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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01641
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 16, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01641

Full Text





CDC boss: President app(


R. (l_-I ,-F I ',i - I .-l._,i'.n - ,
C.'.I 'E ' ILLF F I_ - '. I .-


j v


TODAY & Sunday morning
HIGH Partly sunny. Scattered
88 thunderstorms in the
LOW afternoon.
66 PAGE A4
MAY 16, 2009


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 504 VOLUME 114 ISSUE 282


GM follows Chrysler closures


Associated Press


NEW YORK- General Motors
on Friday told about 1,100 of its
dealers - one in five - that they
would be dropped by late next


year, adding to the economic pain
radiating from the beleaguered
Detroit automakers to cities and
towns across the country.
Including Chrysler's decision a
day earlier to eliminate a quarter


of its own, about 1,900 dealer-
ships - many pillars of their
communities and heavy advertis-
ers for local media - learned in a
matter of 48 hours that they
would be forced either to sell
fewer brands or close altogether.
The GM dealerships will be
eliminated when their contracts
end late next year.
"We're 98 years old. We're two
years from a hundred, and I don't


* For a list of closing C
dealerships in Florid


want to go out at 99 ye
Alan Bigelow, whose fa
a Cleveland-area
dealer that learned i
GM's hit list
While GM doesn't owi
ers, the company says it


is too big, causing dealers to com-
Chrysler pete with each other and giving
a shoppers too much leverage to
Page A2 talk down prices and hurt future
sales.
ars," said Several hundred of the GM
imily runs dealers knew already they were
Chevrolet headed for closure, but most of
it was on them learned for the first time
Friday. An industry group says


n the deal-
ts network


See CLOSURES/Page A2


OF


NARLEO

honors fallen

officers
TAYLOR PROVOST
Chronicle
Se Inverness Primary
SSchool girl wept
* silently as her class-
mates filed out of the
memorial service, shak-
ing hands with police officers
as they went.
"Each year, this service hon-
ors any and all officers killed in
the line of duty," said Andrew
Tarpey, chairman of the local
: branch of the National Associa-
tion of Retired Law Enforce-
ment Officers (NARLEO). "We
are assembled to pay tribute to
those who gave their ives."
Members of NAR LEO. staff
of the Hernando and Citrus
County Sheriff's offices, Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission, Florida Highway
Patrol and members of the
community gathered Friday
morning to recognize National
Peace Officer's Memorial Day
with a short ceremony
First- and third-graders stood
quietly and respectfully, as the
Citrus County Honor Guard led
a procession of officers at
Cooter Park in Inverness, each
carrying wreaths to commemo-
rate the fallen.
NARLEO's service takes
place annually during National
Police Week Similar cere-
monies took place around the
country throughout the week,
NARLEO Chaplain Andrew,
Freund said. Earlier in the
week, 347 names of fallen offi-
cers were added to the wall of
the National Law Enforcement
Officers Memorial in Washing-
ton, D.C.
A bell tolled after each name
of the 46 officers who died this
year was read.


" " -- j, DAVE SIGLERMChronicle
Angela Bierwiler antAndrew Tarpey light a candle Friday at the National Associatfon'of Retired Law Enforcement Day of Remembrance
in Inverness. HernandetCounty Sheriff's Capt. Scott Bierwiler was killed in an automobile accident in February.


The memorial service paid
particular respect to Captain
Scott Bierwiler of the Her-
nando County Sheriff's Office,
who died in a head-on collision
Feb. 19 on his way to work
"It has been said he gave 110
percent in everything he did,"
Tarpey said of Bierwiler. "He
was a real cop's cop, as we
say."


Citrus County Sheriff Jeff Dawsy, center, was joined Friday by law enforcement to pay tribute to law
enforcement officers who gave their life In the line of duty.
The fernando County Sher- read a poem called '"APart of in the line of duty," Hilt said.
iff's Office presented Bier- America Died" by an unknown "So it's important for me."
wiler's widow, Angela author as a Hernando County As American Legion Post 155
Bierwiler, and his mother with Sheriff's helicopter flew over fired a 21-gun-salute to end the
memorial plaques and the pair the service in Bierwi ler's ceremony, no one, not even the
lit a candle of remembrance. honor schoolchildren, moved a mus-
"The service was beautiful. Homosassa resident and re- cle.
It's a very. nice tribute," Angela tired officer Al Hilt and his wife "It's only fitting that we take
Tarpey said. attend the service every year time to honor fallen heroes,"
Florida Highway Patrol "In 32 years in law enforce- Tarpey said. "Our hearts are
Trooper Tod Cloud tearfully , ment I lost two partners, killed heavily burdened."


No warning: County toughens burn ban penalty procedures


Chronicle
Citrus County officials said Fri-
day that as of Monday, there will
b6 no more warnings given in il-
legal burn cases.
Citations that carry a possible
$&00 fine will be issued by sher-


iff's deputies, according to Citrus
County Fire Chief Larry Mora-
bito.
Citrus County is under a burn
ban put into effect by the county
commission in January which
bars all outdoor burning. County
fire officials have in many cases


been issuing warnings to people
found burning illegally; however,
the extreme danger of the situa-
tion has prompted them to
change this practice.
Florida Gov. Charlie Crist has
declared a state of emergency in
Florida because of the fire dan-
ger in many parts of the state af-
fected by the ongoing drought
Morabito said fire officials


have been working with ban vio-
lators where the fire had been
confined to a small area. Initially,
officials attempted to achieve
compliance through education
and warnings; however, the dan-
ger has become too high to con-
tinue that policy
He said occasional rain show-
ers do not' significantly change
the situation because of the ex-


treme dryness. It will take sus-
tained periods of rain to lower
the danger, he said, adding that
officials hope the normal, sea-
sonal rain will soon begin and
subsequently lower the danger
There have been 509 illegal
burns reported between Jan. 9 -
when the burn ban went into effect
- and May 9. There have been 129
brush fires in that same time.


Com ics ........ ............ C8
UC ossword .................... C7
Editorial .................... A8
Horoscope ......................C7
Lottery Numbers ..........B4
Movies ............................. C8
Obituaries ......................A5
Stocks ............................A6
TV listings ...................C7


B, Uniform
. ^ faith
Armed Forces
Day honors
chaplains,
others who
have served the
U.S./C12
RMligion


Senior Style 1E
See what's happening in the monthly magazine./Inside

In paSSing Athlete, musician Wayman Tisdale dies./Page A5 . %

State semifinals Dunnellon competes./Page B13 1

Hubble huddle Astronauth Lroubleshoot repairs./Page A3 l '*"* "*'


Markets cool
Investors move more
money out of stocks, fur-
ther chilling the market's
spring rally./Page A7


6, 1J578 2002 5 I5


ten


/A10


GeneralMotors Corp. eliminating

about 1,100 dealerfranchises


Violators face up to $500 in fines








CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A2 SATURDAY. MAY 16. 2009


CLOSURES
Continued from Page Al

the GM and Chrysler cuts
combined could wipe out
100,000 jobs.
Both GM and Chrysler are
scrambling to reorganize and
stay alive in a severe reces-
sion that has pummeled car
and truck sales for U.S. au-
tomakers, which had already
been losing market share to
foreign companies for
decades.
Chrysler LLC is already in
bankruptcy protection, and
industry analysts say Gen-
eral Motors Corp. is making
its cuts now in preparation
for a bankruptcy filing June
1. The company sdys it would
prefer to restructure out of
court
GM declined to reveal
which dealers will be elimi-
nated. Many dealers vowed
to fight, first through a 30-day
company appeal process,
then possibly in court.
GM's dealers are protected
by state franchise laws, and
the company concedes it
would be easier to cut them
if it were operating under
federal bankruptcy protec-
tion. GM says it's trying to re-
structure outside , of
bankruptcy because of the
stigma of Chapter 11.
Chrysler dealers have
fewer options because the
company has already filed
for bankruptcy protection,
and federal bankruptcy
judges generally trump state
law. And Chrysler said on
Thursday that its cuts were
final.,
GM outlined a plan to cut
about 40 percent of its 6,000-
dealer networkby the end of
2010 in hopes of getting the
company back on its feet Be-
sides the 1,110 dealership
cuts, the company will shed
about 500 dealerships that
market the Saturn, Hummer
and Saab brands, which GM
plans to phase out or sell.
And when the surviving
dealers' contracts are up in
late 2010, GM will cut still
more by not offering re-
newals to about 10 percent of
the dealers who are left.
Dealers could stay open sell-
ing used cars or other
brands, but GM and Chrysler
cuts will still leave cities
across the U.S. with empty
,buildings, vacant lots and
perhaps hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars in lost tax
revenues.
FedEx letters bearing the
bad news began arriving Fri-
day morning at GM fran-
chises around the country.
The letter states that dealers
j had been judged on sales,
customer service scores, lo-
cation, condition of facilities
and other criteria.
While the targeted dealers
represent about 20 percent
of GM's total, they make only
7 percent of its sales, the
company said.
Tne cuts will allow the sur-
\viying dealers to expand the
size of their markets, so they
have a better chance of stay-
ing healthy and attracting
private investment, said
Mark LaNeve, GM's North
American vice president of
sales and marketing.
"Over time, they just can't
afford to invest in their busi-
ness to the degree the com-
petition has," LaNeve said.
Toyota, for example, gen-
erally has larger and newer
showrooms and service de-
partments than GM and
Chrysler dealers - making
those dealerships more at-
tractive to potential buyers.
The Obama administra-
tion's auto task force, which
is overseeing the GM and
Chrysler restructuring be-
cause both have received bil--
lions of dollars from the
government, wasaware GM
would cut dealers, LaNeve
said. But he stressed the
company made the decision
on how many and where.
Chrysler is aiming to close
its nearly 800 dealers by June
9, and those outlets may try
deep discounts to clear out
their remaining inventory.


But in the long run, prices for
cars and trucks will probably
rise for customers as dealer-
ships disappear
"No longer will people be
able to shop between three
or four dealers within 15
minutes of each other for the
best cutthroat price," said
Aaron Bragman, an automo-
tive industry analyst with the
consulting firm IHS Global
Insight
As GM and Chrysler lost
market share to Japanese
and other overseas brands,
they ended up with too many
dealers. So did Ford Motor
Co., which has managed to
stay healthier than either of
its Detroit siblings.


* Bob Boast Dodge, Bradenton.
* Deland Dodge, Deland.
* Maroone Dodge of Miami,
Fort Lauderdale.
" Courtesy Chrysler-Jeep of
Casselberry, Fort Lauderdale.
* Maroone Chrysler Jeep Dodge,
Fort Lauderdale.
* Courtesy Chrysler Jeep of
Sanford, Fort Lauderdale.
* Auto Nation Miller-Sutherlin
SAutomotive, Fort Lauderdale.
* Auto Nation Go Dodge
Southwest, Fort Lauderdale.


* Bankston Dodge of Grand
Prairie, Fort Lauderdale.
* Wallace Chrysler Jeep,
Fort Pierce.
* Lee Jeep, Fort Walton Beach.
* Duval Motorcars, Gainesville.
* Gainesville Dodge Rallye Motors,
Gainesville.
* Palm Chrysler, Gainesville.
* Caruso Chrysler Jeep Dodge,
Jacksonville.
* Regal Jeep Eagle, Lakeland.
* Monarch Dodge, Lauderdale
Lakes.,.


� Jimmie Vickers, Merritt Island.
m Osman Jeep, Melbourne.
N Sunshine Dodge, Melbourne.
a Tamiami Chrysler Jeep Dodge,
Miami.
0 Bob Taylor Jeep, Naples.
W Atlanta Chrysler Jeep Dodge,
Orlando.
* Buzz Leonard Chrysler-Jeep,
Panama City.
* Sandy Sansing Chrysler,
Pensacola.
* Massey-Yardley Chrysler Dodge,
Plantation.


SUPERMARKETT�,









. .,


* Bob Dance Dodge, Sanford.
* Sarasota Chrysler, Sarasota.
* Tarpon Springs Dodge,
Sarasota.
* Winter Park Dodge, Sarasota.\.
* St Pete Jeep Chrysler Plymouth,
St. Petersburg.
* Venice Chrysler, Venice. J
* Venice Dodge, Venice.
* Vero Beach Jeep, Vero Beach. i
* Dependable Dodge, Vero Beach '
Source: http://blog.rebeltraders,net-
I"^ r


'--I


SUlIND o5

Sale prices good on 5/16/09 "5/17/09


CHRYSLER CLOSURES
List of 35 Florida Chrysler dealership notified of closure. City following name of dealership refers to dealer's legal address.


. . .--. .....


^^^"WBB~s^ggllfW1"^ APWPfM-










Page A3 - SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009



ITATE &


LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Aroundthe
'COUNTY


Landfill slates free
waste drops
Residents may drop off
household hazardous waste
front 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tues-
days, Thursdays and Fridays
at the Citrus County Central
'Lan-dfill. Up to 60 pounds
total per visit will be accepted
free of charge. ,
Materials should be deliv-
ered in original containers.
Additional program informa-
tion is posted on the County
.web site at: www.bocc.citrus.
'fl.us/pubworks/swm, or resi-
:dents can call Solid Waste
rnfanagement at 527-7670
during working hours.
Local show to feature
Lecanto High track
This week's Sports Spot-
'light show on WYKE TV is in
:two parts.
: The Lecanto High state
;track meet qualifiers will be
featured in the first half of the
'show.
The-second half of the
show is an interview with
'Lecanto High Athletic Director
,Shawyn Newman, who will
discuss this year's suc-
;cesses. Mike Deem, Stan
;Solovich, Dennis Jenkins and
,Rocky Hensley conduct inter-
views each week with
coaches and athletes of Cit-
:rus County high school sports
:teams. Sports Spotlight can
.be seen at 8 p.m. Thursday,
,3 p.m. Friday and 3:30 p.m.
Saturday on Bright House
:cable channel 16.
S.Blue-McLean to
address spring effort
:Qmmunity leader Lace
'Blue-McLean will speak Mon-
dayopn building the public-pri-
vate coalition committed to
saving
Three Sis-
tors Spring.
The&Cit-
rus Repub-
lican
Women's
'Nework is
nbothe
:Werpen's Lace
Politcal Blue-McLean
'Ndtwork of Citrus County. It is
chartered by the Florida
,Women's Political Network
'and affiliated with the Na-
,tional Republican Women's
'NetWork. The mission of the
network is to inform, educate
-and inspire women on politi-
,cal issues. Meetings focus on
,political topics and legislative
issues at all levels of govem-
ment an'd will feature round
;table discussions, forums,
,and guest speakers.
The network will meet from
'6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Monday at
the.Central Ridge Public Lj-
brary, 425 W. Roosevelt Blvd.
Call Patricia Cowen at 746-
.9003 for more information.
Ocala man charged
for robbery, battery
Authorities arrested an
�Ocala man Friday in connec-
'tion with a robbery and bat-
oerypn an elderly Inverness
man, according to a Citrus
County Sheriffs Office press
:release.
On Monday, the 71-year-
'old lhverness resident met a
man alongside State Road
44 in Inverness; he thought
'the man was interested in
purchasing a travel trailer, ac-
cording to the sheriff's office
'.press release. The resident
told Citrus County Sheriffs
QOffice detectives the man hit
'him from behind and stole
Money and other personal
iitemns from him.
SDuring their investigation,
detectives received informa-
tion which led them to identify
Jeirmaine Gerard Watson, 35,
'of 1746 N.E. Third St., Ocala,
as 1he primary suspect in the
'case. The detectives then ob-
'tained a warrant for Watson's
arrest.
" Marion County authorities
.arrested Watson on the ac-
tive Citrus County warrant for
changes of strong-arm rob-
berg and battery on a person
,65 years of age or older.
SThe detectives' investiga-


:tion is ongoing. Watson has
bonded out of the Marion
County Jail.
-From staff reports


Hubble repairs ongoing


Telescope gets new,

refurbishedparts

Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL - Space-
walking astronauts had to put a re-
furbished pair of gyroscopes into the
Hubble Space Telescope after a
brand new set refused to go in FYiday,
but scientists were satisfied nonethe-
less and confident the observatory
would point precisely to ever more
distant objects in the cosmos.
Replacing the gyroscopes was the
top priority of the repair mission,
and the struggle had NASA on edge
for two hours.
Thanks to the spacewalkers' ef-
fort, Hubble ended up with four
brand new gyroscopes and two re-


furbished ones that were original 19-
year-old telescope parts, said to be
almost as good as the new ones. The
telescope also got fresh batteries.
It was the second spacewalk in as
many days for the Atlantis astro-
nauts. On Thursday, another two-
man team installed a powerful new
camera and a computer data unit,
after struggling with a stubborn
bolt NASA had hoped for an easier,
less stressful spacewalk, but instead
had to endure more drama.
Michael Massimino, who was
working from inside Hubble, and
his partner, Michael Good, had no
problem removing all six of Hub-
ble's 10-year-old gyroscopes. But
the last set of new gyroscopes
wouldn't fit properly.
Mission Control instructed the
men to go get a spare box of gyro-,
scopes from the shuttle, and put
that one in. This spare set originally


was launched aboard Hubble in
1990 and returned in 1999.
The astronauts successfully in-
stalled the refurbished set. By then,
however, five hours 0f the space-
walk had passed and they had yet to
start on the other major chore of the
day, the battery swap.
The gyroscopes were the No. 1
task, though. Three of the old gyro-
scopes no'longer worked, and two
others had been acting up. The
other had seen a lot of use.
"My friend Leonidas has a couple
of words for you guys that are ap-
prdpriate right now," shuttle com-
mander Scott Altman told the
spacewalkers, referring to the an-
cient Spartan king. "Remember this
day, men, for it will be yours for all
time." Then Altman laughed.
Leonidas died in battle in 480 B.C.
"We've got a little more work to
do, but thanks," replied Massimino.


Hubble's deputy senior project
scientist, Mal Niedner, said he was
not concerned the astronauts had to
resort to refurbished gyroscopes.
They lack the latest anticorrosive
wiring, but it's "the difference be-
tween an A and an A-plus."
In all, five spacewalks are planned
so that the observatory-beloved by
astronomers and many others for its
breathtaking views of the universe -
is at its apex while living out its re-
maining years. Scientists expect the
upgraded Hubble to look back even
further in time, to within 500 million
to 600 million years of creation.
Good drove in the bolts for the gy-
roscope boxes as Massimino, a re-
turning Hubble mechanic who is
over 6-feet tall, worked from inside
the telescope, where he had
wedged himself in head first.
"Trained my whole life for this," he
said.


Keep on the sunny side


' - . . . .
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Shash Broxson demonstrates a solar oven called the Sport made by the Solar Oven Society. Canary Nikki, Mike Johnson, Brian Meier and
Mike Rivera watch the demonstration Wednesday at the Family Resource Center in Hernando. Broxson heads up Saving the Planet, a com-
munity service project, seeking sponsors and donors to place solar cookers in the homes of families in need. The ovens are energy efficient,
safe for the environment and can cook almost anything a regular oven can. They are especially useful for those who want to save money on
fuel and electricity. The project finds donors to sponsor the cost of the ovens, which are then given to the Family Resource Center and placed
with clients in need. Broxson reported Friday that she reached her goal of placing 10 ovens in the county. The Sport is the only solar oven
that doesn't require reflectors and that will not burn food.


Officials close probe


of reform school


Report claims

'no evidence

of deaths

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE .- The
questions had lingered for
decades - who was buried
under 31 white crosses at a
Florida reform school, and
how did they die?
Florida officials said Fri-
day they now have the an-
swers, and none of the 29
boys buried in the ceme-
tery known as "boot hill"
died at the hands of abu-
sive school guards. Two of
the others buried there be-
tween 1914 and 1952 were
former staff members.
But the answers aren't so
simple for the former stu-
dents, some who say they
were never interviewed for
the investigation even
though they endured sav-
age beatings at the Arthur
G. Dozier School for Boys
in Marianna.
Many believe some fel-
low students died from the
beatings. Investigators dis-
missed those claims as ru-
mors, saying none of the
former students has pro-
vided firsthand informa-
tion that would identify any
purported victims or per-
petrators.
Agents are continuing to
investigate allegations by


ex-inmates, most now in
their 60s or 70s, who say
they were beaten bloody
and raped by staff mem-
bers during the 1950s and
1960s as punishment for of-
fenses as slight as singing
or talking to a black in-
mate.
Florida Department of
Law Enforcement Commis-
sioner Gerald Bailey and
Mark Perez, the agency's
chief of executive investi-
gations, said an examina-
tion of death certificates
and other records, media
reports and interviews
with former staff members
and students confirmed
causes of death for all ex-
cept six of the students.
None of the bodies was ex-
humed because of the doc-
uments and eyewitness
evidence.
Roger Dean Kiser, who
says he witnessed two
deaths while a student and
interviewed 200 others for
a book, said in a statement
on behalf of himself and
other ex-inmates that he
found it-strange investiga-
tors have not contacted
him. Kiser recalled being
so bloody after the beatings
he didn't recognize himself
in the mirror.
"My personal feeling is
that the state of Florida
does not want to know the
truth," said Kiser, now liv-
ing in Brunswick, Ga. "It is
just too horrible a tragedy
for the general public to
learn about"


AroundTHE STATE


Ocala
Officials find remains
during search
Authorities have located the
clothing of a 27-year-old Silver
Springs man who went missing
earlier this month.
Authorities also found human
remains in the Ocala National
Forest on Thursday. Dental
records and DNA testing will
help officials determine whether
the remains are those of Derek
James McGivern, who was last
seen on May 3.
The Ocala Star-Banner re-
ported that last week, a news-
paper carrier noticed "drag
marks" around the area where
the remains were found. He no-
tified authorities after he saw a
report about the missing man.
Sheriffs office spokes-
woman Jenifer Fisher said in-
vestigators think an animal
might have dragged the re-
mains. They found bear tracks
at the scene.

Tallahassee
State now has 69
cases of swine flu
Six more cases of swine flu
have been confirmed in Florida,
bringing the total in the state to
69.
Officials on Friday confirmed
two new cases of the virus in
St. Johns County and another
case in Dade County. Accord-
ing to a news release, a 1-year-
old boy has also tested positive
for swine flu in Broward County,
along with a 41-year-old
woman and 11-year-old boy.


State officials said there are
currently no probable cases of
the virus in Florida.
.i
Jacksonville
Rare Asian bird
2spqtted on beach
Bird enthusiasts said they've
spotted an Asian bird on a
Jacksonville beach that has
only been documented in the
Western hemisphere one other
time.
Duval Audubon Society pres-
ident Carole Adams is one of
the birders who spotted and
identified the greater sand-
plover Thursday at Huguenot
Memorial Park. One of the
group members managed to
photograph the bird.
It's not clear how the bird got
to northeast Florida.
The American Birding Asso-
ciation says the greater sand-
plover breeds from Turkey to
Mongolia and Siberia, and win-
ters in parts of Africa, Australia
and Asia.
A single greater sand-plover
was documented in 2001 in
Marin County, Calif.

Orlando
Authorities look for
man in abduction
Authorities said they're look-
ing for the man who broke into
an east Orange County home
and tried to abduct a 4-year-old
girl.
The Orange County Sheriffs
Office reported that the girl's
screams woke up her parents
early Thursday morning. The


man quickly jumped out a win-
dow, and the girl's father
chased him for several hundred
yards before giving up.
Deputies responded and
search dogs tracked the sus-
pect to a parking lot a half-mile
away, but eventually lost his
scent.
Authorities believe the at-
tempted abduction was sexu-
ally motivated. A sheriffs
spokesman said such flagrant
abductions are extremely un-
usual.

- Key West
Senate President
Atwater to run for CFO
Senate President Jeff Atwa-
ter will run for Chief Financial
Officer.
A political source close to At-
water said the announcement
will be made on Tuesday,
nearly a week after CFO Alex
Sink said she will run for gover-
nor rather than seek a second
term in the Cabinet post.
The source didn't want.to be
identified because he was not
authorized to speak publicly
about the announcement be-
forehand.
Atwater, a Republican from
North Palm Beach, is market
president of Riverside National
Bank for Palm Beach and
Broward counties.
He's a fifth generation Florid-
ian whose great-grandfather
and great-uncle served as gov-
ernor.
He was elected to the Sen-
ate 2002 after serving a term in
the state House.
-From wire reports









A%4V3 UKU MIVAY 1 2l(NCIRS ON7AFL HR!UC.


Polk deputies
fatally shoot man
WINTER HAVEN -The
Polk County Sheriff's Office
says deputies fatally shot a 27-
year-old Winter Haven man
when they responded to a fam-
ily disturbance.
Edmond Sutton died at a
Winter Haven Hospital following
Thursday night's shooting.
According to a news release,
authorities were called to the
home of Sutton's parents, Albert
and Danita Sutton, who told a
deputy that their son had be-
come violent during an argu-
ment. Danita Sutton also said
herzson suffered a brain injury in
a 2004 motorcycle crash and
. had become increasingly violent.
Three-dTputiesifoond Ed-..
mond Sutton inside a barn. He
was armed with a rifle and
pointed it at one of the dep-
uties. The deputies, not injured,
fired 24 shots at Sutton.
The shooting is under investi-
gation.
Three fired after
prisons shock kids
TALLAHASSEE - The
Florida Department of Correc-
tions has fired three employees
and two others have resigned
after children were shocked
with stun guns during prison
visits last month .
Department of Corrections
Secretary Walter McNeil apolo-
gized for the incidents at a.
press conference Friday.
The incidents took place on
April 23, national "Take Your
Sons and Daughters to Work
Day." As part of demonstrations
at three prisons around the
state, children held hands in a'
circle, and one was shocked
with the stun gun, passing the
shock around the circle. None
of the children was seriously
hurt or taken to the hospital.


The demonstrations hap-
pened at Franklin Correctional
Institution in Carrabelle, Indian
River Correctional Institution in
Vero Beach and Martin Correc-
tional Institution in Indiantown.
Rapist's mom dies
outside court
'SANFORD - The mother of
a man who was locked up for
nine years for raping children
collapsed Friday in the hallway
outside the courtroom where a
judge was deciding whether to
free her son.
Deputies were unable to re-
vive Ruth Merthie, and she was
pronounced dead at a hospital.
Her 26-year-old son, Kareem
Merthie, was freed from prison
by Circuit Judge O.H. Eaton Jr.
- after'the'judge-heard-from toi-
' medical experts who agreed
that Merthie no longer met the
legal definition of an active sex-
ually violent predator.
Before collapsing, Ruth
Merthie was.in the courtroom
while a psychiatrist testified
about her son's improvement.
She got up and walked-out; but
collapsed several minutes later.
Sheriff's office
pays after dog shot
LARGO - The Pinellas
County Sheriffs Office hap paid
a family $5,000 after a deputy
shot their dog while helping
serve a warrant this month.
Pinellas County sheriffs '
Deputy Dana Persha shot the
7-year-old dog, named Kobe, in
leg and chest May 7. Persha
was helping a Department of
Juvenile Justice officer who
was serving ,a warrant at the
Clearwater home of Barbara
and George Garcia. '
A sheriffs office spokes-
woman said the deputy shot
the dog because it was charg-
ing, barking and growling.
S-From wire reports


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER FLO
- -i- ..p[-0--.Cit .-- --..O
HI93 70 0.00 6, 8 O PR 0 91 69 0.0 Daytona Bch. 84
93 70 0.00 88 73 0.00 91 69 Lauderdale 84
Fort Myers. 89
Gainesville 88
Homestead 85
Jacksonville 86
-. =.HI LO PR Key West 86
90 68 0.00 Lakeland 89
Melbourne 84


91 69 0.00 90 68 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK xcuas ily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 88 Low: 66. ,
Partly cloudy: 40%o chance of PM
t -storms .
W r SUNDAY -( MONDAY MORNING
High: 88 Low: 66
Partly cloudy. -50% chance ot PM.t-storms -.

gi .MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 85 Low: 63
Partly cloudy; 60% chance of t-storms

ALMANAC : .


TEMPERATURE*
Friday , . 91/70.
Record'- - -".-.--.-..: -.96/53.
Normal l 88/65
Mean temp . 81
Departure from mean , +5
PRECIPITATION*
Friday I I- : 0.08 in.
Total for the month 2.57 in.
Total for the year 7.35 in.
Normal for the year 14.57 in.
"As uf 6 p m t rivdrree;s
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.08 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 61
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m.' 42%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees and grasses were moderate
and weeds were absent.
"Light - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms. . ' '
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


DATE , SOLUNAR TABLES . , :
DATE DAY" MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)


5/16 . SATURDAY - 5:57 12:08 6:19
5/17 SUNDAY ' 12:27 6:41 12:51', .7:02

CELESTIAL OUTLOOK., : ..
/-^ ' -- SUNSET TONIGHT........................... 8:15 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:38 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY .....................1:34 A.M.
MA 17 M H24 M AY i- 7 MOONSET TODAY ........................12:45 P.M.

" " . .. BURNCONDITI .
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. A burn ban is in effect.
For moljroJformation call Florida Divisibn of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditioris, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi


The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending In 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or''3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending In 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.

�.-,'-_'-,. .... t .... ;....
*From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay **At Mason's Creek
, Saturday Sunday
City High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
Chassahowltzka* 12:03 p/6:56 a 11:01 p/7:08 p 12:57 p/7:51 a -- /8:27 p
Crystal River" 10:24 a/4:18 a 9:22 p/4:30 p 11:18 a/5:13 a 10:48 p/5:49 p
Withlacoochee* 8:11 a/2:06 a 7:09 p/2:18 p 9:05 a/3:01 a 8:35-p/3:37 p
Homosassa"' 11:13 a/5:55 a 10:11 p/6:07 p 12:07 p/6:50 a 11:37 p/7:26 p


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
'Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas-. .
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston .
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrest
* Robert Frances Sepik, Jr., 39, of
20966 Walnut St., Dunnellon, at 12:38 a.m.
Friday on a charge of driving under the in-
fluence. Bond $500. Sepik was driving a
motorcycle and was pulled over at U.S. 19
and Godfrey Lane.
Other arrests
* Lindsay V. Bowman, 42, of 4511 Land
O' Lakes Blvd., Land O' Lakes, at 8:23 p.m.
Tuesday on a charge of felony failure to ap-
pear for a previous charge of driving without
a license, habitual offender. No bond.
* Richard Albert Robinson,48, at large,
at 9:45 a.m. Thursday on a charge of grand
theft. No bond.
* Kevin Allen Thomas, 41, of 100 S.
Shiner Terrace, Inverness, at 10:08 a.m.
Thursday on a charge of lewd and lascivi-
ous molestation and exhibition.of a four-.
year-old mate-victim; Thomas reportedly
exposed himself to the victim and had the
victim touch him inappropriately. Bond
$20,000.
* Clyde William Mumford, 39, of 6720
N. Carl G. Rose Highway, Inverness, at
11:52 a.m. Thursday on charges of burglary
and grand theft. Bond $23,000.
* Jeremy Lee Forrest, 21, of 752 E.
LaSalle St., Hemando, at 7:56 p.m. Thurs-
day on a charge of felony failure to appear
for a previous charge of burglary. No bond.
* Ted L. O'Brien, 37, of 6065 E. Slate
St., Inverness, at 10:22 p.m. on a charge of,
felony Violation of probation for previous
charges of grand theft and burglary.
* Brett Howard Vest, 43, of 13811
Eagle Ridge Lake Drive, Fort Myers, at'

NAT

May 3 to 9, 2009
* Nature Coast EMS responded to
355 medical emergencies and 240
patients were transported to a hos-
pital.
* Out nrf the 355 medical emerenc


ON THE NET
* For more information about
arrests made by the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, go to
www.shenffcitrus.org and click
on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.

11:45 a.m. Friday on a charge of violation of
domestic violence injunction. Bond $25,000.
* Kyle W. Spangler, 19, at large, at 1:41
p.m. Friday on charges of grand theft, deal-
ing in stolen property, secondhand dealer
fraud and giving false information to a pawn-
broker. Bond $13,000. '
* Amy R Pierce, 19, of 1314 Cypress
Cove Court, Inverness, at 1:50 p.m. Friday
on a charge of grand theft. Bond $2,000.
Burglaries
* A burglary investigated on May 5 oc-
curred at approximately 6 p.m. May4, to an
unoccupied structure in the 2600 block of E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness.
M A burglary occurred at approximately
6:30 p.m. May 3 to an unoccupied structure
in the 3900 block of W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Lecanto.
MAburglary,-reported on May 5, occurred
at approximately 9:57 a.m. May 5, to a con-
veyance in the 6200 block of N. Suncoast
Boulevard, Crystal River.
*A burglary, reported on May 5, occurred
at approximately 8 p.m. May 4, to an unoc-
cupied structure in the 5900 block of S.
Chad Point, Homosassa.
* A burglary with battery occurred at ap-
proximately 7:45 p.m. May 5, in the 11400
block of N. Citrus Avenue, Crystal River.
N A burglary with a battery, reported on


URE COAST EMS RECORD OF C

was 7 minutes and 15 seconds.
* 23 of the patients transported re-
quired an emergency response to
the hospital (where seconds/min-
utes may affect the patient out-
come).


calls, based on the caller's informa- CRITICAL CALLS
tion, 192 required an emergency re- 2 Codes (Caria Arrsts).
sponse (with lights and siren) to the - 2 Codes (Cardiac Arrests).
scene. * 3 Cardiac Alerts.
* Average emergency response time 0 3 Trauma Alerts (major or poten-


RIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast City
ts Miami
ts ,Ocala
ts Orlando
ts Pensacola
ts Sarasota
ts Tallahassee
ts Tampa
..ts Vero Beach
pc .-,. W. Palm-Bch.


HI L
84 74
89 66
88 69
84 68
86 73
86 66
88 73
85' 72
-...85 . 74


F'cast
ts

ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts -


" MARINE OUTLOOK " "'
East-southeast winds from 10 to 20 Gulf water
knots. Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland temperature
waters will have a moderate chop.
Scattered showers and thunderstorms 7
will be likely today.

Taken at Aripeka
LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.97 28.04 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 32.50 32.50 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lriverness 34.44 ,34.41 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City , 36.25 . 36.22 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a.43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
-obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subjectto revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at(352) 79.6-7211.. .

. THE NATION


Friday Saturday
H LPcp. FcstH L
74 55 ts 76 51
88 59 ts 77 53
76 60 .42 ts 77 55
85 66 ts 80 63
71 63 .01 pc 77 58
92 70 ts 85 62
77 64 .02 pc 82 61
55 40 pc 72 43
86 67 ts 80 59
'68 41 . s 79 47
70 57 c 65 55
70 47 ts 72 40
69 53 ts 72 48
78 66 1.65 ts 84 70
82 57 ts 81 51
81 66 ts 82 63
61 52 .39 pc 61 39
81 46 .01 ts 74 47
73 45 ts 71 43
84 68 ts 84 65
80 46 ts 75 45
79 55 c 70 51
87. 70 ts 76 56
71 48 ts 68 47
63 54 .88 s 62 39
68 47 .02 sh 69 42
95 67 pc 87 60
85 56 sh 74 48
78 61 .01 ts 83 53
77 57 c 71 51
90 71 ts 87 67
79 51 sh 70 44
87 69 ts 82 63
94 75 s 100 76
88 64 ts 80 56
69 61 s 73 61
82 56 .08 sh 76 54
86 70 ts 79 56
. 62 48 pc- 60 39
72 53 s 53 35
86 66 ts 84 65
87 66 ts 83 65
83 62 .42 ts 79 54


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY

Friday Saturday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 89 72 ts 84 70
New York City 76 60 c 70 56
Norfolk 80 66 .60 pc 83 65
Oklahoma City 84 68 ts 68 .49
Omaha 65 57 .01 s 63 39
Palm Springs 10071 s 103 74.
Philadelphia 79 64 .02 pc 83 57
Phoenix 10075 s 103 75
Pittsburgh 79 49 ts 77 45
Portland, ME 69 51 c 55 51
Portland, Ore 71 45 .01 s 82 .53
Providence, R.I. 69 55 c 68 54
Raleigh 84 69 ts 84 68
Rapid City 59 42 pc 67 42
Reno 81 51 s 89 54
Rochester, NY 64 44 ts 76 43
Sacramento 91 55 s 96 63
St. Louis 86 64 pc 69 .43
St. Ste. Marie 60 32 sh 47 31
Salt Lake City 68 47 s 76 51
San Antonio 92 73 ts 85 64
San Diego 65 61 s 70 60
San Francisco 63 52 s 79 57
Savannah 78 70 1.54 ts 83 68
Seattle 62 43 pc 72 49
Spokane 62 36 pc 72 48
Syracuse 69 44 .01 ts 77 47
Topeka 85 64 .74 -pc 67 43
Washington 76 64 .16 ts 83 62
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 102 Needles, Calif. LOW 25 Embarrass, Minn.

