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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01671
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: June 7, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01671

Full Text

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Birds of a feather: SummerAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007

C I CITRU . COUNTYY-


TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Variable clouds with
88 scattered showers and
LOW thunderstorms.
68 PAGE A4


JUNE 7 2009


www.chrol


Florida's Best Community U. Newspaper Serving Florida's Best


Battista's role worried board in Dick case


MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronlcleonline.com
Chronicle
They talked about the case.
They talked about settlement
strategy They heard advice from
their attorneys. They gave direc-
tion on how to proceed.
Then they got down to dis-
cussing what was weighing on
their minds:


How, they wondered, would the
public perceive of the case of Tom
Dick vs. Citrus County?
Transcripts of a March 18, 2008,
closed county commission meet-
ing show board members ex-
pressed just as much interest in
the roles certain officials played
in the lawsuit as in details of the
case itself.
The transcripts became public
record last week following a


judge's signature officially dis-
missing the lawsuit. Dick settled
the case for $120,000, plus $75,000
in attorney's fees.
Transcripts from the March
2008 meeting show some board
members were particularly keen
on the role of County Attorney
Robert "Butch" Battista.
Commissioners Dennis Damato
and John Thrumston had already
publicly questioned whether Bat-
tista should be advising the board,
given that he once was a defen-
dant in the suit and had a direct
hand in Dick's dismissal.
The conversations appeared to


veer away from ON TH
lawsuit settle-
ment strategy 0 Read the full
with their attor- the March 1K
ney, which is the March 10, 21
only reason county comr
board members Ings at www.
can meet in pri- .fl.us, Click c
vate to discuss agenda and
pending court scroll to the
cases.
Battista said in an interview last
week that all the discussions per-
tained to the lawsuit.
Transcripts revealed:
* Board members said they
wanted Battista out of the loop.


IE WEB
transcripts of
8, 2008, and
009, closed
nisslon meet.
clerk.cltrus
on "board
minutes," then
meeting dates.


They wanted to
communicate
directly with
Heather Brock,
the board's out-
side legal coun-
sel who
defended the
county in the
Dick lawsuit
* Then-Corn-


missioner Joyce Valentino, who
chaired the meeting, wanted no
communication with Brock at all
unless it was during a closed
See DICK/Page A5


Eyesore follows foreclosure


BRIAN LaPETER/Cnroricle
Realtor Richard Venticinque worries that homes in foreclosure, like this one in Citrus Springs, are becoming eyesores for the neigh-
bors and that the neglect makes it a tough sell for real estate agents.

Realtors challenged by

poor shape ofproperty

CHRIS VAN ORMER
cvanormrer@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The cute Citrus Springs home looks ap- . ....". .'
pealing on a Web site, but the photos were " ,
shot before the rats arrived on the heels of ... .
months of neglect


* In April, 278,287
homes in Florida
were in some stage
of foreclosure.
* Currently, Citrus
County has 1,320
foreclosed homes.
* Ranked by counties
throughout the
United States, Citrus
County came in at
No. 504 in the high-
est foreclosure rate
among 3,141 coun-
ties. No. 1 is Clark
County, Nev. Nos. 2
and 3 are Osceola
and Lee counties,
both in Florida.
Information from RealtyTrac.


"There are
lots of rats,"
said Realtor
Richard Ven-
ticinque. "The
pool is in bad
shape. The
smell is over-
whelming."
He said he
was showing
the home late
one evening,
about 7:15
p.m., when he
spotted a large
rat and saw
rat feces.
Never mind
the curb ap-
peal helped
out by neigh-
hnbors whn monw


the yard, rat appearances inside a house
kill a sale.
Venticinque said he's coming forward
because of the number of foreclosed prop-
erties in the county that have been left to
deteriorate. This particular modest home
is just one of many that make a Realtor's
job tough.
"The banks won't do anything," Ven-
ticinque said about the foreclosed houses
that have been reclaimed by lenders. "We
need more code enforcement."


A neglected house In Citrus Springs has a swimming pool filled with smelly, green water.


Q andA: Ugly house upshot.
CHRIS VAN ORMER put a lien on the property ( What should neigh-
cvanormer@ to pay for it. .bors do if they see ro-
chronicleonline.com What about over- dents or insects?
Chronicle .grown A. That is
yards? * Code Enforcement an environ-
Gary Maidhof, Develop- A By 527-5350. mental health
ment Services director for F 1 o r i d a issue. It's a
the county, addressed the Florie t Environmental tough task be-
issues raised about un- statute, the Health 527-5295. cause the gov-
maintained foreclosed county can't Control e
homes. cut grass, be- i Mosquito Control ernment has
homes. cu grass, e 527-778 no right to
How much can the cause it can't 527-7478. enter a prop-
. county do to repair enhance the erty without a
the homes? value of private property, warrant, and courts do not
A. An ordinance allows If neighbors have permis- issue warrants without
the county to take care of sion from the homeowner supporting evidence.
structural issues, such as or agent, they can cut the What if neighbors
missing doors or a col- grass. Otherwise, they are . detect a constant
lapsed roof. The county at risk of being considered odor of propane?
can fix the problem and trespassers. See UPSHOT/Page A7


See EYESORE/Page A7


For many

workers,


fear of

layoff is a

motivator
Associated Press
Her job description says Made-
line Adams is a social worker.
But lately she's begun volunteer-
ing for tasks she never had be-
fore at the St. Louis marriage
counseling agency where she
works: planning events, ordering
supplies, stocking shelves. She
estimates she's put in hundreds
of hours of unpaid overtime'
work.
Adams isn't gunning for a pro-
motion. She just wants to keep
her job.
B a s.,s e s
around the More
country
these days employees
are- discov-
ering it's not seem
too much to
ask for a lit- to be
tle extra showing
help around
the office. up early,
Anything
but forgoing
More em-
SMor y e e s vacation
seem to be time,
showing up
early, forgo- taking on
ing vacation
time, taking extra
on extra projects
projects - projeCtS
and doing it ... - and
all with a
s m i l e doing it all
(whether
real or oth- with a
erwise). Smile
It's hard to smile
say just how (whether
widespread
the phenom- real or
enon is. But
Labor De- otherwise).
apartment fig-
ures show workers have sharply
boosted their productivity over
the past year as layoffs mounted.
Workers' output-per-hour jumped
2.7 percent during 2008 - nearly
double the increase during 2007
and triple the increase in 2006.
Not all that extra productivity
has been voluntary. Some work-
ers are simply forced to do more
as co-workers leave, notes Steve
Davis, an economist with the
American Enterprise Institute.
The pressure mounted Friday,
when the government said em-
ployers cut 345,000 jobs in May,
and the nation's jobless rate hit
a quarter-century high of 9.4 per-
cent. Fear of being the next lay-
off is pushing some workers to
fight harder to cling to their jobs,
said Bruce Tulgan, founder of
New Haven, Conn.-based Rain-
maker Thinking Inc., workplace
consultants.
See LAYOFF/Page A4


Classifieds...................D4
Crossword ..................A14
Editorial........................ C2
Horoscope ..................A14
Lottery Numbers ............B4
M ovies ........................... A12
Obituaries ................... A6
Together...................... A13


Amish
move
Small
towns in
Colorado
welcome
Amish
families.
/Page A10


Sikorski's Attic
Regular columnist flushes out facts about this little figurine./HomeFront

Obamia in FkanCe President marks anniversary of D-Day./Page A8


, w
'4"W


25 gad ate Seven Rivers school conducts ceremony./Page A3

Switching gears Many try new careers during the recession/Page D1 '-


Tonys tonight
Annual award show
airs live from 8 to 11 p m
tonight on CBS Page B6



6 184578 2007!1 o


Transcripts reveal details from

ousted county employee's lawsuit


I


fc


.,
1- 1






A2 SUNDAY,JUNI 7, 2009


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CITRUS MEMORIAL
cT~e~cyi^/ad~e nz


78 42


CiITRUS COVNNJY (FL~) CHRONICLE











Page A3 -SUNDAY, JUNE 7,2009



TATE&


LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


County BRIEFS

Republican club
to meet June 20
The North Suncoast Re-
publican Club will meet on
Saturday, June 20.
The guest speaker will be
candidate for U.S. Senate
and former U.S. Sen. Bob
Smith. The public is invited to
attend. Meet for coffee at
8:30 a.m. at the Sugarmill
Woods County Club, 1 Dou-
glas St., Homosassa.
For directions, visit
www,nsrc-gop.com.
Democratic Club
to meet Saturday
The Central Citrus Demo-
cratic Club will meet at 11
a.m. Saturday at the Central
Ridge Library, on the comer
of Roosevelt and Forest
Ridge Boulevard in Beverly
Hills.
The featured speaker is
Donna Munro, a native
Floridian. Munro is a retired
Navy nurse of 25 years, in-
cluding service during Viet-
nam and Desert Storm. She
has 31 credited years of re-
tired civil service. She holds a
dual Master of Science in
nursing administration and
education. \
Munro will speak about
veterans' issues with empha-
sis on Post Traumatic Stress
Syndrome.
The public is'invited to at-
tend.
Democrat group
to meet June 17
The Citrus County Demo-
cratic Executive Committee
will meet 7 p.m. Wednesday,
June 17, at the Beverly Hills
Community Center, 1 Civic
Circle.
The.Citrus County Demo-
cratic Executive Committee
welcomes all registered De-
mocrats who wish to be part
of a renewed, activist pro-
gram.
Refreshments will be
served after the meeting. For
information, call DEC Chair
Deb DeVito at 746-0638 or e-
mail drdevitol@yahoo.com,
Free rabies clinic
Saturday for pets
There will be a rabies clinic
from 8 a.m, to noon Saturday
at Paws-itively Pets in Inver-
ness. The clinic is for those in,
need and will be sponsored
by the Citrus County Board of
County Commissidners and
the Humane Society of Citrus
County.
The st6re is at 751 S.
Smith Ave., which is off State
Road 44 just east of the inter-
section with Croft Avenue.
The rabies vaccine and
county tag will be free to
those who need help with the
fees.
Interested pet owners
should call for a reservation
at 341-2222. Those without
reservations can come in at
11 a.m., and they will be seen
on a first-come first-served
basis as long as supplies
last.
Sponsors include Room for
One More Pet Rescue; Hu-
manitarians of Florida Inc.;
and Dan Rebman, DVM, of
Floral City Animal Clinic; and
the Citrus County Chronicle.
Progress Energy
rate hearing set
The series of public hear-
ings to discuss Progress En-
ergy's requested rate
increases to pay for the ad-
vance costs of Its nuclear
power upgrades have been
scheduled.
The meetings will take
place In July throughout the
Tampa Bay area. A meeting
Is scheduled from 9 a.m. to
noon Friday, July 17, at the
Citrus County Auditorium,
3610 S. Florida Ave,, Inver-
ness,
The hearings are being
conducted prior to a full rate
hearing In September, when
the Florida Public Service
Commission will make a decl-


slon on the rate Increase ap-
plication.
If additional Information Is
needed regarding the hearing
locations and related Issues,
call state Sen. Mike Fasano's
office at (727) 848-5885 or
toll free at (800) 948-5885.
-From staff reports


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Danny Aiuto gets help with his mortarboard Friday night as he walks into graduation ceremonies at Seven Rivers Christian School in Lecanto. From
left are: Carolyn Allen, Jeremy Massullo, Tucker Cortese and Aiuto.



Seven Rivers graduates 25


NANCY KENNEDY
nkennedy@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
W ith all the solemnity of
a conmnencement cer-
emony, the sacredness
ofa church service
and the joy ofa family reunion.
the 25-menber class of2009 from
Seven R ivers Christian School
graduated Fr-iday in the sanctuary
of Seven Rikers Presb.eterian
Church in Lecanto.
It %\as the school's 10th com-
mencement, culminating its 20th.
year as a school.
Fifteen of the students had been
together at the school 15 years,
since pre-K 3.
Class Salutatorian Anthony
Kauffmann encouraged his class-
mates to consider their coming
college years as a missions trip.
"Often at graduations the speak-
ers say something like, 'We are the
generation who will change the-
world.' But it's Christ who will
change the world," he said. "May
we be the generation who will
bring the world to Christ."
Kauffmann will be attending
New York University in the fall to
study engineering.
Class Valedictorian Katie Ben-
nett highlighted the close relation-
ships the class has shared as a
group.
"From the outside we may have
looked like a random group of in-
dividuals, much like any typical
senior class," she said. "But God
hand-picked the individuals on
this stage - a hippie drummer, a


Valedictorian Katherine Bennett becomes emotional Friday night during
her commencement address at Seven Rivers Christian School.


horse fanatic, aspiring philoso-
pher, a squirrel hunter, a kid with
11 toes, a homecoming queen and
so much more - each with spe-
cific gifts and talents, and put
them together for a cause greater
than themselves."
She also said, while they would
like to think they arrived at this, '
point in their lives by themselves,
they couldn't have done it without
immediate and extended families,
friends, teachers and the church.
Of the teachers she 'said, "They've
give us so much more than,
(lessons) and funny anecdotes;
they've given us the gospel."
Bennett will be attending
Auburn University in the fall in


State BRIEFS -


Man guilty of
beating girlfriend
FORT LAUDERDALE -A
Plantation man has been con-
victed of attempted murder for
repeatedly hitting his ex-girl-
friend in the head with a
sledgehammer.
A Broward jury came back
with 23-year-old Brandon
Bishop's guilty verdict Friday
after deliberating just 30 min-
utes. He could face life in
prison at his July 10 sentenc-
ing,
Prosecutors say Bishop at-
tacked 22-year-old Jennifer
McClary in August 2006 when
she arrived at his home for a
date. He pinned her to the
floor and hit her with a sledge-
hammer at least six times.
Doctors didn't expect
McClary to survive the attack,
and she suffered severe brain
damage.
Bishop had pleaded not
guilty by reason of insanity. His
attorney argued that he suf-
fered from depression.
Man 'gets 6 months
In bald eagle death
TAMPA-A Florida man has
been sentenced to six months
In federal prison for shooting
and killing a bald eagle.


Jesse Barresse was sen-
tenced by a U.S. District Court
judge in Tampa on Friday. The
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
said he killed the bald eagle
Jan. 13, 2008, while illegally
duck hunting in Ruskin.
After completing his prison
sentence Barresse will spend
a year on supervised release.
He has to pay a fine of $500
and $25 in court fees.
Barresse was charged with
violating a federal law protect-
ing eagles after he bragged
about the killing.
Plaza named after
Bo Diddley
GAINESVILLE - Officials
in Gainesville have renamed,
the city's downtown plaza after
rock 'n' roll legend and former
Florida resident Bo Diddley.
Diddley died in June 2008.
Officials honored him Friday
by unveiling a mural and re-
naming the downtown space
the Bo Diddley Community
Plaza. Diddley lived in Archer,
a few miles southwest of
Gainesville, and played at the
plaza In 2006.
Diddley's family plans to un-
veil his tombstone at 10 a.m.
today In Bronson, also south-
west of Gainesvllle,
-From wire reports


the honors program as a mathe-
matics major.
The Senior Swordsman award,
given for outstanding Christian
character and consistent integrity,
was given to Carolyn Allen, Who
will be attending Florida State
University in the fall.
The commencement address
was given by Dr. Frank James,
provost of Gordon-Conwell Theo-
logical Seminary in South Hamil-
ton, Mass.
James, a former church history
professor, spoke about the modem
evangelical church being in trou-
ble. He mentioned a popular book
on the market, "They Like Jesus,
But Not the Church," and charged


the graduating seniors with reviv-
ing and re-energizing the church
by going into the world with a com-
bination of "orthodoxy and ortho-
praxy," Bible truth mixed.with
compassionate service, filled with
radical grace.
"When Jesus (pardoned) the
woman caught in adultery, he did-
n't first ask if she.. .was worthy of
his help. He just gave her grace,"
James said. "The world needs
Christians to engage the same way.
That's how you change the.world."
On Thursday. Inverness Chris-
tian Academy in Inverness gradu-
ated five seniors, including class
Valedictorian Ashley Emerick,
who told her class that, as gradu-
ates of a Christian school, they
have had leaders who made a spir-
itual impact on them. She ex-
horted her fellow graduates to
become spiritual leaders for the
generations coming behind them.
Class Salutatorian Samantha
Faron also emphasized the impor-
tance of friends, families and
teachers keeping them strong.
New Testament Christian
,New Testament Christian
School in Floral City also gradu-
ated five seniors, on May 28. Class
Valedictorian, Zachary Rigsby,
spoke about potential and
charged the class to do everything
to the best of their ability. Class
Salutatorian, Blake Nichol, who
had been at New Testament since
preschool, told the class to enjoy
life and find a job where you can
have fun, but to set goals and
strive to reach them.


Boy charged with
knifing mother
An 11-year-old Lecanto boy
angry with his mother over "dis-
cipline issues" was arrested Fri-
day evening and charged with
cutting her with a steak knife.
* The-boy, whose name is
withheld by the Chronicle be-
cause of his age, had threat-
ened to kill his mother in her
sleep. An arrest report said the
boy's sister picked up a butcher
block containing knives to re-
move them from the kitchen
when he grabbed one and
began waving it at his mother,
The report said the mother
grappled with her son and was
able to gain control of the knife
after being cut on three fingers.
She refused medical treatment,
The boy told sheriff's
deputies he had trouble control-
ling his anger. He was charged
with aggravated battery with a
deadly weapon and released to
the custody of the Department
of Juvenile Justice.
Homosassa man
faces sex charges
A Homosassa man was ar-
rested Friday evening and
charged with having sex with a
9-year-old girl. -
Dale Donaldson Meig, 58, of


5561 S. Woodside Terrace, was
held without bond on a charge
of sexual battery on a person
under 12.
The girl, now 14 and living in
Inverness, said she was staying
the night in Meig's home and
sleeping alone in a bedroom
when Meig crawled into the
room and committed oral sex
on her while she pretended to
be asleep, according to an ar-
rest report.
The girl said she didn't tell
anyone because she was em-
barrassed. An arrest report did.
not say why the girl came for-
ward June 1 with the allega-
tions.
Meig told Citrus County
Sheriff's investigators that.he
doesn't recall the incident ever
taking place and if it did, he "re-
pressed" it In his mind,
Inverness man faces
weapon charge
An Inverness man, who re-
ports said threatened a cable
installer, was arrested Saturday
afternoon on a charged of ag-
gravated assault with a deadly
weapon.
Randall V. Greig, 77, of 3433
S. Fairway Terrace, got into an
argument with a cable com-
pany Installer shortly after noon.
Greig said he thought the man


ON THE NET
* For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the Public
Information link, then
on Arrest Reports
* Watch the "Arrested
Developments" show
from the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office at
www.chronicleonline.tv.
* For the Record reports,
usually found on Page -
A4 when available, are
also archived online at
www.chronicleonline
.com.

was trespassing on his property
in installing underground cable.
The man said Greig went
into his home and returned with
a rifle and pointed it at him. The
man said he then went to his
truck and called the sheriff's of-
fice.
Greig told deputies the rifle
was unloaded and he never
pointed it at the other man. Re-
ports said Greig apologized for
his actions, saying he knew it
was wrong to leave his home
carrying a rifle.
Bond was set at $7,000.
-From staff reports


Arrest :'- r'S -


--=--=---==


--------










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AA ......m T..,i -7 n2n0


ru-v SUNDAYA, JUINE /, ZUU15P


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrest
* Eugene Andren Cooper,
43, of 1441 County Road 643,
Mountain Home, Ark., at 4:22
a.m. Saturday on a charge of
driving under the influence.
The arrest occurred after
Cooper was involved in a traffic
accident. His blood alcohol
concentration was .117 per-
cent; the legal limit in Florida is
.08 percent. Bond $500.
Other arrests
* Frank Lee Sheppard, 39,
of 6939 Gordon Place, Ho-
mosassa, at 2:37 a.m. Satur-
day on a charge of driving
while license revoked-habitual
offender. Bond $2,000.
* Alfonso Eugene Santos,
S25, of 6791 N.. Charles St.,
\ Hemando, at 3:34 a.m. Satur-
day on charges of violation of
probation on an original charge
of battery, and failure to appear
in court on a misdemeanor
charge of driving while license
suspended. No bond.
* Kevin D. Spornhauer,
34, of 9886 W. Fanwood Lane,
Crystal River, at 1 a.m. Satur-
day on a charge of criminal
mischief. Reports said he
spray-painted messages on
the main sign and one building
of the Pelican Bay apartments.
Bond $1,000.
* Kind M. Donaldson, 29,
of 211 S. Jackson St., Beverly
Hills, at 6:09 p.m. Fnoday on
charges of possession of a con-
trolled substance and posses-
sion of less than 20 grams of
marijuana. She was then
charged with concealing a con-
trolled substance on her person
in the jail. Total bond $14,000.
* John R. Barzee, 39, of,
5559 W. Erlen Lane, Ho-
mosassa, at 3:40 p.m. Friday
on charges of battery and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia.
Bond $1,000.


Burglaries
* A burglary, reported on
June 2, occurred approximately
at midnight to an unoccupied
residence in the 2600 block of W.
Goldenrod Drive, Beverly Hills.
*A burglary, reported on June
2, occurred at approximately 9
p.m. May 20, to an unoccupied
residence in the 9800 block of N.
Snowball Point, Crystal River.
* Preliminary investigation re-
vealed between May 29 at 7:30
p.m. and June 1 at 7 a.m., a
commercial burglary and a fraud
occurred to an unoccupied struc-
ture in the 6900 block of S.
Straight Avenue, Homosassa.
* A burglary, reported on
June 3, occurred at approxi-
mately midnight June 2, to an
. unoccupied structure in the 4200
block of S. Rainbow Drive, In-
verness.
* Preliminary investigation re-
vealed that sometime between
June 2 at 5 p.m. and June 3 at
7:45 a.m., a burglary occurred
to a commercial building on Vil-
lage Center Circle, Ho-
mosassa.
* A burglary, reported on
June 3, occurred at approxi-
mately noon on May 31, to an
unoccupied residence in the
9300 block of E. Crescent
Drive, Invemess.
* A burglary, reported on
June 3, occurred at approxi-
mately midnight to an unoccu-
pied residence on S. Barbour
Street, Beverly Hills.
1. * A burglary,-reported-on.
June 4, occurred at approxi-
mately 9 a.m. to a conveyance
on Eden Drive, Inverness.
* A burglary, reported on
June 4, occurred approximately
at midnight to a conveyance in
the 8300 block of E. Turner
Camp Road, Invemess.
* A burglary occurred at ap-
proximately 7 p.m. June 2, to
an unoccupied structure in the
6900 block of S. Straight Av-
enue, Homosassa.


For the RECORD


LAYOFF
Continued from Page Al
Often, the efforts
amount to common sense.
People dress better and
show up early. They say
nice - OK, flattering -
things to the boss. And'
they try to look busy
"I've started to see a sea
change," Tulgan said. "A
growing number of people
are saying: 'I've got to roll
my sleeves up and do
something now.' They're
finding ways they can
identify problems before
they happen."
At a restaurant where
Tulgan consulted, the
kitchen crew crafted a
plan to reduce waste and
please the cost-conscious
managers. Rather than
cook fries to order, they
made them in batches of
100 at a time, so there were
fewer to throw out be-
tween orders. Tulgan said
they were hoping to stave
off layoffs as business
slowed.
Some workers are aim-
ing for the "'halo effect,"
said Bernie Sparks,
founder of the 21st Cen-
tury Leadership work-
place consulting: When
managers decide who goes
and who stays, those., seen
as having a halo over their
heads stand 'a better
chance of surviving.
- -That's what- Chris Kirk-
man is thinking. A graphic
designer in San Diego,
Kirkman plans to scrap the
weeklong summer vaca-
tion he and his wife usu-,
ally take. They'll instead
take off a Friday and go on
a long weekend road trip.
Kirkman says he thinks
avoiding absences can
help an employee build a
reputation as especially
dedicated to the company.


"It kind of pays to hold
on to your vacation days,"
Kirkman said. "It not only
helps when you get laid
off, but it helps you work a
little bit ,harder for your
management to see."
Tulgan says forgoing va-
cation time isn't likely to
save anyone's job. Man-
agers tend to calculate the
overall value each worker
brings, regardless of how
much or how little vaca-
tion they take.
"But on the other hand,
if you disappear on a long
vacation and nobody really
misses you, then you might
be putting ideas in a man-
ager's head," he said.
And it's hardly guaran-
teed that anyone's sudden
boost in productivity - or
attitude - can avert a lay-
off. Bosses tend to see
through behavior that
amounts to, well, sucking
up, said Gary Walstrom,
founder of Culture Index
Inc. consulting firm in
Kansas City, Mo.
Walstrom helps compa-
nies decide whom to let go.
He urges them to focus on
hard data - shedding the
salesmen who generate the
lowest revenue or the cus-
tomer service staffer with
the most unresolved com-
plaints. Someone who
starts showing up early
once the economy sours
isn't necessarily , worth
keeping.
Kathie Martin treats
each workday as an eight-
hour job interview. At 59,
she has more than 30 years'
experience in marketing
and public relations. But
she isn't counting on it to
assure her job at Alabama
Public Television in Birm-
ingham.
In January, Martin was
told her public relations
position would be elimi-
nated in two months. Then


she got a break: A co-
worker left his job in the
nonprofit station's
fundraising department,
creating an opening.
Martin had never done
fundraising. But her boss
offered her a deal: She
could stay at the station if
she spent most of her time
on fundraising. She leapt
at the chance.
She feels today's tight
economy doesn't provide
the luxury to turn down
any job, even if it's not in
your field of expertise.
"You can't just rely on
what you already know;
you have to keep learning,"
she said. "The more you
know, the more valuable to
the company you are."
Learning how to solicit
money has demanded new
skills, Martin said. So she's
working longer hours -
and not complaining about
it.
Some unionized workers
have decided to accept pay
cuts or sacrifice benefits to
save their jobs. In Mult-
nomah County, Ore., county
workers voluntarily agreed
to surrender their usual
cost-of-living pay raises to
save the county money.
Union president Ken
Allen said his members re-
alized that sinking tax rev-
enue could eventually
force layoffs. The conces-
sions are temporary, he
said. Workers will. wait
until revenue rises to ask
for the raises back.
Companies can use the
recession as a motivating
force, said Peter Cappelli,
professor of management
at the University of Penn-
sylvania's Wharton School
of Business.
"It's possible that you
can scare people into per-
forming better," Cappelli
said. "It is also possible
you might be able to en-


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
FI Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


82 70 1.00 79 9 0.25

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Excluase daily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 88 Low: 68
Partly sunny; 50% chance of
thunderstorms
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 67
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of thunderstorms

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 68
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of thunderstorms

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday , 83/70
Record 104/63
Normal 90/69
Mean temp. 77
Departure from mean -2
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday , 0.17 in.
Total for the month 2.23 in.
Total for the year 20.95 in.
Normal for the year 17.97 in.
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6-.moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.95 in.


L F'cast
69 ts
76 ts
71 ts
68 ts
72 ts
68 is
78 ts
70 ts
68 is


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallanassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
Is
Is
ts
s
Is
Is
Is
ts
Is


S:. .:R.. MOOK.....001 : -- --
Southwest winds from 5 to 10 knols. Gulf w ater
Seas 1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland tem perature
waters a light chop. Isolated showers
and thunderstorms today. n a


Taken at Aripeka
SLAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.75 28:86 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.59 33.64 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnyerness 35.15 35.18 40.60'
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.47 37.51 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea leyel. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded In any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geoldgical Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have anyquestions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.


THE.NATION


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. , 69
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 67%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees, grasses and weeds were all
light.
*Ught - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.


AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good w
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MI
(MORNING)
6/7 SUNDAY 5:35 11:47 6
6/8 MONDAY 6:26 12:13 6


NOR
AFTERE
6:00
6:52


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
0 C SUNSET TONIGHT.........
SUNRISE TOMORROW
17 11 32 1 1 MOONRISE TODAY........
ME 7 J M1S JUE22 JiM28 MOONSET TODAY .........


-BUMn CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating i6: LOW. There is no burn
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 75
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division
Wel site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

i WATERING RULES -
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverne
addresses ending In 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through
Wednesday; addresses ending In 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursd
ending In 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres In size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p
and propertIes two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4


. , . ,.,.", TIDES
*From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowltzka' 7:01 /213a 5:38 p/1:45 p
Crystal River" 5:22 a/11:07 a 3:59 p/--
Wlthlacoocheo* 3:09 a/8:55 a 1:46 p/10:00 p
Homosasa"s* " 6:11 /1:12 a 4:48 p/12:44 p


***At M
Mon
High/Low


ith pollutants City
. Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
MAJOR Atlantic City
ERNOON) Austin
-- Baltimore
12:39 Billings
Birmingham
Boston
*. . :.B Buffalo
..............8:27 P.M. Burlington, VT
............... 6:31 A.M. Charleston, SC
............... 8:46 RM. Charleston, WV
charlotte
............... 6:08 A.M. Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
S.' Columbia, SC
ban. Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
4-6777. For Dallas
of Forestry's Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
- . . Evansville, IN
SHarrisburg
County Hartford
ess residents, Houston
ending in 2 or 3, Indianapolis
gh 0 can water Jackson
lays; addresses Las Vegas
Little Rock
p.m. on their day Los Angeles
p.m. on their day. Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
ason's Creek Mobile
day Montgomery
High/Low Nashville


7:37 a12:50 a 6:14 p/2:22 p
5:58 a/12:12 a 4:35 p/11:44 a
3:45 a/9:32 a 2:22 p710:34 p
6:47 a/1:49 a 5:24 p/1:21 p


Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. Fcst H L
78 59 c 74 56
86 62 pc 80 56
80 57 pc 84 59
82 63 pc 86 66
73 58 .pc 76 64
94 61 pc 96 72
76 59 pc 85 64
50 44 .02 sh 50 37
85 56 pc 90 64
72 54 .14 ts 72 49
68 54 pc 78 53
71 53 Sh 69 51
78 49 sh 69 47
82 70 .22 ts 82 72
75 55 pc 88 60
80 63 .02 pc 86 66
63 51 .02 ts 66 53
80 46 pc 85 64
80 48 ts 77 58
82 66 .01 ts 86 67
81 49 ts 86 66
78 52' sh 73' 49
93 69 pc 94 73
79 50 ts 74 50
79 57 .55 ts 75 63
74 53 sh 74 58
97 66 pc 95 68
80 52 pc 88 66
79 58 .02 pc 84 60
81 52 pc 82 57
91 66 pc 92 72
80 53 pc 83 65
85 56 .02 pc 91 69
79 62 pc 85 68
84 58 pc 92 69
68 60 pc 67 59
79 52 pc 88 65
82 58 pc 91 72
57 46 .01 sh 59 49
52 49 .65 c 63 52
86 60 pc 90 67
86 60 pc 91 66
81 51 pc 89 63


LST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 84 66 pc 89 72
New York City 76 57 pc 82 64
Norfolk ' 72 65 pc 81 67
Oklahoma City 88 66 pc 93 71
Omaha '83 52 2.11 ts 76 57
Palm Springs 86 60 pc 88 66
Philadelphia 78 59 pc 85 65
Phoenix 91 70 s 92 69
Pittsburgh 78 48 pc 82 59
Portland, ME 65 53 sh 71 51
Portland, Ore 66 56 .06 pc 73 54
Providence, R.I. 70 54 pc 80 55
Raleigh 76 64 trace ts 86. 66
Rapid City 46 42 .13 sh 51 39
Reno 53 48 .22 ts 74 52
Rochester, NY 75 51 sh 68 49
Sacramento 78 55 pc 82 56
St. Louis 82 62 ts 88 71
St. Ste. Marie 54 39 sh 59 42
Salt Lake City 75 50 ts 64 50
San Antonio 94 66 pc 95 75
San Diego 70 60 pc 67 61
San Francisco 66 56 pc 63 51
Savannah 81 70 1.62 ts 84 69
Seattle 63 55 pc 70 53
Spokane 68 56 sh 68 41
Syracuse 78 53 sh 67 51
Topeka 88 69 .01 ts 89 66
Washington 74 61 pc 86 67
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 105 Wink, Texas LOW 20 Bryce Canyon, Utah

WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 90/75/pc
Amsterdam 62/43/sh
Athens 92/71/pc
Beijing 84/64/sh
Berlin 60/43/sh
Bermuda 79/73/ts


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy; dr-drizzl; airo /515s
f=fair; h=hazy; pc.partly cloudy; r-rain; Calgary 50/34/sh
rs=raln/snow mix; sasunny; sh=showers; Havana 85/74/ts
sn=snow; ts-thunderstorms; w=windy. Hong Kong 89/77/pc
02009 Weather Central, Madison, Wl. Jerusalem 84/63/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


68/52/pc
57/37/sh
76/51/pc
84/52/pc
68/50/pc
61/45/sh
61/42/sh
74/63/sh
77/63/ts
62/45/sh
81/63/s
61/52/sh
61/42/sh


Z1 C kT T R LI S .. ' . C U N I Y,



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gage the employee in some
sort of improved perform-
ance if there is this view
that: 'If we all pull to-
gether, we might get
through this."'
Not that things always
work out smoothly
"Workers in a downturn
can also get so nervous
that they just freeze up
and aren't able to do good
work, especially if they're
afraid of being laid off and
it's not clear what the stan-
dards are," Cappelli said.
That's why some employ-
ees are pushing for more
face time with the boss.
Luke Walters, an engi-
neering construction con-
sultant in Chicago, grew
fearful last year as con-
struction projects slowed.
His firm still had work.
But he'd heard of engi-
neers being laid off at
other firms.
He met with his man-
ager.
"I said: 'Look, is the eco-
nomic downturn going to
affect me and my posi-
tion?'"
His manager said it
eventually could. But he
agreed to notify Walters if
job cuts might be looming.
Meantime, Walters can
focus on his work and keep
his productivity up, with-
out feeling the need to
send out resumes to poten-
tial employers.
. Adams, the St. Louis so-
cial worker, wishes she
were so relaxed. She fears
reduced federal funding
could cause staff cuts at
her agency
If so, Adams, 30, wants to
be last in line when man-
agers start deciding who's
expendable.
In taking on more than
her regular duties, she fig-
ures, "I make sure I'm a
person the agency can't do
without."


.....
.....










Ciu o �m'(L CHONCL.SoDY .UF7 2b


A tion out there in the street,
CASE if you will, in the newspa-
per and what have you,"
Continued from Page Al Battista said, according to
the transcript.
board meeting. That was Thrumston agreed that
because her husband, Sal, Brock should be the
was also a defendant in the board's point person on
lawsuit. Valentino said she the case.
didn't want the public to "..It would give me a
think she was helping her more comfortable feeling
husband's case while get- of perception in the public
ting advice as a commis- that we are doing the right
sioner. thing here and that Mr.
* Brock told commis- Battista is not being in-
sioners not to discuss the volved in that," he said.
case at all in public Battista had
and with the press.
However, Battista role in case
suggested to the from the start
three incumbents . P 1 Battista didn't
in a re-election fire Tom Dick. But
campaign that a * he upheld then-Ad-
siment might no-o be- ministrator June
meant might not be aFisher's decision.
enough. He sug- Robert Dick, a 25-year-
gested if they "Butch" plus county govern-
wanted to say more Battista ment employee,
on the campaign was fired June 9,
trail about the lawsuit that 2006, by Fisher on allega-
they consult first with tions of insubordination.
Brock. Fisher said that in her ab-
* Dick's attorney, Gary sence and against her
Wilson, wrote in a letter to wishes, Dick re-
Brock that he con- leased requests for
sidered Battista's proposals for fi-
role a conflict of in- . nancing on the new
terest. Wilson said * Emergency Opera-
Battista supposedly, tons Center.
declined a $550,000 She said Dick vi-
settlement offer ' olated the state
from Dick without '. Sunshine Law by
discussing it first polling commis-
with commission- Tom Dick sioners for their
ers. support * before-
Battista said that wasn't hand. And, though it was
his call. He said Brock told not a part of the official
him.that the county's in- dismissal action, she also
surance carrier, which accused Dick of being.
paid for any legal costs under the influence of al-
above $100,000, wouldn't cohol during a .staff meet-
approve the settlement ing.
and the only way the board Dick denied all the alle-
could approve it is if the gations. He said he wasn't
county picked up the total polling commissioners,
tab. only calling them to let
Still, Battista 'agreed them know what he was
with Brock's offer to di- about to do and to see if
rectly communicate case there were any objections.
updates with commission- He strongly denied the
ers. Sunshine allegations and
S"There's a perception, being under the influence
there's already a percep- of alcohol at work.


Dick, a 25-year plus county
government employee, was fired
June 9, 2006, by Fisher on
allegations of insubordination. Fisher
said that in her absence and against
her wishes, Dick released requests
for proposals for financing on the
new Emergency Operations Center.


The state attorney's of-
fice said no Sunshine laws
were broken.
Fisher conducted a ter-
mination hearing and
stuck with her original de-
cision. Dick asked for a
post-determination hear-
ing, over which Battista
presided. In August 2006,
Battista sided with Fisher
in dismissing Dick.
Dick sued in federal
court, claiming the dis-
missal was directly tied to
his friendship with former
administrator Richard
Wesch and Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy.
He.also sued as individ-
uals Fisher, Battista, Com-
missioner Valentino and
her. husband, Sal. He
claimed Commissioner
Valentino violated his
rights by making the false
Sunshine allegation; Dick
said Sal Valentino did the
same thing by telling peo-
ple that Dick was going to,
lose his job for being
under the influence.
The county assigned the
case to Heather Brock
from the Tampa law firm
Fowler, White, Boggs and
Banker. Brock has han-
dled employment-related
civil cases with the county
since the late 1990s.,
The board held its first
closed meeting on the case
in March 2008. State law
allows public bodies to
have closed "shade" meet-
ings with their attorneys to
discussed settlement strat-
egy in pending lawsuits.


By the time the board
met, Dick had already
dropped Battista, Fisher
and Commissioner
Valentino as individuals
from the lawsuit. Also,
Fisher had left county em-
ploy in February 2008 for a
job in Highlands County.
The county also had
asked a federal district
court judge to dismiss the
lawsuit. That decision to
deny the motion didn't
come for another year,,
leading to the eventual
settlement.
Prior to the closed meet-
ing, Dick's attorney of-
fered to settle the case for
$550,000, according to
transcripts of that meeting.
Brock told Battista that the
county's insurer would not
settle for that amount; Bat-
tista, in turn, told three
commissioners.
Damato and Thrumston,
however, took the informa-
tion to mean that Battista
had rejected the settle-
ment himself without
board action. They said
Battista should back away
from his involvement in.
the lawsuit.
In the closed meeting,
commissioners agreed that
Brock would communicate
directly with four individ-
ual commissioners any up-
dates. '
Valentino said she
wanted no part in individ-
ual briefings.
"I would prefer not to be
- I have been distant as
much as possible from this


case because of me being
sued," she said, according
to the transcripts. "Even
though it's dropped now
my husband is still in-
volved in the case."
Battista offered
comment alternative
Valentino urged commis-
sioners not to say a word
about the case in public.
"I have always been told
as a commissioner that
anything that is of legal,
we're not to discuss it with
anyone anywhere .includ-
ing the press and I think if
that was done we wouldn't
be setting precedence out
there for any kind of pub-
lic perception," she said.
Battista agreed that
Brock would communicate
issues involving the law-
suit to commissioners, ex-
cluding Valentino.
Commissioners also
seemed to agree to not
comment on the case at all.
Battista, however, sug-
gested another course of
action for Damato,
Phillips and Valentino,
who were up for re-elec-
tion in 2008.
"And for those of you
who are up for re-election,
obviously, this is going to
be tossed at you either
from the audience or from
the person standing next
to you, and obviously, you
need to be able to come up
with some response but
that's going to be up to you'
individually to get ready
for that," he said, accord-
ing to the meeting tran-
script.
Valentino said she
would simply reply that
the case is in litigation
and she would not com-
ment on it.
Battista pressed the
point.
"I think we all under-
stand that you all are fight-
ing to keep the seats you
have on the board and, you
know, God bless you and
more power to you, but


somehow that will have to
be handled and I don't
know whether no com-
ment is where you want to
go," he said. "I think you
need to think now on how
to comment as to that."
He added: "If I take that
position, that tact, because
it's - you know, it's going
to be a hard hit and no
one's going to understand.
They're going to say,
'That's a cop out. You get
off the stage.'"
Battista suggested the
incumbents come up with
a response and run it by
Brock to make sure it
wouldn't damage the
county's case.
Valentino seemed con-
fused by Battista's advice.
"But, Butch, isn't that
how we've handled past
cases?" she asked. "When
we're in litigation, we tell
the citizens we're in litiga-
tion and we're not privy to
speak to the case."
Battista came to the
point.
"All I'm saying is I think
we can give you some wig-
gle room," he said. "I think
we can give you some wig-
gle room when you're on
the platform at these polit-
ical events such that you
can come up with some-
thing other than in front of
that audience 'my attorney
told me not to talk about
that' while the other side's
going to be sitting there
ripping you up one side
and down the other for
whatever reason somehow
involving the suit."
In an interview last
week, Battista said he was
not giving commissioners
campaign advice during a
meeting closed to discuss
litigation strategy.
"We didn't wish to have
things said derogatory to-
ward the county's posi-
tion," he said. "It was to
just protect the county in a
lawsuit, not advice to pro-
vide them something to get
elected."


WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS


* Photos need to be in
sharp focus.
* Photos need to be in
proper exposure: neither
too light nor too dark.
0 Include your name, ad-
dress and phone number
on all photos.
* When identifying persons
in your photo, do so from
left to right.
* We discourage the use of
Polaroid prints.
* Photos printed on home
printers do not reproduce


well; submit the digital
image via disk or e mail.
Staff will color correct
and otherwise "work up"
the image to Chronicle
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* Photos submitted elec-
tronically should be in
maximum-resolution
JPEG (.jpg) format.
* Photos cannot be re-
turned without a self-ad-
dressed, stamped
envelope.
* For more information,
call 563-5660.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Helen
Burkholder, 88
CRYSTAL RIVER
Helen I. Burkholder, age
88, died on May 30, 2009, at
Superior Residences, Ocala,
Florida, from complications
due to Alzheimer's disease.
. She was born in Bedford,
NH, the daughter of Ignacy
and Michalina (Futyra) Woj-
cicki.
Mrs. Burkholder attended
Central High School in Man-
chester, NH, and Hesser
Business School. She was
an active member of the
Polish Social Club and the
Polish Heritage Club. A res-
ident of Crystal River,
Florida, since 1944, Mrs.
Burkholderhad her own ac-
counting business. She was
an avid golfer and was a
charter member of the 7
Rivers Golf and Country
Club. She traveled through-
out the US and the world. In
her later years, she re-
mained very active and en-
joyed walking, gardening
and reading.
She was predeceased by
her husbands Floyd (Danny)
Moran and Kenneth Burk-
holder. Her only son, Robert
Moran, died in 2006. She
was also predeceased by
her two brothers, Chester
and Matthew Wojcicki, and
her sisters, Stella (Lessie)
DiMatteo, Celia Adams, and
Vanda Toscano. She is sur-
vived by a niece, Linda Mur-
phy ofActon, MA, a nephew,
Richard DiMatteo and his
wife Katherine of Leyden,
MA, and a nephew, Charles
Adams of Hudson, NH. She
is also survived by three
great nephews, Matthew
and Benjamin Murphy, and
Nicholas DiMitteo and a
great niece, Elisha DiMat-
teo and husband Rich LeP-
ape, as well as two
great-great nieces, Asha and
Juniper (DiMatteo) LePape.
A Memorial service for
Helen will be held on
Wednesday June 10,2009, at
11:00 A.M. from the Strick-
land Funeral Home Chapel
in Crystal River, FL, with
Father Michael Suszynski of
the St. Benedict's Catholic
Church officiating. Inurn-
ment will be a t a later date


at St Hedwig Cemetery,
Bedford, NH.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.
Wanda
Canino, 84
INVERNESS
Wanda E Canino, age 84, of
Inverness, died Friday, June
5, 2009, at the Hernando-
Pasco Hospice Citrus Care
Center in Inverness. Private
cremation arrangements are
under the care of the Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory, Inverness.

Blanche
Crum, 96
BUSHNELL
Mrs. Blanche Carlton
Crum, age 96, of Bushnell,
Florida, received into the
Loving arms of her heavenly
Father Friday, June 5, 2009,
in Floral City, Florida. She
was born in Moultrie, Ga.,
and came to Bushnell in
1932. Mrs. Crum was the
Owner/Operator of Crum's
Feed and Seed, of Bushnell
for 47 years with her late
husband. Mrs. Crum was the
oldest member of First Bap-
tist Church of Bushnell with
76 years of membership.
She was also involved with
the Joyfull Hearts Senior
Ministries, taught Sunday.
School to all ages from the
cradle to the seniors class,
teaching until 2000, also
played the piano, sand in
the choir, Past president
Women's Missionary Union,
taught the girls auxiliary
and Sunbeams all at the
First Baptist Church of
Bushnell.
Mrs. Crum was preceded
in death by her late hus-
band, Mr. Wilbur Crum
(1992). Surviving are her two
daughters: Ms. Ann
SChisholm, Sanford, FL, and
Mrs. Marilyn (Albert) Jor-
dan, Inverness, FL; sister:
Mary Eckles, Clearwater,
FL; 5 grandchildren: Bruce
Jordan, Carol (David) Trim-
ble, Keith (Pam) Jordan,
Scott Chisholm, Kelly
Chisholm; 5 great-grand-
children: Taylor, Katie,
Paige, Jack, and. Vincent;
several nieces and


nephews.
Funeral Service for Mrs.
Blanche Carlton Crum of
Bushnell will be held 10:00
AM Tuesday, June 9,2009, at
the First Baptist Church of
Bushnell. Friends may call
from 6-8:00 PM., Monday,
June 8, 2009, at the Purcell
Funeral Home, Bushnell.
Interment will follow the fu-
neral services at Tema
Cemetery, Bushnell, FL.
Purcell Funeral Home,
114 W Noble Av., Bushnell,
Florida 33513, (352) 793-
4531.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.




Harold
Devlin Jr., 83
CRYSTAL RIVER
Harold M. Devlin, Jr., 83,
of Crystal River, Fl, died on
June 4, 2009, at the Hospice
House of Citrus County in
Lecanto, FL. Harold was
born on August 24, 1925, in
Baltimore, MD, the son of
Harold and Regina Devlin.
He was a veteran of the
United States Army Air
Corp, serving in World War
II. Mr. Devlin retired from
the US Government. He
moved to Crystal River in
1989 from Bowie, MD.
Harold was a member of
Our Lady of Grace Catholic
Church in Beverly Hills.
He was preceded in death
by his daughter Dana
Eileen, brother Jack and sis-
ter Nancy. Survivors in-
clude his wife of 57 years,
Nancy K. Devlin of Crystal
River, Fl; daughters, Denise
Devlin of Coronado, CA,


BROWN
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY


(352)
795-0111

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Ellen Cummings (Arthur) of
Midlothian, VA, and Regina
Volle (Stephen) of San
Diego, CA; sister Doris
Barnsley of Alexandria, VA;
brother Daniel Devlin of
Rockville, MD; and seven
grandchildren.
Visitation for Mr. Devlin
will be held from 5:00 pm to
7:00 pm on Monday, June 8,
2009, at the Heinz Funeral
Home, 2507 Hwy 44 West, In-
verness. The funeral mass
will be conducted at 10:00
am on Tuesday, June 9,2009,
at Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church in Beverly
Hills. In lieu of flowers, me-
morials may be given to Hos-
pice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464. Envelopes will be
provided at the funeral
home. Heinz Funeral Home
& Cremation, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.
Mary Fleet, 92
SPOKANE, WASH.
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Mary B.
Fleet, age 92, formerly of
Beverly Hills, who died June
2, 2009, in Spokane, Wash.,
will be at 11:00 AM, Tuesday,
June 9, 2009, at the Beverly
Hills Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Homes. Interment will
follow at Fountains Memorial
Park, Homosassa.




John 'Whit"y'
Luhan, 8C'-
HOMOSASSA
SPRINGS
John F Luhan, age 86, of
Homosassa Springs, Flor-

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ida, passed away peacefully
on June 3, 2009, at Shands
Hospital in Gainesville in
the presence of loved ones.
He was born and raised in
Cincinnati, Ohio, by his par-
ents, Andrew and Flora
Luhan. Known as "Whitey"
for his light hair, he gradu-
ated from
Purcell
High School
and earned
a degree in
mechanical
engineering
from the
University
of Cincin- John
riati. The Luhan
next day he
reported for military duty
and served in the Third
Army under Gen. George S.
Patton during World War II.
He fought in the Battle of
the Bulge and ended the
war in Pilsen, Czechoslova-
kia, with the rank of captain.
He began his professional
career working on the Ken-
tucky and Ohio turnpikes
and then joined A. M. Kin-
ney, a prestigious engineer-
ing and architectural firm in
Cincinnati, where he rose to
vice president. For eight
years he operated his own
company, Luhan Construc-
tion, but returned to A. M.
Kinney and retired as pres-
ident of its subsidiary, Wal-
ter Kidde Constructors.
In retirement he was an
avid boater and fisherman
in Homosassa Springs and
enjoyed a second home in




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the hills of Blairsville, Geor-
gia. He was admired for his
skills in building and flying
radio-controlled airplanes
and at age 84 completed an
exact model replica of
Jacques Cousteau's ship
'Calypso', a source of con-
siderable pride. He was a
lifelong member and sup-
porter of the VFW
Whitey is survived by his
loving wife of 66 years, Eve-
lyn; sons Jack in New Lon-
don, CT, Ken (Janet) in
Corpus Christi, TX, and
Michael in Geneva, Switzer-
land; a sister, Jeanne
Schmidt in Cincinnati;
grandchildren Aneil, Chad,
Jenny, John, Patrick and
Vijay; and a great-grandson,
Zachary.
A visitation will be held at
Wilder Funeral Home on
Monday, June 8, from 5-7
PM, followed by a funeral
mass at St Benedict's
Church on Tuesday, June 9
at 11 AM. He will be in-
terred at the National
Cemetery in Bushnell with
military honors.
Sign the guest .book at
www.chronicleonline.com.
See DEATHS/Page A7
* Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes.






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CITRUS CouNn' (FL~ C,-rRnNcf I? SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2009 A7


EYESORE
Continued from Page Al
Walking from the front to the back of
the house, people notice the odor of gas
as they pass the propane tank Opening
the door to the lanai reveals a swim-
ming pool half full of green water
Going inside the house, the stench of
gas gives way to the rankness of mold.
Lacking maintenance and repairs,
the house has become a neighborhood
eyesore.
"The problem is so bad now, we had
a fence put up so we wouldn't have to
look at it," said neighbor Donald
Brown.
Brown and another neighbor, Donna
Howell, have been trying to keep the
house clean.
"We took two loads of trash out of it,"
Brown said.
"The person who owned the place
rented it out, but the renter trashed the
place," Howell said.
The previous Realtor sent them a lit-
tle money to maintain the empty house,
the neighbors said, and they bought
pool chemicals themselves.
"We kept the pool going until last
summer," Brown said. "But then they
shut off the water and electricity, so we
couldn't do anything."
"We can't drain the pool except
through the pump, and the pump won't
work without electricity," Howell said.
"They have set off flea bombs inside,
as they say they can see bugs crawling
over to their own houses.
- "We've cleaned it out, but the mold
is slowly taking it over," Howell said.
I While emptying the house of junk,
they found a bread maker in the back
of a closet - and it had dough left in it
' "I have been cutting the grass even
when the renter was there because I
don't like to look at it," Brown said.
.. ' The house has been sitting empty for
S.eight months, since the renter left, the
. neighbors said.
- Built in 1975, the two-bedroom, two-
bathroom house with carport has a his-
tory on the clerk of court's Web site
that reflects the housing boom and
bust According to public records, the
house was purchased in 1998 for
$55,925 on a 30-year mortgage with a 7
percent interest rate. The monthly
. mortgage payment was $372.
' For whatever reason, perhaps a fi-
nancial emergency or the lure of easy
cash, the homeowner refinanced in
2004 for a mortgage of $73,950 on an


BRIAN LaPETER'Cra,-.rro,,le
Donald Brown and Donna Howell cut the grass at a foreclosed house next door
to their Citrus Springs home to keep the neighborhood from deteriorating.


adjustable rate mortgage that started
at 8.15 percent interest Two years
later, the adjustable rate changed,
adding 6.99 percent, but the interest
rate was not to be greater than 10.15
percent
Two months after the higher rate
kicked in, the homeowner refinanced
again, this time for $137,500, with
terms of 7.45 percent interest as an ad-
justable rate that would change again
in two years. According to the mort-
gage document, the adjustment would
add 6.45 percent, and thereafter would
adjust again every sixth months, but
the interest rate would not be greater
than 14.45 percent
The second adjustable rate mort-
gage adjusted to the higher rate in
September 2008. The lis pendens, the
document giving notice of intent to
foreclose, was issued in October 2008.
It's a pleasant, quiet street where the
empty house is sited. People sit in their
front yards and wave to each other.
The neighbors point out other homes
for sale that don't appear to be neg-
lected by their owners. They wonder
who can be responsible for the upkeep
of the sorely neglected house.
The homeowner is long gone to an-
other state. The bank has taken back
the house, but it is not prepared for
real estate maintenance. The county is
short-handed with a cut budget
It looks like the neighbors must be
caretakers.
The 34-year-old house, purchased in
1998 for $55,925, currently is listed at
$53,900. Perhaps a buyer will see it as a
bargain.


UPSHOT
Continued from Page Al
A While that would be a nui-
sance, it would not be cata-
strophic if it is a slow leak and
will evaporate.
q What should neighbors do
. about an unmaintained
swimming pool?
A. Call Mosquito Control. They
will throw mosquito-eating fish in
it.
Q Why can't the county take
. care of these empty proper-
ties before complaints are re-
ceived from members of the
public?
A. As the problem has grown,
the county has fewer resources to
deal with it. With the decline in
property' values, less tax money is
available and we have fewer
county staff to take care of these
issues. As it stands, the county
has to be more frugal in its re-
sponse because the economic sit-
uation has had an impact on the
government's ability' to respond.
Q Can't the county do more to
. make the owners of the
foreclosed properties maintain
them?
A. Code enforcement is about
compliance, not penalties. It
works with property owners to
bring the property into compli-
ance.


Expo on tap June 19

at extension office


Special to the Chronicle

Numerous exhibitors will
be taking part in the
Florida friendly "Living
Green Expo 2009" from 10


a.m. to 2 p.m.
Friday, June
19, at the Cit-
rus County
Extension of-
fice in
Lecanto.
The office
iis next to the
county


INTEREST
N Organizatii
interested
sponsors o
should call
County Ext
at 527-570


Lecanto Government Build-
ing at 3650 W. Sovereign
Path. Take Saunders Way
off County Road 491 to get to
Sovereign Path.
The University of
Florida/Institute of Food
and Agricultural Science
(UF/IFAS) Citrus County
Extension is hosting the
expo, which will focus on
saving money while protect-
ing the environment, pro-
tecting water quality,
conserving water, and pre-
venting pollution.
Extension officials said
there will be plenty of smart
"green" choices that involve
simple changes.
Admission and parking
are free. Attendees will be
able to visit green technol-
ogy displays, such as a per-
vious concrete
demonstration, and they
can sign up for an energy
audit.
They will be able to learn
more about the new Water
Star Program and saving
water outdoors by using low
volume irrigation equip-
ment.
They will be able to view
a variety of composting bins
for home projects and learn
about Florida Friendly
Landscaping. They will also
learn how to choose the
least toxic chemicals for
home cleanup jobs.


In addition, other topics
will cover: achieving energy
efficiency and how develop-
ment can be low-impact. In-
formation will also be
available about home com-
posting and
|TEREDI? recycling.
;TERED?7 The Fam-
ons ily and Con-
in being s u m e r
>r exhibitors Science divi-
the Citrus sion of the
ension office Extension
00. Office will
have a dis-
play, as will the Florida
Yards and Neighbors pro-
gram. The Extension's Hor-
ticulture program will
feature rain harvesting and
rain garden, and the Natu-
ral Resources division will
present an integrated pest
management program with
the least toxic effects.
There will be many give-
aways. Sponsors and ex-
hibitors include: 4-H Youth
Development, Chevy &
Honda Hybrids, Citrus
County Builder Association,
Citrus County Canning
Kitchen, Citrus County En-
vironmental Health, Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, Cit-
rus County Solid Waste, Cit-
rus County Transportation,
Citrus County Water Re-
sources, Division of
Forestry, Florida Concrete
Product Association, Keep
Citrus County Beautiful,
Martin Federal Credit
Union, Nature Coast Aquas-
capes, Nick Nicholas Ford,
Progress Energy, S.E.C.O.,
Sea Grant, Water Star, So-
larTex, Southwest Florida
Water Management District,
Village Cadillac/Toyota and
Master Gardener Plant
questions/answers.
Organizations interested
in being sponsors or ex-
hibitors should call the Cit-
rus County Extension office
at 527-5700.


DEATHS
Continued from Page A6




Kenneth
Rochefort, 70
FLORAL CITY
Kenneth J. Rochefort, age
70, of Floral City, died Fri-
day, June 5, 2009, at Citrus
Memorial hospital in Inver-
ness.
Private cremation ar-
rangements are under the
care of the Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Crema-
tory, Inverness.

Stephen
Shlatz, 82
CRYSTAL RIVER
Stephen W Shlatz, age 82
of Crystal River, Fla., died
Wednesday June 3, 2009, at
Hospice House of Citrus
County in Lecanto, Fla.
Arrangements under the di-
rection of Strickland Fu-
neral Home, Crystal River,
Fla.

Regina
Smith, 88
LECANTO
Regina Smith, age 88, of
Lecanto, FL, passed away
on June 3, 2009, at Hospice
of Citrus County in Inver-


ness, FL. She was born on
February 10,1921, in Hemp-
stead, New York, to Regi-
nald and Nora (Upton)
Smith. Regina moved to Cit-
rus County 30+ years ago
from Seaford, New York
She was a retired Hair
Dresser.
Survived by one sister,
Lillian E. Morch of Lecanto,
FL; three nephews, Jeffery
Morch of South Hampton,
NY, Gary Morch of Lecanto,
FL, and Timothy Morch of
Mastic Beach, NY; six great
nephews and nieces; two
great-great nephews and
nieces.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto, Florida
in charge of arrangements.
352-795-0111.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline. com.

John 'Jack'
Titus, 81
CRYSTAL RIVER
John "Jack" Titus, age 81
of Crystal River, FL, passed
away June 3, 2009, at Hos-
pice House in Lecanto, FL.
He was born on May 12,
1928, in Philadelphia, PA, to
Edgar D. and Margaret
(Cullen) Titus. Jack moved
to Crystal River 33 years ago
from Philadelphia. He was
a retired Police Officer for
the City of Philadelphia and
an Army Veteran of the Ko-
rean Conflict, He was a past
member of the Crystal River
Rotary Club and the former


Crystal River Yacht Club.
He was a member of the
Fraternal Order of Police
and the American Legion
Post 155 of Crystal River
In addition to his parents,
Jack was preceded in death
by his son John Titus.
Survived
by his wife,
Claire Titus " H
of Crystal
River, FL; i
three chil-
dren, Patri-
cia Byrne of
Horsham,
PA, Ju- John
lianne Cor- Titus
bit of Spring badge
Hill, FL, No. 3113.
and Donald
McClaire of
Crystal
River, FL.; .
five grand-
children; A
and seven
great-grand-
children.
Memorial
services will be held at 10:00
a.m. on Monday, June 8th, at
the Brown Funeral Home
and Crematory in Lecanto,
FL with Father Michael
Suszynski officiating.
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rial donations can be made
to Citrus County Hospice.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory Lecanto, Flor-
ida, in charge of arrange-
ments. 352-795-0111.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.


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* The Citrus County Chronicle's policy per-
mits both free and paid obituaries.
* E-mail obits@chronicleonline.com or
phone 563-5660 for details and pricing


options. Fax obituaries to (352) 563-
3280.
* Paid obituaries are printed as submitted
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CHRONICLE OBITUARY POLICY


1�


SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2oog A7


CHRONICLE


Cmus CouNTY (FL) i









Page A8 - SUNDAY, JUNE 7,2009



N ATION


&


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


WORLD


Nation BRIEFS

Think pink


Day care burns in Mexico


The Pink Panther and
"Scrubs" star Sarah
Chalke show their support
Saturday at the Susan G.
Komen Global Race for the
Cure In Washington, D.C.


Palln helps N.Y.
town note Alaska
AUBURN, N.Y -Alaska
Gov. Sarah Palln set aside
politics only briefly Saturday
to help Auburn officials cele-
brate their inaugural
Founder's Day and raise
money for a museum honor-
ing William Seward, the 19th-
century U.S. secretary of
state who acquired Alaska for
the United States.
More than 20,000 people
turned out to see the former
Republican vice presidential
candidate lead a parade
through downtown Auburn
and sign a proclamation on
the steps of City Hall honor-
ing Seward as 'the one per-
son most responsible for
Alaska."
Alaska became the na-
tion's 49th state on Jan. 3,
1959.

World BRIEFS

Rebels routed
A Muslim separatist camp that
could accommodate 200 rebels
was taken by Philippine troops
following three days of fighting.
that left at least 30 guerillas dead.


