo. (352) 697-3133
Goto: 2/2 SNOWBIRD OASIS Walden Woods Village 352-628-1616(352)697-31 Nice 2/1,Fenced $575.
chronicleonline.com $600 mo. + $600dep. 3 Bedroom./3 bath, CRYSTAL RIVER
and click place Lawn, Water, Sewer carport, Lrg. eat in kit, CITRUS SPRINGS CRYSTAL RIVER
an ad Garb.nc. 352746-7595 liv.,din. rm., Scm'd la- 3/2/2 $900. $585/mo. includes CITRUS HILLS
mrIc324-9 nal, outside storage. CRYSTAL RIVER $585/mo. includes, CITRUS HILLS
CRYSTAL RIVER- Exc. loc. Avail. June. WF 3/2/2 $1075 Movlawn, garbageIn water,$900 3/2 Pool,Home
CLOSE TO $6,400(352) 382-0681 4/2/2 $ A No dogs 352-726-9570 1 Acre, $975
Champaign Diamond, POWER PLANT Duplex1/15350. HOMOSASSA (352)746-4821
loose, .40 karat, oblong. 2/1 $495/up CITRUS SPRINGS
$225 obo; BlackOpal 2/ Partially Homes3/2/2 $675. New,2/2,Rent CITRUS SPRINGS
aRiver Haven 3/2/2 WF, option to buy. 1300 3/2/1$825mo + sec.
1.02 karat $275; Black furnished, BANK FORECLOSUREI " epool $1100. sq. ft. wld hk. up, fans, 352-746-9436
Diamond .77 karat , washer/dryer,on 1/2 3/2 approx. 1300 sqf . Sugarmlll Wds 2/2/2 blinds, refer , stove,352-746-943
$300 obo (352) 560-3263 acre, clean, quiet, no on 1/2 ac..fenced Condo or Villa $625. microwave, tile, carpet. CITRUS
dogs. $500.+ Sec. back yd, scrn room, $750. monthCITRUS
WantedtoBuy_ INGLIS work shop, concrete (352) 592-0893 SPRINGS
CINOLS drive on paved road. 3/2/2 Newer Home.
CLOSE TO Private but close to INVERNESS 2/2 Washer & dryer.
WANTED OLD POWER PLANT town Home in great-. LuKEWNewlW/ID Sprinkler system.
LION EL TRAINS condltloni $3,000 $625mo 352-563-2118 Quiet neighborhood.
Collector Top Prices down, $565/mo. 1 BEDROOM $1,000. Monthly.
Pald. (352) 795-3970 pa/1Apartmentd, WA.C Call to view. Starting @ $425/mo ONE MONTH FREEI (352) 812-1414
pwasher/d , (352) 621-9181 Laundry on premises. LECANTO newer 2/2, CITRUS SPRINGS
clean & quiet. No dogs. crystal river 2/2,sw,on 352-465-2985 dplx, all ktchn appis, Nice 312/2, Near Sch.
$600.+ Sec. 1/2acre new patio, W/D hook-up, $875 mo 352-628-0731
$5001 PoIlice. (352) 447-0333 carpet&stove Very clean * * * * * " nice yard, Exc. Cond. m e- 6-03
m10x14 workshop $35000 4th OF JULY SPECIAL $625 (352) 634-1341 CRYSTAL RIVER
Impounds for sale F.C./HERNANDO o.b.o.813-792-1355 $76 MOVES YOU IN Lovely, Spacious 3/2/
Cars from $500 2BR, IBA, CH/A rsta r 2 BEDROOMS - c or $10n shed 850 furnished
$350/$400 1 st, last, sec. 4/2, on 5 acres, 15 X 30 STARTING AT $450.
Border Collie Pup Nopets 64-0578 family rm. wwet bar 5 - Garb inc 352-7425 352-628-1149
Female, loving, health cart. f rm. (352) bar, 352-257-7644
13ma wk,.l$150., HOME-N-LAND. fireplace, walk in closets, CRYSTAL RIVER
13wks. $150. HOME-N-AND lease w/opton. $850.SW CRYSTAL RIVER Rent or Rent to Own
(352) 28-9656 New home on 1/2 Mo. (352) 465-8346 $47(352) 634-5499 GREAT AMERICAN $850 (908) 322-6529util. +
Dachshund Pup acre. 3/2 1500sqft. 10 2/1,,I/'OFF FIRSTi $699. Move-In Special
Male, red, miniature yr. warranty, sodded Floral City Mo.(352) 2ti3-321 ur Xa222 a ies 3/2, Lrg Faim. Room.
adorable, health cert. 12 lawn, paved Rd. Get 2/2 DW on 3.5 + or- LECANTO 1/1 Tiled, spotless,
wks. old. $195.(352) yourstimulus check acres352). Withacoochee CRYSTAL RIVER Log Cabin CHA, n/pets fenced Pets OK.
628-9656$8000) cash back Forest area great-for 2/1.5, c/h/a w/d hook $475 + 1st, Ist.sec. Wtr. Copelond Park










*New s dHip_ 352-SA527- 3529419-5777:3476-9005 t ms3 Studlo Apts.all utilities. IN3 RNE
pies $25.- $35 ea. 2/2 Stonebr horseook ding.Priced to up. 838 5t Av Nail.E.. Garbg. inc. 352-746-3073FtSec352-527-0493
Own your own home sell. (352) 341-281 $575+sec 727343 73Vill. 3/2/2 $650.Mo (352422-6411
CALL (352) 621-9183 (352)634-07870 727- 455-8Ado998 1 2/ INVERNESS
HWY 488 (352) 634-1290. Opportul 22, Modern, light
HOMOSASSA INGLIS '95 SW CRYSTAL RIVER H sHome 3/2/2

beautiful park wpoo. wooded/. pv 4 ac. se(35) 6345499 GREAT AMERICAN $850 (908) 322-6529
No Pets. 352- 628-4441 backs ups to wildlife REALTY INVERNESS








SINVERNESS Ca NTO patio, WD hook-up Brand New 4/22/2 HIGHLANDS
declawed $85$150 HM SASS deck, g(3ar52)age w/work634-4329 INGLIS VILLAS or S. mill woods
352-476-6832 3/1, $465,2/ 1sarort, last, WEST WIND VILL 55+ Is now Accepting I Beautiful, 3/2 pss2/2









/ BUape orrACiT ( 52 shop Ig shed w/winsaplIcalo f X-Lrg 2/2/2 all utility es. a acesto s o
BU Opets $475 + U. + dws, all apls,was r appltions for our Lease OPt .Flexible
(352) Sec. (352) 586-2976 a 7291 NE 92nd CApts. 2/2 Condo main-ree anin352-795-0088
Shau beNorth of Crys.Riv. Studio Apts.all utilities. INVERNESS
pies $25.- $35 ea. 2/2 Stonebrok Rental Asst. Availl 2/1, Cozy, near Hasp.
All colors, baby .Estates Foreclosures Very Nice 2/2 school, & park. Fst.+ Sec.
bunnies 2 to 3.5 lbs. Unfurnished, Car Port. Welcome Oakwood Vill. 3/2/2 $650.Mo. (352) 422-6411
New Zealand Breeders Pool, Club house. BUS Call 352-447-0106 3/2 Great real INVERNESS
$20 each. 5.5-8 lbs Boat & RV storageB Or Apply: MW, F rPatioitrus am2/2, $650mo, 1st/last
35221-0726 $595. Mo.ce se2/portiremdeled 33 ng. $5ronu 00; Drive 3/22 Newer home $300 sec.(352) 860-2055
ll (352) 422-0774 (352) 422-7887 Adult park Lot Rent Inglis Florida 2/2 Duplex
$195/m$5,00Equal housing Adorable 1/1 & 2/1 INVERNESTA
HWY 488 (352) 4571550 OppoWasher dryer (352)464-250822, Moder, liawn care,
carport. $500 mo.+ dep ParD ONECMONTOHn FEI Very INNicE1S


























.Washer dryer (352) 464-2508 washer/dryer, lawn care,


S--... hook-ups. free golf & club
3 [ " ' 727-446-5871 SUNSET VILLAS membership
8 - 9 352-344-0238 Senior Community included. $950. Mo.
_ _ Chiefland Fl. HUDSON
7 - Api s /for 32/2 Vaulted ceilings,
Apic & 2 BR APTS eat in kitchen, split
__ _ - _ � .. ...Please Apply bedroom, washer/
M, W, F, 8am-12p dryer, & community
S " ; " " " ' " � 124 SW 14th Ave. pool included.
1 5 8 (352) 493-0220 Screened patio, fenced
*_, v_.-_ -r_-------- - - ---- ^ti"t " Rental Assist. Avail back yard
--- 3 6 Foreclosures $850. Mo.
PLACE YOUR AD We lcomeMark Fredrick
24hrs A DAYAT OUR Equal Housing Op. (813)215-3446
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS Charles Rutenberg
CLASSIFIED SITE REALITY
,; chronicleonline.com
.....i:- -ac.. . .. -and click place i T

4 ,.1 8 BEVERLY HILLS
.,n",,^ t..' . :'.. - . We Have Rentals Progress Energy CRYSTAL RIVER
- - - . '. ----- -------- Starting at $425/mo + Contractors 1/1, 312/2.5 $1,200 Mo.
S'-Many others fully furn avail now Garbage and lawn
!' - LANDMARK $825. Includes all util- maintence included.
* 7 REALTY Itles, 100 channel 1st & Sec; Lease,
S352-726-9136 TV/internet. Pets?
Fill In the squares so that each row, column, andt i KathyorJane 2/1 also available (352)795-0207
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9. 311 W Main St. Inv (352) 220-2666 (352) 212-4981


TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 2009 CIA


vi""rmTW


Repos Available RealtySelect
Kinder RealtySelect
Mobile Home Citrus.com
(352) 622-2460




RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Rea elect

(352) 795-1555
BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Rea;ISelect 2 BR, 2 Bath, 1 car
etfdeicltX garage, very nice,
352)9-w15 cS$3,500 down & $450
(352) 795-1555 mo. with average
credit. (352) 726-9369


I �--m W.-771


AGE. LIVE OAKS.
NEEDS TLC. PRICED
TO SELL! ONLY
$194,500. CALL
MYRIAM @ KELLER
WILLIAMS REALTY of
CITRUS COUNTY.
352-613-2644

RealtySelect
Citrus.com









BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION



(352) 795-1555


Ml I. I I I I I I pr�-


-vri -Tr~wwn
POWER PLANT & FOR SALE BY OWNER
Seasonal - Waterfront 88 SJ Kellner, Bev. Hills
homes, Wkly priv. rms, 2/2/2/2, FP, Call Anytime
RV lots. 352-628-0011 OPEN HOUSE on
SUNDAYS 11A-3P
$118K, 352-746-6093


CRYSTAL RIVER
$75 wkly/Ist/L. Incls 2 to 4 Bedrooms
utils. & satellite. RENT TO OWN- NO
352-563-1465/212-1960 REDIT TOWNCHECK N
CRYSTAL RIVER Low Down
- Furn .$450. Pays All 352-464-0866
Clean. 352-563-6428 iademission.com
CRYSTAL RIVER 4+Acres, Canal front
Waterfront, w/private 3/2 large garage/
bedroom & bath, shared workshop +bonus
kitch. $650. 352 2571509 efficiency apt.
REDUCED TO $ 175KI
HOMOSASSA (352) 560-0019
3 Rms , Kit. privileges,
Free cable /2 elec.
$500/mo 352-503-3343

7By Owner $85,500.
8725 Gospel Island
3BR, 90x 120 fenced
2/1, FURN MH Lot, If interested
Homosassa, Util. Incl. Call 726-3238
clean, quiet park. to see Inside,
short/long term. $695 Furniture Included
(352) 628-9759

YOU'LL V THIS!
For Sale By Owner 2
bedroom. 2 bath. 1 car
AGENT ADs garage home at 9260 E.
Alvada Lane in beautiful
Inverness Golf & Coun-
Advertise your try Club Community.
services for Features skylight, lanal
30 days for & sprinkler system.
only$54.50 Asking $145,000. Call
(352)637-5876.
Ad indudes 20 lines of copy (352)637-5876.
w/ photo. For Sale, By Owner
photo.3BR 3BA, Pool, 16x24
workshop, close to
Picture Perfect Homes school, hosp., library,
NEW HOMES START- WTI, 518 Poinsettia, Ave.
ING.At $75,000 On . (352) 860-0878
Your Lot
Atkinson Like Country Living?
Construction 3/2/2 custom built 2005
352-637-4138 Famnrm. 18x24 sports
Lic # CBCO59F85 pool w/scr endcl. 6x6
jaccuzzi, wood firs.
wood burning Firepl
PUBLISHER'S Wood cabinets &
NOTICE: granite cdunter tops,
All real estate . 15K back up house
advertising in this gen, privatel.25 acres.
newspaper is 4439 Stallion Ln. In The
subject to Fair Ranches asking $239k
Housing Act which OBO (352) 573-0029
makes it illegal to
advertise "any PUT YOUR
preference, limitation $MONEY$ TO WORK!
or discrimination based BUY Real Estate
on race, color, religion, NOW! -
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
discrimination.
Familial status
includes children under . L
,the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and Deb Infantine
people securing EXIT REALTY LEADERS
custody of children (352) 302-8046
under 18. This Prices are Downll!
newspaper will not Rates are LOW!!!
knowingly accept any
advertising for real RealtySelect
estate which is in
violation of the law. Citrus.com
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is BETTY MORTON
1-800-927-9275.
2.8% COMMISSION

