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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01644
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 19, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01644

Full Text


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In the 'Stars': Dancing debuts hel O] P) ID
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TODAY & Wednesday morning
HIGH Mostly cloudy with a
79 50 percent chance of
LOW thunderstorms.
65 PAGE A4
MAY 19, 2009


RUS


/B6


CO UNTY


www.chronicleonline.com UME 1 ______2
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOLUME 114 ISSUE 285


move


Characters
Facebooker, Tweeter or
Spacer: Who are you on
the lnternet?/Page Cl
WALL STREET:
Stocks
jump
Reassuring
news about
housing and
banking
convince
investors to
return to-the - -
stock market.
/Page A7
FDA DISAPPROVAL:


Audit angst
The Food and Drug
Administration lags
behind in food -safety
audits./Page AO.
HEALTH CARE:
What to tax?
The U.S. Senate looks at
myriad options to pay
for Americans' health
care needs./Page A9
ELECTIONS:


Just say 'no'
Iran's supreme leader,
Ayatollah Khameni,
urges the public to
reject reform candi-
dates./Page A10
OPINION:
In a tight
budget, one
of the first
items to
go is often
preventive
dental
care.

EDITORIAL, PAGE A8


FOR THE BIRDS:


Evil eye
Study shows mocking-
birds remember the
faces of people they
don't like, and react ac-
cordingly./Page A5


Comics ...... .. :.C8
Community ...... .C6
Crossword ....... .C7
Editorial ........ .A8
Entertainment . . . . .B6
Horoscope ........ C7
Lottery Numbers .. .B4
Lottery Payouts .... .B6
Movies .... . ...... C8
Obituaries ....... .A5
Stocks ......... . A6
TV Listings ...... .C7
Four Sections


6 47I11 iiII! IIII


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Andi DeVore checks out the pool at the Key Training Center home in Floral City where she lives with five other new
Key clients.

Displaced clients find east-side home

N ' ANCY KENNEDY
nkehnedy@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle


O n the drive over to Citrus
County from Merritt Island,
all Mark Allan Johns talked
about with his mother. Junewas
going to the Key Training Center.
For the past 20 years he had
lived in a group home in Mont-
verde, in Lake County, as part of
Bethesda Lutheran Group Homes.
On May 5, Johns and the five
other individuals with develop-
mental disabilities who had been
together in Montverde for nearly
20 years moved into a group home
in Floral City and became a part of
the Key Training Center.
On Jan. 9, Bethesda had an-
nounced it would close its homes
in Florida, six in the Orlando area,
after which the 31 residents of
these homes would become the re- '
sponsibility of the state.
"That news was heart-wrench-
ing when we heard about it," said
Melissa Walker, assistant executive
director for the Key Center. "Mr.
(Chet) Cole and I went and met
with the Bethesda staff and visited
all the homes and immediately
had a love for all of the residents."
Walker said the Key Center'
could not financially afford to pur-
chase the homes nor could they lo-
gistically provide services, since
the homes were spread out all
over central Florida. i |
' However, with the housing mar-
ket the way it is, it would be feasi-
ble to purchase a home in Citrus
County and move the residents
here.,


From left, Deborah Hilton, Mark Johns, Mary Ellen Puch, Denise Volpe, An-
drea "Andl" DeVore and Chris Nelson recently moved from a home In Lake
County to a Key Training Center house in Floral City.


"The parents from the
*Montverde home started calling
us, and we met with them," Walker
said.
The Key Center had an already
state-licensed home in Floral City
up for sale, which they took off the
market-,- and moved in all six res-
idents from Montverde.
"We are so thrilled," June Johns
said on behalf of all the parents.
"I'd heard about the Key Center
years ago, and as soon as I heard
they were interested, I was on it,
calling them and the other par-
ents."
Johns said her son is happy, es-
pecially that he's with the people,
who have become family
"It's like they've always been
there," Johns said.


In a turn of events that Johns be-
lieves is the providence of God.
Melissa Bostick, the resident man-
ager at the Montverde home for
the past four years, had recently
been hired as a residential man-'
ager for a group home in Inver-
ness after learning of the coming
cuts from Bethesda.
When the agreement was made
to bring the six residents to Citrus
County, Cole asked Bostick if she,
would like to transfer to Floral
city.
"If you're putting me back with
my original six, I'll dlo it in a heart-
beat," Bostick told him.
She said she drove the van to
Montverde to pick the residents
up, and to surprise them as their
See HOMEPage A4


'Our cousin's an Idol'


NANCY KENNEDY
nkennedy@
Shronicleonline.com
Chronicle
T.ey may not be kissing
cousins, but that doesn't
mean Gary and Sue Allen of
Citr s Hills aren't thrilled to
be related to "American
Idoll' finalist Kris Allen.
"We've watched-the show
on and off in years past, but
this renewed our interest,"
Mrs. Alen said. "When we
found out he was going to be
on, watched it from the
audit ons in Louisville.
Thelfhen we found out he
made the top 36, we've been
watching ever since."
At 75, Gary Allen admits
he's a bit older than the 23-
year-old Kris and doesn't re-
call the younger distant
cousin from the annual
Allen family reunions, but
kin is kin.
The two are related
through Gary Allen's father
and Kris Allen's grandfa-
ther, who were first cousins.
Mrs. Allen, whose interest
in genealogy has led her to
research the Allen .family
tree, said it all traces back
to two brothers, Daniel and
Louis Allen, who each had


Associated Press
In this publicity Image released by Fox, "American Idol" fi-
nalists Kris Allen of Conway, Ark., left, and Adam Lambert, of
San Diego, are shown Wednesday In Los Angeles. Allen can
claim distant kin In Citrus Hills.


14 children. Louis Allen's
line is the musical one, and
they're the ones who bring
their instruments to the
family reunions and play
and sing, always on Father's
Day in Doniphan, Mo.
"The family originally
came from Kentucky and
then went to Doniphan,"
she said: "Some went to
Arkansas, where Kris is
from, and some to Michi-
gan."
She said following Kris


'IDOL' FINALE
* The "American Idol"
finale is at 8 p.m. today
on the local Fox station.
* The 2009 "American
Idol" winner will be
named during the
results show at 8 p.m.
Wednesday.

through the American Idol
process has brought the al-
See 'IDOL'/Page A2


stirs



debate


West-side neighbors

protestpurchase
MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
.Chronicle
Residents of a gated community
near Lecanto are in an uproar be-
cause the Key Training Center
bought a house there for a new fos-
ter home.
The residents of Heather Ridge
say their homeowners association
requires approval before any home
changed Own-
ership.
They say the It's not
Key should like we're
have made its were
presence sneaking
known before
preparing the into a
house on West
Heather Ridge house
Drive last in the
week for occu-
pancy community.
"It's been
like a circus of
activity with
Key Training
buses busin
in workers,'
next-door
neighbors
James Clin-
"We wondered
what was
going on. No-
body had any Melissa
notice' they Walker
were coming assistant executive
in. We cer- director, Key
tainly felt Training Center.
there should
have been a notice or a neighbor-
hood meeting or something."
Key Center assistant executive di-
rector Melissa Walker said the foster
home would house three Key clients
and a full-time administrator. She
said no one at the Key expected re-
sistance.
"It's. ot like we're sneaking into a
house in the community," she said.
"What we've been receiving in the
neighborhood is discouraging. We're
See DEBATE/Pap A4


Technicality


causes snag in


murder case


SHEMIR WILES
swiles@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Judge Richard Howard
rescheduled the trial of a
35-year-old Crystal River
man Monday after a
change in the case
caused the defense
attorney to request
more time to pre-
pare for trial.
Assistant State At-
torney Brian Trehy
announced he had
amended some of Gi.
the information that Spa
was filed in Gianni face.
Spagnolo's case. cha
Spagnolo is charged
with murder in the third de-
gree and child abuse.
Trehy said he added to
the child abuse charge that
Spagnolo also committed
child abuse by failing to
seek immediate medical
treatment for his girl-


an
gi
Sr


friend's 1-year-old boy that
later died.
Spagnolo was arrested in
April 2008. According to
records, Spagnolo was play-
ing with the child when he
threw the baby into the air,
causing the baby to hit the
ceiling and then fall
to a concrete floor,
hitting furniture
along the way
Spagnolo report-
edly waited about an
hour for the boy's
mother to come
home, and then an-
nni other hour before
nolo taking the baby to re-
more ceive help.
)es. The baby boy suf-
fered severe head
trauma, an injury to his
brain stem and massive reti-
nal hemorrhaging. He was
flown to a hospital and died
a day later from his injuries.
Following Trehy's pro-
See SNAG/Page A2


HEALTH & LIFE:







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TUESDAY, MAY 19,


Crist signs bill


for rebates

Associated Press ances at discount rates,
lower utility costs and bene-
MIAMI - Florida will fit Florida businesses by
begin offering rebates on stimulating sales of energy-
energy-efficient appliances efficient appliances," Crist
in an environmentally said in a news release after
friendly attempt to boost the bill signing in Orlando.
sales under a bill signed The bill's sponsor said at
into law Monday. least $18 million in
Gov Charlie Crist federal stimulus
signed the bill, funds would go to-
which gives rebates ward the program.
on energy-efficient The Legislature also
appliances, such as allocated $150,000 to
washing machines, the Florida Energy
refrigerators, dish- and Climate Com-
washers and freez- mission, which will
ers. The precise Gov. Crist implement the re-
details of the pro- signed bill bate program.
gram, including how Monday. Although an en-
to qualify and how ergy-efficient wash-
much a person could save, ing machine costs about
were not immediately out- $1,000, compared with about
lined, but Crist's office said $575 for a traditional ma-
consumers could save up to chine, it saves about $600 in
20 percent per appliance on water and energy costs over
average, its life span, according to
"This rebate program will data from the Federal En-
help Floridians buy appli- ergy Management Program.


Any day's a good day to fish


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Dane Anderson's desire to fish isn't daunted by the rain Monday afternoon at Fort Island Trail Park. "Some of my best
fishing days have been in the rain, but that's not going to happen today," he said.


SNAG
Continued from Page Al

nouncement of the
amended information,
Spagnolo's attorney, Assis-
tant Public Defender
Joseph Sowell, said that the


whole time the state had
been focusing on the in-
juries the child sustained,
not on any alleged delay of
medical -treatment. Witlf
the modified information
filed, Sowell said he would
have to create a completely
separate defense.
"Quite frankly, Judge, I'm


not prepared," he said.
With Spagnolo looking at
a maximum of 30 years in
prison, Sowell said he
would need at least a
month to build a defense
against the new informa-
tion.
Howard agreed that the
change to the child abuse


charge was 'substantial
enough to grant a continu-
ance.
Spagnolo's case was set
to start trial next week, but
has been moved to the
week of July 20.
He will return to court
July 13 for a pre-trial hear-
ing.


MATTHEW BECK'Crror,.:ie
Gary and Sue Allen prepare to hang a sign on their front door
encouraging their Citrus Hills neighbors to vote for Gary
Allen's cousin, Kris Allen, in the "American Idol" finals
tonight.


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'IDOL'
Continued from Page Al

ready close family, even
closer
"All of a sudden our kids
are interested in (our family
tree) and where they fit,"
Allen said.
The Citrus Hills couple
made a sign to put in their
front yard and everywhere
they go they tell people to
watch the show and vote for
Kris. They've also down-,
loaded all of Kris Allen's
songs from the show on the
iTunes Web site, www
.iTunes.com. The "'American
Idol" finale is at 8 p.m. today
on the local Fox station. The
2009 'American Idol" win-
'ner will be named during
the results show at 8 p.m.
Wednesday.
Throughout the run of the
show, the panel of judges
has praised Kris Allen for
his artistry and his ability to
take a song and make it his,
most notably, "Heartless,"
his song from last week
"American Idol" judge
Simon Cowell remarked
that that song changed
Allen's chances of winning
the competition. Prior to


He's
definitely a
relation of ours.
Gary Allen
Citrus Hills, cousin to
"Idol" contestant Kris Allen.
that, things looked iffy for
the singer from Conway, Ark
After the finale on
Wednesday, the top 10
"American Idol" contestants
,will go on tour to about 50
cities nationwide. Gary and
Sue Allen already have their
Idol Tour tickets for the July
28 performance in Tampa at
the St Pete Forum - first
balcony seats.
"We're thrilled," Mrs.
Allen said. "This is so excit-
ing for our family, and we
can't wait to go to the re-
union and see everyone."
She said security around
all of the Idol contestants
has been tight as far as
phone calls are concerned
and only immediate family
can reach Kris.
"Of course, I'm a whole lot
older than he is and we've
got grandchildren about his
age," Allen said. "But he's
definitely a relation of ours."


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S Page A3 - TUESDAY, MAY 19,2009



TATE


LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Dunnellon
Home completely
destroyed by fire
Afire at a Dunnellon home
late Saturday night caused an
estimated $100,000 in dam-
age, according to a report Cit-
rus County Fire Rescue.
Dispatchers sent three en-
gines to the 1486 Pinnate
Court around 10:30 p.m. Sat-
urday where they found
heavy fire conditions on one
end of the home and in the
attic. As the conditions wors-
ened, interior crews were or-
dered to leave the structure.
The home's owner, An-
thony Hytovick, was out of
town on vacation and notified
of the fire by telephone.
No one was injured.

Citrus County
Rainbow Lakes group
moves meeting
The Rainbow Lakes Es- .
states Advisory Committee
meeting on Wednesday has
been moved from the Rain-
bow Lakes District Office to
the Rainbow Lakes Youth
Center at 4020 S.W. Deep-
water Court. Contact the Dis-
trict Office at 489-4280.
Progress Energy rate
increase hearing set
The series of public hear-
ings to discuss Progress En-
ergy's requested rate
increases to pay for the ad-
vance costs of its nuclear
power upgrades have been
scheduled.
The meetings will take
place in July throughout the
Tampa Bay area. A meeting
is scheduled from 9 a.m. to
noon July 17, at the Citrus
County Auditorium, 3610 S.
Florida Ave. in Inverness.
The hearings are being
.eld prior to a full rate hea r-
MIg in September when the
Florida Public Service Com-
mission will make a decision
on the rate increase applica-
tion. Call State-Sen. Mike
Fasano's office at (727)
848-5885 or toll free at (800)
948-5885.
Dawsy leads celebrity
waiters for fundraiser
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy and his
team of local celebrity waiters
will be on hand from 5 to 10
p.m. Thursday at Beef
O'Brady's in Crystal River.
Tips donated will benefit Big
Brothers Big Sisters, a men-
toring program.
The sheriffs new Mobile
Command Post and
F.O.C.U.S. car with interac-
tive multimedia for young-
sters will be on display.
Children who attend will be
"deputized" with special gold
star badges, and will receive
other goodies from the sher-
iffs office. Call 464-3968.
10-43 Show discusses
disaster readiness
Tune into the next live edi-
tion of the Sheriffs 10-43
show from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday on WYKE, chan-
nel 16.
Capt. Joe Eckstein, Emer-
gency Management Director
for Citrus County, will be in
the studio discussing disaster
preparedness and taking .your
calls. Call 527-2341 anytime
during 7:30 to 8:30 to ask
questions or give your com-
ments regarding emergency
preparedness and/or the up-
coming hurricane season.
Also, last week's show,
which did not air in its entirety
due to technical difficulties,
will air 9 p.m. today and 8
a.m. Thursday. Host Heather
Yates discussed the recent
burglaries and vandalism
that had occurred at Whisper-
ing Pines Park, as well as the
arrests of the four suspects


who committed the burgla-
ries. Special guests Det.
Dave Gater and Pati Smith,
director of Parks and Recre-
ation for the city of Inverness,
appeared on the show.
Prior Sheriffs 10-43 shows
can be seen via the Sheriffs
Web site at www.sheriff
citrus.org.
-From staff reports


AG eyes governor's mansion


McCollum

hopes to keep seat

for Republicans

Associated Press
ORLANDO - Republican Attor-
ney General Bill McCollum an-
nounced JVonday he is running for
governor, telling a group of GOP


leaders that he will work with all
parties and all people to solve the
state's problems.
McCollum's announcement
comes less than a week after Re-
publican Gov. Charlie Crist said he
will run for U.S. Senate next year
instead of seeking a second term.
"The hallmark of a McCollum ad-
ministration will be access and in-
clusion. This administration will be
one that doesn't look at the partisan
label, that brings the brightest
minds together from all walks of life


throughout our state, regardless of
religion, race - any kind of back-
ground whatsoever," McCollum said
at an announcement event packed
with state GOP leaders.
While Agriculture Commissioner
Charles Bronson also is considering
running, it is clear the party leader-
ship wants McCollum as its candi-
date. Republican Party of Florida
Chairman Jim Greer told the crowd
he hopes the party will unite be-
hind McCollum and that he would
ask the party's executive committee


to endorse him at its July meeting.
The primary is in August 2010.
Lt. Gov. Jeff Kottkamp, Senate
President Jeff Atwater, House
Speaker Larry Cretul and U.S. Rep.
Vern Buchanan were among party
leaders at the announcement
McCollum was elected attorney
general in 2006 and has focused
much of his effort on cybercrime,
expanding an Internet crime unit
started by his predecessor, Crist,
and speaking at schools about the
dangers of online predators.


alcoholic beverages with warning labels


Drew Vargulish, Brenden Flannery, and Chris Dibella put on the shirts provided by the Partners
for a Substance Free Campus.


more than ready to take the message to the
streets.
"It was good to see that awareness," Scott
said.
The main reason why the "sticker shock"
focuses on adults, Scott said, is that statis-
tics show that teens are not acquiring alco-
hol on their own. In May, the Florida
Division of Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco
(ABT) conducted a compliance check to see
how many stores in the county are selling al-
cohol to minors. All six stores that were
checked passed and Citrus County received
a 100-percent compliance rate. Scott said it
is great news to see that businesses in the
county are socially responsible. But it also
means teens aren't getting alcohol by pass-


ing a fake identification card.
Adult friends and children sneaking alco-
hol out of refrigerators and liquor cabinets
are factors. Still, what is more disturbing is
that parents are actually giving it to their
children, Scott said. Many parents, she said,
operate under the common myth that it's
better that their child drink at home with
them instead of being somewhere else.
"I don't understand that logic," Scott said.
"There's a lot at stake."
Scott said she has noticed that the aware-
ness in teens has increased over the years.
And as the message reaches the kids, Scott
said, she hopes the adults will follow.
"The kids get it and I hope the adults will,"
she said.


'Stick it' campaign plasters

SHEMIR WILES
swiles@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle T


Buying alcohol for a person under the age of
21 is illegal and for the fifth consecutive year,
the Partners for a Substance-Free Citrus want
to make it painfully clear to any adult who's
thinking about committing the crime.
The coalition, along with several volun-
teers, traveled throughout the county Satur-
day placing stickers on alcoholic beverages to
let adults know that contributing to the delin-
quency of a minor could mean jail time. The
annual "sticker shock" initiative takes place
around prom and graduation time because
this time of the year, said Deborah Scott, ex-
ecutive director of the coalition, because po-
lice see an increase in underage drinking.
"People'want to celebrate," Scott said.
However, Scott said, many teens believe
partying has to involve alcohol.
About. 17 teens from Citrus County Teen
Court, four from Eckerd Youth Alternatives,
a few Students Against Drunk Driving
(SADD) members from Crystal River High
School and one coalition member from Cit-
rus High School participated. In addition, a
couple of parents, sheriff's deputies, coali-
tion members and advisors for the SADD
clubs at Crystal River and Lecanto high
schools came out to help with the stickers.
Out of 10,000 stickers, Scott said they were
able to use about 8,000 of them. They visited
three stores on the east side of county and
two on the west The stickers went on several
alcoholic packages at Sweetbay, Publix and
Winn Dixie supermarkets. Scott said going to
the large chain stores was great because they
have such a large inventory; however, she
hopes in the future, they will be able to visit
the smaller convenience stores.
Scott said this was the largest number of
volunteers she's every recruited for the
"sticker shock" She also said the teens were


EMS schedules week of informative events


Special to the Chronicle
The National Emergency
Medical Services Week
brings together local com-
munities and medical per-
sonnel to publicize safety
and honor the dedication of
those who provide the day-
to-day lifesaving services of
medicine's "front line."
Throughout EMS Week,


Nature Coast EMS will host
the following activities for
the community.
* Today - Free CPR and
AED Education: This event
will highlight the essential
need for community part-
ners trained in CPR by of-
fering a free CPR/American
Heart Association Friends
and Family Course at the
Nature Coast EMS Adminis-


tration and Education Cen-
ter, 3876 W Country Hill
Drive, Lecanto. Classes will
be held at 10 a.m., 2 p.m. and
5:30 p.m. Call 249-4750.
N Wednesday - EMS for
Children Day: This annual
observance draws attention
to the specialized needs of
children. Nature Coast EMS
is sponsoring a Children's Art
Project, asking all. Elemen-


tary Children to do a drawing
of"What EMS means to you."
All drawings, will be dis-
played at Saturday's Com-
munity Partner's Health Fair
and Open House. Nature
Coast EMS Team Members
will also read to kinder-
garten and first grade stu-
dents "A Day with
Paramedics," by Jan Kottke.
Call Jane Bedford, 249-4751.


* Saturday - Nature
Coast EMS Community Part-
ner's Health Fair and Open
House: Nature Coast EMS
will host our community part-
ners in a day of fun and well-
being. Area public services
and health service partners
will be on hand to offer infor-
mation on wellbeing and
community services and well
as fun events for everyone.


Group targets underage drinking


L~iw~


Sx~.*-Ij~s -


.. ,, . . .


S'.*. .* ' DAVE SIGLER/i'C, r,c.r,
Local students and volunteers spent Saturday plastering stickers around area stores warning adults about the penalties involved when buy-
ing alcoholic beverages for minors. Mat Sbaino, Tamara Martin, Megan Paul, Michael Christian, volunteer, and Eileen David, secretary, Part-
ners for Substance Free Campus, talk about the rule for placing the stickers in area stores that support the program.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A4 TEDAYMAY 19 2009


DEBATE
Continued from Page Al

hearing the stereotypical
fears that are just not true."
The Key Center provides
employment training and
housing for mentally ill
adults. It operates 16 group
homes in Citrus County, in-
cluding four foster homes. A
foster home is a group home
housing fewer than six
clients, Walker said. .
Walker said she looked at
about 20 houses in Citrus
County before deciding on.
the one in Heather Ridge,
one of two gated communi-
ties in Crystal Oaks. Deciding
factors included square
footage, price, swimming
pool and proximity to the
Key's campus on State Road
44 in Lecanto.
The house has four bed-
rooms - including a den con-
verted into a bedroom - and
a pool. The purchase price
was $220,000, according to
the deed dated May 6.
Group homes are designed


HOME
Continued from Page Al

"new" resident manager
"The transition has been
pretty decent so far," she
said.
The six new resident-
clients of the Key Training
Center are:
* Mark Allan Johns -
likes computers .and the
ladies. He hopes to find a
girlfriend.,
* Mary "Grandma" Puch
- the oldest at 75; she likes
to do puzzles and color
N Andrea ("Andi") DeVore
- likes puzzles, beads,
stuffed animals and the
color pink


to integrate Key clients into a
community. Walker said
clients come and go from
their homes just like anyone
else.
"They're people with,
hopes and dreams and de-
sires," she said. "They learn
at a slower pace. They are not
individuals you should fear,
or not know how to interact
with."
Walker said she knew
Heather Ridge was a deed-
restricted community, but she
didn't know the details of the
restrictions until after buying
the home and hearing com-
plaints from the residents.
"We did not anticipate this
type of reception," she said.
Walker said a Key Center
attorney sent a letter to the
homeowners association say-
ing that it had the legal right
to occupy a foster home.
"We needed to let them
know, we were not going to
stand by for any harassing of
the individuals and the work
crews," she said.
One neighbor, Sue Croel,
said the Key Center letter
was read Monday at a home-


* Denise Volpe - likes
movies, being busy, likes to
be in the kitchen.
* Chris Nelson - Batman
fan, likes to be outside, es-
pecially doing yard work
* Deborah "Slick" Hilty
- sports fan, says she's
bashful.
Walker said they will have
greater opportunities as
part of the Key Training
,Center than they previously
had in Montverde.
"For these folks, it's a
whole new world for them,"
she said.
Walker went on to say that
it's the Key Center's entre-
preneurial spirit and the
community's ongoing sup-
port that has enabled the
center to ride out the storms
of the state's funding issues.


owners association meeting.
"It was a very hostile let-
ter," she said. "Basically, they
don't want any harassment
The letter was intimidating
and harassing in itself."
Deed restrictions require
that the homeowners' associ-
ation board be notified when
property is sold. However,
neither Clindaniel nor Croel
knew if the board could deny
someone from buying a home
and moving into Heather
Ridge.
"We have hired a lawyer to
instruct us as to what our
rights are," Croel said.
The issue, she said, is not
whether mentally retarded
adults should be allowed to
live in Heather Ridge.
, "I don't care who lives
there. It sets a precedent that
other groups can come in
here as groups," she said.
"You'll have people coming
and going. As a family com-
munity, you kind of like to
know who the neighbors are.
Croel added: "There's so
many thousands of homes out
there. Why did they choose a
gated community?"


"In the state of Florida, so
many providers are closing
homes, reducing their serv-
ices and leaving town be-
cause the state keeps
cutting back its funding,"
she said.
"Last year we were cut 7
percent across the board,
but instead of hunkering
down, in August we pur-.
chased a thrift store in Crys-
tal River In the short nine
months it's been open, it has
exceeded sales predictions.
"So, we feel blessed to be
able to expand our serv-
ices," she said.
"Currently, we have 43 un-
funded (clients) and we'll be
getting. 13 from CREST
when they graduate, with 10
of those unfunded. But
we're not cutting back"


=- "For the RECORD -


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic battery
arrests
* Joseph Lance Mansfield
III, 34, of Beverly Hills, at 4:22
p.m. Wednesday on a charge of
domestic battery. According to
the police report, Mansfield
slapped and pushed a female
victim after they began arguing
in their home. No bond.
* Mary Anne Scalia, 57, of
Inverness, at 11 p.m. Wednes-
day on a charge of domestic
battery. Scalia reportedly struck
a male victim in the face and
threw a beer on him after he
would not leave her residence.
No bond.
* Donna F. Villar, 68, of In-
verness, at 12:46 a.m. Friday on
a charge of aggravated abuse
of elderly. According to the po-.
lice report, Villar caused injuries
to an 86-year-old woman's arms
and hands, including a large cut
that required antibiotics. Villar
told police she became irritated
when the woman did not move
as fast as she would like. While
trying to grab a flower pot from
the victim's hands, the report
said, Villar caused injuries that
required a. skin graft on the
woman's right forearm that left
permanent disfigurement. .No
bond.
* Robert Daniel Smith, 51,
of Beverly Hills, at 7:48 p.m. Fri-
day on a charge of domestic
battery. According to the arrest
report, Smith hit a 57-year-old
woman on the arm leaving a
large bruise, and threw a toy car
-at her after she refused to buy
him more beer. No bond.
* William E. Godby, 68, of
Floral City, at 11:53 p.m. Friday-
on charges of aggravated as-
sault with a deadly weapon and
battery on a person 65 or older.
According to the police report,
Godby sought out his ex-girl-
friend and her mother at the
VFW on State Road 44 then fol-
lowed them home, where he
threatened to shoot them with a


ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to the Web site
www.sheriffcitrus.org and click on the Public
Information link, then on Arrest Reports.
* Watch the "Arrested Developments" show from the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office online at the
Chronicle's www.chronicleonline.tv.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.
* For the Record may also list incident reports about
area burglaries, thefts and vandalisms.


.38-caliber pistol if they called
police. BQnd $16,000.
DUI arrests
* Donald Edward Plotts,
47, of 12782 S.W. 99th Lane,
Dunnellon, at 2:15 a.m. Sunday
on a charge of driving under the
influence. According to the ar-
rest report, Plotts' blood alcohol
concentration was .162 per-
cent; the legal limit in Florida is
.08 percent. The offense oc-
curred at U.S. 41 North and
Montgomery Avenue. Bond
$500.
* Kenneth Steven
Schrump, 36, of 4741 S. Cas-
cade Ave., Inverness, at 4:52
p.m. Sunday on charges of driv-
ing under the influence and re-
fusing to submit an approved
test for alcohol: According to the
arrest report, Schrump broke
the passenger side window of
his vehicle with his arm out of
anger before refusing to submit
to a breathalyzer test. The of-
fense occurred on State Road
44 near Sands Cut Terrace.
Bond $1,000.
Other arrests
* Timothy Gene Anderson,
38, of 6040 Old Dixie Highway,
Vero Beach, at 10:06 p.m. at
10:06 p.m. Thursday on
charges of following harassing
and aggravated stalking with
threat. No bond.,
* Benjamin Bernard
Boyles, 42, of 12370 S.E.
103rd Road Terrace, Archer, at


3:47 p.m. Sunday on a charge
of worthless check. Bond
$1,000.
* Joe Nathan Betsy, 55,
10299 N. Spaulding Drive, Dun-
nellon, at 4:17 p.m. Sunday on a
charge of violation of probation
for a previous charge of driving
under the influence. No bond.
. Curtis M. Pratt, 27, of
3890 E. Owens Trail, Inverness,
at 5:47 p.m. Sunday on a
charge of driving with a sus-
pended, canceled or revoked li-
cense, habitual offender. Bond
$2,000.
* Thomas Joseph Jones,
23, of 6515 W. Grant St., Ho-
mosassa, at 11:38 p.m. Sunday
on a charge of obtaining a con-
trolled substance by fraud or for-
gery. Bond $2,000.
* Roger Alan Steve, 47, of.
6651 S.W. County Road 347,
Cedar Key, at 11:39 p.m. Sun-
day on a charge of felony failure
to appear for an original charge
of driving on an expired license
for more than four months.
Bond $2,500.
* Anna Marie Sodderberg,
33, of 5730 S. Willard Ave., Ho-
mosassa, at 1:49 p.m. Monday,
on a charge of felony violation of
parole for an original charge of
driving under the influence.
Bond $1,000.
* Uzel E. Tyrell, 22, of 7508
Lull Water Ave., Spring Hill, at
2:35 p.m. Monday on a charge
of retail theft. Bond $250.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR -HI LO PR HI L

" 6 .
663.66


72 70 1.30 -- 70 66 1.40o

THREE DAY OUTLOOK foExcidalby:
r V TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 79 Low: 654
Mostly cloudy with scattered
showers and a.few thunderstorms ..
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
High: 82 Low: 65
Partly sunny with scattered showers and
thunderstorms 'j
THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 84 Low: 65
" Sun and clouds with scattered showers and
thunderstorms


TEMPERATURE*
Monday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Monday
Total for the month
Total for the year ,
Normal for the, year
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness


91/67
95/53
88/65
79
+2

1.00 in.
,3.64 in.**
8.42 in.**
14.88 in.


- correction from previous day
UV INDEX: 2
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, '10+ very high


BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Monday at 3 p.m.' 29.95 in.
DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m. 67
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m. 90%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees and grasses were moderate
and weeds were absent.
"LUght - only extreme allergic will show symp:
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience.
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Monday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.,


SOLUNAR TABLES'.
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
5/19 TUESDAY 1:50 8:01 2:11 8:22
5/20 WEDNESDAY 2:28 8:39 2:51 9:02

bffilf4LQsft


S7


15
JUIE 15


SUNSET TONIGHT 8 1 'PM
SUNRISE TOMORROW ...............6:36 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY ...........................3:04A.M.
MOONSET TODAY ....................3:31 P.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. A burn ban is in
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay
Tuesday
City High/Low \High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 1:56a/9:53a ' 2:32 p/10:53 p
Crystal River*. 12:17 a/7:15 a 12:53 p/8:15 p
Withlacoochee* 10:40 a/5:03 a 11:22 p/6:03 p
Homosassa*** 1:06 a/8:52 a 1:42 p/9:52 p


"*At Mason's Creek
Wednesday
High/Low High/Low
3:14 a/10:50 a 3:12 p/11:49 p
1:35 a/8:12 a 1:33 p/9:11 p
11:20 a/6:00 a - /6:59. p
2:24 a/9:49 a 2:22 p/10:48 p


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville,
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


Fcast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota -
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
s
ts

ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK
Northeast winds from 15 to 25 knots. Gulf water
Seas 5 to 7 feet. Bay and inland temperature
waters will be rough. Showers and
thunderstorms are likely. 60O

Taken at Aripeka

LAKE LEVELS.
Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.12 28.14 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 32.61 32.62 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 34.38 34.41 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 36.15 36.28 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data Is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


Monday Tuesday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 54 40 pc 70 52
Albuquerque 87 61 s 90 59
Asheville 63 .42 s 71 40
Atlanta 68 51 s 73 54
Atlantic'City 62 50 s 65 51.
Austin 79 51 s 82 52
Baltimore 62 49 s 72 51
Billings 79 54 pc 93 49
Birmingham 72 45 s 76 50
Boise 95 59 pc 88 46
Boston 52 46 s 69 51
Buffalo 55 34 pc 68 48
Burlington, VT 56 43 c 67 44
Chdrleston, SC 58 51 .16 ts 70 62
Charleston, WV 66 36 s 76 44
Charlotte 66 49 s 74 48
Chicago 66 40 pc 78 57
Cincinnati 67 37 s 75 47
Cleveland 60 34 pc 72 54
Columbia, SC 67 51 .11 pc 74 52
Columbus, OH 66 38 s 74 50
Concord, N.H. 57 41 pc 71 42
Dallas 78 54 s 81 57
Denver 88 49 s 93 60
Des Moines 77 48 s 82 59
Detroit 64 36 pc 72 55
El Paso 90 63 s 91 63-
Evansville, IN 70 42 s 79 51
Harrisburg 62 45 s 72 48
Hartford 57 47 s 73 46
Houston 79 56 s 82 57
Indianapolis 66 42 s 75 53
Jackson 74. 51. s 77 53
Las Vegas 10277. pc 94 73
Little Rock 73 49 s 78 49
Los Angeles 69 60 pc 67' 59
Louisville 68 43 s 78 50
Memphis 74 52 s 79 56
Milwaukee 65 43 pc 74 55
Minneapolis 81 53 pc 79 53
Mobile 73 53 s 79 54
Montgomery 71 56 s 77 55
Nashville 70 44 s 76 48


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=-drzzle;
f=fair, hshazy, pc=partly cloudy; r-rain;
rs=raln/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=wlndy.
02009 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
TUESDAY

Monday Tuesday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 78 60 s 78 61
New York City 58 49 s 69 53
Norfolk 60 52 s 68 50
Oklahoma City 75 48 s 80 57
Omaha 84 54 s 86 61
Palm Springs 10482 pc, 101 73.
Philadelphia 60 50 s 71 49
Phoenix 10680 pc 101 78
Pittsburgh 62 33 s 72 46
Portland, ME 55 45 pc 66 44
Portland, Ore 81 54 sh 59 47
Providence, R.I. 53 46 .03 s 72 48
Raleigh 67 49 .06 pc 70 48
Rapid City 87 43 s 85 55
Reno 91 57 pc 85 51
Rochester, NY 56 36 pc 70 46
Sacramento 91 61 pc 87 56
St. Louis 71 47 s 82 57
St. Ste. Marie 65 30 c 52 37
Salt Lake City 91 52 pc 88 62
San Antonio 84 59 s 84 57
San Diego 69 60 pc 69 61
San Francisco 65 51 pc 66 50
Savannah 61 52 .30 c 72 60
Seattle 66 51 sh 57 44
Spokane 80 53 sh 66 42
Syracuse 55 40 pc 68 47
Topeka - 77 47 s 85 60
Washington 62 50 s 74 52
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
. HIGH 109 Imperial, Calif. LOW 21 Pellston, Mich.

WORLD CITIES


TUESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 89/75/ts
Amsterdam 63/48/c
Athens 79/62/ts
Beijing 89/64/pc
Berlin 68/45/pc
Bermuda 79/65/pc
Cairo 93/67/s
Calgary 51/33/pc
Havana 85/73/ts
Hong Kong 91/78/ts
Jerusalem 93/73/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio ,
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


73/52/s
56/43/sh
82/56/s
75/51/ts
60/41/c
60/41/pc
63/45/sh
77/65/pc
81/60/pc
66/47/r
77/63/s
60/42/sh
68/49/sh


� ; vj!, T R tU S.. C 0 U N T Y



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24 A
MAY24 MAY 30


J~rIUESDY MA l, /


0







TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 A5


CITRus CouNTY (FL E


S*--..:=:. Obituaries -


Lillian
Alvarez, 83
FORMERLY OF
INVERNESS
Lillian M. Alvarez, age 83,
of Hampton Twp., NJ, died
peacefully
at her home
following a
long illness.
Born in Ad- . a.
j u n tas,
Pu e r t o ,
Rico, Lil-
lian moved '/
to Manhat- Lillian
tan and Alvarez
later Staten
Island, where she lived for
thirty-four years. In 1992,
Mrs. Alvarez moved to In-
verness, Fla., where she
lived until moving to Hamp-
ton Twp. in 2005.
Daughter of the late
Hipolito and Margarita
(Dosal) Cardona, Lillian was
a past active member of the
Faith United Methodist
Church in Staten Island as
well as the Inverness
United Methodist Church.
She was a longtime choir
member as well as active in
the Clown Ministry program
in Florida. An avid piano
player, she enjoyed music,
dancing and gardening, es-
pecially her roses.
A retired Administrative
Office Manager for the
Legal Aid Society of Staten
Island, she had worked over
seventeen years. Prede-
ceased by her husband
Manuel Alvarez in 2000, as
well as her brother, Joseph
C. Cardona and her sister,
Luz Aida Eagan. Survivors
include her son, Manuel Al-
varez of Staten Island, NY,
her daughters, Linda A.
Harrigan of Hampton Twp.,
NJ, Lillian M. Alvarez of
Easthampton, MA, and
Nancy Alvarez of Milford,
PA. Survivors also include
her grandchildren, Greg
and Emily Alvarez, Brendan
and Lindsay Harrigan, as
well as her many nieces and
nephews and her faithful
pet and companion Buddy.
Funeral service for Lfl-
lian will be held Friday, May
22, 2009, at 11:00 AM in the
Iliff-Ruggiero Funeral
Home, 156 Main Street
(Route 206) Newton, NJ. Vis-
itation will be Thursday,
May 21, 2009 in the funeral
home from 2 to 4 and from 7
to 9 p.m. In lieu of flowers
memorial contributions- in-
memory of Mrs. Lillian M.
Alvarez may be made to the"
Karen Ann Quinlan Center
of Hope Hospice, 99 Sparta
Ave., Newton, NJ, or Danc-
ing Classrooms American
Ballroom Theater
www.americanballroom
theater.com. Online condo-
lences may be offered
through www.iliff-ruggiero
funeralhome.com.





Charles 'Bud'
Buckius, 82
LECANTO
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr. Charles W
"Bud" Buckius, age 82, of
Lecanto, Florida, will be
held 11:00 AM, Wednesday,
May 20, 2009, at the Grace
Bible Church, 6382 Green
Acres Street in Homosassa,
with Pastor Ray Herriman
officiating. Friends may call
Tuesday May 19, 2009, from
6 to 8 p.m. at the Homosassa
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes. Online condolences
may be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com.
He was born October 29,
1926, in Cleveland, OH, son
of Albert and Olga Buckius.
He died May 16,2009, at his
residence. Mr. Buckius was
a United States Marine
Corps veteran, serving dur-
ing WWII (Pacific Theater)
and a recipient of the Pur-
ple Heart. He was a retired
electrical contractor. He
had moved here from Madi-
son, Ohio in 1991.
Survivors include his wife
of 60 years, Mary Buckius of


Lecanto; children Bob
Buckius of Inverness, Bill
Buckius and Brian Buckius,
both of Madison, OH, Bruce
Buckius of Lecanto, Bud

SO YOU KNOW
m The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy per-
mits both freehand paid
obituaries. E.mail
obits@chronicle on.
line.com or phone 563-
5660 for details and
pricing options.


Buckius Jr., of Clearwater,
Bonnie Bradley and Brenda
Neff, both of Lecanto, and
Barbara Krogh of Ho-
mosassa; a sister, Charlene
Alley of Chesterland, OH; 16
grandchildren; and 11 great-
grandchildren.





Lathan
Hutchins, 84
INVERNESS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr. Lathan C.
Hutchins, age 84, of Inver-
ness, Florida, will be held
12:00 PM Wednesday, May
20, 2009, at the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes with Pastor Donnie
Seagle and Dr. William Or-
tolf officiating. Interment
will follow at Oak Ridge
Cemetery, Inverness.
Friends may call 5:30 to 7:30
PM Tuesday, May 19,2009, at
the Inverness Chapel, fol-
lowed by a Masonic service
at 7:30. Mr. Hutchins died
May 17, 2009, in Inverness,
FL. Online condolences
may be sent to the family at
www. Hooper Funeral
Home.com. Friends who
wish may make memorial
donations to First Baptist
Church of Inverness Debt
Reduction, 550 Pleasant
Grove Road, Inverness, FL
34452 or Citrus Masonic
Lodge, PO. \Box 1851, Inver-
ness, FL 34451.
Born May 25, 1924, in
Lawrenceville, GA, to the
late George F and Eula
Marie (Bowen) Hutchins, he
moved to Inverness from
Douglasville, GA, in 1985.
He was a U. S. Civil service
employee, retiring from the
Federal Aviation Adminis-
tration with 32 years serv-
ice. He traveled extensively
in his lifetime. He was a
member of the First Baptist
Church of Inverness, having
served as director of the
Sunday School Department
and as president of the Fel-
lowship Class. Mr. Hutchins
served with the Sixth Ma-
rine Division during WWII,
where he was a U. S. Navy
Corpsman. He served in the
battles of Guadalcanal and
Okinawa and was wounded
during the battle of Sugar-
loaf Hill. He was a member
of-the-Sixth Marine-Divisiofi
Association, Past Master of
Citrus Masonic Lodge 118,
Inverness; Ocala Scottish
Rite; and Past Presideiitof
Citrus Scottish Rite Club.
Mr Hutchins was pre-
ceded in death by his par-
ents, and a brother, George
E Hutchins Jr. Survivors in-
clude his wife of 61 years,
Linda C. Hutchins of Inver-
ness; daughter, Ginger
(Wayne) Camp of Cleveland,
GA; 2 sons, William E.
(Kathy) Hutchins of Las
Vegas, NV and John R.
(Jane) Hutchins of Tal-
lapoosa, GA; 6 grandchil-
dren; and 6
great-grandchildren.

Eileen,
Miller, 86
INVERNESS
Mrs. Eileen J. Miller, age
86, of Inverness, Florida,
died May 16, 2009, in Inver-
ness, FL.
Arrangements and crema-
tion are under the direction
of the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory

Joyce
Warner, 79
DUNNELLON
A Memorial Service for
Joyce will be held at 11:00
AM Saturday, May 23, 2009,

-flP. H. c.

lU PitoessnalHeng Cenotersn
' .


0 Denny Dingier, A.C A
Audioprosthologlst
M. Div.. BC-HIS


211 S. Apopka Ave., Invemess
www.lnvernessHearing.com


at Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in
Lecanto. The Rev. Ladd
Harris will officiate. A
luncheon reception will fol-
low at the church.
In lieu of flowers, contri-
butions may be made to
Shepherd of the Hills Epis-
copal Church Memorial
Fund, or to Alzheimer's
Family Organization, PO.
Box 1939, New Port Richey,
FL 34656.

Deaths
ELSE . -'.-

Mario
Benedetti, 88
LATIN AMERICAN
WRITER
MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay
- Mario Benedetti, a pro-
lific writer whose novels
and poems reflected the
idiosyncrasies of Uruguay's
middle class and a social
commitment forged by years
in exile from the country's
military- dictatorship, has
died. He was 88.
Benedetti died Sunday at
his home in Uruguay's capi-
tal, Montevideo, said his
personal secretary, Ariel
Silva. He had suffered from
respiratory and intestinal
.problems for more than a
year, and was released from
the hospital on May 6. .
Called "Don Mario" by his
friends, the author penned
more than 60 novels, poems,
short stories and plays, win-
ning numerous honors in-
cluding Bulgaria's Jristo
Borev award for poetry and
essays, and Amnesty Inter-
national's Golden Flame
prize.
His novel "The Truce"
(1960) was translated into 19
languages and adapted to
cinema, theater and televi-
sion. Along with "Thank You
for the Fire" (1965), it her-
alded his inclusion in the
Latin American literary
boom in the 1960s along
with Colombia's Gabriel
Garcia Marquez, Peru's
Mario Vargas Llosa and
Mexico's Carlos Fuentes.
While Benedetti was
renowned throughout Latin
America, he never attained
the other authors' popular-
ity in the English-speaking
world.
Benedetti leaned to the
political left and.firmly de-
fended the Cuban revolu-
tion to the end of his life. In
2006, he joined other Latin
American leftist authors in
a call for Puerto Rican in-
dependence.

John E.
Connelly, 83
ENTREPRENEUR
PITTSBURGH - John E.
Connelly, a former coal
miner turned multimillion-
aire entrepreneur and oper-
ator of riverboat dining and
gambling cruises, has died.
He was 83.
Connelly died Saturday
morning at home of conges-
tive heart failure, his grand-
son, Terrence Wirginis, said
Sunday
Connelly was born in
Pittsburgh, worked in a coal
mine to support his family
after his parents died and
was also a Golden Gloves
boxer. He later built a for-
tune coming up with bank
promotions, and was once
called by Fortune Magazine
"the godfather of make-a-
deposit, get-a-toaster bank
marketing."
Connelly later created
riverboat dining cruises in
Pittsburgh, as well as New
York and St. Louis. He ran


riverboat gambling cruises
on the Mississippi and
sought to bring casino gam-
bling to Pittsburgh. In 1993,
he was on Forbes' list of the
400 richest Americans.
Connelly, a staunch De-
mocrat, ran unsuccessfully
for Congress in 1971 against
Republican H. John Heinz
III, who later represented
Pennsylvania in the U.S.
Senate.

Newt
Heisley, 88
DESIGNER OF
THE POW/MIA
FLAG
COLORADO SPRINGS,
Colo. - Newt Heisley, the
designer of the POW/MIA
flag adopted by Congress in
1990 as a symbol of the na-
tion's concern for those
missing during military ac-
tions in Southeast Asia, has
died. He was 88.
Heisley died at his home
in Colorado Springs Thurs-
day after years of failing
health, said his son Jim.
Heisley's image sketched
in pencil in 1971 during the
Vietnam War shows the sil-
houette of a gaunt man, a
strand of barbed wire and a
watchtower in the back-
ground with the words
POW/MIA "You are not for-
gotten."
Congress in 1998 man-
dated the flag be displayed
at the White House, U.S.
Capitol, military installa-
tions and other federal
buildings on national obser-
vances that include Memo-
rial Day and the Fourth of
July. The flag also flies at
Veterans Affairs medical
centers each day, along with
the American flag.
Heisley was working at a
New Jersey ad agency when
he was assigned the task of
submitting a design. His old-
est son, Jeffrey, now 61, who
had contracted hepatitis
while training at Quantico,
Va., in preparation for a tour
of Vietnam, provided the in-
spiration for the silhouette,
Jim Heisley told The Asso-
ciated Press Sunday. The
words came from Heisley's
experience of flying C-46
transport planes over the
Pacific Ocean during World
War II.
"He told me many a time
that when he was flying mis-
sions out over the water at
night, he'd look around and
say, "Oh my God, if I put this
thing in the drink or land on
a deserted island, I hope to
hell they don't forget about
me,"' Jim Heisley said.
Heisley's original plan
was to add purple and
white, but the stark black
and white pencil drawing
proved popular.
The image was never
copyrighted and Heisley
didn't financially benefit
from his design that has
been used on everything
from lapel pins to vehicle
designs, Jim Heisley said.

Turkan
Saylan, 74
TURKISH
HUMANITARIAN
ANKARA, Turkey -
Turkan Saylan, a doctor
who battled leprosy in
Turkey and founded a secu-
larist association devoted to
providing educational
grants for poor children, has
died. She was 74.
Saylan died in a hospital
in Istanbul early Monday
after a long battle with can-
cer, the Association to Sup-
port Contemporary Life
said.
-From wire reports


783454




Featuring a full line of
c 244 SE.
Hlwy.19

Open Crystal River
Mon.- Sat.
9:00 AM-4:30 PM795-4057









MADE IN
AMERICA


Study: Don't



mess with


mockingbirds

Associated Press .ik ..- . J..." .


WASHINGTON - Mock-
ingbirds may look pretty
much alike to people, but
they can tell us apart and
are quick to react to folks
they don't like.
Birds rapidly learn to
identify people who have
previously threatened their
nests and sounded alarms
and even attacked those
folks, while ignoring others
nearby, researchers report
in Tuesday's edition of Pro-
ceedings of the National
Academy of Sciences.
"This shows a bird is
much more perceptive of
its environment than peo-
ple had previously sus-
pected," said Douglas J.
Levey, a professor in the
zoology department of the
University of'Florida.
"We are a part of their
environment and we are a
concern to them," Levey
said in a telephone inter-
view.
The researchers are
studying mockingbirds as
part of an effort to better
understand how species
adapt to urbanization.
With more and more
areas being converted into
towns and cities, animals
that adapt well seem to be
those that are especially
perceptive about their en-
vironment, he said.
"We do not think mock-
ingbirds evolved a specific
ability to respond to hu-
mans, rather we think that
mockingbirds are naturally
perceptive about their en-
vironment, especially
threats to their nests."
A graduate student in-
volved in research on bird
nesting noticed that when
she would make repeat vis-
its to peoples' yards the
birds would alarm and at-
tack her, while they would
ignore people gardening or
doing other things nearby,
Levey said.
Indeed, it seemed they
could even recognize her
car, and she had to start
parking around the corner.
So research team mem-
bers decided to run their
own tests in which people
would approach mocking-
bird nests around the uni-
versity campus, touch the
nest, and then move on.
The 'study involved 10
people who varied in age,
sex and amount of hair and
facial hair, and dressed dif-
ferently on different days,
Levey said. The individu-

* Nonprofit organizations
are invited to submit
news releases about
upcoming community
events. Call 563-5660.
784348

BROWN
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY


University of Florida/Associated Press
A mockingbird grazes Uni-
versity of Florida biology
major Devon Duffy on April
19, in Gainesville, in an at-
tempt .to drive her away
from its nest.
als approached a total of 24
mockingbird nests., They
would approach the nests
from different directions
and at various times of day.,
For four days the same
student would approach
and touch a nest, and then
leave. The birds began re-
acting to them in advance
starting on day three -
fleeing the nest, sounding
alarms and dive bombing
the researchers.
"You may be walking by
a bird and think it's just
minding its own business.
But if there is a nest
nearby, you are its busi-
ness," Levey said.
The researchers were
surprised that the response
was as rapid and dramatic
as it was, Levey said.
It might have been ex-
pected from crows, ravens
and parrots - birds known
to be highly intelligent-but
not from songbirds living in
a natural setting, he said.
When, on the fifth day, a
different student would ap-
proach the mockingbird
nest, the birds didn't re-
spond in advance.
And even on the days
when they were attacking a
person they perceived as a
.threat, the birds ignored
dozens of other passers-by.
Past studies have sought
to determine if birds could.
choose between two indi-
viduals, or pictures of indi-
viduals, to get a food
reward, Levey said.
This research was differ-
ent in that the bird needed
to pick out one person they
had seen before, not always
dressed the same or com-
ing from the same direc-
tion, while streams of other
people were walking by
And the birds succeeded
after having seen the per-
son just twice.


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AG TUESDAYMAY 19 2009


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I Hwo E TE A E" R I


MOST ACTIVE $1 OR MORE" I MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name VoliO00 Laor Cng, Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(OO Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Amerl-
-,iArOm n .25;:" 11 -3 .1 :1 PSCrudeDLn216809 3.54 +.28 PwShs00QQQ1001523 34.24 +.87 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
Citigrp 2978856 3.64 +.16 Hemisphrx 183227 1.93 +.63 Cisco 615147 18.72 +.80 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
DirxRnBear2477487 4.82 -1.08 BrclndiaTR 25108 49.03 +9.56 DryShips 529564 7.04 +.20 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
SPDR 2173243 91.23 +2.52 EldorGld g 18155 8.32 +.01 Microsoft 441186 20.60 +.38 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
DirxFinBull 2094111 10.31 +1.57 KodiakO g 14733, 1.18 +.14 Intel 432354 15.52 +.33 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...
GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: dd- Issue has been called for redemption by company. d- New 52-week
.GAINERS ($2 OL O-) GAINERS ($2oMOBE) GAINERS ($2ORMORE) ,, :I,i ,iL .1..c.,T,3ir,,,. oi,,il| ;i,l.,,',r,,i,EL,,,.r,,l,3a
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Cho %Chg Name Last Chq %Chg a ,T.M,.,,,g ,,-, y-.,F,' M ia.veapIii,. r, . r.,TIr.rare I,.3,,T, r i: ,, fapi,:,i .l ] ;l'd u,h: h'.i
AnthCa pfC 3.26 +1.71 +110.3 HallwdGp 17.40 +4.90 +39.2 Novogen 4.93 +2.76 +127.2 ing qualification. - Stock was anew issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
AnthCa pfD 2.80 +1.45 +107.4 ProspMed 2.40 +.60 +33.3 KonaGill 3.93 +1.64 +71.6 ures date only from the beginning of trading. p - Preferred stock issue, pr - Preferences. pp -
AgriaCp 2.19 +.61 +38.6 CoastD 2.45 +.50 +25.6 IDMPhmh 2.62 +.92 +54.1 -i.:.i.yo,.r,, ,,i,: ,,,,'.i,:.',' , ,,, �:.,.1. r . Rr,i,.:.r[u :,:u. . i aOr.i" ,:i :
Dillards 10.18 +267 +35.6 Geokinetics 9.20 +1.80 +24.3 OncoGenxnl.88 +3.68 +44.9 'i,.: ri (iir., 'i1.pa r i.r.,ri .,.ir, i a.. i ,, ,..Tra , .i ,l:.,t: ini"i..ri ir,,,e
TataCom 26.71 +5.78 +27.6 BrclndiaTR 49.03 +9.56 +24.2 BSD Med 2.75 +.85 +44.7 :i:,: ,i . . ia wr,. :.,.,i .,1 '.'.' rii,., iii.:..ir.g pu.,:r,a- .- o .l.J.. , rN..
1.-.e - , A - l ,, n vi u, . U ' n ir.i li-:ir , i'n ,,:,rr II', 1 ,'1 *,r', .' �ur *| ' L ''T'lo' , '' E" ii- i I'"J .y'' ':"'': -
LOSERS 152 OR MoRE LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) . -r r, .. -.. .:, ,,,:.1h- .', r., lirp,,15. ,. ' .r-. ,,. ,',,.r, .at rr
Name Last Chq %Chg Name Last Chq %Cho Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associalea Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
DirxFinBear 4.82 -1.08 -18.3 NIVS IntTn 2.30 -.59 -20.4 Consulier 2.62 -.88 -25.1
DirxEMBear16.20 -3.27 -16.8 PSCrudeDSn124.60-17.75 -12.5 FFedBkIA 2.23 -.57 -20.4 0
ProUShtRE 20.50 -3.96 -16.2 PacOffPT 4.18 -.59 -12.4 PlumasBc 4.18 -.79 -15.9
Rdxlnv2xFs 9.92 -1.55 -13.5 Invitel 6.20 -.80 -11.4 Cowlitz 2.78 -.50 -15.2 52-Week Net % YTD
MSeafell 13.84 -2.14 -13.4 ZionO&G 8.45 -1.06 -11.1 CarolTrBk 7.20 -1.26 -14.9 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ch


DIARY


S-26 Advanced
380 Declined
67 Unchanged
3,173 Total issues
9 New Highs
5 New Lows
5,489,013,976 Volume


DIARY


424 Advanced
148 Declined
62 Unchanged
634 Total issues
9 New Highs
2 . New Lows
119,781,237 Volume


2,200
544
125
2,869
29
6
1,962,865,166


13,136,69 6,469.95Dow Jones Industrials
5,536.57 2,134.21 Dow Jones Transportation
530.57 288.66Dow Jones Utilities
9,687.24 4,181.75NYSE Composite
2,433.31 1,130.47Amex Index
2,551.47 1,265.52Nasdaq Composite
1,440.24 666.79S&P 500
14,564.81 6,772.29Wilshire5000
764.38 342.59Russell 2000


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name DIv YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AK Steel .20 1.6 ... 12.62 +1.04 +35.4 IBM 2.20 2.1 12104.58 +3.21 +24.3
AT&T Inc 1.64 6.7 12 24.59 -.29-13.7 Lowes .34 1.7 13 19.94 +1.49 -7.3
AlliedCap ... ... ... 3.14 +.56 +16.7 McDnlds 2.00 3.7 14 54.20 +.74-12.8
BkofAm .04 .3 15 11.73 +1.06 -16.7 Microsoft .52 2.5 12 20.60 +.38 +6.0
CapCtyBk .76 5:3 28 14.25 +.96 -477 Motorola ......... 6.15 +.24 +38.8
Citigrp .04 1.1 .. 3.64 +.16 -45.8 Penney .80 2.9 13 27.16 +.62 +37.9
Disney .35 1.4 12 24.21 +.80 +6.7 ProgrssEn 2.48 7.2 11 34.41 +.34 -13.7
EKodak ... 12 2.76 +.29 -58.1 RegonsFn .04 7 543 +58-318
Embarq 2.75 6.5 8 42.00 +1.12 +16.8 egionsFn .04 .7 5.43 .58 -31.8
ExxonMbl 1.68 2.4 9 70.50 +1.39 -11.7 SearsHIdgs ......... 52.28 +2.41 +34.5
FPLGrp 1.89 3.5 13 54.38 -.06 +8.0 Smucker 1.40 3.5 13 39.75 ... -8.3
FairPoint ... ... ... 1.24 +.01 -62.2 SprintNex ... ... 5.32 +.27+190.7
FordM ... ... ... 5.50 +.01+140.2 TimeWrnrs .75 3.0 ... 24.88 +1.36+11.5
GenElec .40 3.0 9 13.47 +.61 -16.9 UniFirst .15 .4 10 34.59 +1.06 +16.5
GnMotr ... 1.18 +.09-63.1 VerizonCm 1.84 6.2 13 29.70 +.09-12.4
HomeDp .90 3.5 19 26.02 +1.62 +13.0 WalMart 1.09 2.2 15 49.92 +1.77-11.0
Intel .56 3.6 20 15.52 +.33 +5.9 Walgrn .45 1.5 15 30.70 +.92+24.4


S% 52-wk
g %Chg


8,504.08 +235.44 +2.85 -3.10 -34.73
3,146.00 +92.99 +3.05-11.06 -41.69
330.24 +.44 +.13 -10.93 -36.72
5,865.87 +202.98 +3.58 +1.89 -38.91
1,510.50 +37.21 +2.53 +8.08-36.40
1,732.36 +52.22 +3.11 +9.85-31.15
909.71 +26.83 +3.04 +.72 -36.23
9,294.87 +290.70 +3.23 +2.29-35.56
494.79 +18.95 +3.98 -.93-33.00


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here y writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or cal' 563-5660 Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and tre exact name

of thefund. Staff will not provide real-lime quotes


NEWORKSTOKECANG


Name Last Chg


ABBLtd ' 15.50 +.63
ACE Ltd 45.40 +2.28
AESCorp 9.02 +.47
AFLAC 35.52 +3.66
AGLRes 29.15 +.13
AK Steel 12.62 +1.04
AMBPr 18.29 +1.97
AMR 5.03 +.19
ASALtd 57.86 -.32
AT&Tlnc 24.59 -.29
AU Option 10.75 +.23
AXA 17.19 +1.20
AbtLab 43.20 -.12
AberFitc 26.07 -.03
Accenture 30.09 +1.26
AdamsEx 8.33 +.21
AdvAuto 41.97 +1.31
AMD 4.14 +.13
Aeroposti 32.47 +1.47
Aetna 25.90 +.14
Agilent 17.87 +.22
Agnicog 52.66 +.30
AgriaCp 2.19 +.61
Agrium g 5121 +3.03
AirProd 64.30 +2.71
AirTran 6.61 +.20
AlicatelLuc 2.30 +.08
Alcoa 9.49 +.46
AlexREE 34.22 +2.64
AlgEngy 23.63 -2.15
AlegTch 33.62 +1.04
Aaeran 46.51 +1.07
Allete 26.70 +.37
AfiBGbHi 9.62 +.15
AlliBInco 7.40 -.08
AmiBem 17.82 +1.03
AfedCap 3.14 +.56
Alstate 25.85 +1.55
AlphaNRs 27.14 +1.68
AlTia 16.88 -.10
AlumChina 24.66 +2.28
AnbacF 1.42 +.09
Angeren 23.19 -.02
AMouiL 37.84 +2.61
AmAxebh '2.23 +.14
AEagleOut 14.26 +.41
AEP 25.53 +.59
AmExp 26.13 +1.90
AmlnifGp 1.83 +.11
AmSIP3 8.45 +.21
AmTower 3028 +2.07
Amrerigas 30.70 +.34
Arneripise 27.44 +2.04
Anadarko 44.66 +1.99
AnalogDev 19.90 +.44
AnglogIdA 34.55 -2.05
Annaly 14.92 +2.54
AnthCap 1.30 +.61
Aon Corp 37.52 +.90
Apache 79.21 +2.60
Aptlnv 8.85 +1.08
AquaAm 16.38 -.08
ArcelorMi 27.88 +2.15
AchCoal 17.23 +1.11
ArchDan 24.93 -.24
Ashland 26.52 +2.34
AsdEstat 6.18 +.31
ATMOS 24.51 +.38
AutoNat 15.66 -.31
AvalonBay 58.40 +4.57
AvisBudg 3.43 +.32
Avon 23.67 +.73
BB&T Cp 22.62 +.99
BHP BILU 51.75 +2.32
BJSvcs 15.21 ' +.93


BMC St 34.90 +.49
BP PLC 4726 +1.64
BRE 24.70 +2.27
BRT 3.94 +.19
BakrHu 37.20 +1.88
BallCp 39.79 +.58
BcoBrades 13.85 +.96
BcoSantand 9.80 +.64
BkofAm 11.73 +1.06
BkNYMel 28.47 +.79
Barclay 17.50 +1.64
BarickG 33.47 -.02
Baxter 49.35 -.43
BaytexE g 15.49 +.78
BeazerHm 2.81 +.47
BectDck 64.93 -.23
Berkley 24.57 +.78
BestBuy 36.36 +.95
BioMedR 10.65 +.61
BlackD 33.00 +1.42
BIkHilisCp 19.60 +19
BIkDebtStr 2.70 +.05
BkEnhC&l 11.79 +.17
Blackstone 12.16 +.64
BlockHR 14.42 +48
Blockbstr .79 -.03
BlueChp 2.39 +.08
Boeing 44.37 .+1.37
Borders 2.47 +.29
BorgWam 29.03 +1.38
BostBeer 28.96 +.30
BostProp 48.67 +3.70
BostonSd 8.83 +.07
BoydGm 10.67 +1.19
Brandyw 6.71 +.65
Bridnker 17.16 +1.73
BrMySq 20.46 +.45
BradrdF 17.98 +.38
BrkMdAsgs 17.54 +.38
BrkidPrp 7.79 +.57
Brunswick 5.60 +.38
Buckeye 41.47 +1.20
Bungelt 57.73 +2.11
BurgerKing 18.00 +.63
BurINSF 68.87 +1.73
CB RBEis 7.93 +.86
CBeLAsc 6.47 +.67
CBS B 7.32 +.62
CFInds 82.34 +2.59
CH ngy 42.84 +.22
CIGNA 21.47 -.19
CntrGp 2.92 +.26
CMSEng 11.20 -.04
CSSInds 21.50 +.84
CSX 28.66 +.99
CVS Care 31.34 +.54
CablsnNY 19.65 +1.38
CabotO&G 32.81 +1.99
CallGolf 6.78 +.13
Calpine 10.20 -.09
CamdnP 28.86 +1.90
Cameron 29.74 +2.19
CampSp 27.16 +.27
CapOne 26.06 +1.52
CapMSrce 3.97 +.48
CapM pfB 13.36 +.07
CarMax 10.69 +.16
Carnival 26.49 +1.49
Caterpillar 37.78 , +2.04
Celanese 19.88 +1.14
Cemex 9.50 +.68
CenterPnt 10.27 +.22
Cenlex 9.85 +.76
CntryTel 30.97 +.78
ChampE h .50 +03
Chedckpnt 13.35 +.27
ChesEng 21.08 +1.13
Chevron 66.03 +.15
Chicos 8.10 +.63


Chimera 3.73 +.16
ChinaMble 47.49 +1.43
Chubb 40.37 +1.43
Cimarex 30.03 +2.48
CinciBell 2.65 +.05
Ciligrp 3.64 +.16
CleanH 54.53 +2.38
CliffsNRss 23.22 +1.70
Clorox 52.08 +.97
Coach 24.99 +1.85
CocaCE 17.20 +.47
CocaCI 48.07 +1.11
Coeur 1.37
CohStSUd 10.40 +.30
ColgPal 64.48 +.99
ColltvBrd 14.64 +.83
ColBgp 1.36 +.13
Comeica 21.71 +1.26
CmtyHIt 24.27 +1.41
CVRD 18.82 +1.45
CVRDpf 16.07 +1.23
Con-Way 30.65 +1.26
ConAgra 18.08 +.42
CornocPhil 45.52 +1.59
Conseco 2.90 , +.36
ConsolEngy 37.73 +3.34
ConEd 34.85 -.01
ConstellA 12.01 +.11
ConstellEn 25.12 +.32
CtlAirB 11.13 +.71
Cnrgys 9.50 +.30
Coming 14.15 +.27
CorrectnCp 15.70 +,51
CovantaH 15.14 -.62
CoventyH 19.72 +.63
Covidien 35.73 -.67
CrownHold 23.75 -.24
Cummins 31.51 +1.96


DCTIndI 4.65 +48

DPL 21.30
DRHorton 9.78 +.79
DTE 29.67 +.23
Daimler 34.99 +1.37
Danaher 59.39 +1.55
Darden 35.89 +1.59
DeVry 44.55 -1.12
DeanFds 18.66 +.13
Deere 44.47 +2.56
DeLtaAir 6.78 +.45
DenburyR 16.50 +1.00-
DeutschBk 59.15 +5.13
DBGoldDL 19.63 -.50
DevelDiv 4.59 +.44
DevonE 61.52 +3.02
DiaOffs 76.09 +3.61
DiamRk 6.19 +.46
DicksSptg 19.78 +1.59
DigitalRt 38.74 +3.01
Dillards 10.18 +2.67
DirxRnBull 10.31 +1.57
DirxFinBear 4.82 -1.08
DirxSCBear 26.80 -3.23
DirxSCBull 25.99 +2.28
DirxLCBear 38.08 -3.84
DirxLCBull 33.11 +2.67
DirxEnBull 32.59 +2.98
Discover 9.22 +.63
Disney 24.21 +.80
DomRescs 30.50 -.02
DonlleyRR 13.01 +.64
DEmmett 9.63 +.85.
DowChm 17.65 +1.18
DuPont 28.22 +1.29
DukeEngy 13.55 +.07


DukeRlty ) 9.15 +.95
Dynegy 1.92 +.15
EMCCp 12.03 +.09
EOGRes 71.05 +2.80
EastChm 40.22 +2.20
EKodak 2.76 +.29
Eaton 46.50 +1.19
Ecolab 36.84 +58
Edisonlnt 28.30 -.06
EIPasoCp 9.03 +.68
Elan 6.63 +.02
Embarq 42.00 +1.12
EmersonEl 34.81 +1.06