SOURCE: ESRI AP
Philippine troops
seize rebel camp
MANILA, Philippines -
Government troops seized a
Muslim separatist rebel camp
Saturday following three days
of fighting that left 30 guerril-
las dead, a Philippine military
spokesman said.
A rebel spokesman denied
any of its camps had been
overrun.
The Moro Islamic Libera-
tion Front camp that was
taken in southern Maguin-
danao province housed 20
bunkers that could accommo-
date about 200 fighters, said
Lt. Col. Jonathan Ponce,
spokesman for the army's 6th
Infantry Division.
2 bodies found
near crash site
RECIFE, Brazil-
Searchers found two bodies
and the first confirmed debris
- a briefcase containing an
Air France Flight 447 ticket -
in the Atlantic Ocean near
where the jetliner is believed
to have crashed, a Brazil mili-
tary official said Saturday.
The French agency investi-
gating the disaster, mean-
while, said airspeed
instruments were not re-
placed as the maker recom-
mended before the plane
disappeared in turbulent
weather nearly a week ago.
-From wire reports


At least 35 children dead

dozens injured in blaze


Associated Press
HERMOSILLO, Mexico -
Sobbing relatives waited
outside a morgue Saturday
to claim the bodies of 35
children killed in a day care
fire in northern Mexico de-
spite desperate attempts to
evacuate babies and tod-
dlers through the building's


only working exit. One fa-
ther crashed his pickup
truck through the wall to
rescue his child.
Delfina Ruelas, 60, said
her grandchild German
Leon died of his burns Sat-
urday morning, three days
after his fourth birthday.
She and her husband saw
television news reports that


65 years


after


D-Day

Associated Press
OMAHA BEACH, France -
President Barack Obama honored
the valiant dead and the "sheer
improbability" of their D-Day vic-
tory, commemorating Saturday's
65th anniversary of the decisive in-
vasion even as he remakes two
wars and tries to thwart potential
nuclear threats in Iran and North
Korea.
The young U.S. commander in
chief, speaking at the American
cemetery after the leaders of
France, Canada and Britain, held
up the sacrifices of D-Day veterans
and their "unimaginable hell" as a
lesson for modem times.
"Friends and veterans, what we
cannot forget - what we must not
forget - is that D-Day was a time
and a place where the bravery and
selflessness of a few was able to
change the course of an entire cen-
tury," he said.
'"At an hour of maximum danger,
amid the bleakest of circum-
stances, men.who thought them-
selves ordinary found it within
themselves to do the extraordi-
nary."
Obama opened the emotional
day by meeting with French Presi-
dent Nicolas Sarkozy in the nearby
city of Caen. Their wives, dueling
style icons in similar attire, met
separately at the elegant French
Prefecture.
Appearing with Sarkozy before
reporters, Obama displayed grow-
ing impatience with North Korea
and what he called its "extraordi-
narily provocative" nuclear and
ballistic missile tests. He suggested
that the North is testing interna-
tional patience as diplomacy has
failed to persuade the reclusive
communist government to abandon
its nuclear weapons program.
"Diplomacy has to involve the
other side engaging in a serious
way in trying to solve problems,"
he said. "We are going to take a
very hard look at how we move for-
ward on these issues, and I don't
think that there should be an as-
sumption that we will simply con-
tinue down a path in which North
Korea is constantly destabilizing
the region and we just react in the
same ways."
Obama also took on Iran, sus-
pected by the West of seeking to
build its first nuclear bomb, an ac-
cusation Tehran denies. The pres-
ident has said military action
remains on the table, but has of-


the ABC day care was on
fire Friday and rushed over
that evening,
"I thought he wasn't that
burned and that we would
find him OK, but he was
very burned," said Ruelas,
dissolving into tears outside
the morgue in the northern
city of Hermosillo, where
she waited along with 30
other relatives. "They oper-
ated on him yesterday, and
he held on, but today he
couldn't hold on."'
Firefighters carried in-
jured children through the


front door - the building's
only working exit - and
through large holes that a
civilian knocked into the
walls before rescue crews
arrived, according to a fire
department official who
spoke on condition of
anonymity.
The tragedy once again
raised questions about
building safety in Mexico:
Officials cracked down on
code violations following a
deadly stampede at a night-
club last year and a fire at a
disco nine years ago.


Little victims
A fast-moving fire killed 31
children, most ages six months
to 5 years, In a daycare center
In Hermoslllo, Mexico Friday. *
*M I UNITED STATE&
^ *9 Dallas


A;soc.aiea Press
U.S. President Barack Obama, right, Is greeted by French first lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy, foreground right, as
French President Nicolas Sarkozy, second left, greets U.S. first lady Michelle Obama during an arrival ceremony
Saturday at the Prefecture of Caen, northwestern France. Obama and Sarkozy attended ceremonies Saturday
marking the 65th anniversary of the Allied D-Day landings In Normandy.
,It P B. O 't v . S.. . N \of the once-bloody bluffs.
StThe sunny sky, crashing waves,
S" o lush vegetation and pleasant
breezes created a scene of seaside
tranquility at the spot one D-Day
veteran recalled as mostly "dark-
ness and confusion."
"I lost a lot of pals on D-Day,"
said Norman Coleman of Man-
chester, England. He marked the
day by visiting several other buri4a
grounds scattered around the re-
gion, where soldiers were buried
as they fell in pitched battles over
12 decisive weeks.
Julien Marchand, a 40-year-old,
Si carpenter, spontaneously em-
S. braced Coleman in an outburst of
gratitude on the streets of Caen,.
nearly knocking over the elderly
- veteran. "Thank you, thank you,
merci," Marchand exclaimed.
U.S. President Barack Obama greets veterans Saturday at the American The ceremony at Omaha Beach,
Cemetery at Colleville-Sur -Mer, near Caen otn what is technically U.S. soil at
olleville-sur-Mer, took place
feared to change U.S. policy and en- American veteran, Jim Norene, under an American flag flying from
gage in talks with Tehran. He said who fought with the 101st Airborne a metal pole hundreds of feet high.
Saturday, though, it must be "tough Division, came back for Saturday's The crowd of thousands spread far
diplomacy." ceremony, but died in his sleep back from the leaders' platform
"We can't afford a nuclear arms Friday night. and colonnade engraved with
race in the Middle East," Obama "Jim was gravely ill when he left these words: "This embattled
warned. Sarkozy said he worries his home, and he knew that he shore, portal of freedom, is forever
about "insane statements" by might not return," Obama said. hallowed by the ideals, the valor
Iran's president, Mahmoud "Ah- "But just as he did 65 years ago, he and the sacrifice."
madinejad. came anyway. May he now rest in Allied forces charged the shores
At the same time, Obama is di- peace with the boys he once bled of five beaches on France's north?
recting wars in Iraq and with, and may his family always ern coast, facing German land
Afghanistan - seeking to end the find solace in the heroism he mines, machine guns and heavy ar-
first and stepping up U.S. engage- showed here." tillery. Some 215,000 Allied sol-
ment in the second. Both have Joined by Sarkozy, British Prime diers, and roughly as many
lasted longer than the U.S. in- Minister Gordon Brown, and Cana- Germans, were killed or wounded
volvement in World War II. dian Prime Minister Stephen during D-Day and the ensuing
This D-Day anniversary as- Harper, Obama stopped first at the three months before the Allies
sumed special significance be- gray granite visitors center and captured Normandy, opening a
cause veterans of the battle are then at an overlook where the path toward Paris that eventually
reaching their 80s and 90s and leaders talked at length with two took them to Germany and victory
their numbers are dwindling. One D-Day veterans waiting at the top over the Nazis.


Amish heading West


Associated 'Press


WESTCLIFFE, Colo. - A new road sign
cautions drivers to watch for Amish horse-
drawn carriages in the valley beneath Col-
orado's Sangre de Cristo mountains.
Highway pull-offs and dedicated horse-and-
buggy paths are in the works.
Amid the serenity and isolation of south-
ern Colorado, hamlets like Westcliffe, La Jara
and Monte Vista are welcoming Amish fami-
lies who are moving West to escape high land
prices and community overcrowding back
East in Indiana, Ohio and Pennsylvania.
Of an estimated 231,000 Amish nationwide,
more than 60 percent still live in Ohio, Penn-
sylvania and Indiana.
But from 2002 to 2008, Colorado's Amish
population went from zero to more than 400,
according to the Young Center for Anabaptist


and Pietist Studies at Pennsylvania's Eliza-
bethtown College. Montana, with an esti-
mated 540 Am ish, and Colorado now have the
westernmost Amish settlements in the U.S.
Colorado ranks seventh in the nation in
Amish immigration, according to the Young
Center.
Cropland is worth an average $1,400 per
acre in Colorado, compared with $6.000 in
Pennsylvania and about $4,000 in Ohio and
Indiana, according to a 2007 census by the
U.S. Department of Agriculture. Cropland
values in Pennsylvania jumped 17 percent
from 2006 to 2007 but by only 6 percent in Col-
orado.
The Amish are a Christian denomination
who trace their roots to the Protestant Ref-
ormation in 16th-century Europe and mi-
grated to North America in the 18th and
19th centuries.


Associated Press
Handmade furniture is for sale May 13 at Yoder's Mountain
View Furniture on Main Street in the of the town of West-
cliffe, Colo. Westcilffe, population 466, and nearby hamlets
like La Jara and Monte Vista are welcoming a growing Influx
of Amish families drawn westward by cheaper farmland and'
the serenity and isolation of southern Colorado.


'V,,".% ; . . -- .


.1 12'










E Page A9-SUNDAY, JUNE 7,2009



XCIdRSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE





Smoky Mountains Park 75


5,200-acre preserve named by

Cherokee Indians for its natural mist " " ,$


DUNCAN MANSFIELD
Associated Press
GATLINBURG, Tenn. - The
ancient blue-green mountains
with breathtaking vistas and dis-
tinctive mists are home to sala-
manders and black bears, 19th
century log cabins, rippling
streams, waterfalls and more than
800 miles of trails, including a
large section of the Georgia-to-
Maine Appalachian Trail.
It's little wonder the Great
Smoky Mountains attract more
than 9 million visitors a year, twice
as many as any other national
park in the United States.
"No matter what your interest
is, everybody that visits here can
make a personal connection in
one way or another," said Ann
Froschauer, who works with key
park support groups, the Friefids
of the Smokies and the Great
Smoky Mountain Association.
"That's why we have folks who
come back year after year. They
bring their kids and their grand-
kids. Because something here
touched them."
The 520,000-acre preserve
straddling the--Tennessee-North
Carolina border, named by the
Cherokee Indians as "The Land of.
Blue Smoke" for its signature nat-
ural mist, marks its 75th birthday
June 15.
Featured events on the anniver-
sary weekend include a Knoxville
Symphony concert with U.S. Sen.
Lamar Alexander playing piano
among the old cabins and barns in
pastoral Cades Cove near
Townsend. There also will be a
groundbreaking for a $2.5 million
Oconaluftee visitor center in
Cherokee, N.C., that will highlight
Cherokee Indian and Ap-
palachian culture.
A Sept. 2 ceremony at New-
found Gap will mark President
Franklin D. Roosevelt's original


dedication of the park "to the free
people of America" in 1940. Pres-
ident Barack Obama has been in-
vited.
Dozens of related activities are
occurring throughout the year in
surrounding communities - mu-
seum exhibitions, parades, family
reunions and a Dolly Parton-
penned musical about the Smok-
ies at her Dollywood theme park
in Pigeon Forge, with CD profits
benefiting the park
"Our anniversary has been a
reason for so many people to
pause and think back," Smokies
Superintendent Dale Ditmanson
said. "It has been a time of reflec-
tion (and) a jumping off point."
Twenty national parks were cre-
ated before the Smokies, mostly in
Western states beginning with Yel-
lowstone in 1872.
* The Smokies was the first in the
southern Appalachians and the
first to require purchasing land
from individual owners. Congress
authorized the park in 1926, but it
would take eight years to raise the
money to buy some 6,000 tracts.
The states of North Carolina
and Tennessee contributed $2'mil-
lion each, the John D. Rockefeller
family gave $5 million, the federal
government gave $3 million and a
public "Pennies for the Park"
campaign raised $1 million from
schoolchildren and civic groups
around the country.
With that background, the
park's charter stipulates that no

See SMOKIES/Page A12
A boy plays at the bottom of Spruce
Fats Falls near Tremont, Tenn., in
the Great Smoky Mountains Na-
tional Park. The park, which Is
marking its 75th anniversary, has,
800 miles of trails, including 70
miles of the Georgia-to-Maine Ap-
palachian Trail.
Associated Press


Lock and load


Africa: Vast adventure-land


Special to ne Chronicle
Ann Snodgrass and Ted Mell sailed on the Norwegian Pearl from Miami to Los An-
geles, passing through the Panama Canal. The picture of the Panama Canal was
taken from the front of the ship. The Pearl had 11 Inches of clearance on both
sides while passing through the locks. Passage through the canal took all day and
was a trip to remember.


DREAM
VACAT ONS


The. Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win.
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please -avoid, photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


A frica, the dark conti-
nent, a mysterious
place: Voodoo medi-
cine, camel caravans cross-
ing vast deserts - shades of
Lawrence of Arabia - dan-
gerous beasts, and warring
tribes using only spears as
weapons, were my visions of
Africa prior to actually
going there. Just the thought
of being in Africa produced
nightmares at least as scary
as those caused by the mon-
sters hiding under my bed.
The three corners of
Africa - Morocco, Egypt,
and South Africa - are as Welcoming committee of d;
diverse as the four corners Zimbabwe airport.
of the United 'States when
one considers that Florida Cape Town to Tangiers -
has practically no rocks or six thousand miles - give or
stones but lots of sandy take a few, or another way to
beaches, as com- - view the dis-
pared to the moun- . tance: Orlando
tains and rocky ~, ... to Seattle,and
shores of Maine. back - that's
The jagged and the size of
storm-battered Africa! Much of
coast of Washing- Africa has been
Stone state bears lit- explored on
tle resemblance to foot, as detailed
the sunny beaches - in Into Africa,-
and predictable il S by Martin
weather of South- Nei Sawyer Dugard, chroni-
ern California. And SPONTANEOUS cling the ex-
so it is with Africa, TOUR GUIDE ploits of famous
moonscapes at one :-explorers David
end, rocky shores and se- Livingstone and Henry Mor-
cluded beaches at the other, ton Stanley, searching for
with thousands of miles of the source of the Nile, the
drifting sands between. longest river in the world.


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
ancers at the Victoria Falls,

There are no words or
phrases that can adequately
describe the vastness of the
geography, or the intense-
ness of the geology and life
forms that make up Africa.
Your wildest and most vivid
dreams .of far-away places
cannot*possibly bring into
focus the overwhelming
scale of the deserts, moun-
tains, savannahs, the great-
est array of wild beasts,
tribal life, and cultural di-
versity that is Africa!
Africa is a world of con-
trasts, synonymous with "sa-
fari" in Kenya and
Tanzania, sand dunes of the
Kalahari and Namibia, re-
See GUIDE/Page A12


Tour to take in Biblical sites


Special to the Chronicle
The Rev. Mark Whittaker,
Pastor of First United
Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa, will lead a Bible
Lands cruise-tour to four
countries from Nov. 11 to
22,2009. The tour will begin
in Greece where partici-
pants will visit Athens and
ancient Corinth (a city
where the Apostle Paul
lived for 1 1/2 years). Then
they will board a 1,000-pas-
senger cruise ship and sail
to several Mediterranean


ports before returning to
Athens.
In Egypt, participants
will see the great pyramids
of Giza, along with the
Sphinx, and visit the Egypt
Museum while in Cairo.
The museum houses the
King Tut treasures. They
will trace'the Old Testa-
ment Hebrew roots in that
land and remember the
New Testament journey of
the Holy Family escaping
King Herod's rampage.
During three days in Is-
rael, there will be visits to


Bethlehdm (where Jesus
was born), Jerusalem
(where he spent his last
days and the site of his cru-
cifixibn and resurrection),
and the Galilee (where he
spent two to three years
teaching, healing and-per-
forming many miracles).
On the Greek Island of
Rhodes, travelers will re-
member the Apostle Paul's
brief visit there and recall
the crusaders known as the
Knights of St. John, who oc-
See TOUR/Page A12


National Parks plan 3 free weekends


MATTHEW DALY
Associated Press


WASHINGTON - The National Park
Service is looking to stimulate summer va-
cations at national parks.
Interior Secretary Ken Salazar an-
nounced Tuesday that entrance fees at 147
national parks and monuments - includ-
ing the Grand Canyon and Yosemite - will
be waived on three weekends this summer.
The weekends are June 20 and 21, July 18
and 19 and August 15 and 16.
'During these tough economic times, our
national parks provide opportunities for af-
fordable vacations for families," Salazar said
at a news conference at Cuyahoga Valley Na-


tional Park in Ohio. "I encourage everyone
to visit one of our nation's crown jewels this
summer and especially to take advantage of
the three free-admis-
sion weekends."
Most Americans
live less than a day's uwww.nps.gov/
drive from a national findapark/fee
park, Salazar said. freeparks.htm
Last year, national
parks attracted more
than 275 million visits, generating an esti-
mated $10.6 billion for local economies and
supporting more than 213,000 jobs, he said.
The waiver applies only to entrance fees
and does not affect charges for camping,
reservations, tours or concessions.


r- I


qjl�sv,'.47,4-� - -"' -i H.-I 4 -a' � , - -�� I , , . - .- I I








IRY, JUNE ,


Alf)i ......v T,,.TI 7 n2009


* American Legion Post
155 events for the week of
June 7 to 13:
Today: Breakfast 8:30 to 11
a.m., $5. Dart tournament 6
p.m., Steak Shoot.
Monday: Bingo, 1 to 4 p.m.
Tuesday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Installation, starting with
dinner 5 to 6 p.m., then installa-
tion of new officers of American
Legion, American Legion Auxil-
iary, Sons of the American Le-
gion and the American Legion
Riders. E-Board meeting, 7:30
p.m.
Wednesday: Chicken "hot
wings" noon to 3 p.m. Italian
dinner night 5 to 7 p.m., $5.
Live music 6 to 10 p.m. Legion
Riders meeting, 6 p.m. ,
Thursday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Bingo 1 to 4 p.m. Show
Me the Money 5 p.m. Friday:
Auxiliary dinner 5 to 7 p.m., $6.
Live music 6 to 10 p.m.
Saturday: Pool tournament 2
p.m.
Call Cmdr. Jim Woodman at
795-6526 or visit www.post155
.org.
* Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864 schedule of events
for the week of June 7 to 13:
Tuesday: Ladies Auxiliary
meeting, 7 p.m.
Wednesday: Shuffleboard
tournament, 7 p.m.
Friday: Friday night pork
roast dinner, 5 to 6:30 p.m., $8.
Saturday: Free shuffleboard
all day.
June 19 Friday night dinner.
Department Convention in
Orlando June 19 through 22.
Karaoke night is June 26
with J & S and,Joyce's Wings
on Saturday, June 27, noon to
3p.m.
For more information, call the
post at 465-4864.
* Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City, 637-
0100.
Today: June Birthday Bash 2
to 6 p.m. Born in June? Corde
celebrate with us! Food, fun,
karaoke by Turner Camp Dave.
Tuesday: Bingo starting at 3
p.m. sponsored by the Ladies'
and Men's Auxiliaries. Guests
welcome.
Wednesday: Wings three for
$1,4 to 7 p.m. Karaoke by J &
S Entertainment 6 to 9 p.m.
Guests welcome.
Thursday: Men's Auxiliary
.meeting, 7 p.m.
i Friday: All-you-can-eat fish
1(fried, baked or b blackened) $7
-or a three-piece fried chicken
dinner, served from 4 to 7 p.m.
Karaoke by Roger 6 to 9 p.m.
Guests welcome.
Saturday: Flag Day Cere-
mony at Fort Cooper Park, 8
a.m. Food, fun, games until 3
p.m. Flag Retirement Cere-
mony at VFW 7122,11 a.m.
Dinner/Dance: Slow roasted
pork, sauerkraut, and potatoes,
$6.50, served from 5 to 7 p.m.
Music by The Carriers from 6 to
9 p.m. Guests welcome.
Sunday, June 14: U.S. Army
Birthday, 1776. Flag Day. Vic-
tor's "Wimpy Burgers" two for a
buck, 2 to 6 p.m.
VFW State Convention at
Wyndham Resort Hotel, Or-
lanldo, June 18-21.
* VFW Post 7991, 3107 W.
Dunnellon Road, Dunnellon,
(352) 489-1772.
Tuesday: Bingo starts at 1
p.m. Sandwiches or hot dogs
available. Open to the public.
Friday: Bingo, starting at 1
p.m. Sandwiches or hot dogs
are available. Open to the pub-
lic.
The post is now in the
process of forming pool, darts,
and horseshoe teams for tour-
naments. Everyone interested
should call the post after 1 p.m.
Monday through Saturday, 489-
1772.
Come join us for breakfast
on the second and fourth Sun-
day of every month. Full break-
fast menu, all for $5. Come out
and support your VFW, bring


your friends, family and neigh-
bors for a great meal. Children
under 12, $3. Open to the pub-
lic.
July 4: Fourth of July barbe-
cue. Ribs, beans, potato salad,
hot dogs, lots of fun for the en-
tire family. Music, and fun for
the children. Come show your
support for your service men
and women and all veterans.
Call the post for more informa-
tion.
We are a non-smoking post,
but we do have a large smok-
ing patio available. If you are
considering joining the VFW
and its auxiliaries, please come
in or call the post.
* Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 west on Veterans
Drive across from Harley
Davidson dealership an-
nounces events for June.
Today, June 7, 3 p.m., mixed
pool league.
Wednesday, June 10, 2 p.m.,
bingo with light lunch, open to
public; 7 p.m. women's pool
league.
Friday, June 12, 5 p.m., Aux-
iliary dinner: Spaghetti, salad,
garlic bread, dessert $6 dona-
tion.
June 14, 3 p.m., mixed pool
league.
June 17, 2 p.m., bingo with
light lunch, open to public; 7
p.m., women's pool league.
June 19, 5 p.m., chicken
wings, macaroni salad, dessert.
June 20, Convention in Or-
lando.
June 21, 3 p.m., mixed pool
league.
June 24, 2 p.m., bingo with
light lunch, open to public; 7
p.m., women's pool league.
June 26, 5 p.m., light supper:
Pizzas.
June 27, Welcome home
. party for Daniel Williams (DJ)
returning home from
Afghanistan, our young Marine
on leave; 3 p.m. the party
starts, 5 p.m. deep fried turkeys
with trimmings, music by
Rhonda, open tq all his friends,
and family.
June 28, 3 p.m., mixed pool.
Note: Bingos and meals are
open to the public. For more infor-
mation, call 795-5012 after 1 p.m.
* The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58,10730
U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Regular meetings of the Post
and Auxiliary are at 7 p.m. on
the first Wednesday monthly.
Dunnellon Young Marines
meet from 6 to 9 p.m. every
Tuesday except for June, July
and August.
Bingo is held every Thursday
evening. Doors open at 4 p.m.
Games start at 6 p.m. Food is
available.
Third Saturday Outdoor Flea
Market is held every month on
our premises. Vendors - $10.
Call Larry Jones for details,
522-0177..
Pancake breakfast held the
third Saturday of each month
has been suspended for June,
July and August. Will resume in
September. All you can eat for'
a $4 donation.
* Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337, 906 State Road 44 E., In-
verness, phone 344-3495.
Karaoke is presented each
Sunday, Tuesday and Friday
evenings.
Bar Bingo is played Monday
and Thursday afternoons and
Wednesday evening.
Wings are served each Tues-
day evening and fish or chicken
on Friday evenings.
"Show Me The Money" is
played each Saturday from 1 to
3 p.m.
* Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shonk Chap-
ter 70 and Auxiliary 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41.
DAV Chapter 70 and Auxil-
iary meetings are at 2 p.m. on
the second Tuesday of each
month.
The DAV Chapter is open


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.


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IN. ERT2H0 d er S iEaCE
TERMED THI ES H-ARD SUBPAR
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6-7 0 2009 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.


Comerford USCG
Academy grad
Ensign Michael P. Comer-
ford of Coventry, Conn.,
graduated


Guard
Academy
with High
Honors on
May 20. He
is the son
of Mark Michael P.
and Comerford
Joanne
Comerford of Coventry and
the grandson of Charles and
Betty Bradley of Floral City.
He has been assigned to the
Cutter "Walnut," homeported
in Honolulu, Hawaii.
Newton graduates
combat training
Army Reserve Pfc. Greig
D. Newton has graduated
from basic combat training at
Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier studied
the Army mission, history, tra-
dition and core values, physi-
cal fitness, and received
instruction and practice in
basic combat skills, military
weapons, chemical warfare
and bayonet training, drill and
ceremony, marching, rifle
marksmanship, armed and
unarmed combat, map read-


from 9 a.m. to noon every
Tuesday to assist disabled vet-
erans. A service officer is avail-
able by appointment. Contact
Bill Geden at 341-6875.
For the Chapter, call Richard
Floyd, adjutant at 726-5031.
For the Auxiliary, call Lynn Ar-
mitage, adjutant at 341-5334.
* Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Richard Gannoh
at 637-1236; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Debi Gan-
non at 637-1236 or visit
www.Post155.org.
* Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. the


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ing, field tactics, military cour-
tesy, military justice system,
basic first aid, foot marches
and field training exercises.
Newton is the son of Lor-
raine Newton-Crane Her-
nando.
The private graduated in
1991 from Crystal River High
. School, and received an as-
sociate degree in 2002 from
the University of Central
Florida, Orlando.
Oyuela transferred
to England
Alberto M. Oyuela served
in the U.S. Air Force in
Kirkuk, Iraq, from Jan. 7 to
May 19. During his service
there, he
did com-
puter net-
working,
gathered
intelli-
gence
from loqal
nationals
to brief the Alberto M.
base on Oyuela
any infor-
mation.
Starting in September,
Oyuela will do intelligence
operations for the 422nd
Communications Squadron
in Croughton, England, for
four years.
His parents are Lolita and
Roger Dondelinger of Pine
Ridge.


third Tuesday monthly at Crys-
tal Paradise Restaurant in
Crystal River. Have lunch after
the meeting.
Luncheons are held at 1 p.m.
second Tuesdays at selected
restaurants, all are welcome.
June 9 will be at Cracker's
Restaurant on U.S. 19 in Crys-
tal River. July 14 will be at
Frank's Family Restaurant on
U.S. 41 and State Road 200
junction in Hernando due to the
closing of La Luna in Inverness.
Breakfasts are held at 8 a.m.
on the last Sunday monthly.
June 28 will be at Joe's Restau-
rant in Inverness and July 26 at
Crystal Paradise Restaurant in
Crystal River.
For information, call John
Kister at 527-3172.
N Hunger and Homeless
Coalition - Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-


In SERVICE


tance or more blankets is asked
to call John Young at the
Hunger and Homelessoali-
tion at 628-4357, or along
this phone number to vet-
eran.
* The Dan Campbell Air-
borne Association meets at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 Gulf-to-Lake
Highway (State Road 44), Crys-
tal River. All current and previ-
ous Airbome members and
their wives are welcome to join
us. Call Steve Leonard at 726-
3693.
* The Marine Corps
League, Samuel R. Wall De-
tachment 1139 will conduct its
regular meeting at 7 p.m. the
third Wednesday monthly at
DAV Post 70 in Inverness at the
intersection of Independence
Avenue and U.S. 41 North. All
former Marines are welcome.
Call Tom Heron at 637-2724 or
Joe Spoto at 746-3315.
* Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40
East, Inglis (352) 447-3495.
Men's meeting is at 7:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly.
Ladies Auxiliary meets at 5
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday
monthly.
House Committee meets at 6
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
* Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 344-
0727.
* Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets the
third Thursday monthly at the
Floral City VFW Post 7122, call
to order 7:30 p.m. The mem-
bership invites all eligible veter-
ans to come and join us as we
plan for the future of our Post.
* The Herbert Surber
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 225 meets at 7:30 p.m. the
third Thursday monthly at the
Floral City VFW Post 7122 on
U.S. 41, Floral City. Contact
Marcia Gallagher, membership
chairwoman, at 860-1629.
Come and join this newly re-
chartered unit and be a part of
the great accomplishments and
projects in the American Legion
Auxiliary.
* Beverly Hills Memorial
American Legion Post 237,


oUl


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your taxes, fees & surcharges is available from your Alitel customer service representative & on your monthly bill. Phone Details: Phones & applicable rebates available for a limited time,
while supplies last, with activation of a qualifying rate plan. Rebate will be in the form of a VISA gift card. Limit 1 rebate per qualifying purchase. Phone may be returned within 15 days of
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4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza invites inter-
ested veterans to apply for
membership or transfer. Sons
of the American Legion and
Ladies Auxiliary units are now
forming.. Membership meeting
fourth Thursday at 7 p.m. Sun-
day darts at 3 p.m. with
karaoke following. Other activi-
ties being planned. All sporting
events available on five TVs.
Visit, or phone the post at 746-
5018.
* Marine Corps League,
Citrus County Detachment
819 will meet at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. Call
Commandant Robert Deck at
527-1557.
* Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
Sailors meet at Denny's in
Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 621-0617.
* The Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association (AFA) will have its
June meeting at 7 p.m. Thurs-
day, June 25. The location will
be the Landmark Aviation Build-
ing, 1200 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala.
Guest speaker will be chap-
ter member Dave Suban. Dave
is retired Senior Intelligence An-
alyst HDQS, U.S. Special Oper-
ations CMD. Guests are always
welcome to the meetings.
For more information, call
Mike Emig (352) 854-8328.
* Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
AI Point Road, Inverness.
Potluck dinner at 6 p.m., meet-
ing starts at 7:15. Auxiliary Unit
77 meets at the same time and
place. Call Post Cmdr. Norman
Provencal at 726-4257 orAuxil-
iary president Alice Brumett at
860-2981.
* U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585'W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 726-5926.
* American Legion Post
166 meets at 1:30 p.m. the first
Saturday monthly at the
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189 Ladies Auxiliary facility lo-
cated on Veterans Drive, Ho-
mosassa,on the west side of
U.S.. 19 at Dixon's Auto Sales
across from Harley Davidson.
- See VETS/Page All


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SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2009 All


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Flags for Memorial Day


Special to the Chronicle
As part of Wall-Rives Post 58 The American Legion Memorial Day activities, flags were placed on veterans' graves in both Dunnellon cemeteries on
Saturday, May 23. Not in order are Legionaires: BJ Price, Eugene M. Thomas, Larry Jones, John Pollock, Charles Shaw, Fred Horsely, Dave Hacker
and Bob Pallesen. Representing the Legion and Boy Scouts, Roger Suillivan. Many thanks to all the volunteers, especially Dunnellon Troop 452, Boy
Scouts of America. Many hands made the task of finding and placing more than 200 flags on the graves a lot easier.

Rolling Thunder donates to VA hospital


... .. ...... .... ..... .... Special to the Chronicle
Rolling Thunder members recently presented checks for $1,500 to pay for the Fourth of July and Memorial Day BBQ at James Haley VA Hospital. In
front, presenting checks to Mary Ellen Harlan, director of the Haley House Foundation, are Gene Perrino, VP Chapter 7, left, and Ray Thompson,
president. Second row, from left, are: Beverly Bender, Bob Strange, Noranne Melnyk, Kathy Whitley, Jim Linesberry, Chris and George Harris. Back
row, from left, are: Clayton Murphy, John Sargent, Bob Bruno, Jim Gilchrese, Joe Taylor, Ken Hughes, Al Mumford and John Tress.


VETS
Continued from Page A1O

* The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Anyone who has honorably
served within Korea or outside
Korea from June 25, 1950, to
Jan. 31, 1955, and anyone
serving within Korea from 1955
to present is eligible to join the
Korean War Veterans Associa-
tion (KWVA). Call Hank Butler
at 563-2496, Paul Salyer at
637-1161 or Neville Anderson
at 344-2529.
* Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
bimonthly at 1:15 p.m. on the
third Tuesday of January,
March, May, July, September
and November at the Citrus
County Resources CenterNA
Clinic, 2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto (west side of
County Road 491 approxi-
mately 1 mile north of C.R.
486).
All combat wounded veter-
ans and lineal descendants of
Purple Heart recipients are in-
vited to attend a meeting. Life
memberships for combat
wounded veterans and lineal
descendants of Purple Heart
recipients are $50. There are
no chapter dues. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit www.cit-
ruspurpleheart.org or call
382-3847.
* VFW Post 4252 and
Ladies Auxiliary.
All eligible persons are in-
vited to join. Stop in at.the post
or call for information. Post
4252 is at 3190 N. Cart G.
Rose Highway, State Road
200, Hemando; phone 726-
3339. Send e-mails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
* The William Crow
AmVets Post 447 is at 33
Risher Ave. in Inglis. For more
information, call 447-4473.
S*The H. F. Nesbitt VFW
Post 10087 is in Beverly Hills
off County Road 491, across
the street from ROC's 491
Sports Bar and directly behind
the new Superior Bank.


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CITRUS COUNTY (PL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A12 SUNDAY. JUNE 7, 2009


Elephants in Chobe National Park, Botswana.


GUIDE
Continued from Page A9
flnement and sophistication
in Cape Town and Cairo,
and state-of-the-art wine in-
dustry in South Africa. It's
easy to think of Africa as dry
and parched, only to be
jolted into reality when first
viewing the thunderous Vic-
toria Falls, where the Zam-
bezi River reveals it true
size, creating waterfalls
twice the size of Niagara
Falls, and the Okavango
Delta, a seasonally wet area
of over 11,000 sq. miles -
larger than the states of
Massachusetts, Maryland,
or Vermont, fed by the
Kwando River which disap-
pears into the Kalahari.
Africa covers 20 percent of
the world's land area. The
North American Continent
which includes the United


TOUR
Continued from Page A9
cupied the island for two
centuries.
Finally, a stop at Kusadasi,
Turkey, will take passengers
to the grand city of Ephesus
(where St. Paul lived and
ministered for three years).
The restored ruins are
among the most magnificent
in the ancient world.
Whittaker is opening reg-
istration to others in Citrus
County who may be inter-
ested, along with their rela-
tives and friends. "My wife
and I are looking forward to
this special pilgrimage,"
said Pastor Whittaker "I
have traveled to some of
these places before, but not


States, Mexico, Canada, the
North-West Territory and
Greenland combined, cov-
ers only 16 percent of the
world's land area. Just as
surprising is the head-count,
revealing that in Africa
there are 33 percent more
people per square mile than
in North America; 80 people
per square mile in Africa, vs.
60 per square mile in North
America. One begins to feel
as if Africa has been side-
stepped by society, but
Africa does matter as it is
tops in the world for adven-
ture travel. Don't allow un-
warranted fears deprive you
of the excitement of Africa.
Three areas most fre-
quently visited by tourists
are: 1) Cairo and the Nile
Valley, with the colossal
monuments of the pyramids,
Luxor, Abu-Simbel, and Val-
ley-of-the- Kings, 2) The sa-
fari areas of Kenya,
Tanzania and Botswana,

all of them. A trip like this
helps the places named in
the Bible really 'come alive.'
And to walk in the footsteps
of Jesus and Paul is awe-
some. We invite others who
may be interested to join us
on this fabulous journey."
In addition" to motor
coach transportation to and
from Tampa Airport, round
trip airfare, seven days on a
cruise ship, meals, guided
shore excursions and all ad-
missions, the tour also will
include background lec-
tures, Bible study and times
of prayer and reflection at
some of the most significant
Biblical sites.
More information and
brochures are available
from the church office at
8831 W Bradshaw St. in Ho-
mosassa (628-4083).


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle


where you are guaranteed to
see a variety of animals in
the wild, 3) South Africa:
Cape Town, The Cape of
Good Hope, and Johannes-
burg, each offering its own
brand of beauty, culture and
history. Any one of these des-
tinations can easily absorb a
week's time, preferably two
or more, particularly if you
go on a safari or take a Nile
River cruise.
Bon voyage, if you go. If
you don't, non voyage!


Neil Sawyer is a 22-year
Crystal River resident and
businessman. He and his
wife, Karyn, are extensive
travelers, venturing to for-
eign countries two to three
times a year in addition to
taking several domestic ex-
cursions annually E-mail
him at gobuddy@tam-
pabay.rrcom.


SSMOKIES
Continued from Page A9
entrance fee will ever be charged.
In his 1940 dedication, Roosevelt said
Americans had "used up or destroyed
much of our natural heritage just because
that heritage was so bountiful."
In the Smokies, he said, "are trees ...
that stood before our forefathers ever
came to this continent; there are brooks
that still run as clear as on the day the first
pioneer cupped his hand and drank from
them.
"In this park, we shall conserve these
trees, ... the trout and the thrush for the
happiness of the American people."
In fact, the Smokies had been heavily
logged by timber companies, muddying
the streams and leaving only about a quar-
ter of the old-growth forest intact. Boar
from nearby game preserves moved in,
nonnative rainbow trout were stocked in
streams and a blight soon killed off the
massive American Chestnut trees that
once covered 40 percent of the forest


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"Hangover" (R) 12:10 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 5:10 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Land of the Lost" (PG-13) Noon, 2:30 p.m., 5
p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Drag Me To Hell" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 2:50 p.m.,
5:15 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Up" (PG) 12:15 p.m., 2:45 p.m., 5:15 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Night at the Museum II" (PG) 12:05 p.m., 2:35
p.m., 5:05 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Terminator Salvation" (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:25
p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Hangover" (R) 12:10 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes.
"Land of the Lost" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 3:10 p.m.,


Park managers continue to battle these
issues, while new pests threaten hemlocks
and dogwoods and decimate the firs in the
park's Nova Scotia-like higher elevations.
Still, Supervisory Ranger Kent Cave
said, "It is a testament to the regenerative
powers of Mother Nature that the forest
has regrown. It lopks, I am sure, similar to
the way it did when Native Americans
used the land, or the first European set-
tlers came."
The park is designated an International
Biosphere Reserve and a World Heritage
Site with one of the most biologically di-
verse ecosystems on the planet, support-
ing fireflies that blink in unison,
� 2-foot-long salamanders, 300-pound black
bears, a small herd of reintroduced elk
and growing numbers of native brook
trout.
Continuing inventory by scientists and
volunteers of the park's 100,000 estimated
species of plants and animals has discov-
ered thousands previously unseen in the
park and hundreds unknown to science.
The project has become a model for parks
around the country.


5:30 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Drag Me To Hell" (PG-13) 12:40 p.m., 3 p.m.,
5:15 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Up" (PG) 12:05 p.m., 2:20 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7 p.m.,
9:30 p.m. No passes.
"Night at the Museum II" (PG) Noon, 12:30 p.m.,
2:25 p.m., 2:55 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 5:20 p.m., 7:15
p.m., 7:45 p.m., 9:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Terminator Salvation" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 2:50
p.m., 5:25 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Angels & Demons" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:05
p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Star Trek" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20
p.m., 10:15 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie list-
ings and entertainment information.


FORT, COOPER STATE PARK
WANTS YOU
to come and celebrate

FLAG DAY


Did you know that the da Vinci Surgical
System was recently featured on the
daytime medical talk show, the Doctors,
produced by Dr. Phil McGraw, as well as
on the finale of this season's popular TV
medical drama Grey's Anatomy?

Did you know that Munroe surgeons are
leaders in the region, having performed
over 925 cases since 2005?


Please join us on June 15th- for a da Vinci
presentation by Dr. Harvey Taub, of
Central Florida Urology Specialists - the
region's most comprehensive urology
practice, and for a unique opportunity to
"interact with" the da Vinci demonstration
robot "live" on location.

3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
CFCC - Klein Conference Center
3001 SW College Road, Ocala


SCall Munroe's Health Resource Line
Munroe at (352) 867-8181.
Regional ter Monday through Friday
8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Pre-Registration is required to attend this free event, as seating is limited.
783925


Humane Society of Citrus County
Board of County Commissioners
Citrus County Animal Services


. '" ?8 8a.m.* Noon




~ FREE Rabies
Vaccine
- FREE County Tag

Call by June 6 for Reservation 352.341-2222
No RStbrvation? Come at 11 a.m.. - st come 1st served
(Whillauppil P ljit) POR T'rHOE IN NEED

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$318 per person Motorcoach to the Prier
Price is per person double occupancy Washington DC, April 8-13, 2010 Ship Carnival MI-.:ie
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35C 58 B ys I(4 New Orleans, May16-22,2010 Includes taxes & l,
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL CHRnNFCLI? TOGETHER SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2Q09 A13


210th ANNIVERSARY==- - 60thANNIVERSARY====at's good for
TrI.. T .... -... Tl lY/'^ c ,oo


Greg and Brooke La-
garino of Crystal River re-
newed their wedding vows
on their 10th anniversary,
April 4, on the garden patio
of the Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club. Ken Ko-
prowski, a very dear family
friend, officiated.
They were originally mar-
ried on April 4,1999 in Crys-
tal River.
Brooke is the daughter of
Donna Ashby of Homosassa
and Tommy Cleckler of
Clanton, Ala. Greg is the son
of Mary Lagarino of Crystal
River and Daniel Lagarino
of West Haven, Conn.
Brooke wore an ivory and
champagne Chantilly lace
strapless couture wedding
gown with scalloped neck-
line and A-line skirt; skirt
highlighted with satin
under the bust sash with
long streamers and a lace-
up back Her flowers con-
sisted of peach roses and
white hydrangea.
Matron of honor was
Jackie Hendrickson of Ho-
mosassa and best man was
David Lagarino, groom's
brother, of Athens, Ga.
Bridesmaids were Summer
Cleckler and Starr Rieth,
bride's sisters, both of Crys-
tal River. Junior brides-
maids were Destany and
Danni Lagarino, groom's
daughters, both of Crystal
River, and Jaiden Lagarino,
bride and groom's daughter.
The attendants wore peach
crystal satin princess line
gowns with strapless, em-
pire bodice, with draped


band and back flair in ivory
to match the bride's dress.
Their flowers were peach
roses with blue hydrangea.
Junior bridesmaids wore
ivory and champagne A-line
dresses and carried peach
roses with blue roses and
blue hydrangea.
Ushers were Mike La-
garino, groom's twin brother
of Crystal River, Eddie Hen-
drickson of Homosassa and
Devin Lagarino, groom's
son of Crystal River.
Out-of-town guests in-
cluded Daniel and Barbara
Lagarino, West Haven,
Conn., David Lagarino,
Athens, Ga., Chris and Carly
Langston, Thornton, Colo.,
Matt and Jennifer Woods,
Wilmington, Del., and Keith
Harris, Savannah, Ga.
A reception was held im-
mediately following the cer-
emony at the Citrus Hills
Golf and Country Club.


Special to the Chronicle
Jaiden Lagarino, 7, Crystal River, has qualified to repre-
sent Florida in the 26th annual National Miss American
Sweetheart Pageant.


Going to nationals


Special to the Chronicle

Jaiden Lagarino, age 7,
and daughter of Greg and,
Brooke Lagarino of Crystal
River, won the Florida.
Sweetheart Royal Miss Title
at the 2009 Miss Florida
American Sweetheart Pag-
eant during Memorial Day
Weekend, in Orlando,
Florida. Miss Lagarino also
won talent with her tap ren-
dition-to "Shake Your Grove
Thing", the Spirit of America
Award, Best Eyes and Best
Smile. Miss Jaiden Lagarino
was sponsored by Bud
Sasada Painting, Inc, Mike
Scott Plumbing, Gulf Coast
Ready Mix, LLC, Mr. Electric,
AAA Roofing, Crystal Air,
Daniel Haag Stucco, Subway
of Crystal River, and Char-
lie's Fish House Restaurant


Jaiden attends Crystal
River Primary and is in the
first grade. and is in the
REACH program. She is a
third-year dancer at Debbie
Cole's School of Dance
where she takes hip hop,
tap and jazz and is a mem-
ber of the Competition
Dance Team. She also plays
soccer with Citrus United
Soccer League.
Lagarino has qualified to
represent Florida and com-
pete in the 26th annual Na-
tional Miss American
Sweetheart Pageant. She
will attend the National
Pageant for her age group at
Walt Disney World in Or-
lando, during Thanksgiving
Week, where she will com-
pete with other outstanding
girls from across the United
States.


I fie wvv uWAuV.c


Mr. and Mrs. George
Ronald Wilcox, of Dunnel-
lon, marked their 60th an-
niversary recently.
George Ronald Wilcox
and Jacqueline Drew were
married on June 4, 1949, at
the First Methodist Church
in Clearwater.
They have three children
and two grandchildren:


George R. Jr. (Karen) of Tar-
pon Springs, Richard L.
(Kathy) and daughter Kellyn
of Tallahassee and Carol
Wilcox Seiler (Henry) and
son Charles of Woodinville,
Wash.
Mr. Wilcox is a retired
pharmacist.
They have lived in Citrus
County 23 years.


====50th ANNIVERSARY

The Davises

Evelyn and Barry Davis,
of Floral City, celebrated .
their 50th wedding anniver-
sary. A family get-together
was held to celebrate the oc-
casion. ,
They were married June ""
6,1959, in Miami.
Barry is retired from Bas-
com Palmer Eye Institute of
The University of Miami in
Miami. Evelyn retired from .o *
Norwegian Cruise Lines.
They have a son, Jeff (and
his wife, Melissa) Davis, of
Miami, and a daughter, Lori o
(and her husband Danny)
Leon of Floral City; and four
grandchildren, Jonathan
and Samantha Davis of A, 1
Miami and Victoria and
Matthew Leon of Floral City.
The Davises have lived in
Citrus County 11 years.


Engagement

Moore/Williams


Robert and Monica
VanAssen, of Raven Rock,
N.J., have announced the
engagement of their daugh-
ter, Susan Gail Moore, of In-
verness, to Stefan Louis
Williams of Inverness, son of
Debra Williams and
Michael McCumber of Sum-
merfield.
The bride-elect holds an
AS degree in medical assist-
ing and is employed at Van's
Lawn Maintenance.
The future bridegroom
holds a certificate in busi-
ness management and
works for Argo American,
Inc.
A late September wed-


ding is planned with the
place yet to be decided.


DO YOU TWITTER?
* Sign up to follow the latest news from the Citrus
County Chronicle by joining our Twitter group!
* From a computer, you can check the "tweets" at
twitter.com/ CitrusChronicle.
* Or you can join Twitter to get these short updates sent
to your mobile phone as text messages - but
separate charges may apply.



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WRONGFUL DEATH * SOCIAL SECURITY * BANKRUPTCY
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the goose is good


for the scanner


There's been a lot of
worry about those
full-body scanners in
airports that can see under-
neath your
clothes.
"I'm used to it,"
said Sue, "but for
some poor fool :
just trying to do
his job to have to
see you naked for
the first time ...
well, if they don't
quit in disgust
outright, it will J|
probably spoil MUL
their appetite for
days." Please. I
have the body of an 18-year-
old - a big, fat, out-of-shape
18-year-old with Benjamin
Button disease.
Here's a thought experi-
ment: Imagine there was a
rule that all airline passen-
gers had to wear skin-tight
Spandex to fly, similar to the
rule for superheroes. Now
think about your last trip to
the airport and imagine
everyone you saw, in Span-
dex. Finished puking yet?
If a Sports Illustrated
swimsuit cover is a ten, the
average body scan must be
somewhere around a minus
20. Face it, there is no
amount of diet and exercise
that is going to make Nana
and Poppy flying to Florida
look sexy. It makes their dri-
ver's license photos look
like glossies from Glamour
Shots.
My cousin Maxine says
she would never even think
of submitting to a full-body
scan. "I'd be so embarrassed
for some stranger to see me
in my birthday suit." She
told me this while we were
on vacation in Virginia
Beach. She was wearing two
pieces of string and a large
straw hat. The hat was 50
times bigger than her
bathing suit. There are pole
dancers that wear more
clothes. We were sunning on
the deck as all manner of
people walked by on their
way to the beach, all of them
complete strangers.
When I was young, people
used to dress up to fly. You'd
wear your best clothes to the
airport You'd put on sophis-


ticated airs and act as if
you'd been on a plane many
times before, even if this
was your first flight. There
was a time when
seatbelts were a
novelty and yes,
you did have to
pay attention to
find out how they
worked. The
stewardess
("flight atten-
dants" had yet to
hit the scene)
eM would ask you if
.LEN you had flown
before.
"All the time," I
would say as I lit up a non-
filtered Camel. The ashtray
in the armrest was so clean,
it seemed a shame to crush
out my smoke in it. Stew-
ardesses were famous for
being young and glamorous.
For years it was considered
one of the best jobs a
woman could have. The
apartments where they
lived, when they weren't off
to Swingin' London or Paris
and Rome, were called
"stew zoos," and every sin-
gle man in town knew to
hang out in the nearby bars.
Now, when I take a flight,
I expect to see a sign at the
check-in counter that says
"No Shirt, No Shoes, No
Service."
People dress like they are
going to the gym to get on a
plane. Fashionable sweat
pants, check Sleeveless T-
shirt, check Cross-trainers,
check So is going through
the body scanner any more
intrusive than going to the
locker room at your local
gym? Than going to the
bathroom in a rest stop? Is it
any more revealing than
watching Olympic volleyball
or swimming?
Still, a full-body scan is
way past many people's
comfort level. But there may
be a solution. Get the TSA
employees at the gate to
wear Speedos and bikinis.
What's good for the goose is
good for the scanner.


Reach author Jim Mullen at
Jim mullen@myway.com.


===-June 8 to 12 MENUS


CONGREGATE DINING
Monday: Grilled chicken
breast patty, hot German potato
salad, green beans, a slice of
whole wheat bread with mar-
garine, mixed fruit cup, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday: Orange juice, oven
broiled hamburger with
ketchup, baked beans,
coleslaw, hamburger bun,
fruited yogurt.
Wednesday: Beef stew with
vegetables in gravy, parsley
white rice, warm applesauce, a
slice whole grain wheat bread
with margarine, a slice of birth-
day cake, low-fat milk.


Thursday: Oven baked
chicken quarter with chicken
gravy, stewed tomatoes, pota-
toes Florentine, a slice of whole
wheat bread with margarine, 1
fresh banana, low-fat milk.
Friday: Tuna pasta, tossed
garden salad with French
dressing, carrot raisin salad, a
slice of whole grain wheat
bread with margarine, peach
and pear cup, low-fat milk.
Congregate dining sites in-
clude: Lecanto, East Citrus,
Crystal River, Homosassa
Springs, Inverness and South
Dunnellon. For information, call
Support Services at 527-5975.


INSIDE
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Paddock Mall, Ocala I 8
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SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2009 A13


TOGETHER


) CHRONICLE


CiTRus CouN7y (FL)


If


*


I


I


I







CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


&I A e ...-.. T... -7 2onc)


Energetic young dog needs home


Special to the Chronicle

Bailey was born last Oc-
tober, has not yet reached
her first birthday and is
looking for her third home.
Forced relocations of her
families have left her wait-
ing for a loving family
again. She is a mixed-
breed, rough-coated terrier,
spayed, up to date on her
vaccinations, micro-
chipped and ready to relo-
cate to a permanent home
with a family ready to love
her. She gets along with
everybody, cats, and other
dogs. A home with lots of
activity and a fenced yard
would be ideal as she is en-
ergetic, loves to run and
play. She is learning to walk
like a lady on a leash. If you
are interested meeting Bai-
ley or any of other pets
available for adoption
please visit our Web site,
www.preciouspawsflorida
.com, or call us at 726-4700.
Precious Paws Rescue,
Inc. is a new pet rescue
group in Citrus County and
i-escuing pets four paws at a
time. It is an all-volunteer
nonprofit organization.
Based on their age pets are


Special to the Chronicle
Bailey, a mixed-breed, rough-coated terrier, Is ready for
adoption at Precious Paws Rescue Inc.


up to date on all veterinary
care and are fostered in a
member's home. An adop-


tion donation is requested
for each pet to help defray
veterinary costs.


Today HOROSCOPE--


Your Birthday: Although you
prefer a counterpart in most activ-
ities, partnership arrangements in
the year ahead might not serve
your best interests, because
you'll be too dependent on them.-
The chances for success are en-
hanced by your independence.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Com-
panions will take their cues from ,
you. Smile, and the word will smile
with you. Growl, and you'll have
everyone snarling at your feet.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -
Procrastination is your worst
enemy. Unless you attend to
each duty or responsibility as it
arises, jobs and chores will even-
tually pile up to the point of being
overwhelming.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - If you
do nothing at this time, it will lead
friends or associates to believe
you are trying to manipulate
them. Self-serving actions will
jeopardize any good relationships
you've had with these people.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Cer-
tain matters can be difficult


enough without interference from
well-meaning people. By all.
means, keep relatives and those
who don't belong in your affairs at
arm's length.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Peo-
ple in general are more touchy
than usual, so be sure to steer
clear of discussing certain sub-
jects that could ignite the ire of a
temperamental friend. It could
turn into a tirade. _
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - If
possible, avoid making any major
decisions concerning anyone
else's property or assets. Condi-
tions in general are far too iffy,
afid your chances for making a
mistake are more than likely.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -
Be sure to keep all discussions
about a disagreement with your
mate a private matter. An argu-
ment in front of others will invite
their interference and make
things worse..
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)-
Although you usually work well
under pressure, this will not be


one of those times. Abide by a
productive agenda, and don't
leave any vital assignments to
the last minute.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - It
would be a major mistake to walk
around with a chip on your shoul-
der, because two people in partic-
ular have been waiting for just
such a.chance to knock it off.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -
You'd be well-advised to keep an
angry response to an infraction in
check. Overreacting will further
invoke the ire of those who think
you had it coming.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -
There is nothing wrong with
marching to the beat of a different
drummer, but don't expect others
to join the parade unless you
have something positive and
powerful to offer.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - If a
joint endeavor is out of balance
with only a few people .making
contributions, it will fail. All mem-
hrs mu st hbe equallv responnnsible.


News NOTE


CCVC cancels
meetings in summer
The Citrus County Veterans
Coalition invites all honorably
discharged veterans, their
wives, widows and widowers
to its meeting at 6 p.m. on the
fourth Thursday of each month
in the County Veterans Service,
Office classroom at the Citrus.
County Resource Center in
Lecanto next to the. VA Clinic.
Come see what the Citrus Vet-
erans Coalition is all about and,


if you feel you can assist in the
'Veterans Helping Veterans"
program, come on board as a.
member. The next open busi-
ness meeting will be on Sept.
24 as the regular business
meetings for the summer have
been suspended through
June, July and August.
We are a service to needy
veterans' organization provid-
ing food supplements and non-
perishable foods through our
'Veterans Food Pantry."


Lwwnw. -a


L EaI Like new 3BR/21
.comi Will Sell

.y"^~ -^,yJ~ia


If you are looking for an
ganization that devotes all
its energy andfundraising
the philosophy of 'Veteran
Helping Veterans" then the
rus County Veterans Coali
wants you! Annual member
ship donation is just $10 d
a calendar year or $25 for
,three years. Rrenew with,
Ring at 746-0826. For furt
information, go to www.cc,
org Web site. Application f
are available on line.


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SInverness



FLAG DAY

Ceiremorn


June 14 ~ 7 p.m.
Inverness Government Center
212 W. Main St., Inverness
The City of Inverness invites you to
celebrate National Flag Day on Sunday,
June 14, 2009. The ceremony will begin
at 7 p.m. at the Inverness Government
Center and will feature Local Veteran
Color Guard displays, musical and vocal
patriotic tributes. You are encouraged to
* bring lawn chairs, your friends and family!
For more Information call
726-2611 or visit' our Web site
at wwW.inverness-fl.gov


Therapy might help in


behavior modification


Dear Annie: Since I was in my early
teens, I have pretended to be sick on
a lot of occasions when I really was-
n't. I am now entering late adulthood and
still doing it I can't seem to stop. I know it
is an awful way to get attention or whatever
the reason may be. My therapist
doesn't even know the scoop. I
suffer from bipolar disorder,
which wasn't diagnosed until my
20s. I feel ashamed, devious, like
a liar, and sometimes despair of
ever breaking free of this habit.
What can I do? I worry I'm going
to hell for tricking people like
this.
My mother was distant, and
my father was an abusive, mean 5 -1
alcoholic. Both are dead now. My .A
brothers and sisters don't have ANN
this particular problem, but they
are all addicts of one type or an- MAIL
other. One of my younger sisters
gets attention by hyper-dramatizing every-
thing, good or bad. It's like she's perform-
ing on stage. She embellishes every fact
and lies like crazy. We're one deranged fam-
ily, I know. Hardly any of my siblings speak
to one another Any ideas? - Trying To Get
Well
Dear Trying: As you know, the first step
in healing is acknowledging the problem
and then doing something about it. You are
already on the path to recovery While your
therapist helps you uncover the reason you
need this kind of attention, also discuss
medication, if you are not already taking
any for your bipolar disease, along with be-
havior modification to change the way you
conduct yourself. Ask for specific guide-
lines or a referral to someone who special-
izes in such behaviors. We'll be rooting for
you.
DearAnnie: Seven years ago, I met "Dan"
at college and we became fast friends. A se-
mester later, he moved back to his home
state 10 hours away. Even with the distance,
we've grown closer over the years, e-mail-
ing, calling and sending small gifts for
birthdays and holidays. Once in a while,
we'd meet up and talk about everything
under, the sun. I consider him like a
brother
I recently discovered that Dan may not be
who I thought he was. I looked for him on
our college alumni website and he's not
listed. I did an Internet search based on
where he lives and found him listed under


a different last name and slightly older. I
know his parents were divorced and his fa-
ther ruined his credit history by opening
cards in his name and not paying on them,
so maybe that's the reason. Dan also once
mentioned that he wanted to change his
name. I don't know what to think
and can't help wondering
whether he's lied about anything
else. How do I find out? - Won-
dering Wendy
Dear Wendy: There may be a
perfectly innocent reason why
you are having trouble finding
accurate information on Dan.
Sometimes students who leave
before graduation are not listed
as members of that class. The
person you found online at the
IE'S address you checked may have
been someone else altogether. So
.BOX ask him directly Explain that
you couldn't find him on your
college website or anywhere else and see
what he says.
Dear Annie: My condolences to "Califor-
nia," the father whose son died of alco-
holism. It is a common occurrence that is
seldom listed on the death certificate. Al-
coholism took the life of my first wife and
her parents, as well as my father. My son
also seems to be committing suicide on the
installment plan.
As a recovered alcoholic, I heard these
words of wisdom spoken by another recov-
ered alcoholic: "There is nothing you can do
to get an alcoholic to stop drinking or start
drinking unless they decide to." We are all
under God's grace, drunk or sober. We live
in a society where fixing blame is more im-
portant than taking responsibility. Tell him
to blame the disease, not himself, and then
deal with it as best he can. - St Louis
Dear St Lottis Thankyou. We hope "Cal-
ifornia" will find your letter comforting.


Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers column.
Please e-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, PO. Box 118190, Chicago,
IL 60611. To find out more about An-nie's
Mailbox, and read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate
Web page at www.creators.com.


--Sunday PUZZLER

Puzzle answer is on Page A10.