ReqIled,

(352) 795-1555




100% MORTGAG3/2/1, 1 Acre
100%MORTGAGE On Private Lake.
NOAN Beautiful, New rf., new
PAYMENT siding. Has Separate
iAYiMENT Guest house, Serious
Low income applicants Inquires only $320,000.
can quality (352) 726-0477
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or No credit
OKAY
*recent bankruptcy 3/2/2, ULiving Rm. Din-
OKAY* Ing & Fam. Rm., eat in
CAII TIM OR CANDY Kit., scrn. back porch,
Premier Mortgage fenced back yrd., Lrg.
'Group 15 x 30 above ground
352-563-2661 local pool w/attach. deck.
866-785-3604 toll free new roof, insulated
*Credit and income windows, $139,500
restriction apply* .5901 W WOODSIDE DR
Florida licensed mort- (352) 563-0093
gage leader







BONNIE
PETERSON
E E 'I iET Realtor, GRI
8420 N Sarazen Dr Your SATISFACTION
Citrus Springs FL Is Mv Futurell
34434 4bd-2ba in .29
lot spacious w/great (352) 586-6921
golf course right or (352)795-9123
around the comer.
Built in 2005 and in Charlotte G Realty
excellent conditions. & Investments LIC
126,700.00 (OBO) & I__nvestments LLC
For info. call CONNELL HEIGHTS
352-489-7851, 2/2, Great Rm, vaulted
352-322-5323 or email ceil. open kiL b/bar,
to fenced back yrd.
hector@harroyo.net scn. par., new apple's,
1600 sf,(mol) 6172 W.
3/2/2 For Sale or Rent Pine Cir/C.R. Priced to
Citrus Springs Newer Sell (352) 795-9603
Home , Iow/dn. easy
terms 352-840-3324 Crystal River Mini
Ranch
ATTENTION!! 4/2.5/2 on 2 acres, up
BRAND NEW to 5 horses allowed,
DOUBLEWIDE $29,000 down, owner
$39,900. Delivered financing @ 6%. Will
and Set, $0-Down trade for equity.Realty
Land/Home $650. mo. USA (800) 559-4231


$8000 Tax
Credit
for frs time home
buyers if you have
not owned a home In
3 years. Call for info
Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
Kellers Williams RIty









BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI

Your SATISFACTION
Is Mv Futurell
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC











Michele Rose
REALTOR
"Simply Put-
I'll Work Harder"
352-212-5097
thom@atlantic.net
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515

Picture Perfect
Homes NEW HOMES
STARTING At $75,000
On Your Lot Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
-Lic.# CBC059685

VIC MCDONALD
(352) 637-6200








Realtor
My Goal is Satisfied
Customers

REALTY ONE
Oummtsning Ats aft





For Sale By Owner
3 BR, 2 BA, 2-car gar.,
Cement block, north
Dunnellon Low down,
EZ terms w/$3,500
down $595 mo.
(352) 726-9369
OWNER FINANCING
4/2/office, 2.5 ac,
2005 Doublewide
Like new. 1800sqft,
$9,700/dn, $882/mo. or
$23,700 down, $582/mo.
727-992-1372



River Oaks East
4/2.512 Custom Pool
Home on 1.5 acres.
Office bonus rm, green
house, & boat slip.
$449,900 (352) 274-1594




FREE HOME
BUYERS
Seminar like none
other June 23rd
6pm/RSVP
$8,000











Plantation Realty. Inc
L352) 795-0784
Questions about
the new $8000 tax
credit? Don't miss
this seminar!fl!
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner '
HOMOSASSA
3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to
head spring. 163' wfrt,
dock/slip. Brand
new/unoccupied.
2 frpis, granite. $579K
727-808-5229


Inverness
MUST SELL QUICK!
UNIQUE CUSTOM
HOME ON 1 ACRE ON
CANAL TO LAKE
TSALA POPKA. 3,323
sq. ft LIVING! 30'
ATRIUM. 3 BED/2.5
BATH. 2-CAR GAR-











C12 TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 2009



WORDIY KGURDYBY TRICKY RICKYKANE
1. Your and m bakinginedient (1) Every answer s a rhyming
pair ofwords (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Baptism or communion terror (1) theywill it in the letter
. . .. squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Hackneyed verbal dispute (1) syllables in each word. To win
lllll ll l I $10, send your original rhymes
with your definitions to this
4. Diminishes the size of a wildcat (1) newspaper. All entries become
111~III1l1l- l the property of UFS, Inc.
� 2009 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
5. Heavy drinker's painting tools (2)
Thanks and $10 to
Eugene Bales of
6. Actor Newman'sillegible writings (1) Saannah, MO for
#3. Send your entry
to this newspaper.

7. Thankfulness stance or personal view (3)


au(IiLL V aU(fl Vao'L " S'IAVSOS S'IlVd "9 SaIHsllla SHSfl''19
XiA'I S LIIaS ' IHOJIA W J aL '* IHMBIaA sI s 1 ' flO'1M1o0 1i
6-9-09 SH.MSNV


LOOKING FOR HOMES
OR MOBILES & LAND
Purchase, lease, mort-
gage assumptions, take
overpayments + cash.
Any location, price, con-
dition, foreclosure, late on
payments okay.
1-727-992-1372




CITRUS SPRINGS Va-
cant Lot in Citrus .
Springs. Great location
Lot size BOX 125'
Nice home across St.
craig@yourfloridaland.co
m
352-246-7282

@
HOMOSASSA 3.45 acres
dead end road two
streets from hwy 19 btwn.
C.R.& Ham. 30000.00 or
20% with financing -
352-228-1789




Business/Home 3/2 Great
location on Trout Ave. inver-
ness $165,000. Rhema
Realty 228-1301,




7 Rivers Golf & C.C.
priv. member owned.
corner lot1 ac (mol)
$30K (813) 766-9354 or
sweetscaneauest6l




,60 HP Suzuki
4 Stroke, SST Prop,
Runs perfect $2,999
(352) 613-6453




1981 15' BOSTON
Whaler Sport. '93 48HP
Johnson, trolling motor,
rew trailer great cona
16 500 352-201-0096
1993 17' Sylvan
Bow under ,mrmir, lop
, Boat & trallor
85h.p. Yamaha motor
Good cond. $3,500
(352) 344-0457
AIR BOAT
Big 13 Ft. haul,
2 seats. Approx. 375-400
HR 8 blade warp drive.
2-1 reduction gear box.
Used 100 hrs.+ Tri.
$18,500 invest. Sell
for $10,000 firm.
(352) 302-4535
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
AQUA SPORT '05
175 Osprey , 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual
batt. w/sWitch, bimini,
easy load trailer. Low
hours. $9,990
352-860-0277-
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
S9.9001352-746-5856
AQUA SPORT
2000; 225 Explorer 24'
Cuddy cabin. 225
Johnson Ocean Pro.
Loadmaster tandem axle
. trailer. Exc. cond.
$14,500.352-493-7377;
352-221-5230
AQUA SPORT
'86 25FT.Cuddy Cabin.
W/twin '06 Optimax
150hp & double
axle trailer. $16,900
(352)257-1355B
BASS TRACKER 04
PT 175 Special Edition,
50hp Merc. gal trial.
Many Xtra's $7,750
Call for Info
(813)-293-0392 cell
BOAT DOCK
RENTAL
No sails on deep
canal. $125/mo.
352-795-3276
BOSTON WHALER
14' w/ 40 hp Johnson,
Everything works good
$1800 (352) 302-0033
Deck Boat
95' 19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ ra-
dio & fishfinder. New Bat-'
tery switch. 2 batteries,
power pk.
prop./hub.$6,000
(352) 726-0838
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras!
$13,500/obo.
(352) 489-9640
GULF TO LAKE MARINE
New.Used & Service
Brokerage. We pay $$
for clean used boats
(352) 527-0555
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
115HP, 4strke Yamaha,
w/trlr.'$11,200. will
trade (352) 503-3778
HYDRA - SPORT
'90,26' c/c, t-top, '99
260 Marc, on bracket
'05 trailer, too many
upgrades to list,
exc condition $16,800
(362) 886-1754
KEY WEST & FORD
05/2020cc/98Expedltlon
Yam4stk160/5.4L
4x4EBRed Together
$32500 or $26000 Boat
(382)5886-8717


1994 - 16ft, CC bay boat.
88 HP Evinrude, Garmin
GPS/recorder $4000.
352-621-4711
PONTOON '08
Sweetwater 21ft. 25 hours.
90hp Yamaha.
$16,500. Many Extras
352-503-6797
PONTOON
'08, Sun Tracker, 18ft,
50H Mere. mtr, w/ trier,
less than 10hrs. use,
$11,000 (352)795-5413
PONTOON
22' Palm Beach 2002
60hp Yamaha $4800
(239) 571-2628
PONTOON '95
Monarch 24ft,
'95 60HP Mercury
w/Performance trailer.
$5500. 352-344-1503-
PONTOON BOAT
08' 20 Ft. To many
options to list. $13,000
Call for info. 628-7926
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras
$12,000 (352) 628-0281
PRO-LINE 221 ,
WALKAROUND 1999
200 HP Mercury w/9.9 HP
Johnson' klcker,$12k
obo. Call Kurt at Pete's
Pier 352-795-6067,
PROLINE SPORT '06
. 1on C- top 115rIP
Mere Opric M.la, alum
trailer. Many extra's
$17,000. 352-527-8738
SEA PRO
'00 19'FT. C/C. Loaded.
Elec. Pkg. 115 FI 4 Strk.
Yam. 100 hrs: Bim. top.
Best offer(352)533-3093
SPORSTER, 15FT
'97 Runs great, looks
great. 135HP inboard
Boat cover, trailer. '
$3,500. 352-484-9854
T-CRAFT
23'L, 6' W, '02 150H
Evin. mtr. w fuel enj. like
new, trr. w/brks
$5,995 352-489-3661
WELLCRAFT
1987, 250 Sportsman,
25', Gas eng.; 30" draft,
260 hp I/O;alum. '
Iral. er O '.000
(352) 344-9651



22 FT. Minnie Winnie
1993, Class C, 16 mpg,
dependable, like new
small V-8, sleeps 6
,$7,300 (352)563-9964
'02 Cedar Creek 5th
Wheel 29ft, 2-slldes,
queen bed,bath/shower,
low mileage, loaded,
good cond. $16,800
(352) 746-4969
05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
261nch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'87 Coachman C-Class
Clean & Good cond.,
Uke new brakes & tires,
350 Motor, .71k miles
$3,900 obo (352)
503-7304
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 36 K Mi.
Dual air. $37,700 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
* AUTJO.BOAIT*
DONATIONS
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
(352) 795-9621
* Tax Deductible *

CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CHEVY '86 Class C
Very good cond. Needs
tires. $4,000. Call
anytime. (352) 446.6329
COACHMAN
'07 Freelander, 3150,
12K. mi. Mint cond.
$55,000 (352) 637-3673
or (561) 715-3001
CRUISE AIR
"'94, Class A,Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane New
deal. 30Q, class A motor
home, 31% ft.,-22k ml.
V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
.onan 4K gen., qn bed,
etc. Saturn tow Incl.
$35,000. (352) 397-5007
GULF STREAM
BT Cruiser 03, 22' fully
loaded ready to travel
$27,500....
(352) 341-1297
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool,
clubhouse etc. Can be
moved $26,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
HOLIDAY
'89 Rambler, 36',
Rebuilt motor, 2K.rml.
Exc. cond. $19,500.
(352) 257-5947
Holiday Rambler
'03, By Monico, 300
Cummins, 2 slides,
under warranty
mint cond. $69,900.
(352) 302-7073


Admiral Motor Home 36'
2 slides, 340hp, gas eng.
all options transf ext.
warr. $51,900
352 795-3970
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes ale-
sel, Class C Good mpg.
low mi, ". slide, loaaea
$52,995 352-464-0371
Keystone 07
Big Sky 5th Wheel Prem.
Pkg 340RLQ every option.
Center Island Kit. inclds
sep.W/D, added 2nd a/C In
bedroom
Prce to Sale $52K firm
352-794-3068
PACE ARROW
04, 38'3 SLIDES
21k mi fully loaded
3 tv's $92,500 obo
352-302-0743



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
AEROLITE
2007, 21 FT., �
$12,000 obo
(352) 516-3665
BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig.
Uke new. $8,900.
352-489-3661
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers.
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO
07 Jay Flight
28' used twice, smells &
looks new, green clean,
sips 6 $16,800 (352).
503-7431
MEADOWBROOK
5th Wheel, 2000 Excel-
lent Photos at
http:lfplcasaweb.google.c
onifeadowbrook.Glenn .
$13 9900
(352)302-6055 or
(727)692-9045
Montana
'03 5th wheel. 3 slides
like new $30.000
Truck avail also for low L
(352) 422-5731
SKYLINE 04
32' sleeps 8, used
once $11,500
(352) 586-9614



