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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01656
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 31, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01656

Full Text






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61 PAGE A


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community s1 VOLUME 114 ISSUE 297


Water rising to near normal levels


CHRIS VAN ORMER
cvanormer@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle


Two weeks of near-constant rain
is finally paying off with healthier
levels in district water measure-
ments.
"Citrus County had 9.93 inches
of rain from May 1 to midnight
May 28," said Robin Felix, spokes-
woman for Southwest Florida
Water Management District
In its weekly report, which


measures aquifers, rainfall and
surface water, all three sections
showed improvement over the
measures of the previous week.
The historic measure of rainfall
for the month of May is only 3.56
inches for the northern region,
which includes Citrus County.
Rainfall seemed to be heavier in
Citrus County than it was in the
two other regions, with 8.94 inches
recorded for the central region
and 8.1 inches for the southern re-
gion of the district.
With the county suffering a


three-year drought, the increase
in the aquifer level was encourag-
ing. At -0.07 foot in the northern
region, it had risen more than a
foot and a half from April's read-
ing of -1.68 feet, putting it much
closer to the normal range of 0 to 4
feet. One year ago, the May read-
ing was 0.06 foot.
"The rain has brought a half-
foot increase in the lake levels,"
Felix said.
In the northern region, the May
level was -5.43 feet, an improve-
ment over the previous month's
-6.04 feet. On the same date last
year, the measurement was -4.44/
feet.


Each month, the district meas-
ures the water in 76 lakes. The
lake levels are compared to the
lakes' adopted minimum low man-
agement levels.
Streamflow, also
known as discharge, ON Tn
is the volume of 1 waterman
water passing a loca-
tion in a certain
amount of time. The slope of the
watershed surrounding the
stream or river, the permeability
and water storage capacity of the
surrounding soils and the rainfall
pattern all affect streamflow. -
In the northern region, meas-
ures of the Withlacoochee River


near Holder and Trilby showed
improvements over last months
measurements. At Holder, it was
in the 11th percentile, compared
to the previous month's fifth per-
centile. At Trilby, it
E NET was in the sixth per-
tters.org centile, compared to
the second percentile.
The normal range
percentile is 25 to 75 for both
measurement sites.
Felix said the figures for the
Withlacoochee seemed low be-
cause they are monitored down-
stream.
See WATER/Page A4


Shopping for her new image


DAVE SIGLER/Cnronicle
Rebecca Hodges, left, picks out some new clothes during a recent shopping spree at Beall's Outlet in Inverness with Catherine Holder,
RN, right, and Adele Stordato, a medical assistant from Genesis Woman's Center. Hodges was the first patient to begin their weight-
loss program and their "biggest success," for a lot of reasons, mostly her attitude and diligence. She has lost 75 pounds.


Local woman drops weight, gets makeover


NANCY KENNEDY
nkennedy@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle


It had been a long time since Rebecca
Hodges had gone clothes shopping.
After losing 75 pounds, she wasn't sure
what size she wore and was almost
afraid to find out.
Plus she felt awkward having a fuss
made over her, what with three staff
members from Genesis Women's Center
bringing pants and tops and shoes into
the dressing room and a photographer
snapping her picture when she


emerged.
As Jennifer Stricker, certified physical
trainer from Genesis, coaxed Hodges to
look at herself in the mirror and good-
naturedly scolded her for wanting to go
back to her baggy "fat clothes," she said,
"We have two shows going on here -
'The Biggest Loser' and 'What Not to
Wear."'
Hodges, 54, is one of the first patients
in the center's medical weight-loss pro-
gram, which began August 2008. With a
75-pound weight loss, Hodges is almost
at her goal.
See IMAGE/Page A5


Rebecca Hodges shows her new clothes and her new attitude about her appearance
while modeling for her biggest supporters. Through Genesis, local businesses have do-
nated items to Rebecca's makeover. Genesis paid for some new outfits, taking Re-
becca shopping at Beall's Outlet.


Many medical programs proud to yield net loss


NANCY KENNEDY
nkennedy@
chronicleonline.com,
Chronicle
Google "gynecologist" and
"weight-loss programs" and
about 745.000 sites come up.
Not all sites belong to gyne-
cologists who offer medical
weight-loss programs, but
there are enough to deduce a
trend.
Two local obstretics/gynec-
ogy facilities. Genesis Women's
Center in Inverness and Sun-


coast Obstetrics & Gynecology.
currently offer medically su-
pervised help with losing
weight
Suncoast, under the direc-
tion of Dr. Scott Redrick, M.D.,
has about 400 weight-loss pa-
tients' - men and women -
and Genesis has about 200
men and women.
Redrick said most of his
weight-loss patients are not his
regular gynecological patients.
Both facilities began offer-
ing weight-loss programs in
2008.


Obesity is epidemic in the
United States. More than a cos-
metic issue, obesity con-
tributes to a number of serious
health hazards; such as high,
blood pressure, diabetes, can-
cer, gallbladder disease and
gallstones, osteoarthritis, gout,
breathing problems (such as
sleep apnea, when people stop
breathing for a short time dur-
ing sleep), heart disease and
stroke.
According to information
from WebMD, the more obese
a person is, the more likely he


or she is to have health prob-
lems. Someone who is 40 per-
cent overweight is twice as
likely to die prematurely as
someone of average weight
People who are 20 percent
or more overweight can gain
significant health benefits
from losing weight Even a
weight loss of 10 to 20 pounds
can bring significant health
improvements, such as low-
ered blood pressure and cho-
lesterol levels.
See LOSS/Page A5


Clerk of


court sees


budget


cutbacks
SHEMIR WILES
swiles@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The recent legislative session
has left several county clerks of
court around the state figuring
out how to survive as their budg-
ets took serious hit
Although their
court duties did-
n't shift to judges
and court admi n-
istrators, the Leg-
islature now has
control over the
clerks' finances.
Before, the state
had no oversight Betty
of the clerk of Striffler
court-generated said her
revenues, which budget would
typically came be cut from
$2.1 million
from filing fees, $1.9 million.
fines and other
court costs. But a reworked bill
(S.B. 2108), which was approved
7-0 by the Senate Judiciary Com-
mittee, now moves the clerks'
court-related income - which
was used in performing their
court-related duties -- under the
state'sbudgeting process. In ad-
dition, that income instead will
be directed into a trust fund for
the ailing state courts and out of
each county clerk of courts'
hands. This comes as a major
blow with several filing fees set to
increase June 1, which will result
in additional annual revenue the
clerks can't touch.
Citrus County Clerk of Court
Betty Strifler said her budget
would be cut from $2.1 million to
about $1.9 million. In the past,
Strifler said her office would
have anywhere from $200,000 to
$450,000 in excess funds to return
to the county commission, but
this year there will be nothing.
Before the news that clerk of-
fices all over the state may have
to trim their budgets, Strifler said
her office had already' imple-
mented cost-saving measures
during the 2008-09 budget year A
lot of what had to be done affects
wages and benefits, Strifler said,
because 85 percent of the
budget consists of those two ele-
ments.
In an e-mail from Strifler's of-
fice, these are the following ac-
tions that have been taken during
the current budget year:
* Reduced staff by eight tfll-
time positions. (Six became part-
time and two were laid oft)
* Effective April 1, one day per
month of furlough without pay -
office-wide.
* Effective April 1, two days
per month of furlough without
See CLERK/Page A4


Annie's Mailbox ............A14
Classifieds ...................D5
Crossword ..................A14
Editorial..........................C2
Horoscope ............... A14
Lottery Numbers ............B4
M ovies ........................... A13
Obituaries ...................A6
Together...................... A13


Sunken treasure
The'Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg
opens to divers./Page A2


Isn't it romantic?
Despite the economic dowturn, romance novels sell /Page B6

'HaW IO y' Dynamic Cay camp seeks campers /Page A4

Smart Money Bruce Williams has the answers / Page D1

Fear not Over 40 and out of work? There's hope / Page A6


I


,4


contest /B6


Recent rains boost aquifers


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A29 R A.., MA Al 2009


DAYAY In search of a bird feeder ,
In search of a bird feeder


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Rainy weather has washed the trees, animals and countryside clean In preparation for flowers and wildlife to flourish. Lizards
in are in abundance, baby birds are chirping and the squirrels are jumping from tree to wire looking for some food.



County summer camp begins June 8
Special to the Chronicle day and to one other scheduled field N $25: one-time registration fee, re-
trip each Wednesday. They will also be quired for each camper $20 daily fee
Citrus County Parks and Recreation touring wildlife parks and learning for single-day campers.
is hosting a 10-week camp called about Florida. Camp hours are:
Camp Fusion for children from 6 to 12 The base cost is $60 per week plus Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5
years of age from June 8 to Aug. 14 at registration, which includes all men- p.m., regular hours; 7:30 a.m. to 5:30
the Renaissance Center in Lecanto. tioned field trips. p.m., extended care hours.
Campers will not only go swimming Camp prices are: For more information, call coordi-
at Bicentennial Pool on Tuesdays and E $60: weekly fee per camper, nator Whitelaw at 527-7677 or visit the
Thursday, but they will also go to the 0 $70: weekly feeper camper, in- division's Web site at www.bocc.
movies at Regal Cinemas every Tues- cluding extended care. citrus.fl.us.


Associated Press
Divers explore the superstructure of the Gen. Hoyt S. Van-
denberg artificial reef Friday in the Florida Keys National
Marine Sanctuary off Key West.


Vandenberg


open to divers


Associated Press
KEY WEST - A retired
Air Force missile-tracking
ship intentionally sunk to
create an artificial reef in
the Florida Keys National
Marine Sanctuary opened
to the public Saturday.
The 523-foot-long Gen.
Hoyt S. Vandenberg is situ-
ated about seven miles
south of Key West. The bot-
tom of the ship's hull rests
on sand in depths that av-
erage 145 feet But the ship
is so massive that the su-
perstructure begins about
45 feet below the surface.
"I've dove a lot of ships,"
said Tom Kanczuzewski of
South Bend, Ind., after sur-
facing,Saturday. "This is
the ship of all ships. I'd
love to come back in a year
and see all the fishes."


Saturday morning, a lone
barracuda patrolled the su-
perstructure of the ship that
once tracked the U.S. space
program's launches off Cape
Canaveral, monitored U.S.
defense missile test
launches and eavesdropped
on Russian missile launches
during the Cold War.
But project organizers
think it's just a matter of
days before .more marine
life takes up residence.
The wreck is already ful-
filling its promise ofattracting
visitors to the Florida Keys.
. "We have calls coming in
from as far as Germany and
Norway from people planning
tocomejusttodivethiswreck,"
said Bob Holston, owner of
Dive Key West "We have more
pre-bookings for the summer
nowthanwe'vehadin38years
ofbeinginbusiness."


Forest Hills Water System rate case slated for Monday


Special to the Chronicle
At its Monday meeting,
the Citrus County Water and
Wastewater Authority will
consider the second phase
of an incremental increase
in a staff assisted rate case
for the Forest Hills Water
System.
The authority wi)l also get
updates on various rate
cases and petitions for reg-
ulation, including Meadows
Utility Co. in the former cat-
egory and the Springhorn
Water System in the latter.
The authority will addition-


ally discuss time limits of
rate proceedings and get a
Customer complaint sum-
mary. The meeting will be at
the Lecanto Government
Building at 3600 W Sover-
eign Path in Room 166. It
will begin at 1 p.m. .
Operations Director for
Utilities Regulation Charles
t Howard will also update the
authority on current rates
cases. In the Rolling Oaks
Utilities case, the company
- was issued a letter of defi-
i ciencies on requested items
on April 20. The company
has submitted the majority.


Interrogatories were sched-
uled to be issued by May 29,,
from Burton & Associates,
the authority's rate consult-
ant. Burton expected re-
sponse from the utility no
later than June 5, according
to Howard.
The consultant set dates
of June 22 and June 26, re-
spectively, for worse case
delivery dates of its draft
and final technical reports.
The Utility Regulations,of-
fice has tentatively sched-
uled the public hearing for
July 6.
In another case, Tara-


wood Utilities, Howard said
the authority had not re-
ceived responses to all of
the interrogatories issued
by Burton.
In a third case, Meddows
Utility Company has ap-
proached the Citrus County
Water Resources Depart-
ment and is currently in ne-
gotiations for a purchase by
the county of that utility.
The utility is still pursuing'
the rate case until a new
rate base is agreed upon or
another utility purchases it


At a meeting with Burton
on May 13, issues that had
been raised during the cus-
tomer meeting and initial
public hearing were dis-
cussed and Burton said it
expects to have a draft of a
technical report no later
than June 15 and a final re-
port by June 19. The Utility
Regulations office has ten-
tatively scheduled the pub-
lic hearing for July 6, 2009.
In a separate case, Aqua
Utilities of' Florida has
scheduled a customer meet-


ing for June 29. The initial
review of Aqua Utilities sub-
mittal found no deficien-
cies. The consultant
projects to have its analysis
finished, a technical report
issued, and work wrapped
up within 60 days. The rate
case is scheduled to be re-
viewed by the Authority in
July or August of 2009.
Finally, the Forest Hills
Water System is scheduled
for a public hearing for its
second phase incremental
rate increase on Monday.


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I S Page A3- SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009



TATE


LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
COUNTY


Progress Energy rate
increase hearing set
The series of public hear-
ings to discuss Progress En-
ergy's requested rate
increases to pay for the ad-
vance costs of its nuclear
power upgrades have been.
scheduled.
The meetings will take
place in July throughout the
Tampa Bay area. A meeting
is scheduled from 9 a.m. to
noon July 17 at the Citrus
County Auditorium, 3610 S.
Florida Ave., Inverness.
The hearings are being held
prior to a full rate hearing in
September when the Florida
Public Service Commission
will make a decision on the
rate increase application.
If additional information is
needed regarding the hearing
locations and related issues,
call state Sen. Mike Fasano's
office at (727) 848-5885 or
toll free at (800) 948-5885.
Free rabies clinic
slated for June 13
There will be a rabies clinic
from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday,
June 13, at Paws-itively Pets
in Inverness. The clinic is for
those in need and will be
sponsored by the Citrus
County Board of County Com-
missioners and the Humane
Society of Citrus County.
The store is located at 751
S. Smith Avenue, which is off
State Road 44 just east of the
Intersection with Croft Av-
enue. The rabies vaccine and
county tag will be free to
those who need help with the
fees.
Interested pet owners
should call for a reservation at
341-2222. Those without
reservations can come in at
11 a.m., and they will be seen
on a first come first served
basis as long as supplies last.
Sponsors include Room for
One More Pet Rescue, Hu-
manitarians of Florida, Inc.
and Dan Rebman, DVM, of
Floral City Animal Clinic.__
Dream Society
hosts 5K benefit
The Dream Society will
host a 5K run/1-mile walk to
benefit its programs. The
Firecracker 5K will be in con-
junction with Patriotic
Evening on July 3 at Liberty
Park in Inverness.
Sign-up is available now at
www.active.com or in person
starting at 5:30 p.m. on race
day. Early registration is $1.3
for CRR Members and $15
for non-members. Grab bags,
pizza, drinks, and raffle prizes
will be available to all run-
ners.
For information, visit
www.citrusroadrunners.org or
www.active.com. The Dream
Society may be reached at
(352) 400-4967 or info@
thedreamsociety.org for infor-
mation or to volunteer for the
event.
The Dream Society is also
selling tickets for the fifth annual
Country Rocks the Canyon.
Love Chevrolet is the gold
sponsor and Ice Cream Doc-
tor in Inverness is the silver
sponsor.
-From staff reports

Clarification


A recipe from The Amish
Cook in Thursday's Flair for
Food section omitted an in-
struction in her Layered As-
paragus Casserole: Chop the
hard-boiled eggs. Layer half
of the chopped hard-boiled
eggs on top of the first layer
of asparagus. Spread one
can of cream of mushroom
soup on top of the aspara-
gus. Then layer asparagus
on top of soup layer and then
the last of the eggs. Spread
next can of soup over the as-
paragus. Place cheese slices
over the mixture and then
cover with cracker crumbs.
For the complete recipe, visit
the Food section at.
www.chronicleonline.com.


FWC talks manatee interaction


Special to the Chronicle
Environmentally minded
people will have the oppor-
tunity to find out more
about manatee and human
interaction at a "listening
session" held by the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission (FWC), in
conjunction with the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service
(USFWS).
The session is scheduled
from 6 to 9 p.m. Thursday, at
the Plantation Golf Resort
& Spa, 9301 West Fort Island
Trail, Crystal River. The
public is invited.
"Our goal is to gather in-
formation on. human/mana-


Our goal is to gather information on human/manatee
interactions in the Crystal River area and review harassment
laws as they aplpy to these interactions.

IVMaj. Lee Beach
regional commander for the FWC's North Central Region.


tee interactions in the Crys-
tal River area and review
harassment laws as they
apply to these interactions,"
said Maj. Lee Beach, re-
gional commander for the
FWC's North Central Re-
gion. "Among other possible
outcomes, we hope to gather
ideas on ways to better man-


age interactions between
humans and manatees."
The format for these ses-
sions is a short overview of
the current situation, fol-
lowed by a facilitated dis-
cussion.
FWC and USFWS staff
hope to learn more about
users' perspectives on cur-


rent human/manatee inter-
actions in the Crystal River
area, their recommenda-
tions for changes, if any, and
users' recommendations for
long-term plans related to
human/manatee interactions
in the Crystal River area.
"The sessions will be de-
signed to explore these top-


ics and other issues of inter-
est to the participants,"
Beach said. "There are no
pre-determined solutions."
For a copy of the agenda,
send an e-mail to manatee.
interaction@MyFWC.com.
Any person requiring spe-
cial accommodations to
participate in this work-
shop/meeting is asked to ad-
vise the agency at least five
days before the work-
shop/meeting by contacting
the FWC at (850) 488-6411.
If you are hearing or
speech impaired, contact
the agency using the
Florida Relay Service, (800)
955-8771 (TDD) or (800) 955-
8770 (voice).


K'


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\ ' DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Dentist Michelle Graham, left, talks to Norman Mitch, while Roxanne Dejesus assists Saturday at the Hunger and Homeless Coalition of Citrus
County-sponsored "Have a Heart for the Homeless" fair at the Inverness Chapel of Christian Fellowship's Calvary Chapel. The event was held to
those in need of assistance and had local aid. Local and governmental agencies were on hand to help people understand what is available for them
in Citrus County. The medical equipped Mobile Service Center was provided from Volunteers for America and is based in Tampa.


State BRIEFS


South Florida beaches
closed due to bacteria
MIAMI - Five South Florida beaches
are closed due'to a bacteria in the water.
Samples of water taken at the
beaches did not meet the criteria rec-
ommended by the Florida Department
of Health, which recommended Satur-
day that swimmers stay away from the
following beaches: Virginia Beach, Dog
Beach; Key Biscayne Beach Club,,
Cape Florida Park and Wading Beach
at Matheson Hammock..
Health officials said contact with the
water may pose an increased risk of ill-
ness, particularly for susceptible individu-
als.
Firefighter who took foot
sentenced to probation
PORT ST. LUCIE -Aformer St.
Lucie County firefighter who admitted
taking a man's severed foot from.an In-
terstate 95 rash scene last year has
been sentenced to six months probation.
Ajudge withheld adjudication Friday,
so 38-year-old Cynthia "Cindy"
Economou was not formally convicted
of misdemeanor theft.
Economou told the Florida Highway
Patrol after the Sept. 19 crash that she
took the remains to help train her ca-
daver dog. She eventually resigned
from the St. Lucie County Fire District.
There's no law specifically dealing
with the theft of a body part. She was
charged with a misdemeanor because
authorities couldn't determine the mon-
etary value of the foot.
Former commissioner
released from jail
FORT LAUDERDALE -A former
Miramar city commissioner accused of
pulling out a gun in a store is out of jail
following an emergency hearing.
Fitzroy Salesman was ordered re-
leased on bond Friday afternoon. He
had been sentenced to 30 days in jail
and a year on probation. But his lawyer,
Eric Schwartzreich, said the judge in
the case did not allow a bond hearing.
The appeals court decided Salesman


was entitled to a bond hearing. At the
emergency hearing, bond was set at
$1,000. Salesman left the jail around 3
a.m. Friday.
Salesman was convicted last month
of a misdemeanor charge of improperly
displaying a firearm. He said another
shopper threatened him and used a
racial slur while he was shopping at a
store the night before Thanksgiving in
2007.
Homeless man skips
on bill to get arrested
STUART - Authorities said a home-
less man skipped out on the bill for a
steak dinner so he could get sent to jail.
Stuart police reported 40-year-old
Bryan Keith Coley walked out on an
$18 bill Thursday for a steak at an In-
temational House of Pancakes. Officers
found him just a few hundred feet from
the restaurant and arrested him.
According to a report, Coley told po-
lice he didn't pay his check because he
was hungry and wanted to go to jail for
rehab.
Coley was charged with defrauding
an innkeeper and was being held on
$250 bail.
Bear in Broward
may be there to stay
WESTON - The bear spotted in
Broward County may be there to stay.
State wildlife officials had not captured
the animal as of Saturday. It has been
seen several times since April, even
prompting a brief lock down at a South
Florida elementary school this week.
Mike Orlando with the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission said
-the bear may have found himself a suit-
able home in the wilderness along the city.
Biologists have set out a bear trap,
which will be checked daily. If the bear is
captured, it would be taken to the Big Cy-
press National Preserve in Collier County
or the Picayune Strand State Forest.
According to the wildlife commission,
the last bear sighting in Broward
County happened 30 years ago.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
MIAMI - Being a barber was
something that came natural to
Giuseppe Guarihii, who's been cut-
ting men's hair the past four years.
The problem was he was practic-
ing without-a license. Although he
was never caught by state officials,
he didn't like the stigma, either.
"It made me feel really bad be-
cause I don't think I should be has-
sled on a profession I know how to
do," the Homestead resident said.
So the 26-year-old decided to
prepare for the Florida State
Board of Barbering Examination
to become a licensed barber. He
now attends Beauty Schools of
America in the Hialeah campus,
where he is learning about hair
textures, sanitation, sterilization
-and other safety measures. It's "a
lot of things I didn't know," he said.
A bill (S.B. 1566, H.B. 1415) that
failed in the Florida Legislature's
recently completed session would
have allowed barber students to
perform services for pay under the
supervision of a licensed barber
The students would have also been
enrolled in a 1,200-hour training
program.
Current law prohibits anyone
from.practicing barbering without
a license - there are no barber-
ing internships.
Critics argue the program could
discourage students from finishing
their training and completing the
state licensing examination. Some
might even be tempted to practice
without a license, they say.
"Once these interns are out there,
who is going to look out for the citi-
zen?" asked Sam Farkas,
spokesman for the Florida Associ-
ation of Beauty Professionals.
Under the proposed law, the
student's barbering school would
have been responsible for placing
the eligible intern with a licensed


professional. The sponsor would
be required to post a notice in the
salon indicating that a student in-
tern is providing services on the
premises, clearly informing the
public that the intern is not li-
censed. The sponsors would also
have'to pay a registration fee of no
more than $30.
The state has a committee,
called the Florida Barber's Board,
which regulates barbers and bar-
ber shops.
There is also the Department of
Business & Professional Regula-
tion, which inspects each barber-
shop in the state annually and
every complaint about unlicensed
activity, spokeswoman Jenn Meale
said. For the fiscal year that ended
last June 30, there were 262 re-
ports of unlicensed ,barbering.
Through March, the numbers
were up slightly this fiscal year
with 233 cases, on pace for 310.
The department conducts unli-
censed activity sweeps with local
law enforcement to ensure every-
one practicing in a salon is li-
censed and bring violators into
compliance.
"We help them get a license and
keep practicing in that profession
legally. We don't want to get any-
one out of business, but we do
want to help," she said.
Hiring an intern would be diffi-
cult for Jim Jones of Cut Up's in
St. Petersburg, who said every
chair in his shop is being used by
a licensed barber. "I would proba-
bly let an intern work, but not
right now. I'd rather have some-
one graduated and already taken
the test," he said.
That was Guarini's decision
after years of practicing without a
license.
"I did that for a long time. It's
one of the best ways to learn, but
not the safest way," he said. "You
are putting your client at risk."


Gentle dental work


Can Florida's barber

interns make the cut?









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A4SUINflAYVMAY 31,2009)


Dynamic Day Camp welcoming campers


Games, educational

activities highlight

'Harmony'

Special to the Chronicle

"Harmony in the Streets" is cele-
brating more than 25 years of camping
services. Created to promote better
understanding and cooperation
among youngsters, this action-packed,
fun-filled, five-day camping experi-
ence is being offered again this sum-
mer at two Citrus Colunty school
locations.
A joint project of the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office and the Florida Sher-
iffs Youth Ranches Inc., Harmony in
the Streets is open to the first 60
youngsters, ages 6 to 12, who register
to attend. Organizers say there are still
openings.
The first camp is set for June 8 to 12
at Pleasant Grove Elementary School
in Inverness, and the second is sched-
uled for June 15 to 19 at Central Ridge
Elementary School in Citrus Springs.
The two sessions will run from 9


CLERK
Continued from Page Al

pay - management
0 Merit increases - sus-
pended.
* Training- suspended.
* Travel - suspended.
* Continuing education
- suspended.
* Educational reim-
bursement - suspended..
M Cell phone stipends -
reduced or suspended.
* On-call injunction
stipend - suspended.
* Computer hardware
and software rotations and
upgrades - suspended.
Several of these actions


a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday.
Enrollment is free of charge; however,
parents or guardians are responsible
for brown-bagging a lunch each day for
their campers and making travel
arrangements for their children to and
from the campsites. Free drinks and
snacks will be provided.
Applications
are available at 0 For more inforr
the Sheriff's Oper- Hamony in the
nations Center in call supervisor
downtown Inver- at 249-2738, o
ness, and com- and Sgt. Frink
pleted forms may
be turned in at the same location. Or
download an application by going to
the Sheriff's Office Web site at
www.sheriffcitrus.org, and clicking on
the Harmony in the Streets button on
the home page. Because space is lim-
ited, it's recommended that completed
applications be dropped off as soon as
possible.
While attending Harmony in the
Streets, youngsters should dress com-
fortably in T-shirts and shorts, closed-
toe shoes (no sandals), and bring with
them a swimsuit (or a change of
clothes to get wet in), towel, hat and
sunscreen.
Parents and guardians are re-


will remain in place into
the 2009-10 budget year,
with the exception that fur-
lough days for management
were not listed and the sus-
pension of non-mission-
critical projects was added.
Strifler said the change
came at a time when her of-
fice was already hurting.
Expressing deep frustra-
tions with the newest cuts,
Strifler said there was one
bright spot in her turbulent
year - her staff.
."Without them, we
wouldn't be able to con-
tinue the level of service
we do," Strifler said.
. She said some of her em-
ployees have taken on
extra responsibilities and


rn


r


minded that campers should not bring
money, jewelry, radios, cell phones,
electronic games or expensive recre-
ational equipment with them to camp.
Weapons of any kind, clothing with in-
appropriate words or messages, to-
bacco products, alcohol and illegal
drugs of any kind are strictly prohib-
ited at both camp-
nation about sites.
Streets, Outdoor activi-
Lt. Dave DeCarlo ties abound at
r Sgt. Purinton Harmony in the
at 726 4488. Streets. Young-
sters will enjoy
games, team sports, arts & crafts,
water activities, environmental edu-
cation, group-building dynamics,
workshops, plus law enforcement
demonstrations and much, much
more.
According to Sergeants Kevin Pur-
inton and Ron Frink, who oversee the
,agency's school resource officer pro-
gram, SROs will once again join
Youth Ranches staff to supervise the
two camping sessions and work
closely with the children.
For more information about Har-
mony in the Streets, call supervisor
Lt. Dave DeCarlo at 249-2738, or Sgt.
Purinton and Sgt. Frink at 726-4488.


she is thankful to have a
staff that is dedicated and
willing to work hard. Be-
. cause of them, she said her
office continues to provide
excellent customer service
and work on expanding on-
line access to court docu-
ments.
"They have been able to
meet all their performance
standards," Strifler said.
She also expressed deep
gratitude to the number of
volunteers who come in
and work at the clerk's of-
fice. Many of them are stu-
dents from Withlacoochee
Technical Institute. Strifler
said several of them have
plans to eventually work in
government or the court


system and many just vol-
unteer to receive a valuable
experience. Since January,
volunteers have dedicated
more than 600 hours of
services.
Strifler said when she
looks at other clerk offices
around the state.she is con-
fident that her office oper-
ates very efficiently. She
said she can't help but
worry about the future of
her office if cuts keep being
made in Tallahassee; nev-
ertheless, she remains opti-
mistic and confident her
office will weather the
budgetary storm.
"We are survivors and we
will make it through," she
said.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
* Thomas Charles, 35, of
19920 SW 110 St., Dunnellon, at
3:22 a.m. Friday on a charge of
driving while license sus-
pended, canceled or revoked,
knowingly. Bond $500.
* David L. Stanley, 29, of
9375 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Cit-
rus Springs, at 11:51 a.m. Friday
charges of possession of co-
caine with intent to sell or deliver
and selling cocaine. Bond
$30,000.
* Billy F. Steele, 47, of 6889
N. Marmoor Point, Hemando, at
12 p.m. Friday on a charge of
felony violation of probation for
an original charge of possession
of methadone and oxycodone
without a prescription. No bond.-
* Kindi M. Donaldson, 29,
at large, at 2:40 p.m. Friday on
charges of grand theft and giving
false information to a pawnbro-
ker. Bond $1,000.
* MatthewAron Murray, 27,


WATER
Continued from Page Al

"It takes a long time for
the levels to rise in these
areas," she said.
In the central region, the
Hillsborough River was
well above the normal range
of 25 to 75 percentiles, with
a score of 89 percent.
"We see these as a very
good improvement in the
water resources in the past
week," Felix said. "But we
have a long way to go before
recovering from the
drought."
Although the city of
Tampa lifted its emergency
watering restriction regard-
ing lawns because of the
improved streamflow level
of the Hillsborough River,
Felix said the district's


ON THE NET
* For more information
about arrests made by
the Pitrus County Sher-
iff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the Public
Information link, then
on Arrest Reports.
* Watch the "Arrested De-
velopments" show from
the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office at
www.chronicleonline.tv.
* For the Record reports
are also archived online
at www.chronicleon-
line.com.

of 4629 N. Mitchhum Point, Crys-
tal River, at 2:41~a._ Satuirday,
May 23 on a charge of felony vi-
olation of probation for an origi-
nal charge of possession of a
controlled substance without a
prescription (three counts). No
bond.

tight Phase IV restrictions
would still apply to Tampa,
which means watering the
lawn only once a week from
midnight to 4 a.m.
Citrus County is still
under Phase II restrictions,
as it has been since Janu-
ary 2007. In Phase II, home-
owners can water lawns
once a week before 8 a.m.
or after 6 p.m.
"To help recover from the
drought, we're asking resi-
dents to skip their watering
days when it rains," Felix
said. "On days when there
is half an inch of rainfall,
the water is ample for
lawns."
Current watering restric-
tions will stay in effect until
June30, Felix said. The dis-
trict's board will meet June
23 to decide whether to lift
the watering restrictions or
keep them in effect


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PRO PR HILO PR
g90 70 0.00 INA NA NA ) 89 70 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
PC
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts

PC


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


West winds from 5 to 10 knots. Seas
1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a light'chop. Partly cloudy skies
expected today.


89 71 0.00 86 72 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK forecast by
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 89 Low: 61 e4
Mostly sunny and nice

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 62
Mostly sunny

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 63
Partly cloudy; 10% chance of a shower


: ALM
TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 85/69
Record 97/59
Normal 89/68
Mean temp. 77
Departure from mean -1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday -0.00 in.
Total for the month 13.94 in.
Total for the year 18.72 in.
Normal for the year 16.57 in.
*As 6of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.91 in.


DATE
5/31
6/1


IANAC
DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 64
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 51�/%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees, grasses and weeds were all
light.
" 'Light - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms:
AIR QUALITY


Saturday was good wit
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DAY MINOR MAJOR MI
(MORNING)
SUNDAY . 12:31 6:43 1
MONDAY 1:15 . 7:26 1


NOR
(AFTEF
2:54
:38


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
"0 (1 C O SUNSET TONIGHT.........
SUNRISE TOMORROW
E MOONRISE TODAY.
AJ 7 AM115 JAIE22 inllnE2B MOONSET TODAY.........


j.. ."BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division o
Web site: http://flame.fi-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi

.e WATERING RULES'
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus C
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Invernes
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water. Monday; addresses e
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursday
ending in 8or 9, orV through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.r
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.


'.' TIDES
*From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay
Sunday
City HighlLow- ---HighLow
Chassalowltzka' 12:46 p/8:00 a - /8:38 p
Crystal River" 11:07 a/5:22 a 11:11 p/6:00 p
Withlacoochee* 8:54 a/3:10 a 8:58 p/3:48 p
Homosassa*" 11:56 a/6:59 a -- /7:37 p


*"At Mas
Mond
High/Low


F'cast
ts

pc
pc
ts
pc

ts
ts


Gulf water
temperature


na
Taken aM M"ipe


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.75 28.76 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.50 33.50 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 35.08 35.07 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.30 37.31 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from thie Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


h pollutants City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
MAJOR Atlantic City
RNOON) Austin
7:06 Baltimore
7:49 Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
............8:24 P.M. Burlington, VT
............6:32 A.M. Charleston, SC
. 2:01 P.M. Charleston, WV
1:50 A.M. Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
ban. Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
-6777. For Dallas
)f Forestry's Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
county Hartford
s residents, Houston
ending in 2 or 3, Indianapolis
O can water Jackson
ys; addresses Las Vegas
Little Rock
n. on their day Los Angeles
.m. on their day. Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
son's Creek Mobile
lay Montgomery
High/Low Nashville


12:50 a/8:57 a 1:34 p/9:58 p
11:55 a/6:19 a -- 17:20 p
9:42 a/4:07 a 10:29 p/5:08 p
12:00 a/7:56 a 12:44 p/8:57 p


Saturday
H L Pcp.
71 50
80 56
78 54
83 60
79.59
92 63
78 55
88 57
84 58
90 64
78 55 .14
64 48
69 53
86 67
76 55 .02
83 59
79 50
*80 60
73 48
86 69
77 54
76 55
91 62
79 54
83 59
74 46
87 67
83 60
76 53 .03
79 58 .03
94 65
79 59
86 59 .02
89 74
91 61
65 59
80 62
88 62
76 50
72 56 .03
87 62
87 61 .06
85 54


Sunday
Fcst H L
sh 66 38
ts 83 58
s 81 52
pc 87 63
s 72 60
pc 92 62
s 80 51
pc 72 49
pc 88 64
ts 85 50
sh 73 47
s 59 43
sh 57 40
pc 89 69
pc 83 57
pc 88 60
pc 72 59
s 78 55
-pc 68 50
ts 91 63
pc 76 55
sh 69 32
s 92 67
pc 84 54
pc 83 64
pc 69 53
pc 92 64
s 86 67
s 75 48
sh 72 40
pc 92 67
s 78 59
pc 90 64
s 95 74
s 89 64
pc 67 60
s 81 63
pc 90 70
pc 73 54
ts 84 56
pc 91 63
pc 91 64
PC 84 59


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair, h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=raln/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02009 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 87 71 pc 89 69
New York City 76 60 s 76 47
Norfolk 81 66 pc 86 63
Oklahoma City 89 57 s 91 66
Omaha 85 60 pc 89 65
Palm Springs 10067 s 98 69
Philadelphia 79 59 s 79 56
Phoenix 101 76 . s 98 73
Pittsburgh 72 55 s 68 45
Portland, ME 72 51 .12 sh 63 47
Portland, Ore 88 56 .01 pc 84 58
Providence, R.I. 78 59 sh 74 44
Raleigh 85 63 ts 85 63
Rapid City 76 46 ts 83 50
Reno 84 56 ts 83 55
Rochester, NY 66 52 s 59 49
Sacramento 79 54 pc 87 58
St. Louis 88 61 .21 pc 86 64
St. Ste. Marie 57 31 .11 pc 53 40
Salt Lake City 84 59 ts 80 59
San Antonio 91 69 pc 91 67
San Diego 68 60 .04 pc 67 62
.San Francisco 66 55 pc 61 51
Savannah 88 67 pc 86 66
Seattle 78 53 pc 78 54
Spokane 87 63 pc 79 49
Syracuse 67 53 .01 pc 55 44
Topeka 93 63 pc 88 66
Washington 80 58 s 81 54
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 102 Williams AFB, Ariz.
LOW 27 Pellston, Mich.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 95/75/ts
Amsterdam 69/48/s
Athens 82/62/s
Beijing 89/60/s
Berlin 69/55/ts
Bermuda 78/71/ts
Cairo 89/68/s
Calgary 64/41/s
Havana 91/71/ts
Hong Kong 80/77/pc
Jerusalem 84/60/s


Lisbon 84/62/s
London 75/51/s
Madrid 91/60/pc
Mexico City 77/57/ts
Montreal 54/43/sh
Moscow 75/50/s
Paris 71/50/pc
Rio 80/69/pc
Rome 69/59/ts
Sydney 62/55/sh
Tokyo 73/60/sh
Toronto 55/39/s
Warsaw 69/46/ts


SFor the RECORD


S. ' , R s.. * - C - C C, ._ N T V Y



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ra-V auNL)AT, MAY :)1, LUV>l


..........
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s











ExpoJunel9at IMAGE ' a
Continued from PageA1 \ Al . " .


Special to the Chronicle

Numerous exhibitors will
be taking part in the Florida
friendly "Living Green Expo
2009" from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Friday, June 19, at the Citrus
County Extension office in
Lecanto.
The University , of
Florida/Institute of Food and
Agricultural Science
(UF/IFAS) Citrus County Ex-
tension is hosting the expo,
which will focus on saving
money while protecting the
environment, protecting
water quality, conserving
water, and preventing pollu-
tion.
Admission and parking are
free. Attendees will be able to
visit green technology dis-
plays, such as a pervious con-
crete demonstration, and
they can sign up for an energy
audit
They will be able to learn
more about the new Water
Star Program and saving
water outdoors by using low
volume irrigation equipment
They. will be able to view a
variety of composting bins for
home projects and learn
about Florida Friendly Land-
scaping. They will also learn
how to choose the least toxic
chemicals for home cleanup
jobs.
The Family and Consumer
Science division of the Ex-


LOSS
Continued from Page Al

Both of the two local med-
ical centers have similar
programs involving a low-
carbohydrate diet, plus reg-
ular vitamin B injections,
dietary supplements to
boost metabolism and for
some patients, appetite sup-
pressants (amphetamines).
The injections contain a
combination of B vitamins,
amino acids and other nu-
trients; the oral supple-
ments contain
multi-vitamins and miner-
als, including calcium pyru-
vate. Simply put, these
elements are believed to in-
crease metabolism and
burn fat more efficiently.
Both programs also ,offer
emotional support and en-
couragement along the way,
as well as education in por-
tion control, making wise
food choices and getting
enough of the right kind of
exercise.
"I had a similar program
when I had a practice in
Georgia," Redrick said. He
was also involved in an obe-
sity study with Nature Coast
Clinical Research in 2007
and 2008, evaluating new
drugs.
"They asked women who
were interested to take part
in the studies, and there
were more women than
spaces available, so I knew
this was a need," he said.
Education is primary
Catherine Holder, RN, at
Genesis Women's Center,
said they spend time with
their patients educating


tension Office will have a dis-
play, as will the Florida Yards
and Neighbors program. The
Extension's Horticulture pro-
gram will feature rain har-
vesting and rain garden, and
the Natural Resources divi-
sion will present an inte-
grated pest management
program with the least toxic
effects.
There will be many give-
aways. Sponsors and ex-
hibitors include: 4-H Youth
Development, Chevy &
Honda Hybrids, Citrus
County Builder Association,
Citrus County Canning
Kitchen, Citrus County Envi-
ronmental Health, Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, Cit-
rus County Solid Waste, Cit-
rus County Transportation,
Citrus County Water Re-
sources, Division of Forestry,
Florida Concrete Product As-
sociation, Keep Citrus
County Beautiful, Martin
Federal Credit Union, Na-
ture Coast Aquascapes, Nick
Nicholas Ford, Progress En-
ergy, S.E.C.O., Sea Grant,
Water Star, SolarTex, South-
west Florida Water Manage-
ment District, Village
Cadillac /Toyota and Master
Gardener Plant questions/an-
swers.
Organizations interested in
being sponsors or exhibitors
should call the Citrus County
Extension office at 527-5700.


them about what happens
chemically when certain
foods are eaten, how blood
sugar and insulin come into
play
She said many patients
are able to come off their
blood pressure and diabetes
medicines after losing
weight.
Redrick said unlike some
-programs with pre-pack-
aged foods, the programs
that have any lasting effect
are the ones that use food
you buy at the grocery store.
Likewise, Holder said a
diet needs to be realistic.
"We teach our patients
how to eyeball portions
(such as a serving of lean
meat being the size of a deck
of cards). That's part of mak-
ing things simple," she said.
"We tell them not to get
crazy with weighing stuff,
because that's not realistic."
Instead, both programs
have a core list of low-car-
bohydrate, low-fat foods and
patients learn to choose
wisely.
Holder said most health
insurances do not cover the
cost of the program, and gro-
cery c.psts generally in-
crease as patients buy more
fresh vegetables and lean
protein-rich foods.
"I tell them to look at it as
preventative medicine," she
said. "Hopefully, our goal is
to get you to make that
lifestyle change so that 10
years from now you're not
having to spend money on
blood pressure medicine or
diabetes medicine or hospi-
talization.
"So, you're actually saving
money in the long run,".she
said.


extension office


On a recent Friday after-
noon, Stricker, along with
registered nurse Catherine
Holder and medical assis-
tant Adele Scordato, took
Hodges shopping at Beall's
Outlet in Inverness, courtesy
of Genesis Women's Center
Until then, the clothes in
her closet ranged in size
from extra-large to 3X. She
now wears a size 12, maybe a
10, and a medium shirt
In addition to the Genesis-
sponsored shopping spree,
Dr. James Muse of Museum
Eyecare in , Ocala gave
Hodges a free eye exam and
a pair of updated glasses and
Rapunzel's Hair in Lecanto
gave her a haircut and color
and an eyebrow tint.
She went from a gray-
haired matron in outdated,
oversized glasses to a much-
younger boomer with subtle,
light reddish hair.
For the shy and quiet for-,
mer physical education
teacher from Bluefield, Va.,
the fuss was a bit over-
whelming.
"My problem was por-
tions,"
she said, Weigh
regard-
ing her patients le
decades-
I o n g a low-carl
struggle
with her diet, tailor
weight. 'I pat
stayed
with my
grandmother a lot when I
was growing up, and
Grandma was a good cook-
and I liked to eat a lot"
She said she was heavy in
college and during her years
teaching school, but it never
bothered her until recently.
She had been caring for her
mother in Citrus Hills who
noticed that Hodges had dif-
ficulty breathing at night
"Every time I bent over to
tie my shoes I couldn't


DAVE SIGLER/Chronide
Jennifer Stricker, a certified personal trainer, give an inspirational talk to Rebbecca dur-


ing her shopping spree.
breathe," Hodges said, "and
I couldn't walk in stores be-
cause I couldn't breathe. So,
I just sat on the couch and
ate, and when you're eating
a pint of chocolate ice cream
with chocolate syrup and
whipped
t loss cream on
it, it puts
arn to eat weight on
you."
ohydrate s h e
fit to each aideby she
nmt. learned
about the
medical
weight loss program at Gen-
esis Women's Center she was
ready for a change.
The program consists of
an initial visit with a physi-
cian for an exam, electrocar-
diogram reading and lab
work, a consultation with
Holder for nutritional coun-
seling and a session with
Stricker regarding fitness
and exercise recommenda-
tions.
Weight loss patients learn


to eat a low-carbohydrate
diet, tailor-fit to each patient
They also receive regular vi-
tamin B injections and a nu-
tritional supplement to boost
metabolism. Some patients
may receive an appetite sup-
pressant.
"We concentrate a lot on
education - it's the whole
knowledge is power thing,"
Holder said. "Our first goal is
not weight loss, because we
don't want the program to be
about vanity; we want it to be
about good health.
"Our goal is to educate our
patients on living a healthy
lifestyle," she said.
Hodges said her favorite
things to eat now are broc-
coli and cheese and cottage
cheese and lean turkey. Her
ultimate dessert is sugar-free
gelatin with whipped top-
ping.
"My energy has gone
through the roof," Hodges
said.
She exercises regularly.
She said after her first trip to
the gym, muscles she hadn't


! , .


used in years "screamed."
But her best Christmas gift
wds a year's gym member-
ship from her mother
Now Hodges is working on
coming out of her shell and
not hiding beneath baggy
"fat" clothes. She feels more
confident to teach a Sunday
school class at her church,
Hernando United Methodist
Church.
"Before I was really em-
barrassed about what I
looked like," she said.
She said she still feels self-
conscious and "fat in her
head," but that's something
the staff at Genesis is helping
her to work through.
That's why they wanted to
do a makeover for her
After an hour and a half of
shopping, Hodges walked
away with a pair of jeans -
her first in many years - a
pair of dress pants, two
shirts, a pair of shoes and an
uplifted spirit
"We're hoping this will be
a start for her," Holder said.
"She's done so well."





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AS SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009


Over 40 and out of work? There's hope Legislation
inspired by
Associated Press - Just because the job market is tough these days, BRAND YOURSELF ,imr attack

NEW YORK- Trouble in thejob don't assume that the over40 crowd is going to be An employee with a recognizable Lttack
market is bad news for all workersgoing to beil*L1
but those over 40 may be finding first to be let go. Believing that may affect one's job his nameorher a soindustry is hardpertio losein tymied by
these days particularly unnerving
because they fear younger employ- performance. In fact, older workers haven't necessarily Companies wantpeople like that
ees with smaller paychecks could been singled out during the current recession. more apt to hold on to them. elep fa


poach their puosiulo.
That's the wrong way to think
about the current job environment.
Older workers, who make up
nearly half of the 141 million U.S.
work force, should play up their tal-
ents and experience. After all, their
background likely exceeds that of
their younger colleagues, employ-
ment experts say.
They also should know their
rights under the law, because that
will help them watch for and fight
any possible discrimination. Em-
ployers can't terminate workers be-
cause of their age.
The workplace should be "gray
blind," just like it is blind to race,
religion and gender, said Martha
Finney, an author specializing in
workplace issues who wrote the
new book "Rebound: A Proven Plan
for Starting Over After AJob Loss."
"You should never be judged by
your age. It should always be about
performance," Finney said.
To help make that happen, here
are some tips workers over 40
should keep in mind:

REMAIN CONFIDENT
Just because the job market is
tough these days, don't assume that
the over-40 crowd is going to be first
to be let go. Believing that may af-
fect one's job performance.
In fact, older workers haven't
necessarily been singled out during
the current recession. The unem-
ployment rate for those age 45 to 54
rose to a, high of 6.6 percent in
March and was 6.4 percentin April,
according to the Labor Department
While that was the highest since
the winter of 1983, it still trails the
8.9 percent unemployment rate in


April for the total U.S. work force.


The Age Discrimination in Em-
ployment Act of 1967 protects indi-
viduals who- are 40 years of age or
older from employment discrimi-
nation based on age. The ADEA's
protections apply to both employ-
ees and job applicants. That means
it is unlawful to discriminate
against a person because of his or
her age during the hiring, firing,
promoting, laying off, training or
compensating of an individual.
Discrimination can come in two
forms. An employee can claim the
employer treated him or her differ-
ently than other employees or set
standards that alienated certain
age groups. That is known as "dis-
parate treatment."
The other form is known as "dis-
parate impact" and that has to do
with how an employer's practices
may benefit one group over an-
other, even if there was no intent
for discrimination.
In 2008, age discrimination com-
plaints rose 30 percent from the year
before, according to the Equal Em-
ployment Opportunity Commission.
But proving age discrimination
isn't easy. Of the 24;582 cases of age
discrimination the EEOC received
last year, only 18 percent of those
were resolved with outcomes fa-
vorable to the plaintiff.
"There is a direct correlation be-
tween bad economic times and
uptick in discrimination claims,"
said Paul Lopez, who chairs the
labor and employment practice at
the Fort Lauderdale, Fla., law firm


Tripp Scott. "But they are difficult
claims to pursue and prosecute."


uun I unAMi YiUUK*Lr
The worst thing for a worker over
40 to do is make their age an em-
ployment issue. "It will only be a
handicap if you make it a handi-
cap," Finney said.
That means older workers need
to play up their strengths and high-
light their skill set and experience
as valued tools so that employers
recognize why they are worth keep-
ing around. Finney goes so far as to
say employees should tactfully
boast talents to supervisors if that is
what's needed to get them noticed.
"You won't be helping anyone by
keeping your lips zipped," she said.
"Then no one will know the pot of
gold they might have."
Older workers also should try to
avoid dating themselves on their
resume or in the course of their
work For instance, they don't need
to mention on their resume when
.they graduated from college or note
basic computer skills, said Myrtle
Bell, an associate professor of man-
agement at the University of Texas
at Arlington.
On the other hand, Bell thinks
they should tout education that
would bolster their job perform-
ance, such as a masters of.business
administration or foreign language
proficiency. Also, workers could
highlight if they have used new
technologies in their work. For in-
stance, a marketing manager could
show how he used social network-
ing Web sites to grab more cus-
tomers.


- - - -Gal - - - - - -


Hormone pills may make lung cancer more deadly


Associated Press

ORLANDO - There's
more troubling news about
hormone therapy for
menopause symptoms:
Lung cancer seems more
likely .to prove fatal. in
women who are taking es-
trogen-progestin pills, a
study suggests.
Hormone users who de-
veloped lung cancer were
more than twice as likely to
die from the disease as
women who weren't taking
hormones, according to re-
sults reported Saturday.
The new findings mean
that smokers should stop
taking hormones, and those
who have not yet started
hormones should give . it
careful thought, said Dr.
Rowan Chlebowski of Har-
bor-UCLA Medical Center


in Los Angeles. He led the
analysis and presented re-
sults at a meeting of the on-
cology society in Florida.
It's the latest finding from
the Women's Health Initia-
tive, a federal study that
gave 16,608 women either
Prempro or dummy pills.
The study was stopped in
2002 when researchers saw
more breast cancers in
those on Prempro, the es-
trogen-progestin pill made
by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals.
They continue to follow
what happens to women in
the study.
The new analysis looked


at non-small-cell lung can-
cer, by far the most common
type. It found ho big differ-
ence in the number of lung
cancers that developed in
hormone users after five
years on the pills and more
than two years of followup.
However lung cancer
proved fatal in 46 percent of
hormone users who devel-
oped it versus 27 percent of
those given dummy pills.
"It's another piece of evi-
dence to suggest that hor-
mone replacement therapy
should be used with great
caution," said Dr Richard
Schilsky, a cancer specialist at


the University of Chicago and
president ofthe American So-
ciety of Clinical Oncology.
Women who take hor-
mones already are advised
to use the lowest dose for the
shortest time possible, doc-
tors said. "Women almost
certainly shouldn't be using
combined hormone therapy
arid tobacco at the same
time," Chlebowski said.
Still, there have been
only 106 lung cancer deaths
in the study so far - too few
to make sweeping conclu-
sions about risk, said Dr.
Len Lichtenfeld of the
American Cancer Society.


And most women no
longer use hormones the
way they used to, said
Wyeth's Dr Joseph Ca-
mardo. In the federal study,
women started on them at
an average age of 63 and
.took; them for more than
five years. Now,,the typical,
age or starting .is 51 to 54,
and average use is two
years; Camardo said. The
same risks may not apply
with the new patterns of
use, he said.
Researchers have not yet
analyzed lung cancer risk in
another part of the federal
study that tested estrogen
alone without progestin.
Lung cancer is the
world's top cancer killer In
the United States, there
were more than 215,000 new
cases and nearly 162,000
deaths from it last year


KNOW YOUR RIGHTS
EniPT &III -D"9 VnIDQIe I IC


Obituaries


Elizabeth
'Betty' Ogle, 94
FORMERLY OF
CITRUS COUNTY
Elizabeth (Betty) Ogle, age
94, passed away May 26,
2009 in Sun City Center, FL.
Her graveside memorial
service will be held in Eliz-
abethton, TN.




George
Saronsen, 65
YANKEETOWN
George D. Saronsen, 65, of
Yankeetown, Florida, for-
merly of Lakewood, New
Jersey, passed away sud-
denly on Tuesday, May 26th.
Born in Lakewood, he lived
there most of his life. He
was a former member and
Deacon of the First Baptist
Church of Lakewood.
He graduated from Lake-
wood High School. George
received an A.S. degree from
Ocean County College, Toms
River and earned a B.S. de-
gree in Business Administra-
tion from Richard Stockton
State College, Pomona. Dur-
ing the Vietnam War, he
served as a Turret Mechanic
in the U.S. Army
His business careers in-
cluded being a District Man-
ager for Pezrow Company
and Sarvis & Associates,
Inc.; and Supervisor of New
Rad Waste at.Oyster Creek
Nuclear Power Plant, Lacey
where he retired in 1996.
George was a Third De-
gree Mason of Lakewood
Lodge No. 174 F & A.M. He
was a Worshipful Master in
1996 and 2004. He belonged


to the Shriners (Scottish
Rite) and Knights Templar.
An avid debater, he loved
to engage people in spirited
discussions about current
events and politics. George
had a love for animals and
an array of interests that in-
cluded biking, boating, ski-
ing, photography, reading,
music and history. He trav-
eled extensively around the.
.country and enjoyed his
trips out to Sturgis, N.D. on
his Harley.
He was predeceased by
his parents Gertrude M.
Radford Saronsen and
Alvie. J. Saronsen. He is sur-
vived by his brother, J. Rad-
ford Saronsen of Lakewood;
his sister Lillian J. Manning,
his niece Kathleen M. Man-
ning and nephew Thomas
D. Manning, Jr. all of Brick;
and many relatives.
George will be greatly
missed by his family and
friends in New Jersey and
Florida.
Visitation will be from 2-4
and 7-9 p.m., Monday, June 1
at D'Elia Funeral. Home,
Rte. 70 & Vermont Ave.
Lakewood, NJ, (732) 363-
1987. A funeral service will
be at 10 a.m. on Tuesday,
June 2, at the First Baptist
Church of Lakewood, 240


BROWN
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY
5430 W. Gulf to Lake Hiy.
Lcanto, Florida 34451
(352)
S_-,. 795-0111

Richard TI Brown
Q FhLRER DIIE(1R


First St. with interment to
follow at Woodlawn Ceme-
tery in Lakewood.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

Brett
Wattles, 59
CRYSTAL RIVER
Brett Bullard Wattles died
May 28, 2009, a� his home in
Crystal River, FL, after a
courageous battle with can-
cer. Brett was born in Lake
City, FL, on May 3rd, 1950.
He graduated from Colum-
bia High School in 1968. He
attended Florida Atlantic
University and graduated
with a degree in Finance in
1973. He was the owner of
Brett's for Men, Crossroads
and the Fireside Restaurant
He then moved to Ocala and
was the Executive Director
of the Marion County Eco-
nomic Development Council
until 2001. He'then moved to
Crystal River and was the
part time Citrus County Eco-
nomic Developer. Brett




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loved to fish, collect antiques
and spend time with his fam-
ily, especially at Kanuga
Conference Center in North
Carolina. Brett was passion-
ate about giving back to the
community.
Survivors include Flo, his,
wife of 37 years, of Crystal
River, Sons: Matt (Rachel),
Burr, granddaughter Sophia
all of Orlando; sister: Julie
Thomas and her children
Felicity (Chris) Macdonald
and their son Connor all of
Atlanta, and Kelly Smith of
Dunnellon; brother: Tommy
(Cheryl) Whigham of Lake
City; Uncle Joe (Barbara)
Bullard; Aunt Audrey
Bullard (Harry Denune),
Chris (Tammy) Bullard and.
Beth Burlingame of Lake
City; Brother-in-law Mack
(Kathy) Dismuke and family
of Ocala. Also surviving are
the extended family of
young people that he wel-
comed in his home, as well
as his heart. The family
wishes to express sincere
appreciation to Hospice of

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Citrus County who took such
good care of the family and
Brett. In lieu of flowers,
please make donations to:
Hospice of Citrus County,
Inc, P 0. Box 641270, Bev-
erly. Hills, FL 34465 or
Kanuga Conferences, Inc.
PO. Box 250, Henderson-
ville, NC 28793-0250.
Memorial services will be
held Monday, June 1, 2009,
at 2:00 PM. at Gateway-For-
est Lawn Funeral Home
Chapel with Mother
Michael Armstrong of St
James Episcopal Church of-
ficiating. Arrangements are
under the direction of
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 S.
U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City, FL
32025 (386-752-1954). Please
sign the guestbook at
www.gatewayforestlawn.com.






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That doesn't mean the worker's
notoriety results in starring in the
company's television ads, but it
could involve being active in na-
tional and local business associa-
tions for the company's industry
and speaking on panels at industry
events.
"You want to be part of your em-
ployer's path to success," Finney
said. "That could come by con-
tributing to the leading conversa-
tion about your business."
And by being involved in activi-
ties and groups related to work,
employees also get to network with
peers outside of their companies -
something that could help them
land new work if they were to lose
their jobs.

REMEMBER WHY YOU
ARE DIFFERENT:
In most states, workers over 40
are considered a different class of
employees than those below 40.
That not only means they can't be
discriminated against during hir-
ing or their employment, but there
are different rules should they be
terminated, too.
For instance, if an older worker
is laid off and severance is offered,
the Age Discrimination in Employ-
ment Act requires their employer
to give them 21 days to review the
agreement. That differs from
younger workers who are only re-
quired to get a "reasonable period
of time," said Lopez, the labor at-
torney.
Here .is a link to more details
about the ADEA: . http://
www.eeoc.gov/policy/adea.html.


The new findings mean that smokers should stop taking
hormones, and those who have not yet started hormones
should give it careful thought, said Dr. Rowan Chlebowski.


Associated Press

HARTFORD, Conn. -
The Connecticut General As-
sembly won't take up a bill
this session banning a long
list of wild and potentially
dangerous animals as pets.
The legislation stems
from the February attack on
a Stamford resident mauled
by a 200-pound chimpanzee.
Rep. Richard Roy, co-chair-
man of the legislature's Envi-
ronment Committee, told the
Connecticut Post on Friday
the bill is being abandoned be-
cause some lawmakers want
to protect a family-owned ele-
phant farm in Goshen.
Many state politicians
were outraged that poten-
tially dangerous animals
were allowed as pets after
learning of the chimpanzee
attack on Charla Nash, who
lost her hands, nose, lips
and eyelids in the assault
But Roy said Goshen-area
lawmakers fought the bill.
"It's dead because there's
a piece that was put into the
bill that would have not al-
lowed the Commerford fam-
ily to bring in any new
elephants in the years ahead,
thereby, essentially closing
the business down," he said.
The farm has several ele-
phants, a petting zoo and a
variety of exotic animals, in-
cluding zebras and camels.
Commerford brings the ani-
mals to fairs and malls along"
the East Coast
"The Commerford Farm is a
community fixture up in
Goshen and it would be sad to
see that business have to ter-
minate what it does as it moves
into the future," said Rep.
Roberta Willis, D-Lakeville.
Even though the legislative
session ends on Wednesday,
Roy said it won't be brought
up because the debate will
take up too much time.
Sen. Andrew McDonald, D-
Stamford, was surprised by
the bill's demise. The legisla-
tion has been supported by the
Attorney General and the De-
partment of Environmental
Protection-which is hosting
an exotic animal amnesty day
in July to persuade residents
to turn in their illegal and
legal exotic pets.
"The legislation is ex-
traordinarily important and
I understand that there were
concerns expressed by some
legislators, but there's cer-
tainly no excuse for not com-
ing up with a reasonable
compromise that would as-
sure the safety of the people
of our state," McDonald said.









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHR


SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009 A7


RONIr fC


Anticipated hurricanes


leaving consumers exposed


Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. - As
the 2009 hurricane season
arrives, many homeowners
are finding insurance is ei-
ther more expensive, or
harder to get
Homeowners from New
York to Florida and in the
Gulf Coast region are again
seeing premiums rise and
coverage change. And more
are being dropped com-
pletely by their carriers as
insurers try to limit their
exposure in high-risk areas.
'They just don't like being
in the business ... too much
risk," said Scott Hall of Mar-
ket Street Advisers, a finan-
cial advisory firm in
Wilmington, N.C.
Homeowners' insurance
premiums are up about 3
percent nationwide and
probably more in some
coastal areas where the po-
tential for -damage is
greater, according to the In-
surance Information Insti-
tute, a New York-based
industry group. The hurri-
cane season starts Monday
and runs until Nov. 30.
Several factors are affect-
ing premiums and cover-
age, including the $26
billion insurers paid out on
catastrophic losses last year
and the impact of financial
market turmoil on the com-
panies' earnings. Changes
in state regulations are also
driving some premiums
higher.
Late last year, Allstate
Corp. and State Farm Insur-
ance Cos., two of the na-
tion's top home and auto
insurers, raised premiums
in states including Texas,
saying the increase was
needed to offset a rising
number of claims. Hurri-
canes Gustav and Ike hit the
U.S. in September.
Northbrook, Ill.-based
Allstate also implemented
policy changes that raised
deductibles and stopped of-
fering coverage in high-risk
coastal. areas including
downstate New York
"We continually review


all those items and make
the necessary adjustments,"
said Allstate spokesman
Mike Siemienas.
Meanwhile, State Farm
Florida, a subsidiary of the
Bloomington, Ill.-based in-
surer, is trying to pull out of
the Florida market after the
state denied the company's
request for a 47 percent rate
hike. Company officials
have said they need the in-
crease to remain financially
viable. Discussions with
regulators are continuing.
Shawna Ackerman, who
co-chairs the American
Academy of Actuaries'
property and casualty ex-
treme .events committee,
said she has not heard of
any mass non-renewals or
existing policy changes that
are in the works for 2009.
But insurers are continuing
a process that began after
they paid out $23.7 billion in
claims - a number ad-
justed for inflation as of
2008 -4 on Hurricane An-
drew in 1992, trying to limit
their exposure, or vulnera-
bility to losses, in coastal
areas.
Hurricanes Ivan in 2004
and Katrina in 2005 forced
several to pull back further,
with many companies re-
evaluating policy coverages
and raising rates. Ivan
caused more than $8.1 bil-
lion in losses after adjusting
for inflation, while Katrina
was the most costly, with
losses now calculated at
$45.2 billion, according to
Insurance Information In-
stitute data.
"Over the last five years,
where we've seen record
catastrophe losses in
coastal areas - Florida,
Mississippi, Louisiana and
Texas - the increases in
(premiums in) those areas
have outstripped what we
have seen nationally," said
Bob Hartwig, the Insurance
Information Institute's
president
Insurers will raise premi-
ums wherever state regula-
tors allow them to, Hartwig
said. "In' areas 'where they'


are not given that opportu-
nity, insurers are going to
scale back their exposure."
In 2007, Florida ranked
as the state with the great-
est hurricane exposure, fac-


ing a
potential
$2.46 tril-
lion, in
losses, ac-
cording ca-
tastrophe
risk-model-
ing firm
AIR World-
wide Corp.
A close sec-
ond, NeW
York had
$2.:38 tril-
lion in ex-
posure;
and third
was Texas
with $895.1
billion of
exposure.
Current
forecasts
suggest a
less active
season than
was ex-
pected last
year, en-


Cost of big
At the start of the 2
season, homeowner
hurricane insurance
expensive or harde
expensive storms o
Costliest hurrica
In 2008 dollars
Katrina (2005)
Andrew (1992)
Ike (2008)
Wilma (2005)
Charley (2004)
Ivan (2004)
Hugo (1989)
Rita (2005)
Frances (2004)
Jeanne (2004)
SOURCE: Fitch Ratin


couraging news for anyone
with property or invest-
ments that lie within hurri-
cane-prone coastal areas.
The National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Adminis-
tration has predicted nine
to 14 named tropical storms
this year. The named storms
are expected to include
four to seven hurricanes, of
which one to three are
likely to be major storms.
"Even though the forecast
for storms this year seems
to be down, those of us who
are worried about this stuff
are concerned that the East
Coast is due," said Charles
Williamson, president of
AIU Holdings' Private
Client Group, a unit of New
York-based American Inter-
national Group Inc. that of-'
fers property casualty
insurance. "The East Coast
hurricane market, particu-
larly Florida, is very volatile
right iow."