ACROSS
1 Delicious
6 Thin wooden strip
lOMusical instru-
or- ment
of 14Short race
to 18Bowman
iS 20Vagrant
e Cit- 21Succulent plant
ition 22 Rock's - John
er-. 24Read
during 25Culture medium
26Loch -
27Sweetness
John or sourness
her 29Slaughter of base-
VCfl. ball
orms 30Sported
32Spread to dry
34Sal -
36Greek letter
37Pop
38Reduce
39Vacation home
41 Ignore
43Table part
Inllty 44Saint Anthony's -
45Noticeable
470ne of the Bald-
wins
49Where Lodz is
52Medicinal mass
53Distort
55Ankle bones
59Word of woe
S 60Handbook
62Heavy metal
Mary I 64"Lorna-"
S65Ceremony
e...inum 66Do a jig
J AB? 67Fruity drink
[* 69Call
71Aqua-
72Shoe part
73Doorstop shape
74Abbr. in a calen-
dar


75Notions
77Meshwork fabric
78Responsibility
80Aquatic bird
82Kind of scholar
84Blackboard
85Seed appendage
87Ait
880f the kidneys
89Fall of rain
90Fully supplied
92 Roofing pieces'
93Quid - quo
94Stiff
96Harvest goddess
97Spinning or steer-
ing ,
99Cover
102 Peru's capital
city
104 Schoolyard
game
105 Sheep
-106 Utter
107 Descartes or
Coty .
108 Unreactive
110 False show
112 Admiration
114 Fragment
115 Called
117 Gifts for dads
119 Unyielding *
120 Below average
121 Go by boat
123 Use a ruler
125--in-Boots
126 Tree fluid
129 Was aware of
131 Wild distur-
bances
132 Wealthy
133 A legume
136 Persia, at pres-
ent
138 Prod
140 Enthusiastic one
141 Metallic element


142 Hit
143 Excellent
145 Floating plat--
form
147 Love god
149 Hard to under-
stand
151 Sharapova of
tennis
152 Sapling
153 Magical symbol
154 Boardinghouse
dweller
155 Plunder
156 Kernel
157 Crystal-gazer
158 Put on











DOWN
1 Made a sound
recording
2 Sports venue
3 Young fish
4 Consequently
5 Indeed!
6 Portion
7 Theater section
8 Lawyers' org.
9 Mexican bread
1OWields
11Cakes and -
12Betsy the flag
maker
13Money in Cuba
14Fail to pay


15Totality
16Attempt
1 '7Mari dweinV;rg -
19Bounty
230bserve
28Cloth for cleaning
31 Mineral
33Whitney the inven-
tor
35Letters in genetics
38Carnation color
39Worth
40Body joint
42Droplet
44Visage
45Seeing that-- -
46Golf ball peg
48Field's yield
49Separate
50Hodgepodge
51 Delayed success
story (2 wds.)
52Pain
54Walk like a duck
560ut like a light
(2 wds.)
57Become unwound
58Chairs
60Crafted
61 "Dr. Zhivago"
character
63FPayable
66Bad mark
68Fingers or toes
70Great - Reef
73Irrigate
74Guy
75Sick
76Hard outer layer
79Statute
80Drink a little of
81Application
83United
84Place of worship.
85Correctly
86Alert color
89Divide


91 Fencing sword
92Abound
95Marsh or mustard
97To what place
98Attention
100 Indian of an-
cient Peru
101 Buck
103 Weapons
105 Arab VIP (var.)
106 Highly-paid
performers
107 Curved bones
109 Hard wood .
111 Poirft a weapon
113 Window-covers
114 Shove
116 Nitwit
118 Canonized
120 Help
122 Sign of the zo-
diac
124 Old French coin
125 Brooch
126 Family member,
for short
127 Genus of plants
128 Of the bishop
of Rome
130 Toad features
132 Stair part
133 Chubby -
134 Stand for a can-
vas
135 Mimicry
137 Fiddling despot
139 Challenge
141 Region
142 Cease
144 - de Janeiro
146 Fixed charge
148 Regret
150 Big snake


A;L'4 SUNDAY, JUNE 7, ZUU9


-


-----------


- -he


L!


mul all iuoLyuv,4uctiiy I UOFVIK


,4


4









SSection B - SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2009



SPORTS


N Golf, NBA/B2,
0 College baseball/B2
M MLB/B3
E Sports briefs/B4
M*TV, lottery/B4
0 NFL, baseball/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Bird of a different feather


Summer Bird

stuns fieldfor

#elmont Stakes
Associated Press
NEW YORK - This was a
Belmont for the Birds.'
i- It was Summer Bird, not
Mine That Bird and jockey
Calvin Borel, 'who came
tearing down the long
stretch and won the final


jewel of the Triple Crown
on Saturday.
For a brief moment on the
turn for home, Borel looked
like a winner. His tough lit-
tle gelding took the lead, and
even Borel believed his vic-
tory guarantee was assured.
"I thought I was home
free," he said, "but the other
horses galloped by."
They sure did.
With the crowd of 52,861
cheering on the leaders in
the stretch, Mine That Bird
passed Dunkirk. But it was
Summer Bird' who pulled


away from them both for ,
2%-length victory, witi
Dunkirk second and Mile
That Bird a neck back .n
third in the field of 103-
year-olds.
The upset ended Bol,'s
bid to become the first
jockey to win a personal
Triple Crown, and he ailed
to deliver on a guararlee of
victory in the Bflmont
Stakes. Borel won tle Ken-
tucky Derby aboard Mine
That Bird, then tiok the
Preakness with tie. filly
Rachel Alexandra


Summer Bird, sent off at
11-1 odds, gave jockey Kent
Desormeaux a Belmont vic-
tory he desperately wanted.
"I hope from now on we'll
talk about winning one,"
Desormeaux said.
Last year, he won the
See BELMONT/Page B4
Jockey Kent Desormeaux
rides Summer Bird to win
the 141st running of the
Belmont Stakes horse race
at Belmont Park on Satur-
day, in Elmont, N.Y.
Associated Press


Catching' some cobia


S5th annual Cobia Big Fish Tournamert cast its lines Saturday in Homosassa


Photos by BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
E�3. .: Gator MacRae holds a 20.82-pound cobia caught by Bill Harman. SEoiw. Bobby Denton puts a cobia on ice Saturday during the 25th
Annual Cobla Big Fish Tournament at MacRae's in Old Homosassa. The two-daytournament concludes this afternoon.


Red Wings

pound

Penguins

Detroit takes
3-2 lead in

Cup Final

Associated Press
- DETROIT - The Detroit
Red Wings sure don't look
tired now.
After watching their two-
game lead in the Stanley Cup
finals disappear in Pittsburgh,
the defending champions re-
turned to the -friendly con-
fines of Joe Louis Arena and
blew away the supposedly
fresher Penguins 5-0 in Game
5 on Saturday night
The veteran-laden Red
Wings lead the series 3-2 and
they moved within one win of
their 12th Stanley Cup title
and fifth in 12 seasons. Detroit
can wrap this one up Tuesday
night in Pittsburgh, but the.
home team is 5-0 in the re-
match of last year's finals.
Pavel Datsyuk made his
mark in his first appearance
in eight games, notching two
assists, drawing a key penalty,
and knocking leading scorer
Evgeni Malkin to the ice. The
Red Wings made the Penguins
pay for a lack of discipline by
going 3-for-9 on the power
play in front of a crowd that
celebrated most of the night.
Chris Osgood, on the verge
of his fourth Stanley Cup
championship - third as the
Red Wings starting goalie -
made 22 saves for his 15th
playoff shutout. He earned an
assist on 'Valtteri Filppula's
goal for his fifth career play-
off point, and improved to 11-
4 in the finals. Osgood has
two shutouts in this year's
playoffs.
Detroit held a 29-22 shots
advantage, the first time the
home team had the edge.
This series looked firmly in
the Red Wings' control after
they opened with a pair of 3-1
victories, but the Penguins
seized momentum with two 4-
2 wins that made Detroit ap-
pear a bit worn out.
With the first five games
played in eight nights, the
hectic schedule seemed to
catch up with the Red Wings.
Now the playoff-tested veter-
ans can enjoy two days off be-
fore Game 6. There will be
another two-day break should
the Penguins force a Game 7
back in Detroit on Friday.
History suggests the Red
Wings will hoist the Cup again
as 14 of the 19 previous teams
to win Game 5 in a series tied
2-2 have prevailed.


,Kuznetsova claims French Open .


Tennisplayer

downs Safina
to win major
Associated Press
PARIS - Svetlana
Kuznetsova never struck Di-
nara Safina as a Grand Slam
champion in the making


when they were kids in Rus-
sia. Kuznetsova showed up
for matches toting a 2-liter
bottle of soda and wearing
rock band T-shirts.
As I of Saturday,
Kuznetsova owns two major
titles - and that's two more
than Safina.
Far steadier, if not all that
spectacular, Kuznetsova
took advantage of the No. 1-
ranked Safina's assorted er-
rors and won the French


Open final 6-4, 6-2. Hardly a
work of beauty, the 74-
minute match ended, fit-
tingly, with Safina's seventh
double-fault
"She was too tight. She
had so much pressure on-
her," said Kuznetsova, who
also won the 2004 U.S. Open.
"I just played the match. It
was just one more match ....
Definitely it was a lot of
emotions inside of me, but I
control it."


Not at the outset: She lost
the first three points and
was broken in the first
game. Quickly, though, the
seventh-seeded Kuznetsova


See FRENCH/Page B4
Svetlana Kuznetsova strikes
a forehand at Dinara Safina
during their women's singles
final match of the French
Open on Saturday in Paris.
Associated Press


EoL,

.J









CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bettencourt's birdies



propel him into lead\


Golfer tied with

Wilson atop,

Memorial

Associated Press

DUBLIN, Ohio -- Matt
Bettencourt ran off four
straight birdies Saturday on
the super slick greens of
Muirfield Village, survived a
few scary moments on the
back nine and .wound up
with a 4-under 68 for a share
of the lead in the Memorial.
Two-time tour winner
Mark Wilson had a 69 to
match Wilson at 9-under 207,
with a pack of major cham-
pions lurking at Jack Nick-
laus' tournament, including
Tiger Woods.
Jim Firyk steadied him-
self for a 71 and was one shot
behind with Jonathan Byrd,
who overcame a triple bogey
on the par-3 fourth and fin-
ished with a birdie for a 71.
Former U.S. Open cham-
pion Geoff Ogilvy, who
started the third round nine
shots out of the lead, turned
in a tournament-best 63 and
was atop the leaderboard
for most of the warm after-
noon. Ogilvy wound up at 7
under, tied with former PGA
champion Davis Love III
(69), who chipped in for
birdie on his last hole.
Woods climbed into con-
tention on the back nine and
shot a 68, leaving him four
shots behind.
Bettencourt is a true
rookie, having never played
a PGA Tour event until this
year He earned his card by
topping the Nationwide
Tour money list, and it's a
wonder he's even on any
tour. The 34-year-old Cali-
fornian had intentions of a
career in baseball until
hurting his arm, and he did-
n't play competitive golf
until after college.
.PGA State Farm Classic
SPRINGFIELD, II. - Cristie
Kerr made a big jump into a tie
for the lead with Kristy McPher-
son at the State Farm Classic,
delivering a dominant showing
before a late fade in the windy
third round.
Four strokes back after the
second-round, Kerr settled for a
6-under 66 after bogeying two


Associated Press
Matt Bettencourt tees off on the third hole during the third
round of the Memorial golf tournament Saturday in Dublin, Ohio.


of the final three holes. Then,
McPherson (69) stumbled at the
end, bogeying her final two
holes, and that left them tied at
12-under 204 heading into the
last round in the final tuneup for
next week's LPGA Champi-
onship at Bulle Rock.
Jiyai Shin (69) was a shot
behind. Second-round co-lead-
ers Se Ri Pak (72) and Suzann
Pettersen (72) were part of a
crowd at 10 under that included
Ai Miyazato (65), In-Kyung Kim
(69), Amy Hung (69), Angela
Stanford (69) and Helen Al-
fredsson (71), who shot-her
way into contention with a 63
on Saturday. Michelle Wie,
meanwhile, fell out of it with a
77 that left her at 1 under.
Triton Financial Classic
LAKEWAY, Texas - Bern-
hard Langer shot a 3-under 69
in warm conditions to maintain a
one-stroke lead after the sec-
ond round of the Triton Finan-
cial Classic.
The German star, a two-time
winner this year on the Cham-
pions Tour, had a 10-under
134 total on The Hills Country
Club course.
Gene Jones (66) was sec-
ond, Jeff Sluman (69) and Mark


O'Meara (69) were 7 under, and
Jay Haas (68), Scott Hoch (69)
and local star Tom Kite (70)
were 6 under.
Langer had five birdies and
two bogeys,. reaching 10 under
with a 10-foot birdie putt on the.
par-5 17th hole on the Jack
Nicklaus-designed course.
Wales Open
NEWPORT, Wales - Eng-
land's Nick Dougherty eagled
the final hole for a 1-under 70
and a share of the Wales
Open during the rain-delayed
third round.
Denmark's Jeppe Huldahl.
(68) and Spain's Ignacio Gar-
rido (71) matched Dougherty at
5-under 208 on The Twenty Ten
Course, the site of the 2010
Ryder Cup matches.
Englishmen Paul Waring (70)
and Simon Dyson (70) were a
stroke back and Scotland's
Richie Ramsey also was 4
under with two holes to play in
the round delayed 614 hours
because of rain. Ramsey talked
to European tour chief referee
John Paramor about a possible
rule infraction at the eighth
hole, but no decision was
reached and the matter will be
resolved Sunday.


PGA Tour
The Memorial
Saturday
At Muirfield Village Golf Club
Dublin, Ohio
Purse: $6 million
Yardage: 7,366; Par 72
Third Round
Matt Bettencourt 71-68-68-207 -9
Mark Wilson 68-70-69-207 -9
Jonathan Byrd 69-68-71-208 -8
Jim Furyk 67-70-71-208 -8
eoff Ogilvy 72-74-63-209 -7
vis Love Ill 72-68-69-209 -7
er Woods 69-74-68-211 -5
ael Letzig 72-70-69-211 -5
M Kuchar 73-67-71-211 -5
Er Els 70-70-71-211 -5
Bu Watson 71-71-70-212 -4
Luk onald 64-76-72-212 -4
Stewtt Cink 68-72-72-212 -4
Huntoeahan , 74-69-70-213 -3
Troy Mleson 69-73-71-213 -3
Dus.itn nnson 73-68-72-213 -3
Chris Di rco 73-67-73-213 -3
Steve Mao 68-72-73-213 -3
Ryuji Ima 70-69-74-213 -3
Mike Weir 69-69-75-213 -3
Ben Curtis 71-71-72-214 -2
Alex Cejka 73-68-73-214 -2
Daniel Chopl 72-69-73-214 -2
Rod Pamplin 69-71-74-214 -2
K.J. Choi 73-70-72-215 -1
Jason Day 67-73-75-215 -1
Robert Allenby 72-76-68-216 E
Jose Maria Olaz al 74-74-68-216 E
D.J. Trahan 73-74-69-216 E
Mathew Goggin \ 73-73-70-216 E
Jeff Overton 76-69-71-216 E
Lucas Glover 75-69-72-216 E
Reinier Saxton 69-75-72-216 E
Will MacKenzie 70-73-73-216 E
Kevin Na 71-72-73-216 E
Chez Reavie '71-74-72-217 +1
Steve Stricker 70-74-73-217 +1
Kevin Sutherland 9-75-73-217 +1
Webb Simpson B-71-73-217 +1
Char] Schwartzel 7-68-77-217 +1
Marc Leishman 7474-70-218 +2
Steve Lowery 76\1-71-218 +2
Camilo Villegas 71-'73-218 +2
Tom Pernice, Jr. 71-7-73-218 +2
Woody Austin 75-7(73-218 +2
Nick Watney 73-71 4-218 +2
Paul Casey 73-70-5--218 +2
Martin Kaymer 71-76- -219 +3
Richard Sterne 74-71-7--219 +3
John Senden 71-74-74-219 +3
YE.Yang 73-72-74 219 +3
David Duval 71-74-74-219 +3
Tom Lehman 71-74-74--19 +3
Jerry Kelly 72-72-75-t9 +3
Zach Johrion 71 -73-75-2.9 +3
Johnson Wagner 69-74-76-2t +3
Charley Hoffman 71-72-76-21\ +3
lan Poulter 75-71-74-220, +4
George McNeill 76-69-75-220. +4
D.A. Points 75-70-75-220 \ +4
Lee Janzen 72-73-75-220 +4
Kenny Perry 72-73-75-220 ',+4
Erik Compton 72-75-74-221 \'5
Jeff Quinney 75-72-74-221 '5
Ted Purdy 67-79-75-221 -
SSteve Flesch 73-75-44-222 +A
Stuart Appleby 72-74-76-222 +6
Nick O'Hern 73-73-76-222 +61
Nicholas Thompson 69-75-78-222 +6
Bill'Haas 74-72-77-223 +7
Marc Turnesa 72-73-78-223 +7
Tim Herron 75-73-76-224 +8
Mark Brooks 75-73-76-224 +8
Rocco Mediate 73-70-81-224 +8
Brett Quigley 74-73-78-225 +9
Jeff Klauk 76-71-79-226 +10
'Scott McCarron 74-74-82-230 +14
Champions Tour
Triton Financial Classic
Saturday
At The Hills Country Club
Austin,Texas
Purse: $1.6 million
Yardage: 7,035; Par 72
Second Round
Bernhard Langer 65-69-134 -10


Gene Jones 69-66--135 -9
Jeff Sluman 68-69-137 -7
Mark O'Meara 68-69--137 -7
Jay Haas 70-68-138 -6
Scott Hoch 69-69-138 -6
Tom Kite .68-70-138 -6
John Morse 71-68-139 -5
Dana Quigley 68-71-139 -5
Mark James 68-71-139 -5
Dan Forsman 71-69-140 -4
Larry Mize 68-72-140 -4
Mike McCullough 67-73-140 -4
Lonnie Nielsen 74-67-141 -3
Joey Sindelar 72-69-141 -3
Chip Beck 71-71-142 -2
Hal Sutton 71-71-142 -2
Tom Jenkins 69-73-142 -2
John Cook 69-73-142 -2
Mark Wiebe 68-74-142 -2
Leonard Thompson 73-70-143 -1
Gary Hallberg 73-70-143 -1
Fred Funk 72-71-143 -1
Loren Roberts 71-72-143 -1
Morris Hatalsky 71-72-143 -1
R.W. Eaks 70-73-143 -1
Jerry Pate 70-73-143 -1
Joe Ozaki 69-74-143 -1
Dave Stockton 70-73-143 -1
Don Pooley 74-70-144 E
Craig Stadler 74-70-144 E
Fulton Allem 73-71-144 E
Ben Crenshaw 73-71-144 E
Sandy Lyle 71-73-144 E
Wayne Grady 71-73-144 E
Olin Browne 71-73-144 E
Mark McNulty 69-75-144 E
David Eger 66-78-144 E
Vicente Fernandez 76-69-145 +1
Mike Reid 74-71-145 +1
Robert L.Thompson 71-74-145 +1
Bruce Vaughan 71-74-145 +1
Fuzzy Zoeller 71-74-145 +1
Tim Simpson 71-74-145 +1
Tom Wargo 69-76-145 +1
Dave Eichelberger 74-72-146 +2
Jim Thorpe 74-72--146 +2
John Harris - 73-73-146 +2
Mike Goodes 72-74-146 +2
Ken Green 71-75-146 +2
Mike Hulbert 71-75-146 +2
Tom Purtzer 73-74-147 +3
Gil Morgan 71-76-147 +3
Jay Don Blake 71-76-147 +3
Graham Marsh 79-69-148 +4
Phil Blackmar 71-77-148 +4
Bob Gilder 71-77-148 +4
Dave Rummells 75-74-149 +5
James Mason 74-75-149 +5
Peter Jacobsen 74-75-149 +5
Bruce Summerhays 74-75-149 +5
Brad Bryant 76-74-150 +6
David Edwards .73-77-150 +6
Keith Fergus 72-78-150 +6
Isao Aoki 80-71-151 +7
Ron Streck 77-74-151 +7
Chris Starkjohann 77-74-151 +7
Hale Irwin 74-77-151 +7
Jim Colbert 73-78-151 +7
Lanny Wadkins 74-78-152 +8
SteveThomas 81-72-153 +9
Bruce Lietzke 77-77-154 +10
D.A. Weibring 74-80-154 +10
Bob Murphy 75-80-155 +11
Denis Watson -79-77-156 +12
Blaine McCallister 78-78-156 +12
Lee Trevino 78-78-156 +12
Tom McKnight 78-78-156 +12
,Bobby Wadkins . 73-WD
IPGA State Farm Classic
Saturday
At Panther Creek Country Club Course
+Springfield, Ill.
Purse: $1.7,million
Yardage: 6,746; Par: 72
Third Round


Cn-r', K'err
Knsr fPer-."on
Jiyai Shli
Ai Miyazato
Amy Hunq
Angela Stnford
In-Kyung Km
Helen Alfredsson
Suzann Pettersen
Se Ri Pak


69-69-66 204
69-66-69-204
69-67-69-205.
73-68-65-206
71-66-69-206
70-67-69-200
69-68-69-206
72-63-71-206
68-66-72-206
66-68-72-206


Hee Young Park
Jee Young Lee
Karine Icher
Sarah Lee
Hee-Won Han
NaYeon Choi
Sarah Kemp
Paula Creamer
Natalie Gulbis
Joo Mi Kim
Amy Yang
Seon Hwa Lee
Kris Tamulis
Julieta Granada
Shanshan Feng
Taylor Leon
Meaghan Francella
Anna Rawson
Eun-Hee Ji
Pat Hurst
YaniTseng -
Christina Kim
Eunjung Yi
Jin Young Pak
Beth Bader
Ashleigh Simon
Haeji Kang
Becky Morgan
Chella Choi
Karin Sjodin
Anna Grzebien
Song-Hee Kim
Katie Futcher
Katherine Hull
Morgan Pressel
Juli Inkster
Karen Stupples
Moira Dunn
Meredith Duncan
A. Hanna-Williams
Mikaela Parmlid
Sarah Jane Smith
Anja Monke
Mi Hyun Kim
Janice Moodie
Laura Diaz
Anna Nordqvist
Stephanie Louden
Brittany Lang
Marisa Baena
Inbee Park
Sun Young Yoo
Diana D'Alessio
Young Kim
Michelle Wie
Nicole Castrale
Meena Lee
Soo-Yun Kang
J. Gallagher-Smith
Vicky Hurst
Kyeong Bae
Teresa Lu


70-70-67-207 -9
66-69-72-207 -9
70-72-66-208 -8
69-72-67-208 -8
69-69-70-208 -8
72-70-67-209 -7
72-70-67-209 -7
69-71-69-209 -7.
68-72-69-209 -7
70-68-71-209 -7
69-69-71-209 -7
69-68-72-209 -7
67-68-74-209 -7
69-73-68-210 -6
69-70-71-210 -6
69-69-72-210 -6
69-68-73-210 -6
71-71-69-211 -5
70-72-69-211 -5
69-72-70-211 -5
69-72-70-211 -5
72-68-71-211 -5
72-67-72-211 -5
69-70-72-211 -5
69-70-72-211 -5
70-68-73-211 -5
74-68-70-212 -4
73-69-70-212 -4
71-71-70-212 -4
71-71-70-212 -4
71-70-71-212 -4
71-69-72-212 -4
71-67-74-212 -4
70-68-74-212 -4
69-69-74-212 -4
72-65-75-212 -4
69-68-75-212 -4'
69-66-77-212 -4'
69-72-72-213 -3
71-69-73-21.3 -3
70-70-73-213 -3'
70-70-73-213 -3
68-72-73-213 - -3
70-69-74-213 -3
69-69-75-213 -3
73-69-72-214 -2
74-67-73-214 -2
71-70-73-214 -2
69-72-73-214 -2
69-71-74-214 -2.
69-70-75-214 -2.
72-69-74-215 -1
70-71-74-215 -1
70-70-75-215 -1
70-68-77-215 -1,
70-72-74-216 E'
70-71-75-216 E'
69-72-75-216 E
72-68-76-216 E
72-68-76-216 E
71-69-77--217 +1
73-69-77-219 +3


PGA European
Celtic Manor Wales Open
�"Saturday
At Celtic Manor
Newport, Wales
Purse: $2.9 million
Yardage: 7,378; Par: 71
Third Round
(Three players still to finish their rounds
due to rain delays)
Jeppe Huldahl, Denmark 69-71-68-208
Ignacio Garrido, Spain 68-69-71-208
Nick Dougherty, England , 66-72-70-208
Paul Waring, England 71-68-70-209
Simon Dyson, England 74-65-70-209
Mark Foster, England 69-69-72-210
Fabrizio Zanotti. Paraguay 67-71-72-210
Gregory Bourdy, France 70-70-70-210
Niclas Fasth, Sweden 71-68-71-210
Richard Green, Australia 68-71-71-210
Paul McGinley, Ireland 68-71-71-210
JeevMilkha Singh,lndia 69-68-73-210
Chris Wood, England 72-69-70-211
Klas Eriksson, Sweden- 70-72-69-211
Pablo Larrazabal, Spain 67-73-71-211
Danny Willett, England 73-66-72-211
Magnus Carlsson, Sweden 70-69-72-211
Oliver Fisher, England 72-69-71-212
Marcus Fraser, Australia 69-70-73-212
Richard Finch, England 71-68-73-212
Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 70-70-72-212
F. Andersson Hed, Sweden 70-67-75-212


Gators fall to Southern Miss.


Razorbacks bounce

FSU; UF now in

must-win mode

Associated Press

GAINESVILLE - Corey Stevens
drove in three runs, reliever Jonathan
Johnston pitched 3 2-3 scoreless innings
and Southern Mississippi beat Florida,
9-7, in their super regional opener
The Golden Eagles (39-24) are one
win away from their first College,
World Series berth.
Southern Miss won for the 11th
time in its last 14 games, a hot streak
that started shortly after coach Corky
Palmer announced his retirement.
Now, the Eagles need another victory
to give Palmer a storybook send-off in
Omaha, Neb. Florida's Mike Mooney (5) throws to
Johnston allowed just two baserun- Michael Ewing (33) slides into second
ners en route to his first win this sea- during an NCAA Super Regional cont
son. Collin Cargill' pitched the ninth Mississippi defeated Florida, 9-7.
for his 12th save.
Patrick Keating (4-4) took the loss clung to a two-run lead. Matty Ot pitched
for Florida (42-21). the ninth, striking out Brock Holt with a
Arkansas 9, FSU 8 man on base to wrap up his 16th save.
Helenihi drove in a run in the fourth in-
TALLAHASSEE - Andrew Darr's two- ning with a single, and hit a solo homer in
run double in the bottom of the ninth in- the sixth for the Tigers"'final run.
ning lifted Arkansas to a 9-8 NCAA super Ryan Berry (7-2) took the loss for Rice
regional win Saturday over Florida State (43-18); which fell two victories short in its
and a berth in the College World Series. bid for a fourth straight CWS appearance.


uarr, who was hitting just .215 coming
in, had four of Arkansas' 10 hits, including
his fourth homer.
Arkansas (39-22) returns to the CWS in
Omaha, Neb., for the first time since 2004
when it also beat Florida State in the
super regionals. /
The Seminoles (45-18) had taken an 8-
7 lead in the top of the ninth when
Stephen Cardullo singled in two runs and
then scored a short-lived go-ahead run on
Jason Stidham's single.
LSU 5, Rice 3
BATON ROUGE, La. - Louis Coleman
pitched eight strong innings, Derek Helenlhi
drove in two runs and LSU beat Rice to win
the super regional and clinch the Tigers'
15th College World Series appearance.
Coleman scattered nine hits, struck out
five and kept Rice from scoring in the sev-
enth and eighth Innings while LSU (51-16)


Cal St. Fullerton 11, Louisville 2
FULLERTON, Calif. - Jared Clark
homered and drove in three runs and Noe
. Ramirez struck out a career-high 10 over
eight strong innings, sending Cal State
Fullerton to the College World Series.
Fullerton (47-14) has yet to be chal-
lenged in five NCAA tournament contests,
winning them by a combined score of 64-
11. The four-time NCAA champion Titans,
who' last won it all in 2004, will head to
Omaha for the 16th time and third in the
last four years.
Ramirez gave up two solo homers to
Louisville's Chris Dominguez but allowed
only one other hit. The Cardinals (47-18)
managed just eight hits in the two games.
UNC 10, East Carolina 1
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -Alex White
struck out a career-high 12 batters while


Associated Press
o first base as Southern Mississippi's
id for a double play in the ninth Inning
test Saturday in Gainesville. Southern

getting plenty of help at the plate as North
Carolina beat East Carolina to open their
NCAA super regional series.
Kyle Seager had four hits and a home
run for the Tar Heels (46-16), the No. 4 na-
tional seed. North Carolina went ahead
with a pair of runs in the third inning, then
blew the game open with seven more in
the sixth. The Tar Heels can clinch their
fourth straight trip to the College World Se-
ries by beating the Pirates again Sunday.
Brandon Henderson hit a solo home run
in the second for the Pirates (46-19), who
didn't get much else against White. Seth
Maness took the loss, allowing 13 hits and
six eamed runs in five innings.
Virginia 4, Mississippi 3
OXFORD, Miss. - Robert Morey
pitched four hitless innings after giving up
two runs on his first three pitches and Vir-
ginia took advantage of an eighth-inning
error to keep its bid for the College World
Series alive with a win over Mississippi.
An errant throw by second baseman
Evan Button helped Virginia (47-13-1) to
a two-run eighth inning when Franco
Valdes drove in one run and John Barr
beat out a double-play attempt to put the
Cavaliers ahead.


Magic players more


confident for Game 2


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES - Dwight
Howard hasn't been sur-
prised by anything during his
first trip to the NBA finals.
It's all seemed so familiar to
Orlando's center, like he's
been here before.
If it wasn't June, it would
be like any other game.
Sure, there's more media.
There's "that big. trophy
everywhere you look"
There's a stenographer sit-
ting in on the press
conferences.
."That's new," Howard
noted. "Other than that, it's
just basketball."
And as has been the case
most of this season,,the Magic
appear to be in trouble.
Down 1-0 to the Los Ange-
les Lakers after being blown
out 100-75 in Game 1, the
Magic spent part of Friday
watching film of their pa-
thetic return to the finals
after a 14-year hiatus. They
got lit up by Kobe Bryant,
who scored 40 points, and
Howard and Orlando's other
big men were dominated on
the boards by the Lakers'
frontline, which posted a 55-
41 advantage,in rebounding.


"Embarrassing," Magic
coach Stan Van Gundy
snorted.
Orlando was out of its
league.
Bryant scored almost at
will, punctuating each bucket
by extending his lower jaw to
show his lower teeth - a
menacing look underscoring
the self-proclaimed Black
Mamba's drive at winning his
fourth title. The Magic also
hurt themselves by shooting
30 percent and missing open
shots, and Howard was a non-
factor on offense with 12
points and only one field
goal, a 7-foot hook shot in the
game's first two minutes.
The NBAs leading dunker
didn't dunk He didn't domi-
nate. He didn't do diddly
Howard knows he and his
teammates have to do much
more in Game 2 tonight.
"We just didn't have any
energy or effort," Howard
said. "We didn't box out, all
the little things. We can't con-
trol Kobe scoring 40 points,
but we can control boxing
out, getting loose balls, stuff
like that, and we didn't do
that We have to come out
with a better effort"


Associated Press
From left, Dwight Howard, J.J. Redick, Anthony Johnson and
Hedo Turkoglu sit on the bench during the Magic's Game 1
loss to the Los Angeles Lakers In the NBA Finals on Thursday,


B2SuNDAY, JuNE 7, 2009


SPORTS


Cl.









RT.AI XUS O~~UNTY z ), ',


Boston
New York
Toronto
Tampa Bay
A L Baltimore


NL


Philadelphia
New York
Atlanta
Florida
Washington


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
L.A. Angels 2, Detroit 1
Tampa Bay at New York, ppd., rain
Toronto 9, Kansas City 3
Texas 5, Boston 1
Cleveland 6, Chicago White Sox 0
Oakland 9, Baltimore 1
Minnesota 2, Seattle 1, 10 innings
Saturday's Games
Tampa Bay 9, N.Y.Yankees 7
Kansas City 6, Toronto 2
Chicago White Sox 4, Cleveland 2
Seattle 2, Minnesota 1
Detroit 2, LA. Angels 1
Boston 8, Texas 1
Baltimore at Oakland, late
Today's Games
L.A. Angels (Saunders 6-4) at Detroit (Porcello
6-4), 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Garza 4-4) at N.Y.Yankees (Cham-
berlain 3-1), 1:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Davies 2-5) at Toronto (Halladay 9-
1), 1:07p.m.
Texas (Padilla 3-3) at Boston (Matsuzaka 1-3),
1:35 p.m.
Cleveland (D.Huff 0-2) at Chicago White Sox
(B.Colon 3-5), 2:05 p.m.
Baltimore (R.Hill 2-0) at Oakland (Mazzaro 1-
0), 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Slowey 8-1) at Seattle (Bedard 4-
2), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 2:05 p.m., 1st
game
Tampa Bay at N.Y.Yankees, 7;05 p.m.
Toronto atTexas, 8:05 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:11 p.m., 2nd
game
Minnesota at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
N.Y. Mets 3, Washington 1,10 innings
Chicago Cubs 2, Cincinnati 1
San Francisco 2, Florida 1
Milwaukee 4, Atlanta 0
Houston 9, Pittsburgh 1
Colorado 11, St.Louis 4
Arizona 8, San Diego 0
L.A. Dodgers 4, Philadelphia 3
Saturday's'Games
L.A. Dodgers 3, Philadelphia 2,12 innings
Florida 5, San Francisco 4
Washington 7, N.Y. Mets 1
Pittsburgh 6, Houston 4
Cincinnati 4, Chicago Cubs 3, 11 innings
Milwaukee 3, Atlanta 0
Colorado 10, St. Louis 1
.Arizona at San Diego, late
Today's Games - ..
Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 0-2) at Cincinnati (Ar-
royo 7-4), 1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (M.Parra 3-7) at Atlanta (Hanson 0-
0), 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Li.Hernandez ,4-1) at Washington
(Stammen 0-1), 1:35 p.m.'
Pittsburgh (Snell 1-6) at Houston (F.Paulino 1-
4), 2:05:p.m. �
Colorado (Jimenez 3-6) at St. Louis (Pineiro 5-
5), 2:15 p.m.
Arizona (Haren 4-4) at San Diego (Geer 1-1),
4:05 p.m.
_San Francisco (Lcecijjn ,41) at Florida (No-
lasco 2-5), 5:05 p.m I
Philadelphia (Bastardo 1-0) at L.A. Dodgers
(Wolf 3-1), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Colorado at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.


.-.1 .

Associated Press,
Tampa Bay Rays pinch runner Andy Sonnanstine scores ahead
of a throw to New York Yankees catcher Jorge Posada in the
ninth inning Saturday at Yankee Stadium in New York.


Rays 9, Yankees 7
NEW YORK- Joe Dillon hit a
tiebreaking single in the ninth inning
and the Tampa Bay Rays touched up
Mariano Rivera for the second time this
season, defeating the New York Yan-
kees 9-7 on Saturday.
David Price left with a chance to
beat CC Sabathia in a much-antici-
pated matchup pitting a potential ace
against an established one. But the
Yankees rallied for two runs in the
eighth, tying it 5-all against Tampa
Bay's bullpen.
Willy Aybar and Ben Zobrist home-
red to help the AL champion Rays
overcome four errors, which doubled
their previous season high. Tampa Bay
has won four straight and six of seven.
The Rays are 3-0 at the new Yankee
Stadium, including an 8-6 victory May
7 when Rivera served up back-to-back
homers for the first time in his career.
Carl Crawford and Evan Longoria con-
nected for ninth-inning solo shots in
that one.
- Mark Teixeira homered in the
eighth and hit a two-run double in the
ninth for New York. Alex Rodriguez
also went deep for the Yankees, .who
had won 17 of 22.
Rays reliever Dan Wheeler gave up
three straight hits to start the ninth,
then retired Rodriguez and Jorge
Posada with Teixeira on second.
J Ex-Yankee Randy Choath.got.
Robinson Cano on a long fly to center
for his third save in eight days - the
first three of his major league career,
which beganin 2000. B,J. Upton made
a lunging grab to end it.
Zobrist opened the Tampa Bay ninth


with a triple to left-center and scored
orn a single by Dillon, a journeyman
who was acquired from Oakland on
May 9. He has three hits in each of the
past two games, matching his career
high each time.
Upton added a two-out RBI single
off Rivera (0-2), who was then lifted
from the'game in a rare sight.


Tampa Bay
ab rhbi
BUptoncf 3 2 1 1
Crwfrdlf 5 1 2 1
WAyar3b-2b5 1 1 3
C.Penalb 4 00 0
Zobrist 2b-ss3 2 2 1
Dillon dh-3b 3 2 3 1


Navarr c
Kapler ff
Joyce ph-rf
Brignc ss
Longori ph
Snnnstn pr
Wheelr p
Choate p


3 00 1
3 00 0
1 00 0
3000
0000
0. 1 0 0
0000
0000


NewYork
ab r h bi
Jeterss 4 1 1 0
Damon If 4 1 1 0
Teixeirlb 5 1 2 3
ARdrgz3b 3 2 1 1
Posadac 4 1 0 0
Cano2b 4 0 1 1
Swisherrf 3 0 0 0
MeCarr cf 4 t 1 1'
Cervellic 2 0 0 0
HMatsuph 1 00.0
MaRivr p 0 00 0
Coke p ! 0 00 0


Totals 33 99 8 Totals 34 77 6
Tampa Bay 000'023 004-9
NewYork . 010 110 022-7
E-W:Aybar (2), Navarro 3 (4), A.Rodriguez (2),
Damon (2). DP-NewYork 1. LOB-Tampa Bay
3, New York 8. 2B-Damon (13), Teixeira (15),
Me.Cabrera (7). 3B-Zobrist (3). HR-W.Aybar
(4), Zobrist (11), Teixeira (17), A:Rodriguez (8).
SB--Jeter (11), A.Rodriguez (1). CS-B.Upton
(4), Crawford (3). S-Cervelli. SF-r-Navarro.
IP H RER BBSO
Tampa Bay
Price 52-3 2 3 1 5. 3
J.Nelson H,4 2-3 0 -0 0 0 1
BalfourH,7 1 1 2 2 1 0
HowellW,1-2 2-3 1 0 0 1 1
Wheeler 2-3 3 2 2 0 0
Choate S,3-3...... 1,3. .0 -0 0 0 0
New York . '"f "
sairi,, 8 5 5 4 3 5
Ma.Rivera L,0-2 . 2-3 3 4 3 1 0
Coke 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Sabathia (Dillon).
Umpires-Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Scott
Barry; Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Tim McClelland.
T-3:37. A-46,205 (52,325).


Red Sox 8, Rangers 1
BOSTON - Jon Lester retired the
first 19 batters he faced and finished
with a two-hitter, David Oritz homered
and the Boston Red Sox beat the Texas
Rangers 8-1 on Saturday night.
Michael Young doubled into the gap
in left-center with one out in the seventh
inning to break up Lester's bid for a per-
fect game. The sold-out crowd let out a
loud groan as the ball rolled to the wall
before giving Lester a standing ovation.
Young also singled in the ninth.
Oritz, mired in a season-long slump,
connected for the second time this sea-
son and first since May 20. Mike Lowell
also homered - after having his double
overturned by video review.
Lester (5-5), the club's most reli-
able postseason pitcher last year
when he threw a no-hitter on May 19
against Kansas City, got off to a slow
start this year, giving up 11 runs in his
first two starts.
But on Saturday, he showed how
dominating he can be, striking out 11
and walking just two. Itwas his third-ca-
reer complete game.
Texas scored on Andruw Jones' sac-
rifice fly in the ninth.
In 2006, Lester missed the end of
the season after he was diagnosed with
a rare form of non-Hodgkin's lym-
phoma. A year later, he was the starting
and winning pitcher in the Game 4
clincher of the 2007 World Series.
On Saturday, Lester struck out nine
of the first 15 batters he faced, getting
four swinging at pitches down outside
the strike zone.
Texas Boston
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Kinsler2b 4 0 0 0 Pedroia2b 5 22 2
MYong3b 4 02 0 Ellsurycf -4 1 0 0
AnJonsdh,2 00 1 Youkilslb 4 0 1 1
N.Cruz ri 4 00 0 Bay If 4 0 1 2
Byrdcf 3 00 0 Lowell'3b 3 1 1 1
BBoggsIf 3 00 0 D.Ortizdh 3 1 2 1
C.Davislb 3 00 0 Varitekc 3 1 1 0
Sltlmchc 3 00 0 Baldelli rif 3 1 1 0
Andrusss 2 1 0 0 NGreenss 4 1 0 0
Totals 28 1 2 1 Totals 33 8 9 7
Texas 000 000 001-1
Boston 010 034 00x-8
E-B.Boggs (1). LOB-Texas 3, Boston 6.2B-
M.Young (21). HR-Lowell (9), D.Ortiz (2). SB-
Pedroia (10), Ellsbury (23). SF-An.Jones.
IP H RERBBSO


Texas
H.:iiard L i.3
Benson
Mathis
Boston ,
Lester W,5-5
Balk-Holland.


S42-3
21-3
1


S 2 5
3 1
0 -1


9 2 1 1 2 11


Umpires-Home, Ron Kulpa; First, Tim Tim-
mons; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Jeff Kellogg.
T-2:25 (Rain delay: 0:03). A-37,828 (37,373).


Tigers 2, Angels 1
DETROIT - Edwin Jackson
threw a four-hitter for his second ca-
reer complete game and the Detroit
Tigers beat the Los Angeles Angels
2-1 on Saturday night to end a four-
game skid.
Jackson (6-3) improved to 5-1 with
a 0.76 ERA in his last six starts. He
struck out five and walked one, throw-
ing 109 pitches.
Kelvim Escobar wept five innings
for the Angels in his first start since
2007;allowing two runs and four hits.
The right-hander missed all of last
year after elbow surgery.
A night after the Angels won 2-1
with all the runs coming in the ninth in-
ning, Saturday's game didn't have any
scoring after the first.
Chone Figgins led off the game
with a single and Bobby Abreu fol-
lowed with an RBI double to give Los
Angeles a 1-0 lead but Escobar strug-
gled in the bottom half.
Placido Polanco singled with one
out and Clete Thomas walked. Mag-
glio Ordonez tied it with an RBI single
and Curtis Granderson put Detroit in
front with a sacrifice fly.
The Tigers had a chance to add to
their lead in the seventh when Josh
Anderson led off with a single against
Darren Oliver and took second on
Polanco's sacrifice. Thomas then
/bunted for a hit, putting runners on
the corners, but Ordonez hit into a
double play.


Los Angeles
ab rhbi
Figgins 3b 4 1 2 0
Abreu rf 4 01 1
Guerrrdh 4 0 0 0
TrHntr cf 4 0 1 0
KMorlslb 3 00 0
JRiverIf 3 0 0 0
MIzturs ss 3 00 0
Napoli c 3 00 0
Kndrck2b 2 0 0 0
Totals 30 1 4 1
Los Angeles
Detroit


Detroit
ab r h bi
JAndrsIf 4 0 1 0
Polanc2b 2 1 2 0
Thorns rf 3 1 1 0
Ordonzdh 3 0 1 1
Grndrscf 2 0 0 1
Inge.3b 3 0 1 0
Larishlb 4 0 1 0
Laird c 3 0 1 0
Santiag ss 3 0 0 0
Totals 27 2 8 2
100 000 000-1
200 000 00x-2


DP-Los Angeles.3. LOB-Los Angeles 3, De'
troit 8. 2B-Abreu (10), Tor.Hunter (13), Larish
(3). SB-Polanco (1), Granderson (10). CS-
Figgihs (5), Inge (4), Santiago (2). S-Polanco.
SF-Granderson.


Los Angeles
Escobar L,0-1
Bulger
Oliver
Detroit
E.Jackson W,6-3


IP H RERBBSO


9 4 1 1 1.5


HBP-by Escobar (Polanco).
Umpires-Home, Tom Hallion; First, Jerry Craw-
ford; Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Phil Cuzzi.
T-2:25. A-32,367 (41,255).


White Sox 4, Indians 2
CHICAGO - Josh Fields homered
and Gavin Floyd pitched into the sev-
enth inning, helping the Chicago White
Sox end a four-game skid with a 4-2
victory over the Cleveland Indians on
Saturday. -
Paul Konerko had a sacrifice fly in
the first to end the White Soxs score-
less drought at 23 innings.
Floyd (4-5) allowed two runs -
one earned - and five hitsin 6 2-3
innings, He struck out seven and
walked one.
Fields put the White Sox ahead in
the fourth inning with a solo shot with
two outs. It was his third homer of the.
season and first since May 5 at
Kansas City.
The White Sox took advantage of
Indians shortstop Jhonny Peralta's
throwing error in the sixth. With two
outs and runners on first and second,
Fields hit a routine grounder to Per-
alta, who made a high throw to first
that took first baseman Ryan Garko off
the base. Then with the bases loaded;
catcher Victor Martinez allowed a pass
ball that scored Konerko and gave
Chicago a 3-1 lead.
Floyd hit Garko with a pitch in the
seventh, then with two outs, Ben Fran-
cisco chased Floyd with a single.
Cleveland Chicago
. ab rhbi abrhbi
BFrncs cf-rf 4 01 0 Pdsdnklf 4 1 2 1
JCarrll 3b 4 02 1 AIRmrz ss 4 00 0
VMrtnz c 4 01 0 Thome dh 3 00 0
Choolf 4 00 0 Konerklb 2 1 0 1
JhPerltss 3 1 0 0 Przynsc 4 01 0
Hafnerdh 4 01'0 Fields3b 4 1 2 1
DeRosa rf 4 0 2 1 J.Nix rf 3 00 0
Garko lb 2 00 0 Wiserf 0 00 0
Crowecf 1 1 0 0 Getz2b 3 1 2 0
Valuen2b 4 00 0' BrAndrrcf 2 00 0
Totals 34 2 7 2 Totals 29 4 7 3
Cleveland010 000 100-2
Chicago100 101 10x-4
E-Jh.Peralta (5), AI.Ramirez (4). DP-Cleve-
land 1, Chicago 1. LOB-Cleveland 7, Chicago
5. 2B-Hafner (6). HR-Fields (3). SB-
Podsednik 2 (7). S-Bri.Anderson. SF-Kon-
erko.
IP H RER BB SO
Cleveland
Sowers L,1-3 6 5 3 2 2 5.
R.Perez 12-3 2 1 1 0 2*
K.Wood 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Chicago
G.FloydW,4-5 62-3 5 2 1 1 7
Dotel 0 . 0- . ,0,"0 0
Thornton H,10 11-3 0 0"0 0 3
JenksS,13-14 1 1 0 0 0 1
Dotel pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by G.Floyd (Garko). PB-V.Martinez.
Umpires-Home, Doug Eddings; First, Hunter
Wendelstedt; Second, Brian Knight; Third,
Dana DeMuth.
T-2:36. A-30,307 (40,615).


MLB Leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE,
BATTING-ISuzuki, Seattle, .354; MiCabrera,
Detroit, .354;Youkilis, Boston, .349; VMartinez,
Cleveland, .342; AdJones, Baltimore, .340.
RUNS-Pedroia, Boston 45; Scutaro, Toronto,
45; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 44; Damon, New
York, 44; Momeau, Minnesota, 44; BRoberts,
Baltimore, 43.
RBI-Bay, Boston, 55; Longoria, Tampa Bay,
55; Morneau, Minnesota, 51; Teixeira, New
York, 50; Kinsler, Texas, 44; TorHunter, Los An-
geles, 43; CPena, Tampa Bay, 42.
HITS-AHill, Toronto, 77; VMartinez, Cleveland,
76; Crawfqrd, Tampa Bay, 75; ISuzuki, Seattle,
75.
DOUBLES-Lind, Toronto, 21; MYoung, Texas,
21; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 20; Byrd, Texas, 19;
Callaspo, Kansas City, 18; Scutaro, Toronto, 18;
Butler, Kansas City, 17; Lowell, Boston, 17;
Momeau, Minnesota, 17.
HOME RUNS-CPena, Tampa Bay, 17; Teix-
eira, New York, 17; Bay, Boston, 16; NCruz,
Texas, 16; Kinsler, Texas, 15; Morneau, Min-
nesota, 15; Dye, Chicago, 14.
STOLEN BASES-Crawford, Tampa Bay, 34;
Ellsbury, Boston, 23; Figgins, Los Angeles, 21;
BUpton, Tampa Bay, 17; Abrau, Los Angeles,
15; Bartlett, Tampa Bay, 14; Span, Minnesota,
12.
PITCHING (6 Decisions)-Halladay, Toronto, 9-
'1, .900; Slowey, Minnesota, 8-1, .889; Greinke,
Kansas City, 8-2, .800; Beckett, Boston, 6-2,
.750;'Veriander, Detroit, 6-2, .750; Buehrle,
Chicago, 6-2, .750; McCarthy, Texas, 5-2, .714.
STRIKEOUTS-Verlander, Detroit, 97; Greinke,
Kansas City, 91; Lester, Boston, 85; Halladay,
Toronto, 82; FHernandez, Seattle, 79; Beckett,
Boston, 68; GFIoyd, Chicago, 66; Garza, Tampa
Bay, 66.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Tejada; Houston, .356; Pence,
Houston, .347; Beltran, New York, .346; Hawpe,
Colorado, .344; DWright, New York, .340;
HaRamirez, Florida, .338.
RUNS-lbanez, Philadelphia, 45; Pujols, St.
Louis, 44; Zimmerman, Washington, 41; Ad-
Gonzalez, San Diego, 39; Hudson, Los Ange-
les, 39; Utley, Philadelphia, 39.
RBI-Fielder, Milwaukee, 54; Ibanez, Philadel-
phia, 54; Pujols, St. Louis, 49 Rodward-TPhiladel-.
phia, 46; Dunn, Washington, 44; AdGonzalez,
San Diego, 43; Cantu, Florida, 42.
HITS-Tejada, Houston, 79; Hudson, Los An-
geles, 72; Ibanez, Philadelphia, 71;.Zimmer-
man, Washington, 71; Pence, Houston, 69;
HaRamirez, Florida, 69.
DOUBLES-Tejada, Houston, 21; AdLaRoche,
Pittsburgh, 19; HaRamirez, Florida, 19;
FSanchez, Pittsburgh, 19; Beltran, New York,
17; Hudson, Los Angeles, 17.
HOME RUNS-AdGonzalez, San Diego, 22;
Ibanez, Philadelphia, 19; Pujols, St. Louis, 18;
Dunn, Washington, 17; Howard, Philadelphia,
16; Fielder, Milwaukee, 15.
STOLEN BASES-Bourn, Houston, 19; Kemp,
Los Angeles, 13; Pierre, Los Angeles, 13;
DWright, NewYork, 13; Morgan, Pittsburgh, 12;
Reynolds, Arizona, 12.
PITCHING (6.Decisions)-Broxton, Los Ange-
les, 6-0, 1.000; Cain, San Francisco, 7-1, .875;
JoJohnson, Florida, 5-1, .833; Martis, Wash-
ington, 5-1, .833; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 6-2,
.750; TPena, Arizona, 5-2, .714; JSantana, New
York, 7-3, .700.
STRIKEOUTS-JVazquez, Atlanta, 93; Lince-
cum, San Francisco, 91; JSantana, New York,
89; Billingsley, Los Angeles, 85; Peavy, San
Diego, 84; Haren, Arizona, 78; JoJohnson,
Florida, 72.


Brewers 3, Braves 0
ATLANTA - Prince Fielders third
two-homer game of the season gave the
Milwaukee Brewers all the offense they
needed fora 3-0 win over the punchless
Atlanta Braves on Saturday night.
Jeff Suppan (4-4) gave up six hits in
5 1-3 innings as the Brewers took their
second straight shutout win over At-
lanta and extended the Braves' streak
of scoreless innings to 22. The Braves
have lost three straight.
The first-place Brewers moved
two games ahead of St. Louis in the
NL Central.
. Atlanta's Chipper Jones left the
game in the fifth with dizziness.
Milwaukee's Mike Cameron was
ejected by home plate umpire Marvin
Hudson for arguing a called third strike
in the ninth inning.
Trevor Hoffman, Milwaukee's fourth
reliever, pitched the ninth for his 15th i.
straight save.
Fielder gave Milwaukee a 1-0 lead
with his 14th homer, off JavierVazquez
(4-5) in the fifth. Milwaukee added a
run in the sixth when Jason Kendall
singled to right and scored on Craig
Counsel's double.
Milwaukee Atlanta
ab rhbi ab r h bi
Counsll2b 4 02 1 KJhnsn2b 5 0 1 0
Hardy ss 4 00 0 Escoarss 5 01 0
Braun If 4 00 0 McLoth cf 3 01 0
Fielder'lb 3 22 2 C.Jones 3b 2 0 0 0
MCmmrn cf 4 0 1 0 DHrndz3b 1 00 0
McGeh3b 0 00 0 McCnnc 4 01 0
Gamel 3b 3 01 0 GAndrs If 4 00 0
Hall 3b-cf 1 00 0 Francr rf 3 0 1 0
Hartrf 4 01 0 Pradolb 4 02 0
Kendall c 4 1 1 0 JVazqz p 1 0 0 0
_Suppan p 1 00 0 Norton ph 0 00 0
Coffeyp 0 00 0 OFIhrtp 0-00 0
Stetter p 0 00 0 Moylan p 0 0 0 0
Gerut ph 0 00 0 RSorin p 0 00 0
Villanv p 0 00 0 M.Diaz ph 1 00 0
Hoffmn p 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 3 1'3 Totals 33 0 7 0
Milwaukee 000 011 100-3
Atlanta 000 000 000-0
DP-Atlanta 1. LOB-Milwaukee 5, Atlanta 11.
2B--Counsell (7), Gamel (4). 3B-McCann (1).
HR-Fielder 2 (15). SB-McLouth (8), G.An-
derson (1), Francoeur (2). CS-Gerut (1). S-
Suppan, J.Vazquez.
IP H RER BB SO
Milwaukee,
Suppan W,44 51-3 6 0 0 3 2
Coffey H,9, 1-3 0 0 0 1 1
Stetter H,'0 11-3 0 0 0 0 1
Villanue.'H,8 1 0 0 0 0 2
HoffmarrS,15-15 1 1 0 0 0 0
Atlanta'
J.Vazquez L,4-5 6 4 2 2 0 7
O'Flaherty ' 1.3 2 1 1 0 0
Moylnn. 12-3 1 0 0 1 1
R.Sqtiano 1 1 0 0 1 1
Umpires-Home, Marvin Hudson; FIrit,
James Hoye; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third,
Randy Marsh.
T-2:57. A-32,721 (49,743).


Rockies 10, Cardinals 1
ST. LOUIS - lan Stewart homered
twice and matchedia career high with
five RBIs and Aaron Cook beat the St.
Louis Cardinals for the first time in the
Colorado Rockies' 10-1 victory on Sat-
urday night. /
Stewart has four homers and 12 RBIs
the last five gmes, including all three
.three-run homers in the last four games.
He hit a three-run shot to right on a full
count ih the fourth and a two-run shot to
left-centr on-a 2-0 pitch in the sixth, both
off Todd Wellemeyer (5-6).
SA10-for-17 surge with four straight
multihit games has raised Stewarfs av-
eraqe to .231, and he leads the Rock-
is with 11 homers. Two of his three
iultihomer games have come this
season, the other against the Astros at
home on May 12, and 14 of his last 20
Shits have been for extra bases. He also
doubled Saturday night.
Cook (4-3) allowed a run on four
hits in eight dominant innings, facing
no batters with runners in scoring posi-
tion. He lowered his career ERA
against St. Louis to a still hefty 5.61,
with the only damage coming on Rick
Ankiel's third homer in the sixth. Cook
had beep 0-4 against St. Louis.
Clint Barmes added a three-run
homer in the ninth off Blake
Hawksworth; making his major league
debut. The Rockies are 5-4 under
manager Jim Tracy after going 18-28
under Clint Hurdle.


Colorado
' ab rhbl


St. Louis
ab r h bi


S.Smithlf 4 22 0 Schmkr2b 4 00 0
Barmesss 5 1 2. 3 Ankielcf 3 1 1 1
Helton lb 2 1 0 1 Pujols lb 4 0 0 0
Atkins3b 2 00 0 Ludwckrf 4 01 0
Tlwtzkss 2 00 0 Duncan If 3 00 0
Hawpe rf 4 21 0 LaRue c 3 01 0
Stewart 2b 4 3 3 5 Thurstn 3b 3 0 0 0
CGnzlzcf 4 00 0 Hwkswp 0 0 00
Bellom c 4 01 0 Wllmyrp 2 01 0
Cook p 3 00 0 BrRyan ss 1 00 0
Splrghs ph 1 1 0 1 TGreen ss 3 0 0 0
Daley p0000
Totals 3510 910 Totals 30 1 4 1
Colorado 100 302 004-10
St. Louis 000 001 000-1
E-T.Greene (1). DP-Colorado 1. LOB-Col-
orado 3, St. Louis 3. 2B-Hawpe (16), Stewart
(7). HR--Barmes (6), Stewart 2 (11), Ankiel (3).
SF-Helton.
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
Cook W,4-3 - 8 4 1 1 1 4
Daley 1 0 0 0 0 1
BI. Louli
WellemoyerL,5.6- 7 6 6 6 3 6
lsawkiworth 2 3 4 4 1 1
Umplros-Hom�, Jim Reynolds; First, Angel Her-
nandoz; Second, Bill Wolke; Third, Tim Welke.
T-2:27. A-44,002 (43,B7B5)


Nationals 7, Mets 1
WASHINGTON - Helped out by all
sorts of double plays and supported by
three home runs, John Lannan threw his
first career complete game Saturday
night to lead the Washington Nationals
to a 7-1 victory over the New York Mets.
Lannan (3-5) allowed an unearned
run and four hits, facing the minimum
number of batters through the first seven
innings. He was helped out by a fran-
chise-record-tying five double plays -
two 6-4-3s, two 4-6-3s and a head-shak-
ing 9-3-6 that took a while to sort out.
Adam Dunn, Elijah Dukes and Nick
Johnson homered for the Nationals, who
had lost three straight and nine of 10.
Dunn is the only player in the majors
with more home runs (17) than his team
has victories (15).
Washington chased John Maine (5-
4) before he could record an out in the
fifth inning of a game that lasted just 2
hours. Lannan needed only 96 pitches,
including 61 strikes, to finish. �
Lannan gave the Nationals their third
complete game of the season, the type
of pitching performance desperately
needed by a last-place team that started
the day with a worst-in-majors 5.61
ERA. In fact, for one night at least, all
seemed right at Nationals Park: The
weather was splendid after a solid week
of rain that played havoc with the sched-
ule, and the crowd of 31,456 made the
stadium feel lively for one of the few
times this season.


NewYork

LCastill 2b
Brown rf
Beltran cf
Sheffild If
DWrght 3b
Tatis lb
Santos c
WValdz ss
Maine p
Takhsh p
Nieve p
DnMrp ph


ab rhbl
2. 00 0
4 01 0
4 00 0
3 00 0
2 1 1 0
3 01 0
3 01 0
3 00 0
1 00 0
1 00 0
0000
1 000


Washington
ab r h bi
CGzmnss 3 1 0 0
NJhnsn lb 4 2 3 3
Zmrmn3b 3 1 1 1
Dunn If 4 1 1 2
Kearns rf 0 00 0
Dukes rf-Ilf 4 1 3 1
WHarrscf 3 0 0 0
AHrndz2b 4 0 0 0
Nieves c 4 0 0 0
Lannan p 3 1 1 0


Totals 27 1 4 0 Totals 32 7 9 7
NewYork 000 000 010-1
Washington 300 130 OOx-7
E-Dukes (2). DP-Washington 4. LOB-New
York 2, Washington 5. 2B-N.Johnson 2 (10).
HR-N.Johnson (5), Dunn (17), Dukes (5).
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
Maine L,5-4 4 6 7 7 2 1
Takahashi 2 2 0 0 2 1
Nieve 2 1 0 0 0 2
Washington
LannanW.3.5 9 4 1 0 3 2
Maine pitched to 3 batters in the 5th.
Umpire -Home, Brian Runge; First, Derryl
Cousins; Second, D.J. Raybum; Third, Jim Joyce.
T-2:00, A-31,456 (41,888),


Associated Press
Los Angeles Dodgers' Juan Pierre hits a single against the
Philadelphia Phillies during the seventh inning Saturday in
Los Angeles. The Dodgers won 3-2 In 12 Innings.


Dodgers 3, Philies 2,
12 innings
LOS ANGELES - Brad Lidge gave
up a tying home run to pinch-hitter
Rafael Furcal with one out in the ninth
inning for his second blown save in
less than 24 hours, and Andre Ethier
hit his second homer of the game with
two out in the 12th to give the Los An-
geles Dodgers a 3-2 victory over the
Philadelphia Phillies on Saturday.
Ethier, who had a game-ending two-
run double off Lidge in the ninth inning
of Friday night's 4-3 win, sent a full-
count offering from Chad Durbin (1-2)
over the center-field fence to complete
his fourth career multihomer game. In
the fourth, he drove a 1-2 pitch into the
right-field pavilion off Joe Blanton.
Cory Wade (1-3) pitched two perfect
innings of relief for the Dodgers, whose
bullpen leads the majors with 17 wins.
Lidge converted all 41 save op-
portunities last year in the regular
season and seven more without a
miss in the postseason for the World
Series champions.
But in this four-game series be-
tween the teams with the two best
records in baseball, the two-time All-
Star has looked more like the strug-
gling pitcher who temporarily lost his
closer's job with Houston in May 2006.
Lidge has coughed up leads in six
of his 19 save attempts this season. He
has a 7.27 ERA and has yielded seven
home runs in 26 innings. Furcal's home
run was his 85th in the majors and first
as a pinch hitter.


Philadelphia Los Angeles
ab rhbl ab r h bi
Victor cf 5 00 0 Pierre If 6 0 1 0
Werth rf 5 01 0 Hudson 2b 6 0 1 0
Utley2b 3 01 0 Ethierrf 5 23 2
Howard lb 5 00 0 Martin c 4 00 0
Ibanez If 4 1 1 0 Loneylb 5 03 0
Feliz 3b 5 1 2 0 Kemp cf 5 00 0
BrntIttss 2 00 0 Loretta3b 5 00 0
Lidgep 0 00 0 JCastro ss 3 02 0
S.Eyre p 0 00 0 Furcal ss 2 1 1 1
Durbin p 1 00 0 Kuroda p 1 00 0
Ruiz c 2 000 Belisarip 0 00 0
Dobbsph 1 00 0 Hffmnn ph 1 01 0
Coste c 2 00 0 Troncs p 0 00 0
Blanton p 1 00 0 Blake ph 1 0 0 0
Stairs ph 1 0 1 2 Broxtn p 0 00 0
Condry p 0 00 0 Wade p 1 00 0
JRomrp 0 0 0 0
Madson p 0 0 0 0
Rollins ss 2 0 0 0
Totals 39 2 6 2 Totals 45 312 3
Philadelphia 000 000 200 000-2
Los Angeles 000 100 001 001-3
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Martin (2). DP-Los Angeles 1. LOB-
Philadelphia 7, Los Angeles 10.2B-Utley (11).
HR-Ethier 2 (9), Furcal (2). SB-Loney (4).
S-Bruntlett, Blanton, Kuroda.
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
Blanton 6 5 1 1 1 5
CondreyH,6 1-3 2 0 0 0 0
J.Romero H,2 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Madson H,13 1 0 0 0 1 1
UdgeBS,6-19 1 1 1 1 0 1
S.Eyre 2-3 2 0 0 0 1
Durbin L,1-2 2 1 1 1 0 2
Los Angeles
Kuroda 6 2 0 0 3 5
Belisario BS,4-4 1 3 2 2 .0 0
Troncoso 2 1 0 0 1 0
Broxton 1 0 0 0 0 2
WadeW,1-3 2 0 0 0 0 1
WP-Kuroda 2.
Umpires-Home, Mike Winters; First, Tony Ran-
dazzo; Second, Chris Guccione; Third, Todd
Tichenor.
T-4:03. A-41,412 (56,000).


