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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01642
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 17, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01642

Full Text










TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Partly sunny with isolated
88 thunderstorms in the
. LOW afternoon and evening.
66 PAGE A4
MAY 17, 2009 Florida's Best Community


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Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


Read the
twice.
monthly
column from
the CLM
Workforce
Connection
Board in
Business.
/Page D1


Tigers capture title


Dunnellon victorious in Class 4A softball tournament


JOHN CosCIA
jcoscia@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle


I PLANT CITY - On Friday morning, they left the
Dunnellon city limits with a dream. Eighteen hours
later, the Dunnellon Lady Tigers softball team re-
turned to the small bedroom community that they
call home - as state champions.
During the team's postgame celebration, it was
Jessica Altum, one of the two seniors on the team,
who was the most vocal of the group. "Most people
say they're going to Disney World after they win a


championship. We're going to Outback! Yeah baby,
let's go," she screamed.
Dunnellon's 3-1 victory over Lake Wales, the 2007
state champions, was the first state title for the Lady
Tigers in their first-ever state championship ap-
pearance.
Many people saw this day coming. And some even ex-
pected it They just didn't know if it would ever arrive.
It was a journey that began for this special group
See TIGERS/Page A9
The Dunnellon Lady Tigers head coach Kevin Fagan
hoists the Class 4A State Championship trophy.
JOHN COSCIA/Chronicle


Riding into the future


i i 1 - m , * - , _-

DAVE SIGLER/Chroncle
Bicyclists ride along the Withlacoochee State Trall between Floral City and Inverness.


''hen it comes to solving
local economic woes,
some people think the
answer might be as easy
as riding a bike.
" From sunup to sundown any day of
the week, the 46-mile Withlacoochee
State Trail draws scores, sometimes
hundreds, of people on two and
three wheels.
"'Cyclists l i ke to spend money," said.
Charlie Wade, owner of Suncoast Bi-
cycles in Inverness, located right on
the trail. "That's hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars into the focal busi-
pesses, and that's keeping the


PEDAL METTLE
N Everyone from bike shops to tourism
development members are getting
involved in turning Citrus County into
a bicycle-friendly community./Page A3

economy going."
Wade also said what manatees are
to Crystal River, cycling is becoming
to Inverness.
That's not just good news for Inver-
ness, but ultimately for Citrus
County as a whole.
Fact: The housing market in Citrus
County has declined significantly


Solution: Bring in the second string.
That's the recommendation of one
local citizen, Chris Lloyd.
"Tourism has always been big in
this county, but it's been second
string," Lloyd said. "We've been
dominated by a home construction
mentality. We have a terrible eco-
nomic situation in Citrus County,
and we can either sit on our back-
sides and complain about it or we
can do something. The obvious area
for us to exploit is tourism."
Specifically, bicycle tourism.
-Nancy Kennedy


Heavy rainfall just a drip on drought

' CHRIS VAN ORMERv northern region, of which Citrus "We are still in the dry season, about 7.8 inches during a four-
cvanormer County is a part, had risen to -1.74 and we expect to see the water month period.
@chroniocleonline.com feet, up from the previous week's levels declining," Kinsman said. "It will take more than that,
Chronicle -1.96 feet. following several days A regular daily drenching for and then some," he said.


- d
Daily rainfall this week showed
little impact on increasing the
Floridari aquifer, but it will take
' iore than a few afternoon show-
ers to end the drought
"It caused some slight rises in
the aquifer, but we can already
,See them declining again," said
-Granville Kinsman, manager of
bhe hydrological data section of
'the Souithwest Florida Water
management District
'In the district's aquifer re-
Source weekly update for Friday,
the level of the aquifer in the


'Annie's Mailbox..........,.A16
.crossword....................A16
SEditorial ........................0C2
Horoscope ..................A16
Lottery Numbers............B4
M ovies ........................A16
Obituaries.....................A6
Together ......................A15
Veterans .......................A15


with rainstorms. However, for the
same period last year, the level
was 0.37 foot, within the accept-
able range of 0 to 4 feet.
While Citrus County residents
may have delighted to check their
rain gauges, not all parts of the
north region got as-wet.
"The rain we had was not wide-
spread," Kinsman said. "Some
areas had a tremendous amount
of rain, while others did not have
so much."
Anyone thinking of celebrating
the end of the three-year drought
would be taking a premature action.


Recession special
As belts tighten, waists ex.
pand: The U.S. is chowing on
cheap
eats and
stocking
up on
ammo.
/A10O


quite some time is what would be
needed to get through this
drought.
"It would take two to four
weeks of rain before we could ex-
pect to see the aquifer start rising
into normal levels," Kinsman
said. "Starting in June, to get out
of this drought, we would have to
have substantial amounts of rain
well into the next dry season."
In his 22 years with the district,
Kinsman said he has seen three
or four droughts, and to break
those droughts the rainfall has to
be well above normal, which is


"Lake levels are lower than the
last severe drop in 2001," he said.
"In the north region, lake levels are
at least 6 feet below where they
should be. That's pretty severe."
Lower lakes are slower to re-
cover than rivers, he said. Even
with extra rainfall, it would take
up to two years to get the lakes
back up.
"Rivers respond faster," he
said, "because with the heavy
rains they get the runoff. But to
sustain normal flow, we would
have to have 20 to 40 percent
more rainfall."


A night at the museum
The Smithsonian gives sleepovers a shot, hoping to
capitalize on interest renewed by a cinematic sequel./All
Supreme COUrt Last few weeks proving busy./A8'
Why US? Craigslist CEO questions scrutiny./A5

A snap Astronauts repair Hubble's camera./A4


April a


boon to


Realtors

Home sales trend

upward again
CHRIS VAN ORMER
cvanormer
@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Sales of single-family homes
seem to be rebounding with
April's statistics.
"We're getting a few more
customers than before," said
Tom McMurray, broker for the
Inverness office of Keller-
Williams.
The first four months of the
year have sales in the county
tending to rise. In January, 129
single-family homes were sold.
The number went up to 155
homes in February, but
dropped to 138 homes in March.
But in April, 170 single-fam-
ily homes were sold, according
to the monthly statistical re-
port of the Realtors Associa-
tion of Citrus County. Although
it is less than the figure for the
same period last year, 199, the
sales appear to be climbing,
The average sales price of
$121,822 is an increase of 1.94
percent over the previous
month, but some $30,000 less
than the figure for the same
period last year, $152,092.
Likewise, the high sale price
of $440,000 showed an in-
crease of 6.02 percent over the
previous month, but was well
below the figure of $800,000 for
the same period last year.
Sold homes are showing
fewer days on the market, cur-
rently 134 days compared to
149 days last year. Realtors
also are taking on fewer new
listings: 395 for April 2009 and
535 foi April 2008.
McMurray said that his of-
fice expects business to be a
little slow now until the school
year is complete.
"Then I think it will pick
up," he said.
Permit applications to build
single-family homes were
down to 10 for the month of
April, under the previous low
figure of 12, which is what the
county building division
recorded for the months of No-
vember 2008 and January and
February 2009.
However, the overall num-
bers of applications seem to be
increasing. For January, the
total was 661; February saw
'697; March brought 879; and
April rated 853.
As many as 1,624 applica-
tions were made in May 2007.
The number dropped to 593 in
November 2008.
For April, the most permit
applications were made for
residential additions and re-
modeling.
Permit applications show
the intent to carry out con-
struction work The permits
may not be granted, or the
work may not be completed.


Something borrowed
In the world of real estate
investing, what's old
is new again./D1



6 i41Ui IIUiI o


VOLUME 114 ISSUE 283


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TATE


LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Wheels turning to promote cycling


Those who believe cycling is an economic benefit to the area range from city.
planners to bicycle shop owners to biking enthusiasts. As the numbers of
people riding the Withlacoochee State Trail continues to grow, plans are being
formulated to capitalize on appeal of Citrus County as a bicyclist's destination.


MATTHEW BECK'Chronrcle
City of Inverness staff members, downtown merchants, city council representatives and community members gather out-
side of the Deco Cafe on Courthouse Square recently to unveil a new bicycle parking area. The city will designate one
parking space near the cafe solely for bicycle parking.


Bikes a boon to business:


WT while the obvious bust-
VV nesses to benefit from
an in flux of cyclists are the
local bike shops, that's not
all. Bikers get hungry
and thirsty They want
a place to sleep at
7 t night and some-
place to get an ice
cream cone or a
-j cold beer-
The city of Inver-
t ness purchased bi-
cycle racks, which
are scattered
throughout the city
One parking spot out-
. side the Deco Cafe in
downtown Inverness
is now designated bi-
cycle parking, complete
with a bicycle rack. There's
also a bike rack in front of the
Ice Cream Doctor on Pine A\v-
enue.
Inverness City Manager
Frank DiGiovanni said 10 bicy-
cles can fit in one car space,
which will benefit local busi-


There's a huge community of organized
bicyclists that travel long distances to
come here and ride. Word is catching on.
We've got groups that come back year
after year.


nesses because bike riders shop,
too
One local business that's seen a
boost from bicycle traffic is the
Central Motel in Inverness
"There's a huge community' of
organized bicyclists that travel
long distances to come here and
ride," said Terri Adkisson, the
motel's general manager. "'Word
is catching on. We've got groups
that come back year after year."
One group, from Englewood,
has stayed at the motel for the
past seven years and has 40 rooms
already booked for next year
The motel has a secured stor-


Terri Adkisson
eral manager, Cenlral Motel in inverness.
age area for bikes.
"'Even with the economy the
way it is, we had as many if not
more stay with-us last year," she-
said.
'lvo bicycle tour businesses. Bi-
cycle Savannah and Senior Cy-
cling, include the Central Motel
as pailrt of their package to Citrus
County. Adkisson said she has in-
cluded e-mailing to bike clubs as
part of her active marketing to bi-
cyclists.
"The trail sells itself and is a
huge asset to this county," she
said. "We're lucky to be (located)
mid-way on the trail."


Where to bike? West side story:


Although the trail is the main attraction
for bicycle riders, it's not the only place
to ride. Whispering Pines Park in Inver-
ness is open to bicycle traffic. Still in
the planning stage is a mountain
bike trail at the north end of the
park, which will draw a com-
pletely different category of riders ,-
into the area. L
Running along the south side of
County Road 486 is a designated bike
path, said Jim McLean. a member of
Citrus Cycling Club.
He said it's possible to ride from one


end of the county to the other using C.R..
486. State Road 44 and U.S. 19. which
all have bike lanes.
One of the keys is educating car
r owners to share the road. however.
Another place to ride on the
--...- west side of the county- is the With-
lacoochee Bay Trail, near Inglis. It
begins at the Felburn Park Trail-
: head and heads toward the Gulf of
Mexico.
The westernmost 2.5 miles of
paved trail runs through maritime
hammocks and salt marsh.


By the numbers:
The annual Rails to Trails bike ride on the state trail
brings as many as 1.600 cyclists into
the area, and the Clean Air ride an-
other 1.000. TheCitrusCyclingClub
has about 80 members.
Of the bikes purchased last year
and this year from Suncoast Bicy-
cles, about 90 percent were bought
by Citrus County residents Be-
tween 15 and 25 percent were re-
cumbent bikes. Most of the bikes sold
by Hampton's Edge Bicycles since nov^-
ing to its trailside location in Floral ' .
City from Istachatta have been trikes .'. .*"
and recumbents, which can cost sev-
era]l thousand dollars. .: . '
Wade said he rents about 50 bikes
a month, more during the winter months. mostly
to European tourists and Dutch residents of Lakeside
Country Club on U.S. 41 in Inverness.

Map it, Citrus:
One of the proposed projects to help promote bicycle
tourism is a map of designated bicycle trails. Her-
nando County recently produced such a map. with a
grant from the Florida Department of Transportation.
Citrus County's Toumism Develop-
,'. meant Council (TDCI is currently
in the process of applying fora
grant so Citrus County can
have its own map
Si : "'That's just another mar-
/...- keting piece to put in peo-
ple's hands," said Maria
' Chancy. TDC director
"Right now we're iden-
� ,. tifying pa\ed trails
--i with facilities, bike
lanes on streets and
potential.'uture
trails."
S- Chancy said the
TDC's W\eb site,
* ww\v\isitCltrus
.. , ... .corn, also spotlights
biking as an ac-
^A ."I -" v , tivity in Citrus
County.

Maria Chancy

Beyond biking:
For Chris Lloyd, the time is ideal for Citrus County
F "AAs baby boomers are retiring, they're asking
themselves, "Where should I live?' They're more active
than generations before them." he said,
"and I can see folks coming to Citrus
o County because it's a bicycle-triendly
' environment."
, At 46 miles long, the Withlacoochee
fr *- State Trail is the longest trail in Florida,
S nd people come from other states and
. other countries just to ride it.
* As Ken Koch pointed out, most people
who are cyclists are generally also into
Chris Lloyd other sports. They also kayak, swim and
boat, hike, ride horses; they want to go
see the manatees - and whether they visit or move
here, they spend money.

* WHAT: 2009 Citrus County
Cycling Classic.
EE WHEN: 7 to 8:30
a.rn. Saturday, July 18.
* WHERE: Rails to Trails
Inverness trailhead.
* COST: $25 by July 10;
$30 after July 10.
* INFORMATION: www.citruscycling.org;
341-3910.


-Nancy Kennedy


Inverness Bicycle Master Plan:


W ith a $50,000 grant from the Florida Depart-
ment ofTransportation., the City of Inverness
has embarked on developing a Bicycle Master
Plan, to kick off in June, with Kimley-Horn and
Associates from Tallahassee as the consultants
The ultimate goal is to have Inverness desig-
nated a Bicycle-Friendly Community by the
League of American Bicyclists. Currently, there
are only four such places in Florida: Boca Raton,
Gainesville. Orlando and St. Petersburg
Simply put, the Bicycle Master Plan involves
implementing projects throughout the city that
will make bicycling easier Such projects include


painting bicycling symbols on existing bike lanes,
such as on State Road 44, and/or posting signs. It
may mean adding separate bike paths on roads,
possibly installing bike lockers and building
shower facilities for people %who bike to work
"We've been doing our downtown redevelop-
ment for some time, and part of that was to link
dovntom n to the parks." said Ken Koch. director
of development services for the city of Inverness.
"We've tried to make the downtown area pedes-
trian-friendly. so we said may be with this linkage
it should be multi-modal."
Koch said Inverness is uniquely situated with


the Withlacoochee State Trail running di- .
rectly through the area, con-
necting, not only the
downtown area and the League of
parks, but residential areas.
the hospital, several
schools, shopping centers and even A m er
an industrial park. ,
"For the most part, people Mi fH
around here ride for recreation," `Jr
Koch said "We want to make it -
convenient for them to use their
bikes for everything "


County BRIE-FS


Political network
' to host speaker
' Community leader Lace
.Blue-McLean will speak Mon-
Slay about
building the
public-private
coalition com-
mitted to sav-
Ing Three .
sisters ,
pring.
4 The Citrus
republican Lace
Women's Blue-McLean'
Network is now the Women's
Political Network of Citrus
County. It is chartered by the
Florida Women's Political. Net-
work and affiliated with the Na-


tional Republican Women's
Network. The mission of the
Network is to inform, educate
and inspire women on political
issues. Meetings focus on po-
litical topics and legislative is-
sues at all levels of
government and will feature
round table discussions, fo-
rums, and guest speakers.
The Network will meet from
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Monday at the
Central Ridge Public Library,
425 W. Roosevelt Blvd.
Call Patricia Cowen at 746-
9003 for more information. We
welcome donations for CASA
at our meetings: grocery gift
cards, paper towels and
women's size 12 pants needed
currently.


Dawsy to lead
celebrity waiters
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy and his
team of local
celebrity wait- . -
ers will be on
hand from 5
to 10 p.m.
Thursday at t
Beef' ' - -, "-
Brady's in .
Crystal River.
Tips donated Sheriff Jeff
will benefit Dawsy
Big Brothers
Big Sisters, a mentoring pro-
gram.
The sheriffs new Mobile
Command Post and FOCUS
car with interactive multimedia


for youngsters will be on dis-
play during the event.
Children who attend will be
"deputized" with special gold
star badges, and will receive
other goodies from the sheriffs
office.
For more information about
this event or to learn more
about donating to or volunteer-
ing with Big Brothers Big Sis-
ters, call 464-3968.
CUB sponsoring
golf tournament
Citrus United Basket is host-
ing its first golfing event to raise
money for its organization.
The golf event is a four-per-
son scramble and costs $50


per person to enter. Cost in-
cludes range balls, cart, lunch
and donuts and coffee at 7:30
a.m. before tee off.
The event is Saturday, May
30, at the Inverness Golf and
Country Club. Registration is
7:30 a.m. with a shotgun start
at 8:30. Entries must be re-
ceived by May 26.
Make checks payable to Cit-
rus United Basket, Attention
Deborah, P.O. Basket 2094, In-
vemess, FL 34451.
Call 344-2242 for informa-
tion.
Chapel has free
outreach for needy
The Fourth Annual Outreach


will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Satur-
day, May 30, at the Calvary
Chapel of Inverness on U.S. 41
(next to Davis Funeral Home).
Needy public invited. Free
service will be given by 26
agencies, including medical,
legal advice, Department of
Motor Vehicles, Veterans Ad-
ministration, child I.D., housing
and shelter, educational and
vocational information, with ac-
tivities for children.
Hot dogs, chips and drinks
served. The sponsor for this
event is The Hunger & Home-
less Coalition of Citrus County
Inc., 628-4357, and licensed
medical professionals.
-From staff reports


-~


,,7"
* /--'


^esSSffS








CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Spacewalkers successfully repair


Hubble's burned-out camera


Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL -
Spacewalking astronauts
gave the Hubble Space Tel-
escope a more command-
ing view of the cosmos by
installing a new high-tech
instrument Saturday, then
pulled off their toughest job
yet: fixing a broken camera.
It was the third space-
walk in as many days for
the shuttle Atlantis crew,
and it was the most intri-
cate ever performed be-
cause of the
unprecedented camera re-
pairs. Astronauts had never
before tried to take apart a
science instrument at the
19-year-old observatory.
Hubble's chief mechanic,
John Grunsfeld, deftly
opened up the burned-out
camera and plucked out all
four electronic cards that
needed to be replaced.
"Somehow I don't think
brain surgeons go 'woo-
hoo' when they pull some-
thing out," one of the
astronauts observed from
inside Atlantis.
To everyone's surprise,
the new cards and power
supply pack went in just as
smoothly, seeming to take
almost no time at all. In
fact, the astronauts found
themselves running ahead
of schedule for a change,
and their spacewalk lasted
the allotted 6 1/2 hours. The
first two spacewalks ended
up running long because of
unexpected difficulties en-
countered with Hubble,
last visited seven years ago.
The astronauts cheered
when Mission Control radioed
up the news that the freshly
repaired camera had passed
the first round of testing.


Associated Press
Astronauts Andrew Feustel, left, and John Grunsfeld work
on the Hubble Space Telescope on Saturday.


"That's unbelievable,"
Grunsfeld said.
A second round of testing
was expected to last well
into the night.
The high-stakes job un-
folded 350 miles above
Earth. Orbiting so high put
Atlantis and its astronauts
at an increased risk of
being hit by space junk
NASA had another shuttle
on launch standby in case a
rescue was needed.
Earlier, Grunsfeld and his
spacewalking partner, An-
drew Feustel, accomplished
their first task, hooking up
the $88 million Cosmic Ori-
gins Spectrograph.
They made room for the
new supersensitive spectro-
graph - designed to detect
faint light from faraway
quasars - by removing the
corrective lenses that re-
stored Hubble's vision in 1993.
"This is really pretty his-
toric," Grunsfeld said as he
and Feustel hoisted out the
phone booth-size box con-
taining Hubble's old con-
tacts.


Hubble was launched in
1990 with a flawed mirror
that left it nearsighted. But
the newer science instru-
ments have corrective
lenses built in, making the
1993 contacts unnecessary.
The latest addition, the cos-
mic spectrograph, is ex-
pected to provide greater
insight into how planets,
stars and galaxies formed.
NASA hopes to keep
Hubble working for an-
other five to 10 years with
all the improvements. No
one will be back to Hubble,
so everyone at NASA, the
seven astronauts included,
wants to squeeze in as
much repair work as possi-
ble. Already, they have
given Hubble two top-of-
the-line science instru-
ments, fresh-batteries and
gyroscopes, and a new sci-
ence data unit to replace
one that broke last fall.
If all goes well, the fifth
and final spacewalk is set
for Monday and the tele-
scope will be released from
Atlantis on Tuesday.


Citrus BRIEFS


Community reunion
set in Crystal River
The Crystal River Commu-
nity Reunion committee is host-
ing its fourth annual Reunion
Celebration.
The reunion is sponsored by
the George Washington Carver
Alumni Association, the Mt.
Olive Missionary Baptist Church
Brotherhood, Unity Church of
Christ Written in heaven and
Church of the Living God Pillar
& Ground of the Truth.
The event runs from Friday
-to Sunday, May 24, and is free
to the public.
The committee describes the
event as an opportunity to
"bring hope and joy to reuniting
families; rekindling the bonds of
friendship and remembering
our loved ones." The events:
* 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, fish fry
at Copeland Park.
E 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday,
family and friends cookout at
Copeland Park. Food, music,
basketball tournament and kids
wet activities. Children may
need, bathing suits and towels.
N 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday,
adult party at the American Le-
gion, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway. Ages 25 and older. ID
required. No sneakers, T-shirts
or ball caps. Music, photo



Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Thefts
SAtheft of two baby goats oc-
curred at approximately noon on
May 6, in the 3500 block of E. Or-
chid Street, Hemando.
* A petit theft, reported on
May 6, occurred at approxi-
mately 7 a.m. April 20, on Ja-
maica Street in Homosassa.
* A theft of a motorcycle, re-
ported on May 6, occurred at ap-
proximately 6:30 p.m. on May 6,


both, door prizes, old school
dance contest. Cost is $10 at
the door.
* Sunday, May 24, fellow-'
ship with family and friends at
church of choice.
For information, call (727)
216-5132.
Economic groups to
present workshop
The Citrus Chamber of Com-
merce, Citrus Economic Devel-
opment Council, Workforce
Connection, UNF Small Busi-
ness Development Center
presents "Finding Business Op-
portunities in the Recovery Act
Funds," from 8 to 9:30 a.m. Fri-
day, May 29, at Citrus Hills
Lodge, 350 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hernando.
Attend this special workshop
to find out how your business
might benefit from funding and
incentives provided through the
American Recovery and Rein- '
vestment Act of 2009. Find out
this and more:
* Understand the key ele-
ments of the Recovery and
Reinvestment Act.
* Uncover business opportu-
nities from state and federal
Web sites.
* Hear small business suc-
cess stories.
* Learn how to go after con-


For the RECORD

in the 1200 block of N. Tiger
Point, Lecanto.
Vandalisms
MA criminal mischief occurred
at approximately 6 p.m. May 4, in
the 1100 block of W. Efland
Lane, Citrus Springs.
M A criminal mischief ($1,000
or more) occurred at approxi-
mately midnight on April 21 in the
5700 block of N. Carl G Rose
Highway, Hemando.
A criminal mischief, reported
on May 5, occurred at approxi-


tracts or.requests for proposals.
* Find out about new SBA
loans.
* Understanding tax credits and
incentives in the Recovery Act.
* Identifying business train-
ing grants and incentives.
There is no charge for the
workshops, but advance regis-
tration is required. To obtain a
detailed schedule or to register
for this workshop, call the Citrus
Chamber of Commerce at 795-
3149 or e-mail josh@citrus
countychamber.com.
Elections office
surveying voters
The Citrus County Supervisor
of Elections is conducting a
voter registration list mainte-
nance program as required by
law. Some voters will receive an
address confirmation card in the
mail from the elections office.
If your name and address
are correct on the card, you do
not need to do anything.
If you have changed your
name or address, complete the
card and mail it back.
If you received a card to your
address and the voter no longer
lives at your address, please re-
tumrn the card to your mail carrier.
For more information, call the
Inverness office at 341-6740.
-From staff reports


mately 11 p.m. May 4, in the,
5500 block of E. Tangelo Lane,
Inverness.

SA criminal mischief, reported
on May 6, occurred at approxi-
mately 12:01 a.m. May 6, in the
7800 block of W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.

EAcriminal mischief, reported
on May 6, occurred at approxi-
mately 2 a.m. May 6, in the 3300
block of S. Viscaria Way, Ho-
mosassa.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
P i-HI|L- PR Hr- -o 7PR.
trace AQ 71 rac 90 67 0.22
8HI LO trace~ OOpR


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City .... ....H
Daytona Bch. 83
Ft. Lauderdale 85
Fort Myers 89
Gainesville 87
Homestead 85
Jacksonville 85
Key West -86
Lakeland 89
Melbourne 85


L Fast
68 ts
73 ts
68 ts
64 ts
73 ts
64 ts
73 ts
67 ts
69 ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa 1
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


Variable winds from 5 to 15 knots.
Seas 1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland
waters a light chop. Chance of after-
noon showers and thunderstorms.


91 9 trace 91. 67 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
SI TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 88 Low: 66
Partly sunny; 60% chance of PM
t-storms
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
. .. . High: 83 Low: 65
Mostly cloudy; 70% chance of t-storms

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
. nwHigh: 82 Low: 66
w ~Partly sunny; 60% chance of t-storms


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


Gulf water
temperature


89�
Tl ken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.04 27.98 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 32.50 32.48 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Inverness 34.41 34.38 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 36.22 36.18 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness-
UV INDEX: 10


90/69
95/53
88/65
80
+4

0.83 in.
3.40 in.
8.18 in.
14.67 in.


0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.04 in.


DEW POINT
,Saturday at 3 p.m. 63
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 42%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees and grasses were moderate
and weeds were absent.
*Light - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
MORNING) AFTERNOONN)
5/17 SUNDAY 12:27 6:41 12:51 7:02
5/18 MONDAY 1:11 7:22 1:32 7:43


SUNSET TONIGHT ....................... 8:16 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW ..................... 6:37 A.M.
y MOONRISETODAY...........................2:05A.M.
MAY17 MY24 MIAYN JUIE7 MOONSET TODAY............................ 1:40 PM.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. A burn ban is in effect.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire.weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.
TIDES .


*From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 12:57 p/7:51 a -- /8:27 p
Crystal River** 11:18 a/5:13 a 10:48 p/5:49 p
Withlacoochee* 9:05 a/3:01 a 8:35 p/3:37 p
Homosassa** 12:07 p/6:50 a 11:37 p/7:26 p


**At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
12:27 a/8:51 a 1:48 p/9:46 p
12:09 p/6:13 a - /7:08 p
9:56 a/4:01 a 10:04 p/4:56 p
12:58 p/7:50 a - /8:45 p


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
Albany 76 50 .01 pc 58 34
Albuquerque 69 57 pc 82 58
Asheville 77 57 .16 sh 61 40
Atlanta 73 66 1.08 ts 70 51
Atlantic City 75 59 sh 62 45
Austin 82 64 1.60 ts 83 53
Baltimore 80 62 sh 64 41
Billings 71 37 s 84 56
Birmingham 79 66 .19 ts 68 49
Boise 79 45 s 89 55
Boston 65 53 sh 63 45
Buffalo 74 55 .03 s 54 36
Burlington, VT 75 47 .47 pc 57 37
Charleston, SC 85 65 ts 79 56
Charleston, WV 82 62 .65 pc 63 37
Charlotte 80 64 ts 68 46
Chicago 62 55 s 62 43
'Cincinnati 75 65 .29 s 63 37
Cleveland 74 61 .03 s 56 37
Columbia, SC 85 66 .05 ts 75 50
Columbus, OH 75 63 .04 s 59 37
Concord-,N.H. 71 42 sh 62 33
Dallas 77 64 .46 pc 74 51
Denver 72 43 .01 pc 84 54
Des Moines 63 44 pc 66 47
Detroit 67 54 .30 s 62 41
El Paso 84 64 s 86 62
Evansville, IN 76 63 .51 s 67 41
Harrisburg 79 62 .05 pc 63 41
Hartford 73 54 sh 62 38
Houston 90 69 ts 77 59
Indianapolis 68 60 .33 s 61 39
Jackson 84 68 .03 ts 65 50
Las Vegas 96 76 s 103 78
Little Rock 77 64 .33 pc 69 50
Los Angeles 69 62 s 74 62
Louisville 77 67 .36 s 66 42
Memphis 80 71 .03 pc 69 50
Milwaukee 59 52 s 59 44
Minneapolis 57 38 pc 64 47
Mobile 85 69 .43 ts 78 57
Montgomery 87 68 .05 ts 73 56
Nashville 79 66 .92 pc 66 45


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair, h=hazy; pcapartly cloudy; r.raln;
rs=raln/snow mix; s=sunny; sh.showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=wlndy.
@2009 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 87 72 ts 77 60
New York City 72 57 .05 sh 62 45
Norfolk 80 67 .06 ts 63 49
SOklahoma City 71 60 .01 s 71 49
Omaha 65 42 s 73 51
Palm Springs 10272 s 103 76
Philadelphia 80 62 sh 63 44
Phoenix 10274 pc 106 80
Pittsburgh 77 63 .27 s .59 34
Portland, ME 58 46 .01 sh 62 38
Portland, Ore 82 49 .04 s 84 56
Providence, R.I. 71 50 .01 sh 62 41
Raleigh 87 70 .01 ts 67 46
Rapid City 66 24 pc 81 51
Reno 87 51 s 94 58
Rochester, NY 79 56 .20 s 56 35
Sacramento 10057 s 101 64
St. Louis 64 58 .03 s 67 45
St. Ste. Marie 50 34 .49 s 51 32
Salt Lake City 74 42- s 82 61
.an Antonio 86 66 -.48 ts 83. 56
San Diego 67 60 s 70 60
San Francisco 86 53 s 84 56
Savannah 83 67 .07 ts 82 57
Seattle 74 46 pc 71 48
Spokane 69 41 pc 80 53
Syracuse 78 50 .72 pc 54 34
Topeka ' 63 48 s 71 48
Washington 82 64 .05 sh 65 44
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 108 Needles, Calif. LOW-21 Williston, N.D.

WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/73/ts
Amsterdam 61/44/sh


Athens
Beijing
Berlin
Bermuda
Cairo
Calgary
Havana
Hong Kong
Jerusalem


84/63/pc
83/61/s
65/44/pc
75/63/s
91/66/s
70/39/s
85/71/ts
87/75/ts
88/66/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


62/46/s
57/44/sh
66/43/pc
78/54/ts
54/33/pc
56/36/pc
60/42/sh
77/66/s
74/54/pc
64/46/s
71/53/sh
53/36/pc
67/49/pc


S T P U S - C 0 U N T Y


HR�ONICLL
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To start your subscription:
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residents, call toll-free at 1-888-852-2340.
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W^41s 44 -r


Who's In charge:


Gerry M ulligan ........................................................................... Publisher, 563-3222
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Neale Brennan.... Promotions/Community Affairs Manager, 563-6363
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Jeff Gprdon .............................................................. Business Manager, 564-2908
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Report a news tip:
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Sound Off .......................... ........... ....-.....---.. 563-0579
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing, Inc.
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sUNDAY, MAY 17, 9 ...


-A


-ttL duT-LdlW


A. 200Av. ..A ii . , .-r UO


I


I









Crnws COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE 5UNDA~ MAY 17, 2009 AS


State BRIEFS


Sen. Jim King has
pancreatic cancer
, TALLAHASSEE -A long-
time Florida lawmaker and for-
mer state Senate president has
announced he has cancer.
Republican Sen. Jim King
said Saturday he has pancre-
atic cancer that was diagnosed
during a recent checkup.
E A spokeswoman for King
said he realizes the difficulty in
treating the disease but that he
plans to continue serving his
Jacksonville constituency.
King served in the Florida
House from 1986 to 1999 and
, has been'in the Senate since.
He was the Senate president
from 2002 to 2004.
Pancreatic cancer has very
poor survival rates, with just 5
,percent of patients living five
years after their diagnosis. But
survival rates are drastically
better when the cancer is
caught early enough to operate.
King hasn't shared his prognosis.
Dead manatee
found in Ga. creek
BRUNSWICK, Ga. - Geor-
gia wildlife biologists have been
unable to determine the cause
Sof death of a manatee found
floating in a coastal creek.
Clay George, a manatee re-
searcher with the state Depart-
ment of Natural Resources,
said the 10-foot adult female is
* the first manatee known to
have died in Georgia waters
this season. It was found
Thursday at the northern tip of
a waterfront park in Brunswick
just off U.S. 17.
George said Friday that de-
composition made it difficult to
determine the cause of death but
the manatee had no visible injury.
Manatees, protected by state
f and federal law, migrate north
from Florida spring and sum-
mer. In September, four died in
a collision with a ship in the Sa-
vannah River. They also some-
itimes succumb to
entanglement in fishing gear
and harmful algal blooms.
Minor shark
attacks reported
NEW SMYRNA BEACH -
Two minor shark attacks were re-
ported on Florida's Space Coast.
Emergency officials said the
bites were reported five minutes
apart on Saturdayf'obmihg..
One victim was a middle-
aged man who was bitten on
his hand but was able to drive
himself to the hospital.
The other was a 49-year-old
man bitten on his foot in the
same area.
Service honors
lost migrants
MIAMI.-A candlelight vigil
in Miami paid tribute to nine
people who died when their
boat capsized this week off
Florida's Atlantic coast.
The service Friday at Notre
Dame d'Halti Catholic Church
in Miami's Little Haiti neighbor-
hood came after the Coast
Guard called off its search for
additional survivors.
At least nine people died, in-
cluding a 1-year-old girl, and 16
others were rescued after the
boat was spotted Wednesday.
. The victims are believed to
have been mostly Haitian mi-
grants trying to make their way
to U.S. shores.
Vietnam veteran
awarded Silver Star
LEHIGH ACRES -A Lehigh
Acres man has been awarded


the Silver Star nearly 44 years
after rescuing wounded soldiers
in Vietnam.
Sen. Bill Nelson was in south-
west Florida Friday to present
71-year-old Keith Maynard with
the prestigious award. The Sil-
ver Star is the third highest mili-
tary honor for valor in combat.
As an Army staff sergeant, May-
nard volunteered to go on a heli-
copter mission to deliver medical
-supplies onNov. 17,1965. While
under heavy fire, Maynard left the
helicopter to rescue wounded sol-
diers on the battlefield.
The veteran's former com-
mander recommended him for
the honor.
Deputy shoots man
during attack
GAINESVILLE -Authorities
said an Alachua County deputy
fatally shot a Gainesville man
after attempts to subdue him
with a Taser stun gun failed.
The Gainesville Police Depart-
ment reported that several law
enforcement officer responded
to a disturbance in the middle of
an intersection Friday aftemoon.
Lt. Mike Hanson arrived and
tried to break up a fight between
18-year-old Nicholous Vertex
Weeks and a woman.
Witnesses told police that
Weeks attacked Hanson, who
then discharged his Taser.
Weeks went down initially but
then got up and continued his
attack. That's when Hanson
drew his gun and fired several
shots. It's unknown whether
Weeks had a weapon.
Hanson received non-life-threat-
ening injuries. He was placed on
administrative leave with pay.
Man shot after
threatening girlfriend
WEST PALM BEACH -
Palm Beach County authorities
said deputies shot and killed a
Miami man just as he was about
to slit his ex-gidfriend's throat.
The sheriff's office reported
that 21-year-old Gleen Dean , ,
Gomez was pronounced dead
at the scene, just after Friday
morning s shooting.
About half an hour earlier,
authorities said Gomez
stormed into his 21-year-old ex-
girlfriend's home and abducted
her. The woman s mother
called 911. Deputies eventually
spotted a Gomez and the
'woman in a car and forced it to
stop. Deputies said they saw
Gomez grab the woman and
bring a knife to her throat.
That's when at least two
deputies fired at the man.
The woman was treated for
minor injuries but was other-
wise unharmed.
Guard charged with
assaulting inmate
TAMPA - Authorities said a
Hillsborough County detention
deputy was suspended without
pay pending termination for as-
saulting a juvenile inmate.
The sheriffs office reported
that 29-year-old Joshua
Spencer was charged Thurs-
day with misdemeanor battery
and official misconduct.
A report said a 16-year-old
inmate spit on deputies
Wednesday through the food
tray slot of his cell Spencer
then opened the cell door,
charged the inmate and
knocked him to the floor.
Spencer then hit the inmate at
least three times on the back of
the head
Spencer was being held on
$2,500 bail
-Frcinn ..rn .�1porn


CCC
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plus salesas ax
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Ambush at Afghan school


Associated Press
ALIABAD, Afghanistan
- The bearded Afghan
army officer dropped off
bundles of pens and note-
books at the school and
asked one boy which he
preferred: The Americans
or the Taliban?
"I don't know," the boy
replied. But after a short si-
lence other children in the
classroom answered for
him: "The Taliban."
Within minutes the dis-
cussion was punctuated by
an insurgent ambush and
the joint U.S.-Afghan patrol
became pinned down in this
area with forested moun-
tains, caves and ravines that
American soldiers call "the
Valley of Death."
Heavy machine gun fire
blanketed the patrol as
troops used smoke
grenades and cover fire to
escape the ambush. No one
in the patrol was killed in
the firefight Saturday


The Korengal Valley in
eastern Afghanistan's
Kunar province has a repu-
tation as one of most dan-
gerous areas in the country,
where its rugged mountain-
ous terrain makes it a per-
fect insurgent playground.
The region's infamy for
U.S. and Afghan troops dates
back to June 2005, when a
four-man team of Navy
SEALs was caught in a mili-
tant ambush. Three were
killed and the fourth was res-
cued days later by a farmer
A helicopter carrying
American special forces
sent to rescue the SEALs
was shot down with a
rocket-propelled grenade,
killing 16 American troops
in one of the deadliest sin-
gle attacks on the U.S. mili-
tary since the war began
-here in 2001.
Since then, the insurgents
have used the cover of caves
and trees to attack small
American units patrolling
the valley. Despite years of


clashes and airstrikes, U.S.
and Afghan forces have
failed to subdue the Koren-
gal Valley-- one of the most
staunchly anti-American re-
gions in Afghanistan.
The tribes here speak a
distinct language - Koren-
gali - and adhere to the
austere Wahabi brand of
Islam most prevalefit inf
Saudi Arabia, and prac-
ticed by Osama bin Laden
and the Taliban.
The Saturday gunbattle
erupted following a human-
itarian mission to deliver 60
bags of school supplies to
the students, aged 5 to 12-
years old.
An Associated Press
news team embedded with
the U.S. troops dashed back
to the American military
base nearby on dirt trails. It
was unclear what hap-
pened to the students after
the joint patrol retreated.
"Unfortunately the peo-
ple, the Taliban, they don't
like us and the coalition


Craigslist CEO: Why


Associated Press


COLUMBIA, S.C. - Craigslist CEO
Jim Buckmaster pointed out Saturday
there are plenty of places in South
Carolina other than his Web site to
find prostitution ads and obscene
photos, saying in a blog that he wants
to know why the state's top prosecu-
tor is targeting his company.
South Carolina Attorney General
Henry McMaster has threatened to
prosecute Craigslist executives for
aiding and abetting prostitution if an
ad on the Web site leads to a prostitu-
tion case in South Carolina.
In the post on his company's blog,
Buckmaster linked to a publication in
Greenville he said has a larger num-
ber of adult ads and more explicit
content than his Web site. He later up-
dated the post to point out a publica-


tion in Charleston that listed 19 adult
ads on Friday.
In contrast, Buckmaster said the
Greenville "adult services" portion of
his site has had one ad for the past
three days with a photograph of a
completely clothed person, while the
recently closed "erotic services" sec-
tion had eight ads, none of which had
obscene texts or nude pictures.
McMaster's office did not return a
phone message left Saturday.
* Buckmaster said no one would con-
sider suing or conducting a criminal
investigation into either traditional
publication.
"But if for whatever reason you were
so motivated, would you target a venue
with 9 PG-13 rated ads, or one with 250
XXX rated ones?" he asked on his blog.
Earlier this week, Craigslist pledged
to eliminate its "erotic services" cate-


forces to have a good friend-
ship with the local people,"
Afghan army Capt Mubarak
Shah said. "That's why they
started shooting, to make a
distance between the Afghan
army and the people."
Faced with the growing
insurgency, President
Barack Obama has ordered
another 21,000-troops to join
the.fight in the hope of re-
versing the militants' gains
over the past few years.
One of the first units to
deploy to southern
Afghanistan assumed con-
trol Saturday of aviation op-
erations at Kandahar
Airfield, a statement-from
the NATO-led force said.
The 82nd Combat Aviation
Brigade of the 82nd Airborne
Division was the firstto arrive
as part of the surge of troops
ordered to Afghanistan by
Obama earlier this year
The new troops will bol-
ster the record 38,000
American forces already in
the country


target us?
gory and screen all submissions to a
new "adult services" section before
being posted. New postings in the
"adult services" category will cost $10.
McMaster, a Republican who plans
to run for governor of South Carolina
in 2010, has met with Craigslist attor-
ney Bart Daniel of Charleston, who
explained the change. But the attor-
ney general said Friday his office still
planned to monitor the site closely
Craigslist came under closer
scrutiny last month after a Boston-
area man was accused of fatally
shooting a woman who placed an ad
on the site. Police believe 22-year-old
Philip Markoff may have been in-
volved in other crimes against women
who also posted ads on Craigslist.
Some reports have suggested he was
targeting victims to pay gambling
debts.


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SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 AS


-. CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICaE


AG s DAYMAY 17 2009


Jackie
Bivens, 63
OCALA
Jackie L. Bivens, 63,
passed away May 12, 2009,
in Ocala. He was born in
Madisonville, Tn., and he
resided in the Romeo area
since 1995, moving from
Singer Island, Fl.
Survivors include his lov-
ing wife Cynthia Bivens;
daughters, Jaime Sprague,
N.Y., Jacqueline Garratt,
Tampa, Christina St Pierre,
N.C.;.sons, Joseph Bivens,
Daytona, Jason Bivens,
Romeo, Jonathan Bivens,
Hobe Sound, Michael
Bivens, Jupiter; mother,
Marie Bivens; four brothers
and three sisters.
Funeral Services will be
Tuesday, 2:00 PM. in the
chapel of Roberts Funeral
Home. Burial will follow in
the Green Cemetery. The
family will receive friends
Mon. 6 to 8 PM. at the
Roberts Funeral Home,
19939 E. Pennsylvania Ave.,
Dunnellon.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.





Robert
Gaddis, 71
CRYSTAL RIVER
Robert J. Gaddis, 71, of
Crystal River, died Satur-
day, May 16, 2009, at Her-
nando-Pasco Hospice Care
Center in Inverness. He was
born December 27, 1937, in
Queens, New York, and has
been a Crystal River resi-
dent for nine years, moving
here from Spring Hill. IMr.
Gaddis was a U.S. Army vet-
eran and was a member of
the AMVETS.
He is survived by his wife
Evelyn of Crystal River,
brothers James of Hudson
and Douglas of California
and a sister, Helen Bottier of
Queens, New York
Visitation will be held at
the Strickland Funeral
Home Chapel in Crystal
River on Monday, May 18,
from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. The funeral
Mass will be celebrated on
Tuesday, May 19, at 10 a.m.
at St. Benedict's Catholic
Church in Crystal River,
with Father Michael
Suzysinski the celebrant.
Private cremation will fol-
low under the direction of
Strickland Funeral Home.,
For those who wish, a me-


morial contribution may be
made to The Shands Cancer
Center.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline. com.

Eleanore
Gayton, 76
BEVERLY HILLS
Eleanore V Gayton, age 76
of Beverly Hills, died Friday,
May 15,2009, at the Hospice
Care Center at Citrus Me-
morial Hospital. Private
cremation arrangements
are under the care of the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory, In-
verness.

Kristine 'Kris'
Passe, 46
DUNNELLON
Kristine K. "Kris" Passe,
46, of Dunnellon, formerly
of Pinellas Park, passed
away after a long brave bat-
tle with cancer, May 6, 2009,
at Shands Hospital.
She was
preceded in
death by
her father
Dave and,
mother
Sandy She
is survived
by her
brother Kristine
Steve Passe Passe
(wife Bev-
erly), sister Sharon Ginley
(husband Jim) and nephews
Kyle and Jesse Ginley.
Kris loved her Dachs-
hunds, going to her
nephews' baseball games,
was a huge fan of 'Jeff Gor-
don" and NASCAR. She
loved country music and
was Reba McEntire's
Florida Fan Club rep. for
many years. She also had
her "Rock n Roll" favorites
Pat Benatar and Rick
Springfield. Kris loved
singing karaoke, and had
the voice of ah angel. We
love you and will miss you
with all our hearts always.
Enjoy your seat next to mom
& dad at the ballgames. You
all have the best ones ever.
The family will receive
friends at the funeral home
Wednesday, May 20th, from
5-8 PM. with a Memorial
Service to be held for Kris
and her mother Sandy
Passe at 6 PM. In lieu of
flowers, the family prefers
donations to be made to the
Kristine Passe Trust Acct.
R. Lee Williams & Son,
3530-49th St. No./727-527-
1177.
Sign the guest book, at
www. hronicleonline.com.


S Deaths ELSEWHERE


Frahk Aletter
ACTOR
LOS ANGELES - Frank
Aletter,,a veteran character
actor who starred in the
1960s situation comedies
"Bringing Up Buddy" and
"It's About Time," died
Wednesday. He was 83.
Aletter died of cancer at
his home in Tarzana, his
daughter Kyle Oldham told
the Los Angeles Times.
Aletter acted in Broadway
and films, but he was best
known for his TV roles. In
1960 and '61 in "Bringing Up
Buddy," he played Buddy
Flower, an investment coun-
selor living with his spinster
aunts.
In "It's About Time,"
which aired in 1966 and '67,
he played an astronaut who
travels back in time to the
Stone Age. He also had reg-
ular roles on "The Cara Wil-
liams Show" in 1964 and '65
and "Nancy" in 1970 and '71.
Aletter also appeared as a
guest star in more than 100
series, including "Perry
Mason," "The Lucy Show,"
"MASH," "Kojak," "All in
the Family," "Fantasy Is-
land," "Murder, She Wrote"
and "Dallas."
Born in New York City in
1926, Aletter studied acting
after a stint in the Army
from 1946-48. He debuted on
Broadway in 1950 in "Mister
Roberts," His other Broad-
way credits include "Wish
You Were Here" and "Time
Limit!"


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Aletter served for many
years on the board of direc-
tors of the Screen Actors
Guild.

Monica
Bleibtreu
ACTRESS
FRANKFURT - Monica
Bleibtreu, an actress well-
known 'in the German-
speaking world for a prolific
' range of cinema, television
and theater roles, died
Thursday. She was 65.
The Players agency said
Bleibtreu died in Hamburg
after a long battle with can-
cer.
Bleibtreu was born in the
Austrian capital, Vienna, on
May 4,1944.
She made her cinema
debut in "Ludwig - Re-
quiem for a Virgin King" in
1972.
Later roles included ap-
pearances in Tom Tykwer's
'"Run Lola Run," which also
starred her son, German
actor Moritz Bleibtreu; Ger-
man TV biodrama "The
Manns - Novel of a Cen-
tury"; and in this year's
"Knef," a biography of ac-
tress and singer Hildegard
Knef.
-From wire reports


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Love leads to menagerie


HEATHER SCOFIELD
The Daytona Beach News-Journal

BUNNELL - Between growls, purrs
and hisses, a large cougar calmly
crunches through the bones of what ap-
pears to be a whole chicken, easily
swallowing chunks of meat the size of a
human foot
-'Just imagine, that could be your
arm," Lynn Fenimore says to a wary
visitor He laughs, but his eyes aren't
smiling.
Fenimore respects the potential for
fury possessed by the more than three
dozen exotic animals that prowl the
cages and pens on his 10-acre spread in
western Flagler County Although all
the creatures were born and raised in
captivity, every guttural growl through
a mouthful of dagger-sharp teeth, every
claws-extended swipe of a furry paw, is
a reminder that these cuddly looking
big cats are still, at heart, wild beasts.
It doesn't stop Fenimore from snug-
gling with a toothy cougar, though. He
gets right into the cages with it, nuzzling
its face and letting it bat at his arms. In
another cage, Fenimore allows his coa-
timundis to climb on his back to groom
his neck and hair
As he walks by, other caged animals
spot him. They whine, purr and roll on
their backs .as if begging for a quick
belly rub. Fenimore says he even trusts
a few of his critters well enough to
allow them to interact with his grand-
children, who live in the area. He says
the grandkids were the main reason he
relocated to Flagler County.
Raising cougars, tigers, bears and
other flesh-eating creatures is not the
life one might expect of a guy who
spent 23 years working in the medical
electronics industry. It certainly isn't
the future the 66-year-old Fenimore en-
visioned for himself when he was
younger.
But a short-term volunteer project in
the 1990s changed everything.
Fenimore said he was growing in-
creasingly unhappy with his medical
job. His wife, Janice, encouraged him
to "get out of the house" during the day,
he said. It wasn't a suggestion.
So Fenimore said he volunteered to
work in the "birds of prey" exhibit at
Flamingo Gardens, an Everglades na-
tive wildlife sanctuary in Davie, just
west of Fort Lauderdale. He loved it.
Owners of the attraction must've been
impressed; they offered 'him a job
creating educational programs for


ALL HIS ANIMALS
An inventory of animals under
Lynn Fenimore's care at his
10-acre property in western
Flagler County:
N 4 cougars. 0 3 parrots.
* 1 pig. 2 mallards.
* 6 dogs. 1 rooster.
* 8 cats. E 10 catfish.
* 2 servals (small African cats that
can jump as high as 12 feet;
Fenimore calls them his "spring-
loaded kitties").
* 3 coatimundis (sometimes
called South American raccoons,
they resemble a cross between a
monkey and an anteater).
* 1 red fox (he's a color-morph,
though, so he's actually white).
* Numerous guinea pigs.
* Numerous prairie dogs

the facility
"It was only about an 80 percent pay
cut," Fenimore said.
But with support from Janice, who
died four years ago just before Feni-
more moved to Flagler County, he took
the job. He said it later led to another
job at Native Village, a native wildlife
sanctuary in Hollywood, just north of
Miami.
It was there that Fenimore said he
fell in love with a cougar for the first
time.
"Animals give unconditional love,"
Fenimore said. "People often want
something in return for theirs."
In 1999, Fenimore said he opened
Talons and Tails Inc., a nonprofit ani-
mal sanctuary, at his home in Pem-
broke Pines and moved two cougar
cubs that had been rejected by their
mother into the living room.
He collected more and more crea-
tures and said he began taking some on
the road, doing as many as 200 live
shows annually with animals he'd
raised and trained. He said most came
from owners who thought they could
handle an exotic animal but learned
they couldn't
Through the years, so many animals
have called his sanctuary home that
Fenimore said it's hard to remember
them all. He said he's raised everything
from black bears, foxes, cougars and
other exotic cats, to parrots, anteaters,
coatimundis (sometimes called South


City: Bunkerlike D.C. church can be demolished


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - A his-
toric downtown Washington
church that more closely re-
sembles a concrete bunker
than a house of worship can
be demolished because the
structure's upkeep is so ex-
pensive it would eventually
bankrupt the congregation,
a city official has ruled.
Members of the Third
Church of Christ, Scientist,
located just a few blocks
from the White House, have
spent months in federal
court fighting fof a permit
to raze the boxy.modernist
church they say is unwel-
coming and impractical be-
cause of its huge concrete
faces, sharp angles and few

SO YOU KNOW
* The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy per-
mits both tree and
paid obituaries. E
mail obits@chronicle
online.com or phone
563-5660 for details
and pricing options.
* Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted
by funeral homes.
* Free obituaries can
include: Full name of
deceased; age; home-
town/state; date of
death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation
and funeral services.
* A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mil
itary. All obituaries
will be posted at www.
chronicleonline.com.


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windows. But preservation-
ists say the church, which
forsakes a traditional
steeple and nave, embodies
the 1950s and '60s architec-
tural style and should re-
main intact.
In a decision filed
Wednesday in U.S. District
Court, D.C. planning direc-
tor Harriet Tregoning said
despite the building's des-
ignatibn as a historic land-
mark, church leaders
should be allowed to re-
place it. Church members
have welcomed the ruling.
The decision has "basi-
cally freed us from the
bunker," said Eric Rass-
bach, an attorney for the
church.
The church was built in






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1971 and is based on the de-
sign of architect Araldo
Cossutta, who worked with
the firm of the famed archi-
tect I.M. Pei. Pei's Washing-
ton buildings include the
widely admired East Wing
of the National Gallery. But
the church's design was
mostly the work of Cossutta,
who also designed the
Christian Science Mother
Church building in Boston.
Tregoning, acting on be-
half of D.C. Mayor Adrian
Fenty, cited several prob-
lems with the church's con-
struction, including the use
of uninsulated concrete
and defective workman-
ship. The congregation
would need to pay for ongo-
ing repairs to keep it func-





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tional, she said.
The situation could drain
the church's funds and lead
to its demise within eight
years, Tregoning wrote.
The complicated design
also makes it difficult to
convert the church to be
used for something like a
museum.
There's one caveat to the
city's ruling: The church
must first obtain a building
permit for its new structure
at the same site before it re-
ceives the demolition per-
mit.




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Obituaries


A% UNDY MAYI


i


American raccoons that resemble a
cross between a monkey and an
anteater) and numerous species pf
wildlife native to Florida. .
"It's been an interesting 15 years,"
Fenimore said.
Some of his animals have even
helped earn their keep by starring in
feature films, like 'Jackass: The
Movie," appearing in magazines, like
Vogue, and showing up in TV shows,
like National Geographic's '"Animal
Planet"
Fenimore said he misses the days
when it was possible for him to attend
schools and birthday parties where
-dozens of kids could get close enough
to touch his beloved critters. But now
legal restrictions and the skyrocketing
cost of liability insurance "took all of
the fun out of it for me and the kids
both," he said.
It's also making it impossible for Fen-
imore to generate enough money to
cover the cost of caring for the animals
he raises. Depending on how many of
the cages on his property are filled,
Fenimore said it costs between $25,000
and $70,000 annually to care for them.
"I would spend my last dime to take
care of these creatures - and I have,"
Fenimore said.
Fenimore said he gets by with the
help of a trust fund left by his late wife.
More help comes as chicken and veg-
etable scraps and leftovers donated by
one of his neighbors, Linda Ferguson,
who runs a restaurant at Flagler
County's Bull Creek Park and Camp-
ground.
Ferguson said she's not scared or
bothered by Fenimore's wild bunch
and points out he has all the proper
permits to keep them. Carl Laundrie,
county spokesman, said Flagler offi-
cials have never received any com-
plaints of any kind about Fenimore and
he knows of no complaints against him
or his animals.
Fenimore said he feeds his animals
twice each day-two periods of peace
in his world. With birds providing an
early morning soundtrack, it's just Fen-
imore and his animals greeting the day.
At night, two of his six dogs make the
rounds with him. And as he returns to .
the comfort of his country home for the',
evening, each animal seems to give him
a vocal salute as he passes.
"Even after all these years, I still
thank the good Lord that I was given
the privilege of working with these an-
imals," Fenimore said.







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SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 A7


OCTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


I









Aqv7NAUNDAYWO CITARU C N/,H


High court wraps up


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Justice
David Souter's final few
weeks of work will be busy
ones for the Supreme Court,
which has yet to resolve dis-
putes over a major part of
the Voting Rights Act, fed-
eral campaign finance law
and job discrimination
claims by white firefighters.
Before they begin their
lengthy summer break, the
justices also must decide
cases concerning judicial
ethics, the rights of convicts
to test genetic evidence, and
a strip search of a student
who was thought to be hid-
ing the equivalent of pre-
scription-strength Advil.
The court's work will be
done against the backdrop
of Souter's looming retire-
ment, announced May 1,
and President Barack
Obama's nomination of a
successor. Obama has said
he wants the new justice in
place by the time the court's
next term begins on Oct 5.
Souter's final words as a
justice could be in dissents
if, as seems likely, a conser-
vative court majority hands
the Obama administration
defeats in the voting rights
and campaign finance
cases. Broad rulings could
upset decades of settled
practice in both areas.
The voting rights dispute
is a challenge to Congress'
renewal of a provision that
requires all or parts of 16
states, mainly in the South
and with a history of dis-
crimination, to get voting
changes approved in ad-
vance by the Justice Depart-.
ment. The provision has
been the primary means of
preventing discriminatory
state and local election laws
since the Voting Rights Act
was enacted in 1965.
The local Texas governing
authority that is challenging
Section 5 of the voting rights
law says much has changed
in the past 44 years, making
the advance approval re-
quirement unnecessary.
The court's conservative
justices appeared sympa-
thetic to that view when
they heard the case in late.
April and could be willing to
siri k-down the measure in"
Sits entirety.
The campaign finance
case involves a scathing 90-
minute documentary about
Secretary of State Hillary
Clinton that was made by a
conservative group when
she was running for the
Democratic presidential
nomination. The issue is
whether the film can be reg-
ulated as a campaign ad.
Citizens United, the con-


Associated Press
New Haven firefighter Gary Tinney strands April 10 in front
of the firehouse where he works in New Haven, Conn. Inside
a burning building, fire doesn't discriminate between Tinney
and Matthew Marcarelli. However, skin color has put them
on opposite sides of a lawsuit that could transform hiring
procedures nationwide; the U.S. Supreme Court will consider
the reverse discrimination claim of Marcarelli and a group
of white firefighters'.


ON THE NET
a Supreme Court: www.
supremecourtus.gov

servative not-for-profit
group that made the movie,
wanted to air television ads
in important Democratic
primary states and also
make the movie available to
cable subscribers on de-
mand, without complying
with federal campaign fi-
nance law.
n When the court heard ar-
guments in March, it ap-
peared possible the justices
could overrule a long-stand-
ing ban on the use 6f gen-
eral corporate and union
money in federal, election
campaigns.
Souter, 69, has shown a
special interest in both
areas, said Richard Hasen,
an election law expert at
Loyola Law School in Los
Angeles. "I'm sure there'd
be a taste of bitterness in his
mouth if the end of the term
saw the demise of limits on
corporate spending in elec-
tions and Section 5 of the
Voting Rights Act," Hasen
said.
While Souter's imminent
departure will draw much
attention between now and
late June, all eyes will be on
Justice Anthony Kennedy,
.the ..conservative-leaning
justice whose vote ends up
deciding cases on which the
court is ideologically di-
vided.
Kennedy probably will
determine how far the court
goes in the voting rights
case, one of several open
cases that have'civil rights
issues at their core.
The 72-year-old Californ-
ian also probably will play a
crucial role in the challenge
mounted by white firefight-


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I 352-795-3367
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tenor with the Dixie Echoes and The James
Blackwood Quartet.


ers in New Haven, Conn., to
the city's decision to scrap a
promotion exam for cap-
tains and lieutenants after
too few minorities scored
high enough to be pro-
moted.
The question in that case
is whether New Haven, in
trying to avoid discriminat-
ing against the minority fire-
fighters in violation of the
1964 Civil Rights Act, vio-
lated the civil rights of the
white firefighters under the
same law.
A teenage student's rights
are at issue in the court's
consideration of a school
administrator's decision to
order a strip search in his
hunt for prescription-
strength ibuprofen.
The federal appeals court
in San Francisco ruled that
the search of 13-year-old Sa-
vana Redding of Safford,
Ariz., violated her constitu-
tional rights. The search
turned up nothing.
But the justices - with
the exception of the only
woman on the high court,
Ruth Bader Ginsburg - ap-
peared more concerned
with allowing school admin-
istrators the freedom to
search for potentially dan-
gerous objects on school
grounds than they did with
the trauma to an adolescent
who was asked to strip to
her underwear and then'
shake out her bra and
panties.


BlackBerry Pearl"
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*after $100 mail-In
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Commuter crash raises pay,


work conditions issues


Associated Press


WASHINGTON - The investigation into
the commuter plane crash in upstate New
York that killed 50 people in February has
exposed the long hours and low pay of some
regional airline pilots. Lawmakers now are
wondering if such working conditions are
more widespread and pose safety risks.
Members of Congress said they were
stunned by the salaries of the pilots of Con-
tinental Connection Flight 3407, employees
of the smaller commuter airline Colgan Air
Inc. The pilots may, have tried to snatch
sleep in an airport crew lounge, which is
against company policy The first officer
lived with her parents near Seattle and
commuting cross country to work in New
Jersey.
Aviation industry experts said the condi-
tions reflect the broad restructuring of the
industry after Sept 11, 2001, when air travel
dropped sharply and major airlines began
pairing with regional ones. It took the in-
dustry years to recover and led to major air-
line bankruptcies, mergers and
management demands for dramatic wage
and benefit concessions.
The role of regional airlines has grown.
Once considered industry runts, they are
now joined at the hip with the big airlines.


People who buy a ticket on a major airline
often find themselves on a regional carried
for some part of a domestic trip. Passengers
often don't even realize they're traveling on
two airlines.
Regional airlines account for half of all
domestic departures and about one-quar-
ter of the passengers. They are the onl:'
scheduled service to about 440 communi
ties.
Witnesses at National Transportationi
Safety Board hearings this past week said
it's possible that many passengers on Flight
3407 the night of Feb. 12 didn't know the
plane and its flight crew belonged nri 1..
Continental, but Colgan Air of Manassa6,
Va. i
The twin-engine turboprop experienced
an aerodynamic stall as it neared Buffalo
Niagara International Airport before
plunging into a house. All 49 people aboard
and a man in the house were killed. Testi-
mony and documents indicate the captain,
Marvin Renslow, and co-pilot Rebecci
Shaw made a series of critical errors.
NTSB investigators calculated Shaw was
paid just over $16,000. Colgan officials tes,
tified that captains such as Renslow eana
about $55,000 a year. The company late
said Shaw's salary was $23,900 and that
captains earn about $67,000.