$5001 Pol0ce
Impounds for sale
' Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
Jason Truck Cap,
wnite, 6tt Dec,
2 mos, old, pd. $1,150
Sell $600
(352) 642-4868.
SET OF FALKEN-ZIEX-
TIRES + 20" custom
wheels 5 on5,5 size
Tire sz 295-50-R20
$1200 obo
(352) 795-0412



$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead dr Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
Buying Junk Cars
Runnrg or Not
Cash Paid, $150 & Up
(352) 771-6i91
CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 4614518.
conslgnmentusa.org
CASH BUYER
Buvyina Used Cars
Trucks & Vans
For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333



1997 MAZDA MIATA'
Convertable, Fun &
dependable, Porche
Red, new top, 36mpg,
5-speed, A/C, new tires.
Mint $5,700 352)
563-9964
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
ACURA
2004, TSX Certified,
Low MILES, Like New
Only $289,m6.
1-800-733-9138
BMW
'03, 745 LI, NAV, black,
sun roof. all options $29K
Mint
(352) 746-2696
BUICK '04
CUSTOM CENTURY
LOADEDI35k miles, 1
owner retiree, garaged
$7700. 352-628-0698
CADILLAC
'02 SLS,
Leather, loaded,
$7,995. Wooten's Con.
sign your car or truck.
(352) 637-7117
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Ml.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715
CHEVY
'96 Comaro, Conv. rare
auto, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
black, dependable.
$5200 352- 563-0618


I


$16,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC-90,
$20,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352)629-7299
VOLVO
'07 8-40
$16,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299'
VOLVO
'07 V-70
$21,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629.7299
VOLVO
'08 8-80
$19,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352)8 29-7299
VW
2005, Beetle Conv
Ltd - turbol Pwder Blue
Don't MIssi SPmt $299
mo. 1-800-733-9138


LlCars
siol* f:IM4M


'06 Sebring Convertable
$12,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avall.
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CORVETTE
02, Z06,
Black, low ml., over
30 mpg hwy. $24,400.
(352) 613-5355
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 mi-
les on this rare sliver on
sliver on sliver vette,
power convertible top,
*6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are on
this gorgeous vette,
Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
Included, Your's
for only, $48,000.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, auto,
SHOWCARI
$11,500 or will trade for
truck. 352-563-6428
FORD
'00 Focus, 4 dr. AC,
Auto. New tires & brakes
runs great.30 mrrpg
53,950.(352) 302-9217
* FORD
2006. Taurus Lamer
Sunrool .l More
Take Over Pmts $189
mo 1-800-733-9138
HONDA
'08 Civic,:$17,995
Ocala Volvo,
(352) 629.7299
HONDA
2008, Civic EX, 2 Dr
Coupe, Sacrifice
Great Mileage
1-800-733-9138
Hyundai
2008, Tiburon Only 600
Milesl Must Selll Take
over pmts $249 mo
j-800-733-9138
LINCOLN '94
2 dr. sunroof 1311 rmi,
wnete Well mainlalned
$2650. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
MAZDA
'08 MZ 3 Sedan,
S $12,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MAZDA MIATA
MX5,2000 SILVER/TAN,5
.SPEED, $6500
OBO,727-365-5951
MERCEDES
'08 E-350, $38,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MGB
Convertible 1977, 57k mi.
Blue, many xtras
Excellent Condition
$10,500 (352)628-0281
Mini Cooper
2006, S Type Super-
charged - 6 speed
Blg funi Only $289 mo,
wac 1-800-733-9138
MITSUBISHI
'03, Diamante LS, excel.
. cond. Always serviced,
Fully equlp.'Priced be-
low Kelly BB. $7,900.
352-382-5702
Mitsubishi
2008. Eclipse Con.eni.
r, e . Auromr.TIC
Orn, i529 pr' mo. ..aoc
1-800-733-9138
NISSAN
'07 Versa,
. $11,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
SUZUKI
'07 Forenza. 30K mi,
w/100k warr. LOADED
w/touch scrn'nav.
$12.800 352-613-6613
TOYOTA
,. 'i6 Corolla,
$11,995 Ocale Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'06,. Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 ml.
warranty. $19,000
(352) 697-3428
TOYOTA
'07 Camry,
$16,995 Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'07 Camry, silver,4dr.,
loaded, leathe Int.,
$15.000 Obo.
(352) 637-1276
TOYOTA
'07 FJ Cruiser.,
$23,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
Toyota
2002 Camry XLE Lthr,
Moonroof, Loaded, 1,
Own, Low ml., $199 mo,
wacl-800-733-9138
Toyota
2003 Camry LE
Beauty, Low Miles
Only $8995 or $169 ma,
wac 1-800-733-9138
TOYOTA
'99 Coirolla, not running,
good for parts. $500.
Obo.(352) 628-2483
(352) 586-3441
TOYOTA SUPRA '89
All original, red, 79k ml.,
6 cylInder, all power,
targa roof. Original
owner. Garaged, $6,999
(352) 726-3427
VOLKSWAGON
'08 Beetle, $15,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLKSWAGON
'08 Jetta, $13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-40,
$15,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-60, $16,995.
- Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
+ '06 S-80,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Johnston,---RI 21


CLASSIFIE�DS




Imperial, Restorer's
Dream. $3500/obo
352.22a-0597
1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's
Dream. $3500/obo
352-228-0597
1954 CHRY00 Polce

Imperial, Rds fstor slelr's
Cars from $500/
8352-229813 x 7374-
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500

800.366-9813 x 7374

'53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, auto, May
trade in part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door sedan. 6
cyl auto. $9,500. Will con-
sider trade for travel, trailer
of equal value.(352)
628-4053
AMC Gremlin
$600 (352) 637-1074
BUICK 67
RIVIERA, 430 wildcat
motor, 86k ml. amfm,
a/c, title whl. elect seats,
very good cond. $8000
(352) 527-3961
CADILLAC
'75, Eldorado
convertible
$8,500.
(352) 795-5413
CHEVY
'69 Classic C10 SHT BD
350/350 AC, PS,
$15K or trade
(352) 746-9212
EL CAMINO '81
305 Auto, All new
interior, & paint. Crager
mags & tires. 4" raised
hood. $3,250.
(352)341-3613.
GM El Camino
'84, 1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO.
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe
Silver, new paint;
63K mi., $8,900 obo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
trans. & parts. $4,000.
(352) 621-0126
THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$12,90,0 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale!
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Availl
US19, Across Airport
(352)461-4518
conslgnmentusa.org
DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awe-
some Heml-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded
every special feature. Sr.
own, gar. kept., 27K mi,
$40K
Invested Sale $21;750
. See online ad photos
www.mautotrader.comlatca
ridlat-f3fd39f
John (352) 726-1076
DODGE
2006, Dakota, Quad
Cab, Low Miles; Auto
Perfect Work Truck
$13,988 1-800-733-9138
.DODGE RAM '00
Std cab, rare 5spd, heml,
V8, a/c, 25mpg, new 22"
rims & tires. Dependable
$3700. 352-563-0615
FORD
'02 F-150OXLT, Ext. cab,
4dr, auto, loaded black &
silver, extra clean, sharp.
$7,995 Wooten's
(352) 637-7117
FORD Q4
Ranger, X-cab. Exc. cond
38k ml. SLASHED THE
PRICE $97K to $8,500
' (352)746-3919
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serve. van. 41K Mi./5.4 L.-
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serv. body/dble lock drs.
$20,000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
'06 F 250 Lariat, Diesel,
Super tow pkg. 4 wheel
drive, lots of chrome.
$17,000(352) 628-6985
FORD
2003, F150 XLT, Crew
cab 4x4, 50k Mi. $12,990
or $219 mo, waco
Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
FORD
2004, Ranger X-Cab
Automatic w/Cap
Only $199 mo, wac
1-800-733-9138
FORD
2006, F150, Low Miles -
Perfect for Work$S 13,988
or $229 mo, wac
1-800-733-9138
HONDA
2007, Rldgellne RTL
Navi, Moonroof, Low
MIs Immaculate - Must
Selll 1-800-733-9138
TOYOTA
2006, lundra, 32k miles,
Bedllner & More $13,990
or $249 ma, wac
Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813


$5001 Police
Impounds for sale !
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains &
tows heavy loads.
.$3200/or trade.
352- 563-0615
Crystal River
POLARIS
2005, $3,800
(352) 516-3665


Escape, 89kml, 4whil
drive, class 3 hitch, Orig
owner. Great shape &
price. $8,750.
352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
GMC ENVOY
Red,'03, 60k ml.,
On-Star, tow package
8-passenger, $10,500
obo (352) 527-3445
HONDA '99
CR-V AWD, Low miles,
LOADEDI Mint cond,
Garaged. $7500/obo
352-746-4160
HYUNDAI
'07 Santa Fe, $19,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
HYUNDAI
2004, Santa Fe Low Mi,
One Owner Nice Equip
$8990 Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
HYUNDAI
2008, Entourage, Pwr
Doors, Leather, DVD
& Morel Call for details
Jenkins Mazda
1-600-714-9813
KIA SPORTAGE '01
Runs & looks great. Elec,
wind., locks, near new
tires, shocks, breaks,
battery & timing belt
$2,750 (352) 586-5746
LEXUS
'07 RX 350, Black, tan
leather int. Navigation, back
up cam, blue tooth, very
clean, 75K.mi.
$25,000.(352) 527-8372
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG. Silver
W/black int. Loaded,
57K.Mi. Like new .Ask
$18.5K. (352)489-7674
TOYOTA
2004, RAV4. SR Cond,.
Low Mi,. 1 Own. $11,990
or $219 mo, w9c,
Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.'
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,.
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872 '
DODGE,
2005, Grand Caravan
7 Passenger - Low Miles
$8988 or $179 mo, wac
1-800-733-9138
MAZDA
'08 Mazda 5 Van,
, $14,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT








$$ SAVE SS
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY
352-422-6956
.AU.ANLIISCSfrl


S ,977-0611 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop. Citrus County Fleet Management
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board of County Commissiohers will
be selling surplus property & equipment via the Internet
at govdeals.com from May 28, 2009 - June 11, 2009.
Published seven (7) days consecutively In the Citrus
County Chronicle May 28 thru June 11, 2009.

584-0609 TUCRN
6/16 meeting- Affordable Housing Adv. Comm.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the AFFORDABLE
HOUSING ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet at 5:00 PM
on the 16th day of June, 2009, at the Lecanto Govern-
ment Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 166
Lecanto, Florida.
Any person desiring further Information regarding this
meeting may contact Rebecca Schwenk at the Hous-
Ing Services Division, 3600 W, Sovereign Path - Suite 147,
Leconto, FL 34461 (352) 527-5388.
Any person who requires a special accommodation
(ADA) must provide us at least 72 hours notice.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to ap-
peal any decision of the Governing Body with respect
to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may
need to provide that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceeding Is made, which record Includes testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based
(Section 286.0101, Florida Statute)
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle.
June 9, 2009.

585-0616 TUCRN
2009-CP-369 Doris L. Pickering Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY. FLORIDA
File No. 2009-CP-369
Probate Divislon
in Re: Estate of DORIS L PICKERING,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Doris L Pickering,
deceased. File Number 2009-CP-369. Is pending In the
Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division.
the address of which Is 110 N. Apopka Ave. Inverness,
Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are required to file with this
court, WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE, any claims against the estate. Each
claim must be In writing and must Indicate the basis for
the claim, the name and address of the creditor or his
agent or attorney, and the amount claimed. If the
claim Is not yet due, the date when It will become due
shall be stated. If the claim Is contingent or unliqul-
dated, the nature of the uncertainty shall be stated. If
the claim Is secured, the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver a copy of the claim to the
clerk who serve a copy on the personal represent-
ative. All claims not so filed will be forever barred
Publication of this Notice has begun on 6/9/2009.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Richard V. PIckering
116 Peck Hill Road


Mooryce


All other creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
AtL. CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is 6/2/2009.
Signed on April 30, 2009.
Personal Representatives:
/s/ JOHN JAY
3123 Den Hollow Court
Wichitao. KS 67205
/s/ DEBRA JAY
3123 Dan Hallow Court
Wichita, KS 67205
Attorney for Personal Representatives:
/s/ Pamela 0. Price Florida Bar No. 164539
GRAYROBINSON, P.A.
PO. Box 3068, Orlando, FL 32802-3068
Telephone: (407) 843-8880
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 2 and 9. 2009.