Rising prices and de-
ductibles may lead some
homeowners to question
whether they're overpaying.
"It is very difficult for
consumers to figure out if
they are
being
, storms gouged or
:009 hurricane not," said J.
ers are finding Rob e r t
e either more Hunter, a
r togetdueto former
of the past. fo me r
f the past. Texas State
nes in the U.S. Insurance
Commis-
M sioner who
23.7- is now di-
23.7 ' rector of in-
*11.5 surance at
the Con-
U 11.3 summer Fed-
eration of
*8.5 America, a
I8..1 consumer
advocacy
07.3 group.
" Yo u
M 6.2 have to
trust your
I 5.2 state regu-
4.2 lator," he
i 4.2 said, refer-
gs AP ring to the
fact that
state offi-
cials limit how much insur-
ers can charge.
The $26 billion casualty
insurers paid out last year
for catastrophe losses was
substantially more than
they expected. The compa-
nies also lost billions of dol-
lars in the financial
markets; they use invest-
ments to supplement their
premium income and cre-
ate a cushion for when
they're hit by big claims.
For example, Allstate's
catastrophic losses more
than doubled in 2008 to
$3.34 billion. This led the
company to report a loss of
$1.68 billion, or $3.07 per
share, for the year, com-
pared with net income of
$4.64 billion, .or $7.77 a
share, in 2007.
During the first quarter of
2009, the insurer said,
falling investment income
contributed to a $274 mil-
lion loss.


Study: Drug


combos may raise


breast cancer risk


Associated Press

ORLANDO - Breast can-
cer survivors risk having
their disease come back if
they use certain antidepres-
sants while also taking the
cancer prevention drug ta-
moxifen, worrisome new re-
search shows.
About 500,000 women in
the United States take ta-
moxifen, which cuts in half
the chances of a breast can-
cer recurrence. Many of
them also take antidepres-
sants for hot flashes, because
hormone pills aren't consid-
ered safe after breast cancer
Doctors have long known
that some antidepressants
and other medicines can
lower the amount of tamox-
ifen's active form in the
bloodstream. But whether
this affects cancer risk is un-
known.
The new study, reported
Saturday at a cancer confer-
ence in Florida, is the largest,
to look at the issue. It found
that using these interfering
drugs - including Prozac,
Paxil or Zoloft - can virtu-
ally wipe out the benefit ta-
moxifen provides.
Many doctors question the
magnitude of harm from
combining these medicines,
and a second, smaller study
suggests it may not be very
large.
But the bottom line is the
same: Not all antidepres-
sants pose this problem, and
women should talk to their
doctors about which ones are
best
"There are other alterna-
tives we can consider" that
are safer, said Dr. Eric Winer,
breast cancer chief at the
Dana-Farber Cancer Center
in Boston.
He had no role in the
study, which was done by
Medco Health Solutions Inc.,
a large insurance benefits
manager. Researchers used
members' medical records
to identify 353 women taking
tamoxifen plus other drugs


that might interfere with it,
and 945 women taking ta-
moxifen alone. Those taking
a drug combo did so for
about a year on average.
Next, researchers
checked to see how many
were treated for second can-
cers in the following two
years. Breast cancer re-
curred in about 7 percent of
women on tamoxifen alone,
and in 14 percent of women
also taking other drugs that
could interfere - mainly the
antidepressants Paxil and
Prozac, and, to a lesser ex-
tent, Zoloft.
If women want to take an
antidepressant, "you proba-
bly want to stay away from
those three," said Medco's
chief medical officer, Dr.
Robert Epstein.
No greater breast cancer
risk was seen in women tak-
ing the antidepressants
Celexa, Lexapro or Luvox
with tamoxifen, and there
are reasons to think that
other antidepressants may
be safe as well, Epstein said.
A second study led by Dr.
Vincent Dezentj6 of Leiden
University Medical Center in
the Netherlands found little
risk from combining tamox-
ifen and popular antidepres-
sants. However, only 150
women ,in the study took
such combos for more than
two months, and they were
compared to women taking
combos for a shorter time -
not to women using tamox-
ifen alone.
The Dutch and Medco
studies were presented at a
meeting of the American So-
ciety of Clinical Oncology
The federal Food and
Drug Administration has
been considering a change
to tamoxifen's label to warn
about the antidepressants
drugs and a gene variation
some women have that can
make tamoxifen less effec-
tive. An advisory panel
unanimously recommended
a change in 2006, but: the
agency is still considerihngit


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tcvjvltl�














N


Page A8 - 3Nr. MAY31, 2009



ACTION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Transformed


Associated Press
Vance McLennan, 28, of Ed-
monton, Alberta, Canada,
displays Transformers tat-
toos that cover his entire
back Friday at BotCon
2009, the official Trans-
formers convention, mark-
ing the 25th anniversary of
the Transformers phenome-
non In Pasadena, Calif. The
show precedes the opening
next week of the Trans-
formers movie, "Transform-
ers: Revenge of the Fallen."

Support for'Saudis
angers families
NEW YORK - Relatives' ,
'of Sept. 11 victims say they're
angry the Justice Department
is supporting the Saudi royal
family's bid to be removed
from a 9/11 lawsuit.
The Justice Department
filed a brief with the U.S.
Supreme Court on Friday. It
supports the Saudis' argu-
ment that the royal family as
a sovereign state cannot be
sued in a U.S. court.

World BRIEFS

Young lust


Associated Press
Noemi Letizia poses for a
photograph April 28 in her
home in Naples, Italy. Pre-
mier Silvio Berlusconi is
fighting back in a scandal
feeding on his fondness for
young women, with his
lawyer acknowledging Sat-
urday Berlusconi has moved
to block publication of hun-
dreds of photos taken of
guests at his sumptuous
Sardinian villa. State televi-
sion reported that among
the photos were some taken
last New Year's Eve, with
the guests including Letizia
at the heart of the political
and personal scandal.
Berlusconi moves to
block topless shots
ROME - Italian media say
Premier Silvio Berlusconi has
moved to block publication of
hundreds of photos, including
images of young women ei-
ther topless or wearing bikinis
at one of his Sardinian villas.
TV and newspaper reports
say Berlusconi wrote recently
to the Italian watchdog for pri-
vacy issues.
Saturday's reports say
some of the photos were
taken during last New Year's
vacation. Among those at the
villa was a woman the heart
of an alleged scandal.
Berlusconi has denied any-
thing "spicy" in his relation-
ship with 18-year-old Noemi
Letizia. His wife, Veronica
Lario, cited what she called
her 72-year-old husband's flir-
tations with young women
when she announced this
month she wanted a divorce.
The prime minister's
lawyer was notq ediately
available for comment.
-From wire reports


GM in secrecy mode as


bondholder deadline passes


Associated Press
German Economy Minister Karl Theodor zu Guttenberg, right, Finance Minister Peer Steinbrueck, cen-
ter, and Hesse State Premier Roland Koch, left, talk to the media Friday night in front of the German
Chancellery in Berlin. Germany's economy minister on Saturday said he thinks a plan by Magna In-
ternational Inc. to acquire General Motors Corp.'s Opel unit carries high risks and that an "orderly in-
'solvency" could still be the best bet to save the German-based carmaker. Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg
said in a statement that he came away from high-level talks that ended early Saturday with "a differ-
ent risk assessment than my colleagues participating in the Opel negotiations."

Treasury Department, GMsilent on developments


Associated Press
DETROIT - General Motors
Corp.'s board of directors met
for a second day Saturday to
make the final decision on
whether the automaker would
complete its restructuring by
filing for bankruptcy protection
Monday.
The outcome of the meeting
could not immediately be de-
termined. GM and the Treasury
Department, which has been
guiding the Detroit automaker
toward a rescue plan that will
give taxpayers nearly a three-
fourths stake in the company,
went into secrecy mode.
GM's bondholders had a
5 p.m. Saturday deadline to ac-
cept an offer to swap their $27
billion in debt for at least a
10 percent stake in a new GM. If
the Treasury doesn't get the
amount of support it wants,
bondholders could wind up with
far less in bankruptcy court.
The Treasury Department
had no immediate comment on
the deadline passing, and GM.
spokesman Tom Wilkinson said
the automaker did not plan to
makeany statements Saturday.
GM took a huge restructuring
step Friday when the United
Auto Workers union agreed to a
cost-cutting deal, and early Sat-
urday, Germany's finance min-
ister said a plan was approved
for Canadian auto parts maker
Magna International Inc. to
move ahead with a rescue of
GM's Opel unit
But there was still much to do
to beat the government's Mon-
day deadline to qualify for.
more aid. The company already
has received about $20 billion
in government loans and could
get $30 billion more to make it
through what is expected to be
a 60- to 90-day reorganization in
bankruptcy court.
GM has yet to confirm it will
seek bankruptcy protection, but
it has scheduled a news confer-
ence Monday morning in New
York.
The Treasury on Thursday



GOP struggles


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Re-
publicans are divided
over how aggressively to
go after Sonia So-
tomayor, a family feud
about the tone of the de-
bate over confirming the
First Hispanic on the'
Supreme Court
There are concerns
raised by an increasing
number of GOP lawmak-
ers and conservative
leaders about the strident
rhetoric that certain
prominent Republicans
have used to describe So-
tormiayor Some are de-
nouncing right-wing
groups for their negative
advertisements against
the federal appeals judge.


A grou
conserval
change tl
discussion
on Repu
this comir
to hold
debate"
President
Obama's
nee. The
would fo
Sotomayo
tential el
important
court dec
the differ
how Dem
publicans
In a let
GOP sen
the Third
ence adm
licans


GM has yet to

confirm it will

seek bankruptcy

protection, but it

has scheduled a

news conference

Monday morning

in New York.
offered bondholders 10 percent
of a newly formed GM's stock,
plus warrants to buy 15 percent
more to erase the debt. Last
week, GM withdrew an offer of
10 percent equity after only 15
percent of the thousands of
bondholders signed up.
It was unclear how many
bondholders took the latest
offer, although a group repre-
senting large creditors who
hold 20 percent of debt agreed
to it \If the 15 percent who took
the first offer are added in, that
would make 35 percent
Elliott Management Corp., a
$13 billion hedge fund and
major GM bondholder, also said
it had decided to accept the
new deal. But Spokesman Scott
Tagliarino wouldn't say how
much GM bond debt Elliott rep-
resents.
Getting as many bondholders
as possible to, sign on to the
offer in advance of a bank-
ruptcy filing could help the au-
tomaker get through the court
process more quickly, said
Robert Gordon, head of the cor-
porate restructuring and bank-
ruptcy group at Clark Hill PLC
in Detroit.
"The more consensus you
have, the more likely it is you'll
be able to move through the
bankruptcy process in an expe-
ditious fashion with less resist-
ance," Gordon said.
In a typical Chapter 11 bank-
ruptcy case, the company files a


plan of reorganization that
must be voted on by creditors.
In each class oF creditors, the
plan would have to be approved
by holders of two-thirds of the
claims and a majority of the
number of individual creditors
who vote.
But the GM case is anything
but ordinary, and it appears the
company will sell some or all of
its assets to a new entity that
would become the new GM,
rather than submit a plan to re-
organize the old company.
Under a so-called Section 363
sale, the prospective buyer and
seller present a fully negotiated
asset purchase agreement for
approval by the court
Creditors still can lodge ob-
jections, but GM could avoid
the drawn-out fights between
competing creditors, such as
bondholders and workers, that
often occur.
Chrysler LLC, which filed for
bankruptcy protection April 30,
chose a similar path. A judge
heard three days of testimony
and arguments last week over
the sale of most of Chrysler's as-
sets to Italian carmaker Fiat
SpA.
U.S. Judge Arthur Gonzalez is
expected to approve the sale
Monday, pushing Chrysler
closer to its goal of a speedy exit
from bankruptcy, protection.
But an appeal is likely from
three Indiana state pension and
construction funds, which in-
vested in Chrysler debt and say
the deal isn't fair. That may
force Chrysler to further post-
pone the deal's closing.
Chrysler claims that any sub-
.stantial delay could push Fiat
to back out if the deal, since the
Italian automaker has set a
deadline of June 15 to wrap up
a transition.
GM's stock tumbled to the
lowest price in the company's
100-year history on Friday, clos-
ing at just 75 cents after trading
as low as 74 cents. In a Chapter
11 bankruptcy reorganization,
the shares would become virtu-
ally worthless.


with Sotomayor scrutinization
p of prominent "slumbered" during con- edges that blocking a vote
tives, seeking to firmation hearings for to confirm Sotomayor is
he terms of the the last two Democratic unrealistic. But it urges
n, plans to call nominees (Ruth Bader Republicans to use the de-
iblicans Ginsburg .and bate as an "extraordinary
ng week Stephen Breyer, educable moment" thai
'a great both by President makes it"crystal clearwhi
over . 0 Bill Clinton), and Americans should believe
tBarack concludes by say- that Republicans are in-
nomi- ing, "We expect telligent defenders of the
debate more from i" Constitution, or not"
ocus on this time. For Republicans, op-
'r's po- The Assocyted posing Sotomayor is im-
ffect on Sonia Press obtained a portantto core supporters,
t high otomayor draft of the ltter, including social conserva-
cisions and on signed by conservative tives who regard courts as
fences between heavyweights including a battleground. But the
nocrats and Re- Richard Viguerie of Con- party is strugglingtoreach
s pick judges. servativeHQ.com,# avid beyond that base and
ter to be sent to Keene of the Armrican draw more diversity - a
Lators Monday, Conservative Union, and goal that could be frus-
Branch Confer- Gary Bauer of American treated with a bitterly parti-
onishes Repub- Values. san fight, especially given
for having &e letter acknowl- Sotomayor's history.


Geithner wields

little leverage

in China talks
Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Timothy Geith-
ner's first trip to China as treasury
secretary comes at a vulnerable time
for the Obama administration.
Mired in a brutal recession, the
United States needs Beijing to buy
more American goods, allow its cur-
rency to rise and make other moves
to narrow an enormous trade gap.
The U.S. also needs
China's help to con-
front any military
threat from North
Korea.
Yet Washington's
leverage has waned
just as China's power I
over the U.S. has
grown. Timothy
China is now Amer- Geithner
ica's biggest creditor left U.S. for
As of March, it held China Saturday.
$768 billion of Treasury securities -
about 10 percent of publicly traded debt
The U.S. needs China's money to fi-
nance U.S. budget deficits, which are
soaring 4s Washington tries to end the
recession and bolster the banking sys-
tem. The administration estimates the
budget deficit'will hit $1.84 trillion this
year That's four times lastyear's deficit
Geithner, who left Saturday for
meetings Monday and Tuesday with
Chinese leaders, carried an' ambi-
tious U.S. goal of persuading the Chi-
nese government to adopt policies
that would transform its nation of
savers into spenders.
Geithner spent the flight to Beijing
working on a speech he planned to give
at Peking University that was expected
to lay out the administration's recovery
program and its progress. He was also
expected to talk about the administra-
tion's determination to deal with the
government's soaring expenditures
once the U.S. economy is recovering.
The current U.S. administration, just
like the Clinton and Bush administra-
tions, is convinced that the key to a
prosperous global economy rests heav-
ily with China. The U.S. wants Beijing
to rely movie on domestic spending and
less on its exports to power its owp
economy - and the world's.
That shift would uncork enormous
buying power and help rebalance world
trade. It could hasten an end to the
global recession and narrow America's
huge trade gap because the Chinese
would buy more American products.
China would benefit, too.
"Beijing really wants Washington
to be successful in bringing the U.S.
economy out of this recession as fast
as it can because it is critical to Bei-
jing's own economic growth," said
Kenneth Lieberthal, a China expert
at the Brookings Institution.
For the Chinese, there is growing
nervousness about the explosion of
U.S. borrowing. Like any bank wor-
ried about its loans, the Chinese have
fretted over America's budget gap. In
March, Premier Wen Jiabao said,
"We've lent a huge amount of money
to the U.S. Of course, we are con-
cerned about the safety of our assets."
Those comments jolted financial
markets.
The administration insists it isn't
worried that the mound of debt it's
creating will jeopardize America's
sterling AAA bond rating. But treas-
ury officials said Geithner still in-
tends to reassure the Chinese.
Geithner plans to stress that the ad-
ministration sees the $1 trillion-plus
deficits for this and next year as tem-
porary. The deficits are necessary to
fund a stimulus plan to help lift
America out of recession and invig-
orate a wobbly U.S. banking system,
officials say Once those needs are
met, the administration says it will
make deficit reduction a priority.
In addition to talks with President
Hu Jintao and other leaders, Geith-
ner plans a speech Monday at Peking
University, where he studied Man-
darin Chinese during two summers
when he was in college.
American manufacturers see the
undervalued yuan as the major culprit
in the trade deficit with the Chinese,
which last year hit $266 billion, the
highest recorded with one country.
The Chinese agreed in 2005 to begin
letting their currency rise against the
dollar, and it has risen about 20 percent
But those gains stopped last summer
China had begun to fear that a stronger
yuan was reducing its export sales, al-
ready hurt by the global downturn.
Though the crisis has given Geith"
ner a weak hand, treasury officials
said he will seek to push this bargain:
The U.S. will work to reduce its
budget deficits once the crisis ends,


urge Americans to save more and
shrink the trade deficits. To replace
diminished U.S. spending, the Chi-
nese will be asked to step up spending
and stop saving so much. The admin-
istration says this can be done if Bei-
jing improves pensions and health
insurance so Chinese households
don't feel pressured to save so much.


e
Is
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Page A9 -SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009



EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0


Wisconsin chef

teaches cooking

in forests, fields
M.L. JOHNSON
Associated Press

WEST BEND, Wis. - As more
travelers show an interest in
local cuisines, a Milwaukee chef
is taking the trend a bit further
with a cooking school that travels
to the food's origins.
The Braise Culinary School
holds classes on farms and in
forests during warm months.
Most classes start with a farm
tour - or recently, a walk in the
woods - so students can see how
food grows before they learn to
prepare it.
"The idea, basically, is to re-
connect people to their food,"
chef and owner David Swanson
said.
He came up with the idea
while working on a business plan,
for a restaurant and attached
cooking school.
"One question that I would
think that would come up is:
'Where is this food coming
from?"' Swanson said. From
there, it was a short jump to of-
fering classes - sometimes liter-
ally - in the field.
Swanson, 39, worked in restau-
rants in the Chicago area and
Milwaukee for about 20 years be-
fore opening the cooking school
in 2006. Since then, he has
cooked in apple orchards, wheat
fields and breweries. This year's
first class began with a mush-
room hunt in woods near the
University of Wisconsin-Washing-
ton County.
Swanson partnered on the
class with Britt Bunyard, a my-
cologist and editor of Fingi mag-
azine. Bunyard led about two
dozen people through woods and
clearings he had scouted the day
before.
"There's no need to run from
spot to spot," Bunyard said:,
Dozens of morels were waiting to
be picked.
Gail Groenwoldt, 39, of Milwau-
kee, signed up for the hunt after
seeing morels priced at nearly
$50 a pound in her grocery store.
During the hunt, she also spotted
ramps. A side order of the onion-
like plant cost her more than $20
in a Milwaukee restaurant.
"This is why we should learn to
forage," Groenwoldt said.
After the hunt, Swanson
sauteed morels, ramps, aspara-
gus and potatoes and then added
veal stock to make a vegetable
ragout The cooking lesson,
Groenwoldt said, was "a treat."
Sara Wong, 33, also from Mil-
waukee, has taken Indian, sushi
and Thai cooking classes. On a


' Associated Press
Chef David Swanson teaches students how to make a spring vegetable ragout with morel mushrooms, ramps and asparagus, following a mush-
room hunt May 16 in West Bend, Wis. Swanson runs the traveling Braise Culinary School.


trip to Vietnam, she ate dog.
"I'll try just about anything,"
Wong said. She'learned about
Swanson's school at a community
supported agriculture, or CSA,
fair. "I like unique experiences
in food, so I thought this would
be fun."
Many of Swanson's classes are
taught on CSA farms. The farm-
ers sell shares of their crop in the
spring, often 'for $500 or $600, and
then deliver boxes of produce
weekly during the growing sea-
son.
Typically, about a third of
Swanson's students are CSA
members eager to learn how to
prepare the food they're receiv-
ing. Others are foodies, and some
just want a new experience.
"The farmer will talk about
what they're growing, what their
practices are," Swanson said.
"People will ask questions about
what they are growing in their
garden, how it pertains to them."
He varies the menu to reflect
the season and the farms' spe-
cialties. A previous class at Pine-
hold Gardens, just outside
Milwaukee, featured garlic,
greens and fingerling potatoes.
This year's class will be in August
and focus on heirloom tomatoes.
Swanson also plans classes at a
creamery near Madison and a
wheat field on Washington Island
0


BRAISE CULINARY
SCHOOL
* www.braiseculinaryschool
.com or (414) 241-9577.
Days and class times vary.
i The 2009 season runs
through the end of
September.
a Classes and dinners cost
about $50, although all-day
events may be more.

in Lake Michigan. On the Wash-
ington Island trip last year, he
showcased the wheat with a pan-
zanella salad made with wheat
bread, cucumbers, tomatoes, red
onion, olives and feta and scones
made with granola from the hotel
where students stayed. He also
used locally-made Death's Door
Vodka to create vodka-braced
strawberries with cream fraiche.
It was a great adventure, haul-
ing cooking materials into the
field in an old pick up truck,
Swanson said. But, "wheat is just
beautiful, just looking at the
wheat in the wind is nice."
For those more interested in
See DINING/Page A12

A cooking class student unloads
morel mushrooms found during a
hunt in West Bend.


Gaga for glaciers


iN. .~'


Special io me Crroncle
Before their September 2008 marriage, Lecanto resident Alfonso Conti and his then-fl-
ancee Kathleen Dalton took a seven-day cruise to Alaska in September 2007. They flew
from Tampa to Anchorage, then sailed to College Fjord and Glacier Bay for scenic cruis-
Ing. They then visited Skagway, Juneau and Ketchikan. Parts of Alaska are actually
rainforest, Conti writes - Ketchikan measures its annual rainfall in feet, not Inches. The
couple pose here In front of Marjorie Glacier in Glacier Bay.


.i

'I


. ", '. - I"*- .


-~ .(~4~V~f~~ 41. .,


Special to the Chronicle
Dorothy Schwartz of Hernando explored the Icebergs of Antarctica In a Zodiac water-
craft in January 2007. She's in the boat In this photo, dwarfed by the Ice.


The Chionicle and The Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo contest for readers of the
newspaper.
Readers are invited to send a photo from their
Dream Vacation with a brief description of the trip.


If it's selected as a winner, it will be published
in the Sunday Chronicle. At the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select the best photo during
the year and that photograph will win a prize.
Please avoid photos with dates on the print.


Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429, e-
mailed to community@chronicleonline.com or
dropped off at the Chronicle office in Inverness,
Crystal River or any Accent Travel Office.


DREAM
VACATIONS
o1o Caffte








CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ruAJ U SNDAY, MVAY 31, 200


Veterans NOTES


* American Legion Riders
Post 155 Crystal River are
serving breakfast from 8:30 to
11 a.m. today at the Ar'erican
Legion Post 155, 6586 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Crystal River.
Cost is $5, which includes
eggs, bacon, sausage, grits,
home fries, biscuit and gravy,
-orange juice, coffee and all you
can eat pancakes. Public is
welcome. Monies are raised to
help military and community or-
ganizations.
Events for the week:
Today: Dart tournament 6
p.m.
Monday: Bingo, 1 to 4 p.m.
Tuesday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. SAL meeting, 7 p.m.
Wednesday: Chicken "hot
wings" noon to 3 p.m. Italian
dinner night 6 to 7 p.m., $5.
Live musit 6 to 10 p.m.
Thursday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Bingo 1 to 4 p.m. Show
"'Me the Money 5 p.m. 40/8
Voiture 1219 and Cabane 1219
meeting, 7 p.m.
m Friday: Dinner special, 5 to 7
p.m., $6. Live music 6 to 10
p.m.
Saturday: Pool tournament 2
p.m. 4th District Constitutional
Conference at Post 284 Belle-
view, 9 a.m., blood drive noon
to 5 p.m.
Call Cmdr. Jim Woodman at
795-6526 or visit )
www.postl55.org.
* Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864 schedule of events
for the week of May 31 through,
June 6:
Tuesday: Post meeting, 7
p.m.
Wednesday: Shuffleboard
tournament; 7 p.m.
Friday: Friday night fish din-
ner, 5 to 6:30 p.m., $8.r
Saturday: Free shuffleboard
all day.'
Mark the calendars! Karaoke
night is June 26 with J & S!
For more information, call the
post at (352) 465-4864.
* Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City, 637-
0100.
Today: Installation dinner and
installation of new officers of
VFW, Ladies Auxiliary and
Men's Auxiliary 2 p.m.
* VFW Post 7991, 3107 W.
Dunnellon Road, Dunnellon,
(352) 489-1772,,
j;' i- Tuesday: Bingo, starts at 1 .
p.m. Sandwiches or hot dogs.
available. Open to the public.
Friday: Bingo, starting at 1
p.m. Sandwiches or hot dogs
are available. Open to the pub-
lic.
The post is now in the
process of forming pool, darts,
and horseshoe teams for tour-
naments, Everyone interested
should call the post after 1 p.m.
Monday through Saturday,
(352) 489-1772.
Come join us for breakfast,
served from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
on the second and fourth Sun-
day of every month. Full break-
fast menu, all for $5; children
younger than 12, $3. This is
open to the public.
We are a non-smoking post,
but we do have a large smok-
ing patio, available. If you are
considering joining the VFW
and its auxiliaries, please come
in or call the post.
* Dumas-Hartson VFW
.Post 8189 west on Veterans
Drive across from Harley
Davidson dealership an-
nounces events for June.
June 7, 3 p.m., mixed pool
league.
June 10, 2 p.m., bingo with
light lunch, open to public; 7
p.m. women's pool league.
June 12,5 p.m., Auxiliary
dinner: Spaghetti, salad, garlic
bread, dessert $6 donation.
June 14, 3 p.m., mixed pool
league.
June 17, 2 p.m., bingo with
light lunch, open to public; 7


Fleet Reserve Association donates Seabees honor teacher


Special to the Chronicle
Recently the Fleet Reserve Association Branch/Unit 186 presented a $500 donation to Cit-
rus United Basket Executive Director Deborah Rossfeld. CUB provides food, financial and
material assistance in emergencies to citizens of Citrus County. The FRA supports many
community organizations and programs for both military and civilian families who may be
Sin urgent need of assistance. From left are: Joan Huscher, Ladies Auxiliary 186; Deborah
Rossfeld, CUB; Bob Huscher, secretary Branch 186.


p.m., women's pool league.
June 19, 5 p.m., chicken
wings, macaroni salad, dessert.
June 20, Convention in Or-
lando.
June 21, 3 p.m., mixed pool
league.
June 24, 2 p.m., bingo with
light lunch, open to public; 7
p.m., women's pool league.
June 26, 5 p.m., light supper:
Pizzas.
June 27, Welcome home
party for Daniel Williams (DJ)
returning home from
Afghanistan, our young Marine
on leave; 3 p.m. the party
starts, 5 p.m. deep fried turkeys
with trimmings, music by .
Rhonda, open to all his friends
I and family.
June 28, 3 p.m., mixed pool.
Note: Bingos and meals are
open to the public. For more in-
formation call 795-5012 after 1
p.m.
* The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58, 10730
U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Regular meetings of the Post
and Auxiliary are at 7 p.m. on
the first Wednesday monthly.
Dunnellon Young Marines
meet from 6 to 9 p.m. every
Tuesday except for June, July
and August.
Bingo is every Thursday
evening. Doors open at 4 p.m.
Games start at 6 p.m. Food is
available.
\Third Saturday Outdoor Flea
Market is every month on our
premises. Vendors - $10. Call
Larry Jones for details, 522-.
0177.
Pancake breakfast the third
Saturday of each month has
been suspended for June, July
and August. Will resume in
September. All-you-can-eat for
a $4 donation.
* Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337, 906 State Road 44 E., In-
verness, phone 344-3495.
Karaoke is presented each
Sunday, Tuesday and Friday
evenings.
Bar Bingo is played Monday
and Thursday afternoons and
Wednesday evening.
Wings are served each Tues-
day evening and fish or chicken
on Friday evenings.
"Show Me The Money" is
played each Saturday from 1 to
3p.m.
* The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.


Anyone who has honorably
served within Korea or outside
Korea from June 25, 1950, to
Jan. 31, 1955, and anyone
serving within Korea from 1955
to present is eligible to join the
Korean War Veterans Associa-
tion (KWVA). Call Hank Butler
at 563-2496, Paul Salyer at
637-1161 or Neville Anderson
at 344-2529.
* Allen-Rawls American
Legion' Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness.,
Potluck dinner at 6 p.m., meet-
ing starts at 7:15. Auxiliary Unit
77 meets at the same time and
place. Call Post Cmdr. Norman
Provencal at 726-4257 or Auxil-
iary president Alice Brumett at
860-2981.
* U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgepn Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 726-5926.
* American Legion Post
166 will meet 1:30 p.m., Satur-
day, June 6 at the Dumas-Hart-
son VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility located on Vet-
erans Drive, Homosassa, on
the west side of U.S. 19 at
Dixon's Auto Sales across from
Harley Davidson.
All former and current post
members, as well as all inter-
ested veterans, are cordially in-
vited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166.
* Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamlis, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call John Young at the
Hunger and Homeless Coali-
tion at 628-4357, or pass along
this phone number to the vet-
eran.
* Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shonk Chap-
ter 70 and Auxiliary 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41.


DAV Chapter 70 and Auxil-
iary-meetings are at 2 p.m. on
the second Tuesday of each
month.
The DAV Chapter is open
from 9 a.m. to noon every
Tuesday to assist disabled vet-
erans. A service officer is avail-
able by appointment. Contact
Bill Geden at 341-6875.
For the Chapter, call Richard*
Floyd, adjutant at 726-5031.
For the Auxiliary, call Lynn Ar-
mitage, adjutant at 341-5334.
* Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Richard Gannon
at 637-1236; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Debi Gan-
non at 637-1236 or visit
www.Postl55.org. 'i -
* Seabee Veterans-of :
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Crys-
tal Paradise Restaurant in ,
Crystal River. Have lunch after
the meeting.
Luncheons are held at 1 p.m.
second Tuesdays at selected
restaurants, all are welcome.
June 9 will be at Cracker's ,
Restaurant on U.S. 19 in Crys-
tal River; July 14 will be at La
Luna on U.S. 41 South, Inver-
ness.
Breakfasts are held at 8 a.m.
on the last Sunday monthly.
Today's (and the June 28)
breakfast will be at Joe's
Restaurant in Inverness and
July 26 at Crystal Paradise
Restaurant in Crystal River.
For information call John
Kister at 527-3172.
* The Dan Campbell Air-
borne Association meets at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 Gulf-to-Lake
Highway (State Road 44), Crys-
tal River. All current and previ-
ous Airborne members and
their wives are welcome to join
us. Call Steve Leonard at 726-
3693.


Special to the Chronicle
The Navy Seabee Veterans of America Island X-23, Crystal
River, recently surprised an Inverness Primary School first-
grade teacher. They presented a Certificate of Appreciation
that read: "Presented to Sandra Cross for her creative ef-
forts with the students of Inverness Primary School to honor
the Military Veterans of Citrus County." A check was also
presented to IPS from the Seabees. Pictured are Sandra
Cross and NSVA Island X-23 Commander John Lowe.


* The Marine Corps,
League, Samuel R. Wall De-
tachment 1139 will conduct its
regular meeting at 7 p.m. the
third Wednesday monthly at
DAV Post 70 in Inverness at the
intersection of Independence
Avenue and U.S.. 41 North. All
former Marines are welcome.
Call Tom Heron at 637-2724 or
Joe Spoto at 746-3315.
* Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40
East, Inglis (352) 447-3495.
Men's meeting is at 7:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly.
Ladies Auxiliary meets at 5
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday
monthly.
House Committee meets at 6
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
* Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 344-
0727.
-, 0 Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meels the
third Thursday monthly at the
Floral City VFW Post 7122, call
to order 7:30 p.m. The mem-
tbership invites all eligible veter-
ans to come and join us aswe
plan for the future of our Post.
* The Herbert Surber
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 225 meets at 7:30 p.m. the
third Thursday monthly at the
Floral City VFW Post 7122 on
U.S. 41, Floral City. Contact
Marcia Gallagher, membership
chairwoman, at 860-1629.
Come and join this newly re-
chartered unit and be a part of
the great accomplishments and
projects in the American Legion
Auxiliary.
* Beverly Hills Memorial
American Legion Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza invites inter-
ested veterans to apply for
membership or transfer. Sons
of the American Legion and
Ladies Auxiliary units are now
forming. Membership meeting
fourth Thursday at 7 p.m. Sun-
day darts at 3 p.m. with
karaoke following. Other activi-
ties being planned. All sporting
events available on five TVs.
Visit, or phone the post at 746-
5018.
* Marine Corps League,


Citrus County Detachment
819 will meet at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. Call
Commandant Robert Deck at
527-1557.
* Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
Sailors meet at Denny's in
Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 621-0617.
* The Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association (AFA) will have its
June meeting at 7 p.m. Thurs-
day, June 25. The location will
be the Landmark Aviation Build-
ing, 1200 S.W. 60th Ave.,
Ocala.
. Guest speaker will be chap-
ter member Dave Suban. Dave
is retired Senior Intelligence An-
alyst HDQS, U.S. Special Oper-
ations CMD. Guests are always
welcome to the meetings.
For more information, call
Mike Emig (352) 854-8328.
* Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
bimonthly at 1:15 p.m. on the
third Tuesday of January,
March, May, July, September
and November at the Citrus
County Resources Center/VA
Clihic, 2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto (west side of
C.R. 491 approximately 1 mile
north of C.R. 486).
All combat wounded veter-
ans and lineal descendants of
Purple Heart recipients are in-
vited to attend a meeting. Life
memberships for combat
wounded Veterans and lineal
descendants of Purple Heart
recipients are $50. There are
no chapter dues. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit www.cit-
ruspurpleheart.org or call
382-3847.
* VFW Post 4252 and
Ladies Auxiliary: All eligible
persons are invited to join. Stop
in at the post or call for informa-
tion. Post 4252 is at 3190 N.
Carl G. Rose Highway, S.R.
200, Hemando; phone 726-
3339. Send e-mails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
* The William Crow
AmVets Post 447 is at 33
Risher Ave. in Inglis. For more
information call 447-4473.
* The H. F. Nesbitt VFW
Post 10087 is in Beverly Hills
off C.R. 491, across the street
from ROC's 491 Sports Bar and
directly behind the new Supe-
rior Bank.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.

BLOIAIT C HIAIR SCRAP S AR A R A H


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Hasbrouck completes
combat training
Army Pvt. David S. Has-
brouck has graduated from
basic combat training at Fort
Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier studied the
Army mission, history, tradition
and core values, physical fit-
ness, and received instruction
and practice in basic combat
skills, military weapons, chemi-
cal warfare and bayonet train-
ing, drill and ceremony,
marching, rifle marksmanship,
armed and unarmed combat,
map reading, field tactics, mili-
tary courtesy, military justice
system, basic first aid, foot
marches and field training exer-
cises.
Hasbrouck is the son of De-
lynn Johns of Homosassa.
Tubman graduates


BlackBerry* Pearl"
smartphone
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Pack agreement on
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considered one of the top edu-
cational institutions in the coun-
try.
The Academy currently has
4,500 students comprising the
Wing of Cadets who hail from
every state in the union, plus
several foreign allied countries.
Admission to the Air Force
Academy or any of the U.S. mil-
itary academies is a full schol-
arship.
Graduates completed an in-
tensive, four-year program bal-
ancing academics focused on
engineering, a full military regi-
men and rigorous physical fit-
ness to complement the needs
of the U.S. Air Force.
'Their education is combined
with strict, professional military
training, emphasizing the devel-
opment of leadership skills.
Graduates will now fulfill their
commitment to the U.S. Air
Force in various capacities.


Air Force Academy Wood graduates


An area cadet is in the grad-
uating class of 2009 from the
U.S. Air Force Academy, Col-
orado Springs, Colo. 2nd Lt.
Wesley Tubman, a graduate of
Seven Rivers Christian School,
Lecanto, received his Bachelor
of Science in Mechanical Engi-
neering. He will enter pilot train-
ing at Vance Air Force Base in
Enid, Okla.
Tubman
was a soaring
instructor
pilot, compet-
ing in many
national com-
petitions with
aerobatic
demonstra- Wesley
tions at vari- Tubman *
ous air shows graduate of
across the Seven Rivers
country. Christian
cou School.
He was a
part of the
2009 Glider Aerobatic Team
participating in numerous local
and national soaring competi-
tions.
Tubman was involved in Big
Brothers Big Sisters, and en-
joys snow boarding as well as
rock climbing. He looks forward
to serving his country as a pilot
in the Air Force.
Graduation was May 27, with
Vice President Joe Biden deliv-
ering the commencement ad-
dress.
The U.S. Air Force Academy
.(USAFA) in Colorado Springs is


from Coast Guard
COAST GUARD ACADEMY,
New London, Conn. - Cadet
First Class Stephanie Wood of
Homosassa, was one of 225
cadets to graduate recently
from the U.S. Coast Guard
Academy with a Bachelor of
Science degree in Civil Engi-
neering.
During commencement exer-
cises, graduates of the Class of
2009 will receive their commis-
sion as ensigns in the U.S.
Coast Guard from Department
of Homeland Security Secre-
tary Janet Napolitano.
A 2005 Lecanto High School
graduate, Wood is the daughter
of Rhonda and Douglas Wood
of Sugarmill Woods..
Wood's first tour of duty will
be as a student engineer on the
U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Sher-
man in Alameda, Calif.
"I'm excited about being
grown up," said Wood. "I think
living in California will be a
memorable experience."
The Coast Guard Academy
offers an integrated life experi-
ence which emphasizes aca-
demics, physical fitness,
character and leadership, in
order to graduate officers of the
highest caliber.
Graduates go directly to posi-
tions of leadership and are obli-
gated to eight years service,"
five of which must be active
duty.


Worth NOTING


Donate a flag
for Fort Cooper
Donations of U.S., Florida
and military organizations'
flags that are in good shape
can be dropped off at the
Ranger Station at Fort Cooper
State Park. These will be used
in our Flag Day Celebration on
June 13. Call 726-0315.
Summer gymnastics
camps available
Citrus Gymnastics Inc. an-
nounces its Summer Tumble
and Gymnastics Camps are
scheduled for the weeks of:
June 15to 19; June 22 to 26;
June 29 to July 3; July 13 to 17;
July 20 to 24; July 27 to 31; and
Aug. 10 to 14. Time is noon to 4
p.m. Monday to Friday.
Tumble Camp will be June
29 to July 3 from 2 to 4 p.m.
The cost is $95 per week for
one child. Pay by day is $20
per child. Call about prices for
more than one week of camp
or more than one child.
Call Alana at 302-8175 or
746-7700 after 4 p.m.
Citrus Gymnastics is in the
Three Rivers Commerce Park
on State Road 44 in Lecanto.
www.citrusgyrnnastics.com.


West Citrus Elks
plan for June
The West Citrus Elks Lodge
2963 offers the following for its
members and their guests:
Tuesday: Karaoke with
"Debi G" entertaining 5:30 to
9:30 p.m. Menu: fish baskets
with fries or Reuben baskets
with fries and coleslaw served
from 5:30 to 7 p.m. $5.
Tuesday, June 9: Karaoke
with "Turner Camp Dave" en-
tertaining from 5:30 to 9:30
p.m. Menu: fish baskets with
fries or BLT baskets with fries
and coleslaw served from 5:30
to 7 p.m. $5.
Saturday, June 13: Cele-
brate coming of summer at our
Lazy, Hazy, Crazy Days of
Summer dinner/dance with en-
tertainment by "So Fine."
Menu: fried chicken or fried fish
(baked or broiled upon re-
quest), with potato salad,
baked beans, corn on the cob
and coleslaw served at 6 p.m.
$12 per person, tickets avail-
able in the lounge.
Tuesday, June 16: Karaoke
with "Debi G" entertaining
from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m.,Menu:
fish baskets with fries or wings
baskets with fries served from


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5:30 to 7 p.m. $5.
Saturday, June 20: Hungry?
Come to our all you can eat
fish fry special with coleslaw,
baked beans and O.C.'s fa-
mous hushpuppies from 5 to 8
p.m. all for only $8 per person.
Sunday, June 21: Father's
Day program to honor all fa-
thers at 9 a.m. with Chef Ken's
special complimentary.
breakfast from 9 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. for our fathers, children
younger than 12: free, ($4 for
all others).
Tuesday, June 23: Karaoke
with "Turner Camp Dave" en-
tertaining from 5:30 to 9:30
p.m. Menu: fish baskets with
fries or Reuben baskets with
fries and coleslaw served from
5:30 to 7 p.m. $5.
Sunday, June 28: Musical
entertainment by "Elks In-
House Combo" from 4 to 6
p.m. with refreshments.
Tuesday, June 30: Karaoke
with "Wild Willie" entertaining
from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Menu:
fish baskets with fries or ham
and cheese sandwich baskets


with coleslaw served from 5:30
to 7 p.m. $5.
Wednesday and Friday
evenings: Dinner in the lounge
with two early-bird specials at
$7 per person or $13 for two
served from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Full
menus from 4 to 8 p.m. with
Chef Ken surprising us with his
culinary talents.
Please note: Dinner reserva-
tions may be made for parties
of six or more persons.
Call the lodge at 628-1221.
Learn yoga
in Highlands
New happenings at the In-
verness Highlands Civic Asso-
ciation, 4375 S. Little Al Court,
Inverness, include Yoga at
9:30 a.m. Tuesday beginning
June 2, at $7 per session.
You're never too old to im-
prove flexibility or improve pos-
ture. Yoga can help relieve
stiffness, tension, fatigue, etc.
All are invited to come and
meet Lace Blue-McLean, who
is certified in yoga training and
will conduct the yoga classes.


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Guidebook beats smartphones in magazine smackdown


Associated Press
NEW YORK - Conde
Nast Traveler magazine sent
three reporters to Moscow,
one armed with an iPhone,
one with a BlackBerry Bold
and one with an old-fash-
ioned guidebook, to see
whether the gadgets or the
book were more helpful in
completing a series of typi-
cal tourist challenges -
finding a hotel, a restaurant,
a bar, various attractions
and a pharmacy
The results may surprise
you: The writer armed with
the guidebook completed


most of the tasks more
quickly and easily than the
writers with gadgets.
Details of the challenge
appear in Conde Nast Trav-
eler's June issue and online
at www.concierge.com/cn-
traveler/articles/500791.
The tech-assisted writers
were both hampered by
Moscow's slow data net-
work, which made down-
loading information tedious.
This also caused their bat-
teries to run low and some-
times to go dead. Because
the assignment was in Feb-
ruary, the iPhone-assisted
writer also complained of


frozen fingers, since the
gadget can't read a touch
through a glove. In addition,
he said, he could have left
his hotel an hour earlier
each day had he been plan-
ning his itinerary on a lap-
top "instead of zooming in
and out of Web pages and te-
diously typing on-screen."
Staring at the tiny screen, he
added, also cuts you off from
the people around you, and
makes it hard to fully appre-
ciate your surroundings.
The writer using the
BlackBerry Bold did give
the thumbs-up to an app
called the Beiks Talking


English-Russian Phrase
Book, which let an auto-
mated voice speak for him
when asking directions from
passers-by, "The clumsy ma-
neuver earned plenty of
laughs but nearly always got
me where I needed to go and
often led to interesting con-
versations," he wrote.
The writer using the
guidebook, an Eyewitness
Travel guide to Moscow, also
relied extensively on the
kindness of strangers and
advice from her hotel
concierge. She beat out the
gadget guys in five of the
magazine's nine challenges,


including finding a hotel
with no reservation for less
than $300 a night (it took her
45 minutes compared to two
hours for the BlackBerry
user and more than three
hours for the iPhone man);
finding an affordable restau-
rant beloved by locals (it
took the guidebook user five
minutes compared to a com-
plete failure by the Black-
Berry user, whose battery
was dead, .and 45 minutes
for the iPhone guy); and tak-
ing the subway to a bazaar in
search of a craft (the guide-
book user completed the
task in 90 minutes by asking


people for help, while the
BlackBerry user could not
complete the task and the
iPhone user took three
hours).
The guidebook gal also
was the winner when it
came to buying an aspirin at
a pharmacy at midnight and
finding a bar to hang out
with the locals. But it did
take her longer to find the
home of a notable dead
Russian, see a live perform-
ance, and find the Diamond
Vaults at the Kremlin. She
came in second in finding
the best pelmeni (a type of
dumpling) in town for lunch.


Travel BRIEFS


Summer in Chattanooga
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. - Festi-
vals, cruises and history are all part of
the summer scene in Chattanooga.
Here are some ideas for things to
do if you're in the area:
* Boating: The Tennessee Aquar-
ium's new River Gorge Explorer offers
eco-cruises. Other ways to get on the
downtown riverfront and Tennessee
River include a ride on the Blue Moon;
a sightseeing, lunch or dinner cruise
on the Southern Belle Riverboat or a
scenic ride on the Chattanooga Water
Taxi/Fat Cat Ferry or Chattanooga
Ducks.
'* Creatures: The aquarium's collec-
tion includes sharks, stingrays and
penguins, or visit the snow leopards,
red pandas, jaguars and more at the
Chattanooga Zoo.
* Festivals: Summer festival sea-
son kicks off with the Riverbend Festi-
val, June 5-13, and winds down with
the Southem Brewer's Festival Aug.
22, with plenty of outdoor concerts in
between.
* History: It's not a working depot
any more, but Chattanooga's Terminal
Station celebrates its centennial this
year-The station is now a unique va-
cation complex called the Chat-
tanooga Choo Choo that includes a
hotel, retail shops, gardens, conven-
tion center and trolley car. Authentic
Victorian sleeper cars have been re-
stored and turned into hotel rooms.
Just outside the city, Tennessee's
largest mall, Hamilton Place, is 15
minutes from downtown, and Lookout
Mountain, with Rock City Gardens,
Ruby Falls and a passenger railway, is
six miles away.
Chattanooga is less than a two-hour
drive from Atlanta, Nashville and
Knoxville, Tenn., and Huntsville and
Birmingham, Ala.
For more information and things to
do, visit http://summer.chattanooga


Tours in Washington, D.C.


Associated Press
Old and new ways of transportation pass each other May 14 on Pennsylvania Avenue near the White House
in Washington, as visitors on Segways ride past U.S. Park Service mounted police officers and mounted po-
lice officers from other states as they toured the White House grounds in Washington. The officers are in Wash-
ington for National Police Week.


fun.com/ or download a visitors guide
from www.chattanoogafun.com/
visitors-guide.
Des Moines revitalized
DES MOINES - Like many cities
around the country, Des Moines has
experibriced a renaissance of its.
downtown and riverfront, with historic
structures preserved, new buildings,
and public, spaces with art and parks.
Consider a tour of these highlights,,
part of a 10-year, $2 billion'revitaliza-
tion:
.. The Des Moines Public:Library,
by British architect'David Chipperfield,
has a simple linear design that resem-
bles a cutout of an airplane and
serves as a bridge between the city


and surrounding park. The building
features state-of-the-art energy con-
servation systems and an exterior
made of thin copper mesh sand-
wiched between two layers of glass.
The walls seem to disappear at dusk
and artificial light within appears to
glow.
* The Temple for Performing Arts,
an ornate Masonic temple built in
1913, Is now a recital hall with a
ground-floor restaurant, Centro.
* Riverwalk unites the east and
west sides of town in a 1.2-mile loop
with paths and bridges connecting
more than 83 acres including public
art, a civic garden and skating rink.
* The Davis Brown Tower public art
wall by Kansas City artist, STRETCH,


called "Des Moines Color Field," uses
recycled Maytag dryer glass windows
and LED lighting programmed with dif-
ferent colors and motion.
N Other downtown attractions in-
clude the Court Avenue District, the
new Science Center of Iowa, the Iowa
Events Center, and the Des Moines
Botanical Gardens, with its centerpiece
pagoda, brought over from China and
rebuilt in Des Moines brick by brick.
Photo contest and tips
WASHINGTON - National Geo-
graphic magazine is renowned for its
beautiful photos of landscapes, wildlife
and local culture around the world.
Now the magazine is inviting the
public to submit pictures to a photo


contest with finalists judged by one of
National Geographic's best photogra-
phers, Jim Richardson. You can sub-
mit photos to the Energizer Ultimate
Photo Contest until June 30 in six cat-
egories; prizes include publication in
the magazine with a grand prize of a
National Geographics Expeditions trip
to the Galapagos Islands.
But before you run out with your
camera to get that perfect shot, con-
sider trying these techniques from
Richardson:
* If water is in your shot, try to get a
reflection. Bring the camera right down
to water level (but still dry) where the
reflections are most symmetrical.
* Look for ways to frame the photo
as you set up your picture: Doorways,
arches, branches, rock formations.
* Don't rely on your zoom lens
when you should be using your feet to
get in closer to your subject or find a
better angle.
Details on the photo contest at
www.nationalgeographic.com/lithium.
Social networking
ATLANTA- The Georgia Depart-
ment of Economic Development is
using online social networking to pro-
mote the state's tourist attractions.
The department's tourism division
has launched an "Explore Georgia"
fan page on the popular social net-
working site Facebook. The page is
regularly updated and encourages
fans to travel to various destinations ih
the state.
The state has also created a "Geor-
gia Explorers" Facebook group. That's
meant to be an online community for
the state's travel industry to share and
discuss ideas, questions, suggestions
and industry updates,
. The tourism division is also prepar-
ing to launch a blog and a YouTube
channel.
Details at www.exploregeorgia.org.
-From wire reports


DINING
Continued from Page A9

eating than cooking, Swan-
son hosts a series of Sunday
dinners at farms.
Guests receive quick
tours of greenhouses or
strawberry patches before
settling down to meals that
may include roasted
chicken, strawberry short-
cake or grilled summer
squash.
Dress is casual, and "the
big thing," Swanson said, is
"breaking the bread, talking
with the farmer about the '
things they are growing."
In all cases, he tries to
keep the food simple so stu-
dents or dinner guests can
make similar meals at .
home.
"The idea is to get more
people to cook," Swanson Associated Press
said, "and if they make the Edith Braeger, 39, of Mil-
connection to the farmer, waukee, samples a frittata
some of the best meals I've made by Swanson during the
had are simple meals." school's mushroom hunt.

DO YOU TW1ITER?
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County Chronicle: From a computer, you can check the
"tweets" at http://twitter.com/CitrusChronicle.

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Wedding ====45th ANNIVERSARY 60th ANNIVERSARY


Perkins/Brooks


The Calcaneses


The Risedorfi


Anthony Brooks and Stacy
Perkins were united in mar-
riage May 6, 2009, in Inver-
ness. Judy Ramsay officiated
the ceremony.
The bride is the daughter
of Cindy Bury of Citrus
Springs and Chuck Perkins
of Knox, Tenn., and the
granddaughter of Frank
Hanson of Crystal River.
The groom is the son of Ike
Brooks and Della and Her-
man Rice, all of Crystal
River.
The bride was given in
marriage by her grandfather,
Frank Hanson. The maid
and matron of honor were
Andrea Jones and Della
Rice respectively. The best
man was Ernest Jones,
groom's brother.
The wedding reception
will be announced and will
be given by family.
The groom attended
Lecanto schools and is self-


employed.
The bride is a graduate of
Huntsville High and is study-
ing to be a registered nurse.
The couple has seven chil-
dren, Kenisha and Anthony
Brooks of Ohio, Heaven and
Jyniya Brooks of Inverness,
Whitney Perkins, Adrian
Williams and Al'ton Brooks
of Crystal River.
The couple went on a
seven-day cruise for their
honeymoon.
They Will live in Crystal
River


New ARRIVALS


Congratulations to the fol-
lowing new parents:
* To Joel and Selena
Steele, Homosassa, a son,
Joel Brian Steele II, born at
8:24 p.m. Monday, May 4,
2009, at Seven Rivers Com-
munity Hospital, Crystal
River. He weighed '7
pounds, 3 ounces.
* To Felicia King and
Christopher West, Homosas-
sa, a daughter, Destiny Mi-
chelle West, born at 4:54 p.m.
Monday, May 18,2009, at Cit-


rus Memorial Health Sys-
tem, Inverness. She weighed
7 pounds, 14 3/4 ounces.
* To Gabe and Amie
Spooner, Gainesville, a son,
Leland Gabriel Spooner,
born at 2:53 p.m. Friday,
April 24, 2009, at North
Florida Regional Medical
Center. He weighed 8
pounds, 6 ounces, and was
20 inches long. Maternal
grandparents: Tom and
Judye Adams. Paternal
grandparent: Suzi Ward.


- .,f it e"




Nick and Carol Calcanes, Calcanes of Charlotte, N.C.,
of Homosassa, celebrated 45 a daughter, Christine Cal-
years of marriage ("45 glori- canes of Coral Springs, and
ous years," Nick says), on three grandchildren.
Saturday, May 30: They were Carol retired from Sears
married on that date in 1964 in retail and Nick was self-
at Glen Morris Presbyterian employed in the restaurant
Church, Richmond Hill, industry.
N.Y. They have lived in Citrus
They have a son, Nick County 19 years.

FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and en-
gagement announcements, anniversaries, bvrth
announcements and first birthdays.
* Photos need to be in sharp focus.
* Photos need to be in proper exposure: neither too
light nor too dark.
* Include your name, address and phone number on all
photos.
* We discourage the use of Polaroid prints and low res
solution camera phones.
* Photos printed on home printers do not reproduce
well; submit the digital image via disk or e-mail. Staff
will color correct and otherwise "work up" the image
to Chronicle publication standards.
* Photos submitted electronically should be in maxi.
mum-resolution JPEG (.jpg) format.
* Photos cannot be returned without a self-addressed,
stamped envelope.
* For more information, call 563-5660 or send e mail to
communty@chronicleonline.com.


Retired Nurses gather for yearly conference


Special to the Chronicle


The Florida Society of Registered
Nurses Retired had a fun seminar at
the Embassy Suites of Altamonte
Springs. The ladies and gentlemen
from Citrus/Marion counties,
Lake/Sumter counties, Orange/Semi-
nole counties, Space Coast Chapter.
and. Treasure Coast Chapter partici-
pated in a very busy and accomplished
business meeting. Valencia Commu-
nity College of Orlando received an
R.N. scholarship. The RNR State Me-
morial Award was given to the Hospice
of Comfort of Altamonte Springs.
Citrus/Marion Chapter received a


matching fund for one of its charities,
Alzheimers/Dementia Alfiance for Ed-
ucation and Support Inc. Matching
funds were also awarded to Treasure
Coast Chapter's charity: Our Father's
Table, Space Coast Chapter's charity:
Joe's Club and Lake/Sumter Chapter's
charity: Homes. The morning speaker,
Ann Singleton, a published lecturer,
spoke on "Post Polio Syndrome." The
afternoon speaker, Edgar J. EHeur-
eux, spoke on Florida's Lighthouses.
* Separately, the Citrus/Marion
Chapter had an update on hearing loss
and saluted the Charter Members.
' Denny Dingier, an atidioprothologist
of Professional Hearing Centers of In-


verness, kept the ladies smiling with his
humorous presentation on the causes
of hearing loss, the many approaches to
care and the newest appliances.
The Charter Members were hon-
ored with roses and loud applause.
These are the ladies who began the ac-
tive, charitable group March 30, 1992:
Evelyn Crabtree and Jeanne Loranger
of Rainbow Lakes, Dunnellon; Thel-
ma Champeau of Citrus Springs; Mar-
tha McDonald of Oak Run, Ocala;
Doris Hutchinson of Inverness; Helen
Howlett of Belleview; and Joyce Boy-
lan of Oak Run, Ocala.
The meetings are open to retired or
semi retired R.N.s.


Don and Doris Risedorf of
Inverness celebrated their
60th wedding anniversary
with a family get-together.
They were married on May
28, 1949, in South Orange,
N.J.
The Risedorfs have two
daughters, Donna Need-
ham, Inverness, and Sandy
(Ken) lannarone, Aurora,
Colo. They also have five
grandchildren, Tracey,
Corinne, Wendy, Michael
and Cindy, and one great-
grandson, Jayden, and an-
other grandbaby on the way.
Mr. Risedorf is a retired
lineman for Public Service
Electric & Gas of West Or-
ange, N.J., and Mrs. Rise-
dorf worked for the East
t


Jessica Marie Smith of
Dunnellon married Trent
Morgan Faragher of Bris-
bane, Queensland, Aus-
tralia, at 3 p.m. Saturday,
March 7, 2009, "on the is-
land" at Meadowcrest Park,
Crystal River. The Rev. Dan
Lyman officiated the cere-
mony.
The bride is the daughter
of John and Darlene Smith
of Dunnellon, who gave her
away at the ceremony. She
is a 2005 graduate of Crystal
River High School. She was
enrolled in the nursing pro-
gram at CFCC in Ocala prior
to her move to Australia.
Her plans are to complete
her schooling in Brisbane,
Australia, and get a B.S. de-
gree in nursing.
The bridegroom is the son
of Tam and Desleigh
Faragher of Brisbane,
Queensland, Australia. He
graduated with honors in
2006 from the University of
Queenslaid, St Lucia,
where he received a B.S. de-
gree in Mechanical Engi-
neering. He is currently
employed as a project engi-
neer in Brisbane, Australia,
with TFA Engineering.
The wedding reception.
followed the ceremony at


-Hanover Township School
System, East Hanover, N.J.-
They have lived in Inver-
ness for 22 years.


Meadowcrest Clubhouse in
Crystal River.
Entertainment was pro-
vided by Re-Mix Studio &
DJ Services.
The couple honeymoon in
Lord Howe Island, New
South Wales, Australia; a
small island in the South
Pacific Ocean approxi-
mately 360 miles off the
coast of the Australian
mainland between Brisbane
and ,Sydney.
The couple will live in
Brisbane, Queensland,Aus-
tralia. *


ON TH1E NET: ww*.chronicleonline.com


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"Up" (PG) Noon, 2:30 p.m., 5:05 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Drag Me To Hell" (PG-13) 12:10 p.m., 2:45.
p.m., 5:10 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Dance Flick" (PG-13) 12:10 p.m., 2:20 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Night at the Museum II" (PG) 11:50 a.m.,
2:40 p.m., 5:15 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Terminator Salvation" (PG-13) 11:45 a.m.,
2:20 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Angels & Demons" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m.,
3:40 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Star Trek" (PG-13) 12:40 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Up" (PG) 11:30 a.m., 2 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7


p.m., 9:30 p.m. No passes.
"Drag Me To Hell" (PG-13) 12:05 p.m., 2:50
p.m., 5:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Dance Flick" (PG-13) 12:10 p.m., 2:20 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Night at the Museum II" (PG) Noon, 12:30
p.m., 2:30 p.m., 3 p.m., 5 p.m., 5:30 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 8 p.m., 10 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Terminator Salvation" (PG-13) 11:40 a.m.,
2:15 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No
passes.
"Angels & Demons" (PG-13) 11:50 a.m.,,
3:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Star Trek" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 3:15 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"X-Men Origins: Wolverine" (PG-13) 11:45
a.m. 2:40 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m.


..-- June 1 to 5 MENUS


June 1 - 5: Manager's
choice for all school menus.
CONGREGATE DINING
Monday: Meatballs with Ital-
ian tomato sauce, Italian blend
vegetables, carrots, whole
wheat hot dog bun (for meatball
sub), chocolate brownie, milk.
Tuesday: Chicken quarter
with Spanish sauce, fiesta rice,
green beans, slice of whole


wheat bread with margarine,
fresh orange, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Orange juice,
pork chop patty with brown
gravy, broccoli cuts, corn, slice
of whole wheat bread with mar-
garine, fruited yogurt.
Thursday: Chef salad
(turkey, ham, cheese and
boiled egg) with ranch dressing,
2 slices whole wheat bread with


margarine, applesauce, milk.
Friday: Macaroni and
cheese casserole, garden
green peas, stewed tomatoes,
mixed fruit cup, low-fat.milk.
Congregate dining sites in-
clude: Lecanto, East Citrus,
Crystal River, Homosassa
Springs, Inverness and South
Dunnellon. For information, call
Support Services at 527-5975.


(352) 628-4645 (352) 628-7473
4.55 S Suncoasi Bld IHu', I0' So I iHomosas.aj, Florida 34-44o


FREE Varicose Vein Screening

Varicose veins are not always a cosmetic
issue. Varicose veins and heavy, painful
legs can now be treated in the doctor's
office with the VNUS Closure: procedure.


To attend this FREE varicose vein
screening, call now: (352) 291-2400


Wedding

Smith/Faragher


SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2oog A13


TOGETHER


RTIC US COUNTY (FI E









A14 SuNn~y.M.4Y3l. 2009 Cimus CouNm' (FL) CHRONICLE


The Lower 47 states


t was 20 years ago today that Texas se-
ceded from the United States. At the
time, many Texans thought things would
get better if they jumped ship. And they did
get better-- for the USA.
When NASA moved its space center from
Houston to Cape Canaveral, it robbed the for-
mer state of thousands of high-paying jobs as
well as a lot of much-needed brainpower The
joke at the time was that the move dropped
the average IQ of Texans 11 points. When the
Defense Department closed all its
Texas bases, the economy got even
worse. At the time of secession
there were 110,000 active military
in Texas, with another 85,000 in
the reserves. The money from
their paychecks 'disappeared
overnight Mail delivery stopped
and tens of thousands of U.S.
postal workers were suddenly un-
employed. Even with all its oil;
Texas still couldn't afford to main-
tain highways and waterways. MUt
FEMA stopped all work on Galve-
ston, and the damage from subsequent hur-
ricanes has not yet begun to be repaired.
'Crop support, Medicare and Medicaid
stopped, as did unemployment insurance,
food stamps and support for public housing.
The country of Texas couldn't afford to pay
high school football coaches $1 million dol-
lars anymore. Many of them quit in disgust
In the war with Mexico (see the War of
Mexican Reunification, 2015, commonly
called The Two Day War) the former state's
only defense was a group called the Minute-
men. Named after the original Minutemen of
Lexington and Concord who fought against
the best army in the world, the modern Min-
utemen only fought unarmed day laborers
who were trying to cross the then-border to
get low-wage jobs. They were quite successful
against undernourished women and chil-,
dren, but the new Minutemen folded like a


cheap cell phone when faced with the Mexi-
canArmy.
The Mexicans quickly passed "Spanish
Only" legislation that forbade any signs or
documents to be in any language other than
Spanish. There are no bilingual classes in
public schools, putting Anglo children at a
great disadvantage. If an Anglo gets arrested,
there is no requirement that he be provided
with a lawyer or a translator. While many
older Anglos still speak English at home,
their children often pretend notto.
understand it At best, they retain
a word or two like "thanks" or
"Merry Christmas." They are em-
barrassed of their parents' poor
command of the language. Public
schools now have soccer teams,
and football is nolonger played in
Texas.
The saddest part is that thou-
M sands of Texans still wash up on
the shores of Louisiana and
.LEN Florida, malnourished and desti-
tute, begging to be let back into the
United States. What to do with these illegal
aliens is still being discussed in Congress.
Should they be sent back to where they came
from or' should they be given some,kind of
amnesty? The wall the United States built
around Texas to protect the border states of
Oklahoma and Louisiana from illegal Texans
is expensive to maintain and not 100 percent
secure. Each year, thousands of Texans either
climb it or tunnel under it looking for m6re'
lucrative jobs than they can get at home.
Many Americans are afraid that if the wall
comes down, the United States will be
flooded \'ith uneducated, illegal Texans who
refuse to assimilate into the American cul-
ture.


Reach author Jim Mullen at
. jim_mullen@mywaycom.


The Citrus County Animal
Control Shelter has online list-
ings of impounded animals at
animal control.cltrus.fl.us. Select
"Animal Type," etc. and search.
The shelter is in Inverness
near the airport. The shelter
phone hours are 8 a.m. to clos-


ing, and it is open for adoptions
,from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday and Fri-
day, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Thursday and from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday.
. For more information, call
the Citrus County Animal Shel-


ter at 726-7660.
Financial assistance for
spaying and neutering of an
adopted pet is available
through the Humanitarians of
Florida at 563-2370 or from
the Humane Society of Citrus
County at 341-2222.