EmpDist 15.11 +43
EnbrEPtrs 36.43 +1.44
EnCana 51.99 +1.67
Energlzer 54.24 +2.35
EnPro 17.18 +.17
ENSCO 32.78 +2.23
Energy 73.54 +12
EqtyRsd 24.38 +2.34
EsteeLdr 33.36 +1.28
ExcelM 9.57 +.40
ExcoRes 12.65 +1.46
Exelon 46.07 -1.15
ExxonMbI 70.50 +1.39
FMCCorp 49.80 +1.33
FPLGrp 54.38 -.06
FamilyDIr 30.04 -.25
FannieMae h .80 +.02
FedExCp 54.06 +1.08
FedRIty 53.75 +3.18
FedSignl 8.60 +.43
Ferreligs 15.10 +19
Ferro 4.38 -.09
FidlNRFin 15.19 +.19
FidNlnlos 18.76 +43
FstHorizon 11.86 +59
FTActDiv 9.54 +07
FtTrEnEq , 8.61 +.20
FirstEngy 36.51 +.04
Ruors 44.77 +1.52
FootLockr 11.08 +.53
FordM 5.50 +01
ForestCA 6.70 +.45


ForestOil 18.86 +1.48
Fortress 4.15 -.10
FortuneBr 37.23 +1.03
FdtnCoal 28.63 +1.75
FrankRes 64.82 +4.72
FredMac h .84 +.03
FMCG 48.67 +3.50
FrontierCm 7.20 +.02
FronerOil 16.37 +28

GATX 26.40 +.77
GabelliET 3.99 +.13


GabHfthW 4.97 +.12
GabUil 6.25
GameSlop 26.28 -.19
Gannett 4.56 +.20
Gap 15.85 +.69
GenDynam 55.46 +.45
GenElec 13.47 +.61
GenMills 52.68 +.07
GnMotr 1.18 +.09
Genwodrh 5.20 +.53
GaPw8-44 25.25 -.08
Gerdaus 8.81 +.75
GlaxoSKn 32.40 +.62
GoidFLtd 12.11 -.17
Goldcrpng 33.52 +.08
GoldmanS 143.15 +38.75
Goodrich 45.86 +2.55
Goodyear 11.88 +.64
GtPlainEn 14.88 +.08
Griffon 9.89 +.30
GuangRy 24.31 +.18
GuarntyFn .55 -.03
HCC Ins 24.29 +.88
HCP Inc 22.55 +1.95
HDFCBk 95,70 +16.80
HRPTPrp 4.26 +.35
HSBC 42.82 +2.22
HSBC cap 22.84 +.37
Hallibrin 22.11 +.94
HanJS 10.53 -.02
HanPtDv2 7.03 +.10
lanesbrds 15.51 +1,02


Hanoverlns 34.14 +1.39
HarleyD 18.39 +.91
HarmonyG 10.60 -.03
HarIfdFn 16.41 +1.81
Hasbro 23.91 +.98
HawaliB 16.50 +.49
HItCrREIT 33.90 +1.82
HItMgmt 4.68 +.09
HIthcrRty 17.28 +1.28
HealthNet 16.18 -.10
HedaM 2.97 -.01
Heinz 35.60 +.46
HelixEn 10.19 +.86


HelnTel 7.69 +.09
HelmPayne 32.51 +2.79
Hess 60.75' +2.57
HewletP 35.73 +.72
HighwdPrp 23.71 +2.22
HomeDp 26.02 +1.62
HonwIllnI 33.00 +1.36
HospPT 13.67 +.99
HostHods 8.62 +.95
HovnanE 2.84 +.23
Humana 31.42 -.16
Huntsmn 6.39 +.49
ICICI Bk 29.29 +5.90
iSAstla 15.65 +.64
iShBraz 50.97 +3.11
iShHK 13.17 +.65
iShJapn 9.17 +.08
iSh Kor 36.55 +1.77
iShMex 36.32 +1.72
iShSing 8.76 +,39
iSTalwn 10.63 +49
iShSilvers 13.58 -.19
iShCh25 s 35.66 +1.98
iSSP500 91.44 +2.50
iShEMkts 31.75 +1.67
iShB20T ' 96.52 -1.52
iS Eafe , 45.42 +1.67
iSRMCVs 28.58 +1.10
iSRI1KV 47.69 +1.54
iSRIKG 39.68 +1,05
iSRoslK 49.89 +1.48
iSR2KG 53.33 +1.65


iShR2K 49.36 +1.60
jShREst 33,25 +2,32
iShFnSv 47.06 +2.80
iShFnSc 43.68 +2.42
iStar 3.61 +.39
Idacorp 22.42 +.05
ITW 33.68 +.67
Imaton 10.34 +.06
IndiaFd 26.24 +4.65
IngerRd 21.79 +1.24
IntegrysE 27.94 +.29
IntcnUEx 103.61 +6.69
IBM 104.58 +3.21


InIlGame 14.74 +1.14
IntPap 13.61 +1.12
Interpublc 5.26 +.17
IntPotash 30.72 +2.23
Invesco 15.58 +1.30
IronMn 28.08 +1.13
tauUniMult 14.39 +1.03

JPMorgCh 37.26 +2.35
JacobsEng 39.93 +1.35
JanusCap 10.16 +1.54
Jefferes . 19.87 +1.45
JohnJn 56.05 +.64
JohnsnCtl 19.31 +1.06
KB Home. 16.83 +1.27
KKR Fn 1.35 +.07
KC Southn 15.16 +.37
Kaydon 32.51 +1.10
KA EngTR 1534 +.56
Kellogg 43.82 +.63
KeyEngy 6.13 +.77
Keycorp 6.05 +.25
KimbClk 52.04 +1.55
Kimco 11.38 +1.32
lKndME 47.20 +.97
KingPhrm 9.00 +21
Kinross g 16.88 -.01
Kohls 42.77 +1.44
Kraft 25.06 +.26
KrispKrrnm 3.43 +.36
Kroger . 21.89 +.09


LDKSolar 8.20 +.18 Moodys 29.71 +1.41
LLE Roy hlf .62 +.08 MorgStan 28.28 +2.15
LSI Corp 3.87 +.08 MSEmMkt 10.43 +.53
LTC Prp 18.89 +.55 Mosaic 55.00 +3.70
LaZBoy 1.93 -.06 Motorola 6.15 +.24
Laclede 30.70 -.67 MurphO 55.74 +3.41
LVSands 10.30 +1,07, NCRCorp 10.73 +.48
LearCorp 1.35 +.01 NRG Egy 19.30 -.28
LeggMason 19,81 +1.28 NYSEEur 26.10 +1.91
LennarA 10.02 +1.21 Nabors 17.32 +1.26
LeucNall 20.98 +1.14 NatFuGas 31.31 +.50
LexRItyTr 4.36 +.24 NatGrid 46.20 +1.82
Lexmark 17.18 +.06 NOilVarco 34.65 +1.98
LbtyASG 2.59 +.09 NatRetPrp 16.00 +.72
UbtProp 24.55 +2.15 NatSemi 12.15 +.20
LillyBi 34.67 +.50 NatwHP 26.47 +1.76
Umited 11.83 +.82 NewAmrrs 6.19 +.03
LincNat 17.65 +1.53 NJ Rscs 31.26 +.02
Undsay 36.57 +2.70 NYCmtyB 11.24 +.77
UoydBkg 6.03 +.66 NewellRub 10.69 +.30
LockhdM 80.55 +.62 NewfdExp 33.21 +4.18
Loews 26.88 +1.67 NewmtM 42.39 -.25
Lorillard 67.49 -1.90 NwpkRsIf 2.76 +.08
LaPac 4.11 +.22 Nexeng 20.53 +1.18
Lowes 19.94 +149 NiSource 10.68 +.04
Nicor 32.08 +.07
NikeB ' 51.20 +1.45
M&T Bk 48.68 +2.52 NobleCorp 29.39 +1.47
MBIA 6.40 +.75 NobleEn 55.02 +3.05
MDC 34.64 +2.40 NolidaCp 14.63 +.53
MDU Res 17.33 +.48 Nordstin 22.98 +.38
MEMC 16.91 +1.07 onrfkSo 36.25 +1.17
MFA Fnd 6.60 +.36 NoestlUt 20.62 . +04
MCR 7.60 +.04 NorthropG 47.70 -.39
MGIC 4.78 +.59 NSTAR 28.87 +.04
MGMMir 8.74 +1.07 Nucor 40.42 +1.52
Macerich 17.25 +2.23 NvFL " 11.77 +.17
MackCali 24.06 +2.40 NvIMO 12.44 +.04
Macquarh 3.20 t.10 NvMulSI&G 4.93 +.28
Macys 12.14 +.81 NuvQPf2 4.95 +.11
Madecos . 5.95 +.07 OGEEngy 25.87 +.15
Magnalg 32.04 +1.16 OccPet 61.96 +1.93
Manitowoc 6.21 +81 OlficeDpt 3.85 +.40
Manulifgs 19.52 +1.72 OilSvHT 98.08 +4.48
MarathonO 29.79 +1.40 OldRepub 10.19 +.45
MktVGold 37.49 -.16 Olin 13.13 +.47
MktVRus 20.82 +1.05 Omegal-It 15.12 +.98
MarlntA 22.47 +.90 Omnicom 31.97 +1.00
MarshM 19.75 +.62 ONEOK 27.51 +1.04
Marshlls 8.85 +.84 ONEOK Pt 47.09 +.94
MStewrl 3.29 . +.07 OshkoshCp 11.14 +1.22
Masco 10.25 +.71 Owenslll 26.71 +1.39
MasseyEn 20.50 +1.95
MasterCrd 173.40 +.27
Mattel 14.59 +.65 PG&ECp 35.59 +01
McDermlnt 19.52 +1.04 PMIGrp 1.83 +.22
McDnlds 54.20 +.74 PNC 44.58 +2.79
McGrwH 32.13 +2.01 PNMRes 9.28 -.08
McKesson 39.30 +.84 PPG 44.08 +1.88
McAfee 38.94 +.90 PPLCorp 30.76 -.61
Mechels 8.21 +.89 Pactiv 22.41 +1.01
MedcoHIth 45.71 +.97 PallCorp 26.30 +1.03
Medlmic .33.96 +.56 ParkerHan 45.57 +1.91
Merck 25.74 . +27 PatriotCs 8.59 +.37
Metavnte 24.85 +.67 PeabdyE 30.76 +1.82
MetLife 31.29 +1.90 Pengrth g 7.87 +.52
MetroPCS 17.52 +.79 PennVaRs 13.87 +.52
MicronT 4.68 -.44 PennWstg 12.10 +.65
MidAApt 37.23 +2.61 Penney 27.16 +.62
Midas 10.24 +.95 PepBoy 6.85 +.70
"Il,.:.; 65.84 +1.02 i:.-.H:+ .1 12.15 +.26
'., 14.34 +.36 (. .':' . ' 51.17 +.85
MitsuUFJ 6.46 +.14 PepslAmer 25.52 +.08
MobileTel 35.82 +1.82 PerkElm 16.31 +.09
Mohawk 40.97 +1.20 Prmian 9.33 +.30
MolsCoorB 43.25 +1.29 PetroCg 37.39 +2.13
MoneyGrm 1.48 +.01 Petrohawk 23.60 +1.30
Monsanto 90.22 +.27 PetrbrsA 31.59 +1.84
MonstrWw 13.26 +70 Petrobras 39.40 +2.39


Pfizer 15.19 +.18
PhilipMor 42.69 -.48
PiedNG 22.61 +.27
PimcoStrat 8.56 +17
PloNtI 26.25 +1.86
PitnyBw 21.73 +.39
PlainsEx 23.28 +1.98
PlumCrk 34.32 +2.25
Polaris 31.53 +1.72
PoloRL 49.86 +3.13
PostPrp - 14.54 +1.07
Potash 111.46 +4.32
PwshDB 21.74 +.56
PS Agri 26.89 +.74
Praxair 72.52. +2.02
PrecDril 5.10 +.30
PrecDrrt .36 +.05
Pridelnll' 21.43- +1.31
PrinFnd 20.57 +1.99
ProShIS&P 66.92 -2.07
PrUShS&P 57.84 -3.53
ProUltDow 29.19 +1.50
PrUIShDow 48.46 -2.76
ProUltQQQ 33.88 +1.71
PrUShQQQ 38.89 -2.06
ProUItSP 25.68 +1.43
ProUShL2 50.50 +1.37
PrUShCh25 15.07 -2.07
ProUItSEM 23.02 -2.73
PrUShtRE 20.50 -3.96
ProUShOG 18.67 -1.35
ProUShtFn 41.77 -5.75'
ProUItRE 3.77 +.51
PmUltO&G 28.04 +1.67
ProUFin 4.20 +.45
ProUBasM 18.12 +1.38
ProUSR2K 48.89 +3.62
ProUltR2K 18.14 +1.15
ProUltCrude 9.89 +.81
ProctGam 52.52 +1.85
ProgrssEn 34.41 +.34
ProgsvCp 16.50 +.50
ProLogis 8.12 +.82
ProtLife 12.06 +1.07
ProvETg 5.12 +.26
Prudent 41.64 +3.89
PSEG 31.24 -.45
PSEG pfA 72.00
PubStrg 66.02 +4.62
PulteH 10.30 +.67
PPrIT 4.63 +.07
QuantaSvc 22.44 +.57
Quesar 34.48 +1.52
QksilvRes 9.96 +1.40
QweslCm 4.36 +.27
RPM 14.89 +.85
RRI Engy 4.87 +.18
RadioShk 12.56 +861
Ralcorp 60.09 -.54
RangeRs 41.46 +1.53
RJamesFn 16.70 +1.22
Rayonier 38.46 +1.65
Raytheon 45.13 -.94
Rltylnco 21.43 +1.32
RedHat 19.62 -.24
RegalEnt 12.19 +.11
RgcyCas 33.16 +2.78
RegBkHT 69.81 +4.31


RegionsFn 5.43 +58
Repsol 20.70 +.75
RepubSvc 22.67 +.50
RetailHT 79.06 +3.19
RetailVent 3.63 +.55
Revlon rs 4.91 +.04
ReynldAm 39.97 . 01
RiteAjidh 1.04
RockwlAut 32.83 +1.63
RockColl 40.10 +1.88
Rowan 18.17 +1.05
RylCarb 15.73 +1.43
RoyDShIlA 50.34 +1.91
Royce 8.91 +.25
Royce pfB 22.90 +.04
RdxSPEW 30.69 +1.26

SAIC * 17.47 -.36
SAP AG 40.80 +1.55
SCANA 28.93 +.15
SKTIcm 16.25 +36
SLGreen 22.38 +2.58
SLM Cp 5.76 +.21
SpdrGold 90.36 -1.19
SpdrHome 12.80 +.71
SpdrKbwBk 19.51 +1.21
SpdrKbwRB 21.79 +1.23
SpdrRefl 26.57 +1.00
SpdrOGEx 34.21 +1.63
SpdrMetM 34.56 +1.99
STMicro 6.91 +.65
Safeway 19.64 +.41
SUoe 25.00 +1.70
StJude 37.37 +.26
Saks 4.08 +.74
Salesforce 40.40 +.20
� SJuanB 16.46 +.73
SandRdge 10.80 +.86
SaraLee 9.50 +.28
Satyam 2.14 +.33
SchergPI 23.76 +.41
Schlmbrg 54.15 +2.10
SemiHTr 19.70 +.52'
SempraEn 44.41 +.16
SenHous 15.45 +1.23
Sensient 23.03 +.46
ShawGrp 28.07 +1.40
SiderNac 20.60 +1.44
SilvWhtng 8.80 +.22
SmonProp 51.49 +4.57
Skechers 9.37 +.09
SmithAO 29.14 +.86
Smithlntl 28.28 +1.52
SmitnhfF 12.62 +90
Smucker 39.75
SonicAut 8.53 +1.58
SonyCp 26.23 -.25
SoJerind 34.63 +.18
SouthnCo 28.12
SthnCopps 19.24 +1.05
SwstAird 7.12 +.23
SwstlnEngy 40.55 +1.50
SpectraEn 15.48 +.65
SpriritNex 5.32 +.27
SPDR 91.23 +2.52
SP Mid 102.96 +3.54
SPMals 28.57 +.74


AEIA N SOCK5 CAN


Name Last Chg


AMDLInc 1.08 -.13
AbdAsPac 5.36 +.02
AdmRsc 14.80 +.80
AdvTecAcq 7.97 +.03
Adventtx .13 � -.01
AlIdNevG 5.88 +.05
AfAsMwt .15 +.02
AmApparel 5.47 +.38
AmBIrt. 1.52 +.02
Anooraqg .95 +.08
ApoloGg .42 -.01
ArcadiaRs .47 +.02


Augustag 2.15
Aurizon g 4.31
BMB Munal 1.28
BPZRes 6.37
Baldw 1.05
BacAlG36 36.37
BarcGSOil 21.47
BrclndiaTR 49.03
BootsCts 1.16
CdnSEng .67
CanoPet .69
CelSd .31
CFCdag " 11.42
CheniereEn 4.24
ChinaGm n 7.78


ClghGlbOp 10.17 +.25
ColumAcq 7.98 +.01
Contango 43.19 +1.18
CortexPh .30 +.01
CrSuislnco 2.65 +.05
Crossh gl .26 +.04


DWSREII .57 +.01
DenisnM g 1.98 +.21
DuneEngy .17 +.01
EVInMu2 11.89 -.02
EVLtdDur 11.78 '+.04
EldorGId g 8.32 +01
ElitePh ' .11 -.01


ElixirGam .18 +.01
ElswthFd 5.40 +.15
Endvrlnt 1.34 +02
EvglncAdv 7.70 +.34
FemaleHft 4.19 +25
RaPUI 12.31 +.50
FrkStPrp 12.90 +.95


GascoEngy .45 +.01
GastarEg .50 +.02
GenMoly 1.61 +.09
GoldStrg 1.79 -.03
Grahams 14.84 +.59
GranTrrag 2.73 +.24


GrtBasGg 1.36 -.11
HealthFf n 4.28 +24
Hdmisphrx 1.93 +.63
Hyperdyn .29
IA Global .06 +01
Ideation wt .42 +02
ImpOi gs 35.62 +1.11
IndiaGC ' .96 +.43
IndiaGCwt .12 +.07
InovioBio .53 -.01
IntellgSys .61 -.01
Inf 3.30 +.29

JavelinPh 1.24 +.08
KodiakOg 1.18 +.14


Kowabunga .17
LucasE 92 +04

Merimac 3,57 +.20
Metalico 2.38 +17
MetroHIth 1,96 -.03
MdwSoidg .43
NBRESec 1.82 +.11
NDragon .19 -.01
NwGoidg 2.10 -.04
NAPallg 2.43
NDynMng 6.72 +48
NthgtMg 1.75
NovaDelP .29 -.04
NovaGld g 3.62 -.02


Oilsandsg .97 +.08
On2Tech .47 +01
OpkoHrth . 1.32 +05
OverturAo 9.60 +.03

PacRim .25 +.02
Palatn .22 +.04
PionDrill 6.42 +.79
PolyMetg 1.38 +.23
PSCrudeDS nl24.60 -17.75
PSCrudeDLn 3.54 +.28
PSTechLdr 14.09 +.29
Proliance .19 -.01
PyramidOs 5.31 +.27
QuestCapg .90 +.05


RaeSyst 1.17 +.20 UraniumEn 1.30 +.03
Rentech .63 +02
RexahnPn 1.42
RMeraH 1.50 +02
- R � VangTotWn 34.78 +1.30

SeabGld g 24.95 +.43 Walterlnv 13.92 +.36
Sinovac 2.31 +.08 WstGldfdg 2.02 -.06
SulphCo 1.21 +.15
TanzRyg 3.23 +.04 Westmdd 8.25 +.41
Taseko 1.39 +.03
Telkonet .15 WidePoint .58 +.10
US Geoth .88 + 02 WilshrEnt 1.85 -.09
US Gold 1.99 +.01
Uluru .19 -.10 YMBiog .47 +.04


NASDAQNATIONAL ARE


Name Last Chg


A-Power 10.48 +50
ACMoorelf 2.88 +.43
ACIWwde 14.53 +.73
ADC Tel 7.27 +.62
AMAGPh 53.38 -.12
APACC 5.53 +.12
ASMLHId 19.98 +.82
ATP O&G 7.4 +.71
ATS Med 2.79 +01
AVIBio 1.00
Aastrom .37 +.00
Abaxis 17.02 +.80
Abiomed 6.36 +21
AcadciaTo 5.11 +.65
Acergy 8,89 +.48
AcordaTh 23.70 +.47
ActivsBlzs 11.69 +.09
Actuate 4.79 +.12
Acdom 10.32 +.38
Adaptec 2.76
AdobeSy 26.48 +.56
Adtran 20.25 +.53
AdvATech 4.70 +.09
AdvBattery 3.57 +10
AdvantaA .74 +.14
AdvantaB 1.03 +.28
Affymetrx 4.94 +.18
AgFeed 4.13 +.11
AkamaiT 21.21 +47
Aldila 3.69 -.06
Alexions 33.32 -.38
AlignTech 11.87 +.31
Alkerm 8.75 +.13
AllegianfT 43.74 +1.44
AlosThera 6.51 +.11
AliscriptM 12.26 +.45
AlmostFam 28.07 -.36
AlteraCplf 15.30 +.10
AltusPhm .33 +.02
Aivarion 2.83 +.01
AmTrstFin 9.55 +.19
Amazon 75.95 +2.35
Amedisys 31.90 -1.36
AmerBioh .15 -.01
AmCapLtd 3.48 +.42
AmCareSrc 7.09 -.02
ACrndUn 4.35 +.14
AmitPastan 25.64 -2.47
AmerMed 14.92 +.26
AmPubEd 36.00 -.85
AmSupr 24.13 +1.27
AmCasino 20.06 ,+1.30
Amgen 49.34 +1.18
AmkorTif 3.89 +.24
Amylin 11.07 +.57
Anadigc 3.12 +.17
AnadysPh 2.40 +.16
Anldgic 38.57 +.12
Analysts .66 +.06
Andrsons 22.87 +1.56
Angiotchg 1.07 +.02
AngloAm 11.61 +.61
Ansys 27.53 +.58
Anuigncs .66
ApogeeE 12.83 +.66
ApolloGrp 63.25 -.45
Apollolnv 6.17 +.39
Apple Inc 126.65 +4.23
ApldMati 11.12 +.41
AMCC 6.60 +.07
ArchCap 59.79 +2.09
ArcSight 14.99 +.14
AmnaPhm 3.00 +.09
AresCap 7.33 +.53
AriadP 1.49 +.10
Ariba nc 9.99 +.08
ArkBest 25.73 +1.33
ArmHid 5.39. +.39
Arris 10.83 +.53
ArtTech 3.47 +.14
ArubaNet 4.73 -.04
Asialnfo 17.49 +1.29
AssodBanc 16.18 +.52
athenahtih 31.63 +.97


Atheros 15.46 +.17
AtlasAir 24.b6 +1.12
AtlasArms 16.56 +1.03
Atmel 3.75 +.16
Audvox 5.93 +.83
Authentdt h .80 +.08
Autodesk 19.48 +.48
AutoData 36.36 +.57
AvanirPh h 1.43 +47
AvoctCp 15.64 +1.01
Aware 2.30 �
Axcelis .39 +.02
AxsysTech 44.93 +1.58
BEAero 13.77 +1.16
BGC Ptrs 3.07 +.32
BOK 42.40 +4.49
Baidu inc 243.59 +8.58
BankUtd ..89 +.12
Bankrate 29.90 +1,74
BareEscent 9.53 +.88
BeaconPw .78 +.03
BeasleyB 2.49 -.11
BebeStrs 8.37 +18
BedBath 29.29 +1.46
BigBand 5.25 +.12
Biocryst 3.78 +.59
BioFuelEn .68 -.13
Biogenldc 50.70 +1.63
BioMarin 14.32 +.32
Biopurersh .21 -.04
Blkboard 30.00 -.14
BlueCoat 15.07 +.70
BlueNile 44.31 +1.83
BobEvn 25.31 +1.02
Borland .98
BrigExp 2.59 -.01
Brightpnt 6.00 +.10
Broadcom 21.73 +.90
BrodeCm 6.20 +.22
BrkdneB 9.75 +51
BrukerCp 6.79 +.04
Bucyrus s 25.07 +2.31
BuffaloWW 35.27 +.71
CAInc 17.88 -.16
CDCCpA 1.33 +.05
CH Robins 52.02 +1.29
CMEGrp 287.94 +10.64
CTC Media 9.82 +.47
CVB Fnd 6.70 +.35
CabotMic 27.29 +1.42
Cadence 5.67 +.28
Cal-Maine 22.36 +.09
CalmsAst 13.60 +1.70
CalifPizza 13.84 +.31
CaliperLSc 1.12 -.08
CdnSolar 8.13. +.42"
CapCtyBk 14.25 +.96
CpsbnTrb .66 +.04
Cardiomg 4.37 +.27
CardioNet 17.10 -.79
CareerEd 20.63 -.12
Carrizo 18.56 +2.17
CarverBcp 6.00
CasellaW 2.30 +.19
Caseys 25.72 +.66
CtpltCm 9.21 +01
CathayGen 12.69 +.83
CaviumNet 14.01 +.56
Celgene 39.98 +.19
CellGensh .52
CeolTherrsh 1.26 +.07
CentlCom 8.30 +.02
CentEuro 22.60 +1.82
Centardilf 10.15 +.92
CenGrdAlf 9.38 +.96
CentAl 6.17 +.67-
Cephin 64.65 -1.82
Cepheid 9.38 -.60
Camer 57.72 +2.22
Changyoun 30.24 +.55
ChrmSh 3.64 +.37
Chartinds 19.64 +1.19
ChkPoint 23.13 +.82
Cheesecake 16.08 +.99
ChildPlace 34.32 +2.01
ChinaDir 1.24 -.07
ChinaMed 20.05 +.45
ChinaPSi 1.96 +.17


ChinaSun 3.14 +.04
ChinaTcF 1.94 +.15
ChrchllD "39.88 +1.58
CienaCorp 10.47 +.88
CinnRn 23.20 +1.14
Cintas 25.60 +.66
Cirrus 3.52 +.13
Ciso . 18.72 +.80
CitzRep 1.66 +.14
CitrixSys 28.15 +53
Clearwrre 4.77 +.18
CogentC 6.52 +.41
Cogent 11.42 +.28
CognizTech 26.39 +.63
CogoGrp 7.15 +,20
Coinstar 33.24 -.66
ColdwtrCrk 4,15 +.35
CoISprtw 31.19 +.17
Comarco 1,93 +10
Comcast 15.16 +.74
Comcspcl 14.18 +.68
CmcBMO 33.90 +1.72
CommSys 9.80 +.77
CommVIt 11.28 +.17
CmptrPr 34.16 +1.49
Compuwre 7.93 -.02
Comtech 28.57 +.50
Concepts 14.66 +.69
ConcurTch 28.99 +.55
Conexantrs 1.22 +.10
Conmed 14.78 +.45
ConvOrgan 1.76 -.19
Copart 29.64 +.45
CodinthC 16.76 -.04
CorpExc 16.56 +.30
CorusBksh .67 +.06
Costce 46.09 +1.34
Cracker, 29.81 +1.31
Cree nc 27.24 +.89
Crocs 2.39 +.14
CrosstexE 3.22 +.20
Cbip.ceom 37.08 +.06
CubistPh 16.70 -.06
CuraGen h 1.09 +.07
Curis 1.60 +.14
CybrSrce 14.07 +.21
Cydacel .84 -.04
Cymer 236.91 +2.18


Daktonics 8.65 +.06
Dataoom 17.02 +.19
DayStar .63 -.01
DeckOut 50.00 +1.15
Del Inc 11.30 +.32
DiaPsr 1.70 +.04
Dndreon 20.99 +.47
Dennys 2.22 +.04
Dentsply 30.03 +.50
DigRiver 36.38 +1.78
DimeCBc 8.71 +1.14
Diodes 13.54 +1.71
DirecTV 24.88 +.65
DiscCmA 20.08 +.77
DiscvLabs 1.09 +.18
DishNetwk 17.34 +1.63
DIlrTree 42.17 -.03
DrmWksA 24.50 +.99
DressBam 15.11 +.88
DryShips 7.04 +.20
DynMaet 17.58 +1.09
Dynavax 1.15 +.06
ETrede 1.58 +.12
eBay 17.70 +.79
EPI Sys 13.39 -.09
ev3l Inc 8.26 +20
EagleBatk 6.76 +.17
EaglRkEn 3.15 +01t
ErthUnk 7.50 +.06
EstWstBcp 9.16 +1.16
Edipsys 14.23 +.19
Ed Bauer .52 +.02
EdgePet .46 +.01
EduDv 5.59 +.38
8x8 Inch .70
ElectSd 8.74 +.43
BElectArts 21.53 +.50


EmisTechh 1.38 +.45
EncorW 20.83 +.76
EndoPhrm 16.11 +.28
EngyConv 15.43 +.63
EnrgyRec n 8.02 +.23
EngyXXI .66 +.02
Entegris 2.39 +.39
EntreMd h .69 +.04
Equinix 68.36 +4.33
EnrcsnTels 8.84 +.48
EvrgrSIr 2.16 +.08
Exelixis 4.75 +.08
ExideTc 5.96 +.51
Expedia 14.46 +.61
Expdind 32.93 +.82
ExpScripts 60.17 +1.50
ExtrmNet 1.78 +.17
F5 Netwks 26,90 +.55
FUIRSys 25.08 +.43
Fastenal 34.31 +.72
FiberTowr. .53 +.05
AFithThird 7,99 +.89
Fnclnstl 12.76 +1.00
Finisar .66 +.01
FinLne 7.71 +.45
FstCashFn 14.75 -.04
FMIdBc 9.76 +.21
FstNiagara 12.94 +.54
FstSolar 184.90 +7.47
FstMerit 19.60 +.79
Fiserv 41.77 +1.73
Flexlnm 3.69 +.19
Rowlnt 2.01 +.01
FocusMda 8.09 +1.04
ForcePro 7.56 +.54
FomeFac 17.29 +.74
Fossil Inc 22.08 +1.18
FosterWhl 24.46 +1.33
FreeSeas 1.45 -.13
FrontFnd 1.75 +.10
FuelSysSol 19.26 +.70
FuelColl 3.12 +.20
FultonFnd 6.07 +.33
Fuqilntl 9.05 +1.44
GeniF 1 7 810 +32

GFI Grp 5.49 +24
GMXoRs 14.71 +1.53
GMarket 23.93 +.02
GT Solar n 5.55 +.18
Gearin 20.29 -.45
GenProbe 43.72 +.29
GenBidtcih .38 -.06
Genopi x 25.17 +.04
Gentex 11.41 +.46
Gentive 17,39 -.30
GenVec .65 -.05
Genzyme 59.24 +.67
GeoEye 23.72 +1.19
GeronCp 6.45 +.19
GevityHR 4.00 +.02
GigaMed 6.08 +.14
GileadSd 43.38 -.39
GlacerBc 17.34 +1.06
Globlind 6.17 +.40
GIblSrcs 6.06 +.41
GolarLNG 6.72 +.85
Google 396.84 +6.84
GrWifRes 3.01 -.04
GreenMtC 79.46 +1.64
GufportE 4.35 +.71
Gymbree 34.99 +1.59
HLTH 11.79 +22
HMN Fn 5.59 +.24
HMS Hid 35.77 +.58
HainCel 16.65
Haltozyme 6.72 +58
HansenNat 42.39 -.22
Harmonic 5.21 +05
HamsStrA 5.99 +.19
HawHold 4.77 +.02
vjHayesLm .08 -.02
HrtndEx 15.10 +.49
HelenTroy 19.30 +.50
HSchein 44.80 +57
HercOffsh 4.14 +28
HercTGC 8.41 +.08


Hibbett 19.09 +.39 UnearTch 20.83 +.17
HimaxTch 2.59 +.12 ULnnEngy 17.10 +.40
Hologic 11.70 -.01 Uonbrdg 1.76 -.02
Home Inns 14.74 +.37 NMSCmh .15 +.02
HorsehdH 6.92 +.57 LodgeNet 5.20 +.41
HotTopic 8.73 -.10 Logitech 13.92 +.67
HudsCity 12.91 +.63 LookSmart 1.33 +.03
HumGen 1.94 +.13 lululemna 12.89 +.74
HuntJB 27.76 +.86 Uks
HuntBnk 4.99 +.36
IAC Inters 15.27 .+32 MCG Cap 2.20 +.22
ICOGIbA .59 . MDRNAH 1.55 +.14
idexxLabs 41.14 +.34 MGE 30.71. +.31
IDMPhmh 2.62 +.92 MRVCmhlf .55� +.08
IPCHold 26.84 +.21 MTS 21.40 +.31
IShAsiaxJn 43.37 +2.55 MacrvsnSol 21,31 +.45
iShACWI 34.12 +1.14 1.1. .iri-ii 30.41 +41
iShNsdqBlo 66.12 +78 I tl.P .94 +.10
Icad h 1.37 +.02 .i,,-+,i : 37.35 t.04
IconlxBr 14.96 +.34 MannKd 6.39 +.56
Illumines 36.75 +1.11 MarshlEd 1.05 +51
Immucor 15.52 -.29 MartenT 20.13 +.64
Imunmd 2.33 v.38 MavellT 11.28 +59
Incyte 2.79 +.23 Maximltgn 14.41 +.35
Infinera 8.16 +.04 MxwilT 9.33 +.43
InFocus .94 8 +.00 Medarex 6.61 +10
Informa 15.45 +.20 MedAssets 16,46 -.51
InfosysT 34.90 +2.88 Medialnkh .10 -.01
InsightEnt 7.70 +.51 MedicActn 9,72 +.48
InsitTc 13.83 +.54 MediCo 6,95 +.48
Insmed 1.56' +.20 MelcoCrwn 5.81 +.35
IntegLfSc 24.68 +.28 MentGr 6.62 +.13
IntgDv 5.16 +.12 MercadoL 23.82 -.86
Intel 15.52 +.33 MergeHith 3.08 +.07
InteractBrk 14.84 +31 MaridBo 19.52 +1.02
InterDig 27.68 +.54 MesaAiirh .15
Intrface 6.10 +39 Methanx 12.38 +.90
InterMune 12.20 +.86 Micrel 7.35 034
InleBcsh 12.68 +1.03 Microchp 20.71 +.55
IntlSpdw 23.47 +.75 MicrosSys 23.94 +.56
Intersil 11.71 +.29 MicroSemi 12.83 +.48
Intuit 24.52 +.54 Microsoft 20.60 +.38
IntSurg 153.59 +3.67 Microtune 2.24 +.09
InvBncp 9.18 +.41 Middleby 46.83 +1.33
Isis 15.39 +.48 Milllndiawt .10 +.07
IsleCapri 12.73 +.87 MilerHer 14.08 +.88
astaPh 2.64 +.34 Miliom 355.89 +1.97
etron 50.00 +1.32 Misonio 2.48 +.18
S Molex 15.62 +.52
MonarCasn 9.55 +.60
JASolar 3.24 +.13 MonPwSys 19.51 +.86
JDSUniph 4.92 +23 MonroMuf 26.93 +.29
JackHenry 18.18 +.50 Move ric 2.19 +.21
JacklnBox 25.03 +1.71 Mylan 13.13 +.37
JamesRiv 21.49 +2.05 MydridGs 32.64 -.22
JetBlue 5.16 +.10 NABI Bio 2.58 +.18
JosphBnk 38.36 +1.51 NGASRes 2.35 +.13
JoyGIbl 30.79 +2.60 NICESys 22.73 +.07
JnprNtwk 22.27 +.71 NIIl HIdg 18.69 +1.33
KLA Tnc 26.22 +.98 NasdOMX 18.79 +.91
Kendle 9.83 +.32 NaCineM 12.55 +.57
KeryxBioh .38 -.01 Natlnastru 21.00 +.93
Krklands 6.37 +.18 NatPenn 6.42 +.45
KnghtCap 17.61 +.75 NektarTh 6.63 +.60
KonaGrill 3.93 +1.64 NetlUEPS 13.25 +.72
LHC Grp 23.57 -.95 NetServic 9.28 +.66
LKQ Corp 15.63 +.38 NelLogic 32.40 +.60
LSI Inds 5.33 +.28 NetApp 17.69 +.12
LaJollPhh .36 +.04 Netease 30.59 +.14
LamResrch 25.72 +1.33 Netflix 38.77 +.27
LamarAdv 19.52 +1.58 Neurogenh .16 -.01
Landstar 36.26 +1.26 NeutTand 28.46 +1.82
Lattice 1.77 +10 NewsCpA 9.18 +.58
LawsnSft 5.27 +.07 NewsCpB 10.53 +.57
LeapWirlss 38.53 +1.37 NexMed .28 -.02
LeveB 1.07 +.02 NobityH 8.92
LibGlobA 15.72 +1.26 NorTrst 54.89 +1.34
UibGobC 15.66 +1.32 NthfidLb .11 -.06
UbtyMIntA 5.89 +.42 NovtWNrs 10.20 +.10
UbMCapA 13.61 +.85 Novavax 1.91 +19
UbMEntA 25.00 +1.08 Novell 4.02 +.07
LifeParts 14.44 -.84 Novfus 17.69 +.84
LUeTechs 37.06 +.85 Novogen 4.93 +2.76
LfePtH 25.74 +.49 NuHorizlf 3.18 +.17
UgandPhm 2.85 +.18 NuanceCm 12.34
LihirGold 22.90 +.77 Nvidia 9.27 +.53
Uncare 23.06 +.17 OChareys 8.55 +.90
i LncEl 41.51 +1.14 OReillyA 37.02 +.85


OSI Phrm 32.18 -.07
OceanFrt 1.68 +.19
Oclaro .63 +.04
OldDomFh 29.05 -.44
Omnicell 8.98 +.25
Omniture 11.22 +.22
OmniVisn 9.60 +.77
OnAssign 3.05 -.03
OnSmcnd 6.23 +.54
OncoGenxn 11.88 +3.68
Oncolhyrh 3.30 +.32
OnyxPh, 23.75 -1.55
OpenTxt 30.98 -.14
OptimerPh 10.93 -.73
optXprs 16,37 +.51
Oracle 18.92 +.50
Orexigen 3.11 -.03
Orthfx 23.20 +30
OsclenlPh .21 -.02
OllerTail 19.43 +.33

PDLBioh 6.78 -.07
PF Chng 30.07 +.68
PMCSra 7.06 -.04
PSSWdd 16.46 +.24
Paccar 30.27 +1.39
Pacerlntli 3.01 +.22
PacCapB 6.18 +.41
PacEthan .32 -.25
PacSunwr 4.01 +.39
PaetecHid 3.20 +.15
Palm Inc 12.06 +.76
PanASIv 18.73 +.07
PaneraBrd 52.55 +1.53
Pantry 19.88 -.51
PapaJohns 28.06 +95
ParagShip 3.93 +.30
ParPet 2.00 +.17
ParamTch 10.86 +.34
Parexel 10.52 +.28
Patterson 22.55 +.47
PattUTI 13.14 +.98
Paychex 27.60 +.88
PnnNGm 32.Q7 +1.69
PeopUtdF 16.67 +.58
Peregrine h .46 -.02
PerfectWid 17.97 -.05
Perrigo 26.78 +.21
PetMed 15.83
PetroDev 17.36 +1.11
PetsMart 22.70 +.74
PharmPdt 20.27 -.07
Phorin 2.26 +.59
Polycom 17.69 +.02
Popular 3.06 +.35
PwShs QQQ 34.24 +.87
Powrwav 1.32
Presstek 1.80 -.02
PriceTR 40.06 +3.11
priceline 101.60 +1.94
PrivateB 20.28 +1.28
PrognicsPh 5.52 +.15
ProspctCap 9.90 +.35
ProspBcsh 29.99 +2.46
PrvBksh 8.33 +.41
PsychSol 20.37 +.19
PureCycle 2.72 +.01
QIAGEN 16.53 -.02
Qgic 13.16 +.33
Oualcom 41.99 +1.27
QualitySys 59.31 +4.23
QuantFuel .68 +.03
QuestRes .45 -.04
QuestSIt 12.85 +.12
Questcor 4.54 +.17
Quidel 11.80 +.23
RF MicD 2.27 +.05
Rambus 12.10 +.08
Randgold 60.18 +.64
ReaINwk 2.52 +.06
RedRobin 21.48 +1.41
Rdiff.cm 3.40 +.91
RegncyEn 11.91 +.19
Regenm 14.88 +.27
RentACt 19.39 +.80
RschMont 75,36 +3.02
RexEnergy 5.76 +.94


Riverbed 18.23 +.51 TetonEgy .42 +,04
RossStrs 36.15 +-96 TetraTc 24.75 +.76
RovGId 3980 -.17 TevaPhrm 44.83 -.10.
TexRdhsA 11.03 +.52
S1 Corp 6.58 +21 bnkorswim 9.95 +.37
SBA Com 24.01 +1.81 Thoratec 28,08 +.21
SEIInv 15.72 +.96 3Com 4.24 +.12
STEC 15.58 +1.22 TibcoSft 6.64 +.10
SVBFnGp 26.54 +1.20 Tktmstrn 6.89 +28
Sala Inc 13.92 +.88 TiVo Inc 7.63 +.13
SanDisk 14.73 +83 TomoThera 2.26 +.04
Sanmina .60 +04 TowerGrp 25.04 -.39
Sapient 5.10 +.22
SavienlPh 5.45 +.15 TractSupp 37.58 +2.14
Schnitzer 50.97 +3.68 TrdeStaln h 7.63 +,58
Schwab 18.00 +1.09 TrinadGty 1.00 +.03
SciGames 18.56 +1.55 TdcoMar 3.49 +.14
SeagateT 7.62 +37 TrimbleN 20.30 +.08
SearsHIdgs 52.28 +2.41 TriQuint 3.81 +.13
Selectlvns 13.51 +.50 TrueRelig 20.14 +.44
Semtech 14.90 +.67 TrstNY 6.15 +.44
Sepracor 14.39 +24 Truslmnk 21.37 +1.11
Segueanom 2.93 -.10 UA . +.4
Shanda 49.47 +97 UAL 5.10 +.34
Shire 41.05 +1.21 UCBHHid 1.80 +.15
SierrnWr 5.74 +.16 USCncrt 2.37 +.21
Sily 1.71 +42 UTiWddwd 12.17 +.03
SigmaOsg 14.64 +.96 UTStrcm 1.80 +.14
SigmaAld 46.06 +79 Ultrapetrol 4.26 +13
SilganHId 46.39 +.34 Umpqua 9.66 +40
Silicnirg 2.44 +.07 UBWV 23.97 +1.25
SilcnLab 31.10 +.99 VlCAon 480 +18
Slcnware 7.28 +.31 USdnln 6.80 +`18
SilvStdg 19.38 +32 USEnr 2.01 +.06
Sina 27.98 +1.66 UStatn 37.01 +2.40
SiusXM .34 -.01 UtdThrp 64.00 +40
SkyWest 11.15 +.17 UnivFor 31.38 +1.01
SkywksSol 9.03 +.27 UraniumR 1.13 +.06
Smarta] 8.11 +40 UrbanOut 19.59 +83


Sohu.cr 55.19 +2.61 VCAiAnt 24.18 +.14
Solartun 5.07 +.29 VNUS Med 28.86 +.10
Somaxon .46 -.09
SonicCorp 9.14 +.13 ValVisoA .70 +.05
Sonus 2.04 +12 ValueClick 10.54 +.46
SouMoBc 9.90 VandaPhm 12.34 +1.15
Sourcefre 11.34 +.79 VarianSeml 23.18 +.98
SouthFnd 2.08 +.14 Veecolnst 9.54 +.72
SpartnMot 8.64 +.38 Verenium .62 +.08
SpeclPh 4.20 +20 Verisign 23.49 +.51
Staples 20.19 +1.50 VertPh 29.10 +.56
StarSient 3.98 -.02 ViaPhrm h .43 9 +.
Starbucks 13.39 +.45 Vicano . +.0
StarentNet 18.95 +.47 r WgnMdah 7.53 +62
StlDynarn 12.75 +1.32 ViroPhrn 6.02 +.42
SternCells 1.72 -.03 Vrtso 6.98 +.05
Stencyde 52.54 +.45 VisnChina 5.69 +.33
StedBcsh 7.67 +.86 VistaPrt 39.89 +2.49
SmtrFWA 4.50 +.38 Volcano 12.31 +.50
StewEnt 4.06 +.31 WanmerChil 12.19 +.23
SunMicro 8.99 -.01 WarranRs 2.07 +.12
SunPowerA 26.33 +1.28 WashFed 1297 +.53
SunPwr B n 23.42 +.82 WF e 1.57 +.3
SusqBnc 8.19 +.49 Websense 16.83 +72
Sycamore 2.97 +11 WemrnerEnt 16.96 +57
Symantec 15.05 +.23 WAmBcp 56.02 +3.37
Symetrcrm 4.79 +26 WetSeal 3.81 +.27
SynapcsOs 33.24 +2.89 WhitneyH 12.71 +.69
Syneron 7.35 +22 WholeFd 20.75 +1.14
Synopsys 21.26 +.63 WndRar 6.95 +.20
Synovis 12.90 -.33 Winn-Di e 14.16 +.36
TBS InA 9.10 .420 +4 WdrdGv 20.02 .65
TDAmerir 16.82 +.92 d 20 +.65
TFSFnd 11.93 +37 ZWdAccep 18.26 +.39
THO 5.30 +.07 Wynn 41.40 +3.50
twielecom 1135 +.28 XOMA .81 -.02
TXCORes 27 -.27 Xlinx 19.27 +35
TakeTwo 9.03 +.22 xtent .29 -.71
TargaRes 12.26 +.76 YRCWwde 2.85 -.12
TASER 4.38 +.21 Yahoo 15.17 +.26
TechData 29.20 +1.14 Zia rs .37 +01
Tekelec 16,32 +34 37 +01
TlCmSys 7.42 +.27 Z7onBap 17.52 +2.47
Teikh .62 -.06 Zotek 8.04 +.64
Tellabs 4.93 +.07 Zoman 10.42 +66
TesseraT 16.07 +59 Zumiez 10.50 +.25


DIARY


Advar,.:e3
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


P ay for O '. \ (\ y r.



The]LEway!









NO MORE

v' Hassles! V Checks! V Reminders!





| 563-5655 It's ]EZ
*Charge may vary atfirst transaction and at each vacationstart.


The remainder of the
NYSE listings can be
found on the next page.


Yesterday Pvs Day

Argent 3.7280 3.7290
Australia 1.3089 1.3357
Bahrain .3770 .3767
Brazil 2.0778 2.1065
Britain 1.5320 1.5160
Canada 1.1635 - 1.1796
Chile 559.30 561.10
China 6.8283 6.8263
Colombia 2255.50 2256.50
Czech Rep' 19.80 20.04
Denmark 5.5036 5.5279
Dominican Rep 35.90 36.05
Egypt 5.6200 5.6200
Euro .7389 .7421
Hong Kong 7.7529 7.7511
Hungary 208.07 213.68
India 47.699 49.315
Indnsia 10350.00 10400.00
Israel 4.1590 4.1520
Japan 96.42 95.07
Jordan .7082 .7087
Lebanon 1501.50 1502.50
Malaysia 3.5545 3.5495
Mexico 13.0540 13.2758
N. Zealand 1.6847 1.7113
Norway 6.4747 6.5461
Peru 3.040 3.031
Poland 3.26 3.32
Russia 32.0883 32.0924
Singapore 1.4648 1.4718
So. Africa 8.5399 8.7681
So. Korea 1261.25 11252.40
Sweden 7.7459 7.9239
Switzerlnd 1.1162 1.1232
Taiwan 32.97 32.96
Thailand 34.56 34.56
Turkey 1.5462 1.5682
U.A.E. 3.6731 3.6710
Uruguay 23.7001 23.7001
Venzuel 2.1473 2.1473

British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.50 0.50
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.185 0.19
6-month 0.295 0.305
5-year 2.07 2.02
10-year 3.21 3.17
30-year 4.17 4.18



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Jul 09 59.59 +2.59
Corn CBOT Jul09 4211/2 +4r/4
Wheat CBOT Jul09 5901/2 +13
Soybeans CBOT Jul09 11461/2 +16
Cattle CME Jun09 82.52 -.58
Pork Bellies CME Jul09 73.40 -.15
Sugar(world) NYBT JuI09 15.61 +.66
OrangeJuice NYBT Jul09 92.40 -1.10

SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $921.30 $913.00
Silver (troyoz., spot) $13-.1U $13.89U
Copper (pound) $..U/bb $2.(035
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$1137/bU $1120.70
NMER = New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT =
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


%% I tlA, MY , ZU


THE MARKET IN REVIEW


I AMEX


I NASDA


I NYS












Cn~Rrjs COuNn' (FL) CHRONICLE BUSINESS lii 41 I) ~U()9 4.7


MTALF 3D


Name NAV Chg
AIM Investments A:
ChartAp 12.42 +.31
Const p 16.75 +.31
HYdAp 3.28
IntlGrow 19.91 +.52
SelEqtyr 13.10 +.38
AIM Investments B:
CapDvBt 9.30 +.30
AIM Investor Cl:
Energy 29.01 +1.26
Utilties 12.21 +.10
Advance'Capital I:
Balancp 12.03 +20
Retlnc 7.54 -.01
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGrt 4.03 +.12
AllianceBemrn A:
BalanAp 11.84 +.16
GIbThGrAp 50.78 +1.82
IntlValAp 10.82 +.36
SmCpGrA 18.52 +.61
AlllanceBern Adv:
LgCpGrAd 17.80 +.55
AlllanceBem B:
GIbThGrBt 44.46 +1.59
GrowthBt 16.84 +.42
SCpGrBt 15.11 +.50
AllianceBern C:
SCpGrCt 15.19 +.50
Allianz InstliMMS:
NFJDvVl 8.81 +.26
SmCpVI 19.90 +.64
AllIanz Funds A:
NFJDvVIt 8.73 +26
SmCpV A 19.04 +.61
Allianz Funds C:
GrowthCt 16.87 +.57
TargetCt 9.06 +.41
Amer Beacon Instl:
LoCapinst 14.03 +.44
Amer Beacon Inv:
LgCaplnv 13.36 +.42
Amer Century Adv:
EqGroAp 14.98 +.42
Amer Century Inv:
Balanced 12.36 +21
Eqlnc 5.74 +.12
Growth 17.52 +.52
Heritagel 12.71 +.49
IncGro 17.83 +.51
IntDisc 6.82 +24
InOGrol 7.78 +25
UfeSci 4.42 +.04
NewOpp 4.50 +.17
OneChAg 8.81 +24
OneChMd 9.01 +.20
RealEstI 10.45 +.87
Ultra 15.34 +.40
Valuelnv 4.29 +.12
Vista 11.18 +.42
American Funds A:
AmcpAp 13.39 +.39
AMutlAp 19.15 +.41
WBalAp 14.07 +26
BondAp 10.94 -.01
CapWAp 18.68 +.03
CaplBAp 41.24 +.59
CapWGAp 27.43 +.72
EupacAp' 30.62 +1.09
FdlnvA p 26.61 +.75
GovtAp 14.09 -.04
GwthAp 22.37 +.60
HITrAp 8.66 +.01
HiInMunA 12.58 +.04
InooAp 12.92 +.18
IntBdAp 12.86 -.02
ICAAp 21.40 +.45
LtTEB.p 15.12 +.01
NEcoAp 17.79 +57
NPerAp 2023 +56
NwWdldA 38.78 +127
STBAp 9.95 -.02
SmCpAp 23.65 +.79
TxExAp 11.63 +.01
WshAp 20.56 +.45
American Funds B:.
BalBt 14.01 +26
CaplBBt . 41.22 +.59
CpWGrBt 27.27 +.72
GrwthBt 21.64 +57
IncoBt 12.81 +.17
ICABt 21.29 +.44
Ardel Investments:
Apprec 24.63 +1.19
Ariel 26.67 +1.25
Artio Global Funds:
InlEql r 24.17 +.46
InlEqA 23.62 +.45
IntEqllAt 9.75 +.19
IntEqll I r 9.81 +.20
Artisan Funds:
Intl 15.44
MidCap 19.51
MidCapVal 13.80 ..
SCapVal 10.67
BaronM Funds:
Asset 37.98 +1.34
Growth 33.51 +1,02
SmCap 15.17 +.47
Bernsteln Fds:
IntDur 12.33
DivMu 1424
NYMu 13.98 +.01
TxMgdlnt 12.25 +.40
ErM'rk . 2075 .96
Bla unRodksA:
Au..raA 12u8 -.-t
Cap* A. P 1'1& - 'A:
EqtyDiv 13.08 +.31
GIAAr 15.53 +.23
HiYInvA 5.67 +.01
IntOpAp 1 24.69 +.88
BlackRock B&C:
GIAIC t -14.52 +21
BlackRock Inst:
BaVIIE ' 18.69 +.58
GIbAllocr 15.60 +22
Brandywine Fds:
'BlueFdri 18.31 +.31
Bmdywnn 19.96 +28
BrInsoh Funds Y:
HiYIdY n 5.01 ..
Buffalo Funds:
SmCap 18.53 +.54
CGM Funds:
Foicusn 25.53 +1.17,
Muagn 21.42 +.60
Realty n 14.75 +1.12
CRM Funds:
MdCpV1I 19.86 +.52
Calamos Funds:
Gr&lncAp 23.43 +53
GrwthAp 33.69 +1.12
GrowthCt 31.03 +1.03
Calvert Group:
Incop 14.15 +.04
IntlEqAp 11.28 +25
Munint 10.41 +.01
SodalAp 21.24 +.37
SocBdp 14.39
SSocEqAp 24.91 +.78
STxFU 9.51
TxFLgp 15.80 +.01
TxFVT 15.51
Cohen & Steers:
. RltyShrs 33.39 +2.58
Columbia Class A:
Acorn t 18.33 +.65
21CntyAt 9.19 +.40
MarsGrAt 13.92 +.49
Columbia Class Z:
AcomZ 18.87 +.67
AcomlntZ 26.42 +.73
CoreBdZ 10.21 -.01
IntBdZ 7.98 -.01
IntTEBd 10.11
LgCpklxZ 17.64 +.52


DFA Funds:
IntlCorEqn 8.05 +24
USCorEql n 7.48 +.25
USCorEq2 n 7.36 +26
DWS.Inveat A:
DrHIRA 24.93 +.94
StGovSecA 8.61 -.01
DWS Invest S:
EmMkIn 9.15 +.02
EuroEq 18.16 +.70
GIbBdS r 9.63 +.03
* GIbOpp 24.00 +.66
Gold&Prc 15.36. +.10
GrolncS 11.48 +.32
HiYidTx 11.10 +.06
InITxAMT 11.20
In9FdS 35.96 +127

MgdMuniS 8.69 +.02
MATFS 14.00 +.03
SPS00S 12.10 +.36
Davis Funds A:
Davis Funds B:

Davis Funds C &Y:


NYVenY 25.36 +.92
NYVenC 24.24 +.87
Delaware Invest A:
Diver Incp 824
TrendAp 10.05 +.34
TxUSAp 10.66 +.01
Delaware Invest B:
SelGrBt 17.59 +.49
Dimensional Fds:
EmMCrEqn13.17 +.64
EmMktV 22.66 +1.23
IntSmVan 11.91 +.26
USLgCon 26.89 +.79
USLgVan 13.63 +.58
US Micron 8.34 +.32
USSmalln 12.73 +.52
USSmVa 14.96 +.66
IntlSmCon 11.18 +.22
EmgMktn 20.49 +.96
Fid n 10.28 -.01
IntVan 13.52 +.54
Glb5Fxlncn11.05 -.04
2YGIFxdn 10.28
DFARIEn 12.39 +.99
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced 53.44 +1.24
Income 12.15 -.01


I


NtGasn. 26.35 +1.49
Papern 20.30 +.91
Pharm n 8.60 +.14
Retail n 35.11 +1.58
Softwr'n 53.84 +1.15
Techn 50.78 +1.49
Telm n 33.79 +.92
Trans n 28.31 +.79
UtilGr n 36.46 +.02
Wireless n 5.91 +22
Fidelity Spartan:
Eqldxlnvn 32.26 +.95
ExtMkInn 23.93 +.91
5001nxlnvrn63.25 +1.86
Intllnxlnvn 27.17 +.82
TotMktlnvn 25.63 +.79
Fidelity Spart Adv:
EqldxAd n 3226 +.95
500Adrn 63.26 +1.86
TotMktAd r n25.63 +.79
First Eagle:
GIlbA 33.86 +.12,
OverseasA 16.67 -.11
First Investors A
BIChpAp 16.21 +.43
GloblA p 4.80 +.13
GovtAp 11.16 -.01


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables sho'
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.


Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV.
Data based on NAVs reported to Upper by 6 p.m. Eastern;


Name NAV Chg
IntlStk 24.60 +.98
Stock 77.10 +2.50
Dreyfus:
Aprec 27.97 +.67
CorVA 18.37 +.65
Dreyf 6.18 +20
Dr500Int 25.66 +.75
EmgLd 13.06 +.48
GrChinaAr 33.13 +1.16
HiYIdAp 5.66 -.01
lgCStkAp 16.47 +.49
MunBdr 10.83 +.01
StratValA 20.69 +74
TechGroA 18.74 +.52
Driehaus Funds:
EMktGr 21.39 +1.04
Eaton Vance CI A:
ChinaAp 17.28 +.56
AMTFMBI 9.10 +.05
MultiCGrA 5.48 +22
InBosA 4.56
LgCpVal 13.86 +.43
NatlMun 8.93, +.06
SpEqtA 9.92 +.32
TradGvA 7.52
Eaton Vance CI B:
HlthSB t 8.08 +.09
NatIMBt 8.93 +.05
Eaton Vance CI C:
GovtCp 7.51
NatlMCt 8.93 +.05
Evergreen A:
AstAllp 9.62
Evergreen C:
AsAIIC t 9.32
Evergreen I:
SIMunil 9.61
FBR Funds:
Focuslnv 33.96 +1.35
FMI Funds:
LgCappn 11.79 +.34
FPA Funds:
Nwlnc 11.02
FPACres n 21.21 +.21
FaIrholme 24.02 +.65
Federated A:
AmLdrA 10.70 +26
MIdGrStA 24.40 +.82
KaufmAp 3.77 +.15
MuSecA 9.73 +.01
Federated Instl:
KaufmnK 3.77 +.15
TotRetBd 10.40 -.03
Fidelity Adv Fo oT:
EnergyT 25.23 +1.20
HItCarT 15.02 +.20'
FIdelity Advisor A:
DivlintlAr 12.02 +.44
Nwinsghp 13.82 +.37
SItenA 10.5 +.02
Fidelity Advisor I:
Divlntln 12.19 +.44
EqGrin 37.79 +126
EqlnI n 17.36 +.63
IntBdI n 9.90 -.01
Nwlnsgtln 13.95 +.37
Fidelity Advisor T:
BalancT 11.45 +.24
DivGrTp 7.85 +.34
DynCATp 12.50 +.55
EqGrTp 35.55 +1.19
EqInT 17.11 +.63
GrOppT 21.71 +.74
HilnAdTp 6.80 +.07
IntBdT 9.88 -.01
MulncTp 12.32 +.01
OwseaT 13.59 +.49
STFiT 8.76
FIdelity Freedom:
FF2000n 10.38 +.09
FF2010n 10.86 +.19
FF2015n 9.00 +.17
FF2020n 10.60 +.24
FF2025n 8.70 +21
FF2030n 10.26 +27
FF2035n 8.45 +.23
FF2040n 5.87 +.16
Income.n 9.86 +.08
Fldelitylnvest:
AggrGrrn 12.75 +.48
AISectEq 9.71 +.33
AMgrSOn 11.76 +,22
AMgr70rn 11.78 +.31
AMgr20rn 10.84 +.08
Balancn 13.90 +.29
BlueChGrn 28.84 +.97
CAMunn 11.62 +.01
Canadan 39.87 +1.63
CapApn 17.10 +.74
CapDavOn 7.10 +.26
Cplncrin 6.41 +.03
ChinaRg r. 21.84 +.74
CngS n 359.25 +7.05
CTMunrn 11.28
Contra n 46.68 +1.24
CnvScn 16.73 +.44
DisEq n 17.31 +.44
DMntl n 22.78 +.82
DivStkOn' 9.97 +.42
DivGth n 18.11 +.77
EmrMkn s16.28 +.81
Eq ncn 31.87 +1.19
EQIIn 13.43 +.49
ECapAp 14.37 +.57
Eu..-rn 238" @ .-57
6,:r. rA 2. 40 -5.9 2
Enp n 1561 .146
I f1. 6' 0 *8 - '
F.Trv.n 2;.'u ,48
FitRateHirn 8.64 '
FrinOnen 2037 +.54
GNMAn 1124 -.01
Govtlinc .10.79 '-.03
GroCon 53.60 +1.62.
Grolncn 13.19 +.45
Highlncrn 6.96 +.01
Indepnn 15.44 +.72
InProBd n 10.89
IntBdSn 9.48
IntGov n 10.86 -.03
IntrmMun 10.02 +.01
IritlDiscn 24.34 +.84
IntiSCprn 13.68 +.28
InvGrBd 10.80 -.02
InvGBn 6.54 -.01
Japan n, 9.43 +.04
JpnSm n 7.01 +.07
LgCapValn 9.74 +.34
LCpVI r n 8.12 +.27
LatAmn 36.99 +1.84
LevCoStkn 17.03 +.81
LowPrn 25.33 +.72
Magelln n 52.33 +2.05
MDMurn 10.64
MA Munn 11.53 +.01
MegaCpStk n7.13 +.26
MIMun n 11.70
MldCapn 17.37 +.70
MNMunn 11.31 +.01.
MtgSecn 10.19 -.01
Munilncn 12.19
NJMunrn 11.30 +.01
NwMktrn 13.04 +.06
NwMilln 19.18 +.73
NYMunn 12.58 +.01
OTCn 34.05 +1.24
OhMunn 11.44
100Index 6.63 +.18
Ovrsean 25.82 +.89
PcBasn 15.71 +.38
PAMunrn 10.64 +.01
Purtn n 13.64 +.27
RealEn 13.55 +1.15
StlntMuan 10.52
STBFn 8.03 -.01
SmCaplndr 11.03 +.53
SmlICpSrn 11.36 +.57
SEAsia n 21.07 +.48
StkSlcn 17.73 +.60
Stratlnc n 9.43 +.01
SIrReRtr 7.43 +.11
TaxFrBrn 10.52 +.01
TolalBdn 9.66 -.01
Trend n 43.02 +1.41
USBIn 10.82 -.02
Utilt n 12.07 +.09
ValStratn 16.34 +.83
Value n 43.37 +1.96
Wridw n 12.90 +.48
FIdelity Selects:
Airs 22.72 +.75
Banking n 13.53 +.87
Bigtch n 55.32 +.61
Brokrn 37.79 +2.29
Cheman 60.62 +1.90
ComEquip n15.43 +.54
Compn 30.34 +.32
ConDisn 15.00 +.62
ConStapn 50.93 +1.15
CstHo n 24.88 +1.57
DfAer n 49.61 +1.25
Electrn 27.64 +.9
Enrgyn 35.91 +1.71
EngSv n 4722 +2.33
Envirn 13.10 +22
FinSvn 48.65 +320
Gold r n 34.93 +26
Health n 84.06 +1.11
HomFn 9.48 +.47
Insurn 32.10 +1.51
Leisr n 55.89 +1.91
Materialn 40.12 +1.69
MedDIn .31.92 +.56
MdEqSysn 19.61 +.15
Multmcn 25.09 +1.11


LSGrwth 9.43 +26
LSModer 10.17 +.15
Keeley Funds:
SmCpValA p 16.09 +.73
Lazard InstI:
EmgMktl 13.45 +.56
Legg Mason: Fd
SplnvCp 18.62 +.82
VaiTrCp 28.66 +1.13
Legg Mason Ptrs A:
AgGrAp 73.05 +2.54
ApprAp 10.51 +.28
HilncAt 4.54
InAICGAp 6.40 +23
LgCpGA p 17.62 +.49
MgMuAp 15.13 +.03


Name NAV Chg
GrolnAp 10.24 +.29
IncoAp 2.10
MATFAp 11.42 +.01
MITFAp 11.88 +.01
NJTFAp 12.76 +.01
NYTFAp 14.14 +.01
OppAp 17.27 +.56
PATFAp 12.82 +.01
SpStAp 15.64 +.43
TxExA p 9.68 +.01
TotRtAp 11.92 +.19
ValueBp 529 +.15
Firsthand Funds:
Tech Val 24.68 +.44
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUS p 8.95
ALTFAp 10.90
AZTFAp 10.50 +.01
Ballnvp 34.02 +1.40
CallnsAp 11.80
CAIntAp 11.12 +.01
'CarfFAp 6.66 +.01
COTFAp 11.25 +.02
CTTFAp 10.52
CvScAp -10.53 +.13
DblTFA 10.88 +.01
DynTchA 19.16 +.46
EqlncAp 12.24 +.28
Fedlntp 11.24 +.01
FedTFAp 11.38 +.01
FLTFAp 11.19 +.01
FoundAlp 8.13 +.15
GATFAp 11.60 +.01
GoldPrMA 29.90 +.05
GrwthAp 30.46 +.79
HYTFAp 9.17 +.02
HllncA 1.62
IncomAp 1.70 +.01
InsTFAp 11.58 +.01
NYITFp 10.84
LATFAp 10.89 +.01
LMGvScA 10.45 -.01
MDTFAp 10.71 +.01
MATFAp 11.24
MITFAp 11.75
MNInsA 12.09 +.01
MOTFAp 11.59 +.01
NJTFAp 11.63
NYInsA p 10.77
NYTFAp 11.39
NCTFAp 11.81
OhiolAp 12.39
ORTFAp 11.49
PATFAp 9.98 +.01
ReEScAp 7.85 +.61
RiSDvAp 23.46 +.64
SMCpGrA 22.46 +.64
Stratlncp 8.96 +.01
USGbvA p 6.67
UWlSA p 9.51 +.01
VATFAp 11.30
FranklTmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdvp
IncieAd 1.69 +.01
Frank/Temp Fmrnk B:
IncomeBt ' 1.70 +.02
FrankfTemp Frnk C:
FoundAlp 8.01 +.15
Ino6mCt 1.72 +.02
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
BeacnA 9.41 +.20
DiscA 23.63 +.22
QualfdAt 15.11 +.16
SharasA 15:70 +.35
Frank/Temp MIIt C:
DOscC t 23.42 +.22
FranklTempTemp A:
DvMklAp 15.77 +.57
ForgnAp 5.10 +.18
GIBdAp 11.92 +.05-
GrwhA p 13.37 +.38
WoddAp 1121 +.33
Frank/TempTmp Adv:
GthAv 13.37 +.38
Frank/lTemp Tp B&C:
DevMktC 15.41 +.56
ForgnCp .4.99 +.17
GIBdCp 11.94 +.05
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Slnc 10.37 -.02
S&SPM 30.48 +1.03
TaxEx 11.42 +.01
GMO Trust III:
EmMkr P.93
For 9.97 +.29
IntntrVI -17.72 +.50
USQMtyEq 16.03 +.33
GMO Trust IV:
EmCnDt 6.68 +.02
EmnrMkt 8.89
IntlGrEq 17.16 +.36
IntlntrrVI 17.71 +.50
GMOTrust Vi:
ET|,.MH., 8.90 :
ndi,,. 15.56 +.C.3
I'.'.VTi,ei 16.03 +.U2
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 32.33 +1.06
Gateway Funds:
GatewayA 23.51 +.25
Goldman Sachs A:
HiYieldA '5.75 -.01
MdCVAp 22.70 +.82
Goldman Sachs Inst:
HiYield 5.76 -.01
FMidCapV 22.87 +.82
Harbor Funds:
Bond 11.80
CapAplnst 25.84 +.62
Intllnvt 41.60 +1.67
Intlr 41.99 +1.70
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 24.55 +.82
DivGthAp 14.28 +.44
Hartford Fds C: .
CapApCt 22.04 +.74
Hartford Fds L:
GrwOppL 18.49 +.53
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 28.83 +1.01
Div&Gr 14.67 +.46
Advisers 14.81 +.36
Stock 28.66 +1.03
TotRetBd 10.00 -.01
Henderson GIbI Fds:
IntOppAp 17.11 +.45
Hennessy Funds: �
CorGrllOrig 10.07 +.33
HussmnStrGr 12.86 +.06
ICON Fds:
Energy 14.66 +.69
HIthcare 10.68 +.19
ISIFunds:
NoAmp 7.62 +.01
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 18.77 +.30
AssetStAp 19.19 +.30
AssetStrYp 19.22 +.30
GINatRsAp 14.71 +.55
JPMorgan A Class:
CoraBdA 10.86 -.01
MCpValp 15.26 +.54
JPMorgan Select:
HBSMkNep16.16 +.01
JPMorgan Sal Cis:
Corep dn 10.86 -.01
HiYldBdn 6.49 ..
IntmTFBdn 10.84
IntrdAmern 16.21 +.53
ShtDurBd n 10.75 -.01
TxAwRRetn 9.66 +.02
USLCCrPIs n14.36 +.44
Janus:
Balanced 21.24 +.27
Contradan 10.49 +.67
Enlerpr 36.90 +1.13
FedTE
FIxBnd 9.83 -.03
Fund 20.81 +.60
FundaEq 15.37 +.50
GILifeSd 17.07 +.18
GiTechr 10.61 +.31
GrInc 23.69 +.76
Orion 7.61 +.36
Onrseasr 33.64 +1.98
PrkMCVInv 16.26 +.47
Research 19.27 +.61
ShTmBd 2.98
Twenty 49.98 +1.38
Venur 32.26 +.96
WridWr 33.04 +1.05
Janus Adv S Shrs:
Forty 25.47 +.65
JennlsonDryden A:
BlendA 11.73 +.36
HighlnrcA 8.76 +.02
HiYIdA p 4.42 +.01
InsuredA 10.04
UOiityA 7.29 +.10
Jennlsonoryden B:
GrowthB 11.34 +.28
HiYldBt 4.41 +.01
InsuredB 10.06
John Hancock A:
BondAp 12.82 -.01
RgBkA 12.09 +.65
StrinAp 5.57 +.01
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 5.57
John Hancock CI1:
LSAggr 8.60 +.30
LSBalanc 9.90 +21
LSConsrv 10.91 +.09


