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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01649
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 24, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01649

Full Text

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LIBRARY OF FLORIDA I-IISTORY 12-D5'S12

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SB C I T R U..-S' CO U N T Y


premay/B1


TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Mostly cloudy with
89 afternoon thunderstorms.
LOW PAGE A4
67


MAY 24, 2009 Florida's Best Community


www.chronicleonline.com
L Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


It all started when an autistic child was injured in a seclusion room. At a termination hearing Tuesday,
Citrus County School Board members will decide whether to fire CREST School's Teacher of the Year
Heather Ivanyi for forging a form to put the child in isolation. The story is more complex: conflicting
accounts, unclear policies, missing documents, lack of oversight, obscured videotape. But one question lingers:





Who's responsible?


Heather Ivanyi plans to beg for school board members' mercy
to forgive a split-second decision that might end her career.
"I don't sleep. I'm an KERI LYNN MCHALE Beyond the forgery,
emotional wreck. I miss kmchale@chronicleonline.com school officials con-


my students more than
anything and I just want to be back,"
Ivanyi said.
Since 2005, Ivanyi has taught at the Cit-
rus Resources for Exceptional Students in
Transition school, a Lecanto-based educa-
tional facility for children with disabilities.
In February, Citrus County School Dis-
trict officials made a recommendation to
the Citrus County School Board to fire
Ivanyi for forging a parent's signature on a
form to put a child in an isolated area called
a Behavioral Transition Room (BTR).


cluded, after a lengthily
investigation, that Ivanyi did not follow sev-
eral procedures prior to and while placing
the child, who is autistic, in the seclusion
room.
Ivanyi has requested a hearing and will
go before school board members to tell
her side of the story.
Superintendent of Schools Sandra
"Sam" Himmel and CREST School Prin-
cipal Keith Posta refused to be inter-
viewed for this story.
See liv.'..;: /Page A5


Many, many issues at CREST resulted in an injured autistic
student and devastated parents, said attorney Mark S. Kamleiter
Kamleiter, a former KERI LYNN MCHALE fered a hand injury that
special education kmchale@chronicleonline.com required treatment at a
teacher and behavior hospital.
specialist, works specifically with special "The parents just sat there and cried,"
education cases and is representing the stu- Kamleiter said, speaking about the par-
dent and the student's parents regarding is- ents' reaction to video of the incident..
sues stemming from a Jan. 23 incident "The people they were trusting their child
Heather Ivanyi, an exceptional student ed- to were actually injuring their child."
ucation teacher, pulled the autistic student The student's parents told school officials
into a dark seclusion room at Citrus Re- they never consented to the use of the BTR,
sources for Exceptional Students in Transi- nor did they receive any communication
tion school, a Lecanto-based educational from school administrators or staff- prior
facility for children with disabilities, to the Jan. 23 incident-thattheir child had
At some point while in the Behavioral been placed in the BTR on other occasions.
Transition Room (BTR), the student suf- See CREST/Page A7


Masked


gunman


sought


in home


invasion

Police asking
for public's help
in locating
suspect

Chronicle
A masked gunman en-
tered a Crystal River apart-
ment Friday and demanded
money from the resident.
Shortly before 11 p.m. Fri-
day,'Citrus County Sheriff's
Office deputies responded to
the Ridgeview Apartments
on Southeast Eighth Avenue
in response to a reported
home invasion robbery.
Three men, the resident
and his two friends, all be-
tween the ages of 20 and 23,
were watching TV when the
gunman came through the
open apartment door.
He waved a handgun at
the three men and ordered
the resident's two friends to
the floor. Then, the gunma n
demanded cash.
The resident retreated to
his bedroom and turned
over an undisclosed amount
of money to the gunman.
After taking the cash, the
gunman ran away. It's un-
known at this time if a veh i-
cle was involved.
No one was injured.
Deputies canvassed the
area and attempted to track
down the gunman using a
K-9 team, but did not find
the gunman.
The men described the
gunman as a black male,
about 6 feet tall and 200
pounds. The gunman was
wearing a dark-colored ski
mask, a heavy green coat
and black gloves.
None of the men knew
for sure if they knew the
gunman. Deputies are ask-
ing anyone with informa-
tion to call 911 or 726-1121.
.f-;'.s& " , ^_!&y', i-, ' s.' *: **',


Annie's Mailbox ...,.........A14
Crossword.................A14
Editorial ..................... C2
Horoscope ...............A14
Lottery Numbers............B4
Movies ....................... All
Obituaries .........,..... ,....A6
Together ...................... A13
Veterans ...............A., A10


Material memories


f -



DAVE SIGLER/Chronlcle
Savanna Weaver, 6, can barely get her arms around this teddy bear made out of her father Aaron Weaver's
military uniforms. Donna Russell made the bear for her. Russell makes "memory bears" using cherished cloth-
Ing that belonged to deceased loved ones.


Best beaches
Dr. Beach makes his annual
picks, and some of them are
a short drive away,/A9


Shoppers become swappers
Pinched by the economy, consumers are trying something new. The
rules are simple: Bring before you take, and money never changes hands./D1 1
Landing scrWapped Wet weather keeps shuttle in space./A3
NBC's ill at ease Network's new lineup panned./B6
CMH's health Publisher Gerry Mulligan weights in./Cl


NANCY KENNEDY
nkennedy@chronicle.com
Chronicle
E ven though 6-year-old
Savannah Weaver
can't wrap her arms
around her daddy, she
now has a bear to
hold, made from one
of her dad's military uniforms.
Savannah's father, U.S. Army
Chief Warrant Officer Aaron
Weaver, was one of nine soldiers
killed Jan. 8, 2004, near Fallu-
jah, Iraq, when a rocket struck
the Black Hawk medevac heli-
copter he was in. He was head-
ing to Baghdad for a medical
checkup.
As Citrus County's first casu-
alty of the Iraq War, Weaver, 32, a
graduate of Citrus High School
and Central Florida Community
College, had survived the 1993
battle in Mogadishu, Somalia,
and a battle with cancer.
This past week, Donna Russell
presented the stuffed bear to Sa-
vannah and Weaver's widow,
Nancy Weaver. Russell makes
"memory bears" using cherished
clothing from people's deceased
loved ones.'
As Savannah hugged the bear
that's almost as big as she is, she
talked about the daddy she only
knows through photos and sto-
ries from people who knew him.
"He flied in a helicopter and
somebody shot it down with a
big gun, the bad army, and it
crashed," she said.
Describing the bear, she said
it has pockets "so I can write
love notes to my dad."
A letter dated Dec. 14, 2003,
was found in a pocket of the
pants Weaver was wearing when
he was killed; it was a letter
written to Savannah. In the let-
ter, which is framed and hangs
in Savannah's room, Weaver
wrote about how much he
missed her, that he looked for-
ward to seeing her again, that he
was the proudest dad ever and
that she was the best thing that
ever happened to him.
Mrs. Weaver said the letter
came several months after her
husband had died.
Also on the bear is the Ameri-
can flag patch from the shoulder
of the uniform Weaver was wear-
ing the day he died, which one of
his captains had removed and
sent to Mrs. Weaver.
See MEMORIES/Page A2


Bus business
A local businessman thinks
he can get you around the
county more efficiently than
the local government./A3


61I! I 45!8 115 o


VOLUME 114 ISSUE 290


a


IRON. C..








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A2 SUNDAY, MAY 24, 200'


C.R. council considering signage


provision for commercial district


MIKE WRIGHT
mwright
@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle


* WHAT:
Crystal River City
Council meeting.


* WHEN:
Crystal River officials are 7 p.m. Tuesday;
looking at a plan that would preceded by 6 p.m.
spruc e thity's busiest parks workshop. -
roadways. n WHERE:
City council members on City Hall on U.S. 19.
Tuesday will discuss a pro- E ON THEVWEB:
posed "overlay zone" for crystalriverfl.org.
properties abutting U.S. 19 E DATE CHANGE:
and State Road 44 that Meeting is Tuesday
would require monument- ipstead of Monday
style signs for businesses. due to Memorial Day.
"The U.S. 19 and S.R. 44
Overlay Zone is intended to would have 10 years from
enhance the aesthetic value the time the ordinance
and create a visually pleas- takes effect to replace their
ing appearance to those signs with monument signs
properties abutting these no taller than 8 feet. A mon-
routes within the corporate ument sign would replace
limits of the city of Crystal any existing sign damaged
River," a report by develop- more than 50 percent of its
ment director Kurt Woerner value.
states. "Additionally it is an- The overlay zone informa-
ticipated that the require-. tion is presented for council
ments of this section will discussion, but no action.
contribute to improved en- The plan must first be re-
vironmental qualities and viewed in public hearings
traffic calming." by the planning commis-
The council regular meet- sion.
ing is 7 p.m. Tuesday - a day Also on Tuesday's agenda:
late because of the Memo- E Discussion on the city
rial Day holiday. The meet- building now occupied by
ing is preceded by a 6 p.m. the Boys & Girls Clubs of
workshop on discussing Citrus County. The building
plans for the city parks. will be vacated in mid-June
Monument-type signs are and the city received three
designed to replace the proposals from community
hodge-podge of business organizations ,wanting the
signs in the city's business building for their programs.
district City Manager Andy Hous-
According to the agenda ton is recommending the
material, business owners council discuss its priorities


for the building, and then he
could negotiate a lease with
a community group in line
with those priorities.
The three groups that of-
fered proposals for the
building are: Community
Action Foundation of Citrus
County; Nature Coast Min-
istries Inc.; and The Spot
Family Center.
* A plan to make im-
provements to the Pete's
Pier boat ramp and docking
fAcilities. Houston said the
county has offered to split
the project's cost by paying
60 percent That would cost
the city $68,000; the county
commission has yet to ap-,
prove the project
* The council will con-
sider a five-year lease
agreement with Crystal
River Manatee Tours Inc.
for the Northwest Third
Street dive shop operation.
The company would pay the
city $2,800 a month for the
first six months, and then
$3,600 a month through the
remainder of the lease.
In an agenda memo,
Houston said the company
also wants permission to
sell beer and wine, either in
package containers or for
on-site consumption. Hous-r
ton said that while zoning
allows alcohol sales, he is
recommending it not be part
of the lease. He suggested
the company be allowed to
approach the city after two
years to seek permission to
sell alcohol.


-- - NationWorld BRIEFS =


Fmr. S. Korean press. Obama salutes, asks
commits suicide others to do same


SEOUL, South Korea -
Former South Korean Presi-
dent Roh Moo-hyun - whose
hard-won reputation as a cor-
ruption fighter was tarnished
by bribery allegations that
drew in his family and closest
associates- jumped to his
death Saturday while hiking in
the mountains behind his rural
home. He was 62.
After leaving his family a sui-
cide note, Roh threw himself
off a steep cliff around 6:40
a.m., police and lawyer Moon
Jae-in said in the southern port
city of Busan.
"I'm indebted to too many
people. Too many people are
suffering because of me," Roh
wrote in the note left on his
computer.
"Don't be sorry; don't blame
anybody. It's destiny." He
asked to be cremated and a
small gravestone erected in his
hometown.
A self-taught lawyer who'
lifted himself out of poverty to
reach the nation's highest of-
. fice in 2003, Roh had prided
himself on being a "clean"
politician in a country with a
long history of corruption. Re-
cent allegations that he ac-
cepted $6 million in bribes
from a Seoul businessman
were deeply troubling to the
ex-leader.
"I have no face to show to
the people. I am sorry for dis-
appointing you," an emotional
Roh said last month before ,
turning himself over to Seoul
prosecutors who grilled him for
13 hours about the allegations.
His suicide - the first in
South Korea by an ex-presi-
dent - stunned the nation.


.4 -~;vt


DAV-E SIiLEUL;rloniCle
Donna Russell, Savannah and Nancy Weaver talk about the bear. Savannah was asking for
a bear to sleep with but didn't expect it to hold so many memories of her father.


WASHINGTON - Presi-
dent Barack Obama saluted
veterans and urged his coun-
trymen to do the same this
Memorial Day weekend, say-
ing the nation has not always
paid them proper respect.
In his weekly radio and In-
ternet address Saturday,
Obama said people can honor
veterans by sending a letter or
care package to troops over-
seas, volunteering at health
clinics or taking supplies to a
homeless veterans center. He
said it could also mean some-
thing as simple as saying
"thank you" to a veteran walk-
ing by on the street.
"We have a responsibility to
serve all of them as well as
they serve all of us," Obama
said. "And yet, all too often in
recent years and decades,
we, as a nation, have failed to
live up to that responsibility.
We have failed to give them ,
the support they need or pay
them the respect they de-
serve.
"That is a betrayal of the sa-
cred trust that America has
with all who wear and all who
have worn the proud uniform
of our country," he said.
Obama said he was com-
mitted to giving troops the
training and equipment they
need and making certain the
Veterans Affairs Department
had the money it.needed. He
also noted that he had signed
a bill into law that would elimi-
nate waste in defense projects
and was working to improve
'the economy so that veterans
can find a good job, provide
for their families and earn a
college degree.


'That is what Memorial Day
is all about," Obama said. "It is
about doing all we can to
repay the debt we owe to
those men and women who
have answered our nation's
call by fighting under its flag. It
is about recognizing that we,
as a people, did not get here
by accident or good fortune
alone."
Passer-by pushes
jumper off bridge
BEIJING - Chen Fuchao, a
man heavily in debt, had been
contemplating suicide on a
bridge in southern China for
hours when a passer-by came
up, shook his hand - and
pushed him off the ledge.
Chen fell 26 feet ornto a par-
tially inflated emergency air
cushion laid out by authorities
and survived, suffering spine
and elbow injuries, the official
Xinhua News Agency said Sat-
urday.
The passer-by, 66-year-old
Lai Jiansheng, had been fed
up with what he called Chen's
"selfish activity," Xinhua said.
Traffic around the Haizhu
bridge in the city of
Guangzhou had been backed
up for five hours and police
had cordoned off the area.
'"I pushed him off because
jumpers like Chen are very
selfish. Their action violates a
lot of public interest," Lai was
quoted as saying by Xinhua.
"They do not really dare to kill
themselves. Instead, they just
want to raise the relevant gov-
ernment authorities' attention
to their'appeals."
Xinhua said Lai was "taken
away by police" but did not
elaborate.
-From aire reports


MEMORIES
Continued from Page Al
"I have several of his uniforms, and they
hang in the back of a closet." Mrs. Weaver
said. "Looking at them every day was hard.
I'd remember what he used to look like in
his uniform, so I put them in a closet in the
spare bedroom."
She said Savannah had been asking for a
bear to sleep with, she then met Russell and
found out from someone else about the mem-
ory bears. Russell doesn't advertise, because
she considers her work a ministry and be-'
lieves God brings people to her for a bear
So far, Russell has made hundreds of
bears, which she nicknames "beget" bears
because one begets another as people from
around the country find her and tell others.
"I have an emotional bond with each one
I make," Russell said, "but this one was the
hardest. The uniform hung in my closet - I
couldn't cut into it;".


Instead, she unstitched every seam to
take the uniform apart.
"I'm a former military wire, and I have
three sons who are Marines." she said. "M.v
heart is with the military. It's a deeper level
for me because I know the price this child
and this widow have paid.
"The most amazing thing is. these bears
heal," she said.
Mrs. Weaver said as time goes b.y griefgets
easier. When she's asked to attend events
honoring her late husband on holidays, such
as Memorial Day or Veterans Day, she goes
because she doesn't ever want her daughter
and her son, 15-year-old Austin Barker, to
forget their dad and step-dad.
"Savannah asks about him all the time
and we talk about him all the time," she
said. "My son has his dog tags and his
beret, and Savannah has the letter. What I
hope is that things like this bear and nam-
ing the post office after him will make
them happy when they think of him, and
not sad."


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SPage A3 - SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009



TATE


LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
COUNTY

Events on tap for
Memorial Day
The following organiza-
tions contacted the Chronicle
to advise of planned Memo-
rial Day observances for
Monday:
* Fero Memorial Gar-
dens Cemetery, Beverly
Hills - public Memorial Day
observance, 11 a.m.
* Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, Citrus Springs
- Ceremony starts at 11:30
a.m. Public and especially
veterans encouraged to at-
tend.
* American Legion Post
155, Crystal River - Cere-
mony starts at 11 a.m. Guest
speakers: Crystal River
Mayor Ron Kitchen and Den-
nis Flanagan.
* Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, Floral
City, - Ceremony, 11 a.m.
* The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58, Dunnel-
Ion - Ceremony at noon.
Public is invited to attend
County offices
closed for holiday
The following businesses
and offices will be closed
Monday in observance of
Memorial Day: ' .
* The Citrus County
Chronicle business office will.
be closed;
* The Citrus County
Chronicle Circulation Depart-
ment will be openrfrom 7 to
10 a.m.;
* The Citrus County Cen-
tral Landfill will be closed;
* All county offices will be
closed;
* The county Utilities Divi-
sion a'nd its.billing office will
be closed, but will respond to
emergencies;
* The city of Inverness will
not pick up garbage Monday.
* NCREli'sposal's Mon-
day pickups have been
rescheduled for Saturday,
May 23; Riverhaven and
Walden Woods will be picked
up Thursday, May'28.
* FDS Disposal Inc. will be
closed Monday. All Monday
collections will be done
Thursday, May 28.
* Beverly,Hills Waste.
Management will be closed
Monday. All .Monday cus-
tomers will be picked up on
Thursday (both yard waste
and household).
Voter registration
list to be updated
The Citrus County Super-
visor of Elections is conduct-
ing a voter registration list
maintenance program as re-
quired by law. Some voters
will receive an address.confir-
mation card in the mail from,
the elections office.
* If your name and ad-,
dress are correct on the card,
Syou do not needto do'any-
thing.
U If you, have charIged
your name or address, com-
plete the card and mail it
back.
* If you received a card to
your address and the voter
no longer lives at your ad-
dress, please return the card
to your mail carrier.
For more information, call
the Invemess office at 341-
6740.
Seniors vs. Crime
has summer hours
SSeniors vs. Crime will
begin its summer hours
Tuesday, June 2. From June
through August it will be
open from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. Wednesday and
Thursday, but closed Tues-
days..
Seniors vs. Crime is a joint
project of the Citrus County
Sheriffs Office and the
Florida Attomey General's Of-
fice dedicated to recovering
monies lost by seniors victim-
ized by scams, frauds or de-
ceptive business practices.


The Seniors vs. Crime
storefront is in the Beverly
Plaza on County Road 491 in
Beverly Hills. For more infor-
mation, call 249-9139.
The storefront's regular
Tuesday hours will resume
on Sept. 1.
-From staff reports


Company offers services


Group to look at

public transit
MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Citrus County's public transit
system can be operated more effi-
ciently and with less cost - in the
hands of a private company.
So says 'Shannon Heathcock,
owner of DASH Transport Inc. of
Inverness.
Heathcock plans to make his
pitch to county commissioners
Tuesday that his company should


be operating the county transit sys-
tem full-time.
The meeting starts at 1 p.m. in the
county courthouse. Heathcock's
presentation is set for 4:30 p.m.
DASH, which started its business
in 2001, is primarily a medical
transport company. It is the largest
private transport company in the
county.
Heathcock said he believes that
unfunded mandates will force Cit-
rus County to reduce routes and
service, while costs continue to
climb. He said he could guarantee
a fixed-route service, which the
county now is testing, at a lesser
cost.
DASH now has a contract worth


about $50,000 a
year to transport : ,WHAT: Citrus
customers at Commission r
night, .and on * WHEN: 1 p.m
weekends and
holidays. U WHERE: Citru
"We provide Courthouse, 1
whatever service Ave., downtown
they ask," Heath- M ON THE WEB
cock said. citrus.fl.us.'
Heathcock said
he isn't suggesting that DASH oper-
ate the entire county transit system.
Rather, he said the county would
still own the buses and equipment
while DASH provides the service.
"I think I can run the buses more
efficiently than they're run now," he
said.


Interim County
County Administrator
meeting. Brad Thorpe said
Tuesday. Heathcock
should eventually
County get buy-in from
10 N. Apopka. the Citrus County
n Inverness. Transportation
www.clerk. Disadvantaged
Board, which is
chaired by Com-
missioner Winn Webb. Thorpe said
he believes Heathcock wants to see
if the county commission is inter-
ested in pursuing the idea.
"It has to be a business plan,"
Thorpe said of Heatheock's pro-
posal. "We'll have to take a look at
it."


Community reunion


. BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
ABOVE: Andria Addison,
right, and LaDonna Savoy
see each other for the first
time in 17 years on Satur-
day during the community
reunion in Copeland Park.
The women were friends
years ago at Crystal River
Middle School. Savoy now
lives in Maryland, but Addi-
son has lived in Crystal
River since she was 3
years old. The event, held
every two years, featured
food, games and lots of ca-
maraderie. "The purpose of
it is to come together as
one, on a~good occasion, to
celebrate life in general,"
says Ann McCrae, one of
the committee members
who organized the event.
RIGHT: Javon Thomas, 5,
Jalen Dickerson, 3, Geni
Dickerson, 4, Deja Hum-
bert, 5, and Anthoii� bick-
erson wait for lunch to be
served Saturday during the
reunion. Dickerson is from
Orlando, but his mother-in-
law lives in Crystal River.


Floodwaters begin

Volusia County hit hard


Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH -
Floodwaters showed some
signs of receding Saturday
across northeast Florida,
but some residents kept to
shelters and others braced
for the possibility of water
creeping into homes as
scattered showers lin-
gered.
Government officials ma-
neuvered boats through
flooded streets to assess
damage, meals and sand-
bags were distributed and
people whose homes were
inundated earlier in the
week hoped the rains
would end.
"Lord, will you please
stop it from raining?"
asked Willie McCutchen,
51, a landscaper in Daytona
Beach who had about 3 feet
of water in his house ear-
lier in the week. His street
was still flooded with a foot
or two of water. "After next


week, if it's going to rain
some more, I'm going to
make a run for it."
McCutchen has been
sleeping in his truck
parked outside his home,
climbing through a window
to keep water from filling
it.
Floodwaters had been
waist-deep in the worst-hit
parts of Volusia County,
which authorities identi-
fied as Daytona Beach,
Smyrna Beach, New
Smyrna Beach, Holly Hill
and Port Orange. But on
Saturday, despite overcast,
drizzly skies, they appeared
to be receding, though resi-
dents and officials re-
mained cautious.
"It may be receding a lit-
tle and we get more rain,"
said Shelley Szafraniec, a
Volusia County spokes-
woman.
Saturday marked the
sixth straight day rains fell
in the area, where Gov.


to recede
Charlie Crist had a day ear-
lier declared a state of
emergency for 11 counties.
Volusia County made an
early estimate of 976 homes
and businesses with dam-
ages totaling about $55.1
million, though officials
cautioned that tally would
likely increase.
The main beachfront
stretch of Daytona Beach
popular with tourists ap-
peared mostly untouched
by the flooding. Parts of the
Daytona Beach Interna-
tional Speedway had been
under water, but the motor-
way didn't suffer any ap-
parent damage.
Meantime, 32-year-old
Dawn Cone gathered with
family members at a shelter
set up at Westside Baptist
Church, chased from their
Holly Hill home by flooding
and a collapsed roof. She
has a disabled husband and
child and worries about re-
pairs on her stinking,
flooded house.
"I wish it would stop,"
she said.


NASA scraps landing for

shuttle second day in a row


Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL -
Thunderstorms prevented
space shuttle Atlantis
from returning to its home
base Saturday for the sec-
ond day in a row, and kept
the astronauts circling
Earth after a successful
repair job at the Hubble
Space Telescope.
The offshore storms,
which later moved in,
prompted NASA to skip
both morning landing at-
tempts at Kennedy Space
Center. Despite an equally
dismal forecast for Sun-
day, Mission Control opted
to wait out the bad
weather rather than take a
detour to California.
As Atlantis soared over-
head, right around what
would have been landing
time, commander Scott
Altman called down that
he saw "a pretty solid
mass of clouds."
"It looks to us like


maybe it is starting to
break up and move out, so
we're hopeful to get home
tomorrow," he said.
"We're sharing your op-
timism," Mission Control
replied.
Atlantis' seven astro-
nauts made it further into
their landing preparations
than they did Friday, when
storms directly over the
Florida landing site re-
sulted in much earlier
cancellations.
A cooling-system prob-
lem cropped up aboard At-
lantis soon after the
astronauts got word of the
latest delay, and they were
advised to hold off on
opening the payload bay
doors just in case an emer-
gency return was re-
quired. Within minutes,
however, Altman was as-
sured everything was fine,
and the doors were
opened to radiate the heat
generated by all the equip-
ment.


C



:r










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A4 SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009


Peterson allegedly offered $25k for hit on wife


Associated Press

JOLIET, Ill. - Worried a
pending divorce would leave
him penniless, prosecutors
say, ex-police officer Drew
Peterson offered someone
$25,000 to kill his third wife
- but then did it himself.
Peterson also told a fellow
officer just a few weeks be-
fore his wife was found in a
bathtub that his life.would
be easier "if she was just
dead," prosecutors said Fri-
day as they laid out part of
their case against the former


officer from the Chicago
suburb of Bolingbrook
Peterson is charged with
first-degree murder in the
2004 death of his third wife,
Kathleen Savio. He also is a
suspect in the 2007 disappear-
ance of his fourth wife, Stacy
Peterson. He has maintained
his innocence in both cases.
Peterson's attorneys had
asked Friday that his $20
million bail be reduced, but
the judge refused.
Prosecutor James Glas-
gow said Peterson told a fel-
low police officer that he


would be financially ruined
by a pending divorce, and
life would be easier if his
wife were dead. Three
weeks later, Savio's body was
found in her bathtub with a
gash on the back of her head,
the Will County prosecutor
said. Glasgow did not reveal
the source of his allegation.
Savio's death initially was
ruled an accidental drown-
ing, but authorities re-
opened the investigation
after Stacy Peterson disap-
peared. They ruled Savio's
death a homicide after ex-


Police bust Homosassa meth lab


KERI LYNN ICHALE
kmchale
@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

In an old' oven in the
backyard of a Homosassa
residence, deputies found a
jar full of bubbling chemi-
cajs.
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office deputies arrested
Mark Orren Riggs, 45, of
5510 S. Bablan Terrace, on
charges of trafficking in
methamphetamine . and
possessing chemicals
knowingly for the use of.
manufacturing a controlled
substance. Riggs' bond Wvas
set $60,000.
On Friday, deputies were
tipped off about possible
methamphetamine manu-
facturing at Riggs' resi-
dence. They went to Riggs'
residence to conduct what
deputies called a "knock
and-talk investigation" in
their arrest report
Riggs gave the deputies
permission to look around
his property, according to
the arrest report. In the


backyard, in plain view,
deputies found chemicals
used to manufacture
methamphetamine.
Meanwhile, another
deputy, who was standing
with Riggs, noticed bulges
in Riggs' pants pockets. In
Riggs' left.pocket, deputies
found an orange and black
cylinder with four individ-
ual plastic baggies inside;
the baggies contained a
total of 6 grams of metham-
phetamine.
Deputies said Riggs ad-
mitted he was a metham-
phetamine user and that he
had attempted to manufac-
ture methamphetamine,
but was not successful with
his first batch.
Deputies also discovered
directions on methamphet-
amine manufacturing and
two store receipts with
methamphetamine manu-
facturing items amongst the
items Riggs' removed from
his pockets and 1 gram of
methamphetamine in a
small baggie in Riggs' wallet
After further searching
Riggs' backyard, deputies


found more items used in
methamphetamine manu-
facturing, including bottles
containing blue liquid and
a glass baking pan.
A large glass jar with a
metal lid in an old oven in
Riggs' backyard contained
more than 200 grams of a
bubbling white substance.
The white substance was
separating from a blue liq-
uid in the jar and there
were pieces of medal in the
jar, according to the arrest
report
While on scene, deputies
were unable to field test the
white substance to deter-
mine what it was due to the
ongoing chemical reaction..
Narcotics detectives said
they believed it was
ephedrine or pseu-
doephedrine, substances
used in the manufacturing
of methamphetamine, ac-
cording to the arrest report.
Deputies contacted a
hazardous materials (Haz-
mat) team to come to the
scene arid turned the inves-
tigation over to the sheriff's
office narcotics detectives.


huming her body and per-
forming a new autopsy. Pe-
terson was arrested May 7.
Savio's family - who long
said they believed Peterson
killed her-were shocked at
the attempted hit allegations.
"Finally someone's listen-
ing to us," said Sue Doman,
Savio's sister. "This is a vic-
tory for our sister, Kathleen."
Peterson, who is known
for making smart-aleck re-
marks in the media, was
subdued in court Friday He
hung his head as he left the
hearing.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
* Brenda Lee Heavin, 47, of
4480 N. Dogie Terrace, Her-
nando, at 12:27 p.m. Friday on
an active Citrus County warrant
for violation of probation in refer-
ence to original charges of driv-
ing under the influence and
driving while license is sus-
pended or revoked. No bond.
* James R. Seidel, 84, of
'1775 S. Cove Way, Inverness, at
5:45 p.m. Friday on an active Cit-
rus County warrant for an origi-
nal misdemeanor charge of
trespassing on school grounds
after warning. No bond.
* Darryl Flurry, 44, of 404 S.
Washington St., Beverly Hills, at
11:08 p.m. Friday on a misde-
meanor battery charge. According
to the arrest report, a bartender at
Club Rain in Crystal River told
deputies Flurry lunged at him and hit
him in the throat area. Bond $500.


State BRIEF


Trooper charged
with coercing sex
PALM SPRINGS -Authori-
ties said a former Florida High-
way Patrol trooper followed a
woman to her home, made
her strip naked and then co-
erced her to have sex with him
to avoid a traffic ticket.
Palm Springs police said
Ariel D. Valentin was arrested
Friday and charged with sex-
ual battery and bribery.
Police said Valentin ques-
tioned the woman on May 13
after she was involved in a



For the RECORD

* Tawan Thoddus Elam, 23,
of 6058 E. Malverne St., Inver-
ness, at 4:20 a.m. Saturday on a
fugitive from justice charge in ref-
erence to a New Jersey warrant
for an original charge of dealing
in stolen property. No bond.
Burglaries
SA burglary, reported on May
21, occurred at approximately
midnight on May 14, to an unoc-
cupied structure in the 11800
block of N. Blitzen Point, Citrus
Springs.
* An investigation revealed on
May 21, an attempted burglary to
an unoccupied structure and a.
trespass to an unoccupied struc-
ture occurred at approximately 5
p.m. May 17, in the 2900 block of
N. Portico Terrace, Hemando.
Thefts
* A petit theft, reported on
May 21, occurred at approxi-
mately 8 p.m. May 13, in the 200
block of N. Suncoast Boulevard,
Crystal River.


minor car accident. There
were no injuries, and neither
vehicle was damaged. Police
said Valentin searched her at
the scene and then suggested
going to her home nearby to
search her further.
Once they arrived at her
home, the woman told police
that Valentin told her to remove
her clothes and then coerced
her into having sex with him.
Valentin has since resigned
from FHP.
He was being held without
bail.
-From wire reports





* A petit theft of medication,
reported on May 21, occurred at
approximately 8 a.m. May 15, in
the 6600 block of W. Rosedale
Drive, Homosassa.
* A petit theft, reported on
May 21, occurred approximately
at midnight May 13, in the 600
block of W. Highland Boulevard,
Inverness.
* Preliminary investigation on
May 21 revealed a grand theft
occurred at approximately mid-
night July 1, 2008, in the 1000
block of W. Main Street, Inver-
ness.
* On May 21, a petit theft re-
port was taken regarding a stolen
tag in the 6600 block of W. Coun-
try Club Drive, Homosassa.
Vandalisms
* A vandalism, reported on
May 21, occurred at approxi-
mately midnight on May 21, to a
church in the 1100 block of S.
Skyway Avenue, Homosassa.


ON THE NET

* For more information about arrests made by the Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to
wA'','.sheriffcitrus org and click on the Public Information link, then on Arrest Reports.
* Watch "Arrested Developments" from the Citrus County Sheriff's Office at www.chronicle
online.tv. For the Record reports are also archived onhline at www.chronicleonline.com.


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City H
Daytona Bch. 82
Ft. Lauderdale 86
Fort Myers 89
Gainesville 86
Homestead 86
Jacksonville 83
Key West 86
Lakeland 89
Melbourne 85


F'cast
ts
ts
ts .
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


/ South winds from 5 to 10 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a light chop.
Scattered showers and thunder-
storms today.


88 70 0.30 --- 85 68 1.30

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Excuse daily
". TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
SHigh: 89 Low: 67 -
Partly cloudy with a 50%
chance of thunderstorms.
i . MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
S.,-"- High: 89 Low: 67
,i." �as - Partly cloudy with a 50% chance of
- thunderstorms.
w TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low: 67
Spartly cloudy with a 40% chance of
thunderstorms.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 87/70
Record 99/56
Normal 89/66
Mean temp. 79
Departure from mean +1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.46 in.
Total for the month 9.49 in.
Total for the year 14.27 in.
Normal for the year . 15.49 in.
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder-
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.92 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 68
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 63%
POLLEN COUNT**
Grasses and weeds were light
and trees were moderate.
*Light - only extreme allergic will show
symptoms, moderate - most allergic will
experience symptoms, heavy - all allergic will
experience symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollut-


ants mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
5/24 SUNDAY 5:41 11:57 6:13 12:28
5/25 MONDAY 6:46 12:30 7:18 1:02

CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
., - . SUNSET TONIGHT.... .............. 8:20 P.M.
) SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:34 A.M.
IL I _ MOONRISE TODAY ................6:20 A.M.
MAY 24 MAY 30 JINE 7 JINE 15. MOONSET TODAY ............................ 8:58 P.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. A burn ban is in effect.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending In 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.

TIDES
*From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay "*At Mason's Creek
Sunday Monday
City High/Low High/Low . High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 7:03 a/2:12 a 5:45 p/1:56 p 7:53 a/2:58 a 6:28 p/2:39 p
Crystal River* 5:24 a/11:18 a 4:06 p/-- 6:14 a/12:20 a 4:49 p/12:01 p
Withlacoochee* 3:11 a/9:06 a 1:53 p/10:08 p 4:01 a/9:49 a 2:36 p/10:56 p
Homosassa** 6:13 a/1;11 a 4:55 p/12:55 p 7:03 a/1:57 a 5:38 p/1:38 p


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
,ts - .


Gulf water
temperature

74�

Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.60 '28.47 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 32.94 32.94 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 34.76 34.76 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 36.71 36.73 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood,
the mean-annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in
any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District
and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey
be liable for any damages arising out of the use. of this data. If you have any questions you
should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION
S-,,.
S----- r



oIt
A' .a o' m n -, a , .. --' " .
S Ls - , ' " ' 6 "- 7"i-- OS ~sf-- r l-f'


, .-- . ' . -- t , _ S--Pa

s . . ...S. . -O - P,,


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M,


Saturday Sunday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta.
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
'Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


76 54 .01
71 54 .11
73 57
78.65 .16
86 62
84 62
86 60
76 45
73 68 .14
81 52
66 53
78 53
69 43
82 69
86 57
77 62 .07
.80 50
88 58
81 50
80 67 .02
87 62
64 55
85 69
68 53 .10
84 64 .03
77 51
82 56
88 67
86 61
71 59 .03
85 68
86 62
75 68 .21
96 73
85 67
67 59
86 65 .02
84 71
74 51 .04
74 60
78 691.43
76 70 ,.57
82 64


77 52
77 56
76 59
77 66
73 59
89 63
83 61
75 49
79 67
78 54
78 57
72 50
76 47
79 72
80 61
81 63
71 55
80 62
72 53
84 65
78 58
77 50
85 69
74 54
79 56
73 49
87 62
79 65
83 60
81 56
85 70
79 61
81 68
94 72
76 65
66 59
80 64
79 69
65 46
73 52
81 69
81 68
78 66


SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 83 72 .08 ts 84 71
New York City 73 63 ts 80 59
Norfolk 83 64 pc 83 65
Oklahoma City 82 65 ts 81 62
Omaha 87 63 .03 ts 78 60
Palm Springs 98 67 s 96 67
Philadelphia 87 63 ts 83 59
Phoenix 92 72 .01 s 94 74
Pittsburgh 84 60 ts 78 56
Portland, ME 62 53 ts 72 49
Portland, Ore 74 49 .01 s 72 49
Providence, R.I. 67 56 .01 ts 80 56
Raleigh 85 61 pc 84 64
Rapid City 57 44 .22 ts 67 52
Reno 86 56 pc 83 54
Rochester, NY 73 50 ts 72 48
Sacramento 75 51 s 85 56
St. Louis 84 69 .03 ts 80 65
St. Ste. Marie 60 42 s 66 39
Salt Lake City 77 62 ts 66 55
San-Antonio 86 65 .05 ts 89 68
San Diego 67 60 pc 66 60
San Francisco 56 50 pc 58 50
Savannah 76 68 .71 ts 83 69
Seattle 71 49 s 70 48
Spokane 78 43 s 76 48
Syracuse 78 52 ts 76 51
Topeka 88 61 ts 81 62
Washington 85 64 ts 85 62
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 100 Imperial, Calif. LOW 25 Minot AFB,
N.D.
WORLD CITIES
SUNDAY Lisbon 69/57/ts
CITY H/L/SKY London 64/47/pc
Acapulco 88/75/ts Madrid 76/52/ts
Amsterdam 66/55/pc Mexico City 74/53/ts
Athens 81/66/s Montreal 60/39/s
Beijing 95/69/pc Moscow 64/45/sh
Berlin 71/50/pc Paris 72/53/pc
Bermuda 78/69/s Rio 78/65/s
e; Cairo 83/61/s Rome 86/65/pc
Calgary 70/46/pc Sydney 64/50/pc
Havana 88/75/ts Tokyo 75/55/sh
Hong Kong 88/77/ts Toronto 70/46/s
Jerusalem 87/66/s Warsaw 72/48/pc


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


- - , C l ILI -, -



CHRONICLE
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KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzl
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
@2009 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


m










Crmris (?C)FJNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009 A5


State BRIEFS


Rowers offering
instruction
Rowing Organization of
Citrus County
Students (ROCCS)
offers Master's (adult rowing)
rowing 6:30 p.m. Wednes-
days and 7:30 a.m. Satur-
days at Wallace Brooks Park,
Inverness.
First two sessions are free,
and then the cost is $75 for
three months.
Rowing is recreational as
well as competitive for those
who are interested. Certified
rowing coaches will be on
hand to provide instruction,
and make rowing enjoyable..
Master's rowing is for all
adults 18 and older.
ROCCS also offers a com-
petitive rowing program for
middle and high school stu-
dents, and summer rowing
will be available for students
and adults.
Information on all rowing
programs and necessary
sign-up forms can be ob-
tained from the club's Web
site at www.crewroccs.com.
For more information, con-
tact Ward Cooper, head
- coach, at 228-3185 or mr-
cooper2u@yahoo.com; Larry
Triana, president, at 302-
3716 or Itriana001@tam-
pabay.rr.com; Dave Brown,
coach, at 464-2075 or
brownd2@tampabay.rr.com;
Dan Carella, coach, at 697-
3166 or dcarella@embarq-
mail.com.
CRHS class of
1999 reuniting
The 10-year Crystal River
High School Class of 1999
reunion is scheduled for Sat-
urday, July 18. The day's fes-
tivities will include a picnic
and golf outing during the day
and an evening at Cracker's
Tiki Bar featuring live enter-
tainment and a classmate
slideshow.
Please note this is a change
in plans from a previously
scheduled formal dinner in
order to accommodate as
many classmates as possible.
The deadline for registration
is July 1. For further details
and to register, contact Mered-
ith Linley by e-mail at meredith
@linley.us or by phone at
(904) 382-9912 or Maggie
Gunther by e-mail at
maggiegunther@hotmail.com
or by phone at (954) 224-2825.
Service dog training
volunteers needed-
Hero Assistance Dogs is in.
critical need of volunteers to
raise puppies.
Hero Assistance Dogs is an
all-volunteer organization that
donates the service dogs free
of charge to needy recipients.
To volunteer, call 560-3785.
The organization is accepting
donations from any person,
group or business. All dona-
tions are tax deductible.
For information, visit Hero
AssistanceDogs.org.
Man, 81, awarded
Eagle Scout badge
TITUSVILLE--Aman is
getting Eagle Scout honors
nearly 65 years after World
War II put off the ceremony.
The father of Titusville City
Manager Mark Ryan, 81-
" year-old Richard Ryan,
earned the Boy Scouts' high-
est rank long ago, but en-
Slisted in the Navy before he
could be officially honored.
Richard Ryan's grandson,
third-generation Eagle Scout
- Joshua Ryan, pinned the
Sbadge on his grandfather in a
- ceremony in Florence, S.C.
-From staff and wire reports


IVANYI
Continued from Page Al


"(The child's) parents, for
three-plus years, had done
nothing but praise me,"
Ivanyi said. "No matter
how much hurt (the child)
may have put on me, I still
loved the child like my
own."
During her three years as
the child's teacher, the
child progressed phenome-
nally, Ivanyi said, but at
times the child was aggres-
sive and violent. On numer-
ous occasions, the child
attacked Ivanyi and other
school faculty members,
she said. During emotional
outbursts, the child would
drop to the ground and
grab and pull others to the
ground, Ivanyi said. Typi-
cally, she said, the child
grabbed adults.
"I've been attacked nu-
merous times," Ivanyi said.
"You can see some of the
scars. Each time documen-
tation was done and the
parents were made aware."
Ivanyi provided nearly a
dozen Florida Department
of Labor and Employment
injury reports signed by
school officials. The re-
ports describe situations in
which the child bit,
scratched, grabbed,
pinched and squeezed
Ivanyi, causing injuries to
her breasts, back, knees,
ankles and fingers.

On Jan. 23, Ivanyi mo-
mentarily stepped out of
her classroom, leaving her
students with the aides, she
said. Then, she heard the
aides in the classroom
screaming.
The child was having a
tantrum over wanting to
hold a backpack; the child
grabbed another student in
the class and yanked that
student to the floor, Ivanyi
said.
"(The child) had (the stu-
dent on) the ground and
was pulling her down and
would not release," Ivanyi
said, noting she repeatedly
yelled for the child to re-
lease the student.
On the school district's
video footage of the inci-
dent, which does not have
audio, it appears the stu-
dents are playing when
Ivanyi runs into the class-
room, which was not the
case, Ivanyi said.
Ivanyi was aware of less
extreme interventions in
the student's behavioral
plan - to be implemented-
before placing the child in
a time-out area - but de-
cided it was necessary to
immediately put the child
in the BTR to protect the
other special-needs stu-
dents, she said.
First- and second-level
interventions to address
negative behavior are usu-
ally hands-off, milder in-
terventions such as a
"planned ignore," in which
Ivanyi would ignore the
child- until the child
calmed down - which, at
times, lasted hours, Ivanyi
said - or, if the child be-
came more aggressive, the
removal of the other stu-
dents from the classroom
until the child calmed
down.
An aide in the classroom
told school officials the
child was acting out ver-
bally .and physically and
she felt the safety of others
was in jeopardy, according
to the district's investiga-
tion report.
The school district's in-
vestigative report, which
has school officials'
minute-to-minute descrip-
tions of what played out on


video, stated Ivanyi
grabbed the child's arm, al-
though at the time there
was no longer interaction
between the child and the
other student.
Ivanyi then grabbed and
pulled the child by the
arms down the hall and
into the BTR, which was
not lighted. The child
would not stand up, which
is typical when the child is
being resistant, Ivanyi ex-
plained.
She called via her radio
for the school's teachers on
special assignment for be-
havior to bring a key to turn
the lights on, according to
the district's investigation
report.
Ivanyi and an aide moni-
tored the child through the
BTR window and were
able to see the child be-
cause of the hallway light-
ing, Ivanyi said.
While the child was in
the room, Ivanyi periodi-
cally entered to calm the
child. At one point, thEe
child grabbed Ivanyi's arm
and there was a "struggle,"
according to the school dis-
trict's reports.
An exceptional student
education teacher who was
present said the child at-
tacked Ivanyi; the teacher
said he entered the BTR to
help Ivanyi because he was
concerned for her safety,
.according to the district's
investigation report. Both
teachers then exited the
BTR.
The room remained dark
for nearly 10 minutes until
an employee arrived with a
special key to turn 'the
lights on.
"When the light is turned.
on is when blood is visibly
seen on the floor and wall,"
the school district's report
states.
While in the BTR, the
child received a hand in-
jury. The exact cause of the
injury is not noted in the
investigation file beyond
school officials' conclusion
that it was accidental. Ad-
ministrators called paira-
medics to take the child to
the hospital; Ivanyi rode
there with the child.
Ivanyi is unsure how the
child received, the injury,
but said that after the inci-
-dent, Principal Keith Posta
asked the school's custo-
dian to cover a portion of
the door with duct tape.
Posta told school officials,
he had checked the BTR
for any potential hazards;
he didn't find any sharp ob-
jects inside the room, butr
noticed the metal kick
plate outside the door was
bent and 'had a sharp cor-
ner, which is noted in the
district's investigation
records. Posta asked the
custodian to place duct
tape over the door's front
bottom kick plate as a tem-
porary solution, according
to the district's report.


School officials also
noted in their report on the
video that .at one point
while the child was in the
BTR, they saw the child
open the door; the child's
hand or finger appeared on
the door while Ivanyi and
her aide "handled" the
door.
The school district offi-
cials said they would not
release the video footage
due to student privacy
laws.

The incident happened
on a Friday. By Monday
morning, administrators
came to Ivanyi, asking her
for any documentation she
had on file having to do
with the child, including a
parent permission form re-
garding placing the child in
the BTR.
There is no state law or
rule about parents having
to sign a permission form,
according to Florida De-
partment of Education offi-
cials. However, in CREST,
School's faculty handbook,
it states students should
not be placed in the BTR
without written parental
approval.
Beyond the statement in
the handbook about requir-.
ing parent permission,
CREST School has no writ-
ten policies regarding the
parent permission forms.
CREST Assistant Princi-
pal Anita Moon told school
officials the parent permis-
sion forms were not re-
quired until the 2007 - '08
school year. Teachers are
supposed to collect the
forms, which parents typi-
cally hand in at their chil-
dren's annual Individual
Education Plan meetings;
the forms are valid for one
school year, Moon ex-
plained. The signed forms,
along with notes from par-
ents who do not want their
child placed in isolation
areas, are also kept in a
binder in the teacher on as-
signment for behavior's of-
fice, Moon said.
Ivanyi said after the par-
ents attended their child's
annual Individual Educa-
tion Plan meeting in March
2008, they sent the signed
form to the school in their
child's backpack with the
child's daily communica-
tion logs.
The parents of the child
told school officials they


never signed the form to
consent to the use of the
BTR, according to investi-
gation records.
Ivanyi kept a copy of the
form for her records and
submitted the original to
the front office, she said.
"The original document
could not be located in the
location in which signed
documents are filed in the
CREST office. Additionally,
all files and documents in
Ms. Ivanyi's classroom
were reviewed and no orig-
inal documentation was
discovered," the school dis-
trict's report states.
Ivanyi felt pressure to
produce the permission
form but could not find the
form, she said. She knew it
was somewhere, so she
asked her aide to cut the
child's parent's signature
from a communication log
and paste it on a permis-
sion form to give to admin-
istrators until she could
locate her copy Ivanyi said
her judgment lapsed due to
being in a state of panic.
School officials sus-
pended the aide in March
for 10 days without pay for
providing assistance in an
effort to falsify a student
record.
Although she later ac-
knowledged assistance
from the aide, Ivanyi ini-
tially told school officials
she acted on her own and
Sno one else helped her. ac-
cording to the school dis-
trict's investigative report.
Ivanyi said she told offi-
cials she acted alone be-
cause, as the leader in the
classroom, she takes full
responsibility for the alter-
ation of the parental per-
mission form.
"Yes, I made a mistake
and I will admit that,"
Ivanyi said. "I wanted to
please my administration
right away I wanted to give
them the form."
However, she feels her
quick decision to put the
child in the BTR that day
was necessary to keep her
students and staff members
safe.
"I refuse to let any of my
students be .hurt," Ivanyi
said.

"I love what I do. I un-
derstand my children: in
many ways, more so than
others," Ivanyi said.
Prior to working in Cit-


N


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5,
E- *A









^.
." 11


This procedure is typically done at I
universities and now is exclusive to (
there is no need to travel.


rus County, Ivanyi taught
for seven years for Miami-
Dade County Public
Schools. She was named
Teacher of the Year in 2003
at Oliver Hoover Elemen-
tary School in Miami.
In 2002, U.S. Rep. Ileana
Ros-Lehtinen, a Republi-
can from Miami-Dade
County, congratulated and
recognized Ivanyi in front
of the U.S. House of Rep-
resentatives for her advo-
cacy in behalf of and
dedication to special-
needs children.
"Heather has a Down
syndrome child and is
aware of how parents and
schools need to work to-
gether for a severely dis-
abled child to be successful
and productive in life.
Heather works hard on
making sure her students
are able to go into our com-
munity and be a part of our
society," principal Posta
wrote about Ivanyi in a De-
cember 2008 nomination
letter for Teacher of the
Year.
Ivanyi hopes school
board members will allow
her to return to teaching.
She has struggled the past
few months, emotionally
and financially, due to
being suspended without
pay from her exceptional
student education teaching
position.
"I've suffered enough,"
Ivanyi said. "I think I've
paid - my dues and then
some."


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Gates praises more than 950 West Point grads


Associated Press

WEST POINT, N.Y. - Cadets
graduating from West Point were
praised by U.S. Defense Secretary
Robert Gates on Saturday for hav-
ing the courage and patriotism to
join the military in "a dangerous
new century."
Gates noted that the 970 mem-
bers of the U.S. Military Academy's
class of 2009 were preparing their
West Point applications in late
2004, even as American forces were


battling fiercely in Fallujah in Iraq.
"You made your decision to serve
knowing not only that America was
at war, as did every man or woman
who joined the military after Sept
11, but that this war would be
bloody and difficult, of indefinite
length and uncertain outcome,"
Gates told cadets. "In doing so, you
showed courage, commitment and
patriotism of the highest order."
Almost all the graduates become
second lieutenants in the U.S.
Army. Most are expected to serve


eventually in Iraq or Afghanistan.
Gates, who became defense sec-
retary during the Bush administra-
tion in 2006, urged the new officers
to be pioneers in a perilous time.
He called on them to show the
courage to speak hard truths to su-
perior officers and to show com-
passion for soldiers suffering from
post-traumatic stress or other ill-
nesses. His voice appeared to crack
slightly when he told cadets "I feel
a deep, personal responsibility for
each of you."


Cadets who tossed their caps into
the air after the ceremony at the
academy's football stadium said
the four years trained them well to
handle dangerous deployments.
Some said they had concerns, all
said they were prepared.
"You always think about it I get
a lot of comments from my par-
ents," said Rachael Breinling of
Fremont, Mich. "But you have to
think past that"
"I'm ready," said Brandy Kinstle
of Mansfield, Ohio. "If they tell me
to go, I'll be there."
Brent Chapman said the Sept 11
attacks in his hometown of New


York City galvanized the decision to
leave college and enlist He came-
to West Point in 2005 with thoughts
of being an officer - the guy who
wears the brass and gives the or-
ders. He said his time at the acad-
emy has given him a deeper
ambition.
"It transformed into being the
guy who people will trust their lives
with," Chapman said.
The class of 2009 includes 17
cadets from other countries, in-
cluding the academy's first cadet
from Afghanistan, who will attend
graduate school in the United
States.


Obituaries


Josephine
Ajersch, 96
LECANTO.
Josephine Ajersch, age 96,
of Lecanto, FL. passed away
on May 21, 2009. Private cre-
mation under the direction
of Brown Funeral Home
and Crematory.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory Lecanto, Florida
in charge of arrangements.

Marvin 'Rudy'
Atkins,74
INVERNESS
Marvin. R. "Rudy" Atkins,.
74, of Inverness, Fl. passed
away May 20,2009.
He is survived by wife
Barbra Atkins of Inverness,
Fl. and the following chil-
dren and their families:
Kathy Evans, Boynton
Beach, Fl.; Michael Atkins,
Madison, Al.; Steve Atkins,
Lake City, Fl.; Debbie Lutz,
Ravenna, Oh.; Scott Blake,
Deerfield Beach, Fl. and
Todd Blake, Lighthouse
Point, Fl. Rudy was a fire-
fighter in Roanoke, Va. and
Pompao Beach, Fl.
He will be missed by all
who knew him. In lieu of
flowers, the family requests
donations to Citrus County
Hospice.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.





Eugene
Gorecki, 86 '
BEVERLY HILLS
Eugene Gorecki, 86, Bev-
erly Hills, died Saturday,
May 23, 2009 at Hospice of
Citrus County Care Unit at
Citrus Memorial Hospital. A
graveside committal service
with military honors will be
held on Wednesday, June 3,
'2009 at 2:00 PM. at the
Florida National Cemetery
in Bushnell. Friends will
gather at the Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home in Inverness
to form the procession to the
cemetery at 1:00 PM.






Jack Green, 69
INVERNESS
Jack Ronald Green, 69, In-
verness, died Friday, May
22, 2009 at Arbor Trail
Rehab & Nursing Center. A
native of Miami, Jack was
born July 29, 1939 to the late
Leroy and Nellie Green and
came to this area in 2001
from there. He was em-
ployed as an electrical
worker with the Union
Local #349 in Miami for 46
years. Jack was a member of
the, Floral City VFW Post
#7122 Men's Auxiliary, the
IR-RU Club and the Inver-.
ness Eagles Aerie. He en-
joyed hunting and fishing
and was an Everglade's en-
thusiast. He also liked
watching NASCAR races
and football. His survivors
include his wife of 27 yeais,
Arden L. Green, Inverness,
two daughters, Jackie










* Burial
* Cremation
* Pre-Planning
Funeral Directo
C L,,man Strtcklnd 6z T.:'m L PKc(
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
�www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


(Robert) Robbins, Jupiter,
FL and Karen Perez,
O'Brien, FL and four grand-
daughters. Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home is in charge
of private cremation
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

Joyce
Grenman, 78
HERNANDO.
Joyce M. Grenman, age 78,
of Hernando, FL, passed
away May 22, 2009 at her
home under the care of her
family and Hernando-Pasco
Hospice. She was born on
April 27, 1931 to John and
Azelza(Wilcox) Carini. Joyce
moved to Citrus County
seven years ago from West
Charleston, Vermont. She
was a retired Factpry
Worker and a member of the
VEW Post 4254 of Her-
nando.
In addition to her parents,
Joyce was preceded in
death by her daughter
Nancy Louise Grenman.
Survived by her husband,
Ernest Grenman of Her-
nando, FL; four children,
Gunnar Grenman, John
Grenman, Nancy Tucker
and James Grenman all of
Connecticut; three grand-
children.
No services are planned.
Joyce gave the gift of dona-
tion to the Anatomical
Board of the State of
Florida located at the Col-
lege of Medicine, University
of Florida in Gainesville.
Brown Funeral Home and
SCrematory,-Lecanto; Florida
in charge of arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.





Harold
Kitchen, 66
INVERNESS
Harold C. Kitchen, 66, re-
tired U.S. Navy mechanical
engineer,died on Friday,
May 22, 2009 in Inverness,
Florida.
Arrangements under the
direction of Fero Funeral
Home in Beverly Hills,
Florida.

Elinor
Kuhner, 89.
HOMOSASSA
Elinor Kuhner, 89, of Ho-
mosassa,' FI, passed away
Thursday, May 21, 2009, at
Cypress Cove Care Center,
Crystal River She was born
in Brooklyn, NY, and ar-
rived in the area in 2002
coming from Brod-
headsville, PA. She w aserm-
ployed by Bohacks
Supermarket as a book-
keeper, and was a home-
maker of 67 years. She was
a Christian .and attended
Faith Baptist Church, Ho-
mosassa.
She is preceded in death
by her husband Frank Kuh-
ner. She is survived by one
daughter, Carolyn Smith of
Homosassa; and one son
Richard Kuhner ofRemsen,
NY; 9 grandchildren and 11
great-grandchildren.
A viewing is scheduled for



Funeral Home
With Crematory

* Burial * Shipping
* Cremation
Member of
International Order of the
G LDEN






For Information and costs,
call 726-8323


Wednesday, May 27, 2009,
between the hours of 1:00
PM until 3:00 PM, and 5:00
PM until 7:00 PM at Wilder
Funeral Home, Homosassa.
Funeral services are sched-
uled for Thursday, May 28,
2009, 4:00 PM at the funeral
home. Please visit
www.wilderfuneral.com to
submit messages of condo-
lence..

John
Madden, 80
ORLANDO
John H. Madden, age 80,
of Orlando, FL. passed away
on May- 21, 2009 in Her-
nando, FL. Private crema-
tion under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory Lecanto, Florida
in charge of arrangements.

Ellen Martin, 93
LODI, OHIO
Ellen G. Martin, age 93,
passed, away on May 22,
2009.
Services and burial will
be in Lodi, Ohio.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory Lecanto, Florida
in charge or arrangements.

Rita
McGuire, 87
CITRUS COUNTY
Rita McGuire, Our Dear
Mom has died. All who
knew her were. touched by
her grace, her kindness and
her faithfulness in little
things. She ,,_ ,______
died Friday,
May 22,2009
at Hospice
of Citrus
County Care
Unit at Cit-
rus Memo-
r i .a 1
Hospital. A Rita
Mass of I.d, . -
Christian
Burial will be celebrated on
Wednesday, May 27, 2009 at
10:00 A.M. at Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church.
The family will -receive
friends in visitation on
Tuesday, May 26, 2009 from
4:00 to 6:00 PM. at the Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home. In
lieu of flowers, the family
requests memorial dona-
tions in Rita's name to Help-
ing Hands Ministry, Our
Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church or Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270, Bev-
erly Hills, FL 34464. Rita
was born April 14, 1922 in
Amboy, Illinois to the late
Albert and Ruth (McCaffrey)
Rosier and came to this
area in 1978 from,
Oconomowoc, Wisconsin.
She was a special education
teacher as well as owner of
her own mail order busi-
ness. Rita was a parishioner
at Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church and and
charter member of the Min-
istry of Helping Hands and
received the St Jude Award
for service to her church in
2003. She was a charter







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member of the Geneology
Society. Mom enjoyed hav-
ing her constant companion,
her son Tim, with her as a
travel companion and most
recently as her caretaker.
Everyday, Mom gave thanks
to God for her blessings, as
well as saying her rosary,
reading the paper, doing
crossword puzzles and
watching Chris Mathews.
She loved life and her fam-
ily. Her survivors include
two sons Robert M. (Bar-
bara) , McGuire,
Oconomowoc, WI and Timo-
thy J. McGuire, Inverness;
five daughters: Mary
Catherine (Darrel) Larsen,
Ketchikan, AK, Patricia A.
(Jeff) Lavin, Silverthorne,
CO, 'Sheila McGuire, Min-
neapolis, MN, Maureen
(Michael) Fisher, Maple
Lake, MN and Jennifer
McGuire (David Sebora)
Neenah, WI, her brother
Joseph Rosier, Lake Mary,
FL and sister Patricia Ron-
deau, Jackson Port, WI, 13
grandchildren and seven
great-grandchildren. She
was preceded in death by
her husband of 47 years,
Robert on 05/25/1990 and
one brother John Rosier in
1995.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.





Sam
Rotkowitz, 88-
BEVERLY H ILLS
Sam Rotkowitz, 88, Beverly
Hills, died Sunday, May 17,
2009, under the care of his
family and Hernando-Pasco
Hospice.
Born June 18,1920, the son
of David and Annie, he
moved to Beverly Hills in
1979 from his native Brook-
lyn, N.Y.
Sam served honorably as a
Sergeant in the Air Force
during World War II and then
was a Detective with the New
York City Police Department
for 23 years before retiring.
Sam was also a member of
the Moslem Mosque in
Brooklyn, N.Y.
Sam and his late wife Lena
were married for 65 years.
Survivors include his daugh-
ter, Patricia Roa and husband
Frank of Citrus Springs; son,
Bruce Rotkowitz and wife
JoAnn of Brigantine, N.J.;
five grandchildren, Jaysen
Roa of Beverly Hills, Krystal
Roa of Citrus Springs, Scott
Rotlowitz of Hopewell, N.J.,
Russell Rotkowitz of Mount
Laurel, N.J., and Matthew
Rotkowitz of Brigantine, N.J.;
two great-grandchildren,
Camryn Rotkowitz of Mount
Laurel, N.J., and Tyler
Rotkowitz of Hopewell, N.J.;
and five beloved pets.


Piro Funeral Home Brook-
lyn, New York
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

Hannelore
School, 78
LECANTO
Hannelore Schohl, age 78,
of Lecanto, FL passed away
.on May 20, 2009.
Private cremation under
the direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crematory
in Lecanto, FL.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto, Florida
in charge of arrangements.




Charles
Siska Jr., 78
HERNANDO
Charles F Siska, Jr., 78; of
Hernando, FL, died on May
21,2009, at Citrus Memorial
Hospital in Inverness.
Charles was born on No-
vember 15,1930, in Chicago,
IL, the son of Charles and
Anna Siska. He served in
the U.S. Navy during the Ko-
rean Conflict. Charles was
an aircraft mechanic for
Delta. He moved to Her-
nando in 1984 from Miami,
FL. He was a member of the
Westchester Masonic Lodge
#995 in Chicago, IL.
Mr. Siska is survived by
his wife, Nadezdhda Siska
of Hernando, FL; his
brother, Robert R. Siska of
Cerverna Park, Washington,
D.C.: and 'step-daughter:
Nadia Horakova of Proste-
jov, Czech Republic.
* Funeral services for Mr.
Siska will be held at the
Heinz Funeral Home, 2507
Hwy. 44 West, Inverness, on
Tuesday, May 26, 2009, at
11:00 a.m. Visitation will be
from 10:00 a.m. until the
hour of services. Reverend
Kenneth Blyth will preside.
Burial will follow at Florida
National Cemetery in Bush-
nell. Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness, FL.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

Rita Smith, 73
HOMOSASSA
A Celebration of Life for
Mrs. Rita Smith, age 73, of
Homosassa, FL, will.be held
12:30 PM, Tuesday, May 26,
2009, at the Crystal River
Church of God, under the di-
rection of the Homosassa
vChapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes, with Pastor Ronnie
Reid officiating. Cremation
will be under the direction of
Hooper Crematory, Inver-
ness, FL Online condolences
may be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral-
Home.com.
She was born May 14,1936,
in Chicago, IL, daughter of


j vvww.HooperFuneraIHome.com



SFUNERALHOMES
& CREMATORY


the late George and Elsie
(DeHaan) Gajentan. She died
May 18, 2009, in Homosassa,
FL.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Lloyd
Paul Smith
of Ho-
mosassa,
FL, to whom
she had
been hap-
pily married
for 55 years;
dau g h ter, Rita Smith
April K
Phillips and husband,'
Robert; brother, George
Gajentan and wife, Dorothy;
grandson, Wade M. Phillips;
granddaughter, Aspen D.
Phillips; and numerous
nieces and nephews. She was
the greatest wife, mother, and
grandmother She was deeply
loved by her family, friends,
and anyone who knew her
Friends who wish may send
memorial donations to the.
Hydrocephalus and Neuro-
science Institute, Inc., 58 West
Michigan Street, Orlando,
Florida 32806.

