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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01651
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 26, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01651

Full Text


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sa ice


Hundreds

pay homage

to fallen heroes
KERI LYNN MCHALE
kmchale@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
residents carrying
red, white and blue
carnations walked
the path between
the poles ofAmer-
ican flags at half-staff to their
seats alongside the grave-
stones of deceased military
men and women.
More than 200 people at-
tended the Memorial Day
service Monday at Fero Me-
morial Gardens Cemetery in
Beverly Hills. Memorial Day.
an American holiday ob-
served annually on the last
Monday in May. is a day of re-
membrance for men and
women who lost their lives
while serving in the military.
"America will only be the
land of the free so long as it's
the home ofthe brave," said
guest speaker Jonathan
Beard, Hospice of Citrus
County Grief Services man-
ager.
Introductory speaker Den- '
nis "Choke" Kocielko, \TW . '
Post 10087 commander, and
invocation leader Stewart -
Jamison, Beverly Hills Corn-
munity Church pastor: spoke ." b,
about taki ng t i me to honor
and their deep respect for the
nation's courageous protec-
tors, especially military men
and women who have made
the ultimate sacrifice -
death-to defend UAmerican
See NOBLE/Page A2
Veterans of Foreign Wars and
Ladles Auxiliary Post 10087
representatives Bettle
Ringwood, right, and Dennis
"Choke" Koclelko, left, carry a
wreath to be placed on the
veterans monument at Fero
Memorial Gardens as a part of
the Memorial Day Service.
, DAVE SIGLER.Cnronicle



Group collecting

Doations soughtfor program
TAYLOR PROVOST "I enrolled in this prog
Chronicle to-get the community in
ested in remembering the
The Civil Air Patrol of Citrus erans. I believe it is
County is collecting sponsor- important and this is just
ships for memorial wreaths that- other way we can achi
will be placed on the graves of this," said Squadron C
fallen soldiers at Florida Na- mander Gary Williamson.
tional Cemetery in Bushnell. As part of Wreaths Aci


wreaths for veterans


ra ni
nter-
vet-
ver.v,
an-
ieve
om-s
ross


America, a charitable initia-
tive started by the Worcester
Wreath Co. in 1992, the Civil
Air Patrol (CAP) began collect-
ing sponsorships last month
for wreaths that will be placed
in a worldwide ceremony on
Dec. 12.
Since its inception, Wreaths
Across America has placed
300,000 wreaths. Williamson
said the Dec. 12 ceremony


would take place in cemeter-
ies across all 50 states, Puerto
Rico and even in Iraq. -
Each wreath costs $15 to
sponsor, a donation that is tax
deductible. There are also
family packages of four, small
business packages of 10, and
corporate packages of 100
wreaths.
The 35 local senior officers.
See WREATHS/Page A2


N. Korea


nuke test


triggers


outrage

U.N. Security Council

condemns action

Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS - The U.N. Se-
curity Council swiftly condemned North
Korea's nuclear test on Monday as "a
clear violation" of a 2006 resolution ban-
ning them and said it will start work im-
mediately on a new one that could result
in stronger measures against the reclu-
sive nation.
Hours after North Korea defiantly
conducted its second test, its closest al-
lies China and Russia
joined Western powers
and representatives
from the rest of the
world on the council to
voice strong opposition
to the underground ex-
,plosion.
After a brief emer-
gency meeting held at Vitaly
Japan's request, the Churkin
council demanded that Russian U.N.
North Korea abide by ambassador
two previous resolu- said the
tions, which among condemnation
other things called for only initial
Pyongyang to return to response.
six-party talks aimed at
eliminating its nuclear
program. It also called
on all other U.N. mem-
ber states to ,abide by
sanctions imposed on
the North.
Russia's U.N. Ambas-
sador Vitaly Churkin, Susan Rice
the current council ambassador
president, made clear in forU.S. says
a statement that the con- new resolution
demnation was only an work will
initial response, and begin today.
that more will follow. He
said it was too early to give any specifics.
"The members of the Security Coun-
cil have decided to start work immedi-
ately on a Security Council resolution on
this matter," he said.
U.S. Ambassador Susan Rice said the
15-member council agreed that work on
'the new resolution will begin today.
"What we heard today was swift, clear,
unequivocal condemnation and opposi-
tion to what occurred," she said. "The
United States thinks that this is a grave
violation of international law and a
threat to regional and international
See TRIGGERS/Page A4


Online poll
What do you think of Gov. Charlie
Crist's decision to run for U.S. Senate?
A. Good move politically. He has ac-
complished his goals for Florida.
B. Bad move politically. He
Swill have a lower profile as a
will hajunior senator.
*W C. I think he will make a
great senator.
D. He will be Florida's first president.
To vote, visit the Web site at
www.chronicleonline.com.
Results will appear next Moiday. Find
last week's online poll results./Page A4


Garnet Miller: A genteel Southern lady


NANCY KENNEDY
nkennedy@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
As a 25-year-old, Key Training Center Execu-
tive Director Chet Cole met an immovable force
- Garnet Miller
I A genteel Southern lady, the woman he always
called Mrs. Miller was the center's interim di-
rector She had a deep concern for the disabled,


Com ics .......................C6
Community .................C4
Crossword ......................C5
Editorial ..........................A6
Horoscope ...................C5
Lottery Numbers ............B4
M ovies ............................ C6
Obituaries ................A5
TV listings ......................C5


having had'a brother who was handicapped. .
Cole had come to interview for the job, which
he immediately turned down.
"She wouldn't take no for an answer," Cole said
at Garnet's memorial service.


Because of Garnet Miller's persistence and
tenacity, more than 1,300 developmentally dis-
abled adults have found a place to thrive.
'That was 1970. She spent the first year on the
job with me," he said. "Two weeks on the job I.
told her, 'I can't do this,' but she wouldn't let me
give up."
Another 25-year-old, the Rev. Ray Cortese,
came to Citrus County in 1983 from Miami, fresh
See GARNET/Page A4


Time4honored 'Troubadour'
, ,-- Academy of Country honors longtime star George Strait./Page B6


First time for...
David Reutimann celebrates
his first NASCAR win./Page Bi


Sinking ship Keys to get an articifial reef./Page A5

Come home Taliban urges residents to return./Page A8

Homewo rk Medical providers work with Obama./Page A8


Special to the Chronicle
Garnet Miller, of Crystal River, died
May 2 after a long battle with
Alzhelmer's disease.


SNo stocks
Markets were
Closed Monday
in observance
of Memorial Day.


50* VOLUME 114 ISSUE 292


'







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A2 TrurnDv MAx' 9 29009


Obama observes Memorial Day


at Arlington National Cemetery


Associated Press
President Barack Obama bows his head Monday after he lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National
Cemetery In Arlington, Va., during a Memorial Day ceremony.

President has wreaths put at memorialfor Confederate, black soldiers


Associated Press


WASHINGTON - President Barack
Obama avoided a racial controversy on
his first Memorial Day in office by send-
-ing wreaths to separate memorials for
Confederate soldiers and for blacks who
fought against them during the Civil War'
Last week, a group of about 60 profes-
sors petitioned the White House, asking
the first black U.S. president to breaktra-
dition and not memorialize military
members from the Confederacy, the
group of Southern states that supported
slavery.
"The Arlington Confederate Monu-
ment is a denial of the wrong committed
againstAfrican-Americans by slave own-
ers, Confederates and neo-Confederates,
through the monument's denial of slav-
ery as the cause of secession and its hold-
ing up of Confederates as heroes," the
petitioners said. "This implies that the
humanity ofAfricans and African-Amer-
icans is of no significance."
SPheWhiteiHouse ignored the request
Obama laid awreath at the Tomb ofthe
Unknowns at Arlington National Ceme-
tery, a customary presidential undertak-
ing on Memorial Day. He also had one
sent to the Confederate Memorial there,
a traditional practice but not well publi-
cized. Obama also took the unprece-
dented step of sending a wreath to the
African American Civil War Memorial in
Washington's historically black U Street
neighborhood.
That memorial -to the 200,000 blacks
who fought for the North during the Civil
War - had been mentioned as a com-
promise in recent days.


Presidents traditionally visitArlington
National Cemetery to personally leave a
wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns, a
marble structure holding the remains of
unidentified U.S. service members who.
died during war. Presidents then have*
aides deliver wreaths to other meffiorials
or monuments, generally including the
Confederate Memorial.
Wreaths also were left Monday at me-
morials to the USS Maine and the Span-
ish American War
In brief but solemn remarks after he


laid the wreath and observed a moment
of silence, Obama saluted the men and
women of America's fighting forces, both
living and dead, as "the best ofAnierica."
"Why in an age when so many have
acted only in pursuit of narrowest self-
interest have the soldiers, sailors, air-
men and Marines of this generation
volu nteered all that they have on behalf
ofothers," he said. "Why have they been
willing to bear the heaviest burden?"
"Whatever it is, they felt some tug,
They answered a call. They said TI'llgo.'_
That is why they are the best of Amer-
ica,',' Obama said. "That is what sepa-
rates them from those iho have not
served in uniform, their extraordinary
willingness to risk their lives for people
they never met."
The president, who did not serve in
the military, noted his grandfather's
Army service during World War II and
his status as a father of daughters ages
10 and 7. Unlike many of those in the au-
dience, Obama said he can't know what,
it's like to walk into battle or lose a child.
"But I do know this. I am humbled to
be the commander in chief of the finest
fighting force in the history of the
world." he said to applause.
Men and women in uniform saluted
Obama's motorcade as it entered the
hallowed burial ground that is Arling-
ton cemetery. Some in the audience of
several thousands waved American
flags as Obama stepped to the micro-
phone.
Before the ceremony, the president
had a private breakfast at the White
House with people who have lost loved
ones in war.


Games, educational


activities highlight


'Harmony' event


Camps slated

forJune

Special to the Chronicle
"Harmony in the
Streets" is celebrating
more than 25 years of
camping services. Created
to promote better under-
standing and cooperation
among youngsters, this ac-
, tion-packed, . fun-filled,
five-day camping experi-
ence is being offered again
this summer at two Citrus
County school locations.
A joint project of the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office'
and the Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranches Inc., Har-
mony in the Streets is open
to the -first 60 youngsters,
ages 6 to 12, who register to
attend. Organizers say
there are still openings.
The first camp is set for
June 8 to 12. at Pleasant
Grove Elementary School
in Inverness, and the sec-
ond is scheduled.for June
15 to 19 at Central Ridge
Elementary School in Cit-
rus Springs.
The two sessions will run
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday. Enroll-
ment is free of charge;
however, parents or
guardians are responsible
for brown-bagging a lunch
each day for their campers
and making travel arrange-
ments for their children to
and from the campsites.
Free drinks and snacks will
be provided.
Applications are avail-
able at the Sheriff's Oper-
ations Center in downtown
Inverness, and completed
forms may be turned in at
the" same location. Or
download an application
by going to the Sheriff's Of-
fice Web.site at www.sher-


WREATHS
Continued from'Page Al

and cadets have collected
sponsorships for 171
wreaths so far this year to
place in the national ceme-
tery at Bushnell, where
more than 97,000 veterans
have been laid to rest The
group hopes to acquire
sponsorships for 500
wreaths before the dead-
line on Nov 15.
Williamson is a retired
U.S. Air Force chief master
sergeant with 23 years of
active-duty service. He
said he entered CAP in
April 2008 to give back to
the youths of his commu-
nity, and became squadron
commander in February.
The squadron gets $5 for


iffcitrus.org, and clicking
on the Harmony in the
Streets button on the home
page. Because space is lim-
ited, it's recommended that
completed applications be
dropped off as soon as pos-
sible.
While attending Har-
mony in the Streets, young-
sters should dress-
comfortably in T-shirts and
shorts, closed-toe shoes (no
sandals), and bring with
them a swimsuit (or a
charge of clothes to get wet
in), towel, hat and sun-
screen.
Parents and guardians
are reminded that campers
should not bring money,
jewelry, radios, cell
phones, electronic games
or expensive recreational
equipment with them to
camp. Weapons of any
kind, clothing with inap-
propriate words or mes-
sages, tobacco products,.
alcohol and illegal drugs of
any kind are strictly pro-
hibited at both campsites.
Outdoor activities
abound at Harmony in the
Streets. Youngsters will
enjoy games, team sports,
arts & crafts, water activi-
ties, environmental educa-
tion, group-building
dynamics, workshops, plus
law enforcement demon-
strations and much, much
more.
According to Sergeants
Kevin Purinton and Ron
Frink, who oversee the
agency's school resource
officer program, SROs will
once again join Youth
Ranches staff to supervise
the two camping sessions
and work closely with the
children.
For more information
about Harmony in, the
Streets, call supervisor Lt
Dave DeCarlo at 249-2738,
or Sgt. Purinton and Sgt.
Frink at 726-4488.

every wreath to help with
their program, .... so,
Williamson said,,he. hpped
sponsors would credit the
local CAP With their dona-
tion, and that the
cadets learned about veter-
ans' service and sacrifices
with their involvement in
the project
"That's my primary
goal," Williamson said, "to
teach our cadets the re-
spect and honor of the
those who have gone be-
fore us."
CAP is a volunteer, non-
profit auxiliary of the Air
Force that began in 1941.
To sponsor a wreath, call
Williamson at 527-4537 or
Squadron Finance Officer
Ed Voelker at 527-0869.
Visit www.wreaths
acrossamerica.org for
more information.


IT








DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
TOP LEFT: Army Spc. Christopher Loman salutes the flag during the opening ceremony Monday during the Memorial Day
Service. TOP RIGHT: Bill Troyanos and George Blakey bough their heads in prayer during the Memorial Day service.


NOBLE
Continued from Page Al

citizens' freedom.
The Memorial Day Serv-
ice was filled with tradi-
tional tributes led by
members of the VFW and
Ladies Auxiliary Post 10087,
American Legion Post 155,
Lecanto High School Junior
ROTC and Nature Coast
Young Marines, including


the parade of colors, rifle
squad salute, laying of the
wreath and helmet benedic-
tion.
Attendees, clad in patri-
otic colors, stood saluting or
with their hands over their
hearts as they recited the
Pledge of Allegiance and
sang the "Star-Spangled
Banner."
When the bugler played
taps, the somber melody
brought some to tears.
* Prudy Rodriguez, Citrus


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Springs resident, sniffled
through the last part of the
Memorial Day service. Her
sons, 26-year-old Jimmy Ro-
driquez and 27-year-old
Jonathan Rodriguez, are in
the Army and have served
three tours each in Iraq.
Rodriguez said she wor-
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every day, but is supportive
and proud of them for put-
ting their lives on the line in
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SPage A3- TUESDAY, MAY 26,2009



TATE&


LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE .


Around
THE COUNTY

CUB sponsoring
golf tournament
Citrus United Basket will
host its first golfing event to
raise money for the organi-
zation.
The golf event is a four-
person scramble and costs
$50 per person to enter.
Cost includes range balls,
cartlunch, and doughnuts
and coffee at 7:30 a.m. be-
fore tee off.
The event is Saturday at
the Inverness Golf and
Country Club. Registration is
7:30 a.m. with a shotgun
start at 8:30. Entries must
be received by today.
Make checks payable to
- Citrus United Basket, Atten-
tion Deborah, P.O. Box
2094, Inverness, FL 34451.
Call 344-2242 for informa-
tion.
Chapel plans free
outreach for needy
The fourth annual Out-
reach will be 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. Saturday at the Calvary
Chapel of Inverness on U.S.
* 41 (next to Davis Funeral
I Home). Needy public in-
vited. Free service will be
given by 26 agencies, in-
cluding medical, legal ad-
vice, Department of Motor
Vehicles, Veterans Adminis-
tration, child identification,
housing and shelter, educa-
tional and vocational infor-
mation, with activities for
children.
Hot dogs, chips and
drinks will be served. The
sponsor for this event is The
Hunger & Homeless Coali-
tion of Citrus County Inc.,
628-4357, and licensed
medical professionals.
Economic groups
present workshop
The Citrus Chamber of
Commerce, Citrus Economic
Development Council, Work-
force Connection, UNF
Small Business Develop-
ment Center presents "Find-
ing Business Opportunities
in the Recovery Act Funds,"
from 8 to 9:30 a.m. Friday at
Citrus Hills Lodge, 350 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway,
Hernando.
Attend this special work-
shop to find out how your .
business might benefit from
funding and incentives pro-
vided through the American
* Recovery and Reinvestment
Act of 2009. Find out this
- and more:
* Understand the.key ele-
ments of the Recovery and
Reinvestment Act.
* Uncover business op-
portunities from state and
federal Web sites.
* Hear small business
success stories.
* Learn how to go after
contracts or requests for
proposals.
* Find out about new
SBA loans.
* Understanding tax cred-
its and incentives in the Re-
covery Act.
* Identifying business
training grants and incen-
tives.
There is no charge Tor the
workshops, but advance
Registration is required. To
obtain a detailed schedule
or to register for this work-
shop, call the Citrus Cham-
ber of Commerce at
795-3149 or e-mail
josh@citruscounty
chamber.com.
Landfill does free
hazardous waste drops
Residents may drop off
household hazardous waste
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tues-
days, Thursdays and Fri-
days at the Citrus County
* Central Landfill.
Up to 60 pounds total per
visit will be accepted free of
charge.
Materials should be deliv-


ered in original containers.
Additional program informa-
tion is posted on the County
Web site at: www.bocc.cit-
rus.fl.us/pubworks/swm, or
residents can call Solid
Waste management at 527-
7670 during working hours.

-From staff reports


Citrus Hills goes greener


Hauler offering curbside recycling program


MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
A Citrus Hills property-management
company is hoping a fledgling recy-
cling program catches on.
Villages Services Cooperative has
teamed up with FDS Disposal Inc. to
provide low-cost curbside recycling to
residents of Citrus Hills.
Villages Services president Tom Pe-
terson and vice president Bob Collins
said FDS is the exclusive trash hauler
for about 3,800 Citrus Hills homeown-
ers.
Last month, FDS began offering
once-a-week curbside single-stream
recycling, meaning the materials need
not be sorted. There is no additional
fee other than $25 per box of 100 spe-
cial light-blue bags necessary to con-


tain the recyclable material. The sup-
ply is good for about four to six
months. I-
Peterson said about 20 percent of
the Citrus Hills residents have taken
up the recycling offer. FDS wants the
participation rate to hit at least 30 per-
cent before it starts offering the serv-
ice to other con muniti es
Village Services contracted with
FDS for exclusive Citrus Hills resi-
dential trash pickup five years ago. A
year or so ago, FDS began offering vol-
untary recycling pickup on an infor-
mal basis, Peterson said.
FDS approached Village Services
with'a single-stream service that went
into effect April 1. In that first month,
participation was 18 percent. FDS
picked up 29 tons of recyclable mate-
rials in those four weeks that would
have ended up in the county landfill.



Natural dryer


FDS takes ihe material to a process-
ing plant in Orlando where the mate-
rials are separated. When FDS began
the program in Citrus Hills, it paid
$7.50 a ton. The price shot up to more
than $70 a ton; the company is now
paying $52 a ton, said Randy Messer,
FDS government affairs manager.
Messer said FDS would like to open
a processing plant in Citrus County
and is lookingPatpotential sites,
He said single-stream curbside re-
cycling is the best way to reduce the
amount oftrashburied in the landfill.
"Only way to get people to recycle is
to make it easy for them," Messer said.
"We'll get more participation in single-
stream curbside. People don't have to
sort it."
Messer said he has spoken to prop-
erty managers or homeowners groups
in Pine Ridge, Black Diamond, Sug-
armill Woods and Meadowcrest about
the possibility of providing curbside
recycling.


The Citrus County School Board will meet at
9 a.m. today- t the District Services Center,
1007 W Main St., Inveress.


Learn more
Log onto www.citrus.kl2.fl.us and
click on the "School Board" link to
view the agenda or call 726-1931, ext.
2206.
The monthly Citrus County School
Board special meeting and work-
shop will begin today with a due
process hearing regarding Superin-
tendent of Schools Sandra "Sam"
Himmel's recommendation to fire
CREST School's Teacher of the Year.
Board members are scheduled to
vote on the following issues:
* Contract termination: Board
members will decide whether or
not to terminate CREST School ex-


ceptional student education
teacher Heather Ivanyi's contract
based on school officials' investiga-
tion findings that Ivanyi forged a
parent permission form to put an
autistic child in an isolation room
and failed to follow procedures


prior to and while placing the child.
in seclusion.
* Renovation project: Board
members will revisit the multimil-
lion-dollar Crystal River High
School renovation project to decide
if they are going to suspend it, scale
it down or construct it in phases.
Thus far, board members' budget
concerns have delayed the project
* New assistant principal: Board
members will have the opportunity
to appoint a new Crystal River Mid-
dle School assistant principal to re-
place Gloria Bishop, who will
become the school's principal for
the 2009-10 school year. Crystal
River Middle School Principal
Mark McCoy is moving to Crystal
River High School to be its princi-
pal next school year.
- Keri Lynn McHale


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County
Seniors to receive
stimulus funds
Social Security and Sup-
plemental Security Income
(SSI) beneficiaries soon
should receive a one-time
payment of $250 under the
American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act of 2009,
also known as the stimulus
bill.
The Act, which made provi-
sions to-put $787 billion into
the economy, includes federal
tax relief, expansion of unem-
ployment benefits and other
social welfare provisions, and
domestic spending in educa-
tion, health care and infra-
structure, including the
energy sector. It also author-
izes the one-time payment to
nearly 55 million people who
receive Social Security and
SSI benefits.
Those who are eligible
should receive the one-time
payment by June 4 at the lat-
est. The payments will be au-
tomatic, so those receiving
benefits do not need to take
any action.
The legislation also pro-
vides for a one-time payment
to recipients of Department of
Veterans Affairs (VA) and
Railroad Retirement Board
(RRB) benefits. However,
those who receive Social Se-
curity or SSI benefits and
also receive VA or RRB ben-
efits will receive only one
$250 payment. Social Secu-
rity will send that payment.
If the payment does not ar-
rive before June 4, the bene-
ficiary should call the toll-free
number, (800) 772-1213 or
the Ocala Social Security of-
fice at (352) 629-1850.

Boca Raton
FAU expands special
dormitory offerings
Florida Atlantic University
is expanding what it calls
"Living Learning Communi-
ties" in its.dormitories.
Following the lead of
schools around the country,
FAU now has nine dorm set-
tings geared toward students
of specific interests and ma-
jors. Among them, dorrms for
pre-medical students and
those majoring in foreign lan-
guages, engineering and
business.
They've also carved out
communities for those inter-
ested in social justice and en-
vironmental issues.
A planned community for
those emphasizing a drug-
and alcohol-free lifestyle has
been called off because of
lack of interest.

Daytona Beach
Crist requests
disaster be declared
Gov. Charlie Crist is asking
that a federal disaster be de-
clared after heavy rains
flooded central and northeast
Florida.
Crist penned the letter to
President Barack Obama on
Sunday asking for Washing-
ton's help dealing with the af-
termath of the storm.
� Volusia County has been
the hardest hit and Daytona
Beach is the epicenter. That
city recorded nearly 21
inches of rain last week.
1 dead in Daytona
Beach plane crash
One person is dead and
another is critically injured
after a small plane crashed iri
Daytona Beach.
Volusia County officials say
the twin-engine plane went
down at Daytona Beach In-
ternational Airport around 9
a.m. Monday, not long after
taking off. The pilot had re-
ported engine trouble.
The occupants were


trapped in the wreckage of
the plane. One person was
pronounced dead at the
scene.
The other, a 45-year-old
man, is hospitalized. Their
identities have not yet been
released.
-From staff and wire reports


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
A cormorant dries its wings Wednesday in Ozello while watching some boaters in the Gulf of Mexico.





Teacher faces termination

Hearing will open monthly special meeting and workshop








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A4 TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009


QUESTION: Would you like to see the county offer more free dental clinics?
A. Yes. The overwhelming response shows it is necessary. 34.8 percent (216
Votes)
B. Yes. Dental health is key to one's overall health. 33.2 percent (206 Votes)
C. No. Why should we pay for others dental care. 24.2 percent (150 Votes)
D. No. The cost is too high. 7.5 percent (47 Votes)
Total Votes: 619.


GARNET
Continued from Page Al

out of seminary. He came to in-
terview for a job as pastor of a
newly formed church that was
meeting in Garnet Miller's liv-
ing room.
"I had no intention of ac-
cepting the job either," Cortese
said, echoing Cole's words.
"But Garnet and (husband)
Sam prayed, and it became
so."
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church and Seven ,Rivers
Christian School in Lecanto
exist because of Sam and Gar-
net Miller
Elizabeth Garnet Field
Miller, the soft-spoken South-
ern lady with a steel resolve,
died May 2 after a long battle
with Alzheimer's disease, She.
was 85.
"She was physically beauti-
ful, but even more beautiful on
the inside," Cole said. "She
taught me to fight for these
people (at the Key Center). She
taught me to be a shepherd
and to love these people, and
to be loved by them.
"I am going to heaven one
day because Garnet shared
the gospel with me. Garnet
Millert is my hero," he said.
Born in Memphis, Tenn.,
Garnet graduated from,
Rhodes College. She was on
the debate team, coming in
second in a contest in extem-,
poraneous speaking.
She continued het love and
gift for-public speaking as-a
Stonecroft Ministries speaker,
traveling throughout Florida


speaking about her Christian
faith for Christian Women's
Clubs.
"Garnet started the Chris-
tian Women's Club here in
Crystal River," Ruth Levins
said. "She had gone to one in
Tampa and decided we
needed one here. That was
over 30 years ago and we're
still going strong, also one in
Homosassa. We owe it all to
her."
Her lifeblood was reaching
out to others, recalled daugh-
ter Vicki Morris. She was a
geometry teacher, a recreation
director in Los Alamos, N.M.,
during World War II, the "Sto-
rybook Lady" on a children's
radio show in.Memphis, Tenn.
She taught Sunday school,
junior choir, junior church and
vacation Bible school. She led
Word of Life clubs in her
home, and in 1983, she and her
husband, Crystal River physi-
cian Dr. Sam Miller, started a
church in their living room.
"She loved games," recalled
daughter Margie Miller.
"Growing up, we had one night
that was family night and
everybody had to be home -
even Dad if he could make it,
and no friends allowed. We
played cards and board games,
and she loved to win. You did
not want to play Clue with her
- nobody ever beat her! She
definitely taught us her sense
of competitiveness."
"Mother never knew a
stranger,"' Morris said.; "She
was the person in a crowd that
others were drawn to. She was
the- person that made-people
comfortable."
She was genteel, but she


could be a bulldozer when it
came to standing up for what
she believed was right She
had brought her African-
American maid, Cora, to
church for her daughter,
Katie's, baptism, and members
of the church objected. So Gar-
net brought Cora every week
after that and sat right on the
front row.
Another time there was a
teachers' strike, and Garnet
was against teachers unioniz-
ing, so she recruited her col-
lege grad friends to come and
teach so the Crystal River
schools .never missed a day
during the strike. Eventually,
her efforts ended the strike.
"Mother taught full time at
the middle school when Citrus
County schools were inte-
grated, and that was a special
cause for her, working to make
each student feel accepted,"
Margie Miller said. ,
Garnet opened her home to
those in need. Even with six
children of her own, there was
always room for foreign ex-
change students, kids who
needed a safe place to stay or
someone who just needed a
good meal or a place to spend
thenight
Until the end of husband
Sam's life, Garnet and Sam
ended each day with Sam
singing a hymn, reading a de-
votion and saying the Lord's
,Prayer together:
S"She loved people," Margie
Miller said. "She loved influ-
encing and mentoring people
... and her impact has filtered
down through those she
(touched) directly to others and
then to another generation."


Obama blasts N. Korea


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Presi-
dent Barack Obama as-
sailed North Korea Monday
for new missile tests, saying
the world must "stand up
to" Pyongyang and demand
that it honor a promise to
abandon its nuclear ambi-
tions.
Appearing on the White
House steps, Obama said
that its latest nuclear un-
derground test and subse-
quent test firings of
short-range ground to air
missiles "pose a grave
threat to the peace and se-
curity of the world and I
strongly condemn their
reckless action."
It was his second state-
ment within hours of the
tests, the latest in a number
of nuclear actions that
Obama said "endanger the
people of Northeast Asia."
He called it "a blatant vio-


lation of international law"
and said that it contra-
dicted North Korea's "own
prior commitments."
Obama had released a writ-
ten statement chastising the
North Koreans in the early
morning hours of Monday.
In his statement in the
White House Rose Garden,
he noted that the latest tests
had drawn scorn around
the world. Pyongyang's ac-
tions "have flown in the
face of U.N. resolutions"
and had deepened its isola-
tion, he said, "inviting
stronger international pres-
sure."
"North Korea will not
find security and respect
through threats and illegal
weapons," the president
said. "We will work with our
friends and allies to stand
up to this behavior. The
United States will never
waver from our determina-
tion to protect our people


TRIGGERS Nuclear test
- - W W


Continued from Page Al

peace and security and
therefore the United States
will seek a strong resolution
with strong measures."
Churkin was asked
whether Russia viewed the
nuclear test as more serious
than North Korea's missile
launch in April, which also
led to Security Council con-
demnation and sanctions
against three North Korean
companies.
"This is a very rare occur-
rence as you know, and it
goes contrary not only to res-
olutions of the Security
Council but also the (Nu-
clear) Nonproliferation
Treaty and the (Nuclear)
Test Ban Treaty," he replied.
"We are one of the founding


The U.S. Geological Survey said
it recorded a seismic event in -
northeastern North'Korea
Monday morning, coinciding with
its nuclear test claim.
CHINHA ...--.--
,0 . rr, ,. , ri.:' ir , '
,lu .-


S NORTH .- "
.'.',. KOREA

s.., -. . Pyongyang . I"pan
S . S KOREA
:*' .' �,Seoul '.
SOURCES: ESRI; USGS AP
fathers - Russia is - of
those documents, so we
think they're extremely im-
portant in current interna-
tional relations. So anything
which would undermine the-
regimes of those two treaties
is very serious and needs to


and the peace and security
of the world."
In Pyongyang, North
Korea said that it had car-
ried out a powerful under-
ground nuclear test -
much larger than one con-
ducted in 2006. The regime
also test-fired three short-
range, ground-to-air mis-
siles later Monday from the
same northeastern site
where it launched a rocket
last month, the Yonhap
news agency reported, cit-
ing unnamed sources.
The rocket liftoff, widely
believed to be a cover for a
test of its long-range missile
technology, drew censure
from the U.N. Security
Council, which scheduled a
meeting in New York for
later Monday.
The question now is cal-
culating precisely the na-
ture of a threat and what
are options are available to
the Obama administration.


have a strong response."
The five permanent veto-
wielding members of the
council -the United States,
Russia, China, Britain and
France - met behind closed
doors for over an hour with
the ambassadors of Japan
and South Korea ahead of
the closed meeting of the
full 15-member council.
Japan said North Korea's
"irresponsible" nuclear test
and the April missile launch
had challenged the author-
ity of the U.N.'s most power-
ful body "and the response.
must be firm."
"It's a very clear chal-
lenge," said Japan's U.N.
Ambassador Yukio Takasu,
a non-permanent council
member. "So therefore we
need a really, really clear
and firm message from this
- preferably a resolution."


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR R1 HI LO PR 8HI 3LO
g91 64 trace -RR J89 63 I0


S65 trace 8 63 0.50

THREE DAY OUTLOOKExluse dai
T TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 86 Low: 68
Partly to mostly cloudy, a 60% chance
. >. ol showers and thunderstorm.
py .4 WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
High: 85 Low: 68
Humid with late morning to early afternoon
. .' . showers and storms. Rain chance 60%.
pr THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING

High: 86 Low: 68
.,-:- Onshore breeze with showers and
thunderstorms likely. Rain chance 60%.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday ' 86/63
Record 96/54
Normal 89/67,
Mean temp. 75
Departure from mean -3
PRECIPITATION*
Monday 0.02 in.
Total for the month 12.42 in.,
Total for the year 17.20 in,.
Normal for the year 15.77 in.
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 7
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Monday at 3 p.m. 29.93 in.


DEW POINT .
Monday at 3 p.m. . 6.
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m. ' . 81�
POLLEN COUNT**
Grasses and-weeds were light and
trees were moderate.
**Ught: only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY


Monday was good wit,
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR
(MORNING) (AFTE
5/26 TUESDAY 7:55 1:39 8:27.
5/27 WEDNESDAY 9:05 2:49 9:35


CELESTIAL OU'ILOO.OK
O . SUNSET TONIGHT.........
SUNRISE TOMORROW...
MOONRISE TODAY..........
JNE7 JAIEI 5 JIE22 MOONSETTODAY


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. A burn ban is in
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division �
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus G
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Invernes
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses e
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursda
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p

. TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Tuesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowltzka* 8:42 a/3:46 a 7:14 p/3:24 p
Crystal River** 7:03 a/1:08 a 5:35 p/12:46 p
Withlacoochee* 4:50 a/10:34 a 3:22 p/11:44 p
Homosassa"** 7:52 a/2:45 a ' 6:24 p/2:23 p


***At Ma
Wedne
High/Low


h pollutants City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
MAJOR Atlantic City
RNOON) Austin
2:11 Baltimore
3:20 Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
............. 8:21 P.M. Burlington, VT
............:33 A.M. ...-Charleston, SC
.............8:28 A.M. Charleston, WV
Charlotte
........... 11:03 P.M. Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
effect. Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
1-6777. For Dallas
of Forestry's Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
County Hartford
ss residents' Houston
ending in 2 or 3, Indianapolis
h can water Jackson
>ys; addresses . Las Vegas
Little Rock
m. on their day Los Angeles
p.m. on their day. Louisville
. Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
ason's Creek Mobile
3sday Montgomery
High/Low Nashville


9:31 a/4:34 a 8:05p/4:11 p
7:52 a/1:56 a 6:26 p/1:33 p
5:39 a/11:21 a 4:f3 p--
8:41 a/3:33 a 7:15 p/3:10 p


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee '
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK
'South winds from 5 to 10 knots. Seas Gulf water
1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will temperature
have a light chop. Mostly cloudy with
scattered showers and thunderstorms,
mainly during the afternoon. n a

Taken at Aripeka


Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder. 28.65 28.70 . 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.12 33.36 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 34.91 35.00 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 36.93 37.09 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded In any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and.is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION-


Monday Tuesday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L
77 45 - pc 67 49
77 53 .04 pc 77 56
77'64 .21 ts 76 59
80 66 ts 80 65
80 67 r 62 57
91 61 pc 94 69
83 64 .21 r 63 59
72 53 . pc 75 50
82 67 .11 ts 81 67
81 53 pc 84 49
78 62 s 57 47
70 49 sh 70 54
63 43 pc 68 46
82 68 ' ts 76 70'
82 66 .48 ts 83 65
80 68 1.33 ts 80 64
67 54 .03 ts 67 60
78 68 .34 ts 80 65
69 58 ts 70 60
83 69 .66 ts 81 67
81 63 ts 77 64
75 43 pc 65 42
89 65 pc 89 68
64 50 ts 65 49
69 61 .09 ts 72 56
72 51 ts 67 60
88 60 pc 88 61
81. 69 2.07 ts 81 66
82 62 .01 r 59 57
80 59 pc 66 49
90 67 pc 93 74
74 61 .99--ts 78 65
81 70 .60 ts 84 69
93 70 pc 94 73
80 66 .17 ts 84 67
68 59 pc 70 60
79 70 .47 ts 81 66
85 71 .07 ts 83 70
61 48 ts 58 50
78 55 sh 66 51
79 70 .72 ts 83 68
80 68 -17 ts 83 69
83 68 ts 81 66


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c'cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair, h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
snrsnow; ts=thunderstorms; w=wlndy.
02009 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 78 69 1.36 ts 85 72
New York City 81 67 sh 63 54
Norfolk 82 69 r 77 67
Oklahoma City 85 64 ts 81 62
Omaha 82 64 ts 69 55
Palm Springs 94 63 s 95 69
Philadelphia 84 67 r 62 56
Phoenix 96 73 pc 97 73
Pittsburgh 83 60 ts' 73 58
Portland, ME 73 49 pc 57 42
Portland, Ore 74 47 pc 71 53
Providence, R.I. 78 62 pc 65 47
Raleigh ..83. 67 .13 ts 80 65 .
Rapid City 68 56 pc 70 45
Reno 81 53 pc 87 56
Rochester, NY 63 44 sh 70 52
Sacramento- 87 49 pc 94 61
St. Louis 76 64 1.20 ts 79 68
St. Ste. Marie 65 38 sh 64 50
Salt Lake City 73 50 pc 74 57
San Antonio 94 63 pc 92 72
San Diego 65 60 pc 65 59
San Francisco 62 49 pc 73 53
Savannah 84 68 ts 80 69
Seattle 69 46 sh 66 51
Spokane 76 50 pc 74 46
Syracuse 69 44 pc 71 53
Topeka . 78 66 ts 76 60
Washington 82 68 r 66 60
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 105 Laredo, Texas LOW 27 Pellston, Mich.

WORLD CITIES
TUESDAY Lisbon 79/56/s
CITY H/L/SKY London 58/44/pc
Acapulco 90/76/pc Madrid 79/50/s
Amsterdam 67/51/sh Mexico City 78/53/ts
Athens 85/64/pc Montreal 64/45/pc
Beijing 88/63/s Moscow 61/46/sh
Berlin 74/52/ts Paris 66/47/r
Bermuda 76/67/pc Rio 81/67/pc
Cairo 86/60/s Rome 85/62/pc
Calgary 74/46/s Sydney 68/47/sh
Havana 88/75/ts Tokyo 67/51/pc
Hong Kong 87/76/ts Toronto 69/52/sh
Jerusalem 85/63/s Warsaw 72/46/s


R f-- ~ U :i


C O U N T Y


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Sinking to create home for sealife


Ship will become

second-largest

intentional reef

Associated Press

KEY WEST - Aboard the Gen.
Hoyt S. Vandenberg, a massive
World War II ship last used by the
U.S. Air Force to track missiles
and spacecraft, it's anything but
business as usual.
Crews are preparing the decom-
missioned ship for sinking Wednes-
day seven miles off Key West, where
it will become one of the world's
biggest man-made reefs. Explosives
attached to the ship's hull beneath
the water level will be detonated to
open it for flooding, which should
quickly send it to the sea floor The
17,000 ton, 523-foot-long ship will be
sunk on a sandy bottom in about 140
feet of clear water.
"Don't go to the bathroom. Don't
go get a beer It should be under
three minutes for the ship to fully
deploy onto the bottom," said Joe
Weatherby, project organizer at
Reefmakers, a Moorestown, N.J.-
based company that specializes in
acquiring, preparing and sinking
craft to create artificial reefs.
It's a project that has been years
in the making.
The cost is about $8.6 million,
from acquiring the ship to cleaning
it Officials in the Florida Keys ex-
pect it to pay dividends, up to $8
million in annual tourism-related
- revenue, mostly from divers flock-.
ing to get a look at the underwater
spectacle.
The idea is to not only to attract
tourists, but to help protect the
Keys' natural reefs, already suffer-
ing from excessive diving, snorkel-


.. . 'V .. i . w '..- - -----U


Florida Keys News Bureau/Associated Press
The retired U.S. missile tracking ship Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg arrives April 22 in Key West, after it was
towed there from Norfolk, Va. The 523-foot-long ship, that once tracked space launches off Cape Canaveral
and also monitored Soviet missile launches during the Cold War, is scheduled to be intentionally sunk off Key
West on Wednesday to become an artificial reef in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Estimated proj-
ect costs to create a new attraction for sport divers and anglers is $8.6 million.


ing and fishing along with warming
ocean temperatures. -
Weatherby said people - and
fish - will now be drawn to the
wreck from nearby natural coral,
"giving the reef a breather, which is
what it needs."
Preparation for sinking has taken
months of inspections and cleanup
to remove contaminants. Workers
hauled off more than a million feet
of wire, 1,500 vent gaskets, dozens of
watertight steel doors, 81 bags of as-


bestos, 193 tons of potentially can-
cer-causing substances, 46 tons of
garbage that could come loose and
float to the surface, 300 pounds of
materials containing mercury and.
185 55-gallofi drums of paint.chips.
The cleanup was performed at
two Norfolk, Va., shipyards before
the boat made the 1,100-mile voy-
age, arriving in Key West on April
22. Permitting was required from 18
local, state and federal agencies.
The Vandenberg began as the


Gen. Harry Taylor and was later
commissioned by the Army as a
transport vessel, ferrying troops
and supplies from San Francisco to
island bases in the western Pacific
Ocean in 1944. 0
In 1945, it carried troops home
from Europe near the end of World
' War II. It was later used by the Navy
as a transport ship, and was trans-
ferred to the Air Force in 1961,
when it was renamed the Vanden-
berg.


For about 20 more years, the ship
served as a missile tracker through-
out the height of the Cold War and
was retired in 1983.
Mac Monroe, a former mission
controller aboard the Vandenberg,
said he was pleased the ship won't
be turned into scrap metal.
"It's nice to see the old rust
bucket again," Monroe said on a re-
cent trip to Key West to see the ship.
'And it's a positive outcome for itbe
sunk and become something useful
again."
Organizers say it will serve as
"the anchor" to the region's wide
array of existing sunken vessels and
wrecks from Key Largo to Key West,
where some estimate there's a ship-
wreck about every 300 yards.
The rusty hulk is now tied up at a
dock awaiting its final resting place
on the ocean floor
Organizers hope the Vandenberg
sinking goes more smoothly than
that of the Spiegel Grove off Key-
Largo in 2002. That 510-foot decom-
missioned landing ship dock par-
tially sank upside-down,, hours
before an attempt to scuttle it to cre-
ate an artificial reef. The sudden
sinking sent 40 workers onboard
scrambling for safety and left the
ship's bow sticking out of the water
for three weeks.
The Vandenberg will become the
world's second largest intentionally
sunk artificial reef.
In 2006, the USS Oriskany, a de-
commissioned aircraft carrier
nearly three football fields in
length, was sunk about 24 miles off
the coast of Pensacola Beach in the
Florida Panhandle. That ship be-
came the world's largest intention-
ally sunk artificial reef.
'"And it's been paying dividends
since before it sank with the peo-
ple coming for the event," Weath-
erby said. "We expect some of that
same experience here."


Heyday over for Alabama city


Historic black

town now a

'Place in Peril'

Associated Press
HOBSON CITY, Ala. -
The cafes, the school and
the roller rink are long gone
from Alabama's oldest black
city. Empty homes and busi-
nesses line the narrow
streets.
Hobson City has no police
or fire department, and
weeds have overgrown the
oldest part of the cemetery
and a park.
But this small town once
thrived as a place where
black people were in charge
in the midst of the Jim Crow
South.
Now, with the town on the
verge of dying, preserva-
tionists have put the east Al-
abama landmark on the
critical list. The Alabama
Historical Commission this
month included the town of
878 people on its annual in-
ventory of "Places in Peril."
The commission's list typ-
ically includes historic
structures, such as old
homes and abandoned the-
aters. Hobson City is an ex-
ception: an entire town that
in recent decades has seen
its foundation collapse.
Incorporated in 1899,
Hobson City was formed 12
years after Eatonville, Fla.,
which calls itself the na-
tion's oldest black city.
In the decades after the
Civil War, blacks formed
scores of colonies and com-
munities as they migrated to
Kansas and Oklahoma and
* sought independence in lo-
cales around the South.
Some, like Eatonville and
; Hobson City, formally incor-
porated.
"There was a lot of dissat-
isfaction and alienation
among blacks by the 1890s
because of the refusal of
whites in the South to allow
them any real role in civic
life," said University of Ten-
nessee history professor
Robert J. Norrell, who has
written extensively on race
relations.
Blacks also were subject
to discrimination and abuse
by law enforcement. "To-
gether, these created a de-
sire for separate
municipalities," Norrell
said.
Hobson City's residents
created "a thriving munici-
pality, which people at the
time said couldn't be done
because blacks couldn't gov-
ern," said Dorothy Walker,
public outreach coordinator


Burned out and rundown homes are seen May 18 in Hobson City, Ala., a city that once
sported a brisk family life. Now, the cafes, the school and the roller rink are long gone from
Alabama's oldest black city. Empty homes and businesses line the narrow streets; the
busiest place in town is a rural AIDS clinic. But this small town, when it was incorporated
in 1899, gave about 300 black residents a place to call home.


with the Alabama Historical
Commission. "If it is some-
day absorbed into another
city, it will lose that historic
identity."
Roderick Boyd, a handy-
man and Hobson City resi-
dent, worries about his
hometown's survival.
"I fear it's gone too far,"
said Boyd, 49.
A two-mile-long sliver
about 60 miles east of Birm-
ingham, Hobson City is as
narrow as a few hundred
yards in places. Wedged be-
tween two predominantly
white cities, Oxford and An-
niston, it has a few white
residents.
During the 1800s, Walker
said, it was an all-black sec-
tion of Oxford called
Mooree Quarter, a possible
reference to old slave quar-
ters in the area. Residents
were allowed to vote, but
whites maintained control.
The racial relationship
shifted in the 1890s when
the people of Mooree Quar-
ter swayed an election,
Walker said. The state had
not yet disenfranchised
blacks - that wouldn't hap-
pen until 1901. So, Walker
said, whites petitioned state
leaders to de-annex Mooree
Quarter.
Kicked out of Oxford,
blacks incorporated a new
city and named it for Rich-
mond P Hobson, a white
Spanish-American War hero
from Alabama who was


later elected to Congress.
The 1900 Census put the
new town's population at
292.
Hobson City grew to about
1,500 people by the mid-
1900s, with restaurants,
laundries, stores, a skating
rink and other businesses.
The town was poor, but had
a vibrant culture centered
on the all-black vocational
school.
"It was never a rich town,
but it was a good place to
raise children," said Mayor
Alberta McCrory.
Federal anti-poverty
money flowed to Hobson
City in the 1960s, and fed-
eral aid helped build a mod-
ern municipal complex in
the 1970s. But in an ironic
twist, McCrory'said, the end
of racial segregation sent
the city into a tailspin
around the same time.
"Sometimes I think I
wouldn't have gone out and
done all that marching if I
realized how much we were
going to lose," said McCrory,
61, who participated in civil
rights protests as a young
woman.
The all-black Calhoun
County Training School be-
came an integrated elemen-
tary school in 1972, and fair
housing laws meant blacks
could live elsewhere. Many
who could afford to move
away did so, costing Hobson
City hundreds of residents.
With nearly one-third of


its residents living below%
the poverty level, the town
has only three businesses
other than in-home opera-
tions: A small print shop. a
barber shop and a conen-
ience store.
Industries in nearby
towns shut down in the
1980s, costing more jobs.
The elementary school was
moved from the center of
town to the outskirts a few
years ago, leaving a shell of
a building where kids used
to run and play
City offices are now
housed in the old school.
The 1970s-era municipal
complex stands abandoned.
Unable to pay for mainte-
nance, the city left it to the
weeds and weather in 2006
The city still has a police
car and a fire truck, but it
can't afford officers or fire-
fighters. County deputies
handle police calls, and
neighboring cities help with
fires.