2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900ml. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500-
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. HI perf.
Over $43,000 In receipts.
17k ml. $10,900
352-563-0615
Crystal River
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
APOLLO 2007 ORION
ADR PRO 125 CC
MOTOCROSS PIT BIKE,
KICK START,4 SPEED,
GREAT CONDITION,
LECANTO $500.00
(561)236-1051
CHOPPER 3/4 SCALE
08. Like new, 200cc Elec
start, disc brks, alum
whis, & more must see
$1200.
(352) 212-6497
HARLEY
'96 Sporster 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes,chro. Ex. clean
$4,850.(352) 637-5143
Harley Davidson
'06, Road King Classic
low ml., bik cherry, Inci,
helmets/trvl luggage
$14,000 (352) 382-0907
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80",
completely serviced,
good shape. Ex.
access. $5,395. obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109
HARLEY
DAVIDSON"
96-Heritage Soft tail, red
many extras $9600 call
evenings (352) 746-3613
HARLEY DAVIDSON
Electraglide Ultra Classic
2006 HD Ultra Classic
like new. Fully loaded, in-
cludes Drivers Backrest,
V&H Mun lerS, 2 Helmets
Im H e O ' ie c -
3aIr -e.a nets.L
AM/FM/CB/Intercom, HD
cover, Panacia Lighting,
New BatteryLESS than
3500 miles. 18,500 Seri-
ous Inquires only please
344-2491
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 Ml.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
HONDA 02
1100cc Sarbara, 10K
ml. custom exhaust &
seat, lots of Xtras $4500
obo 352-613-5641

HONDA 2007 Shadow
600 Deluxe Powder blue,
3,600 miles, passenger
backrest and slipstream
windshield. $4,500 OBO.'
352-795-9829
HONDA
Shadow Arrow 06,
garage kept, not in rain,
floorboard $6200 obo
(347)223-7269 aft 3:30
KAWASAKI
'00, ZRX 1100
CC,15K. Mi. Very
fast, many extra s.
$4k obo.
(352)621-3764
SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather bik os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, BIk w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This.
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k ,
invested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
TITAN
'00 Phoenix, TRM.
Ferrari red, 6K. mi. Like
new, $11,000
(352) 489-7674
YAMAHA
'05 YZ125 DIRT BIKE
Race ready. Many ex-
tras. Make offer 352-
586-1683: 586-9349
I^^^^^


I I


, CADILLAC,
'05 Escalade, low mi. all
power, sun roof,
exc. cond. $28,000
(347) 266-9328
CHEVY
'04 Trallblazer, Ext. cab,
loaded, gray leather int.
47k. ml. Orig. owner,
$12,500.(352) 527-0456
Chevy
2004 Tahoe LT, Lthr,
Moonroof, BOSE, 3 rows
Family $14,988 or $279
mo. 1-800-733-9138
CHEVY
BLAZER '99 LS 4dr.
126k ml. loaded, great
cond. sunroof, $4k obo
352-422-0065
CHEVY TAHOE
02, 4x4, exc. cond
tow pkg. seats 8,
$9,999 .(352) 527-6909
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
ml., loaded, dual air &
exhaust, Exc. Cond.
$6,000 obo
(352) 344-0505


Johnston, RI 02919
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ J, Patrick McElroy Florida Bar No.: 052712
PO Box 1511, Hernando, FL 34442 (352) 637-2303
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 9 and 16, 2009.


583-0609 TUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Florida State Employees' Charitable Campaign
Steering Committee will be meeting on June 25, 2009
at 3:30 pm at United Way of Citrus County located at
5399 West Gulf to Lake Highway, Lecanto, Florida
34461-8531.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodations at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact United Way of Citrus County at
(352) 527-8894 at least two days prior to the meeting.
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 9,2009.


576-0609 TUCRN
2009-CP-396 Joseph A. Capone NoticeToCred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 2009-CP-396
IN RE: ESTATE of JOSEPH A. CAPONE,
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JOSEPH A.
CAPONE, deceased, whose date of death was OCT.
28,, 2007, Is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which
Is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450.
The names and addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against'decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice Is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE'FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 .MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBUCATION OF THIS
NOTICE. "
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED,
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice Is 6/2/2009.
Personal Representative:
/s/ MARIE E. CAPONE
5820 W. CONESTOGA STREET
BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465
Attorney for Personal Representative
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A.
/s/ Michael Mountioy, Esq. Florida Bar Number: 157310
209 Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450
Telephone: (352) 726-1211
Published two (2) times In the Citrus Coynty Chronicle,
June 2 and 9, 2009.

575-0609 TUCRN
2009-CP-159 Myron R. Utech Notice to Cred.
PUBUC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
- IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
' PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 2009-CP-159
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF: MYRON R. UTECH,
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The Administration of the Estate of MYRON R. UTECH,
Deceased, whose date of death was Feb. 5, 2009, Is
pending in the Circuit Cour0t4e 'Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division,. File Number 2009-CP-159; the address
of which Is Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and
addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who
-. e claims or demands against decedent's estate, In-
:ij..1r,.g unmatured, contingent or unllquidated.claims,
and who have been served a copy of this riotice, must
f41le their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER. OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF FIRST PUBUCA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against the decedent's es-
tate, Including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO'(2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED,
The date of first publication of this notice Is 6/2/2009.
/s/ HOLLY ROBBINS
4715 Pillsbury Ave. South
SMinneapolis, MN 55419 -
Personal Representative, the Estate .of
SMYRON RI.UTECH, Deceased )
/s/ LEON M. BOYAJAN, II, ESQUIRE.
LEON M. BOYAJAN, II, P.A. Florida Bar No. 358312 .
2303 West Highway 44, Inverness, FL 34453-3809
Telephone: (352) 726=1800 Fax No.: (352) 726-1428
Attorney for Personal Representative
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 2 and 9, 2009.

577-0609 TUCRN
2009-CP-446 Jane P. Bunger
Notice to Creditors (Summary'Adminlstration)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.;:2009-CP-446
IN RE: ESTATE OF JANE P. BUNGER, File No.2009-CP-446
A/K/A JANE PHILLIPS BUNGER,
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary
Administration has been entered in the Estate of JANE
P. BUNGER a/k/a JANE PHILLIPS BUNGER, deceased,
File Number 2009-CP-446, by the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which
Is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450;
that the decedent's date of death was JAN. 22, 2009;
that the total value of the estate Is $NONE and that the
names and address of those to whom It has been
assigned by such order are:
CATHY HEDBERG, 739 N. MAYLAN AVE.,
LECANTO FL 34461
CAROL ANN MAWHORTER, 200 LINDEN AVE.,
ROYAL OAKS MI 48073-3469
JAMES A. PHILLIPS, 99 S. STREET, BROOKHAVEN MS 39601
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and per-
sons having claims or demands against the estate of
the decedent other than those for whom provision for
full payment was made In the Order of Summary Ad-
ministration must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE,
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO. FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPULICABLE TIME
PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice Is 6/2/2009.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ Cathy Hedberg
739 N. Maylan Ave.

' BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A. Lecanto, FL 34461
/s/ R. Wesley Bradshow, Esq. Florida Bar No. 0977845
209 Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450
Telephone: (352) 726-1211
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 2 and 9, 2009.

579-0609 TUCRN
2009 CP 310 Elizabeth S. Barbeau, Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009 CP 310
Division: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF ELIZABETH S. BARBEAU,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ELIZABETH S.
BARBEAU. deceased, whose date of death was Feb. 2,
2009; File Number: 2009 CP 310. is pending in the Circuit
Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which Is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, FL 34450-4299. The names and addresses of the
personal representatives and the personal representa-
tives' attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against decedent's estate, on
whom a copy of this notice Is required to be served,
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBUCATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF









June 9, 2009


.4 weekly advertising supplement of the Citrus Counry Chronicle
- Autos, Trucks, RVs, ATVs, Motorcycles, Campers & More!


A bumper crop of

sizzling sport Coupes

is built to go fast and

look good doing it.


PORSCHE 911 CARRERA/CARRERA S


~'


BMW Z4


By JIM GORZELANY CTW FEATURES
Hy hitting the road just in time for summer fun is a fleet
of ne\; sport coupes that can deliver miles of vehic-
HL ,tular smiles. Though all debut in the midst of a %\eak
economy when discretionary spending is limited, and these
are anything but the most-practical rides on the road, the al-
lure of a fast and nimble car on an open road with the sun
shining overhead remains compelling.

Here's a look at six all-new
or redesigned sports cars,
many of which are just
being introduced as
early 2010 releases:
BMW Z4.
Eschewing its old manually operated cloth roof for a
power retractable aluminum hardtop, a newly recast version
of the low-slung Z4 retains its classic roadster proportions,
with a long hood and short rear deck. This time around it of-
fers a choice of two more-powerful 3.0-liter inline-six-
cylinder engines, a 255-horsepower version, in the base 30i
model and a 300 hp variant in the 35i. A six-speed manual
gearbox is standard, with a six-speed automatic offered on
the base model and a seven-speed dual-clutch sport auto-
matic with the 35i. A standard Dynamic Drive Control sys-
tem allows a driver to adjust powertrain and suspension
settings to emphasize comfort or sheer sportiness as desired.
MSRP: $44,000 (estimated).
Chevrolet Camaro.
One of the most-anticipated new cars of the year is the re-
born and retro-styled rendition of the Chevrolet Camaro.
Packed with up-to-date engineering, a standard 300-hp 3.6-
liter V6 engine nets 29 mpg on the highway in LS and LT
models, while a ferocious 422 hp 6.2-liter V8 comes with
the top SS version. The latter makes "just" 400 horses when


paired with the optional six-speed automatic transmission -
a six-speed manual is standard. While it sacrifices a bit in the
handling department, the Camaro remains easier to drive
around town than more tightly sprung sports'cars. Slabili-
Trak stability control is standard, and on the SS includes an
adjustable Competitive/Sport mode that allows for more ag-
gressive driving without intervention; a Launch Control fea-
ture is included with the manual transmission that enables
tire-burning takeoffs. MSRP: $22,245.
Hyundai Genesis Coupe.
The new Genesis Coupe is not just a two-door version of
the well-received Genesis sedan - it comes wrapped in
much-curvier styling and comes powered by an exclusive
range of powertrains. A 210-hp turbocharged 2.0-liter four-
cylinder engine is standard, with an enhanced 306-hp ver-
sion of the sedan's 3.8-liter V-6 is also available for stronger
and smoother acceleration. A six-speed automatic gearbox
is standard, with a five-speed automatic optional on the base
model and a six-speed version with the V6. Oversized tires
and a sports suspension benefit the rear-drive coupe's han-
dling, albeit at the expense of a rougher ride than in the sedan.
"Track" versions, aimed at weekend racers, include even-
harsher suspensions for still better grip. MSRP: $22,000.
Mercedes SLK-Class.
The diminutive SLK two-seat roadster is upgraded this
year with more aggressive-looking styling that features a
more-pronounced V-shape up front and a bolder rear-end
treatment. It retains its retractable metal roof that combines
the best elements of a coupe and a convertible. While the
5.4-liter V8 in the top SLK55 AMG carries over, two up-
dated V6 powerplants include a slightly more fuel-efficient
228-hp 3.0-liter in the base model, which is renamed the
SLK 300, and added power for the 3.5-liter in the SLK 350,
which now generates 300 horses. A new Direct-Steer vari-
able-assist power steering system delivers quicker corner-
ing. A Bluetooth hands-free cell phone interface is standard,
with Mercedes "LINGUATRONIC" voice control system
newly optional. MSRP: $45,950.


HYUNDAI GENESIS COUPE


Nissan 370Z.
Nissan's sleek and sporty coupe gets a full redesign for
2009 and is fitted with a larger and stronger 332-hp 3.7-liter
V6 engine that prompts a name change to the 370Z (it was
previously called the 350Z). The comely coupe's styling is a
bit more, aggressive looking than before - its classic aerody-
namic teardrop-shape remains, though it's now stretched
over what is a slightly shorter wheelbase than before. A six-
speed manual transmission comes standard with an advanced
seven-speed automatic optional. Its cornering abilities are.
enhanced thanks to a revised suspension and steering and
braking updates. The 370Z's corporate cousin, the more lux-
urious and less flamboyant Infiniti G70 coupe, likewise re-
ceives similar improvements. MSRP: $29,930.
Porsche'911 Carrera/Carrera S.
While not exactly a full redesign, the coupe and convert-
ible versions of Porsche's 911 Carrera and sportier Carrera S
get a power boost and other assorted enhancements for a
mid-cycle update this year. The standard 3.6-liter flat-six-
cylinder "boxer" engine now produces a quicker 345 hp,
while the 3.8-liter version in the Carrera S, now boasts 385
galloping horses. A new seven-speed "Porsche-Doppelkup-
plung" double-clutch automated manual transmission re-
places the former Tiptronic S automatic. Modest exterior
revisions include larger front air intakes, new LED daytime
running lights, Bi-Xenon headlamps, dual-arm side mirrors
and LED taillamps. Newly added options include Dynamic
Cornering Lights that pivot to light the way through curves
and a Bluetooth cell-phone interface. MSRP:
$75,600/$86,200. CTW Features


D.I.Y REPAIRS FOR THE FRUGAL


Those trying to save money or
avoid a trip to the shop can
easily tackle this trio of auto re-
pair procedures like a pro.
By JIM GORZELANY CTW FEATURES
As any motorist whose car has aged past
its warranty coverage can attest, auto repairs
can be expensive. While most complex pro-
cedures - especially those involving the
brakes or transmission - are best left up to
the professionals, most anyone can tackle
basic tasks like replacing a battery or chang-
ing the oil.
Here's a quick look at a few common re-
pairs even the mechanically challenged can
do themselves, both to save money and avoid
the inconvenience of having to bring a car in
for service. Just be sure to wear eye protec-
tion, and take other necessary precautions at


all times for safety's sake.
Battery. While a dead battery can often be
jump-started and/or recharged, if it's several
years old it may have to be replaced.
In most cars the battery is located on one
side or another of the engine compartment,
though some vehicles will situate it some-
where less obvious (like under the back seat),
so be sure to check the owner's manual be-
fore proceeding. Typically, removing the old
battery is as simple as using an adjustable
wrench or pair of pliers to detach the bracket
that holds it on place, then loosening the
bolts, one each, that hold the battery cables
to each terminal and removing them. Use a
piece of duct tape to note which one is the
positive (+) cable, and clean any corrosion
off the clamps with a wire brush.
SEE REPAIR PAGE 6


Those with special needs can

still stay on the road, thanks to

an array of accessories aimed

at mobility assistance.