Mildred
Wachtl, 85
SUGARMILL
WOODS
Mildred Ann Wachtl, 85 of
Sugarmill Woods, Homosassa
passed away Tuesday, May 12
from cancer, at home under.
the care of Hospice. She was
born July 21, 1923 in Cross
Plains, WI and: had several
major secretarial jobs during
her working career: Secre-
tary to the Dean of the Mlech.
Engr. DeptattheUniv, of Wis-
consin (Madison), Secty to the
Mgr. of the Supersonic Div. of
NACA (now NASA) in Cleve-
land, OH and then secty for
20 years of the Jr League of
Baltimore. There, she re-
ceived a Proclamation from
Mayor W D. Schaefer desig-
nating 2/27/86 as "Mildred
Wachtl" Day on her retire-
ment Her hobbies were
crafts and gardening
She is survived by her hus-
band William and daughter
Denise from SMW and son
David, wife Tammy and.
grandchildren Taylor, Chris
and David from Morrison,
CO. Her burial services were
held at Fountains Memorial
Park, Homosassa.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline.com.
S' 784348

B ROWN
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY
. 5430 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy
Lecanto, Forida 31451
.. j (352)
795-0111

Richard TIBrown
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Inverness - Homosassa

(352) 726-2271
1-888-7HOOPER (746-6737)


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Class includes 17 cadets from other countries


.Lest We Forget








SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009 A7


STERT Ivanyi said she kept in constant contact
CREST |with the student's parents and that they
were aware of when the child was placed
Continued from Page Alin the BTR. School officials said Ivanyi
never specifically communicated to the
The child's parents have consulted Kam- parents that their child was in the BTR.
leiter, but have not filed a civil suit against While there is a paragraph about the sub-
the Citrus County School District mission of misconduct forms in CREST
Last resort School's faculty handbook, there are no
clear, established written school- or district-
Physical restraint and the use of the level policies regarding parent notification.
BTR, the most restrictive intervention, "(Posta) explained that when a student is
should be used as an absolute last resort placed in the BTR, communication is to be
and only if a child poses a danger to him or made with the parents by either phone and/or
herself or others, Kamleiter said. daily note (communication note)," according
"I don't think there was any excuse for it, to the school district's investigation report.
Kamleiter said, based on what he saw on the Written procedures exist regarding when
video. "Our complaint is abuse .. .(the child) to and who should pace students in the iso-
being dragged out of a classroom, down a nation room based on different crisis levels.
hallway and thrown into a dark room." However, the school nor district has writ-
The parents were under the impression ten rules about the use of the BTR.
the behavior plan they discussed with fac- As far as guidelines for the BTR, faculty
ulty members during their annual Individ- members turn to a Florida Department of
ual Education Plan meeting was being Education Bureau of Exceptional Student
implemented, Kamleiter said. Education and Student Services technical
The plan included ignoring their child's assistant paper.
negative behavior and reinforcing the positive Based on the information in the school dis-
behavior Ifthe student became aggressive, the trict's investigative report, CREST administra-
teacher or an aide was to move the other chil- tors and faculty members did not follow many
dren to a safe place until the student in the guidelines in the technical assistance paper
classroom calmed down, Kamleiter said. * * *,
"None of that happened in the video," Based on school officials' summary of the
kamleiter said. video, prior to Ivanyi dragging the student
I In the school district's report, a guidance to the BTR, a classroom aide dragged the
counselor, who is also an exceptional stu- student two to three feet across the class-
dent education specialist, told school offi- ro floor during a separate situation.
mtcias that during the parents, the parents saidch 2008n The aide's action provoked great concern
meeting with the parentstheir parents said in Kamleiter regarding the training of staff
they did not want their child forced into a members at the school; teachers and their
time-out area, which is clearly noted in the aides should be under the impression that
"student's behavioral plan. they do everything possible to avoid physi-
"The Individual Education Plan, which cal contact with students, he said.
included the behavioral plan for the stu- Also, the BTR is to be used for extreme be-
Sdent, has interventions, which were to be havior cases, Kainleiter said, which is why he
implemented before placement into a 'time- is confused about why he saw, on the video
out' area,"' Superintendent of Schools San- footage, another teacher place a wheelchair-
dra "Sam" Himmel wrote in anApril 5 letter bound student in the BTR at'the same time
to Ivanyi. "These interventions were not fol- as Ivanyi's student was in the room.
-lowed nor were procedures for guiding a Those circumstances indicated to Kam-
student to the BTR room as evidenced by leiter that what happened Jan. 23 was not an
you sliding (the student) down the hallway" isolated incident or the result of one faculty
'After interviewing many of the staff it is member, he said; there are much greater,
apparent that this was an isolated incident, widespread issues at the CREST School.
and the teacher did not use the interven-
tions prescribed nor the training she re- given in CREST'
ceived in h proper manner," Himmel wrote There are two reasons given in CREST's
ceivedina propermanner,"Himmel wrote in goryreport as to why the light
in an April 2 letter to CREST School Prin- investigatory report as to wy the lights
were not on in the BTR: The lights require
cipal Keith Posta. a special key to beturned on to protect stu-
Not just one 'bad apple' dents from receiving an electrical shock, as
- Kamleiter said he does not view the Jan. well as to conserve energy. Custodians,
23 incident as a solitary case, as there are team leaders and administrators have keys.
many other factors, a "culture at the CREST Assistant Principal Anita Moon
school," which, if not corrected, could lead said she did not direct staff members as to
to further issues. whether the lights should be on or off in the
Some of Kamleiter's concerns include haz- room until after the Jan. 23 incident, ac-
ards in the BTR and lack of behavioral train- cording to the investigation records.
ing/support for staff members as well as The DepartmentofEducation'stechnicalas-
unclear school- and district-level policies re- distance paper notes a seclusion room must be
garding physical restraint and seclusion, com- properly lighted, with the switch outside the
munication, documentation and oversight room- one of about 10 listed requirements.
Regarding those concerns, the adminis- U E' .
trators are the ones who are primarily re- On April 2, Him mel placed a letter of rep-
sponsible, Kamleiter said. rimand in Posta's personnel file. It states-
Kamleiter's'conicerns are the iresiill" ".'Althougli it is evident that there is exten-
many disturbing findings in the Citrus County sive training on physical restraint methods for
School District's investigative report, he said. staff.. .the communication on the implemen-
"There's a lot of things that were really station of procedures for the Behavioral Tran-
wrong," Kamleiter said. sition Room has been confusingto some ofthe
E U N employees. Furthermore, the follow-up pro-
The student was placed in the BTR three cedures for placement into this isolation time-
to four times. during the past school year, out setting have not been monitored on a
and Ivanyi was not the only person-who put constant basis; Administration and appropri-
the student in the isolation room. ate personnel should be involved in the over-
"Actually, an administrator did put him sight of these processes..In reviewing your
in," Kamleiter said., procedures, there was a log for the students
In the district's investigation report, an who were placed in the BTR, but continued
administrator and staff member told school flow-up is needed for oversight ofthis log. For
officials during interviews that an admin- example, the log was at times incomplete....
istrator was present during at least one of Further, no cross check was completed to en-
the times the child was placed in the BTR sure parent permission forms, etc. had been
and might have put or assisted in the place- received... I know that these processes have
ment of the child, been in place and have been fine-tuned with
For the times the student was placed in the help of the district office since this event;
the BTR, there was missing or incomplete however, the prior procedures could: have
documentation regarding BTR logs, mis- been monitored and communicated better on
conduct forms and parent notification. a more consistent basis... It is important that
"The parents were not notified at any these processes be communicated more
time," Kamleiter said. clearly to staff and parents."



", A A AeC W i i J


I- MOO


7Di g�, 7r


9o 60i" e 30P Qwn weai

Memorial Day Service
As we Honor our Veterans
rj& Monday, May 25, 2009
10:30 A.M.


Fero Funeral Home Veterans of Foreign War Post 10087
352,746-4646 American Legion Post 155
3 5Lecanto High School JROTC
352-489-9613 Nature Coast Young Marines
5955 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Pastor Stewart Jamison

I Y LE * . Please provide me information on the following at now obligation:
Q Free Consultation L Mausoleum Crypts
J Free Personal Planning Guide Q Private Family Estates
U Burial at Fero Memorial Gardens Cemetery U Out of State Burial
S Burial at Florida National or Other cemetery J Cremation Services and Niches
Q Patriotic Veteran packages U Memorial Monument Estates
NAME PHONE
I I
ADDRESS I
I I
CITY STATE____ ZIP__
Fero Memorial Gardens Cemetery (352) 746-4646 5955 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 I
.------------------------ 7---------1-----------I-------------------- I


CRYSTAL
A U T O M O T I V E

CHEVROLET * CHRYSLER * DODGE * JEEP * NISSAN


An open letter to our friends
and customers:

Thank you to all of our friends
and customers for placing your
faith in Crystal when you
purchased your car or truck
from us. We appreciate your
business.


Our doors are open for business!' We sell cars to and maintain
cars for our customers every day. Next month, we celebrate our 25th
anniversary here in Citrus County. During that time, it has been our
pleasure to serve you. In the past 25 years, we have seen many ups
and downs in our economy. Today, we can say with confidence that
we've never felt better about our future. We would like to share with
. you some important facts regarding the state of the automobile
industry.

We want you to .know the facts regarding your warranty. Your
warranty is and will remain in force. It is backed by the full faith of
the United States government. Our President stated unequivocally
that all warranties for GM and Chrysler are backed by the federal
government regardless of the outcome of current financial wrangling.

The news you hear is not good. Daily, we hear and read negative
headline grabbing stories. We live at a time when the media struggles
to keep our attention, so the more sensational the story, the better it
sells. Rarely mentioned is the tremendous progress that is being made
in restructuring two great American companies. Both GM and
Chrysler are remaking their companies in a fashion that will carry
them for the next generation. At no time has anyone seriously
reported either company will stop building cars and trucks in
America. In fact, they are both restructuring themselves in a way to
guarantee a future automobile industry in America.

Don't be confused as to what Chrysler bankruptcy means. On
April 30, the President stated, "I don't want anyone to be confused as
to what a Chrysler bankruptcy means. This is not a sign of weakness
but one more step on a clearly chartered path to Chrysler's revival. It
will in no way interrupt the ability for you to buy and service a
Chrysler. This is a, process,that has the fullacking of the United ,
States government. There is no doubt Chrysler will emerge from this
process stronger and more competitive." As a part of a global alliance
with Fiat, Chrysler will gain additional technology to ensure its cars
and trucks are both efficient and environmentally friendly.

Current banking conditions are niot as bad as the news reports.
Banks have money to loan. We arrange new and used car loans for
our customers every day. Even for people with less then perfect
credit, financing is available. We continue to offer financing rates as
low as zero percent on many of our most popular models. Used car
financing also remains robust, with attractive terms and rates. To
ensure financing, the President announced the merger of Chrysler
Financial with GMAC. This federally sponsored merger will
guarantee financing is available to those that want it.

The current economic conditions are not as bad as stated
daily in the press. Nationally, unemployment is high and continues
to get higher. But, did you know unemployment in Citrus County
went down in March according to the bureau of labor? Losing a job
can be a life shattering event. But, better days are ahead with the
economic growth coming to Citrus County. We believe the worst is
behind us. Together, as a nation, we will recover. As a community we
will continue to grow and create new and better opportunities for us
all. Our collective fear, to a. degree, is responsible for where we are.
It is our collective hope that will pull us through.

If you are waiting for better times to purchase you don't have
to wait any longer. The current recession will end just like every
previous recession has ended. Why wait to enjoy driving that car or
truck you always wanted? Now is the best time in years to purchase.
Low interest rates, generous factory incentives, and comprehensive
warranties make today the right time to buy. We invite you to visit a
local dealership and see for yourself.

In life, things are never as bad or good as they seem. Times are
tough, but tomorrow will be brighter. What you see, hear or read is
rarely the whole story. Look around and ask, "Are things as bad as
everyone says, or do I believe in the ability of our great nation to
weather the current storm and emerge stronger for the struggle?"

Thanks again, -.






Steve & Jewel Lamb


Chrysler-Dodge Jeep
of Homosassa
1005 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34448
(352) 563-2277
Fax (352) 563-1543


Chevrolet
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34448
(352) 795-1515
Fax (352) 795-5157


Chrysler-Dodge Jeep
of Inverness
2077 Hwy. 44 West
Inverness, FL 34453
(352) 726-1238
Fax (352) 3444833


Nissan
937 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34448
(352) 628-4300
Fax (352) 628-4350


Chrysler-,Dodge Jeep
of Brooksville
14358 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville, FL 34613
(352) 597-1265
Fax (352) 597-2886


ull KU5 tuuiv I r (1-14 t-nnu-'-I


(rrotrs CorrNTv (F.) HRonircLE


t.


_I _










NPage A8 - SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009



NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Salute


Court pick expect this week


Associated Press
Mike Belmesslerl, of South
San Francisco, salutes Fri-
day In front of the grave of
U.S. Marine Michael Blan-
chini at the Golden Gate
National Cemetery, where
more than 100,000 U.S.
war veterans are buried, in
San Bruno, Calif. Binachini
died serving in Vietnam.
Belmessieri, himself a for-
mer Marine, is active in
promoting causes for vet-
erans. His son Dominic
Belmessieri is a U.S. Ma-
rine about to be deployed
to Afghanistan after two
tours in Iraq.

Experts probe
dolphin deaths
SANTA BARBARA, Calif.
- Marine mammal experts
are investigating what
caused the death of five dol-
phins that were discovered
on a small island off the coast
of Santa Barbara.
The National Marine Fish- a
series Service said the dead
northern right whale dolphins
were found Friday on Santa
Rosa Island, about 35 miles
southwest of Santa Barbara.
Rescuers received reports
of five dead dolphins, but
.could only locate and recover
the bodies of four. The car-
casses will be analyzed to
determine cause of death.
Northern right whale dol-
phins are approximately six
to ten feet in length and
weigh up to 250 pounds.
They typically travel in herds
of 100 to 200.


World BRIEFS

Kuwait: Swine flu
. cases detected
KUWAIT CITY-Several
swine flu cases have been de-
tected among U.S. soldiers
passing through Kuwait, offi-
cials said Saturday.
The soldiers were treated on
a U.S. base and some of them
have left the country, the state
news agency quoted a Health
Ministry official as saying. The
official, Ibrahim Abdul-Hadi, did
not say how many soldiers
were infected or where they
were traveling from.
The U.S. Embassy said
cases have 'tentatively" been
confirmed without providing de-
tails. It said the soldiers did not
come into contact with the
Kuwaiti population.
"Each case was character-
ized as being a mild flu-like
symptom," the American mili-
tary said in a statement, s
. Plane crash
in Brazil kills 14
SAO PAULO--A British-
born Brazilian businessman
and nine family members were
among the 14 people killed
when their twin-engine plane
crashed and exploded near a
coastal resort in northeastern
Brazil, a spokesman for his
company said Saturday.
Roger lan Wright, a founding
partner at Sao Paulo financial
consulting firm Arsenal Investi-
mentos, died along with his
second wife, son and daughter
from a previous marriage and
their spouses, two grandsons
and one granddaughter and a
great aunt, the spokesman
said. He declined to be identi-
fied, citing company policy.
The plane crashed Friday
night just short of the Terravista
Airport, a gateway for well-
heeled guests arriving at the
exclusive Terravista golf and
condominium resort in the town
of Trancoso, according to the
state-run Agenda Brasil news
agency.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - On the
verge of choosing his first
Supreme Court nominee,
President Barack Obama
has already provided a pro-
file of the person he is likely
to pick: an intellectual
heavyweight with a "com-
mon touch," someone whose
brand of justice means see-
ing life from the perspective
of the powerless.


Obama is expected to an-
nounce his nominee this
week, as early as Tuesday.
His words, his young presi-
dency and his own life ex-
perience reveal what the
nation should expect-- and
help explain how the presi-
dent is making a decision
that will endure long after
he leaves office.
"You have to have not
only the intellect to be able
to effectively apply the law


to cases before you,"
Obama said in an interview
carried Saturday on C-
SPAN television. "But you
have to be able to stand in
somebody else's shoes and
see through their eyes and
get a sense of how the law
might work or not work in
practical day-to-day living."
That quality - Obama
calls it empathy - is a.
huge factor in picking a
successor to retiring Jus-
tice David Souter. Among
the others Obama is weigh-
ing: judicial philosophy, in-
tellectual sway, gender,
ethnicity, age and the poli-


tics of Senate confirma-
tion.
He is expected to choose
a woman, and perhaps
someone who is Hispanic,
but insists he will not be
"weighed down" by demo-
graphics.
Ultimately, it may come
down to an intangible -
how well the nominee res-
onates with Obama. A pres-
ident's tenure will last at
most eight years, but his
choice of a Supreme Court
nominee could affect the
course of the nation for a
generation, and his
personal legacy for


even longer.
The six people known to
be under consideration by
Obama are U.S. Appeals
Court judges Sonia So-
tomayor and Diane Wood,
Solicitor General Elena
Kagan, Michigan Gov. Jen-
nifer Granholm, Homeland
Security Secretary Janet
Napolitano and California
Supreme Court Justice
Carlos Moreno.
It remains possible that
Obama could nominate
someone else who would
surprise the legal, political
and media communities
tracking his deliberations.


Flag flying


Associated Press
Tiger Scout Robert Casal, 6, of Plainview N.Y., is seen Saturday through an American flag as he places one during an annual event in honor
of the Memorial Day holiday at Long Island National Cemetery in Farmingdale N.Y.


Sri Lanka war zone



scene of devastation


Associated Press
NORTHEAST COAST, Sri
Lanka -- Sri Lanka's former
war zone is a wasteland, its
earth scorched and pocked
by craters. Cars and trucks lie
overturned near bunkers be-
side clusters of battered,
tents.
The government has de-
nied firing heavy weapons
into what had been a battle-
field densely populated with
civilians. But the helicopter.
tour the military gave U.N.
Secretary General Ban Ki-
moon and a group ofjournal-
ists Saturday revealed
widespread devastation.
Civilians who escaped the
zone said they came under
intense shelling from both
the rebels and the govern-
ment
"We ran for our lives from
the shelling in the north,"
said one man who gave his
name as Krishnathurai. "It
was coming from both sides,
the Tamil Tigers and the mil-
itary, and we were stuck in
the middle."
The sandy coastal strip
where the final battles of the
quarter-century civil war
were fought was dotted with
patches of charred earth and
deep recessions. Dark
craters were visible amid
the grayish earth along the
coast
One area was thick with
endless rows of tents, many
of them knocked down and
damaged. Abandoned vehi-
cles were overturned, some
reduced to burnt skeletons.
Some huts with thatch roofs
were destroyed, others had
no roofs.
In one area near the tents,
bunkers appeared to have
been constructed of sand-
bags and barrels.


Associated Press
A sick man is treated Saturday at a hospital in Vavunlya in
Sri Lanka. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon visited the
displacement camp packed with tens of thousands of Tamil
civilians in northern Sri Lanka as he appealed Saturday to
"L-- . � 6 - & �" -


the triumphant government to
decades of civil war.
Along a nearby beach lay
a large boat with the rebels'
roaring tiger emblem.
After touring the area,
Ban said the trapped civil-
ians must have undergone
"most inhumane suffering."
The government declared
victory over the rebels Mon-
day in the civil war that
began in 1983.
In the final weeks, with
the rebels boxed into a tiny
coastal strip and tens of
thousands of civilians
trapped inside the battle-
field, the government said it
would no longer fire heavy


"neal thne wounds after three
weapons.
But government doctors
in the area - , as well as
human rights groups and
foreign leaders - said in-
tense shelling continued,
killing hundreds of civilians.
The U.N. Human Rights
Council has planned a spe-
cial session on Sri Lanka on
Monday in Geneva amid in-
ternational calls for a war
crimes investigation into the
military's conduct
According to private U.N.
documents, at least 7,000
civilians were killed in the
final months of fighting.


Associated Press
HOUSTON - The na-
tion's turbulent space pro-
gram will be run by one of
its own, a calming well-
liked former space shuttle
commander.
President Barack
Obama on Saturday chose
retired astronaut Gen.
Charles Bolden to lead
NASA. He also named for-
mer NASA associate ad-
ministrator Lori Garver as
the agency's No. 2. If con-
firmed, Bolden, who has
flown in space four times
and was an assistant
deputy administrator at
one point, would be the
agency's first black admin-
istrator
Bolden would also be
only the second astronaut
to run NASA in its 50-year
history. Adm. Richard
Truly was the first. In
2002, then-President
George W Bush unsuc-
cessfully tried' to appoint
Bolden as the space
agency's deputy adminis-
trator. The Pentagon said it
needed to keep Bolden,
who was a Marine general
at the time and a pilot who
flew more than 100 sorties
in Vietnam.
"Charlie knows NASA
and the people know Char-
lie; there's a level of com-
fort," especially given the
uncertainty - the space
agency faces, said retired
astronaut Steve Hawley,
who flew twice in space
with Bolden.
Bolden likely will bring
"more balance" to NASA,
increasing spending on
aeronautics and environ-
ment missions, working
more with other nations in
space, and emphasizing
education, which the pres-
ident often talks about
when it comes to space,


Associated Press
This 1992 file photo shows
Charles Bolden Jr. President
Barack Obama on Saturday
named the former shuttle
commander to lead NASA. If
the Senate confirms Bolden,
he would be the space
agency's first black adminis-
trator and the second astro-
naut to hold the post.
said former Johnson Space
Center Director George
Abbey, a longtime friend.
"He's a real leader,"
Abbey said Saturday
"NASA has. been looking
for a leader like this that
they could have confi-
dence in."
Bolden's appointment
came during the tail end of
the space shuttle Atlantis'
mission to repair the Hub-
ble Space Telescope one
final time. He was the pilot
on the flight that sent Hub-
ble into orbit in 1990.
Bolden, 62, would in-
herit a NASA that doesn't
look much like the still-
somewhat-fresh-from-the-
moon agency he joined as
an astronaut in 1980. NASA
now "is faced with a lot of
uncertainty," Abbey said.


Obama sees choice as smart

with 'common touch'


NASA gets familiar

former astronaut boss


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EXCURSIONS
-CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


10 Best Beaches


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TOP FLORIDA BEACHES


In this photo provided by the Sarasota
Convention and Visitors Bureau,
Siesta Beach is shown in Sarasota.


The Cape Florida lighthouse is seen at
Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park, in
Key Biscayne.


A woman leaves a trail of footprints in
the sand as she strolls along Hanalei
Bay in Hanalei, Hawaii. Hanalei Bay is on
the list of Top 10 Beaches produced an-
nually by coastal expert Stephen P.
Leatherman, also known as "Dr. Beach,"
director of Florida International Univer-
sity's Laboratory for Coastal Research.
Associated Press


Two Florida beaches join Hanalei Bay - No. 1


- on list of nation's finest seasides


,. . . NG
Associated Press

, HANALEI, Hawaii - If life is a
beach, Hanalei Bay must be
heaven.
This remote, two-mile crescent-
shaped beach on Kauai where the
emerald mountains meet the
sparkling sea was selected No. 1
on
"Dr. Beach" Stephen P Leather-
man's 2009 list of top 10 beaches,
which was released Friday.
Hanalei beat out other shores
stretching from San Diego to Cape
Cod. -
"The sheer beauty of Hanalei
Bay is breathtaking," said
Leatherman, director of Florida
International University's Labo-
ratory for Coastal Research. "It's
really an idyllic setting."
Hanalei features postcard views
from every angle and is un-
touched by the feverish develop-
ment that has transformed the
coastlines of other islands. It's
cherished by both locals and
tourists as the perfect spot to
swim, surf, snorkel or simply es-
cape and unwind.


The runner-up on Leatherman's list was Siesta Beach in Sarasota,
Fla., followed by Coopers Beach in Southampton, N.Y.,
on Long Island; Coronado Beach in San Diego; Hamoa Beach
in Maui, Hawaii; Main Beach in East Hampton, N.Y.,
on Long Island; Cape Hatteras in Outer Banks, N.C.; Cape Florida
State Park in Key Biscayne, Fla.; Coast Guard Beach on Cape Cod,
Mass.; and Beachwalker Park on Kiawah Island, S.C.


"It's just gorgeous," said Annie
Meredith, who regularly surfs in
the bay. "You've got green moun-
tains, white sand, blue ocean -
that's kind of hard to beat."
The runner-up on Leatherman's
list was Siesta Beach in Sarasota,
Fla., followed by Coopers Beach
in Southampton, N.Y, on Long Is-
land; Coronado Beach in San
Diego; Hamoa Beach in Maui,
Hawaii; Main Beach in East
Hampton, N.Y., on Long Island;
Cape Hatteras in Outer Banks,
N.C.; Cape Florida State Park in
Key Biscayne, Fla.; Coast Guard
Beach on Cape Cod, Mass.; and
Beachwalker Park on Kiawah Is-


land, S.C.
Leatherman based his selec-
tions on 50 criteria, including
water quality and temperature,
cleanliness, weather, sand, safety
and facilities. And Hanalei is his
personal favorite "getaway beach"
in Hawaii.
"If I want to get away from it all
and forget about the rest of the
world, Hanalei is about the best
place to go, as far as I know," he
said.
Hanalei is .on Kauai's North
Shore around the corner from the
Napali Coast, the most stunning
corner of the state. One side offers
lush valleys, dramatic waterfalls


and sculpted mountains with
peaks that rise 4,000 feet. On the
other is the Pacific, where dol-
phins and sea turtles can be seen.
The big attraction here is that
it's not a big attraction: Unlike in
the high-rise jungle of Waikiki,
where thousands or glowing-pale
tourists sprawl across the sand
like eggs in a carton, there's plenty
of breathing room in secluded'
Hanalei.
Nestled between two rivers,
Hanalei is the largest bay on the
island of Kauai.
Leatherman said one of his fa-
vorite views of the bay is from The
St. Regis Princeville Resort, lo-


cated on the bluff. The 252-room
hotel reopens in October, after
nearly a year of renovations.
Hanalei first gained fame when
the hit musical "South Pacific"
was filmed here five decades ago,
and it hasn't changed much. The
sailors sang "There Is Nothin'
Like a Dame" at the bay, while
neighboring Lumahai Beach is
where Mitzi Gaynor made famous,
"I'm Gonna Wash That Man Right
Outa My Hair."
More recently, the North Shore
served as the backdrop in films
from "Raiders of the Lost Ark" to
"Tropic Thunder," which starred
-part-time local resident Bent
Stiller, one of many celebrities
who vacation or live here.
Ranked No. 2 in 2008, Hanalei
will now be retired from the Dr.
Beach's list. Its, selection returns
the top spot to Hawaii, which has
won 12 times since Leatherman
started the list in 1991. Florida
'beaches have been named tops six
times, including last year with
Caladesi Island. North Carolina
won once. California placed No. 4
this year with Coronado Beach but
has never claimed the top sp9t.


Castle royale


Sailing: Expect the unexpected


Special to the Chronicle
Nancy Kikkert, Inverness, her sister and two nieces, of Indiana, traveled to Aus-
tria and Germany for an Alpine Christmas. They visited Innsbruck, Munich, Ober-
ammergau and Salzburg. Pictured is Neuschwanstein Castle in Oberammergau.


DREAM



The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.,
If it's selected as a win-
.ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Monday morning quarterbacks are a
despised group in sporting circles
but there's a lesser known group,
armchair sailors, who are even more loath-
some.
After weeks of planning, we sailed out of
Fort Lauderdale at 10.p.m. to make a Gulf-
stream 'crossing. The beautifully lighted
skyline of the South Florida coast gradually
faded from sight as
we penetrated the
blackness. A calm of
achievement fell over
the crew as we set our
course for the Ba-
hamas and all was
well, until the winds
began to pick up. As
the winds gathered
force, we would soon
learn the meaning of Neil Sawyer
"tossed around like a SPONTANEOUS
matchstick" TOUR GUIDE
"Michael, shouldn't
we haul in the spinnaker; we're getting the
stuffbeat out of us?" I yelled. Capt. Michael
interpreted that as mutinous. Not only did
he not lower the sail, but ignored every
other "suggestion" I made on our 10-day
voyage to Puerto Rico. For the first time I
sensed a chink in the armor of our friend-
ship.
It's not as if I was trying to tell Tim Tebow
how to throw a football. My life was at stake
in this event.
The winds and heavy seas showed no
mercy on our 55-foot schooner, even though
built to withstand such conditions. The
Whistler was built for the Whitbread Race,
a round-the-world sailboat race held every
four years that takes nine months to com-
plete. The name of the race was changed in


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
A calm day at sea on The Whistler some-
where in the Atlantic, north of Puerto Rico.
the 1980s to the Volvo Ocean Race. To say
the least, the Whistler was a fine boat for
the conditions, yet the captain (and crew)
must still pay homage to Mother Nature.
The sun was just above the horizon on


See GUIDE/Page A12


�"f








CITRUS COUNT' (FL) CHRONICLE


A10 SUNDAY, MAw 24, 2009


, * Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call John Young at the
Hunger and Homeless Coali-
tion at 628-4357, or pass along
this phone number to the vet-
eran.
* Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864 schedule of events
for the week of May 24 to 30;
Monday: Memorial Day Cer-
emony and picnic. Ceremony
starts.at 11:30 a.m. with picnic
to follow. Cost is $7 at the door.
Public and especially veterans
encouraged to attend.,
Wednesday: Shuffleboard
Tournament 7 p.m,
Friday: Ladies Auxiliary will
have a dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m. The menu includes
chicken casserole dinner with
rice, salad, dessert and coffee.
The cost is $8. This event is
open to the public.
Saturday: Memorial Flag
Raising .Ceremony for Veterans
at Diamond Ridge Rehab, 11
a.m. Free shuffleboard all day.
* American Legion Post
155 events for the week of May
24 to 30:
Today: Breakfast 8:30 to 11
a.m., $5. Dart tournament 6
p.m.
Monday: Memorial Day Cer-
emony 11 a.m. Guest speakers:
Crystal River Mayor Ron
Kitchen and Dennis Flanagan.
Live music.by Turner Camp
Dave after the ceremony until 4
p.m.
Tuesday: Post Elections from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. then from 4
p.m. to 7 p.m. Lunch 11 a.m. to
3 p.m. Bingo 1 to 4 p.m. Gen-
eral/Auxiliary meeting 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday: Chicken "hot
wings" noon to 3 p.m. Italian
Night: Lasagna dinner 5 to 7
p.m., $5. Live music 6 to 10 p.m.
Thursday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Bingo 1 to 4 p.m. Show
Me the Money 5 p.m. Friday:
Awesome steak dinner 5 to 7
p.m., $8.75. Live music 6 to 10
p.m.
Saturday: Pool tournament 2
p.m. - _
Call Cmdr. Jim Woodman at
795-6526 or visit ww.postl55.org.
* Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City,-637-
0100.
Monday: Memorial Day cere-
mony, 11 a rn. Pig roast by Vic-
tor with all Ihe fixings $7.50
prepay/ $8.50 at door. Karaoke
by Wild Willy 3 to 6 p.m.
Tuesday: Bingo starting at 3
p.m. sponsored by the Ladies &
Men's Auxiliaries. Guests wel-
come.,
Wednesday: Wings three for
$1 from 4 to 7 p.m. Karaoke by
Mark B 6 to 9 p.m. Guests wel-
come.
Friday: All-you-can-eat fish
(fried, baked or blackened) $7
or a three-piece fried chicken
dinner, served from 4 to 7 p.m.
Karaoke by Mark B 6 to 9 p.m.
Guests welcome.
Saturday: Dinner/Dance;
Breaded pork chops $6.50,
served from 5 to 7 p.m. Music
by REBOP from 6 to 9 p.m.
Guests welcome.
Sunday, May 31: Installation
Dinner and installation of new
officers of VFW, Ladies Auxil-
iary and Men's Auxiliary, 2 p.m.
A VFW FPost 7991, 3107 W.
Dunnellon Road, Dunnellon,
(352)489-1772.


50 years acknowledged


Special to the Chronicle
Allen Rawls American Legion Post 77 presents 50-year membership award to Dennis Anderson of Casselberry.
Post Cmdr. Paul B. Miller was accompanied by Past Cmdr. David Staples on a trip to Casselberry for the pres-
entation. Pictured, from left: David Staples, past commander; Dennis Anderson; Mrs. Anderson; and Paul B.
Miller, commander of Post 77.


Today: Breakfast, serving
from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Full,
breakfast menu: eggs, bacon,
sausage, toast; biscuits,
sausage gravy, pancakes, grits.
orange juice and coffee. This is
open to the public. Adults,
$5,children 12 and younger $3.
Monday, May 25: Happy. Me-
morial Day.
Wednesday: There will be a
memorial service for Ronald
�Audette Jr. at, 5-p.m. at the post.
Ron was a member of the
Men's Auxiliary and the son of
House Chairman,, Ronald Au-
dette Sr. Please call the post for
further information,. (352) 489-
1772. Thank you. ,
Friday: Bingo, starting at 1
p.m. Sandwiches or hot dogs
are available. Open to the public'.
We are a non-smoking post,
but we do have a large smok-
ing patio available. If you are
considering joining the VFW
, and its auxiliaries, please come
in or call the post..
SDQumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 west on Veterans
Drive across from Harley
Davidson dealership an-
nounces events.
Today: Bingo with lunch, 2
p.m. Open to public.
Monday: Memorial Day, 2
p.m. hot dogs and hamburgers
for all.
. Wednesday: Bingo'with
lunch open to public.
Friday: Shepherd's pie meal.
Sunday, May 31: Mixed dou-
bles pool league 3 p.m.
For more information, call
795-5012.
I The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58, 10730
U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Wall-Rives Post 58 The
American Legion will be having
a Memorial Day ceremony at
noon on Monday, May 25, at
their Post on U.S. Highway 41
north of Walmart. Barbecue .
lunch to follow. Public is invited .
to attend.
. Regular meeting of the'Post
and Auxiliary is on 'the first
Wednesday of the month start-
ing at 7 p.m.
Dunnellon Young Marines
meets every Tuesday evening
from 6 to.9 p.m.


%s ZYDECO
S STEAKHOUSE 0.



* American � Cajun Steaks Seafood











SCRAZY8 Wednesdays l
SWuesdaYs LIVE MUSIC .
S pins t - W/Ca Pave .


Bingo is every Thursday
evening. Doors open 4 p.m.
Games start at 6 p.m. Food
available.
Pancake breakfast every
third Saturday of the month .
from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. All you
can eat for a $4 donation.
Third Saturday Outdoor Flea
Market monthlyon our prem-
ises. Vendors $10. Call Larry
Jones for information at 522-
0177..
* The H. F. Nesbitt VFW
Post 10087 in Beverly Hills off
County Road 491, across the
street from ROC's 491 Sports
Bar and directly behind the new
Superior Bank will host a Me-
morial Day Picnic from noon to '
3 p.m. on May 25 after the Me-
morial Day services at Fero
Memorial Gardens Cemetery at
11 a.m.
Price $6 one burger, one hot
dog, one sausage & peppers,
potato salad and beans. Music
by Jack & Sheila for the after-
noon.
This event is sponsored by
the VFW Men's Auxiliary of
Post 10087 by ticket only and
only 150 tickets will be sold.
* Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337, 906 'State Road 44 E., In-
verness, phone 344-3495.


Karaoke is presented each
Sunday, Tuesday and Friday
evenings.
Bar Bingo is played Monday
and Thursday afternoons and
Wednesday evenings.
Wings are served each Tues-
.day evening and fish or chicken
on Friday evenings.
"Show Me The. Money" is
played each Saturday from 1 to
3p.m.
* Beverly Hills Memorial
American Legion Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza invites inter-
ested veteransto apply for
membership or transfer..Sons of
the American Legion and
Ladies Auxiliary units are now
forming. Membership meeting
fourth Thursday at 7 p.m. Sun-
day darts at 3 p.m. with karaoke
following. Other activities being
planned. All sporting events
available on five televisions.
Visit, or phone the post at 746-
5018.
* Marine Corps League,
Citrus County Detachment
819 will meet at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. CallI
Commandant Robert Deck at
527-1557.
* Landing Ship Dock (LSD)


Sailors meet at Denny's in
Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 621-0617.
* The William Crow
AmVets Post 447 is at 33
Risher Ave. in Inglis. For more
information, call 447-4473.
* VFW Post 4252 and
Ladies Auxiliary.
All eligible persons are in-
vited to join. Stop in at the post
or call for information. Post
4252 is at'3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road
200, Hernando; phone 726-
3339. Send e-mails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
* The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post ,10087, Beverly Hills, at I
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Anyone who has honorably
served within Korea or outside
Korea from June 25, 1950, to
Jan: 31, 1955, and anyone
serving within Korea from 1955
to present is eligible to join the
Korean War Veterans Associa-
tion (KWVA). Call Hank Butler
at 563-2496, Paul Salyer at
637-1161 or Neville Anderson
at 344-2529.
* Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary


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Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Key Training
Center, 130 Heights Ave., In-
verness. Potluck dinner at 6
p.m., meeting starts at 7:15.
Auxiliary Unit 77 meets at the
same time and place. Call Post
Cmdr. Paul Miller at 344-8277
or Auxiliary president Alice
Brumett at 860-2981.
* U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 726-5926.
* American Legion Post
166 meets at 1:30 p.m. the first
Saturday monthly at the
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189 Ladies Auxiliary facility on
Veterans Drive, Homosassa, on
the west side of U.S. 19 at
Dixon's Auto Sales across from
Harley Davidson.
* Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shonk Chap-
ter 70 and Auxiliary 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41.
DAV Chapter 70 and Auxil-
iary meetings are at 2 p.m. on
the second Tuesday of each
month.
The DAV Chapter is open
from 9 a.m. to noon every
Tuesday to assist disabled vet-
erans. A service officer is avail-
able by appointment. Contact
Bill Geden at 341-6875.
For the Chapter, call Richard
Floyd, adjutant at 726-5031.
For the Auxiliary, call Lynn Ar-
mitage, adjutant, at 341-5334.
* Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare.Richard Gannon
at 637-1236; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Debi Gan-
non at 637-1236 or visit
www.Post155.org.
* The Dan Campbell Air-
borne Association meets at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 Gulf-to-Lake
Highway (State Road 44), Crys-
tal River. All current and previ-
ous Airborne members and
their wives are welcome to join
us. Call Steve Leonard at
726-3693.
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VETS NOTES


~







SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009 All


Post 155 family donates to Citrus County heroes


Special to the Chronicle

American Legion Post 155
Family recently donated $1,100
to Barbara Mills of the Citrus
County Heroes Organization to
keep the welcome home bas-
kets for our returning local vet-
rans coming for 2009 and
eyond. The donations include
$500 checks from American Le-
gion Post 155 and
Legion Riders The We
,Chapter 155 and
a $100 donation Home B
from Citrus 40/8
Voiture 1219. program
The American fully by d
Legion 155 fam- y
ily has seen first-
'hand the good effects of this
!ongoing program of welcoming
home Citrus County veterans
from the global war on terror-
ism and collected funds through
the post and is still raising
money. The post family's doria-
tion is just a stepping stone to
help keep the program going
throughout 2009, and beyond.
More donations are needed.
"You should see the faces on
- 'these young Veterans when we
'welcome them home, the post
comes to attention, standing
and clapping - to a long stand-
ing ovation. It is well worth it!
They are our future veterans,
and it is very important that we
;treat them right and show them
,.the way things should be done.
,-;They deserve our respect and


E
3
ri

(


gratitude. This is money well
.spent. These men and women
are fighting for our everyday
freedoms and should be
thanked and applauded." said
Jay Conti Sr.
The Welcome Home Baskets
program is funded fully by do-
nations and wouldn't have been
possible without the generosity
of Citrus County merchants,
American Le-
lIcome gion, VFW, Fleet
Reserve Associ-
laskets action and other
veteran organi-
is funded zations, who
nations, have donated
natiolnS. items or funds to
fill the welcome
home baskets. If you, your store
or veterans organization would
like to help the Citrus County
Heroes Welcome Home Bas-
kets program for our local vet-
erans to continue or help out
in any way, call Mills at 422-
6236 or visit online at www.Cit-
rus CountyHeroes.org. You can
also send donations to: Barbara
Mills, PO. Box 1046, Inverness,
FL 34451-1046; make checks
payable to VFW Woman's Aux-
iliary 4337.

American Legion Post 155 Ad-
jutant Jay Conti Sr. presents
three checks totaling $1,100
from the post family to Citrus
County Heroes Coordinator
Barbara Mills.
Special to the Chronicle


VETS
Continued from Page A10
-]
S Seabee Veterans of
SAmerica (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
* Honeybees to its monthly meet-
4ing 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Crys-
tal Paradise Restaurant in
Crystal River. Have lunch after
the meeting.
Luncheons are at 1 p.m. sec-
ond Tuesdays at selected
restaurants, all are welcome.
:June 9 will be at Cracker's
-Restaurant on U.S. 19 in Crys-
tal River; July 14 will be at La
Luna on U.S. 41 South, Inver-
ness.
Breakfasts are at 8 a.m. on
the last Sunday monthly. May
" 31 and June 28 breakfasts will
be at Joe's Restaurant in Inver-
.ness and July 26'aktrystal


Paradise Restaurant in Crystal
River. -
For information, call John
Kister at 527-3172.
* The Marine Corps
League, Samuel R. Wall De-
tachment 1139 will conduct its
regular meeting at 7 p.m. the
third Wednesday monthly at
DAV Post 70 in Inverness at the
intersection of Independence
Avenue and U.S. 41 North. All
former Marines are welcome.
Call Tom Heron at 637-2724 or
Joe Spoto at 746-3315.
* Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40
East, Inglis (352) 447-3495.
Men's meeting is'at 7:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly.
Ladies Auxiliary meets at 5
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday
monthly.


House Committee meets at 6
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
* Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 344-
0727.
* Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets the
third Thursday monthly at the


Floral City VFW Post 7122, call
to order 7:30 p.m. The mem-
bership invites all eligible veter-
ans to come and join us as we
plan for the future of our Post.
N The Herbert Surber
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 225 meets at 7:30 p.m. the
third Thursday monthly at the
Floral City VFW Post 7122 on
U.S. 41, Floral City. Contact
Marcia Gallagher, membership
chairwoman, at 860-1629.
Come and join this newly re-


chartered unit and be a part of
the great accomplishments and
projects in the American Legion
Auxiliary.
* Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart (MOPH) meets bi-
monthly at 1:15 p.m. on the third
Tuesday of January, March,
May, July, September and No-
vember at the Citrus County Re-
sources CenterNA Clinic, 2804
W. Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto (west side of County


Road 491 approximately 1 mile
north of C.R. 486).
All combat wounded veterans
and lineal descendants of Pur-
ple Heart recipients are invited
to attend a meeting. Life mem-
berships for combat wounded
veterans and lineal descen-
dants of Purple Heart recipients
are $50. There are no chapter
dues. To learn more about
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
MOPH, visit www.cit ruspurple-
heart.org or call 382-3847.


*\~'4'


" , , 1S - ) , v ...

Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 11:55 a.m., 12:25 p.m., 2:55 p.m.,
637-3377 3:25 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
"Night at the Museum II" (PG) 10:15 p.m., 10:45 p.m. No passes.
.11:50 a.m., 2:40 p.m., 5:15 p.m., 8 "Star Trek" (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 3
Sp.m., 10:40 p.m. No passes. p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Terminator Salvation" (PG-13) "X-Men Origins:, Wolverine"
11:45 a.m., 2:25 p.m., 5:05 p.m., (PG-13) 12:05 p.m., 2:35 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes. 5:10 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Angels and Demons" (PG-13) "Ghosts of Girlfriends Past"
S12:30 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 105 (PG-13) 5 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
p.m. No passes. "Obsessed" (PG-13) 11:40 a.m.,
"Star Trek" (PG-13) 12:40 p.m., 2:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
3:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:15 p.m. "Dance Flick (PG-13) 12:30 p.m.,
"Ghosts of Girlfriends Past" 2:45 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
(PG-13) 12:10 p.m., 2:45 p.m., 9:45 p.m. . -.
'5:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m.. 10:35 p.m. "Night at the Museum II" (PG)
"X-Men Origins: Wolverine" 11:45 a.m., 12:15 p.m., 2:10 p.m.,
(PG-13) Noon, 2:30 p.m., 5 p.m.,- 2:40 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 5:05 p.m., 7
,7:25 p.m., 10:20 p.m. p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:25 p.m., 9:55


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Terminator Salvation" (PG-13)
*Noon, 2:50 p.m., 5:25 p.m., 8
,p.m., 10:35 p.m. No passes.
;"Angels and Demons" (PG-13)


Puz


p.m. No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


'- INSIDE Battery
SEA vIRS I Sale
Crystal River Mall '
795-1484
Paddock Mall, Ocala . 8
237-1665 (Limit 2 per visit)


Sunday's PUZZLER

zle is on Page A14

-~~~~~ A I 1 1 S ~ r ~


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AL SNetwo, wMAY 24 a, 2 0g9



Network TV not working at all if reality is gauge,


The nightly news just ran a
story about the financial
crisis that newspapers are
going through and how they are
jumping through hoops
to figure out a way to .
beat or join the Internet.
After this feature, they
went to a commercial
break. The commercial
was for ShamWow, the .
self-proclaimed ab-
sorbent cloth you have
lived without for many,
many years. It's an ad-
vertisement you would-
n't have seen during the vrij
network news a few
years back.
Not that long ago, like all "spe-
cial TV offer only, call now, but
that's not all" commercials, it
would have run at 4:30 in the
morning between a rerun of a
Gene Autry oater and "The Re-
turn of the Return of the Living
Dead." Now it's running in the


I!
1


nriddle of .he nightly news. And
network television thinks newspa-
pers are in trouble? They'd better
start looking over their shoulder.
On shows during
. - - which the only compa-
Snies that could afford
. _. to advertise made au-
tomobiles, mass-pro-
duced fast food or
beer, now you see com-
mercials for cloak-like
blankets with arm-
holes, and pitches for
Head On. Networks
!VM won't be able to hire
S,- .i '-' any more 5-million-
dollar-a-year anchors
on that kind of scratch.
The death spiral begins.
One primetime show is bragging
that they had 6 million plus view-
ers last week. Twenty years ago,
having that miniscule of an audi-
ence would have gotten them
kicked off the air, and the execu-
tive who OK'd the show would


have been tarred, feathered and
displayed in the town square for
children to laugh at.
You will never see another
"Cheers." "Seinfeld," "Cosby
Show" or "Friends" on network
TV again. They are too expensive.
After a year or two of a hit show,
the once unknown stars want
more money, and the advertisers
want to pay less. The last season of
"Cheers" Ted Danson was getting
$450,000 an episode. The six stars
of "Friends" were getting $1 mil-
lion an episode by the end of their
run, while the grand prize after an
entire season of "The Amazing
Race" and "Survivor" was exactly
the same. (We should all work in a
business where the words "only"
and "1 million dollars" go to-
gether. Like politics.)
That's why reality shows are on
network TV to begin with - they
are the ShamWows of entertain-
ment. Reality shows, game shows
and talk shows are so much


cheaper to produce than pro-
grams that require scriptwriters
and performers, that you don't
need huge numbers of viewers to
make them profitable. It may work
in the short term, but who is going
to watch a repeat of "Survivor"
five, 10, 20 years from now? Or
"Dancing With the Stars" or "The
Bachelor"? There is no pay-off,
and network television's decline
continues. Less money coming in,
cheaper shows, fewer viewers and
on it goes. So what is network TV's
answer to this inevitable decline?
Better shows? No more office
Christmas parties?
This weekend, I watched a
movie from Netflix instantly, as it
streamed onto my desktop com-
puter. No DVD, no mail, no com-
mercials. I could pause it, do
something else and come back to
it at my convenience. For less than
nine dollars a month, I can watch
as many movies as I have time for.
Imagine what they'll be offering to


download two years from now, five
years from now? That's how fast
television will change.
It wasn't that long ago that video
rental places charged a stiff mem-
bership fee before they would rent
you a VHS tape for three bucks a
day. What happened to that busi-
ness model?
Newspapers will adapt, they'll
slowly figure out that they're sit-
ting on a goldmine of back issues
and photographs that they can sell
on the Net over and over again
until the end of time. They'll see
that they can easily self-generate
columns like "A Hundred Years
Ago Today," "Today in the Blogos-
phere" and "Celebrity E-mails."
The opportunities are here and
now. Any business that is waiting
for the future won't have one.


Reach author Jim Mullen at
jim_mullen@myway.com.


GUIDE
Continued from Page A9

our first day at sea when we
pulled into West End, Grand
Bahamas, for repair of a
shredded sail. This was a
day of unplanned R & R for
the crew of four, all friends
from cross-roads of our ear-
lier lives.
Day, two, at dawn, we
headed southeast, within
view of the outer Bahamas,
and had all the promise of
an idyllic voyage on the
glassy waters of the Atlantic.
Autopilot on, the crew laid
back, feet propped up at
head level, cool drink in
hand and self-service from
the galley - that's what sail-
ing is all about. The horizon,
scrolling slowly up and
down ahead of us, and a
gentle breeze from aft, set
the tone for spinning tales
that we had all probably
heard before - yet the sto-
ries always seem to get
more interesting.
Mid-afternoon - a star-
tling observation was made.
One of the astute sailors of
the crew discovered that the
scene of an island on the
starboard side had not
changed during the past six
hours. How could this be?
Referring to the charts, and
whatever other 'sources
were available, Captain
Michael ascertained that we
were in a stream moving in
the opposite direction of our
travel - at about the same
speed as our tailwind pro-
pelled us forward. No men-
tion was ever made of
"human" error.
Our first real day of sail-
ing gained us nothing ex-
cept a decision to change
course - tacking about 400
miles farther east to get out
of the north-flowing stream.


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The happy crew on The Whistler, from left, are: Keith, Capt. Michael, Mike and Neil Sawyer.


Even though we had sailed
around the Bahamas on an-
other occasion, this added
another element of excite-
ment, as none of us had ever
done a truly open ocean
sail.
So ended our initial trials
at sea - at least for the next
couple of days -- and then
the autopilot malfftnc-
tioned. The labor of sailing
became more intensive as
someone had to be at the
wheel 24 hours a day, while
staying the course became a
critical issue. Hand oper-
ated winches added to the
task as we learned firsthand
why the boat normally car-
ried a crew of eight
When at sea, there seems


Toll Free ~ nr.1.877 ,g 111, in,


to be an inevitable and insa-
tiable desire to be the first
to spot anything that inter-
rupts the straight line of the
horizon. There appears to
be a currency value to such
an event. Spotting a light at
night, in the depth of the
darkness, seemed to have
special value. How better to
prove one's sailing skills?
Looking, eating, drinking,
and shifting positions con-
sumed the hours, day and
night. Plus, there were . al-
ways housekeeping duties,
cooking, endless tinkering


with the rigging and grinding.
' Several uneventful days
of sailing swept past, except
for the shifting wind direc-
tion or an occasional squall.
In the pre-dawn darkness
of the 10th day, light from
the El Morro lighthouse, at
the mouth of Old San Juan
Harbor, Puerto Rico, be-
came the focal point and all
hands were on deck to keep
an eye on it.
Soon El Morro Fort, the
largest in the Caribbean,
guarding the entry to the
harbor, loomed into view in


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Bus boards 30 minutes before listed departure time
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the morning haze. We
breathed a sigh of relief as
we passed a cruise ship on
one side and a grounded
Russian freighter on the
other - our last hurdle be-
fore docking.
Another hour to get
docked, boat secured, and
with sea legs, we ambled off
to the nearest restaurant for
a well deserved "real"
breakfast. The anticipated
and jovial quarter-backing
began after a hearty toast to
our captain, Michael, who is
now back home, landlocked,


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle


in Las Vegas.


Neil Sawyer is a 22-year
Crystal River resident and
businessman. He and his
wife, Karyn, are extensive
travelers, venturing to
foreign countries two to
three times a year in
addition to taking several
domestic excursions
annually. They prefer
independent travel or
with small group guided
tours. E-mail him at
gobuddy@tampabay.rrcom.


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SUlNDYn, M, 24, 2009 A13


Five K


Twyford family


Special to the Chronicle
Five generations celebrate Mother's Day, from left: Nicole Hankins, mother of Aysiah, 4, and Sawyer, 2, visiting from
-Fayetteville, N.C., where her husband is stationed at Fort Bragg Army Base; Julie Bleam, grandmother of Citrus
Springs (holding Sawyer), Pauline Twyford, great-great-grandmother of Inverness, and Carol Poole, great-grandmother
of Floral City.


Walker family


Special to the Chronicle
Five generations imet at the home of Virginia Sawyer (sister) in Beverly Hills, while Retha Walker's daughter, grand-'
son and great-grandson were visiting from Michigan. Pictured are Retha Walker, seated, with visitors standing; from
left: Catherine Franklin, Jacob Franklin, Toby Tidwell and Maxine Graham.


� News


BGCCC seeks
scholarship money
Families in Citrus County are
in need. The public may help
'by donating scholarships of
S$60 per week or more so that
.children may have a safe
'haven at the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County under
the supervision of caring, re-
sponsible adults, rather than
being left home alone during
-the day or with a baby sitter.
We have a waiting list at the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County for youths whose par-
ents need help meeting the
fee of $60 a week to allow
their children to attend the
BGCCC summer camps all
day, every day, so mom and


Engagement


King/Wright


Congratulations to Josh
Wright and Stephanie King
of Floral City. They an-
nounced their engagement
,to their families on Easter,
,April 12. They will be get-
-ting married on April 24,
'2010.

FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has
forms available for
wedding and engage-
ment announcements,
anniversaries, birth.
announcements and
first birthdays.


dad can work.
BGCCC Neighborhood
Clubs are open to children
from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. week-
days during summer camp
with planned, fun activities,
field trips and adults who lis-
ten to kids and care about
them. The Westside Boys &.
Girls Club is midway between
Crystal River and Homosassa
Springs at.8535 Goodman
Lane, off U.S. 19 near Love
. Honda and Love Motorsports.
The Inverness Boys & Girls
Club is at 401 N Apopka Ave.,
across from Liberty Park. The
Central Ridge Boys & Girls
Club is the newest facility and
is at 901 Roosevelt Blvd. in
Beverly Hills, beside the com-
munity park. Summer camp


begins June 8 and goes to the
beginning of school.
Citrus County boys and
girls, 5 to 18 years old, need
to have somewhere to go dur-
ing the summer months. Un-
supervised time can be a
dangerous time for kids. The
largest portion of the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County
budget is spent on salaries' for
the adults who supervise the
children. Each employee must
meet specific qualifications
and undergo a background
screening.
Help keep the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County the
"Positivp Place for Kids" with a
scholarship donation by call-
ing 621-9225 or visiting the
Web site at ww.citrusbgc.com.


In the

Ross graduates
from boot camp
Citrus County resident and
2005 graduate of Citrus High
School Pvt. Darnell L. Ross Jr.
graduated May 8 from U.S..Ma-
rine Corps
Boot Camp in
Parris Island' ,
S.C.
He mar-
r:id his long-
time fiancee :
Deidra Miller
on May 16 at
Christ Way Jr
Church in Io-
' verness.
He will begin training in North
Carolina and St. Louis, Mo.


.May 25 to 29


Monday: Holiday fat milk
All remaining school days: Wed
Manager's choice for all with br
menus. tatoes,
CONGREGATE DINING wholes
Monday: Memorial Day - garine,
all sites closed. ' milk.
Tuesday: Frankfurter with Thui
ketchup and mustard, hot dog green i
bun, baked beans with tomato, peaches
warm cinnamon apples, low- bread \


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Inesday: Salisbury steak
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carrot cuts, slice of
wheat bread with mar-
banana pudding, low-fat

rsday: Texas hash,
peas, spiced warm
is, slice of whole wheat
with margarine, a choco-


late chip cookie, low-fat milk.
Friday: Chicken salad,
tossed salad with French dress-
ing, tomato and cucumber
salad, two slices whole wheat
bread with margarine, fresh ba-'
nana, low-fat milk.
Congregate dining sites in-
clude: Lecanto, East Citrus,
Crystal River, Homosassa
Springs, Inverness and South


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Congratulations to the fol-
lowing new parents:
N.ETo Tim and Jenny Lee
Rowand, Citrus Springs, a
daughter, Brooke Skyler
Rowand, born at 10:17 a.m.


Tyler Martin Schweitzer
and Lauren Elizabeth
Nalepa were united in mar-
riage on Saturday, May 23,
2009, at St. Scholastica
Catholic Church, Lecanto.
Fr. Michael Smith officiated.
The bride is the daughter
.of Lt. Col. Robert and Lisa
Nalepa of Hernando. She is
the granddaughter of Jean
Stewart of Denham Springs,
La., and Zoe Nalepa of Bev-
erly Hills.
The groom is the son of
Edward and Billie Jo
Schweitzer of Charlotte,
N.C. He is the grandson of
Georgia Mae Yost of Salis-
bury, N.C.
The bride was given in
marriage by her parents.
Maid of honor was Emma
Nalepa, sister of the bride,
Hernando. Edward
Schweitzer, father of the
groom, served as best man..
Bridesmaids ::.were Erin
Schweitzer, sister of the
groom, Charlotte, N.C.,
Mireille Rowe, Miami, and
Taylor Romero, Scott Air
Force Base, Ill. Flower girl
was Rylie Romero, Scott Air
Force Base, Ill. Ushers were
Ryan Nalepa, brother of the
bride, Hernando, Jason
Elkins, Liberty, N.C., and
Philip Stuckey, Hickory,
N.C.
The wedding reception
immediately followed the
ceremony at Tuscany on the
Meadows, given by the
bride's parents.
Out-of-town guests in-
cluded Stacie Guitreau,
bride's godmother, Denham
Springs, La., and Chris
Nalepa, bride's godfather,
Zachary, La.
Wedding planner was Ann-
Mariel Briercheck of Events
by FMB.
The bride received her
bachelor of science and




Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 527-5975.


Friday, April 3, 2009, at Cit-
rus Memorial Health Sys-
tem, Inverness. She
weighed 7 pounds, 7 ounces.
Brooke has a big sister,
Paige.


70th


The Smalls


Jack and Bonnie Small
celebrated their 70th wed-
ding anniversary May 18.
They, were married on this
date in 1939 in Greenup, Ky.


.They have two daughters,
Jacqueline Miller and Judi
Smoak of Walterboro, S.C.,
four grandchildren and
nine great-grandchildren.
There was a quiet recog-
nition of this event as no
trips are planned due to
Bonnie's illness.


master of science degrees in
nuclear engineering from
University of Florida and is
employed as a nuclear engi-
neer at GE Hitachi.
The groom received his
bachelor of science and,
master of- s'ience d t-IO,"; ':S i
nuclear engineering from
North Carolina State Uni-
versity and is also a nuclear
engineer at GE Hitachi.
Following a honeymoon
on the big island of Hawaii,
the couple will live in Wilm-
ington, N.C.


GET THE WORD OUT
* io riprofit crgiarn cizations
are invited to submit
rne..s release about
j_',cmiirig Cjrrrmmunity
event-,. Write the name
of the event, wvhic. pc'n-
sors it, when and where
it will take plate and
other details.


May 30 - Inverness Chapel of
Christian Fellowship - Calvary Chapel
U.S. 41 South (next to Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home)
10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
J.D. Brennan and Gold Fever Band
performs hits from the 50s and 60s

Donations accepted: Cash ~ non-parishable goods
To benefit the Family Resource Center and
The Hunger & Homeless Coalition

Rain Date: Sunday, May 31 ~ 1 to 5 p.m.

For more information call The Family Resource
Center at 344-1001 or Jim Brennan .... - .
of The Gold Fever Band at 637-6390 (iIpNi]


CniTL S COUNTRY (FL) (,vRL


Wedding

Nalepa/Schweitzer


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE.


A14 Su MAvY 9 A 4.9fll


Sexting can hurt



lives down the, road


Dear Annie: A neighbor of mine
drives the bus for the high school
her 14-year-old daughter attends.
This neighbor tells me the new thing the
kids are doing is "sexting." It means send-
ing nude pictures of themselves
to friends over their cell
phones. My neighbor says this
is all the kids talk about on the
bus. I saw something about this
in the news, but thought it was T
an isolated incident.
I told this neighbor that I had
my cell phone provider disable
the options of pictures and tex-
ting because I did not want to
be responsible for paying for :-
the unsolicited ads sent to me. I
wanted a phone only for emer- ANN
agencies. My neighbor was not
aware this option was avail- MAIL
able. I don't know if all cell
providers offer this, but if they can keep
track of text messages in order to bill you,
they should be able to turn off the feature
altogether. Please pass this on so other
parents can do something before it is too
late. - Helpful Neighbor
Dear Helpful: Sexting is creating quite a
stir these days. Several teens have actu-
ally been arrested for distributing child
pornography because they sent nude pho-
tos of their underage selves. It also risks
arrest for anyone older than 18 who re-
ceives the photos.
Dropping the texting feature and find-
ing a cell phone without a camera are only
stopgap measures. Eventually, the tech-
nology will overcome a parent's best in-
tentions, so it's best to discuss the
repercussions of such behavior openly
Teens often lack judgment. Sexting a nude
picture to your boyfriend allows him to
share it with his friends (yes, he will), who
can then post it online. Once these pic-
tures are on the Internet, they are there
for anyone to see, including your teachers,
parents and prospective employers - for-
ever. It's stupid, but if we jailed everyone
for idiocy, we'd need much bigger prisons.
Dear Annie: I have extremely good ears
and suspect I suffer from hyperacusis,
where I have difficulty tolerating every-
day sounds. I have a phonophobic reac-
tion to many noises, but my greatest fear
is wind chimes. I have panic attacks just
seeing a wind chime. I can hear them even'
when I'm indoors. If one of my neighbors


p
I


should get a wind chime, is there a way I
can make them take it down?
My fear is forcing me to stay indoors and
avoid roads where I know wind chimes
are present. I also cannot go to certain
drugstores because they sell
them at the door. Am I the only
one who complains about this?
It seems nobody understands
what I'm terrified of.-- Fear of
Chiming
Dear Fear: Unless you live in
a complex that prohibits wind
chimes or other annoying pos-
sessions, you cannot force a
neighbor to remove them. But
there is more going on than a
sensitivity to sounds. You have
IE0S developed a phobia leading to
obsessive-compulsive behav-
iBOX iors. First, see an audiologist to
find out if there is another, treat-
able reason for your extreme reaction, to
noise. Then invest in a set of good sound-
blocking headphones or earplugs so that if,
perchance, one of your neighbors gets
wind chimes, they won't drive you batty.
Dear Annie: I agree with the advice you
offered to "It's All About Love," who is of a
different faith from her fiance's. Keeping
this difference a secret is not a good idea
and will ultimately harm their marriage.
As a minister who performs more
than150 weddings per year, let me go a
step further in offering suggestions for a
wedding ceremony. They should look for a
minister who is able to celebrate both
.faith traditions. A competent minister
should be able to incorporate elements
from both religions without stepping on
too many toes in the process. If the couple
is able to view this as an opportunity to
celebrate their different faiths, then I
think their families will, as well. - Vir-
ginia Beach, Va.


Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime '
editors of the Ann Landers column.
Please e-mail your questions to
nniesmailbox@comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, PO. Box 118190,
Chicago, IL 60611. To find out more
about Annie's Mailbox, and
read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit www.creators.com.


Today's HOROSCOPE -=


Your Birthday: Cultivate
your present fields of endeavor
before sowing new seeds in the
year ahead. Chances are your
current interests will produce a
harvest. Financial gains are in-
dicated from channels already
opened.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
- It won't be your imagination
if you start to notice a favorable
change with regard to personal
relationships. Bonds with sev-
eral special people could be
strengthened.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
-Although something benefi-
cial is happening, it could be
screened from your view at this
time. It will make its presence
felt quite soon, pertaining to a
wonderful career opportunity.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -
You could get the long-awaited
opportunity to promote a new
pet project through someone
you know on a social basis.
Your friend might introduce you
to an interested person.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -.
A big, difficult objective might


CITRUS COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL I


The Citrus County Animal
Control Shelter has online list-
ings of impounded animals at
animal control.citrus.fl.us. Select
'Animal Type," etc. and search
The shelter is in Inverness
near the airport. The shelter
phone hours are 8 a.m. to clos-


ing, and it is open for adoptions
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday and Fri-
day, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Thursday and from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday.
For more information, call
the Citrus County Animal Shel-


I


Fang Duke Doogie Name- (none) Benjamen Tinks
A.GE.- 3yrs. AG-':; 10yrs. AGE: 2yrs. AGE: 10yrs. AGE: ? AGE: ? .
sE : M SEX NM SEX: F SEX: SF SEX: M SEX: F
ID: 7558333 i:. 7363593 ID: 7363597 D10: 7618332 ID: 7400137 ID. 7498362
i


DO YOU TWITTER?
* Sign up to follow the latest news from the Citrus County Chroncle by joining our
Twitter group!
* Fr)m a computer, you can check the "tweets" at twitter.com/CitrusChronicle


Sunday PUZZLER

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765259


ACROSS
1 Bicycle part
6 Darkens
lODramatis per-
sonae
14Mad
19Wet outdoors
20Wharton or Piaf
22Musical group
24Unwind
25Kind of orange
'26The subway in
Paris.
27Stage
281ncrease dramati-
,cally
29Gong
30Martin or Mc-
Queen
32Stage,direction
34Finished
35Perfume
39Strict
41 Something
that impedes
43Distributes cards
45Conceal
47Account entry
48Compass pt.
51Tic
53Air pollutant
551n medias -
560bese
59Mongrels
61Go by boat
62Cup handles-
64Shade of red
66Bouquet
68Uppity one
70- at the wheel
72Scandinavian
73Discover
75Keep watch over


77Rose oil
79City in Iowa
80OMake over
82Stage plpy
84Dictator
86Tier .
88Decorates
90Medicinal tablet
91Superficial (hyph.)
95Hippodrome
97Martini fruits
101 Neighbor of Ark.
102 50's rock star
104 Residential area
106 Egyptian talis-
man
108 Swiftly
110 Listed
112 Hair prepara-
tions
114,Scoundrel
115 Wife of Jacob
117 Brad
118 Farm animal
120 British gun
121 Antlered animal
122 Sprint
124 MacMurray
Or Flintstone
126 Lasso
128 Mineral
129 Last
131 Weighing device
133 Concluded
135 Mirrored
139 Special pleasure
141 Not specific
145 - podrida
146 Place of sanctu-
ary
148 Spud
150 Kind of bean
151 - -garde


153 Place in Asia
155 Tear
157. "The Merry-
of Windsor"
158 Woolen fabric
159 Treasure-
160 Laconic
161 Sluggish
162 Brought to bay
163 Let it stand!
164 Nerve network
165 Big tops



DOWN
1 Investigate
2 Facilitates
3 Uses a phone
4 Fished with a
hook
5 Drain cleaner
6 Party mem.
7 - of March
8 Baseball gloves
9 Crane
lOFlatfoot
11Dull pain
12Tolerate
13Tried
14Tax agcy. letters
15News story
16- and well
17Stolen
18Put forth effort
21 Mean dwelling
23Go unsteadily
31God of love
3301d stringed
instrument
36After deductions


37Cries like a crow
38Walter - Disney
40Calls
42Gone up
44Sharp pain
46Australian animal
48Tropical fish
49More certain
50Penned
52Make obscure
54Van Susteren
or Garbo
56Terra -
57Something of
value
58Letters
60Diving duck
63Arrangement*
65Bellow
670ak-to-be
690ne of the Simp-
sons
70Looked up to
71Cookout location
74Commerce
76- avis
78Buns
81 Genuflected
83NYSE cousin
85Shutter sound
87Costner or Bacon
89A little tight
91 Flower part
92Special ability
93Go slowly
94Rice dish
96Betel palm
98Trucks
990ne of the Muses
100 Frugal one
101 Vetch seed
103 Churns


105 Raucous sound-
107 Part of NB
109 Strange
111 Put into office:
113 Support for
an injured arm'.
116 Meal at noon
119 Die out
123 Floating in water
125 Flit
126 Suede
127 Playing card
129 Projecting rim -
130 Rigid bars
132 Fewest
134 Specify the
meaning of
135 Dinner item
136 Young eel
137 Fiery signal
138 Storehouse
140 - Haute
142 Poe's bird
143 Turn aside
144 Endures
147 Wheel hub
149 Remainder
152 Spread to dry '
154 Permit
156 Billy-Williams
157 Intelligence


MJ' UDAIA Zzu


8


be far easier to achieve than
you ever envisioned. It will be
the intervention of an extremely
helpful friend who will make it
so.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)-
Plans and procedures you have
mapped out in minute detail
should not be altered. If your
concepts are sound, the parts
will merge together nicely.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
- There's nothing to get upset
over if your plans are subject to
various changes. In reality,
things will turn out better than
you originally thought.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) - If your attitude is posi-
tive, the day's new cycle will at-
tract tremendous luck in
establishing several perfect al-
liances with persons who can
help further your personal am-
bitions.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
- People will be extremely re-
sponsive to your thoughtful-
ness. Because you show
concern for them, they will re-
ciprocate and help you accom-


pl sl your aimls.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)'
- Even though this might be a-
day off for many, business and
pleasure will merge in a fortu-
nate way. It could be an event'
or social outing that brings like-
minded people together.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20)
- People tend fo listen at this
time, and several who hear
what you have to say will be
supportive of the causes about
which you speak and believe.
Don't hesitate to talk about your
interests.
Aries (March 21-April 19)
- Do not put off any measures
that would better your lifestyle
or advance your present plans.
Anything you begin has a good
chance of turning out to be
highly successful.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Someone you have tried to
help many times in the past
might reciprocate in a material -
manner. This person may spot.
an item he or she believes will'
be perfect for you.



PET PROFILES


ter at 726-7660. ,*
Financial assistance for ,
spaying and neutering of an 4
adopted pet is available r-
through the Humanitarians of ^:*
Florida at 563-2370 or from .
the Humane Society of Citrus -
County at 341-2222. .

ir" .










S. 3 -.' *.AV24,2009



PORTS


M NFL, NBA/B2
0 MLB/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
M Sports briefs/B4
E Golf/B5
M Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


SyOwvsroppeR


F


Photo illustration by ALAN FESTO/Chronicle


Lecanto baller Cortes surpasses lofty expectations


ALAN FESTO ..
afesto@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
On the road and trailing by one
to Belleview with just over two
Seconds remaining, Lecanto bas-
ketball coach Chris Nichols
quickly called a timeout to set up
� possible game-winning shot
- Assistant coach Frank Vilardi
' began scribbling the play before
'Nichols looked at him and said,
"let's just get the ball to Nicky."
"I said 'Nicky, take two drib-
bles and get the best shot you can
get," Nichols recalled.
Nick Cortes did just that, tak-
ing two steps toward center court
*and releasing a 47-footer under
lieavy pressure. The Rattlers
players raised their hands in cel-
ebration and the fans went crazy
only to watch what they thought
was a win disintegrate before


their eyes.
Cortes' prayer was answered,
hitting nothing but net and giving
the Panthers a 53-51 victory.
"That was probably the best
shot and the best feeling I've ever
had in my life," Cortes said.
That statement says a lot con-
sidering the highlight reel one
could make from the senior's re-
markable three-year varsity ca-
reer, Buzzer beaters,
game-changing plays, fancy passes
...makes him an easy choice as an,
Athlete of the Year nominee.
And while that game-winning
shot helped define his senior
season, his past and hard work
ethic help define his character.
Growing up ina house full of
athletes just outside of New York
City, Cortes followed in his three
older brothers' footsteps and by
the time he was 4 years old he
had a basketball in his hand. His


Senior signs scholarship with PHCC


ALAN FESTO
afesto@chronicleonline.c6m
Chronicle
Anyone who's found their
way to the Lecanto High
School gym over the last few
years has likely seen "The
Show" that is all-star guard
Nick Cortes in action on the
basketball court.
Now, those wishing to see an
encore presentation will only
have to travel about 50 miles to
New Port R ichey and the home

eldest brother signed a Division
I scholarship with Farleigh Dick-
inson. Another excelled in both
basketball and football.


of Pasco-Hernando Commu-
nity College.
A few ago. in front of friends,
coaches and family, Cortes
signed a Letter-of-Intent to
play for the Conquistadors.
Cortes invited Lecanto assis-
tant Ed Buckley to the cere-
mony as well as former
teammate Jaredr Brantley.
Buckley was Cortes' first coach
when the budding star moved
to Florida from New York in
See SIGNING/Page B4

"I was always around the
game," he said.
See CORTES/Page B4


Lakers

take 2-1

series lead

Bryant's 3 sparks

LA by Denver

in Western

Conference Finals

Associated Press
DENVER - Kobe Bryant's
3-pointer wasn't nearly as
dramatic as LeBron James'
but equally effective.
Bryant's big shot over J.R.
Smith gave Los Angeles a
one-point lead with just over
a minute left Saturday night
and sparked the Lakers to a
103-97 victory over the down-
trodden Denver Nuggets for a
2-1 lead in the Western Con-
ference finals.
Bryant, who scored 41
points, went 5-of-6 on free
throws to ice it after his 3-
pointer gave Los Angeles a 96-
95 lead.
Carmelo.Anthony scored 21
points but just three after
halftime for Denver, which
lost at home for the first time
since March 9. He was 4-for-
13 in his worst performance
of the postseason.


County's

Triathlon

nets record

numbers
LARRY BUGG
For the Chronicle
Race director Chris Moling
wondered if his crack DRC
Sports team would have a
chance to even put on a 2009 Me-
morial Day Sprint Triathlon on
Saturday at Fort Island Gulf
Beach.
Rain had been pouring down
for the past few days and there
was a 70 percent chance of rain
predicted for Saturday
Could there be a triathlon in
pouring rain and, if so, would
anyone even show up?
The answer was the sun came
through Saturday and a record
crowd of 315 registered for the
event
"We had a super turnout," said
Moling. "This week, I wondered
if we could even put on a
triathlon. It has been raining all
week The sun came out this
morning and-we have had blue
skies this morning"
The rain would come in the af-
ternoon but long after the
triathlon was done.
In the meantime, world class
triathlete Kristin Donahue of
Webster won the female race
with a time of 1:11:49.6.
Palm Harbor's Lucas Caron
won the overall race with a time
of 1:02.35.8.
Gainesville residents swept
the masters field. .Tom Lowery
won the men's masters with a
1:06.08.2. Karyn Austin took the
women's title with a 1:17:16.
Williston's Team Dale Haze
and the Champions won the
relay race with a 1:12:09.1.
Donahue, 21, won her first title
in the Crystal River Sprint event
She is a junior at the University
See TRIATHLON/Page B4


Castroneves has Indy dreams today


Associated Press
Hello Castroneves, left, reacts with one of his crewmen after
they won the finals of the Indy 500 Pit Stop Challenge at the
Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis on Friday. The
'93rd running of the Indianapolis 500 auto race is today.


Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS - Helio
Castroneves. understands
better than most how hard it
is to win the Indianapolis 500.
The charismatic Brazilian
won as a rookie in 2001 and
then backed it up with a vic-
tory the next year, becoming
only the fifth driver in the
history of Indianapolis
Motor Speedway to win two
in a row.
Since then, six years have
passed with no fence-climb-
ing celebrations at Indy for
"Spiderman."
"The first year was pretty


tough," Castroneves said.
"The second year was even
tougher The third year, I had
like a bullet This car was in-
credible, supersonic. I fin-
ished second. So, I learned
that you can't let opportuni-
ties go by. You've got to go for
it That's what we're going to
do this Sunday."
A win this year would be
particularly significant for
Castroneves. On Friday, fed-
eral prosecutors dropped the
remaining tax evasion con-
spiracy charge against him
and his sister, clearing Cas-
troneves of all the charges
that once threatened to de-


rail his career
In just his third race since
returning to the series, Cas-
troneves will start from the
pole Sunday, with Penske
Racing teammate, Ryan
Briscoe next to him in the
middle of the front row. That
1-2 punch gives team owner
Roger Penske a good shot at
his 15th Indy win.
"We've got a good chance
this year with two ears on the
front row," said Penske, who
last visited Victory Lane with
Sam Hornish Jr. in 2006.
"But, to win here, everything
has to work perfectly, every-
thing."


Penske had a 1-2 finish in
2003, with Gil de Ferran out-
dueling Castroneves. This
time, Castroneves would love
to give the team another
sweep - only with himself
out front Rising star Briscoe
could make that difficult
Although Castroneves is
the oddsmakers' favorite,
Briscoe is the one who could
give Penske a new face on
the Borg Warner Trophy.
"Winning this race comes
from the preparations and
the leadup to it, what you've
done in the three weeks
here," the Australian driver
said.












Lakers' Bynum, Jackson at odds over defense


Associated Press
DENVER - Andrew Bynum
wants to play more minutes, and
Los Angeles Lakers coach Phil
Jackson has just the solution: Play
better defense.
"If he plays well, he'll have
more time," Jackson said Satur-
day, several hours before Game 3
of the Western Conference finals
against the Denver Nuggets.
Bynum criticized the Lakers' de-
fensive scheme after getting yanked
from Game 2 early in the second
half for his lackadaisical play that
led to an easy bucket for Denver.
Jackson was displeased that
Bynum didn't hustle downcourt


after failing to get a pass in the
post, which allowed Nuggets cen-
ter Nene to make a layup and
Sdraw a foul from Kobe Bryant So,
Bynum took a seat with 7:14 left in
the third quarter and never re-
turned, finishing with nine points,
two rebounds, one foul and no
turnovers in the Lakers' 106-103
loss that evened the series at 1-1.
Bynum bristled Friday when
asked about Denver's frontcourt
prowess in this series.
"They're getting their stuff be-
cause of our defensive scheme.
They're just driving to the basket
and nobody's bumping them,"
Bynum said, according to The Los
Angeles Times.


Before Game 3, Bynum said he
hadn't discussed his criticism with
his coach but he alternately stuck
by his assertion and backed away
from it
"Yeah, and I think we went over
some different things today,
changed it up a little bit," Bynum
said of.the defensive philosophies.
So, what exactly was wrong with
the defensive scheme?
"Not the scheme is the problem.
We're just not executing it,"
Bynum said. "You've got to take
away that middle pass. They're
throwing it into the middle and
just getting too much penetration."
Bynum insisted there's no fric-
tion between him and Jackson.


"No, definitely not. Like I said,
the scheme is fine. We're not exe-
cuting it," he said.
Does that mean Bynum's not ex-
ecuting it?
"Everybody," he said. "Nobody's
doing what we need to do correctly"
Bynum, who missed a chunk of
the season for the second straight
year after tearing a ligament in his
right knee Jan. 31, has been in-
consistent in the playoffs. He went
scoreless three times against
Houston in the semifinals. Bynum
said he's feeling fine and guessed
his knee was at 85 to 90 percent
He brushed aside a suggestion
that having missed so much time,
he's playing at a slower speed in


the playoffs than his opponents.
'The only part that's tough is not.
knowing when you're going to be
called upon," Bynum said. "Be-
cause you get tight and you get stiff."
Jackson said the way to stay on
the court was playing better. But
he added that this dispute with his
21-year-old center was overblown.
"I think he's doing fine. I think
there's just way too much focus.
This is a guy who hasn't even
played a lot of minutes," Jackson
said. "To sustain the effort for
Andrew is a big deal. He can run
for three, four minutes on the
court and then he tires. ... So,
we're just looking for short busts
from him."


Consider them impressed

Nuggets, Lakers

laudLeBron's

amazing shot

Associated Press


'DENVER - Kobe Bryant was
impressed by LeBron James' amaz-
ing buzzer-beater, not envious.
"He got a clean look," Bryant
said. "That's what you really want
to do."
The fashionable argument for
Lakers fans after watching
James' 3-pointer over Orlando's
Hedo Turkoglu that knotted the
Eastern Conference finals at 1-1
was to say Bryant should have
been given the same chance to
salvage Game 2 against Denver
in the Western Conference finals
in Los Angeles.
Instead, Bryant was a decoy for
a play designed for Derek Fisher,
whose 3-pointer was deflected by
Nene at the buzzer, preserving
Denver's 106-103.win at the Sta-
ples Center on Thursday night and
evening their series.
Hours before the Game 3 tip-off
at the Pepsi Center, Bryant sat
courtside after a short
shootaround and talked about
James' basket off the inbounds
with a second left for a 96-95 win.
"He got a good look, no matter
whatever Hedo does or whoever
does, you can put your hand up, it's
not going to matter," Bryant said.
"If you get a good look at the bas-
ket, that ball's going down."
No, Bryant insisted, his first
thought wasn't that he should
have gotten the. same shot 24
hours earlier.
"No. Game 2's over with,"
Bryant said, adding, "I always
want the ball, so that doesn't
change anything."
Lakers coach Phil Jackson said
he'd still draw up the final play for
Fisher with the Lakers down 106-
103 and trying to force overtime.
"Kobe wouldn't have gotten an
opportunity. They would have
fouled him," Jackson said. "That's
the difference between being
down three and having a two-
point game. Now, Orlando has to
guard the basket and the lane and
everything else and the opportu-
nity's there. So we had to find a
surprise shot"
When Turkoglu's shot with one
second left put Orlando ahead by
two, Jackson figured James would
still salvage the series for the Cav-
aliers.
"I was sitting"at a counter, a
greasy spoon I have in my soup
and a greasy burger," Jackson said.
"The guy next to me said, Aw, man,
Orlando's going to go up 2-0 and
Cleveland's going, to go down in
the series. You want to see Or-
lando? I said, 'You wrote off this
guy He can still make a shot from


Associated Press
Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James .(23) dunks during Game 2 of the NBA Eastern Conference finals
Friday. James made the game-winning 3-point shot over Orlando Magic's Hedo Turkoglu as time expired to
give the Cavaliers a 96-95 win and tie the series at one game each.


almost anywhere.' And he did.
That's the way he is. James is just
a terrific player."
The Nuggets were also abuzz
over the shot heard 'round the
NBA.
"Great, great shot," Chauncey
Billups said. "It's what the great
ones do."
Unlike Jackson, however, he
wasn't so sure the Cavs were going
to pull it out
"I didn't know if they would get a


shot off," Billups said. "But with
him getting a clean look like that,
you've got to think that he's going
to make that shot"
Nuggets coach George Karl,
whose strategic blunders in the
closing minute of Game 1 in L.A.
might have cost his team a big win,
sympathized with Magic coach
Stan Van Gundy.
Van Gundy had his defense
take away the lob pass to the bas-
ket. That forced James to back up


beyond the arc, where he had a
clean catch and an open look at
the biggest 3-pointer in Cavaliers
history.
"In a lot of ways I think Stan did
a great job of knowing what they
were going to run," Karl said. "'And
I think Stan Van Gundy has done a
great job coaching this year. And I
know he's miserable right now. In
some ways he's got to understand
that he's in a great place," tied 1-1
and heading home.


Johnson


wants


rush title

Titans RB sets

for 2009 skyhigh

Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn, - Chris
Johnson may be a little soft-spo-
ken. He certainly isn't bashful. ,
The only rookie voted to the Pro
Bowl in 2008, the Tennessee run-
ning back wasn't happy whenrhe
lost the NFL Offensive Rookie'of
the Year award to Atlanta quar-
terback Matt Ryan. Johnson called
the voting bogus, even though
Ryan led an 11-5 team to the play-
offs and the running back finished
a distant second.
Now Johnson is setting his
sights a little higher for his second.
season: Lead the NFL in rushing.,
And oh yeah, league MVP
"I want to be the best," Johnson'
said Friday.
"I never set
a goal to be
like, 'I'm
going to set
my goal this
high so if I
get close, it'll
still be good.'*.
I set my goal
as high as I
can set it, so I want to accomplish
that. When I set my goal for offen-
sive rookie of the year, I was upset
That's why I said it was bogus.
When I set a goal, I really wan(to
accomplish it"
A running back hasn't been
named MVP since LaDanian Tom-
linson in 2006, and only Shaun
Alexander (2005) and Marshall
Faulk (2000) have kept that award
away from quarterbacks over the
past decade. Steve McNair was
the last player with Tennessee, to
be named MVP, and he shared that
award with fellow quarterback.
Peyton Manning in 2003.
The last running back from this
franchise to be named MVP was
Earl Campbell in 1979 - the Hall
of Famer's second NFL seaspn
with the then-Houston Oilers. ',
Titans assistant coach Earnest
Byner never talked about his per-
sonal goals when he played. BUt
he said he has talked with John-
son often about what the running
back wants to do.
"I try to set the bar as high as'he
likes and try to push him to that,"
Byner said. "With having those
goals, it's going to take a special ef-
fort. But it also takes a special
man. It's probably going to take
some adjustments in some of the
things that he does for him to re-
ally get to that goal." "
The Titans surprised most
everybody by drafting Johnson
with the 24th pick overall out of
East Carolina in April 2008.


Bucs QBs in for battle again


Tampa Bay's

race for top job

heating up

Associated Press
TAMPA - Raheem Mor-
ris characterizes the compe-
tition for the Tampa Bay
Buccaneers' starting quar-
terback job in seven words.
"One bone. Five dogs,"
the first-year coach begins.
"Best man wins."
Luke McCown feels good
about his chances. Byron
Leftwich relishes the
prospect of being a No. 1
again, and veteran Brian
Griese, second-year pro
Josh Johnson and first-
round draft pick Josh Free-
man could figure in the
battle, too.
Morris expects to take
four quarterbacks to train-
ing camp in July,


"It's a competition," said
Leftwich, who signed with
the Bucs in April after re-
ceiving assurances that he
would be given a chance to
win the job that Jeff Garcia
held the past two seasons.
Morris decided against
bringing Garcia back, but re-
signed McCown, who
has been a backup
in Tampa Bay the
past four seasons.
Leftwic h,
who played I -
behind Ben CC
Roethlis-
berger in Pitts-
burgh last year, has
been a starter with Jack-
sonville and Atlanta. The
Steelers were open to his
return, and the 29-year-old
also attracted interest from
Washington. L
Morris sold him on Tampa
Bay, promising that the best
quarterback will play.
"All anybody can ask for
on this football team is that
if I go out here and I play


well, and if I'm playing bet-
ter than anybody else, will I
have the opportunity to be
the guy," Leftwich said.
"The toughest thing in the
world is being in a situation
where no matter what you
do, you know you won't have
a chance to get
. out on the field."
McCown has
appeared in 12
games in five
NFL seasons.
He's 1-6 as a
starter, with four
of his seven
starts coming a
rookie with Cleveland in
2004, and only attempted
one pass while getting lim-
ited playing time in two
games last season.
Nevertheless,' McCown
views himself as the fron-
trunner, even though Left-
wich and Freeman, the 17th
pick in the draft, have been
brought in since the 27-year-
old decided to remain in
Tampa Bay


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CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


B2 SuNDAYv MAY 24. 2009


SPORTS











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009 B3

East Division Central Division West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away W L Pct GB WCGB Li0 Str Home Away
Toronto . 27 19 .587 - - 4-6 L-5 16-6 11-13 Detroit 24 17 .585 - - 7-3 L-1 15-6 9-11 Texas 25 17 .595 - - 7-3 W-2 14-6 11-11
Boston 25 18 .581 % - 4-6 L-2 16-6 9-12 KansasCity 21 22 .488 4 4 3-7 L-4 14-10 7-12 LosAngeles 22 19 .537 2% 2 6-4 W-2 12-8 10-11
NewYork 25 18 .581 % - 9-1 W-1 14-8 11-10 Minnesota 21 23 .477 4% 4% 4-6 W-3 16-9 5-14 Seattle 20 23 .465 5%2 5 4-6 W-1 11-11 9-12
Tampa Bay 23 22 .511 31 3 7-3 W-3 11-10 12-12 Chicago 19 23 .452 5% 5Y2 4-6 W-2 12-9 7-14 Oakland 15 24 .385 8% 8 4-6 L-2 8-11 7-13
Baltimore 18 *25 .419 7� 7. 4-6 W-2 11-11 7-14 Cleveland 16 27 .372 9 9 4-6 L-1 7-11 9-16

East Division - Central Division West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Philadelphia 23 18 .561 - - 7-3 L-1 8-12 15-6 Milwaukee 26 17 .605 - - 7-3 L-2 12-7 14-10 Los Angeles 29 14 .674 - - 7-3 L-1 17-4 12-10
NewYork 23 19 .548 � 2� 5-5 W-2 12-8 11-11 St. Louis 26 17 .605 - - 6-4 W-5 17-8 9-9 San Diego 20 22 .476 8�V 5�2 7-3 W-7 15-6 5-16
Atlanta 22 20 .524 1� 3� 6-4 W-2 10-12 12-8 Cincinnati 22 19 .537 3 3 5-5 W-1 9-11 13-8 San Fran. 19 22 .463 9 6 2-8 L-4 13-8 6-14
Florida 19 25 .432 5� 7Y2 2-8 L-4 8-14 11-11 Chicago 21 19 .525 31 31 5-5 L-5 12-7 9-12 Arizona 18 24 .429 10�4 7� 5-5 W-3 9-15 9-9
Washington 12 30 .286 111 131h 1-9 L-2 6-16 6-14 Pittsburgh 19 24 .442 7 7 5-5 L-3 11-9 8-15 Colorado 17 25 .405 11� 8 -. 4-6 W-1 7-10 10-15
Houston 18 23 .439 7 7 4-6 L-3 9-14 9-9


INTERLEAGUE
Friday's Games
'Baltimore 4, Washington 2, 12 innings
.Dbtroit 4, Colorado 3
Prhiladelphia 7, N.Y.Yankees 3
Cincinnati 3, Cleveland 1
Y. Mets 5, Boston 3
Tampa Bay 15, Florida 2
Atlanta 1, Toronto 0
Texas 6, Houston 5,10 innings
Minnesota 11, Milwaukee 3
Chicago White Sox 2, Pittsburgh 0
St Louis 5, Kansas City 0
&izona 2, Oakland 1
-,A. Angels 3, L.A. Dodgers 1
Seattle 2, San Francisco 1, 12 innings
Saturday's Games
St. Louis 5, Kansas City 0
N.Y.Yankees 5, Philadelphia 4
Texas 6, Houston 3
Baltimore 2, Washington 1
ylplorado 4, Detroit 3
icago White Sox 4. Pittsburgh 0
-Minnesota 6, Milwaukee 2
N.Y. Mets 3, Boston 2
Tampa Bay 10, Florida 3
,tanta 4, Toronto 3
Oleveland at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
.izona at Oakland, 9:05 p.m.
t�. Angels at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Today's Games
Colorado (Hammel 0-3) at Detroit (Willis 1-0),
1.05 p.m.
..Philadelphia (Hamels 2-2) at N.Y. Yankees
(fabathia 4-3), 1:05p.m.
Ceveland (CI.Lee 2-5) at Cincinnati (Cueto 4-2),
1:10 p.m.
'TAmpa Bay (J.Shields 3-4) at Florida (Jo.John-
,son 3-1), 1:10 p.m.
1-altimore (Bergesen 1-2) at Washington (Mar-
tis.5-0), 1:35 p.m.
'Y. Mats (Redding 0-0) at Boston (Wakefield
5-2), 1:35 p.m:
Toronto (Richmond 4-2) at Atlanta (Jurrjens 4-
'2),1:35 p.m.
. Pittsburgh (Karstens 1-2) at Chicago White Sox
,(Buehrle 6-1), 2:05 p.m.
Texas (McCarthy 3-2) at Houston (Hampton 2-
3) 2:05 p.m.
n ansas City (Bannister 3-1) at St. Louis (Pineiro
JP3), 2:15 p.m.
Ali zona (Garland 4-2) at Oakland (Outman 1-'
0), 4:05 p.m.
l-A Angels (Palmer 5-0) at L.A. Dodgers
- illingsley 6-1), 4:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 1-4) at Seattle (F.Hernan-
dez 4-3), 4:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Bush 3-0) at Minnesota (S.Baker 1-
), 8:05 p.m.
.o: NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
5r, Die-go .4 Cnc 3ag Cubi. 0
, Saturday's Games
,hicago, Cub . al Sanr Doge, i ie
Today's Games
Chicago Cubs (Lilly 5-3) at San Diego (C.Young
3-2), 4:05 p.m.,
7 AMERICAN LEAGUE
,-, Monday's Games
QTpronto at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
Y. Yankees at Texas, 2:05 p.m.
BEbston at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
.S3enie .a031' O nd 4 Oi p TI
,Tarmp, Bay 3ai Clveirand 6 Of p r'
,Cr ,'aWria.? S i,', i L A A;,qe.-'. *u5pnm



MLB Leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
3ATTIjG-VMjrI..,,,e-z Ci�elnard. 379.
'.arll-n T.3mpa Bay 376 ME brera. Derr,:,,r.
370 Ajjr,�- Ball3.more. 3E.2 AH-II. Tomrri,:'
..348 MV.:urng Te. as. 345. Moreau. Min-
'nf la. 1 43
OrJS--BR,:'bns, Bslihnc.re 37 AdJcnes. Bal-
.�to,.r-. 36 M.rlark.,-. BalirTrore 36 Scuialo.
Ti~3.63nlo . Moineau Mriresola 35 Bay.
:.ir, 34 Darr,.,. Ne. t Yon, 34
RBI-Lonrg:ria TTp Bay. 48 Bay BoriC.n.
a.-c- P.n., T3mpa Bay. 38. Mrla s', B13llTimore
i%. Morieau MirneSiola 36 AH-if Toionto. 35.
A-un B3ilirr,ore 35. LiriL Tuor,.rlo. 35
'HITrS-AHi Toro:,,,n:, 69 VManir.nez. Clevelanra.
'56, Barileil. Tamrrp. Bay 59. Crawtord. Ts3rrp3
Bay 5 M iC3CTir Deiroi. 57 MorneSu. Mir-
ey'oia .57. MYourn-. Te3as 57
,SOUBLES-Longori.,. Tampa Bay 19.
a .po ,n,3-.' Cily 16 Lind Toronto 15.
'iYoung, Texas, 15; Byrd, Texas, 14; Lowell,
Ziston, 14; VMartinez, Cleveland, 14; Pedroia,
,Bobton, 14.
, RIPLES-Crisp, Kansas City, 5; Atdrus,
.Tcas, 4; JBuck, Kansas City, 3; Crawford,
-'amhpa Bay, 3; Cuddyer, Minnesota, 3; DeJesus,
W'Knsas City, 3; 14 tied at 2.
NtIOME RUNS-CPena, Tampa Bay, 15; Bay,
Boston, 13; Inge, Detroit, 12; Morneau, Min-
pepota, 12; Teixeira, NewYork, 12; 7 tied at 11.
STOLEN BASES-Crawford, Tampa Bay, 26;
,oggins, Los Angeles, 19; Ellsbury, Boston, 18;
Alsreu, Los Angeles; 15; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 14;
Bartlett, Tampa Bay, 13; Crisp, Kansas City, 11.
PITCHING (4 Decisions)-Palmer, Los Angeles,
5-0,1.000; Frasor, Toronto, 4-0,1.000; Halladay,
Toronto, 8-1, .889; Greinke, Kansas City, 7-1,
"375; Buehrle, Chicago, 6-1, .857; Slowey, Min-
nesota, 6-1, .857; RRamirez, Boston, 4-1, .800.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
B#TTING-Beltran, NewYork, .364; CGuzman,
Washington, .357; DWright, New York, .353;
Pence, Houston, .351; Ibanez, Philadelphia,
.350; Zimmerman, Washington, .348; Hudson,
Los Angeles, .343.
itLiNS-Pujols, St. Louis, 38; Ibanez, Philadel-
phia, 37; Zimmerman, Washington, 35; ASori-
ano, Chicago, 33; Worth, Philadelphia, 32;
Braun, Milwaukee, 31;Taveras, Cincinnati, 31.
RBI-lbanez, Philadelphia, 42; Fielder, Milwau-
kee, 40; Pujols, St. Louis, 38; Cantu, Florida, 35;
Hpwpe, Colorado, 34; Phillips, Cincinnati, 34;
Zimmerman, Washington, 34.
H]TS-Zimmerman, Washington, 63; Hudson,
Los Angeles, 60; Beltran, NewYork, 59; Ibanez,
Philadelphia, 56; Tejada, Houston, 55; DWright,
New York, 55; Pence, Houston, 53.
DOUBLES-Kotchman, Atlanta, 16; FSandchez,
Pittsburgh, 16; Hudson, Los Angeles, 15;
HaRamirez, Florida, 15; Beltran, New York, 14;
FLopez; Arizona, 14; Tejada, Houston, 14; Zim-
merman, Washington, 14.
TRIPLES-Kemp, Los Angeles, 4; Victorino,
Philadelphia, 4; Bourn, Houston, 3; Morgan,
Pittsburgh, 3; JUpton, Arizona, 3; Winn, San
SFrancisco, 3; DWright, New York, 3..
.ROME RUNS-lbanez, Philadelphia, 17; Ad-
-aenzalez, San Diego, 16; Pujols, St. Louis, 14;
Buice, Cincinnati, 12; Dunn, Washington, 12;
Reynolds, Arizona, 12; ASoriano, Chicago, 12.
STOLEN BASES-Bourn, Houston, 14;
-Tgveras, Cincinnati, 12; JosReyes; NewYork,
14. Burriss, San Francisco, 10; Fowler, Col-
orado, 10; Morgan, Pittsburgh, 10; Reynolds,
Arizona, 10; DWright, NewYork, 10.
PITCHING (4 Decisions)-Martis, Washington,


5-0, 1.000; Broxton, Los Angeles, 4-0, 1.000;
Meredith, San Diego, 4-0, 1.000; Billingsley, Los
Angeles, 6-1,.857; Pelfrey, NewYork, 4-1, .800;
Stults, Los Angeles, 4-1, .800; Cain, San Fran-
cisco, 4-1, .800.


Associated Press-
Tampa Bay Rays' B.J. Upton, bottom, is out at second base as
Florida Martins shortstop Hanley Ramirez leaps for the throw in
the fifth inning at Land Shark Stadium in Miami on Saturday.


Mets 3, Red Sox 2
BOSTON - Omir Santos hit a two-
run homer off Jonathan Papelbon with
two outs in the ninth inning, a drive that
was initially ruled a double, and the
New York Mets rallied to beat the
Boston Red Sox 3-2 Saturday night.
The long flyball to left field bounced
off the shelf above the Green Monster
and was called a double. But after the
umpires went into the tunnel for the tel-
evision replay - the first in Fenway
Park history - crew chief Joe West
came out and signaled for a home run.
The Mets celebrated and the runners
resumed their trip around the bases.
Pedro Feliciano (1-1) pitched the
eighth. J.J. Putz pitched the ninth for
his second save, getting some fielding
help from third baseman David Wright
on a hard grounder down the line with
a runner on first Shortstop Ramon
Martinez, who made twb errors on Fri-
day night, stabbed Mike'Lowell's hard
grounder in the hole for the final out.
Papelbon (0-1) had been 11 for 11 in
save opportunities. But Gary Sheffield
walked to lead off the ninth and then,
after Papelbon struck out Wright and Je-
remy Reed, Santos hit'the first pitch'for
his s'cornd career hnmer'


Rays 10, Marlins 3r Howell p 0 0 0 0 C.Rosscf 3 1 0 0 . "
Balfourp 0 00 0 RPaulnc 4 02 0 Theatec
MIAMI-- Evan Longoria hit a Gross ph 1 0 0 0 Coghln If 2 10 0 Beckett of
tiebreaking single in eighth inning to. Wheer p 0 0 0 0 West p 1 0 0 0 outing of the
add to his major league-leadingRBI . nnstnph 1 000 Badnhpp 0 00 0 ed an un
lsrnghs p 0o0o0-0 Meyerp 0 0 0 0 IowedanunE
total and the Tampa Bay Rays beat Bartlett ss 5 1 2 3 Gload ph 1 0 1 1 seven scorel
the hapless Florida Marlins 10-3 on Zobrist 2b-r05 1 3 1 Nunez p 0 0 0 0 took a 2-1 le
Saturday night. apienalbr 2 0 0 0 Lndsr p 0 0 0 0 single in
Jason Bartlett had three RBIs and MHrnd c 4 1 2 2 Helms ph 0 0 0 0 , score again
two hits to hike his average to .376, Niemnnrp2 0 0 00 after seven.
Iwar02b-3b 0
and reserve catcher Michel Hernandez Totals 391013 9 Totals 33 3 7 3 NewYork
drove in two runs for the Rays (23-22), Tampa Bay 000 110 116-10 ab
who have won three consecutive Florida 000 100 200-3 DnMrplb 4.
wao ave wn e 500 for the first E-Uggla (5), Lindstrom (1), Cantu (4). LOB- Pag n ri -4
games to climb above .500 for the first Tampa Bay 15, Florida 8.2B-B.Upton (8), Lon- Beirnr an 4.
time since April 13. Jeff Niemann al- goria (19), Bartlett (11), Zobrist (8). HR-Uggla Sheffild If 3
lowed one run in six innings. (8). SB-Crawford (26), Bartlett (13), Bonifacio DWrght 3b 4
After winning 15-2 Friday, the Rays (9), Ha.Ramirez (8). S-B.Upton, Niemann, Reed cf 4
benefited from another dismal perform- IP H R ER BB SO RMrtnz ss 4
ance by the slumping Marlins. Florida Tampa Bay Caci-no !A.c 2
walked nine, hit a batter, balked home Niemann 6 4 1 1 1 5 Torali, 33
wakenine, hittadatter,.alkeanome Howell BS,3-4 2-3 2 2 2 2 1 NewYork
a run, committed three errors and al- BalourW,2-0 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Boston
Iowed Tampa Bay to break a 3-all tie in Wheeler H,6 1 0 0 0 0 1 E-Beckett (1)
the eighth with an unearned run. sringhausen 1 1 0 0 0 1 York 5, Boston
ein ,a I n. Florida tinez (1), Ellsb
Akinorj Iwamura walked against Leo - -,- _h. 4 2 2 4 5
Nunez (lg)tatmt e inning andd-, g ~Cdis- i S;3^ 3 1 1 1 0 NewYork
vanced on a sacrifice. e>yver 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 Pelfrey
Nunez L,2-2 1 1 1 1 1 1 Feliciano W,1-
Tampa Bay Florida . , Lindstrom' 1-3 3 4 4 1 1 Putz S,2-3
ab rhbi abrhbi Penn 2-3 2 2 2 1 1 Boston
BUpton cf 4 1 2 1 Bonifac 3b 5 0 1 0 HBP-by Isringhausen (Helms), by Penn (Lon- Beckett
Crwfrd If 5 3 1 0 Hermid if 5. 0 1,1 goria). Balk-Lindstrom. Papelbon L,0-1
LOig.,' 30 0'2 1 HRmrz is J 0 1 0 UL)mires--H-:Fme Marl, Cart-:.n F,rsc T,,T, T;:r.,ju Umrr:pire,-H.n
Biip.': pr.? r 1 Iu C CaniJ It. 4 0 0 0 S.e,:n'.j BcODavido,, .r, Tr,,rr. Jehl Nel.on S-'.C.d CridJ
WA',,r 1it , ". C 1 1 0001a2bI . 4, J- 1 1 1 T_-'49, __1 A _-2 ,', 1:.3t1 3kI,' T- -" 49 A--1V


Braves 4, Blue Jays 3
ATLANTA - Derek Lowe pitched
into the eighth inning and drove in the
go-ahead run with one of his two hits,
leading the Atlanta Braves to a 4-3 vic-
fory over the slumping Toronto Blue
Jays on Saturday night.
Lowe (6-2) allowed two runs and
live hils in 7 1-3 innings to move into a
tie for the NL lead in wins He has al-
lowed two runs or less in seven of his
10 starts.
Lyle Overbay's RBI single off Mike
Gonzalez cut Atlanta's lead to 4-3 in
the ninth. Rod Baralas then walked to
load the bases but Rafael Sonano
struck out pinch-hitter Kevin Millar and
retired Marco Scutaro on a flyball to left
to earn his fourth save.
Kelly Johnson hit a seventh-inning
homer off B.J. Ryan as the Braves (22-
20) moved two games over .500 for the
first time since April 15, when they
were 5-3.
The AL East-leading Blue Jays
have lost five straight, their longest
streak since losing seven straight from
June 14-21,2008.
Lowe, who entered with a .143 bat-
ting average, was 2 for 3, including a
fourth-inning single that drove in Jeff
Francoeur for a 3-2 lead. Francoeur
had three hits.


Toronto

Scutaro ss
A.Hill 2b
Rios rf
V.Wells cf
Lind If
Rolen 3b
Overay lb
Barajs c
Janssn p
Inglett ph
BJRyn p
Wolfe p
Millar ph
Totals
Toronto
Atlanta


ab rhbi
5 01 2
3 01 0
4000
4000
4 12 0
3 01 0
2 1 1 1
3 1 1 0
1 00 0
1 00 0
0 0 0 0
0000
1 000
31 3 7 3


Atlanta


ab r h bi
KJhnsn 2b 4 2 2 1
Ktchm lb 4 01 2
GAndrs If 4 0 .2 0
McCnn c 4 0 1 0
Prado3b 4 00 0
Francrrf 4 1 3 0
DHrndzss 3 0 0 0
Schafer cf 4 00 0
,D.Lowep 3 1 2 1
Moylan p 0 00 0
MGnzlz p 0 0 0 0
RSorin p 0 00 0

Totals 34 411 4
002 000 001-3
002 100 10x-4


DP-Toronto 1, Atlanta 2. LOB-Toronto 7, At-
lanta 7.2B-Scutaro (11), Lind (15), Rolen (13),
Kotchman (16), Francoeur (5). HR-K.Johnson
(4). S-Janssen.
IP H R ER BB SO
Toronto
JanssenL,0-1 6 8 3 3 1 0
B.J.Ryan 1 1 1 1 0 1
Wolfe 1 2 0 0 0 1
Atlanta
D.LoweW,6-2 71-3 5 2 2 2 2
MoylanH,7 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
M.Gonzalez H,2 1-3 2 1 1 2 0
R.Soriano-S,4-5 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Umpires-Home, Gerry Davis; First, Brian Gor-
man; Second, C.B. Bucknor; Third, Mike Everitt.
T-2:31. A-27,377 (49,743).


Rangers 6, Astros 3
HOUSTON - Nelson Cruz home-
red twice and Hank Blalock also con-
nected to help the Tex.as Rangers beat
the Houston Astros 6-3 on Saturday.
Scott Feldman pitched a season-
high 6 2-3 innings and Blalock finished
with three hits for the Rangers, who
won their second straight in this sea-
son's Lone Star series Feldman (3-0)
allowed three runs and live hits
Cruz also went deep in the 10lh in-
ning Friday night to give the Rangers a
6-5 victory over the Astros.
Miguel Tejada and Geoft Blum
homered for Houston. Brian Moehler
(1-3) gave up six runs and nine hits in
five-plus innings.
Tejada's first-inning drive to right led
to the first replay review of the season at
Minute Maid Park. Rangers manager
Ron Washington argued a fan interfered
with the ball but the umpires upheld the
home run after watching the replay.
Cruz hit a three-run homer in the
fourth to give Texas a 3-1 lead. Omar
Vizquel led off with a single and Josh
Hamilton doubled with one out ahead
of Cruz's full-count drive to left.
Cruz and Blalock hit back-to-back
drives in the sixth to make it 6-1.


Texas
ab rhbi
Vizquel 2b 5 1 2 0
DvMrplIf 4 0 1 0
Hamltncf 4 1 1 0
N.Cruz rf 4 2 2 4
Blatock 3b 4 1 3 1
C.Davislb 4 0 0 0
SItlmch c 4 0 1 0
Andrusss 4 1 1 0
Feldmn p 2 00 0
O'Day p 0 0 0 0
Guardd p 0 00 0
Byrd ph 1 0 0 0
CWilsnp 0 0 0 0

Totals 36 611 5
Texas
Houston


Houston
ab r h bi
Bourn cf, 4 00 0
Tejadass 4 1 2 1
Brkmnlb 4 00 0
Ca.LeelIf 4 0 1 0
Pence rf 3 1 2 0
Blum3b 4 1 1 2
IRdrgz c 4 0 0 0
KMatsu2b 3 0 0 0
Moehlrp 1 0 0 0
Byrdak p 0 00 0
Maysnt ph 1 0 0 0
Wrght p 0 0 0 0
Erstad ph 0 0 0 0
Fulchin p 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 3 6 3
000 312 000-6
100 000 200-3


E-Feldman (1), Ca.Lee (1). LOB-Texas 4,
Houston 5. 2B-Dav.Murphy (5), Hamilton (2),
Blalock (9). HR-N.Cruz2 (11), Blalock (11), Te-
jada (5), Blum (1). CS-Pence (3). S-Feldman.
IP H R ER BB SO
Texas
Feldman W,3-0 62-3 5 3 3 2 5
O'DayH,3 1-3 0 0 0 1 1
GuardadoH,3 1 0 0 0 0 0
C.Wilson S,3-4 1 1 0 0 0 0
Houston
MoehlerL,1-3 5 9 6 6 0 4
Byrdak 1 0 0 0 0 1
W.Wright 1 0 0 0 0 2
Fulchino 2 2 0 0 0 2
Moehler pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
Umpires-Home, Brian O'Nora; First, Fieldin Cul-
breth; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third, Jim Wolf.
T-2:48. A-36,019 (40,976).


drama deprived Josh
victory afterhis longest,
season, in which he fol-
earned run in Ihe first with
less innings The Red Sox
ad on Kevin Youkilis' two-
the first, bbt they didn't
off Mike P4lfrey, who left


rh bi
000
00 0
1 1 0
1 1 1
00 0
3630 1 0
1 2 2
0 1 0
0 0 0
3 6 3


Boston
i ' ab r h bi
Ellsurycf 4 1 1 0
Pedroia 2b 4 1 2 0
D.Ortiz dh 3 0 0 0
Youkilslb 3 0 1 2
Bay If 4 0 0 0
J.Drewrf 4 00.0
Lowell 3b 4 00 0
Varitekc 3 0 1 0
NGreen ss 3 0 1 0
Totals 32 2 6 2
100 000 002-3
200 000 000-2


). DP-New Yorkl1. LOB-New
5. HR-Santos (2). SB-R.Mar-
ury (18), Pedrola (5).
IP H RERBBSO

7 6 2 2 1 6
1 1 0 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 1 e0

8 5 1 0 1 5
1 1 1 221 2
r-it J..e Wea.l Fir: Ed Rapujrio
Fa,,h-rl. TI .re Paul jiaus,
7I 7] 117 i'11


Cardinals 5, Royals 0
ST LOUIS - Kyle Lohse threw
eight innings of four-hit ball and the St.
Louis Cardinals shut out the Kansas
City Royals 5-0 for the .ecornd straihI
lime Saiuiday, giving ihe tolalion its
lifth straight dominant outing.
Lohse (4-3) struck out six with no
walks, shaking off three straight losses
to slan the month. Cardinals starters
have allowed one run in 36 2-3 innings
during a five-game winning sireak in
which SI. Louis has outscored its oppo-
nents 18-2 with a complete game by
Joel Pineiro and an 8 2-3 inning-slint
by Adam Wainwright
Nick Stavinoha had two lirst-inning
RBIs for the second straight game,
providing a fast start for a franchise
that had lost seven of nine before the
pitching staff took over. Skip Schu-
maker added his third homer, all in a
span of 30 at-bats, in the third.
Miguel Olivo doubled twice but no
runner made it past second base for
the Royals, who have losf11 of 14 and
fell one game below .500 (2.1-22) for
the first time since they were 2-3 on
April 11. Kansas City has been shut out
three times, all in the last 13 games.
The Royals had only three runners
in scoring position against Lohse, who
retired the side in order four times. He
looked impressive after struggling on
short rest in a makeup game against
the Brewers on Monday, allowing four
runs in four innings.


Kansas City
Sat
Crisp cf 4
DeJess If 4
Butler lb 4
JGuilln rf 3
Teahen 3b 4
,Callasp 2b 4
Olivo c 3
Aviles ss 3
Mahay p C
Hochvr p 2
Blmqst ss 1
Totals 32
Kansas City
St. Louis


b rhbi
000
401 0
0 1 0
0 1 0
4000
400 0
02 0
3000
00 0
S0 0 0
1000
20 5 0


St. Louis


ab r h bi
Schmkr2b 5 1 2 1
Rasmscf 5 00 1
Pujols 1b 2 1 1 0
DuncanlIf 3 1 1 0
Stavinhrf 3 0 1 2
BrRyan2b 1 1 1 0
YMolinc 3 0 2 0
Barden 3b 3 0 0 0
Lohse p 2 1 1 0
C.Perez p 0 0 0 0
TGreen ss 2 00 1
Totals 29 5 9 5
000 000 000-0
201 000 11x-5


LOB-Kansas City 6, St. Louis 9. 2B-Olivo 2
(3), Stavinoha (1), Br.Ryan (4). HR-Schu-
maker (3). SB-Pujols (7), Y.Molina (2). S-
Y.Molina, Lohse, T.Greene.
IP H R ER BB SO
Kansas City
HochevarL,0-2 61-3 7 4 4 2 1
Mahay 12-3 2 1 1 3 0
St. Louis
Lohse W,4-3 8 4 0 0 0 6
C.Perez 1 1 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Mahay (Lohse), by Lohse (J.Guillen).
Umpires-Home, Chris Guccione; First, Todd
Tichenor; Second, Jerry Layne; Third, Tony
Randazzo.
T-2:34. A-43,829 (43,975).


Rockies 4, Tigers 3
DETROIT-Todd Helton and Chris
lannetta homered to back an efficient
performance by Jason Marquis, and
the Colorado Rockies ended the De-
troit Tigers' seven-game winning streak
with a 4-3 victory Saturday night.
Marquis (6-3) allowed three runs on
six hits and a walk in 7 2-3 innings to
win his second straight start. Randy
Flores got the final out of the eighth
and Huston Street pitched the ninth for
his sixth save in six tries and the 100th
of his career.
Slumping Armando Galarraga (3-4)
allowed four runs on six hits and a walk in
51-3 innings. Galarraga is now 0-4 in five
May starts with a 9.92 ERA after going 3-
0 with a 1.85 ERA in four April outings.
Dexter Fowler hit Galarraga's third
pitch of the game for a triple, then slid
around Gerald Laird's tag to score on
Troy Tulowitzki's sacrifice fly.
lannetta's eighth homer made it 2-0 in
the top of the second, but the Tigers got
a run back in the bottom of the inning on
Miguel Cabrera's ninth home run.
In the third, Fowler pushed the lead
to 3-1 with his second run of the game.
He singled with one out, took third on
TulowitzA:single and scored on Hel-
ton's groundout.
The Tigers tied it with a pair of runs
in the fifth.
Colorado , Detroit
ab rhbi ab r h bi
Fowlercf 3 22 0 Grndrsct 4 00 0
Tli,! -.' 3 0 1 1 Polanc2b 4 00 0
-Hei.,,n ir 4 1 1 2 Thors rt 4 00 0
H.3wp.' 400 0 MiCarrIb 3 1 1 1
Irnr.irr. 3 1 2 1 Ordonzdh 3 1 1 0
Torreal pr-c 1 0 0 0 JAndrs pr 0 0,0 0
S.SmithIf 3 00 0 Inge3b 4 00 0
Splrghsif, 0 0 0 0 Raburnlf 3 1 1 0
Atkinsdh. 4 0 1 0 Larishph 0 00 0
Stewart3Wi4 0 0 0 Laird c 4 0 3 1
Bai,,Te2p. 3 0 0 Everettss 3 00 0
Toii. '32 4 7 4- Totals 32 3 6 2
Colorado 111 001 000-4
Detroit - 010 020 000-3
E-lannetta (1). DP-Colorado 1. LOB-Col-
orado 5, Detroit 5. 2B-lannetta (5), Laird (5).
3B-Fowler (2). HR-Helton (6), lannetta (8),
Mi.Cabrera (9). SB-Ordonez (1), J.Anderson
(9), R P r' , i l I _.-F.:.j.,' 5 F--Tulowitzki.
IP H R ER BB SO
Colorado
v1ria -u.'V -.7 '3 3'- ; " 1 4
Fi-l,.re H i .' H n u 0 1
Street S,6-6 1 0 0 0 2' 2
Detroit
Galarraga L,3-4 51-3 6 4 4 1 2
N.Robertson 2 1 0 0 1 1
Lyon 12-3 0 0'0 0 2
UTnp.i-" ;- H rT.. W ill' Ii 6 11 , l P.1.ariy F..;o er
J, :on,. DJ Rrytbu,- Tr,,, .Ilrn Hir.:rt.,.:
T--2- < A--37.,1'5 W.41 ,


Twins 6, Brewers 2
MINNEAPOLIS-- Joe Mauer had
three hits, a homer and two RBIs to
help Anthony Swarzak win his major
league debut, pushing the Minnesota
Twins past the Brewers 6-2 on Satur-
day night and ensuring Milwaukee's
first series loss in five weeks.
Swarzak sprinkled five singles over
seven shutout innings, walking two
and striking out three. The 23-year-old
had runners on with one out or less in
five different innings, but he put his
fastball in the right places and was
able to walk confidently off the mound
without any damage.
The Brewers won eight of their last
10 series, tying two, while surging to
the top of the NL Central following a 4-9
start. This is their first two-game losing
streak since the first two days of May.
With thousands of Wisconsinites fill-
ing out the crowd of 40,547, a bunch of
"let's go Brewers!" chants roared be-
fore the game.
Swarzak and Mauer made sure
they didn't last.
Minnesota's second-round draft pick
in 2004, Swarzak will probably be
bumped from the rotation when Glen
Perkins returns next week, but his per-
formance might have been strong
enough to warrant a bullpen spot.
Swarzak's career was in trouble last
season, when he was roughed up in
20 starts for Double-A New Britain.
Milwaukee Minnesota
ab rhbi ab r h bl
Counsll ss 5 00 0 Span If 4 1 1 0
McGeh2b 3 1 2 0 Mauerc 3 3,3 2
Braunlf 4 02 0 Mornealb 2 02 1
Fielderib 3 0 2 1 Cuddyrrf 3 0 1 0
MCmrncf 4 00 0 Crede3b 4 12 2
Gamel dh, 4 00 0 Buschr dh 4 00 0
Hall3b 4 00 0 BHarrs ss 4 00 0
Gerut rf . 3 1 1 0 Gomez cf 3 1 1 0
Kendallc 4 0 1 1 Tolbert2b 4 00 0
Totals 34 2 8 2 Totals 31 610 5
Milwaukee 000 000 011-2
Minnesota 003 110 10x-6
E-Braun (1). DP-Milwaukee 2, Minnesota 1.
LOB-Milwaukee 8, Minnesota 6.2B-Kendall
(5). 3B-Gomez (2). HR-Mauer (9), Crede (7).
SF-Momeau.
IP . H RERBBSO
MilwauRee
Looper L,4-3 6 9 5 4 1 1
Swindle 1-3 1 1 1 1 0
Julio 12-3 0 0 0 1 0
Minnesota
SwarzakW,1-0 7 5 0 0 2 3
Guerrier 1 2 1 1 0 1
Mijares 1 1 1 1 1 1
HBP-by Looper (Morneau).
Umpires-Home, Charlie Reliford; First, Adrian
.Iorniorn . (Src Dan 13ai3i '3 Third 'ii a '

T-2- :l4 A--101.4'"4i. :;-'l


Associated Press
New York Yankees' Melky Cabrera follows through on the
game-winning RBI single during the ninth inning as Philadel-
phia Phillies catcher Chris Coste looks on Saturday in New
York. The Yankees won the game, 5-4.


Yankees 5, Phillies 4
NEWYORK--Alex Rodriguez hit a
tying homer off Brad Lidge in the ninth
inning and Melky Cabrera capped the
three-run rally with an RBI single, giving
the New York Yankees a 5-4 victory over
the Philadelphia Phillies on Saturday.
John Mayberry Jr. hit a three-run
homer in his major league debut and
Raul Ibanez also connected, helping
the Phillies build a 4-2 lead for new
starter J.A. Happ.
Lidge (0-2) came on in the ninth
and immediately got in trouble. Johnny
Damon drew a leadoff walk and stole'
second. After Mark Teixeira struck out,
Rodriguez smacked a full-count pitch
over the short porch in right for his sev-
enth homer - and 10th hit - after
missing the first 28 games this season
following hip surgery.
Robinson Cano followed with a sin-
gle, stole second and scored without a
play on Cabrera's single to right-center.
It was the third game-ending hit of
the season for Cabrera, who raised his
arms as he rounded first and dashed
with glee all the way across the dia-
mond as his jubilant teammates
chased him down to celebrate.
The Yankees have won 10 of 11 and
are making a habit of these walk-off
victories. They had three straight
against Minnesota last weekend, and
capped this one in the same way:
pitcher A.J. Burnett pelted Cano and
Cabrera with a pie in the face as they
waited to do an on-field interview -
even getting some whipped cream on


radio broadcaster Suzyn Waldman.
For Rodriguez, it was his sixth
homer in the past eight games.
Lidge, who converted all 48 save
chances in 2008 - including the post-
season - during his first year in
Philadelphia, has blown three of 11 op-
portunities this season.
Jose Veras (3-1) got one out in the
eighth for the win.
Philadelphia New York
ab rhbi ab r h bi


Rollins ss
Utley 2b
Werth If
Howard lb
Ibanez dh
Victorn cf
Feliz 3b
Mayrry rt
Coste c


4 000
4 02 0
4000
4000
4 1 1 1
4 1 1 0
1 1 0 0
3 12 3
3 00 0


Jeterss 4 1 1 1
DamonlIf 3 1 0 0
Teixeirlb 4 02 0
ARdrgzdh 4 1 1 2
Cano 2b 4 2 2 0
MeCatrrcf 3 0 1 1
Swisher rf 3 0 0 1
Cervellic 2 00 0
Gardnrph 1 0 1 0
Berroa3b 0 0 0 0
R.Pena 3b 2 0 0 0
HMatsu ph 1 0 0 0
Cash c 0 0 0 0


Totals 31 4 6 4 Totals 31 5 8 5
Philadelphia 010 030 000-4
NewYork 010 001 003-5
One out when winning run scored.
DP-Philadelphia 1, New York 2. LOB-
Philadelphia 2, New York 3. 2B-Mayberry (1),
Cano (12), Gardner (4). HR-lbanez (17), May-
berry (1), Jeter (7), A.Rodriguez (7). SB-
Damon (4), Cano.(2). S-Me.Cabrera.
IP H R ER BBSO
Philadelphia
Happ 6 4 2 2 0 4
DurbinH,2 1 0 0 0 0 1
MadsonH,8 1 1 0 0 0 3
LidgeL,0-2 1-3 3 3 3 1 1
New York
Pettitte 7 5 4 4 2 5
Coke 12-3 1 0 0 0 0
VerasW,3-1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Umpires-Home, Lance Barksdale; First, Mike
Estabrook; Second, Randy Marsh; Third, Mike
Winters.
T-2:33. A-46,889 (52,325).


. I - -� 4 J


"" y 1'D' 3 V I' ' U-?g,. ' [-


4 1 1










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SCOREBOARD


B4 SiNAYn MAY 24 2009


AUTO RACING
Sprint Cup
Coca-Cola 600 Lineup
After Thurdtay qualifying; race Sunday
At Lowe's Motor Speedway
Concord, N.C.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 188.475.
2.(18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 188.258.
3. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 188.193.
4. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 188.166.
5. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 187.820.
6. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 187.493.
7. (09) Mike Bliss, Dodge, 187.422.
8. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 187.396.
9. (42) J.PR Montoya, Chevrolet, 187.188.
10. (21) Bill Elliott, Ford, 187.169.
11. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 187.162.
12. (1) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 186.916.
13. (11.) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 186.864.
14. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 186.832.
15. (19) Elliott Sadler, Dodge, 186.825.
16. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 186.735.
17. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 186.599.
18. (82) Scott Speed, Toyota, 186.574.
19. (99) Cari Edwards, Ford, 186.548.
20. (96) Bobby Labonte, Ford, 186.477.
21. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 186.368.
22. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 186.233.
23. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, 186.220.
24. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 186.181.
25. (66) Dave Blaney, Toyota, 186.014.
26. (77) Sam Homish Jr., Dodge, 185.970.
27. (88) Dale Eamhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 185.829.
28. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 185.778.
29. (71) David Gilliland, Chevrolet, 185.707.
30. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 185.605.
31. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 185.593.
32. (13) Max Papis, Toyota, 185.433.
33.(26) Jamie McMurray, Ford, 185.319.
34. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 185.172.
35. (12) David Stremme, Dodge, 185.096.
36. (07) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 184.704.
37. (7) Robby Gordon, Toyota, 184.590.
38. (44) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 184.338.
39. (55) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 183.949.
40. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 183.281.
41. (34) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, Owner Points
42. (43) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, Owner Points
43. (36) Scott Riggs, Toyota, 184.433.
Failed to Qualify
44. (41) JJ Yeley, Toyota, 184.093.
45. (73) Mike Garvey, Dodge, 182.457.
46. (64) Todd Bodine, Toyota, 182.426.
47. (06) David Starr, Dodge, 179.081.