BROWN
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY
5.130 W\. Gulf to Like Hy.
Lxcanto, Fionda 34451
(352)
- 795-0111

Riwhard T Brown
FE t L DI.RI (OR


=Death ELSEWHERE==--


Jay Bennett
MUSICIAN
URBANA, Ill. - Jay
Bennett, a musician and
songwriter who was a for-
mer member of the rock
band Wilco, has died. He
was 45.
Bennett died at his Ur-
bana home early Sunday
a nd an autopsy was being
performed,, friend and fel-
low musician Edward
Burch told the Chicago
Sun-Times in a story
posted online late Sunday.
"We are profoundly sad-
dened to report that our
friend died in his sleep ...
Jay was a beautiful human
being who will be missed,"
his record label, Undertow
Music Collective,'said in a


statement posted Sunday
on its Web site.
A cause of death was not
immediately available. A
message left for the Cham-
paign County Coroner on
Sunday was not immedi-
ately returned.
Bennett worked as a
sound . engineer and
played instruments for
Wilco from 1994 to 2001.
SEarlier this month, he
sued the band's lead
singer, Jeff Tweedy, claim-
ing he was owed royalties
for songs during his seven
years and five albums with
the group and money from
the band's 2002 documen-
tary, "I Am Trying to Break
Your Heart"
-From wire reports


* There were no local obituaries submitted for today's
Chronicle. To read online archived obituaries, visit
www.chronicleonline.com.


OBITUARIES

* The Citrus County Chronicle's policy permits both
free and paid obituaries.
* Obituaries must be submitted by the funeral home
or society in charge of arrangements.
* Free obituaries can include: Full name of deceased;
age; hometown/state; date of death; place of
death; date, time and place of visitation and funeral
services.
* A flag will be included for free for those who served
in the U.S. military. (Please note this service when
submitting a free obituary.) Additionally, all obituar-
ies will be posted online at
www.chronicleonline.com.
* Area funeral homes with established accounts with
the Chronicle are charged $8.75 per column inch for
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without accounts are required to pay in advance by
credit card, and the cost is $10 per column inch.
* Small photos of the deceased's face can be in-
cluded for an additional charge.
* Additional'days of publication or reprints due to er
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next day's edition.
* E-mail obits@chronicle online.com or fax to
563:32980. -
* Phone 563-5660 for details.




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TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2oog AS


CiT~us CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLEE


STATE/NATION


7��, .77










Page A6 - TUESDAY, MAY 26,2009



PINION


C


"History is the ship carrying living
memories to the future."
Stephen Spender


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
* Gerry Mulligan..................................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ....................................... editor
Neale Brennan ........promotions/community affairs
ff Mike Arnold ....................... managing editor
Cheri Harris................................. features editor
Curt Ebitz.......................... citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ................................. citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson , Cliff Pierson ....................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


PIECE OF OLD FLORIDA




Floral City's



history makes



for bright future


Years of planning and
dedication to one of the
area's most picturesque
communities paid off recently
with a vote by the Citrus
County Commis-
sion. THE I
Commissioners
unanimously ap- Floral City
proved design plan a p
standards for non-
residential build- OUR OP1
ings in Floral Good thin
City's historic dis- Good the n
trict. when go
Platted in 1882 and gr2
and known for its tort
oak-lined streets, t
Floral City has a
number of 19th-century homes
and other buildings comprising
the historic district - the only
area in Citrus County with that
distinction from the National
Register of Historic Places.
The new county plan encour-


3[
p
I
I

e
a t


ages street-scaping, street park-
ing, outdoor sales and displays,
and other efforts to maintain
Floral City's character.
Coming so soon after the
dedication .of the
SSUE: new Floral City
Library and town
visioning center on Orange
proved. Avenue, the over-
lay gives support-
'INION: ers of this
charming piece of
gs happen old Florida plenty
ernment of reasons to feel
ssroots proud.
erswork It also under-
ther. scores the impor-
tance of county
government involvement in un-
incorporated areas. The new
county library is now a focal
point for the community and
the visioning plan will protect
Floral City's charm for new
generations to discover.


- -Hot Corner:KEY HOME"


Single, not group
i'm calling regarding the Key
Training home in Heather Ridge
and I have to say that I tend to
agree with the people that live in
Heather Ridge. A single family
home is supposed to be just that
- a single-family home, not a
group home....
Show pride
It's not the fact that the Heather
Ridge, residents are concerned,
about mental retardation. It's
(that) you look forward to normal
neighbors. That's the biggest key
because when people move into a
neighborhood, they look forward
to getting together with their
neighbors, pride in their owner-
ship, taking part in some of the
functions that they offer. I'm sorry,
but quite frankly, a Key Center
home is going to stick out and not
be part of the neighborhood and


No good steak
I'd like to know why it is that
here in Florida, they don't
have a decent cut of meat
as.far as prime rib or T-
bones or any type of good
steak. They're all tough.
Why don't they take the
cows off of grazing six
months prior to slaughter
and put them on grain
and oats. It gives them a CAL
better quality of meat. C ,
Also, up North you can 563-
cut steaks and prime rib
and that with a fork, but
down here I can't never find a
good steak or a good prime rib.
Another scam
At 2:45 p.m. May 18, I received
a phone call from someone saying
he was with the Citrus County Po-
lice Department looking for a do-
nation. I informed him that there
is no-such thing as a Citrus
County Police Department, that
the police department does not
exist, only the sheriff's depart-
ment, He became confused and
hung up. Sounds like another
scam in the making.
Train wreck
Electing Bill McCollum as the
U.S. senator to represent Florida
would be nothing less than a train
wreck. That man is so right-wing
and so out of this situation that's


.(


not take care of and not really
make their house stand out with
nice flowers, nice lawns. They're
just going to live there. They don't
have pride of ownership.
Easy for you
The person who made the com-
ment about the Key Center home
going in at Floral City made the
comment, "Don't worry, they're
not contagious." I wonder how
they would feel if one was put
next door to them. It's always
easy to make comments and take
shots at something that is
nowhere'near your neighborhood
and you're not affected by it di-
rectly. But if they were, I wonder
what their attitude would be. It's a
shame that people so quickly
have so many comments to say
and doh't care about the feelings
of others, only themselves. And it
shows by some of these com-
ments made in the Sound Off ...


going on, it's incredible. We need
someone in there like Mrs. Sink.
She would probably be
U iND great. And besides that,
UNPD we do need finally a
r Democratic senator in
this state. This state is
rundown, as you all
know, and it's not going
anywhere under the Re-
publicans. Change has
got to come. (With) Bill
McCollum, the only
0579 change you'd have is
0579 that the disaster we're in
now would become a
total train wreck.
Trash everywhere
In response to the person who
is against offshore drilling be-
cause they said it's going to ruin
Florida's beautiful beaches: Have
you taken a look at Florida lately?
There's trash all over the roads.
There's 10 or 12 cars in every
yard you can find. There's trash
all over the place. Florida is not
beautiful. Maybe offshore drilling
would look better to'you if it was
painted blue or green and hada
big picture of Obama painted on
it. I hope that would satisfy you.
We need offshore drilling. Stop
being so concerned, about the stu-
pid beaches and try and get the
trash on the roads cleaned up.
Maybe that will do some good for
you.


GOP will defeat 'Obamacare'


B arack Obama is making an
enormous mistake on the
most important initiative
of his presidency. In recent
weeks, Obama has stressed that
health care reform is the essen-
tial ingredient for the success of
his economic-recovery plan. Yet
the president, easily the most
gifted White House communica-
tor since Ronald Reagan, has the
message all wrong.
"Our businesses* will not be
able to compete, our
families will not be
able to save or spend,
our budgets will re-
main unsustainable
unless we get health . .'q
care costs under con-
,trol," Obama said in
his May 16 radio ad-
dress. He has said the
same thing on many
other occasions, al- Byron
most always stressing OTH
the threat of runaway OIC
cost. When Obama VOI
talks health care, it's
cost, cost, cost.
But that's not what people want
to hear - or at least not all they
want to hear. Of course, they com-
plain about the expense of med-
ical treatment, but controlling cost
is not their top healthcare con-
cern.
"Americans will prioritize cost
over quality right up until the mo-
ment they realize that it's their
quality that they are sacrificing,"
writes the Republican pollster
Frank Luntz in "The Language of
Healthcare 2009," a brilliant new
analysis of the public's health care
concerns that also serves as a road
map for defeating Obamacare.
Basing his conclusions on exten-
sive polling and focus-group re-
search, Luntz writes that the
public is very worried that a gov-
ernment takeover of health care
- Obamacare - will result in


politicians and government bu-
reaucrats making decisions about
what kind of care patients will re-
ceive and when they will receive it
"Nothing else turns people
against the government takeover
of healthcare more than the real-
istic expectation that it will result
in delayed, and potentially even
denied, treatment, procedures,
and/or medications," Luntz writes.
"When asked which was a higher
priority- spending less on health
care or being treated in
a timely fashion -
timely treatment beat
cost almost unani-
finously."
People know that de-
layed and sometimes
denied care is a way of
life in other countries
-. Ot with national health-
-' care systems. And when
York they hear the presi-
ER dent's repeated empha-
sis on cutting costs, they
'ES sense there's no way
Obamacare cannot re-
sult in delayed and denied treat-
ment. Luntz urges Republicans to
make that the focus of their chal-
lenge to the president's plan. "It is
essential that 'deny' and 'denial'
enter the conservative lexicon im-
mediately," Luntz writes, "be-
cause it is at the core of what
scares Americans most about a
government takeover of health
care."
I called Luntz to discuss his
memo. He didn't want to talk
about it in partisan terms. Instead,
he stressed that whoever wins the
health care debate will "have to
have a solution that addresses the
individual nature of health care,
as well as the health care system
itself, and have to have a solution
.to the uninsured problem that
does not destroy personalized, hu-
manized health care for every-
body else."


And what might Barack Obama
make of the memo? "If he's smart,
he'll use it to amend some of his
policies to address the concerns
that the American people have,"
Luntz told me, "and he'll move
congressional Democrats toward
the center on issues like doc-
tor/patient relationships and ac-
cess to the right medications."
There is evidence that Democ-
rats know they have a problem. On
May 13, top White House aide
David Axelrod hurried to the
Capitol for a meeting with party
leaders who are worried that the
White House is losing the early
message war. One participant,
Sen. Richard Durbin, told re-
porters that Luntz's memo was
"an interesting catalyst for us."
But the president continues to
talk about cost. It's a trap he has
made for himself. Without the sav-
ings Obama claims will result
from health care reform, the
crushing debt of the president's
other spending priorities will be-
come unsustainable. He has bet
everything on his ability to cut
healthcare costs. If that doesn't
work, it all falls apart
There's a consensus among the
Washington punditocracy that
health care reform will succeed
this year because the time is sim-
ply right. But it's almost June.
Obama and his Democratic allies
have not even introduced a re-
form proposal, and yet the presi-
dent says, "We've got to get it done
this year." And all the while, he is
sending out the wrong message on
what really matters. Unless the
White House changes course and
pays more attention to what
Americans really want, Oba-
macare will lose.
-m--

'Byron York is chief
political correspondent for
The Washington Examiner


---- LETTERS to the Editor


Carmaker clarification
Re: "Carmakers" article written by Linus Upson
in the May 17 Chronicle.
Mr. Upson starts by criticizing the CEOs' de-
mands for "gifts," which is false. The CEOs were
applying for a loan.
Mr. Gettlefinger (UAW president) opened con-
tracts three times and gave "billions" owed to the
workers back to the companies to help save them.
Mr. Upson also mentions NAFTA and uses the
words "may" and "roughly" If he knew, for sure,
where the parts came from, he would not be
guessing.
I am not a "Car Czar," but as long they have tax-
payers investing, they should have the right to
watch their money.
Mercedes Benz took over Chrysler, stripped it,
and got rid of it This was not a merger, but a
takeover.
I agree about giving benefits to the car compa-
nies who make the best vehicles in the eyes of the
consumers. The "two top sellers" are the Chevro-
let Silverado pickup and Ford pickup.
It is amusing that Mr Upson wants to bring in
the Ford Brazilian managers. That plant was de-
signed in Dearborn, Mich., and is managed from
Dearborn headquarters.
The ripple effect could be a disaster if Chrysler,
General Motors and Ford do not make a come-
back.
Mr. Upson is so worried about taxpayer dollars
but never mentions the banks that took as much
as 10 times what the auto industry is asking to bor-
row. Mr. Upson took taxpayer dollars all his work-
ing life and surely gets a nice federal pension.
I am 72 years of age, with four years in the mili-
tary, retired with 43 years in a General Motors
plant, and a member of the UAW Mr. Upson's fed-
eral pension far exceeds my UAW pension. Until
Mr. Upson gets the correct facts, he might ought to
write about foreign service or Latin American
studies.
Chuck Weiler
Crystal River


Common sense, creativity
Creativity and common sense are needed to solve
many of the problems facing Citrus County. They
would go a long way to facilitating positive change in
our community. The following are three examples of
issues that have been hot topics in the paper re-
cently:
I have taken a candy making class at the canning
facility and it was a lot of fun. If structured classes
around specific holidays were offered and even
Candy Making 101 and 201 for more advanced stu-
dents were offered, I bet even more people would
sign up. If there were more classes generating in-
come, plus a small fee for using the facility, there
should be a way to keep this county service avail-
able. We need to be doing more with alternative en-
ergy to save costs, particularly for our schools. We
should be exploring grants and stimulus money to
get solar hot water heaters for schools to cut back on
their utility bills. Solar tubes to light dark hallways
and even solar-powered fans might help to bring
down air-conditioning costs. Science projects can
teach our children how to value the beautiful place
they live in and we might be able to save enough
money so we don't have to lay off their teachers.
Building codes need to be adjusted to encourage
big-bbx stores to use alternative energy sources. Per-
haps they could have their impact fees cut by a per-
centage matching their solar energy usage. Even
small business owners should be encouraged to use
energy-saving materials now that their costs are
coming down and there are tax incentives to use
them.
And while we are paying people to drive around
to hand out lawn-watering tickets, how many of us
are wasting water waiting for the hot water to get
from the tank in our garage to our master bathroom
shower? I believe there are fairly simple devices
available these days that could be made part of the
housing code and would save us water now and
money in the long run. Then we could redirect those
water police to the commercial sites who water at
high noon.
Susan Knaut Moore
Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


$








Oraus ourry ( )


Hot Comer
ELECTRIC=
Private enterprise
Here we go again. Private
enterprise, Progress Energy,
is holding a gun to our
heads because our legisla-
tion doesn't do their job and
take the time by reading the
fine print. What's the sense
of another public hearing
just to say no to increases in
fees for energy when people
have been saying no all
along to the legislators and
private enterprises who think
it's OK to put their hands in
their pockets and help them-
selves. I propose Mr. Dean
and Mr. Lyash trade places
and maybe we stand a fight-
ing chance of stopping this.
We, the constituents, as Mr.
Dean likes to refer to us, are
not very happy campers and
something's got to give.
So-called PSC
I hope the so-called Pub-
lic Service Commission can-
not sleep at night after their
increase in our power bills.
Outrageous
I see where Progress En-
ergy is again sticking it to
the public without our knowl-
'edge by having interim price
hikes in July. I agree with
Charlie Dean, Sen. Dean. I
think this is totally outra-
geous that they do this with-
out any public hearing. This
is getting to be the closest
thing to socialism and com-
munism that I've ever seen. I
don't know who these people
from Progress Energy think
they are that they can just,
ram stuff down our throats.
We need an (alternate)
source of 'energy in this
county or in this area of the
state to compete with people
like them. They're not the
greatest thing since chopped.
liver and someday that whole
thing may backfire in their
face and maybe we're going
to find out that nuclear
power isn't the best way to
go. So I hope that the citi-
zens stand up to these peo-
ple ... We need to write to
our state Legislature that we
put an end to this ridiculous
attitude by this Jeff Lyash.
Enormous bills
The federal government
and Congress is proposing a
cap and trade. It is also
called a carbon tax. It proba-
bly will be passed and, ac-
cqrding to this article I'm
reading from my electric
* service company, it will cost
consumers at least $50
more a year, and probably
even higher. I suggest that
you get on the Net and look
up cap and trade. Our elec-
tric bills are going to be enor-
mous. "Even President
Obama is agreeing to have'
this legislation passed. So if
you don't want your electric
bills higher, I suggest you
look into what cap and trade,
a carbon tax, means to the
consumer.


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*WUSF PBS
* WUSF Create
*WMOR HD


Ogg OF TjU6CG PM6Ra-tTOIWW6M IATorG"L I iW4KWPTO TW ONARR


Sound OFF


Nice is free
It doesn't cost anything
to be nice. I say that the
Key foster home should
not be located in Heather
Ridge if even 10 percent
of residents there agree
with the outspoken neigh-
bors that are against it.
The Key clients should be
exposed to regular people
who have compassion,
love, respect and a willing-
ness to be charitable and
nice, just like they are. It
might be a negative thing
for them to be located
there.
Some nerve
This is in regard to Tues-
day, May 19's article, "Key
move stirs debate." I was
outraged reading this arti-
cle. I also live in Crystal.
Oaks, but however, not in
,the gated community of
Heather Ridge. I would
more than welcome the
foster home that houses
handicapped adults to
move in next to me. Do
people these days have
nothing better to do than
complain about nonsense?
My questions to the com-
plainants in Heather.Ridge
are: 1. Do ou really feel'-,,-'
you have the right to
choose your neighbors? 2.
Where do you suppose
handicapped people
should live? 3. Is there a
difference between the
school buses picking up
the children for school vs.
the small buses picking up
the handicapped to take
them to work?
Ending an era
Our time will come with
the county commissioners
-and, yes, even you, Mr.


Dean. Someone had to
vote you all into office, so
you have us by the short
hairs right now. However,
another election is when
we see what happens to
you all. We can put you in
office, but we can take you
out, too. The county good-
ol'-boy days here
in Citrus County
must come to an 0H
end. We pay lots
of taxes and high
utility bills. We get
taken advantage
of by politicians f
who are self-serv-
ing and really
don't care about CAL
the people in this
county. They are 563-
all knocking each
other down trying
to get up on that pedestal.
It is time that we, the peo-
ple of Citrus County, get
something in return. We .
need to see improvements
here that are good for us
and are up-to-date. Let
some new blood in with
honest, intelligent ideas
that will help our commu-
nity...Yes, we have a lot of
law enforcement protec-
tion, but it is a little much
for the size of our commu-
nity. Citrus County either
must downsize the overage
of expense by the sheriff's
department or grow as a
community to warrant all
this protection. We would
probably have to grow as
big as Marion County or
even larger for that to ever
happen. We have a large
number of citizens here
that are out of work and
even homeless. Times are
tough - we know that. To
ever eliminate that, we
need fully committed, hon-


Effective June 25, 2009, Bright House Networks will change the frequency It uses to
deliver the following digital channels:


* WEDU Florida Knowledge Network
* WEDU V-me
*WFLA NBC HD
*WUSF Kids Channel
* WUSF Florida Knowledge Network


Only customers with a digital-ready television (and a QAM tuner) and without a digital set-top
box are affected by this change. Those customers will need to rescan their television set to
continue to view these channels. These channels will, however, remain on the same channel
location and continue to be on the same tier of service for these customers.
For more information about rescanning, customers should refer to the TV's original owner's
manual or http://www.tampabay.mybrighthouse.com/rescan.

For information regarding Bright House Networks, please visit mybrighthouse.com.

bright house

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est people with innovative
ideas in office who can fire
up this county to all work
together for a positive fu-
ture for all of us. So all of
you who have been elected
to office, remember, we are
watching you and waiting
. for our turn to make a dif-
ference in our
county.
IND Don't burn
I What is so im-,
portant about
~- burning? I just
read the front page
of the Chronicle .
Rain won't fix the
problem. The
0579 problem to me is
.0579 the burning, and it
should be done
away with. Burning
causes pollution in the air,.
it causes illness, allergies,
asthma, kills people and,
wildlife ... Put the fire out.
Gender note
Memorial Day is almost
here and the Fourth of July
is rapidly approaching.
Please, all you crooners,
and wannabe singers out
there, when singing "God
Bless the USA,!' please
say, "The ones vho died
for me," and not, "The


men who died for me."
Women have fought and
died for this country since
Day One and are still doing
so both in the USA and
around the"world. A better
song to sing would be "All
Gave Somne, Some Gave
All" by Billy Ray Cyrus, or
"Arlington" by Trace
Atkins.,"God Bless the
USA"'is not the national
anthem and we need to
stop treating it as such.
Plate politics
I'm calling regarding the
Jesus plates issue in
Sound Off. My opinion is:
You know, I don't necessar-
ily like the Seminoles but
there's a Seminole plate. I
don't buy it. I'm not a fan
of USE I don't buy the
plate. What's the big deal
of having a Jesus plate? If
you don't like it, don't buy
it. It's just like everything
else. It's a choice. Don't
put down Christians or reli-
gious people because they
want a plate. Every other
function and organization
has a license plate. It's a
choice whether or not you
support that function,
whether or not you buy the
plate. It's as simple as
that.


Aneurysm re


U without an inc


1.-.








! -






SThis procedure is typically done at
universities and now is exclusive tc
. I ,


there is no need to travel.


Letters to the
EDITOR

Look beyond
It's unfortunate that the
people attending the Tax
Day Tea Parties could not
look beyond their noses be-
cause they would have re-
alized that there's plenty of
political and financial re-
form needed right here in
Citrus County.
For example, they could
have gathered at "farmer
Dean's" barn/house to sing
"Old MacDonald had a
farm."
Or they could have con-
tacted Republican Ray
Sansom and Northwest
Florida State College presi-
dent Bob Richburg to ask
for a slice of the $35 million
misappropriation so that
they could afford to send
their kids to college.
If they had their cell
phones with them, the pro-
testers could have con-
tacted the five Republican
double-dipping lawmakers
on the committee who
voted against a bill (S.B.
1182) which would ban dou-
ble dippers.
And while they were still
in a protesting mood, they
could have phoned their
Republican House and
Senate representatives to
protest bill S.B. 956, which
is a devious scheme to
make it harder for voters to
have their voices heard
and would further increase
the Republican power in
Florida.
Finally, all of us could
eliminate much of our dis-
trust and resentment to-
ward our representatives
by petitioning our govern-
ment to draw up legislative
districts so that they do not
favor or disfavor any one
political party. This will,
prevent the lifelong politi-
cian from running without
opposition and hopefully
would eliminate many of
'our arrogant, dishonest,
greedy and self-serving
politicians who somehow
keep getting re-elected.
Petitions for standards
for the Legislature to fol-
low in redistricting can be
found at: FairDistridts-
Florida.org.
Phil Perrone
Crystal River


p*pair


.ision.



















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) our area so


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TusDsAY, MAY 26, 2oog A7


OPINION


C FL CHRONICLE









Page A8 - TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009



NATION


& W WORLD
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEF


Come back, Swat civilians


Associated Press
Colleen Hauser, left, smiles
at her son Daniel on May 8
as they answered ques-
tions from the media in
New Ulm, Minn.

Boy who fled
chemo returns
NEW ULM, Minn. -An at-
torney says a 13-year-old
Minnesota boy who fled the
state last week to avoid can-
cer treatment has returned
and is being evaluated by a
doctor.
Attorney Tom Hagen,
whose law office represents
Daniel Hauser's parents, said
Daniel was being evaluated
at a hospital in the Twin
Cities on Monday
Hagen also said the boy's
mother, Colleen Hauser, was
not in police custody.
An arrest warrant had
been issued for her after she
and Daniel fled last week, but
authorities lifted the warrant
on Monday.
Hagen said Calvin John-'
son, the lawyer who is repre-
senting the parents,
authorized Hagen to confirm
the boy's return while John-
son was out of town. Hagen
said he couldn't share more
' details.

WorldBRIEFS

Shavuot


Associated Press
Pakistani displaced children wait their turn Monday during a food distribution at Jalozai refugee camp in Peshawar, Pakistan. The Taliban urged
civilians Monday to return to the main town in Pakistan's Swat Valley, promising they won't attack security forces battling insurgents there
but stopping short of calling the move a cease-fire.

Pakistani Taliban urges residents of embattled valley's main city to return


Associated Press
ISLAMABAD - The Taliban on Monday
urged civ ilians to return to the Swat Valley's
main city, promising they would not attack
security forces battling for control out of con-
cern for the safety of trapped residents.
Pakistan's military dismissed the gesture
as a ploy that would allow the militants to
blend in with the residents of Mingora, and
said it had no intention of halting its.often-
sive in the valley.
More than 2 million civilians have fled
Swat and nearby districts, making it easier
for the army to single out insurgents, but re-
turning civilians could further complicate


the battle afternoon that the Taliban's pledge was not a
The appeal also appeared designed to play formal cease-fire offer and that the Islam ist
off the growing public concern for thousands militia's "aides" would stay in the city.
still stuck in Mingora amid shortages of food "I would like to appeal to the people of
and water Mingora to get back to their homes and start
The. U.S. has strongly backed Pakistan's their routine life as we will not fire even a
month-old offensive in the northwest valley single shot," Khan said in a phone call from
and neighboring districts. U.S. officials want an undisclosed location.
Pakistan to root out hide-outs used by al- The army says it secured several major in-
Qaida and Taliban fighters to plan attacks on. tersections in Mingora, a key commercial
Western troops in nearby Afghanistan. and lhub that under normal circumstances.is
Swat is considered an important test of the home to at least 375.000 people. Many of the
Muslim nation's ability and willingness to do extremists were fleeing Mingora for Kabal, a
so. town to the west that security forces were
Taliban spokesman Muslim Khan told The also trying to secure, the army said in a state-
Associated Press late Sunday and Monday ment Monday.


Associated Press
An Ultra Orthodox Jewish
man harvests wheat Mon-
day ahead of the Jewish
Shavuot holiday, In a field
outside the Israeli commu-
nity of Mevo Horon. The
holiday, commemorating
Moses receiving the Ten
Commandments and also a
harvest holiday, begins
Thursday at sundown.


Iraqi trade chief
exits amid scandal
BAGHDAD - Iraq's prime
minister has accepted the
resignation of his trade minis-
ter, shortly before a move in
parliament to oust him over
alleged corruption in his de-
partment, the government
said Monday.
Trade Minister Falahal-Su-
dani submitted his resignation
May 14. But Prime Minister
Nouri al-Maliki delayed ac,
cepting it to allow parliament
to review the allegations, a
government statement said.
Those allegations include
claims that the minister's two
brothers skimmed off tens of
millions of dollars in kick-
backs on food and other
goods imported by the Trade
Ministry.
One of his brothers, Sabah
al-Sudani, was arrested this
month allegedly trying to
leave the country.
The other brother, Majid al-
Sudani, remains at large.
Both were members of the
minister's security force.
Al-Maliki has promised a
major crackdown against cor-
ruption, which opinion sur-
veys have identified as one of
the major public complaints
against the government.
Security and corruption are
emerging as the major Issues
ahead of next January's na-
tional elections.
-From wiro reports


Medical providers face 'homework'


Obama wants to

find some savings
Associated Press,
WASHINGTON - A homework as-
signment from President Barack
Obama is turning into a credibility
test for medical providers.
Obama, once a law professor, has
instructed the health care industry to
come back with specifics on its pledge
to slow rising costs, helping to save
the nation $2 trillionover 10 years.
If the ideas are solid enough to per-
suade government -bean counters,
Obama could be well on his way to
closing a deal with Congress on cov-
erage for nearly 50 million uninsured
people in the United States.
If the providers flunk, more than


their reputations will be tarnished.
Obama will be seen as naive for en-
tertaining such promises.,
Experts say the savings are possi-
ble - in theory. The problem is get-
ting doctors, hospitals and other
medical providers to change years of
ingrained habits that lead to much of'
the wasteful spending in U.S. health
care.
"This should not be hard," said Dr.
Elliott Fisher of Dartmouth Univer-
sity, an authority on medical costs.
"We do not have to assume that slow-
ing spending means we are rationing
beneficial treatment."
Crunching Medicare statistics,
Fisher and his colleagues found that
medical spending varies widely
around the country. The real revela-
tion is that people in high-cost areas
are no healthier. The researchers
concluded that as much as 30 cents of


the U.S. health care dollar could be
.going for tests and procedures of lit-
tle or no value to patients.
The Dartmouth findings became a
sort of financial gospel for Peter
Orszag, the White House budget di-
rector. He sees health care costs as
the biggest long-term threat to the na-
tion's solvency.
That's the central insight behind
Obama's cost-cutting assignment to
the .industry,- and called "home-
work" by White House aides and the
groups themselves.
Insurers, doctors, hospitals, drug
makers, medical device manufactur-
ers, and a leading health care union
took the savings pledge at a White
House photo-op a few weeks ago.
They said they were ready to do their
part to slow projected increases in
costs by 1.5 percentage points a year
for 10 years, on average.


EU farmers protest collapse of milk prices


Associated Press
BRUSSELS - Dairy
farmers created traffic
chaos in Berlin, blocked
milk processing plants in
France and protested at EU
headquarters in Brussels
on Monday, seeking more
aid to stay in business as
milk prices plummet.,-
EU farm ministers later
decided to allow member
states to bring forward the
payment of 70 percent of di-
rect aid to farmers from De-
cember to mid-October,
hoping it wi'ill alleviate the
financial difficulties.
Farmers, though, have
been calling for more dras-
tic measures. They say they
have been forced to. sell
milk below cost because
prices have fallen by up to
50 percent over the past
year
Earlier Monday, some
6,000 farmers with 700 trac-
tors clogged roads in the,


Associated Press
A police officer blocks a cow and farmers Monday with his
shield during a demonstration In Brussels. More than 1,000
farmers protested outside European Union headquarters
and also blocked milk processing plants In France to
protest the drop In milk prices.


German capital, irritating
commuters and bringing
traffic in some areas to a
halt In response, the Ger-
man government promised
to provide cheaper diesel
oil for farmers.


At EU headquarters,
some 1,000 farmers from
half a dozen nations
protested with tractors and
cows in tow to press their
demands for more funds.
Police briefly intervened


when a few farmers sought
to break through the EU's
security perimeter but
order was quickly restored.
"Our dairy sector is in an
unprecedented difficult sit-
uation," said EU Farm
Commissioner Mariann
Fischer-Boel. "It makes it
difficult for a lot of dairy
producers when produc-
tion prices are higher than
the prices at which they
sell."
The European Union has
managed farm prices for
decades, guaranteeing min-
imum prices to farmers or
buying up excess produc-
tion to keep prices artifi-
cially high. The EU says it is
trying to support dairy
prices now by buying
skimmed milk powder and
butter on the market - but
the 27-nation bloc is keen to
avoid stockpiling the mas-
sive 'butter mountains' that
made EU farm subsidies
notorious in the 1980s.


Israelis:

Iran gets


uranium

Venezue4l,

Bolivia are

suppliers

Associated Press
JERUSALEM -
Venezuela and Bolivia are
supplying Iran with ura-
nium for its nuclear pro-
gram, according to a secret'
Israeli government report
obtained Monday by The
Associated Press.
The two South American'
countries are known to '
have close ties with Iran,'
but this is the first allega-
tion that they are involved
in the development of Iran's
.nuclear program, consid-'
ered a strategic threat by Is-'
rael.
"There are reports that
Venezuela supplies Iran
with uranium for its nu-
clear program," the Foreign
Ministry document states,
referring to previous Israeli
intelligence conclusions. It
added, "Bolivia also sup-
plies uranium to Iran."
The report concludes that
Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez is trying to under-
mine the United States by.
supporting Iran.
Venezuela and Bolivia
are close allies, and both
regimes have a history of
opposing U.S. foreign policy
and Israeli actions.
Venezuela expelled the Is-
raeli ambassador during Is-
rael's offensive in Gaza this
year, and Israel retaliated
by expel li ng the Venezuelan
envoy Bolivia cut ties with
Israel over the offensive.


N 11










SSection B - JESDA MAY 26, 2009



PORTS


She's Back:
Was Maria Sharapova
able to make a
triumphant return
at French Open? B5


M Auto racing/B2
M MLB/B3
M Sports briefs/B4
M TV, lottery/B4
M The Game/B5
M French Open/B5
M Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


There's a first time for everything

: A Zephyrhils native, Reutimann, snares 1st Sprint Cup win


Associated Press


CONCORD, N.C. - David Re-
utimann stared atthe gray sky and
silently prayed for one more
heavy rain.
A gamble had putthe journey-

David Reutimann, right, and his fa-
ther, Buzzie, look at the sky during
a rain delay Monday in the .
NASCAR Coca-Cola 600 at Lowe's
Motor Speedway.
Associated Press


man driver in position for his first
Sprint Cup Series victory, and so
long as the clouds lingered over
Lowe's Motor Speedway, it would
come in the crown jewel Coca-
Cola 600.
Reutimann didn't like his
chances.
"These things don't ever go our
way," the 39-year-old thought. "I
don't lolow why it should now."
For most of his nondescript ca-
,reer, Reutimann never got the
lucky break.


It finally came Monday after 75
races, three rain delays, a moment
of silence, a spat with Tony Stew-
art and a 2-hour wait.
NASCAR declared Reutimann
the winner when an ominous
weather forecast indicated it
would be impossible to run the
longest race of the season to its
conclusion. The drivers had fig-
ured that out a day earlier, when,
the race was postponed and car-
See SPRINT/Page B4


Lecanto's Webb never settles for second-best


JON-MICHAEL SORACCH!
jmsoracchi@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

For the first 700 meters, Tory
Webb looks like any other runner
on the. track attempting to close
out the end of the 800-meter run.
More often' than not, though,
Webb turned on the afterburners
and won the race easily with a
kick that puts most other athletes
to shame.
"No one has a kick like Tory
does," said Lecanto boys track and


field coach John Verhelst. "I
haven't seen a kid with such a de-
sire to win."
Combine his signature event
with being the best male cross
country competitor in 2008 and a
starter for the District 4A-6 win-
ning Panthers soccer team and
you have a logical candidate for
Chronicle Male Athlete of the
Year
Webb set a school record by
clocking in at 1:56.86 in the 800
and won the district and regional
titles in that event. The senior also


claimed the district title in the
1600-meter run, but opted not to
run that race in the regional meet
to concentrate on the 800.
Webb defines the prototypical
mind of an elite athlete, always
trying to find new ways to improve
and attempting to outwork his op-
position at every turn.
Soccer is the sport Webb has
played for the longest since taking
up the activity as a child. He
manned the left outside defender
spot for Lecanto, who ran through
the district tournament and were


a bad five minutes from getting , which the Panther finished sec-
out of the first round of the re- ond in Class 3A in the 800, Webb
gional playoffs. counted on possibly upgrading
"He was a solid defender," said into a state championship in 2009.
Lecanto boys soccer coach Doug Coming in first in the district
Warren. "He did well and we and regional races was obviously
counted on him to be our left de- part of the plan, which Webb did
fender . easily.
"Mostly, he would be on the side Looking at the seed times for
of the other team's leading for- the state meet with Verhelst, how-
ward." ever, Webb decided to alter his
There is even a bright spot in racing strategy for the upcoming
the relatively few instances Webb Class 3A championships.
was unable to reach his goals.
Following a junior season in See WEBB/Page B4


Nuggets even series with rout of Lakers


Associated Press

DENVER - The Denver
SNuggets evened the Western
Conference finals Monday
night, beatingthe Los Ange-
les Lakers 120-101 in Game
4 despite a hobbled
Carmelo Anthony.
Chauncey Billups and
J.R. Smith scored 24 points
and Kenyon Martin had a
double-double as the
Nuggets posted their
eighth blowout of the post-
season but first against Los
Angeles following three


games that came down to
the final seconds.
The Nuggets didn't need
to worry about a botched in-
bounds pass in the closing
seconds like the ones that
cost them wins in Games 1
and 3, although Kobe
Bryant had another mon-
ster fourth quarter in an at-
tempt to put a stranglehold
on the series that shifts to
Los Angeles for Game 5
Wednesday night
Bryant, who is averaging
37 points in the series,
scored 34.


'Melo steps up game,
Kobe isn't surprised
Kobe Bryant loves de-
fending his kindred spirit,
Carmelo Anthony, on and off
the basketball court.
The Los Angeles Lakers'
superstar who became fast
friends with the Denver
Nuggets' powerful play-
maker during the Beijing
Olympics bristled at the
trendy notion that 'Melo has
morphed into a star in this
year's playoffs.
,Sure, he's averaging 28


points and has made count-
less clutch plays after five
straight years of frustrating
first-round exits, but Bryant
swears 'Melo, the butt of so
many jokes in China, has
had this type of talent in
him all along.
"He was ready. He was
never the problem. He was
never the issue," Bryant said.
The two have built a
blossoming friendship
even as they doggedly
guard each other in the
best subplot of the Western
Conference finals.


Los Angeles
Lakers cen-
ter Andrew
Bynum, left,
and Denver
Nuggets
center Nene
battle for a
rebound
during the
first half of
Game 4 of
the NBA
Western
Conference
finals.
Associated Press


wmmmmmmmmm


-'












Allison no fan of NASCAR's new car


Associated Press


CONCORD, N.C. - Bobby Alli-
son was not the only one of
NASCAR's top drivers, but also a
whiz in the garage. He was hardly
bashful on Sunday in declaring he
"started the aerodynamic revolu-
tion" when he designed Chevro-
let's Monte Carlo in the late 1960s.
"That gave them a car that was
truly a step into modern aerody-
namics," Allison said. "Now that's
gone too far."
Allison was at Lowe's Motor
Speedway to serve as grand mar-
shal for the Coca-Cola 600. Before
it was postponed by rain until
Monday, the three-time winner of
NASCAR's longest race was be-
moaning the slow switch of racing
cars that closely resembled those
in dealership showrooms to the
space-age Car of Tomorrow.
"We need cars that the fans in
the grandstand can really relate
to," Allison said.
NASCAR shifted to the boxier,
more aerodynamic car in hopes
of creating competitive balance
and reducing costs. But as he took
part in the celebration of the 50th
running of Charlotte's Memorial
Day weekend race, Allison was
pining for the return of cars with
an identity.
"One had an advantage one
place and another had an advan-
tage somewhere else. It's still bal-
anced out pretty good and racing
was good," Allison said. "Racing is
still really good because the com-
petitors put that extra little piece
in there, too. No matter what the
rules are the competitors adjust
and go on and compete.
"But if they were riding in
something that was recognizable
to the people buying that ticket in
the grandstand I think it would be
more attractive."


Allison just wasn't expecting
NASCAR to heed his suggestions.
"They have always had my
phone number, but the only time I
can remember them using it was
when they called me up to tell me
I'd done something wrong," Alli-
son said. "I may get a phone call
about this comment right now."
Danica's Future
Danica Patrick's contract is up at
the end of this season and there's
speculation the Indy Racing League
star, who finished third Sunday at the
Indianapolis 500, might jump to
NASCAR.
There's little doubt she would be at-
tractive to sponsors, fans and just ,
about every team owner. But Bruton
Smith, the outspoken chairman of
Speedway Motorsports Inc., isn't sure
it would be a smooth transition.
"She's small and does a good job
where she is," Smith said. "But I think
if you tried to bring her (to NASCAR),
you've got a two-year tour of duty in
the race car because she's not accus-
tomed to what we're running. But I
think it would be wonderful if we could
find some women who could really
offer the appeal that you're after and
I'm after. It would be great."
Asked whether Patrick was too
small in stature to handle the 800-
horsepower stock cars, Smith sug-
gested she would have her hands full.
"Maybe she is," he said. "But I do
know it takes a lot of seat time. If- .
you're coming from IndyCars into one
of these cars, it takes a lot of seat time
before she would be in a situation to
win one of these events."
Penske celebrates,
Penske Racing's NASCAR division
was watching intently Sunday after-
noon when Hello Castroneves put the
team into Victory Lane at the Indi-
anapolis 500.


Assocated rress-
Olympic gold medalist Shawn Johnson speaks as former NASCAR great Bobby Allison, right, looks on during
a news conference at Lowe's Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. on Sunday.


"I have to admit that I[got teary-
eyed," said Kurt Busch, who watched
the end of the race from the infield at
Lowe's Motor Speedway. "It was re-
ally emotional, but so cool, to see
Helio win this one. He's such a great
teammate."
Sam Homish Jr., too, watched boss
Roger Penske celebrate again at Indy.
"I'm thrilled for Roger," Hornish
said. "To win the Indianapolis 500 for
the 15th time is an incredible accom-
plishment."
Birthday boy
A year ago this weekend, Joey
Logano was presented with a huge


cake and car owner Joe Gibbs sang
happy birthday as the racing phenom
tumed 18.
On Sunday, Sprint Cup's youngest
driver celebrated his 19th birthday and
was to make his first start in the Coca-
Cola 600 until the race was postponed
a day by rain.
"I think even after the All-Star race I
felt very confident about this place,"
said Logano, who finished eighth in
that event a week ago. "I had a really
good car there and I feel like I have a
good car here, too."
Logano's first full season in the
Sprint Cup started with a crash and a
last-place finish at the Daytona 500.


But the driver of the No. 20 Toyota has-
slowly improved. He had two top-10
finishes in the three points races be-
fore Charlotte.
'The more competitive I get, the
more I want to win," Logano said.
Lug nuts
Matt Kenseth has no problem with
one race being a marathon 600 miles.
It's some of the other races he'd
change. "I think a lot of races could be -
shorter and you'd get the same results
and they might even be more enter-
taining," Kenseth said. "Like Darling-
ton, I'm not sure we have to race 4%
hours to have the same effect."


EARN $25 IN THE CHRONICLE'S NASCAR CONTEST



CONTEST RULES
0 Pick the winner of this Sunday's
Autism Speaks 400 in Dover. In the
event that more than one contestant
SIpicks the same driver, the tie will be
broken by guessing the average speed
iof the race.
I The closest contestant to the actual
average speed, over or under, will be
declared the winner If there is no win-
ner one week the $25 prize will carry
over to the following week making that
week's race contest worth $50.
- NU You may enter as many times as
S you like but every entry form MUST
be an original entry form from the
Citrus County Chronicle. No copies
will be permitted.
- Please include your name, address
and telephone number on the printed
entry form. DON'T FORGET TO SUP-
PLY YOUR TIEBREAKER SPEED.
i You may drop offor mail entries to our
Meadowcrest office at 1624 N. Meadow-
Chronicle crest Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429. All
Associated Press Chronicle advertising director John Provost, left, presents Robin Johnson
Kyle Busch drives out of turn four during the NASCAR Sprint Cup with a check for $25 for correctly guessing Tony Stewart as the winner entrees VMUSTbe in the office no later
Coca-Cola 600 auto race at Lowe's Motor Speedway in Concord, of the Sprint Cup Al-Star Race. Johnson won thanks to a tiebreak speed than 5p.m. on Friday, May29.
N.C. on Monday. of 134.287 mph. The actual speed of the race was 99.137 mph.
rm-------------------------------------------------------------


No winner just yet!
The Coca-Cola 600 was
rained out Sunday and ran
Monday afternoon. For the
results of that race, please
see-Page B1.
The winner of the
NASCAR contest will not
be noted until the Tues-
day, June 2 sports section
of the Chronicle.


NASCAR CONTEST ENTRY FORM




DRIVER'S NAME YOUR NAME PHONE NUMBER

TIEBREAKER: (Guess what you think the average speed of the race will be):

You may mail your entry to Citrus County Chronicle, c/o John Coscia, Sports editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL, 34429. All mailed entries must be received by 5 p.m. Friday.
I I
--- ---------------------------------------------------mmmm J


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, I


AUTO RACING


CITRusS COUNTY (FL) CHIRONICLE


82 TuESDAY, MAY 26, 2009










-O M RL BTDYA2,0 B


Boston
NewYork
Toronto
Tampa Bay
A L Baltimore


NL


Philadelphia
New York
Atlanta
Florida
Washington


East Division
GB WCGB
1 -

5 4
8 7


East Division
GB WCGB

� 11�
1� 2Y�
4� 5�
11� 12Y�


Home
8-13
13-8
11-12
9-14
7-16


Detroit
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago
Cleveland


Away
16-6 Milwaukee
11-12 St. Louis
12-9 Cincinnati
12-11 Chicago
6-15 Pittsburgh
Houston


Central Division
GB WCGB L10
- - 8-2


Central Division
GB WCGB
1 -
2% 1V/
- 41 3�
6�V 5%
8 7


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Colorado 3, Detroit 1
Philadelphia 4, N.Y.Yankees 3,11 innings
Cincinnati 4, Cleveland 3,11 innings
Florida 5, Tampa Bay 4, 11 innings
'Washington 8, Baltimore 5
Boston 12, N.Y. Mets 5
Atlanta 10, Toronto 2 .
Pittsburgh 4, Chica6o White Sox 3
Texas 5, Houston 0
Kansas City 3, St. Louis 2
Oakland 6, Arizona 2
L.A. Angels 10, L.A. Dodgers 7
-Seattle 5, San Francisco 4
Minnesota 6, Milwaukee 3
Monday's Games
Baltimore 4, Toronto 1
N.Y. Yankees 11, Texas 1
Boston 6;.Minnesota 5
Detroit 13, Kansas City 1
Oakland 6; Seattle 1
Cleveland 11, Tampa Bay 10
Chicago White Sox at LA. Angels, late
Today's Games
Tampa Bay (Garza 4-2) at Cleveland (Pavano
4-4), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Romero 2-0) at Baltimore (Berken 0-
0), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Chamberlain 2-1) at Texas (Mill-,
wood 4-4), 8:05 p.m . ....
Boston (Lester 3-4) at Minnesota (Blackburn 3-
2), 8:10 p.m. .
Detroit (E.Jackson 4-2) at Kansas City (Greinke
7-1), 8:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Colon 2-4) at L.A. Angels
(Saunders 6-2), 10:05 p.m.
Seattle (Washburn 3-3) at Oakland (Braden 3-
5), 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Colorado 3, Detroit 1
Philadelphia 4, N.Y. Yankees 3, 11 innings
Cincinnati 4, Cleveland 3, 11 innings
Florida 5, Tampa Bay 4, 11 innings
Washington 8, Baltimore 5
Boston 12, N.Y. Mets 5
Atlanta '10, Toronto 2
Pittsburgh 4, Chicago White Sox 3
Texas 5, Houston 0
Kansas City 3, St. Louis 2
Oakland 6, Arizona 2
San Diego 7, Chicago Cubs 2
L.A. Angels 10; L.A. Dodgers 7
Seattle 5, San Francisco 4
Minnesota 6, Milwaukee 3
Monday's Games
Cincinnati 8, Houston 5
Milwaukee 1, St. Louis 0, 10 innings
L.A. Dodgers 16, Colorado 6
San Diego 9, Arizona 7,10 innings
San Francisco 8, Atlanta 2
Florida 5, Philadelphia 3
N.Y. Mets.5, Washington 2
'Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, late
Today's Games
Florida (A.Miller 1-1) at Philadelphia (Blanton 2-
3), 7:05 p.m.
Houston (Oswalt 1-2) at Cincinnati (Owings 3-
5), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Stammen 0-0) at N.Y. Mets
(Li.Hemandez 3-1), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Snell 1-5) at Chicago Cubs (Mar-
:r,3an A 8 ,,5 p I, , , r
Si Lo,iu i WariagriI 4-2) at Milwaukee (Sup-
pan 3-3), 8:05 p.m. "
L.A. Dodgers (Milton 0-0) at Colorado (Cook 3-
1), 8:40 p.m.
San Diego (Correla 1-2) at Arizona (Scherzer
1-3), 9:40 p.m.
Atlanta (Medlen.)-1) at San Francisco (Lince-
cum 3-1), 10:15 p.m.


Rays blow 10-run



lead in setback


/ .Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays outfielder Carl Crawford dives for a double hit
by Cleveland Indians' Grady Sizemore in the first inning Monday
in Cleveland.