; WORLD. CITIES;
SATURDAY Lisbon 67/51/pc
CITY H/L/SKY London 59/46/sh
Acapulco 87/75/ts Madrid 71/53/pc
Amsterdam 63/45/pc Mexico City 77/56/ts
Athens 83/62/pc Montreal 63/45/ts
Beijing 72/53/s Moscow 52/37/sh
Berlin 66/46/sh Paris 62/45/sh
Bermuda 74/61/s Rio 78/69/pc
; Cairo 87/65/s Rome 77/56/pc
Calgary 70/41/pc Sydney 65/47/sh
Havana 86/73/ts Tokyo 68/51/r
Hong Kong 89/76/pc Toronto 67/42/ts
Jerusalem 87/65/s Warsaw 66/44/sh


May 6, occurred at approximately 4 p.m.
May 4, in the 3700 block of S. Sandpiper
Terrace, Homosassa.
* Preliminary investigation on May 6 re-
vealed a burglary occurred, at appi'xi-
mately 7:30 p.m. May 5, to a conveyan6deiri
the 8800 block of E. Moonrise Lane, Flr0M
City. ,si,
* A burglary and attempted theft ' -.
ported on May 6, occurred approximate/ t
midnight on May 5, to an unoccupied sfr&,i
ture in the 2100 block of W. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Lecanto. '.
SA burglary occurred sometime betvwe'ri
May3at 11 a.m.and May 6 at 11 a.m., t6;
unoccupied residence in the 4500 blodc1f
N. Canyon Terrace, Hemando. '
SA burglary occurred on May 6, between
8 a.m. and 6 p.m., to an unoccupied resi-
dence in the 3600 block of N. Holiday Dv
Crystal River.- .
* A burglary, reported on May 6, occurred
atapproxirnately 7p.m. May 5, to a co"n
veyance in the 6100 block of E. ChapeI
Lane, Inverness.
Thefts ,,- b
* A petit theft, reported on May 5, bc-
curred at approximately midnight on Apill
13, on W. Venable Street, Crystal River.t!
* A grand theft, reported on May 5,')b:
curred at approximately 2 p.m. May 2, inl1ri
1300 block of S. Suncoast Boulevard, Mot
mosassa. eiu8
MA trailer was stolen at approximately
p.m. May 4, in the 10400 block of E. Victly
Lane, Inverness.
* On May 5, approximately 10:40 1i'.f,.
a known subject was arrested for retail tflf
and criminal mischief in the 5500 blod6kbI
W. Homosassa Trail, Lecanto. '


ALL

tially major trauma injuries). *, -r
TYPES OF CALLS
Care level provided for calls:
* 35 BLS (Basic Life Support). o
* 201 ALS (Advanced Life Support)q
* 4 ALS2 (Critical Advanced Life) ,8
Support). ,9
* Average calls per day: 50.7. F,1
* Average transports per day: 34.3.-l')
inCl


SC I S.T'-'"':0-,C OLIN T Y



CHR ONICLE
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State BRIEFS


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drle;
f=fair; h=hazry pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02009 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


NIN
All"


CnrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICiL


AA ginTiirix "MAy ur R7nn


-


I








(rrw;s Cnrnvn' (FL) CHRONICLE SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 A5


, Lindel
,4Blasdel, 57
INVERNESS
I ,Lindel Ray Blasdel, "The
Qar Doctor," age 57, of In-
verness, FL, died Friday,
May 15, 2009, at his home
uder the care of his family
and. Hospice of Citrus
Cgqnty. He was born on July
K4,1951, in Metropolis, IL, to
Linidel F and Lula Bell
(tq rey) Blasdel. He moved
, itrus County 30 years
4go.from Illinois. He was an
Auto Mechanic.
Lindel is survived by his
o0npanion, Linda Conroy;
W$y mother, Lula Bell
Checker and stepfather Bob;
three children, Tina, Cindy
hrfd Darinn; three sisters,
Ptn, Kathy and Teresa; five
gOthdchildren.
Visitation will be on Sun-
day, May 17, from 5 until 7
plin. at the Brown Funeral
HImne in Lecanto, FL. Fu-
neral services will be held
ajt40 a.m. Monday, May 18, at
therfuneral home with Pas-
toe Dan Lyman officiating.
Burial will follow at the Oak
Ri4ge Cemetery in Inver-
Wps, FL.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tipns can be made to the
ends Cancer Center or to
Howpice of Citrus County.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto,
Florida, in charge of
arrangements. 352-795-0111.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline.com.

Dorothy
Dill, 80
DANVILLE, IND.
Dorothy J. Case Dill, age
80, of Danville, Indiana, for-
merly of Floral City, passed
away on May 13, 2009. She
was born May 9, 1929, in
Crawfordsville, Indiana.
Dorothy was a graduate of
StY incent's School of Nurs-
inlg and worked as a regis-
teted nurse.
Survivors include her
hiisband of 53 years, Wesley
E. Dill; three daughters,
Jeanne M. Smither and hus-
Pand Mike, Angela R. Dill
and Margaret "Peggy"
irwin; sister, Mary Lou
N�Guire; three grandchil-
Sren, Sarah J., Michael W
and Janice GC. :Smither.
Calling hours will be on
Tuesday, May 19, 2009, from
1:00 to 2:45 PM. at the Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home of
Inverness with graveside
.services to follow at 3:00
PM. at the Hills of Rest
Cemetery, Floral City.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline.com.
yvt Frank
t Fritz, 60
*BEVERLY HILLS
Frank M. Fritz, 60, of Bev-
erly Hills, FL, passed away
n Wednesday, May 13, 2009,
at Woodland Terrace, Her--
nando, FL.
Arrangements are by Fero
Funeral Home, 5955 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills, FL 34465.

Katherine
Klingel, 87
DUNNELLON
Mrs. Katherine B. Klingel,
age 87, of Dunnellon,
Florida, died May 12, 2009;
in Lecanto, FL. Arrange-
ments and cremation are
ander the direction of the
Inverness Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes & Crema-
ory.

Ethel
" Lewis, 88
INVERNESS
Ethel J. Lewis, 88, died
suddenly Thursday, May 14,
2009, in Inverness, Florida.
Se was born June 22, 1920,
i~n Southern Illinois. She
made her home in Michigan
f ',many years before mov-
irgnto Florida in 1987. Be-
fore retirement, she worked
i~ retail. She enjoyed her
family and friends. She
lived the last three years at
theJnverness Club.


I She was preceded in
d~ith by her husband,
P lip, and her son, Gerald.


She is survived by her
daughter, Brenda Allaire
and husband Paul of Crystal
River, Florida; and Gerald's
widow, Kay Lewis of Water-
ford, Michigan; six grand-
children and three
great-grandchildren. She is
also survived by two sisters,
Elizabeth Smith of Spring
Hill, Florida, and Ruth
Willoughby of Demopolis,
Alabama; as well as many
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services and bur-
ial will be in Galatia, Illi-
nois, where she grew up, on
Wednesday, May 20, 2009, at
11:00 a.m. Sloan Funeral
Home is in charge of
arrangements. Calling
hours will be on Tuesday
evening from 5:00 to 8:00
p.m. Those who wish may
make memorial contribu-
tions to: Hernando-Pasco
Hospice, 3545 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills, FL
34465 or the Galatia United
Methodist Church, Galatia,
IL 62935. Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com.

Dorothy
Osborne, 72,
OCALA
Dorothy E. Osborne, age
72, of Ocala, FL, passed
away on Thursday, May 14,
2009.
Visitation will be from 1 to
3 on Saturday May 16, at the
Church Triumphant in
Ocala, FL, followed by a me-
morial service at 3 p.m. Pri-
vate cremation will follow
the services under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto, FL.
Family suggests memorial
donations to Hospice of
Marion County.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline.com.

Janet
Paquin, 75
� INVERNESS
Janet C. Paquin, 75, of In-
verness, Fla., died May 14,
2009, in Inverness. Born in
Ballston Spa, N.Y, she came
here from Ballston Spa in
1996.
She was of the Episcopal
faith.
Survivors include her
mother, Reita May Carpen-
ter; five sons, Michael,
Richard, John, Gary and
Samuel Paquin; two daugh-
ters, Donna S. Duffy and
Cindy C. Older; one brother,
Neil Carpenter; two sisters,
Audrey Wagner and Mabel
Siler; 12 grandchildren; and
3 great-grandchildren.
A memorial service will
be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday,
May 19, 2009, at St. Mar-
garet's Episcopal Church. In
lieu of flowers, donations
can be made to the Ameri-
can Cancer Society.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline.com.

Benita
Sherrill, 88
OCALA
Benita B. Sherrill, 88, of
Ocala, formerly of Inver-
ness, died Wednesday, May
13, 2009, in Ocala, Fla. She
was born July 4, 1920, in
Muncie, Ind., and had
resided in the Inverness
and Ocala area since 1972.
Benita was retired from
Avon cosmetics and during
her career won numerous
awards for outstanding
sales and service. She at-
tended the Meadowbrook
Church and was a member
of the First United
Methodist Church of Inver-
ness.
Survivors include her
sons, Robert Sherrill of
Leesburg, Fla., Ronald and
Gail Sherrill, both of Fayet-
teville, Ark, and Steve Sher-
rill of Lavaca, Ark;
daughters, Audrey Lorenz of
Ocala, Fla., and Jeanne
Strawbridge of Pueblo,
Colo.; and many loving
grandchildren, and great-
grandchildren.
Funeral services will be
Monday, 2 p.m., in the
Roberts Funeral Home of


Dunnellon Chapel with Pas-
tor Ron Howard of the


Meadowbrook Church offi-
ciating. The family will re-
ceive friends Sunday, 6 to 8
p.m., at the Roberts Funeral
Home, 19939 E. Pennsylva-
nia Ave., Dunnellon.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

Melvin
Slaughter, 71
RUSSELLVILLE, ARK.
Melvin Eugene Slaughter,
age 71, of Russellville, AR,
formerly of Crystal River,
FL, died on Thursday, May
14, 2009, at the Citrus Me-
morial hospital in Inver-
ness, FL. Born July 20, 1937,
in Marvel, AR, to Ralph and
Altie Slaughter, he recently
returned to Crystal River
from Russellville, AR, 1
month ago.
He was a retired master
electrician and was the for-
mer owner and operator of
the Ocean Electric in Ft.
Lauderdale, FL. He was of
the Baptist faith. His hob-
bies were his R.V, motorcy-
cles and mud bogging, and
he loved his dogs, Lucy and
Cigars.
Surviving are his son,
Christopher D. Slaughter
(Amanda) of, Russellville,
AR, and a daughter, Teresa
Reinaman (Robert) of Is-
lamorada, FL; a sister, Mary'
Akins (Leon) of Crystal
River; 5 grandchildren and
2 nephews, 1 niece, numer-
ous great-nieces and
-nephews.
A funeral service will be
conducted Sunday, May 17,
2009, at 2:00 PM from the
Strickland Funeral Home
Chapel in Crystal River, FL,
with Rev. Leon Akins offici-
ating. Interment will follow
on Monday at the Woodlawn
Cemetery in Perry, FL, at
11:00 AM. Strickland Fu-
neral Home Crystal River,
FL.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline.com.
Daniel
Tiley, 79
INVERNESS
Daniel J. Tiley, 79, Inver-
ness, died Wednesday, May
13, 2009, at Arbor Trail
Rehab & Nursing Center. A
Celebration of Life memo-
rial service will be held
Monday, May 18, 2009, at 4
p.m. at the Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home.

Savarina
Vail, 67
BEVERLY HILLS
Savarina Aloisi Vail, 67, of
Beverly Hills, FL (formerly
of Danbury), passed away at
Kindred Hospital in Ocala,
FL, May 11, 2009. She was
born in Port Chester, NY, on
May 10, 1942, to the late
James Aloisi and Lena
(Petruciano) Aloisi. She
grew up in Harrison, NY,
before moving-to Danbury,
CT, in 1975.
She was predeceased by
her husband of 25 years,
Elmer G. Vail. Savarina
worked as a bank teller with
Mechanics and Farmers in
Danbury, Chase Bank in
Bethel and Stony Hill of-
fices and most recently at
Mutual Security in Danbury.
After retirement she moved
to Beverly Hills in 2007.
She is survived by her 2
daughters, Christina (Vail)
lannucci and husband An-
thony and Stephanie (Vail)
Ludwig and husband
Thomas; along with 3 grand-
children, Joseph and Taylor
Ludwig and Brandon lan-
nucci. She is survived by 2
sisters, Lenora Smith and
husband Robert Smith of
Pine Ridge, FL, and Grace
Ann Aloisi of Harrison, NY.
She is also survived by a
nephew, Kenneth (Myra)
Smith, and a niece, Robyn
Smith Lee. She was also
predeceased by her loving
dogs, Sassi and Gizmo.
Calling hours will be at
Green Funeral Home, 57
Main St:, Danbury, on Sun-


Funeral Home


726-8323


OBITUARIES
a The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
both free and paid obit-
uaries.
* Obituaries must be
submitted by the fu-
neral home or society
in charge of arrange-
ments.
* Free obituaries can in-
clude: Full name of de.
ceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
* A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
Additionally, all obituar-
ies will be posted online
at www.chronicleon-
line.com.
* Area funeral homes
with established ac
counts with the Chront.
cle are charged $8.75
per column inch. Non-
local funeral homes
and those without ac-
counts are required to
pay in advance by
credit card, and the
cost is $10 per column
inch. Small photos of
the deceased's face can
be included for an addi
tional charge.
* Additional days of pub-
lication or reprints due
to errors in submitted
material are charged at
the same rates.
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
* E-mail obits@chronicle
online.com or fax to
563.3280. Phone 563.
5660 for details.

day, May 17, from 4-8 pm and
Monday, May 18, from 5-9
pm.. Mass of Christian Bur-
ial will be celebrated on
Tuesday, May 19, 10 am at St
Gregory the Great Church,
Danbury. Burial will follow
in St Peter Cemetery, Dan-
bury.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline.com.


MSRP

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Wheelbase

Length, Overall

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Displacement

SAE Net Horsepower @ RPM

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Continuously Variable Trans

Front Tow Hooks


Former All-American,

jazz musician dies

Wayman Tisdale was 44


Associated Press

Wayman Tisdale, a three-
time All-American at Okla-
homa who played 12
seasons in the NBA and
later became a top jazz mu-
sician, died after a two-year
battle with cancer. He was
44.
Tisdale died Friday
morning at St John Medical
Center in Tulsa, hospital
spokeswoman Joy McGill
said.
After three years at Okla-
homa, Tisdale played in the
NBA with the Indiana Pac-
ers, Sacramento Kings and
Phoenix Suns. The 6-foot-9
forward, with a soft left-
handed touch on the court
and a wide smile offit, aver-
aged 15.3 points for his ca-
reer. He was on the U.S.
team that won the gold
medal in the 1984 Olympics.
After basketball, he be-
came an award-winningjazz
musician, with several al-
bums making the top 10 on
the Billboard charts.
Tisdale's death was an-
nounced on the Oklahoma
Senate floor Friday by Sen-
ate Majority Leader Todd
Lamb, who led the chamber
in prayer.
"Whether you're a Cow-
boy or a Sooner, Oklahoma
has lost a great ambassa-
dor," Lamb said. "He was a
gifted musician, a gifted ath--
lete and he just wore that
well wherever he went"
The famously upbeat Tis-
dale learned he had a can-
cerous cyst below his right
knee after breaking his leg
in a fall at his home in Los
Angeles on Feb. 8, 2007. He
said then he was fortunate
to have discovered the can-
cer early
His leg was amputated
last August and a prosthetic
leg that he wore was crim-
son, one of Oklahoma's col-
ors. He made a handful of
public appearances in re-
cent weeks, including one
April 7 at an Oklahoma City
Thunder game.


Associated Press
This 2008 file photo pro-
vided by Rendevous Enter-
tainment shows Wayman
Tisdale posing in Hollywood.
Tisdale, a three-time All-
American at Oklahoma who
played 1.2 seasons in the
NBA, has died after a two-
year battle with cancer. He
was 44.
Also within the past
month, Tisdale was honored
at the Greenwood Cultural
Center in his hometown of
Tulsa and presented with
the Legacy Award. During
the ceremony, he spoke
about his cancer, saying "In
my mind, I've beaten it"
Last month, Tisdale was
chosen for induction into
the National Collegiate Bas-
ketball Hall of Fame.
Tisdale played on an
Olympic team that sailed to
the gold medal in Los Ange-
les. The squad was coached
by Bob Knight and featured
the likes of Ewing, Michael
Jordan, Sam Perkins and
Chris Mullin.
"Wayman was kind of a
catalyst for people accept-
ing roles," said C.M. New-
ton, the manager of the '84
team and now chairman of
the NIT selection commit-
tee. "Michael was the leader
of the team but Wayman was
special in that way. He had a
great work ethic. He loved to
play and was just fun to be
around."


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Obituaries


COMPAI




TODAY


With Crematory
DOROTHY DILL
Viewing: Tues. 1-2:45pm - Chapel
Services: Tues. 3pm - Graveside
Hills of Rest Cemetery
PHYLLIS HALL
Service: Sat. 3pm - Chapel
SALVATORE
CANGELOSI
Private Cremation Arrangements
DANIEL TILEY
Memorial Service:
Mon. 4pm - Chapel


SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 A5


Crraus CouNTY (FL) C E


7835W7











STOCKS


AG sATURDAYMAY 16 20 9


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THEMAR


E D E EVI "W


MOST ACTIVE ($1 o- . :e*-) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE Here are the 825 most active stocks on the NewYork Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chq Name Vol(OO) Last Chg Name Vol(OO) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Amerin-
BkofAm 3167858 10.67 -.64 PSCrudeDLn217464 3.26 -.21 DryShips 1137562 6.84 +.75 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
DirxFinBear2604537 5.90 +30 Hemisphrx 134277 1.30 +.38 PwShs QQQ1054360 33.37 -.02 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
SPDR 2370951 88.71 -.73 ColumAcq 36280 7.95 +.10 Cisco 698797 17.92 -.17 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
Ciligrp 2268704 3.48 -.07 NovaGId g 29324 3.64 +.28 Intel 598765 15.19 -.35 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
DirxFnBull 2049484 8.74 -.49 GoldStr g 23484 1.82 +.12 Microsoft 593604 20.22 +.16 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...
SAIStock Footnotes: cld - Issue has been called for redemption by company., d - New 52-week
GAINERS ($2 oR MoRe) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) AINERS ($2 OR MORE) low. dd -Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chq %Chg Name Last Cho %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h - temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
ADairy 28.48 +10.05 +54.5 Aerosonic 3.98 +.68 +20.6 CmtyShBk 3.00 +.86 +40.2 ,, uai.,, i.:.. .. . ie..:r :.1 re.r Th, 52 wee r..,r, ar,, ai .
WuXi ,7.98 +2.39 +42.8 PSCrudeDSnl42.35+14.10 +11.0 Biocryst 3.19 +.77 +31.8 ur' d.5I.i ,,1,rr, r, re~ngji,.'.nrg .if.r, l.r . Preisnrea snic i:,a.u pr . iP,eurn,,-:
ZaleCp 3.96 +.92 +30.3 CardiumTh 2.09 +.19 +10.0 SIFind 5.59 +1.33 +31.2 H. l-, . e, ;,r,.t]illrr,r. .:1 td,up .r. ,r ,1 - R, , .i 1. r., ay i urai al .: 5 .+p i.,,: (,,,.T a .3
MSSP201111.41 +2.21 +24.0 Gulfstream 3.40 +.28 +9.0 TrubionPh 2.50 +.59 +30.9 ni;.,i-k ra 1phi ty al lai :: -rcer i r....i a i rt .. . Ti,.6: ., c .e s',6n e.r,ar. r.e
ProtLife 10.99 +1.76 +19.1 PacGEpfl 18.50 +1.50 +8.8 Novogen 2.17 +.43 +24.7 stock Is issued. wd-When distributed.wt-Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock u -New
e ,.e.v rigr. ur. . U jr , , . , ..u.h ', .re i' r .r.r e c t,:u.imJ ' -C c nm pa" ry in t. rirupl.:, .� *I
LOSERS ($2 : M.:.REI" LOSERS 32 onE .,c,,E LOSERS 1$2 A u:.aRE ci.mrr..p or, r ,r,n , .:,rGar.,z6.i ur.ie,t mre urk,-u.ilc i A~c ar ,r Irorui 01 te r.m,T,e
Name Last Chq 'XCng Name Last Chg_ .Cng Name Las _ Cng Ch_ Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
BlueLinx 2.40 -.65 -21.3 BreezeE 7.01 -.92 -11.6 AtlBcGp 4.64 -1.36 -22.7
Fortress 4.25 -1.01 -19.2 BcpNJn 9.65 -1.18 -10.9 ParkOh 3.12 -.84 -21.2 13 Ia]W
RussBerrie 2.18 -.49 -18.4 UnvSeclnst 5.02 -.52 -9.4 FstBkshVA 5.21 -1.32 -20.2
GushanEE 2.25 -.48 -17.6 Bamwell 4.35 -.41 -8.6 PABBksh 3.25 -.75 -18.8 52-Week Net % YT[
Sealy 3.13 -.65 -17.2 Servotr 6.75 -.60 -8.2 Pansoftn 5.14 -1.05 -17.0 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ci


DIARY


1,I 10 Advan..e
1,944 Declined
82 Unchanged
/ 3,136 Total issues
1 New Highs
7 New Lows
5,306,198,750 Volume


DIARY


255 A,,,ani:ea
305 Declined
51 Unchanged
611 ,Total issues
4 New Highs
1 New Lows
125,540,745 Volume


1,632
153
2,852
13
11
2,048,275,896


13,1365.9 6,469.95Dow jones inoustrials
5,536.57 2,134.21Dow Jones Transportation
530.57 288.66Dow Jones Utilities
9,687.24 4,181.75NYSE Composite .
2,433.31 1,130.47Amex Index
2,551.47 1,265.52Nasdaq Composite
1,440.24 666.79S&P 500
14,564.81 6,772.29Wilshire 5000
764.38 342.59Russell 2000


YTD YTD
Name. Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AK Steel .20 1.7 ... 11.58 -.16 +24.2 IBM 2.20 2.2 11 101.37 +.32 +20.4
AT&T lnc 1.64 6.6 12 24.88 -.10-12.7 Lowes .34 1.8 12 18.45 -.42-14.3
AlliedCap ... ... ...2.58 -.22 -4.1 McDnlds 2.00 3.7 14 53.46 -.11 -14.0
BkofAm .04 .4 14 10.67 -.64 -24.2 Microsoft .52 2.6 12 20.22 +.16 +4.0
CapCtyBk .76 5.7 26 13.29 -.22 -51.2 Motorola ......... 5.91 +.13 +33.4
Citigrp .04 1.1 ... 3.48 -.07-48.1 Penney .80 3.0 10 26.54 -.11 +34.7
Disney .35 1.5 12 23.41 -.07 +3.2 ProgrssEn 2.48 7.3 11 34.07 -.66 -14.5
EKodak ...... 11 2.47 -.14 -62.5 RegionsFn .04 .8 4.85 -.13 -39.1
Embarq 2.75 6.7 8 40.88 -.80 +13.7 RearsH.d.s 4987 -166+283
ExxonMbl 1.68 2.4 9 69.11 -.65 -13.4 SearsHdgs ......... 49.87 -1.66 +28.3
FPLGrp 1.89 3.5 13 54.44 -.60 +8.2 Smucker 1.40 3.5 13 39.75 -.45 -8.3
FairPoint ... ... ... 1.23 -.08 -62.5 SprintNex ... ... ... 5.05 -.17+176.0
FordM ......... 5.49 +.33+139.7 TimeWrnrs .75 3.2 ... 23.52 -.57 +5.4
GenElec .40 3.1 8 12.86 -.18 -20.6 UniFirst .15 .4 10 33.53 -.29 +12.9
GnMotr ......... 1.09 -.06 -65.9 VerizonCm 1.84 6.2 13 29.61 -.37-12.7
HomeDp .90 3.7 18 24.40 -.13 +6.0 WalMart 1.09 2.3 14 48.15 -.95-14.1
Intel .56 3.7 19 15.19 -.35 +3.6 Walgrn .45 1.5 14 29.78 -.36 +20.7


D % 52-wk
hg % Chg


8,268.64 -62.68 -.75 -5.79 -36.33
3,053.01 +17.53 +.58 -13.69 -43.14
329.80 -9.09 -2.68 -11.05 -36.06
5,662.89 -70.56 -1.23 -1.64 -41.03
1,473.29 -10.57 -.71 +5.42-37.99
1,680.14 -9.07 -.54 +6.54-33.56
882.88 ,-10.19 -1.14 -2.26 -38.06
9,004.17 -99.11 -1.09 -.91 -37.57
475.84 -4.87 -1.01 -4.73-35.80


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. MeadowcrestF

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


N EWYRKSTOKECAN


Name Last Chg


ABBLtd 14.87 -.01
ACELtd 43.12 -.84
AESCorp 8.55 -.60
AFLAC 32.14 -1.61
AGL Res 29.02 -.81
AKSteel 11.58 -.16
AMB Pr 16.32 -1.18
AMR 4.84 -.18
ASALtd 58.18 -.61
AT&TInc 24.88 -.10
AUOptron 10.52 +.23
AXA 15.99 -.82
AbtLab 43.32 -1.31
AberFitc 26.10 -1.15
Accenture 28.83 -.14
AdamnsEx 8.12 -.10
AMD 4.01 -.23
AdvSemi 2.92 +.09
Aeropostl 31.00 -1.79
Aetna 25.76 -.80
Agilent 17.65 -.68
Agnicog 52.36 -1.18
Agriumg 48.18 +1.26
AirProd 61.59 +.02
AirTran 6.41 -.16
AlcatelLuc 2.22' -.06
Alcoa . 9.03 +.29
AtexREE 31.58 -.53
AggEngy 25.78 -1.85
AlegTch 32.58 -.92
Alergan 45.44 -1.02
Alltee 26.33 -.02
AiiData ' 38.82 -1.57
AlmBGIbHi 9.47 -.12
AliBlnco 7.48 +.01
AliBem. 16.79 -.50
Aldlrsh 2.60 -.09
Alstate � 24.30 -.95
AlphaNRs 25.46 -1.24
Atria . 16.98 -.02
AlumrnChina 22.38 -.02
AmnbacF 1.33 -.07
Ameren 23.21 -.81
AMoviL 35.23 -.66
AmAxledeh 2.09 -.13
AEagleOut 13.85 -.14
AEP 24.94, -.77
AmExp 24.23 -.49
'AmlntlGp 1.72 -.12
AmSIP3 8.24
AmTower 28.21 -.68
Aaeigaas 30.36 -.22
SAmerdprise 25.40 +.34
AnedBrng 34.99 -.74
Anadarko 42.67 -.88
AnalogDev .19.46 -.63
AnglogIdA 36.60 +.01
AnnTaylr 8.17 +.30
Annaly, 14.38 -.21
AonCorp 36.62 -.04
Apache 76.61 -2.02
Aptlnv 7.77 -24
u 16.48 -.32
A t 2571 +.18
A 1 hoa .. -.66
ArchDan /25.17 -.04
AvMerith I 2.26 -.13
Ashland 24.18 - -.41
AsdEstat I' 5.87 -.16
AstoiaF 7.65 -.27
ATMOS 24.13 : -.40
AutoNatn 15.97 +.51
AvalonBay 53.83 -1.44
Avon ' 22.94 +,22
BB&TCp 21.63 -.867


BHP BllLt 49.43 -.76
BJSvcs 14.28 -.55
BMCSft 34.41 +.64
BPPLC 45.62 -.60
BRT 3.75 -.10
BakrHu 35.32 -.63
BallCp 39.21 +.20
BooBrades 12.89 -.24
BcoSantand 9.16 -.25
BkofAm 10.67 -.64
BkNYMel 27.68 -.76
Barclay 15.86 -.04
BarrickG 33.49 -.62
Baxter 49.78 -.86
BaytexEg 14,71 -.32
BeazerHm 2.34 -.07
BecOck 65.16 -.73
Berkley 23.79 -.24
BestBuy 35.41 -.72
BigLots 24.28 +.20
BEoMedR 10.04 -.38
BlackD 31.58 +.85
BkIHillsCp 19.41 -.43
BlkDebtStr 2.65 -.04
BkEnhC&l 11.62 -.01
Blackstone 11.52 -.07
BlockHR 13.94 -.04
Blockbstr .82 -.32
BlueChp 2.34 -.05
Boeing 43.00 -.44
Borders 2.18 +.08
BorgWam 27.65 1.12
BastBeer 28.66 -.14
BustProp 44.97 -2.08
BostonSdi 8.76 -.06
BaydGm 9.48 -.15
Brands 7.06 -.53
Brinker 15.43 -.23
BrMySq 28.01 -.45
BrIkdAsgs 17.18 -.40
BrkfdPrp 7.22 -.29
Brunswick 5.22 -.07
Buckeye 40.27 +.71
BurgerlKng 17.37 +.18
BudaNSF 67.14 +1.63
CB RElis 7.07 -.36
CBLAsc 5.80 -.61
CBSB 6.70 -.14
CFInds 79.75 +2.07
CH Engy- 42.62 -.67
CIGNA 21.966 -.20
CITGp , 2.66 -.30
CMSEng 11.24 -.31
CSS Inds 20.66 -1.09
CSX 27.67 +.71
CVSCare 30.80 -1.14
CablvsnNY 18.27 +.41
CabotO&G 30.82 -.65
CallGolf 6.65 +.15'
Calpine 10.29 -.17
CamdnP 26.96 -.76
Cameco gs 24.59 -.41
Cameron 27.55 -.73
CampSp 26.89 +.14
CdnNRyg 39.09 +.85'
CdnNRsg 49.51 -1.50
CapOne 24.54 -.04'
CaptSrce 3.49 +.05
CapMpfB 13.29 +.12-
CarMax 10.53 +.12
Carnival 25.00 -.56
Caterpillar 35.74 -.33
Celanese 18.74 -.76
Cemex 8.82 -.07
Cemigpfs 12.75 -.13
CenterPnt 10.05 -.19
Centex 9.09, -.20
CnbyTel 30.19 -.60
Champ61h .47 -.02


.Checkpnt 13.08 +.04
ChesEng 19.95 -.77
Chevron 65.88 -1.32
Chlcos 7.47 -.02
Chimera 3.57
ChinaMble 46.06 -1.10
Chubb . 38.94 -1.24
Cimarex 27.55 -.45
CinciBell 2.60 -.04
Citigrp 3,48 -.07
CleanH 52.15 -.21
CliffsNRss 21.52 -.49
Clorox 51.11 +.67
Coach 23.14 -.11
CocaCE 16.73 -.20
CocaCI 44.96 +.06
Coeur 1.37 +.06
CohStSUt 10.10 -.24
.ColgPal 63.49 +.05
CollctvBrd 13.81 -.18
ColBgp 1.23 -.05
Comerica 20.45 -.94
CmtyHIt 22.86 -.75
CVRD 17.37 -.25
CVRDpf 14.84 -.19
Con-Way 29.39 +1.18
ConAgra , 17.66 -.05
ConocPhil 43.93 -.81
Conseco, 2.54 -.13
ConsolEngy 34.39 -1.44.
ConEd 34.86 -.16
ConstellA 11.90 +.16
ConstellEn 24.80 -.80
COtAirB 10.42 -.37
Cnvrgys 9.20 -.16
Cooper Ind 32.56 -.62
Coming 13.88 -.20
CoventyH 19.09 +.07
Covidien 36.40 +.38
CownCstoe 21.90 -.48
CrownHold 23.99 +.30
Cummins 29.55 -.4
CvoSemis 7.25 +.09

DCTIndl 4.17 -.17
DJIADiam 82.78 -.36
DNPSet t 7.67 -.06
DPL 21.30 -.52
DR Horans 8.99 -.13
DTE 29.44 -.48
Daimler 33.62 -.80
Danaher 57.84 -.28
Darden 34.10 -.20
DeanFds 18.53 '+.12
Deere 41.91 +.13
DeltaAir 6.33 -.04
DenburyR 15.50 -.73
DeutschBk 54.02 +.44
DevelDiv 4.15 -.44
DevonE 58.50 -3.51
DiaOffs 72.48 -1.52
DianaShlp 15.12 +.43
DicksSptg 18.19 +.25
DigitalRIt 33.73 -1.17
DigitGIbn 20.50 -1.00
DirxFinBull 8.74 -.49
DirxFinBear 5.90 +.30
DirxSCBear 30.03 +.48
DirxSCBull 23.71 -.34.
DirxLCBear 41.92 +.95
DirxLCBull 30.44 -.76
DirxEnBull 29.61 -1.96
Discover 8.59 -.16
Disney 23.41 -.07
DomRescs 30.52 -.52
Domtarglf 1.41 -.02
DonlleyRR 12.37 -.36
DEmmett 8.78 -.39


Dover 31.15 +.17
DowChm 16.47 -.05
DrPepSnap 22.07 +.70
DuPont 26.93 -.04
DukeEngy 13.48 -.25
DukeRlty 8.20 -.43
Dynegy 1.77 -.21
EMCCp 11.94 , +.06
EOG Res 68.25 -3.11
EastChm 38.02 -1.06
EKodak 2.47 -.14
Eaton 45.31 +.44


Ecolab 36.26 -.74
Edisonlnt 28.36 -.96
BPasoCp 8.35 -.09
Elan 6.61 +.16
Embarq 40.88 -.80
EmersonEl 33.75 -.18
EmpDist 14.68 -.29
Emulex . 10.66 +.03
EnbrEPtrs 34.99 -.59
EnCana 50.32 -1.37
Energizer 51.89 +2.20
EnPro 17.01 -.03
ENSCO 30.55 -1.02
Entergy 73.42 -.15
EqtyRsd 22.04 -.70'
EsteeLdr 32.08 -.11
ExcelM 9.17 +.11
ExcoRes 11.19 -.38
Exelon 47.22 -1.69
ExxonMbl 69.11 -.65
FMCCorp 48.47. -1.73
FPL Grp 54.44 -.60
FalrchldS 5.85 +.09
FamilyDIr 30.29 -.31
FannieMaeh ' .78 '-.02
FedExCp 52.98 -.43
FedSignl 8.17 +.15
Ferreligs 14.91 +.07
Ferro. 4.47 -.19
FidlNFin 15.00 -.39
RdNlnfos 18.33 +.09
FstHorizon 11.27 -.14
FTActDiv 9.48 -.01


FtTrEnEq 8.41
FirstEngy 36.47 -3.87
Fluors 43.25 -1.21
FootLockr 10.55 -.21
FordM 5.49 +.33
ForestCA 6.25 -.05
ForestOil 17.38 -.93
Fortress 4.25 -1.01
FortuneBr 36.20 -.40
FdtnCoal 26.88 -1.26
FrankRes 60.10 -.45
FredMach . .81 -.02


FMCG 45.17 -.94
FrontierCm 7.18 -.06
FronfierOil 16.09 -.15

GATX 25.63 +.06
GabelliET 3.86 -.09
GabHIthW 4.85 -.04
GabUtil 6.25
GameStop 26.47 +.50
Gannett 4.36 -.05
Gap 15.16 -.25
GencoShip 18.11 +.65
GenDynam 55.01 -.83
GenBec 12.86 -.'18
GenMills 52.61 -.81
GnMotr 1.09 -.06
Genworth 4.67 -.32
GaPw8-44 25.33 +.17
Gerdau s 8.06 -.07.
Gildan 13.58 +.54
GlaxoSKIn 31.78 -.39
GoldFLtd 12.28 -.12
Goldcrpg 33.44 -.14
GoldmanS 134.40 +.80
Goodrich 43.31 +.14
Goodyear 11.24 -.19
Grafrech 8.77 -.01
GtPlainEr 14.80 -.13
Griffon 9.59 +.01
GpTelevisa 16.93 -.06
GuangRy 24.13 -.56
GushanEE 2.25 -.48


HCC Ins 23,41
HCP Inc 20:60
HRPT Prp 3.91
HSBC 40.60
HSBC cap 22.47
Hallibrtn 21.17
HanJS 10.55
HanPtDv2 6.93
Hanesbrds 14.49
Hanoverlns 32.75
HarleyD 17.48
HarmonyG 10.63