Hurtful words remembered


long after they're spoken


Dear Annie: An old problem keeps
popping up, and I would appreci-
ate some advice. When I was in col-
lege, I was good friends with "Carrie,"
another fairly liberal thinker. When Car-
rie met my long-term boyfriend, she was
rather intoxicated and said
some hurtful things about him.
He is a clean-cut, conservative-
looking guy. Carrie went on and
on about how she couldn't be-
lieve I would date a frat boy,
what did I see in him, that I was
better than that, etc.
Carrie apologized the next
day, and I accepted and thought
that was the end of it I married
the boyfriend and still keep in
touch with Carrie. But even
after two years, I cannot shake
the things she said. I know her ANIN
well enough to realize that MAll
while she was sorry, she meant
every word.
Carrie has asked to visit a couple of
times, and I keep making excuses because
it would be uncomfortable., (My husband,
obviously, is not crazy about her.) I know
her loose tongue was a result of the drink-
ing and she did apologize, but I can't forget
the incident. When she tries
to "make nice" regarding I know hi
my husband, it makes me
cringe. What should I say tongue,
when she tells me she'd like
to come and stay with us? - result c
Confused Since College rinking
Dear Confused: A per-drinking
son's opinion is not written did apo
in concrete. Even if Carrie
,meant those words at the but I can
time, it doesn't mean she
still feels that way, and you the inc
are not giving her the op-
portunity to show you if she's had a change
of heart: Before inviting Carrie to visit,
have a frank discussion. Tell her you are
still bothered by those comments about
your husband and, because you value the
friendship so highly, would like to clear
the air. See what she says before checking
her off your guest list.
Dear Annie: My mom is going out with a
nice guy. I respect him, but sometimes it
feels like she hangs ,out with him and ig-
nores my brother and me. Two weeks ago,
she was out doing stuff .with him while my
brother and I were at the house totally


l


i


:i


bored. She asked if we wanted to go with,
but I was half-asleep because I had been
to a dance and had to get up early.
The next day, I brought it up, and she
said she-knew how we felt and didn't care.
That really hurt Then we started yelling
at each other and got into the
biggest fight we've had in a long
time. I feel like the third wheel,
and something needs to change.
I don't know what I'm going to
do if they get married. - Help-
less Daughter
Dear Daughter. Your mother
shouldn't neglect you, but it is
not her job to entertain you, ei-
ther Kids who grow up in sin-
gle-parent homes often feel
proprietary toward their par-
ents and become jealous of suit-
IE'S ors. But one of these days, you
.BOX and your brother will be out of
the house, and it is rather self-
ish to expect Mom to remain alone. She is
trying to include you in her activities, and
you should do your best to participate. If
you find yourself fighting a lot with her,
you might consider discussing it with your
school counselor, favorite relative or best
friend's mother.
Dear Annie: Thanik you for'
er loose informing "Grossed Out in
Kentucky" that the chances of
was a contracting genital herpes
from a counter clerk at a fast-
of the food restaurant were slim to
and she none, and that he should stop
and She treating her as a pariah.
logize Perhaps the writer could let
S Y' us know where he works so
't forget the rest of us can avoid the
much more contagious and, se-
ident. rious diseases of Misinforma-
tionitis and Acute Bigotry
Disorder (sometimes known as Holier
Than Thou Syndrome). - Absolutely
Amazed at the Audacity in Sarasota, Fla.
Dear Amazed: Touche.


Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers column.
E-mail questions to anniesmailbox@
comcastnet, or write to: Annie's Mailbox,
PO. Box 118190, Chicago, IL 60611. To
find out more about Annie's Mailbox,
visit the Web page at www.creators.com.


SundayPUZZLER


Puzzle answer is on Page A10.


Name: (none) Name: (none) N- Serena Namne: Balto Name: Elliott Name: Piper
AGE: '2-mo.. AGE: kitten AGE: n/a AGE: 6 mo. AGE: 3 mo. AGE: 4 mo.
SEX: M SEX: F SEX: SF SEX: NM SEX: M SEX: F
ID: 7341421 ID: 7621497 ID: 7713172 ID: 7045666 ID: 7443077 ID: 7474881



Today's HOROSCOPE


Birthday: Conditions are likely to change for the bet-
ter in the year ahead What you do with the improved
climate will be up to you - if you choose, you can
enhance both your career and private life.,
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Domestic affairs are
likely to occupy your attention, but this doesn't mean
they have to be work-related. Simply relax and enjoy.
your family; it will make you feel great.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -Although there is noth-
ing you enjoy more than being with your kin, putting a
few friends into the mix will bring something fresh
and different to the normal Sunday get-togethers.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - There is nothing cheap
about you, but you're not foolish, either. If you're foot-
ing the bill for the festivities, you'll be sensible about
just how much is enough - and you'll be right.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -You have the potential
to gain the upper hand in most competitive situations.
But if you're playing just for fun, it won't be important
to try to win every game.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Although you usually
enjoy being with lots of people, you might prefer
'sharing your day with just a few chosen friends. If
you're doing the planning, keep things to a minimum.


Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - Friends who are both
fun and productive will be the ones with whom you
would prefer to spend your day.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - Having clearly de-
fined aims and purposes will provide an edge in all
that you do, whether your activities are for play or ca-
reer purposes. Plan ahead.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - When it comes to
handling a critical situation, keep things on an even
keel by being both philosophical and realistic.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -An opportunity might
arise to help out another and, in doing so, repay a
debt you've been anxious to. reciprocate.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - Not only will you fit
neatly into an arrangement that requires teamwork;
there's a good chance you may even derive some
benefits from being part of it. It'll be just pure luck.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - Just because it might
be a day off doesn't mean you shouldn't do some-
thing useful. This is a perfect day to fix those little,
neglected things around the house.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - Plan a social activity
with friends; it will do you a world of good to let your
hair down and have some fun for a change.


ACROSS
1 Make swollen
6 Blacken by burn-
ing
1ODiscard
15Vaughan or Bern-
hardt
20Baton -
21Something entic-
ing
22Shipping con-
tainer
23Straw hat
24"A Doll's House"
writer
25- Spumante
26Hearsay
27Stop sleeping
28Acquired
29Recipe amount
31Cheerful
33Make untidy
35Watch over
36Hold tight
37Nail polish
39The' States (abbr.)
41Feafful
44Witches' concoc-
tion .
45Pitcher
48Entire
53Cook a certain
way
54Null and-
55Take weapons
from
57Raze
58Endure
59Strong wind
60Mem. of Congress
61Smooth-talking
63Horse's hair
64Black or private
65Follow a sinuous
path
66Zoo animal
68Birthright seller
70Fond du -


71 Discovery .
72Tooth doctor
74Best or Ferber
76Love
79Dwelling place
81Simians
83Locomotive
87Country in Asia
88Capital of 14
, Down
89Dividing
91Wall hanging
921Internal
94Lugosi of old
films
96- of the crop
97Supermarket sec-
tion
98Frond
100 The Motor City
102 Sword
104 Bad (prefix)
107 Apothecaries'
weight
109 Cover with liquid
110 Earthen lump
111 Weep
114 Touch on
116 Entreaty .
118 Newspaper
employees
(abbr.)
119 Molt
120 Moderate
(with "down")
121 Kind of race
123 Declines gradu-
ally
125 Versifier
126 Tartar or tomato
127 Get away from
128 Wall pier
129 Plant genus -
130 Tank for hot
water
131 Part of ASPCA
133 Certain aircraft
136. Influence


,137 Drill
141 Story of old
144 Cheese variety
145 Sal-
146 Peculiar
149 Impervious to
light
151 Countrified
153 Date in March
155 Carved gem
157 Ringed planet
158 Century plant
159 Identical
160 Writer-Zola
161 Killed
162 Fonda or Sellers
163 Arab VIP
164 Appointments

DOWN
1 Ship's prison
2 Timber wolf
3 Eject
4 Grow older
5 Climbing plant
� part
6 Fastening device
7 Be quiet!
8 Skill
9 Ruled
lOGet going!
11 Unrefined
12Male sheep
13Tiny particle
14Neighbor of Chile
15Viewed
16Bodily structure
(abbr.)
17Libertine
18So be it!
19Cards received
23Go by
30Assistance
32Kind of clerk or
court
34Infer


38French article
40'Pointed tool
41 Competent
42Wear away by rub-
bing
43Ascended
44Courageous
46Funny fellow
47- Stanley Gard.
ner
49Skirt border
50Rounded shape
51Horne the singer
52Energy type
(abbr.)
54Graffiti "artist"
55Fender mishap
56- ink
59Liquor
60Rational
62Commanded
65Handled with skill
66Rode a bicycle
67Common medi-
cine
69Not specified
71 Delicate
72Like the Capitol
73Doctrine
75Concur
76 Black cuckoo
77Lair
78Harvest goddess
80Best - and tucker
82 Depot (abbr.)
84Nest egg letters
85- King Cole
86Tee's predecessor
90Breakfast item
93Wyatt the lawman
95"-- Grows in
Brooklyn"
96Bovines
99Misconception
101 Fishing poles
103 Seed vessel


sis
106 Humdinger
108 Nasty
110 One of the sci-
ences
(abbr.)
111 Person
112 A single time
113 Lager
115 Little bit
117 Fitting .
119 Like spoiled
milk
120 Follow
122 You bet!
124 Droop
125 Assumed truth
126 Comforted
129 Town in Okla-
homa
130 Unopened
flower
132 Portent
134 Time off
135 Lazy one
136 Baffling ques-
tion
137 Foreman
138 Iridescent stone
139 Pro -
140 The same (pre-
fix)
142 Pitfall
143 Mammoth
145 Partly (prefix)
146 Leave unmen-
tioned
147 Remove
148 Performs
150 Samovar
152 Urban pest
154 Water barrier
156 Drs.' gp.


36Manner of walking 104 Foal's mother
37A Great Lake ' 105 Name in Gene-


Pictured abfve Is Citrus Pest manage-
ment's JJ' Cournoyer, representing
owner Tony Winebrenner, and winner
Carol Keys. Pictured at left is Smart
Interior's salesperson Susan Zolnierz
with winner Vienna Balemian.


' VIENNA BALEMIAN
Winner of
a gift certificate
from Smart Interiors



www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL PET PROFILES


A14 SuNDAY, MAY 31, 2009


CnRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


11


L










0 French Open/B2
0 Horse Racing/B2
N MLB/B3
0 TV, Lottery/B4
0 College Baseball/B4
0 NASCAR/B4
N Golf, Soccer/B5


S Serena calls player
r a cheat./ Page B2


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Magic moment j


Howard scores 40

as Orlando makes

NBAfinals
Associated Press
ORLANDO - Overlooked and
begging for respect all season, the
Orlando Magic can no longer be ig-
nored. After: 14 frustrating years,
they've returned to the NBA finals.
Dwight Howard dominated in-
side for 40 points, Rashard Lewis
added 18 and the Magic, a team
that can make 3-pointers drop
from thin air, hit 12 in a 103-90 vic-


tory over LeBron James and the
Cleveland Cavaliers in Game 6 of
the Eastern Conference finals on
Saturday night
"Total domination,' Lewis said.
"He totally dominated the game.
He carried us on his back tonight"
The Magic will be maki ng their
first finals appearance since 1995,
one year before Shaquille O'Neal
bolted as a free agent for Los An-
geles, leaving this Florida fran-
chise in ruins.
It's been a long, slow climb back,
but Orlando has been rebuilt and
will meet the Lakers on Thursday
night at the. Staples Center in
Game 1.
Disney World vs. Disneyland.


Oh, and memo to Nike execu-
tives: It's time to break out the
Howard puppet. LeBron's can go
in summer storage.
For now, the only matchup be-
tween James and Lakers superstar
Kobe Bryant will have to be lim-
ited to those cute TV commercials.
The Magic made them irrelevant
With the city's most famous ath-
lete, Tiger Woods, sitting court-
side, Orlando made believers of
See MAGIC/Page B4
Orlando Magic's Dwight Howard
(12) shoots against Cleveland Cav-
aliers' Zydrunas llgauskas,In the
first quarter on Saturday in Orlando.
Associated Press


Marathon Man


Photo illustration by JOHN COSCIA/Chronicle


Hurricane Victor packs one powerful punch


JOHN COSCIA
jcoscia@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The world's No.1 ranked tennis
.player,, Rafael Nadal, was re-
cently dubbed one of the most fit
athletes on the planet. He no
doubt raised a lot of eyebrows fol-
lowing his five-set thrilling victory
over Roger Federer for the 2008
Wimbledon final which is now
*


considered by many as the "Best
match of all time."
You'll get no arguments from
Citrus County's top tennis player
Victor Espinoza. "I love watching
him on TV He's got so much en-
ergy. It's like he never gets tired."
Espinoza ought to know. Be-
cause he's not too shabby in his
own right In fact, his performance
at the Class 2A state tennis tour-
nament two months ago left little


doubt as to the Citrus senior's ath-
leticism and made him an easy
choice as one of our Chronicle
Athlete of the Year nominees.
While Espinoza's Herculean ef-
fort of nearly nine hours of com-
petitive tennis against some of
the state's best may not have
caught the attention of Nadal's
performance, it was certainly no
less impressive.
Competing on the largest stage


of his life to date, Espinoza did
more than just survive. He won.
Not once, not twice, but three
times on the opening day of the
tournament.
But it's how he won that was of
particular interest.
Espinoza's day started at 8 a.m.
when he faced off against Nature
Coast's Phillip Watterson. It was
the third meeting between two of
the region's top players. His day


would end 79 games and three
matches later with two singles vic-
tories that went the full three sets
and a doubles match with his play-
ing partner, Ryan Connor, which
also went three-sets.
By day's end Citrus head coach
James Martone had labeled his
'Canes senior as "My marathon
man. He's been amazing all sea-
son. To watch his character, I've
See VICTOR/Page B4


Red Wings top Penguins in Game 1 of Stanley Cup finals


Associated Press


DETROIT - The Stanley Cup fi-
nals opener was full of flashbacks.
Pittsburgh superstars Sidney
Crosby and Evgeni Malkin were
slowed down and the Detroit Red
Wings scored some fortunate goals.
Johan Franzen scored the go-
ahead goal late in the second pe-
riod and Chris Osgood made 31
saves, helping the defending
champion Red Wings beat the
Penguins 3-1 on Saturday night


in Game 1. scored his first playoff goal early in
Franzen and Brad Stuart had the third, providing a cushion.
goals that went off Pittsburgh Game 2 is tonight in Detroit
goalie Marc-Andre Fleury. The NHL and its TV partners
whose sat on a shot that trick- li kely were happy with how the
led in for Detroit's series- first Stanley Cup finals re-
clinching goal last year. m watch in a quarter-century
Crosby, though, didn't got. started.
have such luck when his - The action, especially
third-period shot went in the first period,
off Osgood, a post and - matched the hype.
landed in the middle of the End-to-end action, big hits
goalie's back as lay on the ice. such as Crosby's left shoulder
Detroit rookie Justin Abdelkader sending Henrik Zetterberg to the


ice, scoring opportunities and a 1-
1 score had to hold nontraditional
viewers giving hockey a chance.
Detroit's first goal of the series
brought back memories of its last
Cup-clinching goal.
Stuart simply dumped the puck
behind Fleury and was rewarded
with a fortunate carom that sent
the puck off Fleury's right skate
and across the goal line with 6:22
left in the first period.
In Game 6 last year in Pitts-
burgh, the goal that ended up being


the difference was pushed in when
Fleury squatted on the puck
The Penguins didn't need good
fortune to tie Saturday's game.
Malkin baited Stuart into trying
to clear a puck off the boards and
took advantage of the turnover
with a slap shot that Osgood
couldn't control, leading to Rus-
lan Fedotenko's backhander off
the rebound.
Pittsburgh had a breakaway and
two power plays in the second pe-
riod but had nothing to show for it


-.' -, ..
...............................























































































Associated Press

NEW YORK - And on
Belmont Stakes day, the
filly will.rest.
The latest episode of
"How The Triple Crown
Turns" resolved some
major issues with the an-
nouncement that leading
lady Rachel Alexandra will
not run in the Belmont
next Saturday.
"While she is in great
shape ... we feel Rachel de-
serves a well-earned vaca-
tion," the Preakness
-winning filly's co-owner
Jess Jackson said a state-
ment issued late Friday af-
ternoon, about the same
time most TV soaps had
signed off with viewers
wondering what new twists
await next week
In the Triple Crown's
final installment, it is this:
Leading man Calvin Borel
will get back on Mine The
Bird with a chance to be-
come the first jockey to win
the Kentucky Derby, Preak-
ness and the Belmont on
different horses.
Borel won the Derby
aboard Mine That Bird at
50-1 odds, then jilted him
for Rachel and beat the
Derby winner in the Preak-
ness by a length. Since
Borel has ridden the filly to
six straight wins, he said
he'd be loyal if she ran in
the Belmont But now he's
free for Mine That Bird
and ready to compete in
his first Belmont with his-
tory riding on the outcome.
Mine That Bird, mean-
while, will attempt to be-
come the 12th horse to
complete the Derby-Bel-
mont double and first since
Thunder Gulch in 1995.
"Now that this decision
is made, I am excited to
come to New York and
ride Mine That Bird in the
Belmont Stakes," Borel
said, thanking the geld-
ing's trainer Chip Woolley
and co-owners Mark Allen
and Dr. Leonard Blach for


their patience before, nam-
ing a rider.
Even though a 31st con-
secutive year will pass
without a Triple Crown
champion, this season has
certainly captured the pub-
lic's attention; TV ratings
were up as Rachel Alexan-
dra became the first filly in
85 years to win the Preak-
ness, and that came two
weeks after fans were still
buzzing over Mine That
Bird's incredible 6 3/4-
length win in the Derby
"It may not be a Triple
Crown year, but it's as far
.as you can get without hav-
ing one," trainer Todd
Pletcher said. "It just all
adds up to a lot of great sto-
ries going into the
Belmont."
The field for the 1 1/2-
mile Belmont, the longest
and most grueling of the
three races, is just about
set with as many as 10 3-
year-olds challenging the
Derby winner, including
Peter Pan Stakes winner
Charitable Man and sev-
eral horses who ran in the
Derby or the Preakness.
* Jackson said it was a
tough call, but he pointed
out that Rachel Alexandra
has had a tough schedule
- five races and five wins
since Feb. 15 - and added
"we will always put her
long-term well being first.
And, of course, we want to
run her when she is fresh."
Pletcher, who will send
out Dunkirk to take on
Mine That Bird, knows all
about running a filly in
the Belmont. He won it
two years ago with Rags
to Riches, who became
the first filly in 102 years
to win the "Test of the
Champion."
"It could lose some of its
luster if the filly doesn't
run, but there's still Mine
That Bird going for the
third leg after winning the
Derby and running so
competitively in the
Preakness when he had a


question mark coming in,"
Pletcher said.
So let's just call this Bel-
mont one for the birds.
Mine That Bird is a son
of 2004 Belmont winner
Birdstone, who spoiled
Smarty Jones' Triple
Crown bid with a dramatic
come-from-behind, one-
length upset. Also ex-
pected to run is Summer
Bird, another son of Bird-
stone, who ran sixth in the
Derby in only the fourth
start of his career.
"He's blossoming at the
right time," Summer
Bird's trainer Tim Ice
said. "What I really liked
about the Derby was the
way he galloped out. I
think the (Belmont) dis-
tance will suit him."
There's also the Nick
Zito connection. The two-


D joIo SUNDAY, M AY A5 atF



Djokovic falls at French Open


Roddick moves

on to 4th round

forfirst time

Associated Press

PARIS - Novak Djokovic
became the first big-name
player to be eliminated
from the men's tourna-
ment at the French Open,
while Andy Roddick and
Serena Williams managed
to stick around.
The fourth-seeded
Djokovic was upset by No.
29 Philipp Kohlschreiber of
Germany 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 in the
third round Saturday.
Roddick reached the
fourth round for the first
time by beating Marc Gic-
quel of France 6-1, 6-4, 6-4.
Williams, the second seed,
rallied to beat Maria Jose
Martinez Sanchez of Spain
4-6,6-3, 64.
Djokovic reached the
semifinals at Roland Garros
in each of the last two years,
but could do little against
Kohlschreiber while play-
ing for the third time in
three days.
"What is disappointing
was that I couldn't find the
rhythm throughout the
whole match," said
Djokovic, who completed a
suspended three-set win
from the previous round Fri-
day. "I was trying not to be
frustrated with a lot of un-
forced errors. Tried to be
positive and just wait for the
chances."
Djokovic finished the
match with 38 unforced er-
rors, 16 more than
Kohlschreiber.
Second-seeded Roger
Federer and No. 5 Juan
Martin del Potro of Ar-
gentina also reached the
fourth round, as did No. 5
Jelena Jankovic.
Federer was again
stretched to four sets before
beating Paul-Henri Math-
ieu of France 4-6,6-1, 6-4, 6-
4. The Swiss star said the
loss of Djokovic wasn't a big
deal for him. The two were


Associated Press
Serbia's Novak Djokovic reacts after being defeated by Germany's Philipp Kohlschreiber
during their third round match on Saturday at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris.


in the same side of the draw
and could have met in the
semifinals.
"Winning the semifinal is
not winning the tournament,
so it doesn't change any-
thing," Federer said.
Roddick is only the sec-
ond American to advance
this far at the clay-court
major since Andre Agassi in
2003, the same year Rod-
dick -won the U.S. Open.
Robby Ginepri also made
the fourth round in Paris
last year.
. "It's three matches," said
Roddick, who had seven
aces and only 11 unforced


errors. "It's a lot better than
I've done here before."
Roddick has reached at
least the semifinals at the
other three majors. Besides
winning the 2003 U.S. Open,
he also is a two-time runner-
up at Wimbledon. But at the
French Open, Roddick's
best performance before
this year was the third
round in his 2001:debut
"I like my chances maybe
more than the other years,'"
Roddick said. "I feel like I'm
moving a little bit better on
this stuff. I'm able to kind of
slide into my forehand."
Del Potro beat Igor An-


dreev of Russia 6-4, 7-5, 6-4,
while No. 9 Jo-Wilfried
Tsonga of France, No. 11
Gael Monfils of France, No.
16 Tommy Robredo of
Spain and Tommy Haas of
Germany also gained the
fourth round.
On the women's side,
fourth-seeded Elena De-
mentieva lost to No. 30
Samantha Stosur of Aus-
tralia 6-3, 4-6, 6-1. Demen-
tieva's exit came a day after
No. 3 Venus Williams lost in
straight sets.
Stosur converted seven of
her 15 break points against
Dementieva, the 2004 run-


ner-up at Roland Garros.
"I just feel I'm far away
from ... being in good shape,"
Dementieva said. "I feel like
I couldn't perform any better"
Stosur has never before
reached the fourth round at
the French. She made it
that far at the 2006 Aus-
tralian Open, but has never
played in the quarterfinals
at a major.
"As that match went on
today I knew I could get
there because I was playing
(well) enough and was han-
dling the conditions and
everything maybe a little bit
better than her," Stosur said.
Jankovic defeated 73rd-
ranked Jarmila Groth of
Australia 6-1,6-1. No. 7 Svet-
lana Kuznetsova, the 2004
U.S. Open champion, beat
Melinda Czink of Hungary
6-1, 6-3.
"I cruised through the
match and did my job, did
what I had to do in order to
win," said Jankovic, who
started the season at No. 1
but has dropped to No. 5.
Williams was broken once
in the first set, but she com-
plained about the final
point, which she believed
hit her opponent's arm.
Martinez Sanchez said the
ball hit her racket.
"The ball did touch her
100 percent on her arm,"
Williams said. "The rules of
tennis is when the ball hits
your body, then it's out of
play. You lose a point auto-,
matically. So the ball hit her
body, and therefore, she
should have lost the point
instead of cheating."
No. 9 Victoria Azarenka of
Belarus completed her
comeback over No. 22 Carla
Suarez Navarro of Spain 5-
7, 7-5, 6-2. Suarez Navarro
won the first set Friday and
Azarenka took the second
before play was suspended
because of darkness.
No. 12 Agnieszka Rad-
wanska of Poland, No. 24
Aleksandra Wozniak of
Canada and unseeded Vir-
ginie Razzano of France also
advanced, while No. 10 Car-
oline Wozniacki of Denmark
lost to Sorana Cristea of Ro-
mania 7-6 (3), 7-5.


Borel to get back on Mine That Bird


mont. Luv Gov was eighth
in the Preakness for
trainer D. Wayne Lukas.
Also expected are
Chocolate Candy, Flying
Private and Mr. Hot Stuff.
The post position draw is
Wednesday.
Mine That Bird has been
training "super" at
Churchill Downs, said
Woolley He breezed a half
mile in 51 seconds under
Borel on Monday, and will
work again Monday before
heading to New York.
Rachel Alexandra cov-
ered the same distance in
50.20, but Jackson was non-
committal afterward. It's
not hard to see why he
opted to rest the filly he
bought after she won the
Kentucky Oaks on May 1 by
an astonishing 201/4 lengths.
She was entered in the
Preakness for a supple-
mental fee of $100,000 and
led from the start before
hanging on for a one-length
victory over fast-closing
Mine That Bird on May 16.
"It's not necessary that
she go in the Belmont,
she's got a whole season
ahead," Jackson said after
Monday's workout. "She's
been running the whole
year so we have to monitor
that very carefully."
Meanwhile, Woolley is
making a change in travel
plans, but not in race strat-
egy. The New Mexico cow-
boy who hitched a horse
trailer to his truck and
drove Mine That Bird to
Louisville, then to Balti-
more and back to
Louisville, will arrive in
New York by plane. So will
Mine That Bird.
"We're not going to alter
his race to try to fit a race
because anything you
change is going to change
his closing kick," Woolley
said. "We were the best
horse in the Derby that day,
but I felt like we were the
best horse in the Preakness
that given day. We had a
pretty rough trip that day
and still got right there.
"And I feel going into this
we're probably the best
horse, so hopefully we can
get a trip to win." -


Associated Press
Jockey Calvin Borel aboard Mine That Bird reacts after win-
ning the 135th Kentucky Derby horse race at Churchill
Downs in Louisville, Ky.


Associated Press
Serena Williams returns the
ball to Maria Jose Martinez
Sanchez on Saturday in Paris.


Williams


accuses

opponent

of cheating

Associated Press

PARIS - Serena
Williams was sure the ball
went off her opponent's
arm, a no-no in tennis. The
opponent, Maria Jose Mar-
tinez Sanchez, insisted the
ball went off her racket
Williams accused Mar-
tinez Sanchez of "cheating."
Martinez Sanchez thought
that was a "stupid" thing for
Williams to say.
Then consider that the
point in question helped
Martinez Sanchez win.the
first set of their French
Open match Saturday. Oh,
and that Williams had a
coughing fit during a third-
set changeover. All in all,
what eventually became a
4-6, 6-3, 6-4 victory for
Williams stands as the lat-
est example of the ath-
lete/actress' penchant for
theatrics.
"I'm, like, drama. And I
don't want to be drama," a
hoarse Williams said, strain-
ing to get the words out "I'm
like one of-those girls on a
reality show that has all the
drama, and everyone in the
house hates them because
no matter what they do, like,
drama follows them. I don't
want to be that girl."
Perhaps. But the 2002
French Open champion,
who dabbles in acting, sure
seems to find herself in the
middle of unique on-court
situations.
Even Williams made pass-
ing reference Saturday to
two episodes by naming the
opponents, if not mention-
ing the details: a 2003
French Open semifinal loss
marked by Justine Henin's
gamesmanship and
Williams' postmatch tears,
and a 2004 U.S. Open quar-
terfinal loss to Jennifer
Capriati that contained
enough questionable offici-
ating to prompt the intro-
duction of replay reviews in
the sport
Here's what happened in
Saturday's third-round
match:
At 2-2 in the first set,
Williams double-faulted to
give a break point to Mar-
tinez Sanchez, a Spaniard
who is ranked 43rd and
never has reached the
fourth round at a major. On
the next point, Martinez
Sanchez raced to the net be-
hind a drop shot that
brought Williams forward,
too. Williams ran up and
smacked a backhand right
at Martinez Sanchez.
In what seemed to be an
effort to protect herself, as
much as to try to hit a volley,
the left-handed Martinez
Sanchez raised her racket,
quick as could be. The ball
ricocheted back - off her
racket? off her arm? off
both? - and past Williams.
The point was awarded to
Martinez Sanchez, giving
her the game.
NBC, which televised the
match, showed The Associ-
ated Press replays in which
the ball appears to glance
first off Martinez Sanchez's
right forearm, then off her
racket, before going over
the net Tennis rules say ifa
ball touches a player, the
point is lost
As the women headed to
the ensuing changeover,
Williams tried to say some-
thing to Martinez Sanchez,
who kept walking. Then
Williamsspoke to the chair
umpire, Emmanuel Joseph,
saying, "I felt so bad. I didn't
mean to hit her."
Repeatedly pointing to
her own forearm, Williams
told Joseph, "I don't know


why you gave her the game.
That's totally not cool."
"She better not come to
the net again," Williams
said.


time Belmont winner, who
trained Birdstone for
owner Marylou Whitney, is
pointing three horses to
the race - Brave Victory,
Miner's Escape and
Nowhere to Hide.
All will be long shots,
but Zito isn't worried.
Birdstone won at 36-1, Da'
Tara won for him last year
at 38-1.
"We've done well in the
Belmont, been consistent,
so why not?" Zito said. "I
don't have Secretariat with
these, but I don't have to.
You never know. Mine That
Bird is definitely the horse
to beat, no one can say he's
not Anyway, there will be a
lot of birds."
Whitney isn't going to be
left out, either. The 83-year-
old Saratoga socialite has
Luv Gov headed to the Bel-


Jockey will go for personal

Triple Crown at Belmont


CiTRus CouN7y (FL) CHRoNicLE


SPORTS


B2 1 2009











CITRUS CbuN~Y (~FL) CHRONIcLE MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009 B3


AL


New York
Boston
Toronto
Tampa Bay
Baltimore


L Philadelphia
New York
Atlanta
Florida
Washington


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Texas 6, Oakland 3, 1st game
Baltimore 7, Detroit 2
N.Y. Yankees 3, Cleveland 1
Toronto 6, Boston 3
Tampa Bay 5, Minnesota 3
Chicago White Sox 11, Kansas City 2 t"4
Texas 5, Oakland 2, 2nd game
Seattle 5, L.A. Angels 2
Saturday's Games
Toronto 5, Boston 3
Tampa Bay 5, Minnesota 2
Detroit 6, Baltimore 3 ,
N.Y. Yankees 10, Cleveland 5.
Chicago White Sox 5, Kansas City 3
Texas 14, Oakland 1
Seattle at L.A. Angels, late
Today's Games
N.Y. Yankees (Hughes 3-2) at Cleveland (Pa-
vano 5-4), 12:40 p.m.
Boston (Lester 3-5) at Toronto (Romero 2-1),
1:07 p.m.
Detroit (E.Jackson 4-3) at Baltimore (Berken 1-
0), 1:35 p.m.
Minnesota (Blackburn 4-2) at Tampa Bay
(Garza 4-3), 1:38p.m. . I , . ,
Chicago White Sox (Danks 4-3) at Kansas City" ': '
(Greinke 8-1), 2:10 p.m.
Oakland (Braden 4-5) at Texas (Millwood 4-4),. ., *. -
3:05 p.m. ' . *' i
Seattle (Olson 0-1) at LA. Angels (E.Santana '
0-2), 3:35 p.m.
Monday's Games
N.Y. Yankees at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. 'Minnesota Twins shortstop
Oakland at Chicago White Sox, 8:11 p:m. out Tampa Bay Rays' Carl
Baltimore at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. off first base and caught s
NATIONAL LEAGUE Saturday in St. Petersburg
Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 2, L.A. Dodgers 1 Rays 5, Twins 2
Houston 6, Pittsburgh 1,
Philadelphia 5, Washington 4 ST. PETERSBURG - David Pri
N.Y. Mets 2, Florida 1,11 innings struck out 11 to earn his first regular
Milwaukee 3, Cincinnati 2
Colorado 3, San Diego 0 season win in the majors, and Evan
Atlanta 10, Arizona 6 Longoria got his 55th RBI of the sea
san Francisco 4, St. Louis 2 to help the Tampa Bay Rays beat thi

Florida 7, N.Y. Mts 3 Minnesota Twins 5-2 on Saturday."
Arizona 3, Atlanta 2, 11 innings Price (1-0), who started the seas
Chicago Cubs-7, L.A. Dodgers 0 at Triple-A Durham and was recalled
Milwaukee 9,HCincinnati 5 Monday, gave up one run, five hits a

Philadelphia 9, Washington 6 two walks over 5 2-3 innings in first
San Diego at Colorado, late start at Tropicana Field.
St. LouisatSan y'sc ate The first overall pick in the 2007 a

Florida (Volstad 4-3) at N.Y. Mets (Maine 4-3), ateur draft was the winner out of the
1:10 p.m. bullpen in Game 2 and picked up th
Houston (Hampton 2-4) at Pittsburgh (Maholm Game 7 save in last years AL cham
3-1), 1:35 p.m.
Washington (Lannan 2-4) at Philadelphia onship series against Boston.
(Moyer 3-5), 1:35 p.m. Longoria had an RBI single during
Cincinnati (Owings 3-5) at Milwaukee (Gallardo four-run third for the Rays, who hav
4-2), 2:05 p.m.r-run third for the Rays, who have
San Diego (Gaudin 1-3) at Colorado (De La won two in a row after a season-higl
Rosa 0-5), 3:10 p.m. five-game skid. Carl Crawford had th
St. Louis (Wainwright 5-2) at San Francisco RBIs, including a solo homer in the
(J.Sanchez 2-4), 4:05 p.m. in s h i
Atlanta (Medlen 0-2) at Arizona (Scherzer 2-3), enth, and Randy Choate earned his
-4:10 p.m.' second save.
1lAIP Dodgeis'(Miltbh' f').at 'Chicag'rtubs Minnesota left-hander Francisco
(Marshall 3-3); 8:05 p.m.
.(Monday's Games ano (2-7) allowed four runs and sevt
N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. hits in four innings. He has lasted jus
Milwaukee at Florida, 7:10 p.m. four innings in three straight starts.
Colorado at Houston, 8:05 p.m. The Twins are 5-16 on the road
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.season.Minnesota
Philadelphia at San Diego, 10:05 p.m. this season. Minnesota was hitless
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. nine at-bats with runners in scoring


Associated Pr
p Brandon Harris, left, waits to tg
Crawford (13) after he was picked
stealing during the third inning
g. The Rdys won, 5-2.


ce
r-

son
e

on

nd


am-

e
pi-

g a
fI
h
vo
sev-


Liri-
en
st


i in
g


position and are 1 of 20 overall the
past two games.
Joe Dillon hit a solo homer, Craw-
ford had an RBI infield single, Longor
hit a run-scoring single and Ben Zobr
drove in a run on an infield single to
give Tampa Bay a 4-1 lead in the their


Minnesota


Tampa Bay


Blue Jays 5, Red Sox 3
TORONTO-- Alex Rios had four
. hits and drove in the go-ahead run in
the seventh inning, leading Brian Tallet
and the Toronto Blue Jays to a 5-3 vic-
tory over the Boston Red Sox.
SToronto won its second straight after
a nine-game losing streak and has
now won six consecutive games at
I home, where it is 18-6 overall.
With the score tied 3-all, the Blue
Jays went ahead with a two-run seventh
against Ramon Ramirez (4-2). Marco
Scutaro led off with an infield single,
went to second on a wild pitch and
scored when Rios singled to center. Ver-
non Wells followed with an RBI double.
Rios hit an RBI single in the first,
doubled and scored in the third and
doubled in the fifth before sparking the
seventh-inning rally. He finished 4 for 4.
Tallet (3-3) won for the first time in
four starts, allowing three runs and
' three hits in seven innings. He walked
A four and struck out six.
ess Rocco Baldelli homered for Boston
ag but left with an injured knee after slam-
ed ming into the fence while trying to
on catch a foul ball.
Shaky early, Tallet gave up all his
runs and walks in the first two innings.
He settled down after that by retiring
13 of the next 14 batters and not allow-
ria ing another hit until Nick Green's two-
rist out double in the seventh.


d.


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Span If 5 1 1 0 BUpton cf 4 1 1 0
Mauerc 3 0 1 0 Crwfrdlf 4 1 3 2
Mornealb 4 0 1 1 Longori3b 4 1 1 1
Cuddyrrf 4 00 0 C.Penalb 2 00 0
Crede3b 1 0 0 0 WAyar2b 3 0 0 0
Tolbertss 2 0 0 0 Zobristss 3 0 1 1
BHartsss3b 3 11 0 Dillon dh 4 12 1
DlmYndh 4 00 0 Kaplerrf 2 0 0
Gomezcf 4 01 0 MHrndc 3 1 1 0
ACasill 2b 4 0 1 1
Totals 34 2 6 2 Totals 29 59 5
Minnesota 001 000 001-2
Tampa Bay 004 000 1Ox-5
E-Price (1). DP-Minnesota 3. LOB-Min-
nesota 8, Tampa Bay 5.2B-Mauer (7), B.Har-
ris (7). HR-Crawford (3), Dillon (1).
CS-Crawford (1).
IP H RERBBSO


Minnesota
Liriano L,2-7
Dickey
Tampa Bay
Price W,1-0
Balfour H,5
Choate S,2-2
WP-Liriano 2.


4 7 4 4 3 3'
4 2 1 1 2 3


52-3 5
22-3 1
2-3 0


Umpires-Home, Jerry Meals; First, James
Hoye; Second, Mikq*DiMuro; Third, Dale Scott.
T-2:54. A-36,052 (36,973).


Boston Toronto
ab rhbi ab rh bi
Ellsurycf 4 00 0 Scutaro ss 5 1 3 0
Pedroia2b 1 1 0 0 A.Hill2b 5 1 1 0
Youlilslb 4 00 0 Rios'rf 4 24 2
Bay If 3 0 0 0 V.Wellscf 4 0 1 1
Lowell3b 4 02 1 Linddh 3 1 2 2
D.Ortizdh 4 00 0 Bautist3b 4 00 0
Varitekc' 3 1 0 0 O0raylb 4 0 1 0
Baldellirf 2 1 1 2 RChavzc 3 0 1 0
J.Drewrf 2 0 00 JMcDnlpr 0 0 00
NGreen ss 3 0 1 0 Barajs.c 1 00 0
Inglett If 4 0.1 0
Totals 30 3 4 3 Totals 37 5145
Boston. 120 000 000-3
Toronto 101 001 20x-5
E-Baldelli (2). LOB-Boston 5, Toronto 9.2B-
N.Green (9), Rios 2(14), V.Wells (14), Overbay
(12). HR-Baldelli (2), Lind (8). SB-Pedroia
(8). CS-Pedroia (4), Scutaro (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
Penny 6 10 3 2 0 5
R.Ramirez L,4-2 2-3 3 2 2 1 0
Okajima 1 1 0 9 0 0
Delcarmen 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Toronto
TalletW,3-3 7 3 3 3 4 6
League H,3 1 0 0 0 0 1
Downs S;7-8 1 1 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Tallet (Pedrola). WP-R.Ramirez.
Umpires-Home, Tim McClelland; First, Andy
Fletcher; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Ted Barrett.
T-2:53. A-35,484 (49,539). ,


White Sox 5, Royals 3
KANSAS CITY, Mo.-- Jim Thome
drove in two runs and Scott Podsednik
and Alexei Ramirez delivered RBI sin-
gles in the top of the ninth to lead the
Chicago White Sox to a 5-3 victory
over the Kansas City; Royals on Satur-
day night.
Chris Getz singled and Josh Fields
walked with one out in the ninth off
Juan Cruz (3-1). Podsednik then drove
in the go-ahead run and Ramirez, with
his third hit, made it 5-3 with another
RBI hit.
Scott Linebrink (2-2) threw six
pitches and got two outs in relief of
Mark Buehrle and got the win, the
eighth in 11 games for the White Sox.
Bobby Jenks pitched the ninth for
his 10th save in 11 opportunities as the
reeling Royals lost for the 15th time in
20 games.
After the White Sox sent six men to
the plate to score one run and go
ahead 3-2 in the eighth, Miguel Olivo
tied it again at 3-all when he hit
Buehrle's first pitch of the bottom of the
eighth for a home run. One out later,
Linebrink came in.
Willie Bloomquist tripled to lead off
the game for the Royals and sped
home when Mitch Maier hit a high
chopper to the left side.


Chicagod
ab rhbi


PdsdnkIf
AIRmrz ss
Dye rf
Thome dh,
Konerk lb
Przyns c
BrAndrcf
Wise ph-cf
Getz 2b
Fields 3b


Kansas City


5 1 2 1 Blmqstrf
5 0 3 1 Maiercf
3 1 1 0 Butler lb
3 0 0 2 JGuilln dh
3 1 1 0 Teahen 3b
3 0 1 0 Callasp 2b
3 0 0 0 Jacobsph
1 0 0 0 DeJess If
2 1 1 1 J.Buckc
3 1 1 0 Olivo ph-c
LHrndz ss


ab r h bi
422 0
4012
4 01 0
4 00 0
4 020
3 00 0
1000
3000
0000
3 1 11
3 0 1 0


Totals 31 5 10 5 Totals 33 3 8 3
Chicago 000 100 112-5
Kansas City 101 000 010-3
E-J.Buck (5). DP-Chicago 2, Kansas City 2.
LOB-Chicago 6, Kansas City 3. 2B-Fields
(5). 3B-Dye (1), Bloomquist (3), Maier (2).
HR-Olivo (4). SB-Getz (5). CS-AI.Ramirez
(2). SF-Thome, Getz.
IP H RERBBSO


Chicago
Buehrle
Linebrink W,2-2
Jenks S,11-12
Kansas City
Meche
Bale
J.Cruz L,3-1
WP--Mche


71-37
2-3 0
1 1


Umpires-Home, Chad Fairchild; First, Paul
Nauert; Second, Paul Schrieber; Third, Ed
Rapuano.
T-2:29. A-37,894 (38,177).


Yankees 10, Indians 5
CLEVELAND - CC Sabathia won
in his return to Cleveland, and the New
York Yankees got home runs from
Jorge Posada and Nick Swisher in a
10-5 victory over the Indians on Satur-
day night.
Sabathia (5-3) didn't allow a hit until
the fifth and worked seven strong in-
nings to beat his former team for the
first time since signing a $161 million,
seven-year contract with New York as a
free agent in December.
The left-hander is 4-0 with a 2.08
ERA in his last five starts. He allowed
three runs, five hits and three walks,
striking out eight.
Robinson Cano drove in three runs,
while Derek Jeter and Johnny Damon
had two RBIs apiece as the Yankees
opened a 1V2-game lead in the AL
East over Boston with their 14th win in
17 games.
New York also played its 16th
straight errorless game, one short of
the major league record set by the Red
Sox in June-2006, according to the
Elias Sports Bureau.
As LeBron James and the Cleve-
land Cavaliers tried to stave off elimi-
nation in the NBA's Eastern
Conference finals at Orlando, the last-
place Indians lost their top hitter to an
injury.
NewYork Cleveland
ab rhbi ab r h bl
Jeter ss 5 0 2 2 ACarer ss 5 0 0 0
Damon if 5 1 1 2 Sizemrdh 4 1 1 1
Teixeirib 5 22 0 VMrtnzc 1 00 0
ARdrgz3b 3 0 1 0 Shppchc 3 0 0 0
R.Pena3b 0 00 0 JhPerlt3b 3 0 0 0
Cano2b 5 12 3 Choorf 3 22 1
Posada c 5 1 1 1 DeRosa If 3 2 1 0
HMatsudh 5 1 3 1 Garko 1b 3 0 1 1
Berroa pr-dh 0 0 00 BFrncscf 4 01 1
Swisherrf 4 2 1 1 JCarril 2b 3 0 1 1
Gardnrcf 3 2 0 0
Totals 401013 10 Totals .32 5 7 5
NewYork 020 501 002-10
Cleveland 000 021 002- 5
E-Choo (4), Garko (2). DP-New York 2.
LOB-New York 7, Cleveland 5. 2B-Teixeira
(11), H.Matsui 2 (11), B.Francisco (11). HR-
Posada (6), Swisher (10), Sizemore (9), Choo
(7).
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
Sabathia W,5-3 7 5 3 3 3 8
D.Robertson 1 0 0 0 0 1
Veras 1 2 2 2 0 1
Cleveland
CarmonaL,2-5 4 8 7 4 3 2
Ohka , / 5 5 3 3 1 3
HBP-by Sabathia (Garko), by Veras (DeRosa).
WP-Sabathia.
Umpires-Home, Bob Davidson; First, Jeff Nel-
son; Second, Mark Carlson; Third, Tim Tschida.
T-3:16. A-34,396 (45,199).


MLB LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-Bartlett, Tampa Bay, .373; MiCabr-
era, Detroit, .355; VMartinez, Cleveland, .350;
AdJones, Baltimore, .350; Morneau, Minnesota,
.344; ISuzuki, Seattle, .344; AHill, Toronto, .338.
RUNS-BRoberts, Baltimore, 43; Scutaro,
Toronto, 42; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 40; AdJones,
Baltimore, 40; Morneau, Minnesota, 40; Damon,
New York, 38; Kinsler, Texas, 38; Longoria,
Tampa Bay, 38; Markakis, Baltimore, 38; Pe-
droia, Boston, 38.
RBI-Longoria, Tampa Bay, 55; Bay, Boston,
48; Morneau, Minnesota, 46; TorHunter, Los An-
geles, 40; Markakis, Baltimore, 40; CPena,
Tampa Bay, 40;Teixeira, NewYork, 40.
HITS-AHilI, Toronto, 77; Crawford, Tampa Bay,
69; VMartinez, Cleveland, 69; Morneau, Min-
nesota, 66; MiCabrera, Detroit, 65; Cano, New
York, 65; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 65.
HOME RUNS-CPena, Tampa Bay, 16; Teix-
eira, New York, 15; Bay, Boston, 14; NCruz,
Texas, 14; Morneau, Minnesota, 14; Dye,
Chicago, 13; Kinsler, Texas, 13; Longoria,
Tampa Bay, 13.
STOLEN BASES-Crawford, Tampa Bay, 30;
Ellsbury, Boston, 21; Figgins, Los Angeles, 19;
Abreu, Los Angeles, 15; BUpton, Tampa Bay,
15; Bartlett, Tampa Bay, 14; Crisp, Kansas City,
11; Span, Minnesota, 11.
PITCHING (5 Decisions)-Palmer, Los Ange-
les, 5-0, 1.000; Greinke, Kansas City, 8-1, .889;
Halladay, Toronto, 8-1, .889.
STRIKEOUTS-Verlander, Detroit, 90; Greinke,
Kansas City, 81; Halladay, Toronto, 68; FHer-
nandez, Seattle, 66.
SAVES-Papelbon, Boston, 13; Fuentes, Los
Angeles, 13; FFrancisco, Texas, 11; Jenks,
Chicago, 11; MaRivera, New York, 10; Sherrill,
Baltimore, 10; Rodney, Detroit, 9.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Beltran, New York, .352; Tejada,
Houston, .347; Pence,, Houston, .343; NJohn-
son, Washington, .337; Hudson, Los Angeles,
.335; DWright, NewYork, .335; FSanchez, Pitts-
burgh, .333; Ibanez, Philadelphia, .333.
RUNS-lbanez, Philadelphia, 39; Pujols, St.
Louis, 39; Zimmerman, Washington, 39; Hud-
son, Los Angeles, 37; ASoriano, Chicago, 36;
AdGonzalez, San Diego, 35; Utley, Philadelphia,
34; Victorino, Philadelphia, 34; Werth, Philadel-
phia, 34.
RBI-Fielder, Milwaukee, 48; Ibanez, Philadel-
phia, 46; Dunn, Washington, 42; Pujols, St.
Louis, 40; Howard, Philadelphia, 39; Cantu,
Florida, 37; Hawpe, Colorado, 36; Loney, Los
Angeles, 36.
HITS-Hudson, Los Angeles, 69; Tejada, Hous-
ton, 67; Zimmerman, Washington, 66;
FSanchez, Pittsburgh, 64; Beltran, New York,
62; Ibanez, Philadelphia, 61;Victorino, Philadel-
phia, 60.
HOME RUNS-AdGonzalez, San Diego, 18;
Ibanez, Philadelphia, 17; Dunn, Washington, 16;
Bruce, Cincinnati, 14; Howard, Philadelphia, 14;
Pujols, St. Louis, 14; Reynolds, Arizona, 13.
STOLEN BASES-Bourn, Houston, 16;
Taveras, Cincinnati, 12; Burriss, San Francisco,
11; Fowler, Colorado,, 11; Kemp, Los Angeles,
11; JosReyes, New York, 11; DWright, New
York, 11.
PITCHING (5 Decisions)-Broxton, Los Ange-
les, 5-0, 1.000; Cain, San Francisco, 6-1, .857;
Martis, Washington, 5-1, .833
STRIKEOUTS-JSantana, New York, 86;
JVazquez, Atlanta, 86; Peavy, San Diego, 84;
Lincecum, San Francisco, 84.
SAVES-Bell, San Diego, 14; Cordero, Cincin-
nati, 13; FrRodriguez, NewYork, 13; Qualls, Ari-
zona, 12; Hoffman, Milwaukee, 12.


Phillies 9, Nationals 6 D-Backs 3, Braves 2,


PHILADELPHIA- Ryan Howard
hit his club-record eighth career grand
slam and added a solo homer to lead
the Philadelphia Phillies to a 9-6 victory
over the Washington Nationals on Sat-
urday night.
Trailing 3-2 in the third, Howard con-
nected on his slam to move past Hall
of Famer Mike Schmidt. Howard had
given the Phillies their first run with a
solo shot in the second inning. It was
the 19th multihomer game of Howard's
career.
Cole Hamels (3-2) gave up six runs
and eight hits in six innings for the win.
He struck out seven in his worst start
this season since allowing seven
against Colorado to open the season.
Brad Lidge pitched a scoreless
ninth for his 11th save.


Washington
ab rhbi


AHrndz 2b
NJhnsn lb
Zmrmn 3b
Dunn rf
Wlngh If
Kearns cf
AIGnzlz ss
Nieves c
Martis p
Brgmn p
Bellird ph
MacDgl p
Villone p
Tavarz p
K.Wells p
WHarrs ph
Colome p


Philadelphia


5 0 2 1 Rollins ss
5 0 2 0 Victorn of
5 0 0 0 Utley2b
4 01 0 Howard lb
4 1 1 0 Ibanezlf
3 21 0 Worth rf
3 1 2 1 Feliz3b
4 1 1 2 Ruiz c
2 0 0 0 Hamels p
0 0 0 0 Dobbs ph
1 1 1 2 S.Eyre p
0 00 0 Condryp
0 0 0 0 Stairs ph
0 0 0 0 Madson p
0 0 0 0 Lidge p
1 0 0 0
0000


Totals 37 611 6 Totals
Washington 030
Philadelphia 015


ab r h bi
5 1 2 1
422 0
3 1 1 0
5 2-2 5
5 00 0
5 01 0
4000
2 21 0
1 0 1 1
0 1 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 00 00
1 00 0
0 00 0
0 00 0


359107
02 000-6
02 OOx-9


E-Dunn 2 (7), A.Hernandez (5), Rollins (3).
DP-Philadelphia 2. LOB-Washington 6,
Philadelphia 9. 2B-Nieves (3), Victorino (12),
Werth (10), Ruiz (10), Hamels (1)..3B-
Alb.Gonzalez (1). HR-Belliard (2), Howard 2
(14). SB-Rollins (9), Victorino (8), Utley (4),
Werth (9), Ruiz (2). S-Hamels.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
MartisL,5-1 4 7 7 7 2 1
Bergmann 1 0 0 0 0 0
MacDougal 2-3 1 2 0 1 0
Villone 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
Tavarez 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
K.Wells 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Colome 1 1 0 0 0 3
Philadelphia
Hamels W,3-2 6 8 6 6 1 7
S.EyreH,9 1-3 2 0 0 0 0
CondreyH,4 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
MadsonH,11 1 0 0 0 0 2
.LidgeS,11-15 1 1 0 0 0 1
HBP-byTavarez (Ruiz), by Colome (Utley), by
Hamels (Alb.Gonzalez).
Umpires-Home, Brian Knight; First, Dana De-
Muth; Second, Doug Eddings; Third, Hunter
Wendelstedt.
T-3:09. A-45,121 (43,647).


11 innings
PHOENIX-- Eric Byrnes singled
home Mark Reynolds in the 11th inning
to give the Arizona Diamondbacks a 3-
2 victory over the Atlanta Braves in a
testy game Saturday.
Reynolds opened the 11th with a
ground-rule double off Jeff Bennett (2-
2) that bounced into the Atlanta bullpen'
down the right-field line. Reynolds
moved to third on Miguel Montero's
sacrifice bunt. With the infield playing in,
Byrnes hit a dribbler up the middle.
Tony Pena (5-2) pitched two perfect
innings for the win.
Javier Vazquez blanked the Dia-
mondbacks through six innings but did-
n't make it through the seventh.
With one out and Arizona trailing 2-
0, Byrnes beat out an infield single,
then Ryan Roberts brought him home
with a double to left-center. Roberts, a'
late addition to the starting lineup when
Augie Ojeda was hurt in batting prac-
tice, advanced to third on a passed ball
and scored on a pinch-hit single on a 3-
2 pitch by Chris Young.


Atlanta


ab rhbi
KJhnsn2b 5 1 1 1
Escoarss 4 0 00
GAndrs If 5 0 1 1
Prado 3b 5 01 0
M.Diazcf 3 0 00
Schafercf 2 0 1 0
Francr rf 5 01 0
Ktchm lb 4 01 0
D.Rossc 3 1 2 0
JVazqzp 1 00 0
OFIhrt p 0. 0 0 0
RSorin p 0 00 0
C.Jones ph 1 0 0 0
MGnzlz p 0 0 0 0
Bennettp 0 0 00
Totals ' 38 2 8 2
Atlanta
Arizona


Arizona

FLopez 2b
GParra cf
J.Upton rf
S.Drew ss
Rynlds lb
Monter c
Byrnes If
RRorts 3b
DDavis p
CYoung ph
JGutrrz p
Whitsll ph
T.Pena p


ab r h bi
5 0 1 0
5 01 0
4 00 0
5 0 1 0
5 1 2 0
4 01 0
3 1 2 1
3 1 1 1
2 000

0 00 0
1 00 0
0 00 0


Totals 38 310 3
002 000 000 00-2
000 000 200 01-3


One out when winning run scored.
DP-Atlanta 1, Arizona 1. LOB-Atlanta 7, Ari-
zona 9. 2B-K.Johnson (9), G.Anderson (7),
S.Drew (6), Reynolds 2 (10), R.Roberts (6).
SB-Schafer (2). CS-Byrnes (3). S-
J.Vazquez 2, Montero, Byrnes.
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
J.Vazquez 61-37 2 1 1 8
O'Flaherty 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
R.Soriano 1 0 0 0 0 1
M.Gonzalez 2 1 0 0 1 3
Bennett L,2-2 1-3 2 1 1 0 0
Arizona
D.Davis 7 7 2 2 2 6
J.Gutierrez 2 1 0 0 0 3
T.PenaW,5-2 2 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by J.Vazquez (Byrnes). WP-M.Gonza-
lez. PB-D.Ross,
Umpires-Home, Jerry Crawford; First, Angel
Campos; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Tom Hallion.
T-3:06, A-35,039 (48,652).


Cubs 7, Dodgers 0
CHICAGO-- Ryan Dempster
bounced back from his worst start of
the season, pitching seven sharp in-
nings for the Chicago Cubs in a 7-0
..victory over the Los Angeles Dodgers
on Saturday.
' Milton' Bradley had three hits and
Reed Johnson homered for the Cubs,
who have won four of five since losing
a season-worst eight straight games.
Mike Fontenot had two extra-base hits
and two RBIs.
Dempster (4-3) allowed just three
hits with one walk, striking out five. It
was Los Angeles' largest loss of the
season.
The Dodgers, who own the best '
record in the majors, have dropped two
,straight after winning four in a row. Los
"Angeles has not lost more than two
consecutive games all year.
Dodgers starter Eric Stults (4-2) had,
another short outing. After pitching 4 1-
3 innings in his previous start at Col-
orado, he lasted three-plus innings
against the Cubs, giving up four runs
.and six hits.


Los Angeles Chicago
ab rhbi
Pierre If 4 0 0 0 ASorin If
Furcal ss 4 0 1 0 Theriot ss
Hudson 2b 2 0 0 0 Bradly rf
Loneylb 4 00 0 D.Leelb
Ethier rf 4 0 1 0 RJhnsn cf
Martin c 3 0 1 0 Soto c
Loretta 3b 3 0 0 0 Scales 2b
Kemp cf 3 0 ? 0 ABranc2b
Stults p 1 0 0 0 Fontent 3b
Mota p 0 0 0 0 Dmpstr p
Ausms ph 1 00 0 AGzmn p
JefWvrp 0 0 0 0 Hoffparph
Leach p 0 0 0 0 Heilmn p
Hffmnn ph 1 0 0 0
Wade p 0 0 0 0


Totals


30 0 5 0 Totals


ab r h bi
5 00 0
2 1 1 1
4 1 3 0
3 1 1 0
3 23 2
2 00 1
3 1 0 0

0 00 0
3 00 0
0 0 0 0
1 00 0
0 070 0


29 7106


Los Angeles 000 000 000-0
Chicago 011 220 10x-7
DP-Los Angeles 3, Chicago 2. LOB-Los An-
geles 5, Chicago 6.2B-Ethier (11), Martin (9),
D.Lee (8), Fontenot (7). 3B-Fontenot (1). HR-
Re.Johnson (3). SB-Re.Johnson (1). CS-


Theriot (3).

Los Angeles
Stults L,4-2
Mota
Jef.Weaver
Leach
Wade
Chicago
Dempster W,4-3
A.Guzman
Heilman


IP H RERBBSO


3 6
1 1
21-33
2-3 0
1 0


7 3 0 0 1 5
1 1 -0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 1 0


Stults pitched to 2 batters in the 4th.
HBP-by Stults (Theriot).
Umpires-Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, Rob Drake;
Second, Mark Wegner; Third, Tim Timmons.
T-2:46. A-41,153 (41,210).


Associated Press
New York Mets pitcher Ken Takahashi delivers during the
eighth inning Saturday against the Florida Marlins in New York.


Marlins 7, Mets 3.
NEW YORK - Jeremy Hermida
homered and drove in four runs, Josh
Johnson put together another domi-
nant start against New York, and the
Florida Marlins beat the makeshift
Mets 7-3 on Saturday.
Jorge Cantu also drove in two runs
for the Marlins, who battered starter
Tim Redding in building a 7-1 lead by
the fifth inning. The top of the Florida
order did most of the damage, with
leadoff hitter Chris Coghlan walking
three times and the first five spots
combining for nine hits.
Johnson (4-1) didn't have nearly as
much trouble with a Mets starting
lineup missing most of its big boppers.
David Wright, Gary Sheffield and Luis
Castillo were given the day off, and
Jose Reyes, Carlos Delgado and Ryan
Church are still out with injuries.
Johnson gave up two runs in seven
innings and improved to 6-0 in eight
career starts against the Mets, includ-
ing the five-hitter he tossed in a 2-1 vic-
tory over Johan Santana on April 12.
The Marlins' big right-hander had
been having trouble with a callus on
the middle finger of his right hand,
which had caused him to be erratic
during his last three starts.


Florida NewYork
ab rhbi
Coghln If 2 1 0 0 Pagan If-cf
Meyer p 0 0 0 0 FMrtnz rf
Lndstr p 0 0 0 0 Beltran cf
Nunez p 0 0 0 0 Takhsh p
Bonifac 3b 5 2 2 0 Santos ph
HRmrzss 5 1 2 0 Stokes p
Cantulb 5 2 2 2 Tatis3b
Hermid rf-If 5 1 3 4 DnMrp lb
Uggla2b 3 00 1 RMrtnz2b
C.Rossc of 4 0 0 0 Schndrc
RPaulnc 4 0 1 0 WValdzss
JJhnsn p 3 00 0 Reddng p
BCardl ph-rf 1 0 1 0 SGreen p
Castillo ph
Reed If


ab r h bi
4 1 2 1
5 02 1
300 0
000 0
1 00 0
0 00 0
4 0 1 1
3 000
4000
3 1 1 0
4 01 0
1 00 0
0000

2000


Totals 37 711 7 Totals 35 3 7 3
Florida 202 030 000-7
NewYork 100 010 001-3
E-Meyer 2 (2), Tatis (1). DP-New York 1.
LOB-Florida 7, New York 8. 2B-Bonitaclo 2
(5), Cantu (10), Hermida (6), R.Paulino (3),
B.Carroll (1), Pagan (2), F.Martinez (1). HR-
Hermida (5). SF-Uggla.
IP H RERBBSO
Florida
Jo.Johnson W,4-1 7 5 2 2 2 5
Meyer 1 0 0 0 0 0
Lindstrom 2-3 2 1 1 1 1
NunezS,1-3 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
New York
ReddingL,0-2 4 8 7 7 2 2
S.Green 1 1 0 0 0 2
Takahashi 3 1 0 0 1 2
Stokes 1 1 0 0 0 1
Redding pitched to 3 batters in the 5th.
WP-Jo.Johnson, Takahashi.
Umpires-Home, Bill Welke; First, Tim Welke;
Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, Angel Hemandez.
T-3:01. A-40,727 (41,800).


East Division
GB WCGB
1� -
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Kansas City
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Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Chicago
Pittsburgh
Houston


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Los Angeles
Seattle
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Lo-:, Anr.joees 34
San Fran. 24
San Diego 24
Arizona 22
Colorado 19


Central Division
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SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2oog B3


MMOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


Onus Coumy (FL) CHRONICLE


1
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B4 SUNDAY, MAY


5 , zu--


21 2009


AUTOr :ING
Sprint Cup
Autism Speaks 400
At Dover International Speedway
Dover, Del.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 156.794.
2. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 156.542.
3. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 156.02.
4. (43) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, 155.952.
5. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 155.932.
6. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 155.885.
7. (44) AJ Allmendinger, Dodge, 155.689.
8. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 155.662.
9. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 155.595.
10. (19) Elliott Sadler, Dodge, 155.514.
11. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 155.447.
12. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 155.44.
13. (99) Cart Edwards, Ford, 155.42.
14. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 155.313.
15. (1) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 155.313.
16. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 155.152.
17. (07) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 155.086.
18. (26) Jamie McMurray, Ford, 155.065.
19. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 155.032.
20. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, 154.919.
21. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 154.812.
22. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevy, 154.799.
23. (82) Scott Speed, Toyota, 154.706.
24. (71) David Gilliland, Chevrolet, 154.593.
25. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 154.573.
26. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 154.566.
27. (96) Bobby Labonte, Ford, 154.434.
28. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 154.328.
29. (55) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 154.242.
30. (12) David Stremme, Dodge, 153.932.
31. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 153.675.
32. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 153.577.
33. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 153.446.
34. (36) Mike Skinner, Toyota, 153.368.
35. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 153.263.
36. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 153.133. *
37. (09) Mike Bliss, Dodge, 153.12.
38. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 152.853.
39. (66) Dave Blaney, Toyota, 152.84.
40. (7) Robby Gordon, Toyota, Owner Points.
41. (34) John Andretti, Chevy, Owner Points.
42. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevy, Owner Points.
43. (37) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 152.491.
Failed to Qualitfy
44. (25) Brad Keselowski, Chevy, 152.265.
47. (13) Max Papis, Toyota, 151.815.
48. (75) Derrike Cope, Dodge, 148.014.
49. (06) David Starr, Dodge.
Nationwide
Heluva Good! 200
By The Associated Press
Saturday
At Dover International Speedway
Dover, Del.
Lap length: 1 mile
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (12) Brad Keselowski, Chevrolet, 200 laps,
122.2 rating, 190 points, $44,388.
2. (1) Joey Logano, Toyota, 200, 137.6, 175,
$38,300. "
3. (17) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 200, 115.8,
165, $28,025.
4. (7) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 200,104.9, 160,
$23,100. ,
5. (8) Carl Edwards, Ford, 200, 103.5, 155,
$20,275.
6. (10) Paul Menard, Ford, 200, 97.9, 150,
$18,675.
7. (4) Scott Speed, Toyota, 200, 95.6, 146,
$18,285.
8. (23) Jason Leffler, Toyota, 200, 87.3,,142,
$26,113.
9. (13) Jason Keller, Ford, 200, 90.2, 138,
$23,768. .. ,
lk,1(21T;JustirftAllgaier, Dodge, 200, 91,3j
134, $24,418 . . ..
11. (29) Michael McDowell, Toyota, 200,80.6,
130,.$23,893.
'12. (9) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 200,
86.6,127, $23,018.
13. (5) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200,103.8,
124, $16,850.


For the record

Flrd LOTTERY ..


Due to technical difficulties Saturday's winning
Florida Lottery numbers were not available. Please
see Monday's Chronicle for winning numbers.