BASKETBALL

NBA Playoffs
CONFERENCE FINALS
(Best.of-7)
Tuesday, May 19
L.A. Lakers 105, Denver 103
Wednesday, May 20
Orlando 107, Cleveland 106
Thursday, May 21
Denver 106, L.A. Lakers 103
Friday, May 22
Cleveland 96, Orlando 95, series tied 1-1
Saturday, May 23
L.A. Lakers 103, Denver 97, L.A. Lakers lead
series 2-1
Sunday, May 24
Cleveland at Orlando, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, May 25
L.A. Lakers at Denver, 9 p.m.
Tuesday, May 26
Cleveland at Orlando, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 27
Denver at L.A. Lakers, 9 p.m.
Thursday, May 28
Orlando at Cleveland, 8:30 p.m.
Friday, May 29
L.A. Lakers at Denver, 9 p.m., if-necessary.
Saturday, May 30
Cleveland at Orlando, 8:30 p.m., if necessary
Sunday, May 31
Denver at LA. Lakers, 8:30 p.m., if necessary
Monday, June 1
Orlando at Cleveland, 8:30 p.m., if necessary



NHL Playoffs
CONFERENCE FINALS
(Best-of-7)
Sunday, May 17
Detroit 5, Chicago 2
Monday, May 18
Pittsburgh 3, Carolina 2
Tuesday, May 19
Detroit 3, Chicago 2, OT
Thursday, May 21
Pittsburgh 7, Carolina 4
Friday, May 22
Chicago 4, Detroit 3, OT, Detroit leads series
2-1
Saturday, May 23
- Pittsburgh 6, Carolina 2, Pittsburgh leads se-
ries 3-0
Sunday, May 24
Detroit at Chicago, 3 p.m.
Tuesday, May 26
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 27
Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Friday, May 29
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m., if necessary:


TRIATHLON
Continued from Page B1

of Florida, majoring in ele-
mentary education.
Donahue is a member of
'the Tri-Gators, Florida
triathlon team and fin-
ished fourth in the world.
triathlon event in 2007 in
Germany. She has finished
second at Crystal River
before.
"It feels really good (to
win at Crystal River)," she
said. "It was windy. I love a
strong wind. I took the lead
among the women before
the bike. I plan to compete
in the world triathlon this
September in Australia."
Caron is 17 years old and
a student at Palm Harbor
University.
"It was tough (on the
course)," Caron said. "The
bike was rough. I took the
lead out of the water. This
is one of my favorite races."
Dunnellon's " -Danny
Stevens Jr., felt like the
competition was a bit too
much although he finished
fifth.
"There were too many
fast guys," said Stevens, 31.
"I had a strong ride."
Dunnellon's Robbie
Stevens, 51, felt like this
race was more of a battle.
He finished 26th overall.
"The conditions were
very'windy," Stevens said.
"It made it tough. It was a
tough race."


For the record

====== Florida LOTTERY ==


Here are the winning
numbers selected
Saturday in the
Florida Lottery:


CASH 3 (early)
8 - 0 -4
CASH 3 (late)
3-6-3
PLAY 4 (early)
4-9-2-8
PLAY 4 (late)
1-1-2-5
POWERBALL
19- 23- 34- 52- 57
POWER BALL
21
POWER PLAY


5
FANTASY 5
7-8-11-32-33
LOTTERY'
22 - 25 - 26-38-41 - 49.


==On the AIRWAVES---=-

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
11 a.m. (ESPN2) Traxxas TORC Off-Road Series (Taped)
1 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) Indianapolis 500
5 p.m. (13, 51 FOX) Sprint Cup - Coca-Cola 600
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) ACC Toumament Final - Teams TBA
4 p.m. (SUN) SEC Tournament Final - Teams TBA
MLB BASEBALL f
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Tampa Bay Rays at Florida Marlins,
1:30 p.m. (TBS) New York Mets at Boston Red Sox -
4 p.m. (WGN) Chicago Cubs at San Diego Padres i
8 p.m. (ESPN) Milwaukee Brewers at Minnesota Twins
BASKETBALL
8:30 p.m. (TNT) Eastern Conference Final Game 3-
Cleveland Cavaliers at Orlando Magic
GOLF
12 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) Senior PGA Championship - Final Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: HP Byron Nelson Championship
- Final Round
3 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) PGATour HP Byron Nelson Championship
- Final Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: BMW PGA Championship
- Final Round'(Same-day Tape)
7 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Corning Classic - Final- Round
(Same-day Tape)
HOCKEY
3 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) Western Conference Final Game 4 -
Detroit Red Wings at Chicago Blackhawks
SOCCER
9 p.m. (47 FAM) English Premier League: Manchester City
vs. Bolton Wanderers. (Same-day Tape)
SOFTBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) NCAA Super Regional - Georgia Tech vs.
Washington
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) NCAA Super Regional - Teams TBA
6 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA Super Regional - California vs.
Florida
8:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA Super Regional - Teams TBA
TENNIS
12 p.m. (ESPN2) French Open - Early Round - Day 1


Saturday, May 30
Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m., if necessary
Sunday, May 31
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7:30 p.m., if necessary
Monday, June 1
Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m., if necessary
Tuesday, June 2
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m., if necessary
STANLEY CUP FINALS
TBD


BASEBALL
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Placed RHP Anthony
Reyes and LHP Aaron Laffey on the 15-day DL.
Recalled LHP Rich Rundles and LHP Jeremy
Sowers from Columbus (IL).
National League
FLORIDA MA PLINS-Purchased the contract
of LHP Sean West from Jacksonville (SL). Re-
called RHP Chris Leroux from Jacksonville. Op-
tioned RHP Ricky Nolasco to New Orleans
(PCL). Designated LHP David Davidson for as-
signment.
LOS ANGELES DODGERS-Signed RHP Ji-
Mo Lee to a minor league contract.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES-Extended the affilia-
tion with Altoona of the Eastern Leagus through
2014. ,


Crystal River's Bob
Brockett was racing against
the older Stevens. Brockett
and Danny Stevens Jr.
staged the first Crystal
River Triathlon in 1995.
"I was trying.to close in
on Robbie Stevens," said
Brockett, 54. "We had over
300 today When Danny and
I had the first triathlon at
Hunter Springs, there were
just 11 people com.petting."
' Memorial Day hiada spe-
cial meaning to'j-rystal
River's Bob Bleakley. He
lost his younger son, Will.
in a boating accident ear-
lier this year. Two NFL
players also lost their lives
in the accident which re-
ceived national media at-
tention.
Bleakley commemo-
rated his son by wearing a
visor with "WB 84" printed
on it. Will wore that num-
ber playing football at the
University of South
Florida. Will was also a
standout at Crystal River
High School and made the
South Florida team as a
preferred walk-on.
Getting through the race
was tough for Bleakley
"I was really tired," he
said. "My legs are worn out.
Sixty people passed me on
the bike. I swam pretty
well. I beat all the other 62-
year-olds. My last
(triathlon) race was in 2000.
"It's (the triathlon) ' a
great event for the commu-
nity. It was great weather.
DRC Sports does a great


Eastern League
TRENTON THUNDER-Announced OF Noah
Hall has been assigned to the team and RHP
Jason Stephens and OF Seth Fortenberry was
transferred to Staten Island (NYP).
Midwest League
QUAD CITIES RIVER BANDITS-Announced OF
Jairo Martinez has been transferred to the team
from extended spring training.
American Association
EL PASO DIABLOS-Released LHP Zach Pic-
cola.
SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS-Released RHP
Mike Koons.
,Can-Am League
AMERICAN DEFENDERS-Signed INF Chris
Kelly.
NEW JERSEY. JACKALS-Released OF Josh
Cox. Signed C Chris Chiarappa.
Northern League
WINNIPEG GOLDEYES-Signed C Hank Lanto.
SOCCER
Women's Professional Soccer
SKY BLUE FC-Suspended coach and general
manager lan Sawyers indefinitely. Named Kelly
Lindsey interim coach.
COLLEGE
KENTUCKY-Announced DE Jeremy Jarmon
was ruled ineligible for his senior season by the
NCAA because of a failed drug test.
WHEATON,' ILL.-Named Jim Gruenwald
wrestling coach.


job. I had the great support
of my wife, Betty."
Homosassa ' playwright
Sam Nall, 65, enjoyed the
race. He had a hip replace-
ment a year and a half ago
and felt like the race was
part of his rehab process.
"It's a good course," said
Nall. " My race) was not
bad."
Crystal River Memorial
Day Sprint Triathlon
2009 Results
Men's Overall winner:
Lucas Caron, Palm Harbor,
1:02:35.
Women's Overall winner:
Kristin Donahue, Webster,
1:11:49.6
Men's'Masters winner: Tom
Lowery, Gainesville, 1:06:08.2
Women's Masters winner:
Karyn Austin, Gainesville,
1:17:16
Relay team: Team Dale
Haze and the Champions,
Williston, 1:12:09.1
Top 10 Finishers
1. Lucas Caron, Palm Har-
bor, 1:02:35.8; 2. Jeffrey Hill,
Land O' Lakes, 1:02:43.2; 3.
Tom Lowery, Gainesville,
1:05.08; 4. Ethan Copping,
Tampa, 1:07:04.5; 5. Danny
Stevens Jr, Dunnellon,
1:07:30.1; 6. David Rowland,
N. Reninbon Bch., 1;07:35.8;
7. John Seppala, Valdosta,
Ga., 1:08:05; 8. Joel Rich,
Gainesville, 1:08:58.1; 9.
Matthew Braun, Ocala,
1:09.17.2; 10. Kyle McEl-
haney, Gainesville, 1:10:18.8.


Malkin's 3 points help
Pens rout Carolina, 6-2
RALEIGH, N.C. - Evgeni
Malkin had two goals and an
assist, and the Pittsburgh
Penguins pushed Carolina to,
the brink of elimination by
routing the Hurricanes 6-2 on
Saturday night.
Sidney Crosby added a goal
and an assist for the Penguins,
who lead the series 3-0. They


SIGNING
Continued from Page B1

sixth grade.
Cortes chose the roughly
6,000-student campus over
several community colleges
in Florida as well as some
Division I offers.
"People think when you
go to college it's just all
about the sport, it's not re-
ally," Cortes said. "You're
going to be there for two or
four years so you have to be
comfortable.
Those factors included
his relationship with cur-
rent players, the coaching
staff, its proximity to his
home and its degree pro-
grams. Cortes plans to major
in sports management and
,PHCC offers classes that
transfer over to state uni-
versities.
'"After I saw the school, it
was an easy pick," he said.
Cortes will bring with him
an all-around game that has


Sports BRIEFS
scored twice in the final minute
of the first period, then added
two more goals in 40 seconds
of the third to seal their fourth
straight victory.
Pittsburgh can sweep the
best-of-seven series Tuesday
night and make a second straight
trip to the Stanley Cup finals.
Bliss gets first
Nationwide win since '04
CONCORD, N.C. - Mike


made him one of the most
prolific statistical players in
the state. The, senior aver-
aged 28 points, five re-
bounds, five assists and four
steals per game this past
season.
"He's a point guard that
has scoring capabilities,"
PHCC head coach Bobby
Bowman said. "He's got the
toughness to defend guys his
size and also bigger."
Bowman- also noted
Cortes' ability to get in to the
lane as well his knowledge
of the game of basketball.
Cortes' game has somewhat
of a street-ball look to it and
at times looks effortless.
That style should fit in
nicely at PHCC where Bow-
man is not averse to running
three perimeter players up
and down the floor.
.Listed at a generous 5-10
on the depth chart, it will
be up to Cortes to prove his
size isn't a liability over the
next year or two if he hopes
to move on to a Division.I
or II school. Cortes has


Bliss raced to his first
NASCAR Nationwide Series
victory since 2004, catching a
break to claim the rain-short-
ened event at Lowe's Motor
Speedway.
Bliss, who started from the
back of the field Saturday night,
took the lead because he was
in the right position when the
caution flag came out with 39
laps to go.


made a habit of using his
quickness and balance to
offset his height, particu-
larly in the paint, but will
now be matching up with
some of the best junior col-
lege basketball teams In
the country.
"I think one of the biggest
worries from so many
coaches is his size and can
he guard? Well they are
going to find that out that he
can guard," Lecanto coach
Chris Nichols said.
"After two years I see hfUn
signing with a Division II or
maybe with a mid-major Di-
vision I. I've always felt he
had that ability."
Bowman has watched liis
former players move on to.
schools such as Kansas
State, Central Florida arid
Georgia. Most recently
guard Stanley Pringle
started this past season for
Penn State. The Nittany
Lions won the 2009 NIT
Tournament against Baylor,
a game in which Prinle
scored 10 points.


ALAN FESTO/Chronicle
Lecanto senior Nick Cortes (front row, second from left) signed recently to play collegiate
basketball at Pasco-Hernando Community College. Cortes, who averaged 28.4 points per
contest for the Panthers, will receive a full athletic scholarship for the Conquistadors.


CORTES
Continued from Page B1

Cortes would constantly at-
tend one of his older brother's
games, watching and learning
everything he could.
"He was a great shooter but
he also had a great driving
game," Cortes said. "I
watched it so many years, it
kind of just went into my
game."
Armed with his natural tal-
ent and hunger to learn,
Cortes dominated the youth
leagues in and around the
city and, in fifth grade, led his
team to the state champi-
onship.
The young all-stareven had
private high schools offering
him scholarship money
"I had everything already,
laid out for me," he said.
About a year later, follow-
ing an incident with one of his
older brothers, Cortes' par-
ents decided to move the fam-
ily to Florida. Cortes was
expecting Miami, Tampa,
maybe Orlando..but not Cit-
rus County.
"I had never even heard of
this place," he said.
The move was unbearable
and, the only thing to help
Cortes get through it was bas-
ketball and his slightly older
brother, Victor
Victor had just begun play-
ing basketball a couple of
years earlier and together
they dominated the Jr Hurri-
cane' basketball league in
their new town. In fact, during
their three years in the
league, Nicky was named
MVP twice and Victor once.
It was there a coach by the
name of Ed Buckley first
.saw the younger Cortes on
the court and realized his
potential.
"I can remember Ed com-
ing and saying 'I just saw
probably the best sixth grader
I've ever seen in my life,"'
Nichols said.
Nichols had to go check
things out for himself and
wasn't disappointed.
'At that age he was just toy-
ing with everyone." Nichols
exclaimed.
Eventually Cortes made it
to Lecanto where he would
begin a remarkable four-year
career. After talking with
Nichols about his options,
Cortes and his coach decided
it was best if he played at the


junior varsity level during his
freshman year . where he
could gain more experience
and playing time.
"If you sit a whole year not
playing at all that could really
hurt your confidence," Cortes
said.
.And confidence was some-
thing the young star couldn't
afford to lose.
During his sophomore year
Cortes made an impact as a
"sixth man," bringing instant
energy and a scoring threat
off the bench. Victor, along
with senior Brian Hamer,
made up the Panthers' start-
ingbackcourt, which was fine
with the younger Cortes.
Nichols told him it wasn't
who started the game but who
finished it that was impor-
tant..and that's when Cortes
was able to make his mark
He averaged about 10 points
per game during the season,
which was fourth on a team
that won a district title and
advanced to the regional fi-
nals of the state playoffs.
Lecanto's great 2006-07 sea-
son ended on a sour note as
the Panthers were manhan-
dled in their final game by the
Atlantic Sharks, a much faster
and athletic squad.
"We weren't prepared for
it," Cortes admitted. '
And in the off-season
Cortes and his brother made
sure it wouldn't happen
again.
A noticeably stronger and
leaner Cortes emerged the
next season and, with his
brother at his side, helped
form one of the best guard
tandems in the state of
Florida. Together they aver-
aged about 42 points, 10 re-
bounds, 10 assists and, five
steals per game. The results
were an undefeated regular
season, the team's first ever
No. 1 state ranking and an-
other district title.
"Playing with Victor every
day in practice really helped
me out," Cortes said. "Every-
thing that I am is because of
him and vice versa.
"It's like he's my other half,
not even my brother."
If Victor is indeed like
Cortes' other half, then the
junior guard would certainly
have his work cut out for him
when his older brother
headed off to college.
Cortes knew he would not
only see more double and
triple teams but would also be
forced to embrace a leader-


ship roll on and off the court
"He struggled a little bit
with that," Nichols said of the
leadership roll.
It was clear as the season
began that Cortes would have
to elevate not only his game,
but also the play of his team-
mates if the Panthers were
going to be successful.
To no surprise Lecanto
struggled at times, partieu-
larly when Cortes wasji't
shooting the ball well. The re-
sult was an early-season loss
to Citrus, Lecanto's first regu-
lar-season loss in 40 games.
The Panthers would lose
two more games in the month
of December, both to quality
teams in the Kingdom of the
Sun tournament Cortes
scored 43 points against
Lakewood in the tournament,
tied for the fifth most in the
event's history.
The tougher competition
has always brought out
Cortes' best ,
"Nobody can stop me, I can
only stop myself," a confident
Cortes said. "I'm not being
cocky it's just the way I've felt
my whole life."
Cortes' squad lost three
more games the rest of the
way including the District 4A-
6 championship to West Port
and in the first round of the
regional playoffs. Despite the
losses, Cortes knows he has
emerged a better player and
now holds the school record
for points in a career
"I think I matured a lot not
having (Victor) here," he said.
"My basketball I.Q. also got a
lot better."
Cortes senior year was a
highlight reel into itself as he
averaged 28.4 points per
game, the second highest
point total in the entire state.
He also hit 38 shots from be-
yond the arc and made 151 of
his 209 shots from the charity
stripe.
Cortez will be moving on to
a new stage in his illustrious
basketball career this fall
when he moves on to Pasco-
Hernando Community CoP
lege before hopefully making'
his move to a Division I or- tl
college. He leaves behind a
legacy at Lecanto High
School that his coach thinks
will live on for quite some
time.
"He has pretty much lived
up to everything I thought he
was going to be able to do,"
Nichols said. "Probably sur-
passed it a little bit"


mp� auNUAT, 1� -, -.7 -_











,Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE GouT SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009 B5


Byron fit to be tied

Two golfers lead


after rounds at
4 Nelson champ.


Associated Press


IRVING, Texas - Rory Sabba-
tini has already won at Hogan's
'Alley. Now he shares the lead
Going into the final round at
, Byron Nelson's tournament
"'Anything associated with his
,'name would be an absolute
honor," Sabbatini said after a 5-
"under 65 Saturday .to keep a
share of the lead at the Byron
,Nelson Championship.
' Two years after his last victory,
't the Colonial where Ben
Hogan's larger-than-life statue is
prominent, Sabbatini is in posi-
tion to win again after five
birdies in a seven-hole stretch
midway through his third round.
, Sabbatini and John Mallinger,.
-who entered the third round tied
as co-leaders, both shot 65 to get to
13-under 197. That is two strokes
Ahead of three other players.
"Obviously got off to a good
.'start, just putting the ball in the
!,right spots, putting it on the
greens, hitting some good
,putts," Sabbatini said. "And
'then never really got anything
going until No. 5."
Even for the day until he got to
'the 174-yard fifth hole, Sabba-
"-tini's pin-high tee shot rolled
,,back and lipped the cup to set up
!a 3-foot birdie. He also had three
:consecutive birdies before mak-
ing the turn, capped by a 41-
Sfooter on the 427-yard ninth hole.
Mallinger, without a win in his
first 76 PGA Tour events, had his
,'second consecutive 65. The
,'bogey-free round was much dif-
ferent from Friday, when he had
two eagles., our birdies and
t-'.hree bogeys.
- "Today was the type of golf
that I like to play. Normally,
t hat's my game," Mallinger said.
-,"I kind of had a game plan going
,*in and I stuck with it I executed;
,',and that was the biggest thing.
Being the leader, it was always a
little different feeling."
Dustin. Johnson struggled
,after going 6 under through eight


Associated Press
Rory Sabbatini reacts after nearly hitting a hole-in-one on the fifth
hole during the third round of the Byron Nelson Championship at TPC
Four Seasons on Saturday in Irving, Texas.


holes. He shot 66 to get in at 11
under with D.A. Points (65) and
Brian Davis (66). At 10 under
were Kevin Streelman (64), Glen
Day (65) and Briny Baird (67),
who was 5 under through seven
holes before three bogeys in a
five-hole stretch.
Sabbatini, playing only ai few
miles from his home this week
and next at the Colonial, fhad a
season-low round of 64 Friday.
Now he has the best two-round
stretch of the season.
After his only bogey, when he
missed fairway at No. 14 and had
to punch out short of the water,
Sabbatini got that stroke back
with an 11-foot birdie at No. 15.


Sabbatini wore a pink ribbon
atop his cap, the symbol for
breast cancer awareness. Phil
Mickelson this week indefinitely
suspended his golfing schedule
following wife Amy's diagnosis.
"Phil and Amy Mickelson are
definitely forefront in every-
one's thoughts out here," Sabba-
tini said. "We all know that she's
a strong and determined person,
and she'll pull through it."
Mallinger made a 9-foot birdie
at the 528-yard third,and tapped
in for par on the next hole after
missing an 8-footer. Consecutive
birdies followed, and his only
other birdies after that came at
Nos. 14 and 15.


Miyazato, g pace Coming field


Associated Press

CORNING, N.Y. -
i-Hee-Won Han proved a
,prophet
', Four years ago, Han
..shot 10 under on the
-third round of the.
LPGA Corning Classic
c�and figured that feat
-was likely to be dupli-
"cated Saturday given
--the near-ideal condi-
-tion of the Coming
-Country Club course.
- She was so right.
On an amazing day of
-scoring, 19-year-old
AJapanese rookie Mika
--'Miyazato shot a 10-
:under-par 62 to tie Soo-
-Yun Kang of South
tiKorea at 17-under 199.
,They were one shot
ahead of 20-year-old
!Yani Tseng of South
K-orea, who also shot 10
under.


off the lead.
Eunjung Yi of South
Korea started shortly
after 9 a.m. and quickly
gave a strong'inkling of
what was about to un-
fold. She made three
eagles in her first five
holes to become just
the fifth player in
LPGA history to accom-
plish the feat on a
round.
Tseng was even bet-
ter, making two eagles
and four birdies on the
front nine for a 28. That
,was just one stroke bet-
ter than playing part-
ner Natalie Gulbis (66),
but it broke the tourna-
ment record of 29 set
two years ago by Wendy
Ward. It also made
Tseng just the ninth
player in LPGA history
to shoot 8 under for
nine'holes.


Minea Blomqvist (66)
of Finland was alone at
15, under. Mikaela
Parmlid (68) of Sweden,
rookie Vicky Hurst (63),
Katherine Hull (65) of
Australia, Sandra Gal
(68) of Germany, and
South Koreans Na Yeon


'"Casey up three strokes


mon European PGA Tour


Associated Press

VIRGINIA WATER, Eng-
Jand - England's Paul
I Casey shot a bogey-free 5-
under 67 on Saturday to
.stretch his lead to three
.strokes after the third
around of the BMW PGA
Championship at historic
Wentworth.
.,* Casey missed 4-foot
birdie chances on the last
two holes.
^ "They felt like two bo-
,geys," Casey said. "They
,were beyond my control. On
,18, I tried to hit it firm in the
middle. And it was heading
,firmly in the middle."
Then it veered off.
Casey had a 13-under 203
-total.
k Denmark's Soren Kjeld-
,sen (68) holed a 25-foot putt
from across the green at the
last to move -into second
,place, while Northern Ire-
,land prodigy Rory McIlroy
,iad the best round of the
week, a 7-under 65, to move
-into third at 9 under
"I had a really good ses-
,sion on the range, then
,every shot I hit was the shot
that I'd seen," McIlroy said.


"I was able to see fades and
draws and hit them where I
wanted to. It was nice to be
able to do that again."
Casey, who has already
won in Abu Dhabi and
Houston this year to climb
to No. 7 in the world rank-
ing, watched the tourna-
ment when he was a boy
and won the 2006 World
Match Play at Wentworth.
"The great players have
their names etched on this
trophy," Casey said. "For,
me it would be nice to get
my name on that Roll of
Honor. For me, that's the
biggest thing."
His 67 was more consis-
tent than his 67 Friday,
which included two eagles
and three bogeys.
"This was more satisfying
because there were no
dropped shots although
yesterday had the fire-
works," Casey said. "I've
battled the swing a little bit
and I hit a couple of poor
shots. I won't say I've got
total control of the golf ball
right now."
Ross Fisher (67) and
Charl Schwartzel (68) were
8 under


Choi (68) and Seon Hwa
Lee (68) were at 14
under.
Karine Icher of
France, who began the
day with a four-shot
lead, stumbled to a 74
and finished the day in
a tie for 17th, five shots


HP-Byron Nelson Championship
Saturday
AtTPC Four Seasons Resort
Irving,Texas
Purse: $6.5 million
Yardage: 7,166; Par 70
Third Round
Rory Sabbatini 68-64-65-197 -13
John Mallinger 67-65-65-197 -13
D.A. Points 68-66-65-199 -11
Dustin Johnson 68-65-66-199 -11
Brian Davis 68-65-66-199 -11
Kevin Streelman 67-69-64-200 -10
Glen Day 69-66-65-200 -10
Briny Baird 69-64-67-200 -10
Marc Leishman 68-70-63-201 -9
James Nitties 65-68-68-201 -9
Charley Hoffman 71-66-65-202 -8
Jeff Maggert 71-66-65-202 -8
Bryce Molder 68-68-66-202 -8
George McNeill 69-67-66-202 -8
Fred Couples 69-66-67-202 -8
James Driscoll 67-66-69-202 -8
Mike Weir 66-71-66-203 -7
Michael Letzig 68-68-67-203 -7
Scott McCarron 66-69-68-203 -7
Charles Howell III 66-69-68-203 -7'
Cr.hrie Wi 73-66-64-203 -7
r.crcoa- Thompson 73-66-64-203 -7
. Jul,,, Leonard 75-63-66-204 -6
rieve Marino 69-69-66-204 -6
jonair,rn Byrd 68-70-66-204 -6
jo,r,, Sernden 71-68-65-204 -6
.ie..per Parnevik 67-68-69-204 -6
Robertr Aienby 67-67-70-204 -6
Aie- CElea 69-69-67-205 -5
J 1 Hirry 71-68-66-205 -5
Robern arrigus 70-66-69-205 -5
Biad Adamonis 66-70-69-205 -5
S i i . ... ...-.........69-67-69--205 -5
Danny Lee 1 69-67-69--205 -5
Ted Purdy 74-65-66-205 -5
Kr, Brnvs 68-71-66-205 -5
N.airr,n Green 70-69-66-205 -5
Brian Baleman 69-70-66-205 -5
Ken DuKe 65-69-71-205 -5
ToTmTiv Armour III 67-71-68-206 -4
Jnr, Ro,:lins 72-66-68-206 -4
Davi, Lo.e III 73-64-69-206 -4
Vijay Singh 70-67-69-206 -4
Tim Wi'i nson 69-67-70-206 -4
Greg Chalmers 68-69-69-206 -4
Hunier Mahan 71-68-67-206 -4
David Marhis 72-67-67-206 -4
C..It Kno1t 67-72-67-206 -4
Jefftt Klauk 72-66-69-207 -3
Aaron Watkins 67-71-69-207 -3
Chris Riley 71-68-68-207 -3
Matt Kuchar 70-69-68-207 -3
Greg Owen 68-71-68-207 -3.
Martin Laird 72-67-68-207 -3
Matt Weibring 67-69-71-207 -3
Joe Ogilvie 69-70-68-207 -3
Notah Begay III 73-65-70-208 -2
Troy Matteson 68-69-71-208 -2
Chris DiMarco 67-69-72-208 -2
Ricky Barnes 69-70-69-208 -2
Rod Pampling 72-67-69-208 -2
Steve Flesch 70-69-69-208 -2
Jimmy Walker 71-68-69-208 -2
David Berganio, Jr. 72-65-72-209 -1
Todd Hamilton 71-67-71-209 -1
Shaun Micheel 72-67-70-209 -1
Harrison Frazar 73-66-71-210 E
Jay Williamson 68-71-71-210 E
Ben Crane 71-68-71-210 E
Kent Jones 67-70-74-211 +1
.Bob iHeintz 68-70-73-211 +1
Mark Calcave:cr 7,0- ' 5---213 *.3
James Oh 71-68-74-213 +3
Cliff Kresge 70-69-74-213 +3
Champions Tour
Senior PGA Championship
'Saturday
At Canterbury Golf Club
Beachwood, Ohio ,
Purse: $2 million
Yardage: 6,895; Par 70
Third Round
Michael Allen 74-66-67-207 -3
Tom Kite 69-70-69-208 -2
Jeff Sluman 70-68-70-208 -2
Tim Simpson 70-71-68-209 -1
Gil Morgan 71-68-70-209 -1
Larry Mize 69-69-71-209 -1
Bruce Fleisher 71-70-69-210 E
Joey Sindelar 69-72-69-210 E
Jay Don Blake 70-69-71-210 E
Don Pooley 74-69-68-211 +1
Fred Funk 71-71-69-211 +1
Joe Ozaki 75-67-69-211 +1
Mark McNulty 72-69-70-211 +1
Chris Starkjohann 71-68-72-211 +1
Bernhard Langer 68-70-73-211 +1
James Mason 71-73-68-212 +2
Mark James 69-71-72-212 +2
Tom Purtzer 66-72-74-212 +2
Ross Drummond 70-66-76-212 +2
Eduardo Romero 73-72-68-213 +3
Jay Haas 71-74-68-213 +3
Tom Watson 72-72-70-214 +4
James Blair 71-72-71-214 +4
Kiyoshi Murota 73-71-70-214 +4
Gary Hallberg 69-74-71-214 +4
Keith Fergus 73-69-72-214 +4
Russ Cochran 70-71-73-214 +4
Dan Foreman 70-70-74-214 +4
Scott Hoch 66-72-76-214 +4
Loren Roberts 73-74-68-215 +5
Ron Streck 73-74-68-215 +5
Mark O'Meara 76-70-69-215 +5
Walter Hall 72-73-70-215 +5
Bill Britton 75-70-70-215 +5


Dave Stockton
Roger Chapman
John Cook
John Morse
Jeff Roth
John Harris
Bob Gilder
Gene Jones
Hal Sutton
Costantino Rocca
Bob Tway,
Mike Goodes
Hale Irwin
Tom Lehman
Wayne Grady
Bobby Wadkins
Andy Bean
Bob Cameron
Mike Reid
Lonnie Nielsen
Kirk Hanefeld
Greg Norman
Ian Woosnam
Brad Bryant
Tom Wargo
Bill Longmuir
Allen Doyle
Mark Wiebe
Robert Gibbons
John Jacobs"
Vicente Fernandez
Juan Quiros
Chip Beck
Tom McKnight
Mike Smith
Dana Quigley
Sam Torrance
Jim White
Ken Green
Ronnie Black
Jim WoodwaYd
Fred Gibson
Jon Fiedler


70-73-72-215
74-68-73-215
73-69-73-215
69-72-74-215
74-73-69-216
72-74-70-216
71-74-71-216
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71-76-70-217
72-75-70-217
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75-71-71-217
70-74-73-217
75-68-74-217
71-72-74-217
75-71-72-218
74-72-72-218
72-73-73-218
74-71-73-218
76-69-73-218
75-70-73-218
73-72-73-218
71-72-75-218
73-67-78-218
74-73-72-219
77-70-72-219
72-74-73-219
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71-73-75-219
70-73-76-219
76-71-73-220
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69-75-77-221
70-71-80-221
74-73-75-222
72-74-76-222
75-71-76-222
72-75-76-223
73-74-78-225
72-74-80-226


LPGA Tour - Corning Classic


Mika Miyazato
Soo-Yun Kang
YaniTseng
Minea Blomqvi
Vicky Hurst
Katherine Hull
Seon Hwa Lee
Mikaela Parmli
NaYeon Choi
Sandra Gal
Ai Miyazato
In-Kyung Kim
Paula Creamer
Lindsey Wright
Suzann Petters
Hee-Won Han
Cristie Kerr
Natalie Gulbis
Mi Hyun Kim
Meredith DuncE
Helen Alfredssc
Song-Hee Kim
Jimin Jeong
Karine Icher
Meena Lee
Angela Stanfor
Becky Morgan
Sarah Kemp
Karen Stupples
Wendy Ward
Jiyai Shin
Brittany Lang
Ji Young Oh
Hee Young Par
Anna Grzeblen
Janice Moodie
Morgan Presse
Wendy Doolan
Michelle Wie
Se Ri Pak
Momoko Ueda
Nicole Castrale
Beth Bader
Teresa Lu
Stacy Lewis
Eunjung Yi
Amy Yang
Stacy Prammai
Jamie Hullett
Michele Redma
Lorie Kane
Haeji Kang
Jimin Kang
Pat Hurst
Sarah Lee
Reilley Rankin
Brittany Uncico
Allison Hanna-V
Russy Gulyana
Jee Young Lee
Kris Tamulis
Amy Hung
Marcy Hart
II Mi Chung
Sung AhYim
Shanshan Feng
Sun Young Yoo
Na On Min
Eva Dahllof
Anna Nordqvist
Alena Sharp
Rachel Hethieri
Maria Hjorth


Surprise, surprise: Alle


Golfer leads

after 3 rounds

ofSenior PGA

Associated Press

BEACHWOOD, Ohio -
After failing to win in 271
PGA Tour events, Michael
Allen figures he's due.
Getting a fresh start in his
senior debut, Allen shot a 3-
under 67 on Saturday for a,
one-shot lead. over Jeff
Sluman . and Tom Kite
through three rounds in the
Senior PGA Championship.
"These guys are great play-
ers and they have beaten me
for a long time, but maybe it's
my turn," said Alien, who
stands at 3-under 207 through
54 holes.
Allen, who turned 50 in
January, is an unlikely leader
in the tour's first major
championship of the year. He
swore he won't be shaken by
the major champions and
perennial winners who are
chasing him.
"I'm certainly not intimi-
dated. I guess when you're 50
you kind of lose some of that,"


Associated Press
Michael Allen watches his tee shot from the second tee dur-
ing the third round of the 70th Senior PGA Championship at
the Canterbury Golf Club in Beachwood, Ohio on Saturday.
Allen is alone atop the leader board at 3-under par after three


rounds of the tournament.
he said. "Out here I played
with most all these guys for
years and I know them all
pretty well. If there's any in-
timidation, I'm more intimi-
dated by the factors of
winning tournaments than I
am playing with the guys."
Sluman had the lead to
himself before bogeying the
16th and 18th holes, complet-
ing a 70 that left him tied with
Kite, who bogeyed the final
two holes for a 69.


"Pretty sadistic finish,
those last couple of holes,"
Kite said. "Obviously, it
leaves a bad taste in my
mouth for a little while. But
there's some range balls out
there that I'll beat some frus-
tration out on. Then we'll be
ready to go tomorrow."
Allen, who turned pro in
1984, deliberated whether to
play in this week's Byron
Nelson event on the PGA
Tour or to make his first foray


Saturday
At Corning Country Club
Corning, N.Y.
Purse: $1.5 million
Yardage: 6,223; Par 72
Third Round
70-67-62-199
65-69-65-199
68-70-62-200
st 65-70-66-201
70-69-63-202
68-69-65-202
67-67-68-202
d 67-67-68-202
66-68-68:--202
65-69-68-202
69-70-64-203
69-69-65-203-
66-72-65-203
67-69-67-203
sen 67-68-68-203
65-67-71-203
68-71-65-204
68-70-66-204
69-67-68-204
an 69-67-68-204
;on 67-69-68-204
67-68-69-204
66-69-69-204
64-66-74-204
67-72-66-205
d 69-69-67-205
69-69-67-205
66-68-71-205
73-68-65-206
72-69-65-206
68-71-67-206
70-68-68-206
70-67-69-206
k 64-73-69-206
70-71-66-207
69-70-68-207
S66-72-69-207
70-67-70-207
.73-67-68-208
73-66-69-208
72-67-69-208
66-71-71-208
70-66-72-208
71-70-68-209
71-69-69-209
71-69-69-209
68-72-69-209
nasudh 69-70-70-209
69-70-70-209
an 72-66-71-209
70-66-73-209
68-73-69-210
69-71-70-210
69-69-72-210
65-73-72-210
67-68-75-210
me 70-71-70-211
Williams 70-71-70-211
mitta 70-70-71-211
72-67-72-211
69-70-72-211
68-71-72-211
69-69-73-211
67-71-73-211
70-71-71-212
S69-72-71-212
72-68-72-212
67-73-72-212
72-69-72-213
69-72-72-213
69-71-73-213
igton 69-71-73-213
73-68-76-217


n on top

on the Champions Tour. So
far, he's made a wise choice.
"It was a little bit of a tough
decision," Allen said. "You
got a $6.5 million tourna-
ment, that's a big tournament
out there. But it was a tour-
nament that really hasn't
been great to me over the
years. So I thought that this
was really a nice opportunity
to come out and see how I
match up."
In 12 starts on the PGA
Tour this year, Allen has
made the cut in nine. His best
finish was a tie for 22nd at the
AT&T Pebble Beach.
He has won tournaments
as a professional before, tak-
ing the 1998 Nike Greater
Austin Open and the 1989
Bell's Scottish Open on the
European tour.
His 66 in the second round
tied the lowest of the day, and
his 67 on Saturday was again
the best in the field.
He was even on the day
through the first 13 holes be-
fore stringing together three
birdies.
A wedge to 6 feet set up a
birdie at the par-4 14th before
he birdied both of the back-
to-back par-5 holes on the
long and treacherous back
nine at Canterbury Golf Club.


GOLFLEADERBOARD


Associated Press
Soo-Yun Kang watches her tee shot on the 15th
hole during the third round of the LPGA Corning
Classic in Corning, N.Y., on Saturday.


jl _


SUNDAY, IMAY 24, 2oog B5


GOLF


, CITRusS CouNnm (FL) CHRONICLE


2


*


_ _












EPage B6 - 'iAYI A 24,2009


ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Aiken apologizes for
'colorful' critique
NEW YORK-Clay
Aiken says blood didn't
truly pour forth from his
ears when he heard run-
ner-up
Adam
Lambert
sing "Ring
of Fire" --
and hey,
he's sorry,
for his
"colorful
Clay choice of
Aiken words."
The former Idol con-
testant writes in a blog on
his Web site dated Friday
that "I obviously meant it
as a colorful statement to
imply that I did not enjoy
what I heard." He also
says he didn't mean it as
"a 'slam' on Adam as a
person."
He had blasted Lam-
bert's take on the classic
Johnny Cash tune as
"contrived," "awful" and
"slightly frightening."
Aiken says he hopes Lam-
bert can forgive him -
but adds Lambert proba-
bly doesn't care about
what he said.
Aiken lost out to Ruben
Studdard in 2003.

Springsteen to close
Giants Stadium
EAST RUTHERFORD,
N.J. - Bruce Springsteen
will be closing Giants Sta-
dium.
The rocker told fans at
the nearby Izod Center on
Thursday that he and his
"wrecking crew," the E
Street Band, will be the
final musical act before
the stadium is demol-
ished

ball sea-
son..

shows are
scheduled
B on Sept 30,
Springstee Oct 2 and
S~pr steenOct 3.Tick-
ets will go on sale June 1.
Over the course of
nearly three hours, Bruce
and the boys performed a
20-song show and:six en-
cores Thursday. They'll
return to the Izod Center
on Saturday.
Springsteen'has sold-
out 44 concerts at the cen-
ter and 16 at Giants
Stadium, making him the
area's top-selling artist.

Comedian won't
face assault charges
LOS ANGELES -
Prosecutors in California
say the wife of standup
comic Robert Schimmel
has declined press as-
sault charges against him.
Deputy District Attor-
ney James Garrison also
wrote in a charge evalua-
tion worksheet filed
Thursday that there was
not enough evidence to
charge the 59-year-old.
Schimmel was arrested
on suspicion of assaulting
his wife on May 2 at his
Calabasas home. She
later filed fpr divorce.
The comedian has been
a frequent guest on "Late
Night with Conan
O'Brien" and on Howard
Sternm's radio show. His
2008 memoir, "Cancer on
$5 a Day," chronicles his
battle with non-Hodgkin's
lymphoma.
-From wire reports


NBC on the ropes?

Network's new

season panned.

Associated Press .


NEW YORK - For a fourth-place
network that hasn't been a threat to
anyone but itself the past few years,
NBC sure drew a lot of negative at-
tention from its rivals when new fall
prime-time schedules were revealed.
Maybe they're actually worried.
NBC's decision to air a Jay Leno
comedy hour every weeknight at 10
o'clock overshadows 'anything else
broadcasters are planning for the fall
It could be an ingenious move, or it
could give CBS and ABC a better
chance at establishing scripted shows
in that hour and bury NBC deeper
Jimmy Kimmel, speaking during
ABC's presentation to advertisers,
said that NBC wouldn't let Leno
jump ship "even if they had to de-
stroy their entire network." Dawn
Ostroff, entertainment president of
the tiny CW network, reminded ad-
vertisers that it had as much
scripted programming as NBC.
CBS Corp. chief executive Leslie
Moonves, as he often has, really
knew how to stick the knife in.
"There's a difference between
the (broadcast TV) model being bro-
ken," he said, "and not being able to
find any new hit shows for years."
NBC is already warning that the
Leno move can't be measured like
most new fall shows, when two or
three weeks make all the difference.
Take into account what Leno does all
year, particularly when the other net-
works are showing repeats, said NBC
Universal chief executive Jeff Zucker
Because Leno's show will be much
cheaper to produce than scripted
dramas, it doesn't necessarily have to
win in the ratings to be a financial hit
. Leno may put on the quintessential
"aw shucks" demeanor, but he does-
n't deny the competitive challenge.
"That's what gives you the impetus


Associated Press
Comedian Jay Leno performs May 10 during the Jay Leno Comedy Stimulus
Plan show at the Roberts Centre in Wilmington, Ohio.


to go out and do what you do," he told
reporters. "To prove people wrong."
Finances played a big part in net-
work decisions, like when NBC can-
celed "My Name is Earl" and CBS
axed "The Unit" and "Without a
Trace." They'd reached the point
where executives considered them
too expensive to produce. But a
handful of creative trends emerged
that may bear watching:
SThe return of comedy: Broad-'
cast television comedy has been on a
slow decline, but NBC is in part sell-
ing the Leno move as counterpro-
gramming to blood and guts dramas
at 10 p.m. The network will air some
prime-time'"Weekend Update" seg-
ments with the idea that topical com-
edy is hot ABC is starting a comedy
night, on Wednesdays and aired one
of its pilots, "Modern Family," in full
for advertisers. It's flat-out hilarious.
* E Friday night lights: Broadcast-
ers have gradually been dimming
the lights on Friday, much as they
have largely given up on Saturdays.
With talked-about series like ABC's


"Ugly Betty," NBC's "Southland"
and Fox's "Dollhouse" on Friday
next fall, there seems to be more of
a competitive effort.
* Retreads: You may have seen
these ideas before. ABC ("East-
wick") and NBC ("Parenthood") are
turning movies into series. ABC's
"V" remakes a 1980s era science fic-
tion tale. CBS is spinning off "NCIS"
and Fox is spinning" off "Family.
Guy." The CW is making a new "Mel-
rose Place," to join its remake of
"90210." Oh, and it has a new series
about vampires. Each of the four
new comedies that ABC will air on
Wednesday features an actor who
has already found fame on a sitcom:
Kelsey Grammer, Patricia Heaton,
Ed O'Neill and Courteney Cox.
"Like clothing, there are really no
new styles," said Shari Ann Brill
analyst for Carat USA.
* Cougars: Cox in "Cougar Town"'
is an older woman new to the dat-
ing scene. Jenna Elfman in CBS'
"Accidentally on Purpose" picks up,
and keeps, a much younger man.


Susan Boyle gets another shot at stardom

Associated Press the shy Scot feted by nomenon that is YouTube-- could do something with my
celebrities, including Oprah it's now all over the world life," Boyle said.
LONDON - Britain's un- Winfrey and Demi Moore. and she's coping rather Since then, she's ap-
likely singing sensation The awkward-looking well," said the singer's peared on "The Oprah Win-
Susan Boyle, the frumpy Boyle, who says she's never brother, Gerry Boyle. "But I frey Show" and had a
church volunteer who been kissed, was greeted think some of the'reality is makeover, to tame her frizz)
wowed the world with her with giggles from a skeptical now starting to sink in." gray-tinged hair.
angelic voice, was on Satur- audience and eye rolls from The youngest of nine chil- "I think she is coping very
day voted into the next round the show's famously sar- dren, Boyle grew up in well at the moment, she is
of a TV talent show that pro- donic judge Simon Cowell Blackburn, a community of just Susan. Just as calm as
pelled her to global fame. when she appeared in April 4,750 people 20 miles west you like. Just carrying on as
The 47 year old, who lives - but startled viewers with of Edinburgh, in Scotland - normal," said Jackie Rus-
alone with her cat Pebbles in her soaring voice, a district blighted by unem- sell, manager of Boyle's
one of Scotland's poorest re- In an update on her Twit- ployment and crime. Boyle local pub The Happy Valley
gions, will now perform in a ter Web site, Moore wrote had learning difficulties as Hotel, in Blackburn.
live show on Sunday, weeks that Boyle's voice had a child and was bullied by Sara Lee, a spokeswoman
after her surprising perform- "made meteary!" other children. for "Britain's Got Talent'
ance of"I Dreamed a Dream" Cowell and his fellow As an adult, she's strug- said that Boyle's perform-
from themusical "Les Miser- judges said Saturday that gled for work but had been ance on Sunday will be
ables" shocked judges and Boyle is among 40 perform- a regular on her local available almost instantly
charmed tens of millions of ers they've selected to ad- karaoke circuit and per- on Internet, allowing her in-
people worldwide. vance in the competition. - formed in church choirs. � ternational fans a chance tc
Boyle's performance last Bookmaker William Hill In an interview with The watch the singer's latest ap-
month on the "American makes Boyle a' runaway fa- Associated Press atherhome pearance.
Idol"-style show "Britain's vorite to Win the final on last month, she said the death But she refused to say
Got Talent" has been May 30. of her mother had inspired. what song Boyle will perform
viewed almost 60 million "She had a tremendous her to enter the TV talent in the broadcast, which will
times on You Tube, and saw reaction because of the phe- show. "I wanted to show her I be screened live in Britain.


'CS writer sued over characters' names


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES - A cou-
ple sued a writer for the
CBS show "CSI," claiming
two shady characters on the
show were named after
them in revenge for a real
estate deal gone bad.
Real estate agents
Melinda and Scott Tamkin
on Friday sued writer and
producer Sarah Goldfinger
for defamation and inva-
sion-of-privacy. They are


seeking $6 million in dam-
ages, alleging the show hurt
their real estate business. I
Calls to Goldfinger and
CBS were not immediately
returned.
The Tamkins represented
the owners of a Los Angeles
home that Goldfinger
wanted tq buy in 2005, ac-
cording to - the lawsuit.
Goldfinger pulled out when
the sale was in escrow, but
there was no indication of
any animosity at the time.


The "CSI: Crime Scene In-
vestigation" show set in Las
Vegas featured a real estate
agent named Melinda, who
dies under mysterious cir-
cumstances, and her husband
Scott, a mortgage broker who
watches pornography, drinks
and is suspected of killing his
wife, according to the suit
The characters had the
last name Tamkin in an orig-
inal screenplay and Goldfin-
ger helped cast actors who
looked like the Tamkins, ac-


cording to the lawsuit. The
Tamkins claim the charac-'
ters' last name was changed
to Tucker at the last minute,
which they said was evi-
dence Goldfinger borrowed
details from their lives.
Anthony Glassman, the
Tamkins' attorney, said poten-
tial clients looking fortheir real
estate company could have
been deterred from contacting
them because episode descrip-
tions were online for months
before the program aired..


Bill Clinton's sax sold to benefit AIDS research


Associated Press

CAP D'ANTIBES, France
- Bill Clinton's saxophone
and Robert Pattinson's lips
have helped a star-studded
charity event raise.money to
fight AIDS.
An alto sax signed and do-
nated by the former U.S. pres-
ident was one of the star lots
at the Cinema Against AIDS
benefit on the sidelines of the
Cannes Film Festival, selling
for $180,000. There was also
keen bidding on two kisses
from "Twilight" star Pattinson,


which raised $28,000 each.
Sharon Stone hosted the
16th annual event late
Thursday at the exclusive
Hotel du Cap on the French
Riviera. Annie Lennox en-
tertained about 800 guests
who included Paris Hilton,
model Claudia Schiffer, di-
rector Terry Gilliam, rapper
50 Cent and scientist James
Watson, one of the discover-
ers of DNA.
Stone urged people to
give generously despite the
global economic slump.
"Looking down at the price


of my own shoes, we in this
room cannot pretend that we
have nothingto give," she said.
Organizers said the event
raised a total of $4.5 million,
compared with $10 million
last year.
Proceeds from the event
go to the American Founda-
tion for AIDS Research
(amfAR), a nonprofit organ-
ization that supports
HIV/AIDS research.
Guests had to pass through
police checkpoints to get to
the event, where they drank
champagne in the hotel


grounds overlooking the
Mediterranean before din-
ing on smoked salmon and
roasted sea bass.
Items on the auction blocks
included a Fiat 500 car cus-
tomized by Diesel, which sold
for $110,000; tennis lessons
from pros Monica Seles and
Jelena Jankovic, which raised
$50,000; and a handmade
Karl Lagerfeld guitar case
filled with Dom Perignon
champagne, sold for $70,000.
A special screening of
Quentin Tarantino's World
War II revenge caper "Inglou-


rious Basterds" raised $84,000.
Amid the auctioneering,
Lennox entertained guests.
The singer dedicated
"There Must be an Angel" to
amfAR supporter Natasha
Richardson, who died after
a skiing accident in March.
Stone said amfAR was set-
ting up a fund in Richard-
son's memory for research
on a cure for AIDS and do-
nated $50,000 to help it along.
"Natasha said that she
would go on until a cure was
found for AIDS," Stone said.
"I believe that she will."


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SO YOU KNOW
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numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, MAY 15
Mega Money: 2 - 19 - 33 - 37
Mega Ball: 17
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call (850) 487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, May 24,
the 144th day of 2009. There
are 221 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On May 24,1844, Sam(el'.
F.B. Morse transmitted th6
message, "What hath God"
wrought" from Washingtonto
Baltimore as he formally .
opened America's first tele-
graph line.
Qn this date:
In 1819, Queen Victoria:
was bom in London.
In 1883, the Brooklyn
Bridge, linking Brooklyn and
Manhattan, was dedicated by
President Chester Alan
Arthur and New York Gov.
Grover Cleveland, and
opened to traffic.
In 1941, the German bat-
tleship Bismarck sank the.
British dreadnought Hood in
the North Atlantic.
In 1962, astronaut Scott
Carpenter became the second
American to orbit the Earth as
he flew aboard Aurora 7. ,
In 1976, Britain and France
opened trans-Atlantic Con-
corde supersonic transport*
service to Washington.
In 1977, in a surprise .
move, the Kremlin ousted,
Soviet President Nikolai Pod-
gomy from the Communist
Party's ruling Politburo.
In 1980, Iran rejected a call
by the World Court in The
Hague to release the Ameri-
can hostages.
Ten years ago: A sharply
divided Supreme Court ruled,
5-4, that schools can be seOj
when officials fail to stop stu-
dents from sexually harass-
ing each other.
Five years ago: Presidert
George W. Bush sought to
reassure Americans in a '
prime-time address that he.
had a plan to pull Iraq out of
the violence and chaos that
had marked the year since ".
he declared an end to major
combat.
One year ago: Comedy
performer and director Didk
Martin of TV's "Laugh-In"
fame died in Santa Monica,
Calif., at age 86.
Today's Birthdays: Come-
dian Tommy Chong is 71.
Singer Bob Dylan is 68. Actor
Gary Burghoff is 66. Singer
Patti LaBelle is 65. Actress
Priscilla Presley is 64. Country
singer Mike Reid is 62. Actor-
Jim Broadbent is 59. Actor Al-
fred Molina is 56. Singer
Rosanne Cash is 54. Actress
Kristin Scott Thomas is 49.
Actor John C. Reilly is 44.
Rapper-recording executive
Heavy D is 42. Rock musician
Rich Robinson (Black Crowes)
is 40. Houston Rockets star


Tracy McGrady is 30. County
singer Billy Gilman is 21.
Thought for Today: "It i-"
the weakness and danger of
republics, that the vices as'
well as virtues of the people
are represented in their legis-
lation." - Helen Maria Hunt
Jackson, American author
(1830-1885).


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OMMENTARY___
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


DAVE SIGLERIChronicle


The exterior of Citrus Memorial hospital is seen Thursday.


The future of Citrus Memorial



should be of concern to all


H ere's why you need to
\ care about the future of
Citrus Memorial hospi-
tal in Inverness.
First and foremost,
CMH is the place where
most people on the east
side of our county go if
they have a serious
health problem. For more than 50 years, the
hospital has been growing with the community.
From a public policy standpoint, residents
need to be concerned because property own-
ers paid $11 million in local takes last year to
help the public hospital. When the nonprofit
hospital is not successful in growing its rev-
enues, the taxpayers of Citrus County will
make up the difference.
We are all stakeholders.
What most Citrus County residents don't re-
alize is that there is a five-person Board of
Trustees that oversees the operation of the
hospital. Those individuals are each ap-
pointed by the governor - in this case Gov.
Charlie Crist.
There is a second, larger board - the CMH
Foundation Board - that also oversees deci-
sions for the hospital. There are 13 members
on this board, including the five appointed by
the governor.
It is a little bit confusing.
What most residents also don't realize is
that there has been a lot of infighting going on
between members of these boards. There is
some serious disagreement over the direction
the hospital is taking by a few members of the
gubernatorial-appointed board.
There are a lot of politics, positioning and
pork that circulates around the issue, so I'll
try to keep it simple.
A group of well-respected Citrus County
physicians believe the hospital is trying to be
too competitive with them and is restricting
their efforts to earn a living. The physicians
are angry that the hospital has opened off-
campus facilities that directly compete with
doctor-owned facilities - and they contend
the hospital has an edge because it does not
pay property taxes. The doctors say they pay
property taxes, which help the hospital com-
pete against them.,
They feel like victims.
On the other side of the equation is the hos-
pital, which is trying like heck to just survive
in a very complicated and costly medical uni-
verse. CMH feels it's the victim because, over
the past decade, many physicians have started
up businesses that directly compete with serv-
ices offered at the hospital. Remember, it
takes volume for any business to survive, and
much of the medical procedure volume now
goes someplace other than the hospital.
In today's medical world, when a doctor or-
ders a colonoscopy, he will most likely send
you to his clinic rather than the hospital. The


same is true with dozens of procedures that
can easily be performed at outpatient facili-
ties. Much of the case volume that once went to
the hospital and created revenue now goes to
the doctors and the private, for-profit clinics.
In the United States, we have a free-enter-
prise system that permits entrepreneurial
doctors to take a risk and start a business.
This type of medical competition is now going
on all across our country.
. The doctors understand the competitive
situation they create for Citrus Memorial, but
they feel the public hospital would be more


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


competitive if it reduced its cost of opera-
tions. Using comparative data available from
the state, the doctors argue that the CMH staff
is too large and the costs are too high.
To be more competitive, the hospital has in-
stead expanded and is trying to keep Citrus
County residents using CMH. Hospital offi-
cials are currently constructing a new facility
on U.S. 19 at Sugarmill Woods, because they
are concerned that many residents seeking
medical care are turning to facilities in
Brooksville or Spring Hill.
The doctors argue that the Sugarmill effort
is another example of the hospital wasting
money and doing things that are not profitable.
You can. see that all of this is pretty compli-
cated and that two groups of very smart peo-
ple have very different opinions about what
the right thing to do is.
There is a very public problem in all of this.
Four of the five board members who are ap-
pointed by the governor are all up for reap-
pointment. One vacancy was created when
Dr. Ralph Rogers recently resigned. One cur-
rent board member, Bob Collins, was recently
notified that he had not been reappointed.
Two other board members, Deborah Osmond
Frankel and Alida Langley, are completing
their secondterms and by protocol are not el-
igible for reappointment.
Only board Chairman Dr. Upender Rao will


stay on as an active member while Gov. Crist
decides who he should appoint to fill the va-
cancies.
There's a whole group of Citrus County res-
idents who now want those appointments to
the Board of Trustees.
In the middle of this mess is Sen. Charlie
Dean of Inverness. Sen. Dean is a critic of the
hospital and will urge Gov. Crist to reappoint
Ms. Osmond Frankel to a third term and then
replace other board members with individu-
als sympathetic to his view. Ms. Osmond
Frankel was a large contributor to Sen.
Dean's re-election committee during the last
election cycle.
Sen. Dean recently convinced a Senate
committee to demand an audit of Citrus Me-
morial because he was unhappy with his in-
ability to get information he wanted on how
tax dollars were spent
The problem with all of this is that there
are a lot of vested interests involved in the ar-
gument Compromises are hard to find, and
it's very hard to do this when you have a
vested interest.
Gov. Crist should appoint members to the
hospital board who don't have a pony in the
race. All of the appointments will be Repub-
licans, because that's the way politics works.
But to handle these extremely difficult and
controversial issues facing CMH, it would
only make sense to have people on the board
who don't have a personal financial stake in
how the argument plays out. The Board of
Trustees should be made up of people who
represent the taxpayers and are driven by the
goals of providing excellent health care and
keeping the institution financially viable.
We'd also like to see the nonprofit hospital
operate with as few tax dollars as possible.
There are plenty of smart businesspeople
who would volunteer their time to serve. And
there may be some retired medical profes-
sionals or those in non-competitive positions
who could lend their expertise.
Taxpayers wouldn't be happy if County
Commissioner Gary Bartell owned a road-
building business or if Clerk of the Circuit
Court Betty Strifler operated a records-pro-
cessing company. The same should be true on
the hospital Board of Trustees.
Few pay that much attention to what hap-
pens in the managing-of CMH. But millions of
dollars in taxpayer money are on the table,
and greater accountability is necessary.
Before Gov. Crist runs off to the U.S. Sen-
ate, he needs to make sure Citrus County has
a viable and independent Board of Trustees
who can create a vision and business plan
that works for everyone.

Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. His e-mail address
is gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


The new COLA wars are just beginning


ANDREW G. BIGGS
Los Angeles Times

There's a cola war going on, but it
has nothingto do with Coke or Pepsi.
It began earlier this month when
the Congressional Budget Office
projected that for the first time in
three decades, there would be no
cost-of-living adjustment - or
COLA-- for Social Security recip-
ients in 2010, 2011 and 2012.
These adjustments are designed
to keep elderly Social Security re-


cipients from losing purchasing
power as prices rise, so it's not
surprising that the initial reaction
was one of concern.
"The absence of a cost-of-living
adjustment ... will be a shock to
older Americans already hit by
plummeting home values, invest-
ment losses and rising health
costs," The New York Times wrote
earlier this month.
Senior groups were predictably
up in arms. An AARP spokesman
moaned that "most seniors have


never been through a year in
which there was no Social Secu-
rity COLA." Some liberal bloggers
accused the Obama administra-
tion of betraying seniors. And
there's already talk of legislation
to address this perceived inequity.
But the outrage is unwarranted.
It's true that most seniors have
never faced a year without a
COLA, but that's only because
they've never experienced a year
without inflation, which is what
the Congressional Budget Office


says is what's happening now.
The COLA is not supposed to be
a "raise" in Social Security bene-
fits, even iCseniois often see it that
way. Rather. when the consumer
price index, or CPI, rises in a
given year, Social Security bene-
fits are adjusted upward to match
that rise in inflation. If done accu-
rately, the purchasing power of So-
cial Security benefits before and
after a COLA will be precisely the
same.
See COLA/Page C3


Charlie Brennan
SHADES
OF GRAY


Not a job for

thin-skinned

individuals
H e's a human being, not
a perissodactyl mam-
mal. He has no horns,
no snout, but says he has rhi-
noceros-thick skin.
Ladies and gentlemen:
Your almost-for-sure new
county administrator: Brad
Thorpe.
The rhino-thick-skin com-
ment came at the end of
Thorpe's meeting with the
Chronicle Editorial Board
this past week, when he ac-
knowledged that sharp criti-
cism will inevitably come in
the press and from the public.
Having been a county com-
missioner and, later, a county
department director, Thorpe
has a better sense than many
of how large the bull's-eye is
on the.back of any county ad-
ministrator. Serving at the
pleasure of a board of five
commissioners; , overseeing
hundreds of opinionated em-
ployees; serving a community
of 130,000-plus cranky resi-
dents; and being scrutinized
by the press makes for just a
little bit of pressure.
Add to that that county gov-
ernment needs to downsize to
fit its shrunken budget, and
the challenge qf the job seems
greater than ever.
Thorpe, however, is step-
ping into the position with:
* A good understanding of
Citrus County government
M A strategy in mind.
* An expressed willingness
to follow the direction of the
collective commission (and,
my guess is, an unexpressed
willingness not to get trapped
by individual commissioners
with personal agendas).
He said customer service
and stability of government
are top goals.
He wants to gain a vision for
county government from com-
missioners, then establish a for-
malized "mission" and execute
that through a "strategic plan"
with measurable-objectives.
Many in corporate America
as well as government have
grown familiar with "vision-
ing sessions" and. "mission
statements" and "key per-
formance measures." Clearly,
Brad Thorpe knows about
them, arid they are real - and
effective - tools for leading
any-organization,
A Chronicle coworker noted
that former administrator An-
thony Schembri talked of
these tools, as well. The tricky
thing for him, though, was
being the middleman, wedged
between the commission and
county staff.
Thorpe said his plan is to
examine the internal struc-
ture and processes in county
government - and he antici-
pates seeing a need to reduce
staffing. He said he'll look to
other county governments to
see what efficiencies they've
implemented that Citrus
County could adopt
Provided he and the com-
mission agree to terms of a
contract, within 60 days or so
of officially taking the job,
Thorpe predicts structural
changes will be made.
A somewhat light-hearted
comment Thorpe made
seemed right on target: If you
want to know how effective
operations are, listen to what
the senior secretaries say.
Somewhere between keep-
ing a light heart, an open ear
and rhino-thick skin, Brad
Thorpe just might be the per-
son to bring long-needed sta-
bility to the administrator's
office.

Charlie Brennan is editor of
the Citrus County Chronicle.
His e-mail address is
cbrennan@chronicleonline.com.