World BRIEFS


Sri Lanka declares
victory in civil war
COLOMBO, Sri Lanka -
Sri Lanka's president declared
victory Saturday in his nation's
quarter-century civil war with
the Tamil Tigers rebels. But the
group's top leaders remained
at large as troops and the cor-
nered insurgents fought fierce
battles across the war zone.
A triumph on the battlefield
appeared inevitable after gov-
ernment forces captured the
last bit of coastline under rebel
control early Saturday, sur-
rounding the remaining fight-
ers in a 1.2-square mile patch
of land.
Thousands of civilians who
had been trapped by the fight-
ing poured across the front
lines, the military said.
Egypt: American
couples on trial
CAIRO - An American
woman who is being tried with
her husband on charges of for-
gery and child trafficking after
they adopted twin orphans
said Saturday the trial was part
of Egypt's "persecution"


against Christians.
Iris Botros, a dual Egyptian
citizen, spoke from behind the
bars of a metal cage in a Cairo
courtroom that also held her
American husband, Louis An-
dros, and another couple that
is being tried for adopting a
newborn in Egypt.
The trial is the first of its kind
in the Muslim country, where
religious tradition and murky
laws make adoption nearly im-
possible.
In the tangle of the country's
regulations and customs, even
lawyers are unsure whether
adoption is allowed. What is
known is that Islamic law for-
bids adoption, and that is the
law applied to Muslims in
Egypt. The religion empha-
sizes maintaining clear blood-
lines to ensure lines of
patrimony and inheritance.
The law is far less clear con-
ceming Egypt's Christian mi-
nority to which both couples
belong. Adoptions within the
Christian community - includ-
ing by Egyptian Christians liv- .
ing abroad - do take place,
usually involving a donation to
a Christian orphanage; Propo-


nents say this type of adoption
is not explicitly banned, but still
faces monumental barriers. m
Gang frees inmates
in Mexican prison,
MEXICO CITY - Local
media report that an armed
gang has raided a prison in
central Mexico and freed more
than 50 inmates.
El Sol de Zacatecas news-
paper says gunmen wearing
federal police uniforms arrived
in several vehicles at the
Cieneguillas prison, then sub-
dued guards and freed 54 pris-
oners early Saturday.
Government news agency,
Notimex says soldiers are
searching for the fugitives.
A woman who answered the
phone at the state prosecutors
office said nobody was avail-
able to comment.
Phones rang unanswered at
the prison and state police
headquarters.
The federal Attorney Gen-
eral's Office declined to com-r
ment because there was.eno.
public confirmation from state
authorities.
-From wire report


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NATION/WORLD


A8 s DYMAY 172009


i








ul 1 K C urrsvvIY ) (?fmv-wAMY 7 09A


The Dunnellon Lady
Tigers celebrate
their 3-1 win over
the Lake Wales
Highlanders on Sat-
urday after the
Class 4A Softball
Championship. The
Tigers surrendered
only one run during
the entirety of the
tournament.
JOHN COSCIA/Chronicle


TIGERS
Continued from Page Al

Wf young ladies back in 2004
when they won the Little
League state championship
'in the 11-12-year-old Majors
division.
The talk then was, "Wait
until this group of kids gets
to high school."
, Well, last year, that group
was part of the nucleus that
made up the Lady Tigers
varsity team.
"We really should have
been here or at least deeper
inthe state playoffs lastyear,"
.explained head coach Kevin
-Fagan at Plant City Park on
Saturday "But we stubbed
our toes and went out early."
This year, however, there
would be no speed bumps to
slow down the D-Train. In-
s-tead, like a speeding locomo-
tive, the Lady Tigers barreled
down the tracks full speed
,ahead with one goal in mind:
Win a state championship.
Winning is something that
Coach Fagan is more than fa-
miliar with. In his seven


years as a member of the San
Francisco 49ers NFL football
team, Fagan was the starting
defensive end for two Joe
Montana-led' Super Bowl
championships. He was also
a member of the University of
Miami Hurricanes national
championship team when
they beat the Nebraska Corn-
huskers for the title in 1984.
So how does Saturday's
victory compare to winning
two championships at the
highest level of his respec-,
tive sport?
"It's not even close. I told
the girls after we won the
Little League championship
that this was the greatest
feeling ever. So you can
imagine, this even tops that,"
Fagan admitted. "I have a
lump in my throat right now,
but don't tell anybody I try
not to go there. That needs to
be our secret. The girls still
think I'm this tough guy."
Fagan, however, isn't fool-
ing anyone. After all, how
tough can you be when
you've just coached a state
championship team that in-
cludes three of your own
daughters as an integral part


of the winning formula?
"That definitely makes it
that much more special. To
be able to share it with three
of my girls," Fagan continued.
"Truth is, all 15 of these girls
are like my daughters. We've
been together since Little
League. I've watched them
grow up. I honestly can't put
into words how proud I am of
what they accomplished."
. On Friday morning, Dun-
nellon principal Michelle
Lewis arranged for a
makeshift parade as the
Lady Tigers' team bus trav-
eled through downtown.
Now that they've returned as
hometown heroes and state
champions, Dunnellon activ-
ities director Frank Beasley
has already made a promise.
"We're going to do some-
thing special to recognize
these girls. They deserve it.
They are a shining example
of what it means to be a real
team," Beasley guaranteed.
"They are role models for
all girls in the area to work
toward. It's great for female
athletics in the area. We are
definitely going to honor
them in some way."


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responding to the advertisement for the
discounted service. Excludes PI, WC,
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SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 A9


LOCAL


RriC us CouNTY (FL s









Page A10- SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009



ACTION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Celebration






Associated Press
The Rev. Jay Bohn, left,
and his wife Mary Bohn of
Halifax, Pa., take shelter
from sprinkles Saturday
under their red, white and
blue umbrellas during the
2009 Armed Forces Day
celebration on City Island
in Harrisburg, Pa.


Bristol Palin
graduates school
WASILLA, Alaska - Gov.
Sarah Palin's oldest daughter
is now a
high school
graduate.
Palin
family
spokes-
woman
Meghan
Stapleton Bristol
says 18- Bristol
year-old hig ool
Bristol Palin high school
Bristol Palin graduate.
received graduate.
her Wasilla
High School diploma Thurs-
day night at a ceremony with
her fellow classmates at the
Wasilla Sports Complex.
The teenager gave birth in
December to son Tripp but
has since separated from
Levi Johnston, the boy's fa-
ther.
She is now a Teen Ambas-
sador for The Candie's Foun-
dation, an organization
devoted to educating
teenagers about the conse-
quences of teen pregnancy.

World BRIEFS

Launched


Associated Press
A Proton-M rocket carrying
the ProtoStar-2 communi-
cation satellite blasts off
Saturday from the
Balkonur cosmodrome In
Kazakhstan. The ProtoStar-
2 satellite will maintain live
television broadcasts and
provide other communica-
tion services, Including
wideband Internet, in the
territories of Indonesia,
India, the Philippines and
Taiwan.


Netanyahu may
back Palestinians
JERUSALEM - On the
eve of Prime Minister Ben-
jamin Netanyahu's crucial
visit to Washington, his de-
fense minister suggested
Saturday the Israeli leader
might endorse a Palestinian
state when he meets with
President Barack Obama.
That would be a significant
shift for Netanyahu, who has
made clear in the past that
he does not think the Pales-
tinians are ready to rule
themselves. But that position
has put him at odds with
long-standing U.S. policy that
supports Palestinian state-
hood as the cornerstone of
Mideast peace efforts.
-From wire reports


India's ruling party wi


Associated Press
NEW DELHI - The ruling Con-
gress party swept to a resounding
victory Saturday in India's mam-
moth national elections, defying ex-
pectations as it brushed aside the
Hindu nationalist opposition and a
legion of ambitious smaller parties.
The strong showing by the party,
which is dominated by the powerful
Nehru-Gandhi political dynasty, laid
to rest fears of an unstable, shaky
coalition heading the South Asian
giant at a, time when many of it
neighbors are plagued by instability,


civil war and rising extremism.
Prime Minister Manmohan Singh
declared victory, telling reporters
that voters had given the Congress
party-led coalition a "massive man-
date."
The left-of-center Congress, which
has long tried to balance free market
reforms with a vow to protect the
downtrodden in this country of 1.2
billion people, wants a "stable,
strong government which is commit-
ted to secular values," he said.
The results left the JHindu nation-
alist Bharatiya Janata Party, the
country's other main party, vowing


Asocia3te P,'e+
Congress party President Sonia Gandhi, left, and indian Prime Minister Maio
mohan Singh, right, interact with the media after election results. 5
a period of introspection after they With most votes counted, t
failed to capitalize on the economic Election Commission said the Con,.
uncertainty and increased turmoil gress-led alliance had won races fbt
in Pakistan, India's longtime rival. 254 seats in the 543-seat Parliame
' S


Chocolate, shoes, Spam


Some products

proving hot sellers,

even in recession
Associated Press


WASHINGTON - It's not all
doom and gloom in the U.S. econ-
omy. Some products are bucking
the recession and flying off store
shelves.
Sales of chocolate and running
shoes are up. Wine drinkers haven't
stopped sipping; they just seem to
be choosing cheaper vintages.
Gold coins are selling like hot
cakes. So are gardening seeds. Tan-
ning products are piling up in shop-
ping carts; maybe more people are
finding color in a bottle than from
sun-worshipping on a faraway
beach.
Strong sales of Spam, Dinty
Moore stew and chili helped
Hormel Foods Corp. post a 6 per-
cent increase in first quarter sales
in its grocery products unit
Consumers have trimmed house-
hold budgets and postponed cars,
major appliances and other big-
ticket items. Yet they still are will-
ing to shell out for small
indulgences and goods that make
life more comfortable at home,
where they are spending more
time.
Recession shoppers also are
drawn to items that make them feel
safe, both personally and finan-
cially ,
"The focus on the family hearth
is something that has happened in The Gloria Ferrer winery Is shown Mo
nearly every recession. It's, 'How in Sonoma, Calif. The Wine Institute
can I hav more fun at home?"' said sales of California wines totaled aboi
Paco Unuerhill, whose company, cent more than the year before. Bu
Envirosp~l, monitors the behavior less expensive selections. The over
of shoppers and sellers across the fell slightly from 2007, the Institute
U.S. and in other countries. omic slump, recession shoppers.
"People are much more focused looking for deals have boosted sales
on their homes and their immedi- at discount chains such as Walmart
ate happiness and they're buying Stores Inc. Dollar Tree Inc.
things that they can use themselves sneaked into this year's Fortune
- seeds, fishing equipment. Lip- 500 for the first time, at No. 499.
stick and chocolate are small re- People are not drinking as much
wards that make you feel better." beer or wine at bars and restau-
Profits in the first three months rants, but they haven't stopped
of 2009 at Hershey Co., the nation's drinking. The Wine Institute says
second-largest candy maker, surged that despite the recession, U.S.
20 percent and beat Wall Street's sales of California wines totaled
expectations. Kraft Foods Inc. re- about 467 million gallons last year
ported double-digit growth in mac- -_ 2 percent more than the year be-
aroni and cheese dinners - the fore. But people are looking more
consummate comfort food. closely at cheaper selections: The
Recessions, it seems, are good for overall retail value of California
love, too. During the final three wine sales fell slightly from 2007,
months of 2008, condom sales rose 5 the institute said.
percent and Match.com reported Those on the go are not shying
its strongest performance in seven away from footing the bill for sturdy
years. running shoes. Sales increased 2
But economic woes are as rough percent in 2008, said Tom Doyle at
on the tummy as they are on the the National Sporting' Goods Asso-
wallet. Chicago-based market re- !ciation in Mount Prospect, Ill.
searcher InformatiOn Resources/ "Runners aren't going to hurt
Inc. reports that sales of laxative themselves to save a few bucks," he
liquids and powders rose 11.5 per-/ said. Likewise, sales of bicycle hel-
cent for the 52 weeks ending April mets are up as parents continue to
19. Sales of stomach remedy spend money to protect youngsters,
tablets, including Pepto-Bismol he said.
and Phillips brands, climbed 8 per- Guns are selling well, too. Total
cent. firearms sales rose 27.5 percent at
As expected during any eco- Smith & Wesson for the three


Associated rress
*nday with vineyards In the foreground
says that despite the recession, U.S.
ut 467 million gallons last year, 2 per-
t people are looking more closely at
ill retail value of California wine sales
said.


Photo courtesy of Hormel Foods Corp.
Canned ham, long associated with
unsolicited commercial e-mail
through the use of the brand name
Spam, helped Hormel Foods Corp.
post a 6 percent increase in first
quarter sales in its grocery products
unit.
months ending Jan. 31. It's not a
sudden interest in hunting behind
the increase; hunting firearm sales
at the company declined during the
quarter by 46 percent
Gun sales are being driven by
concern that the Obama adminis-
tration will tighten gun laws. But
people also are feeling a level of
fear and heightened interest in self-
reliance as they weather the reces-
sion.


Obama


appoint


envoy


to China

Associated Press
WASHINGTON - With y
reach across the pol itical d;'
vide for Utah Gov Jon Hunt^,
man as ambassador to Chin,
President Barack Obamt
may have sidelined for nowB
potential ly
formidable
Republican
moderate
and possible


2012.
Yet Hunts- John
man, who Huntsmarrn
has upset governor of '
the GOP's Utah to .,
conserva- become
conserva- ambassador,
tive baseby to China. ,
supporting
gay civil unions, may gaii.
too. The appointment, whict
requires Senate approval
gives him a chance to bu
nish his credentials and po,
sition himself as a viable
presidential contender iW
2016, if Obama appears to b
a strong candidate for a see,
ond term in 2012. ,*
John Weaver, a one-tim<
senior strategist for John Md:
Cain's presidential cam paigp.
who now advises Huntsman'.
said the governor put courts
try ahead of personal parti*'
san interest Huntsman wa..
national co-chairman of MN<-'
Cain's failed bid against
Obama. *
"It's no more complicated
than that, though it is so ur|'
usual in Washington ever
one has to take a magnifyir?-
glass to it," Weaver said aft l
Obama introduced Hunts
man in the White Hous
Diplomatic Reception Roori
"He was asked by the press
ident to serve in a major
diplomatic post, in a mission
with a country most impose.
tant to our economy, in dealt-
ing with Iran, Pakistan an4"
North Korea. Jon is uniquely.
qualified and thus you dorl.
turn your nation down,
Weaver said.
Obama said he knew
Huntsman's nominatiotN
"wouldn't be the easiest d4-
cision to explain to sonic
members of his party." B$.
Obama said Huntsman wazM
"the kind of leader who
ways puts country ahead l
party and is always willing Wt
sacrifice on behalf of our ni*
tion."
Utah Lt Gov Gary Herbert,-
also a Republican, would beL
come governor until a specie.
election in 2010. *'


Obama, the soccer dad

Associated Press two Chicago friends.
At one point, after Sasha's team scored,
WASHINGTON- It's a busy Saturday for the president excitedly shouted "go ... go ...
Barack Obama. First he named a new am- ' go... goal."
bassador to China and then he switched Obama then moved on to 10-year-old
from being president to being a soccer dad. daughter Malia's soccer match. After soc-
Obama traded a business suit for jeans cer, Obama went golfing.
and a Chicago White Sox jacket before
shuttling around Washington to see daugh- President Barack Obama cheers for his
ters Malia and Sasha play in separate soc- daughter Sasha's soccer team Saturday at
cer games. a park in the Georgetown area of Washing-
Obama cheered and clapped along the ton, D.C.
sidelines at 7-year-old Sasha's game with Associated Press









Page All - SUNDAY, MAY 17,2009
XCURSIONS


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Movie promotes museum fun


Smithsonian

to give

s epovers

a chance

BRETT ZONGKER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON - What hap-
pens after dark in the halls of a
museum? A few lucky kids willget
to find out in the months ahead,
thanks to some big promotions
and travel deals drawing on the
buzz of Hollywood's new museum
flick, "Night at the Museum: Bat-
tle of the Smithsonian."
The world's largest museum
complex, the Smithsonian Institu-
tion, is in the spotlight and hoping
the movie - starring Ben Stiller,
Robin Williams and Amy Adams
-will draw millions of young new
visitors to see the real airplanes
and artifacts housed in Washing-
ton that are featured in the movie.
Kid-friendly product promotions
already are offering chances to
win free trips for a sleepover at
the real Smithsonian.
Much of the movie is set at the
National Air and Space Museum,
though it also features artworks
-and treasures from other sites on
the National Mall. It's set for re-
lease in theaters Friday.
"Hopefully, they canmake history
come to life," said aeronautics cura-
tor Robert van der, Linden, who re-
viewed the script and made sure film
crews didn't break anything while
they shot scenes at the museum last
year
The show is "a complete fan-
tasy," he said, noting the Wright
brothers come alive with their fa-
mous flyer zooming out of the mu-
seum (the real plane barely got off
the ground). Adams portrays the
famed pilot Amelia Earhart with
her bright red Lockheed Vega air-


Associated Press
Seth Walt, with the Smithsonian Institution, checks that a replica of Fonzie's jacket is securely affixed to
a display of "The Pile of Loot," a prop which was used in the movie "Night At The Museum: Battle of The
Smithsonian," that depicts many of the most popular items in the Smithsonian's collections, in Washing-
ton, D.C. It will be on view until Sept. 30.


plane. "It reminds peo-
ple of what's here," the
curator said.
In the sequel to the
2006 film "Night at the
Museum," which was
set at New York's Amer-
ican Museum of Natu-
ral History, Stiller's
character, security
guard Larry Daley, comes
ington to find his museum
who are stone-cold exhib
but spring to life when


We want kids to know


they


can have fun in museums.
Claire Brown
a spokeswoman for the Air and Space museum, about the desire to
promote a.future generation of museum-goers.

goes down. They had been
s to Wash- shipped from New York to a myth- spokeswo
n friends, ical vault under the National Mall.- Space mi
its by day The film trailer gives a few new film.
the sun more hints about the characters "Painti


he'll encounter in D.C.
There are roles for
Dalrth Vader , Oscar the
Grouch and even Abra-
ham Lincoln, who rises
from. his seat at the Lin-
coln Memorial.
It's even more magi-
cal than the first movie,
said Claire Brown, a
oman for the Air and
museum, who has seen the
.ngs come to life. Photo-


graphs come to life. Statues come
to life," she said. "Nothing's off
limits."
The Smithsonian is capitalizing
on this moment - its first time to
be so prominently featured in the-
aters across the country.
Beyond an agreement with 20th
Century Fox for the movie's cre-
ation, officials from the museum
and, the city's tourism bureau
teamed up with the movie studio
to strike deals with McDonald's,
Kraft, Hershey's and Post cereals.
They want to make it hard for any-
one to miss this movie and offer
the chance to visit the real muse-
ums. Sweepstakes offers on mil-
lions of boxes of macaroni and
cheese, candies and cereals will
give away free trips for kids to
have a sleepover with their fami-
lies at the real Smithsonian. An-
other publicity campaign will help
visitors find the real artifacts that
they see in the movie.
The strategy is driven, in part,
by the last "Museum" movie. It
brought in more than $250 million
at the U.S. box office and helped
drive a 20 percent increase in at-
tendance at the New York mu-
seum. And the last big movie that
focused on Washington's cultural
scene, "National Treasure,"
helped drive up attendance at the
National Archives by 200,000 visi-
tors in 2004 - drawing special in-
terest among boys.
The Smithsonian already draws
10 million visitors over the sum-
mer months but would like to see
even more.
"It's reaching a demographic
that is so important to our future,"
Brown said. "We want kids to
know they can have fun in muse-
ums."
The Smithsonian also stands to
gain more than $1 million if the
film does well and tens of thou-
sands of dollars in additional rev-
enue from special events.
Spokeswoman Linda St. Thomas
said they could not reveal specific
See MOVIE/Page A14


Indianapolis revs up for racing, Tut exhibit


CARLY EVERSON
Associated Press
* INDIANAPOLIS - Indy
500 drivers go through up to
five 22-gallon tanks of fuel
. as they roar around the In-
dianapolis Motor Speedway
- on race day each May
Indianapolis tourism offi-
cials hope budget-conscious
travelers will use just one to
* visit the city this year.
"It's a great one-tank trip
for so many people through-
out the Midwest because
We're so centrally located,"
said Kimberly Harms,
spokeswoman for the Indi-
anapolis Convention and


Visitors Association. "More
than half the nation's popu-
lation lives within a day's
drive of Indianapolis.".
The deepening recession
could prove a boon for the
city nicknamed the. Cross-,
roads of America for its ac-
cessibility. The city of
785,000 draws hundreds of
thousands of visitors each
May for the Indianapolis
S500, but tourism leaders
hope they'll come for a taste
of Egypt and Asia as well
this year.
The centerpiece of the
city's attractions is the Indi-
anapolis Motor Speedway,
which is kicking off a three-,


year celebration marking
the 100th anniversary of the
track and the race.
The speedway was built


in 1909 by four Indiana busi-
nessmen as an automobile
testing ground. Its focus
soon turned to racing, with


In this photo provided by
the Indianapolis Conven-
tion and Visitors Associa-
tion, visitors tour the
Indianapolis Children's Mu-
seum's Dinosphere.
Asso a l.;ed Press
Ray Harroun winning the
inaugural Indianapolis 500
on May 30,1911.
Since then, Indianapolis
has become known as the
Racing Capital of the World,
and the speedway remains
the world's largest specta-
tor-sporting facility.
"I don't think there's any
question that the Indi-
anapolis 500 is the best-
known race in the world,"


said Indianapolis Motor
Speedway historian Donald
Davidson. "You can go any-
where and even if they don't
speak English, they know
what it is."
The centennial celebra-
tion got under way May 1
with a balloon festival fea-
turing two races, a tribute to
the first competitive event
held at the speedway: a
June 5,1909, gas-filled bal-
loon race. The 2009 IPL 500
Festival Parade will be held
in downtown Indianapolis
on May 23, featuring race
drivers, national celebrities
and marching bands. Bas-
See SPEED/Page A14


Lots of hot air


Archaeologists celebrate


organization longevity


Special Ot me Chronicle
Sharon Gunn's, Floral City, granddaughter Easha Gray and her boyfriend,, Louis
Chabal, who resides in Albuquerque, N.M., took Gunn's daughter, Renee Gray,
and her great-grandson, Jackson Baker, to the event on the launch field, where
they fill the balloons for takeoff.


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


* Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year,- a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Special to the Chronicle
NEW YORK- Bone dig-
gers, explorers and sur-
vival experts gathered at
the Archaeological Insti-
tute of America (AIA) 130th
Anniversary Gala at Capi-
tale, honoring Harrison
Ford for his portrayal of In-
diana Jones. While the
blockbuster archeologist
wasn't there to accept his
award in person, Ford
beamed in his acceptance
speech by video declaring
his passion for the study of
ancient civilizations. The
event also celebrated the
60th anniversary of Ar-
chaeology Magazine.
Citra residents, Dr.
Michele White and Dr. Ash-
ley White, with their son,
Ethan, went to celebrate
with the AIA. '
Michele is a prominent
physical anthropologist and
published author. Her hus-
band, Ashley, has been re-
searching ancient diseases
and their initial presenta-
tions for prevention of fu-
ture pandemic plagues. This
evidence-based pale-
opathology research has
granted Ashley, access to
some of the world's most
sensitive archaeological


Special to the Chronicle
Drs. Michelle and Ashley White and their son Ethan at-
tended the 130th Anniversary Gala at the Archaeological
Institute of America.


sites in England, Scotland
and North and Central
America and nine additional
countries in Europe and


Asia, including Russia and
China, the Middle East,
See BONE/Page A14








UNDAY, A ,


Ai2 s MY 172009


* The Veterans Apprecia-
tion Week Ad Hoc Coordinat-
ing Committee will conduct its
monthly coordination meeting
for Citrus County's 17th Annual
Veterans Appreciation Week at
1:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 20,
in the Conference Room of the
Citrus County Chronicle Build-
ing, 1624 North Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River.
All veteran service organiza-
tions and individual veterans
are welcome and encouraged
to send representatives to par-
ticipate in the planning process.
Any organization or person de-
siring additional information
should contact Chairman Fred
Daniels by e-mail at fredinfloral-
city@wildblue.net or by phone
at 422-2449.
* Hunger and Homeless
Coalition - Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call John Young at the
Hunger and Homeless Coalition
at 628-4357, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
* Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864 Citrus Springs
schedule of events for the
'weeks of May 17 through 23:
Monday: Men's Auxiliary
meeting 7 p.m.
Wednesday: Shuffleboard
Tournament 7 p.m.
Friday: Poppy Drive all day
collecting at intersections in
N.E. Citrus County. Friday night
dinner 5 to 6:30 p.m., $8.
, Saturday: Free shuffleboard
all day.
Monday, May 25: Memorial
Day Ceremony and picnic. Cer-
emony starts at 11:30 a.m. with
picnic to follow. The public and
especially veterans encouraged
to attend.
Wednesday, May 27: Shuffle-
board Tournament 7 p.m.
Friday, May 29: Friday night
dinner 5 to 6:30 p.m., $8.
Saturday, May 30: Free shuf-
fleboard all day.
t Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) will con-
duct its bimonthly meeting at
1:15 p.m. Tuesday, May 19, at
the Cafe of the Citrus County
Resource CenterNA Clinic,
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto (west side of County
Road 491 approximately 1 mile
north of C.R. 486).
All combat wounded veter-
ans and parents, spouses, sib-
lings and lineal descendants of
living or deceased Purple Heart
recipients are cordially invited
to attend the meeting and to
become a Chapter 776 mem-
ber. Military Order of the Purple
Heart life membership is $50.
There are no chapter dues. To
learn more about Aaron A.\
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit the Chapter 776 Web site
at www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 382-3847.
* Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 11:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Crystal Paradise
Restaurant in Crystal River.
* The Dan Campbell Air-
borne Association meets at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 Gulf-to-Lake
Highway (State Road 44), Crys-
tal River. All current and previ-
ous Airborne members and their
wives are welcome to join us.
Call Steve Leonard at 726-3693.
* The Marine Corps
League, Samuel R. Wall De-
tachment 1139 will conduct its
regular meeting at 7 p.m. the
third Wednesday monthly at
DAV Post 70 in Inverness at the
intersection of Independence
Avenue and U.S. 41 North. All
former Marines are welcome.
Call Tom Heron at 637-2724 or
Joe Spoto at 746-3315.
* Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40


Special to the Chronicle
From left, Commander Jim Woodman presents the American Legion Post '155 2009 Legionnaire of the Year
Award to Larry White with the help of Department of Florida Vice Commander Phil Hearlson.


Post 155 selects Legionnaire of the Year


Special to the Chronicle


On April 26, a special Awards din-
ner banquet took place at American
Legion Post 155 for the purpose of
presenting the post's Legionnaire of
the Year Award to Legionnaire
Larry White.
Escorted into the banquet room by
Honor Guard Capt. Joe Barry, White
was honored by the honor guard
presenting arms and a standing ova-


East, Inglis (352) 447-3495.
Men's meeting is at 7:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly.
Ladies Auxiliary meets at 5
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday
monthly.
House Committee meets at 6
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
* Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 344-0727.
* Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets the
third Thursday monthlyl 1atth&"
Floral City VFW Post 7122, call
to order 7:30 p.m. The mem-,
bership invites all eligible vpter-
ans to come and join us as we
plan for the future of our Post.
* The Herbert Surber
.American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 225 meets at 7:30 p.m. the
third Thursday monthly at the
Floral City VFW Post 7122 on
U.S. 41, Floral City. Contact
Marcia Gallagher, membership
chairwoman, at 860-1629. ,
Come and join this newly re-
chartered unit and be a partdof
the great accomplishments and
projects in the American Legion
Auxiliary.
* Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337, 906 State Road 44 E., In-
verness, phone 344-3495.
Karaoke is presented each..
Sunday, Tuesday and Friday
evenings.
Bar Bingo is played Monday
and Thursday afternoons and
Wednesday evening.
Wings are served each Tues-
day evening and fish or chicken
on Friday evenings.
"Show Me The Money" is
played each Saturday from 1 to-
3 p.m.
* American Legion' Post
155 events for the week of May
17 to 23:
Today: Breakfast 8:30 to 11
a.m., $5. Birthday/Anniversary
Bash potluck dinner 3 to 6 p.m.
Live music. Dart tournament
6 p.m.


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tion from the post's members.
White's was selected because as
an executive committee member he
made the tough choices of running
the everyday business of the post.
He volunteered to cook lunches and
dinners at the post at a minimum of
six times a week and is the sole cook
for the post's Italian night dinners
on Wednesday. He assists with
bingo Tuesdays and Thursdays.
White also at the American Legion


Tuesday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Bingo 1 to 4 p.m.
Wednesday: Chicken "hot'
wings" noon to 3 p.m. Italian
Night:.Stuffed shells dinner 5 to
7 p.n., $5. Live music 6 to 10
p.m.
Thursday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Bingo 1 to 4 p.m. Show
Me the Money 5 p.m.Friday:
Poppy Distribution. Special din-
ner night 5 to 7 p.m., $6. Live
music 6 to 10 p.m.
Saturday: Poppy Distribution.
Pool tournament 2 p.m.
Call Cmdr. Jim Woodman at
795r6526 or visit
www.postl55.org.
* Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City, 637-

Today: District 7 Convention.
Lunch at noon, $6. Convention
and election of officers 1 p.m.
Members only.
* VFW Post 7991, 3107 W.
Dunnellon Road, Dunnellon,
(352) 489-1772.
Wednesday: Bingo, starting
at 1 p.m. Open to the public.
Thursday: Post meeting, so-
cial hour from 5 to 6 p.m. Meet-
ing starts at 6 p.m. This a very
important meeting, come on
members let's all show our sup-
port.
. Friday: Bingo, starting at 1
p.m. Sandwiches or hot dogs
are available. Open to the pub-
lic.
Full breakfast menu $5 sec-
ond and fourth Sunday of every
,month. Come out and support
your VFW, bring your friends,
family and neighbors for a great
meal. Children under 12 $3.
We are a non-smoking post,
but we do have a large smok-
ing patio available. Men and
women interested in joining, are


desk at the Gainesville VA Hospital
once a week for a six-hour shift
He is also in charge of renting out
the post hall to other organizations,
groups, weddings as well as clubs
and organizations.. His dedication
to the American Legion Post 155
family is second to none.
For more information about
American Legion Post 155, call Post
Cmdr. Jim Woodman at 795-6526 or
online at www.postl55.org.


welcome to come talk to us.
* Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 west on Veterans
Drive across from Harley
Davidson dealership an-
nounces events for May.
Today: District meeting in
Floral City 1 p.m.
Wednesday: Bingo and lunch
open to public.
Friday: Cold plate stuffed
tomatoes with tuna or chicken
salad, open to public.
Sunday, May 24: Bingo with
lunch 2 p.m. open to public.
Monday, May 25: Memorial
Day, 2 p.m. hot dogs and ham-
burgers for all.
Wednesday, May 27: Bingo
with lunch open. to public.
: riday, May 29: Shepherd's
pie meal.
Sunday, May 31: Mixed dou-


bles pool league 3 p.m.
For more information, call
795-5012.
* The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58,10730
U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Wall-Rives Post 58 The
American Legion will be having
a Memorial Day ceremony at
noon on Monday, May 25, at
their Post on U.S. 41 just north
of Walmart. Barbecue lunch to
follow. Public is invited to at-
tend. i
Regular meeting of the Post
and Auxiliary is on the first
Wednesday of the month start-
ing at 7 p.m.
Dunnellon Young Marines
meets-every Tuesday evening
from-6 to 9.p.. : ..
Bingo is every Thuisday "
evening. Doors open ,4 p.m.


Games start at 6 p.m. Food
available.
Pancake breakfast every
third Saturday of the month
from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. All you
can eat for a $4 donation.
Third Saturday Outdoor Flea-
Market held monthly on our
premises. Vendors $10. Call
Larry Jones for information at
522-0177.
0 The H. F. Nesbitt VFW
Post 10087 in Beverly Hills off
County Road 491, across the
street from ROC's 491 Sports
Bar and directly behind the new
Superior Bank will host a Me-
morial Day Picnic from noon to
3 p.m. on May 25 after the Me-
morial Day services at Fero
Memorial Gardens Cemetery at
11 a.m.
Price $6 one burger, one hot
dog, one sausage & peppers,'
potato salad and beans. Music
by Jack & Sheila for the after-
noon.
This event is sponsored by
the VFW Men's Auxiliary of
Post 10087 by ticket only and
only 150 tickets will be sold.
1 Beverly Hilsl Memorial
American Legion Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza invites inter-
ested veterans to apply for :
membership or transfer. Sons of
the American Legion and
Ladies Auxiliary units are now
forming. Membership meeting
fourth Thursday at 7 p.m. Sun-
day darts at 3 p.m. with karaoke
following. Other activities being
planned. All sporting events
available on five TVs. Visit, or -
phone the post at 746-5018.
* Marine Corps League,
Citrus County Detachment .
819 will meet at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. Call
Commandant Robert Deck at
527-1557.
* Landing Ship Dock (LSD.)
Sailors meet at Denny's in
Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 621-0617.
* The William Crow
AmVets Post 447 is at 33
RisherAve. in Inglis. For more
information, call 447-4473.
* VFW Post 4252 and
Ladies Auxiliary.
I All eligible persons are in-
vited to join. Stop in at the post
or call for information. Post
4252 is at 3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road
200, Hemando; phone 726-
'3339. Send e-mails to.-
vfw4252@tampabayTriolm,'
See VETS/Page A13


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETS NOTES


0







CITRUS COUNTY 1) CHR M


Six back



from Iraq


Special to the Chronicle Kerry Surber at a VFW Post
4337 sponsored fish fry.
On April 24, a well-de- More than 150 members
.served heroes'welcome was of the community came to
,,,observed at the Inverness VFW Post 4337 for this he-
VFW Post 4337. Veterans roes welcome as Barbara
,showed up to welcome six Mills presented Citrus
local soldiers back from County Heroes- Welcome
Iraq. CW2 Jasoi Goodwini, Home baskets full of gifts
.Spc. Joseph Macias, Spc. donated by Citrus County
SSarah Hernandez, Spc. merchants, veterans organi-
Brandy Goodwin, Spc. Curt zations and the Citrus
Guinan and Spc. Edward County community. During
Cuneo all returned home the welcome home celebra-
,from the ongoing fight on tion, American Legion Post
the global war on terrorism. 155 Adjutant Jay Conti Sr.
It was more than an all- awarded the six with the of-
family and friends gathering ficial American Legion
as six Citrus County heroes "Thank You for Serving"
were honored by numerous Challenge Coin and Bob
veterans from VFW Huscher from the Fleet Re-
Post/Unit 4337, American serve Association Branch
Legion Post/Unit 155, Fleet 186 awarded each soldier
Reserve Association with a Walmart gift card.
Branch/Unit 186, U.S. Sub- Florida National Guard
mariners Association, 40/8 members Godwin, Macias,
', Voiture 1219, Legion Riders Hernandez,- Goodwin -arid
* Chapter 155, Crystal River Guinan all are stationed
Women's Club, Rolling with C Company 1/244th As-
Thunder Chapter 7 and sault Helicopter Battalion
- Gold Star Parents Mr. and in Brooksville, deployed for
Mrs. Flanagan and Mrs. a full year tour. Warrant Of-
45


SSpecial to the Chronicle
From left CW2 Jason Godwin; Don Saylor, senior vice commander VFW Post 4337; Spc. Brandy Goodwin; Spc. Edward
Cuneo; Bob Huscher, Fleet Reserve Association Branch 186; Spc. Sarah Hernandez; Bill Ealey, COB Rolling Thunder
Chapter 7; Spc. Curt Guinan; Barbara Mills, Citrus County Heroes; Jay Conti Sr., American Legion Fourth District Pub,
lic Relations Officer. Spc. Joseph Macias is not pictured.


ficer Godwin is a Blackhawk
helicopter pilot who flew
many missions in his second
tour in Iraq, earning the Air
Medal, Combat Action
Badge and many other high
decorations. Macias, Her-
nandez, Goodwin and
Guinan all worked for the
warrant officer as crew
chiefs and as aircraft me-
chanics. They all saw com-
bat action while deployed as
they all are highly deco-


rated with the Air Medal
and Combat Action Badge
and numerous other high
decorations.
Cuneo, whose home base
is Schofield Barracks,
Hawaii, with the 58th MP
Company, .was deployed to
Iraq for the past 15 months.
He is a highly decorated sol-
dier as a combat wounded
veteran earning the Purple
Heart Medal, Combat Ac-
tion Badge and numerous


other high decorations.
Citrus County Veteran
Service Officer J.J. Kenny
also came by to welcome
home the veterans to see if
he or his staff can offer any
assistance.
All of-these returning.
local veterans are true Cit-
rus County heroes.
The Welcome Home a
Hero Project is funded fully
by donations. If you, your
community, store or veter-


ans organization would like
to help the Citrus County
Heroes Welcome Home
Baskets program for our
local veterans, call Mills at
422-6236 or visit the Web site
www.CitrusCountyHeroes.
org. . . .
You can also send a dona-
tion to: Barbara Mills, PO.
Box 1046, Inverness, FL
34451-1046. Make checks
payable to VFW Woman's
Auxiliary 4337.


VETS
Continued from Page A12


* Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
Sand Cabane 1219 conducts its
" meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
< E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Richard Gannon
at 637-1236; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Debi Gan-
non at 637-1236 qr visit
www.Postl55.org.
Local members of Voiture
and Cabane 1219 of the 40 & 8
from Citrus County recently
traveled to Athens, Ga., to at-
tend the annual Southland's
,.Dixie. The Southland Dixie ro-
tates its location each year 0 Allen-Rawls American
throughout 11 states. Legion Post 77 and Auxilki
During each Southland's Unit 77 meet the first Thursc
Dixie, members get to meet monthly at the Key Training
and greet many of our national Center, 130 Heights Ave., In
officers as well as officers from vemess. Potluck dinner at 6
,other states involved. Through p.m., meeting starts at 7:15.
o this; we are able to interact and. Auxiliary Unit 77 meets at the
,.share ideas for fundraising to sammemeand plae. Call p
,;help us support our many pro-C C-mdr. Paul Miller at 344-827
�#rgrams for veterans and their or Auxiliary president Alice
Offamilies. Also during each Brumett at 860-2981.,
;Southland's Dixie, the leaders U U.S. Submarine Vetern
6mbet to determine a lead candi-
1date for National Chef de Gare
'I for the next year.
The Citrus County group of I
.' 20 members enjoyed the hospi-
.tality and friendliness of the
.,/Georgia members and look for-
Cward to traveling to Gun-
, tersville, Ala., for next year's * 0
gathering with even more mem-,
?.bers attending.
* * The Korean War Veter- Produced and
Y'ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW-. Directed by
A Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1 Jacki Doxey
I ;p.m. the first Tuesday monthly, and
Anyone who has honorably Jeri Augustine
served within Korea or outside
SKorea from June 25, 1950, to Music, song.
hislory and humor..
-Jan. 31, 1955, and anyone decade by decade h
Serving within Korea from 1955
k0to present is eligible to join the Tuscany on
'Korean War Veterans Associa- The Meadows
"lion (KWVA). Call Hank Butler
*at 563-2496, Paul Salyer at Citrus Hills
0.637-11.61 or Neville Anderson Lodge
t 344-2529. 350 E Norvell
Bryant Hwy
(Hwy 486)
SWhenmoppingl Citrus Hills
Hernando
isn't enough Sunday
a: gCall.., May 17 & May 30
"A Doors open at 2 p.m.
Mr, T e Cl Dinner at 3 p.m
SMr. Tile Cleaner Reservations $30
j Showers *.Floors * Lanais Call 527-4100
Cleaning & Sealing t
Residential & Commercial
, 586-1816 * 746-9868



CitrusDt'ABETES
*. Treatment Center I


Legion of Honor
The Marine Corps League, Depart-
ment of Florida, presented the Le-
gion of Honor to Marine Thomas
Heron, of Floral City. During a so-
cial event around a swimming pool,
no one noticed that a toddler had
fallen into the pool and, was drown-
Ing. Heron pulled the toddler, who
was not breathing, from the pool
and rapidly applied CPR to the
child who began breathing. Heron's
quick response in this rescue
saved the toddler with a success-
ful resuscitation. The Legion of
Honor is a national award, and was
presented by National Senior Vice
Commandant Vic Voltaggio of.
Spring Hill..
Special to the Chronicle


(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Le-
gion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
726.5926.
* American Legion Post
166 meets at 1:30 p.m. the first
Saturday monthly at the
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post,


8189 Ladies Auxiliary facility on
Veterans Drive, Homosassa, on
the west side.of U.S. 19 at
Dixon's Auto Sales across from
Harley Davidson. '


WINN DIXIE
Crystal River
Meadowcrest Blvd. and
HWY. 44


* Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shonk Chap-
ter 70 and Auxiliary 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41.
DAV Chapter 70 and Auxil-
iary meetings are at 2 p.m. on
the second Tuesday of each
month.
The DAV Chapter is open
from 9 a.m. to noon every
Tuesday to assist disabled vet-
erans. A service officer is avail-
able by appointment. Contact
Bill Geden at 341-6875.
For the Chapter, call Richard
Floyd, adjutant at 726-5031.
For the Auxiliary, call Lynn Ar-
mitage, adjutant at 341-5334.
* Seabee Veterans of
America Island X-18 All
Seabees, Honeybees, relatives
and friends are welcome to our
meetings and events. Meetings
are at 11 a.m. the second ,
Wednesday monthly at the VA
Office, 2804 Marc Knighton


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AS4 sUNDAYMAY 17 2009


SPEED
Continued from Page All
ketball analyst Dick Vitale is
this year's grand marshal.
The Indianapolis 500 will
be run May 24. Details at
www.indy500.com/.
But if U.S. auto racing
isn't your style, the city is
also offering some interna-
tional fare.
"King Tutankhamun: The
Golden King and the Great
Pharaohs" will open in June
27 at The Children's Mu-
seum of Indianapolis. The
exhibit features more than
130 artifacts from King Tut's
tomb and additional ancient
sites. It runs through Oct. 25;
details at www.childrens-
museum.org/and www.king-
tut.org.
Indianapolis is one of
only a handful of U.S. stops
for the exhibit, which also
has appeared in Atlanta and
Dallas.
Children's Museum
spokeswoman Donna Lolla
said a team from the mu-
seum has been working with


BONE
Continued from Page All
North and Sub-Sahara Africa
and South America, includ-
ing the Amazon Basin.
Other gala attendees in-
cluded Travel Channel Host
Samantha Brown, hunkie
explorer TV host Josh Bern-
stein, shipwreck explorer
and TV host James Delgado,
maven of uncovering under-
water cities George Bass,
Bravo TV's styling diva


MOVIE
Continued from Page All
figures from the movie deal
with Fox.
Washington tourism offi-
cials are planning special
"Night at the Museum"pack-
ages with city hotels and will
advertise for the first time in
movie theaters in cities such
as New York, Philadelphia
and Raleigh, N.C.
The nation's capital al-
ready is drawing attention
from kids, they said, because


Suzanne Mubarak, wife of
Egyptian President Hosni
Mubarak, on a Cairo chil-
dren's museum. That rela-
tionship led to Indianapolis'
opportunity to host the ex-
hibit, she said.
The Tut display coincides
with the museum's opening
this summer of an $8 million
permanent exhibit about
current-day Egypt
Other attractions with
special features this year in-
clude the Indianapolis Zoo
and Conner Prairie, an in-
teractive history museum in
Fishers just north of Indi-
anapolis.
The zoo - www.indi-
anapoliszoo.com -will host
two Komodo dragons May 22
through Labor Day. At 10
feet long, Komodo dragons
from southeast Asia are the
largest lizards in the world.
Conner Prairie plans, an
exhibit to recreate the day
aeronaut John Wise
launched his hot air balloon
150 years ago in Lafayette,
Ind. Opening June 6, the
1859 Balloon Voyage ex-
plores the science and tech-
nology of ballooning and


Gretchen Monahan, Execu-
tive Director of the AIA,
Teresa Keller and President
of the AIA, Brian Rose.
The evening was cele-
brated with a traditional
Mayan feast prepared by
Maya food archaeologist
Patricio Balona, Maya
archeologist Ben Thomas
and Capital Executive Chef
Jason Munger.
The ancient menu at-
tracted the taste buds of
Bravo TV's Top Chef Season
5 cast as their reunion en-
tailed an abundance of an-.


there are two young girls liv-
ing in the White House.
"Oftentimes we hear that
parents have a civic duty to
bring their families to D.C.
for a vacation," said Victoria,
Isley of the tourism bureau
Destination D.C.- "But we
believe 'Night at the Mu-
seum' will really help kids
inspire visits themselves."
Other Washington-area mu-
seums also are getting in on
the action with plans to have
their exhibits "come alive" at
night, regardless of whether
they're featured in the movie.
During the last two week-


Indiana's contribution to
aviation. Guests can fly 350
feet above the museum in a
tethered, helium-filled bal-
loon.
Conner Prairie is the
Smithsonian Museum Insti-
tution's only Indiana affili-
ate. The museum features
five. themed areas covering
200 acres. Patrons can
watch history in action -
and sometimes participate
- as costumed performers
act out Indiana's past. De-
tails at www.conner-
prairie.org.
Harms says Indianapolis
travel officials hope vaca-
tioners on a budget amid a
national recession will
choose the city as a family
friendly, close-to-home al-
ternative to a lavish summer
getaway. The Web site
www.visitindy.com includes
packages for The Children's
Museum, zoo and other at-
tractions.
"More people are skip-
ping the extravagant tropi-
cal vacations in favor of
more affordable trips that
are within.,a day's drive of
their homes," Harms said.


cient ale, corn cakes and
roasted feral pork
There were silent and live
auctions offering exotic get-
aways to ancient Maya and
Roman ruins, rare artifacts,
art and ancient documents.
Cast members included
Leah Cohen, Ariane Duarte,
Jill Snyder, Radhika Desai,
and Patrick Dunlea. The
after-party included Ancient
Ales from around the world
and decadent desserts.
Additional details are avail-
able online at www.archaeo
logical.org/gala/auction.php.


ends in May, George Washing-
ton's Mount Vernon estate is
opening its grounds for
lantern-lit evening tours with
plans f6r historical characters
to pop out of their exhibits.
The site offered similar
themed tours tied to the "Na-
tional Treasure" movie that
have been popular even after
the show closed in theaters.
"It just proves that marrying
pop culture with museums or
cultural attractions really
works," said spokeswoman
Emily Coleman Dibella. "It
gets people excited again
about going to museums."


A really big show



of generation gaps


TV commentator cylinders. They'd jump and
said the other day tumble for 60 seconds to cal-
that with all that was liope music and then they'd
going on in the jump off a spring
world today, board to make a
P r e s i d e n t human tower six
Obama had to people high
"keep a lot of while the bottom
plates spinning." guy balanced the
Those of us who whole group as
stayed home he stood, legs
every Sunday quivering, on
night to watch two of the roly-
Ed Sullivan, poly cylinders. It
knew exactly JIM , must have taken
what he meant. MUiLLE years of practice
But would any- to make some-
one younger , thing like that
than 40 get it? What would . happen and a superhuman
plate spinning mean to amount of effort. This was
today's college freshman? live television. Sometimes
Ed Sullivan was the great they couldn't do it the first
divide between genera- time, so,they'd back up and
tions. If you watched Ed do it again. You sat there
Sullivan to see the acro- thinking, "I couldn't do that
bats, the Borscht Belt co- in a million years." But you
medians and the tiny little also thought, "There's got to
dogs jump through their be an easier way to make a
trainer's hoops, you're from living.",:
one generation. If you suf- After a few commercials
fered through all thatto see for Chevy Corvairs, Esso
the rock band he had on gas and Marlboro ciga-
that week, you're from an- rettes, Ed would introduce
other If you're googling Ed a Russian dance troupe
Sullivan right now on your that would fold their arms
iPhone, well, never mind. in an Ed Sullivan-ish way
There was a time when, and then suddenly squat
if you could imitate Ed's and kick out one leg and
pinched voice and self-hug- then the other over and
going arms at parties, you over. It was all anyone did
could say almost anything at recess at school the next
and get a laugh as long as day because, as everyone
you said the words "Right knew during the Cold War
here, on our stage tonight" that if the Russians could
first out-dance us, they would
It was with those same win. Or if they got more
words that Ed would intro- medals at the Olympics
duce a band of Romanian than we did, they would
acrobats who would come win. Or if they got to the
out in their circus tights moon first, they would win.
logrolling atop multicol- And if the Commies won,
ored, 2-foot-high hollow they'd systematically re-


move Elvis Presley and
rock 'n' roll music, and they
wouldn't let us wear blue
jeans to school. They'd also
find a way to ruin our hair.
Turns out, these are all
the things our leaders
wanted to do. They kid-
napped Elvis for two years
and put Chuck Berry in jail
for three, and Buddy Holly
died in an "accident," leav-
ing plenty of time on Ed's
show for plate spinners.
They seemed to be on every
single week He'd say,
"Right here, on our stage
tonight ..." and out would
come a guy in a tuxedo with
a bunch of three or four
foot-long skinny pool cues.
He'd balance what looked
like a dinner plate on top of
the stick arid give it a few
quick spins to get it going
like a top. He'd wave it back
and forth a few times, flick
it to spinning faster and
faster and then set it, stiQl
spinning, in a little holder
on a table in front of him.
Then he'd start another.
And another. Arid another.
The first plate was starting
to wobble, but just at the
last moment he'd run over
and get it going again. And,
another. What was the,
record for plate spinning?-
Ten? Twelve? Twenty? We
did not practice this the
next day at school. W&just
sat in front of the TV set
and wondered where you
would acquire a skill like
that and whether it would
get you any dates.

Reach author Jim Mullei
at Jim_mullen@
myway.com.


DO YOU TWITTER?
* Sign up to follow the latest news from the Citrus County Chronicle by joining our
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* From a computer, you can check the "tweets" at http://twitter.com/Citrus
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TOGETHER SUNDAY, M~ 17, 2009 A15


Purple Heart veterans visit Vietnam -30thANNIVERSARYT


Special to the Chronicle
VFW Kahle Fund sponsored a Re-
turn to Vietnam Tour for nine Purple
Heart recipients from the Vietnam
War. They were joined in Los Angeles
and accompanied by Bob Greene, As-
"sistant Quartermaster General VFW
of the USA.
VFW recognizes the sacrifices of the
-wounded coming home from war.
'.From amputees and severe burns to
'brain injuries, our warriors deserve
: the very best VFW sent nine Vietnam
Veterans who received Purple Hearts
,on a Return to Vietnam Tour. The tour
began on April 24 with a return home
'on May 7. Paid for by the VFW's Kahle
Fund, the trip included round-trip air-
ifare, Four Star Hotel accommoda-
,"tions, meals, and funds for other
,expenses. The nine men began to
, gather together at LAX and went to
,Hawaii as a group. Sites visited in-
,. cluded: Pearl Harbor, Arizona Memo-
rial, The Punchbowl National
*Cemetery, Hickam Field Air Base, and
),time to relax on Waikiki Beach and
* sample local restaurants as the men
became better acquainted. Most did
'not know each other in Vietnam com-
bat, but all had similar experiences in


the war. Some served in the Army,
some Navy and some Marines. The se-
lect group pf nine'represented eight
states, with,two from Texas.
The group went from Honolulu to
Hanoi, Vietnam, on Korean Airline via
Seoul, Korea. The stay at a modern
city hotel Pi Hanoi included a Water
Puppet Show much to the delight of
the veterans. The men visited the
JPAC Headquarters to learn about our
exhaustive efforts to locate POW and
MIA veterans; again, the group was
most impressed by the priority of the
work beirg completed. From Hanoi
the groupwent to Hue and visited Phu
Bai. Nextstop was the DMZ, LZ Sally
and An 1o Bridge. Some of the men
served al these sites and were im-
pressed ly the changes as well as the
friendly attitude of the local people.
The gr)up was joined by Glen Gard-
ner, Comnander in Chief of the Veter-
ans of Foreign Wars National
Headquarters in Kansas City, Mo.
Larry W Rivers, a past Commander in
Chief Cf the VFW, also joined the
group. Froom the DMZ area the men
went b China Beach. Each was
housed in a private bungalow at the
Hotel Sandy Beach Resort. Some of
the mm had seen the beauty of China


Beach while in combat but it was no
luxury resort at that time. The tour in-
cluded a visit to Chu Lai and then a re-
turn to China Beach for some recovery
time. On to HCMC, Ho Chi Minh City,
once known as Saigon. A short stay at
Hotel Rex in HCMC and visit to Cu Chi
before the long journey home.
Veterans selected as 2009 Vietnam
Trip Winners include: Fred Oberst of
Saranac Lake, N.Y and Crystal River;
Leon E. Zimmermann of Homosassa;
Gary Hutto of Frankston, Texas;
Robert D. Sanchez of San Antonio,
Texas; Kenneth E. Lamberston of
Alexandria, Ind.; Winfred L. Jackson
Jr. of Rapid City, S.D.; Billy Gilliam of
Carson City, Nev.; Steve Bates of San
Diego, Calif.; and Robert Cummings of
Medford, N.J.
Established in 1999 through a $1.1 mil-
lion bequest from World War II Navy vet-
eran Ralph Charles Kahle Jar, the fund
is earmarked for the service, welfare
and entertainment of wounded service-
men. "It was great being able to relax
and enjoy the Return to Vietnam Tour"
said Fred Oberst, a Life Member of
Saranac Lake, N.Y, VFW Post 337, "and
knowing that everything was taken care
of. We are all very grateful to the VFW
for this wonderful opportunity."


News NOTES


Directors urged
to attend meeting
2 The Citrus 20/20 Board of Di-
- rectors will meet at 5:30 p.m.,.
'-'Wednesday in Room 117,
. Lecanto Government Building,
3600 W. Sovereign Path,
SLecanto.
, All directors are urged to at-
- tend. Interested persons or or-
" ganizations are cordially invited.
For more information about Cit-
rus 2020, Inc., visit its Web site
/ at www.citrus2020.com or call
f 344-5955.
. Seminole Club
welcomes public
The Crystal River Seminole
. Club invites the, public to attend
its Thursday dinner at 6 p.m. at
its historic clubhouse at 135
N.E. Third St. in Crystal River.
For membership information,
contact Jim Wazel, president, at
621-1960 or Rhonda Johnson
at 795-6382.
Pinellas County
retirees to meet
The next group meeting for


retirees of Pinella, County will
be at 12:30 p.m. "hursday, May
21, at Stumpknocers Restau-
rant in downtownlnverness.
This is not a clutbut people
who formerly lived in Pinellas
County.
Anyone interested in meeting
with the group i; asked to call
Ruth Embree a 726-2162.
Church to host
gospel singers
Hear singing gospel group
Tuned to Revial perform at
9:30 a.m. Sabrday, May 23, at
the Seventh-iay Adventist
Church on Crdinal Street in
Homosassa.
For three ears the quartet
has been signing a repertoire of
gospel favotes from Albert
Brunley to (eorge Beverly
Shea and 0ll and Gloria
Gaither.
Civicassociation
schedules meeting
The Invmess Highlands
South aniWest Civic Associa-
tion will hve its regular mem-
bership meeting at 7 p.m.
a I


Friday at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center, Little Al
Point, Inverness.
Florence Jones will be
speaking on Mosquito Control:
A Health Issue. Jones is con-
sidered a national expert re-
garding mosquito control.
Come, listen, and ask ques-
tions. Meetings are open to the
public. Refreshments will be
served.
BHRA invites public
to Senior Prom
The Beverly Hills Recreation
Association invites the public to
a Senior Prom from 7.to 10:30
p.m. Saturday. In keeping with
the theme "Phantom of the
Opera," the talented Phan-
tastiks, Paul and Jackie Stevio
will perform an entertaining skit
from the Broadway production
plus providing popular dance
music for the evening.
Admission is $20 per person,
which includes a catered buffet.
Tickets may be purchased at
the office at 77 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills between 8:30 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m. Monday to Fri-


day and 8a.m. to noon on Sat-
urday. Tickets must be pur-
chased in advance. There will
be no tickets sold at the door.
BYOB. Call 746-4882.
Health department
to check car seats
Four out of five car seats are
not used correctly or installed
securely. Even the newest car
seat cannot protect a child if it
is not used correctly.
An inspection of each child's
car seat will be provided at no
cost. Car seats will be checked
for misuse and corrected if pos-
sible. Car seats will also be
checked for manufacturer re-
calls, damage, missing parts.
and expiration date. The check
up will be from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Friday in the parking area
in front of the.Historic Hemando
School on the comer of U.S. 41
North and County Road 486 in'
Hemando.
Bring the child and car seat
instructions if you have them.
Call Sue Littnan at 726-1731
ext. 242, or visit www.citrus
countyhealth.org.


SW Brady and Karin Neeld,
of Crystal River, celebrated
their 30th wedding anniver-
sary recently at a dinner
with their family.
They were married on
Feb. 26, 1979, in Inglis.
They have three sons,
Shawn, of Deltona, Chad, of
Palm Beach Gardens, and
Bret, of Beverly Hills, and
one grandchild.
Brady works in sales at
Harley Davidson and Karin
is a hairstylist at "Sally's."
The Neelds have lived in
Citrus County for 20 years.


-New ARRIVALS


Congratulations to the fol-
lowing new parents:
* To Katie and Jason
Holeman, Lutz, a son, Bryce
Ryan Holeman, born at 9:24


a.m. Thursday, March 5,
2009, at St. Joseph Women's
Hospital. He weighed 8
pounds, 3 ounces. Bryce has
a big brother, Gage.


I-In the SERVICE


Elia graduates from
basic training
Air Force Airman Anthony M.
Elia graduated from basic mili-
tary training at Lackland Air
Force Base,
San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman
completed an
intensive, . .. I
eight-week "'
program that r
included Anthony M.
training in mil- Elia
itary disci-
pline and'
studies, Air Force core values,
physical fitness, and basic war-
fare principles and skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training eam four credits toward
an associate in applied science
degree through the Community
College of the Air Force.
He is the son of Merritt and
Filomena Thomas of N.
Clements Ave., Hemando, Fla.
Peruche graduates
from basic
Air Force Airman Chelsea
A. Peruche graduated from
basic military training at Lack-
land Air Force Base, San An-


tonio, Texas.
The airman completed an in-
tensive, eight-week program
that included training in military
discipline and studies, Air Force
core values, physical fitness,
and basic warfare principles
and skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training eam four credits toward
an associate in applied science
degree through the Community
College of the Air Force.
She is the daughter of Jackie
Peruche of W. Field St., Ho-
mosassa, Fla.
Peruche is a 2008 graduate
of Lecanto High School.
Ross graduates
from boot camp
Citrus County resident and
2005 graduate of Citrus High
School Pvt. Damell L. Ross Jr.
graduated from U.S. Marine
Corps Boot Camp in Parris Is-
land, S.C., on May 8.
He will be married to his
longtime fiance Deidra Miller
on May 16 at Christ Way
Church in Inverness.
He will then begin training in
North Carolina and St. Louis,
Mo.


May 18 to 22MENUS


/ ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Monday:
0, Breakfast - MVP breakfast,
I, General Mills cereal, toast, milk
! variety, juice variety.
Lunch - Manager's choice.
Tuesday:
5 Breakfast - Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, General
Mills cereal, tater tots, toast,
i milk variety, juice variety.
Lunch - Manager's choice.
Wednesday:
Breakfast - Cinnamon
! twister, General Mills cereal,
t toast, milk variety, juice variety.
Lunch - Manager's choice.
Thursday:
Breakfast - Scrambled eggs
with cheese, 'General Mills ce-
real, tater tots, toast, milk vari-
ety, juice variety.
Lunch - Manager's choice.
Friday:
Breakfast- Apple muffin,
cheese grits, tater tots, milk va-
riety, juice variety.
Lunch - Manager's choice.
MIDDLE SCHOOL
, Monday:
, Breakfast - Sausage, egg
�' and cheese biscuit, MVP break-
" fast, General Mills cereal, grits,
toast, milk variety, juice variety.,




P 6EMENT

or 5 forX I 1


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Luncd- Manager's choice.
Tuesey:
Brealast -Apple muffin,
MVP breakfast, tater tots, grits,
milk yaety, juice variety.
Lunn - Manager's choice.
Wednesday:
Breakfast - Egg and cheese
biscu, MVP breakfast, General
Mills ereal, grits, toast, milk va-
riety,peach cup.
Loch - Manager's choice.
Thursday:
Beakfast - Breakfast
sauage pizza, MVP breakfast,
tate tots, grits, milk variety,
juio variety.
Unch - Manager's choice.
riday:
breakfast - Ham, egg and
claese biscuit, MVP breakfast,
Oneral Mills cereal, grits,
test, milk variety, juice variety.
Lunch - Manager's choice.
HIGH SCHOOL
'Monday:
Breakfast - Sausage, egg
md cheese biscuit, MVP break-
ast, General Mills cereal, tater
tots, grits, toast, milk variety,
juice variety.
Lunch - Manager's choice.
Tuesday:
Breakfast- Apple muffin,


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istered dietician on staff
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nsed Clinical Social
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"Products not included
ngl "Individual results may vary.


MVP breakfast, tater tots, grits,
milk variety, juice variety.
Lunch - Manager's choice;
Wednesday:
Breakfast - Egg and cheese
biscuit, MVP breakfast, General
Mills cereal, tater tots, grits,
.toast, milk variety, juice variety.
Lunch - Manager's choice.
Thursday:
Breakfast - Breakfast pizza,
MVP breakfast, tater tots, grits,
milk variety, juice variety.
Lunch - Manager's choice.


Friday:
Breakfast - Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, MVP breakfast,
General Mills cereal, tater tots,
grits, toast, milk variety, juice
variety.
Lunch - Manager's choice.
Menus are subject to change
without notice.
CONGREGATE DINING
Monday: Chicken and yellow
rice casserole, green peas, black
beans, slice of white bread,
packet of raisins, low-fat milk.


Tuesday: Sliced turkey and
cheese, three bean salad, dill
potato salad, two slices whole
wheat bread, mayonnaise and
mustard packets, fresh banana,
low-fat milk. .
Wednesday:. Meatloaf with
brown gravy, au gratin pota-
toes, spinach, slice of whole
wheat bread, one fresh orange,
low-fat milk.
Thursday: Baked chicken
quarter with sweet and sour
sauce, mashed potatoes, broccoli


cuts, slice of whole wheat bread,
mixed fruit cobbler, low-fat milk.
Friday: Meatballs with Italian
spaghetti and sauce, vegetable
blend, tossed salad with Italian
dressing, slice of Italian bread
with margarine, slice of birthday
cake, low-fat milk.
Congregate dining sites in-
clude: Lecanto, East Citrus,
Crystal River, Homrnosassa
Springs, Inverness and South
Dunnellon. For information,.call
Support Services at 527-5975.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AT THIE 'H-IEART OF OUIL COMMUNITY


-IN G.. . . . FOR MA.Y YEA .S,
IN MANY WAYS. ' . ..



For 50 years, Citrus Memorial Health System (CMNIHS) has been providing
quality care to the community. Although we're embracing the future with
innovative technology and an energetic atmosphere, we're still a close-knit
team who greets people by name. It's just our way.

RNs
* CVPCU * PCU * Emergency- Med/Surg-Charge * Surgical Floor
- Orthopedics * Neuro Telemetry and Charge * Educator-ED/CV Services
* External Services Clinical Supervisor * Nurse Manager Med/Surg
* Quality Improvement Director - Cath Lab - CCU - CVOR
* ARNP-Nuclear Medicine Cardiac Stress Testing

Physical Therapists
Positions area available in both our Rehabilitation and Home Health departments.
Degree in Physical Therapy and Florida license/eligibility required.

Certified Scrub Technician-CVOR
Previous surgical experience preferred for Open Heart/Thoracic and Vascular
cases. BLS prior to entering clinical area.

Come join us in Inverness, our scenic town on Florida's Nature Coast, just
north of the Tampa Bay area. Citrus Memorial offers a competitive salary, a
generous benefits package and relocation assistance. If you're looking for a
friendly workplace where people truly care, make yourself at home here.

Please apply online at
www.citrusmh.com

CNIHS is an equal opportunity employer (9ja
CITRUS MEMORIAL
._ . ,,~ ", , ...


TOGETHER


SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 A15


i1'7


i en i VNeemy







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AiG SUNDAY. MAY 17. 2009


Dear Annie: My daughter is in high
school and splits her time between
my house and my ex-wife's. She
often attends parties and sleepovers, and
I've hosted many myself. Recently my
house has become unpopular.
Why? Because I don't serve al-
cohol. My daughter has been to
parties where the parents pro-
vide a bar for the kids, which in-
cludes beer, wine and mixed
drinks. Neither my ex nor the
other parents see anything
wrong with it "We might as well
provide a safe place," goes the
argument.
Annie, my daughter is 15 and
some of her friends are
younger I've thought of calling ANN
the police, but I hate to escalate
things to that level..What do you MA I
think I should do? - Worried
Dad
Dear Worried: A lot of parents believe it
is safer to let the kids drink at home, but
kids can still get alcohol poisoning, climb
out windows, leave the house and get hit
by a car, or wander outside in the cold and
pass out. Some become violent. And evi-
dence indicates there is a greater risk of
brain damage for underage drinkers. Even
with strict supervision by extremely vigi-
lant parents, problems abound.
The Institute of Medicine and the Na-
tional Research Council argued in ,a re-
cent report that parents may be worsening
the underage-drinking epidemic by tacitly
supporting alcohol use. These parents also
run the risk of being arrested. We are NOT
in favor of these parties and prefer par-
ents talk to their children honestly and
openly about the hazards of drinking in-
stead of teaching them that "it's OK, every-
body does it."
DearAnnie: I am grateful to have a good
job. As the head of the household and a
single mother, it is necessary that I be fru-
gal. I buy clothes at the local thrift store,
take the bus to work and check movies out
of the library. I also pack my lunch every
day because it is more economical.
My boss, who earns four times what I do,
repeatedly asks to borrow cash for lunch
because the trendy cafe nearby won't take
credit cards. Each time I refuse. I'm sure
he would pay it back, but that's beside the
point He never stops asking. How can I be
respectful while telling him it is inappro-
priate to ask for money from a staff mem-


I


ber who makes a lot less? - Brown Bag-
ging it in Boston
Dear Boston: You're making this harder
than it needs to be. You're not in trouble
for refusing him, and you don't have to lec-
ture him about what's appro-
priate. If people keep loaning
the boss money, he won't bother
remembering to bring enough
cash to pay for his own lunch. If
he keeps asking, smile and say
you don't have any extra cash
but you know where there's an
ATM nearby - and give him di-
rections.
Dear Annie: I agree that
"Had Enough," who had a
colostomy,,needs help with her
IE'S self-image in order to regain in-
timacy with her husband. But I
.BOX was upset that you put it all on
her. YOU should have addressed
her selfish husband. He should have been
helping his wife become comfortable in-
stead of sending explicit e-mails to other
females. I know he still.has sexual desires,
but he should deal with them better, espe-
cially after being married for 20 years. In-
stead,, you told the wife to basically get
o% er it and have sex with her husband any-
way
You said a colostomy is not comparable
to her husband losing a testicle. How do
you know? This is a deeper issue than sex.
I would suggest they BOTH seek counsel-
ing. - Devoted Reader
Dear Reader: You are right that the hus-
band ought to be better about this, but he
didn't write. Advice.is effective only if a
person is willing to listen to it. "Had
Enough" cannot make her husband less
selfish or less interested in sex. But she
can work on her poor self-image, and we
hope she will.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann Landers
column. Please e-mail
your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie's Mailbox,
PO. Box 118190, Chicago, IL 60611.
To find out more about Annie's
Mailbox, and read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate
Web page at www.creators.com.