EmEurp 11.00 +.33
EmMktSn 21.76 +1.13
Eqlnc n 17.10 +.62
Eqlndexn 24.54 +.72
Europen 11.35 +.45
GNMAn 9.70 -.01
Growth n 21.61 +.70
Gr&lnn 14.45 +.46
HfthScidn 20.13 +.26
HiYield n 5.33 +.01
InllBondn 9.15 +.02
IntDis n 27.92 +.81
Inll G&I 9.87 +.32
IntlStk n 9.68 +.44
Japan n 6.32 -.02


Name NAV Chg
Legg Mason Ptrs B:
LgCpGBt 16.16 +.45
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 19.14 +.62
Intl 11.57 +.39
SmCap 16.59 +.83
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondI 11.15 +.03,
StrlncC 11.44 +.03
LSBondR 11.11 +.03
StrncA 11.39 +.03
Loomis Saylea Inv:
InvGrBdAp 10.31 +.01
InvGrBdCp 10.24 +.01
InvGrBdY 10.31 +.01
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 8.51 +.33
AIIValA 8.88 +.33
BdDebAp 627 +.01
MidCpAp 10.33 +.38
MFS Funds A:
MITA 14.19 +.45
MIGA 10.58 +.30
HilnA 2.66 +.01
MFLA 921 +.01
TotRA 11.62 +.19
U6ilA 11.93 +.24
ValueA 17.64 +.46
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 9.56 +28
GvScBn 10.03 -.01
HilnB n 2.67 +.01
MulnBn 7.98 +.01
TotRB n 11.62 +.19
MFS Funds InstI:
IntlEq n 12.79 +.40
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 4.88
MainStay Funds B:
CapApBt 19.54 +.55
ConvBt 11.43 +.12
GovtBt 8.63 -.02
HYldBBt 4.86 +.01
IntlEqB 9.75 +.19
SmCGBp 8.93 +.27
TotRtBt � 12.76 +.17
Mair & Power:
Growth 5327 +1.42
Managers Funds:
Bondn 20.70 -.05
Manning&Napler Fds:
WIdOppA 6.32 +.13
Marsico Funds:
Focus p 12.31 +.43
Matthews Asian:
India r 9.68
MergerFd 14.82 +.05
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 9.06 -.02
TotRtBdl 9.05 -.02
Midas Funds:
Midas Fd 2.60 +.01
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 10.41 +.46
Morgan Stanley A:
DivGthA 11.43. +.30
Morgan Stanley B:
DivGtB 11.52 +.30.
GibDivB 829 +.15
StratB 15.09 +.17
MorganStanley Inst:
IntEql n 10.98 +.22
MCapGrIn 21.36 +.66
Under Funds A:
IntemtA 16.60 +.49
Under Funds Y:
MCpCGrY r n18.01 +.56
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 9.52 +.21
DiscZ 23.92 +.23
QualfdZ 15.23 +.16
SharesZ 15.82 +.35
Neuberger&Berm Inv:
Focus 14.42 +.39
'Geneslnst 30.47 +.91
Intir 11.75 +.33
Partner 18.35 +.83,
Neuberger&Berm'Tr:
Genesis 31.73 +.96
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc I n 8.08
Nich.n 32.38 +.96'
Northern Funds:
HiYFxlnc 6.20
SmCpldx 5.43 +.21
Technly 9.25 +.19
Nuvean CI A:
LtMBAp 10.70 +.01
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 8:70 +.01
Oak Assoc Fds:
.WhtOkSG n26.20 +.78
Oakmark Funas I
ETyir..:. . - I +31
Cl:.R',iai ' +47
Intl I r 12.76 +.46
Oakmlarkr 28.31 +1.00
Select r 18.24 +.70
Old Mutual Adv II:
Tc&ComZ 11.08 +.28
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 6.18 +.05
GIbSMdCap 10.44 +.25
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMU 5.65 +.04
AMTFrNY 9.78 +.05
CAMuniAp 6.69 +.07
CapApAp 31.53 +.90
CapIncAp 6.84 +.04.
ChmplncAp 1.57
DvMktAp 21.31 +1.22
Discp 33.66 +.96
EquityA 6.42 +.19
'GlobAp 41.47 +1.43
GIbOppA 19.54 +.66
Gold p 25.32 +.24
IntBdA p 5.9b +.03
BMnStFdA 23.38 +.75
MSSCAp 13.37 +.58
MidCapA 10.53 +.30
PAMuniAp 9.22 +.02
StrlnA p 3.47 +.01
USGv p- 8.81 -.01
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 5.63 +.05
AMTFrNY 9.78 +.05
CplncBt 6.74 +.04
ChmplncBt 1.57 -.01
EquityB 5.97 +.17
StrlncBt 3.49 +.02
Oppenheimer C&M:
IntlBdC 5.88 +.04
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.07
RoMuAp 14.00 +.07
RcNIMuA 6.02 +.06
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAd p 9.57 -.01
TotRtAd 10.38 -'01
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIIAsset 10.54
ComodRR 7.01 +.12
DevLcMkr 8.91 +.12
DivIno 9.21 +.02
EmMkBd 9.23
FrgnBd 9.37 +.01
HIYId 7.20
InvGrCp 10.08 -.04
LowDu 9.71
ModDur 10.07
RealRet 1025 -.02
RealRtnl 10.20
ShortT 9.57 -.01
TotRt ' 10.38 -.01
TR II 10.07 ' ...
TRill 9.08
PIMCO Funds A:
LwDurA 9.71
RealRtAp 1020
ToIRtA 10.38 -.01
PIMCO Funds C:
RealIRtC p 1020
TotRtCt 10.38 -.01
PIMCO Funds 0:
TRtnp 10.38 -.01
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 19.48 +.45
Pax World:
Balanced 17.69 +.37
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 33.81 +.45
Pioneer Funds A:
CullenVal 13.81 +.35
BondAp 8.46 -.01
EurSelEqA 18.57 +.74
IntiValA 15.74 +.59
MdCpGrA 9.67 +.30
PionFdAp 28.88 .+.81
TxFreA p 9.41 +.05
ValueAp 8.83 +.25
Pioneer Funds B:
HIYIdBt 7.11 +.05
PIoneer Funds C:
HiYldCt 7.18 +.05
Price Funds Adv:
Eqinc 17.06 +.61
Growth pn 21.46 +.69
Price Funds:
Balance 14.90 +.33
BIChipn 25.88 +.86
CABondn 10.39 +.01
CapAppn 15.38 +.32
DivGin 17.18 +.54


GrTxStr 10.95 +.15
Grwth 10.36 +.29
Gr&lnc 10.44 +.34
IncStk 8.95 +26
Inco 11.31 -.01
Intl 17.32 +.51
NYBd 11.03 +.01
PrecMM 24.84 +.04

Chronicle staff
financial advice
quotes on stock
Consult a finan


Name NAV Chg
LatAmn 31.91 +1.80
MDShrtn 5.24 -.01
MDBondn 10.00 +.01
MidCapn 37.25 +1.17
MCapValn 15.80 +.58
NAmern 22.39 +.67
NAsian 11.26 +.94
NewEra n 35.08 +1.55
NHorizn 19.56 +.60
NIncn 8.84 -.02
NYBond n 10.75
OverSSFrn 6.13 +21
PSIncn 12.86 +21
RealEstn 9.92 +.77
R2010n 11.98 +.24
R2015n 8.95 +.22
R12020 n 12.05 +.32
R2025n 8.65 +26
R2030n 12.21 +.39
R2035n 8.54 +28
R2040n 12.15 +.41
SciTecn 16.57 +.40
ShtBd n 4.72
SmCpStk n 20.76 +.80
SmCapVal n23.56 +.85
SpecGrn 12.10 +.44
SpecInn 10.69 +.06
TFIncn 9.51 +.01
TxFrH n 9.57 +.04
TxFrSIn 5.48
USTIntn 5.95 -.03
USTLgn 12.32 -.13
VABondn 11.24 +.01
Value n 16.35 +.63
Principal Inv:
BdMtgIn 8.61
DiscLCInst 9.24 +.28
LgCV3 In 7.62 +.21
LgGrIn 5.65 +.17
LT2030ln 8.39 +.22
LT20201n 8.65 +.20
SAMBalA 9.79 +20
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvApx 9.26 -.03
AZTE 8.68 +.01
CATxA p 7.35
Convp . 13.92 +.19
DvrinAp 6.59 +.04
EqlnA p 11.14 +.35
EuEq 14.53 +.54
GeoAp 9.62 +.17
GIbEqtyp 6.56 +.17
GrlnAp 9.72 +.32
GIblHIthA .38.64 +.40
HIYdA p 6.03 +.01
HiYldIn 4.78
IncmA p 5.62 +.02
IntGrln p 7.37 +24
InvAp 9.03 +.27
NJTxAp 8.93 +.01
NwOpAp 33.71 +.78
PATE 8.73
TxExA p 8.07 +.01
TFInA p 14.37
TFHYA 10.21 +.03
USGvAp 13.49 +.06
GIblUtilA 9.57 +.03
VstaA p 6.73 +.30
VoyA p 14.74 +.51
Putnam Funds B:
DvrlnBt .6.55 +.04
Eqlnct 11.03 +.35
EuEq 13.92 +.51
GeoBt 9.51 +.17
GIbEqt 5.94 +.16
GINtRs 13.60 +.47
GrInBt 9.54 +.31
GIblHIthB 32.63 +.34
HiYIdBt 6.02 +.01
HYAdBt 4.70 .....
IncmB1t 5.58 +.02
IntGrInt 7.30 +23
InflNopt 10.54 +.30
InvBt 8.14 +.25
NJTxBt 8.92 +.01 1
NwOpBt 29.47 +.67
TxExBt 8.07 +.01
TFHYBg 10.23 +.03
USGvBt 13.42 +.05
GIblUfilB 9.53 +.03.
VistaBt 5.71 +.25
VoyBt 12.57 +.43
RS Funds:
IntGrA 12.42 +.38
LgCArphaA 30.26 +.92
Value 16.22 +.58
Rainier Inv Mgt:
SmMCap 20.51 +.73
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 6.74 +.17
RiverSource A:
BalanceA 7.77 +.16
DIspEqAp 3.96 +.12,
DEI 7.09 +25
DlvBd- '4.55 -.014
DvOppA 5.52 +.16
Growth 18.57 +.51
HiYdTEA 4.06 +.01
LgCpEq p 2.92 +.09
MCpGrA 7.09 +28
MidCpVIp 4.96 +.19
RiverSource I:
TNEmgMktn 6.43 +.35
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 1028 +.32
MicroCapl 10.06 +.31
PennMul r 7.31 +.26
Premier r 12.99 +.45
TotRetl r 8.76 +.29
ValSvc t 7.93 +.26
VIPISvc 8.83 +.30
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 9.37
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 8.67 +23
SEI Portfolios:
CoreFxAn 9.19 -.01
IntlEqAn 6.47 +.14
LgCGroAn 15.16 +.41
LgCValAn 11.93 +.38
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 14.41 +.60
Schwab Funds:
HlthCare 11.81 +.17
1000nvr 26.96 +.82
1000Sel 26.94 +.82
S&P Ilv 14.13 +.42
S&P Sel 14.17 +.41
S&PlnstSI 7.23 +.21
SmCplnv 12.90 +.52
Selected Funds:
AmShD 30.18 +1.11
AmShSp 30.19 +1.11
Sellgman Group:
ComunAt 29.44 +.64
FrontrAt 7.36 +21
GIbSmA 9.09 +.31
GIbTchA t 13.49 +.30
HYdBA p 2.21 +.01
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 22.67 +.65
Sequoian 97.07 +2.30
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 32.02 +.84
SoundSh 23.77 +.67
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 41.22 +.99
Stratton Funds:
Dividend 15.59 +1.07
Multi-Cap 27.60 +.79
SmCap 33.18 +125
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvB t 9.82 -.04
TCW Funds:
TotRetBdl 9.52
T1AA-CREF Funds:
Bondlnst 9.87 -.02
Tamarack Funds:
EntSmCp 13.73 +.48
Value
Templeton Instil:
ForEqS 15.71 +.51
Third Avenue Fds:
Intlr 12.67 +27
RIElVI r 15.66 +.49
Value 37.62 +1.25
Thornburg Fds;
IntValAp 20.30 +.74
InlValue I 20.76 +.76
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld " 3.95
income 7.16 -.02
Transamerica A:
Rexnncp 7.37 -.01
TA IDEX A:
TempGlbAp 19.68 +.65
TrCHYBp 7.00 +.02
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 20.07 +.72
Tweedy Browns:
GlobVal 16.74 +.16
UMB Scout Funds:
Ints 22.93 +.69
US Global Investors:
AlAnm 16.82 +.60
ChinaReg 6.83 +25
GIbRs 6.59 +.25
Gld&Mtls 12.04 +.10
WidPrcMn 12.03 +.11
USAA Group:
AgvGt 23.00 +.80
CA Bd 9.73 +.02
CmstStr 16.47 +.36
GNMA 10.00


Renewed optimism





pushes up stocks


w the fund name, sell







Name NAV Chg
S&Pldx 13.66 +.40
SoTech 8.19 +22
ShtTBnd 8.64
SmCpStk 8.44 +.2
TxEII 12.34 +.02
TxELT 12.19 +.02
TxESh 10.44
VABd 10.54 +.01
WIdGr 13.10 +.37
VALIC:
MdCpldx 13.10 +.49
StkIdx 18.82 +.54
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 12.77 +.24
Van Kamp Funds A:
CATFAp 16.18 +.04
CapGro 8.52 +27
CmstAp 11.07 +37
CpBdAp 5.75 -.02
EqlncAp 6.51 +.15
Exch 342.77 +8.36
GrInAp 13.87 +.44
HarbA p 12.34 +.17
HiYIdA 8.12 +.01
HYMuAp 8.34 +.02
InTFAp 15.81 +.03
MunlAp 12.21 +.03
PATFAp 14.83 +.04
StrMuninc 9.35 +.03
USMtgeA 12.51 -.01
UtiAp 14.94 +.04
Van Kamp Funds B:
EnterpB t 9.89 +.32
EqlncBt 6.39 +.14
HYMuBt 8.33 +.02
MulB 12.19 +.03
StrMuninc 9.35 +.03
USMIge 12.44 -.01
UtilB 14.86 +.04
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmln 16;93 +.32
CAITAdmn 10.70 +.01
CALTAdmn 10.79 +.01
CpOpAdl n 53.49 +1.49
EMAdmrrn 25.53.+1.29
Energyn 95,85 +4.12
ExplAdmIn 41.71 +123
ExtdAdm n 25.54 +.99
500Adml n 84.04 +2.48
GNMAAdn 10.70 -.01
HIthCr n 42.13 +.58
HiYldCpn 4.74 -.01
InfProAd n 23.68 -.01
ITBdAdmIln 10.36 -.04
lTsryAdml n11.65 -.05
IntGrAdmn 42.80 +1.53
ITAdmln 13.29 +.01
fTGrAdm n 8.82 -.03
LtdTrAdn 10.93 +.01
LTGrAdml n 8.01 -.07
LTsyAdmln 11.50 -.12
LTAdmIn 10.72 +.01
MCpAdml n 5727 +2.14-
MorgAdmn 37.38 +1.02
MuHYAdm n 9.83 +.02
NJLTAdn 11.44 +.01
NYLTAdn a10.81 +.01
PrnCaprn 48.64 +1.26
PALTAdm n 10.80
STsyAdmln 10.83 -.02
STBdAdmIn10.32 -.02
ShtTrAd n 15.85
STFdAdn 10.90 -.01
STIGrAdo n 10.07
SmCAdmn 21.28 +.86
TxMCaprn 44.54 +1.39
TflBAdmIn 10.15 -.03
TStkAdm n 22.25 +.70
WellslAdm n43.76 +.34
WelltnAdm n43.06 +.78
Windsorn 32.70 +1.21
WdsfilAdn 34.22 +.99
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 18.62 '+.40
CALTny 10.79 +.01
CapOppn 23.15 �+.64
Convrtn 10.56 +.18
DivdGron 11.18 +.29
Energy n 51.05 +2.19
Eqlnc n 15.21 +.42
Expirn " 44.82 +1.31
FLLTn 11.02 +.01
GNMAn 10.70 -.01
GlobEqn 12.59 +.41
Grolncn 19.47 +.56
GrthEqn 7.44 +.19
HYCorp n 4.74 -.01
HllhCren 99.82 +1.39
InflaPron 12.05 -.01
InllExpirn 10.69 +25
IntlGrn 13.45 +.48
IntlVal n 24.84 +.90
TIGrraden -8.82 -.03
.-n,-,,, 11.65 -.05
UfeConn . 13.61 +.18
UfeGron 16.45 +.43
Ufelncn 12.44 +.08
UfeModn 15.47 +.30
LTlGraden 8.01 -.07
LTTsryn 11.50 -.12
Morg n 12.06 +.33
MuHYn 9.83 +.02
Mulnt n 13.29 +.01
Multdan 10.93 +.01
MuLong n 10.72 +.01
MuShrtn 15.85
NJLTn 11.44 +.01
NYLTn 10.81 +.01
OHLTTEn 11.74 +.01
PALTn 1080, ...
p,-:llr: r , IJ ' +.40
PrmcpCorn 9.60 +.25
Prmcprn 46.88 +1.22
SelValurns 12.56 +.41
STARn 15.04 +.28
STIGraden 10.07
STFedn 10.90 -.01
STTsryn 10.83 -.02
StratEqn 11.93 +.42
TgtRetlncn 9.76 +.09
TgRe2010n8.19 +.29
TgtRe2005nlO0.00 +.12
TgtRe2025 n 9.59 +23
TgtRe2015n 9.87 +.19
TgRe2020n17.13 +.37
TgRe2030 n16.11 +.43
TgtRe2035n 9.60 +28
TgtRe204On15.71 +.45
TgtRe2045 n 9.93 +29
USGron 13.09 +.39
USValuen 7.55 +22
Wellslyn 18.06 +.14
Welltn n 24.93 +.45
Wndsrn 9.69 +.36
Wndslln 1927 +.55
Vanguard Idx Fds:
500 n 84.03 +2.48
Balanced n 16.92 +.31
DevMktn 7.69 +.24
EMktn 19.41 +.98.
Europe n 20.90 +.84
Extend n 25.54 +1.00
Growth n 21.68 +.58
ITBndn 10.36 -.04
LgCaplxn 16.69 +.50
LTBndn 10.98 -.10
MldlCpn 12.62 +47
Pacific n 8.34 +.11
REITrn 10.65 +.85
SmCap n 21.27 +.85
SmlCpGthan12.84 v.46
SmlCpVIn 10.28 +.47
STBndn 10.32 -.02
TotBndn 10.15 -.03
Tolllntln 11.56 +.41
TolStkn 22.24 +.69
Value n 15.57 +.53
Vanguard InstIl Fds:
Ballnastn 16.93 +.31
DvMktlnstn 7.62 +.24
Eurolnstn 20.90 +.83
Extisn 25.55 +.99
Grwthlstn 21.68 +.57
InfProlnstn 9.65
Instldxn 83.50 +2.47
InsPI n 83.50 +2.46
ToUBdIdxn 51.03 -.13
InstTSldxn 20.10 +23
lnsTStPlus n20.10 +.63
MidCplstn 12.65 +47
Paclnstn 8.35 +.11
SCInstn 21.29 +.86
TBllsn 10.15 -.03
TSInst n 22.25 +.69
Valuelstn 15.57 +.52
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 69.42 +2.05
I'FdSign 10.36 -.04


Short-term T-bills up at auction


Associated Press


WASHINGTON - Short-
term Treasury bill rates
edged down slightly in Mon-
day's auction and are ex-
pected to remain at low levels
until the Federal Reserve
starts raising interest rates.
That means businesses,
money market mutual funds
and other investors who use
short-term Treasury bills as
a convenient and safe place
to park their money will not
be getting much of a return.
The Treasury Depart-
ment auctioned $31 billion
in three-month bills at a dis-
count rate of 0.185 percent,


down from 0.190 percent
last week Another $29 bil-
lion in six-month bills was
auctioned at a discount rate
of 0.295 percent, down from
0.305 percent last week
The three-month rate was
the lowest since three-month
bills averaged 0.135 percent
on April 27. The six-month
rate was the lowest since
0.290 percent on Jan. 12.
The three- and six-month
bills have been trading well
below 1 percent for most of
the year. Economists believe
they will remain at low lev-
els for at least another year,
until the Fed believes the
economy, has gained enough


traction that it needs to start
raising interest rates.
In Monday's auction, the
three-month price for a
$10,000 bill was $9,995.24,
while a six-month bill sold
for $9,985.09. That would
equal an annualized rate of
0.188 percent for the three-
month bills, and 0.300 per-
cent for the six-month bills.
Separately, the Fed said
Monday that the average
yield for one-year Treasury
bills, a popular index for
making changes in ad-
justable rate mortgages, fell
to 0.52 percent last week
from 0.53 percent the previ-
ous week.


NEYR 0TOKECANG


Name Last Chg
SPHithC 25.58 +.25
SP CnSt 22.84 +.47
SPConsum 23.22 +1.09
SP Engy 49.66 +1.66
SPDRFnd 1229. +.76
SP Inds 22.60 +.80
SPTech. 1726 +.46
SPUIDI 25.94
StdPac 2.32 +.22
Standex 10.99 +.83
StarwdHtl 21.38 +1.53
StateStr 41.79 +3.28
Sters 24.38 '-.76
Sterite 11.57 +2.39
StoneEngy 7.05 +.86
Stryker 39.41 +.42
SturmRug 11.79 +.57
SubPpne 41.02 +.74
SunCmts 14.67 +.54
Suncorgs 30.22 +1.60,
Sunrco 28.39 +.22
Suntech 15.10 +.76
SunTrst 16.00 +.95
Supvalu 15.69 +.24
Synorvs 4.16 +.46
Sysco 23.28 +.46
TCFFndc 15.52 +.96
TECO 11.12 +.03
TJX 27.94 +1.10
TaiwSemi 10.55 +.53


TalismEgs 14.35
Target 41.77
TalaMotors 9.07
Taubmn 24.10
TeckResg 13.41
TelcmrNZ 7.77
TelMexL s 16.82
Templelnld 11.73
Tenans 28.07
TenetHlh 2.25
Teppco 27.59
Teradata 20.61
Teradyn 6.17
Terex 15.45
Terra 29.36
TerraNitro 125.12
Tesoro 16.70
TetraTech 7.10
Texinst 17.90
Textron 11.41
Theragenh 1.20
ThermoFs 35.47
ThmBet 31.71
ThomCrkg 8.23
3MCo 59.23
Triffany 26.53
TW Cablers 32.30
TimeWm rs 24.88
Timken 16.84
TitanMet 8.26
ToddShp h 14.91
TollBros 19.65


TorchEnif 1.85 -.02
Trchmrk 37.93 +2.59
TorDBkg 4220 +1.62
TotalSA 55.27 +2.29
TotalSys 13.19 +.19
Transocn 70.73 +2.37
Travelers 40.60 +.84
Tredgar 14.74 -.48
TriConl 9.28 +.27
TyoElec 17.48 +.68
Tycolin 26.56 +1.06
Tyson 13.16 +.60
UBSAG 14.35 +1.09
UDR 10.53 +1.24
UIL Hold 24.02 +.47
URS 47.10 +1.10
USAirwy 3.16 +.12
USEC 4.81 +.31
USG 12.93 +1.23
UniFirst 34.59 +1.06
UnilevNV 23.71 +.71
UnionPacs 48.47 +1.89'
Unisysh 1.29
UldMicro 3.19 +.15
UPSB 52.80 +.81
USBancrp 19.35 +1.68
USNGsFd 16.17 +.16
US OiFd 32.71 +1.41
USSteel 28.53 +1.40
UtdTech 52.98 +1.70
UtdNhthGp 27.81 +.30
UnumGrp 17.50 +1.23


ValeantPh 22.06 +1.97
ValeroE 20.95 +.11
Valspar 22.90 -.17
VangTSMs 45.67 +1.36
VangREfr 31.99 +2.38
VangEmgs 31.01 +1.81
VaranMed 35.23 +22
Vectren 22.00 +.26
Ventas 29.26 +2.25
VeolaEnv 28.46 +.84
VediFone 6.87 +.57
VerizonCm 29.70 +.09
ViacomB 21.34 +1.05
VimpelCm 11.04 +.42
Visa 66.41 +1.34
Vishay 5.51 +.13
VMware 27.85 +.85
Vodafone 19.99 +1.52
Vomado 48.55 +4.21
WGLHold 29.48 +.66
Wabash 1.53 +.06
WalMart 49.92 +1.77
Walom 30.70 +.92
WsteMlnc 27.86 +1.03
WalsnPh 30.83 +.83
Weathflnts 18.79 +.95
WeinRIt 14.79 +1.31
WellPoint 48.00 +1.12
WellsFargo 26.93 +2.06


WendyArby 4.39
WestarEn 17.24
WAstEMkt 9.65
WstAMgdHi 4.61
ll .. .''I1r ) 11.15
.u['Ni1r m 23.70
WstnUnien 1739
Weyerh 33.16
Whrpl 43.47
WilmCS 4.88
WmsCos 15.91
WmsPtrs 18.05
WmsSon 12.35
Windstrm 8.47
Winnbgo 7.53
Wipro 11.49
WiscEn 37.13
WT India 17.16
Worthgtn 13.95
Wyeth 44.87
Wyndham 11.19
XLCap 10.15
XTO Engy 42.06
XcelEngy 17.23
Xerox 6.54
Yamana g 8.87
YingliGm 8.82
YumBmds 34.47
ZaleCp 4.78
7rimmer 44.49
ZweigTI 3.36


Beverly Hills



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Associated Press economic rebound. Stocks
fell sharply last week on
NEW'YORK - Reassur- worries that a recovery
ing news about housing and might be further off than
banking on Monday con- hoped, interrupting a rally
vinced investors to return to that has left the Standard &
the stock market. Poor's 500 index up 34.5
The Dow Jones industrial percent since March 9.
average shot up 235 points, Steep drops in home val-
making up three-quarters of ues have been at the heart
last week's losses. All the of the economy's troubles,
major indexes rose about 3 slicing into consumers'
percent. wealth and saddling banks
A better-than-expected with huge losses.
profit report from Lowe's Analysts believe that sta-
Cos., an uptick in home- ability in the housing and
builder sentiment and posi- banking industries are im-
tive comments from analysts perative for the economy to
about U.S. banks revived in- rebound.
vestors' confidence in an The Dow rose 235.44, or


2.9 percent, to 8,504.08. That
was the biggest point gain
since a 246-point jump on
April 9.
The S&P 500 index rose
26.83, or 3 percent, to 909.71,
putting it back in positive
territory for the year. The
Nasdaq composite index
rose 52.22, or 3.1 percent, to
1,732.36.
U.S. stocks got a boost
when Lowe's Cos., the na-
tion's second-largest home
improvement chain, posted
earnings that easily beat Wall
Street's forecasts and raised
its full-year profit outlook
Lowe's closed up $1.49, or
8.1 percent, at $19.94.


MidCpldxn 18.086 +.68
STBdIdxn 10.32 -.02
TotBdSgIn 10.15 -.03
TotStkSgln 21.47 +.67
Vantagepoint Fds:
Growth n 6.24 +20
Victory Funds:
DvsStA 11.57 +.35
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 7.39 +.11
CoreinvA 4.09 +.13
ScTechA 7.38 +.15
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 23.63 +.86
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStkZ 13.07 +.42
Opptylnv 25.21 +.74
Western Asset:
CorePlus 9.02 +.01
Core 9.24 +.02
William Blair N:
GrowthN 7.99 +.20
IntlGhN 14.68 +.62
Yacktman Funds:
Fundp 11.71 +.41

do not provide
- or real-time
cial adviser.


BlNATURBCOST


OR H OllDI C I


BUSINESS


'il I !,' 1 V I').1 2009 A 7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









Page A8 - TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009



PINION


C]


S"That man is great who can use
the brains of others to carry
out his work."
Donn Piatt

_*


ITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
*Gerry Mulligan.....................................publisher
Charlie Brennan ....................................... editor
Neale Brennan ........promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold............................. managing editor
B Cheri Harris....... ...................features editor
Curt Ebitz........................................ citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ................................. citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson ............................... guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


IDEA WITH SOME TEETH





Free dental




day draws




big crowd


For most of us, the image
of people waiting
overnight in a line is for
buying a hot new computer
game or for tickets to a big col-
lege game or rock concert, not
an overnight wait for the op--
portunity to see a dentist.
But when the Citrus County
Health Department recently
sponsored an adult dental
clinic, a half-dozen people
spent the night in line, and
there was a steady
stream of cus-
tomers for the rest
of the day" THE I1
The clinic was Dental c
advertised as an overw
opportunity for
adults to receive a resp
tooth filling or OUR 0
have an extrac- OUR O
tion without cost, Respon.
and when dentists need for
and staff mem-
bers arrived at the
clinic in Beverly Hills at 6 a.m.,
they found a line at the door,
including those who had ar-
rived the evening before and
had spent the night to assure
they could see the dentist.
The health department has
two dentists on staff, and one
part-time private dentist on
contract. They normally only
deal with children, many of
whom are eligible for Medi-
caid, which pays for the dental
services. The dentists also pro-
vide services to children for a
fee that is generally less than
that charged by private den-
tists.
The idea for a public clinic
for adults is an idea that goes
back some time, but the con-
cept never came to fruition
until recently, when Dr. Frank
Vascimini offered to do some
volunteer dental work in the
county clinic.
In order to test the public re-
sponse for adult dental serv-
ices, the health department
advertised the clinic, and Dr.


More facts
In regard to the shooting of the
dog, just to add a few facts to thq
dog shooting incident: The dogs in,
question are not constant .
barkers. They live on an , 'G
acre of property and are
free to run as they like.
Also, they are rarely left
alone, so there's always
companionship. My ques-
tion is: When is it ever OK
to shoot across the street
into a neighbor's yard, not CAL
knowing what or who was
around? If the neighbor is 563'
upset about the dogs, call
the pound or sall the po-
lice. Violence is never the answer.
And don't forget the poor people
who run outside when they hear
shots and see a neighbor standing
there holding a gun. This man
made a very poor decision and has
left neighbors feeling frightened.
Fancy pantsy
I see President Obama wants to
put a bad-habit tax on cigarettes,
alcohol and soda pop. Do you
think that at these little White


Vascimini joined the two staff
dentists to make the clinic a re-
ality.
The response clearly showed
that there is a need. This is
hardly surprising, because in a
tight budget, one of the first
items to go is often preventive
dental care.
Without preventive care,
people often develop gum dis-
ease, cavities, and abscesses.
These eventually lead to pain
and can lead to
problems affect-
ing overall health.
SSUE: Currently, people
clinic gets with dental prob-
nlc get lems who cannot
elm ing afford private care
onse. must either go to
Shands in
PINION: Gainesville or to
se shows the Langley
r service. Health Center in
Sumter County
unless a private
dentist is willing to do pro bono
work.
This means that people in
Citrus County without ade-
quate transportation have con-
siderable difficulty obtaining
low- or no-cost dental care.
Local clinics are one answer,
but the health department says
that it cannot offer more clin-
ics 'with its current budget.
However, officials say the
health department would
sponsor them if it can get more
volunteer dentists and spon-
sorships through either gov-
ernment grants or local civic
clubs willing to help defray the,
cost of the clinics.
While helping with dental
services may not have the im-
mediate appeal of providing
food or clothing to those in
need, for someone with severe
dental problems, access to a
dentist can relieve immediate
pain, and may help overall
health. This is a worthy goal for
our health department, and, for
our community.


House fancy-pantsy dinners that
he's having every Wednesday,
they're sitting aroUnd drinking
water? I think not ...
How sad
UND I've been terribly upset
all day after reading in
the Chronicle today
about that poor couple
in Virginia that won't be
able to afford to take the
two vacations they had
planned this summer in
' their $250,000 motor
0579 home. That is just so de-
(0579 pressing. Can't you find
something more cheerful
to report on than these rich peo-
ple forced to eat sirloin instead of
filet mignon?

Not the pope
I would like to make a comment
on the article "Other Voices," by
Carl Hiaasen. Peter was not the
first pope. That's not in the Bible.
I don't know where he got that
from. If that's in the Bible, I
would like someone to publish
that.


Reagan legacy is ma


- SANTA BARBARA, Calif.
You drive up a steep, rough
and winding road to reach
Ronald Reagan's ranch in
the Santa Ynez mountains. For
eight years, 1981 to 1989, this
place north of Santa Barbara was
the Western White House. Rea-
gan spent nearly a year of his
time in office here. Now, what he
called Rancho del Cielo is pretty
much deserted.
But the ranch, tended by a lone
caretaker, is still much
like it was when Rea-
gan was alive. It's not
open to the public;
these days, the old
adobe house and 688 .
surrounding acres are
owned and carefully
maintained by the con-
servative Young Amer- j
ica's Foundation. The
group doesn't have the Byron
staff or resources to OTH
conduct public tours,
but they were kind VOI0
enough to take me on a
visit one afternoon last week.
The first thing, that comes to
mind as you approach the house
is how modest it is. The main part
of the building was constructed
in 1871. Even after Reagan added
a couple of rooms when he
bought it in 1975, the whole house
measured about 1,500 square
feet.
The floors are covered in a
brick-patterned linoleum. ("He
laid it himself," my guide tells
me.) The furniture is plain and
comfortable; there are a couple'
of chairs upholstered in an or-
ange-and-brown patchwork pat-
tern that could have come out of
any middle-class American den
of the 1970s. Western art hangs on
the walls. ,
The bedroom is small and
plain, with what looks like an old


Ethan Allen chest and two bed-
side tables that had to be turned
sideways because the room was-
n't wide enough to fit them. Rea-
gan's nearby bathroom has a
modular shower and a toilet
squeezed in a tiny nook.
Any budget hotel down the
road has more comfortable ac-
commodations. Reagan, who with
his wife was pilloried for having a
plutocrat's taste, in fact enjoyed a
level of simplicity beyond what
most vacationing
Americans would ac-
cept.
The house is nestled
�.on the edge of a moun-
tainside meadow. It's
idyllic, but if you drive
about five minutes
away, you'll find an-
1 other spot on the prop-
erty, at the top of a hill,
xYork where the president
IER could have built a new
home, perhaps an im-
CES pressive monument to
himself, with fabulous
views of the Pacific to the west
and the valley to the east Instead,
Reagan preferred the little house
by the meadow.
Walking around the ranch, you
can't help thinking about the cur-
rent Republican Party and its re-
lationship to Reagan. One feeling
the ranch produces - nearly
forces on you --is the realization
that the 1980s were a long time
ago. When Reagan took office, the
top income tax rate was 70 per-
cent. The Cold War had entered
one of its most dangerous phases.
By the end of his administra-
tion, Reagan -had reduced that
confiscatory 70 percent tax rate
to 28 percent. And he won the
Cold War. Most presidents don't
leave much to remember them by.
Reagafi has two great legacies.
But what does it mean for


n himself

America today? Certainly low
taxes and a strong national def
fense remain bedrock principle$
for conservative Republicans,
And when Democrats argue, as
Sen. Charles Schumer did re-
cently, that the Reaganite "tradi'
tional-values kind of argument
and strong foreign policy, all that
is over" - well, someday the.
might discover otherwise.
But what specific policy prop
posal would Reagan embrace
today to deal with skyrocketing
health care costs? The crediI
crunch? Immigration? No onj
can really say.
Perhaps it would be more inp
structive to look at the man hinit
self. Over a lifetime of thought
and study - he was 69 when h4
became president - Reagan de&
veloped a set of core principle"
that guided whatever he did. T'
those core principles - liberty,
free enterprise, American excep-
tionalism - he added his owfi
personal qualities. He was a ser-' -
ous reader, a self-improver, de-
cidedly non-cynical, avowedly
non-Washington and deeply paS-
triotic. A gift for communicating
made those qualities instantly
recognizable to the American
public.
As you walk around the old
ranch, and see the private spaces
where he spent so much time,
you realize perhaps more than
ever before that it was Reagan's
character that made his triumphs
possible. For Republicans, co-
herent positions on today's policy
debates will emerge in time. The
tougher question is where they
will find a leader like Ronald
Reagan again.

Byron York is chief political :
correspondent for
The Washington Examiner


--------- LETTERSto the Editor


Health care woes
Obviously, the insurance and
drug company lobbyists are run-
ning the government. Some
things never change, but with
the huge numbers of baby
boomers getting sicker and los-
ing their jobs and health care
benefits, the only reasonable op-
tion is the single payer system.
It's shameful to have govern-
ment of, by and for the rich, but
that is what we have in the
United States. So what if mil-
lions of folks die or can't get
medical care? It's social Darwin-
ism at its core. What if all
healthy people suddenly
dropped their coverage for the
last quarter of 2009? Would that
get their attention?
Shame on our lawmakers for
not listening to the American
people.
Harriet Heywood
Homosassa

Weird book report
In a recent letter, Mr. Ryan
gives us a book report about
Edgar Browning's unnamed epic
which examinedg the welfare
state and equalitariann ideol-
ogy." He likes it. It says nice
things about "equality under the
law and equality of opportunity."
But "In Browning's view "equal-
ity of results is poisonous to a


OPINIONS INVITED
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to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
I All letters must be signed and in-
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* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
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free society and leads to
tyranny."
Neither Mr. Ryan nor Mr.
Browning need concern them-
selves about either. Equality
under the law is a figment A few
years ago a television documen-
tary gave an account of a witch
hunting law enforcement officer
who went after dozens of cou-
ples for child abuse. All who
could afford a lawyer were ac-
quitted. All who had to rely on
public defenders were con-
victed. Often law makes lying a
professional sport, and it is a
sport in which there is no salary
cap to insure equality of play.
Nor, for that matter is there re-
motely likely to be equality in
terms of education or any other
form of opportunity. The Econo-


mist-journal of the plutocracy
and globalization - often
laments the very limited occur-
rence of upward mobility in our
society. Apparently, if you start at
the bottom you usually finish
there.
As for the phobia about equal-
ity of result, other than all of us
being dead someday (and some
of us believe in inequality in that
state) it is neither likely nor
much sought by our politicians.
If Ryan's (or Browning's) facts
are as mistaken as their con-
cerns, we should not concern
ourselves with them. However,
even if true, the money given to
the poor, or to the administra-
tion of welfare programs (we
tend not to concern ourselves
with the massive cost of adminisi
tering other programs public
and private) does little to
achieve the dreaded "equality of
results" feared by Ryan and
Browning.
The late Will Cuppy, in "the
decline and fall of practically
everybody" explained of the
Punic Wars that Carthage was
ruled by her rich men and was
therefore a plutocracy. Rome
was ruled by her rich men and
was therefore a Republic. Some-
times it is hard to tell about the
United States.
Pat Condrayl
Ozello/


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


1
4
(


h(



ir


-.











Mountain of gear What to tax to pay for health care?


Associated Press
A Marine adds his duffle bag to the pile before deployment
Monday at Camp Lejeune, in Jacksonville, N.C. The main
body of 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment will deploy
to Afghanistan to conduct counterinsurgency operations
,in partnership with Afghan National Security Forces.



' Army plans to break up

$160B updating effort


Associated Press
-WASHINGTON - The
Army plans to break up its
$160 billion modernization
plan and will give the high-
fech fighting tools to all its
combat brigades instead of
just a handful as originally
planned, a spokesman for
the service said Monday.
The decision to field the
robots, precision missiles
and surveillance tools
across the Army's force es-
sentially dissolves what has
been pne of the service's
top weapons programs for
the past 10 years, and one
of its most scrutinized.
The Army had envi-
sioned.- a force, of '15
brigades 'that combined
gadgetry with heavy fire-


power that could dominate
battles through military
muscle and advanced tech-
nology. The military
planned to field the Fuiture
Combat Systems brigades
with all the equipment.;
But Defense Secretary
Robert Gates last month
proposed stripping $87 bil-
lion worth of ground vehi-
cles and a giant cannon
from the program, saying
they didn't fit with the
Army's current fights
against insurgencies in
places . like Afghanistan
and Iraq. Critics, including
the Government Accounta-
bility Office, also have ar-
gued that some of the
technology was untested, a
claim the Army vigorously
disputed.


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A fed-
eral soda pop tax. Higher
levies on beer, wine and
hard liquor. Taxing some
health insurance benefits.
Those are among the op-
tions the Senate is consider-
ing to pay for revamping
health care.
How to pay for expanding
coverage to nearly 50 mil-
lion uninsured people is the
toughest question in the
health care debate. Cutting
costs is a popular idea, but
few experts think enough
savings can be wrung from
the system to expand cover-
age to so many - despite
pledges from medical
providers.
The Senate Finance Com-
mittee acknowledged the
dilemma Monday as it re-
leased 40 pages of revenue
raising options, including
cuts to providers and new
taxes. Senators will meet
behind closed doors
Wednesday to debate the
options.
"Many proposals ex-
pected to reduce health
spending in the long run
may not produce sufficient
savings in. the short run to fi-
nance reform," said the Fi-
nance Committee report.
"Other proposals to gener-
ate revenue for health care
reform could include taxes
that affect lifestyle choices
and taxes that generally tar-
get loopholes."
No figures were included
on how much the proposals
would raise. All face deter-
mined opposition from the
industries affected. Law-
makers haven't made any
decisions yet, but the menu
of options gives a peek at
the hit list.
, The soda pop tax would
apply to drinks sweetened
with :sugar, high-fructose
corn syrup or other high-
calorie sweeteners. That in-
cludes iced tea and
noncarbonated drinks like
punch. But diet , drinks
-would escape the tax man.
The tax increase on alco-
holic drinks would hit beer
and wine hardest. Per
ounce of alcohol,; hard
liquor now faces the highest


federal tax rate. The Senate
option would raise the cur-
rent tax rate, and then apply
the same rate to all types of
alcoholic drinks. Small
wineries and breweries
would get some considera-
tion.
Health insurance pro-
vided by employers isn't tax-
able now, even though it's
considered part of overall
compensation. Senators are
considering several options,
including taxing health in-
surance benefits for individ-
uals making more than
$200,000 a year, or $400,000
for a couple. Another would
limit the tax-free status of
health insurance to the
value of the standard plan
available to federal employ-
ees.
Potential revenue raisers


Senate mulls myriad options


Build-to-Order' Free Checking


also include doing away
with flexible spending ac-
counts, limiting the income
tax deduction for out-of-
pocket medical costs, and
charging upper income sen-
iors more for their Medicare
drug plans.
Congress is forging ahead
on health care, with no con-
sensus in sight on how to
pay.
Few of President Barack
Obama's proposed tax in-
creases have been well re-
ceived on Capitol Hill, and
there aren't many popular
ideas coming from lawmak-
ers, either.
Democrats, who have
been fighting the tax-and-
spend label for decades, are
very much aware of what
happened the last time a
Democrat won the White
House and a Democratic-
controlled Congress voted to
raise taxes. It was 1993; and


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Republicans won.control of
Congress the following year.
"Ever since then they've
been especially scared to
deal with these difficult is-
sues," said Eugene Steuerle,
a Treasury official under
President Ronald Reagan.
Obama says his goals are
to rein in costs, guarantee
choice of health plans and
doctors, and ensure that all
Americans have access to
affordable coverage. But
guaranteeing coverage for
all could cost $1.5 trillion
over the next decade, which
has some advocates con-
cerned that Congress will
pass a plan that falls short
Medical providers have
pledged to find $2 trillion in
savings over the next
decade, but much of that
money will be needed to
keep premiums from sky-
rocketing for those who al-
ready have coverage.


TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 A9


NATION


Crraus CouNTY (FL E









Page A10 - TUESDAY, MAY 19,2009



ACTION


&
CITRUS COUNT


WORLD


Nation BRIEFS

At the Met


Gauging greenhouse gases

Obama set to release pollution standards ..


Associated Press
First Lady Michelle Obama
hugs P.S. 325 fifth-graders
Maria Palacios, 11, right,
and Emily Martinez, 11,
Monday during the ribbon-
cutting ceremony officially
reopening the Charles En-
gelhard Court of the newly
renovated American Wing
at the Metropolitan Mu-
seum of Art in New York.

Officer pleads
guilty in theft ring
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -An
Army captain pleaded guilty
Monday to stealing hundreds
of thousands of dollars worth
of military equipment from an
Army base in Iraq and selling
it to a businessman there.
Elbert W. George III, 36, of
Suffolk, Va., faces up to five
years in prison after pleading.
guilty in U.S. District Court to
a single count of conspiracy
to steal government property.
He is the second person to
plead guilty in the theft ring.
Sgt. 1st Class Roy Greene
Jr., 32, of Sylvester, Ga.,
pleaded guilty to an identical
charge last week.

World BRIFS

All rosy

4i


Associated Press
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II
looks at a display df High-
grove roses Monday during
a visit by members of the
royal family to the annual
Chelsea Flower Show In
London. Queen Elizabeth II
presented Prince Charles
with The Royal Horticul-
tural Society's Victoria
Medal of Honour during the
visit, the highest accolade
that the Royal Horticultural
Society can bestow.


Iraq sets elections
for January
BAGHDAD - National
parliamentary elections will
be Jan. 30, Iraqi officials.an-
nounced Monday, sliding the
date into next year in,a move
that could complicate the
U.S. timetable for drawing
down its forces.
The new parliament will
choose a prime minister and
Cabinet, a process that could
take months. A long and tur-
bulent delay in setting up a
new government could force
President Barack Obama to
revise his goal of removing
most of American troops from
Iraq by the end of August
2010.,
Prime Minister Nouri al-
Maliki will be hoping to build
on his success in last Janu-
ary's provincial balloting to
form a strong government ca-
pable of dealing with the se-
curity and economic
challenges facing this country
as the American role fades.
The election for the 275-
rhember parliament had been
expected in December, four
years after the current as-
sembly was chosen. But the
current parliament did not
hold its first session until
March 2006, or about three
months after the December
2005 election.
-From wire reports


Associated Press


WASHINGTON - President
Barack Obama will issue new fuel
efficiency standards and pair them
with a broader goal of reducing pol-
lution from vehicle tailpipes, mark-
ing the first time limits on
greenhouse gases will be linked to
federal standards for cars and
trucks.
Officials familiar with the admin-
istration's discussions say Obama
will unveil the new standards today.
The officials spoke on condition of
anonymity because the official an-
nouncement had not peen made.-
White House spokesman Robert
Gibbs would not release details of
the announcement on Monday, al-
though he said the administration
has been working with states, busi-
nesses and environmental groups
on a deal.
California, 13 other states and the
District of Columbia have urged the
federal government to let them
enact more stringent standards
than the federal government's re-
quirements. The states' regulations


would cut greenhouse gas emis-
sions by 30 percent in new cars and
trucks by 2016.
Officials said today's announce-
ment moves toward the 30 percent
goal by 2016, starting with model
years 2011 and beyond.
The proposal is expected to coor-
dinate two separate standards for
fuel efficiency and greenhouse gas
emissions from vehicles, aiming for
cars that achieve higher miles per
gallon and have lower polluting air
conditioning systems, said Roland
Hwang, the vehicles policy director
for the Natural Resources Defense
Council. The environmental group
has discussed the upcoming
changes with the White House in
recent weeks, he said.
Hwang said he expected the
greenhouse gas standard would be
set to an equivalent of nearly 35
miles per gallon for the vehicle fleet
by 2016.
A 2007 energy law requires car
makers to meet at least 35 mpg by
2020, a 40 percent increase over the
current standard of about 25 mpg.
Passenger car requirements have


Associated Press
Greenpeace members Victoria Park of Fredericksburg, Va., left, and
Michelle Frey, of Rockville, Md., second from left, join fellow protesters
Monday near the Environmental Protection Agency building in Arlington,
Va., as the EPA held the first of two public hearings regarding the agency's
proposed findings that greenhouse gases contribute to air pollution.


remained unchanged at 27.5 mpg
since 1985, drawing complaints
from environmental groups that the
government has been slow to push
automakers to produce more fuel-
efficient vehicles.


Iran prepares for elections


Associated Press
Leading reformist candidate in the upcoming Iranian presidential elections, MIr Hossein Mousavi, and his wife,
Zahra Rahnavard, chat Monday at Tehran Mehrabad airport. Mousavl, an influential former prime minister, is
the leading challenger to hardline President Mahmoud Ahmadlnejad for the June 12 presidential elections.

Supreme leader urges rejection ofpro-Western candidates


Associated Press


TEHRAN, Iran - Iran's supreme
leader urged the public Monday not
to vote for pro-Western candidates
in the June 12 presidential election,
though he gave no clear indication
ofwhether he is supporting hardline
President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
The critical election pits Ah-
madinejad against reformist chal-
lengers at a time when the United
States -under the Obama adminis-
tration - is pursuing dialogue with
its longtime adversary after years of
shunning Iran.
The reformists seek an easing of
social and political restrictions at
home and better ties with the West
They see a strong opportunity to un-
Sseat Ahmadinejad, who has become
increasingly unpopular because of
Iran's economic woes. Critics also
say he has needlessly inflamed
world anger with his statements
casting doubt on the Holocaust and
calling U.N. resolutions "worthless
papers." -


Challenging his re-election bid
are a conservative former Revolu-
tionary Guards commander and two,
reformist candidates who have at-
tacked him over his handling of the
economy and for pursuing a hard-
line foreign policy that they
say has plunged Iran deeper
into international isolation.
"Do not allow those who
would throw their hands up
and surrender to enemies
and defame the Iranian na-
tion's prestige to get into of-
fice," Ayatollah Ali
Khamenei said in a televised
speech in Bijar, in western All h
Iran. k
"(Don't vote for) those who spoke
would provoke the greed of
the enemies of the Iranian
nation and be used by them to cre-
ate divisions within the nation and'
take people away from their reli-
gion, principles and their revolu-
tionary values."
It was not clear whether he was
targeting a specific candidate,


though Khamenei has in the past
denounced reformists, saying they
speak the language of the West In
2000, Khamenei called reformist
newspapers "bases of the enemy."
Within days, more than a dozen re-
formist papers were closed
down.
SHardliners have also de-
n6unced the reformist gov-
ernment of former
President Mohammad
Khatami, in office from
1997 to 2005, saying he
caved in to Western pres-
sure over Iran's nuclear ac-
olah I tivity and suspended
uranium enrichment They
against hail Ahmadinejad, saying
he defied the West and re-
sumed uranium enrich-
ment, a process that can be used to
make fuel for both nuclear energy or
nuclear weapons.
* Obama has been seeking to en-
gage Iran in direct dialogue and
restart international negotiations
over its nuclear program.


Obama's move also would effec-
tively end litigation between states
and automakers, who sought to
block state-specific rules. The new
federal rules would prompt au-
tomakers to drop their lawsuit


Mexico


detains


cartel

hit gang


Police suspected

of being leaders

Associated Press
lTUXTL i G-V.R Z,
Mexico - Police iisBth-
ern Mexico said Monday
they arrested a gang of at
least six drug cartel assas-
sins, including.two alleged
hit women, who were al-
legedly commanded by top
police officers.
The police chief, two com-
manders and a former pub-
lic safety director in the city
of Tapachula, near the
Guatemala border,. were.
also detained on suspicion
of leading the hit gang.
The suspects allegedly
worked for the Zetas, a gang
of enforcers linked to the
Gulf cartel. Police and sol-
diers seized dozens of
grenades assault rifles
during the weekend raid in
which the alleged assassins
were captured, state prose-
cutors said.
The arrests came as drug
corruption scandals blos-
somed across Mexico - in
states far from the U.S. bor-
der region, where the drug
battles have long been con-
centrated.
In Morelos, just outside
Mexico City, prosecutors an-
nounced that the top state
security official and the po-
lice chief in the state capi-
tal, Cuernavaca, were
ordered held for 40 days on
suspicion of aiding the Bel-
tran Leyva cartel. Two other
people were also ordered
held in the case.
Meanwhile, a prominent
senator from Zacatecas
state called a news confer-
ence to deny any knowledge
of a large load of marijuana
found earlier this year at a
warehouse belonging to his
brother.


Report: FDA lags behind in food safety audits


Associated Press


WASHINGTON -The Food and
Drug Administration conducted
only about half the state food. safety
audits it promised in the two years
before the recent peanut salmo-
nella outbreak, according to new
documents the agency sent to Con-
gress.
The documents show the agency
did not do any of the required audits
of state-run food inspections in five
states during those states' budget
years spanning 2007 and 2008. And


the FDA was unable to say whether
audits were conducted at all in 11
additional states during that time,
including Georgia and Texas, where
salmonella was found in two peanut
plants during a wide-ranging
peanut recall earlier this year.
Only 14 states saw 100 percent of
the audits completed.
The FDA audits are a key part of
the federal government's ability to
ensure that food is inspected prop-
erly by states that contract with the
FDA to perform safety checks. The
agency turned over its records on


the audits to Republicans on the
House Energy and Commerce Com-
mittee in response to questioning at
hearings earlier this year.
Officials traced the salmonella
outbreak to the Peanut Corp. of
America's plant in Georgia and
blamed the outbreak for the deaths
of at least nine people. Hundreds
more were sickened.
Additional numbers for 2006 and
2007 showed that no audits were
done in Texas and seven other
states during that period.
"The FDA food safety program is


a major turnaround project," said
Rep. Joe Barton, R-Texas, who re-
quested information on the state au-
dits with Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore.
The FDA itself acknowledged as
much in a letter sent to Barton this
month.
Stephen R. Mason, acting assis-
tant commissioner for legislation at
the agency, said the recent salmo-
nella outbreak "has highlighted lim-
itations in our current approach
and has prompted internal discus-
sions on potential enhancements to
the audit program."


Y CHRONICLE


a









SSection B - TUESDAY, MAY 19. 2009



PORTS


0 Auto racing/B2
M MLB/B3
E Scoreboard/B4
E NFL, Lotto/B4
0 NBA/B5
M Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Gruden replacing Kornheiser on MNF


Associated Press


BRISTOL, Conn. - Former
Tampa Bay coach Jon Gruden is
replacing Tony Kornheiser on
ESPN's Monday Night Football
broadcast team. Kornheiser cited
a fear of flying in his decision to
leave after three years.
The network said Mondhy/that
Gruden will be in the booth with
Mike Tirico and Ron Jaworski
when the show starts its 40th sea-
son this fall.


"If I could handpick a replace-
ment of a football guy, I would cast
a net and drag in Jon Gruden," Ko-
rnheiser said in a statement re-
leased by the network "He is the
two things you most want - smart
and funny - and has the two things
I don't - good hair and a tan."
Gruden led the Bucs to the 2003
Super Bowl title but was fired
after this past season after his
team lost four straight games to
miss the playoffs. He worked as a
guest analyst this year with the


NFL Network during the
draft and scouting com-
bine.
"To join Mike and Jaws
in the booth and to work
alongside this top-notch
team is going to be a real
thrill," Gruden said.
Gruden will make his -
debut with ESPN with a Ko
preseason game on Aug. will
13, a Super Bowl rematch fro
between the Arizona Car-
dinals and Pittsburgh Steelers.


Tony
rnheiser
step down
)m MNF.


Kornheiser will con-
tinue to appear on ESPN's
"Pardon the Interruption,"
and is relieved it doesn't
require air travel.
"My fear of planes is leg-
endary and sadly true," he
said. "When I looked at the
upcoming schedule it was
the perfect storm that
would've frequently moved
me from the bus to the air."
Gruden was an NFL


head coach the past 11 seasons,


with the Buccaneers (2002-08) and
Oakland Raiders (1998-01). He had
a 100-85 record, leading his teams
to five division titles.
His best season came in 2002,
when the Buccaneers went 12-4
and then beat the Raiders 48-21 in
the Super Bowl. Gruden was 38 at
the tirhe and the youngest coach to
win a Super Bowl.
Gruden began his NFL coach-
ing career in 1990 when San Fran-
cisco 49ers offensive coordinator
Mike Holmgren hired him.


Pholo dlusetaion by JOHN COSCA/Cnron.cle
Lecanto soccer:player Carleigh Williams is one of eight nominees for Chronicle Female Athlete of the Year. The winner will be announced during a banquet on June 1 in Inverness.


Lecanto's Williams is team's first line of defense


No sophomorejinx for this 3-port star


JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI
jmsoracchi@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Most sophomores are still usu-
ally learning how to acclimate to
the skill and pressure of varsity
athletics or, more likely, starring
on the junior varsity level.
Lecanto High-School, though, is
lucky enough to count Carleigh
Williams among its student body
and a member of three different
varsity sports team.
To her credit, Williams didn't


simply earn a spot on these
squads; she has excelled since her
freshman year.
The sophomore made leaps and
bounds improvement-wise and
can easily be considered a tone-
setter in soccer and volleyball.
For her superlative efforts 'in
just her second year of high
school, Williams is one of eight
nominees in the running for
Chronicle Female Athlete of the
Year.
A hitter on the volleyball team,
defender on the soccer pitch and


participant in multiple events
during the track and field season,
Williams was often in the middle
of everything for Lecanto.
"Carleigh seems to be good in
whatever she wants to do," said
Lecanto soccer coach Kevin
Towne. "I think that's because of
her dedication and she takes
pride in what she does."
Towne would certainly know in
that capacity; Williams' best sport
is soccer, where she spent the
2008-09 season at the forefront of
the Panthers' ferocious defense as
a stopper.
Williams described her assign-
ment in that role as not letting the
ball reach the sweeper or goal-


keeper, something she was obvi-
ously very adept at doing.
"I love it because you see the
whole field and you get to direct
the other players on the field,"
Williams said. "I liked that be-
cause I'm a vocal person and the
stopper has to be really vocal."
Apparently, her efforts did not
go unnoticed.
Williams' phenomenal play
earned her the regional player of
the year award and Lecanto's
team MVP award. I
Paired with her play on the
Florida Rush, an under-16 team
that finished second in the state
See WILLIAMS/Page B4


Athlete of the Year
voting made easier
* After a number of com-
plaints from readers as to the
difficulty in navigating
"through the voting process
we have made it easier.
* You still have to register first
but after that just go back to
web site, click on Male or Fe-
male Athletes of Year. Click
"vote" and you will gee all.
eight nominees. There's a box
next to each one. Click "Save
your vote" and you're done!


Penguins hold off Hurricanes to take 1-0 series lead


Sidney Crosby held

scoreless in victory
Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - The Carolina
Hurricanes probably expected
Evgeni Malkin and Sidney Crosby
to make a difference. What they
couldn't have anticipated was
being beaten by Miroslav Satan
and Philippe Boucher.
Satan and Boucher scored their
first goals of the playoffs and goal-
tender Marc-Andre Fleury pre-
vented Carolina from getting its
offense going, leading the Pitts-
burgh Penguins to a 3-2 victory
over the Hurricanes in Game 1 of
the Eastern Conference finals
Monday night
Game 2 will be Thursday night
following the first of as many as


three two-day breaks in the drawn-
out series.
Malkin had a goal and an assist
on a night Crosby, the leading
scorer in the playoffs with 22
points, was limited to an assist.
Satan and Malkin scored less than
90 seconds apart midway through
the first period for the Penguins,
who are trying to win back-to-back
conference championships for the
first time since 1991-92.
The Penguins got contributions
from Satan, who fell into such dis-
favor in March that he was sent to
the minors, and Boucher, a de-
fenseman best known for his hard
slap shot
Boucher scored what proved to
be the decisive goal on a power
play at 11:33 of the third, a shot
from the left circle that trickled
across the goal line before Cam
Ward could stop it
Boucher's goal was his first in


the playoffs since April 12, 2004,
and proved significant when Joe
Corvo scored on a power play with
1:26 remaining for Carolina, which
has dropped Game 1 in each of its
three playoff series.
Fleury didn't make as many
tough saves as Ward, who turned
aside 28 shots, but he kept the Hur-
ricanes from getting any offensive
flow going in a game when many of
their best scoring chances came in
the final few minutes. Fleury made
23 saves.
The Hurricanes played better
than they did in losing Game 1 to
New Jersey and Boston, each time
4-1, but played from behind after
Satan came out of the penalty box
and scored at 9:17 on a breakaway
created by Matt Cooke's pass.
Malkin made it 2-0 at 10:41 on a
backhander to Ward's stick side.
See PENS/Page B4


Associated Press
Pittsburgh Penguins' Miroslav Satan (81) switches to the backhand on
a first-period score against Carolina Hurricanes goalie Cam Ward (3) in
Game I of the NHL Eastern Conference finals on Monday in Pittsburgh.








B2 TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 AUTo RACING




Rain slows down Speedway


Only one local

division gets

heats, full race

LARRY MACMILLAN
Special to the Chronicle

Warm sunshine and partly
cloudy skies greeted race
fans and 100 race car drivers
for the Saturday night action
at Citrus County Speedway.
Three point races, two
non point races and two
traveling series were on the
race card and the heat races
went on without any major
problems. It looked like it
was going to be a smooth
night but the sea breeze con-
nection formed right over
the speedway during the
final eight laps of the second
feature on the schedule
bringing on the caution flag.
Then the rains came accom-
panied by a great deal of
lightning and all attempts to
wait out the weather made it,
too dangerous for the fans in
the grandstands and the rac-
ers to race on a slick track so
any further features were
postponed until a later date.
Only one local division got
their heats and feature race
in and that was the 4 Cylin-
der Bombers. Sonya Heater
sat on the pole for the first
eight-car heat and she man-
aged to hold off the hot
shoes like Tim Scalise and
Phil Edwards for the entire
eight laps for her first heat
win of the season. Scalise
picked up a second place
finish over Edwards ifl their


4 Cylinder Bomber Feature
20 Laps -16 Cars
1.#48 Tim Scalise - Lutz - 1st Feature Win
2.#47 Richard Kuhn - Ocala
3. #88 Anthony LaPoint- Zephyrhills
4. #122 Tom Posavec - Dunnellon
5. # 4 Bryson Ward - Crystal River
1st Heat Winner - #71 Sonya Heater - Ho-
mosassa
2nd Heat Winner- #88 Anthony LaPoint
Bass Challenge Series
35 Laps (26 Run) - 9 Cars
1 i20 Bran nWilI Iasin - Pwder Sprr, Ga..

side by side finish. Point
leader Tony LaPoint cele-
brated his birthday coming
from sixth to Victory Lane in
the second heat followed by
Tom Posavec, driving for
John DeGeorge in a much
lighter racer than his
Sportsman car.
Sixteen cars took the
green flag for their feature
race and outside pole sitter
Scalise had his way with the
entire field checking out
early and maintained a good
lead on the field taking a flag
to flag win despite several
caution flags. Runner up
Richard Kuhn came from
the back end of the field
twice after getting up on two
wheels and riding over
Heater's driver window in
an early crash and looking
like he was a member of the
Joey Chitwood show. He and
she survived the crash but
he was sent to the rear and
promptly rocketed forward
to finish in a close second
while trying to make it two
wins in a row and being de-
nied his third win of the, sea-
son. Rounding out the top
five were point leader Andy
LaPoint, Tom Posavec and


2. #00 Daniel Miller -Tavares
3. #24 Rowdy Gordon - Salt Springs
4. #23 Jerry Heflin - Ocala
5. #40 Sene Capps- Salt Springs
Heat Winner - #20 Brandon Williamson
Open Wheel Modified Feature
Rained Out
Heat Race - 8 Laps - 9 Cars
1. #121 John Carter Jr. - Belleview - 1st
Heat Win
2. #01 Curtis Neumann - Inverness
3. #42 Richie Smith - Hemando
4. #6 Bill Bechtelheimer- Dover

Bryson Ward.
The only other feature
race to run was the nine-car
Bass Champions Challenge
Series. Brandon Williamson
from Powder Springs, Geor-
gia showed he definitely
wanted to make the trip
worth while. He blitzed the
field in their eight-lap heat
race and lined up at the
back of the pack for the start
of their 35-lap feature.
Mervin Glick set the early
pace while the faster cars
worked their way through
the traffic towards the front
not realizing that they
wouldn't have all 35 laps to
make it to Victory Lane.
They raced in heavy rain
for two laps to lap 26 when
the caution came qut for the
weather and Bass Champi-
ons management called it a
completed race at that point
with Brandon Williamson
taking the win followed by
FloridaShortTrackRe-
port.com Rookie of the year,
12-year-old Daniel Miller
who came from seventh to
second and was going after
the leader when the caution
came out Eighth starter
Rowdy Gordon locked down


5.#12 Jay Coleman- Holiday
Pure Stock Feature Rained Out
1stHeatWinner -#142 RichieSmith-Hemando
2nd Heat Winner - #24 Tommy Smith - Her-
nando
3rd Heat Winner - #39 John Drye - Inverness
Street Stock Feature Rained Out
No Heats Run
V8Thunder Car Feature Rained Out
Do not run heat races
American Mini Cup Feature Rained Out
1st Heat Winner- #8 Rick Shahid- Floral City
2nd Heat Winner - #20 Brady Marshall

third over Jerry Heflin and
Sene Capps.
Pure Stocks got in three
heats with 20 cars registered
and only a few getting in on
the bounty that has been put
on beating Tommy Smith
after he logged five feature
, wins. Tommy's brother
Richie took the win in the
first heat over Bill Ryan and
Glen Colyer., Heat number
two went to Tommy Smith
for his sixth heat win of the
year followed by early
leader Alex Wilder and
Drew Matissek. John Drye
came from his sixth starting
spot to win the third heat
over Patric Connor who led
for seven of the eight lap
run. Richard Dinkins who
was celebrating his 17th an-
niversary with his wife
Danielle, had the lead when
the white flag came out and
apparently thought it was
the checkered flag losing
two spots before he realized
what he had done took a
solid third place finish.
Open Wheel Modifieds'
put on a great show in their
eight-lap heat race with nine
cars taking the green flag.
Pole sitter John Carter Jr.