Wj~a ww-~awv^i^ *'1.^'-11-










Page C2 SUNDAY, MAY 24,2009


PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


EDITORIAL BOARD


Gerry Mulligan................... ................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ................................... editor
Neale Brennan ........promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ..................................managing editor
Cheri Harris.................................features editor
Curt Ebitz...................... ....citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ......................................citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson ....................................guest member


"You may dffer with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

COMMUNITY VALUES




Key Center




residents


make good






neighbors


ne of the things that the
community of Citrus
County has become
known for is that this is a spe-
cial place for citizens who are
developmentally disabled.
There was a dark time in
Florida's history when citizens
who had such handicaps were
warehoused in institutions and
denied the chance to live a nor-
mal life. They
were often over- THE I|
medicated and
denied even the Who h
most basic human right to
rights. neighb'
Over the past
three decades, the OUR 01
Key Training Cen-
ter in Lecanto has Key re
developed a na- have
tional reputation
as an educational and residen-
tial institution that helps the de-
velopmentally disabled live
their lives to the fullest. Hous-
ing, employment, education and
a future are offered. But the
most important ingredient is the
philosophy at the Key Center
that the developmentally dis-
abled are just regular people
who need to be treated that way.
As the Key's reputation has
grown, families from across the
country have moved to Citrus
County to take advantage of the
progressive services available and
the community's friendly attitude.
That's why we are disap-
pointed to report last week that
some residents in a Lecanto
gated community were object-
ing to the fact that the Key Cen-
ter had opened a foster home
in their neighborhood.
Over the past decade, the Key
has branched out from its main
campus to locate clients in
homes in residential communi-
ties. The philosophy is to fur-
ther integrate the


After-hours bus
It's Wednesday, it's 8 o'clock
(May 13), and I'm just wondering
why there's a school bus turning
off (County Road) 486 onto (State
Road) 44 at 8 o'clock at night with
nobody in it but the driver.
Just curious. Just wonder- C C
ing. You're talking about
cutting costs, then why is
this bus running around
empty? Shouldn't this bus
driver be at home right pr
now? I


Great ride


I



S
ri


U


After reading the paper GLL
today about the volunteer 563"
drivers and the Doctor
Ride program, I would like
to say I am a participant of the pro-
gram and I have never met so many
nice people in all my life. Consider-
ate, compassionate, very nice peo-
ple to help you and give you a smile
that sometimes we homebound
don't get. Thank you, Doctor Ride
program. You are wonderful and I
pray for volunteers for you.


developmentally disabled into
the normal fabric of life in Cit-
rus County. There are more
than a dozen homes in residen-
tial areas throughout the com-
munity, and the results have
been good.
The foster home in question
will house three clients and a
full-time administrator. The Key
paid $220,000 for the property.
Some residents
;SUE: in the gated com-
munity have ob-
as the jected to their
live in a new neighbors
rhood? and think they de-
served some type
INION: of advanced no-
tice. Some of the
idents critics are under
rights. the impression
that they have
veto rights on anyone who
moves into their community.
The laws are pretty clear on
this. The federal government
protects all citizens from being
discriminated against regard-
less of what others might per-
ceive to be a difference. The
federal government is particu-
larly protective of those with
disabilities.
Residents from the Key Cen-
ter are good neighbors in Citrus
County. In fact, when you read
in the Chronicle about some-
one shooting a neighbor's dogs
or someone battering a spouse
or someone selling drugs from
their home, it's clear that Key
clients make better neighbors
than many others.
We'd like to chalk up the con-
troversy to some folks having a
lack of understanding of the de-
velopmentally disabled and the
law. Citizens with developmen-
tal disabilities have as much
right as anyone else to live in a
gated community. That's the law.
And that's our community value.


Thanks, CMHS
I want to put a big thank you in the
paper for the Citrus Memorial hospi-
tal for taking care of me last week...
Big thanks on the fourth floor to the
doctors and the nurses ... Thank you
for getting me well.
JND Read it and weep
mFF I'm calling the Chronicle
in reference to Sound Off.
People keep complaining
about cutting the sheriff's
(office). Have they read the
Chronicle? Have they seerr
the increase in burglaries
and thefts? There's a big in-
)579 crease due to the economy.
The sheriff is doing a great
job. These burglaries and
thefts are only going to increase as
our economy gets bad. And those
people who are complaining, "Cut
the sheriff's department, cut the
sheriff's department," then when
they get (something) stolen or some-
thing's stolen from their yard, they'll
be the first ones to cry, "Where was
the sheriff's department?"


Arbor Day
More than 125 oak and drake
elm trees found a home through
the city of Inverness Arbor Day
celebration, which was held at
Liberty Park on April 24.
Residents, city officials, mem-
bers of Sumter Electric Coopera-
tive Inc. and others gathered to
recognize this important event
with the planting of a redbud
tree. Saplings donated by
Salmon's Wholesale Nursery of
Ocala were distributed.
The city would like to express
its gratitude to members of
SECO for assisting with the
event and educating the public
on proper tree placement
Salmon's is to be thanked for its
contribution of the mature trees
for our give away.
The city would like to thank
Kim Beebe and the Forestry Di-
vision for assistance with the
program and a grant for the pur-
chase of materials.
We also thank the Chronicle
for spreading the word about the
ceremony and distribution. We
would like to recognize the Deco
Cafe in Inverness for creating a
cookie and brownie tray for the
event
Thank you to our city council,
mayor, city manager, clerk and
other staff for their support of
this program, and to the dozens
of community members who
joined us.
David J. Pieklik
assistant director of Satellite Parks
city of Inverness

Thanks to all
On May 5, we were involved
in an auto accident at the inter-
section of State Road 44 and
Turkey Oak Drive.
We want to thank everyone
who helped us that day: a lady
from Inverness, who helped me
'so much but I neglected to get
her name; the paramedics, es-
pecially one named Fred, and
the courtesy of all the motorists
who were held up because of
the accident.


"The Lord so constituted everybody that no
matter what color you are you require the
same amount of nourishment."
Will Rogers, 1949


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Undoing a web within a web


DOUGLAS COHN
AND ELEANOR CLIFT
H house Speaker Nancy
Pelosi, D-Calif., has been
caught in the web of tor-
ture. First, the Bush administra-
tion's Justice Department
rendered an opinion that water-
boarding was not torture. Next,
waterboarding was used against
suspected terrorists at Guan-
tanamo and elsewhere. Then
came the Obama administration
and the closing of the Guan-
tanamo detention center and an
acknowledgement that water-
boarding is torture, followed by a
statement that no criminal
charges are being pursued. That
should have been an end to it It
was not
It was revealed that Rep. Pelosi
had been briefed on the matter in
2003. She denied this. Then she
admitted it, but claimed that
being told that waterboarding
was legal was not the same as
being told waterboarding was
being used. The hairsplitting was
not believed, but, once again, that
could have been an end to it.
Once again, it was not Pelosi de-
cided to go on the offensive,
claiming that she had been mis-
led by the CIA and the Bush ad-


Oth-heOICES


ministration, even going so far as
to claim they specifically told her
that waterboarding was not being
used. It is a claim that is looked
upon with incredulity.'
She has created a web within a
web, and as is often the case in such
situations, it is the web of her mak-
ing that is causing the most harm.
Politicians are not known for
their forthrightness, and Pelosi's
quibbling about the nuance be-
tween a briefing and an intent to
engage in the activity being
briefed was the sort of inside
Washington routine that the pub-
lic has come to expect and ac-
cept. But the new web that pits
her against the CIA is another
matter, especially because the
CIA is now run by the Obama ad-
ministration, and it flatly contra-
dicts her version.
Pelosi is an astute politician,
which makes it all the more diffi-
cult to comprehend how she man-
aged to take a one- or two-day bad
news cycle that put her at odds
with an unpopular prior president,
an unpopular war, and an interro-
gation policy that few support, and
convert it into a dispute with the
popular Obama administration.


Apparently, she perceived the
Washington infighting and back-
stabbing as larger than it was.
Her usually sharp political an-
tennae did not grasp that the pub-
lic had already moved on, and so
she counterattacked. It is now
time to retreat
We suggest a simple statement:
"In 2003 I1 was briefed by the CIA
about waterboarding and numer-
ous other interrogation tech-
niques. I did not automatically
assume that all of these methods
would actually be employed, but I
should have. And the CIA, like all
organizations, has articulate and
less articulate employees. In-
deed, I have been less than artic-
ulate in this matter. But let there
been no misunderstanding. I have
the highest regard for the-CIA as
an institution critical to the safety
of the nation and for the coura-
geous men and women who serve
the agency and the nation."
Web undone.

Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift
author the Washington Merry-
Go-Round column, founded in
1932 by Drew Pearson.


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the editorial board of the newspa-
per.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
I Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Mike Arnold at
(352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
e-mail. Names and hometowns
will be printed; phone numbers
will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
" SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

We also want to thank Dr.
Kolar, Rosemarie and Linda at
Seven Rivers hospital.Emer-
gency Room for their excellent
treatment.
Our heartfelt thanks to you all.
Dom and Bobbie August
Crystal River

History revision
In response to Kathy Do-
bronyi ("Same loud bray," April
28): Before attacking Republi-
cans and Ginny Brown-Waite for
"...helping to create the finan-
cial crisis ... and obstructing leg-
islation to help protect and
employ Americans," I direct
your attention to two sources:
Holmes, Steven A "Fannie Mae
Eases Credit to Aid Mortgage
Lending," New York Times, 30
September 1999; and Labaton,
Stephen, "New Agency Pro-
posed to Oversee Freddie Mac
and Fannie Mae." New York
Times, 11 September 2003.


The gist of the first source is
this: Fannie Mae was easing
credit requirements in response
to pressure from a variety of
groups:
* Clinton administration offi-
cials who wanted Fannie Mae
"to expand mortgage loans
among low and moderate in-
come people, especially minori-
ties. (How did Barney Frank,
Chris Dodd and Nancy Pelosi
miss this tidbit, since they
crafted it?)
* Stockholders "...who
wanted Fannie Mae to maintain
its... profits."
* Banks, thrifts and mortgage
companies ..."who wanted to fa-
cilitate more sub-prime loans."
Holmes wrote, "...Fannie Mae
is taking on significantly more
risk, which may not pose a prob-
lem in flush economic times but
... may run into problems...
prompting a government rescue
similar to the savings and loan
industry of the 1980s."
The Labaton article reports
on the efforts of the Bush ad-
ministration to create a new reg-
ulatory agency to oversee these
mortgage lenders.
Most significantly is this:
"Among the groups denouncing
this proposal were the National
Association of Home Builders
and Congressional Democrats
who fear that tighter regulation
... could sharply reduce their
commitment to financing low-in-
come and affordable housing."
Labaton goes on, quoting Bar-
ney Frank: '"These two entities
- Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac
- are not facing any financial
crisis,' said Rep. Barney Frank of
Massachusetts, the ranking De-
mocrat on the Financial Services
Committee. 'The more people ex-
aggerate these problems, the
more pressure there is on these
companies, the less we will see
in terms of affordable housing.'"
Guess the history revisionists
are alive and well and dwelling
in the Democratic Party.

Gerard Del Vecchio
Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


4


LETTERS X\ to the Editor


LETTERS to the Editor


1. -M
r a Slo,"


0










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE COMMENTARY SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009 ~3


If soda crackers don't have salt, are they still saltines?


I've made it abundantly
clear that I love my
transplanted Yankee
wife without reservation
and beyond measure.
It has been my life's goal
to provide the things she
and our family have needed
as well as most of the things
they've wanted. But in spite
of her desire for it to be so,
one thing I've thought I.
couldn't do was to support
Cheryl in her quest for the
title of "cracker."
Many native Floridians,
especially those of my vin-
tage, take pride - perhaps
too much pride - in their
heritage. Some of us con-
sider our crackerhood a sig-
nificant honor, a status


which isn't easily achieved.
I've always relied on the
standards passed down to
me by my father, who was
also a native Floridian -
according to him, either you
are a cracker or you aren't,
and the only way to be one is
that when your mother
pushed you out into the
world, she did so in the Sun-
shine State.
Up until most recently,
based on Daddy's definition,
I'd always told my sweet-
heart that even though she
is by far the best thing ever
to happen to me, she could
never be a cracker. I consis-
tently followed up by assur-
ing her I consider myself
incomparably blessed to


have her as the mother of Florida resident, either na-
my three little crackers, who tive-born or transplanted.
themselves have been fruit- I huffed and I puffed and
ful and added began work on a
six crackers plus . response in my
a Texan. But all r -. column or, at the
of this still was- very least, a call
n't enough- she 2 to "Sound Off."
was born in In order to solid-
Pennsylvania, ify my position, I
outside the decided to do
realm of sun, some minimal
sand and mos- research - I
quitoes, so a Fred Brannen looked up the
cracker she'd A SLICE word "cracker"
never be. A SLICE in Merriam Web-
Not long ago, OF LIFE ster's Collegiate
while reading Dictionary 10th
the work of another colum- Edition. To my dismay, the
nist, I saw what I considered foremost authority on words
heresy - the writer de- indicated I was wrong. Mr.
scribed a cracker as being a Webster provides a number


of definitions for the word
"cracker" (some of which
aren't very complimentary),
but the definition which is
on point stated that a
cracker is a native or a resi-
dent of the states of Florida
or Georgia.
Ouch!
Not only must I share my
birthright with transplants,
but with Georgians as well!
The silver lining behind
this cloud is I can now em-
brace Cheryl not only as my
soul mate, but also as a fel-
low cracker.
Even so, this recent reve-
lation brought to my mind
another cracker conun-
drum:
Sometimes I come in con-


tact with salt-free soda
crackers, ergo, saltless
saltines. They taste ab-
solutely awful. At the
restaurants Cheryl and I pa-
tronize, oft times these pre-
tenders are sitting right
there in the same basket
with the real things.
I'm rapidly coming to
grips with the concept of
transplanted Florida crack-
ers and now accept that the
nativity clause is unenforce-
able. But shouldn't soda
crackers be required to
have salt to be saltines?

Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
Chronicle columnist


Sad for students
This is in regard to
the contract renewal of
teachers. My daughter
has a teacher who has
tenure. He has been
teaching for many
years. He should not be
teaching anymore. He is
not a good teacher. He
doesn't enjoy the teach-
ing. He doesn't really
do a very good job of
teaching, and my
daughter struggles in
his classroom because,
of this. Whereas newer
teachers, who are more
up-to-date and they
work harder at keeping
their kids' attention, are
not getting renewed,
their contracts renewed.
And many of my daugh-.
ter's teachers like that
are gone now, yet we
have a teacher, who
does not enjoy teaching
anymore, who doesn't
really do much teach-
ing, able to keep his job
... He is not enjoying
teaching. He's been a
teacher for too many
years and is just bored
with it or tired of it.
Whereas these new
teachers who bring in
new ideas and work
harder at keeping the
kids' attention, their
contracts are not re-
newed. Yet they're the
ones who get the kids
excited about learning.
It's these older teachers
With tenure that are
bored with it. They're
just too old for it any-
more and they're still.
there and, you know,
the kids struggle in
their classes. Whereas
the new teachers bring
in new ideas and the
kids love it. It's really
sad for the students
and the teachers.
Seatbelt chase
Hey, it's about the
buckle-up law. I don't
understand. They're
saying it's about money
... It's not about safety,
it is about money. Now
if they'd have the kids
on school buses wear-
ing seatbelts and pro-
tect them, maybe they
can stop a school bus
and make a ton of
money. Want to hear
some irony about the
seatbelt law? I was in
Nevada a couple years
back and a motorcycle
cop saw me without a
seatbelt, so he started
chasing me. He had to
be going about 50 in a
35 to catch me and
stop me. He'went
through a red light and
I was up on a one-way
ramp to get on the free-
way and he gave me a


ticket and he turned his
motorcycle around and
went down the wrong
way off the ramp to get
back to his job.
Justify yourself
What's really sad is
every time you pick up
the Chronicle and read
the paper, there's some-
body complaining about
the sheriff's depart-
ment, about the Democ-
rats, the Republicans,
about the school sys-
tem, the administrators,
about the commission-*
ers. In most cases, their
complaints are justified
and correct. We are liv-
ing in the worst corrupt
society that exists. And
it's so sad because we
had everything going for
us. But there are some
people who want a little
bit more than others
and they don't believe in
equal shares and they
want their libn's share
of everything and to
heck with the rest of the
people. We'll never be
there to see it, but the
saving grace' of this
whole mess is that
someday when they're
all standing in front of/
their maker, they've got
to explain their exis- .
tence. And I woulig~i've
anything to be there just
to watch it because it's
going to be very interest-
ing to see how they re-
spond when they have to
justify their so-called
Christian life on this
Earth.
Breaks for bikers
In reference to Citrus
County becoming a cy-
cling Mecca: I think the
county ought to really
heed the bright horizon
on that issue and make
some serious conces-
sions in marking bike
paths, particularly at
intersections. I think
we should put in more
paved.bike paths, such
'as toward the beach on
Fort Island Trail. They
bring in a lot of money
and in addition to that,
we need the auto driv-
ers safe from impacting
these guys in un-
marked situations. So
let's give the bikers a
break.
Spend it on us
I justcalled on Friday
that they're sending
$240 million to
Afghanistan so they can
grow vegetables. Now
we're sending $110
million to Pakistan so
they have tents...We
should be'using that
money here for some-
thing for, you know,
Americans.


C7AH[K.
.-07n


Taxed enough
Be an optimist and support Barack
Obama's un-American, socialist
agenda? I'd rather remain anin-
formed realist As a former citizen of
Taxsylvania, formerly Pennsylvania,
'"I've seen how increased taxes can de-
stroy an economy. High taxes forced
the steel industry and jobs out from
Pittsburgh and placed them in coun-
tries like China and India. Areas that
have been consistently run by the De-
mocrats for the past 60 years, like De-
troit and New Orleans, look worse
than s6nre Third World countries.
' Now, Na cy Pelosi's Congress is
proposing increased federal taxes on
items most Americans use such as soft
drinks, sugar, gas, snacks, tobacco,
guns, electricity and alcohol. Every
consumer who uses these items will
pay higher taxes, regardless of their
personal income. So, basically, Obama
lied; your tax cuts died.
Americans already pay too much in
taxes. Nearly 90 percent of the taxes
we pay today didn't exist 100 years ago
and we were still a prosperous nation,
had no national debt, had the largest
middle class, and only one household
member had to work Today, Obama
and Pelosi demand nearly 35 percent
of our income. In comparison, God
asked for a "tithe" of only 10 percent
in the Old Testament, and has a better
track record than the liberals.
So why tax more? Social Security,
Medicare, the public school system,
FEMA, etc., are not underfunded, they
are mismanaged. No amount of money
will fix these agencies in their current
forms. Despite the trillions of dollars
spent on the war on poverty, the per-
centage of Americans living under the
poverty rate is about the same as in
1964. The U.S. military is the only fed-
eral entity that performs up to par.
Their victorious campaign in Iraq, es-
timated to cost $800 billion since 2003,
is "chump change" compared to the
tens of trillions dollars Obama is
throwing around.


Letters to THE El
There is no law that state
vidual can't give more money
IRS than what is demanded
als really feel that a "comm
ganizer" knows what's best
money, go right ahead, set a
and send extra money. Me?
enough already.


Bad delay
What was that? Some gro
to get around the Sunshine
quiring a meeting of those a
when the powers are trying
something past the taxpayer
tending to be supplying us v
mation on what they want t
our taxes at this tight time.
tipped their hand by the tin
picked to have their "telepl
ing"- 6 p.m., sure! Dinner
Fundraisers think that is th
time to call, too! Some grou
sell us on building a BART
Tampa? With money from w
They are paring us down to
We have lost essential servi
schools don't have proper fi
the services our kids need a
want us to go into hock for a
Before we should even li,
that snake oil sales talk, we
complete the Veteran's Hig
take that heavy traffic off o
county roads. Time and mo
been wasted on one feasibi
after another when we shoi
making our county conform
quirements to ensure that t
helps pay for a road that wi
eventually and the sooner i
the less it will cost.
Didn't all this futzing aro
give Sugarmill the time to b
lots that they knew would b
so they could collect more
got the check for land acqu
Why were permits even issi
those "condemned" lots? D
it's because they "haven't d


77og s


)ITOR


s an indi- the route yet." Who is kidding whom?
ey to the I'd bet they made their minds up a
1. If liber- long time ago and just haven't in-
unity or- formed us because they didn't;want
for their to hear the outcry from those af-
n example fected.
I'm taxed The longer the road is put off, the'
more expensive it will be for us to re-
Bill Ponko pair our local roads because of the
Dunnellon heavy traffic being dumped on U.S.
98, and that is going to cost our
county/us.

up trying Marie H. Peek
Laws re- Lecanto
affected
Sto sneak Important act
r? Pre-
ith infor- Dear Congresswoman Brown-Waite:
o do with It is with great disappointment to
o do with learn, yet again, you have voted along
They party lines with your recent "no" vote
ne they for H.R. 1139, COPS Improvement Act
hone meet- of 2009. Your continued partisan votes
t bme. of "no," especially with regard to such
e b est an important bill, are not in the best
p trying to interests of the citizens of District 5.
here? The National Sheriffs' Association
the bone. and others strongly urged for the sup-
ces, our port and passage of this bill. In these
ending for uncertain economic times, now more
and they than ever, with Florida counties cut-
a Bart line. ting budgets, we need these all impor-
sten to tant funds to hire additional officers.
need to This bill also covered grants for tech-
hway and nology and the hiring of community
ur local prosecutors.
ney have This bill passed by a vote of 342 to
lity study 78. You may have saved face with
uld be Rush and Newt, but have let down the
ito re- men and women that serve so will-
the state ingly every day to protect our commu-
ill be built nities, families and businesses.
t is done, I realize you have been very busy at-
tending tea parties. Perhaps it is time
und just to wake up and smell the coffee!
build on Homeland Security begins with Dis-
)e taken, trict 5, Ginny!
when they
isition? Deborah R. DeVito
ued for Chairman, Citrus County Democratic
don't say Executive Committee
decided on Hernando


COLA
Continued from Page Al

Under law, Social Secu-
rity benefits are not allowed
to outpace inflation except
in one special case: when
prices fall. That's because
Congress, leery of the polit-
ical consequences of cutting
anyone's benefit check,
structured the Social Secu-
rity Act so that when infla-
tion is negative, COLAs
don't go down, but they re-
main at zero. And when in-
flation is negative and the
COLA is at zero, purchasing
power is actually going up.
If retirees understood that,
they'd hope to never receive
another COLA
That's what's happening


now. Rising energy prices
drove the CPI sharply up-
ward last year, and as a re-
sult, seniors received, a
large 5.8 percent COLA to
compensate in. 2009. Since
then, however, almost that
entire CPI increase was lost
as energy prices dropped,
and the CPI is projected to
remain below 2008 levels
through 2012.
In a world in which policy
trumped. politics, falling
prices would lead to nega-
tive COLAs just as rising
prices lead to positive
COLAs. But that's not the
world we live in.
And there's another twist:
Congress also has ruled that
increases in Medicare Part
B premiums, which are au-
tomatically deducted from
retirees' Social Security


benefits, cannot result in
benefits declining from year
to year. If there is no COLA
this year, this implies that
Medicare Part B premiums
cannot increase either, de-
spite the fact that by law
these premiums must fi-
nance 25 percent of total
Part B costs.
Legitimate questions re-
main regarding Social Secu-
rity COLAs. Many
economists think that the
CPI overstates inflation; if


true, that means that exist-
ing COLAs are too high.
Seniors groups, on the other
hand, think that the CPI,
based on working-age
Americans' spending habits,
doesn't adequately address
seniors' heavy health care
spending. By that way of
thinking, the CPI may un-
derstate price increases for
seniors. But these matters
are entirely separate from
the COLA dispute currently
under way.


Groups such as the AARP
are surely aware that a zero
COLA actually means
higher real benefits and
lower Medicare Part B pre-
miums. But the AARP nev-
ertheless warns that seniors
"feel like they are falling be-
hind." That's irresponsible
- especially from such a
powerful lobbying organiza-
tion with the ability to
change the debate in Wash-
ington. If the AARP seeks to
be something more than a
mere "union for retirees," it
must use its considerable
influence more carefully
Inflation protection for
retirees is important, but it's
just as important not to in-
crease Soci4l Security ben-
efits and reduce Medicare
premiums when it's not nec-
essary - and when these


programs are, as the federal
government regularly in-
forms us, vastly under-
funded.
If Congress were to suc-
cumb to political pressure,
and provide a COLA when
none is needed, it would
only compound the prob-
lem.
One part of the solution is
to make sure retirees un-
derstand how inflation and
COLAs work A second part
is for Congress to say no to
powerful voting blocs when
they're out of line.

Biggs is a resident scholar
at the American Enterprise
Institute and was previously
the principal deputy
commissioner odf the Social
Security Administration.


Sound OFF


In a world in which policy trumped
politics, falling prices would lead
to negative COLAs just as rising
prices lead to positive COLAs.
But that's not the world we live in.


~


1111111111--^"11~--~-~111111


SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009 C3


COMMENTARY


OnusLI COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


:1-71






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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C N CTUNDRUS, iMA Z, CONT ()


CSA SUNY MAY, 242009


Buy an
Paying attention to
what is going on with
the auto industry? If
not, you might want to brush
up on the new Corporate Av-
erage Fuel Economy stan-
dards (CAFE) that Congress
is mandating.
In the late 1970s, America
experienced an oil shortage
as the result of an OPEC em-
bargo. The president and
Congress, rather than let-
ting prices rise so that there
would be more supply, fixed
prices of gasoline and heat-
ing oil and told Americans
to drive less and wear a
sweater when it got cold. I
well recall being able to buy
gasoline only on my permit-
ted day and waiting in long
lines.
Congress wisely deter-
mined to prevent this from
happening again. It opened
up the offshore and govern-
ment properties to drilling,
gave tax subsidies to oil
companies to encourage ex-
ploration and eased the per-
mits for new refineries.
Not! It created the waste-
ful Department of Energy
and hired federal bureau-
crats to distort the market It
established incentives for
alternative energy. (Sound
familiar?) And it passed the
original CAFE legislation to
force automobile manufac-


SUV while you still can


turers to produce cars that
got more miles per gallon -
and which nobody wanted
to buy. The automakers
asked to import small cars
from their cost-efficient
overseas plants to satisfy
CAFE. But, no, as
a favor to the
United Auto
Workers, Con-
gress said the
fuel-efficient cars
had to be manu- J
factured in the
USA- at a loss.
The Japanese
automakers loved Dr. Willia
it! Small was OTn
them. The Ger-
mans just said "to VOI0
hell with it," paid
millions yearly in fines and
produced big cars that sold
very well and took Ameri-
can market share. Light
trucks and SUV's were not
originally covered by CAFE.
They were the source of
profits that kept the "big
three" auto companies alive
while they lost money on the
fuel-efficient cars Congress
demanded.
When gasoline hit $4.50
per gallon in 2008, people
were shocked. Why the sur-
prise? Congress and its
"green" supporters had re-
stricted e ploration for oil
and gas, brought suits


against new coal-fired
power plants and made nu-
clear power plants nearly
impossible to build.
Congress says self-suffi-
ciency in energy is part of
national security. All agree.
Its solution: Con-
tinue restrictions
on exploration.
Hold up licens-
ing of new nu-
clear plants.
Build windmills
(where is Don
Quixote when we
need him?).
im Dixon Spend billions on
ER boondoggle alter-
native energy
CES programs. And,
add light trucks
to an unachievable increase
in the CAFE standards to anl
average 39 miles per gallon
by 2016.
So, the same folks who
regulated the automakers
into bankruptcy and now
own two of them are de-
manding they manufacture
more fuel-efficient little
greenf" coffin-cars that you
won't buy! Doesn't matter
that the highway death toll
will rise or that this will do
nothing for energy inde-
pendence.
Congress knows you won't
drive one of these things un-
less gas prices stay above $5


a gallon. Given our lack of
exploration for new oil at
home, prices will surely rise
once the economy recovers.
But, if they don't, you can be
sure Congress will pass a
gasoline tax to get to $5 per
gallon to force your choice.
My advice is don't buy
them. Full-sized cars and
light trucks are more com--
fortable and much safer in a
collision. You can even take
your family on a trip in one
load - with luggage! I
wotld justify the cost of the
extra gas it uses as the price
for safety. And I'd drive less.
Might be a good time to buy
a sedan or SUV before they
are banned or neutered.


William Dixon graduated
from Columbia College in
New York City, from New
York Medical College and
from the College ofBusi- '
ness Administration at the
University of South
Florida. He was an assis-
tant professor at the Uni-
versity of Georgia and he
has worked in the veterans
administration system. He
served 11 years in the Army
as a surgeon and as special
forces officer, achieving the
rank of lieutenant colonel.
Dr Dixon can be reached
at Wdixonl6@yahoo.conm.


Sound OFF


Squirrely
My neighbors don't like it
that I feed the squirrels.
They say-the squirrels will
get on their roof and go in
their attic. Wow, that's
frightening. I think we
should also, be allowed to
feed the alligators and
bears and even mountain
lions. People say, "Oh,
they're dangerous, then
they get too close to peo-
ple, not afraid of them."
Yeah, well, what creatures
kill the most humans on
the planet? Duh - other
humans, millions of them
every year. Humans are the
dangerous creatures. Let
me feed the squirrels and
>the alligators and the
mountain lions. These peo-
ple that don't.like that, they
want to just pave-the world.
They probably don't want
any trees on the planet.
Then we'd all be dead,
which is more humans
killing humans.
Worst hypocrisy
This is titled "The mana-
tee escape." We are fast
approaching a holiday'
-weekend that invokes a
butchery speed limit on '
King's Bay. Is there anyone
out there who can commu-
nicate this. to the manatees
who are hiding on the
shoreline? Many of them
would like to cross the bay
en route to the gulf without
being lacerated. To label
this area as "Nature Coast"
is hypocrisy at its best -
or I should say, the worst.
Avoid the bay
This is titled "The Wild
West." I don't blame the
sheriff's department or the


marine patrol for avoiding
King's Bay on the weekend.
Frankly, it's far too danger-
ous. For you underaged
drinkers, the shallows is
the place to be.'.
Veggie tales
I just wanted to say
$250 million to
Afghanistan so they can
plant vegetables. I wonder
what we could have done
over'here with that $250
million with everybody un-
employed and the country
going broke. I just don't
understand.
Too wet
I just read that they're
toughening the burn ban.
We have had 12 inches of
rain in the last five days
and it's still raining. What
will it take to end this ban?
Be hard to violate it now.
Everything's too wet to
burn.
Call Fasano
If you want information
concerning the Progress
Energy surcharge, why are
you calling Sen. Dean's of-
fice? When this first came
to light, he blew the citi-
zens off and told us he had
nothing to do with it and he
couldn't be bothered. He
didn't take credit for any-
thing until after Mike
Fasano started finding
problems and getting re-
suIts. Why don't you call
Mike Fasano?
Want my cards?
Once again I'd like to ask
this: Is anybody interested
in collecting Christmas
cards? I have some really
beautiful ones. Would you
call 637-5590?


Teeth first
Regarding the free dental
clinic that was in the paper,
the Chronicle, on Thursday,
May 7: It claims that over
200 people showed up and
needed dental care. Some
even spent the night. Ac-
cording to Judy Tear,
spokeswoman for the
health department, she
said it showed a great need
for this dental service. Now,
about the "free" part: Costs
were said to be over
$15,477, including $6,335
in staff salaries. It was my
understanding these staff
services, including the den-
tist, were free. So why was
there $6,300 worth of staff
salaries? Also, the same
page of the Chronicle
stated that the (Inverness)
City Qouncil voted to build
a gazebo and stage at Lib-
erty Park for $63,000. That
seems unnecessary when
we could take care of
much-needed dental work
... It seems unnecessary
for the city council to have
passed a bill to build a
gazebo and stage at Lib-
erty Park for $63,000. That
would make still a lot of
dental work for the needy
people. Shame on the
county for putting enter-
tainment ahead of pain
and suffering for our low-in-
come people. Of course we
need more dental services.
Please help those who
need it.
Severe and illegal
In a recent Sound Off, a
woman called in sympa-
thizing with the man who
shot his neighbor's dog.
She said he had no re-
course but to shoot the


dog. Excuse me? Not. only
was this an act of severe
cruelty, but it's illegal. He
broke the law. Violence
never solves a'problem; it
only causes more prob-
lems. He could have called
Animal Control or the sher-
iff's department. Perhaps
he should consider a deed-
restricted community
where pets aren't allowed.
This lady also referred to
herself as a dog lover...
Lights on, please
It's amazing. I'm driving
through Inverness right
now in the rain and it's
amazing how many igno-
rant people in this county
don't realize that you
must have your headlights
on when you're driving in
.the rain. At least five of
the vehicles I saw, they're
driving (with) no head-
lights on with cell phones
in one hand and trying to
drive a car in the 'rain with
the other hand. I just don't
understand how ignorant
people can be in this com-
munity, knowing that the
laws are there to protect
them and other drivers
around them, yet they
don't even care about
what happens to them.
Arid they're the ones that
will probably wind up
killing somebody else and
they'll get off scot-free
and they won't get hurt. I
wish the police in this
community would take
some positive action and
start clamping down on
this stuff. You know,'
there's supposed to be
enough deputies out there
to enforce the law. So let's
get out and enforce some
of these.


a
{


Mattress, Copper Kettle
Floral & Gift Shop, Crys-
tal Motor Car Co., Crystal
River Aero Group, Crys-
tal River Firestone,
Cumberland Farms, Cus-
tom Jewelry Creations,
Dave's Body Shop,
Debe's Herb Garden,
Dick's Moving Service,
Dockside Shoppes,
Linda Witherow, D.M.D.,
Eades Fine Arts Studio,
Easy Living Furniture,
El Diablo Golf Club,
Evans Nursery Inc.,
Florida Tax Advisory
Service, Frame Designs,


Many thanks
The Women of Sug-
armill Woods wish to ac-
knowledge and thank
our business partners
who have supported our
fundraising efforts for
this club year. Many of
these businesses have
supported our efforts for
many years and others
are newcomers helping
us fulfill the WSW mis-
sion, "to enhance the
quality of life in our com-
munity." The major
fundraisers this club
year included our Fash-
ion Show in November,
the "Schoolastic" Golf
Tournament in February,
and our Trash and
Treasure Sale in March.
Without the support of
our local businesses and
many WSW volunteers,
we would be unable to
continue our tradition of
providing scholarships
and donations to local
charities.
Six scholarships were
awarded to Citrus
County students at our
April club luncheon.
Awards are based on fi-
nancial need, scholastic
achievement and com-
munity service. The six
outstanding young peo-
ple will attend Florida
colleges to pursue stud-
ies in business, educa-
tion and medicine.
Community donations
were presented at our
May luncheon meeting to
CASA, Homosassa Li-
brary, Homosassa Civic
Association, Eckerd
Youth Alternative Camp
E Nini Hassee, Isaiah
Foundation and The
Path Homeless Shelter.
These fine organizations
provide a variety of serv-
ices to Citrus County and
are to be commended for
their outstanding efforts
to help and support so
many individuals in
need. The donations will
be used to fund a spe-
cific project as outlined
in the grant request sub-
mitted to WSW
The following busi-
nesses helped WSW pro-
vide $28,050 in
scholarships and dona-
tions. to community or-
ganizations. Please
check our website
www.womenofsugarmill-
woods.com for pictures
of our April scholarship
awards, May grant
awards and other events
for this club year.
Major sponsors: Black
Swan Spa, Bush Pest
Control, Citrus County
Chronicle, ERA Key 1
Realty Inc., Jones Ap-
parel Group, Justin Case
Automotive Repair, Shel-
don-Palmes Insurance
Inc.,.StaffMD Inc., Sweet-
water Homes Realty Inc.,
Tally-Ho Vacations, Vil-
lage Cadillac-Toyota,
Walmart, Homosassa,
Walmart, Inverness, and
Wilder Funeral Home.
Advertisers and spon-
so6rs: AAA Roofing, Aard-
vark's Florida Kayak, '
Access Healthcare, Ad-
vance Auto Parts,
Alexander's Flowers &
Silk Designs, American
Pro Diving Center, Anson
Nursery, Apollo Uphol-
stery, Bank of America;
Bay Area Air Condition-
ing & Heating, Bealls,
Bell's Bridal Works, Bet-
ter Health Chiropractic,
Brian P O'Sullivan,
D.M.D., Bright Now Den-
tal, Brooksville Hospital,
Cabbage Palm, Carol
Ann's Interiors, Charles
D. Thomas, D.M.D., Chas-
sahowitzka Hotel, Citrus
County Parks and Recre-
ation, Citrus Memorial
hospital, Citrus Paint &
Decor, Citrus Pet Resort,
Citrus Springs Golf Club,
Color Country Nursery &
Garden Center, Comfort


just a little over the top?
There is an average of
only 44 lightning-caused
deaths annually in the
U.S. and that's out of a
population of over 300
million. Figure the per-
centages!
Guess you folks had to
find something to worry
about other than the
"swine flu pandemic."
Come on, get real!
Dave Martin
Homosassa


= Letters to THE EDITOR


�1111~


IDEMOCRATS1


CITRUS CouNTY (FL CHRONICLE


COMMENTARY


Georgieos Hair Designs,
Glen C. Abbott, Attorney
at Law, Golf, Etc., Gulf
Coast Ford, Hair By
Mare, Harley-Davidson,
Hearth & Home Interi-
ors, Helen's Nursery,
HERS Workout Express,
Homosassa Butterfly,
Homosassa Game Fish
Club Inc., Homosassa
Open MRI, Homosassa
Springs Florist, Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park, Homosassa
Tire & Auto Repair,
Ideal Health Massage
Therapy, J.C. Penney,
Jennifer Ardolino
Gallery, Jim Green Jew-
elers, Kane's Ace Hard-
ware, Kelley Cellular,
Knightly Auto, Koffee &
More Caf6, La Boutique,
L.A. Nails & Spa, Life
Care Center of Citrus
County, Linda's Groom-
ing, Lorna Jean Gallery,
LPGA, MacRae's Of Ho-
mosassa, Magnolia Hair
Studios, Manatee Bowl-
ing Lanes, Manatee Toy
Company, Mary Slinkard,
Midway Animal Hospi-
tal, More Than A Tan,
Mr. Robert White,
Munro's Landscaping &
Water Gardens, Noble's
Marine, Oak Hill Hospi-
tal, O.PI. Nails and Spa,
O'Connell's Landscaping
& Nursery, Pack-N-Post,
Pawfection Ranch,
Pinch-A-Penny, Planta-,
tion Inn, Plantation
Rentals, Professional
Appraisers & Liquida-
tors, LLC, Publix, Qwik
Pack & Ship, Ren-
dezvous Beauty Salon,
Revolution Health & Fit-
ness Center, Richard C.
Swanson,
D.M.D., River Safaris,
Riverside Resort, Robert
C. Christensen, Esq.,
Sam's Club, Seven
Rivers Regional Medical
Center, Sheriff Jeffrey
Dawsey, Slaymaker &
Nelson, Southern Sun
Title Co., Southern Tra-
ditions, Specialty Gems,
Strickland Funeral
Home, Sugarmill Woods
Country Club, Suncoast
Animal Clinic Inc., Sun-
coast Plumbing & Elec-
tric, Surfaces Flooring ;
Inc., Sweetbay, The Cot-
tage Framer, The Finan-
cial Sense People, LLC,
The Hagar Group, The
Show Palace, The Travel
Authority, Tiffany Wigs,
TLC Rehab, TLC Vaca-
tion Watch & Kennel,
Tropical Windows,
Twisted Oaks Golf Club,
Val's Boutique & Spa,
Vertical Blinds of Ho-
mosassa, Vesta Title, Via
Viente, Winn-Dixie,
World Woods Golf Club,
Yai Yai International
Style Lounge.
Restaurants: 44 Bistro
& Grill, Acapulco Bar &
Grill, Applebee's, Bare
Bones, Beef O'Brady's,
Caf0 of the Avenue,
Chili's, Crackers, D-Lites
Ice Cream Emporium,
Emily's Family Restau-
rant, Glen Lakes Country
Club, Harrington's,
Honey Baked Ham,
Mama D's Restaurant,
Marguerita Grill,
Moschello's, Neon
Leon's Zydeco Steak-
house, Panera Bread
Company, Peck's Old
Port Cove, Pizza Hut, Ho-
mosassa, Pizza Hut,
Crystal River, Starbucks
Coffee, Subway, Sug-
armill Woods Country
Club, The Olive Tree,
Water's Edge, Z Chefs
Restaurant
Linda Swart
Director of fundraising,
Women of Sugarmill Woods

New worries
Couldn't help but com-
ment on the "Clay's info
for residents" suggestion
on (a recent) front page
article. Is the suggestion
to "Stay inside for at least
30 minutes after the last
thunder is heard" not








C~p'CONY(F)CROIL CMETAYSNDY AY2,209C


SoundOFF


Kudos to Charlie
I'm reading today's paper,
Thursday, May 14, and
there's a story right on the
cover about state Sen. Char-
lie Dean and the Florida
Water Management District
executive fixing the sinkhole
that's been sucking 1.7 mil-
lion gallons of water a day
from our lakes. A lot of peo-
ple are very cynical in this
world, and I'm one of them.
But I would just like to point
out that even when Sen.
Dean was the sheriff, he was
so concerned about our citi-
zens and our lakes and our
beautiful landscaping, that
he went out there himself 15
or 20 years ago with a shovel
and cement and he and five
or six other guys used their
hands and built a block to
that sinkhole. So this isn't
some political move by him
to get himself in the newspa-
per. He really is concerned -
and I have no relationship
with Sen. Dean whatsoever...
I have no connection with
Sen. Charlie Dean. When I
was younger, he put me in
jail several times for driving
with a suspended license.
But I have a long memory
and I remember when he
was sheriff, he went out there
with a group of men with just
shovels and concrete and ac-
tually built a dike around that
hole that was letting the
water disappear down the
sinkhole. That's to be com-
mended. I mean, anybody
that's willing to get himself
dirty for that. And he was the
sheriff then; he wasn't even a
senator. So kudos to Sen.
Dean and his continued care
of our wetlands and also of
our county. Thank you very
much, Sen. Dean.


Credit for God's work
I was calling about the ar-
ticle on the earthen berm on
the Morrisorr Pool sinkhole.
My question might be more
where was the water going
that ,was going into the sink-
hole if not to recharge the
aquifer? There's no way that
they can make new water by
repairing a berm. The ques-
tion is: Was the sinkhole not
part of the system that
recharges the aquifer that
people's wells depend on? I
somehow think that them
taking the credit for making
new water is taking credit
for something that God
does, in a way. That's my
comment.


Price tag
Smoking comes with a
price tag. For an example:
Smoking in and around
your children, you're teach-
ing your children to smoke.
So don't tell your children
or your teens n6t to smoke
dope and sit there in front
of them smoking. You are a
hypocrite and your breath -
stinks. The same thing
about your beer. Don't tell
your kids not to drink beer
and your refrigerator is full.
of the swill. The day will_.
come when this will cost
you a price tag. Just look at
'the news every day; a drunk
hits and kills some innocent
person. Welcome to jail.


Making sense?
Reading about the Hot
-Corner about seatbelts
makes a lot of sense. The
state passes a law where
you have to wear a seatbelt
now, but they also passed a
law a couple of years ago -
or, excuse me, not passed a
law, but - saying that you
don't have to wear motorcy-
cle helmets anymore. Makes
a lot of sense, don't it?
Brown bagging it
This is to the person who
stole my lunch off the pas-
senger seat of my car when I
went in to pay for my gas at
the RaceTrac on (U.S.) 19: I
hope you choked on it.


Spaced out
Reading the paper again,
we're not getting a raise in
Social Security for the next
couple years. They're cut-
ting Medicare, cutting So-
cial Security, cutting
education, cutting all
health care, but here we're
spending $1 billion to send
the shuttle up to fix the
Hubble. Let's fix America
before we start fixing the
out-of-space problems.
There are people out of
work, there are people
starving, people with no
medical care and no hous-
ing. Let's fix the problem
here in America. Cut the
space program. .


Plenty of room
Reply to "Give it a rest:"
How nice that you have a
$200,000 house and three
cars that you pay taxes on,
and how nice that you're
able to ride the trail for ex-
ercise. I also pay taxes on
my $400,000 house, two
cars and a boat. I would
love to ride a bike, but a
back problem keeps me
from doing so. Therefore, I
need my car. When I cannot
find a space to park on and
one is being used for your
bike, I have to shop and eat
elsewhere. I would suggest,
because you are able, that
after riding the trail, you
park in the city lot and walk
the block to downtown for
even more exercise. The
bike racks do not need to
be on the grass or take up a
parking space. There is
plenty of room on the newly
widened sidewalk next to
the other bike rack.
Init together
It seems very odd to me.
Right now I'm In and out of
a job. I've been. laid off. Had
a job, got laid off. But what
really annoys me is when I
keep hearing about the poor
car people, the poor dealer-
ships, the people that will
'lose jobs at the dealerships.
You know what? We're all in
the same boat together and
I don't understand why the
auto business is'any differ-
ent than any other business
in this country and why we
need to save every one of
them. Excuse me, there's a
bunch of us people out here
out of work, and been out
of work. You're no different
than anybody else. So live
with it. Deal with it.


SUNDAYu, MAY 24, 2009 C7


COMMENTARY


CrfRUS COUNTY (FL ONICLE


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b


CS SIiNDAY MAY 24 2009


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


%rw au�-., - -, -7


I









B Sectioiln D SUNDAY, MAY24,2009



BUSINESS


TREVOR DELANEY
AP personal finance editor
NEW YORK - Mutual
fund managers are human
too. Their nerves can be
frayed by a volatile market
just like the rest of us.
"There's a difference.be-
tween feeling emotional
and acting emotionally,"
said Steve Romick, manager
of FPA Crescent fund, "so
my investment actions are
clinical."
It's a calm reserve that
you would expect to hear
from the manager of a bil-
lion-dollar fund. Romick's
Crescent fund is hard to cat-
egorize because he's al-
lowed to buy stocks, bonds
and convertibles.
Managing the fund since
its inception in 1993,
Romick has posted a return
of more than 9 percent
through May 20, and a five-
year annualized return of
4.84 percent.
A fund manager with un-
usual flexibility, Romick re-
cently sat down for an
interview with The Associ-


ated Press. Here are ex-
cerpts from that interview.
Q: Looking at all that's
going on in Washington,
D.C., and the recent rise in
the market, where's your
head at in terms of how
you're processing this infor-
mation?
A: There's a lot to process,
because there are crosscur-
rents. The government is
making rules that they are
cfianging and applying in-
consistently and it's scary. I
feel like I'm at the blackjack
table and cards have been
played and I've made my
bets. And the dealer hasn't
finished playing his cards
yet and he looks at me and
says, "Hey, the game is now
23."
Q: Tell me more about
what you mean when you
say the rules are being ap-
plied "inconsistently"
A: I mean, Bear Stearns is
saved, Lehman isn't. Rules
are changing regarding stu-
dent loans, there's health
reform coming, there's a lot
See FUND/Page D3


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


SWAP, NOT SHOP


KATHY WILLENS/Associated Press
Women look through used clothing during a recent clothing swap sponsored by Brooklyn Clothing Exchange in New York. Friends have been
trading among themselves as long as parents have been handing down outgrown baby clothes. Now, with some help from the Internet,
swaps among strangers are cropping up in bars, schools, garages and churches across the United States.

Squeezed by economy, shoppers become swappers


BARBARA ORTUTAY
AP business writer


strangers are cropping up in bars, schools,
garages, and churches across the United
States.


- NEW YORK The rules are simple: You bring something
he turtleneck from designer Marc Ja- before you take something, and money never
cobs costs hundreds of dollars at changes hands.
Neiman Marcus or Saks Fifth Avenue. Some swaps are formal affairs -where
But at one Brooklyn bar, the charcoal-gray items are passed along
sweater was free for the taking - along with and tried on. If more- ON TH
jeans, belts and shoes, than one participant is.
The neighborhood watering hole called interested, the group 0 http:/,'www.tot
Sycamore will never be mistaken for a de- votes on whom an item http:.' 'www.sw,
apartment store, but for some recession-bat- suits best. Others, like
tered consumers, it's serving a similar the one at the Sycamore, 8, http:/ bookmo
purpose. It's a chance to update their are more casual: Every- * http://www.clo
wardrobes and capture the adventure of', one just digs through
shopping without having to open their wal- piles for what they want Leftovers are gen-
lets. erally donated to charity.
"It's guilt-free shopping," said Shannon The popularity comes as Americansfrom
McDowell, a bartender and swapper I every tax bracket are cutting back how much
Friends have been trading among them- they spend at stores. Apparel sales declined
selves as long as parents have been handing 10.1 percent in the first three months of the
down outgrown baby clothes. Now, with year. Impulse buying, which represents
some help from the Internet, swaps among more than a quarter of the fashion business,


"is just not there at all," said Marshal Cohen,
chief industry analyst at market researcher
NPD Group.
1 Swapping, it turns out, is one substitute for
shopping. And it's not just clothes. People
are trading DVDs, books, toys and even
houseplants and garden seeds.
"People are naturally
E NET resourceful," said Anneli
Rufus, co-author of the
sswapshop.com/ book "The Scavengers'
iptree.com / Manifesto," a guide to ac-
quiring things for less.
och.com '"At first, they are scared
thingswaps.com/ and shocked. But then,
thank gosh, people are
getting less ashamed in doing this."
Put another way, the newly frugal are
turning to a "basic, pre-money way of com-
merce," she said.
Though bartering has been around for-
ever, many events are being organized with
help from modern technology.
See SWAP/Page D3


s
a
oc
oc
It


Recession makes vacation scheduling complex


Joyce Rosenberg
SMALL TALK


M any small business
owners are likely to
find a perennial sum-
mertime challenge, keeping
their companies staffed dur-
ing peak vacation times, even
harder this year
Layoffs and jobs lost to at-
trition mean that many com-
panies have leaner staffing,
while employees still want to
take time off. Owners may find
this summer that they need to


change their vacation poli-
cies. And those without poli-
cies may feel the need to
create them.
Perhaps the biggest issue
this summer is how many em-
ployees can be off at the same
time. Owners who, for exam-
ple, let three people be off at
once last year may find that
only two can go now.
A further complication is
the fact that fewer companies


they should absolutely avoid.
Instead, Wilson said, owners
should encourage employees
to take their time, let staffers
know, that they've earned
their days off and that their
work is appreciated.
"It's an opportunity for a
business owner to build good-
will with employees," he said.
"Let them take it, come back,
be energized."
See SMALL/Page D3


are taking on extra help for
the summer.
"Two years ago, you'd be
calling a temporary agency,"
said Rob Wilson, president of
Employco, a Chicago-based
resources outsourcing com-
pany. "There's been a drastic
reduction in temps filling in
on vacation time."
Some owners might be
tempted to cut staffers' vaca-
tion time, but that's something


*--- -Business DGEST


Dental association
announces change
Citrus Dental Association,
P.A., established in Lecanto
and Inverness for more than
30 years, announces the
Lecanto office at Allen Ridge
Medical Mall is now where Dr.
Gary Pagett is seeing patients
exclusively.' Dr. Edwin Holland
and Dr. Edger Pichardo are
seeing patients exclusively in,
the Inverness office on Line
Avenue.
Call 746-3800 for the office
in Lecanto or 726-5854 and
press #4 for Inverness.
Store to host
special event
ABC Fine Wine & Spirits at
1795 W. Main St. will host the
Inverness Wine Tasting and
Cigar Smoker event from 6 to
8 p.m. Wednesday. $10. Call
726-4893.
Dinglers travel
abroad
Denny and Bonnie Dingier
of Professional Hearing Cen-
ters in Inverness recently
joined with hearing care pro-
fessionals from across the


Hills Golf and Country Club.
The guest-speakers will be
Gary Maidhof and Josh
Wooten.
For luncheon reservations,
contact Nora Cina, president,
at 382-1929. .
Seminar on tap
for seniors
Pathways Life Services at
Central Florida Community
College invites seniors to a
free Recareering Seminar and
Job Club on Thursday.
The Recareering Seminar
will help seniors who are start-
ing a new career, considering
a change in career, or who
want to improve in their cur-
rent career. The seminar will
focus on resumes, applica-
tions, job development and in-
terviewing. It will be from 9
a.m. to noon in the Ewers
Century Center, Room 107, at
the Ocala Campus, 3001 S.W.
College Road.
The Job Club will meet from
noon to 1 p.m. and will be an
open forum for seniors to dis-
cuss their job search experi-
ences:with their peers.

--From staff reports


U.S. to attend an international
conference on the latest de-
velopments in hearing care.
The Dinglers traveled to
Copenhagen, Denmark, to
meet with the leading audiolo-
gists, researchers and engi-
neers responsible fdr many of
the newest and most success-
ful breakthroughs in hearing
care. The nearly week-long
professional gathering in-
cluded seminars held at the
world headquarters of leading
hearing instruments manufac-
turer, Oticon Inc. and at Oti-
con's world-renowned
Eriksholm Research Center.
For more information about
hearing health and hearing so-
lutions, contact Professional
Hearing Centers at 726-4327
orwww.invemesshearing.com.

Luncheon benefits
arts group
The business community is
invited to attend the Citrus
County Center Theatre For
the Performing Arts Founda-
tion "Business is Good for the
Arts and the Arts is Good for
Business" Luncheon at noon
Sunday, June 7, at the Citrus


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Buy,


rent or


stay?
DEAR BRUCE: My
husband and I are
both 57 and have
no credit card or auto
debt We own our 33-year-
old home and three in-
vestment lots. We have
about $300,000 in sav:
ings/investment accounts.
We don't know if we
should buy a newer home
and rent our current
home until the market
goes up, or stay in our cur-
rent home and plan on
making repairs and/or im-
provements as we get
closer to retirement. Any
suggestions?. - Gail in
Florida
DEAR GAIL: You
haven't addressed the funr
damental question. Why
are you considering buy-
ing a newer. home? You
own your 33-year-old
home, but are you com;
fortable there? Does it
provide the type of living
environment that you
want? In the event that it
does not, now may be a
very good time to consider
buying, since the Florida
market is seriously de-
pressed. I am not enthusi-
astic over renting your
current home. While the
same depression is going
to affect the price of your
current home, I would be
more comfortable if that
was sold, not contracted
for but actually sold, be-
fore you even consider an-
other home. If that means
renting for a few months,
so be it On balance, your
finances are in good
shape. If you buy a new
home you'll have to dip
into your savings (I'm as-
suming you'll want some-
thing more expensive) or
start mortgage payments
again. Why would you
want to do that? All bets
are off if your neighbor-
hood is going down and
you're not comfortable
there. If you are comfort-
able and you're only con-
sidering selling because
of some improvements
that need to be made, I
would gradually effectu-
ate the improvements and
preserve your solid finan-
cial footing.
DEAR BRUCE: I am a
full-time freelance writer,
and my income just about
covers my expenses. I tool
out a home-equity line of
credit on my house last
year to pay for some med-
ical expenses. I took out a
line that was .quite a bit
more than I needed be-
cause I was advised that
the rate would be better
that way I used a little
more than $40,000 of the
$139,000 equity line. It was
$150,000, but recently was
reduced based on the the-
oretically reduced value
of my house. The rate is
now 2.9 percent (down
from 4.8 percent when 'I
got it). I'm thinking it
might make sense to pay
off some of my higher-rate
credit cards as long as I
chop them up and don't
use them anymore. My
student loan is already at
2.5 percent, and my origi-
nal mortgage is $82,000 at
5.75 percent. I have been
thinking about refinanc-
ing, but I have been told
that I would have to refi-
nance my equity line, too,
which doesn't make any
sense. Should I pay off my
charges with the equity
line? The interest is tax-
deductible, and it would
See MONEY/Page D3


Keep emotions in check:

Q&A with fund manager














SUNDAY


2


MAY 24, 2009


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Chamber Connection


of Citrus Hills


Recently, a ribbon cutting ceremony was held, welcoming Essence of Citrus Hills as new
members of the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce. Present, representing Essence of Cit-
trus Hills was Anna Torcuator-Neptune, Amanda Stambek, Betty Powell and Renee
Caggiano. Not pictured was Thea Keith. Pictured above, representing the Chamber Am-
bassador program were John Porter, Rhonda Lestinsky, Nancy Hautop, Jennifer Duca, Betty
Murphy, Bonnie Hardiman, Dan Pushee, Megan Ennis, Jessica Holcomb and Megan Ennis.
Essence Of Citrus Hair Salon and Spa for Men and Women has been in business since
1999. With many years of experience, the staff at Essence of Citrus Hills offers expert ad-
vice on Skin Care, Hair Shaping, Hair Coloring, and Styling. Enjoy a relaxing pedicure and
)manicure. Get a facial or Laser Treatment. Maybe you would like to know more about the
type of make-up to wear and hqw to apply it. We don't just perform the services, we teach
you how to do your own hair or apply your make-up. We are about healthy looking hair and
skin. The feet are just as important. Our goal is Total Satisfaction. So, come spend the day
with us. Get a make over from Head to Sole. Join the fun and relaxation at Essence of Cit-
zus Hills. Call us today at 352-527-6747. We are located at 350 E Norvell Bryant Hwy in
.ernando, conveniently located inside Citrus Hills Lodge ," a Magnuson Hotels affiliate"

The Crafty Lady


Love Honda


The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce would like to welcome LOVE HONDA as new
members. Pictured above, representing the Love Honda family is Steve VanAlstyne, Aimee
VanAlstyne, Riley VanAlstyne, Racheal Halleen, Chad Halleen, Marilyn Halleen, Robert
Halleen, Roger Osborne & Mike Reynolds. Representing the Chamber Ambassador program
are Ambassadors Rhonda Lestinsky, Nancy Hautop, Janet Mayo, James Segovia, Dan
Pushee, Bonnie Hardiman & John Porter. Love Honda is a prime example of how great sell-
ing car dealer steps up to the plate to meet demand for their 2009 and beyond require-
ments. Love Honda, located at 2081 S. Suncoast Blvd in Homosassa opened their new
facility on February 9, 2009. Their goal was to build a state of the art facility, one that
their customers would want to come to. But not only was the look important, they also
needed a facility that would move a high volume of customers-one that was efficient. Love
Honda now ha the technology to better utilize their space and people. The new service de-
partment has wider aisles, better lighting, and quicker access to an expanded, modern
parts department. For additional information and to schedule a sales or service appoint-
ment, call Love Honda at 352-628-9444 or visit online at www.lovehonda.com
, f


44 Bistro and Grill


Recently, a ribbon cutting ceremony was held at The Crafty Lady, welcoming their business
as new members of the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce. Front Row: Ambassador Janet
Mayo, Judy McMichen, Tony Carchia, Stephanie Bell, Owner Marianne Vincelli, Varita Pow-
ers, Tina Carchia & Chuck Heffern. Back row: Ambassador Diane Smith, John Vincelli, Dee
Grkovich, Tanya Robinson, Sandi Altomara and Ambassadors Jackie Marx & John Porter. The
Craft Lady offers classes in scrapbooking, one stroke painting, oil painting, floral arranging,
needle work, quilting, kids crafts and pine needle basket weaving. Their store hours are
Monday - Thursday 10 a.m. - 9 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. and Saturdays 10 a.m. -
I p.m. They are located at 2032 Hwy 44 West in Inverness. Ask about their "Crafty Lady
Club", which offers great specials and perks! Give them a call today at 344-4800.

Citrus Performing Arts & Learning Center


,The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce would like to welcome the Citrus Performing Arts
:& Learning Center as new members. Representing the Arts & Learning Center is Owner
fabara Balser, Nancy Wilt, Jenell Sammy, Kayla Wilt, Kari Peters. Also the children in the
front, from left to right are Abby Outtrim, Bansari Patel, Shivam Patel, and Jenessa Sammy.
,Representing the Chamber Ambassador program are Jennifer Duca, Jessica Holcomb, Janet
,layo, Megan Ennis & John Porter. Citrus Performing Arts and Learning Center is a unique
preschool and after school center. The owner, Barbara Balser has resided in Citrus County
jor 40 years. She and Director, Nancy Wilt, operated an Afterschool Tutoring Center and
*Children's Theatre for 10 years. Lead teachers are Child Development Associate creden-
tialed. Staff is certified in Early Childcare Education, CPR and First Aid. They teach High
,Reach Curriculum, which provides intentional, integrated and evidence based content.
Hours are 6:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. We are located at 2301 Carter Street in Inverness. Visit
our web site WWW.citruslearningcenter.vpweb.com, email us cplac@live.com or call 344-
'4422. (Summer Programs Available)


Event on tap
' Market Day with Art is Second Saturday, June 13.This event is on the grounds of Heritage Vil-
lage (N. Citrus Ave.), Crystal River. Purchase Fresh Produce, Herbs, plants, blooming flower &
,orchids, and baked and canned pantry items. Local Artists and Crafters are invited to sell their
�. creations from 10 a.m. till 3 p.m. Nature and Wildlife education is always welcome. For more info
,.on set-up call 352-564-1400.


p


The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce would like to welcome 44 Bistro & Grill as new
members. Pictured above, representing 44 Bistro & Grill is Belinda Rogers, Linda Perkins,
Doug Reeb, Peggy Carringer, Michelle Reeb and Chelsea Bonifer. Representing the Cham-
ber Ambassadors is Janet Mayo, Wendy Hall, Nancy Hautop, Jennifer Duca and John Porter.
44 Bistro is open for breakfast, lunch and Dinner, they are known as the "Home of the $.99
cent breakfast" they are proud to specialize in serving high quality, homemade foods at af-
fordable prices. Hours are from 6:30am to 9 pm Monday - Thursday and 6:30am to 10pm
Friday & Saturday. Closed Sundays, Happy Hour daily from 3 to 6 pm with $1.50 drafts and
$2.00 house wines. 44 Bistro & Grill is located at 773 NE 3rd Street in Crystal River. They
care located in the American Town Center Plaza. Call them today at 795-5050.


A Bead in the Hand


i9P ktipr


Beadk


Recently, a ribbon cutting ceremony was held for A Bead in the Hand, welcoming them as
new members of the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce. Representing A Bead in the
Hand is Judith Williams. Welcoming the new members are Ambassadors Rhonda Lestinsky,
Jessica Holcomb, Nancy Hautop, Pete Burrell, Janet Mayo, Megan Ennis & Ullian Smith. We
carry a wide variety of beads, crystals, and gemstones, as well as a large selection of ster-
ling silver and gemstone jewelry. We also have findings and sterling silver beads available
for your beading projects. We are located at 2602 Hwy 44 west in Inverness. Hours are Mon
10am-5pm, Tues lpm-5pm, Wed-Fri 10am-5pm. Closed Saturday and Sunday. Give them a
call today at 637-6846 to find out more about all they have to offer. Visit our website today
at www.abeadinthehand.com.


The Kumon Math and Read-
ing Center is conveniently lo-
cated in the Croft Road Plaza at
the comer of Croft Rd. and State
Rd. 44 in Inverness. We have
been in business since February
of 2000. Kumon is the world's
largest and most affordable
after school program. Call us at
726-9694 to schedule a FREE
placement test for your student.
MEN
School Of Dance Arts pres-
ents "Everything Old Is New
Again" to be held on Saturday,
June 6, 2009 at 6:00pm at Cur-
tis Peterson Auditorium in


Lecanto. Tickets are $12.00.
Seating is reserved. To reserve
tickets please contact School Of
Dance Arts at 352-637-4663.
Please welcome Lee
Meador as he joins Citrus Net-
working Solutions Group as a
service desk technician, specifi-
cally to provide remote assis-
tance to our Gold Business
Continuity Clients*. Lee is
an experienced system admin-
istrator (and gifted trou-
bleshooter) with a talent for
understanding complex situa-
tions and making them clear.


He has his MCP from Microsoft,
and with 12 years of varied ex-
perience under his belt, brings
valuable problem-solving skills
and comprehensive under-
standing of business software
packages. Lee's experience in-
cludes working as a help desk
technician, writing technical
training documents and con-
ducting user training in both
large and small group settings.
Lee enjoys the challenges of
presenting technical solutions
that increase productivity and
efficiency while remaining cost
effective to the business owner.