The Citrus County Animal
Control Shelter has online list-
ings of impounded animals at
animal control.citrus.fl.us. Select
"Animal Type," etc. and search.
The shelter is in Inverness
near the airport. The shelter
phone hours are 8 a.m. to clos-


Today HOROSCOPE I.....*==.=


Alcohol dangers



worse for teens


Your Birthday: The year ahead
will offer opportunities to operate
in a more free and independent
manner. With past restrictions
lifted, you will be able to meet any
and all challenges.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - Try
to spend time with some wise and
learned friends who always make
things interesting. They might also
help you see things in a different,
more enlightening perspective.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -
While you are running around,
keep your material goals upper-
most in your mind, because
there's a good chance you'll spot
something with potential to bring in
some big dollars.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -
There's a chance you could meet
someone you've heard a great
deal about. Not surprisingly, you'll
have an instant affinity and a
strong friendship could develop.


Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -Al-
though you don't have to go to
work, you can still conceive some
plans and procedures that could
help you achieve an important ob-
jective. Don't just think about it.
Move on it.
VirgD (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - If you
choose to use it, you have the
ability to make a favorable impres-
sion on someone who has inter-
estedyou lately. You don't have to
put on any pretenses, just relax
and b. yourself.
Libra(Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Don't
leave in important matter that
deeply concerns the family half-
finishei. Think about all the ad-
vantages that finalizing it would
bring t� everyone, including you.
Scorpb (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -
Take tlh day to weigh carefully all
the alternatives before making any
critical changes in your lifestyle.
You'll fini that you have far more


Tody's I ES
T . ;' -.'


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-33'7
"Angels & Demons" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 4 p.n.,
7:05 p.m. No passes.
"Star Trek" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.n. No
passes.
"Ghosts of Girlfriends Past" (PG-13) 1:30 p.rr,,
4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"X-Men Origins: Wolverine" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m.
4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"The Soloist" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:3t
p.m.
"Obsessed" (PG-13) 1:25 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:20 rm.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Angels & Demons" (PG-13) Noon, 12:30 p.m.,;
p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m. N)


passes.
"Star Trek" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 12:45 p.m., 3:15
p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10 p.m., 10:30
p.m. No passes.
"X-Men Origins: Wolverine" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m.,
2:50 p.m., 5:20 p.m., 7:55 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Ghosts of Girlfriends Past" (PG-13) 12:35 p m'
2:55 p.m., 5:15 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"The Soloist" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 3:35 p.m., 7:05,
p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Fighting" (PG-13) 7:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Obsessed" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 3:25 p.m., 7:15 p m ?
9:45 p.m.
"17 Again" (PG-13) 12:10 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 5:05 p.mrf.


ing, and it is oen for adoptions
from 10 a.m. b 4 p.m. Monday,
Tuesday, Weciesday and Fri-
day, from 10 a-n. to6 p.m.
Thursday and "om 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday.
For more information, call
the Citrus Couity Animal Shel-


ter at 726-7660.
Financial assistance for
spaying and neutering of an
adopted pet is available
through the Humanitarians of
Florida at 563-2370 or from
the Humane Society of Citrus
County at 341-2222.


Mila Izzi N-,.: (none) Nap,.: Razor Snoopy Sue
AGE: ? AGE: 2 yrs. AGE: ? A;E: 6 yrs. AGE: 7 yrs. AGE: 6 yrs.
SEX: SF SEX: NM SE.%- M S X: M SEX: NM SEX: F
ID: 7624830 0D: 7617938 ID- 7592634 lD 7445377 ID: 7607261 ID: 7617661


. Nonjrof rgarizations are invited to
subrnm new's releases about upcoming
community events. Write the name of
the event, who sponsors it, when and
where it will take place and other details.


I* Include a contact namre and phone
number to be printed in the paper.
* News releases are subject to editing.
* Call 563-5660 for details.


- Sunday PU AZLER
Puzzle answer is on Page A12.


ACROSS 65Diving bird
1 Dragged 66Harangue
6 Money 67Ballpoint
10 Play a uke 68Kind of test or
15Hem and - show
18Incensed 69Retained
19Feelings of pity 71 A or B or C, e.g.
21 The ones there 73Brink
22City in India 75A letter
24Back tooth 76Name
25Make angry 77Point a weapon
26Competitor 78Sweet potatoes
27Bucket 82Decorative jars
28Loan charge 84Killer whale
(abbr.) 851f not
29Repaired 86Wager
31 River to the North 87Make down-
Sea hearted
33Suitcase 90- Vegas
35Sleep a little 91 Merchant
37- the roost 93Hindu princess
38Sidestep 94Like a lot
3901d movies 95Confidence
40River in France 97Prince in an
42Award opera
.43Kooky religions 98Gold, e.g.
44Mettlesome 99Race an engine
46As long as 100 Mastermind
47Weather phe- 102 City in Utah
nomenon 104 Cut in two
48Ride a wave 105 Was acquainted
52Sunglasses with
53Deer 107 Numerous
54Placard 108 Scornful look
56By way of 109 Determine
57Privileged ones 110 Let in
58Substantive 112 Ravi Shankar's
8Substantiveinstrument
59Without a cent instrument
60Emissary 113 Deadened
62Surrdunded by 114 Strong feeling
63Brass instrument 117 Speeder's und
ing


dj








O"


118 Clenched hnd
119 Formerly, oold
123 Gladdened
124 Jockey,
125 Sir-- Raleig ,
127 From--Z
128 Aspersion
129 Antelope
131 Spike of froze
water
133 Frequently
135 Carry
136 Meaning
137 Ejected
138. Irritate
139 - Aviv
140 Seized
141 God of thunder
142 Brought to a
close

DOWN
1 Fainthearted
2 City in Maine
3 A dance
4 Greek letter
5 Skin (prefix)
6 Taper
7 "- - Grows in
Brooklyn"'
8 Food fish
9 Farm animal
1 OTake long steps
11 Old pronoun
12Wander
13Service branch
(abbr.)
14"Moby Dick" au-
thor
15Unlucky
160nce more
17Watch location


19Poverty
20Like a toady
23Pub orders
30Satie and
Estrada
32Fog
34Elevation (abbr.)
36Got away from
38Discord personi-
fied
39Retinue
41 Dollar bills
42Call
43Barrel
44Brought dishonor
on
45Sidewalk material
461njury
17-, line and
sinker
9Eye part
OPeel
1 Destiny
eContour
5Soft, wet ground
5Bluenose
5Police action
5S.oop in a lasso
59ong
61;arl - tea
63ummit
64lesire for drink
66(rcus performer
70Gmmon abbr.
71 Luid measure
72Stir part
74Pepetually
76Brwned bread
79Did down
80Thraten
81 Waing bird


83Made a hole-in-
one
85Avid
87Kind of chocolate
88Paradise ,,
89Supreme Roman
god
90"1 Love-"
92Sea duck
93Dwell
951nstruct
96Housing expense
98Small rodents "
101 Boastful
102 A Great Lake
103 Wheel with teeth
104 Midler or Davis
106 Squandering
one
108 Facet
109 Did housework;,.)
111 Expire
112 Make blue '
113 Grinder of grain
114 Nuisance
115 Apportion
116 Cook a certain
way
117 Wash cycle
118 Ipso-
120 Appraised
121 Martin or Mad-
den ' .'
122 Softened (withil'
"down")
124 Tier
125 Desire
126 Lariat
130 Grassy field
132 Slash
134 Wetland


w


CITRUS COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL PET PROFILES


GET THE WORD OUT


a


options at your disposal than you
think.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)
Your attitude toward owning prop-
erty might be indifference, which is'
fine and good up to a point. If yow �
don't take certain things seriously,
however, you could miss out on
something important.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -
Your goals and aspirations are not
out of reach unless you make
them so. Apply a little resourceful-
ness and effort; don't wait around
for things to happen. .,
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - It
might be a smart thing to let a col-
league or friend think an idea ori'
concept is actually his or hers I
This strategy will help you achieve
an important goal.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - jy
not to be a loner because good -.
things could happen if you gel oato










S p - o .AY, .'17,


SPORTS


You go girl:
Filly wins Preakness, B2



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


N Horse Racing/B2
0 Golf, Tennis/B2
0 MLB/B3
E NASCAR/B4
N Swimming, Lotto /B4
0 NBA/B5
M Entertainment/B6


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Filly coasts to Preakness win


Rachel Alexandra becomes first ..

female in 85 years to triumph
fc/ �/ A n Bii~~~~mollsi i. S Hh F - ��. * AL *E r m 16 _w u jd^


Associated Press

BALTIMORE - Girls
rule!
The best 3-year-old in the
land just happens to be a filly
named Rachel Alexandra.
Jockey Calvin Borel all
but guaranteed victory in
the Preakness Stakes and,
boy, did she deliver, becom-
ing the first filly in 85 years
to win the second leg of the
Triple Crown.
A rangy bay - as big as
most of the horses she beat
- Rachel Alexandra shot to
the front Saturday and was-
n't seriously challenged
until a late close by Ken-
tucky Derby winner Mine
That Bird.
She led by a head at the
quarter and half-mile poles.
She stretched it to a half-
length at the three-quarters
pole. She was ahead by four
lengths going down the
stretch. In the end, the 9-5 fa-
vorite won by a length in her
first race against the boys.
The win also validated
Borel's decision to climb off
Mine That Bird and stay on
the filly as her regular rider
Now Borel may get a shot
at a personal Triple Crown,
if Rachel Alexandra goes on
to the Belmont Stakes in
three weeks. The 1�/-mile
race is the most grueling of
the three.
"I'm not worried about
nothing," he said. "It's
going to take a racehorse to
beat her"
Rachel Alexandra had al-
ready beaten up on her own
gender, winning her five
previous races by a com-
bined 43�2 lengths.
Muskef Man finished
third, as he did in the. Derby,
followed by Flying Private
and Big Drama.
Rachel Alexandra cov-
ered 1 3-16 miles in 1:55.08
and became the first horse


to win at,Pimlico from the
No. 13 post on the far out-
side. She paid $5.60, $4.60
and $3.60. Mine That Bird
returned $6.60 and $4.80,
while Musket Man paid $5
to show.
"I'm thrilled to death with
the race my little horse ran,"
said Chip Woolley Jr., who
trains Mine That Bird. "You
have to give that filly credit.
She's a great one."
Rachel Alexandra earned
$660,000 from the purse of
$1.1 million.
Papa Clem was sixth, fol-
lowed by Terrain, Luv Gov,
General Quarters, Friesan
Fire, Pioneerofthe Nile, Tone
It Down and Take the Points.
The last filly to win the
Preakness was Nellie Morse
in 1924. Rachel Alexandra
became the second filly to go
off as the wagering favorite
and win. Whimsical at 8-5
odds'was the first, in 1906.
Rachel Alexandra stum-
bled slightly leaving the
gate, then stuck her head in
front at the first turn and re-
fused to give way.
Her first challenge was to
get rid of Big Drama, a per-
sistent presence from inside
down the backside and into
the final turn. Once she
shook him loose and opened
up the four-length lead at
the top of the stretch, Mine
That Bird made a run at her
Borel sensed she was tir-
ing, and took firm hold of
the reins.
"I had to put the bit in her
mouth because she was kind
of struggling," he said. "It
kind of took a lot out of her"
Still, she had enough left at
the end and crossed the fin-
ish line to the cheers of 77,850
fans - the smallest crowd
since 1983 - at Pimlico.
'Awesome," said Bob Baf-
fert, who trains Pioneerof
the Nile. "Rachel Alexan-
dra is amazing. She took the


*, . . . .- . . , ; - -" - -- - .. . .' ....... a7* c ^ _j


Associated Press
Jockey Calvin Borel gesture as he rides Rachel Alexandra to victory in the 134th running of the Preakness Stakes horse
race at Pimlico Race Course on Saturday in Baltimore. Kentucky Derby winner Mine That Bird came in second.


heat and kept on going."
The most impressive of
Rachel Alexandra's per-
formances was her stunning
victory by 201/4 lengths in the
Kentucky Oaks, the day be-
fore the Kentucky Derby.
This ending was far dif-
ferent from the last time a
filly challenged the boys.
Eight Belles finished a gal-
lant second in last year's
Kentucky Derby, then broke
both front legs while gallop-
ing past the finish.line and
was destroyed on the track
This time, it was all
cheers. No tears.
"Rachel Alexandra was
great," trainer Todd
Pletcher said. "She took it
right to them, led every step
of the way. She deserves a


lot of credit."
Rachel Alexandra,
marked by two white spots
on her head, wasn't even
supposed to be in the Preak-
ness. Her original owners,
who named the filly after a
13-year-old granddaughter,
didn't nominateher to the
Triple Crown races, believ-
ing fillies should run only
against their own gender.
After the Oaks, Rachel
Alexandra was sold to Jess
Jackson, founder of
Kendall-Jackson winery,
and Harold McCormick
They ponied up $100,000
to buy her a spot in the race,
and the gamble paid off.
"There was a lot of social
criticism and doubt about
whether she was capable,"


Jackson said. "I think I
would've taken some heat if
she hadn't performed well,
so that takes some heat off
my shoulders."
Borel had total faith in
the filly, making the un-
precedented decision to
dump Mine That Bird after
his stunning Derby victory
at 50-1 odds.
"She's the best horse in
the country right now, bar
none," he said.
The last filly to win a
Triple Crown race was Rags
to Riches, who beat the
Jackson-owned Curlin in the'
2007 Belmont Stakes. Her
victory was the first by a filly
in that race in 102 years.
The start of the Preakness
was delayed slightly when


Big Drama reared up in the,
gate and dumped his rider.
Rachel Alexandra stood at
the opposite end, waiting'
patiently for the biggest test
of her life.
Unlike the Derby, Mine-
That Bird had a tougher trip.
with Mike Smith, Borel's re-
placement, aboard. A light
rain fell at the start of the
race, but it didn't turn the
dirt track into the kind of
slop that he flew through'to'
win at Churchill Downs.
"My hats.offto her She'$;a'
talented, talented mare,"
Smith said. "Anyone else
would have caved."
Borel crossed the finish,
line, wagging his right index,
finger to signal their No. 1
status.


Johnson ties record round


Golfer shoot 10-under

atPGA Texas Open

Associated Press

SANANTONIO - Defending cham-
pion Zach Johnson matched the La
Cantera course record with a 10-under
60 on Saturday to take a three-stroke
lead in the suspended third round of
the rain-soaked Texas Open.
Johnson holed out fr6m 84 yards for
an eagle on the par-4 seventh and had
eight birdies on the soggy course in
the round interrupted by a five-hour
rain delay. He tapped in for par on 18
seconds after the horn blew and dark-
ness suspended play.
Paul Goydos and three-time cham-
pion Justin Leonard were 12 under
through 12 holes. They'll resume the
round Sunday morning.
"I hit a lot of quality shots. I think I
had to get up and down twice for par,"
Johnson said. "I don't think I missed a
green on the backside."
Johnson wore his sunglasses down to
the end as duskturned to dark, having to
peer over them on the tee box at No. 18
before pushing them right back on his
face. He needed just 11 holes to erase a
seven-stroke deficit after waiting until
nearly 4:25 p.m. to start his round.
An afternoon storm dumped more
than 2 inches of rain, causing the
longest delay on the PGA Tour this
year Fourteen players will finish the
round Sunday before starting the final
18, when they'll re-pair.
Marc Leishman and were Scott
Sterling were 11 under when play was
suspended. Leishman had one hole
left and Sterling will resume at 15.
Kent Jones and Fredrik Jacobson
were 10 under through 14.
Pettersen, Oh lead LPGA
tourney after rounds of 69
CLIFTON, N.J. - Suzann Pettersen
and Ji Young Oh seemingly won't have to
worry about three-time defending cham-
pion Lorena Ochoa making a run at them
in the final round of the Sybase Classic.
There are plenty of other challengers
though, including recent major winner Brit-
tany Lincicome, eight-time LPGA winner
Paul Creamer and probably the most fa-
mous non-winner on tour, 19-year-old
Michelle Wie.
Pettersen of Norway and Oh of South
Korea shot 3-under 69s Saturday, taking a
one-stroke lead over Lincicome after three
rounds of the $2 million event that seem-
ingly will have a new champion with Ochoa
10 shots back heading into the final round
on the Upper Montclair Country Club.
The biggest story would be Wie winning
her first title since the USGA Women's Am-


Associated Press
Defending champion Zach Johnson hits his drive Saturday on the first hole dur-
ing the third round of the Texas Open in San Antonio. Play resumed after a rain
delay of more than five hours.
ateur Public Links Championship in 2003. - round of the Regions Charity Classic on
She turned pro in 2006 but that first win Saturday, ending a day that was domi-
has eluded her. nated by the weather.
She had a second in Hawaii earlier this Rain had halted play for 3 hours, 33
year after blowing a three-stroke lead with minutes in the morning and it was sus-
eight holes to go. pended with the threat of storms looming
"It would mean a lot," Wie said after after Jones was 7 under through 14 holes
matching Creamer's 69 to move three in his second round. Fergus had finished
shots behind the leaders. "I always think the front nine in 4 under to join him atop
about it, you know, how - that old Nation- the leaderboard at the Champions Tour
wide Tour commercial with the guy holding event on the Robert Trent Jones'Golf Trail
the little (coffee) creamer thing, that's basi- at Ross Bridge.
cally how I feel. I'm just basically going to "You never know how your body's going
go out there and try my hardest and have to react to things like that, or your mind,"
fun like I had the last few it days and see Fergus said of the long delay. "It worked
where it takes me." out pretty well."
If Wie is going to win, she will have to He moved into the lead with a short
putt better. She missed seven putts of 10 birdie putt on the par-3 ninth, a few min-
feet or less'in the second round and she utes before play was suspended.
missed four of 4 feet or less on Saturday. Tom McKnight was one shot back after


Jones, Fergus share
Champions Tour lead
HOOVER, Ala. - Gene Jones and Keith
Fergus were in the lead at 10 under when
play was suspended by rain in the second


playing his first u noles in 4 under. Jay
Don Blake and Joe Azaki were another
shot back, and five more players were at 7
under. That group included first-round
leader Dan Forsman, who was even
through nine holes.


Nadal, Federer set


for Madrid final


Associated Press

MADRID - Roger Fed-
erer will face Rafael Nadal
for a championship.
On clay. In Spain.
The two rivals set up
their first clash since the
Australian, Open' when
Nadal saved three match
points to beat Novak
Djokovic 3-6, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (9)
on Saturday
Playing their fourth
match this year, they
needed a Masters Series
record 4 hours, 3 minutes
to decide matters at the
Magic Box tennis center.
Federer beat Juan Martin
del Potro 6-3, 6-4 in their
semifinal.
Top-ranked Nadal's 33rd
straight win on clay lifted
him into his seventh final
this season, but he will be
nursing a right knee injury
into Sunday's match.
Federer has lost his last
five matches against
Nadal, including the finals
at the French Open, Wim-
bledon and Australia in
February, when the Swiss
player was in tears after
the defeat.
"What's important for
me is to get past that semi-
final hurdle that I haven't
been able to get past in the
last couple of months,"
Federer said ahead of their
16th meeting in a final. "I
feel like playing him any-
where is a challenge. The
extra flair here is that it's
in Spain."
Earlier, top-ranked Di-
nara Safina beat Patty
Schnyder 6-4, 6-2 to set up a


final against teenager Car-
oline Wozniacki, who put
away ,former No. 1 Amelie
Mauresmo 7-6 (1), 6-3.
Nadal, who won in the
Spanish capital in 2005
when the event was played
on indoor hard court, is 9-1
on clay against Federer, wh6-
didn't doubt Nadal would be'
in top shape for the pairs
first match in Spain.
"They 'asked me the
same question in Aus-
tralia," said Federer, whd,
faced Nadal after he had
won a grueling five-set
match against Fernando
Verdasco. "I think With the
adrenaline and the crowd
he's going to-be the Rafa
we know tomorrow."
It's the mental aspect
that Federer will have to
prepare for as he comes,
face-to-face with Nadal for
the first time since the
Spaniard denied him a
chance to equal Pete Sam-
pras' record of 14 Grand-
Slam wins.
Djokovic was also left
red-eyed after feeling in
control for most of Satuir-
day's match.
"It's frustrating when'
you play so well and you
can't win," No. 4-ranked
Djokovic said.
Nadal complained of dis-
comfort in his right knee
before the match, whi6h
hampered his ability to
move as he made unchar-
acteristic errors that al-
lowed for an early break in
the first set
Nadal had his leg
wrapped in the second set,
before leveling.


Associated Press
Rafael Nadal returns a shot to Novak Djokovic during their
semifinal match at the Madrid Open in Madrid on Saturday.


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


B2 sUNDAYMAY 17 2009












( ,iitt ' (.rg '.u (FL) (unto NIC LI- MATOR LEAGUE BASEBALL SUNDA~ MAY 17, 2009 B3


Toronto
Boston
New York
Tampa Bay
Baltimore



New York
Philadelphia
Atlanta
Florida
Washington


East Division
GB WCGB

2� -
4�2 2
6� 4
8 5%

East Division
GB WCGB

2 2/2
3 3/2
31/2 4
9 9�


Detroit
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago
Cleveland


Milwaukee
Chicago
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Houston
Pittsburgh


Central Division
GB WCGB
- - I
1 2Y/2
2 3�
4 5%h
6% 8


Central Division
GB WCGB
- - 1
V2 --
1 / 2
12 1
5% 5
7' 7


Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland


Los Angeles
San Fran.
Colorado
San Diego
Arizona


West Division
GB WCGB

3/2 2%/
5 4
7/2 6Y2


Home
13-6
12-8
8-7
8-10


West Division
GB WCGB

6 3/2
9 6%
10 7�
10Y2 8


'AMERICAN LEAGUE
'- Friday's Games
Deesit 14, Oakland 1
N.Y.oankees 5, Minnesota 4
joronto 8, Chicago White Sox 3
p , - ij . : -lnd 7
. H, I _ I -,, 8-, 8
-r . ,' a 18, Baltimore 1
i' .h- ' I: oslon 4
1 'V Saturday's Games
t'r'ankees 6, Minnesota 4,11 innings
I to 2, Chicago White Sox 1
T�s 5, L.A. Angels 3
, ei ::- 'land 2

.,, , City2
Bin at Seattle, late
n Today's Games
Npesota (Slowey 5-1) at N.Y.Yankees (A.Bur-
1), 1:05 p.m.
nd (Cahill 2-2) at Detroit (Galarraga 3-3),

fgo White Sox (Floyd 2-3) at Toronto (Hal-
l 7-1), 1:07 p.m.
CQland (Huff 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Sonnans-
ti?-4), 1:38 p.m.
1-. Angels (Jer.Weaver 311) at Texas (Feldman
2A' 2:05 p.m.
Ealtimore (Uehara 2-3) at Kansas City
(Hochevar 0-1), 2:10 p.m.
Boston (Masterson 2-2) at Seattle (Vargas 1-0),
4:1tp.m
" Monday's Games
Cfirago White Sox at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Oakland at Tampa Bay, 7:08 p.m.
L.%Angels at Seattle, 1.0:10 p.m.
6 NATIONAL LEAGUE
I _ Friday's Games
HiSston at Chicago, ppd., rain
Piladelphia 10, Washington 6,12 innings
Colorado 3, Pittsburgh 1
L.A Dodgers 6, Florida 4
Atatita 4, Arizona 3
Mi faukee at St. Louis, ppd., rain
Sar Diego 5, Cincinnati 3
N.WMets 8, San Francisco 6
Saturday's Games
Phil delphia 8, Washington 5, 1st game
Chi'ago Cubs 5, Houston 4
Milaukee 1: St. Louis 0
Ny: Mets 9, San Francisco 6
Florida 6, L.A. Dodgers 3
'Arizona 12, Atlanta 0
C6i6ado at Pittsburgh, late
PHiladelphia at Washington, late, 2nd game
Qncinnati at San Diego, late
Today's Games
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 1-3) at Florida (Koronka
00.' 1:10 p.m.
Colorado (Jimenez 3-4) at Pittsburgh (Duke 4-
3), 1:35 p.m.
Pliladelphia (Park 1-1) at Washington (Zim-
mermann 2-1), 1:35 p.m.
Arizona (Garland 3-2) at Atlanta (D.Lowe 5-1),
1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (M.Parra 2-4) at St. Louis (Welle-
meer 3-3), 2:15 p.m.
HoLoton (Moehler 0-2) at Chicago Cubs
(Fdaden 4-1), 2:20 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 5-2) at San Diego (Peavy 2-
5), 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 4-0) at San Francisco (Cain
3-1), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Pittsburgh at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Arizona at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
� ... i ..,: .a m i,-,i i. 7:10 p.m . . .
Mi~laukee at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
N�YMets at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays shortstop Jason Bartlett fields a ground ball
and eventually threw the Cleveland Indians' Victor Martinez out
during the first inning in St. Petersburg.


Rays 4, Indians 2
ST. PETERSBURG - B.J. Upton
homered for the second consecutive
day, Matt Garza pitched six effective in-
nings and the Tampa Bay Rays beat
the Cleveland Indians 4-2 on Saturday.
Hours after he completed the Rays'
rally from seven runs'down with a game-
ending drive Friday night for an 8-7 win
over Cleveland, Upton put the Rays
ahead 1-0 with his second home run of
the season off Carl Pavano in the fourth.
Gabe Gross and Akinori Iwamura
pulled off a double steal in the fifth, giv-
ing Tampa Bay at least one stolen
base in 18 straight games, which is the
longest stretch in the AL since the New
York Yankees had a 19-game run in
1914. Both scored on Jason Bartlett's
single to make it 3-0.
. Garza (4-2) gave up two runs and
five hits. The right-hander had three
strikeouts and four walks. Joe Nelson,
the third Tampa Bay reliever, worked
the ninth for his second save.
Pavano (3-4) had his three-start
winning streak end. He allowed three
runs, six hits, two walks and struck out
six in five-plus innings. .
Bartlett stole second later in the
fifth, but left was stranded on base. The
Rays have stolen three bases or more
in a game 11 times this season.
The Indians pulled to 3-2 in the sixth
on Jhonny Peralta's RBI double and a
sacrifice fly by David Dellucci.
Tampa Bay went up 4-2 on Ben Zo-
brisfs RBI double in the eighth.
Cleveland loaded the bases with
two outs in the top of the fourth, but


failed to score when Garza induced a
grounder to third from Kelly Shoppach.
Victor Martinez went 3 for 4, rais-
ing his batting average to .409, for
the Indians.
Notes: Cleveland plans to call up
LHP David Huff from Triple-A Colum-
bus to start Sunday's game. It will be
his major league debut.... Rays DH Pat
Burrell (neck stiffness) will be re-evalu-
ated Sunday. He had a cortisone shot
on Friday.... Pavano struck out his first
four batters.... Garza threw 40 of his
120 pitches during the sixth. ,
Cleveland Tampa Bay
ab rhbi ab rh bi
Sizemrcf 4 00 0 BUptoncf 4 1 1 1
ACarerss 5 00 0 Crwfrdif 4 1 2 0
VMrtnzlb 4 1 3 0 Longori3b 3,0 1 0
Choorf 4 1 1 0 C.Penalb 3 0 0 0
Peralta3b 4 02 1 WAyardh 3 00 0
LaPort If 4 00 0 Gross rf 1 1 0 0
Dellucc dh 1 0 0 1 Zobrist f 2 0 1 1
BFrncsdh 0 0 0 0 lwamr2b 4 1 2 0
Shppch c 2 0 0 0 Bartlett ss 3 0 1 2
Valuen b 4 00 0 Navarrc 3 00 0
Totals 32 2 6 2 Totals 30 4 8 4
Cleveland 000 002 000-2
Tampa Bay 000 120 01x-4
DP-Cleveland 2. LOB-Cleveland 9, Tampa Bay
6. 2B-Peralta (8), Zobrist (7). 3B-Crawford (3).
HR-B.Upton (2). SB-B.Francisco (7), Gross
(2), Iwamura (8), Bartlett (10). SF-Dellucci.
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
Pavano L,3-4 - 5 6 3 3 2 6
Laffey 3 2 1 1 2 3
Tampa Bay
GarzaW,4-2 6 5 2 2 4 3
ShouseH,5 1 1 0 0 0 2
.BalfourH,3 1 0 0 0 0 2
J.Nelson S,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1
Pavano pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
HBP-by Balfour (Dellucci). PB-Shoppach.
Umpires-Home, Andy Fletcher; First, Ted Bar-
rett; Second, Tim McClelland; Third, Greg Gibson.
T-3:27. A-34,235 (36,973).


Rangers 5, Angels 3
ARLINGTON, Texas-- Angels.
starter John Lackey's season debut
lasted only two pitches.
Lackey, activated from the disabled
list earlier Saturday, was ejected after
hitting Texas leadoff batter Ian Kinsler
and the AL West-leading Rangers went
on to beat Los Angeles 5-3 for their
sixth straight victory.
The Angels led 1-0 after Chone Fig-
gins walked on four pitches to start the
game and scored on a wild pitch by Vi-
cente Padilla (3-2).
Lackey's first pitch went behind the
head of Kinsler, who homered twice.
Friday night. The next one hit him in the
sideof his upper body, and home plate
umpire Bob Davidson, without a warn-
ing, immediately ejected Lackey.
Kinsler stole second and scored on
the first of Josh Hamilton's two sacrifice
flys. Texas went ahead to stay on
Michael Young's tiebreaking RBI single
in the fourth just before another run-pro-
ducing flyball by Hamilton made it 5-3.
Texas (22-14) has won 12 of 14 and
leads the Angels by 3/2 games in the
AL West. The Rangers ard eight
games over .500 for the first time since
June 2005.
Lackey raised his arms and had a
look of disbelief on his face after he
was tossed. Manager Mike Scioscia ar-
gued at length to no avail.


Los Angeles
ab rhbi
Figgins 3b 4 1 3 1
Mlzturs2b 4 0 1 0
Abreu f 4 0 1 0
Hunter dh 2 0 1 0
KMors lb 4 00 0
Napolic 4 1 1 0
MthwsJcf 4 1 2 0
JRiverIf .4 0 1 1
EAyar ss 4 00 0
Totals 34 310 2
Los Angeles
Texas


Texas
ab r h bi
Kinsler 2b 2 1 0 0
MYong 3b 4 02 1
Hamltricf 2 0 1 2
Blalock dh 4 0 0 0
Byrd If, 3 1 1 0
N.Cruz rf 3 1 1 0
C.Davis lb 4 0 0 0
Sltlmchc 3 1 2 2
Andrusss 3 1 1 0
Totals 28 5 8 5
100 200 000-3
120 200 00x-5


DP-Los Angeles 1, Texas 3. LOB-Los Ange-
les 7, Texas 7. 2B-N.Cruz (7). SB-M.zturis
(4), Kinslet (9), Andrus (4). S-Andrus. SF-
Hamilton 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
Lackey 0 0 1 1 0 0
LouxL,2-3 31-3 7 4 4 2 1
Oliver 12-3 0 0 0 1 0
J.Speier 2 0 0 0 1 2
Bulger 1 1 0 0 0 1
Texas
PadillaW,3-2 8 10 3 3 3 2
C.Wilson S,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 0
Lackey pitched to 1 batter in the 1st.
HBP-by Lackey (Kinsler). WP-Loux 2, Padilla.
Umpires-Home, Bob Davidson; First, Rob
Drake; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Tim Tschida.
T-2:52. A-34,284 (49,170).,


Yankees 6, Twins 4,
11 innings
NEW YORK - A-Rod's first hit at
'the new Yankee.Stadium was a doozy.
Alex Rodriguez belted a game-end-
ing, two-run homer in the 11th inning to
give New York a 6-4 win over the Min-
nesota Twins on Saturday.
Rodriguez hit a long drive off Craig
Breslow (1-2) into the seats in left after
Mark Teixeira led off with a walk. A jubi-
lant Rodriguez threw his arms up as
he rounded first, then discarded his
batting helmet as he made it to the
plate and was mobbed by teammates.
It was just the second game at the
Yankees' $1.5 billion palace for Ro-
driguez, who missed the first part of the
season with a hip injury after admitting
in spring training to using steroids when
he played with the Texas Rangers.
Teixeira tied a career high with four
hits and also had four RBIs for New
York, which has won four straight. Al-
fredo Aceves (1-0) pitched a scoreless
inning to earn the victory.
Justin Morneau hit his third homer
in two games and Joe Mauer also
connected for the second straight day


for Minnesota.
Minnesota
ab rhbi
Span cf 5 Q 0 0
BHarrs2b 6 00 0
.Mauerdh 4 1 1 1
Mornealb 3 2 2 1
Kubell f 5 02 0
Cuddyrrt 4 1 0 0
Buschr3b 3 0 1 2
Rdmndc 3 0 1 0
Gomez pr 0 00 0
JMorls c 1 00 0
Punto ss 4 01 0

Totals 38 4 8 4


NewYork
ab r h bi
Jeterss 2 1 0 0
Damonlf 4 1 1 0
Teixeirdh 4 2 4 4
,ARdrgz3b 4 1 1 2
Swisher lb 4 0 0 0
Cano 2b 4 0 00
MeCarrrf 4 00 0
Gardnrcf 4 0 0 0
Cervellic 2 0 0 0
HMatsuph 1 0 1 0
R.Penapr 0 1 0'0
Cash c 1 0 0 0
Totals 34 6 7 6


Minnesota 010 100 020 00-4
NewYork 003 000 010 02-6
No outs when winning run scored.
DP-Minnesota 1. LOB-Minnesota 10, New
York 4. 2B-Buscher (2), Teixeira (7), H.Matsui
(7). HR-Mauer (6), Morneau (12), Teixeira (8),
A.Rodriguez (2). SB-Span (9). CS-Jeter (1).
S-Punto, Jeter. SF-Buscher.
IP H RERBBSO


Minnesota
Blackburn
Guerrier
Breslow L,1-2
NewYork
Chamberlain
Veras H,1
Ci e , :.; .?
E.Ramirez


6 4 4 3 4
0 0 0 1 1
1 2 2 1 0


Ma.Rivera 2 2 u U.0 Z
AcevesW,1-0 -1 0 0 0 0 0
Breslow pitched to 2 batters in the 11th.
WP-Guerrier.
Umpires-Home, Marty Foster; First, Chad
Fairchild; Second, John Hirschbeck; Third,
Wally Bell.
T-3:35. A-45,455 (52,325).


Blue Jays, 2 White Sox 1
TORONTO - Jose Bautista drove
in the go-ahead run in the eighth in-
ning, and the Toronto Blue Jays beat
the struggling Chicago White Sox 2-1
on Saturday to give rookie right-hander
Robert Ray his first major league win.
Ray (1-1) allowed one unearned run
and three hits in a career-high eight in-
nings. He walked one and struck out .
three, before Scott Downs closed it out
for his fourth save.
Toronto trailed 1-0 to begin the
eighth against Chicago reliever Scott
Linebrink (1-2), before Vernon Wells hit
a one-out single, stole second and
came around on Adam Lind's double
into the right field corner.
Lind went to third on a wild pitch
and scored when Bautista followed
with a single to left.
Chicago's only run came in the first,
when Scott Podsednik drew a leadoff
walk, went to second on a grounder
and stole third. He scored when
catcher Raul Chavez's errant throw
bounced off Podsednik's legs and into
foul territory.
For the White Sox, who lost their
eighth straight in Toronto, the lead was.
their first here in 49 innings. The last
time Chicago led a game in.Toronto
was June 3, 2007.
Chicago Toronto
ab rhbi ab rh bi
Pdsdnklf 3 1 0 0 Scutaross 4 0 3 0.
Getz2b 3 0 0 0 A.Hill2b 4,0 0 0
Betemt ph 1 00 0 Riosr .4 01 0
Dyerf 3 00 0 V.Wellscf 3 1 2 0
Konferklb 3 0 1 0 Linddh 4 1 1 1
Thomedh 3 0 1 0 Bautist3b 4 02 1
AIRmrzss 3 00 0 Overaylib 3 00 0
Przyns c 3 00 0 RChavz c 3 02 0
Fields 3b 3 0 1 0 JMcDnl pr 0 0 0 0
Lillirdgcf 0 0 0 0 Barajsc 1 0,0 0
J.Nixph 1 0 0 0 Snider if 2 0 0 0
* Millar3b 1 0 0 0
Rolen3b 0000
Totals 26 1 3 0 Totals 33 211 2
Chicago 100 000 000-1
Toronto 000 000 02x-2
E-R.Chavez (1). DP-Toronto 2. LOB-
Chicago 1, Toronto 9. 2B-L-Scutaro 2 (9), Lind
(14). SB-Podsednik (1), V.Wells 2 (6), Bautista
(2). CS-Lillibridge (1). S-Lillibridge.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
Colon 5 5 0 ' 2
Di:.EiHi 1 .1 0 0 0 0
Tr,,:,,,i,:,n H.6 1 .2 0 i :, "3 "
Linebrink L,1-2 1 3 2 2 0 1
Toronto
R.RayW,I-1 8 3 1 0 1 3
Downs S,4-4 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by R.Ray (Lillibridge). WP-Linebrink.
Umpires-Home, Larry Vanover; First, Dan
lassogna; Second, Charlie Reliford; Third,
Adrian Johnson.
T-2:26. A-21,759 (49,539).


0' MLB Leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BAl TING-VMartinez, Cleveland, .409; Mi-
S ,,i, LI-etroit, .389; AdJones, Baltimore,
.I II. ii, Tampa Bay, .359; MYoung, Texas,
.354' Callaspo, Kansas City, .344; Longoria,
Tampa Bay, .343.
RUNS-AdJones, Baltimore, 35; Markakis, Bal-
timom, 34; Scutaro, Toronto, 34; BRoberts, Bal-
timffoe, 32; Bay, Boston, 31; VMartinez,
Cljqeland, 31; 3 tied at 30.
RBI-Longoria, Tampa Bay, 46; Bay, Boston,
3WlIff, Baltimore, 33; Markakis, Baltimore, 33;
CPena, Tampa Bay, 33; 3 tied at 32.
HIT�-VMartinez, Cleveland, 61; AHill, Toronto,
58 MiCabrera, Detroit, 51; Crawford, Tampa
Ba 51; MYoung, Texas, 51; Longoria, Tampa
Bly\49; Markakis, Baltimore, 48.
DPBLES-Longoria, Tampa Bay, 16;
CDl' aspo, Kansas City, 15; Lind, Toronto, 14;
MYoung, Texas, 14; Byrd, Texas, 13; Markakis,
Balt.more, 13; Polanco, Detroit, 13.
TRLIPLES-Crisp, Kansas City, 5; Andrus,
Texas, 3; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 3; 11 tied at 2.
HWE RUNS-CPend, Tampa Bay, 13;
SMe r-eau, Minnesota, 12; Kiisler, Texas, 11;
.Lgngpria, Tampa Bay, 11; 5 tied at 10.
STOLEN BASES-Crawford, Tampa Bay, 24;
Etsbury, Boston, 16; Figgins, Los Angeles, 15;
Abtey, Los Angeles, 13; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 11;
B rtltt, Tampa Bay, 10; Crisp, Kansas City, 10.
PfTHING (4 Decisions)-Frasor, Toronto, 4-0,
1.000; RRamirez, Boston, 4-0, 1.000; Palmer,
Lo Angeles, 4-0, 1.000; Greinke, Kansas City,
7-J,.:.875; Halladay, Toronto, 7-1, .875; Slowey,
M0nnesota, 5-1, .833.
ST fKEOUTS-Verlander, Detroit, 69; Greinke,
Kansas City, 65; Lester, Boston, 54; FHernan-
dez,Seattle, 53; Halladay, Toronto, 49; Garza,
TA'pa Bay, 45; Bedard, Seattle, 43.
"NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Beltran, New York, .379; Votto,
Cincinnati, .373; Zimmerman, Washington,
.366( Ibanez, Philadelphia, .361; HaRamirez,
Florula, .354; DWright, New York, .350; Helton,
Cpoorado, .347.
RUNS-Pujols, St. Louis, 33; Ibanez, Philadel-
phia, 32; ASoriano, Chicago, 31; Zimmerman,
Washington, 31; Hudson, Los Angeles, 29;
Werth. Philadelphia, 29; 2 tied at 28.
RBN-Pujols, St. Louis, 37; Cantu, Florida, 33;
Ffiter, Milwaukee, 32; Ibanez, Philadelphia,
32; Hawpe, Colorado,-30; 5 tied at 29.
HVIJ-Zimmerman, Washington, 56; Beltran,
Ne,. York, 53; Hudson, Los Angeles, 53;
DWYight, New York, 49; Ibanez, Philadelphia, 48;
CaLee, Houston, 46; HaRamirez, Florida,.46.
DOUBLES-Hudson, Los Angeles, 14;
irez, Florida, 14; FSanchez, Pittsburgh, 14;
an, Atlanta, 13; Zimmerman, Washington,
ndoval, San Francisco, 12; 5 tied at 11.
TtOLES-Kemp, Los Angeles, 4; Bourn,
. 3 Morgan, Pittsburgh, 3; Victorino,
' ,' Yi.r,,, 3; Winen, San Francisco, 3;
D) ht, New York, 3; 17 tied at 2.
E RUNS-AdGonzalez, San Diego, 15;
, St. Louis, 13; Ibanez, Philadelphia, 12;
, Washington, 11; ASoriano, Chicago, 11;
, Cincinnati, 10; Utley, Philadelphia, 10.
EN BASES-Bourn, Houston, 13; Jos-
,NewYork, 11;Burriss, San Francisco, 10;
Fi r, Colorado, 10; Morgan, Pittsburgh, 10;
T s, Cincinnati, 10; DWright, New York, 10.
ING (4 Decisions)-Martis, Washington,
5J.1000; Broxton, Los Angeles, 4-0, 1.000;
S r,. San Diego, 4-0, 1.000; Pelfrey, New
r 1.000; Billingsley, Los Angeles, 5-1,
.833; DLowe, Atlanta, 5-1, .833.
STR3KEOUTS-JSantana, New York, 67;
JVsaquez, Atlanta, 67; Lincecum, -San Fran-
cisc, 66; Peavy, San Diego, 61; Billingsley, Los
Angeles, 56; Haren, Arizona, 56; WRodriguez,
Houston, 48.


Mets 9, Giants 6
SAN FRANCISCO - Randy
Johnson's pursuit of 300 wins will
take a little longer.
Johnson dug himself an early hole
against New York and ace Johan San-
tana, and the potent Mets beat the San
Francisco Giants 9-6 on Saturday.
Carlos Beltran hit a pair of doubles
and drove in three runs, and David
Wright had a two-run double and three
RBIs for New York. Fill-in cleanup hitter
Gary Sheffield added three hits as the
Mets won their 11th in 13 games and
improved to 12-3 in May.
The Big Unit, looking to become the
24th pitcher to reach the 300-win mile-
stone, is stuck on 298 victories. He
heads to familiar territory to try again:
Seattle on Friday night.
Santana (5-2), the NL ERA leader
,at 0.78 coming in, was far from domi-
nant in a pitching matchup of two
southpaws with seven Cy Young
awards between them. His four earned
runs allowed double his previous 2009
total and raised his ERA to 1.89.


NewYork
ab rhbi
Castillo 2b 4 1 1 0
Cora ss 5 2 2 0
Beltran cf 5 3 3 3
Sheffild If 4 2 3 0
Reed If 0 00 0
DWrght3b 5 1 3 3
Tatis ib . 4 0 0 1
RCastrc 5 0 2 2
Church rf 5 01 0
JSantn p 2 0 1 0
Pagan ph 1 00 0
Parnellp 0 00 0
DnMrpph 1 00 0
Putz p 0 0 0 0

Totals 41 916 9
NewYork
San Francisco


San Francisco
ab r h bi
Burriss 2b 5 0 1 0
FLewis If 5 2 1 0
Sandovl 3b 4 0 2 1
BMolinc 4 1 1 0
Winnrf-cf 4 1 1 1
Uribe ss 4 0 1 0
Rowndcf 4 1 3 3
Meddrsp 0 00 0.
Ishikaw.lb 4'1 1 0
RJhnsn p 2 0 0 0
JMillerp 0 0 0 0
Valdez p 0 0 0 0
Aurilia ph 1 0 1 1
Misch p 0 0 0 0
Schrhlt rf 1 0 0 0
Totals 38 612 6
300 -040 002-9
001 202 100--6


E-Castillo (4), D.Wright (6). DP-New York 1.
LOB-New York 9, San Francisco 5.2B-Cora
(3), Beltran 2 (10), D.Wright (10), F.Lewis (9),
Sandoval 2 (12), Auriila (2). HR-Rowand (3).
SB-Castillo (6), Cora (3). CS-Winn (1), Uribe
(1). S-J.Santana. SF-Tatis.
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
J.Santana W,5-2 7 11 6 4 0 7
Parnell H,7 1 1 0 0 0 2
PutzS,1-2 1 0 0 0 0 1
San Francisco
Ra.Johnson L,3-4 4 11 7 7 0 3
J.Miller 1 2 0 0 1 0
Valdez 1 0 0 0 0 0
Misch 2 1 2 2 1 0
Medders 1 2 0 0 0.0
Ra.Johnson pitched to 4 batters in the 5th.
Misch pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
Balk-Ra.Johnson.
Umpires-Home, Hunter Wendelstedt; First,
Brian Knight; Second, Dana DeMuth; Third,
Doug Eddings.
T-3:11. A-41,336 (41,915).


Brewers 1, Cardinals 0
ST LOUIS- Jeff Suppan threw
seven scoreless innings in his favorite
stadium and Corey Hart hit his first
homer in 27 games to lift the Milwau-
kee Brewers to a 1-0 victory over the
St. Louis Cardinals on Saturday.
Suppan, who parlayed an 2006
NLCS MVP for the Cardinals into a free-
agent contract with the Brewers, outdu-
eled Adam Wainwright in the first of 18
matchups between teams who entered
the day tied for the NL CentraJ lead.
Suppan (3-3) is 131-126 for his ca-
reer, but 9-2 with a 3.02 ERA in 20
starts in St. Louis and 7-2'with a 2.92
ERA in 12 starts against the Cardinals..
The Brewers won for the 10th time
in 12 games despite getting only one
other hit in eight innings against Wain-
wright (3-2), who struck out seven and
walked two in his longest outing of the
year. He's lost his last two starts after
winning nine straight decisions.
Shane Robinson had two hits and a
steal for the Cardinals, who have lost
five of seven while missing Ryan Lud-
wick and Rick Ankiel. St. Louis was
shut out for the first time this season.
Suppan had only two 1-2-3 innings,
one of them aided by a double-play
ball. But he limited the Cardinals to
only four at-bats with runners in scor-
ing position, all with two outs.
Milwaukee St. Louis
ab rhbi 'ab r h bi
Weeks 2b 4 0 0 0 Schmkr2b 4 0 0 0
Hardy ss 3 00 0 Roinsn rf 4 02 0
Braun If 4 01 0 Pujolslb 4 0 1 0
Fielder b 3 00 0 Duncanlf 3 00 0
MCmrncf 3 00 0 Barden3b 1 00 0.
Hart rf 4 1 1 1 YMolin c 4 01 0
Hall3b 2 00 0 Rasmscf 3 0.0 0
Kendall c 3 0 0 0 TGreen ss 2 0 0 0
Suppan p 2 00 0 KGreen ss 2 0 0 0
Counsll ph 1 0 0 0 Thurstn 3b 2 0 1 0
DiFelic p 0 00 0 Wnwrgp 3 01 0
Stetter p 0 00 0 McCllln p 0 00 0
Hoffmn p 0 00 0 DReyes p 0 0 0 0
C.Perezp 0 0 0 0
Totals 29 1 2 1 Totals 32 0 6 0
Milwaukee 010 000 000-1
St. Louis 000 000 000-0
E-Thurston (4). DP-Milwaukee 1, St. Louis 1.
LOB-Milwaukee 5, St. Louis 7. HR-Hart (4).
SB-Robinson (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
SuppanW,3-3 7 6 0 0 2 2
DiFelice H,5 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Stetter H,7 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
HoffmanS,9-9 1 0 0 0 0 0
St. Louis
Wainwright L,3-2 8 2 1 1 2 7
McClellan 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
D.Reyes 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
C.Perez 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
Umpires-Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, Mark Weg-
ner; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Gerry Davis.
T-2:31. A--43,382 (43,975).


D-backs 12, Braves 0
ATLANTA - Max Scherzer pitched
six scoreless innings for his first major
league win and Chris Snyder hit a
grand slam in the ninth, capping the
Arizona Diamondbacks' 12-0 rout of
the Atlanta Braves on Saturday night.
Snyder matched his career high
with five RBIs, including the grand slam
off Buddy Carlyle in a six-run ninth.
Rookie Gerardo Parra drove in three
runs with three hits as Arizona ended a
four-game losing streak.
Scherzer (1-3) gave up four hits and
three walks with four strikeouts.
Braves relievers walked eight bat-
ters in four innings. Jeff Bennett and
Carlyle forced in runs with bases-
loaded walks in the eighth and ninth in-
nings, respectively.
Scherzer's first win came in his 14th
star. He lost his first seven decisions
over two seasons and entered the game
with a career 3.39 ERA in 22 games.
Poor baserunning hurt the Braves
after Yunel Escobar and Chipper Jones
hit one-out singles in the first inning. -


Arizona
ab rhbi


Atlanta
ab r h bi


FLopez2b 6 1 2 0 KJhnsn2b 4 00 0
Qualls p 0 0 0 0 Escoarss 4 02 0
GParracf 6 1 3 3 C.Jones 3b 4 0 2 0
J.Upton rf 4 1 2 0 GAndrs If 3 0 1 0
S.Drew ss 4 1 0 0 Carlyle p 0 00 0
Rynlds 3b 3 31 1 McCnnc 3 01 0
Byrnes If 5 22 2 D.Ross ph 1 0 0 0
Tracy b 3 1 0 0 Ktchml b 3 00 0
Snyderc- 2 2 1 5 Francrrf 4 0 0 0
Scherzr p 2 0 0 0 Schafer cf 2 0 1 0
Whitsll ph 1 00 0 Kawkm p 1 00 0
Schnws p 0 0 0 0 Norton ph 1 00 0
JGutrrz p 0 00 0 Parr p 0 00 0
Monter ph. 0 0 0 1 Prado ph 1 0 0 0
Vasquz p 0 00 0 Bennett p 0 00 0
CYoung ph 1 0 0 0 M.Diaz If 0 00 0
Ojeda 2b 0 0 0 0
Totals 37121112 Totals 31 0 7 0
Arizona 021 000 216-12
Atlanta 000 000 000-0
E-Escobar (3). DP-Arizona 2, Atlanta 1.
LOB-Arizona 8, Atlanta 7. 2B-F.Lopez (12),
J.Upton (8), Reynolds (5), Bymes (8), Escobar
(10). 3B-G.Parra (2), J.Upton (2). HR-Snyder
(2). CS-G.Parra (2), C.Jones (1). SF-Snyder.
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
ScherzerW,1-3 6 4 0 0 3 4
Schoeneweis 2-3 2 0 0 0 1
J.Gutierrez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Vasquez 1 1 0 0 0 0
Qualls 1 0 0 0 0 1
Atlanta
Kawakami L,2-5 5 5 3 3 1 4
Parr 2 1 2 2 2 2
Bennett 1 0 1 1 4 0
Carlyle 1 5 6 6 2 0
WP-Kawakami.
Umpires-Home, Randy Marsh; First, Mike
Winters; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third, Al-
fonso Marquez.
T-3:10. A-30,162 (49,743).


Associated Press
Los Angeles Dodgers' Juan Pierre, right, steals third base as
Florida Marlins' Emilo Bonifacio (1) applies the late tag dur-
ing the first inning Saturday in Miami.


Marlins 6, Dodgers 3
MIAMI - There was a mess on the
field, and for a change it wasn't the
Florida Marlins'fault.
Countless silvery pompon strands
blew onto the diamond Saturday on
pompom giveaway night, but the Mar-
lins emerged from the litter with a 6-3
win over the Los Angeles Dodgers to
break a five-game losing streak.
Andrew Miller (1-1), activated from the
disabled list before the game, won for the
first time since June 16. John Baker
broke a 2-all tie in the fifth inning with a
two-run homer for the Marlins, who
scored five of their runs with two out.
The pompom strands didn't seem to
affect play. Most were launched by kids
from the left-field corner behind the
Dodgers' bullpen, where a 20-mph
wind carried the litter onto the field.
The grounds crew hustled onto the
field between innings to pick up the
strands but couldn't keep up with the
volume, and by the sixth inning left field
shimmered with silver.
The home team showed a little
sparkle, too. Miller allowed four walks
and four hits but left after five innings
with a 4-2 lead. The left-hander had
been sidelined nearly four weeks with
a strained oblique.
Dan Uggla, who came into the
game batting .182, walked twice, sin-
gled, scored a run and had an RBI.
Hanley Ramirez singled, walked,
scored a run and extended his hitting
streak to 13 games.
Four Florida relievers allowed no
earned runs in the final four innings.
Matt Lindstrom pitched a perfect ninth
for his seventh save in nine chances.
The Dodgers had won three games
in a row.


With the score 2-all, Jeff Weaver (2-
1) retired the first two batters in the fifth
before Jorge Cantu singled and Baker
hit his fifth homer.
The Dodgers' Eric Milton, making
his first major-league start in two years,
threw 84 pitches in four innings and left
with the score 2-2. Milton is mounting a
comeback from Tommy John surgery
in June 2007.


Los Angeles
ab rhbi
Pierre If 5 3 3 0
Furcal ss 5 00 1
Hudson 2b 2 0 1 2
Ethier.rf 3 0 1 0
Martin c 2 01 0
Loney b 4 00 0
Kemp cf 3 0 1 0
Blake 3b 3 00 0
Milton p 1 00 0
JefWvrp 0 00 0
Paulph 1 00 0
Leach p 0 00 0
Belisarip 0 00 0
Ohmanp 0 00 0
Loretta ph 1 00 0


Florida
ab r h bi
Bonifac3b 5 0 1 1
Coghin f 5 00 0
HRmrzss '3 1 1 0
Cantu lb 3 1 1 0
JoBakrc 3 1 1 2
Uggla2b 2 1.1 1
Hermidrf 4 1 2 0
C.Rosscf 3 0 1 1
Meyer p 0 00 0
Nunez p 0 00 0
Gloadph 1 00 0
Helms3b 0 00 0
AMillerp 2 00 0
CMrtnzp 0 00 0
Amezgcf 2 1 0 1
Lndstrp 0 0 00


Totals 30 3 7 3 Totals 33 6 8 6
Los Angeles 101 000 100-3
Florida 011 020 02x-6
E-Furcal (6). LOB-Los Angeles 8, Florida 8.
2B-C.Ross (5). 3B-Pierre (1). HR-Jo.Baker
(5). SB-Pierre 2 (7), Ethier (2), Martin (5),
Amezaga (1). CS-Kemp (2). S-Milton. SF-
Hudson 2.
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Milton 4 2 2 2 4 3
Jef.Weaver L,2-1 1 4 2 2 0 0
Leach 1 0 0 0 0 1
Belisario 12-3 2 2 0. 0 1
Ohman 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Florida '
A.MillerW,1-1 5 4 2 2 4 4
C.Martinez H,1 2-3 1 0 0 1 1
MeyerH,6 11-3 2 1 0 0 2
NunezH,6 1 0 0 0 0 2
Lindstrom S,7-9 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Milton (Cantu). PB-Jo.Baker.
Umpires-Home, Ed Rapuano; First, Paul
Schrieber; Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Joe West.
T-3:17. A-25,132 (38,560).


SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 B3


MAIOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


NIC'LE


CIru S' Co('/yI (FL) CHROA











W-EORCTRSCONY()I/, HUc.


For the record


Florida LOTTERY


CASH 3 (early)
1-9-1
CASH 3 (late)
5-2-1
PLAY 4 (early)
Li 2-2-9-3
lorldaLottery PLAY 4 (late)
Here are the winning 9 - 4 - 4 - 6
numbers selected FANTASY 5
Saturdayin the 10 - 28 - 33 - 34 - 36
Florida Lottery: POWERBALL
6- 7 - 31- 40- 56
POWER BALL
38
POWER PLAY
2
LOTTERY
4- 27 - 28- 33- 42- 44


-On the AIRWAVES===

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12 p.m. (VERSUS) IRL Indianapolis 500 Bump Day -
Qualifying
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA: Thunder Valley Nationals - Final
Eliminations (Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (TBS) Minnesota Twins at New York Yankees
1:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Cleveland Indians at Tampa Bay Rays
2 p.m. (WGN) HoustonAstros at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m. (ESPN) New York Mets at San Francisco Giants
3 a.m. (ESPN2) New York Mets at San Francisco Giants
(Same-day Tape)
BASKETBALL
3:30 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) Western Conference Semifinal
Game 7 - Houston Rockets at Los Angeles Lakers
8 p.m. (TNT) Eastern Conference Semifinal Game 7 - Or-
lando Magic at Boston Celtics
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBA King of Bow1ing (Taped)
2 p.m. (ESPN) PBA King of Bowling (Taped)
3 p.m. (ESPN) PBA King of Bowling (Taped)
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: The 3 Irish Open -
Final, Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) Nationwide Tour: BMW Charity Pro-Am -
Final Round
2 p.m. (ESPN2) LPGA Tour: Sybase Classic-- Final Round
3 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) PGA Tour: Valero Texas Open - Final
Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Regions Charity Classic -
Final Round (Same-day Tape)
HOCKEY
3 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) NHL Western Conference Finals Game 1
- Chicago Blackhawks at Detroit Red Wings
RODEO
10 p.m. (VERSUS) Bull Riding The Ford-150 Invitational
(Taped)'
SOCCER
9 p.m. (47 FAM) English Premier League: Bolton Wander-
ers vs. Hull City (Taped)


GOLF
PGA Texas Open
Saturday
At La Cantera Golf Club, Resort Course
San Antonio
Purse: $6.1 million
Yardage: 6,881; Par: 70
PartialThird Round
Note: Due darkness 14 golfers failed to
complete the third rounrd.They will com-
plete the round Sunday.
Zach Johnson- 68-67-60-195 -15
Dustin Johnson 74-65-62-201 -9
Todd Fischer 70-67-64-201 -9
Bill Haas 67-67-67-201 -9
Shaun'Micheel 67-72-63-202 -8
Jonathan Kaye 71-68-63-202 -8
Charley Hoffman 70-69-63-202 -8
Matt Weibring 67-70-65-202 -8
Frank Lickflter 11 69-68-65-202 -8
J.J. Henry 66-70-66-202 -8
Charlie Wi 68-71-64-203 -7
Martin Piller 69-70-64-203 -7
GarrettWillis 68-70-65-203 -7
James Nitties 68-69-66-203 -7
Bob Estes 67-70-66-203 -7
James Driscoll 67-69-67-203 -7
Tim Clark 67-69-67-203 -7
Kevin Stadler 67-68-68-203 -7
Lee Janzen 66-68-69-203 -7
Mark Brooks 71-68-65-204 -6
Corey Pavin 66-72-66-204 -6
Scott Verplank 67-70-67-204 -6
Scott McCarron 70-67-67-204 -6
Robert Gates 73-64-67-204 -6
Wil Collins 67-69-68-204 -6
Jimmy Walker 70-66-68-204 -6
Patrick Sheehan 68-68-68-204 -6
Harrison Frazar 67-69-68-204 -6
Nathan Green 70-69-66-205 -5
Bill Lunde 73-65-67-205 -5
Chris DiMarco 72-66-67-205 -5
Marco Dawson 68-68-69-205 -5
Bart Bryant 70-66-69-205 -5
Kris Blanks 70-65-70-205 -5,
Aron Price 69-66-70-205 -5
Brandt Jobe 70-65-70-205 -5
Jason Gore 70-69-67-206 -4
Mark Wilson 67-72-67-206 -4
Paul Stankowski 70-69-67-206 -4
Gary Woodland 67-70-69-206 -4
Troy Matteson " 72-66-68-206 -4
Scott Gutschewski 71-66-69-206 -4
Greg Chalmers 69-67-70-206 -4
Charles Warren 70-66-70-206 -4
David Peoples 72-67-68-207 -3
Richard S. Johnson .71-68-68-207 -3.
Rocco Mediate 69-70-68-207 -3
Tim Herron 68-71-68-207 -3
Eric Axley 72-67-68-207 -3
Vaughn Taylor 70-68-69-207 -3
Jay Williamson 69-68-70-207 -3
Carlos Franco 71-66-70-207 -3-
David Duval 66-69-72-207 -3
Jeff Maggert 64-70-73-207 -3
Matt Bettencourt 68-71-69-208 -2
Robin Freeman 70-69-69-208 -2
Anthony Kim 69-69-70-208 -2
Matt Jones 67-69-72-208 -2
Chad Campbell 68-69-72-209 -1
Tag Ridings 69-66-74-209 -1
Billy Andrade 72-67-71-210 E
Matthew Loving 72-67-72-211 +1
Failed to complete third round
Paul Goydos 63-65-128
Justin Leonard 63-68-131
Marc Leishman 64-69-133
Scott Sterling 68-63-131
Kent Jones 67-65-132
Fredrik Jacobson 66-66-132
Greg Owen 65-68-133
Stephen Ames 66-67-133
Brian Davis 65-67-132
John Mallinger 67-64-131
Briny Baird 68-66-134
Ted Purdy 64-67-131
Mathias Gronberg 66-65-131
J.RP. Hayes 71-62-133


Leaderboard


.Zach Johnson
Justin Leonard
Paul Goydos
Marc Leishman
Scott Sterling
Dustin Johnson
Todd Fischer
Bill Haas
Stephen Ames
Fredrik Jacobson
Brian Davis


SCORE
-15
-11
-11
-10
-10
-9
-9
-9
-9
-9
-9


THRU TODAY
17 -10
11 -2
11 +1
16 -3
13 -1
F -8
F -6
17 -3
15 -2
13 -1
14 -1


Champions Tour
Regions Charity Classic
Saturday
At RobertTrent Jones Golf Trail at Ross
Bridge
Hoover, Ala.
* Purse: $1.7 million
Yardage: 7,503; Par: 72 (36-36)
Note: Play suspended due to inclement
weather. Only 1 player finished the round.
The round will be


Second Rouni
Morris Hatalsky
Did Not Finish
Dan Forsman
Larry Mize
Hal Sutton
Keith Fergus
Eduardo Romero
Jim Thorpe
Gil Morgan
Tom McKnight
Chris Starkjohann
Chip Beck
Mike Reid
Lonnie Nielsen
Tom Jenkins
Mark Wiebe
Loren Roberts
Fred Funk
David Edwards
Fuzzy Zoeller
Bruce Fleisher
Sandy Lyle
Robert L.Thompson
Phil Blackmar
Gene Jones
Gary Hallberg
Scott Hoch
Denis Watson
Mike Goodes
Tom Purtzer
Joey Sindelar
Joe Ozaki
Jay Don Blake
Walter Hall
Larry Nelson
Bruce Vaughan
Andy Bean
Bob Gilder
Morris Hatalsky
Russ Cochran
Jay Sigel
Tim Simpson
James Mason
Kirk Hanefeld
Lanny Wadkins
David Eger
Bernhard Langer
Jay Haas
Jeff Sluman
Tom Kite
Mark James
Don Pooley
Mike Hulbert
Leonard Thompson
Vicente Fernandez
Mark W. Johnson
Ronnie Black
Allen Doyle
Brad Bryant
Nick Price
lan Woosnam
Gary Koch
Jim Dent
John Harris


70-68-138
h
33-32-65
33-33--66
35-31-66
32-34-66
33-34-67
33-34--67
34-33-67
35,32-67
32-35-67
34-34-68
34-34-68
33-35-68
36-32-68
34-34-68
35-33--68
34-34-68
36-32-68
34-34-68
34-34--68
34-34-68
34-34-68
35-34-69
32-37-69
33-36-69
37-32--69
35-34-69
36-33--69
33-36-69
33-36-69
33-36-69
35-35-70
37-33-70
35-35-70
35-35-70
36-34-70
35-35-70
35-35-70
33-37-70
36-34-70
35-35-70
36-34-70
36-34-70
37-34-71
35-36-71
35-36-71
35-36-71
36-35-71
36-35-71
38-33-71
35-36-71
35-36-71
36-36-72
33-39-72
35-37-72
35-37-72
36-36-72
34-38-72
37-35-72
35-37-72
38-34-72
35-38-73
37-36-73


Ken Green
John Morse
Steve Thomas
Tom Wargo
Frank Shikle
Jim Albus
Hale Irwin
Mark Balen
Mike San Filippo
Lee Trevino
Bob Tway
Blaine McCallister
Jim Colbert
Fulton Allem
R.W. Eaks
Mike McCullough
Leaderboard


37-36-73
35-38-73
37-36-73
36-38-74
39-35-74
38-37-75
38-37-75
37-38-75
36-39-75
36-40-76
37-39-76
39-38-77
37-40---77
36-42-78
71-WD
76-WD


SCORE THF
1. Gene Jones -10
1. Keith Fergus -10
3. Tom McKnight -9
4. Jay Don Blake -8
4. Joe Ozaki -8
6. Bruce Fleisher -7
6. Jim Thorpe -7
6. Dan Forsman -7
6. Larry Mize -7
6. Hal Sutton -7
11. Morris Hatalsky -6
11. Bruce Vaughan -6
11. Bob Gilder -6
11. Larry Nelson . -6
11. Scott Hoch -6
11. Denis Watson -6
11. Phil Blackmar -6
11..Fuzzy Zoeller -6
11.Tom Jenkins -6
11. Loren Roberts -6
11. Mike Reid -6
11. LonnieNielsen -6
11. Gil Morgan -6
LPGA Sybase Classic
Saturday
At Upper Montclair Country Club
Clifton, N.J.
Purse: $2 million
Yardage: 6,413; Par 72
Third Round


JiYoung Oh
Suzann Pettersen
Brittany Lincicome
Paula Creamer
Michelle Wie
Hee Young Park
Candle Kung
Ai Miyazato
Moira Dunn
Helen Alfredsson
Russy Gulyanamitta
Brittany Lang
In-Kyung Kim
Jiyai Shin
Karrie Webb
Natalie Gulbis
Amy Hung
Yani Tseng
Mika Miyazato
Lisa Strom
JeeYoung Lee
M.J. Hur
Wendy Ward
Jennifer Rosales
Vicky Hurst
Meaghan Francella
Stacy Lewis
Soo-Yun Kang
Mollie Fankhauser
Becky Morgan
Laura Davies
Mikaela Parmlid
Minea Blomqvlst
NaYeon Choi
Marisa Baena
Angela Park
Paige Mackenzie
Christina Kim
Giulia Sergas
Stephanie Louden
Katie Futcher -
Ashleigh Simon
Meredith Duncan
Jill McGill
Hee-Won Han
KrisTschetter
Marcy Hart
Irene Cho
Sophie Giquel
Sarah Kemp
Angela Stanford
Karine Icher


RU
14
9
10
16
15
13
9
9
9
9
F
17
17
16
14
14
14
12
11
11
10
10
10


66-69-69-204
65-70-69-204
64-69-72-205
70-69-68-207
70-69-68-207
67-74-67-208
71-69-69-209
73-68-69-210
71-69-70-210
62-76-72-210
73-69-69-211
68-74-69-211
68-73-70-211
69-71-71-211
70-69-72-211
70-72-70-212
70-72-70-212
71-71-74--216
73-68-75 -216
72-69-76-216
69-71-76-216
74-71-72-217
73-72-72-217
72-73-72-217
73-71-73-217
73-71-73-217
70-74-73-217
73-70-74-217
70-72-75-217
71-69-77-217
74-71-73-218
75-69-74-218
74-70-74-218
73-71-74-218
72-72-74-218
73-70-75-218
72-71-75-218
74-70-75-219
73-71-75-219
72-72-75- 219
71-72-76-219
71-72-76-219
76-69-75-220
74-70-76-220
73-71-76-220
73-71-76-220
69-76-76-221
73-71-77-221
70-74-78-222
71-72-79-222
73-70-80-223
73-72-80-225


NHL Playoffs
CONFERENCE FINALS
(Best-of-7)
Sunday, May 17
Chicago at Detroit, 3 p.m.
Monday, May 18
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 19
Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 21
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Friday, May 22
Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Saturday, May 23
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 24
Detroit at Chicago, 3 p.m.
Tuesday, May 26
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 27
Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m., if necessary
Friday, May 29
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m., if necessary
Saturday, May 30
Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m., if necessary
Sunday, May 31
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7:30 p.m., if necessary
Monday, June 1
Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 pdm., if necessary
Tuesday, June 2
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m., if necessary
STANLEY CUP FINALS
TBD

BASKETBALL

NBA Playoffs
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of.7)
Sunday, May 3
Denver 109, Dallas 95
Monday, May 4
Orlando 95, Boston 90
Houston 100, L.A. Lakers 92
Tuesday, May 5
Cleveland 99, Atlanta 72
Denver 117, Dallas 105, Denver leads series
2-0
Wednesday, May 6
Boston 112, Orlando 94
L.A. Lakers 111, Houston 98
Thursday, May 7
Cleveland 105, Atlanta 85
Friday, May 8
Orlando 117, Boston 96
L.A. Lakers 108, Houston 94
Saturday, May 9
Denver 106, Dallas 105
Cleveland 97, Atlanta 82
Sunday, May 10
Houston 99, L.A. Lakers 87
Boston 95, Orlando 94
Monday, May 11
Cleveland 84, Atlanta 74, Cleveland wins se-
ries 4-0
Dallas 119, Denver 117
Tuesday, May 12
Boston 92, Orlando 88
L.A. Lakers 118, Houston 78
Wednesday, May 13
Denver 124, Dallas 110, Denver wins series
4-1
Thursday, May 14
Orlando 83, Boston 75, series tied 3-3
Houston 95, L.A. Lakers 80, series tied 3-3
Sunday, May 17
Houston at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
Orlando at Boston, 8 p.m.