East Division
GB WCGB
4 -
3 211
41h 4
81 8


East Division
GB WCGB

3 1
6 4
61h 4�2
17 15


Detroit
Minnesota
Chicago
Kansas City
Cleveland


Milwaukee.
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Chicago
Pittsburgh
Houston


Central Division
GB WCGB

2� 5
3% 6
5% 8
7 91h


Central Division
GB WCGB
2 -
34 1�1
4� 21�
61 4�%
8 6


Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland


Los Angeles
San Fran.
San Diego
Arizona
Colorado


West Division
GB WCGB

3� 3�
5h 5�
8 8


West Division
GB WCGB

9 2
12 5
13�1 6Y2
14� 7Y1


SuNDAY, JuNE 7, 2o og B3


MAJOR LEAGuE BASEBALL


C C FL CHRONICLE


I -,









SCOREBOARD


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


B4 SUNDAY, JU


TENNIS
French Open Results
Saturday
At Stade Roland Garros
Paris
Purse: $21.8 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Singles
Women
Championship
Svetlana Kuznetsova (7), Russia, def. Dinara
Safina (1), Russia, 6-4, 6-2.
Doubles
Men
Championship
Lukas Dlouhy, Czech Republic, and Leander
Paes (3), India, def. Wesley Moodie, South
Africa, and Dick Norman, Belgium, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2.
Legends Doubles
Round Robin
Men Under 45
Sergi Bruguera, Spain, and Richard Krajicek,
Netherlands, def. Arnaud Boetsch and Guy For-
get, France, 6-1, 7-6 (2). �
Pat Cash, Australia, and Emilio Sanchez,
Spain, def. Yevgeny Kafelnikov, Russia, and
Thomas Muster, Austria, 6-1, 7-5.
Men Over 45
Mikael Pernfors and Mats Wilander, Sweden,
def. John Fitzgerald, Australia, and Guillermo
Vilas, Argentina, 6-3, 6-3.
Junior Doubles
Boys
Championship
Martin Dragania and Dino Marcan, Croatia,
def. Guilherme Clezar, Brazil, and Huang Liang-
chi (4), Taiwan, 6-3,6-2.
Girls
Championship
Elena Bogdan, Romania, and Noppawan
Lertcheewakarn (2), Thailand, def. Timea
Babos, Hungary, and Heather Watson (3);
Britain, 3-6, 6-3, 10-8 tiebreak.
French Open Show
Court Schedules
-Sunday
At Stade Roland Garros
Paris
Court Philippe Chatrier
Play begins at 9 a.m. EDT
Men's Singles Championship
Robin Soderling (23), Sweden, vs. Roger
Federer (2), Switzerland

AUTO RACING

NASCARSprint Cup
Pocono 500 Lineup
At Pocono Raceway
Long Pond, Pa.
Lap length: 2.5 miles
Race Sunday
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 2009 Owner
Points 2nd.
2. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 2009
Owner Points 3rd.
3. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 2009'Owner Points
4th.
4. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 2009
Owner Points 5th.
5. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 2009 Owner
Points 6th.
6. (11) Denny Hamlin,.Toyota, 2009 Owner
Points 7th.
7. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 2009 Owner
Points 8th.
8. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 2009 Owner Points
9th.
9. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 2009 Owner
Points 10th.
10. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 2009 Owner
Points 11th..
11. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 2009 Owner
Points 12th.
12. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 2009
Owner Points 13th.
13. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 2009 Owner
Points 14th.
14. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
2009 Owner Points 15th.
15. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 2009 Owner
Points 16th.
16. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 2009 Owner
Points 17th.
17. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 2009
Owner Points 18th.
18. (1) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 2009
Owner Points 19th.
19. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, 2009
Owner Points 20th.
20. (07) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 2009
Owner Points 21st.
21. (26) Jamie McMurray, Ford, 2009 Owner
Points 22nd.
22. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 2009 Owner
Points 23rd.
23. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 2009
Owner Points 24th.
24.(43) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, 2009 Owner
Points 25th.
25. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 2009
Owner Points 26th.
26. (19) Elliott Sadler, Dodge, 2009 Owner
Points 27th.
27. (96) Bobby Labonte, Ford, 2009 Owner
Points 28th:
28. (12) David Stremme, Dodge, 2009 Owner
Points 29th.
29. (44) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 2009
Owner Points 30th.
30. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 2009 Owner
Points 31st.
31. (55) Michael VWaltrip, Toyota, 2009 Owner
Points 32nd.
32. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 2009 Owner
Points 33rd.
33. (7) Robby Gordon, Toyota, 2009 Owner
Points 34th.
34. (34) John Andretti, Chevrolet, 2009
Owner Points 35th.
35. (09) Sterling Marlin, Dodge, 2009 Owner
Winner.
36. (82) Scott Speed, Toyota, 2009 Owner At-
tempts 13-36th.
37. (71) David Gilliland, Chevrolet, 2009
Owner Attempts 13-37th.
38. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 2009 Owner
Attempts 13-39th.
39. (36) Patrick Carpentier, Toyota, 2009
Owner Attempts 13-41st.
40. (66) Dave Blaney, Toyota, 2009 Owner At-
tempts 13-42nd.
41. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, Owner At-
tempts 7.
42. (51) Dexter Bean, Dodge, Owner At-
tempts 4.
43. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, accident
during practice.
Failed to qualify
44. (75) Derrike Cope, Dodge, 2009 Owner
Attempts 3.
45. (64) Mike Wallace, Toyota, Post Entry. .


46. (37) Tony Raines, Dodge, Post Entry.
Nationwide � Federated
Auto Parts 300 Results
Saturday
At Nashville Superspeedway
Lebanon,Tenn.
Lap length: 1.333 miles
(Start position In parentheses)
1. (1) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 225 laps, 149.2 rat-
ing, 195 points.
2. (10) Brad Keselowski, Chevrolet, 225,
125.5,175.
3. (6) Carl Edwards, Ford, 225,121.6,170.
4. (8) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 225,112.1,165.
5. (12) Jason Leffler, Toyota, 225,110.9,160.
6. (9) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 225,105.4,
150.
7. (16) Steve Wallace, Chevrolet, 224, 99.5,
146.
8. (3) Michael McDoWell, Toyota, 224, 96,
147.
;t ) HK barihdil, ord; 2241 84;:4 143.


For the record

Floid LOTTERY


T-3




Here are the winning
numbers selected
Saturday in the
Florida Lottery:


CASH 3 (early)
4-0-5
CASH 3 (late)
7-4-3
PLAY 4 (early)
9-1-8-5
PLAY 4 (late)
4-3-5-6
POWERBALL
10-18- 23-30-45
POWER BALL
2
POWER PLAY
S3
FANTASY 5
2-9-16-31-36
LOTTERY
6- 24- 26- 28 - 31- 50


On the AIRWAVES-

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2 p.m. (TNT) Sprint Cup - Pocono 500
3 p.m. (13, 51 FOX) Formula One- Turkish Grand Prix
(Same-day Tape)
3 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing - Sportsman Series
(Taped)
4 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing - United Association
Route 66 Nationals - Final Eliminations (Same-day Tape)
5 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) Traxxas TORC Off-Road Series
(Taped)
9 p.m. (47 FAM) ASA Southeast Asphalt Tour (Taped)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
12 p.m. (ESPN) NCAA Super Regional--Arkansas at
Florida State or East Carolina at North Carolina
3 p.m. (ESPN) NCAA Super Regional - Texas Christian at
Texas or Virginia at Mississippi
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA Super Regional - Southern Missis-
sippi at Florida or Rice at LSU
10 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA Super Regional - Clemson at Ari-
zona State or Louisville at Cal State Fullerton
MLB BASEBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees
1 p.m. (WGN) Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati Reds
. 1:30 p.m. (TBS) Texas Rangers at Boston Red Sox
5 p.m. (FSNFL) San Francisco Giants at Florida Marlins
8 p.m. (ESPN) Philadelphia Phillies at Los Angeles Dodgers
2:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Philadelphia Phillies at Los Angeles
Dodgers (Same-day Tape)
BASKETBALL
8:01 p.m. (9, 20,28 ABC) NBA Finals Game 2 - Orlando
Magic at Los Angeles Lakers
2 a.m. (ESPN) NBA Finals Game 2 - Orlando Magic at
Los Angeles Lakers (Same-day Tape)
BICYCLING
5 p.m. (VERSUS) 2009 Dauphine Libere (Taped)
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Celtic Manor Wales
Open - Final Round
12 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Memorial Tournament - Final
Round
1 p.m. (ESPN2) LPGA Tour: State Farm Classic - Final
Round
2 p.m. (GOLF) Nationwide Tour: Melwood Prince George's
County Open - Final Round
2:30 p.m. (6,10 CBS) PGATour: Memorial Tournament-
Final Round
4 p.m. (2, 8 NBC).LPGATour: State Farm Classic- Final
Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Triton Financial Classic -
Final Round (Same-day Tape).
SOCCER
4 p.m. (IND1) 2010 World Cup Qualifier - Peru vs.
Ecuador
TENNIS
9 a.m. (2, 8 NBC) French Open - Men's Final
TRACK AND FIELD
2 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) Nike Prefontaine Classic


10. (4) Brad Coleman, Toyota, 224,98.6,134.
11. (5) Scott Lagasse Jr., Toyota, 223,104.5,
130.
12. (35) Shelby Howard, Chevrolet, 223, 80,
127.
13. (24) Justin Allgaier, Dodge,. 223, 78,124.
14. (21) Bobby Hamilton Jr., Dodge, 223,
76.4,121.
15. (22) Burney Lamar, Toyota, 222, 77.2,
118.
16. (28) Kenny Wallace, Chevrolet, 221, 82,
120.
17. (43) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, 221,
70.5,112.
18. (42) Danny O'Quinn Jr., Chevrolet, 219,
60,109. *
19. (40),Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 219, 51.2,
106.
20. (37) Brandon Whitt, Ford, 218, 47.2,103.
21. (29) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet,
218, 54.1,100.
22. (30) Eric McClure, Ford, 218, 45.9, 97.
23.(18) Kevin Conway, Toyota, 213,61.2,94.
24. (7) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 211,
75.7, 91.
25. (38) Marc Davis, Toyota, electrical, 182,
45.4,88.
,26. (11) Jason Keller, Ford, 170, 77.4, 85.
27. (31) Michael Annett, Toyota, 143, 46.6,
82.
. 28. (2) Trevor Bayne, Toyota, accident, 128,
78.1,79.
29. (13) Sean Caisse, Chevrolet, accident,
127,71.1,0.
30. (25) Brian Keselowski, Dodge, accident,
127, 52.1, 73.
31. (15) Cale Gale, Chevrolet, accident, 123,
74.4,70.
32. (19) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, accident,
123, 60,67.
33. (33) Scott Wimmer, Chevrolet, wheel
bearing; 79, 49.3, 64.
34. (39) Kevin Lepage, Chevrolet, engine, 64,
39.7, 61.
35. (26) Kertus Davis, Chevrolet, vibration,
30,45,58.
36. (17) Willie Allen, Dodge, vibration, 16,
42.8, 55.
37. (32) Kelly Bires, Chevrolet, brakes, 9,
40.6, 52.
38. (23) Johnny Chapman, Chevrolet, vibra-
tion, 8,39,49.
39. (41) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, accident,
4,37.5,46.
40. (34) Casey Atwood, Chevrolet, accident,
4,35.9,43.
41. (36) Brad Baker, Ford, accident, 4, 33.4,
40.
42. (14) John Wes Townley, Ford, accident,
2,34.1,37.
43. (20) Mark Green, Chevrolet, vibration, 1,
31.3, 34.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 129.682
mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 18 minutes, 46 sec-
onds.
Margin of Victory: 0.891 seconds.
Caution Flags! 4 for 24 laps.


LBad C 9Cron,. i2 rnmo8idriverq
L3p Lea.jer;. KBu:cr,1. i . C Ed.ards68;
Bra.Keselowski 69-72; J.Leffler 73-93; K.Wal-
lace 94-100; K.Busch 101-115; J.Leffler 116-
120; K.Busch 121-187; Bra.Keselowski
188-193; M.Bliss 194-199; M.McDowell 200;
E.Darnell 201; K.Busch 202-225. .
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): K.Busch, 4 times for 173 laps; J.Leffler, 2.
times for 26 laps; Bra.Keselowski, 2 times for 10
laps; K.Wallace, 1 time for 7 laps; M.Bliss, 1 time
for 6 laps; C.Edwards, laps;Edwards 1timeorap; M.Mc-
Dowell, 1 time for 1 lap; E.Darnell, 1 time for 1
lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. K.Busch, 2,031; 2. C.Ed-
wards, 1,966; 3. J.Leffler, 1,843; 4. Bra.Ke-
selowski, 1,838; 5. J.Logano, 1,670; 6. M.Bliss,
1,520; 7: J.Keller, 1,519; 8. JAlgalier, 1,468; 9.
M.McDowell, 1,465; 10; B.Gaughan, 1,455.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in
a race.
The formula combines the following cate-
gories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Aver-
age Running Position While on Lead Lap,
Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led
Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.

HOCKEY

NHL Playoffs
STANLEY CUP FINALS
Detroit vs. Pittsburgh
Saturday, May 30: Detroit 3, Pittsburgh 1
Sunday, May 31: Detroit 3, Pittsburgh I
Tuesday, June 2: Pittsburgh 4, Detroit 2
Thursday, June 4: Pittsburgh 4, Detroit 2
Saturday, June 6: Detroit 5, Pittsburgh 0, De-
troit leads series 3-2
Tuesday, June 9: Detroit at Pittsburgh, 8 p.m.
Friday, June 12: Pittsburgh at Detroit, 8 p.m.,
if necessary

TRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
American League
DETROIT TIGERS-Activated OF Marcus
Thames from the 15-day DL. Optioned 1B Jeff
Larish to Toledo (IL).
KANSAS CITY ROYALS-Recalled RHP
Luke Hochevar from Omaha (PCL). Designated
LHP Horacio Ramirez for assignment.
National League
CINCINNATI REDS-Recalled LHP Matt
Maloney from Louisville (IL). Optioned C Wilkin
Castillo to Louisville.
NEW YORK METS-Activated OF Ryan
Church from the 15-day DL. Designated OF
Emil Brown for assignment.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS-Recalled RHP
Blake Hawksworth from Memphis (PCL). Op-
tioned RHP Jess Todd to Memphis.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NEW ORLEANS HORNETS-Announced
the resignation of assistant coach Kenny
Gattison.


Kyle Busch wins
Nationwide Series race
GLADEVILLE, Tenn. - Kyle
Busch raced to his fourth Na-
tionwide Series victory of the
year and ninth overall NASCAR
win of the season Saturday
night, easily holding off Brad
Keselowski and Carl Edwards
in the Federated Auto Parts
300.
The 24-year-old Busch cele-
brated the victory - his 51st
overall in NASCAR's top three
series - by smashing the' gui-
tar trophy in Victory Lane. He
also has three Sprint Cup victo-
ries and two Camping World
Trucks wins this year.
Keselowski, the race winner
last year coming off a victory
last week in Dover, was second
- 0.891 seconds back. Ed-
wards, a three-time Nashville
Superspeedway winner, fin-
ished third on the 1.333-mile
concrete oval.
Mike Bliss was fourth, fol-
lowed by Jason Leffler.
Busch led the most laps and
avoided a series of wrecks
early and midway through the
225-lap race. Busch's crew
serviced his Toyota in a 14.3
seconds during the fir~al round,
of green-flag stops with, 35 laps
to go, and he was back in front
by lap 202.


BELMONT
Continued from Page BI

Derby and Preakness
aboard Big Brown, only to
have to pull up the colt in
the Belmont. And in 1998,
he brought Real Quiet into
the Belmont for a Triple try
only to get beat by Victory
Gallop by a nose in a heart-
breaking defeat.
Charitable Man was
fourth, Saturday, followed
by Luv Gov, Flying Private,
Brave Victory, Mr. Hot Stuff,
Chocolate Candy and
Miner's Escape.
There was an inquiry
filed by Charitable Man's
jockey Alan Garcia against
Dunkirk for interference,
but it was disallowed by the
racing stewards.
The winning time for the
11/2 miles was 2:27.54.
The Triple Crown season
ended the way it started -
with an upset. Mine That
Bird was all but discounted
in the Derby, but won at 50-
1 odds - and his 6/-length
winning margin was. the
largest in 63 years. Two
weeks later, Borel was obli-
gated to ride Rachel
Alexandra in the Preakness
for new owner Jess Jack-
son, and the filly beat Mine
That Bird by a length. Jack-
son said last week Rachel
Alexandra would be given a
rest and not run in the Bel-
mont.
In the Belmont, Mine,



FRENCH'
Continued from Page B1

took control, yanking Safirna
from side to side with the
same powerful ground-
strokes that eliminated Ser-
ena Williams in the
quarterfinals.
More dispiriting to Safina,
perhaps, was Kuznetsova's
defense.
Time and time again, Sa-
fina - sister of two-time
major champion Marat
Safin - delivered a hard,
well-placed shot. And time
and time again, Kuznetsova
scrambled to get the ball
over the net. If the cham-
pion seems to have a cy-
clist's strong legs,, it's
because she does:
Kuznetsova's father
coached her mother to six
world championships and
her brother to an Olympic
silver medal in that sport.
On a cloudy afternoon
with the temperature, in the
low 50s, Kuznetsova also de-
lighted spectators by show-
ing off her soccer skills,
juggling a tennis ball off her
right foot and knee for sev-


eral seconds. Her best work
came with her racket, and
she broke back at love to
make it 1-all, then again to
go ahead 5-3. Safina began
that eighth game with a dou-
ble-fault and rolled her
eyes. As mistakes accumu-
lated, she muttered to her-
self or smacked her left
palm with her racket
On match point, Safina's
second serve hit the net
tape and popped up, sailing
beyond the doubles alley.
"I was, like, 'Oh, my God.
Double-fault,"' Kuznetsova
said.
When Kuznetsova would


Sports BRIEFS
Busch led the first 67 laps,
with Edwards and Keselowski
not far off the pace.
After green-flag pit stops,
they found themselves back in
their respective positions in the
top three by lap 104.
At the halfway mark, Busch
opened a 6-second lead over
Keselowski before things again
turned dicey. Brian Keselowski,
Brad's older brother, spun on lap
114 and on lap 126 Ricky Sten-
house Jr. spun in turn four,
touching off a five-car wreck that
took out Jason Keller and Trevor
Bayne and brought out the red
flag. Keller, who drives for
Nashville-based Baker Curb
Racing, entered the race sixth in
the standings, while Bayne was
second-fastest in qualifying.
When racing resumed, only
10 cars remained on the lead
lap and only six were there by
the finish.
Storm baseball camp
approaching quickly
The Storm baseball club is
holding a four-day baseball
camp at Whispering Pines Park
in Inverness on June 8-11.
The camp will run between the
hours of 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. each,
day and costs $65 per child.
For more information or to
sign up, please call Jon Bolin at


That Bird was gent off as
the 6-5 favorite, but he
seemed a bit more frisky
than usual in the paddock
and on the walk through
the tunnel to the track. And
he was a little too eager in
the race, pulling Borel into
contention sooner than
anyone expected.
"He might have been a
hair higher today coming in
here, just a little more
amped up," Mine That Bird
,trainer Chip 'Woolley said,
'but overall he was the
same horse I led up in the
Derby He ran a great race
and just got beat, and you
have to accept that and go
on."
Summer Bird, mean-
while, looked almost regal
before the start. The chest-
nut son of 2004 Belmont
winner Birdstone - yes,
the same sire as Mine That
Bird - took the rail route
usually the trademark of a
Berel ride before breaking
outside and into the clear.
"The colt broke like a
rocket," Desormeaux said.
"He absolutely dragged me
around the race track. I had
an armchair ride until I
found some room. I found
room."
Summer Bird won the
Belmont in just his fifth ca-
reer start. Owned by Drs.
Kalarikkal and Vilasini Ja-
yaraman, the colt did not
run as a 2-year-old. In his
third start, he was a closing
third in the Arkansas Derby
and came back and was a

allow herself to imagine
winning the French Open,
she always pictured herself
dropping to the clay in joy.
But the anticlimactic way
this one ended didn't call for
such a celebration. Instead,
Kuznetsova simply turned
to make eye contact with
her coach and supporters in
the stands, then walked to
the net for a handshake and
kisses on the cheek.
At the other end of the
court, Safina covered her
forehead with her left hand
--disbelief written all over
her face'- then spiked her
racket
"I was a little bit desper-
ate on the court," said Sa-
fina, who appeared to be
fighting tears late in the
match and during the on-
court trophy presentation.
"Didn't stay tough mentally."
Kuznetsova did, which
hasn't always been the case.
Aside from her U.S. Open
championship, also in an
all-Russian final,
Kuznetsova has her own his-
tory of faltering at key mo-
ments: She entered
Saturday 10-18 in tourna-
ment finals.
The French Open, in par-
ticular, was the site of trou-
ble. In 2004, Kuznetsova
held a match point in the
fourth round before losing.
The next year, in the same
round, Kuznetsova led 5-3 in
the third set and held two
match points before losing.
And in 2007, Kuznetsova lost
the final at Roland Garros to
Justine Henin in straight
sets.
Running through that list
of setbacks, Kuznetsova
noted one significant differ-
ence about Saturday.
"I was calm," she said. "It
was similar feeling when I
won the U.S. Open. I cannot


352-464-0131.
Lane wins BASS event
at Kentucky Lake
PARIS, Tenn. - Bobby Lane
wrapped up his first BASS vic-
tory Saturday, finishing with a
final-day catch of 16 pounds,
15 ounces at Kentucky Lake to
edge four-time Bassmaster an-
gler of the year Kevin VanDam.
by 7 pounds, 8 ounces.
Lane, from Lakeland, Fla.,
had a four-day total of 97
pounds, 9 ounces, and earned
$100,000. VanDam, from Kala-
mazoo, Mich., finished at 92-1.
Farris wins at
US Nationals
CHICAGO - Kendrick Farris
swept his weight class and
earned three gold medals Sat-
urday in the U.S. National
Weightlifting Championships.
Fariswas the top Ameridan at
the 2008 Beijing Olympics, where
he finished eighth overall in the
187-pound weight class. But the
Shreveport, La., lifter injured his
left shoulder on his last lift in Bei-
jing and has been working toward
a comeback ever since.
During his first lift in the clean
and jerk Saturday, the third day
of competition, Farris couldn't
lift the weight over his head and
appeared to have hurt himself
as he came off the platform.


closing sixth in the Derby
- 13 lengths behind Mine
That Bird.
Summer Bird, trained by
the recently licensed Tim
Ice, returned $25.80. $9.30
and $4.70. Dunkirk paid
$5.40 and $3.60, and Mine
That Bird returned $2.60 to
show.
Ice seemed stunned by,
his colt's accomplishment,
which came on the trainer's
35th birthday. As he walked
into the postrace news con-
ference, he was serenaded
with a rendition of "Happy
Birthday."
"Right now it's just unex-
plainable," he said. "If my
career goes nowhere from
here, I've got a Belmont
win."
Once again, the "Test of
the Champion," prevented
a little Triple Crown his-
tory. While a Triple Crown
wasn't on the. line for a
horse, Borel was certain
he'd pull off an unprece-
dented Triple of his own.
But for now, the Belmont
remains a race usually re-
served for long shots. The
favorite has won only six of
the last 30 runnings of the
longest and most grueling
of the Triple Crown races.
"He was tired. He was
used, but he looked all
right," Woolley said. "We're
a little down, disappointed
right now. He ran a great
race. It's been a lot of fun.
We'll give him a good eight
weeks, off and let him
freshen up."

explain it"
Her coach, Larisa
Savchenko, surmised that
maybe three difficult, three-
set matches before the final
- against No. 12 Agnieszka
Radwanska, then Williams,
then No. 30 Samantha Sto-
sur - helped settle down
Kuznetsova.
"Really," Kuznetsova in-
sisted after accepting the
champion's trophy from six-
time French Open winner
Steffi Graf, "I didn't expect
it to happen this year"
Safina was the one who
was supposed to finally
make her breakthrough
after losing in the finals at
last year's French Open and
this year's Australian Open.
Since rising to No. 1 in the
rankings in April, Safina
had won 20 of 21 matches,
including 16 in a row.
The only woman to beat
her in that span?
Kuznetsova.
There are those - includ-
ing Williams and Henin -
who have wondered
whether Safina deserves to
be No. 1 if she hasn't won a
major Safina insisted the
only pressure she felt came
from within.
"I really wanted to win,"
she said. "I just didn't han-
dle it"
About a decade ago, at age
12 or 13, Svetlana living in
St Petersburg, Dinara in
Moscow, they first played
each other Dinara won in a
rout Svetlana's highlight
was asking her opponent's
older - and better-known
- brother, Marat, for an au-
tograph.
Oh, how far Kuznetsova's
come.
"Didn't happen just by
luck," she said. "To have two
Grand Slam trophies - big,
you know."


JNE /, ZUU50


"F -7 20onn













Curveball's sharp break an illusion?


Associated Press
Bert Blyleven threw a
wicked curveball, and what-
ever batters called it - the
deuce, the yakker, the hook
or Uncle Charlie - it was
pretty tough to hit
Why?
"It's a figment of your
imagination," he kidded.
Ever since someone
snapped off the first curve,
and there's been a century-
old debate whether it was
Candy Cummings or Fred


Goldsmith, there's been
equal discussion over exactly
what the pitch does in flight
"There's something physi-
cal about it and something il-
lusory about it," Bucknell
University professor Arthur
Shapiro said.
A diehard New York Mets
fan well versed in the field
of visual sciences, Shapiro
has studied curves from
every angle, and reached
the same conclusion as
many other experts.
"They look like they jump


or break or do all these funky
things, but they don't The
idea that the bottom falls out
isn't so," he said.
"I'm not saying curveballs
don't curve. I emphasize that,
yes, they curve. They just do
so at a more gradual rate. In-
stead of making a sudden
hook, they would form a re-
ally big circle."
That might've pleased
Dizzy Dean. He had a favorite
line for those who doubted
the ball moved at all.
"Stand behind a tree 60


feet away and I'll whomp you
with an optical illusion!" ol'
Diz liked to say.
Shapiro, however, offers a
new theory on why hitters
'might think a ball bends so
drastically: The eye exagger-
ates the break
Shapiro said the brain
processes objects it sees in
peripheral vision differently
from things it observes look-
ing straight on. As in, a batter
tracking a pitch from the cor-
ners of his eyes might throw
himself for a curve.


To illustrate his point,
Shapiro presented a tantaliz-
ing design that recently was
judged the world's best vi-
sual illusion by a group of
neuroscientists and psychol-
ogists.
It depicts a spinning ball
that quickly changes direc-
tion, depending at which
angle it's viewed. Straight
on, it appears to simply
drop; from the side, it seems
to veer.
"I'm not saying this is it,"
Shapiro said. "It's a hy-


pothesis."
Shapiro developed the il-
lusion with three collabora-
tors - Southern California
professor Zhong-Lin Lu and
former students Emily
Knight and Robert Ennis.
"I would agree there is an
illusion taking place when a
batter visually tries to deal
with a curving pitch, but not
due to peripheral vision,"
Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt
told The Associated Press in
an e-mail.


moving forward


Shockey plans to

participate in

Saints workouts

Associated Press
METAIRIE, La. - New Orleans
tight end Jeremy Shockey said he
plans to participate in the Saints
final eight voluntary workouts and
wants to turn the focus on him
back to football.
Shockey, talking to reporters be-,
tween practices at New Orlean's
mandatory minicamp, has made
more headlines off the field than
on it since joining the Saints
nearly a year ago.
He missed much of last season
because of a hernia injury and
failed to score a touchdown in the
NFEs top-rated offense. ,
He did not attend the first four
of the team's voluntary offseason
practices and was back in the
news two weeks ago when he was
treated at a hospital for dehydra-
tion after being found uncon-
scious at a pool party at a Las
Vegas resort
He offered few specifies about
the Vegas incident, but seemed to
confirm that excessive consump-
tion of alcohol mixed with the
desert heat led to the dehydration.
"If you're halfway intelligent you
can read what everybody wrote,"
Shockey said i"You know what they
say, what happens in Vegas stays in
Vegas. That's in the past I'm look-
ing forward to the future."
Shockey said he has not partic-
ipated in voluntary practices in
his previous seven' NFL seasons,
but plans to do so this year to get
better acquainted with quarter-
back Drew Brees and coach Sean
Payton's offense.
"I still haven't been here a year
so I can mature a long way and
tune up my game," he said. "The
most important thing is to know
Drew and know what we're trying,
to get accomplished and knowing
each other's game. It's still a new
offense for me. I'm going to treat it
as a rookie like anyone else in this
locker room that just got here."
The Saints traded for Shockey
last summer and he suffered a
hernia injury during training
camp. He said that he made a
mistake playing through the, in-
jury and eventually needed in-
season surgery. Though he was
third on the team with 50 recep-
tions, Shockey didn't have the
kind of impact New Orleans envi-
sioned even as Brees passed for
the second-most yards ever ir an
N1FL season.
Shockey said he doesn't care if
people question his commitment
as long as his coaches and team-


Associated Press
New Orleans Saints tight end Jeremy Shockey will be at the team's last eight voluntary workouts and is looking
to put behind him a distracting offseason that included him being found unconscious at a Las Vegas hotel.


mates don't.
"I know my heart and my desire
are in this, so people can question
it all they want," he said. "It's al-
ways good practicing, leading up
to the season. But the No.1 thing
to keep in mind is it's during the
game when it counts, not when it's
out here with pillows on your
shoulders. It's when you have the
pads on and you're going against a
real opponent
"I think everyone knows I'm


here to try to help this team win,"
Shockey added. "Ym not here to
sell jerseys or anything like that.
I'll have the time this year to show
people I'm healthy and different
from last year."
Notes: First-round draft choice
Malcolm Jenkins was excused
from Friday's practice to finish
class obligations at Ohio State, but
he was expected to join the team
on the field Saturday. ...Fifth-
round draft choice Thomas


Morstead was excused to attend a
funeral and was due back Friday
night ...LB Dan Morgan left the af-
ternoon workout because of a calf
strain, the severity of which was-
n't immediately known. ...TE Dan
Campbell suffered a partial tear
of his MCL, will undergo arthro-
scopic surgery Monday, and
should be ready for the start of
training camp....TE Darnell Dink-
ins missed the afternoon practice
after spraining his right ankle.


Niners


re-sign


Jennings


SF inks team's

long snapper to

5-year extension

Associated Press

SANTA CLARA, Calif. - Brian
Jennings will be the San Fran-
cisco 49ers' long snapper for
longer than he ever imagined.
The 49ers signed Jennings to a
five-year contract extension Sat-
urday, locking up a flawless per-
former on their solid special
teams units through 2014.
Jennings hasn't made a glaring
mistake' on Sundays ever since the
club drafted him in the seventh
round nine years ago. He's been
recognized as one of the NFEs
most consistent long snappers
since leaving Arizona State in
2000, even making the Pro Bowl
after the 2004 season as a special
selection by NFC coach Jim Mora.
"In a position like mine,
longevity is one of your only ac-
complishments," Jennings said. "I
play a don't-screw-it-up position. It
feels good to be loved, to be
wanted, to be appreciated for
something I put so much time
into."..
Jennings' job is to deliver per-
fect snaps into the hands of Andy
Lee, the 49ers' former Pro Bowl
punter who also holds for kicker
Joe Nedney, one of the NFEs most
consistent at his position in recent
years. Although he never seemed
shaky even as a rookie under
coach Steve Mariucci, Jennings
acknowledged he didn't feel com-
pletely comfortable in his job until
after his second season.
"I was driving back to Arizona,
and I was thinking, 'I can do this,'"
Jennings said.
San Francisco's special teams
haven't been put in position to win
many games during six consecu-
tive losing seasons, but the trio of
specialists has been almost as
good as possible - and it's all de-
pendent on Jennings. Jennings
also has worked out as a backup
tight end, and he's more aggres-
sive on kick coverage than the av-
erage long snapper, making 53
tackles in his career.
He cites a game on Nov. 13,2005,
at Chicago as among his proudest
achievements. He snapped per-
fectly in overwhelming wind and
bitter cold, helping the 49ers score
their only points on a day when
the miserable club could only
complete one pass.


Cassell warming to new role with Chiefs


Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -
Everywhere Matt Cassel
went, a great quarterback
got. in the way.
Not one but two Heisman
Trophy winners kept him on
the bench throughout his
college career at Southern
California, denying him
.even one start Then he was
drafted by New England,
"where .a Super Bowl MVP
was running the offense.
Now he's in Kansas City,
and are things ever differ-
ent. That's not Matt Leinart,
Carson Palmer and Tom
Brady he's competing
against anymore. It's Tyler
Thigpen, Ingle Martin and
Brodie Croyle.
At 27, Cassel has a team
to call his own for the first
time since , high school.
From the first day of spring
drills, 'a team is finally
counting on him not to fol-
low, but to lead; not to hold
the clipboard, but to help


execute the plays on it,
This weekend's manda-
tory minicamp brought all
the Chiefs players on the
field with their.new quarter-
back for the first time. The
realization is sinking in that
his time is finally at hand.
"Slowly but, surely," he
said Satur-
day with a
grin. "We're
building
chemistry,
we're build-
ing rapport
and every-
body's work- -
ing hard."
Although
coach Todd Haley refuses to
name a starter at any posi-
tion, there is no question in
anyone's mind who the No. 1
quarterback will be.
"He's running the team,"
said wide receiver Bobby
Engram. "And I'm very im-
pressed. He's a very sharp
guy. He's watching film,
he's drawing up plays, he's


coaching everybody up.
He's shown early on that
we're going to be able to
rely on him."
Another tip-off about
'who's running the show is
the fact that Cassel will be
paid almost $15 million this
year. After he replaced the
injured Brady in
the season opener
last September
and proved his
worth by throwing
for 3,693 yards and
23 touchdowns,
the Patriots made
him their fran-
chise player. The
trade to Kansas
City soon followed.
So now he's got all the
money he could want, the
chance to start that he's al-
ways craved and Cassel is,
by all accounts is, a very
happy man. When he was
first presented to the Kansas
City media, he shook hands
and introduced himself to
every reporter, broadcaster


and photographer in the
room.
"I can't even tell you the
feelings I have, the emo-
tions," he said. "I couldn't be
more excited."
Chiefs fans are excited,
too. After the team won only
six games in two years, the
coach and general manager
both were told to clean out
their desks so an entirely
new day could dawn for
Kansas City.
"Everything's new," Cassel
said. "It's a new environ-
ment, it's new teammates,
getting to know my linemen,
getting to know my receivers,
getting to know my running
backs."
Haley, the offensive coor-
dinator the past two years at
Arizona, is not known as an
easy man to please. But
when asked about his new
quarterback, he seems al-
most to gush.
"He's the leader for every
workout gi'oup. It's hard to
outwork this guy," he said.


Rolling Thunder's Third Annual

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June 27, 2009 ~ Shotgun Start 9 a.m.,
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Actor


Franco


pulls


out of


speech

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES -Actor
James Franco says he has
'dropped a plan to give a
commencement speech at
the University of Califor-
nia, Los Angeles, a move
that may have been
prompted by pressure
from students.
Franco issued a state-
ment saying he canceled
his June 12 appearance
because of conflicts with
preproduction demands
for his next film.
However, the "Pineap-
ple Express" star had
been the-object of opposi-
tion from students who
said he was not the right
fit for the commencement
speech.
"The problem with him
as a speaker comes down
to the fact he was a peer.
for so many of us," UCLA
senior Erin Moore said.
"He was in our class. He's
not a role model. And he
hasn't had time to accom-
plish anything with his de-
gree."
Franco, 31, enrolled at
UCLA in 1996 and gradu-
ated last year with a de-
gree in creative writing.
He would have been the
youngest person and most
recent graduate to deliver
a commencement speech
at UCLA.,
Soon after the com-
mencement announce-
ment in March, Moore set
up a Facebook page called
"UCLA Students Against
James Franco as Com-
mencement Speaker."
Hundreds joined, and
Moord estimated about 80
percent of them are UCLA
students.
A call'to Franco's man-
ager, early Saturday was
not immediately returned.
A UCLA spokesman re-
ferred The, Associated
Press to Franco's state-
ment, in which he ex-
pressed regret at not being
able to give the speech.
UCLA announced on its
Web site that Franco
would be replaced by
Linkin Park lead guitarist
and UCLA alumnus Brad
Delson, who graduated
with a bachelor's degree
in communication studies
in 1999.
Franco is perhaps best
known for his supporting
role in the "Spider-Man"'
films.
He is preparing for the
comedy "Your Highness,"
which is set to begin film-
ing next month. Amanda
Lundberg, a spokes-
woman for the producer of
the film, said Franco
would be on the set in Ire-
land on June 12.


Neil Patrick Hanis

gets ready as host
MICitAEL IKuvcenaw A
AP drama writer
NEW YORK - Ask Neil Patrick
Harris how he sees his job as host of
the 2009 Tony Awards. and the star of
TVs "How I Met Your Mother" says
judiciously, "ringmaster at the circus
- I want to be strong enough to earn
your trust but be able to allow all the
specially acts to shine."
And this year's ceremony, televised
live from 8 to 11 p.m. today by CBS
from Radio City Music Hall, is packed
with enough entertainment to keep its
host very busy indeed.
Star performances will be abun-
dant: from Elton
John and the cast of
-"Billy Elliot" to Dolly
Parton and the folks
from "9 to 5." Eclec-
tic, too: from Liza
Minnelli to the 1980s
hair-metal band Poi-
son celebrating with
the cast or "Rock of Neil Patrick
Ages." Plus. of Harris
course, scenes front
the nominated best
musicals and best musical revivals.
And we haven't even gotten to the
list of celebrity presenters that will in-
clude such names as Nicole Kidman,
Anne Hathaway, David Hyde Pierce.
Jessica Lange, Frank Langella and
Kevin Spacey. When will there be
time for thank-you speeches?
"I certainly never thought this
would be in the cards," Harris says of
his Sunday gig. "All of a sudden it
came into my world, and I was ec-
static. It's the biggest night on Broad-
way and to be able to helm the ship is
amazing. I get an all-access pass. It
will be the best seat in the house."
Harris comes to the Tony job with
some experience. He had good no-
tices hosting the 2009 TV Land Awards
in April and he's done similar work
for the Writers Guild, various magic
organizations (Hanms is a. magic buff)
and the OvCation Awards, Los Angeles'
theater prizes.
BT McNicholl, who put Hanris into
the Roundabout Theatre Company
revival of"Cabaret" in 2003. says Har-
ris' interest In magic will help the
actor with his Tony duties.
"Neil is a first-rate magician," says
MeNicholl, associate director of
"Cabaret."
"And I think the timing and concen-
tration that are required of people
who successfully practice sleight of
hand has served him well in the the-
ater. He knows how to keep an audi-
ence's attention and focus it in all
the right ways. Plus Neil has a ;
very warm and appealing pres-
ence. not to mention a sense of
comic timing that goes back to the
greats of yesteryear: It's in his
bones."
For those who only know
the 35-year-old Harris as the
womanizing Barney Stinson
on his current CBS sitcom or
from his breakout TV role as ..
"Doogie Howsei; M.D.," the "9
actor's theater career may come as
a surprise.
"I suppose the Tonys will show
them that I am knowledgeable in '
the theater." Harris says. "But I
am not out to show anyone that -
I amn theater-worthy. Quite ,
frankly, I am happy if the peo- . -


Actor
David
Alvarez is
a nomi-
nee for
his work
in "Billy
Elliot: The
Musical"
in the
63rd An-
nual Tony
Awards,
airing
.. . . . . ....today on
St CBS.

ple who are watching in middlesAmer- Then, later. on my first trip to New
ica think that I am the guy from 'How York, ('Les Miz')was the first show that
I Met Ybur Mother' But what I am pas- I saw ... And to see the show's barri-
sionate about, in person, is theater-" cade come rumbling on stage and the
"Les Miserables" was the first mu- turntable spin around - plus the
sical Harris ever heard - years ago - giant flag waving in the background. It
on a cassette tape. was a jaw-droppinsg moment."
"'I was going to a theater camp at The actor made his Broadway
New Mexico State University," says debut in 2002 when director Daniel
the Albuquerque-born Harris. 'It Sullivan put a replacement cast into
sounded very operatic, and I didn't the Pulitzer Pize-winning "Proof," a
quite get it. new ensemble that not only included
Harris. but Anne Heche, Len Cariou
and Kate Jennings Grant FYom
/ there, Harris went into
.."'Cabaret," as its androgynous,
.. ... flamboyant master ofceremonies.
.That's the beauty of theater," he
says. "FYom role torole.you reallyget
1" '1111 to embody an entirely differ-
ent world - 'Proof' being
super-cerebral and
then getting to
( . - "follow that up
with a stint in
What is al-
Smostlikea
Sf. "" , Cirque
j" du Soleil
show"



" : .-
�. . . ... ., ,,. i , .


100-year-old Swiss artist unveils mural at U.N.


Associated Press

GENEVA - Swiss artist
Hans Erni at age 100 un-
veiled one of his largest
works Saturday-- a massive
mural on the outside wall of
the U.N. compound in
Geneva.
The irrepressible Erni,
who has long outlived 20th-
century artist friends like
Pablo Picasso, had to cover
up some of the muscular
nudes in his mural after
concerns were expressed in
Geneva that his original de-
sign migI4 shock some view-
ers, U.N. spokeswoman
Marie Heuze said.
Erni pointed out to Swiss
Foreign Minister Micheline
Calmy-Rey that the 60-yard
(meter) long mural on the
outside wall of the U.N.'s
European headquarters
features a line drawing of
one of his favorite symbols,


Associated Press
Swiss artist Hans Erni, left, and Swiss minister Micheline Calmy-Rey, right, attend the in-
auguratiornSafurday of two frescoes created by Erni at the U.N.'s gate at the Place des Na-
tions of the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland. The frescoes, 30 meters long and 2
meters high, are composed of hundreds of ceramic tiles.


the dove of peace. buildings - also underscores
The mural - with a sec- the world organization as a
tion on either side of the en- uniting force for all races.
trance to the U.N. park and The predominantly blue


mural is six feet (two me-
ters) high and is made up of
hundreds of weatherproof
ceramic tiles, which were


created according to Erni's
design and then assembled
and glued in place.
Erni said he was pleased
to see his creation revealed
for the first time.
"This satisfies me com-
pletely," he told The Associ-
ated Press. "I want to prove
that the inside and outside
of the United Nations have
become one and want our
world to save itself through
peace."
But, he added, the reality
of daily life shows that hu-
mankind still has much to
do if it is to eliminate
weapons.
Erni, who was born in
February 1909, remains an
active artist in his home-
town of Lucerne in central
Switzerland. He and his
wife, Doris, attribute their
longevity in part to their
can-do approach to life and
their daily hour-long swims.


Tonys tonight


tress Helen Baxendale is 39.
Actor Karl Urban is 37. Rock
musician Eric Johnson (The
Shins) is 33. Actor-comedian
Bill Hader is 31. Actress Anna
Tory ("Fringe") is 30. Actress
Larisa Oleynik is 28. Tennis
player Anna Koumikova is 28.
Actor Michael Cera is 21.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
* Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, JUNE 5
Mega Money: 15-29-40-43
Mega Ball: 4
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $500,000
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3-of-4 MB 32 $479
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2-of-4 MB 1,181 $26.50
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Fantasy 5:2 - 17 - 21 - 25- 33
5-of-5 3 winners $76,693.89
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INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY=

Today is Sunday, June 7,
the 158th day of 2009. There
are 207 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
One hundred years ago,
on June 7,1909, "The Violin
Maker of Cremona," a short
film directed by D.W. Griffith
and featuring Mary Pickford
in her first notable screen
role, was released. In Lon-
don, actress Jessica Tandy
was born.
On this date:
In 1753, Britain's King
George II gave his assent to
an Act of Parliament estab-
lishing the British Museum.
In 1769, frontiersman
Daniel Boone first began to
explore present-day Ken-
tucky.
In 1929, the sovereign
state of Vatican City came
into existence as copies of
the Lateran Treaty were ex-
changed in Rome.
In 1967, the Haight Ash-
bury Free Medical Clinic
opened in San Francisco.
In 1998, in a crime that
shocked the nation, James
Byrd Jr., a 49-year-old black
man, was chained to a
pickup truck and dragged to
his death in Jasper, Texas.
(Two white men were later
sentenced to death for the
crime; a third received life.)
Ten years ago: Gunmen
killed popular Mexican televi-
sion host Francisco "Paco"
Stanley.
Five years ago: The
Tampa Bay Lightning held off
the Calgary Flames 2-1 in
Game 7 to win their first
Stanley Cup.
One year ago: Longshot
Da' Tara spoiled Big Brown's
bid for a Triple Crown by win-
ning the Belmont Stakes.
Today's Birthdays: Movie
director James Ivory is 81. Ac-
tress Virginia McKenna is 78.
Singer Tom Jones is 69. Poet
Nikki Giovanni is 66. Actor
Ken Osmond ("Leave It to
Beaver") is 66. Former talk
show host Jenny Jones is 63.
Actress Anne Twomey is 58.
Actor Liam Neeson is 57. Ac-
tress Colleen Camp is 56.
Singer-songwriter Johnny
Clegg is 56. Author Louise Er-
drich is 55. Actor William
Forsythe is 54. Record pro-
ducer L.A. Reid is 53. Latin
pop singer Juan Luis Guerra
is 52. Singer-songwriter Prince
.is 51. Rock singer-musician
Gordon Gano (The Violent
Femmes) is 46. Rapper Ec-,
stasy (Whodini) is 45. Rock
musician Eric Kretz (Stone
Temple Pilots) is 43. Rock mu-
sician Dave Navarro is 42. Ac-


44



..... .....


no


his A
"Sh
Miu













C&oFMENTAYNTARY_
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE







DEFENSELESS


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press
Kimberly Hurell-Harring poses next to a statue May 12 in front of the courthouse in Rochester, N.Y. Hurell-Harring, who served six months for try-
ing to smuggle a small amount of marijuana to her imprisoned husband, is part of a class-action lawsuit filed by the New York Civil Liberties Union
against the state, accusing it of "persistent failure" in providing legal services to the poor.

Nationwide, public defender offices are struggling to provide adequateprotection


Associated Press
It wasn't the brightest decision she'd ever
made. She admits that. But if she'd had
enough money to hire a lawyer she might
not have lost six months of her life.
Kimberly Hurrell-Harring, a certified nurs-
ing assistant and mother of two, had driven
7 1/2 hours to visit her husband and then se-
creted a small amount of marijuana in her pri-
vate parts. He'd pleaded with her on the
phone to bring it, saying he needed to get high
in this awful place.
He was calling from a maximum-security
prison, and someone must have been listening
because.when she walked into the Great Mead-
ows Correctional Facility in upstate New York,
guards immediately yanked her to the side.
They told her things would go easier if she
handed over the dope without a fuss. She did,
and things immediately got worse.
With a swiftness that made her head spin,
she was handcuffed and hauled to jail. At her
arraignment, there was no public defender
available. Standing alone, she was charged
with one felony count of bringing dangerous
contraband into a prison.
And so she tumbled headlong into the Alice-
in-Wonderland chaos of court-appointed
lawyers, where even those lawyers say there
is little time for clients. There are simply too
many and not enough hours in the day.
"If you can't afford an attorney, and you fall
into the criminal justice system, you are really,
really screwed," said Demetrius Thomas of
the New York American Civil Liberties Union.


Especially now. The spiraling recession and
overwhelmed public defenders, some of
whom have rebelled by filing lawsuits to re-
duce caseloads, pose one of the greatest chal-
lenges to the system since the U.S. Supreme
Court in 1963 overturned the petty larceny and
breaking-and-entering convictions of Clarence
Gideon, a poor Florida man tried without a
lawyer. In a landmark, unanimous ruling, jus-
tices said state courts must provide attorneys
to every criminal defendant unable to afford
counsel.
After her arraignment, Hurrell-Harring
went back to jail because she couldn't afford
bail, either. Three weeks passed before a pub-
lic defender appeared, and she says she spent
a total of 15 to 20 minutes with him before her
sentencing hearing.
He told her not to fight the district attorney's
recommended punishment - six months be-
hind bars and five years of probation. It was
the best she could hope for, he said. But she
had no criminal record. Surely, she begged,
couldn't possession of less than an ounce of
pot, a misdemeanor under other circum-
stances, be bargained down to probation?
"It was like he had no time for me," she says
now, still unemployed 17 months after her re-
lease because she lost her nursing license
when she became a convicted felon. "He told
me to plead guilty."
The accused, their lawyers, and even prose-
cutors agree that courts increasingly neglect
their constitutional duties. In a series of Capi-
tol Hill hearings, the latest scheduled for this
week, Congress members are struggling to


grasp the enormity of the crisis. But the op-
tions are far from clear, particularly when vir-
tually every state and local government is
crying poor.
Meanwhile, defendants suffer.
In Georgia, a man accused of murder spent
eight months without a lawyer because the
state's public defender office couldn't afford
one. In Washington, an appeals court awarded
$3 million to a man falsely accused of child
molestation who was jailed for seven months
because his public defender failed to investi-
gate the case. .
There are open lawsuits in at least seven
states - including populous New York,
Florida and Michigan - where overburdened
defenders claim those presumed innocent
until proven guilty are routinely denied their
right to an attorney. Their suggested remedies:
capping the number of cases assigned to them
and completely overhauling state systems.
In April, the bipartisan, nonprofit Constitu-
tion Project released a phone-book-sized re-
port titled "Justice Denied," a national review
of court-appointed lawyers. The five-year
analysis, the most comprehensive look at in-
digent defense in decades, said many states
fail terribly in their constitutional duty to pro-
vide lawyers for the poor.
"Sometimes counsel is not provided at all,
and it often is supplied in ways that make a
mockery of the great promise of the Gideon
decision," said the report signed by former
Vice President Walter F Mondale and former
FBI Director William S. Sessions.
See DEFENSELESS/Page C4


Looking for

freedom in

the mirror
As Father's Day is
right around the
corner, I have spe-
cial .dispensation-to tell.
you about one of my wife's
really strange habits.
She loves the great out-
doors. She loves the great
outdoors so much that
while she is in the house,
she likes to leave the
doors open.
Wide open.
Never mind that we
have big windows and
screened porches that
make it feel like you're
outdoors. She prefers to
be really outdoors.
We live in a neighbor-
hood where it is not un-
usual to see osprey,
alligators, raccoons, squir-
rels, lizards, owls, snakes,
two dozen species of birds
and other assorted
wildlife prowling around.
I constantly advise her
that if she keeps leaving
the doors open, she will
one day find some wild
animal sitting in the living
room watching HDTV She
responds that she would-
n't mind the company, as I
refuse to sit and watch
HDTV with her.
You get the picture -
we are halppily married.'
*Usually, when she sees
me pull my car into the
driveway, she will close the
doors in an effort to avoid
the inevitable confronta-
tion that her strange be-
havior and my know-it-all
personality will produce.
So last Monday when I
stopped by the house after
lunch, I was not surprised
that all the doors were
closed - even though the
house had that "outside"
smell to it
When I went into the
bathroom in the master
bedroom, I was chagrined
to find the place a mess.
Towels and toiletries were
thrown all over the place
and there was goopy stuff
all over my countertop.
Her countertop was
clean.
I did what any other guy
would do - I stuck my
hand in the goop and
, smelled it.
It didn't smell like any-
thing I had smelled before
- and it was not pleasant
My first paranoid
thought was that Sen.
Charlie Dean had some-
how gotten into my house
and trashed my bathroom
in retaliation for our last
"barn" editorial. The goop
smelled like it came from
a barn - even a barn with
three bedrooms and a
kitchen.
With goop dripping
from my finger, I went
looking.for my wife.
"What happened to the
bathroom and what is this
stuff?" I asked.
She took a deep breath
and used a classic diver-
sionary tactic. "Have you
seen my latest artwork?"
See WINDOW/Page C4


CMH must be accountable to taxpayers


GUSTAVO FONSECA,
MARK FALLOWS AND
PARESH DESAI
Special to the Chronicle
Recently there has been much
to say surrounding Citrus Memo-
rial hospital (CMH), a public asset
(hospital) managed by a private
organization. Many times the true
message can be lost in a large
background of noise.
So let us take a moment to clar-


ify the problem and discover
what must be done to solve it. As
members of the Florida Wellcare
Alliance (FWA) and Citrus County
Medical Society (CCMS), we have
tried to look-into the financial sta-
bility of CMH as well as reviewing
its allocation of public county
funds. It is impossible succeed
while CMH continues to refuse to
disclose how it has spent tens of
millions of our tax dollars.
It is important to understand


that there are many Citrus
County physicians who are aware
that CMH has serious financial
problems, as it is burning through
cash at an astonishing rate un-
heard of in surrounding counties.
The majority of the members of
the FWA and CCMS, as well as
other allied health care
providers, like physical therapy
and home health, have also
raised concerns regarding the fi-
nancial well-being of Citrus Me-


morial hospital. CMH has re-
ceived $44 million from Citrus
County taxpayers in just a few
short-years. Contrastingly, Her-
nando County residents have
paid no such taxes to their local
hospital (See Table 1).
CMH justifies its extra tax on
the need to provide
indigent/charity care and facili-
tate the payment of "bad" debt,
which is defined as monies not
received for non-indigent or non-


compensated health care serv-
ices. The flaw in this analysis is
that Hernando County Hospital,
despite not receiving any addi-
tional funds levied on citizens as
a "hospital tax," also provides in-
digent/charity care and makes
enough to cover its own "bad"
debt (See Table 2).
Furthermore, while Hernando
County Hospital incurs the addi-
See (.r,: Page C3









0Page C2 -SUNDAY, JUNE 7,2009



PINION


S "There is no security on this Earth;
there is only opportunity."
Douglas MacArthur


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


2009 GRADUATES


The -next




greatest




generation


T o every parent who was
either doing cartwheels
across football fields or
sobbing uncontrollably over
blurred programs, that child
walking across the stage on
Graduation Day is a remark-
able combination of experi-
ences and
accomplishments THE I
who must now
face a culture, a The class
social order, an
economy and hu- OUR OP
manity that no
FCAT could ever Be the
hope to prepare genera
them for. the ce
But to the more
than 1,000 Citrus County stu-
dents eagerly grabbing that
coveted diploma and throwing
tls gdx,&irtarboard into
the air in defiant celebration, it
would be wise to remember
that 20, 30 maybe even 40 years
from .now you may be sitting
where your parents are. And
you will have to answer to your
own graduating son or daugh-
ter as they ask you what your
dreams were when you heard
those first notes of "Pomp and
Circumstance" and just how
many of them you made come
true.
* Did you undo the damage
done to this planet and change
global warming?
* Did you restore respect
and reverence to the Constitu-
tion of the United States?
* Did you make this country
energy independent?
* Did you end extreme
poverty?


* Did you deal with the
scourge of terrorism and its
causes?
As this community watches
with extreme pride as you end
one chapter of your journey
and begin the next phase, you
must know from within that you
have the ability to
ISSUE: meet these and
even far greater
of 2009. challenges and
will hopefully do a
PINION: much better job
than those who
greatest have brought you
nation of to this threshold.
century. Look to those ca-
reers that will
' stimulate you; continue your
course of education to prepare
you for the jobs that will be in
demand in the next decade: find
your passion and don't expect
others to pave tlhe way for you.
Take the timb to enjoy this
moment of glory and celebrate
with parents, mentors, friends
and teachers who made this
present accomplishment not
only possible but unforget-
table. Then go forth to be this
21st century's "greatest gener-
ation" so when those questions
are asked of you, you can an-
swer with the same pride that
you are feeling today.
You are ready You have the
tools. You have the support.
You have the dreams. You
enter a world that can be as
grim as ever imagined or as
fascinating as your most daz-
zling dream. Real life may be
complicated, but your poten-
tial is virtually unlimited.


What's good for Charlie...
I was calling about the article
you all put in there that the
Freezer should be closed. I live
down here in Old Homosassa and
it's a good place for me to go eat,
so I don't have to go out on the
highway. I think it should stay. It
doesn't hurt anything. There's one
person that doesn't like it, so
we're going to shut it down. And I
don't think John Lawson is
thumbing his nose any more than
Charlie Dean did. I don't see
Charlie Dean's name in the paper,
you writing an article saying his
house should be torn down. So if
it's good for Charlie Dean, it's
good for John Lawson.
Freezer vs. barn
If .the Citrus County Commis-
sion closes the doors on the
Freezer Bar, they should close the
doors on the barn/house owned


by State Sen. Dean. There is no
difference between the bar and
the barn/house. Both should fol-
low the law.
Hernando homologue
This is in reference to the
Freezer restaurant not being
within zone. The same thing, if
not worse, is going on in Citrus ,
County on Lake Hernando. There
is an establishment that's a bait
shop that is now a bar with live
music that plays Thursday
through Sunday nights until 10,
11 o'clock every night (with) loud
bass. The police, the sheriff's de-
partment are called almost every
night that this goes on - live
karaoke, etc. I understand that
they are in violation of code, as
well, and have never applied for
proper zoning. However, for some
reason, this establishment is al-
lowed to continue with no prob-
lems. I'd like to know why.


Reef renewal
I'm calling about a Sound Off in Saturday's paper
(May 30), that says "Stupid sinking." It's about the
sinking of a ship down off Key West to build an artifi-
cial reef. I'd like to respond to that caller and say ...
not only do the ships provide tourist attractions, they
also provide future reefs. We're losing our reefs and
Florida thrives on this. This person has absolutely no
idea where in the world they are living if they don't
understand the importance of being able to strip
down a ship, sink it and have it eventually turn into
an artificial reef.


CA563-579


Inciters and zealots, guilty all


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan....................................... publisher
Charlie Brennan .......................................... editor
Neale Brennan ........promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ................................managing editor
Cheri Harris.................................... features editor
Curt Ebitz..... ......................... citizen member
Founded Mac Harris .................................... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson ..................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus
__________________________________!--------------------------


WHU4ETO@R1C




SMUR ElP



SLAUGHTER

BABY

LETTERULttLE .


LETTERS to the


Remembering
fallen officers
I would like to publicly thank
all the individuals who attended
the Peace Officer's Memorial
Day Ceremony on May 15 at
Cooter Pond Park, Inverness,
sponsored by the National Asso-
ciation Retired Law Enforce-
ment Officers (NARLEO).
I especially would like to thank
the Citrus County Sheriff's Office
Honor Guard, Hernando County
Honor Guard, Sheriff Jeff Dawsy,
CCSO Deputy Scott Roush, FHP
Trooper Tod Cloud, PSO Walter'
Nolan, Paul and Jackie Stevio for
the excellent live performance
singing, David Heinz (Heinz Fu-
neral Home), Rick Brown (Brown
Funeral Home), Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sions (Law Enforcement Divi-
sion) retired members of the Port
Authority Police (PAPD), Andrew
Freund (NARLEO), American Le-
gion Post 155 Honor Guard, bag-
piper Holly Scott, Inverness
Parks Department personnel (Pa-
tricia Smith, director of Parks &
Rec; also Dave Pieklik, city of In-
verness parks), local dignitaries
and community governmental
leaders for their unwavering sup-
port and help.
Particularly, I would like to
thank the citizens of Citrus
County and the children of Inver-
ness Primary School for attend-
ing this most important memorial
service showing the surviving
families that we will never forget
the law enforcement officers who
made the ultimate sacrifice.


OPINIONS INVITED
0 The opinions expressed in Chronicle
editorials are the opinions of the
editorial board of the newspaper.
0 Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
'I All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
e-mail. Names and hometowns
will be printed; phone numbers
will not be published or given out.
N We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

And last, but not least, thanks
to our retired law enforcement
officers from the various law en-
forcement agencies that belong
to NARLEO, who responded to
make this endeavor a tremen-
dous success.
Andrew J. Tarpey, chairman
National Peace Officers Memorial Day
NARLEO
The King has left
the building
My name is Tamara Hunter
and I am one of the owners of
Dave's Chicken King. We have re-
cently been forced to close our
doors and would like to thank the
people of Citrus County who have
been so good to us since we took
over the Chicken King in Decem-
ber of 2006. We were immediately
welcomed by the community.


