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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01666
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: June 2, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01666

Full Text




French Open: Roger


TODAY & Wednesday morning
HIGH Becoming partly cloudy,
90 20 percent chance of
LOW isolated thunderstorms.
63 PAGE A4
JUNE 2, 2009


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i Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* V<


tennis /B1


VOLUME 114 ISSUE 299


Winners'


It was their last chance at one more moment of triumph before the end of the school year.
At the second annual Chronicle Athletes of the Year Banquet Monday, the county's
top high school athletes gathered at the Inverness Golf & Country Club to find out
who would be named best of the best. Here's who walked away with trophies.
-~Pr


BRIAN LaPETERiCr.rorncle
Kristen Hall gets a hug from Crystal River coach'LIfEtCarter on Monday night after being named Female Scholar Athlete of the Year atIfflIn-
nual Chronicle Athlete of the Year Awards at the Inverness Golf & Country Club. Hall also won the Story of the Year Award. To view the cere-
mony, visit www.chronicleonline.com. For more photos from the event, see Page B5.


FEMALE ATHLETE
OF THE YEAR


I'm excited
and honored....
It's a really great
accomplishment.
Summer Dupler
Lecanto High School,
softball, volleyball, weightlifting,
track and cross country.


* Female Scholar-Athlete of the Year:
Kristen Hall, Crystal River High senior,
8 Male Scholar-Athlete of the Year:
Tony Kauffmann, Seven Rivers Christian
School senior,
* Sportsmanship/Humanitarian Award:
Candace Smith, Citrus High School senior,


Com ics .......................... C6
Crossword ...................... C5
Editorial ....................... ..A8
Horoscope .................,,,,,,, C5
Lottery Numbers ...........,,,, B4
M ovies ............................ C6
Obituaries ..................... A5
Stocks ......................... A6
TV listings ,.,...,.. ,,,.... C5


MALE ATHLETE
OF THE YEAR


I've
accomplished
a lot of things,
and this is up
there.


Craig Barker
Citrus High School, wrestling.


* Team of the Year: Citrus High School
girls' golf team.
8 Comeback Team of the Year: Lecanto
High School girls' basketball team,
9 Female Coach of the Year: Citrus High
School girls' golf and tennis coach
Michelle Connor.
* Male Coach of the Year: Citrus High
School wrestling coach Mike Porcelli,


Found In Ocala
Authorities seek the parents
of this baby girl/Page A3


FEMALE MOST
VALUABLE PLAYER
"The Will Bleakley Award"


I wasn't


MALE MOST
VALUABLE PLAYER
"The Will Bleakley Award"


I didn't even


expecting it ... know this award
I'm just really was going to be
glad, really presented ... it's a


happy.


Ashton Connor
Citrus High School, golf and tennis.


very big honor.
Nick Cortes
Lecanto High School, basketball.


i Check out the -m
2008-09 Athletes of the
Year special section :n today's
edition of the Chronicle,


- KERI LYNN MCHALE


The depression test
Doctors hope to identify teens with mental disorders./Page Cl
Summer camps See the range of options./Page A9
Missing French airliner disappears over Atlantic./Page A10
Shared resources Cooperation pays off./Page A8


circle


Tax


values


to drop

MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The news out of Property Ap-
praiser GeoffGreene's office was
as expected:
Citrus County taxable property
values dropped like a rock this
year as a once thriving real estate
and construction market hit an
economic wall.
The tentative taxable value
countywide is $10.03 billion - a
drop of $871 million, or 8 percent,
according to figures Greene re-
leased Monday.
Both the W For more
cities of Inver- details, see
ness and Crys- related
tal River saw story, chart
declines of 9 Page A2
percent.
Taxable
value for the Citrus County
School District dropped 7.5 per-
cent. The decline is slightly less
than the county's because value
on the so-called second $25,000
homestead exemption is not ex-
empt from school taxes.
The drop in value will mean
local governments must cut mil-
lions of dollars from their budg-
ets, or raise taxes to compensate
for the loss in revenue.
Greene submitted the esti-
mates Monday to local govern-
ments as provided by law. The
final tax roll is due July 1.
Greene's report showed sev-
eral economic-based trends, in-
cluding:
: See TAX/Page A2



$400K


to go to


homeless

CHRIS VAN ORMER
cvanormer@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
One way Citrus County will get
a bite of the federal economic
stimulus package is through a
$400,000 grant to help people
whose homes are being fore-
closed from becoming homeless.
"With so many people hurting
and out of work, this will be a
good way to help them," said Joe
Monroe, vice-president of the
Mid Florida Homeless Coalition,
which had the task of identifying
the best agency to administer the
funds.
The number of foreclosure
cases filed in May at the Citrus
County Clerk of Court was 150,
which is a decline from the pre-
vious month's 165. During the
past year and a half, the number
of foreclosures by the month has
fluctuated in the range of 150 to
170. Although consistent, these
figures are high, considering that
293 foreclosure cases were filed
in the county in the whole year of
2007, and only 107 foreclosure
cases were filed in 2006.
The American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act of 2009, a $787-
billion package signed into law in
February, includes $13.61 billion
for projects and programs ad-
ministered by the Department of
Housing and Urban Develop-
ment. Nearly 75 percent of this
sum was allocated to state and
See $400K/Page A2


Stocks
The stock market be-
gins June with a strong
rally, thanks to another
" wave of benign eco
Inomic data,/Page A7


PUBLISHER'S STORY OF THE YEAR AWARD: KRISTEN HALL
Despite the untimely death of her older brother,
Crystal River High School senior
Kristen Hall won the 1,600-meter
run at the district and regional
tournaments - hours after learn-
ing of the loss of her brother and
a day after his memorial service,
respectively.


L---Aa-








A ) Locn_ CTU COUNT (FL C OLUA I rU


A2 TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009


Greene offers 6.1 percent budget cut


MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Citrus County Property Appraiser
Geoff Greene fired two longtime em-
ployees last week in a cost-cutting
move, just as he let go 13 workers in
January.
But the timing means a significant
post-employment difference.
The two 30-year-plus employees,
plus a part-timer whom Greene also
fired, will receive 13 weeks' severance


pay, 18 months county-paid health and
dental insurance, plus 100 percent of
their unused vacation and sick pay.
The workers Greene fired just after
taking office received no compensa-
tion.
Greene and chief deputy appraiser
Les Cook said the recent dismissals co-
incided with the end of the fiscal year,
meaning enough money is in the
budget to cover the cost of a severance
package.
"Nothing I can say. It's just a different
point in the budget cycle," Greene said.


Even so, the staff reduction saves
about $75,000, Greene said.
Greene is submitting a $3.8 million
budget to the county commission and
state Department of Revenue, a 6.1
percent decrease from the current
year.
Greene said employees are volun-
teering to take unpaid furlough days
off, which will save the office $33,000.
He is also discussing a lease arrange-
ment with county government for a
fleet of six county vehicles. About 12 to
14 property appraiser employees who


work in the field now use their own ve-
hicles.
Greene said that presents a liability
issue to the office and potential lack of
efficiency as the office pays employees
gas mileage at 48 cents a mile.
Cook also noted that using the county
fleet would eliminate property ap-
praiser employees from paying tax on
gasoline purchases.
He said using the county fleet would
save his office $30,000 in mileage reim-
bursements.


Rx drop-off project set Friday


Special to the Chronicle


Citrus County residents who want to
safely dispose of unwanted, unused and ex-
pired medications can do so by bringing
these items from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday to
the Citrus County Sheriff's Office in Inver-
ness for proper disposal. The sheriff's of-
fice is across from the courthouse in
Inverness at 1 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Ave., next to Cooter Pond.
Dubbed "Operation Medicine Cabinet,"
the monthly project is designed to reduce
access to medications and prevent them
from being dumped down drains or toilets
and into sources of drinking water.
The project was launched by Citrus
County's prevention coalition, Partners for
a Substance-free Citrus Inc. and by the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office, as a coalition
partner, in response to increasing fre-
quency of reports of prescription and over-
the-counter medication abuse from school
health staff, student resources officers and
youth themselves.
"While many use medications safely and
responsibly, the increased availability and
variety of medications have contributed to
drug misuse, abuse and addiction. This is
happening in our homes, in our schools and
on our streets. By partnering with the sher-
iff's office, the coalition is working to make


the county safer," said Deborah Scott, coali-
tion executive director.
Following are guidelines for OMC:
* Medications must be brought in their
original container.
* The event is free of charge and open to
Citrus County residents.
* Other items will not be accepted.
* Each drug must be cataloged and pa-
perwork signed by the resident - if others
have many items to deliver, expect to wait
"All this costs is effort on the part of resi-
dents to bring in their medications to the
sheriff's office. If folks take advantage of
this service, this will reduce drugs in
homes during real estate open houses, in
nursing homes, in homes where parents,
grandparents and others are raising kids.
In doing this, we can reduce the accessibil-
ity to these medications-- so they aren't out
in the streets, being used by kids and not
being dumped into our drinking water,"
Scott said.
Federal regulations are very strict about
drug disposal. Operation Medicine Cabinet,
with its simple design, allows county resi-
dent turn over their medications to law en-
forcement. The medications are then
sealed and marked as any other property
turned over to the sheriff's office and then
destroyed properly. For more information,
call Deborah Scott at 419-6161.


County BRIEFS


NAMI Citrus group
moves Monday
NAMI Citrus will host its reg-
ular monthly meeting in a one-
time different location. On June
8, the group will meet at the
Family Resource Center at
2435 N. Florida Avenue, Her-
nando, the old school building
now used for many agencies,-
afthe comer of U.S. 41 North'
and Parsons Point Road.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
Joe Monroe, with the Citrus
Housing Authority, will speak.
All those interested in mental
health issues are warmly wel-
comed.
Inverness offers
kayaking classes
The city of Inverness an-
nounces the summer return of
its Introduction to Recreational
Kayaking class, every other
Wednesday beginning June 3.
The classes, which teach
basic techniques such as
proper strokes and safety, are 9
to 11 a.m. at Wallace Brooks
Park, 399 E. Dampier Street.
Matt Clemons of Aardvark's
Florida Kayak Company in
Crystal River will teach the two-
hour course.
Class registration is $40 and
includes all necessary equip-
ment, including a kayak and
Personal Flotation Device. Par-
ticipants can bring their own
kayaks and equipment if they
desire, though PFD's must be
worn at all times.
Pre-registration for all three
classes is available for $99.
Participants must be at least 16
years of age to register.
New this season, the class is
offered as a three-part course
covering kayaking basics, fol-
lowed by a refresher course
and short excursion on Lake
Henderson. The third class is a
longer trip on Lake Henderson


to Davis Lake.
Anyone wishing to participate
in this program can register at
the Inverness Government
Center, 212 W. Main St., or at
Aardvark's Florida Kayak Com-
pany Inc.
For information, contact the
City of Inverness Department of
Parks and Recreation by dialing
726-2611, ext.1309, or e-mail
parks@inverness-fl.gov; or
Aardvark's at 795-5650 or info
@floridakayakcompany.com.
UF offers food
safety training
The University of Florida/
IFAS Citrus County Extension
Service is providing training to
help food managers and staff
keep food served to Florida's
consumers safer.
This is a comprehensive
training that provides the most
up-to-date information and cur-
rent regulations. The ServSafe


Manager's exam is given at the
end of the training, which pro-
vides a National Certification
that is good for five years.
The next class is Wednes-
day, June 17, at the Citrus
County Extension office at 3650
W. Sovereign Path, Suite 1,
Lecanto (from State Road 44,
go south on County Road 491,
turn west on Saunders Way, go
one block, turn left onto Sover-
eign Path. The Extension build-
ing is the first on the right).
The brochure/registration
form can be downloaded from
http://foodsafety.ifas.ufl.edu.
You can also register with
your credit card by calling the
toll free hotline (888) 232-8723.
Pre-registration is required.
Cost for the course and
exam is $110. Manuals may be
purchased in English or Span-
ish for $55. Call Monica in
Lecanto at 527-5713.
-From staff reports


782787


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Year Citrus Springs
2004 $198,733,561


Crystal River
$381,150,437


Inverness County
$315,184,699 $7,111,397,393


2005 $520,935,129 $409,918,487 $362,636,774 $8,724,688,700


2006 $1,019,549,796
2007 $1,034,992,346
2008 $641,264,808


2009
(est)


$498,847,000


TAX
Continued from Page Al

* New construction fell
from $343 million in 2008 to
$162 million this year. It's
the smallest one-year
amount of new construc-
tion value in the last five
years.
M High-growth areas
such as Beverly Hills saw


$400K
Continued from Page Al

local recipients.
To prevent homelessness
when families lose their
homes through foreclosure,
$1.5 billion was earmarked
nationally for preventing
homelessness and enabling
the rapid re-housing of
homeless families and indi-
viduals, helping them reen-
ter the labor market more
quickly and preventing the
further destabilization of
neighborhoods. This fund
is called the Homeless Pre-
vention and Rapid Rehous-
ing Program.
The fund will flow from
the Department of Chil-


$512,109,754 $468,512,513 $11,589,306,439
$530,664,466 $504,320,935 $12,380,488,916
$520,673,592 $453,108,962 $10,899,783,397
$473,812,000 $412,329,000 $10,027,800,000
- Source: Citrus Countvl Property Appraiser's Oftice


significant drops. Beverly
Hills' value dropped 16.4
percent
* In Citrus Springs, the
drop was 22 percent thanks
to falling prices for vacant
lots and improved proper-
ties. The taxable value of
property in Citrus Springs
is one-half what it was just
two years ago.
"The areas that heated
up the most are the ones
that really declined," chief


deputy appraiser Les Cook
said. "The people who
were buying have left the
market. There is no one to
hold the values up."
While both Greene and
Cook said they have heard
that the real estate and con-
struction markets are be-
ginning to show life again,
the tax roll is estimated to
show what is in place by
Jan. 1 and is based on ac-
tual sales.


Other grants are available to help
with other economic hardships,
such as getting back to work.


dren and Families. Kids
Central was chosen to ad-
minister the funds because
it already is established in
the mid-Florida area and
can fulfill the need for
tracking the results though
its caseworkers to follow up
on accountability, Monroe
said.
"This will help with tem-
porary rent assistance for
three months and other
needs," Monroe said.
Funds also could be ap-
plied toward security aind
utility deposits, moving ex-
penses, motel and hotel ex-


Aneurysm re

without an inc


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This procedure is typically done at
universities and now is exclusive to
there is no need to travel.


penses, housing search and
placement and legal serv-
ices, he said.
"What it doesn't do is
make mortgage payments,"
Monroe said.
Other grants are avail-
able to help with other eco-
nomic hardships, such as
getting back to work
According to the coali-
tion, on any given day, at
least 501 people in Citrus
County are homeless, but
the county can meet only 10
percent of the emergency
shelter and homeless
needs of the county.




pair

:ision.


















large teaching
our area so


l * Quicker recovery * No significant pain
e * Discharged 24 hours after surgery
* Safe alternative for the majority of patients
* More than 15,000 people die each year in the U.S. from rupture of an aortic aneurysm (AAA).
* Vascular disease can impair circulation and lead to limb amputation.
* Strokes remain the third leading cause of death in the U.S.
* One in every 20 Americans over the age of 50 has peripheral arterial disease (PAD).
" - VASCULARWEB.ORG



INVERNESS SURGICAL |
VASCULAR SCREENINGS AVAILABLE
Call for appointment

S 403 West Highland Boulevard, Inverness 352-726-3646


Geoff
Greene
Citrus
County
property
appraiser.


TAXABLE VALUE/NEW CONSTRUCTION


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LOCAL


11
.ol

IN
.01









Page A3 - TUESDAY, JUNE 2,2009



TATE&


LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Around
THE STATE

Florida
Apply for alligator
hunting permits now
The hunting season is a
few months away, but those
looking to bag an alligator in
Florida can now start apply-
ing for permits.
Officials began accepting
applications for the roughly
6,000 alligator harvest per-
mits Monday morning. Florida
residents pay $271.50 for an
alligator trapping license and
alligator harvest tags. Out-of-
state hunters must pay
$1,021.50.
Permit holders are allowed
to harvest two alligators in a
designated area.
The 11-week alligator hunt-
ing season runs from Aug. 15
through Nov. 1.

Inglis
Man charged in
homicide attempt
Law enforcement officials
arrested an Alabama man
last week after he allegedly
assaulted and injured an In-
glis police officer.
According to an arrest re-
port, Tim Swiggett was inves-
tigating a blue GMC pick-up
truck with no tag that had
been backed into the woods
on County Road 40 W. in
Yankeetown when Chad
Floyd Jeter, 29, of Atmore,
Ala., assaulted him, cutting
his neck. Jeter then ran into
the woods.
Swiggett was treated for
minor injuries and released.
Cross City Correctional In-
stitution bloodhounds found
Jeter hiding in the marsh at
7:15 that morning. He was
charged with attempted homi-
cide on a police officer and
booked into the Levy County
Jail.

Tallahassee
Crist signs Florida
tuition increase
Gov. Charlie Crist has
signed bills letting universities
increase tuition beyond state
requirements and strengthen
financing of a school voucher
program.
Crist on Monday also ve-
toed a bill (H.B. 714) that
would have delayed a require-
ment to install fire sprinklers in
condominium common areas
from 2014 to 2025.
Under the tuition bill (S.B.
762) universities can boost
rates by up to 15 percent an-
nually until they reach the na-
tional average. The 15
percent maximum includes
an 8 percent increase or-
dered for all the schools this
year by the Legislature.
The voucher bill (H.B. 453)
will give insurance compa-
nies a credit against premium
taxes for donations to a pro-
gram that sends low-income
children to private schools.

Daytona Beach
FEMA worker loses
vehicle to car thief
A Federal Emergency Man-
agement Agency worker's car
has been stolen after the
worker left the car running
while assessing damage in
storm ravaged Volusia County.
Daytona Beach Police
Chief Mike Chitwood said the
theft happened Monday. The
car, which has not been
found, had several govern-
-From staff and wire reports


Clarification

A story on Page A1 of Sun-
day's edition, "Clerk of court
seeks budget cutbacks," re-
quires clarification. According
to Betty Strifler, eight full-time


positions were eliminated -
six were vacated and, two
people were laid off. In addi-
tion, eight full-time positions
were reduced to part-time po-
sitions. Strifler also added
that two days per month of
furlough without pay would
continue for management
into the 2009-10 budget year.


Expert: Skip the line


Hurricane season begins quietly


Associated Press
MIAMI - The "skinny
black line," long a staple of
forecasts showing a hurri-
cane's projected path, could
be a casualty of the 2009 At-
lantic hurricane season that
began Monday.
While urging prepared-
ness, the director of the na-
tion's hurricane center said
he's on a crusade against
the line, which forecasters
have long called misleading.
Bill Read said this year,
people who go to the hurri-
cane center's Web site to
track an approaching storm
won't see that line, just a
graphic that shows a cone
representing the projected


path of its center. He'll also
urge local weather offices to
use a line-less graphic.
Read said that over the
last year he realized just
how many people mistak-
enly use the line to deter-
mine how they'll respond to
the storm - like whether to
evacuate or make other
preparations.
"This way you don't have
that option. You have to
think about it or assume
that it's somewhere in that
swath, which is the correct
way to think about it," said
Read, who is starting his
second season as the cen-
ter's director.
The line could be inter-
preted as the storm narrow-


Associated Press
Emergency personnel take part Monday in a simulation of a
hurricane approaching Miami in the emergency room in
Miami on the first day of the 2009 Atlantic hurricane season.


ing in on a town or city while
three days out from land it
could really be targeting a
whole section of coast.


Hurricane season runs
from June to November and
is typically busiest in August
and September. On Monday


Academy of Environmental Science grads


: . , .. ,. " . M. r . .'
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Twelve students participated Monday evening In the 2009 Academy of Environmental Science senior graduation
program at the Marine Science Station in Crystal River. Above, from left, are Joseph Harp, Ashley Ballien, Gabriela
Tarnowski, Chelsea Moore and Dakota Steffner. The soon-to-be graduates are viewing a photograph taken by
academy art teacher Laurie Canfield immediately prior to the start of the ceremony.


afternoon, the center's Web
site showed the Atlantic
Ocean quiet. A tropical de-
pression formed last week
but quickly dissipated.
Federal forecasters pre-
dicted a near-normal hurri-
cane season with nine to 14
named tropical storms. The
season is expected to in-
clude four to seven hurri-
canes with one to three
likely to be major - Cate-
gory 3 or higher, with winds
more than 111 miles per
hour. There were five major
hurricanes last year.
Of particular concern this
year is whether economic
problems will make people
less willing to purchase
emergency supplies they
may never use or leave their
homes if a hurricane threat-
ens.


Charges


added in


steroids


case

Associated Press
TAMPA- Federal charges
have been filed against a cen-
tral Florida man who told au-
thorities he sold steroids to
professional athletes.
The U.S. Attorney's Office
in Tampa said Monday that
Richard Thomas was
. charged with possessing aid
selling anabolic steroids. His
first appearance was delayed
until Thursday State charges
against Thomas were
dropped...
Steroids were seized when
Thomas was arrested last
week Thomas told authori-
ties he was a major dealer
whose clients included play-
ers for the Washington Na-
tionals and Washington
Capitals.


Committee issues report for Inverness cemetery


SHEMIR WILES
swiles@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

After a dispute about gravesite
memorials and flags caused an out-
pour of emotions on Veterans Day in
2008, the special committee formed
to look into the rules and regula-
tions at Oak Ridge Cemetery has fi-
nally issued a report and the
findings will be discussed at today's
Inverness City Council meeting.
The dispute started about the
gravesite of Army Sgt. Robert Allen
"Bobby" Surber, when the city of In-
verness advised Surber's mother,
Kerri, that a willow tree, solar lights,
potted plants and a number of flags
violated city ordinance.
Surber died in June 2007 when a
roadside bomb exploded near his
Humvee in Iraq.
According to the current ordi-
nance, "No decorative objects of any
nature or kind are permitted to re-
main upon any interment space
within the cemetery. Decorative ob-
jects may include, but are not lim-
ited to: chairs, shells, crushed or
decorative rock or lawn ornaments.
Ceramic figures or toys may be
placed upon interment spaces and


* WHAT: Inverness City Council
meeting.
* WHEN: 5:30 p.m. today.
* WHERE: Inverness Govern-
ment Center, 212 W. Main St.

may remain thereon for a reason-
able period of time not to exceed 90
days."
Flower arrangements, wreaths
and potted plants, artificial flowers
in baskets or unbreakable contain-
ers are allowed if placed close to
gravesites. The city reserves the
right to remove them because of
poor condition or placement
Kerri Surber responded to the
city's notice by stating that the me-
morials should stay in place. Mem-
bers of the community and veterans
groups supported Kerri Surber's ar-
gument with the ordinance.
The committee, which includes
Kerri Surber and other members of
the community, has made several
recommendations in their report,
which is included in the meeting's
agenda packet. According to the re-
port, "an immediate and concerted
effort needs to commence to im-
prove the appearance of the facil-


ity." Several activities listed include
removing any and all items that are
in disrepair, getting rid of non-regu-
lation items that interfere with rou-
tine maintenance and removing or
trimming plants, shrubs and trees
that have been planted and neg-
lected.
The committee also suggested
that there be an increased effort of
awareness to communicate the
rules to the families of the de-
ceased. These efforts include im-
proving the visual appeal of the
Interment Guidelines, improving
communication of these rules via
newspaper publication, the City of
Inverness Web site and with funeral
directors and monument compa-
nies.
Other recommendations made in-
cluded:
* Solar light and flags will be per-
mitted as long as a "special permit"
is secured. The rules will be that
two in-ground solar lights with
white bulbs only can be placed
within 6 inches on either side of a
headstone and two 11-by-16-inch
flags will be permitted as long as
their placement doesn't interfere
with maintenance.
* Seasonal or holiday decoration


will be permitted, but must be re-
moved after 30 days.
* Special exemption will only be
allowed for burial sites with signif-
icant historical importance.
* The city should consider re-
cruiting volunteers to place tempo-
rary flags on the graves of veterans
on Veterans Day and Memorial Day.
* The city should consider erect-
ing a permanent monument in the
cemetery to honor all veterans and
people from the community who
made a difference.
Also at today's meeting, council
members will be asked to vote on
entering into a contract with the
top-ranked firm Kimley-Horn & As-
sociates so they can execute the
city's bicycle master plan and to
consider either renewing the city's
sanitation services contract with
the current hauler or begin the Re-
quest for Proposals (RFP) process
by asking for bids from other com-
panies. They will also be asked to
modify a small part of an Inter-
Agency Agreement (IA) with the
county for fire inspection services
and plan review to allow the city to
hire their own inspectors on a case-
by-case basis for particular proj-
ects.


Abandoned girl in good health


Associated Press


OCALA-Ababy found abandoned in
a box in Ocala is in good health.
Police said a driver reported finding
the baby Saturday in a cardboard box
beside a dirt road.
Doctors say the baby was less than a
week old when found.
She was taken to a hospital for obser-
vation and later placed into the custody
of the Department of Children and Fam-
ilies.
Now, police are hoping to find her
parents or identify the baby.
This baby girl was found in a box Satur-
day along a dirt road in Ocala. Recent
updates indicate the baby is doing well.
Special to the Chronicle


They hope to identify a suspect and
vehicle seen at about 7:30 p.m. Saturday
in the area of Northwest 24th Avenue
and 17th Street. The vehicle was de-
scribed as a grey compact pickup truck
with a white topper, driven by a white
male.
The public is reminded that Florida
State Statutes allows for an unwanted
newborn to be left at a hospital, fire sta-
tion or other emergency medical service
station without it being considered child
neglect
Anyone with information in reference
to this case is asked to call the Ocala Po-
lice Department, at (352) 369-7000 or, to
remain anonymous, contact Crime Stop-
pers at (352) 368-7867 (STOP) or go to
www.ocalacrimestoppers.com.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A4Tui,,'DrYov INr.2. 2009l


For the RECORD


Florida Fish and U Steven Michael Fleischer,
Wildlife 19, of Floral City, at 12:54 a.m.
Conservation Friday on a charge of domestic
Commission battery. According to the arrest
report, Fleischer knocked the
Arrests dinner out of a 49-year-old
* Yunior Rodriguez Heman- woman's hand and slapped her
dez, 34, of 10115 Pepper Ridge on the left side of her head and
Court, Tampa; Yankel Akosta, face, causing a cut above her left
26, of 10115 Royal Acres, ear. He then shoved the woman
Tampa; Luciel Garriga, 35, of and they fell to the floor fighting.
10102 Spring Tree Court, A female witness then grabbed
Tampa; and Juan R. Fernan- the woman and slapped her to
dez-Cruz, 30, of 6823 Blossom stop the fighting. No bond.
Ave., at 2:29 a.m. Tuesday on Jean Clarke Geloso 54 of
charges of possession of deer Inverness, at 10:34 p.m. Sunday
during closed season. Bond on charges of domestic battery
$500. and child abuse. According to the
arrest report, Geloso kicked a
Citrus County 45-year-old male in the groin dur-
Sheriff's Office ing a verbal argument. When a
Domestic battery 12-year-old girl attempted to sep-
arrests arate the couple Geloso bit her
* Joseph Lee McClellan, 34, on the wrist and struck her in the
of Floral City, at 11:34 p.m. mouth, causing a bloody lip.
Wednesday on a charge of do- Geloso refused to sign or com-
mestic battery. According to the plete a sworn statement. Bond
arrest report, McClellan pushed $5,000.
a 41-year-old female and 0 Kevin Michael Cole, 30, of
punched her in the left shoulder Beverly Hills, at 1:11 a.m. Sun-
after an argument over use of a day on charges of domestic bat-
Playstation 3 gaming system. No tery and possession of drug
bond. paraphernalia with intent to use.
* Manuel Luis Reyes Sr., 38, Bond $500.
of Inverness, at 11:52 p.m. 3 Kristie Ann Konetsky, 26;
Wednesday on charges of bat- of Beverly Hills, at 1:26 a.m. Sun-
tery and domestic battery. Ac- day on a charge of domestic bat-
cording to the arrest report, tery. According to the arrest
Reyes had a verbal argument report, Konetsky and a 25-year-
with a 17-year-old female about old man had an argument during
his living situation during which which he accused her of cheat-
Reyes allegedly slapped the ing on him. Konetsky then struck
woman and threw her to the the man with her hands, accord-
ground. When a 19-year-old fe- ing to witness accounts. She
male attempted to break up the then resisted the officers that
argument, Reyes reportedly hit placed her under arrest. No
her in the chest several times. No bond.
bond. Other arrests
* Anthony Hotchkiss, 46, of 0 Christopher Jay Williams,
Inverness, at 10:14 p.m. Thurs- 25, of 3015 N. Pennsylvania
day on a charge of domestic bat- Ave., Crystal River, on a charge
tery. According to the arrest of violation of a domestic vio-
report, Hotchkiss and a 50-year- lence protection order. No bond.
old female had a verbal argu- 0 Edward Lee Gillespie Jr.,
ment that resulted in Hotchkiss 46, of Homosassa, at 11:15 a.m.
throwing a slice of pizza at the Thursday on a charge of tamper-
woman, hitting her in the pants. ing with a witness via harass-
No bond. ment. Gillespie was arrested on


May 26 for lewd and lascivious
molestation of a person younger
than 16. Bond $2,000.
* Terri Lynn Gillespie, 35, of
Homosassa, at 8:55 a.m. Thurs-
day on charges of tampering with
a witness via harassment and
child neglect. According to the
police report, Gillespie tried to co-
erce a 16-year-old female into re-
canting her statement that she
had been molested by Edward
Lee Gillespie Jr. Bond $7,000.
* Kevin Michael Cole, 30, of
Beverly Hills, at 1:11 a.m. Sun-
day on a charge of felony viola-
tion of probation for an original
charge of dealing in stolen prop-
erty. No bond.
* Dennis Ron Exley, 31, of
4573 N. Pine Drive, Hemando, at
4:36 a.m. Sunday on a charge of
driving while license suspended,
canceled or revoked, knowingly.
Bond $500.
* Wayne Erwin Edwards, at
large, at 8:15 p.m. Sunday on a
charge of possession of a con-
trolled substance (oxycodone)
and possession of drug para-
phernalia. Bond $5,500.

Burglaries
* An investigation on May 19
revealed a burglary occurred on
Jan. 1 to a boat on S.W. 1st
Place, Crystal River.
MA burglary, reported on May
19, occurred at approximately 6
a.m. May 6, to an unoccupied
residence in the 8500 block of N.
Deltona Boulevard, Citrus
Springs.
SA burglary, reported on May
20, occurred at approximately
midnight on May 17, to an unoc-
cupied residence in the 5200
block of S. Louise Point, Ho-
mosassa.
SA burglary, reported on May
20, occurred at approximately 8
p.m. May 19, to an occupied res-
idence in the 6500 block of W.
Beaumont Lane, Homosassa.
SA burglary, reported on May
20, occurred at approximately
10:30 a.m. May 20, to an unoc-
cupied residence in the 5000


ON THE NET

* For more information about arrests made by the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the Public Information link, then on Ar-
rest Reports.
* Watch the "Arrested Developments" show from the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office at www.chronicleonline.tv.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.


block of S. Felix Point, Ho-
mosassa.
SA burglary, reported on May
22, occurred at approximately 6
p.m. May 21, to an unoccupied
conveyance in the 2900 block of
S. Panther Pride Drive, Lecanto.
MA burglary, reported on May
22, occurred at approximately 5
p.m. May 21, to an unoccupied
structure in the 3100 block of W.
Dunnellon Road, Citrus Springs.
* An investigation revealed on
May 22, a burglary to an unoc-
cupied conveyance occurred on
Aug. 27, 2005, in the 3800 block
of E. Delight Street, Hernando.
HA burglary, reported on May
22, occurred at approximately 6
p.m. May 21, to an unoccupied
conveyance in the 1100 block of
S. Dream Terrace, Inverness.
* A burglary occurred at ap-
proximately 8 a.m. May 22, to an
unoccupied residence in the
9000 block of N. Patch Drive,
Dunnellon.
HA burglary, reported on May
23, occurred at approximately 4
p.m. May 16, to an unoccupied
residence in the 6500 block of W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River.
SA burglary, reported on May
24, occurred at approximately
1:30 p.m. May 23, to an unoccu-
pied residence in the 200 block
of S. Otis Avenue, Lecanto.
* A burglary and a theft oc-
curred at approximately 6 p.m.
May 23, to an unoccupied resi-
dence in the 9100 block of E.
Swift Place, Inverness.
*A burglary, reported on May
24, occurred at approximately 9


a.m. May 24, to an unoccupied
residence in the 1100 block of E.
Canvas Lane, Hernando.
Thefts
* On May 19, approximately
2:57 p.m., an unknown white
male was arrested for grand theft
auto, fleeing and eluding, resist-
ing with violence, and resisting
without violence, in the 600 block
of W. Norvell Bryant Highway,
Hernando.
* An investigation on May 19
revealed a grand theft occurred
on May 11 in the 700 block of
N.E. 5th Street, Crystal River.
* A grand theft, reported on
May 19, occurred at noon on
May 15, in the 6600 block of W.
Rosedale Drive, Homosassa.
* A petit theft, reported on
May 20, occurred at approxi-
mately 4 p.m. May 19, in the 100
block of W. Citrus Springs Boule-
vard, Citrus Springs.
* A petit theft, reported on
May 22, occurred at approxi-
mately 4 p.m. May 21, in the
7800 block of E. Day Lane, In-
verness.
* A petit theft, reported on
May 22, occurred at approxi-
mately 3 p.m. May 21, in the
1200 block of N.E. 8th Avenue,
Crystal River.
* On May 23, approximately
6:15 a.m., a retail theft of an al-
coholic beverage occurred in the
3900 block of S. Suncoast
Boulevard, Homosassa.
* On May 24, approximately
8:46 a.m., a known white juvenile
male was arrested for retail petit
theft in the 100 block of N.W.


Highway 19, Crystal River.
* A retail petit theft occurred at
approximately 6:39 p.m. May 24,
in the 6700 block of W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River.
HA retail petit theft occurred at
approximately 7 p.m. May 24, in
the 2800 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
* A petit theft, reported on
May 25, occurred at approxi-
mately 4:30 a.m. May 25, in the
800 block of Birch Avenue, In-
verness.
A grand theft of a firearm, re-
ported on May 25, occurred at
approximately 11 a.m. May 9, in
the 9200 block of S. Brittany
Path, Inverness.
* On May 22, a report of a
stolen tag was taken in the 5000
block of S. Slow Point, Ho-
mosassa.
Vandalisms
* A vandalism, reported on
May 20, occurred at approxi-
mately noon on May 20, in the
1200 block of W. Main Street, In-
verness.
SA criminal mischief occurred
at approximately 6 p.m. May 21,
in the 2400 block of N. Florida
Avenue, Hemando.
* An investigation on May 22
revealed a criminal mischief oc-
curred at approximately 10 p.m.
May 21, in the 300 block of
Wright Street, Inverness.
SA vandalism to a vehicle oc-
curred at approximately 8 p.m.
May 22, in the 4300 block of E.
Nebraska Lane, Hemando.
MA vandalism occurred at ap-
proximately 11:23 p.m. May 22,
in the 7900 block of S. Heather
Point, Floral City.
SA criminal mischief to an air-
boat and also the theft of gaso-
line occurred at approximately 6
p.m. May 21, in the 10800 block
of W. Yulee Drive, Homosassa.
* A vandalism, reported on
May 25, occurred at noon on
May 24, to a fence in the 1200
block of N. Country Club Drive,
Crystal River.


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City H L F'cast City
Daytona Bch. 86 69 ts Miar
Ft. Lauderdale 86 75 ts Ocal
Fort Myers 90 72 ts Orlan
Gainesville 90 67 pc Pens
Homestead 87 72 ts Sara
Jacksonville 89 67 pc Talla
Key West 86 78 ts Tam
Lakeland 91 69 ts Vero
Melbourne 85 71 ts W. F

MARINE OUT
East winds from 0 to 5 knots. Seas 1
to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
be smooth. Partly cloudy with isolated
afternoon thunderstorms today.


91 64 0.00 90 66 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exlusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 90 Low: 63
Mostly sunny with a few afternoon
storms possible
t 1 WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
High* 89 Low: 64
Partly sunny with scattered afternoon storms

pr : THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 86 Low: 64
Partly sunny with afternoon storms


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday 89/60
Record 97/55
Normal 89/68
Mean temp. 75
Departure from mean -4
PRECIPITATION*
Monday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.00 in.
Total for the year 18.72 in.
Normal for the year 16.94 in.
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Monday at 3 p.m. 30.01 in.


DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m. 6
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m. 52%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees, grasses and weeds were all
light.
**Light - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY


Monday was good wi
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MIN
(MORNING)
6/2 TUESDAY 1:56 8:07 2
6/3 WEDNESDAY 2:35 8:47- 2


NOR
(AFT
:18
:58


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
C @ SUNSET TONIGHT........
SUNRISE TOMORROW.
MOONRISE TODAY.......
INE 15 JIMI 22 JNE228 MOONSETTODAY


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no bur
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 7
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Divisioi
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

. . WATERING RULES
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citru
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverr
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; address
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K throu
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thurs
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres In size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after


. .,.. r

*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Tuesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 2:21 a/9:55 a 2:20 p/11:08 p
Crystal River** 12:42 a/7:17 a 12:41 p/8:30 p
Withlacoochee* 10:28 a/5:05 a 11:49 p/6:18 p
Homosassa*" 1:31 a/8:54 a 1:30 p/10:07 p


**At f
Wedn
High/Low


vith pollutants



R MAJOR
TERNOON)
8:29
9:10


.................8:25 P.M.
.................6:32 A.M .
................. 3:59 P.M.
.................2:53A.M.



'n ban.
54-6777. For
n of Forestry's




s County
ness residents,
s ending In 2 or 3,
igh 0 can water
days; addresses
p.m. on their day
4 p.m. on their day.


Mason's Creek
nesday
High/Low


3:41 a/10:51 a 3:04 p/--
2:02 a/8:13 a 1:25 p/9:26 p
11:12 a/6:01 a ---/7:14 p
2:51 a/9:50 a 2:14 p/11:03 p


y
mi
a
ndo
sacola
asota
ahassee
pa
i Beach
'alm Bch.


F'cast
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts


LOOK -'
Gulf water
temperature



na
Taken at Mrpeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.71 28.65 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.48 33.48 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 35.06 35.06 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.30 37.29 42.40
Levels reported In feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded In any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
TUESDAY


Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
Albany 65 36 pc 72 51
Albuquerque 79 49 pc 85 58
Asheville 82 51 pc 85 54
Atlanta 89 67 pc 89 66
Atlantic City 67 43 s 75 65
Austin 90 61 pc 91 69
Baltimore 75 46 ts 84 66
Billings 64 47 pc 58 44
Birmingham 89 66 pc 90 68
Boise 82 64 .01 ts 79 55
Boston 71 48 pc 76 53
Buffalo 68 44 pc 68 49
Burlington, VT 62 38 pc 67 43
Charleston, SC 92 70 pc 85 74
Charleston, WV 83 51 pc 89 62
Charlotte 88 65 pc 91 64
Chicago 78 54 .44 ts 64 51
Cincinnati 86 50 pc 89 66
Cleveland 78 50 .01 ts 71 56
Columbia, SC 91 66 pc 93 66
Columbus, OH 83 54 .04 ts 85 66
Concord, N.H. 70 33 pc 74 46
Dallas 88 69 pc 89 70
Denver 73 54 .04 sh 54 47
Des Molnes 77 66 .17 ts 70 50
Detroit 78 54 .06 ts 67 53
El Paso 92 62 s 94 65
Evansville, IN 90 58 pc 87 66
Harrisburg 72 44 ts 82 59
Hartford 72 43 s 79 51
Houston 89 63 pc 90 71
Indianapolis 87 59 ts 85 63
Jackson 91 63 pc 90 68
Las Vegas 95 76 s 96 74
Little Rock 91 65 pc 89 66
Los Angeles 67 59 pc 68 61
Louisville 89 59 pc 89 66
Memphis 91 69 pc 92 72
Milwaukee 81 47 .12 r 56 48
Minneapolis 74 49 pc 68 46
Mobile 91 65 pc 88 68
Montgomery 93 65 .04 pc 92 67
Nashville 90 59 pc 91 66
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy; dr-drizzle;
f.fair; h-hazy; pc-partly cloudy; r-rain;
rs-ralnslnow mix; a.sunny; sh-showers;
an.snow; ts-thunderstorms; w.wlndy.
�2009 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 89 70 pc 87 71
New York City � 71 50 s 82 60
Norfolk 74 67 pc 91 71
Oklahoma City 87 66 pc 85 62
Omaha 82 67 .01 sh 70 51
Palm Springs 99 68 pc 97 68
Philadelphia 73 52 pc 84 69
Phoenix 10074 s 101 76
Pittsburgh 77 44 ts 78 58
Portland, ME 70 39 pc 69 47
Portland, Ore 83 57 pc 78 57
Providence, R.I. 70 43 pc 78 55
Raleigh 87 65 pc 92 65
Rapid City 74 47 .07 pc 60 40
Reno 76 54 ts 79 54
Rochester, NY 66 41 pc 69 48
Sacramento 79 54 ts 79 58
St. Louis 92 68 ts 88 62
St. Ste. Marie 52 42 .32 pc 60 36
Salt Lake City 81 57 ts 79 59
San Antonio 90 68 pc 92 72
San Diego 68 61 pc 66 63
San Francisco 65 54 pc 63 51
Savannah 92 70 pc 89 68
Seattle 82 53 s 83 56
Spokane 79 62 s 77 54
Syracuse 66 38 pc 66 47
Topeka 93 72 ts 81 56
Washington 74 55 ts 86 69
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 102 Needles, Calif. LOW 29 Butternut, Wis.

- WORLD CITIES


TUESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 89/76/ts
Amsterdam 71/50/pc
Athens 83/65/pc
Beljing 87/63/pc
Berlin 68/49/pc
Bermuda 79/70/pc
Cairo 94/73/s
Calgary 68/43/s
Havana 88/75/pc
Hong Kong 86/76/ts
Jerusalem 86/65/s


Lisbon 89/67/s
London 73/53/s
Madrid 88/60/s
Mexico City 79/55/ts
Montreal 60/40/pc
Moscow 74/53/ts
Paris 74/54/s
Rio 75/63/pc
Rome 69/57/sh
Sydney 67/55/sh
Tokyo 77/62/pc
Toronto 60/43/pc
Warsaw 62/43/sh


- .-. _T R U S a C 0 U N T Y



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TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 A5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Martha
Blomgren, 88
CRYSTAL RIVER
Martha Cecilia Blomgren,
88, Crystal River, died Fri-
day, May 29, 2009, at the
Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center in Crystal River
Private cremation arrange-
ments are under the care of
the Strickland Funeral
Home with Crematory.




Joseph
Catallo, 85
FLORAL CITY
Joseph Anthony Catallo,
85, Floral City, died Satur-
day, May 30, 2009, at his res-
idence under the care of his
loving wife, Marie, and Hos-
pice of Citrus County. A
Mass of Christian Burial
will be held at 10 a.m.
Wednesday, June 3, 2009, jt
Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church. The family will re-
ceive friends in visitation
Tuesday, June 2, 2009,
(today) from 4-6 p.m. at the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home. In lieu of flowers, the
family suggests donations to
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464 or the char-
ity of your choice.
Joe was born June 19,
1923, in Pittsburgh, PA, and
came to this area 10 years
ago from Philadelphia, PA
-. He served our country in
the United States Navy dur-
ing WWII and was the recip-
ient of the Purple Heart and
numerous other medals and
awards. Joe was a Masso-
Masseur at the Atlantic City,
N.J., Country Club for 26
years. He enjoyed golfing.
and sports. A man who was
passionate about music, he
was an expert drummer, or-
ganist, singer and dancer.
He played in the band at
Tarawood and also led exer-
cise classes for the residents
there.
His survivors include his
wife of 9 years, Marie
Catallo, Floral City; two
.stepsons, Daniel and wife
Melody Fierimonte, Holly-
wood, FL, and Carl Fieri-
monte, Philadelphia, PA;
two stepdaughters, Rose-
mary and husband Roberit
Taylor, Houston, TX, and
Donna and husband Jeffrey,
Warminster, PA; his brother,
Father Sylvester Catallo,
OFM, CAP of Beacon, NY;
and two sisters, Anne
Ramere, York, S.C., and:
Genevieve and husband
Charles Altlmari, Philadel-
phia, PA; 11 step-grandchil-
dren and five
* step-great-grandchildren.
Sign the guest bbok at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

JoAnn
Foxworthy, 75
HOMOSASSA
JoAnn Gum Foxworthy,
75, formerly of Xenia, Ohio,
died Sunday, May 31, 2009,
at her home in Homosassa,
Florida under the care of
Hospice of Citrus County,
family and friends.
Born in Wallingford, Ken-
tucky to Eugene Gum and
Louise Carpenter Gum; she


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graduated from Tollsboro
High School and Morehead
State University in More-
head, Kentucky, with a
Bachelor of Arts degree in
English and taught in Bell-
brook, Ohio, for many years.
JoAnn loved reading, art,
theatre, films, flowers, and
classical music. She had un-
conditional love for her
family and close friends.
JoAnn is survived by son
Barry (Ann), Sabina, Ohio;
and grandchildren Tyler
(Brittany Hensley, finance)
and Jessica Foxworthy of
Sabina, Ohio. She also
leaves a sister, Joyce (Tom)
Martin of Homosassa, and
niece LeAnne Martin of
Richmond, California. She
was preceded in death by
her parents and brother
Gary Gum.
The family wishes to ex-
press our deep appreciation
to Hospice of Citrus County
who took care of her, as well
as caregiver Angela Middle-
ton and friend Sylvia Crab-
tree.
In lieu of flowers contri-
butions may be made in her
memory to Hospice of Cit-
rus County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, Florida 34464.
Visitation will be 12:30
p.m. - 1:30 p.m. followed by
a Memorial service on Tues-
day, June 2, at Wilder Fu-
neral Home. Burial will be
at Magnolia Cemetery in
Lecanto, Florida.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

Alfredo 'Alfred'
Lopes, 72
LECANTO
Alfredo "Alfred" E Lopes,
age 72, of Lecanto, died Sun-,
day, May 31, 2009, at the
Hernando-Pasco Citrus
Care Center in Inverness.
Services and burial will
be by the Thomas F Dalton
Funeral Home of Levittown,
N.Y.
Local arrangements are
under the care of the Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home with,
Crematory, Inverness.

Leonard
Myers, 95
INVERNESS
Leonard R. Myers, 95, In-
verness, died May 22, 2009,
in' Ihverness.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Inver-
ness Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Homes.

Glonoria
Primo, 86
HOMOSASSA
Glonoria M. Primo, 86, Ho-
mosassa, died May,30, 2009.
Funeral services will be
held in Pawtucket, RI.
Arrangements by Heinz
Funeral Home & Crema-
tion, Inverness, FL.

Emma West, 88
LECANTO
Emma May West, 88,
Lecanto, died Sunday, May
31, 2009, at the Hospice
House in Lecanto.
Private cremation ar-
rangements are under the
care of the Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Crema-
tory, Inverness.


Funeral Home
With Crematory
EUGENE GORECKI
Graveside Service: Wed. 6/3 2pm
Florida National Cemetery
JAMES WALLACE
Private Cremation Arrangements
ALFREDO LOPES
Services in Levittown, NY
JOSEPH CATALLO
View: Tues. 4-6 - Chapel
Mass: Wed. 10am - Our Lady of Fatima
726-8323


Crist signs growth management bill


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Associated Press are already frustrated by traffic con- the c
gestion," said Florida Association of Patti
TALLAHASSEE - A growth man- Counties spokeswoman Cragin to be
cement bill supported by business Mosteller. Th
nd development interests but op- "This is a big setback" with
osed by environmentalists and local Most of the argument has been over "0
)vernments became law a provision designed to cor- arm 1
ith Gov. Charlie Crist's sig- rect an unintended conse- said.
nature Monday. : quence of an existing growth atior
Crist said he hopes the bill management law that re- publ
i.B. 360) will boost Florida's quires ample roads and other As
digging construction industry transportation facilities to be pres
nd create new jobs by mak- in place before development said
ig it easier to build in urban can occur. That's a concept its a
teas and extending the life known as "transportation con- will
existing development per- Gov. Crist currency" regu
its for two years. Other pro- hopes bill will It was aimed at containing stifli
sions are designed to stimulate sprawl but has had the oppo- Fl
promote affordable housing economy, site result Instead of focusing pres.
development. growth in urban areas, con- praii
"I know that it's .probably one of currency has shifted it to outlying and ing "
rose bills where nobody's going to be rural areas because roads there are maki
overly happy on either side," Crist less congested and cheaper to build. cize'
lid. "So, hopefully it's right down the The new law is intended to channel Cr
iddle and will be able to stimulate that growth back into cities by lifting for a
ir economy and not do harm to our transportation concurrency require-, replay
beautiful state." ments in what are termed dense and
Environmentalists, the growth urban areas. State review of large re- othe
management advocacy group 1000 gional developments also will no comic
friends of Florida and the Florida longer be required in those areas. Th
association of Counties had urged a The problem is the measure's 1,000 from
Ato. They argued the legislation will people-per-square-mile definition of men
courage sprawl and make Florida's an urban area is too broad and will state
)adways even more crowded than include suburban and rural sectors, so th
ey are now. said 1000 Friends president Charles law.
"This is going to be a disappoint- Pattison. read
ent to the citizens of Florida who "The areas being exempted are not sion.


ones that are urban and dense,"
son said. "This is clearly meant
nefit development interests."
rose interests certainly are happy
the new law.
ur economy needs the shot in the
that this legislation will provide,"
John Sebree, the Florida Associ-
a of Realtors vice president for
ic policy
sociated Industries of Florida
ident and CEO Barney Bishop
the state's prosperity hinges on
ability to grow and the new law
provide a spark by "easing the
latory burdens that have been
ng economic growth."
orida Chamber of Commerce
ident and CEO Mark Wilson also
sed the legislation while criticiz-
special interests and others" for
ing "a last-minute push to politi-
' the issue.
ist also cited a provision calling
study of mobility fees that would
ace transportation concurrency
spread costs for new roads and
r facilities more broadly across
munities.
e fee concept has drawn support
all sides in the growth manage-
t debate, but Pattison noted the
e already is conducting the study,
Lere was no need to put it in the
The results are expected to be
y for next year's legislative ses-


Florida has no data 3 years into Medicaid trial


Associated Press

MIAMI - Nearly three
years into a Medicaid priva-
tization program former Gov
Jeb Bush said could be a na-
tional model, state officials
say they do not have crucial
data to measure the pro-'
gram's effectiveness, includ-
ing how many patients'
treatments and prescrip-
tions have been approved or
denied.
Patients and health care
advocates have complained
they can't get doctors' ap-
pointments and medications
under the program, which
began in October 2006. An
Associated Press study
found nearly 25 percent of
doctors in Broward and
Duval counties, the \ two
biggest counties in the pilot
program, have dropped out
because of red tape and an
inability to treat patients as
they see fit
The complaints have led
to an outcry for accountabil-
ity from the state's health
care agency, especially after
WellCare, the program's
largest private health care
provider, has admitted to
stealing more than $35 mil-
lion from the state under an-
other program.
There's also been little ev-
idence to show that the pilot,
operating in five counties,
has improved health care or
saved the state money.
"How could you even
think you could get away
with not measuring?" said i
state Rep. Elaine Schwartz,
D-Hollywood, who hears
horror stories ftiom sick res-




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I fear that my only hope for
decent health care will be
to move out of state and away
from family.
Amy Silverman
52-year-old resident of Broward County.


idents complaining they
aren't getter proper care
under the program. "The
people who put this (pro-
gram) in didn't really wantto
know whether our vulnera-
ble population was really
being served because they
were in bed with the HMOs
that were looking at the bot-
tom line and the dollars."
Amy Silverman, 52, calls
the pilot program a "horror"
after trying to get treatment
for her atypical bipolar, se-
vere depression, heart and
kidney problems. Silverman
says many of the doctors and
specialists listed in her plan
have either dropped out or
aren't taking new patients.
She's had such trouble get-
ting appointments that she's
gone to the emergency room,
instead, for minor things,
that could have been han-
dled by a doctor. The plan
also denied, a medication
she's been using for years.
"I fear that my only hope
for decent health care will
be to move out of state and
away from family," said Sil-


verman, a Broward County
resident
The Agency for Health,
Care Administration, Which
oversees the pilot, said in an
e-mail it is overhauling its
computer system and is "in
the process of collecting en-
counter data from all Medi-
caid health plans" but "we
do not have usable data at
this time."
AHCA paid the University
of Florida $2.5 million in
2005 to conduct an inde-'
pendent study of the pro-
gram, but Paul Duncan, who
is heading the study said he
had not yet received the
data.
Various groups, including
Georgetown University, the
health care advocacy group
Florida CHAIN and the AP
have asked for the en-
counter data for nearly a
year, but have not received
it The data should include
patient diagnoses, what
treatments and prescrip-
tions doctors have pre-
scribed and whether they
were paid, denied or de-


played. The data would also
show how many specialist
appointments have been
paid or denied -- a chief
complaint among patients.
"There's definitely a
question of accountability,"
said Joan Alker, research as-
sociate professor at George-
town University. Health
Policy Institute, who has
studied the pilot program.
She said Florida's Medicaid
reform is unique because it
gives HMOs "unprece-
dented power to define the
benefits package."
"HMOs have a bottom line
and that bottom line is to
their shareholders and not
necessarily to the health of
the people they're serving,"
she said.
Under the pilot, the gov-
ernment pays private com-
panies a set amount for
handling a specific number
of residents in the counties
- similar to an HMO in the
private sector The compa-
nies, in turn, decide how to
care for people, including
which doctors they can see
and what medicines and
treatments can be pre-
scribed.
Proponents say the plans
offer patients more cus-
tomized benefits. However,
patients complain they
often have to pick between
plans that cover either their
doctors or medicines - not
both.


Heartfelt Appreciation To Our Spor
Making This Success Possible...