Stewart snags All-Star




race and cool $1 million


Associated Press

CONCORD, N.C. - Tony
Stewart has won his first
race as a team owner, pick-
ing up a $1 million pay-
check in Saturday night's
All-Star race.
Stewart passed Matt
Kenseth with two laps to go


of a thrilling final 10-lap
shootout to win his first
All-Star event. It was the
first victory for Stewart-
Haas Racing, the team
Stewart has turned into a
championship contender
in just his first season of
ownership.
The win at Lowe's Motor


Speedway was in front of
co-owner Gene Haas, who
was at the track for the first
time since the completion of
a 16-month federal prison
term for tax fraud.
Kenseth finished second
and was followed by Kurt
Busch, Denny Hamlin and
Carl Edwards.


Phelps not unbeatable:



Piersol wins 200m breast


Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Michael Phelps is not un-
beatable.
Not when he's going
against Aaron Peirsol.
The world-record holder
and two-time Olympic cham-
pion handed Phelps his first
defeat in almost a year, win-
ning the 100-meter back-
stroke at the Charlotte
UltraSwim on Saturday
night
Wearing his new Arena
suit, Peirsol got off to a
strong start and touched in
53.32 seconds. Phelps was
trailing by more than a half-
second at the turn and had
no chance to make that up
against one of the world's
greatest backstrokers, taking
second in 53.79.
Phelps will remember this
one.
"No matter who I'm rac-
ing. T hate to lose," he said.
"A'zron and I have had a
number of battles back and
forth. ... That's the fun part
about racing Aaron - you
know he's always going be
there. He's a racer He's a
competitor. He's someone I
like to race."
Phelps' last defeat in a
final? Exactly 364 days ago,
when Peirsol beat him in the
200 backstroke at Santa
Clara, Calif., during the run-
up to the Olympics, accord-
ing to USA Swimming.
Phelps didn't swim the
backstroke in Beijing - it
didn't fit into the schedule
that produced a record eight
gold medals and made him
the winningest Olympian
ever. But he's changing
things up as he looks ahead
to this summer's world
championships and the 2012
London Games.
The 100 backstroke is one
of his main targets.
Bring it on, Peirsol said.
"By no means is anybody
giving anything to anybody,"
said Peirsol, who set a world
record in the 100 back while
winning his second straight
Olympic gold in the event at
Beijing. "I definitely wanted
to win that race."
Phelps is competing in
five events at Charlotte - his
first meet since Beijing -
but only two were on his
Olympic program. He won
them both on Friday night,
the 200 freestyle and 100 fly.
He swam the 50 free dur-
ing the Saturday morning
prelims and posted the


CHAMPS
Continued from Page B1

a wild pitch and Dunnellon
looked poised to have an-
other big inning that its op-
ponents have grown
accustomed to witnessing.
Kasey Fagan delivered
with a bloop single to left
field that easily scored
Wright. But somehow Sami
Fagan missed her father's
stop sign and ran right
threw it. And that's hard to
do considering the former
San Francisco 49ers defen-
sive end stands at 6-feet-3
and was jumping up and
down yelling, "Stop!"
"I just wanted to score,"
Sami explained. "When I fi-
nally saw the sign I was like,
'uh-oh.' I felt like ifI tried to
make it back to third, I
would have been dead there
too."
When asked how that con-
versation would have gone
if the team had lost, Sami
Fagan just smiled. Her
younger sister, Haley Fagan,
had her thoughts. ,
"Yeah, you would have
been so grounded. You
would have been doing
extra chores for a long
time," the freshman center
fielder laughed.
Despite the base-running


eighth-fastest time, but that
was merely a chance to test
out the new straight-arm
stroke he'll use in his final
event, the 100 free on Sun-
day Phelps scratched from
the 50 final, which was won
by world-record holder
Frederick Bousquet of
France.
There's still some work to
do in the 100 back, not to
mention some stout compe-
tition. Ryan Lochte, the
Olympic champion in the
200 back, finished fourth Sat-
urday night - not bad con-
sidering he was wearing an
old-fashioned Speedo brief
instead of one of the high-
tech suits.
Phelps' coach ripped off a
lengthy to-do list when they
get back to Baltimore.
"There's probably three or
four things in' that race he
can do better," Bob Bowman
said. "His start wasn't very
good; he came up really bad
from his start. His turn was
not exactly where it should
be. And he didn't have any
legs at the end. That's just
conditioning."
Still,- Phelps tried to put
the loss in perspective. He's
coming off a nine-month lay-
off that was by far the longest
of his career. He had in-
tended to come back sooner,
but had to 'serve a three-,
month suspension imposed
by USA Swimming after a
British tabloid published a
photo of him using a mari-
juana pipe.
The suspension ended
May 5.
Now it's time to chase
down Peirsol.
"When Michael gets beat,
he remembers the race
more," Bowman said. "When
I say, 'Let's do some kicking
to help with the 100 back,'
it'll have more credence."
Phelps was done when he
made the turn in 26.64 -
putting him 0.62 behind
Peirsol.
"If he's going to race
Aaron, he's got to be on even
terms one time and see what
happens," Bowman said.
"You don't come back on
someone who's the best fin-
isher ever. You have to push
him a little bit"
Peirsol was surprised by
his big lead at the flip.
"I couldn't see him, so I
thought he was probably re-
ally far ahead of me," Peirsol
said. "When he wasn't, that
made things a little easier."
Still, this has the makings

blunder, Dunnellon still
managed to plate two runs
in the frame, giving them a
3-0 lead.
Sami Fagan, however,
more than made up for that
gaffe with several great
plays on defense. The most
outstanding came on the re-
ceiving end of a perfect
throw by Tori Williams in
the first inning that gunned
down a Lake Wales base
runner that was trying to
steal.
But in a season that be-
longed to Kasey Fagan, the
state championship would
prove to be her coronation
to greatness. The junior,
who has already commit-
ted to attending the Uni-
versity of Florida when she
graduates, was nothing
short of a one-woman
wrecking crew.
The Dunnellon ace threw
a one-hitter, struck out five,
had two RBIs and scored
the team's only other run.
Coming into the Final Four,
many of the "experts" were
saying that she was the
third-best pitcher. By day's
end, even her father had to
admit that what Kasey had
done was something quite
special.
"She's our hero," Dallas
Towns admitted. "She's
been the one that made this
happen all year long for us.


of a very juicy rivalry. Phelps
said he's not planning to
hang a picture ofPeirsol next
to his bed as he once did with
Ian Crocker when those two
were battling in the 100 but-
terfly
Not yet, anyway.
"This is going to come back
with me," Phelps said of the
loss. "It doesn't matter what
stroke it is or What event it is,
I don't like to lose. Aaron has
got the upper hand on me in
pretty much all of our races."
Though she's been over-
shadowed by Phelps' return,
17-year-old high schooler
Dagny Knutson has actually
won more events in Char-
lotte than the star attraction.
Knutson, who trains with-
out benefit of a team or
world-class facilities in her
native North Dakota, picked
up her third gold medal of
the weekend with another
win over Olympian Katie
Hoff, this time in the 400
freestyle. Knutson won with
a personal-best time of 4
minutes, 9.60 seconds.
Hoff, who changed
coaches after a disappoint-
ing performance in Beijing,
has yet to recapture the form
that made her one of the
most hyped swimmers not
named Phelps going into the
Olympics. She was edged at
the wall in 4:09.72, after also
losing to Knutson in the 200
free.
The North Dakotan's other
win' came in the 400 individ-
ual medley.
Bousquet only entered the
meet on Wednesday, less
than a month after becoming
the first swimmer to break
the 21-second barrier in the
50 free.
He failed to match his
20.94 from the French na-
tional championship, but
turned in the fastest time
ever posted in the U.S. -
21.33. Olympian Cullen
Jones, who trains in Char-
lotte, was second in 21.92.
Bousquet, a former college
star at Auburn, is eager to
take the record even lower,
though his main goal is win-
ning a world championship
in Rome this summer
"I can shoot for sub-20 one
day," he said. "I'm trying not
to put any limit on it But
right now, it's more a matter
of winning the race than
going fast I really want to
win the 50 at the world cham-
pionships. I know it's going to
be very hard. These guys are
bringing it big time."

She's carried us. And we
just jumped on her back and
went along for the ride."
Dunnellon finally yielded
their first run of the tourna-
ment in the third inning
when Whitney DeLoach
reached base after being hit
in the head by a pitch. She
would later score when the
Highlanders' leadoff hitter
Tabitha Martin laced a RBI
triple down the right field
line. But during the next at-
bat, a great pickoff play by
Kasey caught the Lake
Wales speedster napping
and ended the Highlanders
scoring threat.
"We're so proud of our
girls," said Dunnellon prin-
cipal Michelle Lewis, tears
streaming down her face, as
she looked at a mock news-
paper front that declared
her school's team 'State
Champions.' "They're good
Christian girls and they've
worked hard for this. They
deserve every bit of it"
Amongst the strong Dun-
nellon fan base that turned
out in force for the champi-
onship game was a strong
Citrus County contingency,
including several players
from Citrus High School.
"When we play them
they're bur rivals," Citrus
Hurricanes pitcher Alex
McAfee admitted. "Today
though, they're our heroes."


CIrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


B4 sUNDMMe 172009


I


SCOREBOARD








SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 B5


For all the marbles


Associated Press
Orlando Magic forward Hedo Turkoglu, left, drives past Boston Celtics forward Paul Pierce
,during the first half of Game 6 of the NBA Eastern Conference semifinals. The Magic won
83-75 to even the series at three games apiece.


Magic will try

;to win Game 7

at Boston
Associated Press
ORLANDO - The
-Magic's shots were not
, falling. Orlando was not get-.
,ting rebounds and couldn't
make a defensive stop.
The season was slipping
away.
But the team that has
practically made collapsing
a hobby this postseason fi-
,;nally came up big in the
final minutes, prompting
,coach Stan Van Gundy to
even poke fun at his "master
,of panic" title for what his
-critics say is a lack of com-
,posure at the end of games.
The Magic and their coach
will again have to keep their
-cool at crunch time on Sun-
,day if they want to do what
-few teams ever have: win a
Game 7 at Boston.
', "We've been very, very
,good in difficult situations,
which is really hard to un-
,derstand with a coach that
panics like I do," Van Gundy
,joked after the Magic's 83-
75 Game 6 win Thursday.
,,"It's really hard to under-
stand hqw in those situa-
,-tions guys can just go out
,,and get the job done and
"fight through it. But it's
%been a trademark"
Actually, it hasn't
The Magic lost Game 5 at


Boston after losing a 14-
point lead in the fourth
quarter. The Celtics nearly
rallied from 28 points down
to steal Game 1, and Or-
lando also blew two 18-point
leads against Philadelphia
in its first-round series -
losing one of those games.
But Game 6 against
Boston was different.
I The Magic won despite
failing to do what they do
best - make shots at a high
percentage. They could not
hit from short range. Not
from 3-point range. Not
even on free throws.
.Everything was clanking.
Orlando shot just 36.6 per-
cent from the floor arid was
a dreadful 17-for-31 on free
throws. Boston's Paul Pierce
made three straight
jumpers to give the Celtics a
73-72 lead with 4:51 remain-
ing, the kind of push the has
consistently made the Magic
fall apart.
"We thought we had them
beat," Celtics center
Kendrick Perkins said.
Only this time Orlando's
ballhandlers didn't break-
down.
Rafer Alston hit a 3-
pointer and a floater in the
final minutes. Dwight
Howard had a put-back
layup, and Hedo Turkoglu
broke out of a shaky shoot-
ing night with a 3-pointer
that sealed the win.
' "We took better shots
down the stretch than we did
the other night in Boston,"
Alston said. "That's the key:
down the stretch you want to


get good, key opportunities
at the basket. The game is
played on instinct. If they
give you an alley I think you
should drive it hard and at-
tack the rim."
The pattern had all the
makings of a Celtics win. "
The defending champions
have made ugly games their
winning formula. The
Celtics were called for 28
fouls to the Magic's 15, play-
ing the kind of physical
game that usually makes Or-
lando crumble.
The Celtics lost two 10-
point leads in each half.
They committed 19
turnovers, and despite hold-
ing the Magic to a low-shoot-
ing percentage, they were
the team that failed when it
counted most.
"We didn't run out of gas. I
guess we choked," Celtics
guard Rajon Rondo said.
"We turned the ball over and
things did not go our way. We
did not get shots. Turnovers
led to a lot of points."
Now comes the tough part
for the Magic: doing it again.
Orlando has come back
from losses nearly every
time this year. The Magic
have lost consecutive games
only four times this season,
including the playoffs.
This time, there will be no
second chance.
"Now we're in a different
situation because we're com-
ing off a win," Van GTndy
said. "There's no bounce
back if you don't get it done
in Game 7. The bounce back
is next November"


Rockets set to take off?


Lakers pushed
,to the brink

by Houston
Associated Press
HOUSTON -The Hous-
ton Rockets have played
'their best this season when
-,everything seems ready to
fall apart.
They were virtually dis-
Smissed as a playoff threat in
late February, when Tracy
McGrady had season-ending
'knee surgery and Rafer Al-
ston was traded to Orlando.
They fumbled away
- home-court advantage in
the first round with a 95-84
loss to Dallas in the regular-
season finale.
They lost backup center
Dikembe Mutombo during
'the Portland series and
leading scorer Yao Ming a
week ago against the Lakers.
Yet the Rockets are still
playing, pushing Los Ange-
les to Sunday's Game 7 in
.'their Western Conference
'semifinal series with the re-
siliency that has become
their defining trait.
"We're surprising a lot of
-people," said 6-foot-6 for-
ward Chuck Hayes, who be-


MAssoiaeu dPres
Houston Rockets' Luis Scola (4) shoots as Los Angeles Lak-
ers' Andrew Bynum (17) defends during Game 6 of the NBA
Western Conference semifinals on Thursday. The Rockets
won 95-80 to tie the series at 3-3.


came Houston's starting cen-
ter when Yao, who is a foot
taller, broke his foot in Game
3. "I'm sure a lot of people
had us written off."
The day after learning
Yao was out for the rest of
the postseason, the Rockets
routed the Lakers 99-87 in
Game 4. Los Angeles won
Game 5 by 40 points, a loss
that had many believing
Houston's spunk had fi-
nally run out.
Then came Game 6 on
Thursday night. The Rock-
ets raced to another big
lead, staved off a Lakers'


rally and won by 15 points.
"We've been through so
much, that's been the story
of this season," forward Ron
Artest said.
The Rockets found out
on Feb. 18 that McGrady,
the face of the franchise
since he arrived in 2004,
would miss the rest of the
season. The two-time scor-
ing champion was bothered
by knee problems from the
start of training camp and
caused a stir when he an-
nounced that he was going
to have risky microfracture
surgery.


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CIarus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











EPage B6 -SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009



ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Victoria Gotti in
her own court fight
GARDEN CITY, N.Y. -
The daughter of the late
mob boss John Gotti has
found herself in the middle
of her own legal skirmish,
and she says she's not back-
- .-- ing down
from a
fight.
Victoria
Gotti was
in a




to keep her $3 million
Long Island mansion
from foreclosure. She
says she's fighting an ap-
peals court ruling allow-
ing a bank to take the
home featured in her re-
ality TV show "Growing
Up Gotti."
Gotti says a $700,000'
loan taken out by her ex-
husband used the home
as collateral without her
knowledge.
She says there's a pro-
posed deal between her
"ex" and federal prosecu-
tors for him to sell off w
properties he owns to sat-
isfy an forfeiture case re-
sulting from his 2001
racketeering conviction.

America Ferrera
film looks war
MEXICO CITY- "Ugly
Betty" star America Fer-
rera is hoping her new
film will inspire Ameri-
cans to address the strug-
gles soldiers face after
they come home from
Iraq or Afghanistan.
r h The 25-
year-old
America s starng
in and
producing
"The Dry
Land,"
which fol-
lows a
. America young
Frerra mann h dif-
ficul ties readapting to
small-town life following
a tour of duty.
Ferrera says the United
States "should havean hon-
est discussion about the ef-
fects that war has on our /
society, on the men who
come back, on the families
that are broken from it"

Bullock honored
for Katrina charity
NEW ORLEANS - Ac-
tress Sandra Bullock was
inducted Friday into a
New Orleans high
school's "Hall of Fame"
after do-
nating
tens of
thousands

cthe public
school
.sBullock . by Hurri-


Bullocktook the audito-
rium stage at Warren Eas-
ton High School to a
standing ovation from
about 300 people. She said
shecouldn't take all the
credit for renovations
after the school suffered
$4 million in damages
from nearly 10 feet of
floodwater from the storm.
'I just write the checks,"
the actress said.
In an interview, Bul-
lock said she was "embar-
rassed" by the federal
government's slow re-
sponse after Katrina and
felt compelled to help.
Her donation helped
fund scholarships, new
band uniforms and reno-
vations of the school au-
ditorium. She said
providing for new band
uniforms was important
because of New Oleans'
rich music history. School


graduates include jazz
clarinetist Pete Fbuntain,
also in the hall of fame.
"It's not just reading,
writing and arithmetic,"
she said. "Where's the joy
in life? In New Orleans,
it's in music."
-From wire reports


Ang Lee looks at Woodstock hijinks


Associated Press

CANNES, France - Ang Lee views
his 1970s drama "The Ice Storm" as a
representation of the disillusionment
of the '60s, the hangover of Woodstock
Now .director Lee has gone back in
time a few years to capture the party
that led to the hangover "Taking Wood-
stock," Lee's Cannes Film Festival
entry, presents a loving glimpse of the
behind-the-scenes hijinks that resulted
in the gloriously sloppy music fest,
Set in 1973, 1997's "The Ice Storm"
was a portrait of suburban families
unraveling amid adultery, casual drug
use and the backdrop of the Watergate
scandal. "Taking Woodstock" shows
the summer-long buildup to the 1969
rock 'n' roll gathering that lured half a
million free spirits to a rainy, muddy
patch of farmland.
Woodstock "has a symbolic meaning to
me. It's the innocence of a young gener-
ation departing from the old establish-
mentand tryingto find a more refreshing
way, more fairway, to live with everybody
else," Lee said Saturday before the
Cannes premiere of"Taking Woodstock"
"It was dirty, filthy It was actually a
mess," said Lee, a best-director Academy
Award winner for"BrokebackMountain"
"But you have to give those kids,
those half a million kids credit, that
actually, they had three days of peace
and music. Nothing violent happened.
I think that's something. I don't know if
we can pull that off today."
Based on the memoir by Elliot
Tiber, "Taking Woodstock" is the story
of a dutiful son (Demetri Martin) who
views the upcoming rock festival as a
means to save his parents' seedy
Catskills motel from foreclosure. After
Woodstock organizers lose their per-
mit to stage the event in a nearby
town, Elliot.brokers a deal with the


Associated Press
Taiwanese director Ang Lee, right, answers questions Saturday at a press con-
ference for the film "Taking Woodstock" during the 62nd International film fes-
tival in Cannes, southern France. Seated left is American actor Demetri Martin.
promoters to stage the event on the Lee said. "It took me a long way to get
dairy farm of his neighbor Max Yasgur there. I thought after 13 years, I sort of
(Eugene Levy) in Bethel, N.Y. earned the right to do it, just be re-
"Taking Woodstock" also features laxed, be happy and at peace with my-
Emile Hirsch, Liev Schreiber, Imelda self and everybody else." '
Staunton and Henry Goodman. Lee ran a hippie camp to teach the
It's Lee's lightest film since the mid- extras the right way to behave. The film-
1990s, when he made the romances makers said their hardest task was get-
"Sense and Sensibility" "Eat Drink Man ting the extras to look like '60s youths.
Woman" and "The Wedding Banquet" Screenwriter James Schamus said
The project landed on Lee's desk by there's a different look to today's
chance while he was promoting his young people, with their passion for
last film, the dark World War II-era spy fitness and disdain for pubic hair.
thriller "Lust, Caution." Tiber was the Said Schamus: "Whenyouthinkabout
guest following Lee on a San Francisco it, a generation of people who weren't
TV talk show. The two talked a bit and fat, who weren't staring at themselves in
Tiber gave Lee a copy of his book .the mirror all the time, and not shaving
"I was yearning to do a comedy- everything off down there, it captures
slash-drama again without cynicism," the difference of 40 years right there."


Nintendo sets new Wit gizmo:
Associated Press It's no secret the wrist-flicking Wil


LOS ANGELES -
There's nothing all that
charming about Nintendo's
latest gadget.
It's not as zany as a zapper
or as sexy as a steering
wheel. It doesn't even tell you
whether you're losing
weight However, the
gamemaker is hoping a small
cube-shaped device called
Wii MotionPlus will take the
Wii's motion-sensing controls
to a hew level of precision.
It's no secret the wrist-
flicking Wii Remote's lack of
accuracy has long been the
console's clunky downfall.
The Wii MotionPlus, avail-
able beginning June 8, suc-
cessfully defeats that
dilemma by using gyro-
scopic sensors to exactly
minlic gamers hand move-
ments, making such activi-
ties as sword fighting, disc
throwing and golfing look
seamless on screen.
"The great thing about this
particular new technology,
which isn't always true for
other new technologies, is
that we immediately saw the
benefits of it," said "Tiger
Woods PGA Tour 10" senior
producer Jason Shenkman.


in motion
know how hard you have
swung the remote," said
Vandenberghe. "That means
we can ask the player to
have a more physical expe-
rience, like having enemies
wvho are wearing armor that
players will have to hit
harder with their sword."
If the blockbuster sales of
the Wii Balance Board with
"Wii Fit" are any indication,
gamers want the new con-
traption even if it's not com-
patible with their old titles.
Wedbush Morgan game an-
alyst Michael Pachter be-
lieves Wii MotionPlus' price
-$19.99 for one, $49.99 if bun-
dled with "Wii Sports Resort"
- is right for cash-strapped
consumers. He anticipates
that over 30 million Wii own-
ers will pick up the new ac-
cessory in the first year.
Nintendo is likely to pro-
mote Wii MotionPlus and an-
nounce new games that use the
technology at next month's
Electronic Entertainment
Expo, where the gadget was
first unveiled lastyear Rumors
have been circulatingthat Nin-
tendo competitors Microsoft
and Sony may announce their
own motion-control technolo-
gies for the Xbox 360 and
PlayStation3 consoles at E3.-


New show teaches old dogs extreme tricks


Associated Press

ACTON, Mass. - Max the
Border Collie can roll over on
command, herd crowds and
sit still on a table while his
owners eat
But Grace and Michael
Ham want their dog to do
more - like climb people's
backs and then leap into the
air to catch a Frisbee. So, they
have sought the help of Zak
George, a dog trainer made fa-
mous from YouTube clips who
now is hosting a reality TV
show aimed at teaching old
dogs new tricks.
A crew for Animal Planet's
new show -tentatively called
"Fetch Me a Beer" - recently
filmed Max while he was
learning his new moves. The
20-episode series, scheduled
to premiere in October, will
show George teaching other
dogs such skills as riding a
bike and helping a helpless
human land a date.
"The dogs are easy. It's the
people who are more chal-
lenging," George says.
'"There's nothing we can't at-
tempt to teach a dog"
So far, eight episodes have
been shot in Miami and the
Boston area Later this month,


Michael Ham, of Brookline,
Mass., responded to a casting
call earlier this year Before
the call, the couple had fol-
lowed George's YouTube
training videos.
Max was quickly picked
and a crew began recording
the dog's progress. Michael
Ham says it took more than a
month for Max to learn how to
leap off his back and jump for
a Frisbee. "He can do all sorts
of tricks, but this was pretty
difficult," he says.
George says Max had come
a long way from their initial
meeting. During the Wednes-
day taping, Max was joined by
other dogs who have com-
peted in a number of advance
competitions, including two
dancing dogs and a few ad-
vanced Frisbee catchers.
Grace Ham says that after
participating in the show, she
thinks Max will one day pick
up some of those advance
skills. "We didn't know we had
a world-class, competing dog,"
she says. "We learned that
through this show."
George says "the sky's the
limit" on what other dogs can
learn. Then he pauses. 'The
sky? Maybe we should teach a
dog to fly a plane."


"Before I even touched it or
got my hands on it, I knew
exactly what having a gyro-
scope in our possession
would do for this game."
Electronic Arts' "Tiger
Woods PGA Tour 10" will be
the first game bundled with
the Wii MotionPlus.
Shenkman insists the in-
creased sensitivity doesn't
boost difficulty because in-
stant feedback helps gamers
before their shots.
Only five games have so far
been confirmed to employ
the new functionality. The
most prominent is Nin-
tendo's own,"Wii Sports Re-
sort," a beachy followup to


the crew will tape Brumby the
Australian Shepherd com-
pleting his training with
George on learning to bowl
with his owner Yes, bowl.
Seanbaker Carter, execu-
tive producer of Powder-
house Productions, says
viewers will see all sorts of
skills from dogs they didn't
think were possible, such as


the popular "Wii Sports." Be-
sides "Tiger Woods," the
other games are Electronic
Arts' "Grand Slam Tennis,"
Sega's "Virtua Tennis 2009"
and Ubisoft's slice-and-shoot-
'em-up sequel "Red Steel 2."
Though the original "Red
Steel" was one of the most an-
ticipated games to debut
alongside the Wii in 2006, the
first-person samurai
shooter's wonky fidelity left
many gamers feeling let
down. Creative director Jason
Vandenberghe promises Wii
MotionPlus technology will
remedy that in "Red Steel 2."
"One of the cool things is
that with Wii MotionPlus, we


seeing a dog "literally fetching
a beer out of a fridge" and
bringing it to its owner
"Its the one trick we broba-
bly all need to happen," says
Carter, whose company is pro-
ducing the show.
Another episode, he says,
will have a cat using a toilet
The show's producers dis-
covered Max after Grace and


Florida
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U Last night's winning
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FRIDAY, MAY 15
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call (850) 487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY=

Today is Sunday, May 17,
the 137th day of 2009. There
are 228 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On May 17,1954, the U.S.
Supreme Court unanimously
struck down racially segre-
gated public schools in its
Brown v. Board of Education
of Topeka decision.
On this date:'
In 1792, the New York
Stock Exchange had its ori-
gins as a group of brokers met
under a tree on Wall Street.
In 1849, fire erupted in St. -
Louis, resulting in the loss of
three lives, more than 400
buildings and some two
dozen steamships.
In 1875, the first Kentucky
Derby'was run; the winner
was Aristides.
In 1938, Congress passed
the Second Vinson Act, pro-
viding for a strengthened
U.S. Navy.
In 1946, President Harry S.
Truman seized control of the
nation's railroads, delaying -
but not preventing - a
threatened strike by engi-
neers and trainmen.
In 1973, the Senate began
its televised hearings info the
Watergate scandal.
In 1980, rioting that claimed
18 lives erupted in Miami's
Liberty City after an all-white
jury in Tampa acquitted four
former Miami police officers of
fatally beating black insurance
executive Arthur McDuffie.
In 1987, 37 American sailors
were killed when an Iraqi war-
plane attacked the U.S. Navy
frigate Stark in the Persian
Gulf. (Iraq and the U.S. called
the attack a mistake.)
Ten years ago: The
Supreme Court banned states
from paying lower welfare
benefits to newcomers as op-
posed to longtime residents.
Five years ago: Massa-
chusetts became the first
state to allow legal same-sex
marriages.
One year ago: Sen. Ed-
ward Kennedy, D-Mass., was.
flown to a Boston hospital
after suffering a seizure at his
Cape Cod home. (He was
later diagnosed with a can-
cerous brain tumor.)
Today's Birthdays: Actor-
director Dennis Hopper is 73.
Actor Peter Gerety is 69.
Singer Taj Mahal is 67.
Singer-songwriter Jesse Win-
chester is 65. Rock musician
Bill Bruford is 60. Singer-mu-
sician George Johnson (The
Brothers Johnson) is 56. TV
personality Kathleen Sullivan
is 56. Actor Bill Paxton is 54.
Boxing Hall of Famer Sugar
Ray Leonard is 53. Actor-co-
median Bob Saget is 53.


Sports announcer Jim Nantz
is 50. Singer Enya is 48. Talk
show host-actor Craig Fergu-
son is 47. San Antonio Spurs
guard Tony Parker is 27.
Thought for Today: "I al-
ways have a quotation for
everything - it saves original
thinking." - Dorothy L. Say-
ers, English author (1893-
1957).


Remote's lack of accuracy has long
been the console's clunky downfall.
The Wii MotionPlus, available
beginning June 8, successfully defeats
that dilemma by using gyroscopic
sensors to exactly mimic gamers' hand
movements, making such activities
as sword fighting, disc throwing and
golfing look seamless on screen.


Associated Press
Killian, a competitive border collie, flies through the air
Wednesday while chasing a flying disc thrown by owner
Sharon Marconi while warming up for the taping of a televi-
sion show for the Animal Planet channel in Acton, Mass.









Section C - SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009



COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


A river


of


cash


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press
. border officials set up a� roadblock April 23 in San Diego, Calif., to search cars as traffic backs up on Interstate 5 before crossing the border
Mexico from the United States at the San Ysidro Port of Entry.


S:'awks circle above the lines of traffic at the hot, arid border
crossing into Mexico. Sage brush catches clothes tossed by fenc
climbers. Three curious, dusty horses watch the federal agents
tapping on car windows, opening trunks, looking in vain for


e


contraband. -. An agent notices the horses'and wonders aloud if
they're wild. A colleague notes the temperature. 92 degrees. T
"We're sucking up a lot of exhaust out here," supervisory Customs and
Border Protection officer Edith Serrano says, shrugging in her uniform.


Valuable


pressure


washing


lessons
purchased my darling
wife a pressure washer
for Mother's Day.
Just call me a romantic.
Several years ago I got
her a boat. anchor for
Christmas.
These are gifts she asks
for I am not crazy enough
to buy such things if they
aren't requested.
It was a pressure
washer she wanted, and
that's what she got.
Retired two years from
the school system, she still
has not learned to relax.
The pressure washer fit
right into her busy work-
day. She cleaned the back
porch thoroughly and
then eyed our old pontoon
boat sitting at the end of
the dock
The boat was getting
pretty moldy and a good
pressure wash would
brighten things right up.
So she hauled the pres-
sure washer to the end of
the dock, connected the
hose and got to work.
See WINDOW/Page C4


Associated Press


,This is what the Obama admin-
istration's new commitment to
l ,p Mexico fight its drug cartels
looks like..
President Barack Obama this
spring promised his Mexican
counterpart, Felipe Calderon,
that the U.S. would fight two of
the biggest contributions Ameri-
can residents make to the drug
cartels Calderon has vowed to
eradicate: cash and weapons, the
latter hard to come by in Mexico.
'For the past five weeks, hun-
dreds of agents participating in a
newly intensified $95 million out-
bound inspection program have
been stepping into southbound
traffic lanes, stopping suspicious-
looking cars and trucks.
The Associated Press fanned
out to the busiest crossings alohg
the Mexican border - San Diego,
Nogales, El Paso and Laredo - to
see how effective the inspections
are.
The findings? Wads of U.S. cur-
rency headed for Mexico, wedged
into car doors, stuffed under mat-
tresses, taped onto torsos, were
sniffed out by dogs, seized by
agents and locked away for possi-
b| investigations. No guns were
f tund as the reporters watched;
tKey rarely are.
'"I do not believe we can even
rnake a dent in (southbound
struggling) because that assumes
tfr cartels are complete idiots,
-tich they're not. Why in the
wprld would they try to smuggle
weaponss and currency through a
checkpoint when there are so
-jany other options?" said Border
I�trol Agent T.J. Bonner, presi-
dint of the agents' union.
-According to CBP, between
T arch 12 and April 30 officers
iized:
In Fifty-one pieces of ammuni-
ton, weapons parts and guns, a
minuscule fraction of the 2,000
apons the Mexican govern-
nt estimates are smuggled
th every day;
* $12 million in cash, less than
(he-tenth of 1 percent of the $17
I Hlion to $39 billion the U.S. Jus-
tce Department estimates is ille-
sally sent to Mexico from the U.S.
annually, but more than the $10


- U- -
Vehicles and pedestrians enter Mexico from the United States on April 23
at the San Ysidro Port of Entry in San Diego. U.S. Customs and Border Pro-
tection officers have increased their spot searches for cash and weapons
under the administration of President Barack Obama.


million seized in outbound checks
in 2008;
* Sixty-one people on charges
involving weapons or currency of-
fenses and on outstanding war-
rants.
Millions of cars pass into Mex-
ico from the United States every
year. The federal government
doesn't keep track but a count by
Texas A&M International Univer-,
sity's Texas Center for Border
Economic and Enterprise Devel-
opment shows more than 27 mil-
lion vehicles a year drove into.
Mexico just from Texas.
The outbound checkpoints the


AP observed stopped sometimes
one out of four cars, sometimes
one out of 100, and not every day.
Even that amount created huge
traffic backups at some locations
and, agents said, might have al-
lowed spies to call any smugglers
heading that way and warn them
to put off their Mexico trip.
Agents across the border said
the first few minutes of their op-
eration are the most precious.
That's how long it takes for
"scouts" watching from a bridge
in San Diego lined with taxis to
radio ahead to smugglers to stay
away. In Nogales, a dozen men


dashed along a Mexican hill
about 150 yards from the check-
point last week
"We tend to see spotters up
there," said CBP agent Brian
Levin. "They sit up on those hills
and watch everything we do."
Inspectors retreat, then mount
another "surge" after a while
standing on the side of the free-
way.
"We like to be unpredictable.
We like to hit hard fast and pull
back," said Oscar Preciado, direc-
tor of San Diego's San Ysidro port
of entry "If we're going to have
success, it's within the first few
minutes."
Some of those stopped were
sanguine, others annoyed.
"I guess they think I have drugs
or something," said Daniel
Saucedo, a 15-year-old Albu-
querque high school student who
clambered out of the passenger
side of a small white pickup truck
with his two dogs last week in El
Paso, just a few hundred feet
north of Ciudad Juarez, after
agents ordered him into a sec-
ondary inspection area. Watching
agents cut through heavy plastic
wrap covering the computer gear
while the driver unpacked the
truck's bed, Saucedo worried
about the delay.
;"It's dumb," he said, before
repacking and heading south.
"They already had told us to leave
and then they pulled us over"
William Molaski, port director
in El Paso, said agents at his four
El Paso bridges haven't found
much since the focus on outbound
checks started in early April -
one handgun and only about
$400,000 - "but not for lack of try-
ing."
"It's a needle in a haystack,"
Molaski said.
It's a different day, a different
checkpoint, but the description is
echoed again and again along the
southwest border.
"To be honest, it's a crapshoot,"
said Jose Garcia, deputy special
agent in charge of investigations
at U.S. Immigration and Customs
Enforcement in San Diego.
"You're rolling the dice when
doing this without intelligence."
However, Garcia added that the
See CASH/Page C3


Charlie Brennan
SHADES
OF GRAY


No siesta at

Info Fiesta
For several years
now, I've attended
the Citrus Hills
Info Fiesta. It's not that I'm
shopping for a home in the
upscale community. The
Info Fiesta is an event for
residents to learn about a
variety of things that make
Citrus County tick
In addition to the
Chronicle, those repre-
sented included hospitals,
constitutional offices, the
chamber, divisions of
county government, busi-
nesses and other entities.
It's a pleasant 90 or so
minutes where lots of
input, observations and
opinions are offered -
many of which are shared
by the community at-large.
Here are some of the
Chronicle-related things
brought up for discussion:
* Changes to Sunday's
Viewfinder magazine.
Four or five people said
they don't like the scaled-
back, reformatted version
and want to see movies
listed. The only real posi-
tive comment was from
Sports EditorJohn Coscia,
who was there, too, who
said his wife likes the new
version. John is one posi-
tive person.
As mentioned in the
past, the change was
made with the under-
standing it wouldn't be
widely perceived as an
improvement but would
save thousands and thou-
sands of dollars in a time
when all aspects of busi-
See SHADES/Page C4










0N C2 - SUAY, MAY 17, 209



PINION


"When the head aches, all members
partake of the pain."
Miguel de
" "Don


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


L


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
,--l


EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan..... .............. ........... publisher
Charlie Brennan ..... ................. ........... editor
Neale Brennan ........promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ................................managing editor
Cheri Harris................................... features editor
Curt Ebitz..................................... citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ................................... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson ................................ guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


GET THINGS UNDER CONTROL



Administrator


will need clear


direction, latitude


C county commissioners
agreed on a familiar face
last Tuesday when they
unanimously agreed to name
Brad Thorpe as the new county
administrator.
For Thorpe - who served two
terms as a county commissioner
and for the last five years served
as a director in county govern-
ment - the appointment is the
end of a long jour-
ney. He will now
have his opportu- THE I
nity to lead the ef- The neo
forts of county admin
government.
As stated in this
column prior to the OUR 01
appointment, we Challeng
felt Thorpe was the
best candidate for
the job. The last two administra-
tors selected by the county-both
chosen from outside applicants -
had very short tenures because
they never.got in sync with the
elected officials.
. Let's admit it, it has been a group
that's difficult to get in sync with.
Thorpe has spent decades get-
ting to know the key players in
government and the community
and he is well equipped to under-
stand his new role. But expecta-
tions will be high from the start.
And the question will be an-
swered if any appointed county
administrator can get in sync with
a county commission that has
struggled to identify the direction
it would like to travel.
With his background in politics,
Thorpe surely understands that,


S

iV

F
C


it's important that he not be
sucked into one of the political
factions on the commission. As the
appointed leader, he is charged
with implementing the policies
and vision determined by the ma-
jority of elected officials.
Because tax revenues are on
the decline, Thorpe's initial chal-
lenge will be to offer a spending
and organizational plan that is in
line with tax dollars
that will be avail-
SSUE: able. And that
county means additional
sCufIY cutbacks in staffing
and programs will
be on the agenda.
DINION: As an insider,
's ahead. Thorpe knows
where the waste
and inefficiencies
are. But as an insider, it also
makes it more difficult to cut peo-
ple and programs when you have
a personal attachment
He is going to have to make
some hard recommendations in
the months to come.
It was a bit of a love fest last
Tuesday when the commissioners
appointed Thorpe to the job. The
elected officials can help him suc-
ceed by setting clear policy and
expectations. Then those politi-
cians need to get out of the way so
the administrator and his staff can
get the job done.
We've had way too much tur-
moil in county government over
the last four years. It's time to get
things under control and get back
to work doing the business of the
taxpayers.


Hot Corner: ..LIE CRIST -


Not of GOP
When calling in to the Sound
Off referring to our governor, Gov.
Charlie Crist of Florida, do not
refer to him as a Republican. He's
-a turncoat. Charlie Crist is pure
Democrat.
Don't run
I see Gov. Crist wants to run for
the Senate seat. I don't think he
should run for anything. He has
not done Florida one bit of good.
He's giving us gambling ... He has
not given us tax reduction. Now
he wants to drill (offshore) in the
waters off our beautiful Florida.
He's just like every other politician
- out for himself. And the money
he's going to get from gambling,
he said he's going to use for edu-


Doggone it
I read the article in the May 12
newspaper in Sound Off about
"Dogs indoors." I totally agree
with that gentleman or
person because I'm aller- 0 %
gic to dogs, too, and I
happen to have at one
time-worked in these .4.
hardware stores and it's
ridiculous that dogs are
allowed to be in the
stores unless they're
service dogs. They'd
bring them in in baskets, CAL
on carts, anything. You'd 563
think that's the only thing
they've got to do is take a
stroll through the stores. They've
even done their duty on the floor
in the stores and nothing gets
done about it. It's very unhealthy
and I think it's wrong because I'm
allergic to animals myself.
Alphabet soupy
Say no. When the new man
came into the White House, we
said, "Oh no, we are 'Rs' and they
are 'Ds.' The man said, "We need


cation ... Whatever taxes we pay,
we pay for all the services, but
then don't get them ...
Venting
Well, I see in the paper here
that our useless part-time gover-
nor, Crist, is going to leave the of-
fice. Well, he don't do anything in
there anyway except ramble
around and look good with him
and his wife running around doing
nothing. Good riddance to him..
He don't do nothing. He's a part-
time governor., I'm glad to see him
go. Maybe we'll get somebody in
there that really works at the job.
Hah, just like our county commis-
sioners, huh? And that one guy in
there, the administrative job -
what a joke. Got that off my
chest.


to do this." We said, "No." He
said, "We need to change this."---
We said, "No." Anything he says,
we say, "No," because we are "Rs"
and they are "Ds." I'm just an old
man and until the "Rs"
JUND and the "Ds" quit fighting
WF and come together, oh
0 boy, this country's going
to stay in a mess. They
y need to quit acting like
old, spoiled-brat million-
aires.
Are you kidding?
This is in response to
0579 the "Teachers get an in-
complete" article. Sorry,
Ms. Himmel, I don't want
to trust any administrator for a
fair evaluation of a teacher when
there is no clear-cut, specific rea-
son for that teacher to be fired.
Who are you trying to kid? The
public should truly be informed
of the methods and manner
these annual contract teachers
are being let go in. Many princi-
pals do take it lightly, with no
human compassion. Give me a
break.


We need renaissance officers


DOUGLAS COHN
AND ELEANOR CLIFT
recently fired Gen. David.
McKiernan led the 2003
ground invasion into Iraq,
which began with "shock and
awe" and quickly toppled the
regime of Saddam Hussein. Amid
the celebratory coverage of U.S.
military prowess, there was one
notable lapse, and that was the
failure to post guards at the Bagh-
dad Museum. Five hundred years
from now, the U.S. invasion of
Iraq will be a footnote compared
to the 7,000 years of antiquity car-
ried off and lost or destroyed dur-
ing those early, chaotic days. As
commander of the ground troops,
it was McKiernan's responsibility.
to protect the museum just as he
did the oil ministry. The fact that
he didn't see the security of an-
other culture's treasured history
as a priority was perhaps an early
warning of his limitations. He's a
fine soldier, but what we need in
today's world are renaissance of-
ficers with an appreciation for
the cultural complexities that in
the Muslim world can easily
make the difference between
winning and losing a war.
Firing a general in the middle
of a war and not giving him a new
command is so unusual that to
find a comparable situation we
have to go back more than half a
century to President Truman's
ouster of Gen. Douglas
MacArthur in 1951 during the Ko-
rean War. When Defense Secre-
tary Robert Gates was asked if
firing Gen. McKiernan meant


Other VOICES


that the veteran officer had
reached the end of his career, he
replied with a single word, "Prob-
ably," a blunt, career-ending as-
sessment.
At the same time, Gates in-
sisted there wasn't any one thing
that McKiernan had done wrong,
that it was the need for "fresh
thinking" and "fresh eyes" that
drove the decision to replace a
senior commander so abruptly
and at such a critical time in the
evolution of the administration's
war strategy. McKiernan had only
been in Afghanistan 11 months,
and from the beginning of his
time there had requested more
resources, a plea that candidate
Barack Obama heard and made
part of his campaign/platform,
promising that if elected, he
would send more troops to what
had become the forgotten war.
Now that Obama is president,
Afghanistan is his war along with
managing the conflict and chaos in
neighboring .Pakistan. Thanks to
Obama, some of the additional
troops McKiernan wanted are on
their way to the region, but they
won't be enough to pacify the un-
forgiving mountainous terrain that
brought the Soviet army with
500,000 soldiers to its knees. If
Obama is going to have any chance
to win the war he has now esca-
lated, he's got to think way beyond
conventional military tactics.
Fighting and winning a guerilla
war requires military leadership
that recognizes and respects all


the civilian aspects of rebuilding
a country. Winning the hearts and
minds of the population is essen-
tial to putting down an insur-
gency. McKiernan, given his
background and experience, is
seen as more old school in his
thinking. He was trained to kill
and hunt down the enemy, not
build roads and schools and
make deals that distinguish be-
tween good Taliban and bad Tal-
iban, men lacking a livelihopd
and caught up in the adventure
versus the genuine jihadists bent
on death and destruction.
The man who will take over the
command in Afghanistan, Lt.
Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, is a
Special Operations commander
who embraces a broader view, of
the military's mission if it is-to.
succeed in Afghanistan. He" is
part of a new generation of sol-
diers that recognizes military
might is not enough, that the war-
riors of today must be equally
committed to protecting the civil-
ian population, rebuilding shat-
tered infrastructure, or in the.
case of Afghanistan, building new
roads and encouraging the cre-
ation of a civil society. It's a tall
order and one that some tradi-
tional soldiers don't see as part of
their job.

Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift
author the Washington Merr.-
Go-Round column, founded i
1932 by Drew Pearson.


Request your money
Citrus County residents have
often had the misfortune of
being overlooked when gifts and
grants from Washington, D.C.,
have been awarded to Florida.
Two such grant programs are the
"My Safe Florida Home" grant
program and the "Wind Debris
Safety Program."
One reason given by our legis-
lators for the failure to include
Citrus citizens as funding benefi-,
ciaries has been, "We haven't had
any complaints from the citi-
zens." Well, the citizens often
don't know about the availability
of funds until the money has
been exhausted in other coun-
ties. How do the residents of the
southern counties know about
the grants? One way is they check
the Internet and they are also no-
tified by their-local legislators.
You know that the White
House has invested enormous
amounts of our tax dollars to
help pull Wall Street out of
debt.But no one was helping
"Main Street" (the middle class).
People like you and I need help,
too; we are losing our homes and
jobs. So, the president invested
money with the mayors and gov-
ernors, who are mandated to see
that we get the help we need.
All communities do not hap-
pen to have mayors; therefore,
the funds sent for our little
"Main Streets" went to our gov-
ernor. We trust that our county
commissioners and county ad-
ministrator, collectively, would
look after our interests.
How do you know how much
Florida will receive from the
stimulus and what it is for, so
that you can tell your commis-
sioners your primary needs?


OPINIONS INVITED
Il The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the editorial board of the newspa-
per.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Mike Arnold at
(352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
e-mail. Names and hometowns
will be printed;.phone numbers
will not be published or given out.
N We reserve the right to edit let-
. ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

Go online to FlaRecovery.gov.
When the Florida home page
comes up, on the small menu bar
under the title, "The Florida Of-
fice of Economic Recovery,"
click on "'About." On "State and
Local," scroll down the list to
(open and read) any category
that interests you.
Then call the governor's office
at (850) 488-4441 to find out what
office is' running that program.
Contact that office and ask to
have an application sent to you.
At the bottom of the first win-
dow, you'll find the dates that
each program begins. It's a
chart, "Timeline: Florida's Stim-
ulus Milestones." The dates go
on through February 2011.
If the legislators do not hear


from you, they will assume you
are not needy. Remember, it's
your tax money.
Marco Wilson
Inverness

Stamp Out Hunger
I would like to give a quick,
but big special thanks and praise
to the letter carriers, U.S. Postal
Service, and thousands of gener-
ous citizens who contributed big-
time to the Stamp Out Hunger
food drive this past weekend.
This was a great display of con-
cern for our neighbors struggling
to make ends meet in what is ar-
guably the most dire economic cli-
mate many of us have experienced
in our lifetimes. At our food pantry
alone, at St Elizabeth Ann Setori
in Citrus Springs, we received .
more than a ton of food through'
the Dunnellon post office and its
staff of carriers. I'm sure this was
multiplied many times over
throughout the network of food '
pantries in Citrus County Thanks
from all of us for the great effort
Michael Hartney, co-director
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Food Pantry

Quality care
I wish to express my apprecia-
tion and awareness of the qual-
ity of care I received in the
recent four-day period of being a
patient in Seven Rivers hospital,
specifically the second-floor ;
area. The complete staff in
charge of my care and eventual
discharge displayed the utmost
dedication in insuring my condi-
tion received their interest in
immediate care would result in
short-term stay and comfort.
Kenneth Domigan
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


>LETT- to the Editor


-(








COMMENTARY


CnIRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Not burying my head in the sand,
oes an ostrich actu- head in the sand. You can under my desk would save gan Democra
ally bury its head in say I'm an imbecile if you my hide if there was a nu- say, a closet
the sand when it like, but don't denigrate a clear attack bu
feels threatened? group of long-legged, long- Perhaps it's ar
Based on personal, de- necked birds in the process. duct tape around he
tailed and scientific re- Why, you could ask, might the windows as a d
search - I Googled 'em - you think I'm an imbecile? proffered answer * id
ostriches do not bury their Because I believe the big to the threat of a F
heads in the sand when to-do about swine flu is media biological attack - hi
threatened. They will press overkill-- a crock of unadul- during those - l hi
their heads close to the bot- terated hooey And, once heartbreaking, m
tom of their nests, which are again, the question-- why? frightening days th
in fact holes they've dug in Perhaps it's the previous immediately Fred Brannen , su
the ground, but the head- pandemic disasters-in- after Sept. 11, A SLICE qt
burying bit is a myth. waiting, such as bird flu and 2001. cc
So, after you read my mad cow disease. Maybe it's sim- OF LIFE of
writings for today, you can't Maybe it's grade school ply that I've had N
say that I'm acting like an when I'd "duck and cover," it up to here with fear. don't questic
ostrich and burying my trusting that cowering My mother became a Rea- mous quote:


but spitting in
t - which is to we have to fear is fear itself!"
Republican - Take, for instance, the
t growing up economy:
found her Did the short-sellers, con-
lped me to un- glomerates, big banks, mega
rstand the insurance companies, mort-
olization of gage brokers, automakers,
DR. Today, with oil companies, manufactur-
ndsight and ers, Ponzi scheme perpetra-
story as bench- tors and politicians do
arks, I question everything imaginable to get
e benefits ver- us into the mess we're in?
s the conse- Yes.
fences of Even so, it was the gut-
rtain aspects wrenching fear that inun-
Roosevelt's dated investors which
ew Deal, but I pulled the plug and started
n his most fa- an almost unfathomable
The only thing and seemingly unstoppable


SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 C3



fear's eye
cash-flow drain.
I refuse to be afraid of
swine flu.
Should I come down with
symptoms of this latest sup-
posedly monstrous malady
- especially the symptom
which might have me kneel-
ing in the bathroom with my
face where one doesn't ordi-
narily want to place his or
her face -'I'm not burying
my head in the sand, I'm
spitting in fear's eye!


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
Chronicle columnist


CASH
Continued from Page C1
inspections send a message out.
"You're letting people know, 'Hey,
we're a strong presence. We're not
going to just roll over.'"
Without providing any numbers,
Homeland Security Secretary
Janet Napolitano told attendees at
the Border Trade Alliance Inter-
national Conference on April 21
that, just a few weeks into the in-
tensified outbound inspections,
she was amazed at how much had
already been seized. "It's unbe-
lievable," she said. "So the notion
that there wasn't a river of cash
and a flood of guns going into Mex-
ico is a myth. I mean, there was.
We want to stop that river"
CBP's 2010 budget request, re-
leased May 7, includes an addi-
tional $46 million specifically
targeted at southbound enforce-
ment, "interdicting arms and cur-
rency going south," said DHS acting
chief financial officer Peggy Sherry
Customs inspectors' techniques
range from primitive to high-tech,
with about an equal success rate.
Typically they pull vehicles from
outbound traffic and line them up
to the side of the traffic lanes. Driv-
ers and passengers wait to the side.
Sometimes a small white truck
drives slowly alongside the vehi-
cles beaming X-rays at them to re-
veal hidden cash or weapons. A
smaller X-ray unit scans spare tires
or pieces of luggage, a hand-held
density meter called a "Buster"
can reveal hidden compartments
loaded with cash, a fiber-optic
scope snaked into gas tanks looks
for hidden cargo and trained dogs
can sniff out cash or weapons.
But before they get to any of the
gadgets, officers knock with a
knuckle or flat palm on a car's
body panels. And they ask, again
and again: "Do you have any
weapons? Cash? Merchandise?"
Often the dogs make the finds.
Grill, a "currency canine,"
smelled something on 63-year-old
Isabel Ortega Garcia on April 3 in
Hidalgo, Texas, when Ortega was
Walking into Mexico. When Grill
got excited, agents patted her down
and found $148,000,in neat wads of
$100 bills taped around her waist
Two weeks earlier in Laredo,
Akim sniffed cash under the floor
of a southbound bus. Under the
seats, in a hidden compartment,
were 75 bundles of bills totaling
$2,997,510.
But even finding that much cash
doesn't always yield an arrest With-
out a U.S. attorney's say-so, the best
an agent can do is seize any cash
amounts over $10,000 that the trav-
eler does not declare, hand them a
receipt and send them on south.
The best case scenario for
agents who seize undeclared cur-
rency is that federal prosecutors
decide to bring charges and begin
a forfeiture procedure. But often
it is a race against the clock as in-
spectors on the scene try to collect
enough evidence to make it an at-
tractive case for prosecutors.
Although Laredo leads the
country for cash seizures right
now, even there seizing cash is
rare, and arresting someone even
more unusual, a weapons seizure
rarer still. And that's where the in-
convenience to travelers and
agents' frustration set in.
Officers have no booths, no
signs for drivers or lane, to pull
people over in. Yet
"We don't have the infrastruc-
ture that we need to conduct safe
outbound inspections," said Preci-
ado, at the San Ysidro port of entry.
"We do the best with what we have
... So far, we've been lucky."
The Obama administration has
budgeted $269 million to upgrade
these southern ports, adding lanes
and pull-over spaces. Perhaps most
importantly they'll be adding shade
for the wilting agents who wade
into traffic under the blazing sun.
Over five hours on a recent day,
outbound traffic from Laredo,
Texas, to Nuevo Laredo, Mexico,
experienced the gamut from clear,
moving traffic, to multi-agency
teams laying travelers' lives bare,
unpacking, X-raying and inter-
viewing.
Farther west, during a two-hour
"surge" in El Paso, not a single
seizure was made as Border Pa-
trol and CBP agents stopped


Associated Press
Daniel Saucedo, 15, of Albuquerque, N.M., holds back his dogs, Kilo, left, and Alidy, on April 27 as he is questioned by a U.S. Customs agent be-
fore entering Mexico in El Paso, Texas. Agents made spot checks, looking for cash and weapons headed to Mexico.


LEFT: A U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent uses a fiber optic camera to look inside a gas tank April 23 during inspection of vehicle traffic
leaving the United States into Mexico in Laredo, Texas. - " ' .: An unidentified man sits handcuffed April 23 as a U.S. Customs and Border Pro-
tection agent holds the $24,000 in cash found hidden in his shoes after the man failed to declare the money during a check of vehicles leaving
the U.S. into Mexico in Laredo, Texas. The man was processed and released, but the money was confiscated by authorities for his failure to de-
clare an amount over $10,000. ' U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer Paul Werth uses a dog during a search of passengers from a
southbound bus April 23 before it crossed the the border into Mexico at the San Ysidro Port of Entry near San Diego, Calif.


The real issues of assault weapons and bulk cash do not initiate at the border
and cannot be solved there. But gun control? That's a discussion the
current administration is reluctant to wade into.


David Shirk
director of the University of San Diego's Trans-Border Institute.


dozens of vehicles.
Horns blared during afternoon
rush hour south of San Diego as
cars jammed the two freeways
that merge at San Ysidro border
crossing. Inspectors standing at
the end of K-rails that separate
lanes peered into vehicles for 45
minutes, retreated for 30 minutes,
then resumed.
San Ysidro has only seven south-
bound lanes, and some crossings
have fewer, raising fears of night-
marish lines that would choke
commerce and tourism if inspec-
tions become widespread. It's a
busy place, with about 45,000 driv-
ers and 30,000 pedestrians travel-
irig in both directions every day.
The driver of a Volkswagen
Jetta was ordered aside because a
door lock was damaged, raising
suspicions. She was cleared after
explaining that someone tried to
steal her car in Mexico.
Buses were emptied of passen-
gers, who were questioned about
their immigration status and
sniffed by dogs while standing on
the shoulder.
In one lane, about one of every
four cars got stopped for a spell,
while fewer than one in 30 were
getting questioned in another
lane. The crescendo of horns grew.
A day of sporadic inspections of
U.S.-bound vehicles here netted
one stolen vehicle. By compari-
son, on a typical day inspectors
checking motorists and pedestri-
ans entering the U.S. can find be-
tween three and 10 cars stocked
with drugs and 150 illegal immi-


grants, often in trunks or other ve-
hicle compartments.
Tempers are also frayed on the
Mexican side, where soldiers
wearing ski masks and battle fa-
tigues tote M-16 rifles and select a
few motorists to wave aside for in-
spection. Soldiers bang on ceilings
and side panels, open glove com-
partments, and order dogs to walk
over the seats.
On a recent Thursday, soldiers
inspected 150 vehicles between
5:20 a.m. and 9 p.m.,,100 of them
before 1 p.m.
"It's a time-waster, but I under-
stand they have a job to do," said
Maria Soto, 50, of San Diego, who
watched a soldier search her sil-
ver Toyota 4Runner.
The Mexican army dispatched
soldiers to the San Ysidro crossing
in December, a little later than
other points along the U.S. border,
said Cesar David Montoya, assis-
tant Customs administrator in Ti-
juana.
In addition, between 10 percent
and 13 percent of motorists are
randomly directed to pull over
when a red light goes on and bell
sounds in their lanes. Motorists
who get a green light don't have to
pull over.
"The system is completely ran-
dom," Montoya said. "It's not ef-
fective."
By July, the Mexican govern-
ment plans to install license-plate
readers, scales and sensors in Ti-
juana, as it has already done this
year along the Texas-Mexico bor-
der. Authorities estimate the


equipment- being installed at all
of Mexico's 44 border crossings -
will cause each motorists to wait
seven seconds, compared to two
seconds currently
The additional five seconds for
each car is expected to create a
backup of 400 cars in San Diego
during rush hour, Mexican au-
thorities predict.
Mexican customs inspectors,
many of them unarmed, chase
about 10 motorists a day through
the streets of Tijuana when driv-
ers ignore the red lights, bells and
whistles that order them to pull
over. Most say they didn't notice.
Mexican officials say it is ex-
tremely rare to find.anyone with
weapons. The last time anyone in
Tijuana could remember was
April 17, when an American cou-
ple was found with 123 bullets.
They feigned ignorance, despite
giant freeway signs in Southern
California warning that arms are
illegal in Mexico, and were re-
leased without being charged.
Outbound checks have been
going on, on a much smaller scale,
fordecades.
The weapons - easily pur-
chased in the U.S. and banned in
Mexico - are a major conundrum
for this administration.
Obama said while campaigning
that he favored a ban on sales of
assault weapons. But Congress
isn't budging on the issue, and
guns in the U.S., particularly
southern border states, remain
easy to buy legally
"The real issues of assault


weapons and bulk cash do not ini-
tiate at the border and cannot be
solved there," said David Shirk,
director of the University of San
Diego's Trans-Border Institute.
"But gun control? That's a discus-
sion the current administration is
reluctant to wade into."
But Shirk said the stepped-up
outbound checks make clear the
new spirit of cooperation between
Mexico and the U.S.
"It's historic, a watershed to see
the breakthrough in confidence
on both sides of the border that
the two sides can work together to
solve these issues," he said.
Local police and sheriff's de-
partments are loaning agents to
CBP to help with the stops. And
there have been unannounced
southbound inspections in at least
one border city every day since
they were intensified in March,
said border czar Alan Bersin.
He is confident that sporadic
checks are keeping smugglers
away, a sentiment echoed by other
U.S. authorities.
"It's creating a deterrent effect,"
Bersin said in an interview, while
discarding the idea of inspecting
everyone.
Mexican customs inspector Ri-
cardo Briseno, 27, says the in-
crease in U.S. inspections of
Mexico-bound cars has made his
job easier, even though the only ef-
fective solution would be to stop
-every car.
'"At least it's something," he said.
"We are working together on a
shared problem."