DOUGLAS COHN
AND ELEANOR CLIFT
Most anti-abortion ac-
tivists condemned - the
murder of Doctor
George Tiller, in part because
they could hardly do otherwise.
Their words of condolence are
welcome even as they skate over
their role in inspiring the zealot
who pulled the trigger and killed
the Kansas man known as the
abortion doctor. These activists
on the far and often fanatical
Right have the good sense to at
least pretend that they think a
great wrong has been done even
though their words and actions
set the stage for Tiller's death.
Operation Rescue founder
Randall Terry is the exception,
calling Tiller "a mass murderer"
upon hearing of his death. Words
have consequences. You can't as-
sail someone as a baby killer and
a mass murderer and then be sur-
prised and act innocent when
someone is motivated to take a
shot at them. Tiller operated one
of just three clinics in the coun-
try that perform late-term abor-
tions. He had been attacked and
wounded once before, and per-
sisted in his work even as he
knew he had a target on his back
We are on the eve of Supreme
Court hearings in which the nom-
inee's views on abortion rights
will be considered. The ruling
that legalized abortion was
handed down 30 years ago and
most Americans regard it as set-
tled law that permits a woman to
end a pregnancy within certain
established federal and state


ment with extreme anti-govern-
ment groups. His belief that he
was serving a greater cause was
intensified after the Kansas
Court of Appeals overturned his
conviction for carrying bomb-
making materials in his car on
the grounds that it was an illegal
search and seizure. Roeder had
initially been stopped for having
an invalid license plate. His ex-
wife said that after he was re-
leased from probation he felt
vindicated in his mission, and be-
came even more self-righteous.
"He would say, 'See, I'm right and
you're wrong."'
Tiller was serving as an usher
at his Lutheran church in Wichita
when the shots were fired. The
fanaticism that motivated Roeder
to act on his version of religion
and what God wants him to do is
no different from the zealotry
that motivates Muslim extrem-
ists. The young men who flew the
planes into the World Trade Cen-
ter didn't have criminal records;
they were fanatics who commit-
ted heinous acts they believed
would be rewarded in a glorious
after-life. But zealotry under
whatever religious banner it op-
erates is just that, and those who
incite it and live comfortably are
as much to blame as those who
carry out the crimes.

Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift
author the Washington Merry-
Go-Round column, founded in
1932 by Drew Pearson.


I didn't
know
it was
loaded-.


zm ENT-


Editor
We saw how truly supportive
the Hernando and Inverness
communities really were after
our fire in February of 2007. It
was then that we saw how impor-
tant people felt that the Chicken
King was for the area and we did
everything that we could to re-
open though one obstacle after
another was thrown at us.
It took 15 months and a great
deal of work before we could
once again serve Citrus County.
However, things had changed a
great deal.
Since reopening, we faced a
great many obstacles. We fought
the county, we fought other busi-
nesses, we fought for the right of
our customers to park in front of
our restaurant and we fought an
uphill battle against the economy.
Most of all, we fought harder
than anyone will ever know or
understand to remain a part of
Hernando.
Thank you to all of those who
helped us with time and money.
Thank you to our employees, who
worked so very hard for us and
wanted nothing more than to as-
sure that Chicken King succeeded.
We want to thank everyone
who made Chicken King a sec-
ond home, we will very much
miss seeing you all every day
and hope that whoever replaces
us will be able to live up to the
expectations that are so strin-
gently placed on the proprietor
of that space.
With sincerest affection,
David Hunter, Jr.,
David Hunter, III
Tamara Hunter


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


guidelines. Many Americans be-
lieve life begins at conception
and have profound disagree-
ments with those who condone
abortion. President Barack
Obama recognized those differ-
ences when anti-abortion pro-
testers greeted him while he
spoke at Notre Dame last month.
He appealed to both sides in this
longstanding debate to confront
their differences with a sense of
respect for the other side, to
agree to disagree, and then to
find common ground, perhaps in
making adoption more available
for women who might otherwise
seek an abortion.
With age and maturity comes
.tolerance, a recognition that the
debate over reproductive rights
is not black and white, that nei-
ther side has all the answers -
and that the side you oppose has
something of value to contribute,
and is at the very least deserving
of an audience. When anti-abor-
tion activists call their opponents
murderers, it's an open invitation
to the true believers to do what-
ever they can to stop the murder.
Scott Roeder, the 51-year-old man
held in Tiller's shooting, surely
believes he was serving a greater
cause by taking the action he did.
His ex-wife told the Associated
Press that he had become "very
religious in an Old Testament
eye-for-an-eye way," and that all
he cared about was stopping
abortion..
His anti-abortion activities
were an outgrowth of his involve-


Other VOICES


Hot Corner: FREEZER


I

)








umlrrc 5 uuuiv IY(r~j Uk HfmuijuI OMNAYSNAY UE7 09C


How does one paint with tremors?

n a most recent column, to do regardless of difficul- ciated during his lifetime ued to paint, laying his rounding Christ I painted it vinced I was goingto have to
discussing my retire- ties; and, sometimes, facing and he rubbed shoulders paints on the pallet in a cer- 40 years ago and it hung in rename "doubting Thomas"
tmn T nosed the a challenge makes an ac- with the well-to-do and influ- tain order and essentially my mother's home for 23 and call him "cross-eyed


rhetorical question, "How
does one paint with
tremors?" and indicated the
answer would be another
column for another day.
Well, it's another day and
this is another column.
A little background infor-
mation: For most of my life,
I've enjoyed painting. En-
tering retirement, I've es-
tablished a place to pursue
my artwork and my sweet-
heart has given me a wall in
our home on which to dis-
play my stuff. But as many of
you are aware, this has been
complicated by my having to
deal with the onset of
tremors.
Even so, people have a
way of doing what they want


complishment more fulfill-
ing.
Cheryl is a fan of French
impressionist Claude
Monet She has a number of
nice, relatively inexpensive
Monet prints. She calls one
of the guest rooms in our
home the "Monet room" be-
cause several of these prints
are displayed there. (I call it
the "lemon meringue pie
room" because the walls are
painted yellow!)
Please, please, pretty
please, don't think I'm in any-
way comparing myself to
Monet - I'm not - but I've
studied his work and I've
studied his life. He wasn't
your typical "starving artist"
His unique style was appre-


ential, including
enjoying a close
friendship with
French prime
minister Georges
Clemenceau.
On point for
today's column:
During the last 15
years of Monet's
life, he endured Fred B
cataracts. A S
With modern A SI
medical technol- OF I
ogy, Monet's
sight could have been fully
restored, but in 1908,
cataract surgery was primi-
tive at best. He resisted the
surgery until shortly before
his death in 1923. In spite of
his affliction, Monet contin-


I
3r
L
I


feeling his way
along. Bottom
line: If a blind
man could con-
tinue to paint, it
should be a
piece of cake for
someone whose
hands shake.
As to my own
rannen amateurish ef-
forts, my first
projects have
LIFE been to restore
and repaint my
old canvasses. One such en-
deavor was a rendition of
the Lord's last supper- not
an imitation of the
Leonardo da Vinci horizon-
tal version, but a vertical
view with the disciples sur-


years because she loved it.
After her death, it had been
stored in the attic because I
didn't love it. I'd never liked
the way it had turned out,
especially the flesh tones
and the absence of life
within the eyes.
I used sandpaper to re-
move most of the paint and
began again painting im-
ages into the outlines which
remained. It worked quite
well with one minor prob-
lem - the eyes. Reapplying
paint to faces, hands, hair
and robes was generally
done with flowing strokes,
but the small, intricate work
related to the eyes was com-
plicated by my shaky hands.
At one point, I was con-


Thomas." But in the end the
effort was worth it - the
painting has now been fully
restored/repainted and has
a prominent place on the
wall Cheryl gave me.
Yes, in my own home,
Monet has a room and I still
have only a wall, but who
knows? If I continue to work
through the tremors, maybe
one day Cheryl will give me
more space!
How does one paint with
tremors?
Very carefully, but also
very contentedly.

Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist


Amy Remley Foundation opposes

construction on Primerica site


NORMAN HOPKINS
Special to the Chronicle
Several years ago, alongside county
staff, we - the Amy H. Remley
Foundation - opposed the devel-
opment of Crystal River Commons, when
it was being considered by the governing
board of the Southwest Florida Water
Management District. Eventually Realty
Corp., the owners at the time, withdrew
its application.
The ground for our opposition then is
essentially the same as now. That is, de-
stroying wetlands degrades water quality
in King's Bay and the Crystal River. At
that time, toxic algae blooms had become
more severe in the bay due to runoff from
the adjacent Home Depot site on U.S. 19.
At the Board of County Commissioners
meeting on May 26, I in-
formed commissioners of a What
difference between Florida
and federal law. The state public i
law is silent on the fact that
underground water flows in half a
greatly affect our ecosys- nowhere
teams; federal law protects
them under the Clean Water risk to C
Act. The following was then
read into the public record: of the
Brief for BOCC 26May09-
CRCP DA hearing DA-07-03 Coast?
I refer to the documents every
submitted on May 15, 2009,
for the public record and in- set for ta
formation of-the commis-
sioners, the salient points of million
which are as follows: compl
1. The wetlands located to Cmpl
the east of the subject prop- "evac
erty, together with those to
the south are "Connected roUt
Wetlands," in that they cap-
ture, cleanse and convey "Tributary" wa-
ters flowing into riverine King's Bay via
spring vents located there, an existing
nexus for many millennia.
2. It follows that the wetlands and trib-
utary flows constitute a proximate inte-
gral ecosystem of "waters of the United
States."
3. Jurisdiction Under the Clean Water
Act is "the controlling rule of law" for any
proposed activity or discharge at risk of
degrading the water quality of King's Bay
by contaminating tributary flow.
4. Moreover, the federal rules require
an applicant for a permit to undertake
such an activity or discharge to affirma-
tively demonstrate it to be necessary and
desirable under federal standards, and
clearly in the public interest to do so.
5. The decision handed down by the
Ninth District U.S. Circuit Court in the
case of Northern California River Watch
v. City of Healdsburg, No. 04-15442 (9th
Cir. Aug. 6,2007) refers.


t



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DI
e

rt


6. The tributary waters flow in several
unconfined conduits under the subject
property.
7. In addition, King's Bay is a naviga-
ble-in-fact listed Special Water under the
classification of an Outstanding Florida
Water, for which degradation of water
quality from that extant on 1 March, 1979,
is prohibited under Florida law.
8. The draft Citrus County Develop-
ment Agreement of 5/26/09, fails to ensure
protection of water quality in Kings Bay
under the Clean Water Act, especially as
it conveys right to the owner or developer
to assign rights to third parties to provide
vital functions without specific a priori
conditions of that agreement to compel
performance under the provisions of the
Clean Water Act (paras. 16 F, 161 , 19 A (2),
and B, and 20). Paragraphs 11 and 24 ap-
pear to limit application of
t is the the Clean Water Act.
9. It also fails "to affirma-
nterest tively demonstrate clear
public interest" of any such
road to proposed development on
e at the the subject property.
In view of the forgoing, the
ur jewel Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners is
Nature urged to denythe said Citrus
or County Development Agree-
loreover, ment.
thing is Sincerely, Norman Hop-
kins.
xpayers' Commissioners and the
.' developer declined to ques-
nS to tion me. The draft agree-
kteP any ment was approved by a vote
te an nation flaws and federal case law
against it.
te." What is the public interest
in half a road to nowhere at
the risk to our jewel of the Nature Coast?
Moreover, everything is set for taxpay-
ers' millions to complete any "evacuation
route."
You be the final judge.
The Web site at www.amyhrf.org is a
repository for the results of research
over more than eight years. News items
posted there for May 11, and May 26, are
particularly relevant to this issue. Scien-
tific literature from around the world has
been studied, discussions held at every
level of government, academia, and with
lawyers active in environmental protec-
tion, as local environmental groups and
government have sought to understand
reasons for degradation of our water
quality, find ways to slow it down, and
eventually restore the water quality for
the benefit of us all.

Norman Hopkins is a director of the
Amy H. Remley Foundation.


pH(ER
wwtdlMws DISPATCH1.
?MY3


Fight back
Kind of interesting to read the oil
prices are climbing. It's summertime and
I don't know why people are that ignorant
to realize what the government and the
oil companies are doing to us. It's travel
time, it's vacation time, so they stick it to
us every year the same way and people
act surprised because they're going up.
It's amazing how people forget. It's just
like Progress Energy. They're doing
things. They give us a few dollars back
for a month and now they're '
going to turn around and raise it 0
on us again and they don't care.
They're finding every way they
can just to see if they can prove
the average citizen is stupid.
Well, I think the average citizen /
needs to wake up and start fight-
ing against these oil companies
and these energy companies be- CAL
cause when they have a captive
market like they've got, they 563-
have no care or consideration for
the average American. All they
are after is the dollar. It's just total greed,
and some day they'll pay the price.
Congrats, grads
I'd like to commend all the graduates
of the GED program that took place for
Withlacoochee Technical Institute yester-
day evening. They deserve more commen-
dation because these children struggled
and graduated because they wanted to,
not because they had to. It was a beauti-
ful ceremony, but it was a shame to see
the Citrus County School Board mem-
bers, while the graduates were receiving
their individual diplomas, having a cell
phone in clear view and laughing, appar-
ently at a text message or e-mail. The cer-
emony was further spoiled by one of the
speakers who compared the graduates'


I

(


lives to a series of television commer-
cials. These children deserved better and
we should all applaud them for their ef-
forts...Congratulations, GED graduates of
the Withlacoochee Technical Institute. A
special "thank you" should go out to Mr.
Mitchell and his wife, who make that GED
program such a success that it is today,
who were unable to be at the graduation
due to health reasons. You were greatly
missed. Again, congratulations, gradu-
ates, you've earned it.
No more burning
JND Smoke, smoke everywhere. It's
Aftf horrible. Selfish people are burn-
jrl ing trash, debris and business
debris. They bring home and
burn it in their back yards. It
doesn't just last an hour. It's all
day long. We can't breathe or sit
on our own patio. It heads our
way all the time. We're asking
)579w please, the county of Citrus, do
S579 something right and do away
with this private burning all to-
gether. It's horrible. We have a
landfill, remember? There's no reason for
this, especially with the trash.
Skeeter plea
Please, please, please, Mosquito Con-
trol, come to Old Homosassa. They are
ridiculously thick. There's 10, 12 of them
at a time on my legs. Please come spray
Old Homosassa.
People vs. politics
I have lived here for many years and
will never understand how the people can
be so nice and the politics so rotten.
Case in point: How the people at the
Freezer restaurant can be treated so
badly. Lowe's, who doesn't give a care
about the community, can be welcomed
with open arms.


PUBUC SERVICE EXPENDITURES, 2007


Indigent/
charity care


$17 million
$45 million
$7.4 million


CMH


Bad debt


$12 r
$19 r
$6m


COUNTY FUNDS ALLOCATED TO RUN HOSI
OPERATIONS PER FISCAL YEAR


Hernando
County
Hospitals
tax revenue


Seven
Hos
re


$6,846,020
$8,031,865
$10,357,117
$10,889,759
$12,799,305
$44,051,936


ANNUAL TAXES PAID BY EACH COUNTY'S HO


CMH
Real estate No
Sales No
Tangible No
Federal No


HCH


Continued from Page Cl


nilhlon tional financial burden of paying
million county real estate, sales, tangible
lionn and federal taxes, CMH has none of
these expenses (See Table 3). It is
PAL important to note that both hospitals
PnAL provide equal quality health care
and are managed by private corpo-
rations.
en Rivers The question then is: If CMH de-
spital tax pends on these additional funds to
avenue perform the same responsibilities
asked of any other hospital and pays
$0 no taxes, then why is it not making
$0 any profit, and where does all the
$0 extra money go? Is there a defect in
$0 the basic business plan? Again, just
south of us the hospitals without re-
$0 ceiving any public funding continue
$0 to provide the same services, and
$0 make a profit.
$0 Hernando County's per capital in-
come is less and the unemployment
rate is higher than that of Citrus
County. Similar to Hernando County,
'SPITALS both Pasco and Marion counties pro-
SRH vide charity health care without bur-
dening their citizens with a "hospital
Yes tax." Financial sustainability of a
Yes hospital and the provision of indi-
Yes gent care is an operational responsi-
Yes ability of all hospitals and should not
Yes be a tax burden to the county citi-


While you read the accompanying tables,

remember that to solve this problem, our

first step is to demand a full accounting of

all Citrus County tax dollars being funneled

into CMH. We, the people, have a right to

this information; after all, it's our money.


zens.
Finally, let us remember who
should decide on the establishment
of taxes. It is the elected government
that levies taxes on the public, not
appointed board members. If there
is to be a continued hospital tax, the
decision should be made by our
elected members with the support of
the voters. Ultimately, the decision is
ours to make - do we see an injus-
tice and do something about it, or do
we sit back and watch enormous
sums of our hard-earned dollars
being spent by people who refuse to
tell us how they are spending it?
While you read the accompanying
tables, remember that to solve this
problem, our first step is to demand
a full accounting of all Citrus County
tax dollars being funneled into
CMH. We, the people, have a right to


this information; after all, it's our
money. The employees of CMH are
undoubtedly fine individuals and
talented health care professionals.
But that is not the point - our focus
must be on the competency in the
managing of our money.
To avoid yet another financial
bailout it is imperative that we tax-
payers be given access to the details
of the use of public monies by CMH.
Nothing less than complete trans-
parency should be our demand, for
it is certainly our right

Gustavo Fonseca, MD, is president
of the Citrus County Medical Soci-
ety Mark Fallows, DO, is president
of the Florida Wellcare Alliance.
Paresh G. Desai, MD, is a Citrus
County doctor


CMH
HCH
SRH


CMH
tax revenue
'02-'03 $1,523,517
'03-'04 $1,636,218


'04-'05
'05-'06
'06-'07
'07-'08
'08-'09*
Total
*estimated


SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2009 C3


COMMENTARY


RTIC US COUNTY (FL E


q





.LJiL*b HVC *A**^J CL A l icLy. I Imy uU1
tinue to be excellent
Losing money will have
consequences. When CMH
experiences losses, no ef-
fective measures are taken
to reduce expenses such as
those we see being taken by
the county. Positions are not
cut even on the administra-
tive side where patient care
would be less affected. And,
evidently, no thorough
analysis is done of the effec-
tiveness of the hospital busi-
ness plan. Administration
explains to the board that
things are tough all over the
country, that they are doing
the best they can and that
they are making improve-


soever as regards those
taxes. Hospital administra-
tion presents the financial
results to the private CMH
Foundation Board. The
board passes the request to
the trustees who, then, have
no choice but to pass it on to
the county commissioners
for automatic approval. The
taxes are posted. You pay.
CMH is limited as to how
many percentage points
they can tax you. It has not
reached that limit, but in
paying for $60 million in
bonds it issued and in mak-
ing up for yearly losses, it is
closing in on it Then what?
If they run short of cash,


wage to attract business plan
the best staff? where needed.
That should They offered to
concern you. It is help pay for the
a major concern consultant
of more than 100 As Chronicle
physicians in the Dr. William Dixon Publisher Gerry
county who must OTHER Mulligan has sug-
rely on CMH OTHR gested else-
services and fa- VOICES where, a
cilities for their significant num-
patients who need to be hos- ber of that group were not
pitalized. Representatives happy with CMH hiring
of these physicians met with physicians to compete with
a special committee of the them in areas of the county
hospital foundation board already well served. And
last fall to share their con- they did not like the fact that
cerns, express support for it was financed by taxing the
the hospital and volunteer physicians' properties and
their assistance. They asked businesses. What Mr. Mulli-


services.
The hospital board po-
litely advised the physicians
that their help was not
needed. They hired a new
consultant, took token ad-
vice from the medical staff
and readied another five-
year plan for operating the
business. Same management
team. Same board members.
Same processes. How likely
is it that the financial results
will be different?
Other hospitals in our
service area do not have
CMH's tax benefits. Fiscal
discipline forces them to be
efficient. They provide
charity and treat the same


William Dixon graduated
from Columbia College in
New York City, from New
York Medical College and
from the College of Busi-
ness Administration at the
University of South
Florida. He was an assis-
tant professor at the Uni-
versity of Georgia and he
has worked in the veterans
administration system. He
served 11 years in the Army
as a surgeon and as special
forces officer, achieving the
rank of lieutenant colonel.
Dr Dixon can be reached
at Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


DEFENSELESS
Continued from Page C1

"The call for reform has never
been more urgent," the study said.
In May, a major reform battle was
lost by court-appointed lawyers in
Florida's Miami-Dade County. An
appellate court harshly rebuked
and reversed a lower court ruling
that allowed the public defenders'
office to refuse certain felony cases
because it faced funding cuts and
crushing workloads. Under the ini-
tial ruling, attorneys would have
been brought in from a smaller state
office and from private firms, which
would have increased costs.
Reform advocates said the deci-
sion was history repeating itself.
"In the 1960s, the state of Florida
believed Clarence Earl Gideon
could get a fair trial without the
guiding hand of counsel," said
David Carroll, research director for
the National Legal Aid and De-
fender Association. "Today, the as-
sumption is that a poor defendant in
Florida can get equal justice. They
were wrong then and are wrong
today"
But even in the best of times, pub-
lic defenders say a quick plea bar-
gain is sometimes as good as it gets.
Court-appointed lawyers often have
only seconds to whisper with clients
tbe've just met - before standing
"i-ie a judg&sets bail.
Their days are spent like emer-
gency room doctors performing
triage. The worst cases get the most
attention, the lesser cases wait the
longest. Pleas are shuffled like pre-
scriptions - take this, it's a good
deal. Plead guilty, settle for time
served. No, going to trial won't prove
you innocent, it will get you con-
victed.
The pay is awful and so are the
hours.
Hurrell-Harring's court-ap-
pointed attorney is a case in point.
For a yearly salary of $54,000,
Patrick Barber juggles between 100
and 120 cases in his Washington
County, N.Y, office - on top of his
private practice. Between himself
and four part-time defenders, he
says they represent 1,661 cases.
He agrees with his former client
He doesn't have much time to visit
clients. It's not possible to see every
defendant, he said. Many have no
car, and can't get to his office. Others
are in jail, and he simply can't get to
all of them, he says.
Barber claims he did the best he
could for Hurrell-Harring.
"She couldn't have been charged
with a misdemeanor because it was-
n't offered. It wasn't going to be of-
fered. The district attorney takes a
very hard stance when it comes to
prison contraband," he said.
Hurrell-Harrinig, 33, doesn't much
care about Barber's caseload, and
she has two pending legal actions
over her incarceration.
In one, she's part of a class-ac-
tion lawsuit filed by the New York
Civil Liberties Union against the
state, accusing it of "persistent fail-


ure" in providing legal services to
the poor.
In the second, she's asked the ap-
pellate division of state Supreme
Court to reduce her conviction to a
misdemeanor because of inept legal
representation, and because a re-
cent appellate ruling said a small
amount of pot did not qualify as
"dangerous contraband" in prison
settings and should be charged as a
misdemeanor.
If the court agrees, Hurrell-Har-
ring could get her nursing license
back She is living with her mother,
who suffered a recent stroke, and
her two girls, ages 5 and 18. She's
getting by on Social Security.
Poor people like her constitute
about 80 percent of criminal defen-
dants. And in bad economic times,
crime rates increase, legal re-
searchers say, adding more weight
to the groaning system.
In troubled Miami-Dade County,
the public defenders office has lost
12 percent of its budget in the last 18
months, while the average felony
caseload per lawyer increased from
367 to 500 over the past three years.
The maximum number of cases an
attorney should carry is 200, accord-
ing to Florida's public defender as-
sociation. And that's a conservative
number - the Constitution Project
study suggested 100 cases per
lawyer is too many.
In April, New York became the
first city to cap the number of crim-
iria cases juggled by public defend-
ers. Tucked inside the state budget
bill, the law requires that standards
be established by 2010, and phased
in over the next four years as fund-
ing permits.,
But like other legislation, it has
been criticized for not going far
enough.
"A major metropolitan area in our
country is finally willing to enforce
caseload standards," says Carroll.
"But if you look at it, it says at some
future date some standard will be
enforced, if there's money to do it
"How can you say someone in
New York City deserves a reputable
lawyer, but if you're in Buffalo,
sorry? It's really riot doing anything
to help the indigent defense crisis,"
he said.
In some areas, attorneys say over-
hauling the system could actually
save government money.
The Michigan Appellate Defender
Office, for example, saved nearly
$3.7 million in prison costs by cor-
recting four years' worth of sentenc-
ing errors.
"You don't have to just throw
money at it," said Carroll. "We could
just allow law enforcement more
leeway in deciding whether to issue
a citation or arrest someone."
Hurrell-Harring, of course,
wishes she had been given a ticket
instead of six months in prison. But
then she is asked what possessed
her to smuggle a controlled sub-
stance into a state prison?
"I asked myself the same ques-
tion," she says, matter-of-factly "But
let's be honest, we all did things for
men that we shouldn't have did. I bet
it's happened to you."


Cheap smokes
Since we.can order our medications from
Canada much cheaper than we can here, there
certainly must be someplace where we can
order cigarettes much cheaper than here in
Florida since our governor's gone tax crazy. I'm
sure he'll never get very many votes to be a sen-
ator. So there must be someplace that we can
order our cigarettes the same as we can order
our medicines cheaper. Something to think
about and look into.
Obamas' date
Isn't it nice that with the economy so
bad, the president of the United States
can jump on the plane and take his wife 0
out to eat at night (with) the taxpayers'
money, on an airplane, more or less.
Back at square one
This is in response to the article on
Al and A2, Mr. Greene's interview: Let
us go back to square one. Mr. Greene,
when he was running against former PA CAL
Melanie Hensley - who had served the p
county admirably for 26 years - his 56 -1
platform was tax relief. Now, after read-
ing the article today (June 2), it would
appear the only Citrus County property owners
who will see any relief are the big landholders
who supported his candidacy and have been
granted agricultural exemptions. If you recall,
he had been denied this, and I'm sure he has it
now. So it appears that 18 employees, whose av-
erage time with the PA was 18 years, are out of
a job - 12 of whom received zero compensa-
tion, and six others did...The average home-
owner or property owner who is not eligible for
ag exemptions - who get nothing and the serv-
ices are going to disappear unless the millage
rate is increased to compensate for the loss in
revenue - are the real losers here. Guess what,
folks? You're going to see just that happen; mill-
age rates will increase.
Spread them out
I don't understand these businesspeople. Why
do they have filling stations across the street and
next to each other? They have drugstores across
the street from each other. Now they want to put
another warehouse across the street from each
other. Why don't they spread them out in differ-
ent areas so that everything isn't all in one place?
It doesn't make any sense at all to put the same
thing right there next to another one.


(


. Developers and miners
I get a chuckle from the recent callers com-
plaining about the new Lowe's that will be built
on (U.S.) 19. If you didn't vote in the last elec-
tion, you have no right to complain. We had a
good board of county commissioners in Vicki
Phillips and Joyce Valentino. However, the major-
ity of voting citizens would rather the county be
run by developers and'miners. You get what you
vote for.
Why no salute?
I was attending the graduation last night at
Citrus High School. Very impressed -
IND nide ceremony. But (I was) very disap-
JNU pointed (there was) no salute to the
S flag, no opening prayer and no closing
prayer. What's happening with the peo-
ple in Citrus County? I just don't under-
stand it.
Thanks, Avante
I was recently discharged from Avante
Inverness as a patient, then an outpa-
) 5 tient for physical therapy after surgery,
J)57 totaling about six weeks all together. My
care was excellent. Everyone, CNAs, RNs,
physical and occupational therapists
were wonderful. I'd like to thank each and every
one of them. We are indeed fortunate to have
such an excellent facility here in Citrus County.
Bumper heights
Florida Statute 316.251 sets maximum
bumper heights. Why is this statute not enforced
by any law enforcement agency in this state? Ve-
hicles that tower over other passenger vehicles
represent a greater danger in any collision. Their
high center of gravity increases their chance of a
rollover accident, also. This is truly a restriction
that should be enforced for the public's safety.
Seatbelts and safety
...(There was an) article in your paper today
about a man dying in a crashover over on (U.S.) 19.
A lady driving south in the northbound lane runs
head-on into this guy and they're both dead. You
guys kind of made a big thing about he didn't
have his seatbelt on, but there was really very lit-
tle talked about her driving in the wrong lane.
Very confusing. Sounds political to me. I don't
like seatbelts. I'm going to start having to prac-
tice, but I wish you'd get over the fact that seat-
belts don't cause crashes. People that don't
know how to drive cause crashes.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

"The goop," I said with
finger outstretched. "What
is it?"
"Well, I guess I didn't tell
you about the birds," she
replied.
"The birds?" I asked.
It seems that the porch
doors were left in their cus-
tomary wide-open position
when some birds flew in the
house. My wife went looking
for them, but they were tricky
birds and went into hiding.
It was sometime later that
she heard thumping coming
from our bathroom and she
went to investigate.
One of the birds had man-
aged to find the mirror
above my countertop, and


Lest you think that any lessons were learned through
the ordeal, my wife explained that it took her 45 minutes
to capture the winged, bipedal, endothermic, vertebrate
'poop' machine fouling up my bathroom counter.


he was sure the reflection of
sunshine represented free-
dom. So he proceeded to fly
with all his might into the
mirror
Each time he did so, he
apparently had a poopingg"
experience.
Hence, the large piles of
bird poop on my counter.
I was at least relieved that
Sen. Dean had not breached
our security.
Lest you think that any
lessons were learned
through the ordeal, my wife
explained that it took her 45
minutes to capture the


winged, bipedal, endother-
mic (warm-blooded), verte-
brate 'poop' machine that
was fouling up my bathroom
counter.
She finally got a clothes
basket and trapped the
creature against the mirror.
She held the basket closed
and carried the frightened
animal back out on the
porch to set it free. --
This did not turn out to be
one of those "Free Willy"
moments where the bird
flies off to freedom.
"Why?" you may ask?
Well, because my wife still


had the house doors
propped open.
As soon as she let the bird
out of the basket, the dumb
thing flew back in the house
and raced to my bathroom
mirror, where he proceeded
to bang his head and drop ad-
ditional poop on my counter
I guess I can at least be
happy that it wasn't an alli-
gator.

Gerry Mulligan is the pub-
lisher of the Chronicle. His
e-mail address is gmulligan
@chronicleonline.com.


# Be A Locavore- Shop local
Ito save on gas


Call 563-3295 Ci s m . kiE N
Start Saving today! K ,tLx


CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


COMMENTARY


4l, - o........ Ti.,, 7 2n '


4 OUNLAJY, JUN 7,MEA9 C Co '(L HOIL



CMH cannot continue to lose money
he problem with Cit- ments. Then, they raise your will it continue to be the the board to hire an inde- gan failed to say was that sort of patients. They do not
rus Memorial hospi- property taxes to cover their world-class hospital it is pendent consultant to do a every one of those physi- lose money year after year.
tal comes down to one losses! today? How will they buy business analysis of each cians expressed support for The CMH board needs to
issue: The hospital is losing CMH has an independent new technology? Will they CMH segment to determine CMH's efforts, if an inde- quit accepting excuses. It
more money each year The taxing authority granted by be able to reno- where the losses pendent consultant deter- needs to change the hospital
services provided by the hos- the state. The five hospital vate the old facil- were generated, mined it was the only way business plan or hospital
pital and its staff are not an trustees, appointed by the ities while paying and to suggest the hospital could make a management Or both! Com-
i o to us anVnparty They con- overnmr have no sayv what- a competitive changes to the profit and maintain quality placency begets failure.








()T,?rL'~ C(JFJN7Y (14) CHRONICLE COMMENTARY SUNDAY, JUNE 7. 2009 C5


Sound OFF


Tough job
I'm responding to a re-
cent Sound Off concerning
the honor of our so-called
law enforcement officers.
According to the U.S. De-
partment of Labor, the oc-
cupation with the highest
rate of spousal abuse is law
enforcement, highest rate
of alcoholism is law en-
forcement, highest rate of
child abuse is law enforce-
ment, highest rate of di-
vorce is law enforcement.
We need to remember that
these are only people -
human beings, just like you
and I. There's nothing su-
perhuman about them. .
Presidential order
It never ceases to amaze
me that people who call in to
the Sound Off get their facts
incorrect, don't know their
facts and misspeak about
trivial things. One person
wrote in recently that in
1958, President Johnson
was the one who put the So-
cial Security funds into the
general fund. Well, that indi-
vidual needs to go back and
read a little history. In 1958,
the president was Eisen-
hower. President Johnson fol-
lowed Kennedy in the '60s.
Politics as usual
Again the commissioners
have put it to the taxpayers
of Citrus County. The two
new members that ran on
removing the 6-cent tax on
gas have failed us. They
used this promise to get our
votes and then did nothing
to remove the unwanted tax
increase. Gas is on its way
up again and there's talk
that the federal government
wants to increase the fed-


eral tax on gas. What's next?
We already pay a county tax
to register our cars, a com-
munications tax, a 911 tax,
the students have a tax on
the parking lot to use the
parking lot that the taxpay-
ers have already paid for,


more. Dear Abby is written
by Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips.
You can find the column at
www.dearabby.com. Change
can be a good thing.
Lowe's unneeded


tax on the solid waste... I just wanted to let you
Akfan now I am really dismayed
Abby an and really disturbed with
I would like the Chronicle the county commissioners'
to change the Annie's Mail- vote, I guess unanimously,
box column to the Dear to approve what I believe is
Abby column by Jeanne an unnecessary, unneeded
Phillips. She has a much approval for an expansion to
better column. She is very allow Lowe's to be built on
knowledgeable and applies (U.S.) 19 just across the
common sense, plus much street from Home Depot.


We don't need that kind of
competition. That's not
helping. This is totally
ridiculous. We do not need
a Lowe's. How much wet-
land will be lost? Your arti-
cle does not address this
point. That's what I am
most concerned about...
Invisible components
On "Scientific law:" Mr.
Joe D. Gilbreath, in my book
of life experiences, is cor-
.rect. The spirit of God is
what is important. Man has
a spiritual component that
has been placed there by
God. May I add that gravity


is a non-material compo-
nent but we know it is there,
though. we can't see it. With-
out gravity, a spirit compo-
nent, the world would
collapse.
COLA hike due
I'm disgusted with the U.S.
Congress. They have deter-
mined that there is no infla-
tion and: therefore, will.have
no COLA or cost of living ad-
justment, for Social Security
recipients. Well, I'd like to
know who buys their gro-
ceries. Haven't they shopped
recently? Have you seen the
price of beef or pork or milk


or eggs or vegetables or
fruits? These people must
have their heads in the sand.
It's absolutely disgusting.
Don't burn plastic
Well, you can tell that the
burn ban's been lifted.
Here's a guy at the end of
my street; he's burning all
his Dollar General yellow
bags - all plastic - his milk
cartons and his garbage.
The other end of my street,
here's a guy burning plastic
bags, milk bottles, etc.
Stink! You can tell it's been
lifted. Maybe, Chronicle, you
can do us all a favor and put
a little blurb in there, like
you did that the burn ban
was lifted, that you can't
burn this garbage.
Monday in May
Why all the griping?
Didn't President Nixon de-.
clare in 1971 that Memorial
Day would, from then on, be
celebrated on the last Mon-
day of May?
Back in Time fan
I've been reading the Ho-
mosassa Beacon section of
the Chronicle's "Back in
Time." Those years, '35,
1937 and so on, those
years I lived in New York
and so on. But when I read
what happened in this area
at that time, I wish I was
here. I think I'm a country
boy by heart, even though
I'm born in Brooklyn. But I
want to commend the per-
son, whoever, who writes
that "Back in Time." I want
to congratulate them. It's a
very good section. Brings
me memories, even though
I'm not a country boy, but I
would have loved to have
been here in those days.


SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2009 CS


COMMENTARY


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NUfSUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2009


lidvop09 .I


I









B Se. onD. - .,S.Nv',. JUNE 7,2009



BUSINESS


Editor's note: Randy nesses are faced with each
Welker, executive director day, and even when times
of the Economic are good, your
Development � need to concen-
Council of Citrus trate on how you
County, will pro- 0 can make your
vide a ti ice- business better
monthly column . so it can grow
offering guid- during the good
ance and en- cycles and sur-
couragement to vive during the
local businesses, downturns.
in this tough This series of
economic cli- Randy Welker articles will con-
mate. TALKING . centrate on how
If youareone BUSINESS a business can
of the excep- ______O___ survive, and pre-
tions in busi- pare itself for
ness right now, your success during the next
company is having one of growth cycle.
its best years ever. And
there are such companies. FOCUS Oin
During every' cycle you are
going to find businesses your customer
that succeed and busi- So let's start at the begin-
nesses that fail. Which one ning. A good business takes
do you want yours to be? care of its customers, but in
For many of us, we just a down time it is even more
want to survive and make it important to do so. You
through this tough cycle, must keep in contact with
How can we stay in busi- them so that they know
ness so that we can pay our what you are doing and
bills and open our doors to- how you can serve their
morrow? How can we at- needs.
tract new business? Should So keep calling and
we continue our market- maintaining your contact
ing? Has our sales team with your customers and
given up? All of these are ask how you can help them
the questions that busi- succeed in their business.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Opportunities abound


KEVIN CLARK/Washington Post
Laura Murray unpacks boxes in Washington after leaving New York, where she ran a crisis management consulting firm. She moved to re-
engage her first love: politics and public policy.

Recession, layoffs inspire some to blaze new career paths


ELIuzABETH RAZZ
Special to The Washington Post
- WASHINGTON
This wicked recession is
throwing roadblocks in the
way of many careers. It's
not just layoffs knocking people
off track Workers are facing
years with few or no pay raises,
vanishing bonuses, curtailed re-
tirement contributions, longer
hours and a heavier workload.
With the national unemploy-
ment rate at nearly 9 percent,
most people find they have no
choice but to accept more work,
stagnant pay and less security, .
.at least for now. But some - a
minority so far - are steering
their careers in directions they
hope will be more promising,
more fulfilling and more under
their own control. The money
may not be as good as their
prior jobs, and the risk of per-
sonal failure may be high in
some cases - but the prospect
of a new career path - some-
times one long desired but ig-
nored - is alluring.
Maxine Gill, 46, took her ca-
reer in an entirely new direc-
tion after she was laid off from
her job as sales and marketing
director for Comcast in January
2008. "I enjoyed what I did, but
I knew I was not going to retire
from that job," she said. This
was the second time she had
been laid off. "Marketing always
seems to be first to go," she said.-


Maxine Gill, left, Interviews Sarah Stuser, 18, for her nanny and tutor franchise. Gill, of Laurel, Md., In-
vested In the franchise after she was laid off from her sales and marketing job at Comcast. The reces-
sion and layoffs inspire some workers to blaze new career paths.


Earlier this year, she struck
out on her own, investing
$50,000 to $60,000 in a franchise,
College Nannies & Tutors. Her
company hires people (taking
care of the tax and paperwork
headaches) and places them
with families for temporary or
long-term duty. , **,.
"Everything is on my shoul-
ders, but I enjoy working for


me," said Gill, of Laurel, Md. "If
I were still in corporate Amer-.
ica, I would have to work extra
hard, and I would have to
travel. You've got to do more
now because of the economic
recession to keep your job."
The layoff aligned with an ex-
isting desire to open her own
business. "The fact that I have
an impact on children's lives is


very important to'me," Gill said./
"And the fact that I can employ,.
people in this economy is a ./
plus." /
The government is also hi
ing, and some people are seek-
ing security in the public,sector,
with applications for goyern-
ment jobs hitting 7.7. m lion
/
See A..i' ,. PageD3


/�



Inflation-proofing your

portfolio could cost more


ig-time government
borrowing, the pri-
mary medicine the
U.S. is prescribing to ifiject
more cash into its/ailing
economy, is showirig signs'
that it's reviving tlo patient
increasingly
worry abouf a
possible ,invest-
ment-eroding m.
side effect that
long-term mutual
fund investors
may want to brace
for: runaway in-
flation.
The govern- Mark
ment is sinking OF MI
deeper into the INTO
red as a conse-
quence of essen-
tially printing money to bail
out troubled industries and
stimulate the economy. The
Obama administration proj-
ects this year's deficit to hit
$1.8 trillion, four times last
year's all-time high.
"Governments never ad-
vocate inflation, but they
tolerate it, and this adminis-
tration is going to tolerate it
in spades," said George
Schwartz, manager of the
Ave Maria family of funds
that adhere to Roman
Catholic principles.
Zero inflation is seen as


'more likely to persist in the
short run, and any sharp
jump in inflation rates is un-
likely until the economy re-
ally starts coming back.
Most economists say that
prospect is a couple years
off, despite a
rally that's lifted
t the Standard &
Poor's 500 index
- a nearly 38 per-
cent above an
- early March low.
But the mar-
kets are already
reflecting fears
- that long-term
Jewell inflation is likely
UTUAL - investors are
demanding
REST higher premi-
ums to buy long-
term bonds, and paying
more for potential hedges
such as gold and other com-
modities.
If you share such fears
and invest for the long run,
the best time to try to build
more inflation protection
into your portfolio is before
it shows signs of emerging.
"Anytime you're buying
insurance, you want to buy
at a time when the probabil-
ity of needing it is low, be-
cause it theoretically costs
See INTEREST/Page D3


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Bank


fee the


limit
DEAR BRUCE: My
husband and I
have had checking
and savings accounts in
the same bank for 19
years. We recently re-
ceived a fee on the savings
account called an "exces-
sive withdrawal fee."
When I called the bank's
800 number, the gentle-
man told me there is a
federal law that limits sav-
ings withdrawals to four
per month. He said it has
been in effect for years. I
thought he was crazy!
When I went into my local
branch, the customer
service representative
told me the same thing, re-
funded my fee and told
me to keep it to four with-
drawals a month to avoid
the fee. We have more
than $100,000 in this ac-
count, and have never
been charged a fee of any
kind. Is this really a law
(supposedly in effect since
1999!) or is it up to the
bank's discretion? - E,S.,
via e-mail, '
DEAR E.S.: I have en-
closed the regulation that
your bank is citing. Until
you wrote to us I was not
familiar with it. Why in
the world are you making
so many withdrawals a
month? With the amount
of money you have, there
are other types of ac-
counts that very likely
would give you a better re-
turn and give you total
flexibility. A $100,000 de-
positor is an important
customer, and they will
want to keep you. I would
very much like to hear
from you again, explain-
ing to me what necessi-
tates four withdrawals in
any one month? Here is
the "excessive withdrawal
fee" explanation from the
FDIC Web site.. "In the
United States, under Reg-
ulation D, 12 CFR
204.2(d)(2), the term 'sav-
ings deposit' includes a
deposit or an account that
meets the requirements of
Sec. 204.2(d)(1) and from
which, under the terms of
the deposit contract or by
practice of the depository
institution, the depositor
is permitted or authorized
to make up to six transfers
or withdrawals per month
or .statement cycle of at
least four weeks. The de-
pository institution may
authorize up to three of
these six transfers to be
made by check, draft,
debit card, or similar
order drawn by the depos-
itor and payable to third
parties. There is no regu-
lation limiting number of
deposits, however some
banks may choose to limit
deposits themselves."
DEAR BRUCE: I am 26
and make about $34,500 a
year. I have no debt and
about $15,000 in savings. I
am contributing 5 percent
to my retirement account,
with an astounding 10 per-
cent additionally from my
employer. I would like to
go to graduate school full-
time and earn a master's,
then a Ph.D. If I choose to
do so for the next two
years, I have been offered
a full tuition scholarship
and a teaching assistant-
ship worth $11,500.
Clearly, I would be making
drastic lifestyle changes.
After that, I would be
looking for a doctorate
program. My earning po-

See MONEY/Page D3
: *. : * - .! . " ." . "."'. "- -..-- _ :'-- -.*".


What can you do for them
in these tough times? What
services can you provide to
help them prosper? When
you focus solely on what
your customer needs and
how you can help grow
their business, you will be
in a position to make a sale.
How is that different
than before? We all know
our product line or what
services we offer and most
times we sell from our own
needs: I have this much
space available in my di-
rectory or I carry this line
of products. But have I
spent as much time trying'
to see if there is anything
my company can do to help
your business make a sale?
Am I concentrating on what
you need?
By focusing on the cus-
tomer, you set your busi-
ness apart from the
competition. The customer
becomes the focus of how
we perceive our own busi-
ness. If the focus is on the
customer and the cus-
tomer's needs, the sale
won't be determined by
how big a discount you are
willing to give.
Recently, the Chamber of
See CYCLE/Page D3


How to make it through


a tough business cycle


|







l-romotional information proviaea oy ime Ltrus unanueri 01 oilinmmerce


SUNDAY
JUNE 7, 2009


Forever Young Clothing


The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce would like to welcome Forever Young Clothing
as new members of the Chamber. Pictured above is owner Bethany Miner and Chamber
Ambassadors Rhonda Lestinsky, Pete Burrell, Betty Murphy, Bonnie Hardiman, Dan Pushee,
Janet Mayo and John Porter. Stop paying too much for children's jewelry, toys, and cloth-
ing! Newly established, Forever Young Children's Clothing is your unique source for low-
cost children's toys, clothing, and accessories. Earn your GIFT CARD!! Receive instant
in-store credit when you bring us your gently used clothing, toys and accessories. Looking
for a great gift? Come see us! We have Silver treasures in. Silver plated heart shape keep-
sake box is engravable and comes nicely gift boxed. We also have a set gift box with a beau-
tiful silver heart chime teething ring and a crystal rocking horse. We also carry name brand
shoes at a great price, children's toys and children's jewelry and accessories. Store hours
are Tuesday - Friday 10:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Saturday 11:00 a.m - 4:00 p.m. Stop by
today and visit us today. We are located at 6681 West Gulf to Lake Hwy in Crystal River.
Or you can call us anytime at (866) 489-6221 (352) 794-KIDS. Visit our Web site at
www.foreveryoungclothingstore.com

1st Choice Pest Control


Ridgeline Tire & Service LLC

RIDaELIRE I


















were joined by Ambassadors James Segovia, Nancy Hautop, Rhonda Lestinsky & John
Porter. Ridgeline Tire & Service, LLC invites you to come see us at 2302 HWY 44 W. In In-
verness. Call us today at 352-726-3539. Our operating hours are 7:30-5:30 M-F & 8:00-2:00
Saturday. We started our business in June of 2008. We will service all vehicles , as well as
motor homes, tractor trailers and farm vehicles. Customer satisfaction is our number ONE
priority. Come in and see our great staff. We thank you for the opportunity to service your
vehicles.

FDS Disposal Inc.


Congratulations FDS Disposal on your new location! The Citrus County Chamber of Com-
merce was pleased to host a ribbon cutting ceremony, welcoming FDS Disposal to their new
facility. Ambassadors present .Were Rhonda Lestinsky, Megan Ennis, David Heinz, Janet
Mayo, Pete Burrell, Wendy Hall, Jennifer Duca, Nancy Hautop & John Porter;.F.D.S. Dis-
posal, Inc., Citrus County's locally owned waste company provides residential and com-
mercial waste collection services in Citrus County. Our commercial services include
frontload dumpsters and Roll-off dumpsters to meet the needs of the community. Now of-
fering commercial waste audits, let us help you maximize your waste budget and increase
your bottom line. Call for a courtesy waste audit today. F.D.S. Disposal, Inc., leading the
way in Singlestream curbside recycling in Citrus County. Let's work together today for a bet-
ter tomorrow! Call owner Ina Ray at (352) 746-0617 for an appointment.


1st Choice Pest Control, Inc. would like you to take a moment of your time to look at your
existing pest control company and ask yourself if your expectations are being met? Are you
really getting what you are paying for when it comes to lawn service, pest control and/or
termite service? The owners of 1t Choice Pest Control would like to fulfill all your expec-
tations. What separates us from the rest is that we give you what the other companies
don't; the owners of our business actually do the work! We have over 30 years of service
experience and are eager to do whatever it takes to earn your business. We are willing to
go the extra mile to earn a chance at bringing you the very best in personalized, customized,
professional service. Owners/Operators are Bill Biedenstein, Jim Curry and Lloyd Smith.
Ambassadors pictured above are John Porter, Janet Mayo, Tammy LaVelle and Lillian Smith.
Also pictured is Renee Melchionne. Give 1V Choice Pest Control call today at 352-503-
6821. Discover why 1V Choice is the BEST choice!


Citrus County Golf Guide Magazine


Abundant Living


Welcome Citrus County Golf Guide Magazine to the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce.
Pictured above, in a recent ribbon cutting ceremony is owner and sole proprietor Teresa
Jackson Clark with Ambassadors Jennifer Duca, Rhonda Lestinsky, John Porter, Janet Mayo
and James Segovia. Sales for the first issue of Citrus County Golf Guide Magazine began on
June 1t. This publication will be published quarterly, beginning September 1" and will dis-
tribute 10,000 copies! This informative guide will not only feature golfing places and events
but also restaurants and community events. To learn more about this exciting new maga-
zine, call Teresa at 352-586-5516.


~Member �� -' f


A great show of support came out to welcome Abundant Living Assisted Living Facil-
ity as new members of the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce. Representing Abun-
dant Living, pictured above, is Owners Helene Blackmon & James Thompson, Jeff
Thompson, Bill Thompson, Ben Thompson, Amy Thompson, Marge Cowie, Ruth Weaver,
Ruby Maddox, Josle Blackmon, Jiana Blackman and Tison Kelly. Also in attendance
were Ambassadors Jessica Holcomb, David Heinz and John Porter. Abundant Living is
an Assisted Living Facility that was started by two nurses Helene Blackmon and James
Thompson. Our facility offers personalized assistance, supportive services and com-
passionate care in a professionally managed, carefully designed, just like home setting.
It's the perfect alternative for our precious seniors who can no longer live on their own
at home, yet don't need 24-hour, complex medical supervision. Abundant Living fo-
cuses on wellness and keeping residents as independent as possible by providing an
affordable tailored plan of assistance. Our residents enjoy beautifully appointed living
spaces, delicious meals, engaging social activities, transportation, and personalized as-
sistance and care. Its the assistance seniors need with all of the indepenence
they want. Abundant Living Is located at 4201 E. Sunup Court In Inverness. Call them
today at 419-5249.


In order to celebrate the addition of our 75h" advertise
lodging partner, Holiday Inn Express in Crystal site and r
River, Nature Coast Travelhost is offering all each moi
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce members 0836 or c
a.FREE ad creation (a $35 value) with any 6 , your busi
month or greater ad agreement. Additionally, tion that
we will create a FREE
magazine listing with any
12 month ad agreement by .
a chamber member (a $25
value). Save $60 today.
and enjoy the benefits of ,
promoting your business to
hotel travelers in-room with .
Nature Coast Travelhost.
Travelhost is in over 9,000
hotels across the U.S.
every day, helping travel- offer clas
ers find the best places to dine, shop and dis- verse gla
cover. We distribute our full color glossy visitor and pine
guide to over 1,100 Citrus County hotel rooms have an
each quarter, and can help you grow your busi- booking,
ness with the lucrative visitor market. We pro- Lady, cre
vide a complete marketing package, including today for
the quarterly magazine advertising, editorial list- send an
ings, maps and map listings, and web pres- and we w
ence. The entire magazine is online with links to of events


r websites. We are growing the web-
many improvements are happening
ith. Contact Diane Bedard at 352-796-
liane@naturecoasttravelhost.com for
ness consultation and be sure to men-
you are a Citrus County Chamber
member for your discounts.
EUM
Looking for something
fun to do this summer?
Why not check out The
Crafty Lady at 2032 Hwy
44 West in Inverness, lo-
cated in the Colonial
Plaza! In addition to our
one-stroke oil painting for
kids and adults, we now
ses in water color, oil roughing, re-
ss, calligraphy, sewing, paper quilling
needle weaving. For children, we
extreme bedroom makeover, scrap-
t-shirt art and painting. At The Crafty
activity is our passion. Give us a call
more information at 352-344-4800 or
mail to craftyladystore@yahoo.com
vill be happy to email you a calendar
S.


Tl�


m .


,,ion


1h








Cmius COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE Busn"iass SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2009 D3


Bike store has new
service manager
Suncoast Bicycles Plus Inc. is
proud to announce the hiring of
Lee Hogan as the new service
manager. Hogan brings a wealth
of experience
to his new po-
sition, having
worked in
bike shops in
South Florida
as well as a
Trek Shop in
Austria.
Lee Hogan Lee is a
graduate of
the United Bicycle Institute in
Ashland, Ore., where he learned
professional bicycle service and
. store management.
Beyond that, Hogan's passion
for all things bicycling goes back
a long way. He began road rac-
ing in college at the University, of
Florida, and has since become
a certified cycling coach, race
official and promoter, as well as
a racer himself. Hogan has won


state championships in Florida
and has raced in several Euro-
pean countries including Ger-
many, Austria and Italy. He has
competed in the Masters World
Championship road race in St.
Johann, Austria, several times.
Besides racing, Lee has en-
joyed mountain biking in the
high peaks of Tirol, Austria, and
elsewhere, and has toured
throughout western Europe and
the United States. In 1996 he
completed a 42-day, self-sup-
ported bike tour across the
United States.
Before working in the cycling
business, Mr. Hogan became a
radio and television broadcast-
ing professional-upon graduat-
ing from the University of Florida
with a degree in broadcast jour-
nalism. He worked in several
major markets as an air person-
ality and program director, in-
cluding Pittsburgh, Pa.,
Richmond, Va., and Orlando.He
was also a radio journalist for
many years with NPR affiliate
West Virginia Public Radio.


-Business


Hogan continues to be an ac-
tive rider and occasional racer.
He loves riding his new Trek
Madone 5.2 Pro, similar to the
bike Lance Armstrong now
rides.
Suncoast Bicycles is open
seven days a week and is a
platinum level Trek dealer as
well as the No. 2 dealer nation-
wide for Terra Trikes.
Program to help
feed needy
Accents by Grace and
Helen's Consignment Boutique,
in the downtown historic district
of Inverness, will be setting up
a program beginning June 11 to
help the Citrus County families
with their need for food.
The program will be "Feeding
Citrus County Families." Both
owners, Grace and Ann, are
sisters and they are preparing
to give back to the community
that has been so good to them
over the past few years. The
food program will be, bring in a
non-perishable item and re-


DIG


ESP


ceive a 10 percent discount.
Each item that you bring into
the store will allow you 10 per-
cent on any item in the store;
one food item per purchase
item.
The food will be distributed
by Citrus United Basket, Re-
deemer Presbyterian Church,
and Helping Hands of Our Lady
of Fatima Catholic Church. If
you are a family in need, please
contact these three charities.
UPS Store offers
shipping service
With many airlines now
charging passengers for each
checked bag, travelers are
looking at alternatives for a
more convenient, cost-effective
way to get their luggage to its
destination. The UPS Store at
6752 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River, is helping to ease
travelers' burdens by shipping
their luggage ahead.
In addition, The UPS Store
has certified packing experts
who specialize in packing odd,


oversized items, such as skis,
golf clubs and fishing poles -
items travelers would prefer to
have waiting at their destination
rather than lugging them
around an airport.
"Travelers can potentially
save time and money by ship-
ping their luggage at The UPS
Store, which also lessens the
hassle of dealing with luggage
at the airport," said Jerillyn
Clark, The UPS Store fran-
chisee.
One of the many frustrations
that travelers deal with is lost or
misplaced luggage. The UPS
Store offers a variety of ship-
ping options that allow travelers
to track their luggage to its final
destination, such as UPS Next
Day Air, UPS 2nd Day Air, UPS
3 Day Select, and UPS
Ground.
Clark suggests the following
tips when shipping luggage:
E If possible, put luggage in
a box. Doing this will help pro-
tect the luggage as well as pro-
vide a suitable surface for the


shipping label. It will also help
avoid additional handling
charges.
* Another option, in some
cases, is to forego the suitcase
and place items directly in a
box. This can minimize the
chances of having to pay over-
size or overweight charges. Be
sure to pack an extra box,
packaging tape and a return
label and use them on your re-
turn trip.
* Put an additional address
label inside the luggage or
package in case the outside
label is damaged or lost.
* By using a shipping option
like UPS, you can track your
luggage all the way to its desti-
nation via cell phones, PDAs or
other Web-enabled wireless de-
vices.
* Visit www.theupsstore.com
to use the online cost calculator
to research the best rate and
most economical shipping op-
tion.
-From staff reports


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl
tential in my current job is not
great, and there is little room for
advancement in my current posi-
tion. If I leave, I give up a gopd po-
sition, with great benefits, but
would hope to enter a field with a
starting salary of around $60,000
within five to six years. My heart is
telling me to follow my passion, but
my brain is having trouble-justify-
ing the expense. What should I do?
- C.L, via e-mail
DEAR C.L: Going back at your
young age to continue your educa-
tion would seem to me a very good
plan. You mentioned you want to
go to graduate school full-time and
get your master's. Why would you
not consider going part-time, keep-
ing your $34,500 a year and all of
the benefits that you receive? It
may take you an extra year, but
your standard of living would re-
main about the same. There are
many, many good master's pro-
grams aimed at adults who have
full-time jobs. Millions before you
have worked full-time and earned
advanced degrees. I wouldn't give
up the $34,500 a year for the
$11,500 and the privilege of going
full-time. I don't think that makes


good sense.
DEAR BRUCE: My husband is
37. He inherited an IRA and half of
his father's estate worth $75,000.
We have held orito part of the stock
The money has been put into two.
CDs, one of which is close to term.
The other will be at term in about
six months. What should we do
with this money, once it is avail-
able, to ensure that we get the best
return and have it at retirement?
We both contribute 13 percent of
our income to our 401(k), matched
6 percent by our employers. Any
advice? - M.ML, via e-mail
DEAR M.M.: It is a good prob-
lem to have, but at 37 the idea of
plunking money into CDs on a reg-
ular basis leaves a lot to be desired.
You are certainly 20 to 30 years
away from retirement, and while
the market will go up and down
over that period of time, you could
surely expect a reasonable 8 per-
cent to 10 percent return, even tak-
ing into account the valleys we are
currently experiencing. Further,
there are some excellent long-term
buys available in the marketplace
at, the present time. Putting your
money into CDs or similar instru-
ments at your age makes little
sense. You condemn yourself to a
minuscule return that is so dimin-
ished by taxes and inflation that


you are literally treading water.
DEAR BRUCE: I am currently
upside-down on a 2006 Malibu car
loan by $6,000. I have a 3-year-old
bankruptcy. My credit score is 660.
I need to replace this car and want
to buy a new car with $2,000 down.
What can I do? - B.ML, via e-mail
DEAR B.M.: You're $6,000 up-
side-down on a 3-year-old automo-
bile and you had a bankruptcy You
have a very poor credit score. Why
in the world do you want to replace
the car with a new one? It occurs to
me that you're just replicating your
mistakes. You ought to keep your
2006 Malibu and continue the pay-
ments until such time that it is paid
for. That may mean- that you're
going to have to pay strict attention
to maintenance. You cannot bor-
row yourself to prosperity. Our fed-
eral government has been trying to
do that for years without success.
Buying a new car with your $2,000
down is just exacerbating your
problem. Keep the car, pay it down,
take care of it and prepare yourself
to drive it for five more years. Your
plan is just going to perpetuate
past problems.
DEAR BRUCE: I have a ques-
tion that no one seems to know the
answer to. At one of my past jobs I
received one savings bond a month
until I quit. Where can I transfer


them now until I retire and not pay
taxes? - E.W, via e-mail
DEAR E.W: I'm not sure where
the problem lies. The fact that you
have left your job doesn't alter the
bonds - they are in your name..
You can leave them right where
they are. As to keeping them until
you retire, that is another matter.
When the bonds reach maturity
and no longer pay interest, it is cer-
tainly to your advantage to cash
them in and pay the taxes. Hanging
onto them once they have matured
makes no sense to me. I am willing
to listen to someone who takes an-
other position.
DEAR BRUCE: My mother is
now sole owner of five two-bed-
room apartments located on two
separate properties. She is 83 and
wants to turn them over to me to
manage. We would like to sell them,
after the market improves. But for
now, I would like your advice as to
how to handle the income, for my-
self. I am 63 and on Social Security
and a pension. Is there any way I
could get the business deductions
from her property taxes, insurance,
repairs, etc., without buying the
property to help keep my income
down? Should-I lease it from her or
buy it? I think I am allowed to earn
up to $10,000 per year before I lose
any of my Social Security until


after I am 66. - G.S., via e-mail
DEAR G.S.: You didn't share
with me how much these apart-
ments profit, if any. You didn't tell
me their value. Your mother could
gift. the apartments to you with no
taxable consequence if she claims
against her lifetime exemption.
This way the property will be yours
and could be sold at your pleasure.
As to the property taxes, etc., they
would be deducted from any net
income that might be generated
here. I'm sure with some good ac-
counting practices you can keep
the income under the $10,000 that
you mentioned. If, however, your
mother wants you to manage it, you
would not have any of the tax ad-
vantages, but she could pay you a
modest salary for your efforts. Ob-
viously, that number can be con-
trolled so there are no taxes on
your Social Security After you turn
66 you can earn as much as you
wish with-no penalty.


Send your questions to:
Smart Money, PO. Box 2095,
Elfers, FL 34680. E-mail to:
bruce@brucewilliams.com. Ques-
tions ofgeneral interest will be
answered in future columns.
Owing to the volume of mail, per-
sonal replies cannot be provided.