Citrus Speedway Results - 5/16/09


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


took the early lead only to
give it up to a very quick
Richie Smith. Something
apparently went sour in
Smiths racer as he pulled up
and went to the outside
groove at the halfway point
and gave the lead back to
Carter who tobk the win fol-
lowed by Curtis Neumann
with Richie holding out for
third. Rounding out the top
five 'were Billy Bechtel-
heimer and Jay Coleman.
Their feature race was
rained out
The visiting American
Mini Cup cars got two heat
races in with local driver
Rick Shahid winning his
first ever Mini Cup race
over Mike Holt and Jeff
Sweet with eight cars in the
first heat. It was all Brady
Marshall in the second heat
being chased by Jacob Cal-
loway and Carlos Pinto in
that eight-car, . eight-lap
heat race.
Street Stocks were one car
short of the 14-ecar minimum
field to run heat races and of
course their 25-lap feature
was rained out This race
will be rescheduled as a
makeup race when the
schedule allows.
In accordance with all
race track policy, the Satur-
day races got past the inter-
mission with two feature
races run and fan rain
checks will NOT BE HON-
ORED for any future races.
Next Saturday will see
The Central Florida Sprint
Cars teamed up with the
local Sportsman, Mini Stock,
Street Stock and 4 Cylinder
Bomber divisions.


R EARN $25 IN THE CHRONICLE'S NASCAR CONTEST


Chronicle
Associated Press Chronicle advertising director John Provost, left, presents Peggy Lon-
Tony Stewart celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR ganecker with a check for. $25 for correctly guessing Mark Martin
Sprint Cup All-Star auto race on Saturday at Lowe's Motor Speed- as the winner of the Darlington 500. Longanecker had a tiebreak
way in Concord, N.C. speed of 127 mph. The actual speed was 119.687 mph.


Latest winner!
Congratulations to
Robin Johnson for cor-
rectly guessing Tony
Stewart as the winner of
the Sprint Cup All-Star
Race.
Johnson won thanks to'
a febreak speed of
134.287 mph. The actual
speed of the race was
99.137 mph.


-CONTEST RULES
* Pick the winner of this Sunday's
Coca-Cola 600 in Concord. In the
event that more than one contestant
picks the same driver, the tie will be
broken by guessing the average speed
of the race.
' The'oksest contestant to the actual
average speed, over or under, will be
declared the winner. If there is no win-
ner one week the $25 prize will carry
over to the following week making that
week's race contest worth $50.
* You may enter as many times as
you like but every entry form MUST
be an original entry form from the
Citrus County Chronicle. No copies
will be permitted.
* Please include your name, address
and telephone number on the printed
entry form. DON'T FORGET TO SUP-
PLY YOUR TIEBREAKER SPEED.
* You may drop off or mail entries to our
Meadowcrest office at 1624 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd, Cystal River, FL, 34429. All
entrees MUST be in the office no later
than 5 p.m. on Friday, May 22.


r - - --------------------------------im----------------



NASCAR CONTEST ENTRY FORM

I I

DRIVER'S NAME YOUR NAME PHONE NUMBER

TIEBREAKER: (Guess what you think the average speed of the race will be): _

n You may mail your entry to Citrus County Chronicle, c/o John Coscia, Sports editor,

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL, 34429. All mailed entries must be received by 5 p.m. Friday.
i.-- .---------- ----------------------- - --------------------------------


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* Service inspections consisting of every month.
* Minimum of 6 insect sprays per year.
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* Shrub Programs Available.
* Free follow-ups anytime during the year.
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Email: info@citruspest.com


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Adults $13 RaacWe
Senior Citizens and Students (12-17) $9 2mlodos Of 4
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PIT ADMISSION:
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S STREET STOCK


Points
STANDINGS

Sprint Cup
Through May 9
1.Jeff Gordon, 1,601.
2. Tony Stewart, 1,572.
3. Kurt Busch, 1,546.
4. Jimmie Johnson, 1,465.
5. Denny Hamlin, 1,445.
6. Jeff Burton, 1,384.
7. Kyle Busch, 1,380.
8. Ryan Newman, 1,363.
9. Greg Biffle, 1,345.
10. Matt Kenseth, 1,326.
11. Mark Martin, 1,316.
12. Carl Edwards, 1,271.
13. Clint Bowyer, 1,264.
14. Juan Pablo Montoya, 1,255.
15. David Reutimann, 1,232.
16. Kasey Kahne, 1,205.
17. Brian Vickers, 1,188.
18. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 1,182.
19. Martin Truex Jr., 1,144.
20. Marcos Ambrose, 1,131.
Nationwide Series
Through May 8
1. Kyle Busch, 1,539.
2. Carl Edwards, 1,502.
3. Jason Leffler, 1,386.
4. Joey Logano, 1,340.
5. Brad Keselowski, 1,331.
6. Jason Keller, 1,181.
7. David Ragan, 1,139.
8. Scott Lagasse Jr., 1,095.
9. Justin Allgaier, 1,089.
10. Steve Wallace, 1,088.
11. Michael McDowell, 1,085.
12. Brendan Gaughan, 1,062.
13. Mike Bliss, 1,044.
14. Kenny Wallace, 1,019.
15. Tony Raines, 1,008.
16. Michael Annett, 941.
17. Joe Nemechek, 900.
18. Kevin Harvick, 886.
19. Matt Kenseth, 872..
20. Eric McClure, 814.
Camping World Trucks
Through May 15
1. Ron Hornaday Jr., 966.
2. Mike Skinner, 882.
3. Matt Crafton, 877.
4. Kyle Busch, 852.
5. Todd Bodine, 837.
6. Terry Cook, 786.
7. Johnny Benson, 779.
8. Chad McCumbee, 770.
9. Stacy Compton, 762.
10. Brian Scott, 759.
11. Rick Crawford, 747.
12. Tayler Malsam, 742.
13. David Starr, 733.
14. James Buescher, 717.
15. Dennis Setzer, 671.
16. Timothy Peters, 664.









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 B3

East Division Central Division West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Toronto 27 14 .659 - - 7-3 W-4 16-6 11-8 Detroit 20 16 .556 - - 6-4 W-3 11-5 9-11 Texas 23 14 .622 - - 8-2 W-7 14-6 9-8
Boston 22 16 .579 3% - 5-5 L-1 13-4 9-12 Kansas City 20 18 .526 1 2 3-7 W-1 13-8 7-10 Los Angeles 18 18 .500 412 3 6-4 L-3 12-8 6-10
NewYork 21 17 .553 4� 1 8-2 W-6 10-7 11-10 Minnesota 18 21 .462 3% 4� 5-5 L-4 14-9 4-12 Seattle 18 20 .474 51/2 4 3-7 W-1 9-8 9-12
Tampa Bay 20 20 .500 6� 3 6-4 W-4 10-8 10-12 Chicago 15 22 .405 51 6� 2-8 L-5 8-8 7-14 Oakland 13 22 .371 9 72 4-6 L-4 8-10 5-12
Baltimore 16 22 .421 9� 6 5-5 L-1 11-11 5-11 Cleveland 14 25 .359 7T 81 3-7 L-3 7-11 7-14


L New York
Philadelphia
Atlanta
Florida
Washington


East Division
GB WCGB
� 1
3 3Y�.
3�i 4
10 101�


Away
9-8 Milwaukee
12-4 Chicago
12-8 St. Louis
11-11 Cincinnati
6-14 Houston
Pittsburgh


Central Division
GB WCGB
1- --
2 �h
3 1Y2
5� 4.
61 5


W
Los Angeles 26
San Fran. 19
San Diego 16
Colorado 15
Arizona 14


West Division
GB WCGB

6 2/2
9Y2 6
10 6/2
11 7/2


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 3, Minnesota 2, 10 innings
Detroit 11, Oakland 7
Toronto 8, Chicago White Sox 2
Tampa Bay 7, Cleveland 5
Texas 3, LA. Angels 0
Kansas City 7, Baltimore 4
Seattle 3, Boston 2
Monday's Games
Toronto 3, Chicago White Sox 2
N.Y.Yankees 7, Minnesota 6
Tampa Bay 13, Oakland 4
L.A. Angels at Seattle, late
Today's Games
Baltimore (Bergesen 1-1) at N.Y. Yankees
(Sabathia 3-3), 7:05 p.m. -
. Texas (McCarthy 3-1) at Detroit (Willis 0-0), 7:05
p.m.
Oakland (Outman 1-0) at Tampa Bay (J.Shields
3-4), 7:08 p.m.
Toronto (Tallet 2-1) at Boston (Wakefield 4-2),
7:10 p.m.
Cleveland (CI.Lee 2-5) at Kansas City (Bannis-
ter 3-1), 8:10 p.m.
Minnesota (S.Baker 1-4) at Chicago White Sox
(Buehrle 5-1), 8:11 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Palmer 4-0) at Seattle (F.Hernan-
dez 4-2), 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Texas at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Oakland at Tampa Bay, 7:08 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago White Sox, 8:11 p.m.
LA. Angels at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
L.A. Dodgers 12, Florida 5
Pittsburgh 11, Colorado 4
Philadelphia 8, Washington 6
Arizona at Atlanta, ppd., rain
Milwaukee 8, St. Louis 2 '
Houston 6, Chicago Cubs 5
San Diego 3, Cincinnati 1
San Francisco 2, N.Y. Mets 0
Monday's Games
Pittsburgh 12, Washington 7
Colorado 5, Atlanta 1
Arizona at Florida, ppd., rain
Milwaukee at St. Louis, late
N.Y. Mets at LA. Dodgers, late
Today's Games
Pittsburgh (Karstens 1-2) at Washington (Martis
5-0), 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 1-2) at Cincinnati (Cueto
4-1), 7:10 p.m.
Colorado (Hammel 0-2) at Atlanta (Jurjens 3-
2), 7:10 p.m.
Arizona (Garland 3-2) at Florida (Jo.Johnson'3-
0), 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Bush 2-0) at Houston (Hampton 2-
3), 8:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Lilly 5-2) at St. Louis (Pineiro 4-
3), 8:15 p.m. ,
San Francisco (Zito 1-3) at San Diego (C.Young
2-2), 10:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Maine 3-2) at L.A. Dodgers (Billings-
ley 5-1), 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Arizona at Florida, 5:10 p.m., 1st game
Pittsburgh at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Coh.i,,.3 . ir Ailjrliu 7 l Ti 7' - - I,; I
Philadelphia at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
, Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Arizona at Florida, 8:40 p.m., 2nd game
San Francisco at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.


. ,.- . ..


",A
= k ..... L oo. " ' -'I . " - ,/


. . . ' . .''. , ^,.





no.M- -.P' ' "
Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays' Jason Bartlett (8) slides across home plate as Oakland Athletics pitcher Sean Gallagher, left, can't field
a wild throw from catcher Kurt Suzuki after a first inning passed ball on Monday in St. Petersburg.




Bartlett leads Rays over A's


Associated Press Louis Cardinals.
Bartlett went 3 for 3 with a
ST. PETERSBURG - walk to raise his batting av-
Jason Bartlett drove in a ca- erage to .384. He had a two-
reer-high five runs to help run single off Sean
the Tampa Bay Rays beat the Gallagher (1-2) in the first, as
struggling Oakland Athletics well as a run-scoring triple
13-4 Monday night for a sea- in the fifth and a two-run
son-best four-game winning single in the sixth off Gio
streak Gonzalez.
Rookie right-hander Jeff The As, swept at Detroit
Niemann (4-3) allowed four last weekend, have been
runs and eight hits in eight outscored 47-13 during a
innings to win for the fourth four-game losing streak in
time in his last five deci- which their starting pitchers
sions. He struck out three have yielded 31 runs (23
and walked none in the earned) in 13 innings. De-
longest outing of his career, spite giving up just three
Jason Isringhausen, who hits, Gallagher allowed nine
came off the disabled list runs in 2 1-3 innings.
Sutnda.y, pitched the ninth.for ,, Akinori Iwamura drove in
Tampa Bay - his first ap- three runs for the Rays, who
pearance in a major league had at least one stolen base
game since undergoing right in each of the previous 19
elbow surgery in September, games. After building a big
when he was with the St. early lead, they didn't even'


attempt a steal.
The streak was the longest
in the AL since the 1914 Yan-
kees swiped a base in 19
straight games.
Bartlett's first two RBIs
came during Tampa Bay's
six-run first That inning,
Gallagher walked Ben Zo-
brist with the bases loaded,
hit the next batter with a
pitch to force in another run
and later watched two others
race home on a passed ball.
On the passed ball,
catcher Kurt Suzuki ap-
peared to lose sight of the
pitch and was struck in the
left shoulder while trying to
duck out of the way.
The As scored on Jason
Giambi's first-inning sacri-
fice fly, Orlando Cabrera's
solo homer in the third and
Jack Cust's two-run homer in
the eighth.


Oakland Tampa Bay
ab rhbi
OCarer ss 3 1 1 1 BUpton cf
CnghmlIf 1 00 0 Grossrf
KSuzukc 4 1 1 0 Crwfrdlf
Custdh 4 1 2 2 Kapler ph-cf
Hollidy If 3 0 0 0 Longori 3b
Hannhn3b 1 00 0 C.Penalb
Giambi lb 2 0 0 1 Zobrist rf-lf
Powelllb 1 00 0 WAyardh
Kenndy 2b 4 0 2 0 Bartlett ss
RSwnycf 3 0 1 0 Iwamr2b
RDavis ph 1 00 0 MHrnd c
Crosby 3b-ss 4 0 0 0
TBuckrf. 3 1 2 0


ab r h bi
3 1 0 0
1 00 0
3 00 0
2 000
5 22 0

3 1 0 1
2 3 1 1
3 33 5
4.02 3
4 00 1


Totals 34 4 9 4 Totals 3213911
Oakland 101 000 020-4
Tampa Bay 603 022 00x-13
E-Bartlett (3). DP-Oakland 1, Tampa Bay 2.
LOB-Oakland 4, Tampa Bay 5. 2B-T.Buck
(2). 3B-Bartlett (2). HR-O.Cabrera (2), Cust
(6). SF-Giambi.
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
Gallagher L,1-2 21-3 3 9 7 5 1
G.Gonzalez .32-3 6 4 4 3 6 .
K.Cameron 2 0 0 0 1 3
Tampa Bay
Tj.,-r,, WJ : 8 8 4 3 0 3
Isringhausen' 1 1 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Gallagher (W.Aybar). WP--Gallagher.
PB-K.Suzuki.


Baseball Today
SCOREBOARD
Today, May 19
Toronto at Boston (7:10 p.m. EDT). Red Sox
slugger David Ortiz is expected to return to
the lineup after sitting out the team's weekend
series at Seattle. Big Papi is hitting just .208
with no homers in 158 plate appearances this
season.
STARS
Sunday
- Prince Fielder, Brewers, hit a three-run
homer in the seventh inning of an 8-2 victory at
St. Louis.
- Franklin Gutierrez, Mariners, singled under
the glove of third baseman Mike Lowell to score
Ronny Cedeno with two outs in the ninth inning
to give Seattle a 3-2 win over Boston.
- Johnny Damon, Yankees, hit a game-win-
ning homer in bottom of the 10th inning to lift
New York to a 3-2 win over Minnesota.
- Jake Peavy and Kevin Kouzmanoff,
Padres. Peavy pitched a four-hitter and Kouz-
manoff had a solo homer and an RBI single in
San Diego's 3-1 win over Cincinnati.
- Ramon Santiago and Curtis Granderson,
Tigers, each hit three-run homers to rally De-
troit from six runs down in an 11-7 win over
Oakland. Santiago finished with four hits, in-
cluding an RBI triple, and scored three runs.
- John Buck, Royals, hit a tiebreaking RBI
triple in the eighth inning of a 7-4 win over Bal-
timore.
- Roy Halladay, Blue Jays, gave up two runs
in seven innings to win his fifth straight start as
Toronto beat the Chicago White Sox 8-2.
- Scott Feldman, Rangers, gave-up four hits
in six innings of a 3-0 victory over the Los An-
geles Angels.
- Ivan Rodriguez and Lance Berkman, As-
tros. Rodriguez hit his 300th career home run,
a two-run shot, and Berkman had two hits and
an RBI in Houston's 6-5 win over the Chicago
Cubs.
- Nate McLouth, Pirates, had three of his
four RBIs during a 10-run seventh inning as
Pittsburgh rallied for an 11-4 win over Colorado.
WALK-OFF WIN STREAK
Johnny Damon's homer in the 10th inning
Sunday gave the Yankees a 3-2 win over Min-
nesota for their third straight comeback win over
the Twins that was capped by a game-ending
hit. The last time New York had three consecu-
tive walk-off wins was August 27-29, 1972.
BALKY
Mets starter Mike Pelfrey balked three times
in a 2-0 loss against the Giants, matching a du-
bious franchise record. The last pitcher in the
majors to have three balks in a game was Al
Leiter forToronto against Minnesota on April 23,
1994. It was onlythe second time in Mets fran-
chise history that a pitcher had three balks. Don
Rowe did it on April 27, 1963, at Philadelphia.
Bob Shaw holds the NL record with five balks
for the Milwaukee Braves against the Cubs on
May 4,1963 - and he had three in one inning.
QUICK RETURN
Los Angeles Angels starter John Lackey will
return to the mound on Monday night following
an earl' .-,i iiroT, -n, : . :,..:.r. , d'-bu i ir', , .;
e a rl ie r , . . -r , r , . ; s" e)- j ,i - , a r , ' i r .. . .. r.). r ,. r ,:,
pitches at Rangers leadoff man lan Kinsler. An-
gels manager Mike Scioscia said after Sunday's
series finale against the Rangers that Lackey
will get the call Monday night in the opener of a
four-game road series against Seattle.


MLB LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTlNG-VMartinez, Cleveland, .401; Bartlett,
Tampa Bay, .384; MiCabrera, Detroit, .375; Ad-
Jones, Baltimore, .370; MYoung, Texas, .351;
AHill, Toronto, .345; Longoria, Tampa Bay, .345.
RUNS-Scutaro, Toronto, 36; AdJones, Balti-
more, 35; Markakis, Baltimore, 35; BRoberts,
Baltimore, 33; Bay, Boston, 32; 3 tied at 31.
RBI-Longoria, Tampa Bay, 46; Bay, Boston,
40; Lind, Toronto, 35; AHill, Toronto, 34;
Markakis, Baltimore, 34; 3 tied at 33.
HITS-AHilI, Toronto, 61; VMartinez, Cleveland,
61; Bartlett, Tampa Bay, 53; Crawford, Tampa
Bay, 52; MYoung, Texas, 52; 3 tied at 51.
DOUBLES-Longoria, Tampa Bay, 16;
Callaspo, Kansas City, 15; Byrd, Texas, 14; Und,
Toronto, 14; MYoung, Texas, 14; Markakis, Bal-
timore, 13; Polanco, Detroit, 13.
TRIPLES-Crisp, Kansas City, 5; Andrus,
Texas, 3; JBuck, Kansas City, 3; Crawford,
Tampa Bay, 3; 14 tied at2.
HOME RUNS-CPena, Tampa Bay, 13;
Momeau; Minnesota, 12; Bay, Boston, 11; AHill,
Toronto, 11; Kinsler, Texas, 11; Longoria, Tamnpa
Bay, 11;6tiedat 10.
STOLEN BASES-Crawford, Tampa Bay, 24;
Figgins, Los Angeles, 17; Ellsbury, Boston, 16;
Abreu, Los Angeles, 13; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 12;
Bartlett, Tampa Bay, 11; Crisp, Kansas City, 11.
PITCHING (4 Decisions)-Palmer, Los Ange-
les, 4-0, 1.000; Frasor, Toronto, 4-0,1.000; Hal-
laday, Toronto, 8-1, .889; Greinke, Kansas City,
7-1, .875; Buehrle, Chicago, 5-1, .833; Slowey,
Minnesota, 5-1,.833.
STRIKEOUTS-Veriander, Detroit, 69; Greinke,
Kansas City, 65; Halladay, Toronto, 57; Lester,
Boston, 54; FHemandez, Seattle, 53; Beckett,
Boston, 46; Garza, Tampa Bay, 45.
SAVES-Papelbon, Boston, 10; FFrancisco,
Texas, 9; Fuentes, Los Angeles, 9; Jenks,
Chicago, 8; MaRivera, New York, 7; Soria,
Kansas City, 7; Shernill, Baltimore, 7.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Beltran, New York, .378; Votto,
Cincinnati, .366; Zimmerman, Washington,
.358; Ibanez, Philadelphia, .357; DWright, New
York, .352; Hawpe, Colorado, .345; HaRamirez,
Florida, .343.
RUNS-Pujols, St. Louis, 34; Ibanez, Philadel-
phia, 33; ASoriano, Chicago, 33; Zimmerman,
Washington, 33; Werth, Philadelphia, 31; Hud-
son, Los Angeles, 29;-4 tied at 28.
RBI-Pujols, St. Louis, 37; Fielder, Milwaukee,
35; Ibanez, Philadelphia, 35; Cantu, Florida, 33;
Hawpe, Colorado, 32; Dunn, Washington, 31;
Zimmerman, Washington, 31.
HITS-Zimmerman, Washington, 58; Beltran,
NewYork, 54; Hudson, Los Angeles, 54; Ibanez,
Philadelphia, 50; DWright, New York, 50; CGuz-
man, Washington, 47; Tejada, Houston, 47.
DOUBLES-FSanchez, Pittsburgh, 15; Hud-
son, Los Angeles, 14; HaRamirez, Florida, 14;
Zimmerman, Washington, 14; Kotchman, At-
lanta, 13; 3 tied at 12.
TRIPLES--Kemp, Los Angeles, 4; Bourn,
Houston, 3; Morgan, Pittsburgh, 3; Victorino,
Philadelphia, 3; Winn, San Francisco, 3;
DWright, NewYork, 3; 19 tied at 2.
HOME RUNS-AdGonzalez, San Diego, 15;
Ibanez, Philadelphia, 13; Pujols, St. Louis, 13;
ASoriano, Chicago, 12; Bruce, Cincinnati, 11;
Dunn, Washington, 11; 2 tied at 10.
STOLEN BASES-Boum, Houston, 13; Jos-
Reyes, NewYork, 11;Burriss, San Francisco, 10;
Fowler, Colorado, 10; Morgan, Pittsburgh, 10;
Taveras, Cincinnati, 10; DWright, New York, 10.
PITCHING (4 Decisions)-Martis, Washington,
5-0, 1.000; Broxton, Los Angeles, 4-0, 1.000;
Meredith, San Diego, 4-0, 1.000.


Pirates 12, Nationals 7
WASHINGTON -The Washington
Nationals made four errors - all on
routine plays - and the bullpen had
another lead-blowing implosion in a 12-
7 loss to the Pittsburgh Pirates on
Monday night.
A five-run sixth inning led Pittsburgh
to its third straight win and ended an
eight-game road losing streak.
. Ross Ohlendorf (5-3) picked up the
victory despite allowing four extra-base
hits in a five-run,fifth. Craig Monroe hit
a three-run homer, and Jack Wilson
got four hits for the Pirates, who
opened a 10-game road trip.
. Washington has lost five straight de-
spite scoring at least five runs in every
game. The Nationals entered the game
with 37 errors, five more than any team
in the majors.


Pittsburgh
ab rhbi


Washington


DIwYn rf 6 1 2 2 CGzmn ss
FSnchz2b 5 1 1 0 NJhnsnlb
McLothcf 4 1 1 1 Zmrmnr3b
Monroetf 5 11 3 Dunnrt
AdLRclb 3 20 0 Wlnghlf
R.Diazc 3 1 0 0 WHarrscf
AnLRc3b 4 1 1 1 AHrndz2b
JaWlsn ss 4 3 4 2 K.Wells p
Ohlndrf p 2 00 0 Beimel p
Mossph 1 1 1 1 Kearnsph
JChavz p 0 0 0 0 Hanrhn p
Grilny p 0 0 0 0 J.Bard c
Hinske ph 1 0 0 0 Detwilr p
Grabow p 0 0 0 0 Cintron ph
RVazqzph 1 01 2 Mockp
Capps p 0 00 0 Colome p
Bellird 2b
Totals 39121212 Totals


ab r h bi
4 1 2 0
2 21 3
5 1 2 1
3001
5 02.0
5210

0 00 0
0 00 0
1 00 0
0 00 0

1 0 06
1 0 00
10000

35 0 0
35 711 7


Pittsburgh 003 005 013-12
Washington 000 050 011-7
E-C.Guzman 2 (5), N.Johnson (5), A.Hernan-
dez (4). DP-Pittsburgh 1. LOB-Pittsburgh 7,
Washington 8. 2B-McLouth (6), Ja.Wilson 2
(6), Moss (6), R.Vazquez (1), C.Guzman (9),
Zimmerman (14), Willingham (5), W.Harris (2),
J.Bard 2 (2). 3B--Ja.Wilson (1). HR-Monroe
(3), N.Johnson (4), Zimmerman (10). CS-
FSanchez (1), R.Diaz (1), C.Guzman (2). S-
An.LaRoche. SF-Dunn.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
Ohlendorf W,5-3 5 6 5 5 3 1
J.ChavezH,3 12-3 2 0 0 1 1
Gorzelanny H,1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Grabow 1 2 1 1 1 1
Capps 1 1 1 1 1 0
Washington
Detwiler 5 4 3 2 0 6
MockL,0-2BS,2-2 1-3 1 3 3 1 0
Colome 2-3 3 2 2 0 0
K.Wells 12-3 2 1 1 1 2
Beimel 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Hanrahan 1 2 3 3 2 2
HBP-by Mock (R.Diaz), by Detwlter (McLouth).
WP-Mock, Hanrahan. PB-R.Diaz.
Umpires-Home, Paul Nauert; First, Joe West;
Second, Ed Rapuano; Third, Chad Fairchild.
T-3:30. A-14,549 (41,888).


Yankees.7, Twins 6
NEWYORK -The Yankees got
started early, instead of waiting for their
final swing.
Mark Teixeira homered from both
sides of the plate, combining with Alex
Rodriguez for back-to-back drives in a
six-run first inning against Glen
Perkins, and New York beat the Min-
nesota Twins 7-6 on a chilly Monday
night to complete a four-game sweep.
After stringing together three
straight walk-off wins for the first time
since 1972, the Yankees overcame a'
2-0 first-inning deficit and hung on to
extend their winning streak to a sea-
son-high six. New York improved to 23-
3 at home against the Twins during the
regular season since the start of 2002.
Andy Pettitte (4-1) won consecutive
starts for the first time this year, allow-
ing four runs and 12 hits in 6 2-3 in-
nings. Jose Veras relieved in the
seventh and loaded the bases with a
walk, then retired Carlos Gomez on a
flyout to protect a 6-4 lead.
Justin Morneau had four hits and
Michael Cuddyer and Denard Span
homered for the Twins.


Mi nesota NeWYork
ab rhbi
panlf 5 1 2 2 Jeterss
BHarrs 2b 5 1 2 0 Damon If
Mauerc 4 1 1 1 Teixeirib
Mornealb 5 0 4 1 ARdrgzdh
Crede 3b 4 0 0 0 Swisher rf
Tolbertpr 0 1 0 0 Cano2b
Kubeldh 4 00 0 MeCarrcf
Cuddyrrf 4 11 2 R.Pena3b
Gomez of 3 1 2 0 Cervelli c
Puntoss 4 0 1 0
Rdmndph 1 0 0 0


ab r h bi
5 1 2 0
.4 1 1 0
4224
'3 11 1
4 00 0
4 1 2 0

4 010
2 02 1


Totals 39 6136 Totals 347137
Minnesota 200 101 011-6
NewYork 600 000 10x-7
E-Punto (3). DP-Minnesota 1. LOB-Min-
nesota 12, New York 7. 2B-B.Harris (4),
Morneau 2 (11), Cano (10). HR-Span (2),
Cuddyer (4), Teixeira 2 (10), A.Rodriguez (4).
SB-Gomez (4). CS-Punto (1), Cano (1). S-
Cervelli 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
Perkins L,1-3 2-3 7 6 6 0 0
Dickey 41-33 0 0 1 1
Ayala 1 1-33 1 1 1 2
Breslow 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Crain 1 0 0 0 0 0
NewYork
PettitteW,4-1 62-312 4 4 1 3
VerasH,2 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
E.Ramirez H,1 2-3 1 1 1 1 0
Coke S,1-3 1 1-30 1 1 2 1
Breslow pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by Pettitte (Gomez). WP-Coke. PB-
Mauer. Balk-Perkins.
Umpires-Home, John Hirschbeck; First, Wally
*Bell; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Mike Es-
tabrook.
T-3:29. A-43,244 (52,325).


Blue Jays 3, White Sox 2
TORONTO -The.Chicago White
Sox can't get out of Canada quickly
enough.
Alex Rios hit a go-ahead triple in the
eighth inning Monday and the Toronto
Blue Jays completed a four-game
sweep, beating the Chicago White Sox
3-2.
Chicago lost its season-high fifth in
a row and has dropped 10 straight at
Toronto.
"It seems like every time we come
to Toronto ... we can't do anything,"
Chicago catcher A.J. Pierzynski said.
After Jim Thome tied it in the top of
the eighth with his 548th career home
run, Toronto bounced back against Oc-
tavio Dotel (1-1).
The Blue Jays own the AL's best
record at 27-14. They start a nine-
game road trip Tuesday night at Fen-
way Park when they play Boston for
the first time this season.
For-Toronto's Kevin Millar, who hit a
'solo homer, it's a return to the city
where he won the 2004 World Series.
"It's a part of you, no matter what:'
Millar said."I had some good years
back there. It's a fun place to play, one
of my favorite parks and its nice going'
there leading the East."
Chicago scored just eight runs in
this series and went 2 for 23 with run-
ners in scoring position.


Chicago


Toronto


ab rhbi ab rhbl
Pdsdnkcf 4 0 1 0 Scutaross 1 1 0 0
J.Nix If 4 0 1 0 A.Hill 2b 3 0 1 1
Dye rf 4 1 1 0 Rios rf 4 01 1
Thomedh 3 1 1 2 V.Wellscf 3 00 0
Konerklb 4 0 1 0 Lindl f 3 00 0
Przynsc 4 0 0 0 Snider If 0 00 0
AIRmrz ss 3 01 0 Rolen 3b 3 00 0
Getz2b 4 0 1 0 Millarib 3 1 2 1
Fields 3b 4 0 00 RChavz c 3 00 0
Bautist dh 2 1 0 0
Totals 34 2 7 2 Totals 25 3 4 3
Chicago 000 000 020-2
Toronto 011 000 01x-3
E-Podsednik (2). DP-Chicago 2. LOB-
Chicago 7, Toronto 4. 3B-Podsednik (1), Rios
(2). HR-Thome (7), Millar (2). SB--J.Nix 2 (2),
Bautista (3). S-Scutaro. SF-A.Hill.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
Richard 7 3 2 1 3 3
DotelL,1-1 1 1 1 1 1 0
Toronto
Richmond 7 5 0 0 1 7
CarlsonNW,1-2BS,2-2 1 2 2 2 0 0
Downs S,5-5 1 0 0 0 1 1
WP-Richard.
Umpires-Home, Sam Holbrook; First, Charlie
Reliford; Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Dan
lassogna.
T-2:18. A-24,206 (49,539).


Associated Press
Atlanta Braves starter Derek Lowe pitches in the second in-
ning on Monday against the Colorado Rockies in Atlanta.


Rockies 5, Braves 1
ATLANTA - Jason Marquis outdu-
eled Derek Lowe, and Dexter Fowler
drove in one run and scored another in
the Colorado Rockies' 5-1 victory over
the Atlanta Braves on Monday night.
Marquis (5-3) scattered five hits and
allowed one run in eight innings to end
a two-start losing streak. He struck out
three and walked three.
Lowe (5-2) was attempting to be-
come the NL's first six-game winner. He
allowed two runs, three hits and one
walk in eight innings, losing for the first
time in five starts. He dropped to 7-7
against the Rockies but improved his
ERA 20 points to 4.50 in 17 career
starts.
Colorado, which had lost three out
of four and seven of 10, snapped a
two-game losing streak.
The Braves have lost two straight
and three of four. Atlanta dropped to 6-
11 at Turner Field, where they have
lost 11 of 14.
Fowler, who gave Colorado a 1-0
lead in third with an RBI groundout,
doubled leading off the sixth. He
moved to third on a groundout and
made it 2-1 on Todd Helton's fielder's
choice grounder.
The Braves tied it at 1 in the sixth


on a double-play grounder by Casey
Kotchman.
The Rockies scored three runs in
the ninth. Eric O'Flaherty relieved Lowe
to start the inning and Troy Tulowitzki
singled and Helton reached on short-
stop Yunel Escobar's fielding error.
Colorado Atlanta
ab'rhbl. ab r h bl
Fowler of 4 1 1 1 KJhnsn2b 4 0 0 0
Tlwtzkss 4 1 1 0 OFIhrtp 0 00 0
Helton lb 4 1 0 1 Moylanp 0 00 0
Hawpe rf 4 00 0 Escoarss 3 01 0
lannettc 4 1 2 1 C.Jones 3b 3 1 1 0
S.Smith If 3 00 0 GAndrs If 4 0 1 0
SplrghslIf 1 0 1 1 McCnnc 2 0 1 0
Stewart3b 3 00 0 Ktchm lb 3 00 0
Barmes 2b 4 1 1 0 Francrrf 3 0 0 0
Marqusp 3 0 0 0 Schafercf 3 00 0
Atkins ph 1 0 0 0 D.Lowe p 2 0 1 0
Street p 0 0 0 0 Infante ph-2b 1 0 0 0
Totals 35 5 6 4 Totals 28 1 5 0
Colorado 001 001 003-5
Atlanta 000 100 000-1
E-C.Jones (5), Escobar (4). DP-Colorado 4,
Atlanta 1. LOB-Colorado 4, Atlanta 3. 2B-
Fowler (7). SB-Spilborghs (6).
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
Marquis W,5-3 8 5 1 1 3 3
Street 1 0 0 0 0 0
Atlanta
D.Lowe L,5-2 8 3 2 2 1 3
O'Flaherty 1-3 1 2 1 0 0
Moylan 2-3 2 1 0 0 0
PB-lannetta.
Umpires-Home, Jeff Nelson; First, Mark Cart-
son; Second, Tim Tschida; Third, Bob Davidson.
T-2:30. A-15,364 (49,743).








B4TFSA MA 19 09SorsCTU ONY(L HOI


BASKETBALL
NBA Playoffs
FIRST ROUND
(Best of 7)
Saturday, April 18
Chicago 105, Boston 103, OT
Cleveland 102, Detroit 84
Dallas 105, San Antonio 97
Houston 108, Portland 81
Sunday, April 19
LA. Lakers 113, Utah 100
Philadelphia 100, Orlando 98
Atlanta 90, Miami 64
Denver 113, New Orleans 84
Monday, April 20
Boston 118, Chicago 115
San Antonio 105, Dallas 84
Tuesday, April 21
Cleveland 94, Detroit 82
Portland 107, Houston 103
L.A. Lakers 119, Utah 109
Wednesday, April 22
Orlando 96, Philadelphia 87
Miami 108, Atlanta 93
Denver 108, New Orleans 93
Thursday, April 23
Boston 107, Chicago 86
Dallas 88, San Antonio 67
Utah 88, L.A. Lakers 86
Friday, April 24
Cleveland 79, Detroit 68
Philadelphia 96, Orlando 94
Houston 86, Portland 83
Saturday, April 25
New Orleans 95, Denver 93
Dallas 99, San Antonio 90'
Miami 107, Atlanta 78
L.A. Lakers 108, Utah 94
'Sunday, April 26
Chicago 121, Boston 118, 20T
Cleveland.99, Detroit 78, Cleveland wins se-
ries 4-0
Orlando 84, Philadelphia 81
Houston 89, Portland 88
Monday, April 27
Atlanta 81, Miami 71
Denver 121, New Orleans 63
L.A. Lakers 107, Utah 96, L.A. Lakers win se-
ries 4-1
Tuesday, April 28
Boston 106, Chicago 104, OT
Orlando 91, Philadelphia 78
Dallas 106, San Antonio 93, Dallas wins se-
ries 4-1
Portland 88, Houston 77
Wednesday, April 29
Atlanta 106, Miami 91
Denver 107, New Orleans 86, Denver wins
series 4-1
Thursday, April 30
Orlando 114, Philadelphia 89, Orlando wins
series 4-2
Chicago 128, Boston 127, 30T
Houston 92, Portland 76, Houston wins se-
ries 4-2
Friday, May 1
Miami 98, Atlanta 72
Saturday, May 2
Boston 109, Chicago 99, Boston wins series
4-3
Sunday, May 3
Atlanta 91, Miami 78, Atlanta wins series 4-3
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7)
Sunday, May 3
* Denver 109, Dallas 95
Monday, May 4
Orlando 95, Boston 90
Houston 100, L.A. Lakers 92
, Tuesday, May 5
Cleveland 99, Atlanta 72
- Denver 117, Dallas'105
Wednesday, May 6
Boston 112, Orlando 94
L.A. Lakers 111, Houston 98
Thursday, May 7
Cleveland 105, Atlanta 85
Friday, May 8
Orlando 117, Boston 96
ALkers 108, Housion 94
*-itu "io ay9 -"

Cleveland 97, Atlanta 82
-Sunday, May 10
Houston.99, LA. Lakers 87
Boston 95, Orlando 94
Monday, May 11
Cleveland 84, Atlanta 74, Cleveland wins se-
ries 4-0
Dallas 119, Denver 117
Tuesday, May 12
Boston 92, Orlando 88
LA. Lakers 118, Houston 78
Wednesday, May 13
Denver 124, Dallas 110, Denverwins series 4-1
Thursday, May 14
.Orlando 83, Boston 75
Houston 95, L.A. Lakers 80
Sunday, May 17,
L.A. Lakers 89, Houston 70, L.A. Lakers win
series 4-3
Orlando 101, Boston 82, Orlando wins series 4-3
CONFERENCE FINALS
(Best-of-7)
Tuesday, May 19
Denver at L.A. Lakers, 9 p.m.
Wednesday, May 20
Orlando at Cleveland, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 21
Denver at LA. Lakers, 9 p.m.
Friday, May 22
Orlando at Cleveland, 8:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 23
L.A. Lakers at Denver; 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 24
Cleveland at Orlando, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, May 25
L.A. Lakers at Denver, 9 p.m.
Tuesday, May 26
Cleveland at Orando, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 27
Denver at L.A. Lakers, 9 p.m., if necessary
Thursday, May 28
Orlando at Cleveland, 8:30 p.m., if necessary
Friday, May 29
LA. Lakers at Denver, 9 p.m., if necessary
Saturday, May 30.
Cleveland at Orlando, 8:30 p.m., if necessary
Sunday, May 31
Denver at LA. Lakers, 8:30 p.m., if necessary
Monday, June 1
Orlando at Cleveland, 8:30 p.m., if necessary

MOVES
Monday's Sports
Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
DETROIT TIGERS-Announced RHP Juan
Rincon refused his outright assignment and
elected free agency.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS-Placed RHP Dan
Glese on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 16.
Recalled LHP Gio Gonzalez from Sacramento


(PCL).
National League
COLORADO ROCKIES-Placed RHP Matt
Daley on the 15-day DL Purchased the contract
of RHP Joel Peralita from Colorado Springs
(PCL). Designated RHP Steven Registerfor as-
signment.
FLORIDA MARLINS-Purchased the con-
tract of RHP Brian Sanches from New Orleans
(PCL). Designated LHP John Koronka for as-
signment.
NEW YORK METS-Activated RHP Tim
Redding from the 15-day DL. Designated RHP
Nelson Figueroa for assignment. Purchased the
contract of INF Ramon Martineaz from Buffalo
(IL). Placed INF Alex Cora on the 15-day DL.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES-Agreed to terms
with C Paul Bako on a minor league contract.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES-Claimed RHP
Steven Jackson off waivers from the N.Y.Yan-
kees. Released RHP Jimmy Barthmaier.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS-Placed LHP
Scott Olsen on the 15-day DL, retroactive to
May 17. Recalled LHP Ross Detwiler from


Florida Lottery
Here are the winning
numbers selected
Monday in the
Florida Lottery:


CASH 3 (early)
0-5-9
CASH 3 (late)
5-6-2
PLAY 4 (early)
2-2-5-5
PLAY 4 (late)
2-7-7-3
FANTASY 5
1- 6- 10- 15- 30


On the AIRWAVES--

TODAY'S SPORTS
MLB BASEBALL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Arizona Diamondbacks at Florida Marlins
7 p.m. (SUN) Oakland Athletics at Tampa Bay Rays
8 p.m. (WGN) Chicago Cubs at St. Louis Cardinals
NBA BASKETBALL
8:30 p.m. (ESPN) 2009 NBA Draft Lottery
9 p.m. (ESPN) Western Conference Final Game 1 -
Denver Nuggets at Los Angeles Lakers
NHL PLAYOFFS
7:30 p.m. (VERSUS) Western Conference Final Game 2'-
Chicago Blackhawks at Detroit Red Wings


Harrisburg (EL).
Can-Am League
AMERICAN DEFENDERS-Signed RHP
Brett Palanski, INF Boomer Berry and C Arge-
nis Tavarez.
United League
LAREDO BRONCOS-Acquired OF Selwyn
Langaigne from the Shreveport-Bossier (AA).
SAN ANGELO COLTS-Announced the re-
tirement of 2B John Anderson.
BASKETBALL
Women's National Basketball Association
DETROIT SHOCK-Signed F Kristen Ras-
mussen and G Sequoia Holmes.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONA CARDINALS-Agreed to terms
with WR Edward Gant.
BALTIMORE RAVENS-Signed WR Kelley
Washington to a one-year contract. Released
WR Marcus Maxwell. .
DALLAS COWBOYS-Signed DT Jonas
Seawright.
HOUSTON TEXANS-Signed S John Bus-
ing and G Adrian Jones. .
MINNESOTA VIKINGS-Signed FB Ne-
hemiah Broughton.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES-Announced de-
fensive coordinator Jim Johnson has taken an
indefinite leave of absence. Signed QB Adam
DiMichele and DT Jervonte Jackson.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS-Signed S Curtis
Taylor to a four-year contract. Released S
Jimmy Williams.
LACROSSE
Major League Lacrosse
MLL-Suspevnded Cnc,iago D Sieve Holmes
ana coacn Jonn Combs one game apiece for
Ine use o01 illegal equipmeri in a May 1,6~game
ag3anil Denver
COLLEGE
METRO ATLANTIC ATHLETIC CONFER-
ENCE-Announced it is adding the University
of Detroit as a men's lacrosse member begin-
ning next season.
EASTERN NEW MEXICO-Named Dr. Jeff
Gelier ainiei,-i direcTor
"KANSAS STATE-4laimed rJor.r Currie ain-
OiNc clreKor
MINNESOTA-Announced the resignation of
women's assistant basketball coach Marisa
Moseley to take a similar job with Connecticut.
NEWBERRY-Named Brad Edwards athletic
director.
ST. AUGUSTINE'S-Announced the retire-
-rini of men 4 gaci coach Lawrence Coleman
TENtIESSEE-Anroun:e ihe reiremerI ot
Bill Webt. Iracl' and hela coach atl he ena oI
the current season.
: UTAH STATE-Fired softball coach Candi
.-Lefts.

GOLF
PGA Tour Statistics
Through May 17
Scoring Average
1, Tiger Woods, 69.13.2, David Toms, 69.69.
3, Sean O'Hair, 69.73.4 (tie), Kenny Perry and
Steve Stricker, 69.76.6, Zach Johnson, 69.82.
7, Kevin Na, 69.83. 8, Nick Watney, 69.85. 9,
Brandt Jobe, 69.87.10, Brian Gay, 69.91.
Driving Distance
1, Bubba Watson, 313.3.2, Gary Woodland,
308.0. 3, Robert Garrigus, 306.3. 4, Dustin
Johnson, 304.4. 5, Brandt Jobe, 303.1.6, Nick
Watney, 302.6.7, Angel Cabrera, 301.9.8, Scott
Piercy, 301.7.9, Bill Haas, 300.4. 10, Charley
Hoffman, 299.6.
Driving Accuracy Percentage
1, Mark Brooks, 79.81%. 2, David Toms,
74.48%. 3, Brian Gay, 73.84%. 4, Joe Durant,
72.99%. 5, Scott Verplank, 72.32%. 6, Bart
Bryant, 72.14%. 7, Tim Clark, 71.35%. 8, Heath
Slocum, 70.90%. 9, Bob Estes, 70.52%. 10,
Kirk Triplett, 70.36%.:
Greens In Regulation Pct.
1, Camilo Villegas, 71.14%. 2, Briny Baird,
70.57%. 3, Jay Williamson, 70.56%. 4, D.J. Ta-
han, 70.53%. 5, John Senden, 70.49%. 6,
Brandt Jobe, 70.20%. 7, Sean O'Hair, 70.16%.
8, K.J. Choi, 69.93%. 9, Casey Wittenberg,
69.87%. 10, Mark Brooks, 69.63%.
Total Driving
1, Jonathan Byrd, 70.2, Lucas Glover, 75.3,
Bill Haas, 81. 4, Mathew Goggin, 87. 5, Boo
Weekley, 92. 6 (tie), Kenny Perry and D.J. Tra-
han, 95.8, DavidToms, 100.9, Robert Allenby,
102.10,2tied with 111.
Putting Average
1, Luke Donald, 1.696.2, Geoff Ogiivy, 1.703.
3, Kevin Na, 1.710. 4, Kris Blanks,'1.714. 5,
Steve Stricker, 1.721.6 (tie), David Toms and
Dean Wilson, 1.724.8, Charlie Wi, 1.727.9 (tie),
Jerry Kelly and Aaron Baddeley, 1.728.
Birdie Average
1, Geoff Ogilvy, 4.61.2, Anthony Kim, 4.54.
3, Dustin Johnson, 4.44.4, Sean O'Hair, 4.40.5,
Charley Hoffman, 4.29.6, Paul Casey,,4.25.7,
Hunter Mahan, 4.24. 8, Nick Watney, 4.23. 9
(tie), Fred Couples and Tim Clark, 4.11.
Eagles (Holes per)
1, Bubba Watson, 73.8.2, Nick Watney, 79.2.
3; Mike Weir, 82.3. 4, Ryan Palmer, 90.0.5,
Chris Stroud, 92.3.6, Phil Mickelson, 93.0.7,
Retief Goosen, 99.0.8 (tie), Daniel Chopra and
Ben Crane, 102.9.10, 2 tied with 103.5.
Sand Save Percentage
1, Kevin Na, 66.13%. 2, Luke Donald,
66.10%. 3, David Mathis, 66.07%. 4, Webb
Simpson, 63.86%. 5, Brad Adamonis, 63.29%.
6, George McNeill, 62.86%. 7, Brian Gay,
62.71%. 8, Ken Duke, 62.50%. 9, Mike Weir,
62.30%. 10, Bill Lunde, 61.02%.
All-Around Ranking
1, Sean O'Hair, 239.2, Nick Watney, 275.3,
Kenny Perry, 279. 4, David Toms, 287.5, Tim
Clark, 295.6, Steve Stricker, 308.7, Charlie Wi,
325.8, Ben Crane, 375.9, Stephen Ames, 376.
10, Camilo Villegas, 378.
PGA TOUR Official Money Leaders
1, Phil Mickelson (10), $3,238,635.2, Geoff
Ogiivy (10), $3,155,529.3, Zach Johnson (13),
$3,130,921.4, Sean O'Hair (11), $2,963,842.5,
Kenny Perry (12), $2,705,259.6, Nick Watney
(12), $2,497,253. 7, Paul Casey, (6),'
$2,299,950.8, Tiger Woods (6), $2,166,813.9,
Steve Stricker, (11), $1,960,236. 10, Retief
Goosen (10), $1,755,992.


LPGA Tour Statistics
Through May 17
Scoring
1, Lorena Ochoa, 69.8065.2, Cristie Kerr,
70.3235. 3, Yahi Tseng, 70.4706. 4, Angela
Stanford, 70.7778.5, Karrie Webb, 70.8214.6,
Suzann Pettersen, 70.8529.7, Paula Creamer,
71.1538. 8, Song-Hee Kim, 71.1613. 9, Ji Yal
Shin, 71.2069.10, Na Yeon Choi, 71.2941.
Rounds Under Par
1, Cristie Kerr, .676.2, Lorena Ochoa, .645.
3, Angela Stanford, .630.4, Ji Yai Shin, .621.5,
YaniTseng, .618.6, Michelle Wie, .609.7, Kar-
rie Webb, .607.8, Brittany Lang, .588.9,3 tied
with .548.
Eagles
1 (tie), Silvia Cavalleri, HeeYoung Park, An-
gela Stanford and Yani Tseng, 4. 5,9 tied with
3.
Greens in Regulation
1, Paula Creamer, .798. 2, Wendy Ward,
.740. 3, In-Kyung Kim, .737. 4, Anja Monke,
.732.5, JiYai Shin, .728.6, YaniTseng, .728.7
(tie), Brittany Lang and Karrie Webb, .722. 9,
Lindsey Wright, '.716. 10, Angela Stanford,
.713.
Top 10 Finishes
1, Cristie Kerr, .667.2, Lorena Ochoa, .625.
3, Angela Stanford, .571.4 (tie), Yani Tseng
and Suzann Pettersen, .556. 6, Michelle Wie,'
.500.7 (tie), Paula Creamer, Karrie Webb and
Angela Park, .429.10,4 tied with .375.
Driving Distance
1 (tie), Brittany Lincicome and Na Ri Kim,
269.3. 3, Yani Tseng, 268.4. 4, Vicky Hurst,
268 2 5 Jee lourg Lee, 265.5. 6, Michelle
Wea 264 5 7. Brilany Lang, 264.1.8, Lorena
Ocrao 262 7 9. Suzrann Pettersen, 262.5.10,
Karen, Siupples. 260 8
Sand Saves
1 itiei. Mindy Kim and Allijon Hanna-
Williams, 1.000. 3 (tie), Maggie'Will and Jin
Young Pak, .750.5 (tie), Can Wood and Sarah
Kemp, .667. 7; Cindy Rarick, .625.'8, Rus-
samee Gulyanamitta, .611. 9, Ji Young Oh,
.600.10, Candie Kung, .588.
. Birdies
1, 'an, Tseiag, 137:2 (tde), Loren, Ochoa
and Suzann Pettersen, 131. 4, Cristie Kerr,
129. 5, In-Kyung Kim, 125.6, Song-Hee Kim,
113.7, NaYeon Choi, 112.8, Jee Young Lee,
111.9, Katherine Hull, 110.10,2 tied with 108.
Driving Accuracy
1, Allison Hanna-Williams, .845.2 (tie), Ash-
leigh Simon and Song Yi Choi, .821.4, Ji Yai
Shin, .813. 5, Marcy Hart, .811. 6, Kimberly
Hall, .807.7 (tie), Paula Creamer and Eun-Hee
Ji, .805.9, Sung Ah Yim, .799. 10, 2 tied with,
.798.
Putting Average Per Round .
1, Haeji Kang, 8.14. 2, Karen Stuppies,
12.13.3, Ashleigh Simon, 12.93,4, Leta Lihd-
ley, 13.07.5, Paula Creamer, 13 27 6 Seon
Hwa Lee, 13.33.7, Inbee Park, 13 35 8. Rus-,
samee Gulyanamitta, 13.50: 9, Na R, 'im,
14.00.10, Jane Park, 14.04.
Putts Per Green (GIR)
1, Cristie Kerr, 1.75. 2 (tie), Suzann Pet-
tersen, Laura Davies, Natalie Gulbis and In-
Kyung Kim, 1.77. 6,11 tied with 1.78.
Champions Tour Statistics
Through May 17
Charles Schwab Cup
1, Bernhard Langer, 922 Points. 2, Loren
Roberts, 572.3, Keith Fergus, 570.4, Joey Sin-
delar, 489. 5, Andy Bean, 465. 6, Mark
O'Meara, 400. 7, Gene Jones, 392. 8, Nick
Price, 355.9, Jeff Sluman, 324.10, Jay Haas,
315.
. Scoring Average
1, Bernhard Langer, 68.96. 2; Joey Sinde-
lar, 69.40. 3, Mark O'Meara, 69.53. 4 (tie),
Andy Bean and Jay Haas, 69.65. 6, Gene
Jones, 69.70.7, Mark James, 69.91. 8, Dan
Forsman, 69.95. 9, Eduardo Romero, 70.00.
10, Gil Morgan, 70.18. /
Driving Distance
1, Tom Purtzer, 307.1. 2, Steve Thomas,
299.7. 3, Keith Fergus, 294.6. 4, Sandy Lyle,
294.3. 5, Phil Blackmar, 290.0. 6, Gil Morgan,
287.0. 7, R.W. Eaks, 286.0. 8, Eduardo
Romero, 285.6.9, Bemhard Langer, 284.9.10,
Dan Forsman, 283.6.
Driving Accuracy Percentage
1, Blaine McCallister, 81.93%. 2, Hale Irwin,
80.71%. 3, David Edwards, 80.10%. 4,
Leonard Thompson, 79.46%. 5, Bob Gilder,
78.15%. 6, Larry Mize, 77.73%. 7, Allen Doyle,
77.50%. 8, Mark McNulty, 77.38%. 9, Dana
Quigley, 77.14%. 10, Scott Hoch, 77.04%.
Greens in Regulation Pct.
1, Bernhard Langer, 77.22%. 2, Dan Fors-
man, 77.12%. 3, Tom Kite, 75.56%. 4 (tie),
Brad Bryant and Don Pooley, 75.16%. 6, John
Cook, 74.69%. 7, Mark O'Meara, 74.07%. 8,
Jeff Sluman, 73.89%. 9,3 tied with 73.86%.
Total Driving
1, Tom Watson, 24. 2, Gil Morgan, 35. 3,
Bernhard Langer, 37. 4, Leonard Thompson,
38. 5 (tie), Tom Kite and Don Pooley, 39.7,
Blaine McCallister, 44.8, Tom Jenkins, 46.9,
Jeff Sluman, 47.10, Mark James, 48.
Putting Average
1, Morris Hatalsky, 1.688. 2, Jay Haas,
1.717.3, Ben Crenshaw, 1.731.4, Larry Nel-
son, 1.736. 5, Gene Jones, 1.738. 6, R.W.
Eaks, 1.740.7, Andy Bean, 1.743.8, Eduardo
Romero, 1.744.9, Bob Gilder, 1.748.10, Loren
Roberts, 1.750.
Birdie Average
1, Bernhard Langer, 4.65.2, Jay Haas, 4.60.
3, Brad Bryant, 4.55.4, Andy Bean , 4.48.5,
Eduardo Romero, 4.47.6 (tie), Dan Forsman,
Mark O'Meara, Joey Sindelar and Gene Jones,
4.20.10,2 tied with 4.09.
Eagles (Holes per)
1, Jerry Pate, 54.0.2, R.W. Eaks, 58.5. 3
(tie), Joey Sindelar and Gene Jones, 72.0.5,
David Edwards, 76.5.6, Tom Watson, 81.0.7
(tie), Mark O'Meara and Steve Thomas, 90.0.
9, Larry Nelson, 102.0.10,3 tied wth 103.5.
Sand Save Percentage
1, Loren Roberts, 80.00%. 2, Mike McCul-
lough, 68.00%. 3, Mark O'Meara, 66.67%. 4,
Ben Crenshaw, 65.00%.


Former QB Vick to be



monitored for 2 months


Associated Press

RICHMOND, Va. - Even
though Michael Vick is leav-
ing prison this week, he
won't exactly be a free man.
For two months, the sus-
pended NFL star will be
largely confined to his
Hampton home and will
wear an electronic monitor
that allows federal proba-
tion officials to track his
movements.
He will be allowed to go
to his full-time construc-
tion job and likely will be
allowed about five hours a
week for other court-ap-
proved activities, accord-
ing to Ed Bales, managing
director of Federal Prison
Consultants, an inmate re-
habilitation advocacy
group.
Permissible activities for
inmates on home confine-
ment typically include
things like medical ap-
pointments, religious obli-
gations and meetings with
probation officials. No din-
ners out. No chilling at a
friend's house.
And definitely no bars.
"He's going to be pretty
much read the riot act: 'If
we catch you in one situa-
tion like that, it's back to
you know where,"' Bales
said.
The tight restrictions are
designed to ease Vick's
transition from the federal
penitentiary in Leaven-
worth, Kan., back into the
community. He is serving a
23-month sentence for a
dogfighting conspiracy and
is expected to be released
from federal custody on
July 20.
After that, Bales said,
Vick will have 72 hours to
report to the probation of-
ficer to find out what new
rules he will have to follow
during three years of su-
pervised probation. Typi-
cally, those rules include
travel restrictions, holding
down a job and avoiding
known criminals.
One restriction tailored
specifically for Vick: He
can never again own a dog.



PENS
Continued from Page B1

While the Hurricanes
didn't have the opening-
game letdown that some
teams experience after a se-
ries as challenging and emo-
tionally draining as their
seven-game second round
against top-seeded Boston,
they again lacked goals.
That's been an ongoing prob-
lem for a team that found


WILLIAMS
Continued from Page B1

on Sunday, Williams was
one of 26 girls in the state
of Florida born in 1992 se-
lected to the Olympic De-
velopment Program (ODP)
after earning that distinc-
tion during tryouts.
In a few weeks, Williams
will head to Alabama.for a
camp that will split up
players in the Southeast
and pit those members
against the rest of the
United States.
."Carleigh's speed is a
plus," Towne said. "She's
equally good going left or
right. She's extremely
strong and quick... she just
has the whole package."
Ironically, soccer inter-
fered with arguably
Williams' second-best
sport while in middle
school: basketball.
Those two sports both
run during the winter sea-
son and there was no way
Williams was going to pick
basketball.
"I think if I had started
playing basketball at an
earlier age and stuck with
it I could have gotten
pretty good at it," Williams
said.
Volleyball was a bit more
difficult to quantify
Williams' success due to a
very balanced Panthers
team; however, the sopho-
more was usually among


Associated Press
Former Atlanta Falcons quarterback Michael Vick will be
largely confined to his Hampton home for two months and
will wear an electronic monitor that allows federal probation
officials to track his movements.


U.S. District Judge Henry
Hudson already made that
decision when he sen-
tenced Vick. He also or-
dered enrollment in a
substance abuse program
if Vick's parole officer
deems it necessary.
During the day, Vick will
earn $10 an hour as a gen-
eral laborer at one of W.M.
Jordan Co.'s 40 commercial
construction sites, com-
pany president John R.
Lawson has said.
Bales said less than 5
percent of federal inmates
are transferred directly
from prison to home con-
finement. The more usual
scenario is a transfer to -a
halfway house, but all the
beds in the area were

multiple ways to pull out
-games in the first two rounds
but averaged only 2.36 goals
per game - far less than
Pittsburgh's 3.46 average.
The Hurricanes didn't
score until Chad LaRose's
goal off Erik Cole's drop
pass at 13:04 of the second,
and then got only one shot
in the first 10 minutes of the
third.
Notes: Penguins D Sergei
Gonchar played more than
21 minutes although he has
had little practice time


the leaders in kills from
match to match and (not
surprisingly) one of the
most athletic Lecanto girls.
Talking to Williams, how-
ever, one thing that be-
comes transparent is she
uses the word 'we' much
more often than she does 'I.'
"All the time, it's never
about Carleigh," Towne
said. "It's about how the
team is doing."
Asking Williams about
her experience during vol-
leyball provided a very
telling answer.
"For volleyball, I'm going
to miss the seniors so
much," Williams said.
"They helped all the un-
derclassmen so much."
The high jump proved to
be the best event during
track and field for
Williams, who finished sec-
ond in the district, fourth
in the region and 10th in
the Class 3A state meet.
To further underline her
talent, Williams also came
in second in the triple
jump and third in the long
jump at the district meet
while also competing on
the 4x400 meter relay team
on the regional level.
As it is with most ath-
letes, track is a way for
Williams to stay in shape
for soccer but she managed
to "fall in love" with the
high jump in particular.
"I had done that event
'back in middle school,"
Williams said, "and I liked
it. Once I figured out the


booked beyond Vick's re-
lease date.
In some ways, Bales said,
a halfway house is an eas-
ier gig than home confine-
ment. Residents generally
have a couple of hours of
free time after work and
are furloughed on week-
ends, he said. The down-
side: "You're with other
people, and there are prob-
lems that can occur," Bales
said.
The only people Vick will
be with during his home
confinement are is fiancee
and' their children. The.
five-bedroom, 3,538-
square-foot brick home has
an' assessed value of
$748,100, according to
Hampton city tax records.

since a hit by Washington's
Alex Ovechkin injured his
knee in Game 4 of the sec-
ond round. ... Pittsburgh
scored on the power play
for the eighth consecutive
game.
The Penguins -are the
first team since the 1996
Detroit Red Wings to return
to the conference final the
season after losing in the
Stanley Cup finals. ... The
teams, meeting for the first
time in the playoffs, split
four regular-season games.


form and other stuff, I
started getting better and
better at it."
Although it's been
proven that Williams has
excelled at nearly every-
thing she's attempted, soc-
cer has unequivocally held
her undivided attention
since she first signed up
for the sport as a bubbly lit-
tle 4-year-old.
"I love the competition,"
Williams said. "I just love
going out there and being
with my team and showing
people how good we
can be."
Showing unusual fore-
sight for a 16-year-old,
Williams has decided re-
gardless of the rest of her
athletic career that she'd
like to stay in the world of
sports.
Carrying a 3.8 GPA,
Williams said that she'd
like to study sports man-
agement or something re-
lated once she heads to
college in two years.
"She just seems to get
better and better all the
time no matter what she
does," Towne said of
Williams.
Despite all of the great
accomplishments Williams
has racked up in the past
year for the Panthers, her
best may be yet to come ...a
scary thought for those that
have to line up against her
over the next two years.


For the record

==:= Flori LOTTERY


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


$4 TUESDAYMAY 19 2009












Magic look to avoid disappearing act


Orlando set to

battle Cleveland

Jbr East tit

Associated Press

ORLANDO - The walls
at the Orlando Magic's
headquarters are mostly
bare. There are no cham-
pagne-splashed champi-
onship photos. No NBA title
trophies or rings.
All that keeps the practice
court from being completely
blank are a few division title
banners and one for an
Eastern Conference cham-
pionship.
"Low-hanging fruit,"
Magic general manager Otis,
Smith loves to call them.
Fresh off a Game 7 win
over the defending cham-
pion Boston Celtics that pro-
pelled the Magic ,into the
Eastern Conference finals,
fans in Orlando are ready-to
party like it's 1996, when the
team last made it this far.
But there's nothing yet to
celebrate.
A date with the playoff-
perfect Cleveland Cavaliers
and NBA Most Valuable
Player LeBron James in a
best-of-seven series begins
Wednesday, and the archi-
tect of. this Magic team
wants to make clear that it's
time the franchise take the
next step.
"We have to stop talking
about making it to the con-
ference level, and start talk-
ing about winning a


.- V _ 44
q '







S 7- . .. .





ti " s


S. . Associated Press
Orlando Magic's Dwight Howard goes in for the dunk in front of Boston Celtics' Paul Pierce
during Orlando's 101-82 win in Game 7 of an NBA Eastern Conference semifinal on Sunday.


championship," Smith said
Monday "And then we have
to stop talking, and start
doing."
In its 20th year as a fran-
chise, Orlando has had
more disappointments than
highlights
Shaquille O'Neal bolting


for Los Angeles after the '96
season.. Grant Hill's con-
stant injuries, and Tracy
McGrady leading so many
Magic teams to promising
regular seasons that always
ended in the first round.
Now they're halfway to a
title. They've won eight


playoff games and are eight
wins away from reaching
the ultimate goal - yet so
much remains a mystery.
The Magic are full of
young players, most of
whom have never played
this deep 'in the playoffs,
and a topsy-turvy two


rounds have done little to
answer the questions that
consistently crop up on such
a streaky team.
Can they play physical?
Will they shoot such a high
percentage when the pres-
sure gets greater? Will
Dwight Howard be the
leader they need him to be?
Will coach Stan Van Gundy
crumble in the big moment?
Even the Magic aren't re-
ally sure how far they can go.
"We want to see," Magic
forward Hedo Turkoglu said
after the team's 101-82 win
over Boston on Sunday
night. "We have a chance.
We never lose confidence of
what we can do - not my-
self, not anybody"
Van Gundy and his Magic
players were mighty confi-
dent about a possible meet-
ing with the Cavs after a
blowout win against James
and Co. in April, repeatedly
saying how much they love
the matchup.
"If we ever got in a se-
ries with Cleveland, we'd
have great confidence
going in," Van Gundy said
then, grinning like a coach
who had just beat the Cav-
aliers 116-87.
Be careful what you wish
for
While the Magic have won
eight of the last 11 meetings
against Cleveland, all that
means nothing when the
ball is tossed and the flash-
bulbs pop at the start of
Game 1. The Cavs have
moved through the postsea-
sori with ease, sweeping De-
troit and Atlanta.
The Magic were off on


Monday after arriving back
in Orlando around 4 a.m.
and were not made avail-
able to reporters. Though
it's been about 45 days since
Orlando pounded the Cavs,
after the big win in Boston,
the Magic were as confident
as if it was just yesterday.
"I believe we can win the
championship, and we
aren't going to stop going
after one until we get it,"
Howard said. "We have the
right team. We have the tal-
ent. We have the right
coaches, and it's on us to go
out there every night and
play hard."
These playoffs have been
all about getting over the
hump for Orlando.
Howard was suspended
for a game for an elbow on
Samuel Dalembert in the
Magic's. first-round series
against Philadelphia..
Rafter Alston also was sus-
pended one game for slap-
ping Boston's Eddie House
on the back of the head in
the second round.
Turkoglu and Rashard
Lewis have battled through
nagging injuries, and All-
Star point guard Jameer
Nelson was lost to a sea-
son-ending shoulder tear
in early February.
Orlando has still man-
aged to survive and ad-
vance, getting closer to that
elusive first title.
"I think we have a
chance," Smith said. "We're
one of four teams left now,
so our chances got a lot bet-
ter. But we're playing the
best team in the NBA, so
some would say are chances
just got worse."


Nuggets, WWE


msmackdown


over arena conflict


Westlingschedd during game


...Asointatd Press..

Kobe Bryant and the Los
Angeles Lakers are sched-
uled to beat the Pepsi Cen-
ter in Denver next Monday
night
Problem is, so are John
Cena and a bunch of
wrestlers.
World Wrestling Enter-
tainment says it isbookedat
the arena for an episode of
Monday Night Raw, the
same night the Nuggets are
slated to host the Lakers in
Game 4 of the Western Con-
ference finals.
-WWE spokesman Robert
Zimmerman says the organ-
ization secured. the Pepsi
Center last Aug. 15 and has
already sold more than,
10,000 tickets for the event
He says the organization ex-
pects a sellout, with tickets
ranging from $20 to $70.
"Even though the Denver
Nuggets had a strong team
this year and were pro-
jected to make the playoffs,
obviously Nuggets and
Pepsi Center owner Stan
Kroenke did not have
enough, faith in .his own
team to hold the May 25th
date for a potential playoff
game," WWE chairman
Vince McMahon said in a
statement.
Denver is usually done
with basketball by now. The


Nuggets had lost in the first
round five straight years, but
as the No. 2 seed in the West
are in the conference finals
for the first time since 1985.
The Nuggets referred
comment to the NBA, which
handles scheduling during
the playoffs.' NBA
spokesman Mark Broussard
said the league was looking
into the conflict.
Zimmerman said the
Pepsi Center confirmed in
March: with the WWE that
the organization wanted to
keep the May 25 date, and
sent a contract on April 15 -
the final night of the regular
season - which WWE
signed and returned. Tickets
went on sale 4pril 11.
The conflict didn't arise
until Sunday, when the Lak-
ers beat the Houston Rock-
ets in Game 7 of the Western
Conference semifinals. Had
the Rockets won, Denver
would have had home-court
advantage in the next round,
hosting Games 1 and 2 and*
putting the May 25 game in
Houston.
As of Monday afternoon,
the schedule on the Pepsi
Center's Web site listed
WWE for 6:30 p.m. local
time and Western Confer-
ence finals Game 4 at 7 p.m.
Tickets for the wrestling
event could still boe pur-
chased online.