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COMNAR IRU o,' F)CHOIL


C4 sUNDAYMAY 17 2009


This isn't about


he Obama adminis-
tration plans to spend
$2 trillion putting gov-
ernment in charge of your
health care. Support for this
"change" comes in three fla-
vors. (Regardless of the fla-
vors, they are economic
Kool-Aid just the same.)
1. A large group of igno-
rant voters believes there is
a "free lunch" and that the
,wealthy can be forced to pay
for it. They must also be-
lieve in the tooth fairy.
2. The insurance and
pharmaceutical industries
and the American Medical
Association, .fearing the
worst, support the govern-
ment takeover in hopes they
can carve out benefits for
themselves.
3. Businesses and labor
unions see this as a means
for transferring their em-
ployee health insurance
costs to the government and
thereby to taxpayers.
An attempt'to nationalize


health care failed whe
Hillary Clinton was pushing
it in the 1990s. But this tim
a federal Medicare-like pr
gram open to all is likely
be passed. The Democra
attached it to a budget b
so that it cannot be filibu
tered and won't require d
bate or bipartisan suppo
Out-of-favor Republica.
and a few political action
groups are putting up
fight, but the odds again
them are overwhelming.
If you believe Congre
will make these chang
primarily to improve yo
health and welfare, read ]
further! Turn your attenti
to the comics.
What actually drives th
health care legislation is
liberal philosophy that r
jects capitalism in favor
utopian cradle-to-grave go
ernment care. Modern "pr
gressives" believe th
government must guarant
us freedom from all life


health care - it's a power
en needs such as food, shelter medical technology, care benefits to voters. It
ng and health care. They reject Congress could, instead, wants to abolish the profit
ae, the personal freedoms in- encourage more competi- motive completely in favor
*o- corporate in our Constitu- tion to lower costs. It could of salaries for doctors' serv-
to tion as unjust and eliminate mandates for ices. (See IRS and Social Se-
its inadequate, health services every insur- curity Administration for
ill The Congress, while ance policy must cover, examples of government
is- agreeing in prin- price-fixing and "services.") It wants voters
le- ciple, is more burdensome pa- to be dependent on it for all
rt. cynical. Congress perwork require- their needs. This assures re-
ns knows that the ments that drive election. Congress knows
on promises it has up the costs. Con- that once health care is na-
a made to gress could allow tionalized, it can never re-
ist Medicare and j insurance com- vert to a private system.
Medicaid clients . panies to sell Congress is certain the ma-
*ss will require tens competitively jority of American voters
es of trillions of dol- priced policies will accept second-rate
ur lars from bor- Dr. William Dixon nationally with- health care, so long as it's
no rowed money or out state regula- free. And not know the dif-
on new taxes. It can- OTHER tion. It could ference! .
not let these pro- VOICES encourage indi- Obama, bright as he is,
is grams continue vidual health sav- surely cannot believe his
3 a unchanged lest they bank- ings accounts and give tax health proposals will result
re- rupt the country. Congress incentives for being in- in care that is different from
of wants to control costs, as do sured. But that would mean and better than the Cana-
�v- the British.and Canadians, voluntarily giving up control dian Medicare and the
*o-. by rationing care, denying over health care. British National Health
iat patients health choices and Congress needs the politi- Service. Perhaps he sees
ee by slowing the advance of cal power, which comes tight federal control of
e's costly new drugs and new with handing out health prices, limitation of patient


struggle
choices and rationing of
services and medicines as
the best way to control gov-
ernment's costs. Because he
has no knowledge of and no
personal experience with
private-market solutions
and consumer choice, they
never occur to him as an op-
tion.

William Dixon graduated
from Columbia College in
New York City, from New
York Medical College and
from the College of Busi-
ness Administration at the
. University of South
Florida. He was an assis-
tant professor at the Uni-
versity of Georgia and he
has worked in the veterans
administration system. He
served 11 years in the Army
as a surgeon and as special
forces officer, achieving the
rank of lieutenant colonel.
Dr Dixon can be reached
at Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


Don't coddle the carmakers


LINus UPsoN
Special to the Chronicle


he raid on our pockets for
the carmakers based in
Detroit now appears to
be a long-term certainty, with
opportunity posed by the reces-'
sion and the shift of power to
the Democratic Party. (I must
admit, for the life of me, that I
have a very, very hard time
telling the two parties apart
when it comes to fiscal and
monetary policies.)
We have seen the three De-
troit CEOs demand gifts and
then beg for gifts. We have been
given the Gettelfinger by the
UAW (as in union president Ron
Gettelfinger).
Bondholders are being brow-
beaten by a sitting president.
Our president says he wants us
out of NAFTA, which might
mean that no car assembled in
North America could even get
close to having even half the
parts made in the United States.
No kidding. Without Canada
and Mexico, "American" cars
made by Japanese and Euro-
pean companies may actually
have a few percent more United
States-made pailrts than Detroit-
built 'American" cars.
No one, not even the press,
has '6cused on the horrible
laws, t'x gimmicks and so forth
that have enticed, rewarded,
warped and protected Detroit's
bad decision-making. (Why is
the tax rate lower for vehicles
with truckframes than those for
vehicles with car frames? Have
U.S. Reps. John Conyers and
John Dingell ever proposed or
supported a bill that was ra-
tional concerning cars/fuels,
etc.?)
OK So what to do?
Let's clean up the laws first.
Let's make sure that all vehicles
made/assembled in the U.S. o'r
by our essential NAFTA neigh-
bors are on an absolutely even
footing before the law. That is
simply good public policy, good
business policy, and good for the
American consumer. Remem-
ber that cars assembled in Geor-


gia and Alabama employ Amer-
icans at all levels of the compa-
nies and use roughly the same
percentage of NAFTA/U.S. parts
as do the Detroit companies.
And these cars are claiming
more and more market share
for new cars.
Get rid of laws prohibitively
taxing sugar and sugar-derived
alcohol. Besides making all
candy and soft drinks in the
country cheaper, this change
would allow the importation of
ethanol fuels from sugarcane to-
morrow at a much lower cost
than we are now paying for
corn-based ethanol. (Hey,
Florida might be able to get into
the switchgrass and sugar fuel
market with the rest of the new
ranch we just bought down
south! How sweet that would be!
Just send money for develop-
ment)
Secondly, repeal all the laws
that twist the market in ways
contrary to good sense and
stated public policy. In other
words, if benefits are to be given
out to car companies in the
United States, they should go to
manufacturers who make the
best cars in the eyes of the con-
sumers. I especially focus here
on carbon-emissions/gas saving
enticements that we are defi-
nitely going to see. Does anyone
think GM can use federal money
to make an impact on the im-
portation of oil into the country
faster and better on cars made
in United States/NAFTA than
Toyota and Honda can in the
United States/NAFTA?
Will we face a situation in
which the government pays for
new Detroit cars and then
forces us to buy them, through
market-distorting laws and reg-
ulations?
Thirdly, this drivel about a
"car czar" and existent presi-
dential in-your-face involve-
ment against management is
hugely scary and has to stop.
Imagine that we have a car czar.
About 1,000 feds then would
make decisions on bumpers and
benefits - and 500 of those feds
are going to be members of Con-


gress and their staff.
Mercedes-Benz knows some-
thing about making cars and
trucks. It bought Chrysler. It
then sold Chrysler at a loss just
to get rid of it because Mercedes
found the culture and business
constraints of Chrysler made it
impossible to design and sell
cars and trucks profitably. (Look
it up.) Can Congress do better?
Or the President alone? He
seems to think that well-paid
Detroit labor and politicized
CEOs all are all that is needed
to build cars. Where are the en-
gineers?
Fourthly, we need to force the
American car industry to re-
design itself. Do not give car-
makers a plan made in
Washington. Why not one al-
ready made in Detroit? Check
out a Detroit News account of a
Ford plant in Brazil at
http://info.detnews.com/video/in
dex.cfm?id1189. Bahia is one pf
the poorest, least developed
states in Brazil. Detroit has a
much better base on which to
build.
We can look at Pittsburgh as a
model. I remember hearing that
the "end of the steel industry" in
the 1970s and 1980s would kill
the city and the U.S. economy.
Wiser heads at that time al-
lowed the markets to work and
the U.S. economy got though
those times.
Remember, Detroit-made
cars started their skid in the
American and world markets in
the 1970s. And the U.S. govern-
ment then started coddling
them to protect them from the
future. That insulation from re-
ality has horribly warped de-
sign, engineering, management,
marketing, etc., to the point now
that only Ford can barely hold
on.
Pay close attention to the last
few sentences of the Detroit
News piece. I think we could
make that journalist eat his
words - but we would have to'
get mad and then serious. If we
are going to gift this industry bil-
lions of dollars, we should de-
mand-our money's worth. The


loss of Detroit car-making as it
is today would be wrenching but
beneficial. The need for cars
and parts will spawn new, inno-
vative, hungry companies with
different cultures, different
technologies, and so forth.
Would it really be so bad to
bring in some Brazilian Ford
managers to show Detroit how it
is done? It would be cheaper
and better for us to provide a
super-sized opt-out and unem-
ployment deal to Detroit labor
rather than convert GM into a
Democratic Party ATM.
Oh, if you think having car
companies go out of business is
unusual, please Google "defunct
car companies." You will find
hundreds. Then look around for
parts. I find that parts are still
there for Studebakers. I suspect
your Camaro will still have
parts. In fact, I may join with a
bondholder or two and buy
rights to manufacture some GM
parts. Might be a great opportu-
nity.
Oh, by the way, ethanol. To
hear Detroit, alcohol is really, re-
ally difficult. Not so. Corigress
plus Detroit set up an impossible
way. I lived in Brazil in 1983 to
1984. The family had two cars: a
gas Ford (made in Brazil) sedan
and an alcohol Volkswagen van
(made in Brazil). Both worked
fine. Further, when I was in the
U.S. Army, most of our trucks in
the late 1960s were "flex fuel."
And that meant those things
would run on gas, kerosene,
diesel, whatever. Detroit's
newest, proud, FlexFhels run on
gasoline and/or ethanol. Only.
'Nuff said.

Linus E Upson III received a
foreign service degree in 1965
from Georgetown University
and a master's degree in Latin
American studies in 1967 from
the University of Florida. A
U.S. Army veteran and third-
generation Floridian, he has
worked for three federal agen-
cies within the U.S. govern-
ment. He retired in 2005 and
now lives in Citrus Hills.


Sound OFF

Down the toilet
I see in the paper where Jeremy May-
field has been suspended from the
track because he failed a drug test.
This is the sad part about NASCAR
today. These people think they're above
the law, and, like any other profession
or sport, all of a sudden now they're
into drugs and stuff and enhance-
ments, which are illegal. What hap-
pened to the good ole' days when
people drove honestly and sincerely
and tried to make a good sport out of
it? Today it's big dollars, big bucks, big
commercials. They've all got to get
their name in the paper. Well, he got his
name in the paper, too. That's why I
think NASCAR is going down the toilet
very quickly. And if Mike Helton doesn't
do anything about it, then it's going to
be bad, even worse than it is now. If
you'll watch the races on TV, you'll see
a lot of empty seats. They all claim it's
capacity crowds, but if the camera
pans around, sometimes in some of
the races, half the seats are empty ...
Poor job
This is in response to the public's
outcry to the recent horrific murder of
the infant in Tampa. "The system
failed," seems to be the general re-
sponse once it came to light that the
young man who did this has been in
trouble with the law since he was a
child, yet is still on the streets. I have
one thing to say to you pointing blame
at the system for this: You caused this.
It is you that always finds someone
else at fault rather than demanding
accountability by the perpetrator of
heinous deeds such as this, under the
guise of compassion and fairness. You
have voted for and elected the repre-
sentatives who passed these ridiculous
laws that favor the defendant rather
than the victims and our public ser-
vants' strength due to budget con-
straints so you can save $80 a year on
your property taxes. So just look in the
mirror. Congratulations. Job not so
well done.
Spray 'em
This is for the black bugs that have
yellow stripes down their back that are
eating the leaves on your plants: Well,
they are grasshoppers and just wait,
they'll grow three or four more inches.
You can spray them with a bug spray
and it will kill them. I think Malathion
is what you spray them with.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

Wherever my wife travels
around the house, our two
Yorkies go with her to watch
for birds to bark at or other
imaginary enemies. So the
Yorkies sat at the end of the
dock and watched the
cleaning frenzy take place.
She used the full power of
the pressure washer to get


SHADES
Continued from PageC1

ness are being reined in. In
terms of economics, news-
papers do feel the pain of
the. business community
and are forced to make hard
decisions.
N One resident said the
St Petersburg Times box at
the corner of West Keller
Street and Fresno Avenue
was removed and that he
misses it (not the box itself,
but having the paper avail-
able close to his home.)
I checked with our circu-
lation folks and, while we've
taken over home delivery of
the St. Pete Times, the
Times is handling issues re-
lated to vending boxes.


rid of the mold that covered
the outside of the boat. It
was when she finished the
job that she looked around
and realized that only one
dog remained on the dock
watching her.
Wilson, the 6-pound
Yorkie remained in his
usual position. But Duffy,
his 2-pound half-brother,
was nowhere to be seen.
As she was wrapping up
the power-wash equipment
she noticed out of the cor-


* Some interesting input
was offered by a gentleman
who had called our office
and got entangled in our
automated voicemail sys-
tem. It's not something I've
personally dealt with
much, but apparently a
pleasant woman's voice is
the initial automated re-
spondent but then Ms. Au-
tomated turns callers over
to Mr. Automated, and his
vocal delivery is said to be
"just awful."
* Sound Off is perhaps
the most lovingly despised
feature in the Chronicle.
(A lot of guys say, "I don't
read that garbage, but my
wife does ... and you know
the one that really got
under my skin ...") A
woman at the Info Fiesta
said she enjoys Sound Off


ner of her eye something
climbing out of the mud of a
Crystal River low tide.
It was the dog.
The 2-pound dog was ap-
parently standing on the
dock and must have been hit
with a blast from the pres-
sure washer and got
knocked out into the river.
Duffy was coughing up
water and goop. Janet
jumped into the river and
rescued the dazed animal
and immediately rushed him


but urged us to be more
cautious in allowing inac-
curate or deceptive infor-
mation to be printed.
Sound Off calls concerning
biblical information about
pork as well as Joan Rivers
leaving a TV show were in-
accurate or misleading,
she advised.
* One yard sale enthusi-
ast questioned why we
hadn't had any such sales
listed in our classified in
recent days and urged us to
use a numeric system for
the various categories in
our classified. Yard sales
are now included under a
heading of Garage/Yard
Sales.
* An Info Fiesta-goer said
the new Viewfinder doesn't
bother him but -said we
should include in the Page 1


offto the veterinarian's office.
Now even though I was at
work during this entire en-
counter, there were a few
things I learned from the af-
fair.
First, you cannot laugh
when your wife calls you at
the office and tells you that
she just pressure washed
the dog into the river - un-
less, of course, you don't
mind sleeping on the couch
for the foreseeable future.
The second learning expe-


index where in the Monday-
Saturday papers to find the
evening TV grid.
We can do that.
* One man questioned
the legality of placing news-
papers in two-cubby-hole
mail boxes used by the U.S.
Postal Service. He said even
though there's the separate
area for non-mail it was his
understanding that only
USPS can put anything in
the boxes.
I checked with our pub-
lisher, who said, "It is legal.
That's why the second slots
were built there."
* An observant weather
watcher noted that the "Pre-
cipitation" amounts under
the "Almanac" heading on
our Page A4 weather pack-
age are frequently out of
sync with local rain record-


rience is that while it does not
seem biologically possible, a
2-pound dog can swallow
more than 2 pounds of goop
and those 2 pounds of goop
can be barfed up on every
clean surface of a house in
less than 60 minutes.
And the third and final
learning experience is that
any money you thought you
might save by purchasing
your wife a gift-wrapped
pressure washer is really a
dangerous illusion. Those


ings, as well as his observa-
tions. I incorrectly said the
precipitation amounts pro-
vided to us by our weather
service are taken at the
Brooksville Airport -
which they were until fairly
recently Now the amounts
are taken in Inverness, so
I'm hoping that problem has
evaporated.
* One reader simply
asked that we never discon-
tinue the Amish Cook col-
umn in our Food section.
* One fiesta-goer asked
why I hadn't responded to
him or published guest
columns he'd submitted. I
drew a total blank and did
not recall seeing the
columns, although I did re-
member talking to him at
the previous Info Fiesta.
Well, I went to the office


savings will quickly go down
the drain when you add up
the cost of three trips to the
veterinarian's emergency
room over a 24-hour period.
The final outcome is what
really counts: The boat is
clean, the dog has recovered
and I am now off the couch.

Gerry Mulligan is the pub-
lisher of the Chronicle. His
e-mail address is gmulli-
gan@chronicleonline.com.


the next day, plowed
through a pile of papers that
had been building up for
months, and smack at the
bottom was one of his guest
columns, which will appear
in this section today or in
the near future.
* Yet another resident
said he wants to coordinate
efforts with the Chronicle
and others to put on a land-
scaping show. I took his card
and passed it to the appro-
priate person.
All that and more tran-
spired in a short 90 minutes
in Citrus Hills. Thanks for
the input

Charlie Brennan is editor of
the Citrus County Chronicle.
E-mail him at cbrennan
@chronicleonline.com.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COMMENTARY









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLECOMMENTARY SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 c~


Sound.


Bring him back
Ruth Levins' article titled
."Benefit performance inspi-
rational," really captured
the total essence of that
outstanding performance by
James Rogers for the Key
Training Center on March
28. Her last paragraph,
which begins, "Here's hop-
ing Rogers will have a return
engagement soon," ex-
presses how so many of us
who saw that show feel.
Let's bring James Rogers
back to Citrus County.
Correction
To correct a statement in
a Sound Off: Social Security
-payments will not be taxed.
It will be a separate pay-
ment to each Social Secu-
rity recipient signed by the
commissioner of Social Se-
.curity.
Be careful
To the person who says
the police are hiding behind
the malls and the buildings:
'First of all, they're not hid-
:ing. They have a right to go
-anywhere they want to go.
'My question is to you: What
are you doing back there?
.Better be careful.
How ironic
.Conservationists, includ-
ing the power companies,
."tell those of us living in
:Florida we should plant
,trees because they clean
the air and they shade our
homes and they reduce the
need for air conditioning.
It's rather ironic then that
Sumter Electric has a crew
out in my neighborhood and
Instead of trimming the
:trees, they are cutting them
,off at ground level with total


mH.L
-ftGLNUM PATCH 12.A9


disregard for any value the
trees might have. According
to the workers, these trees,
* could grow into the power
lines at some point, so
Sumter's solution is to take
them down to ground level.
Somehow it just doesn't


pletely when a car ap-
proaches because either
they can't read the stop
signs or speed limit signs
and I don't want to get run
over. So please slow down.
Premium only


mium gas was like $2.41.
Three days later, the same -
sign is still there, "Premium
gas only," and his premium
gas goes up to $2.59. So
that means he didn't get a
delivery. This needs to be
looked into. Is this price


make sense. ... Has anyone noticed the gouging or what?
Slow down prices in gas have risen, Pretty dumb
risen, risen? ... I went (to a
This is for speeders and gas station) Friday, pre- I just want to comment
nonreaders: While walking mium gas, which he had a on the kid that got sus-
my pooch on Barber Street, sign on the pump that says pended for dancing at his
I get off the road com- "Premium only," his pre- high school prom. I mean,


that is really unbelievable.
The church, they're not even
allowed to dance and they
can't even listen to rock
music. I find that funny
since the old music I lis-
tened'to in the late '70s and
early '80s, I was shunned
for and,considered a drug-
gie and all that. It's funny
that they're all in the car
commercials and all the
commercials on TV, all the
music I listened to back
then.


What's wrong?
I'd like to know why the
sheriff's (deputies) are hiding
on all side roads, picking up
drivers for just the least little
-in g rth -t have nothing to do
with speeding or anything like
that. What in the world is
going on with them? Also, the
are tailgating a lot of people.
They've been tailgating me
lately on Cardinal Street. I
don't know what's wrong with
the police department ... The
hide on side roads ...
Tax the booze
Now that we have taxed
cigarettes to death, let's
start taxing alcohol.
Honor racers
I think it's time they do
something about these guy
down in Indianapolis, Ind.,
on the old-time drivers that
raced down there and stuff.
I know a lot of them's gone
but they could find out who
won the race and all that.
I'm a race fan myself and
I'd like to see something
like that come out in the
paper, even here in Inver-
ness and Ocala. In Winches
ter, Ind., Anderson, Ind.,
they got all kind of race-
tracks. They had a lot of fui
there and I did, too.
Bring jobs back
I know that the Citrus Me-
morial Health System was
being investigated, and with
the amount of people with-
out work in Citrus County,
why did they hire a company
from Southbend, Ind., to do
a survey after you have been
a patient at the hospital or
one of their labs? I think
these jobs should be brought
back to Citrus County.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 Cl








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B Section D -, u, MAY 17, 2009




SNCITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Planners: Gaining an investor's trust


BRIAN LaPETERCr,..:.niic,
Neil Sawyer, left, and Dennis Seibert are commission-based
financial planners with Lincoln Financial Securities.


CHRIS VAN ORMER
cvanormer@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

How advisers get paid -
fee only or commission -
can raise discord in the fi-
nancial industry.
That debate will continue.
But it misses the point, ac-
cording to two advisers who
mostly work on commission:
Is the remuneration to
the adviser in line with the
product, advice and serv-
ices delivered? Have the
client's needs been ful-
filled? Is the compensation
to the adviser, however
paid, fair?
"As advisers to the client,


we all have the same con- livery of a product or invest-
cerns of meeting and satis- ment service), whereas


fying the
needs and Editor's i
goals of the second of
individual, about fee-o:
and to serve mission-bas,
those indi- ment ad
viduals with Chronicle
a high level advisers wh
of integrity pensated tl
and ethics," missions rat
said Dennis paid direct
Seibert of client
Lincoln Fi-
nancial Services.
. How advisers get
paid, fees vs. commis-
sions, is rarely an issue with
clients, he said. Fee-only
planners are paid directly
by the client (outside the de-


note: In the
two reports
nly vs. com-
ed invest-
vice, the
talks to
ho are com-
irough com-
her than fees
tly by the


commissions
are paid to
the adviser
(or registered
representa-
tive) by the
investment
company re-
ceiving the
clients'
funds, be it
an insurance
comp an y,


mutual fund or money man-
agers. That does not mean
that there is no cost to the
investor; it's simply the fact
that the amount of commis-
sion is included in the price
See TRUST/Page D2


Something old, something new


KEVIN CLARK/Washington Post photo
Edward Green, who runs a home repair business, at his latest investment property, in Dumfries, Va. He and his wife, who Va., embody a new, though traditional, class of real estate investors: they buy, fix and rent with an eye to the long run.


In the world of real estate investing, what's old is new again


ALEJANDRO LAZO
The Washington Post
-WASHINGTON
While it may seem crazy
to bet on real estate for
a steady retirement in-
come these days, that is exactly
what Edward and Olivia Green,
of Manassas, Va., are doing.
With their golden years fast
approaching - he is 64 and she
is 60 - the husband and wife
have snapped up five invest-
ment homes in the past three
years. They hope to buy more as
the struggling real estate mar-
ket continues to produce cheap
properties. Their portfolio in-
cludes a condominium apart-
ment in Manassas; two houses


The Greens said they prefer real estate to
stocks and bonds because they can touch
it, drive by it on a weekend and look at it
- which gives them a level of comfort in
the midst of a volatile economy.,


in Prince William County, Va.;
and two houses in Memphis,
Tenn. Their goal is to buy cheap
foreclosure properties, fix them
up and rent them out.
The Greens said they prefer
real estate to stocks and bonds
because they can touch it, drive
by it on a weekend and look at it
- which gives them a level of
comfort in the midst of a


volatile economy
Buyers such as the Greens
seeking long-term cash flow
from their holdings are emerg-
ing as thv new investors of the
bust. In many ways, they are re-
claiming the term "investor"
from the speculators who,
bought homes during the boom
years with intentions to flip
them for quick gains.


Resumes can open doors


Editor's note: This is a
new twice-monthly column
from CLM Workforce Con-
nection Board. Workforce
Connection is the local,
business-led organization
that plans and coordinates
employment and training
services for businesses and
individual career seekers
in Citrus, Levy and Marion
counties.
M y resume was
tweaked, uploaded
and delivered "vir-
tually" through real doors.
Last year my resume
needed an overhaul or at
least some heavy tweaking.
I had to update my resume
to compete in the current
job market, like thousands
of others searching for
work during the recession.
It was my resume that de-
termined if I was a poten-
tial job candidate based on


a short history of
my course of
life. Prospective
employers had a B j
chance to learn
about my work,
education, skills
and not much
more.
Who needs a
resume? If you Janet
are searching WORKI
for work or an-
ticipating a pos- CONNE
sible layoff, now
is the time to start your re-
sume. Inthe past, you may
have been hired without
the aid of a resume. In
today's market, a resume is
important to almost any po-
sition.
Most employers want
your resume e-mailed or
posted on their company
Web site. If you don't have
computer access, don't


worry,. as the
local Workforce
Connection will
S be able to help,
as there are com-
puters, faxes and
more available
for your job
search.
Where to start?
Walsh You, can post
FORCE your resume on
w w w. e m -
CTION ployflorida.com
- to begin creating
your calling card for your
next job. Use these tools to
develop or refine your re-
sume. If you don't have
someone to help review
your draft, call (1-800-434-
JOBS) or stop by your clos-
est Workforce Connection
Center for resume assis-
tance. You can also visit
See RESUMEPage D3


'"At the peak of the bubble,
you had a lot of people who
called themselves investors but
were really only buying a prop-
erty with the hopes of selling it
at a higher price to a greater
fool later," said Michael Larson,
a real estate and interest rate
analyst at Weiss Research in
Florida. "The long-term way to
invest in real estate is to buy
cheap and buy at a level where
it is profitable to rent; tradition-
ally, anything you got from ap-
preciation was icing on the
cake, not the cake itself."
Nevertheless, these are not
easy times for those looking to
profit from the bust Lending

See OLD/Page D2


Comparison-shopping

target-date funds?


arget-date
mutual funds
are sup-
posed to simplify
investment plan-
ning by automati-
cally dialing down
risk as you ap-
proach' the day
when you can fi-
nally call yourself
retired.
Yet the recent
market meltdown
exposed how funds
with the same tar-


1 -




Marl
OF M
INTE


get date can yield wildly dif-
ferent results. Nevertheless,
the increasingly popular
funds offer a decent option
if you aren't the type to peri-
odically adjust your nest
egg's mix of stocks and
bonds - a task that seems to
perpetually reside at the


bottom of to-do
lists.
Shopping for
a target-date
fund can be a
daunting task.
The funds are
"" j relatively new,
_ and their com-
plexities are so
great that new
kJewell comparison
IUTUAL tools from such
EREST names as Morn-
ingstar, Dow
Jones and J.P
Morgan are geared toward
financial advisers and re-
tirement plan administra-
tors, not individual
investors.
For investors with the
freedom to pick among the
more than 40 companies
See FUNDS/Page D3


F


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Readers'

future

in reverse
DEAR BRUCE: We.
are a childless cou-
ple in our early
70s.' We have a good deal
of equity in our home. We
could live better and
travel more if we had
more "money." We are
bombarded with mailers
and ads on television
about reverse mortgages.
When is this a good idea
and for whom? How does
it work? - RJ., via e-mail
DEAR R.J.: Reverse
mortgages can' be very
useful tools or very dam-
aging, depending on the
individual. You seem to be
an ideal candidate. You
have reached your 70s,
which is the minimum age
a reverse mortgage should
be considered. The older
the person taking out the
mortgage, the -more
money the lending com-
pany is willing to provide
given your longevity being
actuarially shorter. You
also have mentioned you
have no children. Often-
times, people are reluc-
tant to go into a reverse
mortgage because it
would reduce the estate
they could leave., Given
that this is not a variable
in your case also mitigates
in favor of the reverse
mortgage. You should
know that the interest
rates are going to be a bit,
higher and there are
other charges that you will
have to pay. In addition,
the current mortgage on
your home will have to be
retired. There are legal
limits as to the amount of
money that can be loaned
predicated on housing
values in your county. All
of these things consid-
ered, you might wish to
talk to your bank or lender
who processes -reverse
mortgages. You should.
know that no matter how
long you live, as long.as..
the taxes are paid on the
home, you have a right to
stay there without regard
to how much money you
have withdrawn from the
lender. This is an excel-
lent method of allowing
people to stay in their
homes and spend a por-
tion of the equity that they
have earned during their
lifetime. Take into ac-
count some of the vari-
ables I have mentioned. In
your case, I'd say go for it
DEAR BRUCE: What
are your thoughts on the
companies that claim they
can help reduce and settle
debt to the IRS? I have
been paying a tax bill of
$18,000 for about five
years at $232 a month.
When the end of year
comes around, I can't
keep up with the penal-
ties and interest. I am
wondering if I should try
one of these companies.
They want to charge an
upfront fee of around
$2,000.- J.C., via e-mail
DEAR J.C.: The ads are,
in all likelihood, placed by
firms that will help you
make what is called an
"offer and compromise"
proposal. There are some
people, you may be one of
them, who will never be
able to pay off the tax bill
based upon their income
and other obligations. The
IRS, like many busi-
nesses, recognizes that
since they very likely will
never be paid in full, they
are willing to make a com-
promise and accept a
lesser amount in cash as
full settlement. This pre-
See .i.:..- u.PageD3


. - rL*-,n** ~ ... . . . -








BUINSSCIRU OUTY(F)IHRONCL


D2 sUNDAYMAY 17 2009


Tucson Citizen to cease print publication


Associated Press


TUCSON, Ariz. - Arizona's oldest
continuously published daily newspa-
per, the Tucson Citizen, will publish its
final print edition Saturday after its
owner failed to find a buyer.
The closure makes Tucson the latest
two-newspaper town to lose one of its
dailies. The Citizen published in the
afternoon while the Arizona Daily
Starhas appeared mornings.
Kate Marymont, Gannett Co. vice
president for news, told the 138-year-
old newspaper's staff Friday that the
Citizen will continue online with com-
mentary and opinion but no news cov-
erage..
A printed Tucson Citizen editorial
weekly will be distributed with the
Star to expand the.reach of the Citi-
zen's voice.
"Dramatic changes in ourindustry
combined with the difficult economy
- particularly in this region - means
it-is no longer viable to produce two
daily printed newspapers in Tucson,"
said Bob Dickey, president of Gan-
nett's U.S. Community Publishing Dij
vision.
,aThe final issue of the Citizen will be
a 40-page commemorative edition, ed-
itor Jennifer Boice said.
"I'm really sorry to see it go," Boice
said. "We served a function in this
community. We made other news
media better
She said the Citizen's staff produced
a competitive newspaper, and its ab-
sence "will leave a hole in this com-
munity, and it will be a bigger hole
than our circulation indicates."
During its lifetime, the Citizen re-
ported on Arizona's biggest stories, in-
cluding Marshall Wyatt Earp's fabled
1881 shootout at the OK Corral and the
1934 arrest of bank robber John
Dillinger and three other gang mem-
bers hiding out in Tucson.
But the Citizen has struggled for


The Citizen becomes
the latest casualty of a
newspaper industry
struggling to survive
despite the economy,
dwindling advertising
revenues and Internet
competition.

years against the Star, a 117,000-circu-
lation newspaper. During the Citizen's
heyday in the 1960s, circulation was
about 60,000, but it had fallen to 17,000.
The Citizen becomes the latest ca-
sualty of a news-
paper industry ON TH
struggling to sur-
vive" despite the ht www
economy, dNwin-
dling advertising revenues and Inter-
net competition. The battle has. been
especially tough in. two-newspaper
towns like Tucson.
Already this year, E.W Scripps Co.
closed the Rocky Mountain News in
Denver, and Hearst Corp. stopped
printing the Seattle Post-Intelligencer,
making it an online-only operation.
The Christian Science Monitor
stopped daily publication in favor of a
weekly print edition with daily online
news.
On Thursday, the Ann Arbor News
in Michigan said its last day of publi-
cation will be July 23, to.be replaced
by an online-focused news operation
with twice-weekly print editions, built
from the ground up.
Other major newspaper companies,
including publishers of the Chicago
Tribune, the Los Angeles Times and
The Philadelphia Inquirer, have filed
for bankruptcy protection.


Gannett, the largest newspaper pub-
lisher in the country, announced in
January that it would close the Citizen
if it didn't find a buyer for certain as-
sets by March 21.
Four days before the planned clos-
ing, Gannett announced the Citizen
would remain open while it negoti-
ated with two interested buyers.
Those talks ultimately proved unsuc-
cessful.
"In the end, there were no buyers,"
Marymont told the Citizen staff.
She said Gannett would honor sev-
erance pay arrangements that had
been announced in January after the
initial closure announcement. It was
unclear how many of the Citizen's 65
employees would lose their jobs.
* The Arizona Citizen was founded on
Oct. 15, 1870, by John Wasson, a news-
paper man from
E NET California, with
behind-the-scenes
,oncitizen.com help from Richard
McCormick, the
territory's governor and later territo-
rial delegate to Congress.
The newspaper changed ownership
several times over the next 100 years
until Gannett bought it in 1976, just a
few years after a U.S. Supreme Court
case involving the Citizen led Con-
gress to pass the Newspaper Preser-
vation Act and new rules for joint
operating agreements for competing
newspapers doing business together.
Gannett also changed the name to the
Tucson Citizen.
The joint operating agreement Gan-
nett has with Lee Enterprises Inc.,
which publishes the Star, will end Sat-
urday. Under the JOA, Lee and Gan-
nett shared costs and profits; their
business partnership, Tucson News-
papers Inc., handled all non-editorial
functions, including advertising and
circulation. Marymont said that part-
nership will continue outside of the
legal framework of a JOA.


Towns find obstacles to

saying 'I do' to mergers


Associated Press

CHESTER, N.J. - It's a
response to the recession
and dwindling state aid
that seems deceptively
logical: Neighboring
towns can merge into one
to streamline services
and save money.
Problem is, it's rarely
done, though the concept
is being studied in many
states, including New Jer-
sey. But to make it work,
towns have to be willing
to reduce staff and serv-
ices, and they risk losing
their identities and their
independence - and few
seem to be willing to do
that.
In Utah, officials have
discussed making one
city out of five towns
north of Salt Lake City,
and the eastern Massa-
chusetts towns of Hamil-
ton and Wenham have
studied a merger. In
Idaho, a proposed union
of the resort towns of
Ketchum and Sun Valley
was scrapped last month
after strong resistance
from residents of Sun
Valley, a world-renowned
ski resort.
Some New Jersey law-
makers believe they've
found, a solution in hav-
ing their cash-strapped
state act as an ersatz
Match.com for towns
looking to merge.
The state is offering to
pay for studies and give a


property tax credit to
homeowners whose taxes
would rise. The aim is to
save money and escape
Gov. Jon S. Corzine's
plans to slash aid to more
than 300 towns with
fewer than 10,000 resi-
dents.
If that doesn't work,
these towns risk losing
state aid.
"Whenever we've tried
to bring people to the
altar it hasn't worked;
what we need is a few
shotgun weddings," said
Assemblyman Reed Gus-
.ciora, D-Princeton, who
wants "doughnut hole"
towns - small boroughs
surrounded by larger
townships - to share
services or merge within
the next decade.
-The small towns of
Chester Borough and
Chester Township, nes-
tled in the rolling hills of
west-central New Jersey,
provide a good example
of the problems in mak-
ing these forced mar-
riages work.
Relations between the
two towns are friendly.
Children in both towns
attend the same schools
and check out books from
the same library. A single
fire company handles
calls for both towns. They
pay for other services
separately, including po-
lice and a total of two
mayors and 10 council
members.


KEVIN CLARK/Washington Post photo
Edward Green and his wife, Olivia, own five rental properties, three in Virginia and two in
Tennessee. "We are baby boomers, and we are looking for another way to have income.
... With what is out there now, this is probably our best bet," says Green, of Manassas, Va.


OLD
Continued from Page Dl

standards have tightened,
making mortgages for in-
vestors harder to come by.
There is also no guarantee
that home prices will end
their free-fall. Buying a
foreclosed-on home, fixing
it up and then becoming a
landlord requires patience,
vigilance and capital, and
success is not certain.
The Greens have had
their stumbles. Their first
investment property was a
two-bedroom, two-bath
condominium apartment in
Manassas that they bought
from their daughter in 2006
for $250,000. At the time,
they anticipated that the
housing market would take
only a mild hit, and so they
financed the property with
a mortgage but rented it out
for less than their costs.
They expected to sell as
home prices appreciated.
That didn't work out, so
they're taking a hit to their
cash flow - a mistake they
don't intend to repeat.
Glenn Kelman, chief ex-
ecutive of Redfin.com, an
online brokerage based in
Seattle, said one of the first
questions to consider as a
potential investor is
whether you want to be-
come a hands-on landlord.
"If they don't want to be-
come a landlord, then they
have to hire a property
management professional,
and that is going to cut into
their investment," Kelman
said. "That is the funda-
mental decision that some-
body has to make when
going from a very liquid
asset (such as stocks) to
something that is not all
that liquid - and will make
their phone ring in the mid-
dle of the night when the
toilet clogs up."
While rental income ide-
ally. provides a steady
stream of cash, a tenant's fi-
nances can fall prey to the


souring job market. With
the recent wave of foreclo-
sures, potential tenants
may also have shoddy
credit . ratings, meaning
landlords need to decide
whether they're worth the
risk
Kelman said the best in-
vestors are often the "fix-it"
types who can quickly size
up how much they need to
spend on a .property to
make it rentable. They are
also the ones who are will-
ing to spend time making
those repairs and main-
taining the homes.
""They are often wearing
a tool belt on the weekend
and doing it all them-
selves," he said.
Michael McNally, an in-
formation technology man-
ager from Chantilly, Va.,
said he was inspired to get
into real estate investment
by his grandfather, who
started buying properties-
as a side job in Pennsylva-
nia in the 1970s. He now.
owns about 45 such homes
that have been paid off, Mc-
Nally said.
"He just rakes in all
kinds of money," he said.
Last month, McNally
paid $53,000 for a three-
edroom, 2 1/2-bath house
in Dumfries. To make the
purchase, he cashed in a
$60,000 certificate of de-
posit that was earning in-
terest at about 3 percent, he
said.
Danielle Babb, a real es-
tate investor and a co-au-
thor of the book "Finding
Foreclosures," said she has
been approached in recent
weeks by many people
looking for such properties.
Many are getting discour-
aged, she said, because
banks are taking a long
time to close on offers and
finding financing has
grown increasingly diffi-
cult.
The best way to close a
deal quickly is to pay cash,
Babb said. If you need fi-
nancing, make sure you're
satisfied with the mort-


gages you have on the prop-
erties you already own be-
cause it will become
difficult to refinance once
you start borrowing for
other properties, she said.
The Greens bought their
second property in 2007
using cash from a home-eq-
uity loan. The three-bed-
room townhouse had gone
into foreclosure and "was a
disaster inside," recalled
Olivia Green, who is a real
estate agent.
She and her husband,
who runs a home repair
business, decided that with
some Work the home could
fetch a good rent, so they
paid $235,000 in cash for it.
Edward undertook about
$16,000 worth of improve-
ments, and now they rent it
for $1,695 a month.,
In search of cheaper
properties, the Greens re-
searched other 'hard-hit
parts of the country. They
considered Detroit, looked
into some communities in
upstate New York and set-
tled on Memphis., They
hired a local real estate
agent through a family
friend.
During a weeklong trip
last year, the couple se-
lected two houses. They
bought one for $16,000; it
needed another $16,000 in
repairs. They paid $35,000
for the other; it needed just
minor touch-ups. Given the
distance, they hired a prop-
erty manager to rent those
homes.
Their latest purchase
was a three-bedroom, 2 1/2-
bathroom townhouse in
Dumfries they bought out
of foreclosure for $60,000.
They are making some re-
pairs and hope to rent it
this month.
"We are baby boomers,
and we are looking for an-
other way to have income,"
Edward Green said. "It pro-
vides good cash flow if you
have income coming in
from rent, and with what is
out there now, this is proba-
bly our best bet"


TRUST
Continued from Page Al

of the product.
"The client wants someone to feel com-
patible with," said Neil Sawyer, branch
manager of Lincoln Financial Securities.
"If the client gets investment solutions
and his goals met, he rarely asks whether
he is paying a fee or commission. We are,
however, required and committed to di-
vulge to the client how we get paid."
His associate, Seibert, said he sold fee-
based services for 10 years before moving
to the commission side. "We.were charg-
ing a fee, but often felt the customer was-
n't getting what he was paying for," Seibert
said. "You need to ask yourself: 'What do
you get for your fee or commission?'"
Sawyer and Seibert, with more than 50
years of combined experience, are affili-
ated with Lincoln Financial Securities, a
member of Lincoln Financial Group.
"We don't get paid by the client," Sawyer
said. "The commission goes to Lincoln,
which channels it to the proper represen-
tative. There are also times when, we uti-
lize companies outside of Lincoln,
depending on the client's needs."
As with fee-based.planners, Sawyer and
Seibert find themselves involved in some
of their clients' lifestyle decisions, serving
as sounding boards to many of the ques-
tions and problems their clients have.
"Many of our clients are new to the area
and they know that we are here for them,"
Sawyer said,
"We build relationships with our
clients," Seibert said. "For the most part,
whether to use a fee-only or a commis-
sion-based financial planner is not an
issue for most of our clients.
"As long as we are providing what they
ask, it should not make much difference
to the client how the charges are han-
dled," Seibert said. "Cliefits should be
asking themselves: Are the advisers ful-
filVng my needs?"


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"Any successful business must have a
base of satisfied clients," Sawyer said.
"We work hard to build a good reputation
and maintain it. As a result we get most of
our business from referrals."
When asked about a typical client,
Sawyer said, "A typical client has not had
the experience "of turning their affairs
over to somebody else. The question of
fees most often does not arise. They don't
care how we get paid as long as they get
what they want." -
"Most of our clients are retired," Seib-
ert said. "They say they need income, a
slush fund, and they want something to'
leave to their children. We work within
the parameters that they give us and em-
ploy the best techniques for accomplish-
ing their goals."
Seibert pointed out that, as'with 611reg-
istered investment advisers, he and
Sawyer are under the eye of the Securities
and Exchange Commission.
"They can come in with a surprise
audit," Seibert said. "The state and SEC
may drop in on us. We are scrutinized." In
addition to being audited twice a year, the
planners also frequently take classes to
maintain their licenses and skills.
Sawyer said in their dealings with
clients, the advisers are highly regulated
and must complete many compliance and
disclosure forms regularly
"We review an array of products to
make sure of a good fit for particular
needs of the client," Sawyer said.
The two advisers said they could help
investors at every level.
"We will work with people who start-
with nominal amounts to get their plans
or programs started" Seibert said. "We
give them the same level of service as
those who have significant assets. As a re-
sult we have as many as two and three
generations of a family who depend on us
for their needs."
"If we take care of our clients and and
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS








CTP,,' Cn-mLrrVI(X (U-uC-Bu-~s UDA A 1,209D


FUNDS
Continued from Page Dl

now offering target-date
products, good luck The
asset mixes in funds that at-
tempt to ease you toward the
same retirement date vary so
widely that they defy simple
apple-to-apple comparisons.
Plus there's a lack of easy-to-
use tools to see how one fund
. stacks up against the next
"Frankly, product develop-
ment has outpaced quality
control a little bit in this new,
growing space," said Rod
Bare, who recently helped
Morningstar launch a target-
date index oriented toward
' investment pros.
More warts have been laid
bare after last year's market
meltdown. For instance, de-
pending on which 2010 fund
they were in, an investor
looking to retire next year
could have lost.as little as 3.6
percent in 2008 or as much as
41 percent
One reason for those
widely varying returns: The
Stock components of the 2010
funds that Sen. Herb Kohl's
:Senate Special Committee on
Aging recently studied
ranged from 8 percent to 68
percent
"I think it's been a very
rude awakening," said John
Coyne, president of Brinker
S Capital, a Berwyn, Pa.-based
S investment manager. "If you
were in a 2010 fund ...you
probably thought you were
pretty conservatively in-
vested." So when making a
target-date investment, ask
for the specific details about
when the portfolio shifts, so
you can keep an eye on
whether it's truly in line with
your risk tolerance.
Despite recent market tur-
moil that sent many investors
running to the exits, target-
date funds' growth hasn't
waned. The products - also
known as lifecycle funds -
-. took in nearly $42 billion
from investors last year, ac-
.cording to the research firm
Strategic Insight Target-date
funds first appeared on the
market in the mid-1990s, and
the more than 250 such fuids
now available hold about
$180 billion. ,
' Yetthey're misunderstood.
Envesthet. Asset Manage-
mnent. a Chicago-based firm
that serves financial advisers,
found widespread confusion
,in a recent survey. Nearly 40
percent of investors surveyed
thought the risk levels in
funds with the same target
date would be very similar.
And about 38 percent incor-
rectly believed the funds will
produce a guaranteed return.
Part of what makes them
difficult to compare is that
most operate as funds of
funds, meaning they spread
money across several mutual
fund offerings from the same
,provider Managers gradually
shift to more conservative
funds and asset categories as



RESUME
Continued from Page Dl
www.clmworkforce.com to
get started.
It's a good resume if it:
* Is easy to read;
S.' States your skills,
knowledge and experience;
* Shows your accom-
plishments in numbers and
facts;
S* Grabs the reader's
attention, so you will be in-
vited to interview;
* Encourages ques-
tions during an interview;
* Uses white or ivory
paper (Save the colored
paper for holiday family let-
, . ters!);
* Presents com-
pletely accurate facts with no
exaggerations (Employers
check the facts.);
* Is customized for
the particularposition;


retirement approaches.
Financial advisers also
need some help, which moti-
vated Morningstar in Febru-
ary to introduce target-date
indexes that provide bench-
marks for gauging perform-
ance of rival funds. The
indexes feature Morn-
ingstar's own recommended
assets allocations for various
target dates, with varying de-
grees of risk built-in based on
whether an investor wishes
to take a conservative, mod-
erate or aggressive approach.
But Morningstar hasn't yet
made the tools available to
individual investors on its
Web site.
"We want to walk before
we run," Morningstar's Bare
said.
The Morningstar indexes
take a place alongside rival
target-date indexes from Dow
Jones and Standard & Poor's
that have been around a bit
longer. And J.P Morgan Asset
Management in September
rolled out "Target Date Navi-
gator," a comparison tool
that's also geared toward ad-
visers and those who decide
what options to include in
workplace savings plans.
But if you don't know what
you're doing, such tools can
put you at risk of expecting a
fund whose performance
lagged last year is likely to
continue falling short of its ri-
vals for years to come. For ex-
ample, 2020 funds with hefty
.weightings in stocks gener-
ally fared worse last year
than ones with more bond-
oriented portfolios. But that
could reverse when the mar-
ket changes course. And tar-'
get-date funds ,all have
different schedules dictating
which years they shift toward
more bonds and fewer stocks.
-If one 2020 fund happens to
make such a shift when mar-
ket conditions are favorable,
its returns will look great, at
least temporarily.
"Once you start throwing
all these funds into one big
pie and measuring them
against an index, I fear what
happens is you just chase
past performance," said Mike
Henkel, Envestnet's manag-
ing director of retirement
services.
So for now, individual in-'
vestors are left with tools
such as Morningstar's Portfo-
lio X-Ray, which helps ana-
lyze an investor's.asset mix
across their entire portfolio.
While the X-Ray tool can
help, assess the risk level of'
your portfolio, 'it isn't tai-
lored to evaluate target-date
funds.
But with the funds' grow-
ing popularity, the demand
for easy-to-use comparison
tools is likely to yield results
sooner or later..
I "It will be part of the edu-
cation push the industry
makes to advise investors,
and help them feel more
comfortable with target-date
funds," said Lynette DeWitt,
a research director with Fi-
nancial Research Corp.


* Contains important
key words that ,may be
picked up in an employer
search.
If you are savvy enough, it
might be good to display your
resume online without the
phone numbers and refer-
ences listed. You can post
your resume to a blog hosted
on www.blogger.com or
http://wordpress.org/ - both
are free. This is a great way
to show you have Web skills.
Your future opportunities
are waiting at the door. Get
your resume ready for visit-
ing your next employer!


Jannet Walsh, Community
Relations/Communications
Manager at Workforce Con-
nection, can be reached at
(352) 873-7939, ext 1234 or via
e-mail at jwalsh@
clmworkdforce.com.


WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS
* Photos need to be in sharp focus.
M Photos need to be in proper exposure: neither too
light nor too dark.
* Include your name, address and phone number on all
photos.
' . When identifying persons in your photo, do so from
left to right.
S If desired, include the name of the photographer for
credit.
* We discourage the use of Polaroid prints.
* Photos printed on home printers do not reproduce
well; submit the digital image via disk or e mail. Staff
will color correct and otherwise "work up" the image
to Chronicle publication standards.
S Photos submitted electronically should be in maxi-
mum-resolution JPEG (.jpg) format.
* Photos cannot be returned without a self-addressed,
stamped envelope.
S For more information, call 563 5660.


Obama's personal finances sound


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - President
Barack Obama's personal finances
appear to be on sound footing even
as the nation's economy struggles, a
financial report he released Friday
shows.
Obama and his wife Michelle
have $1.4 million to $5.9 million in
assets, not counting their Chicago
home.
Their holdings include up to
$265,000 in checking ac-
counts. ON Ti
The president's new fi-
nancial disclosure report
mirrors one he filed a
few months ago.
Much of the Obamas' wealth
comes from the president's best-


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

supposes that you have
some cash that you can
offer, otherwise the law that
allows this, in your case, is
moot. What troubles me is
the substantial up-front fee.
While I recognize the com-
pany's position is that they
could easily be stuck, so
could the client. A reason-
able compromise would be
the money could be put in
escrow with an attorney
who would release it only
under certain circum-
stances. A very important
factor here is your ability to
be able to pay a fairly sub-
stantial amount of money
up front in. cash. If you're
able to borrow that else-
where, compromise makes
wonderful sense for all par-
ties involved.
DEAR BRUCE: My hus-
band and I have been mar-
ried for three years now.
We're both on our second
marriage. We are both 34
years old and have four
children combined. We al-
ways pay in cash for items
that we need. We have no
credit cards or bad credit.
However, we have "no
credit." I have power of at-
torney for my husband be-
cause he is. a welder and
pipe fitter who works all
over the country. We would
like to buy some land and
put a house on it, but no one
will consider us for a mort-
gage, even though he makes
really good money. We don't
struggle financially by any
means and can make a
house payment with no
problem. What can we do to
build credit when banks
won't look at us 'to give
loans or.a credit card? -
Christina, South Carolina
DEAR CHRISTINA: Sev-
eral things go against you.
While many years ago it
seemed like a good idea to
recommend to people that
they only pay cash, no debt,
etc., it has proven today to
be a huge detriment. No
credit history can often be
worse than bad credit his-
tory. However, at 34 you've
got lots of time ahead if you
take the appropriate steps.
I assume that you have a
checking account. If you
don't, you should open one
immediately Also if it's pos-
sible, you might wish to in-
vest at least some money in
CDs at a local bank that
also issues credit cards.
The fact that you are now a
customer, both a CD and a
checking customer, will
work in your favor for at
least a low-limit credit
card, which will ordinarily
be increased as you. pay
your bills on time. While
you don't wish to max out
the credit line, having a
medium balance that you
pay on every month can
work in your favor. Even if
after doing this, you cannot
find a traditional credit
card company that will
issue you a lower limit
card, you might wish to
open a collateralized credit
card account, which I'm
confident would be no
problem. However, there.
will be an expense in-
curred. With a collateral-
ized credit card, you will be
required to make a deposit
in the bank that issues the
card in the amount of credit
line you wish, and, if you
don't pay your bill, then the
deposit will be withdrawn.
DEAR.BRUCE: How can
I get the rest of my money
out of an annuity? I haven't
paid surrender fees for
years. My insurance broker
has a deaf ear every time I
bring it up! - R.K, via e-
mail
DEAR R.K: Unhappily, t
know of no way you can ac-
celerate taking your money
out of the annuity without


The White House also released Vice President
Joe Biden's new personal financial report.
It shows Biden and his wife Jill have at least
$119,000 to $615,000 in assets and $185,000
to $430,000 in debt.


sellers.
The books, "Dreams from My Fa-
ther" and "The Audacity
of Hope," brought in
E NET about $2.5 million in roy-
ouse.gov alties last year, according
to tax returns Obama re-
leased last month.
The overall value of Obama's
book deals isn't known; like past re-
ports, his new financial report says


paying a very serious sur-
render fee.. This is one of
the reasons that many of us
have counseled against
many types of variable an-
nuities. 'While the insur-
ance guy selling (who made
a very comfortable commis-
sion) will tell you how won-
derful the tax advantages
are and the returns, they
don't share with you that
many times you have to
wait as many as seven years
before you can get to your
principle without penalty.
This is a contract and has to
be lived up to by both sides.
There has been in the past
litigation by government of-
ficials to force companies
to accelerate the surrender.
I doubt seriously that
you're going to find prece-
dent that will allow you to
make these withdrawals
without some considerable
expense. We live and learn.
DEAR BRUCE: I have a
longtime heterosexual life
partner. We have always
kept our finances separate
besides owning a house
and a car together. We have
$30,000 left on our current
mortgage, and we also have
taken out a construction
loan for building a new
house. There is quite a bit
owed on the car. I have al-
ways made the house pay-
ment (loan in both names),
and he has always made
the car payment (loan in his
name only-title inr both
names). He has been let go
from his job and is collect-
ing unemployment. I have
been at my job for 18 years,
and it, is relatively secure.
He is getting behind be-
cause he can no longer
make his payments. I am
making the house pay-
ments and now the car pay-
ments, but cannot pay other
bills in his name. Am I
legally affected if he starts
getting bad credit as long as
I cover what is in both our
names? My credit is great.
- S.T, via e-mail
DEAR S.T: While I am
not at all enthusiastic about
people who are unmarried
buying homes together, you
have done so and, appar-
ently, so far it has worked
out for you. The essential
,question that you have
asked is can you be,held re-
sponsible for other bills
that he has in his name.
The answer is, no. That
having been observed, a
creditor can most certainly
move against the real estate
that you own together, as
well as the automobile you
own together. You are not
responsible for his debts,
but lenders have every
right to .move against any
interest that he may have,
including those that you
own jointly.
DEAR BRUCE: My
credit score is around 700. I
normally pay my bills on
time but I have incurred a
large amount of credit card
debt in recent years. My
daughter will be graduating
from college in May. That
being said, I am finally in a
position to start paying
down my credit card debt.
My question is, where
should I start? I am a fed-
eral employee, and I have
about 40 weeks of sick leave
in reserve. Should I try to
save money for a reserve
account, or should I begin
paying my credit card debt
off? My yearly salary is
around $84,000 per year. My
primary mortgage is $1,260
and my rental property is
covered by the rent - PL.,
via e-mail
DEAR EL: Your 700
credit score is a good one
and should allow you to
borrow money from various
sources. You mentioned
that you have a large
amount of credit card debt
The first thing I'd want to
explore is the interest that
the credit card is charging.
In the event that it is rea-


the value isn't readily ascertainable.
The White House also released
Vice President Joe Biden's new per-
sonal financial report. It shows
Biden and his wife Jill have at least
$119,000 to $615,000 in assets and
$185,000 to $430,000 in debt.
Under ethics rules, the values of
assets and debts can be described in
broad ranges rather than in exact
amounts.


sonable, I would continue it
there. If it is fairly high, you
might wish to look into a
home equity loan, assuming
the equity is there, at a
lower interest rate. The
burden of the college child
has been substantial, as I
too 'can attest. That will
make your life much easier.
I wouldn't be seriously con-
cerned about the reserve
amount that always.can be
borrowed on the short-term
from your credit card. The
first thing to do is deter-
mine the amount of inter-
est. Secondly, is it a
reasonable amount, and is
there another source
where the money can be
borrowed while you're in
this payout mode at a lower
cost,
DEAR BRUCE: Shortly
after I had my first child in
2005, my husband lost his
job, and we began to have
financial difficulties be-
cause of it. I would manage
to pay most of the
bills/loans, leaving only my
credit card unpaid each
month. I was not able to
keep up with the overdue.
payments on my credit card
until some six months later.
Even though I kept up with
my- personal loan pay-
ments, the credit card
delinquency has caused me
bad credit, and I am unable
to get even a small loan.
What can I do, and how
long will it take to bring my
credit ratings back up to a
level where Ican apply suc-
cessfully for a loan? -LA.,
via e-mail
DEAR LA.: Unhappily,
credit takes a long time to
build up and can be de-
stroyed overnight It would
appear that you made some
bad judgments with your
credit card, but we've all
made those, and there's
nothing to be done about it
now. Time will heal the
problem. How much time, I
can't tell you. Bad informa-
tion will stay on your credit
report for as long as seven
years. There are many
lenders who are anxious to
loan money even though
the rates may be unattrac-
tive. I would sit tight and
pay your bills on time. You
haven't mentioned whether
the credit card was can-
celled or you still have it,
but by all means, pay it on
time. Buy nothing that you
can't afford to pay on a reg-
ular basis. If you have no
other credit cards and the
primary card was canceled,
you might wish to consider
a collateralized card,
where you make a deposit
in the bank and pay annual
fees. While this may be a
burden, it is another tool to
build your credit again. Ob-
viously, in order to accom-
plish the building, you must
pay that card religiously on
time, as well as your other
obligations. There is life
after bad credit It may be a
little bumpy for awhile, but
you'll get there.
DEAR BRUCE: Unfortu-
nately, because of a very
nasty divorce where my
husband walked out and
left me with all the debt, in-
cluding a house, I had to
file foreclosure and then
bankruptcy. I have recently
become disabled and will
soon (after the inevitable
appeals and such) be on So-
cial Security. What can I do
to start to rebuild my credit
again, and how long does it
usually take for someone in
my situation to achieve a fa-
vorable credit score? -
D.B., via e-mail
DEAR D.B.: Yours is rep-
resentative of dozens of let-
ters that I am currently
receiving concerning the
rebuilding of credit. You
mentioned that you are
going to be on disability.
Without other income
credit is going to be difficult
to achieve. Credit scores
are determined by several


factors, but one is the
source and amount of in-
come. Since Social Security
income does not provide
large sums of money, I think
you're going to have a diffi-
cult time. This, coupled
with a foreclosure and
bankruptcy, is realistically
going to take years to re-
cover from. I do wish you
well.
DEAR BRUCE: My wife
and I purchased a town-
house in a 55-plus commu-
nity that has an association
policy. Since purchasing,
the board has voted in
many changes that we feel
were not only unethical but
also unlawful. At the time
of purchase, owners were
allowed to have dogs. Be-
cause some of the board
members do not like dogs, it
was voted to not allow dogs.
It has created quite a bur-
den on some of the owners.
One seller had five offers
on his unit but all were
withdrawn because of the
"no dogs' clause. He has yet
to sell. It has been on the
market for more than eight
months. The owner has re-
duced his asking price
three times. The owners
that voted for these restric-
tions do.not know just how
this will affect their value
and selling price. Also,
there was no restriction on
having a boat cover on our
dock when we bought
which I said was not in the
agreement that we signed.
The board members voted
that we could not have a
boat cover. Is this legal? I
am sure that this a big prob-
lems for many elderly peo-
ple who are downsizing and
do not understand what
legal rights they have. This
is, going to an attorney in a
few weeks. - D.L, via e-
mail
DEAR D.L.: Since you
live in Florida, you should
be aware that there are
many, many state laws that
have been passed to protect
home owners given that
Florida has many home-
owners associations, more
than most states. You men-
tioned that the board
changed the rules. You will
have 'to go back to your
charter to see what it takes
to change a rule. Can they
can unilaterally set policy,
or does the membership
have to vote on it. I'm also
wondering how often many
of you folks attended board
meetings until they did
things that you were. not
comfortable with. This is a
common problem. As to
adding restrictions, once
again we have to go back to
the original rules set by the
developer when he formed
this community. The next
thing that your counsel will
have to research is pre-
cisely what Florida law al-
lows the board of directors
to do and what areas are re-
stricted. Very few of us read
the association rules and
regulations and all of the
fine print before we buy a
home. Often, it is to our
detriment In the event that
anyone is buying into a
community that has a
homeowners association,
either they or their attorney
should carefully read all of
the documents and deter-
mine exactly what can and
cannot be accomplished.
Finally, take an interest in
the association. Go to the
meetings, run for office and
don't allow others to take
responsibility and then
complain that you don't
agree with their actions. I
don't agree with the no-dog
provision and would be in-
terested to see how this
matter is finally resolved.


Send your questions to:
Smart Money PO. Box
2095, Elfers, FL 34680. E-
mail to: bruce@brucewil-
liams.com. Questions of


SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 D3


BUSINESS


OTRUS COUNTY (FLJ E


Ii
1












D4

SUNDAY
MAY 17, 2009


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Chamber Connection


Clawdaddy's


Affordable Towing and Recovery Inc.


Pictured Above: Ambassadors Megan Ennis & Wendy Hall, Chef Dan M., Jamie Chapmen,
Molly Hampton, Jessica Malczewski - General Manager, Ashlyn Bass, Owner Ray Bass,
Chad Brown, Ambassadors Tammy LaValle, Betty Murphy and Rhonda Lestinsky. BACK
ROW: Ambassadors Janet Mayo,Dan Pushee, Bonnie Hardiman, Diane Smith, Jennifer Duca,
Nancy Hautop and John Porter (photographer) "Clawdaddys Raw Bar and Grill opened Jan-
uary 2007. We specialize in fresh seafood, such as grouper tilapia, mahi-mahi, while in sea-
son crab claws, king, snow, dungeneous, and stone. Like the raw bars in the Keys, we too
shuck our oysters fresh from Apalachacola Bay. Steaks and ribs are also on the menu and
a crowd pleaser surely. Our tiki themed lounge, that the locals have named HB or home bar
is always filled with familiar happy faces. Happy hour includes 45 cent wings and oysters,
also 2-4-1 draft beers and well drinks daily from 11 AM to 7 PM. We employ 20-40 part-to
full time employees. Owner Ray Bass native Floridian from Trenton, Florida; and general
manager Jessica Malczewski from Toledo, Ohio; are seen working along with the rest of the
team on a daily basis." Clawdaddys is located at 1601 SE Hwy 19 in Crystal River. Give
them a call today at 564-2529.


Dreams Kitchens & Baths of Citrus County


~~b:':~~ i.