Rays 11, Indians 10
' CLEVELAND - Victor Martinez
lined a two-out, two-run single into cen-
ter field, capping a seven-run ninth in-
ning, and the Cleveland Indians rallied
to beat the Tampa Bay Rays 11-10 on
Monday night after trailing by 10 runs
'in the fourth.
The hit off Jasoni Isringhausen (0-1)
snapped an 0-for-18 streak by Mar-
tinez and ruined the much-awaited
season debut of Tampa Bay starter
David Price. The left-hander was
staked to a 10-0 lead but ran his pitch
count up and lasted only 3 1-3 innings.
-- The-Indians-became'the-first team-to-
make up a 10-run deficit and win since,
the Texas Rangers rallied to beat the
DetroitTigers 16-15 on May 8, 2004,
according to the Elias Sports Bureau.
Ryan Garko hit a two-run homer off
Price in the fourth to start Cleveland's
comeback. He added a three-run shot
in the ninth off Grant Balfour-for his
second career multihomer game. ,
Jeremy Sowers (1-2) pitched five
scoreless innings to get the win in his first
relief appearance after 51 career starts.
The loss was Tampa Bay's 14th in a
row in Cleveland. The Rays have not
won a ioad game against the Indians
since a 1-0 victory on Sept. 28, 2005.
The teams combined to use 11 .
pitchers; wholissued a total of 19 walks
-10 by the Rays.
Isringhausen walked the first three
men he faced, forcing in one run to :


make it 10-8. Martinez then lined a 3-2
pitch to center andwas mobbed by
teammates in Cleveland's biggest win
of a disappointing season.


Tampa Bay
ab. rhbi
BUptoncf 6 01 1
Crwfrd If 4 1 1 1
Longori 3b 2 1 0 0
C.Penalb 4 22 1
WAyar2b 4 10 0
Zobristrf 4 2 2 1
Gross dh 3 2 1 3
Navarrc 4 0 2 1
Brigncss 5 1 1 2


Cleveland
ab r h bi
JCarrll2b 3 1 0 0
Sizemrdh 4 1 2 1
VMrtnzc 6 0 1 2
JhPerltss 4 1-1 0
Choort 5 21 0
DeRosa 3b 4 2 2 0
Garkolb 5 2 3 5
LaPortIf 4 0 0 0
ACarerph 0 1 0 0
BFrncscf 3 1 2 1


Totals 36101010 Totals 38,11 129
Tampa Bay 052 300 000-10.
Cleveland 000 200 027-11
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Brignac (1), Longoria (4). DP-Tampa Bay
2, Cleveland 1. LOB-Tampa Bay 9, Cleveland
11. 2B-Zobrist (9), Navarro (6), Sizemore (9),
B.Francisco (8). HR-Gross (3), Garko 2 (4).
SB-Crawford (29).
IP H R ER BB SO
Tampa Bay
Price 31-3 4 2 2 5 6
Cormier 22-3 1 0 0 0 0'
J.Nelson 1 , 0 0 0 0 ,0
Thayer 11-3 5 4 2 1 0
Choate 0 0 1 0 0 0
Balfour 1-3 1 2 2 1 0
lsringhau. L,0-1 0 1 2 2 3 0
Cleveland
Carmona 11-3 3 5 5 5 3
J.Lewis 12-3 3 5 5 2 2
Rundles 1 1 0 0 1 1
,:wersVW,.-": 5"'. 3 0 0 1 1
J.Lewis pitched to 3 batters in the 4th.
Choate pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
Isringhausen pitched to 4 batters in the 9th.
HBP-by Rundles (Navarro).
Umpires-Home, Angel Hernandez; First, -3,ii
Welke; Second, Tim Welke; Third, Jim Reynolds
T-3:51. A-20,929 (45,199).


Red Sox 6, Twins 5
MINNEAPOLIS-- Jason Bay and
Kevin Youkilis hit two-run doubles, and
the Boston Red Sox started a 10-game
road trip with a 6-5 victory over the
Minnesota Twins on Monday.
Jonathan Papelbon survived a two-
out, two-run homer in the ninth by pinch-
hitter Joe Mauer to get his 12th save.
Michael Cuddyer homered early for
Minnesota, but Brad Penny (5-1)
pitched into the sixth for his third
straight victory.
Francisco Linano (2-6) struck out
seven in four innings for the Twins, in-
cluding three straight to finish the sec-
ond after the Red Sox put runners on
second and third But he was done in,
again, by the big inning after the White
Sox hit him with a seven-run fourth last
week in Chicago.
Jacoby Ellsbury stretched his hitting
streak to 20 games with a slow roller
over the mound in the third that Liriano
wasn't in position to field, trying to stick
his glove between his legs as the ball
rolled toward second base.
Boston was quickly in control after that.
Manager Terry Francona left slump-
ing designated hitter David Ortiz on the
bench to stock the lineup with right-
handers; Ellsbury was the only lefty.
2 i


Boston
ab rhbi
Ellsurycf 5 1 2 0
Pedrola 2b 5 2 3 0
Youkils 3b 5 1 2 2
BayIf 5 1 2 2
Lowelidh 5 04 1
NGreendh 0.0,0 0-
Baldelli rf_. 4 0 2 0
J.Drew ph-rf 1 0 0 0
Varitek c 5 00 0
JBailey lb 3 1 1 1
Lugo ss 4 0 0 0
Totals 42 616 6
Boston .
Minnesota


Minnesota
ab r h bi
Gomezcf 4 1 1 0
Tolbert2b 4 0 1 0
Mornea lb 4 1 1 1
Kubeldh 4 1 2 1
Cuddyrrf 4 11 1
. Buschr 3b 4 0 0 0
Rdmndc 3 0 1 0
Mauerph 1 1 1 2
DImYn If 4 00 0
Puntoss 3 0.0 0

Totals 35 5 8 5
003 200 010-6
010 002 002-5


E-Baldelli (1). LOB-Boston 10, Minnesota 3.
2B-Youkilis 2 (13), Bay (11), Baldelli (1),
Gomez (5), Morneau (13), Redmond (3). HR--
J.Bailey (3), Cuddyer (8), Mauer (11). SB-Pe-
droia (6), Bay (5), Tolbert (2). CS-Ellsbury (6).
\IP H RERBBSO
Boston
Penny W,5-1 51-3 '6 3 3 0 7
R.RamirezH,7 12-3 0 0 0 0 1
OkajimaeH,7 1 0 0 0 0 1
Papelbon S,12-13 1 2 2 2 0 1
Minnesota
Liriano L,2-6: 4 11 5 5 0 7
Dickey 4 3 1 1 0 0
Ayala 1-3 2 0 0 0 1
Henri 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Dickey (J.Bailey). PB-Redmond.
Urripires-H,:.Te Jerry Layne; First, Tony Ran-
dazzo Seco,,. , Cr.ri. Guccione; Third, Todd
T :i c er-,r
T-3:01. A-27,636 (46,632).


Yankees 11, Rangers 1
ARLINGTON, Texas - Alex Ro-
driguez had a perfect response for the
hearty boos, matching a career high
with five hits to lead the New York Yan-
kees to an 11-1 victory over the Texas
Rangers on Monday.
Rodriguez also drove in four runs in
his first game in Texas since admitting
earlier this year that he used steroids
while playing for the Rangers from
2001-03. Phil Hughes tossed eight
shutout innings for New York, which
has won 11 of 13.
After singling in the eighth inning in
his fifth at-bat, A-Rod was lifted for a
pinch runner with the Yankees already
up 10-0. His first five-hit game since
April 2005 raised his batting average 60
points - from .189 to .259. He had 10'
hits over his previous 16 games since
being activated from the disabled list.
Hughes (3-2) allowed three hits,
walked one and struck out six before
leaving after 101 pitches. He had allowed
17 earned runs in 15 2-3 innings since
throwing six scoreless innings in his first
start of the season April 28 at Detroit.
Nelson Cruz connected against Yan-
kees reliever Alfredo Aceves in the ninth,
hitting his fifth homer in six games.
The Rangers (26-18), who entered
with the best record in the American
League, had their eight-game home
winning streak snapped,

New York Texas
ab rhbi abrhbi
Jeterdh 5 2 1 0. Kinsler2b 4 00 0
Damonlf 4 32 0 MYong3b 3 00 0
Gardnrcf 1 0 1 0 Vizquel3b. 0.00 0
Teixeirlb 4 32 2 Hamltncf 3 0 1 0
Rdrgz 3b 5 25 4 .DvMrp If 1 00 0
Berroa 3b 0 0 0 0 N.Cruzrf 4 1 2 1
Cano2b 5 1 2 2 Blalockdh 3 0 0 0
MeCarrcf 5 0 1 0 Byrd lf-cf 4 0 0 0
Swisherrf 4 0 1 3 C.Davislb 3 00 0
Penass 5 0 1 0 Tegrdnc 3 0 1 0
Cash c 5 03 0 Andrus ss 3 00 0
Totals 43111911 Totals 31 1 4 1
NewYork 204 013 010-11
Texas 000 000 001-1
OP- Te.--. 2. LOB-New York 10, Texas 5.
2B--Jeter (10), Damon (11), Teixeira (10),
A.Rodriguez 2 (3), Hamilton (4), N.Cruz (9),
Teagarden (2). 3B-Cano (1). HR-N.Cruz (12).
SB-N.Cruz (8), Blalock (1). SF-Swisher.
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
HughesW,3-2 8 3 0 0 1 6
,:e. i . .... 1 1 1' 1 0 1 ,.
Texas "
Harrison L,4-4 5 11 7 7 1 2
Benson 3 6 4 4 2 1
Madrigal 1 2 0 0 0 0
HBP.-by Hughes (Blalock), by Benson (Teixeira).
Umpires-Home, Tom Hallion; First, Jerry Craw-
for second , Mike Muchlinski; Third, Phil Cuzzi.
T ..A--484914 (49,170).


Orioles 4, Blue Jays 1
BALTIMORE - Jeremy Guthrie al-
lowed one run in seven innings, Aubrey
Huff had two RBIs and the Baltimore Ori-
oles beat Toronto 4-1 on Monday to ex-
tend the Blue Jays' losing streak to seven.
Brian Roberts had two hits and
scored twice for the Orioles, who
were 3-14 against Toronto since
June 7, 2008.
Vernon Wells had the lone RBI for
the Blue Jays, who lost three in Boston
and three more in Atlanta before com-
ing to Camden Yards. The seven-game
skid is Toronto's longest since last June.
Guthrie (4-4) gave up seven hits,
walked one and struck out four. The
right-hander failed to retire the side in
order but permitted only three runners
to reach second base after giving up a
first-inning run.
Danys Baez worked the eighth and
George Sherrill got three outs for-his
10th save. Sherrill has not allowed a
run in nine appearances since May 2
in Toronto.
Brian Tallet (2-3) gave up two runs
and seven hits over six innings for the
Blue Jays. The left-hander has a 2.81
ERA over his last five starts, yet is 1-2
over that span.
After Tallet left, former Oriole B.J.
Ryan gave up two runs in the seventh
to put Toronto in a 4-1 hole.
Toronto - Baltimore
ab rhbl ab r h bi
Scutaross 5 1 2 0 BRorts2b 4 22 1
A.Hill 2b 4 0 1 0 Andino 2b 1 0 0 0
Riosrf 4 01 0 AdJonscf 3 0 1 0
V.Wells cf 4 0 2 1 Markks rf 4 00 .0
Linddh 3 00 0 Mora3b- -3 00 0
Rolen3b 4 00 0 A.Hufflb 3 1 1 1
Overaylb 4 02 0 Wggntndh 4 0 1 0
Barajsc 4 0 1 0 ReimldIf 3 0 1 0
Bautistif 3 ,0 0 0 Zaunc 2 0 1 1.
1 Clzturs ss 4 1 2 0
Totals 35 1 9 1 Totals 31 4 9 3
Toronto 100 000 000-1
Baltimore 100 100 20x-4
DP-Toronto 1. LOB-Toronto 9, Baltimore 9.
2B-Overbay ('10), Barajas (12), B.Roberts
(14), A.Huff (13). 3B-B.Roberts (1). SB-Scu-
taro (4). CS-Lind (1). SF-A.Huff.
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
TalletL,2-3 6 7 2 2 2 5 -
B.J.Ryan 2-3 2 2 2 .2 0
Wolfe 11-30 0 0 0 0
Baltimore ...
Guthrie W,4-4 7 7 1 1 1 4
BaezH,4 1 1 0 0 0 0
Sherrill S,10-12 1 1 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Wolfe (Zaun), by Guthrie (Lind).WP-
B.J.Ryan. PB-Zaun. .
Umpires-Home, Tim Timmons; First, Jeff Kel-
logg; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Mark Wegner.
T-2:51. A-24,904 (48,290).


MLB Leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-MiCabrera, Detroit, .378; Bartlett,
Tampa Bay, .373; VMartinez, Cleveland, .364; Ad-
Jones, Baltimore, .359; AHill, Toronto, .348;
Momeau, Minnesota, .341; Kubel, Minnesota, .340.
RUNS-BRoberts, Baltimore, 41; AdJones, Bal-
timore, 38; Damon, NewYork, 37; Momeau, Min-
nesota, 37; Pedroia, Boston, 37; Scutaro, Toronto,
37; Bay, Boston, 36; Markakis, Baltimore, 36.
RBI-Longoria, Tampa Bay, 49; Bay, Boston,
'47; Morneau, Minnesota, 41; CPena, Tampa
Bay, 39; Markakis, Baltimore, 38; AHuff,:Balti-
more, 37; Hunter, Los Angeles, 37.
'HITS-AHill, Toronto, 72; VMartinez, Cleveland,
67; MiCabrera, Detroit, 62; Bartlett, Tampa Bay,
60; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 60;.Morneau, Min-
nesota, 59; Cano, NewYork, 58; Longoria, Tampa
Bay, 58; Pedrola, Boston, 58; M'Young;Texas; 58.
DOUBLES-Longoria, Tampa Bay, 20;
, Callaspo, Kansas City, 16; MYoung, Texas, 16;
�i Byrd, Texas, 15; 'Lind, Toronto, 15; ..ower,
Boston, 15; Butler, Kansas City, 1,4; Vartinez,
Cleveland, 14; Pedroia, Boston,; 14; BRoberts,
Baltimore, 14. ' .
HOME RUNS-CPena,,Tampa Bay, 15; Bay,
Boston, 13; Mornea)r,'innesota, 13; Telxeira,
i NewYork, 13; NCdz, Texas, 12; Inge, Detroit,
12; Kinsler, Tas, 12.
,'7S.btoL'' oASES--Crawford, Tampa Bay, 29;
SFiggins, Los Angeles, 19; Ellsbury, Boston, 18;
Abreu, Los Angeles, 15; Bartlett, Tampa Bay, 14;
BUpton, Tampa Bay, 14; Crisp, Kansas City, 11.
PITCHING (5 Decisions)-Palmer, Los Angeles,
* 5-0,1.000; Halladay, Toronto, 8-1, .889; Greinke,
Kansas City, 7-1, .875; Buehrle, Chicago, 6-1,
.857; Slowey, Minnesota, 6-1, .857; Penny,
Boston, 5-1, .833; RRamirez, Boston, 4-1, .800.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Beltran, New Yc.r 36.7 Pence,.
Houston, .358; DWright, New York, .348; Zim-
merman, Washington, .346; lbanez, Philadel-
phia, .345; Hudson, Los Angeles, .344;
CGuzman, Washington, .344.
RUNS-Ibanez, Philadelphia, 38; Pujols, St.
Louis, 38; Zimmerman, Washington, 37; Hud-
son, Los Angeles, 35; AdGonzalez, San Diego,
33; ASoriano, Chicago, 33; Taveras, Cincinnati,
32; Werth, Philadelphia, 32.
RBI-lbanez, Philadelphia, 43; Fielder, Milwau-
kets, 42; Dunn, Washington, 39; Pujols, St.
Louis, 38; Hawpe, Colorado, 36; Cantu, Florida,
35; Zimmerman, Washington, 35.
HITS-Hudson, Los Angeles, 65; Zimmerman,
Washington, 65; Beltran, NewYork, 62; Tejada,
Houston, 60; Ibanez, Philadelphia, 58; Pence,
Houston, 57; DWright, New York, 56.
DOUBLES-Hudson, Los Angeles, 16; Kotch-
man, Atlanta, 16; FSanchez, Pittsburgh, 16; Bel-
tran, New York, .15; FLopez, Arizona, 15;
HaRamirez, Florida, 15; Tejada, Houston, 15.
HOME'RUNS-AdGonzalez, San Diego, 17;
Ibanez, Philadelphia, 17; Dunn, Washington, 14;
Pujols, St. Louis, 14; Bruce, Cincinnati, 12;
Howard, Philadelphia, 12; Reynolds, Arizona,
1 ASQrano. Chicago, 12.
STOLEN BASES-Bourn, Houston, 15;
Taveras, Cincinnati, 12; Burriss, San Francisco,,
11; Fowle'r, Colorado, 11; JosReyes, New York,
11; Morgan, Pittsburgh, 10; Reynolds, Arizona,
10; DWright, New York, 10.
PITCHING (5 Decisions)-Broxton, Los Ange-
les, 5-0, 1.000; Martis, Washington, 5-0, 1.000;
Cain, San Francisco, 5-1, .833; Stults, Los An-
geles, 4-1, .800; Pelfrey, New York, 4-1, .800;
DLowe, Atlanta, 6-2, .750; JSantana, New York,
6-2, .750.


Mets 5, Nationals 2
NEW YORK - Gary Sheffield hit a
disputed, tiebreaking three-run homer
in the sixth inning that was upheld by a
video review, and the banged up New
York Mets returned home from a,bruis-
ing trip to beat the Washington Nation-,
als 5-2 Monday night,
John Maine (4-3) limited the hapless
Nationals to one run and four hits in'six.
innings, improving to 4-1 in his last'six
starts. New York's bullpen held on de-
spite shaky performances by Bobby Par-
nell, J.J. Putz and Francisco Rodriguez,
who returned from back spasmsto.get...
-hi f3ffi saveln 13 chances,
Carlos Beltran was back in center
field after moving to designated hitter
for the weekend series at Boston's
Fenway Park because of a sore right
knee, and Ramon Martinez played
shortstop despite a sore lower back:
Already without first baseman Car-
los Delgado (hip surgery) and catcher
Brian Schneider (back) because of
longterm injuries, the Mets were miss-
ing shortstop Jose Reyes (calf) and
right fielder Ryan Church (hamstring).
Washington � NewYork
. I ab rhbi abrhbl
CGzmh ss 5 01 0 Paganrf 2 10 0


'NJhnsn lb 3 0 1 0 Castillo2b 3 1 2 0
Zmrmn 3b 4 0 1 1 Beltran cf 3 1 2 1
Dunn-lf-- 4-00 0 ---Sheffildlf 3 1 2 3
Kearns rf 5 00 0 FrRdrg p 0 00 0
WHarrscf 3 1 1 0 -DWrght3b 1 1 0 0
AHmdz2b 2 00 0 Tatislb 4 0 1 0
'Nieves c 3 1,? 1 Santos c 4 01 0
Lannanp 2- 00 0 RMrtnzss 3 0 0 1
Colomep 0'0 0 0 Maine p 2 0 1 0
Maxwll ph 1'00 0 DnMrpph 1 0,0 0
DCarerp 0 0 0 0 Parnellp 0 0 0 0
Brgmnp 0 00 0 Felicinp 0 00 0
Wlngh ph 1 00 0 Putzp 0 00 0
K.Wells p 0 00 0 Reed ph-lf 1 00 0
Totals 33 2 6 2 Totals 27 5 9 5
Washington 010 000 100-2
NewYork 001 004 00x-5
DP-Washington 3. LOB-Washington 13,
NewYork 7.2B-W.Harris (5), Castillo (3), Bel-
tran (15). HR-Sheffield (4). SB-W.Harris (3).
S-Castillo. SF-R.Martinez.
tin Iu oco n e


Washington
Lannan L,2-4
Colome
D.Cabrera
Bergmann
K.Wells
NewYork


IP H H ERH UBB SU
5 8 5 5 4 0
1 1 0 0 0 1
2-3 0 0 0 3 0
1-3 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 2


Maine W,4-3 . 6 4 1 1 3 4
Parnell 1-3 1 1 1 3 1
Feliciano H,6 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
PutzH,9 11-3 0 0 0 2 1
Rodriguez S,13-13 1 1 0 0 1 1
Lannan pitched to 4 batters in the 6th.
WP-D.Cabrera.
Umpires-Home, LarryVanover; First, Dan las-
sogna; Second, Sam Holbrook; Third, Adrian
Johnson. ,
T-3:20. A-41,103 (41,800).


Giants 8, Braves 2
SAN FRANCISCO -Last-minute
lineup addition Travis Ishikawa had a
three-run homer among his career-
high four hits, Jonathan Sanchez won
for the first time in more than a month
.and the San Francisco Giants bear the
Atlanta Braves 8-2 on Monday.
Edgar Renteria hit a two-run double,
three batters.after Emmanuel Burriss
broke up a scoreless game with a fifth-
inning RBI single. The Giants, who had
lost five of six and nine of 11, began a
six-game homestand on a positive
note following a frustrating '-5 trip in
which all thelosses were by one run.
This outing certainly was a boost
for Sanchez (2-4), who went 0-3 over
a six-start winless stretch since his
last victory April 17. But he nearly
saw this one get away after running
into trouble in the sixth. -
Ishikawa's homer in the seventh �
was his first this season and fourth of
his career. He scored on Burriss' single
in the fifth off Javier Vazquez (4-4),
whose wild pitch allowed Ishikawa to
reach third after he stole second.


Atlanta
ab rhbi
KJhnsn2b 5 1 1 0
Prado3b 3 1 0 0
M.Diaz If 3 0 1 0
McCnnc 3 0 3'1
D.Ross c 0 00 0
Francr rf 4 0 0 0
Ktchm lb 3 00 1
DHrndzss 4 0 0 0
Schafer cf 4 0 0 0
JVazqz p 2 01 0
Bennett p 0 00 0
Norton ph 1 00 0
Carlyle p 0 00 0
C.Jones ph 1 0 0 0


Totals 33 2 6 2
Atlanta
San Francisco


San Francisco
ab r h bi
Rownd cf 5 0 1 0
Renteriss 5 0 2 2
Winn rf 4 1 2 0
BMolin c 4 00 0
FLewisIf 3 2 1 0
Ishikaw lb 4 3 4 3
Uribe 3b 3 01 1
Burriss 2b 4 1 1 1
JSnchzp 1 1 0 0
JMillerp 0 0 0 0
Schrhit ph 1 0 1 1
Affeldt p 0 0 0 0
Meddrs p 0 0 0 0
JGzmn ph 1 00 0
BWilsn p 0 00 0
Totals 358138
000 002 000-2
000 032 30x-8


DP-Atlanta 1. LOB-Atlanta 8, San Francisco
7. 2B-J.Vazquez (2), Rowand (10), Renteria
(7), Winn (11). 3B-K.Johnson (2). HR-
Ishikawa (1). SB-Winn (8), Ishikawa (1). S-
J.Sanchez. SF-Uribe.
IP H RER BBSO


Atlanta
J.Vazquez L,4-4
Bennett
Carlyle
San Francisco
J.Sanchez W,2-4
J.Miller H,1
Affeldt H,8
Medders
B.Wilson


5 5 1
0 0 0
3 3 1


J.Sanchez pitched to 4 batters in the 6th.
Affeldt pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
WP--J.Vazquez 2.
Umpires-Home, Jerry Meals; First, Mike
DIMuro; Second, Bill Miller; Third, Dale Scott.
T-3:04. A-40,034 (41,915).


Brewers 1, Cardinals 0,
10 innings
MILWAUKEE - Bill Hall snapped a
1-for-28 slump with a two-out, RBI sin-
gle in the 1Ilh inning to lift the Milwau-
kee Brewers to a 1-0 victory over.the
St. Louis Cardinals on Monday
',Cardinals ace Chris Carpenter took
a perfect game into the seventh inning,
ta"d the Brewers'Yovani Gallardo car-
ried a no-hitter into the sixth before
each finished allowing just two hits
over eight innings.
Milwaukee closerTrevor Hoffman-
pitched a perfect ninth and Carlos Vil-
lanueva (2-3) the 10th for the Brewers,
setting up Hall's dramatics off St. Louis'
Kyle McClellan (2-2).
Casey McGehee reached on an
error by third baseman Brian Barden to
lead off the 10th for the Brewers.
Prince Fielder was intentionally walked
one out later and retired at second on
Mike Cameron's fielder's choice.
After Cameron reached second on
defensive indifference, Hall drove Mc-
Clellan's pitch to right-center field and
wasted no time touching first base be-
fore sprinting back in the dugout and
into the clubhouse.
Carpenter extended his scoreless
streak to 23 innings. He retired the first
18 batters and finished with 10 strike-


outs and no walks.
St. Louis
ab rhbi
Schmkr 2b-rf4 0 1 0


Rasms cf
Pujols l'b
Duncan If
Stavinh rf
McCllln p
YMolin c
Thurstn 3b
Crpntr p
Barden 3b
BrRyan ss


3 00 0
2 00 0
4 00 0
4 00 0
0 00
4 00 0
3 00 0
3 00 0
1 00 0
4 0 1 0


Milwaukee

Counsel ss
McGeh 2b
Braun If
Fielder lb
MCmrn cf
Gamel 3b
Hall 3b
Hart rf
Catlntt rf
Kendall c
Gallard p
Hoffmn p
Gerut ph 1
Villanv p 0


ab r h bi
4 01 0
4 1 0 0
4 00 0
3 000
4 01 0
3 000
1 0 1 1
2 00 0
1 00 0
3 00 0
2 000
0 00 0
10 00
S0 0 0


Totals 32 0 2 0 Totals 32 1 3 1
St Louis 000 000 000 0--0
Milwaukee 000 000 000 1-1
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Barden (3). LOB-St.Louis 6, Milwaukee 3.
CS-Counsell (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
SL Louis
C.Carpenter 8 2 0 0 0 10.
McClellan L,2-2 12-3 1 1 0 1 0
Milwaukee
Gallardo 8 2 0 0 4 6
Hoffman 1 0 0 0 0 0
Villanueva W,2-3 1 0 0 0 0 2
WP-Gallardo.
Umpires-Home, Chad Fairchild; First, Paul
Nauert; Second, Paul Schrieber; Third, Ed
Rapuano.
T-2:26. A-43,032 (41,900).


Associated Press
Florida Marlins shortstop Hanley Ramirez, left, waits to put
the tag on Philadelphia Phillies' Jimmy Rollins who tried to
advance to second on a throwing error to first base in the first
inning Monday in Philadelphia.


Marlins 5, Phillies 3
PHILADELPHIA-Wes Helms
homered and drove in four runs, Chris
Volstad pitched 6 2-3 strong innings and
the Florida Marlins beatthe Philadelphia
Phillies 5-3 on Monday night.
Ryan Howard hit a pair of homers
for the NL East-leading Phillies, while
Jamie Moyer failed in his fifth try to
earn his 250th win.
Volstad (4-3) allowed three runs and
six hits. Dan Meyer retired the only bat-
ter he faced, Leo Nunez pitched a per-
fect eighth and Matt Lindstrom finished
for his ninth save in 11 chances.
Moyer (3-5) gave up four runs and
seven hits in six innings, falling to 12-2
against the Marlins. The 46-year-old
left-hander has improved his last two
starts after a dreadful stretch. His ERA
dropped slightly to 7.42.
Back from an 8-2 road trip, the de-
fending World Series champions con-
tinued their struggles at home. They're
8-13 at Citizens Bank Park, and a
major league-best 16-6 on the road.
Moyer breezed through the first
three innings, retiring seven straight
before running into trouble in the fourth.
Hanley Ramirez and Jorge Cantu
walked to start the inning. Moyer
thought he struck out Helms on a close
2-2 pitch, but didn't get the call. Helms
drove the next offering out to left for his
first homer of the season, giving the
Marlins a 3-2 lead.
Ronny Paulino's RBI single with
two outs in the sixth increased


Florida's lead to 4-2. Howard led off
the bottom half with an opposite-field
shot to left-center.
Helms' RBI single off Chan Ho Park
in the seventh gave Florida a two-run
cushion. Helms heard boos throughout
the night. He was a bust in his only
season with the Phillies in 2007.
Signed to a $5.45 million, two-year
contract, Helms batted .246 with five
homers and 39 RBIs in 280 at-bats,
Florida Philadelphia
ab rhbi ab rhbl
Coghln If 5 02 0 Rollins ss 4 0 1 0
Hermidrf 5 1 2 0 Utley2b 3 00 0
HRmrzss 4 1 1 0 Ibanezlf 3 1 0 0
Cantulb 3 1 1 0 Howard lb 4 22 3
Helms 3b 5 23 4 Werthrf 4 00 0
Uggla 2b 4 0 00 Victorn cf 3 01 0
C.Ross cf 4 0 1 0 Feliz 3b 3 0 2 0
RPauln c 4 01 1 Park p 0 00 0
Volstad p 3 0 0 0 Stairs ph 1 0 0 0
Meyerp 0 00 0 Ruizc 4 00 0
Hayes ph 1 00 0 Moyer p 1 00 0
Nunez p 0 00 0 Dobbs 3b 1 00 0
Lndstrp 0 0 0 0
Totals 38 51) 5 Totals 31 3 6 3
Florida 000 301 100-5
Philadelphia 200 001 000-3
E-Volstad (1). DP-Florida 1. LOB-Florida 9,
Philadelphia 5. 2B-Hermida (5), Rollins (10),
Feliz (11). HR-Helms (1), Howard 2 (12). CS-
Victorino (3).
IP H R ER BB SO
Florida
Volstad W,4-3 62-3 6 3 3 2 6
Meyer H,8 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Nunez H,8 1 0 0 0 0 1
Lindstrom S,9-11 1 0 0 0 1 1
Philadelphia
Moyer L,3-5 6 7 4 4 2 5
Park 3 4 1 1 1 5
HBP-by Volstad (Utley).
Umpires-Home, Marvin Hudson; First, John
Hirschbeck; Second, Wally Bell; Third, Marty Foster.
T-2:51. A-45,186 (43,647).


Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland




Los Angeles
San Diego
San Fran.
Arizona
Colorado


West Division
GB WCGB

2� 2
6 5�
8 7Th


West Division
GB WCGB

7� 3
9 4%
11� 7
12 7�


L10 Str Home
6-4 L-1 14-7
5-5 W-1 12-8
4-6 L-1 12-12
4-6 W-2 10-12



L10 Str Home
7-3 W-1 18-5
10-0 W-10 17-6
3-7 W-1 14-8
6-4 L-2 9-16
4-6 L-1 7-11


� ..


TUESDAY, IMAY 26, 2oog B3


MAJOR5 LEAGLTE BASEBALL


CrfRUS COUNTY (FL H


,,llus ..ufvj I-


A


*









TUESDAY, CmusCONTY(FL CRONCL


RA i'. IM, Y.. l 26 2009 O


TENNIS
French Open Results
Monday
At Stade Roland Garros
Paris
Purse: $21.8 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Singles
Men
First Round
Nikolay Davydenko (10), Russia, def. Stefan
Kpubek, Austria, 6-2, 6-1, 6-4.
MikhailYouzhny, Russia, def. Gilles Muller, Lux-
embourg, 7-6 (2), 6-1, 6-4.
Stanislas Wawrinka (17), Switzerland, def. Nico-
las Devilder, France, 6-3, 5-7, 2-6, 6-4, 6-4.
Poito Starace, Italy, def. Mischa Zverev,'Ger-
many, 6-7 (5), 7-5, 1-0, retired.
Robin Soderling (23), Sweden, def. Kevin Kim,
United States, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (4), 6-2.
Nicolas Massu, Chile, def. Daniel Koellerer,
Austria, 6-3, 6-4, 1-6, 2-6, 6-3.
Nicolas Kiefer, Germany, def. Ilia Bozoljac, Ser-
bia, 7-6 (4), 3-6, 7-5, 6-4.
Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan,'def. Santiago Gi-
raldo, Colombia, 6-3, 6-7 (2), 6-3,7-6 (4).
Victor Hanescu (30), Romania, def. Steve Dar-
cis, Belgium, 7-6 (8), 7-6 (5), 7-6 (3).
Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Marcos Daniel,
Brazil, 7-5, 6-4, 6-3.
Femando Gonzalez (12), Chile, def. Jiri Vanek,
Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-2, 6-3.
Rui Machado, Portugal, def. KristofVliegen, Bel-
gium, 6-2, 6-4, 4-6, 2-6,; 6-3.
Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Alberto
Martin, Spain, 6-4, 6-3, 6-2.
Paul-Henri Mathleu (32), France, def. Laurent
Recouderc, France, 6-4, 6-4, 6-1.
Gulltaume Rufin, France, dtef. Eduardo
Schwank, Argentina, 6-1,6-3, 6-3.
JankoTipsarevic, Serbia, def. Albert Montanes,
Spain, 3-6, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (5), 6-4.
Felioiano Lopez (28), Spain, def. Franco Fer-
reiro, Brazil, 6-7 (3), 4-6, 7-6 (4), 7-5, 6-2.
Telmuraz Gabashvill, Russia, def. Igor Kunitsyn,
Russia, 6-7 (6), 7-6 (5), 6-3, 6-1.
Pablo Andujar, Spain, def. Robby Ginepri,
United States, 6-4, 7-6 (7), 7-6 (3).
Simone Bolelli, Italy, def. Tomas Berdych (19),
Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-4, 5-7, 4-6, 6-3.
Jose Acasuso, Argentina, def. Santiago Veri-
tura, Spain, 3-6,7-6(5), 6-0, 6-3.
Jurgen Melzer (24), Austria, def. Sergio Roll-
man, Argentina, 6-4, 7-6 (4), 6-0.
Andy Roddick (6), United States, def. Romain
Jouan, France, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2.
Jeremy Chardy, France, def. Thiago Alves,
Brazil, 6-2, 7-6 (10), 6-3.
MartinVassallo Arguello, Argentina, def. Thomaz
Bellucci, Brazil, 6-4,6-7 (4), 5-5, retired.
Diego Junqueira, Argentina, def. Paul Capdev-
ille, Chile, 3-6, 7-5, 6-1,6-3.
Ivo Miner, Czech Republic, def. Oscar Hernan-
dez, Spain, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 6-3.
Igor Andreev (25), Russia, def. Fabio Fognini,
Italy, 1-6, 6-3, 6-1, 3-6, 7-5. .
Women
First Round
Aravane Rezai, France, def. Ai Sugiyama,
Japan, 6-3, 6-2.
Dinara Safina (1), Russia, def. Anne
Keothavong, Britain, 6-0,6-0.
Agnes Szavay (29), Hungary, def. Corinna Den-
toni, Italy, 6-3, 6-4.
Tamarine Tanasugarn, Thailand, def. Camille
Pin, France, 6-3, 5-7, 7-5.
Polona Hercog, Slovenia, def. Alisa Kleybanova
(23), Russia, 6-2, 4-6, 6-1.
Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, def. Stephanie
Foretz, France, 6-1, 4-6, 6-4.
Venus Williams (3), United States, def. Bethanie
Mattek-Sands; United States, 6-1,4-6, 6-2.
Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, def. Sabine
Lisicki, Germany, 6-2,1-6, 6-1.
Lucie Hradecla, Czech Republic, def. Yvonne
Meusburger, Austria, 6-1, 6-2.
Michelle Larcher de Brito, Portugal, def. Melanie
South, Britain, 0-6,7,6 (5), 7-5,
Carla Suarez Navarro (22), Spain, def. Edina
Gallovits, Romania, 6-1, 6-4.
Zheng Jie (15), China, def. Stephanie Cohen-
Aloro, France, 6-1,6-3.
Dominika Cibulkova (20), Slovakia, def. Alona
Bondarenko, Ukraine, 6-4, 2-6, 6-4.
Olga Govbrtsova, Belarus, def. Katie O'Brien,
Britain, 6-1, 6-1.
Maria Sharapova, Russia, def. AnastasiyaYaki-
move, Belarus, 3-6, 6-1, 6-2.
Jill Craybas, United States, def. Tsvetana
Pironkova, Bulgaria, 7-5, 6-2.
Mariya Koryttseva, Ukraine, def. Patricia Mayr,
Austria, 6-1, 6-1.
Akgul Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, def. Irena
Pavlovic, France, 6-3, 6-4.
Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain, def. Barbora
Zahlavova. Strycova, Czech Republic, 6-1,4-6,9-7.
Marion Bartoli (13), France, def. Pauline Par-
mentier, France, 3-6, 6-1, 6-3.
Alexa Glatch, United States, def. Flavia Pen-
netta (14), Italy, 6-1, 6-1.
Mariana Duque Marino, Colombia, def. Anna
Chakvetadze'(26), Russia, 3-6, 6-4, 6-4.
Olivia Rogowska, Australia, def. Maria Kirilenko,
Russia, 6-4, 6-4. .
Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine, def. Patty
Schnyder (17), Switzerland, 6-4, 6-3.
Agnieszka Radwanska (12), Poland, dat.
Rossana de Los Rlos, Paraguay, 6-3, 6-1.
Jarmila Groth, Australia, def. Kinnie Laisne,
France, 6-4, 6-3.
Tathiana Garbin, Italy, def. Ayumi Morita, Japan,
7-5,7-5.
vera Dushevina, Russia, vs. Caroline Wozniacki
(10), Denmark, 6-4, 5-7, susp., darkness.

HOCKEY

NHL Playoffs
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7)
Thursday, April 30
Vancouver 5, Chicago 3
Friday, May 1
Detroit 3, Anaheim 2
Boston 4, Carolina 1
Saturday, May 2
Washington 3, Pittsburgh 2
Chicago 6, Vancouver 3
Sunday, May 3
Anaheim 4, Detroit 3, 30T
Carolina 3, Boston 0
Monday, May 4
Washington 4, Pittsburgh 3
Tuesday, May 5
Vancouver 3, Chicago 1
Anaheim 2, Detroit 1


Wednesday, May 6
Pittsburgh 3, Washington 2, OT
Carolina 3, Boston 2, OT
Thursday, May 7
Chicago 2, Vancouver 1
Detroit 6, Anaheim 3
Friday, May 8
Pittsburgh 5, Washington 3
Carolina 4, Boston 1
Saturday, May 9
Pittsburgh 4, Washington 3, OT,
Chicago 4, Vancouver 2
Sunday, Ilay'10 '"
Detroit 4, Anaheim 1
Boston 4, Carolina 0
Monday, May 11
Washington 5, Pittsburgh 4, OT
Chicago 7, Vancouver 5, Chicago wins series 4-2
Tuesday, May 12
Boston 4, Carolina 2
Anaheim 2, Detroit 1
Wednesday, May 13
Pittsburgh 6, Washington 2, Pittsburgh wins


series 4-3
Thursday, May 14
Dairod 4 Anarielm 3 Denrit Wens series 4-3
CaroI,n3 3 B:sion 2 OT Carlina ns series 4-3
CONFERENCE FINALS
(Best-of-7)
Sunday, May 17
Detroit 5, Chicago2
Monday, May 18
Pittsburgh 3, Carolina 2
Tuesday, May 19
Detroit 3, Chicago 2, OT
Thursday, May 21
Pittsburgh 7, Carolina 4
Friday, May 22
Chicago 4, Detroit 3, OT
Saturday, May 23
Pittsburgh 6, Carolina 2, Pittsburgh leads series
3-0
Sunday,,May 24
Detroit 6, Chicago 1, Detroit leads series 3-1
Today, May 26
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 27
Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Friday, May 29
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m., if necessary
Saturday, May 30
Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m., if necessary
Sunday, May 31
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7:30 p.m., if necessary
Monday, June 1
Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m., if necessary
Tuesday, June 2
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m., if necessary
STANLEY CUP FINALS
TBD

AUTO RACING

Sprint Cup
Coca-Cola 600
Monday
At Lowe's Motor Speedway
Concord, N.C.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position In parentheses)
1. (21) David Reutimann, Toyota, 227 laps,
101.3 rating, 190 points, $403,998, ,
2. (1) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 227, 91.1,
175, $326,754.
3.(37) Robby Gordon, Toyota, 227, 65.4,170,
$208,985.
4. (19) Carl Edwards, Ford, 227, 104, 160,
$207,531.
5. (8) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 227, 121.6,160,
$177,898.
6. (2) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 227, 139.4, 160,
$200,198.
7. (6) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 227,115.2,146,
$159,998.
8. (9) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 227,'
106.2,142, $151,773.
9. (14) Joey Logano, Toyota, 227, 106,143,
$163,351.
10. (30) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 227, 94.1,134,
$160,965.
11. (13) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 227, 95.7,
130, $122,655.
12. (20) Bobby Labonte, Ford, 227, 76.9,127,
$135,829.
13. (5) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 227,
112.7, 129, $158,751.
14. (3) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 227, 82.9;
121, $145,951.
15. (10) Bill Elliott, Ford, 227, 68, 118,
$106,000.
.16. (26) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 227, 76,
115, $121,610.
17. (4) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 227, 89, 112,
$111,785.
18. (18) Scott Speed, Toyota, 227,69.2,109,
$116,648.
19. (28) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 227, 84.9,
106, $109,973.
20. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 227, 76.4, 103,;
$116,175.
21. (33) Jamie McMurray, Ford, 227, 76.8,1'
100, $105,050.
22. (35) David Stremme, Dodge, 227, 60.9,
97,.$128,615.
23.(12) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 227, 73.8,
94, $131,140.
24. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 227, 61.1, 91,
$102,325.
25. (40) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 227, 61.2, 88,
$137,731.
26. (23) Marcos Ambrose, T:y.:'la 227 58,
85, $104,898.
27.(29) David Gilliland, Chevrolet, 226, 67.4,
82, $89,200.
28. (25) Dave Blaney, Toyota, 226, 54.6, 84,
$91,175.
29. (31) Paul Menard, Ford, 226, 53.4, 76,
$121,956.
30. (39) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 226, 37.7,
78, $99,925:
31. (15) Elliott Sadler, Dodge, 226, 49.3, 70,
$98,775.
32. (38) AJ Allmendinger, Dodge, 226, 46.6,
67, $88,150.
33. (36) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 226, 41.6,
64, $106,975.
34. (17) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 226, 84.1, 61,
$106,900.
35. (42) Reed Sorenson; Dodge, 226, 39.5,
58, $125,101.
36. (24) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 226, 40.6,
55, $95,625.
37. (11) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 226, 41.4,
52, '$87,400.
38. (43) Scott Riggs, Toyota, 225, 31.4, 54,
$87,285.
39. (41) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 225, 31.3,
46, $95,175.
40. (27) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Craerodel 225,


32.7, 43, $105,065.
41. (22) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 224, 31.5,
*40, $124,283.
42. (32) Max Papis, Toyota, 219, 26.6, 37,
$86,850.
43. (7) Mike Bliss, Dodge, vibration, 42,24.4,
34, $87,817.
Race Statistics I
Average Speed of Race Winner: 120.899
mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 48 minutes, 59 sec-
onds.
Margin of Victory: Under Caution.
Caution Flags: 6 for 40 laps.
Lead Changes: 14 among 10 drivers.
Lap Leaders: R.Newman 1-2; Ky.Busch 3-42;
J.Johnson 43-48; Ky.Busch 49-72; R.Gordon.
73; M.Waltrip 74; S.Riggs 75-77; Ky.Busch 78-
119; B.Vickers 120-130; J.Logano 131;
D.Blaney 132-133; Ky.Busch 134-144; B.Vick-
ers. 145-166; Ky.Busch 167-222; D.Reutimann
223-227.
Lea'er.; Summary iDrnve. Times Led, Laps
Led) Ky Bu .crih, 5 ,iimeu i.:r 173 laps; B.Vickers,
2 times for 33 laps;J.Johnsoh, 1 time for 6 laps;
D.Reutimann, 1 time for 5 laps; S.Riggs, 1 time
for 3 laps; R.Newman, 1 time for 2 laps;
D.Blaney, 1 time for 2 laps; R.Gordon, 1 time for
1 lap; J.Logano, 1 time for 1 lap; M.Waltrip, 1
time for 1 lap.
Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Gordon, 1,722; 2.
T.Stewart, 1,678; 3. Ku.Busch, 1,607; 4. J.John-
son, 1,594; 5. D.Hamlin, 1,575; 6. Ky.Busch,
1,540; 7. R.Newman, 1,538; 8. J.Burton, 1,472;
9. M.Kenseth, 1,460; 10. G.Biffle, 1,448; 11.
C.Edwards, 1,431; 12. M.Martin, 1,428.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in
a race.
The formula combines the'following cate-
gories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15. Finishes, Aver-
age Running P.o.ic.ri Wr,,re on Lead Lap,
Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led
Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.