By TERESA ODLE CTW FEATURES
Today, more people than ever need mo-
bility assistance. But even those with se-
rious physical difficulties still can drive
their own vehicles with just a little adap-
tation. And although the old conv version
van with the wheelchair lift that got poor
gas mileage comes to mind, there are
more-economical choices available for
those who need help behind the wheel.
"Many minivans have four or six cylin-
der engines," says Kelli Moore, a
spokesperson for HandicapRides.com. "In
many, you can drop the floors down by


eight inches to clear room to sit in a
wheelchair," she says.
Those looking for a used vehicle can
turn to Moore's service, which helps
match buyers and sellers of specially
equipped models. The demand is there -
Moore says the response has been great in
the first six months since the service has
been online. "We've had hundreds of
thousands of people searching and not as
many vehicles posted," she says.

SEE MOBILITY PAGE 4


'Ii.
~ ~


S


a








C2O . .,......, 1v. I '1009nn0


M011 1W U-j0ki-


4,.-. . , -ernando S,.zukli
(352) 684-2. 4,,2
5. Nick Nicholas Ford
, .; . -.231
.' -,," , ,d .'' " " . ,-' , , " " - -


the

SUNDAY
* Citrus County Retreads meet for breakfast at 8 a.m. Sunday at the restaurant at
rear of B&W Rexall Drugs, Inverness.All makes and models of motorcycles welcome.
Ride follows.
WEDNESDAY
* Inverness"Big Dogs"motorcycle club meets for breakfast at 8 a.m.Wednesday'
at rear of B&W Rexall Drugs. Ride follows,all bikes welcome. Call J.R.and Rachel Har-
ris at 726-6128.
THURSDAY
* Gold Wing Road Riders Chapter FL1-R of Dunnellon meets at 6:30 p.m. on thp
second, third-and fourth Thursday of each month at McDonald's in Dunnellod.
Monthly gathering is the first Thursday at the Charlie Horse Restaurant, 20049 E.
Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, 6 p.m.to eat and 7:30 to meet. Call chapter directly
Bruce Schlimme at (352) 465-1228. 1
* Gold Wing Road Riders Association Chapter T of Inverness kick tire at 6 p.n4.
Thursday at Burger King parking lot,comer of U.S.41 and S.R.44 East.Call director
Rachel,JR Harris at 726-6128 or Ken and Jackie Smith at (352) 476-7151.
FRIDAY
* Nature Coast Mustangs meets at 7 p.m. Friday at the Wendy's on U.S. 19 in Hq-
mosassa across from the wildlife park. Bring your car and enjoy a fun evening. Call
Bob at 860-2598.
* The Wanderers Club meets from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at the parking lot of the
Beall's Department Store on State Road 44West of Inverness.Bring your old car and
have fun with other car enthusiasts. Call Frank at 212-2966 or visit wandererscar-
clubofinvernessfl.com.
SATURDAY
* Free Wheelin'Sertoma Club motorcycle club meets at 9 a.m. Saturdays"on the
road."Call Rainer Jakob at 726-7903 for destinations.
* Nature Coast Retreads meets at 8 a.m.Saturdays at Harrington's Restaurant,4135
S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. A ride follows.All styles of motorcycles are welcome.
Call Jacque at 637-4693 or Dave at 628-2401.
* Citrus County Cruisers car club invites you to its cruise-in from 6 to 9 p.m. Sat-
urday at Kings Bay Plaza (next to Wendy's) in Crystal River. Canned goods are col-
lected for local charities. Call Jim Moran at 527-0024 or Lester Barnes 628-7021.
* Citrus County Speedway: JUNE 13: Open Wheel Modified, Sportsman, Mini
Stock, Pure Stock,V8Thunder Stock,4 Cylinder Bombers, Fig 8.Any additional ques-
tions please contact the speedway at (352) 726-9339

SSend-u yoOr-.utomotve d ..
iauto -club eventsinformation to
�. . _ P0


The '55, '56, and especially
'57 -Bel AIrs, commonly referred to
as "TriFives"', are among the..ost
recognizable American---
cars ofat-ttime.- -


I!!
BY BRIAN BISSON
WHEELS
"We wanted a '50s car and to us, the
'57 Chev was the car of the '50s. Chevy
tried for three'I ears to make a comeback.
First the '55. next the '56 and finally they
made it with the "57s-style, chrome, and
the 283 cubic inch engine." said Gary
Marzola owner of this ver nicely. restored
'57 Chey Bel Air Sport Coupe.
The �55. '56, and especially '57 Bel
Airs. commonly referred to as "TriFives",
are among the most recognizable Ameri
can cars of all time. If you happen to find
a '57 Chevy (especially sport coupes and
convertibles) you will be looking at one
of the most highly sought after vehicles by
classic car enthusiasts.
The use of tail fins and chrome are the
most recognizable features of the '57


growth in engine displacement
from the 265 cubic inch engine in
'55 and '56 to the 283 cubic
inches in 1957. with most Bel Airs
fitted w ith carburetion.
As members of the Antique
Automobile Club of America,
which likes to focus on the restoration of
antique cars, trucks and motorcycles and
their history as close as possible to origi-
nal, the Marzolas have only changed a
*couple of items on their car. The carbure-
tor and radiator are the only two things
that have been changed leaving this '57
completely stock. "Trying to keep it stock
is a bit harder. However, to me it is more
satisfying. My wife Nancy however likes
the paint, color and the neon lights under-
neath the car," said Marzola. .
"I myself like the engine compartment
the 283 engine and everything under the
hood. There aren't too many '57 Chevys
that have not been made into a Rest-o-
mod (restored with modifications)."
Before they moved to Florida, around
nine years ago, the Marzolas sold the '57
Bel Air they owned in Connecticut. Once
they got settled
into their new
home in Florida
they started to
look for an-
other. After
...... looking hard
and long for
two years they
finally found
one on EBay lo-
cated in Texas.
The car. was al-
ready restored.
"Finally the
car of our
dreams and al-
ready done. It
was the craziest
thing we had


ever done, buying it without going to see
it first," said Marzola. "We had it trans-
ported to our home from Texas, got ex-
cited right away, went for a short two-mile
dive and proceeded to get stuck. We had
to have it flat-bedded (towed) home and
found the car had some minor problems."
Marzola explained, "It was a frame off
restoration but put back together -in a
hurry. The carburetor -and linkage had to
be adjusted. The door windows were put
on backwards. The hood and front fender
panels had to be removed and reinstalled
correctly, and too much more to mention.
Bottom line we went through the whole
car and when it was -finished we decided
to add fender skirts, duel antennas, conti-
nental kit and neon lights underneath."
In addition we also added larger ex-.
haust pipe extensions, lowered the rear
two inches to give it the cruise effect, and
then found out we couldn't get into our
driveway with out hitting the pipes on the
driveway. Our solution was to install rear
air bags, to raise the car, and finally it was
a success story."
"A restoration project is never com-
plete as there is always something you
want to do," said Marzola. "The owners
are the most critical of their own vehicle.


Our '57 Chevy by far, to us, is everything
we ever hoped for and could ever want in
a classic vehicle."
"Men and women alike seem to have
fond memories as they gaze at the back
seat of our car,"' explained Marzola.
"Their smiles really radiate. Then there is
'also the style. It was a blue collar auto that
so many people had and it takes them
back in time."
* Maybe you're a restoration enthusi-
ast and have some stories or memories to
share. Perhaps you own a muscle, classic
or vintage car that is your pride and joy.
Feel free to call 563-3291, or e-mail
Brian A. Bisson at bbissonQ(dchronicleon-
line.com. We would like to get some pic-
tures and possibly a story for our Wheels
section so you can sit back and enjoy a
ride down Memory Lane.


CiTRus CouvTY (FL) CHRONIcal


UA TUESDAY, JUNE V, ZUUY


*








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@2009 UNIVERSAL MEDIA


SYINDIU-ICATE SPEIAL MLVERTI iELiVNI i AIUL ,'..--I"-',..r'-''


Sales are booming for clinical strength diet pill



Participants in clinical study lost an average of 5 times more weight


without additional exercise or diets; 48-hour time limit now in place


,By K. Tedeschi
Universal Media Syndicate

(UMS) - Over 10 million doses
have been shipped to dieters so far,
*iand sales continue to climb every
,day for the diet supplement called
Apatrim�.
' "We knew we had a great prod-
uct, but it's even exceeded our
"expectations," said Ken Geis, Man-
-ager of Call Center Operations for
'PatentHEALTH the company that
developed the clinically tested
weight loss supplement.
"People just keep placing orders,
it's been pretty amazing," he said.
, But a closer look at this weight
loss sensation suggests that maybe
the company shouldn't have been
;caught off guard by its success.
There are some very good reasons
,for Apatrim's surging popularity.
To begin with, the clinical test
,results were very impressive. Par-
,ticipants taking Apatrim's active
ingredient lost an average of 400%
[more weight than those taking a pla-
,cebo during the 4-week U.S. clini-
,cal study. These remarkable results
,were achieved without additional
,exercise or diets.'*
Apatrim comes from a natural
,edible plant source. It's safe, as well
�as easy to use. This weight loss sup-
plement can actually begin work-
'ing the very first day. And since
researchers believe Apatrim works
-to suppress appetite, most people
'can eat what they want and still lose
weight.*
"By suppressing their appetite,
most people will consume fewer cal-
'ories which can lead to weight loss,"
:said Dr. Joseph Dietz, Director of
.Health Science, Research & Devel-
'opment for PatentHEALTH. "Con-
sumers should always keep in mind
:that there is no substitute for proper
,diet and exercise when it comes to
'losing weight."*

:Impressive clinical results
Apatrim's active ingredient has a
known ability to help control hunger
pangs. This allows people to eat the
foods they want and always seem to
be craving because they'll just want
to eat less.*
The U.S. clinical study was con-
ducted in Los Angeles. The study
included healthy, overweight indi-
viduals between the ages of 31 and
73. The caloric intake and level of
exercise was not disclosed.
The participants were instructed
not to change the food they were eat-
ing and not to add any exercise. Spe-
cifically, no changes to their daily
routine; just take the recommended
dosage 30-minutes before lunch and
dinner.
A remarkable 100% of the partic-
'ipants taking Apatrim as directed
either lost weight or inches off of


I- -~
- ~' ~
- A.


* POPULAR PILL: Allison Garwood (front) and Renee Pellegrini pick up a bottle of the breakthrough weight loss supplement called Apatrim� at the pharmacy.
An amazing 100% of the participants in the U.S. clinical trial got results taking Apatrim and its popularity is soaring. Consumers can call 1-866-964-2349
to have Apatrim shipped directly to their homes.


their waistline during the 4 week
clinical study. Those losing weight
lost an average of 5 times more than
study participants who were taking
the placebo pills.*
Some participants experienced
fabulous results, losing as much as 8
lbs and up to.3 inches off their waist-
line. These amazing results were
achieved without' changes in life-
style. All they did was take the pills
as instructed.2*

Professional support
Industry trends along with pro-
fessional's support in the weight
loss and fitness industries indicate
that Apatrim is the real thing. This
amazing pill is being recommended
to companies and clients'across the
country.
Mark Loy, a personal trainer has
had some of his clients use Apatrim
with great success.
"When I'm working with my cli-
ents I can control what they're eat-
ing," said Loy. "But when they leave
they're on their own and that's when
the tendency to cheat comes into
play," he continued.
"I heard about Apatrim so I
checked out the facts then decided
to try it as a part of my training pro-
gram," Loy said.
"It's really helped some of my
clients to control their eating. I've
watched people get some amazing
results while taking Apatrim," said
Loy. "Sign me up, I'm a believer."2
Dr. Joseph Dietz was impressed


with the quality of the clinical
trials as well as the U.S. patent
(#7,060,308). This patent protects
the proprietary method of extract-
ing the active ingredient. This pro-
cess is what the developing scien-
tists believe is the key to the active
ingredient's effectiveness.
"When I read the clinical results,
the U.S. patent and all of the other
scientific support I immediately
knew we needed to use this weight
loss compound," said Dietz.
"The results are real; Apatrim is a
great product that's been shown to


help people lose weight."*

Where to get it
All of the national retail pharmacies
including Walmart, CVS/pharmacy,
and Walgreens have placed orders
for Apatrim.
There have been some reports
of out-of-stocks, so to make it eas-
ier for people to get it right away a
Regional Health Hotline has been
put in place for the next 48 hours.
Starting at 8:00am today;, all consum-
ers have to do is call 1-866-964-2349 and
ask for Dept. AP4512; orders will be'


filled on a first-come, first-served
basis.
"For those people who call the
hotline to have Apatrim shipped
directly to their homes, we guarantee
they'll get product and they can also
qualify for a direct-to-home discount,"
said Ken Geis. "But this discount is
only available through the hotline for
the next 48 hours," he said.
So for those who choose not to call
or miss the deadline you may have
to pay more for Apatrim or possibly
run the risk of not finding it at the
drug store.