~ ,.~


qui


The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce would like to welcome Affordable Towing & Re-
covery, Inc. as new members of the Chamber. Representing Affordable Towing & Recovery,
Inc. are Juan & Elba Jimenez. Representing the Chamber are Ambassadors John Porter,
Wendy Hall and Lillian Smith. Affordable Towing & Recovery is licensed and insured and of-
fers roadside service, in state transport and recovery. Give them a call today at 352-341-
0101. They are located at 114 N. Florida Ave in Inverness.




'Big' night on tap



for Sheriff Dawsy


Visit Crystal River Beef's on Thursday,
May 21 and enjoy a special evening with
Sheriff Dawsy and his team of Celebrity
Waiters. Learn ways to help keep kids on
the right path, plus, get an inside look at the
Sheriff's new Mobile Command Post, and
the cool FO.C.U.S. car with interactive
multi-media for youngsters.
All kids in attendance will be "depu-
tized" with special gold star badges, and
will receive: other goodies from the Sher-
iff's Office. This is your opportunity to help
Big Brothers.Big Sisters help children,
share a fun evening with the Sher-
iff and some of his staff and enjoy a deli-
cious meal. Come anytime during the
evening hours of 5:00-10:00 pm, and be


ready for a great time.
Kids who stop by Beef's throughout the
month will get a free ticket for a special
drawing for a bicycle that is given away on
the BIG NIGHT! Come out, meet and greet -
mentors, children and staff from Big Broth-
ers Big Sisters and Celebrity guests who
support Big Brothers Big Sisters. Be ready
to give some extra special tips to the
celebrities for their outrageous service. All
of the tips will be donated to support Big
Brothers Big Sisters'one-to-one mentoring
programs.
For more information about this event or
to learn more about donating to or volun-
teering with Big, Brothers Big Sisters pro-
grams, call 352-464-3968.


Workshop to help


identify opportunities


The Citrus County Chamber recently held a ribbon cutting ceremony to welcome Dreams
Kitchens & Baths of Citrus County, Inc. Pictured above representing Dreams Kitchens &
Baths is Gary Eccher. Also pictured are Ambassadors Megan Ennis, John Porter and Janet
Mayo. Dreams Kitchens & Baths of Citrus County specializes in custom cabinets, kitchens,
baths, custom closet units, custom granite countertops, fireplaces, flooring and much more.
They are located at 7449 W Gulf to Lake Hwy in Crystal River. Give them a call today at
352-302-2865.

Southern Pride Construction


The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce would like to welcome Southern Pride Construc-
tion as members! Pictured above: Scott Lundy and Ambassadors Nancy Hautop, Janet
Mayo, Lillian Smith & John Porter. Southern Pride Construction, Inc. specializes in new
homes, remodeling, additions, repairs, barns, garages and more. If your home is in need of
a facelift, new bathroom or just extra space, Southern Pride is the place to call. No job is
too big or small. Licensed and Insured. Call them today for a free estimate at 352-563-
0027.


Local business and eco-
nomic development part-
ners have come together to
hold two
workshops on opportuni-
ties available through the
American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act.
, A workshop is scheduled
from 8 to 9:30 a.m. May 29 at
Tuscany in the Meadow at
the Citrus Hills Lodge, at
350 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy
in Hernando. '
Business Opportunities
through the Stimulus Act


The most recent member of
the Citrus Business Network is
Mike Wheeler, Caregivers for
Seniors. Mike was welcomed
into membership on April 10. The
Citrus Business Network meets
every Friday morning at Tuscany
On The Meadow, Citrus Hills
Lodge, 350 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hemando. Breakfast
starts at 7:00 AM, and the meet-
ing is conducted from 7:30 AM to
8:30 AM. Members benefit by ex-
changing information and refer-
rals with other business owners.
Guests are always welcome. At-
tendees should bring business
cards, brochures, coupons, etc.,
to exchange with other business
owners. Eaph person is given an
opportunity to introduce their
products or services. For more
information call Liz Koehlinger,
Membership Director, 527-9790
or Ron Radford, President, 795-
0003, or visit www.citrusbusi-
nessnetwork.com.
MEm
CCA (Community Center for
the Arts) is a Christ-Centered fine
arts school open to adults and
children of the church and the
community. It functions under the
umbrella of the music ministry at
Gulf to Lake Church in Crystal
River, FL. CCA seeks to provide
excellent training in the fine arts
and provide an atmosphere
where students can use their tal-
ents to glorify our Creator. Cur-


Workshops are being pre-
sented by Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce, Cit-
rus County Economic De-
velopment Council, UNF
Small Business Develop-
ment Center and Workforce
Connection. Local tax advi-
sor, Williams, McCranie,
Wardlow & Cash, PLC. joins
the team to discuss tax in-
centives available through
stimulus funds.
Attendees receive an
overview of the Federal Act,
tips and strategies for how


rent offerings include private les-
sons for students age 6 - adult
'in piano, guitar, percussion, violin
and solo dance. Voice lessons
are available for students in 711
grade to adults or for younger
students on a case by case basis
depending on student's level of
maturity. CCA also offers group
lessons in ballet/tapljazz combo
dance (ages 6-12), interpretive
dance (ages 13-adult), dance for
health (ages 55+) and interpre-
tive signing (ages 6-adult). To
register for CCA, visit the CCA
office at the church or register
online at
www.gulftolake.com/cca. Ques-
tions? Call Stacy Mason at 795-
8077 or e-mail her at
stacy.mason@gulftolake.com.
son
Central Florida Community
College - Citrus Campus is
happy to announce the Citrus
County Transit System has a bus
that stops at the Citrus County
Campus located at 3800 S.
Lecanto Highway! This pilot pro-
gram will allow those having
transportation problems to have
access to the Campus. If you
want to take continuing educa-
tion classes but are not able to
get to the campus, now you can!
You can call 249-1210 for infor-
mation about our continuing edu-
cation classes, or for information
on the bus schedule, please call
527-7630.


to find opportunities on fed-
eral, state and agency web
sites, advice on how to pre-
pare a request for proposal,
information on available
employee training grants
and an overview on tax,
credits and incentives.
There is no charge for the
workshops, but advance reg-
istration is required. To ob-
tain a detailed schedule or
to register for one or more
of the workshops, call 352-
795-3149 or email josh@citr-
uscountychamber.com.


MEm
Seven'Rivers Regional
Medical Center will offer a
.Safe Sitter� class for girls and
boys age 11 to 13 on Saturday,
June 20 at the hospital. Regis-
tration for the program is open
until Friday, June 5. Safe Sitter�
is a medically accurate program
that teaches young adolescents
how to handle emergencies
when caring for younger chil-
dren. The cost is $35. To regis-
ter your son or daughter or your
child's babysitter, call Amy
Kingery at 352.795.8344. Thou-
sands of young adolescents
across the country have been
trained by Safe Sitter� to han-
dle life threatening emergen-
cies. All information is taught by
trained instructors. During the
course, students get hands-on
practice in basic lifesaving tech-
niques so they are prepared to
act in a crisis. Safe sitters also
receive helpful tips to make
them more confident care-
givers. They learn safety pre-
cautions and how to
understand and deal with chil-
dren of different ages. They
even learn about the business
aspects of babysitting. To suc-
cessfully complete the Safe Sit-
ter� program, students must
pass a practical and written test
to show they have mastered
the key concepts and have the
skills neces


Member NeWS


===-=======-













Postal increase forces businesses to cut more


NEW YORK-Small
businesses already
working to. hold costs
down during the reces-
sion have another ex- H
pense to contend with:
higher postal rates.
The price of a first-
class stamp went up 2
cents to 44 cents on
Monday, the latest in a Joyce R
series of increases this SMAL
year by the U.S. Postal
Service and private
shippers including FedEx Inc.
and United Parcel Service Inc.
The price hikes have motivated
small business owners to think
about how they can send letters,
cards and packages more cheaply
They've made Stacie Krajchir
think about whether to mail or
ship at all.
Krajchir's Los Angeles-based
public relations firm, The Bunga-
low, routinely sends product sam-
ples to magazine editors. In the
past, PR companies would shower
samples on journalists, sending


0o
-L


packages to any and
every news outlet in the
hope that someone
would give them some
publicity. Now, though,
Krajchir's staff is likely
. to call editors first to
see how interested they
really are.
"Are they working on
senberg a story and looking at
L TALK different products to
include in' a story?"
Krajchir said. If so, her
company will send them samples.
Like other small business own-
ers, Krajchir has also found that
being creative can also keep mail-
ing and shipping costs down. So,
instead of sending several pack-
ages to different editors at a single
magazine, she'll consolidate the
shipments into a single box.
And when she's asked to send
something to an editor or other
person requesting samples, she'll
ask if they have a delivery service
account they'd like to use. Often,
the recipient is willing to pay.


Many small business owners
have also found that delivery serv-
ices and the Postal Service can
help cut costs. Any company open-
ing an account with a delivery
service should be able to negotiate
a price, especially if it has a large
number of letters or packages to
mail. Remember, there's a lot of
competition out there, and, espe-
cially in a slow economy, the de-
livery companies want your
business.
Technology offers small busi-
ness owners many ways to save
money on mailing and shipping
costs. It is easy to send printed ma-
terial by e-mail, or through file
transfer Web sites that can accom-
modate documents and files that
are too large for many e-mail sys-
tems. These methods eliminate
not only postage costs, but also
printing and labor expenses.
There are also Web sites that
can help businesses comparison
shop among delivery services.
Small businesses are also sav-
ing by switching to Web-based or


e-mail billing rather than snail-
mail invoices.
Tamara Wilson's PR firm does
so much work via e-mail, includ-
ing newsletters and billing, that
her monthly postage bill is now
about $200 instead of the $2,000 or
$3,000 she used to spend.
"I'm not only saving that money,
I'm saving my clients' money," said
Wilson, president of Wilson Public
Relations in Seattle. She said she
passes the savings along to her
clients, who are also scrutinizing
costs during the recession.
When she does mail out press
kits, which are traditionally fold-
ers with information about a com-
pany, product or service, they're
no longer on paper. They're on
flash drives that cost considerably
less to mail.
Sometimes, though, Wilson will
spend more on mailings for strate-
gic reasons. For example, she'll
send envelopes with eye-catching
stamps that she buys online. The
price premium is worth it to her if
it will help her mailings get no-


ticed.
She's also having invitations to
an upcoming event hand-deliv-
ered. She believes that sometimes
personal service can have a
greater impact than a letter that
arrives in the mail or an e-mail
that just pops into an inbox.
Owners who have employees
need to be sure that staffers all un-
derstand the need to find cheaper
ways of shipping. That means
teaching them not to use the most
expensive overnight service un-
less a package absolutely has to
arrive early in the morning
(cheaper next-day services often
deliver before noon, anyhow). If a
company uses stamps rather than
postage meters, employees should
know to use a 44-cent stamp and a
17-cent stamp on a 2-ounce letter
- not two 44-cent stamps.
Unless all your employees un-
derstand mailing costs, there can
be an unpleasant surprise when
the next bill arrives from your de-
livery service. Or, when your
postage meter runs out.


Author to speak in
West Palm Beach
Nancy Irven D.C., of Irven
Chiropractic Health Center,
was invited to speak to a group
of Health Corps teachers in
West Palm Beach on Nutrition
for Teenagers on May 8. Dr.,
Irven is the author of "Please
Don't Eat The Wallpaper, The"
Teenager's Guide to Avoiding
Trans Fats, Enriched Wheat
and High Fructose Cornm
Syrup." Health Corps is a non-
profit organization started by
Dr. Mehmet Oz, a regular on
the Oprah Winfry Show.
Wealth manager
speaks to advisers
Ron A. Rhoades, JD, CFP, a
Private Wealth Manager and
Chief Compliance Officer with
Joseph Capital Management,
LLC, was the keynote speaker
at the Kansas Securities Ad-
ministrator's 2009 Compliance
Seminar. Ron provided instruc-
tion to other investment advis-
ers on their fiduciary.duty of
loyalty, disclosures, proper
management of conflicts of in-
terest, and due diligence. Ron
'is a fee-only personal financial
adviser and may be reached at
746-4460.
Local professional
recertified
Matt Watley, CFSP, CPC,
vice president and general
manager of Hooper Funeral
. Homes & Crematory has re-


cently qualified for recertifica-
tion of the designation of Certi-
fied Funeral Service
Practitioner (CFSP), by the,
Academy of Professional Fu-
neral Service Practice. Matt is
also a Lifetime Member of the
Academy.
A number of professions
grant special recognition to
members upon completion of
specified academic and profes-
sional programs and "CFSP" is
funeral service's national indi-
vidual recognition.
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory serves the families
of Citrus County with locations
in Inverness, Beverly Hills and
Homosassa. Should you have
any questions regarding .
Hooper Funeral Homes & Cre-
matory, please call 726-2271.
KioskPros awarded
Yankees contract
KioskPros Inc. announced
today the initiation of a kiosk
project for the New York Yan-
kees. KioskPros was engaged
to engineer and construct a
kiosk to allow Yankees Fan
Club members the ability to
sign up for the Yankees Uni-
verse Fan Club.
The kiosk design incorpo-
rates two PC terminals to allow
'fans to sign up for the New
York Yankees Fan Club.
For further information, go to
www.KioskPros.com or call
(800) 497-1779. KioskPros is
at 4662 Commercial Way,
Spring Hill.


Classifieds


With system under strain, utility starts to deal


Associated Press

MARSHFIELD, Mass. - Len Bick-
nell angled his new garage toward the
sun two decades ago, making room for
the solar panels he planned to slap on
top. He couldn't afford the expensive
panels until several months ago, how-
ever, when the company with seem-
ingly the most to gain from big electric
bills stepped in to help pay for them.
NStar, like other utilities, is con-
fronting soaring demand for energy
and has launched an aggressive effort
in one little seaside town to find ways
to ease that pressure, doling out
money for solar panels, "smart" ther-
mostats and energy audits to cut
power usage by 8 percent during peak
hours.
If it fails, it may be forced to spend
millions upgrading substations.
As part of its two-year project, NStar
helps residents of.Marshfield pur-
chase solar panels, offers free energy
audits and installs "smart" thermo-
stats that the utility can remotely con-
trol, and rein in air conditioner use. ,
For Bicknell, who couldn't afford
the $30,000 solar system, participation
was a no-brainer. NStar's program and
tax credits helped knock down the
cost to about $10,000. Since he in-
stalled them in September, they've
pushed his NStar meter backward at
times, generating more power than
NStar is supplying.
It will take years for Bicknell to re-
coup his investment, but he figures ris-
ing fuel prices will only bring that
break-even day here faster.
"At some point, people say, 'I can
make an investment that can cut (my
electric bill) in half,"' Bicknell said.
"Why wouldn't people do it?"


So far, NStar has completed more
than 800 energy audits and placed
solar panels at five commercial build-
ings and 27 homes. That's four times
more than any other community in
NStar's service area in the eastern
half of Massachusetts in 2008, despite
Marshfield's small size.
NStar has also installed "smart"
thermostats for
free in 240 homes NStar ha
and 80 businesses.
Other utility stalled
companies have ermostat
cut deals with thermostat
business owners 240 ho
who let them put
solar panels on 80 busi
their roofs. Utili-
ties have also
signed agreements with residents who
voluntarily allow them to regulate air
conditioners during certain hours of
the day.
Mark Farber of Photon Consulting,
a solar energy consulting firm, said
few, if any, have tried to integrate
green measures and market them to
one town.
NStar could push more consumers
to install less popular green technol-
ogy, like the "smart theromostats" peo-
ple reject because of loss of control, by
packaging it with incentives for ex-
pensive, green technology and selling
it all under a banner of improved effi-
ciency. The overall approach is a
major change in an industry that's
long focused on supplying energy, not
selling less of it, Farber said
"It's a pretty remarkable change of
culture," said Farber, who serves on
an advisory board for the Marshfield
project. "They're not just feeding en-
ergy to us. They're becoming poten-


tially the network manager."
Marshfield, a town of 24,000 about
30 miles south of Boston, wasn't cho-
sen because NStar was partial to its
salt air or fertile shellfishing beds. In-
stead, the town's growing energy
needs were making the same' de-
mands on its system that NStar knew
many other communities would soon
make, said Penni-
S also in- McLean Conner,
" rtNStar vice presi-
dsmart" dent of customer
for free in care.
s'for free in If demand falls
nes and in Marshfield, the
utility can expand

nesses. the program, said
NStar spokesman
Michael Durand.
The "Marshfield Energy Chal-
lenge" was launched in April last
year by NStar and its partner, the
Massachusetts Technology Collabora-
tive, the state's economic develop-
ment agency for renewable energy,
which is splitting the project's $4 mil-
lion cost.
Consumers aren't required to par-
ticipate in one part of the program to
benefit from another'
Marshfield resident Christine
Fortin and her husband agreed to in-
stall the "smart" thermostats, in part
because NStar offered free insula-
tion upgrades as incentive. New in-
sulation ultimately wasn't possible
because of the design of their beach
side house, but Fortin, who also has
new solar panels on her roof, has few
worries as she heads into her first
summer without total control of her
air conditioning.
"We're all about saving money and
saving energy," she said.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


SWM seeking SWF 40's
early 50's. Am off of
work for 3 months look-
ing to walk the trail &
workout at the gym,
movies and other ac-
tivitles, Height & weight
proportionate. Me
5'10", 190, muscular
build, 49, look younger,
Inverness area. Call
Brian 352-220-3094
ALONE?
Senior Dating Bureau
SAFEST since 1977
Ages 45-90. 1-800-
922-4477 (24hrs) or
log onto: Respected
Dating.com



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
4, Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for your junk car,
truck or van
(352) 634-5389
CASH PAID all
vehicles.Trades welcome
Used PARTS avail
S 352-628-9118
FREE REMOVAL OF
S Garage Sale, Hshold.
& Furniture Items
Call 352-476-8949


WANTED
Junk Lawn Mowers
& Power Equip.
Free Pick-up (352)
564-8014/601-5053
/Us out zoomcltrus.com
WANTED
Junk Lawn Mowers
S& Power Quip.
Free Pick-up (352)
564-8014/601-5053
/Us out zoomcltrus.com
We will remove & haul
away your CHAIN LINK
. FENCING for free.
352-400-3929


5 yr. old Malti-Poo
Free to good adult home
Must go to adult home
not good with children
needs to only dog
(352) 628-4668
100 ft MOL, Anchor
fence, like new, you
remove. Call after 5pm.
(352) 637-0909
Chocolate Lab/
Rottie Mix,
Need good home
Male
(352) 419-0172
Excell. Home for any
unwanted birds, poultry
U-R unable to care for
726-9874
FREE CAT
Mix colored striped,
sweet w/other animals
Needs a good home.
(352) 897-4201


Free to Good Home
Male Beagle Mix
Approx. 9 mos old
(412)651-0622
Free Young
Roosters
(352) 697-9187
LOVESEAT
Twin sleeper. You pick
up. 352-563-5640


Blackberries
Organically Grown.
U-pick, starting May
23th. Sat.& Tues.8A./3P.
$3.50 per pound.
9333 Hwy 48 Floral City.
MADDOX FARMS
Sat 5/16 -U pick peas,
corn & beans, Hwy 475 N.


BLACK a wnHII
CHIHUAHUA MIX
Male- 4 mo. old
Amanda & Oak Lawn
Homosassa.
352-220-2036
CAT
Black with white paws,
white whiskers, white
belly, Lost in Citrus Hills
North, Long Valley Rd.
Area (727) 992-4173
ROTTWEILER
male. young large.
Reward
last Duvall Island
Floral City 352-637-6189


LARGE BLACK & WHITE
MALE DOG - w/chain
collar no tags, Very,
friendly. Near Key
Training Center.
352-302-5821


5arb * Malz
f'otograpkh
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits
Indoor or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed


rescued oetcom
View available pets on
our website or call
(352) 795-9550
Adoption Locations
PET SUPER MARKET
every Saturday 11-2p
Inverness
MERCANTILE BANK
Inverness
May 18th Monday
12-2pm
BIG LOTS
Crystal River
May 22nd Friday
12-2pm
HAVE SOMETHING TO
- GIVE AWAY?
Place your
ad 24 hrs a day.
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
1 Select Place an Ad
2 Create an Account
3 Select Cust. type
4 Select Heading of
Special Notices
5 Select Free
6 Create Ad


Bank Probate
Divorces /Evictions
352-613-3674

CAT
ADOPTIONS






hwiaf .r Os-. l wn, .-
Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A till 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4
All Cats and Kittens are al-
tered, tested for Feline Luk
and Aids. Up to date on
vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofsoha.ora,.
or stop by our offices at
1149 N ConantAve. Comer
of 44 and Conant.
Look for the big white build-
ing with the bright paw
prints.


FACING
FORECLOSURE?
CALL (352) 302-9140

ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT







$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com



NANNY
Will take care of
your children.
Call 352-613-0300
TUTORING - All subjects
& Spanish. Exp. Certified
teacher. Reading
specialist (619) 307-9277
Citrus County
WIDOW/COMPANION
71 to 83 yrs old. Refs
req'd. No drinking/
smoking. Will provide
room & board.
352-447-1242


(2) BURIAL LOTS
' Beverly Hills Memorial
Gardens. Asking $3000
for both. 972-471-1041
Memorial Gardens
Beveriy Hills, Section
Peace, Lot 89 Space A.
(832) 636-8462, To view
Call. (352) 746-4646



A FREE Report of Your
Home's Value
www.naturecoast

missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
Shelter 794-3825




CHURCH
SECRETARY
to perform general
clerical duties
Monday - Thursday,
20 hrs. Must be
computer literate.
Working knowledge
of Publisher Software
a plus.
Call 352-793-3438
or send resume to:
LPUMC
589 CR 470
Lake Panasoffkee, Fl.
33538-6057


Business DIGEST


B "-a t.ty ,


SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 DS


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


11










D6 SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009


BECOME A CNA
For Career and
Test Preparation
Call 352-564-8378
CITRUS SURGERY
CENTER, AN
OUTPATIENT
FACILITY

IS SEEKING AN EXP.
OPERATING ROOM
RN CIRCULATOR
Prefer Ortho & Ent.
Exp. Scheduled Pool
Hours, No Weekends,
or Holidays. No Call,
Great Place to Work
& Top Moneyll
Fax Resume To:
(352) 527-1827
CNA PREP CLASSES
EZ Learning Services
Day & Evening Classes
352-382-EASY; 586-2715
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
Full Time
Lic. Lab Tech &
Phlebotomist.

For busy Physician
Lab. Competitive
Salary & Benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 746-6333

GYN OFFICE IN
CRYSTAL RIVER
LOOKING FOR:
Medical Assistant
Receptionist
LPN Nurse
Dietician
Proactive, one year
experience in
Medical Offices.
Knowledge in
medical software
Please fax resume to:
352-564-8201

HOME HEALTH
COMMUNITY LIAISON
RN Field/Psych nurse
exp a plus.
PHYSICAL
THERAPIST
Possible F/T position w/
exc. benefits.
Advocate Home
Health Care
Lecanto.
352-746-2549
Fax resume to
352-746-2952
Lic# HHA299991842
LPN
Experienced Only
Ortho. Temporary
position through Oct. '09.
Immediate opening.
Please fax resume to
Nettle at 746-0333

�LPN
Full time
Required:
Compassionate and
caring attitude.
Apply at:
Barrington Place

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Front & Back Exp.,
F/T, computer &
phlebotomy.
For busy primary care
MD Office
Email Resume
wfmaresumes@
yahoo.com
or Fax Resume To:
352-489-5786

P/T BENEFITS
SPECIALIST

For local Hospital 2
days wkly. Exp. Req. in
Health Ins., Cust.
Service, & Acct. Mgmt.
Email Resume To:
emolovee.benefitsii

WAF .E A

It's E-Z @ E-Z Learning
Services
Offering CNA Test
Prep Courses
Day/ Evening Classes
CPR Included
W10% O Thru May '09
Refer a Friend and re-
ceive an additional dis-
count. Enroll on line @
EZLeamingsetvic-.. c.mn
or call 352-382-EASY
(3279) or 586-2715




ACCOUNTING
CLERK

Full-time account-
ing clerk position in
Citrus County based
auto dealership.
Absolutely must
have prior experi-
ence in the auto
dealer industry and
be proficient in "
MicroSoft !:'.;el.
Duties mav rncl ude:
Finance F ,"cuct
administras,.on, con-
tract funding, deal
data-entry. May
consider part-time
for the right person.
Send resume
including wage
requirements to:
autoc-
itrus@hotmail.com

POLICE OFFICER
Dunnellon Police Dept
is currently accepting
applications for the
position of F/T and
Reserve Police
Officer. Applicants
must be state cert.
Applications are
available at
Dunnellon Police
Dept. 12014 S.Williams
Street, Dunnellon.


Open until filled.





Y wouvorld first

Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment,
source!


CHRONICLE
Classifieds
toiiiJ~i. 4miii~al


v chrar.L.~eCflhi,'.O


esaua


AUTO MECHANIC
Need
Good mechanic, own
tools, trust
worthy, good with
customers & staff, able
to work on all makes of
cars, 40 hrs. w/chonces
of overtime. Uniforms
provided.(352) 746-7351

Floor Tech

NORTH CAMPUS
REHAB & NURSING
SEEKS EXP. FLOOR
TECH W/ HOUSE-
KEEPING EXP.
TO JOIN OUR TEAM!
FULL-TIME OPENING!
PRIOR EXP. HIGHLY
PREF. BUFFERING
FLOORS, GEN. CLEAN-
ING, TAKING
OUT TRASH & LINEN +
STOCKING CLEAN
LINEN. GREAT SALARY
+ BENEFITS
CALL: 352-323-2400
FAX: 352-323-2409
700 PALMETTO ST. N

FRAMERS

5 yrs. exp. minimun
(352) 601-3691

Granite Polishers
Needed
Experience preferred
but not necessary.
Must be
Dependable, and
have Dependable
transportation.
Apoly in Person
DCI Countertops
Shamrock Ind. Park
6843 N. Citrus Ave.
Biding # (Rt 495)
Crystal River, FL
No Phone Calls

Maintenance
Tech

ARBOR VILLAGE
NURSING
SEEKS EXP. MAINT.
TECH
TO JOIN OUR TEAM
FULL-TIME OPENING
PRIOR EXP. PAINTING,
TRIM CARPENTRY &
GEN. MAINTENANCE
REQ.
WE OFFER GREAT
SALARY & BENEFITSIII
CALL & APPLY
TODAY
CALL 352-787-2910
FAX 352-748-7609
490 S. Old Wire Rd,





HERON POINTE
HEALTH AND
REHAB

IS HIRING FOR
ASSISTANT
MAINTENANCE
PERSON
Day shifts. Must be
available for rotation
and on call hours. 2
yrs exp pref.
Apply
in person to:
1445 Howell Ave.
Brooksville, Fl. 34601
or Fax Resume to:
(352) 796-3149

Pre School Teacher
Needed
(352) 795-6890

Part-time
Helpl


1 Entry Door, 2 Vents,
S13795. INSTALL ED
* . .a ... .. . - t-*

25x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry Door, 2 Vents,
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.795. INSTALLED
30x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$14,995. INSTALLED
Roof overhang,
2-10x10 Rollup Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
* Fl, Engineered Plans
* A local FI Manufact.
* Meets or exceeds
Florida wind codes.
* Conc/Inst by others.
* Many sizes available
* We specialize in
Commercial Buildings
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC1256991
www. metal
structuresllc.com
SHED 12x16
Metal siding. You
move. $1000.
352-464-4763
r i---w- E
Sheds & Garages
of Any Size
i *SHEDS NOW*
We Move & Buy
Used Sheds
I lndependence/41
(352) 860-0111




2 Window A/C Units
1-Haier, 1 Maytag.
From New England only
used during summer
months.$40 ea oab
(352) 746-3668 /
270-0409


AT THE 'HEART OF OUR COMMUNITY


OARING... FOR MANY YEARS,


IN MANY WAYS.





For 50 \eari, Citrus Memorial Health Sistem iCMHsi has been providing
quality care to the community. Although we re embracing the future with
innovative technology and an energetic atmosphere, we're still a close-knit
team who greets people by name. It's just our wa\'

RNs
SC -PCLi - PCU * Emergency - Med'Surg-Ch.arge * urgicaI Floor
* Orthopedics� Neuro Telemetr and Charge - Educ.ator-ED,'CV SerNic
* ExternrJ Sernice. Clinical Super-mor - NursNe Managzr Med Surg
* Qualirv ImproLement Director � Cath Labt - CCLU * OR
* ARNP-Nuclear Medicine Cardiac Stres- Testine

Physical Therapists
Positions area ataldable in both our Rehabiltation and Home Health departments
Degree tn Ph sical Therap\ and Florida icense'eligibilbr required

Certified Scrub Technician-CVOR
Precious surgical experience preferred tor Open HearL, Thoraic and \as'cujar
cases. BL$ pnor to eniernng clinical area.

Come ioLm us L Inverness, our scenic town, *.n Florida Nature Coast, lust
north of the Tampa Bay area Citrus Memorial offer. a competinve aJlar, a
generous benefits package and relocaion assistance It you're looknrig for a
friend]v workplace where people truJl tare, make tourselft home here

Please apply online at
www.citrusmh.com


=1


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IasM


CLASSIFIED



A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
�4 2 Ton $780.00
-42-1/2Ton $814.00
m- 3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation:
SPool Heat Pumps
Free Del. Lic.#CACn
057914 746-4394
ABC Briscoe Appl.
Refrig., washers, stoves.
Serv. & Parts
(352) 344-2928
ALL NEW WHIRLPOOL
REFRIGERATOR- Whi &
Electric range w/hood &
micro (11,500 btu). $800
for all. 352-897-4115
cell- 313-318-6032
Electric Stove, flat top
Amana, self cleaning,
no power cord $65.
Small Microwave $15.
352-795-2647
GE Upright Freezer
like new, frost free
Model 14DVRWW
13.7 cu ft. paid $570.
asking $300 firm (352)
489-5700 or 895-1819
Refrigerator
Kenmore, white,
icemaker,66" h X 30"w
X 30" d. Like new. $400.
(352) 795-6736



SOUTHERN

AUCTION
MARKETING
& APPRAISAL
AUCTION
Mon., May 18th,
6:30 PM
32 -pcs. Gorham
'Chantilly Sterling
flatware, Craftmatic
scooter, John Deere
riding mower, new
smoker, Thomasville
LR set, jewelry, art
glass, 1920s McCoy
jardiniere, more...
See weekly pictures
and descriptions @
www.southern
auctionmkta.net:
15991 NE Hwy 27AIt.
Williston, FL,
352-528-2950
Col. Joel Kulcsar
AU1437-AB2240
10% BP on all sales




2 TON Larin HOIST
w/leveler $150
Clarke 10 gal. sand
blaster $100
Both like new
601-2232
220/20 GALLON
HORIZONTAL AIR
COMPRESSOR With
Hose $99.00. 464-0316
AIR COMPRESSOR
20HP Kohler/Champion
Gas Compressor
Electric start, 80 gal tank,
1.5" main hose. $1200
352-266-6756
' ANTIQUE HAND
TRUCK Wood & Steel
Heavy Duty Rubber
Tires $35.00 464-0316



JVC CHX470 automobile
compact 12 disc CD $25
Hernando 352-344-4357
TELEVISION 19 in
phillips tv in excellent
condition. asking 50.00
obo ask for john
352-382-1436
TV PANASONIC
27" color w/DVD player
$100 (352) 560-7465



2 PAIR OF VINTAGE
EXTERIOR WOOD
SHUTTERS Painted Black
each panel is 16 x 51-3/4
$50 firm (352) 382-1735
90 + USED WHITE
ALUMINUM ROOFING
PANS 1ft x 16ft $1500 obo
(352) 382-1735
2-5 GAL. CONTAINERS
OF FLOOR ADHESIVE
$15.00 each 464-0316


COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer salesirepair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
New & User systems
upgrades. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
www.rdeeii.com
HP COMPUTER
Complete set.
Paid $1,659 (2004)
Never used.
Sell $850/obo.
352-861-9746/evenings



SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather bik os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Blk w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815



Bush Hog Howse 4-ft.,
3-pt. $325; York Rake
4-ft. 3-pt. $175
(352) 422-3629
Tractor
'05, 42HP, like new,
275 hrs. w/ *
attachments $9,500
(352) 302-3820



PATIO SET Ivory, PVC,
4 chairs/coasters, 42" oc-
tagon table $100. Steel
frame hammock $25.
(352) 341-1447



Pre Owned Furniture
Unbeatable Prices
NU 2 U FURNITURE
Homosassa 621-7788
Antique Bedroom Set
1930's Circa. Dark Cherry,
Bureau, dresser wlmirror
& night stand. $500 Obo
(352)476-3848
Antique Table
$400.
Noritaki
12 place setting.
$200.(352) 637-0467
Armoire Desk
slide-out keyboard.
Great for CPU. Cabinet
doors. CD tray. $200;
(352) 382-3675
ARMORIE
tan wood, wicker front
60 h. 39 w. $50:
(352) 344-4852
BEAUTIFUL FLEXSTEEL
Upholstered Living
Room Chair in medium
aqua.Like new, $150,
(352) 249-7263
Bedroom Set, Kingsize,
Solid pine, natural finish
w/glaze.Headboard, foot-
board, night stand,
dresser & mirror. $599.
Ex. cond.(352) 410-0891
BIG RECLINER-Massage
Chair, Dual remote
control panel:
Bluish-Grey suede, Exc.
Cond. $75 (352)
410-0891 ,
BIRCH HUTCH Open
storage and closed stor-
age on the top. Doors
and Drawers on the bot-
tom. Like New $250
352-344-4654








(352) 621-0558


Broyhll Oak
Dining Room Set
with six chairs on
casters and Hutch
$450.
(352) 563-2172
DINING ROOM TABLE
Older, drop leaf oak with
two chairs in excellent
condition. $125.
352-634-2253
Dining RoomTable
w/2 leaves and 6 chairs.
Lt. wood. Well kept.
$175.(352) 746-6509
DINING TABLE ONLY
Light beige wood
w/glass insert 4 ft.
across.$200
(352) 746-3745
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER AND DAYBED
Large oak entertainment
center, 5ft.wide and 6ft.
tall, plenty of stor-
age.$200.
Daybed with trundle,
$125.00 Phone
352/794/3029
FUTON
Solid wood. $95
5-Drawer Desk. $75
352-601-3654
Glass side Table,
3 1/2 shelves $35
Record, CD/Tape
Player with storage
cabinet $125.
(352) 503-7385
HUTCH Older, 1940's
dark oak with lighted cab-
inet in excellent condition.
$150. 352-634-2253
LAZY BOY COUCH &
LOVESEAT
Matching, wall
huggers, teal acyrlic
fabric. Asking $400 for
both. 352-746-3421
Motion Cocktail Table
Hesse, solid oak &end
table. Lg matching pair.
New in Dec. Must see,
asking $350.
(352) 726-7537
NEEDED DONATION
Furniture & Appls. For
The Agape Community
Thifll Store, Inverness
Serving the emergency
needs of our community
Free Pick up available
(352) 726-2287
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30; Full
$40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
Refrigerator
14 Cubic ft. off
white,
$180.
RV. Refrigerator
Brand New 3
way. $300.
(352) 637-0467
SOFA & LOVE SEAT
matching ,dark blue
excellent condition.
$225. obo
(352) 637-3360
Sofa bed, cream color,
excellent condition,
$700. Slip covers too.
(352) 344-0172
WANTED
Antique chest of
drawers (352) 302-8850
Wood Coffee table &
2 matching side tables
glass inserts $125. for all
Divider Screen 4 folds,
lace inserts, $50.
(352) 503-7385
YOUR FURNITURE
DONATIONS
SUPPORTS THE PATH
HOMELESS SHELTER
Call (352) 746-9084



42" TROYBILT Riding
Mower. 8 mths old, good
condition. $450.
352-476-3661
CRAFTMAN 14.5HP
RIDING MOWER
Just serviced. New
battery. 42" cut.
Runs good
-$350. 352-464-0316
RIDING MOWER, Crafts-
man 16HP Turbo O.H.V.
42" cut, new battery &
blades,
good shape, $450.
(813) 789-7857 cell


CNAs


















( Vif 0d) ? l i d i l l i 0/, "( , e, V wike e




In Wildwood

is currently accepting applications

for CNA positions as part of our Nursing team.




Full-Time - 3-11


Part-Time - 3-11 & 11-7



Qualified applicants will meet the following criteria:

* Current FL CNA Licensure

* Strong communication and interpersonal skills

* Prior Long-Term Care experience highly preferred



Competitive pay, a strong benefits package & an

outstanding work environment await you!

To apply, please e-mail your resume to Jobs(Q)CQCare.com

You may also fax your resume to (877) 571-1952 or

apply by phone - toll free (800) 442-1353.

We also accept applications in person.

490 South Old Wire Road

Wildwood, FL 34785


CITRLiS NI MEMORIAL.
^.^�2^l ' ff' "'/


BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. Sat.Sun 8-1pm
for 3 weekends
18 E. Golden St
HERNANDO
Everything Must Go!
24' RV, '84 Corvette-Eng.
rebuilt. 137 E. Brandon
Sat-Sun 9-? No EarlyBirds
HONDA ACCORD
97 $500! Police
Impounds ! for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246




CRYSTAL RIVER
1348 N. Hunterston Point
Sun 12- 5 Meadowcrest



BLACK LEATHER
JACKET, Biker's Dream-
like new, Sz 42-44 $70.
(352) 344-4852



2 ARMY METAL 5.GAL
GAS CAN w/brackets
$40.00 each. 464-0316
2 MOTORCYCLE
HELMETS 1 Motorcross
& 1 Street $25.00 each
464-0316
1 HP, Submersible pump,
$75. Guaranteed will
demonstrate
352-726-7485
3-WHEEL JOGGING
Stroller $25; Window A/C
$50 both good.
(352) 628-7688
BIRDCAGE - MEDIUM
WITH ACCESSORIES &
TABLE $50. DEEP
FRYER - GE $30
352-341-6920
CAMERA
'99 Minolta, RZ330SI.
2 lenses/micro af 3x-lx
Zoom lenses. $300.
for all. Like new.
� (352) 382-7046
COMFORTER Queen
size 15 piece set. $60.00
Vinyl inlay flooring 6'x7'
Neutral color. $50.00
Scal1,352-621-7586
Cowboy Holster
Leather, $45.
Call Walter,
(352) 527-3552
FLAG POLE STAND new
put it by your car or
lawn 10.00 3523821191
GOLF CLUBS several
right hand clubs 5.00
each 3523821191
HONDA ACCORD
97 $500! Police
Impounds ! for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
Hover Vacuum Cleaner
Bag less
$40.
Small Color TV
$35.
(352) 503-7385


-'Act No%%7
.-.- -

ITS FREE
Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad for FREE on
Sour all new
CLASSIFIED SITE.

5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 Items totaling less than
$100.00 each.
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an Ad in the top right
hand corner.
LAWN CHAIR COVERS
new plastic nice 5.00
3523821191
Lawn Mower Toro 21"
self propelled mower
rear drive
$200.(352) 249-1187
Motor Home Items
misc. $50. for all
New 4gal solo back pack
sprayer $50. Like new
10" Sears Table saw
15amp motor w/legs $75.
(352) 249-1187
Oil Paintings,
36x48 were $300, now
$99 -$149 (352) 746-2892


4 chairs $100
Barb b que
$100.
(352) 794-3333
SOD ALL TYPES
Install & Delivery.
Available (352) 257-5760
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT








$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com




2 MANUAL WHEEL
CHAIRS Good Condition
No Foot Rests $40.00
464-0316
4 PRONG CANE
Adjustable Height $25.00
464-0316
Bruno
WHEELCHAIR LIFT
$2,000 oboe
(352) 628-0831
FULL SIZE ALL ELECTRIC
HOSPITAL BED. Remote
control & massage. $995
Call Walter
(352) 527-3552
POWER WHEEL CHAIR
bran new only used 2
times $500.00or b.o.
(352) 249 0815
Scooter GO GO
new batteries,custom
padded seat, exc. cond
$400 obo(352) 464-0316
SCOOTER LIFTS
& POWER CHAIR LIFTS
$500 & up
(352) 564-1414
TUB CHAIR & BED
SIDE COMMODE
$25.00 Each 464-0316
WALKER FOR SALE 4
w/seat &'brakes. $75.00
464-0316




Buying Silver Coins
$.10, .25, .50, $1.00
Pre- 1965,
352- 302-8159
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676




'CLARINET
and Electronic
Metronome both for
$125. (352) 637-2193
Wurlitzer Piano
Console, Pecan finish,
matching bench, very
nice. $895.00
(352) 212-2715



Bench Press Weight set,
incl. 41b bar & 1361bs of
weight, less than 1 yr. old
$75. "
746-3615.
ELECTRIC TREAD MILL
Good Condition $100.00
352-464-0316
STATIONARY BICYCLE
WORKS ARMS TOO
Digital Readout $65.00
464-0316



4 SALE- GUNS & AMMO
AR-15's - AK-47's - Shot
Guns - Pistols..WE LY.
gQLQ. 352-489-4870
AMMO 223 FMJ Brass
case, new production,
500 rounds w/ammo
can $300; 38 Special FMJ
Winchester 100 rounds
$70 (813) 789-0592 Crystal
River Area


Trades
Skllsi3


C-.IH . L, i enila op.'rrur..i c'-,pl,.-











CITRUS COUNTY (IL) CHRONICLE




Winchester 500 rounds r-r
$200; 40 CAL FMJ
Winchester 300 rounds
$200; (813) 789-0592
in Crystal River Area. PLACi
BIKE MEN'S TREK 4300 24hrs A
19 1/2" FRAME, Rack, LNEW
computer, 1.50 tires, toe CLASS
clips, Orange 6 yrs old, chronicl
$175 (352) 344-4357 chronicl
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238 *
GOLF CART
Club car transporter RIDII
6-seater. Exc. cond. MC
$1800. 352-422-0199 zero turn
GOLF GIFT Will pay
CERTIFICATES. 4-18 holes
w/cart. Alll for $75.
(970)388-9058 (Lecanto)
Can split up. Ador-bl'
PRIVATE COLLECTOR puppies
Buying Guns, long & 1
Ammunition& CKC/R
reloading supplies Certs.,
(352) 586-7516 (352)
REMMINGTON 870 ADORA
Tacticle 12 gage combo, AKC, 9
pistol grip, collapsible Health c'
stock, rifle slug barrel & $600 or n
vent rib barrel. $500 right home
(813) 789-0592 - Crystal AKC LAB
River - trade considered for $250.
WE BUY GUNS Ready for
On Site Gun Smithing (352)
(352) 726-5238 ALL BR


CAR HAULER
'06, 32 Ft. Dominator XT.
By Classic C. Trpl.
axels. $14,800. Like
new.(352) 835-4273





KIRA BY GRACO FULL
COLLECTION
Stroller, carseat, swing,
playpen, highchair, new
condition. post $500
All for $300 601-2232


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd
friendly serve. Lowest
rates Free est.
352-860-1452
All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear.
bushliog, tree/debris t
removal. 352-302-6955
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852








OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Work Free Est.
LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Li (352) 4006016 Ins
R WRIGHT TreeService
Tree removal, stump
grind, trim. lns,& Lic
0256879352-341-6827








At Home Computer
Repairs & custom
computers.
Call (352)228-7823
COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
ON-SITE
COMPUTER
SERVICE
352-341-4150




Your world first.
Ever, Da\'


CIw�i


Now ava
Schnau
Malt
352-
BOXER
WEEK
PAPERS
PREM. HE
$300 352
423-
BOXEF
CERTIF
$350 M/D
(352)

Over 3,C
and P
lis
www.n
home


YOUR AD
DAYAT OUR
' EBIZ CITRUS
IFIED SITE
So to:
leonline.com
lick place
in ad



NG LAWN
)WERS
n, Die or Alive
cash 746-7357



e Chihuahua
s all males, 3
smooth coat
EG., Health
8wks. $325.
726-1843
BLE YORKIES
wks. 1F/IM.
ert., 1st shots,
negotiable for
e 352-465-7668
8. 1 blk female
5 months old.
a good home.
302-9559
EED RESCUE
ilable; Westie,
uzer, Shihtzu,
tese mix,
553-2604
PUPPIES 9
S OLD NO
PARENTS ON
HEALTH CERTS.
-564-0710 OR
967-4566
i PUPS AKC
ABLE 9wks
on premises.
)344-3138

000 Homes
properties
ted at
aturecoast
front.com


REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch * Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-1728




Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
work fully coated. 30 yrs.
Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-795-6533
' 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
.ALL HOME REPAIR
painting, drywall flooring,
pwr. wash Malley's
Home Maint
220-9486 (lic0259169)
/ out zoomcltrus.com









FERRARO'S
Painting Service
Int/Ext. Free Est. Press
Cleanin 352 465-6631
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick LicJlns.
(352) 726-9998

Mike Anderson
Painting Int/Ext
& Pressure Washing
Call a Professional,
(352) 464-4418
/ Us out zoomcitrus.com




AFFORDABLE Mobile
Boat Maint. & Repair
Technical/Electrical
Custom Rigging
John (352) 746-4521
V us out zoomcitrus.com
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
27 yrs. exp. Certified
Best prices/guaranteed
352-220-9435
check out zoomcitrus.com


CHIHUAHUA
AKC -Male 12wks- Fawn
Apple Head Perfectl
Shots, healthy. $450
352-637-1111
CHIHUAHUA'S
CKC Reg. Current shots,
$250.Health cert
(352) 406-7123
Ferrets 1 Male, 1 Fem.
All shots. Fixed &
descented, w/Cage.
Great Family Pels.
(352) 489-4879
GERMAN SHEPARD
AKC reg, Male, 4mths
old. Housebroken, well
mannered, crate
trained. 352-249-7266
German Sheppard
Puppies, 21 Wks. 2
males, 2 fems.,1 is blue
all the rest black & tan.
papers, & health certs.
$300.(352) 201-0111
HONDA ACCORD
97 $500! Police
Impounds ! for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
PITBULL PUPPIES
Thick headed Colby,
mild, intelligenetics.
Reg., 8 Pups available
Simply the Best
$200. (352) 621-0268
PUGGLE PUPS
(pug/beagle); Sheltie,
Papillon & maltepoo
pups $375-$450
(352)216-1481
ROTWEILLER PUPPIES
Absolutely Beautiful,
8wks, AKC, big boned,
shots, wormed. Parents,
$650 + (352) 503-6316
Shih-Tzu Puppies
2 New Liters Home
raised w/ love, All shots
included. $300+
3902 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827
(305) 872-8099


-'-
AT YOUR HOME
Mower & Generator
Repair. 352-220-4244
Lic#99990001273













The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing n handi-
cap. Lic/ns. #2441.
352-634-1584




certified caregivers/sitters
Lisa 352-422-4765,
Dee Dee 352-422-1267




* SEE THROUGH
Window Washing
All Aspects (352)
489-4189; 322-0962
/ us out zoomcitrus.com




HOUSE CLEANING
$35.00 for most 2/1.
Experienced & reliable,
w/references 228-1789
' MAIDS ON CALL
Serving Citrus 3Yrs.
Windows/Free Est.
(352) 726-8077
Malou's House
cleaning, $12.00 Per hr. 2
hr. min. Homosassa
area. (352) 47Y-9676




Affordable CABINETS
& COUNTER TOPS
New & Remodel
352-586-8415


1st Choice 11-
S PEST CONTROL, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE


LAWN GOT

PROBLEMS?

Call 503-6821
Owner/Operatorsi .-,
Lloyd Smith - Bill Biedenstein - Jim Chry
74021, 5340W. Glenbrook St.


Hay
Orchid grass 601b
bale $12.00
(352) 628-0156



2 Arabian Studs
1 is registered. 1 Older
Tennessee Walker,
great w/kids & riding. All
under $700. each.
(352) 563-9985
Summer Horse
Camp
(352) 382-5400
www.rymarranch.com
THOROUGHBRED
Reg. 9yrs old gelding.
$800. QUARTER HORSE
Paint Stallion. $800
352-726-4135



BABY GOATS SHEEPs
& Pigeons
For pets only.
Mini Farm off 495
(863) 843-2495 cell
RHODE ISLAND REDS
Assorted Bantams,
Polish, Ducks & Quail
Starting at $2.
352-795-6381



EVINRUDE O/B MOTOR
4HP - Excellent
condition, $400,
352-621-0574 after 6PM.



13 ft. '66 Fiberglass
V-hull, Garmin, bass
seats, oars, trailer, new
4-stroke 9.8 elec. start
motor. $2,000
(352) 344-4609
15 ft 1961 Fiberglass V
40hp, galvanized trailer,
well equipped, Great
cond. $900 (352)
621-3494
1993 17' Sylvan
Bow rider bimini top
Boat & trailer
85h.p. Yamaha motor
Good cond. $3,500
(352) 344-0457
16FT CAR. SKIFF
'96, like new, $5,800
40HP Evinrude, center
console, trolling motor,
b-top, many extras
(352) 344-5858
AIR BOAT
Big 13 Ft. haul,
2 seats. Approx. 375-400
HP 8 blade warp drive.
2-1 reduction gear box.
Used 100 hrs.+Tri.
$18,500 invest. Sell
for $10,000 firm.
(352) 302-4535
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
AQUA SPORT '05
175 Osprey , 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual
batt. w/switch, bimini,
easy load trailer. Low
hours. $9,990
352-860-0277
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
S9.900!a352-746-5856 "














ia
QUALITY CRAFTED
BUILDERS New, Renova-
tions & Commercial
15 Yrs in Citrus County
S 352-726-5507,
ROGERS Construction
New Homes & All
Construction (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872
Schnettler
Construction, LLC
Lic & Ins CBC1253348
Renovations,
room additions,
decks, barns, garages,
various home repairs.
637-4629 cell
352-266-6756
We will beat any price by
far without compromise.
Dunham Construction
Roofing, remodeling,
home maint. painting,
pres. wash, etc. talk to
owner 422-6575
(crco452543
us out zoomcttrus.com



SUBURBAN ND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla rms,
windows, garage scrns
(CBC1257141) 628-Q562



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./Ext.'Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996








Mike Anderson
Painting Int/Ext
Pressure Washing
Call a Professional,
(352) 464-4418


"HOME REPAIRS"
Painting, power wash
jobs big & small
(Eng,/ Spanish)746-3720
V us at zoomcitrus.com


CLASSIFIED



AQUA SPORT
2000; 225 Explorer 24'
Cuddy cabin. 225
Johnson Ocean Pro.
Loadmaster tandem axle
trailer. Exc. cond.
$14,500.352-493-7377;
352-221-5230
AQUA SPORT
'86 25FT.Cuddy Cabin.
W/twin '06 Optimax
150hp & double
axle trailer. $16,900
(352)257-1355
Cabin Cruiser
24 ft.
Owner died, 6 cyl. 10,
alpha one/OD, used in
fresh water, tan. gal. trl
incl.'d $2,100 464-0316
CENTURY
'01- Bay, 21ft.
'02, 150HP Yamaha w/
trlr, custom cover
dep/find, VHF, Iw hrs.,
like new, $13,950.
(352) 442-7772
Deck Boat
95' 19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ ra-
dio & fishfinder. New Bat-
tery switch. 2 batteries,
power pk.
prop./hub.$6,000
(352)'726-0838
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras!
$14,500/obo. (352)
489-9640: 220-6508
FISH- N- SKI '92
16' 50hp motor, bimini,
cover, new floor & radio
all cost guard equipment
$4000. call Ross
(352) 795-0153
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
115HP, 4strke Yamaha,
w/trlr. $11,200, will
trade (352) 503-3778
HURRICANE
23ft Deck Boat, 112HP
Johnson, great for fish-
ing & scalloping Must
Sell $3,500, 628-7397
OSPREY
1994 - 16ft, CC, bay boat.
88 HP Evinrude, Garmin
GPS/recorder $4500.
352-621-4711
PONTOON '08
Sweelwater 21ft. 25
hours. 90hp Yamaha.
$18,000. Paid $26,000.
352-503-6797
PONTOON BOAT
08' 20 Ft. To many
options tb list. $13,000
Call for info. 628-7926
Pontoon Boat
1996,18 ft., Good Cond.
40HP Yamaha, 4 stroke,
$8,500/oboa
(352) 860-1490
PONTOON Landau
90, 24' port a potty, built
n portable gas tank, new
canopy steering cable ss
prop $5K,01 90hp Merc.
00 trailer (352) 465-7987
PONTOON
Palm Beach 2002
22' 60hp yYamaha
$5500 (239) 571-2628
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras
$12,000 (352) 628-0281
PRO-LINE 221
WALKAROUND 199
200 HP.Mercury w/9.9 HP
Johnson kicker,$12k
obo. Call Kurt at Pete's
Pier 352-795-6067


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash &
Gutters Lic. 5863
(352) 746-0141

Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
- Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too sinall!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

N ATURE COAST
HOME REPAIR
& MAINT. INC.
I - Offering a Full I
Range of Services
www.naturecoast
homereoair.com
Lic. 2776/lns.
' 352-634-5499
Visa/MC/Discover

A#I HANDYMAN
Master Craftsman
Repairs at Affordable
Rates. 352-628-6960
/ us out zoomcitrus.com








FASTI AFFORDABLE!
RELIABLE Most repairs
Free Est.. ilc#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *

Senior Saviours
Service.
A mustfo ONLY
$40.00 a Month!
Call 352-342-99115
www.SeniorSaviours.co
m




--= - - -
Sheds & Garages of
I Any Size
| *SHEDSNOW* I
We Move & Buy .
I Used Sheds
I lndependence/41 .
(352) 860-0111
Call 92-34-9911


SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 D7


SEA PRO ,
'00 19 FT. C/C. Loaded.
Elec. Pkg. 115 FI 4 Strk.
Yam. 100 hrs. Bim. top.
Best offer(352)533-3093
SHOAL WATER
'05, 15ft.. Cat Hull,
50HP Evinrude, CC,
extremely shallow
for Flats, with trailer
$12,500. (352)621-0848
T-CRAFT
23'L, 6'W, '02 150H
Evin. mtr. w fuel enj. like
new, trir. w/bfks
$7750 352-489-3661
Triumph
'03-17ft Bass. with
tairler 60 Yamaha,
B-top, Trolling motor,
Excel cond. $5,700
Obo.(352) 860-0760
Ultimate Scallop
Boat 03, 25'Sun
Tracker, 05 Merc 90hp, Io
hrs. tandem tril. like new
exc. value $11,500.
352-586-1676




















WELLCRAFT T
1987, 250 Sportsman,
25', Gas eng., 30" draft,
260 hp I/O, alum.
trailer.$8,000
(352) 344-9651




05' TITANUM
5Th Wheel, 28E335B
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
26inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
'07 NEW MAR
Cypress 32ff 5th wheel.
2 slides. Separate bath.
. Extras. 3 yr ext. warr.
$35,900/0bo
352-794-3534
38FT BOUNDER '96
Class-A - basement
model. 49K ml. 14mpg,
new tires & brakes. (4)
TV's. Ready for long trip.
(22.000. 352-565-0615

* AUTO. BOAT *
DONATIONS
43 year old
. Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
(352) 795-9621
* Tax Deductible *

CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
� Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
,(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org


I-

#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash &
Gutters Lic.5863
(352) 746-0141
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696

ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699




FAST AFFORDABLE!
RELIABLE! Most repairs
Free Est., Lic#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *

Kurt Mac Intyre Plumbing
All Phases Of Plumbing
325-422-5269




C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/201-1422




AARON'S FENCE
All Types, Best Price
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
24/7(352) 795-7373
/ us out zoomcitrus.com

ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencina.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Fence Work Free
Est. LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED!
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins


Cope's-Pool & Pavers
'Pool Refinishing
Sintelocking Brick Paver
SPatio & Driveways

ORDER YOUR
POOL TODAY
I & BE SWIMMING
BY SUMMER
"FREE QUOTES"
Lic. & Insured
CPC1 3 456565
M529......... 352-400-3188


'98 ENDEAVR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 36 K Mi.
Dual air. $37,700 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
CHEVY '86 Class C
Very good cond. Needs
tires. $4,000. Call
anytime. (352) 446-6329
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane New
deal. 30Q, class A motor
home, 31'2 ft., 22k mi.
V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed,
etc. Saturn tow incl.
$35,000. (352) 397-5007
GEORGIE BOY
'05, Pursuit, Class A,
30ft. Excel. cond. 8k mi.,
2 slide outs, 2 TV's, back
up camera, all the bells
and whistles and much
more, must see this
coach, Asking $50,000.
obo (352) 746-7626
GULF STREAM
BT Cruiser 03, 22' fully
loaded, ready to travel
. $27,500....
(352) 341-1297
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool,
clubhouse etc. Can be
moved $29,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
Holiday Rambler
'03, By Monico, 300
Cummins, 2 slides, incl.
tow vehicle,
mint cond. $84,900.
(352) 302-7073
Holiday Rambler
Admiral Motor Home 36'
2 slides, 340hp, gas eng.
all options transf ext.
warr. $51,900
352 795-3970
HONDA ACCORD
97 $5001 Police
Impounds I for visiting
800-366-9813 x 4246
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$52,995. 352-464-0371
Keystone 07
Big Sky 5th Wheel Prem.
Pkg 340RLQ every op-
tion. Center Island Kit.
incls sepW/D, added 2nd
a/c in bedroom
Price to Sale $52K firm
352-794-3068
PACE ARROW
04, 38' 3 SLIDES
21k mi fully loaded
3 tv's $92,500 obo
352-302-0743



'02 Cedar Creek 5th
Wheel 29ft, 2-slides,
queen bed,bath/shower,
low mileage, loaded,
good cond. $16,800
(352) 746-4969
BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig. Like
new. $9,995.
352-489-3661
- COLEMAN POP-UP
12 ft box, sleeps 9,
A/C, 3-way refrigerator,
awning. Exc. cond.
Best offer (352) 476-9563
or (352) 628-3371


AAA ROOFING
Free est. 30 yrs exp.
352-563-0411
John Gordon Roofing
For a hole in your roof
or a whole new roof.
Free est. 352-795-7003




BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Estimates
Lic#2579/lns, 257-0078
Decorative concrete,
Landscape curbing
River rock resealing
344-4209 (Lic.6960)
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack repair,staining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
S352-464-3967 �
Quality Concrete Serv.
Layout to Lentil
ALL TYPES, Tractor
352-726-2383, Llc#2567
ROB'S MASONRY.
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic, #1476, 726-6554




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services
40 Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




A Cutting Edge
Tile Job
Showers. Firs etc
(352) 422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




REPAIRS
Wall & Ceiling Sprays
Int./Ext. Painting.
Lic/Ins 73490247757
352-220-4845
ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs,
Texture, Additions
Free est.220-9016
Lic.#SCC131149747




Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone Drive-
ways & Tractor work
341-2019 or 257-1562
*TOP SOIL SPECIAL*
3 Yd -$60/ 5 Yd $85
10Yd $175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436


L Ca mer


31 'Newly remodeled,
new appls.& a/c, tows ,good
good cond. $2500.
352342-6311.
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO
07 Jay Flight
28' used twice, smells &
looks new, green clean,
sips 6 $16,800 (352)
503-7431
KODIAK
'04, Hybrid Travel Trlr.
AC, Heat, Micro. Tub/
Shwer, toilet exc cond
$9,500. 352-564-4151
MEADOWBROOK
5th Wheel, 2000 Excel-
lent. Photos at
http://llpicasaweb.google.c
om/meadowbrooGlenn -
$13,995.00
(352)302-6055 or
(727)692-9045
Montana
'03, 5th wheel, 3 slides
like new,$34,000.
Truck avail also for tow
(352) 422-5731
SKYLINE 04
32' sleeps 8, used
once $11,500
(352) 586-9614



$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
conslgnmentysa.org
CASH BUYER

For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333
We Buy Junk Cars
Running or Not
Cash Paid, $150 & Up
(352) 771-6191



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'98 BUICK CENTURY
LIMITED. All power,
leather interior, 75k mi,
Excellent cond. $3,995
(352)382-0485-
ACURA
2004 TSX
43k miles. Certified
Onl3 $299 per mo
1-800-733-9138
ACURA
2006, RSX 33k Miles,
Certified, Lthr, Sunroof
$14,988 or $245 mo
1-800-733-9138
BMW
'03, 745 LI,.NAV, black,
sun roof. all options $29K
Mint ;
(352) 746-2696 ,


All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/us out zoomcitrus.com
















#1 Absolute
Lowest Price
Guaranteed
Barker's Lawn Service
Monthly/Per cut rate
(352) 232-8166

#1 AGAIN Pro Tech
Lawn Service. Family
owned & operated.
Serving central Citrus
Cty since 1999. Call
for free estimate
302-7800 - Lic/Ins.
C.R /Homosassa
mowing, beds,
brushes, mulch/haul
Commrl & Resdntl
since 1991 220-6761
out zoomcitrus.com
CLEMENTS LAWN &
Landscape Main.
"Complete Lawn Care"
(352) 489-3070
Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Specials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
3us out zoomcitrus.com
DUN-RITE LAWN SERV
Lic & Ins Clean up,,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681
check zoomcitrus.com
HALLOCK & Son
Lawncare/Landscaping
Covering all your lawn care
needs. Detailed work.
746-6410 Lic/Ins.
HARRY EVERSON'S
LAWN & MAINTENANCE
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
(352) 302-2585
/ us at zoomcrtrus.com
Lawn Care 'N' More
Mow, clean up
brushes, beds
Friendly Service since
1991
Residential/Commd
(352) 726-9570
out zoomcitrus.com
OSBORNE'S
Quality Work - Free
Est. LOWEST RATES
352-400-6016 Lidlns
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
& LANDSCAPE
SINCE 199 (LIc/lIns)
628-9848 or 634-0554
v' us out zoomcitrus.com


7ialA


CADILLAU
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Conv. rare
auto, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
black, dependable.
$4700 352- 563-0615
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US 19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CORVETTE
02, Z06,
Black, low mi., over
30 mpg hwy. $24,400.
, (352) 613-5355
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 mi-
les on this rare silver on
silver on silver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are on
this gorgeous vette,
Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
included, Your's
for only, $48,000.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, auto,
- SHOW CARL
$11,500 or will trade for
truck. 352-563-6428
CORVETTE
96' auto, looks & runs
great. Pwr. everything.
keyless entry. Clear &
solid tops. $10,995
obo.(352) 586-2535
DODGE
'02 Stratus SXT 4
Cyl.
auto, air, loaded.
43K.Mi.
extra clean.
$5,980
Wooten's(352)
637-7117
FORD
'00 Focus, 4 dr. AC,
Auto. New tires & brakes
runs great,30 mpg.
$3,950.(352) 302-9217
FORD
'05 Taurus SE, V-6
Loaded, low mi. extra
clean. Must see. $7,880.
Wooten's (352)637-7117
FORD
'99 Crown Victora,
former detective car. Cold
AC. Runs great. $2,700.
Obo.(352) 613-5776
HONDA
'08 Civic, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
HYUNDIA
'90,Red, 3 dr. hatch-
back,142 K. mi. Very
good condition. $1000.
Obo.(352) 344-4684
KIA RIO
2001 82K ml. New tim-
ing belt, good cond.
Well maint. $2,250 obo
(352) 637-5816
LINCOLN
'02, Towncar, signature
series, excel. condition
well maintained $7,500.
(352) 726-5449


POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
" 352-464-3967 u



r ---- -q
r MOBILE RV
SERVICE
I WE COME TO YOU
Motor Homes
5th Whls/Rv's
Master Tech
1 352-586-5870
SStorage Available





WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard

WELPMPRP6
&FLE SEVC
2YR. EX.Lws


arb Mab
Fhotograph9
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits. Indoor
or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed




ELITE PAVING &
SEAL COATING
All types - Res/Comm
352-302-3030 LIc/Ins
,us out zoomcitrus.com


LAWN RESTORATION
All types of Grasses
Low maint Lawns Avail.
J & J Sod 352-302-6049

SODAllVarities
cut-outinstalled,rolled
Lic/ Ins #3000
(352) 422-0641
check out zoomcitrus.com


WANTED


Experienced auto salespeople

that are willing to work at

one of the best dealerships in Florida,

make great money, with all the benefits

(401K, Group Insurance, Paid Vacations,

Holidays, Every Other Saturday Off

and Closed on Sundays).