I'k-


PEW
qOh
$






















'
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..k*


The 4th Annual

Citrus Memorial Ball

"Diamond Are Forever"

Silver Star Sponsors
Associated Radiologists of Inverness, P.A., Buchanan,
Ingersoll & Rooney, P.C., Phoenix Physicians

Bronze Star Sponsors
American Baromedical Corporation, Citrus Cardiology Consultants,
Citrus Orthopaedic & Joint Institute, Nature Coast Physical Therapy

Red Star Sponsors
Alex Malley - Legacy Financial Associates, Inc., Alex T. Villacastin, M.D. - Suncoast
Primary Care Specialists, Anonymous, Avant6 at Inverness, B & W Rexall Drugs,
Bhadresh Patel, M.D., Brown Parker & DeMarinis Advertising, Charles E. Davis Funeral
Home With Crematory, Citrus County Sheriff's Office "Keeping Citrus County Drug
Free", Citrus Health & Rehabilitation Center, Citrus Pain Clinic, Dr. Dennis and Cindy
Walker, First Service Administrators, Inc., Gresham, Smith and Partners, Highland
Terrace - An Assisted Living Community, Jenkins Auto Group - Acura, Hyundai, Mazda,
Life Care Center of Citrus County, Morgan Stanley - Ellen Zane, CFP, Rose & Glenn
Kilgus, Sweetwater Homes of Citrus, Inc., The Travel Club of Citrus County - Gerry
Jones, Village Crier Newspaper, Woodland Terrace of Citrus County
Thank you to our dedicated Ball Committee
Susan Gill Co-Chairperson, Ellen Zane Co-Chairperson, Judy Berlow, Bob Collins;
Kristy Eichhom, Zana Ennis, Dr. Parmanand M. Gumani, Susan Hendrick,
Dixie Hollins, Gerry Jones, Glenn & Rose Kilgus, Alida Langley, Katie Lucas,
Alex Malley, Debbie Muir, Donna Pearcy, Chris Pool, Becky Vaughn,
Diane Wesch, Lynn Williams, Josh Wooten
Citrus Memorial Health System
Ryan Beaty, President & CEO
Chris Pool, Development Director, Foundation Development Office

CITRUS MEMORIAL Net proceeds of this event 9
._,S . go toward the planned CITRUS MEMORIAL
ADVANCING THE VONo... ,OAUEn Family Care Health & Education Center ,IT /4 ME -1



.45cl


I FREE


IJA i d 4 "'ll


I










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STOCKS


A6 TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009


I Ho oRA H MRE NRVE


I ~ STOCS O LCLNERS


MOST ACTIVE ($1 oR PPRE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name VollOo) Lasi Chg Name Vol(OO) Last Chq Name VoYO0 Last Chg
3d14.oiT. '3o:i 1i 21- -4i6 PSCrudeDLn245752 4.49 +.25 PwShsQQQ1123114 36.39 +1.01
DirxFinBear2985817 4.49 -.21 Hemisphrx 50414 1.71 +.02 CellTherrsh1008352 2.10 +.67
SPDR 2508519 94.77 +2.24 EldorGld g 42420 9.69 -.23 Cisco 962871 19.50 +1.00
DirxFinBull 2330886 10.46 +.46 Oilsandsg 39269 1.06 +.04 DryShips 804746 7.79 -.40
Ciigrp 2281911 3.69 -.03 GoldStrg 37225 2.33 +.05 Intel 738190 16.50. +.78

GAINERS (S2OcMUOEI GAINERS i2 SoCMORE I GAINERS (2 .:r.co..E
Name Lasil _Chg Chg_ Name Last CRne.Cng_ Naime Last _CMng 'Cngl
: lMIGrp 4-19 .75 , 31 F.iEPubni 11 -ill 11. iW C.iiTnu.r r. 1 . r, 14F.'.q
PrimepfB 2.20 +.46 +26.4 PyramidOs 7.89 +1.61 +25.6 WSBHIdgs 3.70 +1.10 +42.3
ArvMerith 3.16 +.61 +23.9 GenMoly 2.64 +.51 +23.9 GreenPlns 6.23 +1.83 +41.6
SLM pfB 23.90 +4.50 +23.2 CoastD 2.86 +.43 +17.7 CarolTrBk 7.97 +2.20 +38.1
Spherion 4.23 +.79 +23.0 Westmrld 9.90 +1.10 +12.5 USGloblnv 9.00 +2.20 +32.4

LOSERS ($2 on MogE) LOSERS '$2 c MORE) LOSERS l52 Or MOrEl
Name Las[ Chg ".Cng Name Lasil _Cn _ aChq ame L3st Cng '.Cng
DirxEMBear1l2.08 -1.73 -12.5 Accelr8 2.25 -.50 -18.2 ARCAbion 5.13 -4.16 -44.8
PrUShCh2512.02 -1.63 -11.9 ContMatfIs 11.77 -2.33 -16.5 SyntaPhm 3.02 -1.14 -27.4
DirxSCBear 22.00 -2.87 -11.6 CagleA 3.68 -.50, -12.0 Oculus 2.97 -.94 -24.0
SFUSEuJ137.93 -.99 -11.1 SagaCmrs 6.15 -.75 -10.9 FFinSvc 14.39 -3.12 -17.8
PlaybyB 2.97 -.36 -10.8 PacOffPT 3.72 -.43 -10.4 FstCalffFn 7.00 -1.45 -17.2


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows'
Volume


DIARY


2,529 A.Jlanced
572 Declined,
74 Unchanged
3,175 Total issues
31 New Highs
2 New Lows
6,192,458,907 Volume


DIARY


368 Adj..ans, ..
210 Declined
56 Unchanged
634 Total issues
19 New Highs
1 New Lows
155,553,504 Volume


'08 I
672
116
2,869
67
8
2,572,849,255


Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...
Slock Footnotes: .. o I?,uw , r, , 3.; *ui5i ie ., e :.-rrL-'iG. , rC, ,t r,r., -,, 4 J* 5a * :.
k,.di'l1 - L.: '" nUl i :T .: e': � n.- .impj.'y li.IrnII ln;il..l .:.,,Arn l i ,:rn.i'niri.), :
,'.Trgirg C. :..,T.pa.r., M,'rIplpa,:e r,. fe.Ti,,:.r-ar ea.,, I. T. ri .1.:r, ,:1w^,^11 :dL, iju.g-lIJ I'h
,,' .iu. r.f.: T ," n . .:,: " - - u ,,', ire 1 i e~e' Tr,:. . aw r,,r, .] I.. i ,,
ui e , fa : r.i Irur, I r, .i.]..'.'.l. 1 pr) tl...] pI , pl-P l .rt.l :l',,: ..: i 'J rI r (. . f l ' l :t , . i ,
H.:.L., .:.,t, i -' ilau1T -. l pu..ra,, i i ,,o i .1 ,g lr,ir ['u, :i,:Jrly at a .':'r'�] IJ":'
. Io .: rn Si s: : i C: .v l1a i 1 i ': ,en lr aT ,, ', ir. e la6 :1 ,e . r *, . T 1, ,i l i E ' ,: n l r .1 , II ',
o : Ii ; ..s d JU Vo* ' W, i i aP :l a['ul W mirr ,.i AIll,.Tr *a ,ul-:r, i " 1 .:.I a3 il'C a- ' fJ
AE .4 k r. gn 'Jr . Urn r.. n:l x.jr, 5ne ir' Ia :.re ,:u'.ry vn . C :. pai','y - f in u l.:y o, r.:.
C ..e& :r-rp i :.' .. er,,', , r,.rag i ,,~d iuJl, h, [*,r an,� , nriupl.y I5 u 4. e T 'e a ,r , I r.:. ,l .I in,i .'a rT
Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


I ~~INES


52-Week
High Low Name
12,726.66 6,469.95Dow Jones Industrials
5,492.95 2,134.21Dow Jones Transportation
528.07 288.66Dow Jones Utilities
9,421.63 4,181.75NYSE Composite
2,379.19 1,130.47Amex Index
2,549.94 1,265.52Nasdaq Composite
1,406.32 666.79S&P 500
14,339.97 6,772.29Wilshire 5000
764.38 342.59Russell 2000


Net' % YTD% 52-wk
Last Chg Chg Chg % Chg
8,721.44 \+221.11 +2.60 -.63 -30.25
3,353.23 +150.78 +4.71 -5.20-37.63
352.22 +11.23 +3.29 -5.00 -31.72
6,169.07 +165.00 +2.75 +7.16 -33.78
1,645.21 +33.93 +2.11 +17.72-30.11
1,828.68 +54.35 +3.06 +15.96 -26.60
942.87 +23.73 +2.58 +4.39 -31.96
9,666.37 +257.91 +2.74 +6:37-31.56
521.33 +19.75. +3.94 +4.38-29.65


YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AK Steel .20 1.3 ... 15.43 +1.13 +65.6
AT&T Inc 1.64 6.7 12 24.64 -.15-13.5
AlliedCap ... ... ... 3.01 +.02 +11.9
BkofAm .04 .4 15 11.21 -.06-20.4
CapCtyBk .76 5.1 29 14.87 +.71 -45.4
Citigrp .04 1.1 ... 3.69 -.03 -45.0
Disney .35 1.4 13 25.03 +.81 +10.3
EKodak ...... 12 2.70 +.09 -59.0
Embarq 2.75 6.4 8 42.66 +.64 +18.6
ExxonMbI 1.68 2.3 9 71.76 +2.41 -10.1
FPLGrp 1.89 3.2 13 58.20 +1.67+15.6
FairPoint ... ... ... 1.09 +.08 -66.8
FordM ...... 6.13 +.38+167.7
GenElec .40 2.9 9 13.86 +.38-14.4
vjGnMotr ...... 75 ... -76.6
HomeDp .90 3.7 17 24.16 +1.00 +5.0
Intel .56 3.4 21 16.50 +.78 +12.6


YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
IBM 2.20 2.0 12 108.37 +2.09 +28.8
Lowes .36 1.8 14 20.18 +1.17 -6.2
McDnlds 2.00 3.3 16 59.85 +.86 -3.8
Microsoft .52 2.4 12 21.40 +.51 +10.1
Motorola ... ... ... 6.33 +.27 +42.9
Penney .80 2.7 14 29.98 +3.89 +52.2
ProgrssEn 2.48 6.8 12 36.46 +.95 -8.5
RegionsFn .04 1.0 ... 3.99 -.20-49.9
SearsHIdgs ... 55 61.83 +4.98 +59.1
Smucker 1.40 3.4 13 41.30 +1.04 -4.8
SprintNex ... ... ... 5.00 -.15+173.2
TimeWrnrs .75 3.1 ... 24.01 +.59 +7.6
UniFirst .15 .4 10 34.30 +.15 +15.5
VerizonCm 1.84 6.3 13 29.25 -.01 -13.7
WalMart 1.09 2.2 15 50.59 +.85 -9.8
Walgrn .45 1.4 15 31.14 +1.35 +26.2


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

ihe Crronicle. Ann: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd . Crvsial River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

ine name ot Ihe stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

lual lunds. list parent company, symbol and the exact name

ol the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


*3 0 a

lOmbOlk 53.40 +1.59 Money0rm 1.50 -.15 PatroCg 45.64 lIltyInca 22.11 +64


Name Last Chg BRE 25.38 +.40
BRT 3.70 +.10
BakrHu 40.93 +1.87
BalCp 42.06 +2.26
ABB Ld 17.18 +.72 BcoBrades 15.84 +.57
AESCorp 10.68 +.69 BkofAm 11.21 -.06
AFLAC 36.26 +.76 BkAnpiE 15.43 +.11
AGLRes 30.06 +1.14 BkNYMeI 27.45 -.33
AKSteel 15.43 ,+1.13 Barclay 20.50 +1.19
AMBPr 19.18 +1.33 BanickG 37.04 -1.04
AMR 4.73 +.28 Baxter 49.23 -1.96
ASALtd . 69.70 +.97 BaytexEg 918.37 +.49
AT&T Inc 24.64 -.15 Berkley 22.04 +.35
AUOptron 10.82 +.43 BestBuy 37.63 +2.53
AXA 19.68 +.83 BigLots 23.77 +.76
AbtLab 44.98 -.08 BioMedR 10.11 +.28
AberFdc 32.24 +2.13 BIkHllsCp 22.55 +1.15
Accenture 31.30 +1.37 BIkDebIStr 2.90 +.06
AdamsEx 8.66 +.22 BIkEnhC&l 12.70 +29
AdvAuto 43.85 +1.26 Blackstone 11.03 +.08
AMD 4.73 +.19 BlockHR 15.03 +.43
Aeropost 35.96 +1.34 BlueChp 2.48 +.09
Aetna 27.37 +.59 Boeing 47.70 0+2.65
Agilent 18.88 +.65 Borders 3.13 , +.46
Agnicog 60.44 -1.42 BorgWam 34.59 +2.34
Agriumg 49.70 +.48 BostBeer 29.90 +1.38
AirTran 5.38 +.31 BostProp 49.88 +1.56
AlcatelLuc. 2.64 +.10 BostonSdi 9.55 +,15
-Alcoa 9.83 +.61 BoydGm 10.56 +.52
ATlgErngy 26.24 +1.24 Brandy 7.41 -.04"
AllegTch' 31.61 +3.20 BrMySq 20.11 +.19
Allergan 44.18 +.05 BrkdAsgs 17.75 +.16
Allete 27.49 +1.07 BrfldPrp 8.02 +.46
AlliBGIbHi 10.50 +.29 Brunswick 5.00 +.36
AlliBlnco 7.59 +.07 Buckeye 43.09 +.10
AlliBem 20.57 +1.49 BungeLt 65.52 +2.25
AlIiedCap 3.01 +.02 BurgerKbng 16.27 -.29
Aldlrish 4.04 +.32 BudNSF 76.15 +3.71
Allstate 26.14 +.41 CBREIlis 8.41 +1.11
AlphaNRs 29.68 +2.13 CBLAsc 6.68 +.45
Atia \ 17.19 +.10 CBS0 B 8.74 +1.36
AmbacF 1.35 +.10 CHEngy 43.11 +1.64
Ameren 24.35 +1.09 CIGNA 23.12 +.95
AMovaiL 38.85, +.52 CinTGp 3.80 -.03
AmAxleeh 2.51 +.47 CMSEng 11.87 +.53
AEagleOut 15.40 +.59 CSSInds 18.63 +.43
AEP 27.26 +.92 CSX 33.71 +1.95
AmnExp 25.99 +1.14 CVSCare 30.60 +.80
AmnnlGp 1.66 -.03 CabeinNY 19.58 +.55
AniOriBio 5.02 +.17 CabotO&G .36.90 +1.77
AmSIP3 8.66 +.02 CallGolf 7.56 +.44-
AmTower 32.21 -.34 Capine 14.68 +1.13
Amedcdt 14.07 +1.36 CamdnP 30.76 +.74
Amerges 32.30 +32 Canecogs 28.96 +1.36
Ameriprise 30.93 +.73 Cameron 32.45 +1.22
Anadarko 49.78 +2.00 CampSp 28.33 +.61
AnalogDev 25.03 +.62 .J,,H,,]y 44.37 +.91
AnglogldA 41.49 - -.84 ,:,ir,lil;� 62.48 +2.72
AnnTaylr 7.75 +.43 CepOne 24.84 +.40
Anrialy 14.25 +.31 CapilISrce 3.93 +.18
Aon Corp 35.65 -.35 CapMpfIB 13.26 +.13
Apache 86.00 +1.74 CarMax 12.47 +1.26
Aptlnv 10.13 +.68 Carnival 26.68 +1.24
AquaAmn 16.71 +.22 Caterpillar 37.55 +2.09
ArcelorMit 36.11 +2.93 Celanese 21.84 +1.33
ArchCoal ' 19.68 +1.15 Celesticg 7.41 +.82'
AKoban,'i:28.39, , .87 Coeinex 10.83. .i+1.07
6.-, r, i.u , i . +.61 CenlerPnt 10.27 *
A.T -,,k- .o '! 4 +1.67 Centex 8.37 - ..
AsdEstat 6.39 +.42 CntryTel 31.29 +.44
ATMOS 24.39 4.39 ChampE h .42 -.02
AutoNatn 16.99 +1.11 Checkpnt 14.65 +.81
AvalonBay 64.43 +2.95 ChesEng 24.52 +1.86
Avnet 22.96 -.05 Chevron 69.21, +2.54
Avon 27.32 +.76. ChicB&l 13.07 +.16
BB&TCp 22.23 -.19 Chicos 10.31 +.55
BHP BMILt 59.27 +3.03 Chimera 3.50 +.01
BJ Svcs 16.39 +.75 ChinaMble 52.13. +2.92
BPPLC 51.88 +2.38 ChinaUni 13,82' +1.47


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 5.41 -.10
AdmRsc 17.65 -.65
Advenrx .13 '-.01
AlexcoRg 2.25 +.13
AlidNevG 7.44 -.31
AmApparel 4.01 +.05
AmO&G 1.05 +.10
Anooraqg 1.17 -.06
ApolloGg .47 +.01
ArcadiaRs :60 +.05
Augusta g 231 +.21
Aurizong 4.56 +.13


BMB Munal 1.70
BPZRes 7.31
Banrog 2.02
BarcAIG36 39.15
BarcGSOil 24.69
BrclndiaTR 52.42
BootsCts 1.37
CdnSEng .74
CanoPet .86
CelSd .27
CFCdag 12.41
CheniereEn 4.26
ChinaGmn 7.56
ClaudeR g .81
CighGlbOp 11.00


Chubb 40.08 +.43 EOG Res 76.72
CinciBell 2.92 +A.13 EastC.m 43.24
CiUgrp 3.69 -.03 EKodak 2.70
CleanH 55.49 +.97 Eaton 47.16
CIffsNRs 29.01 +1.76 Edisonlnt 30.18
Clorox 52.58 +.14 ElPasoCp 10.39
Coach 28.36 +2.09 Elan 7.76
CocaCE 17.10 +.44 Embarq 42.66
CocaCI 49.02 -.14 EmersonEl 33.84
Coeurrs 14.20 -.57 EmpDist 16.24
CohStSUtl 11.41 +.33 Emulex 10.47
ColgPal 69.42 +3.47 EnbrEPtrs 41.80
ColcIvBrd 16.01 +1.25 EnCana 57.54
ColBgp 1.22 -.08____
Comerica 21.36 -.32
CmeMls 18.01 +1.04
ComScop 27.17 +.93
Con-Way 33.93 +1.83
ConAgra 18.96 +.37
ConocPhil 47.90 +2.06
Conseco 2.60 +.19
ConsolEngy 43.57 +2.41
ConEd 36.23 +.77
ConstellA 12.05 +.49 1
ConstellEn 27.51 +.23
C6Air B 10.05 +.73
Cnvrgys 9.21 -.04
Coming 15.62 +.92
CorpOflP 30.75 +1.07
CoventlyH 18.38 +.33




V Hal



DR Horton 9,25 +.04
DTE 31.56 +1.31
Daimler 39.76 +3.65
Danaher 63.23 +2.88
Darden 37.59 +1.42
DeanFds 18.77 -.03 EnP 1.26
Deere 46.96 +3.49 ENSCO 41.29
DeltaAir 6.43 +.62 Entergy 7680
DenburyR , 18.46 +1.27 Equitax 27.30
DeutschBk 69.26 +1.65 EqtyRsd 25.25
DevelDiv 5.10 +.19 ExcelM 11.04
DevonE 66.45 +3.21 ExcoRes 16.29,
DiaOifs 89.19 +4.91 Exekon 49.27
DiamRk 7.08 +.58 EMonMbl 7176
DianaShip 18.20 +.17 FMCPCorp 55.25
DicksSptg 18.65 +.85 FPLGrp chldS 7.70
DigitalRIt 37.29 +1.52 FamilyDIr 3121
DirxRnBull 10.46 +.46 FamlyOIa 31.21
DirxnnBear 4.49 -.21 FannteMae h .72
DirxSCBear 22.00 -2,87 FedExCp 57.88
DirxSCBull 30.112.1 FedRty 54.37
DirxLCBear 33.32 -2:76 FedSignl 850
DirxLCBull 36.95 +2.62 Ferrellgs 17.87
DirxEnBear 17.74 -1.98 FidlNrn 13.96
DirxEnBull 39.55 +3,68 FdNInfons 20.01
Discover ,Ib09 +.53 FstAmCp 22.22
. 25.03 +.81 ]:..,.:,. 12.54
K.T.f,.,,s 32.90 +1.11 .T . 10.11
Domtarglf 1.31 +.17 FTrEnE' 9.04
DonlleyRR 14.43 +.95 FirstEngy 39.32
DEmmett ., 9.44 +.14 F uors 50.50
DowChm 17.10 -.58 FotLockrs 11.44
DrPepSnap 22.47 +.74 .FordM 6.13
DuPont 29.90 +1.43 ForestLab 24.28
DukeEngy 14.37 +.22 ForestOil , 20.14
DukeRlly 9.97 +.46 Ftress 4.45
Dynegy 2.30 +29 FortuneBr ,37.05
EMIVC Cp 12.42 +.67


CoffeeH 3.91 -.32 I EvolPetrol 2.69 +.09
CortexPh .22 +.01 FI'LIM 13.08 -.07
Crosshglf .25 +.01 fl '.n - !3.07 +.47


DenisnMg 1.97 +06 GascoEngy .44 +.01
DuneEngy .17 +.02 GastarEg' .44 +.06
EVInMu2 12.68 +,13 GenMoly 2.64 +.51
EldorGldg 9.69 -.23 GeoGloblR .94 -.05
ElixirGam .22 +.04 GoldStrg 2.33 +.05
BEswlhFd 5.63 -+.08 Grahams 13.17 -.83
EndvrInt 1.74 +.02 GranTrrag 3.15 +.11
EndvSilvg 2.26 +.04 GrlBasGg , 1.54 -.03
EnterAcq . 9,72 +.02 GpoSimec 6.49 +.14
EvlnIcAdv 8.44 +25 Hemisphrx 1.71 +.02


+3.53
+1.80
+.09
+3.66
+.94
+.64
+,78
+.64
+175
+.57
-.52
+1.45
+2.11


FdtnCoal 31.50 +2.15
FrankRes 71.18 +4,33
FredMac h .80
FMCG 58.12 +3.69
FronoerCm 7.51 +.23
FronliefOil 18107 +.60

GATX , 26.57 +1.39
GabelliET 4.75 +.25
GabHllthW 5,06 +.05
GabUtil 6,63 +.08
GameSlop 25.80 +.65


HooperH .48 -.01
IA Global .06 +.01
ImpOilgs 42.51 +1.86
IndiaGC 1:49 +.15
IntellgSys .69
.InURyltyg 3.75 -.03,


JavelinPh 1.40 +.02
KodiakOg 1.20 +.04
LadTha]Fn .83 +.06

MadCatzg .36 -.06
Merrimac 11.23 +.11


HanPtDv2 7.61
Hanesbrds 18.38
Hanoverlns 35.97
HaleyD 18.45
HarmonyG 11.60
HarisCorp 31.16
HartifdFn 15.18
Hasbro 26.02
HawallEI 17.93
HItCrREIT 34.93
HItMgmt 6.04
HlthcrRlity 17.23
HedaM 3.70


Metalico
MetroHIth
Minefrid g
NBRESec
Nevsun g
NDragon
NwGold g
NAPallg
NDynMng
NthnO&G
NthgtM g
NovaDelP
NovaGld g
Oilsandsg
On2 Tech


iSEele


iSRMCVs
iSITRsMd
iSSPMid
iSITC&SRI
iSM1KV
!SRI KG
iSRusIK
iSR2KG
iShR2K
iShMEst
iShFnSo
iShBauM


C I TR nU S.C U ., .N r Yv
lay forJ I I

your CjIHIRpNICL IL



Sh e]]F.-Z-1vay!


NO MORE

>ssles! V Checks! V Reminders!





33-5655 It's EZ !
*Charge may vary at first transaction and at each Vacation start.


Gannett 5.07 4 +.30
Gap 18.61 +.76
GenooShip 28.26 +2.11
GenDynam 59.31 +2.41
GenElec 13.86 +.38
GenMills 51.17. -.01
vjGnMotr .75
v]GMdb32B 2.98T +.36
vjGMdb33 2.91 +.25
vjGM nt48 2.77 +.29
Genworth 6.60 +.68
GaPw8-44 25.13 +.10
Gerdaug 7.22 +.46
Gerdaus 11.12 +.72
Gildan , 17.25 +.80
GoldFULd 13.39 -.19
Goldcrpg 36.91 -2.82
GoldmanS 144.33 -.24
Goodrich 6'51.69 +3.15
Goodyear 12.28 +.83
GrafTech' 11.30 +1.13
GtPlainEn 15.49 +.42,
Griffon 10.19 +.560'
GuangRy 23.94 +.22
Guess 28.74 +2.92
GushanEE 3.05 +.35
HCP Inc 23.52 +.29
HRPTPrp 4.85 +.10
HSBC 45.45 -.01
HSBC cap 23.56 -.27
Hallibrtn 23.92. +.99
HanJS 10.91 +.17


Heinz - 37.11 +.53
HelixEn 11.89 +.64
HellnTel 8.27 +.21
HelmPayne 36.79 +1.82
Hertz 7.08 +,23
Hess 68.04 +1.45
HewlettP 36.00 +1.65
HighwdPrp 23.61 +.99
HomeDp 24.16 +1.00
HonwIllntl 35.35 +2.19
HospPT 14.89 +.92
HostHolls 9.61 +.23
Humana 32.15 +.82
Huntsmn . 6.61 +.29
IAMGIdg 11.02 -.25
ICICI Bk 32.08 +.94
iSAsnla 17.16 +.69
iShBraz 57.41 +2.21
iSCan 23.50 +.40
iShHK 14.59 +.41
iShJapn 9.52 +.15
iSi Kor 37.42 +1.31
iShMex 37.73 +.99
iShSing 9.55 +.23
iSPacxJs 33.22 +1.15
iSTaiwn 11.40 +.13
iShUK 14.12 +.39
iShSilvers 15.35 -.12
iShCh25s 39.53 +2.16
iSSP500 95.02 +2.21
iShEMkts 34.64 +1.40
iShSPLAs 37.39 +1.44
iShB20T 91.09 -2.77


iStar 3.14 +.04
Idacorp 24.30 +1.03
ITW 35.85 +3.56
Imation 9.83 +.17
IngerRd 21.67 +1.44
IngrmM 17.06 +.54
IntegrysE 28.43 +1.34
,IntcnlEx 110.03 +2.24
IBM 108.37 +2.09
IntlGame 17.72 +.36
IntPap 14.61 +.24
Interpublic 5.52 +.28
Invesco 16.29 +.64
IronMIn 28.48 +1.23
ItauUnIMult 16.89 +.84
IvanhM 5.36 -.12

JCrew 27.40 +1.54
JPMorgCh 36.11 -.79
Jabil . 8.40 +.57
JacobsEng 45.44 +2.54
JanusCap 10.82 +.68
Jefferies 21.87 +.24
JohnJn 55.78 +.62
JohnsnCtl 21.31 +1.38
KBHome 15,10 +.10'
KBR Inc 1927 +.85
KCSouthn 16.81 +.32
Kaydon 36.60 +2.20
KAEngTR 17.32 +.19
Kellogg 43.85 +.60
Keycorp 4.74 -.26


KNmbClk 53.48 +1.59
Kimco 12.38 +.69
KiJndME 51.90 +.76
KlngPhrm 9.61 +.15
Kinross g 20.18 -.04
Kohls 46.48 +4.01
Kraft 26.64 +.53
KrispKrm 3.79 +.32
Krdger 23.40 +.60
LDKSolar 9.51, +.39
LLERoyhlf .55
LSI Corp 4.49 +.02
LTC Prp 21.20 +.39
LaZBoy 2.20 +.33
Laclede 32.19 +1.11
LVSands 10.77 +.86
LaSalleH 15.44 +1.76
LearCorp 1.42 +.18
LeggMason 19.73 +.45
LennarA 9.59 +.08
LbtyASG 2.70 +.06
UbtProp 24.38 +1.10
Ullyhi 34.65 +.08
Limited 13.55 +1.04
UncNat 19.58 +.63
Lindsay 33.90 +2.04
LockhdM 84.16 +.53'
Loews 28.43 +1.38


M&T Bk 50.80 +.50
MBIA 6.94 +.49
MDU Res 19.59 +1.13
MEMC 20.94 +1,65
MFGlobael 5.96 -.12
MFA Fnot 6.35 +.09
MCR 7.97 +.04
MGIC 4.67 +.31
MGMMir 8.36 +.90
Macerich 17.80 +.92
Macquar h 3.78 +.35
Macys 13.44 +1.76
Madecos 6.52 +.32
Magnal g 32.84 +.41
Mantowoc 7.07 +.55
Manuli gs 22.26 +.90
MaralhonO 33.32 +1.44
MktVGold 43.41 -.75
MktVRus 25.75 +1.79
MarlntA 24.68 +1.32,
MarshM 19.08 +.16
Marshlls 6.59 +.01
MSIewrt 2 3.50 +.25
Masco 11.05 +.69
MasseyEn 24.74 +1.85
MasterCrd 173.73 -2.60
Mattel 16.32 +.71
McClateh h .82 -.02
McDermInlnt 22.62 +.65
McDOnlds 59.85 +.86
McGrwH 32.13 +2.04
McKesson 41.86 +.71
McAfee 39.00 -.23
Mechel 12.55 +1.54
*,r.-i,.:.Hi, 47.65 +1.76
-.l, rr,,,: 34.90 - ,+55
Menrck 27.53: ' -n5
MeridRsh .61' .1'
Metavnte 26.55 +.90
MetUfe 31.51 +.01
MetroPCS 17.22 +.09
MicronT 5.32 +26
MidMAApt 37.21 +.92
Midas 10.64 +.64
Milipore 64.54 +1.65
Mirant 16.59 +.98
MobileTel 44.30 +2.81
MolsCoorB 44.63 +.64


I I AMER7CAN5STOCK4EXCHAUGEr1


PacRim .35
Palean .22
ParaGSS 1.77
PetroRes .51
PionDrill 6.17
PolyMetg 1.35
PSCrudeDS n76.50
PSCrudeDLn 4.49
ProceraNt .66
Proliance .18
PyramidOs 7.89
QueslCapg 1.11
Rentech .59


Sapphirewt .15
SeabGldg 28.42
SilvrcpM gn 3.25
Sinovac 2.80
SulphCo 1.10
TandyLUhr 2.40
TanzRyg 4.02.
Taseko . 1.78
Telkonet .12
Tengsco .69
TianAcwt 20
USGeoth 1.63
US Gold 2.42


Uranium!


MoneyGrm 1.50 -.15
Monsanto 81.48 -.67
MonstrWw 12.76 +1.08
Moodys 28.55 +1.16
MorgStan 29.89 -.43
MSEmMkt 11.65 +.40
Mosaic 56.47 +1.77
Motorola 6.33 +27
MurphO 59,93 +.92
NCRCorp 11,39 +.65
NRG Egy 23.72 +1.22
NYSEEur 31.12 +1.12
Nabors 19.23 +1.35
NatFuGas 34.83 +1.30
NatGrid 49.89 +1.28
NOilVarco 40.03 +1.41
NalSemi 14.56 +.68
NatwHP 27.28 +.71
Navios 5.46 -.03
Netezza 7.05 +.07
NewAmrn rs 6,80 +.22
NJ Rscs 34.85 +1.58
NY CmtyB 11.07 +.01
NewellRub 11.86 +.35
NewfldExp 37.66 +1.54
NewmtM 47.99 -.88
NwpkRsoIf 2.73 -.15
Nexen g 25.72 +.85
NiSource 11.06 +.37
Nicor 32.51 +1.06
NikeB 59.26 +2.21
NobleCorp 37.03 +2.66
NobleEn 63.17 43.69
NokiaCp 16,17 +.87
Nordstrm 22.45 +2.76
NorfitkSo 39.51 +2.31
NoestUt 21.67 +.88
NorthropG 48.57 +.95
NSTAR 31.07 +1.00
Nucor 46.98 3,07
NvFL 11.71
NvlIMO 12.51 -.07
NvMulSI&G 5.43 +.08
NuvQPf2 5.92 +.18
OGE Engy 26,91 +1.09
OcciPet 69.34 +2.23
OfficeDpt 5.21 +55
OilSvHT 111.60 +5.19-
OldRepub 10.62 +.39
Olin 13.86 +.50
Omnicom 32.37 +1.87
ONEOK 30.02 +.72
ONEOKPI 49.43 +1:04
OshkoshCp 12.54 +.67
OwensCom 14.50 +.57
Owenslil 29.34 +71


PG&ECp 37.73 +1.02
PMIGrp 2.49 +.75
PNC 44.34 -1.21
PNM Res 9.86 +.61
PPG 46.04 +1.57
PPLCorp 34.34 +1.87
Pactiv 23.27 +.87
".nT. 27,04 *136
,I :'.. 5.30
FI . H�,'. 46:67 , -41
PaltiotCs 9.29 +,23
PeabdyE 35.82 +1.84
Pengrthg 8.87 +.11
PennVaRs 15.70 +.45
PennWstg 14.53 +.45
Penney 29.98 +3.89
PepBoy 7.64 +.59
PepcoHold 13.53 +.55
PepsiCo 53.13 +1.08
PepsiAmer 26.34 +.04
Prmian 12.22 +.80


.17
1.67 +.18
En 2.18 -.17


VistaGold , 2.49 -20
WstGldfdg 2.90 -.19
Westmild 9.90 +1.10
WilshrEnt 1.65
WTDrfBz 23.05 +.22
YMBiog .57 +.06


NASDAQNATIONALMRE


Name Last Chg


A-Power 13.55 +1.44
ACMoore6l 3.50 +.14
ADC Tel 7.54 +.51
APACC 6.25 +.60
ARCAblion 5.13 -4.16
ASMLHId 21.84 +1.14
ATMIInc 17.77 +1.54
ATP O&G 8.91 -.10
ATS Med 3.00 +.01
AVIBIo 1.31 +.09
AXTInc 1.21 +.04
Aastrom .36 +.02
AcordaTh 25.43 +.79
ActvsBIzs 12.13 +.05
Actuate 5.09 +.25
Acxiomr 10.96 +.30
Adaptec 2.73 +.03
AdobeSy 29.36 +1.18
Adtran 21.35 +.57
AdvATech 4.84 +.12
AdvBattery 3.65 +.07
AdvantaA .60 -.02
AdvantaB .75 +.05
AEtemag 2.20 +.51
Affynetrix 4.90 +.09
AgFeed 6.89 +.85
AirTmsph 2.29 +.43
AkamaiT 21.69 -.58
AkeenaSh 1.30 +.10
Akom 1.04 -.04
AlancoTch .46 +.17
AMdila 3.61 -,25
Alexion s 36.38 -.12
AlignTech 12.55 +.72
Alkerm 8.11 -.01
AlegiantT 42.23 +1.89
AllosThera 7.23 -.05
AscdriptM 13.44 +.53
AlairNano 1.01
AteraCpeIf 17.66 +.64
AltusPhm .32 +.03
Alvaeon 2.98 +.06
Amazon 83.05 +5.06
Amedisys 32.16 +1.73
AmerBioh .18 -.02
AmCapUd 2.90 +.15
AmltPastan 27,44 -.21
AmerMed 15.67 +.50
AmSupr 29.35 +1.52
AmCasino 21.35 +1.31
Amngen 50.10 +.16
AmkorTIf 4.82 +.29
Amylin 11,26 -.06
Anadigc 422 +.32
AnadysPh 2.12 -.10
Anlogic 37.15 +.66
Analysts .66 +.03
Angiotchg 1.72 -.08
AngloAm -15.59 +1.24
Ansys 31.98 +2.16
Antigncs .89 +.16
ApolloGrp 60.86 +1.76
Apollolnv 5.99 +.48
Apple Inc 139.35 +3.54
ApldMall 12.06 +.80
AMCC- 8.18 +.36
ArchCap 58.44 +1.62
ArcSight 17.09 +1.00
ArenaPhm 3.57 -.11
AresCap 7.94 +.29
AgoGplnt 28.69 +.64
AriadP 1.50
Aribalnc 10.18 4.72
ArkBest 30.37 +2.26
ArmHId 5.38 +.12,
Anis 12.45 +.34
ArtTech 3.81 +.21
ArubaNet 6.72 +.21
Aslalnfo 21.08 +.14
AsscdBanc 14.55 +,12
Atheros 17.10 +.34
AlasAmes 19.19 +.77
Atnel 4.00 +.19
Audvox 8,45 +.63


Authentdth 1.19 +.10
Autobytel .45 ,
Autodesk 22.66 +1.20
AutoData 38.82 +.81
AvanirPhh 1.20 -.07
Aware 2.58
Axcelis .45 +.02
AxsysTech 49.93 +.85
BEAero 15.94 +1.08
Baidu Inc 285.99 +22.19
BareEscent 9.34 +.59
Barzel Inds .26 +.08
BeaconPw .79 +.02
BeacnRfg .15.01 +.51
BeasleyB 2.69 +.09
BebeStrs 8.37 +.31
BedBath 29.98 +1.87
BigBand 5.24 +.02
Blocryst 3.85 -.17
Biogenldc 50.90 -.89
BioMarin 14.10 +.16
Biopuraesh .22 -.00
BlueCoat 15.43 +1.26
BobEvn 26.31 +.51
Borland 1.16 +.18
BostPrv 5.28 +.23
BrigExp 3.75 +.34
Brighlpnt 6.13 +.21
Broadcom 26.53 +1.05
BrcdeCm 7.45 +.11
BrooksAuto 4.00 +.13
BrukerCp 6.99 +.46
Bucyrus 30.69 +2.01
BuffaloWW 37.17 +1.67
CA Inc 17.96 +.51
CDCCpA 1.70 +.05
CH Robins 52.98 +2.16
CME Grp 329.68 +8.04
CTCMedia 11.60 +1.69
CVB Fnd 6.47 +.12
Cadence 5.70 +.05
CdnSolar 13.65 +.42
CapCtyBk 14.87 +.71
CpslnTrb .68 +.04
Caraustar .08 -,10
Cardicah 1.39 +.34
CardioNet 18.49 +.78
CareerEd 20.35 +.27
Carrizo 22.96 +1.61
CarverBcp 5.19
CaiualMal 2.11 +.36
CatalystPh .87 -.03
CathayGen 10.56 +.20
CaviumNet 14.65 +.21
Celadon 8.20 +.61
Celgene 42.60 +.36
CellGensh .44 -.01
CellTherrsh 2.10 +.67
CelldexTh 11.22 +2.20
CentlCom 8.39 -.02
CentEuro 28.03 +2.86
CentGard If 11.44 +.79
CenGrdAlf 10.45 +.61
CentAl 6.33 +.32
Cephln -56.25 -2.06
Cepheid 10.50 +.40
Ceradyne 23.44 +.84
Cemer 58.43 +.14
Changyoun 35.77 +2.87
ChrmSh 3.97 +.21
Chartlnds 22.36 +1.13
ChkPoint 23.55 +.20
Cheesecake 17.55 +.49
ChidtPlace 36.79 +.88
ChinaArch 1.52 +.06
ChinaBAK 2.46 +,23
ChinaDir 1.64 +.39
ChinaMed 21.89 +1.47
ChinaPSi 2.42 +,29
ChinaSun 3.80 +.02
ChinaTcF 1,99 +.10
ChlpMOS .78 +.16
ChrchllD 39.54 +.61
ClenaCorp 12.00 +1.00
CnnRFin 22.90 +.29
CIntas 23.48 +.19
Clrrus 4.04 +.15
Cisco 19.50 +1.00


CitzRep 1.14
CilrixSys 31.57 +.16
CleanEngy 10.03 .+.38
Clearwire 4.46 +.01
Cogent 10.39 +.34
0ognizTech, 26.58 +1.39
Cogo Grp 6.89 +.38
Coinstar 30.84 +1.22
ColdwIrCrk 4.29 +.49
Comarco. 1.90
Comcast 13.92 +.15
Comc spcl 13.13 +.13
CmcBMO 31.29 -.08
CmdVehcl 1.15 -.11
CommSys 10.47 +.68
Compuwre 7.79 +.16
Comtech 29,.74 +.60
Concepts 16,00 +.15
ConcurTch 31.25 +1.75
Conexanitrs 1.11 -.05
Conmed 16.46 +.71
ConstantC 18.00 +.41
ConvOrgan 1.48
Copart 31.90 +1.21
CortnthC 15.71 +.33
CorpExc 18.74 +1.35
CorusBksh .39 . +.10
Costco 49.70 +1.18
CrackerB 32.76 +1.34
Cree nc 31.55 +1.19
Crocs 3.09 +.18
CrosstexE 3.81 +.31
Ctrip.com 42.28 +1.33
CubistPh 17.31 +.25
CuraGen h 1.39 +.05
CybrSrce 13.62 +.63
Cydacel. .92 -.05
CyprsBio 7.66 +.06
Cytokinet 2.81 +.09
C1ori 3.95 +.16

DGFastCh 20.92 +1.14
Daktronics 9.22 +.65
DataDom 26.35 +.88
DayStar .70 +.03
DeckOut 62.33 +4.37
Dell Inc 12.18 +.61
DftaPtr 2.31 +.31
Dndreon 23.42 +.75
Dennys 2.55 '+.03
Dentsply ' 29.88 +.62
DigRiver 39.62 +1.49
Diodes 16.25 +.88
DirecTV 23.01 +.51
DiscCmA 22.40 -.05
DiscCmCn 20.80 -.04
DiscvLabs 1.09
DishNetwk 16.93 +.53
DIIrTree 45.28 +.51
DotHillf .98 +.28
DrmWksA 28.91 +1.05
DressBam 16.43 +.60
DryShips 7.79 -.40
DyaxCp 1.65 -.35
DynMatl 19.59 +1.66
Dynavax 1.46 +.03
ETrade 1.51 +.07
eBay 18.24 +.62
EFJohnson .76 +.06
EPIC Sys 15.65 +.42
eResrch 6,12 +.13
ev3 Inc 9.41 +.27
EagleBulk 7.37 -.41
EaglRkEn 3.17 +.18
ErthUnk 8,05 +.21
EstWstBcp 7.99 -.08
Edipsys 15.48 +.72
Ed Bauer .49 +.01
EdgePet .78 +.19
EduDv 5.16 -.34
ElectSd 9.75 +.79
ElectArls- 23.46 +.47
EFII 11.21 +1.04
Emoere 1.30 -.01
EndoPhrm 16.51 +.58
EngyConv 17.24 +.03
EngyXXI .70 +.07


Entegris 3:09 +21
EntreMd h .81 +.02
Entrust 2.00 -.11
EnzonPhar 8.10 +.15
Equinix 76.49 +2.09
EricsnTels . 9.63 +.32
i..1i: r, 1.70 +.43
-u..,-,er 16.94 +.99
EvrgrSIr 1.92 +.06
Exelixis 5.13 -.42
ExideTc 6.73 +.61
Expedia 17.38 +.07
ExpdIntl 34.21 +1,40
ExpScripts 64.45 +.40
Ezcorp 12.70 +.55
F5Netwks 33.04 +1.28
FUR Sys 22.86 +.40
FacetBiq n 10.91 +1.00
Fastenal 36.17 +2,95
FiberTowr .80 +.06
FifthThird 7.00 +.10
Fndlnst 13.59 +2.04
Finisar .74 +.09
RFinULine 7.52 +.61
FstCashFn 15.93 +.82
FMidBc 8.88 +.18
FstNiagara 12.71 +.03
FstSolar 189.06 -1.23
FstMerit 17.60 +.19
Fiserv 44.00 +1.64
Flextm 4.23 +.27
FocusMda 8.94 +.34
ForcePro 9.75 +1.12
Fossil nc 23.49 +1.156
FosterWhl" 28.04 +1.52
Fredsinc 14.00 +1.17
FreeSeas 2.89 +.30
FuelSysSol 22.74 +1.60
FuelCell 3.63 +.25
FultonFncl 5.89 +.08
Fui Intl 13.85 +1.64

GFIGrp 6.35 +.32
GMXRs 18.41 +.74
GSICmmrc 13.72 +.86
GSIGrpIf .88 -.02
GT Solar n 6.42
G-11 8.26 +1.57
Garmin 21.70 +.84
GenProbe 43.57 +,94
GenBiotc h .43 +.06
Genomic 19.28 -.12
Gentex 12.62 +.83
GenVec .62 -.01
Genzyme 59.41 +,27
GeronCp 6.38 -.14
Gibraltar 7.42 -.30
GigaMed 6.19 +.14
GileadSci 42.77 -.33
Glac erBc 16.56 -.01
Globllnd 7.68 +.68
Globalstar 1.05 +.12
Google 426.56 +9.33
GrLkDrge 5.65 +.44
GreenMtC 83.25 +.01O
GreenPins 6.23 +1.83
GulfportE 6.29 +.07
Gymbree 39,00 +2.15
HLTH 11.96 +.17
HMN Fn 5.69 -.31
HanaBbh .69 +.43
HansenMed 5.67 -.02
HansenNat 36.13 -.55
Harmonic 6.11 +.35
HarrisStrA 4.96 +.17
HawHold 5.40 +.14
HrtlndEx 16.20 +.50
HSchden 46.60 +1.06
HercOlfsh 4.82 +.18
HercTGC 8.14 +.64
HImaxTch 3.43 -20
Hologic 13.33 +,66
Home Inns 16.99 +1,52
HotTopic 7.52 +.31
HubGroup 20.55 +.79
HudsCity 12,89 +.06
HumGen 2.75 +28


HuntJB 31.97 +1.22
HuntBnk 4.04 +.12
[AC Inters 16.57 +.37
ICU Med 36.99 +.83
IdexxLabs 43.81 +1.81
IPCHold 25.73 +1.11
iShNsdqBio 68.12 +.49
IconixBr 16.82 +.63
iGo Inc .86 +.16
Illuminas 37.89 +1.18
ImagEnth 1,14 +.11
ImaxCorp 7.62 +:12
Immucor 15,57 +.52
ImunoGn 8.05 -.24
Imunmd 2.58 +.09
ImpaxLb n 6.74 +.43
Incyte 3.58 +.29
Infinera , 9.08 +.54
Informant 16.84 +,51
InfosysT 35.70 +1.14
Insmed I 1.70 +.02
InspPhar 4.82 +.72
IntgDv 5.79 +.19
Intel 16.50 +.78
InlteraclBrk 14.99 +.12
InlerDig 26.69 +1.07
InterMune 11.42 -.40
IntlBcsh 11.01 -.18
IntlSpdw 25.85 +1.06
Intersil 13,00 +.75
Intuit 27.63 +.41
IntSurg 149.28 -.40
Isis 14.28 +.48
IsleCapri '13.42 +.28
Itron 59.20 +.86
IvanhoeEn 1.68 +05

' j2Global 22.64 +.34
JA Solar 4.53 +.30
JDS Uniph 5.64 +.25
JackHenry 18.75 +.38
JacklnBox 27.62 +1.32
Jamba 1.09 +.09
JamesRiv 24.11 +1.69
JetBlue 4.86 +.33
JosphBnk 40.72 +2.90
JoyGIbl 36.72 +2.25
JnprNtwk 25.34 +.61
KLATnc 29.45 +2.45
Kendle 11.14 +.74
KerixBioh 1.22 +.52
Kiridands 9.13 +1.15
KnghtCap 17.56 +.35
KongZhg 9.96 +,26
KopinCp 4.02 +.08
Kulicke 4.91 +.30
LKQ Corp 15.74 +.53
LS Indlf 5.26 +.40
LTX-Cred .81 +.25
.aJollPhh .32 +.01
LamResrch 28.36 +2.17
LamarAdv 19.55 +1.01
Landstar 39.26 +1.26
Lattice 2.00 +.02
LawsnSft 5.69 , +.43
LeapWiilss 37.21 -.28
Level3 1.11 +.04
LibGlobA 14.35 +.53
UbtyMlntA 6.26 +.40
UbMCapA 14.69 +.80
UbMEntA 24.90 +.74
LifeTech 39.12 +.34
UfePtH 28.32 +1,07
UhirGold 26.39 +.54
Uncare 22,17 +.39
UncEl 42.71 +1,91
LinearTch 24.24 +,86
UnnEngy 19.98 +.23
LodgeNet 5.73 -.07
Logitech 14.37 +.34
LookSmart 1.30 -.10
lululemna 14.42 +1.79

MAPPhm 11.37 -.72
MCGCap 2.39 +.23
MDRNAH 1.45 -.01


MGE 31.80
MRVCmhlf .60
MTS 22.51
MacrvsnSol 22.92
MagelPt 1.15
Magma 1.38
MarvelT 12.13
Masimo 24.43
MatixSv 12.07
Mattson 1.41
Maximlig n 16.68
MaxwIlT 11.99
Medarex , 7.36
MdAssels 15.77
MedicActn 10.58
MediCo 7.61
MedisTech .27
Medivatlion 21.64
MelcoClwn 5.88
MentGr 5.55
MercadoL 22.74
MergeHIth 2.84
MesaAirh .15
Methanx 12.50
Microchp 22.59
MicrosSys 28.01
Microsoft 21.40
Micvisn 2.34
Millicom 64.06
Misonix 2.31
Molex 16.09
MonPwSys 21.37
Mylan 13.62
MyriadGs 36.89
NGAS Res 2.55
Nil Hldg 20.90
NPS Phm 3.01
NasdOMX 20.80
Natlnstruh 22.66
NatPenn 5.99
NektarTh 6.79
NetlUEPS 14.17
NetServic 10.10
NetLogic 36.99
NetApp 20.69
Netease 35.81
Netflix 40.94
NetSoiTch .57
Neurogen h .23
NeutTand 30.96
NewsCpA 10.40
NewsCpB 11.91
NexMed .25
Nextwave h .30
Nissan 12.51
NobltyH 9.50
NorTrst 56.53
NthfldLb .18
NovtlWrls 11.56
Novavax 1.90
Novell 4.31
Novlus 18.97
NuHoriz l 3.75
NuVasive 37.37
NuanceCm 13.25
NutlriSys 14.84
Nvidia 10.94
OCharleys 9.41
OReillyAh 37.33
OSI Phrm 30.31
OceanFrt 1.71
Odaro .69
Oculus 2.97
OdysMar 3.85
OldDomFh 30.59
Omniture 12.07
OmniVisn 11,56
OnAssign 3.81
OnSmcnd 6.99
OncoGenxn 18.85
Oncothyr h 2.63
OnyxPh 24.01
OpnwvSy 1.86
Opnext 2.45
optXprs 17.17
Oracle 19.92
OriginAg 4.70
Orthfx 26.21


Orthovia 3.85 +.14
Oscient hlf .26 +.04
Osids 14.25 +1.64
OtterTail 19.90 +.95
Oeneh 2.18 -.17

PDLBo h 7.01 +.06
PFChng 33.32 +1.38
PMC Sra 7.99 +.40
Paccar 33.13 +3.28
PacerIntl 3.08 +,49
PacEthan .39 +,01
PacSunwr 4.63 +.34
PaetecHkd 3.21 +.15
Palm Inc 12.71 +.52
PanASlv 23.39 -.03
PaneraBrd 53.85 +.61
ParagShlp 5.40 +.12
ParPet 2.20 +.13
ParamTch 12.84 +1.26
Parexel 10.84 +.40
Patterson 20.91 +.32
PatUTI 15.23 +.89
Paychex 28.46 +1.12
PnnNGm 33.54 +.47
PensonWw 10.30 +.42
PeopUtdF 15.41 -.39
Peregrine h .80 -.02
PerfecltWd 22.55 +1.36
Perrigo 27.00 +.14
PelMed 14.85 +.23
PetroDev 18.11
PetsMart 20.99 +.70
PharmPdt 20.51 +.44
Photrln 3.69 +.53
PlugPower .97 +.04
Polycom 18.41 +1.10
Poniard h 5.00 +.51
Pool Corp 18.00 +.57
Popular 2.82 -.13
Power-One 1.38 -.03
PwShsQQQ 36.39 +1.01
Powrwav 1.46 +.11
Presstek 1,81 +.08
PriceTR 41.41 +.84
priceline 114,30 +4.19
PrivateB 20.04 +.01
PrognicsPh 5.16 -.01
ProspotCap 8.86 +.34
ProspBcsh 28.36 +.30
PsychSol 19.51 +1.06
PureCyde 2.74 +.04
QIAGEN 17.80 +.20
Qlogic 14.07 +.42
Quaicom 44.40 +.81
QualitySys 50.07 +.14
QuantFuel .77 +.04
QuestSft 13.24 +.32
Quidel 13.97 +1.26
RFMicD 2.98 +.13
RAMEgy 1.09 +.11
Rambus 14.0% +1.08
Randgold 70.51 +.70
RealNwk 2.77 +.21
RedRobin 17.96 +.66
RegncyEn 13.01 +.37
Regenm 15.59 +.32
RentACt 19.70 +.17
RschMotn 82.15 +3.51
RexEnergy 7.39 +.58
Riverbed 21.46 +1.39
RosettaR 8.77 +.04
RossStrs 39.91 +.75
RoyGId 46.14 -.43
Rvanair 30.29 +1.17

SBACom 25.54 -.03
SEIlInv 16.26 +.83
STEC 17.27 +.88
SVBFnGp 27.81 +.84
SandarFm 44.75 +1.14
SanDisk 16.05 +.39
Sanmina .69
Sapient 5.43 +.13
SavlentPh 6.78 +.43
Savwis 13.32 +1.55


Schnitzer 56.33
Schwab 18.38
SoiGames 18.93
SeagateT 9.46
SearsHIdgs 61.83
SeattGen 9.51
Selectvlns 13.88
Semlech 16.68
Sepracor 15.90
Sequenom 3.43
Shanda 60.23
SiRFTch - 4.45
SigaTech h, 7.89
SigmaDsg ,15.32
SigmaAld 49.82
SilganHId 45.40
SillcnImg 2.47
SilcnLab 35.33
nio,..A. 7.76
! ,i. 1,0.9 24.30
Sina 32.64,
SiriusXM .35
SkyWest 10.79
SkywksSol 9.90
SmithWes 5.46
Sohu.cm 66.25
Solafun 7.67
Somaxon .70
SonicCorp 10.06
Sonus 2,34
SouMoBc 9.00
Sourcefire 12.95
SourceFrg 1.16
SouthFncl 1.95
SpartnMot 10.24
SpectPh 4.58
Staples 21.65
StarBulk 5.09
StarScient 5.00
Starbucks 14.92
StarentNet 22.17
StDynam 15.96
SteinMrt 7.17
StemCells 1.63
Stericycle 51.04
SterlBcsh . 6.60
StPFWA 4.20
SMadden 29.30
StewEnt 4.46
SunMicro 9.09
Sunesish .57
SunOpta 1.87
SunPowerA 29.76
SunPwrrBn 26.82
SuperWell 9.28
SusqBnc 7.16
Sycamore 3.08
Symantec 15.68
Symetricm 5.51
Synaptcs s 36.62
Synopsys 19.86
Synovis 19.74
SyntaPhm 3.02
SynthEngy .70
Syntroleum 2.41
TBS IntiA 10.90
TD Ameritr 17.37
TFSFncd 11.65
THQ 7.09
twtelecom 12.39
TakeTwo 9.01
TargaRes 13.65
TASER 4.56
TechData 32.47
Tekelec 16.62
TICmSys 7.44
TeleTech 12.64
Teik h 1.06
Tellabs 5.85
TerreStar .60
TesseraT 24.70
TetraTc 27.00
TevaPhrm 46.58
TxCapBsh 16.00
TexRdhsA 12.14
Theravnce 13.80
Thrmogn .54
thinkorswim 10.17


Thoratec 24.30 -.78
3Com 4.50 +.18
TibcoSft 6.70 +.07
Tktmstr n 8.00 +.22
TiVo Inc 7.00
TorreyPinh .15 -.16
TowerS h .29 +.01
TownSports 4.16 +.25
TraclSupp 40.60 +2.22
TrdeStatn h 8.45 +.25
TriadGty .79 +.18
TricoMar 3.22 +.25
TrimbleN 20.03 +.85
TriQuint 5.21 +.76
TrueRelig 24.52 +1.46
TrstNY 5.58 -.06
Trustmk 19.75 +.21
UAL 4.97 +.32
UCBHIt 1.53 -.02
USCncit 2.46 +.14
USGIlobnv 9.00 +220
UTiWridwd 13,21 +.10
UTStrcm 2.24 +.17
UltimSott 22.23 +1.92
Ultrapetrol 5.30 +.49
Umpqua 8.41 -.09
UtdNtrlF 23.30 +.57
UtdOnin 6.96 +.56
US Enr. 2.01 +.07
UtdThrp 80.02 +.09
UnivFor 32.17 +1.71
UraniumR 1.33 +.09
UrbanOut 21.85 +1.43


VCAAnt. 24.80 +.53
VNUS Med 28.94 -.02
ValVisA .81 +.06
ValueClick 11.27 +.22
VandaPhm 14.10 -.54
VarianSemi 25.10 +1.60
Verenium .63 +.03
Vergy 12.43 +.43
Versign 23.95 +.54
VertxPh 30.04 +.27
VirgnMdah 9.01 +.31
ViroPhrm 7.08 +.13
Virtusa 7.22 +.16
VisnChina 6.22 +.19
VistaPrt 40.57 +2.28
Vivus 5.10 -.07
Volcano 12.51 +.15
Volterra 14.26 +.60
WameiChil 13.29 +.13
WarrenRs 2.30 +.08
WashFed 13.00 -.08
Websense 18.62 +.49
WemerEnt 18.73 +.74
Westell h .50 +.02
WetSeal 3.20 +.05
WhitneyH 12.24 -.16
WholeFd 20.36 +1.49
WindRvr 7.78 -.11
Winn-Dbixe 15.30 +.04
WdwrdGov 22.36 +1.83
WIdAccep 20.05 +.02
WrighlM 15.90 +.30
Wynn 40.71 +3.65
XOMA .82 +.01
MOinx 21.61 +.87
YRCWwde 2.88 +.30
Yahoo 16.58 +.74
Zhongpin 11.70 +1.12
Zilars .37 +.02
ZionBcp 14.21 +.53
Zophanm 1.69 +.07
Zoltek 10.80 +.90
Zoran 11.43 +.38
Zumiez 9.25 +.33


PetroCg "45.64
PetroEng 5.95
Petrohawk 26.12
PetrbrsA 36.16
Petobras 45.64
Pf.zer 14.76
PhlipMor 43.63
PiedNG 22.85
PimcoStrat 8.61
PioNtl 29.58
PitnyBw 23.20
PlainsEx 30.86
PlumCrk 35.96
Polaris 33.68
Polo RL -58.58
PostPip 16.31
Potash 117.906
PwshDB 23.87
PSAgri 28.87
Praxajir 76.32
PrecDril 6.34
Prddeln 25.64
PrinFnd 22.44
ProShtS&P 64.31
PrUShS&P 53.10
ProUftDow 30.75
PriJIShDow 45.73
ProUIfQQQ 38.28
PrUShQQQ 32.29
ProUltSP 27.60
ProUShL20 55.52
PrUShCh25 12.02
ProUltSEM 18.95
ProUShtRE 17.94
ProUShOG 15.96
ProUShtFn 40.25
ProUShtBM 16.35
ProUItRE 4.12
ProUtEO&G 32.30
ProUtFin 4.27
ProUBasM, 21.46
ProUSR2K 41.47
ProUItR2K 20.12
ProUttCrude 12.90
ProctGam 53.36
ProgrssEn 36.46
ProgsvCp 16.68
Pf2Logis 9.26
ProvETg 5.49
Prudenil 39.52
PSEG 33.63
PSEG ptA 72.50
PubStrg 67.07
PulteH - 8.67
PPrrrT 4.78
OuantaSvc 23.60
Questar 35.75
QksilvRes 11.92
Quiksivw 3.29
QwestC m 4.33
RPM 15.78
RRI Engy 6.16
RadiDShk 14.27
Ralomrp 57.97
RangeRs 47.89
RJamesFn 15.97
i|.:,.,i,' 41.09,
I66]'.... ' f


The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.