K.G. loss too much to overcome


Associated Press

BOSTON - The first-
round victory over Chicago
bought the Boston Celtics
two more weeks, and as
they went into Game 7
against Orlando they al-
lowed themselves to won-
der whether they could
extend their season long
enough-to get Kevin Garnett
.out of street clothes and on
the court.
"Clearly, that's why we
didn't do surgery I think that
was not a secret," Celtics
coach Doc Rivers said after
the Magic eliminated the de-
fending champions with a
101-82 victory on Sunday
night "At one point, he was
going to do surgery And then
we decided, 'Well, why?'Just
fate, hope - you. never
know. So we were hoping.
But I didn't think it was going
to happen." *
Garnett played a total of
66 minutes, 18 seconds in
the last two months of the
regular season because of
strained ligaments and
what the team said is an un-
related bone spur in his
right knee that will require
surgery. The Celtics had
hoped to get him back into
shape for the playoffs, but
Rivers announced on the
eve of the postseason that
Garnett would not be back
The 6-foot-11 superstar
watched the playoffs from
the bench and the team con-
sistently 'shot down any sug-
gestion that he might be
able to return. But the play-
offs are a two-month affair
- Boston clinched the
championship on June 17
last year - and the Celtics
allowed themselves to hope.


S , Associated press
Boston Celtics' Kevih Garnett, right, Paul Pierce, and Stephon Marbury, left, stand in front
of the bench during the final moments of the Celtics' 101-82 loss to the Orlando Magic.


"We were hoping," Rivers
said.
Backup Leon Powe, who
is a free agent,' has already
had surgery to repair a torn
anterior cruciate ligament
and meniscus; he will need
nine months to a year to re-
cover But Garnett's surgery
and recovery will be. fin-
ished in time for the 2009-10
opener, Rivers said, so
there was, no harm in wait-
ing- just in case.
"It's no rush," Rivers said.
"His surgery is not going to
be anything that's going to
take all summer."
But the Celtics are in a
rush.
The new Big Three that


won, the. franchise's 17th
NBA title last season could
be split up after next sea-
son, when Ray Allen is
scheduled to become a free
agent. Plus, Garnett turns 33
on Tuesday, and he already
has 14 years of NBA experi-
ence in a body that has al-
ready broken down once.
Paul Pierce, who has
two more years under con-
tract, will be 32 and Allen
will be 34.
"Unfortunately, we didn't
have the big fella for this
run," Pierce said. "The
main thing right now for
him is to get healthy, keep
the core together, bring him
back next year and see


what .happens. Hopefully
we can stay healthy next
year in the playoffs. Hon-
estly, I believe we are the
best team in the NBA still
when we have a healthy
group of guys."
Even Magic star Dwight
Howard was left to wonder.
"I always loved playing
against KG. He has been a
role model for me my whole
life and to see him go down
was sad for me," he said
after eliminating the
Celtics on Sunday night. "I
just hope he comes back
100 percent and I look for-
ward to playing against him
next year."


Jerry West discusses heart condition for 1st time


Legendsuffers

from atrial

filbrilltion

Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Jerry
West knew there was some-
thing amiss with his body
during his playing days with
the Los Angeles Lakers. -
He would have to breathe
into a paper bag during
games to keep from hyper-
ventilating. He couldn't
sleep. His heart sometimes
felt out of rhythm.
Years later, he would
learn that he was suffering
from atrial filbrillation, a.
heart rhythm disturbance.
"An athlete is well aware
with what's going on in his


Associated Press
Jerry West, left, and Sam Huff talk before a ceremony for the
First Southern Conference hall of fame class on May 4 in
Spartanburg, S.C..


body. I knew there was
something wrong," the Hall
of Fame guard told The As-
sociated Press. "I wonder if
they tested me now, would
they have said I couldn't
have played?"


For the first time Monday,
West discussed in detail his
five-decade battle with the
condition that led him to re-
tire from the Lakers' front
office nine years ago. It's a
disease that disproportion-


ally affects the elderly, but
the man whose silhouette
graces the NBA logo said he
has been dealing with it
since his 20s.
"I pretty much have kept it
hidden over the years," West
said.
West, who turns 71 this
month, told his story at the
launch ofAF Stat, a national
initiative aimed at increas-
ing awareness of the little-
understood condition that
affects an estimated 2 1/2
million Americans.
West said sheer adrena-
line helped him get through
his 14-year playing career in
the 1960s and '70s, and that
doctors originally thought
he was perhaps just one of
those people who had a be-
nign extra beat in his heart
from time to time.
It was when he left the
game for the front office that


the symptoms hit him hard.
"It got to the point where I
couldn't even watch the
game, if it was a significant
game," said West, who spent
19 years as either the Lakers
general manager or execu-
tive vice president of basket-
ball operations. "I would go
to the movie theater and
tape the game. I couldn't
wait to know the score. If we
won, I'd watch the game.
"I would have these anxi-
ety, panic attacks, sleepless
nights, irritable - all the
things associated with this
problem. It seemed to mani-
fest itself in me."
West always had a reputa-
tion for being high-strung
and nervous, but he knew
this was something more.
He was finally diagnosed at
age 42 and said he didn't
start getting seriously
treated until he was 50.


West said he's never
talked much about the con-
dition because there was so
little information available
about it, something he hopes
will change with the launch
of the new initiative. He was
optimistic Monday after
meeting two doctors who
said they might be able to
help him, an encouraging
sign after another sleepless
episode.
"I was out of rhythm last
night," West said. "Some peo-
ple feel it - and I feel it -
and some people don't. I
think it's best to feel it be-
cause at least you're aware of
it and you have an idea that
something's going on here
and you can go to a doctor."
West said his condition
was a "huge part" of his de-
cision in 2000 to leave the
Lakers, the only team he'd
ever known.


TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 B5


NBA


RriC us CouNTY (FL) Canowcm


I









E Page B6- TUESDAY 19, 2009



ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlighton
PEOPLEs

'Survivor' Z
battles can


ohn
icer


NEW YORK-"Sur-
vivor" champ Ethan Zohn
has cancer.
Zohn, who outlasted
the com-
petition
toowin
"Sur-
vivor:
Africa" in
2002, is
undergo-
ingm
Ethan Zohn chemo-
therapy
for a rare form of
Hodgkin's disease. in late
A spokeswoman for the
CBS series, Lori Delli-
Colli, confirmed Zoh n's
condition. The news was
first reported by People
magazine.
The former pro soccer
player, known$1for his
curly mop of hair, was d i-
agnosed with stage-two





NEW YORK-- The re-
cession has been good to
"FamilyGuy" creator
Seth MaeFarlane. So
good that he's bought a
plane.
The 35-year-old i.ked a
repoed $100 million ce
contract last May that
keeps
ehim with
FOX
through

The
deal
makes
him the
highest
movie Fraset paid
r writer-
prod ucer
in television.
He's also the creator on

turpcoming spinoff"The
Clevelahd Show." which
debuts on FOX in Sep -
tember.


screene in pace
LOS ANGELES --
"Star Trek" has been
beamed aboard the Inter-
national Space Station.
Paramount Pic-
tures said they : ,
transferred d iree-
tor J.J.Abrams'
sci-fi franchise re-
boot to NASA's Mission
Control in Houston. The
movie was uplinked to
the space station on
Thursday.
NASA astronaut
Michael Barratt watched
the film on a laptop F'i-
day inside the Unity mod-
ule.
The 50-year-old astro-
naut said he remernm-
bered "watching the
original 'Star Trek' series
and, like many of my
NASA co-workers, was
inspired by the idea of
people from all nations
coming together to ex-
plore space."
-From wre report


Before and after

Does winning the 'Dancing'g trophy boost dancers' careers?


Associated Press


LOS ANGELES - After 10 weeks
on "Dancing With the Stars," actor
Gilles Marini, Olympian Shawn
Johnson and "The Bachelor" reject
Melissa Rycroft have become
household names - at least with
the show's nearly 20 million weekly
viewers.
On Tuesday, one of them will be
named the new "Dancing" champ,
collecting the coveted mirror ball
trophy along with a potential career
boost.
But just as becoming the "Ameri-
can Idol" doesn't automatically
mean a rocking music career, win-
ning "Dancing" doesn't always
translate to bigger and better gigs,
though it certainly opens up the pos-
sibility.
"Anything they go into will be in-
credible," says Pierre Dulaine, co-
founder of Dancing Classrooms,
which teaches ballroom dancing to
fifth-graiders nationwide. "They
learn respect, dedication and hu-
mility."
Here's a look at past winners and
their professional lives before and
after "Dancing With the Stars."
E Season one, Kelly Monaco: A
former Playboy Playmate and some-
time "Baywatch" star, Monaco, 32,
wdn the inaugural season of the
ABC show in 2005 with professional
partner Alec Mazo. Once taking the
trophy, she scored a recurring role
on the TV soap "General Hospital."
She is now appearing opposite fel-
low "Dancing" alumna Melanie
Brown in "Peepshow." a burlesque-
inspired production at Planet Hol-
lywood Resort & Casino in Las
Vegas.
. Season two, Drew Lachey: A
member of the boy band 98 Degrees
with his brother Nick Lachey, Drew
Lachey performed on Broadway in
"Rent" and "Monty':.Python's Spa-
malot" before joining the "Dancing"
cast After winning in 2006 with pro-
fessional partner Cheryl Burke, he
co-hosted '.the Miss USA pageant,
joined the "Dancing With the Stars"
tour and filled in as the show's host
S�&file S'a~nia Harris was on ma-
ternity leave. He appeared on the
ABC show again this season to
weigh in on the latest contestants
and what they need to become
champions. Lachey, 3.2, can next be
seen on "HGTV's ,$250,000 Chal-
""*- lenge," a .series debuting
May 31 that has families
competing for cash
through home-im-
provement challenges.
0 Season three,
Emmitt Smith: The
I~ 41Sd National Football


League's

-* -


With Burke as his partner, he
took the "Dancing" title in No-
vember 2006, opening the
ballroom door for fu-
ture NFL play-
ers. The
following
year. Smith

ESPN as
an ana-
lyst and I
a p
peared
on the | , .
s p o r ts_ .
net-
work's
" M on -
day Night
Countdown"
and "NFL . .
Sunday Count- -
down" shows. The i - - -
network did not ...
renew his con-
tract for 2009.
* Season four,
Apolo Anton
Ohno: An
Olympic speed
skater, Ohno Wvon
gold medals-in
2002 and 2006'.
After claim-
ing the mir-
ror ball in
2007 with
professional
partner Ju-
I i a n ne
Hough, Ih.,
Ohno, 27,
returned
to skating. -
He took gold
in the
world
chain-
pion-
ships
2007 l
a n d I,

2008 and
said he in-
tends (Q
compete
in the
2010 Win-
ter Olympics.
* Season five, Helio
Castroneves: A Brazil-
ian IndyCar driver, Castroneves won
the Indianapolis 500 in 2001 and 2002
before taking the "Dancing" title
with Hough in the
fall of 2007.
In Oc-


�' .tober
20b8. he
w a s.
. charged
with federal


tax evasion
and con-
spiracy He
was ac-
quitted
Last


Smooth on six
counts of tax eva-
sion and the jury was hung
on the conspiracy charge. Days
after his court victory, the 33-year-
old returned to racing at the Grand
Prix of Long Beach and he's now


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
0 Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.


SUNDAY, MAY 17
Fantasy 5: 6- 19 - 29-30-34
5-of-5 No winner
- 4-of-5 192 $555
, 3-of-5 6,218 $27.50
SATURDAY, MAY 16
Powerball: 6-7- 31 - 40
- 56
Powerball: 38
Power Play: 2
5-of-5 PB No win-
- ners
5-of-5 5 $200,000
Lotto: 4 -27-28 -33-42-44
S 6-o01-6 No winner
5-of-6 59 $5,109.50
a ~ --4-of-6 3.428 $71
, ,! . . z' ,3-of-6 67.359 $5
'' '" Fantasy 5: 10-28-33-34
-36
5-of-5 3 $131,272.13
4-of-5 401 $105.50
3-of-5 11 312 $10
FRIDAY, MAY 15
Mega Money: 8 - 13-23-36
Mega Ball: 22
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 7 $1,149
3-of-4 MB 71 $248


preparing for the Indi-
anapolis 500.
E Season six, Kristi
Yamaguchi: A championship
figure skater, Yamaguchi won a
gold medal at the 1992
Olympics, established her
charitable Always Dream
A Foundation in 1996 and was in-
ducted into the Olympic Hall
of Fame in 2005. The 37-year-old won
the "DWTS" trophy in 2008 with pro-
fessional partner Mark Ballas, and
has gone on to become the face of
Nicole by OPI nail colors and Kel-
logg's FiberPlus bars. She will host a
fundraising gala to benefit her char-
ity - featuring performances by the
"Dancing With the Stars" pros - on
May 30 in San Francisco.
* Season seven, Brooke Burke: A
model and TV personality, Burke
hosted "Wild On!" on E! Entertain-
ment channel and the "Rock Star"
talent contest in CBS. She won the
"Dancing" crown with partner Derek
Hough in November 2008. Earlier
this year, the 37-year-old'helped
host. NBC's pre-show for the
Golden Globe Awards.

Cheryl Burke, left,
and Gilles Marini perform May 4.


__ - Videogame NEWS


Microsoft's prime-time game show


Lou KESTEN
Associated Press writer

Real news from the virtual
world:
S COME ON DOWN!
Everyone who loves to watch
game shows thinks the same
thing: "'could do better than
that." But few of us get the
chance, because there's too
much competition for too
few spots on TV.
"We can bridge that gap,"
says Manuel Bronstein, di-
rector of Xbox Live Prime-
time. "We want to give a lot of
people the ability to be on a
game show."
The name of the game is "1
vs. 100," based on the short-
lived TV series. It's a trivia
contest that pits a single
player (The One) against 100
others (The Mob). Everyone
who tunes into the program
on Xbox Live has a chance to


be one of those 101 players.
Bronstein and his col-
leagues on Microsoft's incu-
bation team were trying to
find ways to "bring the large
Xbox Live audience together
for mass events," he says.
"We met with a lot of the big
players in game shows, but
when we saw '1 vs. 100,' that
mechanic was perfect"
I've been checking out the
Canadian beta test of the
game, and it's a lot of fun.
Even if you aren't chosen to
be The One or part of The
Mob, you can still play along
and try to beat the scores of
other audience members.
And Bronstein says audi-
ence members who answer a
lot of questions correctly will
have a better chance of
being named The One.
The questions lean toward
the east side, although I
stumbled across a few


stumpers that were pitched
at the Canadian audience.
(No, I don't know what shape
a Nunavut license plate is
in.) But "1 vs. 100" will offer
something you can't get from
other electronic trivia
games: fresh questions every
episode. And there will be
prizes, too, like Microsoft
points and free Xbox Live
Arcade downloads.
Microsoft hasn't set a date
for the official launch of "1
vs. 100."
* NINTENDO UP AND
DOWN: Like every other in-
dustry around the world, the
video-game business is hurt-
ing. Even the Wii is strug-
gling; last month, Nintendo
sold half as many Wii con-
soles as it did in April 2008,
according to market re-
searcher NPD Group.
Still, there's a silver lining.
Nintendo sold more than 1


Associated Press
A scene from Microsoft's videogame version of the TV game
show, "1 vs. 100," is shown.


million portable DS systems
in April, including 800,000
units of its new DSi. So, even
when gamers are being
forced to pinch pennies, we
still can't resist a shiny new
toy.
M NEW IN STORES: Body
blow! Nintendo's beloved
"Punch-Out!!" boxing game
finally comes to the Wii. ...
Electronic Arts delivers
some Wii goodies as well,


with "Boom Blox Bash
Party" and "EA Sports Ac-
tive." ... Cyborgs: friend or
foe? The debate rages be-
tween Capcom's "Bionic
Commando" and Warner
Bros.' "Terminator Salva-
tion" (both for the Xbox 360,
PlayStation 3).... Or you can
just enjoy more human-on-
human violence with THQ's
"UFC 2009 Undisputed"
(360, PS3).


INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY=

Today is Tuesday, May 19,
the 139th day of 2009.
There are 226 days
left in the year.
Today's
Highlight
in History:
One hun-.
o dred years
ago, on May
19, 1909, the
innovative Bal-
lets Russes (Russian
Ballets), under the di-
rection of Sergei Di-
aghilev, debuted in Paris.
On this date:
In 1536, Anne Boleyn, the
second wife of England's
King Henry VIII, was be-
headed after being convicted
of adultery.
In 1935, British soldier T.E.
Lawrence, also known as
Lawrence of Arabia," died in
Dorset, England, six days
after being injured in a motor-
cycle crash.
In 1962, during a Demo-
cratic fundraiser at New
York's Madison Square Gar-
den, actress Manlyn Monroe
sang "Happy Birthday to You"
to guest of honor, President
John F Kennedy.
In 1967, the Soviet Union
ratified a treaty with the
United States and Britain
banning nuclear weapons
from outer space
Ten years ago: The
much-anticipated movie pre-
quel 'Star Wars Episode I-
The Phantom Menace"
opened.
Five years ago: Millionaire
philanthropist Jack Eckerd,
founder of the drugstore em-
pire that bears his name,
died in Clearwater, at age 91.
One year ago: China
stood still and sirens wailed
to mourn the country's nearly
70,000 earthquake victims.
Today's Birthdays: PBS
newscaster Jim Lehrer is 75.
TV personality David Hart-
man is 74. Actor James Fox
is 70. Actress Nancy Kwan is
70. Author-director Nora
Ephron is 68. Actor Peter
Mayhew is 65. Rock singer-
writer Pete Townshend (The
Who) is 64. Concert pianist
David Helfgott is 62. Rock
singer-musician Dusty Hill
(ZZ Top) is 60. Singer-actress
Grace Jones is 57. Rock mu-
sician Phil Rudd (AC-DC)is
55. Actor Steven Ford is 53.
Rock musician lain Harvie
(Del Amitri) is 47. Actor Jason
Gray-Stanford is 39. Actor
Drew Fuller is 29. Christian
rock musician Tim McTague
is 26. Actor Eric Lloyd is 23.


i


.... ....'
-r .
fi t
*-*.Wt


tO









Section C - TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009


HEALTH


&


LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


. , Dr. David
/Page C4
b Shalyyn
Barker/C2


Different characters


Writer Bob Baker poses for a photo Wednesday at his home in Los Angeles. Baker,
21st century's great wastes of time.


Whts T tr? - .
S . . ., ,jY ',' ,.: '' - - : ,,-'* .
. . ,.



ffiarry and co-wiAGr"
I .e n Culw l .orinv4tId rough 1h e o hangP a
.S, req enl a~5r. " ' lmple question What are
y ou doing?


Associated Press
a Facebook user, disdains Twitter and considers it one of the


Facebooker, Tweeter or Spacer: Who are you on the Net?


JOHN ROGERS
Associated Press writer
-LOS ANGELES
JAs the Twitter juggernaut
roars across the Internet
seemingly unobstructed,
meet at least one guy
' who has angrily placed
himself in its path.
Bob Baker disdains Twitter,
considers it one of the 21st cen-
tury's great wastes of time and
(brace yourself, Tweeters), has no
interest in knowing when you get
up in the morning, when you go to
bed at night or what you do dur-
ing the hours in between. .
"What you're probably hearing
.are the frustrations of an old
man," the 60-year-old Los Angeles
writer says as he wraps up a brief
anti-Twitter rant (one he might


Twitter immediately grabbed the young
testing set, people who like to send out
little blasts of information.
Karen North
clinical psychologist.


have come close to fitting into a
140-character Tweet ifhe'd just-
break down and embrace the
thing).
Baker is a Facebook man-and,
like the proverbial old dog, fig-
ures he may not be capable of
adapting to yet another new so-
cial network
While it's still too early to say
clearly whether things like per-
sonality or age drive people to
one social network over another,


Snoring a common problem
Snoring is the common term achs, avoiding this most human type
for obstructive breathing of problem. There are a few exam-
while sleeping. It is probably ples of animals that do snore, such as
one of the most preva- bulldogs. This is because
lent of the obnoxious M of their facial features,
human habits. which can obstruct the
The problem is more airway. It is not unusual
prevalent in males. In the that they will undergo
\ 30- to 35-year-old popula- surgery, to correct their
tion, approximately 20 airway problem.
/ percent of men snore In an article written in
while only 5 percent of " the annals of medical
women snore. Age is also history titled "Bedlam in
a factor By the age of 60, the Boudoir," the claim is
60 percent of men and 40 Dr. Denis Grillo that 20 of 32 presidents of
percent of women will EAR, NOSE the United States were
snore habitually. Old snorers. I might add that
wives' tales have sug- & THROAT the list was bipartisan.
gesteOd that primitive men Even other world lead-
snordd at-night so as to defend their ers, such as Winston Churchill,
women from beasts by frightening, were snorers - he reportedly was
them away with the noise. This is al- recorded and measured to have a
most exclusively found in humans.
Most animals sleep on their stom- See GRILLO/Page C4


clinical psychologist Karen North
-says some patterns are emerging.
"Twitter immediately grabbed
the young texting set, people who
like to send out little blasts of in-
formation," she says.
Meanwhile, Facebookers are
seen as older, less into expressing
their most random thoughts and
more into leisurely online social-
izing.
And MySpacers? Some com-
pare their site of choice to last


DO YOU TWITTER?
* Sign up to follow the latest
news from the Citrus County
Chronicle by joining our
Twitter group!
* From a computer, you can
check the "tweets" at
http://twitter.com/
CitrusChronicle.
* Or you can JOin Twitter to get
these short updates'sent to
your mobile phone as text
messages - but separate
charges may apply from your
telephone service provider.
year's hot nightspot that has lost
-much of its buzz to younger joints
like Twitter.
Twenty-year-old actress
See CHARACTERS/Page C03


Build personal


health power

Note: In today's arti- N nutrition is vital to
cle, I say that building a. good health.
healthy body is like con- Good nutrition
structing a good home. supplies the building
This is a useful analogy, blocks that. you use to
but like all analogies, it . build a sound body and
is limited. The major 1 mind. The quality of the
principles are similar, building blocks you use
but health and the makes a big difference
human body are far in the long-term sound-
more complex than the Dr. Ed Dodge ness of your body. If you
finest home. In addition, PASSION use poor building blocks,
the human body is being Tour body may seem
remodeled continuously, FOR HEALTH ine, but it will not serve
which makes the ydu well-in the long run.
process even more complex. Yet, Choosing good building materials
that makes the principle of choos- to begin with is a matter of key im-
ing the finest building materials portance.
even more important Keep this in
mind as you read today's column! See DODGE/Page C4


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY



Don't


char


meat
T here is nothing like
a good steak every
now and then. How
you cook or order that
steak may influence your
risk of cancer. Eating
charred, well-done meat
on a regular basis may in-
crease your risk of pan-
creatic cancer by up to 60
percent, according to find-
ings from a University of
Minnesota study pre-
sented at a recent meeting
of the annual American
Association of Cancer Re-
search (AACR).
Previous research has
shown that cooking meats
at very high temperatures
creates chemicals, hetero-
See BENNETT/Page C5








Dr. Sunil Gandhi
CANCER &
BLOOD
DISEASE


Cancer

in rural

areas

It is natural to believe
that since larger cities
have bigger hospitals,
more universities or terti-
ary care hospitals, they
get better health care than
rural communities. Also,
larger communities have
more health care facilities
close by and so they have
less concern about trans-
portation.
Confounding the com-
mon epidemiological wis-
dom, urban dwellers had
a higher risk of four com-
mon, late-stage cancer di-
agnoses than their rural
counterparts did in a new,
populatidn-based analy-
sis. As we know, the ear-
lier we diagnose cancer,
the better the chance of
See.GANDHI/Page C5


WVore than 1,000 hearts given new life,
right here on the Nature Coast.

They say practice makes perfect. That's why we're proud to announce a major milestone.
The Citrus Memorial Heart Center has performed more than 1,000
open-heart surgeries since opening in January 2004. Thanks to the
expertise of our cardiovascular team, we celebrate 1,000 hearts healed.
1,000 lives saved, 1,000 families kept whole. And it all took place here in Citrus County.
- For more information, call the Heart Center at 352-344-6416

1 C IR CITRUS MEMORIAL

., '-l At lte Heart of Our Community


7112F17








1 -' 'r,........ x,0., in nnA


W- TUEiSUAY, M 1YA9Y, ADSE UU9


Camping trip full of little disasters, much fun


A little over a year
ago, my mom and
ike bought
"The Baby" - a nice
little pull-behind
camper for the family I /
truly thought they were
crazy at first. Who
wants to go on vacation,
only to cook your own
food and make your Shalyn
own bed, and, basically, FULL
do a lot of work? Not
me! I'd much rather
stay in a hotel.
But after a year, my mom con-
vinced me how fun it would be
and I helped her book a location I
thought we would all like - St.
Augustine. The campground was
between the ocean and the St.
John's River, and within walking
distance to both. So off we all went
(Mom, Mike, me, Patrick, Emmy,
Graham and The Baby) in a week-
end camping trip across the state.
We arrived on a Friday night.
Patrick and I had to leave a little
later since he had to work, and


F


when we arrived, my
mom and Mike had
everything set up at the
campground: the
camper, the outdoor
seating area, a mos-
quito tent, and little
lights around the
awning. It was surpris-
ingly very nice.
Barker That night, Mike
SLATE - made us burgers on a
charcoal grill. They
were absolutely terri-
ble - I burped lighter fluid all
night. But the next morning, he
made up for the dinner by making
us eggs and bacon. It was deli-
cious.
That day, Mike and Patrick de-
cided to go fishing on the riverside
and my mom and I decided to take
the kids to the beach. I came well
prepared: ample sunscreen, a
beach stroller, an umbrella, and a
playpen. We also packed snacks,
beach toys for Emmy, and chairs
and blankets for us. Thanks good-
ness we had a beach cart to carry


all our stuff. What wasn't so great
was that the short walk to the
beach was in sand, and pushing a
beach cart with a ton of stuff on it
is truly no day at the beach. My
mom pushed the kids and I
pushed everything else. I was ex-
hausted by the time we got there.
Still excited, though, I began to
set everything up. The only prob-
lem was the wind. Just as I got the
umbrella in the sand, it blew up
the wrong way, and when I shaded
Graham with a towel that blew
away, too. It got so windy my mom
and I started to yell at each other
so that we could hear ourselves
speak If you could have seen us -
especially my mother, with her
nostalgic and very gigantic beach
hat - the romanticized day at the
beach we had pictured was not ex-
actly the reality.
Too exhausted to give up, and
too stubborn to admit defeat, we
tried to make it work Can you
imagine packing up and hauling
all that stuff back to the camper?
After the umbrella blew away for


the fifth time and Emmy wrapped
herself up in a towel refusing to
"have fun," I was ready to cry.
Thank God Mike came down to
the beach to check on us! He told
us the riverside was calm and
helped us pack everything up and
move to where they were fishing.
That night, we went to St. Au-
gustine and walked around. I car-
ried Graham in a sling on my chest
and everyone commented on how
much hair he has. Patrick said I
was being rude because I stopped
saying thank you to the compli-
ments, but sunburned and slightly
tired from my battle at the beach,
I had run out of smiles for the day.
The next day was our last day,
and we had just gotten into the
groove of camping. Mike made us
perfect pancakes and we went
down to the beach for a less windy
day. It was beautiful: We ate hot
dogs, buried ourselves in the sand,
and flew a kite.
When it was time to go, Patrick
and Mike began to prepare the
camper Mike wanted to teach him


how to do everything. Whether he
was excited or distracted, I am not
sure, but while they were working
and I was sitting inside with the
kids, I felt the camper move.
My mother assured me that that
is what happens when he begins to
unhook stuff. Then, suddenly we
felt a jolt and the camper tipped
all the way down on one side. My
mother ran outside. Everyone was
fine, but the camper hitch was now
buried 3 feet into the ground.
Workers from the campground
came and helped us out, and we
were just glad no one was hurt.
After my first camping experi-
ence, I cannot wait to go again.
Sure, it was less than perfect -
but it is a perfectly hysterical
memory for me.

Shalyn Barker resides with her
husband, Patrick, daughter,
Emmy and son, Graham, in the
Beverly Hills area. She can be
reached at
citrusamom@yahoo.com.


Health NOTES


* "Physical Therapy as it
Relates to Nursing" free semi-
nar by Tonia Arnette, physical
therapy assistant, 6:30 p.m.
today at Freedom Learning,
Center, 4443 S. Pleasant
Grove Road in Inverness. Call
341-2311 for reservations.
* Friends and Family CPR
course today; three sessions:
10 a.m., 2 p.m. and 5:30 p.m..
at Nature Coast EMS American
Heart Association Training Cen-
ter, 3876 W. Country Hill Drive,
Lecanto, one block off State
Road 44 on County Road 490.
The class is free, book is in-
cluded. Call to reserve your
seat: 249-4750.
* Free Health Fair 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Wednesday at Mer-
cantile Bank, 2080 State Road
44 W. (next to Cinnamon
Sticks), Inverness, 560-0224.
Visit with health specialists:
Interim Health Care, American
Cancer Society,, Father & Sons
Hearing, Lange Eye Care, Gen-
esis Women's Center, massage
therapist, Comfort Keepers.
Special awareness for the
American Cancer Society and,
Memory Beads will be handed
out, albng' with refreshments
and a door prize. All donation
proceeds to sponsor the Ameri-
can Cancer Society.
* LifeSouth bloodmobile
schedule. To find a donor cen-
ter or a blood drive near you,
call 527-3061. Anyone 16 or
older who is in good health and
weighs at least 110 pounds is
eligible to donate.
* 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today,
Walmart Super Center, 2461 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inver-
ness.
* 4 to 7:30'p.m. Wednesday,
First Baptist Church of Crystal
River, 700 Citrus Ave.
* 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednes-
day, Sweetbay Supermarket,
1651 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal
River.
* 7:30 a.m. to 2,p.m. Thurs-
day, Lecanto High School, 3810
W. Educational Path.
* 1 to 6 p.m. Friday, Regal
Cinemas, 2635 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
* 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday,
Walmart Super Center, 2461 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inver-
ness.
* Noon to 5 p.m. Sunday,
Crystal River Mall, 1900 U.S.
19.
* 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday,
Food Ranch, 40 N. U.S. 19, In-
glis.


Camp Boggy Creek
accepting applications
Special to the Chroniclc __

EUSTIS - Camp Boggy Creek for Florida's seriously
ill children is now accepting applications for its summer
sessions. There is no charge to attend this year-round
residential camp. There will be nine summer sessions:
June 3 to 7, Craniofacial & Spina Bifida; June 10 to 16.
Cancer (north Florida); June 20 to 25, Immune Defi-
ciencies including HIV7AIDS; June 28 to July 3, Bleeding
Disorders/Rheumatic; July 8 to 14, Cancer (south
Florida): July 18 to 24, Heart; July 28 to Aug. 2, Sickle
Cell Anemia; Aug. 6 to 11. Epilepsy; Aug. 15 to 20,
Asthma, Kidney, IBD and Transplant.
Parents interested in sending their child to this state
of the art medical camp can request an application on-
line at www.BoggyCreekorg or by calling the camper re-
cruiter toll free at t866) Go-Boggy 1.462-6449), ext 252.
The Camp is accredited by the American Camping As-
sociation and is a member of the Association of Hole In
The Wall Camps.
Camp Boggy Creek is also in need of medical volun-
teers (doctors and nurses) and general volunteers to
serve as cabin counselors or activity helpers. It is a life-
changing experience and you'll have as much fun as the
campers. Information is available on line or by calling
the volunteer coordinator at (866) Go-Boggy (462-6449).
ext. 293.
If you know of a child or family eligible for Camp
Boggy Creek. please refer them.
Camp Boggy Creek is a year-round camp for children
ages 7 to 16 who have chronic or life-threatening ill-
nesses. Since opening its doors in 1996. Camp Boggy
Creek has served more than 40.000 children and family
members. No child or family pays to attend the family
weekends or weeklong summer sessions. Camp Boggy
Creek is solely supported by contributions and dona-
tions from individuals, corporations and foundations.


@ 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Tues-
day, May 26, Walmart Super
Center, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
* 2 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday,
May 26, Inverness Post Office,
1400 N. U.S. 41.
* Seven Rivers Regional.
Medical Center's health edu-
cation programs are in the com-
munity room, second floor of
the Medical Offices Building
(across the street from the hos-
pital) unless otherwise noted.
Call 795-1234 or visit
www.srrmc.com to register.
* Balance screening: 11:15
a.m. to noon, first and third
Wednesday monthly, Seven
Rivers Rehab & Wound Center,
1675 S.E. U.S. 19, in tle Crys-
tal River Shopping Center. No
appointment needed. Call 795-
0534.
* "'Good News About Knee
& Hip Pain" 1 p.m. Wednesday,,
May 20.
* Diet therapy for diabetes,
6 p.m. Tuesday, June 2. Prod-
uct samples available.


* Childbirth-related educa-
tion from the Women's & Fam-
ily Center. To make an
appointment, call 795-BABY
(2229).
* Alzheimer's Caregiver
Training by Jerry Fisher, 1 to 2
p.m. Wednesday at Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Cen-
ter, 6201 N. Suncoast BlVd.,
Crystal River, in the Medical Of-
fices Building, Community
Room, second floor. The train-
ing program is free of charge
and available to the public.
Please RSVP to Jerry Fisher at
(352) 688-4537.
* Arthritis and Other Joint
Pain will be the topic of a semi-
nar presented by Michelle Mc-
Colley, CNHP, natural health
educator and master herbalist,
at 11 a.m. Saturday, May 23, at
Doctor Vitamin Store, 3930 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
Call now as there is limited
seating: 628-7036.
* SPRING HILL- Health
Matters Home Care has a Reg-
istered Nurse available to do
free speaking engagements
I


for your group, club, church or
organization. Call (352) 686-
4493 or (352) 686-5593.
SupportGROUPS

* Scleroderma Support
Group organizing for North
Central Florida. All persons in-
terested, call Melba Withrow at
746-7752.
* Beyond Grief Support
Group, Christian-based meet-
ing for people who have lost.
someone through death, 1:15
p.m. the third Tuesday monthly
at the ministry complex room
behind the SunTrust Bank in
Meadowcrest, off Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Call
Betty Jo at 628-2933 or the
church office at 795-8077. -
* Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization, serving Central
Florida, offers monthly support
group meetings. Public is in-
vited.
* 2 p.m. today, Highland Ter-
race, 700 Medical Court E., In-
verness. Call Ellen Mallon or
Valerie Taylor at 860-2525.
The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization branch office in Cit-
rus County is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. the second Mon-
day monthly. Call the Citrus
County community service rep-
resentative Ellen Mallon at 860-
2525.
* Head and Neck Cancer
Support Group meets 11 a.m.
to noon the third Wednesday
monthly at the Robert Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute,
522 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, north of State Road
44. Call Dr. Patrick Meadors,
(352) 342-1822.
* SPRING HILL- Look
Good Feel Better Support
Group, 3:30 to 5 p.m. third
Wednesday monthly at the
Florida Cancer Institute - New
Hope's Spring Hill Center,
10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203,
in the Medical Arts Building
next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call
Peggy Dome, R.N., group facili-
tator, at (352) 688-7744.
* Alzheimer's caregivers
support, 5:15 p.m. the third
Thursday monthly at the Mem-
ory Unit at Barrington Place,


Safe Sitter class
to train baby sitters
Special to the Chronicle

Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center will offer a
Safe Sitter class for girls and boys age 11 to 13 on Satur-
day, June 20, at the hospital. Registration for the pro-
gram is open until Friday, June 5.
Safe Sitter is a medically accurate program that
teaches young adolescents how to handle emergencies
when caring for younger children. The cost is $35. To
register your son or daughter or your child's baby sitter,
call Amy Kingery at 795-8344.
Thousands of youngadolescents across the country
have been trained by Safe Sitter to handle life threat-
ening emergencies. All information is taught by trained
instructors. During the course, students get hands-on
practice in basic lifesaving techniques so they are pre-
pared to act in a crisis.
Safe sitters also receive helpful tips to make them
more confident caregivers. They learn safety precau-
tions and how to understand and deal with children of
different ages They even learn about the business as-
pects of baby sitting.
To successfully complete the Safe Sitter program, stu-
dents must pass a practical and written test to show they
have mastered the key concepts and have the skills nec-
essary to handle an emergency.


2341 W. Norvell Bryant High- .
way, Lecanto, 34461, for care-
givers and their dementia
patients, by the Citrus team of
Hernando-Pasco Hospice. Din-
ner served to patients while
caregivers attend the 5:30 p.m.
support group meeting. Free.
Call Wendy Hall at 527-4600.
* If interested in a day pro-
gram and support group for
Alzheimer's and dementia pa-
tients, call 344-5228 for more
information.
* The Fibromyalgia Sup-
port Group of the First United
Methodist Church of Ho-
mosassa meets the first and
third Thursday in the confer-
ence room of the administration
building at the church. All are
welcome. Call 628-4083.
* NEW PORT RICHEY-
Lymphedema support group, 3
to 4 p.m. third Thursday
monthly meetings at Florida
Cancer Institute - New Hope's
center at 8763 River Crossing
Blvd., New Port Richey. Call
Community Hospital's Outpa-
tient Healthcare Center at (727)
845-0757.


* Celiac support meeting
for all people who have celiac
disease or dermatitis, from 10
a.m. to noon fourth Saturday
monthly, in the Community
Room at the Coastal Region Li-
brary, 8619 W. Crystal St.,
Crystal River. Call Mary Lou
Thomas at 628-9559.
* Fibromyalgia Support
Group, 1:30 to 3 p.m. the
fourth Saturday monthly at
B&W Rexall in Inverness. Call
Ada Fox at 637-3364.
* SPRING HILL - Am-
putee Support Group, 7 p.m.
the last Monday of every month
at HealthSouth Rehabilitation
Hospital in the private dining
room. Call Eva Baker at (352)
592-7232.
* National Osteoporosis
Foundation Citrus County
Support Group, 1 p.m. the last
Tuesday monthly at the Citrus
County Resource Center, 2804
W. Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto. Call Laura Henderson
of Gulfcoast Spine Institute at
341-4778.

See GROUPS/Page C3


Accepting New OBIGYN Patients -
Saturday Appointments Available

Rose Mary Sobel, MD - Board Cerified OB.'G N. FCOG
Jackie Duncan. ARNP- NCC Cenified in Womren's Health


C ystafd river Tlomen 's health Center

M, F, n -i, . M. . ; .1 -.i 4 I, i. .1 * .i "M . I I N ...n 3 I| U O IS


The Citrus Team at Hernando-Pasco
Hospice is there when you need us most.
There's a lot of misinformation regarding
hospice care. If you want the facts, go to
our website and find out how Hernando-
Pasco Hospice's Citrus Team can help
you. Also, our phones are answered 24
hours a day, seven days a week by HPH


nurses who viant to help you.

Citrus Team Office Citrus Hospice Care Center
*3545 N. Lecanto Hwy. 701 Medical Drive Ct. E
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Inverness, FL 34452
(352) 527-4600 (352) 344-0896


www.hphospice.org


Citrus Hospice House
2341 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461
(352) 746-5700


I&Miracle-Ear
HEARING AIDS
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HEALTH & LIFE


MYTH: H^ernnd-Psc Hsi^e in itrs i

a For-Prfit Hospice.^^^


FACT: He ^rnand-PscoHsie is a^

501 ()(3) ot-FrPft Organization












Six heart medications offered in single pill


9 What can you
tell me about
* the "polypill"?
A The so-called
"polypill" is a combina-
tion of six medications
in one pill or capsule
taken once a day to pre-
vent heart attacks and
strokes. The polypill
(Polycap). is a combina- Richard ]
tion of three blood pres- ASK
sure-lowering drugs 'in PHARB
low doses (thiazide di-
uretic, atenolol and
ramipril), a station drug (simvas-


E
k


tatin), low-dose aspirin,
and folic acid - all in
one capsule. All of these
medications are avail-
able as generics so it
should not be very ex-
pensive if the polypill
' _ ever comes to market,
which could be several
,years from now.
Hoffmann ' A recent study tested
THE the polypill (Polycap) in
fACIST about 2,000 people at 50
centers across India.
The study participants
were age 45 to 80 years old without


cardiovascular disease, but had at
least one risk factor for heart dis-
ease - high blood pressure, high
cholesterol, obesity, diabetes or
smoking.
Some of the participants received
the polypill (Polycap) once a day
while others received aspirin alone,
simvastatin alone, thiazide diuretic
alone, combinations of blood pres-
sure-lowering drugs alone, or com-
binations of blood
pressure-lowering drugs plus as-
pirin. Results from this preliminary
study showed that people taking the
polypill (Polycap) lowered their


blood pressure by about seven units
compared to those given no blood
pressure-lowering medication. The
polypill (Polycap) also reduced LDL
(bad) cholesterol by about 23 per-
cent and triglycerides by about 10
percent Anti-clotting effects of the
polypill (Polycap) were about the
same as aspirin alone and reduc-
tions in heart rates were also about
the same as other people taking
atenolol. Side effects of the polypill
(Polycap) were about the same as
the other treatment groups.
While these results are only pre-
liminary and much more study is


needed, the study researchers con-
cluded that the polypill (Polycap)
formulation could be conveniently
used to reduce multiple risk factors
and cardiovascular risk A much
larger study is now needed to see
whether the polypill (Polycap) actu-
ally does cut heart attacks and
strokes.

Richard Hoffmann has been a'
pharmacist for more than 20
years. Send questions to him at
1135 N. Timucuan Trail,
Inverness FL 34453.


CHARACTERS
Continued from Page C1

Chelsea Staub still keeps Face-
book and MySpace pages but has
mostly defected to Twitter, saying
she has been on the site pretty
much nonstop for the past couple
of months.
"I'm pretty addicted," she gig-
gles, adding she realized just how
addicted when she boarded a Los
Angeles-bound flight in Chicago
recently and felt her heart leap
when she discovered the plane
had WiFi. That meant she could
Tweet all the way home.
"At first I'm like, All right!" re-
calls Staub, who stars opposite the
Jonas Brothers in their new TV se-
ries. "Then I'm like, This may be a
problem. I don't write my mom or
do anything else anymore."
Twitterites tend to skew toward


Staub's generation, North says, be-
cause they grew up using cell
phones as extensions of their bod-
ies.
Some have even been known to
use them. to text-message people
standing right next to them, often
to pass on such vital information
as their immediate need to use a
bathroom. They were made for
Twitter.
By comparison, Facebookers
prefer more extended wireless so-
cializing to getting and sending
snippets of chatter.
Facebook's own data says its
fastest-growing segment of users is
over 35. One is Paula Symons, a 58-
year-old corporate communica-
tions executive from Madison,
Wis., who signed on 18 months ago
and quickly became Facebook pals
with the friends of her 26-year-old
son.
"Which is very weird," she says.
"But now I'm finding all these peo-


ple I know who are my age."
In the old days, such people
might have been the ones who
gathered at the neighborhood bar
after work or at a weekend picnic
to play games and talk
These days, however, after post-
ing photos and exchanging quips,
many get caught up in one of the
many Facebook-linked games,
perhaps the one in which players
pretend to be farmers and spend
hours milking cyber cows and
chasing cyber chickens.
"I don't have enough time to do
this myself," North quickly says of
that game. "But I know people who
are obsessed with it"
And remember MySpace? It
started out attracting the young
and hip with its graphics and
music platform.
But Jeffrey Cole, who runs the
Center for the Digital Future at
USC's Annenberg School for Com-
munications, now compares it to


last year's hot nightspot
It still draws its share of people,
Just not the really coolest ones
anymore.
"One thing we have seen for a
while is that for teenagers, social
networking sites are like night-
clubs," Cole says. "When a night-
club becomes too popular, or the
uncool kids start showing up, the
cool kids are out of there."
Don't tell that to Isabella
Galeazzi, a student at a Southern
California middle school who says
all the coolest kids in her classes
can still be found on MySpace. Old
people, she says, inhabit Facebook
and celebrities have taken over
Twitter.
And those elaborate, page-build-
ing graphics MySpace is known
for? The ones that'drove some of
the over-50 crowd right over to
Facebook when they couldn't fig-
ure out how to work them?
"That's my favorite part,"


Galeazzi says. "I've got icons that
explain my mood, and back-
grounds that are really colorful,
and cool pictures and all kinds of
stuff."
Galeazzi isn't interested in be-
coming one of the 200 million peo-
ple on Facebook, but she is as
addicted to MySpace as Staub is to
Twitter.
Galeazzi estimates she spends
three or four hours a day on it
"Friends get mad because I can
never hang out with them at the
mall," she says.
Sociologist Karen Sternheimer
says that's the attraction of all so-
cial networking sites. No matter
how flashy or simplistic, they pro-
vide a chance to interact with oth-
ers in a way that requires the least
possible personal commitment
"It allows people to maintain the
most superficial of relationships
without any kind of investment,"
Sternheimer says.


GROUPS
Continued from Page C2

* SPRING HILL--Leu-
kemia/Lymphoma Support
Group, 5 to 6:30 p.m. the
fourth Tuesday monthly at the
Florida Cancer Institute - New.
Hope's Spring Hill Center,
10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203
in the Medical Arts Building
next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call
Jeff Haight, R.N., support group
facilitator, at (352) 688-7744.
* Citrus County Multiple
Sclerosis Support Group. 1
p.m. Wednesday, May 27,
Mango Grill Restaurant, 9576
N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Dunnel-
Ion, for a MS lunch.'meeting
session.
Call. Peggy Morisi at 344-
4855 or Florence Cicarelli at
637-4014. Guests are always
welcome. This will be the final
meeting of the group until Sep-
tember.
* Look Good ... Feel
Better, a free two-hour session
for women undergoing radiation
or chemotherapy, at 3 p.m. the
second Wednesday monthly at
the Cancer & Blood Disease
Center, Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the
fourth Wednesday monthly at
the Robert Boissoneault Oncol-
ogy Institute, Lecanto.
Call Mildred Roseberry (746-
7212) or the American Cancer
Society (800) 395-LOOK
(5665) to register.
* Emotions Anonymous
12 step support group, noon
the second and fourth Thurs-
days monthly at Central Ridge
Library, Forest Ridge Boulevard
and Roosevelt, in'Beverly Hills.
Call Meg at 527-2443.
* Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization, serving Central
Florida, offers monthly support
group meetings. Public is in-
vited.
* 10 a.m. Thursday, May 28,
Woodland Terrace, 124 W.
Norvell Bryant Highway, Her-
nando. Call Pam Pepitone at
249-3100.
The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization branch office in Cit-
rus County is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. the second Mon-.
day monthly. Call the Citrus
County community service rep-
resentative Ellen Mallon at 860-
2525.



With Medicare &
Supplement you
may be eligible to receive
a power wheelchair

NO-

Out-01- j
Picket __



Quality Mobility NC.
Home Medical Equipment
Hospital Beds * Wheelchairs * Etc.
1 599 SE U.S. Highway 19
Crystal River
564-1414


Organizations
* Support group meetings
are in the CMHS Administration
Building unless otherwise indi-
cated.
* ACS Man to Man
Prostate Support and Educa-
tion Program meets in the
conference room at the Robert
.Boissoneault Oncology Institute.
at 522 N. Lecanto Highway in
the Allen Ridge Medical Mall.
Spouses and.caregivers are
welcome. Call 527-0106.
* Bariatric Support Group:
6:30 p.m. every three months,
Cypress Room. Call Claudia
Blotz at 697-0051 or Bette
Clark at 860-0383.
* Breast Cancer Support
Group: noon the second Fri-
day,' Robert Boissoneault Can-'
cer Institute. Call Judy Bonard
at 527-4389.
* Citrus Cancer Support:
4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday,
cafeteria meeting room. May
19: Infection Control Update;
CMHS Infection Control Practi-
tioner. Call Carol at 726-1551,
ext. 6596 or ext. 3329.
* Cancer Support: 3 p.m..
last Thursday, Cancer Treat-
ment Center. Call 746-1100.
* Diabetes Support Group:
11:30 a.m. the fourth Wednes-
day, Cypress Room. Call Carol
McHugh at 341-6110.
* Hospice of Citrus
County support groups for
2008. Free,' but reservations
suggested. Call Jonathan
Beard at 527-2020.
* Caregiver support group, 1
p.m. second and fourth Monday
monthly at the Citrus County
Community Center, 2804 W.
Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto.
* Newly Bereaved Work-
shop, 1 p.m. Thursday at the
Hospice of Citrus County Clini-
cal Office, 326 S. Line Ave., In-
verness.
* Grief support group, 11
a.m. Tuesday at Our Lady of
Grace Parish Life Center, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.


Caregiver group to
skip meeting Monday
Special to the Chronicle

The Wings Grief Suppoll Team of Hospice of Citrus
County moderates The Caregiver Support Group, which
meets at 1 p.m. the second and fourth Monday monthly
at the Central Citrus Community Center, 2804 W Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto.
There will be no meeting on Monday, Memorial Day.
Like to talk with other caregivers? Share ideas and
strategies? Ask for support during a difficult moment?
Help someone solve a problem? Then plan on attending
the Caregiver Support Group.
The Caregi\ er Support Group is free and open to the
public. No reservations are required. For information,
call Mary Williams at 527-2020.


* Grief support group, 1 p.m.
Tuesday at the Hospice of Cit-
rus County Clinical Office, 326
S. Line Ave., Inverness.
* Grief support group, 10:30
a.m. Saturday at First United
Methodist Church, 831 W..
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
* Christian-based grief sup-
port group, 1:15 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Gulf To
Lake Ministry Complex, 1506
N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River.
* Social support group, 10
a.m. Tuesday at Crystal Para-
dise Restaurant, 508 N. Citrus
Ave., Crystal River.
* Social support group, 3:30
p.m. Friday at Joe's Family
Restaurant, 911 W. Main St.,
Inverness.
* LIFT luncheon (for widows
and widowers), 11:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club, Her-
nando. Call Teddi Holler at 746-
6518 for reservations and
details.
* Parents support group, a
chapter of Bereaved Parents of
the USA, 7 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at First
Presbyterian Church, 1501 S.E.
U.S. 19, Crystal River.
* Alzheimer's Association-
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter
support groups:


May 30 - Inverness Chapel of
Christian Felowship - Calvary apel
U.S. 4t South (',xt to Chas. E. Davis Fu r omre)
10'1 n. to 3 p.m.
J.D. Brennaf7nd Gold Fever and
performs hits f rn the 50s and 60s

Donations accepted:.,ash ~ non-parishable bds
To benefit the Faiily Resource Ceter and
The Hunger & Hdmrneless a ition

RainiDate: Sunday; May 31- i to 5 p.m.

For mporeiF rmation "cay Resource
CM ant 't t 44-1001 or Jim Brennan . ... ..
of t9ie rold Fever Band at 637-6390 CH*pNIcJE


* Cedar Creek at Kings Bay
Assisted Living Residence, 231
N.W. U.S. 19, Crstal River, 3
p.m. first Thursday monthly.
Call Wendy Hall at 527-4600.
* Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41
S., Inverness, 11, a.m. first
Tuesday monthly. Call Wendy
Hall at 527-4600.
Weekly meetings
E Anorexia and bulimia
anonymous 12-step support
group meets at 5:45 p.m. every
Monday at the Yana Club, 147
N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River
(behind the police station). For
.more information, call Char-
maine at 422-3234.
* Independent Living
Skills, Peer Support and Lit-
eracy workshops, 9 to 11:45
a.m. Monday at the Center for
Independent Living of North
Central Florida, 3774 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Lecanto. Call
Cathy Jackson at 527-8399.
* Beverly Hills Community
Church Community Support
Group, a 12-step program,
meets at 6 p.m. Tuesday in
the fellowship hall, 88 Civic Cir-
cle. Free. All are invited. Call
the church at 746-3620 or Meg
at 527-2443.
* Hernando-Pasco Hospice
presents free grief support


programs, 2:30 p.m. Tuesday
at Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center for anyone who has
experienced the sudden loss of
a loved one.
Registration required. Call
(800) 486-8784.
* Celebrate Recovery, 7 to
9 p.m. Friday at Seven Rivers
Christian School in rooms
216/217 of school building C.
Dinner available before the
meeting from 6 to 7 p.m. for $3
donation and a coffee house
after.
Call SRPC at 746-6200.
* Celebrate Recovery, 7
p.m. Wednesday and Fridays
at the Christian Recovery Fel-
lowship Church, 2242 W. State
Road 44. Call 726-2800.'
:. Celebrate Recovery at
Gulf to Lake Church Ministry
Complex, West Gulf-to-Lake
Highway in Crystal River. Din-
ner at 6 p.m. Friday, followed
by large- and small-group time
and a Coffee Cafe at 9. Call
795-0649.
* Beverly Hills Gay and
Lesbian Support Group
meets weekly. Free, open to
everyone. Group organizer is
PamelaRae and co-organizer is
Wayne Thomas. Call Pame-
laRae at 560-3247 for direc-
tions and details.
* Citrus Abuse Shelter As-
sociation (CASA), 1100 Turner
Camp Road, Inverness, offers
two free weekly women's do-
mestic abuse support groups:
* 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday.
* 10:30 a.m. to noon
Wednesday. ,
Child care available.
Call CASA at 344-8111.
* Overcomers Group for
people recovering from addic-
tions to drugs, alcohol or other
out-of-control habits meets at 8
p.m. Monday at the Sanctuary,
7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Call Paul at 628-2874.
* Dunnellon Life Recovery
group for adults where addic-
tion, compulsion and co-depen-
dency issues are dealt with, at


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7 p.m. Monday at Rainbow
Springs Village Church, 20222
S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnel-
Ion. Call Char at (352) 465-
1644 or Nancy at (352)
794-0017.
* AI-Anon groups meet reg-
ularly in Citrus County. Call
(352) 697-0497.
* Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S.
41.
* Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m.
Tuesday, St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S. Sun-
coast Blvd.
* Last Resort AFG: 11:30
a.m. Wednesday, First United
Methodist Church; 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road, Inver-
ness.
* Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unity Church of Cit-
'rus County, 2628 Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
* Courage AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W..
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
Open meeting. Call Victoria at
503-3961.
* Crystal River AFG: 11:30
a.m. Thursday at YANA Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.

See GROUPS/Page C4

WWW.


LendEars
.corn






Of S O





Participants
sought
for study of

Ziga Hearing Aid
invention.
Free audiology exams and
hearing aid fittings through
2009 Resound research grant.
Free candidate screenings
open to public.
May 18th - 22nd












700 S.E. 5th Terrace
Crystal River, FL
Call 795-5700


!


TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 C3


HEALTH & LIFE


CrrRus Country (FL) CHRONICLE







% ,a-& crUES ASE A ,V 1


Tophaceous gout complication a pain in the foot


I have written about cause short-term dis-
gout, acute gout at- ability, requiring the
tacks, and general- use of medical services.
ized hyperuricemia in Gout is an arthritic
past articles. Recently I 7 , manifestation of hyper-
have had two interesting , uricemia or elevated
cases of tophaceous gout - blood levels of uric
and thought a general re- - - acid.
view of tophaceous gout - Hyperuricemia can
may be in order occur as a result of
-Gout primarily affects Dr. David Raynor many reasons, such as
men older than 50 with BEST FOOT dietary intake of exces-
presentation rates of ap- FORWARD sive protein, alcohol, or
proximately 14/1,000 FORWARD fructose, as well as de-
males versus 6/1,000 fe- hydration, diuretic
males. Acute gout attacks seem to management, hypertension metab-
be on the rise, and some literature olism from dietary ingested protein
sources claim it is the second most and internal endogenous produc-
common -form of inflammatory tion of necessary nucleic acids.
arthritis in the United States.. Normal uric acid concentration
Gout attacks are a significant in plasma is generally under 7 mil-
public health problem in the ligrams/deciliter and is a clear, col-
United States as the attacks usually orless liquid identified by the


kidney and excreted to the urine as
waste in order to maintain proper
plasma levels within the normal
metabolic range.
The liver produces uric acid in
metabolism and the kidney dis-
cards it as waste in the urine. Uric
acid can build up abnormally in the
plasma if the liver produces too
much (overproduction) or if the
kidney does not excrete enough
(underexcretion). Gout manifests
when the plasma uric acid level el-
evates to the point where the uric
acid precipitates out of plasma so-
lution into its crystalline form, usu-
ally in joints, especially the great
toe joint
Acute gout attacks produce
rapid onset of intense pain, heat,
and swelling about the effected
joint(s) that generally require med-'
ical attention as the immune sys-


tem is activated by the presence of
these "foreign" crystals, viewed as
hostile invaders. Tophaceous gout
occurs in the absence of the acute
phase over time if hyperuricemia
is not addressed. In such cases of
tophaceous gout, soft tissues,
joints, and bones can be literally
packed full of uric acid crystals
until the joints and tissues'bulge
out and distort under the pressure
from this toothpaste-like gouty
tophi.
Approximately 50 percent of
poorly managed hyperuricemic
patients with a history of gouty at-
tacks will show some tophi after
about 10 years after their first
acute attack. Tissues can become
so packed with uric acid crystals
that spontaneous rupture of the tis-
sues can occur on occasion, lead-
ing to actual discharge or drainage


of a white, chalky, paste-like mate-
rial from the tissue that is often
mistaken for infection. Infection is
a risk if these ruptured areas and
draining tophaceous deposits are
not properly addressed.
Gouty arthritis tends to present
as an intermittent painful arthritis
of the great toe joint A minority of
cases can become tophaceous,
which presents unlike classic
acute gout attacks and has its own
unique treatment issues. Next
week I will elaborate on a couple
interesting cases I have seen lately
in patients with tophaceous gout

David B. Raynor, DPM, is a
podiatrist in Inverness and can
be reached at 726-3668 with
questions or suggestions for
future columns.


GROUPS
Continued from Page C3

* Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday, St.
Margaret Episcopal Church,
114 N. Osceola Ave., Inver-
ness.
* Beginners Al-Anon: 10
a.m. Saturday at Yana Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
* Alcoholics Anonymous:
If you drink, and want to stop,
call Alcoholics Anonymous Na-
ture Coast Intergroup at 621-
0599. Web site:
www.ncintergroup.com.
M AC Group meets at 7 p.m.


Tuesday at Church Without
Walls, 3962 N. Roscoe Road,
Hernando. Call Laverne at 637-
4563. Web site: www.alcoholics
forchrist.com:
* Overeaters Anonymous:
Call 746-7749 or 341-0777.
* 3 p.m. Monday at the
senior center (VA building) on
County Road 491, Lecanto.
Call Delores, 746-5019.
* Noon Thursdays at Our
Lady of Grace Parish Hall, 6
Roosevelt Blvd, Beverly Hills.
Call Francisca, 746-7749.
* "Circle of Love" 1 p.m.
Thursday at Our Lady of
Grace Church, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call 746-
7749, 726-9112.or 341-0777.
* 7 p.m. Friday at Our Lady


,of Grace Parish Hall, 6 Roo-
sevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call
Carolyn, 341-0777.
* CEA-HOW, for people who
have an eating disorder, at
noon Wednesdays at the First
Presbyterian Church, 206
Washington Ave., Inverness.
Call Judi M. at 726-5882.
* Reiki clinic meets from 7
to 9 p.m. most Wednesdays at
the Beverly Hills Community
Center, 1 Civic Circle, Beverly
Rills. Call Ann Thonen at 795-
5116 or Kristi Kobler at 628-
5537.
* Narcotics Anonymous:
* Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Mon-
day and Saturday, Lions Den,
U.S. 41, Floral City.
* It Works How and Why, 7


SO YOU KNOW
* Support groups
appear as space is
available, with prefer-
ence given to meetings
within the upcoming
week. Thus, listings
change weekly.

p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Saturday and noon Sunday,
YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh
St., Crystal River.
* Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m,
Thursday,. First Christian
Church, Grover Cleveland
Boulevard, Homosassa.
* Recovery on the River, 8
p.m. Monday and Friday,
Lecanto Church of Christ, State


Road 44 and County Road 491,
Lecanto; 8 p.m. Sunday 797 S.
Rowe Terrace, Lecanto, east of
County Road 491 and State
Road 44.
Narcotics Anonymous is not
affiliated with any of the meet-
ing facilities listed. Information
line: 382-0851.
* Narconon provides an-
swers to drug addiction, pro-
vides free assessments,
evaluation and referral services
to internationally recognized al-
ternative and traditional treat-
ment facilities. When continuing
relapse is occurring, call (800)
468-6933 or visit www.stopad-
diction.com.
* Depression and Bipolar
Support Alliance of Citrus


County at 7 p.m. Thursday in
Bailey Hall, First Lutheran
Church, 1900 State Road 44
W., Inverness. Doors open at 6
p.m. Call 503-3262. The Na-
tional DBSAAssociation's num-
ber is (800) 826-3632.
*. The Encouragers Sup-
port Group has been helping
people deal with depression,
anxiety, bipolar and more for
more than 15 years..Weekly
meeting. Call 628-3831 or 637-
3196.
* SPRING HILL - Parkin-
soin's Tai Chi Group, 2:30 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday in the pri-
vate dining room at Health-
South Rehabilitation Hospital of
Spring Hill. Call Charissa
Haffner at (352) 346-8864.


DODGE
Continued from Page C1

What are the best nutri-
tional building materials?
Without question, top-grade
nutritional building materi-
als include vegetables, fruit,
whole grains, pure water,
healthy sources of good pro-
tein and oil, and a few foods
like nuts, eggs and sea veg-
gies. Using the best mix of
one's materials is important
in home construction, and
this is true in health also.



GRILLO
Continued from Page C1

35-decibel snore.
The Guinness Book of
World Records in 1984
recorded a 'gentleman in
England who snored at a.
peak of 87.5 decibels. This is
about the same noise level as
riding:in a diesel bus when
sitting toward the rear of the
vehicle. I
There is no lack of would-
be snoring remedies. The
U.S. patent office has300 reg-
istered to date, everything
from strapping a ball to one's
back to force one to sleep on
his stomach to chin straps to
devices to keep the airway
open and not collapsing and


Research says nine to 10
servings of vegetables and
fruit daily, with similar
amounts of whole grains, pro-
vide us with ideal levels of
many vitamins and antioxi-
dants, as well as much of our
protein, fiber and energy
needs. These are the true nu-
tritional powerhouse materi-,
als for our bodies. Additional
protein and oil from sources
like fish, nuts, eggs and occa-
sional servings of lean white
meat provide added value.
These are the basics.
Avoiding shoddy building
materials, is important in


obstructing, which causes the
snoring sound.
It was said that a legendary
Texas gunfighter in the 1800s
became so upset with a snor-
ing guest in the next hotel
room that he shot the poor in-
dividual through the wall in
efforts to get him to cease
snoring.
. Not only is snoring loud
and disturbs companions, but
the sound is quite irregular
and we can sometimes mar-
vel at the rollercoaster of va-
riety of sounds that can be
produced by a snorer, some-
-times quite frightening, sug-
gesting that it may be their
last breath. Couples have
learned to cope with snoring,
usually establishing separate
sleeping quarters, creating
some anguish. But there are


good construction, and it is
equally important in building
a healthy body. Defective nu-
tritional materials include
sugar, white flour, white rice,
trans fats and many
processed foods made with
these nutritionally inferior
substances. Homes built with
poor building blocks may'
look attractive, but their long-
term quality is poor The
same is true with our health.
How do we know about the
quality of various nutritional
building blocks? We knew a
bit 50 years ago when I was in
medical school, Through the


some other possibilities, for
treatment that should be en-
tertained. .
Existing treatment in-
cludes breathing devices to
help keep the airway open as
well as surgical intervention
including laser and radiofre-
quency removal of excess tis-
sue in the airway, which
obstructs and rattles, produc-
ing the snoring sound. In
some instances, snoring is as-
sociated with sleep apnea, a
problems more profound.
Both of these can be evalu-
ated and treated by a physi-
cian.

Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO,
is an ear, nose and throat
specialist in Crystal River.
Call him at 795-0011. '


years since then, thousands
of research studies have
given us much more solid in-
formation about the value of
most foodstuffs. We still have
more to learn, but today the
overall picture is clear.
Veggies, fruits, and whole
grains are immensely valu-
able foods that boost our im-
mune systems and help
protect us from infection,
cancer and many degenera-
tive diseases. By contrast,
many processed foods are
bereft of much nutritional
value. Sugar, a major culprit,
not only fails to improve


health, but contributes to a
variety of health problems.
Many foods are palatable
mainly because of being
sweetened with sugar
Taste is not a reliable guide
when it comes to choosing
foods for nutritional value.
Yet, most of us depend on our
taste buds in deciding what to
eat We want something that
tastes good, and that usually
means something familiar
Many people today are most
familiar with foods of poor
nutritional value, and so that
is what they prefer.
The good news is that our


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HEALTH & LIFE


C4 T DYMAY 19 2009












Teeth whitening methods vary in effectiveness


Q I am inter-
* ested in
* whitening my
tee for an upcoming
reunion. I have seen "
and read about so many
different ways of doing
this. What are your
feelings on whitening -
teeth? -
A: I think that tooth Dr. F
whitening is one of the Vasci
things that dentistry SOUND
has to offer that will
make a big difference
for a relatively small investment.
Just picture what your smile
would look like with whiter teeth.
Actually, you do not have to imag-
ine anymore.
Many offices, including mine,
have software that can manipu-
late an image of yourself to show
you what you would look like with
whiter teeth. In addition, you can
even see what a complete dental
makeover could look like. There
are so many times that people do
not consider the appearance of
their teeth when evaluating their
overall appearance. I have read


and seen firsthand that
your smile can be your
biggest asset when
meeting someone for
. l the first time.
There are a number
of ways that you can
whiten your teeth.
There are over-the-
counter products that
rank you can purchase in a
mini store. There is also pro-
BITES fessional whitening
that can be performed
in one of two ways. The
first way is through the fabrication
of a form that fits on your teeth.
The second way is through an in-
office procedure. I will briefly de-
scribe all three methods.
Over-the-counter
The most popular over-the-
counter method is Crest whitening
strips. These are strips that you
place on your teeth that are im-
pregnated with a whitening solu-
tion. These have been shown to
work but they only reach the front
teeth and there is "no supervision
by a dentist. You can also pur-
chase a system that has a prefab-


ricated tray that you put the
whitening gel in. This method is
not very precise because the tray
is generic in nature and does not
fit well.
You can also find systems like
this that have a tray that you heat
and form around your teeth. This
one works better but I have seen
people get sore gums because
there is very little control on how
well the tray fits. You also tend to
use a lot of whitening material,
which of course runs up the cost
with mediocre results at best. This
way also does not have the benefit
of your dentist's supervision. 13A
general, I have seen the over-the-
counter versions work, but not
normally to the level that the pa-
tient expected.
Professional tray system
This is done in the dental office
from a tray that is made specifi-
cally for you. A gel is placed in the
tray and worn for 1 to 1.5 hours at
a time. The time it takes for
whitening to take place varies
from patient to patient; however,
two to three weeks is a good aver-
age. This method is very pre-


dictable and long lasting. ,
In the event that you need to
whiten again in the future, all you
have to do is put some gel in the
tray and wear it for a few sessions.
Professional in-office method
This in-office method entails
the placement of a protective bar-
rier around the teeth on the gums.
The dentist then places the
whitening solution on the teeth
and uses a heat and light source to
shine on the teeth. This usually
takes two to three one-hour ses-
sions; however, if the teeth do not
need much whitening, it can take
only one session. You are more apt
to get what is called rebound from
this method. Rebound is when the
teeth darken a little after the pro-
cedure is completed. It is for this
reason that in many cases the den-
tist will make a tray for you to
wear at home after the in-office
whitening.
One of the dental journals that I
read just dedicated an issue to
teeth whitening. It was the overall
consensus that the safest method
was the professional tray system.
That is not to say that the others


do not work They felt that it made
most sense to have a dentist eval-
uate the patient, diagnose the sit-
uation and make the appropriate
suggestion for treatment. They
also felt that since the end result
was the same between the in-of-
fice and the tray system that the
tray system was the treatment of
choice.
It is not clear if there is extra
risk being taken with the light and
heat source for no benefit in the
end result There has been exten-
sive research using the tray sys-
tem and the appropriate
whitening solution with no risk to
the teeth or the patient.
To recap: I think you should
whiten your teeth. You will be
thrilled with the result as long as it
is done under the right circum-
stances. Enjoy your reunion!