Applications are accepted at

2901 West Hwy. 44 in Inverness

any time from 8:00'a.m. until 5:00 p.m./
Monday through Friday, or call

352-726-1231.

Ask for a sales manager for the chance to join our
sales team and see the difference.
763508o DRUG FREE WORK PLACE


Installations by ..
Brian CBC1253853

352-628-7519
Siding, Soffit
& Fascia,
Skirtin g,
cScreen

Rooms..
Swww.advancedaluminum.info


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"

In just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtut
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Tub to Shower Conversions Tool!!

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In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
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I


,-I










D8 SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009


97 $500! Police
Impounds ! for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well maintained.
$2650. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
LINCOLN
'97, Towncar, white
excel cond. well main-
talned $3,000. firm
(352) 726-5118
MERCEDES
'05 SLK, $24,995. 2 avail.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'05 SLK, $24,995..2 avail.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'08 C- CLASS,$29,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCURY '04
Grand Marquis LS, blk
w/tan int., 63K, adult
owned. Non smoker, all
options. Estate car.
$9400/neg.
352-465-8722
MGB
Convertible 1977, 57k mi.
Blue, many xtras
Excellent Condition
$10,500 (352)628-0281
Mitsubishi
'08 Spyder, Conv. Low
ml., Like New! Sacrifice
$16,988 or $299 mo
1-800-733-9138
, PONTIAC
'98, Sunfire,
runs good, looks good,
asking $1,275.
(352) 637-5394
SMART CAR '08
Passion Cabriolet 7k ml.
Mercedes engineered.
All power opts. including
top. Factory Warranty
$16,750 (352) 382-2092
SUZUKI
'07 Forenza. 30K mi,
w/100k warr. LOADED
w/touch scm nav.
$12,800. 352-613-6613
TOYOTA
'06 Corolla Sport LE
Sun roof, 48K. Mi. silver,
private sale. $12,500
Obo.(352) 860-1106
TOYOTA
'06 Corolla,
$11,995 Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 mi,
warranty. $19,995.
(352) 382-1857
TOYOTA
'95, Camry, automatic
AC, CD player, 4 DR
$2,500.
(352) 563-5155
TOYOTA SUPER '89
All original, red, 79k ml.,
6 cylinder, all power,
targa roof. Original
owner. Garaged, $7,695
(352) 726-3427
VOLVO
'05 S60, $15,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S40, $15,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S60, $17,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S80, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S 40, $17,995.
2 avail. Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO '
'08 S60, $19,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299


1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's
Dream. $3500/obo
352-228-0597
'53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, 350 V-8,
auto, May trade in part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433


Custom line 4 door se-
dan. 6 cyl auto. $9,500.
Will consider trade for
travel trailer of equal
value.(352) 628-4053
CAMARO IROC Z
'88 Red, PS./PB. Cold
A.C. 62,000 Mi. Great
Condition. $6,900.
(352) 422-5663
CHEVY
'69 Classic C0lSHT BD
350/350 AC, PS,
$15K or trade
(352) 746-9212
EL CAMINO '81
305 Auto, All new
interior, & paint. Crager
mags & tires. 4" raised
hood. $3,250.
(352)341-3613.
GM El Camino
'84, 1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
HONDA ACCORD
97 $500! Police
Impopnds I for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint;
63K mi., $8,900 obo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MERCEDES BENZ
1985 380SL, 2 top road-
ster. Drives, looks great.
Many new Mercedes
parts. New A/C. Must
seel REDUCED! $7,900.
David 352-637-6443.
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
trans. & parts. $4,000.
(352) 621-0126







PLYMOUTH Barracuda
1970,$4000, 75000
miles,coupe, automatic,8
cylinderexterior:
purple,interior: black
chelseasmouse@gmail.co
m
THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$12,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122



'94 CHEVY
Ext. cab, 8 ft bed. New.
motor, good cond. 2
wheel drive Z71 pkg.
$3,900.
352-563-1518 Iv msg
'94 TOYOTA PICKUP
Ext. Cab, 4 cyl, 5-spd,
new clutch, shocks &
more, tool box,148k Ml.
$2500 (352) 302-0033
'96 FORD F-150 XLT
Deluxe, good cond. new
tires 5.0 V8. w/cap $3,695
obo (352) 563-2583
CHEVY
'03 S-10 Ext. cab LS,
3rd door.V-6 auto, air,
loaded sharp, $5,980.
Wooten's (352)637-7117
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US 19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awe-
some Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded
every special feature. Sr.
own, gar. kept., 27K mi,
$40K
invested Sale $21,750
'See online ad photos
www.autotrader.com/atca
rid/at-f3fd39f
John (352) 726-1076
DODGE
'94 Dakota, V-8, long
bed, auto. $1,500
(352) 527-1727


DODGE RAM '00
Std cab, rare 5spd, hemi,
V8, a/c, 25mpg, new 22"
rims & tires. Dependable
$3700. 352-563-0615
FORD 04
Ranger, REDUCED/
X-cab. Exc. cond.
38k mi. $9,700/obo
(352)746-3919
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serve. van. 41K Mi./5.4 L.
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
. Serv. body/dble lock drs.
$20.000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
'91 V-8 auto,
air, loaded,
2 tone paint,
chrome
wheels/duals.
$2,880.
Wooten's
(352)637-7117
FORD
93, White Box Truck,
runs good $1500 obo
(352) 564-0700
FORD F150 '89
with topper. Good
running condition,
auto. $1000/obo
'352-464-4763
FORD F-50
1995, 4x4. cold a/c,
new tires, runs good
$2500 obo(352)
564-0530
FORD RANGER
01, XLT, 4.0 liter, 6 cycle
60K mi. many x-tras, tow
behind no trailer needed
$6500.(313) 404-5129
HONDA ACCORD
97 $5001 Police
Impounds ! for visiting
800-366-9813 x 4246




. BUICK
'03 Rendezvous.
$8,995 Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
CADILLAC
'05 Escalade, low mi. all
power, sun roof,
exc. cond. $28,000
(347) 266-9328
CHEVY
'06 Trailblazer
$12,995.2 avail. Ocala
Volvo (352) 629-7299
CHEVY '78
Blazer - 4x4, auto, '84
engine. New parts.
Good cond. $800/obo
352-563-1889
DODGE
2004, Durango SLT
Hemi 4x4, Lthr, DVD +++
$12,785 or $199 mo
1-800-733-9138
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded. dual air &
exhaust, Exc. Cond. $6,000
obo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl
drive, class 3 hitch, Orig
owner. Great shape &
price. $8,750.
352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
GMC SUBURBAN
1993 4 WD, 454 rebuilt
eng., new transm.,
great tires, good cond.
$3,500 obo
(352) 20.1-1413
HQNDA ACCORD,
97 $500! Police
Impounds ! for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, $8,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
MERCED.ES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG. Silver
W/black int.. Loaded,
57K.Mi. New $64K.Ask
$20K. (352)489-7674
VOLVO
'06 XC90, $20,995
3 avail. Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299


FORD '06 F-150
Crew cab XLT. Tow pkg
& topper, 51K mi.
Exc cond. LOADED
$18,500/obo. (352)
634-1378; 795-2053
HONDA ACCORD
97 $500! Police
Impounds 1 for visiting
800-366-9813 x 4246
JEEP '97
Wrangler - 4cyl, 121 K
miles, ready for high-
way & off road. $4500
(352) 419-4394




CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872
CHRYSLER
'96 Plymouth Voyager.
Handicapped. Runs
good, asking $2,300.
(352) 795-1411
ECONOLINE VAN '01
White, regular hand
controls, Wheelchair
acc., w/lIft, $3,500
(352) 341-7798
HONDA ACCORD
97 $500! Police
Impounds I for visiting
800-366-9813 x 4246
KIA
2007, Sedona EX
Leather, All Pwr, Low
MI. $12,988 or $199 mo
1-800-733-9138

ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT









$$ SAVE $$

* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
- *ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com




HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains & tows
heavy loads. $3200/or
trade. 352- 563-0615
Crystal River




2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900mi. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. Hi pert.
Over $43,000 in receipts.
17k mi. $11,700
352-563-0615
Crystal River
$5001 Police
Impounds for salel
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale!
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374


CLASSIFIED




Impounds for sale!
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'97 SOFT TAIL HARLEY,
DAVIDSON. Custom
build. 3K mi. Black,
chrome. Must Seel $15 k
invested-$9,000 sacrifice
(352) 860-0675
'99 SUSUZKI MARAUDER
805,15k ml., $3500 obo;
'05 SUSUZKI VINSON 500
ATV 4x4 $3300 oab
Call for info
(352)220-7152
BMW 91
R-100, w/soviet side car,
good cond. 49k ml, runs
well, kept maint record
$4500 (352) 344-2331
HARLEY
'96 Sporster 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes,chro. Ex. clean
$4,850.(352) 637-5143
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80", com-
pletely serviced, good
shape. Ex.
access. $5,895. obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109
HARLEY
DAVIDSON
96 Heritage Soft tail, red
many extras $9600 call
evenings (352) 746-3613
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 Mi.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
HONDA 04
1300 VTX,
thousands in options.
mint condition $5900 obo
(352) 302-7073
HONDA ACCORD
97 $5001 Police
Impounds ! for listing
800-366-9813 x 4246
HONDA
Shadow Arrow 06, 714K
,mi. garage kept, not in
rain, floorboard $6200
obo (347)223-7269 aft
3:30
KAWASKI
'00, ZRX 1100
CC,15K. Mi. Very
fast, many extra s.
$4k obd.
(352)621-3764
SCOOTER
'06 Suzuki, 400
Bergman. 4,200 Mi. Like
new cond. $4,500
(352) 382-2715
SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker .
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
.seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Bik w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k
invested, may trade for
nice, tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
SUZUKI
2002 intruder 800 cc
shaft driven 6400miles
windshield,saddlebags,2
helmets $3,800 or best
dffer 352-628-6020
SUZUKI 50CC
MOPED
900 miles.
I $300. 352-746-0549


... - Home Finder



www.chroniclehomefinder.com
y . . . "


tie YourtIreasHom


Search Hundreds of Local Listings


www.chroniclehomefinder.com


VENTO PHANTOM
Scooter, 318 miles,
150CC, Like new.
$2,190/obo.
352-422-2433


YAMAHA
'05 YZ125 DIRT BIKE
Race ready. Many ex-
tras. $2500. 352-
586-1683:586-9349



349-0517 SUCRN
6/1 sales
Advanced Towing
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:


-7
ADVANCED TOWING
gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Uen and Intent to
sell these vehicles) on
06/01/2009, 8:00 a.m., at
4875 S. Florida Ave.,
Inverness, FL 34450,
pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the Florida Stat-
utes. ADVANCED TOWING
reserves the right to
accept or reject
any and/or all bids.
1B3HD46T4SF571556
1995 DODGE
IFALP52UITA203571
1996 FORD
3FAPP15J8PR210427
1992 FORD
Published one (1) time In
Citrus County Chronicle,
May 17, 2009.


351-0517 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice Is hereby given that the Southwest Florida Water
Management District has received an application for a
water use permit to withdraw water from wells and/or
surface waters from Black Diamond Properties, Inc.
2600 W. Black Diamond Circle Lecanto, FL 34461. Appli-
cation number: 20008785.007. Application received
02-24-09. Predominant use type: recreation/aesthetic.
Total requested withdrawal average daily gallons per
day: 980,000. Peak month average gallons per day:
2,680,000. Maximum dally gallons per day: 2,680,000..
From six (6) wells. Location: Sections 15, 16. 21, and 22,-
Township 18S. Range 18E In Citrus County. The applica-
tion Is available for public Inspection Monday through
Friday at Brooksvllre District Office 2379 Broad Street.
Brooksville, FL 34604. Interested persons may Inspect a
copy of the application and submit written comments
concerning the application. Comments must Include
the permit application number and be received within
14 days from the date of this notice. If you wish to be
notified of agency action or an opportunity to request
an administrative hearing regarding the application,
you must send a written request referencing the permit
application number to the Southwest Florida Water
Management District, Regulation Performance Man-
agement Department, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, FL
34604-6899 or submit your request through the District's
website at www.watermatters.org. The District does
not discriminate based on disability. Anyone requiring
accommodation under the ADA should contact the
Regulation Performance Management Department at
(352) 796-7211 or 1-800-423-1476: TDD only
1-800-231-6103.
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
May, 17, 2009.


355-0517 SUCRN
5/27 meeting CC Const. Uc. & Appeals Board
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
THE CITRUS COUNTY CONSTRUCTION LICENSING AND
APPEALS BOARD WILL CONDUCT A MEETING ON MAY
27, 2009 AT 2:00 P.M., AT THE LECANTO GOVERNMENT
BUILDING, 3600 W. SOVEREIGN PATH, RM 166 LECANTO,
FLORIDA 34461.
SCHEDULED TO MEET THE BOARD ARE:
1. DONALD P. SICILIANO II, to meet the Board for
approval for a Underground Utility Competency Card.
OLD/NEW BUSINESS:
DISSCUSION:
ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DECISION
MADE BY THE CONSTRUCTION LICENSING & APPEALS
BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT
THIS PUBLIC HEARING, HE/SHE WILL NEED TO INSURE THAT
A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS MADE,
WHICH RECORD SHALL INCLUDE THE TESTIMONY AND
EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.
(SECTION 286.0101, FL. STATUTES.)
ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMO-
DATION AT THIS MEETING BECAUSE OF A DISABILITY OR
PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE COUNTY
ADMINISTRATOR'S OFFICE, MASONIC BUILDING, 111
-WEST MAIN STREET, 3rd FLOOR, INVERNESS, FL 34450,
(352) 341-9801AT LEAST TWO DAYS BEFORE THE MEET-
ING. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR SPEECH IMPAIRED, USE
THE TDD TELEPHONE (352-341-6580) OR LECANTO GOV-
ERNMENT BUILDING (352-527-5312).
Published onre (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 17,2009.

352-0517 SUCRN
PUBUC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 044-09
Fire Alarm Protection Systems
Testing & Repair Services
The Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County,
Florida Invites Interested parties to submit a Bid to pro-
vide annual testing and/or Inspections of fire alarm sys-
tems county wide. Provide repair service, system up-
grades and Install new systems as needed.
Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference: A MANDATORY Pre-Bld
Conference will be held on May 26, 2009 at 10:00 AM
at the Lecanto Government Building - Room 166, lo-
cated at 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida. A
site visit will be made Immediately following the confer-
ence.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before June 18,
2009 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy Crawford, Office of Man-
agement & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite
266, Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for June 18,
2009 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 226,
Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the
Public Opening because of a disability or physical Im-
pairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the
meetings. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this an-
nouncement, please visit the Citrus County Webslte at
www.bocc.ctrus.fl.us and select "BIDS" on the left hand
side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Manage-
ment & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5203.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
John Thrumston, Chairman .
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle
May 17, 2009.


353-0517 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote Notice
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice Is hereby given:
Gregory E. Blount
Last Known Address of
725 Greenledf Avenue
Inverness, Florida 34450
Eric W. ammerbeck
Last Known Address of
8158 West Miss Maggie Drive
Homosassa, Florida 34446
Douglas R. Hendricks
Last Known Address of
12281 North Juniper Point
Dunnellon, Florida 34433
Debra Hollis
Last Known Address of
115 Northeast 9th Avenue.
Crystal River, Florida 34429
Bruce C. Jordan
Last Known Address of
3530 East Foxwood Court
Inverness, Florida 34452

Kerri A. Ross
Last Known Address of
4920 East Parsons Point Road, Lot 7
Hemando, Florida 34442
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in
question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of
Elections, in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond
will result In a determination of Inellglbillty by the Super-
visor and your name will be removed from the state-
wide voter registration system. If further assistance Is
needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections at the
below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 North Apopka Avenue
Inverness, Florida, 34450

Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle
May 17, 2009.

348-0517 SUCRN
2009-CP-311 Aaron Snowden Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009-CP-311
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF AARON SNOWDEN
a/k/a AARON SNOWDEN, JR.
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of AARON
SNOWDEN, a/k/a AARON SNOWDEN, JR., deceased.
whose date of death was Feb. 9, 2009, and whose so-
cial security number Is 369-32-1741. Is pending In the


Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which Is-110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness,
Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal representative's


CITRUS COUNTY (fL) CHRONICLE




attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons havy-,
Ing claims or demands against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF'
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBUCATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OP
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBUCATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice Is 5/10/2009 .
Personal Representative-,
/s/ STACEY A. SNOWDEN,
79 West EridanI Court
Citrus Springs, FL 34434"
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ GLEN C. ABBOTT,Esquire Florida Bar No. 235911
Attorney at Law Telephone: (352) 795-5699
P.O. Box 2019, Crystal River, Florida 34423-2019
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 10 and 17.2009.

354-0607 SUCRN
2007-DP-722 Term. of Parental Rights I
(To: Jonathan Harris) Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT.
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA'
JUVENILE DIVISION'
CASE NO.: 2007-DP-722'
IN THE INTEREST OF:
A.P. DOB: 02/23/96
K.H. DOB: 02/19/98
A.W. DOB: 03/30/04
Minor Chld(ren)
NOTICE OF ACTION. SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF
ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIP
THE STATE OF FLORIDA
TO- Jonathan Harris
L/K/A Unknown
You are hereby notified that a petition under oaths
has been tiled In the above-styled court for the termi-I
nation of your parental rights as to K.H. a male child
born on 19th day of February, 1998 In Citrus County.
Florida, and for placement of the child with the Florida*
Department of Children and Families for subsequent'
adoption, and you are hereby corrimanded to be andc
appear before General Magistrate Keith Schenck of
the Circuit Court or any judge assigned to hear the'
above cause, at the Advisory Hearing on June 15, 2009'
at- 1:30 PM. at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N.J
Apopka Avenue, 3rd floor, Inverness, FL 34450. t
YOU MUST PERSONALLY APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME'
SPECIFIED. -
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY 'APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY'
HEARING OR THE ADJUDICATORY TRIAL FOR THE TERMI-,
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO
THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THESE
CHILDREN. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND
TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO,
THE CHILDREN NAMED IN THE PETITION.
YOU ARE ENTITLED TO HAVE AN ATTORNEY PRESENT TO'
REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU WANT AN ATTOR-A
NEY, BUT ARE UNABLE TO AFFORD ONE, YOU MUST I
NOTIFY THE COURT, AND THE COURT WILL DETERMINEi
WHETHER YOU QUALIFY FOR AN ATTORNEY TO BE
APPOINTED TO REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability.
who needs any accommodation In order to
participate In this proceeding, you are entitled, at no'
cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance.4
Please contact John Sullivan at the Citrus County,
Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL.
34450 or phone (352) 341-6700 within two working days
of your receipt of Notice of Advisory Hearing for
Termination of Parental Rights. If you are hearing 4
Impaired or voice Impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. 1
THIS NOTICE shall be published once a week for four'
consecutive weeks In the Citrus County Chronicle's'
Classified Section.
Dated this 13th day of May, 2009, at Inverness, Citrus,
County, Florida.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of Courts,
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Kelly Carpenter:
Deputy Clerk'
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,!
May 17, 24, 31 and June 7, 2009.


350-0517 SUCRN
DEP Intent to Issue Permit 011848
PUBLIC NOTICE
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT
The Department of Environmental Protection gives,
notice of Its Intent to Issue a permit (No.FLA011848) to,
the City of Crystal River. The facility Is located at 302,
N.W. 11th Street, Crystal River, FL 34428 In Citrus County.
The Permit Is for the expansion and operation of a'
slow-rate restricted public access reuse system for a'
domestic wastewater treatment facility. The expansion
is for the reuse system to go from 1.5 million gallons a.
day (mgd) annual average dally flow (AADF) to.2.0,
mgd AADF. Upon completion of construction of both,
the reuse system expansion and the
previously-permitted plant expansion, the plant permit-,
ted capacity will be limited to the reuse system permit-'
ted capacity of 2.0 mgd AADF.
The Department will Issue the permit with the at-
tached conditions unless a timely petition for an ad-'
ministrative hearing Is filed under sections 120.569 and*
120.57 of the Florida Statutes before the deadline for fil-,
ing a petition. The procedures for petitioning for a,
hearing are set forth below.
A person whose substantial Interests are affected by'
the Department's proposed permitting decision may
petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) un-,
der sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statutes.,
The petition must contain the Information set forth be-,
low and must be filed (received by the clerk) In the Of-
fice of General Counsel of the Department at 3900'
Commonwealth Boulevard, Mall Station 35, Tallahas-'
see, Florida 32399-3000.
Petitions by the applicant or any of the parties listed,
below must be filed within 14 days of receipt of this4
written notice. Petitions flied by any persons other tman
those entitled to written notice under section 120.60(3)
of the Florida Statutes must be filed within fourteen1
days of publication of the notice or within fourteen
days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs
first. *
Under section 120.60(3) of the Florida Statutes, how-
ever, any person who has asked the Department for'
notice of agency action may file a petition within four-5
teen days of receipt of such notice, regardless of theta
date of publication.
The petitioner shall mall a copy of the petition to the
applicant at the address Indicated above at the time'
of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition'
within the appropriate time period shall constitute ao
waiver of that person's right to request an admlnlstra-
tive determination (hearing) under sections 120.569!
and 120.57 of the Florida Statutes. Any subsequent In-I
tervention (In a proceeding Initiated by another party)'
will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer,
upon the filing of a motion in compliance with rule,
28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code.
A petition that disputes the material facts on which
the Department's action Is based must contain the fol-i
lowing Information:
(a) The name, address, and telephone number of,
each petitioner; the Department permit identification
number and the county in which the subject matter
or activity is located;
(b) A statement of how and when each petitioner re-,
celved notice of the Department action;
(c) A statement of how each petitioner's substantial
Interests are affected by the Department action;
(d) A statement of the material facts disputed by thet
petitioner, if any;
(e) A statement of facts that the petitoner contends,


warrant reversal or modification of the Department ac-,
tlon;
(f) A statement of which rules or statutes the peti-
tloner contends require reversal or modification of the'
Department action: and
(g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner.
stating precisely the action that the petitioner wants
the Department to take,
A petition that does not dispute the material facts on,
which the Department's action Is based shall state that
no such facts are In dispute and otherwise shall contain
the same Information as set forth above, as required by
rule 28-106.301.
Because the administrative hearing process Is de-.
signed to formulate final agency action, the filing of a
petition means that the Department's final action may
be different from the position taken by it In this notice.
Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by'
any such final decision of the Department have the'
right to petition to become Q party to the proceeding,
In accordance with the requirements set forth above,

Mediation under section 120.573 of the Florida Stat-,
utes is not available for this proceeding.

These on Is available for public Inspection dur-
ing normal business hours. 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m,, Mon-
day through Friday, except legal holidays, at the DEP'
Southwest District Office, 13051 N, Telecom Parkway,
Temple Terrace. FL 33637-0926,
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,o
May 17,2009.







.CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
t__________^__ . - _ - _ * _ - -


SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 D9


MODEL YEAR-END


MUST SELL
S


REMAINING 2009sTtilS'M]VOfTH TO MAKE ROOM FOR


S. DEEP DEALER


,I -f. 'A.


2010s ARRIVING DAILY


a-"'


* 1 . . ..- -


i i ; . - " ,\
* . . .


- .. .

LINCOLAN MKZ
LINCOLN MKZ


Financing

5 FULL


Available for

YEARS 2


-"I -.


ALL PA'l-t. PLUS .,.A r.IAFEE ii ' -4 ��Ar LALER AERa.ri F rl Au�Ll EMP I.>Il r,,il i.._. '-. . *- . -: . - '. . . *.. .. - - .*r . . * . :,:. .- *. ERP JA r-tLii ""a t"L. rI A�ji A/t E TMkDL- 6E LOAE ri0fE
,,,%. .. . . :, . ," ,., , I,... - _ . **. , .- o' ',I '.* . . ,, . , ,, , ...= -


CETIIE


* 6 YEAR/100,000 MILE LIMITED WARRANTY
* VEHICLE HISTORY REPORT
* FULL TANK OF FUEL AT DELIVERY


CERTUIFIEDU
PR-OWNED


2006 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR ELITE

'Sam9'


5i^-?^ ^ ^


LINCOLN PREV'fF CERT FIEDIF1 , Ipr. E' t't1 I.V t IP AR O.' a "
PWR RUNNING F.S P 'R LiFC-TC :2 ,H:HAIED ,lW HEEL S,
L 1 t4 0 C FAA CoE TIl 0TN O t -1 " ' E.4TE,;1 LOaL: L ON F.-OLVAr ' -




CERTIFIED


2006 LINCOLN ZEPHYR


2007 LINCOLN MKZ 2006 MERCURY MONTEGO AWD


2006 FORD ESCAPE XLT


.2-J4 R4RE H O' JUS T TURNED 20K MILES. NAVIGATION,
CHROA 'Efl ;!HftS tfV. fR 'ot."ifNR H-i.l , o t ii
FROIJI SEATS. tl'COLN ,PEAfll. ER CErIi"iO


S* CERTIFIED
SSALE
- PRICE


PX3582 "BRASS HAT" COMPANY GAR. 16K MILES.
ALLOY CLEARCOAT STONE LEATHER.
LINCOLN PREMIER CERTIFIED
$29.175"; ofm0S mp

CERTIFIED
SSALE
Pt - PRICE


*5236A 17.800 MILES. RED CARPET LEASE RETURN. ONE-
OWNER. ALL-WHEEL DRIVE. CVTAUTO TRANSMISSION,
LEATHER, MORE. MERCURY CERTIFIED TOO'
$285,06w,soRMS
-�1;0P, s 9 um.n , C IFUMes,
1 CERTIFIED
$ 914,/S |SALE
- . n _ PRICE


PX3621 29K MILES. BLAZING COPPER WITH FLINT TRIM.
POWER FEATURES. STEP BARS, NEW W/L RADIALS.
CERTIFIED.
$23,005 i.P MS1
-$! 8IO 10 sMU smiHR WM,
l-C - CERTIFIED
SALE
PRICE


All prices plus $489 admin fee plu, in S la Offa, ac od da of pubiication only. Dealer reserves righito correct errors. (R) 3.9% for 36 mos on select certified units thru Ford Credit. Not all applicants may qualify.
(S) a. .r,*g'- m r..g.i,ii t IP iP rP . r.- nr ai.r iW limited warranty expires 6 years from original in-service date or 100,000 total vehicle miles, whichever comes first,

SQALA LINCfiOLN MERCURY
a1 Your Downtown Dealer nr


732-2866
TOLL FREE
1-866-217-7815


I SAEHUS O-R A :0MoSTRA A- PZ**SEVC HOR:MNFI73A- PMI


-. -.


-x .





T HISNUs A 17, WN O
U


THIS WEEKEND ONLY.




AND WE WILL PAY OFF YOUR TRADE-IN NO MATTER THE AMOUNT OV


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONIC


VED!


2009 VERSA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 6112
8,988 or 159 m�
2009 SENTRA






. .3,488 o I 238'm

2008 ALTIMA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 6131
$13,999* or'247*mo

2008 FRONTIER



FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755Ext. 6140
$13,999* or$ 247* m.

CRYSTAL


937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext.
, crystalautos.com


2009 AVEO
-_ ,t,


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING '
800.584.8755 Ext. 1101
s8,98I or 1 59 me
2008 MALIBU


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 1131
510,988* or 194* m

2009 IMPALA



FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584-8755 Ext. 1133
'14,988* or'264* mo

2009 SILVERADO



FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 1115
16,988t or $298' me.

CRYSTAL
LSM ANAMERiCAN
REVOLUTION
1035 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
800-584-8755 Ext. 1
crystalautos.com


r2008 PT CRUISER)


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext.4131
$8,988* or$159* mo.

2008 CARAVAN


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 3131
10,988* orl'94* mo.
2009 300


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 3101
$19,988' SAVE '6200'


2009 RAM


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 4119
$18,988' SAVE 16100

CRYSTAL
Jeep
1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA
2077 HWY. 44 W.
INVERNESS
800-584-8755 Ext. 1
, crystalautos.com /


"All Prices/Payments exclude tax, tag, title, dealer ads and dealer fee ($599.50). Price/Payments include $2000 down (Cash or Trade Equity), owner loyalty, rebates and all factory incentives (must Qualify). Payments are at 7.99 A.P.R. for 72 Months/No
payments'till 2010 7% A.P.R for 60 mos. 90 days first payment. W.A.C. All prior sales excluded and may restrict stock. Not responsible for typographical errors. Special offers cannot be combined. *Vehicles are pre-owned and pictures are for illustration
purposes only.


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CnTRus COUNTY (FL) CHRoNICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


Tolle takes course
on eminent domain
Hugh E.
Tolle, of Tolle
Appraisal
Service Inc.,
n Crystal
River, re-
;ently com-
uleted the
Appraisal In- Hugh Toe
3titute's con- Tolle Appraisal
Jemnation Service Inc.
3nd eminent
Jornomain real estate appraisal
course in Tampa. The three-day
-ourse covered all appraising
techniques for whole, partial
and right-of-way takings, as
well as inverse condemnation.-
ERA spotlights
top agents
ERA
American


Realty is f
Droud to rec-
agnize
Jackie Davis
as the Top
Listing asso-
ciate and
Dawn Ther-
oux as the ER
Top Sales as-

ARREST
REPORTS
* For more in-
formation
about ar-
rests, go to
www.sheriffc,
itrus.org and
click on the
Public Infor.
nation link,
then on Ar-
rest Reports.
* Watch the
"Arrested De-
velopments"
show at
www.chroni
cleonline.tv.
* For the
Record re-
ports are
also archived
online at
www.chroni-
cleonline.
com.


Jackie
Davis,
A American
Realty.


sociate for
April for the
Inverness of-
fice. Theroux
has achieved
the over $1
million dollar
mark in .
closed sales Dawn
volume for Theroux
2009. ERA America
Davis and Realty.
Theroux
would be de-
lighted to help
you with all
your real es-
tate needs .
and they can
be reached at "..
the ERA Lou IVlele
American Re- ERA America
alty office in Realty.
Inverness at
(352) 726-
5855.
Forour
Beverly Hills
office, Top
Listing hon-
ors go to Lou
Miele. Top Brian Ucc
Sales and BRanec
Top Sales ERA America
T op Sales Realty.
Volume hon-
ors go to Brian Ucci for April.


n

n


n


They can be reached
at ERAAmerican Re-
alty's office in Bev6rly
Hills at (352) 746-
3600.
ERAAmerican Re-
alty is also pleased to
'welcome Nicholas A.
Tullo to "The American
Team." He will work as
a sales associate in the
company's Inverness


-4

Nicholas
Tullo
ERA American
Realty.


Office. Tullo has lived
in Florida for 20 years.
Upon retiring after 14
years of public service
as a building inspector
and plans reviewer on
new construction proj-
ects, Nick, wife Sandy
and daughter Nicole
moved from Delray
Beach to Homosassa.
They have been in Cit-


rus County approximately four
years and during that time, Nick
worked for Citrus County Build-
ing Division as assistant build-
ing department director and
later moved on to become Crys-
tal River's chief building official.
In addition, Nick has two
sons - Ralph is a medical doc-
tor who works and lives with his
wife Alicia and daughter


Kristina in the Orlando area;
Thomas is a managing director
of the Industrial and Diversified
Service Division for a major in-
ternational bank.
Nick is an experienced sail-
boat skipper and competed in
many sailboat races. He can be
reached at 726-5855.

See DIGEST/Page E15


I American RealtyTASIA SEIlAS
r;ME & Investments
E A". 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy. RealtorP
REAL ESTTE Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 746-3600 cel 302-0569
Email: tasiaera@yahoo.com
1 q W01


SALE OR LEASE
WITH OPTION
Building newly buflt. 5,000
- sq. ft. of warehouse space,
1,000 sq. ft. office space
with central heat & air.
Also second level can be
built for more space. 3 bays,
Sis a loading bay.
$329,000


OWNER fiNANCING
AVAILABLE
Hwy. 19.
S"- : . Great
location -
S. of
Sugarmill
Woods
entrance,
N. of
new
Publix.
$28S,000


ICALL Roy Bass TODAY (352) 726-2A
' Email: royboass@tampobay.rr.com www.olldtrusreolty.com After Hours (352) 302-6714


GENERALCOMMECA
5 *I 41 RTA L


nZZAEEZZ 3E


*E2 sUiNDAY, kIAY 17Q 09


1n
n






CITRUS COUNTY (r) CHRONICLE

CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 E3


REALTY LEADERS




Crystal River 794-0888 Inverness 341-1233 Beverly Hills 527-1112


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
(352) 476-8579
REALTORW


Karen
Kennedy
(3S2) 422-8656
REALTORS"


Brad and V_^
Sherry \17
Potts
bradfordpottssr@aol.com * sherylpotts@aol.com


www.pottsteam.com
(352) 697-1368
(352) 697-5500


W CAMBRIDGE GREENS POOL HOME -
7 i33 ..1.r. .1 bath, 2 car garage (2000), 7 x, .
S . ,..i .:uide-sac, all new appliances, S
e" , , f,::..i windows + many extras. ,
. 1 r. access to pool area,:
. r , ,:, cage. No mandatory social .
-.. T -:nip on this one. MLS #329122:
- ' S71.000. Call Coleen_ Fatone-
A rd,. r:n 352-476-8579 w '

COVE 212.5
PTOWNHOUSE
. ir. CONVENIENTlY LOCATED
, : INVERNESS HEIGHTS - Spacious
211 w/large family room (over 1,400 CLOSE TO SHOPPING AND TOWN
SH,-,,., ,-, s.f. giving ; city water/sewer; new Fully fenced 3/2 split plan has jetted tub in master, two
roof 2007); oversized lot; close to sheds and two carports, newer flooring. Perfect for
i:r..,.T-... park - quiet neighborhood. starter home or retiree. Being sold "as-is" with no
- $84,500. MLS#331921. MLS#328454. $9so500. known, hidden defects. MLS#331173.
Call Coleen RFtonbe-Anderson Call Coleen FatonenAnderson own hidden defects. MLS#331173.
-n, area Of n an. Karon Kannadv _152-d22-RSfi5


NEW HOME NEVER LIVED IN ON I ACRE OUTSTANDING STARTER HOME
Drastic price reduction by owner in popular neighborhood.
Ride your golf cart to 7 Rivers G&CC, store your boat and OR RETIREMENT HOME
RV on your land. Home has many upgrades including huge Clean, large and unrestricted on 1 acre. Bring the boats, RV
jetted tub, walk-in shower, mirrors galore, stainless sink, flat-
top range plus fans and blinds on all windows Sellers loss is and pets. First time home buyers may qualify for $8,000
your gain, cannot duplicate at this price. Will not disappoint. tax credit and 100% financing. Existing furniture conveys.
Shopping and all amenities nearby. Open split plan. Home will not disappoint. Come take a look. Great location
MIl it'aA91 .A near shnonina- eateries, river and new librarv- MLS#333861


dstone34@tampabay.rr.com


. 7i0


. CITRUS SPRINGS
BEVERLY HILLS CRUS SPRINGS GREAT BEGINNINGS
POOL HOME PERFECT HOME - Live well but reasonably in the 3/1/1
Unbelievable price for a 2/1 pool home You will love this charming 3/2/1 home home on partially fenced lot New item
vith ALL new systems (plumbing, water near the country club. Great curb include electric, water heater, dish.
heater, air/heat, stove, pool pump & appeal and beautifully decorated, washer, disposal and air conditioner
eptic). MLS#334137 MLS#334139 MLS#334212


I OPENHOUSE ]=l


HOSE


ADVANTAGES OF JACKIE SOURINI
Empowered with knowledge
and 28 years of experience
* Relocation Leads: World-wide not (local)
* Advertising 50% more vs. Competitors
S * Professional References
ti 7. � *Personal Website
Determination. There is NO
substitution for Expertise and most
important "POSITIVE ATITrUDE"
Siu maAe a_'uing by what you get, You make a life by
what you give."
Pornn.- o-" my commissions go back into OUR
C.:.-.u.-.mia. 10 teach the Handicapped through Horse
Therapy.
I can be reached through
EXIT REALTY LEADERS
DIRECT 3552-527-6585 CELL 352-634-4436
Email: sourini-ladde@msn.com * www.jshomes.com


HOUS ]


PINE RIDGE WITH
SEPARATE IN-LAW SUITE
4 BR's/3 BA's under 300K....Newer listing super nice!
Cabana-styled pool & spa. MLS#333069





PINE RIDGE ACREAGE
WITH LOTS OF BONUSES!!!
3 Acres, on the trails, Separate Concrete
2100 sq. ft. bldg., heated pool, beautifully maintained


I rqOU.LSE


, -
";...:-: ., .' : -,


1:00-3:00 COMI
MLE SUNDAY MAY.17TH, 2009 1:00-3:00 FLOR
wy. 19 N to R 6426 W. CANNONDALE section
teadowcrest Dir: From U.S. 19N in Crystal River, to R on family
innondale) to Hwy. 44 -Eto L on Meadowcrest Blvd., to L walk-i
on Cannondale, to home on L MLS#334238. great
2-2994 MARY GULUING 352-422-2994 I


WSUHOWM, MAY 17TH, 2009* I:0.:00 burning fireplae in the family room, largeSUN MA 17 2009 1:003:00 SUND
4185 W. GORGE N.!, PINE RIDGE kitchen, master bedroom with an office/sitting - 6623 W. CANNONr AlE ,
. MOTIVATED SELLER! area...plus 3 more bedrooms and a 30x11 Dir: From Crystal River, take 44 east, left Dir. From
Directions: Pine Ridge Blvd. to N on screened porch. Privacy and nature are yours on 486, right on Meadowcrest Blvd., right on Hwy. m
flagstaff Ave., to Rt on W Gorge Ln.- on this lovely 2.5 acre property just outside on Cannondale; take 1st left to home on Blvd., 1st
louse on Left MLS#324654. Pine Ridge. MLS#326129. left. MLS#333732. villa on LS .
CHARLENE ANGELO 352-464-4179 MARY GULING 352-422-2994 MARY GULLING 352-422-2994 MAR






af6D.[. -ao .om ao� ,,Lxl6 pabcIOr, uL , .ijo . "Our pih if[e accp. a Fna take a oap irn your oeau t.rul Cryitul R.,er Tr..s 2 Pearoom, 2 BANK I
making, oversized garage with door opener, extra' inground pool! Wonderful open floor plan. bath pool home is located on deep canal wtth Tlo
Driveway pad for2nd car/guests, & nice landscaping. 2/2/2 Home is tiled throughout. New paint that is directly off the Indian River which bath on j
community features nearby clubhouse, swimming and most appliances and fixtures are brand takes you to the Crystal River. Access the room witt
pools, tennis & shuffleboard. Come enjoy a wonderful new, storage galore. Just over half an acre Gulf of .Mexico. Live, the waterfront dream!l back of
lorida lifestyle. MLS#328229. on a cul-de-sac. MLS#328902. MLS#333806. MLS#330
MIKE STOKIEY 352-206-909% CHARIENE ANGELO 352-464-4179 CHAJENEJ ANGELO 352-464-4179 CHAR


se overlook private settir


� ': -- " ^ ' ^l 6 lru e? le E l^ r, : ,g:,I r,,:,,T , T r.. ,,' ,+, 1.-. y ,, i
all aL rspeoual a..r...,' . p. a ,-, , I.:..:. . lar

I re a ,er, l , :' r IF SaO' ;urr.n i cardl tnrougr , r iidcr, wrncr>'lae yIao u allOcugn na. Saaa
a July '09. Split floor plan with separate door to relax on the screen-enclosed wood
t entrance to second bedroom - perfect deck! The kitchen has a built-in desk and bright
I situation for roommates! Nice fenced and open space. New A/C In May '081 Youll
. backyard for children and/or pets. want to call THIS one YOUR new home!
MLS#328758. MLS#331408.
NANCY ARES 3S52-279-5058 NANCY AFRES 3522179-S05


7
4-h
"we. �


BARBARA STONE
352-586-3072


is in a 4/2/2.
ar. split flool


Ls- 19, -0.0


1







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E4 SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009


Nature's food bounty


Food is something you
might take for
granted. As a country,
we're fortunate. But if
you've ever gone through a
weather emergency or fi-
nancial hardship, you know
you aren't as immune to a
food shortage as you'd like
to think If you've ever par-.
ticipated in Scouts, you
might have learned a bit
about wild foods and edible


plants. While it seems in-
significant because of the
abundance of food available
in our daily lives, identify-
ing food sources in nature is
an important frugal skill to
have - not just for emer-
gency survival but for their
frugal, organic, nutritional
and medicinal value, too.
If you're looking for a fun

See,-.. AL/Page E7


U]Speciaizing in T[era Vista

& BrentwoodResale
ww .eraI.ista^elty p


Detached Villa I 3Bd+Den- Single Famil I y/3Bd-2Bath- Detached Villa 3Bd-2Bath-
2.5Bath-2Car I Hillside Villas 2Car / Hunt Club 2Car+Pool / Hillside Villas
Popular Windward Model on a cul de sac. Expanded Richmond model. Upgraded Beautiful golf course home. Fully furnished
Nicely landscaped and priced to sell. Kitchen. Awesome curb appeal. & professionally decorated.Swimming Pool.
TVRG# 1100 $339.000. TVRG# 1075 $399.900. TVRG# 1054 $349.00(


Truths about tree roots


Here are a few
facts about tree
roots. Most trees
do not have tap roots.
The deep roots that do
grow directly beneath
the trunk of some tree
species are known as tap
roots. Research shows
tap roots may develop on
some trees in the woods
and forests in well-'
drained soils.
However, as a rule, tap
roots usually will not
form on trees planted in
an urban landscape.
They do not develop
when the soil is compact
or when the water table
is close to the soil sur-
face. Some pines and
oaks will develop tap
roots when planted in
sandy, well-drained
soils.
Roots grow far beyond
the drip line or edge of
the branches. A healthy
tree growing in the forest
generally has a root sys-


tem reaching
well beyond
the perimeter
of its bran-
ches - often
to a distance
from the
trunk equal to
the tree's
height. Roots
on trees and Kerry ]
shrubs T1
planted in a
landscape
grow to about
three times the branch
spread within two or
three years after plant-
ing.
Damaging roots on one
side of the tree may cause
branches to die back ei-
ther on that side only, or
randomly throughout the
crown. Unless the trunk
is twisted, roots on one
side of a tree, such as oak
or mahogany, generally
supply the same side of
the crown.with water and
nutrients, absorbed


OBITUARY
OPTIONS


* The Citrus
Count\ Chronr
icle's policy
permits both
free and paid
obituaries. E.
mail obits@
chroni.::le
online cormn or
phone 563-
5660 for
details and
pricing op
tons.


I n


Citrus Hills with Gorgeous Trees is thesetting for this comfortable
home on over an acre. Window seat in nook, sparkling pool, 3 full
bathrooms, fresh paint & new roof! Steal this for $215,000.


through the
roots. When
roots on one
side of tree
are injured,
branches on
that side will
often drop
leaves. When
trees such as
Creider the maples
g- and rosewood
receive dam-
*RIST age on one
side of the root
system, branch death
may occur anywhere in
the crown of the tree.

Kerry Kreider is a
practicing arborist, a
member of the Interna-
tional Society ofArbori-
culture, a tree
preservationist and
president ofAction
Tree Service. He can be
reached at 302-2815 or
.. e-mail actionpro
arborist@yahoo.com


Sara Noel
FRUGAL
LIVING


r4


.










m OUTSTANDN AGNS OUSANDIN REUT



242 N. Lecmt Hw. Beel Hil ro 87 S.un sBldHm ss I0 W.Mi nS.Ive es - 504 NEH y 9 rs ta ie
T 6870 676207541
^^^^(^^^^Kii;BffaBBBffrmlK*3i^ljBlM^BI


* EXTRA NEAT AMBASSADOR -SCREENED PORCH
* 2/2 with Florida Room
* Neutral Carpet
**Won't last at this prices
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997
Virtual Tours @ wew.Floridatistinlnfo.com


FISH OR CANOE THE CANAL
* 3/2 SPANISH STYLE * TILE ROOF/CIRCLE DR.
* LOFT-FIREPLACE * STONE FP/Accents
* Great style/different
* Screened porch/CP
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997
Email: kellyg@remax.net


* POOL & LANAI * 3/2/2 SPLIT PLAN
* FLORIDA landscape * Quality built
* PRIOED RIGHT!
* Large master suite!
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997
Email: kellyg@remax.net


* 2BD/2BA/Carport * Waterfront w/Dock
* Pelican Cove Condo * 1159 SF Living
* Screened porch
* Maintenance Free i; I
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
Realtorse
(352) 527-7842 * (352) 422-3875












5592 N. BEDSTROW BLVD., PINE RIDGE
* 3BD/2BA/3CG/Den * Detached 3CG
* Heated Pool * Motor Home Garage
* Home 2,218 SF/AC
* Garage 1,716 SF/AC
PETER & MARVIA KOROL 5'l
Realtors,
(352) 527-7842 * (352) 422-3875


SPACIOUS END UNIT
Witr Catmn kitchen, bonu.. room & tiled Flonda
roomll Oversized 1 car garage, ie-d Floor,
newer appliances and a lovely treed I
backyard Easy to see - call today
Susan Knowles I [
(352) 228-9015
Email susanknowles@remax.net


3/2.5/2 W/1716 SQ. FT. OF LIVING, WITH
OPEN FLOOR PLAN AND BUILT-IN BACKYARD SPA
Recently remodeled with porcelain tile, wood
cabinets, solid surface counters,
and whirlpool tub.
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Euig kcamebulia,@ranumxz.jt


with den (2718 sq. ft.) in the very desirable
development of Fairview Estates. Home has
been lovingly cared for and is
in great condition.
RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663
Crlfed'altlrsdProperty Exprt


Modem/updated kitchen Z Updated cathw/cemerec 0.in
SLarge bedrooms
Den & living room
SScreened-in Lanai
New Drainfield
CHERYL LAMBERT
352-637-6200
--a u -ery -xt ."Bb l


4 .'-



�..-.- i-7 * j ;



LIKE NEW - MUST SEE!!
MP.I~u = .- r. -i Tt, i',. h2 .,Ti. : r j u ,1..,rrrf.. J..,..
room, eat-in kitchen, large giving room. Outdoor utility shed
with power ( 14 X 17). 2 master bedrooms
with full baths, beautiful professionally
landscaped, well kept mobile.
JOE LOPEZ
(352) 637-6200
Direct: (352) 220-8405


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 E5







E6 Sunday, May 17, 2009


HomeFront is a weekly real estate section -.
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
It is also distributed to approximately
300 business locations throughout Citrus County.
Display advertising information....... .......... ..........563-55!
r'lrrifissnI , adfrsinrr infonrnorun 63_Q-


g ...................................................... 6
News information .................................................................................. 563-5660
............................................................ ......newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listings.............................www.naturecoasthomefront.com
Sign up for www.naturecoasthomefront.com.....................................563-3206
Advertise online...............................................................................563-3206
....................................................................... NCCsales@chronicleonline.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CIONICLE ICLE



To have your news in the Chronicle's HomeFront section, you may mail, fax or email the
information to the Chronicle, 1624 North Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. The
newsroom fax number is 563-3280 and email is newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.
You may also drop off your information at the Meadowcrest office or the newspaper's
Inverness office at 106 W. Main Street.
When submitting information, please make sure it is printed or typed, is concise and includes a
contact telephone number.
If you have any questions or comments, contact the section editor, Mike Arnold, at 563-5660
(email - newsdesk@chronicleonline.com).
HOW TO GET YOUR PHOTOS INTO THE PAPER:
-We accept color and black and white photos. We also accept negatives. We do not accept Polaroid prints.
-All photos need to e cropped tightly. That means no wasted space in your photo.
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- Be sure that photos or negatives you submit are taken using 35 mm film. Others will not he accepted.
- Please include your address and phone number on any photos or negatives submitted.
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- When identifying persons in you photo, please do so from left to right, front to back.
- For more information, please contact Matt Beck, photo team leader, at 563-5660.


Raising butterflies can


be fun, rewarding hobby


O nly about 10 percent of butterfly
eggs will survive the gauntlet of
threats faced on their journey to
transformation into a beautiful butterfly
Butterfly eggs and caterpillars must sur-
vive everything from ants, bee-
tles, parasitic wasps, spiders, F .01
birds, bats, rodents and reptiles
to human threats such as pesti- '
cides and habitat destruction.
One of my favorite projects is
raising caterpillars inside, giv-
ing them a little respite from
the predators and threats that
abound. I've been raising Gulf
Fritillary butterflies inside for
several months now and have Audre
found this to be a simple, ex- g"-
tremely gratifying hobby.
I keep my caterpillars in a
decorative birdcage lined with netting to
keep them from escaping; however, any
container will do. The only thing caterpil-
lars really need is a constant, fresh supply
of their "host plant"
Most caterpillars can only eat one or two
species of plant and their mother knew ex-
actly which type of plant to lay her eggs on.
If relocated to another species of plant,
the caterpillar will actually starve to death


rather than eat the wrong plant. For ek-
ample, Monarchs and Queens require
milkweed, and Gulf Fritillaries and Zebra
Longwings require passion flowers.
The Florida Museum of Natural History
offers a wonderful database of
. Florida butterflies and their
host plants at
www.flmnh.ufl.edu/wildflower.
Once you know your caterpil-
lar's host plant, the rest is just a
*- r matter of providing them pro-
tection from predators and lots
of food until they form their
chrysalis.
Gulf Fritillary eggs are
y Durr golden to brown and about the
rg size of a poppy seed, often laid
on the tendrils or leaves of pas-
sion flower vinie. A hardy or-
ange caterpillar with harmless black
spikes emerges about five days after the
egg is laid. All caterpillars are eating ma-
chines, because it takes a tremendous
amount of energy to form a chrysalis and
to undergo metamorphosis to become a
butterfly. The Polyphemus moth holds the
record, eating 86,000 times its birth weight

See HOBBY/Page E14


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


Princess palace
PAGE E8
Frugal Living
PAGE E4
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E2

WHERE'S JANE?
* Gardening columnist
Jane Weber is taking a
break from her column,
Jane's Garden. It will re
turn later this year.

For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the Web site for the Citrus
County Property Appraiser's Of-
fice, www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Clock would interest collectors'; cannonballs leave their mark


D ear John: I hope you hour on the hour. The open
can give me some in- escapement on the dial adds
formation on my clock to collector interest as do the
and what it might be worth. diamond crystals set in the
The clock has four glass pan- dial and pendulum bob. The
els. The front is a letter "A' on the
door that opens to B. dial indicates the
wind the clock and clock was made by
the back is also a p, the Ansonia Clock
door. The height is . ' Company.
about 16 inches. - "' The Ansonia
Just above the "6" Company was one
on the dial is a _ of the largest
small diamond American clock
shape with the let- companies in busi-
ter "A' inside it. ness from the mid-
Thank you for any John Sikorski 19th century until
help. -AR., Inter- SIKORSKI'S the 1920s. The
net ATTIC name is widely
Dear A.R.: Wow, recognized by
you have a beauti- clock collectors.
ful clock referred to by col- Your clock appears to .be in
lectors as . a "crystal excellent condition. Potential
regulator." The style of the dollar value is in the $1,000
upper and lower portion of range, perhaps more on a
the clock is Rococo. The two good day.
winding holes in the dial in- Dear John: Something you
dicate the clock strikes the said right there at the end of
half hour and strikes the full your program today rang a


bell in my memory about can-.
nonballs. -
Years ago, I knew this fam-
ily in Vicksburg, Mississippi,
who lived in an antebellum
house called Plain Gables.
The house had several
unique features. First off, not
quite so unique, was the fact
that the "Maid of Vicksburg,"
a famous Civil War ghostette,
roamed their back alley. Nu-
merous people, not just the
owners of the house, had
seen her.
Second, they had a small
hall table on the upper floor
that had the habit of thump-
ing the floor and moving sev-
eral inches away from the
wall, but only when everyone
in the family was eating the
evening meal - never at
breakfast or lunch. A polter-
geist, perhaps? .
Third, they had an upstairs
library from which books
would fly through the air to
the top of the stairs, make a


right angle turn and begin fly-
ing down the stairs, but would
disappear before they
reached the ground floor.
But this e-mail was sup-
posed to be about cannon-
balls, wasn't it? Well, they had
always noticed `that there
were several spots in the
floors of both the first and
second floors where squares
of the original flooring had
been replaced, the patches
being about 2 feet square.
And the patched areas on the
second floor were always
right above those on the first
floor.
See ATTIC/Page E6
This "regulator" clock was
manufactured by the Ansonia
Clock Company in a "Ro-
coco" style. Ansonia was
once one of the largest manu-
facturers of American clocks.
This example might sell for
$1,000, or possibly more.
Associated Press


9/


..5
-'3
Y








CITRUS COUNTY ITL C7HRONICLEISik~1,20E


Green remodeling FRUGAL
Continued from Pi


can bring in 'green


R recently,
o u r
Scripps
sister network for
this column, r,- 4
HGTVPro.com,
contacted me to
do a five-part
mini-segment se-
ries on home-
bui lding Ed Del
information that it ASK
can share with its PLU
viewers. Working
with me to pro-
duce these segments is my
old friend and media person-
ality in his own right, Brad
Staggs. When Brad and I get
together, you'll usually find
some pretty sound home-im-


GET THE
WORD OUT
* Nonprofit or-
ganizations
are invited to
submit news
releases
about up
coming corn
munity
events. Call
563 5660.


NEW LISTING



SHERNANDO-BK FORECLOSURE
211 !' acre mol. Scr porcn. shed
twpo*er S34,500 #333448


provement infor-
mation in our fin-
ished scripts.
Keeping that in
mind, we thought
it would be a
good idea to actu-
ally bring our
HGTVPro.com
mini-segment se-
Grande ries to my read-
THE ers. So, for your
entertainment
IBER and information,
please enjoy part
one of "Ed's Commonsense
Guide."
In many areas of the
country, about half the


See Pl ,. --.: Page E1O


352-795-7357
888-795-7356
wwwxrhemarea ty.com



PROPERTIES FOR SALE & RE


INV - BANK FORECLOSURE 3?2
w/ above gd pool 2 sheas huge
scr porcr, $39,900 #333927
NEW LISTING
.- --.- _W


age E4


activity this summer, you
can learn about wild-food
foraging. Involve the whole
family during a nature hike,
camping trip or neighbor-
hood stroll. You don't have
to gear up like Survivorman
and trap and roast a desert
critter. But it's good to know
plants that are free, edible
and available in nature and
those that are poisonous or
protected. You can bring a
camera, journal, specimen
jars; binoculars or a flower
press, too.


Here are a few small ways
to get started.
LEARNING RE-
SOURCES: Go to your li-
brary, and look for books on
wild-food foraging and edi-
ble plants. I recommend
"The Forager's Harvest: A
Guide to Identifying, Har-
vesting, and Preparing Edi-
ble Wild Plants" by Samuel
Thayer. It includes excellent
pictures and his experi-
ences, which makes it a
practical field guide for be-
ginners. Call your local co-
operative extension or
nature center, and see
whether they have any

See FRUGAL/Page E15


George E. L'Heureux, Broker i
.CURB, ' ' E.ift Gulf to Lake Hwy., Inverness, FL (352) 637 - CURB (2872)
APPEAL www.curbappealcitrus.com (s.orcctCs CuntyandAorids)
".. n s.r, (First Time Buyers) Up to $8,000 in Cash! Call Today.
c .L 3 5913 ROSEWOOD iJ B 5924 N.
DR. i- . ROSEWOOD DILR.
Q.... . " I .. .... .. , &1. 6'; 1

rest Call Today' $447,500. .., ... 319,000

SSS^'- ""- , BUTlMoNBUSH I .aEl, :, -"...


u.: . -f.? [. jur,ur; 1I.. $84,000. tu em.Catloduaytoseethiscdarmginhre.$s 7 00.


Jackide & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
(352) 634-2371 Cell j ,".
MON (800) 476-2590 Toll Free
ER A For a Visual Tour of our listings
REAL ESTATE fand all MLS: bidavis.com r


I


Lou Miele, Realtoi 2t
4511 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465 |
Office: 352-746-3600
Cell: (352) 697-1685 iEm
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU AMERICAN ERAT
ALWAYS THERE FOR REALTY & INVESTMENTS AL -111
' PINE RIDGE BEAUTY - This Mitch Underwood extended
Captiva Model is a must see. As you pull up the driveway.
you cant help but to be in awe of the lush landscaping
with hundreds of flowering shrdbs and trees. And once
m o_ k" inside, you'll be ready to call this home. With 3 bedrooms,
3 baths, loads of extras, and a huge lanai (31x10) and
huge screened patio (50x18), this is the perfect home for
both relaxing and entertaining. See it todayll
MLS#331767 $276,900
I - ramnn iae ,nnn= vta..A ..Ia"Pn lAnh


FABU USO ITEMU* -3A CUn u
CABANA HOME - This 3 bedroom, 3 bath home
boasts over 2000 sf of living including a private separate
Scabana with bedroom and bath for guests/in laws. The
very: private courtyard/pool area will be great for
entertaining or just relaxing. Too many upgrades to ist
here. Come see for yourself. And yes, ifs on the Skyview
Golf course. MLS#332950. $349,000
LECANTO - Very well maintained 3 bedroom
home on two lots This home features large
Sbdr'oom: beautiful parquet *ooa0 rloorin,
innewer AC a fabulous 'creeneO porchr, anpa o
much rrmore This home mudI be seen to be
appreciated Take a look today"
MLS#330341 $149,900.
AS YOU DRIVE THE PRIVATE ROAD lined by lush
shady trees, you immediately know you are somewhere
special. There you'll find your new home. Updated kit, wood
- 'laminate floors, 4BR, 3BA, gas fpl., 2-car det. gar., and a
view you'll never tire of coming home to. Imagine yourself
relaxing by your heated pool watching the sun set over your
220-feet of lakefront property. Refurbished dock and boat lift
moments notice. Don't let this one slip away! Call today for
your private tour. MLS#334073. $589,000
R L OVELY AND COZY 2 bed, 1.5 bath, spacious
. iar 'i ''.g home in nice area of Bevery Hills. Well
ma-,2a.-i, split plan, with new carpet and paint.
Sa..' l,,ci , roof shingles, and soffit. Features privacy
: -rn, .:..' garage door, sprinkler system, and window
. .... t-'J.: r,, :e golf course, tennis, and near shopping.
-" ,: readyto move in! MLS#328856.$89,900
-2V PRICED FOR IMMEDIATE SALE - Ar,,i ,,TI,'IMuiE

A n . r . i . ,i N-- i . .
4ljm b - 1.'-.: .-r l I.r. E :"',' . ,, * r. :..j ui
i.JiI .,:,,. ,' l.lL-i,:1:3;it $184,990
r3 BEDROOM POOL HOME ON
2 LOTS. Over 1500 sq Fh or li;ing
..- .,' . with a heated pool in Flying Dutchman
S'". Estates. Home has newer room AC &
S .- slove MLS#328416 $139,999
f S S ~AFFORDABLE AND IyIMACULATE! :'.,? ,i,
beautiful P.-n Ragm E;ULITE Tr..: ]'re rir.,&,� ,o ,
": ^ .' . _ yab.-r, . 1 ar _.II 1,'.. T,:,,'. l Ficf H- i -, ih [luDr
m.v.,T,, r.r, Tih E h-n. e .5 lcul, a ,T,,I al I,
r, LS 3 4 6. $199,900
.- PICruRESQUE MiNi-RANCiH..:-.r-,i, .. :. ,, Tru , ..,
r . n a . ] . el ' .
I 1 1 jII r,, ~,, r,, - r. ', ,. ic . j.r .n.C , T w .:
|||Hf|jH | t.;j.'jBRl T r i. ,ud h.j,.j ,,' ltj,-,*l r,,?,c ,',, t.'aiT?.a^ - .p,l
;.-i~ - M.- S s -.k - Ul .: * S273 9,0


BEAUTIFUL HOME sils on two
lots. Ceramic tile, French doors, great
lighl, near shopping and amenities
Make your appointment today before
tIhis one slips away. MLSg334007.
$134,900
LOTS AND ACREAGE ALSO AVAILABLE!
MLS#326201: 0.23 Acre, Citrus Springs..........:......... $7,500
MLS#329512: 1+ Acres, Hwy. 41, Floral City.... ....... $20,000
MLS#331076: 7+ Acres, Crystal River .................... $159,000

Chc ou th eto aousI-etr


SU ,MDXY lr 17, 2009 *E-


(

i







CImTRUS 'CNIY (FL) CHkONIcuL


'E8 SUNDAY,MAY '17 2009 ,


Bedroom gets princess-worthy revamp

- Youngster has space for her imagination to run wild


'CANDICE OLSON
Home and Garden Television
S even-year-old Charlotte
is a fantasy writer in the
making. She has a won-


derful imagination that has
been fueled by mom Chris-
tine's romantic stories of far-
away places and dad Norbert's
many creations - including a
castle downstairs where Char-


lotte and brother Adrian can
play .
But Charlotte longed for a
space that would be all her

See L ' - "Page E9


SHNS photo courtesy HGTV
rHWltBKe^d kWF-.W;wus.p Nook. y ^wfr


I * NE OMS * IMEDAT OCUAC


SPECIAL
* Elegant Granite Island Kitchen
w/SS Appliance. Pkg.,
* Wood Cabinets Throughout
* Spa M. Bath (Jetted Tub & Walk-In
Shower)
* Tile Floor Pkg.
* Alarm, Central Vac, Intercom/
Music
* Dry Bar w/Wine Frig.