Yesterday Pvs Day


Argent
Australia
Bahrain
Brazil
Britain
Canada
Chile
China
Colombia
Czech Rep
Denmark
Dominican Rep
Egypt
Euro
Hong Kong
Hungary
India
Indnsia
Israel
Japan
Jordan
Lebanon
Malaysia
Mexico
N. Zealand
Norway
Peru
Poland
Russia
Singapore
So. Africa
So. Korea
Sweden
Switzerlnd
Taiwan
Thailand
Turkey
U.A.E.
Uruguay
Venzuel


RItylnco 22.11 +.64
RedHat 20.77 +.82
RgcyCtrs 36.96 +1.33
RegBkHT 68.61 -.04
RegionsFn 3.99 -.20
ReneSola 4.93 +.69
Repsol 23.19 +70
RepubSvc 23.61 +,82
RetailHT 81.27 +3.64
RetailVent 2.82 +.21
ReAon rs 5.26 +.25
ReynAldA 39.98 - +.01
RSteAid h 1.30 +.14
RockwLAut 32.71 +2.02
RockColl 44.98 +2.56
Rowan 21.83 +1.37
RylCarb 15.92 +.86
RoyDShlIA 55.47 +1.56
Royce 8.75 +.37
Royce pfB 23.05 -.10


SAPAG 43.94 : +.59
SCANA 30.88 +.86
SKTlcm 15.83 +.10
SLGreen 24.98 . +2.08
SLM Cp 6.67 +.06
SpdrGold 95.73 -.47
Spdittome 12.33 +.25
SpdirlwBk 18.65 -.21
SpdrKbwRB 20.19 +.20
SpdrRet 29.09 +1.60
SpdrOGEx 38.25 +2.12
SpdrMetM 40.44 +2.58
Safeway 21.09 +.83
SUJoe 26.46 +.92
SUtude 39.83 +.81
Saks 4.26 +.44
Salesforce 39.78 +1.83
SJuanB 17.85 +.63
SandRdge 11.51 +.62
Sanoefi 32.91 +1.22
SaraLee 9.00 +.01
Satyamrn 2.28' +.16
SchergPI 24.40
Schlmirg 59.17 +2.15
SemiHTr 22.17 +1.07
SenHous 17.44 +.69
Sensient 23.58 +.66
ShawGrp. 29.00 +1.80
SiderNac 25.96 +1.44
SilvWhtg 10.49 -.03
SimanProp 56.39 +2.92
Skechers 10.20 +.70
SmitMAO 31.06 +1.07
Smithlnfl 30.88 +1.69
Smucker 41.30 +1.04
SoJerlnd .33.72 +.34
SouthnCo 28.93 -.52
SthnCopp 22.56 ,A1.63
SwstAir 6.88' +.14'
SwstnEngy 45.65 +2.18
SpeclraEn 16.74. +.69
SprintNex 5.00 -.15
SPDR 94.77 +2.24
SPMid 108.59 +3.92
': PMi i. n ,'', *63


3.7460
1.2513
.3771

1.9748
1.6140
1.0938
561.75
6:8293
2140.50
1 19.08
5.2715
35.95
5.6230
.7076
7.7520
200.52
47.150
10285.00
3.9130
95.15
.7090
1501.50
3.4945
13.1765
5 1.5665
6.3144
3.020
' 3.19
30.8375
1.4443
7.9805
1252.40
7.5930
1.0678
32.61
34.33
1.5390
3.6731
23.2499
2.1470


3.7490
1.2331
.3771
1.9453
1.6446
1.0892
561.75
6.8277
2112.50
18.83
5.2549
35.95
5.6097
.7056
7.7514
196.85
46.889
10235.00
3.8950
96.52
'.7090
1501.50
3.4715
13.2237
1.5294
6.1581
2.985
3.15
30.6466
1.4414
7.9973
1232.80
7.4074
1.0703
32.31
34.33
t.5192
3.6730
' 23.5499
2.1473


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


IL L Yesterday Pvs Day


3.25 3.25
0.50 0:50


Federal Funds Rate :uu-.Zo .uu-.ao
Treasuries
3-month 0.15 0.175
6-month 0.29 0.30
5-year 2.54 2.25
10-year 3.71 3.49
30-year 4.57 4.44

I SMOITE


FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg

Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Jul 09 68.58 +2.27
Corn CBOT Jul09 4453/4 +17
Wheat CBOT Jul09 6741/2 +371/4
Soybeans CBOT Jul09 1218V12 +341/2
Cattle CME Aug 09 81.65 -.17
Pork Bellies CME Jul 09 71.70 -.90
Sugar (world) NYBT Jul09 15.85 +.27
Orange Juice NYBT Jul09 94.25 +.10

SPOT !
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot $978.60 $953.10
Silver (troy oz., spot) 1b.2'5 t14.5bB

Copper(pound) $2.319u $2.14b.
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$122U.U $1 139.u
NMER = New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT =
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change'. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


Prime Rate


THE MARKET IN REVIEW


I AMEX


I NASDA


I NYSE


�l 'an I p


I I


A6 TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009


I -J..- ..-


\ '


I


Uluru
Uranerz









CUrprI CeuTNTTUV I Y .) (rMLnnVIc,p USNES--SO -UN , 2009-A7


Name NAV Chg
AIM Investments A:
ChartAp 12.78 +27
Const p 17.48 +.38
HYdAp 3.39 +.02
IntlGrow 21.01 +.29
SelEqtyr 13.52 +.31
AIM Investments B:
CapDvBt 9.86 +.35
AIM Investor Cl:
Energy 32.29 +124
UfTiTies 13.04 +.42
Advance Capital I:
Balancp 12.40 +.18
RetlInc 7.56 -.04
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGrt 4.32 +.16
AllianceBern A:
BalanAp 12.12 +.18
GIbThGrAp 55.78 +1.90
IntlValAp 11.62 +.32
SmCpGrA 19.84 +.72
AllianceBern Adv:
LgCpGrAd 18.58 +.48
AllanceBernm B:
GIbThGrBt 48.82 +1.66
GrowthBt 17.64 +.51
SCpGrBt 16.18 +.59
AlllanceBem C:
SCpGrCt 16.26 +.59
AllIanz Inst MMS:
NFJDvVI 9.16 +22
SmCpV1 20.89 +.62
Allanz Funds A:
NFJDvVIt 9.06 +21
SmCpVA 19.98 +.59
Allianz Funds C:
GrowthCt 17.64 +.47
TargetC t 9.75 +.36
Amer Beacon Insti:
LgCaplnst 14.49 +.39
Amer Beacon Inv:
LgCaplnv 13.80 +.37
Amer Century Adv:
EqGmoAp 15.67 +.40
Amer Century Inv:
Balanced 12.71 +.19
Eqlnc 5.87 +.11
Growth 18.43 +.53
Heritagel 13.53 +.49
IncGro 18.64 +.48
IntDisc 7.43 +21
IntlGrol 8.29 +.20
NewOpp 4.82 +.17
OneChAg 9.21 +.20
OneChMd 9.31 +.15
RealEsti 11.01 +.42
Ultra 1620 +.46
Valuelnv 4.41 +.10
Vista 11.91 +.36
American Funds A:
AmcpAp 14.01 +.44
AMuStAp 19.94 +.47
BalAp 14.28 +.22
BondAp 11.00 -.06
CapWAp 19.08 +.02
CaplBAp 42.98 +.59
CapWGAp 29.15 +.67
EupacAp 32.88 +.82
FdlnvAp 28.03 +.72
GovtAp 13.92 -.10
GwthAp 23.54 +.55
HITrAp a90 +.04
HilnMunA 12.67 -.02
IncoAp 13.38 +.19
IntBdAp 12.81 -.06
ICAAp 22.38 +.53
LUTEBAp 15.02 -.03
NEcoAp 18.86 +51
NPerAp 21.47 +.49
NwWrIdA 39.61 +1.06
STBAp 9.93 -.02
SmCpAp 2524 +.77
TxExAp 11.60 -.03
WshAp 21.39 +.54
American Funds B:
BalBt 14.25 +.23
CapIBBI 42.95 +.59
CpWGrBt 28.97 +.66
GrwthBt 22.77 +.53
IncoBt 13.27 +.18
ICABt 22.26 +.53
Ariel Investments:
Apprec 25.76 +1.17
Ariel 27.82 +127
Artlo Global Funds:
IntlEql r 26.52 +.82
IntlEqA 25.91 +.80
IntEqllAt 10.71 +.34
IntEqll Ir 10.77 +.34
Artisan Funds:
Intl 17.25 +.41
MadCap 21.46 +.69
MidCapVal 14.98 +.52
SCapVal 11.65 +.47
Baron Funds:
Asset 37.38
Growth '33.71
SmnCap 15.52
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 12.32 -.06
DlvMu 14.16 -.02
NYMu 13.93 -.01
TxMadlnti 13.14 +.33
,',f.:.n t13.09 +.33,
ErrMi1. 22.77 +.86
BlackRock A:
AuroraA 13.09 +.39
CapDevAp 12.59 +.39
EqtyDiv 13.70 +.32
GlAIAr 1620 +.17
HiYlnvA 5.85 +.03
InflOpA p 26.85 +.72
BlackRock B&C:
GIAJCt 15:15 +.16
BlackRock Instl:
BaVII 19.39 +.39
GIbAlocr 16.28 .+.17
Brandywine Fds:
BlueFdn 18.97 +.36
Bmdywnn 19.35 +.34
Brinson Funds Y:
HiYldlYn 5.16 +.03
Buffalo Funds:
SmCap 19.27 +.55
CGM Funds:
Focus n 26.81 +.77
Mudn 22.27 +.58
Realtyn 15.30 +.54
CRM Funds:
MdCpVII 20.87 +.58
Calamos Funds:
Gr&lncAp 24.70 +.60
GrwthAp 36.54 +1.41
GrowthCt 33.65 +1.31
Calvert Group:
Incp. 14.15 -.07
IntEqAp 12.05 +.31
Munint 10.33 -.02
SodalAp 21.83 +34
SocBdp 14.34 -.06
SocEqAp 25.72 .+.84
TxFMLt 9.49
TxFLgp 15.62 -.06
TxF VT 15.42 -.03
Cohen & Steers:
RtyShrs 35.25 +1.37
Columbia Class A:
Acomnt 19.35 +.67
21CntyAt 9.49 +.16
MarsGrAt 14.60 +.30
Columbia Class Z:
Acorn Z 19.92 +.69
AcmlntZ 28.32 +.65
CoreBdZ 10.15 -.07
IntBdZ 8.05 -.05
InMTEBd 10.06 -.01
LgCpldxZ 18.30 +.46
MarsGrZ 14.83 +30
MdCpVIZp 9.22 +31
ValRestr 3526 +1.17
DFA Funds:
natFACorEqn 68.74 +.21'
USCOrEqn n 7.79 +.23
USCOrEq2n 7.67 +.23
DWS Invest A:
CommAp 12.91 +25
DrHiRA 25.75 +.64
MgdMunip 8.66 -.02
StirGavecA 8.55 -.04
DWS Invest S:
CorPlslnc 9.75 -.04
EmMIdn 9.32 +.04
EmMkGrr 14.18 +.68
EuroEq 19.69 +.54
GNMAS 14.96 -.05
GIbBdS r 9.80 -.03
GIbOpp 26.11 +.63

GrolncS 12.01 +.31
HiYIdTx 11.22
Int FdS 39.16 +1.24

MgdMunIS 8.67 -.02
MATFS 13.94 -.03
SP5OOS 12.55 +.31
Davis Funds A:
Davis Funds B:
Davis Funds C &Y:
NYVanY 26.37 +.70


NYVenC 25.20 +.67
Delaware Invest A:
Diverlncp 8.35 -.04
TrendAp 10.78 +.38
TxUSA p 10.60 -.04
Delaware Invest B:
SelGrBt 18.59 +.48
Dimensional Fds:
EmMCrEqn14.52 +.49
EmMktV 25.12 +.89
IntSmVan 12.90 +.26
USLgCon 27.89 +.70
USLgVan 14.14 +.38
"US MIron 8.79 +34
US Small n 13.44 +.55
USSmVa 15.72 +.64
InDlSmCon 12.10 +.22
EmgMktn 22.29 +.65
Flxdn 10.30
IntVa n 14.88 +.39
GIb5Fxlncn n11.08
2YGIFxdn 10.30
DFARIEn 13.10 +.49
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced 54.71 +.86
Income 12,27 -.08
InUlStk 26,368 +.86


Paper n 21.42 +.71
Pharm n 8.78 +.02
Retail n 36.89 +1.97
Softwrn 56.33 +1.21
Tech n 55.55 +1.93
Talcm n 34.55 +.35
Transn 303.13 +1.37
UtIGr n 39.21 +1.38
Wireless n 6.21 +.15
Fidelity Spartan:
Eqldxlnvn 33.47 +.84
ExtMklnn 25,17 +.82
600Inxlnvrn65.62 +1.65
Intlnxlnvn 29.15 +.71
TotMklanvn 26.66 +.71
Fidelity Spert Adv:
EqldxAd n 33.47 +.84
0MAdrn 865.63 +1.65
TotMktAd r n268,67 +.72
First Eagle:
GibIA 35.47 +.54
OverseasA 17.56 +.18
FIrest Investors A
BIChpAp 16.72 +.39
GloblAp 5.12 +.15
GovlAp 11.06 -.05
GrolnAp 10.69 +.28


Hereare the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV Net asset value
Cng. Net change in puce of NAV
Data based on NAV. reported a Upper by 6 p m Eastern


I


LSModer 10.46 +.10 uro rn 17.79 +.406
Keeley Funds: EmEurp 12.90 +.78
SmCpValA p 17.01 +.66 EmMktSn 24.06 +.98
Lazard Inti: Eqlncn 17.60 +.48
EmgMktl 14.85 +.49 Eqlndexn 25.46 +.64
Legg Mason: Fd Europen 12.17 +.28
Legg Mao: F 7d i GNMAn 9.63 -.04
SplnvCp 19.80 +.75 Growthn 22.62 +.55
ValTCp 30.31 +1.04 Gr&lnn 15.17 +.40
Legg Mason PtraA: HIhSci n 20.74 +.21
AgGrAp 76.57 +2.01 HIYieldn 5.48 +.03
ApprAp 10.89 +.27 InlBondn 9.38 -.02
HilncAt 4.71 +.04 IntDisn 30.07 +.55
InAICGAp 6.84 +.16 IntG&l 10.60 +.26
LgCpGAp 18.52 +.42 InifStkn 10.45 +.25
MgMuAp 15.07 -.05 Japann 6.57 +.02
LalAm n 34.95 +1.06


Name NAV Chg
Stock 79.35 +1.90
Dreyfus:
Aprec 29.22 +.74
CorVA 18.87 +.41
Dreyf 6.49 +.19
Dr5001nt 26.61 +.66
EmgLd 13.76 +.50
GrChinaAr 36.68 +1.47
HiYIdA p 5.79 +.03
LgCStkAp 17.27 +.47
MunBdr 10.80 -.03
StratValA 21.37 +.51
TechGroA 20.17 +.71
Driehaus Funds:
EMktGr 23.64 +.78
Eaton Vance Cl A:
ChinaAp 18,94 +.58
AMTFMBI 9.05 -.02
MultiCGrA 5.95 +.21
InBosA 4.71 +.03
LgCpVal 14.35 +.30
NatlMun 8.87 -.06
SpEqtA 10.40 +.34
TradGvA 7.46 -.02
Eaton Vance Cl B:
HIthSBt 827 +.02
NatlMBt 8.87 -.06
Eaton Vance CI C:
GovtCp 7.45 -.02
NaUWCt 8.87 -.06
Evergreen A:
AsIAIIp 10.13 +.13
Evergreen C:
AstAIICt 9.82 +.13
Evergreen I:
SIMunil 9.62 -.01
FBR Funds:
Focuslnv 34.95 +.94
FMI Funds:
LgCappn 12.02 +.35
FPA Funds:
Nwlnc 11.01 -.01
FPACresn 22.12 +.34
Fairholme 25.09 +.61
Federated A:
AmLdrA 10.84 +.17
MidGrStA 25.94 +.94
KaufmAp 3.84 +.05
MuSecA 9.66 -.04
Federated Instl:
KaufrmnK 3.84 +.05
TotRetBd 10.36 -.05
Fidelity Adv FocT:
EnergyT 28.55 +1.30
HItCarT 15.42 +.15
Fidelity Advisor A:
DntlAr 12.89 +.30
Nwlnsghp 14.41 +.25
StrlnA 10.79 +.03
Fidelity Advisor1:
Divint n 13.08 +31
EqGrl n 39.56 +1.07
EqlnIn 17.93 +.42
IntBdln a 9.96 -.05
Nwlnsgtin 14.55 +.25
Fidelity AdvisorT:
BalancT 11.83 +.17
DivGrTp 8.35 +.27
DynCATp 13.05 +.37
EqGrTp 37.21 +1.02
EqlnT 17.66 +.41
GrOppT 22.92 +.69
HiInAdTp 7.21 +.11
IntBdT 9.94 -.05
MulncTp 12.21 -.04
OvrseaT 14.59 +.36
STFiT 8.79
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2000n 10.55 +.06
FF2010n 11.19 +.15
FF2015n 9.29 +.13
FF2020n 10.99 +.19
FF2025n 9.04 +.17
FF2030n 10.69 +22
FF2035n 8.82 +.19
FF2040n 6.14 +.14
Income n 10.01 +.06
Fidelity Invest:
AggrGrrn 13.69 +.50
AIISectEq 10.19 +.27
AMgrSan 12.21 +.18
AMgr7Orn 12.36 +.26
AMgr20rn 11.04 +.05
Balancn 14.35 +21
BlueChGr n 30.39, +1.01
CAMunn 11.49 -.03
Canada n 44.71 +.99
CapApn 17.85 +.49
CapDevOn 7.54 +.21
Cplncr n 6.71 +.07
ChinaRgr 24.13 +.79
CngSn 367.92 +8.76
CTMunrn 1120 -.03
Contran 48.69 +.89
CnvScn 17.88 +.36
DisEqn 17.99 +.41
DMntin 24.31 +.56
DivStkOn 10.50 +.31
DivGthn 19.24 +.59
EmrMkn 18.05 +.69
Eqlncn ' 33.00 +.81
EQIIn 13.87 +.32
ECapAp 15.43 +.41
Europe 25.67 +.70
Exchn 253.82 +8.47
Export n 16.53 +44
SFdel n 24.79 +.64
Fityrn 13.10 +.41
FRRateHirn a8.76 +.03
FrinOnen 21.16 +.46
GNMAn 11.27 -.04
GovtInc 10.65 -.08
GroCon 56.49 +1.68
Grolncn 13.68 +.33
Highlncrn 7.18 +.05
Indepnn 16.24 +.38
InProBdn 10.85 -.08
IntBdn 9.54 -.04
IntGovn 10.74 -.06
IntmMun 9.95 -.02
IntDiscn 26.14 +.73
IntlSCprn 14.90 +25
InvGrBd 10.81 -.06
InvGB n 6.56 -.04
Japan n 9.82 +.16
JpnSm n 7.53 +.10
LgCapValn 10.03 +.18
LCpMrn 8.33 +.17
LatAmn 40.80 +1.34
LevCoSkan 18.56 +.74
LowPrn 26.70 +.78
Magelln n 55.57 +1.77
MDMurn 10.60 -.03
MAMunn 11.48 -.03
MegaCpStk n7.38 +.17
MIMuan 11.61 -.03
MidCapn a18.64 +.64
MNMunn 11.24 -.02
MtgSecn 10.16 -.04
Munilncn 12.07 -.05
NJMunrn 11.19 -.03
NwMktrn 13.39 +.15
NwMill n 20.32 +.57
NYMunn 12.46 -.05
OTCn 36.40 +1.17
OhMunn 11.35 -.04
100Index 6.80 +.14
Ovrsean 27.85 +.81
.PcBasn 17.27 +.46
PAMunrn 10.56 -.03
Pudltnn 14.06 +20
RealEin 14.46 +.66
StIlntMun 10.49 -.01
STBFn 8.06 -.01
SmCaplndrl1.83 +.47
SmIICpSrn 12.14 +.41
SEAslan 22.49 +.61
StkSlc n 18.44 +.47
Stratlncn 9.63 +.02
StrReRtr 7.69 +.11
TaxFrBrn 10.42 -.04
TotalBdn 9.74 -.04
Trend n 45.58 +1.49
USBIn 10.75 -.07
Utility n 12.45 +.23
ValSOratn 17.33 +.64
Value n 46.04 +1.72
Wddwn 13.76 +.38
Fidelity Selects:
Airn 23.11 +1.12
Bankingn 12.92 -.01
Blotch n 56.77 +.10
Brokrn 40.61 +1.01
Chemn 61.25 +1.46
ComEqulp n16,86 +.64
Compn 32.36 +1.13
ConDisn 15.56 +.58
ConStapn 52.61 +1.05
CstHon 25.00 +1.08
DfAern 52.30 +2.03
Electrn 30.91 +1.44
Enrgyn 40.63 +1.85
EngSvn 53.44 +2.46
Envirn 13.47 +.46
FInSvn 51.24 +.85
Goldrn 40.18 -.38
Health n 86.34 +.83
HomFn 9.35 +.09
Insurn 32.34 +.63
Lelsr n 59.37 +1.81
Materal n 42.78 +1.49
MedDI n 33.49 +.93
MdEqSysn 20.22 +.24
Multmd n 25.50 +.73
NtGasn 29.89 +1.58


Gr&lnc 10.94 +.33
IncStk 9.16 +.20
Inco 11.38 -.07
Intl 18,34 +.31
NYBd 10.93 -.05
PrecMM 29.28 -.21
S&P dx 14.17 +.36
ScTech 8.67 +.24


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
IncoAp 2.14 +.01 Legg Mason Ptre B:
MATFAp 11.34 -.04 LgCpGBt 16.98 +.39
MITFAp 11.80 -.04 Longleaf Partners:
NJTFAp 12.63 -.05 Partners 19.93 +.73
NYTFAp 14.00 -.06 Intl 12.11 +.39
OppAp 18.28 +.57 SmCap 17.29 +.69
PATFA p 12.72 -.05 Loomis Sayles:
SpSitAp 16.41 +.50 LSBondl 11.46 -.01
TxExAp 9.59 -.05 StrIncC 11.79
TotRIAp 12.21 +.15 LSBondR 11.42 -.01
ValueBp 5.46 +.14 StrincA 11.74
Firsthand Funds: Loomis Sayles Inv:
TechVal 26.16 +.71 invGrBdApx10.47 -.11
Frank/Temp Frnk A: InvGrBdC px 10.40 -.11
AdjUSp 8.95 -.01 InvGrBdYx 10.47 -.12
ALTFAp 10.77 -.06 Lord Abbett A:
AZTFAp 10.44 -.04 AffilAp 8.71 +.20
Ballnvp 35.50 +1.29 AIIValA 9.36 +.28
CallnsAp 11.64 -.05 BdDebAp 6.40 +.02
CAIntAp 11.04 -.02 MIdCpAp 10.90 +.41
CalTFApx 6.62 -.03 MFS Funds A:
COTFAp 11.17 -.06 MITA 14.78 +.36
CTTFAp 10.47 -.03 MIGA 11.03 +.32
CvtScAp 10.94 +.21 HilnA 2.74 +.01
DblTFA 10.89 -.01 MFLA 9.15 -.03
DynTchA 20.26 +.51 TotRA 11.83 +.13
EqlncAp 12.75 +.28 UtiA 12.84 +.42
Fedlntp 11.14 -.03 ValueA 18.21 +.36
FedTFApx 11.27 -.09 MFSFundsB:
FLTFAp 11.11 -.04 MIGBn 9.96 +.29
FoundAlp 8.34 GvScB n 9.94 -.06
GATFAp 11.49 -.06 HilnBn 2.75 +.02
GoldPrM A 35.38 MulnB n 7.96 -.02
GrwthAp 31.84 +.93 TotRBn 11.83 +.13
HYTFAp 9.24 -.01 MFS Funds InstI:
HilncAx 1.66 ... IntlEqn 13.53 +.23
IncomApx 1.76 MalnStayFunds A: *
InsTFAp 11.45 -.06 HIYIdBA 4.97 +.02
NYITFp 10.75 -.02 MainStay Funds B:
LATFAp 10.77 -.07 CapApBt 20.58 +.59
LMGvScA 10.40 -.04 ConvBt 11.87 +.17
MDTFAp 10.70 -.03 GovtB1 8.49 -.07
MATFAp 11.14 -.05 HYIdBBt 4.95 +.02
MITFAp 11.63 -.05 InIlEqB 10.16 +.10
MNInsA 11.99 -.03 SmCGBp 9.52 +.35
MOTFAp 11.52 -.05 TotRtBt 13.00 +.12
NJTFAp 11.54 -.05 Mairs & Power:
NYInsAp 10.63 -.06 Growth 54.43 +1,63
NYTFApx 11.25 -.09 Managers Funds:
NCTFAp 11.70 -.05 Bondn 21.13 -.17
Ohlol A p 1225 -.06 Manning&Napler Fds:
ORTFAp 11.42 -.04 WidOppA 6.75 +17
PATFAp A -.4 M9r.lo0 Funds:
ReEScAp 8.28 +.30 a Fcusp 12Fu .7 +.19
RisDvAp 24.21 +.63 Mocusp 12ew A79 +19
SMCpGrA 23.89 +.84 Indiare 12.90 +29
Stratilnp 9.01 -.05 re 14.82 +.04
USGovApx 6.59 -.06 MergerFd 14.82 +.04
UtilsApx 9.98 +.18 e TroWetFs ds:
VATFA p 1121 -.04 TotRetBd 9.03 -.05
Frank/Tmp Fnk Adv: TotRBd-9.02 -06
GIhOdv p ......Midas Funds:
IncmeAdx 1.75 ' Midas Id 3.10 +.03
Frnd 1FrnkB '" Monetta Funds:
ncomeBtx 1.76 +.01 Monettan 11.09 +.39
Frankrremp Fmk C: Morgan Stanley A:
FoundAlp 8.21 DivGthA 11.92 +.30
IncomCtx 1.78 +01 Morgan Stanley B:
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: DivGtB 12.602 +.31
BeacnA 9.72 +.18 GIbDivB 8.627 +.15
DiscA 24.04 +21 StratB 15.73 +.19
QualfdAt 15.35 +.15 MorganStaniey nst:
SharesA 16.30 +.34 ntlEqi 11.54 +.20
Frank/Temp Mtl C: MCapGrl n 22.75 +.81
DiscCt 23.82 +.21 Munder Funds A:
Frank/fempTemp A: IntemA 17.69 +.61
DvMktAp 17.57 +.74 MunderFunds Y:
ForgnAp 5.46 +.15 MCpCGrYrn18.88 +.58
GIBdAp 11.91 +.06 Mutual Series:
GrwlhAp 14.07 +.35 BeacnZ 9.82 +.18
WordAp 11.76 +.26 DicZ 24.33 +.22
Frank/TempTmpAdv: QualfdZ 15.47 +.15
GrthAv 14.07 +.35 SharesZ 16.43 +.35
Frank/TempTmp B&C: Neuberger&Berm Inv:
DevMktC 17.16 +.73 Focus 15.05 +.42
ForgnCp 5.34 +.15 GenesInst 32.01 +1.11
GIBdCp 11.93 +.06 Intlr 12.47 +.18
GE Elfun S&S: Partner 19.65 +.71
S&S Inc 10.33 -.06 Neuberger&Berm'fr:
S&SPM 31.84 +.83 Genesis 33.33 +1.16
TaxEx 11.33 -.04 Nicholas Group:
GMOlTrust III: HilncIn 8.28 +.06
EmMkr 10.14 +.38 N ichn 34.00 +1.18
For 10.66 +23 Northern Funds:
IntntrVI 18.84 +.41 HiYFxlnc 6.32 +.02
USGtyEq 16.50 +.27 SmCpidx 5.72 +.21
GMO Trust IV: Technly 9.84 +.29
EmrMkt 10.09 +.38 Nuveen CIA:
IntlGrEq 17.96 +.24 LtMBAp 10.62 -.02
IntlintrV 18.83 +.41 Nuveen CI R:
GMOTrustVI: IntDMBd 8.65 -.01
EmgMktsr 10.10 +.38 Oak AssoccFds:
StrFxInc 15.42 -.05 WhitOkSGn27.79 +1.00
USQxtyEq 16.50 +.27 Oakmark Funds I:
Gabelll Funds: Eqtylncr 22.82 +.33
Asset 33.74+1.02 Globall 16.10 +.31
Gateway Funds: Intl r 13.51 +.25
GatewayA 23.75 +.17 Oakmarkr 29.23 +.93
Goldman Sachs A: Selectir 18.95 +.50
HiYieldA 5.94 +.03 Old Mutual Adv II:
MdCVAp 23.79 +.77 Tc&ComZ 12.02 +.38
Goldman Sachs Inst: Old Westbury Fds:
HiYield 5.95 +03 GobOpp 6.32 +.05
MidCapV 23.98 +.78 GIbSMdCap11.00 +.27
Harbor Funds: Oppenheimer A:
Bond 11.82 -.09 AMTFMu 5.71 -.01
CapAplnst 27.17 +.61 AMTFrNY 9.77 -.05
Inllinvt 45.10 +1.22 CAMunlAp 6.75 -.02
Intlr 45.52 +1.23 CapApAp 33.24 +.81
Hartford Fds A: CapIncAp 6.98 +.05
CpAppA p 26.05 +.66 ChmplncAp 1.62
DivGthAp 14.81 +.32 DMklAp 22.80 +.84
Hartford Fds C: Discp 35.93 +1.16
CapApCt 23.38 +.59 EquityA 6.71 +.15
Hartford Fds L: GlobAp 44.26 +1.18
GrwOppL 19.31 +.51 GIbOppA 21.0 +.59
HartfordHLSIA: Gold p 29.77 -.11
CapApp 30.57 +.89 ntBdAp 6.6+.76
Div&Gr 1523 +.34 MnSFdA 24.56 +.76
Advisers 15.23 +.27 MSSCAp 14.31 +.61
Stock 29.90 +.86 MidCapA 10.98 +-35
TotRetBd 10.04 -.05 PAMuniAp 9.29 -.03
Henderson GlblIFds: StrinA p 3.55
IntOppAp 18.48 +.49 Gvppenh 8.73 -.06
Hennessay Funds: Oppenheimer B:69
CorGNlOdg 10.93 +.44 AMTFrNY 9.78 -.0
SelLgVOdgri 1729 +.34 Aplnc*t 9.7 8 .05
HussmnStrGr13.12 +19 CplncB 6.87 +.05
ICON Fda: ChmplncBt 1.62
ICON Fd: EqutyB 624 +.14
Energy 16.59 +.79 StrIncBt 3.56
HlIhcere 10.95 +13 Oppenheimer C&M:
ISI Funds: intlBdC 6.04
NoAme p 7.51 -.07 Oppenheimer Roch:
Ivy Funds: LtdNYA p 3.09
AssetSCt 19.60 +.39 RoMuAp 14.03 -.07
AsselttAp 20.05 +.40 RcNtMuA 6.20 +.02
AssetIStrYp20.08 +.40 PIMCOAdmilnPIMS:
GINatRsAp16.54 +.65 ShtTmAdp 9.59 -.02
JPMorgan A Class: TotRtAd 10.37 -.06
CoreBdA 10.78 -.06 PIMCO Insti PIMS:
MCpValp 15.87 +.50 AuAsset 10.85 +.02
JPMorgen Select: ComodRR 7.60 +21
HBSMkNep16.14-.05 DevLcMkr 9.21 +.03
JPMorgan Sel Cis: Divlnc 9.36 -.02
CoreBdn 10.78 -.06 EmMkBi 9.36
HIYIdBdn 6.65 +.04 FrgnBd 9.37 -.05
IntmTFBd n 10.75 -.02 HiYld 7.50 +.09
ntrdAmern 16.91 +.44 InvGrCp 10.15 -.08
ShtDurBdn 10.72 -.02 LowDu 9.77 -.04
TxAwRRetn 9.70 +.01 ModDur 10.10 -.06
USLCCrPisn14.94 +.34 ResReal 10.11 -.16
Juss e: ResiRal 10.21 -.09
Balanced 21.75 +.18 ShorT 959 -.02
Contrarian 11.17 +.37 TaRt 10.37 -.06
Enteipr 39.01 +1.31 TR u 10.08 -.05
FedTE . TRill 9.08 -.05
FIxBnd 9.81 -.06 PIMCO Funds A:
Fund 21.78 +.47 LwDurA 9.77 -.04
FunduEq 16.26 +.45 RealRtAp 10.21 -.09
GIUfeSci 17.70 +.15 TotRtA 10.37 -.06
GiTechr 11.36 +.36 PIMCO Funds C:
Grlnc 24.87 +.4 RealRtCp 10.21 -.09
Onon 8.04 +23 TotRtCt 10.37 -.06
Ovrseasr 36.17 +.98 PIMCOFundeD:
PrkMCVInv 16.98 +.46 PIMCO Funds -0:

Twenty 52.31 +.98 Eqtylnc a 20.26 +.57
Venture 34.38 +1.18 ax World:
WndWr 34.80 +.69 Balane 1832 +.31
Janus Adv S Shre: Parnranr 35.nd s
Forty 26.46 +.43 P eerFnnt ds.27 +38
BlendA 12.44 +.32 Cu-"n"a 14.41 +.37
HighmnaA 8.77 -.02 BOndA p 8.46 -.05
HiYidAp 4.51 +.02 EurSelEqA 19.97 +.52
InsuredA 10.04 InalVulA 16.89 +.34
UlhityA 7.71 +18 MdCpGrA 10.39 +.35
Jeionoryds B: PonFdAp 30.20 +1.02
GrowthB 11.91 +.27 TsreAp 9.49 -.03
HiYldBt 4.50 +.01 VaiueAp 9.14 +.20
InsuredBR 10.08 Pioneer Funds B:
John Hancock A: HiYIdBt 7.39 +.10
BondAp 12.88 -.08 Pioneer Funds C:
RgBkA 11.81 +.01 HiYldCt 7.48 +.09
StInAp 5.62 +.01 Price Funds Adv:
John Hancock B: Eqlnc 17.56 +.47
StIrlncB 5.62 +.01 Growthpa 22.48 +.54
John Hancock Ci1: Price Funds:
LSAggr 9.10 +.26 Balancen 15.41 +.24
LSBalanc 10.30 +.17 BlChipn 27.30 +.65
LSConsrv 11.11 +.04 CABOndn 10.31 -.04
LSGwlwh 9.68 +.22 CpApn _5.91 +.29


Name NAV Chg
MDShrtn 5.24
MDBondn 9.97 -.03
MidCapn 39.35 +125
MCapVaIn 16.70 +.56
NAmern 23.59 +.65
N Asian 12.67 +.34
New Era n 39.02 +1.57
N Horizn 20.61 +.67
NIncn 8.85 -.04
NYBondn 10.68 -.04
OverSSFrn 6.56 +.16
PSInc n 13.23 +.15
RealEstn 10.55 +.43
R2010n 12.39 +.20
R2015n 9.29 +.17
R2020n 12.56 +.26
R2025 n 9.05 +.21
R2030 n 12.79 +.31
R2035 n 8.96 +.22
R2040 n 12.75 +.32
ScTec n 17.80 +.53
ShtBdn 4.73 -.01
SmCpSlkn 21.88 +.79
SmCapVal n24.87 +.80
SpecGrn 12.73 +.34
Speclnn 10.84 +.04
TFIncn 9.46 -.04
TxFrHn 9.65 -.02
TxFrSIn 5.46 -.01
USTInt n 5.84 -.06
USTLgn 11.82 -28
VABondn 11.17 -.04
Value n 17.01 +.45
Principal Inv:
BdMIgIn 8.67 -.05
DiscLCInst 9.58 +.23
LgCV3in 7.90 +.18
LgGrIn 5.89 +.12
LT2030ln 8.78 +.17
LT20201n 9.01 +.15
SAMBalA 10.14 +.16
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvA p 9.23 -.04
AZTE 8.65 -.02
CATxA p 7.32 -.02
Convp 14.53 +.22
Dv1nAp 6.74
EqlnAp 11.56 +.26
EuEq 15.68 +.37
GeoAp 9.74 +.12
GIbEqtyp 6.99 +.16
GrinAp 10.03 +.22
GIblHIthA 39.59 +.24
HiYdA p 6.19 +.03
HiYid In 4.90 +.03
IncmnAp 5.67 -.01
IntGrln p 7.93 +.16
InvAp 9.40 +.22
NJTxAp 8.89 -.03
NwOpAp 35.52 +,92
PATE 8.70 -.03
TxExAp 8.04 -.03
TFInA p 14.28 -.03
TFHYA 10.38 +.01
USGvAp 13.54 -.01
GIbiUtlA 10.29 +.22
VstaA p 7.39 +.30
VoyAp 15.48 +.42
Putnam Funds B:
DvrlnB t 6.70
Eqlnct 11.44 +.25
EuEq 15.02 +.36
GeoBt 9.65 +.13
GIbEqt 6.33 +.16
GINtRst 15.05 +.56
GrinB 9.85 +.22
GIblHIthB 33.42 +20
HiYIdBt 6.18 +.03
HYAd t 4.82 +.02
IncmBt 5.63 -.01
IntGrInt 7.86 +.17
InlfNopt 11.47 +.27
InvBt 8.47 +.20
NJTxBt 8.88 -.03
NwOpBt 31.05 +.80
TxExBt 8.05 -.02
TFHYBt 10.40 +.01
USGvB t 13.47 -.01
GlblUtlIB 10.24 +.22
VistaB t 6.28 +.26
VoyBt 13.20 +.36
RS Funds:
IntGrA . 13.23 +.33
LgCAIphaA 31.10 +.60
Value 17.15 +.44
Rainier Inv Mgt:
SmMCap 21.59 +.82
RIdgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 7.05 +.21
RiverSource A:
BalanceA 7.98 +.16
DispEqAp 4.08 +.08
DEI 7.37 +.22
DivrBd 4.54 -.03
DvOppA 5.76 +.14
Growth 19.47 +.52
HiYdTEA 4.04 -.02
LgCpEqp 3.02 +.07
MCpGrA 7.64 +.28
MidCpVl p 5.28 +.20
RiverSource I:
TNEmgMkt n 7.09 +.28
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSv r 11.34 +.38
MicroCapl 10.90 +.30
PennMulir 7.79 +.28
Premierlr 13.97 +.50
TotRetl r 9.21 +.31
ValSvct 8.62 +.31
VIPISvc 9.48 +.31
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 9.42 -.05
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 9.20 +.26
SEI Portfolios:
CoreFxAn 9.19 -.06
IntEqAn 6.94 +.15
LgCGroAn 15.93 +.42
LgCValAn 12.25 +.27
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 15.74 +.55
Schwab Funds:
HlthCare 12.13 +.09
1000lnvr 28.02 +.73
1000Sel 27.99 +.72
S&P lnv 14.66 +.37
S&P Sel 14.70 +.37
S&PlnstSI 7.50 +.19
SmCplnv 13.69 +.54
Selected Funds:
AmShD 31.47' +.87
AmShSp 31.47 +.87
Sellgman Group:
ComunAt 30.78 +.80
FrontrAt 7.76 +.30
GIbSmA 9.70 +.21
GIbTchA 14.18 +.33
HYdBAp 2.25 +.01
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 23.76 +.65
Sequoia n 99.33 +2.72
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 33.36 +.74
SoundSh 24.76 +.46
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 43.00 +1.20
Stratton Funds:
Dividendx 16.16 +.43
Mui-Cap 29.56 +.97
SmCap 34.31 +1.12
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBSt 9.61 -.11
TCWFunds:
TotRetBdl 9.48
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bondlnst 9.80 -.06
Tamarack Funds:
EntSmCp 14.71 +.60
Templeton Instlt:
ForEqS 16.67 +.42
Third Avenue Fds:
Inslr 13.66 +.32
RIEstVIr 17.09 +.32
Value 40.94 +,80
Thornburg Fds:
InIValAp 21.59 +.55
IntValue I 22.08 +.56
Thrlvent Fda A:
HiYld 4.04 +.01
Incom 7.23 -.05
Transamerica A:
Rexinc p 7.48 -.02
TA IDEX A:
TempGlbAp20.88 +.58
TrCHYBp 7.31 +.05
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 21.58 +.81
Tweedy Browne:
GlubVal 17.38 +.26
UMB Scout Funds:
Inml 24.21 +.48
US Global Investors:
AlAm 17.67 +.41
ChinaReg 7.57 +.33
GIbRs 7.43 +.23
Gld&Mils 14.12 +.05
WldPrcMn 14.44 -.01
USAA Group:
AgvGt 24.12 +.45
CABd 9.62 -.05
CmstStr 17.48 +.27
GNMA 9.93 -.04
GrTxStr 11.09 +.09
Grwth 10.86 +.31


Chronicle staff do not provide
financial advice or real-time
quotes on stocks or funds.
Consult a financial adviser.


Stocks rally following



positive economic data


Associated Pri


Name NAV Chg
ShtTBnd 8.69 -.02
SmCpStk 8.87 +.32
TxElt 12.32 -.03
TxELT 12.17 -.05
TxESh 10.43 -.01
VABd 10.48 -.03
WidGr 13.72 +.27
VALIC:
MdCpldx 13.81 +.49
Stlkdx 19.55 +.49
Value Line Fd:
LrgCo n 13.27 +.28
Van Kamp Funds A:
CATFAp 15.91 -.08
CapGro 8.92 +.29
CmstAp 11.29 +.23
CpBdAp 5.83 -.04
EqlncAp 6.68 +.10
Exch 357.53 +8.22
GrinAp 14.35 +.35
HarbAp 12.76 +.18
HiYIdA 8.34 +.05
HYMuAp 8.36 -.02
InTFAp 15.63 -.07
MunlAp 12.19 -.05
PATFAp 14.77 -.05
StrMunInc 9.39 -.02
USMtgeA 12.41 -.08
UtilAp 15.86 +.47
Van Kemp Funds B:
EnterpBt 10.37 +.35
EqincBt 6.56 +.11
HYMuBt 8.36 -.02
MulB 12.18 -.04
StrMunInc 9.38 -.03
USMtge 12.35 -.07
UtiiB 15.77 +.46
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmln 17.30 +.24
CAITAdmn 10.61 -.04
CALTAdm nl10.70 -.04
CpOpAdIn 56.16 +1.54
EMAdmr r n 27.92 +1,01
Energy n 106.03 +4.03
ExplAdmIn 43.89 +1.47
ExtdAdm n 26.97 +.94
500Admln 87.19 +2.19
GNMAAdn 10.60 -.05
HithCrn - 43.24 +.41
HiYldCp n 4.86 +.01
InfProAdn 23.64 -.15
ITBdAdmIn 10.22 -.11
TsryAdml n 11.39 -.12
IntGrAdmn 46.07 +1.29
ITAdmln 13.19 -.03
ITGrAdm n 8.84 -.07
LtdTrAdn 10.89 -.01
LTGrAdmln 8.01 -.15
LTsyAdmIn 10.97 -.28
LTAdmln 10.64 -.04
MCpAdmln 60.33 +2.14
MorgAdrn 39.58 +1.21
MuHYAdm n 9.81 -.03
NJLTAdn 11.34 -.04
NYLTAdn 10.71 -.04
PrmCaprn 50.85 +1.34
PALTAdmnlO.72 -.04
STsyAdml n 10.82 -.01
STBdAdmlnlO.30 -.03
ShlTrAd n 15.84
STFdAdn 10.87 -.02
STIGrAdn 10.14 -.02
SmCAdm n 22.50 +.85
TxMCaprn 46.44 +1.28
TCiBAdmILn 10.08 -.07
TStkAdmn 23.16 +.63
WellslAdm n44.60 +.24
WellnAdm n44.27 +.54
Windsorn 33.81 +.85
WdsdrlAdn 35.33 +.87
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 18.99 +.29
CALTn 10.70 -.04
CapOpp n 24.31 +.67
Convdrn 10.90 +.15
DivdGron 11.65 +.31
Energyn 56.47 +2.15
Eqlnc n 15.64 +.32
Expirn 47.17 -+1.59
FLLTan 10.95 -.05
GNMAn 10.60 -.05
GlobEqn 13.38 +.36
Grolncn .20.18 +.46
GrthEq n 7.77 +.20
HYCorpn 4.86 +.01
HLthCren 102.45 +.98
InflaPron 12.03 -.08
IntlExpirn 11.48 +.21
IntGr n 14.48 +.41
IntlVal n 26.65 +.73
ITIGrade n 8.84 -.07
frTsryn 11.39 -.12
USfeConn 13.84 +.12
UteGron 17.05 +.36
Ufslncn 12.51 +.02
UfeModn 15.86 +.23
LTIGraden 8.01 -.15
LTTsryn 10.97 -28
Morgn 12.76 +.38
MuHYn 9.81 -.03
Mulntg n 13.19 -.03
MuUdn 10.89 -.01
MuLongn 10.64 -.04
MuShrtan 15.84
NJLTn 11.34 -.04
NYLTsn 10.71 -.04
OHLTTEn 11.64 -.05
PALTn 10.72 -.04
PrecMtsrn 16.74 +.69
PrmcpCorn 10.05 +.28
Prmcprn 49.00 +1.29
SeiValurn 13.24 +.37
STAR n 15.51 +.22
STIGraden 10.14 -.02
STFed n 10.87 -.02
STTsryn 10.82 -.01
StratEqn 12.59 +.42
TgtRetlncn 9.87 +.04
TgRe2010 n18.60 +21
TgtRe2005n10.15 +.07
TgtRe2O25 n 9.93 +.19
TgtRe2015n10.14 +.15
TgRe2020 n17.67 +.30
TgRe2030 n16.74 +.36
TgtRe2035 nl.00 +.23
TgtRe2040 n16.37 +.38
TgtRe2045 n10.35 +.24
USGron 13.71 +.36
USValuen 7.77 +.16
Wellslyn 18.41 +.10
Welltn n 25.63 +.31
Wndsrn 10.02 +.25
Wndslln 19.90 +.49
Vanguard Idx Fds:
500n 87.17 +2.19
Balanced n 17.30 +.24
DevMktn 86.24 +.20
EMkt n 2123 +.78
Europe n 22.52 +.60
Extend n 26.96 +.94
Growth n 22.70 +.63
ITBndn 10.22 -.11
LgCaplxn 17.34 +.45
LTBndn 10.78 -.21
MidCapn 13.30 +.47
Pacific n 8.85 +.18
REITrn 11.29 +.43
SmCap n 22.49 +.85
SmICpGth n 13.68 +.49
SrnICpVIn 10.77 +.42
STBndn 10.30 -.03
TotBnd n 10.08 -.07
TollntlIn 12.4 5 +.34
ToiSlkn 23.15 +.62
Value n 16.03 +.37
Vanguard InstIl Fda:
Ballnst n 17.31 +.25
DvMklinstn 8.17 +.20
Eurolnstn 22.53 +.60
Extlin n 26.98 +.95
Grwthlstn 22.72 +.64
IniProlnstn 9.63 -.06
Instldxn 86.63 +2.18
InsPI n 86.63 +2.18
TollBdldx n 50.61 -.36
InstTStldxn 20.92 +.57
lnsTSlPlusn20.92 +.56
MidCplstn 13.33 +.47
Paclnstn 2.86 +.18
SCInstin 22.50 +.84
TBIstn 10.08 -.07
TSInst n 23.16 +.62
Valuelstn 16.04 +.37
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 72.02 +1.81
ITBdSign 10.22 -.11
MidCpidxn 19.04 +.67
STBdIdxn 10.30 -.03
TotBdoSgin 10.08 -.07
TotStkSgI n 22.35 +.60
Vantagepolnt Fds:
Growth n 6.56 +.18
Victory Funds:
DvsStA 12.12 +.32
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 7.74 +.16
CorelnvA 4.27 +.12
DivOppAp 11.48 +.33
DivOppCt 11.39 +.33
SOTechA 7.85 +.22
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 25.15 +1.00
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStkZ 13.75 +.44


NEW YORK - The stock
June with a strong rally, tha
wave of benign economic da
But some investors are n
month, traditionally a weak
may not end well.
Traders homed in Mon-
day on better-than-
expected readings on
manufacturing, consumer
spending and construc-
tion spending. The Dow
Jones industrial average
and other major indexes
rose more than 2 percent,
and the Standard & Poor's
500 index and Nasdaq
composite rose to their
highest levels this year.
The economic data sug-
gested the economy's de-
cline is moderating, but
did not yet show a re-
bound. Personal spending
was down slightly in April,
personal incomes were
flat and U.S. manufactur-
ing activity contracted for
the 16th straight month in
May, although at a slower
pace.
Monday also brought
General Motors Corp.'s
bankruptcy filing, the
fourth-largest in U.S. his-
tory. The filing was not
shocking, but served as a
reminder of the govern-
ment's heavy involvement
in corporate America follow'
market crash and economic
Separately, a trend that
vestors last week - fallingT
and surging yields - resume
but the stock market shrugg
in long-term Treasury yield
upset stock investors with'
terest rates on consumer
mortgages could go high
threatening an economic re
Despite the appearance
resuming their forward mai
a turnaround in the econor


Rates fall in Treasury bill auction


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Inter-
est rates on short-term
Treasury bills fell in Mon-
day's auction.
The Treasury Depart-
ment auctioned $31 billion
in three-month bills at a dis-
count rate of 0.150 percent,
down from 1.175 percent
last week Another $31 bil-
lion in six-months bills was
auctioned at a discount rate
of 0.290 percent, down from
0.300 percent last week.
The discount rates reflect
that the bills sell for less
than face value. For a
$10,000 bill, the three-month
price was $9,996.21, while a
six-month bill sold for


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$9,985.33. That would equal
an annualized rate of 0.152
percent for three-month
bills and 0.294 percent for
the six-month bills.
Separately, the Federal
Reserve said the average


yield for one-year Treasury
bills, a popular index for
making changes to ad-
justable-rate mortgages,
rose to 0.49 percent last
week, up from 0.47 percent
the previous week.


y Hills | j



CENTER i L


Exam,


X.Rays&



Whitening Ceang
* FMX 00210
* Prophy 01110
* Initial Oral

Raphael C. Lewis, D.D.S. P.A. Exams 00150
SValue '207.00

Senior Citizens i$ eA o00O

Discount (Ask For lMust Presen


Ulls (Across From Fire Station) 1T 1s i

330 .-- W � t *kt "
WM MH =M-0j


Name Last
SP HlthC 26.00
SPCnSt 23.58
SP Consum 24.23
SP Engy 53.58
SPDRFnd 12.36
SPInds 23.53
SPTech 18.15
SPULI 27.63
Standex 10.54
StaIrwdH 26.10
StateStr 46.57
StatoiHyd 22.03
Steds 24.64
SItete 14.09
Sryker 39.15
SturmRug 11.99
SubPpne 42.70
SunCmts 14.55
Suncorgs 36.57
Sunoco 30.53
SunsrnH 4 6.59
Suntech 1721
SunTrat 13.80
Supvalu 17.67
Synovus 3,38
S7sco 24.55
T PFFnd 14.14
TECO 11.73
TJX 30.72
TalwSeml 11,49


TalismEgs 16.57
Target 41.67
Taubmn 25.61
TeckRes g 17.15
TelcmNZ 8.23
TelMexLs 16.60
Tempxelnld 13,38
Tenaris 32.00
TenetHith 3.81
Tennecoh 6.91
Teppco 30.06
Teradyn 7.49
Terex 14.37
Terra 28.60
TerraNiSo 122.50
Tesoros 17.51
TetraTech 9.55
Texinst 20.38
Textron 12.00
Theragenh 1.13
Thermonis 39.85
ThmBet 31.93
3M Co 59.29
Tifany 31.01
TW Cable rs 30.44
TimeWm rs 24.01
Timken 18.35
TtanMket 10.18
ToddShph 15.10
TollBros 18.80
TorchEn It 3.91
Trchmrnk 40.62


TorDBkg
TotaJ SA
TotaSys
Transocn
Travelers
Tredgar
Tdcont
TrniFty
TycoBec
Tycolnt
Tyson
UBSAG
UDR
UIL Hold
URS

USEC
UtraPtg
UniRrst
UnilevNV
UnionPac
Unisysh
UtdMicro
UPS B
USBancr
US NGsFd
US OiFd
USSteel
UtdTerch
UtdhithGp
UnumGrp


ValeSA 20.44 +1.29
ValeSApl 17.44 +1.21
ValeantPh 23.61 +.62
ValeroE 22.81 +.44
VangTSMs 47.48 +1.15
VangREr 3423 +1.67
VangEmg s a33.89 +1.27
VadanMed 37.43 +1.67
Vectren 23.37 +.62
Vetas 31.40 +1.04
Veo anv 29.80 +.37
VerFone 8.67 +1.04
VerizanCa 29.25 -.01
VWaomB 23.21 +1.04
VWapelCm 13.95 +89
Visa 66.66 -1.05
Vsay 86.06 +.53
VMware 32.22 +1.18
Vodatone 19.26 +.44
Vormado 49.05 +2.39
W&TOff 11.53 +1.33
WGLHold 30.56 +.84
Wabash 1.33 +.08
WaddelR 25.28 +.88
WalMart 50.59 +.85
Waigm 31.14 +1.35
WsteMInc 28.88 +1.29
Wealfilnt 21.78 +1.08
Weinflt 16.58 +.70
WellPoint 47.47 +.90


WellsFargo 25.43
WendyAsby 4.38
WestarEn 18.42
WAstEMkt 10.23
WstAMgdHi 4.87
WAstInfOpp 1125
WDigtyf 25.91
WstnRefln 13.16
WslnUnon 18.13
Weyerh 35.56
WhlnVi 42.96
WniCS � 5.08
WrmsCos 17.82
WmsPtrs 19.33
WrmsSon 13.81
Wndstnn 8.47
W nbgc 8.42
WwcEn 40.59
Worthgtn 15.37
Wyeth 44.69
Wyndham 12.44
XLCap 10.38
XTOEngy 44.08
XcelEngy 17.77
Xerox 6.99
Yamanag 11.40
YigliGm 14.20
YumBmds 35.89
ZwekgTI 3.40


NEYR STCUXCAG


'ess analysts still think the market has come too
far, too fast in the past three months since
k market began hitting 12-year lows in early March.
banks to another "I can't really buy into today's super-happy
ata. stock market," said Kim Caughey, equity re-
ervous that the search analyst at Fort Pitt Capital Group.
one for stocks, She said she was skeptical because even if
the economy is stabilizing,
there is little to drive de-

Market watch mand once it bottoms.
June 1, 2009 According to prelimi-
nary calculations, the
Dow Jones :+2 4i . Dow rose 221.11, or 2.6
industrials 8,721.44 percent, to 8,721.44. The
Standard & Poor's 500

Nasdaq +54.35 index rose 23.73, or 2.6
compsite 182868 percent, to 942.87. The
composite 1,828.68 Nasdaq composite index

Standard& rose 54.35, or 3.1 percent,
Poor's 500 to 1,828.68.
942.87 So far, this year's stock

Russell market has had an eerily
2000 similar pattern to last
521.33 year's, noted Shaeffer's In-

NYSE di aryvestment Research analyst
NYSE diary Todd Salamone, falling
Advanced: 2,516 until mid-March, then

Declined: 566 gaining sharply through
May. Last year in June, the
Unchanged: 76 market started sinking.

Volume: 6.37 b Salamone pointed out that
June's average return dur-
Nasdaq diary ingthe past 20 years is neg-

Advanced: 1,863 ative 0.5 percent
Declined: 512 Standard & Poor's chief
Deced: 512 economist David Wyss said
Unchanged: 64 he expects the U.S. econ-

Volume: 1.85 b omy to bottom out late this
summer or early in the fall,
SOURCE: SunGard AP but then experience a
"rather sluggish" recovery.
wing last year's He predicted U.S. gross domestic product-
c tumble. which measures the value of all goods and
had ruffled in- services produced in the country - to drop
Treasury prices 3.1 percent this year, with even sharper de-
ned on Monday, lines in European economies and Japan.
ed it off. A spike The market still rallied on Monday,
Is last week had though, because it wasn't just economic
worries that in- data that encouraged buying. Technical fac-
loans such as tors did, too. The first trading day of the
ier, potentially month often brings with it a surge of new
Recovery money from mutual funds, and meanwhile,
that stocks are the S&P broke through its 200-day moving
rch on hopes for average. That's a key development that has-
my, a number of n't occurred in over a year.


Opptylnv 26.34 +.81
Western Asset:
CorePlus 9.18 -.02
Core 9.39 -.03
William Blair N:
GrowthN 8.31 +.26
IntlGthN 15,69 +.35
Yacktman Funds:
Fundp 12.37 +.40


TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 A7


BUSINESS


RTIC US COUNTY (FL E









Page A8- TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009



OPINION


"Ifyou could kick the person in the pants
responsible for most ofyour trouble, you
wouldn't sit for a month."
Theodore Roosevelt, 1858-1919


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


SHARED RESOURCES


Cooperative




effort reaps




dividends


Tough economic times
open - and sometime
push - the door to
smarter thinking, innovative
ways to do things better, and
even such efficient ways to op-
erate that we
might ask our- THE
selves, "Now why THE
didn't we do that Citrus
in the first place?" Public
It was recently Training
announced that
Citrus County OUR 01
School District
and Citrus County Working
Sheriff's Office of- improves
ficials, and possi- service at
bly other public
safety agencies, are joining
forces and combining re-
sources to launch the Citrus
County Public Safety Center.
Under this reorganization
and new structure, academies
and programs for law enforce-
ment positions, and possibly
paramedics and firefighters,
will operate under the new
public safety center at the
Withlacoochee Technical Insti-
tute (WTI). This consolidation
includes instructors, trainers,
equipment, facilities, budgets
and networking. Consolidation
and mutual cooperation from
the sheriff's office and the
school system brings a host of
benefits that not only eliminate
duplication in many areas, but


S


g

P
q3
t


also raises efficiency and cuts
cost in many areas due to
shared resources.
In addition to the physical
benefits, there is a higher stan-
dard which is anticipated to
accompany the
new structure:
>SUE: more stringent in-
County structor require-
Safety ments, further
Center. reality-based sce-
nario instruction,
>INION: added mental pre-
paredness train-
together ing, and more
quality of career diversity.
a savings. Tightening the
budget belts of
those various agencies that will
benefit from this action was
not the end-all mission of this
project, but it still must be her-
alded as a good example of a
better way to do things when
we all get together and share.
And as this plan unfolds in our
community, it is anticipated to
be that shining example of
good things that happen when
innovative leaders leap over
barriers and paradigms and
focus on high quality coupled
with maximum efficiency.
Combining services for the
Public Safety Training Center
will create a better, stronger
and more professional training
center - another plus for this
community.


Hot Corner: KEY CLIENTS


Good people
Those of you who are worried
about there being a Key Training
house at Heather Ridge, you need
to know that they own a nursery.
Maybe they can help your yard
look a little better. I live near one
of these houses and the kids who
walk by my house from the Key
house are sweet, complimentary,
loving and always friendly and
nice. They're not freaks.
Bad influence
I called in when I first read
about the Key home going in
Heather Ridge, and I want to say
the same thing. That home should
not be located there. It would not
be good for those clients to asso-
ciate with the people that don't
want them there. They should be


relocated to a place that's next
door to me ... Who wouldn't want
somebody that nice living there?
And I think the residents of
Heather Ridge would probably be
a bad influence on the Key resi-
dents. Should sell that home at a
profit and go somewhere where
people are compassionate, giving,
forgiving and mind their own busi-
ness.
Trade neighbors
This is to the citizens of
Heather Ridge complaining about
the Key Center students moving
into their neighborhood. Anytime
they want to move into mine, they
are welcome in the house right
beside me, but providing one
thing: they have to take my neigh-
bors from hell. I would trade them
any day.


Pass the ribs taking care of the buildings they
owned when she was a council-
This is in reference to the arti- woman? Has she approached the
cle Wednesday, May 27, from Ger- foundation with her criti-
ald S. Anthony concerning cisms or offered to help
Put down those ribs." OUND since she specializes in
That was a very nice arti- historical buildings?
cle and I was happy to Health care organiza-
find 1 Timothy 4:1-5 to tons need foundations
cross-reference my Bible. to attract donors, man-
The law concerning un- age assets and carry out
clean pork was under the projects .. Determining
old law. In the New Testa- which areas of the coun-
ment, the law that is bind- CA try are underserved for
ing, please read Acts CA health care is much
10:9-16. If you don't care 563-U579 more complicated than
for pork ribs, it wouldn't fighting the location of a
hurt you to read it any- facility, and she provides no ra-
way. In the meantime, yum, yum, tionale for her judgment.
yum - please pass those ribs., tionale for her judgment.
It is better to improve with posi-
A retort tive behavior and comments and
Sophia Diaz-Fonseca is critical active support than criticize and
of the Citrus Memorial Founda- attempt to destroy an organiza-
tion. Did she criticize them for not tion that is important.