HanisCorp 29.68 +.51
HarifdFn 14.60 -,-15
Hasbro 22.93 -.19
HawaihEl 16.01 -.32
HItCrREIT 32.08 -1.20
HItMgmt 4.59 -.23
HithcrRIty 16.00 -.77
HealthNet 16.28 -.57
HlthSouth 11.08 +.05
HedaM 2.98 -.13
Heinz 35.14 -.33
HelixEn 9.33 -.38
HellnTel 7.60 -.23
HelmPayne 29.72 -1.28
Hess 58.18 -1.71
HewlettP 35.01 +.08
HighwdPrp 21.49 -.30
HomeDp 24.40 -.13
Honwillnl 31.95 +.03
HospPT 12.68 -.55
HostHots 7.67 -.52
HovnanE 2.61 -.01
Humana 31.58 -.21
Huntsmn 5.90 -.17
IAMGId g 9.83 +.05
ICICI Bk 23.39 +1.10
iSAsta .15.01 -.29
iShBraz 47.86 -.95
iSCan 20.01 -.31
ISh HK 12.52 +.03
iShJapn 9.09 +.09
iSh Kor 34.78 -.37
iShMex 34.60 -.30


iSTaiwn 10.14
iShSilvers 13.77
iShS&PIOO 41.67
iShCh25s 33.68
iSSP500 88.94
iShEMkts 30.08
iShB20T 98.04
iS Eafe 43.75
iSRMCVs 27.48
iShRsMd 61.35
iSR1KV 46.15
iSR1KG 38.63


iSRuslK 48.41 -.43
iShR2K 47.76 -.18
iShREst 30.93 -1.05
iShFnSv 44.26 -.88
iShFnSc 41.26 -.96
iStar 3.22 -.31
ITTCorp 40.77 +.01
Idacorp 22.37 -.69
nTW 33.01 -.94
Imation 10.28 -.04
IngerRd 20.55 +.15
IngrmM 15.61 +.08
IntegrysE . 27.65 -.71
IntcntEx 96.92 -3.84
IBM 101.37 +.32
IntiCoal 2.68 -.13
InUGame 13.60 -.07
IntPap 12.49 -.01
Interpublic 5.09 -.09
IntPotash 28.49 +.07
Invesco 14.39 -.65
IronMtn 26.95 -.08
1tuUni3Mdt1336 -38

JCrew 18.40
JPMorgCh 34.91 -63
Jabil 7.49
JacobsEng 38.58 -1.25
JanusCap 8.62 -.59
Jarden 18.06 +.76
Jeffedes 18.42 -.03
JohnJn 55.41 +.39


JohnsnCtI 18.25 -.43
JonesApp 8.32 -.11
KB Home 15.56 -.26
KBRInc 16.99 -.40
KKRFn 1.28 -.22
KCSouthn 14.79 +.24
Kaydon 31.41 +.30
KAEngTR 14.78 -.28
Kellogg 43.19 -.22
KeyEngy 5.36 -.37
Keycorp 5.80 -.13
KimbClk 50.49 -.05
Kimco , 10.06 -.61
KindME 46.23 -.29
KingPhrm 8.79 -.23
Kinrossg 16.89 -.13
Kohls 41.33 +.09
Kraft 24.80 -.30
KrispKrrn 3.07 -.26
Kroger 21.80 -.41
LDK Solar 8.02 -.10
LG Display 11.78 -.13
LLE Roy hIf .54 -.01
LSI corp 3.79 -.17
LTCPrp 18.34 -.51
LaZBoy 1.99 -.04
LabCp 61.66 -1.66
Ladede 31.37 -.87
LVSands 9.23 -.20
LearCorp 1.34 +.02
LeggMason 18.53 +.39
LennarA 8.81 -.22
LeucNatl 19.84 -1.09
Lexmark 17.12 +.50
LbtyASG 2.50 -.02
UbtProp 22.40 -1.21
UllyEi 34.17 -.95
United 11.01 -.12
LincNat 16.12 -.12
Undsay 33.87 +.47
UzClaib 4.38 +.07
LockhdM 79.93 -.94
Loews 25.21 -1.01
Lorillard 69.39 +1.24
Lowes 18.45 -.42

M&TBk 46.16 -1.83
MBIA 5.65 -.41
MDURes 16.85 -.10
MEMC 15.84 -.20
MFAFnd 6.24 -.15
MCR 7.56 +.01
MGIC 4.19 -.52
MGMMir 7.67 -.09
Macerich 15.02 -.93
MackCali 21.66 -1.24
Macquarh 3.10 -.09
Macys 11.33 +.01
Madecos 5.88 +.02
Magnalg 30.88 -.89
Manitowoc 5.40 -.22
Manulifgs 18.03 -.45
MarathonO 28.63 -.46
MktVGold 37.65 -.40
MarlntA 21.57 -.04
MarshM , 19.13 +.03
Marshlls 8.01 -.38
MStewrt 3.22 -.04
Masco 9.54 +.08
MasseyEn 18.55 -.63
MasterCrd 173.13 -.22
Mattel 13.94 -.14
McDermInt 18.48 +.33
McDnlds 53.46 -.11
McGrwH 30.12 -.38
McKesson 38.46 -1.01
MeadVWco .14.47
Mechels 7.32 -.17


MedcoHith 4.74 -1.39
Medmnic 33.40 -.19
Merck 25.47 -.58
Metavnte 24.18 +.07
MetUfe 29.39 -1.10
MetroPCS 16.73 -.01
MicronT 4.24 -.31
MidAApt. 34.62 -2.98
Midas 9.29 -.21
Millipore 64.82 -.78
Mirant 13.98 -.55
MobileTel 34.00 +.58
MoneyGrm 1.47 -.01
Monsanto B9.95 -.08
MonslrWw 12.56 -.07
Moodys 28.40
MorgStan 26.13 -.44
MSEmMkt 9.90 +.06
Mosaic 51.30 +.97
Motorola 5.91 +.13
MurphO 52.33 -1.86
NCR Corp 10.25 -.21
NRGEgy 19.58 -.67
NYSE Eur 24.19 -.28
Nabors 16.06 -.99
NalcoHId 16.53 +.47
NatFuGas 30.81 -.82
NatGrid 44.38 -.58
NOilVarco 32.67 -1.47
NatSemi 11.95 -.11
NatwHP 24.71 -.80
NewAm rs 6.16 -.10
NJ Rscs 31.24 -.52
NYCmtyB 10.47 -.58
NewellRub 10.39 +.02
NewmtM 42.64 -1.03
NwpkRs If 2.68 -.11
Nexeng 19.35 -.62
NiSource 10.64 -.23
Nicer 32.01 -.47
NikeB 49.75 -1.20
NobleCorp 27.92 -1.19
NobleEn 51.97 -2.17
NolkiaCp 14.10 +.26
Nordstnm 22.58 +1.63
NorflkSo 35.08 +.58
NoestUt 20.58 -.45
NorthropG 48.09 -.74
Novartis 39.23 -.88
NSTAR 28.83 -.77
NuPor 38.90 -.50
NvFL 11.60 +.04
NvIMO 12.40 +.06
NvMulSI&G 4.65 -.05
NuvQPf2 4.84 +.02
OGE Engy 25.72 -.29
OcciPet 60.03 -1.38
OffioeDpt 3.25 -.32
OffceMax 6.97 -.17
OilSvHT 93.60 -2.63
OldRepub 9.74 -.36
Olin 12.66 +.08
Omnicom 30.97 -.29
ONEOK 26.47 -.53
ONEOK Pt 46.15 +.26
OshkoshCp 9.92 . -.40
Owenslll 25.32 -.47

PG&ECp 35.58 -.70
PMIGrp 1.61 -.16
PNC 41.79 -1.33
PNM Res 9.36 -.29
PPG 42.20 -.21
PPLCorp 31.37 -.57
Pactiv 21.40 -.01
PallCorp 25.27 -.08
ParkerHan 43.66 +.27
PatriltCs 8.22 -.34


PeabdyE 28.94 -1.06 QwestCm 4.09 -31
Pearson 10.61 -.01 RPM 14.04 +.32
Pengrthg 7.35 -.16 RRIEngy 4.49 -.35
PennVaRs 13.35 +.13 RadioShk 11.95 -.05
PennWstg 11.45 -.43 Ralcorp 60.63 -.29
Penney 26.54 -.11 RangeRs 39.93 -1.67
PepBoy 6.15 +.06 RJamesFn 15.48 --.36
PepcoHold 11.89 -.30 Rayonier 36.81 -.63
PepsiBott 32.28 +.16 Rdytheon 46.07 -.95
PepsiCo 50.32 -.55 Ritylnco 20.11 -.83
PepsiAmer 25.44 +.18 RedHat 19.86 +1.74
Prmian 9.03 -.43 RgcyCrs 30.85 -1.21
PetroCg 3526 -1.42 RegBkHT 65.50 -1.31
Petrohawk 22.30 -1.06 RegionsFn 4.85 -.13
PetrbrsA 29.75 -.67 Repsol 19.95 -.25
Petrobras 37.01 -.91 RepubSvc 22.17 -.42
Pfizer 15.01 -.33 RetallHT 75.90 -.92
PhilipMor 43.17 +.75 RetailVent 3.08 -.06
PiedNG, 22.34 -.70 Revtonrs 4.87 +J8
PimcoSlrat 8.39 -.01 ReynldAm 39.96 +23
PioNtr 24.39 -1.37 FiteAld h 1.04 +.04
PitnyBw 21.34 -.14 RobtHalf 21.96 -.24
PlainsEx 21.30 -.64 RockwlAut 31.20 -.07
PlumCrk. 32.07 -.77 Rockcot] 38.22 +.64
Polaris 29.81 -.06 Rowan 17.12 -.38
PostPrp 13.47 +.05 RylCarb 14.30 -.15
Potash 107.14 -.79 RoyDShIIB 48.95 -.40
PwshDB 21.18 -.55 RoyDShlIA 48.43 -.76
PSAgri 26.15 -.89 Royce 8.66 -.15
Praxar 70.50 -.53 RocepB 22.86 -.04'
PrecDdl 4.80 -.36
Pridelntl 20.12 -.51
PdnFnd 18.58 -.28 SAPAG 39.25 -.62
ProShtS&P 68.99 +.46 SCANA 28.78 -.96
PrUShS&P 61.37 +.97 SKTIcm 15.89 -.03
ProUltDow 27.69 -.25 SLGreen 19.80 -.78
PrUIShDow 51.22 +.38 SLMCp 5.55 -.01
ProUltQQQ 32.17 -.07 SpdrGold 91.55 +.52
PrUShOQQ 38.95 +.02 SpdrHome 12.09 +.02
ProUItSP 24.25 -.42 SpdrKbwBk 18.30 .-.41
ProUShL20 49.13 +.19 SpdrKbwRB 20.56 -.53
ProUItSEM 25.75 +.31 SpdrRel 25.57 -.14
ProUShtRE 24.46 +1.53 SpdrOGEx 32.58 -.98
ProUShOG 20.02 +.82 Saleway 19.23 -.35
ProUShtFn 47.52 '+1.63 SUoe 2.380 -.56
ProUIIRE 3.26 -.21 StJude 37.11 +.19
ProUltO&G 26.37 -1.11 Saks 3.34 -.26
ProUlFin 3.75 -.15 SJuanB 15.73 -.71
ProUBasM 16.74 -.18 SandRdge 9.94 -.18
ProUSR2K 50.51 +.45 SaraLee 9.22 -.11
ProUItR2K 16.99 -.22 SchergPI 23.35 -.28
ProUltCrude 9.08 -.67 Schlmbrg 52.05 -1.88
ProctGam 50.67 -.13 SemiHTr 19.18 -.36
PrngrssEn 34.07 -.66 SenHoes 14.22 -.80
ProgsvCp 16.00 -.26 Sensient 22.57 -.50
ProLogis 7.30 -.32 SiderNac - 19.16 -.38
Proutlfe 10.99 +1.76 SivWhtn g 8.58 -.28
ProvETg 4.86 -.10 SimonProp 48.92 -3.13
Prudent 37.75 -1.62 Skechers 9.28 +.01
PSEG 31.69 ... SmilthAO 28.28 -.12
PSEGpfA 72.00 ... Smitlnt 26.76 -.99
PubStrg 61.40 -2.03 SmiFthF 11.72 -.19
PuiteH 9.63 -.12 Smucker 39.75 -.45
PPrIT 4.56 -.11 SoJerind 34.45 -.64
QtmDSSh 1.02 ... SouthnCo 28.12 -.36
Questar 32.96 -1.00 SthnCopps 18.19 -.45
QksilvRes 8.56 -.40 SwstAi rl 6.89 -.06
tuiksivr 2.14' +.25 SwstnEngy 39.05 -.19




The remainder of the
NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.


IA EIA N TOK XCANE1


Name Last Chg

AbdAsPac 5.34 +.08
AdmRsc 14.00 -.12
Advenltrx . .14 -.01
AlhdNevG 5.83 -.05
AlAsMwt .13 +.02
AmApparel 5.09 -.36
AmO&G .84 -.10
Anooraqg .87 -.04
ApolloGg .43 +.02
ArcadiaRs :45 -.01
Augus g 1.92
Aurizong' 4.28 -.27


BMB Munal 1.09 +.08
BPZRes 5.86 -.29
BarcAIG36 35.60 -.83
BarcGSOil 20.50 -.78
BrclndiaTR 39.47 +.61
BOotsCts 1.15 -.04
BritATob 52.35 -.23
CanoPet .62 -.06
CelSd .31 +.01
CFCdag 11.50 +.06
ChenlereEn 3.97 -.04
ClaudeRg .75 +.01
ClghGIbOp 9.92 -.03
ColumAcq -7.95 +.10
Contango 42.01 -.28


CortexPh .29 -.01
Crossh glf .22 -.03
Cristalxa .30 -.01

DWSREII .56 -.00
DenisnMg 1.77 -.13
DuneEngy .17 -.01
EVInMu2 11.91 --.04
EVLIdDur 11.74' +.09
EldorGldg 8.31 +.07
EBtePh ' .12 +.01
BbdrGam .17 -.02
EllswthFd 5.25 -.06
Endvrlnt 1.32 -.01
EndvSilvg 1.70 +.01


EntreeGold 1.03 -.05
EvglncAdv 7.36 -.28
EverMultSc 11.45 +.04
RaPUtl 11.81 -.59
FrkStPrp 11.95 -.48
FrontrD 2.91 -.05

GHLAcwl .50 +.05
GascoEngy � .44 -.01
GastarEg .48 -.01
GenMoly 1.52 -.11
GoldRsvg .64 +.01
GoldStrg 1.82 +.12
GranTrrag 2.49 +.03
GrtBasGg 1.47 +.04


Hemisphrx 1.30 +.38
IA Global .06 -.01
ImpOilgs 34.51 -.62
InovioBo .54 -.01
IntellgSys .62 +.02
InterAtF 7.74 -.02
IntlRyltyg 3.01 +.04


JavelinPh 1.16 +05
KBLHAcq 7.70 -.04
KodiakOg 1.04 +.08
Kowabunga . .17
LadThalFn .65 -.06


Merrimac 3.37 -.11
Metalico . 2.21 -.13
Metrolth - 1.99 +.06
Minefndg 7.90 +.18
�NBRESec 1.71 -.07
Nevsung 1.27 +.01
NDragon .20 +.02
NwGoldg 2.14 -.04
NAPallg 2.43 -.04
NDynMng 6.26 -.02
NthnO&G 5.86 -.06
NthgtMg 1.75 -.01
NovaDelP .33 -.02


NovaGld g 3.64 +.28
NvVADv2 13.96 -.07
Oiandsg .89 -.03
On2Tech .46 -.02


PacRim 23 -.00
Palatin .18 +.03
ParaG&S 1.54, +.11
PionDrill 5.63 -.33
PolyMeg 1.15 -.05
PSCrudeDLn 3.26 -.21
Protalix 3.89 -.27
PyramidOs 5.04 -.13
QuestCapg -.86 +.13


RaeSyst .97 -.01
Rentech .61 -.02
RivieraH 1.48 -.03
Rubicon a 1.82 +.01

Sapphire 9.63 +.02
SeabGldg 24.52 -.46
SilvrcpMgn 2.84 +.14
Sinovac 2.23 -.07
"SulphCo 1.06 -.06
TanzRyg 3.19 -.04
Taseko 1.36 -.03
Telkonet .15 -.02
Tengsco .50 -.01
TiensBio 2.65 +.18


US Gold 1.98 -.02
Uluru .29 +.10
Uranerz 1.20 -.05
UraniumEn ' 1.27 +.06


VangMega 30.77 -.36
VimetX 1.53 -.01
VistaGold 2.19 -.04
Walterlnv 13.56 -.29
WstGldfdg 2.08 -.06
Westmdd 7.84 -.42
WilshrEnt 1.74


1: ASD.AQ N ATINLMRE


Name Last Chg


A-Power 9.98 +73
ACMoore 2.45 -.06
ADCTel 6.65 -.07
AMAGPh 53.50 -.35
APACC 5.41 -.08
ASMLHId 19.16 +.04
ATMIInc 14.46 -.22
ATPO&G 6.75 -.29
ATS Med 2.78 +.03
AVIBlo / 1.00
Aasm .37
Acadia i 1.61 -.13
AcordaTh 23.23 +.71
AclvsBz s 11.60 +.09
Actuate 4.67 +.10
Acxom 9.94 +.62
Adpt 2.76 +.02
Ad y 25.92 -.01
Ad 19.72 +.32
AdvAech .4.61, -.05
Ad ey 3.47 +.23
AdaA .60 -.00
AdvantaB .75 -.01
AdventSft 31.89 -.52
Ayet 4.76" -.03
AgFeed 4.02 +.02
AsMeth 29.12 +2.22
AkamaiT 20.74
AlancoTch .47 -.12
AlaskCom 6.78 -.07
Aldila 3.75 -.17
Alexions '33.70 +.98
AlignTech 11.56 +.02
Alkerm 8.62 -.01
AllegianfT 42.30 -1.29
AllosThera 6.40 -.08
AIIscriptM 11.81 -.31
AlmostFam 28.43 -.98
AlnylamP 19.43 -.27
AlteraCpI 15.20 -.05
AltusPhm .31 -.01
Amazon 73.60 -1.51
Amedisys 33.26 -2.29
AmerBloh .16 -.02
AmCapLtd 3.04 -.21
AmitPastan 28.11 +1.20
AmerMed 14.66 -.20
AmPubEd 36.85 +2.33
AmSupr 22.86 -.35
AmCasino 18.76 +.16
Amgen 48.16 -.02
AmkorTIf 3.65
Amylin 10.50 +.09
Anadigc 2.95 -.06
AnadysPh 2.24 -.03
Annogic 38.45 -.01
Analysts .60 +.02
Andrsons 21.31 +.43
Anglotchg 1.05 -.11
AngloAm 11.00 -.13
Anss . 26.95 +.75
ApooGrp 63.70 -.48
Apolloln 5.78 -.35
Apple Inc 122.42 -.53
ApldMaut 10.71 -.35
AMCC 6.53 +.05
ArchCap 57.70 -1.89
ArcSight 14.85 +1.03
ArenaPhm 2.91 +.19
AresCap 6.80 -.40
AdadP 1.39 +.04
Aiba Inc 9.91 +.04
ArkBest 24.40 +1.61
ArmHld 5.00 +.02
Arrls 10.30 +.09
Amowhtd .49 -.06
ArtTech 3.33 -.08
Asialnfo 16.20 -.10
AsscdBanc 15.66 -.58
Astec 27.45 -.02
alhenahilh 30.66 -1.46
Atheros 15.29 -.34
AdasAIr 23.74 +.35
AtasnAms 15.53 -.07


Atmel 3.59 -.26
Audvox 5.10 +.16
Authentdth .72 +.24
Autadesk 19.00 +.16
AutoData 35.79 -.38
AvoctCp 14.63 -.05
Aware 2.30 -.01
Axcelis .37 -.01
AxsysTech 43.35 ,+.65
BEAero 12.61 +.41
Baidu Inc 235.01 +.41
BankUtd .77 -.11
8areEscent 8.65 +.17
BasinWater .35 -.03
BeaconPw .75 -+.02
BeacnRfg 14.43 -.34
BeasleyB 2.60 +.35
BebeStrs 8.19 -.14
BedBath 27.83 +.10
Blocryst 3.19 +.77
Biogenldc 49.07 +.07
BloMarin 14.00 -.17
Biopurersh .25 -.01
. Blkboard 30.14 +.98
BlueCoat 14.37 +.45
BobEvn 24.29 -.36
BostPrv 5.19 +.13
BrgExp 2.60 -.07
=Brightnt 5.90
20.83 -.15
BrodeCm 5.98 -.02
BridneB 9.24 -.18
BrooksAuto 4.76 +.09
Bucyruss 22.76 -.32
BuffaloWW 34.56 -.45
CAlnc 18.04 -.23
CDCCpA 1.28 +.06
CH Robins 50.73 -.09
CME Grp 277.30 -7.07
CTC Media 9.35 -.25
CVBFncl 6.35 -.20
CabotMic 25.87 +.06
Cadence 5.39 +.03
Cal-Maine 22.27 -1.69
CalifPizza 13.53 -.48
CaliperLSc 1.20 -.08
CallWave 1.16 +.01
CdnSolar 7.71 -.10
CapCtyBk 13.29 -.22
CpstnTrb * .62 +.00
Caraustar .21 +.00
Cardica 1.77 -.27
CadioNetl 17.89 -.43
CareerEd 20.75 +.03
Carizo 16.39 -.62
CarverBcp 6.00
Caseys 25.06 +.40
CalhayGen 11.86 -.52
CaviumNet 13.45 +.43
CeleraGrp 7.72 -.62
Celgene 39.79 -.91
CellGens h .52 -.02
CellTher rsh 1.19 +.06
CentlCom 8.28
CentEuro 20.78 -.77
CentAl 5.50 -.19
Cephln 66.47 +1.06
Cepheid 9.98 -.17
Ceradyne 19.73 +.06
Cemer 55.50 +.60
CerusCp .99 -.05
Changyou n 29.69 +.29
ChrmSh 3.27 +.08
Chartlnds 18.45 +.03
ChkPoint 22.31 -.02
Cheesecake 15.09 -.21
ChildPlace 32.31 +.10
ChinaArch 1.58 -.24
ChinaDir 1.31 -.10
ChinaMed 19.60 -.11
ChinaPStII 1.79 -.09
ChrchllD 38.30 +.86
ClenaCorp 9.59 +.04
ClnnRn 22.06 -.73
Cintas 24.94 -.16
Cirrus 3.39 -.09
Cison 17.92 -.17
CitizRep 1.52 -.04


CitrixSys 27.62 +.32
CleanEngy 8.92 +.42
Clearwire 4.59 -.35
CogentC 6.11 -.25
Cogent 11.14 +.15
CognizTech 25.76 +.81
CogoGrp 6.95 -.14
Coinstar 33.90 +.90
ColdwIrCrk 3.80 -.05
Co[Sprtw 31.02 +.42
Comarco 1.83 +.03
CombRx .74 -.06
Comcast 14.42 -.44
Comcspd 13.50 -.40
CmcBMO 32.18 -.64
CommSys 9.03 -.17
CommVIt 11.11 +.09
Compuwre 7.95 +.53
Comtech 28.07 +1.05
Comverge 8.83 +.52
ConcurTch 28.44 +1.02
Conexantrs 1.12 . -.04
Conmed 14.33 +.22
ConstantC 15.86 -.36
ConvOrgan 1.95 -.24
Copart 29.19 -1.05
CorinthC 16.80 +.23
CorpExc 16.26 -.07
CorusBksh .61 -.10
Costco 44.75 -.05
CrackerB' 28.50 -.25
Cree Inc 26.35 +.04
Crocs 2.25
CrosstexE 3.02 -.18
Ctrip.com 37.02 +.15
CubistPh 16.76 -.03
CuraGenh 1.02 +.02
Cydacel .88 +.13
Cymer 24.73 -.05
CyprsBio 7.49 +.03
CvtRx .50

DG FastCh 18.81 +.50
DataDom 16.83 -.10
'DayStar .64 -.05
DealrTrk 13.08 -.18
DeckOut 48.85 -2.04
decodGenh .33 +.02
Dell Inc 10.98 +.05
DItaPtr 1.66 -.04
Dndreon 20.52 -.29
Dennys 2.18 -.09
Dentsply 29.53 -.12
DigRiver 34.60 +.29
Diodes 11.83 +.02
DirecTV 24.23 -.54
DiscCmA 19.29 -.01
DiscvLabs .91 +.07
DishNetwk 15.71 -.13
DllrTree 42.20 +.18
DrmWksA 23.51 +.17
DressBam 14.23 +.44
DryShips 6.84 +.75
DynMatl 16.49 +.01
Dynavax 1.09 -.01
ETrade 1.46 -.06
eBay 16.91 +.07
EPIQSys 13.48 -.13
eResrch 5.54 +.04
ev3lnc 8.06 -.04
EagleBulk 6.59 +.14
EaglRkEn 3.14 +.13
ErthULink 7.44 +.12
EstWstBcp 8.00 -.40
Eclipsys 14.04 -.74
Ed Bauer .50 -.14
EdgePet .45 +.02
EduDv 5.21 -.09
ElectSd 8.31 +.05
ElectArts 21.03 +.95
Emcore 1.04 -.09
EndoPhrm 15.83 -.35
Eneri 6.12 -.25
EngyConv 14.80 -.39
EngyXXI .64 -.01
Entegris 2.00
EntreMd h .65 +.05


Entrust 2.10 +.16
EnzonPhar 6.54 -.02
EpicorSIt 4.71 -.17
Equthix . 64.03 -1.61
EricsnTels 8.36 -.02
Eurand 12.04 . -.46
EvrgrSIr 2.08 -.05
Exelixis 4.67 +.25
ExideTc 5.45' -.13
Expedia 13.85 -.16
Expdlntf 32.11 +.13
ExpScripts 58.67 -1.38
Ezcorp .11.68 -.14
F5 Netwks 26.35 +.05
FLUR Sys 24.65 -.17
FacetBlon. 9.09 +.03
Fastenal 33.59 +.62
FberTowr .48 -.08
FiflthThIrd 7.10 -.42
Fncllnst 11.76 -1.40
Fnisar .65 -.01
.RnUne 7.26 -.15
FstCashFn 14.79 -.40
FMIdBc 9.55 -.26
FstNiagara 12.40 -.26
FstSolar 177.43 -3.00
FstMerit 18.81 -.42
Fiserv 40.04 +.43
Rextrn 3.50
FocusMda 7.05 -.43
ForcePro 7.02 +.02
FormFac 16.55 +.30
Fossil Inc 20.90 -.68
FosterWhl 23.13 +.27
Fredslnc 12.53 -.26
FrontFncl 1.65 -.17
FuelSysSol 18.56 -.30
FuftonFnd 5.74 -.27
Fuqilnt 7.61 +1.12
FushiCo 778+36

GFIGrp 5.25 +.19
GMX Rs 13.18 +.28
GTSolarn 5.37 -.15
GTCBioh .36 -.02
GTx Inc 9.88 +.28
Garmin 20.74
GenProbe 43.43 +.19
GenBiotch .44 -.00
Genomic 19.00 +.09
Genoptix 25.13 -1.30
Gentex 10.95 -.14
Genftva 17.69 -1.35
GehVec .70 +.01
Genzyme 58.57 -1.37
GeoEye 22.53 -1.10
GeronCp 6.26 +.03
GevityHR 3.98 -.01
GileadSci 43.75 -.45
GlacierBc 16.28 -.62
Globlind 5.77 -.06
Globalstar .78 +.05
Google 390.00 +2.50
GrCanEd n 14.35 +.16
GreenMtC 77.82 -1.90
GrpoFin 2.80 +.22
GuidSofth 3.27 +.04
Gymbree 33.40 +.64
HLTH 11.57 -.05
HMN Fn 5.35 -.21
HMSHId 35.19 -.30
HSN Incn 8.83 +.54
HainCel 16.65 +.31
HansenMed 5.89 -.10
HansenNat 42.61 -.19
Harmonic 5.16 -.10
HrvrdBio 2.95 +.06
HawHold 4.75 -.23
vjHayesLm .10 +.02
Healthwys 10.93 .-.16
HrtIndEx 14.61 +.17
HelenTroy 18.80 +.23
HSchein 44.23 -.58
HercOffsh 3.86 -.189
Hibbett 18.70 +.69
HimaxTch 2.47 -.05
Hologic 11.71 -.35


Home Inns 14.37 +.04 UnearTch 20.66 -.59 OldDomF h 29.49 +2.23
HotTopic 8.83 +.09 UnnEngy 16.70 +.12 Omriiture 11.00 +.37
HubGroup 21.06 -.28 LodgeNet 4.80 -.06 OmniVisn 8.83 +.11
HudsCity 12.28 -.35 Logitech 13.25 +.06 OnAssign ' 3.08 -.21
HumGen 1.81 -.01 LookSmart 1.30 +.02 OnSmcnd 5.69 -.07
HuntJB 26.90 +.17 uule n 12.15 -.32 OncoGenxn 8.20 +.59
HuntBnk 4.63 -.09 OnyxPh 25.30 -.50
HutchT 2.13 OpenTxt 31.12 +.38
lACInters 14,95 -.20 MCGCap 1,98 -.06 OpenTV 1.54 +.03
ICOGIbA .59 -.04 MDRNAH 1.41 +.26 OpnwvSy, 1.20 -.02
IdexxLabs 40.80 -.21 MGE 30.40 -.69 optXprs 15.86 -.36
IPCHold 26.63 -.55 MRVCmhIf .47 +.01 Oracle 18.42 -.04
iShACWX 31.55 -.31 MTS 21.09 +.06 Orexigen 3.14 +.03
iShNsdqBio 65.34 -.17 MYRGrpn 16.05 +.86 Orthfx . 22.90 -.28
IconPLCs 16.02 -.61 MacrvsnSol 20.86 -.25 OsdentPh .23 +.02
IconixBr 14.62 +.44 MageinHI .30.00 +.10 OtterTail 19.10 -.39
Illuminas 35.64 +.19 MaidenH 4.82 +.14
Immuonr 15.81 -.10 ManTech 37.31 +.94
ImunoGn 7.04 -.42 Martek 17.77 -.51 PDLBioh 6.85 +.05
Imunmd 1.97 +.07 MarvellT 10.69 +.01 PFChng 29.39 +.35
ImpaxLbn 6.49 +.18 MaxCapital 16.82 +10 PMCSra 7.10 +05
Incyte 2.56 -.23 Maximltgn 14.06 -.13 PSSWrld 16.22 -.32
Infinera 8.12 +.07 MxwIllT 8.90 +.23 Paccar 28.88 -.56
Informal 15.25 +.01 Medarex 6.51 +.11 Pacerlnt 2.79 -.18
InfoSonich .54 +.25 MedAssets 16.97 +.06 PacCapB 5.77 -.28
InfosysT 32.02 +.54 MedicActn 9.24 -.35 PacEthan .57 +.01
InsghtEnt 7.19 -.20 MediCo 6.47 -.23 PacSunwr 3.62 -.12
Insmed 1,36 +.03 MelcoCrwn 5.46 *-.02 PaetecHId 3.05 -.07
Insulet 6.75 -.02 Mellanox 11.59 +.61 Palm Inc 11.30 +.33
IntegLSci 24.40 +07 MentGr 6.49 +.02 PanASIv 18.66 -.54
Integrals 7.35 +.51 MercadoL 24.68 +.41 PaneraBrd 51.02 +.16
IntgDv 5.04 -01 MergeHtlh 3.01 +.07 Pantry 20.39 -1.00
Intel 15.19 -35 MesaAir h .15 ... PapaJohns 27.11 +.16
InteractBrk 14.53 +07 Methanx 11.48 -.74 ParagShip 3.63 +.18
InterDig 27.14 +.23 Microchp 20.16 +.20 ParPet 1.83 -.11
Inttace 5.71 -.01 MicrosSys 23.38 -.01 ParamTch 10.52 +.05
InterMune 11.34 -27 MicroSemi 12.35 -.11 Parexal 10.24 -.01
IntBcsh. 11.65 -55 Microsoft 20.22 +.16 Patterson 22.08 -.17
IntlSpdw 22.72 +.14 Middleby 45.50 +2.91 PattUTI 12.16 -.94
Intersil 11.42 -.11 MillerHer 13.20 +.30 Paychex 26.72 -.04
Intuit 23.98 -.34 Millicom 53.92 +1.54 PnnNGm 30.38 -.28
IntSurg 149.92 -3.61 Misonix 2.30 PeopUtdF 16.09 -.31
Isis 14.91 -.31 Molex 15.10 -.16 Peregrineh .48 +.00
IsleCapri 11.86 +.22 Momenta 9.25 -.62 PerfectWId 18.02 -.32
Itron 48.68 +.99 MonarCasn 8.95 -.96 Pemrigo 26.57 -.13
IvanhoeEn 1.47 -.03 Monogrmrs 2.20 +.13 PetMed 15.83 -.43
MonPwSys 18.65 +.69 PetroDev 16.25 -.40
MonroMuf 26.64 +1.78 PetsMart 21.96 +.86
j2GIobal- 21.19 -.18 Move Inc 1.98 -.10 PharmPdt 20.34 -.61
JA Solar 3.11 -.24 Mylan 12.76 +.09 PlugPower .90 -.03
JDS Uniph 4.69 +.02 MyriadG s 32.86 +.50 Polycom 17.67 -.04
JackHenry 17.68 -.01 NABIBto 2.40 -.09 Popular 2.71 -.27
JacklnBox 23.32 -.48 NllHklg 17.36 +.07 PowerMedh .70 -.30
JkksPac 12.58 +25 NasdOMX 17.88 -.07 Power-One 1.10 -.09
JamesRiv 19.44 -1.21 NatCmeM 11.98 -.15 PwShsQQQ 33.37 -.02
JetBlue 5.06 -.14 Natlnstru 20.07 -.83 Powrwav 1.32 +.01
JosphBnk 36.85 -.01 NatPenn 5.97 -.68 Presstek 1.82
JoyGIbl 28.19 +.01 NektarTh 6.03 -.16 PriceTR 36.95 -.37
JnprNtwk 21.56 +.02 NetIlUEPS 12.53 -.20 priceline 99.66 -.08
KLATno 25.24 -.27 NetServic 8.62 PrivateB 19.00 -.47
Kendle 9.51 +.11 NetLogic 31.80 -.38 PrognicsPh 5.37 -.03
KeryxBioh .38 -.05 NetApp 17.57 +.16 ProspBcsh 27.53 -.69
Kforce 9.00 +.07 Netease 30.45 -.10 PrvBksh 7.92 -.24
Kirklands 6.19 +.36 Netfix 38.50 +1.42 PsychSol . 20.18 -.21
KnghtCap 16.86 -.58 NIScout 8.58 -.08 PureCycle 2.71 -.10
KnighlT 12.64 -1.43 Neurogenh .17 -.01 QIAGEN 16.55 +.09
LHCGrp 24.52 -2.23 NeutTand 26.64 -.31 Qlogic 12.83 +.16
LKQCorp 15.25 +.02 NewsCpA 8.60 -.23 Qualcom 40.72 +.19
LSIInds 5.05 -.07 NewsCpB 9.96 -.26 QualitySys 55.08 +.24
LaJollPhih .32 +.05 NexMed .30 +.05 QuantFuel .65 -.03
LamResrch 24.39 -.25 Nextwave h .30 -.04 QuestRes .49 -.06
LamarAdv 17.94 -1.01 Nissan 10.71 .. QuestSft 12.73 +.18
Lance 22.34 +.08 NobityH 8.92 -.70 Questcor 4.37 +.35
Landstar 35.00 -.03 NorTrst 53.55 -1.45 Quidel 11.57 +.28
Lattice 1.67 -.01 NiNWdLb .17 -.01 RFMicD 2.22 -.08
LawsnSit 5.20 -.03 NovlWrds 10.10 +.35 Rambus 12.02 -.28
LeapWirss 37.16 -.75 Novavax 1.72 +.08 Randgold 59.54 -.93
Level3 1.05 -.03 Novell 3.95 -.03 RealNwk 2.46
UbGlobA 14.46 -.17 Novlus 16.85 -.03 RegncyEn 11.72 +.11
UbtyMlntA 5.47 +.08 NuHorizIf 3.01 +.01 Regenm 14.61 -.49
UbMCapA 12.76 +.58 NuanceCm 12.34 +.37 RegentCh .16 +.01
iUbMEntA 23.92 -.48 Nvidia 8.74 +.22 RentACt 18.59 -.16
LifeParts 15.35 +.08 OCharleys 7.65 -.48 Repign 4.05 +.13
LifeTechs 36.21 -.13 OReillyA 36.17 +.75 RepubAir 5.85 -.40
LUfePtH 25.25 -1.35 OSIPhrm 3225 -1.90 RschMotn 72.34 +1.22
UhirGold 22.13 -.87 OceanFrt 1.49 +.10 RexEnergy 4.82 +11
Uncare 22.89 -.56 Odaro .59 -.03 RightNow 9.13 +1.04
UncEl 40.37 -.77 OdysseylIt 9.89 -.01 Riverbed 17.72 +.24