Drug stores load up with powerful joint pill


Sales skyrocketing; news of its amazing results spread across the U.S.


By G.W. Napier
Universal Media Syndicate
UMS - Consumers can't seem
to get enough of it and drug
'stores are selling it as fast as
they can get it.
"Unbelievable, that's all I
can say," said Darla Miller,
.'Operations Manager for
-PatentHEALTH the company
.that developed the break-
through joint supplement.
Miller was referring to the
fact that in just one day a drug
store chain sold 2,000 bottles
of the powerfuljoint health sup-
plement called Trigosamine�.
"We've already shipped over
500,000 bottles of Trigosamine
and sales just keep growing,
it's been crazy," said Miller.
Scientists have developed
this amazing oral tablet that
doesn't require a prescription
-and is taken only once a day.
It's so impressive that one
'key ingredient has the abil-
ity to retain fluid up to 1000
times its own weight; this
helps increase lubrication for
the joints allowing them to
move with ease.*
Trigosamine's key ingredi-
ent is Hyaluronate also called
HA-13 which is the building
-block of "natural joint fluid,"
medically known as synovial
fluid.
This joint fluid reduces fric-
tion in the joints allowing for
effortless motion. It not only


lubricates the joints, but it also
acts as a comfortable shock
absorber.
"As we age, the body's nat-
ural production of this fluid
declines and this can force
the bones in our joints to
grind together which can re-
sult in nagging discomfort,"
said Dr. Joseph Dietz.'
"Using Trigosamine is like
taking a can of oil and applying
it directly to your joints," said
Dr. Dietz.*
Trigosamine combines HA-13
with the essential blend of glu-
cosamineandchondroitinwhich
have been clinically shown to
help build healthy cartilage in
the joints allowing for increased
flexibility and range of motion.*
A clinical study conducted
by the United States govern-


ment found that glucosamine
and chondroitin, similar to
those found in Trigosamine,
had a 79.2% effective rate for
those with moderate to severe
joint discomfort.2*
But it's the results that
make this joint supplement so
impressive.
"We get messages from con-
sumers all the time telling us
how great Trigosamine works
for them," said Miller.
"Everybody wants it," added
Miller.
"CVS/pharmacy was one
of the first ones to order
Trigosamine and they've load-
ed up their shelves. We've re-
ceived reports that show they
have some inventory left," said
Miller.
"And to make it easier for people


who can't find Trigosamine or
don't want to go to the store,
we've set up a National Order
Hotline so they can have it de-
livered directly to their home,"
said Miller.
"We'll be offering a direct
delivery discount .for the
next 72 hours, and consumers
should know they can't get
this discount at drug stores,"
she added.
Otherwise those living in
the local area that miss the
deadline won't be able get
the discount. They'll have to
go to their local drug store to
try and get Trigosamine and
may be hard pressed to find
it. M

Or, visit us online at:
www.trigosamine.com


* HEALTHY JOINTS: X-rays reveal joints that have the proper amounts of
synovial fluid to lubricate the joints. HA-13, one of Trigosamine's key ingre-
dients is a component of synovial fluid.


Local Readers Discount Deadline . . L I '- J. .
You may be able to find Trigosamine at CVS/pharmacy since they have received .-M-- ,,.- , - -
shipments. If you want Trigosamine shipped directly to your home and would like W"W. 'M " ' T..... .-- r. -..
the local readers discount, call the National Order Hotline listed below before the
72-hour deadline expires. Otherwise you'll have to get Trigosamine at the drug
store and may run the risk of not being able to find it.

Begin Calling at 8:00AM TODAY
1-800-924-2109
Approval Code: TG8670
Discount Ends in 72 hours
1. Dr. Joseph Dietz, PhD currently conducts full time research for PatentHEALTH, LLC. as Director of Health Science, Research Development. AM T
2. Statements herein are based upon published public information and do not imply affiliation, sponsorship or endorsement of ALMOST GONE: Sales of the joint pill Trigosamine are soaring which could
Trigosamine by the United States Government. lead to out of stocks as shown in this photo illustration. Consumers unable to
* THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS HOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVET ANY DISEASE. find it can call 1-800-924-2109 and have it shipped directly to their homes.


Here's how to guarantee you get it:
To n-ial.e it ea.:, for people to get Apatrim quickly, .the - c'rmpanry hai set up a Regional Health Hotline.
Follow the instructions listed belo',' to ha..e apatrim shipped directly , to ,'our home .,r you can check your
loc l3 drug store to see if they ha...e it in stc..-'. For consum-eri , ., . ll 311 the hothnlie, .ad..ise the operator
that ,'ou waant Apatrim shipped directly to :. our home So they can s.e if ,'ou qualify, fcr the direct-to-home
shipping discount.
Regional Health Hotline; 48-hours only
Consumers can begin calling promptly at 8:00am today The hotline '..ill be available for the next 48
hours. Call 1-866-964-2349 and ask for Dept. AP4512. All orders vill be processed on a first-come,
first-served ba.is.
Retail Pharmacies:
National chains across the country that have ordered Apatrirn include Walmart, CVS/pharmacy and
Walgreens. All of these chains have confirmed that they ha'.'e recei ed their initial shipments of Apatrim
and are working to make certain they ha-.-e stoo.- a.ailable. ',onsumers not able to find Apatrin at their local
pharmacies can call the hotline and hav.'e it delivered directly ' to their homes 'icu may also qualify for a special
discount.
On the web: www.apatrim.com
- ..: .i.,lH al.H Ll''7 PrU C . uF'. mt.i
1. Primary study based on 26 participants over a 4-week period. Participants were directed not to add any exercise
or change eating habits. Participants level of caloric intake and exercise were not measured or disclosed. 2. Individu-
al results may vary. 3. Mark Loy is a personal trainer and fitness consultant to PatentHEALTH, he is remunerated for his services.
*THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.


TuEsDAY, JUNE 9, 2009 C3


I -,CiTRrj.,; CouNTY (FL) CHRONiCLE


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Steering



you right t


Get Longer Life Out of Your Truck or SUV


ALTERNATIVE

ISSUES
Q. A few of our local gas outlets have added that E85 gas to
their pumps. It's fine that there are those alternatives out there,
but I worry that we're going to wind up accidentally putting
some of that into one of our cars, which aren't outfitted to ac-
cept that stuff. In fact, since we have a teenaged son who isn't
always, well, completely focused on what he's doing, we've
banned him from using any.of the gas stations that sell E85 so
he doesn't wind up ruining a car because he wasn't paying at-
tention. So here are my questions: Why don't they put that gas
and the gas hose into a completely different pumping unit, in-
stead of on one side of the same unit where you get the regu-,
lar gas? Do you ever worry about making a mistake? And
really, what would happen if he (or we, for that matter) did ac-
cidefitally put that gas into our car?

A. As an increasing number of vehicles are being manufac-
tured to use E85 fuel (a blend of 15 percent gasoline and 85
percent ethanol, said to be more environmentally friendly than
conventional gasoline), you will, of course, see more fuel out-
lets selling it. Right now there are about 6 million E85-com-
patible vehicles on the roads, according to the National Ethanol
Vehicle Coaltion, and hundreds of outlets sell E85 fuel.
As you point out, the vast majority of E85 dealers sell it from
a pumping station that also dispenses regular gasoline (though
there is a different hose and different underground holding tank
for the E85). There's a strong possibility that as the number of
E85 vehicles increases and demand for E85 fuel increases,
there will be separate pumps in more locales.
In the meantime, they're ,trying to keep consumers from
pumping the wrong fuel by doing two things: the hose and rioz-
zle for the E85 fuel are, in all the ones I've seen, a bright yel-
low that's pretty hard to miss, and there's a sign by the nozzle
that warns consumers that what flows out of this hose is not
gasoline.
That said, those are things that could easily escape the notice
of a teenager, there being so many other important things cir-
culating through their brains.
What would happen in the event of an
accidental fill-up of-E85 in a vehicle not
constructed to use it? Most experts say
you'd be dealing with some short-term
unhappiness, but it's highly unlikely it
would cause permanent damage.
So the prohibition you've established probably is a reason-
able way to prevent an accidental fill-up. (But a bigger ques-
tion every reader is joining me in wondering about is this: how
do you get him to actually go and put fuel in the car?)
Anyhow, what would happen in the event of an accidental
fill-up of E85 in a vehicle not constructed to use it? Most ex-
perts say you'd be dealing with some short-term unhappiness,
but it's highly unlikely it would cause permanent damage.
The engine would not be getting the proper mixture and
therefore insufficient energy, so the check engine light would
almost certainly come oni, to let you know the vehicle is in
some distress, and most vehicles would (if you could get them
to start) run pretty poorly.
Many experts recommend immediately draining the fuel
tank in this kind of situation and refilling it with gasoline
(which, of course, you'd kind of have to do if the car won't
start); some say if it's running, even poorly, don't worry too
much, just add some gasoline when you can and it'll be fine.
I tend.to be super cautious when it comes to vehicles, so if I
made such an error, I'd drain it immediately rather than driv-
ing it around on a diet lacking sufficient nutrients.
Fact is, this E85 approach is still new enough that there isn't
a huge body of information about what happens short term and
especially long term when E85 goes into a vehicle not con-
structed to run on it.
When all is said and done, although most say a one-time
mistake won't wreck the engine, they caution you to try to
avoid winding up in that situation.

Q. What's a micro-car? I've heard the term on TV a couple
of times, and I have no idea what it means.

A. It's an itty-bitty, smaller-than-subcompact car.
Microcars became very popular in post World War II Eu-
rope and Japan, often used in urban areas to drive from home
to public transportation (and-parkin places ordinary cars could-
n't)..
Micros generally accommodate only the driver and one pas-
senger. Many of the most popular models have only three
wheels. Some were known as "bubble cars."
In this country, the Smart Fortwo is inarguably a micro car.
Some regard the Mini Cooper as a microcar, but you'd get
some argument from many if you suggested that.
And just so you know, there's even a microcar museum in
this country. It's located in Madison, Ga., about 60 miles from
Atlanta, and has scores of the little buggers on display.


jS, your question?
* a.'Pteri 'Aoldlike to hear what's on your mind when it
b:for,idriving, repairing and making the most of your
,p'our questions to sharon@ctwfeanires.com


(ARA) - In this economy, not many people are in the mar-
ket for a new truck. While fewer trucks are being sold, mil-
lions are still on the road. Your truck is a big investment and
if you can improve its handling, safety and ride you can ex-
tend the life of your vehicle.
In addition to keeping up the look of your truck by vacu-
uming the interior and washing the exterior regularly to keep
harmful road deposits from damaging the finish, there are
steps you can take to get ensure the truck performs on- and
off-road and in any weather:
* Clean the air filter regularly. The air filter in your truck
removes particulates before they can enter the engine. Re-
placing a clogged air filter can improve fuel efficiency by up
to 10 percent, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.
* Don't wait until there's a service light on; take your truck
in for regularly scheduled maintenance. A poorly maintained
vehicle can negate the warranty, reduce fuel mileage and cut
thousands of dollars off the resale price, so skipping your
scheduled maintenance can end up costing you much more.


(ARA) - In today's economy, every dollar counts. If you
need to purchase an expensive necessity item like a car you
must do so with serious thought and attention to detail. Here
are some things to consider.
* First select a sturdy, efficient car that has a proven track
record of performance and dependability. Thought must be
given to a variety things including: type of car, size, gas
mileage, maintenance, service contracts and insurance. Some
cars carry a higher insurance premium due to the theft ratio.
With the fluctuating price of gas, consider models that get the
best gas mileage.
* With the automotive industry in crisis, be on the look-
.out for over-zealous car dealers who are trying to turn every
consumer visit to the dealership into an immediate sale. Shop
around various dealerships for the best bargain you can find.
It is important to be an informed shopper. Read the automo-
tive section in the newspaper to become familiar with prices
and deals available. An informed consumer can force the
dealer to reduce his offer two or three times.
* Consider your needs, lifestyle and road travel require-
ments. A mother with children who is active in the commu-
nity car pool may consider an SUV to be the best fit. A
business executive who often travels with clients, customers
and potential customers may look for a more traditional four-
door sedan as a good fit. A single person without a lot of fam-



MOBILITY FROM PAGE 1
HandicapRides.com visitors can search for used vehicles
by body style, model, price and accessibility feature. The
site was founded by a physical therapist who started the site
partially in response to the struggle he had for years find-
ing an appropriate vehicle for his wife who has multiple
sclerosis. However, as with any used-car purchase, Moore
cautions those using the service to have all vehicles under
their consideration fully checked out (ideally, by a me-
chanic) before completing any transaction.
In the new-car market, automakers have not only have
made it easier to adapt their vehicles for those with special
needs, they've tried to save buyers money in the process.
For example, General Motors reimburses customers up to
$1,000 when they adapt any of their Buick, Cadillac,
Chevrolet, GMC, Hummer, Pontiac or Saturn cars with any
of 35 eligible mobility equipment devices. GM itself offers
a "Sit-n-Lift" power seat on some of its models.
What's more, GM offers customers more than just a mon-
etary incentive to cover costs of adding accessibility fea-
tures. The company now offers two free years of its OnStar
communications/safety service to customers who purchase
new GM models equipped with OnStar and with eligible
adaptive mobility equipment. Buyers can learn more about
the program at www.gmmobility.com.
Some automakers also equip vehicles with scooters and
scooter lifts. Other devices such as a wheelchair ramp or
hand-operated controls for the brake and accelerator usually
have to be purchased and installed in the aftermarket.
Moore says that adapting cars like the Chrysler PT Cruiser
and Honda Element crossover vehicles make it possible to
drive the car directly from a wheelchair. "The doors open
upward like a Lamborghini, and the wheelchair hooks
down to the floor. Hand controls allow the driver to drive
right from the wheelchair and look really cool doing it,"
she says.