Race and the Supreme Court


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........................................ publisher
Charlie Brennan .......................................... editor
Neale Brennan ........promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ................................ managing editor
Cheri Harris.................................... features editor
Curt Ebitz...................................... citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ................................... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson ..................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


y
)p
H
4


In his first Supreme
Court appoint-
ment, President
Barack Obama has
chosen to take Amer-
ica a step backward.
He has been ap-
plauded - again and
again - for choosing a
woman of Puerto
Rican heritage, Sonia Kathr
Sotomayor, a Bronx- Lo
born federal judge, for
the Court... largely be- OTI
cause she is a woman VOI
of Puerto Rican her-
itage.
I'm not interested in belittling
Sotomayor's accomplishments.
Certainly, less-qualified lawyers
have been nominated to the
Court in the past. But her selec-
tion perpetuates a damaging type
of identity politics in judicial se-
lection. There is not a "woman's
seat" on the Court: when Ruth
Bader Ginsburg retires from the
bench, she does not have to be re-
placed by a female - or, for that
matter, by a Jewish person or a
former ACLU lawyer (all bills she
fits). Nor will Clarence Thomas
have to be replaced by a black
man or Anthony Kennedy by a
white Catholic male.
The next justice to possibly
join the highest court in the land
once said, "I would hope that a
wise Latina woman with the rich-
ness of her experiences would
more often than not reach a bet-
ter conclusion than a white male
who hasn't lived that life."
President Obama, whom we
are all to believe is a transforma-
tional force on matters of race,
agrees with the above statement.
His standard for nominating jus-
tices is this: empathy, and maybe
some political capital with an in-
terest group. This is not transfor-


mation - it's not even
progress.
A court with nine
white males or nine
Hispanic women
might not look like
America - but, de-
pending on the charac-
ter and intelligence of
the particular judges,
n Jean it might well do a good
nez job of representing
America.
IER Sotomayor is right
DES when she says: "Amer-
ica has. a deeply con-
fused image of itself that is in
perpetual tension. We are a na-
tion that takes pride in our ethnic
diversity, recognizing its impor-
tance in shaping our society and
in adding richness to its exis-
tence." But cultural distinction
alone should not be the primary
requirement for serving on the
Supreme Court; Sotomayor's His-
panic background should not
make her a shoo-in - just as the
fact that Nancy Pelosi is the first
female House speaker should not
make her any less accountable for
her words and actions than a
male speaker.
So often, in talking about race
and the American dream, we re-
turn to the words of Martin
Luther King Jr. In his famous
speech on the National Mall, he
said to a crowd of fighters for
racial justice: "We must forever
conduct our struggle on the high
plane of dignity and discipline."
He spoke of "all of God's chil-
dren" singing a song of freedom
together, when the chains of
racism would be broken.
Those chains are not broken -
indeed, they are made stronger-
when we encourage division of
the kind we have seen in the dis-
cussion of the Sotomayor nomi-


to the Editor


their willingness to step up to
the challenge.
Unfortunately, this teacher is
just another victim of flounder-
ing school administrations and
the broken mental health system
in this country.
Roger B. Krieger
Beverly Hills

Feeding many
Today be thankful for your
blessings and share with those
not so well blessed: That is what
the communities of Inverness
and Floral City did with their
donations to Feed the Hungry
Post Office Food Drive May 9,
which benefited Citrus United
Basket (CUB) Food Pantry.
The amount of food we re-
ceived this year was overwhelm-
ing and will help us to be able to
increase the amount of food we
distribute to our Citrus County
residents in need. On one of the
warmest days, we had Debbi Lat-
tin's organization and her army of
postal carriers and volunteers
deliver the collections to us; it
was nothing short of amazing.
I personally wish to thank
each and everyone who partici-
pated in this year's drive to pro-
vide for the less fortunate.
Deborah L. Rossfeld,
executive director
Citrus United Basket


LETTERS


Broken system
The recent firing of a CREST
school teacher due to her han-
dling of a special needs child
should serve as an awakening to
those in authority as to the chal-
lenges our teachers face daily
with identified and unidentified
children that have emotional or
mental problems.
After over 30 years in law en-
forcement, I thought I had saw it
all until I went to work for the
Florida Department of Juvenile
Justice. I spent eight years with
them and the last three as an as-
sistant superintendent of a juve-
nile detention center The
number of challenged kids I saw
going through the system was ob-
scene. The department's ability to
deal with these kids was less than
stellar The staff were not skilled
enough to deal with a youth that
was as big as an adult involved in
violent actions or other abnormal
behavior Often, physical force
was necessary to protect the
other children or staff. This at
times would lead to injuries of
the youth or staff- and lawsuits.
One common thread was the
slowly emerging awareness that
many of these kids were ex-
tremely intelligent but were also
very emotionally challenged.
Frequently after counseling with
the youth, underlying issues
would emerge such as family di-
vorce or the loss of a parent that


OPINIONS INVITED
9 The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the editorial board of the newspa-
per.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
" SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
etters@chronicleonline.com.

never was addressed properly
for the child. In other cases we
were able to identify clinical
problems from inappropriate
prescribed or administered
medications to conditions like
Asperger's Syndrome. Many of
the kids came through the foster
care programs.
Teachers need to be better
trained to deal with these kids
and there needs to be adequate
staff to assist them. Parents need
to be part of the process. They
need to understand that their
child may be a challenge to the
teacher and in some cases a
threat to other children. The an-
swers are out there but it will be
a true test on the system as to


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


nation, and seen even in the 2005
nomination of Harriet Miers.
Supreme Court Judge Samuel
Alito is God's child, too - and he
was also a damn good lawyer. But
let's not forget that he was ulti-
mately nominated because, back
in 2005, the "chick card" back-
fired. We'll be able to sing that
song King was hoping to hear
when candidates aren't proffered
because of their race, gender or
even sexual orientation.
In his inaugural speech this
past January, President Obama
borrowed from the Bible and de-
clared, "The time has come to set
aside childish things." He pro-
claimed, "The time has come to
reaffirm our enduring spirit; to
choose our better history; to carry
forward that precious gift, that
noble idea, passed on from gener-
ation to generation: the God-given
promise that all are equal, all are
free, and all deserve a chance to
pursue their full measure of hap-
piness." He proclaimed "an end
to petty grievances."
Let's look at the Sotomayor
nomination with that standard in
mind. In a speech in 2001, So-
tomayor counted heads on state
and federal courts, and she
lamented the 11-year gap be-
tween Sandra Day O'Connor's ap-
pointment to the Supreme Court
and Ginsburg's. Could grievances
be pettier than these? This is the
same kind of poison that kept
Miguel Estrada off the federal
bench because he was not "His-
panic enough."
Shouldn't we put away these
childish things?

Kathryn Lopez is the editor of
National Review Online. She
can be contacted atklopez@
nationalreviewcom.


VISOO~v 0 w ofA~








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICUI



Summer camp signups start


Chronicle
Final exams are almost
complete and summer is
right around the corner, so
there's never been a better
time to plan how your kids
are spending their summer
vacations.
Local schools, sports
clubs and other community
organizations have planned
a plethora of summer camps
and academies for children
of all ages. Some area
churches will offer summer-
long Bible camps, while
dance studios and sports
groups will offer athletic
training camps and classes.
In addition, several com-
munity programs will pro-
vide weekday camps and
activities throughout the
summer for children with
working parents. At YMCA
Adventure Camps, which
will be in Inverness and
Lecanto, each week will
have a different theme, like
Grossology Week- an entire
week devoted to yucky stuff.
Parents who are inter-
ested in registering their
children should pay atten-
tion to fast-approaching reg-
istration deadlines; any of
the camps begin next week.
Church camps
* Music Fair 2009. July
28-July 31. Grades 1 through
5. $40 per child. 795-8077 or
www.gulftolake.com/gtl/
music fair.
* North Oak Baptist
Church Summer Day Camp.
7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday
through Friday all summer
long. Grades K through 5.
$12 per day. Call Karen Pin-
ney at 489-3359.'
* Bible Basic Boot Camp.
Rock Crusher Road Church
of God. Every Sunday and
Wednesday, June 7 through
Aug. 30. Grades K through 5.
795-5553.
* Good Counsel Camp.
Floral City. Co-ed. residen-
tial camp. July 3, July 11,
July 24 and Aug. 7. Ages 7
through 15. $350-$575. 726-
1910 or goodcounselcamp.
cath6licweb.com.
* Solid Rock Christian
Academy Youth Camp. 7 a.m.
to 5:30 p.m. June 1 through
Aug. 21 at Christ Way Fellow-.,
ship on Independence Hwy.
Ages 4 through 12. $65 per
week 726-9788.


Educational camps
* Nature Academy Sum-
mer Camp. Homosassa
Springs Wildlife Park. June
22-27 for ages 8 and 9, July 13-
18 for ages 11 and 12. $45 per
child. Call Tania Burchell at
628-5343 ext 1006. Deadline
for registration is June 5.
* Eco-Adventure at Crys-
tal River Preserve State
Park. 9 a.m. to noon, June 8
through 12 for second
graders, June 15 through 19
for third graders and June
22 through 26 for fourth
graders. Free. Call Chris
Carpenter at 563-1136.
Sports camps
* Dance Camp hosted by
School of Dance Arts in In-
verness. June 15 to July 3.
Ages 5 through 12. $100 per
week or $275. Call 6374663.
* Citrus United Summer
Soccer Academy. June 14
through 18 at Holden Park,
Inverness. Ages 9 through
16. $130 per child. www.cit-
rus united.com.
M Ronnie's Academy of
Dance. 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
July 6 through 10 for 3 and 4-
year olds; 1 to 5 p.m. July 13
through 17 for 5 and 6-year-
olds; July 20 through 24 for
7- and 8-year-olds. $90-$170.
795-1010.
* Big Blue Hoops Camp. 9
a.m. to noon daily June 15
through 18, 22 through 25
and June 29 through July 2
at Crystal River High
School. $49 per person or
$59 for two. Call Coach Feld-
man at 601-0870.
* Gymnastics Camp.
Noon to 4 p.m., June 15
through Aug. 14. Ages 5+.
$95 per child or $20 per day.
Call 746-7700 after 4 p.m.
* ROCCS Summer Rowing
Program. 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday and Saturday,
June 6 through July 25 at Wal-
lace Brooks Park, Inverness.
Grades 6 through 12. $100. E-
mail Coach Dave Brown at
brownd2@citrus.k12.fl.us.
* Dance Central. Camp: 1
to 4 p.m. June 16-17, July 21-
22 and Aug. 4-5 at Dynabody
Fitness Gym. $45-$60. Work-
shops: 1 to 4 p.m. June 22-26,
July 13-17 and Aug. 10-14.
$45-$110. www.dance-cen-
tral.org/camp.html. :;
M Hurricane Youth Foot-
ball Camp, 9 a.m. to noon,
June 9 through 11. Two ses-


sions: Grades 3 through 5
and 6 through 8 at Citrus
High School stadium. $40 in-
cluding lunch and t-shirt.
Call Randy Roland, 400-6681.
Other camps
* Camp Fusion. 10-week
camp, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (7:30-
5:30 for extended care).
Ages 6 through 12. $60 per
camper or $70 including ex-
tended care, plus $25 one-
time registration fee. Call
Amanda Whitelaw 527-7677
or www.bocc.citrus.fl.us.
* Kid K-9 Camp. Bark Cen-
tral Dog Park 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Friday through Sunday in
June and July. $350 per per-
son. Call 341-2275 or info@
barkcentraldogparkcom.
* Cub Scout Day Camp. 9
a.m. to. 3 p.m. June 15
through 19, Whispering
Pines Park. Ages 6 through
10. $100 per scout. Gwyn
Young at 726-2193.
* Kindermusik Summer
Adventures. June 11
through July 10 at St. Paul's
Lutheran School. Ages birth
through 5. $70 per person.
Call Angie at 465-2821 or
angiegabb@gmail.com.
* SALSAArt Camp. 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Monday through


Friday, June 22 through 26
at Lecanto High School.
Grades K through 9. $115.
* YMCAAdventure Camps.
7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday
through Friday all summer at
Whispering Pines Park, In-
verness and Rock Crusher
Canyon, Lecanto. Ages 5
through 12. $85 per week
www.ymcasuncoast.org.
* Boys & Girls Club Sum-
mer Camp. 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Monday through Friday, June
8 through Aug. 14. Grades K
through 12. $60 per week.
Call 621-9225 in Beverly
Hills, 795-8624 in Homosassa
and 341-2507 in Inverness.
* Crafty Lady Summer
Program. June 1 through 26.
Activities include extreme
bedroom makeover for kids,
painting a bubble lamp, oil
painting and scrapbooking.
$30-$35. Call John Vincelli
at 344-4800.
* Harmony in the Streets.
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday, June 8
through 12 at Pleasant
Grove Elementary and June
15 to 19 at Central Ridge El-
ementary. Free. Download
an application at www.sher-
iffcitrus.org. Lt. Dave De-
Carlo 249-2738.


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TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 A9


Ancient pottery


might be oldest ever


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Bits of
pottery discovered in a
cave in southern China
may be evidence of the ear-
liest development of ce-
ramics by ancient people.
The find in Yuchanyan
Cave dates to as much as
18,000 years ago, re-
searchers report in Tues-
day's edition of
Proceedings of the Na-
tional Academy of Sci-
ences.
The find "supports the
proposal made in the past
that pottery making by for-
agers began in south
China," according to the re-
searchers, led by Elisa-
betta Boaretto of Bar Ilan
University in Israel.
The pottery found at
Yuchanyan "is the earliest
so far," Boaretto said.
Pottery was one of the
first human-made materi-
als and tracing its origins
and development opens a
window on the develop-
ment of culture, said
Tracey Lu, an anthropolo-
gist at the Chinese Univer-


sity of Hong Kong, who
was not part of Boaretto's
team.
"Pottery initially serves
as a cooking and storage fa-
cility. Later on, some pot-
tery vessels become
symbols of power and so-
cial status, as well as ex-
amples of art," Lu said.
"Pottery is still an impor-
tant part of human culture
today."
Lu noted that the dates
reported in this paper "are
slightly older than the
dates (of pottery found) in
Japan. However, the accu-
racy of radiocarbon dates
in the limestone area has
been under debate for
many years."
Patrick E. McGovern, an
anthropologist at the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania,
noted that figurines have
been found in what is now
the Czech Republic that go
back as far as 35,000 years.
But those were not actual
pottery vessels, he said.
This report "firms up
that evidence for China,"
as the home of the earliest
pottery yet found, he said.


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N Page A10 - TUESDAY, JUNE 2,2009



N ACTION


&
CITRUS COUNT


WORLD


Y CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Passport?


Industrial giant falls


Associated Press
A U.S. Customs and Border
Protection officer checks
Monday to make sure driv-
ers have their identification
documents ready as they
wait in line to enter the
United States from Canada
In Blaine, Wash. Monday
was the first day of new
rules requiring passports or
new high-tech documents
to cross the U.S. border.

Army recruiter
killed in shooting
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - Po-
lice in Little Rock, Ark., say a
man who likely had "political
and religious motives" shot
two new Army soldiers, killing
one, at a military recruiting
center.
Police Chief Stuart
Thomas identified the victim
who died as 24-year-old
William Long of Conway. He
and the second soldier, both
wearing fatigues, had re-
cently completed basic train-
ing and volunteered to help
attract others to the military.
The suspect pulled up a
black vehicle outside the
Army-Navy recruiting office in
west Little Rock and fired
shots about 10:30 a.m.
Thomas told reporters at a
news conference that the
gunman targeted the military
but was not believed to be
part of a broader scheme.

World BRIEFS


American icon

GMfiles for

bankruptcy
Associated Press
WASHINGTON - In a
defining moment for Ameri-
can capitalism, President
Barac1k Obama ushered
General Motors Corp. into
bankruptcy protection Mon-
day and put the government
behind the wheel of the
company that once symbol-
ized the nation's economic
muscle.
The fallen giant, the
largest U.S. industrial com-
pany ever to enter bank-
ruptcy, is shedding some
21,000 jobs and 2,600 deal-
ers. Sparing few communi-
ties, the .retrenchment
amounts to one-third of its
U.S. work force and 40 per-
cent of its dealerships.
"We are acting as reluc-
tant shareholders because
that is the only way to help
GM succeed," Obama said of
the temporary nationaliza-
tion of the 100-year-old com-
pany
Obama lauded what he
called a "viable, achievable
plan that will give this
iconic American company a
chance to rise again" as GM
followed Chrysler LLC into
bankruptcy court. Of De-
troit's "Big Three" automak-
ers, only Ford Motor Corp.
has avoided bankruptcy re-
structuring and has not
taken federal bailout
money.
The prepackaged GM
bankruptcy deal - crafted
by the administration, the
company, the United Auto
Workers union and a group
of bondholders - would
give the Z S. government a
60 percer eontrolling stake
in what was once the
world's largest automaker.
An additional 12.5 percent
would be under Canadian
government ownership.
"What I have no interest
in doing is running GM,"
Obama said. His only goal,
he said, was to get GM back
on its feet and then "to get
out quickly."
Yet, the U.S. could end up
holding the shares for some
time.
Neither Obama nor his
spokesman offered an indi-
cation of how long the gov-
ernment's involvement with
GM would last. "I don't know
that there is a timeline,"
said Robert Gibbs, the White
House press secretary.


Associated Press
An American flag flies in front of the General Motors Global Headquarters Monday in Detroit, Mich. General
Motors Corp. filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Monday as the iconic U.S. automaker moved to
shrink its global operations and shed thousands of jobs, with massive help from the Obama administration
and $10.5 billion from the Canadian and Ontario governments.


GM files for bankruptcy
General Motors filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in New York
Monday as part of the Obama administration s plan to shrink the Announces Posts $21.3 billionlos in
automaker to a sustainable size and give majority ownership to the Ol end of three quarters; accepts a
federal government. __
1908 1925 1929 1953 1966 1973 2000 00-09
S0 _0
General 'Acquires Acquires Air con- Develops First mass $38.7 Sells 51 Government forces
Motors Vauxhall Adam ditioning first fuel production billion percent Rick Wagoner to
Company Motors Opel AG first offered cell air bag car loss of GMAC step down as
founded Ltd. vehicle chairman and CEO
SOURCE: General Motors AP




Judge OKs sale of Chrysler to Fiat


Associated Press
NEW YORK - A federal
bankruptcy judge approved the
sale of most of Chrysler LLC's
assets to Italy's Fiat, moving the
American automaker a step
closer to its goal of a quick exit
from court protection.
But a trio of Indiana state pen-
sion and construction funds filed
an appeal, saying that the ruling
sets aside the rights of the com-
pany's secured lenders while
doling out the company's assets
to others.
Judge Arthur Gonzalez said in
his ruling late Sunday that a
speedy sale - the centerpiece of
a restructuring plan backed by
President Barack Obama's auto-
motive task force - was needed


to '-edIthe ?-ilue of Chrysler
from deteriorating and would
provide a better return for the
company's stakeholders than if it
had chosen to liquidate.
"Any material delay would re-
sult in substantial costs in sev-
eral areas, including the
amounts required to restart the
operations, loss of skilled work-
ers, loss of suppliers and dealers
who could be forced to go out of
business in the interim, and the
erosion of consumer confi-
dence," Gonzalez wrote in his
opinion.
"In addition, delay may vitiate
several vital agreements negoti-
ated amongst the debtors and
various constituents."
As a result, the proposed sale
must be approved in order to


preserve the value of Auburn
Hills. Mich.-based Chrysler's
business and what is ultimately
left for its stakeholders. Gonza-
lez said.
"With this approval, the new
Chrysler Group is created and
can prepare to launch as a vi-
brant new company formed with
Fiat," Robert Nardelli,
Chrysler's outgoing chairman
and chief executive, said in a
statement
Nardelli is slated to leave
Chrysler once the sale is final.
"'While this has been an ex-
tremely difficult chapter in,
Chrysler's history for all in-
volved, the new company and its
customers, employees and sup-
pliers can now begin on a fresh
page,"-Nardelli said.


Associated Press
German Chancellor Angela
Merkel takes a drink of
beer Monday after her
speech at a beer festival
tent In Unterschlelsshelm,
near Munich, southern Ger-
many.

Canadian official
eats seal heart
KUUJJUAQ, Quebec -
Canada's governor general
says images of her eating a
raw seal heart promoted a
better understanding of the
country's North and the seal-
ing industry.
Governor General
Michaelle Jean, the repre-
sentative of Britain's Queen
Elizabeth II as Canada's
head of state, gutted the seal
and swallowed a slice of the
mammal's heart last week.
Her actions came after the
EU voted last month to Im-
pose a ban on seal products
on grounds that the seal hunt
Is cruel.
The Image raised eye-
brows around the world.
Jean says It sparked a big
discussion and a new aware-
ness about Canada's north-
ern Inult communities. She
wrapped up her trip to the
North on Monday.
Sealers and Canadian au-
thorities say the seal hunt is
humane and provides in-
come for isolated communi-
ties.
-From wire reports


Massive search for missing French airliner


Rescuers scour

Atlantic for

signs of plane
Associated Press
RIO DE JANEIRO - An
Air France jet with 228 peo-
ple on a flight to Paris van-
ished over the Atlantic
Ocean after flying into tow-
ering thunderstorms and
sending an automated mes-
sage that the electrical sys-
tem had failed. A vast
search began Monday, but
all aboard were feared
killed.
Military aircraft scram-
bled out to the center of the
Atlantic, far from the coasts
of Brazil and West Africa,
and France sought U.S.
satellite help to find the
wreckage. The first military
ship wasn't expected to
reach the area where the
plane disappeared until
Wednesday,
If there are no survivors,
it would be the world's
worst aviation disaster
since 2001.
French President Nicolas
Sarkozy said the cause re-
mains unclear and that "no
hypothesis" is being ex-
cluded. Some experts dis-
missed speculation that


Plane lost In vast stretch of Atlantic
Brazil s military searched a vast area off Its coast for the missing Air
France Jet carrying 228 people fromlRio de Janeiro to Paris. The
French military scoured the oceapiiear the Cape Verde Islanas.


SOURCES: National Oceanic and Atmoopherlo Admilnlstrat or,
Weather Underground; ESRI; Air France; Brazilian military


lightning might have
brought the plane down. But
violent thunderheads
reaching more than 50,000
feet high can pound planes
with hail and high winds,
causing structural damage
if pilots can't maneuver
around them.
Sarkozy said he told fam-
ily members of passengers
on Air France Flight 447
that prospects of finding
survivors are "very small."
Brazil's president, Luiz
Inacio Lula da Silva, ex-
pressed hope that "the
worst hasn't happened," and
said "we have to ask God" to


help find survivors.
The 4-year-old Airbus
A330 left Rio Sunday night
with 216 passengers and 12
crew members on board,
said company spokes-
woman Brigitte Barrand.
Most of the passengers were
Brazilian and French, but 32
nations in all were repre-
sented, including two Amer-
icans.
The plane was cruising
normally at 35,000 feet
(10,670 meters) and 522 mph
(840 kph) just before it dis-
appeared nearly four hours
into the flight. No trouble
was reported as the plane


AsOCilateda ress
A woman looking for Information on Air France flight 447 re-
acts Monday while being taken to a private room at Tom
Jobim airport In Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The jet carrying 228
people lost contact with air traffic controllers over the At-
lantic Ocean, officials said Monday. Brazil began a search
mission off Its northeastern coast.


left radar contact, beyond
Brazil's Fernando de
Noronha archipelago, at
10:48 local time.
But just north of the equa-
tor, a line of towering thun-


derstorms loomed, Bands of
extremely turbulent
weather stretched across
the Atlantic toward Africa,
as they often do in the area
this time of year.









Section B - TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009



.PORTS


AROUND THE HORN:
Giant feat
Randy Johnson brushes
off talk about nearing
milestone.
S!/Page B3
/ p'is


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Huskies take bite out of UF


Gators lose opening game ofBest-of-3

series for women's college softball title


Associated Press


OKLAHOMACITY-Jenn Sailing
hita two-run single that turned into a
whole lot more as Washington routed
top-seeded Florida 8-0 Monday night
in Game 1 of the Women's College
World Series finals.
Selling's single brought in four


runs when catcher Kristina Hilbreth
tried to catch a runner at second. Her
throw sailed into center field.
Morgan Stuart added a two-run
double in the fifth inning as the
Huskies (50-12) had a surprising of-
fensive outburst against Stacey Nel-
son, the nation's stingiest pitcher with
an 0.48 ERA Nelson (41-4) had con-


secutive shutouts to open the World
Series.
Danielle Lawrie (41-8) threw a two-
hitter to set a new Washington record
with her 41st ca-
reer shutout Jen- I WHO: Washi
nifer Spediacci, Florida; Garr
who pitched the series of Wo
Huskies to their World Series
last championship 0 WHEN: 8 p.r
appearance in
1999, held the old record with 40.
Game 2 of the best-of-three series
is tonight
A member of the Canadian


Olympic team, Sailing joined the
Huskies late in the season before
playing a key role in their postseason
push. After transferring from Oregon,
she wasn't al-
ngton vs. lowed to play until
e 2 of Best-of-3 April because of
men's College NCAA rules and
started her abbre-
n. today, ESPN2. viated season 0-
for-13.
Selling turned it around in the
last two weeks of the regular sea-
son and then into the postseason
and is hitting at a .413 clip (19-for-


46) since May 7.
Now, she and Lawrie - the na-
tional player of the year and her
teammate from the Olympic team -
have the Huskies within one win of
their first NCAA softball title.
There was an awkward moment
after Kelsey Bruder struck out to end
the sixth inning as both teams lined
up for postgame handshakes, think-
ing the game was over because of the
mercy rule. However, the rule is not
in effect duringthe championship se-
ries and the teams were told to re-
sume play.


BAyantfacing

prospect of seeing

Man ofSteel again

Associated Press


LOS ANGELES - Kobe Bryant is
staring down the prospect of sharing
the court with Superman again. Only
this time, it's Dwight Howard and not
Shaquille O'Neal who's wearing the
cape that Bryant wants to tug on.
Bryant and the Los Angeles Lakers
will be trying to win their first NBA title
without O'Neal when the finals open
Thursday against Howard and the Or-
lando Magic.,
They failed 6t do so last year, losing to
Boston in a humiliating Game 6 defeat
O'Neal was traded after Los Angeles lost
the 2004 finals to Detroit, leaving Bryant the
undisputed leader of a team that won three
straight championships at the start of the
decade. Bryant still bristles at implications he
had something to do with that
"People that really know basketball know that
that stuff means nothing," Bryant said Monday,
deflecting questions about O'Neal. "It's non-
sensical actually You want to win just to wi n
it"
Bryant, who turns 31 in August, is
completing his 13th season. He kept
to himself around his older team-
mates early in his career. Although
he teamed with O'Neal to lead the
Lakers to three straight champi-
onships, the two frequently zinged
each publicly.
Adding a fourth NBA champi-
onship to the gold medal he helped
the United States win at last year's
Beijing Olympics would burnish
Bryant's still developing legacy
"You're thankful to be in this posi-
tion," he said. '"A lot of players never
get to this position once in a career
See BRYANT/Page B4

NBA FINALS
Orlando vs. L.A. Lakers;
ABC will air games
* Thursday: Orlando at L.A. Lakers, 9 p.m.
* Sunday: Orlando at L.A. Lakers,
8 p.m.
* Tuesday, June 9: L.A. Lakers at
Orlando, 9 p.m.
* Thursday, June 11: L.A. Lakers at
Orlando, 9 p.m.
* Sunday, June 14: L.A. Lakers at
Orlando 8 p.m., if necessary.
* Tuesday, June 16: Orlando at L.A.
Lakers, 9 p.m., if necessary.
., Thursday, June 18: Orlando at L.A.
,: -La.kers, 9 p.m., if necessary.


F Magic mull possible

return ofpoint guard

Associated Press


ORLANDO - Jameer Nelson can shoot
again. His injured right shoulder can take
contact, and he's been cleared by doctors to
practice.
Though that doesn't add up to Orlando's All-
Star point guard being healthy enough to play
in the NBA finals, it does create a dilemma for
the Magic's front office.
Nelson said Monday that he has been playing
full-court games, participating in contact drills and
will practice with the Magic for the
first time since tearing the labrum in
. his right shoulder Feb. 2 against
f the Dallas Mavericks.
.m"Im a competitor," Nelson
said. "No matter what the situa-
tion is, I always think I can go
out there and get contact."
He had what was then called
season-ending surgery Feb. 19. Jameer
Nelson's rehabilitation was NeIsoar
supposed to take at least has been out
another two months. since Feb. 2.
Game 1 ofthe finals is
Thursday night in Los Angeles.
Magic general manager Otis Smith and
coach Stan Van Gundy expressed doubt
Monday whether Nelson could seriously
return for the finals. Smith, who had repeat-
edly said Nelson will not play this season.
said Monday a quicker recovery and the
chance of winning a championship has
forced him to at least take a look at Nelson.
"It's still no in my mind," Smith said,
adding that the team will explore the idea
even if Nelson doesn't return for Game 1.
"There's a very smidgen of a chance he can
play"
Orlando was 2-0 against the Lakers this sea-
son. Nelson was Orlando's leading scorer in
both those games, averaging 27 5 points. He has
been lobbying the Magic for a chance at playing
since the playoffs began, with each round the
team advances the idea - and the talk - of him
returning growing.
But Nelson would likely just be a shell of his All-
Star form. He hasn't played in four months, and
even he admits it will be difficult to convince the
training staff and coaches that he isn't risking future
damage.
"A miracle has to happen." Nelson said.
The Magic had the best record in the NBA in January
behind Nelson, who was having a career season. He
y , averaged 16.7 points, 5.4 assists and 3.5 rebounds in 42
games this season.
" But their title hopes took a major hit after he was
injured. A trade-deadline deal that brought Rafer Al-
See G,'ARDPage B4
Lakers guard Kobe Bryant, will play for his fourth NBA
Championship, while the Magic's Dwight Howard, right, will
play for his first title. The series tips off Thursday night.
The series will air on ABC.
A .:i3,. -3, Pre :.


Federer


rallies,


avoids


upset.

Roddick, lone U.S.

male lef, ousted

Associated Press
PARIS - Roger Federer knows
full well, of course, that Rafael
Nadal is no longer around this
year to befuddle him, to beat him,
to stand between him and a
French Open title.
Federer insists he is not think-
ing about that, not thinking
ahead. Still, Federer sure did
play as if preoccupied for the bet-
ter part of two hours Monday,
dropping the first two sets of his
fourth-round match against 63rd-
ranked Tommy Haas of Germany.
One point from letting Haas
serve for the victory, Federer con-
jured up one particularly spec-
facular forehand that managed to
change the entire flow of things.,
That shot spurred a run of nine
consecutive games for Federer,
sending him to a 6-7 (4), 5-7,6-4,6-
0, 6-2 victory over Haas and a
berth in the quarterfinals at'
Roland Garros.
"I knew I was going to look back
on that shot That saved me," Fed-
erer said. "I was in quite some
danger."
But he escaped. With two more
victories, Federer, will reach a
fourth consecutive final at the
French Open, the only Grand
Slam championship he hasn't
won. Federer lost to Nadal in
each of the past three finals and
in the 2005 semifinals, but the
Spaniard's 31-match winning
streak at the clay-court major
tournament ended Sunday
against Robin Soderling.
See FEDERER/Page B4


Associated Press
Roger Federer reacts during his
fourth-round match Wednesday
against Tommy Haas at the French
Open tennis tournament. Federer,
who has lost three straight years
in the finals, won in five sets.


------------^ ---Two-Minute DRILL


Nicklaus, Woods to play
Skins together Wednesday
DUBLIN, Ohio (AP) - Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods will
play together in the Memorial Skins Game, only the sec-
ond time they have competed against each other in
the same group.
The Memorial Skins Game is Wednesday at
Muirfield Village and involves four players in two
groups. Nicklaus and Woods will be joined by
Stewart Cink and Kenny Perry. The other group
'will have Vijay Singh, Padraig Harrington, Jim
- Furyk and Camilo Villegas.
The other time Nicklaus and Woods played in
the same group was the 2000 PGA Championship.
-Photo by Associated Press


UF cornerback arrested, Mine That Bird works
shot with Taser out ahead of Belmont


GAINESVILLE (AP) -A University
of Florida football player has been ar-
rested and shot with a Taser gun after a
fight broke out near a dub.
Gainesville Police spokesman Lt.
Keith Kameg said police saw UF cor-
nerback Janoris Jenkins punch another
man in the head Saturday morning.
When Jenkins continued fighting, they
shot him with the Taser, and he tried to
run away. He was arrested on charges
of resisting arrest without violence and
posted bail later Saturday.


LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) - Kentucky
Derby winner Mine That Bird has
worked out at Churchill Downs with
jockey Calvin Borel back on board
ahead of the Belmont Stakes.
Mine that Bird went a half mile in
50 seconds and came off the track
Monday prancing and kicking.
Trainer Chip Woolley says his geld-
ing knows the difference when Borel
is on him and looks comfortable.
Mine That Bird won the Kentucky
Derby with Borel aboard last month.


Mickelson plans
to play in U.S. Open
DUBLIN, Ohio (AP) - Phil Mickel-
son plans a brief return to the PGATour
in time to play in the U.S. Open.
The world's No. 2 player suspended
his schedule indefinitely upon announc-
ing two weeks ago that his wife, Amy,
has been diagnosed with breast can-
cer.
Mickelson intends to return next
week at the St. Jude Championship in
Memphis, Tenn., then play the following
week in the U.S. Open at Bethpage
Black, according to a source.


ir
n
)r








SPORTS CITRUS Couivry (FL) CHRONICLE


B2 TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009


Suncoast summer swim season begins


Team tryouts

not necessary
Special to the Chronicle
During the past 14 years,
the Sun Coast Swim Team
(SCST) has established itself
as the source of many of Cit-
rus County's very best com-
petitive athletes. More
important than agcomplish-
ments alone, Sun Coast
Swim Team takes pride in
offering a program for all
ages and ability levels.
Everyone has a special
place on the Sun Coast
Swim Team. Age group
swimming builds a strong
foundation for a lifetime of
good physical and mental
health by teaching time
management, self-discipline
and healthy fitness habits.
Sun Coast Swim. Team
teaches the ideals of hon-
esty, integrity, fair play and
sportsmanship in addition
to the techniques and val-
ues of hard work and dedi-
cation.
Several SCST Swimmers
have gone on to swim in col-
lege at NCAA Division I, II
and III levels, as well as
other collegiate levels in-
cluding: Florida State Uni-
versity, United States Naval
Academy, Norwich Univer-
sity, Indian River, Florida
Southern, Virginia Military
Institute, University of
Bridgeport and others.
The Crystal River and
Lecanto high school swim
teams, with strong support
from swimmers who also
swim for SCST,'have won
more than a dozen FHSAA


District Titles.
There are no tryouts,
SCST hold swimmer evalu-
ations to help us place
swimmers into appropriate
practice groups. We have an
experienced staff of
coaches who are all certi-
fied through USA Swim-
ming and are required to
maintain certifications in
CPR, Safety Training for
Swim Coaches and First
Aid. Some hold additional
coaching certifications as
well.
Practices through Satur-
day are Tuesday, Thursday
and Saturday:
* Session I (high school
swimmers)-- 4 to 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday; 7 to
9 a.m. Saturday.
* Session II (elementary
and middle school swim-
mers) - 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tues-
day and Thursday; 9 to 11
a.m. Saturday.
From June 11 to July 31,
practices are Monday
through Friday:
* Session I (high school
swimmers) - 6:15 to 8 a.m.
* Session II (elementary
and middle school swim-
mers) - 7:45 to 9 am.
Stop by the pool during
any practice for more infor-
mation or to sign up for the:
team.
In addition, Citrus County
Parks & Recreation offers
many programs for all ages.
Swim lessons, lap swim-
ming, recreational swim-
ming, and pool rental are all
available.
Bicentennial Park Pool
795-1478 and/or to contact
Sun Coast Swim Team, visit
our Web site at www.Sun
CoastSwimTeam.com.


Charity

golf


tourney

Saturday
Special to the Chronicle
The inaugural 'HOPE
Wildlife' Golf Tournament
will be at noon Saturday at
Pine Ridge Community
Golf & Country Club, in
memory of Harry Wendler.
HOPE Wildlife Reha-
bilitation shelters sev-
eral permanently
injured (non-releasable)
hawks, owls and falcons,
licensed with U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service, that
they use for their "Wings
of HOPE" educational
programs to help edu-
cate the community
about birds of prey
Registration for the
scramble-format charity
tournament begins at 11
a.m.
Prizes will be awarded
for first-, second- and third-
place teams. There will be
contests for longest drive,
closest to the pin and put-
ting.
Cost per player, includ-
ing hot dogs, hamburgers
and pulled chicken after
golf, is $50 ($30 is tax de-
ductible). Proceeds will
help HOPE with the enor-
mous food and medical
bills for the injured and,
orphaned wildlife in
their care.
For an entry form or
more information, call 628-
9464.


R EARN $25 IN THE CHRONICLE'S NASCAR CONTEST


Associated Press
Jimmie Johnson, front left, and his wife, Chandra, right, celebrate In
Victory Lane after Johnson won the NASCAR Autism Speaks 400
auto race on Sunday at Dover International Speedway In Dover, Del.


Associated Press
Greg Biffle pits during the NASCAR Autism Speaks 400 auto race on
Sunday at Dover International Speedway In Dover, Del.


CONTEST RULES
* Pick the winner of this Sunday's
Pocono 500. In the event that more
than one contestant picks the same
driver, the tie will be broken
by guessing the average speed of the
race.
0 The closest contestant to the actual
average speed, over or under, will be
declared the winner If there is no win-
ner one week the $25 prize will carry
over to the following week making that
week's race contest worth $50.
M You may enter as many times as
you like but every entry form MUST
be an original entry form from the
Citrus County Chronicle No copies
will be permitted.
* Please include your name, address
and telephone number on the printed
entry form. DON'T FORGET TO SUP-
PLY YOUR TIEBREAKER SPEED.
* You may drop offor mail entriesto-our
Meadowcrest office at 1624 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd, Crystal River, FL, 34429. All
entrees MUST be in the office no later
than 5 p.m. on Friday, June 5.


-pi-mii - mmi.m-m-----mmimmmmmmmm-----i--i- --------------------------


Latest winner!
Congratulations to
Lynda Hinson for correctly
guessing Jimmie Johnson
as the winner of Sunday's
Autism Speaks 400 at
Dover.
Hinson won $25 thanks
to a tiebreak speed of
115 mph. The actual
speed was 115.237 mph.


SNASCAR CONTEST ENTRY
I



DRIVER'S NAME YOUR NAME PHONE

TIEBREAKER: (Guess what you think the average speed of the race will be):
You may mail your entry to Citrus County Chronicle, co John Coscia, Sp
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL, 34429. All entries must be received
I


FORM



NUMBER


orts editor,
I by 5 p.m. on June 5.


-- ------------------ mm-------------------- -----------.


a DON MISS OUT ON THE

^Eyeitem ent
GRANDSTAND ADMISSION:
Adults $13 Racehcktocated
Senior Citizens and Students (12-17) $9 2 isou fio
Children 11 & Under $7; Children under 42" $4 on US Hiy.,41 aohe
Family Pack: $30 C s
(2 Adults & 2 Children) l
PIT ADMISSION:
Adults $25 /
Children

- -"" 616109
* a m m


TO LAWN DAMAGING CHINCH

BUGS & MOLE CRICKETS!
Service for Annual Lawn Program
* Service inspections consisting of every month.
* Minimum of 6 insect sprays per year.
* 3 fertilizers per year consisting of
environmentally sound slow release fertilizer.
* Weed Control.
* Fungicide Application Included.
* Shrub Programs Available.
* Free follow-ups anytime during the year.
GUARANTEED TO BEAT OUR COMPETITOR'S PRICES
_* Best of the Best 7 years
* Established & Trusted Since 1998
(352) 563-66989 400 NE t Sene, -CV ntUerV, MLS
www.citnrupest.com
1-86-860-BUGS (2847) *mail: info@citruspest.com


CrrRus CoLuvTy (FL) CHRoNicLE


SPolRrs


/ \ ,









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 B3


AL


New York
Boston
Toronto
Tampa Bay
Baltimore


L Philadelphia
New York
Atlanta
Florida
Washington


W L
28 20
28 22
25 25
24' 28
13 36


East Division
GB WCGB
1 -
2 1
6 5
7 6


East Division
GB WCGB

1 1
4 4
6 6
15� 151�


Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota
Kansas City
Cleveland


Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Chicago
Pittsburgh
Houston


Central Division
GB WCGB L10 Str
- - 5-5 W-2
3� 3� 8-2 W-4
4� 4� 6-4 W-1
5� 51 2-8 L-4
8 8 6-4 L-1


Central Division
GB WCGB
- --
S3 2�/
4 3Y�
7 6�
8 7�


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Cleveland 5, N.Y. Yankees 4
Boston 8, Torpnto 2
Detroit 3, Baltimore 0
Minnesota 3, Tampa Bay 2
Chicago White Sox 7, Kansas City 4
Oakland 5, Texas 4
L.A. Angels 9, Seattle 8
Monday's Games
N.Y. Yankees 5, Cleveland 2
Chicago White Sox 6, Oakland 2
Baltimore at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Boston (Matsuzaka 0-3) at Detroit (Pbrcello 6-
3), 7:05 p.m.
Texas (Padilla 3-2) at N.Y. Yankees (A.Burnett
3-2), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Saunders 6-3) at Toronto (Halla-
day 8-1), 7:07 p.m.
Kansas City (Davies 2-4) at Tampa Bay (Son-
nanstine 3-5), 7:08 p.m.
Cleveland (D.Huff 0-1) at Minnesota (Slowey 7-
1), 8:10 p.m.
Oakland (Mazzaro 0-0) at Chicago White Sox
(B Colon 3-4), 8:11 p.m.
Baltimore (Da.Hernandez 1-0) at Seattle (Be-
dard 3-2), 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Boston at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Texas at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 7:08 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Oakland at Chicago White Sox, 8:11 p.m.
Baltimore at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
N.Y. Mets 3, Florida 2
Houston 2, Pittsburgh 1
Philadelphia 4, Washington 2
Milwaukee 5, Cincinnati 2
San Diego 5, Colorado 2
San Francisco 5, St. Louis 3
Atlanta 9, Arizona 3
L.A. Dodgers 8, Chicago Cubs 2
Monday's Games
Pittsburgh 8, N.Y. Mets 5
Florida 7, Milwaukee 4
Houston 4, Colorado 1
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 pm.
, Tuesday's Games
N.Y. Mets (J.Santana 7-2) at Pittsburgh (Duke
5-4), 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 4-1) at Washington
(Stammen 0-1), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago .Cubs (R.Wells 0-2) at Atlanta
(Kawakami 3-6), 7:10 p.m. '
Milwaukee (M.Parra 3-6) at Florida (A.Sanchez
1-4), 7:10 p.m..
Colorado (Jimenez 3-6) at Houston (F.Paulino
1-4), 8:05 p.m. -
Cincinnati (Arroyo 7-3) at St. Louis (B.Thomp-
son 0-1), 8:15 p.m.
Philadelphia (Bastardo 0-0) at San Diego
(Peavy 5-5), 10:05 p.m.
Arizona (Haren 4-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Wolf 3-1),
10:10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m,
.5- Fr .-,.!,:,:, il I' -,',,- l.:,.'. " {I , p.m .
Ch,,:,. Cutb; a Ati.'rI 7 10 p m ' ) p m
Milwaukee at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Colorado at Houston, 8:05"p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m..
Philadelphia at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-Bartlett, Tampa Bay, .373; Mi-
Cabrera, Detroit, .355; ISuzuki, Seattle, .354;
VMartinez, Cleveland, .348;AdJones, Baltimore,
.344; Momeau, Minnesota, .342; AHill, Toronto,
.333; MYoung, Texas, .333.
RUNS-BRoberts, Baltimore, 43; Scutaro,
Toronto, 43; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 40; Damon,
NewYork, 40; AdJones, Baltimore, 40; Momeau,
Minnesota, 40; Pedroia, Boston, 39.
RBI-Longoria, Tampa Bay, 55; Bay, Boston,
49; Morneau, Minnesota, 47;Teixeira, NewYork,
44; TorHunter, Los Angeles, 42; CPena, Tampa
Bay, 41; Markakis, Baltimore, 40.
HITS-AHill, Toronto, 77; VMartinez, Cleve-
land, 70; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 69; ISuzuki, Seat-
tie, 68; Morneau, Minnesota, 67; MiCabrera,
Detroit, 65; Cano, NewYork, 65; Jeter, NewYork,
65; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 65; MYoung, Texas, 65.
HOME RUNS-CPena, Tampa Bay, 17; Teix-
eira, New York, 16; Bay, Boston, 15; NCruz,
Texas, 14; Morneau, Minnesota, 14; Dye,
Chicago, 13; Granderson, Detroit, 13; Kinsler,
Texas, 13; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 13.
STOLEN BASES-Crawford, Tampa Bay, 30;
Ellsbury, Boston, 21; Figgins, Los Angeles, 20;
Abreu, Los Angeles, 15; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 15;
Bartlett, Tampa Bay, 14; Crisp, Kansas City, 11;
Span, Minnesota, 11.
. PtTCHING (5 Decisions)-Palmer, Los Ange-
les, 5-0, 1.000; Greinke, Kansas City, 8-1, .889;
Halladay, Toronto, 8-1, .889; Slowey, Minnesota,
7-1, .875; Buehrle, Chicago, 6-1, .857; Pettitte,
NewYork, 5-1,.833; Penny, Boston, 5-1, .833.
SAVES-Fuentes, Los Angeles, 13; Papelbon,
Boston, 13; Jenks, Chicago, 12; FFrancisco,
Texas, 11; MaRivera, New York, 11; Rodney, De-
troit, 10; Sherrill, Baltimore, 10.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Tejada, Houston, .353; Beltran,
New York, .352; Hawpe, Colorado, .345; Pence,
Houston, .341; Pujols, St. Louis, .339;
HaRamirez, Florida, .337; Hudson, Los Angeles,
.332; Ibanez, Philadelphia, .332.
RUNS-Pujols, St. Louis, 42; Ibanez, Philadel-
phia, 40; Zimmerman, Washington, 39; Hudson,
Los Angeles, 38; AdGonzalez, San Diego, 37;
ASoriano, Chicago, 36; Utley, Philadelphia, 35;
Victorino, Philadelphia, 35.
RBI-Fielder, Milwaukee, 48; Ibanez, Philadel-
phia, 46; Dunn, Washington, 42; Pujols, St. Louis,
42; AdGonzalez, San Diego, 40; Howard,
Philadelphia, 40; Cantu, Florida, 39; Hawpe, Col-
orado, 39.
HITS-Tejada, Houston, 71; Hudson, Los An-
geles, 70; Zimmerman; Washington, 66;
FSanchez, Pittsburgh, 65; Beltran, NewYork, 62;
Ibanez, Philadelphia, 62; HaRamirez, Florida, 62.
HOME RUNS-AdGonzalez, San Diego, 20;
Ibanez, Philadelphia, 17; Dunn, Washington, 16;
Pujols, St. Louis, 16; Bruce, Cincinnati, 14;
Howard, Philadelphia, 14; Reynolds, Arizona, 13.
STOLEN BASES-Bourn, Houston, 16;
Kemp, Los Angeles, 12;Taveras, Cincinnati, 12;
DWright, New York, 12; Burriss, San Francisco,
11; Fowler, Colorado, 11; Morgan, Pittsburgh, 11;
JosReyes,NewYork,11.
PITCHING (5 Decisions)-Broxton, Los An-
geles, 5-0,1.000; Cain, San Francisco, 6-1, .857;
Martis, Washington, 5-1, .833; LiHernandez,
New York, 4-1, .800; JoJohnson, Florida, 4-1,
.800; Pelfrey, NewYork, 4-1,.800; Lincecum, San
Francisco, 4-1,.800.


SAVES-Bell, San Diego, 15; FrRodriguez,
New York, 14; Cordero, Cincinnati, 13; Hoffman,
Milwaukee, 13; Qualls, Arizona, 12; BWilson, San
Francisco, 12; Lidge, Philadelphia, 12; Franklin,
St. Louis, 12.


Big Unit approaches big number


Veteran lefty

seeks 300th win


Associated Press


SAN FRANCISCO - Mere mention
of the milestone causes Randy John-
son to recoil.
"I'm not going to talk about this stuff.
OK, I got to go," he said the other day,
quickly leaving his locker and heading
to the field. "I get distracted. I just try
not to talk at all."
So that's how it's going to be as the
Big Unit prepares for his first try at 300
wins Wednesday night at Washington.
At 45, the San Francisco lefty owns a
World Series ring and co-MVP honors,
five Cy Young awards and is a 10-time
All-Star selection. He's thrown two no-
hitters, including a perfect game, and
ranks second on the career strikeout
list
Some of his best season 'have come
in his later years - he's won more
games in his 40s than he did in his 20s.
The tallest player in the majors
when he debuted with the long-gone
Expos more than two decades ago,
Johnson grew into more than oddity
He harnessed his 6-foot-10 frame, re-,
fined his blazing fastball and wicked
slider and came to symbolize what
power pitching is all about '
"If he has control of his stuff, he's
'going to win a lot of ballgames," Mon-
treal manager Buck Rodgers predicted
after Johnson's second appearance in
the big leagues.
Still capable of dominating with the
Giants, he's on the verge of a plateau
that many in baseball believe will
never again be reached.
Next up on the win list behind John-
son is 46-year-old-Jamnie Moyer (250),
followed by 36-year-old Andy Pettitte
(220). At 32, Roy Halladay isn't even
halfway there (139).
"With the way pitching is being used
nowadays, I think it probably lessens
the chance of it," said Nolan Ryan,
a nong the 22 aces to ach ieve the mark
."Whether they start using starters dif-
ferently because pitching is at uch a
premium, I don't.know."
Some thought Greg Maddux might
have been the last to the milestone in


Marlins 7, Brewers 4
MIAMI - Hanley Ramirez
and Jeremy Hermida had RBI
singles in Florida's five-run
sixth inning and the Marlins ral-
lied to beat Milwaukee.
Jorge Cantu had two RBIs
for Florida. Ramirez finished
with three hits.
Eleven Marlins batted in the
sixth, with the first eight reach-
ing base safely. Jorge Julio (1-
1) faced six batters'and
allowed five runs, four earned..
He walked one and hit two bat-
ters.
Cristhian Martinez (1-1)
pitched 1 2-3 innings to earn
his first major league win. Matt
Lindstrom pitched a scoreless
ninth to earn his 10th save in
12 opportunities.
Casey McGehee and Jason
Kendall each had two hits and
an RBI for Milwaukee, which
led 4-2 after five innings. Jeff "
Suppan allowed two runs and
seven hits in five innings.
Milwaukee Florida
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Hartrtf 50 1 1 Coghn If 4 1 1 1
Hall 3b 5 0 1 0 BCarrllrf. 0 00 0
Braun If 4 00 0 Bonifac 3b 4 1 0 0
Coffey p 0 0 0 0 HRmrz ss 5 2 3 1
McClngp 0 00 0 Cantu 1b 4 02 2
Gamel ph 1 00 0 Hermid r-lf 5 02 1
Villanvp 0 0 0 0 Uggla2b 2 1 0 1
Fielder b 5 1 1 0 JoBakrc 5 0 1 0
MCmrncf 1 1 1 0 C.Rosscf 4 1 1 0
Juliop 0 00 0 AMillerp 2 01 0-
Catlntt If 2 0 1 0 CrMrtn p 0 0 0 0
Hardyss 5 1 2 0 Hayesph 1 1 0 0
McGeh2b 5 1 2 1 Sanchs p 0 00 0
Kendallc 3 02 1 Nunezp 0 00 0
Suppan p 0 00 1 Lndstr p 0 00 0
Gerut ph-cf 2 0 0 0
Totals 38 4114 Totals 36711 6
Milwaukee 030 010 000 - 4
Florida 110 005 00x - 7
E-Fielder (3), Ha.Ramirez (4), Bonifacio (8).
-LOB-Milwaukee 12, Florida. 12. 2B-
Ha.Ramirez (17). CS-Fielder (1). S-Suppan.
IP H RER BB SO
Milwaukee
5uppan 5 7 2 2 3 5
Julio L,1-1 BS,1-1 0 2 5 4 1 0
Coffey 1 1 0 0 1 3
McClung 1 1 0 0 0 0
Villanueva 1 0 0 0 0 1
Florida
A.Miller 41-36 4 3 4 4
Cr.MartinezW,1-1 12-32 0 0 0 2
SanchesH,1 1 2 0 0 0 0
NunezH,9 1 0 0 0 0 0
Lindstrom S,10-12 1 1 0 0 0 2
Julio pitched to 6 batters in the 6th.
HBP-by Julio (Hayes, Cantu).
Umpires-Home, Mike DiMuro; First, Dale
Scott; Second, Jerry Meals;Third, Damien Beal.
T-3:15. A-10,509 (38,560).


Associated Press
Sani Francisco Giants pitcher Randy Johnson will attempt to become the
23rd pitcher in Major League history to win 300 games. The veteran lefty
will get his first crack at the milestone Wednesday against the Nationals.


2004. But then Tom Glavine reached with Arizona.
300 two years ago. "He's not just some genetic freak
"I don't know them," he said when who comes up every five days. He
asked about Maddux works," St. Louis
and Glavine. "I was- 300 WIns List Cardinals manager
n't their teammate." i cy',un,,ug 511 Tony La Russa said.
Johnson has put 2 waiter Johrnson .417 "Whenever you
himself in position 3 Grove, Cleveland Alevander 37 were within two or
by overcoming back C'5 Pud Galn 3'5 three weeks of play-
problems that 6 Warren Spahn 363 ing him, you started
threatened to end 7 KidNichols 361 counting the days
his career He's 4-4 8 Gre. Maodux 3V hoping you missed
with a 5.71 ERA in RogerClemens 354 him."
, 1 Tm Ke-fe 342
his first two months 11 Steve Carton 329 Johnson probably
with the Giants. 12 John Clarkson 3)8 figured he'd be
"This is a mile- 13 Edde Plank 326 doing this forthe Di-
stone, but he has 14 NolanURyan 324 amnondbacks,butthe
said he didn't come 14Don Sutton 324 sides failed to reach
1. P Pri Jeklo 318
here to just win five 7 Gaylor Perry 3,4 an agreement last
games," Giants man- t8 Tom Seaver 311 winter. He instead
ager Bruce Bochy 19 Hoss Ra.-bourn 30)9 signed an $8 million,
said. "He wants to M okeyene-year contract
21 x-Tom Glaine 3 one0
reach it but he wants 22 Le Grove - 3 with San Francisco
to get it behind him, 22~Early Wynn 300 in late December to
too." - (-active) pitch' in his native
Many ofthe Giants, Bay Area, then five
will tour the White House before the victories shy of 300.
game Wednesday Johnson wasn't plan- "There are only a handful of guys
ning to join them, certainly opting to that have pitched this game that make
prepare for his starLt , the opposing manager alter his
"I'vealreadybeenthere," he said. lineup," said Dodgers manager Joe
Johnson takes great pride in the fact Torre, Johnson's former skipper with
he worked tirelessly to return from two the New York Yankees. -Even your
back operations in recent years while guys that play every day. left-handers


Pirates 8, Mets 5
PITTSBURGH -Andy
LaRoche had three RBIs and
the Pirates scored five runs in
the eighth inning to beat the
Mets.
Adam LaRoche and Jack
Wilson had three hits apiece for
Pittsburgh, which came back
from a 5-0 deficit to win for only
the second time in six games.
Wilson Valdez had two hits
and a career-high three RBIs
for the Mets, who fell to 22-2
when leading after seven in-
nings. Jeremy Reed added two
hits and scored two runs.
The bottom of the eighth had
to stir up bad memories of last
season for Mets fans, but
bullpen implosions have been
rare this season.
Tom Gorzelanny (3-1) got
one out to record the win, and
Matt Capps pitched the ninth
for his 11th save.


NewYork Pittsburgh
ab rh bi
LCastill 2b 5 0 0 0 Morgan If
FMrtnzIlf 3 1 1 0 FSnchz 2b
DnMrplb 4'0 0 0 McLothcf
Sheffildrf 3 1 0 1 AdLRclb
DWrght 3b 3 0 0 0 Hinske rf
Reed cf 4 2 2 0 AnLRc3b
WValdzss 4 1 2 3 Jarmllc
Schndrc 3 0 1 1 JaWlsnss
LHrndzp 2 00 0 Snell p
Parnell p 0 0 0 0 RVazqz ph
Felicin p 0 0 0 0 SBurntt p
Putz p 0 0 0 0 SJcksn p
Stokes p 0 00 0 GrzIny p
Tatis ph 1 0 1 0 DIwYn ph
- Capps p
Totals 32 57 5 Totals
NewYork 023 000 000


ab rhbi
4 02 0
5 00 1
4001
5230
2 1'0 0
4 22 3'
4 1 2 1
4'1 3 1
1000
1 00 0
0000
000 0,
0000

0000
35813 8
* - 5


Pittsburgh 000 300 05x - 8
E-W.Valdez (1), Jaramillo (2). DP-New York
1, Pittsburgh 1. LOB-NewYork 7, Pittsburgh 8.'
2B-Reed 2 (3), W.Valdez (1),-Ad.LaRoche 2
(16). 3B-W.Valdez (1), An.LaRoche (1). SB-
F.Martinez 2 (2), Morgan (11). S-Li.Hernan-
dez, Snell. SF-McLouth.
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
Li.Hernandez 52-37 3 3 2 5
ParnellH,11 1-3 1 0 0 0 1
Feliciano H,9 11-31 1 1 0 2
Putz L,1-4 BS,2-4 0 4 4 3 1 0
Stokes 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Pittsburgh
Snell 6 6' 5 5 5 2
S.Burnett 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
S.Jackson 1 0 0 0 1 0
GorzelannyW,3-1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
CappsS,11-13 1 1 0 0 0 0
Putz pitched to 5 batters in the 8th.
Umpires-Home, Scott Barry; First, Ted Barrett;
Second, Tim McClelland; Third, Adrian John-
son.
T-3:08. A-i11,812 (38,362).


White Sox 6, A's 2
CHICAGO - Jim Thome hit
the 550th homer of his career in
the eighth inning to put the
White Sox ahead and Chicago
went on to beat Oakland.
A.J. Pierzynksi homered and
Scott Podsednik scored two
runs for the White Sox, who
won for the fourth straight time
and have won 10 of its last 13
overall.
Oakland reliever Craig Bres-
low (1-4) allowed a leadoff walk
to Scott Podsednik in the eighth
inning. After Alexei Ramirez
popped up a bunt attempt, Jer-
maine Dye singled off Santiago
Casilla. On a 1-2 pitch, Thome -
hit an opposite field home run
to left-center to put the White
Sox up 5-2.
Thome is 13th on the career
homers list and has nine this
season.
Matt Thornton (3-1) struck
out the side in the eighth.
Matt Holliday hit a two-run
homer in the first for the Athlet-
ics, who have lost five of its last
six games and have the worst
record in the American League.
Holliday's seventh homer of
the season was off White Sox
starter Gavin Floyd.


Associated Press
New York Yankees starting pitcher Joba Chamberlain waves
at a cloud of small insects Monday as he pitches against
the Indians in the eighth inning in Cleveland. The right-han-
der threw a career-high eight innings in the Yankees' win.


Yankees 5, Indians 2


CLEVELAND - Joba
Oakland Chicago ab r h b Chamberlain allowed two runs
ab rhbi ab rhbi
OCarerss 4 00 0 Pdsdnkif 3 2 0 0 in a career-high eight innings
Kenndy 2b 4 0 0 0 AIRmrz ss 4 0 1 0 and New York set a record for
Custdh 4 1 1 0 Dye.rf 2 1 1 1 consecutive games without
Hollidy If 4 12 2 Thomedh 4 1 2 3
Giambi lb 3 0 0 0 Konerk lb 3 1 0 0 making an error in a victory
KSuzuk c 4 0 0 0 Przyns c 4 1 2 1 against the Cleveland Indians.
RSwnycf 3 0 1 0 Fields 3b 4 0 0 0 Chamberlain (3-1) retired the
Cnghm rf 4 01 0 Wise cf 2 0 0 0 first 11 batters before Mar-
Hannhn 3b 2 0 0 0 BrAndr ph-cf 1 0 0 0
J- .Nix2b 3 0 0. 1 tinez's home run in the fourth.
Totals 32 25 2 Totals 306 6 6 He allowed four hits, walked
Oakland 200 000 000 - 2 two and struck out five. Mari-
Chicago 100 010 04x - 6
E-Kennedy (4). LOB-Oakland 6, Chicago 7. ano Rivera worked a perfect
2B-Holliday (7). HR-Holliday (7),Thome (9), ninth for his 11 th save in 12
Pierzynski (5). SB-J.Nix (3). SF-Dye. chances.
IPOakland H R ER BB SO New York played error free

Cahill 52-33 2 2 2 3 for the 18th straight game, and
BreslowL,1-4 11-30 1 1 1 2 surpassing Boston's mark of 17
S.Casilla 1-3 2 3 3 1 0 games set in 2006. New York's
K.Cameron 2-3 1 0 0 2 1 last error came on May 13 at
Chicago
G.Floyd 7 4 2 2 3 8 Toronto when shortstop Ramiro
ThorntonW,3-1 1 0 0 0 0 3 Pena misplayed a ground ball.
Linebrink 1 1 0 0 0 1 Nick Swisher doubled home
Breslow pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. a pairf runs and Alex Ro-
Umpires-Home, Phil Cuzzi; First, Tom Hallion; runs an
Second, Jerry Crawford; Third, Dan Bellino. dnguez.singled home two more
T-2:46. A-26,038 (40,615). in a four-run seventh inning.