RosettaR 8.01 -.05
RossStrs 35.19 -.04
-R 5 Gd 3997 59
SBACom 22.20 -52
SEI Inv 14.76 -.20
STEC 14.36 +.27
SVBFnGp 25.34 -1.44
SalixPhm 9.49 -.21
SanDisk 13.90 +.77
Sanmina .56 -.03
Sapient 4.88 +.36
SavientPh 5.30 +.13
Schnitzer 47.29 -1.14
Scholastc 19.07 +16
Schwab 16.91 -.17
SdGames 17.01 -.29
SeagateT 7.25 -.04
SearsHidgs 49.87 -1.66
SeattGen 8.38 -.11
Selectvlns 13.01 -.46
Semtech 14.23 +.09
Sepracor 14.15 -.25
Sequenom 3.03 -.04
Shanda 48.50 -1.01
Shire 39.84 -.17
ShifilMstr 4.00 +.13
Shutterity 13.76 +1.16
SiRFTch 3.49 -.10
SierraWr 5.58 +.17
SigmaDsg 13.68 +.26
SigmaAld 45.27 -.08
SilganHId 46.05 +.07
Silicnlmg 2.37 -.01
SilcnLab 30.11 +.21
Slcnware 6.97 -.01
SilvStdg 19.06 -.83
Sina 26.32 -.34
Sinclair 1.59 -.10
SidrusXM .35 -.01
SkyWest 10.98 -.13
SkywksSol 8.76 +.16
SmithWes 5.51 +.26
SmithMicro 8.75 +.82
Sohu.cm 52.58 -.58
Solarfun 4.78 +.03
Sonccorp 9.01 -.01
Sonus 1.92 +.02
SouMoBc 9.90 -.66
SouthFnd 1.94 -.21
SpectPh 4.00 -.07
Staples 19.19 -.39
StarBulk 3.48 +.08
StarSdent 4.00 -.02
Starbucks 12.94 +.21
StarentNet 18.48 +.03
StODynam 11.43 -.14
StemCells 1.75 +.04
Stericycle 52.09 +2.03
SterlBcsh 6.81 -.10
StiFWA 4.12 -.52
SunHithGp 9.46 -.53
SunMicro 9.00
SunPowerA 25.05 -.16
SunPwr Bn 22.60 +.01
SuperWell 9.68 -.69
SusqBnc 7.70 . -.34
Sycamore 2.86 -.05
Symantec 14.82 -.08
Svmetricm 4.53 -.09
Synapticss 30.35 -.35
Synopsys 20.63 +.07
Synovis 13.23 -.46
TBSInlA 8.64 -.06
TD Ameritr 15.90 -.24
TFS Fnd 11.56 -.27
THQ 5.23 +.03
twtetecom 11.07 -.26
TXCORes .54 -.04
TakeTwo 8.81 +.62
TASER 4.17 -.08
TechData 28.06 +.29
Tekelec 15.98 +.40
TnCmSys 7.15 +.14
TeleTech 10.84 +.35
Telik h .68 +.05
Tellabs 4.86 +.02


TesseraT 15.48 -1.30
TetonEgy .38 -.03
TetraTc 23.99 +.34
TevaPhrm 44.93 -.03
TexRdhsA 10.51 +.01
Theravnce 13.42 -.01
thinkorswim 9.58 -.07
Thoratec 27.87 -.67
3Com 4.12
TibcoSft 6.54 +.12
Tktnstrn 6.61 -.03
TiVo Inc 7.50 +.14
TowerGrp 25.43 -.27
TractSupp 35.44 . -.03
TiiadGty .97 -.01
TriooMar 3.35 -.24
TrdentM h 1.42 -.01
TrimbleN 20.22 -.11
Trimeriss 2.18 +.08
TriQuint 3.68 -.08
TrueRelig 19.70 -.14
TrstNY 5.71 -.17
Tmsmk 20.26 -.45
UAL -4.76 -.16
UCBHHId 1.65 -.08
UMBFri 43:07 -1.22
USCncrt 2.16 -.08
UTiWddwd 12.14 -.30
UTStrem 1.66 +.06
Umpqua 9.26 -.39
UtdNtrlF 24.40 -.28
UtdOnIn 6.62 -.13
USEnr 1.95 -.01
USIatn 34.61 -.41
UtdThrp 63.60 +.34
UnivFor 30.37 -.39
UraniumR 1.07 +.07
UrbanOut 18.76 -.28

VCAAnt 24.04 -.61
VNUS Med 28.76 -.04
ValueClick 10.08 +.23
VandaPhm 11.19 -.24
Varian 33.30 -.53
VarianSemi 22.20 -.15
Verenium .54 -.01
Veridgn .22.98 -.50
VerlxPh 28.54 -.42
ViaSat 21.88 +.45
VirgnMdah 6.91 +.03
ViroPhrm 5.0 -.01
VisnChkina 536 +.33
VistaPrt 37.40 +.07
Vrvus 4.26 -.06
Volcano 11.81 -.16
Volterra 10.87 +.22
WanrerChil 11.96 +.48
WarrenRs 1.95 -.16
WashFed 12.04 -.44
Websense 16.11 +.06
WemerEnt 16.39 +.10
WhitneyH 12.02 -.53
WholeFd 19.61 -.94
WindR.t 6.75 -.01
Winn-Dixie 13.80 -.32
WdwrdGov 19.37 -.86
WldAccep 17.87 -.39
WrightM 14.56 -.30
Wynn 37.90 -1.54
XOMA .83 -.02
Xilinx 18.92 -.08
XinhuaSpt .74 +.09
YRCWwde 2.97 -.30
Yahoo 14.91 +.15
ZebraT 19.49 -.04
Zlars .37
ZionBcp 15.05 -1.07
Zoran 9.76 +.28


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


i T R Ub
Pay forr . v-11\

your jtllJ,'I L-



The]EZway!







NO MORE

V Hassles! V Checks! V Reminders!





563-5655 It's EZ!
*Charge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation start.


Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 3.7290 3.7300
Australia 1.3357 1.3138
Bahrain .3767 .3769
Brazil 2.1065 2.0800
Britain 1.5160 1.5236
Canada 1.1796 1.1697
Chile 561.10 563.25
China 6.8263 6.8295
Colombia 2256.50 2251.50'
Czech Rep 20.04 19.69 ,,
Denmark 5.5279 5.4555
Dominican Rep 36.05 36.05
Egypt 5.6200 5.6185
Euro .7421 .7325
Hong Kong 7.7511. 7.7503
Hungary 213.68 211.01
India 49.315 49.606
Indnsia 10400.00 10450.00
Israel 4.1520 4.1307
Japan 95.07 95.71
Jordan .7087 .7088
Lebanon 1502.50 1502.50
Malaysia 3.5495 3.5475.
Mexico 13.2758 13.2000
N.Zealand 1.7113 1.6718
Norway 6.5461 6.4624
Peru 3.031 3.053
Poland 3.32 3.28
Russia 32.0924 32.1844
Singapore 1.4718 1.4632
So. Africa 8.7681 8.5233
So. Korea 1252.40 1264.25
Sweden 7.9239 7.8309
Switzerlnd 1.1232 1.1033
Taiwan 32.96 32.95
Thailand 34.56 34.56
Turkey 1.5682 1.5620
U.A.E. 3.6710 3.6731
Uruguay 23.7001 23.7001
Venzuel 2.1473 2.1473

British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


- Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.50 0.50
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.16 0.18
6-month 0.26 0.30
5-year 1.98 2.14
10-year 3.12 3.29
30-year 4.08 4.27



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Jun 09 56.34 -2.28
Corn CBOT Jul09 41714 -11
Wheat CBOT Jul 09 5771/2 -153/
Soybeans CBOT Jul09 113012 -17
Cattle CME Jun 09 82.37 -.43
Pork Bellies CME Jul09 73.10 -.45
Sugar (world) NYBT Jul09 14.95 -.52
Orange Juice NYBT Jul09 93.50 +.40

SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $930.90 $914.40
Silver (troy oz., spot) $13.3uu $13.93b
Copper (pound) $2.U28U � 2.14/U
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$11U0.UU $1147.1u
NMER = New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT =
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


'




I


7
AmE�x


I NBgASDA^


I NYSE I


. I


i










(~.Vtl~t s COImnY (FL) CHRON 1(71 U BUSINESS SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 A7


W. NAV Chg Name NAV Chg *How *o CREATE lUTLF[l TBE
,Ivestments A: IntlSlk 23.62 18
, 12.11 D10 Sck 74160 8 Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
1. 1644 .09 Dreyfus: price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
'. 328 -.01 Aprec 27.30 -.24
- 19.39 -08 CorVA 17.72 -.26 Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
yF 12.72 -12 Drey 5.9 -.07 NAV:Net asset value.
AlN Investments B: Dr5001n 1 2491 -.27
-.06 EmgLd 12.58 -15 Chg: Net change in price of NAV.
. r.'-, .. GrChinaA r 31.97 +47 Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.
- - -.74 HiYIdAp 5.67
[,AP,6l 12.11 -.26 LgCSIkAp 15.98 -.17 Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
AlJaeyce Capital I: MunBdr 10.82 +.01
bancp 11.83 -.07 SIratValA 19.95 -.30 GrolnAp 9.95 -.09 Legg Mason Ptrs B: LatAmn 30.11 -.32 S&PIdx 13.26 -.15
F 5nc 7.55 -.01 TechGroA 18.22 +.06 IncoAp 2.10 -.01 LgCpGBt 15.71 -.01 MDShrtn 5.25 +.01 SciTech 7.97 -.03
AIlg&-funds B: Driehaus Funds: MATFAp 11.41 +.01 Longleaf Partners: MDBondn 9.99 +.01 ShtTBnd 8.64 -.01
,rspGrt 3.91 -.02 EMktGr 20.35 ... MITFAp 11.87 +.01 Partners 18.52 -.11 MidCapn 36.08 -.18 SmCpStk 8.17 -.07
All-nceBern A: Eaton Vance Cl A: NJTFAp 12.75 +.01 Intl 11.18 +.12 MCapValn 15.22 -.19 TxElt 12.32 +.03
BaWAp 1168 -,10 ChinaAp 16.72 +.07 NYTFAp 14.13 +.01 SmCap 15.76 -.20 NAmern 21.72 -.15, TxELT 12.17 +.03
01lb6T1rAp48.96 -.42 AMTFMBI 9.05 +.03 i OppAp 16.71 -.17 Loomis Sayles: NAsian 10.32 +.13 TxESh 10.44
I1lial'Ap 10.46 -.05 MultiCGrA 5.26 -.07 PATFAp 12.81 +.01 LSBondl 11.12 -.02 NewEran 33.53 -.73 VABd 10.53 +.01
.tCpGrA 17.91 -.06 InBosA 4.56 -.01 SpSitAp 15.21 -.12 StrIncC 11.41 -.02 NHorizn 18.96 -.02 WldGr 12.73 -.12
AtlftnceBern Adv: LgCpVal. 13,43 -.23 TxExAp 9.67 ... LSBondR 11.08 -'02 NIncn 8.86 -,01 VALIC:
L-BpSrAd 17.25 -.15 NatlMun. 8,87 +.03 TotRtAp 11.73 -.07 StrilncA 11.36 -.02 NYBondn 10.75 +.02 MdCpldx 12.61 -.14
AliflpceBern B: SpEqtA 9.60 -.10 ValueBp 5.14 -.05 Loomis Sayles Inv: OverSSFrn 5.92 -.02 StkIdx 18.28 -.21
GqhGrB0t 42.87 -.37 TradGvA 7.52 -.01 Firsthand Funds: InvGrBdA p 10.30 -.02 PSIncn 12.65 -.05 Value Line Fd:
dro�ihBt 16.42 -.16 Eaton Vance Cl B: TechVal 24.24 -.05 InvGrBdCp 10.23 -.03 RealEstn 9.15 -.33 LrgCon 12.53 -.11
SC GrBt 14.61 -.05 HIthSBtI 7.99 -.07 Frank/TempFrnkA: InvGrBdY 10.30 -.03 R2010n 11.74 -.07 Van Kamp Funds A:
Al !eBernC: NaSlMBt 8.88 +.03 AdjUSp 8.95 +.01 Lord Abbett A: "R2015n 8.73 -.06 CATFAp 16.14 +04
S t 1C 14.69 -.04 Eaton Vance ClIC: ALTFAp 10.90 +.01 AffilApx 8.18 -.10 R2020n' 11.73 -.08 CapGro 8.25 -.07
Al Instln MMS: GovtCp 7.51 -.01 AZTFAp 10.49 +.01 AlValA 8.55 -.12 R2025n 8.39 -.07 CmstAp 10.70 -.11
NFQWvVI 8.55 -.12 NatlMCt 8.88 +.03 Ballnvp 32.62 -.31 BdDebAp 6.26 -.01 R2030n 11.82 -.09 CpBdAp 5.77
SmcpVI 1926' -.16 EvergreenA: CallnsAp 11.80 +.02 MidCpAp 9.95 -.13 R2035n 8.26 -.06 EqlncAp 6.36 -.06
Allia Funds A: . AstAlip 9.64 ... CAIntAp 11.11 .... MFSFundsA: R2040n 11.74 -.10 Exch 334.41 -3.93
NFJvVIt 847 -.11 Evergreen C: CaITFAp 6.65 +.01 MITA 13.74 -.16 SdTecn 16.17 +.04 GrlnAp 13.43 -.16
SmCpVA 1843 -.15 AsAICt 9.35 ... COTFAp 11.23 +.02 MIGA 10.28 -.10 ShtBdn 4.72 ... HarbAp 12.17 -.04
Allianz Funds C: Evergreen 1: CTTFAp 10.52 +.01 HilnA 2.65 +.01 SmCpStkn 19.96 -.15, HiYIdA 8.11 +.02
GrowlhCt 16.30 -.21 SIMunil 9.61 +.01 CvtScAp 10.40 -.01 MFLA 9.20 +.01 SmCapVal n22.71 -.22 HYMuAp 8.32 +.03
TargetlCI 865 -.09 FBRFunds: DbITFA 10.87 +.03 TotRA 11.43 -.10 SpecGrn 11.66 -.10 InTFAp 15.78 +.02
AmerBeacon Insti: Focuslnv 32.61 -.35 DynTchA 18.70 -.07 UtilA 11.69 -.22 Speclnn 10.63 -.04 MunlAp 12.18 +.02
Lgftapnst 13,59 -.17 FMIFunds: EqIncApx 11,96 -.13 ValueA 17.18 -.23 TFncn 9.50 +.02 PATFAp 14.79 +.02
AmerBeacon Inv: LgCappn 11.45 -.10 Fedlntp 11.23 +.01 MFS Funds B: TxFrHn 9.5, +.03 StrMunInc 9.32 +.02
LgCaplnv 1294 -.16 FPA Funds: FedTFAp 11,37 +.01 MIGBn 9.28 -.10 TxFrSIn 5.48 .. USMIgeA 12.52
AmerCenturyAdv: Nwnc 11.02 FLTFAp 11.18 +.01 GvScBn 10.04 -.01 USTIntn 5.98 -.01 UlilAp 14.90 -.33
SEQGr oAp 14.56 -.15 FPACresn 21.00 -.10 FoundAip 7.98 -.05 HilnBn 2.66 +.01 UST n 12.45 -.02 Van Kamp FundsBi
l centuryy Inv: Fairholme 23.37, -.36 GATFAp 11,59 +.01 MulnBn 7.97 +.01 VABondn 11.23 EnterpBt 9.57 -.09
l d 125 -.08 FederatedA: GoldPrMA 29.85 -39 TotRBn 11.43 -.10 Valuen 15.72 -.16 EqlncBt 6.25 -.05
5.62 -.05 AmLdrA 10.44 -13 GrwthAp 29.67 -.22 MFS Funds Inati: Principal Inv: . HYMuBt 8.31 +.02
4t4l1 1700 -15 MidGrSIA 23.58 -.14 HYTFAp 9.15 +-01 IntllEqn 12.39 -.10 BdMtgn 8.61 MulB 12.16 +.02
l �ragal, 12.22 -.09 KaulTAp 3.62 -02 HilncA 1.62 MaInStayFundsA: DiscLCnst 8.96 -.10 StrMunlnc 9.32 +.02
1732 -.20 uSeA 9.72 + IncomAp 169 -.01 YdBA 4.88 +.02 LgCV3In 7.41 -.09 USMtge 12.45 -.01
FseC 6,58 +.03 Federated Insth: InsTFA p 11.57 +.01 MainStay Funds B: LgGrIn 5.48 -.03 UtilB 14.82 -.32
li 7.53 -.02 KaulmnK 3,62 -02 NYITFp 10.84 +01 CapApBt 18.99 -.15 LT203OIn 8.17 -.07 Vanguard Admiral:
ci 4.38 -,04 TotRetBd 10.43 -01 LATFAp 10.88 +.01 ConvBt 11.31 -.01 LT20201n 8:45 -.06 BalAdmln 16.61 -.12
Opp 4.33 -,03 FidelityAdvFoeT: LMGvScA 10.46 -.01 GovtBt 8.65 -.01 SAMBalA 9.59 -.06 CAITAdm n 10.69 +.01
ChAg 8.57 -.06 EnergyT 24.03 -.70 MDTFAp 10.70 +01 HYIdBBt 4.85 +01 Putnam Funds A: CALTAdmn10.78 +.01
Chrd 8.81 -.06 HtCarT 14.82 -17 MATFAp 11.24 +.01 IntlEqB 9.56 -.03 AmGvAp 9.29 +.01 CpOpAdin 52.00 -.23
Esl 9.58 -.42 FdeltyAdvisorA MITFAp 11.75 +.01 SmCGBp 8.66 -.03 AZTE 8.67 . EMAdmrrn24.24 -.02
st4ra 14.94 -.13 DivIn orA0r 11.58 06 To1RB1 12.59 .06 CATxAp 7.35 +-01 Energyn 91.73 -2.10
. 4.17 -.04 ,, 13.45 -10 MOTFAp 1158 +.01 Mars&Power:9 -.6 ConvAp 13.73 .05 ExpAdmln n 40.48 -122
r, . 1016 -.09 ,m-,. 10.54 -.01 NJTFAp 11.63 +.02 Growth 51.85 -.25 DrlnpAp 6.55 +-02 ExtdAdmn 24.55 -.24
Aerican Funds A: FidelityAdvisor NYnsAp 10.77 +02 Managers Funds: EqInAp 1079 -.17 00Admln 81.56 -.91
PN"tpAp 13.00 -.11 Divintln 11.75 -.07 NYTFA p 11.39 +02 Bondn 20,75 -.02 EuEq 1399 -24 GNMAhAdn 10.71
AutI Ap 18,74 -.19 EqGrlIn 36.53 -36 NCTFAp 11.81 +.02 Manning&Napler Fds: GIeoA p 9.435 -.06 HlthCrin 41.55 -.56
pA58p 13.81 -.09 Eqlnin 16.73 -26 OhiolAp 12.39 +.01 WIdOppA 6.19-.03 GnA ty 6.39 -.07 HiYldCpn 4.75 -.01
ndA q 10.95 -.01 IntBdIn 9.91 +01 ORTFA p 11.49 +.01 Marsco Funds, GrInAp 9.40 -.12 In4ProAdn 23.69 +.06
Ap 18.65 -.06 Nwgtln 1358 -.09 PATFAp 9.97 +.01 rgeFd 1. IbHIthA 38.24 -.48 ITBdAdm n 10.40 -.01
Ap .5 -. T ReEScA pp 7.24 -.30 usp 188ss: HiYdAp 6.02 -.01 ITsryAdml n 11.70 -.01
C* Ap 40, 23 Fidelity Advisor: RisDvAp 22.82 -.23 Mattews Asan: ,HiYIdIn 4.78 ... IntGrAdmn 41.27 -.13
VGAp 26.71 .22 BalnT 11.21 09 SMCpGrA 21,82 -.12 Indiar 9.68 +.20 'IncmAp 5.60 +.02 ITAdmin 13.28
vApn 2586 -.26 DalnOTp 1 n1.925 . 2StraCpr 8195 -.01 IntGrIn pU 7.13 -.07 ITGrAdmn 8.85 +.01
A 5.6-.26 DynATp 11.95-.21 USGovAp 6.67 MetroWestFds -.0 nvAp 8.76 -.11 LUdTrAdn 10.92
p -01 EqGrT p 34.36 -.35 UtilsA p 9.50 -20 TotRetBd 9.08 .02 NJTxA p 8.92 +-01 LTGrAdmI n 8.08 -.01
iAp 2177 -.20 EqlnT 16.48 - 26 VATFAp 11.30 +'02 M TotRBd 9.07d - NwOpAp 32.93 -.19 LTsyAdmln 11.62 -.03
FunA p +7.2 3 i n p -18 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: PATE 8.73 +.01 LTAdmln 10.71 +.01
n 1254 0 np D-01 GIbBdAdvip MidasFd 2.59 -.01 TxExAp 8.06 ... MCpAdmln55.13 -.62
0p4 12.74 '-.08 I3ntBdT G.89dnp
A 2I -8 1 I IncmeAd 1. -. i Mon etta Funds: TFInAp 14.37 +.01 MorgAdm n 36.36 -.24
S pp 12.88 Tp 12.31 -.0 FrnTempFrnk B:' Monetan 9.95 -.14 TFHYA 10.18 +.02 MuHYAdmn 9.81 +.01
, 15.11 4.01 SFT 8.76 -07 IncomeBt 1.68 -.01 Morgan StanleyA: USGvAp 13.43 +.02 NJLTAdn 11.43
Ap 17.22 -.10 Fidelity Freedom: Frank/Temp Fmk C: DGthA 11.13 -.13 GIblUIA, 9.54 -.19 NYLTAdn 10.80 +.01
eAp 19.67 -.1 Fidelity F reedom2xn1029 10 FoundAp 7.8 -05 MorganStanley B: VstaAp 6.43 -.06 PrmCaprn 47.38 -40
xerdA 35.567 -.143 FF2000xn 10.2967 -.12 IncomCt 1.70 .O DvGIB 11.22 -.13 VoyAp 14.23 -.21 PALTAdmnlO.80 +.01
WrodA 35.51 -13 FF20 n 10.67 -.12 sbD&B 8.14 -.04 Ptnam Funds B: ryn 48.85 +1
-MA p 9.97 FF2015 xn, 8.83 -.09 Frank/Temp Mt11A&P: GI biB 8.14 -.04 Pptnam Funds B: STsyAdml n 10.85 +.01
r, -.07 FF2020xn 10.36 -13 BeacnA 9.21 -08 StralB 14.92 -.09 DvrlnBt 6.51 +.02 STBdAdml n10.34 +.01
I .01 FF2025n 8 +.49 -10 DiscA 2341 +102 MorganStanley nst: Eqlnct 10.68 -.18 ShtTrAdn 15.85 ...
iF,0, , 24 FF2 n, . 12 QualfdAt 14.95 -01 InEqln 10.76 -.03 EuEq 13.41 -.22 STFdAdn 10.91
'F. . 25 r FF203 n 44n -.8 M10 SharesA 15.35 -12 MCapGrln 20.70 -.16 GeoBt 9.34 -.06 STIGrAdn 10.07 +.02
. 10 FF2040 x 5.7122 -07 FranTemp Mtl Munder Funds A: GIbEq t 5.78 -.07 SmCAdm n 20.42 -.22
,.. 23 Inon 94.78 03 DiscCt 2320 +01 IntetA 16.11 -.04 GINRstI 13.13 -.21 TxMCaprn 43.15 -.50
i-, .' -022 FidelIty nvest: FrenkrrempTempA: MunderFundsY: GrInBt 9.23 -.12 ntlBAdmIn 10.18
.' -=, -.1 9 IAggrGrrn 12.27-9 DvMktAp 1520 +02 MCpCGrYrn17.45 -.10 GIblHithB 32.29 -.40 TStkAdmn 21.55 -.24
'r -08 AISeclEq 9.38 -.12 ForgnA p 492 Mutual Series: HYIdB t 6.01 ... WellslAdm n43,42 -.17
S i.' 17 Er ,,e,, 1154 -.06 Gi OrBdApx 11.87 BeacnZ 9.31 -.08 HYAdBt 4.70 -01 WelltnAdmn42.28 -.34
SInvestmen ,' 11.47 - 08 GIrwhAp 1299 , DscZ 23.69 +02 IncmBt 5.56 +.02 Windsor n 31.49 -.40
.ppec 23.44 - AMgLr2O rn10.76 - 02 WordAp 10.88 -.05 QualfdZ 15.07 ... IntGrIn t 7.07 -.06 WdsrllAd n 33.23 -.40
Aael 2542 -.14 Balancgin 13.61 -.10 FrankTempTmp Adv: SharesZ 15.47 -.12 IntlNopt 10.24 -.10 Vanguard Fds:
A Global Funds: BlueChGrn 27.87 -.2 GhAv 1299 -07 Neuberger&Berm Inv: InvBt 7.89 -.09 AssetAn 18.22 -.16
Ir8qlr 23.71 +.19 CAMunn-11.61 Frank/TerpimpmB& Focu 14.03 -.15 NJTEI 8.91 +.01 CALTn 10.78 +01
hiHfEqA 23.17 +.18 Canadan 38.24 -.4 DevMktC 1485 +02 Geneslnst 29.56 -33 NwOpBt 28.80 -.16 CapOppn 22.51 -.10
lrEqIIAt 9,56 +.07 CapApn 16.36 -.29 ForgnCp 4.82 +.01 Intlr 11.42 -06 TxExBt 8.06'... Contn 10.38 -.05
+0 CopevOn 6.4 09 GlBdCpx 11.89 Partner 17.52 -.22 TFHYBt 1020 +.02 DivdGron 10.89 -.12
r.-' F, +.6n CplncrDevOn 6.84 GEE-fun &: Neuberger&BermTr: u:G.iB 13.37 +.02 Energyn 48.86-1.11
S -n Fu 6 aChiaRgr 21.10 +40 S&Snc 139 -.01 Genesis 30.77 -.35 Se-t."JId,6 9,50 -.19 Eqlncn 14.79 -.18
i -.07 CnaRg 352.20 -1.73 S&SPM 29.45 -.31 Nicholas Group: VistaBt 5.46 -.05 3 Explrn 43.51 -.23
.:'r' N: .' .11 3 1.1,- . 11.28 7 TaxEx 1141 +01 Hilncln 8.08 -.01 VoyBt 12,14 -.18 'FLLTn 11.01 ..
-0. 5 Contran 45.44 -,33 GMOTrustll Nichn 31.42 -.22 RSFunds: . GNMAn.. 10.71
u. nds CnvScn 16.29 -.13 EmMkr 8.93 -02 Northern Funds: IntGrA 12.04 -.03 aGlobEqn 12.18 -.06
- ,,:j -.25 DisEqn 16.87 -.19 For 9.68 -.053 HiYFxln 6.20 -.01 LgCAIphaA 29.34 -.42 Grolncn 18.91 -.22
i ,. .22 Divntln . 21.96 -.15 IntInrVI 17.22 -.07 SmCpldx 5.22 -.05 Value 15.64 -.25 GrthEqn 7.25 -.05
, , 4' -.14 DivStkOn 9.55 -.13 USQItyEq 15.70 -1 Technly 9.06 -.01 Raainler Inv Mgt: HYConrpn 4.75 -.01
c-'. " - stn - Nuveen CIA: SmMCap "19.78 -.15 HlthCren 98.43 -1.33
,,,,,, -.0 EmrMknh 15.47 +.07 EmCnDt 6.68 LtMBAp, 10.69 +.01 RidgeWorth Funds: InflaPron 12.06 +.03
r i, -. Eq Incn 30.68 -.49 EmrMkt 8.89 -.02 Nuveen CI R: LCGrStkAp 6.57 -.05 IntlExpIrn 10.44 +.03
E l n 12.94 .21 ntSGrEq 16.80 -.13 InIDMBd 8.69 +.01 RiverSource A: IntlGr n 12.97 -.04
0 ,, ; 7 ECapAp 13.80 -.15 ntilnfrIr " 17.21 -.07 OakAssOc Fds: . BalanceA ,7.61, - ,l-iril.. 23.94 -.11,
, 07 Europe 22.93' -.26 GMOTrustV WhtOkSG n25.42 -.09 DispEqAp 3,84 -s ViGltna 8.85 +.01
+.02 Exch n 38.48 -1.36 EmgMkts r 8.90 -.01 Oakmark Funds : DEI 6.84 -.09 TTsry n 11.70 -.01
i' A Exportn 15.15 -.15 SIrFxlnc 15.50 Eqtyncr 21.90 -.13 Divrd 4.56 ... Ufeonn 13.43 -.06
-.07 Fideln 22.98 -.23 USQItyEq,. 15.71 -.10 Globall 14.70 -.07 DvOppA 5.36 -.07 UifeGron 16.02 -.13
S ,11.51 09 Fityrn 11.81 -.13 GabellFunds: Inllr 12.30 -.05 Growth 18.06 -.14 Ufelncn 12.36 -.04
1.1-9 Fitywr4Fn.Ueodpsn 15 +
, 12.77 -.14 FtRaeHirn 8.64 -.01 Asset 31.27 -.26 Oakmarkr 27.31 -.20 HrYdTEA 4.05 . UeModsn 15 -.1 0
10 -130 6 0 FrinOnn 1983 -.17 Gateway Funds: Selectr 17.54 -.14 LgCpEqp 2.83 -.03 LTIGraden 8.08 -.01
HI .1 3 5.66 -.01 GNMAn 11.35 - GalewayA 23.26 -.11 Old Mutual Adv I:1 MCpGrA 6.81 -.06 LTTrsuyn 11.62 -.03
Ins!OpAp - 23.81 +,01 Govtlnc 10.82 -.01 Goldman Sachs A: Tc&ComZ 10.80 MidCpVl p 4.77 -.08 Morg n 11.73 -.08
BlackRock B&C: GroCo n 51.98 -.27 HiYieldA 5.76 Old Westbury Fds: RiverSource 1: MuHY n 9.81 +.01
IG"C IC 14.31 -.06 Grolncn 12.74 -..15 MdCVAp 21.88 -.32 GlobOpp 6.13 TNEmgMktn6.08 +.01 Mulntn 13.28
kimi." n , Highlncrn 6.95 Goldman Sachsi lnst: GSIbSMdCap 10.19 -.05 Royce Funds: MutUdn 10.92
S -.29 I ndepnn 14.72 -.2: HiYield 5.77 Oppenheimer A: LwPrSkSvr 9.96 -.12 MuLong 10.71 +.0
- 138 -.05 InProBdn' 10.89 +.03 MidCapV 22.05 -.32 AMTFMu 5.61 +.02 MicroCapl 9.75 -.04 MuShrtn 1I.85
kt:ywine Fds: IntBd n 9.48 Harbor Funds: AMTFrNY 9.73 +.04 PenonMulr 7.05 -.05 NJLTn 11.43
,,- " -.14 IntGovn 10.89 Bond 11.80 -.01 CAMuniAp 6.62 +.01 Premiedrr 12.54 -.14 NYLTn 10.80 +.01
,,,." 03 InlmMun 10.601 .1 CapAplnst 2522 -.17' CapApAp 320.63 -.26 TotlRetlr 8.47 -.09 OHLTTEn 11.73 +.01
.4_,,.. Fu.ol . InllDison 23.50 -.O5 I ntllnvt 39.93 -.43 CaplncAp 6.80 -.03 VatSvt 7,67 -.09 PALTn 10.80 +.01
'HiY r 'n 5.01 ..-.01 I nlSCpr n 13.40 +.07 Intlr 40.29 -.44 ChmplncAp 1.57 -.01 IlPISvc 8.53 .07 PrecMtIlsr n 13.668 -.13
,r.t ar,; nvGrBd 10.82 HartfordFdv s DvMktAp 20.09 +.03 Russell Funds S: Prmcpcorn 9.35, -.07
..t.i' J ap-3 nn 6.55 .8 CpAppAp 2373 -1 Discp 32.70 .-.06 StratBd 9.37 -.01 Prmcprn 45.66 -.38
' 7L -.0 MthJapn 19.39+7Ap 13.84 -.19 EquityA 6.23 -.58 RydexAdvlsor: SelValurn 12.15 -14
. ' -2 JpnSmn 6.94 +.14 Hartfordd ' F C GlobAp 40.04 -.21 NasdaqAdv 8.44 -.03 STARin 14.76 -08
. iz,,, 0. 2 9. -.2 LgCapValtn 9.40 -.17 CpApCt 21oFds - 16 GlbOppA 18.88 -.22. SEIPortfolios: STIlGraden 10.07 +.02
S 213.63 -.517 LCpVl rn 7.85 -.21 Hartford Fds L: Gold p 25.08 -.41 CoreFxA n 9.20 -02 STFed n 10.91
., ." LatAm n 35.15 -A6 1 + OppL 1796 -06 IntBdAp 5.87 -.02 inlEqAn 8 -.33 +04 STrsryn 10.85 +O0
, i -: .16 .4o6n 6228 -.2 HrtorLsA' 1 . MnStFdA 22.63 -.24 LgCGroAn 14.75 -11 StratEqn 11.51 .12
r, ie -1 LowPrn 24.61 -.14 CapApp 2T82'.23 MSSCAp 12.79 -.10 .LgCVaIAn 11.55 -.16 TgtRetlncn 9.67 -.03
. -.1 451202 -.1243 D&Gr 14.21 pp 2.4 -.2 MidCapA 10.23 -.02 SSgA Funds: TgRe2910 n17.90 -.09
.�:-rp32.57 -.260.64 .3 -. Adviser 14.4 -5 -1 PAMuniAp 9.20 +.02 EmgMkt 13.81 +01 TgtRe2005n 9.88 -.04
" ,I -.4 ,1 .1 8 .7 9 - ,24- M A M u n n 1 0.52 + . 01 Stoc k 2 7 .63 -.3 6 S hT A dp 3 .46 - . h w ab 2 .20 T g tR e2. in 15 9 .36 - .07
, 51, MeguCpS n6.87-.08 TotRe~ld10. :01.01 USGvp 8.82 -.01 HithCare 11.64 -.16 TgtRe202ln 9.68 -.06
t . MIMu p"tn 11.70 Henderson Gibid.1 -1 Oppenheimer B: 1000lnvr ' 26.14 -.30 TRe2020n16.76 -12
,,:- a l-02 Mldeap n 16.67 -.52 endeson PMCtM S -.1
S-.03 M IntOppAp 16.66 +.0 AMTFMu 5.58 +01 10OSetl 26.12 - 29 TgRe2O30n.8 -.13
MN Mun ntp1.31 . AMTFrNY 9.73 +.03 S&P Inv 13.71 -16 TgtRe2O35 n 9.32 -,08
.,, 7.99 .. M ullnn 11430 Hennessy Funds: CplncBt 6.70 -.03 S&PSel 13,76 .15 TgtRe204O n15,26 -.13
20l.8I ', +01 Munilncn 10.20 CorGrl'Orig 9,74 -.02 Ch5rplneBt 1.58 S 9PlnstSl 7.02 -.07 TgtRe2045 n9.64 -.09
... t- 1 4.39 NJ M ryn 1R1.8 -0 -.07d SCplnv 12.38 -.12 USGron 12.70 -.11
.1 11 41 NwMktrn 12.98 - .02 ICONFda: n StrInc 3.47 -.01 Selected Funds: USValuen 7.33 -.10
i . NwMilln 18.45 22 En r y 13.97 Oppenheimer C&M: AmShD 29.07 -.38 Wellsly n 17.92 -.07
-, . 5 +301 NYiMun 1.5 Hlthcare 10.49 -.20 InIBd 5.4 -.3 AmShp 2Weltn n 24.48 -.20
nf I 1T27n +9 01-3 1 FnmsdS'p 29.08 - 138
+,03281 ISFunds: Oppenheimer"Roch: Seligman Group: Wndsr n 9.33 -.12
, - P, :OC 3 .8 ::7 NoAmp 7.61 -.02 pspe7
OhMunn 11.44 LtdNYAp 3.07 ComunAt 28.80 +.02
,, ' .. .. 1,21 l0Lndex 6.45 " IsyFunds: RoMuAp 13.93 +.07 FrontrAt 7.15 -:09 VanguardIdaFda:
i,,,r; 1rs74 1 Vrluen 249 AseiSCI 918.47 -.05-.0 SOA--- F- ! - 00n 81.55 -.91
17,.8:,8h. 23.99 -.46 rse n -2..1 -.18 setA 5.47 -.06 +02 GlbSmA 8.78 +02 Ba501 unen 8165. -.91
,,13.43 -.12 Puitnn 13.37 -08 GINatRAp 14.1 -.18 ToRtAd 10.39 -. SentInel Group: '" M



i,,itE-, 10.11 +01 SEAsia n 20.59,+27 JPMorgan-Sels Ci: 5EmMkd 9.23 +0S2 stFarmAssoc: LT3dan 11.66 -.01