* Change your tires. Trucks are notoriously noisy because -
of their larger tires, so a little bit of homework and a small in-
vestment can mean a much smoother ride. There are two
types of truck tires - all-terrain and all-season. All-terrain
tires handle better in the mud, but ride poorly on road and
have a short tread life. All-season tires are the most popular
choice for trucks. They're much quieter, have better dry trac-
tion and last between 50,000 to 70,000 miles. The new Sea-
sonal All-Terrain (SAT) tires from KumhoTireUSA are an
all-season tire with a winter rating and utilize the best tech-
nology from both types of tires.
* Don't idle your truck for long periods of time. Low idling
causes oil pressure to drop which is bad for engine life.
* The larger your truck is and the more weight you carry,
the more frequently you should change your oil.
, Courtesy ofjARAcontent
For more information on the proper tires
for your truck, visit KumhoTireUSA.com.


Tips for


Finding the


Right Vehicle


that Fits


Your Style


and Wallet

ily ties may be interested in a sporty, fast, two-seater vehicle
as a perfect fit.
* Make sure you select a car that is affordable for your
budget and lifestyle. It is important to select a vehicle that will
have a payment plan that allows easy manageability along
with other financial obligations such as mortgage, rent, food,
utilities and recreation. Buyers are encouraged to pay special
attention to financifig rates. .....
* "Shop the financing before you buy. Buyers can be ap-
proved for a dollar amount and fill in the car later. Then check
what the dealer is offering," says Robert Lindquist, professor
of business at Argosy University, Orange County.
* Lindquist also recommends car buyers make sure that a
low-interest quote is simple interest, and not add-on interest
which doubles the rate and, ultimately, costs the consumer
more.
In addition, Lindquist advises buyers to consider purchas-
ing an extended warranty, particularly if you finance the car
for longer than 36 months. The average car warranty is three.
years or 36,000 miles.
All of these factors are crucial when selecting the right ve-
hicle for you. It is important that consumers are thoughtful in
choosing a car that complements their lifestyle, and is. af-
fordable for their wallet. Courtesy ofARAcontent


But converting a minivan or crossover vehicle is not a
job for just any repair shop. Those looking to convert a ve-
hicle for mobility assistance should look for a repair shop
that's a member of the National Mobility Equipment Deal-
ers Association. The organization's Web site
(www.nmeda.org) allows users to search by location and
find dealers or shops that carry NMEDA's quality assur-
ance program seal. Modifying a vehicle is not simple and
if done incorrectly, it can cause "serious safety problems,"
the organization says. � CTWFeatures


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


%pst TUESDAY, JUNE Y, ZUUY


Q







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1I',IH


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m!1114


2007 FUSION


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFOAND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 2164
'8,988 or 158* mo.
2006 GRAND CHEROKEE


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8005848755 Ext. 2167
1,988 or$21 mo.
2005 GALANT


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800-584.8755 Ext. 2160
5,988* or '112' mo.
2004 MUSTANG


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$10,988* or 206'm
2003 MONTE CARLO


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CRYSTAL


937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
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2006 WRANGLER


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFOANDSPECIALPRICING
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2003 F250


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WVTH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2153
1 6,988 or$31 8mo
CRYSTAL
geep o BP. ., i
1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
2077 HWY. 44 W.
INVERNESS
800-584-8755 Ext. 1
- crysfalautos.com


2006 MKZ


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE ITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext.2163
14,988 or 264'mo.
2005 LACROSSE


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO ANDSPECIAl PRICING
800.5848755 Ext. 2161
19,988' or 187 mo.
2004 THUNDERBIRD


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE VTH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584-8755 Ext.2158
17,988* or '337* mo.
2004 DAKOTA


FREE24 HR RECORDEDMESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584-8755 Ext.2166
'5,988' or'112*'mo.
2002 SUBURBAN


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFOANDSPECIALPRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2152
$7,988 or$149* mo.
CRYSTAL
A-' AN AMERICAN
REVOLUTION
1035 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext. 1
crystalautos.com


"Aii Pnir?.P.�yrnere.. l eule Ij. laq I - 1a''r ads and dealer fee($S599.50). .'nrePynes iL d e 2i o) di hr Trade Equity), owner eoyiii re a~. l a ii.;llI ry.;inciler,r,i- u Qu31)j Payments are at 7.99 A.P.R. for 72 Months for model years 2 006-2009
and 770 A.PR. fo 66 months for model years 2002-2005 WAC. Cannot be combined with other offers. All prior sales excluded and may restrict stock. Not responsible for typographical errors. Vehicles are pre-owned and pictures are for illustration purposes only.


If


I


1I


"You must know what your
trade is worth, no matter
where you plan to buy..."









Cr'Rus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C6 TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 2009


REPAIRS FROM PAGE 1

The battery should then be able to come up and out of its
holder, but be sure to wear work gloves and proceed with cau-
tion since a car battery contains caustic fluid. Always bring the
old battery to an auto parts store or other facility for recycling.
Installing the new battery is essentially the same process in re-
verse, but be mindful to connect the negative cable to the neg-
ative terminal-(-) first to avoid inadvertently shorting out the
car's electrical system.
Oil and Filters. Despite the proliferation of quick oil-change
outlets, many motorists still prefer to save a few dollars and do
the job themselves. For safety's sake, drive the vehicle up onto
a pair of ramps, or support the front end by a pair of jack stands
(with the parking brake on and chocks behind the rear wheels
for added security) - never rely on a single jack alone. Change
the oil after the engine's been wanted up, but allow a few min-
utes for the lubricant to fully collect in the oil pan (be careful,
*as the engine will be hot to the touch).
Locate the drain plug on the oil pan at the bottom of the en-
gine, and remove it with a wrench. Drain the oil into a bucket
or other container. Use a metal-band-type wrench to twist offthe
oil filter, which should be in clear sight near the bottom of the
engine, and allow the rest of the oil to drain.
. Spread a bead of oil onto the new oil filter's rubber gasket,
then simply twist the new filter into place and tighten it by hand
until it's seated,, then give it another ? turn. Replace the oil drain
plug and tighten it securely with a wrench, but be careful not to
fasten it too tightly, which may strip the screw threads.
Move the car off the ramps or jack-stands, and pour the
amount of lubricant specified in the vehicle's owner's manual
into the engine via the oil-filler cap under the hood, which is
usually clearly marked. Allow a few minutes for the oil to run
down into the oil pan, then stait the engine and let it run for a
short period, looking for leaks underneath the car. Switch off
the engine, let it sit, and check the oil levelvia the engine's dip-
stick, which should also be easily identified. Pour the used oil
into an empty plastic milk jug for recycling at a service station
or other facility.
Also check the car's air filter with every oil change to ensure
that the engine is "breathing freely." It's usually located under
a plastic cover to one side of the engine that's affixed with
quick-release clips. Remove thd clips and cover, and take the air
filter out of its housing. Give it a shake and/or bang it against a







Automotive

Classifieds








' .- ..


DOWN
2. Oil reservoir
3. Knotty wagon trim
4. Transmission slip-up
6. Spinout star
7. First FWD Dodge
8. Cariadian-buill gullwing
9. Corvette "tuner" enjoys
,"driving"
11. Fender
12. Days of Thunder hero
13. Snifft-gate cover
14. A deluxe Comet
15. Four-wheel skid
18, Australian-built Pontiac


19. AMG badge found on these
vehicles
21. WW II highway
24. "Mag" wheel
25. Larnborghini mascot
26. Mixes with fuel for combustion
29. Aspect ratio refers to height of
this
.30. Bugatti's handle
31. A show for cars
32. Shop wvilhout leaving car
34. Speeding driver (slang)
36. Italian lire maker
38. Korean sport-ute
42. Tire valve mounts inside this


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COPYRIGHT WHEELBASE. COMMUNICATIONS


solid surface a few times to dislodge any loose dirt. Visually in-
spect the filter - it's usually made up of a special pleated paper.
If it looks dirty, it should be replaced.
Spark Plugs.. Most new cars today come equipped with plat-
inum-tipped spark plugs that will last for 100,000 miles. Oth-
erwise, it's typical to replace ordinary, spark pluigs e\ Ie N l\0 o
years or 30,000 miles (replace them\ iih platullm-npped plugs,.
and N ott ina\ ne\ er iha e toi v. 1ry about it again). To avoid mix-


ing up the spark-plug wires, remove and replace the plugs-one
at a time. Pull up on the base of the spark-plug wire to dislodge
it from the top tip of the plug, and use a spark-plug socket
wrench to remove the plug. Carefully screw the new plug into
its threaded socket until it's seated - be sure it's installing freely
- then finish the job with the socket wrench. Press firmly on
the spark-plug wire to replace it onto the e45o'sed tip.
� CTW Features


To place an ad, call 563-5966


'.. �- Classifieds

In Print




Online

S All

/ The Time


I )m-. .


BBoa

60 HP Suzuki
4 Stroke, SST Prop,
Runs perfect $2,999
(352) 613-8453



1981 15' BOSTON
Whaler Sport. '93 48HP
Johnson, trolling motor,
new trailer, great cond.,
$6,500. 352-201-0096
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
AQUA SPORT '05
175 Osprey, 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual
batt. w/switch, bimlni,
easy load trailer. Low
hours.$9,990
352-860-0277
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermep, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras
$13,500/obo.
(352) 489-9640
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
115HP, 4strke Yamaha,
w/trlr. $11,200. will
trade (352) 503-3778
HYDRA - SPORT
'90, 26' c/c, t-top, '99
250 Merc. on bracket
'05 trailer, too many
upgrades to list,
exc condition $16,500
(352) 586-1754
KEY WEST & FORD
05/2020cc/98Expedition
Yam4stk150/5.4L
4x4EBRed Together
$32500 or $26000 Boat
(352)586-6717
PONTOON '08
Svheetwater 21ft. 25 hours.
90hp Yamaha.
$16,500. Many Extras
352-503-6797.


14' w/ 40 hp Johnson,
Everything works good
$1800 (352) 302-0033
PONTOON '95
Monarch 24ft,
'95 60HP Mercury
w/Performance trailer.
$5500. 352-344-1503
PONTOON BOAT
08' 20 Ft. To many
options to list. $13,000
Call for info. 628-7926
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras $12,000
(352) 628-0281
PRO-LINE 221
WALKAROUND 1999
200 HP Mercury w/ 9.9 HP
Johnson kicker,$12k
obo. Call Kurt at Pete's
Pier 352-795-6067
PROLINE SPORT '06
19ft, CC,T-top, 115HP
Merc Optic Max, alum
trailer, Many extra's
$17,000. 352-527-8738
SEA PRO
'00 19 FT. C/C. Loaded.
Elec. Pkg. 115 FI 4 Strk.
Yam. 100 hrs. Bim. top.
Best offer(352)533-3093
SPORSTER, 15FT
'97 Runs great, looks
great. 135HP inboard
Boat cover, trailer.
$3,500. 352-484-9854
T-CRAFT
23'L, 6'W, '02 1501-1 Evin.
mtr. w fuel enj. like new, trir.
w/brks
$7750 352-489-3661
WELLCRAFT
1987, 250 Sportsman,
25', Gas eng., 30" draft,
260 hp I/O, alum.
trailer.$8,000
(352) 344-9651



22 FT. Minnie Winnie
1993, Class C, 16 mpg,
dependable, like new
small V-8, sleeps 6
$7,300 (352) 563-9964
'02 Cedar Creek 5th
Wheel 2911, 2-slides,
queen bed,bath/shower,
low mileage, loaded,
good cond. $16,800
(352) 746-4969