NewYork Cleveland
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Jeterss 3 1 2 0 ACarerss ' 4 00 0
Swisherrf 4 1 2 2 BFrncscf 4 00 0
Teixeirib 3 0 1 0 VMrtnzdh 4 1 1 1
ARdrgz dh 4 0 1 2 Choo rf 4 1 2 0
Posadac 4 0 0 0 JhPerft3b 2 0 0 0
Cano 2b 4 0 0 0 DeRosa If 3 00 1
MeCarrIf 3 00 0 Garkolb 2 00 0
Berroa3b 2 0 0 0 JCarrIl2b 3 0 1 0
HMatsuph 0 0 0 0 Shppchc 3 0 0*0
R.Pena pr-3b1 1 0 0
Gardnrcf 2 2 0 0
Totals 30 56 4 Totals 292 4 2
NewYork 001 000 400 - 5
Cleveland 000 100 100 - 2
DP-New York 1, Cleveland 2. LOB-New York
9, Cleveland 2. 2B-Swisher 2 (11). HR-
V.Martinez (8). SB-Gardner (10), Choo 2 (8).
CS-J.Carroll (1).
IP H RERBBSO
New York
Chamberlain W,3-1 8 4 2 2 2 5
Ma.RiveraS,11-12 1 0 0 0 0 0
Cleveland
Sowers 5 3 1 1 5 3
AquinoL,1-1 11-31 4 4 4 1
Vizcaino 12-31 0 0 2 1
J.Lewis 1 1 0 0 0 2
Sowers pitched to 3 batters in the 6th.
WP-Vizcaino.
Umpires-Home, Mark Carlson; First, Tim
Tschida; Second, Bob Davidson; Third, Jeff Nel-
son.
T-3:13. A-23,651 (45,199).


Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland


Los Angeles
San Fran
San Diego
Arizona
Colorado


West Division
GB WCGB
4� 3
6� 5
10� 9


West Division
GB WCGB
- - 1
8� 3�
9 .4
12� 7�
14 9


TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 B3


CiTRus CouN7y (FL) CHRoNicLE


MAJOR LEAGuE BAsEBALL


that would play every game against
left-handers, you wouldn't do it against
Randy Johnson."
Johnson would be the sixth lefty in
major league history with 300.
Catcher Bengie Molina can't wait
He already helped celebrate home run
king Barry Bonds' 756th homer in Au-
gust 2007 that moved the slugger past
Hank Aaron.
'"A 300-game winner, we might not
see it again," Molina said. "I hope
Randy understands how much it
means to us. We appreciate every ef-
fort. I've never heard him mention any
of that - his goals, 300."
Johnson was selected by the Expos
- now the Nationals - in the second
round of the 1985 draft out of Southern
California. He broke into the big
leagues three years later as a wild
thrower still learning how to pitch.
He was traded to the Seattle
Mariners in May 1989, part of a pack-
age for Mark Langston, and it was
there where his career took off in the
early 90s after he received some advice
from an aging Ryan.
"I think for Randy to win 300 makes
his career complete," Ryan said. "He
obviously, for a period of time, 10 to 15
years, was one*of the most dominating
pitchers in baseball."
His most memorable moments were
in 2001, when he came out of the
bullpen to beat the Yankees in Game 7
of the World Series to give the Dia-
mondbacks the title. He went 3-0 in the
Series, sharing the MVP award with
Curt Schilling.
Johnson pitched the last perfect
game in the majors, at age 40 against
Atlanta.
Johnson goes into his next start with
a 299-164 record and a 3.29 ERA. He's
struck out 4,843 - Ryan leads that list
with 5,714.
Johnson's first major league victory
came on Sept 15, 1988, five days after
his 25th birthday. He has 71 wins since
turning 40, compared to 64 during his
20s. .
"He had tremendous talent, over-
powering talent," La Russa said. "Now
he's got %\ery good talent Right now he
throws like most guys would like to
throw. But when he was younger it just
wasn't fair. Very few every generation
come around like him. He's very spe-
cial."








SToUsSITRSYUN (F)NCRONCL


TENNIS
French Open Results, Monday
At Stade Roland Germs, Paris
Purse: $21.8 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Singles, Men
Fourth Round
Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Tommy
Haas, Germany, 6-7 (4), 5-7, 6-4, 6-0, 6-2.
Tommy Robredo (16), Spain, def. Philipp
Kohischrelber (29), Germany, 6-4, 5-7, 7-6 (4),
6-2.
Juan Martin del Potro (5), Argentina, def. Jo-
WilfriedTsonga (9), France, 6-1,6-7 (5), 6-1,6-
4.
Gael Monfils (11), France, def. Andy Roddick
(6), United States, 6-4, 6-2, 6-3.
Women
Fourth Round
Serena Williams (2), United States, def. Alek-
sandra Wozniak (24), Canada, 6-1, 6-2.
Svetlana Kuznetsova (7), Russia, lef. Ag-
nieszka'Radwanska (12), Poland, 6-4,1-6, 6-1.
Sorana Cirstea, Romania, def. Jelena
Jankovic (5), Serbia, 3-6, 6-0, 9-7.
Samantha Stosur (30), Australia, def. Virginie
Razzano, France, 6-1, 6-2.
Men's Doubles
Quarterfinals
Wesley Moodie, South Africa, and Dick Nor-
man, Belgium, def. Jose Acasuso, Argentina,
and Fernando Gonzalez, Chile, walkover.
Lukas DIouhy, Czech Republic, and Leander
Paes (3), India, def. Bruno Soares, Brazil, and
Kevin Ullyett (5), Zimbabwe, 6-2,7-6 (5).
Women's Doubles
Quarterfinals
Victoria Azarenka, Belarus, and Elena Ves-
nina (12), Russia, def. Yan Zi and Zheng Jle
(16), China, 6-4, 4-6, 6-2.
Anabel Medina Garrigues and Virginia Ruano
Pascual (3), Spain, def. Anna-Lena Groenefeld,
Germany, and Patty Schnyder (11), Switzer-
land, 7-6 (2), 6-2.
Mixed
A Second Round
Anna-Lena Groenefeld, Germany, and Mark
Knowles, def. Lisa Raymond, United States,
and Marcin Matkowski (3), Poland, 3-6, 7-5, 10-
6 tiebreak.
Quarterfinals
Liezel Huber and Bob Bryan (1), United
States, def. Ai Sugiyama, Japan, and Andre Sa
(5), Brazil, 1-6, 6-4, 12-10 tiebreak.
Vania King, United States, and Marcelo Melo,
Brazil, def. Sybille Bammer, Austria, and Lukasz
Kubot, Poland, 6-3, 7-5.


NASCAR
NASCAR Sprint Cup Leaders
Through May 31
Points
1, Tony Stewart, 1,853.2, Jeff Gordon, 1,807.
3, Jimmie Johnson, 1,789.4, Kurt Busch, 1,762.
5, Ryan Newman, 1,680.6, Kyle Busch, 1,634.
7, Denny Hamlin, 1,630.8, Matt Kenseth, 1,625.
9, Greg Biffle, 1,618.10, Jeff Burton, 1,587.11,
Carl Edwards, 1,582.12, Mark Martin, 1,567.
13, David Reutimann, 1,536.14, Kasey Kahne,
1,501.15, Juan Pablo Montoya, 1,475.16, Clint
-Bowyer, 1,449. 17, Brian Vickers, 1,436. 18,
Dale Earnhardt Jr., 1,352.19, Martin Truex Jr.,
1,338.20, Marcos Ambrose, 1,319.
Money
1, Matt Kenseth, $3,743,814. 2, Tony Stew-
art, $3,220,324. 3, Kevin Harvick, $2,900,841.
4, Jimmie Johnson, $2,888,788.5, Jeff Gordon,
$2,817,939.6, Kyle Busch, $2,781,800.7, Carl
Edwards, $2,236,868. 8, Jeff Burton,
$2,205,318.9, Ryan Newman, $2,202,642.10,
David Reutimann, $2,128,893. 11, Joey
Logano, $2,093,828. 12, Kasey Kahne,
$2,051,714. 13, Greg Biffle, $2,029,634. 14,
Mark Martin, $1,995,058,. 15, Kurt Busch,
$1,983,109. 16, Clint Bowyer, $1,981,534.17,
Juan Pablo Montoya, $1,908,718..18, Martin
Truex Jr., $1,895,639. 19, Reed Sorenson,
S 683 382 20 ,J Ai menaiOr.er 'i. 86 81.

TRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Placed RHP Rafael
Betancourt on the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP
Tony Sipp from Columbus (IL). Released OF
David .Dellucci.
National League
CIICINNATI REDS-Ac:rvated RHP Ea.n-
son Voiquez from tne 15-day DL Opiioned RHP


FEDERER
Continued from Page BI

"You're aware ofit," Fed-
erer said. "Definitely
changes it up, if I were to
make the final. But we're not
there yet, so honestly it hasn't
changed a whole lot for me."
Federer now tries to reach
the semifinals at a 20th
Grand Slam event in a row,
which would extend his own
record, when he meets 11th-
seeded Gael Monfils of
France, a 6-4, 6-2, 6-3 winner
over No. 6 Andy Roddick, the
last American man in the
tournament
Federer is 4-0 against Mon-
fils, including a victory in the
French Open semifinals a
year ago. Monfils dominated,
Roddick, even out-acing him
17-4, and Roddick began
complaining in the second
set that it was too dark to see.
"Don't tell me what's OK
and what's not," the 2003 U.S.
Open champion snapped at
chair umpire Enric Molina.
"You're not the one playing."
It was the day's last match
on Court Suzanne Lenglen,
and the start was delayed by
No. 5Jelena Jankovic's loss to
the 41st-ranked Sorana
Cirstea of Romania 3-6,6-0,9-
7, which lasted 2 hours, 44
minutes.
"It wasn't easy at the end,"
said Cirstea, two points from
defeat when Jankovic served
for the match at 5-4, 30-love in


For the record

SFlorida LOTTERY


..- CASH 3 (early)

CASH 3 (late)
1-8-4
PLAY 4 (early)
2-4-4-0
flordaLottey PLAY 4 (late)
Here are the winning 1-2-3-5
numbers selected FANTASY 5
Monday in the 10 - 11 - 13 - 18 - 19
Florida Lottery:


--On the AIRWAVES==-

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
6:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NASCAR Now (Live) (CC)
BASEBALL
6:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Marlins Live! (Live);,(SUN) Rays Live!
(Live)
7 p.m. (FSNFL) MLB Baseball Milwaukee Brewers at
Florida Marlins. From Land Shark Stadium in Miami. (Live);
(SUN) MLB Baseball Kansas City Royals at Tampa Bay Rays.
From Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Fla. (Live); (WGN)
MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Atlanta Braves. From Turner
Field in Atlanta. (Live),(CC)
10 p.m. (ESPN) Baseball Tonight (Live) (CC)
Midnight (ESPN) Baseball Tonight (Live) (CC)
FOOTBALL
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) College Football Live (Live) (CC)
4 p.m. (ESPN) NFL Live (Live) (CC)
GOLF
6 p.m. (GOLF) Golf Central (Live)
HOCKEY
7:30 p.m. (VERSUS) Hockey Central Analysis of players
and teams; interviews with players and coaches; highlights.
With Bill Patrick, Keith Jones and Brian Engblom. (Live)
8 p.m. (VERSUS) NHL Hockey Stanley Cup Final Game 3
- Detroit Red Wings at Pittsburgh Penguins. From the Mellon
Arena in Pittsburgh..(Live)
11 p.m. (VERSUS) Hockey Central Analysis of players and
teams; interviews with players and coaches; highlights. With
Bill Patrick, Keith Johes and Brian Engblom. (Live)
SOFTBALL
8 p.m. (ESPN2) College Softball NCAA World Series Cham-
pionship Game 2 - Teams TBA. From Oklahoma City. (Live)
(CC)
TENNIS
Noon (ESPN2) Tennis French Open - Men's and Women's
Quarterfinals. From Roland Garros Stadium in Paris. (Live)
(CC)


Jared Burton to Louisville (IL).
I LOS ANGELES DODGERS-Activated RHP
Hiroki Kuroda from the 15-day DL. Optioned C
A.J. Ellis to Albuquerque (PCL).
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS-Announced
RHP Kelvin Pichardo came.off the suspended
list. Designated LHP Pat Misch for assignment.
Eastern League
REAPING P-IiLLIES-Ann:.ur,,:e3 RHP KylVe
Drabek has been called up from Clearwater
(FSL).
TRENTON THUNDER-Assigned OF Seth
Furier.berry i.:. Siatel.-' lard it rP)
Southern League
CAROLINA ,MuDCATS-A-dag IN FYndqr
Aionzo !iroT, Saraxoa (FSLI
Midwest League
QUAD CITIES RIVER BANDITS-Trarn.
ferried AHP Deryvk Hooker io evended spring
t-3ining
American Association
EL PASO DIABLOS-Reiea-.ed RHP Baton
Srno
FORT WORTH CATS-Signed RHP Tyler
Pearson and C Adam Miller. Released RHP
Kelly Casares.


GRAND, PRAIRIE AIRHOGS-Acquired
RHP John Wesley from Laredo (United) for a
player to be named. Released LHP Justin Gar-
cia.
SIOUX FALLS CANARIES-Signed RHP'
Ryan Sheldon.
Can-Am League
QUEBEC CAPITALES-Released RHP
Deibis Gomez and INF Mark Charrette.
United League
RIO GRANDE VALLEY WHITEWINGS-
Signed OF Omar Rosario, 3B Joaquin Ro-
,r;.Quez 2B Arnioniu Aru.- RHP. Juan Trinidad,
LHP Tirr. Karkw1iIo- LHP TLa Neal and RHP
S..Siana Hii
SAIl ANGELO COLTS-Signerd RHP Matt
Duff
FOOTBALL
National Football League
DETROIT LIONJS-Released OT George
Fcsrer S.gned OT Jon Jar.irr,
JACKSONVILLE JAGiJARS-Named Brian
Simmonr. and jert Goocu.:ho ie team's player
personnel staff, Chris Driggers pro scout, Chris
Prescott southwest regional scout and Jason
DesJarlais midwest regional scout.


Assocoated PreS.
Andy Roddick serves to France's Gael Monfils during their
fourth-round match at the French Open tennis tournament.


the third set "I saw she was
tired, also. So I knew it was
also a little bit mental: Who is
going to stay stronger?"
Elsewhere, 2002 champion
Serena Williams beat No. 24
Aleksandra Wozniak of
Canada 6-1, 6-2; No. 7 Svet-
lana Kuznetsova defeated
No. 12 Agnieszka Radwanska
of Poland 6-4,1-6,6-1; and No.
30 Samantha Stosur beat Vir-
ginie Razzano of France 6-1,
6-2.
"This," Williams said, "is
when everything counts."
No one knows that better
than Federer, whose 13 major
championships are one shy
of Pete Sampras' record. With
Nadal, Roddick and No. 4
Novak Djokovic all gone,
Federer is the only man left
with a Grand Slam title.
"For a lot of players," Fed-
erer said,-"I think it must be
quite a big opportunity, and
their heads must be spinning
right now."


The other matchup on his
half of the draw is No. 5 Juan
Martin del Potro of Argentina
against No. 16 Tommy Ro-
bredo of Spain - two men
who are a combined 0-6 in
Grand Slam quarterfinals.
Del Potro beat No. 9 Jo-Wil-
fried Tsonga of France 6-1,6-
7 (5), 6-1, 6-4, and Robredo
eliminated No. 29 Philipp
Kohlschreiber of Germany 6-
4,5-7,7-6 (4), 6-2.
"Expectations? Everyone
has expectations, even my-
self," Robredo said.
There are two ways to look
at what Nadal's loss means
for Federer., A potential ob-
stacle is out of the way. And
now Federer is expected to
win the title, which could be a
burden.
Consider: Dating to 2005,
Federer is 0-4 against Nadal
at the French Open, 27-0
against everyone else.
% "It kicks the door open for
Roger, but suddenly: 'Yeah,


KANSAS CITY CHIEFS-Named Joel Col-
lier assistant general manager; Chris Caminiti
manager of football operations and Dom Green
and Ryan Kessenich area scouts.
MIAMI DOLPHINS-Released WR Todd
Lowber.
NEW YORK JETS-Waived FB Brannan
Southerland.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES-Named Brian
Stewart special assistant to the defense.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
BUFFALO SABRES-Signed F Paul Byron
to a three-year contract.
MONTREAL CANADIENS-Named Jacque
Martin coach.
NEW JERSEY DEVILS-Re-signed LW
Pierre-Luc Letourneau-Leblond.
OTTAWA SENATORS-Signed F Ryan Keller
to a one-year contract.
International Hockey League
KALAMAZOO WINGS-Announced the
team is withdrawing from the IHL.
ECHL
ELMIRA JACKALS-Promoted senior sales
executive Donald Lewis to assistant general
manager.
COLLEGE
ALCORN STATE-Named Brenda T. Square
interim athletics director.
ARKANSAS-Suspended G Marcus Britt in-
definitely from all basketball team activities for a
violation of team rules.
DUKE-Named Trisha Stafford-Odom
women's assistant basketball coach.
. LONG BEACH STATE-Announced men's
volleyball coach Alan Knipe will coach the USA
volleyball team through 2012. Named Andy
Read interim men's volleyball coach.
LOYOLA, MD.-Named ' Sarra Moller
women's assistant soccer coach and Elise Paul-
son assistant director of academic affairs for
varsity student-athletes/compliance coordina-
tor.
QUEENS, N.Y-Named Tom Sowinski base-
ball coach.
TOLEDO-Named Abbey Szlanfucht
women's assistant volleyball coach.
UNC WILMINGTON-Announced the resig-
nation of men's assistant basketball coach Joe
Redmond.
WRIGHT STATE-Named Andy Riesenberg
women's assistant volleyball coach.

GOLF
World Golf Ranking
Through May 31
1.Tiger Woods USA 9.18
2. Phil Mickelson USA 8.27
3. Paul Casey Eng 7.15
4. Sergio Garcia Esp 6.53
5. Geoff Ogilvy Aus 6.09
6. Henrik-Stenson Swe 6.06
7. Kenny Perry USA 5.75
8. Steve Stricker USA 5.65
9.Vijay Singh Fji 5.23
10. Padraig Harrington Irl 5.07
11. Camilo Villegas , Col 4.82
12. Robert Karlsson Swe 4.49
13.Sean O'Hair USA 4.47
14. JimFuryk USA 4.41
15. Anthony Kim USA 3.90
16. Ian Poulter Eng 3.81
17. Rory Mcllroy NIr 3.80
18. Ernie Els SAf 3.73
,19. Zach Johnson USA 3.73
20. Lee Westwood Eng 3.68
21. Luke Donald Eng 3.39
22. Martin Kaymer Ger 3.37
23. Ross Fisher ' Eng 3.33
24. Alvaro Quiros Esp 3.32
25. Mike Weir Can 3.31
26. Angel Cabrera Arg 3.30
27. Tim Clark . SAf 3.29
28. Relief Goosen SAf 3.26
29. Stewart Cink USA 3.20
30. Rory Sabbatini SAf 3.16
31.Ben Curtis USA 3.13
32. Justin Leonard USA 3.10
33. NickWatney ' USA 3.00
34. Jeev Milkha Singh Ind 2.80
35. Shingo Katayama Jpn 2.80
36. Soren Kjeldsen Den 2.78
37. Robert Allenby Aus 2.78
38. Miguel A Jimenez Esp 2.68
39. K.J. Choi Kor 2.65
40. Justin Rose Eng 2.63
41.Adam Scott Aus 2.62
42.Trevor Immelman SAf 2.55
43. Dustin Johnson - USA 2.50
44. Oliver Wilson Eng 2.41
45. Chad Campbell USA 2.41
46. Hunter Mahan USA 2.33


step up.' Now the pressure's
real ly on," three-time French
Open champion Mats Wilan-
der said. "The pressure be-
fore was to just give Nadal a.
good match. Now, it's like;
'Hey, listen, if you can't win it
now, then you're definitely
not considered the greatest
player of all time - until you
do.'"
Asked about Nadal, Fed-
erer joked: "Um, he didn't re-
tire, right?"
"My dream scenario is to
beat Rafa here in the finals,"
Federer continued, "but I've
got to concentrate on my part
of the draw and make sure I
come through like today."
Good as he was at the start
against Haas - Federer won
the first 24 points on his serve
-there were moments when
his signature forehand let
him down. Federer missed
two in a row to fall behind in
the opening tiebreaker
When Haas took the sec-
ond set, too, the prospect of
the No. 2-seeded Federer fol-
lowing No. 1 Nadal on the
way out was a distinct possi-
bility. Then came the third-
set point both Federer and
Haas considered pivotal:
With Federer serving at 3-4,
30-40 - five points from los-
ing - he ran around his
backhand side for an inside-
out forehand winner that
landed right near a line.
"We both knew there was a
chance for me to finish him
off," Haas said. 'Justgot to tip
your hat and say, 'That's why
he's Roger Federer."'


What in the world is
going on at my
alma mater, Citrus
High School? Have they re-
ally hired one of those
Roland boys as head coach
of the football team? Those
Rolands from Dunnellon
have been dealing misery
by scoring baskets,
striking out batters
and scoring touch-
downs against the
Black and Gold for
many years and
now they have one
leading the Hurri-
cane football team?
Actually, Randy Do
Roland is a great
hire for Citrus. And John
there is some corn- ON FOO
mon ground for the
new coach between Dun-
nellon and Citrus even
though they are long-time
rivals. Randy's dad, Lawton,
who along with his brothers
were all outstanding ath-
letes at Dunnellon High
School, taught and coached
at Inverness Middle School
for several years and Randy
actually attended school at
Citrus High School before
he transferred to Dunnellon
his sophomore year where
he too was a multi-sport
standout for the Tigers for
three years.
I had the privilege of
coaching young Randy dur-
ing his senior youth league
baseball days. He was a
tough competitor who never
gave up and from what I
saw recently at Sparr that
tenacity will carry over into
his coaching career.
What Hurricane fans and
parents witnessed was
David nearly felling Go-
liath. The 'Canes took the
field with about half the
number of players as the
powerful North Marion
Colts, (good thing each
team can only field 11 at a
time), but those smaller,
slower and heavily outnum-
bered 'Canes gave the Colts
all they could handle for
two quarters of football on
the Colts home turf. Yes,
there is still a place for dis-
cipline and toughness on
the gridiron and the size of
a man's body often betrays


BRYANT
Continued from Page B1

and I've been fortunate to be
here for six times now. It's
been very, very luck~'".
Like O'Neal, Lakers coach
Phil Jackson also departed
after the 2003-04 season, and
later wrote a book in which he
called Bryant. uncoachablee.".
Jackson then returned after
taking a season off and has
had a seamless relationship
with Bryant ever since.
But there have been big
bumps in the road.
Bryant implored the Lak-
ers to surround him with bet-'
ter players in the summer of
2007, then demanded a trade.
The team responded by
adding Andrew Bynum and
Pau Gasol, and Los Angeles
reached the finals last year
for the first time since 2004.
Biyant also won his first
league MVP award a year ago.
Jackson initially noticed a
change in Bryant's outlook
two years ago.
"He ended up just racing
away with the scoring cham-
pionship on an incredible
run of about 15 games in a
row," the coach recalled.
"When we came back the
next year we just said we
' don't want that type of ball to
happen again. We want more
inclusiveness. There was a
whole issue about us getting
better talent around him and
that's happened over the last
two years and here we are."
Bryant often talks about his
love for his teammates and
the ways in which he's coun-
seled them on improving
their games. Derek Fisher's


the size and strength of the
heart that is housed within
that body.
Coach Roland will be the
first to tell you that his team
has a long journey ahead
and it won't be without set-
backs. He would also say
that it is not a good sign to
celebrate a loss.
But even the tough-
est critic would
have to be im-
pressed with the
way the Hurricanes
played against
North Marion. The
hard licks and spir-
ited play took me
ug. back to a time and
ston place when football
ITBALL was often a survival
of the fittest: The
team that was better condi-
tioned, more disciplined
and mentally tougher was
usually the team that came
out on top. Those qualities
are still important, but
make no mistake about it,
when you have a team full
of athletes who can run 40
yards in less than five sec-
onds you have a definite
competitive edge: No mat-
ter what their attitudes are.
Citrus is not blessed with
that kind of team this year.
Randy Roland is a throw-
back from an era that
passed us by. An era when
"yes sir, yes ma'am" and
"no sir, no ma'am" was how
a student-athlete answered
his coaches, parents and
teachers. Part of being dis-
ciplined is.being a good stu-
dent, a good citizen and
representing your school
and community in a man-
ner that will make them
proud. Coach Roland will
make sure his players are
in tune with those solid val-
ues that we used to hold
dear.
I hope the parents and
community members will
get behind this young marl
in his effort to restore CHS
football to respectability:
Off the field as well as on.


DougJohnston is a
former sports reporter for
the Riverland News.


return last season clearly
benefited Bryant on and off
the court. They were team-
mates on the Lakers from
1996-04 before Fisher left for
three years.
"He's continued to recog-
nize that in order for him to
accomplish some of his indi-
vidual goals, the team goals
have to match or'exceed his
own goals," Fisher said. "That
means other guys around him
have to perform at a high
level. Things he can share
with them, he knows how im-
portant that is,-and: how well
we take it when he does. He's
done a great job at it the last
couple of years.',
And when his teammates
struggle, well, Bryant can al-
ways just take, over games
himself. He did so in the
Western Conference finals
opener against Denver, scor-
ing 40 points and making six
free throws in the final 30 sec-
onds to cinch the victory after
the Lakers trailed most of the
game.
"He's just gotten more com-
fortable with where he is in
terms of what he's capable of
doing on the floor and knows
he can always come back to
that," Fisher said.
After losing the 2004 finals,
the Lakers didn't make the
playoffs the following season.
They failed to gbt out of the
first round in 2006 or '07, in-
creasing Bryant's feelings of
frustration and impatience.
"It's been a long haul to get
back here for all of us," he
said. "I certainly appreciate it
even more. Once you have
that celebration and that feel-
ing of winning, of accom-
plishment, you want to have it
again."


GUARD
Continued from Page B1,

ston from Houston largely saved
the Magic's season, allowing the
rotation to remain the same and
Anthony Johnson to continue to
provide solid play as Alston's
backup.
The formula was enough to win
only the franchise's second East-


ern Conference championship,
knocking off the defending cham-
pion Boston Celtics and elimi-
nating MVP LeBron James and
the Cleveland Cavaliers.
Van Gundy said disrupting that
chemistry would be a concern.
"You always worry about that,"
Van Gundy said. "But that's just
the decision that I'll have to
make after a couple of days and
he's practicing. ... But to me, four
months is a long time to be out to


have two practices and play in
the NBA finals."
Nelson, has been lauded by
players and coaches during the
playoffs for his leadership. He
has been sitting between the
coaching staff and players on the
Magic bench, offering pointers
during timeouts and acting like
"a fifth or sixth assistant coach,"
Smith said.
But Smith worried from the be-
ginning that Nelson would feel


excluded. The two met before the
playoffs to make sure Nelson
wasn't tempted to rush back
early
"I just told him, 'Don't fall prey
to the trap,"' Smith said. "The
trap is, you want your team to do
well, but you don't want them to
do too well because you feel like
you're not needed or missed."
Teammates say they would
welcome his return.
Dwight Howard, one of Nel-


son's closest friends, said Nelson
is a "fearless" player who always
wants to do what's best for the
team. But even Howard said Nel-
son's comeback might be taking
too much of a chance.
"I just want him healthy,"
Howard said. "He doesn't have to
play if he doesn't feel up to it. I'd
rather see him healthy more than
anything because his career in
the long run is more important.
This is just one series."


Citrus coach



throwback to



different era


Onus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


SPORTS


B4 2 2009


)U







C.,r,,s ou,.,ry I( ) Hnntr O ~i USA, UE2 09B


SECOND ANNUAL CHRONICLE AWARDS BANQUET








Photos by Brian LaPeter * Chronicle
























the 9-pound weight class, wa
Citrus wrestler Craig Barker, a state champion in thel
named the eChhronicleis Male eLecanto's Summ
Cits coach Michelle Connor, the Chroncle's female coach of the y Duper a five-sporar star, as named the Chronis Female Athleteathlete McKenzie Brisson.






, - : p , ,ifl


-P>


























C oh sf Meni Brisson,


Citrus High S -- hool-J"--"15
Player Award by Betty Bleakley.


Lecanto's Nick is presented the Will BeakeyMostaluable Male Player Award
by Bob Bieakley, right, and Chronicle Sports Editor John Coscla.


TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2oog B5


SPORTS


C FL CRNICa











E Page B6 - TUESDAY, i-:.%'i 2, 2009

ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


otlight on
PEOPLE

Lautner becomes
werewolf
LOS ANGELES -
"Twilight" fans hungry
for a sneak peek at the
next in-
stallment
are get-
ting a
good one:
The wolf.
During
an exclu-
sive pre-
Taylor miere of
Lautner the "New
Moon"'
trailer at the MTV Movie
Awards, fans saw Taylor
Lautner's teen werewolf
Jake transform instantly
into a giant, menacing ca-
nine.
Lautner had to pack on
some muscle for his role
in the second install-
ment, and it showed
when he appeared shirt-
less to save Kristen Stew-
art's Bella from a
threatening vampire in
the clip.

Davis speaks to
college grads
LEWISTON, Maine -
Actress Geena Davis says
it's critical that young
people
Geena uatsee morin
women in
movies
and TV






five speakers at Bates'Col-






for best supporting ac-
lege grad-
Geena uates in
Davis Lewiston,
Maine,
Davis says that "society
can only l benefit if
women ar aat the table."
The "Thelma and
Louise" star was one of
five speakers at Bates'r
commencement cere-
mony. She won an Oscar.blem-
for best supporting ac-
tress in the 988 movie,
sThe Accidental Tourist.

Ivey to portray
Aders' life anders. The
NEW YORK-Ann
Landers will be dispens-
ing advice off:Broadway
this fall.
Judith Ivey will portray
the legendary problem-
solving columnist in "The
Lady With All the An-
swers," David Rambo's

e musical "VanititersThe
one-woman show begins
performances OctJuly 16 at
tCh Cherry Lane Theatre.
Ivey, a two-time Tonyh
winner, will have adi-busy
summer She is directing
the musical Vanities,ght The-
opening July 16 at off-h
Broadway's Second Stage
Theatre.
The Lady With All the

Neil Diam by B. on
runs the Northlight The-
atre in Skokie, Ill., where
Ivey started in the play
last year. "Lady" had its
world premiernclude in 2005 at
San Diego's Old Globe
Theatre.




Landers died in 2002.
Nill Diamond,
to llay in Boston


BOSTON - Boston's

Fourth ofsJuly celebra-

l Rby Nedl
Diamond,s

Carolinedt
is an an-t






Boston Pops for the tradi-
tional concert and fire-
works spectacular on the
Charles River Esplanade.


That's not far from Fen-
way Park, where fans
sing along with "Sweet
Caroline" during every
game.
About a half-million
people attend the free
show each year.
-From wire reports


'Twilight' tops awards


Vampire tale

lights up MTV

movie honors
DERRICK J. LANG
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES -
he MTV Movie Awards were
a blood bath Sunday night
with "Twilight" taking five
trophies, including best movie.
But it was Sacha Baron Cohen
who gave the show it's trademark
bizarro moment when he landed
upside-down on the lap of Em-
inem, who may or may not have
been deeply offended.
"Twilight," the popular vam-
pire drama starring Robert
Pattinson and Kristen Stew-
art, sucked up golden pop-
corn trophies for best movie,
best fight, best kiss, break-
through male performance
and breakthrough female
performance during Sun-
day's freewheeling and
often-bleeped cere-


mony at the Gibson Amphitheatre
in Universal City, Calif.
"The fans are the ultimate driv-
ing force," Stewart said while ac-
cepting her best female
performance trophy (which she
promptly dropped on the floor,
breaking off a chunk of the
golden popcorn). Awards were
decided by fan votes.
Other winners included "High
School Musical 3: Senior Year"
star Zac Efron for male perform-
ance and his co-star Ashley Tis-
dale for female breakthrough
performance. Miley Cyrus ac-
cepted the best song from a


movie prize for "The Climb" from
"Hannah Montana: The Movie,"
preventing "Twilight" from
sweeping all six nominated cate-
gories.
But that was upstaged by Baron
Cohen, who flew in on a wire,
hanging above the audience.
Dressed as flamboyant character
"Bruno" in a pair of feathery
white wings and his rear end
mostly exposed, the comedian
crashed into an overhead obsta-
cle and was lowered head-first
into the lap of Eminem, his bare
hindquarters in the rapper's face.
Eminem seemed visibly upset
by the encounter. But had the
self-styled homophobic rapper
been punked by Baron Cohen
and MTV or was he in on the
elaborate stunt?
Baron Cohen's publicist,
Matthew Labo\. had no comment
after the show.


'Up' has Latin American inspiration


Venezuela was

model for

film's sceney

Associated Press

NEW YORK - When the
filmmakers at Pixar
watched a documentary
about the Venezuelan rain
forest, they wondered at
first if that place even really
existed on Earth.
Looking for a location to
develop their next animated
feature, they decided to
travel to that magical place.
Not only did they hone their
story there, but they found
another "character" - the
landscape itself, much of
which inspired the film's
dreamlike locations.
"Up" opened Friday with
Venezuela as one of its main
characters, as director Pete
Docter and story supervisor
Ronnie del Carmen told the
AP in a recent interview.
AP: What places that you
visited can we see in the
movie?
DOCTER: We pretty much
focused our trip around the
tepuis (a table-top moun-
tain) in Venezuela and
Brazil ... We went in a heli-
copter to another tepui ...
and then went to the Angel
Falls. We changed it a little
bit in the movie.
AP: How did you decide
to focus on that area?
DOCTER: We were look-
ing for places to put our
characters in and put them
stuck together. We thought a
tropical island ... (But) we
saw a documentary by
Adrian Warren and he came


Associated Press/Disney/Pixar Films
In this image from the film "Up," animated characters Russell, left, and Carl Fredricksen
trek through heavy jungle terrain that Pixar animators say was inspired by the Venezuelan
rainforest.


to Pixar to show us some
other places ... We said, "We
need to go there!" This
place is unique, very spe-
cific, we really needed to
experience what it's like to
put it in the movie.
AP: Seeing those land-
scapes, what did you think?
DEL CARMEN: That was
the most magnificent trip
that most of us would take in
our lifetime. The only thing
that I can compare it to is
that moment in "Jurassic
Park" that the line goes:
"Welcome to the Jurassic
Park." You land there in a
helicopter but you couldn't
put yourself in context with
Roraima. You find yourself
being so small in front of
this magnificent mountain.


It takes your breath away
and you stare at it for a long
time. Is a memorable mo-
ment not only to stand in
front of a tepui, but a tepui
you are about to climb.
AP: How much did the lo-
cation change the story?
DOCTER: We spent three
days drawing, painting, tak-
ing lots of photographs. It
really affected the film both
on the images and the story
... Really, a lot of ideas grew
out of this mysterious rock
shapes that look like people.
That's real and we put it in
the film: that's how we in-
troduced our character
"Dug."
DEL CARMEN: We had
ideas of what we would be
doing but not what they'd be


feeling ... And also how the
rocks looks like, how slip-
pery the road is, how big
things are: (the characters)
can walk, but it's gonna be
hard. We got to know the
characters more and how
they would behave in this
landscape. My feeling is that
the location is also a char-
acter in the movie.
AP: How do you expect
the movie to affect those
places in terms of tourism?
DOCTER: I think, boy!
When people see this ...
When we have a feature of
the documentary on the
DVD they will want to go. I
hope everybody is respect-
ful of the location and don't
ruin them 'cause they are
really beautiful places.


Florida
LOTTERIES.

SO YOU KNOW
* Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

SUNDAY, MAY 31
Fantasy 5:6 - 13 -15 - 22 - 24
5-of-5 2 winners $88,439.12
4-of-5 253 $112.50
3-of-5 7,972 $10
SATURDAY, MAY 30
Powerball: 1 -23 - 42 - 51 - 59
Powerball: 20
Power Play: 5
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 2 $200,000
Lotto: 11-31-34-36-43-49
6-of-6 No winner '
5-of-6 57 $5,548
4-of-6 2,825 $91 '
3-of-6 62,062 $5.50 ,
Fantasy 5: 9 - 13 - 19 - 32 - 34
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 286 $555 "
3-of-5 10,412 $25
FRIDAY, MAY 29
Mega Money: 6 - 9 -18 -19
Mega Ball: 1
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 21 $353.50
3-of-4 MB 60 $271.50
3-of-4 1,663 $29
2-of-4MB 1,550 $21.50:-
2-of-4 37.189 $2
1-of-4 MB 10,923 $3
INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should -
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY=

Today is Tuesday, June 2,
the 153rd day of 2009. There
are 212 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in His-
tory:
On June 2,1953, Queen
Elizabeth II of Britain was
crowned in Westminster
Abbey, 16 months after the
death of her father, King
George VI.
On this date:
In 1886, President Grover
Cleveland married Frances
Folsom in a White House
ceremony.
- In 1897, Mark Twain, 61,
was quoted by the New York
Journal as saying from Lon-
don that "the report of my
death was an exaggeration."
In 1941, Lou Gehrig, base-
ball's "Iron Horse," died in
New York of a degenerative
disease, amyotrophic lateral
sclerosis; he was 37. .
In 1979, Pope John Pauli'li
arrived in his native Poland
on the first visit by a pope to
a Communist country.
In 1986, for the first time,
the public could watch the
proceedings of the U.S. Sen-
ate on television as a six-
week experiment of televised
sessions began.
Ten years ago: South
Africans went to the polls in
their second post-apartheid
election, giving the African
National Congress a decisive
victory; retiring president Nel-
son Mandela was succeeded
by Thabo Mbeki.
Five years ago: Software
engineer Ken Jennings
began his 74-game winning
streak on the syndicated TV
game show "Jeopardy!"
One year ago: Massachu-
setts Sen. Edward M.
Kennedy underwent 3 1/2
hours of risky and delicate
surgery to cut out as much of
his cancerous brain tumor as
possible.
Today's Birthdays: Ac-
tress-singer Sally Kellerman
is 72. Actor Ron Ely is 71.
Actor Stacy Keach is 68.
Composer Marvin Hamlisch
is 65. Movie director Lasse
Hallstrom is 63. Actor Jerry
Mathers is 61. Actor Dennis
Haysbert is 55. Comedian
Dana Carvey is 54. Rapper
B-Real (Cypress Hill) is 39. ,
Actor-comedian Wayne
Brady is 37. Actor Zachary
Quinto is 32. Actress Nikki


Cox is 31. Actor Justin Long
is 31. Rock musician Fabrizio
Moretti (The Strokes) is 29.
Country singer Dan Cahoon
(Marshall Dyllon) is 26.
Thought for Today: 'Truth
is stranger than fiction, but it
is because fiction is obliged&
to stick to possibilities; truth
isn't."-- Mark Twain (1835-
1910).










SSection C - TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009



HEALTH


&


LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* Dr. Thomas
Stringer
/Page C2
n Shalyn
Barker /C3


Testing for teen depression


Doctors hope

to ID those

with disorders
SHANKAR VEDANTAM
The Washington Post
- WASHINGTON
S oon after her sis-
ter committed sui-
cide, Caroline
Downing started '
doing poorly at school.
During math tests she
would freeze up, and she
found her mind wandering
constantly Officials at St.
Andrew's Episcopal
School in Potomac, Md.,
gently suggested that the
high school sophomore get
a mental health screening.
The idea of a psychiatric .
evaluation sent chills ..
down the spine of Caro- '
line's mother, Mathy . .
Milling Downing, who be-
lieved that her younger
daughter, Candace, had .
committed suicide be-
cause of an adverse reac-
tion linked to a psychiatric
drug - the antidepressant
Zoloft. Shortly after Can- Mathy Milling Downing, left, was alarmed
dace's death, the Food and after the suicide of Caroline's sister.
Drug Administration
placed black-box warnings cial and medical burden of emotional pi
on several antidepressants mental disorders in the The therapy
to say they elevated suici- United States. mediate and
dal thinking among some Downing said she pact and tur
children. If Caroline were agreed to have her older Milling Dow
going to get the same kind daughter screened be- about some]
of mental health care as cause the child was obvi- tal health tre
Candace, Downing wanted ously in distress, but she fan of menta
no part of it. told school officials that if ment done r:
Downing's family offers an evaluation led to a pre- "My grade
a powerful case study into scription for medications, almost failin
the pros and cons of new she would refuse to go . honor roll,"
guidelines recommending along. Downing, no
widespread screening of ' The screening, unsur- an interview
adolescents for mental dis- prisingly, found that Caro- ment worked
orders: Last month, the line's emotional problems cause "gettii
U.S. Preventive Services were linked to her sister's out of your h
Task Force, a federal death. After several inten- don't need th
group that makes public sive evaluations that more room f
health recommendations, delved into the girl's men- you need to
said, that all adolescents tal and emotional history, head."
between ages 12 and 18 and that obtained a family The very d
should be screened for history and detailed infor- rierces of th
major.depression. In mation about Candace's illustrate the
Marqi, the Institute of death, Caroline was placed the heart of
Medi ine, which advises in "art therapy," painting ommendatic
Congress on scientific mat- . or making sculptures with ters is not wi
ters, told policy-makers a therapist who simultane- screening is
that e' 'rly screening was ously used the sessions to it is done and
key to reducing the finan- draw out the teenager's ing informant


X rostomia - dry mouth

X erostornia (zero-sto-mia) adequate secretion or use saliv
means dry mouth. This is a substitutes. They also require mor
much neglected syndrome frequent dental prophylaxsis an
with some serious med- fluoride. Dry mouth als
ical implications. This may be a clue to mor
condition is most corn- serious medical disor
only found in older ders such as Sjogren'
women. About one-half syndrome.
of individuals with .-. Mild xerostomia ma
rheumatoid arthritis be accompanied by per
have xerostomia. Radia- ' sistent halitosis (bad
tion, certain medica- breath) or the decrease'
tions and autoimmune I, ability to taste. It may b
disorders a0e associated - caused by breathing
with this prOblem. It is a Dr. Denis Grillo mainly through the
conditionA related to EAR, NOSE mouth, a salivary duc
aging-Pakinson's dis- obstruction or infection
ease and diabetes. & THROAT dehydration or emc
Saliva performs an tional factors.
important protective function in A person who has more than
the mouth. A normal petrsonopro- mild symptoms may complain c
duces about 1 to 2 liters of saliva burning or pain of the tongue o
daily.-Saliva not only washes and mouth. They may also experience
lubricates the mouth but also rem- choking and have difficulty eating
ineralizes the teeth and counter- foods that are dry and hard t
acts bacteria. When people have
dry mouth, they need to stimulate See GRILLO/Page C:


SUSAN BIDDLE/The Washington Post
when a mental health test was suggested for her daughter Caroline, right,


problems.
py had an im-
beneficial im-
ned Mathy
ning, a skeptic
kinds of men-
eatment, into a
1 health treat-
ight.
s went from
.g algebra to
Caroline
*w 20, said in
. The treat-
d, she said, be-
ng all the stuff
ead that you
here gives you
or all the stuff
have in your
Different expe-
e two sisters
e paradox at
screening rec-
ons: What mat-
hether
done, but how
d how screen-
ion gets used.


a
e
d
0
e
s
y
T-
d
e
g
e
;t
n,
0-

n
if
r
e
g
o


2


In the case of her
younger daughter, Down-
ing said, a child psychia-
trist put Candace on Zoloft
after a very brief evalua-
tion because the child was
experiencing anxieties
during tests. When Can-
dace turned 12, the psychi-
atrist upped the dose on
the grounds that it would
help her academically
When Downing expressed
concerns about the drug,
she said the doctor blew
her off: "He said, 'What
are you worried about? It
is safe and effective."'
-One day in January
2004, Candace had just fin-
ished watching a show on
Animal Planet with her fa-
ther and sister. She had
been laughing during the
show. A short while later,
Downing said, Candace
hanged herself in her bed-
room, using a belt from a
bathrobe and a rod on her
four-poster bed.


Candace's treatment,
Downing said, involved a
one-size-fits-all approach
to mental health that sees
medications as a magic
pill. By contrast, she said,
the multiple screenings'
that Caroline received
carefully evaluated the
child as an individual and
homed in on the kind of
therapy that was best for
her.
"Screening a child to
find out what the root of
the problem is can be use-
ful," Downing said. "In the
case of my daughter (Caro-
line), it helped (that) they
found a connection be-
tween her Focusing prob-
lems and the death of her
sister."
The recommendation by
thePreventive Services
Task Force, which advises
primary care physicians
on contentious medical is-
See TEEN/Page C2


Cut sugar damages


Excess sugar causes damage
to human health.. Few im-
. partial health ex-
perts would dispute this
today. How much sugar it
takes to begin causing
damage and how big a
health threat it poses are
critical questions that
need to'be answered.
Unfortunately, we do
not have precise an-
swers .for these ques-
tions yet A great deal of Dr. Ed
research has been done PASS
on sugar's impact on
health. Dr. Richard FOR HI
Johnson summarizes
much of this in his book, "The
Sugar Fix."'He makes it clear that
sugar causes serious damage to
health.
In using the term sugar here, I
mean all commonly used forms of
sugar, including table sugar, corn
syrup, cane syrup, maple syrup,


honey., ructose and others. While
sugars differ in their metabolic
pathways, in excess, all
sugars cause damaging
effects.
What are some of
these effects? They in-
clude displacement of
healthier foods in the
diet by nutritionally
"empty" sugar calories;
obesity problems caused
in part by high intake of
Dodge "empty" calories; high
SION build-up of triglycerides
as excess fructose is con-
EALTH verted to triglycerides
by the liver; and many
damaging inflammatory changes in
the body.
Dr. Johnson notes that excess
fructose is a factor in insulin re-
sistance, which in turn is a cause of
type-2 diabetes. He shows that high
fructose intake also contributes to
See DODGE/Page C3


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY


Breast

cancer

inblacks
A re we screening
black women for
breast cancer early
enough?
For more than a decade,
one of the missions of the
American Cancer Society
has been to lower the dif-
ferences seen in early di-
agnosis and cure rates
between different races
and socio-economic
classes. If current breast
cancer screening recom-
mendations are followed
for black women, more
than 10 percent will al-
ready have advanced dis-
ease at first detection.
This data comes from a
study published in the
May issue of the Journal
of the American College of
Surgeons.
Due to thisfinding, it is
very reasonable to as-
See BENNETT/Page C2









Dr. Sunil Gandhi
CANCER &
BLOOD
DISEASE


Cancer


care gets


personal

L ast weekend, I at-
tended the largest
meeting for oncolo-
gists, which are cancer
specialists. More than
30,000 oncologists from ap-
proximately 125 countries
attended the meeting.
This is an annual event
The cancer field is con-
tinuously changing. New
research comes out con-
tinuously. The researchers
from around the world
present the latest findings
of their research. Since
this is a true international
conference, we learn
about the latest informa-
tion on all different types
of cancer. New advances
and the most up-to-date
and most current findings
are presented.
See GANDHI/Page C2


World-class heart care

just inches from home.

S Undergoing open-heart surgery is a lot less stressful when you don't have to travel far from home.
S. Citrus Memorial Heart Center is located right here on the Nature Coast and we provide the
S same amazing care as big-city hospitals. In fact, since January 2004, more than 1,200 patients
have trusted us for open-heart surgery. It may be because we use the most sophisticated technology,
S di maybe it's because we have some of the most knowledg'eA'btlcardiovascular physicians and staff.
S. . . Whatever the reason, we're going to continue to grow and heal even more hearts.
... -- .For more information, call the Heart Center at 352-344-6416

CITRUS MEMORIAL


S" '


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I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HEALTH & LIFE


PCA3 gene testing for prostate cancer differs from PSA


P rostate cancer detection has
increased in the past two
decades. Most of this has
been driven by prostate-specific
antigen (PSA) measurement PSA
is specific to the prostate gland,
but can be elevated by other non-
cancerous prostate dis-
eases. PSA elevation
often leads to prostate ,.
biopsy and even posi-
tive biopsy does not ac-
curately separate lethal
from latent disease in
many cases.
Using the PSA test to
screen for prostate can-
cer is controversial be- Dr. Th
cause of an ill-defined
survival benefit. Addi- Stri
tionally, it is unclear UROI
that the benefits of TOI
screening outweigh the
risks of follow-up diag-
nostic tests and cancer treat-
ments. The potential for
over-diagnosis may subject-some
men to risk of complications with
overall low risk for prostate can-
cer progression in their lifetime.
Current research is under way
to validate and improve the PSA
test. The National Cancer Insti-
tute (NCI) is currently conducting
the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal,
and Ovarian Cancer Screening
Trial (PLCO) to determine


1
I

L
0


whether certain screening tests
can help reduce the number of
deaths from these cancers. The
PSA test and digital rectal exam
are being evaluated to determine
whether yearly screening to detect
prostate cancer will decrease a
man's chances of being
. one of the 28,000 men
per year to die from
. this disease.
Initial results of the
r PLCO Trial suggests
that many men were di--
agnosed and treated for
cancer-that would not
have been detected in
their lifetime without
)mas F. screening and as a con-
nger sequence were ex-
.OGY posed to potential
MAY complications of treat-
ment without benefit It


is possible that a bene-
fit to early detection may emerge
with longer follow-up in this study.
In contrast, initial results from
a large randomized, controlled
trial of prostate cancer screening,
called the European Randomized
Study of Screening for Prostate
Cancer (ERSPC) found a 20 per-
cent reduction in prostate cancer
deaths associated with PSA test-
ing every four years. As in the
PLCO Trial, many more cancers
were diagnosed in the screening


group than in the control group.
Research is ongoing to improve
the sensitivity and specificity of
the PSA test. This will potentially
allow the patient and physician to
distinguish cancerous from be-
nign conditions as well as latent
from lethal cancers. Methods un-
derstudy include PSA velocity,
PSA density, percentage of free
PSA and alteration of the PSA cut-
off level.
A specific marker for early
prostate cancer detection as well
as one that measured risk for pro-
gression would be extremely valu-
able. Such a test is paramount
before the question of who should
be screened and who should be
treated can be answered.
Researchers are investigating
several other ways to detect
prostate cancer that could be used
alone or in combination with the
PSA test and digital rectal exam.
One candidate to become a spe-
cific marker for early prostate
cancer detection is the prostate
cancer antigen (PCA3) gene. This
gene is over-expressed by more
than 95 percent of all prostate can-
cers tested.
PCA3 expression, which is 60- to
100-fold greater in cancers than in
benign prostate tissues, gives the-
gene a cancer specificity lacking
with, PSA. At the cellular level,


PCA3 determination can separate
benign from malignant prostate
cells with an accuracy approach-
ing 100 percent PCA3 is the most
specific prostate cancer gene
identified to date.
The PCA3 test requires collec-
tion of the first 20 to 30 cubic cen-
timeters of voided urine after a
digital rectal exam. The first gen-
eration test initially provided
qualitative (positive or negative)
results only The current second
generation product provides a
quantitative result, controlling for
the number of prostatic epithelial
cells in the urine.
PCA3 scores, as opposed to
serum PSA levels, do not increase
with increasing prostate volume.
Serum PSA is an excellent marker
of prostate volume, whereas PCA3
is not. The concentration of PSA
in BPH (benign) cells is several
times higher than in prostate can-
cer cells. With PCA3 the opposite
is true: Prostate cancer cells ex-
press 60 to 100 times more PCA3
than benign prostate cells.
Along with direct trauma (e.g.
biopsy and cystoscopy), prostatitis
is the most common cause of sud-
den elevation in PSA levels. Al-
though data is limited, urinary
levels of PCA3 gene seem unaf-
fected by acute or chronic inflam-
mation of the prostate. Thus, at an


early stage of clinical evaluation,
the cancer specificity of the PCA3
gene seems to be maintained in
the face of the two major causes of
non-cancerous PSA elevation,
namely BPH and prostatitis.
Additionally, higher PCA3
scores suggest more pathologi-
cally significant cancers and may
potentially be an effective tool for
determining recommendations
for treatment vs. active surveil-
lance for prostate cancer.
A marker specific for early
prostate cancer will fill an impor-
tant void. PCA3 gene testing may
particularly help in patients with
elevated PSA values with negative
biopsies; in patients found to have
prostate cancer with normal
PSAs; in patients with PSA eleva-
tion associated with prostatitis;
and in patients undergoing sur-
veillance for low volume prostate
cancer. Further testing is neces-
sary to fully define the application
and value of PCA3 gene testing.

Thomas E Stringer, M'D., FACS,
is president of Citrus Urology
Associates, president of the
Southeast Section ofAUA Inc.,
and a clinical professor in the
Division of Urology at the
University of Florida,
Gainesville.


GANDHI
Continued from Page C1

This year, many new excit-
ing findings are coming out It
is obvious that many new ad-
vances are due to the new
and ever-evolving field of ge-
netics and cancer.
The main concept of this
conference is the new and
evolving field of personalized
cancer care. We are increas-
ingly deciding the patient's
treatment depending on the
patient's individual cancer.
Everyone must realize that
every cancer is different
Even in the same kind of can-
cer, there are many different
variables. This makes every
cancer unique and different
from another cancer
With the help of genetics
and cellular biology, we can
diagnose difficult cases bet-
ter and 'more accurately.
Newer markers help us bet-
ter define the use of proper
chemotherapy drugs in cer-
tain cancers. More research
is being done to genetically
decide which drug to use in a
particular case. ,This still
needs to be refined and could
require some more tweaking
before it can be widely used.
Cancer begins with the



GRILLO
Continued from Page C1

chew. Other symptoms in-
clude thirst, difficulty with
speech, oral cavity changes
such as a furrowed tongue
and mouth ulcers, dry
cracked lips and corners of
the mouth, fungal infections
and the inability to retain
dentures. People may also
complain of "eye irritation,'
itch, burning or fatigue.
Medications such as di-
uretics, antihistamines, anti-
depressives, anti-hyper-
tensives and decongestants,
among others, can all cause
dry mouth. Smoking and the
use of alcohol-based mouth-
washes can aggravate this
problem.
Avisitto your ear, nose and
throat doctor. is the first step


modification of a single cell
- and can be caused by ex-
ternal, genetic or hereditary
factors, or a combination of
these. Now with advances in
the biology of cancer, many
different clinically significant
cancer markers make it pos-
sible to.distinguish individu-
alized characteristics of each
patient's cancer
Overall, 4,000 different re-
search works are going to be
presented this year Some re-
search in colon cancer, par-
ticular kinds of breast cancer,
lymphoma and lung cancer is
going to be a real break-
through. Much of this re-
search will change the
practice of oncology.
In the next few weeks, I
will report important indi-
vidual cancer advances. It is
not possible to report all new.
advances, so if any reader is
interested in any particular
type of cancer or if you heard
something on TV or read
somewhere and you want to
know more, please write to
me. I will try to address those
issues.

Dr Sunil Gandhi is a hema-
tologist and oncologist, and
volunteer medical adviser
of the Citrus Unit of the
American Cancer Society.

toward diagnosis and treat-
ment of this condition. Your
doctor will take a detailed
history to determine the un-
derlying cause of the prob-
lem. Diagnostic tests may
include sialometry and a sali-
vary gland biopsy Conserva-
tive treatment may include
moderating or adjusting drug
usage, stopping the use ofcig-
'arettes and alcohol, chewing
sugarless gum, sucking on
tart lozenges, sipping water
frequently, adjusting the hu-
midity in the home or using a
saliva substitute.
Establishing a good oral
hygiene program and using
fluoride . toothpaste and
rinses may also be helpful.

Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO,
is an ear, nose and throat
specialist in Crystal River
Call him at 795-0011.


TEEN
Continued from Page Cl

sues, says that children be-
tween 12 and 18 should be
routinely screened in -doc-
tor's offices. But the task-
force offered an important
caveat:, Screening made
sense only if the children
then had access to the kind
of specialized and individu-
alized care that Caroline
Downing received. The new
guidelines reversed an ear-
lier recommendation by the
same group in 2002 that said
there was insufficient evi-
dence to recommend
screening children for de-
pression.


BENNETT
Continued from Page Cl

sume that we' should be
looking at different screen-
ing guidelines based upon
race for certain cancers. I
believe that black women
may consider earlier breast
cancer screening, possibly
starting around 33 to 35
years of age if this data can
be supported by other stud-
ies looking at this subject It
is at this age that the inci-
dence of breast cancer in
black patients equals that
for white women at 40 years
of age, and that is the sug-
gested age to start screening
white women.


The typical screen re-
quires a paper-and-pencil or
computer test that takes
about 10 to 12 minutes for a
child to complete. The test
raises red flags in about 25
percent to 30 percent of the
children, said Laurie Flynn,
national executive director
of. TeenScreen, a mental
health screening program
affiliated with Columbia
University. Those children
are then given a more com-
prehensive, 20-minute eval-.
uation to make sure they
understood the questions
correctly.
About 16 percent to 17
percent of kids out of the
40,000 that TeenScreen eval-
uated last year were re-
ferred for a formal


In this study, researchers
at the University of Miami
identified 63,472 breast can-
cer patients between 1998
and 2002 on analysis of ,a
Florida cancer registry and:
inpatient hospital data. Of
these, 90.5 percent were
white and 7.6 percent were
black
Black patients presented
at a younger age and with
more advanced disease on
first diagnosis. The re-
searchers found that 10.5
percent presented with
breast cancer before the age
of 40 years, and 22.4 percent
before age 45 years. Black
patients were also less likely
to receive surgery, because
the cancer was so advanced
in many cases at the time of


psychological evaluation.
Between half and three-
quarters of the families typ-
ically follow up on the
recommendation: Teen-
Screen is not involved in
making formal diagnoses of
mental health disorders or
recommending particular
kinds of treatment
Steven Hyman, Harvard
University's provost, who is
also a psychiatrist and for-
mer director of the National
Institute of Mental Health,
said he sided with the rec-
ommendations of the Pre-
ventive Services Task Force
in that he thought that men-,
tal health screening for chil-
dren should be limited to
depression, and limited to
adolescents.


diagnosis.
Based upon this study,
black women have a 1.72-
fold increased risk of death
from breast cancer when
compared to white women;
Approximately.two-thirds of
this excess risk is attributa-
ble to an advanced stage at
diagnosis, which leads to a
higher death risk Low so-
cioeconomic status was also
an independent predictor of
worse prognosis after con-
trolling for other illness and
medical problems, and the
availability of the patients to'
pursue treatment Women of
low socioeconomic status
presented with larger tu-
mors on initial diagnosis and
were less likely to receive
surgery


Like all public health
measures, he said, screening
made sense only for condi-
tions that were widespread,
where tests were accurate,
where treatments available,
where the costs of adminis-
tration were not prohibitive
and where the screening
techniques did not lead to
large numbers of normal
children getting misdiag-
nosed and large numbers of
children with real disorders
getting missed.
'"A good reason to screen
for depression is it can be a
brief, discreet and relatively
private interaction," Hyman
said. "Depression meets the
public health challenge that
makes screening worth-
while.".