,,;Ir, 6.45 -.10 $1rReRtr 7.32 -.06 nintdBdn 6.49 HiYld 7.20 -.01 Stratton Funds: REITrn 9.80 -.42


IUS;llEq2n 7.10 -.08 Utiliyn 11.88 -27 Janus: ShorIT .9.58 .. TCWFunds: Totlntn 11,15 -.04
)Ws mnvestA:" V1lStratn 15.51 -.23 Balanced 20.97 -.10 TonRt 10.39 -.01 TotRetmdI 9.51 TotStkn 21.55 -.24


WS invest :, Banking n 12.66 -.32 Fund 20.21 .22 ReaRtAp 10.20 +.03 Value Eurolnstn 20.07 -.20









,,,,., _ 34.04 -.49 O1n'drn 714R7 -,A5 JennisonDrnyden A: CullenVal .. ..13.46 -.12 Renlncpx 7.38 -.03 Vatuelstn "15.05 -.23


.i 8.67 +.01 | Heallhn 8295 -94 BlendAx 11.37 -.14 uonAp u.47 .T TAIDEXA: Vanguard Signal:
13,97 +.01 HomFn 9.01 -.24 HighlncA 8.74 +,02 EurSeEqA 17.83 -.19 TempGIbAp19.03 -.17 500SgIn 67.37 -.76 .
.-: 11.74 -.13 Insurn 30.59 -68 HiYIdAp 441 InflValA 15.15 -.08 TrCHYBpx 6.98 -.07 ITBdSign 10.40 -.01
7,4unds A: Leisa n 53.98 -.08 InsuredA 10.04 MdCpGrA 9.37 -.05 Turner Funds: MidCpldx n 17.40 -.20
A 24.18 -.32 I Maerialn 3843 -23 UtilyA 7.19 -.12 PionFdAp 28.07 -.21 SmlCpGrn 19.35 -.14 STBdldxn 10.34 +.01
A 2lFundsB:- MedDin 31.36 -.49 JennisonDryden B: .TxFreAp 9.36 +.03 Tweedy Browne: TotBdSgl.n 10.18
NYVenB 23.21 -.30 MdEqSysn 19.46 -.10 GrowthB 11.06 -.08 ValueAp 8.58 -.13 GlobVal 16.58 . TotStkSgIn 20.80 -.23
avlsFunds C & Y: Mutmdn 23.98 -.23 HYdB t 4.40 -.01 Pioneer Fbnds B: UMB Scout Funds: Vantagepoint Fds:
Y 24.44 -.32 NIGasn 24.86 -.82 InsuredB 10.06 HiYIdBt 7.6 .02 Int 22.24 -.13 Growth n 6.04 -.05
lN y C 23.37 -.30 Paper n 19.39 -.01 John Hancok A: Pioneer Funds C: US Global Investors: Victory Funds:
e narelnvestA: Pharmn. 8.46 -.12 BondAp 12.83 HiYIdCt 7.13 .02 AIIAm 16.22 -.10 oDvsStA 11.22 '-.14
Si- .-,- 8.24 -.01 Retail n 33.53 -.26 RgBkA 11.44 -.25 Price Funds Adv: ChinaReg 6.58 +.11 Waddell & Reed Adv:
� &-,r - 9.71 -.05 Softwrn 52.69 +.38 StrInAp 5.56 .-.01 Eqlnc 16,45 -21 GIbRs 6.34 -.14 AssetSp 7.28 -.02
TjSAp 10.65 +.01 Techn 49.29 +.15 JohnHancockB: Growth pn 20.77 -.22 GId&Mts 11.94 -.18 CorelnvA 3.96 -.03
weiare Invest B: Telcmn 32.87 -.48 StnncB 5.57 -.01 Price Funds: WIdPrcMn 11.92 -.18 ScTechA 7.23 -.04
S18,t 17.10 -.19 Transn 27.52 +.16 John Hancock Cl: Balncen 14.57 -.09 USAAGroup: Wasatch:
e sional Fds: UtilGrn 36.44 -1.05 LSAggr 8.30 -.06 BIChipn 25.02 -.24 AgvGt 22.20 -.17 SmCpGr 22.77 +.01
EtiiCrEqgn12.53 ... Wireless n 5.69 -.04 LSBalanc 9.69 -.05 CABondn 10.38 +.01 CABd 9.71 +.02 Wells Fargo Adv:
E rltV 21.43 +.10 Fidelity Spartan: LSConsrv 10.82 -.04 CapAppn 15.06 -.11 CmstStr 16.11 -.06 CrnStkZ 12.65 -.09
IntSnmVan 11.65 +.03' Eqldxlnvn 31.31 -.35 LSGiwth 9.17 -.07 DvGron 16.64 -.17 GNMA 10.00 -.01 Opptylnv 24.47 -.20
i .n.. 26.10 -.29 ExtMkInn 23.02 -,22 LSModer 10.02 -.04 EmEurp 10.67 -.05 GrTxStr 10.80 -.03 WesternAsset: .
13.05 -.21 5001nxlnxnvrn61.39 -.68 KeeleyFunds: EmMkSn 20.63 +.04 Grwth 10.07 -.06 CorePlus 9.01 -.04
. 8.02 --06 Intllnxlnvn 26.35 -.11 SmCpValAp 15.36 -.19 Eqlncn 16.48 -.22 Gr&Inc 10.10 -.11 Core 922 -.03
,"'.,1 12.21 -.11 TotMkllnvn 24.84 -.26 Lazardlnstl: Eqldexn 23.82 -27 IncStk 869 -.11 William Blair N:
US-NVa 14.30 -.17 Fidelity Spart Adv: ErngMktl 12.89 -.08 ENMuropen 9.7 1 -.01 Int 11.32 +-01 GrownthN 7.79 -.02
1r06.. 10.96 +01 EqldxAdn 31.31 -.35 LeggMason: Fd Growthn 20.91 -.22 NY 102 +01 YacmanFund: -.06
r- u. 19,53 -.03 500Adrn 61.40 -.66 SptnvCp 17.80 -.23 Gr&lnn 13.99 -.13 PrecMM 24.80 -.33 Fundp 11.30 -.07
10.29 +.01 TotMktAdrn24.84 -.26 VaITrCp 27.53 -.45 HlthScn 19.87 -.17
IlnIVan 12.98 -.08 i First Eagle: Legg Mason Ptrs A: HiYeldn .32 -.01
lGI5Fxlncn11.09 ... GIbIA 33.74 +.06 AgGrAp 70.51 -.74 IntBondn 9.13-.04 Chronicle staff do not provide
2YGiFxdn 10.28 O... verseasA 16,78 +.13 ApprAp 10,.23 -.10 IntDisn 27.11 +.09
DFARIE'n 1140 -.48 Firstl investors A HilncAt 4.54 iG& 955 . financial advice or real-time
hodge&Cox: BIChpAp 15.78 -.17 InAICGAp 6.17 -.01 InnStlkn 9.24 -.05 quotes4onstocksorfunds.
'Balanced 52.20 -.39 GloblAp 4.67 -.02 LgCpGAp 17.13 -.01 Japann 6.34 +.10 f *
income 12.16 ... GovtAp 11.17 . MgMuAp 15.10 +.01 Consult a financial adviser.


Stocks extend week's


losses after 2-month rally


Associated Press


NEW YORK - On Wall
Street, not so bad is no
longer good enough.
Stocks extended the
week's losses Friday, further
chilling the market's spring'
rally. Traders who last week
sent stocks higher on eco-
nomic news that wasn't as
bad as expected are now
selling. And analysts say it
will take more upbeat data
to restart the rally that
swept major stock indica-
tors up more than 30 per-
cent from 12-year lows in
early March.
The Labor Department
said Friday that consumer
prices in April were flat, as
economists predicted. Man-
ufacturing activity in the
New York area and indus-
trial production contracted
less than economists ex-
pected. And a Reuters/Uni-
versity of Michigan index of
consumer sentiment rose to
an eight-month high in May,
a possible harbinger of im-
proved consumer spending.
But even with this hand-
ful of silver-lining eco-
nomic data, traders found
little incentive to buy. In-


Market watch
May 15, 2009

Dow Jones -62.68
industrials 8,268.64

Nasdaq -9.07
composite 1,680.14

Standard & -10.19
Poor's 500 882.88

Russell -4.87
2000
2000 475.84

NYSE diary
Advanced: 1,089
Declined: 1,927
Unchanged: 90
Volume: 5.43 b
Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 897
Declined: 1,444
Unchanged: 101
Volume: 2.14 b
SOURCE: SunGard AP

stead, a droj in the price of
oil hit energy companies,
while financial stocks slid
on worries that the eco-
nomic recovery could be
further off than traders had
been betting in recent
months.
"This market is tired,"


said Joe Saluzzi, co-head of
equity trading at Themis
Trading LLC.
Wall Street's rally has
also hit a lull now that the
government's stress tests of
banks are done, earnings
reports are winding down
and the first wave of April
economic data has been re-
leased. Traders aren't clear
what the next catalyst
might be to pump the mar-
ket higher - or whether
the gains might erode.
"We've gotten through the
panic point, and what will
get us to the next level is
seeing the economy actu-
ally grow. It'll happen, but
it's a matter of when," said
Douglas Kreps, managing
director at Fort Pitt Capital
Group.
The Dow Jones industrial
average fell 62.68, or 0.8
percent, to 8,268.64. The
broader Standard & Poor's
500 index fell 10.19, or 1.1
percent, to 882.88, and the
Nasdaq composite index
fell 9.07, or 0.5 percent, to
1,680.14.
For the week, the Dow
fell 3.6 percent, the S&P 500
index lost 5 percent and the
Nasdaq slid 3.4 percent


Four nuclear companies to get help
/
Associated Press tion Energy for a reactor at its Calvert Cliffs
,nuclear plant near Lusby, Md.; NRG Energy
WASHINGTON - The Energy Depart- for two new reactors at its South Texas Proj-
ment has narrowed its list of the most likely ect near Bay City, Texas; Southern Company
recipients of $18.5 billion in government for two new reactors at its Vogtle power
loan guarantees for building the first new plant near Waynesboro, Ga.; and South Car-
nuclear power plants. olina Electric & Gas, for two new reactors at
The department recently informed four its VC. Summer power plant near Columbia,
companies planning new reactors in Mary- S.C.
land, Georgia, South Carolina and Texas Last October, the department received 19
that their applications have been elevated applications from 17 electric power compa-
for closer scrutiny, department and indus- nies seeking a total of $122 billion in loan
try officials said Friday guarantees to build new reactors, far more
Energy Department spokeswoman 'than the $18.5 billion Congress has provided
Stephanie .Mueller said the applications in loan guarantee authority for nuclear
were singled out for closer review because power plants.
they are furthest along in obtaining a li- It's not clear how the department plans to
cense from the Nuclear Regulatory Com- divide the loan guarantees or how many
mission. She said the department has made projects will end up being approved.
no decision on who will get the loan guar- With the cost of a new nuclear powerplant
antees "and has not eliminated any appli- now at more than $9 billion and credit mar-
cations." kets reluctant to commit to such projects in
The proposed projects singled out for the current economic climate, utilities have
"due diligence" review, often the final virtually ruled out construction of a new
phase of the review process, are: Constella- plant without government loan guarantees.


She needs a


Godly motbi

...a woman who
' fears the Lord, '"

she shall be praised"
-Proverbs 31:30b


YOU CAN FIND HIM AT...

W nOa.
BS "IP IIS CHuRC HC
dig * www.northoakbc.org


1.


Attecrero .Ek mBv.& .Ctu SrnsBv. (52 .49-68,, (32)74-10


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Contemporary * tRaditional * Casual




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NEWORKSTOKECAN


Name Last Chg
SpectraEn 14.83 -.28
SpdnlNex 5.05 -.17
SPDR 88.71 -.73
SPMid 99.42 -.77
SP Maut 25.83 +.09
SP HIthC 25.33 -.20
SPCnSt 22.37 -.21
SPConsum 22.13 -.16
SPEngy 48.00 -1.05
SPODfnd 11,53 -.24
SPInds 21.80 +.01
SPTech 16.80
SPUtil 25.94 -.63
Standex 10.16 -.36
StarwdHt 19.85 -.10
StateStr 38,51 -.72
Steis 25.14 -.37
SloneEngy 6.19 -.47
StAer 38.99 -.26
StunmRug 11.22 +.36
SubPpne 40.28 -.44
SunCmts 14.13 -.12
Suncorgs 2862 -1.08
Sunoco 28.17 -127
Suntech 14.34 -.39
SunTrst 15.05 +.02
Supvalu 15.45 -.39
Synovus 3.70 -.16
Sysco 22.82 -.05
TCFFnrd 14.56 -.04


TECO 11.09
TJX 26.84
TaiwSemi 10.02
TalismEgs 13H64
Target 40.37
TeckResg 12.10
TelcmNZ 7.60
TeIMexLs 16.49
Templelnld 10.97
Tenaris 26.33
Tenetlth 2.31
Teppco 27.13
Teradyn 5.85
Terex 14.43
Terra 28.36
TerraNiro 124.30
Tesoro 16,60
TelraTech 6.64
Texinst 17.63
Textron 10.82
Theragenh 1.10
ThermoRs 35.14
'ThmBet 3022
3M Co 57.92
Tiffany 25.48
TW Cablers 31.01
TimeWmrs 23.52
Timken 15.85
TitanMet 7.67
ToddShph 14.91
TollBros 18.57
TorchEnI 1.87


Trchmrk 35.34
TorDBkg 40.58
Total SA 52.98
TotalSys 13.00
Transocn 68.36
Travelers 39.76
Tredgar 15.22
TriConIl 9.01
TyooElec 16.80
TycolntI 25.50
Tyson 12.56
UBSAG 13.26
UDR 9.29
UIL Hold 23.55
URS 46.00
USAirwy 3.04
USEC 4.50
USG 11.70
UltraPtg 45.06
UniRrst 33.53
UnilevNV 23.66
UnionPacs 46.58
Unisys h 129
UtdMicro 3.04
UPSB 51.99
USBancrp 17.67
US NGsFd 16,01
USOilFd 31.30
USSteel 27.13
UldTech 51.28
UtdhithGp 27.51
UnumGrp 16.27


ValeantPh 20.09
ValeroE 20.84
Valspa 23.07
VangTSMs 44.31
VangREIT 29.61
VangEnmgs 29.20
VangEurPc 26.85
VarianMed 35.01
Vectren 21.74
Ventas 27.01
VeoiaEnv 27.62
VerizonCmn 29.61
ViacomB 20.29
VimpelCm 10.62
Visa 65.07
VMware 27.00
Vodatone 18.47
Vomnado 44.34
Votorantim 10.29
WGLHold 28.82
Wabash 1.45
WalMart 48.15
Waigm 29.78
WalterEn 29.16
WREIT 20.48
WsteMtnc 26.83
WalsnPh 30.00
WealtIntIs 17.84
WeinRIt 13.48


I WelPoit 46.88
WellsFargo 24.87
WenfdyAry 4.24
WestarEn 16.96
SWshASB 6.02
I WAstEM 9.40
WstAMgdHi 4.46
WAstlnfOpp 11.01
WDgillt 23.16
WstnUnion 16.36
Weyerh 31.45
WhMpl 41.98
WilrCS 4.70
WmsCos 15.05
WmsPtrs 17.52
Windstrn 8.24
Winnbgo 6.92
WiscEn 37.28
Worthpg -13.12
WuX -7.98
Wyeth 44,30
Wyndhamn 10.54
XL Cap 8.93
IXTOEngy 39.99
XcelEngy 17.20
Xerox 6.23
Yamanag 8.87
YingliGr 8.50
YumBrnds 3316
ZaeCp 3.96
ZweigTI 3.30


l


SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 A7


BUSINESS


1I1CLE


G)ttPU.s COUNTY (FL) CHRON









,P ,-h, - ' Pr, , '. 16, 2009



PINION


"Responsibility's like a string ,
we can only see the middle,of
Both ends are out of sight.
William McFee, aI.S


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CLICK IT OR TICKET


New law:




Buckle up




or pay price


S tarting June 30, if you're
not wearing a seatbelt
you can be pulled over
and issued a ticket,
In recent years it has been il-
legal to travel without being
buckled up, but authorities
couldn't .pull drivers over
based on that alone. Many


speeders have
learned that being
cited for failure to
buckle up -
and/or failure of
passengers to
buckle up -
comes at a signifi-
cant cost above
and beyond the


THE IS
Seat be

OUR OP
Makes
... sor


primary speeding ticket.
Since the law has required
seat belt use, it's logical to ex-
tend that to allowing police to
stop and ticket motorists for
failure to strap up.
What's illogical is that this law
exists for drivers and passengers
in cars and trucks in an era when
motorcyclists are no longer re-
quired to wear helmets.
For years, motorcycle activists
lobbied to have the helmet law
dropped and, in largp part thanks
to former state legislator-turned-
Public Service Commission Com-
missioner Nancy Argenziano's
efforts, that requirement was
dropped several years ago.


Rain pain
Instead of Progress Energy ask-
ing us to subsidize their several-
billion-dollar new atomic power
plant way down in the future -
they want us to pay for it now so
they don't have to - they need to
try to figure how to keep the
power on in Heatherwood. It
rained today and at 4 o'clock it
rained and at 4:10, the power's
off. Thirteen years this has been
going on. Every time. it rains,
Heatherwood loses
power. It sure would be
nice if a CEO rived out
here, because then I am
sure they would figure
out the problem in a day.


Glorious rain
You know, it's Tuesday
(May 12) about 7:30 p.m.
This wonderful rain we CAL
just had - thunder, light- 563-
ning, wind - stopped
about an hour ago. The,
tree drips still fall. I live on the
river, so as the rain slowed down,
the steam began rising from the
water, birds came back out and
started singing, the green on the
trees was so electric. Let's re-
member Sound Off isn't only for
discontent. What a glorious rain
we had this afternoon. Y'all enjoy.
Give it a rest
This is Wednesday morning
(May 13) and I just read in the
paper about somebody complain-
ing about the bike rack downtown
taking up the space of one auto-
mobile. I think they just find any-
thing to complain about. I don't
know. I have a house that's valued
over $200,000 and I bet I pay
more taxes in this county than
they do. We have three cars and
we pay taxes. We try to save gas.
We ride the bike trail when we go


I


The argument was success-
fully made that helmets offer
only limited protection and, in
some cases, can be a contribut-
ing factor to accidents. Regard-
less, the issue was largely
based on personal freedom.
To have cyclists legally cruis-
ing our highways without head
protection, then to
SiUE* I allow authorities
"SUE to ticket those in
�lt law. cars for failure to
fasten their seat-
INION: belts seems a sig-
nificant conflict.
sense That's not to say
rt of. the buckle-up re-
quirement is bad
- it's not. It will cause many
people to modify their behav-
ior when getting behind the
wheel. As a result of the
mandatory safeguard, health
insurance claims for individu-
als and businesses should be
reduced in corresponding lev-
els to the degree of injuries.
Since taxpayers typically foot
the bill for uninsured motorists
injured in wrecks, taxpayers
should benefit from the law,
too.
Personal freedoms are great,
but when the cost of accidents
impact more than one person,
requiring safeguards makes
sense.


to town; we take our bike and we
go to eat. We should be allowed to
park where the bike rack is and
take up one car space...They want
us to park on the grass, but then
you complain we're killing the
grass. People don't have a life. I
mean, they go around just looking
for things to complain about. I
mean, get on your bike and park
your car at home and maybe you
can save some gas money and
also some time and space. Look
at life at a different view. Don't
complain all the time.
JND 'About time


F I'm very thankful that
we havea seatbelt law.
It's been long overdue.
We need to look at the
cell phone use and also
tailgating. Our police de-
9j* apartment in Citrus
County do an exemplary
0579 job. I am thankful we're
protected, we're looked
after, and we need to take
better care of ourselves. People
are sloppy. Take it easy. Take a
deep breath or you'll get a ticket.
Greedy
I'm definitely for halving the county
commissioners' salary. And while
we're at it, (school) board members,
you're suppos tl'be there for
everyone's children and your own,
not to have a salary. I don't think you
should accept one penny. They don't
do it anywhere else, but I guess peo-
ple in Citrus County are very greedy.
Blame game
Republicans blame the Democ-
rats; Democrats blame the Repub-
licans. Until they tear down the
two-party system and totally abol-
ish it, it's going to be the same.
Just ask yourself this question:
Are you better off than you were
eight, nine years ago?


Obama must mind


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan....................................... publisher
Charlie Brennan .......................................... editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ...........................managing editor
Cheri Harris....................................... features editor
Curt Ebitz.................................... citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ......................................citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson ................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


n the London Underground,
a recorded voice warns trav-
elers to "mind the gap" be-
tween an incoming train and the
station platform. The phrase be-
came so popular that it has
spawned a book, a TV quiz show
and countless T-shirts.
As President Obama tries to
overhaul the health care system,
he actually has to mind two gaps,:
a treasury gap and a trust gap. Ei-
ther one could derail his ambi-
tious plans to cover the 47 million
Americans who lack
health insurance.
Without a doubt,
there are some positive
signs. At a White House -
meeting this week,
major players in the
health care industry- "
doctors, drug makers,
insurers, hospitals -
pledged to reduce the Coki(
rapid rise in health e
care costs by 1.5 per- Steven
cent a year for 10 years. OTH
Since health care ac- y VOI|
counts for about 17 per-
cent of the entire American
economy, those savings could, in
theory, amount to $2 trillion.
Obama has clearly made head-
way with his argument that
everyone suffers from spiraling
health costs: Workers lose wages,
businesses lose customers and
young families can't afford pre-'
miums or find jobs that provide
benefits. In the latest Kaiser
-Family Foundation survey, 59
percent said health care reform
is more important than ever,
while only 37 percent'called it too
costly in the current economy.
Still, skepticism is the only sen-
sible mindset when it comes to
health care reform. Obama went
way overboard in using words like
"historic" and "watershed" to de-
scribe his White House meeting.
He forgot to mind the gaps.
Start with the treasury gap.
Just as Obama was lavishing


praise on health care executives,
his own budget office reported
that this year's deficit would sur-
pass previous estimates and
reach $1.84 trillion. A day later,
trustees warned that Medicare
was facing a "significantly less fa-
vorable" financial outlook. And
yet the president still insists he
can find the $1.5 trillion needed
to finance his reform proposals.
His "watershed" is looking a bit
more like a cold shower.
It's certainly encouraging that
health care executives
feel compelled to
promise a cost-reduc-
tion effort, but frankly,
S we've heard all this be-
fore. Many times.
When we started cov-
ering Congress in the
late 1970s, "hospital
cost containment" be-
e and came a major buzz-
and word, but it never
Roberts happened. Henry J.
IER Aaron, an economist at
CES the Brookings Institu-
-- tion, captured our feel-
ings in the New York Times: "I
had a Rip Van Winkle moment, as
if I had fallen asleep in 1977 and
woke up again this morning."
As Aaron's comment indicates,
confidence might be in shorter
supply than cash. The health care
issue resembles the Middle East,
a landscape littered with broken
promises, failed hopes and deep
suspiciousness on all sides. And
that lack of trust centers on one
key element of the debate -
whether to create a public insur-
ance plan that competes with pri-
vate companies.
Supporters of the idea are ab-
solutely convinced - or so they
say - that without a public plan
influencing the marketplace, pri-
vate insurers will never provide
adequate coverage for high-risk or
low-wage families. In the words of
New York Times columnist Paul
Krugman, insurance companies


LETTERS to the Editor


Not so threatening
I read with some sadness a let-
ter concerning evolution from a
recent correspondent. 1 suspect
that he gets his information from
creationist literature such as the
books written by Werner Gitt.
Professor Gitt is an engineer and
information scientist who has
applied his version of informa-
tion theory to the origin of the
universe, the earth and evolu-
tion. Just about every authority
in his field has discounted his
creationist writings as nonsense,
with no basis in scientific fact.
Your correspondent is con-
fused about mutations and an-
tibiotics.
Mutation is a change in the nu-
cleotide sequence that can lead
to variation. There is no loss of
genetic information, just a
change in it.
He is correct in stating that
evolution is change over time.
Variation in genes caused by
mutation' and other processes at
the cellular level, produces or-
ganisms which will vary in their
reproductive success. Genes
producing this success will be-
come more abundant in suc-
ceeding generations and
evolution occurs.
Whether this can be inter-
preted as an increase in infor-
mation, I doubt.
Information, as defined by infor-
mation scientists such as Gitt, does
not require an author It relates to
how complex a structure is.


OPINIONS INVITED
8 The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the editorial board of the newspa-
per.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Mike Arnold at
(352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
e-mail. Names and hometowns
will be printed; phone numbers
will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
0 SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

Antibiotics attack bacteria by
interfering with their cell mem-
branes and/or enzyme systems.
Bacteria become resistant to an-
tibiotics because a few will con-
tain genes that allow them to
survive when the other members
of the population succumb. This
is variation, The resistant ones
rapidly reproduce and evolution
has occurred.


To those who find science
threatening, I would point out
that everything your doctor does
for you is the result of scientific
research, as is your computer,
telephone, aircraft you fly in,
etc., etc., etc.
Brian Pasby
Floral City

Costly change
Regarding the May 13 an-
nouncement of the sudden
change in the schedule for the
upcoming school year; the Citrus
County School Board has found
a legal loophole to circumvent
the state law requiring a later
start date. Board members say
they were "surprised" that the
idea wasn't more popular with
district personnel. What about
the thousands of students' fami-
lies who plan their lives around
the school calendar?
Regardless of the merits of the
new schedule, we families were
not given enough notice of this
change. As recently as mid-May
the school board Web site still
posted a start date of Aug. 24.
Summer plans have been made.
It will be a hardship to give up .
costly reservations and carefully
made summer plans, or instead
to force our students to miss the:
first week of school. This change
should begin with the 2010-11
school year, not this summer
Dan Montgomery
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


the gaps

are "major villains" that will -
ways put maximizing profit ahea4
of serving people. Adds Ohio Se4.
Sherrod Brown: "Private insur-
ance plans are often just one step
ahead of the sheriff." ' 1
The trust gap is equally 'idy
on the other side. Critics ot'a iPub-
lic plan are absolutely convi ocei
- or so they say - that federal
intervention in the marketati
lead to only one outcome. natrirr-
alization of health care. No pa-
ter that Obama has insv�ep
repeatedly that a govern -
run system is off the table. Mis
critics refuse to believe him.
Take the Wall Street JouMl
editorial page, which allegedtfit
Obama wants to create a "n!w
entitlement" that "would quickly
crowd out private insurance as
people gravitated to heavily sub-
sidized policies, eventually lead-
ing to a single-payer system." -
If he's going to succeed, Obama
has to isolate the ideologueop
both sides: the far left that rejly
wants a government-run sys f,
and the far right that really wj
no change at all. Fortunately, '*,.
Charles Schumer has offereia
useful set of conciliatory ideas.
Any public plan, he suggess,
should not enjoy the unfair-'
vantages feared by the JouraJ:
no subsidized premiums,,.o
lower payouts to providers, npN -
quirements that doctors and~ho-
pitals must participate. ad.
Obama has to explain, honsy,
how he's going to finance hips -
forms. And he has to embrace, 1q -
estly, a public plan that preserges
the free market and preclud.ea
national takeover. Otherwisej,the
gaps could swallow him up.
Tr'iR
Cokie Roberts'latest book1,is
"Ladies ofLiberty: The Womip
Who Shaped Our Nation"'
(William Morrow, 2008). Stevq and
Cokie Roberts can be reached 4 a
stevecokie@gmail.com.4
ve r


�e

]c


-(


I








(,-,c( ',-,rrLUIVY rv (Hluv(17 aC - LngrpN TONSTRAILL 6 09A


Return from Iran


Associated Press
LUS.-Iranian journalist Roxana Saberi smiles Friday as she arrives at the Vienna Interna-
;tipnal Airport near Schwechat, Austria. Saberi, the American journalist accused of spy-
l ",on Iran, has arrived in Austria after her release from an Iranian jail.

SFreed U.S. journalist arrives back in the West


Associated Press


^-!VIENNA-After four months in an Iran-
lin' prison, American journalist Roxana
'1aeri was savoring her first taste of free-
n back in the West - beaming a confi-
ict smile Friday upon touching down in
�Astria's capital, but keeping silent about
di'details of her ordeal.
*After thanking those who supported her
-fiOng her captivity, Saberi was whisked
-Raiy to the home of friends in Vienna,
*1wre she planned to spend several days re-
'iperating and coming to terms with her ex-
Arences in Iran.
-COi need some more time to think about
what happened to me over the past couple
f'cdays," the 32-year-old journalist told re-
proers at the Vienna airport "Nobody
-Uldws about it as well as I do and I will talk
alipt it more in the future, I hope, but I am
'hf prepared at this time."
S' aberi, who grew up in Fargo, North
Dakota, and moved to Iran six years ago, has
dual citizenship. She was arrested in late
January and convicted of spying for the
Ufiited States in a closed-door trial that her
I~ iian-born father said lasted only 15 min-
,utes.
I She was freed on Monday and reunited
liti her parents, who had come to Iran to
seek her release, after an appeals court re-
duced her sentence to two years suspended.
The United States had said the charges
against Saberi were baseless and repeat-
edly demanded her release. The case


against her had become an obstacle to Pres-
ident Barack Obama's attempts at dialogue
with the top U.S. adversary in the Middle
East
Saberi, who at one point went on a hunger
strike, said she was grateful for the support
she. had received: "Both journalists and
non-journalists around the world, I've been
hearing, supported me very much and it was
very moving for me to hear this," she said..
Among those who strove to bring attention
to her plight were students and faculty at
Northwestern University's Medill School of
Journalism, Saberi's alma mater.
"We are delighted that she has been re-
leased," Larry Stuelpnagel, who taught
Saberi in 1999, said in an e-mail. "She
showed a great deal of courage during her
ordeal and we all hope to see her when she
returns to the States."
Saberi's safe arrival in Austria was also
greeted with joy in her home state. Gov.
John Hoeven said he spoke by phone with
Saberi Friday morning and was "pleased to
hear she and her family are doing well."
"I expressed that all North Dakotans are
happy about her release, and we look for-
ward to welcoming her home," Hoeven said
in a statement
While her supporters rejoiced, rights
groups cautioned that many incarcerated
journalists face a less fortunate fate.
"The good news is short-lived - we don't
want others to be forgotten," said Meredith
Greene Megaw, director of communications
at the Committee to Protect Journalists.


.,",- * " 'k4'

. . . ,- - . , . _. �,


Associated Press
NEW YORK - The
Gallup Poll reported Friday
that 51 percent of Ameri-
cans now call themselves
pro-life rather than pro-
choice on the issue of abor-
tion, the first time a majority
gave that answer in the 15
years that Gallup has asked
the question.
The findings, obtained in
an annual survey on values
and beliefs conducted May 7-
10, marked a significant shift
from a year ago. A year ago,
50 percent said they were
pro-choice and 44 percent
pro-life - in
the new poll, 42
percent said Strong
they were pro- A new poll foL
choice. "pro-life" on t
The new sur- It's the first til
vey showed identified the
that Americans Americans i
remained
deeply divided 60 percent.......
on the legality
of abortion - 0 5o......0 .
with 23 percent
saying it should
be illegal in all 40 ..
circumstances, -
22 percent say- 30..................
ing it should be �1995
legal under any SOURCE: Gallup
circumstances,
and 53 percent saying it
should be legal only under
certain circumstances.
The findings echoed a re-
cent national survey by the
Pew Research Center, which
reported a sharp decline
since last August in those
saying abortion should be
legal in all or most cases -
from 54 percent to 46 per-
cent
Taken together, the two
polls have elated anti-abor-
tion activists, who had been
stung by the November elec-
tion results that placed Pres-
ident Barack Obama and
other abortion-rights sup-
porters in power in Washing-
ton.
"Ironically, Obama's radi-
cal abortion policies and
nominees may have helped
make America more pro-


life," said Wendy Wright,
president of the conserva-
tive advocacy group Con-
cerned Women for America.
The president of a leading
abortion-rights group, Nancy
Keenan of NARAL Pro-
Choice America, said the
Gallup findings "do not
square with the voting pat-
terns in the last two elections
cycles."
"It would be a mistake, for
anti-choice groups to inter-
pret this one poll as a signal
that Americans want even
more interference from
politicians in their personal,
private decisions, including


shift in opinion on at
und 51 percent of Americans identify th
he issue of abortion and 42 percent as
me since 1995 that a majority of U.S. a
mselves as pro-life.
calling themselves "pro-life" or "pr

"pro-choice"


"pro-life"

2000 2005

a woman's right to choose
safe, legal abortion," Keenan
said.
Another abortion-rights
leader, Planned Parenthood
Federation of America pres-
ident Cecile Richards, ques-
tioned the terminology in the
Gallup questions.
"Tihe terms pro-choice
and pro-life no longer define
the parameters of the de-
bate, witnessed by the fact
that in the Gallup Poll, a ma-
jority of people say they are
both pro-life and that abor-
tion should be legal,"
Richards said.
She added that most
Americans share Obama's
stated goal of reducing the
number of unintended preg-
nancies.
Planned Parenthood also
noted that another recent


national survey, a
CNN/Opinion Research
Corp., poll in April, reported
49 percent of respondents
identifying as pro-choice
and 45 percent as pro-life.
The Gallup poll's release
came just ahead of Obama's
scheduled commencement
speech Sunday at the Uni-
versity of Notre Dame,
where he also is to receive
an honorary degree. Those
plans by the Roman Catholic
university have sparked a
wave of protests by anti-
abortion activists, who con-
tend Notre Dame should not
honor a such a prominent
supporter
of abortion
portionn rights.
themselves as Gallup
"pro-choice." said its new
adults have poll showed
an increase
o-choice" in the pro-
life position
across
51% Christian
% \V religious af-
Sfiliations,
including
. 42.% an eight-
point gain
......................... a m o n g
2009 Protestants
AP and a
seven-point
gain among Catholics. It also
reported a 10-point shift to-
ward the pro-life category
among Republicans but said
there was no significant
change among Democrats.
"It is possible that, through
his abortion policies, Obama
has pushed the public's un-
derstanding of what it means
to be 'pro-choice' slightly to
the left, politically," accord-
ing to the Gallup analysis.
"While Democrats may sup-
port that, as they generally
support everything Obama is
doing as president, it may be
driving others in the oppo-
site direction."
The Gallup survey was
based on telephone inter-
views with 1,015 adults na-
tionwide. Its margin of
sampling error was plus or
minus 3 percentage points.


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Poll: More Americans


call themselves pro-life


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SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 A9


NATION


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Page A 0 - SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009



ACTION


&
CITRUS COUNT


WORLD


N


Nation BRIEF

McCain: Gun limits
won't stop cartels
PHOENIX - The drug war
in Mexico shouldn't be used
as an excuse to try to restrict
American gun rights, Sen.
John Mc-
Cain said
Friday at
the Na-
tional Rifle
Associa-
tion's con-
vention.
The Ari-
SencJohn zona Re-
publican
and former presidential ,can-
didate told thousands of peo-
ple in Phoenix that the United
States needs to do more to
crack down on gun smug-
gling into Mexico, but that
such assistance in Mexico's
war against drug cartels '.
doesn't require restrictions on
the gun rights of law-abiding
Americans.
"It should be noted that
any effort to restrict gun own-
ership in the U.S. will not stop
Mexican cartels from acquir-
ing guns and ammunition
from other countries," Mc-
Cain said. He added that car-
tels are already getting
grenades and other weapons
from other countries.
McCain said the cartels
threaten the security of the
United States because Amer-
ica doesn't have a secure
southem border and has a
big appetite for illegal drugs
from Mexico. Kidnappings
tied to drug and immigrant
smuggling have eamed
Phoenix the title of America's
kidnapping capital.