Dr Frank Vascimini is a
Homosassa dentist Send your
questions to 4805 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 or
e-mail them to him at info@
masterpiecedentalstudio.com.


GANDHI
Continued from Page C1

survival.
Researchers from the Uni-
versity of Illinois Urbana-
Champaign analyzed data
from the State of Illinois Can-
cer Registry. The authors
continued the assessment in
an analysis that focused on
the rural-urban gradient of
late-stage cancer risk in Illi-
nois for 1998 through 2002.
They limited the analysis to
four major types of cancer:
breast, colorectal, lung and
prostate. These are the four
most common kinds of can-
cers.
They divided areas in five
parts as follows: Chicago,
Chicago suburbs, other met-
ropolitan areas, large towns
(population 10,000 to 50,000)
and rural areas (population
less than 10,000).
Analysis of late-stage can-
cer diagnosis by the five geo-
graphic areas revealed a
"clear and remarkably con-
sistent rural-urban gradient
in late-stage risk,'" the au-
thors said. "Risk is highest in
Chicago, decreases in the less


BENNETT.
Continued from Page Cl

cyclic amines, which might
increase cancer risk Hete-
rocyclic amines (HAs) are
created by the burning of
amino acids and other sub-
stances in meats cooked at
particularly high tempera-
tures and that are particu-
larly well done. HAs turn up
in grilled, and barbecued
meat as well as broiled and
pan-fried meat.
The link between eating
well-done meat and pancre-
atic cancer risk has been
noted before. This study in-
vestigates the association on
a larger scale. Researchers
with the University of Min-
nesota's School of Public
Health and Masonic Cancer
Center surveyed the eating
habits of more than 62,000
people, noting meat intake,
preferred cooking methods,
and doneness preferences.
The study participants were
then followed for an aver-
age of nine years as part of
the PLCO (Prostate, Lung,
Colorectal and Ovarian)
screening trial.
During the nine-year pe-
riod, the researchers found
that people who preferred
well-done meat, whether
bacon, sausage, hamburger
or' steak, tended to have an


urbanized zones,'and reaches
a nadir in other metropolitan
areas and large towns."
The exact cause of this is
unclear at this time. The au-
thor considered many differ-
ent variables such as age and
race. Differences in age and
race did not explain the geo-
graphic disparities seen for
lung cancer, indicating that
other factors - such as can-
cer awareness or diagnostic
differences - account for the
rural-urban differences in
late-stage lung cancer diag-
nosis.
A high concentration of
vulnerable populations and
economically disadvantaged
areas in Chicago and its sub-
urbs accounted for the high
rates of late-stage diagnosis
found in these highly urban
areas. Among the different
races, the black population
was particularly vulnerable
to late diagnosis. In contrast,
the lower rates of late-stage
diagnosis in rural areas re-
flected the greater presence
of elderly patients who have
a lower risk of late-stage di-
agnosis, likely because of fre-
quent doctors' visits and
age-related cancer screen-
ings.


increased risk of getting
pancreatic cancer. Re-
searchers found that those
who preferred very well
done steak were almost 60
percent more likely to get
pancreatic cancer as those
who ate steak less well done
or did not eat steak at all.
Furthermore, when they
looked at the amount of con-
sumption with doneness
preferences, they found that
those with the highest in-
take of very well done meat
had a 70 percent higher risk
for pancreatic cancer over
those with lowest consump-
tion.
These findings are fur-
ther evidence that turning
down the heat when grilling,
.frying and barbecuing to
avoid excess ,burning or
charring of the meat may be
a sensible way for some peo-
ple to lower their risk for
getting pancreatic cancer.
So, as we enter the summer
months here in Florida and
grilling takes on it role as a
national pastime, let's look
at some ways to limit your
exposure to potentially can-
cer-causing HAs.
To start, try these healthy
barbequing tips:
* Choose lean cuts of
meat and trim any excess
fat. Fat dripping onto hot
coals causes smoke that
contains potential carcino-
gens. Less fat means less


We in ... Citrus
County have a
better chance of
surviving cancer.


The authors noted that "all
other factors being equal, pa-
tients who live outside the
Chicago area are 25 percent
to 35 percent less likely than
their Chicago-area counter-
parts to present with late-
.stage lung cancer."
This article sheds light on
the fact that we in this rural
area here in Citrus County
have a better chance of sur-
viving cancer than those in
big cities.
---g----M---
Dr Sunil Gandhi is a
hematologist and
oncologist He is the
volunteer medical adviser
of the Citrus Unit of the
American Cancer Society.
Send questions or
comments to 521 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
FL 34461 or e-mail to
sgandhi@tampabay.rr.com
or call 746-0707.


smoke.
. Line the grill with foil
and poke small holes in it so
the fat can still drip off, but
the amount. of smoke com-
ing back onto the meat is
lower.
* Avoid charring meat or
eating parts that are espe-
cially burned and black A
as I, stated above, they have
the highest concentrations
of HAs.
* And finally, add colorful
vegetables and fruit to the
grill. Many of the chemicals
that are created when meat
is grilled are not formed
during the grilling of vegeta-
bles or fruits, so you can
enjoy grilled flavor worry-
free. Red, yellow and green
peppers, yellow squash,
mushrooms, red onions and
pineapple all grill well and
make healthy additions. to
your plate.


Dr C. Joseph Bennett is a
board-certified radiation
oncologist, past president
of the Citrus County Unit of
the American Cancer
Society and a member of
the Board ofDirectors and
Executive Committee of
the Florida Division of the
American Cancer Society.
Contact him at 522 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
FL 34461 or e-mail
cjbennett@rboi.com.


MedicalEQUIPMENT


* The Center for Independent Living of
North Central Florida supplies no-cost amplified
telephones and other equipment for the hearing
impaired. Call 527-8399, ask for Linda Perry.
* Telecommunication equipment is avail-
able to any Florida resident who has a hearing or
speech impairment. Call Citrus Hearing Impaired
Program Services at 795-5000 (voice) or 795-
7243 (TTY). Visit the Web site at www.ftri.org.
* The Beverly Hills Lions Club Inc. has a loan


closet for wheelchairs, walkers, canes, bath
chairs, etc. Call Lion Warren Adams, 746-1984.
* Florida Alliance for Assistive Services
and Technology (FAAST) will exhibit and
demonstrate adaptive and assistive devices for
people with disabilities and the elderly at the
Center for Independent Living's Lecanto office.
FAAST is at 3774 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Lecanto. The center is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5
p.m. Monday through Friday. Call 527-8399.


569-0519 TUCRN

NOTICE OF ESTABLISHMENT OR CHANGE
OF A REGULATION AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND,
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CHANGE AND/OR
CHANGE OF LAND USE

The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners (BCC) proposes to adopt or change by ordinance: A regulation
affecting the use of land; the comprehensive plan, and/or the use of land within and for the area shown on the map
in this advertisement. The overall impact of these proposals may be significant.
The Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) will review and discuss the proposed 2009 Second Large
Cycle Amendments to the Citrus County Comprehensive Plan (Ord. No. 89-04) and Land Development Code Atlas
(Ord.No.90-14).
Comprehensive Plan Amendment 09-01 - Department of Development Services
CPA-09-10 - Chapter Five Infrastructure Element
An update of the Capital Improvement Projects listed in the Potable Water and Wastewater sub-elements. An update
to Appendices B, C, D, & E to include newly acquired potable water and wastewater facilities.
Comprehensive Plan Amendment 09-13
CPA-09-13 - Clark A. Stillwell for Citrus Minine and Timber. Inc.
A request for a text amendment to the Future Land Use Element of the Comprehensive Plan to add a new land use
district known as the Port District. The new district will allow for master planned waterfront development that
could include residential, commercial, and industrial uses.
Comprehensive Plan Amendment 09-14
CPA-09-14 - Clark A. Stillwell for Citrus Mining and Timber. Inc.
Re-designation of approximately 545 acres from Industrial District (IND), Conservation District (CON), Extractive
District (EXT), and Transportation/Communication/Utilities District (TCU) to Port District and Transportation/
Communication/Utilities District (TCU) on the Generalized Future Land Use Map (GFLUM). Location: Sections
08,09,10 & 11,Township 17 South, Range 16 East. Further described as parcel 13000 in 16E17S10, a portion of
11000 in 16E17S09 a portion of 11100 in 16E17S08. (Including the areas known as parcel 10000 and parcel 13200
in section 16E17S 10) The subject property lies north of the Florida Barge Canal and west of US 19 (Inglis area).
(The complete legal description is on file with the Department of Development Services.)
Comprehensive Plan Amendment 09-15
CPA-09-15 - Clark A. Stillwell for River Lodge Resort.LLC
Re-designation of approximately 170 acres from Industrial District (IND), Low Intensity Coastal and Lakes District
(CL), and Public/Semi-Public Institutional District (PSI), to Recreational Vehicle Park (RVP) and Coastal and Lakes
Commercial (CLC) for Section 11 .Township 17 South.Ranee 16 East. Further described as Parcel 10000, Parcel
14310, and Parcel 42300. The property is located at 13150 W. Foss Groves Path to the east of the existing River
Lodge Resort RV Park. (Inglis Area) (The complete legal description is 6n file with the Department of Development
Services.)
Comprehensive Plan Amendment/Atlas Amendment 09-11
CPA/AA-09-11 - R. Blair Commons for Seven Rivers Presbyterian Church
Re-designation of approximately 22 acres from General Commercial (GNC) and Professional Services/Offices
(PSO) to Public/Semi-Public/Institutional (PSI) on the Generalized Future Land Use Map (GFLUM), and from
General Commercial (GNC) and Professional Services/Offices (PSO) to Public/Semi-Public/Institutional (PSI) on
the Land Development Code Atlas Map (LDCA) for Section 32.Township 18 South. Range 18 East and Section 05.
Township 19 South. Range 18 East. Further described as Lot 22, Lots 13-16, Lots 23-27, Lots 39-32 of unrecorded
Gaynor Subdivision in Section 05,Township 19 South, Range 18 East; and Parcel 22300 in Section 32,Township
18 South, Range 18 East; which property is known as Seven Rivers Presbyterian Church, 4221 West Gulf to Lake
Highway. (Lecanto Area) (The complete legal description is on file with the Department of Development Services.)

LOCATOR MAP





-A









Interested parties may appear at the hearing and be heard regarding the proposed amendment. The PDRB will hold
public meetings on the following dates:
Transmittal Public Hearing: Thursday, June 4,2009,9:00 AM
The meetings will be held in the in the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 166,
Lecanto,Florida,34461. Please note tha the PDRB meeting g begins at 9:00AM. The actual time that a particular
item is discussed will vary depending on how fast the Board moves through the agenda.
All persons desiring to make a request to intervene pursuant to proceedings established in the Citrus County
Quasi-judicial Ordinance #2002-A 18, shall provide written notice to the Department of Development Services at
least five (5) business days prior to the hearing on the matter. Forms for Irequest to intervened may be obtained by
calling (352) 527-5239 or on-line at www.bocccitrus.fl.us/commdev/community developoment.htm and click on
"Quasi-Judicial-FAQ".
Persons are advised that any individual who might wish to appeal any decision made at this meeting/hearing
regarding any matter is hereby advised that they will need a record of the proceedings for such purpose and that
they may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony
and evidence upon which such appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment
should contact the County Administrator's Office, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Room
100, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 341-6580.
Copies of the proposed amendments will be available for inspection and/or purchase between the hours of 8:00 anm.
and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday in the Department of Development Services, Citrus County Division
Community Development, Lecanto Government Center, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 140, Lecanto, FL 34461.
For more information regarding the proposals discussed herein, contact the Department of Development Services at
(352) 527-5239.
Chairman
Citrus County Planning and Development Review Board
769006


570-0526 TUCRN

Public Notice
Marshall and Liza Hash of Citrus County have applied to the Board of County
Commissioners, Office of Utility Regulations for a transfer of the Meadow Wood
Water System Utility Franchise
The Water and Wastewater Authority will review the application at the July 6, 2009
meeting at 1:00 P.M. at the Lecanto Government Building in Room #166
Any concerns may be directed to the Citrus County Office of Utility Regulations at
(352) 527-5452
Below is a map of the area serviced by the Meadow Wood Water System affected by
this transfer of ownership.



low MI 7 I I TM 7 11 SW 73" PU1 72 1 111 W T1-




- I-- Sm M MIN In It Wa o W

719 I90 IM low--M
769907


TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 CS


HEALTH & LIFE


CrrRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'r
�i










Page C6 - TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009



OMMUNITRUS COUNTY
11 CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Lions to serve
pancakes Sunday
The Beverly Hills Lions
Club, 72 Civic Circle Drive,
will have its next pancake
breakfast from 7:30 a.m. until
noon Sunday. The cost is
$3.50 for adults and $1.75 for
Children younger than 12.
Price includes all the pan-
cakes you care to eat, choice
of sausage or bacon or
"combo," orange juice and
coffee. Come join the Lions
for breakfast - socialize and
meet new friends. For addi-
tional information, call Lion
Gail Blandino at 527-7410.
Highlands to do
Memorial Day
The Memorial Day cele-
bration at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center on Little Al
Point will be Sunday, and is
open to the. public. Hot dogs,
etc., will be served at 1 p.m.,
witi beer and soda. The cost
is $8 per person, children
ages 5 to 12,are $4, and chil-
dren younger than 5 eat for
free.
For tickets, call Flo at 344-
1563 or Pauline at 637-4102.
Humanitarians
slate adopt-a-thon
On Sunday, the Humani-
tarians of Florida Inc., will
conduct its feline adoption-a-
thon. Come and visit kittens
and cats from noon to 4 p.m.
All the felines are
spayed/neutered, litter-box
trained, and tested for feline
Leukemia and AIDS. They
have been given age-appro-
priate vaccines and flea pre-
ventative, and their nails
trimmed and ears cleaned.
The Humanitarians' Man-
chester House - look for the
white building with the
brightly colored paw prints -
is on the corner of State
Road 44 and Conant Avenue,
east of Crystal River.
To0 view kittens and cats,
go online to www.hofspha.org,
or call 563-2370.
VFW plans picnic
Monday at post
The Veterans of Foreign
Wars Post 10087 will have a
Memorial Day picnic from '
noon to 3 p.m. Monday at the
post, following the Memorial
Day services at Fero Memo-
rial Gardens Cemetery at 11
a.m.
Price is $6 for one burger,
one hot dog, one sausage
and peppers, potato salad
and beans. Music will be pro-
vided by Jack & Sheila for
the afternoon.
This event is sponsored by
the VFW Men's Auxiliary of
Post 10087, is by ticket only
and only 150 tickets will be
sold.
Legion to have
observance
Wall-Rives Post 58 of the
American Legion will have a
Memorial Day ceremony at
noon on Monday, at their
post on U.S. 41 north of Wal-
mart in Dunnellon.
A barbecue lunch will fol-
low. The public is invited to
attend.

Pet , ,;,, : T

Pergo


Golf tourney helps HOPE


Charity event set for June 6 in Pine Ridge


Special to the Chronicle

The inaugural HOPE Wildlife Golf
Tournament will be Saturday, June 6,
at Pine Ridge Community Golf and
Country Club, in memory of Harry
Wendler Harry, a retired Miami-Dade
police officer and Pine Ridge resi-
dent, was a dedicated friend to all an-
imals and a HOPE supporter.
A shotgun start is at noon for the


scramble-format charity tournament,
with check-in beginning at 11 a.m.
Prizes will be awarded for first, sec-
ond and third places.
There will be contests for longest
drive, closest to the pin and putting.
.The cost per player is $50 for the
general public, $35 for Pine Ridge
Community Golf and Country Club
members, $30 for golfers under 18
years of age, and includes post-golf


hot dogs, hamburgers and pulled
chicken. The deadline for registration
is June 4.
HOPE - Helping Our Precious En-
vironment- Wildlife Rehabilitation
is a nonprofit, all-volunteer organiza-
tion, dedicated to the rehabilitation
and release of injured, orphaned and
displaced animals that are native to
Florida.
HOPE also shelters nine perma-
nently injured (non-releasable)
hawks, owls and falcons which are li-
censed with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife


Service; the birds are used in their
"Wings of HOPE" educational pro-
gram to help educate the community
about birds of prey.
Proceeds from the golf tournament
will help with the enormous food and
medical expenses for the injured and
orphaned wildlife in the care of
HOPE volunteers, who receive no
salary or compensation. HOPE re-
ceives no funding from city, county,
state or federal government agencies.
For an entry form or more informa-
tion, call HOPE Wildlife at 628-9464.


Group Study Exchange


Special t6 pe Chronicle
The Rotary Club of Central Citrus recently hosted members of this year's Group Study Exchange Team from Rotary District 3780 in, the Philip-
Oines. From left are: team members Harry Ruiz Lorenzo, Devine Grace Manlapaz, Central Citrus President Anthony Palumbo, GSE Team Leader
Albert Lee, Portia Cadag, Margaret Joy Clavecillo and Lenna Rosa Desuasido.





Humor, emotion pepper 'The Lucky O'Learys'


he Art Center The-
atre's 2008-09 season
has concluded with a
smash hit "The "Lucky'
O'Lea'rys," written by James
Brochu and directed su-
perbly by Jackie de Torres, a
theater buff since childhood
who has spent a lifetime or-
ganizing, performing or di-
recting theater.
And what a difference a
director can make in the
production of a play! It was
self-evident as we caught the
magnetism de Torres
brought forth with skill and
emotion.
JThe rapid-fire-delivery of
Chris Venable as Peg
O'Leary and the perfect tim-
ing of her abundant come-
backs tinged with a
combination of humor and
irony kept us wanting more.
Her style was genuinely per-
fected and suited her role as
a daffy, manipulative Irish
Brooklyn matron to a "T."
As the plot thickens and
the Peg character aggres-


sively insists her son Brian, patience. Monsignor
played by Chris Hubner, be- William Rafferty, played by
come a priest and not marry John Foye, has a sometimes
Amy, played by Laura calming influence on the
Radecki, the twists and two sisters with his telling
turns and the misinterpreta- statement: "The only thing
tions make for unabated that is doomed is the plans
laughter. Entirely we make for oth-
flamboyant Rose, ers." This play re-
the sister of Peg, minded me of the
played by Jeannie plans that I had
Loehle, is in com- for my daughter
petition with sis- )- . to marry a
ter Peg and boasts florist's son. It,
loudly and long of too, was doomed.
her daughter's They had their
career choice as a sights set on oth-
nun. This pro- ers.
vides the prover- Ruth Levins Add to the mix
bial fire to the F-P'" E, . I i-fTHE an ex-husband of
flame that has . -.-. ~ -... . Peg entering the
burned for years fray and you have
between the two a constant show


sisters.
With lines of protest like
"corned beef and tomato
sauce don't mix" at the
thought of Irish Brian and
Italian Buddhist Amy's
forthcoming marriage, we
have to applaud the couple's


of emotionally charged
characters, all bent on win-
ning the lottery for various
good reasons.
Peg's devotion to St.
Genevieve proves to be a
turning point when the Mon-
signor disproves the saint's


Clubs seek scholarships to send


area children to summer camp

Special to the Chronicle Goodman Lane, off U.S. 19 near Love
Honda and Love Motorsports. The inver-


Families in Citrus County are in need. ness Boys.& Girls Club is at 401 N Apo
The public may help by donating scholar- Ave., across from Liberty Park The Cer
ships of $60 per week or more so that chil- Ridge Boys & Girls Club is the newes
dren may have a safe haven at the Boys & cility and is at 901 Roosevelt Blvd. in
Girls Clubs'of Citrus County under the su- erly Hills, beside the community p
pervision of caring, responsible adults, Summer camp begins June 8 and
; rather than being left home alone during throughout the summer months until
S: the day or with a baby sitter, beginning of school.
We have a waiting list at the Boys & Girls Citrus County boys and girls, 5 to 18 y
� Clubs of Citrus County for youths whose old, need to have somewhere to go du
parents badly need help meeting the fee of the summer months. Unsupervised t
$60 a week to allow their children to attend can be a dangerous time for kids.
the BGCCC summer camps all day, every largest portion of the Boys & Girls Clul
day, so mom and dad can work or seek em- Citrus County budget is spent on sala
Pergo Herndon lives with ployment. for the adults who supervise the child
Holli and Tim Herndon. He BGCCC Neighborhood Clubs are open to Each employee must meet specific qua
loves to play chase and is a children from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays cations and undergo a background scr
bodyguard for two children, during summer camp with planned, fun ac- ing. Help keep the Boys & Girls Club
When Pergo Isn't playing, tivities, field trips and adults who listen to Citrus County the "Positive Place for K
he cuddles up on the kids and care about them. The Westside with a scholarship donation by calling
couch to watch Animal Boys & Girls Club is midway between Crys- 9225 or visiting the Web site at www.cit
Planet on TV. tal River and Homosassa Springs at 8535 bgc.com.

1 Submit information at least two weeks before the event. � Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
I1 Early sulbmi,;,.Nf, i f timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 563-3280; or e-mail to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


�pka
itral
t fa-
Bev-
park.
goes
the

ears
ring
;ime
The
bs of
aries
ren.
alifi-
een-
)s of
ids"
621-
trus-


authenticity.
Lovely Laura Radecki is a
picture-perfect bride-to-be
ever the one to please and
deeply in awe of Peg's un-
abashed audacity. Chris
Hubner as the groom-to-be
is as amorous as "all get
out," suave to the hilt.
The sparring of the Peg
and the Rose characters is
worthy of an Academy
Award performance. Bravo!
Bravo!
Tom Venable, as Martin
O'Leary, the ex of Peg,
brings to his role a combina-
tion of sentimental reflec-
tion and a naughty devilish
delight in his attempt to up-
stage the unflappable Peg.
David Kuhn, as Frank
Baviello, Amy's carefree
Buddhist father, was a bun-
dle of energy who pranced
about the stage as if there
was no tomorrow, and the
cast was put to the task to
contain his show of brute
force for the role he was
given.


* All goes well and in the
end the Martin and Mar-
garet O'Leary Health Cen-
ter, a dream for Monsignor
Rafferty, becomes a catalyst
for what all of us have come
to know: "Miracles are not
the money and in this case,
the $116 million New York
lottery, but the people in our
lives that we meet and come
to love and appreciate."
A play that enthralls, that
teaches, that entertains, that
provides a stimulus for in-
trospection, that's "The
Lucky O'Learys."
Season tickets are now on
sale for the 2009-10 season
by calling the box office at
746-7606.

Ruth Levins participates
in a variety of projects
around the community Let
her know about your
group's upcoming
activities by writing
to PO. Box 803, ,
Crystal River, FL 34423.


Helping Habitat


: d-- -..-, f .

Special to the Chronicle
Ruth and Al Hunter present a check for $500 to Lois Eatz,
public relations director for Habitat for Humanity of Citrus
County, as Joy Trexler-Carr of the Withlapopka Civic Associ-
ation looks on. Money for Habitat was raised by a raffle of a
print by award-winning local artist Neil Adamson, and then
equally matched by the association.

Would you like to lend a hand?
Habitat for Humanity of Citrus County needs volunteers for
its "Everything For, The Home" store in Inverness and to help
with construction or answer phones in the office in Crystal
River. Take advantage of the opportunity to meet new and in-
teresting people and help others by calling 563-2744.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.





PHILLoP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
Francesco Petrarch; an Italian
poet who died in, 1374, said, "A
shortcut to riches is to subtract
. from our desires."
In bridge, is a shortcut to winners
to subtract from ourlosers? It does-
n't sound qdite right, but it feels
close.
In yesterday's grand slam, de-
clarer had only 12 top tricks but
generated a 13th by, executing a
dummy reversal. Today, though,
things look bleak You are in seven
Hearts, and West leads the spade
* king. How many tricks do you have?
How will you try to make your con-
tract?
North's two no-trump was the Ja-
coby Forcing Raise. Your three
spades showed a singleton or void
in that suit. Four diamonds was a
control-bid (cue-bid) promising that


- - Bridge

North 05-19-09
A J 5
� 98652
. AK Q
* K 74
West East
A K Q 107 4 9 8 6 4 32
V4 V 3
* 7.5 2 J 10 8 3
4 J 9863 Q10
South
A A
V A K Q J 10 7
* 9 6 4
* A 5 2
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
1 I Pass 2 NT Pass
3 6' Pass 4 * Pass
4 NT Pass 5 Pass
5NT Pass 6 V Pass
7 V Pass Pass Pass
Opening lead: A K


ace and denying the club ace. You
took over with two doses of Black-
wood before optimistically leaping
to seven hearts.
There are only 12 tricks (one
spade, six hearts, three diamonds
and two clubs) with no apparent
hope for a 13th. You have only two
chances. One is a power outage! Or
you can execute a squeeze, finding
West with the spade queen (marked
from his lead) and at least five clubs.
Win with your spade ace, run all
of your hearts, discarding a club
from the board, and take dummy's
three diamond winners, leaving
everyone with three cards. West,
who will have kept the spade
queen to cover dummy's jack, can
save only two clubs. You cash
dummy's club king, play a club to
your ace and hope that the club five
(or two, for the theatrical!) is now a
winner.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jelf Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I JAROM I


FRUTOH


NEW JUMBLElNINTENDO www.jumble.com/ds
CURPES
/ II


WHEN THE SKIN
POCTOR. OPENED HIS
PRACTICES,
HE 5TARTEP ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A:wers tomorrow)
(Answers tomorrow)


ACROSS 37
38
1 Jungle crusher 39
4 Cholesterol 40
raisers
8 Fidel's friend 41
11 Starfish part
12 Without 42
delay 44
13 "Road" 47
pictures name 51
15 -alai 55
16 Pupa 56
18 Tip off 57
20 Not hunched 58
21 Admirer's 59
S sound 60
23 Crater edge. 61
24 Empower
27 Stove part
29 Mr. Arnold
- 32 Peak 1
33 Ranch 2
measure
34 Between pi and 3
sigma 4
35 Sellout notice 5
36 Monstrous 6
giant


Objectives
Pull hard
Tourist's need
Balance sheet
word
Daisy -
Scraggs
River tamer
Eye part
Legend
Greek or Roman
One, to Fritz
Bad mood
Queue
Sunbeam
Mag fillers
Ferber or Best
Firearms lobby
DOWN
Lower California
Kind of
hygiene
Jacques' girl
Ipso -
Blonde shade
Material at La
Brea


Answer to Previous Puzzle
UIRI � AL S TOMB MW
SIOIUTALOIN LEE
EILI I E L'E NA I M P
R ESIUME&S DEPOT

PAS S ENURTURIE
ELLA WAW N T AID
ESA AVIE BEND
ROMANCE DUSTY
0 CJEJO EEONW
ALTER KATYDID
FEE DENSE ADE
AFT SNEEfR FLA
RT E DEL T N


7 Glimpse
8 Bewitch
9 Perforation
10 Film spectacular
14 Approx.
17 Fishing net


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


5-19


19 Habitual
22 Deli
sandwich
23 Go over again
24 Very large
25 Pantyhose
color
26 Inversion
problem
28 TV hookups
29 Small combo
30 Units of
resistance
31 Fallen log
coverer
36 Egg shapes
37 Soprano-
Gluck
41 Light drizzles
43 Wouldn't hurt
44 Some IBMs
45 Wrist bone
46 Reimbursed
48 Capital near
Zurich
49 Fact fudger
50 "Paint the Sky
with Stars"
singer
52 Henri's
landmass
53 England's FBI
54 Blyth or
Landers


Dear Annie: I am 23 years
old and a virgin. I have
never seen a naked man
in my life because I be-
lieve virginity should
be kept until marriage.
The other day I went .
with my sister to watch
my nephew's baseball
game. He plays on a
field that is uphill, so
you can see the back-
yards of some of the
houses across the
street. My nephew had
heard from his friends
that one of the men in AN
those yards sits naked MAII
in his hot tub. I always
assumed this wasn't
true.
When I got to the game, I in-
stantly remembered those ru-
mors. I didn't intend to be a
Peeping Tom, but I looked


L


around and saw a man in a hot
tub. I assumed this was the guy, so
I kept watching. Five minutes
later, he got out of the
hot tub and really was
naked. I instantly got a
headache and my eyes'
burned.
I want to do some-
thing to prevent chil-
dren from seeing him.
I know he was in his
own backyard, but you
could see him clearly
from the field.
Would that count as
IE'S public nudity? Do you
.BOX think I should report
him? - Scarred for
Life
Dear Scarred: We're sure glad
you didn't go blind. For someone
claiming not to be a Peeping Tom,
you certainly expended a lot of
energy trying to catch a glimpse


of this naked man. If he is hot-
tubbing onhis own property and
taking appropriate precautions
to be discreet, it is not public nu-
dity
Unless, of course, he does the
hot-tub routine only during
games, in which case there is
some exhibitionism going on.
If you think this is traumatizing
the Little Leaguers, you can men-
tion it to one of the parents.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. E-mail annies
mailbox@comcastnet, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, PO. Box
118190, Chicago, IL 60611. To
find out more about Annie's
Mailbox, visit the Croators
Syndicate Web page at www
creators.com.


Today's HOROSCOPE


Your Birthday: You will be more adven-
turesome than usual in the year ahead.
You are likely to get much out of all your
excursions and romps.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - Don't try to
gain acceptance from a subordinate; go
directly to the big shots to promote an
idea you believe will help your company.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -Along with
your fellow workers, substantial benefits
can be generated. You could be re-
warded more than the others.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - Don't be
shy about expressing your ideas to a siz-
able group, because your thoughts could
offer that extra zest and impact everyone
is looking for. Speak up.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - You will likely
bring together all the individual factions
involved in order to generate substantial


material rewards in a collective en-
deavor. You can make it a success
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)- Through
warmhearted communication, harmony
can be restored in a relationship that has
been a bit testy of late. Instead of finger-
pointing, call attention to all the agree-
ments you have.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - If someone
comes to you with a proposal he or she
believes could generate collective bene-
fits, listen. This person could have a win-
ner of an idea you'll want to be part of.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -A close
friend might share some of the nice
things others are saying about you,
showing that you are much more popular
than you ever suspected.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - You
can make this an extremely productive


day by completing some work you have
been brushing aside for quite some time.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- It might
be impossible to avoid attention and/or
the limelight, and there is no reason why
you should.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - Lady
Luck tends to favor you, so take advan-
tage of the ways being offered to con-
tribute to your material well-being.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - It may
not be your best asset, but thinking fast
on your feet will help you make an ex-
tremely beneficial judgment that proves
to be a blessing for all involved.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - If you are
not listening to your instincts telling you
what a favorable day this can be, it'll be
your fault if you go into a funk. Good
things will happen if you just let them.


z
cr


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TUESDAY, MAY 19. 2009 C7


C FL CHRONICLE


.II lUSi ouEiNY (PL) ) .ENSL,-,Y M..19.200..

TUESDAY EVENING MAY 1 2009 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C BID I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 10:00 I 10:30 11:00 11:30 i
fWESil NBC H 19 19 19 News (N) NBC News Entertainment Access H'wood Outrageoutragutrageous Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit News (N) Tonight Show
BBC World News Nightly Business The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer (N) Age of Terror"War on the West" Frontline Various factors lead to eco- Frontline Various factors lead to eco- Independent Lens Stranded: The
(WlD PBS 3 3 14 6 'G' a Report (N) a (In Stereo) a nomic crisis. (In Stereo) 'PG' nomic crisis. (In Stereo) 'PG Andes Plane Crash Survivors"'14'
(WlUF PBS ~ 5 - 5 5 16 BBC News Business Rpt. The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer Nova 'PG' (DVS) Age of Terror "War on the West" Frontline 'PG' (DVS) 'Allo, 'Allo! 'G' iTavis Smiley __
News (N) NBC Nightly Entertainment Extra (N)'PG' a Most Outrageous Most Outrageous Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit News (N) The Tonight
fWFio NBC 0 8 8 8 8 8 8 News(N)'G' Tonight (N) Moments. Moments "Swing" (In Stereo)'14'a "Liberties"(N)'4' a Show-Jay Leno
B News (N) (In World News- Jeopardy! (N) Wheel of Fortune Dancing With the Stars The finalists. Dancing With the Stars (Season Finale) The winner. (In Stereo Live) 'PG' News (N) (In Nightline (N)
S ABC 0 20 20 20 20 Stereo) Gibson 'G'BN (N) 'G' (In Stereo) 'PG' s a Stereo) a 'G c:__
News CBS Evening Inside Edition Who Wants to Be NCIS "Aliyah" Ziva has a tense The Mentalist "Red John's Without a Trace "Undertow" (Season News Lat Show VWith
(W]R CBS ( 10 10 10 10 10 10 News-Couric 'PG'[ aa Millionaire reunion with her father. '14' a Footsteps" (Season Finale) (N)'14' Finale) (N) 'PG' aDavid Letterman
N ews (N) TMZ (N)'PG'a The Insider (N) American Idol Remaining finalists Glee A teacher tries to reinvent the News (N) a News (N) a TMZ (In Stereo)
WV Fox 13 13 13 13 'PG' g perform.'PG' a high school's glee club. (N)'PG'? 'PG'
(Wg ) ABC D 11 11 4 15 News (N) |ABC WId News Entertainment Inside Edition Dancing With the Stars 'PG' c Dancing With the Stars (Season Finale) The winner. 'PG' News (N) Nightline (N)'G'
-I---ND - 2 2- 2- 2 22 22 Richard and Lindsay Roberts 'G' Kenneth Hagin Jr. Fresh Manna with Word of Dwight Keith Life Today With Bay Focus The 700 Club 'PG' a Pure Passion Jewish Voice
f IND 2 2 2 2 22 22 'G'i Oliver Excellence James Robison
AC News (N) World News- Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) Dancing With the Stars The finalists. Dancing With the Stars (Season Finale) The winner. (In Stereo Live)'PG' News (N) . gI.lilii.: NHi-
rWFna ABC D 1111 1111 Gibson (N) 'G' 'G'Ga (In Stereo) 'PG' ______________
Family Guy '14'B Family Guy '14'm Frasier "The Frasier'PG' a Law & Order: Criminal Intent "Suite ** "The Mothman Prophecies" (2002, Suspense) Richard Gere Laura Unney, Will Patton. ,5- .10 -,]i,.t
Hi)IND E 12 12 Harassed"'PG Sorrow"'14'm aA reporter investigates strange phenomena in a small town. 'PG-1i' a t-
(WfTA MNT D 6 6 6 16 9 Deal or No Deal Deal or No Deal Every-Raymond Every-Raymond Street Patrol (N) Street Patrol (N) Jail (N)'14' Jail'14' a News Channel That '70s Show That '70sShow Seinfeld'PG'
iWACX) TBN M 21 ,-21 21 Assembly-God The 700 Club 'PG' a Pastor Barber Power of Praise Manna-Fest'G' Variety Thompson Variety Claud Bowers This Is Your Day ITims Ministies
CW --M 4 4 4 4 12 2Two and a Half The King of The Simpsons Two and a Half Reaper "Business Casualty" (N) (In 90210 Naomi decides to have an The King of According to Jim According to Jim .South Park'14' a
en) W 4 4 4 4 12 enPG' QueensPG' PG'B Men'14'ag Stereo)'14' after-prom party at her house. Queens"PG' 'PG'a 'PG'a
TV 20 News Watch The Truth Your Citrus Every Day is a Straight Talk Med Movie Guide TV Paid Program Off the Streets The EA Sports High School All TV 20 News Your Citrus
iWYK) FAM m 16 16 16 16 County Court Gift Local health. American Show'G' ______County Court
l(TB FOX -- 13 13 7 7 TMZ (N) 'PG' King of the Hill The Simpsons The Simpsons American Idol'PG' a Glee "Pilot" (N) 'PG' a FOX 35 News at 10 (N) a News (N) Seinfeld 'PG'
(BVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 15 15 Noticias 62 Noticiero Univ Las Tontas No Van at Cielo Cuidado con el Angel Mafiana es Para Siempre Aqui y Ahora_ Noticias 62 Noticiero Univ.
[ OWXPX ION - 171 - Family Feud Family Feud RebaPG' , Reba'PG'a Boston Legal '14'a Boston Legal 'PG' s Boston Legal'14'a Paid Program Paid Program
A&E) 54 48 54 54 25 27 Cold Case Files '14' a CSI: Miami "One of Our Own"'14' The First 48 '14' a . The First 48 '14' a The First 48 '14' a Manhunters IManhunters
AMJ 55 64 55 55 ** "Last of the Dogmen"i 1995. Tom Berenger 'PG' * "Calitos Way"(l993l At Pacr c An e'..an lrals i hard o escape his former ife o crime 'R "Sleeping With the Er3em) 1 I'}l
5( 21 52 35 52 52 19 21 Uniamred and UriCul 1m | 'abiir Hurii5PG ' _ unian.re Ue a uri4 LI.I tVenom 911 .naietilEi G i: I Sriculdn i Be Alive PG eC: Urnlame and Uncul 1.1i1-
1m 96 19 96 96 106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live 'PG' a ** "Barbershop"(2002. Comedy) ILe Cube 'FPG-13 F . College Hill College Hill **."Barbershop"(2002)
BRAVO - - 51 Real Housewives NYC Real Housewives: Reunion Housewives of New York City Real Housewives of Jersey Real Housewives of Jersey Real Housewives of Jersey
27 61 27 - 33 Wieners(2008)REN911'14' Scrubs'14' |Scmrbs'14' Daily3Show Colbert Report Futurama 'PG' South Park'MA' Dane Cook: ISolated INcident'14' DailyShow |Colbert Report
CMT - 98 45 98 98 28 37 World's Strictest Parents Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition *** "Pure Country"(1992 Drama) George Strait Lesley Ann Warren (In Stereo 'P' Pure Counmry
9CB 43 42 43 43 Mad Money . Kudlow Report CNBC Reports Warren Buffett: Billio-,ire Orn ire Money |M , l.Mlorey'
40. 29 40 40 41 46 Situation Room-Wolf Blitzer Lou Dobbs Tonight a Campbell Brown: No Bias, No Bull Larry King Live (N) 'PG' a Anderson Cooper 360 'PG' a
S 46 40 46 46 6 5Phineas-Ferb Zack & Cody Han. Montana |Han. Montana ** "The Thleep ( Year"(1999)Chez Starbuck. |Phineas-Ferb Wizards-Place Han. Montana Zack & Cody That's So Raven
[EPN 33 27 33 33 21 17 SportsCenter (Live) a NBA Draft Lottery NBA Basketball Western Conference Final Game 1 -- Teams TBA. (Live) a SportsCenter
(ESPN2 34 28 34 34 43 49 Around the Horn Interruption Football Live NFL Live (N) Series of Poker 2008 World Series of Poker a Baseball Tonight (Live) a SportsCenter Football Live
-(EWi --i - 95 70 95 -95 48 Choices-Face Tell the World Daily Mass: Our Lady Mother Angelica-Classic Religious Catal. '|The Holy Rosary Threshold of Hope'G' Christ in City Religious Order
�__M)Y8 29 52 29 2920 28 My Wife-Kids My Wife-Kids That'70s Show That '70s Show America's Funniest Home Videos America's Funniest Home Videos America's Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club'PG' Bc-
LEWB0) 44 37 44 44 32 Special Report With Bret Baler (N) FOX Report With Shepard Smith The O'Reilly Factor (N) a Hannity (N) . On the Record-Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor
--_[FOO) - . 26 56 26 26 Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Challenge Pastry. Good Eats Good ts'G' Food Detectives |Ace of Cakes Chopped Good Eats |Unwrapped
IFSF 35 39 35 35 - - Sports Stories Martins Livel MLB Baseball Arizona Diamondbacks at Florida Marlins. From Iphin Stadium in Miami. (Live) Inside Marlins |The Final Score Best Damn Sports Show Period
- 30 60 30 - 30 - 51 '*'"Click" (2u061 Adam Sandler PG 13' . 'Night at the Museum 12006, Fanlas.l Ben Slillei Premiere PG' Rescue Me Play (NIMA' Rscue MePlay"'MA'
(GOLF 67 Gall C tral Tp I0 Piyvn Lessors inside POA IThe Approa:h .**," y Gilmore"1996 ComedIy Adam Sandler 'PG13' Co Videos. The Appro:acrin Goil Cenriral
LHAi---) 39 68 3 39 5 ' 5 A''H PG - IM'A''-H PG Golden Giris Golde. 3rS G1 n GGn Godr Grl . Journey to the Center of the Earth" 12008) Rick Scnroder 'NR',i Murder e - . .. . . Wr
_* "The Invasion"i2007, Science F rlicini Nicole Kidman An epidEmilc * "'Get Smart" 2008, Cornimjl S.e.e Carell Agentrilli.well Smart REAL sports Witlh B~yan Gurmbel irn Tire~mini In i,.jiTrr,..,i
H2 2 2 alien origin ihrealens humanity (In Sierec) 'PG-13' S battles the KAOS crime 'yndicale (inr Sereol PG-13 'ii II11) In StereoP 'P MA I: r
iH-- GTV) 23 57 23 23 42 52 Designre to Sell |t.ieme Livinrg H'oue Won"i' H,)ue Hunters My Firsi F'lacte i My Fis PlIc,:e Hu.e HuniTers Bang Buo Hcuse Hunters t re Sljgeirs'G Income Pr.perly |Mv I .1_ yr.
6[11) 51 25 51 51 32 M 42 Mdern Marvels '0 c Modern Marvels PG ra Ijosiradamus 2j12 Prelictions :, caiay':tlyrm PG r - Lle Aner People IN) 'PG 1- , History ,ul Se. Fr c i
- LIFEi 24 38 24 24 31 Silr Sianding_ |Slilt Standing Reba 'PG'y |Reoa PG'iP Reba 'PG'_ |ReDa PG'R |ba * "Miracle Run" (2004, Drama) Mary-Louise Parker Jwi Wii&Gra:e |Wii l~ Gr ,i
"Cruel Intentions 3"12004 Drama) Kerr Sminr. Krishna Anapau 'Precious Victims" (1943 Drama) Parn Overall. Robby Benson Richard "Fighting the Odds: The Marilyn Gambrell Story"(20:. .1:0 i ,Ti..?. A -
ILMNI 50 Manipulative teens are :aught in a web 01 lurmoil 'R' , Thomas A mother clairis her two infrianls were kidnapped r'. parole officer helps children whose parents are in jail a _
S"'Miss Congeniality" (20001 Sandra Bullck A clumsy FBI aernt *.. "Fracture" 200,l Arnihny Hoprns A prose:ulr plays a cat-and- **- "The Strangers" (2008, Suspense) Liv Tyler, ,C. Ed
MAJ 3 3 goes under cover a 3a beauty pageant (in Siereo) 'PG-13 a 1 mouse game witi a dangerous suspect IIn Stereo) R' . Scott Speedman (In Stereo) *R' !o ntleri .
(iMiSiB- 42 41 42 42 - Tr, Ed Show Hrdb'al li Counriidown Witi Keilh Olbermanin The Ra:rei Madd:w Shcw Couidownr With Keitr Olbermann fre R.:rieiMad'ijMw 5.i
9i71 6 97 66 97 97 39 MTV Special (In Stereo) Sucker Free (In Stereo) 'PG' MTV Special (In Stereo) MTV Special (In Stereo) MTV Special (In Stereo) MTV Special (In Stereo) ____
65M-165 1 44 53 Explorer'PG' Secrets of Revelation 'PG' Hooked: Monster Fish! 'G' Hooked Again: Monster Fish! 'G' .Explorer "Zoo Tiger Escape"'14' Hooked: Monster Fish! 'G'___
CMii 28 136 128 28 35 25 Drake & Josh Drake & Josh ~iCarly'Y7' a iCarly'Y7'Na SpongeBob ISpongeBob Home Improve. (Home Improve. George Lopez |George Lopez The Nanny'PG' The Nanny'PGC'
TorjYt-44 - - Tri & Dean Tori & Dean Tori & Dean ITori & Dean Tori & Dean Tori & Dean Tori & Dean: Home To Be Announced To Be Announced ___
1,X - 62 "**"Invincible'"(2001) Timn Roin * * -"Prelude to a Kiss"119921 Alec Baldwin. A strangers hi, has deep * * "Hoosiers"lt 986, Dramal Gene Hackman The new high-school ** -"Reality Bltes"'I l,: I W rin I
PiE) 62(In Siereol PG.13ru a repercussions for Iwo newlyweds (In Slerec)'PG.-1'a ibaslietball coach meels with resentment (in Slereo)'PG'r[ Ryder PG-.13' i
IsIFI - - 31 59 31 3126 29 Stargale SG-1 Sinrgulariry'PG' Star TrekEnterprise Babel One Sa Trk Enterprise 'Uniied Star Trek Enerprise The Aenar ECW (Live)'14, L,V ** *'Virus"(1995, Su.p'e,.-.i
-Sp- 122 112 122 22 Urnique Whips PimRp My Ride |Pass Time Pmp MyRide Pimp My Ride Drag Race Hign |Draq Race High Super Bikes' (N) |Kawasaki Test Pimp My Ride jP,.~,Tin,e
siKliE)- 37 43 37 37 27 36 CIf I Ol ouOnly Die Once '14 CSI Crime Scene Investigai,,,ri CSI C rme re Investiaioroni Deadliest Warrn:r 'n Stereol Deadirest Warrior (I) (In Slereoi 41n and Long Irn Slereol 4
L1i6 -- 36 31 36 36 PleI"'ure Boaer Rays ve ILe.vel MLB BaLseall Oaharld AlhlEii:s at Tampa Bay Rvys From Trop'.3ana Feld in i Peer.turil FlI ILivel nside the Rays Irnsile re Rays P'w rboCiaiirq P...rt,.'lir'
(-T ) 49 2349 49 16 19 Ever-RaymoInd FrenId- PG ' Serineld PG Sneld PG' Family Gu; 14 [Family Guy 14' Family Guy 'PG Famly Guy 14 Tre Ofce 'PG' My Boys r'4 The Cnce'FPG' |.:r.ileij '
3 *.5 "Speedway"(1 968, Musical) Elvis Presle Nanc Sinatra Bill Baby **.s"The Lawless" 19501 Gail Russell Mexican. *** *"Trial"(1955, Drama) Glenn Ford, Dorothy McGure A Meican I 'Ciy rough"
T I 53 30 35 A wealthy race-car diver Ialls tor a Deautiul IR agern G'[ American fruit pickers endure humiliatlin NR' boys murder final lurns ino a naltonal scandal ' ____I _. __
(Ti. ] 53 34 53 53 24 26 Cah Cab G' CasihCab G' Deadliest Catch (In Slereo) '4' Deadiesl Calch (In Slereol 11Dead estCan -Deadline'-14' Oul ol he Wid. Alaska Deadiest Cacnn (In l 14
-il '50 46 50 50 29 30 Whal lot I0 Wear Debbie' PG Dewars Linie People. Big Steps Little People Jusl Married G' 17 Kids arind CunrngPG'i- Painted Babies al 17'PG i' Liie People Juil MaIrrI ed
i"-Ni 48 33 48 48 31 34 B:one.r (In Stere) 14' i Law S Order '4 EI (DVS)l Law S Order 14 ,' lDVSI Law & Order 'Over Here 14 Bnies In Sieieo '14' LiLaw v, Order 14 c ll'. I.
-(9 54 9 9 44 Bizarre Foods-Zimmern Bizarre Foods-Zimmern Bizarre Foods-Zimmern Bizarre Foods: Asia Bizarre Foods-Zimmern Bizarre Foods-Zimmernm!
itrilU ) - 25 55 25 25 98 98 Cops'14'B Cops'14' Operation Repo |Operation Repo Operation Repo. Operation Repo Most Shocking'14' Most Shocking '14' Forensic Files I Forensic Files
TL-) 32 49 32 32 34 24 Hogan's Heroes Green Acres'G' Bev. Hillbillies Bev. Hillbillies Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Cosby Show. |Cosby Show Cosby Show Cosby Show
(U1iDA 47 32 47 47 17 18 House 'TB or Not TB"'14' House "Cane & Able"'PG' a House (In Stereo)'PG'a House "Who's Your Daddy?"'14' House "Top Secret"14'B Law &,Order: Special Victims Unit l
WE 140 69 117 117 Golden Girls Golden Girls Women Behind Bars a Women Behind Bars a |Women Behind Bars a Women Behind Bars (N) a Women Behind Bars l: j
(W-I-N) - 18 18 18 18 20 Becker'PG' Becker'PG' America's Funniest Home Videos MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at St. Louis Cardinals. From Busch Stadium in St. Louis.'G'a WGN'News. Scrubs '14'


ENTERTAINMENT









T, vvI UESDAY,M AY , Ss T C


Garfield


Cathy


P IFOR THE PIRsT H MANYN NONE . I U.ST WNT
BANKRUIJPT RETIREMENT TiPL IN PL .., IT 5TAND IN ONE
PLUNGIN& ROMEVALUES... TE OF IOUI. LIMLE ROOSO
IN-LAWS CImPEOT 01 IN -HE KHE... WIMWER AND HIDE FOR WHILE.

-'OL . DOG IUST SOmETHING
PUKED IN THERE. EVERIfONE'S 0TINO& -


Sally Forth


r TODAY, HII! BUT DOESN'T IT BOTHER BECAUSE YOU USED TO SCREAM
. " L. I YOU WE'VE LOST EVERY I BLOODY MURDER EVERY TIME
GAME SO FAR? - WE DIDNT HT
j WHY I A HOME RUN. PEOPLE CHANGE, HIL
S I wout.Ir IT soo ~m TIEIRI


Dilbert


WAIT A MINI1 WHY
DOES THAT SUDDENLY
SEEM RIDICULOUS?


For Better or For Worse
HoW coMe ICT' RftINING SO! ALREAD, 1 HE IF WE DIDN'T M H AE M VING5lTb
RAINN? I WANT 8UMME SPRINw- FLoweRS WTArT FOR SUMMER LIMe W T f LoHG- EAH. RIGHT.
To COME. WHEN IS ASrE COMING- UP,'E THISt WOULD COME PNOD MEFOR
ITGONNABE LEEGARE.R rON Go- ND WE'D NEVER SUMMERIS A
WARM 1FIElPEES5 ND APPRecIATE IT AS MUIH G QOOD -kl
OUtSIDE?! - -iE DSAFy -E ,, E-- -








Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells
7U \ \oV.l DA'MR6 IRM P * PE RME V9T
B7 ECASE-IME R\A 1t I BA\ TENUR?17
To ( BEM A s% ,
17 I Ty & -) IM 0
, 4 ,J^ \� oE r156Y^^P&


The Born Loser


'a>YOU LOS5E BtABULE ATN
Tme SLOT i eCRINES WIRILE
'(OU WEF. E-. ECAs', LOU7


SFRST I >, uT TWERN I
FOUI .A t Ct4lAHE. I N EM-R
LOST w AOREY IN A...


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


NO... ACTUALLY, I WAS
JUST KDING...IT'S YOUR -
SELECTRIC t2'-,





4^-?fe f


HEY, IN TOUGH TIMES
LIKE THESE, IT'S NICE
NOW ANO THEN
T SEE A SML


The Family Circus


"In case you didn't hear me the first time,
you have been charged with fraud.
How do you plead?"


Doonesbury


Big Nate


Arlo and Janis


"I'M NOT AFRA( OFNMYoWNpHdA OW,BUT
rt46V5 LOT� o'FoT HEIS ouTTOiERFIrHATARE


Betty


Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6- Inverness; 637-3377 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10 p.m., 10:30
"Angels & Demons" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., p.m. No passes.
7:05 p.m. No passes. "X-Men Origins: Wolverine" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m.,
"Star Trek" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No 2:50 p.m., 5:20 p.m., 7:55 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
passes. "Ghosts of Girlfriends Past" (PG-13) 12:35 p.m.,
"Ghosts of Girlfriends Past" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 2:55 p.m., 5:15 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m. "The Soloist" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 3:35 p.m., 7:05
"X-Men Origins: Wolverine" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., p.m., 9:40 p.m.
4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:45 p.m. "Fighting" (PG-13) 7:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"The Soloist" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:30 "Obsessed" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 3:25 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
p.m. , 9:45 p.m.
"Obsessed" (PG-13) 1:25 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:20 p.m. "17 Again" (PG-13) 12:10 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 5:05 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Angels & Demons" (PG-13) Noon, 12:30 p.m., 3 Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No and entertainment information.
passes.
"Star Trek" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 12:45 p.m., 3:15
Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious
WXCV-FM 95-3 Adult,
Contemporary


Local RADIO


WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious
WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies


WIFL-FM 104.3 Adult Mix
WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


Peanuts


I HAVE AN
MBA FROM A TOP
BUSINESS SCHOOL. .


I'M A MANAGEMENT
EXPERT BECAUSE I READ
CASE STUDIES ABOUT
BUSINESSES THAT WERE
IN COMPLETELY DIFFER-
ENT SITUATIONS.
ICU


Blondie


THIS LETTER SAYS YOU'VE BEEN
SELECTED TO SAIL ONA VACHT TO
SICILY TO ACCEPT A -,
LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT REALLY?!!
AWARD
INTERNATIONAL
PEPPERONI
SOCIETY/


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: S equals C


"SKMGET, HXWT ZPGZKXGT, SMG AT M


NLXTGF BL M NBT, M AHTZZXGE BL M


SPLZT, M FMJG BL M FPZW."


- JXHHXMU M. JMLF


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Canada is a good country to be from. It has a gentler, slower
pace - it lends perspective." - Paul Anka
(c) 2009 by NEA, Inc. 5-19


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COMICS


OB T DAYMAY 19 2009


I








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

SThe Citrus Team of Her-
nando-Pasco Hospice (HPH)
and its not-for-profit Homecare
affiliate, HPH Homecare, pro-
vide ongoing education to Cit-
rus County residents about
their many programs, services
and volunteer opportunities.
There is no charge for a
speaker and the solicitation of
funds is never involved. Educa-
tional materials are provided at
no charge. Call Wendy Hall,
community liaison, at 527-4600.
* The Lighthouse for the
Visually Impaired offers serv-
ices to Citrus County residents.
Workshops will include learning
skills, such as managing med-
ications, money identification,
using adaptive equipment,
home management (safe cook-
ing and house-keeping), use of
magnification equipment for
reading and managing mail and
much more. All workshops are
free.
Call (866) 962-5254 or 527-
8399 The workshops will from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday at
the Center for Independent Liv-
ing of North Central Florida at
3774 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Lecanto, across from Cowboy
Junction.
* The Center for Independ-
ent Living of North Central
SFlorida in Lecanto offers free
Social Security workshops, SSI,
.SSDI, Medicare and Medicaid.
All questions are answered the
third Wednesday monthly from
-10 a.m. to noon. Call for reser-
vations, 527-8399.
* Citrus Hearing Impaired
Program Services in Crystal
River, provides assistance with
hearing aids and devices
needed to enhance the quality
of life for deaf, hard of hearing
-and speech impaired individu-
als. Call 795-5000 (voice) or
795-7243 (TTY) to find out
more about this program.
CHIPS is open from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. Monday through Friday.
* Free Medical Loan
Closet offers wheelchairs,
crutches, shower chairs and
more, sponsored by the Yan-
keetown Inglis Woman's Club.
Call volunteer chairwoman Dee
Dixon at (352) 447-0164. Dona-
tions of money or items wel-
comed, especially small


TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 C9


wheelchairs.
* "Every Day Is A Gift" 30-
minute community affairs pro-
gram airs 7:30 p.m. Tuesday
and Thursdays and 10 a.m. Fri-
days on Key TV channel 47
and cable channel 16. On the
radio, it airs at 8 a.m. Sunday
on WRGO 102.7 FM. Both pro-
grams highlight local programs,
resources, and valuable health
information of interest to you
and your family.
* The Citrus County Health
Department offers child safety
seat checks by appointment at
the Inverness office, 120 N.
Montgomery Ave. Call Sue Lit-
tnan at 726-1731, ext. 242. Visit
citruscountyhealth.org.
* Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center offerings:
* Speakers Bureau brings
customized programs to clubs,
churches and other community
organizations. Call Amy Kingery
at 795-8344 or (352) 489-2022
ext. 8344. -
* Send e-mail messages to
loved ones who have been ad-
mitted to SRRMC. Visit
www.srrmc.com, click on Pa-
tient and Visitor Information and
select Email a Patient.
* Free eCards are available
at www.srrmc.com. Click on Pa-
tient and Visitor Information and
select eCard.
* Savings from more than
60 local businesses through
SRRMC's Med-Key Healthy
Discounts program: free and
open to everyone. Call 795-
8344 or visit www.srrmc.com.
* Review listings of free
health education programs
provided by SRRMC and sign
up to attend at the click of a
button. Visit www.srrmc.com
and select Classes & Events.
* Inverness Family Practice
offers free diabetes testing
from 9 a.m. to noon and from
1:30 to 4:30 p.m. daily at Inver-
ness Family Practice at 2222
State Road 44 W. Walk-ins wel-
come. Call 860-0633.
* Hospice of Citrus County
offers monthly blood pres-
sure screenings from 9 a.m.
to noon the third Tuesday
monthly at the Inverness Bras-
hear's Pharmacy at 206 W.
Dampier St., and from 1 to 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly


Health


at the Brashear's Pharmacy in
Lecanto, off 491 between Allen
Ridge Medical Mall and Sun-
coast Dermatology. Free, no
reservation is required. Call
Hospice of Citrus County Public
Relations Manager Joseph
Foster at 527-2020.
* INGLIS - Hospice of the
Nature Coast seeks volun-
teers who live in Inglis and
Yankeetown.
Call Judy Knowlton, volun-
teer program manager, at 527-
6613 or (866) 463-1385.
Hospice of the Nature Coast
is a program of Hospice of Cit-
rus County. www.hospiceof
thenaturecoast.org.
* Respite care available
from Isaiah Foundation Inc. for
families with children who are
mentally or physically disabled
or who are autistic. Call (352)
447-1775.
* The Center for Independ-
ent Living of North Central
Florida in Lecanto offers free
Social Security Workshops.
SSI, SSDI, Medicare and Medi-
caid. All questions answered.
Third Thursday of every month.
Call for reservation, 527-8399.
* Free hearing screenings
offered by All Children's Ser-
toma Therapy Center from 9 to
11 a.m. Tuesdays-and Thurs-
days by appointment only at
760 W. Hampshire Blvd., Suite
9, Citrus Springs. Call 746-
3300.
* Professional counseling
for depression, abuse, trauma,
PTSD and other issues is avail-
able for adults from Richard
Canfield at Isaiah's Place in
Yankeetown. Call (352) 447-
1775.
* Professional counseling
services on a sliding fee scale
are available to individuals,
couples, families and children
experiencing a broad range of
personal, relationship and fam-
ily problems including grief
counseling. Daytime and
evening appointments in Bev-
erly Hills and Lecanto, call
Chris at Catholic Charities at
(800) 242-9012.
* SHINE Program volun-
teers help elders make in-


formed decisions about
Medicare and health insurance.
Call Elder Helpline (800) 262-
2243 to learn more about be-
coming a SHINE volunteer.
Comprehensive training pro-
vided, travel-related expenses
reimbursed.
* Diabetes education pro-
gram from Citrus Memorial
Health System's Diabetes Cen-
ter: tour with a diabetes educa-
tor through Publix to learn
which foods will effectively meet
dietary needs and how much
can be eaten. Call Carol
McHugh at 341-6110.
* Free spinal scan and fa-
cility tour with Dr. Russell
Lewandowski, who is also
available to speak at commu-
nity organizations. Call Barbara
at 726-0888. Visit www.proad
justerbyrussellchiro.com.
, * American Cancer Society's
"Road to Recovery" program
needs volunteer drivers. Call
Cindi Crisci, area patient serv-
ices representative at the Amer-
ican Cancer Society, at (727)
812-7028.
* The Alzheimer's Family
Organization's Wanderers
Identification Program pro-
vides an identifying bracelet or
pendant with a code number
and direct telE)hone number to
the participating sheriff's office.
Call toll free at (888) 496-8004.
* The Alzheimer's Family
Organization's Respite Assis-
tance Program is available to
all residents of Citrus, Pasco,
Hernando, Sumter and Lake
counties caring for an individual
with dementia or Alzheimer's
,disease. Call (727) 848-8888 or
toll free at (888) 496-8004.
* Citrus County Community
Support Services and Catholic
Charities offers a Respite Care
Program for people with early
onset Alzheimer's disease or
other dementia-related ill-
nesses, from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday at Our Lady of
Grace Church, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call Donna
Atwell at 527-5932, Citrus
County Community Support
Services or Marie Monahan
with Catholic Charities at (800)


242-9012, ext. 22.
* The Doctor Ride program
helps with medical appointment
transportation in Citrus County
for those age 65 and older.
Three or four days' notice is re-
quired, and only one ride per
week is available. To volunteer
or ride, call John at 746-3796.
* Beverly Hills Skillbank, a
volunteer organization, will
drive qualified Beverly Hills resi-
dents to doctors' appointments
and pharmacies throughout Cit-
rus County. They will also drive
to grocery stores, hair salons
and barbers in Beverly Hills. To
qualify, you mOst be 60 years of
age or older and cannot drive
yourself. If you need this serv-
ice, phone 746-5001 from 9
a.m. until noon Monday through
Friday. There is no fee for this
service.
* Telephone Friends serv-
ice confirms safety and imparts
care and concern, is available
at no cost. Call Nature Coast
Volunteer Center at 527-5950
or e-mail ncvc@bocc.citrus
.fl.us.
* The Citrus County Health
Department (CCHD) has a toll-
free information line, (877) 746-
3248. The CCHD Web address
, is www.citruscountyhealth.org
and the Community Resource
number is 211.
* Florida Elks Children's
Therapy Services provides free
in-home physical and occupa-
tional therapy to Florida chil-
dren in need. For more
information, call Inverness Elks
Secretary Walt Mabie, '
PDDGER at the Lodge office 8
a.m. to noon Monday through
Friday at 726-2027.
* Citrus County Health De-
partment offers birth control
services to women of child-
bearing age. These confidential
services are available at all
health department locations
from a female provider who,
specializes in women's health.
Call the office nearest you: In-
verness 726-1731; Crystal
River 795-6233; Lecanto 527-
0068.
* A+ Healthcare Home
Health will be at the following
locations to offer free blood,
pressure screening. Call Mary
Pearsall at 564-2700.


* East Citrus Community
Center: 9 to 11 a.m. first
Wednesday monthly.
* Brentwood Health Center:
10 to 11 a.m. second Tuesday
monthly.
* West Citrus Community
Center: 9 to 11 a.m. third
Wednesday monthly.
* Inverness Community
Center: 9 to 11 a.m. third Tues-
day monthly.
* Inverness Sports & Ortho-
pedic Rehab Team (SPORT)
offers free screening, by ap-
pointment, for individuals with
neck/back pain, headaches, or-
thopedic injuries, carpal tunnel,
tennis elbow, osteoporosis and
general fitness. Call 341-3740.
* SHINE (Serving Health In-
surance Needs of Elders) coun-
selors offer information and
assistance on Medicare (figur-
ing out the paperwork, bills and
filing appeals), Medicare Sup-
plemental Insurance, Medicare
prescription drug coverage and
long-term care planning.
For an appointment at Citrus
Memorial Health System's
SHARE Club from 9 a.m. to
noon Monday, call 344-6513,
SHARE Club affiliation is not re-
quired.
For appointments at other
sites throughout the county or
information, call the Elder Help
Line at (800) 262-2243 or leave
your name and telephone num-
ber with the Citrus County Sen-
ior Care Services at 527-5930.
A SHINE counselor will return
your call. SHINE Walk-In Sites
with no appointment necessary:
* Citrus County Resource
Center - noon to 4 p.m. Tues-
days and Thursdays - 2804
W. Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto.
* "Medically Speaking," a
30-minute health awareness
program, airs at 5 p.m. Mon-
days on WYKE TV, channel 16,
hosted by April Saxer, market-
ing director for Gulfcoast
Aquatic and Rehabilitation.
* Professional counseling
services are available to indi-
viduals, couples, families and
children experiencing a broad
range of personal, relationship
and family problems.Call Chris
at Catholic Charities at (800)
242-9012.


Choice ~[le,


To place an ad, call 563-5966
..... .mmm 'I


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa:(52 6-55 Tl re:(8),5-34 mal lasfes 5 roilenln0 *ISebi:ww hrnclonieSo


ALONE?
Senior Dating Bureau
SAFEST since 1977
Ages 45-90. 1-800-
922-4477 (24hrs) or
log onto: Respected
Dating.com
SWM seeking SWF 40's
early 50's. Am off of
work for 3 months look-
ing to walk the trail &
workout at the gym,
movies and other ac-
tivities, Height & weight
proportionate. Me
5'10", .190, muscular
build, 49, look younger,
Inverness area. Call
Brian 352-220-3094


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for your junk car,
truck or van
(352) 634-5389
CASH PAID all
vehicles.Trades welcome
Used PARTS avail
352-628-9118
FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale, Hshold,
& Furniture Items
Call 352-476-8949
WANTED
Junk Lawn Mowers
& Power Equip.
Free Pick-up (352)
564-80141601-5053
/Us out zoomcitrus.coam


Junk Lawn Mowers
& Power Quip.
Free Pick-up (352)
564-80141601-5053
/Us out zoomcitrus.com


Excell. Home for any
unwanted birds, poultry
U-R unable to care for
726-9874
FREE CAT
Mix colored striped,
sweet w/other animals
Needs a good home.
(352) 897-4201
FREE KITTENS
352-860-0964
Free to Good Home
Black Lab Puppy
male, 4 months old
(352) 794-3476
Free Young
Roosters
(352) 697-9187
HAVE SOMETHING TO
GIVE AWAY?
Place your
ad 24 hrs a day.
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
1 Select Place an Ad
2 Create an Account
3 Select Cust. type
4 Select Heading of
Special Notices
5 Select Free
6 Create Ad
Pit bull & Catahola
Mix, female 6 mo. old.
(352) 220-6190
RESCUED 2 DOGS
FREE TO GOOD HOME
(352) 220-9652
(352)795-8811


Blackberries
Organically Grown.
U-pick, starting May
23th. Sat.& Tues.8A./3P.
$3.50 per pound.
9333 Hwy 48 Floral City.
MADDOX FARMS
Sat 5/16 -U pick peas,
corn & beans, Hwy 475 N.
4,5 ml. N. Bushnell (352) 303-0105
NOW OPEN, 8:30A/6P
BELLAMY GROVES
Fresh Sweet Corn
Lopes, watermelons,
vegies. 1.5 miles E. on
Eden Dr. From Hwy 41
(352) 726-6378



ROTTWEILER
male, young large,
Reward
last Duvall Island
Floral City 352-637-6189



Black Lab Mix
Male, young (352)
465-1662


E>ar:b Malz.
F'otograph9
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits
Indoor or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed


- wwwmadopa
rescued oet.com
View available pets on
our website or call
(352) 795-9550
Adoption Locations
PET SUPER MARKET
every Saturday 11-2p
Inverness
MERCANTILE BANK
Inverness
May 18th Monday
12-2pm
BIG LOTS
Crystal River
May 22nd Friday
12-2pm
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT






$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com


-7----
F ank Probate
Divorces /Evictions
352-613-3674

FACING
FORECLOSURE?
CALL (352) 302-9140







CAT
ADOPTIONS








Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A till 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4
All Cats and Kittens are al-
tered, tested for Feline Luk
and Aids. Up to date on
vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
or stop by our offices at
1149 N ConantAve. Corner
of 44 and Conant.
Look for the big white build-
ing with the bright paw
prints.