The issue of how best to
initiate earlier screening
will likely be the topic of fu-
ture studies. Based upon the
current literature, I would
suggest earlier, screening
mammography and the pos-
sible use of ultrasound in
black women, especially if
there is a family history of
breast cancer.

Dr C. Joseph Bennett is
a board-certified radiation
oncologist, past president
of the Citrus County Unit
of the American Cancer
Society and a member of
the Board ofDirectors and
Executive Committee of
the Florida Division of tilhe
American Cancer Society.


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Did you know that Munroe surgeons are
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(',I'o~rrc CC,,NI Y (PT j (mx-wv'trcr ET iETPDY E2 09


New insomnia medication


s I heard that a new under-the-
* tongue medication was approved
* for insomnia. What can you tell
me a out it?
A: The FDA recently ap-
proved Edular sublingual,
(under the tongue) tablets for
the short-term treatment of in-
somnia characterized by diffi- -.
culties in falling asleep. Edular i
contains the active ingredient t K
zolpidem, which has been avail-
able as an oral tablet for many |
years in products like Ambien
or Ambien CR and is also avail- Richard I
able as a generic product. In ad- ASK
edition Zolpimist, an oral spray PHARMV
product which contains zolpi-
dem, is available.
The usual adult dose of Edular is a 10-
milligram tablet placed under the tongue
once a day immediately before bedtime.
The tablet should not be swallowed or
taken with water and should not be taken
with or immediately after a meal. A lower
5-milligram dose is recommended for eld-
erly or debilitated patients and in patients
with liver function problems or those tak-
ing central nervous system depressants.
This new sublingual tablet provides for fast
and effective absorption from the oral mu-
cosa where the tablet disintegrates.
Zolpidem is classified as a sedative-hyp-
notic drug and is used for the short-term
treatment of insomnia. It is not chemically
related to barbiturates like Phenobarbital
or the benzodiazepine drugs used for sleep
like Dalmane (flurazepam), Restoril
(temazepam), or Halcion (triazolam). Ex-
actly how zolpidem induces sleep is not ex-
actly known, but it appears to interact
(bind) with certain receptors in the brain
believed to be responsible for sedation and


sleep.
Zolpidem has been shown to reduce the
time to fall asleep, decrease the number of
awakenings, and to increase
total sleep time. The sleep in-
duced by zolpidem seems to be
more natural and causes less se-
dation the next day compared to
some of the other drugs men-
tioned above.
The most common side effects
of zolpidem during short-term
treatment (up to 10 nights) were
drowsiness, dizziness and diar-
Ioffnmann rhea. During longer-term treat-
THE ment (28 to 35 nights), the most
IACIST commonly observed side effects
were dizziness and drugged
feelings. However, many other
side effects can occur. Because it can cause
drowsiness, patients taking zolpidem need
to be cautioned about performing tasks re-
quiring alertness, coordination or physical
dexterity. Alcohol and other CNS depres-
sants should also be avoided when taking,
zolpidem.
Approximately one in three American
adults complain of some type of insomnia
and 20 million Americans suffer from
chronic insomnia. Insomnia is character-
ized by'difficulty in falling asleep, difficulty
staying asleep, or poor quality of sleep,
leading to impairment of next-day func-
tioning. It has been linked to a variety of
health care problems including obesity, di-
abetes, hypertension, heart disease and
depression.

Richard Hoffmann has been a
pharmacist for more than 20 years. Send
questions to him at 1135N. Timucuan
Trail, Inverness FL 34453.


Producing annual dance recital

exciting, exhausting experience


Memorial Day weekend marked my
dance school's 18th annual recitals.
I say "recitals" because there were
three of them in one day. Of the three, I
couldn't tell you which one was my favorite
because they all were great
The first show is for my stu-
dents younger than 6 years old
(and that includes Emmy). This
year, the munchkins were Beach ,
Ballerinas and the set was deco-
rated to match. I love having
them separate from my other stu-
dents because I don't want them
to have to wait backstage during
a really long show. Plus, my older Shalyn
students volunteer to help out. :,S h a
We provide them with a very spe- FULL I
cial Recital Staff tank top (that
you can only get if you volunteer). That way
every mother is out front watching her child
dance - except for me, but my view on the
wing of the stage is pretty good.
After the first show, we broke down the
set and hung a flower, a fall leaf and a
snowflake with the sun that was already
hanging because our next two shows cele-
brated the seasons. I nursed Graham, tried
to guzzle down some water and got ready to
reopen the doors.
The second show went fantastically, de-
spite being the only show that wasn't com-
pletely sold out The crowd was just as loud
as the other two shows. Once again my
teenagers helped all. the younger students
and were so proud of their students. They
really took ownership, carefully pinning in
each hairpiece and tucking in each string
on their ballet slippers.
After the second show, it began to pour.
Patrick grabbed his huge golf umbrella out


I


of the car and began escorting those with-
out umbrellas to their vehicles. When he
was finished his pant legs, shoes and socks
were soaked. But the show must go on,
right?
When the last show began I
placed Graham in his bouncer in
the wing right behind the curtain.
Then, I took a good look around
at my husband in the sound
booth, Mike running the front
door and greeting our customers,
and my mother backstage help-
ing our students through any-
thing they needed at that
Barker moment And then I cued the first
dance. The music began and as
PLATE the lights came up slowly.on our
poihte dancers, Graham quieted
and began to watch the show (as he did al-
most every number during the last show). It
was truly an amazing moment for me.
When the shows were all over, we broke
down the props and the lighting and my
mother cleaned the dressing room. We went
out to dinner and I cried tears of accom-
plishment and exhaustion. Putting on a
recital is very much like putting on a big
wedding.
At dinner, we began to tell little stories
that happened to each of us that day and we
even began to talk about themes for next
year's recitals. It was a wonderful day, and
after I get a little rest, I'll be happy to say
that I cannot wait to do it again.

Shalyn Barker resides with her husband,
Patrick, daughter, Emmy and son,
Graham, in the Beverly Hills area. E-mail
her at citrusamom@yahoo.com.


Patient provides feedback after getting expert advice


f you are a regular Chronicle tests and they were negative. The
reader, you will remember the last visit to the specialist he
question and answer that is to wanted to do a biopsy on the saliva
follow. The neat part gland. I have not de-
about this is this pa- cided on thatyet
tient's initial response I have tried all OTC
to my answer and the remedies, toothpaste,
most recent e-mail I re- sprays etc., ...help some
ceived. , but not taking care of
Once you read what , the problem.
this patient's last re- i.. I have an upper plate
sponse was, you will re- I. l . denture and a partial
alize why I, as a dentist, *~ . - below with 2 crowns all
and any other health Dr. Frank done at the same time...
care provider does ra * It has nowprogressed to
what they do. It meant Vascimini where my remaining
so much to me to see SOUND BITES teeth are decaying rap-
that I was a part of this idly.
patient's solution that I decided to . Any help? I know when I sleep
reprint ti is question. I also want to my mouth is open, . . ,.
thank all of the other health care" -v My answer to the first question:'
providers for being a part of much A. understand exactly what you
the same. are going through. It appears that
The first question: you are doing all the right things in
I am 77 years old. For a while, I search of a solution. Has a fungal
have been bothered by drymouth. infection like candidiasis been
I know this can be an aging prob- ruled out?
lem. It has progressed to the point You mentioned that you get
it has become painful, in that my some relief with some of the prod-
lower lip inside stays inflamed and ucts available. Keep using the ones
the tip of my tongue stays sore. that work There is a spray that, to
I have had all the auto immune my knowledge, is not available


OTC - it is called Theraspray.
Your dentist may have this avail-
able at his or her office, If not, they
may be willing to order some for
you. It is not a prescription so you
cannot get it from the pharmacist
Some patients have had success
with it, while others have found noi,
relief. The other product that
some have found helpful is called
Salese. Salese is a long lasting
lozenge that is formulated to help
with a dry mouth while not pro-
moting decay. Your dentist may
have this as well. If not, it is avail-
able online.
The other issue you mentioned
is the decay associated with your
only remaining teeth. It is very im-
portant, that this get restored as
soon as. possible. The, decay is.
likely on the root surface of the
tooth, an area where decay moves
fast It is also very important that
you see your hygienist every 3
months to keep the bacteria down
in your mouth. Your hygienist
should place a fluoride varnish on
your teeth at each hygiene ap-
pointment to help harden the root
and make it more resistant to
decay. You should also use a pre-.


scription sodium fluoride tooth-
paste and a prescription stannous
fluoride mouth rinse daily. All of
these items should be available
from your dental office or through
prescription at your pharmacist.
In addition to all of this, be sure
not to eat sugar candies. If you like
mints, etc, be sure to use ones that
are sweetened with 100 percent
Xylitol. These are hard to find,
though your dentist 'may have
them. Be sure they are 100 per-
cent Xylitol, there are many prod-
ucts out there that have some
Xylitol in them but are not 100
percent Xylitol. You can also get
100 percent Xylitol sweetened
chewing gum."
I hope this has helped.
The patient's response:
As I am a snowbird, ... I will be
returning north next week, but
your suggestions will begoingback
with me and I will see my dentist
when I get back, and myPC for the
fungus check... that had not been
suggested...
The patient's most recent e-'
mail:
I don't know if you remember
me, Ihad written to you regarding


mydrymouth.
Since I was a snowbird ... I am
back home and saw my dentist
and PC doctor.
My sore mouth was a fungal in-
fection, which was treated and has
healed. This had been.a problem
for at least 2 years.. .it feels good to
be able to eat without the pain... J
had to insist the doctor treat it as
such.
Also visiting my dentist...found
that I had 8 cavities, which are
now filled and have the PreviDent
toothpaste and they ordered the
mouth rinse for me. ...I will prob-
ably always have the dry mouth
but the sprays help with that...
Thanks for the tips ... your rei-
.sponse is now part ofnmy record at
the dentist and I think we, all
learned from your response.,
Have a great day and a better to-
morrow.

Dr. Frank Vascimini is a
Homosassa dentist Send your
questions to 4805 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 or
' e-mail them to him at info@
masterpiecedentalstudio.com.


DODGE
Continued from Page C1

high blood pressure, un-
healthy blood fats, kidney
damage and
other inflamma- Hasc i
tory disorders.
Indeed, sugar worth
may prove to be
the most de- Ye
structive of all
foodstuffs to I enjoy
health. nutri
If this is so, nutr
how. much foods
should we cut
back on sugar I'm a
for the sake of
our health? Al- heal
though there is septua
no clear defini-
tion of how than I v
much sugar in-
take is safe, top had I I
health experts
have carefully eating
analyzed avail- foods 1
able evidence.
Based on this, the -
the World
Health Organi-
zation advises limiting sugar
to 10 percent of total calo-
ries, or about 10 teaspoons a
day for most adults - quite a
drop from the 50 teaspoons a
day consumed by most
Americans.
How can we accomplish
this? I have no magic for-
mula, but first one must be
convinced that cutting down
on sugar is valuable for one's
health. The evidence is
strong that this is true. Then
one must feel capable of cut-
ting down on sugar con-
sumption - not easy for

OUT OF SPACE
* Look for Health Notes
and support group
meetings to return in
future editions of the
Chronicle.


t
A
e

H

1
II

H
9
N
k


anyone with high sugar in-
take, but definitely possible.
I know.
Although I have a sweet
tooth, I gradually cutback on
sugar over the years as I re-
alized its dangers to health.
First, I elimi-
t bee nated soft
been drinks of all
doing? kinds. They are
Sa major source
(S! 'of sugar, and
a. they have no re-
eating deeming health
tious - value. Then I
quit candies
, and, and cut back on
Cakess. pies,
much. doughnuts and
other pastries,
thier as well as ice
renarian cream, sorbets,
enarian cook ies,
vould be muffins, jams
and jellies-all
cept on common
sources of
sugary sugar Pancakes
S IhroUh and waffles can
hrUugh carry a day's
ears. worth of sugar
when covered
with syrup, so I
rarely indulge in them any-

Don't Be Stuck Indoors!
Get Going Again With

OUR TAKE.APART



NO Out-of-PocketCost*
with Medicare & supplement on
scooters or power wheelchairs.
*If you qualify


more.
My purpose in citing all
this is to give an example of
how one person cut down on
sugar intake through the
years.
Has it been worth doing?
Yes! I enjoy eating nutritious
foods, and I'm- a much


w.. .


healthier septuagenarian
than I would be had I kept on
eating sugary foods through
the years.
If I can make such
changes, anybody can. I don't
suggest doing this on a crash
basis, but almost anyone can
do it faster than I did.


Regardless of how. long it
takes, making the decision is
the key factor. As the ad says.
"Just do it" You'll be glad
you did!

Dr Ed Dodge is a retired
physician now living in San


Accepting New OB/GYN Patients"
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Rose Mary Sobel, MD - Board Cerinied OB GYN, FACOG
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Fn s �." M - 4 "'' PM - I 'llrA M I1" N i.52i7408


Fine


.for Fin
A\ Wine Tasting
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i "Suga




SFoI


Wine


ed Minds
c Ind Chinese Auction


Programi spons.oredf bythe



Rot \ ClubN of


tuesday, July 28

6:30 - 9:30 p.m.
mill Woods Count-ry Club
Douglas St., Homosassa
0 includes admission. wine tasting.
assorted cheese and crackers and
initial supply of auction tickets
Tickets or Donations contact
Ken Steidel at 352-503-7355


Benefactors-The Women of Sugarmill Woods
Scholarship Fund I'P imary) and other charities


Antonio, Texas. Visit his
Web site, www .passion
forhealth.info.

EWWW.

LendEars
.com


Participants
sought

for study of
Ziga Hearing Aid
invention.
Free audiology exams and
hearing aid fittings through
2009 Resound research grant.
Free candidate screenings
open to public.
June 1 - 5


700 S.E. 5th Terrace
Crystal River, FL
Call 795-5700


TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 C3


HEALTH & LIFE


trTrorreT a r T /C NrT ( FLJ) ) RNfirT L


H
c









C age C4- TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009



COMMUNITY
' CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Oak Village seeks
board volunteers
The Oak Village nominat-
ing committee is taking re-
sumes for two open,
voluntary positions on the
2009-10 board of directors.
Submit a single, letter-sized
page resume to the Oak Vil-
lage office in person, e-mail
oakvillagemanager@gmail
.com or fax 621-0723 no later
than 4 p.m. Friday.
Interviews will be con-
ducted Monday and Tuesday.
Golf tourney
to benefit HOPE
The inaugural HOPE
Wildlife Golf Tournament will
be Saturday at Pine Ridge
Community Golf and Country
Club, in memory of Harry
Wendler, a retired Miami-
Dade police officer and Pine
Ridge resident who was a
dedicated friend to all ani-
mals and a HOPE supporter.
A shotgun start is at noon
for the scramble-format char-
ity tournament, with check-in
beginning at 11 a.m. Prizes
will be awarded for first, sec-
ond and third places. There
will be contests for longest
drive, closest to the pin and
putting.
The cost per player is $50
for the general public, $35 for
Pine Ridge Community Golf
and Country Club members,
$30 for golfers younger than
1.8 and includes post-golf hot
dogs, hamburgers and pulled
chicken. The deadline for
registration is Thursday.
HOPE receives no funding
from government agencies.
For an entry form or more
information, call HOPE
Wildlife at 628-9464 or
527-3481.
Learn to kayak
through CFCC
Central Florida Community
College Citrus Campus will
'offer two-kayak courses in
June.
Introduction to Kayaking
will meet from 9 a.m. to noon
Thursday and will focus on
the basic skills of kayaking.
The course will meet at
Riversport Kayaks at the
Riverside Resort, 5297 S.
Cherokee Way, Homosassa.
The course fee of $35 in-
cludes all equipment.
Kayaking Fishing Tour will
meet two Saturdays, from 9
to 11 a.m. this Saturday and
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. June
13, also at Riversport
Kayaks. The first session will
provide instruction and the
second session is a four-hour
fishing trip. The $50 fee in-
cludes kayak equipment. Stu-
dents will need to provide
their own fishing gear.
For information or to regis-
ter, call 249-1210. Online reg-
istration can be completed
any time at www.CFCCtrain
ing.com.
Transit Retirees
slate meeting
The next meeting of the
New York City Transit Re-
tirees of Florida, Chapter 9,
Citrus County is at 1 p.m. Fri-
day in the Beverly Hills Com-
munity Building, One Civic
Circle. Anyone retired from
the New York City Transit
System and residing in Citrus
County is invited to attend.
Also, any retirees from the
NYC Transit System, visiting
locally, are welcome. After
the meeting, refreshments
will be served.
For information, call
Clarence Redd, president,
at 527-8418 or Clarisse
D'Adamo, secretary, at
527-2508.
Center plans
Father's Day BBQ
Congregation Beth Sholom
will host its annual Father's
Day Barbecue at 2 p.m. Sun-
day, June 21.
Everyone is invited to


enjoy hamburgers, hot dogs
and all the fixings, and enter-
tainment all for a donation of
$12 per person.
Call 746-5303.


HSCC receives


Pedigree grant

Dogs help member promo movie


Special to the Chronicle
The Humane Society of,
Citrus County received a
much appreciated grant
from the Pedigree Corpora-,
tion. Pedigree is an active
supporter bf pet adoption
and rescue.
The Humane Society of
Citrus County was invited to
the promo for the movie
"Hotel for Dogs." The film
was sponsored by Pedigree.
Anyone interested in,
more information about how
to get involved with HSCC


Bands wow audience


As he Crystal
River High
lL School and
Middle School bands
joined forces' for a
stellar spring concert. .
performance at the
Pirate auditorium
last week
With the leadership
of bandmasters John Ruth Levins
Ash'at Crystal River AROUND THE
High and Mike o M U I
Williams at Crystal ___MUn_ _
River Middle School,
a year of band instruction, music apprecia-
tion and a healthy dose of courage and con-
fidence building was evident throughout
the evening concert. Wild applause from
parents, friends and student fans fueled the
flames of enthusiasm for the
members of the band as they On to ti
performed.
Once again, the popular In- season
cident Report ensemble
brought down the house with fine
its special take on "Franken- f mus
stein" by Edgar Winter, "The of
Conga" by E. Garcia, "Dun't Sugar
Be Blue Mon" by Lalo Davilla,
"Glitsville" and "Sushi Funk" 20:
by Chris Crockarell.
The CRHS Concert Band
performed "Rhapsodie Episode" by
Charles Carter, "Bohemian Rhapsody" by
John Berry and "Symphony No. 1" by
Danile Bukvich, which consisted of a mood
altering movement prologue, a seeds-in-the-
wind movement of intense fury and the 'Ave
Maria" movement reflecting upon our artis-
tic heritage evolving into a prayer The final
movement evoked the sounds of the fire and
storm in a climactic resolution of the three
previous movements ... the bombing of
Dresden in 1945.
The Crystal River Middle School Band se-
lections included "Fleur-de-lis" by Sandy
Feldstein and Larry Clark, a dynamite per-


cussion piece 'A Western Legend" by Sandy
Feldstein and John O'Reilly, the "March of
the Aliens" by Barrie Gott, the "Chorale and,
Invention" with added percussion flavor, by
Feldstein and O'Reilly, and "March Mili-
taire," which was a solid crowd pleaser.
Written by classic composer Franz Schu-
bert, and with arrangements by John
Kinyon, much deserved applause rang out
throughout the hall.
We applaud the efforts of the percussion-
ists who alternate with their assigned band
instruments to add that extra flavor to a
concert selection when needed. Such was
the case with the concert band's "Dance of
the Thunderbolts" by Larry Clark.
With the final selection "Castles and
Dragons" by Todd Stalter, we agreed that we.
had been royally entertained by the com-
bined dedication of the two bands, their su-
perb leaders and a committed
he next support system from the
school leadership staffers,
I of the parents and community
booster friends.


Sar
sic and
rBowl


And now, on to the next sea-
son of the fine art of music and
Sugar Bowl 2010 participation
Jan. 4, 2010.


I fChurch and club groups are
10. asked to support this coura-
geous effort with their time
and financial sponsorship by contacting the
Band Booster leadership: Melissa Small
and Terri Simon, secretaries; Debbie Har-
mon, chaplain; Becky Norman, fundraising;
and Heather Lamb, flag instructor.
Call Holly Elpers, president of the
Friends of the Golden Pirate Band, at 302-
3757 to be of help with the trip.

Ruth Levins participates in a variety pf
projects around the community Let her
know about your group's upcoming
activities by writing to PO. Box 803,
Crystal River, FL 34423.


Stay safe on the


road with AARP


refresher course


Special to the Chronicle
True or false? At an in-
tersection while waiting to
turn left, your wheels
should be turned toward
the left.
Take the AARP Driver
Safety class as a refresher It
could also result in an insur-
ance discount; checkwithyour
insurance carrier.
Course fee is $14, for
AARP members $12.
To register for a class,
call the listed instructor.
For information regarding
future classes, call Charlie
Lucente at 726-0753.
False. Wheels should be
straight If they are turned to
the left and you are hit from
behind, you could be pushed


into oncoming traffic.
Crystal River, Ho-
mosassa area
* June 24 and 25: 9 a.m.
at First United Methodist
Church, 8831 W Bradshaw
Ave., Homosassa. Call
Frank Tobin at 628-3229.
Beverly Hills and
Lecanto
* June 9 and 11: 8:15 a.m.
at Beverly Hills Recreation
Center, 77 Civic Circle. Call
Theresa Williams at
746-9497.
Inverness, Hernando
* June 9 and 10: 9 am. at
Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem Share Club Auditorium.
Corner of Grace and Osceola,
Inverness. Call Don Slough at
3444003.


WPP swim classes delayed

Session to start Thursday


Special to the Chronicle
Due to a large number
of staff attending the Cit-
rus High graduation cere-
monies today, the evening
swim lesson session
scheduled at Whispering
Pines Park Pool will be de-


played. Swim classes will
commence Thursday.
Make-up classes for the
missed day will be Friday
at the regularly scheduled
class time.
For additional informa-
tion, call Whispering Pines
Park Pool at 726-1995.


* Submit Information at least'two weeks before the event. m Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Eqrly submission of timely-.material Is appreciated, but Crysta River; by fax at 563-3280 ore-mail to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


A W.H.A.L.E. of a job


Special to the Chronicle
From left, volunteers Sally Susami and Mary Lee Johnson from the public affairs committee of the Crystal River Woman's Club tackled
the job of packaging hundreds of identification labels for children who ride in car seats or boosters. The identification program is called
the W.H.A.L.E. Check and stands for "We Have A Little Emergency." These packets are provided by the Health Department, and funded
by the Department of Transportation. The ID packets are available at all Health Department locations and Sheriff's offices at no cost. For
more information, call Sue Littnan at the Health Department at 726-1731, ext. 242, or www.citruscountyhealth.org.


and help rescue and place
homeless area, pets j. new
forever homes is,. encour-
aged to call 341-2222.
Representatives from Hu-
mane Society of Citrus
County, with some of the
available adoptable pets, at-
tended, the showing of
"Hotel for Dogs" on Jan.
17 at the Regal Citrus Cine-
mas 6 in Inverness. Karron
Curtis, HSCC, with a puppy
named Demi visits with one
of the ticketholders for the
movie.
Special to the Chronicle


d


I











TUESDAY EVENING JUNE 2 2009 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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BBC World News Nightly Business The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer (N) Magic Moments: The Best of 50's Pop Recording artists from the 1950s Great Performances Eric Clapton and Steve Winwood reunite for a once-
CWEPn) PBS 8 3 3 14 6 'G's9 Report (N) Ba (In Stereo) Nm reunite and perform. (In Stereo) 'G' m rin-a-litetime concert. (In Stereo) 'G' Sm
W-FtJ PBS B 5 5 5 16BBCNews Business Rpt. The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer To Be Announced
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News (N) (In World News- Jeopardyl (N) Wheel of Fortune According to Jim According to Jim Earth 2100 Population growth climate change and resource depletion News (N) (In Nightline (N)
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News CBS Evening Dr. Phil (In Stereo) 'PG' sB NCIS "Cloak" The team must play a The Mentalist "Bloodshot" Patrick Without a Trace Jack and Samantha News Late Show With
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'(GMR IND 2 2 2 2 22 22 'GI' - Excellence James Robison
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) ABC 11 11 11 11 Gibson 'G' im 'G' 9 (N) 'PG' 'PG' m could result in catastrophe. (N) (In Stereo) 'G9' m
IND -'- 12 12 Family Guy '14 I. Family Guy 14 r Frasier "The Frasier 'PG r.: Law & Order Criminal Intent A 'The Foursome" (2006, Comedy) Kevin Dillon, Sir Baruc. Chns Sii i branidrg Sil Srarrir
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FAM 16 16 16 16 County Court Gift Localhealth. Sport om Sports 'PG' County Court
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S~ * "Fool's Gold" (2008) Malthew *** "American Gangster"(2007, Crime Drama) Denzel Washington Russell Crowe. Chiwelel Eliofor A V:, "Rush Hour 3"(2007) Jackie Chan Carter and Lee Co-Ed
(MA]) 3 3 McConaughey. 'PG-13' chauffeur becomes Harlem's most-powerful crime Doss (In StereoYNR'N' battle Chinese gangsters in Pans. 'PG 13' Confidertiai 3
M C -- 42 41 42 42 The Ed Snow Hardball Q Counidown Wiir Keith Olbermann The Racnel Maddow Show Countdown Wir en elh Oltermanri Tre Rachel Maddow Snow
(MiIV ) 97 66 97 97 39 The Hills (In Stereo) 'PG' a Hills Wedding |College Life'14' Paris Hilton's My New BFF'14' Paris Hilton's My New BFF'14' Paris Hilton's My New BFF Bu Paris Hilton's My New BFF B I
MID - 65 44 53 Explorer "Moment of Death"'14' Dog Whisperer 'G' Egypt Unwrapped 'G' Explorer'PG' Explorer (N) 'PG' Egypt Unwrapped 'G'
(iK-l - 28 36 28 28 35 25 Drake & Josh IDrake & Josh iCardy'Y7'Im |iCarldy'Y7'Tm SpongeBob |SpongeBob Home Improve. |Home Improve. George Lopez |George Lopez The Nanny'PG' |The Nanny'PG'
- -XVI44- Tori & Dean: Home - Tori & Dean: Home Tori & Dean: Home Tori & Dean: Home Tori & Dean: Home Tori & Dean: Home
62t * 6 i, - "Constellation"(2005) Billy Dee * * % "My Life"(1993, Drama) Michael Keaton. Nicole Kidman A cancer * * "Always"(1989. Fantasy) Richard Dreyfuss. Holly Hunter A ** * "2010" (1984) Roy Scheider.
i 62 Williams 'PG-13'I victim confronts his illness and his past. (In Stereoj 'PG-13' cm firefighters ghost returns to guide a rookie pilot Iln Stereo) PG's (In Stereo) PG' s
(CIF 31 59 31 31 26 29 Slargale SG-1 (In Siereo)'PG StarTrek Enterprise PG'rc StarTrek Enterpnse PG'oB Star Trek Enterprise PG a ECW (Livel'14 L.V "BloodMonkey"(20071'NR' B
PEED-)122 112 122 122 Unique Whips Pimp My Ride IPass Time Pimp My Ride |Pimp My Ride Drag Race High |Drag Race High Super Bikes' ISuper Bikes' Pimp My Ride Pass Time
PiKE 37 43 37 37 27 36 CSI. Crime Scene Investigation CSI Crime Scene Investigation CSI Crime Scene Investigation Deadliest Wanior (In Slereol Deadliest Warrior (NI (n Stereo) The Ullimae Fighter 14 LV
(SUN] 36 31 36 36 Pleasure Boater Rays Live! (Live) MLB Baseball Kansas City Royals at Tampa Bay Rays. From Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Fla. (Live) Inside the Rays Powerboating. FIGHTZONE Presents
(i 49 23 49 49 16 19 Every-Raymond Friends'PG Seinfeid PG ISeintei PG Family Guy'i1 |Family Guy'14 |Family Guy 14 |Family Guy'14 Tre Onice'PG' The Otie 14' Seinirel PG ISenreid PG
n ** "Dr. Jekylland Mr. Hyde"(1941, Horror) Spencer Tracy, Ingrid **** "It Happened One Night"(1934) Claudette Colbert ClarkGable: ** s "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" (19391 James Stewart. An ideal-
Be 53 30 35 Bergman. A scientist's personality experiments backfire 'G' (DvS) A newspaperman shields a runaway heiress from her father 'NR' istic young man wades into hot political waters 'NR'
-- ) 53 34 53 53 24 26 Cash Cab G' ICash Cab'G' Deadliest Catch 'Deadline" '14 Deadliest Catchn (in Stereo) 14' Deadliest Catch (N) (In Stereo) '14 Man vs Wild IN) (In Slereo) PG' Deadliesi Catch (In Stereol -14'
('I) 50 46 50 50 29 30 What Not to Wear 'PG' cm Say Yes-Dress |Cake Boss'PG' Jon & Kate |Jon & Kate 18 Kids-Count ]18 Kids-Count Little Couple ILittle Couple Jon & Kate |Jon & Kate
-T- Y] 48 33 48 48 31 34 Bones (In Stereo)'14'cm Bones (In Stereo)'14'm BLaw & Order"Quit Claim"'14' Law&Order"Flaw"'14' Bones (In Stereo)'14'm Law & Order "Veteran's Day"'14'.
filA|J 9 -54 9 9 44 Bizarre Foods-Zimmem Bizarre Foods-Zinmem Extreme Waterparks'G'o m Bizarre Foods-Zimmern Bizarre Foods-Zimmernm Bizarre Foods-Zimmern
ITVJ 25 55 25 25 98 98 Cops'14'm Cops'14'mB OperationRepo Operation Repo Operation Repo Operation Repo Most Shocking '14' Hot Pursuit'14' Hot Pursuit'14' ForensicFiles Forensic Files I
~TL 32 49 32 32 34 24Hogan'sHeroes Green Acres'G' Bev. Hillbillies Bev. Hillbillies Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith |Andy Griffith CosbyShow Cosby Show Cosby Show Cosby Shqw
(MJ 47 32 47 47 17 18 NCIS "Split Decision" 'PG' m NCIS "Witch Hunt"'PG' m House "Finding Judas" 'PG' c House "One Day, One Room" '14' House "Needle in a Haystack"'14' Burn Notice 'PG' a
(1i 140 69 117 117 Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls |Golden Girls. Women Behind Bars a _Women Behind Bars cm Women Behind Bars (N) cm Women Behind Bars cm
.WN 18 18 18 18 18 20 Becker'PG' Becker'PG' MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Atlanta Braves. From Turner Field in Atlanta. (In Stereo Live) cm WGN News at Nine (N) Bo Scrubs'14' |Scrubs'14'


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
\ In the real world, players make
many strange bids and incorrect
plays. That applies in this deal
from a social game. How would you
critique the auction? What should
West lead against three diamonds?
Who should,come out on top, de-
clarer or the defense?
South was strong to overcall two
diamonds, but to make a takeout
double with a singleton spade
would have been dangerous. North
knew no fear when she bid two
spades on two points and a single-
ton diamond. Then it looks as
though South was very cautious in
rebidding three diamonds, but he
knew his opponents were reliable
citizens who would have their bids.
This meant that North had few
high-card points. Maybe South
should have passed out two spades,
although four spades can be made.


Bridge

North 06-02-09
A 10 9 8 7 6 5 2
V 1.0 4
7
. Q 10 7
West East
A AQ4 J 3
9,6 5 V K 8 7 3 2
* 1054 * KJ2
4 9 5 32 . & K J 8
South
AK
V AQJ
* A Q 9863

Dealer: East
Vulnerable: North-South
South West North EAst
2 2 V 2 4 Pass
3 * Pass Pass Pass
Opening lead: ??

If South had rebid three no-trump,


which would have had no chance,
perhaps North would have run to
four spades.
Against three diamonds, West
correctly led the heart nine, top of
nothing.
Now East made a fatal error,
playing her king. From West's lead,
she should have realized that de-
clarer had the ace-queen-jack of
hearts and that she was giving him
three heart tricks on a platter with
watercress around. If East had
withheld her king, declarer would
have won with his queen and led
the spade king. But West would
have won with his ace and.shifted
to a club, the nine being the best
card with this layout. Then South
would have been sunk If, for ex-
ample, he won in his hand, cashed
the heart ace, and ruffed his last
heart, he would have lost one
spade, two diamonds and two
clubs.


ACROSS 41 Spelling error
43 Throat bug
1 Magazine 47 Police-blotter
fillers info
4 Doctrines 49 Eaves
8 Not her hanger
11 - Lanka 50 Bounders
12 Matador's foe 53 Worth less
13 Has regrets 55 Story line
14 Unwelcome 56 PDQ
notice 57 Price ticket
(2 wds.) 58 Supermodel
16 Gumbo Carol -
veggie 59 Thick head of
17 Tiedthescore hair
18 Rose fruit 60 Summer in
20 Banister post Savoie
21 Form droplets
24 Uphold DOWN
28 Diner coffee
30 Lose traction 1 Popular ski
33 Lobster eggs resort
34 Snow boots 2 Go by car
35 Travel stops 3 Tendon
36 Purchase 4 Back
37 Annoys to normal
38 Turf 5 Hawked
39 Rock tumbler 6 Hi-tech scan
stones 7 Ex-frosh


Answer to Previous Puzzle
BO[LE MW DAME
MOAN EGG ER IE
WHIM LUTE FISKi
STABLE LIDSK
SAO VEE
EXIST PFNDED
GENE YULNA N AE
ONS THAI T Y RO
ATEOUT LOAI|NS
NTH G Y M
YOdGA POtETIc
CARILLON ONES
IRAN ENE MIDI
IDL E DER STEP


8 Hearty laugh
9 Above, to
Tennyson
10 UN member
13 Hemp
product


15 Massages
19 "Big Blue"
22 Not quite shut
23 Wharf
25 Lily pad
sitter
26 Corn Belt
state
27 Housing fee
29 Doubly
curved letter
30 Bro's sibling
31 Lumber flaw
32 - 500
34 Flower
organ
39 NASA thumbs-
up (hyph.)
40 Go on the lam
42 Memoir
topic
44 Sharp, as
hearing
45 Trouser feature
46 Row of bushes
48 Not know
from -
49 "Terrible" tsar
50 Financial wiz
51 Everybody
52 Polka -
54 That
muchacha


ear Annie: I. have been
married to "Tom," a suc-
cessful farmer, for seven
years. We both have
children from previ-
ous marriages,three of
whom work here, and
my youngest son lives
at home.
I quit my job to help
on the farm, and now I
don't have a husband
anymore, just a boss.
Our intimate tiLne and
conversation is fairly
nonexistent, and
there's no such thing ANN
as family time. Holi- RAIL
days, birthdays and
our anniversary are
not important to him. Tom tells
his sons every personal thing I
think should be kept between
husband and wife. The only thing
he wants to discuss is farming.
Otherwise, he tells me I talk too


I


much. So now I barely speak to
him at all.
My mother and grandparents
live on the West Coast
My daughter and
grandkids live on the
East Coast My
- - youngest son and I
visit them without
Tom because he says
he cannot leave the
farm. I'm not sure why
we're still married. We
don't have children to-
gether. If he loves me,
he certainly doesn't
HIE'S show it. If I left him,
BOX I'm sure he'd replace
me in a heartbeat with
a farm worker.
I'm miserable and I'm sure he's
unhappy, too. I've suggested we
work on our marriage, but he just
works more on the farm. J don't
want to give up, but I also don't
want to feel like this for the rest


of my life. Any suggestions,
Annie? - Midwest Farmer's Wife
Dear Wife: Sometimes mar-
riage to a farmer means you're
married to the farm. Tom thinks
this is what you signed up for, but
it is not what you expected. In
order for your relationship to im-
prove, Tom must be willing to de-
vote more time to his family, and
we can't guarantee it. Tell Tom
you are terribly unhappy and that
counseling is likely the only way
to save your marriage. Even if he
won't go with you, you should still
speak to someone who will help
you clarify the issues and decide
what, if anything, is worth keep-
ing.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. E-mail annies
mailbox@comcastnet


Today's HOROSCOPE


Birthday: Even if the financial waters
are roiled and turbulent, you are likely to
be one of the lucky few who will fare
quite well in the year ahead.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - It won't be
a waste of time to shoot for the moon,
especially.if it involves work. Favorable
aspects have much to do with financial
enterprises and foreign investments.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - You've en-
tered into a propitious cycle where wor-
thy targets can easily be attained with
just a little effort on your part.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Opportunities
might occur through two partnerships.
The first could deal with a learning expe-
rience, while the other is more personal.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Your finan-
cial affairs look extremely encouraging,


so be alert for a lucky break involving
your work or talents.
Libra (Sppt. 23-Oct. 23) - Two consid-
erate persons who think the world of you
will provide something you cannot ac-
complish alone.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - Owing to
a self-assured manner and strong per-
sonality, you can't help but finish
strongly. Of equal importance: You will
be just plain lucky as well.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - Some-
thing fortunate could develop that will el-
evate your immediate hopes and future
expectations. A good friend or a close
relative will play a role.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - If the
boss doesn't come to you with a raise
and your recent performance warrants


one, bring the subject up.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Appeal-
ing issues and special interests will at-
tract others to follow in your footsteps.
Point people to where you want them to
go.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - Lady
Luck has been a little laid-back lately, but
appearances might be deceptive. She is
ready and willing to snap into action.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - You have
the ability to make a personal contribu-
tion to any group in which you are
presently involved.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - Don't
waste time on mundane goals. Make
certain that you try to better something
that is truly meaningful to you. Aim high,
and fire accurately.


Ans: THE


� 2009 by NEA, Inc.


TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 C5


ENTERTAINMENT


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE









COMICS CITRUS COrINTh' (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Dilbert


Beetle .';-


The. Grizzwells


The Born Loser


'(06U vE.'( WELL-lRow, Does 0 0R~-T~F~TW
�j 51 X F I &URF CI5FIGURE~S WILL
5OUM� 5- 05


Dennis the Menace The -',i;' , Circus


Doonesbury


www.ailydrcus.com i
"Grandma, when you were little,
what kinda music did you
play on your iPod?"


Ii'EWN TAIMNAU ~ 15I'N~rAVD REATAT- 174J~
HAr L aa MAEEU, fMrAWXK-BRL~WMC UP ON UPAU~ MtifIT TWRO7ON jIFAC-
MLA 7ML.4W E4MN5 1715 PRANNX1M. N4 W O PK AII, weMa
IT %H0..01, SawwomJoNS NN6 OMP, ZICAN M NOWe/f
5AITAN..7 ARSI..YSSEI AY9
A(C~

Ban 'I
.14 T


Big Nate


Betty


Frank & Ernest


JENNY, I'M
l V LAY� NOT
MY LADY YOUR
LADY.

V~~~ 1 "^A-


joi


THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN
MORE DRAMATIC IF SHE'D
ACTUALLY LOOKED AT
STHE PICTURE !
SHUT UP. WHEN Do
I WE GET TO THE
PART WHERE
S SHE REALIZES
l SHE'S IN LOVE
WITH YOU ?


Arlo and Janis


D0 YOU NAVt -ANY gOoF AfOuTr
Y / -EPIDOPT61A?


- OUt) t.I TO
J')AJOIN "Mt 900K~z
OF Ti4C MOTHI
* CLUB "?7
____ ____ ____ ____ _ ti-iVEA5,


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"Up" (PG) Noon, 2:30 p.m., 5:05 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10
p.m. No passes.
"Drag Me To Hell" (PG-13) 12:10 p.m., 2:45 p.m.,
5:10 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Dance Flick" (PG-13) 12:10 p.m., 2:20 p.m., 4:40
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Night at the Museum II" (PG) 11:50 a.m., 2:40
p.m., 5:15 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Terminator Salvation" (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:20
p.m., 5 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Angels & Demons" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:40 p.m.,
7 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Star Trek" (PG-13) 12:40 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:15
p.m., 10:15 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Up" (PG) 11:30 a.m., 2 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:30
p.m. No passes.


"Drag Me To Hell" (PG-13) 12:05 p.m., 2:50 p.m.,
5:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Dance Flick" (PG-13) 12:10 p.m., 2:20 p.m., 4:40
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Night at the Museum II" (PG) Noon, 12:30 p.m.,
2:30 p.m., 3 p.m., 5 p.m., 5:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 8
p.m., 10 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Terminator Salvation" (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:15
p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.
"Angels & Demons" (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 3:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Star Trek" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 3:15 p.m., 7:15
p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"X-Men Origins: Wolverine" (PG-13) 11:45 a.m.
2:40 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious
WXCV-FM 95-3 Adult-
Contemporary


Local Furo


WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious
WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies


WIFL-FM 104.3 Adult Mix
WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies .
WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: K equals J


"UP VZP


V JVXFWJ WT GMZFNXFVJN VJE


YINRFYN, KPUN VJE MFJEIN,


VJE


JWJSPRFPCPZN." - HZPNFEPJX SVZVGL


WSVYV

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "If there's one thing I've learned ... don't even waste your time
trying to figure out life." - Vin Scully
(c) 2009 by NEA, Inc. 6-2


C6 TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009

Peanuts


Cathy


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Today's MOVIES


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


COMICS













I' . * Chronic[e


O0 0


. 563-5966


F ( s 6-iT 1 T e) * a I 3 5 2-2 040 1 Emai 0jls Bi - ff0m I b sit w BicloB i ne^jom



Isr Mi. 1o E-a- - -,-1


- - '~1


- ---- ------ -J


Loved family dog
missing. Lost in the
vicinity of Eden Drive
and Moccasin Slough
Inverness. Answers
to the name BJ.
Small black pomera-
nian.
Very shy. Please call
352-697-5827 or
697-5826. $250.00 re-
ward for safe return.
***eee-e*l, *


"arb*.Ma Z
photographs
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits
Indoor or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed


ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT








$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
*ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com


CAT
ADOPTIONS


Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A till 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4
All Cats and Kittens are
altered, tested for Fe-
line Luk and Aids. Up to
date on
vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofsoha.ora.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant Ave.
Corner of 44 and Co-
nant.
Look for the big white
building with the bright
' paw prints.





























Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
Sheltei 794-3825




CeriIc




Secrearia


EXP. DENTAL
ASSISTANT
In search of a
motivated team
player for busy
Inverness practice.
Must be computer
literate. Proficient In
making crown &
bridge temps. Paid
Vac, Health Ins.
profit sharing, 401K.
F/T, Mon - Thurs.
Fax Resume Attn:
Karen (352)726-6893

Experience LPN
FT position,
Cardiac exp. a plus
Competitive salary
and benefits
Fax Resume to:
352-726-5038

F/T REHAB
THERAPY AIDE
CNA license required.
JOIN OUR TEAM
CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
700 SE 8th Ave.
Crystal River
352-795-8832
Fax 352-417-0490
0 O0


GYN OFFICE IN
CRYSTAL RIVER
LOOKING FOR:
Cert. Medical Asst.
Receptionist Billing
Dietician
Proactive, 1 year
exp. in Medical Of-
fices. Knowledge In
medical software
Please send resume:
mredrick@earthlink.net
or fax 352-564-8201

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Front & Back Exp.,
F/T, computer &
phlebotomy.
For busy primary care
MD Office
Email Resume
wfmaresumes@
yahoo.com
or Fax Resume To:
352-489-5786

RN/LPN-
CV SERVICES


This position Is respon-
sible for providing
self-directed care to
CV, thoracic surgical
patients In the.pre-op
setting. Completion
of an accredited
school of professional
nursing and current
FL RN or LPN license.
Must have critical
care experience and
good assessment
skills. BLS within 30
days, ACLS within 6
months. Previous OR
experience and
specialty certification
preferred. Please
apply online at
www.cltrusmh.com.
CMHS Is an equal
opportunity
employer.




FACILITATOR
Shared Service
Alliance of Citrus Co.
Is seeking a
Professional Facilita-
tor that provides,
administrative
support and reports
to the SSA Board. This
is a Part time annual
contract position,
min. AA degree req.,
Bachelors preferred
Salary $15,000-$20,000
based on exp./
education. No Bene-
fits. Send Resumes to:
Brad Thorpe
Citrus Co. Courthouse
2nd Floor
110 N. Apopka Ave
Inverness Fl. 34450


BenTH~auty�M
COSMETOLOGY
BARBl. ERe~











rNairl Techrology_

Massage []
I The,' r apy II[]I '

[ome =] v

June[ 15, Jul y 27lI [ , i


Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?

This area's
� #1
employment
source!


Classifieds


Z- G t;- E i.




E61izLE:s 8 l


CH~komE
CLassfleds,


0 0


- . 900-I:0.


784218

SudCoku **-s 4puz.com


3 9 1 6 5 8


6 77 3 9
- -




8 3 7 1


65 1 9




4 5





7 2 9 8 34
Fill In the squares so that each row, column, andn
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


People Systems
is Seeking

SOCIAL WORKERS
Needed in Marion
and Citrus To work
w/ developmentally
disabled consumers
In the community.
Flexible schedule,
competitive salary,
fringe benefits. 4 yr.
degree w/ a mln.
of 2 yrs. exp. in the
Human Services Field,
Fax Resume:
352-620-2232

Programmer,
Analyst
The Citrus County
School District is
seeking a highly
qualified Individual to
assist in the support
and maintenance of
our financial
Information systems.
IBM System i5
and COBOL
experience desired.
For more
information go to
www.citrus.kl12.fl.us or
call 352-746-3437. EOE





I11111

Advertising Sales
Representative
The Citrus County
Chronicle is now
accepting
applications for an
Advertising Sales
Representative.
Must have
minimum of 2 years
sales experience with
proven sales results for
new and existing cus-
tomers. Computer
proficiency a must: Ex-
cellent organizational
and customer service
skills.
Fax cover letter and
resume to HR at:
352-564-2935
or email:
dkam-
lot@chronicleonline.com
Final applicant must
undergo a drug
screen. EOE
IIIII

WANTED
Highly self motivated
Sale's people,
Company truck Is
provided. Yearly,
paid vacation.
Holidays paid.
Benefits available.
Positions open In
Citrus, Hernando,
and Sumter Counties.
Apply in Person
ONLY, from 9 am to
4 pm Mon-Fri, At
A-I Termite &
Pest Control,
1840 Hwy 44 West,
Inverness, FL 34453.
Located across
from Applebee's.
Only well groomed
and properly dressed
applicants will be
considered.




Your World

' dwv9414 ed


0� 00

oo 0


o,, 0


our world first.
Every Day



Clas'isieds


- .- . -- . . I


I Free Offe


I Free Offers I


SGN Wireless
AT&T
Authorized Retailer
store In
Citrus County is
looking to fill full time
sales position
Please E-mail
resume to: resume
@sgnwireless.com





EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
SCHOOL

IN LECANTO IS
NOW ACCEPTING
APPS. FOR
INSTRUCTOR'S.
Qualilfed
Candidates Must
Possess The
Following, Five
Or More Years Of
Operating Exp.,
Must Be A Team
Player Motivated,
Hard Working, &
Pay Attention To
Details. Ability And
The Willingness To
Teach Inside The
Classroom Relia-
bility And Honesty
A Must. Resumes
Will Be Accepted
Via Fax Or Email
Only, No Phone
Calls.
Fax Resumes To:
(352) 628-0823.
EmailTo:
b Cndreosumes
@yahoo.cor

Local Fuel
Delivery Driver
Min. Class B CDL,
must have HAZMAT,
Apply in Person
1021S. E. US Hwy 19
Crystal River
No Phone Call Please



***G**r

APPOINTMENT
SETTERS
Up For A Challenge?
Serious minded
individuals will earn
great $$$ setting appts
for our very busy local
company. Call Steve
@ 352-628-0254




Deliver Phone Books
Citrus County

* Work Your Own
Hours
* Have Insured
Vehicle
* Must Be At Least
18 Years Old
* No Experience
Necessary
800-247-4708
www.sddsinc.com

Experienced Only
VPK TEACHERS
CDA TEACHERS
(352) 201-2770
0 0 1


00















A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
4 2 Ton $780.00
42-/2Ton $814.00
4 3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Free Del. Uc.#CAC
057914 746-4394











C8 TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009


REFRIGEU AI UT R ood
condition-$50.00 Call
(352) 795-7057 after 5
p.m.
WASHING MACHINE
Kenmore, heavy duty,
large capacity washer.
Works good. $100 obo
352-637-1488
Whirlpool
washer & dryer,
$75 each. Cash
(352) 344-2752



ONSITE STORE
LIQUIDATION
Downtown Leesburg,
Main St. to So. on 2nd
Thursday June 4
Preview: 8 AM
Auction: 9 AM
Odds & ends
warehouse. Everything
from household to fum.
to 100's of box lots
dudleysauctlon.comn
AB1667-AU2246 10%BP

PUBLIC AUCTION
Oxford/ Wlldwood, FL
11262 US Hwy 301
Sat. June 6, 9 a. m.
Consignments:
8 am- 6 pm
Monday June 1-
Friday June.5
10% seller's comm.
5% buyer's prem.
Farm Equipment,
Vehicles. Boats, and
Personal Property
Reggie Caruthers:
Call: 352-233-8875 or
John Hill: (386)
590-1214.




18 + foot aluminum
extension ladder $80;
McClain Edger $65
(352) 746-4734
Craftsman
10" radial arm saw
with table, $125.
(352) 637-4865



Hitachi 50" HD TV
$500. (352) 746-3323
SONY 25" TV w/4 Door
Corner Pine Cabinet,
68"H. $100.
352-465-9186
TV. & ENTERTAIN-
MENT CENTER
56" JVC Projection HDTV
& 10ft. wide expandable
Pine Entertainment Cen-
ter. $650 for both! Call
352-270-3200




Carpet Padding Felt 32
oz., 9 rolls, 360 yrds,
HalfOffl$432r- -
, (352)586-1728
Floor Grade Pine
1 X 8 up to 1 X 12 inch
width. 8' to 16"length.
Bargain while it lasts.
(352) 621-0778


19' COMPAQ CRT
MONITOR with matching
JBL speakers. 352
382-2591
$30.00
COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
New & Used systems
upgrades. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
www.rdeeli.com



SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Dpuble Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, BEk w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This
bad boy Is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815



42" TILE & CEMENT
Table w/3 benches.
$400. 23" Cement Table
w/2 benches, $150 or
both for $500.
352-796-9350
PVC 48 In. Octagonal
Table, 4 cushion chairs &
wilder, floral pattern.
125 (352) 746-5229
Table & 4 chairs, love
seat glider chaise
lounger & small table, all
w/ cushions $100
(352) 270-3189
Vinyl Table w/6 chairs, 2
behch seats, 2 small
talbes, $60 (352)
270-3189




1 Twin Beds
complete w/ mattress &
box springs, $75
(352) 726-0312

* THIS OUT!
1950S TABLE &
CHAIRS 1930S DINING
TABLE'&CHAIRS
1950sPedestal table
35x35slze Four chrome
burgundy vinylchairs
$150.00 1930sDuncan
Phyfe drop leaf table &
chairs $450.00
352-746 0513
Cannonball Queen Sz.
Head & Foot & Rails
Huge Pine Post $150
Coffee Table & 2 end"
tables, glass on ornd-
mental Iron, real nice
$100. 352-860-1885


Applianc


I Co =


---I


MAHOGANY
Convex Glass
Breakfront $800. obo
(352) 628-0505
CHINA HUTCH
Solid maple, 52" wide.
$225/obo.
352-628-4207 '
Couch
w/recliners on each end,
blue. $150.
Futon
Wood & metal $50.
(352) 795-7513
Day Bed,
Cream Color, Rattan
$125
3 Covers, blue, green
pink $25. ea
(352) 344-4852
Dining Room Set
w/leaf, 8 chairs,
buff. & serv. cabinet.
$1,800.(352) 795-3334
ENT CTR Cherry,3 pc,
76"x 5 feet, dovetail
draws, 31" tv incl. 99e
sold as set 352-410-0891
FULL SIZE WHITE
WITH PALE PASTEL
COLORS TWEED COUC
Great Condition! $110.00
464-0316
GERMAN WEIGHT
DRIVEN
GRANDFATHER
CLOCK $600. OBO
(352) 628-0505
'Handmade drop leaf
Desk, many cubby
holes.shelves & draw-
ers, built In chair, $135. ,
Glass top & side curio
cab. doors on ea. end
white $85., 860-1885
Hide A Bed
Queensize, floral design,
w/bamboo arms. $150.
(352) 628-0147
LANE BEDROOM SET
(2) Twin beds, 6 drawer
dresser, 3 drawer bu-
reau, 2-night tables,
Cream lacquer finish.
Very good condition.
* $300. 352-746-9206
LEATHER LOVESEAT
AND SWIVEL ROCKER
cream color, barely used.
$395.00. Two Palm Paint-
ings, large,matted,framed
orig.$300 each $125.00
both 352-697-5779
LIV, DIN, KIT FURNITURE
(813)300-7929
Sugarmlll Woods
Living Room Set
w/4 chairs. $400.
2 Curio Cabinets
w/lights. $600.
(352) 795-3334
MAHOGANY DUNCAN
PHYFE Dining Table w/
8 matching shelld back
chairs org $3800
sacrlcific',$1500
obo(352) 628-0505
Mirror 40" X 54",
bevelled glass, framed,
$125. Broyhill coffee.
table, all wood, $125
(352) 527-8978
PORTABLE AIR
CONDITIONER on
� wheels, Maytag 8000
BTU. Like new, works
great any room. $299.
352-410-0891


reowne attress
Sets from Twin $30; Full
$40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
Round wood kit table
w/leaf & 4 chs $200
(352) 795-1339 601-0656
SOFA BED & LOVE SEAT
$150. 352-527-8529:
352-302-2668
SOFA
new w/matching 2
chairs & 2 ottoman,
solid taupe color $550
(352) 795-1339
352-601-0656
Sofa,
dark green
$165.
(352) 382-1502
Sofa, tapestry, soft col-
ors, ball & claw feet,
gently used, $375
(352) 527-8978
Used office desk
$145 OBO. Call
352.201.2073
YOUR FURNITURE
DONATIONS
SUPPORTS THE PATH
HOMELESS SHELTER
Call (352) 746-9084




CRAFTMEN"S
RIDING
Lawn Mower 19.5
hp 42" deck $550.
(352) 746-7357
HAND GARDEN PLOW
Stainless steel frame.
24" wheel. Like new.
$40. 42" CONCRETE
WAGON WHEEL. $40
352-563-5386
KAWASAKI WEED
TRIMMER Low hours.
Paid $285, selling for
$100. Extras.
352-527-1882
LAWN TRACTOR '08
42 In Craftsman. Auto
transmission.
w/broadcast spreader.
$1125. 352-489-2421
MUST SELU
RIDING MOWER
w/bagger & trailer.
$200/obo,
AUTOMATIC POOL VAC
$100. 352-726-4048
RIDING MOWER
'08 Cub Cadet
46" cut, used little
Paid $1800, will take
$1100 firm (352)
563-0818
Riding Mower
Yard Machine, 18.5 hp.
8 speeds. 42" cut, lights,
newly serviced. $450.
(352) 601-3654
TRIMMER MOWER,
EDGERAND POWER
WASHER Craftsman 5.5
Horsepower, Highwheel
Trimmer mower.-$125.00
Karcher power
washer-$125.00 and
Black and decker
edger-$35.00. All in very
good condition. Call (352)
795-7057 After 5 p.m.
WEEDEATER LAWN
MOWER 500 SERIES
Excellent Condition used
only 3 times asking
$100.00 OBO
352-465-8841


CLASSIFIED




4 Manavox DTV
Digital too Analog
Converters
$100 for all
(352)795-3764
95 MERCURY TRACER
good body, motor needs
work, $175 obo. call
352-613-6020
Air Compressor
$100.
Refrigerator
Kenmore $50.
(352) 795-3334
Boat N-haul
12'fiberglass,
new oars,
life jackets incl.'
$450.
Sonic Scooter,
motor-
ized, w/basket,
easy load,
exc. cond. needs
battery.
$375.(352)
726-5584
Copier
Xerox Work Center Pro
4165021 used once.
$600. IBM Typewriter
$50. (352) 795-3334
DINETTE 27" round
glass top table 4 chairs
steel frame/cane
. 746-1186
DODGE RIMS 15" Shark
style 5 lug $100. White
porgelin bath sink 19 3/4"
round has faucet $40.
S563-1073

Exterior solid wood
door, 32x79, $50
Wardrobe closet,
31x74, $40
(352) 746-2932
Futon couch, great
condition, $40.00.
Medium upright GE
freezer, $35.00.
352.726:4480
Generator
1500 Watts, Brand New,
Cost $434.
Will Sell For $330.
(352) 746-7127


- ActNom -


ITS FREE
Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad for FREE orl
our all new
CLASSIFIED SITE.
5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 Items totaling less than
$100.00 each.
Go to:
chronlcleonline.com
and click place
an Ad in the top right
hand corner.