-On the AIRWAVES--

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1:30 p.m. (13, 51 FOX) Sprint Cup - Dover 400
3:30 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) IndyCar Racing - ABC Supply
Co. Inc./A.J. Fdyt 225
4 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA- O'Reilly Summer Nationals -
Final Eliminations (Same-day Tape)
MLB BASEBALL
12:30 p.m. (TBS) New York Yankees at Cleveland Indians
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Marlins at New York Mets
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Minnesota Twins at Tampa Bay Rays
2 p.m. (WGN) Chicago White Sox at Kansas City Royals.
8 p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Dodgers at Chicago Cubs
GOLF
10 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour - European Open -
Final Round (Same-day Tape)
3 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) PGA Tour - Crowne Plaza Invitational -
Final Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour - Champions - Principal Charity
Classic - Final Round (Same-day Tape)
NHL PLAYOFFS
8 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) Stanley Cup Final Game 2
Pittsburgh Penguins at Detroit Red Wings
SOFTBALL - NCAA WORLD SERIES
1 p.m. (ESPN) Game 11 -Washington vs. Georgia,
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Game 12 - Florida vs. TBA
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Game 13 --Teams TBA. If necessary
9:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Game 14 - Teams TBA. If necessary
TENNIS
3 p.m. (2 NBC) French Open - Men's Third and Women's
Fourth Rounds (Same-day Tape)


14. (16) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 200, 79.7,121,
$22,793. --
15. (30) Bobby Hamilton Jr., Dodge, 200,
75.7,118, $23,468.
16. (39) Brian Keselowski, Dodge, 200, 67.1,
115, $22,943.
17. (3) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 128.4,122,
$16,100.
18. (14) Sco "Wimmer, Chevrolet, 199,79.4,
109, $22,518.
19. (40) Michael .Annett, Toyota, 198, 59.2,
1 21 r2 6 "
20 '31) BrandonWhm, Ford, 198; 60.3,103,
$23,268. f'"- '
21. (38) Danny O'Quinn Jr., Chevrolet, 196,
49.7,100, $22,368.
22. (34) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, 196,
51.6, 97, $22,268.
23. (18) Eric McClure, Ford, 196, 49, 94,
$22,593.


24. (41) Kevin Conway, Toyota, 194,43.6, 91,
$22,143.
25. (11) Greg Biffle, Ford, 191, 64.2, 88,
$15,775.
26. (42) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, too slow,
175, 39.9, 85, $22,043.
27. (33) Scott Lagasse Jr., Toyota, accident,
158,63.4,82, $21,993.
28. (37) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 151, 62.6,
79, $21,943.
29. (20) Steve Wallace, Chevrolet, accident,
145,70, 76, $21,868.
30. (2) David Ragan, Ford accieni. 143,
95.6, 73, $15,650.
31. (25) Peyton Sellers, Chevrolet, 128, 31.4,
70, $15,295.
32. (6) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, accident,
126, 79.6, 67, $15,235.
33. (28) Kenny Wallace, Chevrolet, engine,
97, 60.5, 69, $24,143.


34. (22) Marc Davis, Toyota, accident, 83,
47.9, 61, $21,608.
35. (35) Kevin Lepage, Chevrolet, accident,
65, 35.5, 58, $15,110.
36. (43) Kertus Davis, Chevrolet, overheat-
ing, 43, 39.7, 55, $15,085.
37. (36) Ken Butler, Chevrolet, accident, 26,
42, 52, $21,533.
38. (27) John Wes Townley, Ford, accident,
26, 38.1, 49, $21,468.
39. (19) Mark Green, Chevrolet, overheating,
14, 37.3, 46, $14,975.
40. (26) Johnny Chapman, Chevrolet, vibra-
tion, 13, 37.4, 43, $14,920.
41. (15) Terry Cook, Chevrolet, overheating,
11, 35, 40, $14,895.
42. (24) Dennis Setzer, Dodge, vibration, 8,
30.8, 37, $14,860.
43. (32) Casey Atwood, Chevrolet, transmis-
sion, 8, 31.4, 34, $21,272.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 93.168
mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 8 minutes, 48
seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.299 seconds.
Caution Flags: 9 for 50 laps.
Lead Changes: 7 among 5 drivers.
Lap Leaders: J.Logano 1-30; M.Annett 31;
J.Logano 32-56; K.Busch 57-74; K.Wallace 75-
76; J.Logano 77-108; K.Busch 109-198; Bra.Ke-
selowski 199-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): K.Busch, 2 times for 108 laps; J.Logano,
3 times for 87 laps; Bra.Keselowski, 1 time for 2
laps; K.Wallace, 1 time for 2 laps; M.Annett, 1
time for 1 lap.
Top 10 In Points: 1. K.Busch, 1,836; 2. C.Ed-
wards, 1,796; 3. J.Leffler, 1,683; 4. J.Logano,
1,670; 5. Bra.Keselowski, 1,663; 6. J.Keller,
1,434; 7. B.Gaughan, 1,364; 8.D.Ragan, 1,358;
9. M.Bliss, 1,355; 10. J.AIIgaier, 1,344.


French Open Results
Saturday
At Stade Roland Garros
Paris
Purse: $21.8 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Singles
Men
Third Round
Tommy Haas, Germany, def. Jeremy Chardy,
France, 7-5, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4..
Andy Roddick (6), United States, def. Marc
Gicquel, France, 6-1,6-4, 6-4.
Juan Martin del Potro (5), Argentina, def. Igor
Andreev (25), Russia, 6-4, 7-5, 6-4.
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (9), France, def.
Christophe Rochus, Belgium, 6-2, 6-2, 6-2.
Gael Monfils (11), France, def. Jurgen Melzer
(24), Austria, 6-2.4-6,16-3, 6-1.
Tommy Robredo (16), Spain, def. Maximo
Gonzalez, Argentina, 4-6, 7-5, 6-1, 6-0.
Philipp Kohlschreiber (29), Germany, def.
Novak Djokovic (4), Serbia, 6-4, 6-4, 6-4.
Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Paul-
Henri Mathieu (32), France, 4-6, 6-1, 6-4, 6-4.
Women
Third Round
Svetlana Kuznetsova (7), Russia, def.
Melinda Czink, Hungary, 6-1, 6-3.
Samantha Stosur (30), Australia, def. Elena
Dementieva (4), Russia, 6-3, 4-6, 6-1.
Agnieszka Radwanska (12), Poland, def.
Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine, 6-2, 6-4.
Victoria Azarenka (9), Belarus, def. Carla
Suarez Navarro (22), Spain, 5-7, 7-5,6-2.
AleksandraWozniak (24), Canada, def. Lour-
des Dominguez Lino, Spain, 6-2, 3-6, 6-3.
Virginie Razzano, France, def. Tathiana
Garbih, Italy, 7-5, 7-5. "
Jelena Jankovic (5), Serbia, def. Jarmila
Groth, Australia, 6-1, 6-1.
Serena Williams (2), United States, def. Maria
Jose Martinez Sanchez, Spain, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4.
Sorana Cirstea, Romania, vs. Caroline Woz-
niacki (10), Denmark, 7-643), 7-5.


Gators beat



'Canes, 8-2


Associated Press

GAINESVILLE -
Stephen Locke pitched 7 1-
3 stellar innings, Jonathan
Pigott drove in two runs and
Florida beat Miami 8-2 in
NCAA regional play Satur-
day night.
The Gators (41-20) de-
feated the Hurricanes (37-
21) for just the fourth time in
16 postseason meetings, and
this one might have been
the biggest of all. After all,
Florida is 0 for 10 when
grouped in the same region
as the four-time national
champions.
Now, Miami will play
Jacksonville in an elimina-
tion game Sunday, with the
winner needing to beat the
No. 8 national seed Gators
twice to advance ,,to the
super regional.
Locke (5-2) deserved most
of the credit The senior, left-
harider scattered six hits
and didn't allow an earned
run. He struck out three and
walked one, leading Florida
to its first postseason win
against the Hurricanes
since 2003.
Nick Maronde and closer
Billy Bullock did the rest.
Maronde struck out two
with runners on first and
second to end the eighth,
and Bullock pitched a per-
fect ninth.
But the night belonged to
Locke..
Although Locke had just
one win in his last four
starts coming into the game,
the Gators felt good about
him taking the mound at
home. He improved to 8-0 in
12 starts at home the last
two years. His latest outing
was what the Gators ex-
pected - but didn't get -
all season.
He injured his right knee
following fall practice and
wasn't ready when the sea-
son began. Things got worse
when he was charged with
driving under the influence
in January arid immediately
kicked.off the team. He was


reinstated two months later,
but only because prosecu-
tors dropped the charges.
Still, he had fallen behind
in his rehabilitation.
He got back on track with
three straight wins in mid-
April, and his return gives
Florida an experienced
starter in postseason play.
It helps when he gets the
kind of run support he got
against the Hurricanes.
Florida scored four runs
in the third - with just one
ball leaving the infield.
Teddy Foster and Mike
Mooney drew consecutive
walks to start the inning,
then Avery Barnes loaded
the bases with a sacrifice
bunt. Left-hander Chris
Hernandez field the ball
and failed to get Foster
at third.
Pigott followed with an in-
field single, and Preston
Tucker added an RBI single
to right. Miami minimized
the damage with a run-scor-
ing double play, but Matt
den Dekker capped the in-
ning with a bunt single that
scored Pigott.
The Gators added two,
runs in the sixth and an-
other in the seventh on
Pigott's solo homer. Bran-
don McArthur had an RBI
double in the sixth, and
Teddy Foster - the hero of
Friday night's come-from-
behind victory against
Bethune-Cookman -
added an RBI single.
Barnes made it 8-2 with
an RBI single in the eighth.
Miami's Chris Hernandez
(7-5) allowed six runs in 51/3
innings.
Locke was much better.
Miami's lone runs were
unearned, the result of a
rare error by Tucker. He
dropped a perfect throw to
first on Nathan Melendres'
sacrifice bunt. Bth runners
advanced on Scott Lawson's
sacrifice, then Ted Black-
,man scored on a fly ball to
center. Jason Hagerty fol-
lowed with an infield single,
scoring Melendres.


MAGIC
Continued from Page 1l

all those who wondered if
they were better than the
Cavaliers, a team that won
66\games in the regular sea-
son, or the defending cham-
pion Boston Celtics.
The Magic made both dis-
appear in the postseason.
"I just think this team all
year long has shown an in-
credible amount of heart,"
Magic coach Stan Van
Gundy said. "This team just
keeps fighting back. They
deserve it."
James scored 25 in his
worst game of the series, but


VICTOR
Continued from Page B1

read some stuff on personal
fortitude but today I saw it
demonstrated first hand."'
But Espinoza wasn't
through. He would return
the next day for another full
day of tennis.
The effects of the previ-
ous day were evident early
as Espinoza fought to keep
his feet moving. But the Cit-
rus Hurricanes senior
never quit. He just finally
wore down.
And even when the 18-
year old was sapped of most
of his energy he refused to
go down without a fight.
This was after all the Class
2A state tournament It was
the pinnacle moment of
what had been an illustrious
prep career. He had waited
his whole life for this. He
wasn't going to go quietly.
Therefore, it was no sur-
prise that Espinoza, even
after falling behind 3-1,
love-30 in the first set of his
state semifinal champi-
onship match against Sara.-
sota's Cody Gusto, somehow
found a way to dig deep to
find one extra gear.
He had one last rally left
The district's best tennis
player showed the heart he
had demonstrated all sea-
son and won four of the


the 24-year-old was magnifi-
cent for most of it, adding to
a legacy still in its infancy.
But the league MVP had to
do most of it alone, as Mo
Williams lost his shooting
touch and Cleveland's
bench was badly outplayed
by Orlando's reserves.
Delonte West added 22
and Williams 17 for Cleve-
land, which went 0-5 in Or-
lando.
During the closing min-
utes, James was mocked by
Orlando's crowd singing "M-
V-P" as Howard shot free
throws.
And after Superman mus-
cled underneath for a thun-
derous dunk with 2:21 left,'
the crowd moved into finals
mode chanting, "Beat L.A.!"


next six games to take a 5-4
lead. His opponent, how-'
ever, on much fresher legs,
then regrouped! and. won
the next three games to
close out the set
It was Espinoza's last hur-'
rah. Completely gassed from
more than 10 hours of tennis
in the past 26 hours, the re-
gion's best player fell 6-2 in
the second set
Distraught, wore ought
and thinking about what
might have been, Espinoza
planted himself on the
bench reserved for the play-
ers during changeovers. His
face buried in the white
towel soaked in his own
sweat. The grueling two
days of tennis had finally
taken its toll.
The seconds grew into
minutes, but still Espinoza
remained seated.
And then he felt the soft,
warmth that only a mother's
touch can provide. Maritza
Espinoza then capped it off
with a tender kiss to her
son's head.
The gesture spoke louder
than any words could. The
message was clear as the
Peruvian mother hugged
her son. Te quiero much ...
I love you.
It didn't make things right
again for Victor, but it cer-
tainly went a long way in
getting the healing process
started.
Although it would be sev-


Howard's one flaw has
been his free-throw shoot-
ing, but he made 12 of 16 in
Game 6.
The Magic's season hasn't
been without its share of
turmoil. Point guard Jameer
Nelson sustained a season-
ending shoulder injury in
early February, a setback
that at the time seemed as if
it would prevent Orlando
from doing anything special
this year.
But general manager Otis
Smith acquired guard Rafer
Alston in a trade with Hous-
ton. Alston, a former play-
ground legend, fit in
perfectly. In the opening
round against Philadelphia;
the Magic lost the opener
before rebounding and win-


eral more minutes before
Espinoza left the court,
when he did, the warrior
mentality had once again
taken over him.
He knew he wasn't
through. Espinoza was fully
aware that his teammate,
Connors, would need him at
full strength if they were
going to come off victorious
in their quarterfinal dou-
bles match.
And win they did ... in the
most convincing of fashions.
After dropping the first
two games of the first set to
Luke Burton and Bradley
Carver, the Citrus duo won
12 of the next 16 games for a
6-4, 6-2 victory.
They had done it again.
Espinoza was back in the
semifinals and this time he
had brought his playing
partner along for the ride.
In the semifinal match,
the two friends met up with
a buzz-saw Christopher
Jannsen, who only an hour
earlier had won the individ-
ual state title. Along with his
playing partner Jason Berry,
from North Broward, the
private school, academy-
trained athletes, outlasted
Connors and Espinoza 6-2,
6-2, to win the match.
But even in defeat the
Citrus duo never stopped
fighting.
"We may have been a lit-
tle overmatched by the last
two kids, but we weren't out-


ning a close-out-Game 6 on
the road.
Then, following Game 5 of
the Boston series, Howard
called out Van Gundy for not
getting him the ball enough
and challenged his substitu-
tion patterns.
The Magic shook off that
spat, too, winning two
straight, including Game 7
on Boston's parquet.
In the conference finals,
they beat Cleveland with a
devastating mix of inside
power and outside fire-
power.
When the final horn
sounded, James could only
pull out his jersey and walk
slowly off the floor just as he
did last year after losing
Game 7 in Boston.


classed," Martone said.
"These two young men rep-
resented their school and
their county with a lot of
pride. To go deep into the
second day of the state tour-
nament is very satisfying.
"Victor never com-
plained, not once, about
how tired he was. That goes
to the kind of competitor he
is," Martone recalled. "Ob-
viously, there's no filling
Victor's shoes. He'll be
sorely missed. What a great
conclusion to a remarkable
year. It's been an awesome
journey."
This fall Espinoza will
begin a new journey when
he enters the University of
South Florida where he
hopes to play on the school's
tennis team.
"I'm going to try out and
see what happens," ,Es-
pinoza explained. "It would
be great to make the team.
I'm pretty confident I can
but those guys are really
good so I'll have to work
hard. But I'm ready to give it'
my all."
The.Peruvian-born gradu-
ating senior may be no
match for his Spaniard idol
on the hard court but after
his performance at this
year's state tournament one
thing is for sure, Victor Es-
pinoza has one thing in com-
mon with Rafael Nadal...
both marathon men have
the heart of a champion.


Associated Press
Brad Keselowski drives to Victory Lane as a crew member
carries the checkered flag after Keselowski won the
NASCAR Heluva Good! 200 Nationwide series auto race on
Saturday in Dover, Del.



Keselowski wins



Nationwide race


Associated Press

DOVER, Del. - Brad Ke-,
selowski raced to his first
NASCAR Nationwide Se-
ries victory of the season on
Saturday, taking the lead
during a restart with two
laps left at Dover Interna-
tional Speedway.
Kyle Busch led most of
the second half of race and
appeared on the way to his
third win of the season. But
he seemed to have tire trou-
ble off the restart that came
after the caution with seven
laps left. Busch also was
nudged from behind byJoey
Logano and both cars went
up the track, giving Ke-
selowski space to pass.
Keselowski's victory per-
haps took away some of the
sting of failing to qualify for
Sunday's Cup race.
He led only one lap in his
first career Cup win at Tal-
ladega in April, giving him
three laps led total in his
two NASCAR victories this
season.
"We caught a break," Ke-
selowski said.
Logano was second on the
first anniversary of his Na-
tionwide debut. He took the
blame for pushing Busch
too hard.
"I was trying to stay right


up on him," he said. "I was
going to stay with him
through the first corner. I
got right up on his bumper. I
got in the back of him. Com-
pletely my fault."
Clint Bowyer, Brian Vick-
ers and Carl Edwards
rounded out the top five.
Busch ended up 17th
after leading the most laps
for the fifth straight race. He
has only one win over that
span.
Fourth-generation Earn-
hardt driver Jeffrey Earn-
hardt failed to qualify for
what he was hoping would
be his debut race in the Na-
tionwide Series. He was the
lone driver who did not
crack the 43-car field
Scott takes trucks
race at Dover
DOVER, Del. - Brian Scott
won the Camping World Trucks
race at Dover International
Speedway on Saturday for his
first career victory in any
NASCAR series.
Dennis Setzer had a season-
best second-place finish in the
caution-filled race, while Ron
Homanday Jr. and Kyle Busch
were derailed by tire woes.
David Starr was third, fol-
lowed by Jason White and
Johnny Sauter.


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) Ci-momcu


SPORTS











Jt-Il,z) t CfljN,.t.-F)CROIL,/or UDAMY31 09


Associated Press
Tim Clark watches his shot from the sixth tee during the third round of the Colonial golf tournament Saturday in Fort
Worth, Texas. Clark finished the day in the lead at 17-under par 193.




Tim Clark grabs lead


Three players

sitting 2-back

'Associated Press

FORT WORTH, Texas
With $12.7 million in career
earnings on the PGA Tour,
Tim Clark has the dubious
distinction of winning the
most money without win-
ning an event.
Now he's got a great
chance to let someone else
carry that burden.
Clark shot a 4-under 66
on Saturday in the third
round of the Crowne Plaza
Invitational to take a two-
stroke lead into the final
round.
The 33-year-old South
African has been near the
top of the leaderboard all
week, then finally moved
into first place all by him-


self with a birdie on 11.
After a string of pars, he
birdied 18 to dip to 17-
under 193 and stretch his
lead. That kind of finish'
also might be the momen-
tum-extender to help him
snap his 0-for-183 skid.
"It's tough to win out
here; everyone knows it,"
said Clark, 63rd on the
tour's career money list.
"Hopefully, I do get that win
sometime and it makes
things easier. That's all I
can hope for."
Reason to believe he can
do it starts with his streak
of eight straight rounds in
the 60s at the Colonial
Country Club. That in-
cludes all of last year's
event, when he walked off
the course tied for first but
wound up second, when
Phil Mickelson birdied the
final hole. It was the sixth
runner-up finish of Clark's


career; another came at the
2006 Masters.
That giant 0-fer is reason
enough to question
whether Clark can do it.
There's also this nugget:
Clark's only other 54-hole
lead was at the 2008 St.
Jude Classic. He opened
that final round with a
triple bogey, shot 6 over and
finished 18th.
"It's never easy being the
front-runner. It's a little bit
tougher than coming from a
few shots back," he said.
"But I have led a few tour-
naments on the European
tour going into the last
round and have been able
to shoot a good score. It's
about staying calm and not
getting too far ahead of
yourself.
"This is a great course for
doing that, too. You still
have to come out and play
good golf. If someone is


going to catch me tomorrow
they have to play really
good, so that's good to
knoww"
Well, that brings. up an-
other problem. Lots of peo-
*ple are playing really good
this-week
Wind is the only defense
this old course has against
modern players and their
technological advances,
and there's yet to be any-
thing more than a gentle
breeze. Making things even
easier, many greens are
new and soaked by a rainy
spring, leaving them nice
and soft - just the way
players like it.
Jason Day has capital-
ized with three straight
rounds of 65, and Steve
Marino shot a tournament-
best 62 on Saturday, moving
them into a tie for second
place at 15 under with
Steve Stricker (69).


Price takes 1-shot lead in lowa


Associated Press

WEST DES MOINES,
Iowa - Nick Price took a
one-stroke lead into the
final day of the Principal
Charity Classic for the sec-
ond straight year
After finally winning on
the Champions Tour in April
at the Outback Steakhouse
Pro-Am, the three-time
major champion liked his
chances to wrap up the title
that eluded .him last year
when he faded to a third-
place finish at Glen Oaks.
"This year's a little differ-
ent. I'm obviously a little
more comfortable, having
had the win under my belt,"


Price said after shooting a 4-
under 67 on Saturday. "But
it's going to be a shootout to-
morrow. This field is so
bunched up."
Price had a 7-under 135
total. Joey Sindelar (67) and
Mark Wiebe (68) were 6
under, and Fred Funk (69)
and Mark McNulty (69)
were 5 under. Mike Reid
had a 66, the best round of
the day, to top a six-player
group at 4 under
Two-time defending
champion Jay Haas was 3
under after a 67.
Price overcame two early
bogeys Saturday with an
eagle on No. 9, then nearly
made a hole-in-one on .the


par-3 14th.
Sindelar and Wiebe both
three-putted 18 to miss a
chance to tie Price.
Wiebe, who has just one
top-10 finish this season, is
shooting for his first title
since the Cap Cana Champi-
onship in April 2008.
"I like the way I'm swing-
ing, for sure, and my attitude
is pretty good," Wiebe said.
"Obviously the last hole is
frustrating, to end that way,
but I've played good. I like
the way I'm playing, I like
being in the hunt"
Three players entered the
second round with a share
of the lead for the first time
in the tournament's nine-


year history They all shot
over par Saturday -to fall
back into the pack
Native Iowan Lonnie
Nielsen had double bogeys
on the par-4 10th and par-3
14th and finished with a 72.
Nielsen, who also held a
share of lead after last year's
first round before faltering,
was tied for 12th at 3 under
Bruce Vaughan's day dis-
integrated after an opening
birdie. Vaughan- went
through a stretch with four
bogeys in eight holes - all
on par 4s. He had a 74 to
drop into a tie for 23rd at 1
under Tour newcomer Olin
Browne bogeyed his final
two holes for a 73.


Chelsea tops Everton in FA Cup final


Associated Press

WEMBLEY, England -
Chelsea recovered after
conceding the fastest goal in
FA Cup final history, beating
Evertonx 2-1 Saturday to win
the trophy a fifth time.
Louis Saha put Everton
ahead after 25 seconds at
Wembley, but Didier Drogba
tied the score in the 21st
minute and Frank Lampard
delivered the winner with
18 minutes left.
Chelsea won its first tro-
phy in two years, giving
manager Guus Hiddink the
perfect farewell before he
resumes his job as coach of
the Russian national team.
"We were very tough and
the team has showed after
a- setback they react al-
ways, which is what I like,"
Hiddink said. "It was one
of the biggest, a big
achievement: winning in
the Mecca of world foot-
ball. The FA Cup is some-
thing you cannot believe."
On the record goal, a
header by Chelsea mid-
fielder John Obi Mikel was-
n't cleared properly and
Marouane Fellaini headed
to Saha just inside the
penalty area. The France
striker turned and
smashed a shot past goal-
keeper Petr Cech.
Saha beat the previous
quickest goal in a Wembley
final by 18 seconds and was


Associated Press
Chelsea's Didier Drogba, center, kicks the ball during the Eng-
lish FA Cup final Saturday at Wembley Stadium in London.


five seconds quicker than
the winner Bob Chatt
scored for Aston Villa in the
1895 FA Cup final, which
was played at Crystal Palace
in south London.
U.S. goalkeeper Tim
Howard of Everton sug-
gested that the goal had
come too early for his team.
"It was going to be tough
whether we scored in the.
first minute or the last," he
said. "It's 90 minutes and
we had to refocus and get
our shape and get back to
the game plan, so it was a
bit like coming down off
Cloud Nine."
The goal gave Everton
hope of a first trophy since
the 1995 FA Cup. But Flo-
rent Malouda collected


Lampard's looping pass out
of a crowd and sent in a curl-
ing cross that the unmarked
Drogba met with a header
into the back of the net
It was Drogba's second FA
Cup final - he scored the
extra-time winner in
Chelsea's 2007 victory over
Manchester United.
Lampard made it 2-1
from just outside the
penalty area with a firm
shot past Howard, whose
view was blocked by play-
ers in front of him.
"I thought we were hav-
ing our best spell when they
got their goal from. Frank
Lampard," Everton man-
ager David Moyes said.
"He's a big player and he
scores goals, and that's


what he did."
The victory could have
been more convincing had
Malouda been awarded a
goal in the 78th minute. His
30-yard shot hit the bar and
bounced down, but the ref-
eree could not tell whether
the ball had gone over the
line as television replays
indicated.
Chelsea and Everton
played to scoreless draws in
both their Premier League
games this season. Chelsea
finished 20 points and two
places above Everton.
"It's been a great season,
finishing fifth in the Pre-
mier League and reaching
the final, but it leaves a bit-
ter taste," Everton mid-
fielder Tim Cahill said.
"But it's an experience I
can take forward in the
coming years."
The Chelsea fans cheered
each player as he lifted the
famous cup. The loudest
cheers were for Hiddink,
who filled in as coach for
four months.
"You can better say good-
bye with what has been
achieved," Hiddink said.
"Some sadness but some joy.
It was emotional in the
dressing room. I gathered
the players, just the players
and the technical staff, be-
cause I won't get the oppor-
tunity in the morning to
speak to them.


GOLF SCORES
Colonial Crowne
Plaza Invitational
Saturday
At Colonial Country Club
Fort Worth, Texas
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,204; Par 70
Third Round
Tim Clark 63-64-66-193 -17
Steve Marino 66-67-62-195 -15
Jason Day 65-65-65--195 -15
Steve Stricker ' 63-63-69-195 -15
Vijay Singh 64-64-69-197 -13
Justin Leonard 66-68-64-198 -12
Woody Austin 63-68-67-198 -12
Paul Casey 66-67-66-199 -11
Sean O'Hair 65-64-70-199 -11
Zach Johnson 69-67-64-200 -10
lan Poulter 66-69-65-200 -10
Kevin Na 66-68-66-200 -10
Ted Purdy 69-65-66-200 -10
Luke Donald 68-65-67-200 -10
Jeff Overton 69-67-65-201 -9
Lucas Glover 70-65-66-201 -9
Kevin Sutherland 66-67-68-201 -9
Tim Herron 71-65-66-202 -8
Harrison Frazar 67-69-66-202 -8
John Senden 68-67-67-202 -8
Jason Bohn 69-65-68-202 -8
Ryan Palmer A 69-63-70-202 -8
Matt Kuchar 70-68-65-203 -7
Tom Lehman 68-69-66-203 -7
Charlie Wi 67-70-66-203 -7
Stephen Ames 68-68-67-203 -7
James Driscoll 69-64-70-203 -7
David Toms 67-72-65-204 -6
Kevin Streelman 68-70-66-204 -6
Mark Wilson 67-71-66-204 -6
Fredrik Jacobson 68-70-66-204 -6
Nick O'Hern 69-69-66-204 -6
Jim Furyk 68-69-67-204 -6
Geoff Ogilvy 70-67-67-204 -6
Hunter Mahan 69-67-68-204 -6
Kenny Perry, 64-72-68-204 -6
Jason Dufner 69-71-65-205 -5
Charley Hoffman 73-67-65-205 -5
Bart Bryant 70-68-67-205 -5
Anthony Kim 69-68-68-205 -5
Stewart Cink 71-66-68-205 -5
Bob Estes 71-66-68-205 -5
James Nitties 67-68-70-205 -5
Corey Pavin 71-69-66-206 -4
Brandt Jobe 71-69-66-206 -4
J.J. Henry 71-68-67-206 -4
Rod Pampling 73-66-67-206 -4
Scott Verplank 70-68-68-206 -4
George McNeill 68-70-68-206 -4
Rocco Mediate 67-70-69-206 -4
Greg Owen 68-69-69-206 -4
Tom Pernice, Jr. 69-67-70-206 -4
Chris DiMarco 69-71-67-207 -3
Matt Bettencourt 69-70-68-207 -3
Tommy Armour III 67-72-68-207 -3
Derek Fathauer 68-69-70-207 -3
Brian Davis 69-68-70-207 -3
Danny Lee 69-67-71-207 -3
Heath Slocum 69-71-68-208 -2
Dudley Hart 74-66-68-208 -2
Adam Scott 68-71-69-208 -2
Carl Pettersson 71-68-69-208 -2
Justin Rose 69-69-70-208 -2
John Rollins 70-67-71-208 -2
Mike Weir 69-67-72-208 -2
Rory Sabbatini 71-69-69-209 '-1
Bo Van Pelt 71-69-69-209 -1
Brian Gay-....- . .ti0-iI-2309. -.1
Ben Crane 71-68-70-209 ..-1
Richard S.Johnson 71-69-70-210 E
Chez Reavie 72-68-70-210 E
John Merrick 71-68-71-210 E
Michael Bradley 70-67-73-210 E
Ryuji Imada 69-68-73-210 E
Failed to make final round
Ken Duke 71-69-71-211 +1
Mark Brooks 71-69-72-212 +2
Aron Price 67-72-73-212 +2
Joe Ogilvie 67-73-73-213 +3
Mark Calcavecchia 68-72-74--214 +4
Champions-Principal
Charity Classic
Saturday
At Glen Oaks Country Club Course
West Des Moines, Iowa
Purse: $1.725 million
Yardage: 6,679; Par: 71
Second Round


Nick Price
Joey Sindelar
Mark Wiebe
Fred Funk
Mark McNulty
Mike Reid
Hal Sutton
Keith Fergus
Tim Simpson
David Eger
Tom Kite
Bruce Summerhays
Jay Haas
Craig Stadler
John Harris
Hale Irwin
Jeff Sluman
Larry Nelson
Lonnie Nielsen
-Tom Jenkins-
Brad Bryant
Olin Browne
Gene Jones
Loren Roberts
Dan Forsman
Jay Don Blake
Fuzzy Zoeller
Bruce Fleisher
Bruce Vaughan
Russ Cochran
Mark W. Johnson
Bob Gilder
Morris Hatalsky
Ken Green
Phil Blackmar
Jim Colbert
Vicente Femandez
Jerry Pate
Gary Hallberg
Ronnie Black
Bruce Lietzke
Jim Thorpe
John Cook


68-67-135
69-67-136
68-68-136
68-69-137
68-69-137
72-66-138
70-68-138
70-68-138
68-70-138
69-69-138
68-70-138
72-67-139
72-67-139
72-67-139
72-67-139
70-69-139
68-71-139
68-71-139
67-72-139
72-68-140
71-69-140
67-73-140
72-69-141
71-70-141
71-70--141
70-71-141
70-71-141
68-73-141
67-74-141
74-68-142
73-69-142
72-70-142
72-70-142
71-71-142
71-71-142
70-72-142
70-72-142
70-72-142 �
69-73-142
68-74-142
72-71-143
72-71-143
70-73-143 '


Robert LThompson 69-74-143


Tom Wargo
LeonardThompson
Denis Watson
Mark James
Gil Morgan
John Morse
Mike Hulbert
Sandy Lyle
Tom Purtzer
Ian Woosnam
R.W. Eaks
Allen Doyle
Dave Stockton
Ken Schall
Mike Goodes


75-69-144
74-70-144
72-72-144
72-72-144
71-73-144
70-74-144
74-71-145
74-71-145
72-73-145
69-76-145
75-71-146
75-71-146
73-73-146
73-73-146
73-73-146


-7
-6
-6
-5
-5
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
. -2
-2
-2
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
+1
+1
+1
+1
+2
+2
+2
+2
+2
+2
+3
+3
+3
+3
+4
+4
+4
+4
+4


Wayne Grady
Tom McKnight
Chip Beck
Blaine McCallister
Ben Crenshaw
Steve Thomas
Walter Hall
Joe Ozaki
Bobby Wadkins
John Adams
Tim Conley
James Mason
Mark O'Meara
Dick Mast


73-73-146
73-73-146
71-75--146
71-75-146
70-76-146
70-76-146
76-71-147
74-73-147
74-73-147
74-73-147
73-74-147
72-75-147
70-77-147
76-72-148


Mike San Filippo 77-71-148 +6
Graham Marsh 74-74-148 +6
Isao Aoki 75-74-149 +7
Dave Eichelberger 75-75-150 +8
Mike McCullough 76-77-153 +11
Andy Bean 68-WD
Nationwide Tour
The Rex Hospital Open
Saturday
At TPC Wakefield Plantation
Raleigh, N.C.
Purse: $525,000
Yardage: 7,257; Par: 71
Third Round
Kevin Johnson 65-69-65-199
Rich Barcelo 65-70-65--200
Jim McGovem 70-66-65-201
Chris Baryla 72-67-63--202
Chad Collins 68-70-64-202
Josh Teater 67-71-64-202
Adam Bland 66-70-66-202


Cameron Percy
Grant Waite
David Mathis
Josh Broadaway
Jeff Gallagher
Jeff Gove
David Branshaw
Brad Fritsch
Gary Christian
D.J. Brigman
Chad Ginn
Justin Hicks
Andrew Svoboda
Tom Gillis
Justin Bolli
Hunter Haas
Garth Mulroy
Fabian Gomez
Craig Bowden
Skip Kendall
Bradley lies
Jeff Brehaut


70-66-66--202
68-67-67-202
66-69-67-202
64-70-68-202
64-69-69-202
71-67-65-203
70-68-65---203
68-68-67-203
67-68-68-203
68-67-68-203
66-68-69-203
69-65-69-203
68-71-65-204
66-71-67-204
69-68-67-204
67-68-69-204
72-67-66-205
72-66-67-205
70-67-68-205
65-70-70-205
64-69-72-205
68-70-68-206


Roger Tambellini 69-69-68-206
lan Leggatt 72-66-68-206
Geoffrey Sisk 65-72-69-206
Marco Dawson 67-70-69-206
Craig Barlow 67-70-69-206
Todd Demsey 69-67-70-206
Jason Gore. 70-66-70-206
Michael Sim 66-69-71-206
Major Manning 72-63-71-206
Jim Rutledge 68-70-69-207
Chris Tidland 71-68-68-207
B.J. Staten 70-67-70-207
Esteban Toledo 70-67-70-207
Henrik Bjomstad 68-68-71-207
Seung-su Han 69-67-71-207'
Jeff Curl 68-65-74-207
Paul Stankowski 70-69-69-208
Chris Anderson 66-72-70-208
*Bob May 69-69-70-208
Matthew BorcheOt 70-67-71-208
David McKenzie 69-68-71-208
Willie Wood '-: - .` 67-69-7�-208
Steve Wheatcroft 69-67-72-.:26'8'1
Tommy Gainey 69-70-70-209
Won Joon Lee 69-70-70-209
Darron Stiles 71-68-70-209
Fran Quinn 71-68-70-209
Greg Sonnier 71-67-71-209
Alex Prugh 69-69-71-209
Ryan Armour 71-67-71-209
Scott Gardiner 70-63-76-209
Brendon de Jonge 70-69-71-210
Brendon Todd 70-69-71-210
Andrew Buckle 70-69-71-210
John Kimbell 71-68-71-210
Garrett Willis 71-68-71-210
David Robinson 68-70-73-211
Scott Dunlap 67-71-73-211
Blake Adams 67-70-74-211
Len Mattiace 68-67-76-211
Scott Medlin 72-67-73-212
Brian Stuard 69-69-75-213
Matt Every 67-71-78-216
European PGA
Saturday
At The London Golf Club, Heritage
Course
Ash, England
Purse: $2.86 million
Yardage: 7,257; Par: 72
Third Round, Leading Scores
Jeev Milkha Singh, India 67-69-71-207
Christian Cevaer, France 67-70-70-207
Chris Wood, England 69-73-68-210 .
Rory Mcllroy, N. Ireland 69-73-68-210
Alvaro Quiros, Spain 71-70-69-210
Soren Hansen, Denmark 69-75-67-211
Gary Orr, Scotland 71-72-68--211
Steve Webster, England 69-72-70-211
Marcus Fraser, Australia 69-70-72-211
Richie Ramsey, Scotland 74-70-68--212
Jamie Donaldson, Wales 68-70-74-212
Jose Manuel Lara, Spain 70-68.74-212 -
Chapchai Nirat, Thailand 69-76-68-213
Magnus Carlsson, Sweden 71-74-68-213
Louis Oosthuizen, S. Afripa 68-75-70-213
Gregory Bourdy, France 71-70-72-213
Anthony Wall, England 68-69-76-213
M.Lorenzo-Vera, France 67-69-77-213
Callum Macaulay, Scotland 71-72-71-214
Stephen Dodd, Wales 75-70-70-215
Martin Kaymer, Germany 71-72-72-215
David Drysdale, Scotland 72-71-72-215
Ricardo Gonzalez, Argentina 69-73-73-215
Also
Anders Hansen, Denmark 65-73-78-216
G. McDowell, N. Ireland 70-73-74-217
Robert Karlasson, Sweden 68-74-75-217
Paul Lawrie,.Scotland 73-71-73-217
C. Montgomerie, Scotland 70-74-74-218
Serglo Garcia, Spain 69-75-74-218
Lee Westwood, England 70-75-74-219
Thomas Bjom, Denmark 70-74-76-220
NCAA Men's Dv. I
Championship
Saturday
At Inverness Club
Toledo, Ohio
Yardage: 7,255; Par 71
Match Play
Championship
Texas A&M (7) 3, Arkansas (4) 2
Bronson Burgoon, Texas A&M, def. Andrew
Landry, Arkansas, 1 up.
Andrea Pavan, Texas A&M, def. David Ling-
merth, Arkansas, 7 and 6.
John Hurley, Texas A&M, def. Ethan Tracy,
Arkansas, 6 and 4.
Jason Cuthbertson, Arkansas, def. Matt
Van Zandt, Texas A&M, 3 and 1.
Jamie Marshall, Arkansas, def. Conrad
Shindler, Texas A&M, 3 and 2.


SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009 B5


SPORTS


CrrRUS COUNTY (FL E


.










E Page B6- SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009



ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


otlight on
PEOPLE -

Prince Harry
plays polo in N.Y.
NEW YORK-- Prince
Harry followed in his
mother's footsteps Satur-
day by raising money for
a charity that supports
AIDS orphans as he
played polo in a city
Princess Diana loved.
Her 24-year-old son
was on' Governors Island
in New York Harbor to
play in the Veuve Clic-
quot Manhattan Polo
Classic.
The match will benefit
the Sentebale charity
that Harry set up with
Prince Seeiso of Lesotho
for impoverished chil-
dren in that African na-
tion.
"The prince and I both
lost our mothers when
we were very young,"
Harry told a pre-match
VIP gathering. "We set up
Sentebale in their mem-
ory, and because my
mother loved this city, it
makes this occasion all
the more poignant for
me."

Osbourne sues in
NYC over name
NEW YORK - Ozzy
Osbourne has accused
former Black Sabbath
band mate Tonylomnumi of
taking over the heavy
metal titans' name and
costing him royalties
from merchandise sales.
Osbourne, who sued
the guitarist earlier this
week, issued a statement
Friday imploring him to
"do the right thing."
S"Tony, I am so sorry it's
had to get to this point by
me having to take this ac-
tion against you," the
singer-turned-reality -
show star said. .
But, he added, "we've
all worked too hard and
long in our careers to
allow you to sell mer-
chandise that features all
our faces, old Black Sab-
bath album covers and
band logos, and then you
tell us that you own the
copyright."
Osbourne, who lives in
California, filed suit
Tuesday in a federal
court in New York, saying
lommi falsely claimed to
have sole rights to Black
Sabbath's trademark in,
negotiations over the last
year with'a company that
sells the band's merchan-
dise.'
-From wire reports


NEW YORK - With an out-of-work
husband and two children to support,
Christine Mead needs a cheap - and
uplifting - break from life.
So lately she's been escaping into
sweet and heartening stories of love
and passion, where heroines over-
come insurmountable obstacles to
find their happiness.
"I am left with a satisfied feeling at
the end of a good book, a feeling of
hope that all can, and will, be OK,"
said Mead, who lives in the small town
of Festus, Mo., and suffers from fi-
bromyalgia and osteoarthritis.
Mead, 41, rarely goes anywhere be-
cause of the price of gas, and the fam-
ily has been relying on a food pantry.
Romance novels, she said, are "a dis-
traction from not knowing what's
going to happen next"
Love may not conquer all in real
life, but its power in relatively inex-
pensive books is quite a comfort in
this economy. Publishers are seeing
strong sales in the romance genre as
other categories decline and con-
sumers cut back on spending.
Harlequin Enterprises Ltd., a
global giant in women's fiction, re-
ported fourth-quarter earnings up 32
percent over the same period a year
earlier, with U.S. retail sales up 9 per-
cent in 2008.
For the week of May 10, romance
book sales overall were up nearly 2.4
percent compared with the same
week last year, according to Nielsen
BookScan, which covers 75 percent of
retail sales. Travel book sales were
down 16 percent, detective/mystery
and self-he'lp were each down 17 per-
cent and adult fiction overall, of
which romance is a subgenre, was.up
1 percent.
Jennifer Enderlin, associate pub-
lisher for St. Martin's Press, said ro-
mance is doing so well, the publisher
is releasing 32 titles this year (more
could be added), compared to 26 last
year.
Books from notable authors, in-
cluding Lora Leigh,Lisa Kleypas and
Sherrilyn Kenyon, are experiencing
healthy sales, she said.
Enderlin and other publishers said
they're not surprised by the genre's
success.
"If you really think about it, there is
a little romance in virtually every
book," said Laurie Parkin, vice presi-
dent and publisher of Kensington
Publishing Corp. Kensington has seen
a 5 percent increase in sales for mass
market paperback romances for its
fiscal year beginning Oct. 1, she said.
"But especially when business is
bad or business is down, people want
to escape a little bit," Parkin added. "I
think romance offers that in a won-
iderful, wonderful way."
When life is more stressful, people
need that escape even more, said


Associated Press
This photo released by Kensington Publishing shows a row of romance books,


Nancy Molitor, a clinical psychologist,
in Wilmette, Ill. She said movie atten-
dance and alcohol sales are also up.
Romance novels are affordable and
you can easily get them from the li-
brary or purchase them used.
"It's a healthy and positive coping
mechanism," said Judith Orloff, a
medical doctor and author of "Emo-
tional Freedom." She said the stories
help people find an oasis of calm.
Christine Dionne, 38, of Cloverdale,
Ore., said romance was the soothing
balm -after one of her two sons died
playing an asphyxiation game in 2004
at age 10. Now, she's reaching for
more lighthearted fun romances as a
distraction from financial and family
troubles. Her husband, a truck driver,
has had his hours cut and the farm
where she works has taken a hit.
She said the books make her feel
like she's something bigger than her
tiny town and the small house that she
rarely leaves. With little money to go
out (she doesn't drive), she shops at
Goodwill. Ramen has become a staple
in the house.
"It's my connection to the world and
I can visit other places and be some-
body else - for just, a little while,"
said Dionne, whose surviving son is
12.
Katherine Petersen, 43, of Menlo


Park, Calif., said she feels more ener-
gized to resume her job search after
she finishes a good romance. Petersen
is blind and has been looking for work
for about a year.
Before, reading was a hobby. Now,
it's her saving grace. She said it's
something she can do in braille or by
listening without the company of oth-
ers and without spending a lot of
money.
"When I'm reading, I'm thinking
about something else," said Petersen,
whose background is in public rela-
tions. "I'min certainly not worrying
about that job letter I just sent out or
who I have to call or how I am going
to pay the electric bill. It's kind of a
freedom from that."
But escapism is only part of the at-
traction, said best-selling author
Janet Evanovich, who started out
writing romance and then morphed
into mystery. She likes romance be-
cause the characters are quirky, vi-
brant women who take charge, are
tenacious and are able to overcome
crises in their lives - characters
women can identify with.
The books are a feel-good read, En-
derlin said. The'endings may be pre-
dictable, but there's solace in knowing
that things are going to turn out like
they should.


Dream over: Boyle finishes 2nd in UK reality show


Associated Press

LONDON - She dreamed a
dream, and it very nearly came
true.
But Susan Boyle's reality show
journey finished Saturday with a
second-place finish in the finals of
"Britain's Got Talent," an ending
that didn't fit the fairy tale. Instead
of the 48-year-old internet sensa-
tion, an exuberant dance troupe
called "Diversity" took the 100,000-
pound ($159,000) prize and will
perform for Queen Elizabeth II at
the Royal Variety Show.
Boyle paced around the stage as
the hosts named the top three of
the ten final acts, and looked al-
most relieved when her name was
called as


the runner-up. She recovered in
time to graciously praise the
dancers.
"The best people won," Boyle
said. "They're very entertaining.
Lads, I wish you all the best"
Boyle then curtsied several
times to the audience, gave them
her signature shimmy, and strolled
offstage.
It had been a tumultuous week
for Boyle, a woman previously un-
used to the limelight. She lost her
cool during a confrontation with
two reporters, and the police inter-
vened. One contest judge said
Boyle had contemplated pulling
out of the competition to soothe
her frazzled nerves.
But when she stepped into the.
spotlight Saturday, Boyle seemed
more polished - and animated -
than in previous appearances.
She wore a modest, but glam-
orous, floor-length gown, and
chose to go back to the song
| that rocketed her into the in-
ternational spotlight: "I
*I Dreamed a Dream," from
the musical "Les Miser-
ables."
Her hometown of Black-
burn, Scot-
. land - a


small, working class village about
10 miles (16 kilometers) west of
Edinburgh - rallied round her,
stringing up posters and signs in
her support. Friends and neigh- .
bors gathered at a local pub to
watch the performance.
"I've known her for many
years,"*said 72-year-
old neighbor Margaret ONiT
-Yule. "She's a lovely
lassie and she will do * www.ta
well whatever hap-
pens. Susan is about
the singing, and fame and fortune
won't change her."
Millions tuned in to the live pro-
gram and voted by telephone af-
terward.
Boyle was up against a host of,
everyman acts determined to find
stardom on reality television, in-
cluding Shaheen Jafargholi, a 12-
year-old whose voice has been
compared to Michael Jackson's,
Hollie Steel, a 10-year-old who
turned in a solid performance
, after a tearful
. . semifinal
meltdown,
and a grand-
father-
Sgrandaughter
singing duo.
And then there
-H was "Stavros Flat-
ley," a father-son act
who parodied "The
Lord of the Dance" by
romping around the
stage shirtless, in blond
wigs and leather pants,
combining Greek and Irish


le


dancing and music.
But it was Boyle whom people
tuned in to watch.
After her first appearance in
April, Boyle became the favorite to
win the competition. As she
stepped on stage during auditions,
her frumpy appearance drew con-
descending looks
from the studio audi-
HE NOE ence and the judges,
ent.itv.com. but her soaring,
evocative voice si-
lenced the doubters
and turned her into an Internet
sensation.
The .first moment Boyle sang was
one that has been viewed millions
of times, the fifth-most watched
clip in history on YouTube. It was a
moment that went down in reality-
show history.
As Boyle hit a high note at the
end of the song's first line, judge
Simon Cowell's eyebrows rose
along with her voice. The audience
went mad. And a star was born.
She has since appeared on the
"Oprah Winfrey Show." Demi
Moore tweeted about Boyle on her
Twitter feed. Boyle dominated
Britain's tabloids - but there
were signs she was feeling the
heat.
She acknowledged Saturday
that it had been a stressful few
weeks, but said onstage that it had
been "well worth it."
Cowell said.that she'd been
given a rough ride, but that she
was "a nice, shy person who wants
a break"


Susan Boyle, whose performance on the television show "Britain's Got Tal-
ent" wowed the judges, poses singing with a hairbrush at her home in Black-
bum, Scotland. Associated Press


SUMMER LOVIN'

Romance novels -perfect beach reading - thrive in tough times

Associated Press F


musician Andy Hurley (Fall
Out Boy) is 29. Actor
Jonathan Tucker is 27. Actor
Curtis Williams Jr. is 22.
Thought for Today: "One
does not love a place the less
for having suffered in it unless
it has all been suffering, noth-
ing but suffering." - Jane
Austen, British novelist (1775-
1817).


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
* Last night's winning
numbers, Page B134.

FRIDAY, MAY 29
Mega Money: 6 - 9 - 18 - 19
Mega Ball: 1
4-of-4 MB No winner -
4-of-4 21 $353.50
3-of-4 MB 60 $271.50
3-of-4 1,663 $29
2-of-4 MB 1,550 $21.50
2-of-4 37,189 $2
1-of-4 MB 10,923 $3
Fantasy 5:1 - 6 - 7 - 11 - 30
5-of-5 1 winner $231,785
4-of-5 421 $88.50
3-of-5 12,667 $8
THURSDAY, MAY 28
Fantasy 5: 8 - 10 - 21 - 30 - 32
5-of-5 2 winners $115,843.74
4-of-5 276 $135
3-of-5 9,535 $10.50
WEDNESDAY, MAY 27
Powerball: 5 - 6 - 12 16 - 21
Power Ball: 7
Power Play: 3
Jackpot 1 winner $232 million
Power Play No winner

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num.
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487.7777.

Today in
HISTORY=

Today is Sunday, May 31,
the 151st day of 2009. There
are 214 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in His-
tory:
On May 31, 1889, more
than 2,000 people perished
when a dam break sent water
rushing through Johnstown,
Pa.
On this date:
In 1809, composer Franz
Joseph Haydn died in Vienna
at-age 77.
In 1910, the Union of South
Africa was founded.
In 1949, former State De-
partment official Alger Hiss
went on trial in New York,
charged with perjury. (The jury
ended up deadlocked, but
Hiss was convicted in a sec-
ond trial.)
Ten years ago: During a
Memorial Day visit to Arlington
National Cemetery, President
Bill Clinton asked Americans
to reconsider their ambiva-
lence about Kosovo, calling it
"a very small province in a
small country. But it is a big
test of what we believe in."
Five years ago: Alberta
Martin, one of the last widows
of a Confederate veteran of
the Civil War, died in Enter-
prise, Ala., at age 97.
One year ago: Space
shuttle Discovery and a crew
of seven blasted into orbit,
carrying a giant Japanese lab
addition to the international
space station.
Today's Birthdays: Ac-
tress Elaine Stewart is 80.
Actor-director Clint Eastwood
is 79. Singer Peter Yarrow is
71. FormerAnglican Church
envoy Terry Waite is.70.
Singer-musician Augie Mey-
ers is 69. Actress Sharon
Gless is 66. Football Hall of
Famer Joe Namath is 66.
Actor Tom Berenger is 59.
Actor Gregory Harrison is 59.
Actress Roma Maffia is 51.
Comedian Chris Elliott is 49.
Actor Kyle Secor is 49. Ac-
tress Lea Thompson is 48.
Singer Corey Hart is 47. Actor
Hugh Dillon is 46. Rapper
DMC is 45. Actress Brooke
Shields is 44. Country musi-
cian Ed Adkins (The Derail-
ers) is 42. Jazz musician
Christian McBride is 37. Actor
Colin Farrell is 33. Rock musi-
cian Scott Klopfenstein (Reel
Big Fish) is 32. Actor Eric
Christian Olsen is 32. Rock









Section C - SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009



O M M CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press


A "for sale" sign hangs in front of a Homestead home on March 24.


*f


6


ORLANDO - We first heard the term decades ago: T2e "Sun Belt" was just starting a run of
phenomenal growth - and no wonder. It conjured a sunny state of mind as well as a balmy place on the
map. I Everybody, it seemed, wanted a spot in the sun. � Induries such as aerospace, defense and oil
set up shop across America's southernmost tier, capitalizing on the low involvementQf labor imons
and the proximity of military bases that paid handsomely, and reliably, for their products and services.


Later, San Jose, Calif., and Austin, Texas,
developed into high-tech nerve centers;
Houston grew into a hub for the oil industry;
Nashville became a mecca for music record-
ing and production; Charlotte, N.C., trans-
formed itself into a center for low-cost
banking and finance; and then there were the
new Dixie Detroits, places like Canton, Miss.,
Georgetown, Ky., and Spartanburg, S.C., that
began rolling out Titans, Camrys and BMWs.
Meanwhile, other warm-weather havens of-
fered their own variants of the Sun Belt
dream - as Fountains of Youth for 60-and-up
duffers, as Magic Kingdoms for fun-seekers,
as Cape Canaverals for middle-aged north-
erners looking to launch their second acts.
Air conditioning, bug spray and drainage
canals that transformed marshes into golf-
course subdivisions --these innovations, plus
the availability of flat, low-taxed land at-
tracted migrants from Brooklyn and Cleve-
land, Havana and Mexico City to locales once
dismissed as too hot, too swampy, too dry, too
backwater-ish.
"We Give Years to Your Life and Life to
Your Years!" That was the sort of slogan you'd
hear from developers pitching the promise
that a new start in the Sun Belt might even, in
the best of circumstances, extend one's-time
on Earth.
In this way, for a generation or more, the


TODD LEWAN
Associated Press


Sun Belt thrived like no other region in Amer-
ica - a growth so steady it felt as though the
boom would never end. But now it has, re-
placed by a bust that has left some swaths of
the region suffering as s verelas anywhere
in the current recesslW .
. What brought the dark clouds to the Sun
Belt, and are they here to stay?
Interviews with economists and demogra-
phers across the region, and data from The
Associated Press Economic Stress Index, a
month-by-month analysis of foreclosure,
bankruptcy and unemployment rates in more
than 3,000 U.S. counties, suggest that the an4
swers are not all encouraging.


Some cities - Las Vegas, Phoenix, Fort
Myers are good examples - hitched their
floats to housing bubbles and got caught up in
development that depended largely on, well,
development itself, rather than sustainable,
scalable, productive industry, economic ana-
lysts say.
It's in these places where the economic
meltdown "will likely find its fullest bloom,"


Richard Florida, the urbanist and author,
wrote recently in an Atlantic Monthly article
titled "How the Crash Will Reshape Amer-
ica."
AP Stress Index figures, which calculate
the economic impact of the recession on a
scale ofl to 100, illustrate how the downturn
has plated out in some of these communities:
* In Maricopa County, home to Phoenix,
the Stress Index more than doubled from 5.12
at the beginning of the recession in Decem-
ber 2007 to 12.67 in March 2009, worsened by
a foreclosure rate that nearly tripled.
* Mounting foreclosures in Las Vegas'
Clark County drove up its Stress Index score
from 10.5 at the start of the recession to 19.3 in
March 2009.
* In Lee County, home to Fort Myers, un-
employment has doubled and foreclosures
have soared 75 percent since the recession
began, lifting its Stress Index from 10.5 to
19.98.
The boom in parts of the Sun Belt was,
Florida wrote in the Atlantic, a "giant Ponzi
scheme".- a growth machine that banked on
wishful thinking, on the hope that an unend-
ing stream of new arrivals.would forever in-
ject their money into construction and real
estate.
See SN BELT/Page C3


Ten things

that won't

make you

grumpy
I m often accused of
being grumpy around
the office, so let me
share 10 things with you
that make me happy.
1. My dog Duffy has
made a complete recovery
from his power-washer in-
cident in the Crystal River
and is back to barking at
the neighbors.
2. It is raining in Florida
and you can almost hear
the aquifer filling up.
3. Brad Thorpe is the
new Citrus County admin-
istrator and he appears to
be positive and hopeful
about making some real
progress with county gov-
ernment. County commis-
sioners are behaving
themselves, which in itself
is worth recording.
4. Home sales are im-
proving in Citrus,County
(and Florida) and that
might mean that we are
actually climbing out of
this awful recession. Just
about every person I come
ip contact with caWishare
a story of woe generated
by this economic catastro-
phe. If there is a positive
outcome to this, it may be
that greed finally goes out
of style.
5. The unemployment
rate in the county is drop-
ping. That means more
people are finding jobs
and are able to support
their families.
6. Marla Chancey, the
new head of the Citrus
County Tourist Develop-
ment Council, is really
plugged in to helping peo-
ple enjoy their vacation
time in our community.
She has gotten focused on
telling that story to Citrus
County residqets who may
not remember that lots of
inexpensive fun is avail-
able right here.
7. Josh Wooten, the new
CEO of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce, is
doing an excellent job of
extending services to the
many struggling busi-
nesses in the community.
Wooten, who served a
term as a county commis-
sioner, has brought some
new excitement and pur-
pose back to the chamber.
Wooten showed some ex-
cellent leadership in his
new role by immediately
hiring the soriidoplace
.candidate for his job -
See WINDOW/Page C4


Congratulatio
Editor's note: The following column is
by Jim Clark, editor of the Williston Pio-
neer, based in Levy County. The Williston
Pioneer is a sister paper of the Citrus
County Chronicle.


e JIM CLARK
Special to the Chronicle


his is a big weekend for many
young people, as they leave high
school and move on to the next
phase of their lives.
Graduation is a landmark day for these
young adults who are ready to venture out
into the world.
This graduating class has been through a
little more than many of us. These young
people were fourth-graders on Sept 11,
2001, when two planes smashed into the
World Trade Center in New York, one hit the
Pentagon and another crashed in Pennsyl-
vania, changing the face of America forever
They are venturing into an uncertain
world, one filled with the fear of terror-
ism, one filled with eroding freedoms in
the name of security.
Those of us who have lived through
many years of strife and conflict - and


ns and advice


many years of prosperity and peace - can
give some words of advice to the young
graduates. Whether they pay attention is
up to them, and whether they agree is also
up to them. Bt at least it's a point of view
that they can se to steer them in what-
ever direction they want to go.
Here we go:
1. If you have a chance to continue your
education, by all means do so. In this era, it
is almost impossible to advance yourself in
the job market without some sort of post-
secondary education. It can be college,
junior college, trade school or specialized
classes, but make sure you learn as much
as you can. You've made it through one im-
portant period - you've got your high
school diploma. Now look to see what else
you can do to learn. Your brains are still
relatively young; you have a better capac-
ity to learn than many of us old dogs, who
find it hard to learn new tricks.
2. If you go to college, learn the differ-.
ence between opinion and fact from your
professors. The good ones will make it
clear for you, but there are some who will
ram their thoughts down your throat,
See ADVICE/Page C4


Adulthood requires sacrifice


Jim Clark, the editor of the Chroni-
cle's sister paper up the road in
Williston, offers a column in today's
section with some excellent advice for
high school graduates.
He lists seven points for
graduates to ponder as they
step into the world. Here's
some observations I have
about this pivotal point in life.
* I was getting my Saturday
coffee a couple of weeks ago
when I overheard a young man
ask the clerk if the store was hir-
ing. Curious, I looked or and
saw that this guy had his l cap
on sideways, was wearina jer- -,
sey and his shorts were slung low. Charlie
There's nothing wrong with SHA
any of that, except ?st impres-
sions are every ng. The OF C
working world requires some
sacrifices and one of those is often ap-
pearance. In general, one should dress for
interviews in a fashion those who will be
doing the interviewing are dressed.
At most, the clerk was humored by the
young man, but not interested in taking an
application.


I
u
a<


* For my high school graduation re-
hearsal, the students rode busses into the
city where the ceremony took place. As we
drove by a 7-Eleven store, one student
pointed and said, "There's
Frank's alma mater." That was
sarcasm. The classmate Frank
and another dolt decided they'd
hold up the 7-Eleven a week or
two before graduation. They got
caught and Frank didn't gradu-
ate, at least not with us. Frank
was popular and a good athlete,
but stupid decisions have very
real consequences.
N Two or three months after
u gluation, I was lucky enough
3rennan enrolled in junior college.
DES s living a long distance
where I grew up and thor-
RAY t ly thrived on the inde-
pendence, -socially anyway
I don't remember his name anym4
but there was another freshman who s
equally thriving on iglependence. Inhis
dogm rpom, he kept the little refrigerator
constantly stocked with Heinekens.
)HADES/Page C4


C\


]""


mmvm..


I - I-










Page C2 SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009



PINION


C


"The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars I
But in ourselves, that we are underlings."
William Shakespeare, "Julius Caesar"


ITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
*Gerry Mulligan......................................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ............................................editor
Neale Brennan ........promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ..............................managing editor
Cheri Harris.................... .....features editor
- Curt Ebitz... ..................... citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ..................................citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson ................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


POLICIES AND OVERSIGHT



Broader issues


require attention


at CREST school


L ogically, the Citrus
County School Board
fired a CREST School
teacher after learning she had
had a parental signature su-
perimposed on a form re-
quired to place a child in an
isolation room.
It's regrettable that the
school's Teacher of the -Year
made the decision
to have the signa- THE IS
ture falsified, THE I
since her record CREST
prior to the inci- and teact
dent was stellar.
It's also regret- OUR OP1
table that the
challenges and Huge ch
bureaucracy in- unfort
volved with edu- circums
eating and
supervising autistic children
and others with special needs.
is staggering. But that's the re-
ality at the school with an
acronym that stands for Citrus
Resources for Exceptional Stu-
dents in Transition.
Even had the teacher pro-
duced a consent form signed by
the parents to allow their child
to be secluded for behavioral
reasons, there can be no excus-
ing the falsified document. De-
spite the teacher's contention
to the contrary, the parents say
they never signed the form,
would not sign such a form and
that they oppose seclusion as
an option for when their child
acts out. To compound the
problem, the child was injured
during the incident.
It's troubling to note, how-
ever, that the child had been
put in the isolation room in the
past and that other school offi-
cials were aware of that fact.
To that end, the teacher likely
felt taking whatever action was
necessary to safeguard other
students, and herself, was ap-
propriate. While the fault for


h


a
s


falsifying the form lands
squarely on the teacher, it's
clear that there are broader is-
sues and policies that need to
be addressed.
A lawyer for the parents has
made accusations of insuffi-
cient documentation for use of
the isolation room. The super-
intendent of schools, in a letter
of reprimand to
the , principal,
SSUE: noted, "... the fol-
School low-up proce-
ier firing. dures for
placement into
INION: this isolation
time-out setting
illenges, have not been
unate monitored on a
dances. constant basis. Ad-
ministration and
appropriate personnel should
be involved in the oversight of
these processes...In reviewing
your procedures, there was. a
log for the students who were
placed in the (isolation room),
but continued follow-up is
needed for oversight of this
log."
The superintendent also
stated, "Further, no cross check
was completed to ensure par-
ent permission forms, etc., had
been received."
Clearly, there's fault to share,
but it's critical to remember
that those teachers and admin-
istrators at the CREST School
willingly take on monumental
educational challenges fraught
with complexity and peril.
In the wake of recent events,
procedures have been scruti-
nized by district officials. Such
scrutiny must be ongoing with
every effort made to simplify
bureaucracy, protect all con-
cerned and to provide parents
with confidence that their
child will be treated as agreed
upon when enrolled at the
school.
, /


-Hot Corner: ADMINISTRATOR'S PAY'


Same ol' boss?
Would someone please tell me
what the new county administra-
tion will do for $122,500 plus
perks per year? Could this be the
well-known good-ol'-boy problem
in Citrus County?
Another mistake
Well, it looks like we've got a
new county administrator, Brad
Thorpe. I think that's an excellent
selection, but give me a break on
the benefits. He's going in at a
good salary level, but these perks
- four weeks annual sick leave,
four weeks annual vacation? We
didn't hire a new president. This is
just obscene. I think it's time for
our commissioners to go. They're
the problem. It hasn't been our
prior county administrators. Our
commissioners have cost us prob-
ably millions of dollars in the past
with their foolish mistakes, and
this is another one.
Excessive benefits
I am questioning Brad Thorpe's
benefits. Why does he start out
with four weeks annual sick leave
and four weeks annual vacation?
How many jobs provide that un-
less you're a CEO of a big corpo-
ration? But why does our county
government provide such gener-
ous benefits to a county adminis-
trator? I think that's excessive and
I think that we need to make
some serious changes in our
county government.


Too high
I was reading the Chronicle today
on the front page that $122,500 a
year (is going to be) paid (to. the)
man Brad Thorpe (for) being the
county administrator. This is ab-
solutely absurd to pay a man this
kind of money (with) perks,. whatever
else goes, benefits, medical; that the
county commission has to have an-
other person to have an opinion to
comingle with theirs. My God, what's
this world, this country coming to? To.
pay these high-falutin' officials this
kind-of money when they can't even
get their own house in order when
they argue among themselves on
issues for months going into years.
Outrageous
Brad Thorpe making $122,000
a year and we're letting people go
in Citrus County because of the
economy. Simply outrageous.
Slap in the face
Well, a'hother slap in the face to the
poor taxpayer who has to pay for the
new county administrator. He's going
to be making about $1,000 a day to
implement the board's wishes. This
is in a county with 10 percent unem-
ployment Did you see the tax rolls?
Thick volumes of unpaid taxes. Peo-
ple cannot afford to pay for the fat
government that this county has.
They couldn't find somebody to work
for $60,000 a year? Anybody who
makes money from the taxpayer
should pay their own health benefits.
How much would that save us?