FEATURES
* Floratam Sod, Landscaping Pkg. &
Sprinklers
* Double Pane Insulated Windows &
Sliders
* Radiant Attic Heat Barrier
* Decorative Stepped CIgs.
* Designer Light/Fan Pkg,
* Screen Enclosed
Waterfall Pool


S(352) 688-6864 * www.vanordenhomebuilder.com I
*B~6lM USsE*1011


*******************************
* r Uc "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods" u- Take my *

NANCY virtual*

PONTICOS www.nancyknows.com tours
S Direct: 352-64-422 E Suncoal Blvd Homias FL 3 -1700


S--A-.... ays There For Yu *




4 3 CAR GARAGE, HEATED POOL + GRANITE KITCHEN! SPECTACULAR SOUTHERN WOODS OPEN FAIRWAY VIEW! *
S3 Bed + Study Corner Cul-de-Sac Location * 10' Pocket Sliders to SOLAR HEATED, Self-Cleaning POOL
* * Well for Yard Upgraded Stainless Appliances *Volume Ceilings ' Beautiful Landscaping ' 3 Bed/3 Bath *
* $235,000 MLS#325939 $290,000 MLS#331256 *
^* TakemyUIU0�^ /'~lf| *I-^Il

* U~^x ~ x x x x


Email: cent21@infionline.net
www. jwmortonrealestate.com


HERNANDO WATERFRONT: YES! YES!
I ha-.a a r M. i.a .,ht .r.ia r... 3 2 :phli R,>ar
plar, .th :fprt i �.. , Sller ha: dan, all t3 .
,.-h and .: a'"o., e' . ,a N.ce ,eck oH hi.-
co'-. dxk aelle, ..11 I:- ai '.Ild,r, ri.e
mnrGag.i Le keLe o lake a loo nd k i.a-a .:ur oi&.,
REDUCED TO 5109,000 a3�:32h
Call Deb Thompson cell 352-634-2656


NATURE LOVERS PARADISE - 1T.: n.^ 3l0
?9A h'0.n. ka 3a rtar., IEare- '. - T-aokc IfE
god fa-T.il, rm 'fpl odi-ooT *at n lii 0--3
,atQ In. ri and MaAr o- c.-.erlocIS -'ruora
lard ,ad la., fa.-rr O-.r .25 0 .q h LA LahI
ao;cs ,t ,&. ba.:k. d .cir d and ..Idlr
ab,:.and here Ver,r pr..3 ir..arid ,r. I ,
aWer. Add.r.cral a.:'-.a- a,al ae aff32321
5258,900
Call Pat Davis (352) 212-7280


J.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. Main St., Invernessi FL
SALES: (352) 726-6668 * 1-800-543-9163
Property Management (352) 726-9010 1900'9


COUNTRY HOME: Th.s ,: li- cana. e ,t.
P.6l ..'.:de -' lor-.d ot I .'ll ^t . ..
and lot c.' ',d a.ond pe r.- , fd :'-iii , v ' ,e
nran r, ha ha. l.,r f r ,, I ha, a Jc :-.:f d
2 crt arar,3 a loarg p:l: k.r.. - .rh 3 ni.lr;
buIdd.rg ci, ca:h e.d a .rr.6kh6:,,,, or iha i.l,
o.- "Ili ca r-h id . i.a lake ha: - a qa zr.:, d't.
a'.d 196 h of '.-a..ll ahe ,aer'.. go'n fk..r
.II rerurn '-, h:p, 6 .a lI i..: :.-. aFp .t. I >,.e
oF ao.-d or. a dead end .vrd1 5145,900
Call Ruth Frederick 1-352-563-6866


CHARMING 2BR, BA HOME, loc.i ..
l.,r.. . , Hqhla..j- T. hM _ . ..,T- , a cen-.e I:
a.d. ha a .t.,at. .:*I ,lui,.,d e-in.a..." ,a.' .3
,:,rulr &3.. .-ack,oard .nl.de& a n,:, IZ08
tr.l, bid. ond prr.c:, t:r.q 'rid.;--
nrir t-ti.FcnFa71I. rni. i ..ad t hfra kia,. .-ood
an S..a.t.r. Op.t- ,. h Fnr.rh dow.n- Iv.1
t.e L , r tan 6a' 0q i rrck p.r-E r par, Gre'-,r
kI aor.I Cc le .a I rdc .3a.il 3r I
Ask for Maxine Hellmem 352-212-4147
or Kimberly Miner 352-586-9549


BIG LAKE HENDERSON I(c3l 1 ar d.*mfy
*,i:hn;d l.L, ",.-.- J -ad " hx, AU -" "
i dr3 ..a dJ-i..:r N:- aI p3'.T
r,'a ..iral r-. _.) ,I,.. I.,.ir.., i0tn". p d._ c '., l &
l,:..kr- iul, > .r-ci ,lri,..'. .TO.r.r.n.r..e-tri
-7c, .rr :.; re jarr.r. l.ierr. hopp'rr ir.]
h71. r T fif.l , 1 *r..i ~ l- * _la Io. . rar . lea- s
Ask for IGmbery Miner 352-586-9549
or Maxine HeHmers 352-212-4147







HERNANDO: CUSTOM BUILT ' ,rk .n:,de
Ia,',r,- N.-.,r I.rd .n ar.d .-, a-o-nr. r. v
a-ne,. ii,,, d ,,bla-d. ", . a a 0 .a.,-,rf I .'tdr',,
CprI. I. ] ' c.. 3.. i ro, n. d.ri.. and .rchen
Dc- .lJ 3:c::. .e .tre , fr a ll "o ur boan..g
V-l, ,.r,. o %i r, rla e he g .3 va-oon, Y
a,-En| I . -L . o, :o. +h.: o-, Srll-r .11
I -t ai hold.r.3 rhe rrn.:,rqage 599,900
4132.33
Call Deb Thompson cell 352-634-2656







CITRUS~IOUNTY(FL)r CHRONicLE - S1JNOA~S~ MAY17, 2009 ES


DESIGN
Continued from Page E8

own for dreaming and writ-
ing her "happily ever after"
stories. Charlotte couldn't
even imagine herself as the
princess she'd like to be-
come in her sparsely fur-
nished bedroom with
hand-me-down furniture,
poor lighting and windows
that cause the room to be
too cold in the winter and
too hot in the summer. How
could she possibly create in
a space so lacking in imagi-
nation!?
Christine and Norbert
wanted their daughter to
have a bright and inspiring
space to enjoy, so they
asked me to play fairy god-
mother and create a
princess-perfect space
where Charlotte could play,
sleep, imagine, and do her
homework So I waved my
magic design wand to make
the perfect room for her.
I wanted Charlotte's
room to be practical as well
as whimsical - a place for
an imaginative little girl
now and for the bright
young woman she'll be in a
few years. My jumping-off
point was a vibrant floral
wallpaper in tangerine and
fuchsia with sparkles and
self-adhesive flower ap-
pliquds. It's a look that will
please a young princess
and be fun and funky for a
teen-ager. The wallpaper
provided the color palette
for the whole room, with
white and marmalade
paints for the remaining
walls and rich fuchsia fab-
ric for the-most regal fin-
ishes.
The bay windows of the
turret-shaped room pro-
vided a natural home for a
long custom-built desk
This workspace offers nat-
ural light and lots of stor-
age. Like the wallpaper, the
desk will continue to work
well for Charlotte as she
gets older and needs it for
less princess-y, more prac-
tical purposes.
To make sure the imagi-
nation station was a com-
fortable place to spend
creative time, we put spe-
cially treated film on the


windows and added ther-
mal blinds to keep the win-
ter cold and summer heat
outside.
Another magical touch
was inspired by the
draperies. The beautiful
fuchsia fabric that frames
the windows even more en-
chantingly creates a unique
way for Charlotte to use the
area. Soft sheer curtains
combine with fuchsia side
panels to create the effect
of a stage where Charlotte
can act out her stories.
And, when she draws the
curtains, her desk area is
transformed into a cozy
nook where she can hide
away to dream up her next
adventure.
Across the room, we com-
pletely transformed Char-
lotte's existing bed, starting
with a customized tanger-
ine headboard tufted with
fuchsia buttons. To make it
truly princess-perfect, we
installed crown molding to
support a valance and pan-
els of the rich fuchsia fab-
ric that flank the head of
Charlotte's bed. Overhead,
we hung a floral chandelier
that we had painted white
for the crowning touch.
Near Charlotte's small
closet, we created a dress-
ing area with a large
wardrobe and a dresser
with lots of storage for play-
ing dress-up today and stor-
ing her clothing for years to
come.
A few finishing touches,
including mirror-mirrors
on the wall and a very cool
area rug, and the room was
complete.
Charlotte's creativity was
stifled in a dark, drafty
room that didn't live up to
her imagination. But with
bold colors, storybook-in-
spired whimsy and an eye
to the future, I created a
play-work-sleep space
that's enchanting and prac-
tical. A room where Char-
lotte can live happily ever
after. Now thht's divine!


Interior decorator Candice
Olson is host ofHGTV's
'"Divine Design."For more
ideas, information and
show times visit
www.HGTVcom or www.
divinedesign.tv


I*. Nearly a dozen medical professionals contribute their
expertise to columns in Health & Life./Tuesdays
* Read up on all things school-related in the Chronicle's
Education section./Wednesdays
* Plan menus for the week from the tempting recipes in
the Flair for Food section./Thursdays

1 00 o3 BR, 2 BA, 2 CAR GARAGE

"112.0,0 Oi your lot
www.encorehomesofcitrus.com







Building homes in Citrus County since 1986
Monday Friday 10:00am-4:00pm
Sbuc0k8 0@owe8,c.|
2271 South Olympic Hills Terrace (352) 726-2179
Directions: Hwy. 41 S. of Inverness, turn left on Eden Drive, take 1st right at South Olympic Hills.

the link between plans and reality .


Dennis amato
State Certified CGC-004344 I

GENERAL CONTRACTOR, INC.
A TRADITION OF QUALITY SINCE 1972
* Consultation & Project/Plan Review
S - Design Services
* Cost Estimating * Design-Build Construction
S * Custom Crafted Homes * Waterfront Homes
S * "Cracker-Style" Homes & Buildings
* Residential Renovations
- Commercial Construction & Remodeling
* Adaptive Re-Use & Restoration of Buildings

430 NE 3rd Street, P.O. Box 1312, CrystalRiver,FL34423-1312


SHERRI C. PARKER & ASSOCIATES
Realors, LLC
626 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River, FL 34428
iW~lll~l^ website: www.ShemnCParker.com rlI'
. . -' * emrnail c-tru.reahor@aol.com
. Iau~YaE..2i299 -... . su 7mfl~no .u..


5400 E. Uve Oak
Inverness

ENJOY YOUR PRIVACY YVoL can keep
your boal or RV under cover here Tnia
gorgeous 31212 nornrie on 70 acre near
lown is the perflec getaway or permaneri
home for you AT ONLY $138,900. if
wornm mne trip io. view mis one
MLS#327032


ARE YOU SEARCHING FOR THAT
SPECIAL HOME that is charming,
unique. pnvate and doesn't cost a
lot? This is it! This 2/2.511 on over
1.15 acres is cozy. Call today
MLS#333915 $106,000


HEALTH NOTE GUIDEUNES
* TO-ubmit information about upcoming seminars,
healt.related events open to the public or support
group rr,.etings, e-mail newsdesk@chronicleonline.
- com attn: health Notes.





custom glass doors, all open t ding area, ihen w
MI& "ella "Gaba" En ,
.r rs to l 24211 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanta. FL 34461
S[352-2414961
OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1-4
. . *' , CUSTOM BUILT 3=2 PINE RIDGE HOME WITI BEAUTIFULLY
LANDSCAPED 1.75 (MOL) Acre comer lot w/deladied, insulated
and A/C 36x30 garage/wokshop. Enter great room thni beauM
-c custom glass doors, all open to dining area, gourmet kchen wt
73anit&urilers custom maple cabinets, built-in wall oven, cookiop and refrigerate. Master suite
'acknoling *alk-in closets, dbllvanities, garden tub & walk-in shower. Lg. guest bedioms, one
opening to beautiful pool and lanai area complete with rock garden with running water.
DIRECJIONS: North on Hwy 486 to L n Pine Rige BM. to R. on W. Bucsinand Cpern.


it _ "American Service
KEwith Dutch Touch"

Myriam Reulen
21 Call: (352) 613-2644
7 1A A 1 7

CAN URY LAKE ESMES, H AD
312/2 pool hone GR -A B -U I-
Hot Tub GREAT BUY!
* Spacious Kitchen
SRoom for workshop in garage
* Designer pavers and more
* Lot next door available
for purchase
MLS 315567

See iuitoIurI at www eusineflui ii slm|


ME MN CA GARY
ERA mNamaAsm UI ALTMAN
4511 N.Lecanto Hwy. l REALTOR�
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 , IS 3 3 , ie. 305




27VINCASHOMOSASSANFt 34446


SUGARMILL WOODS OPEN HOUSE
Beautiful 4BR, 2BA, 2 car garage, 2,236 sq. ft Mercedes
home.. Large kitchen with wood cabinets and an exceptionally
large master bedroom.
Pinr TO SELL AT $169,999-!
DON'T LET THIS HOME PASS YOU BY!
Directions: From 98 N, on Long Pine St., right on VWnca St to#27


CnTRUS' &UNTY (FL), CHRONICLE


' 8t M, -Y17, 20099 .E9







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E10 SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009


PLUMBER
Continued from Page E7

homes sold recently have
been bank-foreclosed prop-
erties or short sales. It's no
secret that many of these
types of properties have
been neglected or even van-
dalized by the former own-
ers. I've even seen homes
where evicted owners have
gone through the place with


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

It -was not until they put
central air-conditioning into
the house that they found out
the reason. Within the soil
beneath the house they
found four cannonballs, each
one centered below a pair of


sledgehammers. Most ,of
these homes need wdior
renovations.
The good news" that the
new stimulus tax package
does take this matter into
consideradon. There is an
expanded remodeling tax
credit for "energy efficient"
home .. improvements
through 2010 to help buyers
of foreclosed homes as well
as other homeowners. So, if
we take the foreclosed prop-
erties sold that will need re-


those patched holes. Appar-
ently during the Civil War,
the shelling of the city by the
Union gunboats on the Mis-
sissippi River had fallen a lit-
tle short of the siege trenches
surrounding the city, and
Plain Gables had taken some
of the hits. - CE.P, Internet
Dear C.E.E: Good story. I
suspect there are others
that have similar stories. In


modeling, figure in those
who want to remodel their
present home and, finally,
add the available tax credits
- well, we could have a new
gold rush! Ed's "common
sense" says that the real
"green" in building (I'mn
talking about the money)
will be in the remodeling
business for the foreseeable
future.
Some basics you need to
know about the federal tax
credits for energy-efficient


fact, in New England, if a
house is thought to be
haunted, it must state so as-
part of the public record
when sold. As always, any
Remember When moment


CiTI!


home improvements in-
clude: Partial "installation"
costs are included for some
projects like "high-effi-
ciency" fuel-fired heating
and cooling systems, solar
water-heating systems, geo
thermal heat pumps and
wind-power systems.
Only "material" costs are
eligible for projects like ef-
ficient window units, doors
and roofs. In all cases, re-
ceipts and factory specifica-
tions need to be saved to see


triggered -by the column or
radio show are welcome.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-


if they qualify for the tax
credits. Some improve-
ments may not. They in-
clude kitchen appliances,
window air conditioners,
washers and dryers. But
consumers are still urged to
make sure all appliances
are "Energy Star" rated.
I hope my "common-
sense" guide helps motivate
you to look into these tax
credits so you'll end up with
a lot of extra "cents" in your
pockets!


tiques business for more
than 20years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Siko-
rski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1
FM) Saturdays from 11 a.m.
to noon. Send questions to


N
Master Contractor/Plumber
Ed Del Grande is known in-
ternationally as the author
of the book "Ed Del
Grande's House Call" and
for hostingTVshows on
Scripps Networks and
HGTVPro.com. For more
information, visit eddel-
grande.com or write eddel-
grande@hgtvpro.com.
Always consult local con-
tractors and codes.


Sikorski's Attic, c/o The Cit-
rus County Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429, or
e-mail asksikorski@
aol.com.


mUEAY


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HwY.
[[ -j, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM

.:4 - . .*z 5


BEVERLY HILLS 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath LECANTO - One Of A Kind W/6 Bedrms, 3
W/Glassed Porch, Tile Floors In Baths, 2 Kitchens, 2 Living Rms, 2 Dining
Kitchen, Dining, Laundry, Both Baths, Rms, 2 Screened Porches, Solarium/Family
New Shingles, A/C, Drainfield. Comer Rm, 2 Heat Pumps, All On 1+ Acre. Well
Lot. #334213 $59,900 And Septic, Shed And Fencing, Center Of
County. Reduced #332770 $249,900



LECANTO - Lou Crl F.:.-,rn Or. 3 14A.:. o NORTH CRYSTAL RIVER - 3 B.rir.:,,rr. 2
Land W/ Beautiful Oaks, 4 Bdrms, 2 Baths, Bath Home In Quiet Neighborhood. Tile
Fam Rm WIF Gas Fireplace, 19 X 46 Glassed Floors, New Range/Oven, Refrigerator,
Rear Porch. Upgraded Kitchen, Fenced Yard Fresh Paint, Ceiling Fans, Laundry Rm,
W/ 2 Gates. Ingmd Fiberglass, Caged Pool. Fenced Rear Yard, Small Shed, Ready To
Reduced #325394 $259,900" Move In Condition. # 333446 $89,900



CRYSTAL RIVER DUPLEX 3 CRYSTAL OAKS 3bedrm, 3.5 Bath, 2 Car
Bedroom, 2 Bath, Each Side. Well Garage, L" Shaped Scm Porch W/ Hurricane
Maintained, Fully Rented Until 9/09 & Shutters, Sliding Drs From Family, Living &
10/09; $585 & $ 575. New A/C In 483 Bedrms. Cath Ceilings, Ceiling Fans Thru Out,
Unit: #330326 $110,000 Dining Rm, Breakfast Nook, Laundry Rm,
__FuiT,,;n-,'I @ ,11r,.W ..W S185.000


i OPPORTUNITY
'vwI u" I ea ;! I I wwwIcitrusbestbuy om


NEW HOE I PINE R IE I 2 ARES


I = NE =H5R-- E


NE HOME' ".1: I NEW '.HO"ME : I NEW"2 HOME--


I PINE RIDGE -1


I ANTERURYLAKEESTBCTRU SPINgGlS[ ^I~f CIRU SI 11I I r


NEW HOM IV' []f


I t BEVELY Hl; '1ILL I BEE L H, ! l= !k4 -ILL I


ON ACR POO I CI:= !: -''ITU SPR;.t}t"]' !ING I


I [.] S SS I,[I'_.'-f


BEVERLY HILLS I CITRUS SPRINGS _J









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 Eli


Chron le


Real Estate

Classifieds


STo place an ad, call 563-5966


: -Classifieds


__In Print
�~ ~ , . . . . ...... , .9;! , . ..

3.and


.Online


7 :All


U The Time


Fax:~~ (32 56.56 1a Tol Free (88 85-24 1 Emi:cas-escrnceniecm Iwbie'w~hoilol
Moil Hom MoieHmsMbl oe Mbl oe oie.oelRa sae Ra sae rrmns
Moil HomesI I II
Fo Ret Fo Ren Fo Ren Fo Sal an Lan In Par Fo etFrRetu


AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hemando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk.
Free intemet/long dist.
Trailers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant
CRYSTAL RIVER
"2/1, No dogs
$500 mo. first, 1st, sec.
352-795-9738
HERNANDO
1/1, open lake, quiet,
carport, sheds, fenced,
covered porch, incl.
county water, garb.,
yard maint. $525 mo.
$525 sec. 352-344-3864
HOMOSASSA
1&2 Brfum & Unfum.
1 br. RV $300 mo.
No Pets Call 628-4441
HOMOSASSA
1/1 Ist/last/sec.
$350mo 352-634-2368
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Cha, wsh./dry.
$450. + Sec.
(352)503-6747
(352) 628-1928
HOMOSASSA
2/1, private $495/mo
'Discounts 352-344-5597
HOMOSASSA
2/1.5 $500. Mo.
(352) 628-5696
HOMOSASSA
2/1%, Big lot, Near 19
$425 mo + Sec. + Ref.
No pets 352-628-3019


HOMOSASSA
3/2, Clean W/D, 1
Acre (352) 382-3675

HOMOSASSA 55+
2/2 Stonebrook Estates
Unfurn. Car Prt. Pool,
Club hse. Boat' & RV star.
$595. Mo.(352) 422-7887

HOMOSASSA.
Quiet Country
Setting.
2/1 Furnished on
fenced 1 acre + .
Large shed, large
deck. Enclosed
porch, CHA
Remodeled
kitchen, washer.
New well. $ 575.
Mo. + $350.
Security Dep.
(352) 628- 5244

HOMOSASSAI/
Lecanto 1/1 quiet country
Fst/Lst./Sec. Elec. incid.
$400. Mo. (352)628-0545
(352) 212-0888

HWY 488
2/2, fenced yard new
carpet, $450. .mo, + sec
No Pets 352-795-6970

INVERNESS
Large 3/2, appx 2000 s.f.
under roof. No pets. 1 yr.
lease. $675 mo. F/L/S
344-3444 / Eves.
344-3084


INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park,
2BR, 1-1/2BA, $475.
1 BR,1 BA, $350 Incl.
water 352-476-4964
COUNTRY
SETTING
2/2 in Country Setting.
$500/mo. + $500 Sec.
No. pets. For application
Call Lee at 352-314-5092
or 800 -692-4162.
LECANTO
2 Bed Rm $450. MO.
HOMOSSASA
2 Bed Rm $425. MO
DON CRIGGER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 746-4056,
(352) 746-0052 Eve.




BANK
FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181
CRYSTAL RIVER
Suncoast Mobile Home
Park. 2/2, 32x14 Florida
room, Fireplace, Oak
Kit. Cabinets. New shed
$12,000 (352) 601-0412
Crystal River, Suncoast
MHP. 2/2 14 X 70, partly
.fum., CHA, Screened
porch. Ex. cond. $6,500.
(352) 564-0245
(352) 422-6735
INVERNESS
55+ Waterfront Park,
1BR, water incl. A/C
$3,500 + $270 mo. lot
rent. 352-476-4964


INVERNESSI MOSSY
OAK PARK, 55 + COMM.
2/1 Carport/ Scm'd porch.
CHA,Fum., Wsh./dryer.
New electrical wiring.
Close to downtown.
$10,900.(352) 637-3436
Palm Harbor 3/2
Singlewide
Introductory Model
$299/mo wac. 10
models to choose from
On Your Lot
Call John Lyons
1-800-622-2832 ext.210




6018 W Oaklawn 2/2,91,-
14x65 fixer, 1.25 acres,
$37,900, www.zillow.com,
813-695-0890 or
352-382-1002
Homosassa

BANK
FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181

CRYSTAL RIVER
2br 2ba sw on 1/2 acre
new carpet & stove.
very clean.alum roof
over.10x14 work-
shop.$35000 cash or
offer 813-792-1355

Floral City
2/2 DW on 3.5 + or -
acres. Withlacoochee
Forest area great for
horse riding.Priced to
sell. (352) 341-6281
(352) 634-0787
(352) 634-1290.


Move In Special
1-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $150
2-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $200
� Exp. 5/31i09
Call Monday Through Friday 8:00amn - 5:00pm
We accept HUD Vouchers; Foreclosures Acce ed.

(352) 489-1021 OPNI.W


HERNANDO
Neat & clean 2/1, 14
Wide. Carport & covered
area. 12 X 36 scrn'd
porch. Ready to move in.
-Parsley Real Estate Inc.
$48,500 Call
Gareth Rouillard.
(352) 422-5731
HOME-N-LAND
New Home 3/2
10 Yr. Warranty
Sacrifice! $3,000
down $676.43/mo.
Call to Qualify
352-621-3807
Receive $8,000
Cash Back
INGUS '95 SW
2/11V, beautiful,
wooded, priv 1 /4 ac.
backs ups to wildlife
sanctuary. Incis covered
deck, garage w/work
shop, Ig shed w/win-
dows, all appls, washer,
dryer. STEAL at $53.900!
352-419-5777:476-9005
New 2009
2 bed, 2 bath, large
rms. appliance pkg.
2x6 construction,
10 yr. warranty. Must
See! $39,900 includes:
A/C, steps, skirting.
Call for Mlore details
352-621-9182

NEW JACOBSEN
TRIPLE WIDE
High end home on
2 /2 Acres, 2150 sq ft,
3/2, glamour kitchen,
marble in bathroom,
appliance pkg.
. Must Sell $179,900
or $787/mo. Call
(352) 621-9181
Receive $8,000
Cash Back.



CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55 + comm. 3/2
.with a lovely view of the
Lake. Call The C.R.
Village office $75K obo
, 352-795-7161
Furn. 6 mos. lot rent w/
full price offer, 3/2
End. tiled lanai, dbi
carport, tape &
textured throughout,
Kathy (352) 228-7991


FOREST VIEW ESTATES
Great Loc. Pools, clbhs.
& more. Move-in ready,
comp. furn. 2/2 DW,
wheelchair acc., shed
& sprinklerNew heat
pump. $39,900
563-6428/563-1297
Homosassa, 55+ Park
Great loc. Pool, clbhs.
& more! Full furn. Dbl
2/2 w/porch cov.
.carport & shed. Must
sell $20,000
352-628-1067
INVERNESS 1 BR Mobile,
55+ w/. waterfront
park$9,900 AC, W/D,
Shed 352-476-4964
Walden Woods
55+ Upscale comm.
28 x 56, upgrades &
decorator touch, 3/2/2
Carport, scrn & encld.
lanal, 6 mo. Free Rent'
w/ full price. Must Seel
(352) 503-5164
(352) 228-7991




Castro
Realty and Property
Management Inc.
333 N. Croft Avenue
Inverness FL 34453
352-341-4663
Beverly Hills
1,2 & 3 Bedrooms
$475 - $750/mo.
Citrus Springs
2 & 3 Bedrooms
$600 - $1050/mo.
Inverness
2 & 3 Bedrooms
$450 - $800/mo.
Citrus Hills
2, 3 & 4-Bedrooms
$825 - $1050/mo.
Pine Ridge
3 & 4 Bedrooms
$800 - $1800/mo.
Hernando
1,2 & 3 Bedrooms
$475 - $800/mo.
Check Out Our
Webslte At www.
castrorealtyl.com.
Rental Inventory
changes dally.
Furnished rentals also
available.
See Our Rental Ad In
The Real Estate News
Magazine


CHASSAHOWITZKA
2/2 waterfront DW $600
2/2furn'd DW $700
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furn'd $900
Agent, 352-382-1000





37AW. MWRw. Z4inC, UK
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
Pritchard Island
3/2/1 Villa- $875
Arbor Lakes
3/2/2 -$800
Inverness
2/2/2- $700
3/2/2- $750
2/1/1 - $595
2/2/1 - $625
3/2/1 - $895
2/2/1 Villa- $695
1&2 Bd Apartments
starting at $400
2/1 2/1 - $600
Beverly Hills
2/1/2/1 - $600
Lecanto
/I Apartment- $395
See our website:
www.jwmortonreal
estate.com
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
352-726-9010



RENTALS
Pine Ridge w/Pool
5169 N. Perry Dr $1800
3/4/3 Pool/pool maint
4470 N. Ficus Dr $1400
3/2/2 Pool/pool maint
Citrus Spring
9661 N. Parquet Way
$800
Citrus Hills
838 W. Massachusetts
St. $1400 -
3/2/2 Pool/pool main
Beverly Hills
27 New York Blvd
$800
188 W. Seymeria St
$675
42 S. Monroe St $600-
14 Plaza St. $600
HEDICK GROUP
REALTY '
352-422-2522
hedickgroup.net


SINGLE FAMILY
HOMES,
DUPLEXES,
WATERFRONT,
MOBILE HOMES

FURNISHED/
UNFURNISHED,
WE HAVE THEM ALL
THROUGH OUT THE
COUNTY GIVE US A
CALL..From $525/mo
to $1250/mo
Alexander
Real Estate, Inc.
Crystal River
352-795-6633 ph
352-795-6133 fx

LECANTO
2 Bed Rm $450. MO.
HOMOSSASA
2 Bed Rm $425. MO
DON CRIGGER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 746-4056,
(352) 746-0052 Eve.




AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hemando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
intemet/long dist.
Trailers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant





CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5, c/h/a w/d hook
up. 838 5th Av N.E.
$650.+sec Unfurn.$600
727-343-7343; 455-8998
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT I Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025

HOMOSASSA
_Bd Rm, refr. stove, with
W&D, cable TV air, util.
included $600. mo. + sec,
352-628-6537 -


RENTALS AVAIL.
FROM $585.
(352) 795-9123
Charldotte G Realty
& Investment LLC





BEDROOM UNITS
* MOVE IN SPECIAL
MUST MOVE IN BY
5/31/09
KNOLLWOOD
Inverness
I B/R SEC DEP. $150
1B/R 1st MO $150
S2B/R SEC DEP. $200.
2B/R 1ST MO $200.
CALL 344-1010
TU, TH, FRI
8-12 &1-5 NO PETS
HUD VOUCHERS
ACCEPTED
Equal Housing
Opportunity


BEDROOM UNITS I
* Move In Special*
Move In by 5/31/09
1BRSec.dep $200 1
2BR Sec. dep $250.
CANDELWOOD I
COURT
Inverness
CALL 344-1010 I
TUES, THUR, FRI.
8-12 & 1-5
NO PETS
HUD VOUCHERS
ACCEPTED
Equal Housing
Opportunity .

1 & 2
BEDROOMS
Starting at
$450
352-257-8048

1 BEDROOM
Starting @ $425/mo
Laundry on premises.
352-465-2985

HOMOSASSA 1/1
CHA, clean, quiet, No
pets. $375 Inds water.
(352) 563-2114


Couch

Realty
& Investments, Inc.
[ For All Your Real Estate Needs.
Richard (Rick)
Couch
Lic. Real Estate Broker

1045 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hemando, FL 34442 i
Office: 352 344-8018 - Cell: 352 212-3559
www.Rcouch.com


SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 Ell


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








12 St NDAy MAY 17, 2009


<> ." CiTRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INGLIS VILLAS
Is now accepting
applications for our
1, 2,3BR Apts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Crys. Riv.
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
SWelcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: M,W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglis Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity

INVERNESS
2/1 Duplex $525;
2/1 home $550, f/I/s
(352) 422-2393

INVERNESS
2/ITri-plex, Great Loc,
clean & roomy. No
smoke/no pets $500
Mo. Fst/Lst/Sec.
352-341-1847

INVERNESS 3/2/2
$1000/mo pets ok appls
info@www.citruscounty
sales.com

INVERNESS
Great Neigh. 2/1
*Move In Special*
$550. mo. +sec.
(352) 634-5499

LECANTO
1 BR (352)746-5238
613-6000/613-5974

ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appis,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341

Pinewood Villas
Is now Accepting
applications for our
1, 2,3 BR Apts.
Located in Bronson
� RentalAsst Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-486-2612
Or Apply Tues & Thur
7291 NE 92nd CL #17,
Bronson, Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity






INVERNESS
2/1- $500; 2/2- Irg scm
prch, quiet. $600. W/D
hk-ups, 727-446-5871
727.-688-7866. -


PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY AT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place,
an ad
We Have Rentals
Starting atF$425/mo +
Many others
LANDMARK
REALTY
352-726-9136
Kathy or Jane
311 W Main St. Inv




HERNANDO
ALESCI'S
-CORNER PLAZA
HWY. 486
OFFICE/RETAIL
1000, SQ. FT.
INCLUDES COMMON
AREA
MAINTAINENCE,
WATER, WASTE,
GARBAGE &
SIGNAGE. ONLY
$750.MO. + SALES
TAX. $795. TOTAL. NO
SEC., NO LAST MO.
RENT. FIRST MO.
RENT ONLY. ALSO
1,194 SQ. FT, 1,250
SQ. FT. & 2,000 SQ.
FT. AVAILABLE. -
(352) 447-1244
OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507
PINE RIDGE
1000 sqft unit, (currently
beauty salon).
352-527-9013




CITRUS HILLS
Home, Villa, Condo
GREENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-5921
(888) 446-5921
greenbriarrental.com
INVERNESS
Extra Irg. 2/2/1 Lakeside
Community, pool, dock,
no smoke, no pets. $665
mo. + sec.
(866)637-2631
TOLL FREE
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, Completely furn.
$850. mo. 352-746-4611


FREE RENT!
SUMMERHILL
AT
MEADOWCREST
Luxury Condos
Limited Time!
Call agent for
details,
352-563-5657
/ out zoomcitrus.com

INVERNESS
Waterfront 2/21/2 Com-
munity Pool/Boat Ramp
All apple's $700. mo
352-400-0731
MEADOWCREST
Summerhill, 2/2 wllarge
1 car garage,_ground
floor, new, never lived
in, near shopping.
Reduced to $900.
Mo./unfurn. $1200/furn.
(352) 746-9770
(352) 697-0375
Gloria Bonner P & R
Mid Florida Reality



CITRUS SPRINGS
NEW 2/2. Duplex in a nice
private area close to shop-
ping & schools. Water &
sewer included $600/mo. 1st
& last. Mike 352-558-4477
CITRUS SPRINGS
New, 2/2, all appl.
Wash/Dry. $600.-$625.
(954) 557-6211
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 312/1 Lg. master
suite, granite, stainless
steel apple. Large lanai.
Lease, + Dep. No pets,
$800.Mo.(352)697-3133
E. INVERNESS
1 BR Modern, energy
eff., clean, country
setting, C/H/A, $550.
352-726-1909
INVERNESS
1/1 w/scmd prch. W/D
Near dwn twn.& lake
$4951mo. (352) 274-1594
INVERNESS
2/1 W/D, garb./water.
incl;, fenced, pets ok
$650.mo. 1st., last $300
sec. 352-746-4611
INVERNESS
2/1/1; W/D hookup;
remodeled ,$600 mo.
F/L/S (352) 697-1396


Lecanto
Newer 2/2, dsh/Wsh.
W/dry, H20 incl. No pets.
Lg.Yd. (352)628-2815
ONE MONTH FREE!
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appis,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341




INVERNESS 1/1
$450 mo. Incis all utils. +
cable. 352-270-8298










CRYSTALRIVER
Lovely, Spacious 3/2/1, incl
all utilities $1000/mo.furn
$850 unfum 352-628-1149
DUNNELLON
2/1 Rainbow Lakes Est.,
$650/mo. 239-438-8085
or 239-455-8858




















Senior Community
Chiefland FI.
Accepting
Applications for
1 &2BRAPTS
Please Apply
M, W, F, 8am-12p
124 SW 14th Ave.
(352) 493-0220
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.


BEVERLY HILLS 1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms...$475-$750/m0.
CITRUS SPRINGS 2 & 3 Bedrooms...$60$1050/mo.
INVERNESS 2 & 3 Bedrooms ...... : ...... 01110/mo.
CITRUS HILLS 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms....$8251050/ok,
PINE RIDGE 3 & 4 Bedrooms........... $800-$18010./mo.
HERNANDO 1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms .........$475800/mo.
Check Out Our Website At
wwwxastrorealvl .com
Rental Inventory changes daily
I Furnished rentals also available.
See Our Rental Ad In The Real Estate News Magdtzw.


AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Herando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
intemet/long dist.
Tfgaers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant

BEVERLY HILLS
Progress Energy
Contractors 1/1,
fully urn avail now
$825. includes all util-
ities, 100 channel
, TV/internet.
2/1 also available
(352) 220-2666
BLACK DIAMOND
Live in park like setting
3/2/2 gated
community $1,150. Mo.
,(352)212-1401
Citrus Hills
Townhouse 2/22/1.
Terra Vista Club incl.
$1,000 Mo + util.
(516) 991-5747
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2 Waterfront Furn.
8 rm. house on Lake
Russo, boat ramp &
private dock. $1,200 Mo.
RV. sight also avail.
$350.Mo.(850) 566-4195
HOMOSASSA
3/2/1 Nearly new. Off of
Rock Crusher Road,
near school. Well furn.
& clean. Great cond.
Lease with Option to
purchase. $950.
Month. + electric
5640 Irving Court
(352) 563-2776
INVERNESS
1 BR Mobile, 55+ water-
front park, Incl. water
$475 352-476-4964




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 + scrn rm - $525
2/1/1 + fl rm - $600
352-795-1722
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1- FamRm/Lrg- $675
2/1-Fam Rm/Nice- $575
352-795-0538
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2 + Bonus Room
$750 mo.(352) 527-1051
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2, W/D, very clean,
$775. w/ opt, Immed.
Occup. (352) 726-7543
BEVERLY HILLS
Very Nice 2/1, $590 mo.
(352) 220-0740
www.letaj.com/lemon


CITRUS'HILLS
3/2 Pool Home
1 Acre, $975
(352)746-4821

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/1 $825mo + sec,
INVERNESS
2/1/1 $650 + sec
352-746-9436

Citrus Springs
4/2/2, New, Split Plan,
Cath.celllngs2,150sq.
ft.$900.Mo.352-697-1820


CITRUS
SPRINGS
3/2/2 Newer Home.
Washer & dryer.
Sprinkler system.
Quiet neighborhood.
$795. Monthly.
(352) 812-1414

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, Fenced Yard.
$800. Mo. Fst./Sec.
118 W. Frisco Lane
(352) 560-0229
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1 Carport/fenced
yard. $500. Mo.
FstJ./Sec.
31 E. Lemon St.
(352) 560-0229

CITRUS SPRINGS
CUTE 212/1 remodeled,
w/screen lanai,
washer/dryer, CHA
$650. mo. & I mo. sec.
9095 N. Alpinia Dr.
352- 465-2434 Lv.msg.

CITRUS SPRINGS'
. Lovely modern '04,
4/2/2 built by
Mercedes Homes.
This 2600 Sq. ft. home
on large comer lot.
. Large patio, fenced
back yard, sprinkler sys
Near Great Schools,
Churches, Parks, &.
Shopping. Located at
8249 N. Triana Drive.

12 Mo. lease, $1,100
Mo.$1,000 Sec.
deposit.'
Will Consider Lease
Option.
Call Dan at:
(813) 716-5605
CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 3/2/2, Near Sch.
$875. mo 352-628-0731
COUNTRY CLUB
LOCATION view, firepl. -
spac. 3/2/2, $800.
1 mo Free(908) 322-6529
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, INCLS UTILITIES
$200-$220 per wk -
(352) 628-1062







CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/:1, Garbage & lawn
Incl.'d Pets?, $750. mo.
+ sec. 352-795-0207 *
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 & Large Farn. Rm.
Newly Remodeled
Pets OK, $750mo.
352-527-0493
352-427-7644

HOMOSASSA
$350.... 1 /, Duplex
$525/up;.2/1 Duplex
$700..2/2/2 SMW Villa
$1000. WF 3/2/2 Home
River Unks Realty Call
352-628-1616

HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550/mo. 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210


HOMOSASSA
2/2 off Cardinal Lane
$600 mo. 1st + deposit
(352) 628-7682
Homosassa SMW
2/2/1 & carport, screen
back porch, private
wooded area. Newly
painted, carpet & tile
Unfurn. $700. No Pets
No smokers
(352) 650-5986
INVERNESS
2/1/1 $600 or furn'd for
$650 PET OK
1ST/SEC(352)422-2655
INVERNESS
2/2/1, lanai, 1/2 acre
close to town, pet ok.
$650. Mo.(813) 973-7237
INVERNESS 3/2/1.
Gospel Island Area. On
cul-de-sac by lake.
$850/mo, 1st/last/sec.
NO PETS. 352-860-2146
INVERNESS 3/212
$1000/mo pets ok appis
info@www.citruscounty
sales.com
INVERNESS
610 Independence Hwy
3/2/2 Fenced yard.
Rent w/option to buy.
$750/mo. 1st +Sec.
352-422-3670
Inverness
area Beautiful, 3/2,poss
2/2
Lease Opt .Flexible
Fincacn9 Imm. Occ
352-795-0088
INVERNESS
BEAUTIFUL
WATERFRONT
3/2% Tile, Washer &
Dryer Scrn'd. Pch. on
Lake TsalsaApopka.
Community pool, ten-
nis & dock.'$875. Mo.
352-812-3213

INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
4/2/2 or 3/2/2 Starting
at $790 (352) 341-1142
(352) 601-2615
INVERNESS
Large 30x50 workshop
with 1/1 home, 1/4acre
fenced lot. $750.
352-362-3435
INVERNESS
Waterfront Townhouse
2/2-M, with 3 decks &
. balconies, private
community pool, very
quick access to Lake
Henderson, less than
3 min. drive to
downtown Inv. &
access to-Rails to
Trails.
$700 mo + sec. dep.
(352) 817-3185 appt
OLD HOMOSASSA
3/2 Like New, Modern
Kit. w/ D/W & Microwve
Indoor laun. rm. $795
(352) 697-5708
RENTALS AVAIL.
FROM $585.
(352) 795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investment LLC
RIVERHAVEN VILL.
2/2 Fncd. yd., sc. parch,
$750 (352) 628-0961
Sugarmlll Woods
NEW 4/2/2, Huge lotl
$950/mo 786-402-9748


SOUTHERN
WOODS
4/3/2 Luxury
executive home
on golf course,
great views,
$1,300/Mo.
(813) 390-7109

SUGARMILL Woods
2 Masters /2/2 (large)
Screen lanai, oversized
gar. new appl. & A/C
$850 mo.
(352)302-4057
Sugarmill Woods
4/2/2, , Golf course
community, access to
clubhouse, pool & ten-
nis court, secluded on
culdesac, $1,000. mo
Call (352) 228-1220



CRYSTAL RIVER
Adorable furnished
waterfront
2BR/Boatslip, Lanai
Pets? 352-220-6593
INV. LAKEFRONT
2/2/2, Lrg. home,
great area, tiled. New
carpets. City-water.
$750 mo. 352-476-4896
INVERNESS 2/2
Lake,Pocono1 2 story,
% ac lot, 60ft dock.
Tile/wood floors. $750
352-362-3435
POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - Waterfront
homes, Wkly priv. rms,
RV lots. 352-628-0011




AlValueinn.com
Inverness
Hemando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
interet/long dist.
Trailers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744-
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant
BEVERLY HILLS
Lg. fum. rm. w/private
bath. No smoke/pets.
$425.Mo.(352) 527-3710
CRYSTAL RIVER
Share Condo w/own
priv. rm & Bth quiet &
nice neighbors .Full kit.
priv & pool $100/wk
(352) 795-7263


-I-.
OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507




Al Valueinn.com
. Inverness
Hemando - Citrus
New Efficiencies
$235wk. Free
internet/long dist.
Trallers $175wk.
3Br Luxury Homes
furnished $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
11-15 ml to Pwr Plant


AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50
Ad indudes 20 lines of copy .
w/ photo.




Lakefront 7 Acres, Flo-
ral City Lake Tsala
Apopka 2 dwellings 2
barns see
pictures/details
floralcitylakefront.com
skyetraveler@att.net

Picture Perfect Homes
NEW HOMES START-
INGAt $75,000 On
Your Lot
Alklnson
Construction "
352-637-4138
Lc.# CBC059685


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to
advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
discrimination.
" Familial status
includes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing
custody of children
under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our.readers are hereby
informed thatrall
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.












DUNNELLON
Must See
Rainbows End,
312/2.5 Split plan. New
kitchen, appls.,carpet.
Sat & Sun.8AJ5P..
8120 S. W. 202nd.
Ave. (352) 804-5480


= ACnON- 352-795-RENT
(l IIMWWBaUmIlMrm, .www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com


HOMES * MOBILES * APARTMENTS
, FEATURED PROPERTIES-
BEVERLY HILLS ....................Starting At $575
CITRUS SPRINGS 3/2/1.......................... $750

CRYSTAL RIVER ....................Starting At $550
HOMOSASSA ...................$600 Moves You In!
INVERNESS 21/1 House .....................$650
Call for moe Information. OVER 40.0 CHOOSE FROM










Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, M.~r 17, 2009 E13


INV. GOSPEL ISLAND
7704 E. Pocono Dr.
Sunday 12-2pm
2/2, new carpet, fresh
paint, private lake
setting. $120K
Bonnie Peterson
Charlotte G Realty
352-586-6921






PINE RIDGE
3118 N. Sheriff Drive
Sunday 12-3PM
ONE OF A KINDI
Take Pine Ridge Blvd.
go West on Frontier
Lane, Right on Sheriff
Drive, House on Left.
Maria, 352-302-0403




100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
*Low income applicants
can quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or No credit
OKAY
*recent bankruptcy
OKAY*
CAII TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
*Credit and income
restriction apply*
Florida licensed mort-
gage lender



- dl




HERNANDO
ALESCI'S
CORNER PLAZA
HWY. 486
OFFICE/RETAIL
1000, SQ. FT.
INCLUDES COMMON
AREA
MAINTENANCE,
WATER, WASTE,
GARBAGE &
SIGNAGE. ON L
$750.MO. + SALES
TAX. $795. TOTAL. NO
SEC., NO LAST MO.
RENT. FIRST MO.
RENT ONLY. ALSO
1,194 SQ. FT., 1,250
SQ. FT. & 2,000 SQ.
FT. AVAILABLE.
(352) 447-1244


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


mmi


.. . . 4

OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Great Location,
HWY. 19.
South of
Sugarmill woods
entrance. North of new
public. $285,000.
TASIA SEIJAS
ERA American Realty
& Investment
(352) 302-0569
(352) 746-3600
Email To:
tasiaera(dvahoo.com






SALE OR LEASE
W/OPTION
Building newly built,
5,000 sq. ft. of ware-
house space. 1,000 sq.
ft. of office space
w/CHA. Second level
can be built for more
space, 3 bays, 1 is a
loading bay. $329,000.
TASIA SEIJAS
ERA American Realty
& Investments.
(352) 302-0569
(352) 746-3600
Email to:
tasiaerai(Svahoo.com





3/2/2 For Sale or Rent
Citrus Springs Newer
Home, low/dn, easy
terms 352-361-6551

ATTENTION!!
BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
$39,900. Delivered
and Set, $0-Down
Land/Home $650. mo.
Repos Available
Kinder
* Mobile Home
(352) 622-2460

BEAUTIFUL LOCATION
3/2/2 w/garden room.
By Owner. Lots of
upgrades. Like new.
Oversized prime lot.
A must to see. Asking
$179,900 (352) 527-4488

THE BRITTANY MODEL
3/2/2 - Hugh master
bath & screened lanai.
All appliances, includes
several locations to
choose from. $159,900
Citrus Ridge Realty
352-465-3000


THE MERLE MODEL
3/2/2 - FHA approved
with 2/10 warranty.
Builder will pay $5000 of
buyers closing costs.
$129,900. Citrus Ridge
Realty. 352-465-3000




BROOKHAVEN MODEL
3/2'/2/3 nearly 3000 sqft.
Volume ceilings
Corian top/sinks
Lots of upgrades
Summerwind Homes
Inc. 352-527-8035
COUNTRY HOME
4/3/2 Fabulous home
on 2 landscaped ac-
res. Hardwood & tile.
Huge caged pool, ,
25x14 pool, spa w/ wa-
terfall & outdoor bar.
40x60 workshop/RV
garage w/12' ceilings.
90001b lift and office.
$499,900. Middleton
Sunshine Properties
352-476-2871
Don Mercadq Model
4/3/3 Grand column en-
try, spacious kitchen, ex-
quisite master suite with
award winning master
bath. Base price
$214,900
Dream Custom Homes
of Citrus. 352-527-7171

RealtySelect
Citrus.corn


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Reai ltect

(352) 795-1555

THE OAKWOOD MODEL
3/2/2 - Open floor plan
w/formal living & family
room, den and spec-
tacular master bath.
Sweetwater Homes of
Citrus, Inc.
352-382-4888




BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2. Nice yard, near
school. $108k Call
anytime to see.
(352) 201-0991
(352)726-7543
FOR SALE BY OWNER
13 Donna Street
2/1 2/2 carport,
16x20 fam room, 12x16
workshop, 8x10 shed.
Fenced yd. OPEN
HOUSE SUNDAY'S T-3
$87k. 352-527-8548

FOR SALE BY OWNER
88 SJ Kellner, Bev. Hills
2/21/2, FP, OPEN
HOUSE on SUNDAYS
11A-3P $118K firm
Call to See. 746-6093


Must Sell 2 BR, 2 BA,
CH/A, completely re-
done 15 S. Barbour St.
Make offer. After 7PM
(352) 637-3614.
OPEN HOUSE
SAT & SUN 12-3
Comp. redone rare
2BR 2BA, 63K or offer
15 S. Barbour St.
Beverly Hills




Crystal Oaks 3/2/2
For Sale
By Owner
Price Reduced
Split plan. Pool home
w/private back yard, on
cul de sac, move in
condition.. Asking
$169,900.
(352) 746-7088



3/2/2, POOL HOME,
I acre, membership
avail. to Cit. Hills C.C.
$189,900 (352)860-0766
MODEL CLOSE OUT
Below cost - Private
gated community.
Heritage off 486, 1 blk E
of Forest Ridge Blvd.
Owner/Developer
352-422-0199
POOL HOME
4/3/3 - built '04
Tile, pavers, Citrus Hills
membership available.
To view listing
www.1605wredding.com
$299,900. 352-464-1316
REDUCED!
SPOOL HOME
4/3/Ext. 2 Car Garage
on I Acre.
Membership Avdilable
$277,900.352-527-7856




3/2 New roof, & morel
Move in cond. Priced
as a 2/1 @ $74,900
(813) 968-0001

BRAND NEW
For Sale, 3/2 w/ alot
of upgrades
Beck St. Inverness
352-637-4138
Lic # CBS059685

EDGEWATER II MODEL
3/2 - Great Valuel
Upgraded appliances,
pantry, large walk-in
closet & more.
Encore Homes, Inc.
352-726-2179

PUT YOUR
$MONEY$ TO WORK!
BUY Real Estate
NOW!









Deb Infantine
EXIT REALTY LEADERS
(352) 302-8046
-Prices are Down!!
Rates ore LOWIl


For Sale, By Owner
3BR 3BA, Pool, 16x24
workshop, close to
school, hosp., library,
WTI, 518 Poinsettia, Ave.
(352T860-0878
RealtySelect
Citrus.cornm


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Ret 7-ect

(352) 795-1555


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI
Your SATISFACTION
Is My Future
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC
CONNELL HEIGHTS
2/2, Great Rm, vaulted
ceil. open kit. b/bar,
fenced back yrd.
scm. par., new apple's,
1600 sf,(mol) 6172 W.
Pine Cir IC.R. Priced to
Sell (352) 795-9603
RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

ReftiaiSect

(352) 795-1555



Get Results


In The Homefont

Clssifeds!


BY OWNER -3/2
Super nice Less than
1 yr old, approx 1 acre.
Incis most furn. Beautiful
lot, close to town.
$128,500. Call Dan
312-343-8329; Moving
out of state.
7289 W. Pompey Ln
Homosassa, FL 34446

RIVERHAVEN I MODEL
New - 4/2/2 - Want the
best of both worlds at
a reasonable price?
Best quality - located �
on the Grand Canal of
Riverhaven Village
offers easy gulf access
& a terrific community.
$439,000. Moore &
Moore Realty, Inc.
352-621-3004




3/2/2 w/den
screen porch
Built 2005, $164,000
Owner Financing
(352) 410-9316

BEACHWOOD POINT
VILLAS 3/2/2
Maintenance free
condo living w/the
privacy of a villa.
Sweetwater Homes of
Citrus, Inc.
352-382-4888


$8000 Tax
Rebate
for first tim home,
buyers ,if you have
not owned a home in
3 years. Call for info
Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
Kellers Williams Rity


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI

Your SATISFACTION
Is My Futurell
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC

CRYSTAL RIVER
The Springs on Kings
Bay 3/21/2/2- Luxurious
home - 4,276 sq ft.
20ft ceilings in foyer &
family room. Hardwood
floors. Edward Russell
Johnston/Builder
352-795-2200


Michele Rose
REACTOR
"Simply Put-
I'll Work Harder"
352-212-5097
thom@atlantic.net
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515

Picture Perfect
Homes NEW HOMES
STARTING At $75,000
On Your Lot Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBCQ59685


(352) 637-6200


vics - o i':






Realtor
My Goal is Satisfied
Customers

REALTY ONE
OatstandigAgntw
Ootslinng 11Results





For SaWek *
CITRONELLE 3 bed-
room, 2 bath. Mini
Farms 2.5 Acres,
Trailer, Water with
softener, septic. As
is $49,000.00.
813-695-0853
For Sale By Owner
3 BR, 2 BA, 2-car gar.,
Cement block, north
Dunnellon Low down,
EZ terms w/$3,500
down $595 mo.
(352) 726-9369
OWNER FINANCING
4/2/office, 2.5 ac,
2005 Doublewide
Like new. 1800sqft,
$9,700/dn, $882/mo. or
$23,700 down, $582/mo.
727-992-1372



River Oaks East
4/2.5/2 Custom Pool
Home on 1.5 acres.
Office bonus-rm, green
house, & boat slip.
$455,900 (352) 274-1594



Price Reduced
Crystal River 1/1 fully
furn. $69,800. Buy
Owner.com. 34429
(352) 563-5844


BLUE MARLIN II MODEL
3/2/2 - Maintenance
free waterfront living.
The Moorings at Point of
Woods. 352-637-3391
Call About Saving
Your Home
We Have Ideas!


Plantation Realty. Inc
J352) 795-0784
Cell 422-7925
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner
See all of the
listings in Citrus
County at
www.plantation
realtvinc.com
HOMOSASSA
3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to
head spring. 163' wfrt,
dock/slip. Brand
new/unoccupied.
2 frpls, granite. $579K
727-808-5229

RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

R(352) 795-5ect

(352) 795-1555


Hme


FiUt Yoar Drwum H/OMW
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
wwvw..i I. -r . r.finder com
k


LOOKING FOR HOMES
OR MOBILES & LAND
Purchase, lease, mort-
gage assumptions, take
over payments + cash.
Any location, price, condi-
tion, foreclosure, late on
payments okay.
1-727-992-1372




Business/Home 3/2 Great
location on Trout Ave. Inver-
ness $165,000 . Rhema
Realty 228-1301





7 Rivers Golf & C.C.
priv. member owned.
corner lot I ac (mol)
$30K (813) 766-9354 or
sweetscaoeauest@)
verizon.net

BLOW OUT PRICES!
Inv. Hiahlands S6.900
Hernando V2 A $5,000
Dunnellon $4,000
Inv. Acres $4.500
Crystal River, Ocala
Bellview, from $4,900
Visit the website at
www.
flalandandrealtv.com
772-321-7377.

CITRUS HILLS lot in
Presidential Estates
$22,000:
CRYSTAL MANOR
Nicely freed lot
$18,000. Please call
(352)302-9140

LECANTO 1/2 acre has
well, septic & Pwr pole
$15,000 813-792-1355




235FT ON
WITHLACOOCHEE
RIVER. 2+ acres. Deed
restricted comm. $250K
Owner. 352-422-0199


SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 E13


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








E14 SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009


HOBBY
Continued from Page E6

in the first 56 days of life!
Gulf Fritillary caterpillars
will eat several passion
flower leaves during the ten
or so days before they form
their chrysalis. After seven
to ten days, the butterfly will
emerge from its chrysalis to


start the cycle all over again.
Once the butterfly
emerges and has dried its
wings for a few hours, I re-
lease it into my yard where
there is plenty of passion
flower for it to lay its eggs
and nectar plants to sip
from. While caterpillars are
very picky about what they'll
eat, the adult butterfly will
sip nectar from 9dwide vari-
ety of plants, such as butter-


Helping caterpillars to become
butterflies is as simple as providing
a little protection and a lot of
their host plant.


fly bush, lantana, pentas,
firebush and milkweed.
Helping caterpillars to
become butterflies is as sim-
ple as providing a little pro-


tection and a lot of their
host plant.
Citrus County UF/IFAS Ex-
tension's Florida-friendly
Landscaping program is a


free public education pro-
gram, funded jointly by the
Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners and
the Coastal Rivers and With-
lacoochee River Basin
Boards of the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District For more informa-
tion, visit the University of
Florida's Web site www.Solu-
tionsForYourLife.org, or con-
tact the Citrus County UF/


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
IFAS Extension at 527-5700.
All programs and related
activities sponsored for, or
assisted by, the Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sci-
ences are open to all per-
sons with non-discrim-
ination with respect to race,
creed, color, religion, age,
disability, sex, sexual orien-
tation, marital status, na-
tional origin, political
opinions, or affiliations.


MEET AND GREET
U Clubs are invited to submit information about regular
meetings for publication in The Meeting Place each
Thursday. Send in inf.:rmatiori attn: The Meeting
Place, 1624 N. Meadow.:rest Blvd, Crystal River, FL
34429, or fax. to 563 3280.


SuEFROM PO HOME NVNESS GOLF AND COUNTRY
Beautiful 2 BR, 2 BA 2-car garage, seawall, boat CLUB .
house, boat ramp, pontoon boat included, RV Just a drive away from the Pro Shop, pool and
parking, nice open floor plan with great room, lighted tennis courts. Be on the first tee and
family room, screened porch, patio beautiful playing in a minute. 3/2/2 split plan with a glass-
caged pool, central H/A, public water, located on enclosed rear porch off the living room as well as
Big Lake Henderson. several fruit trees.
$159,900 #330671 $139,900 #331595


Great home for first time buyer,-seasonal or a Enjoy this 3 BR, 2 bath mobile on a canal with a
rental. The kitchen and bath have been updated detached workshop and dock, 2 screened
and new carpet as well. Home includes 3 lots. porches. Central H/A includes adjacent waterfront
Central HA. Close to town and easy access off lot; boat ramp, Yamaha gas golf cart.
Hwy. 44 to get to the Interstate or Tumrnpike. PRAN D TO SM $219,900.
$59,900 #334126 #334109


a ~----







Cimus (SourvTv (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, M.~ 17, 2009 E15


DIGEST
Continued from Page E2

RE/MAX agents
reach new
heights
The associates and
staff of REIMAX Realty . . .
One are pleased to rec-
ognize Johnny Hol-
loway Jr. this week for John
passing the $1 million Holloway Jr.
mark in closed sales vol- RE/MAX
ume this year. Johnny is Realty One.
an agent in the Inverness
RE/MAX office located on Main Street. He


joins an elite club of
agents who have passed
this hard-earned mile-
stone this year. Johnny
specializes in the East
Citrus County market-
place, including the
many lakefront proper-
Sally Cure ties in the area. Reach
RE/MAX him at 637-6200.
Realty One. Sally Cure recently
achieved multimillion dol-
lar status. She is a broker/associate with,
the firm and manages the Homosassa of-
fice. She demonstrates a great example of
success and professionalism to their asso-
ciates. The brokers and associates would
like to congratulate Holloway and Cure on
their accomplishments.


DIGEST PHOTOS
N Headshots of real estate agents and associates submitted for the Real Estate Digest are kept
on file in the Chronicle Editorial Department. It is the responsibility of the individuals submit-
ting news notes to ensure headshots have been sent to the newsroom, and to advise staff of
any name changes. E-mail headshots to go with the Real Estate Digest to newsdesk@chroni-
cleon lire.com, attn: HomeFront.


*.I OPEHOS TOD.AY |vi '.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

classes on the topic or
plant experts or natural-
ists who will share their
knowledge. Visit natural-
ist Steve Brill's Web site
(www.wildmansteve-
brill.com) for informa-
tional articles, recipes
and additional- re-
sources, too.
NEIGHBORHOOD
BOUNTY: Foraging
doesn't have to be out on
forest trails. It can en-
compass simply asking
around your community.
You can contact farmers,
grocery stores, u-pick
farms or your neighbor
and ask whether you can
glean their excess.
Maybe you have driven
by a home that seldom
picks their fruit or nut
trees or have a neighbor
who has wild berries.
Just ask Fallen fruit and
unharvested vegetables,
rot and can be a chore to
clean up, so they might
be more than happy to
give. it away. If needed,
you can offer to volun-
teer some time to help
them in exchange for
food. You can place an
ad in your local newspa-
per or on craigslist.org or
freecycle.org, too. On the
flip side, please, if you
have an abundance of
food that you would oth-
erwise throw away, do-
nate it to a local shelter
or food bank


BROADEN YOUR
HORIZONS: Normally,
we think about wild
foods such as blueber-
ries, blackberries,
grapes or walnuts. But
there are many addi-
tional edible plants
available, such as crab
apples, wild asparagus,
onions, leeks, roots, dan-
delions, rhubarb, milk-
weed, herbs, cattails,
seeds or sumac, to name
a few. You can make de-
licious dishes such as
salads, sides, jams and
beverages. Even if you
don't plan to supplement
your meals with wild
food or if the kids only
collect pine cones and
leaves, it's the perfect
opportunity to teach kids
more about nature.

Money doesn't buy
happiness. If you take a
look around, you'll dis-
cover that there are joy-
ful benefits to the
recession. Not simply
monetary opportunities.
in real estate, airfare,
cheap stocks or from
businesses struggling
and discounting prices
or liquidating and going
under, but in your per-
sonal life. It's an invol-
untary pause in your
pursuit of happiness. It
gives you much needed
time to reflect, create
new goals, and repriori-
tize your life. While you
still need money to pay
your bills, you've proba-
bly realized there's a lot
to be thankful for, too.


What benefits have you
seen?
Here are a few silver
linings:
FAMILY TIME: Many
families are staying
home more often.
They're cooking more
meals at home and eat-
ing together, spending
less money on entertain-
ment, and getting back to
the basics of sharing
quality time. According
to NPD Group, a con-
sumer and retail market-
research company,
board-game purchases
climbed 6 percent in
2008, reaching $794 mil-
lion in sales in the
United States. Cutting
back is boosting appreci-
ation for many things
that were previously
taken for granted. This
isn't deprivation. This is
the good life.
COMMUNITY
FOCUS: Whenever you
go through a tough time,
it opens your eyes to oth-
ers who have it worse.
Low times encourage
people to give more to
others. It might be
through volunteering or
donations. One reader,
Melody in Seattle,
shares: "This economy is
making me really grate-
ful for what I have. I
have also become more
giving. This year, we par-
ticipated in two giving
trees (school and work)
to share with TIoefless
fortunate, and I also


See DIGEST/Page E16


SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2009 E15


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







R1B~SuNn&1~ /tlAx.1~', 2009 - Cinws.CouNrv (TL) Ctwojvicui..


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E15

signed up to make dona-
tions next year directly out
of my paycheck. Since we
have been blessed, espe-
cially in these times, it
seems especially important
to share." Giving doesn't
have to be a charitable do-
nation. You might reach out
to neighbors more and
share tools, garden harvests
or help out - you know, the


way it used to be before peo-
ple decided that high fences
made good neighbors.
NEW SKILLS: While
many have lost their jobs, it
has become an opportunity
to learn new skills or leave
a job they weren't happy
with. Many people are
learning to do more repairs
and home improvements on
their own, too. For those
working in industries that
are taking a hit, they're bar-
tering their skills.
SAYING NO: It has never
been easier to just say no to


S SAVE UP TO $8,000,
on your new home. K fluAM
Call me for details. 352-746-7113 office
Barb Malz, Picture Perfect Realtor 352-212-2439 cell
K1- "Always There For You"
KE GAIL COOPER
Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
N 1E Cell: (352) 634-4346
n OFFICE: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me @ homes4u3@mindspring.com






GREATLY REDUCED! HAMMOCKS GOLF COURSE VILLA!
* 4/3/3 pool home w/2297 living * 3/2/2 villa overlooking 5th fairway
* Tuscany" feel w/red barrel roof * Laminate floors in main areas
* Gas fireplace in family room * Wood burning 2-sided fireplace
* New AC with Puron in 2008 * Garage has 12x3 bumpout
* Speakers in main areas & garage * Corian kitchen w/wood cabinetry
#330469 $259,000 #331635 $229,000




'1D O1LE DIGIT SAVINGS"
SAVE THOUSANDS WITH US AND TAKE
ADVANTAGE OF THE $8,000 TAX CREDIT TODAY!


CITRUS
B I CT"-R# 352-527-8764 1
B--0 U IJ _ - SAVE THOUSANDS,/
' "3$ltMWiS*"i Sit und" We pay closing costs!
vIr oW WinaMll www.droushwderoanne.com


all the things that get you to
part with your time and
money. Friends and family
are more compassionate
about your budget Another
reader, Heather in Idaho,
shares: "Suddenly, I have
friends who are starting to
cut back and join me on
some of my frugal ventures.
Not that I need to have that
validation, but it is kind of
nice not to be the constant
'oddball' in trying to 'con-


serve and save."
Can't attend that wedding?
They understand. Want to
pare down on gift giving dur-
ing the holidays? Now is the
time to bring it up.

Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (wwwfru-
galvillage.com), a Web site
that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for
everyday living.


Write to Sara Noel, c/o
United Media,
200 Madison Ave., 4th


Floor, New York, NY 10016,
or e-mail sara@
frugalvillage.com.


8826G . GO LE DR 37S N. CHICKASAW WAY
aTUS SPRIiGS BEV HLLS
* 2BD/2.5BAN2CG - New Roof & NC Immaculate 2BD/1.5 Baths *1 Car Garage
* Sits on 2 lots, .66 ac. * Solar Heated Pool , Florida Rm with tinted glass * Berber Carpeting
* Close to Golf Course * Fam. Room/3rd BD i AC new in 2004. Apnliances new in 2005


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75 900Time
phnl ^ For Limited Time


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CEILING
GARAGE
19.8 X 20
KITCHEN
14X13 .5


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*prices subject to change

MANY PLANS AVAILABLE
Si Open Monday-Friday 8am-4pm
low- - After Hours & Saturday By Appointment Only
CALL TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION
S352-637-3912
~s34 Many Floor Plas to ChooseFrom cwacowmss www.homesbycosy.com
11145 W. Bentbow Path, Crystal River, FL 34428* U.S. Hwy. 19, 2 miles north of the Crystal River Mall


Open House Sunday
May 17,11 AM- 2 PM
No signs allowed in Pelican Cove - Follow Directions: Hwy. 19 Nto left on State
Park Dr. to left into Pelican Cove to # 11006 on the left just past community pool.
I l, PRICE REDUCED!
11006 W Cove Harbor Dr. Waterfront condo with boat
Crystal River dock and access to the
Crystal River and Gulf
waters; 2/2 has 1252 sq. ft
living; completely
upgraded - granite, wood
cabinets, stainless
appliances, flooring, fans,
interior painted & more.
Includes washer/ dryer
Screened porch overlooks
the water! MLS#333131
S259,900
Jerry and Sue Hartman
Direct 352-382-1112
KELLER WILLIAMS. www.jerryhartman.com
783278 R E A L T Y hartmans@tampabay.rr.com


El6-UNnffl, M�UM,17,.2009 ,


Ctus, COUNTY (FL) CH=QONIc.


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