GOLF CLUBS
21eft hand driver
and 2 right hand
$30. 3523821191
LAWN
,EDGER-COLOR TV
lawn edger,gas,$30
19" sanyo color tv $35
352-503-3446
LAWNCHAIRCOVERS
clear plastic 4 for $15
352-382-1191
MICHELIN TIRES
TWO 295/30ZR18 &
TWO 345/30ZR18
Good cond. $100 for all
(352) 476-1896
POWERMATE 4,000w
generator converted
to propane $250
(352) 564-1390
SMALL CAST OLD
CARS never used
still in boxes
INCL. 5 BOXES $25.
3523821191
Stereo/Cassette
Fischer, w/2 spks. $200.
Oriental Wall Plaques
$75.00(352) 795-3334
TRIPLE DRESSER all
wood, white, 72Wx 30H x
19D.
$50. 527-2553
Twin Bed
New Craftmatic adjusta-
ble, $425. Refrigerator
18 cu. ft. w/icemaker
Bisque colored, $275.
(352) 726-5584
WET/DRY VACUMN
Ridged 9 gallon. $75
352-746-1447
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT








$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com




2 MANUAL WHEEL
CHAIRS Good Condition
No Foot Rests Only
$40.00 464-0316
4 WHEEL WALKER
WITH SEAT & BRAKES
New In Box $85.00
464-0316 '
AMEGO 3 WHEEL
SCOOTER New 12 Volt
Battery Comes Apart
$200.00 464-0316
AUTOGO SCOOTER
Good condition
w/charger. $400/obo
352-746-1433
HARMAN Auto lift $750;
Invacare Power Chair
$800; Invacare Walker
$50 (352) 795-4421


Incline Board
adjustable, like new
$95.
(352) 637-4273
Power Chair
Jazzi 1113, cover, cup
holder, nice cond. will
deliver $850.
Wheel Chair/Invacare,
$50.(352) 220-0075
Wheelchair, paid $450
Used 1 mo. all leather,
exc. cond. sell for $150
Power chair, used 2
wks, like new, $650
(352) 726-2425
X- LARGE WHEEL-
CHAIR X-LARGE BED-
SIDE COMMODE Excel-
lent condition. $75 for
both or b6st offer
352476-1303




"THE REVENUE"
Buy & Sell
Vintage coins/currency
352r 302-8159
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676



Guitar
Fender Squire, w/case
& beginner music book.
Exc. cond. $100.
(352) 465-7139

FitnessB
Equime~nt


$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
Adorable Chihuahua
Puppy smooth coat, 9
wk. old male $225. & 1
Male Long Coat
CKC/REG., Health Certs.
$275. (352) 726-1843


- II
GOLF CLUBS Used,
w/bag, good for beginner
$25.
352-419-4302
High Standard
Derringer 22 magnum,
exc. cond. $200.
(352) 464-0926
HUFFY BICYCLE
26" girl's. Good
condition. $50.
352-563-5386
MENS' DRYJOY
OXFORDS 81/2 Extra
wide White w/Brown
$40 (352) 341-0523
PRIVATE COLLECTOR
Buying Guns,
Ammunition&
reloading supplies
(352) 586-7516
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238



CAR HAULER
'06, 32 Ft. DominatorXT.
By Classic C. Trpl.
axels. $14,200. Like
new.(352) 8354273


Baby Items


BABY GOATS SHEEPs
& Pigeons
Foroets only.
Mini Farm off 495
(863) 843-2495 cell
RHODE ISLAND REDS
Assorted Bantams,
Polish, Ducks & Quail
Starting at $2.
352-795-6381



2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Util. incl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
(352) 628-9759
2/2 SNOWBIRD OASIS
$600 mo. + $600dep.
Lawn, Water, Sewer,
Garb. inc. 352-744-7595
AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hernando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk.
Free internet/long dist.
Trailers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant


4 . ,


Citrus County Home
Inspections
$75. Any house in
June. (352) 978-8403

DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR,
Repairing gas & diesel
engines. No job too big
or small. 352-228-2067




A TREE SURGEON
- Lic. & Ins. Exp'd
friendly serve. Lowest
rates Free est.
352-860-1452

All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
COLEMAN TREE SERV.
Trim & Removal. Lic.
Ins. FREE EST. Lowest
rates. 352-270-8462
check out zoomcitrus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Haullng,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
Bobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272









OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Work Free Est.
� . LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED!
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins
R WRIGHT TreeService
Tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins,& Lic
0256879 352-341-6827





Richard Mills Tree Serv
Trim, haul, top,
removal, Free Est
Reasonable Rates
(352) 398-9881
Richard Mills Tree Serv
Trim, haul, top,
removal, Free Est
Reasonable Rates
(352) 398-9881




At Home Computer
Repairs & custom
computers.
Call (352)228-7823
COMPUTER DOCTORS
112 MI. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344.4839

ON-SITE
COMPUTER
SERVICE
352-341-4150


REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch.Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-128




Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
work fully coated. 30 yrs.
Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-795-6533
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST7 (352) 586-2996








INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
SJ. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Mike Anderson
Painting Int/Ext
& Pressure Washing
Call a Professional,
(352) 464-4418




RENEE'S MOBILE
WASH-N-WAX. We
come to you. Serving
Citrus Cty for 8 years,
352-446-0209




PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
27 yrs. exp. Certified







Mower & Generatoe
Repair. 352-2204244

DAVE'SREA MOBILE
Gas / Diesel Engines
352-228-2067

Mower Repair,
Hernando, Pick up &
delivery, Don Mead
352- 400-1483


The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/lrs. #2441.
352-634-1584




certified caregivers/sitters
20 + yrs exp, Trans. Avail
Lisa 352-422-4765,
Dee Dee 352-422-1267

OUTREACH SENIOR
COMPANION
SERVICES
Affordable, quality.
Senior Care.
Companions,.
Homemakers, Sitters.
Licenced, Bonded &
Insured Call toll free
1-877-803-1608
www.outreachsenlor
companlon.com
Llc #231103

PRIVATE DUTY CARE
Specialty: Quallty of life
Fl. St. Lic./Bonded, Ref.
Lee (352) 201-4565




"* SEE THROUGH
Window Washing
All Aspects (352)
489-4189; 322-0962
/ us out zoomcitrus.com




A Reg. Home Daycare
in Beverly Hills. Very
Reasonable
Rates. Call Tara
220-8086 . .'
Reg'd HOME DAYCARE
Citrus Springs - Summer
Program/Planned Cur-
riculum, 352-422-7904
/us out @ zoomcllrus.com




Affordable CABINETS
& COUNTER TOPS
SNew & Remodel'
352-586-8415




QUALITY CRAFTED
BUILDERS New, Renova-
tions & Commercial
IS Yrs In Citrus Count
352-726-5507


Cope's Pool & Pavers
* Pool Refinishing .
* Interlocking Brick Paver
* Patio & Driveways

ORDER YOUR
POOL TODAY
& BE SWIMMING
BY SUMMER
"FREE QUOTES"
Lic. & Insured
CPC1456568
S.... 352400.3188


ROGERS Construction
New Homes & All
Construction (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872

Schnettler
Construction, LLC.
R6novatlons,room
additionsdecks, barns,
garages,various home
repairs. (352)637-4629
cell 352-266-6756
L & Ins CBC1253348




SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla rms,
windows, garage scrns
(CBC1257141) 628-0562




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996




"HOME REPAIRS"
Painting, power Wash
jobs big & small
(Eng,/ Spanilsh)746-3720
v us at zoomcltrus.com
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable, Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
Uc. 5863 (352) 746-0141

Andrew Joehi
Handyman.
Gen/Malnt/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too smalllReli able ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

S NATURE COAST
HOME REPAIR
& MAINT. INC.
w Offering a Full I
I Range of Services
www.naturecoast I
homereoair.com |
LIc. 2776/lns.,
352-634-5499 I
Vlsa/MC/Dlscover I



116 � �� � .
EX i ANYA


Service for A/C, Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator & Morel

* Cal/Anytime * Same Day Service
* 42 Years Experience

[ 'One Man
IIIIII/M Low
Serving Citrus and Overhead
SMarion Counties Low

352-445-0072 Prices
000c Johnson #RA0067081


painting, drywall
Malley's Home Maint
220-9486 (fic0259169)
/ out zoomcitrus.com
FAST AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs
Free Est,; 'Llc#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *.
Senior Saviours
Monthly Maintenance
Service.
A must for ONLY
$40.00 a Monthl .
Call 352-342-99111
www.SeniorSaviours.co
m




, #1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs,
Also Phone, Cable, Ldn
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
Uc. 5863 (352) 746-0141
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726.2907
EC13002699
SALTMARSH
ELECTRIC
Comm/Resid. & Sign
Lighting. CR13012391
352-344-3810
/ us out zoomcltrus.com



FAST AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs
Free Est., Llci0256374
*(352) 257-9508 *



C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/201-1422



PAVING & SEAL COAT
VIGLIONE LLC-/IIc/Ins
www. TAR-MAX.com
Free Est13521726-3093




ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est, Lie. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing,
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


Lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Fence Work Free
Est. LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED!
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins



AAA ROOFING
Free est. 30 yrs exp.
352-563-0411
,John Gordon Roofing
For a hole in your roof
or a whole new roof.
Free est. 352-795-7003



BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Estimates
Lic#2579/Ins, 257-0078
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack repair,staining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
e 352-464-3967 &
Quality Concrete Serv.
Layout to Lentil
ALL TYPES, Tractor
352-726-2383, Llc#2567
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
LIc. #1476, 7.266554
---



Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services
40 Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768
W. F. GILLESPIE CONST.
Lic. #CRC1327902
(352) 344-0009
www.wfglllesple.com




A Cutting Edge
Tile Job
Showers. Firs etc
(352) 422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone Drive-
ways & Tractor work
341-2019 or 257-1562


Landclearing,
.IHauling, Site Prep,
Driveways. Lic. & Ins.
(352) 795-5755
*TOP SOIL SPECIAL*
3 Yd -$60/5 Yd $85
10IYd $175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436



All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/us out zoomcitrus.com
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,HaulingSite
Prep, Driveways
Lic/tns795-5755
Ck out zoomcitrus.com
.Pasture mowing, lots
acreage, commercial.
$18. peracre & up.
(352) 978-8403



D's Landscape &
. Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
Bobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272













I Lowest Price I
I Guaranteed I
S Barker's Lawn
SService Monthly or I
S Per cut rate
(352) 232-8166

#1 AGAIN Pro Tech
Lawn Service. Family
owned & operated.
Serving central Citrus
Cty since 1999. Call
for free estimate
302-7800 - Lic/Ins.
Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Specials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
check out zoomcitrus.com
DUN-RITE LAWN SERV
Lic & Ins Clean up,,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681
check zoomcltrue.com


HALLOCK & Son
Lawncare/Landscaping
Covering all your lawn care
needs. Detailed work.
746-6410 Lic/Ins.
HARRY EVERSON'S
LAWN & MAINTENANCE
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
(352) 302-2585
V us at zoomcitrus.com
HEDGE TRIMMING,
HAULING(ANY KIND),
LAWN MOWING,
MULCH. FREE 'ESTI-
MATES. 352-344-9273
OR 352-201-9371
INVERNESS AREA
Mowtrim, beds,
Fast Reoonse since
1991 352- 422-5978
/ zoomcltrus.com
Lawn Care 'N' More
Mow, clean up
brushes, beds
Friendly Service since
1991
Residential/Commra
(352) 726-9570 .
out zoomcitrus.com
MOWING & TRIMMING
Residential/ East citrus
county area.
352-302-1511;341-5182
OSBORNE'S
Quality Work - Free
Est. LOWEST RATES
352-400.6016 Licl/Ins
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up. Lc. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
& LANDSCAPE
SINCE 199 (LIc/Ins)
628-9848 or 634-0554
V us out zoomciltrus.com




EVERCLEAR POOL
SERV. & Maint.
Concrete Pools Only
(352)344-5122
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
" 352-464-3967 �


------I

S MOBILE RV
S SERVICE
WE COME TO YOU
I Motor Homes I
S 5th Whls/Rv's
Master Tech
352-586-5870 I
Storage Available
i m --- ,,


WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard

WELL PUMP
ULER SERVICE


arb Ma
Fhotograph,
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits. Indoor
or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed



ELITE PAVING &
SEAL COATING
All types - Res/Cormm
352-302-3030 Lic/Ilns


Circle T Sod Farms.
Tired of your dead
lawn?
Replace it with
Bahia. Delivery
Avail (352)400-2221
LAWN RESTORATION
All types of Grasses
Low maint Lawns Avail.
J & J Sod 352-302-6049


1st Choice -v
PEST CONTROL, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
- , a.-'. - -.. --- - -. . w

LAWN GOT

' PROBLEMS?I
'Call 503-6821

Owner/Operators J .
Lloyd Smith * BiBledensteln * JIm
78'a52 5340W.Glenbrook St.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"

In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtut
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old Onetll
Tub to Shower Conversions Tool!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM


Installations, by
Brian , CBC25.53

352-628-7519






Siding, Soffit & Fascia, Skirting, Roofovers, a
Caports, & Screen Rooms
www.advancedaluminum info


Now available; Westle,
Schnauzer, Shlhtzu,
Maltese mix,
352-553-2604
Border Collie Pup
Female, loving, health
cert. 13 wks. $225.
(352) 628-9656
CHIHUAHUA'S
CKC Reg. Current shots,
$195.Health cart
(352) 406-7123
Dachshund Pup
Male, red, miniature,
adorable, health cert. 12
wks. old. $195.(352)
628-9656
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
Poodles, Mini pups,
males, AKC reg. Choco-
late, blue, silver, beautiful
& well socialized.$300.
(352) 527-1920
PUGGLE PUPS
(pug/beagle); Sheltie,
Papillon & maltepoo
pups $375-$450
(352)216-1481
Pure Bred Collies
2/both 1 year old.
$350. for both, obo.
Must go together.
(352) 795-7513
ROTWEILLER PUPPIES
Absolutely Beautiful,
8wks, AKC, big boned,
shots, wormed. Parents,
$650 + (352) 503-6316
Shih-Tzu Puppies
2 New Liters Home
raised w/ love. All shots
included. $300+
3902 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827
(305) 872-8099


BABYsGoA H


GAZELLE
PERFORMANCE 300
Exerciser as seen on
HSN, new & assembled
will Incis basic DVD
player $100 firm
352-527-2456
Nordic Trac,
Heavy Duty Frame
Inversion Table,
Asking $200 obo
(352) 794-3085
- PRECOR EFX 544
Elliptical, like new
org. price $2400 price
$850. Body Solid Weight
Lifting Rack $450
(352) 746-3323
STAIR STEPPER WITH
LARGE DIGITAL
READOUT Great
Condition!Works Arms
Too! $100.00 464-0316




AMMO 357mag, 3 -50
Round boxes, FMJ $30
per, 357 mag 2-30 Round
boxes, JHP $40 per
(813) 789-0592
Crystal River area
AMMO 45 cal., 300
rounds, $200; 9mm,
400 rounds $160.
(813) 789-0592
Crystal River Area
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238


-gTAct Now ,.

PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY AT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place .
an ad



beautiful mans ring,large
garnet stone set in 10
karat setting with 4 dia-
monds 150.00
352-628-1669



REFRIGERATOR SWAP
Off-White Kenmore
side-by-side,dispenser
in door, for any make
Black similar size and
condition. 352-628-1434



WANTED OLD
LION EL TRAINS
Collector Top Prices
Paid. (352) 795-3970











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

I.. 1


6-2 0 LaughlngStock International IncJdlst. by UFS Inc., 20091

"He was born on the second
and third of December."
784216


Unfurn'd, country.
2/2 DW, carport. Newly
remodi'd. $700 mo.
STUDIO APT. WD, open
plan, 800 sqft. Incis
elec. $550 mo.
No smoking, 1 pet ok.
352-464-4808
HERNANDO
3/2 on 2 acres, front
porch, laundry area
$600 mo. (813) 843-2105
HOMOSASSA
1& 2 Brfurn & Unfurn.
In beautiful! park w/pool.
No Pets. 352- 628-4441
HOMOSASSA
2/2 DW Fenced back
yard. No pets. $500
1st + sec. (352) 628-3736
HOMOSASSA 55+
212 Stonebrook
Estates
Unfurnished, Car Port.
Pool, Club house.
Boat & RV storage
$595. Mo.
(352) 422-7887
HWY 488
2/1.5, large lot, $425. mo,
3/2 $600 mo. + sec:
No Pets 352-795-6970
INVERNESS
2/1 Scrn. Prch. Fenc,d
yrd,Fst./Lst./Sec.$475.mo
No pets (352) 726-4842
INVERNESS
3/1 & 2/2 - $450/mo
352-476-1122; 476-2417
INVERNESS
Large 3/2, appx 2000 s. f.
under roof. No pets. 1 yr.
lease. $675 mo. F/L/S
344-3444 / Eves.
344-3084
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park,
2BR, 1-hBA, $475.
1 BR,1 BA, $350 Incl.
water 352-476-4964
LECANTO
1 BR MH CHA all util.
Washer. $580. mo.+ sec
(352) 628-2590
YANKEETOWN
2/2 Complete Furn.,
New W/D. $600mo
+ $300 dep. 15 min.
from power plant
Paul (407) 579-6123
COUNTRY
SETTING'
2/2 in Country Setting.
$500/mo. + $500 Sec. No.
pets. For application Call
Lee at 352-250-0664 or
800 -692-4162.



60ft.x 14 ft, IN PARK
2/2, W/D, scm. in room.
owner finance $12,500.
(352) 2b1-7276
Crystal River
Suncoast MHP 55 +.
212 '84, Newly remod.
10 X 28 glass Fla. rm.
Covered front & back
porches. Nice cond.
$14,000 (352) 795-4266.
INVERNESS
55+ Waterfront Park,
1BR, water Incl. A/C
. $3,500 + $270 mo. lot
rent. 352-476-4964
INVERNESS/ MOSSY
OAK PARK, 55 + COMM.
2/1 Carport/ Scrrd porch.
CHA,Furn., Wsh./dryer.
New electrical wiring.
Close to downtown.
$10,900.(352) 637-3436
NEW 2009 2/2, large
rooms, appliance
pkg. 2x6 construction
10 yr. warranty, must
seel $37,000 Includes
A/C & heat, steps,
skirting on new pad!
352-62 1-9182
Palm Harbor 3/2
Singlewide
Introductory Model
$299/mo wac. 10
models to choose from
On Your Lot
Call 1-800-622-2832
Walden Woods Village
3/3, Carport, Lrg. eat in
kit, liv.,din. rm., Scm'd
lanai, outside storage.
Exc. loc. Avail. June.
$56,400(352) 382-0681




BANK FORECLOSURE
3/2 approx. 1300 sqft
on 1/2 ac. fenced
back yd, scm room,
work shop, concrete
S drive on paved road.
Private but close to
town Home In great-
conditioni $3,000
down, $565/mo.
W.A.C. Call to view.
(352) 621-9181
Floral City
212 DW on 3.5 + or -
acres. Withlacoochee
Forest area great for
horse riding.Priced to
sell. (352) 341-6281
(352) 634-0787
(352) 634-1290.
HOME-N-LAND
New Home 3/2
10 Yr. Warranty
Sacrlficel $3,000
down $676.43/mo.
Call to Qualify
352-621-3807
Receive $8,000
Cash Back

HOME-N-LAND
New home on 1/2
acre). 3/2 1500sqft. 10
yr. warranty, sodded
lawn, paved re. Use
gov't stimulus for your
dn payment ($8,000)
only $665/mo. W.A.C.
Own your own home
Call (352) 621-9181


INGLIS '95 SW
2/1'/2, beautiful,
wooded, priv 11/4 ac.
backs ups to wildlife
sanctuary. Incls covered
deck, garage w/work
shop, Ig shed w/win-
dows, all appls. washer.
dryer. STEAL o 53.9001
352-419-5777:476-9005




CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55 + comm. 3/2
with a lovely view of the
Lake. Call The C.R.
Village office $75K obo
352-795-7161
INVERNESS 1 BR Mobile.
55+ w/. waterfront
park$9,900 AC, W/D,
Shed 352-476-4964
LECANTO
Senior Park., roomy
2 bedrm 1.5 bath, fully
furnish, move in ready
Very Nice $7500
(352) 634-4329
WEST WIND VILL 55+
(2) NEW 2005 Incredible
Price! Resales/Rentals ,
avail w/lease - Pet ok.
furnished. 352-628-2090




POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - RV SITES
Waterfront homes
Weekly private rooms
352-628-0011




CHASSAHOWITZKA
2/2 waterfront DW $600
2/2 furnished DW $700
2/1 carport - $500
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2furnished $900
Agent, 352-382-1000


OnLWO

Jt.W-ll w xem, b
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
Pritchard Island
3/2/1 Villa-$875
3/2/2 - $800
Inverness
2/2/2- $700
3/2/2 -$750
2/1/1 -$595
2/2/1 - $625
3/2/I - $895
2/2/1 Villa- $695
1&2 Bd Apartments
starting at $400
2/1/1- $600
Beverly Hills
2/1/11 - $600
Lecanto
1/I Apartment- $395
See our website:
www.jwmortonreal
estate.com
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
352-726-9010


RENTALS
Pine RidMe w/Pool
5169 N. Perry Dr $1800
3/4/3 Pool/pool maint
4470 N. Ficus Dr $1200
3/2/2 Pool/pool maint
838 W. Massachusetts
St. $1400
3/2/2 Pool/pool main
.BeverivHhlls
27 New York Blvd
$800.
188 W. Seymerla St
$675
42 S. Monroe St $600
14 Plaza St. $600
HEDICK GROUP
REALTY
S352-422-2522
hedickgroup.net





AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hernando - Citrus
NewEfficenci/es
$235wki Free
intemet/long dist.
Trailers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant





1 &2
BEDROOMS
Starting at
$450
352-257-8048

1 BEDROOM
Starting @ $425/mo
Laundry on premises.
352-465-2985

INGLIS VILLAS
Is now accepting
applications for our
1,2,3 BRApts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Crys. Riv.
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: M,W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglls Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity


. CRYSTAL RIVER


DUNNELLON
2BR In duplex in city
limits. $495 mo.
pay your own utilities
.(352) 489-3381
INVERNESS
2/1 Duplex $525;
2/1 home $550, f/ll/s
(352) 422-2393
LECANTO
1 BR (352)746-5238
613-6000/613-5974 .
LECANTO
Lrg 2/2, C/H/A, screen
porch, water Incl. $550.
F/L/S, 352-746-4191
ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appis,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341

PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apartments
Rental rates begin
at $570 plus utilities.
Rental assistance
available to qualified
applicants.
Income limits apply.
For Rental Info &
Applications
Pelican Bay
Apartments
9826 West Arms Drive,
Crystal River
(352) 795-7793, M-F
9:00 AM-5:00 PM
(TDD #1-800-955-8771)
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Employer





Pinewood Villas
Is now Accepting
applications for our
1, 2, 3 BR Apts.
Located in Bronson
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-486-2612
Or Apply Tues & Thur
7291,NE 92nd Ct. #17,
Bronson, Florida
Equal Housing '
Opportunity- �






-A ctNow

PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEWEBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad
We Hove Rentals
Starting at $425/mo +
Many others
LANDMARK
REALTY
352-726-9136
Kathy or Jane
311 W Main St. Inv




HERNANDO
ALESCI'S
CORNER PLAZA
HWY. 486
OFFICE/RETAIL
1000, SQ. FT.
INCLUDES COMMON
AREA
MAINTAINENCE,
WATER, WASTE,
GARBAGE &
SIGNAGE. ONLY
$750.MO. + SALES
TAX. $795. TOTAL. NO
SEC., NO LAST MO.
RENT. FIRST MO.
RENT ONLY. ALSO
1,194 SQ. FT., 1,250
SQ. FT. & 2,000 SQ.
FT. AVAILABLE.
(352) 447-1244




CITRUS HILLS
2/2/1 Nicely furnished.
Social membership
avail. $825 mo. F/L/S
(352) 341-1019
CITRUS HILLS
Home, Villa. Condo
GREENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-5921
(888) 446-5921
greenbrlarrental.com





FREE RENT!
SUMMNERHILL
AT
�MEADOWCREST
Luxury Condos
Limited Time!
Call agent for
details.
352-563-5657
/ out zoomcitrus.com

INVERNESS
2/2, very clean / pool
$575.(352) 419-4510
352-400-0882
INVERNESS
Whispering Pines Villa
2/2, garage, W/D,
comm. pool. $600.
352-592-9926


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, $560 mo. + dep.
C/H/A (352) 464-2716
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/2
Lg Apt on Sams Pt.
$585/mo incis lawn,
garbage, water
352-726-9570
HOMOSASSA
New, 2/2, Rent
w/option to buy. 1300
sq. ft. w/d hk. up, fans,
blinds, refr., stove,
microwave, tile, carpet.
$750. month
(352) 592-0893
INVERNESS
1/1 w/scmd prch. W/D
$495/mo. (352) 274-1594
ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appls,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341




HERNANDO
1/1, fum. $400. moves.
you in. (352)-726-5050
LECANTO
Sm, Cottage, private,
Internet $695
(352) 621-4725




GREAT AMERICAN
REALTY
Invernes
X-Lrg 2/2/2 all utilities.
2/2 Condo main-free
BIGI Like new 3/2/2
Studio Apts.all utilities.
kBeverivill
Very Nice 2/2
Oakwood VIII. 3/2/2
3/2 Great real
Citrus Springs
3/2/2 Newer home
2/2 Duplex
Adorable 1/1 & 2/1
Hemndoa
Brentwood 3 & 2 bd
Townhouses
Very Nice 1/1,
2/2 with Pool
Brand New 4/2'/2/2
Focralf CY
3/2 Mobile waterfront
352-637-3800
www.choosegar.com

INVERNESS
I 3/1 LIKE NEW"
I $595 PER MONTH
CALL TODAYII
352-212-3412
954-684-9631


INVERNESS

Immaculate
Newer Homes

.3/2/2, Back Porch,
$800. Mo., no pets.
2/2/1 Patio Home
close to shops,
$700 Mo.
2/2/2 + Fla. room
adult 55 + cornn, pet
ok. $750. Mo.
2/2/2 Fenced yard, out
building, avail Aug. 1
st. $700. Mo.
(352) 344-2500
(352) 464-2508

SUNSET VILLAS
Senior Community
Chiefland Fl.
Accepting
Applications for
I & 2 BR APTS
Please Apply
M, W, F, 8am-12p
124 SW 14th Ave.
(352) 493-0220
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.




AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hernando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
internet/long dist.
TrailOs $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant

BEVERLY HILLS
Progress Eneray
Contractors 1/ll,
fully furn avail now
$825. InCludes all util-
ities, 100 channel
TV/internet.
2/1 also available
(352) 220-2666
Citrus Hills
Townhouse 2/2/ 1.
Terra Vista Club incl.
$1,000 Mo + util.
(516) 991-5747
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2 Waterfront Furn.
8 rm. house on Lake
Russo, boat ramp &
private dock. $1,200
Mo. RV. sight also
avail. $350.Mo.
(850) 566-4195,
FLORAL CITY
Lakefront, 3/2/1, scrn.
porch. fruit trees, dock
Lovely area, $1,600.
Incl. all util, & yrd. care, .
ref. req. 1st last, sec.
352-860-1885, 697-2290
HOMOSASSA
312/1 Nearly new. Off of
Rock Crusher Road,
near school. Well furn.
& clean. Great cond.
Lease with Option to
purchase. $950.
Month. + electric
5640 Irving Court
(352) 563-2776
INVERNESS
1 BR Mobile, 55+ water-
front park, Incl. water
$475 352-476-4964


INVERNESS IBD
w/2 bd loft. W/D. $600
+ sec. 352-726-1882




2 Masters /2/2 (large)
SUGARMILL Woods
Screen lanal, oversized
gar. new appl. & A/C
$850 mo.
(352)302-4057

2 or 3 Bedrooms
RENT TO OWN- NO
CREDIT CHECKII
Low Downl
352-484-0866
lademission.com
BEV. HILLS/Cit. Sprg
2/1, Bev, Hills $650. mo.
4/1, Cit. Sprgs $700. mo
352-746-0330


Duplexes
For Rent I


POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - Waterfront
homes, Wkly priv. rms,
RV lots. 352-628-0011
RIVERHAVEN
3/2/2, Liv. Din. Fam. Rm.
Patio $950 mo.
(352) 341-4178




AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hernando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
intemet/long dist.
Trailers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant
CRYSTAL RIVER
$75 wkly/lst/L. Incls utils.
& satellite. (352)
563-1465: 212-1960;
CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR Furn., cable, W/D,
phone, priv., BA, use of
Kit, $350. 352-795-7412


CLASSIFIED




2/1 + fl rm, renovated
5 S. Lincoln Av. $600.
(352) 422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1,C/H/A, ceiling fans,
W/D, ready now $575.
mo. 352-422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 Fl. Rm., W/D, CHA
New: Paint, Carpet,
refrig., blinds, 795-9060


CITRUS HILLS
3/2 Pool Home
1 Acre, $975
(352)746-4821

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/1 $825mo + sec.
352-746-9436

CITRUS
SPRINGS
3/2/2 Newer Home.
Washer & dryer.
Sprinkler system.
Quiet neighborhood.
$795. Monthly.
(352) 812-1414
CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 3/2/2 , Near Sch.
$875. mo 352-628-0731
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, INCLS UTILITIES
$200-$220 per wk
(352) 628-1062
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lovely, Spacious 3/2/1,
Unfurnished $850 mo.
or $1000 mo. furnished
352-628-1149
CRYSTAL RIVER
Rent or Rent to Own
Copeland PK Beauty
3/2, Lrg Fam. Rm.
Tiled, gorgeous
spotless, fenced,
Pets OK, $750mo.
352-527-0493
352-427-7644
DUNNELLON
3/1 '/2/2, Fire Place,
$895. mo. 1st last, sec.
(352) 48.9-9239
GOLFER'S DREAM
Home 3/2/2
3000 sf
$850 (908) 322-6529
HOMOSASSA
$350....1/1, Duplex
$525/up..2/1 .Duplex
$700..2/2/2 SMW Vjlla
$1000. WF 3/2/2 Home
River Unks Realty. Call
352-628-1616
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$55Q/mo. 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
2/2 off Cardinal Lane
$600 mo 1st + dep. Lease
option (352) 628-7682
HOMOSASSA SMW
Beautiful, 3/2 posss 2/2
Lease Opt .Flexible
Financing Imm. Occ
352-795-0088
INVERNESS
2/2, $650mo, 1st/last
$300 sec.(352) 860-2055
INVERNESS
2/2, Modern, light
& bright. $650/mo.
F/L/S/352-634-1141
INVERNESS
2/2/1, City Water.
No Pets $650+ sec
352-344-4192; 613-6364
INVERNESS
2/2/1, pet ok. $650. Mo.
(813) 973-7237
INVERNESS
2/2/2 New kitchen,
fam. rm., fire place,
fen'cd. yd., close to
schools & shop. $700.
mo.+sec.(845) 313-3992
INVERNESS
610 Independence Hwy
3/2/2 Fenced yard.
Rent w/option to buy.
$750/mo. 1st +Sec.
352-422-3670

INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
4/2/2 or 3/2/2 Starting
at $790 (352) 341-1142
(352) 601-2615

INVERNESS
Very nice quiet
neighborhood, close
to Ft. Cooper Park. 3/2
w/oversized garage
enclosed porch,
fenced In back yard,
all appliances. Lots of
closet space. Very
clean. Ready to move
In. Only $825 per
month. 1st, Lst, Sec.
For appointment call
(352) 726-3258
OLD HOMOSASSA
3/2, Like New, Modern
Kit. w/ D/W & Mlcrowve
Indoor laun. rm. $795
(352) 697-5708
PINE RIDGE
3/2/2, $1,000 ma. 1st
last sec. 352-527-0635

SOUTHERN
WOODS
4/3/2 Luxury
executive home
on golf course,
great views,
$1,300/Mo.
(813) 390-7109
SUGAR MILL
WOODS
3/2/2 w/den, scm 'd porch
$875. Mo. + Sec.
(352) 597-5221




CRYSTAL RIVER
31212.5 $1,200 Mo.
Garbage and lawn
Smaintence included.
1st & Sec; Lease,
Pets?
(352) 795-0207
(352) 212-4981


100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
*Low income applicants
can quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or No credit
OKAY
*recent bankruptcy
OKAY*
CAII TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
*Credit and income
restriction apply*
Florida licensed mort-
gage lender










HERNANDO
ALESCI'S
CORNER PLAZA
HWY. 486
OFFICE/RETAIL
1000, SQ. FT.
INCLUDES COMMON
AREA
MAINTENANCE,
WATER, WASTE,
GARBAGE &
SIGNAGE. ONLY
$750.MO. + SALES
TAX. $795. TOTAL. NO
SEC., NO LAST MO.
RENT. FIRST MO.
RENT ONLY. ALSO
1,194 SQ. FT., 1,250
SQ. FT. & 2,000 SQ.
FT. AVAILABLE.
(352) 447-1244






8420 N Sarazen Dr
Citrus Springs FL
34434 4bd-2ba in .29
lot spacious w/great
golf course right
around the corner.
Built in 2005 and in
excellent conditions.
126,700.00 (OBO)
For info. call
352-489-7851,
352-322-5323 or email
to
hector@harroyo.net


HOME TO SHARE
Widow would like
person to share lovely
home on 2 acres.
Dog okay. 1/2 utils only.
352-220-6100
Inverness 1 bedroom. 1
Private bath. Smokers
Welcome 352-560-7334




2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Util. Incl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
(352) 628-9759



OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507




AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hernando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
internet/long dist.
raiers175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant




AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50
Ad includes 20 lines of copy
w/ photo.



Lakefront 7 Acres, Flo-
ral City Lake Tsala
Apopka 2 dwellings 2
barns see
pictures/details
floralcitylakefront.com
skyetraveler@att.net

Picture Perfect Homes
NEW HOMES START-
INGAt 175,000 On
Your Lot
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lc. # CBC059685

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to
advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
discrimination.
" Familial status
includes children under
. the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing
custody of children
under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
.number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



' I


3/2/2 For Sale or Rent
Citrus Springs Newer
Home, low/dn, easy
terms 352-840-3324

ATTENTION!!
BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
$39,900. Delivered
and Set, $0-Down
Land/Home $650. mo.
Repos Available
Kinder
Mobile Home
(352) 622-2460

BEAUTIFUL LOCATION
3/2/2 w/garden room.
By Owner. Lots of
upgrades. Like new.
Oversized prime lot.
A must to see. Asking
$179,900 (352) 527-4488





RealtySelect
Citrus.com ,


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Re~ia*"ect

(352) 795-1555




FOR SALE BY OWNER
88 SJ Kellner, Bev. Hills
212%/2, FP, Call Anytime
OPEN HOUSE on*
SUNDAYS 11A-3P
$118K, 352-746-6093




3/2/2, POOL HOME,
I acre, membership
avail, to Cit. Hills C.C.
$189,900 (352)860-0766




4+Acres, Canal front
workshop +bonus
efficiency apt.
REDUCED TO 175K
(352) 560-0019

YOU'LL *THIS!
For Sale By Owner 2
bedroom. 2 bath. 1 car
garage home at 9260 E.
Alvada Lane in beautiful
Inverness Golf & Coun-
try Club Community.
Features skylight, lanai
& sprinkler system.
Asking $145,000. Call
(352)637-5876.

For Sale, By Owner
3BR 3BA, Pool, 16x24
workshop, close to
school, hosp., library,
WTI, 518 Poinsettia, Ave.
(352) 860-0878

Like Country Living?
3/2/2 custom built 2005
Famrm. 18x24 sports
pool w/scr endcl. 6x6
jaccuzzi, wood firs.
wood burning Firepi
Wood cabinets &
granite counter tops,
15K back up house .
gen, private1.25 acres.
4439 Stallion Ln. In the
Ranches asking $239k
OBO (352) 573-0029

PUT YOUR
$MONEY$ TO WORK
BUY Real Estate
NOW!


Deb Infantine
EXIT REALTY LEADERS
(352) 302-8046
Prices are Downllt
Rates are LOWIII

RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON I


2.8% COMMISSION

Rea t Il
R3IE*Iec

(352) 795-1555





3/2/1, 1 Acre,
On Private Lake,
Beautiful, New rf., new
siding, Has Separate
Guest house, Serious
Inquires only $320,000.
(352) 726-0477


2 or 3 Bedrooms
RENT TO OWN- NO
CREDIT CHECKII
Low Down!
352-484-0866
iademission.com
3/2/2, Living Rm. Din-
Ing & Fam. Rm., eat In
Kit.. scrn. back porch,
fenced back yrd., Lrg.
15 x 30 above ground
pool w/attach. deck.
new roof, Insulated
windows. $139,500
5901 W WOODSIDE DR
(352) 563-0093


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI
Your SATISFACTION
Is Mv Futurell
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC
CONNELL HEIGHTS
2/2, Great Rm, vaulted
ceil. open kit. b/bar, .
fenced back yrd.
scm. par., new appl's,
1600 sf,(mol) 6172 W.
Pine Cir IC.R. Priced to
Sell (352) 795-9603
Crystal River Mini
Ranch
4/2.5/2 on 2 acres, up
to 5 horses allowed,
$29,000 down, owner
financing @ 6%. Will
trade for equity.Realty
USA (800) 559-4231
RealtySelect
Citrus.com










BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION



(352) 795-1555













$8000 Tax-
Credit
for first tim home
buyers ,if you have
not owned a home in
3 years. Call for info
Phyllis Strickland
P152) 613.35n3


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI

Your SATISFACTION
Is MyvFuturell
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC

Picture Perfect
Homes NEW HOMES
STARTIN.GAt $75,000
On Your Lot Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685

VIC MCDONALD
(352) 637-6200









Realtor
My Goal Is Satisfied
Customers

REALTY ONE I
Outstanding Agents
Outstanding Resultl


For Sale By Owner
3 BR, 2 BA, 2-car gar.,
Cement block, north
Dunnellon Low down,
EZ terms w/$3.500
down $595 mo.
(352) 726-9369
OWNER FINANCING
4/2/office, 2.5 ac,
2005 Doublewide
Like new. 1800sqft,
$9,700/dn, $882/mo. or
$23,700 down, $582/mo.
727-992-1372


River Oaks East
4/2.512 Custom Pool
Home on 1.5 acres.
Office bonus rm, green
house, & boat slip.
$449,900 (352) 274-1594




Call About Saving
Your Home
We Have Ideas!


Plantation Realty. Inc
1352) 795-0784
Cell 422-7925
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner
See all of the
listings in Citrus
County at
www.elantation
realtvinc.com
HOMOSASSA
3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to
head spring. 163',wfrt,
dock/slip. Brand.
new/unoccupied.
2 frpls, granite. $579K
727-808-5229

must sell!
Inverness
MUST'SELL QUICK!
UNIQUE CUSTOM
HOME ON 1 ACRE ON
CANAL TO LAKE
TSALA POPKA. 3,323
sq. ft LIVING! 30'
ATRIUM. 3 BED/2.5
BATH. 2-CAR GAR-
AGE. LIVE OAKS.
NEEDS TLC. PRICED
TO SELL! ONLY
$194,500. CALL
MYRIAM @ KELLER
WILLIAMS REALTY of
CITRUS COUNTY.
352-613-2644

RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Reai-tyZect

(352) 795-1555




LOOKING FOR HOMES
OR MOBILES & LAND
Purchase, lease, mort-
gage assumptions, take
over payments + cash.
Any location, price, con-
dition, foreclosure, late on
payments okay.
1-727-992-1372




CITRUS SPRINGS Va-
cant Lot in Citrus
Springs. Great location
Lot size 80X 125'
Nice home across St.
craig@yourfloridaland.co
m
352-246-7282






Business/Home 3/2 Great
location on Trout Ave. Inver-
ness $165,000. Rhema
Realty 228-1301



7 Rivers Golf & C.C.
priv. member owned.
comer lot 1 ac (mol)
$30K (813) 766-9354 or
sweetscaOeauestti)




1993 17' Sylvan
Bow rider bimini top
Boat & trailer
85h.p. Yamaha motor
Good cond. $3,500
(352) 344-0457
15ft. SHOAL WATER
'05, Cat Hull, 50HP
Evinrude. CC,
extremely shallow for
Flats, w/trailer $10,950.
(352)621-0848
16FT CAR. SKIFF
'96, like new, $5,500
40HP Evinrude, center
console, trolling motor,
b-top, many extras
(352) 344-5858
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
AQUA SPORT '05
175 Osprey, 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual
batt. wlswitch, bimini,
easy load trailer. Low
hours. $9,990
352-860-0277


TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 C9



WORDY GURf BY TRICKY ICKYKANE

1. Poetically, above Clinton VP Al (1) Evey answers arhyming
__________ _ ~ pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Genetic double sector (1) they will fit in the letter
- -ll_ -ll_ l l squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Oration abgut a Georgia fruit (1) syllables in each word. To win
I- m I----_I_- $18, send your original rhymes
-- TBB0 1 1 with your definitions to this
4. "Beetle Bailey" dog's slogans (2) newspaper. All entries become
I __II-I-1 ___1_1_1 the property of UFS, Inc.
� 2009 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
5. Not as intense actor Gene (2)
I l_ l tll Thanks and $10 to
SI IPatricia Heckman of
6. Strongly advocating joining together (2) Long Beach, CA for
#2. Send your entry
1 1 1to this newspaper.

7. Three-wheeler's frozen water hangings (3)


SaI'I31STODAlll fMIONIlW DNI9lfl '9 W(l Ml1Ul lW'U
SOOJ10I SOJJAO'f' HOa$EdS HOvad'e SNOZMNOT' aHODIOD-'T
6-2-09 ssSNacw











CIO TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009


190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
L.90QL352-746-5856
AQUA SPORT
2000; 225 Explorer 24'
Cuddy cabin. 225
Johnsdn Ocean Pro.
Loadmaster tandem axle
trailer. Exc. cond.
$14,500.352-493-7377;
352-221-5230
AQUA SPORT
'86 25FT.Cuddy Cabin.
W/twin '06 Optlmax
150hp & double
axle trailer. $16,900
(352)257-1355
Bass Stream Boat
1999, 15 ft., boat, motor
& trailer, starter needs
fly wheel $1,200. obo
(352) 287-2510
BOSTON WHALER
14 ' w/40 hp Johnson,
Everything works good
$1800 (352) 302-0033
Cabin Cruiser
24ft.
Owner died, 6 cyl. 10,
alpha one/OD, used in
fresh water, tan. gal. tri
Incl.'d $2,100 464-0316
CENTURY
'01- Bay, 21ft.
'02, 150HP Yamaha w/
trdr., custom cover
dep/find, VHF, Iw hrs.,
like new, $13,950.
(352) 442-7772
Deck Boat
95' 19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ ra-
dio & fishfinder. New Bat-
tery switch. 2 batteries,
power pk.
prop./hub.$6,000
(352) 726-0838
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras!
$13,500/obo.
(352) 489-9640
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
115HP, 4strke Yamaha,
w/trir: $11,200. will
trade (352) 503-3778
OSPREY
1994 -16ft, CC, bay boat.
88 HP Evinrude, Garmin
GPS/recorder $4500.
352-621-4711
PONTOON '08
Sweetwater 21ft. 25 hours.
90hp Yamaha.
$16,500. Many Extras
352-503-6797
PONTOON
22' Palm Beach 2002
60hp Yamaha $4800
(239) 571-2628
PONTOON BOAT
08' 20 Ft. To many
options to list. $13,000
Call for info. 628-7926
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras
$12,000 (352) 628-0281
PRO-LINE 221
WALKAROUND 1999
200 HP Mercury w/ 9.9 HP
Johnson kicker,$12k
obo. Call Kurt at Pete's
Pier 352-795-6067
SEA PRO
'00 19 FT. C/C. Loaded.
Elec. Pkg. 115 FI 4 Strk.
Yam.'100 hrs. Bim. top.
Best offe'(352)533-3093
SEADOO 15FT
'97 Runs great, looks
great. 135HP Inboard
Boat cover, trailer.
$4200..352-484-9854
SUNDANCE SKIFF
'02 - 16ft. 30HP Mercury.
Center Console, trolling
motor., B-top, trailer.
$4500. 352-422-7765
T-CRAFT
23'L; 6'W, '02 150H Evin.
mtr. w fuel enj. like new, trir.
w/brks
$7750 352-489-3661
Ultimate Scallop
I Boat 03, 25' Sun
Tracker, 05 Merc 90hp, lo
hrs. tandem trial. like new
exc. value $11,500.
352-586-1676
WELLCRAFT
1987, 250 Sportsman,
25', Gas eng., 30" draft,
260 hp I/O, alum.
trailer.$8,000
(352) 344-9651



22 FT. Minnie Winnie
1993, Class C, 16 mpg,
dependable, like new
small V-8, sleeps 6
$7,300 (352) 563-9964
'02 Cedar Creek 5th
Wheel 29ff, 2-slldes,
queen bed,bath/shower,
low mileage, loaded,
,good cond. $16,800
(352) 746-4969
'07 NEW MAR
Cypress 32ft 5th wheel.
2 slIdes. Separate bath.
Extras. 3 yr ext. warr.
$35,900/obo
352-794-3534
$5001 Police
Impounds for salel
Cars from $500
800.366-9813 x 7374
'98 ENDEAVOR '
38 Ft. W/Slide. 36 K Mi.
Dual air. $37,700 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
* A.TO.J OA*
* & RVr*
DONATIONS;
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
(352) 795-9621
* Tax Deductible *r

CHEVY '86 Class c
Very good cond. Needs
tires. $4,000. Call
anytime. (352) 446-6329
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273


FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane New
deal. 30Q, class A motor
home, 31% ft., 22k ml.
V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen.,-qn bed,
etc. Saturn tow Incl.
$35,000. (352) 397-5007'
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008'
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool,
clubhouse etc. Can be
moved $29,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
Holiday Rambler
'03, By Monico, 300
Cummins, 2 slides,
under warranty
mint cond. $69,900.
(352) 302-7073
Holiday Rambler
Admiral Motor Home 36'
2 slides, 340hp, gas eng.
all options transf ext
warr. $51,900
352 795-3970


BT Cruiser 03, 22' fully
loaded, ready to travel
$27,500....
(352) 341-1297
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low ml, 1, slide, loaded.
$52,995. 352-464-0371
Keystone 07
Big Sky 5th Wheel Prem.
Pkg 340RLQ every option.
Center Island Kit. incis
sep.W/D, added 2nd a/c in
bedroom
Price to Sale $52K firm
352-794-3068
PACE ARROW
04, 38' 3 SLIDES
21k mi fully loaded
3 tv's $92,500 obo
352-302-0743



BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrlg.
Uke new. $8,900.
352-489-3661
COLEMAN NIAGRA
2002, 15FT, opens to
26FT, 1 slide, $5,500 obo
(352) 302-1322
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778

I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO
07 Jay Flight
28' used twice, smells &
looks new, green clean,
sips 6 $16,800 (352)
503-7431
MEADOWBROOK
5th Wheel, 2000 Excel-
lent. Photos at
http:l/plcasaweb.google.c
ornmeadowbrook.Glenn
$13,9m&00
(352)302-6055 or
(727)692-9045
Montana
'03, 5th wheel, 3 slides
like new,$30,000.
Truck avail also for tow
(352) 422-5731
PROWLER
'99 21', self contained,
sleeps 6, new tires, AC,
bath, etc. $5,300
(352) 795-1417
SKYLINE 04
32' sleeps 8, used
once $11,500
(352) 586-9614
TRAIL CRUISER '04
17FT, lightweight,
fully loaded. Used
10 times. $6800.
352-628-4522



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374



$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
CASH BUYER
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans
For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333



1997 MAZDA MIATA
Convertable, Fun &
dependable, Porche
Red, new top, 36mpg,
5-speed, A/C, new tires.
Mint $5,700 352)
563-9964
'06 TOYOTA
Corolla LE Sport, 48k ml,
Sliver, pwr roof, win-
dows, dr locks. Cruise,
auto, 6 disc CD, 40mpg.
Senior owned. New tires.
Garage kept $11,900
352-860-1106:201-4499
,$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
ACURA
2004, TSX Certified.
Low MILES, Uke New
Only $289 mo.
1-800-733-9138
BMW
'03, 745 LI, NAV, black,
sun roof. all options $29K
Mint "
(352) 746-2696
CADILLAC
'99 DeVIlle, 39 K. MI.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
dxc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715
CHEVY,
'05, Impala, All Pwr, CD,
sunrf., new batt. good
cond., 46K mi. $7,600
(352) 527-3735
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Conv. rare
auto, AC, V6, 36 mpg )et
black, dependable.
$5200 352- 563-0615
CORVETTE
02, Z06,
Black, low mi., over
30 mpg hwy. $24,400.
(352) 613-5355
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 mi-
les on this rare silver on
sliver on silver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are on .
this gorgeous vette,


Over $2,000 In
aftermarket parts
Included, Your's
for only, $48,000.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE 4-speed,1978
Silver Anniversary w/air,
t-top, 350 Chevy motor.
Works good. $12,500
(352) 212-5526
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, auto,
SHOW CARI
$11,500 or will trade for
truck. 352-563-6428
FORD
2006, Taurus Lather,
Sunroof & More
Take Over Pmts $189
mo 1-800-733-9138
HONDA
'08 Civic, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
HONDA
2008, Civic EX, 2 Dr
Coupe, Sdcriflce
Great Mileage
1-800-733-9138


2008, Tlburon Only 600
Miles Must Selll Take
over pmts $249 mo
1-800-733-9138
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k ml,
white. Well maintained.
$2650. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
LINCOLN
'96, Towncar, garage
kept, 88K miles, loaded
$3,650 obo
(352) 344-5555 ext. 101
MAZDA
1999, MIata Only 60k
Orig MI Fun In the SunI
$7990 Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
MAZDA
2006, 3 Automatic,
Sunroof, 30K Miles Bal.
of Warranty, $229 mo,
wac Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
MAZDA
2007, 6, V-6 Power, Low
Miles Only $12,990
Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
MERCEDES
'05 SLK, $24,995. 2 avail.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'05 SLK, $24,995. 2 avail.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'08 C- CLASS,$29,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCURY '03
Grand Marquis LS,
1-owner, garage kept.
54K ml. Exc. cond.
$9500. 352-560-7386
MERCURY '97
Cougar XR7 sedan,
MffT condition. $3,000.
.352-382-1108
MGB
Convertible 1977, 57k mi.
Blue, many.xtras
Excellent Condition
$10,500 (352)628-0281
Mini Cooper
2006, S Type Super-
charged - 6 speed
Big funI Only $289 mo,
wac 1-800-733-9138
MITSUBISHI
'03, Diamante LS, excel.
cond. Always serviced.
Fully equip. Priced be-
low Kelly BB. $7,900.
352-382-5702
Mitsubishi
2008, Eclipse Converti-
ble - Automatic
Only $289 per mo, wac
1-800-733-9138
NISSAN
2003, Altima Low Miles,
Loaded Only $249 mo,
WAC Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
PONTIAC '96
BONNEVILLE
Looks GoodI Runs
GoodI Asking $1275.
352-637-5394
SATURN
'02, SC2, Silver 3-DR
coupe-automatic clean
& sporty runs great, I
owner, pwr. WDL, cold
air, well maint. 31mpg,
188k, $2,400
(352) 795-7180
SUZUKI -
'07 Forenza. 30K mi,
w/100k warr. LOADED
w/touch scm nav.
$12,800. 352-613-6613
TOYOTA
'06 Corolla,
$11,995 Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 ml.
warranty. $19,000
(352) 697-3428
TOYOTA
'07 Camry, silver, 4dr.,
loaded, leathe int.,
$15.000 Obo.
(352) 637-1276
Toyota
2002 Camry XLE Lthr,
Moonroof, Loaded, 1
Own, Low ml., $199 mo,
wacl-800-733-9138
Toyota
2003 Camry LE
Beauty, Low Miles
. Only $8995 or $169 mo,
wac 1-800-733-9138
VOLVO
'05 S60, $15,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S40, $15,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S60, $17,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S80, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S 40, $17,995.
2 avail. Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
� VOLVO
'08 S60, $19,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VW
2005, Beetle Cony
Lia - rurDbOi Pyvaer Blue
Don I l..s1i 5Pm' *2992
T.,. 1-800-733-9138
VW Beetle
2004,Con. Leotner &
LC.,a3le' LOw Miie, Cr.i,
10 i 990 Jenklns Mazda
1-800-714-9813



1954 CHI YSLER
rperial, Re-st.lorer's
Dream -,35005obo
352-228-0597
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'56 FORD
Cuslorm ine 4 door sedan 6
:y' auto $9.500'WiI con
siaer trade for travel trailer
' of equal value.(352)
628-4053
ALFA ROMEO
'76, SpIder. Project car.
$2300 obo


352-382-5702
AMC Gremlin
$600 (352) 637-1074
AUTO/SWAP/CAR
CORRAL SHOW
Sumter Co.
Fairgrounds
Sumter
Swap Meets
June 7th 2009
1-800-438-8559
BUICK 67
RIVIERA, 430 Wildcat
motor, 86k ml, amfm,
a/c, tiltl wh. elect seats,
very good cond. $8000
(352) 527-3961
CHEVY
'69 Classic C10 SHT BD
360/350 AC, PS,
$15K or trade
(352) 746-9212


305 Auto, All new
Interior, & paint. Crager
Smags & tires. 4" raised
hood. $3,250.
(352)341-3613.
GM El Camino
'84, 1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint;
63K mi., $8,900 obo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MERCEDES BENZ
1985 380SL, 2 top road-
ster. Drives, looks great.
Many new Mercedes
parts. New A/C. Must
seel REDUCEDI $7,900.
David 352-637-6443.



1982 GMC,
64 PASS. SCHOOLBUS,
366 big blk, 5 spd Io ml
loading ramp, seats
removed, painted
white, new front tires
$3000. (352) 274-0339
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CHEVROLET
1994, 1500 W/T. runs
great, new A/C, top-
per, $2,000 obo
(352) 302-1322
CHEVROLET S-10
1998 Ext. cab, topper,
newer tires, 4.3 auto.,
runs great, $2,800 obo
Call Jack at
(386) 867-6999
or (352) 621-0311
DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awe-
some Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded
every special feature. Sr.
own, gar. kept., 27K mi,
$40K
Invested Sale $21,750 ,
See online ad photos
www.autotrader.comlatca
ridlat-f3fd39f
John (352) 726-1076
DODGE
2006, Dakota, Quad
Cab,- Low Miles, Auto.
Perfect Work Truck
$13,988 1-800-733-9138
DODGE RAM '00
Std cab, rare 5spd, hemi,
V8, a/c, 25mpg, new 22"
rims & fires. Dependable
$3700. 352-563-0615
FORD 04
Ranger, X-cab. Exc. cond
38k mi. SLASHED THE
PRICE $97K to $8,500
(352)746-3919
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serve. van. 41K Mi/5.4 L.
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serv. bodyldble lock irs.'
$20,000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
. FORD
2004, Ranger X-Cab.
Automatic w/Cap
Only $199 mo, wac
1-800-733-9138
FORD
2006, F150, Low Miles -
PFri-.: ro ork Wri ,'I S8
.'r ;;0 mo "'-ac
1-800-733-9138
GMC
2003, Sierra, 40k Miles,
1 owner Loaded,
$13,990 Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
HONDA
2007, Ridgellne RTL
Navl, Moonroof, Low
Mis Immaculate - Must
Selll 1-800-733-9138
NISSAN
2005, Frontier Low MI.,
Great Little Truckl $8990
Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
TOYOTA
2003, Tacoma Crew
Cab, Beautyl 45k Orig
Miles Loaded - Call for
Deal Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
BUICK
'03 Rendezvous.
$8,995 Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299'
CADILLAC
'05 Escalade, low mi. all
power, sun roof,
exc. cond. $28,000 "
(347) 266-9328
CHEVY
'06 Trailblazer
$12,995. 2 avail. Ocala
Volvo (352) 629-7299
Chevy
2004 Tahoe LT, Lthr,
Moonroof, BOSE, 3 rows
Famllyl $14,988 or $279
mo. 1-800-733-9138
CHEVY
BLAZER '99 LS 4dr.
126k mi. loaded, great
cond. sunroof, $4k obo
352-422-0065
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air &
exhaust, Exc. Cond. $6,000
obo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl
drive, class 3 hitch, Orig
owner. Great shape &
price. $8,750.
352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
FORD 2006
Explorer - Eddie Bauer
4dr. Leather Interior.
Exc. cond. Asking
$19,000, 352-489-2421


GMC ENVOY
Red,'03, 60k ml.,
On-Star, tow package
5-passenger, $10,500
obo (352) 527-3445
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, $8,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
ISUZU
2005, Ascender 30K ml.,
Great SUV,1 Owner
Loadedl - $13,990
Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
LEXUS
'07 RX 350, Black, tan
leather Int. Navigation, back
up cam, blue tooth, very
clean, 75K.mi.
$25,000.(352) 527-8372
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG. Sliver
W/black Int. Loaded,
57K ml. Like new Ask
$18.5 K. (352)489-7674
VOLVO
'06 XC90, $20,995
3 avail. Ocala Volvo
'(352) 629-7299


CLASSIFIED



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
DODGE
2005, Grand Caravan
7 Passenger - Low Miles
$8988 or $179 mo, wac
1-800-733-9138
DODGE
2005, Grand Caravan
Pwr Drs. Tailgate,
loaded family van only
$219 mo, wac Jenkins
Mazda 1-800-714-9813
ECONOLINE VAN '01
White, regular or hand
controls, Wheelchair
acc., w/llft, $4200
(352) 341-7798
FORD E250 V-8
2002, Work Van, Inside
tool boxes, good cond.
$3,800 (352) 564-4598
HONDA ODYSSEY-EX
MINI-VAN 2002, GREEN,
I Owner, DVD, $7,900
obo (352)422-3735
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT








$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com




$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains &
tows heavy loads.
$3200/or trade.
352- 563-0615
Crystal River



1973 HARLEY DAVIDSON
GOLF CART. Gas
engine, AM/FM, light.
Good cond. $500
(352) 220-2374
2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900ml. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. Hi pert.
Over $43,000 In receipts.
17k mi. $10,900
352-563-0615
Crystal River
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500 .
800-366-9813 x 7374
'85 HONDA GOLDWING
Limited Edition, $3,200
(352) 212-5526
CHOPPER 3/4 SCALE
� 08 Like new, 200cc Elec
start, disc brks, alum
whis, & more .must see
5 1200
(352)212-6497
ELECTRIC.SCOOTER
Street legal. 20mph. No
aliens read. $250.
352-419-4553 or
228-3285
HARLEY
'96 Sporster 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes,chro. Ex. clean
$4,850.(352) 637-5143
Harley Davidson
'06, Road King Classic
low ml., blk cherry, Incl.
helmets/trvl luggage
$14,000 (352) 382-0907
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80", com-
pletely serviced, good
shape. Ex.
access. $5,395. obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109
HARLEY
!DAVIDSON -
96 Heritage Soft tail, red
many extras $9600 call
evenings (352) 746-3613
HARLEY DAVIDSON
Electraglide Ultra Classic
2006 HD Ultra Classic
like new. Fully loaded, In-
cludes Drivers Backrest,
V&H Mufflers, 2 Helmets
with Head sets,
AM/FM/CB/Intercom, HD
cover, Panacia Lighting,
New BatteryLESS than
3500 miles. 18,500 Seri-
ous Inquires only please
344-2491
HD 1200L
'07, 1000 ml. loaded
w/chrome $7200
Fin avail. We Rent Bikes
Lucky U Cycles
(352) 330-0047
HD HERITAGE
'06, low miles, BIk
flnanc avail $12,700.
Lucky U Cycles
(352)330-0047
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 MI.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000 '
(352) 746-3069
HONDA "99
Valkyre 30K ml. Bik, C
- Clean $8k, Lucky U
Cycles (352) 330-0047
- HONDA 06
Goldwing Trike, loaded
14k, ml. $27,500 Lucky U
Cycles (352) 330-0047
HONDA 1976


550cc. 4 cyc. Super
sport, complete, runs
good, ride/restore
$650.(352) 628-5606
HONDA
Aero 2006 wlndshelld
V & H pipes, 2nd seat,
sissy bar $5200 obo
352-302-4320
SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather bik os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Bik w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2' Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, TiL
bad boy Is not for the
fantof heart.$30k
Invested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more Info.
352-302-2845


HONDA
Shadow Arrow 06,
garage Jept, not in rain,
floorboard $6200 obo
(347)223-7269 aft 3:30
KAWASAKI
'00, ZRX 1100
CC,15K. Mi. Very
fast, many extra s.
$4k obo.
(352)621-3764
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
SUZUKI
'77, 750 CC,
$1,100 Firm.
(352) 563-5688
SUZUKI S40
'05, 650cc, 6K miles,
Only $2000. Lucky U
Cycles (352) 330-0047
TITAN
'00 Phoenix, TRM.
Ferrari red, 6K. mi. Like
new, $11,000

am.77


YAMAHA
'05 YZ125 DIRT BIKE
Race ready. Many ex-
tras. $2500. 352-
586-1683: 586-9349



580-0602 TUCRN
6/13sale
Advanced Towing
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
ADVANCED TOWING
gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Uen and Intent to
sell these vehicles) on
06/13/2009, 8:00 a.m., at
4875 S. Florida Ave.,
Inverness, FL 34450. ,
pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the Florida Stat-
utes. ADVANCED TOWING
reserves the right to
accept or reject
any and/or all bids.
1J4FT48S3YL265529
2000 JEEP
Published one (1) time in
Citrus County Chronicle,
June 2, 2009.