(2) BURIAL LOTS
Beverly Hills Memorial
Gardens. Asking $3000
for both. 972-471-1041


Memorial Gardens
Beverly Hills, Section
Peace, Lot 89 Space A.
(832) 636-8462, To view
Call.. (352) 746-4646



A FREE Report of Your
Home's Value
www.natureoast
ivinp.net
missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
Shelter 794-3825


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SP RINING



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Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and:
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


Home Finder
www.ch'fomcthoemefinder.com


CITRUS SURGERY
CENTER, AN
OUTPATIENT
FACILITY

IS SEEKING AN EXP.
OPERATING ROOM
RN CIRCULATOR
Prefer Ortho & Ent.
Exp. Scheduled Pool
Hours, No Weekends,
or Holidays. No Call,
Great Place to Work
& Top Moneyll
Fax Resume To:
(352) 527-1827

atftornorjve
Your world first
EverP, Da\
CHRONIU.i
Classifieds


� 8T '69- 'L: S
6 7 ZL S :89 9
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Annuncm en


HEALTH & LIFE











CIO TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009


BECOME A CNA
For Career and
Test Preparation
Call 352-564-8378
CNA PREP CLASSES
EZ Learning Services
Day & Evening Classes
352-382-EASY; 586-2715
/ us out zoomciHrus.com
CNA TEST PREP
Now Offering Day & Eve.
Classes Free CPR train-
ing w/enrollment
341-2311
Scholarships Available

GYN OFFICE IN
CRYSTAL RIVER
LOOKING FOR:

Medical Assistant
Receptionist
LPN Nurse
Dietician
Proactive, one year
experience in
Medical Offices.
Knowledge in
medical sdftwares
Please fax resume to:
352-564-8201

HOME HEALTH
COMMUNITY LIAISON
RN Field/Psych nurse
exp a plus.
PHYSICAL
THERAPIST
Possible F/T position w/
exc. benefits.
Advocate Home
Health Care
Lecanto.
352-746-2549
Fax resume to
352-746-2952
Lic# HHA299991842

LPN
Experienced Only
Ortho. Temporary
position through Oct. '09.
Immediate opening.
Please fax resume to
Nettle at 746-0333

LPN
Full time
Required:
Compassionate and
caring attitude.
Apply at:
Barrington Place

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Front & Back Exp..
F/T, computer &
phlebotomy. �
For busy primary care
MD Office
Email Resume
wfmaresumes@
yahoo.com
or Fax Resume To:
352-489-5786

P/T BENEFITS
SPECIALIST

For local Hospital 2
days wkly. Exp. Req. in
Health Ins., Cust.
Service, & Acct. Mgmt.
Email Resume To:
emolovee.benefitsOa
Myfd&= Ia


HUMAN
RESOURCES/
PAYROLL
Due to a promotion, we
are searching for a
Human Resource
employee who will be
responsible for the
Human Resource
functions plus payroll at
Osprey Point
Nursing Center.
Experience is required.
This position works
Monday through Friday,
8:30 am to 5:00 pm &
we offer a complete
benefit package to you.
If qualified, please
fax resume to: (352)
568-8780 or stop
in and complete
your application at
Osprey Point Nursing
Ctr 104 N. Main Street
Bushnell, FL 33513

POLICE OFFICER
Dunnellon Police Dept
is currently accepting
applications for the
position of F/T and
Reserve Police
Officer. Applicants
must be state cert.
Applications are
available at
Dunnellon Police
Dept. 12014 S.Williams
Street, Dunnellon.
Open until filled.





COOK
NEEDED F/T at Small
Assistant Facility,,
2 years,min., exp.
Apply 1745
Forest Dr. Inverness
No Phone Calls

SHORT ORDER
COOK
3 years Exp. req.
Apply in person
Twisted Oaks Grill
352-746-6882





WANTED
Highly self motivated
' Sale's people
Company truck Is
provided. Yearly
paid vacation.
Holidays paid:
Benefits available.
Positions open In
Citrus, Hernando,
and Sumter Counties.
Apply in Person
ONLY, from 9 am to
4 pm Mon-Fri, At
A-I Termite &
Pest Control,
1840 Hwy 44 West,
Inverness, FL 34453.
Located across
from Applebee's.
Only well groomed
and properly dressed
applicants will be
considered.


UP TO $ 1OaK +
Exp Only. Benefits,
must have valid DL.
Fax resume to:
352-628-4427


A/C SALES TECH
UP TO $100OK +
Exp Only. Benefits,
must have valid DL.
Fax resume to:
352-628-4427
A/C SERVICE
TECH.
Exp. req'd. Apply
at Air Care Heating
& Cooling 7745 WV
Homosassa Trail
AUTO MECHANIC

Need
Good mechanic, own
tools, trust
worthy, good with
customers & staff, able
to work on all makes of
cars, 40 hrs. w/chances
of overtime. Uniforms
provided.(352) 746-7351
Granite Polishers
Needed
Experience preferred
but not necessary.
Must be
Dependable, and
have Dependable
transportation.
Apply in Person
DCI Countertops
Shamrock Ind. Park
6843 N. Citrus Ave.
Biding #9 (Rt 495)
Crystal River, FL
No Phone Calls




POOL TECH

P/T Will train.
Reliable, Good
driving record
Apply In Person:
1 Golden St. /491
or Fax 352-620-8435
Pre School Teacher
Needed
(352) 795-6890




P/T Front & Snack
Counter Help

Nights & Weekends
Experience a plus.
Smiling faces a must
Apply In Person,
Manatee Lanes,
Crystal River DFWP



Your World

oe( ~~age sa&ej




C(l :,i,()NIi..0


~ ~ ----


L-----I�$



25x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry Door. 2 Vents,
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.795. INSTALLED
30x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,'
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab -
$14.995. INSTALLED
35x50x12(3:12 pitch)
Roof overhang,
2-10x10 Roliup Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$29.995 Installed
* Fl. Engineered Plans
t A local Fl Manufact.
* Meets or exceeds
Florida wind codes.
+ Conc/Inst brothers.
� Many sizes available
We specialize in
Commercial Buildings
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
www. metal
structuresllc.com


� Sheds & Garages �
I of Any Size I
I *SHEDS NOW*
W WeMove&Buy
I Used Sheds I
I lridependence/41 I
(352) 860-0111
', 'e


CLASSIFIED



SHED 12x16
Metal siding. You
move. $1000.
352-464-4763

Appliances


COSMETOLOGY
.BARBER
ESTHETICS/
SPA TRAINING
Nail Technology
Massage
Therapy

Cos= ;avs
June 15, July 27,
Sept 8, Oct 19, Nov 30,
2009
cosmetology Nights
July 27, Oct. 19, 2009
Massage Days
Aug. 31,
Dec.14,2009
Massage Niohts
Aug.31,2009
Massage Weekends
July 11, 2009
Barbering Nights
June 15, Sept 8,
Nov 30, 2009

93% of our
Graduates passed
the NdETMB
the 1st time!
SKIN & NAIL Classes
Weekly - Days
& Nights
(727) 848-8415
BENE'S
International School
of Beauty, Barber &
Massage Therapy
7027 U.S. Hwy. 19
New Port Richey,
FL 34652


A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
4 2 Ton $780.00
4 2-S'2Ton $814.00
4- 3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Free Del. Lic.#CAC
057914 746-4394
ABC Briscoe Appl.
Refrig., washers, stoves.
Serv. & Parts
(352) 344-2928
Electric Stove, flat top
Amana, self cleaning,
no power cord $65.
Small Microwave $15.
352-795-2647
GE Upright Freezer
like new, frost free
Model 14DVRWW
13.7 cu ft. paid $570.
asking $300 firm (352)
489-5700 or 895-1819
Kenmore Up-right
Fridge. White, icemaker,
66" h X 30"w X 30" d. $350.
Window A/C 110 v. $50
Both like new
(352) 795-6736



220/20 GALLON
HORIZONTAL AIR
COMPRESSOR With
Hose $99.00. 464-0316
ANTIQUE .HAND
TRUCK Wood & Steel
Heavy Duty Rubber
Tires $35.00 464-0316



TV PANASONIC
27" color w/DVD player
$100 (352) 560-7465



90 + USED WHITE
ALUMINUM ROOFING'
PANS 1ft x 16ft $1500 obo
(352) 382-1735
2-5 GAL. CONTAINERS
OF FLOOR ADHESIVE
$15.00 each 464-0316
DOOR & SCREEN
32 x 76 $50
(352) 503-7548 .



COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
New & Used systems
upgrades. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
www.rdeeii.com
HP COMPUTER
Complete set.
Paid $1,659 (2004)
Never used.
Sell $850/obo.
352-861-9746/evenings


CITRUS C(


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0 11

In v 6p N


JfeA^i l/'&


S A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins: Exp'd
friendly serv. Lowest
rates Free est.
352-860-1452

All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/ us out zoomcilrus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852









OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Work Free Est.
LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins
R WRIGHT TreeService
Tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Uc
0256879 352-341-6827









At Home Computer
Repairs & custom
computers.
Call (352)228-7823
COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839

ON-SITE
COMPUTER
SERVICE
352-341-4150




REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch- Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-1728




Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
work fully coated. 30 yrs.
Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-795-6533
352-464-1397
'CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996




EXM HNYA


SALL HOME REPAIR
painting, drywall flooring,
pwr. wash Malley's
Home Maint
220-9486 (lic0259169)
/ out zoomcitrus.com
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Mike Anderson
Painting Int/Ext
& Pressure Washing
Call a Professional,
(352) 464-4418
/ Us out zoomcitrus.com



AFFORDABLE Mobile
Boat Maint. & Repair
Technical/Electrical
Custom Rigging
John (352) 746-4521
V us out zoomcitrus.com



AT YOUR HOME
Mower & Generator
Repair. 352-220-4244
Lic#99990001273,












The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic//ns. #244e.
352-634-1584




certified caregivers/sitters
20 + yrs exp, Trans. Avail
Lisa 352-422-4765,
Dee Dee 352-422-1267
PRIVATE DUTY CARE
Specialty: Quality of life
Fl. St. Lic./Bonded, Ref.
Lee (352) 201-4565



*r SEE THROUGH
Window Washing
All Aspects (352)
489-4189; 322-0962
/ us out zoomcitrus.com


HOUSE CLEANING
$35:00 for most 2/1.
Experienced & reliable,
w/references 228-1789
, MAIDS ON CALL
Serving Citrus 3Yrs.
Windows/Free Est.
(352) 726-8077
Malou's House
cleaning, $12.00 Per hr. 2
hr. min. Homosassa '
area. (352) 476-9676




Affordable CABINETS
& COUNTER TOPS
New & Remodel
352-586-8415




QUALITY CRAFTED
BUILDERS New, Renova-
tions & Commercial
15 Yrs in Citrus County
352-726-5507
ROGERS Construction
New Homes & All
Construction (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872
Schnettler
Construction, LLC
Lic & Ins CBC1253348
Renovations,
room additions,
decks, barns, garages,
Various home repairs.
6374629 cell
352-266-6756
We will beat any price by
far without compromise.
Dunham Construction
roofing, remodeling,
home maint. painting,
.pres. wash, etc. talk to
owner 422-6575
(crco452543
us out zoomcitrus.com



SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla rms,
windows, garage scrns
(CBC1257141) 628-0562


* 3


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Mike Anderson
Painting Int/Ext
Pressure Washing
Call a Professional,
(352) 464-4418




"HOME REPAIRS"
Painting, power wash
jobs big & small
(Eng./ Spanish)746-3720
V us at zoomcitrus.com
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash &
Gutters Lic. 5863
(352) 746-0141

Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
1,,,- -=--=,,1
NATURE cOAST
HOME REPAIR
& MAINT. INC. �
- Offering a Full I
Range of Services
www.naturecoast
homereoair.com
Lic. 2776/Ins.,
352-634-5499
Visa/MC/Dlscover

A #1 HANDYMAN
Master Craftsman
Repairs at Affordable
Rates. 352-628-6960
/ us out zoomcilrus.com








FAST! AFFORDABLE!
RELIABLE! Most repairs
Free Est., Llc#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *

Senior Saviours
Monthly Maintenance
Service.
A must for ONLY
$40.00 a Month!
Call 352-342-9911!
www.SeniorSaviours.co
m


Service for A/C, Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator & Morel

* CallAnytime * Same Day Service
.* 42 Years Experience

l f One Man
i Low
Serving Citrus and Overhead
Marion Counties Low
352-445-0072 Prices
Doc Johnson ,RAoo67oal


Sheds & Garages of q
Any Size
I *SHEDS NOW* I
We Move & Buy
Used Sheds
I lndependence/41 I
(352) 860-0111 0




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash &
Gutters Lic.5863
(352) 746-0141
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699
SALTMARSH
ELECTRIC
Comm/Resid. & Sign
Lighting. CR13012391
352-344-3810
/ us out zoomcitrus.com




FAST! AFFORDABLE!
RELIABLE! Most repairs
Free Est., Lic#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *
Kurt Mac Intyre Plumbing
All Phases Of Plumbing
325-422-5269




C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/201-1422




AARON'S FENCE
All Types, Best Price
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
24/7(352) 795-7373
,V us out zoomcitrus.com
ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279


A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Fence Work Free
Est. LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED/
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins




AAA ROOFING
Free est. 30 yrs exp.
352-563-0411
John Gordon Roofing
For a hole in your roof
or a whole new roof.
Free est. 352-795-7003



BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Estimates
Lic#2579/lns, 257-0078
Decorative concrete,
Landscape curbing
River rock resealing
344-4209 (Lic.6960)
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack repairstaining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
a 352-464-3967
Quality Concrete Serv.
Layout to Lentil
ALL TYPES, Tractor
352-726-2383, Llc#2567
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services
40 Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




A Cutting Edge
Tile Job
Showers. Firs etc
(352) 422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!?
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM


REPAIRS
Wall & Ceiling Sprays
Int./Ext. Painting
Lic/Ins 73490247757
352-220-4845
ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs,
Texture, Additions
Free est.220-9016
Lic.#SCC131149747




Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone Drive-
ways & Tractor work
341-2019 or 257-1562
*TOP SOIL SPECIAL*
3 Yd -$60/5 Yd $85
10OYd $175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436




All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/us out zoomcitrus.com
















#1 Absolute
Lowest Price
Guaranteed
Barker's Lawn Service
Monthly/Per cut rate
(352) 232-8166

#1 AGAIN Pro Tech
Lawn Service. Family
owned & operated.
Serving central Citrus
Cty since 1999. Call
for free estimate
302-7800 - Lic/Ins.
C.R /Homosassa
mowing, beds,
brushes, mulch/haul
Commrl & Resdntl
since 1991 220-6761
out zoomcitrus.com


1st Choice--
PEST CONTROL, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE


LAWN GOT

PROBLEMS?

Call 503-6821"
Owner/Operators
Lloyd Smith - Bill Biedenslein - Jim CuMrr
78421 5340W. Glenbrook St.


CLEMENTS LAWN &
Landscape Main.
"Complete Lawn Care"
(352) 489-3070
Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Specials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
3us out zoomcitrus.com
DUN-RITE LAWN SERV
Lic & Ins Clean up,,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681
check zoomcitrus.com
HALLOCK & Son
Lawncare/Landscaping
Covering all your lawn care
needs. Detailed work.
746-6410 Lic/Ins.
HARRY EVERSON'S
LAWN & MAINTENANCE
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
(352) 302-2585
V us at zoomcitrus.com

Lawn Care 'N' More
Mow, clean up
brushes, beds
Friendly Service since
1991
Residential/Commrl
(352) 726-9570
out zoomcitrus.com
MOWING & TRIMMING
Residential/ East citrus
county area.
352-302-1511;341-5182
OSBORNE'S
Quality Work - Free
Est. LOWEST RATES
352400-6016 - Lic/Ins
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
& LANDSCAPE
SINCE 199 (Licl/Ins)
628-9848 or 634-0554
V us out zoomcitrus.com



POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
a 352-464-3967 u




MOBILE RV
SERVICE
WE COME TO YOU
Motor Homes I
1 5th WhIs/Rv's
Master Tech
352-586-5870
Storage Available
L ---- 1


WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard




�"j 1va Ik, aa Y


ELITE PAVING &
SEAL COATING
All types - Res/Comm
352-302-3030 LIc/Ins
Vus out zoomcitrus.com




Circle T Sod Farms.
Inc.
Tired of your dead
lawn?
Replace It with
Bahia. Delivery
Avail (352)400-2221

LAWN RESTORATION
All types of Grasses
Low maint Lawns Avail.
J & J Sod 352-302-6049
SOD All Varites
cut-out,installed,rolled
Licl Ins #3000
(352) 422-0641
check out zoomcltrus.com


Installations by

Brian cBCt253
Ws eit liltd 4r !

352-628-7519
Siding, Soffit
Skirting,
SRoofovers, ,
Carports, &
Screen
Rooms,
www.advancedaluminum.info


SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, BIk w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This
bad bov is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815




Tractor
'05, 42HP, like new,
275 hrs. w/
attachments $9,500
(352) 302-3820



Antique Bedroom Set
1930's Circa. Dark Cherry,
Bureau, dresser wlmirror
& night stand. $500 Obo
(352)476-3848
Antique Table
$400.
Noritaki
12 place setting,
$200.(352) 637-0467
Armoire Desk
slide-out keyboard.
Great for CPU. Cabinet
doors. CD tray. $200;
(352) 382-3675
BEAUTIFUL FLEXSTEEL
Upholstered Living
Room Chair in medium
aqua.Like new, $150,
(352) 249-7263
Bedroom Set, King size,
Solid pine, natural finish
w/glaze.Headboard, foot-
board, night stand,
dresser & mirror. $425.
Ex. cond.(352) 410-0891
BIG RECLINER-Massage
Chair, Dual remote
control panel.
Bluish-Grey suede, Exc.
Cond. $75 (352)
410-0891
Broyhill Oak
Dining Room Set
with six chairs on
casters and Hutch
$450.
(352) 563-2172












CENTER AND DAYBED
Large oak entertainment

tall, plenty of stor-
age.$200.
Daybed with trundle,
$125.00 Phone
352/794/3029


BRN Leath Sleeper Sofa
Good $100
(352) 503-7548
Glass side Table,
3 1/2 shelves $35
Record, CD/Tape
Player with storage
cabinet $125.
(352) 503-7385
Large solid wood Desk
$75.
Sofa, really nice
$50.
(352) 628-4766
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30; Full
$40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
Refrigerator
14 Cubic ft. off
white,
$180.
RV. Refrigerator
Brand New 3
way. $300.
(352) 637-0467
Sofa bed, cream color,
excellent condition,
$700. Slip covers too.
(352) 344-0172
Wood Coffee table &
2 matching side tables
glass inserts $125. for all
Divider Screen 4 folds.
lace Inserts, $50.
(352) 503-7385
YOUR FURNITURE
DONATIONS
SUPPORTS THE PATH
HOMELESS SHELTER
Call (352) 746-9084



CRAFTMAN 14.5HP
RIDING MOWER
Just serviced. New
battery. 42" cut.
Runs good
$350. 352-464-0316
John Deere
Riding Lawn Mower
20HP, 42" cut
Almost New, 30 hours,
$700. obo
(352) 446-6144
RIDING MOWER, Crafts-
man 16HP Turbo O.H.V.
42" cut, new battery &
blades,
good shape, $450.,
(813) 789-7857 cell




BEVERLY HILLS
MOVING SALE Tues5/19
through Wed 5/27 9a-6p
32 14 N. Juniperus Way
HONDA ACCORD
97 $500! Police
Impounds ! for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246




BEVERLY HILLS
Elec. lift chair$200,
elec. hosp. bed $150,
elec. wheel chair $150;
100 yr old roll top desk
$300, safe $200, turnn,
tools, fish pond.
Thursday 10-4
31 Beverly Hills Blvd


2 ARMY METAL 5 GAL
GAS CAN w/brackets
$40.00 each. 464-0316
2 MOTORCYCLE
HELMETS 1 Motorcross
& 1 Street $25.00 each
464-0316
3-WHEEL JOGGING
Stroller $25; Window A/C
$50 both good.
(352) 628-7688
Almond refrigerator
$60.00 4 bar stools 24"
good cond.$99.00 (352)
746-0714
BIRDCAGE - MEDIUM
WITH ACCESSORIES &
TABLE $50. DEEP
FRYER - GE $30
352-341-6920
CAR FLOODLIGHT 15
foot extension cord
chrome powerful 5.00
3523821191
Cowboy Holster
Leather, $45.
Call Walter,
(352) 527-3552
DRESSER LAMPS real
nice ,cute 15.00 pair
3523821191
FLAG POLE STAND new
put it by your car or
lawn 10.00.3523821191
Garage Door Open
Sears, 1/3 Hp. $35.00
Circular Saw
Craftsman 7" blade.
$15.00(352) 228-7670
GOLF CLUBS several
right hand clubs 5.00
each 3523821191
HONDA ACCORD
97 $500! Police
Impounds ! for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
Hover Vacuum Cleaner
Bag less
$40.
Small Color TV
$35.
(352) 503-7385
INDOOR OUTDOOR
CARPET RUNNERS 271n
by 20 foot new 15.00
3523821191


= Art Now JE


ITS FREE

Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad for FREE on
our all new
CLASSIFIED SITE.
5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 Items totaling less than
$100.00 each.
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an Ad in the top right
hand corner.
LAWN CHAIR COVERS
new plastic nice 5,00
3523821191
Lawn Mower Toro 21"
self propelled mower
rear drive
$200.(352) 249-1187


COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE ,




CARS 5 boxed new
models limited edition
25.00 3523821191
Outdoor Table &
4 chairs $100
Barb b que
$100.
(352) 794-3333
SINGER BUTTONHOLE
KIT nice compact kit
10.00 3523821191
SOD ALL TYPES
Install & Delivery
Available (352) 257-5760
SWIMPOOL new 18
Inch grid filter com-
plete cost 289 now
99.00 3523821191
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT








$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com




2 MANUAL WHEEL
CHAIRS Good Condition
No Foot Rests $40.00
464-0316
4 PRONG CANE
Adjustable Height $25.00'
464-0316
FULL SIZE ALL ELECTRIC
HOSPITAL BED. Remote
control & massage. $995
Call Walter
(352) 527-3552
Scooter GO GO
new batteries,custom
padded seat, &xc. cond
$400 obo(352) 464-0316
SCOOTER LIFTS
& POWER CHAIR LIFTS
$500 & up
(352) 564-1414
TUB CHAIR & BED
SIDE COMMODE
$25.00 Each 464-0316
WALKER FOR SALE 4
w/seat & brakes. $75.00
464-0316




Buying Silver Coins
$.10, 25, .50, $1.00
Pre- 1965,
352- 302-8159
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676



ELECTRIC TREAD MILL
Good Condition $100.00

STATIONARY BICYCLE
WORKS ARMS TOO
Digital Readout $65.00
464-0316


uI POLS/AVES











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







I VET


5-19 � LaughingStock International Inc,/dist. by UFS Inc., 20091

"I've done the best I can."
/ 784216


-I
' 4 SALE- GUNS & AMMO
'AR-15's - AK-47's - Shot
Guns - Pistols. MWEBUY
GQ . 352-489-4870
BIKE MEN'S TREK 4300
19 j/2" FRAME, Rack,
computer; 1.50 tires, toe
clips, Orange 6 yrs old,
$175 (352) 344-4357
Concealed Weapons
. , Permit Course
, DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CART
Club car transporter
6-seater. Exc. cond.
$1800. 352-422-0199
GOLF GIFT
CERTIFICATES. 4-18 holes
w/cart. AIII for $75.
(970)388-9058 (Lecanto)
Con split up.
Pool & Liner
12 x 24, 4 ft deep
No pump & filter
352-621-7257
PRIVATE COLLECTOR
Buying Guns,
Ammunition&
reloading supplies
(352) 586-7516
REMMINGTON 870
Tacticle 12 gage combo,
pistol grip, collapsible
stock, rifle slug barrel &
vent rib barrel. $500
(813) 789-0592 - Crystal
River - trade considered
-" WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




. CAR HAULER
'06, 32 Ft. Dominator XT.
By Classic C. Trpl.
axels. $14,800. Like
new.(352) 835-4273








PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY AT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronicleonllne.com
and click place
an ad



Adorable Chihuahua
Puppies all males, 3
long & 1 smooth coat
CKC/REG., Health
Certs., 8wks. $325.
(352) 726-1843
ADORABLE YORKIES
AKC, 9wks. IF/IM.
Health cert., 1st shots,
$600 or negotiable for
right home 352-465-7668
AKC LAB. 1 bik female
for $250. 5 months old.
Ready for a good home.
(352) 302-9559
ALL BREED RESCUE
Now available; Westie,
Schnauzer, Shihtzu,
Maltese mix,
352-553-2604
BOXER PUPS AKC
CERTIFIABLE 9wks
$350 M/D on premises.
(352)344-3138
CHIHUAHUA
AKC -Male 12wks- Fawn
Apple Head Perfect!
Shots, healthy. $450
352-637-1111
CHIHUAHUA'S
CKC Reg. Current shots,
$250.Health cart
(352) 406-7123
Ferrets 1 Male, 1 Fem.
All shots. Fixed &
Sdescented, w/Cage.
Great Family Pets.
(352) 489-4879
German Sheppard
Puppies, 21 Wks. 2
males, 2 fernms.,1 is blue
- all the rest black & tan.
papers, & health certs.
$300.(352) 201-0111
. HONDA ACCORD
97 $5001 Police
Impounds I for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
PUGGLE PUPS
(pug/beagle); Sheltie,
Paplllon & maltepoo
pups $375-$450
(352)216-1481
ROTWEILLER PUPPIES
Absolutely Beautiful,
8wks, AKC, big boned,
* shots, wormed. Parents,
$650 + (352) 503-6316
Shlh-Tzu Puppies
2 New Liters Home
Raised w/ love. All shots
included. $300+
3902 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827
(305) 872-8099



Hay
Orchid grass 601b
bale $12.00
(352) 628-0156



THOROUGHBRED
Reg. 9yrs old geldIng,
$800. QUARTER HORSE
Paint Stallion. $800
352-726-4135


BABY GOATS SHEEPs
& Pigeons
For pets only.
Mini Farm off 495
(863) 843-2495 cell
RHODE ISLAND REDS
Assorted Bantams,
Polish, Ducks & Quail
Starting at $2.
352-795-6381



6 MONTHS RENT FREE
Trade for handyman
work. Must have Job &
refs. $400 mth after 6
mths. $400 sec. dep.
352-746-7752 Iv msg.
AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hernando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk.
Free intemet/long dist.
railers$175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744 .
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant
HERNANDO
1/1,-open lake, quiet,
carport, sheds, fenced,
covered porch, incl.
county water, garb.,
yard maint. $525 mo.
$525 sec. 352-344-3864
HOMOSASSA
1&2 Brfum &Unfurn.
1 br. RV $300 mo.
No Pets Call 628-4441
HOMOSASSA
1/1 Ist/last/sec.
$350mo 352-634-2368
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Cha, wsh./dry.
$450. + Sec.
(352)503-6747
(352) 628-1928
HOMOSASSA
211%, Big lot, Near 19
$425 mo + Sec. + Ref.
Nopets 352-628-3019
HO6MOSASSA 55+
2/2 Stonebrook Estates
Unfum. Car Prt. Pool,
Club hse. Boat & RV star.
$595. Mo.(352) 422-7887
HOMOSASSA
Quiet Country
Setting.
2/1 Furnished on
fenced 1 acre + .
Large shed, large
deck. Enclosed
porch, CHA
Remodeled
kitchen, washer.
New well. $ 575.
Mo. + $350.
Security Dep.
(352) 628- 5244
HOMOSASSA/
Lecanto 1/1 quiet country
FstJLst./Sec. Elec. inci'd.
$400. Mo. (352)628-0545
(352) 212-0888
HWY 488
2/2, fenced yard new
carpet, $450. mo, + sec
No Pets 352-795-6970
INVERNESS
Large 3/2, appx 2000 s. f.
under roof. No pets. 1 yr.
lease. $675 mo. F/L/S
344-3444 / Eves.
344-3084
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park,
2BR, 1-'/2BA, $475.
1 BR,1 BA, $350 Incl
water 352-476-4964
COUNTRY
SETTING
2/2 in Country Setting.
$500/mo. + $500 Sec.
No. pets. For application
Call Lee at 352-314-5092
or 800 -692-4162.




'| BANK
FORECLOSURES
| (352) 621-9181
CRYSTAL RIVER
Suncoast Mobile Home
Park. 2/2, 32x14 Florida
room, Fireplace, Oak
Kit. Cabinets. New shed
$12,000 (352) 601-0412
Crystal River, Suncoast
MHP. 2/2 14 X 70, partly
furn., CHA, Screened
porch. Ex. cond. $6,500.
(352) 564-0245
(352) 422-6735
INVERNESS
55+ Waterfront Park,
1BR, water Incl. A/C
$3,500 + $270 mo. lot
rent. 352-476-4964
INVERNESS MOSSY
OAK PARK, 55+ COMM.
2/1 Carport/ Scm'd porch.
CHA,Furn., Wsh./dryer.
New electrical wiring.
Close to downtown.
$10,900.(352) 637-3436
Palm Harbor 3/2
Singlewide
Introductory Model
$299/mo wac.10
models to choose from
On Your Lot
Call John Lyons
1-800-622-2832 ext.210



6018W Oaklawn 2/2,'91,
14x65 fixer, 1.25 acres,
$37,900, www.zillow.com,
813-695-0890 or
352-382-1002
Homosassa

FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181J


2br 2ba sw on 1/2 acre
new carpet & stove.
very clean.alum roof
over.10x14 work-
shop.$35000 cash or
offer 813-792-1355 o
Floral City
2/2 DW on 3.5 + or -
acres. Withlacoochee
Forest area great for
horse riding.Priced to
sell. (352) 341-6281
(352) 634-0787
(352) 634-1290.
HERNANDO
Neat & lean 2/1, 14
Wide. Carport & covered
area. 12 X 36 scrn'd
porch. Ready to move in.
Parsley Real Estate Inc.,
$48,500 Call
Gareth Rouillard.
(352) 422-5731
HOME-N-LAND
New Home 3/2
10 Yr. Warranty
Sacrifice! $3,000
down $676.43/mo.
Call to Quality
352-621-3807
Receive $8,000
Cash Back
INGLIS '95 SW
2/11/2, beautiful,
wooded, priy 11 , ac.
backs ups to wildlife
sanctuary. Incls cover'O
deck, garage w/work
shop, Ig shed w/wln-
dows, all appls, washer,
dryer. STEAL at $53.900
352-419-5777: 476-9005
New 2009
2 bed, 2 bath, large
rms. appliance pkg.
2x6 construction,
10 yr. warranty. Must
Seel $39,900 Includes:
A/C, steps, skirting.
Call for more details
352-621-9182

NEW JACOBSEN
S TRIPLE WIDE
High end home on
2 1/ Acres, 2150 pq ft,
3/2, glamour kitchen,
marble in bathroom,
appliance pkg.
Must Sell $179,900
or $787/mo. Call
(352) 621-9181
Receive $8,000
Cash Back.




CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55 + comm. 3/2
with a lovely view of the
Lake. Call The C.R.
Village office $75K obo
352-795-7161
FOREST VIEW ESTATES
Great Loc. Pools, clbhs.
& more. Move-in ready,
comp. furn. 2/2 DW,
wheelchair acc., shed
S& sprinkler. New heat
pump. $39,900
563-6428/563-1297
Furn. 6 mos. lot rent w/
full price offer, 3/2
End, tiled lanal, dbl
carport, tape &
textured throughout,
Kathy (352) 228-7991
INVERNESS 1 BR Mobile,
55+ w/. waterfront
park$9,900 AC, W/D,
Shed 352-476-4964
Walden Woods
55+ Upscale comm.
28 x 56, upgrades &
decorator touch, 3/2/2
Carport, scrn & end.
lanai, 6 mo. Free Rent
w/ full price. Must Seel
(352) 503-5164
(352). 228-7991







JAlL Mmm Rt tAut IMS
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
Pritchgrd Island
3/2/1 Villa- $875
Arbor Lakes
3/2/2 - $800
Inverness
2/2/2- $700
3/2/2- $750
2/1/1 - $595
2/2/1 - $625
3/2/1 - $895
2/2/1 Villa - $695
1&2 Bd Apartments
starting at $400
2/7V/2 -$600
2/1 s/1I - $600
Lecanto
I/1 Apartment- $395
See our website:
www.jwmortonreal
estate.com
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
352-726-9010

RENTALS

Pine Ridge w/Pool
5169 N. Perry Dr $1800
3/4/3 Pool/pool maint
4470 N. Ficus Dr $1400
3/2/2 Pool/pool maint
Citrus Soring
9661 N. Parquet Way
$800
838 W. Massachusetts
St. $1400
3/2/2 Pool/pool main
27 New York Blvd
$800
188W. Seymerla St
$675
42 S. Monroe St $600
14 Plaza St. $600
HEDICK GROUP
REALTY
352-422-2522
hedlckgroup.net


CHASSAHOWITZKA
2/2 waterfront DW $600
2/2 furnished DW $700
2/1 carport - $500
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $900
Agent, 352-382-1000



-I

Al Valueinn.com
Inverness
Hernando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
internet/long dist.
Trailer$175wk.
38r Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5, c/h/a w/d hook
up. 838 5th Av N.E.
$650.+sec Unfurn.$600
727-343-7343; 455-8998

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1Bd Rm, refr. stove, with
W&D, cable TV air, until.
included $600. mo. + sec,
352-628-6537

RENTALS AVAIL.
FROM $585.
(352) 795-9123
Charlotte G Really
& Investment LLC



*---2
S 1 &2
BEDROOM UNITS
* MOVE IN SPECIAL
MUST MOVE IN BY "
5/31/09
KNOLLWOOD
Inverness
1B/R SEC DEP. $150
IB/R 1st MOS$150
2B/R SEC DEP. $200.
2B/R 1ST MO $200 '
SCALL 344-1010
TU, TH, FRI.
8-12 & 1-5 NO PETS
HUD VOUCHERS
ACCEPTED
Equal Housing
Opportunity


& 2
BEDROOM UNITS
* Move In Special*
Move In by 5/31/09
1BR Sec. dep $200
2BR Sec. dep $250.
CANDELWOOD
COURT
Inverness
CALL 344-1010
TUES, THUR, FRI.
8-12 & 1-5
NO PETS
HUD VOUCHERS
ACCEPTED
Equal Housing
Opportunity


1 &2
BEDROOMS
Starting at
$450
352-257-8048

I BEDROOM
Starting @ $425/mo
Laundry on premises.
352-465-2985

INGLIS VILLAS.
Is now accepting
applications for our
1, 2, 3 BRApts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Crys. Riv.
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: M,W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglis Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity

INVERNESS
2/1 Duplex $525;
2/1 home $550, f/l/s
(352) 422-2393

INVERNESS
2/1Tri-plex, Great Loc,
clean & roomy. No ,
smokelno pets $500
Mo. Fst/Lst/Sec.
352-341-1847

INVERNESS 3/2/2
$1000/mo pets ok appls
info@www.citruscounty
sales.com

INVERNESS
Great Neigh. 2/1
*Move In Speclal*
$550.'mo. +sec,
(352) 634-5499

LECANTO
1 BR (352)746-5238
613-6000/613-5974

ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appis,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341

Pinewood Villas
S-.Is now Accepting
applications for our
1, 2, 3 BR Apts.
Located in Bronson
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-486-2612
Or Apply Tues & Thur
7291 NE 92nd Ct. #17,
Bronson, Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity




INVERNESS
2/1- $500; 2/2- Irg scrnm


prch, quiet. $600. W/D
hk-ups, 727-446,5871
727-688-7866.






Act Now

PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Goto:
chroniclaonllne.com
and click place
an ad

We Have Rentals
Starting at $425/mo +
Many others
LANDMARK
REALTY
352-726-9136
Kathy or Jane
311 W Main St. Inv


CLASSIFIED




HERNANDO
ALESCI'S
CORNER PLAZA
HWY. 486
OFFICE/RETAIL
1000, SQ. FT.
INCLUDES COMMON
AREA
MAINTAINENCE,
WATER, WASTE,
GARBAGE &
SIGNAGE. ONLY
$750.MO. + SALES
TAX. $795. TOTAL. NO
SEC., NO LAST MO.
RENT. FIRST MO.
RENT ONLY. ALSO
1,194 S. FT., 1,250
SQ. FT. & 2,000 SQ.
FT. AVAILABLE.
(352) 447-1244

OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507
PINE RIDGE
1000 sqft unit, (currently
beauty salon).
352-527-9013




CITRUS HILLS
Home, Villa, Condo
GREENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-5921
(888) 446-5921
areenbriarrental.com






FREE RENT!
SUMMERHILL
AT
MEADOWCREST
Luxury Condos
Limited Time!
Call agent for
details.
352-563-5657
/ out zoomcitrus.com.

INVERNESS
Extra frg. 2/2/1 Lakeside
Community, pool, dock,
no smoke, no pets. $665
mo. + sec. (866)637-2631
TOLL FREE
INVERNESS
Waterfront 2/2E2 Com-
munity Pool/Boat Ramp
All appl' $700. mo
352-400-0731
MEADOWCREST
Summerhill, 2/2 w/large
1 car garage, ground
floor, new, never lived
in, near shopping.
Reduced to $900.
Mo/unfurn. $1200/furn.
(352) 746-9770
(352) 697-0375
Gloria Banner P & R
Mid Florida Reality
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, Completely turn.
$850. mo. 352-746-4611




CITRUS SPRINGS
New, 2/2, all appl.
Wash/Dry. $600.-$625.
(954) 557-6211

CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/1 Lg. master
suite, granite, stainless
steel appl. Large lanai.
Lease, + Dep. No pets,
$800.Mo.(352)697-3133

HOMOSASSA
New, 2/2, Rent
w/option to buy. 1300
sq. ft. w/d hk. up, fans,
blinds, refr., stove,
microwave, tile,'carpet.
$750. month
(352) 592-0893

INVERNESS' '
2/1 W/D, garb./water
Incl., fenced, pets ok
$650.mo. 1st., last $300
sec. 352-746-4611
INVERNESS
2/1/1; W/D hookup;
remodeled ,$600 mo.
F/L/S (352) 697-1396

ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appls,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341




INVERNESS 1/1
$450 mo. Inds all utils. +
cable. 352-270-8298











CRYSTAL RIVER
Lovely, Spacious 3/2/1, inclI
all utilities $1000/mo.fum
$850 unfurn 352-628-1149


SUNSET VILLAS
Senior Community
Chiefland Fl.
Accepting
Applications for
1 & 2 BRAPTS
Please Apply
M, W, F, 8am-12p
124 SW 14th Ave.
(352) 493-0220
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.





AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hernando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
intemet/long dist.
7ralers$175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk
(352) 726-4744
11-15 ml to Pwr Plant


BEVERLY HILLS
Progress Enerav
Contractors 1/1,
fully furn avail now
$825. includes all util-
ities, 100 channel
TV/internet.
2/1 also available
(352) 220-2666
BLACK DIAMOND
Uve in park like setting
3/2/2 gated
community $1,150. Mo.
(352)212-1401
Citrus Hills
Townhouse 2/2v/1.
Terra Vista Club incld.
$1,000 Mo + until.
(516) 991-5747
HOMOSASSA
3/2/1 Nearly new. Off of
Rock Crusher Road,
near school. Well turn.
& clean. Great cond.
Lease with Option to
purchase. $950.
Month. + electric
5640 Irving Court
(352) 563-2776
INVERNESS
1 BR Mobile, 55+ water-
front park, Incl. water
$475 352-476-4964


BEVERLY HILLS
2/I + scrn rm - $525
2/1/1 + fl rm - $600
352-795-1722
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 ,C/H/A, ceiling fans,
W/D, ready now $575.
mo. 3527422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1- FamRm/Lrg- $675
2/1-Fam Rm/Nice- $575
352-795-0538
'BROOKSVILLE
4/2 Close to Reg. Hosp.
on 2.4 acres, 2,400sq. ft.
ex. cond. in nice residen-
tial area. $925. mo.
w/option to purchase.
(813) 949-6205
(813) 505-0894


CITRUS HILLS
3/2 Pool Home
1 Acre, $975
(352)746-4821

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/1 $825mo + sec.
rINVERNESS
2/1/1 $650 + sec
352-746-9436

CITRUS
SPRINGS
3/2/2 Newer Home.
Washer & dryer.
Sprinkler system.
Quiet neighborhood.
$795. Monthly.
(352) 812-1414

CITRUS SPRINGS
312/2, Fenced Yard.
$800. Mo. Fst./Sec.
118 W. Frisco Lane
(352) 560-0229
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1 Carport/fenced
yard. $500. Mo.
Fst./Sec.
31 E. Lemon St.
(352) 560-0229
Citrus. Springs
4/2/2, New, Split Plan,
Cath.ceilings,2,150sq.
ff,$900.Mo.352-697-1820
CITRUS-'SPRINGS

Lovely modern '04,
4/2/2 built by
Mercedes Homes.
This 2600 Sq. ft. home
on large corner lot.
Large patio, fenced
back yard, sprinkler sys
Near Great Schools,
Churches, Parks, &
Shopping: Located at
8249 N. Triana Drive.

12 Mo. lease, $1,100
Mo.$1,000 Sec.
deposit.'
Will Consider Lease
Option.

Call Dan at:
(813) 716-5605

CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 3/2/2, Near Sch.
$875. mo 352-628-0731
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/1, Garbage & lawn
Incl'd Pets?, $750. mo.
+ sec. 352-795-0207

CRYSTAL RIVER
Rent or Rent to Own
3/2 & Large Fam. Rm.
Newly Rerodeled
Pets OK, $750mo.
352-527-0493
352-427-7644

GOLFER'S DREAM
Home 3/2/2
3000 sf
$850 (908) 322-6529
HOMOSASSA
$350.... 1/1, Duplex
$525/up..2/1 .Duplex
$700..2/2/2 SMW Villa
$1000. WF 3/2/2 Home
River Links Realty Call
352-628-1616
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550/mo. 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
2/2 off Cardinal Lane
$600 mo. 1st + deposit
(352) 628-7682
Homosassa SMW
2/2/1 & carport, screen
back porch, private
wooded area . Newly
painted, carpet & tile
Unfurn. $700. No Pets
No smokers
(352) 65d-5986
INVERNESS
2/1/1 $600 or furn'd for
$650 PET OK
1ST/SEC(352)422-2655
INVERNESS
2/2/1, lanai, 1/2 acre
close to town, pet ok.
$650. Mo.(813) 973-7237
INVERNESS
610 Independence Hwy
3/2/2 Fenced yard.
Rent w/option to buy.
$750/mo. 1st +Sec.
352-422-3670
Inverness
area ,Beautiful, 3/2,poss
2/2
Lease Oat .Flexible
Financing imm. Occ
352-795-0088
INVERNESS
BEAUTIFUL
WATERFRONT
3/2'/2 Tile, Washer &
Dryer Scm'd. Pch. on
Lake Tsalsa Apopka.
Community pool, ten-
nis & dock. $875. Mo.
352-812-3213

INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
4/2/2 or 3/2/2 Starting
at $790 (352) 341-1142
(352) 601-2615


TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 CIA



WORDY GURDYBY TRICKY RICKYKANE
1. Violently wiggle a cobra (1) Every answer is a rhyming
S pair ofwords (like FAT CAT
SI and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Waist circler made of a trapper's hide (1) they will fit in the letter
|----l --lisquares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. "The Apprentice" boss's sugar blocks (1) syllables in each word. To win
- - -l l - - _ - - - - I $10, send your original rhymes
with your definitions to this
4. Sniff a conch (1) newspaper. All entries become
_0 ll ________the property of UFS, Inc.
� 2009 United Fealure Syndicate. Inc.
5. S.F. team's ocean cruise ships (2)
-_ _ _- _ _-_ Thanks and $10 to
S1 1 1 1 1 Judy Mun6z of
6. Chivalrous one with exceptional ability (2) Victorville, CA for
S#3. Send your entry
Il to this newspaper.

7. Final-choice-making exactitude (3)


NOISIDMtd NOISIOIIL N [IVI ANVTIVoD 9 SHaNYI SHEaNINN
TI-HS TMIH S 'TI , S t SdWII LH fil ,'I E 'ISad ' aIVNS 3aVHS T1
5-19-09 SHaMSNV


AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50
Ad includes 20 lines of copy
w/ photo.




Lakefront 7 Acres, Flo-
-ral City L.ake Tsala
Apopka 2 dwellings 2
barns see
pictures/details
floralcitylakefront.com
skyetraveler@att.net

Plcture Perfect Homes
NEW HOMES START-
ING At $75,000 On
Your Lot
Atkdnson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic # CBC059685












PINE RIDGE
OPPORTUNITY
KNOCKS TODAY
MAGNIFICENT HOME
sitting on 3 acres, 3
bed, 3 bath plus Den,
Pool. $399,000
w/furniture.
Maria, 352-302-8403


$1000/mo pets ok appis
info@www.citruscounty
sales.com
INVERNESS
Waterfront Townhouse
2/2-%, with 3 decks &
balconies, private
community pool, very
quick access to Lake
Henderson, less than
3 min. drive to
downtown Inv. &
access to Rails to
Trails.
$700 mo + sec. dep.
(352) 817-3185 appt
OLD HOMOSASSA
3/2, Like New, Modern
Kit. w/ D/W & Mlcrowve
Indoor laun. rm. $795
(352) 697-5708
RENTALS AVAIL.
FROM $585.
t(352) 795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investment LLC

SOUTHERN
WOODS
4/3/2 Luxury
executive home
on golf course,
great views,
$1,300/Mo.
(813) 390-7109

SUGARMILL Woods
2 Masters /2/2 (large)
Screen lanai, oversized
gar. new apple. & A/C
$850 mo.
(352)302-4057
Sugarmill Woods
4/2/2,, Golf course
community, access to
clubhouse, pool & ten-
nis court, secluded on
culdesac, $1,000. mo
Call (352) 228-1220 ,



CRYSTAL RIVER
P Adorable furnish
waterfront 2BR
Boatslip, Lanai Pets?
$1000 incl utilities
352-220-6593
POWER PLANT &
Seasonal -Waterfront
homes, Wkly prv. rms,
RV lots. 352-628-0011




AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hemando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
internet/long dist.
Traiers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant




2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Util. incl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
(352) 628-9759



OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507




AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hernando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
internet/long dist.
Trailers$175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 ml to Pwr Plant




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to
advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
discrimination. -
" Familial status
includes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing
custody of children
under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


THE BRITTANY MODEL
3/2/2- Hugh master
bath & screened lanal.
All appliances, Includes
several locations to
choose from. $159,900
Citrus Ridge Realty
352-465-3000
THE MERLE MODEL
3/2/2- FHA approved
with 2/10 warranty.
Builder will pay $5000 of
buyers closing costs.
$129,900. Citrus Ridge
Realty. 352-465-3000



BROOKHAVEN MODEL
3/2'2/3 nearly 3000 sqft.
Volume ceilings
Corlan top/sinks
Lots of upgrades
Summerwind Homes
Inc. 352-527-8035
COUNTRY HOME
4/3/2 Fabulous home
on 2 landscaped ac-
res. Hardwood & tile.
Huge caged pool,
25x14 pool, spa w/ wa-
terfall outdoorr bar.
40x60 workshbp/RV
garage w/12' ceilings.
90001b lift and office.
$499,900. Middleton
Sunshine Properties
352-476-2871
Don Mercado Model
43/33 Grand column en-
try, spacious kitchen, ex-
quisite master suite with
award winning master
bath. Base price
' $214,900
Dream Custom Homes
of Citrus. 352-527-7171

RealtySelect
Citrus.com.


BETTY MORTON

2.8% COMMISSION

ReaiSect

(352) 795-1555
THE OAKWOOD MODEL
3/2/2 - Open floor plan
w/formal living & family
room, den and spec-
tacular master bath.
Sweetwater Homes of
Citrus, Inc.
352-382-4888



BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2. Nice yard, near
school. $108k Call
anytime to see.
(352) 201-0991
(352)726-7543
FOR SALE BY OWNER
13 Donna Street
/1 2/2 carport,
16x2 fam room, 12x16
workshop, 8x10 shed.
Fenced yd. OPEN
HOUSE SUNDAY'S 1-3
$87k. 352-527-8548
FOR SALE BY OWNER
88 SJ Kellner, Bev. Hills
2/2'/22, FP, OPEN
HOUSE on SUNDAYS
11A-3P $118K firm
Call to See. 746-6093
Must Sell 2 BR, 2 BA,
CH/A, completely re-
done 15S. Barbour St.
Make offer. After 7PM
(352) 637-3614




3/2/2, POOL HOME,
I acre, membership
avail, to Cit. Hills C.C.
$189,900 (352)860-0766
MODEL CLOSE OUT
Below cost - Private
gated community.
Heritage off 486. 1 bik E
of Forest Ridge Blvd,
Owner/Developer
352-422-0199
POOL HOME
4/3/3 - built '04
Tile, pavers, Citrus Hills
membership available.
To view listing
www.1605wredding.com
$299,900. 352-464-1316
REDUCED
POOL HOME
4/3/Ext. 2 Car Garage
on 1 Acre.
Membership Available
$277,900.352-527-7856



3/2 New roof, & morel
Move in cond. Priced
as a 2/1 @ $74,900
(813) 968-0001
BRAND NEW
For Sale, 3/2 w/alot
of upgrades
Beck St. Inverness
352-637-4138
Lic # CBS059685

PUT YOUR
$MONEY$ TO WORK
BUY Real Estate
NOW!


Deb Infantine
EXIT REALTY LEADERS
(352) 302-8046
Prices are Downill "
Rates are LOWII


OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Great Location,
HWY. 19.
South of
Sugarmill woods
entrance. North of new
public. $285,000.
TASIA SEIJAS
ERA American Realty
& Investment
(352) 302-0569
(352) 746-3600
Email To:
tasiaera0(vahoo.com







SALE OR LEASE
W/OPTION
Building newly built,
5,000 sq. ft. of ware-
house space. 1,000 sq.
ft. of office space
w/CHA. Second level
can be built for more
space, 3 bays, 1 is a
loading bay. $329,000.
TASIA SEIJAS
ERA American Realty
& Investments.
(352) 302-0569
(352) 746-3600
Email to:
tasiaera@ tvahoo.com





3/2/2 For Sale or Rent
Citrus Springs Newer
Home , ow/dn, easy
terms 352-361-6551


ATTENTION!!
BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
$39,900. Delivered
and Set, $0-Down
Land/Home $650. mo.
Repos Available
Kinder
Mobile Home
(352) 622-2460

BEAUTIFUL LOCATION
3/2/2 w/garden room.
By Owner. Lots of
upgrades. ULike new.
Oversized prime lot.
A must to see. Asking
$179,900 (352) 527-4488










C12 TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009


3/2 - Great Valuel
Upgraded appliances,
pantry, lafge walk-in
closet & more.
Encore Homes, Inc.
352-726-2179
For Sale, By Owner
3BR 3BA, Pool, 16x24
workshop, close to
school, hosp., library,
WTI, 518 Poinsettia. Ave.
(352) 860-0878
RealtySelect
Citrus.corn


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION



(352) 795-1555


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI
Your SATISFACTION
Is Mv Futurell
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC
CONNELL HEIGHTS
2/2, Great Rm, vaulted
cell. open kit. b/bar,
fenced back yrd.
scm. por., new appl's,
1600 sf,(mol) 6172 W.
Pine Cir/C.R. Priced to
Sell (352) 795-9603
RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

ReaiQt^Ilect

(352) 795-1555




BY OWNER -3/2.
Super nice Less than
1 yr old', approx 1 acre.
i1cls most fum. Beautiful
.lot, close to town.
$128,500. Call Dan
312-34A-8329; Mov f '
out of state,.
7289W. Pompey Ln
Homosassa, FL 34446
RIVERHAVEN I MODEL
New - 4/2/2- Want the
best of both worlds at
a reasonable price?
Best quality - located
on the Grand Canal of
RIverhaven Village '
offers easy gulf access
& a terrific community.
$439,000. Moore &
Moore Realty, Inc.
352-621-3004



BEACHWOOD POINT
VILLAS 3/2/2
Maintenance free
condo living w/the
privacy of a villa.
Sweetwater Homes of
Citrus, Inc.
352-382-4888


$8000 Tax
Rebate
for first time home
buyers ,If you have
not owned a home In
3 years. Call for Info
Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
Kellars Williams Rltv


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI

Your SATISFACTION
Is Mv Futurel/.
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC
CRYSTAL RIVER
The Springs on Kings
Bay 3/2'//2 - Luxurious
home - 4276 sq ft.
20ft ceilings In foyer &
family room, Hardwood
floors. Edward Russell
Johnston/Builder
352-795-2200


Michele Rose
REALTOR
"Simply Put.
I'll Work Harder"
352-212-5097
thom@atlantic.net
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1516


Homes NEW HOMES
STRING At $75,000
On Your Lot Atklnson
Construction
352-8637-4138
1 ,�itreo- R 07 r AAI


Realor
My Goal Is Satisfied
Customers

REALTY ONE
OuttandlngAgatsh
Outsiandinges ls






orSaklel
CITRONELLE 3 bed-
room, 2 bath. Mini
Farms 2.5 Acres,
Trailer, Water with
softener, septic. As
Is $49,000.00.
813-695-0853
For Sale By Owner
3 BR, 2 BA, 2-car gar.,
Cement block, north
Dunnellon Low down,
EZ terms w/$3,500
down $595 mo.
(352) 726-9369
OWNER FINANCING
4/2/office, 2.5 ac,
2005 Doublewide
Like new. 1800sqft,
$9,700/dn,' $882/mo. or
$23,700 down, $582/mo.
727-992-1372



River Oaks East
4/2.5/2 Custom Pool
Home on 1.5 acres.
Office bonus rm, green
house, & boat slip.
$455,900 (352) 274-1594



Price Reduced
Crystal River 1/1 fully
furn. $69,800. Buy
Owner.com. 34429
(352) 563-5844


SHome
BLUE MARLIN II MODEL
3/2/2 - Maintenance
free waterfront ailing.
The Moorings at Point of
Woods. 352-637-3391
SCall About Saving
Your Home
. We Have Ideas!


Plantation Realty. Inc
(352) 795-0784
Cell 422-7925
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner
See all of the
listings in Citrus
County at'
www.Elantation
realtvlnc.com
HOMOSASSA
3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to
head 'spring. 163' wfrt,
dock/slip. Brand.
new/unoccupied.
2 frpis, granite. $579K
727-808-5229

must sell!
Inverness
MUST SELL QUICKI
UNIQUE CUSTOM
HOME ON 1 ACRE ON
CANAL TO LAKE.
TSALA POPKA. 3,323
sq. ft LIVING! 30'
ATRIUM. 3 BED/2.5
BATH. 2-CAR GAR-
AGE. LIVE OAKS.
NEEDS TLC. PRICED
TO SELL ONLY
$194,500. CALL
MYRIAM @ KELLER
WILLIAMS REALTY of
CITRUS COUNTY.
352-613-2644

RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION



(352) 795-1555




LOOKING FOR HOMES
OR MOBILES & LAND
Purchase; lease, mort-
gage assumptions, take
over payments + cash.
Any location, price, condi-
tion, foreclosure, late on
payments okay.
1-727-992-1372



Business/Home 3/2 Great
location on Trout Ave. Inver-
ness $165,000 . Rhema
Realty 228-1301



7 Rivers Golf & C.C.
priv. member owned.
comer lot 1 ac (mol)
$30K (813) 766-9354 or
sweetscaneauestia

BLOW OUT PRICES
Inv. HIghlands S6.900
Hernando 'hA $S5.000
Dunnellon $4.000
Inv. Acres S4.500O
Crystal River, Ocala
Bellvlew, from $4,900
Visit the website at
www.
flalandandrealtv.com
772-321-7377


HLotsoSWIolin
Presidential Estates
$22.000:
CRYSTAL MANOR
Nicely treed lot
$18,000. Please call
(352)302-9140
LECANTO 1/2 acre has
well, septic & Pwr pole
$15,000 813-792-1355



235Fr ON
WITHLACOOCHEE
RIVER. 2+ acres. Deed
restricted comm. $250K
Owner. 352-422-0199



EVINRUDE 0/B MOTOR
4HP - Excellent
condition. $400.
352-621-0574 after 6PM.



1993 17' Sylvan
Bow rider bimini top
Boat & trailer
85h.p. Yamaha motor
Good cond. $3,500
(352) 344-0457
16FT CAR. SKIFF
'96, like new, $5,800
40HP Evinrude, center
console, trolling motor,
b-top, many extras
(352) 344-5858
AIR BOAT
Big 13 Ft. haul,
2 seats. Approx. 375-400
HP. 8 blade warp drive.
2-1 reduction'gear box.
Used 100 hrs.+Trl.
$18,500 invest. Sell
for $10,000 firm.
(352) 302-4535
AIRBOAT
1996, 15',500cubic inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
AQUA.SPORT '05
175 Osprey, 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth Finaer, dual
batt. w/switch, bimini,
easy load trailer. Low
hours. $9,990
352-860-0277
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
$2W00QL352-746-5856
AQUA SPORT
2000; 225 Explorer 24'
S Cuddy cabin. 225
Johnson Ocean Pro.
Loadmaster.tandem axle
trailer. Exc. cond.
$14,500.352-493-7377;.
352-221-5230
AQUA SPORT
'86 2Fi .Cudo, CaouIr.
VJ.r..rn O6 C. 'pIrr.a
I lnrp . dOcuble
axle trailer. $16,900
(352)257-1355
BOSTON WHALER .
14' w/,40hp Johnson
Everything works good.
$1800 (352) 302-0033
Cabin Cruiser
24 ft.
Owner died, 6 cyl. 10,
aipr.a *,.e,:'OD u.ea In
-retrn ,..,atr. ion gal In,
Incl.'d $2,100 464-0316
CENTURY
'01- Bay, 21ft.
'02, 150HP Yamaha w/
trir., custom cover
dep/find, VHF, Iw hrs.,
_ae new $13,950.
(352) 442-7772
Deck Boat
95' 19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ ra-
dio & fishfinder. New Bat-
tery switch. 2 batteries,
power pk.
prop./hub.$6,000
(352)726-0838
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL'25ft, openifish-
ermnen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras
$14,500/obo. (352)
489-9640: 220-6508
FISH- N SKI '92
16' 50hpmotor, bimini,
cover, new floor& radio
all cost guard equipment
$4000.,call Ross
(352) 795-0153
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
115HP, 4strke Yamdha,
w/ trr. $11,200, will
trade (352) 503-3778
HURRICANE
23ft Deck Boat, 112HP
Johnson, great for fish--
ting & scalloblng Must
Sell $3,500, 628-7397
OSPREY
1994- 16ft, CC, bay boat.
88 HP Evinrirude, Garmln
GPS/recorder $4500.'
352-621-4711
PONTOON '08
Sweetwatr 21ft. 25
hours. 90hp Yamaha.
$18,00. ,Pald,$2,00o0.
352-803-6797
PONTOON BOAT
08' 20 Ft. To many
options to list. $13,000
Call for Info. 628-7926
Pontoon Boat
1996,18 ft.i'Good Cond.
40HP Yamaha. 4 stroke,
$8,5001obo
(352) 860-1490
PONTOON
Palm Beach 2002
22' 60hp yYamaha
$5500 (239) 571-2628
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras
$12,000 (352) 628-0281
PRO-LINE 221
WALKAROUND 1999
200 HP Mercury w/9.9 HP
Johnson kicker,$12k
obo. Call Kurt at Pete's
Pier 352-795-6067
SEA PRO
'00 19 FT. C/C. Loaded.
Elec. Pkg. 115 FI 4 Strk.
Yam. 100 hrs. Bim. top.
Best offer(352)533-3093
SHOAL WATER


'05, 15ft., Cat Hull,
50HP Evlnrude, CC,
extremely shallow
for Flats, with trailer
$12,500. (352)621-0848
T-CRAFT
23'L, 6'W,'02 150H
Evin. mtr. w fuel enj. like
new, trlr. w/brks
$7750 352-489-3661
Triumph
�'03-17ft Bass. with trailer
60 Yamaha, B-top,
Trolling motor, Excel
cond. $5,700 Obo
(352) 860-0760
Ultimate Scallop
Boat 03, 25' Sun
Tracker, 05 Marc 90hp, Io
hrs. tandem tril. like new
exc. value $11,500.
352-586-1676
WELLCRAFT
1987, 250 Sportsman,
25', Gas eng., 30" draft,
260 hp I/O, alum.
traller.$8,000
(352) 344-9851


'02 Cedar Creek 5th
Wheel 29ft, 2-slldes,
queen bed,bath/shower,
low mileage, loaded,
good cond. $16,800
(352) 746-4969
05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
26Inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
'07 NEW MAR
Cypress 32ff 5th wheel.
2 slides. Separate bath.
Extras. 3 yr ext. warr.
$35,900/obo
352-794-3534
38FT BOUNDER '96
Class-A - basement
model. 49K mi. 14mpg,
new tires & brakes. (4)
TV's. Ready for long trip.
$22.&00. 352-563-0615
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 36 K Mi.
Dual air. $37,700 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
* AUIO.i BAT *
DONATIONS
43 year old
'Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
(352) 795-9621
* Tax Deductible !*

CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461,4518
consignmentusa.org
CHEVY '86 Class C
Very good cond. Needs
, tires. $4,000. Call
anytime. (352) 446-6329
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane New
deal. 30Q, class A motor
home, 31%/ ft., 22k mi.
V10 gas, ducted rf. air;
onan 4K gen., qn bed,
etc. Saturn tow Incl.
$35,000. (352) 397-5007
GEORGIE BOY
'05, Pursuit, Class A,
30ft. Excel. cond. 8k mi;,
2 slide outs, 2 TV's, back
up camera, all the bells
and whistles and much
more, must see this
coach, Asking $50,000.
obo (352) 746-7626
GULF STREAM
BT Cruiser 03, 22' fully
loaded, ready to travel
$27,500..,.
(352) 341-1297
HAMPTON'BAY
43ft.2008
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool,
clubhouse'etc. Can be
moved $29,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
Holiday Rambler
'03, By Monico, 300
Cummins, 2 slides, incl.
tow vehicle,
mint cond. $84,900.
(352) 302-7073
Holiday Rambler
Admiral Motor Home 36'
2 slides, 340hp, gas eng.
all options transf ext.
warr. $51,900
352 795-3970
HONDA ACCORD
."97$5006'Polic ~'
Impounds I for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low ml, 1, slide, loaded.
$52,995. 352-464-0371
Keystone 07
Big Sky 5th Wheel Prem.
Pkg 340RLQ every op-
tion. Center Island Kit.
Incis sep.W/D, added 2nd
a/c in bedroom
Price to Sale $52K firm
352-794-3068
PACE ARROW
04, 38' 3 SLIDES
21k mi fully loaded
3 tv's $92,500 obo
352-302-0743




BONAIR '01 "
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig. Like
new. $9,995.
352-489-3661
Holiday Rambler
'31 'Newly remodeled,
new appls.& a/c, tows good
good cond. $2500.
352342-6311.
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO
07 Jay Flight
28' used twice, smells &
looks new, green clean,
sips 6 $16,800 (352)
� 503-7431
KODIAK
'04, Hybrid Travel Trir.
AC, Heat, Micro. Tub/
Shwer, toilet exc cond
$9,500. 352-564-4151
MEADOWBROOK
5th Wheel, 2000 Excel-
lent. Photos at
http://plcasaweb.google.c
$13,95.00
(352)302-6055 or
(727)692-9045
Montana
'03, 5th wheel, 3 slides
like new,$34,000.
Truck avail also for tow
(352) 422-5731
SKYLINE 04
32' sleeps 8, used
once $11,500


(352) 586-9614



$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CASH BUYER
Buvina Used Car
Trucks & Vans
For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333
We Buy Junk Cars
Running or Not
Cash Paid, $150 & Up
(352) 771-6191


CLASSIFIED



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'88 BUICK ELECTRA
Runs good, rear end
damage. drive or parts
(352) 795-8800
*98 BUICK CENTURY
LIMITED. All power,
leather Interior, 75k ml,
Excellent cond. $3,995
(352) 382-0485
ACURA
2004 TSX
43k miles, Certified
Only $299 per mo
1-800-733-9138
. ACURA
2006, RSX 33k Miles,
Certified, Lthr, Sunroof
$14,988 or $245 mo
1-800-733-9138
BMW
'03, 745 LI, NAV, black,
sun roof. all options $29K
Mint
(352) 746-2696
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715 .
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Conv. rare
auto, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
black, dependable.
$4700 352- 563-0615
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CORVETTE
02, Z06,
Black, low mi., over
30 mpg hwy. $24,400.
(352) 613-5355
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 mi-
les on this rare silver on
silver on silver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are on
this gorgeous vette,
Over $2,000 In
aftermarket parts
included, Your's
for only, $48,000.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, auto,
SHOWCARI
$11,500 or will trade for
truck. 352-563-6428
DODGE
'02 Stratus SXT. 4


6, air, baded.
43KMi.
extra clean.
.$5,980
Wooten's(152)
637-7117
FORD
'05 Taurus SE, V-6
Loaded, low mi. extra
clean. Must see. $7,880.
Wooten's (352)637-7117
FORD
'99 Crown Victora,
former detective car. Cold
AC. Runs great. $2,700.
Obo.(352) 613-5776
HONDA
'08 Civic, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
HONDA ACCORD
97 $5001 Police
Impounds I for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
HYUNDIA
'90 Red, 3 dr. hatch-
back,142 K. mi. Very
good condition. $1000.
Obo.(352) 344-4684
. 'KIA RIO
2001 82K ml. New tim-
Ing belt, good cond.
Well maint. $2,250 obo
(352) 637-5816
LEXUS
'07 RX 350, Black, tan
leather Int. Navigation,
back up cam, blue tooth,
very clean, 75K.mi.
$25;000.(352) 527-8372
LINCOLN
'02, Towncar, signature
series, excel. condltlon
well maintained $7,500.
(352) 726-5449
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well maintained.
$2650. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
LINCOLN
'97, Towncar, white
excel cond. well main-
talned $3,000. firm
(352) 726-5118
MECHANIC'S DREAM
MERCURY '87 GR Marq.
New gas tank, radiator,
batt., pnt-vln top. 27k orig
ml. Blown head gasket.
$600/flrm 352-503-7548
MERCEDES
'05 SLK, $24,995.2 avail.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'05 SLK, $24,995. 2 avail.
Ocala Volvo
. (352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'08 C- CLASS,$29,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCURY '04
Grand Marquis LS, bik
w/tan int., 63K, adult
owned. Non smoker, all
options. Estate car.
S$8900/neg.
352-465-8722
MGB
Convertible 1977, 57k ml.
Blue, many xtras
Excellent Condition
$10,500 (352)628-0281
Mitsubishi


'08 Spyder, Conyv. Low
mi., ULke Newl Sacrifice
$16,988 or $299 mo
1-800-733-9138
PONTIAC
'98, Sunfire,
runs good, looks good,
asking $1,275.
(352) 637-5394
SMART CAR '08
Passion Cabriolet 7k ml.
Mercedes engineered .
All power opts. Including
top. Factory Warranty
$16,750 (352) 382-2092
SUZUKI
'07 Forenza. 30K mi,
w/100k warr. LOADED
w/touch scm nay.
$12,800. 352-613-6613
TOYOTA
'06 Corolla Sport LE
Sun roof, 48K. Mi. silver,
private sale. $12,500
Obo.(352) 860-1106
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 ml.
warranty. $19,995.
(352) 382-1857


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


$11,995 Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA SUPER '89
All original, red, 79k ml.,
6 cylinder, all power,
targa roof. Original
owner. Garaged, $7,695
(352) 726-3427
VOLVO
'05 S60, $15,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S40, $15,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S60, $17,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S80, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S 40, $17,995.
2 avail. Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S60, $19,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299



1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's
Dream. $3500/obo
352-228-0597
'53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, 350 V-8,
auto, May trade in part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door se-
dan. 6 cyl auto. $9,500.
Will consider trade for
travel trailer of equal
value.(352) 628-4053
CAMARO IROC Z
'88 Red, PS./PB. Cold
A.C. 62,000 Mi. Great
Condition. $6,900.
(352) 422-5663
CHEVY
'69 Classic C10 SHT BD
350/350 AC, PS,
$15K or trade
(352) 746-9212
EL CAMINO '81
305 Auto, All new
interior, & paint. Crager
mags & tires. 4" raised
hood. $3,250.
(352)341-3613.
GM El Camino
'84, 1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO
19b67, The real. deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
HONDA ACCORD
97 $500! Police
Impounds ! for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
JAGUAR
'16 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint;
63K mi., $8,900 obo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
trans. & parts. $4,000.
(352) 621-0126







PLYMOUTH Barracuda
1970,$4000, 75000
miles,coupe, automatic,8
cylinder,exterior:
purple,interior: black
chelseasmouse@gmail.co
m
THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.
38K; Mi. Like New.
$12,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122



'94 CHEVY
Ext. cab, 8 ft bed. New
motor, good cond. 2
wheel drive Z71 pkg.
$3,900.
352-563-1518 Iv msg
'96TFORD F-150 XLT
Deluxe, good cond. new
tires 5.0 V8. w/cap $3,695
obo (352) 563-2563
CHEVY
'03 S-10 Ext. cab LS,
3rd door.V-6 auto, air,
loaded sharp, $5,980.
Wooten's (352)637-7117
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US19, Across Airport
(352)461-4518
conslgnmentusa.org
DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awe-
some Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded
every special feature. Sr.
*own, gar. kept., 27K mi,
$40K '
invested Sale $21,750
See online ad photos
www.autotrader.com/atca
rld/at.f3fd39f
John (352) 726-1076
DODGE
'94 Dakota, V-8, long
bed, auto. $1,500
(352) 527-1727
DODGE RAM '00
Std cab, rare 5spd, hemi,
V8, a/c, 25mpg, new 22"
rims & tires. Dependable
$3700. 352-563-0615
FORD 04
Ranger, X-cab. Exc. cond
38k mi. SLASHED THE
PRICE $97K to $8,500
(352)746-3919
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serve. van. 41K Mi./5.4 L.
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serve. body/dble lock drs.
$20.000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
'91 V-8 auto,
air, loaded,


2 tone paint,
chrome
wheels/duals.
$2,880.
Wooten's
(352)637-7117
FORD
93, White Box Truck,
runs good $1500 obo
(352) 564-0700
FORD F-150
1995, 4x4, cold a/c,
new tires, runs good
$2500 obo(352)
564-0530
FORD F150 '89
with topper. Good
running condition,
auto. $1000/obo
352-464-4763


01, XLT, 4.0 liter, 6 cycle
60K mi. many x-tras, tow
behind no trailer needed
$6500.(313) 404-5129
HONDA ACCORD
97 $5001 Police
Impounds ! for visiting
800-366-9813 x 4246



BUICK
'03 Rendezvous.
$8,995 Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
CADILLAC
'05 Escalade, low mi. all
power, sun roof,
exc. cond. $28,000
{347) 266-9328
CHEVY
'06 Trailblazer
$12,995. 2 avail. Ocala
Volvo (352) 629-7299
CHEVY
BLAZER '99 LS 4dr.
126k mi. loaded, great
cond. sunroof, $4k obo
352-422-0065
DODGE
2004, Durango SLT
Hemi 4x4, Lthr, DVD +++
$12,785 or $199 mo
1-800-733-9138
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air &
exhaust, Exc. Cond. $6,000
obo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl
drive, class 3 hitch, Orig
owner. Great shape &
price. $8,750,
352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
HONDA ACCORD
97 $500! Police
Impounds for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, $8,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG Silver
W/black int. Loaded,
57K.Mi. New $64K.Ask
$20K. (352)489-7674
VOLVO
'06 XC90, $20,995
3 avail. Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299



FORD '06 F-150
Crew cab XLT. Tow pkg
& topper, 51K mi.
Exc cond. LOADED/
$18,500/obo. (352)
634-1378; 795-2053
HONDA ACCORD
97 $5001 Police
Impounds.! for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
JEEP '97
Wrangler - 4cyl, 121K
miles, ready for high-
way & off road. $4500
(352) 419-4394



CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996.
0 CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872
CHRYSLER
'96 Plymouth Voyager.
Handicapped. Runs
good, asking $2,300.
(352) 795-1411
HONDA ACCORD
97 $5001 Police
Impounds ! for visiting
800-366-9813 x 4246
KIA
2007, Sedona EX
Leather, All Pwr, Low
Ml. $12,988 or $199 mo
1-800-733-9138
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT








$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
ANNUITIES
DISABILITY

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com




HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains & tows
heavy loads. $3200/or
trade. 352- 563-0615
Crystal River



2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900ml. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. HI pert.
Over $43,000 in receipts.
17k mi. $11,700
352-563-0615
Crystal River
$5001 Police
Impounds for satel
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374


$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for salel
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for salel
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374


DAVIDSON. Custom
build. 3K ml. Black,
chrome. Must Seal $15 k
invested-$9,000 sacrifice
(352) 860-0675
'99 SUSUZKI MARAUDER
805,15k ml., $3500 obo;
'05 SUSUZKI VINSON 500
ATV 4x4 $3300 obo
Call for Info
(352)220-7152
HARLEY
'96 Sporster 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes.chro. Ex. clean
$4,850.(352) 637-5143
Harley Davidson
2005, Dyna Wldegllde
7,400 mi., excel. cond.
$11,000.
(352) 249-7277
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80",
completely serviced,
good shape. Ex.
access. $5,395. obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109
HARLEY
DAVIDSON
96 Heritage Soft tail, red
many extras $9600 call
evenings (352) 746-3613
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 Ml.
124S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
HONDA 04
1300 VTX,
thousands in options.
mint condition $5900 obo
(352) 302-7073
HONDA
Shadow Arrow 06, 714K
,mi. garage kept, not in
rain, floorboard $6200
obo (347)223-7269 aft
3:30 .
KAWASKI
'00, ZRX 1100
CC,15K. Mi. Very
fast, many extra s.
$4k obo.