World BRIEFS

Pope ends
pilgrimage
JERUSALEM - Pope
Benedict XVI ended his pil-
grimage to the Holy Land Fri-
day with a stirring call for
peace at
, Jesus' cru-
cifixion and
then made
an emo-
tional ap-
peal to -
Israel and
Pope the Pales-
Benedict tinians: "No
XV'
x more
bloodshed. No more fighting.
No more terrorism. No more
war."
After a weeklong struggle
to get his message across
through a din of Israeli criti-
cism and Palestinian protest ,
against Israel, Benedict deliv-
ered his strongest words yet
on the Jewish state's right to
exist and the Palestinians'
right to a country of their own..
"Let it be universally recog-
nized that the state of Israel
has the right to exist, andto
enjoy peace and security
Within internationally agreed
borders," Benedict said onvi
the airport tarmac before
boarding a plane to Rome.
"Let it be likewise acknowl-
edged that the Palestinian
people have a right to a sov-
ereign independent home-
land," he said.
Watchdog: Piracy
not based onintel
LONDON - Pirate attacks
offthe.Somali coast appear
to be mainly opportunistic
and there is no indication that
vessels are targeted with the
help of intelligence from inter-
national contacts, a maritime
watchdog said Friday.
The International Maritime
Bureau said there was no ev-
idence to support media re-
ports that individuals with
access to information about
shipping routes and cargoes
may be helping pirates to lo-
cate the most vulnerable
ships, and ones most likely to
yield large ransoms.
Pirate raids on vessels off'


the Hom of Africa have
surged this year, confounding
authorities who have been
hard-pressed to curb the as-
saults despite the deploy- I
ment of an international task
force of military craft.
-From wire reports


Economy: Prices hold steady

December 2007 and is down 16 per- could send industrial production
Inusial proucton dips ' cent since then. lower, economists said.
1 "Overall, yet another report that Meanwhile, the Labor Depart-


Associated Press
WASHINGTON- More evidence
emerged Friday that the recession
is easing, with output by the nation's
factories, mines and utilities falling
at the slowest pace in six months.
At least one area of the economy
is flat, but that's welcome news.
Consumer prices were level in April
after a slight dip the prior month.
Inflation usually doesn't pick up
until well after a recovery begins,
noted Mark Vitner, senior economist
at Wachovia. If the economy re-
bounds late this year, as many ana-
lysts expect, prices likely will be
stable until 2011, he said.


Some economists have been con-
cerned about the possibility of de-
flation, a sustained period of
declining prices that can deepen a
recession. But most say that possi-
bility appears remote because the
Federal Reserve has responded
with force to combat the downturn.
The Fed said output at factories,
mines and utilities fell 0.5 percent
last month, after revised declines of
1.7 percent in March and 1 percent
in February. Analysts had expected
a drop of 0.6 percent last month.
Still, the report showed U.S. in-
dustry remains weak. Industrial
production has fallen in 15 of the 17
months since the recession began in


fits within the pic-
ture of an econ- A 1.4 perce
omy contracting
more, slowly but in auto p
still far from an which cam,
actual recovery,"
Paul Ashworth, reductions
senior U.S. econo-
mist at Capital year, bow
Economics, wrote
in a note Friday. Overall
A 1.4 percent in-
crease in auto production, which
came after huge reductions earlier
this year, boosted the overall results.
But that won't last as Chrysler LLC
and General Motors Corp. are shut-
ting plants in May and June, which


The dog is on it!
f _


Associated Press
Max, a two-year-old border collie, catches a flying discWednesday after he jumped off the back of
owner Michael Ham of Brookline, Mass., while being videotaped for a television show for the Animal
Planet channel in Acton, Mass. Ham has been training his dog to do the stunt for only a few weeks.
The show is aimed at teaching old dogs new tricks, like fetching a brew from the fridge or helping a
human land a date.




NYC health commissioner tapped to head CDC
Associated Press I '


WASHINGTON - President
Barack Obama on Friday ap-
pointed New York City's crusading
health commissioner, Dr. Thomas
Frieden, to lead the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention,
the disease-detective agency that
spearheads the nation's fight
against threats from AIDS to obe-
sity.
Frieden has made national head-
lines in a bid to get New Yorkers to
live a healthier lifestyle - with
bans on smoking in a city known for
smoky clubs and cigar-fueled
power lunches, and on certain fats
in restaurant foods.
But he's also a well-known infec-
tious disease expert who will in-
herit a looming decision on how
best to manage the swine flu out-
break - including whether or how
to produce a vaccine.
"I am honored and humbled by
the challenge and privilege of
working with the greatest public
health agency in the world,"
Frieden said in an e-mail to CDC
employees Friday morning. Of their
round-the-clock work since discov-
ering the new swine flu virus last
month, he added: "CDC shone."
But beyond dealing with out-
break crises, Obama signaled that
he expects the public health agency
to play a big role in his plans to


Associated Press
Dr. Thomas Frieden, right, newly named director of the Centers for Disease
Control, speaks Friday during a news conference with New York City Mayor
Michael Bloomberg in the Queens borough of New York.


overhaul health care.
The new CDC chief has been a
"leader in the fight for health care
reform, and his experiences con-
fronting public health challenges in
our country and abroad will be es-
sential in this new role," Obama
said in a statement announcing
Frieden's appointment
Frieden already has ideas, telling
his new staff that science - along
with "creative and strategic think-
ing" -will guide how they ramp up
public health programs that in turn
play a role in "increased produc-


tivity in society, and to reducing
costs for America's families, busi-
nesses and government."
* The White House said Frieden,
48, will begin at the CDC in early
June. His appointment does not re-
quire Senate confirmation.
Public health advocates wel-
comed the choice.
"Dr. Frieden is a bold leader who
has the courage to shake up the sta-
tus quo if science and evidence
show that change needs to hap-
pen," said Jeff Levi of the nonprofit
Trust for America's Health.


ent increase
reduction,
e after huge
i earlier this
hosted the
results.


ment said its
Consumer Price
Index was flat
last month, meet-
ing economists'
expectations.
The tame infla-
tion performance
reflected a sec-
ond monthly
drop in energy
costs and a third


straight decline in food prices.
Over the past year, consumer
prices have fallen 0.7 percent, the
largest 12-month decline since a
similar drop for the year ending in
June 1955.



Obama


revives



terror


.trials

Liberals dismayed
Associated Press

WASHINGTON - President
Barack Obama said Friday he
would reform and restart the mil-
itary tribunals he once reviled for
Guantanamo Bay detainees, jeop-
ardizing his timetable for closing
the prison by January and dis-
maying many supporters who sug-
gested he was going back on
campaign promises.
Now, after the detainees are
given stronger legal protections -
a ban on evidence obtained under
cruel duress, for example - the
trials of 13 defendants in nine
cases will be restarted no sooner
than September Five of the 13 are
charged with helping orchestrate
the Sept 11, 2001, attacks.
The rest of the 241 Guantanamo
detainees will either be'released,
transferred to other countries,
tried in civilian U.S. federal
courts or, potentially, held indef-
.initely as prisoners of war with
full Geneva Conventions rights.
"This is the best way to protect
our country, while upholding our
deeply held values," Obama said,
announcing his decision to
renew the tribunals in a three-
paragraph. White House state-
ment. The administration said'
he was not embracing the1 Bush-
era system because it would be
so significantly changed. ,
However, his action was al-
most instantly denounced by a
host of liberal-leaning groups
that championed his presiden-
tial campaign' last year.
"In one swift move, Obama both
backtracks on a major campaign
promise to change the way the
United States fights terrorism and
undermines the nation's core re-
spect for the rule of law," said
Amnesty International executive
director Larry Cox.
"There is no such thing as 'due
process light," said American
Civil Liberties Union executive
director Anthony D. Romero.
'"As a constitutional lawyer,
Obama must know that he can put
lipstick on this pig - but it will al-
ways be a pig," said Zachary
Katznelson, legal director of Re-
prieve, a London-based legal ac-
tion charity that represents 33
Guantanamo detainees.
Obama's announcement was
greeted more warmly on Capitol:
Hill, where he will need broad
support to quickly push through
tribunal changes. The White
House hopes to do so before mid-
September, when a new 120-day
freeze the president put on the
cases Friday runs out
The Democratic chairman of
the Senate Armed Services Com-
mittee, Carl Levin, D-Mich.,
called the changes "essential in
order to address the serious defi-
ciencies in existing procedures."
Senate GOP Leader Mitch Mc-
Connell said the announcement
was an "encouraging develop-
ment"
"By taking this action, President
Obama has reinforced that we are
at war, and that the laws of war
should apply to these prisoners,"
said Sen. Joe Lieberman, I-Conn.


Y CHRONICLE










S Section B SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009



SPORTS


0 Horse Racing/B2
N MLB/B3
M Scoreboard/B4
N Golf/B4
0 NBA/B5
M Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Dunnellon routs

Stanton, 9-0;

moves into Class

4A championship
JOHN COSCIA
jcoscia@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
PLANT CITY - The city of Dun-
nellon held a makeshift parade
* ,downtown. It was a hero's sendoff
1-"for the Lady Tigers softball team
" just prior to the team's departure
for the Final Four of the Class 4A
state tournament Friday morning.
And now, when the Lady Tigers
return to the small community
Saturday night, there's a 50-50
chance they'll do so as Florida
state champions.
'; The locomotive that is the
'Tigers D-Train continued its mer-
ciless assault on its opponents in
the state playoffs with a 9-0 dis-
..'mantling of the Stanton College
'Prep Blue Devils in the state
semifinals. It was Dunnellon's
fourth straight shutout and im-
-proved Dunnellon's run differen-
tial to 47-0 in the state playoffs
over its collective opponents.
Following the game, Kevin
' Fagan, Dunnellon's head coach
'. 'and a two-time Super Bowl cham-
pion, was asked if he expects to be
'iore nervous heading into today's
championship game than he was
'for the Super Bowl.
"I'll be way more nervous
'(today) for sure," admitted the for-
Smer defensive end, who played for
seven years with.the San Fran-
cisco 49ers. "It was easy as a de-
ifensive end. I could just reach out
Sand slug somebody and the nerves
: would go away Tomorrow it's out
-of my control. It's all on the girls."
The D-Train wasted no time ex-
*erting'its strength, striking for a
S'run in the home half of the first in-
Ining. Tori Williams got things
-started with a one-out infield sin-
Vgle and scored on Dallas Towns'
[RBI single.
' "We were nervous. Well at least I
.(was nervous in that first inning,"
FITowns admitted. I don't know what
�(pitch) I was looking for exactly.
t But it felt great to get that hit."
dI That got the locomotive on the
f'8 right track but what happened in
ithe second inning had that D-Train
Sbarreling down the tracks full
4-speed ahead on a crash course
, with the state 'title game. The


HIlotos Dy L1AU rILS I CItKbpecial to hme unronicle
. The Dunnellon softball team celebrates following a 9-0 thrashing of Stanton in the Class 4A state softball semifinal Friday afternoon in
Plant City. With the victory, the Tigers advance to the Class 4A statetitle game against Lake Wales today at noon. Tigers pitcher Kasey
Fagan, center, gives her fa her and Dunnellon coach Kevin Fagmaiasit bump after hitting a solo home run in the fourth inning.


Tigers would score five runs on today," on this day it was still more
five hits in the frame to take a com- than good enough to quiet the Blue
manding 6-0 lead after two innings. Devils' bats. Over the course of the
Holly Roberson first three innings,
got things started / Kasey allowed only
with a shot down one walk and one
the left field line. It hit and struck out
was the start of Join the Chronicle sports three.
seven straight Lady crew on the 'net today at But Dunnellon's
Tigers reaching noon as they tweet the in- offensive train was
base safely before ning-by-inning results of the finally slowed in
they would record Class 4A Softball champi- the fourth inning...
a single out By the onship when the Dunnellon by Mother Nature.
time the dust had Tigers take on Lake Wales: At 5:30 p.m. the
settled, Roberson, twitter.com/citruschronice heavens opened up
Danielle Burns and the game was


(walk), Samantha Wright (double),
Sami Fagan (single) and Williams
(single) had all scored.
And although Kasey Fagan later
said, "I didn't have my best stuff


delayed for 1 hour and 17 minutes.
When play resumed, an infused
Stanton team came to the plate
and quickly loaded the bases
See TIGERS/Page B4


jGoydos vaults atop leaderboard

SGolfer opens 3-stroke r

marginn at Texas Open i

Associated Press


'. SAN ANTONIO - Paul Goydos re-
,membered hitting one mediocre shot
.Friday in the Texas Open, but not any
,bad ones.
; Goydos followed his opening 7-under
,063 with a 65 to reach 12 under on the La
- -Cantera Golf Club course - three strokes
ahead of three-time
GOLF champion Justin
SCORES Leonard and four
others. It's the
- For the golf biggest lead Goydos
leaderboard has ever had on the
and LPGA and PGA Tour.
Champions "It's just kind of
results, please like being the pace
see: car, for lack of a bet-
PAGE 84 ter word," the 44-
year-old Goydos
said. "We're going to
go out and play two more rounds of golf,
'but the tournament's going to be in front
'of me tomorrow, which is kind of cool."
Goydos had six birdies after dropping
a stroke on his first hole, the par-4 10th,
"This is why you play If I wasn't com-
fortable where I am right now, I need to
find another profession," said Goydos,
the 1996 Bay Hill and 2007 Sony Open
winner. "This is why we play, practice
'"and endure rough weeks, so we learn
See PGA/Page B4
Paul Goydos looks at his putt on the
18th hole during the second round of the
Texas Open on Friday in San Antonio.
Associated Press


L,


Johnson snares top


spot for All-Star race


Associated Press


CONCORD, N.C. - Jimmie
Johnson has a history of domi-
nance at Lowe's Motor Speed-
way, but had never started from
the pole in the All-Star race.
After a speedy, mistake-free
performance Friday, the deco-
rated driver can check off that ac-
complishment, too.
The three-time defend-
ing Sprint Cup points
champion won five of six
points races at Lowe's
from 2003-05. He's in po-
sition to return to the top
spot after being the star
of the unusual qualifying
format.
Teams had to go three Jim
laps and make a four-tire Joht
pit stop without speeding sits on
down pit road or leaving NASCA
loose lug nuts.
Time penalties for those in-
fractions cost several drivers, but
not Johnson. He had a speedy
first lap, but shot to the front by
being the fastest out of the pits -
119 mph.
He finished in 2 minutes, 1.416
seconds, then held off all chal-
lengers. Kurt Busch will start sec-
ond in the 100-lap non-points
shootout Saturday night that pays
the winner $1 million.
"I think with track position as
important as it's going to be in the
race, to be where we are is a


1
,1


great situation," Johnson said.
"We focused-on it hard today and
everybody did their jobs.
Busch finished in 2:02.187.
Matt Kenseth will start third, fol-
lowed by Dale Earnhardt Jr. and
Mark Martin.
'"Jimmie Johnson, the 48 guys
are always the tough ones to beat
here at Lowe's, no matter what
event it is," Busch said.
"But overall I'm very
happy with our lap. To be
starting outside pole,
that's almost as good as
starting on the pole here
at Lowe's."
Jeff Gordon qualified
sixth, followed by Bobby
Mie Labonte, Kasey Kahne,
sone Kevin Harvick and Brad
pole at Keselowski.
R event. Several drivers, includ-
ing Kyle Busch and Carl
Edwards, slipped out of the top
10 because of penalties.
Edwards posted a time of
2:01.80, but received 15 seconds
in penalties for three loose lug
nuts. He'll start 14th.
"It's a mini version of how our
season is going so far," Edwards
said.
Kyle Busch dropped from third
to 13th because of loose lug nuts.
It was a much lighter atmos-
phere than qualifying for points
races. Not everybody even knew
the rules.


naI









HOSAIN IRSCONY(LCRIIL


134TH PREAKNESS STAKES


Sf fill Kentucky Oakes winner Rachel Alexandra, attempt
Make room for the ly was made the 8-5 favorite and will break from the




Big Mine That Musket Luv Gov Friesan Terrain Papa
Drama Bird Man Fire Clem
J. Velazquez M. Smith E. Coa . J. Theriot G. Saez . J. Rose R. Bejarano
10-1 6-1 8-1 50-1 6-1 30-1 12-1
1-0-1-0 3-1-1-0 5-3-0-2 4-1-3-0 4-3-0-0 2-0-0-1 4-1-2-0
$30,000 $1,487,200 $715,000 $53,225 $540,000 $103,500 $860,000


:ing to become only the fifth filly to win the Preakness Stakes,
No. 13 position in Saturdays race.


General
Quarters
J. Leparoux
20-1
5-2-1-0
$604,000


Pioneerof
the Nile
G. Gomez
5-1
4-3-1-0
$1,090,000


Flying
Private
A. Garcia
50-1
7-0-3-0
$145,200


Take the
Points
E. Prado
30-1
3-1-1-0
$107,200


Horse * Jockey * Odds
2009 record * earnings


Tone it
Down
K. Desormeaux
50-1
5-2-1-1
$48.840


Rachel
Alexandra
I C. Borel
8-5
4-4-0-0
$756,914


SOURCE: Maryland Jockey Club


Bird not the word


Jockey leaves

Derby winner

for Preakness

Associated Press


BALTIMORE - Calvin
Borel has complete confi-
dence his horse will win the
Preakness, the kind ofgravi-
tas expected from the Ken-
tucky Derby-winning jockey.
Except Borel won't be rid-
ing the Derby winner today. .
He made the unprece- .
dented decision to get off
Mine That Bird and onto A Nt
Rachel Alexandra, the spec- - ' -
tacular filly who is the 8-5
early favorite for the second
leg of the Triple Crown.
"It's hard to leave a Ken-
tucky Derby winner," jockey
Robby Albarado said.
"You're the only one with the
chance ofwinning the Triple
Crown. It's a hard decision to
make."
Mine That Bird is the co-
third choice at 6-1 with
Friesan Fire, the Derby wa-
gering favorite who stag-
gered home next-to-last on
the first Saturday in May.
"The 12 other horses are -
going to have to run the race '
of their life or me fall off or *'
something stupid happen,"
Borel said by phone Friday
from Louisville, Ky., where
he took a break from mowing
his lawn to chat ..
"I just got to point her in
the right direction and she'll
,,get me there."
If that happens, Rachel
Alexandra would become
only the fifth filly to win the'
Preakness. Ten have tried
since Nellie Morse in 1924 Preakness entrant Rachel Alexandra gets a bath outside
was the last to wear the Race Course on Friday in Baltimore. Today will mark the 134th ru
winner's blanket of black-
eyed Susans. other times, winning it with which is Rachel Alexandra's
If Mine That Bird should Prairie Bayou in 1993. favorite place to be. She'll
win and set up a Triple "Calvin will just tell me to' start-from the No. 13 post on
Crown try in the Belmont go to the lead," Smith said, the far outside; Mine That
next month, well, Borel can joking. Bird is in the No. 2 post
take some of that credit, too. Smith also sought advice The surface isn't as deep
He has permission to help from his girlfriend Chantal as Churchill Downs, which
the enemy - virtually ver- Sutherland. She rode Mine was mired in mud and
boten in a major race - by That Bird to three consecu- bogged down most of the 20
talking to Mine That tive wins in horses on Derby Day. The
Bird's new rider Cz C- / anada, where forecast Saturday is for a 30
Mike Smith. At the colt percent chance of isolated
trainer Chip At ' " was a thunderstorms and a high
WoolleyJr.'s re- . champion of 80.
quest, Borel -. 2-year-old. The Preakness is also a
agreed to go over May16, 200 ' Sutherland sixteenth of a mile shorter
a few things with .PImlc. . " will be than the 1�/4-mile Derby, giv-
Smith on Satur- 7- : watching Sat- ing closer less time to make
day morning. urday from Woodbine, up a deficit
"He ain't no dummy," where she rides.' None of that bothers
Borel said. "I'll tell him what Smith plans a strategy Borel, who all but guaran-
I think and it's up to Mike. similar to the one Borel used teed victory for Rachel
He knows his horses. It's in the Derby, taking Mine Alexandra. Together, they
kind of hard for me to tell That Bird off the pace and own a five-race winning
him how to ride a horse." waiting patiently before streak that includes a smash-
Borel said he's helping as making a big closing run. ing -20 1/4-length win in the
a thank you to Woolley and "Hopefully get him in Derby eve Kentucky Oaks.
his camp for putting him on rhythm and he punches like "She's just so much the
his second Derby winner in that again," Smith said. best," he said. "I never lose
three years. Some things are different on her"
Smith comes in with his this time, though. Borel was understandably
brown eyes wide open. The Pimlico's dirt track is worried last week after'
Hall of Fame jockey has known to favor horses run- Rachel Alexandra was sold
ridden in the Preakness 10 ning at or near the lead, to new owners Jess Jackson


Associated Press
the stakes barn at Pimlico
nning of the Preakness Stakes.
and Harold McCormick and
moved to trainer Steve As-
mussen's barn.
"I watched her walk away
with tears coming down my
eyes," he said.
Jackson then told Borel he
could continue riding the
filly - "That meant a lot to
me," Borel said - and the
jockey informed Woolley
that he was sticking with
Rachel Alexandra for the
Preakness. That led Mine
That Bird's trainer to ask
Smith, whom he barely knew
until recently, to take over
the mount
"Everyone is asking me if
there's added pressure,"
Smith said. "I'm so excited to
get the opportunity. Hope-
fully, we can go out and show
it was no fluke."
And if Mine That Bird val-
idates his last-to-first dash in
the Kentucky Derby by win-.
ning the Preakness, Borel
plans to be one of the first to
offer congratulations. Not
that he believes it'll happen.
"He'd have to run the race
of his life to beat my filly,"
he said.


Mine That Bird,


trainer Woolley


not rushing home


Associated Press

BALTIMORE - Chip
Woolley Jr., the cowboy with
the big black hat, will be,
glad to get home when the
Triple Crown is over.
Not that Woolley hasn't
enjoyed the trip so far. The
trainer will try to validate
Mine That Bird's reputa-
tion today in the Preakness
Stakes at Pimlico.
Having pulled off a stun-
ning 50-1 upset in the Ken-
tucky Derby, Mine That
Bird faces 12 rivals in the
middle jewel of the series,
including' the sensational
filly Rachel Alexandra.
"It's been pretty fulfill-
ing," Woolley said Friday.
'It's been exciting. You
couldn't ask for anything
better than what's hap-
pened to me so far. We
never came here thinking
we could win the Derby.
We just wanted to get as
much as we could. Little
did we know, we'd knock a
home run."
Still, this is all a long way
from home in Bloomfield,
N.M.
"I'll be glad to go back
home," he said. "It's more'
laid-back and comfortable
there. I don't know if all this
will change anything. We're
all pretty tight back there."
Woolley drove from New
Mexico to Churchill Downs
for the Derb.N, transporting
his horse in avan hitched to
his pickup. He plans re-
main with the gelding
through the three-weekgap
between the Preakness and
Belmont Stakes.
"I won't go back home
until the horse is done with
this campaign," he said.
If all goes well in the
Preakness, Woolley will
take Mine That Bird back to
Churchill Downs and train


him there for the Belaront
on June 6.
"The horse will helped e-
cide everything," Woolley
said. "Everything we do Will
be in the best interest of
this horse. As long asfie's
healthy and doing good,
we'll keep spotting himni
'LAST HURRAH: E rry
moment is tinged with
nostalgia for trailer
Larry Jones as he sehds
out Friesan Fire in,,the
Preakness. , o
Jones will drasticlly
scale back his stable at the
end of the year. He andwife
Cindy will still train a-Wew
horses, but the scope will be
greatly reduced.
Jones felt he needed a
break following the fifo-
tional ordeal after theiatal
breakdown of his filly Eight
Belles moments after fin-
ishing second in last year's
Kentucky Derby. -
From inside the Pirtico
stakes barn; Jones reflected
on what could be the final
time he stood in that spot.
"Every time we do some-
thing, we realize it could be
the last time," he Waid.
"We're trying to enjoy il as
we go. Some of it we're
going through thinking,
'Thank God I don't haye to
do this again.' It's good 4nd
it has been good."
With a reduced ,ork-
load, . the 52-year-'old
trainer will be able to- do
things most folks his age
take for granted: sleeping
late, taking vacation and
enjoying time with his
grandchildren.
"I want to be there to see
them open birthday pes-
ents," Jones said. "'On
Christmas, we hope to have
them all in one spot That's
something we haven't got to
do that everybody takes for
granted."


Associated ,ress
Kelly Dennington holds Kentucky Derby winner and Preak-
ness entrant Mine That Bird while he gets a bath on Friday
at Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore.


Pioneerof the Nile

out to avenge defeat


Associated Press

BALTIMORE - Bdb Baf-
fert oozed confidence in Pi-
oneerof the Nile leading to
the Kentucky Derby.
The colt was in front com-
ing down the stretch, and for
a few moments the Hall of
Fame trainer thought he
had his fourth Derby victory.
"It just took the air out of
us," Baffert recalled Thurs-
day
As was the case with most
of the 150,000 people at
Churchill Downs that day.
Calvin Borel and 50-1 shot
Mine That Bird blew by Pio-
neerof the Nile to win by 6%/4
lengths in the second-biggest
upset in Derby history.
Now Baffert and his colt
are back for a rematch in
Saturday's Preakness.
Not only will they have to
contend with the Derby win-


ner, but Borel has switched
horses and will ride stellar
filly Rachel Alexandra, the
8-5 morning line favorite
who brings a five-race win-
ning streak into the 1 3-16-
mile race at Pimlico.
"I would've taken a shot at
the Derby with her. She's
just a tremendous athlete,"
Baffert said. "She's a good
filly and these classics are
huge. There's not a lot of
money to run for fillies. She
fits with these boys, so I
don't blame them for taking
a shot"
Baffert did the same thing
with Excellent Meeting in
1999, but she was pulled up
as a precaution and didn't
finish the race.
He expects a better result
for Rachel Alexandra, who
will break from the No. 13
post on the far outside
under Borel.


SPONSORED BY:









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* -lV VyE mm P ",I 0--


I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHROICLE


HORSE RACING










,CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 B3

East Division Central Division West Division
W L Pot GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away W L Pot GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Toronto 24 14 .632 - - 6-4 W-1 13-6 11-8 Detroit , 17 16 .515 - - 5-5 L-3 8-5 9-11 Texas 21 14 .600 - - 8-2 W-5 12-6 9-8
Boston 21 14 .600 1% - 6-4 L-2 13-4 8-10 Kansas City 18 17 .514 - 3 4-6 L-6 11-7 7-10 Los Angeles 18 16 .529 2% 2% 7-3 L-1 12-8 6-8
NewYork 18 17 .514 4Y 3 5-5 W-3 7-7 11-10 Minnesota 18 18 .500 Y 31 5-5 L-1 14-9 4-9 Seattle 16 19 .457 5 5 1-9 L-3 7-7 9-12
Tampa Bay 17 20 .459 6� 5 6-4 W-1 7-8 10-12 Chicago 15 19 .441 2� 5% 3-7 L-2 8-8 7-11 Oakland 13 18 .419 6 6 4-6 W-2 8-10 5-8
AL, Baltimore 15 20 .429 7h 6 6-4 W-1 11-11 4-9 Cleveland 14 23 .378 5 8 4-6 L-1 7-11 7-12


New York
Atlanta
Philadelphia
Florida
". *Washington


East Division
GB WCGB
1� 3
2 3�4
3 412
7 81,


Milwaukee
St. Louis
Chicago
Cincinnati
Houston
Pittsburgh


Central Division
GB WCGB
- - I


Los Angeles
San Fran.
Colorado
San Diego
Arizona


West Division
GB WCGB

5� 2�Y
9V2 6�1
11 8
114 81


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Mienesota 6, Detroit 5
exas 3, Seattle 2
L.A. Angels 5, Boston 4, 12 innings
NJ. Yankees 3, Toronto 2
Cleveland 11, Tampa Bay 7
Baltimore 9, Kansas City 5
Friday's Games
N.Y. Yankees 5, Minnesota 4
r- OOkland at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
onto 8, Chicago White Sox 3
?, .,apa Bay 8, Cleveland 7
Texas 10, L.A. Angels 8
Baltimore at Kansas City, late
2.Baston at Seattle, late.
Today's Games
rMinnesota (Blackburn 2-2) at N.Y. Yankees
elChamberlain 2-1), 1:05 p.m. _
ftCliicago White Sox (Coloin'-3- -at foronto
i i'PARay 0-1 ),1:07 p.m.
Cleveland (Pavano 3-3) at Tampa Bay (Garza
5:" _ ),4:10p.m. ,
t 0 B.A. Angels (Lackey 0-0) at Texas (Padilla 2-2),
bo,10 p.m.
O'kland (Braden 3-4) at Detroit (Porcello 3-3),
7:05 p m .
SBaitimore (R.Hill 0-0) at Kansas City (Davies 2-
it 1h 7:10 p.m.
;cBjipton (Beckett 3-2) at Seattle (Olson 0-0),
,-010 p.m.
Sunday's Games
df Minnesota at N.Y.Yankeet 1:05 p.m.
Oakland at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
r, iC.icago White Sox at Toronto; 1:07 p.m.
. 1C.lveland at Tampa Bay, 1:38 p.m.
).LLA. Angels at Texas, 2:05 p.m.,
Tq'rialtimore at Kansa6 City, 2:10 p1m.
..VBopton at Seattle, 4:10 p.m.
ju NATIONAL LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
; Ml,'waukee 5, Florida 3 - ---.-.-- -
,,.A. Dodgers 5, Philadelphia 3,10 innings
"0'.cago Cubs 11, San Diego 3
iJ-�euston 5, Colorado 3 .
,, ,.Louis 5, Pittsburgh 1
Mets 7, San Francisco 4
" Friday's Games
'L 1'lorado 3, Pittsburgh 1
L.A. Dodgers 6, Florida4
Ai.A anta 4, Arizona3 3 .
):� Piladelphia at Washington; late
) uston at Chicago, ppd., rain
,uKiMwaukee at,St. Louis, ppd., rain
Cipcinnati at San Diego, late
N.Y. Mets at San Francisco, late
9fn1o Today's Games
di hduston (Oswalt 1-2) at Chicago Cubs (R.Wells
LiW), 1:05 p.m.
. iiladelphia (Myers 2-2) at Washington (Olsen
' -3), 1:05 p.mh.,1st game'
'wilwaukee (Suppan 2-3) at St. Louis (Wain-
a {; ri.ght3-1), 1:10p.m: . .
N.. Mets (J.Santana 4-2) at San Francisco
''H.Johnson 3-3), 4:10 p.m.
1-.0. Dodgers (Milton 0-0) at Florida (A;MillerO-
1), 6:10 p.m.
,.. CRlorado (Cook 2-1) at Pittsburgh (Snell 1-5),
: '5p.m. . ' /. . ,
HC (Piladelphla (Happ'1 -0) at Washington (D.Cabr-
lb era 0-4), 7:05 p.m., 2nd game'
SArizona (Sclemere O3),at-Atlanta.(Kawakami 2-
'7:li10 p.m.' ' " .
:1 dinclnnati (Volquez 4-2) at San Diego (Geer 0-
n151), 10:05 p.m:
-4 . Sunday's Games
L.A. Dodgers at Florida, :10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 1:35 p.m.
);-C6lorado at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
A 'iona at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m.
1Milwaukee at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
"Huston at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
f.ihcinnati at San Diego, 405 p.m.
'itffW. Mets at San Francisco, 8:05 p.m.
,r "',


Rays 8, Indians 7 single that trimmed Cleveland's lead to 7-
ST. PETERSBURG - B.J. Upton's. 3.
ninth-inning homer off LuisVizcaino The Rays pulled within two runs on
capped the biggest comeback in Tampa second baseman Jamey Carroll's throw-
Bay history and the gave the Rays an 8-7 ing error in the sixth, and Jason Bartlett
victory over the Cleveland Indians on Fri- scored on a wild pitch that trimmed the
day night. deficit to 7-6 in the seventh.
The defending AL champions fell be- Notes: Indians manager EricWedge
hind 7-0 before coming back with plenty was ejected in the third inning. He argued
of help from the last-place Indians. with plate umpire Greg Gibson after Mark
The Rays scored two runs on throwing DeRosa, trying to score from second
errors and a third on a wild pitch before base on a single, appeared to slide in
Ben Zobrist led off the bottom of the eighth ahead of a throw from Upton but was
.....caedouL...Rays LF.Ca'[Crawford-re-
_tl mtumed to the lieup after missing one
Upton led off the ninth with his first game because of a bruised right should
homer on a 3-2 pth fromCeveano(0-1)Thursday, der. He had his major league-leading
who signed wth Ceveland on Thursday. 23rd and 24th steals.... ndians/DH Travis
A night after building a 9-0 .lead and Hafner, who's been on the 15-day dis-
holding off the Rays in the late innings for abled list since April 29 because of a sore
an 11-7 victory, the last-place Indians right shoulder, began a rehab assign-
jumped out to another big advantage ment at Triple-A Columbus.... Rays DH
against left-hander Scott Kazmir. Pat Burrell, who sat out his fourth con-
Grady Sizemore opened the game secutive game because of a sore neck,
with the 19th leadoff home run of his ca- received a cortisone shot and will be out
reer, breaking a tie with Kenny Lofton for Saturday, too. His status will be re-evalu-
the most in Indians history Shin-Soo ated on Sunday.
Choo homered for the second straight Cleveland Tampa Bay
game, hitting a two-run shot that madeit ab rhlevel bind Tampa Ba h bi
7-0 in the fourth. . Sizemrcf 5 1 1 1 BUptoncf 5 2 3 1.
Evan Longoria, Carlos Pena and Willy ACarer ss 4 1 0 0 Crwfrd if 4.1 2 0
-Aybardrove-in runsinlhecorrreback ' VMrthzc 5 1 2 0 Longori3b 3 2 1 1
Choorf 3 32 2 C.Penalb 3 1 1 1
against Indians starter Anthony Reyes Peralta 3b 3 1 2 0 WAyar dh 3 0-1 1
and relievers Tony Sipp, Jensen Lewis DeRosalb 4 0.1 2 Grossrf 2 00 0
andRafaelBetancourt, who escaped a Garkodh 4 0 1 1 Zobristrf 2 11 1
intheseventh onyto, LaPortlf 4 0 0 1 Iwamr2b .3 0 0 0
bases-loaded jam in the seventhonly to JCarrll2b 4 0 2 0 :Bartlett ss 4 1 1 0
give up Zobrisfs tying homer in the Navarr c3000
eighth. Totals 36 711 7 Totals .32 810 5
Dan Wheeler(10) pitchedoneinning Cleveland ,.. 203 200 000-7
to ge hee. Tampa Bay 000 302 111-8
to get the win. . No outs when winning run scored
Kazmir allowed seven runs and 10 E-J C3rri..il i Cnoo 13 Lorr (,T,,1) LOB-
hitsin 31-3 innings-his shortest outing Cl- 3- . Ha ampa Bay , .B-Peraia
� " ' " f " . ' n " BUpior, Baranlen IB| HR--S :ernie I,1
ofthe season. Since beating Boston and crou i5~. B U pion 17 , Zot",r.,i i sB-S'ze
the NewYorkYankees in his first two more (6). B Upton 2 (11i. Crawora 2 (24). Zo-
starts, the 25-year-old left-hander has bsi (3) CS-Iwamuta (11 S-Peralia, lavano.
yielded 30 runs, 41 hits and 22 walks in'. " PF-L H R ER BB SO
his last 28 2-3 innings. , Cleveland '. . ,
Reyes retired nine in a row before A.Reyes. . 51- 5 5 3 f1 '
Upton-doubled forTampa Bay's first hit. Sipp . 0 0 0 1
, hespeedycenterf"r'oeirv J.LewisH,4 ' 3, 1 1,0 '0
Thespeedycenterieerstolethird, giv- BencounBS 12-3 2
ing the Rays at least one swipe in 17. vzc:.an: L:, 0 1 1 1i 0
consecutive games, and scored on Tampa Bay , . . .
Penas RBI sin s gle eK,,.r .. -:.-,
The stolen base streak matches the Percival 'r 0 0 0 C 1
longest in the AL since1954.The1976 Howel 1 I 0 0 ) 0
Athletics and 2001 Yankeeseach swiped Wlne, Ierw' i' o 1 ( o
Howell pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.,
a base in 17 straight, while the longest sipp pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. '
stretch in the majors during that span is vizcaino pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
29 by the 1985 Cardinals. WP-Sipp, J.Lewis; Kazmir.,
Second run inthe Rays'fourth Umpires-Home, Greg Gibson; First, Andy
Fletcher; Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Tim Mc-
scored on Choo's throwing error from Clelland..
rightlield, and Aybar followed with a RBI T-3:28. A-25,827 (36,973).