.Essence








..ITR .. O (


FUND
Continued from Page Dl

of different pieces to this
puzzle. Some are rules that
are changing, some rules
are inconsistently applied;
it's both. And then you've got
the idea that the sanctity of
contract law was subverted
for the benefit of Chrysler
unions. It makes me cau-
tious at best
Q: Expand on that idea of
being cautious. We've been
seeing more about people
slowly increasing their will-
ingness to get back in the'
market Are you feeling any
more comfortable as of late?
A: Everybody's been using
this term "green shoots." It's
a term that's way too over-
used. What do people expect
when consumer spending
has fallen off a cliff in the
fourth quarter and it's up 2
percent in the first quarter,
well some of that is deferred
spending. It's going to be a
long bumpy road.
There are opportunities
out there. As we survey the
landscape, those opportuni-
ties aren't just in equities.
They're in other asset
classes like distressed cor-
porate bonds. And that's
where we've actually spent
more of our time in allocat-
ing more of our capital in
the last four or five months.
Q: Your fund is included
in Morningstar's moderate
allocation category. What
does that signify?
A: I can't speak to the
moderate allocation cate-
gory. But-the Crescent Fund
is a unique fund. It's a fund
that can go anywhere and
do almost anything, though
it doesn't do everything. The
goal is to generate equity
rates of return with less risk
than the market So the way
we've accomplished that
over time has been to buy.


SMALL
Continued from Page Dl

Still, some summer time-
off perks like half-days on
Friday may be 'disappear-
ing. Wilson suggested that
owners forced to make such
cuts give something back to
employees, like pizza for
lunch, or ice cream.
S"It's a good morale
booster, people appreciate
it and it's not a big expense,"
he said.
And, in any economy,
owners need to know how
they're going to resolve the
conflicts that arise when too
many people ask for the
same time off. In, many
small companies, employ-
ees are able to sort out
among themselves who will
take a. particular day or
week off. Wilson said vaca-
tion scheduling can be an
opportunity for team build-
ing - employees who can
figure out their vacations to-
gether will probably be able
to collaborate on work-re-
lated projects.'
But vacation planning
shouldn't be left entirely to,



MONEY
Continued from Page D1l

give me some flexibility in
having one payment in-
stead of many. - C.M. New
Jersey
DEAR C.M.: Cutting
through most of the detail,
there is one area that is
often overlooked. You
mention that you can bor-
row the money at a lower
interest rate on your
home-equity line. I have
no problem with that as
long as you are paying it
off in a relatively modest
period of time. What I am
not comfortable with is
having you pay off a credit
card and then take 10 or 15
years to pay off clothing,
hamburgers, etc., that
were charged on this
credit card. That is analo-


gous to making the mini-
mum payments, which is
nonsense. You also go on to
say that as long 'as you
chop up your credit cards
and don't use them any-
more. I wouldn't do that,
either. First of all, cancel-
ing the credit cards has a
deleterious affect on your
credit. Keeping the cards
and occasionally charging
something and then paying
it on time that month is a
far better course of action.
The only time chopping up
the cards may be a desir-
able course of action is if
you are so out of control
and not able to resist buy-


corporate bonds as part of
the mix. We do it across the
capital structure: We'll by
common stocks, preferred
stocks, convertible bonds,
subordinated debt, senior
notes, and bank debt
By blending this portfolio
together it ends up creating
a portfolio that's less risky
than the market
Q: For investors who are
thinking about their own
asset allocation, what's your
portfolio looked like over
the last year or so?
A: We saw a lot of this
coming. We wrote about the
"case for cash" in 2004, and
started building cash at that
time. We didn't own finan-
cial stocks because we were
concerned about a lot of
these issues that have man-
ifested themselves. So going
into all of this we were rela-
tively well positioned -
with cash in the portfolio,
last September, of almost 40
percent Now that cash has
come down to the low to
mid-20s as we've put a lot of
capital to work in debt
So today we have about 37
percent long equities. We do
have the ability to short
stocks and we are 7 percent
short, so net equity expo-
sure in our fund is only 30
percent. And we also have a
little over 30 percent in
debt. And the debt in our
portfolio had a yield-to-
maturity, at the end of
March, of 22 percent, and
change. It's clearly not a
low-risk portfolio. We look
at this debt as if it's equity;
we just think it offers
greater relative value when
compared to equity.
Q: Within the stock mar-
ket, are there sectors that
you like?
A: We like energy for
three reasons. We like the
supply-demand characteris-
tics of energy. I haven't seen
any dinosaur roaming the
streets of New York, which


staffers. An owner should
have a written vacation pol-
icy that details for employ-
ees how much vacation
they're entitled to, how they
accrue it and how they
schedule it A policy should
include the methods of re-
solving conflicts, whether
it's according to seniority or
on a first-come, first-served
basis.
Owners can find sample
.vacation' policies online.
The Business Owners
Toolkit has a fairly lengthy
sample policy at
www.toolkitcom. It also con-
tains policies including sick
time, jury duty and parental
and military leave. You'll
need to register with the site
to download the policy.
The Employment Law In-
formation Network has sev-
eral samples . at
www.elinfonet.com/picked-
pol/167.html.
You can also get advice
from human resources pro-
fessionals about how to cre-
ate a policy. If money is
tight, SCORE, an organiza-
tion of retired executives
that advise small busi-
nesses, offers free help on
HR and other topics. You


ing things that you cannot
afford, then and only then,
would I cut up the cards.
At the risk, of redundancy,
if you have the discipline
to pay off the home-equity
loan that was used to re-
tire credit card debt in a
reasonable period of time,
certainly no more than
three years, I would go
ahead. Otherwise, even
though it is more costly, I
would continue to pay the
credit cards as contracted.
DEAR BRUCE: I should
be receiving a large
amount of money from a
pending lawsuit. I'm up in
the air as to how I should
invest. I currently have
$42,000 in a 401(k) stable
fund. I lost more than
$10,000 before I moved it.
My question is, since the
lawsuit money is non-tax-
able, I don't want to put it
in my 401(k) because I may
need some of it, and I don't
want to pay taxes. I'm 49
years old. What do you sug-
gest as a good investment?
The lawsuit money should
be between $75,000 and
$100,000. - C.L., via e-mail
DEAR C.L.: You observa-
tion is completely accu-
rate. There is no reason to
put money into your 401(k)
since these are after-tax
dollars. At 49, you have a
long way to go. However,
you have not addressed
your tolerance for risk.
Many people, including
this writer, believe there
are some very attractive
bargains available in the


probably means there's not
more supply coming - on
the fossil fuel side anyway.
And there's this inexorable
increase in demand over
time, albeit, with certain
dips along the way due to
the weak economies we
have today globally So we
think demand will increase
over time and we do believe
supply will continue to de-
crease, so we like those
characteristics.
_ - But the way the govern-
ment is using the dollar cre-
ates the potential for
inflation. There's no guar-
antee, but that risk is there
and oil will certainly be a
beneficiary of that.
We also think there's
going to be future devalua-
tion of the U.S. dollar
against certain global cur-
rencies. Since oil is a com-
modity that is priced in
dollars, as the U.S. dollar
weakens, the commodity is
more expensive in dollar
terms, which is attractive
for the investment that we
have.
Q: For investors who look
at their fund portfolio
makeup with, say, a large-
cap fund, a small-cap fund,
how does size factor into
your investment decisions?
A: I look for good busi-
nesses that are inexpen-
sively valued. I don't think
about big versus small or
medium. If you look at an of-'
fice building, whether it's a
50-story building vs. a 20-
story building, it's the same
analysis. It's really a func-
tion of what's the best
risk/reward out there in the
marketplace.
For the individual in-
vestor, they need to accept
and expect volatility. If you
don't you're going to buy
high and sell low.


Questions? E-mail in-
vestorinsight@ap.org.


can find a SCORE counselor
through www.score.org.
Wilson advises owners to
be flexible in their policies.
For example, if a young
staffer has a once-in-a-
lifetime opportunity to go to
a family reunion, being
rigid and sticking to a policy
based on seniority is likely
to hurt morale, and not just
for that employee. Some
diplomacy may be called
for, and that means asking
the more senior staffer to
choose another time. Or,
figuring out another way for
all the work to be done
while both staffers are
away.
Meanwhile, many busi-'
ness owners are taking less
time off this summer.
"We're seeing a lot more
CEOs and presidents of
companies in the trenches
working more and cutting
back on travel time," Wil-
son said. Many are proba-
,bly concerned about
keeping business coming in
and 'also trying to save
money, but the sacrifice
they're making is some-
thing that employees notice
and will appreciate, he
said.


marketplace, if purchased'
with the idea that they will
be held for some reason-
able period .of time. I'm
talking about many large,
well-funded and success-
ful companies that, in this
writer's opinion, will be
here well after I leave this
vale of tears. You men-
tioned that you may need
the money, and securities
are always redeemable at
a flick of a switch; how-
ever, not all times are good
times to sell. Given that
condition, you .might wish'
to vary the industries that
you choose to invest in. For
example, the industrials,
drugs, services, etc. When
one market is suffering an-
other may be doing consid-
erably better. Unless you
are so disposed as not to
take any risk, in today's in-
credibly low-interest envi-
ronment, 2-1/2 percent is
considered respectable.
Without the ability to take
some risk, you are con-
demned to just treading
water, which is a shame.
You are relatively young,
and time will be your ally.
Make use of it.


Send your questions to:
Smart Money, PO. Box 2095,
Elfers, FL 34680. E-mail to:
bruce@brucewilliams. com.
Questions ofgeneral inter-
est will be answered in fu-
ture columns. Owing to the
volume ofmail, personal
replies cannot be provided.


- | - .













PF







KATHY WILLENS, Ai-i.:.�Lai ,f'es
Frances Wood, left, and Sarah Hanks shop for free used clothing at a recent clothing
swap sponsored by Brooklyn Clothing Exchange in New York.


SWAP
Continued from Page Dl

Meetup.com, a Web site that helps
users organize local groups for people
with common interests,.has 42 clothing
swap groups, up from 13 a year ago. The
groups, which cost organizers $12 a
month to maintain, have more than 4,500
members, up from 1,200 a year ago.
While many swaps are organized be-
tween friends and neighbors, Web sites
like Swaptree.com and Paperback-
swap.com help people trade old CDs,
books and video games online. Totsswap-
shop.com, meanwhile, connects people
who want to trade kids' items from
clothes'to nursery furniture.
Aimee Gallagher, a mother of three
young children, turned to Swaptree after
cutting back on frivolous spending.
"I.used to take the kids just to entertain
them to Borders, let them walk around,.
(and) I'd get a coffee, buy a couple of
books," she said,
speaking from her While many
home in Rosemont,
Pa. "I don't do that organized
any more." friends and
Instead, she lists friends and
on Swaptree the Web sil
items she wants to
give away, .and the N Swaptr e
things she wants.
Two or even three- Paperbacksw
,way swaps are cre- peple trad
ated. She pays for p pe
shipping the items books and ga
she sends.
Swaps that take
place over the Web and mail lose some of
the fun of the real thing.
At a swap organized by the Brooklyn
Clothing Exchange, Frances Wood
likened the experience to a treasure hunt
as she sorted through a pile of folded
clothes with about two dozen other swap-
pers on a rainy Sunday afternoon. 'She
found and took home items she'd never'
buy at a.store.
"When you are not paying for some-
thing, you are a little more free," Wood,
the administrator of a non-profit, said.
Odette Pollar, a professional organizer
and garden enthusiast in Oakland, Calif.,
organizes plant swaps twice a year. She
said about 95 people showed up to the
first one she held, back in October 2007.
Now, it's up to 300, and the Lakeshore
Neighborhood Plant Exchange'is about to
outgrow the neighborhood. It's not just
plants people are swapping, but tools,
gardening equipment, even koi and gold-
fish.


"People bring 8-foot trees, literally,'"
she said.
Bars can provide a practical and social
setting for clothing swaps. As patrons
sipped beer and mint juleps at Sycamore,
the Brooklyn bar that also doubles as 4
flower shop during the day,. some browsed
clothes draped on seats and hung over
walls. Lacking a fitting room, women
pulled skirts over pants and cardigans
over T-shirts in front of a full-length mir,
ror. , "
"Who wants a Marc Jacobs turtleneck?"
asked Tory Giardina, a 22-year-old sth-
dent behind this and about 15 other
swaps. She held up the thin sweater,
which had no takers despite the pricey
brand name because of a large, somewhat
suggestive circular opening on the baclL-
"It's difficult to wear," said Ashley La'
houd, its previous owner, who had come
to her first clothing swap. The turtleneck
had been a Christmas gift from an ex-
boyfriend.
"I don't think I ever wore it," she sail.
"I just told him I liked it."
Giardina, who's
V swaps are gotten her mom and
her friends in to
between swaps (even though
"none of them ever
neighbors, shop second
tes like hand"), said the
swaps feel validat-
..com and ing. They are like a
common dressing
vap.com help room, she ex-
e old CDs, plained, where
l women compliment
ames online. each other on thl1
clothes they try o.ar
Kym O'Neill, .a
mother'of two who bought a few expect~
sive items to the Brooklyn swap, said if
was "time to get rid of old things." She is
going through a divorce. One particular,
dress, by Vena Cava that she wore onkL
once, to a wedding, was one such iterti
She got it after having her second child,
and has lost weight since.
"I was like, should I put it on eBay, ge0
money for it?" she said. 1
In the end. she brought it to the swal,'
hoping somebody would appreciate if.
The dress fit'McDowell, the bartender,
perfectly.
In turn, O'Neill ended up with the gras
Marc Jacobs turtleneck. As the afternoon
turned chilly, she pulled it on.
"It's a.good label; it's soft. If it didn't
have a hole in the back the first person
would have taken it," she said.
Walking by, its original owner, Lahoucd,
complimented her.
"I'm glad it found a home," she said,
"The sweater looks really good on you."'


CNAs
















In Wildwood
is currently accepting applications
for CNA positions as part of our Nursing team.


Full / Part Time - 11-7

Qualified applicants will meet the following criteria:
* Current FL CNA Licensure
* Strong communication and interpersonal skills
* Prior Long-Term Care experience highly preferred

Competitive pay, a strong benefits package & an
outstanding work environment await you!
To apply, please e-mail your resume to Jobs(COCare.com
You may also fax your resume to (877) 571-1952 or
apply by phone - toll free (800) 442-1353.
We also accept applications in person.
490 South Old Wire Road
Wildwood, FL 34785


SUNDAY, MAY 24,. 2oo9 D3


BUSINESS


CITRUSF COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









D4 SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009






CHIPoNICLE



CLASSIFIED

1624 Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429

(352) 563-5966


"1$ TOP DOLLAR $$
r�aid for Junk Vehicles,
' J.W. 352-228-9645
$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
_$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for your junk car,
truck or van
(352) 634-5389
CASH PAID all
vehicles.Trades welcome
SUsed PARTS avail
352-628-9118
FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale, Hshold.
& Furniture Items
Call 352-476-8949
, WANTED
SJunk Lawn Mowers
& Power Equip.
Free Pick-up (352)
564-80141601-5053
/Us out zoomcitrus.com
WANTED
- Junk Lawn Mowers
& Power Quip.
Free Pick-up (352)
564-80141601-5053
/Us out zoomcltrus.com
*W4Ne will remove & haul
away your CHAIN LINK
. FENCING for free.
352-400-3929




Chow
8 y.o. nuet, up to date
on shots, owner passed
away.(352) 794-3628
Excell. Home for any
unwanted birds, poultry
U-R unable to care for
726-9874
,Free to good home two
*cats one male one fe-
Smale both fixed. ,
They are both very lova-
ble and social.-They are---
'7years old and years
old. The female is tan
and black with sapphire
.blue eyes. The riale is
grey and white with
green eyes.
Please call
352-228-7822
Green Iguana with
,custom cage 6 years
old. Free to responsible
'� person.
.Call for more details.
S 352-228-7822

OLD LEATHER
HARNESS
(863) 843-2495
YOUNG CATS
10 mo. old. Extremely
loveable, well behaved.
No fleas or worms.
Call Rosa (352)464-1567



S Blackberries
,* Organically Grown.
26th. Sat.& Tues.8A.13P.
$3.50 per pound.

. MADDOX FARMS
LU-pick peas, corn, beans
k.& green p-nuts. Hwy 475 N.
W,.5 mi. N. Bushnell (352) 303-0105
^NOW OPEN, 8:30A/6P
SBELLAMYGROVES
� Fresh Sweet Corn
. Lopes watermelons,
',eggie; 1.5 miles E. on
SEj-. C.Dr From Hwy 41
(352) 726-6378




I Border Collie
. Female, black & white.
Black leather collier, scar
. on neck from surgery,
i chipped. (352) 860-3226
S PITBULL
White & Brindle, Fe-
male w/splke collar.
E. Hwy 44 across from
Sydney Perry Ins.
352-287-0634



S 2 PIT BULLS
1 blue nose & 1 brindle
w/white face ,last seen
Sat 5/16 off 488 by the
goldendale boat ramp
REWARD (352) 257-9088










� rescued oet.com.
"View available pets on
our website or call
(352) 795-9550
Adoption Locations
PET SUPER MARKET
every Saturday 1l-2p
Inverness
- MERCANTILE BANK
Inverness
May 18th Monday
12-2pm

Crystal River
May 22nd Friday
12-2pm

ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT



, -� ( -- .. " m


$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
*DISABILITY
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com


Bank Probate
Divorces /Evictions
352-613-3674



















ComWe see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A till 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4
All Cats and Kittens are al-
tered, tested for Feline Luk
and Aids. Up to date on
vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofspha.org,
or stop by our offices at
1149 N ConantAve. Comer
of 44 and Conant.
Look for the big white build-
ing with the bright paw
prints.



LICENSED CNA
Looking to take care of
- .elderly.- Live-in/out. 24
yrs exp. 352-860-1426
TUTORING - All subjects
& Spanish. Exp. Certified
teacher. Reading
specialist (619) 307-9277
Citrus County



Memorial Gardens
Beverly Hills, Section
Peace, Lot 89 Space A.
(832) 636-8462, To view
Call. (352) 746-4646



A FREE Report of Your
Home's Value
www.naturecoast

missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
Shelter 794-3825



TEACHER

Part time Exp. Required
CDA Preferred
TADPOLES EARLY
LEARNING
(352) 560-4222












































CRYSTAL HEALTH
& REHAB CENTER
A skilled nursing
facility is looking for
caring Individuals to
fill the following
position:
Swing Shift
'Dietary Cook

We need dependa-
ble people with a
positiveattitude, who
take pride In a job
well done.
Previous experience
In a skilled nursing.
facility a plus.
We offer competitive
pay, benefits & a safe
work environment.


If you would like
to be a part
of our team.
Please contact:
Crystal River Health
and Rehab Center
136 NE 12th Ave.
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 795-5044
HR/Connie
(M, T, Th & F 9-3)
DFWP/EOE


BAYLOR RN
Join our team of
quality Health Care
Professionals. Shift
and weekend differ-
entials. Excellent
Benefits. Fax resumes
to 352-854-9730
Timber Ridge Nursing
& Rehab. Center
9848 SW 110th St
SSR 200 1 mi N of
CR 484
EOE/DFWP
BECOME A CNA
For Career and
Test Preparation
Call 352-564-8378
CNA TEST PREP
Now Offering Day & Eve.
Classes Free CPR train-
ing w/enrollment
341-2311
Scholarships Available

DIETARY AIDE/
COOK

We have a position for
a part time
Dietary Aide In our
skilled nursing facility.
We offer a good salary
& work environment.
Please apply in
person.
Citrus Health and
Rehabilitation
Center
701 Medical Court E
Invemrness
EOE/DFW
Not for profit

F/T PHYSICAL
THERAPY
ASSISTANT ,
We are looking for a
PTA for visits In Citrus
County. Come join
our growing team No
home health exp.
necessary. Will train
the right person.
Apply online at www.
baycarejobs.com
EOE

Full Time
Lic. Lab Tech &
Phlebotomist.


For busy Physician
Lab. Competitive
* Salary & Benefits.'
Fax Resume to:
(352) 746-6333

GYN OFFICE IN
CRYSTAL RIVER
LOOKING FOR:
Medical Assistant
Receptionist
Dietician
Proactive, 1 year
exp. in Medical Of-
fices. Knowledge In
medical software
Please fax resume to:
352-564-8201

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Front & Back Exp.,
F/T, computer &
phlebotomy.
For busy primary care
MD Office
Email Resume
wfmaresumes@
yahoo.com
or Fax Resume To:
352-489-5786

Part Time Billing
Personnel
& Full Time
Receptionist
Medical/Chiropractic
Experience a must.
Fax Resume to
352-564-8906

REGISTERED
PHYSICAL
THERAPIST
Looking for a
dynamic RPT to join
our Rehab Team. We
are a 116 bed skilled
nursing center with a
large rehab dept.
providing OT/PT/ST
services to subacute
* and long term care
residents as well as
outpatient rehab.
Come join our stable
and experienced
staff.. Excellent salary
and benefits. Life is
short, have fun at
work.
Apply in person
or e-mail resume to:
cbacree
southernltc.com
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turrner Camp Rd
Inverness, FL 34434
352-860-7644
EOE

RN,PTA, OT &
MEDICAL DATA
COORDINATOR
Established expanding
home health agency
seeking team members
to join us in providing
quality care.
Coordinator to work in
clincal/business
operations. Email
resume to: athomas
@villagehomecare.org
or fax (352)368-9887

STAFF
DEVELOPMENT
COORDINATOR/
RISK MANAGER

Come'join on
exciting team.
Qualified candidate
must have knowl-
edge of Federal.
State and OSHA
Regs. Two years exp
in HealthCare field,
teaching, training
and development.
FL RN license
required. Excellent
benefits. EOE.
Resume to:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, FL 34453
Fax: 352-637-1921
Email: disoanaler@
southernltc.com


CNAPRE LASSES
EZ Learning Services
Day & Evening Classes
352-382-EASY; 586-2715
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
WA fE A
It's E-Z @ E-Z Learning
Services
Offering CNA Test
Prep Courses
Day/ Evening Classes
CPR Included
10% OFF Thru June '09
Refer a Friend and re-
ceive an additional dis-
count. Enroll on line @
EZLeamingservices.com
or call 352-382-EASY
(3279) or 586-2715


Professiona


HUMAN
RESOURCES/
PAYROLL
Due to a promotion, we
are searching for a
Human Resource
employee who will be
responsible for the
Human Resource
functions plus payroll at
Osprey Point
Nursing Center.
Experience is required.
This position works
Monday through Friday,
8:30 am to 5:00 pm &
we offer a complete
benefit package to you.
If qualified, please
fax resume to: (352)
568-8780 or stop
in and complete
your application at
Osprey Point Nursing
Ctr 104 N. Main Street
.Bushnell, FL 33513




Our Promise....
Your Future...:
Central Florida
Community College
Faculty-Nursing
Instructor:
Master's degree with
18 graduate semes-
ter hours In Nursing &
FL Nursing Ucense is
required. Open until
filled. Screening
will begin 6/23/2009..
Trades Worker-
/ HVAC:
Open until filled.
Screening will begin
6/3/09
For additional
information visit
www.cf.edu
'Employment' or
e-mail hr@cf.edu.
Fax transcripts to
352-873-5885,
CFCC, P.O. Box 1388,
Ocala. FL 34478-1388.
CFCC Is an EEO/
AA/DFW employer
The Citrus County
Mosquito Control
District Is accepting
applications for:

Mosquito Control
Technician
. Public Health Pest
Control Certification
Is necessary within six
months of employ-
ment. A detailed job
description and
application can be
obtained at the
Citrus County
Mosquito Control
District Headquartbr's
Office or our website
www.
citrusmosquito.org
968 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
(352) 527-7478
between 7:30 a.m. -
4:00 p.m. weekdays.

Deadline to receive
applications will be
2 PM, June 5, 2009.
.The Citrus County
Mosquito Control
District Is an equal
opportunity employer
and does not discrim-
.indate on the basis of
race, color, national
origin, sex, religion,
age or disability
in employment or the
provisions of services.
Preference will be
given to veterans. (A
copy of the DD-214
must be provided).



. A/C SALES TECH
UPTO$100OK+
Exp Only. Benefits,
must have valid DL.
Fax resume to:
352-628-4427
NEW YEAR/
NEW CAREER

The best opportunity
In Citrus County.
Average income for
2008 was $56.000.
Our 15
representatives
enjoy company trips,
bonuses, and many
other incentives.
Qualifications;
' Self-motivated
* Team Player
* Outgoing
Personality
and the
* Willingness to Learn
2 POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY
Mon. through Fri.
No late evenings,
weekends or holidays.
No experience
necessary,
training available.

Take control
of your future-
call today!!

Joe Bresnahan
(352) 726-7722


CLASSIFIED



OUTSIDE SALES
REP
Business to Business
Sales Must Have Sales
Experience.
Experience In The
Waste Industry Con-
sidered a Plus but
not required. Mail
Resume to F.D.S.
Disposal Inc.
P.O. Box 906
Hernando, FI 34442
Attention William or
Email to
ldsdisposalinc@
aol.com
Do NOT Apply in
Person & NO Phone
Calls Will Be
Accepted


SALES/
TELEMARKETING
Gar. Sal., great earn-
ing potential benefits
Call Barbara
(352) 726-5600


WANTED
Highly self motivated
Sale's people
Company truck Is
provided. Yearly
paid vacation.
Holidays paid.
Benefits available.
Positions open in
Citrus, Hernando,
and Sumter Counties.
Apply in Person
ONLY, from 9 am to
4 pm Mon-Fri, At
A-i Termite &
Pest Control,
1840 Hwy 44 West,
Inverness, FL 34453.
Located across
from Applebee's.
Only well groomed
and properly dressed
applicants will be
considered.





HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
SCHOOL

IN LECANTO IS
NOW ACCEPTING
APPS. FOR
INSTRUCTOR'S.
Qualilfed
Candidates Must
Possess The
Following, Five
Or More Years Of
Operating Exp.,
Must Be A Team
Player, Motivated,
Hard Working, &
Pay Attention To
Details. Ability And
The Willingness To
Teach Inside The
Classroom Relia-
bility And Honesty
A Must. Rdsumes
Will Be Accepted
Via Fax, Or Email
Only, No Phone
Calls.
Fax Resumes To:
(352) 628-0823
EmailTo:
blindresumes
(Vahoo.com


A/C SALES TECH
UP TO S1IOOK +
Exp Only. Benefits,
must have valid DL.
Fax resume to:
352-628-4427

MARINE FINISH
TECH
Exp. in APOXY & ALL
GRIP finishes.
(352) 422-3891

ROOFERS / CREWS
(352) 564-1242

SHOP FORMAN/
DIESEL
MECHANIC
Citrus County...Big
Truck Experience
Required. Manage-
ment Experience
With Good Computer
Skills
And Inventory Con-
trol, Experience with
Managers Plus or
Comparable Fleet
Maintenance
Software.Mail Re-
sume To
F.D.S. Disposal Inc.
P.O. Box 906 Her-
nando, Fl 34442
Attention William or
Email TO
fdsdlsaosalinc@aol.
corn Do Not Apply
In Person And NO
Phone CaLLS Will Be
Accepted. Benefits
And Top Dollar Sign-
ing Bonus For Quali-
fied Applicant.





$$ EARN $12 PER
HOUR $$,

Occasionally spend
4-8 hours on nights or
weekends serving as a
mock juror in a mock
trial to evaluate settle-
ment of an actual court
case. If you have lived
in Florida for 1 year
& have a valid FL.
Drivers License, or
are a Registered
Voter please enroll
with us www.SignUp
Direct.comor call
your information in
toll free at
1-800-544-5798

k -k*- -
APPOINTMENT
SETTERS
Up For A Challenge?
Serious minded
individuals will earn
great ,$$$ setting appts
for our very busy local
company. Call Steve
@ 352-628-0254

EXPERIENCED
MOWING &
LAWN CARE
PERSONNEL
Competitive wages
and benefits.
Apply in Person
920 E. RAY ST.
HERNANDO


COMPUTER
OPERATOR/TUTOR
Needed. $10 hr, P/T,
ebay exp. necessary.
Art interest helpful.
(352) 628-9128


Recreation
Program
Specialist
Announcement
S09-13
Responsible position
coordinating and
leading recreational
activities for the
County Parks &
Recreation Division.
H.S. graduation or an
acceptable equiva-
lency certificate.
Some experience in
recreation and/or
programming. Must
be certified in the
following: Infant.
Child and Adult CPR,
First Aide and AED.
Must have current
valid Florida
Driver License.
$9.99 hourly to start.
Excellent Benefits.
Applications may be
submitted to the

Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL. 34461
no later than
Friday, May 29, 2009.
EOE/ADA.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WORKER


Temporary worker
needed on Saucier Tree
Farm, Hattiesburg, Miss.
Min. 2 yrs. training in
forestry work. Clearing,
burning, Katrina debris,
planting, pruning, mark-
ing trees for sale,
clearing 6 mi. fire lanes.
Tools/equip. & housing
provided, 8A./5P. Mon.
thru Fri. $11.51, per hour.
7/15/09 thru 5/15/10.
Call: Win Job Center
(601) 584-1202
Job # MS3102269
POOL TECH

P/T Will train.
Reliable, Good
driving record
Apply in Person:
1 Golden St. /49T
or Fax 352-620-8435
Telemarketer
Opening for an
aggressive marketer to
process large
database of inquiries.
No cold calling. Late
afternoon, evening &
weekend hours with
flexible schedule. Long
established firm with
proven track record.
Salaried with bonuses.
Fax resume to
352-746-7707
,orllol,,,.e 1
Your world ftirt.

(;11I I )NI i.-'


RECEPTIONIST/
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT

Needed in Wildwood,
Excel and Word a
must, Fax Resume To:
(352) 330-2609
EOE/DFWP '




Key Training
Center

has F/T & P/T positions
available In group
home/apartment
setting. Assist
Developmentally
Disabled adults with
. daily living skills.
HS Diploma/GED
required. �
Call 352-341-4633
for more info.
Apply in person at
130 Heights Ave.,
Inverness. *E.O.E."

P/T Front & Snack
Counter Help
Nights & Weekends
Experience a plus.
Smiling faces a must!
Apply in Person.
Manatee Lanes,
Crystal River DFWP
Victim Advocate PT/$10
HR/SUMTER
COUNTY.COLLEGE DE-
GREE PREF. FAX RE-
SUME TO
(352)569-5340.DEADLINE
06/05.


S Kick Off.-

7 \ Spring

With a New

Career




At Seven Rivers Regional, we're dedicated to helping patients get back
to doing the things they love to do. Be an important part of our success.

Rehab Nurses (7pm-7am)
Physical Therapists
Experience in the area of physical rehabilitation preferred.%
Other Opportunities:
RNs: MedSurg, Telemetry, ICU, OB
Clinical Dietician (per diem)
Coder
Ultrasound Tech
We offer flexible scheduling, competitive wages .
and a comprehensive benefits package.
For these and other opportunities, visit our web site at
www.srrmc.com and click 'Career', email
Linda.Macaulay@hma.com or apply in person to Human
Resources, 6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34428.
EOE/Drug and Tobacco-Free Workplace


0
Inpatient Rehabilitation
SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL MEDICAL CEN rTER


Your Life.
Our Story. 7855W


SALES HELP






WANTED!







CRYSTAL


A U T O M 0 T I , V E


LOOK AROUND. EVERYONE'S DRIVING ONE.



One of Florida's Fastest


Growing Dealers



IMMEDIATE FULLTIME


POSITIONS AVAILABLE


No Experience Necessary

* Paid Salary While You Train

* Insurance Available

Paid Vacation

* Longevity Bonus

*401K

* Largest Inventory

* Progressive Commission Structure

* Opportunity For Advancement


'-F--!


~.JC5Wd


Equal opportunity employer

Drug free workplace


See Ron Davis 9:00am - 6:00pm


APPLY IN PERSON

937 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL
L ".'


*C- " M � S L- E=-


.all' -"












Emplo
13,





COSMETOLOGY
BARBER
ESTHETICS/
SPA TRAINING
Nail Technology
Massage
Therapy
- C/
Cosmet= 'Days
June 15, July 27,
Sept 8, Oct 19, Nov 30,
2009
Cosmetology Nights
July.27, Oct. 19, 2009
Massacie Days
Aug. 31,
Dec. 14,2009
Massage Nights
Aug. 31, 2009
Massage Weekepds
July 11, 2009
Barbering Nights
June 15, Sept 8,
Nov 30, 2009

93% of our*
Graduates passed
the NCETMB
the I st time!

SKIN & NAIL Classes
Weekly - Days
& Nights
(727 848-8415
B6NE'S
International School
of Beauty, Barber &
Massage Therapy
7027 U.S. Hwy. 19
New Port Rich
FL 34652


L





25x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry Door, 2 Vents,
4" Concrete Slab.
$13,795. INSTALLED
30x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$14,995. INSTALLED
35x50x12(3:12 pitch)
Roof overhang.
2-10x10 Rollup-Doors.
2 Venls. 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$29.995 Installed
+ Fl. Engineered Plans
* A local FI Manufact.
+ Meets or exceeds
Florida wind codes.
+ Conc/Inst by others.
+ Many sizes available
* We specialize in
Commercial Buildings
METAL Structures, LLC .
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
www. metal
structuresllc.com

W --I S
I=(W'


Follow.th


* 1('01111cU[)ji)


eminiemcm for 3our car-eer.

-4


CuwARE CENTER
�4 SUPERVISOR



Florida. iiia~lfiedCfliift d
2 Ir6rtrilleC5I."-Cd


We are ttrLILC he I ,
unLi~fmpoi nkitng care Ir..,idl,'
byuMr enp~l Iy~cs. I-'Li-m
diLlkted,1 taft.'and dli-c'., I:

Isc nil ranlc- hI-A. %A%

698 S'outh BroadIIISLrcet,
BoltruikvtIle IFL :3461

FLLK. :3.52-790. 77031
O r callI iur Recullra
www~ihosl li-,r

Hemanda )Pac

Ho45s p- n'c"'e'


MOMENTS
Assorted Figurines. $200
352-419-4272


Appliance


Electric, carpet and
shelves. 3 yrs old.
$1000. 352-419-4553;
352-228-3285
Sheds & Garages
S of Any Size
I *SHEDS NOW*
We Move & Buy Used
Sheds
II ndependence/41
S(352) 860-0111




DROP LEAF TABLE
$100. Misc. chairs. $20
352-341-5247



DOLL CRIB $25
Doll High Chair $15
352-341-5247
GLENN MILLER
96 Original, 78s in eight
hardbound albums w/
poster $100; Big Band
Scrap book $10
(352) 746-1108


Your World

of gaTnage datlej




CI I )'NICi.I',
I_ h '5il ri td


wV ahrcniErl',3nliho cam


CLASSIFIED




27" color w/DVD player
$100 (352) 560-7465
TV RCA 60" Projection
Excellent condition and
works fine. Local
delivery possible $300
(352)270-1775


A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
-) 2 Ton $780.00
-42-y2sTon $814.00
3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Free Del. Lic.#CAC
.057914 746-4394
ABC Briscoe Appl.
Refrig., washers, stoves.
Serv. & Parts
(352) 344-2928
Electric Stove, flat top
Amana, self cleaning,
no power cord $65.
Small Microwave $15.
352-795-2647
GE Upright Freezer
like new, frost free
Model 14DVRWW
13.7 cu f. paid $570.
asking $300 firm (352)
489-5700 or 895-1819
Kenmore Up-right
Fridge. White, icemaker,
66" h X 30"w X 30" d. $350.
Window A/C 110 v. $50
Both like new
(352),795-6736
MINI FRIDGE Haler mini
fridge used 1 year $50
(352) 860-0023
Refrigerator
Whirlpool 25.5 Cu. ft.
side by side, white. $850.
Flat Top Range
$300.(352) 302-3179
WHIRLPOOL WASHER
Excellent condition.
2 years old. $145.
352-795-6650



COMPUTER DESK for
corner with attached file
cabinet, shelf for tower,
and raised shelf for mon-
itor. $200. 352-860-0121



1 TOOL BOX ON
WHEELS in good condi-
tion 75.00
637 0046
18 + foot aluminum
extension ladder $80;
McClain Edger $65
(352) 746-4734
JORGENSON 64020 MI-
TER BOX WITH SAW
$70.00 Excellent condi-
tion 1-352-489-7141
PORTER CABLE
MODEL 444 PROFILE
SANDER $60.00
1-352-489-7141




HOME ENTERTAINMENT
CETNER w/32" Tobishi TV
$100 (352) 726-7815
PANASONIC 42"
PLASMA HDTV. Never
used. With shelved glass
fronted TV stand.
$950.00 352-560-3677
TV
60" Hitachi Ultravision
Projection TV $349.
(352) 746-6272


5 ton A/C Heat pump,
air handler & stat.
Complete ready to
install system $800
(352) 637-4693
90 + USED WHITE
ALUMINUM ROOFING
PANS 1ft x 16f $1500 obo
(352) 382-1735



COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
COMPUTER MONITOR
17 inch. $60
(352) 613-3503
DELL COMPUTER
w/monitor, keyboard,
printer & speakers $75
(352) 746-1108
DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
New & Used systems
upgrades. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
www.rdeeii.com
HP COMPUTER
Complete set.
Paid $1,659 (2004)
Never used.
Sell $850/obo.
352-861-9746/evenings
PC Computer monitors
17 Inch, $15 each obo.
(352) 257-3322



SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
.Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, BIk w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This
bad boy is not for the
, faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucketor
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815




Tractor
"'05, 42HP, like new,
275 hrs. w/
attachments $9,500
(352) 302-3820



18" Poulin Chain Saw
$75; (352) 601-3654 *



White Aluminum Round
Glass Table w/ 4
slingback teal chairs
$100 (352) 746-0183


Antique Table
$400.
Noritaki
12 place setting.
$200.(352) 637-0467
Bassett Recliner
Black, includes brown slip
cover, $75.00 Obo.
(352) 560-0291
Bedroom Set, King size,
Solid pine, natural finish
w/glaze.Headboard, foot-
board, night stand,
dresser & mirror. $425.
Ex. cond.(352) 410-0891
BLUE SOFA, LOVESEAT &
CHAIR
Excellent condition
$350/obo
352-502-2664
BOOKSHELVES book-
shelves $25 (352)
795-3708
Broyhill Oak
Dining Room Set
with six chairs on
casters and Hutch
$450.
(352) 563-2172
BURGUNDY WING RE-
CLINER Large Burgundy
Recliner Wing Style
$125 352-283-0044














CHAIR and LAMP, Floral
papasan chair with ot-
toman, 2 floor cushions,
nice $65. Heavy floor
lamp, very unique $50.
352 489-9795


DEACON BENCH
Dark wood, 43 inches
wide, good condition.
$40 (352) 613-3503
Dining Room set,
med. brown wood,
inlc. 4 chairs, leaf, glass
top, excel. cond.
$195. obo
(352) 489-2953
DINING ROQM TABLE
Older maple with two ,
drop leafs and two chairs
in excellent condi-
tion...$125. 352-634-2253
Glass side Table,
3 /2 shelves $35
Radio/Record/CD/
Tape Player with
storage cabinet $125.
(352) 503-7385
HUTCH Older (1940's)
dark wood with lighted
cabinet in excellent
condition. Reduced to
$150... 352-634-2253
KING DARK WOOD
BEDROOM SET
Headboard,Dressers,nighst
and
40 yrs old $200
352-283-0044
KITCHEN SET
Wood 36"x54" table
w/12" leaf that folds into
table, 4 chairs. Very good
cond. $125.
352-586-6740


SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009 Ds


TWEED COUCH Great
Condition $150.00
464-0316
Large solid wood Desk
$75.
Sofa, really nice
$50.
(352) 628-4766
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30; Full
$40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
Refrigerator
14 Cubic ft. off'
white,
$180.
RV. Refrigerator
Brand New 3
way. $300.
(352) 637-0467
TIFFANY LAMPS
1 Table - $50.
I Floor - $150
352-419-4272
Wood Coffee table &
2 matching side tables
glass inserts $125. for all
-Divider Screen 4 folds,
lace inserts, $50.
(352) 503-7385
YOUR FURNITURE -
DONATIONS
SUPPORTS THE PATH
HOMELESS SHELTER
Call (352) 746-9084



4-ft Garden Wagon
from Lowes. Exc. cond.
$50; Grill/fireplace by
Coleman never used
$40 (352) 489-9795
CRAFTMAN 14.5HP
RIDING MOWER
Just serviced. New
battery. 42" cut.
Runs good
$350. 352-464-0316 .
Gravely Model L
w/30" bush hog & riding
sulky, runs good $550.
352-212-9306



HONDA ACCORD
97 $500! Police
Impounds I for visiting
800-366-9813 x 4246



9 Professional A/C filters,
.21x26 $50 obo
(352) 257-3322
220VOLT 20 GALLON
AIR COMPRESSOR On
Wheels Works Great
$99.00 Firm 464-0316
3RD ROW LEATHER
SEAT for Chevy Subur-
ban $40.
352-341-5020
3-WHEEL JOGGING
Stroller $25; Window A/C
$50 both good.
(352) 628-7688
71/2 ft. pre-lit Christmas
Tree. Tons ornaments,
tinsel, etc., used one
time. $75 obo; Two 13 in.
color Iv's, lw/ dvd,
1 w/VHS. $45 ea.
(352) 601-3654
CLIK-CLAK FUTON
$75.00 excellent
condition. Camel colored
(352) 227-8347 or
795-7764


DOOR & ROLLAWAY
Brown alum. screen
door w/palm tree, $75
Rollaway bed. $20
352-341-5247
Garage Door Open
Sears, 1/3 Hp. $35.00
Circular Saw
Craftsman 7" blade.
$15.00(352) 228-7670
GARDEN EQUIPMENT
Yard tools, 5 pieces
heavy duty $20; Lawn
care chemicals & equip
under $4 (352) 746-1108
HONDA ACCORD
97 $500! Police
Impounds ! for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
Hoover Vacuum
Cleaner Bag less
$40.
Small Color TV
$35.
(352) 503-7385
KITCHEN TABLE SET,
Butcher Block type $65;
Men's Bike $40
(352) 621-0896
PALM TREE PICTURES
$25. DOCTORS SCALE
$50. 352-341-5247
PEDESTAL FAN 16"
Box Fan 20", both for
$10;
Dehumidifier $15
(352) 746-1108
PREMIUM XBOX 360
Great cond. 2 wireless
controllers, 5 high quality
games, including
Madden 'Q9 & NCAA
Football $250
(352) 746-3615
The Citrus
County
Mosquito Control

Is disposing of Surplus
Property. A 1000
gallon (Con Vault)
double walled above
ground fuel tank.
Very good cond.
fuel pump not incl. This
tank was purchased ih
'03 & has never been
used. A min. bid of
$5,000. This tank is
avail. at our facility for
inspection. Mon. thru
Fri. 7:00 a.m. lil 5:30
p.m. If you have any
further questions or
would like additional
information, email to:
iiacobsonlSt
citrbscountv.orq
or call
Joel Jacobson at
(352)527-7478.'
Citrus County
Mosquito Control
District 968 North
Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto Fl. 34461

ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT





- -


$$ SAVE $$

* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
*ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com


r ..i-" ,.-.-5r _


es - ...

SlleB ^F S^^^ 7 ^" ^^ ^l!'a T"^^


DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Repairing gas & diesel
engines. No job too big'
or small. 352-228-2067




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd
friendly sarv. Lowest
rates Free est.
352-860-1452
All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
COLEMAN TREE SERVE.
Trim & Removal. Lic.
Ins. FREEEST. Lowest
rates. 352-270-8462
check out zoomcitrus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852









OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub,
Quality Work Free Est.
LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins
R WRIGHT TreeService
Tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Lic
0256879352-341-6827








At Home Computer
Repairs & custom
computers'.
Call (352)228-7823
COMPUTER DOCTORS
Computer sales/repair



SERVICE





REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch * Installation
Co/Ia for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-1728




Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
work fully coated. 30 yrs.
Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-795-6533
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic.& Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


FERRARO'S.
Painting Service
Int/Ext. Free Est. Press
Cleanin 352 465-6631
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
8 ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./ns.
(352) 726-9998
Mike Anderson
Painting Int/Ext
& Pressure Washing
Call a Professional,
(352) 464-4418
/ Us out zoomcitrus.com



PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE







AT YOUR HOME
Mower & Generator
Repair. 352-220-4244
Lic#99990001273
DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Gas I Diesel Engines
No job too bio or small.
352-228-2067

Mower Repair,
Hernando. Pick up &
delivery, Don Mead
352-400-1483





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
. Specializing in handi-
cap. rlclns. #2441..
352-634-1584




certified caregivers/sitters
20 + yrs exp, Trans. Avail
Lisa 352-422-4765,
Dee Dee 352-422-1267
OUTREACH SENIOR
SERVICES
Affordable, quality
Senior Care.
Companions,
Homemakers, Sitters.
Licenced, Bonded &
Insured Call toll free
1-877-803-1608
www.outreachsenior
companioncom
LIc #231103
PRIVATE DUTY CARE
Specialty: Quality of life
Fl. St. Lic/Bonded, Ref.
Lee (352) 201-4565





All Aspects (352)
489-4189; 322-0962
/ us out zoomcitrus.com


HOUSE CLEANING
$35.00 for most 2/1.
Experienced & reliable,
w/references 228-1789




Affordable CABINETS
& COUNTER TOPS
New & Remodel
, 352-586-8415






tions & Commercial
15 Yrs in Citrus County
352-726-5507
ROGERS Construction
New Homes & All
Construction (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872
Schnettler
Construction, LLC
Lic & Ins CBC1253348
Renovations,
room additions,
decks, barns, garages,
various home repairs.
637-4629 cell
352-260-6756
We will beat any price by
far without compromise.
Dunham Construction
roofing, remodeling,
home maint. painting,
press. wash, etc. talk to
owner 422-6575
(crco452543
us out zoomcitrus.com




SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla rms,
windows, garage scrns
(CBC1257141) 628-0562




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Mike Anderson
Painting Int/Ext
Pressure Washing
Call a Professional,
(352) 464-4418




"HOME REPAIRS"
Painting, power wash
jobs big & small
(Eng./ Spanish)746-3720
" us at zoomcitrus.com
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable, Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
Lic. 5863 (352) 746-0141

Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ins.
0256271 352-465-9201


NATURE COAST
HOME REPAIR
&.MAINT. INC.
-* Offering a Full
Range of Serviceso
.www.naturecoast
inhomerepair.com
Lic. 2776/lns.,
352-634-5499
Visa/MC/Olscover


Advanced Home Imp.
all types of home re-
pair, flooring, soffit&
fascia, pressure wash-
ing, roof repairs and
cleaning, no job to big
or to small
352-201-7972









FAST! AFFORDABLE!
RELIABLEI Most repairs
Free Est., Lic#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *

Senior Saviours
Monthly Maintenance
Service.
A must for ONLY
$40.00 a Month
Call 352-342-9911!
www.SeniorSaviours.co
m





Sheds & Garages f
I Any Size I
S*SHEDS NOW*
SWe Move & Buy
I Used Sheds &
Independence/41
(352)860-0111





#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable, Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
LIc. 5863 (352) 746-0141
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696


DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699
SALTMARSH
ELECTRIC
'Comm/Resid. & Sign
Lighting. CR13012391
352-344-3810
/ us out zoomcitrus.com




FAST! AFFORDABLE!
RELIABLE! Most repairs
Free Est.. Lic#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *
Kurt Mac Intyre Plumbing
All Phases Of Plumbing
325-422-5269




C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/201-1422




PAVING & SEAL COAT
VIGLIONE LLC-lic/Ins
www.TAR-MAX.com
Free Est(3521726-3093




AARON'S FENCE
All Types, Best Price
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
24/7(352) 795-7373
V us out zodmcitrus.com
ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencina.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Fence Work Free
Est. LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins




AAA ROOFING
Free est. 30 yrs exp.
352-563-0411


Cope's Pool & Pavers
* Pool Refinishing
* Interlocking Bnck Paver
* Patio & Driveways

-l - ORDER YOUR
POOL TODAY
& BE SWIMMING
BY SUMMER
- , , "FREE QUOTES"
C .", Lic. & Insured
CPC1456565
S...... 352400.3188


John Gordon Roofing
For a hole in your roof
or a whole new roof.
Free est. 352-795-7003




BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-.
Sidewalks. Estimates
Lic#2579/lns, 257-0078
Decorative concrete,
Landscape curbing
River rock resealing
344-4209 (Lic.6960)
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack repair,staining"
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
, 352-464-3967 -
Quality Concrete Serv.
Layout to Lentil
ALL TYPES, Tractor
352-726-2383, Lic#2567
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554

- i


Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services
40 Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




A Cutting Edge
Tile Job
Showers. Firs etc
(352) 422-2019
Li. #2713, Insured.




ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs,
Texture, Additions
Free est.220-9016
Lic.#SCC131149747




Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone Drive-
ways & Tractor work
341-2019 or 257-1562


BATHFITTER

"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!
Tub to Shower Conversions-Tool!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM


All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,
Hauling, Site Prep,,
Driveways. Lic. & Ins.
(352) 795-5755
ATOP SOIL SPECIALa
3 Yd -$60/ 5 Yd $85
10Yd$175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436




All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris.
removal. 352-302-6955
/us out zoomcilrus.com
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,HaulingSite
Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins795-5755
Ck out zoomcitrus.com




D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
Bobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272















S Guaranteed
Barker's Lawn
Service Monthly or
r Per cut rate i
p (352) 232-8166 "

#1 AGAIN! Pro Tech

owned & operated.
Serving central Citrus
Cty since 1999. Call
for free estimate
302-7800 - Lic/Ins.
C.R /Homosassa
mowing, beds,
brushes, mulch/haul
Commrl & Resdntl
since 1991 220-6761
out zoomcitrus.com
CLEMENTS LAWN &
. Landscape Main.
"Complete Lawn Care"
(352) 489-3070


Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Specials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
3us out zoomcitrus.com
DUN-RITE LAWN SERVE
Lic & Ins Clean up,,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681
check zoomcitrus.com
HALLOCK & Son
Lawncare/Landscaping
Covering all your lawn care
needs. Detailed work.
746-6410 Lic/Ins.
HARRY EVERSON'S
LAWN & MAINTENANCE
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
(352) 302-2585
/ us at zoomcitrus.com
HEDGE TRIMMING,
HAULING(ANY KIND),
LAWN MOWING,
MULCH. FREE ESTI-
MATES. 352-344-9273
OR 352-201-9371
Lawn Care 'N' More
Mow, clean up
brushes, beds
Friendly Service since
1991
Residential/Commrl
(352) 726-9570
out zoomcitrus.com
MOWING & TRIMMING
Residential/ East citrus
county area.
352-302-1511;341-5182
OSBORNE'S
Quality Work - Free
Est. LOWEST RATES
352-400-6016 Lie/Ins

STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up. Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
& LANDSCAPE
SINCE 1999 (Lic/Ins)
628-9848 or 634-0554
v us out zoomcitrus.com



POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
� 352-464-3967




r - MOBILE RV
SERVICE
WE COME TO YOU
Motor Homes
I 5th Whis/Rv's
Master Tech
| 352-586-5870 |
* Storage Available "
L .m .i.m m �


1st Choice
PEST CONTROL, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE


LAWN GOT

PROBLEMS?

Call 503-6821
Owner/Operators ,
Lloyd Smith - Bill Biedenstein - Jim Cf''ry
-M�, 5340W. Glenbrook St.


WATER PUMP SERVICE'
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard






















ar Mat
Fhotographtj
Specializing in:
Children, families"
pets. Business
Portraits. Indoor
or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed"




ELITE PAVING &
SEAL COATING
All types - Res/Comm
352-302-3030 Lic/Ins
us out zoomcitrus.com




Circle T Sod Farms.
Inc.
Tired of your dead
lawn?
Replace it with
Bahia. Delivery
Avail (352)400-2221

LAWN RESTORATION '
All types of Grasses
Low maint Lawns Avail.
J & J Sod 352-302-6049
SOO All Varities I
cut-out,installed,rolled
Lic/ Ins #3000
(352) 422-0641
check out zoomcitrus.comrf


A4dtwweed A44aMceUw
Installations by
Brian nci2531853
it5 tdif twsed4 4S �m iem 4i4t511m
352-628-7519
r a Wd Siding, Soffit

a i. Skirting,
., 'Roelovers,

S Screen .
, P - Rooms. t
[ www.advanccealumlinumnfnio .l


CITRS COtNi( FIl) CIIRONICLIE


I,


Rubbermaid deck ,
storage box 24x48x32 hl
$100; Ivory rattan
smoked glass top
coffee table $25
(352) 746-0183
SOD ALL TYPES
Install & Delivery
Available (352) 257-5760
WEBER Spirit-E-SP-210
Perfect shape, clea, clean
used 4 times, has cover
$175 (352) 621-1664
WOOD CORNER SHELF
74" tall. $60
COLOR TV mounts un-.
der cabinet. $35
352-341-5247



2 MANUAL WHEEL
CHAIRS No Foot Rests
$45.00 Each
464-0316
AMEGO 3 WHEEL
SCOOTER 12 Volt Co-
mes Apart. $20000-
464-0316
FULL SIZE ALL ELECTRIC
HOSPITAL BED. Remote
control & massage.
$600 Call Walter
(352) 527-3552
HARMAN Auto lift $750;
Invacare Power Chair
$800; Invacare Walker
$50 (352) 795-4421
WHEEL WALKER WITH
SEAT & BRAKES New In
Box $85.00 464-0316




Buying Silver Coins
$.10, .25, .50, $1.00
Pre- 1965,
352- 302-8159
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676



Piano
Baldwin Spinet,
Walnut finish, Pd. $2,20Q(e
very good cond. asking*
$500. Hernando ,
(239) 877-1027'
TWO ALTO SAXAPHONES
with cases $250 each
(352) 621-6606
Wurlitzer Piano -
Console, Pecan finish,
matching bench, very
nice. $850.00
(352) 212-2715



FEDDERS AC WINDOVI,
UNIT AC window unit with
remote,'$75
352-283-0044
KING SIZE COMFORTER,
Sheets, shams, drapes,
pillows. Pink/Grey $60
(352) 613-3503
RALPH LAUREN KING
COMFORTER RL Cotton
King Yellow Floral Com-
forter $40 352-283-0044



INVERSION TABLE Top
9f the line, TEETER
EP-850 Model. Like new.
Great bargain at
$125.00. 352-344-4217











D6 SUNDAY, M-AY 24, 2009


CISE BICYCLE Works
Both Arms & Legs Good
Work Out Good Condition
$65.00 464-0316
Total Gym 1500 by
Chuck Norris, never
used. $100 (352)
613-3503
URBAND REBOUNDER
Urban Rebounder
w/handlebar,DVD.Carry
Case $60 283-0044



4 SALE- GUNS & AMMO
AR-15's - AK-47's - Shot
Guns - Pistols. WE BUY.
GOD. 352-489-4870
AMMO 300 rounds,
Federal 223 brass case
55 grain, FMJ $220; 308
AMMO 300 rounds,
brass case $225. (813)
789-0592 Crystal River
AMMO
40 CAL-300 ROUNDS�
$200. 45 Cal 300 Rounds,
$200. Crystal Rvr area
(813) 789-0592
AMMO
762X39 Brass case.
500 Rounds $300.
Crystal River area.
(813) 789-0592
AMMO, 9mm brass
case, FMJ, 500 rounds,
$200 (813) 789-0592
Crystal River Area
BIKE MEN'S TREK 4300'
19 1/2" FRAME, Rack,
computer, 1.50 tires, toe
clips, Orange 6 yrs old,
$175 (352) 344-4357
Complete Set of
Catcher equip. for 9-12
yr. olds. w/nike bag.
60.00. Lv. msg.(352)
746-1693
Complete Set of
Catcher Equipment, for
13 yr. olds & up w/easton
roller bag. $175. Lv.
msg.(352) 746-1693
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CART
Exc. cond. like new.
Fold down windshelld,
curtains, baskets,
buckets, mirror. $1950
352-795-5146
GUN AK47 Rifle
w/colapsable stock, 100
rounds ammo,
w/access. $1000; Trade
Considered (813) *
789-0592 Crystal River
High Standard
Derringer 22 magnum,
exc. cond. $200.
(352) 464-0926
INFLATABLE KAYAK
Clear bottom $150 new,
take $75 obo.
(352) 795-8800
PRIVATE COLLECTOR
Buying Guns,
Ammunition&
reloading supplies
(352) 586-7516'
Rifle US Model, 1917
Winchester, 30-06. $200.
M-1 Garand $550.
Russian Moisen, 762 X
54, new stock, $150.
Model 94 Winchester,
Slever act. 30/30 $400.
XD 45 ACP Springfield,
4",barrel. $400. XD/9
SlSpringfield, 4" barrel,
$400. Ruger Red Hawk
Dbl. action revolver,
44 Mag, 7.5" barrel.
$500.(352) 795-2270
SMITH & WESSON
.-l-i,01-O � -u round
mn.a t I "'n c'r.-lr,-r
prr ,.o- 352-746-1417
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




CAR HAULER
'06, 32 Ft. Dominator XT.
By Classic C. Trpl.
axels. $14,800. Like
new.(352) 835-4273







GM Mini-Van (Venture,
Silhouette, Montana)
older, well maintained
prefer cloth 697-2333



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
A Dog Worth Owning
is A Dog Worth Training
Crittersandcanines.com
(352) 628-2770
ADORABLE YORKIES
AKC, 9 wks. IF/IM.
Health cert., 1st shots,


ALL BREED RESCUE
Now available; Westle,
Schnauzer, Shihtzu,
Maltese mix,
352-553-2604
CHIHUAHUA
AKC -Male 12wks- Fawn
Annle Head Perfectl
Shots, healthy. $450
352-637-1111
CHIHUAHUA'S
CKd Reg. Current shots, '
$195.Health cert
(352) 406-7123
FREE MALE CATloves
to be held and petted,
needs loving home cell
352-586-4428
German Sheppard
Puppies, 21 Wks. 2
males, 2 ferns.,1 is blue
all the rest black & tan.
. papers, & health certs.
$300.(352) 201-0111 -
GERMAN SHEPPARD
puppies. 8 wks, 6 Fern.
3 males. All black & tan.
Health cert. $300
(352) 795-7897
(561)324-3151


HONDA ACCORD
97 $5001 Police
Impounds I for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
Need Someone to
Shear 13 Sheep &
Keep the wool
cell (863) 843-2495
Mini farms off 495
Poodles, Mini pups,
males, AKC reg. Choco-
late, blue, silver, beautiful
& well socialized.$300.
(352) 527-1920
PUGGLE PUPS
(pug/beagle); Sheltle,
Paplllon & maltepoo
pups $375-$450
(352)216-1481
ROTWEILLER PUPPIES .
Absolutely Beautiful,
8wks, AKC, big boned,
shots, wormed. Parents,
$650 + (352) 503-6316


2 New Liters Home
raised w/ love. All shots
included. $300+
3902 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827
(305) 872-8099





Orchid grass 601b
bale $12.00
(352) 628-0156



Mini Horse
Stud, 5 yrs. old.
White & brown. $250.
Obo.(352) 628-1277

Summer Horse
Camp
(352) 382-5400
www.rymarranch.com
THOROUGHBRED
Reg. 9yrs old gelding.
$800. QUARTER HORSE
Paint Stallion. $800
352-726-4135



BABY GOATS SHEEPs
* & Pigeons
For nets only.
Mini Farm off 495
(863) 843-2495 cell
RHODE ISLAND REDS
Assorted Bantams,
Polish, Ducks & Quail
Starting at $2.
352-795-6381



1993 17' Sylvan
Bow rider bimini top
Boat & traitor
85h.p. Yamaha motor
Good cond. $3,500
(352) 344-0457
16FT CAR. SKIFF
'96, like new, $5,500
40HP Evinrude, center
console, trolling motor,
b-top, many extras
(352) 344-5858.
AIR BOAT
Big 13 Ft.ihaul,
2 seats. Approx.'375-400
HP. 8 blade warp drive.
2-1 reduction gear box.
Used 100 hrs.+ Trl.
$18,500 invest. Sell
for $10,000 firm.
(352) 302-4535
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic inch,
Cadillac engine
Completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
AQUA SPORT '05
175 Osprey , 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual
bait. w/switch, bimini,
easy load trailer. Low
hours. $9,990
352-860-0277
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
,115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
.91290L352-746-5856
AQUA SPORT
2000; 225 Explorer 24'
Cuddy cabin. 225
Johnson Ocean Pro.
Loadmaster tandem axle
trailer. Exc. cond.
$14,500.352-493-7377;
352-221-5230
AQUA SPORT
'86 25FT 'ucld, 'C.)b ,

150hp & double
axle trailer. $16,900
(352)257-1355.
BOSTON WHALER
14 ' w/ 40 hp Johnson,
Everything works good
$1800 (352) 302-0033
Cabin Cruiser
24 ft.
Owner died, 6 cyl. 10,.
alpha one/OD, used in
fresh water, tan. gal. trl
,Jncl/'d $2,100 464-0316
CENTURY
'01- Bay, 21ft:
'02, 150HP Yamaha w/
trlr., custom cover
dep/find,,VHF, Iwhrs.,
like new, $13,950.
(352) 442-7772
CENTURY
'01- Bay, 21ft.
'02,150HP Yamaha w/
trlr., custom cover
dep/find, VHF, Iw hrs.,
like new, $13,950.
(352) 442-7772
Deck Boat
95' 19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ ra-
dio & fishfinder. New Bat-
tery switch. 2 batteries,
power pk.
prop./hub.$6,000
.(352) 726-0838
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras
$14,500/obo. (352)
489-9640: 220-6508
GRADY WHITE
20f0., 200 hp, Honda
4-stroke, 2004, 179 hours
on motor. Kept Indoors,
Exc. cond., + trailer
$9,995 (352) 637-2145
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ff.,
115HP, 4strke Yamaha,
w/trlr. $11,200. will
trade (352) 503-3778
HURRICANE
23ff Deck Boat, 112HP
Johnson, great for fish-
ing & scalloping Must
Sell $3,500, 628-7397
OSPREY
1994- 16ft, CC, bay boat.
88 HP Evinrude, Garmin
GPS/recorder $4500.
352-621-4711
PONTOON '08
Sweelwater 21ft. 25 hours.
90hp Yamaha.
$16,500. Many Extras
352-503-6797
PONTOON
22' Palm Beach 2002
60hp Yamaha $4800
(239) 571-2628
Pontoon Boat
1996, 18 ft., Good Cond.
40HP Yamaha, 4 stroke,
$8,500/obo


(352) 860-1490
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras
$12,000 (352) 628-0281
PRO-LINE 221
WALKAROUND 1999
200 HP Mercury w/ 9.9 HP
Johnson klcker,$12k
obo. Call Kurt at Pete's
Pier 352-795-6067
SEA PRO
'00 19 FT. C/C. Loaded.
Elec. Pkg. 115 FI 4 Strk.
Yam. 100 hrs. Bim. top.
Best offer(352)533-3093
SHOAL WATER
'05, 15ft., Cat Hull,
50HP Evinrude, CC,
extremely shallow
for Flats, with trailer
$12,500. (352)621-0848


08' 20 Ft. To many
options to list. $13,000
Call for info. 628-7926
T-CRAFT
23'L, 6'W, '02 150H
Evin. mtr. w fuel enj. like
new, trlr. w/brks
$7750 352-489-3661
Ultimate Scallop
Boat 03, 25' Sun
Tracker, 05 Mere 90hp, lo
hrs. tandem trail. like new
exc. value $11,500.
352-586-1676




















WELLCRAFT
1987, 250 Sportsman,
25', Gas eng., 30" draft,
260 hp I/O, alum.
trailer.$8,000
(352) 344-9651



'02 Cedar Creek 5th
Wheel 29fi, 2-slides,
queen bed,bath/shower,
low mileage, loaded,
god cond. $16,800
(352) 746-4969

5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets..
SInverted, central van.
26inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
'07 NEW MAR
Cypress 32ff 5th wheel.
2 slides. Separate bath.
Extras. 3 yr ext. warn.
$352),900/065







Impoudsfer We, 28E3
Iaslide. 1r00 Wets .