BASKETBALL

NBA Playoffs
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7)
Sunday, May 3
Denver 109, Dallas 95
Monday, May 4.
Orlando 95, Boston 90,
Houston 100, L.A. Lakers 92
Tuesday, May 5
Cleveland 99, Atlanta 72
Denver 117, Dallas 105
Wednesday, May 6
Boston 112, Orlando 94
L.A. Lakers 111, Houston 98
Thursday, May 7
Cleveland 105, Atlanta 85
Friday, May 8
Orlando 117, Boston 96
L.A. Lakers 108, Houston 94
Saturday, May 9
Denver 106, Dallas 105
Cleveland 97, Atlanta 82
Sunday, May 10
Houston 99, L.A. Lakers 87
Boston 95, Orlando 94
Monday, May 11
Cleveland 84, Atlanta 74, Cleveland wins se-
ries 4-0
Dallas 119, Denver 117
Ti"esday, May 12
Boston 92, Orlando 88
L.A. Lakers 118, Houston 78
Wednesday, May 13
Denver 124, Dallas 110, Denver wins series
4-1
Thursday, May 14
Orlando 83, Boston 75
Houston 95, L.A. Lakers 80
Sunday, May 17
LA. Lakers 89, Houston 70, L.A. Lakers win
series 4-3
Orlando 101, Boston 82, Orlando wins series
4-3
CONFERENCE FINALS
(Best-of-7)
Tuesday, May 19
L.A. Lakers 105, Denver 103
Wednesday, May 20
Orlando 107, Cleveland 106
Thursday, May 21
Denver 106, L.A. Lakers 103
Friday, May 22
Cleveland 96, Orlando 95
Saturday, May 23
L.A. Lakers 103, Denver 97, LA. Lakers lead
series 2-1
Sunday, May 24
Orlando 99, Cleveland 89, Orlando leads se-
ries 2-1
Monday, May 25
L.A. Lakers at Denver Nuggets, late
Today, May 26
Cleveland at Orlando, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 27
Denver at L.A. Lakers, 9 p.m.
Thursday, May 28
Orlando at Cleveland, 8:30 p.m.
Friday, May 29
LA. Lakers at Denver, 9 p.m., if necessary
Saturday, May 30
Cleveland at Orlando, 8:30 p.m., if necessary
Sunday, May 31
Denver at LA. Lakers, 8:30 p.m., if necessary
Monday, June 1
Orlando at Cleveland, 8:30 p.m., if necessary


For the record


=== Florida LOTTERY


SCASH 3 (early)
1-2-9
CASH 3 (late)
2-0-8
PLAY 4 (early)

Florda Lottery PLAY 4 (late)
Here are the winning 09- O 1
numbers selected' FANTASY 5
Mondayin the 5-12-15-28 - 30
Florida Lottery:


==On the AIRWAVES==

TODAY'S SPORTS
BASEBALL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Marlins at Philadelphia Phillies
7 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Cleveland Indians
8 p.m. (ESPN) St. Louis Cardinals at Milwaukee Brewers
BASKETBALL
8:30 p.m. (TNT) Eastern Conference Final Game 4 -
Cleveland Cavaliers at Orlando Magic
HOCKEY
7:30 p.m. (VERSUS) Eastern Conference Final Game 4 -
Pittsburgh Penguins, at Carolina Hurricanes
TENNIS
12 p.m. (ESPN2) French Open - Early Round - Day 3


Rays' Iwamura out for
season; Price called up
CLEVELAND -Tampa Bay
Rays second baseman Akinori
Iwamura will miss the rest of the
season with a tom ligament in his
left knee.
The Rays placed the infielder
on the 15-day disabled list in a
series of moves Monday. Tampa
Bay also recalled left-hander
David Price from Triple-A Durham
to start Monday night in the
opener of a four-game series
against the Indians in Cleveland,
placed lefty Brian Shouse on the
1 5-day DL with a strained left
elbow, transferred outfielder Fer-
nando Perez to the 60-day DL
and called up lefty Randy Choate
from Durham.
Manager Joe Maddon ex-
pressed sympathy for Iwamura.
"You feel for him," said Mad-
don, who received a three-year
contract extension earlier Mon-
day, 'The rehab process is going
to be difficult. We're going to miss
him. He was probably playing as
well as I've seen him overall,"
Maddon didn't dwell on the in-
jury and hoped Price could give


Tampa, Fla. The two didn't
S PRI bother with an Umbrella as
they stood in a steady drizzle
Continued from Page Bi for just over 2 hours.
"I tell you what, people, it's
first time in its 50-year his- been a long road. It's taken us
tory. a long time to get here,"
"It wasn't the prettiest win, Buzzie Reutimann said. "I'm
but somebody has to win," he afraid I'm going to wake up
said. "When you envision in the morning and find out
yourself winning your first I'm dreaming all of this.
Sprint Cup race, you envi- Words can't describe how
sion it different. But it's so great a father would feel to
hard to win these deals, we'll see his son to win a race."
take it any way we can." Buzzie Reutimann was in
With intermittent showers attendance for his sofn's other
spraying the track all day NASCAR victories, a 2007
Monday, the race was one of Nationwide race at Memphis
strategy, as every driver sim- and a 2005 Truck race at
ply tried to be in front when Nashville, The duo never
the event was finally washed imagined they'd make it to
out the top level, though, when
Reutimann gave it his best they were eking out a living
shot when, running 14th, he in lower levels for most of
and crew chief Rodney their careers. '
Childers decided not to join "I wasn't racing to be an
the parade of cars following NASCAR driver. I was just
leader Kyle Busch down pit racing to race, to be able to
road during a caution for be like my dad, make a living
rain 22 laps past the halfway at racing," Reutimann said.
point "When I was at East Bay
The race had reached the Raceway running for $350 to
point where if it was stopped win in a late model feature, I
again for rain, it was official, wasn't concerned about
and the Michael Waltrip Rac- being here, I was concerned
ing team prayed the ei p s. about making it to next week
soon. .. . " ^^That's,4,en thementality.
Reutimann claimed the my whole life."
lead, with pole-sitter Ryan Newman finished second
Newman and Robby Gordon and Gordon was third. Gor-
following him to the front as don might have a problem,
the rest of the field went to though. NASCAR confis-
pit road for fuel and fresh cated his real; axle housing
tires. He didn't lead a single following post-race inspec-
lap under green-flag racing, tion for further evaluation.
but was out front for five-laps Carl Edwards, who had
under caution before changed into street clothes
NASCAR called the cars by the time the race was
back to pit road for the third called, finished fourth, fol-
rain stoppage. lowed by Brian Vickers and
Most drivers headed to Busch.
their motorhomes to wait out Reutimann, 39, didn't get
the rain. his break in the Cup series
Not Reutimann. until Michael Waltrip hired
He was joined at his car by him in 2007 when he formed
his 68-year-old father, Buzzie, his own race team. But
a racer with one career Michael Waltrip Racing was'
NASCAR start who still tears terrible, and Reutimann was
it up in dirt track events at not competitive as he strug-
East Bay Raceway near gled to even make races.


WEBB
Continued from Page B1

See, Webb figured he could
have earned a top-six distinc-
tion and medaled again if he
wanted to. After thinking
about it, Verhelst said Webb
attempted to formulate a plan
unlike his usual ...one that
would be an all-out attempt to
go for gold.
The ensuing result was a
valiant effort but one that
would see the track standout
roll in at 13th.
Although Webb has a per-
sonal best of 51.5 seconds in
the 400-meter race, he recog-
nized that he couldn't rip off a
time like that in the 800's first
lap and have anything left for
the second.
"He knew a guy who was
going to go out and run 51 sec-
onds on the first lap," Verhelst
said. 'Tory knew he couldn't
do that and tried to set up a
strategy.
"He could have muddled in
the pack and been third or
fourth," Verhelst continued,
"but he wanted to win it"
Webb had this take on his
last race: "I did everything I
could do and not everything
works out the way you want
it to."
Call it the nature of the
beast known as the 800, a race
that's not a sprint, but not
quite distance either
The training regimen Webb
received from Verhelst and
put himself through is pun-
ishing to say the least, one the


senior says is built on the
foundation of building up en-
durance and then hitting the
track later to hone the speed
needed for the sudden burst
needed to run hard for any-
where between 100-400 me-
ters at the end of a race.
Webb, for his part, said he
has been inspired along the
way by his parents Robb and
Madeleine and coach Ver-
helst
Whether his drive came in-
ternally or from people
around him, it was that un-
compromising approach that
led Webb to run cross country
in his senior year His think-
ing in choosing to do that was
to be in better shape and
show collegiate coaches that
he could run any distance be-
tween 400 meters and over
three miles.
"I didn't have too many ex-
pectations (for cross coun-
try)," Webb said. "I just
wanted to run a good time to
show colleges.
"I think I knew I had the
potential to be really good,"
he continued. "I just didn't
know how good."
Webb takes that unwaver-
ing approach into his per-
sonal life, maintaining a 3.5
GPA and engaging in active
pursuits outside of academics
and athletics.
The Panther has actually
built his own kayak after
falling in love with the activ-
ity during the summer be-
tween his seventh and eighth
grade years.
A friend of Tory's father
owned a canoe and let him


Sports BRIEFS

the Rays a lift.
"I know we're all eager to get
him out there," Maddon said.
"He's a big part of our future."
The No. 1 overall pick in the
2007 draft out of Vanderbilt, Price
was dominant at three minor
league levels in 2008, going 12-1
with a 2.30 ERA before being
called up Sept. 13. He posted a
1.93 ERA in five outings - with
one start-- and excelled in the
postseason for the Rays.
Price did not give up a hit over
2 1-3 innings in the AL champi-
onship series against Boston, in-
duding 1 1-3 innings in a Game 7
win. He finished with a 1.59 ERA
in five postseason outings.
The 23-year-old left-hander
started in place of Scott Kazmir,
who went on the 15-day disabled
list Friday with a strained right
quad muscle.
Price was 1-4 with a 3.93 ERA
in eight starts at Durham. He was
in the minors because the Rays
wanted to limit his workload this
year.
Maddon signs
extension with Rays
ST. PETERSBURG - Joe


The team has made small
strides in the past 2-plus sea-
sons, and Reutimann has
carried thebanner. He's lin-
gered around the top 12 in
points all season and has
given MWR credibility.
Now he's made MWR the
first Toyota team other than
Joe Gibbs Racing to win a
Cup race.
Waltrip, who earned his
second Daytona 500 title -
after a lengthy rain delay .
shortened the 2003 event,
joined the father and son at
the car midway through the
final delay.
Reutimann also received a
congratulatory call from
Stewart, who argued with
him and one of his crew
members during the second
rain delay. Stewart was upset
with how hard Reutimann
raced him earlier when
Stewart had the faster car,
and a longtime Reutimann
crew member intervened.
"I think Tony felt like I
raced him a little harder
than I should have," he said.
"That's all it was."
Rain -ruined a' race for
Busch for the second time in
three days. He led a race-
high 173 laps and was: oQt
front when he pitted during
the final caution. He wound
up sixth.
Busch led 143 laps in Sat-
urday night's Nationwide Se-
ries race, lost the lead during
a round of pit stops, and
never had a chance to re-
claimn it when the race was
shortened by 45 miles be-
cause of rain.
"Weather, you can't do any-
thing about it, really," Busch
said.
Defending race-winner
Kasey Kahne was also de-
nied a chance when, as he
was closing in on Busch's
bumper, caution was called
for rain. In second as they
headed down pit road, he
wound up seventh when the
race never resumed.

take it for a ride down the
river That same person later
gave the Webb family a book
for Christmas on how to build
a canoe.'
Although 0 kayaking has the'
potential to beg strenuous ac-
tivity, Webb enjoyed the more
serene aspects. ',
"I just like paddling arjo tu"
and it's nice and peaceful for
the most part," he said.
As of now, Webb said he
was close to committing to
Embry-Riddle University in
Daytona Beach. There, he
wants to enroll in their busi-
ness program and run track
and field.
Until then, Webb is cur-
rently training with his for-
mer Lecanto teammates to
run the 4 x 40-meter relay
race and 800 at the Golden
South Classic in Orlando. The
track meet is an invitation-
only event for high school stu-
dents.
Webb said he didn't do as
well as he would have liked
that the same meet in 2008
and was taking one last shot
at it.
Parents and coaches al-
ways tell an athlete to push
themselves as hard as they
can, not to leave anything on
the field.
Although Tory Webb fell
just short of his lofty expec-
tations, he didn't cheat
track and field. More im-
portantly though, he didn't
cheat himself and settle for
something he knew he
could easily attain.
At the end of the day, what
more could anyone ask of ;
him?


Maddon wasn't looking to
leave, and Tampa Bay had no
intention of letting him go.
The Rays rewarded their
manager for leading them to
last season's World Series, an-
nouncing a three-year contract
extension Monday that runs
through 2012.
"This is where I belong. This
is where I want to be," Maddon
said during a conference call.
"I really have to use the
word love when I talk about
this organization, and I really
see this as just the beginning.
... For me, it's a no-brainer. I
really want to stay here, and
I'm really grateful to get that
opportunity."
Maddon, 55, is in his fourth
season with Tampa Bay, which
posted a winning record for the
first time in 2008. He was
voted AL Manager of the Year
after leading the Rays to 97
regular-season wins, a 31-
game turnaround from the pre-
vious year.
Tampa Bay started Monday
with a 23-23 record, four
games behind first-place
Boston in the AL East.


CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


- I


SCOREBOARD


I








Page B5- TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009


YOUR GUIDE TO CITRUS COUNTY COMMUNITY SPORTS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


June Calendar
of Events
. 6/1 Men's softball
sign-ups open, Men's
flag football at HARP
6/2 Tiny Cheers cheer-
leading and Start Smart
flag football at Bicenten-
nial Park
Men's basketball at
CREST Gymnasium,
Coed Summer Softball
Meeting
6/3 Coed Kickball
Meeting, Men's flag foot-
ball at HARP
6/4 Start Smart Bas-
ketball at Parks and
Recreation Admin. Office
Men's basketball at
CREST Gymnasium
6/5 Men's softball
sign-ups close
6/8 Summer Youth
Camp: Camp Fusion
begins ,
Water volleyball be-
gins at Bicentennial Pool,
Men's flag football at
HARP
6/9 Men's basketball
at CREST Gymnasium
Tiny Cheers cheer-
leading and Start Smart
flag football at Bicenten-
nial Park
6/10 Men's flag foot-
ball at HARP
6/11 Men's basketball
at CREST Gymnasium
6/15 Coed kickball
sign-ups open
-Coed softball sign-ups
open
Water volleyball at Bi-
centennial Pool
6116 Tiny Cheers
cheerleading and Start
Smart flag football at Bi-
centennial Park, Men's
basketball at CREST
Gymnasium
6/18 Men's basketball
at CREST Gymnasium
6/19 Coed kickball
sign-ups close
Coed Softball sign-ups
close
6/22 Water volleyball
at Bicentennial Pool
Men's softball begins
at Bicentennial Park
6/23 Coed Softball be-'
gins at Bicentennial Park
6/24 Coed kickball be-
gins at Bicentennial Park
6/25 Coed Softball
games at Bicentennial
Park
6/29 Water volleyball
at Bicentennial Pool
Men's softball at Bi-
centennial Park
For further information
on any of Citrus County
Parks and Recreation's
programs or events,
please call 527-7677.


Parks and




recreation




ongoings


Camp Fusion to visit
Ray. James Stadium
By now, everyone should
have heard about Camp Fu-
sion, Citrus County Parks and
Recreation's elite summer
youth program running from
June 8th to August 14th (that's
all summer)! Well, one of our
secret field trip, destinations has
been leaked, and it's true! -
Camp Fusion campers will go
on a backstage tour of the
Home of the Tampa Bay Buc-
caneers, Raymond Ja-mes Sta-
dium, this summer during
Sports Week! Don't let your
kids miss out, sign up today!
From Bicentennial Pool to
the Homosassa Springs
Wildlife Park, campers at Camp
Fusion will have a well-
rounded, exciting and educa-
tional summer. Children
between 6 and 12 years of age
should not miss out on an op-
portunity like this! Sign up for
Camp Fusion before May 30th,
and receive $10 off of camp
registration fees!
All staff will be trained in CPR
and First Aid, as well as undergo
an extensive background check.
Guess what else? Each of the
aforementioned trips are already
factored into the weekly fees. It's
only $60 per child, per week and
if you need extended care, it's
just $70 per child, per week.
Walk-up campers are welcome
for $20 per chilod,per day. ,
Contact Parks and Recre-
ation's Summer Youth Camp
Coordinator at 352-527-7677 or
visit us online at www.my-
space.com/campfusion.
Parks and Recreation
now on MySpace
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation is happy to an-
nounce its mergence into the
online social networking world.
With other parks and recreation
divisions logging on across the
nation, it was silly for us to sit
back and not utilize this free
service. Social networking sites,
such as MySpace.com, Face-,
book.com and Twitter.com, have
become a midnight-in-your-paja-
mas-browsing-profiles craze.
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation has decided to make


use of MySpace. With features
like sports logging, the ability to
reach thousands of users, and
instant announcements made
accessible to anyone, it is an ef-
fective means of communica-
tion, and again, it is free.
So what does this mean for
you? If you have ever wanted
one of our snap shots of your
last pitch, touchdown, score,
run, slide, team picture or your
Heisman in mid-air pose? Now
you can tag them from our My-
_.Space page to yours. If we post
bulletins, update a sports blog,
or status of a league, or add
new programs for our county's
youth, as well, it is all just a
mouse click away at www.my-.
space.com/ccparksnrecreation.
Football camp comes
to Citrus County
Former University of Florida
Football Athletes Association in
partnership with Citrus County
Parks and Recreation will be
hosting a three day football
camp, July 27-29, from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. all three days. The
camp will be held at Central
Ridge District Park's soccer
fields. This football camp is in-
tended for children between the
ages of 8-16.
The camp will offer three
great days of football. The staff
of instructors will include former
NFL players, former college
players, and local football
coaches. Each day of the camp
will encompass all aspects of
the offense, defense, and spe-
cial teams. We will end on a Fri-
day with a flag football game
divided by specific age groups.
- Cost-for thi-e - ip is $12~5
per participant. If you register
before July 1, you will receive
$15 off your registration fee.
Don't miss this exciting oppor-.
tunity to be involved with the
University of Florida football
camp. To register, log on tp
www.fycc.net
Water fitness class
- happening now
Are you ready for the sum-
mer sun and a splash in the
pool for some fun and exer-
cise? Certified water fitness in-
structor, Cindy Januszewski is
and she will be waiting for you.


4


Special to the Chronicle
Kyle Metz makes a fierce attempt to kick a home run. Citrus County Parks aid Recreation's
coed kickball meeting will now be held at Bicentennial Park's field 5 at 6 p.m. on June 3.


at Bicentennial Pool. Cindy has
teamed up with Citrus County ,
Parks and Recreation to in-
struct water fitness classes.
During the summer months, her
classes will be held from 12-1
p.m. every Monday, Wednes-
_day and Friday..
Cindy's water fitness classes
include a series of underwater
movements that incorporate the
entire body, as well as a few
breathing techniques. With the
option of using weights and
other water friendly equipment,
such as noodles, Cindy's class is
intended for any and every adult
that would like to be involved.
If you would like to join Cindy's
water fitness class, please call
Bicentennial Pool at 352-795-
1478 for more information.
Co-ed softball signups
currently going on
Citrus County Parks and


Recreation summer's coed,
softball season will begfri'dh
June 23. Sign-ups will be held
at the Parks and Recreation
administrative office located
on 491, in Lecanto from June
15-19.
Ouroffice is open from 8
a.m. to 5 p.m. Parks and
Recreation will not accept any
late registrations. The registra-
tion fee $250 per team.
Games will be held on
Tuesday, and Thursday nights
at 6:30, 7:30, and 8:30 p.m.
Games are played on field 5
at Bicentennial Park in Crystal
'River.
For further information about
this league, call Jennifer Wor-
thington at 352-527-7677, at-
tend the league meeting on
June 2 at the Parks and Recre-
ation administrative office, or
visit us online at CitrusCoun-
tyFl.org.


Water Volleyball
.open to all adults
If you think volleyball on a court
is fun, try playing in the water! Cit-
rus County Parks and Recre-
ation's premiere of water
volleyball will begin June 8. This
program.will be held at the Bicen-
tennial Park Pool in Crystal River.
The program is open to males
and females ages 18 and up.
The cost is just $3 per player.
Water volleyball will be played
on Monday nights from 6-9
p.m. No pre-formed teams will
be allowed, as this is an open
program. All participants will
have equal playing opportunity;
rotation is required.
Don't use chilly nights as an
excuse, not to play, Bicenten-
nial Pool is heated! For more
information about this, program
call Bicentennial Pool at 352-
795-1478.


Sharapova back at French Open; top men win easily


Nadal wins 29th

straight; Roddick,

Federer move on

Associated Press
PARIS - Those unmistakable
shrieks punctuating point after
point on Court 1 at the French
Open on Monday trumpeted
Maria Sharapova's return to the
Grand Slam stage.
There were other ways Shara-
pova made her presence felt -
the big groundstrokes off both
wings; the tough-as-nails turn-
around after a slow start; the pre-
match accessories of buttoned-up
blue jacket and oversized white
purse; the postmatch victory
waves and blown kisses.
Sharapova's tennis is not yet
back to her lofty standards, as one
might expect after shoulder sur-
gery in October and four singles
matches in the past 10 months. The
64th-ranked Anastasiya Yakimova
of Belarusis not the sort of oppo-
nent who would normally trouble a
top-of-her-game Sharapova, yet
there was trouble Monday
Still, a win is a win, and Shara-
pova's first match at a major tour-
nament in nearly a year ended
with a 3-6,6-1,6-2 victory over Yaki-
mova and a spot in the French
Open's second round. It will take
more than that performance for
Sharapova to erase the uncertainty


that comes with such a long layoff.
"This is the first time in my ca-
reer where I can really say I don't
.have any expectations," the three-
time major champion said. "I don't
know how things are going to work
out. I don't know what's going to
happen tomorrow, how my shoul-
der is going to feel."
Because of her time away,
Sharapova is ranked 102nd and
unseeded at Roland Garros,
which might help lower others'
expectations, too. A year ago, after
all, she was No. 1.
"If I was a mentally weak person
or individual," Sharapova said, "I
think I wouldn't be here today."
The pressure to produce has not
affected Rafael Nadal in the least,
and he extended his French Open
winning streak to a record 29
matches Monday by beating Mar-
cos Daniel of Brazil 7-5, 6-4, 6-3 in
the first round.
Nadal is trying to become the
first player to win five titles in a
row in Paris, and the man he beat
in the past three finals, Roger
Federer, also wort easily Monday.
More noteworthy, perhaps, was
Andy Roddick's 6-2, 6-4, 6-2 vic-
tory over French wild-card entry
Romain Jouan, the American's
first victory in the tournament
since 2005.
"I'm just glad I finally won a
match out there," Roddick said.
The only seeded man to exit was
No. 19 Tomas Berdych, but there
were more surprises on the
women's side, including 116th-
ranked American Alexa Glatch's


6-1, 6-1 victory over No. 14 Flavia
Pennetta of Italy. No. 17 Patty
Schnyder, No. 23 Alise Kley-
banova and No. 26 Anna Chakve-
tadze all lost Th ird-seeded Venus
Williams beat Bethanie Mattek in
three sets, while No. 1 Dinara Sa-
fina shut out Anne Keothavong of
Britain 6-0, 6-0.
When they met at the net, ac-
cording to Safina, Keothavong told
her, "At least you could give me
one game."
Nadal's accomplishment wasn't
exactly heralded with much fan-
fare. There was no announcement
over the loudspeakers, no on-
court presentation of a plaque, no
wild celebration from the
Spaniard. He simply yanked off
his yellow head wrap - the one
that matched his neon wristbands
and accompanied his bright pink
shirt - and went to the net to
shake Daniel's hand.
"It's better than dress the same
color every week, no?" Nadal said.
He and Bjorn Borg had shared
the men's mark of 28 consecutive
victories at Roland Garros; Nadal
now shares the overall tourna-
ment mark with Chris Evert.
Nadal did have a few wobbles, get-
ting broken while serving for the
first set at 5-4 and again to fall be-
hind 3-1 in the second.
If there never appeared to be
real doubt about the outcome of
that encounter, Sharapova's
deficit against Yakimova was
more daunting.
"I started pretty lousy," Shara-
pova said.


Maria Sharapova returns the ball to Anastaslya Yaklmova during their
first round match Monday at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris.


Citrus County
Parks & Recreation


4 &LIS K-


*











EPage Bi6 TUESDAY, MAY26, 2009


ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE
Joel drummer
files lawsuit
NEW YORK-A for-
mer drummer for Billy
Joel claims the Grammy
Award-winning singer of
hits including "Uptown
Girl" and "Movin' Out"
No l -- hans staffed
0 him out of
royalties
for years.
Liberty
DeVitto
has filed a
lawsuit in
Manhat-
Billy Joel tan's state
Supreme Court demand-
ing Joel pay him overdue
royalties. The 58-year-old
says he was Joel's drumn-
mer from 1975 to 2005 and
helped the piano man
craft some ofhisbiggest
albums.
DeVitto's lawyer says he
doesn't know how much
his client is owed. He says
Joel's sales are subject to
an audit
DeVitto says he's work-
ing as a studio musician
and teaching to support
his family, including three
children.
Joel's spokeswoman
hasn't returned a tele-
phone message seeking
comment

Rare Hepburn
stamp for sale
BERLIN- A collector
stands to make a tidy
profit after discovering a
rare stamp portraying
movie star Audrey Heip-
burn smoking - one of a
series that should have
been incinerated by the
German government
In 2001, the government
printed 14 million Audrey
Hepburn stamps as part
of a series featuring
movie stars including
Charlie Chaplin, Marily i
Monroe and Greta Gauto.
The print r n was de-
stroyed after Hep-
burn's son, Sean
Ferrer, objected to
the cigarette holder
dangling from the '
actress' mouth and '
refused to grant
copyright
But the Finance
Ministry had al-
ready delivered ad-
vance copies ofthe
Hepburn stamps to
Deutsche Post for ap-
proval. Thirty of these
proof copies escaped
destruction when an u n-
known employee pock-
eted them and used
them to send letters
postmarked from
Berlin.
A minimum bid of
$41,959 has been set
for the stamp-- of
which only five
copies are known to
exist - at its auction
today at Berlin's
Kempinski Hotel
Bristol.

T.I. packs
arena prior to
jail time
ATLANTA-- Grariny-
winning rapper TL told
fans he would stay opti-
mistic when he heads to
prison on
a federal
weapons .,

tion.
The 28-
year-old
rapper,
whose
T.I real name
is Clifford J. Harris Jr.,
performed for a packed
audience Sunday night in
Atlanta's Philips Arena
less than two days before
'he is to begin serving the
sentence of a year and a
day
"I'm going to stand up
tall, head up high," he
said. "Tharnkyou for all of
your support"


He must report by noon
today to the Federal Cor-
rection Institution at For-
rest City, Ark. He was
arrested after prosecutors
said he tried to buy unreg-
istered machine guns and
silencers from undercover
federal agents in 2007.
- From wire reports


I I1TIMIE-HONORED








Stars salute Strait as ACM's Artist of the Decade


JOHN GEROME
AP entertainment writer

- LAS VEGAS
George Strait couldn't help feel-
ing a little like he was being led
out to pasture when the Academy
of Country Music saluted him as
their Artist of the Decade with an
all-star concert.
"It's almost like this was a
farewell deal. but I ain't ready to
go yet," the soft-spoken Texan told
the audience during the April 6
event.
And then, perhaps to prove the
point, the 56-year-old superstar
closed the show by leading a sing-
along of his hit "Troubadour,"
with its chorus, "I was a young
troubadour when I rode in on a
song, and I'll be an old troubadour
when I'm gone."
With the honor, joins the ACM's
four other artists of the decade:
Marty Robbins in the 1960s.
Loretta Lynn in the '70s. Alabama
in the '80s and Garth
Brooks in the '90s.
As the reining Artist
of the Decade, Brooks
presented the award. He
said it was ironic handing
the award to the person
largely responsible for him,
having it, and told a story
about hearing Strait's first hit,
"Unwound," in 1981.
"From that very second I
lknew what I wanted to be. It
was so easy and it didn't seem
that far away. I wanted to be
George Strait," Brooks recalled.
Later, Brooks said.the secret
of Strait's longevity-- he's had
57 No. 1 country singles,
more than anyone else,
and he's still going _:.
strong - is that he
doesn't pretend to
be something �
he's not.


act ... he's just being him," Brooks arena. I asked him if he had ad-
said. vice about performing in the


Most of the evening, Strait,
wearing a dark jacket
and cowboy hat, sat a
with his family in the
MGM Grand Garden
Arena as a parade of
performers including
Alan Jackson, Tim Mc-
Graw, Toby Keith, E
Brooks & Dunn, Taylor \
Swift. Jamie Foxx, a.
Sugarland. Dierks
Bentley. Miranda Lam-


WHAT: G
Strait, Ac
of Count
Artist of
Decade
WHEN:E
Wednesc
TV: CBS


bert, John Rich and more spoke
about the famously taciturn star's
music and kindness, and then
sang his songs.
"When I was 16 1 went on my
first tour, as opening act for
* George Strait," began 19-year-old
Swift. who sang Strait's ballad
"Run." "I'd never been on big
stage before


round.


He said. 'Yes, I do,"'
ieorge Swift said, then
academy paused a good while.
try Music "I sensed that I
the needed to ask a follow-
salute. up question. So I said
'How do you do that?'
8 p.m. He said. Just do it for
day. 25 years and it will
feel real natural."'
Eddie Montgomery
ofthe duo Mont-
gomery Gentry said that when he
was playing clubs in Kentucky,
"everylime we'd go to work. the
first thing the club owner would
ask is, 'Do you know any George
Strait?' And ifyou didn't, you did-
n't get the gig."
The four other artists of the
decade were also briefly saluted.
Keith Urban did a medley of Rob-
bins' songs. Faith Hill performed
Lynn's "You Ain't Woman
Enough," Montgomery Gentry did
Alabama's "Mountain Music" and
Martina McBride sang Brooks'
"The Dance."
But it was clearly Strait's night.
Jamey Johnson and Lee Ann
Womack sang "Give It Away,"
a. song Johnson wrote and
Strait took up the charts.
A After they finished,
Johnson walked over
and handed Strait his
guitar to autograph.
I "1 just never been in
a situation where I had
. e guitar and George at
he same place at the
S same time," Johnson ex-
plained afterward, still clutching
the instrument.
Keith, who sang "Unwound."
quipped: "The bad news is that
because he's been so success-
ful he has to sit here and lis-
ten to us butcher all of his
songs."
True to form, Strait
kept his remarks brief.
mostly thanking every-
one and complimenting
em on their perform-
ces. He joked with
oxx, who gave "You
ook So Good in Love"
an R&B flavor.
'Jamie, I'm going to
ave to rethink the
H way I sing 'bou Look
So Good in Love' now,"
e said.
But mostly Strait
looked humbled. At the
.end, he performed a
ew of his own songs
'and gathered everyone
on stage with him to
'sing '"Troubadour."
"I've played in here
uite a few times, and
've never been this
ervous," he said.
The program was
aped the day after the
ACM Awards for a special
air Wednesday on CBS.
eorge Strait performs after
ecelving the Artist of the
)ecade award at the ACM
Artist of the Decade All-Star
Concert In Las Vegas.


'Night at the Museum' tops Terminator'


Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - "Night
at the Museum: Battle of the
Smithsonian" claimed a box
office victory over "Termina-
tor Salvation."
The live-action family com-
edy starring Ben Stiller won
$70 million duringthh Memo-
rial Day weekend, according
to estimates from distributor-
20th Century Fox. That put it
well ahead of the first "Night
at the Museum" movie, which
had a $30.4 million three-day
opening in December 2006.
"It's blown away our ex-
pectations," said Chris Aron-
son, senior vice president of
domestic distribution for 20th
Century Fox. "We've nearly
doubled the opening of the
first 'Night at the Museum.'
It's an incredibly strong No. 1
that beats out 'Terminator,'
which I think most people


TICKET SALES
1. "Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian"
. . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $70 m million
2. "Terminator Salvation" . .......... $53.8 million
3. "Star Trek" . . . . .............. $29.4 million
4. "Angels & Demons" . ............. $27.7 million
5. "Dance Flick" . . . .... . . . . . . . . ...$13.1 million
6. "X-Men Origins: Wolverine" . .. . . $10.1 million
7. "Ghosts of Girlfriends Past" .......... $4.8 million
8. "Obsessed" . ... ......... . .. . . . . . . . $2.5 million
9. "Monsters vs. Aliens" . .... ...... . .. $1.9 million
10. "17 Again" ... . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1.3 m million


thought would win the week-
end."
"Terminator Salvation"'
pulled in $53.8 million
throughout the four-day holi-
day weekend - plus $13.4
million on opening day
Thursday - bringing the
post-apocalyptic action film
starring Christian Bale and
Sam Worthington to a total of


$67.2 million since debuting,
according to distributor
Warner Bros.
With a three-day total of
$43 million, that puts the
fourth movie in the "Termi-
nator" series behind '"Termi-
nator 3: Rise of the
Machines," the last of the
franchise's installments to
star Arnold Schwarzenegger.


The third chapter took in $44
million in its first weekend in
2003.
"I think people expected it
to be No. 1 because of that
'Terminator' name alone,"
said box-office analyst Paul
Dergarabedian of Holly-
wood.com. "If you look at it
objectively though, it's a sci-fi
action film that played to an
older audience. It didn't have
the broad based appeal of
'Night at the Museum.'"
Paramount's "Star Trek"
held up well with $29.4 mil-
lion, warping down to the No.
3 spot but raising its total to
$191 million. The sci-fi fran-
chise reboot directed by J.J.
Abrams is on the verge of be-
coming the year's top-gross-
ing movie so far, approaching
the $193.5 million gross of
DreamWorks Animation's
"Monsters vs. Aliens."


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
N Last night's winning
numbers, Page 14.
SUNDAY, MAY 24
Fantasy 5: 6-18-23-24-30
5-of-5 1 winner $171,064.82
4-of-5 371 $74
3-of-5 7,361 $10
SATURDAY, MAY 23
Powerball: 19 - 23 - 34 - 52 - 57
Powerball: 21
Power Play: 5
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 6 $200,000
Lotto: 22 - 25 - 26 - 38 - 41 - 49.
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 46 $6,935
4-of-6 2,980 $87
3-of-6 64,792 $5.50
Fantasy 5: 7 - 8 - 11 -32 - 33
5-of-5 3 winners $85,621.07
4-of-5 320 $129
3-of-5 11,023 $10.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num.
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.

Today in

HISTORY
Today is Tuesday, May 26,
the 146th day of 2009. There
are 219 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On May 26,1940, the evac-
uation of Allied troops from
Dunkirk, France, began during
World War II.
On this date:
In 1868, the impeachment
trial of President Andrew
Johnson ended with his ac-
quittal on the remaining
charges.
In 1960, U.N. Ambassador
Henry Cabot Lodge accused
the.Soviets of hiding a micro-
phone inside a wood carving
of the Great Seal of the United
States that had been pre-
sented to the U.S. Embassy in
Moscow.
In 1969, the Apollo 10 as-
tronauts returned to Earth
after a successful eight-day
dress rehearsal for the first
manned moon landing.
In 1972, President Richard
M. Nixon and Soviet leader
Leonid Brezhnev signed the
Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty in
Moscow. (The U.S. withdrew
from the treaty in 2002.).
In 1981, 14 people were
killed when a Marine jet
crashed onto the flight deck of,
the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz.
off Florida.
In 1994, Michael Jackson
and Lisa Marie Presley were
married in the Dominican Re-
public. (They divorced in
1996.)
Ten years ago: House Re-
publicans pushed through leg-
islation that would put new
obstacles in the way of spend-
ing government surpluses that
came from Social Security
taxes.
Five years ago: Nearly a
decade after the Oklahoma
City bombing, Terry Nichols
was found guilty of 161 state
murder charges for helping
carry out the attack. (Nichols
later received 161 consecutive
life sentences.)
One year ago: President
George'W. Bush paid a Me-
morial Day tribute to Amer-
ica's fighting men and women
who died in battle, saying na-
tional leaders must have "the
courage and character to fol- -
low their lead" in preserving
peace and freedom.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
James Amess is 86. Actor
Alec McCowen is 84. Sports-
caster Brent Musberger is 70.
Rock singer-musician Levon
Helm (The Band) is 69. Coun-
try musician Gates Nichols
(Confederate Railroad) is 65.
Rock musician Garry Peter-
son (Guess Who) is 64.(
Singer Stevie Nicks (Fleet-


wood Mac) is 61. Country
singer Hank Williams Jr. is 60.
Comedian Bobcat Goldthwait
is 47. Singer Lenny Kravitz is
45. Actress Helena Bonham
Carter is 43. Actor Joseph Fi-
ennes is 39.
Thought for Today: "Life is
a tragedy full of joy."-"
Bernard Malamud, American
author (1914-1986).


a..








Section C- TUESDAY, MAY26, 2009


HEALTH


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


FE


I


* Dr. David
Ray-nor
/Page C2
� Dr. Frank
Vascimini
/Page C7


What's your



beach personality

Memorial Day weekend has come and gone - the unofficial kickoff to summertime.
It's the season of shades, sand and swimming, Take this quiz just for fun and find out
which of these Chronicle staffers matches your beach personality.


1. I absolutely cannot for-
get to put these.two things in
my beach bag:
A. A towel and my iPod.
B. A paperback book and
sunglasses.
C. Protective lip balm and
a hairbrush.
2. One item I must have
with me at the beach is:
A, A nice trashy beach
read.
B. Something yummy to
drink
C. An entertainment maga-
zine.
3. My favorite leisure
beach activities are:
A. Failings asleep with
some tunes in my ear.
B. Sprawling on a towel in
the sand, talking with
friends, reading.
C. Reading, listening to
music, falling asleep.

-Compiled by Keri Lynn McI


4. When it comes to sun
i protection, I prefer.
A. SPF 45.
B. SPF 30.
1 C. SPF 15.
5. My perfect beach
Sweatheris:..
A. 85 degrees and breezy
B. Hot, hot, hot!
90 degrees, not a cloud
i in sight.


7. My favorite physical
beach activities are these
two things:
A Wading in the water and
playing bocce ball.,
B. Swimming and walking
on the beach.


C. Swimming and football.
8. My must-have beach
snack is:
A. Grapes.
B. Is tequila a snack?
C. Fruit.


Which Chronicle staffer matches your beach personality?


I W ~ 0
~ if'


WbA 4;11 IVL


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY


Diabetes

links to

cancer
In the past year, I have
written about many
topics related to pre-
vention or possible cause
of prostate cancer. Many
things have fallen out of
favor; some are still being
evaluated.
Now is it possible that
another disease can lower
the risk of prostate can-
cer?
An analysis of data from
the Health Professionals
Follow-up Study confirms
that men with diabetes
mellitus are less prone to
develop prostate cancer
than their diabetes-free
peers.
According to a report in
a recent issue of the Inter-
national Journal of Can-
cer, prostate cancer is 17
percent less likely in men
with diabetes. However,
See BENNETT/Page C2


Mostly A's:
Beach Bum
I'm happy so long
as th re is music in
my ars and a
breez blowing
throu h my hair. -.
Betwe n naps, all I
need [ are my
grapes and
cheap beach
reads. ' 1 I
don't wander
too farnfrom
my blanket, ex-
cept for a quick dip
in the ocean to cool
off or to participate in a
not-so-strenuous beach
activity. I don't want the
sand to burn my feet or
the sun to burn my skin.
-Taylor Provost, intern
reporter


Mostly B's:
and Social Hostess
I'll wear sunglasses
and a smile on my face
all day, so long as
the sun unbearably
beats down on my blan-
ket - a blanket that's sur-
rounded by my friends. I
like it hotter than hot, which
is why a sporadic swim 'in
the ocean and plenty
of sunscreen is es- ,
sential to last the
day. It's not a true
beach day for me without
good conversation, light
S literature, refreshing
cocktails and a walk along
the shore.
- Cheri Harris, features
editor


Basal cell carcinoma
asal cell c rci- Other geographic areas
.noma (BCC) i the of high incidence in-
most co on c elude countries near the
skin cancer in, the equator and high alti-
United States. A4r esti- tude communities.
mated 900,000 case are - The incidence of BCC
diagnosed each year. It ' is higher in men than in
represents 75 percent of women and increases
all skin cancers diag- with age, usually occur-
nosed and outnumbers ring between 40 and 6C
the second most comrn- Dr. Denis Grillo years of age. There has
mon skin cancer (squa- EAR, NOSE beenan increase in BCC
mous cell carcinoma) by & THRe. -- diagnosed in younger
four to one. BCC is the & THRO people and this may be
most commonly , diag- due to more leisure time
nosed cancer in the world. Its high-
est incidence occurs in Australia. See GRILLO/Page C7


I-..


Beach Blanket Beauty
I'm in it for the long haul, to snag a great beach
blanket spot in the early hours of morning, sun-
bathe during the peak and nap during late af-
i ternoon, just before sunset, I'm all about
frequent, periodic swims, to refresh and exfo-
liate. Then. I'm right back to my blan-
ket. where I left my tabloid mag. Can't
forget to smear lip balm on my salty,
dried-out lips and brush the knots out
of my wet hair. Every so often, I'll !
join a game o'f beach football and
run off the pound of fruit I ate
throughout the day.
- Keri Lynn McHale,
reporter


Sugar - treat or trick?


T rick or treat! This
time-honored
Halloween de-
mahd is usually re-
warded by giving
children candy or some
kind of sugary snack
After completing their
"hallowed" rounds, the
kids gleefully take home
a treasure-trove for the Dr. Ed Dodge
sweet tooth. PASSION
It's not only children AS
who enjoy sweets. A FOR HEALTH
"sweet tooth" is a fairly
universal trait, found in most peo-
ple in virtually all cultures. For


most of human history,
the only way to satisfy a
sweet tooth was to eat
something naturally
sweet, such as fruit or
honey.
Sugar began to be
commercially produced
in the Middle Ages, but
became affordable to
most people only around
1900. Since then, aver-
age sugar consumption
per person has skyrock-
eted from 15 pounds to
See DODGE/Page C7


Dr. Sunil Gandhi
CANCER &
BLOOD
DISEASE.


Healthy

lifestyle

helps
diagnosis of cancer
changes your -life.
You realize the
value of what you take for
granted all your life. With
modem advances, in can-
cer care, more and more
patients survive cancer
every year. In the United
States, there are more
than 10 million cancer
survivors today.
Sixty-four percent of
adults whose cancer is di-
agnosed today can expect
to be living in five years.
Breast cancer survivors
make up the largest group
of cancer survivors (22
percent) followed by
prostate cancer survivors
(17 percent) and colorec-
tal cancer survivors (11
percent). The majority of
See GANDHI/Page C3


- -~4
.~ .4.p.


K-i;re than 1,000 hearts given new life,
right here on the Nature Coast.

\ heb say practice makes perfect. That's why we're proud to announce a major milestone:
: -The Citrus Memorial Heart Center has performed more than 1,000
open-heart surgeries since opening In January 2004. Thanks to the
' expertise of our cardiovascular team, we celebrate 1,000 hearts healed,
*~O0 lives saved, 1,000 families kept whole. And It all took place here In Citrus County.
For more Information, call the Heart Center at 352-344-6416

CITRUS MEMORIAL

ys.'At tha Heart of Our Community,


Ok


_ _


~


A a


--- -, - ---, . -a- - ,


7


loompomem,


4








V 1 TUESDAY, MIVAY 26, V C2009U


Aggressive treatment needed for tophaceous gout


T his week, I want
to continue our
discussion on
tophaceous gout and
share with you a few in-
teresting cases I have
seen recently. As I men-
tioned last week, a
small number of cases
of gout can become
tophaceous. Topha- Dr. Davi
ceous gout presents dif- BEST
ferently from acute gout FORV
and has its own unique FOR
treatment issues. In
such cases of tophaceous gout, soft
tissues, joints, and bones can be
literally packed full of uric acid
crystals until the joints and tissues
bulge out and distort under the
pressure from this toothpaste-like
gouty tophi.
One person with a significant
number of tophaceous nodules
presented to see me for the second


d
C


time in six months with
uric acid paste draining
from underneath a toe-
nail. The joint was ab-
solutely packed with
uric acid crystals within
- a six-month period
since a previous
episode.
The patient required
d Raynor a minor office surgery
FOOT of incision and
drainage and antibi-
vARD otics for the previous
episode, but there was
no infection present at this time.
Discharge persisted from the toe
even after a week of wound care
during this most recent episode.
Based on this patient's history of
comorbid medical issues, I recom-
mended that the joint be surgically
excised. In this case, the joint is no
longer salvageable when it gets to
the point when uric acid paste is


constantly leaching and oozing
from the joint. Thus, surgical re-
moval of the joint, though destruc-
tive, simply eliminates the joint
where the crystals collect and
solves the problem of tophi at that
location.
Another case involved a patient
who presented with an apparent
bunion as her chief complaint, but
she also had a history of gout Un-
fortunately, radiographs revealed
destruction and cystic changes of
the bones of the bunion area.
This finding greatly complicated
matters because the integrity and
strength of the bone was greatly af-
fected due to the recurrent
episodes of gout. In this case, the
possibility of traditional bunion
surgery is not an option because
the damage to the bone by the uric
acid crystals greatly altered the
quality of the bone.
Therefore, the bone was not


able to support orthopedic hard-
ware needed to correct the
bunion, such as screws or an im-
plant, due to its damage from the
gouty tophi over time. Therefore,
the treatment based on the pa-
tient's age, current activity level,
and quality of life, was removal of
the joint
Yet another interesting case in-
volved a patient who came in after
he caught his second toe, causing
it to be forced underneath his foot,
and thus tore open his joint The
joint burst because it was packed
with uric acid crystals that simply
broke through when he rolled over
his toe.
The patient thought he had had
an infection with pus coming out
of the toe, but he unknowingly had
tophaceous gout, so it was actually
uric acid crystals coming out of his
joint We aggressively cleaned the
joint over multiple visits. The joint


did become infected, so he re-
quired antibiotics as well.
After conservative treatments
failed to heal the wound, and due
to his comorbidities of diabetes,
PAD, and having another nonheal-
ing wound on the same foot at the
same time, I recommended ampu-
tation of the toe. Based on his his-
tory and inability to progress, I felt
this was the best course of action
in his case and he agreed.
Tophaceous gout is an interest-
ing condition, but is very difficult
to treat Patients are often sur-
prised at how difficult it can be
and how aggressive treatment op-
tions are needed in some cases.

David B. Raynor, DPM, is a
podiatrist in Inverness and can
be reached at 726-3668 with
questions or suggestions for
future columns.


Health NOTES


* LifeSouth bloodmobile
schedule. To find a donor cen-
ter or a blood drive near you,
call 527-3Q61. Anyone 16 or
older who is in good health and
weighs at least 110 pounds is
eligible to donate.
* 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. today,
Walmart Super Center, 2461 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inver-
ness.
* 2 to 5:30 p.m. today, Inver-
ness Post Office, 1400 N. U.S.
41.
* 2 to 6 p.m. Wednesday,
Citrus County Sheriffs Office, 1
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
Inverness.
* 10 a.m. to 1-p.m: Wednes-
day, Citrus County Sheriffs Of-
fice Emergency Operations
Center, 3549 Saunders Way,
Lecanto.
01:30 to 4:30 p.m. Thurs-
day, Citrus County Solid Waste,
230 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Lecanto.
* 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Fri-
day, Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, 3495 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
* 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday,
Walmart, 3826 S, Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
* 9 ;.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday,
Calvary Chapel, 960 S. U.S.
41, Inverness.
* The Bloodmobile will be
parked in front of the West Cit-
rus Elks Lodge 2693 on Grover
Cleveland Boulevard east of
U.S. 19 in Homosassa, on
Wednesday, July 1, from 3 to 6
p.m. Anyone who gives blood
will receive a coupon for a free
dinner served every Tuesday
during Karaoke night at the
Lodge. The blood you give
today may help someone you
know or love.
* Seven Rivers Regional
-Medical Center's health edu-
cation programs are in the com-
munity room, second floor of
the Medical Offices Building
(across the street from the hos-
pital) unless otherwise noted.
Call 795-1234 or visit
www.srrmc.com to register.
* Grief Support Group: 2:30
p.m. Tuesday. Workbook pro-
vided. Call (800) 486-8784 to
register. Free.
* Balance screening: 11:15
a.m. to noon, first and third
Wednesday monthly, Seven
Rivers Rehab & Wound Center,
1675 S.E. U.S. 19, in the Crys-
tal River Shopping Center. No
appointment needed. Call 795-
0534. Free.
* Pre-Surgery Ortho Camp:
1 p.m, June 1 and June 15.
Learn about pre- and post-
surgery exercises, knee and hip


BENNETT
Continued from Page Cl

the reduced risk is not ap-
parent until at least one
year after the diabetes diag-
nosis. As suggested, other
studies have reported an in-
verse association between
diabetes and the risk of
prostate cancer. However,
many of these studies have
not adjusted for lifestyle
factors or time since dia-
betes diagnosis.
The current study fea-
tured 46,168 non-diabetic
and 1,613 diabetic men.
During follow-up from 1986
to 2004, prostate cancer was
diagnosed in 4,511 men.
Men who had the disease
for one to six, six to 15 or
more thanl5 years were 18
percent, 25 percent and 22
percent less likely to de-
velop prostate cancer, re-
spectively, than their
non-diabetic counterparts.
The inverse relationship


precautions and adaptive
equipment. Call 795-0534 to
register. Free.
* Parkinson's Exercise
Group: 10 a.m. Wednesday,
July 1, 15, 29 and Aug. 12
(four-class program) teaches
Parkinson's patients and their
caregiver therapeutic exercises.
Take-home instructions also
provided. Free.
* Diet therapy for diabetes:'
6 p.m. Tuesday, June 30. Free.
* Childbirth-related educa-
tion from the Women's & Fam-
ily Center. To make an appoint-
ment, call 795-BABY (2229).
* Seminar on "Re Energize
& Re Vitalize," a healthy solu-
tion to feel better and look bet-
ter, will be conducted by
Michelle McColley, Master
Herbalist and certified natural
health professional, at 11 a.m.
Saturday, June 6, at Doctor Vi-
tamin Store, 3930 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa, in the Publix
shopping center. Call, as there
is limited seating: 628-7036.
* Cathy Jackson, Center
for Independent Living, to
speak at the Friday, June 12,
meeting of FFRA (Families and
Friends Reaching for the Abili-
ties) at the Key Training Center,
130 Heights Ave., Inverness.
Social time and business meet-
ing begin at 9, followed by a
speaker at 10 a.m. Call Ron
Phillips at 382-7819, or
Stephanie Hopper at 344-0288.
* Safe Sitter class for girls
and boys age 11 to,13 on Sat-
urday, June 20, at Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Cen-
ter, $35. Registration open until-
Friday, June 5, call Amy
Kingery at 795-8344. Students
must pass a practical and writ-
ten test to show they have mas-
tered the key concepts and
have the skills necessary to
handle an emergency.
* SPRING HILL - Health
Matters Home Care has a Reg-
istered Nurse available to do
free speaking engagements
for your group, club, church or
organization. Call (352) 686-
4493 or (352) 686-5593.
* The Citrus Team of Her-
nando-Pasco Hospice (HPH)
and its not-for-profit Homecare
affiliate, HPH Homecare, pro-
vide ongoing education to Cit-
rus County residents about
their many programs, services
and volunteer opportunities.
There is no charge for a
speaker and the solicitation of
funds is never involved. Educa-
tional materials are provided at
no. charge. Call Wendy Hall,
community liaison, at 527-4600.
* The Lighthouse for the


was strongest in the pre-
PSA testing era (before
1994) than afterward.
The results also showed
that men with obesity and
diabetes had a lower risk of
prostate cancer than men
with only one of the two con-
ditions. The overall evi-
dence for an inverse
association between dia-
betes mellitus and prostate
cancer continues to grow,
and studying these biologi-
cal clues will .continue to
provide insight into the
metabolic and hormonal
changes behind prostatic
cancer.
For now, we don't know
the answer to the question
"Why?" but further re-
search will continue to ex-
plore this possible link.