Yankees 5, Twins 4
NEW YORK-- Melky Cabrera
capped a three-run rally in the ninth in-
ning with a two-run single, and the
New York Yankees stopped a five-
game home losing streak with a 5-4
victory over the Minnesota Twins on
Friday night.
Justin Momeau hit two solo homers
and Joe Mauer had one as the Twins
built a 4-1 lead, but Joe Nathan couldn't
hold a two-run lead in the ninth.
A-Aljex Rodriguez,.playing-a home for
the first time since admitting he used
steroids and having hip surgery, was 0
for 1 with a strikeout and four walks.
Brett Gardner, who entered after
Johnny Damon was ejected in the
third, began the comeback in the sev-
enth with the first inside-the-park
homer at the $1.5 billion ballpark.
Gardner, who went 3 for 3, tripled
leading off the ninth againstNathan (1 -
1) and scored on a single by Mark
Teixeira to cut the deficit to 4-3.
Rodriguez walked, Hideki Matsui
struck out and Nick Swisher hit a
bouncer between first and second that
Morneau snagged with a dive and
turned into an out at first. .


Minnesoti

Span If
Tolbert 2b
Mauerc
M,10:ea 1D
Kubeli adi
Cuddyr rt
Crede 3b
BHarrs 3b
Gomez cf
Puri. )is

T.-lals
Mirnesote
New York


. NewYork
ab rhbi ab r h bl
2 01 0 Jeterss 4 1 1 1
5 00 0 Damonlf 2 00 0
4 1 1 1 Gardnrcf 3 23 1
5 2 2 2 Teixeirib 4 1 2 1
4 1 2 0 ARdrgz3b 1 00 0
4 0 1 0 R.Penapr 0 1,0 0
2 00 0 HMatsudh 4 00 0
2 01 0 Swisherrf 4 0 1 0
2 00.0 Cano2b 300 0
3 0 1. 1 MeCarrcf 5 02 2
Cash c 4 0 1 0
33 49 4 Totals . .34 510 5
a 010 110 100-4'
000 010 103-5


Two outs when winning run scored.
DP-Minnesota 1, New York,'1. LOB-Min-
n r:.:.i: 11, NewYork 13.2B-Cuddyer (6), Teix-
Era i.i Cash'ifi ?B-Gardner-(2). HR-Mauer
15i Morneau 2 1111, Jeter (5), Gardner (2).
SB-Punlo (41 S-Gomez SF-Punto..
IP H RERBBSO,
Minnesota
L1,hnro i. 4 1 1 6 6
Craw. H 2 2-3 2 1 ,1 1
, l ' H . 11 I ' ] i ' 1 0
aJrnan L.1k-t' -3 - . : 1,..
New York
Hugres 5 6 3 3 -1 2
Alt.blalejo i 1 0 0 1 2
C, : . 2-3 , 1 1 1 0 0
Tomko '2-3 1 0 0 0 0
E.Ramirez 11-3 0 0 0 2 2
VerasW,2-1 1-3 0 .0 0 0 1
Umpires-Home, Wally Bell; First, Marty Fos-
ter; Second, Chad Fairchild; Third, John
Hirschbeck.
T--3:37. A-43,856 (52,325).


BIlu Jays 8, White Sox 3
TORONTO - Aaron Hill hit a two-
run honner, rookie Brett Cecil won his
second straight start and the Toronto
Blue Jays beat the Chicago White Sox
8-3 on Friday night. ':
Cecil (2-0) allowed three runs and six
hits in six innings. Jesse Carlson got six
outs and B.J. Ryan finished in his first
appearance since being activated off
the 15-day disabled list Thursday. Ryan
had been out since April 23 with muscle
tightness in his back and shoulder.
Hill went 3 for 4 with two RBIs for
his 18th multihit game this season. He
raised his average to .347.
The White Sox lost for the seventh
straight time in Toronto. Chicago was
limited to 11 runs and a .146 batting
average during six consecutive defeats
in Canada over the past two seasons,
and was shut out twice in four games
.here in 2008.
Hill opened the scoring with his 10th
homer in the third and Toronto blew it
open with a six-run fourth, opening the
inning with seven consecutive hits and
chasing John Danks.
Adam Lind led off with a double to
right. He went to third on Scott Rolen's
single. and scored on a base hit by
Kevin Millar. Rolen scored when Rod
Barajas doubled off the wall in left and
Millar came around when Carlos
Quentin dropped the ball.
.Chicago Toronto
ab rhbi ab r h bl
J,Nix3b 4 0 0 0 Scutaross 4 2 2 1
Getz2b 4 01 0 A.Hill2b 4 1 3 2
Quentin If 3 1 0 0 Rios rf 3 00 0
Dye f 4 1 1, 2 V.Wellscf 4 00 0
Thome dh 3 01 0 Lind dh 4 1 2 0
Lillirdgpr 0 00 0 .Rolen3b 4 12 0
Konerklb 3 1 1 1 Millar 1b 4 1 1 1
Przynsc 4 0 1 0 Barajsc 4 1 1 1
AIRmrzss 4 0 1 0 Bautistlf 2 1 1 1
Pdsdnkcf 3 0 1 0
Totals , 32 3 7 3 Totals - 33 812 6
Chicago 000 012 000-3
Toronto, 002 600 00x-8
E-Quentin (1). DP-Chicago,3, Toronto 2._
LOB-Chicago 5; Toronto 5. 2B-Scutaro. (7),
Lind (13), Barajas (11), Bautista (4). HR-Dye
(8), Konerko (4), A.Hill (10).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
Danrv' L.'.3 3 ' .7 I 3
as 2 i I 0
Broadway 3 ' 0 0 2 2
Toronto
CecilW,2-0 6 6 3 3 2 3
Carlson 2 1 0 0 0 1
B.J.Ryan 1 0 0 0 1 2
Danks pitched to 5 batters in the 4th.
HBP-by Carrjsco tRios)
Umpires-Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Larry
Vanover; Second, Dan lassogna; Third, Char-
lie Reliford. .
T-2:23. A-17,241'(49,539).


Jim Rice tours
baseball Hall of Fame
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. -
One glance at the wall behind
him was all it took for Jim Rice
to feel he was home at last.
"It's an honor to be chosen to
be in this elite group of men
that played the game of base-
ball," the former Boston Red
Sox slugger said Friday after
touring the Baseball Hall of
Fame, the .plaues of the first
class of Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb,
Christy Mathewson, Honus' "
Wagner, and Walter Johnson
gleaming in the background.
"I think I'm ahead of the
game. I never thought one day
I'd play in the big leagues," said
Rice, now 56 with flecks of gray
streaking his beard. "If it was
the other way around, if I wasn't
sitting here today, I wouldn't be
angry or anything like that be-
cause I'm ahead of the game."
Rice, who retired in 1989
after playing his entire career
with the Red Sox, was elected
to Cooperstown in January in
his final year of eligibility on the
Baseball Writers' Association of
America ballot. After missing
out for 14 years, he received
412 votes - seven more than
he needed - from the 539 bal-
lots cast to earn induction
alongside stolen bases leader
Rickey Henderson.
Also to be honored at the
July 26 induction ceremony are
former Yankees and Indians
second baseman Joe Gordon,
elected last month by the Veter-
ans Committee, as well as
broadcaster Tony Kubek and
writer Nick Peters, winners of
the Frick and Spink awards, re-
spectively.
From posing for photos with
an elementary school group. to
grasping bats once wielded by
Babe Ruth and Rabbit
Maranville, Rice, accompanied
by his wife, Corine, smiled
often during his first visit to the
museum. He was a man at
ease after so many years of
waiting and wondering if his
day would come..


d-l -


MLB Leaders
'AMERICAN LEAGUE,
BATrirlG-VMarlinez, Cleveland, .400; Ad-
' Jones, Baltimore, .370; MiCabrera,,Detroit, .366;
".Barlett, Tampa Bay, .359; MYoung, Texas,.350;
S",AHiII. Toronto, .347: Markakis. Baltimore. .346.
' RuIS-AoJone-: BaIrn.ore. 35 MarkaIk, Bal-
'Imore, 34, Scularo, Tor.onlO, 34, Bay, Bc,'ion,-
'30; VMartinez, Cleveland, 30; Pedroia, Boston,
'3 BRoberts, Baltimore, 30.
l-Longoria, Tampa Bay, 46; Bay, Boston,
R larkakls, Baltimore, 33; CPena, Tampa Bay,
AHill, Toronto, 32; Huff, Baltimore, 32; 3 tied
fS-AU-jToronto, 58; yMartinez, Cleveland,
SCrawford, Tampa Bay, 49; MYoung, Texas,
Longoria, Tampa Bay, 48; 3tied at 47.
UBLES-Longoria, Tampa Bay, 16;
laspo, Kansas City, 14; MYoung, Texas, 14;
d, Texas, 13; Lind, Toronto, 13; Markakis,
timore, 13; Polanco, Detroit, 13.
TRIPLES-Crisp,' Kansas City, 5; Andrus,
ITAeas, 3; 12 tied at 2.
4:1BBIME RUNS-CPena, Tampa Bay, 13; Kinsler,
r, [as, 11; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 11; Morneau,
Minnesota, 11; 4 tied at 10.
STOLEN BASES-Crawford, Tampa'Bay, 24;
Ellsbury, Boston, 16; Figgins, Los Angeles, 15;
Afireu, Los Angeles, 13; BUpton, Tampa Bay,
.,; Bartlett, Tampa Bay, 9; Crisp, Kansas City, 9.
(IrCHING (4 Decisions)-:-Palemii,LosAnge'
Sett 4.0. 1.000; Frasor, Toronto, 4-0, 1.000;
lsamrr,,ez, Boston, 4-0, 1.00b; Halladay,
/Yojonto, 7-1, .875; Greinke, Kansas City, 6-1,
'.B7; Buehrle, Chicago, 5-1 .833.
sTRIKEOUTS-Verlander, Detroit, 69; Greinke,
Cjsas City, 59; FHernandez, Seattle, 53; Hal-
y Toronto, 49; Lester, Boston; 49; Bedard,
Battle, 43; 2 tied at 42
; NATIONAL LEAGUE
hTING-Votto, Cincinnati, .374; Beltran, New
ok, .371; Hawpe, Colorado, .363; Zimmer-
n, Washington, .357; HaRamirez, Florida,
.4; MRamirez, Los Angeles, .348; Helton,
lorado, .347.
NS-Pujols, St. Louis, 33; ASoriano,
hicago, 30; Hudson, Los Angeles, 29; Weeks,
'41waukee, 28; Zimmerman, Washington, 28;
7a'rt, Milwaukee, 27;Werth, Philadelphia, 27.
RBI-Pujols, St. Louis, 37; Cantu, Florida, 33;
,'ielder, Milwaukee, 32; Hawpe, Colorado, 30;
tier, Los Angeles, 29; BMolina, San Fran-
sco, 29; 4 tied at 28.. ' .....*.
"S-Hudson, Los Angeles, 52; Zimmerman,
shington, 51; Beltran, New York, 49;
m..ARamirez, Florida, 45; FLopez, Arizona, 44;
FSanchez, Pittsburgh, 44; Tejada, Houston, 44.
DOUBLES-Hudson, Los Angeles, 14;
HaRamirez, Florida, 14; FSanchez, Pittsburgh,
'4t*Kotchman, Atlanta, 13; Zimmerman, Wash-
ington, 12; 5 tied at 11.
TRIPLES-Kemp, Los Angeles, 4; Bourn, Hous-
3; Morgan, Pittsburgh, 3; Victorino, Philadel-
!ria, 3; DWright, New York, 3; 18 tied at 2.
IIOME RUNS-AdGonzalez, San Diego, 14;
Pujols, St. Louis, 13; Dunn, Washington, 11;
ASoriano, Chicago, 11; Bruce, Cincinnati, 10;
"'15nez, Philadelphia, 10; Utley, Philadelphia, 10.
SSTOLEN BASES-Bourn,'Houston, 13; Jos-
'IlRlyes, NewYork, 11; Burriss, San Francisco, 10;
Fowler, Colorado, 10; Morgan, Pittsburgh, 10;
Taveras, Cincinnati, 10; DWright, New York, 9.
,l�,TCHING (4 Decislons)-Martis, Washington,
5-0, 1.000; Broxton, Los Angeles, 4-0, 1.000;
SMeredith, San Diego, 4-0,1.000; Pelfrey, New
*Wfok, 4-0, 1.000; Billingsley, Los Angeles, 5-1,
k#, 3; DLowe, Atlanta, 5-1, .833.
,I. RIKEOUTS-JVazquez, Atlanta, 67; Peavy,
i??$ Diego, 61;JSantana, Newtork, 60; Uncecum,
, an Francisco, 58; Billingsley, Los Angeles, 56;
4 aliren, Arizong, 56; WRodriguez, Houston, 48.


Rangers 10, Angels 8
ARLINGTON, Texas -lan Kinsler
homered twice, Andruw Jones drove in
three runs and the AL West-leading
Texas Rangers held on for their fifth
straight.victory, 10-8 over the Los-An-
geles Angels on Friday night,:
Kinsler and Jones hit two-run
homers in a span of four pitches in the
third off Joe Saunders (5-2), who
throughout his career has been great on
the road - everywhere except in Texas.
Josh Hamilton homered for the third
time in four games since coming off the
disabled list, a towering, tworun 460-
foot drive into. the second deck of seats
in right field in the eighth that wound up
the difference.
Los Angeles scored five times in the
ninth, including a three-run homer by
Kendry Morales. But C.J. Wilson, the
third pitcher in the inning, earned his
-first save and finally ended the game
when Howie Kendrick hit a grounder
with two runners on base.
Kevin Millwood (4-3) gave up two
runs while scattering nine hits and
walking two over six innings. It was the
first time in his eight starts this season
the right-hander didn't go at least
seven innings.


Los Angeles
ab rhbi
Figgins 3b 5 2 3 0
EAyarss 5 2 3 2
Abreurf 5 1 1 2
Hunter cf 2 2 0 0
KMorlslb 5 1 3 3
Napoli dh 4 03 0
JRiver If 4 0 2 1
Willitspr 0 00 0
Kndrck2b 5-01 0
Mathis c 2 0 0 0
Quinlan ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 38 816 8
Los Angeles
Texas


Texas
ab r h bi
Kinsler 2b 3,3 2 3
MYong3b 5'2 2 0
Hamltncf 5 2 2 3
AnJons rf 4 1 1 3
Blalock dh 4 0 0 0
Byrd If 3 1 1 0
C.Davis lb 4 01 1
Sltlmchc 4 00 0
Andrusss 3 11 0

Totals 35101010
000 011 105-8
204 001 12x-10


E-Figgins (5), K.Morales (2). DP-Texas 3.
LOB-Los Angeles 9, Texas 6. 2B-E.Aybar
(7), Abreu (6), Napoli (7), M.Young (14), C.Davis
(4). 3B-E.Aybar (2), Hamilton (2). HR-
E.Aybar (1), K.Morales (6), Kinsler 2 (11),
Hamilton (5), AnJones (4). SB-Figgins 2 (15),
Byrd (2). SF-An.Jones.
IP H RER BBSO


Los Angeles
Saunders L,5-2
J.Speier
Loux
Texas
Millwood W,4-3
Holland
O'Day
C.Wilson S,1-1


7 7 2 4
0 0 0 0
3220


O'Day pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.'
WP-Holland. PB-Mathis.
Umpires-Home, Tim Tschida; First, Bob David-
son; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Jeff Nelson.
rT-3:02. A-33,429 (49,170).


Dodgers 6, Marlins 4
MIAMI--The Los Angeles
Dodgers' reunion with Manny Ramirez
lasted about 10 minutes. Then they ..
went to the ballpark and won another
game without him.
Juan Pierre, Ramirez's replacement
in left field, hit a tiebreaking two-run sin-
gle in the seventh inning, and the
Dodgers rallied from a three-run deficit
to beat the slumping Florida Marlins 6-4
on Friday night.
Los Angeles' third consecutive victory
came hours after Ramirez apologized to
his teammates at the team hotel. It was
his first time with the Dodgers since
being suspended for 50 games for using
a banned substance.
The Dodgers upped the best record
in the majors to 25-12, and improved to
4-4 without Ramirez. The Marlins lost
their fifth straight game and are 6-18
since starting the season 11-1.
. With the score 3-all, James Loney led
off the Dodgers' seventh with a single.
Kiko Calero came on and walked Matt
Kemp and pinch-hitter Mark Loretta.


Los Angeles
ab rhbi
Pierre f 4 1 2 2
Furcalss 5 1 1 0
Hudson2b 5 0 2 0
Ethier rf 4 0 1 2
Martin . 5 00 0
Loneylb 4.1 2 0
Kemp cf 3 1 1 0
Blake3b 4 1 2 1
Stults p 1 00 0
Paulph 1 1 1 1
JefWvrp 0 00 0
Loretta ph 0 00 .0
Leach p 0 0 0 0
Belisarip 0 00 0
Wadep 0000
JCastro ph 1 0 0 0
Broxtn p 0 0 00
Totals . 37 612 6
Los Angeles
Florida


Florida
ab r h bi
Bonifac3b 5 1 2 0
CoghlnIf 3 1 0 1
HRmrz ss 4 01 1
Cantu lb 4 00 0
Uggla2b 4 00 0
Lndstrp 0 0 0 0
Gload ph 1 00 0
Hermidrf 3 13 0
C.Rosscf 3 1 1 2
Pinto p 0 0 0 0
Nunez p 0 00 0
Helms 3b 1 0 0 0
RPauln c 2 00 0
JoBakrc 0 0 0 0
Volstadp 2 00 0
Calerop 0 00 0
Amezg cf 2 0 0 0
Totals 34 4 7 4
000 003 201-6
000 210 100-4


LOB-Los Angeles 8, Florida 10. 2B-Blake
(7), Ha.Ramirez (14), Hermida (4). 3B-Bonffa-
cio (2). HR-Blake (8), Paul (1), C.Ross (5).
CS-Pierre (3). SF-Ethier.
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Stults 5 5 3 3 2 5
Jef.Weaver W,2-0 1 0 0 0 1 1
Leach H,1 2-3 1 1 1 0 1
Belisario H,5 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
Wade H,5 1 1 0 0 1 1
BroxtonS,9-11 1 0 0 0 2 0
Florida
VolstadL,2-3 6 7 4 4 0 3
Calero 1-3 0 1 1 2 1
Pinto 11-3 2 0 0 0 1
Nunez 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Lindstrom 1 2 1 1 1 2
Volstad pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Belisario pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Umpires-Home, Joe West; First, Ed Rapuano;
Second, Paul Schrieber; Third, Paul Nauert.
T-3:46 (Rain delay: 0:17). A-20,039 f38,560).


Rockies 3, Pirates 1
PITTSBURGH - Brad Hawpe's
two-run homer was part of Colorado's
three-run ninth inning and the Rockies
rallied for a 3-1 victory overthe Pitts--
burgh Pifates on Friday hight.
Hawpe hit a 1 1 pitch from Matt
Capps into the shrubbery beyond the
wall in center field wall, scoring lan
Stewart, who led off the inning with a
pinch-hit double. It was Hawpe's sixth
homer and it gave him 11 RBIs in his
last five games.
Capps (0-3) blew his second save
in his last four appearances. Making
his third outing since sitting out a week
due to elbow fatigue, Capps has al-
lowed nine runs and 15 hits in his last
4 2-3 innings.
Alan Embree (1-1) earned'the win
with a.scoreless eighth, and Huston
Street struck out the sie in the ninth
for his fifth save.
Capps' blown save negated Paul
Maholm's seven shutout innings, and
took Rockies starter Jorge De La Rosa
off the hook for another tough-luck loss.
Pinch-hitter Matt Murton's RBI sin-
gle capped the ninth for Colorado.
Craig Monroe went 2 for 3 and had
Pittsburgh's only RBI and Robinzon
Diaz had two hits for Pittsburgh.
Colorado ' Pittsburgh
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Fowler cf 4 02 0 Morgan If 3 00 0
Tlwtzkss ;4 0 2 0 FSnchz2b 4 00 0
Heltonib 4 01 0 McLothcf 4 1 1 0
Atkins 3b 3 00 0 Monroe rf 3 0 2 1
Stewart 3b 1 1 1 0 AdLRc10 4 01 0
Hawperf 4 12 2 R.Diazc 4 02 0
Splrghs If 4 1 1 0 AnLRc3b 3 01 0
lannettc 4 01 0 RVazqzph 1 00 0
Barmes2b 4 00 0 JaWisnss 4 00 0
DeLRs p 2 00 0 Mahlm p 2 00 0
S.Smith ph 1 0 1 0 DlwYn ph 1 00 0
Emree p 0 0 00 Yates p 0 0 00
Murton ph 1 01 1 Grabow p 0 00 0
Street p 0 00 0 Capps p 0 0 00
Totals 36 312 3 Totals 33 1 7 1
Colorado 000 000 003-3
Pittsburgh 000 001 000-1
DP-Pittsburgh 1. LOB--Colorado 7, Pittsburgh
7.2B-Tulowitzki (5), Stewart (4), lannetta (4),
Monroe (2), R.Diaz (3). HR-Hawpe (6). SB-
Tulowitzki (3), Murton (1), Morgan (10),
McLouth (4). CS-Fowler (3).
IP H RERBBSO


Colorado
De La Rosa
EmbreeW,1-1
Street S,5-5
Pittsburgh
Maholm
Yates H,3
Grabow H,4
Capps L,0-3 BS,2-8
WP-De La Rosa.


7 7 1 1 0 10
1 0 0 0 0 3


7 5 0
2-3 2 0
1-3 0 0
1 5 3


Umpires-Home, Scott Barry; First, Angel Her-
nandez; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Tim WVlke.
T-2:41. A-17,179 (38,362) ..


Associated Press
Atlanta Braves third baseman Chipper Jones follows through
with a solo home run in the third inning against the Arizona
Diamondbacks in Atlanta on Friday.


Braves 4, D-backs 3
ATLANTA -Yunel Escobar hit a
sacrifice fly with the bases loaded in
the bottom of ninth, giving the Atlanta
Braves a.4-3 win over the Arizona Dia-
mondbacks on Friday night after blow-
ing a lead in the top of the inning.
With one out in the ninth, Jordan
Schafer hit a single to right off Tony
Pena (3-1). Pinch-hitter Kelly Johnson
walked and Omar Infante singled to
center. Schafer, who hesitated be-
tween second arid third to see if center
fielder Chris Young would catch the
ball, had to hold at third.
Then Escobar's fly to center al-
lowed the speedy Schafer to score
the winning run from third base with-
out a slide.
Braves closer Mike Gonzalez (2-0)
gave up a tying homer to Stephen
Drew to lead off the ninth. It was the
third blown save in nine chances for
Gonzalez.'
Chipper Jones homered in the third
to give Atlanta a 3-2 lead that held until
the ninth. It was the Braves' sixth
homer of the season at Turner Field,
the low home total for any team in the
majors. It was the ninth homer allowed
by Doug Davis this season.
The Braves, who opened a 10-
game homestand with the worst home
record in baseball, improved to 6-9 at
Turner Field.


The loss was the fourth straight and
seventh in eight games for Arizona,
which opened a 10-game road trip.
Javier Vazquez struck out 10 in
seven innings as the Braves took their
fifth win in six games.
Arizona Atlanta
ab rhbi ab rh bi
FLopez2b 4 1 1 0 Infante 2b 5.02 0
GParralf 3 1 1 1 Escoarss 4 00 1
J.Uptonrf 4 0 1 1 C.Jones3b 3 1 1 1
Rynlds3b 4 00 0 GAndrslf 4 01 0
S.Drewss 4 1 2 1 McCnnc 4 1 1 0
CYoungcf 4 00 0 Francrrf 3 1 1 0
Whitslilb 4 01 0 Ktchmlb 4 00 0
Snyderc 3 00 0 Schafercf 4 1 1 1
DDavis p 2 01 0 JVazqzp 1 00 0.
RRorts ph 1 00 0 Norton ph 0 00 0
Rauch p 0 00 0 OFIhrt p 0 00 0
T.Pena p 0 00 0 Moylan p 0 00 0
MGnzlz p0000
KJhnsn ph0000
Totals 33 3 7 3 Totals 32 4 7 3
Arizona 200 000 001-3
Atlanta 021 000 001-4
Two cuts when winning run scored.
E-D.Davis (1). LOB-Arizona 5, Atlanta 8.
3B-G.Parra (1). HR-S.Drew (2), C.Jones (4).
CS-G.Parra (1). S-J.Vazquez. SF-Escobar.
IP H R ER BB SO
Arizona
D.Davis 6 4 3 2 0 3
Rauch 1 0 0 0 2 1
T.Pena L,3-1 12-3 3 1 1 2 1
Atlanta
J.Vazquez 7 5 2 2 2 10
O'FlahertyH,5 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Moylan H,6 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
GonzalezW,2-0 1 1 1 1 0 2
Umpires-Home, Alfonso Marquez; First,
Randy Marsh; Second, Mike Winters; Third,
Lance Barksdale.
T-2:50. A-32,593 (49,743).


\






1A










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the record


Florida LOTTERY


W- -







Here are the winning
numbers selected
Friday in the
Florida Lottery:


CASH 3 (early)
9-8-7
CASH 3 (late)
7-1-9
PLAY 4 (early)
9-5-2-1
PLAY 4 (late)
7-7-5-8
MEGA MONEY
8-13-23-36
MEGA BALL
22
FANTASY 5
5-6-9-19-21


- On the AIRWAVES==-


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING,
12 p.m. (VERSUS) Indianapolis 500 - Qualifying
6 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA - Thunder Valley Nationals -
Qualifying (Same-day Tape)
7 p.m. (SPEED) Sprint Cup - All-Star Race
MLB BASEBALL
1 p.m. (WGN) Chicago White Sox at Toronto Blue Jays
4 p.m. (13, 51 FOX) Cleveland Indians at Tampa Bay Rays
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Clemson at North Carolina State
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Alabama at Aubumrn
4 p.m. (SUN) Kentucky at Florida
EQUESTRIAN
3:30 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) Equestrian Rolex Championships (Taped)
4:30 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) Preakness Stakes
GOLF
10 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour - The 3 Irish Open -
Third Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour - Nationwide Tour-- BMW
Charity Pro-Am - Third Round
2 p.m. (ESPN2) LPGATour - Sybase Classic - Third Rd.
3 p.m. (6,10 CBS) PGATour - Valero Texas Open - Third Rd.
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour - Champions - Regions
Charity Classic - Second Round (Same-day Tape)
COLLEGE LACROSSE
12 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA Tournament Quarterfinal -
Maryland vs. Syracuse
TRACK AND FIELD
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Adidas Classic


Prep CALENDAR


SOFTBALL
Class 4A State Championship
12 p.m. Dunnellon vs. Lake Wales


GOLF

PGA Texas Open
Friday
At La Cantera Golf Club, Resort Course
San Antonio
--['i"*- Purse: $6.1 million
Yardage: 6,881; Par: 70
Second Round


ierg


63-65-128
63-68-131
66-65-131
64-67-131


r 67-64-131
68-63-131
67-65-132
son 66-66-132
65-67-132
71-62-133
s - 66-67-133
65-68-133
n 64-69-133
68-66-134
66-68-134
67-67-134
64-70-134
68-67-135
70-65-135
67-68-135
69-66-135
69-66-135
66-69--135
70-65-135
70-66-136
ar 67-69-136
n '68-68--136
en 70-66-136
rs 69-67-136
an 68-68-136
66-70-136
70-66-136
67-69-136
67-69-136
II 67-69-136
67-69-136
71-66-137
ell 68-69-137
70-67-137
II 69-68-137
73-64-137
ewski 71-66-137
in 70-67-137
67-70-137
n 69-68-137
k '67-70-137
68-69-137
67-70-137
Id 67-70-137
72-66-138
70-68-138
0 72-66-138
68-70-138
73-65-138
69-69-138
66-72-138
72-67-139
ian 70-69-139
in 74-65-139
ski 70-69-139
72-.67-139
in 70-69-139
Durt 68-71-139
69-70-139
ing 72-67-139
68-71-139
e 71-68-139
68-71-139
:e 69-70t-139
67-72-139
hnson 71-68-139
ei 67-72-139
70-69-139
72-67-139
70-69-139
71-68--139
Failed to qualify
71-69-140
69-71-140
a 71-69-140
70-70-140
72-68-140
72-68-140
n 73-67-140
70-70-140
70-70-140
70-70-140
III 68-72-140
S 69-71-140
69-71-140
70-70-140
lo 70-70-140
mpson 72-69-141
73-68-141
an 72-69-141
72-69-141
roeck 71-70-141
h 72-69-141


Paul Goydos
Justin Leonard
Mathias Gronb
Ted Purdy
Johrt Mallinge
Scott Sterling
Kent Jones
Fredrik Jacobs
Brian Davis
J.P. Hayes
Stephen Ames
Greg Owen
Marc Leishma
Briny Baird
Lee Janzen
Bill Haas
Jeff Maggert
Zach Johnson
Brandt Jobe
Kevin Stadler
Aron Price
Tag Ridings
David Duval
Kris Blanks
Bart Bryant "
Harrison Fraza
Marco Dawsor
Charles Warre
Greg Chalmer
Patrick Sheeh
J.J. Henry
Jimmy Walker
Tim Clark
Matt Jones
James Driscol
Wil Collins
Carlos Franco
Chad Campbe
Todd Fischer
Frank Uckliter
Robert Gates
Scott Gutsche
Scott McCarro
Bob Estes
Jay Williamso
Scott Verplani
James Nitties
Matt Weibring
Gary Woodlan
Troy Matteson
VaughnTayloi
Chris DiMarco
Garrett Willis
Bill Lunde
Anthony Kim
Corey Pavin
Eric Axley
Chariey Hoffm
Dustin Johnso
Paul Stankow
Billy Andrade
Robin Freema
Matt Bettenco
Martin Piller
Matthew Lovin
Tim Herron
Jonathan Kay
Charlie Wi
Rocco Medial
Mark Wilson
Richard S. Jo
Shaun Michee
Nathan Green
David Peoples
Jason Gore
Mark Brooks

Heath Slocum
Ryan Palmer
Daniel Chopra
Bob Bums
Tom Byrum
Tyler Aldridge
Spencer Lavin
Colt Knost
Steve Allan
Nick O'Hem
Notah Begay
Tmn Wilkinson
Rich Beem
Bryce Molder
PeterTomeas
Nicholas Thoi
Joe Durant
Brian Batema
Chris Riley
Lance Ten Br
Brian Vranesh


-12
-9
-9
-9
-9
-.9
-8
-8
-8
-7
-7
-7
-7
-6
-6
-6
-6
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-2
-2
-2
-2
-2
-2
-2
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1

E
E
E
E
E'
E
E
E
E
E
E
E'
E
E
E
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1


Dean Wilson
Greg Kraft
DJ. Trahan
chez Reavie
Ricky Bames
Tommy Gainey
Jim McGovern
Guy Boros
Dicky Pride
D.A. Points
Casey Wittenberg
Jarrod Lyle
David Ogrin
Neal Lancaster
Grant Waite
Troy Kelly
Matthew Borchert
Rick Price
Brad Adamonis
Mark Hensby
Darron Stiles
Bob Heintz
John Huston
Cameron Beckman
Omar Uresti
Willie Wood
Tadd Fujikawa
Derek Fathauer
David Mathis
J.L. Lewis
Jesper Pamevik
Glen Day
Brendon de Jonge
Roland Thatcher
Robert Gamez
Chris Stroud
Stephen Leaney
Jim Gallagher, Jr.
Jay Delsing
Stephen Dartnall
Joe Ogilvie
Brendon Todd
Alex Cejka
Jason Day
Kirk Triplett
Steve Pate
Ted Schulz
James Oh
Mike Heinen
Aaron Watkins
Tim Thelen
Phil Tataurangi
Chris Baryla
Leif Olson
Trevor Dodds
Kenny Knox
Nolan Henke
Jose Coceres
Brent Geiberger


67-74-141 +1
70-71-141 +1
74-67-141 +1
70-71-141 +1
71-70-141 +1
71-70-141 +1
75-67-142 +2
70-72-142 +2
71-71-142 +2
75-67-142 +2
70-72-142 +2
72-70-142 +2
72-70-142 +2
73-69-142 +2
68-74-142. +2
72-70-142 +2
74-68-142 +2
73-69-142 +2
73-70-143 +3
69-74-143 +3
74-69-143 � +3
71-72-143 +3
71-72-143 +3
74-69-143 +3
73-75-143 +3
66-77-143 +3
72-71-143 +3
68-75-143 +3
75-66-143 +3
72-72-144 +4
70-74-144 +4
71-73-144 +4
74-70-144 +4
73-71-144 +4
76-69-145 +5
72-73-145 +5
71-74-145 +5
72-73-145 +5
70-75-145 +5
73-72-145 +5
76-70-146 +6
75-71-146 +6
73-73-146 +6
76-70-146 +6
79-68-147 +7
72-75-147 +7
74-73-147 +7
72-75-147 +7
73-75-148 +8
78-70-148 +8
73-75-148 +8
72-76-148 +8
74-74-148 +8
79-71-150 +10
70-860-150 +10
78-74-152 +12
79-74-153 +13
80-77-157 +17
75-WD


LPGA Sybase Classic
Friday
At Upper Montclair Country Club
Clifton, N.J.
Purse: $2 million
Yardage: 6,413; Par 72
Second Round
Brittany Lincicome 64-69-133 -1
Ji Young Oh 66-69-135
Suzann Pettersen 65-70-135
Wendy Doolan 70-68-138
Helen Alfredsson 62-76-138
Song-Hee Kim 72-67-139
Karrie Webb 70-69-139
Michelle Wie 70-69-139
Paula Creamer 70-69-139
Sandra Gal 70-69-139
Candle Kung 71-69-140
Moira Dunn 71-69-140
Becky Morgan 71-69-140
Jee Young Lee 69-71-140
Jiyai Shin 69-71-140
Katherine Hull 67-73-140
Louise Stahle . 73-68-141
Ai Miyazato 73-68--141
Mika Miyazato 73-68--141
Lisa Strom 72-69-141
Young Kim 71-70-141
Chella Choi 71-70-141
Alena Sharp 70-71-141
Hye Jung Choi 69-72-141
In-Kyung Kim 68-73-141
Hee Young Park 67-74-141
Russy Gulyanamitta 73-69-142
Becky Lucidi 72-70-142
Momoko Ueda 71-71-142
Yani Tseng 71-71-142
Lorena Ochoa 71-71-142
Amy Hung 70-72-142
Natalie Gulbis 70-72-142
Mollie Fankhauser 70-72-142
Brittany Lang 68-74-142
Juli Inkster 75-68-143
Soo-Yun Kang 73-70-143
Angela Stanford 73-70-143
Angela Park 73-70-143
Paige Mackenzie 72-71-143
So RI Pak , 72-71-143


Janice Moodie
Ashleigh Simon
Katie Futcher
Sarah Kemp
Meg Mallon
Mikaela Parmlid
Jill McGill
Christina Kim
Minea Blomqvist
Giulia Sergas
Irene Cho
Kris Tschetter
Meaghan Francella
NaYeon Choi
Vicky Hurst
Anna Grzeblen
Marisa Baena
Eun-Hee Ji
Cristie Kerr
Kim Hall
Stephanie Louden
Sophie Giquel
Stacy Lewis
Hee-Won Han
Meredith Duncan
Laura Davies
M.J. Hur
Wendy Ward
Karin Sjodin
Karine Icher
Jennifer Resales
Marcy Hart


Failed tc


Allison Fouch
Shiho Oyama
Eunjung Yi
Nicole Castrale
Meena Lee
Seon Hwa Lee
Sun Young Yoo
Birdie Kim
Joo Mi Kim
Sung AhYim
Kristy McPherson
Shi Hyun Ahn
Heather Bowie Young
Stacy Prammanasudh
Maria Hjorth
Lindsey Wright
Jimin Kang
Jimin Jeong
Diana D'Alessio
Maggie Will
Liselotte Neumann
Mi Hyun Kim
Sophie Gustafson
Pat Hurst
Aree Song
Michele Redman
Anja Monke
Carolina Llano
Inbee Park
Taylor Leon
Beth Bader
Amy Yang
Mindy Kim
Louise Friberg
Rachel Hetherlngton
Shanshan Feng
Kris Tamulis
Sarah Jane Smith
Morgan Pressel
AUdta Burks
Erica Blasberg
Jin Young Pak
Eva Dahllot
Dorothy Delasin
Reilley Rankin
Anna Rawson
Jamie Hullett
Michelle McGann
Jin Joo Hong
II Mi Chung
Carin Koch
LeahWigger
Karen Stupples
Johanna Mundy
Linda Wessberg
Laura Diaz -
Kyeong Bae
Brandie Burton
Carri Wood
Lorie Kane
Jeanne Cho-Hunicke
Laurie Rinker
Jeehae Lee
Liz Janangelo
Young Jo
Kell Kuehne
Julieta Granada
MIchelle Ellis
Na On Min
Sarah Lee
Teresa Lu


71-72-143
71-72-143
71-72-143
71-72-143
70-73-143
75-69-144
74-70-144
74-70-144
74-70-144
73-71-144
73-71-144
73-71-144
73-71-144
73-71-144
73-71-144
72-72-144
72-72-144
72-72-144
72-72-144
72-72-144
72-72-144
70-74-144
70-74-144
73-71-144
76-69-14E
74-71-145
74-71-145
73-72-145
73-72-145
73-72-145
72-73-145
69-76-145


o qualify
77-69-146
75-71-146
73-73-146
73-73-146
73-73-146
73-73-146
73-73-146
72-74-146
72-74-146
71-75-146
71-75-146
78-69-147
75-72-147.
75-72-147
74-73-147
74-73-147
74-73-147
74-73-147
74-73-147
72-75-147
72-75-147
72-75-147
71-76-147
78-70-148
76-72-148
75-73-148
75-73-148
744-7-148
74-74-148
74-74-148
72-76-148
77-72-149
76-73-149
75-74-149
75-74-149
75-74-149
74-75-149
73-76-149
73-76-149,
71-78-149
71-78-149
78-72-150
77-73-150
76-74-150
75-75-150
74-76-150
73-77-150
79-72-151
78-73-151
76-75-151
76-75-151
76-75-151
77-75-152
76-76-152.
75-77-152
78-75-153
78-75-153
77-76-153
77-76-153
75-78-153
75-78-153
76-78-154
76-79-155
73-82-155
81-75-156
77-79-156
78-79-157
77-80-157
79-80-159


3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4


Champions Tour
Regions Charity Classic
Friday
At RobertTrent Jones GolfTrail at Ross
Bridge
Hoover, Ala.
Purse: $1.7 million
Yardage: 7,503; Par: 72 (36-36)
First Round .