38 F h.Tde306500.
352-794-3534
38FT BOUNDER '96
� Class-A - basement
model. 49K mi. 14mpg,
new tires & brakes. (4)
TV's. Ready for long trip.
2 352-563-0615
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/Slide. 36 K Mi.









'si.ea f.uA longrip.
Dual air, $37,700 Obo.
352-586-3090
* AU. BO.AT *

: 50 rPo lieold
I moorn.dpordalln
01-C.-3 Crxnr3
S Maritime Ministries
a (352) 795-9621
* Tax Deductible *

CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT.USA
US19, Across Airport


CHEVY'86 Class C
..eI $4,000. Call
anyrme (352)446-6329


body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane NewA
deal. 30Q, class A rhotor
home, 31'. ft, 22k mi
V10 ga:- lucled n ar.
onan -K gen qn I5e,
etc. Saturn tow incl.
$35,000. (352) 397-5007
GEORGIE BOY
'05, Pursuit, Class A,
30ft. Excel, cond. 8k mi.,
2 slide outs, 2 TV's, back
up camera, all the bells
and whistles and much
more, must see this;
coach, Asking.$50,000.
obo (352) 746-7626
GULF STREAM
BT Cruiser 03, 22' fully
loaded, ready to travel
$27,500....-
(352) 341-1297
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
Great RV Park, pool,
clubhouse etc:.Can be
moved $29,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
Holiday Rambler
'03, By Monico, 300
Cummins, 2 slides, incl.
. tow vehicle,
mint cond. $79,900.
(352) 302-7073
Holiday Rambler
Admiral Motor Home 36'
2 slides, 340hp, gas eng.
all options transf ext.
warr. $51,900
352 795-3970
HONDA ACCORD
S 97 $5001 Police
Impounds I for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1,'slide, loaded.
$52,995. 352-464-0371
Keystone 07
Big Sky 5th Wheel Prem.
Pkg 340RLQ every op-
tion. Center Island Kit.
incos sep.W/D, added 2nd
a/c in bedroom
Price to Sale $52K firm
352-794-3068
PACE ARROW
04, 38' 3 SLIDES
21k mi fully loaded
3 tv's $92,500 obo
352-302-0743
VOLKSWAGON
'01 Rialta, model 22FD,
18-21 mpg,51k org. ml.
fully self contained, too
mdny extras to list call
for details. Super Nice


(352)628-9599



BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig. Like
new. $9,995.
352-489-3661
COLEMAN NIAGRA
2002, 15FT, opens to
26FT, 1 slide, $5,500 obo
(352) 302-1322
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call/ Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO
07 Jay Flight
28' used twice, smells &
looks new, green clean,
sips 6 $16,800 (352)
503-7431


CLASSIFIED




'04, Hybrid Travel Trir. '05 SLK, $24,995. 2 avail.
AC, Heat, Micro. Tub/ Ocala Volvo
Shwer, toilet exc cond (352) 629-7299
$9,500. 352-564-4151 MERCEDES
MEADOWBROOK '05 SLK, $24,995. 2 avail.
5th Wheel, 2000 Excel- Ocala Volvo
lent. Photos at (352) 629-7299
http:Ilpicasaweb.google.c MERCEDES
ommeadowbrook.Glenn- '08 C- CLASS,$29,995
$13,995.00 Ocala Volvo
(352)302-6055 or (352) 629-7299
(727)692-9045 (352)
Montana MERCURY '04
'03, 5th wheel, 3 slides Grand Marquis LS, bik
like new,$30,000. w/tan int., 63K, adult
Truck avail also for tow owned. Nonsmoker,all
(352) 422-5731 options. Estate car.
$8900/neg.
PROWLER 352-465-8722
'99 21', self contained,
sleeps 6,.new tires, AC, MGB
bath, etc. $5,300 Convertible 1977, 57k mi.
(352) 795-1417 Blue, many xtras
Excellent Condition
SKYLINE 04 $10,500 (352)628-0281
32' sleeps 8, used MITSUBISHI
once $11,500 '03, Diamante LS, excel.
(352) 586-9614 cond. Always serviced.
Fully equip. Priced be-
low Kelly BB. $7,900.
352-382-5702
MITSUBISHI
$5001 Police '09, Spider, as new,
Impounds for sale 2.200 mi., All black
Cars from $500 BEST OFFER
800-366-9813 x 7374 (352) 503-7626
'90 Chev Lumina 4 dr. SATURN
3.1, V-6 $375 obo '01, L-300, leather, sun
2 truck doors, good roof, new tires, 78K. mi.
shape '73-'90 $300 $6,500, (352) 795-5032
obo(352) 344-2984 -SUZUKI
il '07 Forenza. 30K mi,
w/100k warr. LOADED
tw/touch scrn nav.
$$CASH PAID$$ $12,800. 352-613-6613
Wanted Vehicles TOYOTA
Dead or Alive, '06 Corolla,
Dale's Auto Part $11,995 Ocala Volvo
352-628-4144 (352) 629-7299
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$ TOYOTA
Paid for Junk Vehicles '06, Highlander,
J.W. 352-228-9645 Hybrid,, 100,000 mi.
warranty. $19,995.
CARS, TRUCKS, (352) 382-1857
RV'S, BOATS TOYOTA SUPRA '89
Cash or ConsignA All original, red, 79k mi.,
COS9 GNM T A 6 cylinder, all power,
US1(9, Acrss Airport tafga roof. Original
(352) 461-4518 owner. Garaged, $7,695
consignmentusa.org (352) 726-3427
'CASH BUYER VOLVO
Buvina Used Cars '05 S60, $15,995
Trucks & Vans Ocala Volvo
For used car lot (352) 629-7299
LARRY'S AUTO SALESVOLVO
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River VOLVO
Since 1973 564-8333 '06S40, $15,995
-Ocala Volvo
We Buy Junk Cars (352) 629-7299
Running or Not
Cash Paid, $150 & Up VOLVO
(352) 771-6191 '06 S60, $17,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S80, $17,995
$5001 Police Ocala Volvo
Impounds for sale (352) 629-7299
Cars frm 00.VOLVO
800-366-9813 x 7374 08S VOLVO4 $17995 /
'88 BUICK ELECTRA 2 avail. Ocala Volvo
Runs good, rear end (352) 629-7299
damage, drive or parts VOLVO
(352) 795-8800 '08 S60, $19,995
'94 ACCORD EX ocala volvo
4dr. 160k miles. Ice cold (352) 629-7299
,a/c.Auto. $1500 or
trade. 352-746-1417 Classic
BMW
'03, 745 LI, NAV, black,
sun roof. all *options $29K 1954 CHRYSLER
Mint Imperial, Restorer's
(352) 746-2696 Dream. $3500/obo
BUICK 352-228-0597
'07 Lacrosse CX. $5001 Police
9,500 Mi. Ruby red, like ' Impounds for sale
new. Must see. $12,900 Cars from $500
Wooten's(352) 637-7117 800-366-8813 x 7374
CADILLAC 05 '53 MERCURY
:.1: 13ac. '3 cj.r.-gl-.ioi 2.0', narai:.p 3;:0 V-8,
C-..r.ei ,, . .i . 0 . ua M.a I, a e .'r. part;
. 2.o r.1r, : c 1.01 352-621-0182;
S 352-201-0991 727-422-4433
CADILLAC "56 FORD
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi. Custom line 4 door se-
Car Fax avail. Light gold, dan. 6 cyl auto. $9,500.
exc. cond. $7,500 Will consider trade for
(352) 382-2715 travel trailer of equal
CHEVY value.(352) 628-4053
'96 Camaro, Cony. rare ALFA ROMEO
auto, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet '76, Spider. Project car.
black, dependable. $2300 obo
$4700 352- 563-0615 352-382-5702
CONSIGNMENT USA BUICK 67
*Clean Safe Auto's4 RIVIERA, 430 wildcat
Financing Avail.' motor, 86k mi. amfm,
US19, Across Airport "a/c. title whi, elect seats,
(352) 461-4518 very good cond. $8000
consignmentusa.org (352) 527-3961
CAMARO IROC Z
CORVETTE l88 Red, PS./PB. Cold -
02, Z06, A.C. 62,000 Mi. Great
Black, low mi., over Condition. $6,900:.
30 mpg hwy. $24,400. (352) 422-5663
(352) 613-5355' CHEVY
CORVETTE '69 Classic C10 SHT BD'
1007 convertible '350/350 AC, PS,
corvette,only 4,076 mi- .$15K or trade
les on this rare silver on (352) 746-9212
silver on silver vette,
power convertible top, EL CAMINO '81
6 sp auto, paddle shift, 305 Auto, All new
heads up display, mag- interior, & paint. Crager
netic F55 suspension, mags & tires. 4" raised
- navigation system, all hood. $3,250.
options available are on (352)341-3613.
this gorgeous vette, GM El Camino
Over $2,000 in '84, 1-owner, low
aftermarket parts miles. $5,000/obo or will
Included, Your's consider trade.
for only , $48,000. 352-628-7077
352- 270-3193 GTO
CORVETTE 1967, The real deal, older
'80, Stingray, white, auto, restoration, just out of
SHOW CAR! storage $25K or trade
$11,500 or will trade for (352) 621-0666-
truck. 352-563-6428 HONDA ACCORD
DODGE 97 $5001 Police
'02 Situss SXT.4 CyL' Impounds ! for listing
2 Sius SXT4. 800-366-9813 x4246
aub, ~a, aded. 43KI. A U R
extra clean. $5,980 JAGUAR
Wooten's(352) 637-7117 '76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint;
' FORD 63K mi., $8,900obo
'05 Taurus SE, V-6 (352) 527-4221
Loaded, 43K. mi. extra (908) 763-8384
clean. Must see. $7,880. MERCEDES BENZ
Wooten's (352)637-7117 1q85 380SL, 2 top road-
FORD ster. Drives, looks great.
'99 Crown Victora, Many new Mercedes
former detective car. Cold parts. New NC. Must
AC. Runs great. $2,700. see! REDUCED! $7,900.
Obo.(352) 613-5776 . David 352-637-6443.
HONDA MG MIDGET
'08 Civic, $17,995 '77, New int. & seats.
Ocala Volvo Need to be install. Extra
(352) 629-7299 trans. & parts. $4,000.
HONDA ACCORD (352) 621-0126
97 $500! Police g, , .- -


Impounds I for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
KIA
'04, Ofima 35k Mi.
loaded. I Can't drive
anymore, $5,900 obo
(352) 344-5555 ext. 101 . - -
� KIA RIO PLYMOUTH Barracuda
2001 88K m New1970,$4000, 75000
2001b8e8Kmi. New tlm- miles,coupe, automatic,8
Ing belt, good cond. cylinder, exterior:
Well maint. $2,100 obo purleinteo back
(352) 637-5816 chelseasmouse@gmail.co
LINCOLN '94 m
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi, THUNDERBIRD
white. Well maintained. ' NE IR
$2650. (352) 628-7410: 38K. Mi. Like New.
628-6370 $12,900 Obo. Will trade.
LINCOLN (352) 795-0122
'96, Towncar, garage
kept, 88K miles, loaded
$3,900 obo
(352) 344-5555 ext. 101
.MAZDA '94 CHEVY
'03, Protege, auto Ext. cab, 8 ft bed. New
trans, AC, AM FM w/ motor, good cond. 2
CD, PW, PL, 83,400-mi. wheel drive Z71 pkg.
$4,975 (352) 220-2199 $3,900.
MECHANIC'S DREAM 352-563-1518 Iv msg
MERCURY '87 GR Marq. CHEVROLET
New gas tank, radiator, 1994, 1500 W/T. runs
batt., pnt-vin top. 27k orig great, new A/C, top-
mi. Blown head gasket. per. $2,000 obo
$600/firm 352-503-7548 (352) 302-1322


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CHEVY
'88 S-10, auto, 2.8
V-6, short bed, 2 wh.
drive, cold air, great truck.
$1,900. Obo.
(352) 564-0039
(352) 279-8179
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
'DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awe-
some Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded
every special feature. Sr.
awn, gar. kept., 27K mi,
$40K
invested Sale $21,750
See online ad photos
www.autotrader.comfatca
rid/at-f3fd39f
John (352) 7,26-1076
DODGE RAM '00
Std cab, rare 5spd, hemi,
V8, a/c, 25mpg, new 22"
rims & tires. Dependable
$3700. 352-563-0615
FORD
'00, F250, 7.3 Desel,
84K mi. raised, custom
int., red, $15,500 obo
(352) 344-5555 ext. 101
FORD
'02 F-150 XLT, Ext. cab,.
4dr, auto, loaded black &
silver, extra clean, sharp.
$7,995 Wooten's
(352) 637-7117
FORD 04
Ranger, X-cab. Exc. cond
38k mi. SLASHED THE
PRICE $97K to $8,500
(352)746-3919
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serv.van. 41K Mi./5.4 L:
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serv. body/dble lock drs.
$20,000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
93, White Box Truck,
runs good $1500 obo
(352) 564-0700
FORD F-150
1995, 4x4, cold a/c,
new tires , runs good
$2500 obo(352)
564-0530
HONDA ACCORD
97 $500! Police
Impounds ! for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale!
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
BUICK
'03 Rendezvous.
$8,995 Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
CADILLAC
'05 Escalade, low mi. all
power, sun roof,
exc. cond. $28,000
(347) 266-9328
CADILLAC 2004 Esca-
lade $19,500 - Low Mi-
les 43500 OnstarXm
Radio and Phone ready,
3rd Row Seats, Rear
Air, Heated Seats, Run-
ning Boards, 22"
rims/tires and original
Rims/tires. Garage
Kept/Non Smoker
352-302-6073
CHEVY
'06 Trailblazer
$12,995. 2 avail. Ocala
Volvo (352) 629-7299
CHEVY
BLAZER '99 LS 4dr.
126k mi. loaded, great
cond. sunroof, $4k obo
352-422-0065
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air &
exhaust, Exc. Cond. $6,000
obo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl
drive, class 3 hitch, Orig
� owner. Great shape &
price. $8,750.
352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
GMC ENVOY
Red,'03, 60k ml., On-Star,
5-passenger, $10,500
obo (352) 527-3445
HONDA ACCORD
97 $500! Police
Impounds I for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, $8,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
LEXUS
'07 RX 350, Black, tan
leather int. Navigation, back
up cam, blue tooth, very
clean, 75K.mi.
$25,000.(352) 527-8372
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG. Silver
W/black int. Loaded,
57K.Mi. New $64K.Ask
$20K. (352)489-7674
TOYOTA
'03, 4-Runner SR5, 6 cyl
leather, moon roof
tow pkg. $8,500 firm.
(352) 563-9834
VOLVO
'06 XC90, $20,995
3 avail. Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
FORD '06 F-150
Crew cab XLT. Tow pkg
& topper, 51K mi.
Exc cond. LOADEDL
$18,500/obo. (352)
634-1378; 795-2053
HONDA ACCORD
97 $500! Police
Impounds! for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
SUZUKI
'96, Sidekick,


4 x 4 with RV tow
packages 1,995.00
(352) 697-5530



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
j )467-0872m


DODGE
'03 Grand Caravan SE.
low mi. 53K. dual air, sun
screen, CD & cass. New
tires. Looks & drives like
new. White, $6,800.
(352) 860-1106
HONDA ACCORD
97 $500! Police
impounds ! for listing
8001366-9813 x 4246

ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT




i-



$$ SAVE $$

* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com


$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
HONDA T
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains & tows
heavy loads. $3200/or
trade. 352- 563-0615
Crystal River



2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
SDYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900mi. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. Hi perf.
Over $43,000 in receipts.
, 17k mi. $11,700
352-563-0615
Crystal River
1970's HONDA MINI
TRAIL - Classic,
3-spd auto clutch.
Excellent condition.
$900. 352-228-3285
352-419-4553
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'97 SOFT TAIL HARLEY
DAVIDSON. Custom
build. 3K ml. Black,
chrome. Must See! $15 k
invested-$9,000 sacrifice
(352) 860-0675
'99 SUSUZKI MARAUDER
805,15k mi., $3500 obo;
'05 SUSUZKI VINSON 500
ATV 4x4 $3300 obo
Call for info
. (352)220-7152
HARLEY
'96 Sporster 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes,chro. Ex. clean
$4,850.(352) 637-5143
Harley Davidson
2005, Dyna Wideglide
7,400 ml.. excel, cond.
$1.1,000.
(352) 249-7277
Harley Davidson
81 Shovelhead, 80",
completely serviced,
good shape Ex
access $5,.395 obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109
HARLEY
DAVIDSON
96 Heritage Soft tail, red
many extras $9600 call
evenings (352) 746-3613
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 Mi.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
Sof chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 .6 Spd. 8,700 Mi.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
HONDA 04
1300 VTX,
thousands in options.
mint condition $5900 obo
S(352) 302-7073
HQNDA ACCORD
97 $5001 Police
Impounds I for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
HONDA
Aero 2006 windsheild
V & H pipes, 2nd seat,
sissy bar $5200 obo
352-302-4320
HONDA
Shadow Arrow 06,
garage kept, not in rain,
floorboard $6200 obo
(347)223-7269 aft 3:30
KAWASKI
'00, ZRX 1100
CC,15K. Mi. Very
fast, many extra s.
$4k obo.
(352)621-3764
SCOOTER
'06 Suzuki, 400,
Bergman. 4,200 Mi. Like
new cond. $4,500
(352) 382-2715
SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Bik w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" oarlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This
fad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k
invested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
SUZUKI
'77, 750 CC,
$1,100 Firm.
(352) 563-5688
VENTO PHANTOM
Scooter, 318 miles,
150CC, Like new.
$2,190/obo.
352-422-2433
YAMAHA
'05 YZ125 DIRT BIKE
Race ready. Many ex-
tras. $2500. 352-
586-1683: 586-9349
YAMAHA
2005 V-Star Classic 1100
5000 mi. BIk & gold,
much chrome,
immaniiilaa is 7nn


358-0524 SUCRN
6/4 meeting- Resident Advisory Board
PUBLIC NOTICE


PUBLIC NOTICE BY CITRUS COUNTY
DIVISION OF HOUSING SERVICES
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the RESIDENT ADVISORY
BOARD will meet at 9:00 AM on the 4th of June, 2009, at
The Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Room 146, Lecanto, Florida.
Any person desiring further Information regarding this
meeting may contact Lynne Clarke, Assistant Director
at the Housing Services Division. 3600 West Sovereign
Path - Suite 147, Lecanto, FL 34461 (352) 527-5385.
Any person requiring special accommodation (ADA)
for a disability at the time of the meeting must call the
Division of Housing Services at least 72 hours in ad-
vance at 527-5305. If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to ap-
peal any decision of the Governing Body with respect
to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may
need to provide that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceeding Is made, which record includes testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based
(Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 24, 2009.


357-0524 SUCRN
PUBUC NOTICE
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
RFP No. 043-09
Alternative Landfill Cover
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners in-
. vites Interested parties to submit a Proposal to provide
Alternative Landfill 'Cover Material and Equipment to
apply the material.
The County has received approval from the Florida De-
partment of Environmental Protection to use as alter-
native landfill cover the following products: "ProGuard
SB', "ConCover', "Posl-Shell" and "FINN Waste Cover".
Proposals are !being' solicited from companies for only
for those specific products. No "alternatives" or
equalss" to these products will be considered.
-SEALED Proposals are to be submitted on or before June
24, 2009 @ 2:00 PM to Ronald -Bamer, Office of Man-
agement & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite
266, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
A Public Opening of the Proposals Is scheduled for
June 24, 2009 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Room 226, Lecanto, Florida 34461. The only Information
conveyed at the public opening will be the names of
the companies who submitted Proposals.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to the
public opening because of a disability or physical im-
pairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at.(352) 527-5457 at least two days before the
meetings. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Proposal Docu-
ment for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select
"BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left hand side of the Home
Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.

CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
John Thrumston, Chairman
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle
May 24, 2009.

356-0524 SUCRN
Bid 09-B-13 Sidewalk Repair Project
PUBLIC NOTICE.
INVITATION TO BID
City of Crystal Rivere
Sidewalk Repair Project
BId E09-B-13
The City of Crystal River will receive sealed bids for Side-
walk Repair Project. You are hereby Invited to submit a
bid on the above referenced project.
OWNER: City of Crystal River
123 NW Highway 19
Crystal River, FL 34428
Bids will be received until 10:00 AM, on June 10, 2009,
opened and read aloud at '10:15 AM In the Council
Chambers at Crystal River City Hall. - -
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Perform all WORK and furnish
all necessary labor, equipmerlt, material and transpor-
tation for repairs to the existing sidewalks through out
the designated areas. Contractor shall remove dam-
aged sidewalks to the nearest control joint.
Following locations-
NE 11 h Street NE 91h Ave. .
NE 8th Ave NE 10th Ave
NE 6tn Ave SE Paradise Pt. Rd.
NW 19th Street NW Crystal Street
NE 7th Ave. NE Crystal Street
SE Kings Bay Drive
ALL BIDDERS must be qualified for the type of work for
which the BID Is submitted. BIDS must be enclosed in
an opaque envelope and marked:
"BID FOR SIDEWALK REPAIR PROJECT.
BID #09-B-13", AND THE
NAME OF THE BIDDER AND HIS ADDRESS
BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO:
CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
CAROL A. HARRINGTON, CITY CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428
All contract documents may be examined at City Hall.
No BIDS may be withdrawn for a period of SIXTY (60)
days after closing time scheduled for receipt of BIDS.
The OWNER reserves the right to reject any and all BIDS
for any reason whatsoever Land waive all Informalites.
THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES' THE RIGHT TO SELECT THE
BID RESPONSE THAT IN ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST
MEETS ITS BUSINESS NEEDS.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 24,2009.


354-0607 SUCRN
2007-DP-722 Term. of Parental Rights
(To: Jonathan Harris) Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2007-DP-722
IN THE INTEREST OF:
A.P. DOB: 02/23/96
K.H. DOB: 02/19/98
A.W. DOB: 03/30/04
Minor Chlttd(ren)
NOTICE OF ACTION. SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF
ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIP
THE STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: Jonathan Harris
L/K/A Unknown
You are hereby notified that a petition under oath
has been filed In the above-styled court for the termi-
nation of your parental rights as to K.H. a male child
bom on 19th day of February, 1998 In Citrus County,
Florida, and for placement of the child with the Florida
Department of Children and Families for subsequent
adoption, and you are hereby commanded to be and
appear before General Magistrate Keith Schenck of
the Circuit Court or any judge assigned to hear the
above cause, at the Advisory Hearing on June 15, 2009
at 1:30 PM. at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N.
Apopka Avenue, 3rd floor, Inverness, FL 34450.
YOU MUST PERSONALLY APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME
SPECIFIED.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING OR THE ADJUDICATORY TRIAL FOR THE TERMI-
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO
THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THESE
CHILDREN. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND
TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO
THE CHILDREN NAMED IN THE PETITION.
YOU ARE ENTITLED TO HAVE AN ATTORNEY PRESENT TO
REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU WANT AN ATTOR-
NEY, BUT ARE UNABLE TO AFFORD ONE, YOU MUST
NOTIFY THE COURT, AND THE COURT WILL DETERMINE
WHETHER YOU QUALIFY FOR AN ATTORNEY TO BE


APPOINTED TO REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, if you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in order to
participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact John Sullivan at the Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness. FL
34450 or phone (352) 341-6700 within two working days
of your receipt of Notice of Advisory Hearing for
Termination of Parental Rights. If you are hearing
Impaired or voice Impaired, call 1-800-955-8771.
THIS NOTICE shall be published once a week for four
consecutive weeks In the Citrus County Chronicle's
Classified Section.
Dated this 13th day of May, 2009, at Inverness, Citrus
County, Florida.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of Courts
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Kelly Carpenter
Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle.
May 17, 24, 31 and June 7, 2009. '


L egals


I Legals^






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Your Downtown Dealer


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732-2866
TOLL FREE
1-866-217-7815


FL 34471


All offers are exclusive and cannot be combined. Factory rebate and 0% APR are not compatible. Dealer reserves right to correct errors. These offers are through May 25. 2009. Sogo restrictions / qualifications may apply. So Dealer for details, (1) 0% for 72 months on
new 2009 Uncoln MKZ or new 2009 Mercury Milan V6. Requires Ford credit contract, not all applicants may qualify. (2) Discount from Dealer suggested retail price and vary by model and equipment level.The 00S0 maximum Dealer discount is on new Uncoln MKS
5130. (3) Factory rebate varies by model. The $5000 maximum rebate is on new 2009 Mercury Grand Marquis. Prices plus S489Admin Fee, Tax Tag. (4) 3.9% APR for 36 months on select Certified vehicles. Requires Ford credit contract. Not all applicants may qualify.


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SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2oog D7.:


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS IS GREAT AT CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE
LOOK AROUND. EVERYONE IS DRIVING ONE!


CHECK OUT THESE BIG SAVINGS


2008 VERSA 2008 CALIBER
A=E^ =WWI


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 6151
SAVE 5,990*
2008 SENTRA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584-8755 Ext. 6149
SAVE $6990*
2008 ALTIMA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 6150
SAVE 17,9900
2008 ROGUE


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.5848755 Ext. 6147
SAVE$7,990*
2008 TITAN


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 6148
SAVE $9,990*

CRYSTAL

937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext. 1
crystalautos.com 44


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND-SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext.2180
SAVE $4,990*
2008 300


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext.2136
SAVE-7990*
2008 CARAVAN


FREE 24 RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext.2181
SAVE 8,990*
2008 TjO COUNTRY


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2137
SAVE 10,990*
2008 RAM


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 2182
SAVE 11,990*

CRYSTAL
Jeep
1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
2077 HWY. 44 W.
INVERNESS
800-584-8755 Ext. 1,
Scrysfalautos.com


2008 AVEO


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.5848755 Ext. 1136
SAVE $4,990*
2008 MALIBU


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
8004584.8755 Ext. 1131
SAVE 7,990*
2008 IMPALA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800584.8755Ext.1132
SAVE $8,990*
2008 TRAILBLAZER


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 1134
SAVE 10,990*
2008 SILVERADO


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 1135
SAVE t12,990*
CRYSTAL


4-- AN AmBRIAN
REVOLUTON


1035 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext. I
crystalautos.com


TRADING IN A VEHICLE?
"You must know what your trade is worth, no matter where you plan to buy..."
CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
4 800-440-9054


*MSRP when vehicle was new minus Selling Price equals Savings. Cannot be combined with other offers. All prior sales excluded and may restrict stock. Not responsible for typographical errors: Vehicles are pre-owned and pictures are for illustration
purposes only.


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E2 SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009

Redal Estate DIGEST

ERA
Suncoast
taps top

ERA Suncoast
,ealty is proud to
announce the fol- Harry Eck and
:wing achieve- Karen Stukes
nents by their ERA Suncoast
associates. Realty..
The
ather/daughter team of Harry Eck and
(aren Stukes recently reached $2 million
i closed sales.
They can be reached at the office at
'95-6&11.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DIGEST DEADUNES


* Submit information for the Real
Estate Digest by 4 p.m. Thursday
for publication Sunday.
* Headshots of real estate agents
and associates submitted for the
Real Estate Digest are kept on. file
in the Chronicle Editorial Depart
ment. It is the responsibility of
the individuals submitting news
notes to ensure headshots have
been sent to the newsroom, and
to advise staff of any name
changes.
* Submit material, attn: Home-
Front, at Chronicle offices in Inver-
ness or Crystal River; fax to
563-3280; or e mail to news-
desk@ chronicleonline.com.


-From staff reports

O EKEMY Your Sugarmill Woods Specialists
ER " 8015 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446
Office 382-1700 * 1-800-237-1112 * Fax: (352) 382-5580 1Z

Tony & Louise Schmid

352-382-5579
www.goFLhomes.com







In "The Hammocks" 2 Master Bedrooms
* Free standing home; no outside work * Lots of living space in 2 story Condo
* 3 split bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage Great room opens to 24 foot patio
* Vaulted ceilings; enclosed lanai Balcony off.1 of the Master bedrooms
* Secured, heated community pool In unit laundry + powder room
* Large rooms, Plant shelves -Attached garage + guest parking
* In unit Laundry * Share BBQ Area
Lowest Prices $180,000 Call &seo today. Priced to Sell @ $85,000

CAROLYN LISTER V}
B * Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
im cell: 422-4620 KE"Y
. .... office: 382-1700
,View virtual tours @ www.Usterllstings.com
Remember Our Fallen Heroes!
I~r Tl--. - Ir 11


CAREFREE CONDO LIVING 4 BEDROOM HOME!
* 1/1/1 w/ all large rooms * 4/2/2 w/ family room
* Enc. lanai & screened porch * Pool w/ waterfall
* Tile & Berber floors * Stainless appliances
*.Small pets allowed * Breakfast bar & cafe room
* Furniture available * Master garden tub + shower
#333108 $110,000 #331875 $275,500


~~V SpeialP~izin in Terra VI ~d T ista

I& retwod esle
wwwTeraisa a*y ou.co


Terra Vista &Brentwood


Rentals.,'

Terms- 6 Months or More









CITRUS CoriNTh' (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY MAY 24, 2009 E3


Crystal River 794-0888


Inverness 3


MELONIE HAAG (352) 257-1783 3
LEE ANN WARD (352) 302-4347
REALtORSh e
www.citrushomes4sale.com E


LEADERS



41-1233 Beverly Hills 527-1112

3PAT LEHMAN
7- 7 Ou AM TO 0BrokerAssociate/Real Estate Instructor
352-697-17797 -


GET SHOPPING!!
The $8,000 Tax Credit
\ ill not last forever


MOTIVATED SELLERS /'
m Tni home i MOT 3 s hon Salell
NEW ON MARKET BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED ?B5P 3 u11 BAs or, Ist o'vr ar.
Looking for a i -' -'tr , n' r . ' ' , *- lr,. " ' -11li , ? dr- lanC- f d -- .
some cork started bOu not ..... ,,,. , '.T,,,I, .arie .IK nA r iu..l Srand
completed Over two acres -.:T .:. - iSi., in,s ;.:, AC i0l, ana so, much TrC.
cleared and the rome SitE ,T,.'r, mrC - '-.: TI.Tiuri., on.,r horn, ' iz .r. a pn'aie - strepi a.m
on tir-ie highest point of th6e ,~:, . r,.r .. . . cT,,: ,rd 2� orn. r hc.me- Come e-npoy
property Come take a n ir, . . ,a--.,' al ih.; rnom, harto cr, i Call US today for
O0ok. ML#33-1222 ,L .' rrant% ,LSna2835 more details


YOUR HOME WILL HAVE A

HOME WARRANTY

WHEN YOU SELL OR BUY

A HOME WITH US!!!!l

Courtesy of: Joe Ponds and Pat Lehman


F JOE PONDS
BrokerAssociate/Real Estate Instructor
1 352-527-1112







Call About a
Possible Tax
Credit of $8,000


fAKE US AN OFFER ON THIS ONE! Gi... i..
,I Il r.,.m,. r c.u,. : . ..:, .1.. i:.e,-I .-,. 1,.,i.:.. LARGE KITCHEN AND PRIVATE YARD r. .- 1i ir..
u, .r-n t i. n a , I Ir ,..u g ri Ju lj 1 S p ill I -' ' p lan .*.uIr, 1. . I., rS:..:.iTt aila ta' i .'ze5 lr ,.:o r . , ;. t.r lrn. r. rr..:.m
separate entrance to second bedroom - perfect super clean home. Some furnishing may be yours,
situation for roommates! Nice fenced backyard for Ready for your immediate occupancy, just bring
children and/or pets. MLS#328758. your toothbrush! MLS#330167
Nancy Ayres 352-279-5058 Nancy Ayres 352-279-5058
W


RELAX. ENJOY AND LISTEN TO THE BIRDS T. ,r.. .. rr, Ti
LOVELY 2 i2 HOME ON A CORNER LOTIN SING - r.l-,,-i-. ,,-,-,r,.ei.' i,,n., i, t .ul.rul F.i .:. Ir - . :... r, . ' .'
OAKWOOD VILLAGE. g.n,r r:., ,, . .1ii`,. T r,, , .:r,r iT,,,-, .] ia.;in-0 .. 11. , ffr- r..irugn int r ..'Jj. ioiA it6a i . .er* ,io,r l .. d
area. Kitchen with newer appliances, breakfast bar stress-free enjoyment with new stone tile floors and wood deck! The kitchen has a built-in desk and bright and
and large dining section. Large Florida room with fresh paint, in addition to 2 community pools, tennis open space. New A/Cn May'08! You'll want to call THIS
decorative tile is a must to see. MLS#323381. courts and many other amenities. MLS#334238. one YOUR new home! MLS#331408.
Barbara Stone 352-586-3072 Mary Gulling 352-422-2994 Nancy Ayres 352-279-5058

BILe~SSB^MK.^


U REA SEE IS ONE Totally renovated maitenance-re vill in desirable Fox Hollow. t features
updated kitchen with stainless appliances, rich ceramic tie, an open kitchen as well as 3 bedrooms plus a den. Huge on a nice cul-de-sac: Large master bedroom suite. GI
nd decorator lighting. This inviting detached villa s spacious antry This roomy floor plan is warm inviting and easy to All bedrooms have lots of closets. Electric range, w
rd beautifully maintained. It is in move in" condition love. Enjoy the wonderfuLview of the lush landscaping dishwasher, disposal, ceiling fan, garage door st
umishings are negotiable. Enjoy the community pool, tennis from the back patio as w as as two community pools, park openers, lawn sprinkler system, and TV satellite ap
courts and maintenance-free living. MLS#334116. and tennis courts and much more. MLS#333732. dish. This will be a short sale. MLS#326389. ar
Mary Gulling 352-422-2994 Mary Gulling 352-422-2994 Mike Stokley 352-206-9096
"N.a3 Sir weh" ^ SERENE & .. ^'CHARMING d1^ IyT^ I
SRLLENG MEADOWCREST
.PRIVATE - .I -, A "N -I LA IN
RIVERFRONT THS 5R NT
PARADISE, t COMMUNITY FAIRMONT
Watch the tranquil OF PARKSIDE - VILLAGE-1
Withiacoochee VILLAGE pU r..r.ral
from your Tht- 2 th-oE, 1W.i' Il, d plar
wraparound porch :; ' ,nle. i sele- F,,F
.- , _ high above the Aa, g-,a,, (.,' AL r,. at pump
creened porch-off the master bedro.v a ' ownve -he .- ','.' J", " ,,dg1.3 I
elevator allows easy access to this lovely home, the coziness of villa living. Enjoy Florida's sunshine on l ,:.pcnhr a1 r, , .1
surrounded by tall trees. Natural landscaping provides your 38'xl 0' (380 sq. ft.) deck overlooking the palms on 2007, microwave new in 2006, refrigerator new in B
asy maintenance. Additional features include a this beautiful comer lot, or enjoy the covered, front porch 2008. Indoor laundry, new ceramic tile in entry and C
replace, vaulted ceilings, workshop in garage, of this quiet cul-de-sac location. Freshly painted and in kitchen, dual sinks in master bath with large walk- la
greenhouse and great views! MLS#327148. ready to move into MLS#332943. in closet Furniture negotiable. MLS#322995. di
Mary Gulling 352-422-2994 Nancy Ayres 352-279-5058 ' Nancy Ayres 352-279-5058


WONDERFUL COUNTRY ESTATE or, 1297",,:
Living room, dining room with real wood flooring &
REAT CUSTOM BUILT TWO STORY family I kitchen enjoy 3-sided stone fireplace. Great room has
water access home featuring boat slip at end-of- U stone fireplace and views of pool/lanai area. Gourmet
reet, solid oak floors, hickory cabinets, stainless | kitchen features Codan countertops, stainless steel
pliances, wraparound porch, fenced comer lot appliances, eat at bar for 6 with adjoining dining area
id much more. MLS#331348. f c with table for 5. Summer kitchen on lanai. MLS#333061.
Brenda Hannigan 352-257-9135 i Mike Stokley 352-206-9096


Liil


rge lanai under air.
ual sinks in master ball
- Nancy Ayr(


OPE HO;USEi~:~;~h-


S.- * i NATURAL PRIVATE SETTING i.., Tr, .i.2
- ." ._L '' i* u r,,, . ):c.,, 1 3.7 ac'e i: c.Tpl.;|il I,-nic 6.20
3/2/1 IN ARBOR U storage building, new pump for well & water treatment
New roof in 2006, system. Sit on your porch & watch Mother Nature!!
with eat-in kitchen, Enjoy the open floor plan & relax in your garden tub! A
taluel MLS#331083. must see. MLS#330364
279-5058 Charlene Angelo 352-464-4179
MOT= I M3 711.Fl S 1111


MT OF YOUR FIREPLACE afrer
itrul Florida .urselt rrom your
This extremely well-maintained
3 bedroom, 2 bath home on a
acre comes complete with an over
id 3 car carport. MLS#331728.
Ann-l- KAtCA.A470


SUN., 4AY 24TH 1-3 PM
4185 W. GORGE BEVERLY HILS
Dir Pine Ridge Blvd. to N on Flagstaff Ave. to R on VA
Gorge Ln., House on left. MLS#324652.


CITRUS
)ne store
-L room
-lillsboroi


SUNDAY, MAY 24TH 1-3 PM
IS CONDO - 806 E HIUSBOROUGH Cr.
nd unit with private view and newly tiled
)ir Rt 486 to S on Annapolis to R on
i. ML#333563


BEAUTIY1 ?,.,


completely
sized wor
(1I


www~~lexitred~r~


SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2oog E3


0ITRUS CoUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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E4 SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009


Frugal notebook.


can be helpful guide
In previous columns, zition note- hard copy as a
I've mentioned or- book in a big backup. Not
ganizing recipes and z i p p e r e d only will this
coupons, creating a binder with help you man-
price book to track prod- . lots of pockets i .age your time
uct prices, a garden jour- and some _ and home; it
nal and menu planning. files. I also - can be a great
A frugal notebook is a have stamps, gift, too.
place to' organize all address . la- These note-
these useful tools. It's bels, sta- books are so
easy to put together and tionery, cards Sara Noel popular that
cheap, too. All you need and a calcula- : . :. my Web site
is a binder, page protec- tor." Many . (www. fru -
tors, dividers, index people store ___ galvillage.
cards and a few print- their informa- com/forums)
able forms, such as a cal- tion on their computer, has an entire forum ded-
endar and checklists to but it's nice to have a icated to them that in-
get started. One reader, portable binder or index cludes free printable
Jean in Canada, shares: cards to slip into your
"I keep my home-organi- wallet or pocket and a See FRUGAL/Page E5


'CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRIME REPORTS
* For more information about arrests made by the Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go towww.sher
ifcitrus.org and click on the Public Information link, then on Arrest Reports.
* Watch the "Arrested Developments" show from the Citrus County Sheriff's Office at
www chronicleonline.tv.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at www.chronicleonline.com.








Cimus CoUN7Y (FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY MM 24, 2009 E5


IR UI A I FAMILY: This can include
FRUGAL Vgift ideas and gift-closet in-
ventory, clothing sizes and,
Continued from Page E4 clothes inventory, recent
: photos and library-card in-
forms and helpful tips to formation. You can also in-
customize your personal clude school information
planner. You can start with such as progress reports,
building categories. Each lunch menus and _school-
person will have their own . contact information. Organ-
preference on what they'd ize your holiday planning,
like to have in their note- .such as addresses to send
book. Some people even 'cards, wish lists and deco-
have more than one note- rating ideas, too.
book HOME: Include informa-
Category sections can in- tion such as chore charts,
clude: 'home-maintenance sched-
CALENDAR: For family ule, cleaning routines, stain
member's schedules, spe- guides, homemade cleaner
cial occasions and meal recipes, contact information
planning. for bills such as utilities,


loans, cable, cell phones, In-
ternet and waste manage-
ment. Another reader,
Margerie in Canada, shares:
"I have a few pages of notes
that I've scribbled about the
overall plan I'm working to-
ward, so that I stay focused
and my decor reflects a
thought-out plan, not a
mishmash. When you are on
a budget and can't afford to
rebuy something, it pays to
keep the overall plan in
mind. You can recognize
your bargains when they
come along." You can have a
section for your home
budget, too. Save any ac-
count statements, war-
ranties, appliance manuals


and receipts. You can add
store hours, phone numbers
and policies, too. Your gar-
den journal can be added to
this section. It can contain
information such as plant
care, seed starting, layouts
and design, chores and frost
dates.
HEALTH: Add informa-
tion such .as immunization
records, fitness journals, in-
surance information, pre-
scription information and
doctor and emergency-con-
tact numbers, such as clos-
est contact if you're
unavailable, local hospital
or poison control. If you

See . AL/Page E13


783426
S- - "American Service
KELLER with Dutch Touch"

SE A T Myriam Reulen

Call: (352) 613-2644


~:-~**~# ,~

-u


3/3 pool rome with
family room and office
on professionally
landscaped, private
1 acre lol Beautiful
architectural details.
nigr ceilings, slacked
sione and brick paver
erntry, 3 car side entry
garage, and upgrades
galore Impressive
home inside and oul
MLS P 333998
$389,500


785500



WJ K RELYON EMSo * 06ueoutelstt~o
2421_________________ N.______wyBvrlHll_- 83 5S.______Bld,________100WM inStIvenss-_04NEHw .19_CysalRie


LAKESIDE VILLAGE
* Maintenance free Villa 2BD / 2BA / 1 CG
* Split bedroom plan * Florida room
* Certified over 55 * Many upgrades
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
Realtors@ I I
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875








227 S. JACKSON ST.
BEVERLY HILLS
* Lovely 2BD/2BA/2CG * Newer Roof &A/C
* Living & Family Rms. * Well maintained
* Pretty neighborhood � 1644 sf. living
PETER & MARVIA KOROL F-l
Realtors@
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


SUGARMILL WOODS
LOVELY NEWER HOME! A MUST SEE!
High ceilings, stainless appliances,
3/2/2 huge closets, stunning master
bath, extra large garage;
granite counters.
SARITA HARTY 352-527-7842
Emai: saritah@remax.net


^^^'8

"''^B^


*2BR/2BA/2-Car Garage * Built in 1988
* Withlacoochee River Not Far Away
* Seawall & Concrete Boat Slip
* A "Cooks Kitchen"
* Workshop with A/C


DEBRA PILNY (352) 637-6200
HomelnGtrusCounty.com


WARM AND CHARMING
2003 3/2 home located in Citrus
Springs. Screened lanai and
separate covered patio. This is a
must see. Won't last long.
SARITA HARTY 352-527-7842 i J
Email: seritah@remax.net


UKINU TUUK nUKM��::
Beautifully maintained 3 bedroom,
2 bath doublewide on 5 fenced and
cross fenced acres, 24x36
workshop, garden, Lecanto schools,
large scattered oaks.
DIANNE MACDONALD 2.12-9682 i 1
Email: aJmfl@yahoo om


WHEN ORDINARY WILL
NOT DO IN SUGARMILL!!
Spacious 4BRs, 2.5BAs, tiled.floors,
huge FR, heated pool, 2 A/C's,
oversized 2 car garage.
NANCY BOWDISH * (352) 628-7800
Direct: (352) 422-0296
Visual Tours at www.b unydtruscmly.Scom


3B3s, 2As, split plan, covered gar., new flooring, newer
apple , awesome Florida rm., immaculate cond. Mrs. Clean
buy lives here. Large yard w/plenty of room for al your wader
toys & even an outbuilding for storage. Wonderful canal just
tconds from main Foral City Lake & river Come and enoy
the waterfront Florida lifese at its very best This home is
priced to move. Call today for your private tour.
Private location. You will love this home.
JOHINHY HOLLOWAY 352-302-1891
Emm: johnnyholluway@tampabay.rr.com


A SIMPLER LIFESTYLE!!
Enjoy FLORIDA as
it was meant to be
*CONDOS AND VILLAS
Laurel Ridge $134,900
2/2/2 * Great kitchen * Florida room #331286
Laurel Ridge Sale Pending $141,900
2/2/2 * On Golf Course #327996
Lakeside Village $119,900
2/2/2 � Large great rm. * Family rm. 9329.103
Meadowcrest $109,000
2/2/2 * Great rm.* Florida rm. #333914
The Glen $99,900
2/2/1 * Fl. rm. porch #332539
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536 rK
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997 ,'
I taU!'kiuv~atA t. db.iL


WIWIIWAIBK 4/J.,2/ FUUL KIUMNI
2,519 sq. ft. liviyn space.
SHome InspectionAppraisal 4/09
* Deep green belt
* Screened lanai w/shower/gas hookup
SSplit/open floor plan
SWater softener
SSolar tube lighting
DANNY UNDERWOOD (352) 586-1743
I., ., .-,' " J ,IL--: ll .. _


-3BR/2BA/2CG
B Granite kitchen countertops
* 42 in. Hickory cabinets
SHeated pool
* Detached 30 x 40 garage/
workshop/heated & cooled
*Ei PALMER (352) 212-261 s
*.* %~nAA aii��'�'- 91 .I


* 3/2/2,1987 Home * Large kitchen
* Large master bedroom - Split floor plan
* Dining area ' Enclosed lanai
* All on 1+ acres -
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
a' Emi *AM F'lA:�< e�irnlKmri .aeii~~ !*_


PERFECTION ACHIEVED!!
New kitchen cabinets, tiled floors, new
wind, 3/2/2 SUGARMILL BEAUTY.
Freshly painted, beautiful landscaping.
JUST MOVE IN.
NANCY BOWDISH (352) 628-7800
Direct: (352) 422-0296
Visual Tours at www.buvdlruscouila.com


LOVELY 4/3/2 W/HEATED
POOL IN GATED COMMUNITY
Open family room & kitchen w/
breakfast nook. Great flowing plan
for entertaining. Many extras at this
great price.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: o adal@earthlink.net


MILLION DOLLAR
WATERFRONT VIEW
Located in Inverness on the open lake is
this 2BR/2BA Home. 2 Car garage,
spacious bedrooms, and large screened
room overlooking the water.
City water and sewer [
BARIARA MILLS (3.1)37-6200 I'I
P *lmnku T. N a aft


IMMACULATE
3BR, 2BA, I CAR GARAGE
Beautiful laminate floors; fenced
backyard for privacy and a beautiful
view; Office off kitchen. Don't rent it,
own itt REDUCED
VICKI LOVE 352-697-071p2.
I.1 -wdw.VlcktJ vIilrms.mii�**Lh


~~_~____~_~_~ I


SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2oog ES


CImRUS CoumyT (FL) CHRONxCLE


1J


g


~U~s~ea~p�i







E6 SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009 Cimus CouNn' (FL) CHRONICLE


HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
It is also distributed to approximately
300 business locations throughout Citrus County.
Display advertising information.......................................................... 563-5592
Classified advertising information...................................................... 563-5966
News information................................................................................563-5660
...........................................................................newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listings.......................... www.naturecoasthomefront.com
Sign up for www.naturecoasthomefront.com...................................563-3206
Advertise online.............................................................................. 563-3206
......................................................................... NCCsales@chronicleonline.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CmHONIcLE I


To have your news in the Chronicle's HomeFront section, you may mail, fax or email the
information to the Chronicle, 1624 North Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. The
newsroom fax number is 563-3280 and email is newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.
You may also drop off your information at the Meadowcrest office or the newspaper's
Inverness office at 106 W. Main Street.
When submitting information, please make sure it is printed or typed, is concise and includes a
contact telephone number.
If you-have any questions or comments, contact the section editor, Mike Arnold, at 563-5660
(email -newsdesk@chronicleonline.com).
HOW TO GET YOUR PHOTOS INTO THE PAPER:
-We accept color and black and white photos. We also accept negatives. We do not accept Polaroid prints.
- All photos need to e cropped tightly. That means no wasted space in your photo.
- Photos need to be in sharp focus. We do not accept photos that are out of focus.
- Be sure that photos or negatives you submit are taken using 35 mm film. Others will not be accepted.
- Please include your address and phone number on any photos or negatives submitted.
- Photos or negatives submitted will be returned if supplied with a return envelope and postage.
- When identifying persons in your photo, please do so from left to right, front to back.
- For more information, please intact Matt Beck, photo team leader, at 563-5660.


The absolute truth



about those lovebugs
Despite popular belief, lovebugs are through clouds of mating flies become
not a University of Florida experi- spattered on windshields and radiators
ment gone wrong; they actually mi- may become clogged, causing cars to over-
grated here from Central America. These heat. Insects spattered on the windshields
insects are not true "bugs," as can obscure vision, and if the
the common name suggests, but dead insects are not cleaned.
are flies of the order Diptera. off, they can ruin the car's fin-
The common name "lovebug" f ish.
has been given to these black There are several things that
colored, orange-backed flies be- / can be done to lessen the prob-
cause they are most often seen '-- lem facing motorists. By travel-
flying around in mating pairs. " : ing at night, motorists can avoid
For most of the year, "love- - the insects; lovebugs reach
bugs" are beneficial, in that peak activity at 10.a.m. and stop
their larvae stage lives in grassy Joan Bradshaw flying at dusk Traveling at
areas and feeds on dead vege- FLORIDA- slower speeds will reduce the
station within the thatch. This FRIENDLY number of bugs that will be
results in the eventual release LIVING spattered. A large screen
of nutrients back into the soil placed in the front of the grill
and a decrease in excessive will keep the radiator fins from
thatch, which can be detrimental to grass. clogging, and will protect the finish on the
Soon after rainy periods in the spring (typ- front of the car. If a large screen is not used
ically May) and especially in the fall, "love- in front of the grill, at least place a small
bugs" emerge as adults and mate in screen behind the grill in front of the ra-
swarms around roads and buildings. diator.
Although their behavior and their com- Spattered bugs should be washed off the
mon name may be amusing, their pres- car as soon as possible. Lovebugs are more


ence in such large numbers can be
somewhat of a nuisance. Cars driving


See LOVEBUGS/Page E7


Inside...


. -





High-tech trailer
PAGE E9
Ask the Plumber
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E2
WHERE'S JANE?
* Gardening columnist
Jane Weber is taking a
break from her column,
Jane's Garden. It will re-
turn later this year.

For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the Web site for the Citrus
County Property Appraiser's Of-
fice, www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Slow firelesss cookers' were once widely manufactured


Dear John: Attached are four
photos of a yet-to-be-
identified object found on a
farm in Indiana. This may take some-
one with some seniority in the old-
farts club to identify. I
found it in my shed while
cleaning things out. It is all
metal outside, looks like
galvanized inside, with
steel weights in the bottom.
I did not measure it, but it is .,
about the size of a foot-
locker. Do you -have any
idea what it is? - S. & WG.,
Internet John S
Dear S. & W.G.: You have Jon S
a fireless cooker There SIK ,F
were numerous companies A'r
during the late 19th century
to early 20th century pro-
ducing what they called fireless cook-
ers. They used slabs of soapstone
heated on a stove and placed in the
chest to provide a slow cook. Chests
like yours were steel boxes on legs,
double-walled to hold insulation. The
interiors were all metal, featuring
built-in ti6ndi'il-htoliild'-6v


ered canisters that just fit them. There
would be pairs of thick soapstone
plates, also sized to just fit the holes,
one below and one atop the food can-
ister. The soapstone was heated on the
S stove then placed above
and below the food canis-
ters to cook the food.
The overall condition of
., . your fireless cooker ap-
pears to be poor. Potential_
dollar value is below $100,
, short of good luck.T
Dear John: Recently .
someone gave - me this -
ikorski bracelet and earrings from --
my grandma. I do not know
Sk o S the- year she got them, but
Ic my father was born in 1890:
They came from Italy. I un-
derstand that the stones are
mother-of-pearl. I would like to know
if you could tell me something about
them. -M.D.B., Lecanto
Dear M.D.B.: The photograph you
sent is completely out of focus. In
order to help you I need good, clear Special to the Chronicle
This old firelesss cooker" was found on a farm in Indiana. Food was placed in a container designed to
r,. See.- If lPagEl0, fit-in the covered holsand the:n eaJhd inside beit, .' h d.e-tones.


ES SUNDAY, IMAY 24, 2009


0Trcus CouNTn (FL)- CHRONICLE


t


i

1







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, Mxt 24, 2009 E~


LOVEBUGS
Continued from Page E6

easily removed, and the chance of
damaging the car's finish is less-
ened if the car has been waxed re-
cently. When the remains are left
on an unwaxed car for several
days, the finish will often be per-
manently damaged. Soaking for
several minutes with water aids in
their removal. When lovebugs are
numerous, some motorists spread


a light film of baby oil over the
front of the hood, above the wind-
shield and on the grill and
bumper. This practice will make
their removal a simpler task.
A number of insecticides have
been evaluated for effectiveness
in controlling lovebug larvae and
adults. Most of them kill lovebugs
but are impractical because high
populations of the insects occur
over vast areas of the state. A vac-
uum cleaner can be used to re-
move adults from confined areas,
such as in buildings and vehicles.


While you may not have noticed
it, during the past several years,
both the April-May and August-
September lovebug flights have
been substantially- reduced in
Florida. This reduction in the pop-
ulation is partly attributed to pred-
ators. Larvae aggregate in
extremely high nufibers in pas-
tures and other grassy habitats.
This makes them vulnerable to for-
aging birds. Lovebug larvae have
been found in the gizzards of robins
and quail. Although examinations
of the stomach contents ofarmadil-


los have been negative, observa-
tions suggest that they, too, may be
excellent predators of the larvae.
Laboratory studies using inverte-
brate predators found in lovebug-
infested pastures indicated they
were voracious predators too.
These included earwigs, two
species of beetle larvae and a cen-
tipede. For more information, con-
tact County Extension at 527-5700.
Citrus County Extension links
the public with the University of'
Florida/IFAS's knowledge, re-
search, and resources to address


youth, family, community, an(
agricultural needs. Programs an(
activities offered by the Extensioi
Service are available to all per
sons without regard to race, coloi
handicap, sex, religion, or na
tional origin.

Dr Joan Bradshaw is the natural
resource conservation faculty foi
specialized programs in Citrus,
Hernando, Pasco and Sumter
County University of
Florida/IFAS Extension Service.


P&R Mi.A-Flor"z-idaa
Realty Services, Xnmo.
j1 ar 746-9770 - 1-800-329-7002
----I S3 W. LEMON ST., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465
Visit us on the Web at: p-rrealty.com E-mail: pandr639@earthlink.net
oIommERZT. PROPERTY RENTAL IS
*i14 N -oAG Rue Hw.v MU A01mACBiBKOBfi.I
CrjririTctul jrd aA -_- . . 1 u1 '- " "..'! - .

MLSt- .". o .. - . .. - . l
i 5.nar an d r . 5.n ' r u 30 9

SPRUCE CREEK PRESERVE OCLEARVIW ESTAMS
I , ,i-.., ' i ] ., , ,,TI,,u ,-I Pnrice educu dl f.I.r qt ulk ale
' I-,, .J, . _T I ,:i. ,lr..i ,lil -l i, I ~ *:'." o C. n,' edar in. , c TLC 3
! * .: : L c � T. I dst- n 3 hbaih- sphpl..n, i.. czr grmge

MLi'KJ.>'' S149,000 Moys-I-.l4A; , U4,900
G:8.na Bonr,.r .'.I( " Robert Slrickland 352-502-6588
I ENTAILS AVAALE AD WANTED. OBLANDO CONO0
AVAILABLE FOR RENT OR SALE. TINE ESRE 2EnTAL ALSO
AVAILABLE. GLORIA BORNER 885-697-0578


Jacdkie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
(352) 634-2371 Cell
(800) 476-2590 Toll Free .
ERA For a Visual Tour of our listings
REAL ESTATE and all MLS: bidavis.com


the link between il plans and reality J

Ek Dennils l amato
State Certified CGC-004344

GENERAL CONTRACTOR, INC.
A TRADITION OF QUALITY SINCE 1972
S* Consultation & Project/Plan Review .
* Design Services
* Cost Estimating * Design-Build Construction
* Custom Crafted Homes * Waterfront Homes
* "Cracker-Style" Homes & Buildings
* Residential Renovations
- Commercial Construction & Remodeling
* Adaptive Re-Use & Restoration of Buildings ,

u *r. - 430 NE 3lrd Street, P.O. Box 1312, Crystal River, FL34423-1312 *


IDO
. Corport.
icy


-~ 0 maWW. ....
END UNIT - REGENCY PARK Refurnished 2BR/2BA.up
Furnished 2BR/2BA condo with fireplace. Wood floorin. Imn
Community pool & clubhouse. $70,900 | $105,000 A
VACANT LOTS
OAKS GOLF COURSE -g
1/2 Acre Lot............ $69,900
CITRUS HILLS a
1 Acre with Central Water . . . $29,900 GOSPEL ISU
LECANTO 3BR/2BA home sir
5 Acres, Pave St. Nice k Tree $ Fireplace central wafeo
5Acres, Paved St. &, Nice Oak Tree's $ s58,000 9 152. 500 A


SRe M9WW. 0M .l

Thank You Veterans! -










. _- N. W-


I . Homes from

S -.- " .-: . 900*. S.;flow'

Dolphin Limted meOffer *prices subje to change Sunflower

05 AROvEa MANY PLANS AVAILABLE
7. ,. Open Monday-Friday 8am-4pm
LiPdA Ti After Hours & Saturday By Appointment Only
.� . Call today for more information 352-637-3912
. www.homesbycosy.corh
352-LS73 11145 W. Bentbow Path, Crystal River, FL 34428
ri , S F rs U.. Hwy. 19, 2 miles dno_0pot$poC il; vi "
am~. RI oA�I= � _ g_7g gg agg_1111111


SUNDAY, IMAY 24, 2oog El


0ITRUS CouNT'I(FL) CHRomcCLE












New thing: Geothermal heat soEu
RADO&', Multi-Million Dollar Realtor U,
MaD Cell: (352) 634-434a P
M y producer, Brad the new interest in geother- While geothermal energy is a very OFFICE: (352) 3821700x309
Staggs, and I putto- . mal heat, I also believe the attractive-heat source, the major hur- n OFFi (352) .n. pin7Ox3O9a.
gether for slowdown in new-home dle facing the industry right now is the E-mail: homes4u3@mindspring.com


aqGTVPro. com a five-part
look at the latest home-re-
modeling trends that qual-
fy for the new tax credit
package. And we thought it
would be a good idea to also
-ihare this information
aere. The second part of Ed Del
"Ed Del Grande's Common- ASK
-lense Guide" focuses on ge-
othermal heat PLU
No matter what area of
.he country you live in, you might have
-aoticed that geothermal heating and
cooling systems have started to draw
some attention in the building indus-
*ry. Some say the reason for this is the
current tax credit available for en-
ergy-efficient heating and cooling sys-
:.ems.-
While tax credits may play a part for


construction has nudged
many forward-thinking
contractors to expand their
operations into new fields
of the industry. Indeed, it
would make perfect sense
for a company to offer more
Grande services to customers in an
THE effort to stay busy. Like the
*BER old saying says: "Follow the
fBER money!"
Since geothermal heat is
often called "green heat," this may be
an attractive incentive for contractors
like well-drilling companies, HVAC
businesses, pipe fitters and even
standby-generator companies to re-
tool their business a bit, educate em-
ployees and get involved in this
growing field to fill in for lost profits
left by the slowdown.


hYING TO SELL YOUR HOME

AT 1lS DIFFICULT 1M?
WE WOULD LIKE TO HELP YOUR BOTTOM LINE!
List For Just 4% Commission
Full service, MLS plus nationwide exposure on the web (Realtor.com, etc.)
Call us for a free market analysis or a chat about the market.


price. Material costs alone can be 50
percent to 100 percent higher than
standard heating and cooling systems.
Extra labor costs can include deep
well drilling and ground loop tubing
installations. Plus, most contractors
install a standby power generator to
keep the geothermal system up and
running under any condition. How-
ever, if sized right, the standby gener-
ator can also power the entire home so

See.P-- ' - .- ,Page E13


- =--� i1 A
---mi-- S -* s;
Email: cent21@infionline.net
www. jwmortonrealestate.com


OLDER HOME ALL FIXED UP LIKE
NEW! 2 '2 s ith re, hI Cher, Iom-iare
Floor, & more OWNER FINANCING
MVY BE A ILABLE'1 ASKING
565,000 E Waier acc.ci' 0333Q32
Call Barb Manahan at 726-0094


LOTS OF ROOM FOR THE FAMILY or.
I-.. 2 acre i in. r, I.err,eL; HI-.ghland: WeA.ITl'
With :.,.r lirii :q f I..ing .r. th., 2?BR
2EA home w.rh a 2 .:ar gar 6..rnq room
farr.l, room enrl.: d pg-r.:h urd.,, lihed
r.,'rd laundry and mrrre rr3342"9
Ask for Maxine Hellmers
352-212-4147 or
Kimberly Miner 352-586-9549


FENCED ACREAGE-FOR FAMILY LIVING IMMACULATE GOLF COURSE VILLAt1
3+ office/3/2 solar heated pool home * 2/2 detached villa on #4 green e
* 2258 living area in Citrus Hills * New roof & skylights - 2006
Easy care salt system for tife pool * New heat pump - 2005
Huge pool deck for entertaining * Newer Pergo flooring & verticals
SExtra buffer gives even more privacy Only occupied part time
#323076 $325,000 #315335 $144,900
L1001 P111 *a.,AkmilJAIIe.!Jg:4K


T

E;-
Centurion Office
1993-2006


FLORAL CITY - D;.,.n,,,n li.--J. .,:, -i,


"? 's.I- AWING Le a :iB i mool


to pevde andaskfor file -334 17


LOVELY AND ROOMY 5WEETWATER
POINTE ... .....rNradine t.pz'ai
ABP 2BA. L0. 'a 1 in 1- 11..- .L d--
inn- irIa.,..l..-.:zqrd ocis.&lar-~
'ir- I~lr t.3 - 00' ".,.k~r r L-1
rrPr- -a i A... pie , a ri lo,. '
h-iv UPE9 LAFI' :C ASzTER BATrH ' '.
qzdwr,-. ,ti.b a lL .3ok. [%.-- ,-n.d rae,r nd
a3:-ij REDUCED TO S275,000.
Coali Doris Miner (cell) 422-4627
or (office) 726-6668


PRICED TO MOVE!!!! Th,; 2BR 1BA BEAUTIFUL CORNER LOT. 2 bedroom
I ca. garage home ha 2 exna lor. Very 2 ba. 2 car garage home located .. a
ne.al ar-d elli.epi home -irk load; oa f r ar H-11% o , a
iocm for 4,e l., and/cr gardening nce area of b.ertr H.llI Fr.hl, paired
N32782d irA~de. riewer carpel newer oolt home it
Ask for Maxine Hellmers in excepnoroal cond.r.on lake a Ic,ok'
352-212-4147 or PRICED AT Si 114,900 #3t1.273
Kimberly Miner 352-586-9549 Call Cheryl Scruggs 726-6668


-- REDUCED TO S179,000! GREAT BijVi i.0,) 3
569,900 - WATERFRONT 2BR/2BA I1 ' ,:, :ti.,h I.:h'r. HOME 15 KNOCK DOWN C
MOBILE .,'dock & encl,.ed abo.e grur.d GOEIC-C.bi. L.ghr br.h, & open pIa', B
poo l 2 I .b h |. lli, ' o ne d ) . r 2 : , o ra r ' ,V ar l J rrK lle -,1 I a ins m`.. , . -,T W H T ra
o i " NAt u T i'" C an rr 0 l i ,a-. a ld cirur. .-r dr b .ir
a, parl<.r.1 No hon-,eo*nr ea. Pange _y
and hqg ,n,:luded Nicel. landcape ..el, ,',g oArh . aor, o 12pl.: o-lo I.-oil
ioora.3e he- Canal .,:rrr, ltad. to .L1R 264, pl,, ra csr go' All ap,1 s & .aen L
Henderi.n 5-6 misn o Imnemes and I L :r11 3re r,.., tamlr ire -. 1 '-.akn iote 1
m n in -'5 "34392 n*da ntLie :.iLd -d gon.-r irb & tl'hee Lo-elp
'in T 3-'5 7533,T9� ,, d #3o343 , r,a ld MUST SEE' 327497
Call Tim Donovan 352-220-0328 U SI r S-72.M6.E' 2 . .
' c > * r" . r. * , - -. *. . i ' I ,


REAT HOME FOR ENTERTAINING. If..
OP 2=4A penllnre ia .*enr wela iz.,I Mea
rga.d p ,:ih~ per'-up sl-dsr.n C11-3-rrd
'simFn.% an.d .o*i.Jar L.-Cr..g r70.-n h-3:~
..orp ad.C g~eimdrvr- 3 rO..
icarig and q.-aderji�- 3gm, .-.d po.~~
Mrs Cira, Hi-lls tmen~br hip nd.idt-
xcos-d inn C.3.'iinnqe Coverti s~lb, al Cm',v
[Itt S238,400 .33lCrid9
Ask for Jeanne or Willard Pickrel
35 2-2 12-34 10
FWW. ivscolmtvSWAl.con,


J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. Main St., Inverness, FL
SALES: (352) 726-6668 * 1-800-543-9163
Property Management (352) 726-9010


IL -


II I - I


I -


IiS SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009


CITRusS COuv~y (FL)- CHRomcmL


(







Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009 E9


New 'i-house' concept takes manufactured housing into


the new millennium


DUNCAN MANSFIELD
Associated Press


KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -
F rom its bamboo floors to its
rooftop deck, Clayton
Homes' new industrial-
chic "i-house" is about as far
removed from a
mobile home as ON T1
an iPod from a
record player. Clayton Ho
Architects at media.corn
the country's meda.co
largest manufac-
tured home company embraced
the basic rectangular form of
what began as housing on
wheels and gave it a postmod-
ern turn with a distinctive v-
shaped roofline, energy
efficiency and luxury appoint-
ments.
Stylistically, the "i-house"
might be more at home in the
pages of a cutting-edge a rchi tec-
tural magazine like Dwell "-aah


i.


inspirational source - than
among the Cape Cods and
ranchers in the suburbs.
The layout of the long main
"core" house and a separate
box-shaped guestroom-office
"flex room" resemble the letter
"i" and its dot. Yet Clayton CEO
and President
E NET Kevin Clayton
said "i-house"
nes "~house" stands for more
Iayton than its footprint.
* house. With a nod to
the iPod and
iPhone, Clayton said, "We love
what it represents. We are fans
of Apple and all that they have
done. But the 'I' stands for inno-
vation, inspiration, intelligence
and integration."
Clayton's "i-house" was con-
ceived as a moderately priced
"plug and play" dwelling for en-
vironmentally conscious home-
buyers. It went.on sale
nationwide recently with its "


presentation
shareholder
vestor Warr
shire-Hatha
Neb.
"This inn
featuring sr
merous oth
products. Is
future." Bu
holders. "E
electricity
about $1 pe
is sited in a
Omaha."


n at the annual Maryville. Tenn.-based Clay-
rs' meeting of in- ton Homes, acquired by Berk-
,en Butfett's Berk- shire-Hathawa. in a $1 7 billion
away Inc. in Omaha, buyout in 2003, delivered 27.499
mobile or manufactured homes
ovative 'green' home. last year, a third orthe industry
)lar panels and nu- total. Kevin Clayton thinks the
er eneroy-saving
truly a home oflthe See ::,.ll . i /Page E1l
ffett %wrote his share-
stimated costs for
and heating total only

n area like
rda wethSo


This artist rendering shows
the floor plan of the "i-house." The
S' prefab home can be altered, by the buyer, in
size and shape. In this example, the core of the
house has a second bedroom and has been arranged in an
. ,.-. "l" pattem.wrth the. separtt "flexoomjn" off.the deck.


q-


SUNDAY, IMAY 24, 2oog E9 '


CITRUSS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C







E10 SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

photographs of your brace-
let and earrings. Make sure
to look closely for any hall-
marks indicating maker and
gold or silver content Often
these marks are very small
and need a hand magnifier
to be seen. Then I will be
able to help you.
Dear John: I have had this
cassette in my collection for
some time and would like to
have an opinion regarding its
value. It is called a cassette of


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


a "V-Disc" and the feature is
the first radio appearance of
Frank Sinatra on the Major
Bowes Amateur Hour. The
host introduces "Frank Sina-
tra and his Hoboken Four."
There are many songs by
him, including "Exactly Like
You," which he sings on the
Fred Allen Show. He sings
with Tommy Dorsey. and
Benny Goodman. One of the
earliest dates mentioned is
1939, then 1942, when he
sings: "Getting Hot in
Berlin," if I recall.
I also have a set of golf
clubs with irons 3,5, 7, and 9.
They are marked Patty Berg.