Gingric
DOUGLAS COHN
AND ELEANOR CLIFT
F ormer House Speaker
Newt Gingrich says he'll
decide in 2011 whether to
run for president in 2012. That's
a long way off, and the voters
aren't exactly clamoring for him
to enter the race, but the prospect
of his candidacy is not as implau-
sible as it seems. Granted he left
the House under a cloud, and his
hyper-partisan rhetoric seems
out of tune with the civility and
bipartisanship that President
Barack Obama's election symbol-
izes. The main reason he has a
shot at the nomination is because
in today's radicalized i'right-wing
Republican Party, Gingrich looks
like a moderate.,
.Rush Limbaugh and former
Vice President Dick Cheney have
opened up a path for Gingrich.
Next to them, he looks like the,
voice of reason. The other advan-
tage he brings is ideas. Gingrich
generates ideas with an ease that
few people have, and while not
all of them are worthy, his ability
to advance them in an otherwise
parched Republican landscape
sets him apart from those whose
intellectual depth doesn't go be-
yond sound bites. The GOP is des-
perate for contenders who can
elevate the argument above
name-calling.
The Republican Party needs
fresh thinking and new faces, and
Gingrich, by virtue of having first
been elected to the House in the
late 1970s, is hardly new to the


Helping communities
The National Association of
Letter Carriers Stamp Out
Hunger food drive on May 9 was
a huge success.
In spite of economic hard
times, the caring people of Cit-
rus County reached out and
helped their more unfortunate
neighbors by donating a total of
62,136 pounds of food!
Donations were distributed to
an assortment of assistance
foundations throughout the
county: in Inverness, 22,753
pounds to Citrus United Basket;
in Crystal River (9,976 pounds),
Lecanto (13,079 pounds) and
Beverly Hills (1,212 pounds) to
Daystar. In Hernando (8,330
pounds) and Holder (100
pounds) of food was sent to the
Family Resource Center. Floral
City's 2,456 pounds was split be-
tween Floral City Church of
Christ and the Floral City First
Baptist Church. In Homosassa,
50 pounds went to the Ho-
mosassa Civic Club. In Ho-
mosassa Springs, 4,180 pounds
was given to the Salvation Army
We would like to thank all city,
rural, highway contract carriers,
clerks and maintenance person-
nel for their hard work. Thank
you to our sponsors: National
Association of Letter Carriers,
U.S. Postal Service, Campbell
Soup Co., America's Second Har-
vest, AFL-CIO, United Way, Val-
pak, Publix and the Citrus
County Chronicle.
Thank you to Debbie Lattin and
her tireless crew of volunteers.
This was the 17th annual
NALC National Food Drive, the
largest one-day food drive in the
nation. Through the efforts by
members of the National Associ-


1 the moderate


Other VOICES


scene. But he has a way of re-in-
venting himself to embrace the
21st century while still holding on
to the conservatism that made
him such a firebrand when he led
the Republican Revolution to
gain majority control of the House
in 1994 for the first time in 40
years. He found the way out of the
wilderness then and he has the
intellectual heft and the bravado
to at least claim he can do it again.
Like Richard Nixon and Bill
Clinton, both major political fig-
ures, Gingrich's flaws are evident
His personal life is hardly a
model, and when he wielded
power in the House, he did it in
such a dictatorial fashion that
Saturday Night Live parodied
him slamming down the gavel to
declare law after law passed from
his beloved Contract With Amer-
ica. For all his talk about Jeffer-
sonian democracy, he ruled in an
extremely autocratic fashion.
When the health care debate
heats up this summer, Gingrich
will be the man to watch. He has
founded a non-partisan think
tank, American Solutions, and he
understands that it's not enough
to just oppose what the Democ-
rats together with President
Obama develop to extend univer-
sal health care to Americans.
Pollster Frank Luntz, who
worked with Gingrich to develop
the Contract in '94, has written a
memo advising Republicans how
to counter the Democrats on


health care by calling whatever
plan they settle on "a Washington
takeover." Gingrich's counter-
proposal will rely more on pri-
vate markets, and he will
probably lead the charge against
any public plan that could be-
come a forerunner to a single-
payer plan that would make it
harder for insurance companies
to compete.
. There are lots of reasons to run'
for president short of thinking
you can win the nomination, or
ultimately the White House. All
those debates before even the
first vote is cast are a platform for
debating ideas, which is Gin-
grich's strong suit. Plus, his con-
servative .credentials are still
intact and he would have an eas-
ier time than, say, former Gov.
Mitt Romney, R-Mass., convincing
the Right they should vote for
him in the primaries. At the same
time, the GOP has positioned it-
self so far to the Right that Gin-
grich looks like a moderate
alternative to, say, Gov. Sarah
Palin, R-Alaska, or former Gov.
Mike Huckabee, R-Ark. So when
Gingrich says he'll make up his
mind in 2011 about the presi-
dency, don't dismiss him. He may
have found his calling.

Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift
author the Washington Merry-
Go-Round column, founded in
1932 by Drew Pearson.


S OPINIONS INVITE
M The opinions expressed in
cle editorials are the opini
the editorial board of the
per.
* Viewpoints depicted in po
cartoons, columns or letter
not necessarily represent t
opinion of the editorial bo
* Groups or individuals are
to express their opinions ir
ter to the editor.
N Persons wishing to address
editorial board, which mee
weekly, should call Mike A
(352) 563-5660.
0 All letters must be signed
elude a phone number ann
town, including letters ser
e-mail. Names and home
will be printed; phone nur
will not be published or gi
I We reserve the right to ed
ters for length, libel, fairn
good taste.
* Letters must be no longer
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limited to three letters per
M SEND LETTERS TO: The I
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvc
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
(352) 563-3280, or e-mai
ietters@chronicleonline.c

ation of Letter Carriers (
CIO) and other volunteer
record was set last year o
million pounds, bringing
during the drive's 16-yeai
tory to nearly 1 billion po
food donations to commu
food banks and pantries.
Citrus County can be vei
of its caring and generous
Again, the National Ass
tion of Letter Carriers wi
say thank you to all who 1
us help our communities
Rick Meyer, pi
Inverness Bran
'National Association of Lette


to the Editor

ED Give us more
Chroni- I am sending this letter to
ons of the editor to let you know that
newspa- the recent concert with Blood,
Sweat and Tears, and Check
litical Negron, formerly of Three Dog
ars do Night at Inverness Speedway
ard. on May 15 at 7:30 p.m. was a
invited huge-success. I also need to
n a let- greatly compliment the Inver-
ness Rotary for all of their
ss the hard work in putting this great
ets show together. In fact, I really
rnold at hope that there will be more
shows like this one in which
and in- big-name rock groups like
d home- Blood Sweat and Tears could
owns perform. This would be a great
-bers help to Citrus County and the
ven out. city of Inverness with regard to
it let- helping boost community
ess and awareness, as well as provid-
ing a great source of entertain-
r than ment for the area rather than
Smonth. making it necessary for resi-
dents to have to drive to
Editor, s- Gainesville or Tampa to see
x to these great performances.
I to The show went very well and
om. the Speedway was left as clean
and neat as it was upon the be-
AFL- ginning of the show. I also send
s, a thanks and my compliments to
f 73.1 all of the volunteer security and
a total staff members who attended the
r his- show. They did a wonderful job
)unds of of helping everyone to their
nity seats, etc. The crowd greatly ap-
preciated the performers, as
ry proud well as the venue.
citizens. In this manner, again, I sin-
socia- cerely hope that there will be
shes to more shows like this one to fol-
helped low at the Speedway and I re-
spectfully am making this
request.
resident
ch 6013 Richard K. Palais
r Carriers Hernando Beach


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers..


lu Ghtl ~PIC ~1K OW QY/ FARAQK OBNAM TTLr=


LETTERS









CITRus COuNT7 (FL) CHRONICa C


Shedding light o
A surprising number of of some of my still employed
people have inquired friends, I don't always have
as to how I'm enjoy- time to do everything as
ing retirement It's been six quickly as I'd like. For ex-
months and some had sug- ample, one such friend -
gested once the new had Frank, a friend who's been
worn off, I might not find on- my friend since our days at
going leisure as wonderful Pasco High School; a soldier
as I expected it to be. But the with whom I shared a pup
truth, the whole truth and tent when we were army re-
nothing but the truth is I'm servists; a comrade in many
still loving it It's sort of like adventures while we were
when I was a kid and school bank examiners; and, for
was out for the summer - I the past several years, once
feel free. It's as though I'm more, a valued coworker -
again allowed to roam the guffawed (he laughed in my
riverbank barefooted during face) when I complained I
the middle of the day. hadn't yet found time to
Even so, I don't always do clean out and replant flow-
what I want to do when I ers in my window boxes.
want to do it. I don't live in a I'm now doing those
vacuum. I still have a sched- things I'd pretty much given
ule; and, to the amusement up for the last several years.


the current state of retirement


I've written a couple of wants what's best for me
thousand more words of my and she encouraged mie to
very own version of the find relaxation wherever I
great American could, including
novel and I'm painting in her
painting up a . kitchen. I, on the
storm. (Painting -' other hand,
with tremors? couldn't put up
That's another with an ongoing
column for an- mess. So, each
other day.) time I finished a
On the subject session, I'd clean
of painting - up, including
smearing oil 'Fred Brannen putting away all
paints on canvas A SLICE of the parapher-
- it didn't take nalia. Painting is
long to realize OF LIFE fun, cleaning up
using the kitchen isn't.
was going to be more diffi- I began to look for a more
cult than I initially thought, suitable space.
Why? The kitchen was the best
Cheryl hadn't com- place inside the house and it
plained. She loves me, she had already been ruled out.


The garage wouldn't work
- Cheryl loves me enough
to let me paint in her
kitchen, but her love would
have been sorely tested had
I smudged paint or splashed
paint thinner on her car.
But there is a happy end-
ing. While evaluating the
garage, I had an epiphany: I
spied a window air condi-
tioner which, along with a
small generator, we'd
bought as a part of a hurri-
cane survival package; and,
adjacent to the garage
stands an 8 by 10 feet tool
shed which has always
housed very few tools and a
lot of junk. Shazam! An air-
conditioned shed would
make a fine art studio!
As it is for me with virtually


all such projects, it took much
more effort than I thought it
would, but eventually, the ex-
cess junk was removed and
the shed was transformed
into a studio - an air-condi-
tioned studio, carpeted, out-
fitted with fluorescent
lighting and fully equipped
with easels, brushes paints, a
drawing board, a cute little
adjustable stool, and even a
mini-refrigerator!
And there you have it -
thanks for allowing me to
share, shedding some light
on the current state of my
retirement.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
Chronicle columnist


Deterrent
Death row: With 390 prisoners on death
row costing the state of Florida $8 million
to $10 million a year, boy, could the state
find better use of that money now. All per-
sons on death row should have one appeal
per year and be executed in two years,
(with) a maximum of two appeals. To keep
a person longer-than that is cruel and un-
usual punishment and it only helps to
make money for the lawyers. Execution of
murderers has been proven to be
a deterrent to crime. Over and out.
Shame on Hello
I don't know how people can
think that Helio Castroneves is such
a great athlete and star. He screwed
this country out of several thou-
sands of dollars of tax money that
was kind of hidden somewhere and
it probably still is hidden some- CAL
where. And the jury couldn't make a 6
decision on it, so they dismissed J5"-
the case. So this guy is going scot-
free and they're applauding him like he's a
hero. He won a race. He's really stuck it to
the citizens of this country by what he's done
to them, and we're trying to laud him out as
being a big hero. I don't understand that ... I
don't understand how a selected jury can't
even make a good decision based on the fact
that he did take money. It was basically
proven he took money, but they couldn't
come up with the unanimous vote to put him
in jail, so they let him go.
Tough enough
I am calling in about the Sound Off on
Sunday,, May 24, about the bus driver. I
feel these bus drivers have a tough enough
job without people complaining about
them.and what- they're doing. tJimagine
that these people (were) doing after-work,
after-school programs and they have to go


(


to the far corners of the county to get
these children home safe and sound. I
think these people need to realize that
people are trying to do their jobs and they
shouldn't complain about it when they're
trying to get their children home safe and
sound.
Need fresh troops
The time is here to start a draft. We
need fresh soldiers, fresh Marines and
fresh sailors. We have to build up our Navy,
our Army, our Air Force because
JiND (of) what's going on in North
Korea, Iran and Pakistan. They
f|C -are definitely threatening us, and
EI" unless we protect ourselves like
f we did in World War II after we
were attacked, we're going to be
goners. We have to start forget-
ting these people who are weep-
ing about having people drafted.
It worked in World War II and it
5 r79 has to work now. We need fresh
57) troops, not the ones that are
reused and reused and reused.
Meat from North
This is in response to the person who
wrote in "No good steaks in Florida be-
cause they don't keep the animals off
grazing." I'm a meat cutter at one of the
major markets in Inverness, and most of
our meat comes from up North. I think
you ought to get your story straight. All the
.meat that's sold in these markets does not
come from Florida. We buy our meat from
up North where the Black Angus are.
No sidewalks
This is for the Sound Off person who
said people should not walk their dogs on
the road: It is legal for people to walk on
the road:c There's usually no sidewalks on
the road and it's illegal'to harass pedestri-
ans on the road.


Letters
Kindness of strange
-My family and I were recently ti
ents of "a random act of kindness,"
hard to describe how blessed that
you feel. Last Sunday morning, my
and I,and my two sons were having
fast at Cockadoodle's, when, right
had ordered, the waitress said tha
the other customers had paid for
I suspect that our benefactor mi
been influenced by the fact that m
sons are obviously physically and
challenged and I believe this wasa
of support from a Citrus County ne
for my sons and family as part of t
munity But, whatever the reason,
kindness was especially welcome
all the news about a very few nega
tions to a Key Center home being i
a gated community. My boys have 1
of the Key Center for years and we
and love many of the other clients
also met hundreds of people who
the Key, my sons, and all of their fi
just through the goodness of their
Citrus County is home to many of
caring neighbors on Earth.
. Thanks, again, to those unkno
wonderful, people who gave us t
minder last Sunday.
Larry and Stephani


Working the wat<
East Citrus County waterfront h
owners are pleased that SWFWM
the sinkhole problem. I also want
all the east Citrus folks that push
with me to get it done. Without th
tance of BOCC Chairman John TI
it would not have been accomplish


's to


C7 n.:T 0R


ers While the lakes seem to be improving a
little and we are waiting to get some of the
he recipi- water from the Green Swamp, it would
"and it is seem to me to be an ideal time for the
makes county and SWFWMD to clean out,
y husband deepen and widen the two main sources of
g break- water that would come into our lake sys-
after we tem from the Withlacoochee River.
it one of The Heffner Canal and the Orange
our meal. State Canal are in sad shape and would
eight have not be able to handle a large amount of
y two water. Much of it would end up over or
mentally around the Wysong Coogler Dam. Repair-
a gesture ing the two inlets would allow more water
neighbor to get in and less to go toward the Gulf.
he com- I have talked to several persons in posi-
this act of tions of authority, and they agree that the
following dam could be raised another foot and there
itive reac- could be an opening into the Flying Eagle
opened in management area from the river between
been part the dam and the outfall river that would save
e know much of the water coming out of Lake Pana-
We have soffkee. Also, it would allow water from the
support river to flow into the marshes of the Flying
lends, Eagle and cleanse itself as it flows through.
hearts. I know that there are persons in
the most SWFWMD that agree with me. It does not
take a scholar to see that the opening
wn, but from the outfall river and the water from
his re- it all is going north to the dam and not
running back up to the two canals that
feed our river inlets (Heffner and Orange
e Hopper State). An opening into the management
Inverness area would capture that for the lakes.
I propose that the BOCC and
er SWFWMD take a look at these items and
direct the persons that have the re-
home- sources and manpower to get it done to
tD fixed take the necessary actions. Hard work
tto thank now would certainly ease the situation
ed along when the water comes our way. ,,
e assis-
hrumston, Jim Adkins
shed. Inverness


SUN BELT
Continued from Page C1

But as often is the case with
such schemes, there comes a day
when the engine sputters, gasps,
and conks out. A day when the
faithful stop turning up.
In the Sun Belt's newer, shallow-
rooted communities, the roadkill is
most evident: Where once there
were "boomburbs," there now stand
"ghostdivisions." Where property-
flipping was once almost a middle-
class sport, joblessness and "For
Sale by Owner" signs reign.
The fallout is traceable in other
Ways, too. Nevada -the only state
with a lower proportion of native
residents than Florida-- has seen
net migratiorrplunge-61 percent in
two years; Arizona, 55 percent.
Were it not for immigrants,
many of them from Latin America,
and for fertility, the Sunshine
State would actually have lost
population last year - an "as-
tounding development in the
Florida experience," says Bill
Frey, a senior fellow and demog-
rapher at the Brookings Institu-
tion in Washington, D.C.
He said the end of steady move-
ment of people into the Sun Belt'
is part of a broader trend of cur-
tailed migration during this down-
turn. "The merry-go-round has
stopped, in terms of people mov-
ing from place to place."
Does this mean we've witnessed
the Rise and Fall of the Sun Belt?
Will those who swept into these
Miracle-Gro states get swept out
just as quickly, leaving behind a
sprawl of hollow houses; cul-de-
sac moonscapes and mosquito-in-
fested pools - the stucco ghettos
of the 21st century?
Or will the latest downturn
merely force the Sun Belt to rein-
vent itself again?


The housing bubble in many
places revealed an obsolescent
model of economic life, in which
cheap real estate encouraged low-
density sprawl and created a work
force "stuck in place, anchored by
houses that cannot be profitably
sold," Florida wrote in his March
article.
These places, he says, include
older, factory towns/across the
northern Rust Belt but also count-
less communities ij the Sun Belt


whose prosperity was built on "fic-
titious wealth."
What to do? Scrap policies that
encourage homebuying, he sug-
gests, and give incentives to more
mobile renters who can go where
the jobs are.
In the digital age, he says, indus-
tries will likely cluster in "mega-re-
gions" of multiple cities and their
surrounding suburban rings (e.g.,
the Boston-New York-Washington
corridor). These areas will surge,
lifted by the brainpower of edu-
cated professionals and creative
thinkers that turn out "products
and services faster than talented
people in other places can."
In short: Those that can draw
talented, young people with high-
quality, higher education will reap
the spoils.
There is some evidence to sug-
gest an- imbalance -in American
educational achievement across
regions. According to research by
two Harvard economists, Edward
Glaeser and Christopher Berry,
educational attainment is no
longer as evenly spread across
America as it was in the '70s.
Places such as San Francisco,
Boston and Seattle now turn out
two to three times the college
graduates of, say, Akron or Buf-
falo. When examining postgradu-
ate achievement, the researchers
found even greater disparities.
If locales that boast premium uni-
versities will be able to more quicldy
pick themselves off the mat, a ques-
tion arises. In the Sun Belt's "sand
cities," their expansion now halted,
where will the tax money come from
to pay for college upgrades?
Parts of Arizona, Nevada and
the Los Angeles exurb of River-
side overbuilt and overstretched,
said Anthony Sanders, a professor
of finance and economics at Ari-
zona State University.
Like Looney Toons characters
who, suspended in mid-air, look
down to behold they've run off a cliff,
officials are scrambling to reverse
course -- either by scrapping gov-
ernment services they'd promised
or, at the very least, by hiking taxes
to pay for services created in expec-
tation of bigger suburbs, exurbs.
Phoenix is in this fix. Shocked
by a 33 percent plunge in home
values between October 2007 and
October 2008 alone, the city is run-
ning a $200 million budget deficit,
a shortfall that's only expected to
grow. (It has petitioned the federal
government for funds.)
California has an even wider


hole in its battered canoe.
That state "went on a spending
spree that was- incredible," said
Sanders. Now, at a time when
many resident retirees are in no
mood, or shape, for tax increases,
"they're having to raise taxes or
cut back services, both of which
are making moving to California a
lot less desirable than it has been
in previous decades."
Other Sun Belt states are mak-
ing similar "mistakes," Sanders
said, adding: "Unless we lower the
tax burden, making it simpler for
businesses to do more operations,
and freeing up the ability to at-
tract workers, the economy here is
not going to come back."
The challenges don't end there.
Even before the Crash of '08, the
Sun Belt was being buffeted by out-
migration of factory jobs abroad. In
..the Carolinas, for example, indus-
tries that linked up the economy,
society and culture for more than a
century - furniture making, to-
bacco and textiles - had been gut-
ted by a decade of decline.
And although the overall expan-
sion of the Sun Belt's economy has
been dramatic, the distribution of
the region's prosperity has been un-
even; of the 25 metropolitan areas
with the lowest per capital income
in 1990,23 were in the Sun Belt
That has to change, said Warren
Brown, a demographer at the Uni-
versity of Georgia, although he
noted that the Sun Belt's unbri-
dled growth in the '80s and '90s
was "unsustainable, bound to cool
off," and not just because of burst-
ing housing or migration bubbles.
The limits of natural resources
were poised to put the brakes on
development in the Land of Sunny
Dreams anyway, he said. Two big-
gies: oil and water.
"Long before we run out of land,
we'll be running out of water;" he
said. "Water is a major issue right
now."


- Doomsaying pundits have
played the Sun Belt dirge before.
In 1981, for example, Time maga-
zine declared Florida a "Paradise
Lost" The state then embarked on
an epic boom, in which the Miami-
Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach
corridor ballooned into the seventh-
largest metro area in America.
Granted, today's news from the
Sunshine State is hardly cheery: It
ranks near the top in foreclosures
and near the bottom in high-


school'graduation rates. There's a
water crisis, an insurance crisis, a
budget crisis.
So why do some experts caution
that talk of Florida's demise - and
the Sun Belt's - is exaggerated?
Among other things, Frey, the
Brookings demographer, notes that
outmigration from metro Miami ac-'
tually fell last year, and in years to
come "we're going to have large
numbers of immigrants in the
United States who are going to help
us in all kinds of ways," he says.
Stan Smith, a professor of eco-
nomics and director of the Bureau
of Economic and Business Re-
search at the University of Florida,
says tourism, the "momentum" of
decades of population growth, and
already extensive networks of per-
sonal connections will again draw
more migrants to Florida.
Frozen credit won't last, he says.
Real estate price declines - as
much as 70 percent in some Sun
Belt counties - will encourage buy-
ers. And with home heating costs in
the "Frost Belt" only expected to
rise, Smith says, the attraction of
warm weather to retiring Baby
Boomers can't be overestimated.
Florida is one of only nine
states without an income tax. Cou-
ple that with the fact that its taxes
on corporations and financial
transactions have many exemp-
tions, he says, and "the effects of
the positive factors will continue
to outweigh the negative."
Recovery will take time, though,
and few economists see any sig-
nificant growth in the Sun Belt be-
fore 2010. Steve Malanga, a senior
fellow at the Manhattan Institute
in New York City, agrees that
states that have piled up surplus
housing "are not going to solve it
in this budget cycle or the next
budget cycle. It's going to be with
them for five, six, seven years, no
doubt about it."
And yet, to say all areas across
the Sun Belt are in for long-term
decline is simplistic, he says.
Scanning the most recent employ-
ment maps put out by the Bureau
of Labor Statistics reveals "a 'belt'
in the middle of the country -
Texas is part of it - that is doing
quite well." (The AP Stress Map
backs up that finding, revealing a
swath of comparatively unscathed
counties starting in North Dakota,
stretching through South Dakota,
Nebraska and Kansas and ending
in Oklahoma and Texas.)
Out of the nation's 100 fastest-
growing counties, the majority


were in Texas (19), Georgia (14),
North Carolina (11) or Utah (nine),
according to U.S. Census figures
last year. Raleigh-Cary, N.C., and
Austin-Round Rock, Texas, were
the nation's fastest-growing metro
areas, registering growth rates of
4.3 percent and 3.8 percent, re-
spectively. Both high-tech centers,
the two metros are also sites of
major college campuses that
helped cushion them.
Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston
registered the biggest numerical
gains, the census figures show.
Phoenix and Atlanta ranked third
and fourth in growth, respectively,
followed by Los Angeles, despite
the housing slump.
"Obviously, the best situation is
a state that hasn't had a residen-
tial meltdown, still has a low-cost
advantage, and has a weather ad-
vantage," Malanga says. High-tax
states, such as California, are
going to take longer to rebound.
And yet, Sun Belt states will have
to offer more than tax incentives to
reel in companies in the new,
global economy, says Keith Schwer,
executive director of the Center for
Business and Economic Research
at the University of Nevada.
Quality health care, quality recre-
ation, quality education - compa-
nies and individuals consider the
caliber of amenities before relocat-
ing. Cosmetic fixes don't help, he
says. "You can't hide your warts."
Does all of this mean the Sun
Belt will have to reinvent itself to
grow again?
Rethink may be a better term.
As an example, Caron St John,
director of the Spiro Institute for
Entrepreneurship at Clemson Uni-
versity in South Carolina, says Sun
Belt states now rationing funds
ought to consider returning to "First
Principles" - that is, channeling
what little money they have toward
elementary and high schools rather
than higher education.
"Elementary and high school
children - we can't scar their
lives because of a budget crisis.
That has to be the first priority."
The question is whether the Sun
Belt will show the rest of the nation
how to retool schools, save water
and energy, and better plan its sub-
urbs and exurbs in an era of less.
"By necessity, we're already
being forced to address these is-
sues," says Schwer, of the Univer-
sity of Nevada. "This crisis is an
opportunity, more than anything
else, to reset things, to put some
balance back into our lives."


SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009 C3


COMMENTARY














Do we deserve to be Americans?


History confirms that
bondage or enslave-
ment is the normal
human condition. Our
American "experiment" is
an exception.
Our founders proclaimed
the rights of the individual
to be derived from "Na-
ture's Creator" rather than
granted by any ruler. They
limited our government so
that it served the people
and was responsible to
them. They derived the
rights of the government
from the consent of the gov-
erned. Each individual was
set free to seek his fortune
and, should he fail, to try
again or throw himself upon
the charity of his neighbors.
Our founders, in their let-
ters, expressed concern that
corrupt politicians aided by
apathetic citizens would
lead the nation back to
human bondage. Were they
to rise up from their hal-


lowed graves and view
America today, they would
be shocked and greatly sad-
dened. Freedom and indi-
vidual liberties, as they
knew them, have given way
to dependency, ignorance
and apathy Individual re-
sponsibility, discipline and
ambition have given way to
a sense of entitlement for a
large segment of voters who
feel victimized by competi-
tion and freedom itself.
The founders might rue-
fully ask: Do Americans of
2009 deserve to be citizens of
this exceptional nation we
founded? Do they no longer
appreciate its greatness,
their freedoms and opportu-
nities denied citizens else-
where? Why have they not
defended their rights against
serfdom to the federal gov-
ernment? What became of
their courage and self-suffi-
ciency? What became of ac-
cepting responsibility for


one's choices and actions?
Has America become a na-
tion of self-indulgent, whin-
ing cowards?
Maybe President Obama
and his cult-like supporters.
have it right after
all. Perhaps we
have become a
nation of losers
and incompe-
tents. Poorly edu-
cated by our
public schools,
lacking in confi-
dence, discipline
and courage, Dr. Willia
many no longer OTI
believe they can,
work hard, corn- VOI
pete and be suc-
cessful. To them it makes
sense, as Obama suggests, to
have the government take
money from productive citi-
zens (the ones who are de-
rided as greedy, uncaring
and immoral) and use it to
help out the rest


fl
IH
1


One wonders what will
happen when Congress
raises taxes on the producers
of wealth to the level where
they no longer have an in-
centive to work and support
the country. Many
will retire. Some
will relocate busi-
nesses to wher-
ever there is more
economic free-
dom. Those who
must remain in
America and have
not accumulated
am Dixon the wealth to re-
4sER tire will find ways
to spend less and
CES work less. The
American stan-
dard of living will fall. As al-
ways, those on the bottom
rungs of the economic ladder
(clamoring for "hope" and
-"change") will suffer the
most
Unless the laws governing
economics - unchanged


over the past two thousand
years - are wrong, this ad-
ministration's move to man-
age the economy will fail.
Miserably The nation and
the people will be the worse
for it There will be more
poverty, more pain and re-
newed calls for "change."
Historically, the "change" is
ultimately to dictatorship of
some sort with loss of indi-
vidual freedoms. Germany,
for example, was an intellec-
tually vibrant nation with
representative government
before socialism and eco-
nomic collapse gave rise to
national socialism (Nazism).
We delude ourselves who
think this cannot happen in
America.
Can seizure of the economy
and most other aspects of so-
ciety by the "governing class"
be reversed? Is there a
Ronald Reagan out there who
can speakthe truth about gov-
ernment in a fashion under-


stood by all as he did in the
dismal Carter years? Proba-
bly not The task falls, on
lesser talents, yours and
mine. We must speak out and
fight against the taking of our
freedoms. Those who will not
defend the country do not de-
serve its citizenship.

William Dixon graduated
from Columbia College in
New York City, from New
York Medical College and
from the College ofBusi-
ness Administration at the
University of South Florida.
He was an assistant profes-
sor at the University of
Georgia and he has worked
in the veterans administra-
tion system. He served 11
years in the Army as a sur-
geon and as special forces
officer, achieving the rank
of lieutenant colonel. Dr
Dixon can be reached at
Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


9TARLERv
�i4e ctgs CCgil ~SIpATCH-
. 2W9.


ITH-IN1K
I FOUN D
SOME~THING!


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

Meredith Linley. Meredith,
whose dad was once in charge
of the Homosassa Springs at-
traction, grew up here and is
a great addition to the staff.
8. The YMCA has offi-
cially opened up an office in
Citrus County and has a full
schedule of programs being
offered. Summer camps are


planned at both Whispering
Pines Park in Inverness and
Bicentennial Park in Crys-
tal River. Citrus residents
have been talking about get-
ting a YMCA started here
for more than 20 years - it's
nice to finally see it happen.
9. If you want to feel good
about our future as a country,
take a look atJ.T Hutcherson
of Crystal River High School.
This young man, a student
leader at the high school and
a 2009 graduate, was named


If you want to feel good about our
future as a country, take a look at
J.T. Hutcherson of Crystal River High
School.... A student like this gives
me confidence about the future.


a Gates Millennium Scholar
(as in Bill Gates). J.T has won
a full scholarship to college
and graduate school. He
plans on studying medicine


and returning to Crystal
River as a doctor A student
like this gives me confidence
about the future.
10. It was two years ago


that a young lady close to
many of us at the paper died
in a tragic auto accident
Melissa Hess had just gradu-
ated from Citrus High School
when she and her friend
Molly were killed while driv-
ing back from a shopping trip
in Ocala. While the sorrow is
still so strong, the positive
side of the story is that Tim
Hess, the former operations
director at the Chronicle and
Melissa's dad, was back at
Citrus High School last week


handing out two scholarships
from contributions made at
the time. Tim and his wife, .
Lori, have dealt with the
tragedy by making a positive
impact on the dreams of
other young people. Their
strength makes us all a little
stronger.

Gerry Mulligan is the pub-
lisher of the Chronicle. His
e-mail address is gmulligan
@chronicleonline.com.


ADVICE
Continued from Page C1

without making it clear that it's what they
think, not what the world accepts as truth.
3. If you haven't already, develop a good
work ethic. When it comes to studying and
school assignments, the days of someone
looking over your shoulder to make sure
you are doing what you are supposed to
are over You're on your own. Your educa-
tion, or your job, are what you make it.
Take a look at employment ads in almost
every major field. They'll say things like
"self-starter" or "must work well without
supervision." Managers in the business
world don't want to have to watch every
step that you do. Learn to work by yourself
with maximum effort. Remember, the
world doesn't owe you a living - you have
to go out and make your own mark.
4. Choose your friends wisely. Hang
around with people who have good goals,
who want to make a decent mark in this
world. There was a great commercial on TV
(I can't remember what product it was for)
where one guy in a group of wild young
people gets a suit-and-tie job, so the others
always want him to buy dinner, because
they aren't doing a thing. You will undoubt-
edly encounter some of these students -
steer clear and be your own person. Some
years later, these will be the students who
will come to you begging for a job.
5. Stay active. There will come a time in
your life when you can't exercise like you
used to, but that day isn't here yet for most
of you. I'm afraid that we are producing a
generation of computer-chair potatoes (as
opposed to couch potatoes), those who do
nothing but sit in front of a computer
screen for all their free time. Get out and
do something. You can walk, you can run,
you can play a sport, you can swim - just
do something. It's good for your mind and
your body.
6. Volunteer in the community. There


are all sorts of things that need doing.
Some involve some physical work, others
involve using your brains to help people.
Give something back to the community;
show that you care. You never know, some-
day you may be one of the people who
needs help, and maybe there will be folks
around who will recall what you did for
others, and you'll get some help in return.
And don't do it for the glory and the recog-
nition. The best volunteers are those who
work behind the scenes, who get nothing
out of it but personal satisfaction.
7. Finally, keep the faith, and not just re-
ligious faith. If you are a religious person,
you will be tested. Most of those who are
religious find great solace in that faith, so
don't let yourself get tempted away from it
But there is another kind of faith, faith in
your fellow human beings, faith in the
country Be aware of the times you live in,
for sure, but realize there are so many
places in the world that are worse off than
we are.
While we live in the fear that ,there
could be another attack on us somewhere
in the United States, there are people who
live with the very real fear of being blown
up every day. While we have medical care
available to us when we get sick, there are
people who succumb to the least little ill-
ness because their bodies can't fight dis-
eases, or they have no access to things as
simple as an aspirin.
As you depart from high school, thank
your teachers, your counselors, your
school employees. They surely don't get
rich doing what they do, but almost all of
them love their profession. Someday you
will realize how good the days of high
school were. But for now, you've reached
your goal of getting your diploma, which is
a job well done.
Congratulations!

Jim Clark can be reached at
editor@willistonpioneercom
or at 528-3343.


SHADES
Continued from Page C1

Time for classes would come and go
and, morning, afternoon and evening, you
could find this guy in his room and share a
cold one with him.
It was a short friendship, though. He
was gone after th'e first semester, and by
the time the second semester ended, he
was off in Southeast Asia
serving his country in the Monel
Army
Had that been his initial everythil
plan I'd be praising him, but happiness
he landed there because he P
had no self-discipline. be. It's u
* One of my best friends
hated high school but made greatly th
it through, barely. While he
didn't enjoy the classroom between
learning process, he was teens an
smart enough to realize
that he'd get nowhere with- mid-20s c
out hard work. I
When he landed a job in rest of C
a factory at age 18,1 Iwas en-
vious because he was making three times
what I was pulling in as a car-washer/odd-
job-guy at the local Chevy dealership.
When I got a job after junior college, he
was making three times what I made work-
ing in the citrus biz in Sarasota.
When I graduated from state college and
started working for newspapers, he was
making nearly four times my salary.
In my mid-40s, when I was looking at two
decades until retirement, he was retiring.
I don't envy his life in the factory, but he
has a great pension, handsome house, nice
vehicles and time to pursue his second ca-
reer as a flight instructor
* Most of my high school friends were
happy to stay where they were, and sev-
eral worked in supermarkets. I wouldn't
have guessed it at the time, but a couple of
them made a very wise choice of staying


y



r






I1
)[


with a particular supermarket and what
started as a job out of high school became
a good career.
* Perhaps the smartest guy in my high
school went on to get a college degree,
moved to California and now writes poetry,
and washes dishes (professionally). He's
an excellent poet and his dedication to the
art is commendable. It's not for me to say
or second guess, still I've wondered if
someone who could have been a nuclear
physicist is happy with his day job.
Money's not everything
('s not ' - and happiness just may
be. It's unreal how greatly
g - and that window between the
just may late teens and early to
mid-20s steers the rest of,-
ireal how one's life. One need not
sell their soul to make sac-
at window rifices that'll be beneficial
for a lifetime.
the late Wear that ball cap side-
I early to ways, but not to a job in-.
terview.
teers the ' Don't blow an opportu-
nity like graduating from
ne's life. high school on an idiotic
move like committing a
crime. That'll haunt you for years.
Don't invest in college if you're not will-
ing to invest in your brain.
If you latch onto a solid job, don't dis-
count its potential.
Dedicate yourself to your greatest inter-
ests, butthat doesn'thave tobe at the expense
of a career or furthering your education.
Don't be defeated by setbacks - they're
inevitable.
Be yourself but challenge yourself and,
in the long haul, it'll be a "self" you can be
proud of - just like the pride felt when
clutching that new, well-deserved
diploma.

Charlie Brennani,.s editor of the Citrus
County Chronicle.Ie can be e-mailed
at cbrennan@chrnicleonline.com.


tC4SUINflAY.MAY 31.2009


MOT KK K WSVICACWGION
'MW K WAM M" VW %WA*T


f r:z:


Cmus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE,


COMMENTARY








Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE COMMENTARY SUNDAY MAY 31, 2009C5


Sound OFF


Good people
I'm calling in regard to
the caller who called in on
the "Key Center home" Hot
Corner in Floral City. I un-
derstand you're defending
the rights of the mentally
handicapped, but yet you
put them down by stating
that they're helpless and
you stereotype them as, you
know, saying, "Are you
afraid that you'd wake up
one morning and find them
drooling over your front
porch?" If you're going to
defend these people, defend
them. Don't put them down.
They are not helpless and
they don't all drool. Love
them and care for them.
These are some of the best
people you would ever, ever
meet in your entire life.
A sin
So, little rich girl kills a
person with her car and
drives away and goes free
without even a traffic ticket.
Money will buy anything if
you have enough. It's a sin.
Twice bitten
I just witnessed a pit bull
dog jump a fence, jump
onto a lady, an elderly lady,
73 years old. She called the
sheriff's office and was in-
formed that since she was
not badly hurt or badly bit-
ten, it was not against the
law. This is a crying shame.'
Does the elderly have to be
really hurt before the law
will address these prob-
lems? Have a good day.
The one bitten
I just got through walking
my dog down the street on
a leash and a pit bull -
which there are two, in their


yard that are not tied -
jumped right over the fence
and come after me. It hit
me with two paws on my
chest and almost knocked

me over. I was petrified. I
picked up my dog, who's
only a little shih tzu. I
thought he was going to get
eaten up. I don't even re-
� member what I said. I just
stood there and screamed,
"Help!" I come home and I
called up the police station
and they said I had to.call
Animal Controlt. called Ani-
mal Control and they told
me that it wasn't an emer-
gency. They asked me if' I
was bleeding or if I got bit


or whatever ... I couldn't
even get anyone to come up
and put it on record, what
happened. I'm 73 years old.
This is how they treat senior
citizens? I don't know what's
going to become of any-


thankful we have real Ameri-
cans who want the best for
the United States, no mat-
ter who proposed the plans.
What are you?
ABC's fault


couple of other incidents.
However, the commercials
were always in English.' My
indicator was set to the
English language on the TV.
I have Bright House, so it's
not the cable company.


body around here. It's just I'm having the same Logic rules it to be the ABC
-disgusting. problem as "Dishing it," in station.
Real Americans? the May 25 Sound Off. og time ago
Watching the programs I
Maybe you should look at taped in March, an entire In the letter to the editor
it this way: First, we have episode of "Lost" was in "Proud to share," (written by)
Republicans who want all Spanish, but the program Lauri Gist of Inverness, she
other programs aimed at following it was in English. wrote a great letter and lap-
Ssuccess to fail. Also,-there- -An episode of '"Desperate prove. The only thing is, Chet
are the Democrats who Housewives" was in Span- Cole 'was not the-founder of
want to totally dominate the ish, but the programs be- the Key Training Center. The
governmental decisions at fore and after it were in Van Nortwicks were. That
any cost. We should be English. And there were a goes back a long time.


A joke
The "Buy American" slo-
gan is a joke. As long as
health care is tied to em-
ployment, American com-
panies can't compete. Polls
show that individual Ameri-
cans prefer the single-
payer national health care,
but Congress rejects it be-
cause politicians receive
money from the health in-
surance industry. Our legis-
lators are not representing
their constituents. Manu-
facturing has died in the
U.S. because, unlike the
other industrial nations, we
refuse to have national
health care and we cripple
manufacturers with health
care costs.
Why call?
Why do I call Sen.
Dean's office? I call his of-
fice because he is our Sen-
ate representative here in
Citrus County. I call him to
let him know we haven't
forgotten the Progress En-
ergy bill he voted for origi-
nally. I call him to let him
know I vote in every elec-
tion. 1 call him to hopefully
keep up the pressure on
him to do the right thing
for the people he repre-
sents, not just the special
interest groups. That's why
I call Sen. Dean.
Love Dr. Dixon
I want to thank the Chron-
icle for publishing the arti-
cles written by Dr. William
Dixon. His commentaries
make more sense than any
of our federal politicians, in-
cluding our president.
Please keep publishing his
very intelligent commen-
taries.


SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009 CS


COMMENTARY


CiTRus CouNTY (A) CHRoNici.E






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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


2008 DODGE
AVENGER


2001 CHEVROLE
. MALIBU !�l









B Section D SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009




CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Real estate agents help you stay put


CHRIS VAN ORMER have undergone. training about
cvanormer@chronicleonline.com short sale and foreclosure transac-
Chronicle tions through the Distressed Prop-
erty Institute to gain the
When the pre-foreclosure notice designation of a Certified Dis-
arrives after a few missed mortgage tressed Property Expert (CDPE).
payments, many people Founded last year by
don't know where to 0 For information real estate professionals
turn. call 637-6200 in Texas, the Distressed
"About 70 percent of Property Institute an-
people never contact nounced in a recent
the bank after they have been statement that it has trained more
served," said Karen Cunningham of than 7,500 real estate agents nation-
ReMax Realty One: wide in methods for helping home-
Cunningham and many of her col- owners in distress.
leagues have been working to keep Although the designation is not
people in their homes. She said that affiliated with the National Associ-
26 of the 45 agents at her agency ation of Realtors, which offers its


own training in dealing with fore-
closures and short sales, ReMax In-
ternational, the parent company of
Cunningham's agency, has
launched a national training tour
for more of its agents to gain the
CDPE designation.
What this means is that these real
estate agents offer advice to owners
of distressed homes, houses that
may be in some stage of the foreclo-
sure process, and, if possible, try to
keep the homeowner in their house,
and the house off the market.
According to Cunningham, this
makes good business sense.
"It lowers the number of houses
on the market, and helps raise the


values of homes for sale," she said.
In statistics Cunningham pro-
vided, the number of active listings
is just starting to decrease from
3,403 in May 2008 to 3,013 in May
2009, but the average sale price has
dropped, too, from $148,930 to
$122,061. Prices depreciated by 12
percent in 2008, and are showing a
decline of 18 percent in 2009.
One way for real estate to recover
from the recession is to help home-
owners hang onto their homes, Cun-
ningham said. Through their
training, the agents can evaluate
whether a property really needs to

See AGENTS/Page D3


Small business boom


.i , KEITH SRlAKO"OClalTed Prs
Chuck Minerd, an edge prep technician at Slem Tool, treats a rack of ddrill bts recently using Conicity Technologies' driE preparation machine
at Slem Tool In Latrobe, Pa. Slem Tool vice president of manufacturing Jim Gray credits Conicity, a company that offers a high-tech way of
preserving the Ife of manufacturing tools, with helping his company grow since then from just four tool-making machines to 14 today.


Some small companies grow

as large firms cut costs


RAMIT PLUSHNICK-MASTI
Associated Press
LATROBE, Pa. -
For 10 years, Conicity Tech-
nology has been trying to
convince the nation's
largest manufacturers - from
auto companies to Caterpillar
that its products could save them
millions of dollars.
The technology that extends
the life of manufacturing tools
was a tough sale when the econ-
omy was growing. But since the
recession began, Conicity's rev-
enue is up 75 percent.
Welcome to another side ofthe
new frugality sweeping the coun-
try from individual consumers to
global conglomerates: Small


companies that offer unique
ways to cut costs or help big com-
panies retain customers are see-
ing their businesses blossom.
"That's the beauty of a small
business," said Lynn Vos, the Sa-
vannah-area director of the Uni-
versity of Georgia's Small
Business Development Center.
Small businesses are able to roll
out products quicker than corpo-
rate behemoths. "They can re-
spond quickly to changing
market forces and they're not
afraid to try."
Conicity has perfected a tech-
nique known' as microgeometry
- a process that gives tool
blades a unique shape, extend-
See BOOM/Page D3


Upcoming job fair on CFCC campus


Special to the Chronicle
Workforce Connection is
hosting the Ocala/Marion
Job & Career Fair from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. at the CFCC
Klein Conference Center in
Ocala, across from the Pad-
dock Mall. Area companies
and educational providers
are expected to attend.
Job candidates have the
opportunity to gather infor-
mation and apply for jobs
with employers from vari-
ous industries including
health care, corrections ca-
reers, government, call cen-
ters and staffing services. A
full list of exhibitors and job
fair tips for resumes and
more can be found at
www.clmworkforce.com by
clicking on "job fair" under
the calendar of events sec-
tion.
National Emergency
Grant (NEG) staff will be on
hand to answer questions


about scholarship opportu- County, or toll free (800)434-
nities. Former employees 5627 and speak to a work-
' from the following 12 manu- force representative.
facturing companies may be Workforce Connection is a
eligible for member of
NEG grant ON THE NET the Employ
assistance. Florida net-
The compa- 0 clmworkforce.com. work ofwork-
nies include, force services


Closet-maid,
Emergency One, Fluid
Routing Systems, American
Panel, Golden Flake,
Hamilton Products,
Homette Corporation (Sky-
line), Masco (Merillat), Mon-
terey Boats, Pro-line Boats,
Seminole Foods, and Uni-
versal Forest Products. The
NEG grant provides train-
ing scholarships for quali-
fied job candidates,
relocation assistance and
support services.
Those who cannot attend
but would like more infor-
mation about Workforce and
the services available can
call (352) 840-5700 in Marion


and re-
sources. Workforce Connec-
tion is an equal opportunity
employer/program. Auxil-
iary aids and services are
available upon request to
individuals with disabili-
ties. All voice telephone
numbers listed above may
be reached by persons using
TTY/TDD equipment via
the Florida Relay Service at
711. If you need accommo-
dations, please call (352)
840-5700, ext. 1278,
or e-mail accommoda-
tions@clmworkforce.com.
Please make request at least
three business days in ad-
vance.


Bl Shafer, owner of Conicity Technologes talks recently about edge
preparation machines that can be leased to clients, at the company's
headquarters Latobe, Pa. Whie the economy may continue to slog
through the worst recession i more than two decades, sales at Consl-
Ity Technology, which offers a hlightech way of preserving the We of
manufacturing tools, are up 75 percent hi the past year.


Business DIGEST

Local accountant Olde Towne board
attends seminar . fills vacancies


Citrus County C Phillip W.
Price, MBA, CPA, with the firm
Price & Company, P.A. in
Crystal River, recently at-
tended the Florida Institute of
Certified Public Accountants
FSU Spring Accounting Con-
ference in Tallahassee, on
May 14 and 15. This seminar
highlighted such topics as
AAccounting for Functional Al-
locations and Special
Events@, 'The New Form
990" and AFiduciary Account-
ing@. Also, the Auditor Gen-
eral covered their responsibility
for all government accounting
in Florida. The FICPA is a pro-
fessional association repre-
senting the interests of more
than 18,400 CPAs with approx-
imately 4,400 offices through-
out Florida.
Price can be reached at
795-6118 or via the firm Web
site at www.pwprice.com.


At a recent membership
meeting of the Inverness Olde
Towne Association, Ellie
Smith, vice president and
branch manager of the Inver-
ness Superior Bank, and
Leslie Baker, owner of Baker
Financial Group, were elected
to serve unexpired terms of
two board members who re-
signed because of a change in
business circumstances.
Network
announces speaker
Eric Tidwell, of the Stake-
holder Liaison, division of the
IRS, will speak to the Citrus
Business Network on June 5.
The Stakeholder Liaison
was organized for the benefit
of small business. Along with
disaster assistance and emer-
gency relief, the Stakeholder
Liaison delivers information on
See DIGEST/Page D4


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Where

there's


a will...
DEAR BRUCE: Our
grandfather left a
substantial amount
of money to his six kids,
about $100,000 each, but
he died without a will,
thinking the kids would
live by his wishes. One of
his sisters (my aunt) took
the entire $600,000 out of
the bank after his death
and never divided it Is
there any legal recourse
that can be taken, as none
of the other siblings ever
made her administrator of
his estate? -- D.E, via e-
mail
DEAR D.E: You say
your grandfather left a
substantial amount of
money to his kids, but that
is not true. Since he died
without a will, the state
will decide to whom and
in what amounts the
residual of his estate,
after his obligations have
been settled, will go. How
your aunt took the money
out of the bank is another
question. She may have
been on the account -
and if she was, the money,
in most cases, would be-
long to her. Furthermore,
someone should apply to
the surrogate's office in
the county where your
grandfather lived to be
named administrator of
his estate to settle the
legal matters. Should this
application be made, all of
his children will be asked
to sign off. The likelihood
is that' your aunt would
object to someone else's
being appointed adminis-
trator. If it gets to that,
there would be legal mo-
tions made on the part of
both parties, and the sur-
rogate would have to set-
tle the matter. This is just
another example of how
having 4 properly drawn
will would obviate all of
these difficulties. A few
dollars spent on a will
would have saved a great
many dollars that will now
have to be expended.
DEAR BRUCE: A fam-
ily member bought a
house, which was over-
priced. The house has a
mortgage of about
$200,000 at a 6 percent.
fixed-rate loan for 30
years. They made pay-
ments on the loan over the
course of a year. The fam-
ily member and spouse
both recently lost their
jobs. Because my husband
and I are retired, we have
income and some savings.
Would it be wise to help
the family make' their
house payments in the
hope that they can find
work? If they are unable
to find jobs equivalent to
what they were paid, can
the house be refinanced
at a later date at a lower
rate of interest? - LO.,
via e-mail
DEAR LO.: It would ap-
pear that the $200,000 pur-
chased value has
diminished rather consid-
erably You didn't indicate
the amount they may have
put down, but I'm guess-
ing it was a modest
amount. If these supposi-
tions are correct, then the
family involved is very
much under water. They
both have no income, and
the question of when their
income will resume is im-
possible to answer. While
I must congratulate you
on your generous offer, it
is unlikely to be a smart
move. They have no. eq-
uity in the home and little *
See MONEY/Page D3


- *.*" . -, ~. .. ,..~. * -:


.. . I - i: .. .












D2

SUNDAY
MAY 31, 2009


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Chamber Connection


7 Rivers Chiropractic Center


Sugarmill Diagnostic Imaging


The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce would like to welcome 7 Rivers Chiropractic Cen-
ter as new members. Above, representing 7 Rivers is Dr. David Kreinbrook, Lisa Kreinbrook
& Ann Gosdeck. Pictured, representing the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce Ambas-
sador program is Tammy LaVelle, Wendy Hall, Rhonda Lestinsky, Janet Mayo, Megan Ennis,
Bonnie Hardiman, Dan Pushee, Jackie Marx, Nancy Hautop & John Porter. 7 Rivers Chiro-
practic Center and Dr. David Kreinbrook are thrilled to announce the opening of the prac-
tice located at 927 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River. Dr. Kreinbtook graduated from Palmer
College of Chiropractic and has been in practice for over 15 years. The office is open on
Monday, Tuesday & Thursday from 9:00am-5:30pm and can be reached at 794-3824.

Cattle Dog Coffee Roasters


* A great crowd came out to welcome Cattle Dog Coffee Roasters with a ribbon cutting cer-
emony hosted by the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors. Present were
Owners Heather & James Cook, Linda Allam, Pastor Steve, Sue, Juan, Dennis Allam, Amy
Castro, Nick And Amelia, Paul & Roe, Janet & George, Linda, Heather and James Cook,
Linda Allam, Sharon & Steve, Ronnie, Nancy & Keith, Mr and Mrs. Fogarty, John & Gloria,
Jim Heavrin, Robert and Karen Fero. Also there were Ambassadors Lillian Smith, Jacqueline
Marx, Jamet Mayo, Megan Ennis, Rhonda Lestinsky and John Porter. Here at Cattle Dog Cof-
fee Roasters, we get green coffee beans from all over the world and roast them daily in our
store. Below are some items we have available at our store. We offer: Coffee Roasted Fresh
Daily, Coffee Roaster on Site - Personalized Roasting Available, Ground or Whole Bean Cof-
fees from Around the World, Espresso, Cappuccino, Hot, Cold & Frozen Coffee Drinks, Fresh
Made Pastries, Cookies, Brownies & More, Outside Seating, FREE Wi-Fi, daily specials and
much more! For more information or to place a coffee order, please feel free to call us at
249-3166 or send us an email to cattledogcoffeeroasters@embarqmail.com. We also have
a web site: www.cattledogcoffeeroasters.embarqspace.com

Granny Nannies


The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce would liketo welcome Sugarmill Diagnostic Im-
aging as new members. Above, representing Sugarmill Diagnostic Imaging is Shawn Mc-
Carthy, Julie Vaughan, Dr. Michael Herron, Vivian Humphries, Tammy Futrell, Caryl Perry,
Molly Manuel, Gall Rogers, Janifer Carlson & Eileen Quinn. Also present were Ambassadors
Rhonda Lestinsky, Bonnie Hardiman, Dan Pushee, Nancy Hautop, Janet Mayo & John Porter.
Sugar Mill Diagnostic Imaging (SMDI) is located on US 19 Just South of the Sugarmill
Woods residential community. SMDI is independently owned and operated by a local board
certified radiologist. Fees for service are billed globally and we accept most insurances. The
focus is on quality and comfort.. SMDI is dedicated to providing you and your physician the
most accurate diagnostic information while ensuring you the best possible exam experi-
ence. We successfully combine first-class technology with highly trained board-certified ra-
diologists and staff to give patients the highest level of medical care. For more information,
give us a call at 628-9900 or come by our office, located at 8303 S. Suncoast Blvd in Ho-
mosassa.


Dee Dee's Cookies & Cinnamon Buns


The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce would like to welcome new members, Dee Dee's
Cookies & Cinnamon Buns, as new members. Representing Dee Dee's, pictured above, is
Gary Blum, Daniel Corrao & Diana Blum. Those present, representing the Chamber Am-
bassador.program are Rhonda Lestinsky, Janet Mayo, Pete Burrell, Wendy Hall, Jennifer
Duca and John Porter. Dee Dee's Cookies & Cinnamon Buns is located at the Stokes Flea
Market on Hwy 44 in Crystal River. Stop by for a great treat! For business hours, call them
today at 4004912.


Cyndie Ford Purdy, LMHC


A helping hand and a gently heart is exactly what Granny Nannies provides. Representing
Granny Nannies is Jenny Vacca, Marketing Rep., Karen Addison, Office Manager, Cyndi Wil-
son, Owner, Administrator, Ken Wilson, Owner, President. Also present are. Ambassadors'
Jennifer Duca, Rhonda Lestinksy, Jackie Marx, Janety Mayo, Wendy Hall and David Heinz.
Granny NANNIES is a nursing agency that specializes in Certified Nursing Aides (CNA's) and
Home Health Aides (HHA"S) level of care for the elderly, couples, or individuals with spe-
cial needs. Our highly qualified personal caregivers are available up to 24 hours a day, seven
days a week and can provide personal care at affordable prices. Give us a call today at 352-
5604229. You can also visit our website at www.grannynannies.com


Recently, a ribbon cutting ceremony was held by the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce,
welcoming Cyndie Ford Purdy, LMHC as new members of the Chamber. Pictured above,
representing the member is Cyndie Ford Purdy, Eugene Ford, Debbie Priest, Betty Ford and
Tom Ford. Ambassadors present were Jennifer Duca, Wendy Hall, Lillian Smith and John
Porter. Hello, my name is Cyndie Ford Purdy. I am a Licensed Mental Health Counselor in
Florida and a Licensed Professional Counselor in Alaska. I am a National Certified Counselor
(NCC) through the National Board for Certified Counselors, a Master Addictions Counselor
(MAC) and a Certified Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) through NAADAC, The Associ-
ation for Addiction Professionals. I am a state-approved clinical supervisor in Florida and
Alaska. My areas of special interest include personal growth and development, relation-
ship issues, adjustment disorders, depression, stress and anxiety, grief and loss, and re-
covery and relapse prevention from chemical abuse and dependency. I am located at 470
Pleasant Grove Rd. in Inverness. Give me a call today at 341.0435. You can also visit my
website at www.fordpurdy.com


--Member NEWS


Phillip W. Price, MBA, CPA,
with the firm Price & Company,
P.A. in Crystal River, FL, re-
cently attended the Florida In-
stitute of Certified Public
Accountants FSU Spring Ac- *
counting Conference in Talla-
hassee, Florida on May 14 &
15, 2009. This seminar high-
lighted such topics as AAc-
counting for Functional
Allocations anq Special
Events@, "The New Form 990"
and AFiduciary'Accounting@.
Also, the Auditor General cov-
ered their responsibility for all
government accounting in
Florida. The FICPA is a profes-
sional association representing


the interests of more than
18,400 CPAs with approxi-
mately 4,400 offices throughout
Florida. Phil takes courses
such as these to insure a con-
tinued high level of service to
the firms clients in accounting,
consulting and tax issues. If
you have any questions, Phil
can be reached at 795-6118 or
via the firm website at www.pw-
price.comrn

Hospice of Citrus County will
provide Orientation Training for
individuals who are interested
in learning more about Hospice
and Hospice volunteer oppor-
tunities. The class will be held


on Wednesday, June 10, 2009,
at the Hospice of Citrus County
Inverness Office, 326 S. Line
Ave., Inverness, Florida from
9:00am to 12:00pm. The class
provides an overview of Hos-
pice philosophy and history.
Participants will become ac-
quainted with services provided
by Hospice of Citrus County for
patients and their families.
They will also become familiar
with the concept of palliative
care and learn the importance
of confidentiality. At the end of
this session, those wishing to
volunteer in specific areas will
be qualified to do so. To regis-
ter for this class or to request


training for your group, contact
Marcey Mast, Hospice of Citrus
County Volunteer Program
Manager, at 352-527-6613 or
email mmast@hospiceofcitr-
uscounty.org.
MEN
What's going on at the store?
All of our One of a Kind, pre-
made, custom Jewelry is 20%
off for May. So hurry in Gentle-
man and get your special lady
a great new gift. Or Ladies,
come in a buy yourself a well
earned "Sparkly" just for you.
All pre-strung Gemstones are
also on Sale for 20% as well, a
great savings on our already
low prices. Don't forget Sum-


mer is almost here and we now June7, 2009 at 1:00pm at the
carry Sculpy III and Primo Poly- Citrus Hills Golf and County
mer Clay for Big and Little Kids. Club hosted by the Citrus
An inexpensive way to have County Center Theater for the
great family fun. As always, Performing Arts Foundation.
classes are still going on. Call The business community is in-
the store for more info. We look vited to attend and learn more
forward to seeing you soon. about the Foundation's exciting
Rock On and Bead Happy!! Cir- project with its International
cle of Fire Art & Bead Shop is Cultural Arts Center's presenta-
located at 1813 US 41 North in tions to our County and the
Inverness. Call us today at 344- World. For Luncheon reserva-
3473. tions please call 352-382-1929.
nE. mu.
Gary Maidoff and Josh Doctor Vitamin's Store Na-
Wooten will be the guest tional Representative, will be at
speakers for "Business is good Doctor Vitamin Store, Saturday,
for the Arts and the Arts are June 6th at 11:00 am..
good for Business" luncheon on Call now as there is limited









BUSINESS SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009 D3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AGENT
Continued from Page Dl

go onto the market, or
whether the agent
should offer to help the
homeowner renegotiate
the loan.
"We have arranged it
so that the bank has
wrapped the missed
mortgage payments into
the back end
of the loan," Back il
Cunning-
ham said. banks
If refi- worker
nancing work
can't be people
arranged,
Cunning- when
ham said,
the agents found it
try to get a ak
short sale make II
rather than payn
let the r
house go
into foreclosure.
"People don't realize
that with a foreclosure
their security clearance
can lie taken away," Cun-
ningham said. "They
could lose their job or it
could affect their future
employment."
Many employers will
run a credit check on a
prospective employee. If
the job requires security
clearance, a defatilted
mortgage raises the pos-
sibility that a ,deficiency
judgment could be
placed on the job candi-
date. The employer
might assume that the
job candidate could be
compromised by a need
for money to pay off the
judgment.
Cunningham and her
fellow agent, Cheryl
Lambert, started train-
ing in dealing with dis-
tressed properties about
two years ago.
"We are as educated as
much as we can be," Cun-
ningham said, "but
things are constantly
changing."
Back in 2007, banks
were not working with
people ,as much when
they found it hard to
make mortgage pay-
ments.
"Between 2006 and
2,009, there was a 40-per-
cent deficit in the market
value of the house from
when the mortgage was
written," Lambert said.


r






L


Whether overcome
with fear or not compre-
hending the importance
of acting quickly, many
homeowners have ig-
nored the initiation of
foreclosure proceedings.
"People have come in
when they are past the
point of panic," Cunning-
ham-said.
Lambert agreed: "A lot
of people didn't truly un-
derstand the mortgage it-
self."
n 2007, While it
helps the
Vere not real estate
I Wih industry
g with o vera ll,
as much Lambert
they s h ows
ReMax is
t hard to trying to
reach out
mortgage and help
ients. people who
see a fore-
closure
looming.
"I have a couple who
didn't understand how
they got into this prob-
lem," Lambert said.
"Now they have a 10-year
loan modification. They
have been telling other
people about how we
helped them."
Cunningham said to
get help, the homeowner
has to prove hardship.
But first the homeowner
has to face the situation.
"People have their
pride," Cunningham
said. "It's human nature
to not want others to
know their problems."
Real estate agents,
Cunningham said, are in
, a good position to rene-
gotiate mortgages with
banks because they know
the people who work at
banks from their many
transactions. Real estate
agents can make the case
that foreclosing on a
home and taking back
the property is not in the
best interest of the bank.
Having helped a num-
ber of people stay in
their homes, Lambert
said she liked the feeling
it gave her.
"It's paying it for-
ward," Lambert - said;
"Citrus County is a small
area where everybody
knows everybody."
"The important thing
is to talk to your bank
and stay in your home,"
Cunningham said.


BOOM
Continued from Page Dl

ing their life. Car manufacturers, for
example, use a $200 carbide drill to
make boltholes on crankshafts. Typi-
cally, the drill bores about 600 holes be-
fore breaking. With the Conicity edge,
the same drill can make 2,400 holes.
Companies such as Ford, Chrysler and
GM. spend upward of $200 million a
year on drills and other tools.
When the economy is booming, "it's
easy to step over a small company,"
said Bill Shaffer, Conicity's executive
vice president "But now they can't
look away."
Shaffer estimates his technology
could save them upward of $60,000 a
year on each tool. That's the equiva-
lent of bne autoworker's salary, with-
out bonus or overtime. That adds up
when manufacturers have reached the
point where they have laid off as many
people as they can without halting pro-
duction.
"When you get to that point, then you
have to look someplace else for cost
saving," Shaffer said.
Until late 2007, companies that
wanted to add Conicity's edge to their'
tools had to ship them to Latrobe to
have them fitted in large, energy-hun-
gry machines. Now, Conicity offers a
vending-style machine that can be
leased or bought by manufacturers..
With 15 minutes of training, the 20-sec-
ond process can be done in-house.


Since then, Conicity has delivered 30
machines to companies nationwide,
their placement noted by colorful
thumbtacks on a U.S. map behind
Shaffer's desk Companies'that never
let him past the reception area now
seek his assistance. Recently he gave
his spiel to corporate bigwigs at John
Deere in Waterloo, Iowa.
Other industries
are also seeking Shaffer est
help to cut costs.
Allegiance, a technology
software company them up
in South Jordan,
Utah, has enjoyed $60,000
triple-digit sales
growth in the past each
18 months and has
hired 14 people in
the past year, said Chris Cottle, the
company's vice president of marketing.
The reason: Allegiance software al-
lows companies to survey customers
and respond to feedback through a sin-
gle, Web-based platform.
Besides increasing customer reten-
tion, Cottle says Allegiance software al-
lows companies to meld their surveys.
For example, rather than human re-
sources and marketing surveying sepa-
rately, they can both use Allegiance
software, at an average cost of $100,000
a year, saving money, manpower and
time.
Corporate frugality is so trendy now
that Allegiance's Cottle said even some
of the biggest corporations are moving
away from their traditional $2 million-
a-year Gallup polls and using his soft-


ware instead.
Melanie Jones, e-commerce man-
ager for Ultradent, a dental equip-
ment company also based in South
Jordan, said Allegiance allowed it to
streamline how it gathers feedback,
making it easier to find and respond to
customers who were unhappy. And in
this economy, customer retention is
key, Jones said.
inmates his u lt r a d e n t
started using Alle-
could save giance software in
ward of 2006 and esti-
)ward of mates it saved
a year on about $330,000 in
sales in the first
tool. year - and more
every year since.
So while Ultra-
dent, a company of almost 800 em-
ployees and m6re than $100 million in
annual sales, has made significant
cuts - including halting 401(k)
matches, stopping subsidized lunches
and eliminating the practice of cash-
ing out ou sick and vacation days - it
has only had to lay off five people,
Jones said.
Melissa Wegner, market research
manager at Dallas, Texas-based Tex-
ans Credit Union, said all the com-
pany's departments were charged with
cutting spending to avoid layoffs. So
she began using Allegiance software in
January, cutting her department's re-
search budget by 60 percent.
"Economic times are difficult; we
need to cut costs," she said. "We've
avoided layoffs and plan to."