SA II time to-be in Washington,"
SDD Murray said. She is aggres-.
C.oninu. 'from- ,,sivelypursuing jobs at fed-
.:-Continued-from Page Dl eral agencies or with a
private-sector group that
during the first five works with the govern-
months of this year. That ment. Her new career will
comes close to the 8.1 mil- most likely result in a pay
lion total for all of last cut, but Murray says Wash-
year. Other people are pur- ington's lower cost of living
suing a more spiritual (she pegs it as 15 to 20 per-
bent. Applications to study -cent cheaper than New
this fall at Wesley Theolog- York) will cushion the loss.
ical Seminary in Washing- "I view this as an opportu-
ton are up 10 percent. nity, and I'm not going to
"Most of it is attributable waste it," she said.
to a change in the economy Finally, consider the
and to people looking for story of a frustrated Wash-
more meaningful work," ington lawyer who is put-
said Beth Ludlum, direc- ting a pretty face on the
tor of recruitment at the recession. With a $100 in-
seminary., vestment in a sample kit,
And the number of peo- this lawyer in her 30s
ple who want to volunteer launched a side career
for charitable organiza- selling Mary Kay cosmet-
tions is soaring. ics. She spoke on condi-
Madye Henson, presi- tion of anonymity because
dent and chief executive of she doesn't want her law
Greater DC Cares, a group firm to know she hopes to
that trains volunteers for leave. "They think I'm
work with more than 200 happy as a bug in a rug,
charitable groups, said and I want to keep them
there is clearly an in- thinking that," she said.
crease in volunteering, in But happy she is not.
part because it helps laid- Still burdened with
off people keep their skills $150,000 in law school
sharp. But she tied it to the debt, she is working for a
presidential election, as firm that has frozen its
well. "I think a lot of it is salaries. "All that, and this
attributable to the, presi- is the payoff," she said. "I
dent raising a flag and get to work and work and
challenging everybody to work for no raise and no
give back," she said. bonus."
Laura Murray took a big She and her husband,
step in the spring to alter who works for the govern-
her'life. She is a lawyer in ment, would like to sell
her early 50s who closed their home, move some-
her 10-year-old crisis man- where where the pace of
agement consulting busi- life is slower and start a
ness in New York, sublet family. But that will have
her apartment and moved to wait; the housing bust
tb throw her energies into drained their home's value
an alternative career in and they cannot afford to
Washington. "It is one of sell. "The economy has
the smarter, cooler things I suddenly made it so we are
have done," she said. stuck," she said.
In September, Murray Eventually, she hopes to
said, business was so good quit the law firm and
she had to consider turn- maybe open a private
ing away clients. Then the practice. "I went to law
financial. crisis hit. She school so I would have
faced. a decision: drasti- tools in my tool-kit," she
cally reshape the business said.
- or grab the chance to try Her tool-kit now in-
something new. cludes myriad shades of
"It really was an oppor- lipstick. Each item sold
tunity to think, 'do you earns her a 50 percent
want to do something dif- commission, and three
ferently?' " she said. "The months into the business,
old way isn't working." she says she earns $400 to
Now she is re-engaging $500 a month. "That is our
her first love: politics and ticket to changing our en-
public policy, a field she tire lives," she said. "I now
had worked in early in her question whether I will
career. even go back to the prac-
"It's such an exciting tice of law after I quit."


INTEREST
Continued from Page D1

less," said Curtis Arledge, who has al-
located about 5 percent of the fixed-
income portfolios he manages at fund
manager BlackRock Inc. to inflation
hedges. "You don't want to buy fire in-
surance when you see smoke coming
out of your house."
Arledge counts himself among
skeptics who argue inflation risks
aren't unusually high. He figures a
tightening in borrowing by corpora-
tions and consumers could be pro-
longed, offsetting steps the
government is taking to potentially
fuel inflation by increasing the
money supply through its own bor-
rowing.
But Arledge nevertheless expects
fear to fuel a rise in the price of in-
flation hedges that tend to hold value
when many other investments and
cash lose it.
He points to a recent spike in the
price of Treasury inflation-protected
securities - government bonds on
which the principal increases with
inflation. This week, the yield gap be-
tween 10-year TIPS and 10-year notes
that don't offer inflation protection
topped 2 percentage points. This sug-
gests investors expect inflation to av-
erage more than 2 percent over the
coming decade compared with the
current zero. It's the first time the
yield gap has hit 2 percentage points
since markets plunged last Septem-
ber and stoked fears of deflation - a
decline in consumer prices. ,
But beyond the rise in TIPS yields,,
there are plenty of indicators of ris-
ing inflation fears:
* A spike in yields for long-term.
bonds, reflecting the greater pre-
mium investors are demanding to
protect against inflation's effects. The
yield on 10-year Treasurys last week
rose to a six-month high of 3.75 per-
cent. That increase helped lift 30-
year mortgage rates above 5 percent
for the first time in nearly three
months.


CYCLE
Continued from Page Dl

Commerce, the EDC, the
SBDC (Small Business De-
velopment Center) and
Workforce Connection have
been holding meetings to
help people find ways to
use the stimulus monies
that might be available in
our community. One thing
learned from these sessions
was that businesses must
find new ways of develop-
ing customers and even


* The increasing price of gold, a
hedge investors turn to when they
rear inflation will erode the value of
cash and other nonphysical assets.
This week an ounce of gold ap-
proached $1,000, a level just below its
all-time high set in March 2008.
* Prices of energy stocks, also seen
as a hedge against inflation, have
been on a tear recently.
* The U.S. dollar has taken a beat-
ing lately, which makes it more ex-
pensive to buy foreign-made goods,
potentially fuel-
ing inflation.
Scwhartz, of the Others
Ave Maria funds, ,, frein n
said he's recently reign c
put as much as 5 faring
percent of his
funds' total $500 than the
million stock in-
vestments into SPDR Gold Shares
(GLD), an exchange-traded fund that
buys gold bullion.
"It's an insurance policy, not an in-
vestment," he said.
He's also boosting stakes in stocks,
such as oil companies with low debt
and strong cash flow that will benefit
from higher oil prices. Those include
Exxon Mobil Corp. and Occidental
Petroleum Corp.
Schwartz is also buying stocks of
companies with "pricing power" -
unique products or strong brands
that give them leverage to raise
prices when inflation increases their
costs. Examples include Procter &
Gamble Co. and 3M Co., he said.
Basic commodities also are gaining
favor. Josephine Jiminez, who spe-
cializes in emerging markets as man-
ager of the Victoria 1522 Find
(VMDAX), is shifting into stocks tied to
precious metals, oil and agricultural
seeds, betting inflation and global pop-
ulation growth will increase prices.
"When you have high inflation, cash
loses value, and those companies with
real assets are the ones that tend to
outperform," Jiminez said.
Deepa Majmudar is co-manager of
JPMorgan Tax Aware Real Return
(TXRAX) - a fund with a unique strat-
egy that seeks to combine the tax ad-


change what they do to
meet the new needs of a
particular business.
And customer base may
not be in your own back
yard. Each presenter made
it clear that the creativity
used in developing new
business was going to de-
termine long-term viability
and eventual success.
An example of this given
at the conference is that
one regional company
started searching for gov-
ernment contracts that
might make use of their
product: pumps. By search-


a

I


E


vantages of buying municipal bonds
with inflation protection from invest-
ments in complex securities linked to
inflation.
The fund lost 7.5 percent last year as
deflation fears hurt returns. But it's up
more than 9 percent this year, in part
because inflation fears are back .
Majmudar expects inflation to re-
main low at 1 percent to 2 percent for
as long as the next year before accel-
erating.
""While the economy is still weak,
we will not see in-
flation," she said.
3iso see "You would need
currencies some stabilization
in the economy be-
better fore inflation can
show its head
e dollar, again."
But she also be-
lieves foreign countries could bounce
back from the recession faster than the
U.S., which could trigger a rise in com-
modity prices. That could create a sit-
uation where the U.S. experiences
inflation before an economic recovery
takes hold.
Others also see foreign currencies
faring better than the dollar. That's fu-
eling a belief that inflation could kick
in more strongly here than in coun-
tries whose governments haven't bor-
rowed so heavily to prop up their
economies.
Jeff Layman, chief investment offi-
cer of BKD Wealth Advisors, a Spring-
field, Mo.-based money manager, said
his firm has shifted money out of U.S.
stocks and into international equities
as part of a broader inflation-hedging
strategy. Many emerging markets are
particularly attractive because their
economies are tied heavily to com-
modities and natural resources.
"With the debt burden we are tak-
ing on in the U.S.," Layman says,
"there are other parts of the world
that are poised to grow more
quickly"


Questions? E-mail
nvestorinsight@ap.org


ing the government data-
base used to help compa-
nies access the stimulus
monies, they were able to
find new customers they
had not served before. By
responding to the request
for proposals and providing
a product line to a group
they had not previously
serviced, the company was
able to provide pumps in a
new market.
The advice makes sense;
it takes hard work to find
that new company and pro-
vide them with a product.
Some of the customer base


that may need your services
has no idea that you exist
and that you can help them.
So, take the first step in
keeping your company
afloat by maintaining your
focus on how to help your
customers and what they
need.


Randy Welkeris the ex-
ecutive director of the Cit-
rus County Economic
Development Council.
Contact him at 795-2000 or
rwelker@citrusedc.com.


SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2oog D3


BUSINESS


CrrRus CouN7y (FL) CHRoNicLE










D4 SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2009

CITRUS COUNTY









CLASSIFIED

1624 Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429


(352) 563-5966


48 yr old Male, 5'9", 85
Ibs., smoker, wants
SFemale companion
between ages 35 & 50,
Interested In sports,
social drinking, enjoys
life. Call 352-287-1902



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
SDead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for your junk car,
truck or van
(352) 634-5389
CASH PAID all
vehicles.Trades welcome
Used PARTS avail
352-628-9118
WANTED
Junk Lawn Mowers
& Power Equip.
Free Pick-up (352)
564-80141601-5053
/Us out zoomcitrus.com
We will remove & haul
away your CHAIN LINK
FENCING for free.
' 352-400-3929



ELECTRIC DROP IN
COOK TOP
Over the stove Micro
Wall Oven, works good.
E longated toilet
(352) 795-6693
Excell. Home for any
unwanted birds, poultry
U-R unable to care for
726-9874
Female Border Collie mix
puppy between 1-2 years
old, free to good home.
Her name is Molly, she is
a black and brown me-
dium sized dog. She is
very friendly and loves to
play. Has never shown
any signs of aggression
towards poeple or ani-
mals. Caught up on shots
and flea medicine, I have
her vet and adoption
papers. She is spayed
and has a homefinder
chip. She is a loving dog
and deserves.a family
that can give her lots of.
love and attention.
Please Contact us at
813-374-5751 or at
352-476-3893.
FREE LAB MIX
House trained, 7nrths
old, male.
352-563-0964
FREEI To good home. 7
years old, siamese fe-
male cat. Tan & black
with sapphire blue
eyes. Very lovable &
friendly.
Call 352-228-782?
KING SIZE BOX SPRING &
FRAME & Pillow top
cover. Call for details
(352) 465-0721
Music Lessons
Knowledgeable Teacher
Begin & Advanced
Frpe Intro Lesson - Citrus
only-for Guitar, Banjo,
Bass & KB (352) 795-7305

-i

Blackberries
Organically Grown.
U-pick, starting May
26th. Sat.& Tues.8A./3P.
$3.50 per pound.
9333 Hwy 48 Floral City.
Sweet Corn @ Bellamy
Grove, located 1.5 ml.
east on Eden Dr. from
Hwy. 41, Inverness. Wa-'
termelons,, cantaloupes,
squash & peppers.


English Bull Dog
Male, brown, white& brin-
die last'seen 491 & Cardi-
nal area'5/15/09 (352)
586-7355 /352-586-7961



Found Puppy
Anna Jo Drive
Call For Information
(352)341-5383
Wallet
found In Inverness
Call to identify
cell (910) 431-1935




Pank Probate
Divorces I/Evictions
352-613-36,74,















H--ow

To Make

Car


Disappear..

Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results

quickly!
quickly!


(352) 563-5966


www.chronicleonline.com


I was wondering if
anyone would like to
donate a car to a
severely handicapped
man who can't walk
I foot. Wife can drive.
Goes to Dr's every 3
weeks. Wife goes
every other week.
Taxi's getting
expensive.
(352) 527-1925
thank you In advance
would be much
appreciated
PRECIOUS PAWS
RESCUE, INC.
352-726-4700
See adaptable pets
on our website
www.oreclouspaws
florida.com
Visit our Pets every
Saturday
at Petsupermarket
Inverness 10- 1pm
& Crystal River Mall
Sat June 20th 10-1 pm
or call us.
Reg'd HOME DAYCARE
Citrus Springs - Summer
Program/Planned
Curriculum.
352-422-7904
/us out @ zoomcltrus.com


FJarb *MaL
Photograph5
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits
Indoor or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed














wwwadoota
rescued oet.com
View available pets on,
our website or call
(352) 795-9550

Adoption Locations
Crystal River Marl"
June 6th 11-3pm
Pet Supermarket
June 13th, 20th &
29th... 11-2pmr

ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT








$$ SAVE $$

* LIFE INSURANCE
*,HEALTH
*-ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com

CAT '
ADOPTIONS










Come see

our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A till 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4
All Cats and Kittens are
altered, tested for Fe-
line Luk and Aids. Up to
date on
vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofsoha.org
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant Ave.
Comer of 44 and Co-
nant.
Look for the big white
building with the bright
paw prints.




I DO HOUSE CLEANING &
CHILD CARE FOR YOU
Reasonable rates
(352) 621-0238
TUTORING - All subjects
& Spanish. Exp. Certified
teacher. Reading
specialist (619) 307-9277
Citrus County



FOUNTAINS MEMORIAL
Homosassa $1280 (well
below mkt value) obo
Michelle (352)628-2555
Two Cemetary Plots
Dunnellon Memorial
Gardens for sale.
Delores (352)789-0107 or
Uz at (352)274-3958


A FREE Report of Your
.Home's Value
www.naturecoast




BOOTH RENTAL $80/wk
Be your own boss
Come & Join a
team(352) 637-2602











































' ACTIVITY
ASSISTANT
,PART TIME

Join an exciting
team
We are looking
for someone
energetic, creative,'
and customer
service-oriented:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd1
Inverness, FL 34453
EOE
Fax:352-637-1130
adharris@
southernmltc.com
BE A CNA
One week Prep Course
Train & test with us.
GETYOURCNA.COM
341-PREP (7737)
BUSY GYNECOLOGIST
� OFFICE Looking for:

Physician Assistant
Exp. In Gynecology,
Min. 5 yrs exp. Proactive
Please send resume to:*
mredrick@earthlink.net

CNA
Medical office exp.
Required. Full time
with benefits, For
busy medical office.
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2512

CNA PREP & TEST
E' Learnirng Ser.lce,
Do, S E.-rIrg ,Clas.es
352-382-EASY; 586-2715
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
CNA TEST PREP
Now Offering Day & Eve.
Classes Free CPR training
w/enrollment. New classes
begin every 3 wks
341-2311
Scholarships Available
CNAs

JOIN OUR QUALITY
TEAM OF AIDES AT
North Campus
Rehab & Nursing
FULL & PART TIME
7-3& 3-11
PRN - ALSO AVAIL.
COMPETITIVE WAGES

LTC EXP. REQUIRED!
DRUG / BCKGRND
CHK REQ.
CALL & APPLY TODAY!
CALL 800-442-1353
FAX 877-571-1952
JOBS@CQCARE.COM
Leesburg
Diamond Ridge Health
& Rehab Center
We are currently
accepting applications
for an RN Unit Manger
for our long term Units.
Also accepting
applications for O.T.
Department for full time
& part time. Please
apply within.
2730 W. Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto.

Experience LPN
FT position,
Cardiac exp. a plus
Competitive salary
and benefits
Fax Resume to:
352-726-5038

Full Time
Lic. Lab Tech &
Phlebotomist.

For busy Physician
Lab. Competitive
Salary & Benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 746-6333

GYN OFFICE IN
CRYSTAL RIVER
LOOKING FOR:


Cert. Medical Ant.
Receptionist - Billing
Dietician -
Proactive, 1 year
exp. In Medical Of-
fices. Knowledge In
medical software
Please send resume:
mredrlck@earthllnk.net
or fax 352-564-8201


Granny Nannies
Seeking Experienced
CNA/HHA & Live ins.
Call 352-560-4229
LPN/CNA

For Physician's Office.
Phlebotomy exp pref'd.
Call 352-563-0835

NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
ULife Care Center of
Citrus County
RN/LPN
PRN positions are
available for all shifts.
Must have a current
nursing license.
Long-term care ex-
perience preferred.
CNA
Full-time positions are
� available,
3p.m. - 11 p.m.
and 11 p.m. - 7 a.m.
Must have current
state certification.
Long-term care ex-
perience preferred.
We offer competitive
pay In a
mission-driven
environment.

Apply In person to
Hannah Mand.
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln.
Lecanto, FL 34461
www.LCCA.com
EOE/M/F/V/D
Job #9394.




Cj


Ready for a More
Rewarding
Therapy Career?
The homecare Industry
Is revolutionizing
Shealthcare In
America, and Gentlva
, Home Health Is
leading that evolution
with exceptional
care, Innovative
solutions and
uncompromising
service. Due to rapid
growth, the LECANTO
team Is now hiring
for the following
positions:
PT & OT
* Work one on one
with clients
* Be able to advance
your career
Commit to us.
We'll commit to you.
Sign on Bonus -
Available
call Mala Wolfe at:
1-877-623-2350 or email
mala.wolfe@
gentiva.com
Or visit
careers.gentiva.com
EOE


RN- Unit
Manager

SOUGHT TO MANAGE
ADMIN, CLINICAL &
SPRVY FUNCTIONS
AT
North Campus
Rehab & Nursing
PRIOR LTC/ SPVR EXP.
REQUIRED
SUBACUTE EXP.
REQUIRED
COMPETITIVE SALARY
GREAT BENEFITS
CALL 800-442-1353
FAX 877-571-1952
JOBS@CQCARE.COM
700 Palmetto St.
N Leesburg

S RN/LPN-
CV SERVICES


This position Is respon-
sible for proylding
self-directed care to
CV, thoracic surgical
patients In the pre-op
setting. Completion
of an accredited
school of professional
nursing and current
FL RN or LPN license.
Must have critical
care experience and
good assessment
skills. BLS-wlthln 30
days, ACLS within 6
months. PreviousdOR
experience and
specialty certification
preferred. Please
apply online at
www.citrusmh.com.
CMHS Is ah equal
opportunity


STAFF
DEVELOPMENT
COORDINATOR/
RISK MANAGER

Come Join an
exciting team.
Qualified candidate
must have knowl-
edge of Federal,
State and OSHA
Regs. Two years exp
In HealthCare field,
teaching, training
and development.,
FL RN license
required. Excellent
benefits. EOE.
Resume to:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Tumer Camp Rd
Inverness, FL 34453
Fax: 352-637-1921
Email: disoangle
southemlitc.com



It's E-Z @ E-Z Learning


Services
Offering CNA Prep &
State Testing
Day/ Evening Classes
CPR Included
10%QQEEI Thru June '09
" Refer a Friend and re-
ceive an additional dis-
count. Enroll on line @
EZLeamlngservices.com
or call 352-382-EASY
(3279) or 586-2715





ADMINISTRATIVE
CLERK

Wanted for Human
Service Agency.
16-20 hrs. per week.
Recent office
experience & Excel
a must. Quick books
a plus. Soon to be a
Smoke Free Facility.
Fax Resume to: (352)
564-0891 or Email to:
hr@keypinevillage.com


CLASSIFIED












Applications for
PUBLIC WORKS
DIRECTOR

IN THE CITY OF
INVERNESS
WILL BE ACCEPTED
FROM JUNE 3, 2009
UNTIL JULY 3, 2009
Highly responsible
and Professional
position requiring






- I
task management
skills. Detailed Job
Description may
be obtained with
required application
Online @
INVERNESS-FLGOV.
Or Inverness
Government Center,
212 W. Main Street
SInverness, Fl. 34450
Between
8:00AM and 5:00 PM
Weekdays.
�BO/teommodf for
Hernqemeg
Employee-Veteran 1




COMMUNICATIONS
OPERATIONS
COORDINATOR

Mature Individual with
Interpersonal
communication skills
and working knowledge
of Microsoft Office
Programs. Must have
demonstrated work
history and ability to
work with Individuals
and groups. Available
via radio/cell 24/7 in
event of emergency.
Pick up application at
spruce Creek Preserve -
SR 200 Dunnellon
Mon-Frl 9a-3p or
contact Steve or Julle
(352)861-0159



Cypress Creek
Juvenile Offender
Correctional Facility
In Lecanto Is looking
for a Ucensed Mental
Health Therapist.
Qualified applicants
should have knowl-
edge of adolescent
psychopathology
and mental health,
substance abuse and
suicide screenings.
Must be able to pro-
vide comprehensive
clinical assessments,
treatment planning
and Individualized
mental health/
substance abuse
therapeutic Interven-
�tlons. Requirements:
Must possess a
license: (LCSW,
LMHC) from the state
of Florida, Master's
degree from an
accredited college
or university In the
field of counseling,
social work, psychol-
ogy; rehabilitation,
special education
or In a related human
services field Is
preferred.
Apply In person at
Cypress Creek
2855 W. Woodland
Ridge Dr. Lecanto
or Fax resume to
352-527-2235.



FACILITATOR
Shared Service
Alliance of Citrus Co.
Is seeking a
Professional Facilita-
tfor that provides,
administrative
support and reports
to the SSA Board. This
Is a Part time annual
contract position,
mln. AA degree req.,
Bachelors preferred
Salary $15,000-$20,000
based on exp./
education. No Bene-
fits. Send Resumes to:
Brad Thorpe
Citrus Co. Courthouse
2nd Floor
110 N. Apopka Ave
Inverness Fl. 34450



Programmer
Analyst
The Citrus County
School District Is
seeking a highly
qualified Individual to
assist in the support
and maintenance of
our financial
Information systems.
IBM System 15
and COBOL
experience desired.
, For more
information go to
www.cltrus.kl 12.fl.us or
call 352-746-3437. EOE



THE WILLISTON
PIONEER SUN
NEWS

PART TIME
OFFICE
COORDINATOR

Applicants must have
excellent customer
service skills, basic.


computer knowledge,
be a skilled typist and
highly organized. This
position requires selling
and typing classified
advertisements, '
maintaining circulation
database and newspa-
per sales, providing
excellent customer
service both internally,
externally, and basic
accounting functions.
This position Is 24-29
hours per week with
occasional additional
hours to cover for
vacations, illness, etc.
Applications can be
picked up at the Wll-
liston Pioneer Sun
News Office at 28
N.W. First Ave., WllIs-
ton, FL., (across from
the Post Office) or
email cover letter and
resume to
tmarksiasmcitizen
- .corn. Qualified
Applicants must
undergo a drug
screen. EOE


RED CROSS
TRAINING
MANAGER
For Crystal River
Office to develop
new business,
manage clients and
customers. Health
and safety back-
ground pref. Email
resume to











Ref. required, appye


GRIusLL COOKhnell
HiriExp. apply in pers
Ref. required, apply
Mon. - Fri. AM

Exp. apply in person
at Papa J's Cafe.
1458 Hwy. 41 N.
Inverness








Advertising Sales
Representative

The. Citrus County
Chronicle is now
accepting
applications for an
Advertising Sales
Representative.
Must have
minimum of 2 years
sales experience with
proven sales results for
new and existing cus-
Stomers. Computer
proficiency a must. Ex-
cellent organizational
and customer service
skills.
Fax cover letter and
resume to HR at:
352-564-2935
or e-mail: l
dkam-
lot@chronicleonline.com
Final applicant must
undergo a drug
screen. EOE





Immediate
S opening for
iales Associates

Village Cadillac
Toyota

offers the best
pay plan and
Work schedule
in the county.
Don't hesitate,
there are
limited positions
available.
Candidates
should be highly
motivated
professional and
have superior
S customer
service skills.
Please contact
Jorge Santiago
or Charlie
De Freese at
352-628-5100
for an appoint.
i- -- i ll
M/C Sales Person

Experienced &
Motivated. Fax Resume
Tues-Sat to
(352)795-4956
NOW HIRING
SALES PERSONAL
TOP $$$ PAID
Exp. preferred but
will train. Benefits,
company vehicle.
Apply in Person
ray's Pest
Control
3447 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Inverness
(352) 746-2990

TELEMARKETER

Regional Builder
seeking telemarketer
for working large
prospect database.
No cold calling. Late
afternoon, evening
and weekend hours
with flexible schedule
Salary and bonuses.
Fax resume to
. 352-746-7707




LANDSCAPING
COMPANY

Seeking exp. hard
scaper (walls, pavers
& water gardens).
Must have clean dr.
Ilc. 352-621-1944

LOCAL TOWER
SERVICE CO.
Looking for
Individual capable of
ascending & servic-
Ing tall broadcasting
towers.
Electronlc.electrlcal
exp.strongly prefer
Travel provided
throughout the
Southeast.
Company Vehicle,


fuel, hotel provided
for travel. Good
Pay,Health
Benefits,Per Diem.
Vacation / BonusesI
Background Check.
NEED CLEAN FL
DRIVER'S LICENSE
Apply in person at:
Hilights Inc.
4177 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River,.Fl
(352) 564-8830
rsobo9
hlllahtslnc.comr

MECHANIC'S
WANTED

Experienced,
Valid Driv. Llc. &
tools a plus.
Apply InPerson
WALLY'S
806 NE US19 Cry Rv.

ROOFER-REPAIR
Exp. only Apply at
AAA Roofing.
352-563-0411


APPOINTMENT
SETTERS

Up For A Challenge?
Serious minded
individuals will earn
great $$$ setting appts
for our very busy local
company. Call Steve
@ 352-628-0254
HELP WANTED
SELLING CATHERINE
ROSE SKIN CARE. To
family & friends. 50%
comm. Have fun mak-
ing $$$I 1-800-314-2945
LAWN &
LANDSCAPE
TECHNICIAN

Experience Preferred
(352)726-9481












MAIL ORDER
BUSINESS
2 to 3 days per wk.
(352) 220-6100
P/T CLEANER

Exp., background check
Call between 2-5pm
352-476-8084 LM

P/T TENNIS

Local Tennis Club,
In need of Part time
counter help. $7 hr.
Flexible hrs. a plus
This Is a smoke free

















































format. No exp. nec.
P/T Nts 0


Restaurant For Salee
profitable franchise in





Candy Franchise fore
facile. Call stoc249-k a115














































HOME BASED
MAGAZINE FOR








call L AREA. Christian352-422-3701
















25x30x9(3:12 pitch)
2-9x7P/T biz. NGaragets $70K Guar-
1 Enteery Door 2 Vents. Retiring
$24,900.941-685-8291

SCoRestaurant Forete Saleob













303rofitable franchise in
Crystal Riverhang. $239K.
Candy Franchise Doors,
sale. All stock and










HUGE territos 1 Entry Doo$30k.r,
NO ROY TALTY FEES














325x30x92(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
2 Ventry Door1, 2 VEntry Doors,





4" Concrete Slab.
213.795. INSTALLED
SMeetsRoof Overhangxceeds



Roof overhaung,
2-I0x10 Rolup Doors,
MEAL Structurete SlabLC
29.995 Installed
Captu Engineered Gerlans
S Meets oNg exceeds
Florida wlnd codes.

Commercial BuSldlngs








Captured Germapn
Propaganda film, 1941, in


original cardboard
German container.
Serious Inquiries only.
(352) 560-3263



HOT TUB/SPA
by Hot Springs, very
nice cond. works exc.
4 people, Bargain $500
(352) 795-9187



A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
4 2 Ton $780.00
4 2-1/2 Ton $814.00
4 3 Ton $882.00
-*Installation kits;
'.Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Free Del. LIc.#CAC
057914 746-4394


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-pplianc Furnitur


A/C WINDOW UNIT
10,000 BTU's w/remote.
Only used a few mths.
$175. 352-613-4249
ABC Briscoe Appl.
Refrig., washers, stoves.
Serv. & Parts
(352) 344-2928
FRIGIDAIRE FREEZER
21cuft. Upright, used 2
years. Excellent cond.
$175. 352-637-3376
GE GLASS TOP STOVE
Works and looks like
new! First $90.00 takes it
away! 352-563-1519
KENMORE Dishwasher,
WHIRLPOOL Glass-top
Electric Stove, both
Black/White $100 for
both (352) 634-2070
KENMORE LARGE UP-
RIGHT FREEZER $80.00
Must Go! Looks and runs
like new! (352)249-7132
NEW ECOQUEST
FRESH AIR PURIFIERS
Does a whole house.
Great for pets,allergies,or
asthma. $400
352-419-6100




SOUTHERN
AUCTION
MARKETING
& APPRAISAL

AUCTION
Mon., June 8th,
S 6:30 PM I
1995 Pontiac Grand
Am, gorgeous
Cane china hutch,
ornate marble-top.
half-moon table w/
mall mirror, Lane
cedar chest, horse
tack, pony surrey,
Ethan Allen drop-.
front desk/hutch,
more...
See weekly pictures
3 and descriptions @
www.southem
auctionmktg.net:
15991 NE Hwy 27Alt.
WlliIston, FL, I
352-528-2950
Col. Joel Kulcsar
AU1437-AB2240 I
13% BP on all sales




CHICAGO Compound
Mitre & Chop Saw $150;
Brand new air tools
Includ.air chisel & 2-ton
chain hoist $100
(352) 560-3263
Craftsman
10" radial arm saw
with table, $125.
(352) 637-4865
MAKITA 10" MITER
SAW,
Excellent condition $75.
Stand tools available
also. Call 527-6425
STIEL CHAINSAW MS250
18 inch $250; -
STIEL CHAINSAW D12
AVP 14" $160
(352) 560-3263



4 FT, 1/4" Well Points
New, made in USA,
$75.
(352) 341-1871
6x18 Aluminum screen
porch. Came off a
Moble Home. $150
Call after 10am
(317) 348-5598
Aluminum Soffit Brown,
4" & 6" wide, 8'& 10' inks,
$5; White Fascia Soffit 4"
wide 10' long $5. Call
George (352) 621-0726
Hickory Rough Sawn,
air dry, 778" by 12',
6" to 12" Wide,
500 sq ft., $500.
(352) 447-5560






COMPUTER AND
BUSINESS EQUIP-
MENT Including:
Upgraded computer
with 15 inch monitor,
internet ready asking
$150.00; HP 3330 Laser,
Fax,Scanner,Copier,
with toner cartridge
cost new $650.00 asking
$150.00; DELL docking
station $25.00; printer
table $5.00, large
speakers $10.00. Call
Bob 352-564-1717
COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
New & Used systems
upgrades. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
www.rdeeii.com
GATEWAY LAPTOP
Computer, Windows XP,
15.4" screen, $250
(352) 560-7465




SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
. inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather bik os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Bik w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" CarlinI handle bars.
Chrome to max, "this
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815


42" TILE & CEMENT
Table w/3 benches.
$400. 23" Cement Table
w/2 benches, $150 or
both for $500.
352-796-9350
PATIO SET
1 table w/4 chairs and
side table. $100
352-601-3654




/ THIS OUTI
1950's Pedestal table
35x35slze Four chrome
burgundy vinylchairs
$150.00.1930's Duncan
Phyfe drop leaf table &
chairs $450.00
352-746 0513


Cabinet 2 side drawers
one top drawer $200
Depression Glass $200.
(352) 465-7139
BASSETT
MAHOGANY
Convex Glass
Breakfront $800. obo
(352) 628-0505
Cannonball Queen Sz.
Head & Foot & Rails
Huge Pine Post $150
Coffee Table & 2 end
tables, glass on orna-
mental Iron. real nice
$100. 352-860-1885
CHINA HUTCH
Solid maple, 52" wide.
$225/obo.
352-628-4207
Couch
w/recliners on each end,
blue. $150.
Futon
Wood & metal $50.
(352) 795-7513
Day Bed,
Cream Color, Rattan
$125
3 Covers, blue, green
pink $25. ea
(352) 344-4852
Dining Room set,
Med. brown wood, inlc. 4
chairs, leaf, glass top,
excel, cond. $150. obo.
Dinette Set
Beige, glass top, 4 chairs.
$125. (352) 489-2953
DRESSER Cherry with
Pediment, bifolding mir-
ror, 65" W x 34" H, 18" D
excel. cond. $100.
352-527-8176
or 352-212-6918
DRESSER White formica
6 drawers, good cond.
$50; China Cabinet
w/light, good quality
$150. (352) 795-4878
Dual Rocker/Recliner
La Z boy Brown Leather
4 yrs. new $325.
2 Swivel Rockers
1 peach, 1 blue, $65.
ea. (352) 382-0022
ENTERTAINMENT CEN-
TER Excellent condition.
48" x 50" x 17". $50 obo
352-249-4495
GERMAN WEIGHT
, DRIVEN
GRANDFATHER
CLOCK $600. OBO
(352) 628-0505
Handmade drop'leaf
Desk, many cubby
holes shelves & draw-
ers, built In chair, $135.
Glass top & side curio
cab. doors on ea. end
white $85., 860-1885
LEATHER LOVESEAT
AND SWIVEL ROCKER
cream color, barely used.
$395.00. Two Palm Paint-
ings, large,matted,framed
orig.$300 each $125.00
'both 352-697-5779
LIV, DIN, KIT FURNITURE
(813)300-7929
Sugarmilll Woods
Love seat $50.
oval coffee table
cherry finish $25.
(352) 527-1069
MAHOGANY DUNCAN
PHYFE Dining Table w/
8 matching sheild back
chairs org $3800
sacriclfic $1500
obo(352) 628-0505
MAPLE DESK
5-drawer w/computer
chair. $65.
352-601-3554
MEDIA/DISPLAY '
78"x63"x21".GIass doors,
drawers,cabinets.$60obo
249-4495
Mirror 40" X 54",
bevelled glass, framed,
$125. Broyhill coffee
table, all wood, $125
(352) 527-8978
MOVING SALE,
SLiving Rm., Dining Rm.
Family Rm. Furniture
(352) 249-9160
PORTABLE AIR
CONDITIONER on
wheels: Maytag 8000
BTU. Uke new, works
great any room. $299.
352-410-0891
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30; Full
$40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
SOFA BED,
cream color,
excellent condition,
slipcover, $700
(352) 344-0172
Sofa, tapestry, soft col-
ors, ball & claw feet,
gently used, $375
(352) 527-8978
TABLES
Maple end table, $15
White patio coffee table,
$10
352-382-0022
Used office desk
$1450BO. Call
352.201.2073
YOUR FURNITURE
DONATIONS
SUPPORTS THE PATH
HOMELESS SHELTER
Call (352) 746-9084



4 x 8 Trailer
side rails, $150.obo
Craftsman, weed eater
& hedge trimmer, like
new $150 obo
352-860-1426 Iv msg.
'02 JOHN DEERE
38" Riding mower. $425.
352-746-5157
CRAFTSMAN 21"
MULCHING
LAWNMOWER
6.75horsepower, $85 -
firm 352-201-2764
CRAFTSMAN 21"
MULCHING
LAWNMOWER
6.75horsepower, $85 firm
352-201-2764
Craftsman 22 Lawn
Mower, mulching,
self-propelled, like new
w/new blade $90
352) 726-5372
Craftsman
Riding Lawn Mower, 18
'AHP, new engine, has
deck, elec. start, needs
transmission work


i$299. (352) 746-7044
HAND GARDEN PLOW
Stainless steel frame.
24" wheel. Uke new.
$40. 42" CONCRETE
WAGON WHEEL. $40
352-563-5386
LAWN TRACTOR '08
42 In Craftsman. Auto
transmission.
w/broadcast spreader.
$1125. 352-489-2421
LAWNMOWER AND A
COMPUTER PRINTER
Weedeater brand gas
mower,used 6 times, $45
- Dell 4 In 1 printer, 4 yrs
old, $40 Call 860-2045
RIDING MOWER
'08 Cub Cadet
46" cut, used little
Paid $1800, will take
$1100 firm (352)
563-0818









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Riding Mower
Murray 42" cut, $500.
Obo.(352) 795-4421




INVERNESS
Huge Yard Sale
Sat. & Sun 8a-2p
Collectibles. &
Commercial lawn equip
Dixie chopper, Stihl, True
Vac Leaf Vac, Little
-Wonder, Honda CT 70,
Pin Ball Machine. Puck
Bowler. Tonkas,
Children's clothes
Ranches Off 581
9100 S Thoroughbred Pt
LECANTO
Fri 6/5- 6/30 9-4pmr
5429 W. Shady Knoll PI
MOVING SALE!
LECANTO
Sat & Sun 8-3
5771 S. Hills Pt.
Whole house furnishings
491 S. right on Noble,
4th left Hills Pt to end.
352-628-0035
MOVING SALE
Table saw china
hutch, book case,
couches &more
(352) 489-6641
PIJE RIDGE
Sat & Sun 8-2p
5826 N Calico Dr

- --

Let us pay YOU to
cut your 5+ acre
bahia field for sodl
Circle T Sod
352 400-2221




BABY HIGH CHAIR
$25. 2 Offices
chairs $25. ea
(352) 746-0513
BIKE HELMET & SEAT
PAD Schwinn Helmet
($20), Bell Seat Pad
($10) 352-746-4160
CAMO ATV TIE DOWNS
brand new, $12 Inver-
ness 864-283-5797


-3NAct Now-


ITS FREE
Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad forFREE on
our all new
CLASSIFIED SITE.
5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 Items totaling less than
$100.00 each.

Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an Ad in the top right
hand corner.


Commercial Paper
shredder, SEM, $35
(352) 726-5372
DEHUMIDIFIER
A-1 condition, 8 quart
capacity, Prevents
mold, $15
BAR CLAMPS -set of 5.
Professional quality.
$10. 352-746-1108
HURRICANE READY
Generac Generator
4,000/6,000 wafts, electric
start, like new, used for
only 4 hrs $400
(352) 795-9399
Large Microwave, extra
features $40 obo;
20" HD TV $50 obo,
(352) 560-7457
(813)486-4463
Let us pay YOU to
cut your 5+ acre
bahia field for sodll
Circle T Sod
352-400-2221
MITER SAW 8-1/4"
Compound Miter Saw,
1-1/2 HP.Cast Iron Base-
& table.$65
352-746-4160


Photography
\"Melissa Fields"
specializing in
weddings, events,
group & individual
portraits, professional
portfolios, live concerts.
call for special price
(352) 220-4124

The Citrus
County
Mosquito Control
Is disposing of Surplus
Property. A 1000
gallon (Con Vault)
double walled above
ground fuel tank.
Very good cond.
fuel pump nt incl. This
tank was purchased in
'03 & has never been
used. A min. bid of
$5,000. This tank is
avail, at our facility for
inspection. Mon..thru
Fri. 7:00 a.m. til 5:30
p.m. If you have any
further questions or
would like additional
information, entail to:
ilacobsoni)
citruscountv.oro
' or call
.Joel Jacobson at
(352)527-7478.
Citrus County
Mosquito Control
District 968 North
Lecanto Hwy..
Lecanto Fl. 34461


SCANJET w/manual &
disk. Never used. $40
OBO 352-746-4160
POWERMATE 4,000w
generator converted
to propane $250
(352) 564-1390
PRINTER Epson Stylus
color printer, Model 880
w/disk & manual, $40
352-746-4160
RAINBOW RIVER
CLUB MEMBERSHIP
Transfer fee only.$200.
(352) 489-3544
SIZZIX RED DIE CUT
MACHINE with con-
verter, for scrapbooking
& crafts,$35
352-201-2764
SIZZIX RED DIE CUT
MACHINE with converter,
for scrapbooking &
crafts,$35 352-201-2764
Tractor
Shubara, small farm size,
4 wh. drive, 3 pt. hitch,
$1,400 Obo.
(352) 489-9569
, (352) 427-2534
Wardrobe closet,
31x74, $20
Water fountain
concrete, works, $50
(352) 746-2932
WEIGHT BENCH +
WEIGHTS weidenpro
weight bench plus
weights 125.00
352-628-1669
WESTIN CHROME
BRUSHGUARD with
mounting brackets No
rust $100 352-465-5828
WET/DRY VACUMN
Ridged 9 gallon. $75
352-746-1447
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT








$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
*ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com




AUTOGO SCOOTER
Good condition
w/charger, $400/obo
352-746-1433
Invacare Power Chair
$600;Invacare Walker
$50 (352) 795-4421
SWING-A-WAY
Wheelchair lift.
$900/obo.
WHEELCHAIR Manuel,
new. $125/obo.
352-637-1153


"THE REVENUER"
Buy & Sell
Vintage coins/currency
352- 302-8159
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676




Nordic Trac,
Heavy Duty Frame
Inversion Table,
Asking $200 oab
(352) 794-3085
Treadmill Exerciser
Like new, $275
(352) 344-8927

- o


8 ft Pool Table
w/ bar & bar light, sticks &
rack, excel. cond., clear
glass & reg. pool balls
$700. (352) 476-8571
1950s Girls Schwinn
Bicycle, has tank,
headlight, & bookrack
$200 Call George
(352) 621-0726
AK-47; Model GP1975,
NIB, black synthetic
collapsible stock,
threaded barrel, bayo
lug, w/ access & ammo
$1,000 (813) 789-0592
Crystal River Area.
AMMO 357mag, 3 -50
Round boxes, FMJ $30
per, 357 mag 2-50 Round
boxes, JHP $40 per
(813) 789-0592
Crystal River area
AMMO 40cal, 300
rounds, $200.
(813) 789-0592
Crystal River area
AMMO 45 cal., 300
rounds, $200; 9mm,
400 rounds $160.
(813) 789-0592
Crystal River Area
BOW FLEX Ultimate
Complete + all manuals
& charts. $295
(352) 586-5746
COLD STEEL XL
VOYAGER KNIFE
Brand new $65, Inver-
ness 864-283-5797
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
HEX DUMBBELLS 1 pair
50lbs each, new $90 In-
verness 864-283-5797
LADIES GOLF CLUBS
Square 2. Woods 1/3/5.
Irons 4-11, chipper,
putter & bag. Petite
graphite shafts. Exc.
$125.'352-746-3143
Plow Swivel Head (Cor)
Anchor made in
Switzerland, 22 Ibs $199;
Fortress Anchor $12; Call
George (352) 62 1-0726


CLASSIFIED




26" girl's. Good
condition, $50.
352-563-5386
POOL TABLE
Perfect Father's Day
Gift. Slate w/leather drop
pockets. Extra stools,
rack, etc. $650 obo.
(352) 270-8121
PRIVATE COLLECTOR
Buying Guns,
Ammunition&
reloading supplies
(352) 586-7516
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238



4X8 ENCLOSED TRAILER
Excellent condition.
New tires & lights. $500
352-746-4703
4'6" x 8' $350. Can see at
1367 E. Amberjack In
Hernando. Call after
10am (317) 348-5598
CAR HAULER
'06, 32 Ft. Dominator XT.
SBy Classip C. Trpl.
axels. $14,200. Like
new.(352) 835-4273






Sct Now '.
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY AT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad



Champaign Diamond,
loose, .40 karat, oblong.
$225 abo; Black Opal
1.02 karat $ 275; Black
Diamond .77 karat
$300 abo (352) 560-3263



OLD AND USED
FISHING, ARCHERY &
BOATING EQUIPMENT.
352-628-0033
WANTED OLD
LION EL TRAINS
Collector Top Prices,
Paid. (352) 795-3970



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
Adorable Chihuahua
Puppy smooth coat, 9
wk. old male $150. & 1
Male Long Coat
CKC/REG., Health Carts..
$275. (352) 726-1843


SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2009 D5


Female, loving, health cert.
13 wks. $150.
(352) 628-9656
CHIHUAHUA'S
CKC Reg. Current shots,
$195.Health cert
(352) .406-7123
Dachshund Pup
Male, red, miniature,
adorable, health cert. 12
wks. old. $195.(352)
628-9656







EXOTIC HIPPIE
BUNNY RABBITS

For Sale
New small breed, Hip-
pies $25.- $35 ea.
All colors, baby
bunnies 2 to 3.5 Ibs.
New Zealand Breeders
$20 each. 5,5-8 lbs
35-o_' 2_7f79


GERMAN SHEPHERD
puppies. 8 wks, 6 Fem.
3 males. All black & tan.
Health cert. $300
(352).795-7897
(561)324-3151
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
MOVIE BUFFS
These puppies are for
youl This breed starred
In the Jack Nicholson
movie, "As God As It
Gets" Brussels Griffon
Beauties. $675
(352) 726-1526
. Pure Bred Collies
2/both 1 year old.
$350. for both, obo.
Must go together.
(352) 795-7513
Schnauzers. 2 Females,
Miniatures 1-7 mo. old.
choc. & silver, 1-4 mo.
old salt & pepper.$350.
each (352) 344-1612
ShIh-Tzu Puppies
2 New Liters Home
raised w/ love. All shots
included. $300+
3902 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827
(305) 872-8099



DOG CAGE
30x23x21, divided has a
tray, elect collar for
small dog$75.00
(352) 344-5334


RHODE ISLAND REDS
Assorted Bantams,
Polish, Ducks & Quail
Starting at $2.
352-795-6381



60 HP Suzuki
4 Stroke, SST Prop,
Runs perfect $2,999
(352) 613-8453
Great White
Trolling Motor
12V 361b thrust
$100
352-563-5386



1981 15' BOSTON
Whaler Sport. '93 48HP '
Johnson, trolling motor,
new trailer, great cond.
$6,500. 352-201-0096
1993 17' Sylvan
Bow rider bimini top
Boat & trailer
85h.p. Yamaha motor
Good cond. $3,500
(352) 344-0457
AIR BOAT
Big 13 Ft. haul,
2 seats. Approx. 375-400
HP. 8 blade warp drive.
2-1 reduction gear box.
Used 100 hrs.+ Trl.
$18,500 invest. Sell
for $10,000 firm.
(352) 302-4535
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
AQUA SPORT. '05
175 Osprey, 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual
batt. w/switch, bimini,
easy load trailer. Low
hours. $9,990
352-860-0277
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
$g9L0352-746-5856
AQUA SPORT
2000; 225 Explorer 24'
Cuddy cabin. 225
Johnson Ocean Pro.
Loadmaster tandem axle
trailer. Exc. cond.
$14,500.352-493-7377;
352-221-5230
AQUA SPORT
'86 25FT.Cuddy Cabin.
, W/twin '06 Optimax
150hp & double
axle trailer. $16,900
(352)257-1355
BASS TRACKER 04
PT 175 Special Edition,
50hp Merc. gal trial.
many Xtra's Info call
(813) 685-2820
(813-293-0391 cell
BOAT DOCK
RENTAL
No sails on deep
canal. $125/mo.
352-795-3276


BOSTON WHALER
14 ' w40 hp Johnson,
Everything works good
$1800 (352) 302-0033
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
.ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras!
$13,500/obo.
(352) 489-9640
GULF TO LAKE MARINE
New,Used & Service
Brokerage. We pay $$
for clean used boats
(352) 527-0555
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
115HP, 4strke Yamaha,
w/ trr. $11,200. will
trade (352) 503-3778
HYDRA - SPORT
'90, 26' c/c, t-top, '99
250 Merc. on bracket
'05 trailer, too many
upgrades to list,
exc condition $16,500
(352) 586-1754
KEY WEST & FORD
05/2020cc/98Expedition
Yam4stk150/5.4L
4x4EBRed Together
$32500 or $26000 Boat
(352)586-6717
OSPREY
1994 - 16ft, CC, bay boat.
88 HP Evinrude, Garmin
GPS/recorder $4500.
352-621-4711
PONTOON '08
Sweetwater 21ft. 25 hours.
90hp Yamaha.
$16,500. Many Extras
352-503-6797
PONTOON
22' Palm Beach 2002
60hp Yamaha $4800
(239) 571-2628
PONTOON '95
Monarch 24ft,
'95 60HP Mercury
w/Performance trailer.
$5500. 352-344-1503
PONTOON BOAT
S08' 20 Ft. To many
options to list. $13,000
Call for info. 628-7926
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras
$12,000 (352) 628-0281
PRO-LINE 221
WALKAROUND 1999
200 HP Mercury w/ 9.9 HP
Johnson kicker,$12k
obo. Call Kurt at Pete's
Pier 352-795-6067
PROLINE SPORT '06
19ft, CC,T-top, 115HP
Merc Optic Max, alum
trailer. Many extra's
$17,000, 352-527-8738
SEA PRO
'00 19 FT. C/C. Loaded.
Elec. Pkg. 115 Fl 4 Strk.
Yam. 100 hrs. Bim: top.
Best offer(352)533-3093
SPORSTER, 15FT
'97 Runs great, looks
great. 135HP inboard
Boat cover, trailer.
$3,500. 352-484-9854


12M


23'L, 6'W, '02 150H Evin.
mtr. w fuel enj. like new, trir.
w/brks
$7750 352-489-3661



















WELLCRAFT
1987, 250 Sportsman,
25', Gas eng., 30" draft,
260 hp I/O, alum.
trailer.$8,000
(352) 344-9651



. 22 FT. Minnie Winnie
1993, Class C, 16 mpg,
dependable, like new
small V-8, sleeps 6
$7,300 (352)563-9964
'02 Cedar Creek 5th
Wheel 29ft, 2-slides,
queen bedboth/shower,
low mileage, loaded,
good cond. $16,800

05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E335B
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
26inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'87 Coachman C-Class
Clean & Good cond.,
Uke new brakes & tires,
350 Motor, 71k miles
$3,900 obo (352)
503-7304
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 36 K Mi.
Dual air. $37,700 Obo:
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
* AUTO. BOAT *
DONATIONS
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity. ,
Maritime Ministries
(352) 795-9621
* Tax Deductible *
CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org'


1st Choice
PEST CONTROL, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE


LAWN GOT

PROBLEMS?
Call 503-6821
Owner/Operators
Lloyd Smith * Bill Biedensltein * Jim Curr
784852 5340 W. GlenBrook St.


Citrus County Home
Inspections
$75. Any house in
June. (352) 978-8403
DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Repairing gas & diesel
engines. No job too big
or small. 352-228-2067




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd
friendly serve. Lowest
rates Free est.
352-860-1452
All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
COLEMAN TREE SERV.
Trim & Removal. Lic.
Ins. FREE EST.Lowest
rates. 352-270-8462
check out zoomcitrus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
Bobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272









OSBORNE'S
Lawn[Treelthrub
Quality Work Free Est.
LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins
R WRIGHT TreeService
Tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Uc
0256879 352-341-6827





Richard Mills Tree Serv
Trim, haul, top,
removal, Free Est
Reasonable Rates
(352) 398-9881
Richard Mills Tree Serv
Trim, haul, top,
removal, Free Est
Reasonable Rates
(352) 398-9881

F - - - - - -


REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch *Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 5864-128



Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
work fully coated. 30 yrs.
Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-795-6533
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996







FERRARO'S
Painting Service
Int/Ext. Free Est. Press
Cleanin 352 465-6631
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./lns.
(352) 726-9998
Mike Anderson
Painting Int/Ext
& Pressure Washing
Ca/ll a Professional,
(352) 464-4418



RENEE'S MOBILE
SWASH-N-WAX. We
come to you. Serving
Citrus Cty for 8 years,
352-446-0209




PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
27 yirs. exAp. Certified
Best prices/guaranteed
352-220-9435
check out zoomcitrus.com











AT YOUR HOME
Mower & Generator
Repair. 352-220-4244
Lic#99990001273
DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Gas / Diesel Engines
No lob too bia or small.
352-228-2067
Mower Repair.


At Home Computer Hernando. Pick up &
Repairs & custom ' delivery, Don Mead
computers. 352- 400-1483
Call (352)228-7823

112 Mli. B t h
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839 ** *
The Tile Man
ON-SITE Bathroom remodel
COMPUTER Specializing In handl-
SERVICE cap. Lic/ns. #2441.
352-341-4150 352-634-1584


certified caiegivers/sitters
20 + yrs exp, Trans. Avail
Lisa 352-422-4765,
Dee Dee 352-422-1267
OUTREACH SENIOR
COMPANION
SERVICES
Affordable, quality
Senior Care.
Companions,
Homemakers, Sitters.
Ucenced, Bonded &
Insured Call toll free.
1-877-803-1608
www.outreachsenlor
companion.com
Llc #231103
PRIVATE DUTY CARE
Specialty: Quality of life
Fl. St. Uc./Bonded, Ref.
Lee (352) 201-4565



-,SEE THROUGH
Window Washing
All Aspects (352)
489-4189; 322-0962
/ us out zoomcitrus.com



Reg'd HOME DAYCARE
Ciirus Springs - Summer
Program/Planned Cur-
riculum. 352-422-7904
/us out @ zoomcltrus.com



FAITH DEAN'S Cleaning
Family Busn. Since '96
Free Est. Lic# 6159
Insured. (352) 341-8439
Cell 476-4603




Affordable CABINETS
& COUNTER TOPS
New & Remodel
352-586-8415'


ROGERS Construction
New Homes & All
Construction (352).
637-4373 CRC1326872

Schnettler
Construction, LLC
Renovations,room
additions,decks, barns,
garages,various home
repairs. (352)637-4629
-cell 352-266-6756
UL. & Ins CBC1253348




SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fila rms,
windows, garage scrns
(CBC1257141) 628-0562




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996



'HOME REPAIRS"
Painting, power wash
Jobs big & small
(Eng./ Spanish)746-3720
/ us at zoomcltrus.com
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable, Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
Lc, 5863 (352) 746-0141
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maintf/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.,
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too smallReli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

r-N-- - - -
NATURE COAST
HOME REPAIR
& MAINT. INC.
S u Offering a Full
Range of Services
www.naturecoast
homerealir.com
LiUc. 2776/Ins.,.
352-634-5499
Viso/MC/DIscover

ALL HOME REPAIR
painting, drywall
Malley's Home Maint
220-9486 (l1c0259169)
/ out zoomcltrus.com


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old OnellI
Tub to Shower Conversions Tooltl
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM


FAST! AFFORDABLE!
RELIABLEI Most repairs
Free Est., Lic#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *
Senior Saviours
Monthly Maintenance
Service.
A must for ONLY
$40.00 a Month!
Call 352-342-9911!
www.SeniorSaviours.co
rm




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable, Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
Lc. 5863 (352) 746-0141
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696

ELECTRIC INC,
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699
SALTMARSH
ELECTRIC
Comm/Resid. & Sign
Lighting. CR13012391
352-344-3810
/ us out zoomcItrus.com



FAST AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEi Most repairs
Free Est.. Lic#0256374
'* (352) 257-9508 *




C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/201-1422



PAVING & SEAL COAT
VIGLIONE LLC-CIc/Ins
www. TAR-MAX.com
Free Est7352726-3093


Installations by I
Brian CBC1253853

352-628-7519






Siding.Soffit& Fascia,Skirting,Roofovers,
Carpos, & Screen Rooms.
www.advancedaluminum info


Aaron's Fence 2417
Will beat any legitimate
price. Lic. & Ins. Free
Est. (352) 795-7373
ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
'352 422-7279
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
. OSBORNE'S
LawnnTree/Shrub
Quality Fence Work Free
Est. LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins



AAA ROOFING
Free est. 30 yrs exp.
352-563-0411
John Gordon Roofing
For a hole in your roof
or a whole new roof.
Free est. 352-795-7003



BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Estimates
Lic#2579/lns, 257-0078
Decorative concrete,
Landscape curbing
River rock resealing
344-4209 (Lic.6960)
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack repairstaining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
SDecorative Concrete
- 352-464-3967 ?
Quality Concrete Serv.
Layout to Lentil
ALL TYPES, Tractor
352-726-2383, Lic#2567
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services
40 Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768


W. F. GILLESPIE CONST.
Uc. #CRC1327902
(352) 344-0009
www.wfgillesple.com




A Cutting Edge
Tile Job
Showers. Firs etc
(352) 422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone Drive-
ways & Tractor work
341-2019 or 257-1562
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing;
Hauling, Site Prep,
Driveways. Lic. & Ins.
(352) 795-5755
*TOP SOIL SPECIALi*
3 Yd -$60/ 5 Yd $85
10Yd $175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436




All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/us out zoomciltrus.com
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,HaulingSite
Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins795-5755
Ck out zoomcltrus.com
Pasture mowing, lots
acreage, commercial.
$18. per acre & up.
(352) 978-8403




D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
Bobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272


Cope's Pool & Pavers
* Pool Refinishing
* Interlocking Brick Paver
* Patio & Driveways

ORDER YOUR
POOL TODAY
& BG SWIMMING
fBY SUMMER
"FREE QUOTES"
,Lic. & Insured
- CPC1456565
7.187.- 352400.3188


-mm - -
#1 Absolute
I Lowest Price
| Guaranteed
S Barker's Lawn
I Service Monthly or I
I Per-cut rate ,
(352)232-8166

#1 AGAIN Pro Tech
Lawn Service. Family
owned & operated.
Serving central Citrus
Cty since 1999. Call
for free estimate
302-7800 - Lic/Ins..
Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Specials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
check out zoomcitrus.com
DUN-RITE LAWN SERV
Lic & Ins Clean up,,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681
check zoomcltrus.com
HALLOCK & Son
Lawncare/Landscaping
Covering all your lawn care
needs; Detailed work.
746-6410 Lic/Ins.
HARRY EVERSON'S
LAWN & MAINTENANCE
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
(352) 302-2585
/ us at zoomcltrus.com
HEDGE TRIMMING,
HAULING(ANY KIND),
LAWN MOWING,
MULCH. FREE ESTI-
MATES. 352-344-9273
OR 352-201-9371
INVERNESS AREA
Mow,trim, beds,
Fast Reponse since
1991 352- 422-5978
'/ zoomcitrus.com
Lawn Care 'N' More
Mow, clean up
brushes, beds
Friendly Service since
1991
Residential/Commrl
(352) 726-9570
out zoomcltrus.com
MOWING & TRIMMING
Residential/ East citrus
county area.
352-302-151 1;341-5182
OSBORNE'S
Quality Work - Free
Est. LOWEST RATES
352-400-6016 Lic/Ins
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, ULic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166



EVERCLEAR POOL
SERV. & Malnt.
Concrete Pools Only
(352)344-5122
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
� 352-464-3967 �

R Seruices


r - MOILTE RV
I SERVICE
SWE COME TO YOU
I Motor Homes
1 5th Whis/Rv's
S Master Tech
| 352-586-5870 |
S Storage Available


WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard





IN." W.111


Photography
"Melissa Fields"
specializing in
weddings, events,
group & individual
portraits, professional
portfolios, live concerts.
call for special price
(352) 220-4124


Earb . Maez
Photographs
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits. Indoor
or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed





ELITE PAVING &
SEAL COATING
All types - Res/Comm
352-302-3030 LIc/Ins
Vus out zoomcltrus.com





Circle T Sod Farms.