977-0611 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop, Citrus County Fleet Management
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
be selling surplus property & equipment via the Internet
at govdeals.com from May 28, 2009 - June 11,2009.
Published seven (7)' days consecutively In the Citrus
County Chronicle May 28 thru June 11,2009.

576-0609 TUCRN
2009-CP-396 Joseph A. Capone NoticeToCred,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 2009-CP-396
IN RE: ESTATE of JOSEPH A. CAPONE,
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JOSEPH A.
CAPONE, deceased, whose date of death was OCT.
28, 2007, Is pending In the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which
Is 110 North Ar-opka -i.ue .,-. e FlIrida 34450,
The names r a . i , ',: rre e;,:r,3 .'eI: resenta-
tive and the p . e rr ao' are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice Is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's estate
must file their 'claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
SALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS'OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice Is 6/2/2009.
Personal Representative:
/s/ MARIE E. CAPONE
5820 W. CONESTOGA STREET
I BEVERLY HILLS; FL 34465
Attorney for Personal Representative
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A.
/s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esq. Florida Bar Number: 157310
209 Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450
Telephone: (352) 726-1211
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 2 and 9, 2009.

573-0602 TUCRN
2009-CP-000293 Herbert F. Bubser Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
NO.: 2009-CP-000293
IN RE: ESTATE OF HERBERT F. BUBSER,
iDeceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of, Herbert F. Bubser,
deceased, whose date of death was Nov. 18, 2008,
and whose Social Security Number Is 263-50-4763, Is
, pending In the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division; the address of which Is 110 North
Apopka �Avenue; Room 101, Inverness, Flcr' :i
34450-4299. The names and addresses of the penr.-.ai-
-representative and the personal rei'.:- -.r . ; ahor-
ney are set forth below. '. -
All creditors of the decedent and other persons r.a.,
Ing claims or demands against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice Is,,equlred to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. .
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court.WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice Is 5/26/2009.
/s/ Gloria J, Bubser
3117 N. Woolflower Terrace
Beverly Hills, Florida 34465-3807
Personal Representative
Robert E. Austin, Jr. Florida Bar No. 0002701
robert E, Austin, Jr. Law Offices
P.O. Box 490200, Leesburg, FL 34749-0200
Telephone; (352) 728-1020 Facsimile: (352) 728-0595
Attorney for Personal Representative
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 26 and June 2, 2009.

575-0609 TUCRN
2009-CP- 159 Myron R. Utech Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 2009-CP-159
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF: MYRON R. UTECH,
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The Administration of the Estate of MYRON R. UTECH,
Deceased, whose date of death was Feb. 5, 2009, Is
pending In the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, File Number 2009-CP-159; the address
of which Is Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and
addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who
have claims or demands against decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims,
and who have been served a copy of this notice, must
file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF FIRST PUBUCA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against the decedent's es-
tate, Including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated.
claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE'OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER-BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice Is 6/2/2009.
/s/ HOLLY ROBBINS
4715 Pillsbury Ave. South
Minneapolis, MN 55419
Personal Representative, the Estate of
MYRON R. UTECH. Deceased
/s/ LEON M. BOYAJAN, II, ESQUIRE
LEON M. BOYAJAN, II, P.A. Florida Bar No. 358312
2303 West Highway 44, Inverness. FL 34453-3809
Telephone: (352) 726-1800 Fax No.: (352) 726-1428
Attorney for Personal Representative
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 2 and 9, 2009.

577-0609 TUCRN
2009-CP-446 Jane P. Bunger
Notice to Creditors (Summary Administration)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No,: 2009-CP-446
IN RE: ESTATE OF JANE P. BUNGER,
A/K/A JANE PHILLIPS BUNKER,
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary
Administration has been entered in the Estate of JANE
P. BUNGER a/k/a JANE PHILLIPS BUNGER, deceased,
File Number 2009-CP-446, by the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which
Is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450;
that the decedent's date of death was JAN. 22, 2009;
that the total value of the estate is $NONE and that the
names and address of those to whom It has been
assigned by such order are:
CATHY HEDBERG, 739 N. MAYLAN AVE.,.
LECANTO FL 34461
CAROL ANN MAWHORTER, 200 LINDEN AVE.,
ROYAL OAKS Ml 48073-3469
JAMES A. PHILUPS, 99 S. STREET, BROOKHAVEN MS 39601
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and per-
sons having claims or demands against the estate of
the decedent other than those for whom provision for
. full payment was made In the Order of Summary Ad-


CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



ministration must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME
PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTE R THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice Is 6/2/2009.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ Cathy Hedberg
739 N. Maylan Ave.
Lecanto, FL 34461
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A.
/s/ R. Wesley Bradshaw, Esq. Florida Bar No. 0977845
209 Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450
Telephone: (352) 726-.1211
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 2 and 9. 2009.


579-0609 TUCRN
2009 CP 310 Elizabeth S. Barbeau, Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009 CP 310
Division: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF ELIZABETH S. BARBEAU,
Deceased:
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ELIZABETH S.
BARBEAU, deceased, whose date of death was Feb. 2,
2009; File Number: 2009 CP 310. Is pending In the Circuit,
Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which. Is 110 North Apopka Avenue,'Inver-
ness, FL 34450-4299. The names and addresses of the
personal representatives and the personal representa-
tives' attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against decedent's estate, on
whom a copy of this notice Is required to be served,
must tile their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is 6/2/2009.
Signed on April 30, 2009. ,
Personal Representatives:
/s/ JOHN JAY
3123 Den Hollow Court
SWichita, KS 67205
/s/aDEBRA JAY
3123 Dan Hollow Court
Wichita, KS 67205
Attorney for Personal Representatives:
/s/ Pamela 0. Price Florida Bar No. 164539
GRAYROBINSON, P.A.
P.O. Box 3068, Orlando, FL 32802-3068
Telephone: (407) 843-8880
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,.
June 2 and 9,2009.


979-0610 TU/WCRN
CU-09-07
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following public hear-
ing will be held by:
The Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board (PDRB) on June 18. 2009. at 9:00 AM In the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please note that the
PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that a
particular item Is discussed will vary depending on how
fast the PDRB moves through the agenda.
1. Said hearing shall be for the purpose of considering
a Conditional Use request.
2. All persons desiring to be heard, to speak for or
against, may be heard.
CU-09-07 Sarah D. Henry for Gertrude Maves Isreques-
ting a Conditional Use from the Citrus County Land De-
velopment Code (LDC), to allow for animals in MDR,
pursuant to Section 4426. Animals, of the LDC. Land
Use Designation: MDR' - Medium Density Residential.
District, Mobile Homes Allowed. The property Is located
In Section 01. Townshipo 19 South. Range 18 East: more
specifically, New Mayflield Acres First Addition, Lot 5,
Block G; which address is 639 W. Sharp Lane, Lecanto,
Florida. (Lecanto Area) (A complete legal description is
on file with tho Community Development Division)
Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan Is available on the Internet at
htto..'/www bocc.cllrus fl.us .C .-. .:.r. Departments,
scroII a.:...r, I. ' -.I.'e rrre6r, l irrlce irir.i, o Commu-
,.,T, E,-.ei^prrer.. -- .
'l11 iti r,re: ae.1ri-.g 10 Dec .,rr, a p a.lT rre proceed-
Ir,1 T,-.:, ubmrn a "re.3iJse 1. Imnerene'" pursuant to
p':',:'aure: el i.:.-nj, Ir, Articile .ii r.ic..r, 2 c-f-the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. Such request shall.be sub-
mitted to Department of Development Services at
least five (5) working days (excluding Weekends and
Holidays) prior to the hearing on the matter. A
"request to Intervene" may be obtained on-line; click
on "Quasi-Judicial-FAQ. .
Jf any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at this
meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the
proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may
need to Insure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
Ings Is made, which record Includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6565, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
Impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
For more Information about this application please
contact a Planner at the Department of Development
Services (352) 527-5239.

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 2 and 10, 2009.

980-0610 TU/WCRN
CU-09-10
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following public hear-
ing will be held by:
The Citrus County ,Planning and Development Revlew
Board (PDRB) on June 18. 2009. at 9:00 AM In the
Lecanto Government Building. 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please note that the
PDRB meeting bealns at 9:00 AM. The actual time that a
particular item Is discussed will vary deonending on how
fast the PDRB moves through the agenda.
1. Sald hearing shall be for the purpose of considering
a Conditional Use request.
2. All persons desiring to be heard, to speak for or
against, may be heard.
CU-09-10 Henry Quates for the First Baotist Church of
Floral City Inc. Is requesting a Conditional Use from the
Citrus County Land Development Code (LDC). to allow
for an expansion of a House of Worship In a CLR,
Coastal and Lakes Residential District, pursuaht to Sec-
tion 4622. Coastal and Lakes Residential District (CLIR.,
as specified In the LDC. Specifically, the First Baptist
Church of Floral City Inc. Is proposing to add a 42-foot
by 104-foot building for educational uses for a Sunday
School. Land Use Designation: Coastal and Lakes Resi-
dential District (CLR). The property is located in Sec$ti ,
15. Townshtp 20 South. Ranae 20 East: more specifically,
Lots 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13, Block 15, of FCI Com-
pany's Addition to Floral City as described In Plat Book
1. Page 24; which address Is 8551 E. Magnolia Street,
Floral City, Florida. (Floral City Area) (A complete legal
description Is on file with the Community Development
Division)
Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan Is available on the Internet at
htto://www.bocc.citrus.fl.us (Click on Departments,
scroll down to Development Services, then to Commu-
nity Development).


All persons desiring to become a party to the proceed-
ings may submit a "request to Intervene' pursuant to
procedures set forth In Article II, Division 2, of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. Such request shall be sub-
mitted to Department of Development Services at
least five (5) working days (excluding Weekends and
Holidays) prior to the hearing on the matter. ' A
"request to Intervene" may be obtained on-line; click
on "Quasl-Judlclal-FAQ",
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at this
meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the
proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may
need to Insure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings is made, which record Includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6565, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
Impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
For more Information about this application please
contact a Planner at the Department of Development
Services (352) 527-5239.

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 2 and 10, 2009.









June 2, 2009


WiivPPAGE 2
A i'eeklvy iadverising supplement of the Citrus County Chronicle
Autos, Trucks, RVs, ATVs, Motorcycles, Campers & More!


Larger proportions and a new skin keep

Kia's family sedan up to date and on target


2009 Kia Optima

Type - FQdour-door, front wheel-drive mid-size'/dan .
Engines 2.4-liter OOHC inlinefour-cjlinder (175 hp); 2.7-' -
.It.: ' er rDOHC V6 (190 hp)
Transrmissionis .
S.' , Five-wpeed manuel(!4 only);flve-speed automatic
S'(opton 14 standard on V6)
SMarket poitiol. ..
As with the similar Hyun ai Sati ie tima
S. offers petyand stand content fprthemopey

*,Pinf.ts Ai:- g .'lhtly tarper-and ~orqdtinctii-lopngitheiarin
o ^igonlogvsioni Restyledineriosul add
, cusonier appel. Surprising tiahat n a'slaarger.
';pt. -3.3ite V pon.ot olrd in. theOptirma, .
*.1L ongWangiryinspres buyng co'hfldAnce A
. . ,lleng-rtoAciord, CatmryanovMalibu sedans;
' ' . bt.ikely woQ't beat theioin sales Definitely
.... worth a look-see for sedan shoppers -
,Safef-ty ,^ , Froit alrbags; sidernpact arbags hdertain -
Sirbags: ant-lock brakes; -..
traction control; stability control - .
Ihie.numbers . . . .
. ,MPG (citylhwy): 22/32 (4, MT). '
;Base price: 19,000 (est, Incl. destination)

BY COMPARISON




CHEVROLET MALIBU
Base price: S26.000
";',.'' Plnh' f t ) h tI h i nL i .pa ' pin. iaqp1'\ . r. i l ud n/rl. hidiJlna, d': "'
l., . _I1 a s ...




HONDAACCORD
Base price: 521.1'00
Snlisi i a J ,id i . -li ,.i





FORD FUSION
Base price: S18,500
? I .a , , f'-ol/ hba1d I( k kl 'ir f 011nd ot & l 1D opi, on..


In the passenger-car business, the vast gap in the level
of quality between the leaders and followers can now
be measured in mere inches instead of miles. One of.
the four-doors that fits within, that miniscule gap is Kia's
redesigned Optima sedan that arrives this fall.
From fumble beginnings back in 2001,
the. Optima represented an attempt by
Hyundai's offshoot division to compete
with more. established sedan major-lea-
guers such as the Honda Accord, Toyota
Camry, Chevrolet Malibu plus a sprin-
kling of other players. Less than a decade
later, the Korean-built car runs neck and The styling fit
neck with the pack, especially since the the Toyota Cai
Optima has been restyled\and upgraded cially the Chei
less than three years after launching its matic.
previous-generation model.
Although the previous Optima used the same basic plat-
form as its Hyundai Sonata counterp.It, overall length was
shorter by about 2.5 inches. That mrnor shortfall has been
addressed, with both models (the Sonata has also been up-'
dated fbr-2009) now virtually equal in size. Most of the


s,
m
vy


Optima's gain is due to a complete redesign of the front
end, now displaying a more prominent grille and logo.
Also more substantial is a new front bumper and available
fog lights, while, conversely, the headlamp pods have been
downsized and now blend in with the new grillework.
Other physical changes
include revised side trim,
rear decJ lid and tail-
lamps..
The Optima now dis-
plays more character, a
vital ingredient in getting
with this category, although prospective buyers to con-
iry, Honda Accord and espe- nect with the Optima on
y Malibu are much more dra- an emotional level instead
of simply relying on its
practical nature to gener-
ate new or conquest sales from competing sedan brands.
Interior changes include a new dashboard and control
panel layout for easier identification and intuitive func-
tion. As well, a spot has been created for the navigation
system, a first-time offering on the Optima.


The base 2.4-liter four-cylinder now delivers 175 horse-
power a gain of 15 ponies, while the optional 2.7-liter V6
gains five horsepower for a total of 190.'Kia claims both
engines produce improved economy, although exact fig-
ures have not been released.
Interestingly, among the significant platform and com-
ponent sharing that exists between the Optima and the
Hyundai Sonata, the 2.7 motor remains exclusive to the
Kia. Meanwhile, the Sonata's upgraded-for-'09 249-horse-
po%\ er 3.3-liter V6 is not available in the Optima.

SEE OPTIMA/PAGE4


The Optima now displays more character,
a vital ingredient in getting prospective buyers
to connect with the Optima on an emotional level
instead of simply relying on its practical nature to generate new
or conquest sales from competing sedan brands.


Pickup & Delivery UP TO 50% OFFIN STOCK
anyservice APPAREL & ACCESSORIES








r UESDAY, JUNE~ 2, 2009


"MAP 18 FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, LOCATION OF ADVERTISERS MAY NOT BE EXACT


SUNDAY
*Coaow CountyReredsmeetforbreakfastat8a.m.Sundaysatthe restaurant at
rearof B&W Rexall Drugs, lnvemess.All makes and models of motorcydeswelcom
Ride follows.
WEDNESDAY
* hwemen"Big Dogs"motorcycle dub meets for breakfastat 8 am.Wednesdays
at rear of B&WRexall Drugs. Ridefollows'all bikes welcome.CallJ.R.and Rachel Har-
risat726-6128.
THURSDAY
0 Gold Wing Road RidersChapter FLI-R of Dunnellon meets at 630 p.m.on the
second, third and fourth Thursday of each month at McDonald's iri Dunnellon.
Monthly gathering is the first Thursday at the Charlie Horse Restaurant, 20049 E.
Pennsylvania Ave, Dunnellon,6 p.m.to eat and 7:30 to meet Call chapter director
Bruce Schlimme at (352) 465-1228.
* Gold Wing Road Riders Association Chapter T of Inverness kick tire at 6 p.m.
Thursday at Burger King parking lotcomer of US.41 and SJL44 EastCalldirectors
Rachel,JR Harris at 726-6128 or Ken and Jackie Smith at (352) 476-7151.
FRIDAY
SNature Coast Mustangs meets at 7 p.m.Friday at the Wendy'sn U.S19 In Ho-
mosassa across from the wildlife park. Bring your car and enjoy a fun evening.Call
Bob at 860-2598.
* The Wanderers Club meets from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at the parking lot of the
Beall's DepartmentStore on State Road 44West of lnverness.Bring yourold carand
have fun with other car enthusiasts. Call Frank at 212-2966 or visit wandererscar-
dubofinvemessfl.com.
SATURDAY
* Free Wheelin'Sertoma Club motorcycle club meets at 9a.m.Saturdays'on the
road." Call Rainer Jakob at 726-7903 for destinations.
ENatureCoastRe eads meetsat8a.m.SaturdaysatHarrington'sRestaurant,4135
S.Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.A ridefollows.AII styles of motorcycles are welcome.
Call Jacque at 637-4693 or Dave at 628-2401.
* Citrus Conty Cruisers car dub invites you to its cruise-in from 6to 9 p.m., Sat-
urday at Kings Bay Plaza (next to Wendy's) in Crystal River.Canned goods are col-
lected for local charities.Call Jim Moran at 527-0024 or Lester Bames 628-7021.
* Citrs County Speedway:JUNE 6: Super Late Model, Mini Stock, Street Stock,
Pure StockV8Thunder Stock, Mini Cup.Any additional questions please tontactthe
speedway at (352) 726-9339.

Send us your automotive and
auto club events information to
wheels@chronicleonline.com


By MALCOLM GUNN
WHEELBASE COMMUNICATIONS
- _ _----- .


Paavement-pounding power
wrapped in a sleek body
barely begins to describe
the Buick GSX.
In fact, just about the only thing that
could be considered slow about the car
was it sales.
In the GSX's brief two years of exis-
tence in 1970 and '71, the keys to fewer
than 1,000 of these hairy beasts passed
into the hands of buyers. However, those
fortunate few were treated to the ride of
their lives.
Mid-sized (or intermediate) models:
such as the GSX were originally designed
years earlier as primarily sedate grocery
getters or as secondary additions to the
family fleet. However, more by happen-
stance than by design, they wound up with
oversized engines under their hoods and
floor-mounted four-speed shifters:in the
right hands of their exuberant drivers.
The 1964 GTO was the original catalyst
for this change. It revolutionized the auto-
motive world into one where speed and
performance became the lexicon used by a
predominantly youthful male demo-:
graphic. These baby-boomers hungered to
go fast and the "The General", with Ford
and Chrysler in major supporting roles,
happily supplied the horsepower they
craved.


FINE LIN

1 '9 7 0 Bui c k


ES
GSX.


In the GSX's brief two years of existence in 1970
and '71, the keys to fewer than 1,000 of these hairy
beasts passed into the hands of buyers.


GM's Chevrolet and Pontiac divisions
became the primary power brokers with
their potent SS 396 and GTO models lit-
erally streaming out of Detroit. But that
didn't stop the corporation's so-called pre-
mium brands, Oldsmobile and Buick,
from wanting a piece of the action. In fact,
Olds was actually credited with beginning
the whole cheap speed movement when,
in 1949, the division's handlers stuffed an
all-new "Rocket" V8 into a benign Futur-
matic 88 model.
Unfortunately, Buick was stuck with a
different image. It was a popular brand
mostly with older folks, professionals and
senior management types, who wanted to
look stylish but who would never stoop to
laying down a patch of rubber when the
stoplight changed to green.
Still, the onslaught of 18-25 year-olds
willing to risk their driver's permits was
too big a bulge to ignore and, willing or
not, Buick was thrust into the battle.
The genesis for the GSX began with the
1965 Skylark Gran Sport. It featured a
1950s-era V8 originally developed for
full-size models and, at 325 horsepower,


wasn't particularly potent. Two years later,
an all-new 400 cubic-inch V8 gave the GS
more punch - up to 360 horses worth -
in either coupe or convertible bodystyles.
The advertising copy of the day tried to
separate the GS from more mundane Sky-
larks by proclaiming "Your father never
told you there'd be Buicks like this."
For the remainder of the decade, GS
versions of the Skylark sold in steady, if
unspectacular, fashion but in numbers far
short of the league-leading (and cheaper)
Chevrolet Chevelle SS 396 or its Pontiac
GTO counterpart, with up to 370 ponies at
the ready. Even the hot-shoe Oldsmobile
4-4-2, at an advertised 360 horses, was no
slouch in the sales department.
For 1970, an onslaught of unbridled
horsepower shot out from nearly every di-
rection. At GM, the gloves were off and
larger engine options pushed maximum
outputs well past the 400-horsepower
threshold. Mid-way into the model year,
Buick introduced the ultimate GS-based
offshoot, titled the GSX. The car featured
an available 455 cubic-inch V8 that pro-
duced a claimed 360 horsepower. But with


a torque rating of 510 pound-feet at just
2,800 rpm, big performance was there for
the taking. At the drag strip, the GSX
could hit 60 mph in 6.5 seconds and run
the quarter-mile in 13.2 seconds at a speed
of 105 mph.
Other goodies in the GSX kit bag in-
cluded front and rear spoilers, hood-
mounted tachometer, heavy-duty
suspension, front disc brakes, four-speed
manual gearbox with Hurst shifter and a
limited-slip differential.
As a final flourish, only two colors, ob-
viously influenced by the ongoing space
race, were available to GSX buyers -
Apollo White and Saturn Yellow - with
contrasting hood and side stripes for each.
Unfortunately, Buick buyers were
unimpressed with the GSX package that
added a punishing $1,200 to the sticker
price of a GS. By year end, fewer than 800
units had been produced, barely a trickle
compared with the other GM heavy-
weights. The next year was even worse,
with 124 cars sold.
The cancellation of the GSX coincided
with a cap on all performance machinery
resulting from rapidly escalating insur-
ance premiums and more stringent emis-
sions controls. Buick's attempt at
attracting youthful buyers to the fold
might have failed, but the car produced in
the attempt remains the stuff of legends.
N Malcolm Gunn is Wheelbase Communications'
chief road tester and historic writer. You can send him
a note online at www.wheelbase.ws/mailbag.html.
Wheelbase is a worldwide supplier of automobile news,
reviews and features.


Ul


Cinius CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


no Y. ,-, Uin








GITRLIS COUNTY (FL) QiRoNIcIE TUESDAY, JUNF 2, 2009 D3


Steering


.;a*'^ * ir , i
,-. .S tI "f


FLAGGED?
Q. Is it true, as my sister insists, that those skinny-flagpole
kinds of antennas have been outlawed? I can't recall seeing
anm oil anything but quite old cars for years.
/ A. They're not outlawed, but there are becoming pretty rare.
They're generally referred to as stick or pole antennas, and
these days they're installed on only about a quarter of new cars
(and a higher percentage of.trucks).
They've been largely replaced by in-windshield and along-
roofline antennas.
Although stick antennas provide excellent reception (better,
most would say, than their nearly invisible replacements), there
are downsides. They're often assaulted by car wash machines
and victimized by vandals; they detract visually from the ve-
hicle's design and they create added wind resistance. Thus
there's a press for those of the less visible, less vulnerable va-
riety.

Q. There's all this attention given to alternative fuels and
hybrid cars and all that. But here's a concept: why not just lit-
tle carsReally, back in the 1970s there were'many small cars
that got more than 30 miles a gallon. Seems like this could be
a fairly simple way to save fuel.
A.. In recent years, carmakers have rolled out some very
small cars - sub compacts and smaller - that are very fuel-ef-
ficient.
These mini-mobiles don't get the attention that the new tech-
nologies receive because, well, as a society we're more en-
chanted with brand-new than with old and improved.
But little cars that get really good mileage are out there. And
their popularity is increasing, especially among the younger
set. These motorists haven't become entrenched in the bigger-
is-better thinking so many of us adopted in the '80s and '90s,
upon discovering how much more secure we felt in a higher
vehicle (the better to see) and a heavier one, when surrounded
on the interstates by 18-wheelers and a growing number of
passenger behemoths.
So far consumers aren't moving in massive numbers toward
smaller vehicles. But sales of them are up about 20 percent,
acco t' ekymates, and since fuel prices are on
the n3 in e numbers could undergo a rather dramatic in-
crease.
In the meantime, for the slices of the population who are in-
terested in going the smaller route, there are options. Among
them are the.Toyota Yaris, Nissan Versa, Honda Fit and Kia
Spectra. And in a couple of years Ford w ill roll out a net
model in he U.S., the Verve, which is slated to go on sale in E u-.
rope later this year,

Q. I bought a .wonderful Honda with, unfortunately, black
cloth seats. I say unfortunately because they look great, but I
didn't think the concept all the way through. They show every
tiny speck of lint, threads, and everything else. I've used.every
kind of lint/hair magnet I can think of and not one of them does
the job well. Do you have a suggestion for something that I
can keep in the car that will quickly remove all that crud?
A. Sure do. There's a product that looks like a sponge, but
is much, much denser and much heavier (and you don't wet
it). Rub it gently over any fabric, from carpets to seats, and it
will attract every unwanted spec of unwanted matter.
It was developed as a pet-hair remover (and any pet owner
will tell you that it's almost impossible to get that stuff off
couches, chairs and car seats), but it turns out it works on all
manner of unwelcome fly-aways.
The specific brand I'm familiar with is Natural Magic Pet
Hair Lifter, and I can vouch for its ability to extract even the
heaviest coating of pet hair (and lint's got nothing on spring-
shed dog hair). I stumbled across it and bought one seven years
ago in a Houston pet store, and I use it still. It's a marvel.
They're available in pet stores, and even some discount
stores. You can expect to pay $5 to $8. If you have a choice,
pick the densest version, even if it costs a little more, because
the things really do last for years.

Q. Reducing fuel consumption seems to be regarded as the
responsibility of only the middle class. All of the hybrids I've
seen or know about are in the $20,000 to $40,000 range. I un-
derstand that rich people don't have to worry much about the
price of a gallon of gas, but I have to assume they've made it
obvious to carmakers that they're not really interested in doing
their part, since no one's making lower-fuel consumption lux-
ury cars. Is there any chance that will change any time soon?
A. It already has. There are some hybrids aimed at the high-
end crowd these days. There's the Lexus LS 600h, which sells
for a cool $104,000. It's a potent large sedan that that gets
about 22 mpg on the highway, accelerates 0 to 60 in 5.5 sec-
onds and costs about $33,000 more than the LS460 L non-hy-
brid upon which it is based.
A couple of other hybrid vehicles from Lexus are also aimed
at the well-heeled crowd (though perhaps not quite as affluent
as the LS 600). The GS 450h sedan and the RX 400h SUV sell
for about $57,000 and $43,000 respectively.
So the diamonds-and-champagne crowd does have some
fuel-saving options. Not as many as one might like, perhaps.
But chances are pretty good the numbers will grow with time
- Porsche, for example, is planning a hybrid version of their
Cayenne SUV - along with other new technologies in that
class of cars that reduce fuel consumption.


What's your question?
Sharon Peters would like to hear what's on your mind when it
comes to caring for, driving, repaimnng and making the most of your
vehicle. Send your questions to sharon@ctwfeatures.com


WELCOME to International AutoCross.
a puzzle dedicated to the automobile enlhusiasti
AutoCross will test your I N T E R N A T I .
knowledge of cars, brand names and
auto-related people from all over the world. Good luck'




DOWN
1. Movie set in Radiator Springs
3. Early Porsche nickname
5 _- highway
7. Nitro based on this
8. Healey's original
11. Explosive safety devices
13. ignition component
17. Rolls ragtop
18 Overhead cover
I 20 Hit from behind -
21. Horizontally _ (engine
type)
23. Exterior trim
26. 1970s small Chevy "star"
28 Mitsubishi model
29 UK TV P.I. drove P 1800
Sb30. Hyundai home
32. Redirecting road sign
34. Fender
36. Lead-acid
" 37. Mexican-built Chrysler
40 "Full Throttle' columnist
43 Force air trom brakes
44. Enthusiasts' TV channel
45 Skirt ispartof this
47 Scissor, bottle or hydraulic
49. Auto and lawn mower inventor


ACROSS
2. Number 53
4. Down-under nameplate
6, "M" is to BMW as this is to
Mercedes
9. Before cars. he was into
porcelain bathtubs
10. Annoying brake noise
12 International off-roader
14. Car option first offered in '29
15. Bought Buick to form GM
16. Tire malady
19. Leads to garage
22. Zero-emissions fuel
24. A cooling device /
25. Rear-engine Sunbeam
27. Fenderless 32 roadster


29. Tire type firsi offered in 1950
30. "295" in P295/50.18
31. Celebrity Car publisher
33. Oft. described as the heart of an
engine
39. Chevy inline six (slang)
41. British racing
42. Mid-engine Lotus
44. Supercharged Jaguar sedan
46. Highway barrier
48. ES, IS or LS car
50. First to second to third
51. Milk-truck maker of old
52. All the options
53. Mercury's Escape
54. Founded by aviation engineers


By JAY KOBLENS CTW Features

As an increasing array of electronics
takes ovter many of the functions of new
automobiles, it can seem that engineers
and designers are spending more time try-
ing to annoy and thwart drivers than to as-
sist or entertain them. Just as past
generations of enthusiasts hale li fled the
hood to "hot rod" mechanical compo-
nents, there is now a growing industry
aimed at tinkering with a car's electron-
ics. It's becoming increasingly possible to
add options and features you wish your
car had from the beginning and even alter
some of the built-in functions more to
your liking.
Automakers sometimes choose' to.
block features that could otherwise be
available in an electronics package of-
fered on a given model. A supplier might
build a multi-purpose device for different
auto brands. Then each brand will choose
which features of that device to offer its
customers. The other features may be hid-
den within the device, but "locked out" by
design for a given auto.
One common example is the modem
satellite navigation system. Many au-
tomakers allow drivers to program a des-
tination only while the car is stopped. Not
even the passenger can make changes to
the destination or other settings while the
vehicle is in motion. Not only can this be
frustrating, but can lead to drivers making
unsafe stops on the-side of the road just to
find a destination in the system.
One company offering solutions is
Coastal Electronic Technologies of Mel-
bourne, Fla. Owner David Watson ex-
presses the irritation felt by many car
owners, pointing out that a simple $100
navigation device purchased over-the-
counter allows full use at any time. But
relying only on original equipment, "As
soon as I drive my car with a $2,000 nav-
igation system, you can't use it." This is
one of the reason why Coastal came up


with its Lockpick devices. Watson notes
the idea is to: "unlock systems the manu-
facturers have blocked."
The companN began pursuing such
concepts in 2000 with the Toyota Prius.
Watson notes :lhat 'hen the Prius first ar-
rived, it wasn't a ailable t ith cruise con-
trol in the U.S., although that feature was
available in other countries. More recent-
models offer cruise control Meanwhile
the company discovered another feature
available elsewhere that Toyota blocks in
the U.S.: the ability of the Prius to operate
for short periods only on electric power
without starting the gasoline engine. Once
the Coastal team started developing fixes
for those issues, Watson noted, they found
a way to fix the navigation in the Prius so
it could be operated while the vehicle was
being driven. Since that navigation sys-
tem is the same as other Toyota and Lexus
products, it became relatively simple to
offer Lockpick devices for other vehicles.
Now such devices are offered for many
Toyota and Lexus products, plus General
Motors, Honda and Chrysler brands. Es-
sentially, the fix involves some disman-
tling of the dashboard to get to the
electronics wiring harness in order to add
a device. Without labor, notes Watson,
Lockpick prices range from $99 to $349.
Depending upon the application, a user
can not only unblock certain features, but
also add new ones.
One of the most popular tweaks is to
add Bluetooth phone integration with the
OnStar system, thereby giving a car an ex-
cellent hands-free phone feature. In an-
other example, Jeep disabled its Uconnect
Bluetooth system in the Wrangler for fear
wind noise would interfere with the sys-
tem. A Lockpick can give this hands-free
function back to the driver. In this case, the
system also requires the addition of a mi-
crophone.
Integrating iPods with factory audio
systems is a common addition that is
sometimes blocked, but otherwise avail-


able. Increasingly widespread, new cars
have backup cameras that show what's
behind the vehicle on the navigation
screen. Coastal allows owners to add
cameras and integrate them with the nav-
igation system on cars that were no so-
equipped from the factory. It's also
possible to add additional cameras show-
ing the sides or front.of the car. The Lock-
pick device can also let the driver decide
when to show the camera's image with-
out having to put the car in reverse.
One small annoyance that virtually all
automakers add to navigation units is the
legal screen requiring the driver to press
"I agree" before using any features.
When the Lockpick is added, this screen
can disappear forever.
One of the best features offered by the
Lockpick, says Watson, is that it opens the
door to choices previously unavailable.
For example, a number of navigation sys-
tems can play DVD videos on the LCD
monitor, although no factory setting al-
lows this feature while'the vehicle is in
motion. Many states prohibit playing
driver-viewable videos when a car is in
motion. The Lockpick allows those
videos to be played, although safety and
common sense indicate that it's probably
not a very good idea.
Automakers choose to disable electron-
ics features for many reasons. In some
cases, too many features can add to the
clutter of operating a modem car. Occa-
sionally, the legal department may be con-
cerned that operating a complex function
while driving could lead to accidents- and
lawsuits. Often, it may be that the manu-
facturer wants to make the feature avail-
able only at a certain option price, or on
certain premium models in its lineup. It
may be difficult to discern just what fea-
tures may be hidden behind your dash-
board; but it's nice to know someone out
there is trying to help you find out what
they are and how to make them openly
available. � CTWFeatures


COPYRIGH~T Wt1E E LBA~E EOMMUNICATInl


Fix some of those electronic annoyances


built into new high-tech vehicles


TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2oog D3


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D4 TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009


FINDING



USED-CAR BARGAINS

You can get a great deal without buying 'someone else's troubles.'


If you like your gauges to be simple and straightforward,
the new Optima is your machine. Deeply recessed pods
will keep the front passenger off your back about the
speed you're doing since they can't see.


OPTIMA
/FROM PAGE 1

A five-speed manual
transmission, or optional
five-speed automatic is of-
fered with the four-cylinder,
while V6 models come with
the automatic.
For 2009, the Optima
lineup has been increased to
three versions: LX; EX; and
SX. Base cars include air
conditioning, power win-
dows and door locks, six-
speaker audio system,
multi-adjustable (non-
power) driver's and front
passenger's seat and a com-
prehensive rundown of
air6ags and other safety
gear. The EX adds climate
control, leather-covered
seats, power adjustable dri-
ver's seat, tilt and telescopic
steering wheel and auto-
dimming.rearview mirror.
The new-for-2009 SX's
exclusive features include a


sport-tuned suspension,
unique grille and headlight
trim, outside-mirror-
mounted turn-signal lights,
aluminum interior trim with
metal accelerator and brake
pedals and 17-inch wheels
(both LX and EX run on 16-
inch rims).
Along with a new naviga-
tion package,. Optima buyers
can add a power sunroof,
premium sound system and
a wealth of other goodies.
Enough can't be said
about Kia's, five-
year/60,000-mile bumper-
to-bumper warranty and
10-year/100,000-mile pow-
ertrain coverage, which has,
yet to be matched by any of
its.major competitors, save
for Hyundai. Thai le\el of
protection is yet another rea-
son why the Optima's hair's-
breath distance from other
mainstream sedans deserves'
serious consideration by
sedan shoppers.


A new SX brings the total number of models to three. It in-
cludes-a sport-tuned suspension and unique grille and
headlights. /


By JAY KOBLENZ
CTW FEATURES
With the economy in its greatest tur-
moil in decades, fewer buyers are willing
to make a major investment in a brand-
new car or truck. Yet the need for basic
transportation still exists, no matter what
a family's economic situation. Thus,
many astute car shoppers are instead con-
sidering pre-owned models these days.
The good news is that there are great bar-
gains available on what are very reliable
used vehicles.
Depreciation is the biggest long-term
cost of any new vehicle purchase and by
the time a typical car or truck is just a few
years old it has lost more than half its
value. That means a car that cost $30,000
three years ago is likely to sell for around
$14,000 on the used market. The average
car for this age will have about 40,000
miles on the odometer, which not a lot for
a modem car where a 200,000-mile lifes-
pan (with the proper maintenance) is be-
coming common.
Essentially, there are two trains of
thoughts on buying a used car. The first
is simply to get the lowest price possible
on a vehicle with acceptable perform-
ance, comfort and reliability. The flip side
is to take the money you might spend on
a bare bones, bargain-priced new car and
instead obtain a much more luxurious
used model for the same capital outlay.
These days it's fairly easy to do some
research to learn about virtually all cars
and trucks built and sold over the past
decade. Various Web sites can provide
plenty of information about which mod-
els were available ina given year, the trim
levels that were offered and a list of stan-
dard equipment and options.
There is also plenty of information to
help shoppers estimate a price for a given
pre-owned vehicle: Unlike new models,
however, the costs of which are based on
the manufacturers' retail prices, the mar-
ket establishes the transaction prices of
used models. That price can vary de-
pending upon condition, location and
even by color.
The most important step for a use-car
buyer is simply to ensure that a given


model comes with no hid- � " ,
den problems or undis- "-
closed history. A
Fortunately, this is easier
today than it has ever .
been. One simple solution
is to simply buy the car $
from a reputable dealer-
ship. Many will offer a
comprehensive warranty
on late-model vehicles.
What's more, most
new-car dealerships also
participate in manufactur-
ers' "certified" used car
programs that include a
thorough inspection plus-
a warranty. While this is the most expen-
sive way to buy a used car, it's still quite
a bit cheaper than choosing a new model
and still gives nearly the same level of
confidence.
When buying from an individual party,
however, buyers need to take extra care.
Potential pitfalls include cars that come
with undisclosed problems. One example
is a model that's been damaged in a flood.
Although states require salvaged cars to
say so on the registration or "pink slip,"
unscrupulous sellers'are known to move
cars from state to state to "clean up" the
paperwork.
To avoid this sort of rip-off, experts
suggest used-car buyers have the VIN
(vehicle identification.number) checked
before handing over any cash. That num-
ber is found on the dashboard visible
through the windshield on the driver side.
Number of organizations can cheek this
number for you online. Among the best
known is Carfax, which charges a varying
fee based upon the thoroughness of the
report.
Although a VIN search will disclose
any reported problems, it can't tell a used-
car shopper about many issues with a car
that easily go unreported. If a car was
damaged but repaired without an insur-
ance claim, it's unlikely to show up in a
report, for example. That's why consumer
advocates universally recommend those
buying a vehicle from a, private party,
have the car or truck professionally in-


spected b\ a mechanic- before taking
ownership.
Plan to spend $75 to $150 to have a
qualified technician perform a pre-sale in-
spection. A mechanic should be able to
assess various systems and components,
such as the engine, transmission, brakes,
suspension and so on.
A good mechanic should also be able
to determine if there has been previous
body damage or other signs of trouble. If
major problems are indicated, consider
these to be deal-breakers. If there are only
signs of minor trouble, such as incom-
plete maintenance records or wear-and-
tear type repairs that will likely be
necessary down the road, this information
may be used to renegotiate a lower price
with the seller.
One of the toughest elements of buy-
ing any car these days, new or used, is fi-
nancing. It used to be that a dealership
would be happy to finance a car because
money was plentiful from myriad lenders
and it meant additional potential profits.
With the current credit crunch, however,
cash is-king. Those needing to borrow
should pre-check with their own bank or
credit union to see what sort of rates and
maximum loan amounts are available,
and how large a down payment is re-
quired. These days the more a buyers cani
put down on a vehicle, the easier it is to
get a loan, and that's the case nowadays
whether one is acquiring a used car or a
new one. � CTWFeatures




63-5966


Classifieds

In Print

and

Online

All

The Time


Fa:(32 535651 o Fe: 88)82-30 mal Was idsu,-honceU ,e m ebie:wwfhonceolttuo


15ft. SHOAL WATER
'05, Cat Hull, 50HP
Evinrude, CC,
extremely shallow for
Flats, w/trailer $10,950.
(352)621-0848
16FT CAR. SKIFF
'96, like new, $5,500
40HP Evinrude, center
console, trolling motor,
b-top, many extras
(352) 344-5858
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
$i.0a0L352-746-5856
AQUA SPORT
2000; 225 Explorer 24'
Cuddy cabin. 225
Johnson Ocean Pro.
Loadmaster tandem axle
trailer. Exc. cond.
$14,500.352-493-7377;
352-221-5230
BOSTON WHALER
14' w/ 40 hp Johnson,
Everything works good
$1800 (352) 302-0033
Cabin Cruiser
24 ft.
Owner died, 6 cyl. 10,
alpha one/OD, used in
fresh water, tgn. gal. tri
incl.'d $2,100 464-0316
CENTURY
'01- Bay, 21ft.
'02, 150HP Yamaha w/
trr., custom cover
dep/find, VHF, Iw hrs.,
like new, $13,950.
(352) 442-7772
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras!
$13,500/obo.
(352) 489-9640
"' . HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
115HP, 4strke Yamaha,
w/trlr. $11,200. will
trade (352) 503-3778
PONTOON '08
Sweetwater 21ft. 25 hours.
90hp Yamaha.
$16,500. Many Extras


PONTOON BOAT
08' 20 Ft. To many
options to list. $13,000
Call for info. 628-7926
PONTOON
Suntracker 24, 75HP
Merc, tandem trlr, cus-
tom cover. $5500/obo
352-503-3554
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras $12,000-
(352) 628-0281
PRO-LINE 221
WALKAROUND 1999
200 HP Mercury w/ 9.9 HP
Johnson kicker,$12k
obo. Call Kurt at Pete's
Pier 352-795-6067
SEA PRO
'00 19 FT. C/C. Loaded.
Elec. Pkg. 115 FI 4 Strk.
Yam..100 hrs. Bim. top.
Best offer(352)533-3093
SUNDANCE SKIFF
'02 - 16ft. 30HP Mercury.
CC, trolling mtr, B-top,
trailer. Many xtras.
$4500. 352-422-7765
T-CRAFT
23'L 6'W, '02 150H
Evin. mtr. w fuel enj. like
new, trlr. w/brks
$7750 352-489-3661
WELLCRAFT
1987, 250 Sportsman,
25', Gas eng., 30" draft,
260 hp I/O, alum.
trailer.$8,000
(352) 344-9651



22 FT. Minnie Winnie
1993, Class C, 16 mpg,
dependable, like new
small V-8, sleeps 6
$7,300 (352) 563-9964
'02 Cedar Creek 5th
Wheel 29ft, 2-slides,
queen bed,bath/shower,
low mileage, loaded,
good cond. $16,800
(352) 746-4969
'07 NEW MAR
Cypress 32ft 5th wheel.
2 slides. Separate both.
Extras. 3 yr ext. warr.
$35,900/obo
352-794-3534
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 36 K Mi.
Dual air. $37,700 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
CHEVY '86 Class C
Very good cond. Needs
tires. $4,000. Call
anytime. (352) 446-6329
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273


HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool,
clubhouse etc. Can be
moved $29,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$52,995. 352-464-0371



COLEMAN NIAGRA
2002, 15FT, opens to
26FT, 1 slide, $5,500 obo
(352) 302-1322
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778

I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
PROWLER
'99 21', self contained,
sleeps 6, new tires, AC,
bath, etc.' $5,300
(352) 795-1417
TRAIL CRUISER '04
17FT, light weight,
fully loaded. Used
10 times. $6800.
352-628-4522



1997 MAZDA MIATA
Convertable, Fun &
dependable, Porche
Red, new top, 36mpg,
5-speed, A/C, new tires.
Mint $5,700 352)
563-9964
'2000 Buick LeSabre
Beautiful car - all the
extras. 128k mi. $4500
Call (352) 697-2333
'06 TOYOTA
Corolla LE Sport, 48k mi,
Silver, pwr roof, win-
dows, dr locks. Cruise,
auto, 6 disc CD, 40mpg.
Senior owned. New tires.
Garage kept $11.900
352-860-1106: 201-4499
ACURA
2004, TSX Certified,
Low MiLES, Uke New
Only $289 mo.
1-800-733-9138
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715


CHEVY
'05, Impala, All Pwr, CD,
sunrf., new batt. good
cond., 46K mi. $7,600
(352) 527-3735
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 mi-
les on this rare silver on
silver on silver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are on
this gorgeous vette,
Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
included, Your's
for only, $48,000.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE 4-speed, 1978
Silver Anniversary w/air,
f-top, 350 Chevy motor.
Works good. $12,500
(352) 212-5526
FORD
2006, Taurus Lather,
Sunroof & More
Take Over Pmts $189
mo 1-800-733-9138
HONDA
'08 Civic, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
HONDA
2008, Civic EX, 2 Dr
Coupe, Sacrifice
Great Mileage
1-800-733-9138
Hyundai
2008, Tiburon Only 600
Miles Must Sell Take
over pints $249 mo
1-800-733-9138
KIA RIO
2001 88K mi. New tim-
ing belt, good cond.
Well maint. $2,100 obo
(352) 637-5816
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well maintained.
$2650. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
MAZDA
1999, Miata Only 60k
Orig MI Fun in the SunI
$7990 Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
MAZDA
2006, 3 Automatic,
Sunroof, 30K Miles Bal.
of Warranty, $229 mo.
wac Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
MAZDA
2007, 6, V-6 Power, Low
Miles Only $12,990
Jenkins Mazda �
1-800-714-9813
MERCEDES
'05 SLK, $24,995. 2 avail.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299


MERCEDES
'05 SLK, $24,995. 2 avail.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'08 C-.CLASS,$29,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCURY '03
Grand Marquis LS,
,1-owner, garage kept.
54K mli Exc. cond.
$10,495;352-560-7386
Mini Cooper
2006. S Type Super-
charged - 6 speed
Big funI Only $289 mo,
wac 1-800-733-9138
MITSUBISHI
'03, Diamante IS, excel.
cond. Always serviced.
Fully equip. Priced be-
low Kelly BB. $7,900.
352-382-5702
Mitsubishi
2008, Eclipse Converti-
ble - Automatic
Only $289 per mo, wac
1-800-733-9138
NISSAN
2003, Allima Low Miles,
Loaded Only $249 mo,
WAC Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
SATURN
'02, SC2, Silver 3-DR
coupe-automatic clean
& sporty runs great, I
owner, pwr. WDL, cold
air, well maint. 31mpg,
188k, $2,400
(352) 795-7180
TOYOTA
'06 Corolla,
$11,995 Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'07 Camry, silver, 4dr.,
loaded, leather int.,
$15.000 Obo.
(352) 637-1276
Toyota
2002 Camry XLE Lthr,
Moonroof, Loaded, 1
Own, Low mi., $199 mo,
wacl -800-733-9138
Toyota
2003 Camry LE
Beauty, Low Miles
Only $8995 or $169 mo,
wac 1-800-733-9138
VOLVO
'05 S60, $15,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S40; $15,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S60, $17,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S80, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299


'08 S 40, $17,995.
2 avail. Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S60, $19,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VW.
2005, Beetle Conv
Ltd- turbol Pwder Blue
.Don't Miss S$Pmt $299
mo. 1-800-733-9138
VW Beetle
2004,Conv, Leather &
Loaded, Low Miles Only
$10,990 Jenkins Mazda.
1-800-714-9813



1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's-
Dream. $3500/obo
352-228-0597
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door se-
dan. 6 cyl auto. $9,500.
Will consider trade for
travel trailer of equal
value.(352) 628-4053
ALFA ROMEO
'76, Spider. Project car.
$2300 obo
352-382-5702
BUICK 67
RIVIERA, 430 wildcat
motor, 86k mi. amfm,
a/c, title whi. elect seats,
very good cond. $8000
(352) 527-3961
EL CAMINO '81
305 Auto, All new
interior, & paint. Crager
mags & tires. 4" raised
hood. $3,250.
(352)341-3613.
GM El Camino
'84, 1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
MERCEDES BENZ
1985 380SL, 2 top road-
ster. Drives, looks great.
Many new Mercedes....
parts. New A/C. Must
see! REDUCED! $7,900.
David 352-637-6443.



CHEVROLET
1994, 1500 W/T. runs
great, new A/C, top-
per, $2,000 obo
(352) 302-1322
DODGE
2006, Dakota, Quad
Cab, Low Miles, Auto
Perfect Work Truck
$13,988 1-800-733-9138


'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serv. van. 41K Mi./5.4 L.
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serv. body/dble lock drs.
$20,000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
2004, Ranger X-Cab
Automatic w/Cap
Only $199 mo, wac
1-800-733-9138
FORD
2006, F150, Low Miles -
Perfect for Work$ 13,988
or $229 mo, wac
1-800-733-9138
GMC
2003, Sierra, 40k Miles,
1 owner Loaded,
$13,990 Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
HONDA
2007, Ridgeline RTL
Navi, Moonroof, Low
Mis Immaculate - Must
Sell 1-800-733-9138
NISSAN
2005, Frontier Low Mi.,
Great Little Trucki $8990
Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
TOYOTA
2003, Tacoma Crew
Cab, Beauty! 45k Orig
Miles Loaded - Call for
Deal! Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813



BUICK
'03 Rendezvous.
$8,995 Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
CADILLAC
'05 Escalade, low mi. all
power, sun roof,
exc. cond. $28,000
(347) 266-9328
CHEVY
'06 Trailblazer
$12,995. 2 avail. Ocala
Volvo (352) 629-7299
Chevy
2004 Tahoe LT, Lthr,
Moonroof, BOSE, 3 rows
Family $14,988 or $279
mo. 1-800-733-9138
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air &
exhaust, Exc. Cond. $6,000
obo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl
drive, class 3 hitch, Orig
owner. Great shape &
price. $8,750.
352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
FORD 2006
Explorer - Eddie Bauer
4dr. Leather interior.
Exc. cond. Asking
$19,000. 352-489-2421


GMC ENVOY
Red,'03, 60k mi.,
On-Star, tow package
5-passenger, $10,500
obo (352) 527-3445
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, $8,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
ISUZU
2005, Ascender 30K mi.,
Great SUV,1 Owner
' Loadedl- $13,990
Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
LEXUS
'07 RX 350, Black, tan
leather int. Navigation, back
up cam, blue tooth, very
clean, 75K.mi.
$25,000.(352) 527-8372
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG. Silver
W/black int. Loaded,
57K.Mi. New $64K.Ask
$20K. (352)489-7674
VOLVO
'06 XC90, $20,995
3 avail. Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299



SUZUKI
'96, Sidekick,
4 x 4 with RV tow
package$1,995.00
(352) 697-5530.



DODGE
2005, Grand Caravan
7 Passenger - Low Miles
$8988 or $179 mo, wac
1-800-733-9138
DODGE
2005, Grand Caravan
Pwr Drs, Tailgate,
loaded family van only
$219 mo, wac Jenkins
Mazda 1-800-714-9813
ECONOLINE VAN '01
White, regular or hand
controls, Wheelchair
acc., w/lft, $4200
(352) 341-7798
FORD E250 V-8
2002, Work Van, inside
tool boxes, good cond.
$3,800 (352) 564-4598
HONDA ODYSSEY-EX
MINI-VAN 2002, GREEN,
1 Owner, DVD, $7,900
obo (352)422-3735



2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900mi. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat.
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237


'85 HONDA GOLDWING
Limited Edition, $3,200
(352) 212-5526
HARLEY
'96 Sporster 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes,chro. Ex. clean
$4,850.(352) 637-5143
Harley Davidson
'06, Road King Classic
low ml., blk cherry, incl.
helmets/trvl luggage
$14,000 (352) 382-0907
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhedd, 80", com-
pletely serviced, good
shape. Ex.
access. $5,395. obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109
HARLEY
DAVIDSON
96 Heritage Soft tail, red
many extras $9600 call
evenings (352) 746-3613
HARLEY DAVIDSON
Electraglide Ultra Classic
2006 HD Ultra Classic'
like new. Fully loaded, in-
cludes Drivers Backrest,
V&H Mufflers, 2 Helmets
with Head sets,
AM/FM/CB/Intercom, HD
cover, Panacia Lighting,
New BatteryLESS than
3500 miles. 18,500 Seri-
ous Inquires only please
344-2491
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 MI.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
HONDA
Aero 2006 windsheild
V & H pipes, 2nd seat,
sissy bar $5200 obo
352-302-4320
SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Bik w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, h&/s
bad boy Is not for the
faint of heart. $30k
invested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
SUZUKI
'77, 750 CC,
$1,100 Firm.
(352) 563-5688


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


--Alm







TUESDAY, JUNE 2, 2009 D5


CrTorr CroriNTY (FL) CnHRNICLE


2009
SONATA

*13,80 87
sL -- ^^^^^ ^ I I^ ^^ ,r 1


4*


2009 o11
ELANTRA GLS 1,I 89
o n sftwSSwwB MI,.,


" 2009 6 987
ACCENT GS I I

or Buy for' 41-
$169 mr ,O


TUCSON GLSG$10985


0


. 4


2009
ELANTRA TOURING
rn -


We're So
Confident
You'll Love
Driving A New
Hyundal -
We'll Pay You
To Test Drive!*


$239mO
/ Muill t


.


2009
GENESIS
ddw.S .
mMmw~


$3a99M
36 ImetilaaIM*


2010
GENESIS COUPE
im 'o


$259mO
36 month Lease


--i!#9B0422I
Voted North American Car of the Year
- Detrot Auto Show


e


AMERICA'S BEST WARRANTY' 5 Year i60,o00 Mile T U41 MP

10 YEAR/100000 MILE 8u-,pe To Bum per Cover.ea
POWERTRAIN LIMITED WARRANTY 5 Year Unlimited Miles I FT FF
'See dealer for LIMITED WARRANTY details. 24 IHr Roadside Assistance .1'A: .
Advertised prices are plus tax, tag and $599 dealer fee, are before any dealer installed options and include all available manufacturer rebates & incentives. Vehicles subject to prior sale. All offers with approved credit and some cannot be combined. *Expected range for most drivers, your actual mileage
may vary depending on how you drive and maintain your vehicle. ** On the Accent. As listed on Monroney sticker., t Genesis Coupe lease, $259 per mo, $1999 down, Genesis lease, $399 per mo, $2599 down, Elantra Touring lease, $239 per mo, $2499 down; all 36 mo. leases. A Accent purchase $169
per mo. at 7% APR for 84 mos. Some offers may require financing thru HMFC., ft Must be 18 years or older. No purchase necessary. See us for full rules & regulations. Photos are for illustration purposes only.

USED CAR SAVINGS CENTER.


LIST PRICE .... ..'12,899
YOUR CASH OR TRADE ... 3,000
-YO PY


2002 HYUNDAI ELANTRA $4,798
PL 43A..........................?' $4,'98
2002 HYUNDAIACCENT $4,A 99
L 1666A ............. ... ..........
2003 CHEVY VENTURE VAN fN
L 387B................................. 5,29 9
2003 KIA SPECTRA $ , A49
L1330B.................................. ....... 5 4
2001 FORD RANGER XLT QQ$5,998
L1748A ........... .................. .
2002 SATURN SC f$5998
L1 168A.................................$5. 998
2002 HYUNDAI SANTA FE $6,498
LI598AI...........................-...$6 ,4 98
2004 SATURNVUE Q$6,598
L1729A................................ .. .....


2004 ISUZU RODEO $6,998
LI001A ................................ 6 9
2007 HYUNDAI ENTOURAGE $6,998
L1456A................................
2004 KA SEDONA EX $6,998
PLI1421A .................................
2001 HONDA ODYSSEY EXL $7298
L1 764A................................ "
2005 FORD FREESTYLE $7,399
LI241A.............................. ...
2005 SCION XB $7,998
PLI406A .... ........................
2003 TOYOTA CAMRY $7998
L1405 B .................................
2006 HYUNDAI TIBURON $8,998
L1656A............................... ... .


2005 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 QQ
PL 407A........................ ....... $8 998
2005 HYUNDAI SANTA FE $90899
L1761A.................................$9 99
2004 HYUNDAI SANTA FE 80 958
L 1709A9................................. $ 9 98
2005 BUICK LACROSSE Q f
PL1435A................................. ,9 9
2006 HYUNDAI SANTA FE LX 64 .7On
L1287A ......................... ..... $107998
2006 HYUNDAITUCSON SE $ ..,99
PL1434A ...................... . '
2006 SCION TC $10,998
PL1434A............................... .1 )9
2005 HYUNDAITUCSON e 0i99
L1623A......................."....... U 9


LIST PRICE ........*10,298
YOUR CASH OR TRADE... *3,000
YOU PAy lak
f�'t~.i'7^ ~ Wryow


2009

SANTA FE GLS

*.1990. .


(R) HYunDg;l THE INTiELL11GENT CHOICE


t




CITRUS COUNTY. (FL) CHRONICLE


WO T UESDAYt, J UiNF Z, SZtr


I/


I H


"You must know what your
trade is worth, no matter
where you plan to buy..."


-ti kil liii


:1111


~!iII


0 .11;"


2009 VERSA


FREE 24HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 6112
8,1988' or "159t'm,O
2009 ALTIMA


FREE24HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIALPRICING.
800.584-8755 Ext. 6132,
1t6,988 or'298 mo.
2009 ROGUE


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 ExI.2149
1i6,988* or $298 mo.
2009 MURANO


FREE24HRRECORDEDMESSAGE WITH INFOAND SPECIALPRICING
800.584.80755Ext.o,2148
1 9,988 or'.358mo.l
2009 TITAN


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 6110
17,988' or 318 mT .
CRYSTAL


937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext. 1I
crystalautos.com


r 2009 CALIBER


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 4111
$9,988' 'or 176t mo.
2009 WRANGLER


FREE 24HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO ANDSPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 4125:
'16,999 or '298 mo.
2009 GRAND CHEROKEE


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITHINFOANDSPECIALPRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 2146
'19,988 or $358 mo.
2009 TOWN & COUNTRY


FREE24 HR RECORDEDMESSAGE WITH INFOAND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext.2151
-16,988 or' 298 mo
2009 RAM


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 3119
'1 7,988' or '318 Tmo.
CRYSTAL
Jeep
1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
2077 HWY. 44 W.
INVERNESS
800-584-8755 Ext. 1.
- crystalautos.com


2009-.-COiBALT


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 1102
$12,988 or 229 m
2009 MALIBU


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 2147
$14,988* or264 mo.
2009 IMPALA


FREE24HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFOAND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext.2165
14,988* or 264 mo.
2009 EQUINOX


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext.2145
'21,988* or '398 0mo.
2009 SILVERADO


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFOAND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584-8755 Ext.2150
'18,988' or '338 mo.
CRYSTAL

REVOLUTION


1035 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800.584.8755 Ext.
. crystalautos.com


"All Prices/Payments exclude tax, tag, title, dealer ads and dealer fee ($599.50). Price/Payments include $2000 down (Cash or Trade Equity), owner loyalty, rebates and all factory incentives (must Qualify). Payments are at 7.99 A.P.R. for 72 Months for model years 2006-2009
and 7.70 A.P.R. for 66 months for model years 2002-2005 W.A.C. Cannot be combined with other offers. All prior sales excluded and may restrict stock. Not responsible for typographical errors. *Vehicles are pre-owned and pictures are for illustration purposes only.


9.


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