Dr C. Joseph Bennett is a
board-certified radiation
oncologist, past president
of the Citrus County Unit of
the American Cancer
Society and a member of


Citrus Hospice plans
'A Walk To Remember'
Special to the Chronicle

The Wings Grief Support Team of Hospice of Citrus
County will present "A Walk To Remember" at6 p.m. Fri-
day on the grounds of Hospice of Citrus County's Hos-
pice House at 3350 W Audubon Park Path in Lecanto.
At "A Walk To Remember," you can remember a spe-
cial person in your life who has died. During this heart-
warming and inspiring event, attendees 'choose a
memorial ribbon to wear as they walk through a series
of remembrance stations. Refreshments will be served
at the conclusion of this memorial event There is no
cost to participate.
Hospice of Citrus County, licensed in 1986 and ac-
credited by the Joint Commission, is proud to serve as
your original hometown provider. Hospice of Citrus
County is preserving the integrity of hospice philosophy
in the finest traditions of serving you. For information
about the walk, call Jonathan Beard. grief services man-
ager, at 527-2020 or www.hospiceofcitruscountyorg.


Visually Impaired offers serv-
ices to Citrus County residents.
Workshops will include learning
skills, such as managing med-
ications, money identification,
using adaptive equipment,
home management (safe cook-
ing and house-keeping), use of
.magnification equipment for
reading and managing mail and
much more. All workshops are
free.
Call (866) 962-5254 or 527-
8399 The workshops will from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday at
the Center for Independent Liv-
ing of North Central Florida at
3774 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Lecanto, across from Cowboy
Junction.
- N The Center for Independ-
ent Living of North Central
Florida in Lecanto offers free
Social Security workshops, SSI,
SSDI, Medicare and Medicaid.
All questions are answered the
third Wednesday monthly from
10 a.m. to noon. Call for reser-
vations, 527-8399.
* SHINE (Serving Health Insur-
ance Needs of the Elders) is a
free program where volunteers
assist clients with Medicare,
Medicaid, private health insur-
ances, long-term care options,
benefit and claim issues, pre-
scription drug assistance pro-
grams and much more. To
receive assistance to solve
health insurance problems or
inquire about becoming a vol-
unteer, call 527-5956 and a
SHINE counselor will call you.
N Citrus Hearing Impaired
Program Services in Crystal
River, provides assistance with
hearing aids and devices
needed to enhance the quality
of life for deaf, hard of hearing
and speech impaired individu-
als. Call 795-5000 (voice) or


the Board of Directors and
Executive Committee of
the Florida Division of the
American Cancer Society.


795-7243 (TTY) to find out
more about this program.
CHIPS is open from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. Monday through Friday.
* Free Medical Loan
Closet offers wheelchairs,
crutches, shower chairs and
more, sponsored by the Yan-
keetown Inglis Woman's Club.
Call volunteer chairwoman Dee
Dixon at (352) 447-0164. Dona-
tions of money or items wel-
comed, especially small
wheelchairs.
* "Every Day Is A Gift" 30-
minute community affairs pro-
gram airs 7:30 p.m. Tuesday
and Thursdays and 10 a.m. Fri-
days on Key TV channel 47
and cable channel 16. On the
radio, it airs at 8 a.m. Sunday
on WRGO 102.7 FM. Both pro-
grams highlight local programs,
resources, and valuable health
information of interest to you
and your family.
* The Citrus County Health
Department offers child safety
seat checks by appointment at
the Inverness office, 120 N.
Montgomery Ave. Call Sue Lit-
tnan at 726-1731, ext. 242. Visit
citruscountyhealth.org.
Support GROUPS

* Scleroderma Support
Group organizing for North
Central Florida. All persons in-
terested, call Melba Withrow at
746-7752.
* National Osteoporosis
Foundation Citrus County
Support Group, 1 p.m. the last
Tuesday monthly at the Citrus
County Resource Center, 2804
W. Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto. Call Laura Henderson
of Gulfcoast Spine Institute at
341-4778.
* SPRING HILL -Leu-
kemia/ Lymphoma Support


Group, 5 to 6:30 p.m. the
fourth Tuesday monthly at the
Florida Cancer Institute - New
Hope's Spring Hill Center,
10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203
in the Medical Arts Building
next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call
Jeff Haight, R.N., support group
facilitator, at (352) 688-7744.
* Citrus County Multiple
Sclerosis Support Group, 1
p.m. Wednesday, Mango Grill
Restaurant, 9576 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Dunnellon, for a
MS lunch/meeting session.
Call Peggy Morisi at 344-
4855 or Florence Cicarelli at
637-4014. Guests are always
welcome. This will be the final
meeting of the group Until Sep-'
tember.
* Look Good ... Feel
Better, a free two-hour session
for women undergoing radiation
or chemotherapy, at 3 p.m. the
second Wednesday monthly at
the Cancer & Blood Disease
Center, Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the
fourth Wednesday monthly at
the Robert Boissoneault Oncol-
ogy Institute, Lecanto. Call Mil-
dred Roseberry (746-7212) or
the American Cancer Society
(800) 395-LOOK (5665) to reg-
ister.
* Emotions Anonymous
12-step support group, noon
the second and fourth Thursz-
days monthly at Central Ridge
Library, Forest Ridge Boulevard
and Roosevelt, in Beveriy Hills.
Call Meg at 527-2443.
* Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization, serving Central
Florida, offers monthly support
group meetings. Public invited.
0 10 a.m. Thursday, Wood-
land Terrace, 124 W. Norvell
Bryant Highway, Hemando.
Call Pam Pepitone at 249-
3100.
* 2:30 p.m. Monday, Crystal
Gem Manor, 10845 Gem St.,
Crystal River. Call Coral Price
at 794-7601.
The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization branch office in Cit-


Contadt him at 522 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
FL 34461 or e-mail
cjbennett@rboi.com.


rus County is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. the second Mon-
day monthly. Call Citrus County
representative Ellen Mallon at
860-2525.
* NEW PORT RICHEY-
"Community Chatterboxes"
is a support group to assist indi-
viduals suffering from commu-
nication deficits (i.e., aphasia,
apraxia, dysarthria, etc.) as a
result of a Cerebral Vascular
Accident or other neurological
disorders.
The group meets from 3 to 4
p.m. every other Thursday
(May 28) at Community Hospi-
tal Health Care Center, 5400
School Road, New Port Richey.
Caregivers and spouses are
encouraged to attend. Call 727-
845-0757.
* SPRING HILL- Stroke
Support Group, at noon on the
fourth Thursday monthly at
HealthSouth Rehabilitation
Hospital in the private dining
room. Call Pam McDonald at
(352) 346-6359.
* BROOKSVILLE - Look
Good Feel Better Support
Group, 3 to 5 p.m. Thursday
in the conference room at
Florida Cancer Institute -
New Hope, 7154 Medical Cen-
ter Drive, Spring Hill. Reserva-
tions are required, call Mary
Capo at (352) 596-1926,
ext.150.
* Fibromyalgia Support
Group, 1:30 to 3 p.m. the last
Saturday monthly at B&W Rex,
all Drugs in Inverness. Call Ada
Fox at 637-3364.
* OCALA- The Alzheim-
er's and Memory Disorders
support group of Ocala, 3 to 5
p.m. the first Monday monthly
at the Medical Office Building at
West Marion Community Hos-
pital, 4600 S.W. 46th Court,
second-floor Community Room.
Call (352) 401-1453.
See GROUPS/Page C3


WWW.


LendEars
.corn














Participants
sought
for study of
Ziga Hearing Aid

invention.
Free audiology exanis and
hearing aid fittings through
2009 Resound research grant.
Free candidate screenings
open to public.
May 26th- 29th












700 S.E. 5th Terrace
Crystal River, FL

Call 795-5700


570-0526 TUCRN .

Public Notice
Marshall and Liza Hash of Citrus County have applied to the Board of County
Commissioners, Office of Utility Regulations for a transfer of the Meadow Wood
Water System Utility Franchise
The Water and Wastewater Authority will review the application at the July 6,2009
meeting at 1:00 P.M. at the Lecanto Government Building in Room #166
Any concerns may be directed to the Citrus County Office of Utility Regulations at
(352) 527-5452
Below is a map of the area serviced by the Meadow Wood Water System affected by
this transfer of ownership.

WL14
.** ','7 . , - . n� r' . .. .- - . . . "

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769907w noifw w m___


---- -- ----- - -


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CITRUS CouINTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HEALTH & LIFE


P-9 ....... *.. ' ?nnn


I











Hair-loss drug can affect PSA tests for prostate


I take Prope-
f * cia for hair
L. loss. Can it af-
fect e PSA test for my
prostate?
A. Yes it can, and you
should let your physi-
cian know whenever .
you get a PSA test done.
The reason for this con-
cern was recently re- Richard I
viewed in a Johns ASK
Hopkins Health Alert PHARM
(www.johnshopkins-
healthalerts.com, 2009).
The 'prostate-specific antigen
(PSA) test measures an enzyme
produced almost exclusively by
the glardular cells of the prostate.
It is secreted during ejaculation


B
L!




vi


into the prostatic ducts
that empty into the ure-
thra.
PSA liquefies semen
after ejaculation, pro-
. moting the release of
sperm. Normally only
.' very small amounts of
PSA are present in the
blood, but an abnormal-
[offmann ity of the prostate can
THE disrupt the normal ar-
8ACIST chitecture of the gland
and create an opening
for PSA to pass into the
bloodstream. Thus, high blood lev-
els of PSA can indicate prostate
problems, including cancer
Ablood test to measure levels of
PSA was first approved by the U.S.


Food and Drug Administration
(FDA) in 1986 as a way to deter-
mine whether prostate cancer had
been treated successfully and to
monitor for its recurrence.
Today, however, PSA tests are
FDA approved for prostate cancer
detection and are widely used to
screen men for the disease.
Now research suggests that the
hair-growth medication Propecia
(finasteride) significantly lowers a
man's PSA level, producing mis-
leading results and potentially
masking the presence of prostate
cancer. Propecia is the same med-
ication as Proscar, which is used
to control benign prostatic hyper-
plasia (BPH).
The difference is the dosage - 5


milligrams per day for Proscar vs.
1 milligram for Propecia. Proscar
is known to artificially lower PSA
levels by about half, and doctors
interpreting PSA results in these
men compensate by doubling the,
PSA value.
Propecia's impact on the PSA
level has not been formally stud-
ied until now. Researchers in a
study, which was reported in the
journal Lancet Oncology, assigned
355 men age 40 to 60 to take either
Propecia or a placebo (inactive
pill) for 48 weeks..
For analysis purposes, the men
were grouped by age: 40 to 49 and
50 to 60.
By the end of the study period,
PSA levels among men in the


younger group had dropped by an
average of 40 percent; in the older
group, PSA declined by an aver-
age of 50 percent.
Among men taking the placebo,
the PSA levels of the younger men
had not changed, and the levels of
the older men had risen by an av-
erage of 13 percent So, if you use
Propecia, be sure to let your
physician know so that your PSA
results can be adjusted accord-
ingly
- m -
Richard Hoffmann has been a
pharmacist for more than 20
years. Send questions to him at
1135N. Timucuan Trail,
Inverness FL 34453.


GROUPS
Continued from Page C2

* BROOKSVILLE - "Man
to Man" prostate cancer sup-
port group, 6 to 7 p.m. the first
Monday monthly at the Florida
Cancer Institute - New Hope's
Brooksville Center, 7154 Med-
'ical Center Drive just behind
* Johnny Carino's. Call Mary
* Capo at (352) 596-1926.
. BROOKSVILLE - Wo-
men's breast cancer support
group, 6 to 7:30 p.m. the first
Tuesday monthly at Florida
� Cncer Institute - New Hope
Center 7154 Medical Center
Drive, Spring Hill. Call Tambra
Randazzo, R.T., at (352) 592-
84128.
*.WomenHeart of Nature
Coast (the National Coalition of
Women With Heart Disease)
meets at 6 p.m. the first Wed-
nesday monthly at the Lakes
Region Library in Inverness.
Call Martha at 341-0614 or
bowmania48@yahoo.com.
Organizations
* Support group meetings
are in the CMHS Administration
Building unless otherwise indi-
cated.
4ACS Man to Man
Prostate Support and Educa-
tion Program meets in the
conference room at the Robert
Boissonpault Oncology Institute
at 522 N. Lecanto Highway in
the Allen Ridge Medical Mall.
Spouses and caregivers are
welcome. Call 527-0106.
*eBarjatric Spport'Group:
6:30 p.m. every three months,
Cypress Room. Call Claudia
Blotz at 697-0051 or Bette
Clark at 860-0383.
* Breast Cancer Support
Group: noon the second Fri-
day, Robert Boissoneault Can-
cer Institute. Call Judy Bonard
at 527-4389.
* Citrus Cancer Support:
4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday,
cafeteria meeting room. June
16: Chemotherapy Drug Up-
date, CMHS pharmacist. Call
Car6l at 726-1551, ext. 6596 or
ext. 3329.
* Cancer Support: 3 p.m.
lait Thursday, Cancer Treat-
ment Center. Call 746-1100.
. *- Diabetes Support Group:
.11:30 a.m. the fourth Wednes-
day, Cypress Room. Call Carol
McHugh at 341-6110.
* Hospice of Citrus
County support groups for
2008. Free, but reservations
suggested. Call Jonathan
Beard at 527-2020.
* Caregiver support group, 1
p.m. second and fourth Monday
monthly at the Citrus County
Community Center, 2804 W.
Marc Knightoh Court, Lecanto.
. <

GANDHI
' Continued from Page C1

cancer survivors are more
than 65 years of age. One in
six -. persons 65 and older
today il a cancer survivor.
. These are all important
statistics, which kill the old
myth' ,that "cancer means
chanel."
*, Now research is focusing
Son how to improve or main-
tain the quality of life in
cancer survivors.
In the May 13 issue of
JAMA (Journal of American
Medical. Association), re-
searchers from Duke Uni-
versity reported a study in
cancer survivors over 65.
Cancer, cancer treatment,
older,age, and overweight
all 'predispose this patient
population; to accelerated
Sfuhctional decline.
The researchers con-
ducted a clinical trial in
which 319 subjects were
randomly assigned to diet
and exercise intervention
and 322 were assigned to a
Control group with no inter-


* Newly Bereaved Work- the fellowship hall, 88 Civic Cir-
shop, 1 p.m. Thursday at the cle. Free. All are invited. Call
Hospice of Citrus County Clini- the church at 746-3620 or Meg
cal Office, 326 S. Line Ave., In- at 527-2443.
vemess. U Hernando-Pasco Hospice
* Grief support group, 11 presents free grief support
a.m. Tuesday at Our Lady of programs, 2:30 p.m. Tuesday
Grace Parish Life Center, 6 at Seven Rivers Regional Med-
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. ical Center for anyone who has.
* Grief support group, 1 p.m. experienced the sudden loss of
Tuesday at the Hospice of Cit- a loved one. Registration re-
rus County Clinical Office, 326 quired. Call (800) 486-8784.
S. Line Ave., Inverness. * Celebrate Recovery, 7
* Grief support group, 10:30 to 9 p.m. Friday at Seven
a.m. Saturday at First United Rivers Christian School in
Methodist Church, 831 W. rooms 216/217 of school build-
Bradshaw St., Homosassa. ing C. Dinner available before
* Christian-based grief sup- the meeting from 6 to 7 p.m. for
port group, 1:15 p.m. the third $3 donation and a coffee house
Tuesday monthly at Gulf To after. Call SRPC at 746-6200.
Lake Ministry Complex, 1506 0 Celebrate Recovery, 7
N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal p.m. Wednesday and Fridays
River. at the Christian Recovery Fel-
* Social support group, 10 lowship Church, 2242 W. State
a.m. Tuesday at Crystal Para- Road 44. Call 726-2800.
dise Restaurant, 508 N. Citrus ' Celebrate Recovery at,
Ave., Crystal River. Gulf to Lake Church Ministry
* Social support group, 3:30 Complex, West Gulf-to-Lake
p.m. Friday at Joe's Family Highway in Crystal River. Din-
Restaurant, 911 W. Main St., ner at 6 p.m. Friday, followed
Inverness. by large- and small-group time
* LIFT luncheon (for widows and a Coffee Cafe at 9. Call
and widowers), 11:30 a.m. the 795-0649.
third Tuesday monthly at Citrus 0 Beverly Hills Gay and
Hills Oolf & Country Club, Her- Lesbian Support Group
nando. Call Teddi Holler at 746- meets weekly. Free, open to
6518 for reservations and everyone. Group organizer is.
details. PamelaRae and co-organizer is.
* Parents support group, a Wayne Thomas. Call Pame-
chapter of Bereaved Parents of ,laRae at 560-3247 for direc-
the USA, 7 p.m. the second tions and details.
Wednesday monthly at First 0 Citrus Abuse Shelter As-
Presbyterian Church, 1501 S.E. sociation (CASA), 1100 Turner
U.S. 19, Crystal River. Camp Road, Inverness, offers
* Alzheimer's Association- two free weekly women's do-
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter mestic abusesupport-grups:
lsupport'g'rolups:'" 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday.
* Cedar Creek at Kings Bay 0 10:30 a.m. to noon
Assisted Living Residence, 231 Wednesdays.
N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, 3 Child care available.
p.m. first Thursday monthly. Call CASA at 344-8111.
Call Wendy Hall at 527-4600. '0 Overcomers Group for
* Our Lady of Fatima people recovering from addic-
Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41 tions to drugs, alcohol or other
S., Inverness, 11 a.m. first out-of-control habits meets at 8
Tuesday monthly. Call Wendy p.m. Monday at the,Sanctuary,
Hall at 527-4600. 7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Weekly meetings Call Paul at 628-2874.
Weeky meetings Dunnellon Life Recovery
* Anorexia and bulimia group for adults where addic-,
anonymous 12-step support tion, compulsion and co-depen-
group meets at 5:45 p.m. every dency issues are dealt with, at
Monday at the Yana Club, 147 7 p.m. Monday at Rainbow
N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River Springs Village Church, 20222
(behind the police station). For S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnel-
more information, call Char- Ion. Call Char at (352) 465-
maine at 422-3234. 1644 or Nancy at (352)
* Independent Living 794-0017.
Skills, Peer Support and Lit- 0 Al-Anon groups meet reg-
eracy workshops, 9 to 11:45' ularly in Citrus County. Call
a.m. Monday at the Center for (352) 697-0497.
Independent Living of North 0 Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Central Florida, 3774 W. Gulf- Mondays, Our Lady of Fatima
to-Lake Highway, Lecanto. Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S.
Call Cathy Jackson at 527- 41.
8399. 0 Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m.
* Beverly Hills Community Tuesdays, St. Benedict
Church Community Support Catholic Church, 455 S. Sun-
Group, a 12-step program, coast Blvd.
meets at 6 p.m. Tuesday in 0 Last Resort AFG: 11:30


vention. The study partici-
pants were long-term sur-
. vivors of breast, prostate
and colorectal cancer with
no evidence of progressive
disease and no additional
cancers. Every one was
r above 65 and obese.
The program included a
t workbook tailored to each
participant's needs, with
recommendations for
strength training (15 min-
; utes daily), endurance train-
ing (30 minutes daily),
1 increased intake of fruit and
vegetables, restriction of
f saturated fat, and a goalof a
10 percent weight loss by
the end of the program.
After one year, global
* physical function declined
half as much in the .inter-
vention group as in the con-
t trol group. In other words,
t those who followed the diet
and exercise program re-
mained healthier and they
could better maintain their
1 quality of life.
As per Miriam C. Morey,
t Ph.D., of Duke University's
Center for the Study of
Aging and Human Develop-
ment, "Even modest


lifestyle changes elicited by
the program produced clin-
ically meaningful improve-
ments in physical function,
and health-related quality
of life for patients who were
5 years or more beyond
their cancer diagnosis."
Though the study was
done in cancer survivors, I
believe that everyone older
than 65 who wants to feel
good and .stay healthy
longer should follow the
regimen in the study
Eat your fruits and veg-
etables every day
Exercise regularly. This
can be in the form of walk-
ing, gardening or playing
tennis, etc.

Dr Sunil Gandhi is a
hematologist and
oncologist He is the
volunteer medical adviser
of the Citrus Unit of the
American Cancer Society.
Send questions or
comments to 521 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecan to,
FL 34461 or e-mail to
sgandhi@tampabayrrcom
or call 746-0707.


a.m. Wednesday, First United
Methodist Church, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road, Inver-
ness.
* Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unity Church of Cit-
rus County, 2628 Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
* Courage AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, First United Meth-
odist Church, 8831 W. Brad-
shaw St., Homosassa. Open
meeting. Call Victoria at 503-
3961.
* Crystal River AFG: 11:30
a.m. Thursday at YANA Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River. '
* Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday, St.
Margaret Episcopal Church,
114 N. Osceola Ave., Inver-
ness.
* Beginners Al-Anon: 10
a.m. Saturday at Yana Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
* Alcoholics Anonymous:
If you drink, and want to stop,
call Alcoholics Anonymous Na-
ture Coast Intergroup at 621-
0599. Web site:
www:ncintergroup.com.
M AC Group meets at 7 p.m.
Tuesday at Church Without
Walls, 3962 N. Roscoe Road,-
Hernando. Call Laverne at 637-
4563. Web site: www.alcoholics
forchrist.com,
* Overeaters Anonymous:
Call 746-7749 or 341-0777.
* 3 p.m. Monday at the
senior center (VA building) on


For those readers seriously
concerned or even embar-
rassed by forgetting that im-
portant name, date or to-do
item again, here's some wel-
.come news!
A world-renowned brain
research university has an-
nounced the successful testing
of a memory pill that can re-
claim as much as 10, even 15
years of mental decline and
lost brainpower.
It's a fast-acting formula
developed by US clinical re-
search scientist and best-sell-
ing author Joshua Reynolds
that took years to perfect.
For close to 40 years,
Reynolds studied more than
1.5 million human brains, an-
alyzing countless brain scans
of older people and research-
ing thousands of natural ingre-
dients.
Procera AVH contains the.
three premier brain energy nu-
trients in precise, clinically
tested doses., Reynolds calls
acetyl -1-camitine, huperzine
and vinpocetine, "the 3 Mira-
cle Memory Molecules!"

Are Aging Brains
Starved for Oxygen?
Reynolds explains his for-
mula's success. "It's a simple
concept; an aging brain can't


County Road 491, Lecanto.
Call Delores, 746-5019.
* Noon Thursdays at Our
Lady of Grace Parish Hall, 6
Roosevelt Blvd, Beverly Hills.
Call Francisca, 746-7749.
* "Circle of Love" 1 p.m.
Thursday at Our Lady of
Grace Church, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call 746-
7749, 726-9112 or 341-0777.
* 7 p.m. Friday at Our Lady
of Grace Parish Hall, 6 Roo-
sevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call
Carolyn, 341-0777.
* CEA-HOW, for people who
have an eating disorder, at
noon Wednesdays at the First
Presbyterian Church, 206
Washington Ave., Inverness.
Call Judi M. at 726-5882.
* Reiki clinic meets from 7
to 9 p.m. most Wednesdays at
the Beverly Hills Community
Center, 1 Civic Circle, Beverly
Hills. Call Ann Thonen at 795-
5116 or Kristi Kobler at 628-
5537.
* Narcotics Anonymous:
* Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Mon-
day and Saturday, Lions Den,
U.S. 41, Floral City.
* It Works How and Why, 7
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Saturday and noon Sunday,
YANAClub, 147 N.W. Seventh
St., Crystal River.
* Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m.
Thursday, First Christian
Church, Grover Cleveland
Boulevard, Homosassa.
* Recovery on the River, 8
p.m. Monday and Friday,


catch its breath. Once you
reach 50, you may have al-
ready lost half your brain
power. At that age, your brain
is literally gasping for oxy-
gen."
"With each passing birth-
day, less and less oxygen gets
to your starving brain cells as a
result of toxic build-up and
impaired neurotransmitter ca-
pacity," he adds.
"Severely depleted neuro-
transmitters dull your cogni-
tive powers, constricting your
ability to concentrate, to re-
member things, and to make
even the simplest decisions."
"Procera AVH fixes all of
that," he says. Users report that
mental focus returns and
memory powers snap back to
where they were 10, even 15
years ago..
"I was forgetting my em-
ployees' names and it was re-
ally embarrassing," says user
Jeff P. "After a week on Pro-
cera, I started remembering
them again and I was much
more focused and self-confi-
dent."
Procera AVH increases the
blood circulation in the brain,
flooding oxygen-starved cells
with fresh supplies of energiz-
ing oxygen and vital brain nu-
trients. It gets the neurons


Lecanto Church of Christ, State
Road 44 and County Road 491,
Lecanto; 8 p.m. Sunday 797 S.
Rowe Terrace, Lecanto, east of
County Road 491 and State
Road 44.
Narcotics Anonymous is not
affiliated with any of the meet-
ing facilities listed. Information
line: 382-0851.
a Narconon provides an-
swers to drug addiction, pro-
vides free assessments,
evaluation and referral services
to internationally recognized al-
ternative and traditional treat-
ment facilities. When continuing
relapse is occurring, call (800)
468-6933 or visit www.stop
addiction.com.
* Depression and Bipolar
Support Alliance of Citrus
County at 7 p.m. Thursday in
Bailey Hall, First Lutheran
Church, 1900 State Road 44
W., Inverness. Doors open at 6
p.m. Call 503-3262. The Na-
tional DBSA Association's num-
ber is (800) 826-3632.
* The Encouragers Sup-
port Group has been helping
people deal with depression,
anxiety, bipolar and more for
more than 15 years. Weekly
meeting. Call 628-3831 or 637-
3196.
* SPRING HILL - Parkin-
son's Tai Chi Group, 2:30 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday in the pri-
vate dining room at Health-
South Rehabilitation Hospital of
Spring Hill. Call Charissa
Haffner at (352) 346-8864.


fired up again!
The result? Users say the
effects are felt quickly, like
putting on a pair of prescrip-
.tion eye glasses for the very
first time. Everything becomes
clear and focused like when
we were young.
"It's amazing, I felt
sharper, more focused and
alive in just minutes!" says
Penny S.
Not yet available in stores,
Reynolds is now making this
clinically tested, non-prescrip-
tion formula available risk-free

All New Users
Receive Free Bonus Bottle!
Try Procera AVH Risk-Free
today and receive a Free Bonus
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Reynolds' medically acclaimed
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Days to A Quicker, Calmer,
Sharper Mind!", a $20 value.
Procera AVH is clinically shown
to quickly improve memory,
focus, concentration and energy!
And it comes with a 90-day sat-
isfaction guarantee so you can
experience the long term results
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Free Rapid Detox Formula
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Reynolds is also. including,
with the first 500 orders, a FREE
supply of his powerful brain detox
formula, Ceraplex, scientifically
designed to rapidly flush away
environmental toxins from the
brain to help enhance memory
and focus even further. This is a
special introductory offer and
supplies are limited, so call now.

Call Toll-Free!
1-800-210-6667 |

This product is not intended to diagnose,
treat, cure or prevent any disease.
These statements have not been
evaluated by the FDAk Results may vary.


B , "PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Brain Oxygen-Boosting


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New pill sharpens focus, clears away brain

fog, erases 15 years of lost memory power!


TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009 C3


HEALTH & LIFE


OITRus C ouN-,ry (FL) CHRONICIX


I









SPage C4 - TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Register now for
Head Start
Parents) of children be-
tween 3 and 4 years old on
or before Sept. 1, 2009, may
complete an application for
the Head Start Program.
Services are also provided
for children with disabilities
and homeless families.
Call Linda Petty or Lori
Hale at 563-0185.
CRUG to teach
Photo Story 3
Crystal River Users Group
is offering classes on Photo
Story 3 from 10 a.m. to noon
on Monday, June 15, 22
and 29, at the Citrus Springs
Community Center. The in-
structor is Carolyn Ohlmeyer.
The cost is members $15,
nonmembers $20.
Microsoft Photo Story 3 is
a free application that allows
users to create a show
and/or presentation from their
digital photos. You can touch-
up, crop or rotate pictures
with a single click. Plus you
can add stunning special ef-
fects, soundtracks, and your
own voice narration to your
photo stories. Also you can
personalize them with titles
and captions. Photo Story
runs on both Windows XP
and Windows Vista.
Sign up for classes on
www.CRUG.com, visit
www.dnnclass.com/morton or
call Alfred Morton at
344-0231.
Learn to kayak
through CFCC
Central Florida Community
College Citrus Campus will
offer two kayak courses in
June.
Introduction to Kayaking
will meet from 9 a.m. to noon
Thursday, June 4, and will
focus on the basic skills of
kayaking. The course will
meet at Riversport Kayaks at
the Riverside, Resort, 5297 S.
Cherokee Way, Homosassa.
The course fee of $35 in-
cludes all equipment.
Kayaking Fishing Tour will
meet on two Saturdays, from
9 to 11 a.m. June 6 and from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 13,
also at Riversport Kayaks.
The first session will provide
instruction and the second
session is a four-hour fishing
trip. The $50 fee includes
kayak equipment. Students
will need to provide their own
fishing gear.
For information or to regis-
ter, call 249-1210. Online reg-
istration can be completed
any time at www.CFCCtrain-
ing.com.
Dust off boots for
ballroom dance
On Saturday, ballroom
goes country! Dust off those
hats an.d boots, wear your
best country attire and join
Spirit of Citrus Dancers as
Butch Phillips mixes dance-
able country tunes With your
favorite ballroom music.
On Saturday, June 13,
we'll celebrate the birthdays
of those bom this month with
our Birthday Party Dance. Bill
Dimmitt will give a compli-
mentary dance lesson and
provide the music for the
evening.
Dances are held at the
Kellner Auditorium, Jewish
Center in Beverly Hills and
the public is invited. Doors
open at 6:45, there is a com-
plimentary lesson from until
7:30 and general dancing .
from 7:30 until 10 p.m.
Admission is $5 for mem-
bers and $7 for non-mem-
bers. Ice and coffee are
provided. For information call:
Barb and Jack at 344-1383
or Ann at 344-3768.
BHRA open on
Saturday mornings
Beginning immediately, the
Beverly Hills Recreation As-
sociation will be open for
business from 8 to 12 Satur-


day mornings.
You may purchase tickets
for events, or purchase mem-
berships.


Withlacoochee River awareness


Special to the Chronicle
Several kayak/canoers took part in the Withlacoochee Wilderness Challenge on May 2, conducted by the Withlacoochee Area Residents (WAR) Inc.


Inagural challenge put kayaks, canoes in water to call attention to preservation


Special to the Chronicle


The May 2 inaugural Withla-
coochee Wilderness Challenge
took place on the Withlacoochee
River in Yankeetown. The event
was a kayak and canoe race and
fun paddle of 6.2 miles. There
were 29 participants. There were
many local participants and some
from as far away as Tampa and
Ocala.
The winners by class were:


Men's Kayak - first, Chris Leamy,
1 hour; second, Jeff Comer, 1 hour,
30 seconds; and third, Emerson
Clause, 1 hour, 15 minutes, 05 sec-
onds.
Women's Kayak - first, Tracey
Hart, 1 hour 16 minutes, 22 sec-
onds; second, Christine Richard-
son, 1 hour, 20 minutes, 55 seconds;
and third, Marsha Drew, 1 hour, 29
minutes, 40 seconds.
Men's single Canoe - first, Mike
Mondral, 1 hour, 8 minutes, 15 sec-


onds.
Mixed Canoe - first, Frieda and
James Nichols, 1 hour, 46 minutes,
7 seconds; and second, Anthony
and Merry Kirk, 1 hour, 51 min-
utes, 40 seconds.
The challenge was sponsored
by: the Citrus County Chronicle,
Beasley Tire Co., Polar Ice,
Perkins Financial Group, NAPA
Auto ,Parts, Our Pub, Hook Line
and Sinker, Pine Lodge B&B, Sun-
rise Outpost, Aqua Power Marine,


Tunmbleweed.com and Young
Boats.
With all of our great waters in
the lower Withlacoochee River, fu-
ture events on various locations of
this Outstanding Florida Waterway
will continue each year to bring
awareness of our waters.
The event was held by Withla-
coochee Area Residents to support
the continuing efforts to protect
and preserve our waters of the Na-
ture Coast.


Sharp
shooters




The Citrus County Shooting Club had
its championship competitions, Thurs-
day, April 23. The winners are: John
D'Andrea, Chuck Taylor, Mike Bugman,
Jean Clark, Mary Kay Bugman and Bud
High. The club shoots every Thursday,
.and then everyone goes for lunch after-
ward. For more information about the
club, call Bud High, 746-5217, or Mark
Gibbs, 489-7035. You can also go to
www.ccsc.us. The site gives informa-
tion in order to learn about the club's
history and shows lots of pictures.

Special to the Chronicle


Students' 'Salute to Broadway' an energetic tribute


Pope John Paul II Catholic
School's "Salute to Broad-
way" was a total delight. With
more than 200 children and youth


we were taken on a magic
carpet ride to see "Mary
Poppins," "The Wizard of
Oz," "The Phantom of the
Opera" and "Grease."
Directed by Jackie Ste-
vio and Fanny Stacio, Dr.
Lou Whitaker choreo-
graphed the production
and videography was by
Wayne and Isabelle Whit-
ley Paul Stevio of Phan-
tastic Sounds provided
the sound equipment.
In Act I with clockwork


Ruth I
AROUND
COMM


precision, the EC3 and first-graders
presented Mary Poppins "Spoonful
of Sugar" joyously, led by Claire Trod-
den. Sleepy children were serenaded
with "Stay Awake" by Trodden, then
Wayne Whitley joined the group in
"Supercalifragilistic, expialidocius"
evoking memories we shared with
our own children when the movie


burst on the scene in the '60s. Vocals
by the vibrant Claire Trodden gar-
nered much deserved applause with
her "Feed the Birds." Likewise Whit-
ley's "Chim Chim Cher-
ee" brought a rousing
climax to the first set with
"Let's Go FlyA Kite."
Act II was performed by
the second- to fourth-
S graders following quick set
backdrop panel changes.
.. Energetic second-through
fourth-graders came
Levins marching off to see the
"Wizard of Oz." Not fright-
ID THE ened by the wicked witch,
IUNITY with the good one in the
wings reassuring them, the
group performed happily"Ding Dong
the Witch is Dead." Familiar Oz char-
acters appeared singing "If I Only
Had A Dream." Emma Nalepa came
down the auditorium aisle demurely
singing the classic "Over the Rain-
bow," Judy Garland's signature song.
Matthew Shanel sang "Lollypop Kid"
and the set concluded with "Merry 0


Land of Oz."
Abby Runk was a wild Wicked
Witch of the West, and lovely Robin
Carroll gave a super performance as
the Good. Witch.
Act III was a thrilling experience
for the audience as Jackie and Paul
Stevio, of Phantastic Sounds joined
the fifth-graders on stage for their
signature performance of "Phantom
of the Opera."
Hauntingly beautiful "Think of
Me" was performed flawlessly by
the Stevios amid splendid lighting
and sound effects and fabulous cos-
tumes. Jordan Farmer and Paul Ste-
vio's "Angel of Music" was
breathtaking. A stillness settled over
the crowd as Paul Stevio sang
"Music of the Night." A wild "Mas-
querade" piece brought this stupen-
dous set to a conclusion with the
entire company receiving thunder-
ous applause.
Act IV featured the fifth- through
eighth-graders in a lively set in trib-
ute to "Grease." Jordan Farmer's
powerful take on "Hopelessly De-


voted to You" and the dynamite
voice of Anthony Vascimini as he
sang "Sandy" with full confidence of
a star beyond his years was thrilling
to experience. When they joined to-
'gether with "You're The One That I
Want," this writer wildly applauded
the talented duo and wanted to hear
more from them. It was star power
in the making!
With magic in the air we wanted
to get right out of our seats and join
this talented cast in their "Rock and
Roll Is Here to Stay" (It sure is!) and
"We Go Together."
Thanks to the school staff, the par-
ents; the Stevios and especially to
the students for a show of shows "A
Salute to Broadway."
When is your next production?

Ruth Levins participates in a
variety of projects around the
community. Let her know about
your group's upcoming activities by
writing to PO. Box 803, Crystal
River, FL 34423.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle oatices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fa at 563 3280 or e-mail to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chionicleonline com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


__ _I C











TUESDAY EVENING MAY 26 2009 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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(Lll 54 48 54 54 25 27 Cold Case Files'14' s CSI: Miami "Bunk"'PG' s The First 48'14' .a The First 48 '14' a The First 48 '14' a Manhunters Manhunters
C] 55 64 55 55 ..', "'Clear and Present Danger" n 994 Harrison Ford. PG 13" * . "Driving Miss Daisy"'I119891 Morgan Freeman PG'B * * I "In the Line of Fire" (1993, Suspense) Clin Easrwood R'a
(ANiD 52 35 52 52 19 21 Uniajrne and Unrcul 14'EI |jaiural Wori ior, *ere njiG vien HunlFr PG DO.L V . even i Dead.ly Silr� G 11 I Shrouldi Be Aii,~: PG V-enm Hunrer 'PG DL V
96 19 96 96 106 &Park BETs Top 10 Live PG |** "Diary of a Mad Black Woman"( 205) Kimberly Ellse. Steve Harris PG i3 1 Cilleie Hill ICol eHII "Diary o a Mad Black Woman"
511 Real Housewives ij Aiijria 1j. Real H:ousOE-ive3 AillIjniria 'I eal HoJi Heju ves H ',i: Jersey v0 31l Hu.i.,:W's l 1 Jersey Real Hou.seiives oi Jersey Reail H.)u-'ewivei o Jersey
1) 27 61 12 27 33AMigh yWind RENO 911!'14' Scrubs'14' Scrubs'14' Daily Show Colbert Report Futurama'PG' South Park MA' South Park'MA' SouthPark'MA' DailyShow ColbertReport
CMTI 98 45 98 98 28 37 W(Corids StrileSi P3aenis Etir-rrem Makeover Home EdiEiirn E irmne MajeOver Homei Eiiin ** "Police Academy" 11984) Steve Gunen-erg (In SiereoilR '*t "PoliceAcademy"(1984)'R'
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40 29 40 40 41 46 Siluaiiion Roorri-Woll Blazer Lbu DCoit Tcrnightl ri Campbelli Brown li, Bias. lcN Bull Larry Ki. Live (N)'PG' B Anderson Cooper 360'PG's
(0i[ 46 40 46 46 6 5 Phlneas-Fert Za.:i & Cody Han Moniana |Han Mo ridarn * * "Double Teamed" 1 0021 Pppr Monroie Phineas-Ferb Wizards-Place Han. Montana Zack & Cody IThat's So Raven
fE-EPN P 33 27 33 33 21 17 SporsCerrier (Live) i MLB Basetiall Teajms, io Be Annirur'e:id !Sujecil i Blaeci.:'ui !Livve PG 1 Baseball Tonight (Live) a SportsCenter (Live) Ba
E N2 34 28 34 34 43 49 Tennis NASCAR Now Interruption NFL Live (N) Final Preview 2008 Scripps National Spelling Bee , |12008 Scripps National Spelling Bee'PG' a
gj r 95 70 95 95 48 Choices-Face Tell the World Daily Mass: Our Lady Mother Angelica-Classic Religious Catal. The Holy Rosary Threshold of Hope'G' , Christ in City Religious Order
(F29 52 29 29 20 28 My Wife-Kids My Wife-Kids That'70s Show |That'70s Show America's Funniest Home Videos America's Funniest Home Videos America's Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club'PG'
(FER 44 37 44 44 32 Special Report With Bret Baler (N) FOX Report With Shepard Smith The O'Reilly Factor (N) as Hannity (N) On the Record-Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor
F0 26 56 26 26 Home Cooki.ng 30-Minule Meals Challenge Hamburgers Goodj Ealb ood Eats f(i) Dear Food FJNtwork Sarajsta Fla Chopped Good Eats"Q" Unwrapped'G'
(FN 3 35 39 35 35 Sponrs Snries Marlins Live' MLB Baseball Florida Mjrlris at Philadelpha Phriaillis From Ctizer s Bar Par in Phriladirelpir i (Live) Insde T F Se Marlr. IT al core Best Damn Top.50 Special
FX 30 60 30 30 51 'I "S.W.A.T."(2003. Achoni Sarmue L Jackson PG-13' . "TheMarine"i2006 Ac:lor iiJonn Cena Roben Painck PG-13' Re'ciue Me I:er n ir'MA Rei.:ue Me 'remarjn'MA
[GOLF 67 Golf Central Th:p 10 The A[pproa.ri Inrsidle PGA G.[reatest Game *I* . "The Greatest Game Ever Played" 12005 Dramal Shia LaBeoul 'PG' The Appr:oaci Goil Central
6i839 68 39 39 45 54 M'AS'H PG M'A'SH PG Glidern Girls G:,lden Girls G,:ldenGirl Goclder Girl. *** "Ever After: A Cinderella Story'" 19981 Drew Barrymore ag Murder SneWro e G ,
s * "Shutter" Chin s Unnalural ..* "Kung Fu Panda" 12008 Voices ol Jack Black Animated A clumsy '-"What Happens in Vegas" (2008 Romance- Larnd :f the LOSI In Trerilmen In Treatment
IB3 2 2 (2008)'PG-13' Disasler panda learns marital arts'wrlh legendary masters 'PG' L Comedy) Cameron Diaz ITn Stereo'PG-13 I Firil LO,' MA , MA'i:
fHGTV) 23 57 23 23 42 52 Designed tol Sell Elireme Living House Woirh' Hui. HunterS My Firt Place iMy F Pi PiOar. ue H.u i"e Hur B l. rBrig BuJ," Huni e Huir r irpery My e le' r rIpr My F lace
HS 51 25 51 51 32 42 Life Aher People PG ' Modern Marvetirl Sajt 'PG " Seve r iSigns oi re Apc,,:aypse Pr:.pnre.y ..l Armjagejddcn PG ,' Lie Ater Peoplie il) PG G i T(re Hii.jrry ct Ste '14 i
4 24 38 24 24 31 Si Sll tandrngr |1 Slanding' G'Reb'PG E" R- a PG RebRe PG ,i, Reba i Pij -e t- "Mother,May I Sleep Wih Danger?"11996) Torn Spelling a Will & Grace |WilaGrace
S5 * -'* Girl"(1998, Romance) Dominique Swain Sean Patnc. Flanery A "Unwed Father"ll997. Driia) Bnan Austin Green, tcholle Tom, Alan * 'Our Very Own" (2005 Drama) Allison Janey, Cherl Hines.
[ 50 leenager wants to lose her virginity before college 'R R Rachins A ,college student music raise his infant son alone I,. Premiere A Tennessee worran tries to keep her family infac. 'NR' r
S** "'The Incredible Hulk"12008) Edward Norton Bruce Banner laces * "10.000 B.C." 12008. Alvenlrure Stevenr Strail A prehsBlori,: man muEi * - "The Replacements" L2000) Keanu Reevs Mistit substitutes take
MXI3 3 an enemy known as The Abomination tin Slereo 'PG-13 save his beloved from evil warlords ilnr Stereol PG IS13 Ihe iihel during a Ijooiball strike (In Stereol 'PG-13 Si
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fIM 97 66 97 97 39 True Lite lln Stereo) True Lile (in Stere-ol True Le ilnr Slrial True Lile In Slirel * * 'Scary Movie"1200.. Comedy) Shawn Wayans (In Stereo)'R'
(i 65 44 53 Epplorer 'Zoo Tigeer Escape '14 . Dog Whisperer G Slurong fMnr itii 'PG SirorM Men Tnaiiarind Il PG E,plorer Mirrmeiil of Deaih 14' Sirong Men PG
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(y 44 r To a Dean Home To:ri & Dear H:rme Tori Dear, Hcrre Torn . Dearn H.rjme PToi Dean Hrome Ton S Dean HHome-
S* ** '"To KII a Mockingbird" * * "Mask"(1985. Bioaraphyl Enc Stoltz Cher. Sam Elict1 A dnisiured F** "Fandango"11985 Corriedy-Dramal Kevin A*. "A Walk in the Clouds" (1995. Romance) Keanu
PL 62 11962) Gregory Peck 'NR leen strives 10 lead a normal ie PG-1,3'la Costrer. Judd i'lein' Iin Siereoi PG Reeves. (In Slereo) PG-13' i
CIFI 31 59 31 31 26 29 Stargate SG- Solitudes PG S Star Trei Eerpnrse PG e, Sjr Trel Enrerpprse'14 Slar Tre' Enterprise PG'i ECW ILve'i14 L.V "Pterodactyl" 2005) Coolio.
EED 122 112 122 122 Unique Whips Pimp My Ride Pass Tim, Pimp My Ridje Pimp My Ride Drag Race Hignh |,Drgj Raj:e Hign upper, Bril (l Super Be s Pimp My Ride Pass Time
f-1-iK-E 37 43 37 37 27 36 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Deadliest Warrior (In Stereo) Deadliest Warrior (N) (n Stereo) The Ultimate Fighter'14'
10N 36 31 36 36 Pleasure Boater Inside rhe Rays MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Rays at Cilveland Indians From Prgr:. ,e Field ,i' Cleveland ILivel Ins:ie Ine Rays Tennri Easier Bowl .r Gridron Greats
(T J 49 23 49 49 16 19 Every-Raymond Frien jdsPG Seiinleld PG ISeifileilJ PG Family Guy 'PG |Family Guv 14 Family Guy 1i- |Farmily Guy'- TrineO iee'PG' M Bvvy. ril 14 |Trhe Ori:e 14 Seinfeld'PG
53 "Fi htinn Man **"Cariboo Trail' 11950, Westeml Randolph Scolt. * "Stand and Deliver" 11988. Drama) Edward James Olmnos L.A ** "Walk Proud"(1978. Drama) Robby Benson Premiere A Latino
( )53 30 35 of he Plains" George "Gajbby Hayes BillWilliams N'R' leacrher Jame Escalarne leads lowly cla.s inro calculus. PG youth s while gintriend urges him to leave his gang 'PG
IEM 53 34 53 53 24 26 Cas Cab DarP' C.asr Cab G' Deadliest Calc r 1)4 ,.- Deadlihsi al C jhein Dealli:e 14Cail'.:n l)ir 1,Sieri)oj 14 Oui oI trie W ,t Ai3'aa Deadiesi Caiih Deadlinre"'14'
tL-) 50 46 50 50 29 30 What Not to Wear: Spouse Say Yes-Dress CakeBoss'PG' Jon& Kate Plus 8'G' a 18 Kids-Count 118 Kids-Count Little.Couple :Little Couple Jon& Kate Plus 8'G'a
[iTNI 48 33 48 48 31 34 Bones (In Stereo)'14' Bones ( Stereo) 4' NBA Pregame |NBA Basketball: Eastern Conference Final Game 4-- Cavaliers at Magic Inside the NBA (Live) as
(TRAV' 9 54 9 9 44 Bizarre Foods: Asia Bizarre Foods-Zimmern Bizarre Foods-Zimmern Bizarre Foods-Zimmern Bizarre Foods-Zimmern Bizarre Foods-Zimmern
truV 25 55 25 25 98 98 World's Wildest Police Videos Cops'14' Cops'14'a Most Shocking'14' Most Shocking'14' Most Daring "Wild Women"'14' Forensic Files Forensic Files
(i 32 49 32 32 34 24 The Beverly Hillbillies 'G' AndyGriffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith | Andy Griffith Roseanne'G' |Roseanne'G' Cosby Show Cosby Show CosbyShow Cosby Show
(UA) 47 32 47 47 17 18 NCIS "Left for Dead"'PG' a NCIS "Hiatus"'14'B House "Ugly"'14' a House (In Stereo)'14'.a House "Living the Dream"'14' Burn Notice "Do No Harm"'PG'
(WE) 140 69 117 117 Golden Girls Golden Girls GoldenGirls Golden Girls Women Behind Bars a Women Behind Bars a Women Behind Bars (N) a I Women Behind Bars as
IWIGN 18 18 18 18 18 20 Becer PG Beiker PG AiTer:as Funnies Home Videas **** 'The Cider House Rules" 11991 Toney Maguire (In Stereol PG 13 liewsRadi: PG' Si.ruts'14 Scrubs 14'