Do you recall her in golf
competition? There are sev-
eral Wilson woods also and-
the bag is for sale. Please let'
me have your opinion on
value. -R.G.H., Homosassa.
Dear R.G.H.: I suspect
you have triggered some Re-
member When moments for
our readers with your ques-
tion. There is no specific
collector interest in your
Sinatra cassette recording.
Potential dollar value is
catch-as-catch-can.
Golf memorabilia is a
large !specific category of
collector interest The items
you ask about are low on the


totem pole of collector in-
terest Potential dollar value
is-below $100.
-* m -

John Sikorski has been a
-professional in the an-
tiques business for more
than.20 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Siko-
rski's Attic, on WJUF(90.1
FM) Saturdays from 11 a.m.
to noon. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, c/o The Cit-
rus County Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429, or
e-mail asksikorski@
aol.com.


********************************
:* r� "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"

, A NANCY Direct: 352-634-4225
* PONTICOS * KEY REALTY INC.
.ON I O A E ^ ^ 8015 S Suncoast Blvd. HomosUsa, FL 382-1700

" - T - Iw'"'- .ys There For Y





BEAUTIFUL, UPGRADED SOLAR HEATED POOL HOME! SWEETWATER HEATED POOL HOME ON LARGE CORNER LOT!
S3 Bed T Den/FULL 3 CAR Garage -Conan Island Kitchen * New Roof Shingles 2007 Cathedral Ceilings
* Ventless Electnc Fireplace * Well for Irmgation . 3 Bed/2 Bathf2 Car Garage " Well for Irrigation
, MLS#333459 $268,000 MLS#331843 S179,000 ,

* Takem visual un S I I


Lou Miele, Realtor i2t
4511 N. Lecanto Hw. Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Office: 352-746-360o 0
Cell: (352) 697-1685 lNE
ALWAYS THERE FOR Y MERICAN ERA
ALWAYS THERE FORYOU REALTY & INVESTMENTS .........


PINE RIDGE BEAUTY- This Mitch Underwood extended
Captiva Model is a must see. As you pull up the driveway,
you can't help but to be in awe of'the lush landscaping
with hundreds of flowering shrubs and trees. And once
inside, you'll be ready to call this home. With 3 bedrooms,
3 baths, loads of extras, and a huge lanai (31x10) and
huge screened patio (50x18), this is the perfect home for
both relaxing and entertaining. See it todayll
MLS#331767 $276,900
FABULOUS TERRA VISTA COURTYARD/
CABANA, HOME - This 3 bedroom, 3 bath home
boasts over 2000 sf of living including a private separate
cabana with bedroom and bath for guestsfin laws. The
very private courtyard/pool area will be great for
entertaining or just relaxing. Too many upgrades to list
here. Come see for yourself! And yes, i's on the Skyview
Golf course. MLS#332950. S349.000


LECANTO - Very well maintained 3 bedroom
home on two lots. This home features large
bedrooms, beautiful 'parquet wood flooring,
newer AC, a fabulous screened porch, and so
Such more. This home must be seen to be
appreciated.. Take a look today!!
MLS#330341. $149,900.
AS YOU DRIVE THE PRIVATE ROAD lined by lush
shady trees, you immediately know you are somewhere
S A . . special. There you'll find your new home. Updated kit., wood
laminate floors, 4BR, 3BA, gas fpl., 2-car deL gar., and a
view you'll never tire of coming home to. Imagine yourself
relaxing by your heated pool watching the sun set over your
220-feet of lakefront property. Refurbished dock and boat lift
will have you cruising beautiful Lake Henderson in a
moments notice. Don't let this one slip away! Calltoday for
your private tour. MLS#334073. $589,000
M LOVELY AND COZY 2 bed, 1.5 bath, spacious
C2 ca garage home in nice area of Beverty Hills. Well
maintained split plan, with new carpet and paint
. 3 Newer A/C, roof shingles, and soffit. Features privacy
screen on garage'door, sprinkler system, and window
. . blinds. Nice golf course, tennis, and near shopping.
S- Home is ready to move in! MLS#328856. $89,900
I ' PRICED FOR IMMEDIATE SALE -This immaculate
and well maintained home in the much sought after
single family section of Meadowcrest is sure to
Please. With 3 bedrooms, a large kitchen with breakfast
nook, a fabulous and huge glassed-in lanai overlooking
the park-like setting, this comfortable home is just
waiting for you. Come take a look and your searching
-will be over! MLS#331766 $184,990
3 BEDROOM POOL HOME ON
2 LOTS. Over 1500 sq ft. of living
. .4 with a heated pool in Flying Dutchman
i Estates Home has newer room AC &
slove. MLS-328416 5139,999
AFFORDABLE.AND IMMACULATE 3/2/2 in
beautiful Pine Ridge Estates. This fine home is
situated on an elevated corner lot, has a fenced
backyard, newly remodeled kitchen with maple
cabinets, and lots, lots more. Free Health Club
membership. This home is truly a must see!!
MLS#333478 $199,900
PICTURESQUE MINI-RANCH centrally located to Citrus County's
amenities. Custom-built w/breathtaking details. Bring your horses!
5 Acres fenced and cross-fenced, plus a 24 x 48 3-stall barnm.
Inside you'll find warm hickory kit. cab., Brazilian cherry wood
floors, stained/leaded glass details, and much more. Generously
sized guest BRs and huge jetted tub in the master BA make this
home one the whole family will love. Take a sneak peak at the
Visual Tour, then schedule your private showing today You'll
� never want to leave. MLS#334256. $279,900
BEAUTIFUL HOME sits on two
lots. Ceramic tile, French doors, great
light, near shopping and amenities.
Make your appointment today before
this one slips away. MLS#334007.
$134,900
LOTS AND ACREAGE ALSO AVAILABLE!
MLS#326201: 0.23 Acre, Citrus Springs................... $7,500
M LS#329512: 1+ Acres, Hwy. 41, Floral City............$20,000
MLS#331076: 7+ Acres, Crystal River.................... $159,000



Check itrso








Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY; MAY 24, 2009 ElI


To place an ad, call 5635966


Real Estate


Classifieds


.~- 'ilk


.4,Choncl


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fo Ren .- 0 Fo Ren Fo en.nLn I a I r Ren I Fo en 1Ununshd1


2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa. Util. incl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
(352) 628-9759

AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hemando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk.
Free internet/long dist.
Trailers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant

HERNANDO
1/1, open lake, quiet,
carport, sheds, fenced,
covered porch, incl.
county water, garb.,
yard maint. $495 mo.
$495 sec. 352-344-3864
HOMOSASSA -
1& 2 Br turn & Unfumrn .
1 br. RV $300 mo.
No Pets Call 628-4441
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Remod. granite kitch.
carpet, scm'd rm. $550.
mo. Quiet(352)302-4619
HOMOSASSA
2/1.5 $500. Mo.
(352) 628-5696
HOMOSASSA.
2/1%/, Big lot, Near 19
$425 mo + Sec. + Ref.
No pets 352-628-3019

HWY 488
2/2, fenced yard new
carpet, $450. mo, + sec
3/2 $600.mo. + sec.
.No Pets 352-795-6970


HOMOSASSA 55+
2/2 Stonebrook
Estates
Unfurnished, Car Port.
Pool, Club house.
Boat & RV storage
$595. Mo.
(352) 422-7887

HOMOSASSA
Quiet Country
Setting.
2/1 Furnished on
fenced 1 acre + .
Large shed, large
deck. Enclosed
porch, CHA
Remodeled
kitchen, washer.
New well. $ 575.
Mo. + $350.
Security Dep.
(352) 628- 5244

INVERNESS
Large 3/2, appx 2000 s. f.
under roof. No pets. I yr.
lease. $675 mo. F/L/S
344-3444 / Eves.
344-3084

INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park,
2BR, 1-1/2BA, $475.
1 BR,1 BA, $350 Incl.
water 352-476-4964

LECANTO 1/1
Log Cabin CHA, n/pets
$475 + 1st, Ist.sec. Wtr.
Grbg inc. 352-746-3073


Couch

Realty
& Investments, Inc.
For All Your Real Estate Needs.
Richard (Rick)
Couch
Lic. Real Estate Broker

1045 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando, FL 34442
t_*A ik o .v"*A t,4SoM .-;,: 4 1


LECANTO
2/1, $535/MO
HOMOSASSA
2/1 $550.
Call 352- 464-3159
YANKEETOWN
2/2 Complete Furn.,
New W/D. $600mo
+ $300 dep. 15 min.
from power plant
Paul (407) 579-6123
COUNTRY
SETTING
2/2 in Country Setting.
$500/mo. + $500 Sec. No.
pets. For application Call
Lee at 352-250-0664 or
800 -692-4162.



BANK
FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181
Crystal River
Suncoast MHP 55 +.
212 '84, Newly remod.
10 X 28 glass Fla. rm.
Covered front & back
porches. Nice cond.
$14,000 (352) 795-4266
Crystal River, Suncoast
MHP. 2/2 14 X 70, partly
turn., CHA, Screened
porch. Ex. cond. $6,500.
(352) 564.0245
(352) 422-6735
INVERNESS
55+ Waterfront Park,
1 BR, water incl. A/C
$3,500 + $270 mo. lot
rent. 352-476-4964
INVERNESS/ MOSSY
OAK PARK, 55 + COMM.
2/1 Carport Scrn'd porch.
CHA,Furn., Wsh./dryer.
New electrical wiring.
Close to downtown.
$10,900.(352) 637-3436
Used Mobiles and
Modular for Resale.
LOW prices, call
Palm Harbor for
inventory list. On Your
Lot. 800-622-2832
ext, 210 -Mr. Lyons


BANK
FORECLOSURES
I A-97 W , I,


6018 W Oaklawn 2/2,'91,
14x65 fixer, 1.25 acres,
$37,900, www.zillow.com,
813-695,0890 or
352-382-1002
Homosassa
Floral City
2/2 DW on 3.5 + or-
acres. Withlacoochee
Forest area great for
horse riding.Priced to
sell. (352) 341-6281
(352) 634-0787
(352) 634-1290.
HOME-N-LAND
rew Home 3/2
10 Yr. Warranty
Sacrifice! $3,000
down $676.43/mo.
Call to Qualify
352-621-3807
Receive $8,000
S. Cash Back
INGLIS '95 SW
2/1V2, beautiful,
wooded, priv 1 /4 ac
backs ups to wildlife
sanctuary. Incls cover d
deck, garage w/work
shop, Ig shed w/win-
dows, all appls, washer,
dryer. STEAL at $53.900!
352-419-5777: 476-9005
New 2009
2 bed, 2 bath, large
rms. appliance pkg.
2x6 construction,
10 yr. warranty. Must
See! $39,900 includes:
A/C, steps, skirting.
Call for more details
352-621-9182

NEW JACOBSEN
TRIPLE WIDE
High end home on
2 '; Acres, 2150 sq ft,
3/2, glamour kitchen,
marble in bathroom,
appliance pkg.
, Must Sell $179,900
or $787/mo. Call
(352) 621-9181
Receive $8,000
Cash Back.


CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55 + comm. 3/2
with a lovely view of the
Lake. Call The C.R.
35..z"-zs:T '.


FOREST VIEW ESTATES
Great Loc. Pools, clbhs.
& more. Move-in ready,
comp. furn. 2/2 DW,
wheelchair acc., shed
& sprinkler. New heat
pump. $39,900
563-6428/563-1297
Homosassa, 55+ Park
Great loc. Pool, cibhs.
& morel Full turn. Dbl
2/2 w/porch cov. car-
port & shed. Must sell
$20,000 352-628-1067
INVERNESS 1 BR Mobile,
55+ w/. waterfront
park$9,900 AC, W/D,
Shed 352-476-4964
LECANTO
Senior Park. roomy
2 bedrm 1.5 bath, fully
furnish, move in ready
Very Nice $7500
(352) 634-4329
Walden Woods
55+ Upscaie comm.
28 x 56, upgrades & -
decorator ouch, 3/2/2
Carport, scrn & encl.
lanai, 6 mo. Free Rent
w/ lull price. Must Seel
(352) 503-5164.
(352), 228-7991
WEST WIND VILL 55+
(2) NEW 2005 Incredible.
Price Resales/Rentals
avail w/lease - Pet ok.
furnished. 352-628-2090





Waterfront homes
Weekly private rooms
352-628-0011


CHASSAHOWITZKA
2/2 waterfront DW $600
2/2 furnished DW $700
2/1 carport - $500
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $900
Agent, 352-382-1000

Get
Results in
the
homefront
clqssifieds!


Castro
Realty and Property
Management Inc.
333 N. Croft Avenue
Inverness FL 34453
352-341-4663
Beverlv Hills
1,2 & 3 Bedrooms
$475- $750/mo.
Citrus Sorings
2 & 3 Bedrooms
$600 - $1050/mo.
Inverness
2 & 3 Bedrooms
$450 - $800/mo.
Citrus Hills
2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
$825 - $1050/mo.


Hernando
1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms
$475 - $800/mo.
Check Out Our
Website At www.
castrorealtyl.com
Rental Inventory
changes daily.
Furnished rentals also
available.
See Our Rental Ad In
The Real Estate News
Magazine





PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
Pritchard Island
3/2/1 Villa - $875
Arbor Lakes
3/2/2 - $800
Inverness
2/2/2 - $700
3/2/2- $750
2/1/1 - $595
2/2/1- $625
3/2/1 - $895
2/2/1 Villa - $695
1&2 Bd Apartments
starting at $400
2/1/I 2- $600
Beverlv Hills
2/I/2/I - $600
Lecanto
1/I Apartment- $395
See our website:
www.jwmortonreal
estate.com
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
312-J26- 9010,


RENTALS
Pine Ridge w/Pool
5169 N. Perry Dr $1800
3/4/3 Pool/pool maint
4470 N. Ficus Dr $1400
3/2/2 Pool/pool maint
citrus.Hills
838 W. Massachusetts
St. $1400
3/2/2 Pool/pool main
Beverlv Hills
27 New York Blvd
I $800
188 W. Seymerla St
$675
42 S. Monroe St $60Q
14 Plaza St. $600
HEDICK GROUP
REALTY
352-422-2522
hedlckgroup.net


AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hemando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
internet/long dist.
Trailers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant





CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5 In town Location
Nice, Clean $650.
(352) 586-9349
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5, c/h/a w/d hook
up. 838 5th Av N.E.
$650.+sec Unfurn.$600
727-343-7343; 455-8998
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025

RENTALS AVAIL.
FROM $585. 2
(352) 795-9123
Charlotte q Realty.
& Investment LLC' j. i


S 1 & 2 m
BEDROOM UNITS I
* MOVE IN SPECIAL
MUST MOVE IN BY
5/31/09
KNOLLWOOD
I nverness
1B/R SEC DEP. $150
IB/R 1st MO $150
2B/R SEC DEP. $200.
2B/R 1ST MO $200.
CALL 344-1010
TU, TH, FRI.
8-12& 1-5NOPETS
HUD VOUCHERS
ACCEPTED
Equal Housing *
Opportunity

" 1&2
BEDROOM UNITS
**-Move In Special*
Move In by 5/31/09
1BR Sec. dep,$200
2BR Sec. dep $250.
CANDELWOOD
COURT
Inverness
CALL 344-010
TUES, THUR, FRI.
8-12 & 1-5
NO PETS .
HUD VOUCHERS
ACCEPTED
Equal Housing
Opportunity

1 &2
BEDROOMS
Starting at
$450
352-257-8048

1 BEDROOM
Starting @ $425/mo-
Laundry on premises.
352-465-2985

INGLIS VILLAS.
Is now accepting
applications for our
1,2, 3 BRApts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Crys. Riv.
SRental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: M,W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglis Florida
SEqual Houring .
.. ..i. . .'n ru


INVERNESS
2/1 Duplex $525;
2/1 home $550, f/ll/s
(352) 422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1 No pets $500 + dep.
352-860-2026

INVERNESS
2/1Tri-plex, Great Loc,
clean & roomy. No
smoke/no pets $500
Mo. Fst/Lst/Sec.
352-341-1847

INVERNESS
Great Neigh. 2/1 .
*Move In Special*
$550. mo. +sec.
(352) 634-5499

LECANTO
1 BR (352)746-5238
613-6000/613-5974

ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appls,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341

Pinewood Villas
Is now Accepting
applications for our
1, 2,3 BRApts.
Located in Bronson
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-486-2612
Or Apply Tues & Thur
7291 NE 92nd Ct. #17,
Bronson, Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity




INVERNESS
2/1- $500; 2/2- Irg scm
prch, quiet. $600. W/D
hk-ups, 727-446-5871
727-688-7866.




RENTALS, SALES,
SUNSET REALITY
& INVESTMENTS.
(352)726-5050


U - - -.


~~L r� r �~_ ~jl- � -~ I � �-~1L~


a r-tj^ f * e * * * ^** f i^ * a^ L:" ^ ^' > ' r *f^^fl�_^ J'1 **


SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2oog Ell


CITrus CoUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









E12 SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009 Cimus CQLINTI' (FL) CHRONICLE


-I
- Act Now �E

PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad
We Have Rentals
Starting at $425/mo +
Many others
LANDMARK
REALTY
352-726-9136
Kathy or Jane
311 W Main St. Inv




44 W. Inverness
900 to 1300 sf
upscale Office
Retail Space.
1st Month FREE.
Ist Yr 20% discount.
352 344-5488
HERNANDO
ALESCI'S
CORNER PLAZA
HWY. 486
OFFICE/RETAIL
1000, SQ. FT.
INCLUDES COMMON
AREA
MAINTAINENCE,
WATER, WASTE,
GARBAGE &
SIGNAGE. ONLY
$750.MO. + SALES
TAX. $795. TOTAL. NO
SEC., NO LAST MO.
RENT. FIRST MO.
RENT ONLY. ALSO
1,194 SQ. FT., 1,250
SQ. FT. & 2,000 SQ.
FT. AVAILABLE.
(352) 447-1244
OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND5 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507
PINE RIDGE
1000 sqft unit, (currently
beauty salon).
352-527-9013
MI I


CITRUS HILLS
Home, Villa, Condo
GREENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-5921
(888) 446-5921
areenbriarrental.com
INVERNESS
2/2, very clean / pool
$575.(352) 419-4510
352-400-0882


FREE RENT!
SUMMERHILL
AT
MEADOWCREST
Luxury Condos
Limited Time!
Call agent for
details.
352-563-5657
/ out zoomcitrus.com

INVERNESS
Extra Irg. 2/2/1 Lakeside
Community, pool, dock,
no smoke, no pets. $665
mo. + sec.
(866)637-2631
TOLL FREE
MEADOWCREST
Summerhill, 2/2 w/large
1 car garage, ground
floor, new, never lived
in, near shopping.
Reduced to $900.
Mo.unfurn. $1200/furn.
(352) 746-9770
(352) 697-0375
Gloria Bonner P & R
Mid Florida Reality
Sugarmill Woods,
2/2, Completely furn.
$850. mo. 352-746-4611



CITRUS SPRINGS -
NEW 2/2. Duplex in'a
nice private area close to
,shopping & schools.
Water & sewer included
$600/mo. 1st & last. Mike
-._ 352-558-4477
CITRUS SPRINGS
New, 2/2, all apple.
Wash/Dry..$600.-$625.
(954) 557-6211
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/1 Lg. master
suite, granite, stainless
steel appl. Large lanai.
Lease, + Dep. No pets,
$800.Mo.(352)697-3133
HOMOSASSA
2/1 w/carport $550 mo.
+sec.; 2/2 w/ fam. rm &
carport $650 + sec. Both
remodeled
(352) 746-3228

HOMOSASSA
New, 2/2, Rent
w/option to buy. 1300
sq. ft. w/d hk. up, fans,
blinds, refr., stove,
microwave, tile, carpet.
$750. month
(352) 592-0893


IMACTIOWV A7QALRFDNT I


REO lLMMA I BfIIl1 l WMC, .L www.CitnsCountyHomeRentals.com


HOMES * MOBILES * APARTMENTS
FEATURED PROPERTIES-
BEVERLY HILLS ..............................StartingAt$600
CITRUS SPRINGS 3/2/1................................ ....$725
CRYSTAL RIVER ........... ................StartingAt$475
HOMOSASSA ...........................$600 Moves You In!
ROCK CRUSHER AREA 20/22 House ...............$800
SUGARMILL WOODS ......................Stating A $750
Call for more information. OVER 40 TO CHOOSE FROM


INVERNESS
2/1 W/D, garb./water.
Incl., fenced, pets ok
$600.mo. 1st., $300 sec.
352-746-4611
INVERNESS
2/1/1; W/D hookup; -
remodeled ,$600 mo.
F/L/S (352) 697-1396
Lecanto
Newer 2/2, dsh/Wsh.
W/dry, H20 incl. No pets.
Lg.Yd. (352)628-2815
ONE MONTH FREE!
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appls,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341




FLORAL CITY
Adorable 1/1 Furn
Cottage $425 +dep,
No smoking/ pets
(352)860-1239










CRYSTAL RIVER
Lovely, Spacious 3/2/1,
$1000/mo.furn or $850
unfurnish 352-628-1149




















Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


SUNSET VILLAS
Senior Community
Chiefland Fl.
Accepting
Applications for
1 & 2 BR APTS
Please Apply
M, W, F, 8am-12p
124 SW 14th Ave.
(352) 493-0220
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.




AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hernndo - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
internet/long dist.
Tralers $175wk.1
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant

BEVERLY HILLS
Progress Energy
Contractors 1/1,
fully furn avail now
$825. includes all util-
ities, 100 channel
TVlinternet.
2/1 also available
(352) 220-2666
BLACK DIAMOND

community $1,150. Mo..
(352)212-1401
CITRUS HILLS 2/2
Pool, amenities.$750 w/
lyr lease. 352-637-5662
Citrus Hills
Townhouse 2/2%2/1.
Terra Vista Club incl.
$1,000 Mo + until.
(516) 991-5747
HOMOSASSA
3/2/1 Nearly new. Off of
Rock Crusher Road,
near school. Well fum.
& clean. Great cond.
Lease with Option to
purchase. $950.
Month. + electric
5640 Irving Court
(352) 563-2776
INVERNESS
1 BR Mobile, 55+ water-
front park, Incl. water
$475 352-476-4964




BEVERLY HILLS
211 renovated
5 S. Lincoln Av. $600.
(352) 422-2798


Move In Special
1-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $150
2-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $200
Exp. 5/31/09 . :
Call Monday Through Friday 8:00am - 5:00pmr
We accept HUD Vouchers, Foreclosures Accepted


3s=)_l


2 or 3 Bedrooms
RENT TO OWN- NO
CREDIT CHECK!!
Low Down!
352-484-0866
iademission.com

BEVERLY HILLS
.1/1 + Bonus Room,
Can be used as a
bedroom or office.
Carport/fenced yard.
$500. Mo.
Fst./Sec.
31 E. Lemon St.
(352) 560-0229
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1,C/H/A, ceiling fans,
W/D, ready now $575.
mo. 352-422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 + fl rm - $600
352-795-1722
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1- FamRm/Lrg- $675
2/1-Fam Rm/Nice- $575
352-795-0538
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1 new kitchen, Lrg
BD rms, FI rm, $725.mo
845-282-3504
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2, Porch, Fla.rm
(352) 464-2514
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2, W/D, very clean,
$775. w/ opt, Immed.
Occup. (352) 726-7543
BEVERLY HILLS
Why rent? Own this
2/2/1 For $365. Mo. w/5%
dwn. (352) 476-4179
BRENTWOOD
At Terra Vista 3/2 Pool
Home $1,100 incl. soc.
memb. (352) 422-4086
BROOKSVILLE
4/2 Close to Reg. Hosp.
on 2.4 acres, 2,400sq. ft.
ex. cond. in hice residen-
tial area. $925. mo.
w/option to purchase.
(813) 949-6205
(813) 505-0894

CITRUS HILLS
3/2 Pool Home
1 Acre, $975
(352)746-4821

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/1 $825mo + sec.
INVERNESS
2/1/1 $650 + sec
352-746-9436

CITRUS
SPRINGS
3/2/2 Newer Home.
Washer & dryer.
Sprinkler system.
Quiet neighborhood.
$795. Monthly.
(352) 812-1414
Citrus Springs
4/2/2, New, Split Plan,
Cath.ceilings,2,150sq.
ft.$900.Mo.352-697-1820
CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 3/2/2, Near Sch.
$875. mo 352-628-0731
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/1, Garbage & lawn
incl.'d Pets?, $750. mo.
+ sec. 352-795-0207
CRYSTAL RIVER,
3/1 Near hosp. $695
(727) 631-2680
DUNNELLON
3/J'A/2, Fire Plac, ,
S895.-mo. 1st-last-sec-
(352) 489-9239


CITRUS SPRINGS
Lovely modern '04,
412/2 built by
Mercedes Homes.
This 2600 Sq. ft. home
on large corner lot.
Large patio, fenced
back yard, sprinkler sys
Near Great Schools,
Churches, Parks, &
Shopping. Located at
8249 N. Triana Drive.

12 Mo. lease, $1,100
Mo.$1,000 Sec.
deposit.
Will Consider Lease
Option.
Call Dan at:
(813) 716-5605

CRYSTAL RIVER
RRent ent to Own
Copeland PK Beauty
3/2, Lrg Fam. Rm.
Tiled, gorgeous
spotless, fenced,
Pets OK, $750mo.
352-527-0493
352-427-7644

. DUNNELLON
2/2 $600. mo.
3/2 $700. mo.
2/2 $800. mo.
Lakefront. For info.
352-489-0979
Owner/agent
FLORAL CITY
2/1/carport, porch CHA
$420 mo. 352-726-2979
GOLFER'S DREAM
Home 3/2/2
3000 sf
$850 (908) 322-6529
HOMOSASSA
$350.... 1/1, Duplex
$525/up..2/1 Duplex
$700..2/2/2 SMW Villa
$1000. WF 3/2/2 Home
River Links Realty Call
352-628-1616
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550/mo. 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
Homosassa SMW
2/2/1 & carport, screen
back porch, private
wooded area. Newly
painted, carpet & tile
Unfurn. $700. No Pets
No smokers
(352) 650-5986
INVERNESS
3/2/1 Gospel Island area,
on culdesac, by lake
$850. Mo. Fst./Lst./Sec.
No pets(352) 860-2146
INVERNESS 3/2/2
Split plan, extra clean,
Snewer carpet, wood
floors. GREAT AREA
$750. 352-476-4896
INVERNESS
610 Independence Hwy
3/2/2 Fenced yard.
Rent w/option to buy.
$750/mo. 1st +Sec.
352-422-3670
Inverness
area ,Beautiful, 3/2,poss
clubhse,pool 2/2
Lease Opt .Flexible
Financing Imm. Occ
352-795-0088

INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
4/2/2 or 3/2/2 Starting
at $790 (352),34 1142
(352) 601-2615


Em

INVERNESS
BEAUTIFUL
WATERFRONT
312% Tile, Washer &
Dryer Scrn'd. Pch. on
Lake Tsalsa Apopka.
Community pool, ten-
nis & dock. $875. Mo.
352-812-3213

INVERNESS
Large 30x50 workshop
with 1/1 home, /acre
fenced lot. $550.
352-362-3435

INVERNESS
Waterfront Townhouse
2/2-2, with 3 decks &
balconies, private
community pool, very
quick access to Lake
Henderson, less than
3 min. drive to
access to Rails to
Trails.
$700 mo + sec. dep.
(352) 817-3185 appt
LECANTO
Crystal Oaks.
4/3/2 Remod.new appls.
granite c/tops, tile, carpet,
scrn'd pool. on culdesac.
$1,300 Mo.727-492-6679
OLD HOMOSASSA
3/2, Uke New, Modern
Kit. w/ D/W &-Microwve
Indoor laun. rm, $795
(352) 697-5708
-PINE RIDGE
3/2/2, $1,000 mo. 1st
last sec. 352-527-0635

RENTALS AVAIL.
FROM $585.
(352) 795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investment LLC

SOUTHERN
WOODS
4/3/2 Luxury
executive home
on golf course,
great views,
$1,300/Mo.
(813) 390-7109

SUGARMILL Woods
2 Masters /2/2 (large)
Screen lanai, oversized
gar. new appl. & A/C
$850 mo.
(352)302-4057

SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 Quiet, rent or rent
to own. $750/mo.
352-382-2904
Sugarmill Woods
4/2/2,, Golf course
community, access to
clubhouse, pool & ten-
nis court, secluded on
culdesac, $1,000. mo
Call (352) 228-1220
Sugarmill Woods
NEW 4/2/2, Huge lot!
$950/mo 786-402-9748





CRYSTAL RIVER
312/2.5 $1,200 Mo.
Garbage and lawn
maintence included.
1st& Sec; Lease,
Pets?
.(362)1959-20T
(352) 212-4981


INV. LAKEFRONT
2/2/2, Large home,
great area, tiled. New
carpets. City water.
$700 mo. 352-476-4896
Invereness
Condo 2/2 maint. free
$650/mo +sec
(352) 586-9549
POWER PLANT &"
Seasonal - Waterfront
homes, Wkly priv. rms,
RV lots. 352-628-0011





AIValueinn.com
Invemess
Hemando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
internet/long dist.
Traiers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744-
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant

INVERNESS
Furn'd bdrm w/bath.
$375/mo. w/utils & hs
privileges. 352-344-0085




2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Util. incl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
(352) 628-9759


-I.

OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507
OFFICE/STORAGE UNIT
600ft. $235/mo
(1) STORAGE UNIT 600ft
$235/mo.352-382-2904


-II

AlValueinn.com
Invemess
Hernando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
intemet/long dist.
railers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant





AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50
Ad indudes 20 lines of copy
w/ photo.



Lakefront 7 Acres, Flo-
ral City Lake Tsala
Apopka 2 dwellings 2
barns see -
pictures/details
floralcitylakefrontcom
skyetraveler@att.net


Picture Perfect Homes
NEW HOMES START-
ING.At $75,000 On
Your Lot
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
LiC # CBC059685


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to
advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
discrimination.
Familial status
includes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing
custody of children
under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.














100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
*Low income applicants
can quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or No credit
OKAY
*recent bankruptcy
.OKAY*
CAll TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
- *Credit and income
restriction apply*
Florida licensed mort-
.gage lender


E12 suNDAY, MAY 24, 2009


CITRUSs COUNTYn (T- CHRONICLE










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY MAY 24, 2009 E13


PLUMBER
Continued from Page E8


that investment pays off outside of the
system itself.
As more and more contractors get
competitive in this field, the prices
should come down, making geother-
mal energy a more mainstream and
popular industry Meanwhile, the tax
credit is an attractive incentive for
homeowners to take advantage of now.
So if you're a contractor looking to stay
ahead of the curve, now may be the
time to "dig deep" in your pockets and
invest in geothermal technology for
your business.


Master Contractor/Plumber Ed Del
Grande is known internationally as
the author of the book "Ed Del
Grande's House Call" and for hosting
TV shows on Scripps Networks and
HGTVPro.com. For more informa-
tion, visit eddelgrande.com or write
eddelgrande@hgtvpro.com. Always
consult local contractors and codes.



FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5


have pets, you can add their medical
records, too.
FOOD: Create and store your meal
plans, recipes, cooking substitutions
and kitchen tips such as conversions,
homemade mixes, food storage and
freezer- and pantry-inventory lists,
your price book, coupons, rebate in-
formation, seasonal foods, takeout
menus and master grocery list.
FUN: This can be a running list of
activities to do on weekends, breaks
and vacations. It can include free local
entertainment, crafts and homemade
craft recipes and projects, and movie
and reading lists, too.


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal Vil-
lage (wwwfrtugalvillage.com), a Web
site that offers practical, money-sav-
ing strategies for everyday living. To
send tips, comments or questions,
write to Sara Noel, c/o United Media,
200 Madison Ave., 4th Floor, New
York, NY 10016, or e-mail sara@
frugalvillage. comn.


GET THE WORD OUT

* Nonplotit organizations are in.
citedd to submit news releases
3bout upcoming community
events. Call 563.5660 for details.


HERNANDO
ALESCI'S
CORNER PLAZA
HWY. 486
OFFICE/RETAIL
1000, SQ. FT.
INCLUDES COMMON
AREA
MAINTENANCE,
WATER, WASTE,
GARBAGE &
SIGNAGE. ONLY
$750.MO. + SALES
TAX. $795. TOTAL. NO
SEC., NO LAST MO.
RENT. FIRST MO.
RENT ONLY. ALSO
1,194 SQ. FT., 1,250
SQ. FT. & 2,000 SQ.
FT. AVAILABLE.
(352) 447-1244
LEASE/SALE
3870 Sqft building on
1.6ac. Zone GNC Hwy
200, high traffic count'
w/prking.352-502-3970

OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Great Location,
HWY. 19.
South of
Sugarmill woods
entrance. North of new
public. $285,000.











TASIA SEIJAS
ERA American Realty
& Investment
(352) 302-0569
(352) 746-3600
Email To:
tasiaerat5)vahoo.com

SALE OR LEASE
W/OPTION
Building newly built,
5,000 sq. ft. of ware-
house space. 1,000 sq.
ft. of office space
w/CHA. Second level
can be built for more
space, 3 bays, 1 is a
loading bay. $329,000.











TASIA SEIJAS
ERA American Realty
& Investments.
(352) 302-0569
(352) 746-3600
Email to:
tasiaeral(ovahoo.com




3/2/2 For Sale or Rent
Citrus Springs Newer
Home, low/dn, easy
Sterrifii12484-a3M24
I l ...' 3�;


ATTENTION!!
BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
$39,900. Delivered
and Set, $0-Down
Land/Home $650. mo.
Repos Available
Kinder
Mobile Home
(352) 622-2460
BEAUTIFUL LOCATION
3/2/2 w/garden room.
By Owner. Lots of
upgrades. Like new.
Oversized prime lot.
A must to see. Asking
$179,900 (352) 527-4488




RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

ReaI elect

(352) 795-1555






2 Bedrm, 2 baths,
| 1400 sq.ft. CH/A I
Redone, move in
condition
m 15 S. Barbour St. J
637-3614 after 7PM
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2. Nice yard, near
school. $108k Call
anytime to see.
(352) 201-0991
(352)726-7543
FOR SALE BY OWNER
13 Donna Street
2/1 2/2 carport,
16x20 fam room, 12x16
workshop, 8x10 shed.
Fenced yard. OPEN
HOUSE SUNDAY'S 1-3
$87k. 352-527-8548
FOR SALE BY OWNER
88 SJ Kellner, Bev. Hills
2/2%/2, FP, Call Anytime
OPEN HOUSE on
SUNDAYS 11A-3P
$118K, 352-746-6093
Must Sell 2 BR, 2 BA,
CH/A, completely re-
done 15 S. Barbour St.
Make offer. After 7PM
(352) 637-3614



3/2/2, POOL-HOME,
1 acre, membership
avail, to Cit. Hills C.C.
$189,900 (352)860-0766
MODEL CLOSE OUT
Below costly - Private
gated community.
. Heritage off 486, 1 blk E
of Forest Ridge Blvd.
Owner/Developer
6. F;3I - :r0Z ,4�2.1
1 e6'-4.W (i5e-


POOL HOME
4/3/3 - built '04
Tile, pavers, Citrus Hills
membership available.
To view listing
www.1605wredding.com
$299,900. 352464-1316

REDUCED!
POOL HOME
4/3/Ext. 2 Car Garage
on 1 Acre.
Membership Available
$277,900.352-527-7856





3/2 New roof, & more!
Move in cond. Priced
as a 2/1 @ $74,900
(813) 968-0001

4+Acres, Canal front
3/2 large garage/
workshop +bonus
efficiency apt.
REDUCED TO S175K!
(352) 560-0019


YOU'LL THIS!
For Sale By Owner 2
garage home at 9260 E.
Alvada Lane in beautiful
Inverness Golf & Coun-
try Club Community.
Features skylight, lanai
& sprinkler system.
Asking $145,000. Call
(352)637-5876.

For Sale, By Owner
3BR 3BA, Pool, 16x24
workshop, close to
school, hosp., library,
WTI, 518 Poinsettia, Ave,
(352) 860-0878

PUT YOUR
$MONEY$ TO WORK!
BUY Real Estate
NOW!


2 or 3 Bedrooms
RENT TO OWN- NO
CREDIT CHECKII
Low Downi
352-484-0866
jademission.com


. ^^^^^j^^


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI
Your SATISFACTION
Is Mv Futurel!
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC

CONNELL HEIGHTS
2/2, Great Rm, vaulted
ceil. open kit. b/bar,



Sell (352) 795-9603









Crystal River Mini
Ranch
4/2.5/2 on 2 acres, up
to 5 horses allowed;
$29,000 down, owner
financing @ 6%. Will
trade for equity.Reality
USA (800) 559-4231

RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON Lic.# CBCO59685
2.8% COMMISSION

Realty Sele VIC MCDONALD
na (352) 637-6200
(352) 795-1555


;,B. -. ';



BY OWNER -3/2 I
Suoer nice Less than Realtor
1 yr old, approx 1 acre. My Goal is Satisfied
Incls most furn. Beautiful Customers
lot, close,to town. D AW
$128,500. Call Dan 4'2'
312-343-8329; Moving REALTY ONE 4
out of state. Ouils.rli.ng . r,. *-
7289 W. Pompey Ln r .1,1,.ldin. RtiilI,
,Ho asa 6 .|,.. !,m :
^Jml k ' V = ' '=" " 9. "*T ibW W H' -K"^ fIj


Citrus County~


Plantation Realty, Inc
L352) 795-0784
Cell 422-7925
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner
See all of the
listings in Citrus
County at
www.plantation
realtvinc.com

FLORAL CITY/2 Homes
on adj. tots,1 PRICE
$235,000 Newly rem.
CHA. Scm'd in grd. pool
dock, seawall. FSBO.
(352)586 - 9498


For Sak le A
CITRONELLE 3 bed-
room, 2 bath. Mini
Farms 2.5 Acres,
Trailer, Water with
softener, septic. As
is $49,000.00.
813-695-0853 .

For Sale By Owner
3 BR, 2 BA, 2-car gar.,
Cement block, north
Dunnellon Low down,
EZ terms w/$3,500
down $595 mo.
(352) 726-9369

OWNER FINANCING
4/2/office, 2.5 ac,
2005 Doublewide
Like new. 1800sqft,
$9,700/dn, $882/mo. or
$23,700 down, $582/mo.
727-992-1372




River Oaks East
4/2.5/2 Custom Pool
Home on 1.5 acres.
Office bonus rm, green
house, & boat slip.
$455,900 (352) 274-1594




Price Reduced
Crystal River 1/1 fully
furn. $69,800. Buy
Owner.com. 34429
(352) 563-5844





Call About Saving
Your Home
We Have Ideas!


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Rea6Select

(352) 795-1555




LOOKING FOR HOMES
OR MOBILES & LAND
Purchase, lease, mort-
gage assumptions, take
over payments + cash.
Any location, price, condi-
tion, foreclosure, late on
payments okay.
1-727-992-1372



Business/Home 3/2 Great
location on TroutAve. Inver-
ness $165,000. Rhema
Realty 228-1301

I -I

7 Rivers Golf & C.C.
priv. member owned.
corner lot 1 ac (mol)
$30K (813) 766-9354 or
sweetscaoeauestO@
verizon.net
BLOW OUT PRICES!
Inv. Hiahlands $6.900
Hernando 'h A $5.000
Dunnellon $4,000
Inv. Acres S4,500
Crystal River, Ocala
Bellview, from $4,900
Visit the website at
Www.
flalandandrealtv.com
772-321-7377
LECANTO 1/2 acre has
well, septic & Pwr pole
$15,000 813-792-1355


HOMOSASSA
3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to
head spring. 163' wfrt, 235FT ON
dock/slip. Brand WITHLACOOCHEE
new/unoccupied.. RIVER. 2+ acres. Deed
2 frpls, granite. $579K restricted comm. $250K
1_ ..727408-5229 -- --_ QwA-e .352,422al.Si,]
O~iCT'lK02^ NI ' o . 713%K1','o


must sell!
Inverness
MUST SELL QUICK!
UNIQUE CUSTOM
HOME ON 1 ACRE ON
CANAL TO LAKE
TSALA POPKA. 3,323
sq. ft LIVING! 30'
ATRIUM. 3 BED/2.5
BATH. 2-CAR GAR-
AGE. LIVE OAKS.
NEEDS TLC. PRICED
TO SELL! ONLY
$194,500. CALL
MYRIAM @ KELLER
WILLIAMS REALTY of
CITRUS COUNTY.
352-613-2644

RealtySelect
Citrus.com


0ITRus CouNTn (FL) CHRONICmE


SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2oog E13








E14 SUNDAY, MAx' 24, 2009 Cimus Couivm' (FL) CHIioNIcI~


RTERA|LE waste. Clayton has four plants in Oregon, Ten-
nessee, California and New Mexico geared up
for "i-house" production.
Continued from Page E9 A 1,000-square-foot prototype unveiled at a
Clayton show in Knoxville a few months ago was
"i-house" very quickly could represent more priced at around $140,000. It came furnished,
than 10 percent of its business, with a master bedroom, full bath, open kitchen
"I think in 12 to 18 months it is possible," he and living room with Ikea cabinetry, two ground-
told The Associated Press. "That is a lofty goal, level deck areas and a separate "fl'x room" with
but it is very possible. Retailers are saying they a second full bath and a second-story deck cov-
want the home on their lots tomorrow. I know the ered by a sail-like canopy.
demand is there. How fast we capture it is really "It does not look like your typical manufac-
just determined by how affordable we can make 'tured home," said Thayer Long with the Manu-
it." factured Housing Institute, a Washington-based
Clayton Homes plans to price the "i-house" at group representing 370 manufactured and mod-
$100 to $130 a square foot, depending on ameni- ular home-building companies.
'ties and add-ons, such as additional bedrooms. A And shattering those mobile home stereotypes
stick-built house with similar features could is a good thing, he said. "I think the 'i-house' is
range from $200 to $300 a square foot to start, just more proof that the industry is capable of
said Chris Nicely, Clayton marketing vice presi- delivering homes that are highly customizable
dent. at an affordable price."
The key cost difference is from the savings The "i-house's" metal V-shaped roof - in-
Clayton achieves by building homes in volume spired by a gas-station awning - combines de-
in green standardized factories with very little sign with function. The roof provides a


rainwater catchment system for recycling, sup-
ports flush-mounted solar panels and vaults in-
terior ceilings.at each end to 10 1/2 feet for an
added feeling of openness.
The Energy Star-rated design features heavy
insulation, 6-inch-thick exterior walls, cement
board and corrugated metal siding, energy effi-

See TRAILER/Page E15








www.rhemarealtv.com |.

Driftwood.
PROPERES FOR S E & T
appreciate


OBITUARIES
* The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy per-
mrrits both free and paid
obituaries. E mail
obits@chronicle
online.com.


MEET AND GREET
* Clubs are invited to submit information about regular
meetings for publication in The Meeting Place each
Thursday. Send in information attn: The Meeting
Place, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River, FL
34429, or tax to 563-3280, attention: The Meeting
Place. E mail to community@chronicleonline.com. In
elude "The Meeting Place" in the subject line.



Homes from $120,900 on your lot



www.encorehomesofcitrus.com (352) 726-2179


e~lr


/M Vic McDonald
EALTY ONE 00
jPrm. "Serving Citrus County 30 Years"
I 100 W Ma.I Si
, In.erne: FL 34-10
�t"""


RMulrlloei
Oiai, Pr'ducor


S .. INVESTORS!!!
6.'7,7 aC I h 1,, ,.3 doule,.il..de
mo ;bile h,:.me M-.t.,le horme ,
l I h'ver uppe.r ard ineied-c i ofr vI.:.rk
o ,a r removed Thi 3 t, a Lei-uifull
eludedd plec : .:. pr.:pertry alh Ic-lo
01 iree: and %ildlild WV .,ndr-rlul
' pporI.-.illt y l.,r ihe l tur- l ,ei r
" � $169,900 #330552

Ge-o'gi E LH.ureu* Bro.ker t,-' :
.CU B . IEClit,:L.,a�, rri rTe:-t FL (352)637-CURB 12872) 2
APPEAL www.curbappealcitrus.com .... ,. ...r..... .,,
"E^LTlr IFir.l Time Buyers) Up io $8.000 in Cash! Call Today
5913 ROSEWOOD At.3 I i2 5914 N.
. . D. ROSEWOOD DR.


rest Call Today! $4125,000. . . - .. ,,, ., ,$314,900


*k3s5KSeetbt d D84,000.- - * - r-. rmi 79,900.
A beautiful . .,...,6 P,
1.5 BA ho ,-� , ,, ,'
awaits you - ,... TIr,,. ,C., ) ,rr, 1 ,, '


uUS num mM

465.30004 O 746.9000
9542 N.Citnis Springs Blvd., ' 3521 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Citrus Springs N i i " aL� k Beverly Hills, FL 34465


.m ss.-A Lo,ni,. C M,.- 41 M CF, Z .hu 16o&u.I C-

1-866-465-35002
Roil ', * I EQUAL HOUSI
) OPPORTUNITY
ruus SPRINGS1111111 cfflus SPMIGS cffliUs SPRINGS r C C'USSRI


7081 W. WESTBROOK WAY 8991 . GOLFVIE
1 27.900 5120.000
INEW, H S1S1
BUILDER MODELS
S124.900
9356 JOURDEN DR.
AND CITRUS SPRINGS
2060 SWANSON DR.


nw* a w uuw - b.. al In as

1-888-789-7100
=,1V1:�*1 ,


ro


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHdioNICLE


E14 SUNDAY, IMAY 24, 2009







Cimus COUNTY (FL) CH~m~ocILSNA, A 4 20 1


TRAILER
Continued from Page E14

cient appliances, a tankless
water heater, dual-flush toi-
lets and lots of "low-e"
glazed windows.
The company said the
prototype at roughly 52,000
pounds might be the heavi-
est home it has ever built
The final product will
come in different exterior
colors and will allow buyers
to design online, adding an-
other bedroom to the core


house, a second bedroom to
the flex room or rearranging
the footprint to resemble an
"E' instead of an "I."
"We thought of this a little
like a kit of parts, where you
have all these parts that can
go together in different
ways," said Andy Hutsell,
one of the architects.
Susan Connolly, a 60-year-
old accountant who works
from her conventional
Knoxville home, hopes to be
one of the first buyers. She's
seen the prototype and has
been talking to the company.
"I have been interested in


S ITRUS License # RB0033452
� CITRUS* 352-527-8764
BUILDER- SAVE THOUSANDS
"MBift Wffit *a ot3 AUid" We pay closing costs! E
VISIT OUR WEBSTlE: www.cdiwsbuilderonline.com

M E- Fran Perez
... .. . . Rea'lor',
AMERICAN REALTY 1352 586 o"888
& INVESTMENTS Cell (352) 586-8885 i
4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU
Office: 352-746-3600
IMPECCABLY CLEAN AND VERY WELL MAINTAINED
; S ' POOL HOME P. d-:i.i -. f Eld ai. ; L.ui s-


- -in. .. UI s l m.-IL' 1'-..."817 o - 75264,000r
S:. . CALLING ALL COLLECTORS CARS. BOATS, l.r,,i..r
= l� ' -j,.- I r 16-. 1, 1 Al.loi :It, D -roiu r..: ., ,-,

E' Iuf ijI laI. :.- r.fap ,,) lO r, l, r, , r, o| ,l ic:.,:.I r,' ;. w ; l,A',

- TAKE A GOOD LOOK. Almost two acre; Real
Since property Home in need of refinisning
Large oulbuildirig' Over 200 ft on N Florida
Ave 141) Great location - Come and see *nai
- - you can do to compliment itis beaultful site'
S - . Everything is as-is"" MLS#332536 $139,000
V*SL. : *�-..'.... -', ::7i '


green construction and the
environment in my own per-
sonal life," she said. "It is
nice to have a group of peo-
ple that have thought of
everything. Where you don't
,have to shop around and go
to different places ... to find
the products you want."
"I think it is smart. It is
fresh. It is kind of hip for a
new generation of green-
thinking homebuyers," said


Stacey Epperson, president
and CEO of Frontier Hous-
ing, a Morehead, Ky.-based
regional nonprofit group
that supplies site-built
homes and manufactured
housing, including Clayton
products, to low- and mod-
erate-income homebuyers.
"You know a lot of people
don't see themselves living
in manufactured (housing),
but a lot of those people


would see themselves living
in an 'i-house.' I could live
in an 'i-house,' she said.
"Are we repositioning to
go after a new market?"
Nicely said. "I would think.
we are maintaining our
value to our existing market
and expanding the market
to include other buyers that
previously wouldn't have
considered our housing
product"


Brian McKinley, presi-
dent of Atlantis Homes of
Smyrna, Del., a manufac-
tured-home dealer that sells
Clayton and other brands,
said the "i-house" resem-
bles high-end custom homes
he sees along the Delaware-
Maryland shore.
It represents a "new di-
rection and an innovative
application for what our in-
dustry can do," he said.


785578


BH " * - * r combo, RV pad w/electric & septic, 'f-stall Iclosets, pool bath Ig. kitchen/great rm. &
3751 N. Muscadine Path, BH 4889 W. Maverick Ct., BH 158 Clifton PI., BH horse barn & entire 5 acres fenced & cross- wood fireplace. Sold "as-is" w known alk
Gorgeous lot on a cul-de-sac Reducedl Beautiful lot in RedlucdlBeaufulcomerlofGCBfton& fenced defects.& walk
inBH. Close to shopping. Pine Ridge Estates. This is a unique RomanyLp.Thisis are finte beautiful 352-527-1820 I 352-527-1820 1
MLS#327028 & desirable equestrian comm. Laue ofBHeargol ourse MLS#328348 MLS#328011
$32,900 MLS#327029 $49,900 MLS#327030 $29,900


"DOUBLE DIGIT SAVINGS
SAVE THOUSANDS WITH US AND TAKE
ADVANTAGE OF THE $8,000 TAX CREDIT TODAY!

3 t' ilo , 2 b2 th,

2 9.dcar g 5r%,tq .


6m Prudential Florida Showcase Properties

CITRUS HILLS OFFICE PINE RIDGE OFFICE


I


SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2oog E15


CITRLIS CoLINn (FL) ~WROMCLE


l







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E16 SUNDAY, MAY 24, 2009


SPACIOUS POOL HOME
with huge l'rchen & bonus
family room
$129,000 Code (3566)
VAULTED CEILINGS make
this little hou-e hbave b-jg soul'
2/1.5 w/creer.ed roomrr
BANK SAYS...
$70,000 (Code (3567)





BELOW MARKET VALUE!
This REDUCED 4BR/2 5BA
home, on I acre
ITS A STEAL!
$149,900 Code (3580)
ABANDONED GIANT
with 4 bedrooms. 3 baths
and a pool. on over I acre
Bank REO & Jusi Reduced
$180,900 Code (3575)


4BRs, 3BAs wlgourmel kn ,.
pool, spa, on I acre
$499,000 Code (3584)
[4]It 11 TnIn/'^H


GORGEOUS REMODEL
on this Kings Bay Dr. home.
Stainless steel appliances.
$139,900 Code (3591)
BEAUTIFUL 5 ACRE HOMESITE
OF ROLLING HILLS AND
BIG TREES IN THE COUNTRY
Over 1800 sq. ft. with 3/2.
$136,900 Code (3568)





BEAUTIFUL
TREE-LINED STREET IN
MANICURED HILLCREST!
Open great room to kitchen &
lanai make for casual living.
$139,900 Code (3592)


nEW.fl 11`1 1 as ..0
of town living in a waterfront
area for non-waterfront price.
$359,000 Code (3582)
THIS REMODELED
4BR/2BA home on cul-de-sac
is ready for new family!
$107,900 Code (3569)


BEAUTIFUL VIEW
DOWN CANAL FROM 2/2
W/DOCK & LIFT!
M$nuies lo ihe Gull
$144,900 Code (3577)
PERFECT
SNOWBIRD PERCH
:lo0/e Io shopping
& commnrriy pool
$40,000 Code (3593)
ft - 41


GREAT FAMILY HOME!
3/2 in Trop-c Terrace Bank
says LET'S MAKE A DEAL'
$89,900 Code (3571)
ANOTHER BANK REO -
NEEDS TLC.
Giani 4/3 almost 2300 sq h
$99,900 Code (3597)


3BR/2BA and 2 car garage
Shows like new!
$129,000 Code (3600)


SPACIOUS NEW HOME
with 3BR/2BA,
built in 2006 and
near boat ramp & mall.
$149,000 Code (3586)
IT DOESN'T GET MUCH
BETTER THAN THIS!
3BR/2BA w/carport -
EXCEPT this home
comes w/extra lot!
$79,900 Code (3581)

moor, 5779B


WILDLIFE PRESERVE
OUT YOUR
BACK WINDOW!
3BR, 2BA, waterfront.
$299,000 Code (3576)
NICE 3 BEDROOM
ON FENCED
DOUBLE LOT.
Owner financing/little down.
$59,900 Code (3585)


Built in 2004
on 2.2 acres.
Bonus workshop w/elec.
$145,000 Code (3601)


7I 9w_.#ALkQP


, , . _-- _ -000












RUNNING OUT? -

Is Your ARM Set To

Adjust In 3-6 Months?

Don't Wait

Until It's Too Late... $199,


4 Bed
Kim DeVane home wBA
Certified Distressed Property Expert $119,0o


EA* a E i


Tm




M


MAJESTIC 3BR/2BA
I home backs up
open acreage
ST REDUCED
30 Code (3587)
IT BEFORE THE
NK TAKES ITI!
room, 2 bath block
ih brck wall Fireplace.
on 2 acres
00 Code (3589)

T-1 9T T f2BB


WITH FRENCH DOORS
TO STUDY, TOO!
Solid, poured concrete walls.
SUIDrER CO VlU .. SAVE ON INSU RANCE
P2UQlflf iN AD~l~


GIGANTIC 5BR/3BA
on 2.5 acres,
$298,000 Code (3572)
07T1 r'a M 'I*I1


BRAND NEW BEAUTY
AND BANK-OWNEDI
3 bedrooms, 3 baths,
over 2400 sq. ft.
$189,900 Code (3570)
GIANT,
CUSTOM-BUILT HOME
4,000+ sq. ft., 2 car garage,
4/2, on 1. acre. Pool &
waterfall w/summer kitchen.
$398,500 Code (3599)


on 2/2 POOL home.
111,000 Code (3578)


BEAUTIFUL
HARDWOOD FLOORS,
New kitchen, updated baths
& great landscaping.
Unbelievable good buy!
$120,000 Code (3602)

Ltt7. i]


GRANITE KITCHEN,
with double oven and 6 bumer
grill make every gourmet melt.
4BRs/3.5BAs, pool,
in Cypress Village
$289,000 Code (3583)


ENJOY MAINTENANCE-
FREE LIVING & MORE
TEE TIME
Vaulted ceilings & 3BRs/2BAs.
$129,000 Code (3594)








GORGEOUS
COUNTRY HOME
ON 10 ACRES
4BRs/3.5BAs, pool,
gourmet kitchen
w/SS appls.
$639,000 Code (3590)
ROMANTIC STONE FPL
graces liv. rm. in this 3/2/2
pool home w/2 master suites.
$199,000 Code (3595)


GREAT STARTER HOME-
with 2 bedrooms and 2 baths.
$46,900 Code (3596)

Contact:


JUST RIGHT!
3/2/2 on I acre Close 1o
shopping and Rails io Trails
$129,000 Code (3573)






WATER ON BOTH SIDES
of this split plan.
3/2 with family room
$169,900 Code (3598)






CUL-DE-SAC ON CANAL
boasts newer renovations.
Over 1900 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA.
$178,000 Code (3603)
CRACKER HOUSE
BUILT IN 1952
3BRs/2BAs, on Gospel Island
$54,900 Code (3579)


Kim
DeVane
Broker Associate

352-257-5353


Receive a
FREE ASSESSMENT of your
personal position in this market!

Kim@KimDeVane.com U KimDeVane.com


!RMEI REALTY ONE
504 ME Hwy. 18, Crydno River
i 795-2441


1_ �


IS IS

OUR

MONEY




TRANQUIL
S SETTING
ON RIVER
|| qllh IIl hulrri
lhal sleep, 8 Tin Rool
Io &s screened rri
$269,000
Code (3574)

MENMTTnTnm�


SIMANN111111" ��RI


I