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

prospect of having equity for
a long period of time. A vol-
untary repossession would
very likely be in their best
-interest. If you choose to
help them get into, a rental
property, that would be very
generous. I would not con-
tinue to pay the mortgage on
a house that is very under-
valued and has little chance
of recovery for considerable
period of time.
DEAR BRUCE: If some-'
one had $3 million, they
could put $250,000 in savings
and checking accounts, and.
the FDIC would protect
them. Where is a safe place
to put the balance while
they are contemplating
where to spend or invest it?
- S.Z., via e-mail
DEAR S.Z.: The current
FDIC maximum per account
is $250,000, as you have
stated. However, there are
ways to construct the other
accounts in that institution
so that you may have several
accounts covered. Your mar-
ital status is a factor here.
Further, your bank probably
has associations with others
that would allow it to act as
an agent, opening accounts
in other FDIC-insured de-
positories. You don't need to
use that - you can go to any
number of institutions in
your community - but it is
generally easier to . go
through your own bank and
have them make the
arrangements. It's not a dif-
ficult thing to accomplish.
DEAR BRUCE: Should I
continue to invest in my
403(b), my Roth, my IRA or
all three? Currently, I invest
in my 403(b) bi-weekly. Like
many, I have lost a lot of
value. I am 56, a school-
teacher and can retire with
80 percent benefits next
year I am single, have one
home with a mortgage, own
my car and have no credit-
card debt. My children have
grown and are out of the
house. I do not want to have
to find myself a part-time job
to make ends meet! I can
live nicely on my retirement


pension, but my 403(b) -
and other investments I was
counting on when I turn 59-
1/2 or later--just may not be
there for me when I need it,
since I am older with less
time to recoup investments.
What is the best way to go for
a person retiring at 57 years
old? Should I stop investing
at this point? - R.M., via e-
mail
DEAR R.M.: You have
done all the right things,
consistently saved and be-
cause of the sharp deterio-
ration in the investment
world, you have lost a good
deal of money As you point
out, you are a bit older and
you may not have as much
time to recoup your invest-
ments. You also raise an in-
teresting point - that you
can retire with 80 percent
benefits next year. Or put an-
other way, if you continue to'
work you'll be working for 20
cents on the dollar - and
the other 80 cents you would
have received anyway, if I'm
correctly interpreting what
you have said. While you say
you don't want to find your-
self with a part-time job to
make ends meet, as young as
you are you might consider
some type of part-time em-
ployment either inside or
outside the area of educa-
tion. Given that you will not,
be eligible for Social Secu-
rity for several years and
your nest egg has shrunk, it
would seem to me that put-
ting off actual retirement for
a few years would be your
best course of action. You
also didn't indicate whether
your. benefits would in-
crease if you stayed on.
Since you do have debts and
you didn't indicate what
other assets you have, I be-
lieve that you and many like
you should reconsider the
total retirement area. Look
at it as an unavoidable con-
sequence of the market con-
ditions, and continue to
bring some money in.
DEAR BRUCE: My hus-
band and I are separated.
He was in prison for 18 years
and then came home. He
has not had a job since but
has credit cards. I don't
know how many credit cards
or what the charges are. My


name is not on any of his
cards. Am I responsible-for
the debts he incurs? My
credit rating is very high,
and I do not want to have it
damaged. - J.E Allentown,
Pa.
DEAR J.E: In that you
have not signed for 'any of
these cards, the responsibil-
ity is his. Congratulations on
maintaining a very good
credit rating. I'm wondering
why you. welcomed him
home after 18 years and
have continued with him,
since he has shown behavior
that is very anti-social. Af-
fairs of the heart are some-
times hard to understand.
DEAR BRUCE: I recently
received a phone solipita-
tion from a well-known fi-
nancial institution wanting
to consolidate my debt and
refinance. Here is what the
salesperson said, to para-
'phrase: "I ran your credit re-
port and saw that you had
outstanding balances on a
couple of credit cards." Can
they run credit reports
solely to solicit new busi-
ness? I thought the purpose
of running credit reports
was to see if you were credit-
worthy when you had ap-
plied for a loan of some
kind, not to solicit someone.
This seems unethical at the
leas t-J Lexiigton, Ky
DEAR J.S.: You are cor-
rect when you say that the
basic reason for credit re-
ports is to help businesses
select whom they choose to
do business with based on
their credit-worthiness. The
reality is that many compa-
nies pull credit reports prior
to making an offer. Whether
using the information as
you've described is ethical is
an area that I'm not pre-
pared to comment upon.
However, the offer to help
you consolidate your debt
leaves me very nervous
about their proposal. There
are so many of these debt
consolidation/negotiation
firms that it leaves one ques-
tioning their motives and
ethics. I would tread very
carefully.
DEAR BRUCE: My son
lives in Carmichael, Calif.
An existing mortuary (not a
cemetery) added a crema-


tory that is 70 feet from his
back-patio door. There is a
Catholic school within 1,000
feet of the crematory stack
My son and his neighbors
took the issue to court on
code violations and lost
(they did not appeal the
building permit in the al-
lowable 10 days) but are
going to try court again
based on public nuisance.
This is a modest-income
neighborhood. The crema-
tory can afford to keep this
in court until the neighbors
run out of money. Do you
have any .suggestions that
would help the neighbor-
hood proceed with their
case? - N.R., Elk Grove,
Calif.
DEAR N.R.: I hate to be.
the bearer of bad news, but
unless the mortuary violates
specific codes, it would
seem that they have a right
to do what they're doing.
While your son missed the
appeal process' 10-day re-
quirement, there is nothing
to say that the appeal would
have been looked upon fa-
.vorably You mentioned that
there is a school and a cre-
matory stack; I take it your
son objects to the smoke and
odor. Whether either of
these things is in violation is
another matter. 'Your son
and his neighbors will dis-
cuss this matter with coun-
sel. I suspect that you will be
told that there is nothing
more than an outside
chance of being successful.
Whether the mortuary could
be persuaded to add some
type of filter on their stack
should be explored. If that
would clear up most of the
problem, this would be a sat-
isfactory answer and a great
deal less expensive for all
sides.
DEAR BRUCE: My sister
lives in North Carolina. Her
boyfriend passed away a
year ago, dying without a
will. He has a daughter and
ex-wife who live in the same
state. Both of them are mar-
ried and to date have not
had themselves appointed
to administrate his estate.
He did not own a home. He
has two trucks and an old
car that he planned to re-
store. He also has a car


trailer and some tools. His
credit cards certainly are in
excess of his assets. His life
insurance has gone to the
beneficiary, my sister, who
had to pay the funeral ex-
penses and cemetery costs.
My sister's name was not on
any of his possessions. The
problem is, his possessions
are at my sister's home, and
she does not want to get her-
self appointed administra-
tor of his estate to dissolve
his assets and apply any of
the proceeds to the credi-
tors, as this would be a mess.
My sister prefers not to deal
with his daughter, who ini-
tially wanted to handle
things, as she is immature
and not pleasant to deal
with. My guess is the daugh-
ter realizes now that his un-
paid bills far exceed the
assets and has given up on
this matter The ex-wife has
not shown any interest ei-
ther. How does my sister get
rid of his trucks, etc., from
her property, so she can get
on with her life? --A.L, via
e-mail
DEAR A.L: Brought down
to its essence, nobody wants
this stuff-- it's all junk, with
the possible exception of the
tools. Your sister may be for-
tunate and find a yard that
will take the trucks, the car,
etc., without bills of sale,
which are required. In the
absence of that, have her
call the city or community
and tell them that there are
abandoned vehicles on her
property and that she would
like assistance in having
them removed. Most cities
recognize this problem and
have a mechanism in place
to handle this. The fact that
he didn't have a will doesn't
mean a whole lot, since he
didn't have any assets.
DEAR BRUCE: I lost my
job at the age of 48. I am now
pursuing new employment I
have from my previous em-
ployer a guaranteed pension
of $43,000 per year, which
will start June 1 and go on
for the rest of my life. I know
I am fortunate to have that
My question pertains to the
distribution of the funds.
The first option would be to
take the whole amount per
month and no surviving-
4


spouse benefit upon my
death. This would mean
that, upon my death, the
benefit would stop and my
spouse would have no in-
come from this for the rest of
her life. The second option
is to take a reduced amount
with a 50-percent surviving-
spouse benefit, which would
pay the spouse upon my
death $1,500 for the rest of
her life should she outlive
me. To accept this option,
our initial benefit would be
reduced to $2,875 per
month. The third option
would be to take a 75-per-
cent surviving-spouse bene-
fit, and her income would be
$2,000 per month upon my
death. It would seem to me
that a better option would be
to take out an additional re-
newable term-life policy for,
say, $500,000, which, since I
am in good health, would
only cost about $200 to $300
per year. Then, should I pass
before my spouse, it would
give her an additional half-
million, and, even if not in-
vested, would give her the
same $2,000 per month for
more than 20 years. Am I
right in my thoughts that the
term will be a better deal? -
R.S., via e-mail
DEAR RS.: It seems to me
that you have thought this
out very well. The term in-
surance option is far and
away the best. If you pass
away, your wife, and not the
insurance company, will
have the cash. If you survive,
which is very likely for a
long period of time, the cost
is modest and certainly a
whole lot less than taking
the reduced-pension bene-
fit When I was reading your
letter, I was already thinking
about recommending the
term insurance, and, at the
very end, you answered your
own questions.


Send your questions to:
Smart Money, PO. Box 2095,
Elfers, FL 34680. E-mail to:
bruce@brucewilliams. com.
Questions of general inter-
est will be answered in fu-
ture columns. Owing to the
volume of mail, personal
replies cannot be provided.


SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2oog D3


BUSINESS


KEITH SRAKOCIC/Associated Press
In this recent photo, a series of pushpins on a map at the company headquarters in Latrobe, Pa. represent the-locations
in the northeast region of the country where Conicity Technologies has its machines in place.


ti

F








BUSNES CIRU CONTY(,)ZCRONCL


D4UN AY. MAY l 200


Small businesses plan to hire


unpaid interns this summer


NEW YORK- The idea
of hiring unpaid interns
this summer has become
very appealing to small
business owners contend-
ing with a difficult econ-
omy.
An extra worker, even an
inexperienced one, can be
a big help to a company
that can't afford to hire a Joyce R(
regular staffer. But busi- SMALL
ness owners need to be
sure they don't take on in-
terns only to -save money. Federal
labor laws are fairly direct in saying
that internships should be for the
benefit of the interns, not their em-
ployers.
Paula Slotkin knew back in Janu-
ary she couldn't afford to pay an in-
tern as she has in the past.
"We're having the same issues our
clients are," said Slotkin, a partner in
Topaz Partners, a Woburn, Mass.-
based public relations firm. "I can't
take on someone for $350 a week in.
the summer."
But Slotkin started getting resumes
from would-be interns who were
happy to work for nothing, just so they
could get the experience of being at a
PR agency She hired a young woman
who will be earning college credit for
her work this summer.,
Summer interns are common at
public relations firms. Interns who
are in school want hands-on experi-
ence before they graduate, while re-
cent grads are looking to build their
resumes.
Company owners often look at in-
ternships as tryouts for a permanent
job in the future.
"I would never hire someone who
wasn't first an intern," said Kellee
Johnson, a principal with The Ballast
Group, a PR firm in Chicago. Her
company is doing well this year, and
will have three paid interns who have
finished school. A fourth intern who's


o
0


still in school won't be
paid.
Johnson also likes hav-
ing interns because "I've
W': been mentored very well
in my career and I believe
it's time to give back"
O'Connell & Goldberg, a
PR firm in Fort Laud-
erdale, Fla., hasn't been
senberg able to hire full-time
L TALK staffers the past few
months, so having two un-
paid interns this summer
will help fill the gap. If the interns do
well, "when the economy turns
around, obviously they'll be my first
picks" for permanent jobs, co-owner
Barbara Goldberg said.
Nancy Shenker has just hired her
first unpaid interns for her Thorn-
wood, N.Y.-based marketing firm,
theONswitch. The economy was a
factor in her deciding to have unpaid
interns, but she also is impressed by
students' commitment to the job even
if it doesn't have a paycheck.
"They are passionate about the
business and are comfortable with
making sacrifices to get the experi-
ence they need," she said.
Owners who take on unpaid interns
should be familiar with the federal
Fair Labor Standards Act, which de-
tails the criteria that an internship
must meet in order for the intern to
not be paid. The law regards an in-
ternship as a training program.
Under the FLSA, an intern must re-
ceive training similar to that offered
in a vocational school. The training
must be for the benefit of the intern.
The intern must not displace, or do
the work of, a regular employee.
The law also states, that an em-
ployer must receive no immediate ad-
vantage from what an intern does.
That might jeopardize the unpaid sta-
tus of many internships - if an in-.
tern, say, stuffs envelopes for mailing,
helps to manufacture products or per-


forms other services that benefit an
employer.
The FSLA also says an unpaid in-
tern is not necessarily entitled to a job
at the end of the internship. And, fi-
nally, both the intern and the em-
ployer understand the intern is not
entitled to wages.
The Department of Labor's Web
site has more information about the
criteria that must be met for an intern
to be unpaid: It can be accessed at
www.dol.gov/elaws/esa/flsa/scope/erl
5.asp.
Interns who get college credit but
not pay are covered by the School-to-
Work Opportunities Act of 1994,
which generally requires that an in-
tern be in a planned program of job
training that's coordinated with
school-based learning. He or she
should perform tasks and activities
that build upon one another, increase
in complexity and help the intern to
learn and master basic skills. The in-
tern must be exposed to all aspects of
the industry.
As with the.FLSA, an intern under
the School-to-Work act cannot dis-
place a regular employee. -
Julie Talenfeld, president of Board-
room Communications Inc., based in
Plantation, Fla., worked with the Uni-
versity of Florida in hiring two un-
paid interns who will earn college
credit for the summer. The interns
will be doing public relations work
such as writing press releases, but the
work is intended to help them learn,
Talenfeld said.
"They get to have a lot of great ex-
perience," she said. "They realize
that experience is valuable, and even
more valuable than money right
now."
The Labor Department also has a
page describing the criteria for un-
paid internships under the School-
to-Work programs. You can find it at
www.dol.gov/elaws/esa/flsa/scope/erl
5astw.asp.


Experts see rebound this year


DAVID PITTrr
APpersonal
finance writer

CHICAGO - The U.S.
economy may be on track
for recovery later this year
but growth is likely to be
inuted, unemployment ele-
vated and government reg-
ulation of markets on the
rise.
Those are the predictions
of some of the nation's lead-
ing mutual fund managers
and financial advisers gath-
ering this' week in Chicago
to swap stories, share
strategies and look ahead to
the coming months.
The financial industry
professionals are trying to
sort through the conflicting
economic indicators and
the resulting rallies and re-
treats in the stock market at
the Morningstar Investment
Conference, one of the
largest such gatherings
held each year.
The conference itself has
seen the impact of eco-
nomic pressures. Atten-
dance this year is down
about 25 percent from last
year, with about 1,000 fund
managers and financial ad-
visers and product vendors
attending, Morningstar
said.
One expert who said he
believes recovery will be
slow is bond fund manager
Bill Gross, who oversees
$720 billion in fixed securi-
ties for California-based
PIMCO.'
He said the nation's total
output of goods and serv-
ices, the gross domestic
product, will grow only at 1
percent to 2 percent instead
of the usual 2 percent to 3
percent for the next several
years. He also predicted
unemployment will retreat
from the anticipated high of
10 percent but will remain
higher than average at
around 7 percent to 8 per-
cent for years to come..
Reasons for those long-
term changes are rooted in
the complexity of the eco-
nomic meltdown that has
swept through financial


* Follow these guidelines to help
ensure timely publication of sub
mitted material..The earlier
Chronicle editors receive submis-
sions, the better chance of notes
running more than once.
l Community notes: At least one
week in advance of the event.
* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednes-
day for publication Sunday.


services, housing and- auto-
motive industries. The situ-
ation is made worse by
excessive borrowing by fi-
nancial services companies
and consumers. As that in-
debtedness is unwound in
the economy, it will take
years to get back to the
point where consumers can
spend as freely again.-
"Our inclination to shop
and to consume basically
was exaggerated to an ex-
treme proportion," he said.
. The mood of conference
attendees appears mostly
upbeat considering the
beating fund managers
have taken in the market
and financial advisers have
taken from their clients,
who wonder why the pro-
fessional investors couldn't
avoid the 20 percent to 30
percent losses many portfo-
lios suffered.
Many fund managers are
talking about investment
opportunities found in un-
dervalued stocks of finan-
cially sound companies.
Others, however, 'con-
tinue to say all the talk
about a significant recovery
this year may be greatly ex-
aggerated and it could be
too soon to jump fully'back
in the market.
The conference con-
vened at a time when stock
volatility, which has be-
come all too common, re-
turned.
The Dow Jones industri-
.als climbed 196 points 'on
Tuesday on news that con-
sumer confidence was
pointing to a possible eco-
nomic rebound 'later this
year. It all reversed course
on Wednesday, however,
and the Dow lost 173 points,
on news that borrowing
costs may increase.
The Dow is still 26.8 per-
cent above the lows it
reached in early March, but
41.4 percent below the
record high it hit in October'
2007.
Thursday saw the mar-
kets bounce around a bit
more with the Dow ending
up about 104 points.
Conference participants


have had some tough ques-
tions for fund 'managers
and other investment ex-
perts about why some of
them, considered the lead-
ing economic minds of our
time, didn't foresee the
home mortgage meltdown,
the banking crisis and the
resulting, stock , market
crash.'
In one session Wednes-
day, a question was raised
about who was at fault for
failing to see the downturn
coming. The result caused
investors, including many
with 401(k) retirement
funds invested in mutual
funds, to lose large chunks
of their portfolios.
"I think this sort of blame
game going on is an out-
come of the fact that it is a
very much of an emotional
experience for people and
nobody really likes to take
the blame on themselves,"
said Karen Dolan, director
of fund analysis for Morn-
ingstar. "I think when you
let emotion enter the pic-
ture, that's when it gets a lit-'
tle dangerous."
The discussion continued
into Thursday with speak-
ers explaining why they
were caught off-guard by
the depth and breadth of
the market meltdown.
Gross, the PIMCO fund
manager, said 401(k) bal-
ances are not likely to
bounce back to levels of 18
months ago anytime in the
next few years.
Things have changed for
investment professionals,
too, who are likely to see
their compensation change
significantly as investors
push for lower fees and
more accountability in the
profession.
Don Phillips, managing
director of Morningstar Inc.
said some of the issues re-
garding the public percep-
tion of fund managers can
be traced to inadequate
fund information.
He called the accounting
measures used by mutual
funds a mess, lacking a sim-
ple procedure in which
sales and distribution costs


SUBMISSION DEADUNES

* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednes-
day for publication Sunday.
* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednes-
day for publication Sunday.
* Chalk Talk- 4 p.m. Monday for
publication Wednesday.
* Health Notes: 4 p.m. Friday for
publication Tuesday.
0. Religious events : 4 p.m. Tuesday
for publication Saturday.


are clearly outlined.
"I don't know why we
can't get to that place and it
seems to me that's some-
thing as investors that we
should be demanding," he
said.
Investors have the right
to know how much a bond,
company is spending on
marketing and research
and how efficiently they're
running the fund, he said.
"It's just beyond me why
an industry that's as impor-
tant to the American econ-
omy and to investors'
well-being doesn't have that
simple straightforward ac-
counting."
David Winters, chief ex-
ecutive of Wintergreen Ad-
visers and portfolio
manager. for Wintergreen
Fund, said much of the
country's corporate trou-
bles could be blamed on a
lack of accountable corpo-
rate boards.
Investors should take an
active roll in demanding
corporate board accounta-
bility, he said.
People like him:probably
should have foreseen some
of the sub-prime lending
woes, but some of it was
simply not revealed by com-
'panies and should have
been, he said.
He singled out insurance
companies in particular for
failing to disclose some of
the liabilities they held on
their books in bad real es-
tate and other investments.
Rajeev Bhamann, senior
vice president and portfolio
manager of the Oppen-
heimer Global Fund,
agreed.
He said at times it's nec-
essary for investors to band
together and get someone
put on a corporate board.
"That's the only way
we're going to get any sig-
nificant dissension when it
really matters," he said.
Bhamann said board
members are often friends
and frequently serve to-
gether for years, reducing
the likelihood that they will
challenge one another
when necessary.


* Real Estate Digest: 4 p.m. Thurs-
day for publication Sunday.
* Photos and stories are published
as space is available. The Chroni-
cle cannot guarantee placement
on color pages.
* Submit material at Chronicle of-
fices in Inverness or Crystal
River; by fax at 563-3280; or by
e-mail to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com.


DIGEST
Continued from Page Dl

creates opportunities for dia-
logue, solicits feedback and re-
sponds to the concerns of
small business.
The Stakeholder Liaison is a
little known division of the IRS,
and all business people in the
area are invited to hear Eric
Tidwell on June 5, at the regu-
lar meeting of the Citrus Busi-
ness Network.
The Citrus Business Net-
work meets each Friday, from
7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. at Tus-
cany On The Meadow, Citrus
Hills Lodge. The breakfast bar
is open and guests who wish
to help themselves to break-
fast are asked to arrive in time
to have served themselves
and be seated before the
meeting is called to order.
The Citrus Business Net-
work is a group of local busi-
nesses providing a wide range
of quality goods and services.
Each member strives to main-
tain the highest level of profes-
sional integrity and customer
satisfaction.
For more information, con-
tact Ron Radford, president,
795-0003 or Liz Koehlinger,
membership director, 527-
9790, or visit www.CitrusBusi-
nessNetwork.com.
Companies needed
.to host youth
Job sites are critically
needed in Citrus and Levy
Counties to host area youth for
Recovery Act funded 2009
Summer Youth Employment
Program. -
The American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act of 2009, the
Recovery Act, provides
$918,869 for youth, ages 14 to
24, for summer job training
programs in Citrus, Levy and
Marion Counties. Marion
County job sites have been se-
cured, but Levy and Citrus
Counties companies are still
needed to host the Recovery
Act funded jobs.
This is a chance for busi-
nesses to prepare the future
workforce at no expense to
their company. Area youth, age
17 to24, have a chance to ex-
plore careers in a variety of in-
dustries while businesses,
including for-profit, non-profit
and governmental agencies,"
provide a pipeline for the future
workforce. Youth under the
age of 17 will participate in
non-worksite training pro-
grams.
The summer program runs
June 22 to Sept. 30. Youth are
placed for five weeks at the job
site with a 20 hour a week
training allowance paid by
Workforce Connection. The
program will include intem-
ships or job shadowing as they
leam about prospective ca-
reers. The on-the-job training
will give students a chance to
explore sustainable and grow-
ing careers for the future job
- market.
Prospective Summer Youth
Employment Program busi-
ness Partner can visit
www.clmworkforce.com or call
Workforce at (352) 873-7939,
ext. 4444 for more information,
Learn more about services at
Workforce Connection, contact
(352) 840-5700 in Marion
County, or Toll Free 1-800-434
JOBS and speak to a work-
force representative.
Workforce Connection is a
member of the Employ Florida
network of workforce services
and resources. Workforce
Connection is an equal oppor-
tunity employer/program. Auxil
iary aids and services are
available upon request to indi-
viduals with disabilities. All
voice telephone numbers liste(
above may be reached by per-
sons using TTY/TDD equip-


ment via the Florida Relay
Service at 711. If you need ac-
commodations, call (352) 840-
5700, ext. 1278 or e-mail
accommodations@clmwork-
force.com. Please make re-
quest at least three business
days in advance.
CFCC meetings
open to public
The CFCC Foundation
meetings listed below are open
to the public. 0 CFCC Founda-
tion
Executive Committee Meet-.
ing, 4:30 p.m. Monday, June 8,
at Central Florida Community
College (CFCC) Enterprise
Center, 2nd Floor Board
Room, 3001 SW College Rd,
Ocala, FL 34474. Purpose:
General business of the CFCC
Executive Committee.
* CFCC Foundation Board
of Directors Meeting, 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday, June 17, at Cen-
tral Florida Community College
(CFCC) Founders Hall Board
Room, 3001 SW College Rd,
Ocala, FL 34474. Purpose:
General business of the CFCC
Foundation Board of Directors.
* CFCC Foundation Invest-
ment Committee Meeting, 3
p.m. Tuesday, June 2, at Cen-
tral Florida Community College
-tCFCC)-Enterp-is Center, _.
Foundation Office, 3001-SW
College Rd, Ocala, FL 34474.
Purpose: General business of
the CFCC Foundation Invest-
ment Committees.
* CFCC Foundation Invest-
ment Committee Meeting at 3
p.m. Wednesday, June 24, at
Central Florida Community
College (CFCC) Enterprise
Center, Foundation Office,
3001 SW College Rd, Ocala,
FL 34474. Purpose: General
business of the CFCC Founda-
tion Investment Committees.
A copy of the agenda will be
available at each meeting. For
further information, contact the
CFCC Foundation office, P.O.
Box 1388, Ocala, FL 34478.
Network welcomes
new members
The most, recent member of
the Citrus Business Network is
Jacqui Watkins, new owner of
John C. Meyers, Sr. Locksmith
company. Tara Briggs is the
new representative for Care-
givers for Seniors. Both Jacqui
and Tara have been welcomed
into membership.
'The Citrus Business Net-
work meets every Friday mom-
ing at Tuscany On The
Meadow, Citrus Hills Lodge,
350 E. Norvell Bryant Highway,
Hemando. Breakfast starts at 7
a.m., and the meeting is con-
ducted from 7:30 to 8:30. Mem-
bers benefit by exchanging
information and referrals with
other business owners.
For more information call Liz
Koehlinger, membership direc-
tor, 527-9790 or Ron Radford,
president, 795-0003, or visit
wwwv.citrusbusinessnetwork.com.
Young Farmers &
Ranchers to meet
Florida Farm Bureau's Young
Farmers.& Ranchers will gather
July 18 and 19 at The Planta-
tion Golf Resort & Spa, Crystal
River.
"The Farm. Bureau-Young--
Farmer & Ranch-erprograms at
t both the state and national lev-
els are aimed at building future
Leaders for the industry and
Farm Bureau," said Florida
Farm Bureau President John L.
Hoblick. "As an alumnus of both
programs, I can attest to the
programs' effectiveness."
More information about the
conference, including the reg-
- istration form and agenda, can
be found on the Florida Farm
Bureau's Web site
www.FloridaFarmBureau.org.
d The registration deadline is
June 19. The conference reg-
istration fee is $75.


C i ITRUS ."''_ COUNTY


' www.chronicleontine.comn

Advertising Sales Representative
The Citrus County Chronicle
is now accepting applications for an
Advertising Sales Representative.
Must have minimum of 2 years sales
experience with proven results for new and
existing customers. Computer proficiency a
must. Excellent organizational and customer
service skills are required.
Fax cover letter and resume to HR at:,
352-564-2935
or e-mail:
dkamlot@chronicleonline.com
Qualified applications must undergo drug screenings.
EOE


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CL4SSIFIEDS SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009 D5


To place an ad, call 563 m5966


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- ,e,~-, - t-~A5~
.. ~ '~-


Fa:(32I535651TolFre (8)85-34 Eal, lssf*dohonceolnecmI wb * w w~hoicl*nine I


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles
J.W. 352-228-9645

$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for your junk car;,
truck or van
(352) 634-5389
CASH PAID all
vehicles.Trades welcome
Used PARTS avail
352-628-9118
FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale. Hshold.
& Furniture Items
Call 352-476-8949
WANTED
Junk Lawn Mowers
& Power Equip.
Free Pick-up (352)
564-8014/601-5053
/Us out zoomcltrus.com
We will remove & haul
away your CHAIN LINK
FENCING for free.
352-400-3929




3 COOTER TURTLES
for fish tank or pond
(352) 726-9573
6-Drawer wooden desk;
5-drawer metal file
cabinet; Call to arrange
pickup (352) 563-2395
AMERICAN
STAFFORDSHIRE TERRIER
6mos old, female, all
shots and spayed.
352-697-2971
Anchors and fishing sup-
plies for sale, all sizes
and types (Eagle claws,
kahtl hooks 7 alt down to
#10s). Call Jack for
prices: 352-422-0774
EGG CARTONS
(352) 726-5937
Excell. Home for any
unwanted birds, poultry
U-R unable to care for
726-9874
FREE 5 baby kittens
loveable. Call
(352) 746-9719 after 6p
FREE KITTEN
Long hair, black
w/green eyes. 8wks old
(352) 794-3579
FREE KITTENS
8 wks, all different colors
male & females
(352) 746-6227
FREE TO GOOD HOME.
4-8 week old kittens. 2
male/2 female. All long
haired, litter box trained.
Call 352-220-6156
HAVE SOMETHING TO
GIVE AWAY?
Place your
ad 24 hrs a day.
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
1 Select Place an Ad
2 Create an Account
3 Select Cust. type
4 Select Heading of
Special Notices
5 Select Free
6 Create Ad
Old Boat & Trailer
Needs work
No motor
(352) 860-1885
SET OF SLIDING GLASS
DOORS, Brown Stained;
and two large pieces of
tempered glass.
(352) 212-4608
Wanted- FREE Truck
Rack for 1998 Fullsize
Ford F150 Longbed
Pickup.
Call 586-7665
YOUNG CATS
10 mo. old. Extremely
loveable, well be-
haved. No fleas or
worms.Call Rosa
(352) 464-1567


-g


Blackberries
Organically Grown.
U-pick, starting May
26th. Sat.& Tues.8A./3P.
$3.50 per pound.
9333 Hwy 48 Floral City.
MADDOX FARMS
U-pick Farm peasbeans
corn + fresh green pnuts
tor sale, Hwy 475 N. 4.5
ml. North of Bushnell
(352) 303-0105
NOW OPEN, 8:30A/6P
BELLAMY GROVES
Fresh Sweet Corn
Lopes, watermelons,
veggies. 1.5 miles E. on
Eden Dr. From Hwy 41
(3521 726R-617


Loved family dog
missing. Lost in the'
vicinity of Eden Drive
and Moccasin Slough
Inverness. Answers
to the name BJ.
Small black pomera-
nian.
Very shy. Please call
352-697-5827 or
697-5826. $250.00 re-
ward for safe return.
***,**,**,**


Has a chip. Lost in
vacinity of North
Oakmont in Pine Ridge
Reward (352) 746-0912
Missing Brown & White
Pitt Bull. white strip
down face. 1 V2 old
E. Marylou, Croft Area,
Inverness
(352) 220-8646

POT BELLY PIG
Family pet. Black &
white. Vicinity CR39/
2mi Prairie/ Cedar Cove.
352-201-6594 call
anytime.



BLack & White Shlh- tzu
Male, very friendly, col-
lar red white, blue
found 5/26
in Citrus Springs
(352) 465-2091




Bank Probate
Divorces lEvictions
352-613-3674
1. -J --


Farb 6* Ma.I
Fhoto qphq,
otograp tt
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits
Indoor or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed



CyaRer


www.adoota
rescued pet.com
View available pets on
our website or call.
(352) 795-9550
Adoption Locations


$$ SAVE $$

* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com


Come see


our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A till 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4
All Cats and Kittens are
altered, tested for Fe-
line Luk and Aids. Up to
date on
vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
. Visit us at
www.hofspha.ora.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant Ave.
Corner of 44 and Co-
nant.
Look for the big white
building with the bright
paw prints.


Can anyone out there
donate a car to me?
Im a mother with 3
small children, working
full time and going to
college. Husband un-
employed, can't
afford car payment.
Verification of above
upon request,
really need HELPI
Thank you In advance
352-422-4733
TUTORING - All subjects
& Spanish. Exp. Certified
teacher. Reading .
specialist (619) 307-9277
Citrus County




Memorial Gardens
Bev. Hills, Section Peace,
Lot89 Space A $2200
/obo (832) 636-8462, 'To
view call. (352) 746-4646




A FREE Report of Your
Home's Value
www.naturecoast
liingvnet

missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
Shelter 794-3825




Teacher CDA
Preferred ARK ANGELS
(352) 795-2360
TEACHER

Part time Exp. Required
CDA Preferred
TADPOLES EARLY
LEARNING
(352) 560-4222




ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT

Inglils, Accts Pay, Detail
oriented, Multi-tasker
w/exc. phone, comp. &
cust. serve. skills.Apply in
person 10a-3p Mon-Thur
131 U.S. Hwy 19, North
















































Administrator

Local, private not for
profit organization is
seeking MBA with
Healthcare Adminis-
tration experience to
oversee business-
operations of Human
Service Agency,
Please submit resume
and salary require-
ments to Administra-
tor, P.O. Box 773402,
Ocala, FL 34477-3402

BECOME A CNA
For Career and
Test Preparation
Call 352-564-8378
CNA PREP CLASSES
EZ Learning Services
Day & Evening Classes
352-382-EASY; 586-2715
/ us out zoomcitrus.com

CNA/HHA/
Caregiver
Friendly & Cheerful '
people needed
to provide
CNA, HHA or
Caregiver Services
Paor time, for Citrus &
Hernando Counties
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
3770 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto
10am-2p, Mon.-Fri.


CNA TEST PREP
Now Offering Day & Eve.
Classes Free CPR train-
ing w/enrollment
341-2311
Scholarships Available

CNAS
JOIN OUR QUALITY
TEAM OF AIDES AT
North Campus
Rehab & Nursing
FULL & PART TIME
7-3, 3-11
WEEKENDS - 7A-7P
PRN - ALL SHIFTS!
COMPETITIVE WAGES
STRONG BENEFITS
LTC EXP. REQUIRED!
DRUG / BCKGRND
CHECK REQ.
CALL & APPLY
TODAY!
CALL 800-442-1353
FAX 877-571-1952
JOBS@CQCARE.COM
700 Palmetto St. N
Leesburg

COME
GROW
WITH US!







FT RN
Hospice House
3p-11p
Mon-Fri
FT Baylor RN
Hospice House
7p-7a
Sat & Sun
PT LPN
Hospice House
7p-7a
Sat & Sun
(2) FT RN
Green Team
Red Team
PRN Staff
RN's
LPN's
CNA's
A full description
these jobs as well
as our other open
positions and
application can
be found at our site:
www.hospiceofcitrusc
ounty.org
Fax: 352.527.9366
hr@hospiceof
citruscounty.org
HOSPICE OF CITRUS
COUNTY
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, Fl 34464
DFWP/EOE

DENTAL
ASSISTANT

Full time position at
community health
center in Sumterville.
Must have expanded
function certification.
Experience preferred
Good Benefits
Fax resume to:
HR Dept., Langley
Medical Center,
352-793-6269 or
e-mail
jpike@telmedical.com
EOE/ DFWP

EXP. DENTAL
ASSISTANT
In search of a
motivated team
player for busy
Inverness practice.
Must be computer
literate. Proficient in
making crown &
bridge temps. Paid
Vac, Health Ins.
profit sharing, 401 K.
F/T, Mon - Thurs.
Fax Resume Attn:
Karen (352)726-6893

F/T REHAB
THERAPY AIDE
CNA license required.
JOIN OUR TEAM!
CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
700 SE 8th Ave.
Crystal River
352-795-8832
Fax 352-417-0490

HOME HEALTH
OPPORTUNITIES

Find out how
BayCare HomeCare
can offer you all the
quality, growth and
career advantages
you'd expect from a
regional health care
leader.

* Physical

Full-time in Spring Hill
* Physical
her y
Full-time in Crystal
River
To apply, contact
Mary Miller, RN
Administrator
352-795-4495 or online
atwww.
BayCareJobs.com



BAYCARE
HomeOare
EOE/AA/M/F/D/V
DFWP


Experience LPN
FT position,
Cardiac exp. a plus
Competitive salary
and benefits
Fax Resume to:
352-726-5038

Full Time
Lic. Lab Tech &
Phlebotomist.

For busy Physician
Lab. Competitive
Salary & Benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 746-6333

GYN OFFICE IN
CRYSTAL RIVER
LOOKING FOR:

Cert. Medical Asst.
Receptionist - Billing
Dietician
Proactive, 1 year
exp. In Medical Of-
fices. Knowledge in
medical software
Please send resume:
mredrick@earthlink.net
or fax 352-564-8201

Intake/Evaluator
The Centers Is seeking
Intake/Evaluator
for our Access to
Services program in
Adult Mental Health.
' Master's Degree in
a field of Human
Services with exp
reqd. Salary Range is
$32,000 - $35,000
annually.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE
Fax or e-raoll resume
to HR, the Centers
Inc., (352) 291-5580
lobs@thecenters.us
. For more info visit
www.thecenters.us

LPNs

Help Promote Quality
Care & Services at
Arbor Village Nursihg
PART-TIME - 3-11
LTC EXP REQUIRED!
COMPETITIVE WAGES!
DRUG / BCKGRND
CHECK REQ.
CALL 800-442-1353
FAX 877-571-1952
JOBS@CQCARE.COM
490 S. Old Wire Rd.
Wildwood

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Front & Back Exp.,
F/T, computer &
phlebotomy.
For busy primary care
MD Office
Email Resume
wfmaresumes@
yahoo.com
or Fax Resume To:
352-489-5786

- NORTH CAMPUS
REHAB &
NURSING
A 120-bed SNF seeks
COOK
TO JOIN OUR
SUPERB DIETARY
TEAM!
FULL-TIME OPENING!
3+ YRS EXPERIENCE
REQUIRED!
GREAT SALARY +
BENEFITS
CALL 352-323-2400
FAX 352-323-2409
700 Palmetto St. N
Leesburg

Part Time Billing
Personnel
& Full Time
Receptionist
Medical/Chiropractic
Experience a must.
Fax Resume to
352-564-8906

RN- Unit Manager

North Campus
Rehab & Nursing
SEEKS EXP'D. RN TO
MANAGE ADMIN,
CLINICAL
& SPRVY FUNCTIONS
PRIOR LTC/ SPVR EXP.
REQ. SUBACUTE EXP
REQUIRED!
COMPETITIVE SALARY
GREAT BENEFITS
CALL 800-442-1353
FAX 877-571-1952
JOBS@CQCARE.COM
700 Palmetto St. N
Leesburg

RN/LPN-
CV SERVICES


This position is respon-
sible for providing
self-directed care to
CV, thoraclc surgical
patients in the pre-op
setting. Completion
of an accredited
school of professional
nursing and current
FL RN or LPN license.
Must have critical
care experience and
good assessment
skills. BLS within 30
days, ACLS within 6
months. Previous OR
experience and
specialty certification
preferred. Please
apply online at
www.citrusmh.com.,
CMHS is an equal
opportunity
employer.


GETYOURCNA.COM
Train & test with us.
341-PREP (7737)

RNs ,LPNs
W/Long-Term Care
exp.
WE'RE LOOKING FOR
YOU!
North Campus
Rehab & Nursing
PRN Openings!
We Offer Great
Salary
& Work Environment
DRUG/BCKGRND
CHK REQ.
CALL 800-442-1353
FAX 877-571-1952
JOBS@CQCARE.COM
700 Palmetto St. N
Leesburg

Sr. Social Worker
The Center is seeking
State Certified Senior
Child Welfare
Workers for Marion
& Citrus County
positions.
Current (PDC) Family
Services Counselor
Certification
Bachelor's degree in
field of Human
Services and 2 yr ex-
perience is required.
Futill benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE
Fax or e-mail resume
to HR, the Centers,
Inc., (352) 291-5580
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us

WA E A
it's E-Z @ E-Z Learning
Services
Offering CNA Test
Prep Courses
Day/ Evening Classes
CPR Included
10% IThru June '09
'Refer a Friend and re-
ceive an additional dis-
count. Enroll on line @
EZLedrningservices.com
or call 352-382-EASY
(3279) or 586-2715




Elections Logistic
Technologist
Announcement
#09-14
Responsible position
with the Supervisor of
Elections. Starting
pay $15.38 hourly.
Excellent benefits. �
Applications may be
submitted to the
Citrus County Office
of Human Resources,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto FL 34461

by Friday,
June 5, 2009.
For more Information
please visit
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
EOE/ADA

FACILITATOR
Shared Service
Alliance of Citrus Co.
Is seeking a
Professional Facilita-
tor that provides.
administrative
support and reports
to the SSA Board. This
is a Part time annual
contract position,
min. AA degree req,.
Bachelors preferred
Salary $15,000-$20,000
' based on exp./
education. No Bene-
fits. Send Resumes to:
Brad Thorpe
Citrus Co. Courthouse
2nd Floor
110 N. Apopka Ave
Inverness Fl. 34450

People Systems
is Seeking

SOCIAL WORKERS
Needed in Marion
and Citrus To work
w/ developmentally
disabled consumers
in the community,
Flexible schedule,
competitive salary,
fringe benefits. 4 yr.
degree w/ a min.
of 2 ,rs, exp. in the
Human Services Field,
Fax Resume:
352-620-2232

Programmer
Analyst
The Citrus County
School District is
seeking a highly
qualified individual to
assist in the support
and maintenance of
our financial
information systems.
IBM System I5
and COBOL
experience desired.
For more .
information go to
www.citrus.kl 12.fl.us or
call 352-746-3437. EOE


NEW YEAR/
NEW CAREER

The best opportunity
in Citrus County.
Average income for
2008 was $56.000.
Our 15
representatives
enjoy company trips,
bonuses, and many
other incentives.
Qualifications:
* Self-motivated
* Team Player
* Outgoing
Personality
and the
* Willingness to Learn
2 POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY
Mon. through Fri.
No late evenings,
weekends or holidays.
No experience
necessary,
training available.

Fax Resumes
to Atten: Joe
352-726-6813

SALES HELP
Licensed Real Estate
person needed for
busy.office.
Confidential Interview
Call 352-464-1515

SGN Wireless
AT&T
Authorized Retailer
.store in
Citrus County it
looking to fill full time
sales position
Please E-mail
resume to: resume
@sgnwireless.com

WANTED
Highly self motivated
Sale's people
Company truck is
provided. Yearly
paid vacation..
Holidays paid.
Benefits available.
Positions open in
Citrus, Hernando,
and Sumter Counties.
Apply in Person
ONLY, from 9 am to
4 pm Mon-Fri, At
A-I Termite &
Pest Control,
1840 Hwy 44 West,
Inverness, FL 34453.
Located across
from Applebee's.
Only well groomed
and properly dressed
applicants will be
considered.





EXP. LAWN
SPRAYING TECH.
Call 352-527-9373

HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
SCHOOL

IN LECANTO IS
NOW ACCEPTING
APPS. FOR
INSTRUCTOR'S.
Qualilfed
Candidates Must
Possess The
Following, Five
Or More Years Of
Operating Exp.,
Must Be A Team
Player Motivated,
Hard Working, &'
Pay Attention To
Details. Ability And
The Willingness To
Teach Inside The
Classroom Relia-
bility And Honesty
A Must. Resumes
Will Be Accepted
Via Fax, Or Email
Only, No Phone
Calls.
Fax Resumes To:
(352) 628-0823
EmailTo:
blindresumes
)vahoo.com

Local Fuel
Delivery Driver
Min. Class B CDL,
must have HAZMAT,
Apply in Person
1021 S. E. US Hwy 19
Crystal River
No Phone Call Please

MAINTENANCE
PERSON - F/T
Exp. Call Cindy, 352-
860-0829, Floral City.








Deliver Phone Books
Citrus County

* Work Your Own
Hours
* Have Insured
Vehicle
* Must Be At Least
18 Years Old
* No Experience
Necessary

800-247-4708
www.sddsinc.com


APPOINTMENT
SETTERS

Up For A Challenge?
Serious minded
individuals will earn
great $$$ setting appts
for our Very busy local
company. Call Steve
@ 352-628-0254

Experienced Only
VPK TEACHERS
CDA TEACHERS
(352) 201-2770
HELP WANTED
SELLING CATHERINE
ROSE SKIN CARE. To
family & friends. 50%
comm. Great for quick
cash! 1-800-314-2945
INVERNESS
DOMINO'S PIZZA
NOW HIRING
DRIVERS
Flexible eve. hrs. avail.
(352) 637-5300
TEACHER NEEDED
F/T P/T, call
(352) 341-1559













CLEANING HELP

Call 352-637-0585
After 7pm 746-4202
HOSTIHOSTESS
Are you people person
w/computer skills looking
for evening work.
(352) 817.4461

Key Training
Center
has F/T & P/T positions
available in group
home/apartment
setting. Assist
Developmentally
Disabled adults with
daily living skills.
HS DIploma/GED
required.
Call 352-341-4633
for more info.
Apply in person at
130 Heights Ave.,
Inverness. *E.O.E.'





















































2-9x7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry Door, 2 Vents,
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.795. INSTALLED
30x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang, .
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
2 Vents. 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$S 14995. INSTALLED
35x50x12(3:12 pitch)
Roof overhang,
2-10x10 Rollup Doors,
2 Vents. 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$29.995 Installed
* Fl. Engineered Plans
* A local FI Manufact.
* Meets or exceeds
Florida wind codes.
* Conc/Inst by others.
* Many sizes available
* We specialize in
Commercial Buildings
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
www. metal
structuresllc.com


Classifieds



In Print



and



Online



All



The Time


19' COMPAQ CRT
MONITOR with matching
JBL speakers. 352
382-2591
$30.00
COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 MI. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
New & Used systems
upgrades. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
www.rdeell.com
FLIP VIDEO MINI
CAMCORDER.BRAND
NEW! $150 OBO
352-746-3668
HP WIRED KEYBOARD
AND MOUSE In good
condition.Colour silver.
$20.00 352 560 3677


r Sheds & Garages
I of Any Size I
* -SHEDS NOW*
We Move & Buy Used
I Sheds
I lndependence/41 *
(35)860-0111





PRECIOUS
MOMENTS
Assorted Figurines. $200
352-419-4272




4 Person
Dream Maker Spa
Excellent Condition
$650. obo
(352) 287-2510




A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
4 2 Ton $780.00
4 2-1h Ton $814.00
4 3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Free Del. Uc.#CAC
057914 746-4394

A/C WINDOW UNIT
10,000 BTU's w/remote.
Only used a few mths.
$175. 352-613-4249
FRIGIDAIRE FREEZER
21cuft. Upright, used 2
years. Excellent cond.
$175. 352-637-3376
GE WASHER
white, excellent condition,
$75. Like new aueen
WATERBED mattress,
liner, heater $25,
352-637-4779
MAYTAG WASHER
$100 & WHIRLPOOL
DRYER $50 BOTH RUN
WELL 746-5453
REFRIGERATOR Good
condition-$50.00 Call
(352) 795-7057 after 5
p.m.
Refrigerator
Whirlpool 25.5 Cu. ft.
s ide, white. $850.
Flat Top Range
$300.(352) 302-3179
WASHING MACHINE
Kenmore, heavy duty,
large capacity washer.
Works good. $100 obo
352-637-1488
Whirlpool
washer & dryer,
$75 each. Cash �
(352) 344-2752
WHIRLPOOL WASHER
Excellent condition.
2 years old. $145.
352-795-6650
WINDOW AIR CONDI-
TIONER HAIER
5000BTU.LIKE NEW!
$50 OBO 352-746-3668




COIN Auction
Tues 6 PM 6/2
101 S Main St.
WILD WOOD
Estate Collection
Morgan & Peace
Dollars-Key Dates
High Grade Cond,
Silver Proof Sets
& GOLDI
Pesco Auctions
AB2164 AU2959
13%BP 0%Tax
Proxibld.Com/Pesco

COMPLETE
LIQUIDATION OF
LALUNA RESTAURANT
Mon. June 1
Preview: 8 AM
Auction: 10 AM
Hwy. 41-S, Inverness
all equip. & access.
Also 1986 BMW 325
dudleysauction.com
AB1667-AU2246 10%BP




18 + foot aluminum
extension ladder $80;
McClain Edger $65
(352) 746-4734
Craftsman
10" radial arm saw
with table, $125.
(352) 637-4865




Hitachi 50" HD TV
$500. (352) 746-3323
SONY 25" TV w/4 Door
Corner Pine Cabinet.
68"H. $100.
352-465-9186
. TV. & ENTERTAIN-
MENT CENTER
56" JVC Projection HDTV
& 10ft. wide expandable
Pine Entertainment Cen-
. ter. $650 for both! Call
352-270-3200

TV RCA 60" Projection
Excellent condition and
works fine. Local
delivery possible $300
(352)270-1775




Carpet Padding Felt 32
oz., 9 rolls, 360 yrds,
Half Offi $432.
(352) 586-1728
Floor Grade Pine
1 X 8 up to 1 X 12 inch
width. 8' to 16' length.
Bargain while It lasts.
(352) 621-0778


I Storage 1


SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009 DS


CLASSIFIED


S











D6 SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009


SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, BIk w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This
bad bov is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-3Q2-2815



42" TILE & CEMENT
Table w/3 benches,
$400. 23" Cement Table
w/2 benches, $150 or
both for $500.
352-796-9350
Table & 4 chairs, love
seat glider chaise �
lounger & small table, all
w/cushions $100
(352) 270-3189
Vinyl Table w/6 chairs, 2
bench seats, 2 small
talbes, $60 (352)
270-3189



2 Twin Beds
complete w/ mattress
& box springs,
$150. or $75 ea
(352) 726-0312

* THIS OUT!
1950S TABLE &
CHAIRS 1930S DINING
TABLE &CHAIRS
1950sPedestal table
35x35size Four chrome
burgundy vinylchairs
$150.00 1930sDuncan
Phyfe drop leaf table &
chairs $450.00
352,746 0513
BASSETT
MAHOGANY
Convex Glass
Breakfront $800. obo
(352) 628-0505
BLUE SOFA, LOVESEAT &
CHAIR
Excellent condition
$350/obo
352-502-2664
Cannonball Queen Sz.
Head & Foot & Rails
HugePine Post $150
Coffee Table & 2 end
tables, glass on orna-
mental Iron, real nice
$100. 352-860-1885
Couch
w/recliners on each end,
blue. $150.
Futon
Wood & metal $50.
(352) 795-7513
Day Bed,
Cream Color, Rattan
, $125
3 Covers, blue, green
pink $25. ea
(352) 344-4852
Dining Room Set .
w/leaf, 8 chairs,
buff. & serve. cabinet.
$1,800.(352) 795-3334


Citrus County Home
Inspections
$75. Any house In
June. (352) 978-8403

DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR ,
Repairing gas & diesel
engines. No job too big
or small. 352-228-2067





A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd
friendly serve. Lowest
rates Free est.
352-860-1452

All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
COLEMAN TREE SERV.
Trim & Removal. Lic.
Ins. FREE EST. Lowest
rates. 352-270-8462
check out zoomcitrus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design. ,
Bobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272










OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Work Free Est.
LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED!
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins

R WRIGHT TreeService
Tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Lic
0256879 352-341-6827






Richard Mills Tree Serv
Trim, haul, top,
removal, Free Est
Reasonable Rates
(352).398-9881
Richard Mills Tree Serv
Trim, haul, top,
removal, Free Est
Reasonable Rates
(352) 398-9881




At Home Computer
Repairs & custom
computers.
Call (352)228-7823

ON-SITE
COMPUTER
SERVICE
352-341-4150


Dining Room set,
med. brown wood.
inlc. 4 chairs, leaf, glass
top, excel, cond.
$195. obo
(352) 489-2953
DINING ROOM TABLE
Solid wood w/6/chalrs
$350. solid wood buffet
$250. round wood kit
table w/4 chs $200
(352) 795-1339 601-0656
ENT CTR Cherry,3 pc,
76"x 5 feet, dovetail
draws, 31" tv incl. 99e
sold as set 352-410-0891
Entertainment Center,
Lowrey Organ, 1929
Dining room table &
buffet, 5HP go cart
(352) 860-0534
FULL SIZE WHITE
WITH PALE PASTEL
COLORS TWEED COUC
Great Condition! $110.00
464-0316
GERMAN WEIGHT
DRIVEN
GRANpFATHER"
CLOCK $600. OBO
(352) 628-0505
Handmade drop leaf
Desk, many cubby
holes shelves & draw-
ers, built in chair, $135.
Glass top & side curio
cab. doors-on ea. end
white $85., 860-1885
Hide A Bed
Queensize, floral design,
w/bamboo arms. $150.
(352) 628-0147
LANE BEDROOM SET
(2) Twin beds, 6 drawer
dresser, 3 drawer bu-
reau, 2-night tables.
Cream lacquer finish.
Very good condition,
$300. 352-746-9206
LEATHER LOVESEAT
AND SWIVEL ROCKER
cream color, barely used.
$395.00. Two Palm Paint-
ings, large,matted,framed
orig.$300 each $125.00
� both 352-697-5779
LIV, DIN, KIT FURNITURE
(813)300-7929
Sugarmill Woods
Living Room Set
w/4 chairs. $400.
2 Curio Cabinets
w/lights. $600.
(352) 795-3334
MAHOGANY DUNCAN
PHYFE Dining Table w/
8 matching shelld back
chairs org $3800
sacricific $1500
obo(352) 628-0505
PORTABLE AIR
CONDITIONER on
wheels. Maytag 8000
BTU. Like new, works
great any room. $299,
352-410-0891
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30; Full
$40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
Room Divider
35 i/2"w x14"d x 4q"h
w/4 shelves, dark wood
tone, Like new $45;
(352) 563-2926
SOFA
new w/matching 2
chairs & 2 ottoman,
solid taupe color $550
(352) 795-1339
352-601-0656


1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
iX-Box 360(352)344-4839



' REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch * Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-1728



Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
work fully coated. 30 yrs.
Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-795-6533
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996








FERRARO'S.
Painting Service
Int/Ext. Free Est. Press
Cleanin 352 465-6631
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./lns.
(352) 726-9998
Mike Anderson i
Painting Int/Ext
& Pressure Washing
Call a Professional,
(352) 464-4418
/ Us out zoomcitrus.com



PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
27 yrs. exp. Certified
Best prices/guaranteed
352-220-9435
check out zoomcitrus.com



AT YOUR HOME
Mower & Generator
Repair. 352-220-4244
Lic#99990001273
DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Gas / Diesel Engines
No iob too bia or small.
352-228-2067
Mower Repair,
Hernando. Pick up &
delivery, Don Mead
352- 400-1483





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




certified caregivers/sitters
20 + yrs exp, Trans. Avail
Lisa 352-422-4765,
Dee Dee 352-422-1267


$150. 352-527-8529:
352-302-2668
Sofa,
dark green
$165.
(352) 382-1502
TIFFANY LAMPS
1 Table - $50
1 Floor - $150
352-419-4272
UNIQUE BED. HEAD-
BOARD CAN FIT ANY
MATTRESSI$200OBO.
352-746-3668
Used office desk
$145 OBO. Call
352.201.2073
YOUR FURNITURE
DONATIONS
SUPPORTS THE PATH
HOMELESS SHELTER
Call (352) 746-9084




CRAFTMEN"S
RIDING
Lawn Mower 19.5
hp 42" deck $550.
(352) 746-7357
DESK
w/chair, glass top,$70
Pullon chainsaw w/new
18' chain $75.obo
(352) 601-3654
KAWASAKI WEED
TRIMMER Low hours.
Paid $285,-selling for
$100. Extras.
352-527-1882
LAWN TRACTOR '08
42 In Craftsman. Auto
transmission.
w/broadcast spreader.
$1125. 352-489-2421

RIDING MOWER
w/bagger & trailer.
$200/obo.
AUTOMATIC POOL VAC
$100. 352-726-4048
RIDING MOWER
'08 Cub Cadet
46" cut, used little
Paid $1800, will take
$1100 firm (352)
563-0818
Riding Mower
Yard Machine, 18.5 hp.
8 speeds. 42" cut, lights,
newly serviced. $450.
(352) 601-3654
TRIMMER MOWER,
EDGER AND POWER
WASHER Craftsman 5.5
Horsepower, Highwheel
Trimmer mower.-$125.00
Karcher power
washer-$125.00 and
Black and decker
edger-$35.00. All in very
good condition. Call (352)
795-7057 After 5 p.m.
WEEDEATER LAWN
MOWER 500 SERIES
Excellent Condition used
only 3 times asking
$100.00 OBO
352-465-8841




BLOW OUT SALE!
Sat & Sun 7-5 - Hom.
Across from Neffer's
CITRUS SPRINGS
Sat & Sun 8-5
8126 N. Pitcairn Way
Near middle school
Lots of kids items,
Barble jeep & morel


OUTREACH SENIOR
COMPANION
SERVICES
Affordable, quality
Senior Care.
Companions,
Homemakers, Sitters.
Ucenced, Bonded &
Insured Call toll free
1-877-803-1608
www.outreachsenior
companlon.com
Uc #231103

PRIVATE DUTY CARE
Specialty: Quality of life'
Fl. St. Lic./Bonded, Ref.
.Lee (352) 201-4565.



* SEE THROUGH
Window Washing
All Aspects (352)
489-4189; 322-0962'
V us out zoomcitrus.com



A Reg. Home Daycare
in Beverly Hills. Very
Reasonable
Rates. Call Tara
*220-8086 ,
Reg'd HOME DAYCARE
Citrus Springs - Summer
Program/Planned Cur-
riculum. 352-422-7904
/us out @ zoomcitrus.com




Affordable CABINETS
& COUNTER TOPS
New & Remodel
352-586-8415




QUALITY CRAFTED
BUILDERS New, RenoVa-
tions & Commerciial
IS Yrs In Citrus County
352-726-5507
ROGERS Construction
New Homes & All
Construction (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872

Schnettler
Construction, LLC.
Renovations,room
additions,decks, bams,
garages,various home
repairs. (352)637-4629
cell 352-266-6756
Uc, & Ins CBC1253348




SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rovers,
wood decks, fia rms,
windows, garage scms
(CBC1257141) 628-52



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Mike Anderson
Painting Int/Ext
Pressure Washing
Ca/ll a Professional,
(352) 464-4418


2 GIRLS SCOOTERS
ONE BARBIE AND ONE
PRINCESS BOTH FOR
25.00 OR 15.00 EACH
601-4882 AFTER 2PM
4 Manavox DTV
Digital too Analog
Converters ,
$100 for all
(352)795-3764
95 MERCURY TRACER
good body, motor needs
work, $175 obo. call
352-613-6020
Air Compressor
$100.
Refrigerator
Kenmore $50.
(352) 795-3334
BABY HIGH CHAIR
SWIVELROCKER
CHAIR Baby high chair
Evenflo$20.00 Swivel
rocker chair like new in
light coral $25.00 352
746 0513
Boat NIV-haul
12'fiberglass,
new oars,
life jackets incl.
$450.
Sonic Scooter,
motor-
ized, w/basket, .
easy load,
exc. oond. needs
battery.
$375.(352)
726-5584
CAR FLOODLIGHT 15
foot cord very powerful
chrome15.00
3523821191
COMPUTER MONITOR
BRAND NEW 15.00
601-4882 AFTER 2PM
CONAIR ELECTRIC
HAIR CUTTING SET.
Used twice. With all ac-
cessories. $10.00 352
560 3677
Copier
Xerox Work Center Pro.
4165021 used once.
$600. IBM Typewriter
$50. (352) 795-3334
DINETTE 27" round
glass top table 4 chairs
steel frame/cane
746-1186
DODGE RIMS 15" Shark
style 5 lug $100. White
porcelain bath sink 19 3/4"
round has faucet $40.
S 563-1073
Exterior solid wood
door, 32x79, $50
Wardrobe closet,
31x74, $40
(352) 746-2932
FREE ADORABLE 2
.'YR.OLD CAT! MY CAT
IS ANGRY! NEED GOOD
HOME! 352-746-3668
FREEZER SMALL
20"DEEP X 33.5" HIGH
X 20" WIDE�$99.00 ONE
YEAR OLD
CALL352-382-3110
Futon couch, great
condition, $40.00.
Medium upright GE
freezer, $35.00.
352.726.4480


"HOME REPAIRS"
Painting, power wash
jobs big & small
(Eng./ Spanish)746-3720
' us at zoomcltrus.com
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable, Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
Uc. 5863 (352) 746-0141
#1 HOME SOLUTIONS
Press Wash, paint,
repairs, ceilings, baths,
low rates, exc: refs.
Uc# 260098 Call Don,
(352) 634-0171

Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too smalllReli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
_.-.. q

NATURE COAST
HOME REPAIR
& MAINT. INC.
Offering a Full I
Range of Services
www.naturecoast
homereoalr.com
Lic, 2776/lns.,
352-634-5499
Vlsa/MC/Dlscover

ALL HOME REPAIR
painting, drywall
Malley's Home Maint
220-9486 (lic0259169)
/ out zoomcitrus.com








FASTI AFFORDABLE!
RELIABLE Most repairs
Free Est., Lic#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *
Senior Saviours .
Monthly Maintenance
Service.
A must for ONLY
$40.00 a Month!
Call 352-342-9911
www.SeniorSaviours.co






S sed Garages O
Any Size
S*SHEDSNOW*
We Move & Buy

(352) B60-0111 !






All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable. Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
Uc. 5863 (352) 746-0141
SANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696


CLASSIFIED



Generator
1500 Watts, Brand New,
Cost $434.
Will Sell For $330.
(352) 746-7127
GLASS COFFEE TABLE
IN GOOD SHAPE 20.00
601-4882 AFTER 2PM
GT EXPRESS 101 IN-
DOOR COOKER AS
Seen On TV,Works good
with lots of extras,$30.00
(352)465-2459
HOOVER STEAM VAC,
works and looks like
new,instruction
book,extras $75.00
(352)465-2459





ITS FREE
Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad for FREE on
our all new
CLASSIFIED SITE.

5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 Items totaling less than
$100.00 each.

Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an Ad in the top right
hand corner.
KENMORE
Washer/Dryer $200;
Complete double bed -
box spring/matt/frame
$100 (352)249-7670
KIDS RAZOR BUMPER,
CAR NO CHARGER
25.00 601-4882 AFTER
2PM
KITCHEN TABLE SET,
Butcher Block type $65;
Men's Bike $40
(352) 621-0896
LAWN
EDGER-COLOR TV
lawn edger,gas,$30
19" sanyo color tv $35
352-503-3446
MICHELIN TIRES
TWO 295/30ZR18 &
TWO 345/30ZR18
Good cond. $100 for all
(352) 476-1896
NEW 18 IN GRIDS for
your pool filter paid 289
yours 99.00 3523821191
QUEEN ANNE CHAIR
mahogny legs, never
sat in tan cloth 99.00
3523821191
RUNNER RUGS indoor
outdoor 27inx20ft.
new15.00 3523821191
* SEGO PALMS, two ready
to plant $50 ea.; 1/2 Box
of NFL - Eagles - low ball
drinking glasses $40
After 1 lam
(352)637-2881
SINGER BUTTONHOLE
SET for the one who
sews 10.00 3523821191
SLENDERTONE AB-
DOMINAL TONER.
GOOD CONDITION.
$20.00 352 560 3677
SMALL DRESSER
LAMPS real nice, cute
15.00 pair 3523821191
SMALL FLAG POE
STAND use in your
f. driveway 10.00
3523821191


DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699
SALTMARSH
ELECTRIC
Comm/Resid. & Sign
Lighting. CR13012391
352-344-3810
/ us out zoomcitrus.comrn



FASTI AFFORDABLE! *
RELIABLE! Most repairs
Free Est., Llc#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *



C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264 /201-1422



PAVING & SEAL COAT
VIGLIONE LLC-/ic'Ins
www. TAR-MAX.com
Free Est(3521726-3093




ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencinga.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
OSBORNE'S
'lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Fence Work Free
Est. LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins




AAA ROOFING
Free est. 30 yrs exp.
352-563-04IJ
John Gordon Roofing
For a hole in your roof
or a whole new roof.
Free est. 352-795-7003




BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Estimates
Lic#2579/ins, 257-0078
Decorative concrete,
Landscape curbing
River rock resealing
344-4209 (Lic.6960)
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack repair,staining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
r 352-464-3967 m
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Uc. #1476, 726-6554


Stereo/Cassette
Fischer, w/2 spks. $200.
Oriental Wall Plaques
$75.00(352) 795-3334

The Citrus
County
Mosquito Control

Is disposing of Surplus
Property. A 1000
gallon (Con Vault)
double walled above
ground fuel tank.
Very good cond.
fuel pump not incl. This
tank was purchased in
'03 & has never been
used. A min. bid of
$5,000. This tank is
avail, at our facility for
inspection. Mon. thru
Fri. 7:00. a.m. til 5:30
p.m. If you have any
further questions or
would like additional
information, email to:

citruscountv.orq
or call
Joel Jacobson at
(352)527-7478.
Citrus County
Mosquito Control
District 968 North
Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto Fl. 34461

TRIPLE DRESSER all
wood, white, 72Wx 30H x
19D.
$50. 527-2553
Twin Bed
New Craftmatic adjusta-
ble, $425. Refrigerator
18 cu. ft. w/icemaker
Bisque colored, $275.
, (352) 726-5584
WEIGHT BENCH +
, WEIGHTS weiderpro
weight bench with
weights $150.00
352-628-1669

ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT









$$ SAVE $$

* LIFE INSURANCE
4 HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
*-DISABILITY

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com




2 MANUAL WHEEL
CHAIRS Good Condition
No Foot Rests Only
$40.00 464-0316
4 WHEEL WALKER
WITH SEAT & BRAKES
New In Box $85.00
464-0316
AMEGO 3 WHEEL
SCOOTER New 12 Volt
Battery Comes Apart
$200.00 464-0316
AUTOGO SCOOTER
Good condition
w/charger, $400/obo
352-746-1433


e


Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services
40 Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768
W. F. GILLESPIE CONST.
Lic. #CRC1327902
(352) 344-0009
www.wfgillesple.com




A Cutting Edge
Tile Job
Showers. Firs etc
(352) 422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone Drive-
ways & Tractor work
341-2019 or 257-1562
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,
Hauling, Site Prep,
Driveways. Uc. & Ins.
(352) 795-5755
*TOP SOIL SPECIAL*
3 Yd -$60/ 5 Yd $85
10Yd $175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436




All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/us out zoomcitrus.com
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, HaulingSite
Prep, Driveways
Lic/lns795-5755
Ck out zoomcitrus.com
Pasture mowing, lots
acreage, commercial.
$18. per acre & up.
(352) 978-8403



D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
Bobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272






SERVICEC


#1 Absolute �
Lowest Price I
Guaranteed I
Barker's Lawn
Service.Monthly or I
S Per cut rate
(352) 232-8166

#1 AGAIN Pro Tech
Lawn Service. Family
owned & operated.
Serving central Citrus
Cty since 1999. Call
for free estimate
302-7800 - Uc/Ins.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ARMAN Auto lift 750;
Invacare Power Chair
$800; Invacare Walker
$50 (352) 795-4421
Incline Board
adjustable, like new
$95.
(352) 637-4273
Power Chair
Jazzi 1113, cover, cup
holder, nice cond. will
deliver $850.
Wheel Chair/lnvacare,
$50.(352) 220-0075 "
Wheelchair, paid $450
Used 1 mo. all leather,
exc. cond. sell for $150
Power chair, used 2
wks, like new. $650
(352) 726-2425



"THE REVENUER"
Buy & Sell
Vintage coins/currency
352- 302-8159
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676



Guitar
Fender Squire, w/case
& beginner music book.
Exc. cond. $100.
(352) 465-7139
Piano
Baldwin Spinet,
Walnut finish, Pd. $2,200,
very good cond. asking
$500. Hernando n
(239) 877-1027
TWO ALTO SAXAPHONES
with cases $250 each
(352) 621-6606
F Finess^
Equipment


GAZELLE
PERFORMANCE 300
Exerciser as seen on
HSN, new & assembled
willIncis basic DVD
player $100 firm
352-527-2456
Nordic Trac,
Heavy Duty Frame
Inversion Table,
Asking $200 obo
(352) 794-3085
PRECOR EFX 544
Elliptical, like new
org. price $2400 price
$850. Body Solid Weight
Lifting Rack $450
(352) 746-3323
STAIR STEPPER WITH
LARGE DIGITAL
READOUT Great
Condition!Works Arms
Too! $100.00 464-0316




(2) HUFFY BICYCLES
26" girls. Good
condition. $50 each.
352-563-5386
4 SALE- GUNS & AMMO
AR-15's - AK-47's - Shot
Guns - Pistols. WE BUY
SOLD. 352-489-4870
AMMO, 9mm brass
case, FMJ, 500,rounds,
$200 (813) 789-0592
Crystal River Area


Landscape Main.
"Complete Lawn Care"
�(352) 489-3070
Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Specials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
check out zoomcitrus.com
DUN-RITE LAWN SERV
Lic & Ins Clean up,,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681
check zoomcitrus.com
HALLOCK & Son
Lawncare/Landscaping
Covering all your lawn care
needs. Detailed work.
746-6410 Lic/Ins.
HARRY EVERSON'S
LAWN & MAINTENANCE
Uc. & Ins. Free Est.
(352) 302-2585
V us at zoomcltrus.com
HEDGE TRIMMING,
HAULING(ANY KIND),
LAWN MOWING,
MULCH. FREE ESTI-
MATES. 352-344-9273
OR 352-201-9371
INVERNESS AREA
Mow,trim, beds,
Fast Reonse since
1991 352- 422-5978
I zoomcitrus.com
Lawn Care 'N' More
Mow, clean up
brushes, beds
Friendly Service since
1991
Residential/Commrl
(352) 726-9570
out zoomcitrus.com
MOWING & TRIMMING
Residential/ East citrus
county area.
352-302-1511;341-5182

Over 3 000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


Uonea e Uepons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
FOOTBALL TABLE
Hvy Duty $100.
(352) 746-3323
GOLF CART
Exc. cond, like new.
Fold down windsheild,
curtains, baskets,
buckets, mirror. $1950
352-795-5146
GUN AK47 Rifle
w/colapsable
stock,100 rounds
ammo, w/access. $800;
trade 45 cal pistol.(813)
789-0592 Crystal River
High Standard
Derringer 22 magnum,
exc. cond. $200.
(352) 464-0926
MENS' DRYJOY
OXFORDS 81/2 Extra
wide White w/Brown
$40 (352) 341-0523
PRIVATE COLLECTOR
Buying Guns,
Ammunition&
reloading supplies
(352) 586-7516
R580XD TAYLOR
MADE GOLF DRIVER
R580XD Taylor made
driver, stiff shaft,9.5
loft,used only a few
times,excellent condi-
tion. $100.00
352-503-5030
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238



CAR HAULER
'06, 32 Ft. Dominator XT.
By Classic C. Trpl.
axels. $14,200. Like
new.(352) 835-4273


5.Act Now -

PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE[
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad




beautiful mans ring,large
garnet stone set in 10
karat setting with 4 dia-
monds 150.00
352-628-1669




REFRIGERATOR SWAP
Off-White Kenmore
side-by-side,dispenser
in door, for any make
Black similar size and
condition. 352-628-1434



SILVER & GOLD Coins
any broken or un-
wanted jewlery
paying $$$ 344-1283


OSBORNE'S
Quality Work - Free
Est. WEST RATES
352-400-6016 Lic/Ins
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
& LANDSCAPE
SICE 199 (Licl/Ins)
628-9848 or 634-0554
* us out zoomcitrus.com




EVERCLEAR POOL
SERV. & Maint.
Concrete Pools Only
(352)344-5122
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
u 352-464-3967 U




P - -- -
MOBILE RV
SERVICE. |
WE COMETO YOU
I Motor Homes I
5th WhIs/Rvs
Master Tech
352-586-5870 '
Storage Available




WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard

WEL PUP EPI
&FLE SERIC


Installations by I
Brian CBC1253s53
7ee M4 rod 4 fimiM
352-628-7519






Siding,.Soffit & Fascia. Skirting ,Roofovcrs,
Carports.& Screen Rooms.
wwwwadvancedaluminum info

u^.0 -r


1st Choice
PEST CONTROL, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE


LAWN GOT

PROBLEMS?..

Call 503-68;1
Owner/Operators .
Uoyd Smith * Bill Bledenstein * Jim C'rr
7 ,2 5340W. Glenbrook.St.


$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
Adorable Chihuahua
Puppy smooth coat, 9
wk. old male. & 1 Male
Long Coat CKC/REG.,
Health Certs. $225.
(352) 726-1843
ALL BREED RESCUE
Now available; Westle,
Schnauzer, Shlhtzu,
Maltese mix,
352-553-2604
CHIHUAHUA'S
CKC Reg. Current shots,
$195.Health cert
(352) 406-7123
FREE MALE CATloves
to be held and petted,
needs loving home cell
352-586-4428
German Shepherd
Puppies, 21,Wks. 2 males,
2 fems.,1 is blue all the rest
black & tan. papers, & health
certs. $300.(352)
201-0111
GERMAN SHEPHERD
puppies. 8 wks, 6 Fern.
3 males. All black & tan.
Health cert. $300
(352) 795-7897
(561)324-3151
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
Poodles, Mini pups,
males, AKC reg. Choco-
late, blue, silver, beautiful
& well socialized.$300.
(352) 527-1920
PUGGLE PUPS
(pug/beagle); Sheltie,
Paplllon & maltepoo
pups $375-$450
(352)216-1481
Pure Bred Collies
2/both 1 year old.
$350. for both, obo.
Must go together.
(352) 795-7513
ROTWEILLER PUPPIES
Absolutely Beautiful,
8wks, AKC, big boned,
shots, wormed. Parents,
$650 + (352) 503-6316
Shih-Tzu Puppies
2 New Liters Home
raised w/ love. All shots
Includ'd. $300+
3902 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827
(305) 872-8099



Mini Horse
Stud, 5 yrs. old.
White & brown. $250.
Obo.(352) 628-1277

Summer Horse
Camp
(352) 382-5400
www.rymarranch.com




BABY GOATS SHEEPs
& Pigeons
For nets only.
Mini Farm off 495
(863) 843-2495 cell


arb * Ma1
totqograph9
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits. Indoor
� or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed




ELITE PAVING &
SEAL COATING
All types - Res/Comm
352-302-3030 LIc/Ins


Circle T Sod Farms.
Inc.
Tired of your dead
lawn?
Replace it with
Bahia. Delivery
Avail (352)400-2221
LAWN RESTORATION
All types of Grasses
Low maint Lawns Avail.
J & J Sod 352-302-6049


BATHFITTER

"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM


PO.OLS/PA.JJ:S


Proessona











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Assorted Bantams,
Polish, Ducks & Quail ,
Starting at $2.
352-795-6381



1993 17' Sylvan
Bow rider bimini top
Boat & trailer
85h.p. Yamaha motor
Good cond. $3,500
(352) 344-0457
15ft. SHOAL WATER
'05, Cat Hull, 50HP
Evinrude, CC,
extremely shallow for
Flats, w/ trailer $10,950.
(352)621-0848
16FT CAR. SKIFF
'96, like new, $5,500
40HP Evinrude, center
console, trolling motor,
b-top, many extras
(352) 344-5858
AIR BOAT
Big 13 Ft. haul,
2 seats. Approx. 375-400
HP. 8 blade warp drive.
2-1 reduction gear box.
Used 100 hrs.+ Trl.
$18,500 invest. Sell
for $10,000 firm.
(352) 302-4535
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubik inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
AQUA SPORT '05
175 Osprey , 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual
bait. w/switch, bimini,
easy load trailer. Low
hours. $9,990
352-860-0277
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
.00Lt352-746-5856
AQUA SPORT
2000; 225 Explorer 24'
Cuddy cabin. 225
Johnson Ocean Pro.
Loadmaster tandem axle
- trailer. Exc. cond.
$14,500.352-493-7377;
352-221-5230
AQUA SPORT
'86 25FT.Cuddy Cabin.
W/twin '06 Optimax
150hp & double
axle trailer. $16,900
(352)257-1355
Bass Stream Boat
1999, 15 ft., boat, motor
& trailer, starter heeds
fly wheel $1,200. obo
(352) 287-2510 -
BOSTON WHALER
14 ' w/40 hp Johnson,
Everything works good
$1800 (352) 302-0033
Cabin Cruiser -
24 ft.
Owner died, 6 cyl.,10,
'alpha orie/OD, used in
fresh water, tan: gal. trl
Incl.'d $2,100 464-0316
CENTURY
'01-. Bay, 21ft.
'02, 150HP Yamaha w/
trir., custom cover
dep/find, VHF, Iw hrs.,
like hew, $13,950.
(352) 442-7772
� Deck Boat
95'19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ra-
dio & fishfinder. New Bat-
tery switch. 2 batteries,
power pk.
prop./hub.$6,000
(352) 726-0838
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras!
$14,500/obo. (352)
489-9640: 220-6508
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
115HP, 4strke Yamaha,"
w/ trr. $11,200. will .
trade (352) 503-3778
OSPREY
1994 -'16ft, CC, bay boat.
88 HP Evinrude, Garmin
GPS/recorder $4500.
352-621-4711
PONTOON '08
Sweetwater 21ft. 25 hours.
90hp Yamaha.
$16,500. Many Extras
352-503-6797
PONTOON
22' Palm Beach 2002
60hp Yamaha $4800
(239) 571-2628
PONTOON BOAT
08' 20 Ft. To many
options to. list. $13,000
Call for Info. 628-7926
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine'Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
Sport-o-potty, extras
$12,000 (352) 628-0281
PRO-LINE 221
WALKAROUND 1999
200 HP Mercury w/9.9 HP
Johnson kicker,$12k
obo. Call Kurt at Pete's
Pier 352-795-6067
SEA PRO
'00 19 FT. C/C. Loaded.
Elec. Pkg. 115 FI 4 Strk.
Yam. 100 hrs. Bim. top.
Best offer(352)533-3093
SEADOO 15FT
'97 Runs great, looks
great. 135HP Inboard
Boat cover, trailer.
$4200. 352-484-9854
SUNDANCE SKIFF
r 02- 16ft. 30HP Mercury.
Center Console, trolling
motor., B-top, trailer.
S $4500. 352-422-7765
is T-CRAFT
23'L, 6'W,.'02 150H
Evin. mtr. w fuel enj. like
new, trir. w/brks
$7750 352-489-3661
Ultimate Scalklop
Boat 03, 25' Sun
Tracker, 05 Merc 90hp, to
hrs. tandem-tril. like new
exc. value $11,500.
352-586-1676


WELLCRAFT
1987, 250 Sportsman,
25', Gas eng., 30" draft,
260 hp I/O, alum.
trailer.$8,000
(352) 344-9651




22 FT. Minnie Winnie
1993, Class C, 16 mpg,
dependable, like new
small V-8, sleeps 6
$7,300 (352) 563-9964


5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
' Inverted, central van.
261nch. TV.$30;500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
'07 NEW MAR
Cypress 32ft 5th wheel.
2 slides. Separate bath.
Extras. 3 yr ext. warr.
$35,900/obo
352-794-3534
38FT BOUNDER '96
Class-A - basement
model. 49K mi. 14mpg,
new tires & brakes. (4)
TV's. Ready for long trip.
"$2LQQ. 352-563-0615
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 36 K Mi.
Dual air. $37,700 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
* AUTO. BOAT *
*&RV*
DONATIONS
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
(352) 795-9621
* Tax Deductible *

CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
conslgnmentusa.org
CHEVY '86 Class C
Very good cond. Needs
tires. $4,000. Call
anytime. (352) 446-6329
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide'
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane New
deal. 30Q, class A motor
home, 31% ft., 22k mi.
V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed,
etc. Saturn tow incl.
$35,000. (352) 397-5007
GEORGIE BOY
'05, Pursuit, Class A,
30ft. Excel. cond. 8k mi.,
2 slide outs, 2 TV's, back
up camera, all the bells
and whistles and much
more, must see this
coach, Asking $50,000.
obo (352) 746-7626
-GULF STREAM
BT Cruiser 03, 22' fully
loaded, ready to travel
$27,500....
(352) 341-1297
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool, .
clubhouse etc. Can be
moved $29,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
Holiday Rambler
'03, By Monico, 300
Cummins, 2 slides,
under warranty
mint cond. $69,900.
(352) 302-7073
Holiday Rambler
Admiral Motor Home 36'
2 slides, 340hp, gas eng.
all options transf ext.
warr..$51,900
352 795-3970
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$52,995. 352-464-0371
Keystone 07
Big Sky 5th Wheel Prem.
Pkg 340RLQ every option.
Center Island Kit. incis
sep.W/D, added 2nd a/c in
bedroom
Price to Sale $52K firm
352-794-3068
PACE ARROW
04, 38' 3 SLIDES
21k mi fully loaded
3 tv's $92,500 obo
352-302-0743




BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed, '
microwave, Irg refrig. Like
new. $9,995.
352-489-3661
COLEMAN NIAGRA
2002, 15FT, opens to
*26FT, 1 slide, $5,500 obo
(352) 302-1322
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778

I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO
07 Jay Flight
28' used twice, smells &
looks new, green clean,
sips 6 $16,800 (352)
503-7431
MEADOWBROOK
5th Wheel, 2000 Excel-
lent. Photos at
http:l/picasaweb.google.c
onCmeadowbook.Glenn -
$13,995.00
(352)302-6055 or
(727)692-9045
PROWLER
'9921', self contained,
sleeps 6, new tires, AC,
bath, etc. $5,300
(352) 795-1417
SSKYLINE 04
32' sleeps 8, used
once $11,500
(352) 586-9614
TRAIL CRUISER '04
17F"T, light weight,
fully loaded. Used
10 times. $6800.
352-628-4522




$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374


$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
" CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org

Buvina Used Cars
Trucks & Vans
For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333


LRecreation
! 1 j
= , �j
Vehicles


PONTIAC '96
BONNEVILLE
Looks Goodl Runs
GoodI Asking $1275.
352-637-5394 '
SATURN
'02, SC2, Silver 3-DR
coupe-automatic clean
& sporty runs great, I
owner, pwr. WDL, cold
air, well maint. 31mpg,
188k, $2,400
(352) 795-7180
SUZUKI
'07 Forenza. 30K mi,
w/1OOk warr. LOADED
w/touch scrn nav.
$12,800. 352-613-6613
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 mi.
warranty. $19,995.
(352) 382-1857
TOYOTA
'07 Camry, silver, 4dr.,
- loaded, leather int.,
$15.000 Obo.
(352) 637-1276


1-800-714-9813
NISSAN
2005, Frontier Low Mi.,
Great Little Trucki $8990
Jenkins Mazda
1-800.714-9813
TOYOTA
2003, Tacoma Crew
Cab, Beauty! 45k Orig
Miles Loaded - Call for
Deal Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
BUICK
'03 Rendezvous.
$8,995 Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299


Running or Not
Cash Paid, $150 & Up
(352) 771-6191



1997 MAZDA MIATA
Convertable, Fun &
dependable, Porche
Red, new top, 36mpg,
5-speed, A/C, new tires.
Mint $5,700 352)
563-9964
2000 Buick LeSabre
Beautiful car - all the
extras. 128k ml. $4500
Call (352) 697-2333
'06 TOYOTA
Corolla LE Sport, 48k ml,
Silver, pwr roof, win-
dows, dr locks. Cruise,
auto, 6 disc CD, 40mpg.
Senior owned. New tires.
Garage kept $11,900
352-860-1106:201-4499
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
BMW
'03, 745 Li, NAV, black,
sun roof. all options $29K
Mint
(352) 746-2696
BUICK
'07 Lacrosse CX. -
9,500 Mi. Ruby red, like
new. Must see. $12,900
Wooten's(352) 637-7117
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715
. CHEVY
'05, Impala, All Pwr, CD,
sunrf., new batt. good
cord., 46K ml. $7,600
(352) 527-3735
COMPLETE
LIQUIDATION OF
LALUNA RESTAURANT
Man. June 1
Preview: 8 AM
Auction: 10 AM
Hwy. 41-S, Inverness
all equip. & access..
Also 1986 BMW 325
dudleysauction.com
AB1667-AU2246 10%BP
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
. Financing Avail.
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consigpmentusa.org
CORVETTE
02, Z06,
Black, low mi., over
30 mpg hwy. $24,400.
(352) 613-5355
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 mi-
les on this rare silver on
silver on silver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are on
this gorgeous vette,
Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
included, Your's
for only , $48,000.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE 4-speed,1978
Silver Anniversary w/air,
t-top, 350 Chevy motor.
Works good. $12,500
(352) 212-5526
' CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, auto,
SHOW CARI
$11,500 or will trade for
truck. 352-563-6428
FORD
'05 Taurus SE, V-6
Loaded, 43K. mi. extra
clean. Must see. $7,880.
Wooten's (352)637-7117
HONDA
'08 Civic, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
* KIA RIO
2001 88K mi. New tim-
ing belt, good cond.
Well maint. $2,100 obo
(352) 637-5816
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well maintained.
$2650. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
LINCOLN
'96, Towncar, garage
kept, 88K miles, loaded
$3,650 abo
(352) 344-5555 ext. 101
MAZDA
1999, MIata Only 60k
Orig MI Fun In the Sun!
$7990 Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
MAZDA
2006, 3 Automatic,
Sunroof, 30K Miles Bal.
of Warranty, $229 mo,
wac Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
MAZDA
2007, 6, V-6 Power, Low
Miles Only $12,990
Jenkins Mazda
, 1-800-714-9813
MERCEDES
'05 SLK, $24,995. 2 avail.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'05 SLK, $24,995. 2 avail.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'08 C- CLASS,$29,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCURY '03
Grand Marquis LS,
1-owner, garage kept.
54K ml, Exc. cond.
$10,495. 352-560-7386
MGB
Convertible 1977, 57k mi.
Blue, many xtras
Excellent Condition
$10,500 (352)628-0281
MITSUBISHI
'03, Diamante LS, excel.
cond. Always serviced.
Fully equip. Priced be-
, low Kelly BB. $7,900..
352-382-5702
NISSAN
2003, Altlma Low Miles,
Loaded Only $249 mo,
WAC Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813


'06 Corolla,
$11,995 Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA SUPRA '89
All original, red, 79k ml.,
6 cylinder, all power,
targa roof. Original
owner. Garaged, $7,695
(352) 726-3427
VOLVO
'05 S60, $15,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S40, $15,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S60, $17,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S80, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S 40, $17,995.
2 avail. Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S60, $19,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VW Beetle
2004,Convy, Leather &
Loaded, Low Miles Only
$10,990 Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813




1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's
Dream. $3500/obo
352-228-0597
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, 350 V-8,
auto, May trade in part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door se-
dan. 6 cyl'auto. $9,500.
Will consider trade foa
travel trailer of equal
value.(352) 628-4053
ALFA ROMEO
'76, Spider. Project car.
� $2300 obo
352-382-5702
AMC Gremlin
$600 (352) 637-1074
BUICK 67
RIVIERA, 430 wildcat
motor, 86k mi. amfm,
a/c, titi whl. elect seats,
very good cond. $8000
(352) 527-3961
CHEVY
'69 Classic C10 SHT BD
, 350/350 AC, PS,
$15K or trade
(352) 746-9212
EL CAMINO '81
305 Auto, All new.
interior, & paint. Cragpr
mags & tires 4" raised
hood. $3,250.
(352)341-3613.
GM El Camino
'84, 1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint;
63K mi., $8,900 obo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MERCEDES BENZ
1985 380SL, 2 top road-
ster. Drives, looks great.
Many new Mercedes
parts. New A/C. Must
see! REDUCEDI $7,900.
David 352-637-6443.
THUNDERBIRD
-'73, New paint, tires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$12,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122



$5001 Policee
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'94 CHEVY
Ext. cab, 8 ft bed. New
motor, good cond. 2
wheel drive Z71 pkg.
$3,900.
352-563-1518 Iv msg
CHEVROLET
1994, 1500 W/T. runs
great, new A/C, top-
per, $2,000 obo
(352) 302-1322
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US 19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awe-
some Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded
every special feature. Sr.
own, gar. kept., 27K ml,
$40K
invested Sale $21,750
See online ad photos
www.autotrader.comlatca
rid/at-f3fd39f
John (352)726-1076
FORD
'02 F-150 XLT, Ext. cab,
4dr, auto, loaded black &
silver, extra clean, sharp.
* $7,995 Wooten's
(352) 637-7117
FORD 04
Ranger, X-cab. Exc. cond
38k mi. SLASHED THE
PRICE$97K to $8,500
(352)746-3919
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serve. van. 41K Mi./5.4 L.
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serve. body/dble lock drs.
$20,000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD F-150
1995, 4x4, cold a/c, '
new tires, runs good
$2500 obo(352)
564-0530
GMC
2003, Sierra, 40k Miles,
1 owner Loaded,
$13,990 Jenkins Mazda


SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009 D7


CLASSIFIED




'05 Escalade, low mi. all
power, sun roof,
exc. cond. $28,000
(347) 266-9328
CHEVY
'06 Trailblazer
$12,995. 2 avail. Ocala
Volvo (352) 629-7299
CHEVY
BLAZER '99 LS 4dr.
126k mi. loaded, great
cond. sunroof, $4k obo
352-422-0065
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air &
exhaust, Exc. Cond. $6,000
obo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whi
drive, class 3 hitch, Orig
owner. Great shape &
price. $8,750.
352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
FORD 2006
Explorer - Eddie Bauer
4dr. Leather interior.
Exc. cond. Asking
$19,000. 352-489-2421
GMC ENVOY
Red,'03, 60k ml.,
On-Star, tow package
5-passenger, $10,500
obo (352) 527-3445
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, $8,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
ISUZU
2005, Ascender 30K ml.,
Great SUV,1 Owner
Loaded - $13,990
Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
LEXUS
'07 RX 350, Black, tan
leather Int. Navigation, back
up cam, blue tooth, very
clean, 75K.mi.
$25,000.(352) 527-8372
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG. Silver
W/black int. Loaded,
57K.Mi. New $64K.Ask
$20K. (352)489-7674
VOLVO
'06 XC90, $20,995
3 avail. Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299



$500! Police
Impounds for sale!
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
FORD '06 F-150
Crew cab XLT. Tow pkg
&topper, 51K mi;
Exc cond.'LOADEDL
$18,500/obo. (352)
634-1378; 795-2053



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872
DODGE
'03 Grand Caravan SE.
low mi. 53K. ,dual air, sun
screen, CD & cass. New
tires. Looks & drives like
new. White, $6,800.
(352) 860-1106
DODGE
2005, Grand Caravan
Pwr Drs. Tailgate, ,
loaded family van only
$219 mo, wac Jenkins
Mazda 1-800-714-9813
ECONOLINE VAN '01
White, regular or hand .
controls, Wheelchair
acc., w/lift, $4200
(352) 341-7798
FORD E250 V-8
'2002, Work Van, inside
tool boxes, good cond.
$3,800 (352) 564-4598
HONDA ODYSSEY-EX
MINI-VAN 2002, GREEN,
1 Owner, DVD, $7,900
obo- (352)422-3735
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT









$$ SAVE $$

' LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com




$5001 Police
Impounds for sale!
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374



1973 HARLEY DAVIDSON
GOLF CART. Gas
engine, AM/FM, light.
Good cond. $500
(352) 220-2374
2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900mi. HD custom.
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237 .
1970's HONDA MINI
TRAIL - Classic,
3-spd auto clutch.
Excellent condition.
$795. 352-228-3285
352-419-4553
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374


HARLEY DAVIDSON
Electraglide Ultra Classic
2006 HD Ultra Classic
like new. Fully loaded, in-
cludes Drivers Backrest,
V&H Mufflers, 2 Helmets
with Head sets,
AM/FM/CB/Intercom, HD
cover, Panacia Lighting,
New Battery LESS than
3500 miles. 18,500 Seri-
ous Inquires only please
344-2491
HD 1200L
'07, 1000 ml. loaded
w/chrome $7200
Fin avail. We Rent Bikes
Lucky U Cycles
(352) 330-0047
HD HERITAGE
'06, low miles, Bik
finance avail $12,700.
Lucky U Cycles
(352) 330-0047
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 Mi.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
HONDA "99
Valkyre 30K ml. Blk, C
Clean $8k, Lucky U
Cycles (352) 330-0047
HONDA 04
1300 VTX, .
thousands in options.
mint condition $5900 obo
(352) 302-7073
HONDA 06
Goldwing Trike, loaded
14k, ml. $27,500 Lucky U
Cycles (352) 330-0047
HONDA 1976
550cc. 4 cyc. Super
sport, complete, runs
good, ride/restore
$650,(352) 628-5606
HONDA
Aero 2006 wlndsheild
V & H pipes, 2nd seat,
sissy bar $5200 obo
352-302-4320
SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
, inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Blk w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k
invested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815


977-0611 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop, Citrus County Fleet Management
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
be selling surplus property & equipment via the Internet
at govdeals.com from May 28, 2009 - June 11, 2009.
Published seven (7) days consecutively in the Citrus
County Chronicle May 28 thru June 11, 2009.


976-0531 DAILYCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Warning: as of this date the grounds and facilities
owned by the Moorings @ Point 0' Woods Homeowners
Assoc. located on Gospel Island Rd and all contiguous
properties on Pelican Cove Ct, Heron Creek Loop,
White Egret Path, Golf Harbor Path, E. Pebble Creek Ct.
are for the exclusive use of the HOA owners only.
Trespassers will be prosecuted.
The Board of Directors,
Moorings @ POW, HOA
Published five (5) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
Mary 27, 28, 29, 30 and 31,2009.


359-0531 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote Notice- Kennedy & Cassldy
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice Is hereby given:
Michael A. Kennedy
Last Known Address of
6461 West Goldenleaf Lane
Crystal River, Florida 34429
Shane J. Cassidy
Last Known Address of
6 Michael Drive
Beverly Hills, Florida 34465
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote Is In
question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of
Elections, In Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond
will result In a determination of Inellgibility by the Super-
visor and your name will be removed from the state-
wide voter registration system. If further assistance Is
needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections at the
below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 North Apopka Avenue
Inverness, Florida, 34450
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle
May 31,2009.


978-0601 SU/MCRN
6/4 Emergency meeting- Citrus County Transit
PUBLIC NOTICE
Public Notice:

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Transportation Disad-
vantaged Coordinating Board will hold ,a Special Emer-
gency Meeting at 10:30 A.M. on the 4th day of June.
2009 at the Lecdnto Government Building at 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Room 280,. Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person requiring special accommodations or desir-
Ing further Information regarding this meeting may
contact the Transportation Supervisor of Citrus County
Transit, 1300 S. Lecanto Highway, Building #22, Lecanto,
FL 34461. Telephone: (352) 527-7630
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: any person who decides to ap-
peal any decision of the governing body with respect
to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purposes may
need to provide that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceeding Is made, which Includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal Is based. (Section
286.0101, Florida Statutes)
JOHN THRUMSTON
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 31 and June 1, 2009.


361-0621 SUCRN
2008-CP-747 Estate Llese-Lotte Hildebrandt
Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
UCN: 092008CP000747
CASE NUMBER: 2008-CP-747
DIVISION: Probate
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF LESE-LOTTE HILDEBRANDT
.(A/K/A UESE-LOTTE HILDEBRAND),
Deceased

Kemp & Associates, Inc., as Owner and Holder of a
Partial Assignment of Interest of MARTA BOPZIN, et al.,
Petitioner,
v.
HENRY L. STAUFFER. as Personal Representative of the
Estate of LIESE-LOTTE HILDEBRANDT (A/K/A LIESE-LOTTE
HILDEBRAND), et al,,
Respondents.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ANY UNKNOWN OR UNASCERTAINED BENEFICIARIES,
CLAIMANTS OR HEIRS OF LIESE-LOTTE HILDEBRANDT
(a/k/a LIESE LOTTE HILDEBRAND) AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST
THEM.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition for Determination of
Heirs & Their Respective Shares has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to It on Sherri M. Stinson, Petition-
ers' attorney, whose address Is 1239 S. Myrtle Avenue,
Clearwater, Florida 33756, on or before June 30, 2009,
and file the original with the clerk of this court either
before service on Petitioners' attorney or Immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In the complaint or peti-
tion.
Dated May 27, 2009,
BETTY STRIFLER
As Clerk of the Court


HONDA
Shadow Arrow 06,
garage kept, not in rain,
floorboard $6200 obo
(347)223-7269 aft 3:30
KAWASKI
'00, ZRX 1100
CC,15K. Mi. Very
fast, many extra's.
$4k aobo.
(352)621-3764
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
SUZUKI
'77, 750 CC,
$1,100 Firm.
(352) 563-5688
SUZUKI S40
'05, 650cc, 6K miles,
Only $2000. Lucky U -
Cycles (352) 330-0047
YAMAHA
'05 YZ125 DIRT BIKE
Race ready. Many ex-
tras. $2500. 352-
586-1683: 586-9349



362-0607 SUCRN
Unit A08
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given
that the undersigned . In-
tends to sell the personal
property described below
to enforce a lien Imposed
on said property under
the Florida Self Storage
Facility Act (Section
83.801-83.809).
The undersigned will sell
at Public Sale by com-
petitive bidding on the
16th day of June, 2009 at
11:00 a.m., being on the
premises where said
property has been stored
and which Is located at
Acorn Self Storage, 3710
E. Gulf To Lake Hwy,
Inverness, County of
Citrus, State of Florida, the
following:
Dominique Rigos, Unit A08
Household Goods
Purchases must be paid
for at the time of pur-
chase In cash only. All
purchased Items sold as Is
where Is and must be re-
moved at the time of
sale. Sale subject to can-
cellation in the event of
settlement between
owner and obligated
party.
Dated this day: 5/27/09
Call Acorn Self Storage
for details 352-341-1622
Published two (2) times In
Citrus County Chronicle,
May 31 & June 7, 2009.


354-0607 SUCRN
2007-DP-722 Term. of Parental Rights
(To: Jonathan Harris) Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
. CASE NO.: 2007-DP-722
IN THE INTEREST OF:
A.F. DOB: 02/23/96
K.H. DOB: 02/19/98
A.W. DOB: 03/30/04
Minor Clld(ren)
NOTICE OF ACTION. SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF
ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIP

THE STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: Jonathan Harris
L/K/A Unknown
You are hereby notified that a petition under oath
has been filed in the above-styled court for the termi-
nation of your parental rights as to K.H. a male child
born on 19th day of February, 1998 in Citrus County,
Florida, and for placement of the child with the Florida
Department of Children and Families for subsequent
adoption, and you are hereby commanded to be and
appear before General Magistrate Keith Schenck of
the Circuit Court or any judge assigned to hear the
above cause, at the Advisory Hearing on June 15. 2009
at 1:30 PM. at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N.
Apopka Avenue. 3rd floor,.Inverness, FL 34450.
YOU MUST PERSONALLY APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME
SPECIFIED.

FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING OR THE ADJUDICATORY TRIAL FOR THE TERMI-
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO
THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THESE .
CHILDREN. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND
TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO
THE CHILDREN NAMED IN THE PETITION.
YOU ARE ENTITLED TO HAVE AN ATTORNEY PRESENT TO
REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU WANT AN ATTOR-
NEY, BUT ARE UNABLE TO AFFORD ONE, YOU MUST
NOTIFY THE COURT, AND THE COURT WILL DETERMINE
WHETHER YOU QUALIFY FOR AN ATTORNEY TO BE
APPOINTED TO REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABI1UTIES ACT, if you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation In order to
participate In this proceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact John Sullivan at the Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL
34450 or phone (352) 341-6700 within two working days
of your receipt of Notice of Advisory Hearing for
Termination of Parental Rights. If you are hearing
Impaired or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771.
THIS NOTICE shall be published once a week for four
consecutive weeks in the Citrus County Chronicle's
Classified Section.
'Dated this 13th day of May, 2009, at Inverness. Citrus
County, Florida.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of Courts
(CIRCUIT COUR1 SEAL)
By: /s/ Kelly Carpenter
Deputy Clerk

Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 17, 24, 31 and June 7, 2009.


1---MlK


I Legals


(Court Seal)
By /s/ P. Hendrickson
As Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 31, June 7, 14 and 21,2009.


363-0531 SUCRN
PUBUC NOTICE
NOTICE OF FINAL AGENCY ACTION BY THE
SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
Notice is given that the District has granted an exemp-
tion from Environmental Resource Permit pursuant to
Subsection 40D-4.051 (9) (a) Florida Administrative
Code. (F.A.C.) for activities on N/A to serve Govern-
ment known as City of Crystal RIvec- NE 6th Ave., Cul-
vert Replacement. The project Is located In Citrus
County. Section(s) 22, Township 18S South, Range 17E
East. The Exemption Is granted to City of Crystal River,
whose address Is 123 NW Hwy 19, Crystal River, FL
34428,
The Exemption no. Is EX 6304.
The file(s) pertaining to the project referred to above Is
available for Inspection Monday through Friday except
for legal holidays, 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, at the Southwest
Florida Water Management District (District) 2379 Broad
Street, Brooksville, FL 34604-6899
Notice of Rights
Any person whose substantial Interests are affected by
the District's action regarding this exemption may re-
quest an administrative hearing In accordance with
Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes (F.S.), and
Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), of
the Uniform Rules of Procedure. A request for hearing
must (1) explain how the substantial Interests of each
person reauestina the hearing will be affected by the
District's action, or final action: (2) state all material
facts disputed by each person requesting the hearing
or state that there are no disputed facts: and (3) other-
wise comply with Chapter 28-106. F.A.C. A request for
hearing must be filed with and received by the
Agency Clerk of the District at the District's Brooksvlle
address, 2379 Broad Street. Brooksville. FL 34604-6899
within 21 days of publication of this notice. Failure to file
a request for hearing within this time period shall consti-
tute a waiver of any right such person may have to re-
quest a hearing under Sections 120.569 and 120.57. F.S.
Because the administrative hearing process is designed
to formulate final agency action, the filing of a petition
means that the District's final action may be different
from the position taken by It in this notice of final
agency action. Persons whose substantial Interests will
be affected by any such final decision of the District on
the application have the right to petition to become a
party to the proceeding, In accordance with the re-
quirements set forth above.
Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, F.S., to settle an
administrative dispute regarding the District's final ac-
tion in this matter Is not available prior to the filing of a
request for hearing.
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 31,2009,


360-0531 SUCRN
Bid 09-B-1 I Restroom modifications
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
RESTROOM MODIFICATIONS FOR CITRUS COUNTY
SHERIFF SUBSTATION IN CRYSTAL RIVER
Bid # 09-B-11
The City of Crystal River will receive sealed bids for
RESTROOM MODIFICATIONS FOR CITRUS COUNTY
SHERIFF SUBSTATION IN CRYSTAL RIVER. You are hereby
Invited to submit,a bid on the above referenced proj-
ect.
OWNER: City of Crystal River
123 NW Highway 19
Crystal River, FL 34428
Bids will be received until 10:00 AM, on June 9, 2009.
BIDS will be opened and read aloud on June 9, 2009 at
10:05 AM in the Council Chambers at Crystal River City
Hall.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Perform all work and furnish all
necessary labor, equipment, materlpls and transporta-
tion for demolition of exiting two restrooms and create
a one unisex restroom. The unisex restroom shall meet
ADA compliance. This Is a project-design to be as built
and approved by City. The unisex restroom shall In-
clude a Shower. Laboratory, Urinal, Sink, Stall Dividers,
Wallboard, Exhaust Fan, Mirror, Electrical Outlets, Tile,
Hot Water Heater, Grab Bars and extend A/C .duct If
needed, etc.
The work Included shall meet current building, electri-
cal and plumbing code. All work shall be Inspected by
the license building Inspector, from the City of Crystal
River.
ALl BIDDERS-must be State Ucensed Contractor for'the
t, p or ..c.rk i.,r ir.,i:h rr.e BID is :.u .rnea BIDS ImusT . .
�b- e r,.o.- a I'. a'r. .:paque r eic.pe ar,- d rar- eo

"BID FOR RESTROOM MODIFICATIONS FOR
CITRUS COUNTY SHERIFF SUBSTATION

NAME OF THE BIDDER
BIDDER'S ADDRESS
BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO:
CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
CAROL A. HARRINGTON, CITY CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428
Once opened, all contract documents may be exam-
Ined at City Hall.
The City of Crystal River ("OWNER") reserves the right to
reject any and all BIDS for any reason whatsoever. THE
OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SELECT THE BIDDER
THAT IN ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST RESPONDS TO ITS
BUSINESS NEEDS AS OUTLINED IN THE INVITATION TO BID.
Hard copies of the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS .may be
obtained at:
City of Crystal River
123 NW Hwy. 19
Crystal River, FL 34428
Public Works Department
352-795-6149 x 314
Published one (1) time In th6 Citrus County Chronicle,
May 31,2009.


'85 HONDA GOLDWING
United Edition, $3,200
(352) 212-5526
ELECTRIC SCOOTER
Street legal. 20mph. No
license read. $250.
.352-419-4553 or
228-3285
HARLEY
'96 Sporster 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes,chro. Ex. clean
$4,850.(352) 637-5143
Harley Davidson
'06. Road King Classic
low mi., blk cherry, incl.
helmets/trvl luggage
$14,000 (352) 382-0907
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80",
completely serviced,
good shape. Ex.
access. $5,395. obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109
HARLEY
DAVIDSON
96 Heritage Soft tail, red
many extras $9600 call
evenings (352) 746-3613







~'II.


I EI


II


"You must know what your
trade is worth, no matter
where you plan to buy..."


118C.1 1k i:Z k'lkI


l'.JhJ;flkllIhII


.11114


2008 MALIBU.



FREE 24 HRRECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO ANDSPECIALPRICING
'8005848755 Ext. 2144
$8,988 or '59*mo.
2006 T BLAZER,


FREE 24 HRRECORDED MESSAGE WITHINFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2143
$9,988 ors176 mom.
2006 TAURUS


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800584.8755 Ext. 2142
S 6,988 or123 mo.
2005 EQUINOX


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext.2135
$8,988 or$1t68* mo
2004 ODYSSEY


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 2132
|10,988* or $208 mo.
CRYSTAL

937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext. 1
* __crystalautos.com


' 2006 ECLIPSE



FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFOAND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext.2140
$10,988* or'194* mo.
200 IMA


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIALPRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 2138
S0,988 or$ ,94* mo.
2006 ACCORD


FREE 24 HRRECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFOAND SPECIALPRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2169
$10,988 or $194 mo.
2005 XTERRA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 2137
$9,988 or 1 88*M.
2004 LIBERTY


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 2131
$7,988 or$148'mo.
CRYSTAL
Jeep- C3-4''S- V
1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
2077 HWY. 44 W.
INVERNESS
800-584-8755 Ext. 1,
S5crystalautos.com


-2006 COLORADO



FREE24HR RECORDED MESSAGE NTH INFOANDSPECAPRICING
800-5848755 Ext. 2139
$6,988 or 123* mo.
2006 RUISER


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext.2141
5,988 VorS105mo.
2005 PACIFICA


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext.2136
$8,988 or $168* mo.
2004 TOWN & COUNTRY

*^ ^ ^ ., *-' ;* __


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.5848755 Ext. 2134
'6,988' or'1l31'o.
2004 SEBRING


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 2133
'5,988 or 111 mo.
CRYSTAL
REVOLUTION
1035 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext. 1
crystalautos.com


,All Prices/Payments exclude tax, tag, title, dealer ads and dealer fee ($599.50). Price/Payments include $2000 down (Cash or Trade Equity), owner loyalty, rebates and all factory incentives (must Qualify). Payments are at 7.99 A.P.R. for 72 Months for model years 2006-2009
and 7.70 A.P.R. for66 months for model years 2002-2005 W.A.C. Cannot be combined with other offers. All prior sales excluded and may restrict stock. Not responsible for typographical errors. Vehicles are pre-owned and pictures are for illustration purposes only.


UIS SNDAY, MVAY 31, 2009~


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E2 SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009


Real Estate DIGEST =


Charlotte G.
names top agents
Charlotte G. Realty &
Investments LLC proudly
"ecog-
iizes Re-
3Itor
Michelle
barker for
achieving
op-listing
tatuss for
he
months of akreke
vlarch Charlotte G.
and April. Realty.
barker
continues
o excel
is top-
isting
agent.
Realtor
3eth En-
sing
achieved - Beth
op-sales Ensing
status for Charlotte G.
vlarch, . Realty.
and Bon-
lie Peter-
son, GRI,
TRC, Re-
altor, ."
achieved - ..
.op-sales
status for
April. In Bonnie
an effort Peterson
:o expand Charlotte G.
ner inter- Realty.
-ational
knowledge , Peterson re-


cently earned her TRC
(Trans International Referral
Certification) designation.
All these agents can be
reached at the downtown
Crystal River office at 425
N. Citrus Ave., or by phone
at 795-9123.
ERA gives props
to Rodrick
ERA
Suncoast
Realty is
proud to
announce .
that Real-
tor De-
anna
Rodrick Deanna
has Rodrick
achieved ERA Suncoast
$1 million Realty.
in closed
sales. She can be reached
at the office at 795-6811 or
302-6213.
Keller Williams
taps Reulen
What is a Culture Icon? A
Culture Icon is someone
Swho makes decisions that
are right for the market cen-
ter and community regard-
less of individual impact.
Doing something right with-
out wanting to be recog-
nized or acknowledged for
it. Being part of the solution
and not part of the problem.
Who is this person? Pat
Kennedy, team leader,


Keller
Williams
Realty of
Citrus -
County,
is pleased
to an-
nounce
our Cul- Myriamn
ture Icon Reulen
for June Keller Williams
is Myrialti Realty.
Reulen.
She can be reached at 613-
2644 or at the Keller
Williams office at 746-7113
for all your real estate
needs.

REAL ESTATE
DIGEST
DEADULINES
* Submit information
for the Real Estate
Digest by 4 p.m.
Thursday for public
cation Sunday.
* News notes are
published as space
is available.
* Submit material,
attn: HomeFront, at
Chronicle offices in
Inverness or Crystal
River; fax to 563-
3280; or e-mail to
newsdesk@ chroni-
cleonline.com.
* We reserve the
right to edit notes
for style, grammar,
or space.


viA,=. relkyll 4-'ill -U1g


SUARM WOOD2




5 ~ ~ BOXOO CT 1 LC IL

POO HO E3251u TD PO O Ee/,1


Directions: US 19 to
Cypress Blvd. W. to Left on
Cypress Blvd. E. to Left on
Corkwood Blvd. to Left on
Boxwood Ct. House on
Right of cul-de-sac.


Directions: US 19 to
Cypress Blvd. W. to Left
on Cypress Blvd. E. to
Left on Black Willow st.
to Left on Black Willow
Ct. N. House on Right.


'Pr


I Single Family I 4Bd-3.5Bath- Detached Villa I 3Bd-2Bath-
3Car I/ Hillside'South 2Car I Woodview Villas
Spacious home features upgraded Kitchen Oversized garage, enclosed lanai and select
& Heated Pool. tile floors.
TVRG# 1014 $549,000. TVRG# 1041 . $259,900.


I J(352) 688-6864 * www.vanordenhome uil er.com
1 (352) 688-6864 e www.vanordenhomeb'uilder.com


Terra Vista & Brendwood


Rentals.'