PHIIUP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
Jack Benny said, "It's not so
much knowing when to speak, as
when to pause."
At the bridge table, it's not so.
much knowing when to play, as
making sure you pause at trick one.
Do that on this deal. You are in
three no-trump. West leads the
heart three and East puts up the
king. What would be your plan?
For once, the bidding was per-
fect! Partner, with a long minor, no
singleton, no void and insufficient
points for a slam, was right to go for
the nine-trick game.
Start by counting your top tricks.
You should see seven: one spade,
one heart, one diamond and four
clubs. The extra tricks can come
from diamonds.
However, if the diamond finesse
loses, you will be-wide open in


Bridge

North 05-26-09
J 4
S8 2
SA Q 10 9 7 6
K 5 4
West East
4 8 6 5 2 4 K Q 10 9
V Q 7 6 3 V KJ95
S43 K 5
S9 72 4863
South
SAA 7 3
V A 10 4
* J 8 2
4 A Q J 10
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1 NT Pass 3 NT. All pass

Opening lead: V 3


hearts.
Could that be a problem?
Not if West is an upright citizen.
He led the heart three and you can
see the two on the board. So West
must have only four hearts. If you
take the first trick and run the dia-
mond jack, you will lose at most
one diamond and three hearts.
Can it cost to make a holdup play
in hearts?,
Yes, if East is thinking too. He
knows from the point-count that
you have the heart ace. He. also
knows West has only four hearts.
Realizing that he will be getting in
with his diamond king, he should
shift immediately to the spade king.
Then you will lose five tricks: three
spades, one heart (at trick one) and
one diamond.
If the eight cards in their suit are
splitting 4-4, win trick one and go
about your business.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I DAULT I


0=
Z E






Ere
<~I


CHINTS


NEWJUMBLE NINTENDOwww.jumble.com/ds
THOGTE
7^, ~~ '"^
77-77


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: t oIT)
(Answers tomorrow)


ACROSS
1 Natural elevs.
5 Brillo rival
8 Futuristic
11 Circle size
12 Loophole
13 -St. Laurent
15 Commuter
home '
17 Fine
sediment
18 Part of LAX
19 Ladybug
21 Floating plat-
forms
24 Zero
25 Viper
26 Employ
27 Delphi's god
30 Thump
32 Vive le -!
33 Held on to
37 Jekyll's
other half
38 Wood-
shaving tool
39 Vaccines
40 Brass


instruments
43 Decked
44 Casual wear
.-47 .Soul,. to Pierre -
48 Padlock part-
ners
50 Oak Ridge
Boys hit
52 Wowl
53 Made top hon-
ors
54 Old West badges
(2 wds.)
59 Trevi Fountain
coins
60 Tax shelter
61 Birds' beaks
62 Batik need
63 Iowa hrs.
64 Perched


Answer to Previous Puzzle
MAN.S GPA HOC
GLOM ISLA USA
RAOLIID CREE KS

SERS OKR A
A NA FOASOG
HA C K SA S F A
HUNS 1I TAS
PLAIN LI Z

IR-KWABBA RU ED
MOE NIORM K LEE


DOWN EIN S E IRI I SIEIRIEI


Grad. degs.
Play about
Capote
Kan .. ...,
neighbor
River rapids


5 Cries
audibly
6 Yes, to Yvette
7- Keep from fluc-
tuating
8 AMEX rival


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


5-26


9 A Peron
10 Petroleum
mines
14 Dance move
16 Sub-
20 House
a1 addition
21 Roman or
Buzzi
22 Wan
'23 Quarrel
24 Piece of pasta
28 Down-to-earth
_ 29 Approves
31 Rookie
socialite
34 Cartoon
. shrieks
35 Shore up
36 Tiny amounts
41 Nasser's org.
42 Hens and
mares
- 44 Duck or hue
45 Heston title
- role (2 wds.)
46 Each
-49 Insurance giant
51 - fixe
52 Biting fly
55 Form 1040
sender
56 Catch cold
-57 Hitter stat
58 JFK arrival of
yore


D ear Annie: I'm
61 years old and .
-my two remain- " -
ing sisters, are not
speaking to each other.
"Elsa" is married, but
"Lois" is single and has
never liked Elsa's hus-
band.
Two years ago, our
older sister, the one
who kept peace in the
family, suddenly died. &A K
Soon after the funeral, AN
Lois wrote a very hate- MAIL
ful letter to Elsa, saying
she'd ruined 19 years of Christ-
mases, didn't like her husband and
never wanted to speak to her
again.
However, Elsa still gives me $100
to buy Lois birthday and Christmas
presents, but asks that I not men-
tion who they are from. Needless
to say, Lois thinks I'm really giving
her great gifts. Any bright ideas on


how I can get these two
hardheads to thlk to
each other -again? *-
Tired of Being in the
Middle
Dear Tired: First,
stop taking credit for
Elsa's gifts to Lois. Ei-
ther tell Lois who is re-
ally being so generous,
or stop accepting the
job of go-between. As
E'S long as you act as en-
abler, they can avoid
.BOX fixing the problem.
But you can still be a
temporary facilitator and media-
tor Talk to Lois first Tell her she
doesn't have to like Elsa's husband
in order to have a relationship
with her sister, and that life's too
short to throw away family mem-
bers who love you. Ask if she would
meet you and Elsa (no husband) at
a local coffee shop. If she agrees,
approach Elsa with the same offer,


set it up and help them keep the
conversation civil. If they refuse,
-the best you can do-is-stay out of it-
Dear Annie: I am responding to .
the suggestion of donating sample
shampoos and conditioners to
women's shelters. I work in a
homeless shelter, and although
this is a fantastic idea, we often get
big bags of donated personal care
items that are either from the
1970s or half used.
Please remind your readers that
dates on the items should be fairly
current, and not to send us the
dredges of items they enjoyed
using most of. We just end up
throwing all of it out, which in-
creases our garbage bill. Thank
you. - Sheltered
- - Dear Sheltered: -People often
mistakenly believe their leftovers
are still usable for someone else.
Please, folks, we know you mean
well, but don't donate your trash. It
is neither wanted nor appreciated.


Today's HOROSCOPE


Your Birthday: Just about any opportu-
nity in which you want to engage will be
possible in the year ahead. This time
frame will be especially favorable in all
business and commercial activities.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - If you
study the procedures or tactics used by
those who are successful, you'll better
understand what you need to do to ad-
vance your interests.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - If you
have worked hard on behalf of another's
interests, there is a good chance that
your reward is at hand..
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Talking softly
brings tremendous power to make peo-
ple want to comply with your wishes.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Those very
people to whom you've been lending a


helping hand will be.there for you. They
will do a job you can't.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Don't hesi-
tate to promote your ideas with flair. The
more relaxed you are, the better your
chances will be to sell your thinking.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - Your in-
herent sixth sense will guide you when it
comes to money matters; trust it. It can
be extremely relevant if negotiations or
bargain making are of vital importance.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - It
won't take much to set aside more seri-
ous concems and to let your hair down a
bit. You'll do yourself a world of good.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - Nothing
is ever too good for those you love. If
one of them wants or needs something,
you'll find a way to help out.


Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - You can
be a charismatic person, so it shouldn't
be any surprise if people automatically
follow your lead.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - It is natu-
ral for you to be humble and inoffensive
in situations where assertiveness is not
required. Yet you are likely to be a power
to be reckoned with when it comes to
something important.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - Because
you are likely to see the world with
greater sensitivity, a much-anticipated
opportunity to better your position in life
could suddenly appear. Be ready.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - Objectives
and goals have better chances of fulfill-
ment if you share your desires only with
those who aren't in competition with you.


� 2009 by NEA, Inc.


__ ~llll~----X^


~11 �11~1~ 1


TUESDAY, IMAY 26, 2009 CS


ENTERTAINMENT


CiTrus CoUNTY (L) CHRONICLE


1









,IUES, ,M A/, CINH


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Dilbert


The Born Loser


OW�( ONE. bOF G90CE-Fl
h--STZDTot>M, u~5-


'(OU K.NOW4, WI-EN. WE WERE





COULT> LIVE.
A$ ONCE...,


LITTI Nt>I(t K4ROW WE WOUL3


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


vww.famltycircus.com rn ]Bt
"Quick, Dolly! Run in the house and
bring me your piggy bank. I've
run out of change."


Ithad been the worst nightmare Danny had
ever had, until he woke up.


Big Nate
*0 YOU
USED TO IT'S
WEAR ADORABLE!
,YOUR,
SISTER'S OKAY
TiATS OKAY.
HILARIUS AT


WE ALL DID
EMBARRASSING THINGS
WHEN WE WERE
TODDLERS! WE'VE ALL
BEEN THERE, RIGHT?


WE
JUST HELLO,
HAVEN'T ORGEOU
SEENE-
HERE!

II^ / I


Arlo and Janis


Frank & Ernest


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"Night at the Museum II" (PG) 11:50 a.m., 2:40
p.m., 5:15 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:40 p.m. No passes.
"Terminator Salvation" (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:25
p.m., 5:05 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Angels and Demons" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:30
p.m., 7 p.m., 105 p.m. No passes.
"Star Trek" (PG-13) 12:40 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7:15
p.m., 10:15 p,m.
"Ghosts of Girlfriends Past" (PG-13) 12:10 p.m.,
2:45 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m.. 10:35 p.m.
"X-Men Origins: Wolverine" (PG-13) Noon, 2:30
p.m., 5 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:20 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Terminator Salvation" (PG-13) Noon, 2:50 p.m.,
5:25 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:35 p.m. No passes.
"Angels and Demons" (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 12:25


p.m., 2:54p.m., 3:25 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Star Trek" (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 3 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"X-Men Origins: Wolverine" (PG-13) 12:05 p.m.,
2:35 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Ghosts of Girlfriends Past" (PG-13) 5 p.m., 9:50
p.m.
"Obsessed" (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:20 p.m., 7:20
p.m.
"Dance Flick (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 2:45 p.m., 4:50
p.m., 7:40 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"Night at the Museum II" (PG) 11:45 a.m., 12:15
p.m.,,2:10 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 5:05 p.m., 7
p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:25-p.m., 9:55 p.m. No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1
WHGN-FM 91.9
WXCV-FM 95-3
Contemporary


National Public
Religious
Adult


Local RADIO


WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious
WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies


WIFL-FM 104.3 Adult Mix
WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: F equals K


"GOVHD AKTG WY KS KY SHZWD -


KS KY RHKOR SH IPWORG!"


- YSGNPGO XWBVGUWO


"KS'AA WAA UHXF HJS."


- SHB NGSSD


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The story of America's quest for freedom is inscribed on her
history in the blood of her patriots." - Randy Vader
(c) 2009 by NEA, Inc. 5-26


Peanuts


Cathy


Doonesbury


Betty


Today MOVIES


i


--------------


~


-- 111111


CmusO CouNTm (FL) CHRONICLE


COMICS


CO TEDAYMAY 262009








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE HEALTH& I LIFurE .I.A.,MA, .. , --.



Second opinions bring up questions of trust


n the past few weeks
I have had a num-
ber of patients come
to me for a second opin-
ion. Some of these pa-
tients turned out to be a
true second opinion
about what they were
told was needed. There
were a variety of rea-
sons for them seeking
out my thoughts; how-
ever, they all involved
an uncertainty of the


Dr. F
Vasci
SOUND


recommendation made.
As a dentist, I understood where
they were coming from. Depending
on the circumstances, I agreed with
some of the recommendations or
made recommendations of my own.
In either case, this is not what is im-
portant. What is important in my


mind is what follows.
Many of the second
opinions really turned
out to be a question of
the fees the patient was
presented rather than
the actual recommen-
.dation that was made. I
V e . understand that we are
in a time of great diffi-
rank culty when it comes to
mini the amount of money
BITES we have to spend on the
things we need. I be-
lieve that we have all
been affected by the state of the
economy in one way or another
My point here is, if the patient
had complete trust in their dentist
and all of a sudden there is a need
in their mouth that they feel is jus-
tified, however, they feel that the


fee is not justified, I would like for
them to remember that this is the
dentist they have trusted over the
years.
If necessary, talk about it with
your dentist. He or she may have
another solution that is not as
costly or, a way to pay for it that can
fit into your budget. I know that
talking about money can make
things uneasy, especially if in the
past it was never a problem.
I think that, given the chance to
talk about this together, a solution
can be found. It would be such a
shame to have a patient and den-
tist separate from each other over
such a situation. If this sort of thing
is going on with you and your den-
tist - or, for that matter, any serv-
ice provider - ask yourself if you
are leaving for the right reasons.


Since we are talking about sec-
ond opinions, let me review what I
have said before about them. Be
careful that your second opinion
does not lead to the need for a
third and even a forth opinion.
My suggestion on second opin-
ions is to seek them out with a spe-
cialist in whatever field your need
is in. If it has to do with the gums,
go to a periodontist; if it has to do
with the need for a root canal, go to
an endodontist, etc. The tough
thing, even with this suggestion, is
being sure you are going to a rep-
utable source. This is why you have
seen me write about having 100
percent trust in your dentist
Let's face it, how do you know
the qualifications of that second
opinion?
I hope this has helped some of


you. Please realize that your den-
tist has more understanding of the
economics at play in 2009 than you
may think As I have said so many
times in the past - good commu-
nication is of paramount impor-
tance. If you trust your dentist 100
percent, talk with him or her. If that
100 percent trust is not there, then
start searching for a dentist you
can have 100 percent trust in. I
have found that without trust in a
relationship things just do not
work out the same.


Dr Frank Vascimini is a
Homosassa dentist Send your
questions to 4805 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 or
e-mail them to him at info@
masterpiecedentalstudio. com.


GRILLO
Continued from Page C1

and environmental damage, which
causes the sun's rays to be more harm-
ful. Approximately 80 percent of all
BCCs occur in the head and neck The
nose is the most common site, fol-
lowed by the cheeks and forehead.
Other hot spots include the ears and
the back of the neck
There are multiple predisposing
factors for BCC. Sunlight exposure, in
particular, the ultraviolet B band,
which is responsible for the common
sunburn. Other risk factors include a
fair complexion, light hair color, blue
or green eyes, inability to tan, a
propensity to sunburn, a history of
multiple or severe sunburns and
Celtic ancestry. Sick and immuno-
compromised individuals (such as
AIDS, other cancers and transplant
patients) are at greater risk for devel-
oping BCC.
There are three to five main types
of BCC, depending on which expert
you listen to, but the most commonly
seen type is a raised, nodular growth,
with an ulcer in the center.
While localized and individual


BCCs are the most common, with a
cure rate of 93 percent to 99 percent,
metastasis (spread) of BCC is rare,
with a reported occurrence of less
than .5 percent. The most common
site to spread is from the ear and it
spreads through the lymph nodes and
blood to local lymph nodes and rarely
to the liver and other internal organs.
Tumors smaller than 1/4 inch rarely
spread. A history of radiation therapy
may increase the chance of metasta-
sis.
Since the vast majority of BCC are
small and not aggressive, they gre
highly responsive to treatment Treat-
ment depends on size and location
and includes medicine applied di-
rectly, electro-cautery surgery, freez-
ing with liquid nitrogen, irradiation,
and surgical excision, which is most
definitive. When the surgeon removes
the growth, it is usually evaluated by a
pathologist to determine if it is com-
pletely removed and has no "roots."
This confirms that the BCC is com-
pletely removed, unlike the other
treatment choices.
-U

Denis Grillo, D. 0., FOCOO, is an
ear, nose and throat specialist in
Crystal River Call him at 795-0011.


DODGE
Continued from Page C1

150 per person every year.
Today sugar is cheap, but the
consequences of its over-con-
sumption are hugely expensive
in terms of health costs.
Human bodies are well
equipped to process 15 pounds
of sugar a year, but we are not
able to healthfully handle the
large amounts of sugar we con-
sume today.
Scientists calculate that most
of us can handle 30 pounds of
sugar a year (about 10 teaspoons
. of sugar a day,) without a prob-
lem, but most people consume
five times that much!
You don't ladle 50 teaspoons
of sugar into your food every
day, so where does it come
from? Mostpf it is hidden in soft
drinks, pies, cakes, cookies and
other processed foods that we
like to eat.
Few people know the true ex-
tent of their sugar intake.
Does the excess sugar load we
consume cause problems? Yes,


but often so subtly that most
people are not aware of them
for many years. Even then, they
may not associate those prob-
lems with their sugar intake.
How does sugar cause prob-
lems?,
' First, sugar has been stripped
of all nutritional value except
calories. When sugar intake is'
low, this doesn't make much dif-
ference, but as sugar consump-
tion climbs, it begins to displace
healthier foods, which is not
good. This effect is compounded
when sugar is added to many
processed foods that would not
taste good without sugar
The net result: Much of the
food many people eat is of infe-
rior nutritional quality, partly
due to sugar.
Finally, sugar overload in the
human body'has an inflamma-
tory effect on internal tissues
and organs, and may be a factor
in many chronic diseases. In
2003, an expert report by the
World Health Organization
(WHO) linked excess sugar in-
take to the immense global bur-
den of chronic diseases such as
obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart


disease, dental caries, and oth-
ers. This report specifically ad-
vised limiting sugar intake to
less than 10 percent of total
calories.
The sugar industry vigorously
disputed this, but the compre-
hensive WHO report by top
world experts is more credible
than the self-serving protests by
the sugar industry.
So, is sugar a treat or a trick?
Actually, it is both. In small.
quantities it is a treat for most
people. However, in the larger
quantities most people con-
sume, its sweet seductiveness
plays nasty tricks, betraying
long-term good health for its
sweet taste. That is not a price
worth paying.
In spite of my "sweet tooth," I
have cut down my sugar intake
greatly over the past 40 years.
Am I a martyr?
No! I enjoy my food (and my
health) more than ever.


Dr Ed Dodge is a retired
physician now living in Texas.
Visit his Web site,
wwwpassionforhealth.info.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


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NOTICE what's going on in your community.


School District Budgets ', Local Tax Changes


SP ope iy Auctions

Adoptions


Public Hearings


CI kIIN-, )NI(1J


Find out about public notices in:
Citrus County Chronicle
Or sw( ih online at:

www.floridapublicnotices.com


$$ TOP DOLLAR$$
Paid for Junk Vehicles
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for your junk car,
truck or van
S(352) 634-5389
CASH PAID all
vehicles.Trades welcome
Used PARTS avail
352-628-9118
FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale, Hshold.
& Furniture Items
Call 352-476-8949
WANTED
Junk Lawn Mowers
& Power Equip.
Free Pick-up (352)
564-8014/601-5053
/Us out zoomcltrus.com
WANTED
Junk Lawn Mowers
& Power Quip.
Free Pick-up (352)
564-80141601-5053
/Us out zoomcitrus.corn


Excell. Home for any
unwanted birds, poultry
U-R unable to care for
726-9874
HAVE SOMETHING TO
GIVE AWAY?
Place your
ad 24 hrs a day.
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
1 Select Place an Ad
2 Create an Account
3 Select Cust. type
4 Select Heading of
Special Notices
5 Select Free
6 Create Ad
MINIATURE DACHSHUND
Female, spade, up to
date on shots. Leave
msg. (352) 382-3982
OLD LEATHER
HARNESS
(863) 843-2495
Two FREE Kittens
I male, I female
used to children
(352) 795-8019

f' kiotive
Your world firhl.
Eiverv Day

Ci NiicLE
Clagss(fieds


YOUNG CATS
10 mo. old. Extremely
loveable, well behaved.
No fleas or worms.
Call Rosa (352) 464-1567


Blackberries
Organically Grown.
U-pick, starting May
26th. Sat.& Tues.8A./3P.
$3.50 per pound.
9333 Hwy 48 Floral City.


2 Baby ducks & 2 Baby
geese. Around Perry
Street & Independence.
Missing on Friday
(352) 302-1459
Loved family dog
missing. Lost in the
vicinity of Eden Drive
and Moccasin Slough
Inverness. Answers to
the name BJ. Small
black pomeranian.
Very shy. Please call
352-697-5827 or
697-5826. $250.00 reward
for safe return.





ank Probate
Divorces lEvictions
S352-613-3674










5arb i Mat
)hotograpkh.
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits
Indoor or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed


www.adoota
rescued oet.com
VieVv available pets on
our website or call
(352) 795-9550
Adoption Locations
PET SUPER MARKET
every Saturday 11-2p
Inverness
MERCANTILE BANK
Inverness
May 18th Monday
12-2pm
BIG LOTS
Crystal River
May 22nd Friday
12-2pm

ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT








-U
$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com



LICENSED CNA
Looking to take care of
elderly. Uve-ln/out. 24
yrs exp. 352-860-1426



Memorial Gardens
Bev. Hills, Section Peace,
Lot89 Space A $2200
/obo (832) 636-8462, To
view call. (352) 746-4646


A FREE Report of Your
Home's Value
www.nathrecoast
livina.net

missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
Shelter 794-3825




TEACHER
Part time Exp. Required
CDA Preferred
TADPOLES EARLY
LEARNING
(352) 560-4222


uersnal


BECOME A CNA
For Career and
Test Preparation
Call 352-564-8378
CNA TEST PREP
Now Offering Day & Eve.
Classes Free CPR train-
ing w/enrollment
341-2311
Scholarships Available
GYN OFFICE IN
CRYSTAL RIVER
LOOKING FOR:
Medical Assistant
Receptionist
Dietician
Proactive, 1 year
exp. in Medical Of-
fices. Knowledge in
medical software
Please fax resume to:
352-564-8201

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Front & Back Exp.,
F/T, computer &
phlebotomy.
For busy primary care
MD Office
Email Resume
wfmaresumnes@
yahoo.com
or Fax Resume To:
352-489-5786

RN,PTA, OT &
MEDICAL DATA
COORDINATOR
.Established expanding
home health agency
seeking team members
to Join us In providing
quality care.
Coordinator to work In
cllncal/business
operations. Email
resume to: athomas
@villogehomecare.org
or fax (352)368-9887


CNA PREP CLASSES
EZ Learning Services
Day & Evening Classes
352-382-EASY; 586-2715
/" us out zoomcltrus.com



OUTSIDE SALES
REP
Business to Business
Sales Must Have Sales
Experience.
Experience In The
Waste Industry Con-
sidered a Plus but
not required. Mail
Resume to F.D.S.
Disposal Inc.
P.O. Box 906
Hernando. Fl 34442
Attention William or
Email to
fdsdlsoosallnc@
aol.com
Do NOT Apply in
Person & NO Phone
Calls Will Be
Accepted
WANTED
Highly self motivated
Sale's people
Company truck Is
provided. Yearly
paid vacation.
Holidays paid.
Benefits available.
Positions open In
Citrus, Hernando,
and Sumter Counties.
Apply In Person
ONLY, from 9 am to
4 pm Mon-Fri, At
A-l Termite &
Pest Control,
1840 Hwy 44 West,
Inverness, FL 34453.
Located across
from Applebee's.
Only well groomed
and properly dressed
applicants will be
considered.


t7~S .,z i 9lT E 6

T 9 5'EIS Vz68
6E8 Z'9 CS) Z -S
S � ?: s 13 6-6 8 9

siz- Zit- L.8 T 6


� S!" 6 8 *tE 9 i


I


Timrrm\ MAY 26 2009nn C7�


TT ... --. 0 J






































5-26 0 LaughingStock International Inc./dist by UFS Inc.. 2009

"Grandpa's bought a wig:'
784216


UP TO $100K +
Exp Only. Benefits,
must have valid DL.
Fax resume to:
352-628-4427





EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR


IN LECANTO IS
NOW ACCEPTING
APPS. FOR
INSTRUCTOR'S.
Qualilfed
Candidates Must
Possess The
Following, Five
Or More ears Of
Operating Exp.,
Must Be A Team
Player Motivated,
Hard Working, &
Pay Attention Io
Details. Ability And
The Willingness To
Teach Inside The
Classroom Relia-
bility And Honesty
A Must. Resumes
Will Be Accepted
Via Fax Or Email
Only, No Phone
Calls.
Fax Resumes To:
(352) 628-0823
EmailTo:
blindresumes
(Syahoo.com



Your world first.
Every Day


Ci IRNicLE
Cla :.,n-J


DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Repairing gas-& diesel
engines. No job too big
or small. 352-228-2067





A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd
friendly-serv. Lowest
rates Free est.
352-860-1452

All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/ us out zoomcltrus.com
COLEMAN TREE SERVE.
Trim & Removal. Lic.
, Ins. FREE EST. Lowest
rates. 352-270-8462
check out zoomcitrus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852









OSBORNE'S
LawnlTree/Shrub
Quality Work Free Est.
LOWNES
RATES GUARANTEED!
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins
R WRIGHT TreeService
Tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Uc
0256879352-341-6827









At Home Computer
Repairs & custom
computers.
Call (352)228-7823
COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839

ON-SITE
COMPUTER
SERVICE
352-341-4150




REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch. Installation
SCall for Fost Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-1728




Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
work fully coated. 30 yrs.
Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-795-8533
352-464-1397


UP TO $IOOK +
Exp Only. Benefits,
must have valid DL
Fax resume to:
352-628-4427
SHOP FORMAN/
DIESEL
MECHANIC
Citrus County..Big
truck Experience
Required. Manage-
ment Experience
With Good Computer
Skills
And Inventory Con-
trol, Experience with
Managers Plus or
Comparable Fleet
Maintenance
Software.Mall Re-
sume To
F.D.S. Disposal Inc.
P.O. Box 906 Her-
nando, Fl 34442
Attention William or
* Email TO
fdsdisoosallinc@aol.
com Do Not Apply
In Person And NO
Phone CaLLS Will Be'
Accepted. Benefits
And Top Dollar Sign-
Ing Bonus For Quali-
fied Applicant.


All Int./ Ext. Painting -
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996







INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Mike Anderson
Painting Int/Ext
& Pressure Washing
Call a Professional,
(352) 464-4418
/ Us out zoomcitrus.com



PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
27 yrs. exp. Certified
Best prices/guaranteed
S 352-220-9435
check out zoomcitrus.com



AT YOUR HOME
Mower & Generator
Repair. 352-220-4244
Lic#999900g1273
DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Gas / Diesel Engines
No lob too bio or small.
S352-228-2067
Mower Repair,
Hernando, Pick up &
delivery, Don Mead
352-400-1483





The Tile Man
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic//ns. #2441
352-634-1584




OUTREACH SENIOR
COMPANION
SERVICES
Affordable, quality
Senior Care.
Companions,
Homemakers, Sitters.
Licenced, Bonded &
Insured Call toll free
1-877-803-1608
www.outreachsenlor
companion.com
Uc #231103


ROOFERS / CREWS
(352) 564-1242





APPOINTMENT
SETTERS

Up For A Challenge?
Serious minded
individuals will earn
great $$$ setting appts
for our very busy local
company. Call Steve
@ 352-628-0254

EXPERIENCED
MOWING &
LAWN CARE
PERSONNEL
Competitive wages
and benefits.
Apply in Person
920 E. RAY ST.
HERNANDO

Experienced Only
VPK TEACHERS
CDA TEACHERS
(352) 201-2770

P/T LAWN HELP
w/Drl. Lic.
352-425-8703

RECEPTIONIST/
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT

Needed in Wildwood,
Excel and Word a
must, Fax Resume To:
(352) 330-2609
EOE/DFWP


certified caregivers/sitters
20 + yrs exp, Trans. Avail
Lisa 352-422-4765,
Dee Dee 352-422-1267.
PRIVATE DUTY CARE
Specialty: Quality of life
Fl. St. Uc./Bonded, Ref.
Lee (352) 201-4565




* SEE THROUGH
Window Washing
All Aspects (352)
489-4189; 322-0962
/ us out zoomcitrus.com




Affordable CABINETS
& COUNTER TOPS
New & Remodel
352-586-8415




QUALITY CRAFTED
BUILDERS New, Renova-
tions & Commercial
5 Yrs in Citrus County
352-726-5507
ROGERS Construction
New Homes & All
Construction (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872
Schnettler
Construction,'LLC
Lic & Ins CBC1253348
Renovations,
room additions,
decks, barns, garages,
various home repairs.
637-4629 cell
352-266-6756
We will beat any price by
far without compromise.
Dunham Construction
roofing, remodeling,
home maint. painting,
pres. wash, etc. talk to
owner 422-6575
* (crco452543
us out zoomcitrus.com




SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla rms,
windows, garage scrns
(CBC1257141) 628-052




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


Cope's Pool & Pavers
* Pool Refinishing
* Interlocking Brick Paver
* Patio & Driveways

ORDER YOUR
J POOL TODAY
& BESWIMMING
BY SUMMER
"FREE QUOTES"
Lic. & Insured
CPC1456565
352400.3188


CS TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009

1[ -


Mike Anderson
Painting Int/Ext
Pressure Washing
Call a Professional,
(352) 464-4418



"HOME REPAIRS"
.Painting, power wash
jobs big & small
(Eng./ Spansh)746-3720
V us at zoomcltrus.com
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable, Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
Uc. 5863 (352) 746-0141
#1 HOME SOLUTIONS
Press Wash, paint,
repairs, ceilings, baths,
low rates, exc. refs.
Lic# 260098 Call Don,
(352)634-0171
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too smallReli able ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

N NATURE COAST
HOME REPAIR
& MAINT. INC.
* Offering a Full I
SRange of Services
www.naturecoast
homereair.com
Lic. 2776/lns.,
352-634-5499
Visa/MC/Dlscover

Advanced Home Imp.
all types of home re-
pair, flooring, soffit&
fascia, pressure wash-
ing, roof repairs and
cleaning, no job to big
or to small.
352-201-7972








FAST AFFORDABLE!
RELIABLEI Most repairs
Free Est., Llc#0256374
*k (352) 257-9508 *
SSenior Saviours
Monthly Maintenance
Service.
A must for ONLY
$40.00 a Month!
Call 352-342-9911!
www.SeniorSaviours.co
m


Service for A/C, Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator & More!

* CallAnytime * Same Day Service
* 42 Years Experience

One Man

Serving Citrus and Overhead
Marion Counties Low
352-445-0072 Prices
DOC Johnson #RA0067081


Part Time
Permanent AM
Mattress delivery, 16 hrs.
per week (352) 628-0808



















































25x30x9(3:,12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry Door, 2 Vents,
4" Concrete'Slab.
$13.795. INSTALLED
30x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Gardge Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$14.995. INSTALLED
35x50x12(3:12 pitch)
Roof overhang,
2-10x10 Rollup Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
.$29.995 Installed
+ Fl. Engineered Plans
* A local Fl Manufact.
+ Meets or exceeds
Florida wind codes.
* Conc/Inst by others.
+ Many-sizes available
# We specialize in
Commercial Buildings
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9100
Lic CBC1256991
www. metal
structuresllc.com


------ q
Sheds & Garages of
Any Size
S*SHEDS NOW*
We Move & Buy,
I Used Sheds
Independerce/41 |
(352) 860-0111 '




#1 A+IECHNOLOGIES.
All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable, Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
LIc. 5863 (352) 746-0141
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907

SALTMARSH
ELECTRIC
Comm/Resid. & Sign
Lighting. CR13012391
352-344-3810
/ us'out zoomcltrus.com



FAST AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs
Free Est,, Lic#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *
Kurt Mac Intyre Plumbing
All Phases Of Plumbing
325-422-5269



C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Fumiture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/201-1422



PAVING & SEAL COAT
VIGLIONE LLC-lic/Ins
www.TAR-MAX.com
Free Est(3521726-3093 �



AARON'S FENCE
All Types, Best Price
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
24/7(352) 795-7373
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279


CITRUS COUN';Y (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED



StoRAg e
Electric, carpet anhd
shelves. 3 yrs old.
$1000. 352-419-4553;
352-228-3285
" Sheds & Garages
I of Any Size
| *SHEDS NOW*
We Move & Buy Used
I Sheds
I Ind dependence/41 |
(352) 860-0111




. DROP LEAF TABLE
$100. Misc. chairs. $20
352-341-5247



DOLL CRIB $25
Doll High Chair $15
352-341-5247
GLENN MILLER
96 Original, 78s In eight
hardbound albums w/
poster $100; Big Band
Scrap book $10
(352) 746-1108
PRECIOUS
MOMENTS
Assorted Figurines. $200
352-419-4272




A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
-4 2 Ton $780.00
4 2-2-/2 Ton $814.00
-4 3 Ton $882.00
* Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Free Del. Llc.#CAC
057914 746-4394
ABC Briscoe Appl.
RefrIg., washers, stoves,
Serv. & Parts
.(352) 344-292�
Refrigerator
Whirlpool 25.5 Cu. ft.
side by side, white. $850.
Flat Top Range
$300.(352) 302-3179
WHIRLPOOL WASHER
Excellent condition.
2 years old. $145.
352-795-6650



COMPUTER DESK for
corner with attached file
cabinet, shelf for tower,
and raised shelf for mon-
itor. $200. 352-860-0121



YouLr World

9a=4u e M0CUW








*.i w.nroriklo nil n.rcom


A 5 STAR COMPANY,
Go Owens Fencinag.
All Types. Free Est.
Corim/Res. 628-4002
SOSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub

RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins




AAA ROOFING
Free est. 30 yrs exp.
352-563.0411
John Gordon Roofing
For a hole in your roof
or a whole new roof.
Free est. 352-795-7003




BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Estimates
Lic#2579/lns, 257-0078
Decorative concrete,
Landscape curbing
River rock resealing
344-4209 (Lic.6960)
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack repair,staining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
v 352-464-3967 =
Quality Concrete Serv.
Layout to Lentil
ALL TYPES, Tractor
352-726-2383, Llc#2567
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services
40 Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768





A Cutting Edge
Tile Job
Showers. Firs etc
(352) 422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.


1 TOOL BOX ON
WHEELS in good condi-
tion 75.00
637 0046
18 + foot aluminum
extension ladder $80;
McClain Edger $65
(352) 746-4734



PANASONIC 42"
PLASMA HDTV. Never
used. With shelved glass
fronted TV stand.
$950.00 352-560-3677
TV
60" Hitachi Ultravision
Projection TV $349.
(352) 746-6272
TV RCA 60" Projection
Excellent condition and
works fine. Local
delivery possible $300
(352)270-1775


- I
5 ton A/C Heat pump,
air handler & stat.
Complete ready to
install system $800
(352) 637-4693



COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Iiv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
COMPUTER MONITOR
17 Inch. $60
(352) 613-3503
DELL COMPUTER
w/monitor, keyboard,
,printer & speakers $75
(352) 746-1108
DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
New & Used systems
upgrades. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
www.rdeeii.com
PC Computer monitors
17 inch, $15 each obo.
(352) 257-3322



SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Bik w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
.2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This
bad bov is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815



Tractor
'05, 42HP, like new,
275 hrs. w/
attachments $9,500
(352) 302-3820


Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone Drive-
ways & Tractor work
341-2019 or 257-1562
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,
Hauling, Site Prep,
'Driveways. Uc. & Ins.
(352) 795.5755
*TOP SOIL SPECIAL*
3 Yd -$60/ 5 Yd $85
10Yd $175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436



All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/us out zoomctrus.com
All AROUND TRACTOR
SLandclearing HaulingSite
Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins795-5755
Ck out zoomcitrus.com



D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
'Bobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272











r;' 1

#1 Absolute
Lowest Price
| Guaranteed
Barker's Lawn
Service Monthly or
m Per cut rate
(352) 232-8166 .
I- -- J
#1 AGAIN! Pro Tech
Lawn Service. Family
owned & operated.
Serving central Citrus
Cty since 1999. Call
for free estimate
302-7800 - Lic/Ins.
C.R /Homosassa
mowing, beds,
brushes, mulch/haul
Commrt & Resdntl
since 1991 220-6761
out zoomcltrus.com
Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Specials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
3us out zoomcitrus.com


1st Choice
PEST CONTROL, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE


LAWN GOT

PROBLEMS?.
Call 503-6821'
Owner/Operators = r
Uoyd Smith * Bill Bedesten Jim
7,82, 5340W. Glenbrook St.


18" Poulin Chain Saw
$75; (352) 601-3654



White Aluminum Round
Glass Table w/ 4
slingback teal chairs
$100 (352) 746-0183




BLUE SOFA, LOVESEAT &
CHAIR
Excellent condition
$350/obo
352-502-2664













CHAIR and LAMP, Floral
papasan chair with ot-
toman, 2 floor cushions,
nice $65. Heavy floor
lamp, very unique $50.
352 489-9795


DEACON BENCH
Dark wood, 43 inches
wide, good condition.
$40 (352) 613-3503
Dining Room set,
med. brown wood,
Inlc. 4 chairs, leaf, glass
top, excel. cond.
$195. obo
(352) 489-2953
KITCHEN SET
Wood 36"x54" table
w/12" leaf that folds into
table, 4 chairs. Very good
cond. $125.
352-586-6740
Large solid wood Desk
$75.
Sofa, really nice
$50.
(352) 628-4766
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30; Full
$40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
TIFFANY LAMPS
1 Table - $50
1 Floor - $150,
352-419-4272
YOUR FURNITURE
DONATIONS
SUPPORTS THE PATH
HOMELESS SHELTER
Call (352) 746-9084




4-ft Garden Wagon
from Lowes. Exc. cond.
$50; Grill/fireplace by
Coleman never used
$40 (352) 489-9795.
Gravely Model L
w/30" bush hog & riding
sulky, runs good $550.
352-212-9306


Landscape Main.
"Complete Lawn Care"
(352) 489-3070
DUN-RITE LAWN SERVE
Lic & Ins Clean up,,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681
check zoomcitrus.eom
HALLOCK & Son
Lawncare/Landscaping
Coverng all your lawn care
needs. Detailed work.
746-6410 Lic/Ins.
HARRY EVERSON'S
LAWN & MAINTENANCE
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
(352) 302-2585
/ us at zoomcitrus.com
HEDGE TRIMMING,
HAULING(ANY KIND),
LAWN MOWING,
MULCH. FREE ESTI-
MATES. 352-344-9273
OR 352-201-9371
Lawn Care 'N' More
Mow, clean up
brushes, beds
Friendly Service since
1991
Residential/Commrl
(352) 726-9570
out zoomcitrus.com
MOWING & TRIMMING
Resldentlal/ East citrus
county area.
352-302-1511;341-5182
OSBORNE'S
Quality Work - Free
Est. LOWEST RATES
352-400-6016 Lic/Ins
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up. Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
& LANDSCAPE
628-9848 or 634-0554
v us out zoomcitrus.com



EVERCLEAR POOL
SERV. & Maint.
Concrete Pools Only
(352)344-5122
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
a 352-464-3967 v




r MOBLEV
SERVICE
WE COME TO YOU u
Motor Homes
5th Whls/Rv's
Master Tech
L 352-586-5870 |
" Storage Available
L m - l mm-


9 Professional A/C filters,
21x26 $50 oab
(352) 257-3322
71/2 ft. pre-lit Christmas
Tree. Tons ornaments,
tinsel, etc., used one
time. $75 obo; Two 13 in.
color tv's, lw/dvd,
1 w/VHS. $45 ea.
(352) 601-3654
DOOR & ROLLAWAY
Brown alum, screen
door w/palm tree. $75
Rollaway bed. $20
352-341-5247
Garage Door Open
Sears, 1/3 Hp. $35.00
Circular Saw
Craftsman 7" blade.
$15.00(352) 228-7670


ActNowHE


ITS FREE
Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad for FREE on
our all new
CLASSIFIED SITE.
f
5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 Items totaling less than
$100.00 each.
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an Ad in the top right
-hand corner.
KITCHEN TABLE SET,
Butcher Block type $65;
Men's Bike $40
(352) 621-0896
PALM TREE PICTURES
$25. DOCTORS SCALE

Rubbermald deck
storage box 24x48x32 h
$100; Ivory rattan

coffee table $25
(352) 746-0183
SOD ALL TYPES
Install & Delivery
Available (352) 257-5760
WEBER Splrit-E-SP-210
Perfect shape, clean,
used 4 times, has cover
$175 (352) 621-1664
WOOD CORNER SHELF
74" tall. $60
COLOR TV mounts un-
der cabinet. $35
352-341-5247

ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT








$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
*ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY.

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com


WATER PUMP SERVICE.
& Repairs-all makes &.
models. An6lme,
344-2556,.Rthard


arb (Ma1iz
khotogaph .
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
ortralts. Indoor
or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-1439
Satisfacton guaranteed





ELITE PAVING &
SEAL CASTING
All types - Res/Comm,
352-302-3030( Lic/Ins :
/us out zoomcitnls.Qomi





Circle T Sod Farms.
Tired of your dead
lawn?
Replace it with ,
Bahia. Delivery
Avail (352)400-2221

LAWN RESTORATION
All types 6f Grasses *
Low maint Lawris Avail.
J & J Sod 352-302-6049

SOD All Varities ,-
cut-out,installed,rolled
Lic/ Ins #3000
(352) 422-0641
check out zoomcitruk.com


Installations by
Brian CBC125s853
wakit & tia wd 4ti9&0#441M pqw
352-628-7519 6
Siding Soffit
& Fascia,
'Skirting,
[ I lRoofovers,
Carportse, &n

www.advancedaluminum.info


�2 MANUAL WHEEL
CHAIRS No Fodt Rests
$45.00 Each
464-0316 '
FULL SIZE AIL ELECTRIC!
HOSPITAL BED. Remote
control & massage.
$600 Call Walter,
(352) 527-3552
HARMAN Auto-lift $750;
In;acare Power Chair
$800; Invacare Waletr
$50 (352) 795-4421




Buying Silver Coins
$.10, .25,.50, $1.00
Pre- 1965,
362- 302-8159
BUYING USCOINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paidp
,(352) 228-7676



Piano
Baldwin Spinet,
Walnut finish, Pd. $2,200,
very good cond. asking
$500. Hemando
(239) 877-1.027 '
TWO ALTO SAXAPHONES
with cases $250 each -
(352) 621-6606
Wurlitzer Piano
Console, Pecan finish,
matching bench, very
nice. $850.00
(352) 212-27i ,



KINGSIZE COMFORTER,
Sheets, shams, drapes,
pillows. Pink/Grey $60
(352) 613-3503



INVERSION TABLE Top.'
ot the line, TEETER
EP-850 Model. Like new.
* Great bargain at
$125.00. 352-344-4217.
Total Gym 1500 by.
Chuck Norris, never
used. $100 (352)
'613-3503



4 SALE- GUNS & AMMO
AR-15's- AK-47's- h)dt .
Guns - Pistols. WE BUY. -
GQL. 352r489-4870
AMMO 300 rounds,
Federal 223 brass case
55 grain, FMJ $220; 308
.AMMO 300 rounds,
brass case $225. (813)
789-0592 Crystal River
AMMO
40 CAL 300 ROUNDS
$200.,45 Cal 300 Rounds.
$200. Crystal Rvr area
.(813) 789-0592
AMMO
762X39 Brass case.
500 Rounds $300.
Crystal 'River area.
(813) 789-0592
AMMO, 9mm brass
case, FMJ, 500 rounds,
$200 (813) 789-0592
Crystal River Area,


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!?
Tub to Shower Conversions TooMtt
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




19 1/2" FRAME, Rack, 1& 2 BrfL
computer, 1.50 tires, toe 1 br. R
clips, Orange 6 yrs old, No Pets
$175 (352) 344-4357 HOM
Complete Set of 2/1 Remo
Catcher Equipment, for carpet, s(
13 yr. olds & up w/easton mo. Quie
roller bag. $175. Lv.
msg.(352) 746-1693 HOMO!
Concealed Weapons 2/2 S
Permit Course E
DAN'S GUN ROOM Unfurnis
(352) 726-5238 BPool, &
GOLF CART $5
Exc. cond. like new. (352)
Fold down windsheild,
curtains, baskets,
buckets, mirror. $1950 HOM
352-795-5146 Quiel
GUN AK47 Rifle Si
w/colapsable stock,100 2/1 Fur
rounds ammo, fencec
w/access. $ 1000; Trade
Considered (813) Large
789-0592 Crystal River deck.
High Standard pori
Derringer 22 magnum, Rer
exc. cond. $200.
(352) 464-0926 kitchen
PRIVATE COLLECTOR New
Buying Guns, Mo.
Ammunition& SecL
reloading'supplies (352)
(352) 586-7516
Rifle US Model, 1917 H
Winchester, 30-06. $200. 2/2, fen
M-1 Garand $550. carpet, $
Russian Moisen, 762 X 3/2 $6(
54, new stock, $150. No Pets
Model 94 Winchester, INV
lever act. 30/30 $400. IrNg /
XD 45 ACP Springfield, Lunarge 3/2,
4" barrel. $400. XD/9 lease. $
Springfield, 4" barrel, 3es. V
$400. Ruger Red Hawk 34
Dbl. action revolver,
44 Mag, 7.5" barrel. INV
$500.(352) 795-2270 Waterfr
SMITH & WESSON 2BR 1
AR-5IOR - 3-30 round 1 BR,1 I
mags. $1700/consider water
prt trade. 352-746-1417 LEC�
WE BUY GUNS Log Cab
On Site Gun Smithing $475 + 1
(352) 726-5238 Grbg inc


CAR HAULER
'06, 32 Ft. Dominator XT.
By Classic C. Trpl.
axels. $14,800. Like
new.(352) 835-4273








PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITEI-
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad



GM Mini-Van (Venture,
Silhouette, Montana)
older, well maintained
prefer cloth 697-2333


$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
ALL BREED RESCUE
Now available; Westle,
Schnauzer, Shihtzu,
Maltese mix,
352-553-2604
CHIHUAHUA'S
CKC Reg. Current shots,
$195.Health cert
(352) 406-7123
FREE MALE CATloves
to be held and petted,
needs loving home cell
352-586-4428
German Sheppard
Puppies, 21 Wks. 2
males, 2 fers.,1 is blue
all the rest black & tan.
papers, & health certs.
$300.(352) 201-0111
GERMAN SHEPPARD
puppies. 8 wks, 6 Fern.
3 males. All black & tan.
Health cert. $300
(352) 795-7897,
(561)324-3151
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,.
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
Need Someone to
Shear 13 Sheep &
Keep the wool
cell (863) 843-2495
Mini farms off 495
Poodles, Mini pups,
males, AKC reg. Choco-
late, blue, silver, beautiful
& well socialized.$300.
(352) 527-1920
PUGGLE PUPS
(pug/beagle); Sheltie,
Paplllon & maltepoo
pups $375-$d50
(352)216-1481
ROTWEILLER PUPPIES
Absolutely Beautiful,
8wks, AKC, big boned,
shots, wormed. Parents,
$650 + (352) 503-6316
Shih-Tzu Puppies
2 New Lters Home
raised w/ love. All shots
Included. $300+
3902 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827
(305) 872-8099



Mini Horse
Stud, '5 yrs. old.
White & brown. $250.
Obo.(352) 628-1277
Summer Horse
Camp
(352) 382-5400
www.rymarranch.com




BABY GOATS SHEEPs
& Pigeons
For pets only.
Mini Farm off 495
(863) 843-2495 cell
RHODE ISLAND REDS
Assorted Bantams,
Polish, Ducks & Quail
Starting at $2.
352-795-6381


- I
2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Util, ncl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
(352) 628-9759
AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hernando - Citrus
New Efficencies
$235wk.
Free interet/long dist.
Trailers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 ml to Pwr Plant


LE
2/1,
HON
2/
Call 35
YANI
2/2 Co
New V
+ $300
from
Paul (4
CC
SE
2/2 in C
$500/mo.4
pets. For
Lee at 3!
800


urn & Unfum .
RV $300 .,o.
Call 628-4441
IOSASSA
d. granite kitch.
cm'd rm. $550.
t(352)302-4619
SASSA 55+
Stonebrook
Estates
hed, Car Port.
Club house.
& RV storage
i95. Mo.
) 422-7887

OSASSA
t Country
getting.
rnished on
d 1 acre +.
shed, large
Enclosed
ch, CHA
modeled
n, washer.
well. $ 575.
+ $350.
irity Dep.
628- 5244
WY 488
ced yard new
450. mo, + sec
00.mo. + sec.
352-795-6970
VERNESS
, appx 2000 s. f.
if. No pets. 1 yr.
675 mo. F/L/S
344 / Eves.
14-3084
VERNESS
ont 55+ Park,
-/2BA, $475.
3A, $350 Incl.
352-476-4964
ANTO 1/1
bin CHA, n/pets
st, Ist.sec. Wtr.
. 352-746-3073
"CANTO
$535/MO
MOSASSA
/1 $550.
52- 464-3159
KEETOWN
mplete Furn.,
W/D. $600mo
dep. 15 mln.
power plant
07) 579-6123
COUNTRY
GETTING
country Setting.
+ $500 Sec. No.
application Call
52-250-0664 or
-692-4162.


,FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181
Crystal River
Suncoast MHP 55 +.
2/2 '84, Newly remod.
10X 28 glass Fla. rm.
Covered front & back
porches. Nice cand.
$14,000 (352) 795-4266
Crystal River, Suncoast
MHP. 2/2 14 X 70, partly
turn., CHA, Screened
porch. Ex. cond. $6,500.
(352) 564-0245
(352) 422-6735
INVERNESS
55+ Waterfront Park,
1BR, water Incl. A/C
$3,500 + $270 mo. .ot
rent. 352-476-4964
INVERNESS/ MOSSY
OAK'PARK, 55 + COMM.
2/1 Carport/ Scm'd porch.
CHA,Furn., Wsh./dryer.
New electrical wiring.
Close to downtown.
$10,900.(352) 637-3436
Used Mobiles and
Modular for Resale.
LOW prices, call
Palm Harbor for
Inventory list. On Your
Lot. 800-622-2832
ext. 210 - Mr. Lyons



6018 W Oaklawn 2/2,'91,
14x65 fixer, 1.25 acres,
$37,900, www.zillow.com,
813-695-0890 or
S352-382-1002
Homosassa
SBANK
FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181
Floral City
2/2 DW on 3.5 + or -
acres. Withlacoochee
Forest area great for
horse riding.Priced to
sell. (352) 341-6281
(352) 634-0787
(352) 634-1290.
HOME-N-LAND
New Home 3/2
10 Yr. Warranty
Sacrlficel $3,000
down $676.43/mo.
Call to Qualify
352-621-3807
Receive $8,000
Cash Back
INGLIS '95 SW
2/1/2, beautiful,
wooded, priv 1/ 4 ac.
backs ups to wildlife
sanctuary. Incls covered
deck, garage w/work
shop, Ig shed w/win-
dows, all appls, washer,
dryer. STEAL at $53.9001
352-419-5777:476-9005
New 2009
2 bed, 2 bath, large
rms. appliance pkg.
2x6 construction,
10 yr. warranty. Must
See! $39,900 includes:
A/C, steps, skirting.
Call for more details
352-621-9182

NEW JACOBSEN
TRIPLE WIDE
High end home on
2 /2 Acres, 2150 sq ft,
3/2, glamour kitchen,
marble in bathroom,
appliance pkg.
Must Sell $179,900
or $787/mo. Call
(352) 621-9181
Receive $8,000
Cash Back.

-oileHoe


CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55 + comm. 3/2
with a lovely view of the
Lake. Call The C.R.
Village office $75K obo
352-795-7161
FOREST VIEW ESTATES
Great Loc. Pools, clbhs.
& more. Move-in ready,
comp. furn. 2/2 DW,
wheelchair acc., shed
& sprinkler. New heat
pump. $39,900
563-6428/563-1297
Homosassa, 55+ Park
Great loc. Pool, clbhs.
& morel Full turn. Dbl
2/2 w/porch cov. car-
port & shed. Must sell
$20,000 352-628-1067


-U-1

INVERNESS 1 BR Moble,
55+ w/. waterfront
parkS9,900 AC, W/D,
Shed 352-476-4964
LECANTO
Senior Park. roomy
2 bedrm 1.5 bath, fully
furnish, move In ready
Very Nice $7500
(352) 634-4329
WEST WIND VILL 55+
(2) NEW 2005 Incredible
Pricel Resales/Rentals
fuiClIak L 352-628-2090




POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - RV SITES
Waterfront homes
Weekly private rooms
352-628-0011




CHASSAHOWITZKA
2/2 waterfront DW $600
2/2 furnished DW $700
2/1 carport - $500
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $900
Agent, 352-382-1000



��W�^TsR Cl,
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT

3/2/1 Villa- $875
Arbor Lakes
3/2/2- $800
Inverness
2/2/2-$700
3/2/2 -$750
2/1/1 -$595
2/2/1 - $625
3/2/1 - $895
2/2/1 Villa- $695
1&2 Bd Apartments
starting at $400
2/11/1I -$600
Beverly Hills
2/1V/I1- $600
Lecanto,
I/I Apartment- $395
See our website:
www.jwmortonreal
estate.com
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
352-726-9010

RENTALS
Pine Ridge w/Pool
5169 N. Perry Dr $1800
3/4/3 Pool/pool maint
4470 N. Ficus Dr $1400
3/2/2 Pool/pool maint
838 W. Massachusetts
St. $1400
3/2/2 Pool/pool main
Beverlv Hills
27 New York Blvd
$800
188 W.Seymera St
$675
42 S. Monroe St $600
,14 Plaza St. $600
HEDICK GROUP
REALTY
352-422-2522
hedickgroup.net




AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hernando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
internet/long dist.
trailer $175wk.
38r Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1:5 In town Location
Nice, Clean $650.
(352) 586-9349
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5, c/h/a w/d hook
up. 838 5th Av N.E.
$650.+sec Unfurn.$600
727-343-7343; 455-8998
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT I Bedrm.
SAC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
RENTALS AVAIL.
FROM $585.
(352) 795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investment LLC


RIME 0-


BEDROOM UNITS
* MOVE IN SPECIAL
MUST MOVE IN BY
5/31/09
KNOLLWOOD

Inverness
I B/R SEC DEP. $150
1B/R Ist MO $150
2B/R SEC DEP. $200.
2B/R IST MO $200.
CALL 344-1010
TU, TH, FRI.
8-12 & 1-5 NO PETS
SHUD VOUCHERS
S ACCEPTED
Equal Housing
Opportunity
=E==l==
r- &2
BEDROOM UNITS
* Move In Special*
Move In by 5/31/09
* 1BR Sec. dep $200
2BR Sec. dep $250.
CANDELWOOD
COURT
Inverness
CALL 344-1010
TUES, THUR, FRI.
8-12 & 1-5
NO PETS
HUD VOUCHERS
S ACCEPTED
Equal Housing
= . Opportunity

S 1 & 2
BEDROOMS
Starting at
$450
352-257-8048

1 BEDROOM
Starting @ $425/mo
Laundry on premises.
352-465-2985

INGLIS VILLAS
Is now accepting
applications for our
1,2,3 BR Apts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Crys. Riv.
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: M,W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglis Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity
INVERNESS
2/1 Duplex $525;
2/1 home $550, f/I/s
(352) 422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1 No pets $500 + dep.
352-860-2026


INVERNESS
2/1Tri-plex, Great Loc,
clean & roomy. No
smoke/no pets $500
Mo. Fst/Lst/Sec.
352-341-1847
LECANTO
1 BR (352)746-5238
613-6000/613-5974
ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appis,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341

Pinewood Villas
Is now Accepting
applications for our
1,2,3 BR Apts.
Located in Bronson
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-486-2612
Or Apply Tues & Thur
7291 NE 92nd Ct. #17,
Bronson, Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity




INVERNESS
2/1- $500; 2/2- rg scrn
prch, quiet. $600. W/D
hk-ups, 727-446-5871
727-688-7866.

OIL
0 M . F * T


-3_Act Now

PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY AT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronicleonllne.com
and click place
an ad
RENTALS, SALES,
SUNSET REALITY
& INVESTMENTS.
(352)726-5050
We Have Rentals
Starting at $425/mo +
Many others
LANDMARK
REALTY
352-726-9136
Kathy or Jane
311 W Main St. Inv




HERNANDO
ALESCI'S
CORNER PLAZA
HWY. 486
OFFICE/RETAIL
1000, SQ. FT.
INCLUDES COMMON
AREA
MAINTAINENCE,
WATER, WASTE,
GARBAGE &
SIGNAGE. ONLY
$750.MO. + SALES
TAX. $795. TOTAL. NO
SEC., NO LAST MO.
RENT. FIRST MO.
RENT ONLY. ALSO
1,194 SQ. FT., 1,250
SQ. FT. & 2,000 SQ.
FT. AVAILABLE.
(352) 447-1244
OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507
PINE RIDGE
1000 sqft unit, (currently
beauty salon):
352-527-9013



CITRUS HILLS
Home, Villa, Condo
GREENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-5921
(888) 446-5921
greenbrlarrental.com





FREE RENT!
SUMMERHILL
AT
MEADOWCREST
Luxury Condos
Limited Timel
Call agent for
details.
352-563-5657
/ out zoomcitrus.com
' INVERNESS
2/2, very clean / pool
$575.(352) 419-4510
352-400-0882
INVERNESS
Extra Irg. 2/2/1 Lakeside
Community, pool, dock,
no smoke, no pets. $665
mo. + sec. (866)637-2631
TOLL FREE
MEADOWCREST
Summerhill, 2/2 w/large
1 car garage, ground
floor, new, never lived
in, near shopping.
Reduced to $900.
Mo./unfurn. $1200/furn.
(352) 746-9770
(352) 697-0375
Gloria Bonner P & R
' Mid Florida Reality
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, Completely furn.
$850. mo. 352-746-4611




CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/1 Lg. master
suite, granite, stainless
steel apple. Large lanai.
Lease, + Dep. No pets,
$800.Mo.(352)697-3133
HOMOSASSA
2/1 w/carport $550 mo.
+sec.; 2/2 w/ fam. rm &
carport $650 + sec. Both
.remodeled
(352) 746-3228
HOMOSASSA
New, 2/2, Rent
w/option to buy. 1300
sq. ft. w/d hk. up, fans,
blinds, refr., stove,
microwave, tile, carpet.
$750. month
(352) 592-0893
INVERNESS
2/1 W/D, garb,/water
Incl., fenced, pets ok
$600.mo. 1st., $300 sec.
352-746-4611
ONE MONTH FREE!
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appls.
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341


CLASSIFIED


-~




















SUNSET VILLAS
Senior Community
Chiefland Fl.
Accepting
Applications for
1 &2BRAPTS
Please Apply
M, W, F, 8am-12p
124 SW 14th Ave.
(352) 493-0220
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.


AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hernando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
interet/long dist.
Trailers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744 '
11-15 ml to Pwr Plant

BEVERLY HILLS
Progress Energy
Contractors 1/1,
fully furn avail now
$825. includes all util-
ities, 100 channel
TV/internet.
2/1 also available
(352) 220-2666
Citrus Hills
Townhouse 2/2%/1.
Terra Vista Club incl.
$1,000 Mo + util.
(516) 991-5747

HOMOSASSA
312/1 Nearly new. Off of
Rock Crusher Road,
near school. Well fum.
& clean. Great cond.
Lease with Option to
purchase, $950.
Month. + electric
5640 Irving Court
(352) 563-2776

INVERNESS
1 BR Mobile, 55+ water-
front park, Incl. water
$475 352-476-4964


mI mF iimFT


2 or 3 Bedrooms
RENT TO OWN- NO
CREDIT CHECK!!
Low DownI
352-484-0866
iademission.com

BEVERLY HILLS
15 S. Desoto 2/1/1
w/fl rm. $625 mo. (352)
697-1907; 527-8432
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 renovated
5 S. Lincoln Av. $600.
(352) 422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 ,C/H/A, ceiling fans,
W/D, ready now $575.
mo. 352-422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/I +fl rm - $600
352-795-1722
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1, new kitchen, Lrg
8D rms, Flrm, $725.mo,
845-282-3504.
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2, Porch, Fla.rm
(352) 464-2514
BRENTWOOD
,At Terra Vista,3/2 Pool
Home $1,100 Incl. soc,
memb, (352) 422-4086'


CITRUS HILLS
3/2 Pool Home
I Acre, $975
(352)746-4821

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/1 $825m + sec.
INVERNESS
2/1/1 $650 + sec
352-746-9436

S CITRUS
SPRINGS
3/2/2 Newer Home.
.Washer & dryer.
Sprinkler system.
Quiet neighborhood.
$795. Monthly.
(352) 812-1414

CITRUS SPRINGS
Lovely modern '04,
4/2/2 built by
Merbedes Homes.
This 2600 Sq. ft. home
on large comer lot.
Large patio, fenced
back yard, sprinkler sys
Near Great Schools,
Churches, Parks, &
Shopping. Located at
8249 N. Triana Drive.

12 Mo. lease, $1,100
. Mo.$1,000 Sec.
deposit.
Will Consider Lease
Option.
Call Dan at:
(813) 716-5605

CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 3/2/2, Near Sch.
$875. mo 352-628-0731

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/1, Garbage & lawn
Incl.'d Pets?, $750. mo.
+ sec. 352-795-0207

CRYSTAL RIVER
Rent or Rent to Own
Copeland PK Beauty
3/2, Lrg Fam. Rm.
Tiled, gorgeous
spotless, fenced,
Pets OK, $750mo.
352-527-0493
352-427-7644

DUNNELLON
3/11/2/2, Fire Place,
.$895. mo. 1st last, sec.
(352) 489-9239
FLORAL CITY
2/1/carport, porch CHA
$420 mo. 352-726-2979
HOMOSASSA
$350....1/1, Duplex
$525/up..2/1 .Duplex
$700..2/2/2 SMW Villa
$1000. WF 3/2/2 Home
River Unks Realty Call
352-628-1616


TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009 C9


Home 3/2/2
3000 sf
$850 (908) 322-6529
Homosassa SMW
2/2/1 & carport, screen
back porch, private
wooded area. Newly
painted, carpet & tile
Unfurn. $700. No Pets
SNo smokers
(352) 650-5986

INVERNESS
610 Independence Hwy
3/2/2 Fenced yard.
Rent w/option to buy.
$750/mo. 1st +Sec.
352-422-3670
Inverness
area Beautiful, 3/2,poss
clubhse,pool 2/2
Lease Oot .Flexible
Financna Imm. Occ
352-795-0088
INVERNESS
BEAUTIFUL
WATERFRONT
312% Tile, Washer &
Dryer Scrn'd. Pch. on
Lake Tsalsa Apopka.
Community pool, ten-
nis & dock. $875. Mo.
352-812-3213

INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
4/2/2 or 3/2/2 Starting
at $790 (352) 341-1142
(352) 601-2615

INVERNESS
Waterfront Townhouse
2/2-2, with 3 decks &
balconies, private
community pool, very
quick access.to Lake
Henderson, less than
3 min. drive to
downtown Inv. &
access to Rails to
Trails.
$700 mo + sec. dep.
(352) 817-3185 appt
LECANTO
Crystal Oaks.
4/3/2 Remod.new appls.
granite c/tops, tile, carpet,
scrn'd pool. on culdesac.
$1,300 Mo.727-492-6679
PINE RIDGE
3/2/2, $1,000 mo. 1st
last sec. 352-527-0635
RENTALS AVAIL.
FROM $585.
(352) 795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investment LLC

SOUTHERN
WOODS
4/3/2 Luxury
executive home
on golf course,
great views,
$1,300/Mo.
(813) 390-7109

SUGARMILL Woods
2 Masters /2/2 (large)
Screen lanai, oversized
gar. new appl. & A/C
$850 mo.
(352)302-4057
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 Quiet, rent or rent
to own. $750/mo.
362-382-2904




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/212.5 $1,200 Mo.
Garbage and lawn
maintence included.
1st & Sec; Lease,
Pets?
(352) 795-0207
(352) 212-4981

POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - Waterfront
homes, Wkly prv. rms,
RV Iots. 352-628-0011




AlValueinn.com
Invemess
Hernando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
intemet/long dist.
Trailers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352),726-4744
11-15 ml to Pwr Plant


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to
advertise "any ,
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
discrimination.
" Familial status
includes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
,people securing
,custody of children
under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
.available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



P'.i n\ u ,iii


2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Util., incl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
(352) 628-9759




OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507
OFFICE/STORAGE UNIT
600ft. $235/mo
(1) STORAGE UNIT 600ft
$235/mo.352-382-2904


-enItaB


LEASE/SALE
3870 Sqft building on
1.6ac. Zone GNC Hwy
200, high traffic count
w/prking.352-502-3970


OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Great Location,
HWY. 19.
South of
Sugarmill woods
entrance. North of new
public. $285,000.


AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50

Ad includes 20 lines of copy
w/ photo.




Lakefront 7 Acres, Flo-
ral City Lake Tsala
Apopka 2 dwellings 2
barns see
pictures/details
floralcitylakefront.com
skyetraveler@att.net

Picture Perfect Homes
NEW HOMES START-
ING.At S75,000 On
Your Lot
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lie # CBCO59685





100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
*Low income applicants
can quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or No credit
OKAY
.recent bankruptcy
OKAY*
CAII TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
*Credit and income
restriction apply*
Florida licensed mort-
gage lender




OPPORTUNITY .






HERNANDO
ALESCI'S
CORNER PLAZA
HWY. 486
OFFICE/RETAIL
1000, SQ. FT.
INCLUDES COMMON
AREA
MAINTENANCE,
WATER, WASTE,
GARBAGE &
SIGNAGE. ONLY
$750.MO. + SALES.
TAX. $795. TOTAL. NO
'SEC., NO LAST MO.
RENT. FIRST MO.
RENT ONLY. ALSO
1,194 SQ. FT., 1,250
SQ. FT. & 2,000 SQ.
FT. AVAILABLE.
(352) 447-1244


Fi Your' bDrem* Hom


Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehomefinder.com

783572


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WORDY U IBY TRICKY RICKY KANE
bear) Every answer is a rhyming
1. Purposely ignore a baby bear (1 air of words (like FAT CAT
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Funnyman Leno's mania (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Ailing hayseed (1) syllables in each word. To win
$10, send your original rhymes
with your definitions to this
4. Lively and cheerful actress Halle (2) newspaper. All entries become
I _IH I M III the property ofUFS, Inc.
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5. Toasted baseball pitcher's hill (1) 2009 United Feature Syndicate,
Thanks and $10 to
Sh Ford Thompson of
6. Welcomed guests occupying a chair (2) Independence, MO
. entry to this

7. "24" star Sutherland's prep people (2) L pp


saHasdM salas ITL i aLvas anagHD *9 oNflOW EaaNMO 9
1 H M Aa MTHj 31 '31OII T HOIS a 3Zv' 3 avSAi T 1z 0 n flNS
5-26-09 saASNV


TASIA SEIJAS
ERA American Realty
& Investment
(352) 302-0569
(352) 746-3600
Email To:
tasiaerat@vahoo.com



SALE OR LEASE
WIOPTION
Building newly built,
5,000 sq. ft. of ware-
house space. 1,000 sq.
ft. of office space
w/CHA. Second level
can be built for more
space, 3 bays, 1 is a
loading bay. $329,000.












TASIA SEIJAS
ERA American Realty
& Investments.
(352) 302-0569
(352) 746-3600
Email to:
tasiaera@'vahoo.com





3/2/2 For Sale or Rent
Citrus Springs Newer
Home, Ilow/dn, easy
terms 352-840-3324


ATTENTION
BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
$39,900. Delivered
and Set, $0-Down
Land/Home $650. mo.
Repos Available
Kinder
Mobile Home
(352) 622-2460










C10 TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009


3/2/2 w/garden room.
By Owner. Lots of
upgrades. Like new.
Oversized prime lot.
A must to see. Asking
$179,900 (352) 527-4488




RealtySelect
Citrus.coml


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

R eaE lct

(352) 795-1555




BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2. Nice yard, near
school. $108k Call
anytime to see.
(352) 201-0991
(352)726-7543
FOR SALE BY OWNER
88 SJ Kellner, Bev. Hills
2/21'//2, FP, Call Anytime
OPEN HOUSE on
SUNDAYS 11A-3P
$118K, 352-746-6093



3/2/2, POOL HOME,
1 acre, membership
avail, to CIt. Hills C.C.
$189,900 (352)860-0766
MODEL CLOSE OUT
Below costly - Private
gated community.
Heritage off 486,1 bik E
of Forest Ridge Blvd.
Owner/Developer
352-422-0199
POOL HOME
4/3/3 - built '04
Tile, pavers, Citrus Hills
membership available.
To view listing
www.1605wredding.com
$299,900.352-464-1316
REDUCED
POOL HOME
4/3/Ext. 2 Car Garage
on 1 Acre.
Membership Available
$277,900.352-527-7856



4+Acres, Canal front
3/2 large garage/
workshop +bonus
efficiency apt.
REDUCED TO S175KI
(352) 560-0019

YOU'LL THIS!
For Sale By Owner 2
bedroom. 2 bath. 1 car
garage home at 9260 E.
Alvada Lane in beautiful
Inverness Golf & Coun-
try Club Community.
Features skylight, lanai
& sprinkler system.
Asking $145,000. Call
(352)637-5876.
For Sale, By Owner
3BR.3BA, Pool, 16x24
v.cr'r . cI o; 10
, -cncc,!, r,,,,p II',r r,
WTI, 518 Poinsettla, Ave.
(352) 860-0878
S PUT YOUR
$MONEY$ TO WORK
BUY Real Estate
NOWI


Deb Infantine
EXIT REALTY LEADERS
(352) 302-8046
Prices are Downlll
Rates are LOWlII

RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION



(352) 795-1555




2 or 3 Bedrooms
RENT TO OWN- NO
CREDIT CHECKII
Low Downi
352-484-0866
Iademisslon.com


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI
Your SATISFACTION
Is My Futurell
'(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC

RealtySelect
Citrus.caom


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION



(382) 798-1855


-p-I
Crystal Riv

212, Great Rm, vaulted
cell. open kit. b/bar,
fenced back yrd.
scrn. por., new appl's,
1600 sf,(mol) 6172 W.
Pine Cr /C.R. Priced to
Sell (352) 795-9603
Crystal River Mini
Ranch
4/2.5/2 on 2 acres, up
to 5 horses allowed,
$29,000 down, owner
financing @ 6%. Will
trade for equity.Reality
USA (800) 559-4231



BY OWNER -3/2
Super nice Less than
I yr old, approx 1 acre.
Incis most tumn. Beautiful
lot, close to town.
$128,500. Call Dan
312-343-8329; Moving
out of state, .
7289 W. Pompey Ln
Homosassa, FL 34446


3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to
head spring. 163' wfrt,
dock/slip. Brand
new/unoccupied.
2 frpls, granite. $579K
727-808-5229

must sell!
Inverness
MUST SELL QUICK
UNIQUE CUSTOM
HOME ON 1 ACRE ON
CANAL TO LAKE
TSALA POPKA. 3,323
sq. ft LIVINGI.30'
ATRIUM. 3 BED/2.5
BATH. 2-CAR GAR-
AGE. LIVE OAKS.
NEEDS TLC. PRICED
TO SELL! ONLY
$194,500. CALL
MYRIAM @ KELLER
WILLIAMS REALTY of
CITRUS COUNTY.
352-613-2644

RealtySelect
Citrus.comr


BETTY MORTON

$8000 Tax 2.8% COMMISSION
Credit RIlect
for first tme home �,>
buyers ,if you have (352 795-t555
not owned a home in (352) 795-1555
3 years. Call for Info
Phyllis Strickland -
(352) 613-3503
Kellers Williams Rity
LOOKING FOR HOMES
OR MOBILES & LAND
Purchase, lease, mort-
gage assumptions, take
over payments + cash.
Any location, price, condI-
tlIon, foreclosure, late on
payments okay.
1-727-992-1372

BONNIE "e
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI BusIness/Home,3/2 Great
location on Trout Ave. Inver-
Your SATISFACTION ness $165,000. Rhema
Is&jfluurall Realty 228-1361

(352) 58676921
or (352)795-9123 L .
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC 7 Rivers Golf &'C.C.
priv. member owned.
corner lot I ac (mol)
$30K (813) 766-9354 or
sweetscaoeauest@

LECANTO 1/2 acre has
well, septic & Pwe pole
S$15,000 813-792-1355

lWafti -r roSn
WWLadU


Michele Rose
REALTOR
"Simply Put-
I'll Work Harder"
352-212-5097
thorn@atlantic.net
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515

Picture Perfect
Homes NEW HOMES
STARING .At $75,000
On Your Lot Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685


CITRONELLE 3 bed-
room, 2 bath. Mini
Farms 2.5 Acres,
Trailer, Water wth
softener, septic.As
Is $49,000.00.
813-695-0853
For Sale By Owner
3 BR, 2 BA, 2-car gar.,
Cement block, north
Dunnellon Low down,
EZ terms w/$3,500
down $595 mo,
(352) 726-9369
OWNER FINANCING
4/2/office, 2,5 ac,
2005 Doublewide
Like new. 1800sqft,
$9,700/dn, $882/mo. or
$23,700 down, '$582/mo,
727-992-1372



SRiver Oaks East
4/2.5/2 Custom Pool
Office bonus rm, green
house, & boat slip.
$455,900 (352) 274-1594



Price Reduced
Crystal River 1/1 fully
turn. $69,800. Buy
Owner.com . 34429
(352) 563-5844




Call About Saving
Your Home
We Have Ideasl


Plantation Realty, Inc
(352) 795-0784
Cell 422-7928
'Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/0Owner
See aIll of the
listings In Citrus
County at


235FT ON
WITHLACOOCHEE
RIVER. 2+ acres. Deed
restricted comm. $250K
Owner. 352-422-0199



1993 17' Sylvan
Bow rider bimini top
Boat & trailer
85h.p. Yamaha motor
Good cond. $3,500
(352) 344-0457
16FT CAR. SKIFF
'96, like new, $5,500
40HP Evinrude, center
console, trolling motor,
b-top, many extras
(352) 344-5858
AIR BOAT
Big 1. Fi. haul,
2 seats. Approx. 375-400
HP. 8 blade warp drive.
2-1 reduction gear box.
Used 100 hrs.+ Trl.
$18,500 invest. Sell
for $10,000 firm.
(352) 302-4535
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic Inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
AQUA SPORT '05
175 Osprey, 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual
batt. w/switch, bimini,
easy load trailer. Low
hours. $9,990.
352-860-0277
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer
Ready to fish. Reduced
L9.900352-746-5856
AQUA SPORT
2000; 225 Explorer 24'
Cuddy cabin. 225
Johnson Ocean Pro.
Loadmaster tandem axle
trailer, Exc. cond,
$14,500.352-493-7377;


'86 25FT,Cuddy Cabin.
W/twin '06 Optlmax
150hp & double
axle trailer. $16,900
(352)257-1355 '
BOSTON WHALER
14 ' w140 hp Johnson,
Everything works good
$1800 (352) 302-0033
Cabin Cruiser
24 ft.
Owner died, 6 cyl. 10,
alpha one/OD, used In
fresh water, tan, gal, trl
Incl.'d $2,100 464-0316
CENTURY
'01- Bay, 21ft.
'02, 150HP Yamaha w/
I trr., custom cover
dep/find, VHF, Iw hrs.,
like new, $13,950.
(352) 442-7772
Deck Boat
95' 19 Ft. Slyvan, i ra-
dio & fisnfinaer New Bal.
tery switch. 2 batteries,
powerpk.
prop./hub.$6,000
(352) 726-0838
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons'.Traller,
Many extrasil
$14,500/obo, (352)
489-9640: 220-6508
GRADY WHITE
20 ff., 200 hp, Honda
4-stroke, 2004, 179 hours
on motor. Kept Indoors,
Exc. cond., + trailer
$9,995 (352) 637-2145
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
1 16HP, 4strke Yamaha,
w/trlr. $11,200, will
trade (352) 503-3778
HURRICANE
23ft Deck Boat, 112HP
Johnson, great for fish-
ing & scalloping Must
Sell $3,500, 628-7397
OSPREY
1994 - 16ft, CC, bay boat,
88 HP Evinrude, Garmin
GPS/recorder $4600.
362.8-21-4711


run Il w =/ DV
08' 20 Ft. To many
options to list. $13,000
Call for Info. 628-7926
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras
$12,000 (352) 628-0281
PRO-LINE 22f
WALKAROUND 1999
200 HP Mercury w/9.9 HP
Johnson klcker,$12k
obo. Call Kurt at Pete's
Pier 352-795-6067
SEA PRO
'00 19 FT. C/C. Loaded.
Elec. Pkg. 115 FI 4 Strk.
Yam. 100 hrs. Bim. top.
Best offer(352)533-3093
T-CRAFT
23'L, 6' W, '02 150H
Evin. mtr. w fuel enj. like
new, trlr. w/brks
$7750 352-489-3661
Ultimate Scallop
Boat 03, 25'Sun
Tracker, 05 Merc 90hp, lo
exc. value $11,500.
352-586-1676
WELLCRAFT
1987, 250 Sportsman,
25', Gas eng., 30" draft,
260 hp I/O, alum.
traller.$8,000
(352) 344-9651



22 FT. Minnie Winnie
1993, Class C, 16 mpg,
dependable, like new
small V-8, sleeps 6
$7,300 ,(352) 563-9964
'02 Cedar Creek 5th
Wheel 29ft, 2-slides,
queen bedbath/shower,
low mileage, loaded,
good cond, $16,800
(352) 746-4969
05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
26inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.



2 slides. Separate bath.
Extras. 3 yr ext. warr.
$35,900/obo
352-794-3534
38FT BOUNDER '96
Class-A - basement
model. 49K mi. 14mpg,
TV's. Ready for long trip,
2 . 352-563-0615
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/Slide. 36 K Ml.
Dual air. $37,700 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
*AUTO.BOA* -

DONATIONS
43 year old.
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
(352) 795-9621
* Tax Deductible *


Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.ot '
CHEVY '86 Class C
Very good cond. Needs
tires. $4,000. Call
anytime. (352) 446-6329
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane New
deal. 30Q, class A motor
home, 31� ft., 22k ml.
V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed,
etc. Saturn tow Incl.
$35,000. (352) 397-5007
GEORGIE BOY
'05, Pursuit, Class A,
30ft. Excel. cond. 8k ml.,
2 slide outs, 2 TV's, back
up camera, all the bells
and whistles and much
more, must see this
coach, Asking $60,000.
obo (352) 746-7626
GULF STREAM
BT Cruiser 03,22' fully
loaded, ready to travel
$27,500....
(352) 341-1297
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished., In
great RV Park, pool,
clubhouse etc. Can be
moved $29,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
Holiday Rambler
'03, By Monico, 300
Cummlns, 2 slides,
under warranty
mint cond. $69,900.
(352) 302-7073
Holiday Rambler
Admiral Motor Home 36'
2 slides, 340hp, gas eng.
all options transf ext.
wartr. $51,900
352 795-3970
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$52,995. 352-464-0371
Keystone 07
Big Sky 5th Wheel Pram.
Pkg 340RLQ every option.
Center Island Kit. Incis
sep.W/D, added 2nd a/c in
bedroom
Price to Sale $52K firm
352-794-3068
PACE ARROW
04, 38' 3 SLIDES
21k ml fully loaded
3 tv's $92,500 obo
352-302-0743
VOLKSWAGON
'01 Rialta, model 22FD,
18-21 mpg, 51k org. ml.
fully self contained, too
many extras to list call
for details, Super Nice
(352) 628-9599


BONAIR'01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig. Like
new. $9,995.
352-489-3661
COLEMAN NIAGRA
2002, 1SFT, opens to
26FT, 1 sllde, $65,500 obo
(382) 302-1322
I BUY RV'8,
Travel Trallers,
8th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Ca(l Glenn
(352) 302-0778


CLASSIFIEDS .




07 Jay Flight
28' used twice, smells &
looks new, green clean,
sips 6 $16,800 (352)
503-7431
KODIAK
'04, Hybrid Travel Trlr.
AC, Heat, Micro. Tub/
Shwer, toilet exc cond
$9,500. 352-564-4151
MEADOWBROOK'
5th Wheel, 2000 Excel-
lent. Photos at
http://plcasaweb.google.c
onmneadowbmookG-enn-
$1395.00
(352)302-6055 or
(727)692-9045
Montana
'03, 5th wheel, 3 slides
like new,$30,000.
Truck avail also for tow
(352) 422-5731
PROWLER
'99 21', self/contained,
sleeps 6, new tires, AC,
bath, etc. $5,300
(352) 795-1417
SKYLINE 04
32' sleeps 8, used
once $11,500
(352) 586-9614

--I.

$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'90 Chev Lumlna 4 dr,
3.1, V-6 $375 obo
2 truck doors, good
shape '73-'90$300
obo(352) 344-2984



$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles



Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CASH BUYER

For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES.
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333
We Buy Junk Cars
Running or Not
Cash Paid, $150 & Up
(352) 771-6191



1997 MAZDA MIATA
Convertable, Fun &
dependable, Porche
Red, new top, 36mpg,
5-speed, A/C, new tires.
Mint $5,700 352)
563-9964
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale!
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'94 ACCORD EX
4dr. 160k miles. Ice cold
a/c. Auto. $1500 or
trade. 352-746-1417
BMW
'03,745 LI, NAV, black,
sun roof. all options $29K
Mint
(352) 746-2696
BUICK
'07 Lacrosse CX,
9,500 Mi. Ruby red, like
new. Must see. $12,900
Wooten's(352) 637-7117
CADILLAC 05
CTS; loaded, orglnlal
owner 55k mil w/$1000
warranty $16,500
352-201-0991
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Faxavail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Conv. rare
auto, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
black, dependable.
$4700 352- 563-0615
CONSIGNMENT USA
*kClean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
conslgnmentusa.org
CORVETTE
02, ZO6,
Black, low ml., over
30 mpg hwy. $24,400.
(352) 613-5355
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvetteonly 4,076 mi-
les on this rare silver on
sliver on sliver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are on
this gorgeous vette,
Over $2,000 In
aftermarket parts
Included, Your's
for only, $48,000.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, auto,
$11,500 or will trade for
truck. 352-563-6428
DODGE
'02 Sratus SXT.4
Cy.
auto, air, loaded.
43KMi.
extra clean.
$5,980
Wooten's(352)
637-7117
-FORD
'05 Taurus SE, V-6
Loaded, 43K. mi. extra
clean. Must see. $7,880.


Wooten's (352)637-7117
FORD
'99 Crown Victora,
former detective car. Cold
AC. Runs great. $2,700.
Obo.(352) 613-5776
HONDA
'08 Civic, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
KIA
'04, Oltma 35k MI,
loaded, I Can't drive
anymore, $5,900 obo
(352) 344-5555 ext. 101
KIA RIO
2001 88K ml. New tim-
Ing belt, good cond,
el maint, $2,100 obo
(352) 637-5816
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k ml,
white. Well maintained.
$2850. (382) 628-7410;
628-0370
LINCOLN
'96, Townear, garage
kept, 88K miles, loaded
$3,900 obo
(352) 344-5555 ext, 101


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'03, Protege, auto
trans, AC, AM FM w/
CD, PW, PL, 83,400 ml.
$4,975 (352) 220-2199
MECHANIC'S DREAM
MERCURY '87 GR Marq.
New gas tank, radiator,
batt., pnt-vln top. 27k orig
ml. Blown head gasket.
$600/firm 352-503-7548
MERCEDES
'05 SLK, $24,995.2 avail.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES

(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'08 C- CLASS,$29,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCURY '04
Grand Marquis LS, blk
w/tan int., 63K, adult
owned. Non smoker, all
options. Estate car.
$8900/neg.
352-465-8722
MGB
Convertible 1977, 57k mi.
Blue, many xtras
Excellent Condition
$10,500 (352)628-0281
MITSUBISHI
'03, Dlamante LS, excel.
cond. Always serviced.
Fully equip, Priced be-
low Kelly BB, $7,900.
352-382-5702'
MITSUBISHI
'09, Spider, as new,
2,200 mi., All black
BEST OFFER
(352) 503-7626
SATURN
'01, L-300, leather, sun
roof, new tires, 78K. mi.
$6,500, (352) 795-5032
SUZUKI
'07 Forenza. 30K mi,
w/100k warr. LOADED
w/touch scrn nav.
$12,800. 352-613-6613
TOYOTA
'06 Corolla,
$11,995 Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 nil.
warranty. $19,995.
(352) 382-1857
TOYOTA SUPRA '89
All original, red, 79k ml.,
6 cylinder, all power,
targa root. Original
owner. Garaged, $7,695
(352) 726-3427
VOLVO
'05 S60, $15,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S40, $15,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S60, $17,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S80; $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S 40, $17,995.
2 avail. Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S60, $19,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299







$5001 Police
Impounds for sale! ,



2-Dr hardtop, 350 V-8,
auto, May trade in part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door se-
dan. 6 cyl auto. $9,500.
Will consider trade for
travel trailer of equal
value.(352) 628-4053
ALFA ROMEO
'76, Spider. Project car.
$2300 obo
, 352-382-5702 '
BUICK 67
RIVIERA, 430 wildcat
motor, 86k ml. amfm,
a/c, titl whl. elect seats,
very good cond. $8000
(352) 527-3961
CAMARO IROC Z
'88 Red, PS./PB. Cold
A.C. 62,000 Mi. Great
Condition. $6,900.
(352) 422-5663
CHEVY
'69 Classic CI0 SHT BD
350/350 AC, PS,
$15K or trade
(352) 746-9212
EL CAMINO '81
305 Auto, All new
Interior, & paint. Crager
mags & tires. 4" raised
hood. $3,250.
(352)341-3613.
GM El Camlno
'84, 1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO
1967, the real deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-066
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupel
Silver, new paint;
63K ml., $8,900 obo-
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MERCEDES BENZ
1985 380SL, 2 top road-
ster. Drives, looks great.
Many new Mercedes
parts. New A/C. Must
seel REDUCEDI $7,900.
David 352-637-6443.
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
trans. & arts. $4.000.


PLYMOUTH Barracuda
1970,$4000, 75000 -
miles,coupe, automatic,8
cyllnder,exterior:
purple,Interior: black
chelseasmouse@gmall.co
m

THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.
38K. MI. Like New.
$12,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 7985-0122



$85001 Pollae
Impounds for alel
Care from $800
800-38B-9813 x 7374


motor, good cond. 2
wheel drive Z71 pkg.
$3,900. ,
352-563-1518 Iv msg
CHEVROLET
1994, 1500 W/T. runs
great, new A/C, top-
per, $2,000 obo
(352) 302-1322
CHEVY
'88 S-10, auto, 2.8
V-6, short bed, 2 wh.
drive, cold air, great truck.
$1,900. Obo.
(352) 564-0039
(352) 279-8179
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US19, Across Airport
(352)461-4518
conslgnmentusa.org
DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awe-
,some Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded
every special feature. Sr.
own, gar. kept., 27K mi,
$40K
invested Sale $21,750
See online ad photos
www.autotrader.com/atca
ridlat-f3fd39f
John (352) 726-1076
DODGE RAM '00
Std cab, rare 5spd, hemi,
V8, a/c, 25mpg, new 22"
rims & tires. Dependable
$3700. 352-563-0615
FORD
'00, F250, 7.3 Delsel,
84K mi. raised, custom
int., red, $15,500 obo
(352) 344-5555 ext. 101
FORD
'02 F-150 XLT, Ext. cab,
4dro,auto, loaded black &
silver, extra clean, sharp.
$7,995 Wooten's

FORD 04
Ranger, X-cab. Exc. cond
38k mi. SLASHED THE
PRICE $97K to $8,500
(352)746-3919
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serve. van. 41K Mi/5.4 L.
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serv. body/dble lock drs.
$20,000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD F-150
T995, 4x4, cold a/c,
new tires, runs good
$2500 obo(352)
564-0530



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
BUICK
'03 Rendezvous.
$8,995 Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
CADILLAC
'05 Escalade, low ml. all
exc. cond. $28,000
(347) 266-9328
CADILLAC 2004 Esca-
lade $19,500 - Low Mi-
les 43500 Onstar,Xm
Radio and Phone ready,
3rd Row Seats, Rear
Air, Heated Seats, Run-
ning Boards, 22"
rimsitires and original
Rims/tires. Garage
Kept/Non Smoker
352-302-6073
CHEVY
'06 Trailblazer
$12,995. 2 avail. Ocala
Volvo (352) 629-7299
CHEVY
BLAZER '99 LS 4dr.
126k mi. loaded, great
cond. sunroof, $4k obo
352-422-0065
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air &
exhaust, Exc. Cond. $6,000
obo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl
drive, class 3 hitch, Orig
owner. Great shape &
price. $8,750.
352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
GMC ENVOY
Red,'03, 60k ml., On-Star,
5-passenger, $10,500
obo (352) 527-3445
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, $8,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
LEXUS
'07 RX 350, Black, tan
leather Int. Navigation, back
up cam, blue tooth, very
clean, 75K.mi.
$25,000.(352) 527-8372
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG. Silver
W/black Int. Loaded,
57K.MI. New $64K.Ask
$20Kr (352)489-7674
TOYOTA
'03, 4-Runner SR5, 6 cyl
leather, moon roof
tow pkg. $8,500 firm.
(352) 563-9834 "
VOLVO
'06 XC90, $20,995
3 avail. Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
FORD '06 F-150
Crew cab XLT. Tow pkg
& topper, 51K mi.
Exc cond. LOADEDQL
$18,500/obo. (352)
634-1378; 795-2053
SUZUKI
'96, Sidekick,
4 x 4 with RV tow
packageS 1,995.00
(352) 697-5530



$5001 Police


Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT








$$ SAVE $$

* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
'ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

352-422-6956
wwwANUSSO.oom


CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872
DODGE
'03 Grand Caravan SE.
low mi. 53K. dual air, sun
screen, CD & cass. New
tires. Looks & drives like
new. White, $6,800.
(352) 860-1106




$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains & tows
heavy loads. $3200/or
trade. 352- 563-0615
Crystal River




2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900mi. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. Hi perf.
Over $43,000 in receipts.
17k mi. $11,700
352-563-0615
Crystal River
1970's HONDA MINI
TRAIL - Classic,
3-spd auto clutch.
Excellent condition.
. $900. 352-228-3285
352-419-4553
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'97 SOFT TAIL HARLEY
DAVIDSON. Custom
build. 3K ml. Black,
chrome. Must Seel $15 k
Invested-$9,000 sacrifice
(352) 660-0675
'99 SUSUZKI MARAUDER
805,15k ml., $3500 obo;
'05 SUSUZKI VINSON 500
ATV 4x4 $3300 obo
Call for Info
(352)220-7152
HARLEY
'96 Sporster 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes,chro. Ex. clean
$4,850.(352) 637-5143
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80", '
completely serviced,
good shape. Ex.
access. $5,395. obo
352-746-7655-726-4109


DAVIDSON
96 Heritage Soft tall, red
many extras $9600 call
evenings (352) 746-3613
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 MI.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
HONDA 04
1300 VTX,
thousands In oflto .
mint condition $5900 obo
(352) 302-7073
HONDA
Aero 2006 wlndshelld
V & H pipes, 2nd seat,
sissy bar $5200 obo
352-302-4320
HONDA
Shadow Arrow 06,
garage kept, not in rain,
floorboard $6200 obo
(347)223-7269 aft 3:30
KAWASKI
'00, ZRX 1100
CC,15K. Mi. Very
fast, many extra's.
$4k obo.
(352)621-3764
SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather bik os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Bik w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, IThs
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k
invested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Askigg $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
SUZUKI
'77, 750 CC,
$1,100 Firm.
(352) 563-5688
VENTO PHANTOM
Scooter, 318 miles,
150CC, Like new.
$2,190/obo.
352-422-2433
YAMAHA
'05 YZ125 DPIRT BIKE
Race ready. Many ex-
tras. $2500. 352-
586-1683: 586-9349
YAMAHA
2005 V-Star Classic 1100
5000 mi. Bik & gold,
much chrome,
immaculate, $5,700


572-0526 TUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Petitioner, Jeff Eberly, on behalf of Octaviao
Thomas. hereby give notice of their Intention to peti-
tion the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners
to vacate the east and west side utility easements on
the property located at 521 W. Duquet Place, Citrus
Springs, lot 17 block 336 unit 4, section 24, township 17
south, range 18 east, plat book 5, page 133. The pur-
pose of this easement vacation Is to allow for a retain-
Ing wall on each side of the home.
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 19 and 26,2009.

. 573-0602 TUCRN
2009-CP-000293 Herbert F. Bubser Notice to Cred.
' - ' PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
NO.: 2009-CP-000293
IN RE: ESTATE OF HERBERT F. BUBSER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of, Herbert F. Bubser,
deceased, whose date of death was Nov. 18, 2008,
and whose Social Security Number Is 263-50-4763, Is
pending In the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division; the address of which is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Room 101, Inverness, Florida
34450-4299. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons hav-
Ing claims or demands against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice Is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
.AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE,
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. ,
The date of first publication of this notice Is 5/26/2009.
/s/ Gloria J. Bubser
3117 N. Woolflower Terrace
Beverly Hills, Florida 34465-3807
Personal Representative
Robert E. Austin, Jr. Florida Bar No, 0002701
robert E. Austin, Jr. Law Offices
P.O. Box 490200, Leesburg, FL 34749-0200
Telephone: (352) 728-1020 Facslmile: (352) 728-0595.
Attorney for Personal Representative
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 26 and June 2,2009.