Tired of your dead
lawn?
Replace It with
Bahia. Delivery
Avail (352)400-2221

LAWN RESTORATION
All types of Grasses
Low main Lawns Avail.
J & J Sod 352-302-6049











D6 SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2009


Very good cond. Needs
tires. $4,000. Call
anytime. (352) 446-6329
COACHMAN
'07 Freelander, 3150,
12K. mi. Mint cond.
$55,000 (352) 637-3673
or (561) 715-3001
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane New
deal. 30Q, class A motor
home, 31% ft., 22k mi.
.V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed,
etc. Saturn tow Incl.
$35,000. (352) 397-5007
GULF STREAM
BT Cruiser 03, 22' fully
loaded, ready to travel
$27,500....
(352) 341-1297
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool,
clubhouse etc. Can be
moved $26,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
HOLIDAY
'89 Rambler, 36',
Rebuilt motor, 2K.mi.
Exc. cond. $19,500.
(352) 257-5947
Holiday Rambler
'03, By Monico, 300
Cummins, 2 slides,'
under warranty
mint cond. $69,900.
(352) 302-7073
Holiday Rambler
Admiral Motor Home 36'
2 slides, 340hp, gas eng.
all options transf ext.,
warr. $51,900
352 795-3970
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$52,995. 352-464-0371
Keystone 07
Big Sky 5th Wheel Prem.
Pkg 340RLQ every option.
Center Island Kit. incis
sep.W/D, added 2nd a/c in
bedroom
Price to Sale $52K firm
352-794-3068
PACE ARROW
04, 38' 3 SLIDES
21k mi fully loaded
3 tv's $92,500 obo
352-302-0743



$500! Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrlg.
Like new. $8,900.
352-489-3661
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO
07 Jay Flight
28' used twice, smells &
looks new, green clean,
sips 6 $16,800 (352)
503-7431
MEADOWBROOK
5th Wheel, 2000 Excel-
lent. Photos at
http://picasaweb.google.c
omkGeadwbrookGlenn-
, " $13,995.00
(352)302-6055 or
(727)692-9045
Montana
'03, 5th wheel, 3 slides
like new,$30,000.
Truck avail also for tow
(352) 422-5731 ,
SKYLINE 04
32' sleeps 8, used
once $11,500
(352) 586-9614




$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
DIAMOND PLATED
TOOLBOX Truck toolbox
for full size pickup bed.
$75.00 527-1788 or cell
586-7665
Jason Truck Cap,
white, 6ft bed,
2 mos. old, pd, $1,150
Sell $600
(352) 642-4868
SET OF FALKEN-ZIEX-
TIRES + 20" custom
wheels 5 on5.5 size
Tire sz 295-50-R20
$1200 obo
(352) 795-0412
Two DIAMOND PLATE
Aluminum Truck bed
tool boxes. $150 & 100
Call George
(352) 621-0726




$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ TOR DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
Buying Junk Cars
Running or Not
1 Cash Paid, $150 & Up
(352) 771-6191
CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CASH BUYER
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans
Fo? used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333


1997 MAZDA MIATA
Convertable, Fun &
dependable, Porche.
Red, new top, 36mpg,
5-speed, A/C, new tires.
Mint $5,700 352)
563-9964
'06 TOYOTA
Corolla LE Sport, 48k ml.
Silver, pwr roof, win-
dows, dr locks. Cruise,
auto, 6 disc CD. 40mpg.
Senior owned. New tires.
Garage kept $11,900
352-860-1106:201-4499
ACURA
2004, TSX Certified,
Low MILES. Like New
Only $289 mo.
' 1-800-733-9138
BMW
'03, 745 LI, NAV, black,
sun roof. all options $29K
Mint
(352) 746-2696


Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
BUICK '04
CUSTOM CENTURY
LOADEDI 35k miles, 1
owner retiree, garaged
$7700. 352-628-0698
CADILLAC
'02 SLS,
Leather, loaded,
$7,995. Wooten's Con-
sign your car or truck.
(352) 637-7117
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715
CHEVY '
'96 Camaro, Cony. rare
auto, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
black, dependable.
$5200 352- 563-0615
CHRYSLER
'06 Sebring Convertable
$12,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
conslgnmentusa.org
CORVETTE
02, Z06,
Black, low mi., over
30 mpg hwy. $24,400.
(352) 613-5355
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 mi-
les on this rare silver on
silver on silver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,,
heads up display, mag-
. neatic F55 suspension.' ,
"navigation system. all
options available are on
this gorgeous vette,
Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
Included, Your's
for only, $48,000.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, auto,
SHOW CARI
$11,500 or will trade for
truck. 352-563-6428
FORD
'00 Focus, 4 dr. AC,
Auto. New tires & brakes
runs great,30 mpg.
$3,950.(352) 302-9217
FORD
2006, Taurus Lather,
Sunroof '&More:'
Take Over Pmts $189
mo 1-800-733-9138'
HONDA
'08 Civic, $17,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299 "
HONDA
2008, Civic EX, 2 Dr
Coupe, Sacrifice
Great Mileage
1-800-733-9138
Hyundai
2008, Tiburon Only 600
Miles Must Sell! Take
over pmts $249 mo
1-800-733-9138
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well maintained.
$2650. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
LINCOLN
'96, Towncar, garage
kept, 88K miles, loaded
$3,650 obo
(352) 344-5555 ext. 101
MAZDA
'08 MZ 3 Sedan,
$12,995.
OcalaVolvo. r
(352) 629-7299
MAZDA MIATA
MX5,2000 SILVER/TAN,5
SPEED, $6500
SOBO,727-365-5951
MERCEDES
'08 E-350, $38,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MGB
Convertible 1977, 57k mi.
Blue, many xtras
Excellent Condition
$10,500 (352)628-0'81
Mini Cooper
2006, S Type Super-
charged - 6 speed
Big funI Only $289 mo,
wac 1-800-733-9138
MITSUBISHI
'03, Diamante LS, excel.
cond. Always serviced.
Fully equip, Priced be-
low Kelly BB. $7,900.
352-382-5702
Mitsubishi
2008, Eclipse Converti-
ble - Automatic
Only $289 per mo, wac
1-800-733-9138
NISSAN
'07 Versa,
$11,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
PQNTIAC '96
BONNEVILLE
Looks Good! Runs
Good Asking $1275.
352-637-5394
SUZUKI
'07 Forenza. 30K mi,
w/100k warr. LOADED
w/touch scrn nay.
$12,800. 352-613-6613
TOYOTA
'06 Corolla,
$11,995 Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 mi.
warranty. $19,000
(352) 697-3428
TOYOTA
'07 Camry,..
$16,995 Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'07 Camry, silver, 4dr,
loaded, leathe int.,
$15.000 Obo.
(352) 637-1276
TOYOTA
'07 FJ Cruiser.
$23,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
Toyota
2002 Camry XLE Lthr.
Moonroof, Loaded, 1
Own. Low ml., $199 mo.
wacl-800-733-9138


Toyota
2003 Camry LE
Beauty, Low Miles,
Only $8995 or $169 mo,
wac 1-800-733-9138
TOYOTA
'99 Corolla, not running,
good for parts. $500.
Obo.(352) 628-2483
(352) 586-3441
TOYOTA SUPRA '89
All original, red, 79k ml.,
6 cylinder, all power,
targa roof. Original
owner. Garaged, $6,999
(352) 726-3427
VOLKSWAGON
'08 Beetle, $15,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLKSWAGON
'08 Jetta, $13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299


'Ou 6-4U,
$15,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-60, $16,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-80,
$16,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC-90,
$20,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 S-40
$16,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 V-70
$21,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S-80
$19,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VW
2005, Beette Conv
Ltd - turbol Pwder Blue
SDon't MIssI $Pmt $299
mo. 1-800-733-9138




1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's
Dream. $3500/obao
352-228-0597
$5001 Police
Impounds for salel
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale,
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 i7374
-, 53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, auto 'May
trade In part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door sedan. 6
cyl auto. $9,500. Will con-
sider trade for travel trailer
of equal value.(352)
628-4053
AMC Gremlin
$600 (352) 637-1074
AUTO/SWAP/CAR
CORRAL SHOW
Sumter Co.
Fairgrounds
Sumter
Swap Meets
June 7th 2009
1-800-438-8559
BUICK 67
RIVIERA, 430 wildcat
motor, 86k mi. gmfm,
a/c, title whl. elect.Teats,
very good cond. $8000
(352) 527-3961
CHEVY
'69 Classic C10 SHT BD
350/350 AC, PS,
$15K or trade
(352) 746-9212
EL CAMINO '81
305 Auto, All new
interior, & paint. Crager
mags & tires. 4" raised
hood. $3,250.
(352)341-3613.
GM El Camino
'84, 1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of
o... ra,.e .9K ,oi irde'
(352) 621-0666
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, r,., p.s r.,i
63K mi., $8.90J obo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
THUNDERBIRD'
'73, New painttires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$12,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122



1982 GMC,
64 PASS. SCHOOL BUS,
366 big blk, 5 spd 16 mi
loading ramp, seats
removed, pointed
white, new front tires
$3000. (352) 274-0339
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CHEVROLET S-10
1998 Ext. cab, topper,
newer tires, 4.3 auto.,
runs great, $2,800 obo
Call Jack at
(386) 867-6999
or (352) 621-0311
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518,
consignmentusa.org
DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awe-
some Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded
every special feature. Sr.
own, gar kept., 27K mi,
$40K
invested Sale $2,1,750
See online ad photos
www.autotrader.com/atca
rid/at-f3fd39f
John (352) 726-1076
DODGE
2006, Dakota, Quad
Cab, Low Miles, Auto
Perfect Work Truck
'$13,988 1-800-733-9138
DODGE RAM .'00
Std cab, rare 5spd, hemi,
V8, a/c, 25mpg, new 22"
rims & tires. Dependable
$3700. 352-563-0615
FORD.
'02 F-150 XLT, Ext. cab,
4dr, auto, loaded black &
silver, extra clean, sharp.
$7,995 Wooten's
(352) 637-7117
FORD 04
Ranger, X-cab. Exc. cond
38k mi. SLASHED THE
PRICE $97K to $8,500
(352)746-3919
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serv. van.41K Mi.5.4L.


Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serve. body/dble lock drs.
$20,000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
'06 F 250 Lariat, Diesel,
Super tow pkg. 4 wheel
drive, lots o.bfirome.
$17,000(352) 628-6985
FORD
2003, Fi50 XLT, Crew
cab 4x4, 50k Mi. $12,990
or $219 mo, wac
Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
FORD
2004, Ranger X-Cab
Automatic w/Cap
Only $199 mo, wac
1-800-733-9138
FORD
2006, F150, Low Miles -
Perfect for Work$13,988
or $229 mo, wac
1-800-733-9138


2007, RIdgeline RTL
Navl, Moonroof, Low
Mis Immaculate - Must
Selll 1-800-733-9138
TOYOTA
2006, Tundra, 32k miles,
Bedllner & More $13,990
or $249 mo, wac
Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813




CADILLAC
'05 Escalade, low mi. all
power, sun roof,
exc. cond. $28,000
(347) 266-9328
CHEVY
'04 Trailblazer, Ext. cab,
loaded, gray leather int.
47k. mi. Orig. owner,
$12,500.(352) 527-0456
Chevy
2004 Tahoe LT, Lthr,
Moonroof, BOSE, 3 rows
Family $14,988 or $279
mo. 1-800-733-9138
CHEVY
BLAZER '99 LS 4dr.
126k mi. loaded, great
cond. sunroof, $4k obo
352-422-0065
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl
drive, class 3 hitch, Orig
owner. Great shape &
price. $8,750.
352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
GMC ENVOY
Red,'03, 60k ml.,
On-Star, tow package
5-passenger, $10,500
obo (352) 527-3445
HONDA '99
CR-V AWD, Low miles,
LQADED Mint cond.
Garaged. $7500/obo
352-746-4160
HYUNDAI
'07 Santa Fe, $19,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
HYUNDAI
2004, Santa Fe Low MI,
One Owner Nice Equip
$8990 Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
HYUNDAI
2008, Entourage, Pwr
Doors, Leather, DVD
& Morel Call for details
Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
KIA SPORTAGE '01
Runs & looks great. Elec.
wind., locks, near new
tires, shocks, breaks,
battery & timing belt
$2,750 (352) 586-5746
LEXUS
'07 RX 350, Black, tan
leather int. Navigation, back
up cam, blue tooth, very
clean, 75K.mi.
$25,000.(352) 527-8372
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG. Silver
W/black int. Loaded,
57K.Mi. Like new .Ask
$18.5K. (352)489-7674
TOYOTA
2004, RAV4, SR Cond,
Low MI, I Own. $11,990
or $219 mo,'wac.
Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CHEVY
'94.Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,00 aObo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872
DODGE
2005, Grand Caravan
7 Passenger - Low Miles
$8988 or $179 mo, wac
1-800-733-9138
FORD E250 V-8
2002, Work Van, Inside
tool boxes,.good cond.
$3,800 (352) 564-4598
MAZDA
'08 Mazda 5 Van,
$14,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT









$$ SAVE $$
*LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

352-422-6956
..ni*"" x o n. A i O ItX �


OUU1 ruonce
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains &
tows heavy loads.
$3200/or trade.
352- 563-0615
Crystal River



2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900mi. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. HI pert.
Over $43,000 In receipts.
17k mi. $10,900
352-563-0615
Crystal River
APOLLO 2007 ORION
ADR PRO 125 CC
MOTOCROSS PIT BIKE,
KICK START,4 SPEED,
GREAT CONDITION,
LECANTO,$500.00
(561)236-1051
CHOPPER 3/4 SCALE
08 Like new, 200cc Elec
start, disc brks, alum
whis, & more must see
$1200.


CLA.SSIFIEDS




Impounds for salel
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
ELECTRIC SCOOTER
Street legal. 20mph. QNo-
license read. $250.
352-419-4553 or
228-3285
HARLEY
'96 Sporster 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes,chro. Ex. clean
$4,850.(352) 637-5143
Harley Davidson
'06. Road King Classic
low ml., blk cherry, Inci,
helmets/trvl luggage
$14,000 (352) 382-0907
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80",
completely serviced,
good shape. Ex.
access. $5,395. abo
352-746-7655; 726-4109
HARLEY
DAVIDSON
96 Heritage Soft tail, red
many extras $9600 call
evenings (352) 746-3613
HARLEY DAVIDSON
Electraglide Ultra Classic
2006 HD Ultra Classic
like new, Fully loaded, in-
cludes Drivers Backrest,
V&H Mufflers, 2 Helmets
with Head sets,
AM/FM/CB/intercom, HD
cover, Panacia Lighting,
New BatteryLESS than
3500 miles. 18,500 Seri-
ous Inquires only please
344-2491.
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 Ml.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
HONDA02
11 ,00c Sorbara, 10K
ml custom exhaust &
seat; lots of Xtras $4500
obo 352-613-5641
HONDA 2007 Shadow
600 Deluxe Powder blue,
3,600 miles, passenger
backrest and slipstream
windshield. $4,500 OBO.
352-795-9829
HONDA
Shadow Arrow 06,
garage kept, not in rain,
floorboard $6200 obo
(347)223-7269 aft 3:30
KAWASAKI
'00, ZRX 1100
CC,15K. Mi. Very
fast, many extra.s.
$4k obo.
(352)621-3764
SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor.wy/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Bik w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, "IbL'
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart $30k -
invested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
TITAN
, Or)Frorn.,. TRM.
SFrrari red 6K'm, Like
- ne.. $11, Q .-
(352) 489-7674
YAMAHA
'05 YZ125 DIRT BIKE
Race ready. Many ex-
tras. Make offer 352-
.586-1"683: 586-9349



366-0607 SUCRN
6/10 meeting
Academy of
Environmental Science
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Board of Directors
for the Academy of Envi-
ronmental Science will
hold a regular monthly
meeting at 2:30 pm on
Wednesday, June 10,
2009 at the Academy of
Environmental Science, a
Charter School sponsored
by the Citrus County
School District, located at
12695 ".V. I F.:-.i Island
Trail, C.',.r.:al ~ -. Florida.
The purpose of the meet-
ing Is to discuss and act
upon any business that
needs to come before
the Board of Directors. A
: . r, o ine Agenda Is
0a - 0ar.3 :.r public re-
.-., o rr.e Academy of-
fice.,
If any. person decides to
appeal adecislon made
by the Board of Directors
with respect to any mat-
ter considered at this
meeting, that person may
need to Insure that a ver-
batim record of the pro-
ceedings Is made, which
record should Include tes-
timony and evidence
upon which that person's
appeal Is based.
Steve Farnsworth
Chair, Board of Directors
Academy of
Environmental Science,
Inc.,
Published one (1) time In
Citrus County Chronicle,.
June 7,2009.
362-0607 SUCRN
Unit A08
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice Is hereby given
that the undersigned In-
tends to sell the personal
property .described below
to enforce a lien Imposed
on sald property under
the Florida .Self Storage
Facility Act (Section
83.801-83.809).
The undesigned will sell
at Public Sale by com-
petitive bidding on the
16th day of June, 2009 at
11:00 a.m.. being on the
premises where said
property has been stored
and which Is located at


Acorn Self Storage, 3710
E. Gulf To Lake Hwy,
Inverness, County of
Citrus; State of Florida, the
following:
Dominique Rigos, Unit A08
Household Goods
Purchases must be paid
for at Jhe time of pur-
'chase, In cash only. All
purchased items sold as is
where Is and must be re-
moved at the time of
sale. Sale subject to can-
cellation In the event of
settlement between
owner and obligated
party.
Dated this day; 5/27/09
Call Acorn Self Storage
for details 352-341-1622
Published two (2) times In
Citrus County Chronicle,
May 31 &June 7,2009.


361-0621 SUCRN
2008-CP-747 Estate Llese-Lotte Hildebrandt
Notice of Action


PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
UCN: 092008CP000747
CASE NUMBER: 2008-CP-747
DIVISION: Probate

IN RE: THE ESTATE OF UESE-LOTTE HILDEBRANDT
(A/K/A LIESE-LOTTE HILDEBRAND),
Deceased

Kemp & Associates, Inc,, as Owner and Holder of a
Partial Assignment of Interest of MARTA BOPZIN, et al.,
Petitioner,
v,
HENRY L. STAUFFER, as Personal Representative of the
Estate ofLI UESE-LOTTE HILDEBRANDT (A/K/A LIESE-LOTTE
HILDEBRAND), et al.,
Respondents.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ANY UNKNOWN OR UNASCERTAINED BENEFICIARIES,
CLAIMANTS OR HEIRS OF LIESE-LOTTE HILDEBRANDT
(a/k/a LIESE LOTTE HILDEBRAND) AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST
THEM.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition for Determination of
Heirs & Their Respective Shares has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, If any, to It on Sherri M. Stinson, Petition-
ers' attorney, whose address Is 1239 S. Myrtle Avenue,
Clearwater, Florida 33756, on or before June 30, 2009,
and file the original with the clerk of this court either
before service on Petitioners' attorney or Immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In the complaint or peti-
tion,
Dated May 27, 2009.
BETTY STRIFLER
As Clerk of the Court
(Court Seal)
By /s/ P. Hendrickson
As Deputy Clerk

Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 31, June 7, 14 and 21,2009.

977-0611 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop. Citrus County Fleet Management
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
be selling surplus property & equipment via the Internet.
at govdeals.com from May 28, 2009 - June 11, 2009.
Published seven (7) days consecutively In the Citrus
County Chronicle May 28 thru June 11, 2009,

364-0607 SUCRN
Big. To Vote Notice- Chesley & Potter
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice Is hereby given:
Richard E. Chesley
Last Known Address of
5145 West Starburst Lane
.Homosassa, Florida 34446
Ruth Potter
Last Known Address of
7254 West Hadenotter Lane
Homosassa, Florida 34446
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote Is In
question, You are required to contact the Supervisor of
Elections, in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond
will result In a determination of Ineligibility by the Super-
visor and your name will be removed from the state-
wide voter registration system. If further assistance Is
needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections at the
below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
-Susan Gill
Citrus County.Supervisor of Elections
120 North Apopka Avenue
Inverness, Florida, 34450,

Published one (1) time in the-Citrus County Chronicle
June 7.2009.


365-0607 SUCRN
6/11 meeting Citrus County Aviation Advisory
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY
AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will meet at 3:00 p.m. on
June 11, 2009 In Room 166 of the Lecanto Government
Center. 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further Information regarding this
meeting may contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call
(352) 527-5446.
JOHN THRUMSTON, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC ~.-,, rpr'.:.r. who decides to ap
r. , i a-'., s e:, i . :r ir , *,--: e= -r..r..: body w ith respect t
c -.Ior,' matter considered at -this meeting will need a.
- :c.3 of the proceedings and for such purpose ma\
need to provide that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceeding Is made, which record .-.:i j,a- i'.r.ir.:.r, .rd-,j
evidence upon which the appeal Is to. be based.
(Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes). ,,,.-.. ....

Any er ' i.: lrIr..: reasonable 3.:.:. ,:T,-.oar.: . 1
this T-..iir.ng ce: u'e of a disablllt .:.,' i r i:.:. impo. ,
ment. should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call
(352) 527-5446, at least two days before the meeting.
If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tel-
ephone (352) 527-53.12.
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 7, 2009.


354-0607 SUCRN.
2007-DP-722 Term. of Parental Rights
(To: Jonathan Harris) Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2007-DP-722
IN THE INTEREST OF:
A.P. DOB: 02/23/96
K.H. DOB: 02/19/98
A.W. DOB: 03/30/04
Minor Chlld(ren)
NOTICE OF ACTION. SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF
ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIP

THE STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: Jonathan Harris
L/K/A Unknown
You are hereby notified that a petition under oath
has been filed In the above-ityled court for the termi-
nation of your parental rights as to K.H. a male child
born on 19th day of February, 1998 In Citrus County,
Florida, and for placement of the child with the Florida
Department of Children and Families for subsequent
adoption, and you are hereby commanded to be and
appear before General Magistrate Keith Schenck of
the Circuit Court or any Judge assigned to hear the
above cause, at the Advisory Hearing on June 15, 2009
at 1:30 PM. at the ClIrus County Courthouse, 110 N.
Apopka Avenue, 3rd floor, Inverness, FL 34450.
YOU MUST PERSONALLY APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME
SPECIFIED.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING OR THE ADJUDICATORY TRIAL FOR THE TERMI-
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO
THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THESE -
CHILDREN. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND
TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO
THE CHILDREN NAMED IN THE PETITION.
YOU ARE ENTITLED TO HAVE AN ATTORNEY PRESENT TO
REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU WANT AN ATTOR-
NEY, BUT ARE UNABLE TO AFFORD ONE, YOU MUST
NOTIFY. THE COURT, AND THE COURT WILL DETERMINE
WHETHER YOU QUALIFY FOR AN ATTORNEY TO BE
APPOINTED TO REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABIUTIES ACT, if you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation In order.to
participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Plepse contact John Sullivan at the Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL
34450 or phone (352) 341-6700 within two working days
of your receipt of Notice of Advisory Hearing for
Termination of Parental Rights, If you are hearing
Impaired or voice Impaired, call 1-800-955-8771.
THIS NOTICE shall be published once a week for four
consecutive weeks In the Citrus County Chronicle's
Classified Section.


Dated this 13th day of May. 2009, at Inverness. Citrus
County,'Florida.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of Courts
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Kelly Carpenter
Deputy Clerk

Published four (4) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 17, 24, 31 and June 7, 2009.


367-0607 SUCRN
6/17 Special Master Hearing
PUBUC NOTICE
The public is hereby notified that the Citrus County
Code Enforcement will conduct its monthly Special
Master Hearing on Wednesday, June 17, 2009 @ 9.00
A.M. In the Lecanto Government Building,
Mufti-purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any
and all persons Interested are Invited to attend. The
following cases) will. be heard by the Code Enforce-
ment Special Master; however cases may abate prior


Lega-s


Trumpold, Thomas C.
7050 W. Green Acres St. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to keep, dump, store, place or de-
posit abandoned, unlicensed,. Inoperable, junked, disa-
bled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles'
on any property, street or highway. Citrus County Code
of Ordinances, Section 20-41.

Vijay Real Estate Limited Partnership
755 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL
Construction of an accessory structure (shed) without a
valid Development Order LDC 2020
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the Code Enforcement Special Master with
respect to any matter considered at this public hear-
ing, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record
of the proceedings Is made which record shall Include
the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal Is
to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Citrus County Court House. 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450. phone: (352) 341-6560, 15
least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD-telephone (352)
341-6580.
MICHELEIJEBERMAN, SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE ENFORCEMENT
Published'one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 7, 2009.


I Legals


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




to hearing date, If you have questions, contact Code
Enforcement at (352) 527-5350.
Adams, Michael W. & Pamela K.
7073 S. Finale Pt. Homosassa, FL
Foiled driveway apron Inspection LDC 4221(J)
Brock, Richard L. & Gla
8220 N. Hale Rd. Citrus Springs, FL
It shall be a violation to keep, dump, store, place or de-
posit abandoned, unlicensed, Inoperable, junked, disa-
bled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused
vehicles/vessels on any property, street or highway, Cit-
rus Code Code of Ordinances, Section 20-41. To Wit:
'Boat trailer with no tire, blue trailer with no plate, dere-
lict Buick station wagon
Cannon, Marilyn S.
2061 S. Hunt Pt. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of abandoned property, junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. Section 20-31(b). To Wit: Abandoned
construction materials/fallure to furnish on-slte litter re-
ceptacles, etc. Tires, wood, metals, torp, bricks, plastics
Crawford, William
5141 S. Polnte Dr. Inverness, FL
Failure to build a single family dwelling to approved site
plan LDC 4245
Curry, Nancy J.
5360 W. Blade Ln. Dunnellon, FL
Placement of a mobile home w/out a valid Develop-
ment Order In violation of LDC 2020
Downing, Gregory Scott
1110 N. Crescent Dr. Crystal River, FL
Installation of carport without a Development Order
LDC 2020

Fallls. Anthony
4345 E. Archer Ln. Inverness, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of abandoned property, junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: Lawnmowers,
automotive parts, scrap metal & other misc. junk/debris
Falls, Anthony
4345 E. Archer Ln. Inverness, FL
It shall be a violation to keep, dump, store, place or de-
posit, abandoned, unlicensed, Inoperable, Junked, disa-
bled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles
on any property, street or highway, Citrus County Code
of Ordinances, Section 20-41.

Ghost Dog Investments, Inc./The Hogan Law Firm LLC
3991 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Lecanto, FL
Non-compliance - meeting requirements for permitt-
Ing, LDC 2020, 2321 C1 & C2
Gibbs, Kenneth C. & Danielle J.
2051 S. Hunt Pt. Crystal River, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of abandoned property, Junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(b). To Wit: Abandoned
construction materials/failure to furnish on-site litter re-
ceptacles, etc. Door, fencing, wood, metals, plastics,
paper, tarps
Gibson, Steve & Miranda
2851 S. Woodbine Ave. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of abandoned property, Junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: Household Items,
computers, Junk & debris
Gibson, Steve & Miranda
2851 S. Woodbine Ave. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to keep, dump, store, place or de-
posit abandoned, unlicensed, Inoperable, junked, disa-
bled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles
on any property, street or highway, Citrus County Code
of Ordinances, Section 20-41.
- Massey, Boyd & Veropica
7418 W. Parrish Ln. Dunnellon, FL
It shall be a violation to keep, dump, store, place or de-
posit abandoned, unlicensed, Inoperable, junked, disa-
bled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused
vehicles/vessels on any property, street or highway, Cit-
rus County Code of Ordinances, Section 20-41. To Wit:
Wrecked blue vehicle and numerous boats. All vehi-
cles on property must have current license
plates/registrations and be operable and road worthy.
Massey, Boyd & Veronica
7418 W. Parrsh Ln. Dunnellon, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of abandoned property, Junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above properly. Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: Tarps, wood, pal-
lets, barrels and misc. Junk & debris.
Morgan, Martha J.
5695 S. Magnolia Ave. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of abandoned property, Junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: Furniture, toys,
k lr.:l r.?lrTe S: O .:ra.h1'. TO Ih.S larl : *


II r,. l e.,- . ,:.1i.1:.- .. :. .i: rT.I *:o.:u.e or have an accu-
.,.ji ii.:.- .: i- aord.:-.d ,o erly, junk & debris (as de-
j',eJ, -,, ir.. at.: e .- i.i.:c-'ry, Citrus County Code of
:v.r.- :. :r.:.r. . :.r ,' Jo Wit: Abandoned con-
SJ.: :-. r.| iial 1t. r' Cr , fumnist- on-site litter recep-
':, .:-. '.': iic " pi,.*-,,:,a plaStibs, 'mr tal material,
bricks
Morgan,Martha J.
5695 S. Magnolia Ave. Homosassa, FL
Porch enclosure without a required Development Or-
der LDC 2020
Mumford, Stuart R.
1016 Carnegie Dr. Inverness, FL
Storage bullding(s) on property without a Development
Order(s) LDC 2020
Mumford, Stuart R.
1016 Carnegie Dr. Inverness, FL
It shall be a violation to keep, dump, store, place or de-
posit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disa-
bled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles
on any property, street or highway, Citrus County Code
of Ordinances, Section 20-41.
Mumford. Stuart R.
1016 Carnegle Dr. Inverness, FL
it shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of.abandoned property, junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above property. Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: Tires, trash, card-
board & scrap metal etc.
Owens, Marina
2763 N. Vasser Ter. Hernando, FL -
It shall be a violation to keep. dump, store, place or de-
posit abandoned, unlicensed, Inoperable, junked, disa-
bled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles
on any property, street or highway, Citrus County Code
of Ordinances, Section 20-41. 1 Maroon Honda Ac-
cord
Peterson. Shane A. & Rebecca R.
7652 W. Autumn St. Homosassa, FL
Failed driveway apron Inspection LDC 4221(J)
Salmons Jr., Jermone C. DBA Wellaqua Co.
2948 S. Portland Terr. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of abandoned property, Junk & debris (as de-
flned) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: Tarps, furniture,
appliances, boxes
Salmons. Jerome C. DBA Wellaqua Co.
2948 S. Portland Terr. Homosassa, FL
t shall be a violation to keep. dump, store, place or de-
posit abandoned, unlicensed, Inoperable, junked, disa-
bled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles
on any property, street or highway, Citrus County Code
of Ordinances, Section 20-41.
Schwieckert, Robert & Hannlgdn, Wendl
111 W, Harvard St. Inverness, FL
Construction of an enclosed accessory structure & an
open-sided accessory structure w/out a valid Develop-
ment Order LDC 2020.
Schwleckert, Robert & Hannlgan, Wendi
111 W. Harvard St. Inverness, FL
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm
or corporation to keep, dump. store, place or deposit
abandoned, unlicensed, Inoperable, Junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on
any property, street, or highway, Article IV, Section
20-41, Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Box
van w/ no valid tag & a flat tire.




SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2009 D7


I 1


IIH


"You must know what your
trade is worth, no matter


,where you


Ilan to buy...


141 ar 111 aIkI I l' iF ' I


Jk j 1.1-1 ki II


I I I


ill'


I ~i II


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
8005848755 Extm.2144
8,988 or 158 *mo.


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 2143
$9,988or-176* meo.
2006 TAURUS


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.5848755 Ext.2142
$6,988 or i123* mo.


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE'WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.5848755 Ext.2135
$8,988 or 168 mo.


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800584-8755 Ext. 2132
^10,988 or$206' mo.
CRYSTAL


937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext. 1
i crystalautos.com


2006 ECLIPSE


FREE 24 HRRECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFOAND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2140
'10,988' or'$194 me.


FREE 24 MR RECORDED MESSAGE WIlT INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.755 Ex. 2138
*10,988* or $194' mo.


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.5848755 Ext. 2169
1 0,988' or $194 mo.


FREE 24 HR RECORDED'MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-5848755 Ex. 2137
19,988 or 187 moe.


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext.2131
$7,988* or 149 mo.
CRYSTAL
Jeep i" i .


1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
2077 HWY. 44 W.
INVERNESS
800-584-8755 Ext.I
crystalautos.com


F 2 0 C L R D


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ex. 2139
$6,988 or 123 me.


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ex. 2141I
$5,988 or 105* me.
2005 PACIFICA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584-8755 Ext. 2136
$8,988 or$168' mo.
2004 TOWN & COUNTRY


FREE24 HRRECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFOAND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext.2134
$6,988 or 131 mo.


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
8005848755 Ext. 2133
'5,988* or' 112* mo.
CRYSTAL
SANAMERICAN
REWVLTION
1035 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext. 1
crystalautos.com A


"All Prices/Payments exclude tax, tag, title, dealer ads and dealer fee ($599.50). Price/Payments include $2000 down (Cash or Trade Equity), owner loyalty, rebates and all factory incentives (must Qualify). Payments are at 7.99 AP.R. for 72 Months for model years 2006-2009
and 7.70 A.P.R. for 66 months for model years 2002-2005 W.A.C. Cannot be combined with other offers. All prior sales excluded and may restrict stock. Not responsible for typographical errors. *Vehicles are pre-owned and pictures are for illustration purposes only.


CTR. AfUS O t.UNTY A I LHA NIL


'I


111 1;


do


rnrf IQ ,.,Tv aT T \ CUHRONICLE







SI II


"You must know what your
trade is worth, no matter
where you plan to buy..."


I lk M W ' ill,


:11 N-1k1


i~tII


~!II1-r


Cr


2009 VERSA


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFOANDSPECIALPRICING
800.584.8755Ex. 6112
'8,988' or '158' mo.
2009 ALTIMA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584-8755 Ext. 6132
$16,988* or p299* mo.
2009 ROGUE


FREE 24HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITHmINFO ANDSPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Exlt.2149
t 6,988 or 299, moe
2009 MURANO.


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO ANDSPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 2148
s19,988 or $352 mo.
2009 TITAN


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ex. 6110
't8,988' or 335t'me.
CRYSTAL


937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext. j
crystalautos.com


2009 CALIBER



FREE 24HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 4111
29,988' or '176' m'e.
2009 WRANGLER


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO ANDSPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 4125
16 999 or $299 mo.
2009 GRAND CHEROKEE


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 2146
!9,988 or 352 ma.
2009 TOWN & COUNTRY


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE'WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2151
$16,988' or 299* mo.
2009 RAM


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584-8755 Ext. 3119
17,988 or'317' mo.
CRYSTAL
* .aLliq C H R . Ys v L E R
Jeep
1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
2077 HWY. 44 W.
INVERNESS
800.5888755 Ext. 1
Scrysfalauos.com r


2009 COBALTo


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 1102
12,988' or $229 me.
2009 MALIBU


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.5848755 Ext.2147W
$14,988* or 264 mo.
2009 IMPALA


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2165
:$ 4,988 or $264 mo.
2009 EQUINOX


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2145
'21,988' or 398 mo.
2009 SILVERADO


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 2150
'18,988* or '335 me.
CRYSTAL
-' AN AMERICAN
REVOUlTION
1035 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext. i
crystalautos.com M


"All Prices/Payments exclude tax, tag, title, dealer ads and dealer fee ($99.50).Prce/Payments include $2000 down (Cash or Trade Equity), owner loyalty, rebates and all factory incentives (must Qualify). Payments are at 7.99 A.P.R. for 72 Months for model years 2006-2009 "
and 7.70 AP.R. for 66 months for model years 2002-2005 W.A.C. All pdor sales excluded and may restrict stock. Not responsible for typographical errors. Cannot be combined with other offers. *Vehicles are pre-owned and pictures are for illustration purposes only.


U6e SUNDtAY, JJUNEI 7,


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


n e ...--.. T.,.. " 7 on)n


I


H!






" -Tt Section E -


2009


4


RO CNT C
CITYRUS 4COLN ri C


5
. ,- y . ... 'y :^ ; -,_
, . . .- . ** " *'. .'. *' ' *


, 4 _


.4. ~Zfl. -
- - -
rc -


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i < . ' "


SA. P4


Li
4


BilE1i:


311,


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C
'1


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.wj
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(


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...2'L





4'6r�iM ouY'(FL)' ,~k


Fig -.rr,~ 7 ')AnO


Frugality doesn't


have to be frazzling


Seialzn inTrait
& BentoodResle
ww .eraisae Ity ru~o


F rugality should be
peaceful. But
there - are times
when frugal living might
cause you to be unhappy
or stressed. It's usually
when you take on too
much or when you try
strategies that work well
for some families but are
a bad match for yours.
You have to sort out what
works best for you.
Often, frugal tips simply
need your personal
touch to be successful.
But sometimes they
aren't solutions that fit
your life at all.
Here are a few sugges-
tions.
COOKING FROM
SCRATCH: Some home-
cooked meals have too
many ingredients. If you
work, coming home and
cooking meals that re-
quire a lot of prep time is
going to stress you out.
Add the stack of dishes


and cleanup,
let alone any-
thing else,
and you're
setting your-
self up for
failure. Of
course, take-
out is going to
be appealing
if you take on Sara
too much FRU
extra work LIV
And you're
supposed to
be baking homemade
bread and clipping
coupons, too?
ADAPTATION: The
idea is to eat out less
often. This is for your
wallet and your health.
While scratch cooking is
ideal, it's not the best so-
lution for busy sched-
ules. Save the more
in-depth recipes for
weekends. Two well-
planned meals on the
weekend can become


two addi-
tional short-
cut meals for
the upcoming
week. With
the onset of
suinmmer, you
can use a slow
cooker one
night, grill an-
Noel other night
GAL and do lighter
ING fare, such as
salad and
sandwiches,
pasta or stir-fry, on the
remaining days. Semi-
homemade meals are
still a step above takeout
or dining out, too. And if
you do eat out, try going
out for lunch vs. dinner,
just for dessert and cof-
fee, or when you have
restaurant coupons or
gift cards. And the home-
made bread? If you don't
have time or the desire,
See FRUGAL/Page E5


County offers classes for


first-time homebuyers


Detached Villa 3Bd-2Bath- Single 2.5Bath-
2Car / Hillside Villas 3Car Woodside
Beautiful pool home loaded with upgrades on Spectacular Cordova model loaded with
private homesite. . upgrades. Priced to sell.
TVRG# 1012 $305,000. TVRG# 1050 $469,000.


Special to the Chrohicle
Citrus County's Division of Housing
Services and Extension Services are
offering First Time Homebuyers
classes to interested individuals: Two
classroom sessions will be held at the
Lecanto Government Building at 3600
W Sovereign Path, 4Iecanto, in Room
280.
There is no charge for these classes.
Those individuals attending both ses-
sions will receive a Certificate of Com-
pletion. Any person who requires a
special accommodation (ADA) for a
disability must call 72 hours in ad-
vance.
Session No. 1 will be from 5:30 to 9
p.m. Thursday, June 18, and will cover
introduction to SHIP, credit, family
budget, pros and cons to building and
buying existing, applying and qualify-
ing for a mortgage, and finding a real


estate agent and the contract signing.
Session No. 2 will be from 5:30 to 9
-p.m. Thursday, June 25, and will cover
home security, home maintenance, fair
housing, homeowners insurance, en-
ergy conservation, landscaping, termite
prevention and homestead exemption.
Other presenters will be: Citrus
County Cooperative Extension Serv-
ice, Citrus County Department of Code
Enforcement, Citrus County Fire Res-
cue, Community Legal Services, Bar-
bara Vargo With SunTrust Mortgage,
and David Ivory with Exit Realty
Leaders.
For more information or to reserve
your seat, call the Citrus County Divi-
sion of Housing Services at 527-5388.
Limited seating space available. Only
those preregistered will be allowed to
attend classes. If you plan to attend
you should call immediately to re-
serve your chair.


Terra Vista & Brentwood


Rentals.'

Terms- 6 Months or More


rl






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY JUNE 7, 2OO2~3
U_____________________________________ U


Crystal River 79"


ULI GARCIA SUSAN MASTRANGELO John P. Maisel III REALTY
Lgarcial9@tampabay.rr.com susan.mastrangelo@yahoo.com
352-302-9129 352-364-0068 I (352) 302-5351 * www.FlaMLSonline.com


-jL.J < g .8699 E. SAN RAMON
INVERNESS


Directions: 41 S, L on Eden,
R on Old Floral City Rd.,
L on Sweetwater Pointe entrance,
R on Paddock,
R on San Ramon Ct.
Home on the right.
MLS#334374


COMFORTABLE f CUSTOM BUILT HOME wift
2/2,3, WATERFRONT, 6BRs. 4BAs. courtyard with sola
POOL HOME r. . i ,,h, i r,,i , l t. t ,,




''"INCREDIBLE OPPORTUNITY ""' '--GREAT- - OPPORTUNITY TC
acr, L , r,.T,, i- - % . AMERICAN DREAM IN Iii
Mi t , .' OWN A PI. C OF TII I
S irn 1 13 , ' i ,r I. I I
T , , n : - - .. I-,I t, la,:,, ,, lV "9 "yi .i i '. ,

di Fnal l rt.- , F . :,.I r : ",: ' n,, ..: r,. I i i. , ., ,:i .I:.
finn11,nn r, 01 " d, n ...rtir, 1 Fi- I "t.l1iT'.':'


j.


� *- .... " ' -^ .'
MOTIVATED SELLER!! CL , & e, inr,,
pi,: 13,:ular %tc-ertar l, i dJ'.i L-j.- rr.,iadl rh ,T.-e'
Move into your family dream home w/4 bedroom/3
bath plus an office. So much more-See it tqday!!


WANT A QUIET SECLUDED RETREAT' Tr.,i
Serene E C. i , 1, rH j.l>lu>l i : .9 A ,: ,] r.y re.W .:, ! r.
Ir. family rioom large iNr.a- r -, i - drt. .3r.: . aHlr'
arf ;.rli . ina.a aa^a plu; T* i Tife v.c L.'.i . a .]
30x11 screened porch. Privacy and nature are yours
on this lovely 2.5 acre property just outside Pine
Ridge. MLS#326129.
MARY GULLING 352-422-2994


OPE HOS SUNW1-3


REALTY LEADERS



1-0888 Inverness 341-1233 Beverly Hills 527-1112


m


SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2009, K3


CiTRus CoqN7Y (H) CHRomcu .






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


~ErErr~RV hr~ *7 9fli~iQ


Real Estate DIGEST


RE/MAX agents
pass $1M mark
The
associ-
ates and
staff of

Realty
One are
pleased
to recog- Wayne
nize two Hemmerich
more as- RE/MAX
sociates Realty One.
who
passed the million dollar


mark in
sales this
year.
Wayne
Hem-
merich
and Jody
Broom
have Jody Broom
each sur- RE/MAX
passed Realty One.
this mile-
stone. They are both agents
in the Crystal River office of
RE/MAX. Broom has been
with the firm for over 10
years and is a consistent


* Submit information
for the Real Estate
Digest by 4 p.m
Thursday for publh.
cation Sunday.
* The Chronicle re-
serves the right to
edit news notes for
style and space.

multimillion dollar producer.
Hemmerich is also a con-
sistent top producer in the
area and has been a Real-
tor here since 1993.-
See .',Page E8


DIGEST PHOTOS

* Headshots of real estate agents and associates submitted for the Peal Es
tate Digest are kept on tile in the Chronicle Editorial Department It is the
responsibility of the individuals submitting news notes to ensure head
shots have been sent to the newsroom, and to advise staff or any name
changes.
* Photos need to be in sharp focus and should be in ma iurium resolution
JPEG (.jpg) format.
* E mail headshots to go with the Real Estate Digest to nev ,desk@chroni-
cleon line.com, attn: HomeFront.


SO YOU KNOW
* The Citrus Count. Chronicle's policy permits both free and paid obituaries. E mail obits@chroni-
cle online.cornm or phone 563 5660 for details and pricing options.


-YREMIER COMMUNITY - SHOWS LIKE A MODEL
.. . . . ....... . . ...... . ..



AFFORDABLE 4BR. 3BAII GRAB THE KIDS AND RUNI

... ...m. 11J. :-. .


KAREN E.
MORTON
Hall of Fame
Centurion Member


S .... ,.. - Bu FORSR I ENif .RY EFFIFCiiNCY & SryLEri -m al.
Website:

, . .(* " ' 352) 7280-008
.. (352) 212-7505
GENERAL COMMERCIAL IGCi - 5 ACRES PIUS 4 BR POOL HOME TOLL FREE
-6- ......i..... " .. ..'' "" 1 800D-543-9103

. ........ .. .' ....I.. ,ll
iJ.W. MORTON
WONDERFUL LOCATION W DEEDED LAKE ACCESS REAL ESTATE
'" - ,"- * ,,, , . ,1, ,i .t..r,,i, 1645 W ast ManSt.
�" ., ,. , ,,,,. , , i,,'i,,~,.,,, , .' Invemass, FL 3445

'. 5 ... '-* ......... ..... j..i ,,,,i , u, i'l'a"'" "
'.... - 11 ,, ,, ,,- , .-,, . i , ,,, ,V LOiS7 TE


5 ACRES OF WOODS AND PRIVACY - LOOKS LIKE NEWI
, 6 ..'1 . .




WALK OUT BASEMENT TO CAGED INGROUND POOL AREA


P1, Ui ,."i:.' " . .......


CUSTOM HOME ON 1 9 ACRES - REDUCED S50.000
i i- ,



SELLERS ARE SACRIFICINI - CHORus RuI3 2007 CLASSICALLY COMPOSED




CLEARUIEW ESTATES - CUSTOM HOME WITH GUEST HOUSE


- Elia'il ,l ,i ,,H i, 1i,~,,T


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
m-om (352) 634-2371 Cell H " ',
i (800) 476-2590 Toll Free
ERA For a- Visual Tour of our listings.
REAL ESTATE and all MLS: bidavis.com
*A 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH
DOUBLEWIDE .. i.:r..i r,.3 . i,-,



S331188 $54,900
THIS 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH
HOME (inside laundry) 3rn ,ro.e-
In C r r.itiorn r, ol to.e hrome r.a-:
I "t -'1 '"S - b -eer neNl up eid i r,-iT, Ir, rI-,,W
on d. ir.,is..- 3n, owui Put.,
grapefruil orange and Ian.3err-,e
lieese produce aburn.j.anll,
-- 330361 $69,900


E4Q_ TUNE 7 200Q


I










Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY; JUNE 7, 2009 E5


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E2

don't feel you're not frugal
enough. Consider using a
bread machine or shopping
the bread outlets and stock-
ing up when there's a sale.
HANGING CLOTHES TO
DRY: This is one of many
frugal solutions that people
either love or hate. It can
help you save a' good
amount of money
But maybe you don't have
time to hang them on a line,
can't because of community
restrictions, or you don't
like how the clothes feel
when line-dried.


ADAPTATION: Hang
some laundry on an indoor
drying rack or retractable
clothesline some of the
time. Even air-drying one
load per week will help your
budget. If you want to save a
bit more, you can use the
dryer less often. If your
laundry feels stiff, toss it
into your dryer for a few
minutes on tumble dry to
soften it. Using vinegar as a
fabric softener, hanging on a
windy day and giving
clothes a good - snap help
with the stiffness. Your
clothes will last longer, too.
FRUGAL HELPERS:
Many kitchen gadgets, small
appliances and machines,
such as stand mixers,


. . _ ..

f.c . .. ;- ...'' *: '- w sii -v..
FANTASTIC VIEW of Sugarmill Woods golf course
from this immaculate 2/2/2 villa. Over 1600 sf of air
conditioned living space for only $139,000.


VACANT LOTSII. _
OAKS GOLF COURSE - -
1/2 Acre Lot ............ $69,900 .,-
CITRUS HILLS
1 Acre with Central Water .... $29,900 GOSPEL ISLAND LOCALE
LECANTO 3BR/2BA home situated on 1 acre.
L-CANTO Fireplace, central water & well, fenced yard.
5 Acres, Paved St. & Nice Oak Trees $ 58,000 152,500 MLS#326641

CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352) 726-2471
Email: roybass@tampaboy.ir.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 1352 302-6714 [


2005 BUILT BEAUTY! 4681 N. LENA DR.
*3 CAR GARAGE PINE RIDGE
* 3/2 with nice office * 4BD/3BA/3CG -3412 SF Living
- Lots of tile/granite counters - Built in 2007 U Heated Pool/Spa
* Neutral, tasteful decor Many, Many Upgrades Office/Den
* PINE RIDGE ESTATES . PETER & MARVIA KOROL ,-"
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536 Realtors@
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997 (352) 527-7842
www.Floridalistinglnlo.com (352) 422-3875


EXTENDED FAMILY HOME
*2 UNITS OFLIVING AREA
*3/2/2 PLUS a spacious 1/1t
* ON 9th HOLE of GOLF COURSE
* Each unit has fireplace
* Courtyard and swimming pool
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997
Email: kellyg@remax.net


TIGHT BUDGET?
* 2/1 with office - - Carport & shed
* Good rental property
* Close to Comm. Center
* 27 E. Lemon - Beverly Hills
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536 r'
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997
Email: elliesulton@remax.nil


11004 W. COVE HARBOR DR.
CRYSTAL RIVER
* 2BD/2BA/Carport . Waterfront w/Dock
* Pelican Cove Condo .* 1159 SF Living
* Screened porch * Maintenance Free
PETER & MARVIA KOROL 757
Realtors@
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875








5592 N. BEDSTROW BLVD.
PINE RIDGE
- 3BD/2BA/3.CG/Den * Detached 3CG
* Heated Pool * Motor Home Garage
- Home 2,218 SF/AC Garage 1,716 SF/AC
PETER & MARVIA KOROL 7
Realtors� 1l
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


#7 MILBARK DR. MLS#320311
#9 MILBARK DR. MLS#320313


Two (2) 2007 Rusaw Homes side-by-side
Both 3BR/2BA/2 car, great room style, open
split floor plans and situated on beautiful lots.
Drctinas: Enter SMW on Cypress Blvd. W. past idrde
to I a Cypress Blvd. � to L an Uinder Dr. (not St.)
to R oa Whtewoe d toL an loark
LOU VALLEY
(352) 257-9016
Email: lioualley@tampabay.rr.com


Great home, great location, great pncell Come
see this 2BR, 2BA, 1 car carport home with a
shed utility building to store tools and lawn mower.
This home has an add'l rm. that can be used as an
office/den or 3rd BR. Great locations in Invemess
Highlands South close to shopping,
hospital, and area amenities.
DAWN WRIGHT
(352) 400-1080
Email: dawnwright@tampabay.rr.com


MOTHER IN LAW SUITE!
This wonderful home has a separate
wing with private kitchen and bedroom
for guest. Totally remodeled home on
2 lots with 3BRs, 2BAs, family room
and big 2 car gar. A must see.
STEVE VARNADOE
795-2441 OR 795-9661
Emalb stevevarnadoo@remax.net


3677 S. SPRINGBREEZE WAY SUGARMILL WOODS BEAUTY
2 Bedroom, 2 bath on .75 acre. Just waiting for new owner, this
Newer roof & A/C. yummy home has all the bells and
U.S. 19 N to riqhtl o Grover Cleveland, whistles. 3/2/2 with new kit.,
left on Springbreeze, house on right. baths, windows & more.
VAL MAHONEY (352)220-4023 -AN&
At a ney@wmaoyntc3 NANCY BOWDISH *(352) 628-7800
SALLY CURE (352)-220-3001 Direct: (352) 422-0296
Imf: scure@ltmpokay.rr.om Visual Tours at www.baimstmer.coa m ty.


ON ALMOST 1/2 ACRE!
Breakfast nook w/bay window, tile
floors in neutral colors and a 20 x
14 Florida room YOU CAN
MOVE IN TODAYII
SUSAN KNOWLES
(352) 228-9015
Email: susanknowles@remax.net


HOMOSASSA WATERFRONT
* 3/2/carport * 17 x 4 dock
Remodeled � Granite counters
* Wood cabinets
* New carpet .
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Emalh kcunningham@iemax.net


CLOSING COSTS for this great
3/2/2 never lived in home. Built
in 2006 and ready to move into.
MOTIVATED OWNER
SAYS SELL!!
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: acadol@earthlink.net


* 3BR/2BA/2CG
* Granite kitchen countertops
* 42 in. Hickory cabinets
- Heated pool
* Detached 30 x 40 garage/
workshop/heated & cooled
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Emalk leapolmor@remax.n _et


READY TO DOWNSIZE?
Want to walk to shops, library, and pool?
Consider this 2/2 villa with affordable
maintenance of $125/month.
DIR: U.S. 19 S, L Periwinkle, R Marquis, I Earl
Loop #8356
NANCY BOWDISH * (352) 628-7800
Direct: (352) 422-0296
Visual Tors atwww.bydtrusactv.com


Home Inspection/Appraisal 4/09
* Deep green belt
* Screened lanai w/shower/gas hookup
.Splitopen floor plan
SWater softener
Solar tube lighting
DANNY UNDERWOOD (352) 586-1743
Integrity Selling Specialist
Email: Florida.LfeStyle@hotmailconm


YOUR HOME AWAITS YOU!!
* 3/2/2 1987 Home Large Kit,
Large Master BR * Split Floor Plan
SDining Area
* Enclosed Lanai
All on 1 + Acres F.
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Emao cheryllambert@remax.net


SUNDAY, JUNE7, 2oog E5


CITRUS COUNTY (F CHRONICLE


. o









EB Sunday, June 7, 2009Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRoNIcUi


HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
It is also distributed to approximately
300 business locations throughout Citrus County.
Display advertising information................................ ..................563-5592
Classified advertising information................ ............................... 563-5966
News information.................................................................................. 563-5660
...................................................................... newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listings....................... www.naturecoasthomefront.com
Sign up for www.naturecoasthomefront.com ..................................563-3206
Advertise online...................................................................................563-3206
.................................................................. NCCsales@chronicleonline.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CHION1C E



- To have your news in the Chronicle's HomeFront section, you may mail, fax or email the
information to the Chronicle, 1624 North Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. The
newsroom fax number is 563-3280 and email is newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.
You may also drop off your information at the Meadowcrest office or the newspaper's
Inverness office at 106 W. Main Street.
When submitting'information, please make sure it is printed or typed, is concise and includes a
contact telephone number.
If you have any questions or comments, contact the section editor, Mike Arnold, at 563-5660
(email - newsdesk@chronicleonline.com). I
HOW TO GET YOUR PHOTOS INTO THE PAPER:
- We accept color and black and white photos. We also accept negatives. We do not accept Polaroid prints.
- All photos need to e cropped tightly. That means no wasted space in your photo.
- Photos need to be in sharp focus. We do not accept photos that are out of focus.
- Be sure that photos or negatives you submit are taken using 35mm film. Others will not be accepted.
- Please include your address and phone number on any photos or negatives submitted.
- Photos or negatives submitted will be returned if supplied with a retum envelope and postage.
- When identifying persons in your photo, please do so from left to right, front to back.
- For more information, please contact Man Beck, photo team leader, at 563-5660.


Ladybugs: Beneficial


Florida garden guests

For the third year running, the Citrus "Attract Wildlife" and "Manage Yard Pests
County UF/IFAS Extension will be Responsibly" There are nine Florida-
doing a ladybug and but- friendly landscaping principles
terfly release as part of our an- that were developed by the Uni-
nual "open house" event. This . versity of Florida to make it
year's Green Expo is focused on easy to transform any yard into
helping you to save energy and " .- a Florida-friendly yard that
water inside and outside the- saves water, keeps our water
home. Mark your calendar for , supply clean and provides habi-
Friday, June 19 from 10 a.m. to I .-. . tat for birds, butterflies and
2 p.m. to attend the Green Expo other wildlife.
at the Extension office at 3650 Ladybugs demonstrate the
W Sovereign Path, Lecanto. . principle "Manage Yard Pests
The event will include a hy- Audrey Durr Responsibly," because ladybugs
brid car show, guided tours of FYN are voracious, beneficial in-
our Florida-friendly garden, a sects that consume several pest
permeable concrete demon- insects, including aphids,
station and "green" informational dis- chinch bugs, thrips, whiteflies, mites and
plays. The schedule includes welcome scales. A ladybug might eat over 5,000
and introductions at 10 a.m., a commemo- aphids in its lifetime!
rative tree planting at 10:30, a butterfly Ladybugs fall into that 99 percent of in-
and ladybug release at 10:45, permeable sects that have no effect or are actually
concrete installation at 11 and guided beneficial to humans and our plants. It's
tours of our garden from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 that tiny 1 percent (the mosquitoes, chinch
p.m. Green exhibits can be visited anytime bugs, fleas, etc.) that unfairly give a bad
during the expo. rap to the rest of the insect kingdom.
Butterflies and ladybugs are always re- Integrated Pest Management, or IPM, is
leased at the event to demonstrate two
Florida-friendly landscaping principles: . See GUESTS/Page E10


Inside...


Italian makeover
PAGE E9
Ask the Plumber
PAGE E14
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E4

WHERE'S JANE?
N Gardening columnist
Jane Weber is taking a
break from.her column,
Jane's Garden. It will re-
turn later this year.

For current property transac-,.
tions, use the search features on
the Web site for the Citrus
County Property Appraiser's Of-
fice, www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Figuring out about figurine; info about cluster of curios


Dear John: I have at- think he is having a hard
tached a picture of time of it- The ceramic
a small body appears to
figurine about be hand painted
2 inches high of bisque, an
a child sitting unglazed porce-
on a chamber ,. ' lain. I wish your
pot It was my .s , photographs
mother's and ' were clearer; it
sat on a shelf ' S appears to be
for as long as I finely detailed. I
can remember. think it was
As a child I al- made in. Ger-
ways loved it. I John Sikorski many about 100
have had it for SIKORSKI'S years ago. Po-
years now and tential dollar
have never ATI'C value is below
seen another $50.


like it. I read "Sikorski's
Attic" every week and fi-
nally decided to send in, a
picture. There are no
markings on the bottom of
the piece. Any informa-
tion you have would be
appreciated. - J.M., Ho-
mosassa
Dear J.IVM.: The look on
the child's face makes me


Dear John: I enjoy read-
ing your articles and hope
they continue for many
years to come. I have some
questions for you. My mom
died this year at 97. En-
closed is a picture of a
crystal vase she remem-
bered from grandmother.


See ATTIC/Page E10


S- special to the Chronicle
ABOVE: These two glasses appear to be ruby flashed glass, a style of glassware in
which a thin layer of ruby-colored glass is applied over clear glass. A design is then
etched in the ruby layer. Ruby flashed glass is generally more desirable than ruby
stained glass, in which the color is simply painted on. The handled "Atlantic City" cup
is potentially worth about $50; the other piece would probably fetch $10 or $15.
RIGHT: This figurine of a young boy on a chamber pot was probably made in Germany
about 100 years ago. It appears to be painted bisque, which is a type of unglazed
porcelain. It's probably worth $50 or less.


ES Sunday, June 7, 2009


Cimus CouNTY (FL) CHRomcLE








C1mUS COUNTY (FL CHRONICLESNAYJUE72097


WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS
* Photos need to be in sharp focus.
* Photos need to be in proper exposure: neither too
light nor too dark.
* Include your name, address and phone number on all
photos.
* When identifying persons in your photo, do so from
left to right. For more information, call 563 5660.


the link between plans and reality

Dennis [ amato
State C, ,r in i CGC-004344 4

GENERAL CONTRACTOR, INC.
A TRADITION OF QUALITY SINCE 1972
* Consultation & Project/Plan Review
- *f Design Services
S* Cost Estimating * Design-Build Construction
* Custom Crafted Homes * Waterfront Homes
* "Cracker-Style" Homes & Buildings
' Residential Renovations
* Commercial Construction-& Remodeling
k Adaptive Re-Use & Restoration of Buildings s

430 NE 3rd Street, P.O. Box 1312, Crystal River, FL 34423-1312
I I ,1


I AWARD WINNING
I MULTI-MILLION $$$
PRODUCER
352-302-3179
Bring all offers!
WEEKS REALTY


Ga~ffne'


5 BevedyIfflisl


Reator


kok or Ithqv.SundayI


352-795-7357
888-795-7356
www.rxhemarealtyicom


PIoPERIlES FOR SALE & RENi


I* wwIirsetu~o I


CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS S



8172N DANDELION 1 2472 . PINECROVE 9580 TRA
?59 900 179.900 5115.


- .M.... .i-.
3381 WEBSTER PL. 2728 W. EDISON PLACE 9930 N. CHERRY LAKE DRIVE 1574 W. LAVENDER LN. 2225 N. NAUTILUS LN. 9481 GRECO
$135,000 $149,700 $319,000 $139,900 $79,900 $89,500
3/2/2 home. #326322 2005 bultW 3/2/2. #329662 Extra large 3/2/2 on 1 acre. #312400 3/2/2 lana #333404 3/1 home. #332759 2/2/1 wh lanai. #321317


827 GREAT PINE PT. 695 W. STARJASMINE
PINE RIDGE R, PE $85,900
so 7059LECANTO HWY. J ,FPE. $100.000
INVERNESS -'4 Ai-E $17 000
CITRUS HILLS 1 "c-E $44,900
3861 N. EVERLASTING LOT ON CANAL .................................$89,900
COMMERCIAL BUILDING 2 COMMERCIAL
BUILDINGS
& SIGN BUSINESS � ZONED GNC
Sale includes established, lucrative sign business FOR SALE
and all equipment, wide format printers, laminators,
vinyl covers, trimmers, bucket truck. We will also stay OR LEASE
on after the sale to assist in running the business. CALL 302-3170
Take all for $199,000 OWNER/AGENT


SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2oog E7


JFV


J1.11y-







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E8 SUNDAY. TUNE 7. 2009


DIGEST
Continued from Page E4

ERA
taps top



top agents for Davs
ERA -
American
Realty is
proud to rec- i
ognize the Jackie
top agents for Davis
May. ERAAmerican,
Jackie Realty.
Davis was
the Top Listing associate and
Barbara Banks was the Top
Sales associate for May for the
Inverness office.


Uary
Altman
ERAAmerican
Realty.


Both
Jackie and
Barbara can
be reached at
the ERA
American Re-
alty office in
Inverness at
(352)726-
5855 to dis-
cuss all of
your really es-


tate needs.
For our
Beverly Hills
office, Top
Listing hon-
ors go to
Gary Altman.
Top Sales
and Top Barbara
Sales Volume Banks
honors go to ERAAmerican
Denise Mc- Realty.
Keever for
May.
McKeever and Altman can
both be
reached at
ERAAmeri-
can Realty's
office in Bev-
erly Hills at
(352) 746-
3600 to dis-
Denise cuss all of
McKeever your real es-
ERAAmerican tate ques-
Realty. tions.

0 Real Estate Digest news
notes submitted with-
out photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is
provided later.


WEEKLY LINEUP


* Nearly a dozen medical professionals contribute their
expertise to columns in Health & Life. 'Tuesdays
* Plan menus for the week from the tempting recipes in
the Flair for Food section./Thursdays
* Get a jump on weekend entertainment with the stories
in Scene./Fridays
* See what local houses of worship plan to do for the
week m the Religion section./Saturdays


SNW
,::--Homes from""

... Homes from


Dolphin,


S76 900*
For Limited Time


C 0 OVE,


35-67-91
MayIo ln oCos t CA CLYDE


. -


Rose-1


G: -I-.
,: '--- .'NG


*prices subject to change


MANY PLANS AVAILABLE
Open Monday-Friday 8am-4pm
After Hours & Saturday By Appointment Only
CALL TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION
352-637-3912
www.homesbycosy.com


11145 W. Bentbow Path, Crystal River, FL 34428 * U.S. Hwy. 19, 2 miles north of the Crystal River Mall


CAROLYN LISTER tl
A Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
MOM cell- 422-4620 KEYl
ER,. Office: 382-1700 "-
View virtual tours @ www.Usterlistngs.com
- I W1


SPECIOUS INSIDE AND OUT!
On large estate lot with turn-
around drive. 3/2/2 plus family
room with fireplace & glass
enclosed lanai. Extras include
skylight, tile & carpet,
upgraded appliances, pool with
Diamond Bright finish and
brand new roof. #331880
\$239,900


ALL UPDATED INTERIOR!
2/2/2 with family room. New
carpet & tile. New kitchen &
bathroom cabinets &
countertops. New interior paint.
New ceiling fans. Sun porch
and covered verandah, all
screened. Pass-thru from
kitchen to outside. #332983
$147,500 , .