97 $5001 Police
Impounds I for lisiling
800.366-9813 x 4246
SCOOTER
'06 SuzukI, 400
Bergman. 4,200 Mi. Like
new cond. $4,500
(352) 382-2715
SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather bik os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Blk w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal. *
2" Cartini handle bars.
Chrome to max, IThs
bad bov is not for the
faint of heart. $30k
invested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
SUZUKI
2002 intruder 800 cc
shaft driven 6400miles
windshield,saddlebags,2
helmets $3,800 or best
offer 352-628-6020
SUZUKI 50CC
MOPED
900 miles.
$300. 352-746-0549
VENTO PHANTOM
Scooter, 318 miles,
150CC, Like new.
$2,190/obo.,
352-422-2433
YAMAHA
'05 YZ125 DIRT BIKE
Race ready. Many ex-
tras. $2500. 352-
586-1683: 586-9349


572-0526 TUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Petitioner, Jeff Eberly, on behalf of Octavlo
Thomas, hereby give notice of their, Intention to peti-
tion the' Ctrus County Board of County Commissioners
to vacate the east and west side utility easements on
the property located at 521 W. Duquet Place, Citrus
Springs, lot 17 block 336 unit 4, section 24, township 17
south, range 18 east, plat book 5, page 133. The pur-
pose of this easement vacation Is to allow for a retain-
Ing wall on each side of the home.
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 19 and 26,2009.


567-0519 TUCRN
(Christine Volgt) Picard Self Storage
PUBLIC NOTICE
Disposal of stored goods and property pursuant to
Florida Statute #83.0806.
Notice Is hereby given that Picard Self Storage, Inc.,
located at 1274 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernanao, FL
34442, with the' rental office located at 1274 E. Norvell
Bryant Hwy., Hernando, FL, 34442 Intends to dispose of
personal property/goods stored by CHRISTINE VOIGT,
whose last known mailing address was 2518 E. Steven
Street, Inverness, FL 34453 for purposes of satisfying de-
linquent rents and related collection costs accruing
since Jan. 31,2009.
Tenant stored goods, If saleable, will be sold on site
after this public notice has been published two times in
accordance with Florida Statute #83.806. The sale of
-stored goods, If not redeemed by payment In full of all
delinquent, 'rents and related costs, may be sold 15
days from the publication of first notice in accordance
with Florida Statutes.
. i/s/W.J. Picard
President & Owner
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 12 and 19,2009. .


566-0519 TUCRN
2009-CP-3'.t Er 3a H -r":her i i N:rice .:. ICred,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 2009-CP-358
IN RE: Estate of EARL H. ARCHER III,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of Earl H. Archer Ill,
deceased, whose date of death was Feb. 27, 2009, Is
pending In the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division; File Number 2009-CP-358; the address -
of which Is Inverness Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave-
nue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The name and address of
the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who
have claims or demands against decedent's estate, In-
cluding unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims,
and who have been served a copy of this notice, must
file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION O OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons
who have claims or demands against the decedent's
estate, Including unmatured, contingent or unliqul-
dated claims, must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WIL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS May
12,2009.
Personal Representative:
Patricia Kelly Archer
3814 West Black Diamond Circle
Lecanto, FL 34461
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Wright Mouiton, Attorney
Mouiton.McEachern & Walker
5041 Bayou Boulevard, Suite 300, Pensacola, FL 32503
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 12 and 19, 2009.

571-0526 TUCRN
AA-09-17
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN ORDINANCE
TO ESTABLISH OR CHANGE REGULATIONS
AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND

The Planning and Development Review Board will con-
duct a Public Hearing on June 4. 2009. at 9:00 AM, at
the Lecanto Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto,
Florida, to consider adoption of the following ordi-
nance. Please note that the PORB meeting bealns at
9:00 AM. The actual time that a particular item Is dIs-
cussed will vary depending on how fast the PDRB
moves through the agenda.
AA-09-17 Clark A. Stillwell for River Lodge Resort. LLC Is
requesting a Land Development Code (LDC) Atlas
Amendment, to'amend a previously approved Master
Development Plan for River Lodge Resort pursuant to
Section 2270. Planned Develooments, of the LDC. The
Master Development Plan was previously established
by Vested Rights Determination VR-03-01 River Lodge
Park. The property under application is Parcel 44100,
located at 13790 W. Foss Groves Path, Inglls, Florida.
(Section 11. Townshio 17 South. Ranoe 16 East). A com-
plete legal description of the property is on file with the
Department of Development Services)

Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be
heard with respect to the proposed' Ordinance
Amendment.
A copy of the proposed Ordinance and supporting
materials Is available for public Inspection pnd copying
between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. at the
Community Development Division, Suite 140. 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida. For more Information
about this application please contact a Planner at the
Department of Development Services (352) 527-5239.
Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan Is available on the Internet at
htto://www.bocc.citrus.fl.us (Click on Departments, De-
velopment Services, then the Community Develop- -
ment link).

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at this
hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceed-
Ings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to in-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings Is
made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal Is to be based,
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Adminstrator's Office,
Citrus County Courthouse. 110 North Apopka Avenue.
Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6565, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
Impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 19 and 26. 2009.









May 19, 2009


A weekly advertising supplement of the Citrus County Chronicle
Autos, Trucks, RVs, ATVs, Motorcycles, Campers & More!


By JEFFREY STEEL CTW FEATURES


T here's something about Chevrolet's iconic
Corvette that just' naturally brings people to-
gether. The proof is in the vast number of shows,
competitions, rallies, festivals and other events
held yearly to celebrate what's cherished as "America's
Sports Car."
Among the best-loved events takes place next month,
when Bloomington Gold convenes at Pheasant Run Resort
and Golf Course in St. Charles, Ill., in June. Open to the gen-
eral public, the show is a treat for those who join in Amer-
ica's love affair with the Corvette, or simply savor a good
time, says Bloomington Gold CEO David Burroughs, who's
been a show participant for 37 years.
"The reason people come is they will see more Corvettes
in one place than they will ever see anywhere else,"-he says.
"And with all the cars in all different colors and years parked
out on the golf course fairway, it's the most beautiful show


in America."
Bloomington Gold was launched in 1973 in Blooming-
ton, Ill,, Burroughs says. That first year, the event was in-
tended as a parts swap meet that would also include basic
judging of original Corvettes - with "original" being the op-
erative word. "There are hot rods and modified cars, but
Bloomington Gold has always had a focus on 'original cars'
that have not been customized," Burroughs says.
The event made sense from a demographic standpoint, he
adds, noting that in 1973, members of the baby boomer gen-
eration were just old enough to indulge their interest in
Corvettes, though were not yet established enough to pur-
chase new ones. "But they could afford to buy used
Corvettes and parts to restore and repair them and fix them
up," he says. "That was the whole reason it started."
At the time, no other Corvette shows were yet established
that allowed cars to be shown, and cars and parts to be pur-
chased, Burroughs says. That uniqueness helped make
Bloomington Gold a fairly instant success. The first year
saw participation by about 40 vendors and a few hun-
dred 'Vette owners and their cars. By 1976, it had
quadrupled in size, and by 1992. attendance topped
30.000. Today, hundreds of vendors and thousands
of Con iettes con% erge on the event, and attendees
come from all over North America. Europe. Aus-
tralia and Japan.
The sho\ 's philosophy % as established early.
In the 1970s, many classic-car events offered
bestt in show" trophies to \ inning car own-
ers, but exerN other contestant \tent a%%a%
empty-handed. "That didn't sound like a
%ern good business plan," Burroughs re-
calls thinkjne at the time. Bloomington
Gold's organizers determined Cor erte
.T. -owners %Nould be re%%arded for cars
0 that had been prefer~ ed in or restored


l , '



to factory authenticity and condition.
Cars that are simply dressed up with special paint and
chrome don't fare well in this regard. But owners who have
preserved or restored their 'Vettes to 95 percent of the con-
dition in which it left the factory, earn Gold Certification.
Those whose cars reach 90 to 94 percent receive a Silver
Certification and 85 to 89 percent perfections earn Bronze.
"It's not really a competition,".Burroughs says. "It's a
measure of how well you've preserved or restored a car to
factory authenticity. If you don't make it one year, you've
learned enough to come back and achieve certification the
next."
What Burroughs hopes participants gain most from the
show is an entertaining education, resources that will help
them buy or sell Corvettes from any year, 1953 through
2009, and the parts and equipment to keep them going.
If they gain certification, they earn the recognition and
credibility of an independent, third party certification, some-
thing that can be invaluable when selling a 'Vette to a buyer
in another state. "A prospective buyer can call our office and
\erifv that that car has been Gold Certified. and also on what
date." Burroughs says.
Ahead for Bloomington Gold is a newt program called
"Sur ivor," that %% ill recognize cars that are completely un-
restored. "The ne\t frontier is educating people about preser-
vation and giving credibility to cars that are %ery well
preserved." Burroughs say s.
Of course. Bloomington Gold isn't the only exent wel-
coming Corn ene owners this summer and fall. Consider this
representative sampling of other extravaganzas:
* The 20th Annual Lone Star Corn ette Classic. Ft. Worth.
Tex.. May 15-17. 2009
* 30th Annual In-Vette-Tational Reading. Pa., July II.
2009.
* Mid America Motorxxorks Caravan Kick-Off. Effing-
ham. I11.. September 2.' '10 . * ..:- F.,,


. . ... . 2007 Victory
......cu. . i Hammer "S"
FREE Pickup & Delivery UPTO 50% OF IN STOCK ... 12,788
onany service APPAREL & ACCESSORIES! I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


i UESjDAY, iAY- ,7. ------
'^^a^iB^S^i^^^^^^1^^^1'3^^ ,Iy^^!'�A-t~fi-*{?-.,---�t.^sass^^~i,^^iie..^w~>..1;-.*,


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The Ford Advantage Plan lets you buy or lease a high-quality new
Ford, Lincoln or Mercury vehicle with the unparalleled peace of
j mind of the Ford Payment Protection Program.

ANNOUNCING C
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\ OWNER will re
TRADE IN PROGRAM
Effective April 24, 2009 .-


customers that currently own or lease
1995 or newer Chrysler/Jeep/Dodge/Plymouth Car, Truck or SUV
who Trade In or have a Lease expiring by July 31, 2009
ceive $1,000 toward the purchase of an eligible 2008/2009/2010-Model SUV/CUV
and $500 toward the pureahse of an eligible 2008/2009/2010-Model Car.


Hurry! The Ford A.dvantage Plan ends June 1, 2009.


We Welcome All Owners


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For Your Sales & Service Needs


2005 Ford 2001 Lincoln Town 2005 Ford
Escape XLT Car Carler Focus Wgn ZWX
Clean well maintained SUV Top of the line Town Car. Low low miles and super
N9T022A N8T643M clean. N9C60A
$10,995 $11,995 1. 11,995



2005 Buick 2006 Mercury 2004 Ford Ranger
Lacrosse CXL Mariner 4x4 Supercab
Super clean CXL Small luxury sport utility. 4 wheeling fun
#N8C110A $ #N9C025A #N8T634A
_ 10,99.5- Li139 .95 13,995S


2007 Mecnuiy 2006 Ford 2006 Ford Five
Mo.nego Premier Explorer XIS Hundred SEL
Only 18K miles and lots of Localtrade bou ht here 6 yearll00k mile warranty!
fctorv warran.NPR5216 new. NgT106B $certified. #NPR539
_ 19 . _1 . _17,286 .



2006 Lincoln Town 2006 Ford FISO 2008 o ge
Car Sig Series XLT Super Crew Limited
Lots and lots of luxury. 4 doors and lots of room This Edge Limited looks
NP5212 MPR537 eat. #NPR545
1*20.995 -_2Q,99_5_ 2 .6995I


2006 Mercury 2006 Mercury 2007 FORD 2005 Ford 2005 Ford Escape
Milan Premier Milan Premier FOCUS ZX3 Escape XLIT XLT
1 premier premier. Leather and luxury Economical and Low miles and clean. Only 32K miles.
NP5226 equipment. #NP5226 sport. #NPR522 #NPR531A N9T083A
S 2,995 ..2,995 i 1 995 12,995 13,995
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MUSTANG CLUB
3rd Wednesday every month @ 7pm


2005 Ford 2007 Ford 2008 Ford
Mustang GT Freestyle SEL Escape Hybrid
Loaded and onl 20K miles. Hard to find freestyle with The mosffuel efficient SUV
NP521 2k miles #NP5209 on thelanet#NP5172
- .9-9.9-5- -4-9.19 9s?



2008 F FO50 XLT 2008 Ford FISO XLT 2008 Ford F-450 XLT
4x4 Super Cab 4x4 Super Crew 4x4 Crew Cob
Only 5K miles, that's 4 wheel drive fun. Don't miss this low rice on
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2004 Chevrolet 2005 Ford Focus 2004 Ford 2004 T ta 2004 Ford Freesfar
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18, i 5 1 - �95 189995 25 $1159995


D2 M 192009


I


ftai-i I -. .'2AS


b


�400


I Fp.'#.07`g�







TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 D3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL E


19 6 3 0 L DS MOGB I LE





CONVERTIBLE


Like most classic car enthusiasts Tom Feeney is not
new to the restoration of older vehicles. Over the years
he has owned several vehicles that he has restored in
one form or another. Feeney said, "I have restored a
1968 Camaro, a .1969 Z/28, and a 1970 Chevelle SS
454 convertible. Once you have the bug it seems to
never let go." .
,Feeney's current; project, his 1963 Oldsmobile
Dynamic 88 convertible, was purchased about five
years ago and has been an ongoing project ever sense.
"I will never forget going to look at the car. A branch
had fallen through the convertible top, and when the
trunk was opened it seemed to have 50 gallons of water
in it. It really looked bad. However, I really wanted, a
new project so I bought the car and drove it home. The
car had been sitting for so long that all four tires had flat
spots, on them. It was the bumpiest ride I had ever had. 1
have always liked convertibles and it is always nice to
have a car that can haul the whole family," Feeney said.
A new squared-off styling highlighted the full sized
Oldsmobile's appearance for 1963. A few of other
notable new options included a tilt away steering wheel
with six positions, cruise control and a AM/FM radio.
The least expensive full size 1963 Oldsmobile
convertibles were offered in
the Dy)namic series.
Feenevy's full sized
Oldsmobile. like most, is
po%\ered b. the 394 cubic-
inch Rocket \'8 in 0hich the
- 7 Dynamic 88 series received
the more economical two-
Sk barrel carburetor, 250.


horsepower engine that used regular gas. The Super 88
series featured a four- Barrel carburetor. "Ultra High
Compression" 394 Skyrocket V8 engine that was rated
at 325 horsepower. The 394 Skyrocket V8 could be
purchased as an additional option and required high-
octane fuel.
"The engine compartment was also in really poor
shape when I got the car. I spent months taking every
nut and bolt off and restored the engine compartment
back to original condition. The engine has registered
just a little over 73,000 miles on it" Feeney said. ,
Feeney expects to continue to make improvements to
the car and try to keep the mileage down despite his
Sunday rides. You may have also seen the car in any
one of our local holiday parades. I'll give you a hint. It
has been the one with the Chronicle sign attached to it.
"Most people that ask me about my car usually. have
a story -about a family member or a friend that owned a
similar one at one time or another. Let's face it. You
rarely see forty plus year old cars on the road anymore,"
Fenney said.
You might wonder what the dream car is of a man
that drives around in a 40 plus year old car. Feeney
replied, "If I win the lottery I would love to buy an
ENZO Ferrari."

Malvbt you're a rcstio'natin enliusiat and hav't some
stories or mnemorie 0to share. Ptrlihaps vYo'u owin a muscht,
classic or vintage car that is \otr'r pride and jt'\. Fe'tl fiet
to call 563.-3291, or e-mail Brian .4. Bission at
bbisson@.r'c hroinh I online.com. 1i would hlke to9 get some
pictures and possibly a storn for our Wheels section so
you can sit back, and enjoy a ride down Alemtnory Lane.


UlJAXU5 U"UNly


PARTICIPATING ADVERTISERS" LOCATIONS

Olvd-o'll I ft
rx--7 : i Zi 77


Auto events listings and cruise events are subject tochange without our knowledge.
Always doublecheck with your favorite event before you decide to attend.

SUNDAY
* CITRUS COUNTY RETREADS meet for breakfast at 8 a.m. Sunday at the
restaurant at rear of B&W Rexall Drugs, Inverness. All makes and models of motorcycles
welcome. Ride follows.
WEDNESDAY
* INVERNESS "BIG DOGS" motorcycle club meets for breakfast ot 8 a.m.
Wednesday at rear of B&W Rexall Drugs. Ride follows, all bikes welcome. Call J.R. and
Rachel Harris at 726-6128.
THURSDAY
* GOLD WING ROAD RIDERS CHAPTER FLI-R of Dunnellon meets at 6:30
p.m. on the second, third and fourth Thursday of each month at McDonald's in
Dunnellon. Monthly gathering is the first Thursday at the Charlie Horse Restaurant,
20049 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, 6, p.m. to eat and 7:30 to meet. Call chapter
director Bruce Schlimme at (352) 465-1228.
* GOLD WING ROAD RIDERS ASSOCIATION CHAPTER T of Inverness kick
tire at 6 p.m. Thursday at Burger King parking lot, corner of U.S. 41 and S.R. 44 East.
Call directors Rachel, JR Harris at 726-6128 or Ken and Jackie Smithat (352) 476-
7151.
FRIDAY
* NATURE COAST MUSTANGS meets at 7 p.m. Friday at the Wendy's on U.S.
19 in Homosasso across from the wildlife park. Bring-your car and enjoy a fun evening.
Call Bob at 860-2598.
* THE WANDERERS CLUB meets from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at the parking lot of
the Beall's Depaltment Store on State Road 44 West of Inverness. Bring your old car
n' d have fun with other car enthusiasts. Call Frank at 212-2966 or visit
wondererscarclubofinvernessfl.com.
SATURDAY
I* FREE WHEELIN' SERTOMA CLUB motorcycle club meets at 9 a.m. Saturday
"on the road." Call Rainer Jokob at 726-7903 for destinations.
* NATURE COAST RETREADS meets at 8 a.m. Saturday at Harrington's
Restaurant, 4135 S. Suncoast Blvd.,. Homosassa. A ride follows. All styles of
i , motorcycles are welcome. Call Jacque at 637-4693 or Dave at 628-2401.
* CITRUS COUNTY CRUISERS car club invites you to its cruise-in from 6 to 9
p.m. Saturday at Kings Bay Plaza (next to Wendy's) in Crystal River. Conned goods are
collected for local charities. Call Jim Moran at 527-0024 or Lester Barnmes 628-7021.
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY: MAY 16: Street Stock, Pure Stock, V8
Thunder Stock, 4 Cylinder Bombers, Bass Pro Challenge Series, Mini Cup. Any additional
questions please contact the speedway at (352) 726-9339.
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY: MAY 23: Central FL Sprints, Sportsman, Mini
Stock, Street Stock, 4 Cylinder Bombers. Any additional questions please contact the
speedway at (352) 726-9339.
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY MAY 30: 4 Cylinder Bombers 50 Lops, Mini
Stock,-Street Stock, Pure Stock, V8 Thunder Stock, Outlaw Mod Mini. Any additional
questions please contact the speedway at (352) 726-9339:
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY: JUNE 6: Super Late Model, Mini Stock, Street
Stock, Pure Stock, V8Thunder Stock, Mini Cup. Any additional questions please contact
the speedway at (352) 726-9339.
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY: JUNE 13: Open Wheel Modified, Sportsman, -
Mini Stock, Pure Stock, V8 Thundet-Stock,:4 Cylinder Bombei,. Fig 8. Any additional..
,i uH r raplue oict triet , peedwq af r(352j; .6-939 ' ' ".
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY: JUNE 20 Street Stock, Pure Stock, V8
Thunder Stock, 4 Cylinder Bombers, Desoto Champ Karts, Mini Cup. Any additional
Squestiohs please contact the speedway at (352) 726-9339. �
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY: JUNE 27 School Bus Fig 8, Sportsman, Mini
Stock, Street Stock, 4 Cylinder Bombers. Any additional questions please contact the
speedway at (352) 726-9339.
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY: JULY 11: Open Wheel Modified, Sportsman,
Mini Stock, Pure Stock, V8 Thunder Stock, 4 Cylinder Bombers, Fig 8, Mini Cup. Any
additional questions please contact the speedway at (352) 726-9339.
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY: JULY 18:50 Truck Race, Street Stock, Pure
Stock, V8 Thunder Stock, 4 Cylinder Bombers, FOWL, Mini Cup. Any additional
quesnoii iileoae cuoiii rte speedwny at (352) 726-9339.
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY: JULY 25: Pure Stock/V8Thunder 50 Laps,
Sportsman, Mini Stock, Street Stock, Outlaw Mod Mini, 4 Cylinder Bombers. Any
.additional questions please contact the speedway at (352) 726-9339.
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY: AUGUST 1: Super Late Model, Mini Stock,
Street Stock, Pure Stock, V8 Thunder Stock, Bass Champions Challenge Series, Mini
Cup. Any additional questions please contact the speedway at (352) 726-9339.
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY: AUGUST 8 Open Wheel Modified,
Sportsnan, Mini Stock, Pure Stock, V8 Thunder Stock, 4 Cylinder Bombers, Fig 8, Bass
Champions Challenge Series. Any additional questions please contact the speedway at
(352) 726-9339.
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY: AUGUST 15: Street Stock, Pure Stock, V8
Thunder Stock, 4 Cylinder Bombers, Bass Champions Challenge Series, Desoto Champ
Karts, Mini Cup. Any additional questions please contact the speedway at (352) 726-
9339.

SPECIAL EVENTS
STAY SAFE ON THE ROAD WITH
AARP REFRESHER
In the year 2007 in Florida, there were 256,206 crashes, 59 percent in business areas,
702 crashes daily. Drive safely! Take on AARP Driver Safety class as a refresher. Check
with your insurance carrier to ask If you are entitled to an insurance discount. Course fee
is $14, for AARP members $12. To register for a class, call the listed instructor. For
information regarding future classes, call Chadlie Lucente at 726-0753.
CRYSTAL RIVER, HOMOSASSA AREA
* MAY 20:1 p.m. at Coastal Regional Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River.
Call Lou Harmin at 564-0933.
* MAY 21 AND 22:8:30 a.m. at First Christian Church, 7030 W. Grover Cleveland
Blvd., Homosassa Springs. Call Carol Thomas at 746-2416.
BEVERLY HILLS AND LECANTO
* MAY 23 AND 30:10:30 a.m. at Central Ridge Library, 425 W. Roosevelt Blvd.,
Bevedy Hills. Call Kathie Lund at 527-4853.



Send us your automotive and

auto club events information to

wheels@chronicleonline.com


for publication every Tuesday In

the Wheels Section of the




CH ONItLE
Swww.chronideonline.com-


t








D4 TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


8 THEY'RE NOT JUST FOR CARS ANY MORE.
I |THE MOST ELABORATE GARAGES BOAST WORKSHOPS AND
t ien LIVING SPACES AND CAN EVEN DOUBLE AS BASKETBALL COURTS.


ALL POINTS


BULLETIN

Q: I have a three-year-old car that I took in for regular.
maintenance last week. The service guy mentioned that a By JEFFREY STEELE
service bulletin was issued on the car last year - something CTW FEATURES
having to do with a warning light. He didn't perform any . At the dawn of the autoinotive'
work (he said the car didn't need it), but said if I have trou- age and for decades afterwards,
ble in the future, I'm to bring it in and I'll have to pay for the the American garage was simply
work and replacement part. I asked him why he wouldn't fix a shelter for a car. Tucked behind
something if it's unsafe, and why the manufacturer wouldn't the house and usually just big
be paying for it, since they've paid for other problems. But he enough to accommodate a single
auto, garages were purely func-
didn't really explain, and got annoyed when I said I didn' t ional pieces of real estate
really understand. Should I call the manufacturer to figure But as Americans' love affair
-out exactly what the problem is and.get it taken care of before with their automobiles acceler-
it's a hazard? ated, garages began to take on en-
tirely new personas. In some
A: You probably need to do absolutely nothing about the McMansions, the garages are
car until a problem presents itself (which may never happen). built for as many as four or more
But you should find a new dealership service tech or a me- vehicles, with designs ranging
chanic who will explain things - using as many different from traditional to ultra-modem.
words, diagrams, hands-on demonstrations, or whatever it Capable of doing more than sim-
takes for as long as it takes until you fully understand. ply storing cars, today's garages
Most of us didn't go to car-fixing school, and most of us have become as varied as the peo-
have less than intimate knowledge of the secret workings of ple who own them.
The importance attached to
a vehicle's innards. The mechanic's our go-to guy on these modem-day garages is reflected
matters and each time we turn to him is his opportunity.to in the fact that years afterthe in-
share the one thing that makes him superior to everyone else production of magazines devoted
at that moment: his ability to diagnose and fix a problem ... to beautiful homes and eye-catch-
and explain it all in a way that helps us understand exactly. ing cars and trucks, there's finally
why we're writing that $638 check. a publication expressly focused
The smart ones have gone to some trouble in recent years on garages.
to make sure they communicate properly and leave little In an era of multi-car house-'
room for misunderstanding, suspicion or disappointment. In- holds, the basic one-car garage
deed, my experience in the last decade or so is that the serv- with a service door, workbench
ice guys far outshine the sales people and management types and pegs for rakes, brooms and
snow shovel has become some-
in terms of competency, communication skills and eagerness hat antiquated. Far more com-
to p e what antiquated. Far more com-
to please. -t mon are 2-1/2-car renditions,
So 'don't assume that rude behavior is the norm. It is 'not. with enough space for two cars,
Now I'll climb off my bad-behavior lecture box and an- lawn care equipment, storage.
swer the question you asked. A recall is either conducted vol- tools and a workbench.
untarily by the vehicle's manufacturer or is ordered by the, During the height of the real
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration for known estate boom, homebuilders who
malfunctioning systems or pieces that can be a safety hazard. turned to offering garages for
That might be a gas pedal that sticks, a rear door lock that multiple cars were banking on the
doesn't stay locked or wiring problems that can ignite. The idea that prospective buyers, even
manufacturer is required to pay for any safety-oriented re- if they didn't actually own three
call-type repair., . cars, would seek extra room for
boats, snowmobiles, closes and
A TSB (technical service bulletin) is something else. It is , snowmobiles,
perhaps home workshops.
sent out to technicians to alert them to problems that seem to There has been a growing in
be arising in' higher than usual numbers in a particular make terest in detached garages thatac-
and model. These problems are often of the sort that are dif- commodate people and cars.
ficult to trace (you might take it in and for that moment, the Some garage designers and
car is showing no evidence of having a problem at all) and to builders are marketing two-story
overcome. When tackled on an individual basis, it can take Victorian and Cape Cod-style
hours of exploration time to resolve. The bulletin pinpoints garages that boast livable space
the problem and offers a step-by-step guide on making the above the ground-level car stor-
fix. age.
What you now know, thanks to the little bit of info shared 'Second-level dormers and bal-
by the service guy, is that there seems to be a greater than cony windows throw light on in-
* ' tenriors that can be turned into
normal chance for your vehicle to develop an issue with a home offices, family rooms,
warning light coming on. It's doubtful that every model of pom s, g quarters or
that car made that year will display that problem. But if yours pll "in-law" residences. Ino
does, you won't have to spend lots of hourly diagnostic some large garages, the upstairs
money as the technician attempts to get to the bottom of a can be turned into a full apart-
stubborn problem; he'll already have a pretty good idea of ment with kitchen and laundry,
what it is and how to fix it. ' which can be used by a family
member or as a rental loft, where
Feedback A reader from Indiana had something to say local ordinances allow.
about my recent answer regarding why there's any justifica- If the upper stories are being
tion at all in massive SUVs that are being offered in hybrid put to good use, the same can be
form. Here's what he had to say: "Your reasons for the Big said of the ground levels of many
fully featured garages. Garage
Three's decision to hybridize vehicles like the Cadillac Es- iftu a r ge s. Gi
car-lifts allow those who like to
calade are valid to a great extent. But let me offer another tinker under their vehicles to hoist
idea to consider. The profit they make from humongous vehicles up and get' under them
SUVs is far greater than what they realize from almost all of with ease.
the midsize and smaller vehicles. It's all about the bottom Available garage organizing
line." './ O CTWFeatures systems combine shelving, clos-
� ets, storage bins and sliding draw-
ers that take fullest advantage of
every square inch.
-- -. -- - And in northern states, garage
W h aI 's yo u furnaces give the spaces comfort-
q u e ti n ?able warmth, allowing owners to
qu 6 S &10 plunge into home projects with-
out having to don a parka.
Sharon Peters would like to hear what's on your mind After World War II, as car
when it come- to caring for, diving, repairing and mak- ownership soared and suburban
.. ing the most of your vehicle. Send your questions to s m
shfron@ctwfeaturcs.com subdivisions sprouted, many
- houses with attached garages fea-


tured large garage doors as pait of
the homes' facades. The philoso-
phy seemed to be that homeown-
ers were also car owners, so why
not trumpet that ownership with
wide garage doors facing the
street? In addition, it was quicker
to glide a car into its berth in the
front of the house than having to
drive it around back.
It was only .decades later that
questions arose about the wisdom
of devoting up to one-third of the
home's prominent front. side to
gaping garage doors. Today, if
front-facing garage doors are part
of a design they are often camou-
flaged behind garage doors' that
appear at first glance to be part of
the home's decorative facade.
Windows, shutters, flower boxes
and other exterior features are
often part of the "door" that lifts
up into the garage when the
homeowner is ready to berth his


or her car.
A trend in luxury homes, par-
ticularly in cold weather climes,
is inclusion of indoor home gyms
with tennis and basketball courts
and batting cages. Some luxury
builders use hardwood-floored
garage space that doubles as both
a carport and a modified basket-
ball court. These garages incor-
porate vaulted ceilings and
high-line garage door tracks that
run parallel to the diagonal
roofline, sending the door high
into the ceiling and out of the tra-
jectory of rainbow jump shots.
Add' basketball backboards,
hoops and netting, padded walls
and axradiant-heated garage floor
with appropriate striping and a
no-skid surface to enhance trac-
tion and you have a garage that
can double as a half-court haven
for hoopsters when the weather
outside is less than conducive to


COMF




TOD


Base
Msrp
Alarm
Rear Seat
Heat Ducts
Rear Reading
Lamps
Entertainment
System
Keyless Start
Dvd Player
Front Leg Room
Front Hip Room
Trunk Volume
Epa Fuel Economy Est
- City
Cruising Range
- City
Cruising Range
-Hwy.
Sae Net Torque
@Rpm


2009 Nissan Altima
4 Dr. Sedan
14 CVT


$19,900
Standard
Standard

Standard

Available

Standard
Available
44:1 In.
56.8 In.
15.3 Ft.
23 MPG

460.00 Mi.

620.00 Mi.

180 @ 3900


fast breaks and driving layups.
With so much happening in
garage design, it was merely a
matter of time before garage afi-
cionados got their own periodical.
CarProperty.com, which bills, it-
self "The Incredible Garage
Newsletter" and claims more than
1.25 million members.
The publishers say the site
caters to car enthusiasts, car col-
lectors, people who work or en-
tertain in their garages, those
seeking hard-t6-find parking and
anyone "who simply loves a great
garage." ;
It's here you can see photos of
a Sorrento, Fla. "car guy's"
garage with 11 slots, and a garage
in Santa Monica,, Calif., with
space for 100 vehicles. Readers
can even learn that Leonardo Di-
Caprio's Malibu "Beach Para-
dise" has just four parking spots.
�'CTWFeatures


E


2009 Toyota Camry
4 Dr. Sedan
14 Auto Le (Natl)


I I


$21,650
Not Available
Not Available

Available

Not Available

Not Available
Not Available
41.7 In
54.6 In.
15.0 Ft.
21 MPG

388.50 Mi.

573.50 Mi.

161 @ 4000


2009 Honda Accord
Sedan 4 Dr.
14 Auto Lx


$21,705
Not Available
Not Available

Not Available

Not Available

Not Available
Not Available
42.5 In
56.6 In
14.0 Ft. :'
21 MPG

388.50 Mi.

555.00 Mi.

161 @ 4300


CRYSTAL


NISSAN
FASTEST GROWING NISSAN DEALER IN FLORIDA .
937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA 800584m8755 Ext. 1
crystalautos.com ....................


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


D4 TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009





TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 D5S


I "Y~ U C)f,, I,'. T F. J.L lC R NnI . \ T


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With offers like these, there's never been a better ime to drive Chevy!


AllNew 2010

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New 2009 Cl
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Equipped with Air Cond.
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Some customers will not qualify. Not available with other offers.
See dealer for details. Take delivery by 6/1/09.


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STRAVERSE



PW, PL, Cruise, Tift, CD, 3rd
Row Seating, Automatic Trans! *

N J 1 . -*' . '' ' ., .


New '809 cte.
SILVERADO
1500 Pick,


LS, ExL Cab, Air Conditioning,
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07 HYUNDAl llBURON 08 CHEWVY HHR 08 MAZDA 3 06 CHEVY COBALT SS 06 GMC SIERRA
#H5657. BLACK BEAUTY, #10074, ILT LOTSOF #PU0125. GREAT CA, #97J40 TURBOCHARGED 100. #H50 CREW CAB NICEST
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t-r. T


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* All prices include $2,000 cash or trade equity plus tax, tag and $449 administrative fee. Pictures for illustrative purposes only. Offers expire 5-18-09.


I


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Imak AM .
























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44





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


D8 TUESDAYMAY 19 2009


MSRP................................................ $15,748
FACTORY REBATE.........................($1,750)
MILITARY REBATE...........................($500)
CUSTOMER DOWN PAYMENT
OR TRADE EQUITY.......................($3,0999)
COLLEGE GRADUATE REBATE........($500)


MSRP.............................................$19,919
FACTORY REBATE...........................($1,500)
MILITARY REBATE ......................... ($500)
OWNER LOYALTY REBATE.............($750)
CUSTOMER DOWN PAYMENT
OR TRADE EQUITY ......................($3,999)
COLLEGE GRADUATE REBATE.......($500)
FROM


ock #8850
Adel #LNNB4


# 611A2C9


M SRP ........................................ $19,319
CUSTOMER REBATE............($3,000)
MOTORCYCLE/ATV/
MARINE OWNER DISCOUNT...($500)
MILITARY REBATE.................... ($500)
CUSTOMER DOWN PAYMENT
OR TRADE EQUITY...............($3,909)
COLLEGE GRADUATE REBATE. ($500)
FROM





ICRYSTAL RIVER


TOLL FREE
1-866-32-SUZUKI B2 t Local
(I -866-327-8985) Just East of Suncoast Pkwy. Exit 46 352-799-9999
Allfferwitappove creditSomeoIn Beautiful Brooksville 3524 994 999
All offers with approved credit Some offers cannot be combined. All offers must be requested at time of original negotiation. All prices plus tax, tag. title and include $499 Dealer Delivery fee FREE $50 Test Drive limit one per family per 6 month period. Must have valid drivers license and proof of insurance. Dealer
retains all rebates and incentives that customer must qualify for. On select models. Some vehicles may require factory or locate order Free trailer hitch offer requires Suzuki Equator purchase Class 3 hitch, harness, tow bar, labor included. All offers expire May 3 th 2009, 8 PM. Test drive offer limit () per family per
month, limit 25 maximum thru 5/31/09. Scheduled Test Drive appointment suggested. Please see dealer for complete details. Test Drivers must be at least 18 years old wit valid drivers license and proof of insurance.


0.
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SR50 O
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CITRUS CouNn' (FL) CHRONICLE TUESDAY; MAY 19, 2009 DS


J',' ....-..,..". o_ ^ ^ ..
. ,-'A .-. - . *? - ,' .


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Toyota Prius


*~L.

.ki -


These five fuel-frugal vehicles can help


ease the pain at the pump for



cash-strapped commuters.


BY JIM GORZELANY CTW FEATURES
ow acutely are Americans
feeling the sting of sky-high
gas prices? According to a
recent market research
study conducted by automo-
tive price guide Kelley Blue Book
(kbb.com), 28 percent of new-car shoppers
have stopped going to Starbucks or other
coffee houses entirely, 21 percent indicate
they are going out less often and 28 percent
said they've stopped buying DVDs and
CDs. Meanwhile, 30 percent of all respon-
dents said they've just plain cut back in
general and are spending less because of
soaring fuel costs.:
"What was once a frequent occurrence
such as the morning trip to Starbucks or
taking the family to a ball game just isn't
as financially feasible when $4.00-per-
. gallon gas must also share a place in the
budget," says Jack R. Nerad, executive ed-
itorial director and executive market ana-
lyst for the publication. If you're thinking
of making your next car a higher-mileage
ride to help stretch your budget, consider
any of the following models, which the En-
vironmental Protection Agency estimates
will achieve the best fuel economy in each
of their respective market segments.
(Complete information for all makes and
models can be found at the EPA's Web site,
*fueleconomy.gov.)

Two-Seater:
Smat Fortwo
The diminutive Smart Fortwo is roughly


half the size of a midsize car and, as its
moniker suggests, seats only two passen-
gers. Available either as a coupe or con-
vertible, it's fairly maneuverable, is
amazingly roomy on the inside and is un-
questionably endearing to look at. Unfor-
tunately, while its 1.0-liter engine enables
.the microcar to achieve 33-city/41-
highway mpg, it generated only a timid 70
horsepower, and is saddled with an odd-
shifting automatic transmission to boot. It
also requires premium gasoline, which
boosts its operating costs by 20-25 cents
per gallon.

Minicompact:
Mini Cooper
There are few cars on the road that are as
fun to drive as a Mini Cooper - its stellar
fuel economy (28/37 mpg) is literally icing
on the cake. True, it's not the most practi-.
cal ride on the road, but there's ample room
up front for two full-size adults, albeit with
a penalty box of a back seat and little cargo
room unless the rear bench is folded flat.
Still, a 120-horsepower 1.6-liter engine is
peppy enough to propel this lightweight
and nimble British coupe with authority
and it's small enough to park just about
anywhere. A convertible version is also of-
fered, as is a three-door Clubman variant
and higher-powered Cooper S models.

Compact:
Honda Civic Hybrid
One of the most fuel-frugal cars sold in
the U.S., the Civic Hybrid is also accom-
modating and reasonably stylish. A 110-


",'! "" *





.
K'


horsepower four-cylinder gasoline engine
teams with a 15-kilowatt electric
motor/generator and a continuously vari-
able automatic transmission to deliver ac-
celeration that's equivalent to the standard
model, yet registers 40/45 mpg. It's suffi-
ciently roomy for four passengers and fea-
tures a stylish high-tech dashboard with a
two-tiered instrument panel that places se-
lect readouts directly in the driver's line of
sight.

Midsize:
Toyota Prius
It's no coincidence that the auto industry's
mileage leader is also its most popular hy-
brid-powered model. The midsize Prius
sedan outsells some automakers' entire
fleets, with recent inventory shortages
being the only impediment to seeing more
of them on the road. A 76-horsepower, 1.5-
liter four-cylinder gasoline engine works in
tandem with an electric motor/generator to
produce the equivalent of 110 horses,
which is sufficient, if not particularly
speedy. The car makes up for it by breezing
past gas stations with its estimated 45/48
mpg fuel economy. Distinctively rounded
exterior styling gives the car a high-tech
look, and affords a roomy interior.

Large:
Honda Accord
. The top-selling Accord grew in size with
its most recent redesign last fall, but it re-
mains fairly fuel-efficient, with the stan-
dard 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine
delivering 177-horsepower in the base LX


version, and a slightly quicker 190 in the
EX, with the same 22/31 mpg. The avail-
able 3.5-liter V6 is faster yet with 268
horsepower, but it's slightly thirstier at 19-
city/29-highway mpg. As always, the Ac-
cord performs admirably, with plentiful
features and a voluminous passenger com-
partment.

SUV:
Ford Escape and Mercury
Mariner Hybrids
The mechanically identical Escape and
Mariner Hybrids recently received updates
as early-2009 models that include added
power. A new 2.5-liter engine (still teamed
with an electric motor/generator) delivers
quicker acceleration than before - Ford
says both models now reach 60 mph about
1.3 seconds faster - and maintains equiva-
lent mileage at 34/30 mpg.
A long list of safety features is included;
key gadgetry includes the automaker's in-
novative Sync hands-free media control
system. A similar version is sold, though
only on a limited basis through select deal-
ers in California, as the Mazda Tribute Hy-
brid. � CTW Features



Complete information

for all makes and

models can be found
at the EPA's Web site,
fueleconomy.gov.


.~ '-
I;


Fuel economy


TUESDAY, MAY 19,.2009 D9


� CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DI0 i ... U IA .I, n nOUO"


TUESDAY, ]WAY 19, 2009


11110


a m
How run-flat ireswork


The most
S distinguishing lealuie
f run-flal tires are
their sidewalls -
_ - much thicker than
* conventional
* -sidewalls - which
support the weight of
the car when there's
no air in the tres. The
Ihicker sidewalls
Structural usually make for a
reinforngheavier tire that oftenI
rdides somewhat
Rougher than B
Sconvenbional fira.


# *nforcediand .
0 AI ker thantos-e IF,
1 e convertironal fire..e)l-
this stffening. in-flatt
rival the comfort of their
non-run-flatcounlerparts.
Depending on the make.
you go from 50-200
miles of driving once the
air is completely gone,
usually enough 0 gel
you to a tire shop

The benefits: hassle
free driving, no lack, no
spare. As well. it allows
manufacturers Io use
different size tires front Steel bes
S and back (the car would
otherwise need
Some run-al tw6 spare tires)
Some fun-llal and e~~n upfht
tires require M ale e
special rims
With an inner
ledge to keep
the "bead"
sealed lt the tre
goes tlat.





i t IaVre -oes IlaL how do you
know?' VO en Irniflattires are
purchased, Mi air-pressure-
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Automotive

C1lasifieds


10 II1Ip81


ACROSS
1. Sporty Falcon
3. Oversteer leads to this
4. Has lobes, ramps and overlap
8. Studebaker __.. _ Hawk
10. Hub-cap type
13. Stunt-driver Joie
14. 1930s Ford model
17. Engine additive
20. AMC's *Fishbowl'
22. Multi-seat Vee-Dub
27. Imporled the Strada
28. Auto finance option
29 Dodge or Mitsubishi
30 High-performance Buick

COPYRIGHT WHEELBASE


32. Dodge's 'E' body
34. Oil reservoir
35. First FWD Caddy
37 Pump or jockey
39. Formula One engine, once
40. Can be chrome or body color
43 NHRA founder
4A 5. Corvette specialty builder
46. Malcolm's gullwing
47. Trunk name
50. Police or PT
52. Shocks are yellow/blue
53. Mack's canine
54. Treadless tires

CO M MUNI'CATIONS


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Classifieds

In Print

and

Online

All

The Time


Fa: 35)56-565 1Tal5re:(88)85- 340 1*mal:ci 5fids *5rnil-n neco Iw 5sie.ww croiceolie-o


13 ft. '66,Fiberglass
V-hull, Garmin, bass
seats, oars, trailer, new
4-stroke 9.8 elec. start
motor. $2,000
(352) 344-4609
16FT CAR. SKIFF
'96, like new, $5,800
40HP Evinrude, center
console, trolling motoc.
b-top, many extras
(352) 344-5858
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', S00cubic inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
US.0LA352-746-5856
AQUA SPORT
2000; 225 Explorer 24'
Cuddy cabin. 225
Johnson Ocean Pro.
Loadmaster tandem axle
trailer. Exc. cond.
$14,500.352-493-7377;
352-221-5230
AQUA SPORT
'86 25FT.Cuddy Cabin.
W/twin '06 Optimax
150hp & double
axle trailer. $16,900
(352)257-1355
Cabin Cruiser
24 ft..
Owner died, 6 cyl. 10,
alpha one/OD, used in
fresh water, tan. gal. tri
lncl.'d $2,100 464-0316
CENTURY
'01- Bay, 21ft.
'02, 150HP Yamaha w/
trir., custom cover
dep/find, VHF, Iw hrs.,
like new, $13,950.
(352) 442-7772
Deck Boat
95' 19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ ra-
dio & fishfinder. New Bat-
tery switch. 2 batteries,
power pk.
prop./hub.$6,000
(352) 726-0838
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras!
$14,500/obo. (352)
489-9640: 220-6508
FISH- N- SKI 82
16' 50hp motor, bimini,
cover, new floor & radio
all cost guard equipment
$4800. call Ross
(352) 795-0153
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
115HP, 4strke Yamaha,
w/trlr. $11,200. will
trade (352) 503-3778
HURRICANE
23ft Deck Boat, 112HP
Johnson, great for fish-'
ing & scalloping Must
Sell $3,500, 628-7397


PONTOON '08
Sweetwater 21ft: 25
hours, 90ho Yamaha.
$18,000. - 3.i ,:.'1."::
352-503-6797
PONTOON BOAT
08' 20 Ft. To many
options to list. $13,000
Call for Info. 628-7926
Pontoon Boat
1996,18 ft., Good Cond.
40HP'Yamaha, 4 stroke,
$8,500/obo
(352) 860-1490
PONTOON Landau
90, 24' port a potty, built
n portable gas tank, new
canopy steering cable ss
prop $5K,01 90hp Merc.
00 trailer (352) 465-7987
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
pbrt-o-potty, extras $12,000
(352) 628-0281
PRO-LINE 221
WALKAROUND 1999.
200 HP Mercury w/9.9 HP
Johnson kicker,$ 12k
obo. Call Kurt at Pete's
Pier 352-795-6067
SEA PRO
'00 19 FT. C/C. Lobded.
Elec. Pkg. 115 Fl 4 Strk.
Yam. 100 hrs. Bim. top.
Best offer(352)533-3093
SHOAL WATER
'05, 15ft., Cat Hull,
60HP Evinrude, CC,
extremely shallow
"for Flats, with trailer
$15,000. (352)621-0848
T-CRAFT
23'L, 6'W,'02 150H
Evin. mtr. w fuel enj. like
new, trlr. w/brks
$7750 352-489-3661
Triumph
'03-17ft Bass. with
tairler 60 Yamaha,
B-top, Trolling motor,
Excel cond. $5,700
Obo.(352) 860-0760




05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
26inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
'07 NEW MAR
Cypress 32ft 51h wheel.
2 slides. Separate bath.
Extras. 3 yr ext. warr,
$35,900/obo
352-794-3534
38FT BOUNDER '96
Class-A - basement
model. 49K mi. 14mpg,
new tires & brakes. (4)
TV's. Ready for long trip.
$22.000.Q352-563-0615


'98 ENDEAVOR
*38 Fi Vj Si.ie& 36 K Mi.
Duar ar ! .70, '.700 Otu.
' 352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
CHEVY '86 Class C
Very good cond. Needs
tires. $4,000. Call
anytime. (352) 446-6329
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison'Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane New
deal. 30Q, class A motor
home, 31'/% ft., 22k mi.
V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
aonan 4K gen., qn bed,
etc. Saturn tow Incl.
$35,000, (352) 397-5007
GEORGIE BOY
'05, Pursuit, Class A,
30ft. Excel. cond. 8k mi.,
2 slide outs, 2 TV's, back
up camera, all the bells
and whistles and much
more, must see this
coach, Asking $50,000.
obo (352) 746-7626
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool,
clubhouse etc. Can be
moved $29,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Merced.es die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$52,995. 352-464-0371




'02 Cedar Creek 5th
Wheel 29ft, 2-slides,
queen bed,bath/shower,
low mileage, loaded,
good cond. $16,800
(352) 746-4969
BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig. Like
new. $9,995.
. 352-489-3661
COLEMAN POP-UP
12 ft box; sleeps 9,
A/C, 3-way refrigerator,
awning. Exc. cond.
Best offer (352) 476-9563
or (352) 628-3371
Holiday Rambler
31 'Newly remodeled,
new appls.& a/c, tbws ,good
good cond. $2500.
352342-6311.

I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778


KODIAK
'04, Hybrid Travel Trdr.
AC, Heat, Micro. Tub/
: Shwer, toilet exc cond
$9,500. 352-564-4151
SKYLINE04
32' sleeps 8, used
once $11,500
(352) 586-9614



'98 BUICK CENTURY
LIMITED. All power,
leather interior, 75k mi,
Excellent cond. $3,995
(352) 382-0485
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Conv. rare
auto, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
black, dependable.
$4700 352- 563-0615
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 mi-
les on this rare silver on
silver on silver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are on
this gorgeous vette,
Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
included, Your's
for only , $48,000.
352- 270-3193
DODGE
'02 StratusSXT. 4


auto, air, loaded.
43KMi.
extra clean.
$5,980
Wooten's(352)
637-7117
FORD
'05 Taurus SE, V-6
Loaded, tow mi. extra
clean. Must see. $7,880.
Wooten's (352)637-7117
FORD
'99 Crown Victora,
former detective car. Cold
AC. Runs great. $2,700.
Obo.(352) 613-5776
HYUNDIA
'90 Red, 3 dr. hatch-
back,142 K. mi. Very
good condition. $1000.
Obo.(352) 344-4684
KIA RIO
2001 82K mi. New tim-
ing belt, good cond.
Well maint. $2,250 obo
(352) 637-5816


'08 Civic, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
LINCOLN
'02, Towncar, signature
series, excel, condition
well maintained $7,500.
(352) 726-5449
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well maintained.
$2650. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
". LINCOLN
'97, Towncar, white
excel cond. well main-
tained $3,000. firm
(352) 726-5118
MERCEDES
'05 SLK, $24,995. 2 avail.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299,
MERCEDES
'05 SLK, $24,995.2 avail.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'08 C- CLASS,$29,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCURY '04
Grand Marquis LS, blk
w/tan int., 63K, adult
owned. Non smoker, all
options. Estate car.
$9400/neg.
352-465-8722
PONTIAC
'98, Sunfire,
runs good, looks good,
asking $1,275.
(352) 637-5394
TOYOTA
'06 Corolla,
$11,995 Ocala Volvo
,(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 mi.
warranty. $19,995.
(352) 382-1857
TOYOTA
'95, Camry, automatic
AC, CD player, 4 DR
. $2,500.
(352) 563-5155
TOYOTA SUPER '89
All original, red, 79k mi.,
6 cylinder, all power,
targa roof. Original
owner. Garaged, $7,695
(352) 726-3427
VOLVO
'05 S60, $15,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S40, $15,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S60, $17,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S80, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299


VOLVO
'08 S 40, $17,995.
2 avail. Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S60, $19,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299



1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's
Dream. $3500/obo
352-228-0597
'53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, 350 V-8,
auto, May trade in part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door se-
dan. 6 cyl auto. $9,500.
Will consider trade for
travel trailer of equal
value.(352) 628-4053
CAMARO IROC Z
'88 Red, PS./PB. Cold
A.C. 62,000 Mi. Great
Condition. $6,900.
(352) 422-5663
EL CAMINO '81
305 Auto, All new
interior, & paint. Crager
mags & tires. 4" raised
hood. $3,250.
(352)341-3613.
GM El Camino
'84, 1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint;
63K mi., $8,900 obo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
trans..& parts. $4,000.
(352) 621-0126


PLYMOUTH Barracuda
1970,$4000, 75000
miles,coupe, automatic,8
cylinder,exterior:
purple,interior: black
chelseasmouse@gmail.co
m
THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$12,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122


'94 CHEVY
Ext. cab, 8 ft bed. New
motor, good cond. 2
wheel drive Z71 pkg.
$3,900.
352-563-1518 Iv msg
'94 TOYOTA PICKUP
Ext. Cab, 4 cyl, 5-spd,
new clutch, shocks &
more, tool box,148k Ml.
$2500 (352) 302-0033
'96 FORD F-150 XLT
Deluxe, good cond. new
tires 5.0 V8. w/cap $3,695
obo (352) 563-2583
CHEVY
'03 S-10 Ext. cab LS,
3rd door.V-6 auto, air,
loaded sharp, $5,980.
Wooten's (352)637-7117
DODGE
'94 Dakota, V-8, long
bed, auto. $1,500
(352) 527-1727
DODGE RAM '00
Std cab, rare 5spd, hemi,
V8, a/c, 25mpg, new 22"
rims & tires. Dependable
$3700. 352-563-0615
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serve. van. 41K Mi./5.4 L.
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serv. body/dble lock drs.
$20.000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
'91 V-8 auto,
air, loaded,
2 tone paint,
chrome
wheels/duals.
$2,880.
Wooten's
(352)637-7117
FORD F-50
1995, 4x4, cold a/c,
new tires, runs good
$2500 obo(352)
564-0530
FORD RANGER
01, XLT, 4.0 liter, 6 cycle
60K mi. many x-tras, tow
behind no trailer needed
$6500.(313) 404-5129



BUICK
'03 Rendezvous.
$8,995 Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299 -
CADILLAC
'05 Escalade, low mi. all
power, sun roof,
exc. cond. $28,000
(347) 266-9328
CHEVY
'06 Trailblazer
$12,995. 2 avail. Ocala
Volvo (352) 629-7299


DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air &
exhaust, Exc. Cond. $6,000
obo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl
drive, class 3 hitch, Orig
owner. Great shape &
price. $8,750.
352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, $8,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299,
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG. Silver
W/black int. Loaded,
57K.Mi, New $64K.Ask
$20K. (352)489-7674
VOLVO
'06 XC90, $20,995
3 avail. Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299



FORD '06 F-150
Crew cab XLT. Tow pkg
& topper, 51K mi.
Exc cond. LOADED!
$18,500/obo. (352)
634-1378; 795-2053
JEEP '97
Wrangler - 4cyl, 121K
miles, ready for high-
way & off road. $4500
(352) 419-4394



'02 CHEVY ASTRO
'02, 8 pass., exc. cond.
only 59K mi. book price
$8,300. Asking $6,500
(352) 637-2596
CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872
CHRYSLER
'96 Plymouth Voyager.
Handicapped. Runs
good, asking $2,300.
(352) 795-1411
ECONOLINE VAN '01
White, regular or hand
controls, Wheelchair
acc., w/lift, $3,500
(352) 341-7798



HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains & tows
heavy loads. $3200/or
trade. 352- 563-0615
Crystal River


2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900ml. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. Hi pert.
Over $43,000 in receipts.
17k mi. $11,700
352-563-0615
Crystal River
'97 SOFT TAIL HARLEY
DAVIDSON. Custom
build. 3K mi. Black,
chrome. Must Seel $15 k
invested-$9,000 sacrifice
(352) 860-0675
'99 SUSUZKI MARAUDER
805,15k mi., $3500 obo;
'05 SUSUZKI VINSON 500
ATV 4x4 $3300 obo
Call for info
(352)220-7152
BMW 91
R-100, w/soviet side car,
good cond, 49k mi. runs
well, kept maint record
$4500 (352) 344-2331
HARLEY
'96 Sporster 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes,chro. Ex. clean
$4,850.(352) 637-5143
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80", com-
pletely serviced, good
shape. Ex.
access. $5,895. obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109
HARLEY
DAVIDSON
96 Heritage Soft tail, red
many extras $9600 call
evenings (352) 746-3613
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 Mi.
124S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
KAWASKI
'00, ZRX 1100
CC,15K. Mi. Very
fast, many extra s.
$4k obo.
(352)621-3764
SCOOTER
'06 Suzuki, 400
Bergman. 4,200 Mi. Like
new cond. $4,500
(352) 382-2715
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
SUZUKI
2002 intruder 800 cc
shaft driven 64Q0miles
windshield,saddlebags,2
helmets $3,800 or best
offer 352-628-6020
VENTO PHANTOM
Scooter, 318 miles,
150CC, Like new.
$2,190/obo.
352-422-2433


12-1 ��&A� .-


WELCOME to10 International AutoCross,

a puzzle dedicated to the automobile enthusiasti

AutoCross will test your INTER NAI NA 1" O NA L
knowledge of cars, brand names and


auto-related people from all over the world. Good luck'P





D0 W N
-o, 2 Pontiac power option
3. Road
5 Pre-Sorento
6 Wheel measurement
)a7 Scissor or hydraulic
S9 Indy 500 opening act
1 1. Hot-rod pinstripe legend.
23 12 Ford's fast F-150
24 15 Firebird-driving 'Bandit'
16 'ECNALUBMA'
17. Lark maker
13. Piston accessory
on -3219. Spoiler's effect
21. More than an impala
23. Scot-branded Toyota
2-4. Shiny exterior bits (slang)
25 Chevy with a Midgate
26 Pillarless two-door
31 Help tires in the winter
40 Al 4233 Porsche's,auto trans
4436. A patriotic Rambler?
44637. High-powered Pontiac
38. Battery terminal
4 4 1, Fastest race driver gets it
42. An English wrench
44. Sun or moon
47. Off-road race venue
48. Taurus relative
6349. Mopar mill relaunched in '66
� ... 51 Behind the grille




TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009 Dll


*'l U tU N Ir�) ttLjI-


WEEKEND


0


NLY


AND WE WILL PAY OFF YOUR TRADEmIN NO MATTER THE AMOUNT OWED!


2009 VERSA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584-8755 Ext. 6112
8,988 or 159,mo

2009 SENTRA


2009 AVEO


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL'PRICING
800-5848755 Ext. 1101
$8,988t or 1O59 .

2008 MALIBU


'2008 PT CRUISER'



FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584-8755 Ex. 4131


or
fi: !, , i - ,,


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WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-5848755 Ext. 6109


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1!0,988* or 1 94* TO.

2009 IMPALA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-5848755 Ext. 3131


'10,98 8* or -


mo,


2009 300


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 6131
13,999* or$'247* mo


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 1133
r14,988* or $264*


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-5848755 Ext. 3101


$19,988 st
$tQF- Qf'f ,�


2009 RAM


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 6140
13,999* or'247* mo.

CRYSTAL


937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext. 1
crystalautos.com _


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 1115
1 6,988' or '298t mo

CRYSTAL


1035 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext, 1
crystalautos.com


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 4119


$1 88


CRYSI


Jeep ..
1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
2077 HWY. 44 W.
INVERNESS
800-584-87
[a crystalautos.com


'*All Prices/Payments exclude tax, tag, title, dealer ads and dealer fee ($599.50). Price/Payments include $2000 down (Cash or Trade Equity), owner loyalty, rebates and all factory incentives (must Qualify). Payments are at 7.99 A.P.R. for 72 Months/No
payments till 2010 7% A.P.R for 60 mos. 90 days first payment. W.A.C. All prior sales excluded and may restrict stock. Not responsible for typographical errors. Special offers cannot be combined. "Vehicles are pre-owned and pictures are for illustration
purposes only.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS IS GREAT AT CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE
LOOK AROUND. EVERYONE IS DRIVING ONE!
CHECK OUT THESE BIG SAVINGS


2008 VERSA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 6151
SAVE $5,990*
2008 SENTRA


FREE 24HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ex. 6149
SAVE L
2008 ALTIMA
Aji^L^V - x-'"fli


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.5848755 Ext. 6150
SAV E $7 990*
2008 ROGUE


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE 'WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 xt. 6147
SAVE 7,990*


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 6148
SAV E 9,990*
CRYSTAL


937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800o584,8755 Ext. 1
aCystalautos.com


r2008 CALIBER


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 2180
S4AVE 990*


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.58448755 Ext. 2136
SAVE $7,990*


2008 CAR


AVAN


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.5848755 Ext. 2181
SAVE ;8, 990 ,
2008 TOWN COUNTRY


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2137
SAVE '10,990*
2008 RAM


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755Ext. 2182
SAVE 11,990*
CRYSTAL


Jeep - -
1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
2077 HWY. 44 W.
INVERNESS
800 584-8755 Ext .
Scrystalautos.com


' 2008 AVEO


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Et. 1136
SAVE $4,990*


200


.IBU


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 1131
SAVE '7,990*
2008 IMPALA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 1132
SAVE 8,990*
2008 TRAILBLAZER
* -~i^- ~-ta


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFOAAND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 1134
SAVE $10,990*
2008 SILVERADO
r.~~~k 46 -----


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFOAND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 1135
SAVE E12,990*
CRYY STrAL


I 1035 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
I IHOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext, 1
crystalautos.com


I TRADING IN A VEHICLE?
"You must know what your trade is worth, no matter where you plan to buy..."
CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
I 800-440-9054


*MSRP when vehicle was new minus Selling Price equals Savings. Cannot be combined with other offers. All prior sales excluded and may restrict stock. Not responsible for typographical errors. Vehicles are pre-owned and pictures are for illustration
ft inflecTonly.


TJb IUESDAY, MVIA 9, 9U


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