571-0526 TUCRN
AA-09-17
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN ORDINANCE
TO ESTAB4SH OR CHANGE REGULATIONS
AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND
The Planning and Development Review Board will con-
duct a Public Hearing on un 4. 09 at 9:00 AM, at
the Lecanto Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto,
Florldoa, to. consider adoption of the following ordi-
nance. Please note that the PDRB meeHng bealns at
9:00 AM. The actual time that a particular Item iL dis-
cussed will vary deoendina on how fast the PDRB
moves through the agenda.
AA-09-17 Clark A. Stillwell for River Lodge Resort. LLC Is
requesting a Land Development Code (LDC) Atlas
Amendment, to amend a previously approved Master
Development Plan for River Lodge Resort pursuant to
Section 2270. Planned Develooments, of the LDC. The
Master Development Plan was previously established
by Vested Rights Determination VR-03-01 River Lodge
Park. The property under application Is Parcel 44100,
located at 13790 W. Foss Groves Path, Inglls, Florida.
(Section 11. Township 17 South. Ranae 16 East). A com-
plete legal description of the property Is on file with the
Department of Development Services)
Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be
heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance
Amendment.
A copy of the proposed. Ordinance and supporting
materials Is available for public Inspection and copying
between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. at the
Community Development Division, Suite 140, 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida, For more Information
about this application please contact a Planner at the
Department of Development Services (352) 527-5239.
Information' regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan Is available on the Internet at
http://www.bocc.citrus.fl.us (Click on Departments, De-
velopment Services, then the Community Develop-
ment link).
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at this
hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceed-
Ings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to In-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings Is
made, which record Includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal Is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6565, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
Impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 19 and 26,.2009.


















A weekly advertising supplement of the Citrus County Chronicle
Autos, Trucks, RVs, ATVs, Motorcycles, Campers & More!


BY COMPARISON
,'-..


For around 20 grand, you don't need a lot of green to be green


The Insight is back with more power, a more
practical design and a new mission as the most-
affordable gasoline-electric hybrid on the
block.
The original Insight, available from 2000-'06, was a fuel-
sipping marvel. Unfortunately, its two-passenger capacity kept
it in niche-market territory, while Toyota's category-leading
Prius four-door hybrid hatchback stole:the show. Meanwhile.
Honda briefly tried marketing an Accord hybrid and continues
to sell a similar Civic, but still trails the Prius by a consider-
able distance in terms of sales.
Honda is now pinning its hopes on a brand new Insight
squarely aimed at urban professionals seeking great fuel econ-
omy while helping protect the environment. The Japanese-
based automaker also hopes to appeal to the fearlessly frugal by
keeping the sticker price in the $20,000
range (the actual price won't be set until O iWng a 4
closer to the Insight's launch on Earth city/highv
Day, April 22). tle lttfillt
As with the similar-looking Toyota
Prius, the Insight has been designed for its estimate
maximum practicality as well as fuel ef- city rating I
ficiency. The cabin feels particularly consumpti e
roomy and the storage space beneath the
hatchback beats the current Prius by dedicaSd 'h
about 14 percent (Toyota will launch an driving p
all-new and enlarged Prius later this using h vry 1
spring).
Although the Insight is a dedicated hy- WIck
brid, which means it's not merely con- beat that
verted from another Honda model, its by arIy
basic structure has been lifted from the


entry-level Honda Fit and the view out the generously sized
windshield is 'virtually identical. However, the car's-aerody-
namically shaped nose helps it more efficiently slice through
the air, which increases fuel economy.
Motivating the Insight is an 88-horsepower 1.3-liter gas en-
gine functioning with a 13-horsepower electric motor for a net
total of 98 horses. By comparisoiEf,"oth the current Prius and
the Honda Civic hybrid are each rated at 110 horsepower.
The power system is connected to a continuously variable
transmission (CVT) of a type favored by most hybrid manu-
facturers.
Fuel econoiny is estimated at a respectable 40 mpg city, 43
mpg highway and 41 mpg, overall. However, dash-moufited
monitors encourage drivers to beat these numbers. The gauge
display includes an "Eco Assist" speedometer that changes


way leg,
:achieved
ad 434npg
for ~owrail
My while a





number
30 on".


background color from blue (inefficient) to
green (the most fuel efficient), depending
on your driving, style. 'When questioned
why orange or red wasn't displayed for
leadfoot types, Insight chief engineer Ya-
sunari Seki said that he "did not wish to
scold drivers" for their fuel-wasting habits,
but use gentle persuasion to teach them.
The Insight also comes with an ECON
button that, when pushed, induces the gas
engine to shut down sooner when stopping,
limits power and torque by four percent and
runs the air conditioning and fan motor
more efficiently.
Finally, an Eco Guide display rates driver
performance by displaying an increasing
number of "tree leaves"


earned per trip as an indication of an efficient driving style.
During a 60-mile city/highway leg, the Insight achieved its
estimated 43-mpg city rating for overall consumption, while a
dedicated 'hyper-miler' driving partner, using every fuel-saving
trick imaginable, beat that number by nearly 30 mpg. With
practice, and the help of the Insight's ever-present reminders
about driving efficiency, it was easy to attain figures in the low-
60-mpg range, but only by using the kind of slow-motion driv-
ing tactics that would aggravate most passengers and anyone
sharing the road.
In the real % world. the fully equipped base Insight LX proved
a comfortable, capable and an enjoyable way to get around,
while the optional EX added to the fun with cruise control;
heated outside mirrors, upgraded audio system and an optional
navigation package.
Honda has obviously tried to make the Insight appealing to
all kinds of buyers and, if
the company holds fast to
its low-price approach,
will no doubt entice
many hybrid fanciers
into the Honda
camp.


If. t


2007 Victory
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE'


D2 TUESDAY. MAY 26. 2009


'MAP IS FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, LOCATION OF ADVERTISERS MAY NOT BE EXACT


SUNDAY
tr County Rtrads meet for breakfast at 8 a,mSundays at the restaurant at
rearof B&WRexall Drugs, InvemrnessAll makes and models of motorcycles welcome.
Ride follows.
WEDNESDAY
SInvewes g Dogs" motorcycle dub meets for breakfast at 8 amWednesdays
at rear of B&W Rexall Drugs.Ridefollows.all bikes welcome,Call J,Rand Rachel Har-
ris at 726.6T2
THURSDAY
SGold Wing Road RldersChapterFL1-R of Dunnellon meets at 630 p.m. on the
second, third and fourth Thursday of each month at McDonalds in Dunnellon.
Monthly gathering Isthe first Thursday at the Charlie Horse Restaurant, 20049 E.
Pennsylvania Ave, Dunnellon, 6 p.m.to eat and 730 to meet Call chapter director
Bruce Schlimme at (352) 465-1228.
* Gold Wing Road Riders Association ChapterT of Inverness kick tire at 6 p.m.
Thursday at Burger King parking lotcomer of U.S,41 and S.R.44 East.Call directors
Rachel, JR Harris at 726-6128 or Ken and Jackie Smith at (352) 476-7151.
FRIDAY . .
* Nature Coast Mustangs meets at 7 p.m. Friday at the Wendy' on US. 19 In Ho-
mosassa across from the wildlife park Bring your car and enjoy a fun evening. Call
Bob at 860-2598.
* The Wanderers Club meets from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at the parking lot of the
Beall's Department Store on State Road44West of lnvemess.Bring your old car and
have fun with other car enthusiasts. Call Frank at 212-2966 or visit wandererscar-
dubofinvemessfl.com.
SATURDAY
* Free Wheelin'Sertoma dub motorcycle club meets at 9 a.m. Saturday "on the
road.'Call Rainer Jakob at 726-7903 for destinations.
* Nature Coast Retreads meets at 8 am.Saturdays at Hatringtont Restaurant,4135
S.Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.Aride follows.All styles of motorcycles are welcome,
Call Jacque at 637-4693 or Dave at 628-2401.
* Citrus County Cruisers car club invites you to its cruise-In from 6 to 9 p.m., Sat-
urday at Kings Bay Plaza (next to Wendy') In Crystal River. Canned goods are col-
lected for local charities. Call Jim Moran at 527-0024 or Lester Barnes 628-7021.
SCitrusCountySpeedwayMAY30;4Cylinder Bombers 50 Laps,MinilStock.Street
Stock, Pure Stock V8 Thunder Stock, Outlaw Mod Mini. Any additional questions
please contact the speedway at (352) 726-9339.

Send us your automotive and
auto club events information to
wheels@chronicleonline.com


DRA(


Owner

Jim Mayer


J im Mayer bought the Mustang new. 19 years ago the engine by the turbo charger. The
for his son Chris to have a reliable car when he purpose of the cooled air is to be able to
went off to college. During those college years he run the car ds lean as possible, which
managed to put over 100,000 miles on the car. creates more power. The inner cooler
"The Mustang did'everything we' have ever asked also has a secondary purpose of cooling -
for. It was a wonderful car. It was the reliable . the Lransmission fluid.
workhorse I had hoped for while my son was off to The goil is to get into the class
school," said Mayer. called Drag Radial This class runs on
"One day, after my son had graduated from college, what is known as a radial tire. The idea
my son and I were talking about what we should do is to be able to hook up 2,000
with the car and my son came up with the idea to make horsepower to a street tire. According to
a racecar out of it. It was my son's idea to transform Mayer there is a fine line to be able to ,
the reliable workhorse into a dragster. get 2,000 horsepower delivered
"Since my son's decision to create a dragster out of correctly'to the tires and ultimately to the track's surface.
our '90 Mustang it, has gone through many "Can you imagine if 2,000 horsepower went directly to
-transformations. It has gone from Old Teliable, to-super - ."-the rear tires? Everything would blow apart. You need to
pretty, to dragster, and finally, as bad as it can be. start off with .the correct boost at the beginning and
"We have had three different motors with each increase boost as you increase the power, paying particular
adding more horsepower along the way. In doing so we attention not to spin the tires resulting in loss time and
also had to keep changing the configuration of the car speed. You need the tires to stick. All that is done by the
to be able to handle the increase in the horsepower," computer, which analyzes each run. Then we make
explained Mayer. adjustments accordingly. Hopefully we get it right" Mayer
Just as an example, it costs the Mayers $18 per said with a smile.
gallon for the fuel and about 40 to 50 pounds of ice just . . The Mustang has a 302 "R" block Ford engine bored
to get the Mustang to make a run down the track just out to 70 o\ er which makes this little beast have only 356
for testing or what you might call "dialing the car in." cubic inches. "R" block engines do not have water jackets
The ice is needed for the inner-cooler that converts like everyday conventional engines.
170-degree air into 61-degree air, which is forced into Simply put, the engine block is solid with eight holes
for the pistons. Besides the front
and back Ford emblems and the
Ford "R" block, every other piece
of equipment on the Mustang is
S'there for the sole purpose of
creating more speed.
Although they are still in the
, testing stages, the range of time
and speed is running in the high
seven seconds at a speed of 178 to
185 miles per hour in the quarter
mile.
During a Ford Mustang-
show last year, Mayer heard a
lot of trash talk about all the
Mustangs that had been .on a
quarter-mile drag simulator
dyno. The dyno is a true
simulator where one or two
vehicles can actually be


SBlock: Ford Racing R302
4-bolt main 8.2 deck height
Bore: 4,080
Stroke: ' 3.400
MADisplacement: 356 cu. in.(302 block)
Compression: 8.3:1
f S T E R h l- I - Assembly:. ,' Scat Billetsteel crnk,
Oliver Billet steel rods, JE Pistons
Camshaft: Cam Motion customgrind
T Heads: TFS Twisted Wedge-R series
ported by Total Engine Airflow
Intake: Edelb0k Super Vir Junior
.,modifiedfor Fuel injection
with Wilson EFI elbow
Throttle Body: Accufab 90mm
Power Adder: Precisi nTurbo 106mm trbo
S with 3000hp air to water intercooler
custom fabricated by Chishled Performance,
dual 42mm wastegates and a Turbonetics
Bypass. All intercooler piping custom fabricated
by Eddie Bickett Fabrications
Fuel System: Weldon 2345 2000+hp Efi
Sfuel pump with custom stainless feed
a nand return lines, Weldon EFI regulator
Exhaust: Pro Turbo Kit Headers,

DRIVETRAIN:
' Transmission: 2 speed Powerglide by
strapped down and emulate a quarter mile race. The Trans-port Specialties
dyno will record the speed and elapsed time and give w/fronsbroke, Cheetah Shifter
t1 ' 0 radtrg Astrthe horsepower of, te d R tca A i8 ridrs o At8 d ill e"sids,
vehicle delivered to the rear tires. fortified with 33spline Moser axles and spool
So Mayer decided to show them all "hoW the big dogs
run." They strapped the Mustang down using six straps ELECTRONICS:
instead of the traditional two straps. In a matter of a few Engine Management:F.A.ST. XFI system with
seconds, the Mustang ramped up to 7,500 rpm not even data logger tuned by Ramsey's Performance
having reached .8,000 rpm, which is the rpm that Mayer of Tamp
would have shifted gears when the Dyno started to shake Ignition: MSD 7am-3,MSD HVC coil,
and make funny noises. Needless to say Jim had to shut the 10mm Tylo wires, NGK Plugs
little beast (Mustang) down.
The horsepower registered was 1552 horsepower at the CHASSIS/SUSPENSION:
rear tires. When you take 22 per cent horsepower'lost Cage: 25.5 NHRA approved Chromoly rollcage
between the engine and the wheels you get approximately custom fabricated by Eddie Bickett Fabrications
1900 horsepower at the engine. The owner of the dyno Front: QA1 coilover struts with QA1 14" springs,
said the Mustang registered the highest of any vehicle that QAl complete K-member package
had run. It might be safe to say the Mustang should deliver Rear: Lakewood 50/50 shocks
2,000 horsepower. and Eiboch Drag springs
The son explains that the ride is different. "You get h l rd R in g springs
pushed back so hard you don't hear anything. It becomes ,Wheels/Tres: WELD Racing 15x3.5,15x10
completely quiet. It is almost like blacking out. It's not like rears with 28x10.5 Mickey Thompson slicks
the earlier cars where you could reach around and do things PERFORMANCE:
as you went down the track. With this car you are just
along for the ride," he said. 1500+hp, estimated high 7 second
"I guess we will continue to build on it until we run out
of parts to put on it.'Honestly, we never expected to build amilti7 m
car with this much technology and horsepower, Mayer said.
Maybe you're a restoration enthusiast and have some
stories or memories to share. Perhaps you own a muscle,
classic or vintage car that is your pride and joy. Feel free
to call 563-3291 or e-mail Brian A. Bisson at
bbisson@chronicleonline.com. We would like to get some
pictures and possibly a story for our Wheels section so we
all can sit back and enjoy a ride down Memory Lane.


Today everything is related to speed. .


Pictures and story by:
Brian A. Bisson


_____----------




TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009 D3


'XV


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Motor oil can last a lot longer

than most motorists think, says

one state environmental agency.


By Holly Ocasio Rizzo
CTW Features
The little plastic sticker in the
comer of the windshield plays on
your guilt: "Next oil change," 'it
says, listing an odometer reading
3,000 miles higher than the last
time you had the car into the"
shop. Your odometer rolled past
that number 1,500 miles ago
.without so much as a sip of fresh
oil for the engine.
Are you driving down the road
to ruin? After all, the conventional
wisdom says oil should be
changed every 3,000 miles. Then,
just as you're figuring out what
your car's tombstone should say,
along comes a campaign claiming
that the conventional wisdom is a
fabrication.
The campaign, "The 3,000-
Mile Myth," originated with the
California Integrated Waste Man-
agement Board, a state agency
charged with reducing landfill
junk and pollution. In a survey,
the board found that 73 percent of
Californians took the conven-
tional wisdom to heart, changing
their cars' oil most often at 3,000
miles - more frequently than their
cars' manufacturers' recom-
mended. Moreover, it discovered,
only 60 percent of
used engine oil is
tured in for recy- |
cling.. .
The result was
that more oil than O I
necessary is con-
sumed and more for
used oil is going into
landfills, where it
could potentially
contaminate water
.supplies. Changing
motor oil less fre-
quently saves oil, 31C
money and the envi-
ronment, the board ad,
contends.
"While the old ca
standard for oil
change frequency
was every 3,000
miles, advances in h *
car engines and oils
have made that ob- that
solete," says the t
campaign's Web
site, 3000mile-
myth.com, where the'
word "debunked" Ca
greets visitors in
large orange letters. V
"Many of today's
automakers recom- 300C
mend oil changes at
5,000, 7,000 or even


10,000 miles."
- Word of the campaij
is being conducted in pr
radio, has rolled across t
The American Automol
ciation and Enterprise R
have signed on. But not
is so ready to abandon
dor they've heard th
cai-owning lives.
According to the W
the Automotive Oil Cha
ciation, a trade group t
sents 3,500 oil-change ft
the U.S. and abroad, "(
your oil every 3,000
three months, whichey
fist, is generally record
However, you should f
recommendations u
owner's manual."
Oil to an engine is li
makeup and makeup
rolled into one. It lubric
minor flaws and carries
purities. It also helps co
gine and protects
corrosion. It's a necess
for engine-life.
With use, oil become
the oil filter picks out
nants. It also begins
down, losing some of i
ity, or thickness, because


While the

I standdi

oil chanl

equency

ras ever)

)00 mile

vances i

ir engine

and oils

ave madi

t obsolet

says the

mpaign'

Veb site.

Omilemyth.c(


sure to heat. So automakers assign
gn, which various life spans to oil, depend-
ild and on ing on the engines in which it's
he nation. used.
bile Asso- Some driving conditions has-
.ent-a-Car ten the oil-breakdown process.
everyone They're called "severe" condi-
the wis- tions, even though drivers may
eir entire experience them every day. These
conditions include long periods of
eb site of idling (such as in traffic jams),
nge Asso- driving in weather colder than 10
hat repre- degrees and hotter than 90 de-
acilities in grees, high humidity and towing
Changing a trailer.
miles or Some manufacturers have de-
'er comes vised computerized sensors to de-
.fnended. tect when it's time for the old
follow the engine oil to go. General Motors,
n your BMW and Mercedes-Benz all
have them. The sensors measure
ike lotion, factors such as engine lemper3-
-remo\ er ture and vehicle speed to make
cates, fills their calculations. Mercedes has
away im- developed sensors that gauge vis-
lol the en- cosity and measure the contami-
against inants in oil based on the oil's
sary fluid response to an electric field. The
idea is to relieve drivers of the re-
es dirty as sponsibility for remembering
contami-' when to change the oil. i'
to break Left in drivers' hands, what's
ts viscos- right? Only a car's owner's man-
e of expo- ual knows for sure, so be sure to
check it before heading in for an
oil change.
If your car is from the 2000
Smodel-year or later, you also can
,:' check its maker-recommended
oil-change frequency at the 3,000-
Mile Myth Web site, 3000mile-
g e myth.org. Although the site
doesn't list every vehicle, it shows
a wide range of possibilities. For
example, the BMW 3 Series' fre-
S. quency is determined "by inspec-
" tion," while the Honda Accord
and Civic can go a year between
s i changes under ideal driving con-
-. editions. The range for Inost of the
In models on the list is 3,000 to
7,500 miles.
kS But since few motorists drive
under ideal conditions all the
time, what's reasonable? The oil-
change industry association sug-
e gests sticking to 3,000 miles
between changes. It's not a mat-
e Je ter of making lube shops rich -
S' they say they don't make much
money on oil changes. Some ex-
perts suggest that, if you must
have a rule of thumb, make it
5 5,000 miles. And if you have an
older car - built before the days of
21st century engine efficiency
and better, longer-lasting oil - and
om want to change the oil every 3,000
miles, nobody will stop you.
(c) CTW Features


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755
Ext. 4146

*10,988*
or $194 mo."

'06 LIBERTY





FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INF)AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755
Ext. 4145
$9,988*
or $176 mo.*

'05 MAGNUM


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755
Ext. 4139
*10,988*


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755
Ext. 4143
$10,988*
or $194 mo.*

'05 CADILLAC





FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755
Ext. 4137
*'14,988*

or, 264 mo.m

'04 SEBRING






FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755
Ext. 4135
$5,988*


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755
Ext. 4141
15,988*
or $284 mo.

'05 PACIFICA I


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755
Ext. 4144
$10,988*
or *194 mo.'

'03 DURANGO






FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755
Ext. 4133
$6,988*


CRYSTAL CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP

m""-". Jeep

2077 Hwy. 44 West 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd. 14358 Cortez Blvd.
INVERNESS HOMOSASSA BROOKSVILLE


800-584-8755 Ext. 1 crystalautos.com
Ia0A'MwaP il(c isti�T Bc.e 4


F I UESDAY, MAY 20, ZUUY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DA TirT,,... A.2., o6r 0nn












there's never been a better


AlI-New 2010
CHEW CAMAROS


:ew 2009 Chtevy
AVL


he -,


It's back with an All-New
Retro-Modem Design!


nitn Air Conal.
Transmission


34
MPG!


bubAfIiw


Monthly payment $16.67 for every $1,000 financed.
Some customers will not quality. Not available with other offers.
See dealer for details. Take delivery by 6/1/09.


New ~A9 Uhaw


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COBALT *


Automatic Transmission,
-Air Conditioning, 4 Door!



29 MPG!
- *** . .* *


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on Highway 44West
in Inverness

p5 m2111
*^fii BB.f0BBB1'~lB -~l **' w ui'


You'll LOVE Doing
Business WithO Us!


* All prices include $2,000 cash or trade equity plus tax, tag and $449 administrative fee. Pictures for illustrative purposes only. Offers expire 5-26-09.


'BUl


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONIC


TUESDAY, MAY 26, 2009 D5


V6s!l
VWs!


ISI


' "









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


nD TUESDnAv MYv 9M Y2.20


TOO BIG FO!
SQ: I will be taking care of my grandchild for the next several
months. He's 9 - obviously too big for a child seat, but he's small for
his age. Is there any way to know if the adult seatbelts will do what
Hg pm i . they should do in an accident?
S- A: There is. The American Automobile Association suggests this
easy test:
A2 * When your grandchild sits all the way back against the car's seat,
do his knees bend as they should at the seat edge?
SDoes the seat belt crops at the-shoulder (and not at the neck or
' arm)? ,
* Is the lap belt as low as possible, actually touching the thighs?
S* Can he stay seated like this for the whole trip?
AAA says if you answer "no" to any of the questions, the kid needs
a booster seat to make the belt fit properly.
He probably won't be happy if he has to go back into a booster seat
at his age, but you may be able to lessen the sting by reminding him
that it won't be for very many months.
In fact, AAA recommends a booster seat for kids up to eight years
P .old anyhow, unless the child is 57 inches tall or taller. So it's not
, ~ that far out of the norm.
Q: Now that the Smart ForTwo minicar is becoming available,
what's the consensus? Flash in the pan or worth examining?
W hat's your question? A I haven't driven it, but among those who have there is pretty
widespread agreement: It's definitely not for everyone. Still, if you
Sharon Peters would like to hear iwhat s orn your mind when i want to make a conservation statement, appreciate the attention such
comes to caring for, driving, repairing and making the mos of you car generates (because this little naber really cant be ignored)
vehicle. Send your questions Io sharon@ctwfeatures.com- a


Automotive

Classifieds


rE -


R BOOSTER?

and don't take a lot of long road trips, you may like it.
A writer for the Associated Press recently observed that although
it's pretty cheap ($11,590 base price) it's more expensive than the
Toyota Yaris and Hyundai Accent, which are larger four-passenger
subcompact vehicles. And although it gets better mileage (33 mpg)
than the Yaris, it's not nearly as fuel stingy as the Toyota Prius or the
Honda Civic Hybrid (which each are rated at 40 mpg or better).
And you get a lot of road noise in the Smart ForTwo, everyone
agrees.
Still, if you do a lot of in-city driving, it is not only nimble and fuel-
efficient, it's a breeze to park.
For those who haven't yet seen one buzzing about, it's a mere 8.83
feet long, seats two passengers and looks sort of like a rolling, snub-
nose helicopter cabin.
Q: I always see advice against topping off the gas tank. But no
one has ever explained why, and, really, if you can get an extra 10
or 15 miles per fill-up, you're sort of inclined to do it. Can you ex-
plain?
A: Two reasons: When you top off, .you're filling up the small
open space in your gas tank system that's intended to keep gas fumes
from escaping into the air. We don't need any more of that.
And the second is this: When you're working against the automatic
cut-off, you're likely to overfill to the point that some (maybe just
a little) fuel gushes out of the tank and onto the ground, and there's
likely to be some spill-off from the pump nozzle as well. Both are
bad for the environment.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds

aIn Print

and

Online

All

=/ The Time


!!I.P.


Bereti


16FT CAR. SKIFF
'96, like new, $5,500
S40HP Evinrude, center ,
console, trolling motor, '
b-top, many extras
(352) 344-5858
A IRBOAT
1996 15' 500Subic inch,
Cad1ia: erg,re
' completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
AQUA SPORT
,190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
9.92001352-746-5856
AQUA SPORT
2000; 225 Explorer 24'
. Cuddy cabin. 225
Johnson Ocean Pro.
Loadmaster tandem axle
trailer. Exc. cond.
$14,500.352-493-7377;
352-221-5230
BOSTON WHALER
14 ' w/ 40 hp Johnson,
Everything worknsgood
$1800 (352) 302-0033
Cabin Cruiser
" . 24ft.'
". :'..r.,-r.3 .3 *:*cyl. 10,
a*ip.r,.3 ,.;,n /C. used in
Fresh water, tan. gal. trl
Incl.'d $2,100 464-0316 .
CENTURY
, '01-Bay, 21ft. '
'02. 1501-P Yarnarra ,A
Irir , cusi o i ,'o er ,
dep/find, VHF, Iw hrs.,
like new, $13,950. 7.
(352) 442-7772
Deck Boat .
95' 19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ ra-
, dio & fishfinder. New Bat- ,
tery switch. 2 batteries,
. . power pk.
S prop./hub.$6,000
S (352) 726-0838
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Jor-n.onz Tra,,.l
Many e6 l,':a,.
$14,500/obo. (352)
,489-9640: 220-6508
. GRADY WHITE
20 ft., 200 hp, Honda
4-stroke, 2004, 179 hours
on motor. Kept indoors,
Exc. cond., + trailer
$9,995 (352) 637-2145
, HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
1 15HP, 4strke Yamaha,
w/trlr, $11,200. will -
* trade (352) 503-3778
HURRICANE
23ftDeck Boat, 112HP
Johnson, great for fish-
Ing & scalloping Must
Sell $3,500, 628-7397
PONTQON '08
Sweetwd2er21ft. 25 hours.
90h Yamaha.
.i ....O r.1.ar,, E .r,3:
352-503-6797
PONTOON BOAT
08'20 Ft. To many
options to list. $13,000
Call for Info. 628-7926
PONTOON
Sylvan 20'Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hra. Playpen Cdver_
port-o-potty, extras $12,000
(352) 628-0281
PRO-LINE 221
WALKAROUND 1999
.200 HP Mercury w/9.9 HP
- Johnson ilcker,$12k
obo. Call Kurt at Pete's
� Pier 352-795-6067
SEA PRO
'00 19 FT. C/C. Loaded..
Elec. Pkg. 115 FI 4 Strk.
Yam. 100 hrs. Bim, top.
Best offer(352)533-3093
T-CRAFT
23'L, 6'W,'02 150H
Evin. mtr. w fuel enj. like
new, trIr. w/brks
$7750 352-489-3661
WELLCRAFT
1987, 250 Sportsman,
S25', Gas eng., 30" draft,.
260 hp I/O, alum.
trailer.$8,000
(352) 344-9651


'02 Cedar Creek 5th
Wheel 29t, 2-slides,
queen bed,bath/shower,
low mileage, loaded,
good cond. $16,800
(352) 746-4969
05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets:
Inverted, central van.
26inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835,
'07 NEW MAR ,
Cypress 32ht 51h wheel
2 .11 ". '' p .a ra ii a ir,.
Extras. 3 yr ext. warr.
$35,900/obo
. 352-794-3534
38FT BOUNDER '96
Class-A - basement
model. 49K mi. 14mpg,
.new tires & brakes. (4)
TVs. Ready for long trip.
2 0-00. 352-563-0615
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Fl IW. Slide. 36 K Mi.
.'uai a'r $37,700 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
CHEVY '86 Class C
Very good cond. Needs
tires. $4,000. Call ,
anytime. (352) 446-6329
CRUISE AIR,
. .'94, ClassA, Wide ..
body. Diesel.pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273 i
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane New
deal. 30Q, class A motor
.home, 31' ft., 22k mi.
V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed,
etc. Saturn tow incl.
$35,000. (352) 397-5007
GEORGIE.BOY
'05; Pursuit, Class A,
30ft. Excel, cond. 8k mi.,
2 slide outs, 2.TV's, back
up camera, all the bells
and whistles and much
more, must see this
coach, Asking $50,000.
obo (352) 746-7626
* HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008 ',
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool,
clubhouse etc. Can be
moved $29,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg;
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$52,995. 352-464-0371
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-,
sel, Class C.,Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
,,$52,995. 352-464-0371
VOLKSWAGON
'01 Rialta, model 22FD,
18-21 mpg, 51k org. ml.
fully self contained, too
many extras to list call '
for details. Super Nice.
(352) 628-9599



COLEMAN NIAGRA
' 2002. 15FT, opens to
26FT, 1 slide, $5,500 obo,
(352) 302-1322
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
KODIAK
"04, Hybrid Travel Tdr.
AC, Heat, Micro. Tub/
Shwer, toilet exc cond
$9,500. 352-564-4151
PROWLER
'99 21', self contained,
sleeps 6, new tires, AC,
bath, etc. $5,300
(352) 795-1417


'88 BUICK ELECTRA
Runs good, rear end
damage, drive or parts
(352) 795-8800
BUICK
'07 Lacrosse CX.
9,500 Mi. Ruby red, like
new. Must see. $12,900
Wooten's(352) 637-7117
CADILLAC 05
CTS, loaded, orglnlal
owner 55k ml. w/$1000
warranty $16,500
352-201-0991
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax-avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715


m
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Convrare
auto, AC, V6,36 mpg jet
black, dependable.

CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 mi-
les on this rare silver on
silver on silver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-'
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are ori
this gorgeous vette,
Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
included, Your's
for only ,.$48,000.
352- 270-3193
DODGE
'02 Status SXT. 4

4auii, air, loaded.
S43KMi.
extra clean.
$5,980'
Wooten's(352)
637-7117
FORD
'05 Taurus SE, V-6
Loaded, 43K. mi. extra,
clean. Must see. $7,880.
Wooten's (352)637-7117
FORD
'99 Crown Victora,
l~jm.r delv.'hCIe *'. Cl1, ",
W,. Runs great. 52.700.
Ooo.(352) 613-5776
HONDA
, 08 Civic, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
KIA
d04. Ohtma .' l.ii
I,',,3 . l3, I . .'3a I a r .
aor., ,ore$5:900 obo
* (352)1344-5555 ext 101
KIA RIO
2001 88K ml. New tim-
ing belt, good cond,
(352)437-5816
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well maintained.,
$2650. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370. .
LINCOLN
'96, lowncai. aorag -
J e p t, ' l,. , . i.:..3 .-. 1
$3,900 obo
(352) 344-5555 ext. 101
MAZDA
'03, Protege, auto
trans, AC, AM FM w/
CD, PW, PL. 83,400 mi.
$4,975 (352) 220-2199
MERCEDES'
'05.SLK, $2499,5. 2 avail.
Ocala io61vo
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'05 SLK, $24,995. 2 avail.
. Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'08 C- CLASS,$29,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCURY '04
Grand Marquis LS, bik
w/tan int ; 63K,; adult
owned. Non smoker, all.
options. Estate car.
$8900/neg.
352-465-8722
MITSUBISHI
'03, Diamante LS, excel,
cond. Always serviced,
Fully equip/Prlced be-
low Kelly BB. $7,900.
352-382-5702
MITSUBISHI
'09, Spider, as new,
BES1 OFFER
(352) 503-7626
SATURN
'01, L-300, leather, sun
roof, new. tires, 78K. mi.
$6,500, (352) 795-5032
TOYOTA
'06 Corolla,
$11,995 Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 mi.
warranty, $19,995.
(352) 382-1857
TOYOTA SUPRA '89
All original, red, 79k ml.,
6 cylinder, aloil power,
larga roof. Original
owner. Garaged, $7,695
(352) 726-3427
VOLVO
'05 S60, $15,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299


VOLVO
'06 S40, $15,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 80, $17,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S80, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
, VOLVO ,
S 08 S 40, $17,995.
S2 avail. Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S60, $19,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 6298-40537299



71954 CHRYSLERc
Imperial, Restorer's
Dreani$3S00obbo
352-228-0597
'- 53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, 350 V-8,
auto, May trade in part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
' 56 FORD
Custom line 4 door se-
dan. 6 cyl auto. $9,500.
Will consider trade for
tratrv ailer of equal
value.(352) 628-4053
ALFA ROMEO
'76, Spider. Project car.
$2300 obo
352-382-5702
BUICK 67
RIVIERA,' 430 wildcat
motor, 86k mi. amfm,
a/c, itw iwhi. elect seats,
very good cond. $8000
(352) 527-3961
CAMARO IROC Z
'88 Red, PS./PB. Cold
A.C. 62,000 Mi. Great
Condition. $6,900.
(352) 422-5663
GM El Camino
'84,1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
S GTO
1967, The'real deal, older
* restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint;
' 63K mi., $8,900 abo
(352) 5274221
(908) 763-8384
MERCEDES BENZ
1985 380SL, 2 top road-
ster. Drives, looks great.
Many nfew Mercedes
parts: New A/C. Must
seel REDUCEDI $7,900.
David 352-637-6443
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
trans. & parts. $4,000.
(352) 621-0126 ,


b- . . I
PLYMOUTH Barracuda
1970,$4000, 75000
milescoupe, automatic,8
cylinder,exterior:
purpleinterior: black
chelseasmouse@gmail.co
m
THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.

(352)1795-0122



'94 CHEVY
Ext. cab, 8 ft bed. New
motor, good cond. 2
wheel drive Z71 pkg.
$3,900.
352-563-1518 Iv msg
CHEVROLET
1994, 1500 W/T. runs
great, neW A/C, top-
per, $2,000 obo.
(352) 302-1322
CHEVY
'88 S-10, auto, 2.8
V-6, short bed, 2 wh.
drive, cold air, great truck.
$1,900. Obo.
(352) 564-0039
(352) 279-8179
DODGE RAM '00
Std cab, rare 5spd, hemi,
V8, a/c, 25mpg, new 22"
rims & tires. Dependable
$3700. 352-563-0615


FORD
'00, F250, 7.3 Delsel,
84K ml. raised, custom
int., red. $15,500 abo
(352) 344-5555 ext. 101
FORD
'02 F-150 XLT, Ext. cab,
4dr, auto, loaded black &
silver, extra clean, sharp.
"'$7,995 Woaten's
.' .(352) 637-7117
FORD.
*06 E 350, Cutaway,
sqrv. van. 4-K M. '54- L.
'Eng, Aulo '. Knanne.de
Se'. .' 0:dy.'Cb lEhock .r '
$20,000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD F-150
S1995, 4x4, cold a/c,
new tires, runs good
$2500 obo(352)
564-0530 ,



BUICK
Bj03 Rendezvous.
$8,995 Ocala Volvo
'(352) 629-7299
CADILLAC
'05 Escalade, lOw m . all
1pw " i un r.:,c'
IC ,:on 1,,'l 8.00j
(2471 266-9328
CAbILLLAC 2004 Esca-
lea 43500 Onstar,Xm
Radio and Phone ready,
3rd Row Seats. Rear
Air, Heated Seats. Run-
ning Boards, 22'
rnmsitires and original
Rims/tires. Garage
Kept/Non Smoker
352-302-6073
CHEVY
'06 Trallblazer
$12,995. 2 avail. Ocala
Volvo (352) 629-7299
DODGE
99, DURANGO4x4 80K
mi., loaded, dual air &
exhaust, Exc. Cond. $6,000
' aobo
(352) 344-0505
'GMC ENVOY
Red,'03, 60k mi., On-Star,
5-passenger, $10,500
obo (352) 527-3445
S HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, $8,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629:7299
LEXUS
'07 RX 350, Black, tan
leather int Navigation, back
up cam, blue tooth, very
:; clean, 75K.mi.
$25,000.(352) 527-8372
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG Silver,
W/black int. Loaded,
S57K.Mi. New $64K.Ask
$20K. (352)489-7674
VOLVO
'06 XC90, $20,995
3 avail. Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299



FORD '06F-150
Crew cab XLT. Tow pkg
"& topper, 51K mi.
Exc cond. LOADED
$18,500/obo. (352)
634-1378; 795-2053
SUZUKI
'96, Sidekick,
4 xa 4 with RV tow
package$1,995.00
(352) 697-5530



CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872
DODGE
'03 Grand Caravan SE.
low mi. 53K. dual air, sun
screen, CD & cass. New,
tires. Looks & drives like
new. White, $6,800.
(352) 860-1106



HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains & tows
heavy loads. $3200/or
trade. 352- 563-0615
Crystal River


2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900mi. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat;
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237

'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. Hi pert.
Over $43,000 in receipts.
17k mi$11,700
352-563-0615
Crystal Riyer
'97 SOFT TAIL HARLEY
DAVIDSON. Custom
build. 3K mi. Black,
chrome. Must Seel $15 k
invested-$9,000 sacrifice,
(352) 860-0675
' 99.SUSUZKI MARAUDER
805,15k mi., $3500 obo;
'05 SUSUZKI VINSON 500
ATV 4x4 $3300 obo
r info
" S , 52)'220-7152


'96 Sporster 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes,chro. Ex. clean
$4,850.(352) 637-5143

Harley Davidson
2005, Dyna Wideglide
7,400 ml., excel. cond.
' $11,000.
(352) 249-7277

Harley Davidson
81 Sr, ovlniea. 8u
CC-m.plel5 -.:e- d,
good shape. Ex".
access. $5,395. obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109


'HARLEY
DAVIDSON
96 Heritage Soft tail; red
many extras $9600 call
evenings (352) 746-3613 '


$19,900,

Standard

Standard


Standard


Available


Standard

Available

44.1 In.

56.8 In.

15.3 Ft.

23 MPG


460.00 Mi.


620.00 Mi.


180 @ 3900


'H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 Mi.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069

SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
' Gangster white walls, :
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, BIk w/colored ghost
.flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, "IThis
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k
invested, may trade-for
nice tractorw/bucket or
bobcat etc.
0aj2lf qcmgreqinfo.
5'2 302'28t15


$21,650

Not Available

Not Available


Available


Not Available


Not Available

Not Available

41.7 In

54.6 In.

15.0 Ft.

21 MPG


388.50 MI.


573.50 Mi.


.161 @ 4000


m
HONDA
Aero 2006 windsheild
V & H pipes, 2nd seat,
sissy bar $5200 abo
352-302-4320
KAWASKI
'00, ZRX 1100
CC,15K. Mi. Very
fast, many extra's.
$4k obo.
(352)621-3764
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
SUZUKI
'77,750 CC,
$1,100 Firm.
(352) 563-5688
VENTO PHANTOM
Soooter, 318 miles,
150CC, Like new.
S$2,190/obo.
S"352422-2433 r


$21,705

Not Available

Not Available


Not Available


Not Available


Not Available

Not Available

42.5 In

56.6 In

14.0 Ft.

21 MPG


388.50 Mi.


555.00 Mi.


161 @ 4300


' ,,,i . .




2009 Nissan Altima 2009 Toyota Camry 2009 Honda Accord
4 Dr. Sedan 4 Dr. Sedan Sedan 4 Dr.
_ 14 CVT 14 Auto Le (Natl) 14 Auto Lx


Base
Msrp



Rear Seat
:Heat Ducts

Rear Reading
Lamps

Entertainment
,System

Keyless Start

Dvd Player

Front Leg Room

Front Hip Room

Trunk Volume

Epa Fuel Economy Est
- City

Cruising Range
- City

Cruising Range
.-Hwy.

Sae Net Torque
@Rpm


CRYSTAL

NI SSAN


FASTEST GROWING NISSAN DEALER IN FLORIDA


937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA 8 5848755 I
crystalautos.conOr 8* 5EtOm.v IA w m 1
Tiraetled. uiSM i 7Rd lit75 M Aresdft


2009 NISSAN ALTIMA
FOR FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING

800-584-8755 ext. 6101
INS AAA* IAA*


MOU I UESDAY,) IVIAY Z , Z r~ol


a


I Moto


I Boats


I






























2009
SONATA

s13,987

Tu HW _Y
R,_-,.


2009
SANTA FE GLS

$17, 90


, #26403


2009
ACCENT GS
&rrniB~l


s9,987


or Buy for
$169mo


#15313


2009 CDQDm
ELANTRA TQURING ,i mO
rn .. 36 mEintb Leasou*


2009 11989
ELANTRA GLS'







2010 W$
GENESIS COUPE , l 0WNO
IB 36mnlhthleaset
kae.o u


2009 $6,95
TUCSON GLS $06


I , #t1423 .


2009
GENESIS


$399mo
36 mon lease t


I Wied ~n 1,ecn Car (ix f rhe lW'r
. MDftrit.1 urnShow


AMERICA'S BEST WARRANTY' 5 Year / 60,00 Mile

10 YEAR/100 000 MILE Bumper To Bumper Coverage
POWERTRAIN LIMITED WARRANTY 5 Year Unlimited Miles
' See dealer for LIMITED WARRANTY details. 24 Hr Roadside Assistance


UP 41 MPG
TO HWY'

ONE VOOEAR
IODEMn TIrV T EF
PIOTECGTIOHN PlMA


Advertised prices are plus tax, tag and $599 dealer fee, are before any dealer installed options and include all available manufacturer rebates & incentives. Vehicles subject to prior sale. All offers with approved credit and some
cannot be combined. *Expected range for most drivers, your actual mileage may vary depending on how you drive and maintain your vehicle: ** On the Accent. As listed on Monroney sticker., t Genesis Coupe lease, $259
per mo, $1999 down, Genesis lease, $399 per mo, $2599 down, Elantra Touring lease, $239 per mo, $2499 down; all 36 mo. leases. A Accent purchase $169 per mo. at 7% APR for 84 mos. Some offers may require financing thru
HMFC., ft Must be 18 years or older. No purchase necessary. See us for full rules & regulations. Photos are for illustration purposes only.

[WE'LL DOUBLE YOUR CASH ANDIOR TRADE EQUITY UP TO A TOTAL OF $5000


LIST PRICE ........ 7,.990
YOUR CASH OR TRADE 62,500
DOUBLE ...........2,500

1995 Chevrolet Cavalier Of
H9371cB....... . $990
H9371B. .................... ... ......... V' 1
1997 Chrysler LHS $990
PH2362B..........................,......... $ '
All prices are olus tax. tag & $599 dealer fee. All offers are


*


1996 Dodge Caravan $990
H9386B ...........................$990
1997 Dodge Intreid $990
H9075C.....................................
1997 Ford Expedition e9QQ
.H 9 134B .. .,. . v.... -... ....... .. ' , . ..
1994'Chevrolet Suburban $1 990
H8967B ................................. ' v
1998 Chevrolet Cavalier $1 90
H8974C ................!..............;.. w v
2000 Ford Focus $ 1990
H9396A ..............................
1997 Lincoln Town Car $1 $1A9
H9424A ................... .....J. , v
1997 Dodge Dakota........... $2,990
H8543AI.................. . .......
2003 Ford Taurus $2'O990
PH2350B..... ...................... .........


Vehicles j
Additional,


2004 Hyundai Accent 2 $2,990
H9379A ................................. .9
2001 Hyundai Santa Fe1 2 2AO S
PH2373 .................. I ............ ,9 90
2000 Buick LeSabree'a Con
H8543A ............... p. $3990v
2004 Dodge intrepid s
H9249B .......................... .. $3,990V vA
2004 Hyundai Sonata $3990 LIST P ORICE C 10
H9419A .....L...........L...........T...... $ ,990T . ,01M
2001 Dodge Ram 1500 2003 4..A.0 DOUBLE ........ 2.500
Dodge Caravan $4,990
H9383AI ...... ..................... $4,990
2004 Hyundai XG3S0 $4,990 2001ncoln vm Car . $4,990
PH2370A ................................ PH2368A f.................................
2005 Hyundai Elantra 4990 999 ,Amercury Grand Marquis $4,990
H9158A .................... .......... , H 1A . . . . . . a -e d


with aproved rdt Vehics ae s t t


with approved credit. Vehicles are subject to prior sale. Cash doubling comes In the form of price reduction. Offer not available on vehicles with reduceoprice already marked on the windshield. Limit 1 trade-in per purchase. Jen
is subject to change without notice. t Qualifying vehicles must have 48,000 miles or less and have been manufactured within the last 48 months. See dealer for complete details. * Excludes Audi, BMW, Jaguar, Mercedes Benz,


.t" ,,- ' .r.Au.s^ " ... . ..g|^, ||g ,,| .-- - - . .. -- ..s i,.,0 ,<- ,.-.
Prese c~p and present coLuon u,.n ..re4sr e-w p Exp" 603T I
Jenki nH
Jenkins Hyundai - 1602 SW College Rd * SR 200 * Ocala i , Jenkins Hyundai * 1602 SW College Rd * SR 200 * Ocala
---.-----^---------------------.---------------------------------- -------------- ------------- ------------- - ------------^ -


o


S#62423


;fliiM I


2000 FORD
1� RANGER I


��





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LO I EDYMA1, V l


BUSINESS IS GREAT AT CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE
LOOK AROUND. EVERYONE IS DRIVING ONE!
CHECK OUT THESE BIG SAVINGS


S2008 VERSA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 6151
SAVE 5,990*
2008 SENTRA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 6149
SAVE $6,990*
2008 ALTIMA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.5848755 Ext. 6150
SAVE $7,990*
2008 ROGUE-


FREE24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFOAND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 6147
SAVE $7,9
2008 TITAN,


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584-8755 Ext. 6148
SAVE $9,990*
CRYSTAL


937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext. 1
,, crystalautos.com


.2008 CALIBER


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2180
SAVE 4,990*
2008 300


FREE 24 -R RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 2136
SAVE 7.990*


2008


VAN


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 2181
SAVE 990*
2008 TO1 COUNTRY


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 2137
SAVE 't0,990*
2008 RAM


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2182
SAVE 990
CRYSTAL


Jeep


Mrnu et ' S II f


a


1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
2077 HWY. 44 W.
INVERNESS
800-584-8755 Ext. 1
S crystalautos.com


' 2008 AVEO


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-5848755 Ext. 1136
SAVE $4,990*
2008 MALIBU


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584-8755 Ext. 1131
SAVE $7990*
2008 IMPALA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext.1132
SAVE $8,990*
2008 TRAILBLAZER


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-5848755 Ext. 1134
SAVE 10,990*
2008 SILVERADO


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 1135
SAVE '12,990*
CRYSTAL

REVOUIUION
1035 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext. 1
S crystalautos.com


*MSRP when vehicle was new minus Selling Price equals Savings. Cannot be combined with other offers. All prior sales excluded and may restrict stock. Not responsible for tpographical errors. Vehicles are pre-owned and pictures are for Illustration
purposes only.


nD TuEsnDv MAvY 9MY6.00


a