Terms- 6 Months or More


"ii-'f'l









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICIJE


Crystal River 794-0888


Inverness 3


I EST

.LEADERS




41-1233 Beverly Hills 527- I112


BARBARA STONE dstone34@tampabay.rr.com AUSON (352) 697-0761 STE

W352-586-3072 MARIKAM (352) 422-3998 MCCWlORY
www.naturecoastltving.com info@naturecoastlivMng.com
. - A 1 NW ,


~~~~6~ OAKWOOD VILLAE _


*.


Spacious 2/2/1
with newly painted
interior and
new flooring.
MLS#323381
Directions: Rte. 491 or 486 to Forest
Ridge Blvd., Lincoln St., to house on
right after stop sign.


EST VALUE IN CRYSTAL OAKS. Motivated
sellers. Located on circle of cul-de-sac. Move-
i ready, 4BR, 3BA home beautifully appointed
with new flooring and interior & exterior newly
painted. Features include luxurious master
uite, wood-buming fireplace, oversized kit.
cabinets, 3 car garage, built-in bookcases, and
ots of storage-space. Crystal Oaks also offers
residents the added benefit of a private
creation center including clubhouse,
swimming pool, shuffleboard and tennis.
Secured boat/RV storage area is available.


ntry doors welcome you into a everywhere including granite, double trayed
Room boasting 10' ceilings. The ceilings, exterior rail trim, side entry
am suite Is a "must see" with oversized 2 car garage, siM.t.. i
his/hers walk-in closets, dual hardwood cabinets w/crown .,iai,.,
snail shower. Think of the arched doorways and hallways, e.
.rtainin you'll do on the paved arched d oorways and hall ays, u ai. ,. ,
s d a i, aen ea heot lighting fixtures. Details this special rarely
.he phone, it's time to see this seen at this price. Treat yourself -o


tie
-.
I -~ . -...


MAKE US AN OFFER
fr'- L r..-j r or. Eu ;-.
Current tenant through Ji
separate entrance to s(
situation for roommates!
children and/or pets. ML5
- _ -. . A..--


ONEt L0.: r1 i


dciEl r Nri~:r' LARGE KICHENA,
flit floor plan with family room add vi
Room - perfect super clean home.
ed backyard for Ready for your im
H your toothbrush! ML
t l-n=: . I! ..__ .. A


PRIVATE ARD orff i tme
D 2 bedroom 2 bathroom
i furnishing may be yours.
ite occupancy, just bring


w Village.
s-free enj(
paint, in
s and mar


W LISTEN TO THE BIRDS
-..r,'-, lI r., ,r., n b ,ajI i'ui Fc..
charming detached villa offers
"", ,.;, .... '^-^ '"^ a-1 .. . ,4


ODEL..



I.: .il a 1i Sprc.�i ai"'i"L J ri ire r ic7', 0,., I1
and all it.- v'ir 5-p'.. erilh Ihr .na l -: a . :
both tIne kicrien ana m.as,3 i [hwrOrjr.T i. so.' ,.:... I" r,-
Er., 4-.;i . ,'A FI.:.''3 .3 .':,T.',3.n Ar. rcln I_ 5.3 ,.:.J Ir,,L, I. Itr
back door to relax on the screen-enclosed wood deckl
The kitchen has a built-in desk and bright and open .
space. New A/C n May '08! You'll want to call THIS one:
YOUR new home MLS#331408.
Nancy Ayres 352-279-5058


YOU REAL MUST SEE THIS ONE1! Totally renovated.
updated kitchen with stainless appliances, rch ceramic tile,
and decorator lighting. This inviting detached villa is spacious
and beautifully maintained. It-is in "move in" condition.
Furnishings are negotiable. Enjoy the community pool, tennis
courts and maintenance-free living. MLS#334116.
Mary Gulling 352-422-2994


PRISTINE AND SERE! r.: i .-r
maintenance-free villa in desirable Fox Hollow. It fe,
an open kitchen as well as 3 bedrooms plus a den.
pantry. This roomy floor plan is warm, inviting and e
love. Enjoy the wonderful view of the lush lands
from the back patio as well as two community pools
and tennis'courts and much more. MLS#333732.
Mary Gulling 352-422-2994


on a nice cul-de-sac. Large master bedroom suite. GREAT CUSTOM BUILT TWO STORY family
All bedrooms have lots of closets. Electric range, water access home featuring boat slip at end-of
dishwasher, disposal, ceiling fan, garage door street, solid oak floors, hickory cabinets, stainless
openers, lawn sprinkler system, and TV satellite appliances, wraparound porch, fenced comer 10o
dish. This will be a short sale. MLS#326389. and much more. MLS#331348:
Mike Stokley 352-206-9096 Brendai Hannigan 352-257-9135


WONDERFUL COUNTRY ESTATE .:...- I ' -o,::
Living room, dining room with real wood flooring &
kitchenn enjoy 3-sided stone fireplace. Great room has
stone fireplace and views of pool/lanaj area. Gourmet
kitchen features Corian countertops, stainless steel
appliances, eat at bar for 6 with adjoining dining area
with table for 5. Summer kitchen on lanai. MLS#333061.
Mike Stokley 352-206-9096






BUGARMILL WOODS IS THE PLACE TO BET! Thi
10 -i. rr , *l, - ' .. . .l rr..riul. 1:. ... Ju.. . C. . . 'O
:.3sir, .:. .._ l i.T t .. i. . 'i,, a s', A.i i r r
fa.c a iAcK.1 irue picE and ir.in Corne ara L .a 0a 'pK aL
(our next home! Highly desired Lecanto School District.
rhis is a short sale. MLS#329171.
Peggy Price 352-302-5633

N r nr - _ -9


l 'r locleae or, a6 p ~ , al tnai r4 'r.,ty ot ri I r.,.an ar. n t' 't*r. NEW A' C. NEV i "
tol River an.ch laake- ou c. IMe Cy't.-Ial Ri-er Access appl,3,nce Nt rgo -,a 110 o a'3 a n
an the Gulf of Mexico. Live the waterfront dream!! pleasing view. Be sure to check this one out before
2. MLS#333806. - making a decision! MLS#333563
Peggy Price 352-302-5633 Barbara Stone 352-586-3072


r-
. www.exitreal


SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2oog E3







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E4 SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009


Taking care of toy clutter


It's time to
spring clean.
One over-
whelming, task
can be organizing
toys. It can be
next to impossi-
ble if your child
knows what
you're up to. Sud-
denly, toys that
have been long
since forgotten
become precious
novelties. And, as


Sara

.Vi


a parent, you don't want to
be the meanie who threw
away a childhood favorite
toy and hear about it for
years to come.
'Here are a few. sugges-
tions.
GATHER AND SORT: Get
all the toys in one room. Use
boxes or totes, and put like
items together. Arrange by
type and age ranges. Sepa-
rate any dirty or broken toys
or any that are missing
pieces. If any are missing
pieces, call the manufacturer


* and see whether
you can get re-
placement pieces.
Check online auc-
tions, thrift stores
and garage sales,
too. When visiting
these secondhand
sources, take
notes on prices
Noel they charge for
" A : the toys you have
,.. so you have an
idea on pricing if
you want to sell
any. Identify which toys can
be cleaned easily and which
are at the end of their useful
life.
STORAGE SOLUTIONS:
Floor space is'prime real
estate, so look for space on
walls, ceilings, closets and
doors. Toy nets, shelves,
hooks, door and closet or-
ganizers, and hanging
chains work well. Floor
space is often best utilized
with shelving units, toy bins
and rolling-drawer caddies.
You can use a picture- or


text-label system to make it
easy for kids to know exactly
where a toy belongs.
PURGE: The toys your
child has outgrown are an
opportunity to teach him or
her. about money or giving.
Let them learn as you sell of


donate toys. This can be a
motivator for them to let go
of some of the toys they
might be clinging on to.
There are multiple, places
that will take them.

See .. .. Page E5


OBITUARIES
* The Citrus Countyr Chronicle's policy permits both free
and paid obituaries. E mail obits@chronicle
online.com or phone 563-5660 for details and pricing
options.


CY L E BEHIND ON YOUR PAYMENT
CAROLYN LISTEhR FACING AN ECONOMIC HARSH
a Multi-Million Dollar Realtor ... .
.1. Office: 382-1700 ,".: -
View virtual tours @ www.isterlistings.com


SUNDAY, MAY 31,
109 ANTON CT.
2/2 Springwood condo
End unit - 2nd floor
#331042 $125,900
13 BEVERLY CT.
2/312 w/fam rm & FL rm
Eat-in kitchen & new roof
#328484 $135,000
6 DOUGLAS CT S.
3/212 pool home w/fam rm
Hurricane resistant windows
#333138 $193,000


TS?. Stress, frustration, worry,
lIP? uncertairity... Families are trying
to survive on barely one salary or
S..less while losing income, the day
to day demands and bills do not
halt. It is insane,like walking on a
b tightrope!
We understand and have Short
Sale Specialists with the right
tools to help you.

What is a Short Sale? Are you a
short sale candidate? Someone
you know facing economic
hardship?

H For help visit our website at
www.CitrusSold.comlShortSale
We can help'
WF-,,-.-- .


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
(352) 634-2371 Cell
(800) 476-2590 Toll Free
E R A For a Visual Tour of our listings
REAL ESTATE and all MLS: bjdavis.com .

HERE'S A HOME THAT BOLDLY FACES THE
WORLD LOOKING DRAMATICALLY DIFFERENT.
It's 3 bedrooms and 2 baths enjoy a very open and
h., ir.- ,4,.11 (vu . La,, ,: i l.,, i' .. ,,, ir,., ,'b ,r,.,,
T.: r I,.:, . Tl r-. ,, : .. .. r . , I .' i, ,
l.' . , l.J'-. f Ii,' l ii ,,l b , 4 ,,'j, in ,li..,' Ti, jt.,:,n|I
11334559 $155.000

HERE'S A CAREFREE VILLA WITH A
__.,' JAW.DROPPING VIEW OF OPEN LAKE

"" - -, , sproxim ir. , ,.' , . : ,I " rc : ' i: .' I''. ,'| :
poBr,d ou, , ' ,,z 4r... ,, : Pa: l | .I i.l:
#331330 $119.000
HUGE OAK TREES FRAME THI-S HOME ir,

I ..r, a . h ' ,:, 1,�" ., ,: - . 1 r-

33600 42 5 17000
THIS 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH HOME ra
1, 9 ,r � * W.3.a : , I.. ,i 3,.: rt ..i r..

'. .t-#" *'' . i t .T. F -. .-.,:.:3 . .'3 m .t.ir. ? i ,I: ;!. '.: a -F.-.._


noi ..... - i
* .! 1_1 ,g, . .. ,7


:-- .- -
D IN IN ,


NEWs
Homes from


GARAGE
19.8 X 20


Dolphin


CHAD GLYDE
CH .C 2511.2 Many Floor Plans toi Cloosc Ftiam GB C05971S


For Li75 9 0 0mited Time
, For Limited Time


Rose-1


CATCH. -
CEILING


' I;' I


*prices subject to change


MANY PLANS AVAILABLE
Open Monday-Friday 8am-4pm
After Hours & Saturday By Appointment Only
CALL TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION
352-637-3912
www.homesbycosy.com


11145 W. Bentbow Path, Crystal River, FL 34428 * U.S. Hwy. 19, 2 miles north of the Crystal River Mall


',: ,: i,, r


- CI.i:,l ',,',p.M








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, M.4x' 31, 2009 E5


The facts about wind energy FRUGAL.
IContinued from Page E4


M y producer, Brad many unconventional prod-
Staggs, and I put to- ucts now available to con-
gether for tractors for installation in
HGTVPro.com a five-part residential homes. One -
look at the latest home-re- . such product: personal
modeling trends that qual- , wind generator. I've. had
ify for the new tax-credit some experience with per-
package. And we thought it sonal wind generation, and
would be a good idea to also I'd like to share-with you a
share this information here. few of my opinions of what
This third part of "Ed Del Ed Del Grande is real about wind power as
Grande's Commonsense ASK THE opposed to what may be
Guide" focuses on wind - . just a lot of hot air.
power: 0 For the most part, it's
New tax credits to home- widely accepted that in-
owners for "energy-efficient products" stalling a personal wind generator for-
have generated a lot of interest in a home in most cases will not remove


you from the electrical grid. Realisti-
.cally, you can expect to generate about
25 percent to 30, percent of a home's
electrical power with wind power.
That's important to know since the av-
erage base price installation costs for
a small wind turbine system can be
around $5,000 and up, depending on
where you live.
The generation figure is based on a
residential wind turbine installed 30
to 40 feet above the ground. Now, this
brings up a very important considera-
tion. Building a 30-foot-plus wind
tower in 'the "back yard" of most

See' . Page E14


Here are a few sugges-
tions.
SCHOOLS: Ask teachers
whether they wait toys for
their classroom,, treasure
boxes or as rewards.
TOY LENDING LI-
BRARIES: Sometimes, even
if they can't use them to lend
out, they'll accept them to
resell to buy toys they need.
CHILDREN IN NEED:
You can donate books, toys
and other much-needed ma-
terials to children in the
Philippines. Visit Books foi


the Barrios (www.books-
forthebarrios.com) for more
information. You can even
donate stuffed animals. Visit
SAFE (Stuffed Animals for
Emergencies, at www.
stuffedanimalsforemergen-
cies.org), which gives them
to emergency organizations
to dispense as needed.
SECOND USE: Reuse
toys for crafts, as ornaments
or as gift embellishments.
Organize a toy swap with
friends, create activity
boxes for the car or a rainy
day, or make story sacks
with toys, printable work-
sheets, craft supplies and a
book

See i: -,.AL/Page Ell


POOL HOME ON DOUBLE LOT
* 3/2/2, LIVING & FAMILY ROOM
* Enclosed Lanai to POOL
* Lots of Ceramic Tile
* SHOWS GREAT!
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997
Email: kellyg@remax.net


11004 W. COVE HARBOR DR.,
CRYSTAL RIVER
* 2BD/2BA/Carport * Waterfront w/Dock
* Pelican Cove Condo * 1 159 SF Living
* Screened porch * Maintenance Free
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [7T-
Realtors@ -
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


8826 N, GOLFVIEW DR. 6045 N. OAKMONT DR. SUGARMILL WOODS
CITRUS SPRINGS PINE RIDGE GOLF COURSE HOME
2BD/2.5BNA/2CG New Roof &A/C * 3BD/2BA/2+CG Lg. Screened Patio
*Sits o 2 lots, .66 ac. * Solar Heated Pool, Great Room Office or Den 3/2/2 w/htd pool, new roof & A/C.
* Close to Golf Course * Fam. Room/3rdBD Garage Workshop Pristine Condition 19 Priced to sell.
Garage Workshop .n Din. US 19 S. L Cypress Blvd., R Pin
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [ PETER & MARVIA KOROL | Inkapl Or. to s34
Realtors@ -Realtors NANCY BOWDISH * (3521628-7800
(352) 527-7842 (352) 527-7842 Direct: (3521 422-0296
(352) 422-3875 (352) 422-3875 Wsn 11Tol at www.1n,,nc4aer 1


Sugarmill Woods heated, salt, pool home
New tile, freshly painted, 3/2/3 w/den.
DIR: SMW Cypress W, R on Cypress E to
Corkwoa I oan Hadcberry oe on the left
NANCY BOWDISH * (352 628-7800
Dired: (352) 422-0296
Visuaa ToWs at www1dm.


OWNER'S TOUCH SHOWS!
3/2/3 WITH OFFICE
S2005 BUILT
Ceramic tile/granite
SDream kitchen/great DR
Large lanai & POOL
* Circle Drive-corner lot
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997
Email: kellyg@remax.net


NEW AC CITRUS SPRINGS
SOwn your PLACE IN THE SUN! CT U S N
VERY NICE HALF ACRE LOT Almost new... Great location of
2BR/2 bath - screened porch newer homes. 3/2/2 with covered
Split plan - lots of storage '
* Rootfver lanai to quiet, private backyard I
* Pavpd 1ret NNOT A SHORT SALE!
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536 L ..
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997 VICKI LOVE 352-697-0712
Email: kellyg remanx.nel www.ladkioveffomes.com


Meadowcrest!! Arbor Court Villa'!
2 Bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car garage,
corner location, handicapped shower,
new hurricane garage door and
laminate flooring, double glazed
glassed in lanai
DIANNE MACDONALD 212-9682
Emaild dill fahoo.com


LOVELY 4/3/2 W/HEATED
POOL IN GATED COMMUNITY
Open family room & kitchen w/
breakfast nook. Great flowing plan
for entertaining. Many extras at this
greai price
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
fEmmt wadal.earthrm.nel fl


S",0 5 sq. U -ieny apace.
SHome InspectionAppraisal 4/09
Deepgreen belt
Screened lanai w/shower/gas hookup
Split/open floor plan
*Water softener
* Solar tube lighting
DANNY UNDERWOOD (352) 586-1743
Integrity Selling Speciaist
t Emaihtorie.ULifeStyk4e(otm fMAcom


LAUREL RIDGE
* Near TWISTED OAK COURSE
LOVELY SETTING
S3/2/2 w/Ig. Family rm.
SScreened porch & lanai
* Laminate & tile
PRICE REDUCED AGAIN
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997
Email: kellyg@remax.net


CITRUS SPRINGS
* 3BR/2BA/2CG
* Granite kitchen countertops
* 42 inHickory cabinets
* Heated pool
* Detached 30 x 40 garage/
workshop/heated & cooled
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611i
Emalk lenpalmer@remax.net


BRING YOUR HORSES!!!
4/3, 1993 doublewide (1,728 sq. ft liv.)
Split floor plan * Large master suite
* Large eat-in kitchen * 2.5 Acres
* Huge liv. rm. w/fpl. * Near riding trails
* Beautiful Pasture with
2-stall barn in back
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Email: cheryiamnber remaxnaet


CYTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicm


SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2oog ES






E6 Sunday, May 31, 2009





HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
It is also distributed to approximately
300 business locations throughout Citrus County.
Display advertising information........................................................563-5592
Classified advertising information................................................... 563-5966
News information................................................................................. 563-5660
......................................................................... newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listings.................. .......... www.naturecoasthomefront.com
Sign up for www.naturecoasthomefront.com..................................563-3206
Advertise online................... .......................... ............................563-3206
.........................................................................NCCsales@chronicleonline.com
"The market leader in real estate information"





To have your news in the Chronicle's HomeFront section, you may mail, fax or e-mail the
information to the Chronicle, 1624 North Meadowerest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. The
newsroom fax number is 563-3280 and email is newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.
You may also drop off your information at the Meadowcrest office or the newspaper's
Inverness office at 106 W. Main Street.
When submitting information, please make sure it is printed or typed, is concise and includes a
contact telephone number.
If you have any questions or comments, contact the section editor, Mike Arnold, at 563-5660
(email - newsdesk@chronicleonline.com).
HOW TO GET YOUR PHOTOS INTO THE PAPER:
- We accept corand black a nd white photos. We a a accept negatives. We do not accept Polaroid prints.
- All photos need to e cropped tightly. That means no wasted space in your photo.
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- Be sure tiat photos or negatives you submit are taken using 35 mm film. Others will not be accepted.
- Please include your address and phone number on any photos or negatives submitted.
- Photos or negatives submitted will be returned if supplied with a return envelope and postage.
- When identifying persons in your photo, please do so from left to right, front to back,-
- For more information, please contact Matt Beck, photo team leader, at 563-5660.


Pavement poses issues


for rainwater runoff


Our nation has come a long way since
early cobblestone streets kept our
feet out of the muck While we may
have managed to keep our feet dry, we
have also succeeded in keeping
stormwater from percolating
into the soil. Conventional
paving materials are imperme-
able to the passage of water and
have resulted in some serious
problems like stormwater / -.
runoff. If rain water cannot
soak into the ground where it
falls, it will run downhill, pick-
ing up particles as it goes. Joan B:
On a small scale, we can see FLOg
this at home when water runs
off the driveway onto the lawn, FRIE
maybe leaving a small eroded LIV
area. Multiply this effect over
the expanse of a shopping center or an en-
tire metropolitan area and you begin to
understand the size of the problem.


As water'collects downstream, every-
thing from soil and fertilizer to cigarette
butts and oil spills are carried along, in-
creasing the potential for pollution of our
water bodies.
In recent years, efforts have been made


t9 develop a permeable concrete that
mimics the way nature drains. Permeable
paving materials have been in existence


since the


racsnaw
RIDA-
NDLY
ING '


1970s, but widespread use has
been slow due to unfamiliarity
with correct procedure, leading
to faulty installation, and a sub-
sequently high rate of failure.
However, with proper installa-
tion and maintenance, these
systems can be very effective
and long-lasting.
Designers developed perme-
able paving systems that allow
runoff to pass through the pave-
ment into a stone reservoir, be-
fore infiltrating the soil below
to recharge the groundwater
supply With proper installation
and maintenance, porous


paving allows for infiltration of up to 80
percent of annual runoff volume. Addi-
tionally, studies indicate that permeable
concrete systems can remove up to 65 per-
cent of undissolved nutrients from runoff
and up to 95 percent of sediment in runoff.
To learn more about this environmen-
tally friendly paving material that offers
See PAVING/Page E10


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


Seed swaps
PAGE E9
Ask the Plumber
PAGE E5
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E2

WHERE'S JANE?
N Gardening columnist
Jane Weber is taking a
break from her column,
Jane's Garden. It will re-
turn later this year.

For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the Web site for the Citws
County Property Appraiser's Of-
fice, www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Clear photograph helps with positive ID on ceramic plate
D ear John: Please the unglazed platter, which posed of scrolls topped
find attached pic- was then fired in the kiln. with a fan-shaped shade
tures of an old plat- The transfer print process upon a rounded base,
ter given to me by my allowed for mass produc- which resembles a lantern.
grandfather. I would like to tion. There are covered urns
know the value ofthis piece The category of collect- and some stone steps in the
both for insur- ing is called Eng- foreground.
ance and what it lish Transfer- In the background, seen
would bring in ware. Your plat- through, the arch, there is . .
the antiques ter is in the sub an imposing columned
world. .- M.O., , category Ro- building with a wide pedi-. ;
Internet - . mantic Scenes meant surmounted by a
Dear M.O.: and the pattern
Your platter was name is. Vene- See ATTIC/Page E7 ... . S-, _
made in the .- tian Gardens. 1 Thanks to this impressively ..
Staffordshire found your Ve- detailed photograph, this
district of Eng- netian Gardens plate can be positively- �
land during the John Sikorski pattern in' identified as a piece of Eng-
early to mid 19th SIKORSKI S Williams & We- lish Transferware from the
century. The de- ATTIC bers' definitive Staffordshire district of .
sign on the plat- _..book "Stafford- England. It was manufac-
ter is a transfer. shire Romantic tqred In the early to mid-
print The designs were en- Transfer Patterns." It accu- 19th century, and the
grayed by artists on copper rately describes the center . pattem-rn style is called
plates. After inking the as follows: 'A wreath of "Venetian Gardens."
plate, tissue paper was ap- beads surrounds the cen- The maker is'unknown,
plied and the design trans- tral scene. The garden of however. It might sell for
" ferred onto the paper. The the title is depicted by a about $200.
p per-was then laid onto., flowerlade arch,- om-r�, . i."s, _tuechroiWl -







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, M~ 31, 2009 El


ATTIC
Continued-from Page E6

statue." The authors list the
pattern as "maker un-
known." I appreciate the
good clear photograph,
making it possible to com-
pare the description. Poten-
tial dollar value currently is
in the $200 range.
Dear John: I read your
column in the Homefront
every Sunday. I really like it
I am sending a photo of a
painting that we found 25
years ago. I though it was
beautiful. Can you tell me
anything about it or if it is
worth anything? - M. Y,
Dunnellon
Dear M.Y.: I am glad you


included a good clear pho-
.tograph of the artist's signa-
ture. I can see the name is
Stevens; however, there is
no first name or initial.
There are numerous listings
for the name, but without a
first name or initial it is not
possible to identify the
painter. Considering the
artist is unknown, and as-
suming it is a painting not a
print, it perhaps would sell
for about $100.
Dear John: I read your
column in the Chronicle
every Sunday. You have
helped a lot of people and I
hope you can help me. En-
closed are pictures of a
chair I think is quite beauti-
ful. There are no markings
underneath, but the designs
on the chair are either Chi-


nese or Japanese. All the
white flowers are mother of
pearl and all in perfect con-
dition.
I am sorry there are no
markings to tell you about,
but I hope you can still tell
me something about it. It
was purchased at a flea
market about 12 to 13 years
ago. -B.M., Inverness
Dear B.M.: I think your
decorative chair with fancy
mother of pearl floral inlays
was made within the last 25
to 30 years. It was likely
made in Indonesia. There is
no collector interest Poten-


tial dollar value is catch-as-
catch-can.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for more
than 20 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Siko-
rski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1
FM) Saturdays from 11 a.m.
to noon. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, c/o The Cit-
rus County Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429, or
e-mail asksikorski@
- ol.om.


' " . . ... . ;-- Spectacular
r-. water view at
.: " - The Landings
;: : . , .-. of Inverness
.. ..3/2/2 w/private,
heated pool.
Paradise Found!
S , , .- , . ' Priced to sell fast
View 50 plc slideshow at ghrealty.com at $229,900


* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and en-
gagerent announ,:ements, anniversaries, birth an-
nouncerents rind lirst birthdays.


ww cirsigerelt.com


I PIERIG PO


HO .,,SS


I NE OE I NWHM I NWHM


I PIE..D


�a w wctub stbyS0


PINE FUDGE I


SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2oog E7


CYTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNxLE


PINE FUDGE I


1 2 ACRES


I CANTEMURY [AKE EST. I


I CITRUS SPRINGS I CITRUS SPRINGS I NEW HOME I BANK OWNED I


r-MVERLY HILLS


I BEVERLY HILLS ,


I BEVERLY HILLS


NEW


I NEW HOME I NEW HOME







E8 SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009


E i " "Always There For You"
REAL GAIL COOPER
*WOW Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
RA mm Cell: (352) 634-4346
OFFICE: (352) 382-1700x309
Email me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


L M


. -. George E L'Heureux, Broker stI! "
ZIh , 2 EatGuili,,LiikHA. ) ineme FL. (352) 637- CURB (2872) )
APPEAL www.curbappealcitrus.com ,,anh Cisco.unlyqwtAlten
S Firs Time Buyers) Up to $8.000 In Cashl Call Today.
5913 ROSE1W,.o '00 9 . 21% W KBMORI
3/3/3 with over- Y . r , ,, .Lu.
MHI llil l a :sized detached 2 -r,, i 64 r ( 7 r,,T, VLww.ViOtl ,;',.,, 0
car garage and at and upgraded carpeting in the bedrooms. A must see!.
custom pool. This home is truly a cut above the $118,000 Dr 41 take CitrusSpr sBd at thetountains
rest. Call Today! $425,000. to t Santas to ihton Kenmm o home on ie uiht.



address. See as beauty ted $84,000 9
Pd..... .......... $6,900.o


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





352-795-7357
888-795-7356
wwwxhemarealty .com



PROPERTIES FOR SALE & RENT


2 LOTS IN SOUTH OAK VILLAGE!
* 3/+ large office/2/2 w/heated pool
* 2248 living area - custom design
* Corian island kitchen - walk-in pantry
* Vaulted ceilings - well for yard
* Crown molding- 16" tile
#331055 $285,000


NEW ROOF IN 20091
* 2/2/2 with room for a pool!
* Remodeled kitchen w/wood cabinets
* Glass enclosed FL room wheat & air
* Beautiful landscaping w/ well for yard
* 15' easement on west side of home
#312133 $139,900


I Se Vita Tor @ w wr saleom suco


785605


(u Prudential


CITRUS HILLS OFFICE


Florida Showcase Properties


PINE RIDGE OFFICE


962 W. Sun Valley Ct. 3779 w. Northcrest Ct. 1123 W. Hampshire Blvd. 2285 N. Hardee Pt.
$499,000 $192,900 $119,900 $118,o500
Majestic large villa w/desirable side load 3/2.5/2 in Crystal Glen near community 3 Bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage Fully furished Meadowview patio home
garage on comer lot. Courtyard home with dub house/pool tennis courts. Impressive home built in 2008. Close to with a Citrus Hills Sodal Membership. Well-
foyer, hardwood floors, crown molding, dining & great rooms with 12' ceilings,
large MBR/bath, SS appl., custom painted fireplace & marble flooring thru-out. Lanai shopping, split floor plan, great for cared for one owner; has a nice screened
with sunny southern exposure view from (under air)/family room with sliders to a. first time home buyer, ready for lanai overlooking a pretty backyard and
lanai. 21x37 patio. immediate occupancy. greenbelt.
352-746-0744 MLS#334525 352-746-0744 MLS#334463 352-746-0744 . MLS#334481 352-746-0744 MLS#334532


3 Polk St. 3563 W. Blossom Dr. 261 E. Hartford St. 5-6B .7121 N. Outrigger Terr.
$64,900 $369,000 $149,500 $149,000
Completely remodeled 2 bedroom, 2 bath Beautiful 3/3/3 pool home. Office/den has 3/3.5 tri-level townhouse w/2-glass 4 BEDROOMS, 2300 L/A in a nice
home In nice setting. This home has 2 computer stations &'Murphy bed. Large enclosed porches, mirrored dining area,
central heat & air, a separate laundry/ great rm. w/gas fireplace, pool w/spa, wet bar, new appliances, spiral stairway to -area of Citrus Springs with newer
utility room and fenced in yard. Perfect for summer kitchen in lanai, hurricane bottom' level, tile & carpet, fans, great homes all around. **THIS IS A
a.. /fit time home ubg#. p,. " shutters & whole house generator, clrZL^ fdlly rurnsreda SHORT SALE **
*{ ... 352-746-4 #334482 352-527-1820 MLS#328144 35 46-0744. LS#327730 3525i2%1i20 'LS#333r,89


7 Davs
Foryour
Ivenlence











Gardeners trade tips, seeds

'Seed swaps'

becomingpopular

with green thumbs

IMELISSA KOSSLER .
DUTTON
Associated Press
goF athy Tinius is growing some
Suniusual sunflowers in her
Syard this summer, and has
good reason to believe the vari-
eties will thrive.
Another gardener in her area
grew the flowers successfully,
and gave Tinius the seeds during
a seed swap that drew people
from Maryland, Virginia and
Washington, D.C.
Tinius, of Ashton, Md., has dab-
bled with growing from seed for
years, and likes swaps because
attendees exchange information
as well as seeds.
"I try and get some tips," the
54-year-old said. "You can get
seeds in hand-written packages.
You can get different varieties. I
really like that"
Seed swaps, or exchanges
where gardeners bring their ex-
tras to share, give people access
to plants and varieties not typi-
cally found in stores. Although
the Internet can connect garden-
ers with seeds from around the DAMIAN DOVARGANESIAssociated Press
world, seed swaps put them in Erik Knutzen and Kelly Coyne work in their sidewalk garden that they've grown from seeds at their Echo Park home in Los Angeles.
touch with local growers. They
are often organized by gardening For some, the plants are a
clubs, neighborhood associations touchstone to the flavors and
or enthusiasts of the ancient scents of their youth.
practice of collecting seeds from "They're looking to recreate
plants., whatever taste or whatever flow-
Check gardening newsletters, ers they saw in their child hood."
Craigslist or Jentz said.
www.foodnotlawns.net for local Increased interest in organic
swaps. Organizations or Web sites and locally grown food also is
dedicated to living green or grow- drawing people to seeds. Jentz
ing heirloom plants also are good said. Others see seed saving as a ..-
sources for seeds. wayto save money while garden-
Growing from seed has gained ing.
momentum recently as gardeners Erik Knutzen, who grows much
seek out unusual or particular of his own food, recently picked
varieties of flowers and vegeta- up some pepper and eggplant
bles, said Kathy Jentz, editor of seeds at an organized seed swap. .. -
Washington Gardener Magazine See SEEPS/Page E11
in Silver Spring, Md. Gardeners
are looking for "very specific va- Exchanged okra, cosmos,
rieties or experiences - not and mystery seeds are seen at
what ypu get from big boxstores," Eric Jutn's Echo Park home in
she q .:-.. . ,... ,os fgeis.-


0TRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


SUNDAY, Mxv 31, 2oog E9






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E10 SUNDAY. MAY 31. 2009


PAVING
Continued from Page E6

the durability of standard
concrete while retaining
stormwater runoff and re-
plenishing local watershed
systems, attend a demon-
stration at the Florida-
friendly Living Green Expo
at from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
June 19 at UF/IFAS Citrus


County Extension, at 3650
West Sovereign Path, Suite
1, Lecanto, FL 34461. The
Green Expo will feature
green technology displays,
water and energy saving de-
vices, as well as a showcase
of the latest hybrid cards.
Plan to tour the learning
landscape and participate
in the butterfly and ladybug
release. For more informa-
tion, contact Citrus County
Extension at 527-5700.


DOUBLEE DIGIT SAVINGS"
SAVE THOUSANDS WITH US AND TAKE
ADVANTAGE OF THE $8,000 TAX CREDIT TODAY!
~~ Laiidiciped li.
.3 c utfi.ro , 2 baIi,
2
hicar Iga at1 kt
~Iuich /r ! 'hq Pt


I VIMI OUR WEBSITI: www~.gihsbuildemnline~com


Citrus County Extension
links the public with the
University of Florida/IFAS's
knowledge, research, and
resources to address youth,
family, community, and agri-
cultural needs. Programs
and activities offered by the
Extension Service are avail-
able to all persons without
regard to race, color, handi-


cap, sex, religion, or na-
tional origin.

Dr Joan Bradshaw is the
natural resource conserva-
tion faculty for specialized
programs and the County
Director for Citrus County
University of Florida/IFAS
Extension.


the link between plans and reality /

Dennis amato
State C ,hJ CGC-004344

GENERAL CONTRACTOR, INC.
A TRADITION OF QUALITY SINCE 1972
* Consultation & Project/Plan Review
* Design Services
* Cost Estimating * Design-Build Construction
* Custom Crafted Homes * Waterfront Homes
* "Cracker-Style" Homes & Buildings
k Residential Renovations
. Commercial Construction & Remodeling
- Adaptive Re-Use & Restoration of Buildings s ,
~~Ar estoatio


8826 N. GOLFVIEW D PE RGE
*Clse t olafm us e A f & I/C 3BDB2BAN2+CG Attached +4 Car Detached
* 2BD/2.5BAN2CG �New Roof & A/C
SSits on 2 lots, .66 ac. Solar Heated Pool All Hardwood Roorts Lg. Screened Pato
Close to Golf Course Farn. Room/3rd BD | Screened Lanai Many Extra Features


Lou Miele, Realtor
' 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465 ,
Office: 352-746-3600 L
7^'I Cell: (352) 697-1685 _am
ALWAY T AMERICAN IME
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU REALTY & INVESTMENTS E...


COMMERCIAL BUILDING
& BUSINESS <4M
Sale includes established, lucrative sign business and all equipment,

" l also stay on after the sale to assist in running the business.
.S9lo OOS&^


TuMi rECAiOtW , ,:i : NSI I
CraRUS.,u. ; .x I"M
LOT ON C AL. . .. . -- ait0M
2 COMMERCIAL
BUILDINGS
ZONED GNC
FOR SALE
OR LEASE
.JALL3-2aU9,
OWNER/AGENT


E10 suNDAY, MAY 3 1 2009






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE MY3,20El


Protecting trees from


lightning strikes


W while observing the
lightning this past
week, thoughts of
this week's article came to
mind: The need for light- j
ning protection. ,
Some tree species in -.
Florida shade and beautify
our landscape for hundreds - -,
of years. They provide shel-
ter for wildlife, produce Kerry
oxygen for the environment Ty
and perform many other ARB
beneficial duties.
These majestic assets to
our environment could be destroyed
in less than a second by a bolt of light-
ning.
Trees that stand in the open land-
scape or are the tallest tree in an area
are likely candidates for lighting
strikes.
There are many circumstances that


Kreider
g1E
MRIST


warrant protecting a tree
from a lightning strike -
historic trees, trees of great
economical value,- large
trees 10 feet from a struc-
ture, trees on a golf course,
in a park, trees that are
used to aid shelter from
weather or trees in our own
front or back yard. These
should be quipped with
lightning protection sys--
tems.
A lightning protection
system entails a series of


copper conductors that extend from
the top of the tree down the main
stems and trunk, past the tree's drip
line, and that are then grounded.
All lightning protection hardware
should be approved by NFAA and LPI.

See TREES/Page E14


FRUGAI other toy has to leave. You can cessity, you make the most of
FRUGmAL tuck some away and rotate the your hard-earned money and
toys they play with to get best waste less, too. When you strip
Continued from Page E5 use from them all. away the excess in your life, you
M E discover a sense of truth and
NEW RULES: Set new rules, Frugality isn't cheap living or authenticity. Your identity is
such as for each new toy that voluntary poverty. Whether
enters the house at least one you're frugal by choice or ne- See '- ' ..Page E15


a -


SEEDS
Continued from Page E9


asm for sav
the final stb
"There's
Hill, 32. "To
watching


The Los Angeles resident also There's a l
swaps casually with fellow gardeners Swappin
and neighbors. He particularly enjoys between g
exchanging seeds with his mother's the seeds b
neighbor, who brings them to Califor- reminders
nia from his native Greece. - times.
"You can access things that you can't, "I always
buy," said Knutzen, coauthor of "The from some
Urban Homestead" (Process Media, she enjoys
2008). "You can grow things you can't her seeds
get in the supermarket" - yard. "The
Swaps are good places to find seeds plants."
from thriving plants that grew near
your home; gardeners typically save -, -'
seeds from their healthiest, most pro-
ductive plants, said Knutzen. .....
"You're selecting varieties that are website: www
well adapted to a particular place," he 352 79C
said. "It's like Darwin. There's a higher 352-527
probability it will be successful." 'S-52
'Just throw a party and invite peo-
ple who do gardening," he said. "It will
-be fine."
Paige Hill did just that when she re-
alized she had more basil seeds than
she could ever use. She rightly figured
many of her gardening friends had a
"wealth of knowledge and a wealth of ".
seeds" to share. She also invited Beautfuy cra
and breaKfast
friends who had never saved seeds to woodworking
the swap. .,.r, ,, , ,e
t/Ol ..r - ,o ,
"Everybody.got so excited," said Withlacoochee
Hill, ofAustin, Texas. "It was so fun." (Really, just.the
S e yourself encha
She hoped to pass on he enthusi- .....


ing seeds, which she sees as
ep in successful gardening.
a completeness to it," said
o be out working in the soil,
the plant grow and die.
)t of life in that dead plant."
.g seeds also creates a bond
ardeners, she said. When
become plants they serve as
of friendships and good

s know which plants came
body else," she said. And
seeing plants grown from
flourishing in a neighbor's
re'ss a connection to these


HERRI C. PARKER& ASSOCIATES
626 N Citrus Ave., Realtors, LLC
Crystal Rir, FL 34428s I
.SherriCParker.com
usreaftor@aol.comrn
i-3322 office
-8090 cell






Mff :17!'51 2t1 OULOOKING
iEY NK '," -!,.Y UNIQUE?
ted, lovingly d(ecoratud and a bit like a bed
near the river? Do you appreciate fine
with natural Tne ".i1 an.3 dft.=iri .
1,:4. IT -. : ', , 4ni4, ]I '5 I c o ,:Il,"aA -
.r -.ul ;i-p *,. from the boat ramp and
River. Come to 'he end of the Earth
end of Turner Camp-Rd.) and you will find
nted and never want to leave:
.rL 32. 8 SQ9,900


SuNDAY, MAY 31, 2oog Ell


U -


B







E12 SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Real Estate


Classifieds








. , : 1


~.
.;.7.-.-1~ .wr* ~.


Chroniele


%L


Fax (-2 56-5. 1. .- Toll .fee (38 85-24 1 Em- as1dft ed~"~e I -esie w who ie fnea


2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Util. incl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
(352) 628-9759
2/2 SNOWBIRD OASIS
$600 mo. + $600dep.
Lawn, Water, Sewer,
Garb. inc. 352-746-7595
AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hemando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk.
Free intemet/long dist.
Trailers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
fumished $450wk.*
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant
FLORAL CITY
Unfurn'd, country.
2/2 DW. carport. Newly
remodi'd. $700 mo.
STUDIO APT. WD, open
plan. 800 sqft. incls
elec. $550 mo.
No smoking, I pet ok.
352-464-4808
HERNANDO
3/2 on 2 acres, front
porch, laundry area
$600 mo. (813) 843-2105
HOMOSASSA
1& 2 Br furn & Unfurn .
In beautiful park w/pool.
No Pets. 352- 628-4441
HOMOSASSA
2/1.5 $500. Mo.
(352) 628-5696
HOMOSASSA
2/2 DW Fenced back
yard. No pets. $500
1st + sec. (352) 628-3736
HOMOSASSA 55+
2/2 Stonebrook
Estates
Unfurnished, Car Port.
Pool, Club house.
Boat & RV storage
$595. Mo.
(352) 422-7887
HWY 488
2/1.5, large lot, $425.
rno,
3/2 $600 mo. + sec.
No Pets 352-795-6970
INVERNESS
2/1 Scm. Prch. Fenc,d
yrd,Fst./Lst./Sec.$475.mo
No pets (352) 726-4842
LECANTO
H CHA all until.
mo.+ sec
-2590


INVERNESS
Large 3/2, appx 2000 s. f.
under roof. No pets. I yr,
lease. $675 mo. F/L/S
344-3444 / Eves.
344-3084,
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park,
2BR, 1-/2BA, $475.
1 BR,1 BA, $350 Incl.
water 352-476-4964
LECANTO
2/1, $535/MO
HOMOSASSA
2/1 $550.
Call 352- 464-3159
YANKEETOWN
2/2 Complete Furn.,
New W/D. $600mo
+ $300 dep. 15 mn.
from power plant
Paul (407) 579-6123
COUNTRY
SETTING
2/2 in Country Setting.
$500/mo. + $500 Sec. No.
pets. For application Call
Lee at 352-250-0664 or
800 -6924162.



60ft x 14 ft, IN PARK
2/2, W/D, scrn. in room:
owner finance $12,500.
(352) 201-7276
BANK
FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181
Crystal River
Suncoast MHP 55 +.
2/2 '84, Newly remod.
10 X 28 glass Fla. rm.
Covered front & back
porches. Nice cond.
$14,000 (352) 795-4266
INVERNESS
55+ Waterfront Park,
1BR, water incl. A/C
$3,500 + $270 mo. lot
rent. 352-476-4964
INVERNESS/ MOSSY
OAK PARK, 55 + COMM.
211 Carport/ Scrn'd porch.
CHAFum., Wsh./dryer.
New electrical wiring.
Close to downtown.
$10,900.(352) 637-3436
Walden Woods Village
313, Carport, Lrg. eat in
kit, liv.,din. rm., Scm'd"
lanai, outside storage.
Exc. loc. Avail. June.
$56,400(352) 382-0681


BANK
FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181

Floral City
2/2 DW on 3.5 + or -
acres. Withlacoochee
Forest area great for
horse riding.Priced to
sell. 4352) 341-6281
(352) 634-0787
(352) 634-1290.

HOME-N-LAND
New Home 3/2
10 Yr. Warranty
Sacrifice! $3,000'
down $676.43/mo.
Call to Qualify
352-621-3807
Receive $8,000
Cash Back

INGLIS '95 SW
2/1V2, beautiful,
wooded, priv 1 V4 ac.
backs ups to wildlife
sanctuary. Incls covered
deck, garage w/work
shop, Ig shed w/win-
dows, all appls, washer,
dryer. STEAL at $53.9001
352-419-5777: 476-9005

New 2009
2 bed, 2 bath, large
rms. appliance pkg.
2x6 construction,
10 yr. warranty. Must
See! $39,900 includes:
A/C, steps, skirting.
Call for more details
352-621-9182

NEW JACOBSEN
TRIPLE WIDE
High end home on
2 /2 Acres, 2150 sq ft,
3/2, glamour kitchen,
marble in bathroom,
appliance pkg.
Must Sell $179,900
or $787/mo. Call
(352) 621-9181
Receive $8,000
Cash Back.





2/2, Moonrise, Floral
City, 45+ All new tile
floors, washer & dryer,
pets OK. $17,900 obo
(727) 391-9555


m-ii me t-Et
Inij^ Pak orRetJ~IB


CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55 + comm. 3/2
with a lovely view of the
Lake. Call The C.R.
Village office '$75K obo
352-795-7161
FOREST VIEW ESTATES
Great Loc. Pools, clbhs.
& more. Move-in ready,
comp. turn. 2/2 DW, -
wheelchair acc., shed
& sprinkler. New heat
pump. $39,900
563-6428/563-1297
INVERNESS 1 BR Mobile,
. 55+ w/. waterfront
park$9,900 AC, W/D,
Shed 352-476-4964
LECANTO
Senior Park. roomy
2 bedrm 1.5 bath, fully
furnish, move in ready
Very Nice $7500
(352) 634-4329
WEST WIND VILL 55+
(2) NEW 2005 Incredible
Price Resales/Rentals
avail w/lease - Pet ok.
furnished. 352-628-2090



POWER'PLANT &
Seasonal - RV SITES
Waterfront homes
Weekly private rooms
352-628-0011



CHASSAHOWITZKA
2/2 waterfront DW $600
2/2 furnished DW $700
2/1 carport - $500
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $900
Agent, 352-382-1000


Castro
Realty and Property
Management Inc.
333 N. Croft Avenue
Inverness FL 34453
352-341-4663
Beverly Hills
1,2 & 3 Bedrooms
$475 - $750/mo.
Citrus Springs
2 & 3 Bedrooms
$600 - $1050/mo.
Inverness
2 & 3 Bedrooms
$450 - $800/mo.
Citrus Hills
2,3 & 4 Bedrooms
$825 - $1050/mo.
Pine Ridge
3 & 4 Bedrooms
$800 - $1800/mo.
Hernando
1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms
$475 - $800/mo.
Check Out Our
Website At www.
castrorebltyl.com
Rental Inventory
changes daily.
Furnished rentals also
available.
See Our Rental Ad In
The Real Estate News
Magazine


CITRUS RENTAL
MANAGEMENT &
REALTY LLC
527-2428
Full Service
Full Time
Swww.citruscountv


2/2/1 ont.650
2/2/1 Villa.............$750
2/2/2-waterfront...$650
2/1/1 .. ........... $600
2/2 Condo ............$675
3/2/2 Pool.............$995
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1/1 CP............;$525
3/2/2................ -$725
2/1 Duplex T1A95
HOMOSASSA
0,jm.i.,' - -1
LECANTO COMMR'L
1125 sq ft......... $950+tx
More Inventory
Available
' Jennifer Foreman
Realtor PRM
Alex Griffin Realtor


CITRUS RENTAL
MANAGEMENT &
REALTY LLC
527-2428
Full Service
Full Time
www citruscountv

2/1/1 Carpor ..475.
2/1/1........ ....... $565
2/2 CoR Iur$850
4/3/2 Pool ...........$1700
3/2.5/R2 1095
3/2/2 Pool, furn..$1100
Canterbury Lakes
3/2/2............$1000
Crystal River
900 sf Trplowers 800
1160 sf Office...,.$800
1400 sf..................$1900
700 sf......................$950
Jennifer Foreman
Realtor PRM
Alex Griffin Realtor




Jw arawmi Re E.t, t.
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
Pritchard Island
3/2/1 Villa - $875
Arbor Lakes
3/2/2 - $800
Inverness
2/2/2- $700
3/2/2- $750
2/I/1 - $595
2/2/1- $625 -
3/2/ - $895
2/2/I Villa- $695
1&2 Bd Apartments
starting at $400
2/1 2/1 - $600
Be early Hills
2/?%/I -$600
Lecanto
1/I Apartment - $395
See our website:
www.jwmortonreal
estate.cam
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
352-726-9010


Your world first
Ever- Dar


-.= h- -Lin


RENTALS
Pine Ridag w/Pool
5169 N. Perry Dr $1800
3/4/3 Pool/pool maint
4470 N. Ficus Dr $1200
3/2/2 Pool/pool maint
838 W. Massachusetts
St. $1400
3/2/2 Pool/pool main
27 New York Blvd
$800
188 W. Seymeria St
$675
42 S. Monroe St $600
14 Plaza St. $600
HEDICK GROUP
REALTY
352-422-2522
hedickgroup.net

SINGLE FAMILY
HOMES,
DUPLEXES,
WATERFRONT,
MOBILE HOMES

FURNISHED/
UNFURNISHED,
WE HAVE THEM ALL
THROUGH OUT THE
COUNTY GIVE US A
CALL...From
$5251mo to
$1250/mo
Alexander
Real Estate, Inc.
Crystal River
352-795-6633 ph
352-795-6133 fx





AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hemando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
internet/long dist .
Trailers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5 In town Location
Nice, Clean $650.
(352) 586-9349


FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352).344-1025




r 1&2 -
BEDROOM UNITS I
* MOVE IN SPECIAL
MUST MOVE IN BY
5/31/09 I
KNOLLWOOD
Inverness
I1B/R SEC DEP. $150
1B/R 1st MO$150
2B/R SEC DEP. $200.
2B/R IST MO $200
I CALL344-1010 I
TU, TH, FRI.
I 8-12 & 1-5 NO PETS I
HUD VOUCHERS
ACCEPTED
Equal Housing
Opportunity

&- 2m m

BEDROOM UNITS. I
S* Move In Special* g
Move In by 5/31/09 i
1BR Sec. dep $200
2BR Sec. dep $250.
CANDELWOOD
COURT
Inverness
CALL 344-1010
I TUES, THUR, FRI.
8-12 & 1-5
NO PETS
HUD VOUCHERS
ACCEPTED
SEqual Housing
Opportunity
L m ~ m n


1 &2
BEDROOMS
Starting at
$450
352-257-8048

1 BEDROOM
Starting @ $425/mo
Laundry on premises.
352-465-2985

CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2 BR $600 +
sec. (352) 634-5499
DUNNELLON
2BR in duplex in city
limits. $495 mo.
pay your own utilities
(352) 489-3381
INGLIS VILLAS
Is now accepting
applications for our
1, 2, 3 BR Apts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Crys. Riv.
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: M,W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglis Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity
SINVERNESS
2/1 Duplex $525;
2/1 home $650, f/l/s
(352) 422-2393
LECANTO
1 BR (352)746-5238
613-6000/613-5974


Move In Special
1-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $150
2-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $200
Exp. 6130109
Call Monday Through Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm
We accept HUD Vouchers, Foreclosures Accted.

(352) 489-1021 11


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


m


Cla ssfieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Mobille nome:1 mobille Homes
For Rent For Rent


et










Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009 E13


LECANTO
Lrg 2/2, C/H/A, screen
porch, water Incl. $550.
F/L/S, 352-746-4191

ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appis,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341

PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apartments
Rental rates begin
at $570 plus utilities.
Rental assistance
available to qualified
applicants.
Income limits apply.
For Rental Info &
Applications
Pelican Bay
Apartments
9826 West Arms Drive,
Crystal River
(352) 795-7793, M-F
9:00 AM-5:00 PM
(TDD #1-800-955-8771)
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Employer






Pinewood Villas
Is now Accepting
applications for our
1, 2,3 BR Apts.
Located in Bronson
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-486-2612
Or Apply Tues & Thur
7291 NE 92nd Ct. #17,
Bronson, Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity


-.





PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad

We Have Rentals
Starting at $425/mo +
Many others
LANDMARK
REALTY
352-726-9136.
Kathy or Jane
311 W Main St. Inv





44 W. Inverness
900 to 1300 sf
upscale Office
Retail Space.
1st Month FREE.
Ist Yr 20% discount.
352 344-5488

OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507


HERNANDO.
ALESCI'S
CORNER PLAZA
HWY. 486
OFFICE/RETAIL
1000, SQ. FT.
INCLUDES COMMON
AREA
MAINTAINENCE,
WATER, WASTE,
GARBAGE &
SIGNAGE. ONLY
$750.MO. + SALES
TAX. $795. TOTAL. NO
SEC., NO LAST MO.
RENT. FIRST MO.
RENT ONLY. ALSO
1,194 SQ. FT., 1,250
SQ. FT. & 2,000 SQ.
FT. AVAILABLE.,
(352) 447-1244




CITRUS HILLS
2/2/1 Nicely furnished.
Social membership
avail. $825 mo. F/L/S
(352) 341-1019
CITRUS HILLS
Home. Villa, Condo
GREENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-5921
(888) 446-5921
areenbriarrental.com





FREE RENT!
SUMMERHILL
AT
MEADOWCREST
Luxury Condos
Limited Timel
Call agent for
details.
352-563-5657
/ out zoomcitrus.com

INVERNESS
2/2, very clean / pool
$575.(352) 419-4510
352-400-0882
INVERNESS
Whispering Pines Villa
2/2, garage, W/D,
comm. pool. $600.
352-592-9926


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, $560 mo. + dep.
C/H/A (352) 464-2716
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/2
Lg Apt on Sams Pt.
$585/mo incis lawn,
garbage, water
352-726-9570
HOMOSASSA
2/1 w/carport $550 mo.
+sec.; 2/2 w/ fam. rm &
carport $650 + sec. Both
remodeled
(352) 746-3228 -
HOMOSASSA
New, 2/2, Rent
w/option to buy. 1300
sq. ft. w/d hk. up, fans,
blinds, refr.,.stove,
microwave, tile, carpet.
$750. month
(352) 592-0893

INVERNESS
1/1 w/scmd prch. W/D
$495/mo. (352) 274-1594


Lecanto
Newer 2/2, dsh/Wsh.
W/dry, H20 incl. No pets.
Lg.Yd. (352)628-2815
ONE MONTH FREE!
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appis,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341 .




HERNANDO
1/1, fum: $400. moves.
you in. (352)-726-5050
LECANTO
Sm. Cottage, private,
all utilities/cable
internet $695
(352) 621-4725


GREAT AMERICAN
REALTY.
Inverne
X-Lrg 2/2/2 all utilities.
2/2 Condo main-free
BIG! Like new 3/2/2
Studio Apts.all utilities.
Bever Hills
Very Nice 2/2
Oakwood Viii. 3/2/2,
3/2 Great area!
Citrus Sorinas
3/2/2 Newer home
2/2 Duplex
Adorable 1/1 & 2/1.
HernondQ
Brentwood 3 & 2 bd
Townhouses
Very Nice 1/1
2/2 with Pool
Brand New 4/2,2/2
3/2 Mobile waterfront
352-637-3800
www.choosegar.com

S INVERNESS
I 3/1 LIKE NEW* I
I $595 PER MONTH
CALL TODAY!!
| 352-212-3412
954-684-9631

SUNSET VILLAS
Senior Community
Chiefland Fl.
Accepting
Applications for
1 &2 BR APTS
Please Apply
M, W, F, 8am-12p
124 SW 14th Ave.
(352) 493-0220
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.




Al Valueinn.com
Inverness
Hemando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
internet/long dist.
Trailers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 7264744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant

INVERNESS
1 BR Mobile, 55+ water-
front park, Incl. water
$475 352-476-4964


BEVERLY HILLS
Proaress Enerayv
Contractors 111,
fully furn avail now
$825. includes all util-
ities, 100 channel
TV/linternet.
2/1 also available
(352) 220-2666
Citrus Hills
Townhouse 2/212/1.
Terra Vista Club incl.
$1,000 Mo + util.
(516) 991-5747
CRYSTAL RIVER
312/2 Waterfront Furn.
8 rm. house on Lake
Russo, boat ramp &
private dock. $1,200
Mo. RV. sight also
avail. $350.Mo.
(850) 566-4195
FLORAL CITY
Lakefront,- 3/2/1, scrn.
porch, fruit trees;,dock
Lovely area. $1,600.
incl. all util. & yrd. care,
ref. req. 1st last, sec.
352-860-1885, 697-2290
HOMOSASSA
3/2/1 Nearly new. Off of
Rock Crusher Road,
near school. Well furn.
& clean. Great cond.
Lease with Option to
purchase. $950.
Month. + electric
5640 Irving Court
(352) 563-2776

INVERNESS 1BD
w/2 bd loft. W/D, $600
+ sec. 352-726-1882




2 Masters/2 2, (large)
SUGARMILL Woods
Screen lanai, oversized
gar. new appl.-& A/C
$850 mo. j
(352)302-4057

2 or 3 Bedrooms
RENT TO OWN- NO
CREDIT CHECK!!
Low Down!
352-484-0866
jademission.com
BEV. HILLS/Cit. Sprg
2/1, Bev. Hills $650. mo.
4/1, Cit. Sprgs $700. mo
352-746-0330.
BEVERLY HILLS
15 S. Desoto 2/1/1
w/fl rm. $625 mo. (352)
697-1907; 527-8432
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 + fi rm, renovated
5 S. Lincoln Av. $600.
(352) 422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 ,C/H/A, ceiling fans,;
W/D, ready now $575.
mo. 352-422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS ,
2/1/1 Fl. Rm., W/D, CHA
New: Paint, Carpet,
refrig., blinds, 795-9060
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1. new kitchen, Lrg
BD rms, Fl rm. $725.mo
845-282-3504
BEVERLY HILLS
Oakwood Village 2/2/2
$650mo +sec. 422-0139
BEVERLY HILLS
Very Nice 2/1, $575/
mo. (352) 220-0740
www.letaj.com/lemon


BRENTWOOD
At Terra Vista 3/2 Pool
Home $1,100 Incl. soc.
memb. (352) 422-4086


CITRUS HILLS
3/2 Pool Home
1 Acre, $975
(352)746-4821

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/1 $825=mo- sec.
352-746-9436

CITRUS
SPRINGS
3/2/2 Newer Home.
Washer & dryer.
Sprinkler system.
Quiet neighborhood.
$795. Monthly.
(352) 812-1414
CITRUS-SPRINGS
Nice 3/2/2, Near Sch.
$875. mo 352-628-0731
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 Near hosp. $695
(727) 631-2680
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lovely, Spacious 3/2/1,
Unfurnished $850 mo.
or $1000 mo. furnished
352-628-1149

CRYSTAL RIVER
Rent or Rent to Own
Copeland PK Beauty
3/2, Lrg Fam. Rm.
Tiled, gorgeous
-spotless, fenced,
Pets OK, $750mo.
352-527-0493
352-427-7644

DUNNELLON
3/112/2, Fire Place,
$895. mo. 1st lost, sec.
(352) 489-9239
GOLFER'S DREAM
Home 3/2/2
3000 sf
$850 (908) 322-6529
HOMOSASSA
$350.... 1/1, Duplex
$525/up..2/1 Duplex
$700..2/2/2 SMW Villa
$1000. WF 3/2/2 Home
River Lnks Realty Call
352-628-1616
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No-pets
$550/mo. st + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
2/2 off Cardinal Lane
$600 mo Ist + dep. Lease
option (352) 628-7682
INVERNESS
2/2, $650mo. 1st/last
$300 sec.(352) 860-2055
INVERNESS
2/2/1, City Water
No Pets $650+ sec
352-344-4192; 613-6364
INVERNESS
2/2/2 New kitchen,
fam. rm., fire place,
fen'cd. yd., close to
schools & shop. $700.
mo.+sec.(845) 313-3992
INVERNESS 3/2/2
Split plan, extra clean,
newer carpet, wood
floors; GREAT AREA!
$750. 352-476-4896

INVERNESS.
610 Independence Hwy
3/2/2 Fenced yard.,
Rent w/option to buy.
$750/mo. 1st +Sec.
352-422-3670


INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
4/2/2 or 3/2/2 Starting
at $790 (352) 341-1 142
(352) 601-2615

INVERNESS
Very nice quiet
neighborhood, close
to Ft. Cooper Park. 3/2
w/oversized garage
enclosed porch,
fenced in back yard,
all appliances. Lots of
closet space. Very
clean. Ready to move
in. Only $825 per.
month. 1st, Lst, Sec.
For appointment call
(352) 726-3258

INVERNESS
Waterfront Townhouse
2/2-'/, with 3 decks &
balconies, private
community pool, very
quick access to Lake
Henderson, less than
3 min. drive to
downtown Inv. &
access to Rails to
Trails.
$700 mo + sec. dep.
(352) 817-3185 appt
LECANTO
Crystal Oaks.
4/3/2 Remod.new appis.
granite c/tops, tile, carpet,
scrn'd pool. on culdesac.
$1,300 Mo.727-492-6679
OLD HOMOSASSA
3/2, Like New, Modern
Kit. w/ D/W & Microwve
Indoor laun. rm. $795
(352) 697-5708
PINE RIDGE
3/2/2, $1,000 mo. 1st
last sec. 352-527-0635
SOUTHERN
WOODS
4/3/2 Luxury
executive home
on golf course,
great views,
$1,300/Mo.
(813) 390-7109
SUGAR MILL
WOODS
3/2/2 widen, scm 'd porch.
$875. Mo. + Sec.
(352) 597-5221
Sugarmill Woods
NEW 4/2/2', Huge lot!
$950/mo 786-402-9748




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2.5 $1,200 Mo.
Garbage and lawn
maintence included.
1st & Sec; Lease,
Pets?
(352) 795-0207
(352) 212-4981
INV. LAKEFRONT
2/2/2, Large home,
great area, tiled. New
carpets/.'City water.
$700 mo. 352-476-4896
POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - Waterfront
homes, Wkly priv. rms,
RV lots. 352-628-0011




Inverness 1 bedroom. 1
Private bath. Smokers
Welcome 352-560-7334


AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hemando - Citrus
Nw Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
internet/long dist.
Trailers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi toPwr Plant
CRYSTAL RIVER
$75 wkly/lst/L. Incls utils.
& satellite. (352)
563-1465: 212-1960;
HOME TO SHARE
Widow would like
person to share lovely
home on 2 acres.
Dog okay. 1/2 utils only.
352-220-6100



2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Util. incl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
(352) 628-9759



OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507




AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hernando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
intemet/long dist.
Traders $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 7264744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant




AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50
Ad includes 20 lines of copy
Sw/ photo.


U-
Lakefront 7 Acres, Flo-
ral City Lake Tsala
Apopka 2-dwellings 2
barns see ,
pictures/details
floralcitylakefront.com
skyetraveler@att.net
Picture Perfect Homes
NEW HOMES START-
INHSAt $75,000 On
Your Lot
Atklnson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685


Get

Results in
the

homefront
classified!


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to
advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
, discrimination.
" Familial status
includes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing
custody of children
under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.












100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
*Low income applicants
can quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or No credit
OKAY
*recent bankruptcy
OKAY'
CAll TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
*Credit and income
restriction apply*
Florida licensed mort-
. gage lender












LEASE/SALE
3870 Sqft building on
1.6ac. Zone GNC Hwy
200, high traffic count.
w/prking.352-502-3970


8420 N Sarazen Dr
Citrus Springs FL
34434 4bd-2ba in .29
lot spacious w/great
golf course right
around the comer.
Built in 2005 and in
excellent conditions.
126,700.00 (OBO)
For info. call
352-489-7851,
352-322-5323 or e-mail
to
hector@harroyo.net

3/2/2 For Sale or Rent
Citrus Springs Newer
Home, low/dn, easy
terms 352-840-3324

ATTENTION!!
, BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
$39,900. Delivered
and Set, $0-Down
Land/Home $650. mo.
Repos Available
Kinder
Mobile Home
(352) 622-2460

BEAUTIFUL LOCATION
3/2/2 w/garden room.
By Owner. Lots of
upgrades. Like new.
Oversized prime lot.
A must to see. Asking
$179,900 (352) 527-4488


Commercial
6goema 11" E s t a t ei]


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2oog E13








E14 SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009


FOR SALE BY OWNER
88 SJ Kellner, Bev. Hills
2/2/2/2, FP, Call Anytime
OPEN HOUSE on
SUNDAYS 11A-3P
$118K, 352-746-6093



3/2/2, POOL HOME,
1 acre, membership
avail. to Cit. Hills C.C.
$189,900 (352)860-0766
REDUCED!
POOL HOME
4/3/Ext. 2 Car Garage
on 1 Acre.
Membership Available
$277,900.352-527-7856


4+Acres, Canal front G uest house, Senous
3/2 large garage/ Inquires only! $320,000.
workshop +bonus (352) 726-0477
efficiency apt.
REDUCED TO $175K I.
(352) 560-0019 Ho [e

YOU'LL THIS! 2 or 3 Bedrooms
For Sale By Owner 2 RENT TO OWN- NO
bedroom. 2 bath. 1 car CREDIT CHECKI!
garage home at 9260 E. Low Down!
Alvada Lane in beautiful 352-484-0866
Inverness Golf & Coun- iademission.com
try Club Community.
Features skylight, lanai
& sprinkler system. 3/2/2, Living Rm. Din-
Asking $145,000. Call ing & Fam. Rm., eat in
(352)637-5876. Kit., scm. back porch,
fenced back yrd., Lrg.
For Sale, By Owner 15 x 30 above ground
3BR 3BA, Pool, 16x24 pool w/attach. deck.
workshop, close to new roof, insulated
school, hosp., library, windows, $139,500
WTI, 518 Poinsettia, Ave. 5901 W WOODSIDE DR
(352) 860-0878 (352) 563-0093

- ACNON= 352-795-RENT
(1hI,141UM Wu92n, I C) www.CtrusCountyHomeRRetals.cor


HOMES a MOBILES * APARTMENTS

BEVERLY HILLS .............................StartingA $600
CITRUS SPRINGS 3/2/1 ................. ...............$725
CRYSTAL RIVER ..............................StartingAt $475
CRYSTAL RIVER WATERFRONT 3/2/2.....$1300
ROCK CRUSHER AREA W2/2 House ...............$800
SUGARMILL WOODS...................Starting At $750
Call for more information. OVER 40 TO CHOOSE FROM


Pine Bid


BY OWNER -3/2
Super.nice! Less than
1 yr old, approx 1 acre.
Incis most turn. Beautiful
lot, close to town.
$128,500. Call Dan
312-343-8329; Moving
out 6f state.
7289 W.Pompey Ln
Homosassa,. FL 34446


Inverness
Homes


Plantation Realty. Inc
1352) 795-0784
Cell 422-7925
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner
See all of the
listings in Citrus
County at
www.lantation
realtvinc.com


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI
Your SATISFACTION
Is Mv Futurel!
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC
CONNELL HEIGHTS
2/2, Great Rm, vaulted
ceil. open kit. b/bar,
fenced back yrd.
scrn. por., new apple's,
1600 sf,(mol) 6172 W.
Pine Cir IC.R. Priced tQ
Sell (352) 795-9603
Crystal River Mini
Ranch
4/2.512 on 2 acres, up
to 5 homrses allowed,
$29,000 down, owner
financing @ 6%. Will
trade for equity.Realty
-USA (800) 5594231

RealtySelect
Citrus.comrn


Citrus County
I Homes


VIC MCDONALD
(352) 637-6200


;-.f ' N'." *.




Realtor
My Goal is Satisfied
Customers

REALTY ONE '
Outsitanding Agents I
Outstanding Reslts




For Sale By Owner
3 BR, 2 BA, 2-car gar.,
Cement block, north
Dunnellon Low down,
EZ terms w/$3,500
down $595 mo.
(352) 726-9369
OWNER FINANCING
4/2/office, 2.5 ac,
2005 Doublewide
Like new. 1800sqft,
$9,700/dn, $882/mo. or
$23,700 down, $582/mo.
727-992-1372




River Oaks East
4/2.5/2 Custom Pool
Home on 1.5 acres.
Office bonus rm, green
house, & boat slip.
$449,900 (352) 274-1594




Price Reduced
Crystal River 1/1 fully
fum. $69,800. Buy
Owner.com. 34429
(352) 563-5844





Call About Saving
Your Home
We Have Ideasl


HOMOSASSA
3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to
head spring. 163' wfrt,
dock/slip. Brand
new/unoccupied.
2 frpls, granite. $579K
- 727-808-5229

must sell!
Inverness
MUST SELL QUICK!
UNIQUE CUSTOM
HOME ON 1 ACRE ON
CANAL TO LAKE
TSALA POPKA. 3,323
sq. ft LIVING! 30'
ATRIUM. 3 BED/2.5
BATH. 2-CAR GAR-
AGE. LIVE OAKS.
NEEDS TLC. PRICED
TO SELL! ONLY
$194,500. CALL
MYRIAM @ KELLER
WILLIAMS REALTY of
CITRUS COUNTY.
352-613-2644
RealtySelect
Citrus.com


TREES
Continued from Page Ell

The tallest point of a sys-
tem is called the air termi-
nal. Copper or copper
bronze is used for this pur-
pose. These are attached to
the tree using copper nails.
The number of grounds de-
pends on the'girth of the
tree. Lightning protection
systems should be inspected
annually to maintain a con-
tinuous flow of current.
Florida is the lightning.
capital of the world. Unfor-
tunately, a tree struck by


WIND
Continued from Page E5

neighborhoods may not fly
well with local inspectors
and neighbors. So, before
you even look into wind
power for a residential
home, make sure it's even
possible to do the project.
Also, keep in mind that if
your area is too windy, most
units may have to shut down
in high-wind conditions to
- prevent damage.
So after spending all that
money on a wind system,
you may be frustrated from
time to time when you see a
still propeller on a very
windy day. On a positive
note, though; when a wind
turbine is working, it's a very
uplifting feeling to know
you've captured the wind
just like an ocean sailor!
Speaking of which, from
what I've seen, small cabins
and large boats seem to be
the most "commonsense"
small wind-generator appli-
cations, to be used along
with backup fuel-fired gen-
erators. The good news is
that prices for smaller wind
turbines are not that bad.


lightning cannot be re-
placed as easily as televi-
sions, answering machines,
telephones, etc. Science, re-
search and the skills of an
arborist can help protect
our historical old friends.


Kerry Kreider is a practic-
ing arborist, a member of
the International Society of
Arboriculture, a tree
preservationist and presi-
dent ofAction Tree Serv-
ice. Ifyou have any
questions he can be
reached at 302-2815 or
email actionpro
arborist@yahoo.com.


MEET AND GREET

* Clubs are invited to submit information about regular
meetings for publication in The Meeting Place each
Thursday.
* Send in information attn: The Meeting Place, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River, FL 34429, or fax to
563-3280, attention: The Meeting Place. E mail to
community@chronicleonline.com. Include "The Meet-
ing Place" in the subject line.


Couch

SRealty
& Investments, Inc.
For All Your Real Estate Needs.
Richard (Rick)
Couch
Lic. Real Estate Broker

1045 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando, FL 34442 |
Office: 352 344-8018 * Cell: 352 212-3559.
www.Rcouch.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Equipment specially made
for marine use and hunting
camps can start at about
$700 and go up from there.
Bottom line, the future of
wind power should be
stronger on the industrial
end, with the boom in wind
farms being planned and
built across the country.
Wind technology does have
a lot of room to grow and is a
force to be reckoned with.
Right now, though, re-
garding residential home
use, I basically see selected
installations, with contrac-
tors picking and choosing
only homes that can fully
take advantage of both the
tax credits and the condi-
tions to make wind power a
residential reality.


Master Contractor/Plumber
Ed Del Grande is known in-
ternationally as the author
of the book "Ed Del
Grande's House Call" and
for hosting TV shows on
Scripps Networks and
HGTVPro.com. For more
information, visit eddel
grande.com or write eddel-
grande@hgtvpro.com. Al-
ways consult local
contractors and codes.


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

RetySelect

(352) 795-1555



LOOKING FOR HOMES
OR MOBILES & LAND
Purchase, lease, mort-
gage assumptions, take
over payments + cash.
Any location, price, con-
dition, foreclosure, late on
payments okay.
1-727-992-1372


Business/Home 3/2 Great
location on Trout Ave. Inver-
ness $165,000. Rhema
Realty 228-1301



7 Rivers Golf & C.C.
priv. member owned.
corner lot 1 ac (mol)
$30K (813) 766-9354 or
sweetscaoeauestt(M
verizon.net


Floral City
Homes I







Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2009 E15


FRUGAL
Continued from Page Ell

less involved. It can be an eye-opener
to realize how much emotion is
wrapped up in the items you buy and
own. There's freedom and inner peace
from living within or even below your
means, and plenty of other reasons to
love frugal living. Here are a few.
KNOWLEDGE: Learn at your own
pace. Find one frugal strategy to focus
on that you can apply to your life. It
doesn't have to be all or nothing. Some
people find an interest in dehydrating
food, upcycling or refashioning what
someone else tosses, making home-
made cleaners or growing sprouts.
Once this one area becomes a habit
and you've mastered it, add another
frugal strategy. Plus, some frugal tips
work only in certain situations. When
your situation changes, you wind up
learning more or using tips you might
have merely glossed over before. One
reader, Anne Marie in Texas, shares:
"Sometimes, I truly learn something
new. Sometimes, I simply hear or read
something again, but this time it res-
onates with me. Maybe it's something
I'm finally ready to try, or I actually un-
derstand it better this time. It varies."
A part of frugality is doing things that
many people have simply stopped
doing through the generations or
never did or tried at all. It's empower-
ing to know how to do many things
yourself. It's rewarding to share and
teach others, too. It's even better when
they ask you how to do something.
GOAL SETTING: Wishes and
dreams become realistic goals. An-
other reader shares: "My favorite thing
about frugal living is having money in
the bank, being able to pay bills as soon
as they come in the door and not after
they are due, and having a fully stocked
pantry. Not at all like my nonfrugal

Uri"


WARM AND UIARMING
2003 3/2 home located in Citrs
Springs. Screened lanai and
separate covered patio. This is a
mustsee. Wonl asong.
SAR0Alif352-52-11842
manaM~mrUL


days." You create a road map and work
toward your goals in manageable steps.
You're accountable for your financial
actions and pinpoint money leaks. You
know the actual numbers in your
budget and have a plan instead of sit-
ting like a frog in boiling water.
TRUE COST ANfD VALUE; You
have a greater respect for your money
and time and appreciate everything
more. It takes less to make you happy
when you're creative and open to pos-
sibilities. You not only prioritize what
is most important to you but you also
discover the true value of things. And
because you're more organized, plan
ahead, and are satisfied with less, you
have more time to do things you enjoy,
too. Think of it as proactive living in-
stead of reactive.
HOPE, RESILIENCE - AND
CHANGE: While others around you
might be struggling or even if you are,
you have the tools and skills to ride out
tough times. Frugality gives you added
confidence, too. You utilize these skills
not only during the recession but as a
complete lifestyle change. It's making
consistent decisions. You know that a
setback is just that. You aren't devas-
tated by it: It's nothing more than a
temporary situation. You know your
efforts will continue to make a differ-
ence. People are frugal for various
reasons, but there's a light-bulb mo-
ment when you realize there are op-
tions. There are many things you have
complete control over, too. Good
things happen when you're open to
them happening. And the best ,part
isn't when it actually happens. It's
right before. It's the moment you take
action and know that things are going
to change for the better. The key is
knowing what it is that you want And
frugality helps you sort that out
MEN
DEAR SARA. I read an article, and
it discussed "shampoo bars." What is
this? - Christine B., e-mail


VACANT LOTS
OAKS GOLF COURSE -,r l
1/2 AcreLot ............$69,900 -C I;
CITRUS HILLS
1 Acre with Central Water . . . $29,900 GOSPEL ISLAND LOCALE
LECANTO 3BR/2BA home situated on 1 acre.
5 Aces, Pved St. , Nice Oak Ins $58,000 Firepla central water & well, fenced yard.
cAaes Paved St. & Nce Oak ees $58,000 1i152,500 MLS#326641
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352) 726-2471
Email: royboss@tompaboy.rr.com www.alldtrusreolty.com After Hours (352) 302-6714 F l


DEAR CHRISTINE: It's shampoo in
bar form instead of liquid. Many peo-
ple who make soaps make shampoo
bars, too. They consist of natural in-
gredients - typically, glycerin, essen-
tial oils, fruit extracts and a vegetable
protein. I recommend checking out
www.chagrinvalleysoapandcraftcom/s
hambar.htm. It's nice that they're not
only all-natural but they're sold in less
packaging than shampoo, too.

Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal Vil-
lage (www.frugalvillage.com), a Web
site that offers practical, money-sav-
ing strategies for everyday living. To
send tips, comments or questions,
write to Sara Noel, c/o United Media,
200 Madison Ave.,-4th Floor,.
New York, NY 10016, or e-mail
sara@frugalvillage.com.


Email: cent21@infionline.net
www. jwmortonrealestate.com


3 BR, 2 BA, 2 CAR GARAGE

2120,900 on your lot
www.encorehomesofcitrus.com







Building homes in CGius County since 1986

( Monday-Friday 10:m00 =4:pm

.2271 South Olympic Hills Terrace (352) 726-2179
Directions: Hwy. 41 S. of Inverness, turn left on Eden Drive, take 1st right at South Olympic Hills.


J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. Main St., Inverness, FL
SALES: (352) 726-6668 * 1-800-543-9163
Property Management (352) 726-9010 1"'..2."


LOVELY SPLIT PLAN. 2 bedroom, .2 bath home with nice -- - ..
screened porch, fenced yard, in area on hornes only. Close to all MOBILE IN 55+ PARK. 2/1, 1982. Lot rent $235.00. Water
shopping, hospital, restaurants and more. #318750. $89,000: and sewer, eat-in kitchen. Thunderbird Mobile Park. $32,500.
Call Martha Snyder today 352-476-8727 Call Emil Lupu 302-1713


SUNDAY, MAY 31, 2oog E15


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E1i STrNDAV MAY 1. 2009


SFPALIUUb UUL naum.
with huge kichen &, bonus
family room
$129,000 Code (3566)
VAULTED CEILINGS make
this line house have big soul
211 5 w/screened room
BANK SAYS ...
$70,000 Code (3567)





BELOW MARKET VALUE
This REDUCED -4BR/2.5BA
home, on 1 acre
ITS A STEAL!
$149,900 Code (3580)
ABANDONED GIANT
wlh 4 bedrooms, 3 balhs
and a pool. on oter I acre
Bank REO & Jusi Reduced.
$180,900 Code (3575)


ELEGANT & STUNNING
4BRs. 3BAs w/gourmel ka.
pool. spa. on I acre
$499,000 Code (3584)






GORGEOUS REMODEL
on this Kings Bay Dr. home.
Stainless steel appliances.
$139,900 Code (3591)
BEAUTIFUL 5 ACRE HOMESITE
OF ROLLING HILLS AND
BIG TREES IN THE COUNTRY
Over 1800 sq. ft. with 3/2.
$136,900 Code (3568)






TREE-LINED STREET IN
MANICURED HILLCiESTI
Open great room to kitchen &
lanai make for casual living.
$139,900 Code (3592)


uI Luwn IlVi1v1 ill watieIumII
area for non-waterfront price.
$359,000 Code (3582)
THIS REMODELED
4BR/2BA home on cul-de-sac
is ready for new family
$107,900 Code (3569)


ENF-7MMM�


3BR/2BA and 2-car garage
Shows like new'
$129,000 Code (3600)


SPACIOUS NEW HOME
with 3BR/2BA,
built in 2006 and
near boat ramp & mall.
$149,000 Code (3586)
IT DOESN'T GET MUCH
BETTER THAN THIS
3BR/2BA w/carport -
EXCEPT this home
comes w/extra lot!
$79,900 Code (3581)


WATERFRONT
SHORT SALE!
3BR, 2BA,
over 2300 sq. ftl
$269,000 Code (3576)
NICE 3 BEDROOM
ON FENCED
DOUBLE LOT.
Owner financing/little down.
$59,900 Code (3585)


LARGE 41R, ZBA
Built in 2004
on 2.2 acres.
Bonus workshop w/elec..
$145,000 Code (3601)


BEAUTIFUL VIEW
DOWN CANAL FROM 2/2
W/DOCK & LIFT
Minutes io Ihe Gull
$144,900 Code (3577)
SHORT SALE!
Huge 4-1 bedroom/2 balh
on I 4 acres
$89,900 Code (3643)






GREAT FAMILY HOME
*ilh new roof
and srylish delail3
$99,000 Code (3641)
ANOTHER BANK REO -
NEEDS TLC.
Giant 4!3 w/almooa 2300 sq fh
$99,900 Code (3597)


U~~~$ - A-- 00000


IS TIME



RUNNING OUT?


Is Your ARM Set To

Adjust In 3-6 Months?

t Don't Wait

A Until It's Too Late...


* Kim DeVane
Certified Distressed Property Expert











,I l SUPER COOL VALUE


on 2.5 acres,
$298,000 Code (3572)
mflc#'u i'ilr m'I',


BRAND NEW UtAU IT
AND BANK-OWNED!
3 bedrooms, 3 baths,
over 2400 sq. ft.
$189,900 Code (3570)
BANK OWNED
WITH NEW KITCHEN
and laminate hardwood floors,
over 2000 sq. ft.I
$69,900 Code (3642)


on 2/2 POOL home.
$111,000 Code (3578)






BEAUTIFUL
HARDWOOD FLOORS,
New kitchen, updated baths
& great landscaping.
Unbelievable good buyl
$120,000 Code (3602)
k


GRANITE KITCHEN,
with double oven and 6 burner
grill make every gourmet melt.
4BRs/3.5BAs, pool,
in Cypress Village
$289,000 Code (3583)


ENJOY MAINTENANCE-
FREE LIVING & MORE
TEE TIME!
Vaulted ceilings & 3BRs/2BAs.
$129,000 Code (3594)


GORGEOUS
COUNTRY HOME
ON 10 ACRES!
4BRs/3.5BAs, pool,
gourmet kitchen
w/SS apples.
$639,000 Code (3590)
ROMANTIC STONE FPL
graces liv. rm. in this 3/2/2
pool home w/2 master suites.
$199,000 Code (3595)


THIS IS

YOUR

MONEY


l1


TRANQUIL
SETTING
ON RIVER
with 1lt home
that sleeps 8 Tin Roof,
loft & screened rm
$269,000
Code (3574)


THIS MAJESTIC 3BR/2BA
pool home backs up
to open acreage
JUST REDUCED
$199,000 Code (3587)
GET IT BEFORE THE
BANK TAKES ITII
4 Bedroom 2 bath block
home with bnck wall fireplace
on 2 acres
$119,000 Code (3589)


MAGNIFICENT 4BR/3BA
WITH FRENCH DOORS
TO STUDY, TOO!
Solid, poured concrete walls
SAVE ON INSURANCEo
$229,000 Code (3588)


GREAT STARTER HOME
with 2 bedrooms and 2 baths.
$46,900 Code (3596)

Contact


JUST RIGHT!
3/2/2 on 1 acre. Close lo
shopping and Ratls 1o Trails
$129,000 Code (3573)


TERRIFIC STARTER HOME
with 2BRs 2BAs1
$69,900 Code (3644)


CUL-DE-SAC ON CANAL
boasts newer renovations.
Over 19 go00 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA.
$178,000 Code'(3603)
CRACKER HOUSE
BUILT IN 1952
3BRs/2BAs, on Gospel Island
$54,900 Code(3579)


Kim
DeVane i
Broker Associate

352-257-5353
Receive a

FREE ASSESSMENT of your
personal position in this market!

Kim@KimDeVane.com N KimDeVane.com


'MW MWuREALTY ONE
S504 ml Hw,. 18, Crystl Riwve
7 795-2441 .-b,


E16 suN. MAY 31 2009


\ \ ppij FiLI
- .1PZ 1011 t


LECANTO


F_ INVERNESS