05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
26inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
'87 Coachman C-Class
Clean & Good cond.,
Like new brakes & fires,
350 Motor, 71k miles
$3,900 obo (352)
503-7304
'99 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 36 K Mi.
Dual air. $37,700 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
CHEVY '86 Class c
Very good cond. Needs
tires. $4,000. Call
anytime. (352) 446-6329-
COACHMAN
'07 Freelander, 3150,
12K. mi. Mint cond.
$55,000 (352) 637-3673
or (561) 715-3001
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane New
deal. 30Q, class A motor
home, 31% ft., 22k mi.
V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed,
etc. Saturn-tow Incl.
$35,000. (352) 397-5007
HOLIDAY
'89 Rambler, 36',
Rebuilt motor, 2K.mi.
Exc. cond. $19,500.
(352) 257-5947.,
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$52,995. 352-464-0371



BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig.
Like new. $8,900.
352-489-3661
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778


TRAIL CRUISER '04
17FT, light weight,
fully loaded. Used
10 times: $6800.
352-628-4522



1997 MAZDA MIATA
Convertable, Fun &
dependable, Porche
Red, new top, 36mpg,
5-speed, A/C, new tires.
Mint $5,700 352)
563-9964

BUICK '04
CUSTOM CENTURY
LOADEDI 35k miles, 1'
owner retiree, garaged '
$7700. 352-628-0698
CADILLAC '
'02 SLS,
Leather, loaded,
$7,995. Wooten's Con-
sign your car or truck.
(352) 637-7117
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715
CHEVY
'05, Impala. All Pwr, CD,
sunrf., new batt, good
cond., 46K mi. $7,600
(352) 527-3735
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Conv. rare
auto, AC, V6, 36 mpg let
black, dependable.
$5200 352- 563-0615
CHRYSLER
'06 Sebring Convertable
$12,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
CORVETTE
'80," Stingray, white, auto,
SHOWCAR!
$11,500 or will trade for
truck. 352-563-6428
FORD
'00 Focus, 4 dr. AC,
Auto. New tires & brakes
runs great,30 mpg.
$3,950.(352) 302-9217
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well maintained.
$2650. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370


MAZDA
'08 MZ 3 Sedan,
$12,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MAZDA MIATA
MX5,2000 SILVER/TAN,5
SPEED, $6500
OBO,727-365-5951
MERCEDES
'08 E-350, $38,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MITSUBISHI
'03, Diamante LS, excel.
cond. Always serviced,
Fully equip. Priced be-
low Kelly BB. $7,900.
352-382-5702
NISSAN
'07 Versa,
$11,995.;
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 mi.
warranty. $19,000
(352) 697-3428
TOYOTA
'07 Camry, silver, 4dr.,
loaded, leathe int.,
$15.000 Obo.
(352) 637-1276
TOYOTA
'07 FJ Cruiser.
$23,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA SUPRA '89
All original, red, 79k mi.,
6 cylinder, all power,
targa roof. Original
owner. Garaged, $6,999
(352) 726-3427
VOLKSWAGON
'08 Beetle, $15,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLKSWAGON
'08 Jetta, $13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-60, $16,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC-90,
$20,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299


'53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, auto, May
trade in part,
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door sedan. 6
cyl auto. $9,500. Will con-
sider trade for travel trailer
of equal value.(352)
628-4053
EL CAMINO '81
305 Auto, All new
interior, & paint. Crager
mags & tires: 4" raised
hood. $3,250.
(352)341-3613.
GM El Camino
'84, 1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint;
63K mi., $8,900 oab
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$12,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122



CHEVROLET S-10
1998 Ext. cab, topper,
newer tires, 4.3 auto..
runs great, $2,800 obo
Call Jack at
(386) 867-6999
or (352) 621-0311
DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awe-
some Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit," Loaded
every special feature. Sr.
own, gar. kept., 27K mi,
$40K
invested Sale $21,750
See online ad photos
www.autotrader.comlatca
ridlat-f3fd39f
John (352) 726-1076
DODGE RAM '00
Std cab, rare 5spd, hemi,
V8, a/c, 25mpg, new 22"
rims & tires. Dependable
$3700. 352-563-0615


'02 F-150 XLT, Ext. cab,
4dr, auto, loaded black &
silver, extra clean, sharp.
$7,995 Wootlen's
(352) 637-7117
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serv. van, 41K Mi./5.4 L.
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serv. body/dble lock drs.
$20,000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
'06 F 250 Lariat, Diesel,
Super tow pkg. 4 wheel
drive, lots of chrome.
$17,000(352) 628-6985



CADILLAC
'05 Escalade, low mi. all
power, sun roof,
exc. cond. $28,000
(347) 266-9328
CHEVY
'04 Trailblazer, Ext. cab,
loaded, gray leather int.
47k. mi. Orig. owner,
$12,500.(352) 527-0456
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl
drive, class 3 hitch, Orig
owner. Great shape &
price. $8,750.
352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
GMC ENVOY
Red,'03, 60k ml.,
On-Star, tow package
5-passenger, $10,500
obo (352) 527-3445
HYUNDAI
'07 Santa Fe, $19,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
KIA SPORTAGE '01
Runs & looks great. Elec.
wind., locks, near new
tires, shocks, breaks,
battery & timing bell
$2,750 (352) 586-5746
LEXUS
'07 RX 350, Black, tan
leather int. Navigation, back
up cam, blue tooth, very
clean, 75K.mi.
$25,000.(352) 527-8372
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG. Silver
W/black int. Loaded,
57K.Mi. Like new .Ask
$18.5K. (352)489-7674


CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872
MAZDA
'08 Mazda 5 Van,
$14,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299



HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains &
tows heavy loads.
$3200/or trade.
352- 563-0615
Crystal River



2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900ml. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. Hi perf.
Over $43,000 in receipts.
17k mi. $10,900
352-563-0615
Crystal River
APOLLO 2007 ORION
ADR PRO 125 CC
MOTOCROSS PIT BIKE,
KICK START,4 SPEED,
GREAT CONDITION,
LECANTO $500.00
(561)236-1051
HARLEY
'96 Sporstr 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes,chro. Ex. clean
$4,850.(352) 637-5143
Harley Davidson
'06. Road King Classic
low mi., bik cherry, incl.
helmets/trvl luggage
$14,000 (352) 382-0907
(11,,oF01"1'
Your world first.
Every D�D i

(:Cl. II)1l.I.l
� Classifi'd.s


Harley Davidson
'81 Shpvelhead, 80",
completely serviced,
good shape. Ex.
access. $5,395. obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109
HARLEY DAVIDSON
Electraglide Ultra Classic
2006 HD Ultra Classic
like new. Fully loaded, in-
cludes Drivers Backrest,
V&H Mufflers, 2 Helmets
with Head sets,
AM/FM/CB/Intercom, HD
cover, Panacia Lighting,
New BatteryLESS than
3500 miles. 18,500 Seri-
ous Inquires only please
344-2491
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 MI.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
HONDA 02
1 OOccSarbara, 10K
ml. custom exhaust &
seat, lots of Xtras $4500
obo 352-613-5641
HONDA 2007 Shadow
600 Deluxe Powder blue,
3,600 miles, passenger
backrest and slipstream
windshield. $4,500 OBO.
, 352-795-9829
SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, BIk w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Cartini handle bars.
Chrome to max, IThu
bad boy Is not for the
faint of heart. $30k
invested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
TITAN
'00 Phoenix, TRM.
Ferrar red, 6K. mi. Like
new, $11,000
(352) 489-7674


WELCOME to International AutoCross, .

a puzzle dedicated to the automobile enthusiast!

AutoCross will test your INTE"R N A T I 0A,.

knowledge of cars, brand names and

auto-related people from all over the world. Good luck'





s 7 ACROSS

1. A wrench in London?
5 Hydraulic-suspension car
6. Mr. Tucker
- 10. Insight maker
. 11. 1960s mid-size Plymouth
14 Cherokee, Wagoneer rolled int
one
- 16 An Acura in Japan
17. Shift too soon
20. Bond's ride
22 Roadster builder Donald
23. Unmarked police car
24 Pavement inventor
26. Braking assistant
27. German FWD specialist
28 Caddy SUV
33 Fasciaframesthis
35 Nissan's sunroof
37. Popular '50s Ford option
38 A deer Triumph ,,
39. Service dept. vehicle (slang)
40. Metropolitan maker
41. Like Minor only bigger
43. Bed cover
44. Bntish traffic circle
45. On-board mapping
46. a.K.a. emissions equipment


AANSWWERS






TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 2009 C7


c.1


HuDRU TH ITLLGNTCOIE


JENKINS HYUNDAI


IIYI


DAI...


Fuel MP
Efficient l


ciHyufDl-R


Assu


rance


AMERICA'S BEST WARRANTY
10 YEAR/100.O00 MILE
POWERTRAIN LIMITED WARRANTY
'See dealer for LIMITEO WARRANTY delalis.


5 Year / 60,000 Mile
Bumper To Bumper Coverage
5 Year Unlimited Miles
24 Hr Roadside Assistance


2009
SONATA

9$13,987


&6


S= Value!


2009
SANTA FE GLS

*$17,990
D ::" '. " -' > ' " '!


#26403


2009 $ 8
ACCENT GS

or Buy for ... .. . ....' . .. . "
$169, A

#15313
#15313


2009
ELANTRA GLS e lliO9
IBnH mx~wiIHiitt


.2009 - -LS 1-6?!$5
TUCSON GLS $O I950l


2009 N99 B
ELANTRA TOURING $22Wl''
36 month ieaset
-hNBIJ
BS~iBH i-t.


2010
GENESIS COUPE $1-alB0O
St36 month leased


2009
GENESIS
Amojju "uljlu &Uji


$399me
36month eMts


Voted North Ameericat C&' ofhe Ywa
-Det'ollAuto Show


Advertised prices are plus tax, tag and $599 dealer fee, are before any dealer installed options and include all available manufacturer rebates & incentives. Vehicles subject to prior sale. All offers with approved credit and some cannot be combined. *Expected range for most
drivers, your actual mileage may vary depending on how you drive and maintain your vehicle. ** On the Accent. As listed on Monroney sticker., t Genesis Coupe lease, $259 per mo, $1999 down, Genesis lease, $399 per mo, $2599 down, Elantra Touring lease, $239 per meo,
$2499 down; all 36 mo. leases. A Accent purchase $169 per mo. at 7% APR for 84 mos. Some offers may require financing thru HMFC., ft Must be 18 years or older. No purchase neccessary.See us for full rules & regulations.Photos are for Illustration purposes only.


WE'LL DOUBLE YOUR CASH ANDIOR TRADE EQUITY UP TO A TOTAL OF $5000


LIST PRICE ........ '8.990
YOUR CASH OR TRADE . '2.SO0
DOUBLE ....... . 2,500

1999 Chevrolet Venture
H9365A.. ............. $99
1992 Toyota 4Runner SR5
H8638A.................................... W


1993 Mazda 626
H9224B ....... .....................
2002 Pontiac Montana Q$ M
H9204B ................. ... .....
1995 Oldsmobile 88 Royale 9M
PH2403A ........................ .
2001 Hyundai Santa Fe $ 9 0
H9486A................................. IW W
1995 Ford Mustang 9m
H9266B.................................. . IW W
2003 Hyundai Accent MAR
H8828A ....... ......... ..... 1. IW
1999 Ford Taurus . QQ.
H9206A.............................. .... . . .
2002 Kia Optima t99, A
PH2402A ..............................
1998 Mercedes-Benz C-Class 9 . 99
H9338A..................................v.. "


Vehicles. *
Come
With �


2003 Ford Taurus
PH2350B................................
2000 Chrysler Sebring
PH2401A.................:..............
2004 Hyundai Accent
H9379A................................
2001 Chevrolet Malibu
H9233B ..................... ............
1999 Cadillac Catera
PH2396A ................................
1999 Mazda B-Series 4WD Truck
H9109B................................
2000 Chrysler 300M
H9483B .................... .....
2002 Buick LeSabre
H9466B................ .........
2002 Toyota RAV4
H9423A ................................


$31990
$3,990

$3,990
$3,990
$3,990
$3,99
AsM


LIST PRICE .......12. 0
YOUR CASH OR TRADE .. 2.500
DOUBLE .. ...... 2,.500
YOU PAY
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2001 Mercury Sable
H9060B ................................
2001 Toyota Camry
H9410A................................
Proa shorn are aftor doobliasi or caih .ad/o, trad. ,qmt an


dealer fee All offers are with approved credit. Vehicles are subject to prior sale. Cash doubling comes In the form of price reduction. Offer not available on vehicles with reduced price already marked on the windshield. Limit 1 trade-in per purchase. Jenkins Hyundai will double you
ra total nfi 4 on DmPrramrn ihianr tn channa wit et notic i Oallfuvlnn inehiclea must have 48 000 miles or less and have been manufactured within the last 48 months. See dealer for complete details." Excludes Audi, BMW, Jaguar, Mercedes Benz, Saab, Porsche & Volvo.


Jenkins Hyundai * 1602 SW Cc


Rd * SR 200 * Ocala Jenkins Hyundai * 1602 SW College kd * SR 200 * Ocala
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III


#62423


TRUS COUNTY (11L) CHRONICIJI


783020


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T UESDAY, JUiNt Y, 2009


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2007 FORD 2005 Ford 2006 Merry
FOCUS ZX3 Escape XIT l Milan Premier r
Economical and Low miles and clean. Leather and luxury
spo #NpR522 #NPR31A equpment.NP5226


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Onus CouNTY (Fl.) CHRoNicix


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