' Always There For You"
-g'|X- mGAIL COOPER
11 1 Multi-Million Dollar Realtor ,
ERA, Cell: (352) 634-4346
SOFFICE :(352) 382-1700x309
" ~^ E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com

rl� VI


PEACE & PRIVACY ARE YOURS!I
* 3/2/2 home on quiet cul de sac
* Pool added in 2004 - large lanai
* Corian kitchen-newer S/S appliances
* Gas fireplace in living room
* Perfect setting for entertaining
#329580 $175.000


LIVE IN A HOME YOU CAN LOVE!
* 3/2/3 home with 1926 living
* Set on 2 lots for great privacy
* AC new in 2007
* Exterior repainted in 2008
* Glassed FL room opens to patio
#332707 $249,500


. RIM T I I!". Ill. I.I..


ME AMERICAN GARY
ERA mrvawsrmurs ALTMAN
4511N.Lecanto Hwy. REALTOR�
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 1352) 746-3600, Ext. 305
gtaltman@embarqman'.com a (516) 782-5319S



27 VINCA ST., HOMOSASSA, FL 34446








SUGARMILL WOODS OPEN HOUSE
Beautiful 4BR, 2BA, 2 car garage, 2,236 sq. ft. Mercedes
home. Large kitchen with wood cabinets and an exceptionally
large master bedroom.
PRICED TO SELL AT $169,999!!!
DON'T LET THIS HOME PASS YOU BY!
Directions: From 98 N, on Long Pine St., right on Winca St to #27


ESSUNDAY, JUNE 7 2009


^












Capturing Italy in the kitchen


Italian Embassy/The Washington Post
The kitchen layout in the home of the Italian ambassador: 1) crystal storage; 2) two wine coolers hold 46 bottles each; 3) Scholtes built-in coffee maker; 4) steam oven, traditional
oven, microwave and professional oven; 5) miniature greenhouse; 6) chef's island with two fryers, grill, cook top, sink and warming top; 7) family eating island; 8) washing area and
four Scholtes dishwashers; 9) cookbook library and storage.

Italian ambassador and wife bring cooking space in official residence into the 21st century


JuRA KoNCius
The Washington Post
WASHINGTON -
L ila Castellaneta ar-
rived at Villa Firenze,
her new home at the
edge of Rock Creek Park,
full of grand plans for
diplomatic entertaining. It
was 2005, and she and her
husband, Giovanni, the
newly appointed Italian


ambassador to the United
States, were moving into'
the 1927 English Tudor-
style estate that serves as
the official ambassador's
residence.
But there was a problem:
The kitchen in the 57-room
house dated back several
decades.
Soon after, Castellaneta
picked up the phone and
dialed her friend Silvio


Fortuna, chief executive of
Arclinea,-an Italian com-
pany known as the Ferrari
of kitchen design. "Silvio,
aiuto!" (translation: Help!)
she said:
In a project that was
months in the planning and
six months in construction,
Arclinea gutted the three
rooms of the old, 968-
square-foot kitchen, trans-
forming it with cool


stainless steel, black oak
and amazing amenities in-_
cluding warming tops on
the counters to keep plates
toasty, four dishwashers
and an indoor herb garden
lit by LED lights. The chal-
lenge: to create a sleek,
professional space for offi-
cial entertaining as well as
a cozy corner for the family
to enjoy an espresso.
They finally popped the


prosecco on the finished
project in November 2007.
"We wanted to catch the
spirit and versatility of
Italy in this kitchen," Lila
Castellaneta says. "And we
wanted a kitchen that was
so beautiful we could serve
a buffet in it."
The property has seen a
lot of Washington history.
The house was built as a
private home for the family


of a construction magnate.
It has a three-story main
hall with a balcony, timber
beams, a pipe organ and a
rotunda ornamented with
signs of the zodiac. A li-
brary, now the ambas-
sador's private office, has
paneling by 17th-century
English designer Christo-
pher Wren. The house had

See KITCHEN/Page Ell


SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2oog E9


Crmus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicm







CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E10 SUNDAY. IUNE 7, 2009


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

It has a beautiful ring
sound that just keeps going.
It is 8 inches tall.
Also enclosed is a picture
of a green ice bucket with a
braided metal handle.
The other two glass items
are 3 inches tall, from At-
lantic City, with "Helen"'(my
mother's mom) and "1907"
scrolled on the cup. I would
like to know more about
these, and if there is any
'money value to them. If so,
how does one go about sell-
ing these and other items?
- C.D., Citrus Springs
Dear C.D.: The crystal
vase was likely made in
America about 100 years
ago. Potential dollar value is
below $50.
The ice bucket was proba-
bly made after World War II.
There is no specific collec-
tor interest Potential dollar
value is catch-as-catch-can.


GUESTS
Continued from Page E6

a safer, healthier method
of managing pests by com-
bining multiple controls,
like choosing pest-resistant
plants, good maintenance
practices, encouraging ben-
eficialinsects like ladybugs,
regular scouting for prob-
lems and using less-toxic
chemicals like horticultural
oils and insecticidal soaps.
IPM's main focus is prevent-
ing insect pest problems
through intelligent mainte-
nance practices.
The Green Expo will pro-
vide you with more informa-
tion on IPM, Florida-friendly
landscaping, water conser-
vation and a variety of other
green topics. We hope to see
you there!
Citrus County IUF/IFAS Ex-


The two pieces of glass,
with their ruby colored
upper portion and clear
glass base, are in the sou-
venir glass category. They
are either ruby stained or
ruby flashed glass. Ruby
flashed glass is made by ap-
plying a thin layer, of ruby
colored glass over the clear
glass. Then the design,
name, or place is cut
through the thin layer of
ruby to the clear glass.
Ruby stained glass is sim-
ply an applied color in the
form of a lacquer. It is a
cheap imitation of flashing.
The coating is not fired on
and has the tendency to
wear off over time or show
scratch lines- through the
color. The two pieces you
have appear to be ruby
flashed. The handled cup
with Atlantic City has a po-
tential dollar value in the
$50 range, the other piece
$10 to $15.
Dear John: As with all of
the e-mails you receive, I
hope you can help. I am

tension's Florida-friendly
landscaping program is a
free education program,
funded jointly by the Citrus
County Board of County
Commissioners and the
Coastal. Rivers and Withl a -
coochee River Basin Boards
of the Southwest Florida
Water Management District
For more information, visit
the University of Florida's
Web site www.Solutions-
ForYourLife.org or contact
the Citrus County UF/IFAS
Extension at 527-5700.
All programs and related
activities sponsored for, or
assisted by, the Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sci-
ences are open to all per-
sons with non-disc-
rimination with respect to
race, creed, color, religion,
age, disability, sex, sexual
orientation, marital status,
national origin, political
opinions, or affiliations.


CITRUS COUNTY ARREST REPORTS
* For information about arrests made by the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriffcitrus.org and
click on the Public Information link, then on Arrest
Reports. Watch the "Arrested Developments" show
from the Citrus County Sheriff's Office at www.chroni
cleonline.tv.


sending some pictures of a
cast-iron dining room set
and two paintings. I have no
background information on
them, as they were pur-
chased at a yard sale or
Goodwill store.
The artist's name on the
pictures is "Milo." In Eng-
lish, printed on the back, is
"Neushvchtein castle,
Bavaria. Louis IV ruled
from 1268-1347". On the sec-
ond picture, again written
on the back, is "Temporary
home of Luis V, Garmich,
Bavaria".
The table gives me little
information. It is 72 by 40
inches, and stands 29 inches
high. Can you give me any
insight? -J.G., Internet
. Dear J.G.: The pictures
you have are likely prints,
not original paintings. They
appear to be commercial


grade. Without a first name
or initial it is not possible to
investigate the name Milo.
Potential dollar value is
catch-as-catch-can.
I think the table and
chairs were manufactured
within the last 30 years. The
style of the chairs and table
base are taken from the 18th
century. Potential dollar
value is catch-as-catch-can.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for more
than 20 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Siko-
rski's Attic, on WJUF(90.1
FM) Saturdays from 11 a.m.
until noon. Send questions
to Sikorski's Attic, c/o The
Citrus County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowerest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429.


-B Couch

.9 Realty
& Investments, Inc.
For All Your Real Estate Needs.
Richard (Rick)
Couch
Lic. Real Estate Broker

1045 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando, FL 34442
Office: 352 344-8018 *:Cell: 352 212-3559
www.Rcouch.comr

1'." "" Ask a Veteran - a
Norm
W Overfield KELLER
StE-Ll') -62 WILLIAMS
(352)586-8620


1 0, 0 o 3 BR, 2 BA, 2 CAR GARAGE


R www.encorehbmesofcitrus.com

*PB^W~W''.^S


.-i:1


Building homes in Citrus County since 1986
Monday-Friday 10:00am-4:00pmn


2271 South Olympic Hills Terrace (352) 726-2179
Directions: Hwy. 41 S. of Inverness, turn left on Eden Drive, take 1st right at South Olympic Hills.


I ggj Fran Perez
ERA Realtor - *
AMERICAN REALTY (:2)
& INVESTMENTS Cell (352) 586-8885 A A
4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU ~
Office: 352-746-3600
W f- IMPECCABLY CLEAN AND VERY WELL MAINTAINED
A ^*.'^S^ ~POOL HOME ,r. .,, t.,e Pine Ridge Estates. Must see
r, '-i g" M...' . . i ,',1 *i,,*s 111 model featuring upgraded
r'.- , ,: -,i:r-. r, 4 itiful bay window in din g room.
L ,-ylJ | n, 1. . ,:, al,,i', - ri,',.*..:,:,,1 soors in 3rd bedroom and hallway-
S, ,, ,,: ,,r-.* ,,-, ,:- a ' baths. Ready to just move right
" " . .H .j ,nc r,e,, .Tr.Tu.rTiry cTrfr.: many amenities such as tennis,
' run [..ar, r .: .- 1 P-IAe Ridge Golf Course is just a short
1,,, .'.:., 'ML". B3l 7A I264,000


CALLING ALL COLLECTORS, CARS, BOATS, whatever, this
beautiful caged pool home also features a separate 32 x 32
garage with 18 ft. door & 10 ft. door - Finished floor, air conditioned
and heated. Also a powerful whole house fan. Great also for a
party place!!" This property also features another separate shed
w/electricity. Beautiful home - Beautiful landscaping, fantastic
heated pool new water heater and so much more. Move-in
. .il,, iXi- 1" s299.900 Dir. 491 to Pine Rpage Bhd
to property on IE ft just passed Beastrow


TAKE A GOOD LOOK. AlmosI two acres Real
Srii,.e propen, Honme In need of refinihng
Large outbuilding' Over 200 ft on N Flor.-oa
4ve I41 Great locanor, - Come anr see wnril
S. you can do to comphrlent hi.s beauhiul -.de'l
;': " - :-' Eerytng i. as-is"' MLS#332536 $139,000

3751 N. Muscadine Path, BH 4889W. Maverick Ct., BH 158 Clifton PI., BH
Gorgeous lot on a cul-de-sac Reducedll Beautiful lot in Raducedll Beauliful comer lot an Clifton &
in BH. Close to shopping. Pine Ridge Estates. This is a unique Romany Lp.iis is a rare tnd in the beautiful
MLS#327028 & desirable equestrian comm. LaurelRdgeeaofBHneargolfcourse.
$32,900 MLS#327029 $49,900 MLS#327030 $29,900


,1tezxdem
REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HwY.
[fl] CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES(.ALI


E10SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2009


E


OPEN HOUSE
SUN. 1-31111"M


779982









C ' COUNTY/F1 I CHRONICLESNA,


FRUGAL
* Continued from Page E5

sucked into buying many
of these items to save
money. Then lo and be-
hold, they collect dust
ADAPTATION: When
you .see an item you
think will help you save
money, put it on a wish
list for a while. Delay
your purchase to see


whether it's merely an
impulsive decision. Do
some research, read re-
views, watch demonstra-
tions, or even borrow an
item from friends or
family to test it out be-
fore buying it. Consider
your, time and knowl-
edge constraints and
whether you can justify
making these expensive
purchases. You might
have always wanted to
dehydrate your own


food, but do you have an
inexpensive food
source? How often will
you use it? Do you have
room for it? You might
discover there's a
cheaper alternative, you
can buy it secondhand,
or you can live without
it, after all.
ON.
An Internet connec-
tion is frugal. When
given the choice be-
tween cable television


and an Internet connec-
tion, frugalitarians
choose being online.
hands down. They'll give
up their landline phone,
dryer, dishwasher, going
to the movies and eating
out, but don't mess with


their computer - and lars on their Web sites.
who can blame them One reader, Dayna in
when it pays for itself? Ohio, shares: "I check
There are many ways to sales on the store Web
save money online, sites. Some stores, like
SEARCH SALES Walgreens, have an on-
FLIERS: Stores offer
their weekly sales circu- See FRUGAL/Page E14


KITCHEN
Continued from Page E9

several occupants until
it was bought in 1942 by
copper magnate Robert
Guggenheim and his
wife, Polly, who were
known for their lavish
parties. In 1976, Guggen-
heim's widow sold the
estate to the Italian gov-
ernment
Over the, years, differ-
ent ambassadors have
added Florentine art-
works, contemporary
Italian sculptures and
Murano chandeliers. Its
22 acres of hills - it's
one of the largest private
estates in the city - are
home to formal rose gar-
dens and manicured
lawns. Deer are often.
uninvited guests at
evening receptions on
the rear piazza.
But the kitchen was
worn out and unsuitable
for serving the 4,000 peo-
ple that an ambassador
annually welcomes to re-
ceptions and formal din-
ners. It had old
appliances, obsolete
plumbing, dated cabinets
coated with layers of
paint, and scant storage.
It had not had a major
renovation in decades.
"It was a very old
kitchen, ugly and 'old-
fashioned," recalls For-
tuna, whose grandfather
founded Arclinea in 1925
outside Venice. The
company, whose compo-
nents are designed by
Milanese architect Anto-
nio Citterio, has in-
stalled kitchens for Brad
Pitt, Donna Karan, Jen-
nifer Aniston, Sting and


- three times - for the
late tenor Luciano
Pavarotti. Arclinea is
scheduled to open its
ninth American show-
room this fall in George-
town.
While a celebrity's
kitchen may serve only
as a trophy, the kitchen
at the Italian ambas-
sador's residence is used
every day by its chef,
Roberto Grazioli.
Lila � Castellaneta
,worked closely with Ar-
clinea to plan a work-
able space for cooking,
storing and serving. "I
know myself that a
kitchen is riot a show-
room. You don't just put
in all this fun stuff," she
says. "It has to be func-
tional."
Still, there is plenty of
fun. Arclinea installed
steel worktops on two is-
lands and along either
side of the room. On the
right, a 22-foot-long
counter houses sinks
and four dishwashers,
each with a 12-place-
setting capacity On the
left, a wall of cabinets
with glass fronts holds
crystal and china and
two 46-bottle wine cool-
ers; then comes the cof-
fee machine, refrig-
erators and ovens.,
The two center islands
have different purposes.
The larger is left for the
pros: the chef and assis-
tants who might prepare
food for 300 guests with
steam ovens and fryers:
Half of the island is
equipped with a warm-
ing top to keep platters
of food warm.
For light meals, the
Castellanetas can pull
up two white bar stools


to the smaller island.
This island also incorpo-
rates storage and a sink
Above it, Arclinea in-
stalled a tiny indoor
greenhouse with violet-
colored lights that come
on and go off on a pre-set
cycle so a variety of
herbs can be grown for
recipes or garnish. A
built-in coffee machine
can brew espresso, cap-
puccino or cafe Ameri-
cano. The floors are
matte gray Italian ce-
ramic tile.
"When we entertain, if
it's a buffet, we set it up
here because it's beauti-
ful and very chic," says
Castellaneta. "So many
of our guests are sur-
prised because nobody
invites them into their
kitchens."
At a recent dinner to
honor contributions
made for Abruzzo earth-
quake relief and recov-
ery, 48 guests walked
into the kitchen to pick
up their Ginori dinner
plates and make their
way around the islands,
which were layered with
homemade pizza, buffalo
mozzarella, squid stuffed
with shrimp and veg-
etable risotto.
Castellaneta chose a
playful black-and-white
still from the 1954 movie
'An American in Rome"
("Un Americano a
Roma") to hang on the
back wall. It shows an
iconic Italian scene: the
late actor Alberto Sordi
savoring a plate of
spaghetti.
Framed on the opposite
wall are dreary "before"
photos of the kitchen. Ex-
treme makeover, Italian
edition.


LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURE!

+,

^ ^^jg�-" Ta-K.. . A.^3B .ggK : .,:.-- .-- I*- "-I-l"--
VERY ROOMY 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH. 1. ,.i, CHARMING AND COZY 1998 BUILT 212
ving and family room with open floorplan and lots of HOME. Perfect for first-time home buyers or, second
windows. Ready to move right in. AlNso available are the home. Features privacy-fenced yard & screened lanai
rear vacant lots to expand your backyard and preserve with hot tub. ALL FOR $88,000! Motivated sellers.
our privacy. A must to see for that affordable easy 694 N. SAVARY AVE., INVERNESS - MLS#333588
living! 610 SPRUCE - $84,500 MLS#334608 Linda Call Tonya Koch 352-613-6427 or Debbie Tannery


SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2oog Ell


CrrRUS COUNTY (FI E









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


~12 ~ ~ 7 9AA0


[IN


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa:(5)5356 1Tl re 88 85-24 1, Em il cls.i-.,,----ceofie~o I -e e ww-hoiloln~o

Moil Home Moil Hoe MblHoe]Mbl m RaEtteI eal EsatI ?a i Aprmet Rnal
For 1 RetFrRn orSl nPr FrRn o en nunshd nomto


2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Util. incl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term, $695
(352) 628-9759
2/2 SNOWBIRD OASIS
$600 mo. + $600dep.
Lawn, Water, Sewer,
Garb. inc. 352-746-7595
AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hemando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk.
Free interet/long dist.
Tialrs $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant

CRYSTAL RIVER
CLOSE TO
POWER PLANT

2/1 Partially
furnished,
washe(/dryer,on 1/2
acre, clean, quiet, no
dogs. $500.+ Sec.
INGLIS
CLOSE TO
POWER PLANT

2/1 Apartment,
partially furnished,
washer/dryer,
clean & quiet. No dogs.
$600.+ Sec.
(352) 447-0333
F.C./HERNANDO
2BR, 1BA, CH/A
$350/$400 1st, last, sec.
No pets 564-0578
HERNANDO
3/2 on 2 acres, front
porch, laundry area
$600 mo. (813) 843-2105

HOME-N-LAND
New home on 1/2
acre. 3/2 1500sqft. 10
yr. warranty, sodded
lawn, paved Rd. Get
your stimulus check
($8,000) cash back
only $665/mo. W.A.C.
Own your own home
CALL (352) 621-9183

HOMOSASSA
1&2 Brfum & Unfurn .
In beautiful park w/pool.
No Pets. 352- 628-4441


HOMOSASSA
2/1.5, No Pets $500. Mo.
(352) 628-5696
HOMOSASSA
2/2/Carport, Clean!
No pets! $475 + Util. +
Sec. (352) 586-2976

HOMOSASSA 55+-
2/2 Stonebrook
Estates
Unfurnished, Car Port.
Pool, Club house.
Boat & RV storage
.$595. Mo.
(352) 422-7887

HWY 488
Extra Clean 2/2, Irg.
fenced yd. scrn. par.,
carport, $500 mo.+ dep
no pets. 352-795-6970
INVERNESS
2/1 Scrn. Prch. Fenc,d
yrd,Fst./Lst./Sec.$475.mo
No pets (352) 726-4842
INVERNESS
3/1 & 2/2 - $450/mo
352-476-1122; 476-2417
INVERNESS
Large 3/2, appx 2000 s. f.
under roof. No pets. I yr.
lease. $675 mo. F/L/S
344-3444 / Eves.
344-3084.
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park,
2BR, 1-V2BA, $475.
. 1 BR,1 BA, $350 Incl,
water 352-476-4964
COUNTRY
SETTING
2/2' in Country Setting.
$500/mo. + $500 Sec. No.
pets. For application Call
Lee at 352-250-0664 or
800 -692-4162.




Handyman
Special, DW 3/2
Needs TLC, Carport
Good Location,
near shopping/fishing
$35,000 obo Call
Owner 352-795-3397

INVERNESS
55+ Waterfront Park,
I BR water incl. A/C
$3,500 + $270 mo. lot
rent. 352-476-4964


NEW 2009 2/2, large
rooms, appliance
pkg. 2x6 construction
10 yr. warranty, must
see! $37,900 Includes
A/C & heat, steps,
skirting on new pad!
352-621-9182
Palm Harbor 3/2
Singlewide
Introductory Model
$299/mo wac. 10
models to choose from
On Your Lot
Call 1-800-622-2832
Walden Woods Village
3 Bedroom 13 bath,
carport, Lrg. eat in kit,
liv.,din. rm., Scrn'd la-
nai, outside storage.
Exc. loc. Avail; June.
$56,400(352) 382-0681



BANK FORECLOSURE!
3/2 approx. 1300 sqft
on 1/2 ac. fenced
back yd, scrn room,
work shop, concrete
drive on paved road.
Private but close to
town! Home In great-
condition! $3,000
down, $565/mo.
,W.A.C. Call to view.
(352) 621-9181
crystal river 2/2,sw,on
1/2acre new
carpet&stove very clean
10x14 workshop $35000
o.b.o.813-792-1355
Crystal River
412, on 5 acres, 15 X 30
family rm. w/wet bar,
fireplace, walk in closets,
lease wloption. $850.
Mo; (352) 465-8346
Floral City
2/2 DW on 3.5 + or -
acres. Withlacoochee
Forest area great for
horse riding.Priced to
sell. (352) 341-6281
(352) 634-0787
(352) 634-1290.
INGLIS '95 SW
2/1 '/2, beautiful,
wooded, prlv 11/4 ac.
backs ups to wildlife .
sanctuary. Incis covered
deck, garage w/work
shop, Ig shed w/win-
dows, all appis, washer,
dryer. TEAL at S53.9001
352-419-5777:476-9005


2/2, Moonrise, Floral
City, 45+ All new tile
floors, washer & dryer,
pets OK. $17,900 obo
(727) 391-9555
BUSHNELL
2/1 part. remodeled
Adult park, Lot Rent
$195/mo $5,500 obo
(352) 457-1550
INVERNESS 1 BR Mobile,
55+ w/. waterfront
park$9,900 AC, W/D,
Shed 352-476-4964
LECANTO
Senior Park. roomy
2 bedrm 1.5 bath, fully
furnish, move in ready
Very Nice $7500'
(352) 634-4329
WEST WIND VILL 55+
(2) NEW 2005 Incredible
Prices Resales/Rentals
avail w/lease - Pet ok.
furnished. 352-628-2090.




POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - RV SITES
Waterfront homes �
Weekly private rooms
352-628-0011




CHASSAHOWITZKA
2/2 waterfront DW $600
2/2 furnished DW $700
2/1 carport - $500
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $900
Agent, 352-382-1000

River Links Realty
352-628-1616

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $900..
CRYSTAL RIVER
WF 3/2/2 $1075
4/2/2 $1050

Duplex /I $350.
2/1 $495/up
Homes 3/2/2 $675.
River Haven 3/2/2 WF,
pool $1100.,
Sugarnmlll Wds 2/2/2
Condo or Villa $625.


Castro
Realty and Property
Management Inc.
333 N. Croft Avenue
Inverness FL 34453
352-341-4663
Beverly Hills
1,2 & 3 Bedrooms
$475 - $750/mo.
Citrus Sorings
2 & 3 Bedrooms
$600 - $1050/mo.
Inverness
2 & 3 Bedrooms
$450 - $800/mo.
Citrus Hills
2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
$825 - $1050/mo.
Pine Ridge
3 & 4 Bedrooms
$800 - $1800/mo.
Hernando
1,2 & 3 Bedrooms
$475 - $800/mo.
Check Out Our
Website At www.
castrorealtyl.com
Rental Inventory
changes daily.
Furnished rentals also
available.
See Our Rental Ad In
The Real Estate News
Magazine





PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
Pritchard Island
3/2/1 Villa- $875
Arbor Lakes
3/2/2 - $800
Inverness
2/2/2- $700
3/2/2-$750
2/I/I -$595
2/2/1 - $625
3/2/1- $895
2/2/1 Vila - $695
l&2BdApartments
starting at $400
2/112/1- $600
2/I 2/I - $600
Lecanto
I/I Apartment- $395
See our website:
www.Jwmortonreal
estate.com
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
352-726-9010


NATURE COAST
Crystal River:
2/2 home $650

Furnished Homes:
2/1 - $1000
1/1 -$1200
2/1 - $1800 W/F
2/2 - $1500 W/F
The Islands/Condos:
2/2 - $1200 and up
furnished

Port Paradise:
2 & 3/2 WF w/dock
Several units to
choose from
Fully furnished
2/1 Apartments:
$550 to $575
Homosassa:
3/2/2 - $775
3/2/2 - $850
Citrus Sorinas:
3/2/2 - $950
Visit our website:
www.c21nature-
or call 352-795-0021

SINGLE FAMILY
HOMES,
DUPLEXES,
WATERFRONT,
MOBILE HOMES

FURNISHED/
UNFURNISHED,
WE HAVE THEM ALL
THROUGH OUT THE
COUNTY GIVE US A
CALL..:From
$525/mo to
$1250/mo
Alexander
Real Estate, Inc.
Crystal River
352-795-6633 ph
352-795-6133 fx

Get
Results in
the
home front
classitieds!


AlValueinn.com
' Inverness
Hernando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
internet/long dist.
Trailers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant





1 BEDROOM
Starting @ $425/mo
Laundry on premises.
352-465-2985


4th OF JULY SPECIAL
$76 MOVES YOU IN!
2 BEDROOMS
STARTING AT $450.
352-257-8048

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, 1% OFF FIRST
Mo.(352) 263-6321
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5, c/h/a w/d hook
up. 838 5th Av N.E.
$575+sec 727-343-7343;
727-455-8998

CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2 BIR $600 +
sec. (352) 634-5499

INGLIS VILLAS
Is now accepting
applications for our
1, 2, 3 BR Apts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Crys. Riv.
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: M,W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglis Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity


ONE MONTH FREE!
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appls,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341


Pinewood Villas
Is now Accepting
applications for our
1, 2, 3 BR Apts.
Located in Bronson
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-486-2612
Or Apply Tues & Thur
7291 NE 92nd Ct. #17,
Bronson, Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity




INVERNESS
2/1- All new floors,.
nice setting. $500;
2/2- Large rooms,
completely tiled,
screen lanai, very
quiet & private. $600.
Washer dryer
hook-ups.
727-446-5871
352-344-0238




---

.. Act Noi' '

PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad


We Have Rentals
Starting at $425/mo +
Many others
LANDMARK
REALTY
352-726-9136
Kathy or Jane
311 W Main St. Inv




44 W. Inverness
900 to 1300 sf
upscale Office
Retail Space.
1st Month FREE.
Ist Yr 20% discount.
352 344-5488

CRYSTAL RIVER
AUTO REPAIR
SHOP FOR
LEASE.
8 Bay Auto Center
includes all lifts. Great
location, great rates.
CIP18886475111
(407) 647-5111

HERNANDO
Office, on 3/4 acre.
Busy intersection, great
for sheds, boats, sales.
$835. Mo.(352) 637-7117





CITRUS HILLS
2/2/1 Nicely furnished.
Social membership
avail. $825 mo. F/L/S
(352) 341-1019


Move In Special
1-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $150
2-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $200
Exp. 6/30/09
Call Monday Through Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm
We accept HUD Vouchers, Foreclosures Acc ted.


(352) 489-1021 &I
~~~ , PPRUNT


0 9 S -"- 11-- -7 2000








Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2009'E13


CITRUS HILLS
Home, Villa, Condo
GREENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-5921
(888) 446-5921
greenbriarrental.com
Citrus Hills
New A/C, new rugs, Unf.
2/2, use of pool, patio,
W/D, carport, No Pets
$699 (718) 833-3767





FREE RENT!
SUMMERHILL
AT
MEADOWCREST
Luxury Condos
Limited Time!
Call agent for
details.
352-563-5657
/ out zoomcitrus.com

INVERNESS
Extra Irg. 2/2/1 Lakeside
Community, pool, dock,
no smoke, restricted
pets. $600 mo. + sec.
(866)637-2631 TOLL FREE
INVERNESS
Whispering Pines Villa
2/2. garage, W/D,
comm. pool. $600.
352-592-9926




CITRUS SPRINGS
NEW 2/2. Duplex in a
nice private area close to
shopping & schools.
Water & sewer included
$600/mo. 1st & last.
Mike 352-558-4477
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/1
Large master suite,
stainless steel appl.
Large lanai. Lease,
+ Dep. No Pets $800.
Mo. (352) 697-3133
Crystal River 2/1
$425./mo. 1st, last, sec.
firm. (352) 746-6691
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, $560 mo. + dep.
C/H/A (352) 464-2716
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lrg, 2/2 C/H/A, Nice
$585/mo., includes,
lawn, garbage, water,
Move in with $900.
No dogs 352-726-9570
HOMOSASSA
New, 2/2, Rent
w/option to buy. 1300
sq. ft. w/d hk. up, fans,
blinds, refr., stove,
microwave, tile, carpet.
- $750. month
(352) 592-0893
INVERNESS 2/2
LIKE Newt w/W/D
$625mo 352-563-2118
Lecarito
Newer 2/2, dsh/Wsh.
W/dry, H20 incl. No pets.
Lg.Yd. (352)628-2815

ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2
dpix, all ktchn appls,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341


INVERNESS 1/1
$475 mo. Incis all utils. +
cable. 352-270-8298




2 BDR 2 BA
for Annual Lease
Overlooking Rainbow
River, No Pets
19948 Burkitt Rd.
Dunnellon, Green Rock
Realty, Inc.
Owner-Broker
727-595-3480
GREAT AMERICAN
REALTY
Inverne
X-Lrg 2/2/2 all utilities.
2/2 Condo main-free
BIG! Like new 3/2/2
Studio Apts.all utilities.
Beverly Hill
Very Nice 2/2
Oakwood VIII. 3/2/2
3/2 Great areal
Citrus Sorings
3/2/2 Newer home
2/2 Duplex
Adorable 1/1 & 2/1
Hernando
Brentwood 3 & 2 bd
Townhouses
Very Nice 1/1
Citrusil
2/2 with Pool
Brand New 4/21/2/2

3/2 Mobile waterfront

352-637-3800
www.choosegar.com


INVERNESS

Immaculate
Newer Homes

3/2/2, Back Porch,
$800. Mo., no pets.
2/2/1 Patio Home
close to shops,
$700 Mo.

2/2/2 + Fla. room
adult 55 + cornm., pet
ok. $750. Mo.
2/2/2 Fenced yard, out
building, avail Aug. 1
st. $700. Mo.

(352) 344-2500
(352) 464-2508

SUNSET VILLAS
Senior Community
Chiefland Fl.
Accepting
Applications for
1 & 2 BR APTS
Please Apply
M, W, F, 8am-12p
' 124 SW 14th Ave,
(352) 493-0220
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.





BEVERLY HILLS
Progress Energy
Contractors 1/1,
fully furn avail now
$825. Includes all util-
ities, 100 channel
TV/Internet.
2/1 also available
(352) 220-2666


AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hernando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
internet/long dist.
Trail.rs $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant
Citrus Hills
Townhouse 2/212/1.
Terra Vista Club incl.
$1,000 Mo + until.
(516) 991-5747
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 on canal. $900. Mo.
Fst.J Lst. + $300. Sec.
(352) 622-4387
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2 Waterfront Furn.
8 rm. house on Lake
Russo, boat ramp &
private dock. $1,200
Mo. RV. sight also
avail. $350.Mo.
(850) 566-4195
HERNANDO
Attention Progress

Util. Incl. o smokl/ ,pets
$1,200. mo+. depq.


- River Lakes Manor
3/2.5/2 Scrn'd patty,
CHA, washer/dryer.
$650. Mo., fst./Ist. + sec.
(352) 322-0149
HOMOSASSA
3/2/1 Nearly new. Off of
Rock Crusher Road,
near school. Well furn.
& clean. Great cond.
Lease with Option to
purchase. $950.
Month. + electric
5640 Irving Court
(352) 563-2776
INVERNESS
1 BR Mobile, 55+ water-
front park. Incl. water
$475 352-476-4964
. RIVERHAVEN
VILLAGE
2/2 Fncd. yd., sc. porch,
$850.(352) 628-0961




2 Masters /2/2 (large)
SUGARMILL Woods
Screen lanai, oversized
gar. new apple. & A/C
$850 mo.
(352)302-4057

2 or 3 Bedrooms
RENT TO OWN- NO
CREDIT CHECK!!
Low Down!
352-484-0866
iademission.com
BEV. HILLS/Cit. Sprg
2/1, Bev. Hills $650. mo.
4/1, Cit. Sprgs $700. mo
352-746-0330
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1/1 Fla rm, $525
2/2/1 End porch, patio
$675 (845)282-3504
BEVERLY HILLS
2 BD Houses starting @
$575. All central a/c,
All FIRST FREE Month
352-422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 Fl. Rm., W/D, CHA
New: Paint. Carpet,
refrig., blinds, 795-9060


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1.5 fam rm, porch,
shed. New carp. & tile
dishwsh c/h/a $650 mo.
86 S. Lincoln 795-7374
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1. Newly painted,
new floors, nice porch,
big back yard
746-1300
68 S. Jackson St.
BEVERLY HILLS
Nice 2/1,Fenced $575.
E-Z Terms!352-400-4275
BEVERLY HILLS
Very Nice 2/1, $575/
mo. (352) 220-0740
www.letaj.com/lemon
**-*** **
CITRUS HILLS
3/2 Pool Home
I Acre, $975
(352)746-4821

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/1 $825mo + sec.
352-746-9436c

CITRUS
SPRINGS
3/2/2 Newer Home.
Washer & dryer.
Sprinkler system.
Quiet neighborhood.
$1,000. Monthly.
(352) 812-1414

CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 3/2/2 , Near Sch.
$875. mo 352-628-073t
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, INCLS UTILITIES
$200-$220 per wk
(352) 628-1062
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 Near hosp. $695
(727) 631-2680
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1, large 1 acre lot, very.
private. Only 5 min. from
amenities. Includes kit.
apple , $700 1st & last
(352) 563-1491
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lovely, Spacious 3/2/1,
Unfurnished $850 mo.
or $1000 mo. furnished
352-628-1149

CRYSTAL RIVER
Rent or Rent to Own
$699. Move-In Special
3/2, Lrg Faim. Room.
Tiled, spotless,
fenced, Pets OK&
Copeland Park
352-527-0493
352-427-7644

FLORAL CITY
1/1 on. Lakefront. Stack
W/D, Pets OK, util. incl.
$625. (813) 241-7117


GOLFER'S DREAM
Home 3/2/2
3000 stf
$850 (908) 322-6529
HOMOSASSA
or S. mill woods
Beautiful, 3/2 posss 2/2
Lease Ot .Flexible
Financin 352-795-0088
INVERNESS
2/2, $650mo, 1st/last
$300 sec.(352) 860-2055
INVERNESS
2/2, Modern, light
& bright. $650/mo.
F/L/S/352-634-1141
INVERNESS
2/2/1, pet ok. $650. Mo.
(813) 973-7237
INVERNESS
3/2/1 Gospel Island
area, on culdesac, by
lake $850. Mo. First & Last
No pets (352) 860-2146
INVERNESS
610 Independence Hwy
3/2/2 Fenced yard.
Rent w/option to buy.
$750/mo. 1st +Sec.
352-422-3670

INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
4/2/2 or 3/2/2 Starting
at $790 (352) 341-1142
(352) 601-2615

INVERNESS
Very nice quiet
neighborhood, close
to Ft. Cooper Park. 3/2
w/oversized garage
enclosed porch,
fenced in back yard,
all appliances. Lots of
closet space. Very
clean. Ready to move
in. Only $825 per
month. 1st, Lst, Sec.
For appointment call
(352) 726-3258
PINE RIDGE
3/2/2, $1,000 mo. 1st
last sec. 352-527-0635
Rainbow Lks. Est
2/2 CHA, IsIstt/sec. $650
(352) 489-4282
SOUTHERN
WOODS
4/3/2 Luxury
executive home
on golf course,
great views,
$1,300/Mo.
(813)390-7109

SUGAR MILL
WOODS
3/2/2 w/den, scm 'd porch
$875. Mo. + Sec.
(352) 597-5221


I~AcTIONi~ 2S2.795.RENT I


INTAMANAIMDTRIAY, IC.www.CitirusCountyHomeRentals.com


HOMES * MOBILES * APARTMENTS
FEATURED PROPERTIES
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1 Apartment........................ $475
3/2/2 Fum. Waterfront ........$1,500
CITRUS SPRINGS 4/2/2 House ..........................$900
INVERNESS 2/1/1 House ...........:.........................$650
HOMOSASSA 3/2 Doublewide ........................... 700
HOMOSASSA/SMW 3/2/2 ................................. . 850


SCall for more information. OVER 40 TO CHOOSE FROM


TERRA VISTA
3/2/2, Newly built,
gated community,
washer/dryer, lawn care,
free golf & club
membership
included. $950. Mo.

HUDSON
3/2/2 Vaulted ceilings,
eat in kitchen, split
bedroom, washer/
dryer, & community
pool included.
Screened patio, fenced
back yard.
$850. Mo.
Mark Fredrick
(813) 215-3446
Charles Rutenberg
REALITY





CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2.5 $1,200 Mo.
Garbage and lawn
maintence included.
Ist & Sec; Lease,
Pets?
(352) 795-0207,
(352) 212-4981

INV. LAKEFRONT
2/2/2, Large home,
great area, tiled. New
carpets. City water.
$700 mo. 352-476-4896

POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - Waterfront
homes, Wkly priv. rms,
RV.Iots. 352-628-0011

RIVERHAVEN
3/2/2, Liv. Din. Fam. Rm.
Patio $950 mo.
(352) 341-4178




AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hernando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free .
internetolong dist.
Traite $175wk.
3Br Luxuryv Homes

(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant

CRYSTAL RIVER
Furn .$450. Pays All
Clean. 352-563-6428
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront, w/private
bedroom & bath, shared
kitch. $650. 352 2571509
DUNNELLON
IncIs utils. priv entrance
$400/mo. 352-816-0936
HOME TO SHARE
Widow would like
person to share lovely
home on 2 acres.
Dog okay. 1/2 utils only.
352-220-6100
HOMOSASSA
3 Rms , Kit. privileges,
Free cable /2 elec.
$500/mo 352-503-3343




2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Util. Incl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
(352) 628-9759


AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hernando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
internet/long dist.
Traiers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant




AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50
Ad indudes 20 lines of copy
w/ photo.
Picture Perfect Homes
NEW HOMES START-
ING At $75,000 On
Your Lot
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
LIk. CBC0596S5

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to
advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
discrimination.
" Familial status
includes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing
custody of children
under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellirrgs advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of.
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275..



- , ,


- s m
| -


SUGARMILL WOODS
NEW POOL HOMES




Sat & Sun 11a-5p
5 Boxwood Ct
17 Black Willow Ct. N.
(352) 688-6864
www.VanOrdenHome
Builders.coam





100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
*Low income applicants
can quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or No credit
OKAY
*recent bankruptcy
OKAY*
CAll TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
*Credit and income
restriction apply*
Florida licensed mort-
gage lender











OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Great Location,
HWY. 19.
South of
Sugarmill woods
entrance. North of new
public. $285,000.







- - .:,



TASIA SEIJAS
ERA American Realty
& Investment
(352) 302-0569
(352) 746-3600
Email To:
tasiaerai)yahoo.com





3/2/2 For Sale or Rent
Citrus Springs Newer
Home, low/dn, easy
terms 352-840-3324

BEAUTIFUL LOCATION
3/2/2 w/garden room.
By Owner. Lots of
upgrades. Like new.
Oversized prime lot.
A must to see. Asking
$179,900 (352) 527-4488


8420 N Sarazen Dr
Citrus Springs FL
34434 4bd-2ba in .29
lot spacious w/great
golf course right
around the corner.
Built in 2005 and in
excellent conditions.
126,700.00 (OBO)
For info. call
352-489-7851,
352-322-5323 or email
to
hector@harroyo.net

ATTENTION!!
BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
$39,900. Delivered
and Set, $0-Down
Land/Home $650. mo.
Repos Available
. Kinder
Mobile Home
(352) 622-2460





RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON

2.8% COMMISSION

R61ky~ect

(352) 795-1555




FOR SALE BY OWNER
88 SJ Kellner, Bev. Hills
2/2%/2, FP, Call Anytime
OPEN HOUSE on
SUNDAY 11A-3P
$118K, 352-746-6093




PRICE SLASHED on
immaculate 2/2/1.5
Arobor Ct. Villa, Berber
cpt., tile, Corian Ctr. tops,
newer roof & paint, dec.
lighting, 2" blinds, all
appliances, maint. free,
2 pools, tennis cts.
clubhouse, on culdesac
1631 N. Dalary Pt.
Crystal River. By owner.
$124,000 (352) 563-6468




4+Acres, Canal front
- 3/2 large garage/
workshop +bonus
efficiency apt.
REDUCED TO 175K!
(352) 560-0019

For Sale, By Owner
3BR 3BA, Pool, 16x24
workshop, close to
school, hosp., library,
WTI, 518 Poinsettia, Ave.
(352) 860-0878


SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2009'E13


CITRUS COUNTY (F CHRONICLE


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


5,n,,,, 7 9fl00


By Owner $85,500.
8725 Gospel Island
3BR, 90 x 120 fenced
Lot, If interested
Call 726-3238
to see inside,
Furniture Included


YOU'LL THIS!
For Sale By Owner 2
bedroom. 2 bath. 1 car
garage home at 9260 E.
Alvada Lane in beautiful
Inverness Golf & Coun-
try Club Community.
Features skylight, lanai
& sprinkler system.
Asking $145,000. Call
(352)637-5876.

Like Country Living?
3/2/2 custom built 2005
Famrm. 18x24 sports
,pool w/scr encl, 6x6
jaccuzzi, wood firs.
wood burning Firepl
Wood cabinets &
granite counter tops,
15K back up house
gen. private 1.25 acres.
4439 Stallion Ln. In The
Ranches asking $239k
OBO (352) 573-0029

PUT YOUR
$MONEY$ TO WORK
BUY Real Estate
NOW!


Deb Infantine
EXIT REALTY LEADERS
(352) 302-8046
SPrices are Downill
Rates are LOWIII

RealtySelect
Citrus.com I


BETTYY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Rea-l"Iect

(352) 795-1555





3/2/1, 1 Acre,
On Private Lake,
Beautiful, New rf., new
siding, Has Separate
Guest house, Serious
Inquires only $320,000.
(352) 726-0477


-W-5-57
tatrus ty
Homes I


Plantation Realty. Inc
Q352) 795-0784
Questions about
the new $8000 tax
credit? Don't miss
this seminar!!!!!
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner
. HOMOSASSA
3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to.
head spring. 163' wfrt,
dock/slip. Brand
*new/unoccupied.
2 frpls, granite. $579K
727-808-5229

must sell!
Inverness
MUST SELL QUICK!
UNIQUE CUSTOM
HOME ON 1 ACRE ON
CANAL TO LAKE
TSALA POPKA. 3,323
sq. ft LIVING! 30'
ATRIUM. 3 BED/2.5
BATH. 2-CAR GAR-
AGE. LIVE OAKS.
NEEDS TLC. PRICED
TO SELL! ONLY
$194,500. CALL
MYRIAM @ KELLER
WILLIAMS REALTY of
CITRUS COUNTY.
352-613-2644 -


RealtySelect
Citrus.com


[-C-rystal-Rii"r
I Homes


7 Rivers Golf & C.C.
priv. member owned.
corner lot 1 ac (mol)
$30K (813) 766-9354 or
sweetsca eauestO
verizon.net


Biomass stoves have



evolved over years


OWNER FINANCING
4/2/office, 2.5 ac,
2005 Doublewide
Like new. 1800sqft,
$9,700/dn, $882/mo. or
$23,700 down, $582/mo.
727-992-1372


River Oaks East
4/2.5/2 Custom Pool
Home on 1.5 acres.
Office bonus rm, green
house, & boat slip.
$449,900 (352) 274-1594



FREE HOME
BUYERS
Seminar like none
other June 23rd
6pm /RSVP


FRUGAL
Continued from Page Ell

line inventory system so
I can see which stores
have the sale items in
stock This has saved me
a lot of time by avoiding
wasted trips." You can
also use Web sites such
as Shop Local
(www.shoplocal.com),
which lists. your local
stores and their sales
ads, so you can compare
prices all in one place.


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Reaty Select

(352) 795-1555



LOOKING FOR HOMES
OR MOBILES & LAND
Purchase, lease, mort-
gage assumptions, take
over payments + cash.
Any location, price, con-
dition, foreclosure, late on
payments okay.
1-727-992-1372



CITRUS SPRINGS Va-
.cant Lot in Citrus
Springs. Great location
Lot size 80 X 125'
Nice home across St.
craig@yourfloridaland.co
m
352-246-7282


HOMOSASSA 3.45 acres
dead end road two
streets from hwy 19 btwn.
C.R.& Hom. 30000.00 or
20% with financing
352-228-1789 .



Business/Home 3/2 Great
location on Trout Ave. Inver-
ness $165,000 . Rhema
Realty 228-1301

Lot Fra l


MAILING: Gone are
the days of waiting in
line at the post office.
You can order free prior-
ity-mailing supplies and
print labels, and ship
right from home. And
with online bill paying,
you save on gas and
stamps, too.
HOBBIES AND DIY:
There are tons of free
pattern Web sites fornthe
craft enthusiast If you're
interested in learning a
new craft or finding DIY
project instructions,
there are many video tu-


trials to choose from,
such as 5min
(www.5min.com). Or lo-
cate the best deal on a
local contractor. Another
reader, Vail in Washing-
ton, shares: "I've become
the DIY queen and
saved myself literally
thousands. Last week, I
repaired dovetails in an
original 1913 tallboy
dresser. It was an old
dresser with a busted
drawer and cost $13. And
through Angie's List

See FRUGAL/Page E15


Get


Results


In The


Homefront


Classified!


IM11 A Q_ TUNE 7 2000
-NFft- -.1 1


My producer, Brad Staggs, and I
put . together for
HGTVPro.com a five-part look
at the latest home-remodeling trends
that qualify for the new tax-
credit package. And we
thought it would be a good
idea to also share this infor-
mation here. This fourth
part of "Ed Del Grande's p , "
Commonsense Guide" fo-
cuses on biomass stoves.
Included in the new stim-
ulus package is a nice 30
percent tax credit for bio- Ed Del
mass stoves with efficiency
ratings of at least 75 per-
cent. Even though the tax PLUR
incentive caps out at
around $1,500, this is still a
good chunk of change and has created
quite the buzz. Still, this may raise the
question: What exactly is a biomass
stove?
To answer that, we need to start off
with explaining what biomass fuel is,
since that's what a. biomass stove
burns.
All fossil fuels started out as bio-
mass fuels. Organic molecules were
transformed by time and pressure into
fuels like oil, gas and coal.
Where biomass fuels differ from fos-
sil fuels is that,biomass fuels are an
easily renewable and cheaper natural
resource. With fossil fuels, what we
have is. what we have and they tend to
be on the pricey side. Wood is a bio-
mass fuel because it's made from
trees; we can grow new trees. As a
matter a fact, the "first" biomass
stoves that came out 20 years ago were
fueled by - guess what? - wood pel-
lets.


J


So, there it is. Basically, a biomass
stove is what we used to call a "pellet
stove."
The new biomass stoves on today's
market are very efficient
and well made. Over the
S years, they have developed
into high-tech marvels, with
push-button starting and
even automatic ash removal
from the fire chamber!
Many stoves can now
burn other "bio" fuels be-
sides wood pellets. If set up
Grande properly, new biomass
stoves can burn corn pellets
THE and even waste biomass
BER fuels like "cherry pits."
However, keep this in
mind: If anyone out there
knows where to get a truckload of
olive pits in the middle of a New Eng-
land winter, please let me know. Com-
mon sense tells me to set the stove up
for the wood or corn pellets, because
in many areas they may be easier to
get. But check with your distributor
for local recommendations.
Bottom line, like the saying goes,
"what's old is new again," and with the
current tax incentive, it may be worth-
while to take a good look at the new
biomass stoves available in your area.


* Master Contractor/PlumberEd Del
Grande is known' internationally as
the author of the book "Ed Del
Grande's House Call" and for hosting
TV shows on Scripps Networks and
* HGTVPro.com. For more informa-
tion, visit eddelgrande.com or write
eddelgrande@hgtvpro. com. Always
consult local contractors and codes.


Citrus Coun
Homes �


Dunnellon






4 . � r
Cimus Couiwr~ (FL) CI-moNIcI~


SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2009 5


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E14

(www.angieslist.com), I
found a guy to put in my new
95-percent-efficient gas fur-
nace and all new insulated
ducting for $3,800 instead of
the average of the other
quotes of about $8,000."
You can bid for items
through online auctions,
find items free on Web sites
such as Freecycle
(www.freecycle.org) or swap
for what you want at Web


sites such as Swap Thing
(www.swapthing.com).
TRAVEL: Budget-travel
tips are a click away. You can
look up national, parks, day
trips and airfare, hotel and
car-rental deals. Look for
places where kids eat free or
at a discount, too. Visit Web
sites such as KidsMealDeals
(www.kidsmealdeals.com).
Learn about renting or
swapping vacation homes,
and going on volunteer and
farm-stay vacations, too.
OEM
School is almost out for
summer. Once your child is


$8,OOO* Down Payment
Could Be Available To You.
*Ask Your Financial Institution For Details.
Lia biLnd, apdJ Iw,


License # RB0033452
SCITRUS 352-527-8764
SAVE THOUSANDS
"'uilt 'lith 'lyju :Jn A.ind" We pay closing costs! J
VISIT OUR WEBSHE: www.citrusbuilderonline.com


home on break, you can take
inventory of what supplies
are left that are still in good
condition. Often, binders,
backpacks, lunchboxes, and
clothes can be used again in
the fall. The first reader tip
is great because the kids can
have a "new" backpack and
you don't have to spend any
money. This tip won't work
as well for backpacks with
trendy characters or movie


themes, so keep that in
mind when buying them.
JUST LIKE NEW: I put
away my kids' backpacks at
the end of the school year.
The following year, I buy
new backpacks and then put
those away at the end of the
year. At the beginning of the
following school year, I pull
out the ones that were put
away the first time, and it's
'like new backpacks! This-


makes them last two years
and avoids the "everyone
else has a new backpack,
and I want a new one, too"
whines. Also, not backpack-
related, I cook things with
good cuts of steak like faji-
tas and cheese-steak sand-
wiches so that one package
of steak will last for two or
three meals. - Angelee,
Missouri.
REUSE PACKAGING: I


save the wrappers from
sliced cheese to separate
the frozen burgers that I
make myself. I just throw
them in a container that I
keep in the freezer, then use
them when I'm ready to
make my burgers. I also
make use of empty cereal,
cracker, tortilla and frozen-
waffle bags for lunches. An-

See FRUGAL/Page E16


CITRUS SPRINGS -3/2 Brand BEVERLY HILLS- 212 Sia.nlees
New. Almost completed! Come steel app, jacuzzi, Scr. Lanai, dec.
and see! $94,900 #331133 pond. $139,900 #333791


831 E, Falconry Cl. 3186 W. Bird Nest Dr. 1075 S. Softwind Lp.
$262,000 $249,900 $192,000
Pool home on the 15th green of Peace & serenity welcomes you 3/2/3 home, kitchen, dining, family &
Meadows Golf Course, 3 BR, 2.5 BA, w/bright & airy 3/2/2 pool home. This living rooms are the "hub", lanai has
2-car garage on cul-de-sac. New carpet, home is nestled on a beautiful acre, vinyl windows. Beautiful corner lot.
Corian counters and smart wiring thru- Features includes formal liv./din., family Double front doors. Make an
out home. Self-cleaning, gas heat, rm., master BA has dual sinks & jetted appointment to see this home today. It
caged pool. Membership available, tub & enclosed FI rm. could be your future.
352-746-0744 MLS#332315 352-527-1820 MLS#333881 352-746-0744 MLS#334144


782190

Prudential Florida Showcase Properties

CITRUS HILLS OFFICE PINE RIDGE OFFICE
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. 1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Hernando, FL 34442 l Beverly Hills, FL 34465
f (352) 746-0744 4 (352) 527-1820 1
1-888-222-0856 1 -88-553-2223 LENDER


I r__i MR.I


Craus CouNTY (Fi) CHR�kkLE


A vvv ....






SCITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE '


E16 SUNDAY. lUNE 7.2009


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E15

other is reusing my washed foil. I also
find the brown-paper lining in sugar
bags to be the perfect weight for drain-
ing fried foods. - Theresa, Florida
KEEP WOOL SWEATERS LOOKING
GREAT. Hand wash only when neces-
sary in a tub of cool water and about a
teaspoon of all-natural delicate wash
soap. Just push the suds through once
or twice, and let set in the water for five
minutes. Treat any spots. Then, with
cool water, rinse the sweater thoroughly,
but not with much agitation or your
sweater may begin to felt Once rinsed,
roll your sweaters in several old towels
(in case you have colors that bleed) to
take out the water Lie the sweaters flat,
or, if they are bulkier, you can drape
them across the center on a clothesline.
Once dry, block with an iron and pick off
any fuzz with a sweater shaver I wash
my good wool sweaters about once a.
year before I put them away for summer
-Michelle G., Vermont
MAKE IT LAST: To extend the life
of pantyhose and knee-highs, try ap-
plying some ordinary hairspray to the
toe area. A quick spray after each
wash will ,prevent the toe area from
wearing through. A sticky zipper can
come unstuck when sprayed heavily
with starch or when they are rubbed
with a candle, too. - Sarah L., e-mail
REPAIR CLOTHES: I took in some
pants that I picked up at a thrift store
to have the zippers replaced. For a
total of $20 each, I got a lined pair of
wool pants, linen pants and poly-
ester/rayon pants. Not bad. I have de-
cided it is really worth it to have new
zippers .put ini on these good-quality
pants from the thrift store. Maybe not


the cheap pants, but the good lined
ones, yes. -Jean, Canada

DEARSARA: My husband has a great
recipe for homemade sausage. Last
time, he made it in cornhusks, but he
asked if I could ask where he might be
able to find sausage tubes (or wrap,
whatever it is called). - Chrissy Florida
DEAR CHRISSY Natural casings
can be found at a butcher shop or
meat department. You'll need a
sausage stuffer, too. If you don't want
natural casings, you can use plastic
wrap or aluminum foil to form a tube
for freezing the sausage. Visit
www.thekitchn.com/thekitchn/tips-
techniques/how-to-grind-your-own-
sausage-079778 for a sausage-making
tutorial using plastic wrap.
DEAR SARA. I've been using vine-
gar as a shower cleaner, and the smell
about knocks us out. What can I do'to
it to make the smell less strong? -An-
drea, West Virginia
DEAR ANDREA. You can add es-
sential oil, such as eucalyptus, lemon,
lavender or peppermint, to it You can
combine-lemon oil, peppermint oil or
eucalyptus oil, dish liquid and water
with vinegar, too. Use no more than 10
drops total of essential oils, a squirt of
dish liquid and roughly 3-to-1 ratio of
vinegar and water. Or simply add
lemon juice to the vinegar. Place in a
spray bottle, and shake before using.


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal Vil-
lage (www.frugalvillage.com), a Web
site that offers practical, money-sav-
ing strategies for everyday living. To
send tips, comments or questions,
write to Sara Noel, c/o United Media,
200 Madison Ave., 4th Floor, New
York, NY 10016, or e-mail sara@
frugalvillage.com.


.5 BOWO CT 17 BLC WIL
POOLHOME3/2.13 +STUD POO HOM 3/25/3


* Gourmet Kitchen
*Spa Master Bath


* Granite Counters
* Security System


* Tile Floors
* Vacuum System


Directions: US 19 to Cypress Blvd.W Directions: US 19 to Cypress Blvd.
'to Lefti Cypress Blvd. E. to Left orn W.to Left on Cypress Blvd. E.to Left
Corkwo Blvd. to Left on Boxw--i on Black Willow st.to Left on Black
Ct.House on Right of cul-de-sac. Willow Ct.N. House on Right.


(352) 688-6864 w vanordenhomebuilder.com


I "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods" �

NANCY Direct: 352-634-4225

PONTICOS KEY 1 REALTY INC.







PRIVATE COURTYARD CABANA POOL HOME! UPGRADED SOLAR HEATED POOL HOME BEAUTY!
1 3 Bed + Office / 3-112 Baths * Summer Kitchen "3 Bed + Study / 3 CAR Garage * Spacious Master
| 2 Car Garage has Mini-Kitchen, Workshop AND Desk ' Corian Counters, Oak Cabinets & Tile Kitchen plus Walk-In Pantry
MLS#333760 S299,500 MLS#326854 S267,000

r
IEtearj u !]L! J]L! t^^ iiij ilij^^ ^Sar~rjj jii~i~LUUN~MIo!3


OnRE
-- 1645
Email: cent21@infionline.net SALES: (35
www. jwmortonrealestate.com Property

THE STATE FOREST IS
YOUR BACKYARD ...
No more trailering from this
direct access 5 acre (MOL)
parcel. 2-stoall barn with
extra hay storage, round
pen, mature pasture that's
enced and cross-fenced for
your horses. Custom built
. ...^ ^ -- 3BR, 2BA home with
oversized master suite for you. Great room floor plan with large kitchen
that has cherry cabinets and all black appliances. Split bedroom plan
fireplace, screened porch, shed, 2 car gar. plus carport are only a few of
the amenities this farm has to offer. #328010. $315,000.
Call Martha Snyder 352-476-8727
MOBILE
HOME IN
PARK.
ADULT PARK.
Rent

Doublewide.
3/2,
Furnished. #19893MHP. $38,000.
Call Ruth Frederick 1-352-563-6866
HERNANDO:
TAKE A GOOD
LOOK HERE:I 1,ih
2006 dcoublewd ,s
PRICED TO SELL
AT ONLY
$69,900. Property
offer, thr
bars,,,;n ,de
laubr.dr;, breakat,v
nook and island in kitchen, open living with great room wit built-in
entertainment center, master bedroom has walk-in closet, garden tub and
shower. Also offers shed, carporfland deck. Seller said sell! #333693.
Call Deb Thompson (Cell 352-634-2656)
ON GOLDEN
POND, a spring-fed
lake. 3BR, 2BA, 2 car
Hickory orge hardwood floors, super large screen lan, 2 car carport.
decorT, t .howpflce
rralandscapirially upalefenced. $227,500. #334386.
home features pnor W d Pickl 352-22-3410
www.CirCounvS space h.com
granite cour,ters
-ornal dining room
Hickory Forge hardwood floors, super large screen lanai, great
landscaping, partially fenced. $227,500. #334386. ,
Ask far Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 352-212-3410
www.CitinusCountvSold com


. MORTON
XL ESTATE, INC.
SW. Main St., Inverness, FL
2) 726-6668 * 1-800-543-9163
Management (352) 726-9010 1"0".


INVERNESS: Entoy the country sr/le ouhid ar.d opi.. -ig I.nide
rt"h. hoie of-r . 2/2/, -vth breaktai rook, lon, Properr, . . cl. e to all,
your needs, shopping, schools and hospital. Great for he first time home
buyer or snow birds and yes, even all year around. SELLER HAS
REDUCED THIS PROPERTY TO JUST $105,900. #327545.
Call Deb Thompson for your showing. (Cell 352-634-2656)

Fencedi y l nas, been treated
with loes arid alt ,-hon
Two rroa,er �s e-ach
with large bedrooms s N:ce
size living roon. d:r. rm
family rm plus creered
-- - lana. all add up tr o.r
'- -1500 I1..rg area TT. car
garage c.t screen
Fenced yard and light landscaping finish this picture. Must see at
$99,500. #333039:
Call Doris Miner for appointment
352-726-6668 (day) 352-344-1515 (eve.)
NATURE
LOVERS
PARADISE -
This new 3BR,
2BA home has
so man, features
to ma life
.good. Family rm.
w/fpl. adjoins
eat-in kit. area. Large liv. rm. and master suite overooks estuary
land and large farm. Over 2500 sq. ft. LA. Lake access at your back
door. Bird and wildlife abound here. Very private.. Situated on 1.16
acres. Additional acreage available. #332321. $258,900.
Call Pat Davis (352) 212-7280


E16SUNIDAY, JUNE 7 2009