Dan Forsman
Larry Mize
Hal Sutton
Keith Fergus
Eduardo Romero.
Jim Thorpe
Gil Morgan
Tom McKnight
Chris Starkjohann
Chip Beck
Mike Reid
Lonnie Nielsen
Tom Jenkins
Mark Wiebe
Loren Roberts
Fred Funk
David Edwards
Fuzzy Zoeller
Bruce Fleisher
Sandy Lyle
Robert L. Thompson
Phil Blackmar
Gene Jones
Gary Hallberg
Scott Hoch
Denis Watson
Mike Goodes
Tom Purtzer
Joey Sindelar
Joe Ozaki
Jay Don Blake
Walter Hall
Larry Nelson
Bruce Vaughan
Andy Bean
Bob Gilder
Morris Hatalsky
Russ Cochran
Jay Sigel
Tim Simpson
James Mason
Kirk Hanefeld
Lanny Wadkins
David Eger
R.W. Eaks
Bernhard Langer
Jay Haas
Jeff Sluman
Tom Kite
Mark James
Don Pooley
Mike Hulbert
Leonard Thompson
Vicente Fernandez
Mark W. Johnson
Ronnie Black
Alien Doyle
Brad Bryant
Nick Price
lan Woosnam
Gary Koch
Jim Dent
John Harris
Ken Green
John Morse
Steve Thomas
Tom Wargo
Frank Shikle
Jim Albus
Hale Irwin
Mark Balen
Mike San Filippo
Mike McCullough
Lee Trevino
Bob Tway
Blaine McCallister
Jim Colbert
Fultid Allem


33-32-65
33-33-66
35-31-66
32-34--66
33-34-67
33-34-67
34-33-67
35-32-67
32-35-67
34-34-68
34-34--68
33-35--68
36-32-68
34-34-68
35-33-68
34-34-68
36-32-68
34-34-68
34-34-68
34-34-68
34-34--68
35-34-69
32-37-69
33-36-69
37-32-69
35-34-69
36-33-69
33-36-69
33-36-69
33-36-69
35-35-70
37-33-70
35-35-70
35-35-70
36-34-70
35-35-70
35-35-70
33-37-70
36-34-70
35-35-70
36-34-70
36-34-70
37-34-71
35-36-71
37-34--71
35-36-71
35-36-71
36-35-71
36-35-71
38-33-71
35-36-71
35-36-71
36-36-72
33-39-72
35-37-72
35-37-72
36-36-72
34-38-72
37-35-72
35-37-72
38-34-72
35-38-73
37-36-73
37-36-73
35-38-73
37-36-73
36-38-74
39-35-74
38-37-75
38-37-75
37-38-75
36-39-75
37-39-76
36-40-76
37-39-76
39-38-77
37-40-77
36-42-78


-1
-1
-1
-1
E-1
E

E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E

+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1

+2
+2
+2
+2
+2
+2
+2
+2
+2
+2
+2
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+4
+4
+4
+4
+4
+4
+4
+4
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+7
+7
+7
+7
+7
+8
+8
+8
+9
+9
+9
+9
+9
+9
+10
+11
+11
+12
+12
+13
+13
+15
76-WD
78-WD


All-Star Uneup
Friday's qualifying; Saturday's race
AtLowe's Motor Speedway
Concord, N.C.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number In parentheses)
1. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevy, 44.475 mph.
2. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 44.195.
3. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 43.837.
4. (88) Dale Eamhardt Jr., Chevy, 43.807.
5. (5) Mark Martin, Chevy, 43.673.
6. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevy, 43.429.
7. (96) Bobby Labonte, Ford, 43.424.
8. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 43.330.
9. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevy, 43.290.
10. (09) Brad Keselowski, Chevy, 43.204.
11. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 42.682.
12. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevy, 42.681.
13. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 42.602.
14. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 39.473.
15. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevy, 39.191.
16. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevy, 37.565.
17. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevy, 37.144.
18. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 0.000.


Lincicome snags



Sybase lead


BASKETBALL

NBA Playoffs
FIRST ROUND
(Best of 7)
Saturday, April 18
Chicago 105, Boston 103, OT
Cleveland 102, Detroit 84
Dallas 105, San Antonio 97
Houston 108, Portland 81
Sunday, April 19
L.A. Lakers 113, Utah 100
Philadelphia 100, Orlando 98
Atlanta 90, Miami 64
Denver 113, New Orleans 84
Monday, April 20
Boston 118, Chicago 115
San Antonio 105, Dallas 84
Tuesday, April 21
Cleveland 94, Detroit 82
Portland 107, Houston 103
LA. Lakers 119, Utah 109
Wednesday, April 22
Orlando 96, Philadelphia 87
Miami 108, Atlanta 93
Denver 108, New Orleans 93
Thursday, April 23
Boston 107, Chicago 86
Dallas 88, San Antonio 67
Utah 88, L.A. Lakers 86
Friday, April 24
Cleveland 79, Detroit 68
Philadelphia 96, Orlando 94
Houston 86, Portland 83
Saturday, April 25
New Orleans 95, Denver 93
Dallas 99, San Antonio 90
Miami 107, Atlanta 78
L.A. Lakers 108, Utah 94
Sunday, April 26
Chicago 121, Boston 118, 20T
Cleveland 99, Detroit 78, Cleveland wins
series 4-0
Orlando 84, Philadelphia 81
Houston 89, Portland 88
Monday, April 27
Atlanta 81, Miami 71
Denver 121, New Orleans 63
L.A. Lakers 107, Utah 96, L.A. Lakers win
series 4-1
Tuesday, April 28
Boston 106, Chicago 104, OT
Orlando 91, Philadelphia 78
Dallas 106, San Antonio 93, Dallas wins
series 4-1
Portland 88, Houston 77
Wednesday, April 29
Atlanta 106, Miami 91
Denver 107, New Orleans 86, Denver wins
series 4-1
Thursday, April 30
Orlando 114, Philadelphia 89, Orlando wins
series 4-2
Chicago 128, Boston 127, 30T
Houston 92, Portland 76, Houston wins
series 4-2
Friday, May 1
Miami 98, Atlanta 72
Saturday, May 2
Boston 109, Chicago 99, Boston winssedries4-3
Sunday, May 3
Atlanta 91, Miami 78, Atlanta wins series 4-3
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7)
Sunday, May 3
Denver 109, Dallas 95
Monday, May 4
Orlando 95, Boston 90
Houston 100, L.A. Lakers 92
Tuesday, May 5
Cleveland 99, Atlanta 72
Denver 117, Dallas 105, Denver leads series
2-0
Wednesday, May 6
Boston 112, Orlando 94
LA. Lakers 111, Houston 98
Thursday, May 7
Cleveland 105, Atlanta 85
Friday, May 8
Orlando 117, Boston 96
L.A. Lakers 108, Houston 94
Saturday, May 9
Denver 106, Dallas 105
Cleveland 97, Atlanta 82
Sunday, May 10
Houston 99, L.A. Lakers 87
Boston 95, Orlando 94
Monday, May 11
Cleveland 84, Atlanta 74, Cleveland wins
series 4-0
Dallas 119, Denver 117
Tuesday, May 12
Boston 92, Orlando 88
L.A. Lakers 118, Houston 78
Wednesday, May 13
Denver 124, Dallas 110, Denver wins series 4-1
Thursday, May 14
Orlando 83, Boston 75, series tied 3-3
Houston 95, L.A. Lakers 80, series tied 3-3
Sunday, May 17
Houston at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
Orlando at Boston, 8 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL Playoffs
CONFERENCE FINALS
(Best-of-7)
Sunday, May 17
Chicago at Detroit, 3 p.m.
Monday, May 18
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 19
Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 21
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Friday, May 22
Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Saturday, May 23
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 24
Detroit at Chicago, 3 p.m.
Tuesday, May 26
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 27
Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m., if necessary
Friday, May 29
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m., if necessary
Saturday, May 30
Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m., if necessary.
Sunday, May 31
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7:30 p.m., if necessary
Monday, June 1
Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m., if necessary
Tuesday, June 2
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m., if necessary
STANLEY CUP FINALS
TBD

AUTO RACING

NASCAR Sprint


Homaday takes



Trucks from Busch


Associated Press

CONCORD, N.C. - Ron
Hornaday Jr. raced to his
first NASCAR trucks victory
of the season and the 40th of
his career, holding off Kyle
Busch over the final laps Fri-
day night at Lowe's Motor
Speedway.
Hornaday passed 2008
winner Matt Crafton for the
lead shortly after the restart
on lap 106 of the 134-lap race.
Busch, who had eventful
night that included wrecking
then-leader Colin Braun,
couldn't catch Hornaday over
the closing laps and failed to
win for the ninth time this
season in NASCAR's top
three series.
Crafton was third, followed
by Ryan Newman and Terry


TIGERS
Continued from Page B1


against Kasey But a base-
running blunder in which
the runner left early on a
sacrifice fly gave the Tigers
a double play that ended the
inning.
The Blue Devils were back
at it in the fifth inning, load-
ing the bases again but two
strikeouts by Fagan and a
routine play by Williams at
shortstop ended the threat
In the fourth inning Kasey
once again did serious dam-
age with her bat, blasting a
solo home run over the left
field fence. In the sixth in-
ning, Sami Fagan and
Wright scored the last two
runs for Dunnellon.
Despite the apparent
ease of which the Tigers
gained victory, their head
coach still saw room for irh-
provement
"I wasn't pleased. We
stumbled in a lot of areas.
But I guess you can chalk
that up to nerves," Coach



PGA

Continued from Page B1


something, to improve and
get better. And tomorrow is
going to be another chapter
in that learning process of
becoming a better player."
Leonard, tied with Goy-
dos after the first round,
shot a 68 to join Scott Ster-
ling (63), John Mallinger
(64), Mathias Gronberg (65)
and Ted Purdy (67) at 9
under
Gronberg opened the
tournament with a 66, then
went to work quickly chas-
ing Goydos. Using a pitching
wedge, he holed out for
eagle from 123 yards on the
par-4 12th and followed with
birdies on the next two
holes.
"It's a good place for me,"
said Gronberg, who finished
third in 2007. "Normally
certain players play good in
certain places, and this golf
course has been very good
to me over the years."
Defending champion
Zach Johnson was seven
strokes back after a 67.
"Maybe a little polishing
on the weekend, and hope-
fully we can make a push,"
Johnson said.
David Duval shot a 69 and
was seven back, fading,


Cook in a race that included a
spectacular crash involving
Mike Skinner 35 laps in.
Skinner was unhurt, but
'gave up the points lead to
Hornaday, who now has an
84-point edge.
Hornaday was once a lap
down when he was in the pits
when a caution was called.
But he clearly had the supe-
rior car.
"She was fast at the end,"
the 50-year-old Hornaday
said. "This was really cool. I
won at Lowe's."
Braun led more laps Fri-
day (43) than he.had all sea-
son (28)- until Busch turned
to the inside and hit the iight
rear corner of Braun's No. 6
Ford on the 88th lap. Braun
crashed into the outside wall,
ending his night.


Fagan said. t'(Kasey) did not
have her good stuff (Friday).
All throughout the game, she
didn't have her best stuff.
"I don't think there's any
doubt that we came out of
the weaker half of the
bracket In the long run, you
hope that doesn't cost you
when you face better oppo-
nents," Fagan continued. "I
mean the teams in our half
weren't horrible. But we're
certainly not strutting
around right now. I guess
that's what I'm trying to say."
The Tigers will face Lake
Wales in the championship
game. Lake Wales earned
the berth with a 4-0 victory
over Pembroke Pines Char-
ter, thanks in large part two
errors that opened the flood-
gates in the sixth inning.
Because of the threat of
weather, the FHSAA has'.
changed the start of the
Class 4A state title game to
be played at approximately
noon. The Class 6A title
game is a 10 a.m. scheduled
start and the Class 4A cham-
pionship game will begin
immediately following that
game's conclusion.

down the back nine after
birdieing four of his first
nine holes and getting
within a stroke of the lead.
Still, the world's former No.
1 made his first tournament
cut in three months.
Trouble began for Duval,
who hasn't won a tourna-
ment since 2001, when his
tee shot on the par-4 11th
hooked badly into the
rough.
Duval and a rules official
studied the ball, tucked
around dry brush and rock,
and Duval's options for
about a minute. The 2001
British Open champion
tried about every angle that
might of given him a chance
before resigning himself to
take a penalty stroke and
start over.
He sputtered to another
bogey two holes later, when
he missed a 12-footer on No.
13. The 37-year-old re-
bounded with a birdie on
the next hole, but finished
the round with by missing a
7-footer that would have
saved par.
"I feel like I've been play-
ing exponentially better
than my scores have been,"
Duval said. "I'm finally get-
ting closer to scores I think
are representative of how
I'm playing. ... I'm trying to
have a chance to win golf
tournaments."


SPoxrs


SATURDAY, AY ,


84 M 162009


Associated Press

CLIFTON, N.J. - Brit-
tany Lincicome shot a 3-
under 69 on Friday to take a
two-shot lead over Suzann
Pettersen and Ji Young Oh
in the LPGA Sybase Classic.
Lincicome, the Kraft
Nabisco winner, had an 11-
under 133 total on the Upper
Montclair Country Club -
the lowest 36-hole total on a
par-72 course this year.
Helen Alfredsson, coming
,off a career-best 62, bal-
looned to a 76 in a round that
included a missed tap-in. She
was tied for fourth at 6 under
with Wendy Doolan (68).
Michelle Wie (69), Hall of
Famer Karrie Webb (69) and
Paula Creamer (69) topped a
group at 5 under, and three-
time defending champion
Lorena Ochoa was 2 under
after her second straight 71.
Irish Open
BALTRAY, Ireland - North-


ern Ireland amateur Shane
Lowry shot a 10-under 62 to
take a two-stroke lead after the
second round of the Irish Open.
The 22-year-old Lowry had
a 15-under 129 total. Eng-
land's Jamie Donaldson and
Wales' Robert Rock were sec-
ond after 65s.
First-round leader Francesco
Molinari of Italy was disqualified
after his 73 for signing for the
wrong score on two holes. He
opened with a 63.
Padraig Harrington (68) and
John Daly (75) missed the cut.
Regions Charity Classic
HOOVER, Ala. - Dan Fors-
man shot a 7-under 65 to take a
one-stroke lead over Larry Mize,
Hall Sutton and Keith Fergus in
the Regions Charity Classic.
Tom McKnight, Gil Morgan,
Eduardo Romero, Chris Starkjo-
hann and Jim Thorpe had 67s,
and Bob Tway shot a 76 in his
Champions Tour debut.














Nowitzki committed to Dallas


AU-Star has

been with Mavs

for 1 years

Associated Press

DALLAS - Dirk Nowitzki
is the backbone of the Dallas
Mavericks, the first MVP in
franchise history and the ca-
reer leader in pretty much
every scoring category.
All that's missing is a
championship, and he's not
interested in going . any-
where else to get one.
'"After I played here for 11,
years - played hurt, played
sick, whatever they needed
me .to do, basically playing
my heart (out) for the last 11
years - I don't think it
would feel the. same way
somewhere else," Nowitzki
said. "It's always been my
dream here to finish my ca-
reer and win a champi-
onship. I think my window
has not closed yet and I'll
still see what we can do."
Nowitzki inadvertently
raised the question of how
long he was willing to stick
with the organization while
describing his disappoint-
ment over falling short
again this season. j
After the Mavs were elim-
inated by Denver on


Associated Press
Dallas Mavericks forward Dirk Nowitzki, center, slaps hands with the fans after the Mav-
ericks beat the Denver Nuggets, 119-117, in Game 4 on Monday in Dallas.


Wednesday night, then
again during a wrapup in-
terview Thursday, Nowitzki
mentioned several times
that this was his 11th sea-
son and that he'll be turn-
ing 31 in a few weeks. He
talked about the window of
opportunity starting, to
close, calling every title-
less season a waste. He also
said he understands that
36-year-old Jason Kidd
might sign with another
team he considers closer to


winning a championship.
So, does all that mean
Nowitzki thinks the Mavs
are far from winning a title?
That time is running out for
him? Or maybe that he's
running out of patience?
No, no, no.
"I always said I'd love to
finish my career here and
bring this franchise a cham-
pionship," he said. "I still
feel like I have a good
three, four years left of
solid basketball. I don't


want to feel overanxious
and put my pressure on my-
self. I'm going to be ready to
play and I'm going to work
hard again this summer
and do more of the same
again next year."
Nowitzki noted that he
could opt out of his contract
in 2010 "if I wanted to," but
he didn't say it in a threat-
ening way.
In fact, he tempered the
thought by adding,. "I
never really thought about


it this way."
Nowitzki is coming off
perhaps his best year other
than his MVP season of
2006-07.
He averaged 25.9 points
and 8.4 rebounds and was
first-team All-NBA - or, as
coach Rick Carlisle put it,
he was voted "the best
powVb forward on the
planet."
His numbers were down
in the first round of the
playoffs because San Anto-
nio based its defense
around slowing him. Then,
facing single coverage
from the Nuggets, he aver-
aged 34.4 points, scoring 44
in Dallas' lone victory. He
did it while dealing with
his girlfriend getting ar-
rested at his home, bring-
ing unwanted attention on
his very private non-bas-
ketball life.
"It takes a strong individ-
ual to go through what he
did and then carry us on his
back through this whole
playoffs," teammate Jason
Terry said.
Part of Nowitzki's devo-
tion'to Dallas stems from
his confidence in owner
Mark Cuban and front-of-
fice boss Donnie Nelson.
"It's pretty obvious
(Cuban) wants to win - get-
ting in fights with'people in
the stands, being fired up
about every loss," Nowitzki


said, laughing. "I think he
wants to win as much as I
do. He made all the right
statements that we're trying
to improve the team this
summer."
If it was up to Nowitzki,
the Mavericks' offseason
plan would start with keep-
ing Kidd.
"His leadership on and
off the floor has been
great," Nowitzki said. "He's
showed that even though
he's a little older that he's a
warrior. He played 40-some
minutes the last couple of
months when we needed to
win games."
Next, Nowitzki would
make sure to "keep some of
the core guys and just add
pieces." He'd like better de-
fenders, more 3-point
shooters and some young,
fast, leapers so Kidd "can
actually throw some lobs on
the break."
"It really showed in the
second round that we need
some athleticism," he said.
"Denver was just stronger
and faster, it felt like, at
every position."
As for Nowitzki's offsea-
son, he's expecting the Ger-
man national team to ask
him to play in the European
championships. He's not
sure he wants to after
reaching the pinnacle of
playing in the Olympics last
summer.


WillL.A. put it together, or is Denver West's best?


Associated Press

Kobe vs. LeBron would'
bring the best player buzz to
the NBA finals, and Lakers-
Celtics is always a can't-miss
matchup.
Nobody really considered
that the Lakers wouldn't
show up.
Los Angeles was an ex-
pected stop on the finals itin-
erary all season long, but
suddenly Denver looks in-
creasingly possible instead.
With the Nuggets surging and
,the./,,Lakers-. struggling
through the playoffs, there
are more questions about
whether the defending con-
ference champs really are
the best in the West
"Denver; and Cleveland
are the two best teams I've
seen in the playoffs," TNT
analyst Charles Barkley said
this week "I'm going to stick
with my pick, I think the
Denver Nuggets are going to
the finals. The Lakers have
been too inconsistent"
Plenty are jumping off the
Los Angeles bandwagon
right along with him. Nobody
is questioning the Lakers'
talent, just their desire and
ability to demonstrate it on a
nightly basis.
"We've seen the Lakers,
they are the most skilled
-team in basketball, probably
the best personnel from 1-12,
andthey know it and they are
arrogant about it," said


Barkley's partner, Kenny
Smith. "Behause they are ar-
rogant, they get complacent."
The Lakers are playing
Sunday, just in the wrong
round against, the wrong
opponent.
Instead of hosting, the
Nuggets in Game 1 of the
Western Conference finals,
Los Angeles has to play a sev-
enth game in the semifinals
against a undermanned
Houston team - which they
insist is no concern.
"You know what, you've
got to- grind lhese .ti gs
out." Bryant said. "We could
be playing much better oni a
more consistent basis, but
we're not The key right now
is to win by any means nec-
essary. Just win the damn
series. Get the hell out of
this one."
Already without Tracy Mc-
Grady, the Rockets lost Yao
Ming for the season after
dropping Game 3. Yet they've
won two of the past three
games, jumping out to enor-
mous early leads in both
Games 4 and 6.
Two nights after blowing
out the Rockets by 40 and
again looking like the best
team in basketball to take a
3-2: lead, the Lakers some-
how found themselves down
17-1 Thursday en route to a
95-80 loss.
"This series has woke us
up and we have to be ready
to play from the beginning,"


A -t-G , .
Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant (24) has a word with*
referee Monty McCutchen during the second quarter of Game
6 on Thursday against the Houston Rockets in Houston.


Lakers forward Trevor
Ariza said.
The Lakers' rocky postsea-
son - they repeatedly had
trouble putting away the
Utah Jazz despite big leads
in their first round - could
be similar to what Boston
went through last year.
After rolling to 66 wins and
the NBAs best record, the
Celtics needed seven games
to survive each of their first
two series. By the time they
reached the finals, many ex-
perts were picking against
them - which Boston coach
Doc Rivers understood.
, "Well, we caused it We
didn't play well in the first
two series," he said during
the finals. "I thought it was
great for us in the long run, I
really do.


"I did think it helped our
team, and it helped me see
how guys reacted in those sit-
uations, as well. So if they
come up again, you're better
equipped to get through it"


And maybe the Lakers
will, finding astern test from
Houston was exactly what
they needed after breezing
through the West playoffs
last year.
But what if their problems
aren't all mental, and Denver
is s5 inply a better team?
The Nuggets have every-
thing a championship con-
tender needs: solid point
guard leadership from
Cha uncey Billups, an explo-
sive scorer in Carmelo An-
thony, rugged interior, play,
from-Nene and Kenyon Mar-
ti n t and- energetic' behch
contributions from J.R.
Smith, Chris Andersen and
Anthony Carter.
They cruised through their
first ,two opponents in five
games, outscoring New Or-
leans and Dallas by 16 points
per game while shooting 50
percent from the field


"We're good enough to
make some noise," Denver
coach George Karl said.
"We're playing basketball at
a really nice level."
Meanwhile, the Lakers are
showing some flaws. Derek
Fisher has shot the ball terri-
bly and looks a step slow on
defense. Sasha Vujacic isn't
providing the timely shooting
off the bench he delivered
last year. Lamar Odom is
banged up after landing on
his back after a hard fall.
'That might be enough to
consider Cleveland or Den-
ver the favorites in potential
matchups with the Lakers.
And that's the way ABC's
Mark Jackson is going after
calling the Game 4 and Game
6 debacles.
"One thing I know," he said
late in Game 6, "is that those
teams are going to show up."


ti' Your Dreasm Homew
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.com ,


SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 B5


NBA


ornus Counry (FL) E











E Page B6 - SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009



ENTERTAINMENT
I, CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
OPEPLE

Shields upset
by media glare
NEW YORK - Brooke
Shields says she's fright-
ened and frustrated by
the media storm the
Kiefer Sutherland arrest
has
dumped
on her
doorstep
- and re-
ally does-

stand why
Broo e she's
Shields being
brought
into the situation at all.
Sutherland was
charged last week with
head-butting designer
Jack McCollough at a
Manhattan nightclub.
Shields was there, and re-
ports have said the inci-
dent was over her. Police
have said they want to
question Shields.
At an event Thursday
night to promote The
Chain of Confidence, an
organization that spon-
sors girls and promotes
positive attitudes in
women, Shields ex-
pressed frustration that
she has been linked to the
case.
"I am always interested
in the fact that I can be
minding my own busi-
ness. I can be in London
doing a play and things
could happen. It is inex-
plicable to me," she said.

Hudgens tries to
break from Disney
LOS ANGELES -
Vanessa Hudgens has left
"High School Musical" to
make a movie about
music -
at a high
school.
The key
differ-
ence:
"Band-
slam,"
due in
aness theaters
Hudgens in August,
is being
released by the new stu-
dio behind "Twilight,"
well outside the tween
hit-making machine that
made her a star. Now 20,
the actress-singer says
she's ready for roles that
mark a departure from
her shy and geeky
Gabriella Montez charac-
ter - and from Disney.
"It definitely is a love-
hate thing, you know,"
Hudgens said in a recent
interview. "Disney is in-
credible. And 'High
School Musical' did won-
ders and I could not be
more thankful. But at the
same time, people see me
as my character,
Gabriella. And I'm just ex-
cited to kind of branch
out of that and have peo-
ple see me in a new
light,"

Parton expanding
literacy program

ton says she's expanding
her philanthropic work
with chil-
e by dren



United

Dolly The en-
Parton tertainer
says her
Imagination Library and
the United Way have set a
goal to provide free books
monthly to 1 million chil-
dren by 2014. That's dou-
ble what the literacy
initiative now serves.
She joined Brian Gal-
lagher, chief executive of
the national nonprofit, to
make the announcement


at a conference in Detroit
on Friday. Parton also
performed her hit "9 to 5."
The program founded
by Parton in her home
state of Tennessee in the
mid-'90s operates in the
U.S., Canada and Britain.


-From wire reports


NETW K IDS 1 ON THE lIlt


A-w M W


mm m -e o' ~


'%w a i nm mA -


Associated Press
The New Kids on the Block, from left, Danny Wood, Joey McIntyre, Donnie Wahlberg, Jordan Knight and nathan
Knight, pose on the cruise ship Carnival Imagination Friday in Miami. The group, which reunited after 14 years
for a tour and, new album In May 2008, will kick off summer performance schedule with the sold out three-day
concert cruise to the Bahamas on Friday

New Kids hanging' tough with fans on 3-day cruise


Associated Press


- MIAMI
r he little girls who made the,
l New Kids on the Block a boy
band sensation in tiie late
1980s and early 1990s are all
grown up, and now they've got
disposable income.
So what better way to show
their love for Jordan, Jonathan,
Joey, Donnie and Danny than
spending three days with them on
a Caribbean cruise?
About 2,100 women, most in
their 20s and 30s, paid more
$1,000 each for a sold-out, three-
day Carnival Cruise Lines trip
that left Miami for the Bahamas
on Friday The voyage kicks off
the band's summer concert tour,
when they'll dust off hits like
"Hangin' Tough" and "Step by
Step" along with songs from their
2008 album.
Fans squealed and giggled as
they boarded the boat, angling for
a glimpse of the Ne.w Kids. Some
wore buttons and T-shirts with
their favorite band members'
names and photos. Others kissed
cardboard cutouts.
The band will perform twice
during the trip, allowing half the
passengers to come one night and
the other half the next. Other
events include meet and.greets
and photo ops.
Concert cruises provide a nice
bumlp for CarniVal, which re-


cently lowered its earnings fore-
cast because it's had to slash
prices to maintain its bookings. *
John Mayer and Lynyrd Skynyrd
have done recent cruises and an
upcoming voyage is Elvis-themed.
Barenaked Ladies took its fifth
"Ships & Dips" cruise with Nor-
wegian Cruise Line in February.
Fans like the concert cruises
because they're "a more intimate
experience than you would have
in a typical stadium or concert
venue," said Cherie Weinstein,
Carnival's vice president for busi-
ness development
New Kids cruiser Shannon'
Wright, 32, of Syracuse, N.Y, was
hoping to get up close and per-
sonal with her favorite New Kid,
Donnie - as in Wahlberg. older
brother of Mark Wahlberg. who
started out as rapper Marky Mark
and is now a respectable film
actor-- but said she'd probably
faint when she did.
She might get the chance if she
aces a poker tournament on the
cruise itinerary for Sunday - the
winners play Wahlberg at mid-
night.
Wright says her husband is "a,
little jealous of Donnie, but oth-
erwise he's OK with it" She just
got over seeing the group in con-
cert a month ago, and now she's
got them cornered on a boat
Emily Vance of Dayton, Ohio,
took the cruise with her mother,
Debbie Kingham, and friend


Jenny Duncan. They wore match-
ing black tour-branded tank tops
arid gushed about their favorite
member - also Wahlberg, who
was kno\vn as the "bad boy" of
the group
Kingham and Vance remem-
bered their first concert in July
1990. When Vance went to their
reunion concert this October, she
cried.
Vance and Duncan said their
husbands think they're crazy, but.
they don't care.
"We're the only ones who un-
derstand," Duncan said.
After 20 years, band members
say it's flattering to still have
screaming women at their feet.
The confined spaces of a boat
make it harder to get away from
obsessed fans, but they said they
want to spend time with people
who are still loyal.
In between jokes about wear-
ing Speedos on deck and making
the entire boat breakfast, band
members talked Friday about
why they decided to continue
performing.
"Our fans have come out since
Day One, and we've just tried to
answer the call," said Joey McIn-
tyre, at 36 the youngest member
of the group. "It had to be fun and
it had do be challenging, or we
wouldn't have done it."
The New Kids "Full Service"
summer tour begins June 4 in At-
lanta.


New modem art wing lights Chicago's Art Institute


Associated Press

CHICAGO - Light, bright
and definitely pricey - the
Modern Wing at the Art In-
stitute of-Chicago is a tri-
umph for Pritzker
Prize-winning architect.
Renzo Piano.
In a single stroke, the
264,000-square-foot: wing,
which opens Saturday, turns
Chicago's art museum into
the nation's second-largest
and opens up the previously
windowless fortress of cul-
ture to the sky and the city.
"This is the
largest ex- ON TH
pension and
addition in http://wwv
the Art Insti-
tute's history," saidjnuseum
president and director
James Cuno.
The wing, which houses
the museum's modem art
collection, cost $300 million,
on top of $110 million for re-
lated improvements and up-
keep.
Cuno recently announced
that adult admission to the
museum would rise from


The wing, which houses
the museum's modern art
collection, cost $300 million,
on top of $110 million for related
improvements and upkeep.


$12 to $18, making it one of
the most expensive art mu-
seums in the country, but
Chicago Park District voted
Wednesday to cut the fee to
$16.
It's a pretty price to pay,
but Piano's
E NET work may be
worth it He
v.artic.edu has covered
the wing with
a "flying carpet" of alu-
minum blades, calibrated
for Chicago's latitude, allow-
ing only northern light to
shine through skylights
forming the three-floor
wing's roof.
Cuno has estimated that
the light from outside should
reduce the electrical con-
sumption of the new wing to
half that of the largely win-


dowless main building.
The space and chronolog-
ical arrangement of works
allow visitors to see the be-
wildering array of 20th cen-
tury artistic schools in their
historical context and gain
clue to their interrelations.
The top-floor galleries
begin and end with works by
Pablo Picasso, demonstrat-
ing the steady march toward
increasing abstraction by
such artists as Piet Mon-
drian and Constantin Bran-
cusi. The added space also
allows display of more of the
museum's surrealist collec-
tion, some of which were
kept in storage.
The second floor is de-
voted to European and
American art from 1950 to
the present, including a


room devoted to the color
field paintings of Ellsworth
Kelly In the Gerhardt
Richter room, location of the
German painter's pieces
play on Piano's theme of am-
bient lighting, with Richter's
all-gray works facing away
from windows and his color
panels receiving outdoor
light obliquely
The wing's windows also
will likely be a major draw
since they frame Millen-
nium Park and its. Frank
Gehry-designed music pavil-
ion and the city's looming
skyline. The wing's third
floor connects to the park
through a cantilevered
bridge, which stretches
across Monroe Street
The first floor houses a
grand entrance, new photog-
raphy and temporary exhi-
bition galleries, an
educational center, offices, a
high-end restaurant, and a
new gift shop. Despite the
amenities, some critics have-
pointed out that only 65,000
square feet of the Modern
Wing has been devoted to
new gallery space.


Lt


tion) is 41. Actor David Bore-
anaz is 40. Political
correspondent Tucker Carl-
son is 40. Actress Tracey,
Gold is 40.
Thought for Today: "Tteb
best actors do not let the.
wheels show." - Henry
Fonda, American actor bornm
this day 1905, died 1982)'.


.. t


-- - - *** -


Florida
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numbers officially
posted by the Florida .
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call (850) 487-7777. '

Today in
HISTORY=

Today is Saturday, May
16, the 136th day of 2009.
There are 229 days left in-the
year.
Today's Highlight:
On May 16, 1929, the first.,
Academy Awards were pre-
sented during a banquet at
the Hollywood Roosevelt
Hotel. The movie "Wings"
won "best production," while
Emil Jannings and Jahet
Gaynor were named best
actor and best actress.
On this date:
In 1770, Marie Antoinette,
age 14, married the future
King Louis XVI of France,
who was 15.
In 1866, Congress author-
ized minting of the first 5-
cent piece, also known as
the "Shield nickel."
In 1920, Joan of Arc waq
canonized by Pope Benedict
XV.
In 1939, the government"
began its first food stamp
program in Rochester, N.Y.
In 1975, Japanese climber
Junko Tabei became the first
woman to reach the summit
of Mount Everest.
Ten years ago: The Uis-
tice Department said prelimi-
nary figures from the FBI
indicated a decline in serious
crime in 1998 for the seventh
consecutive year. -
Five years ago: The
United States announced a
new initiative to speed up the,
approval process for.new
combination AIDS drugs that'
was designed to bring
cheap, easy-to-use treat-
ment to millions of people; in.

One year ago: President'
George W. Bush visited
Saudi Arabia, where he
failed to win help from Saudi6
leaders to relieve skyrocket-
ing American gas prices.
Today's Birthdays: Acton
George Gaynes is 92. Actor
Harry Carey Jr. is 88. Jazz
musician Billy Cobham is 65.
Actor Bill Smitrovich is 62.
Actor Pierce Brosnan is 56t
Actress Debra Winger is 54.
Soviet-born gymnast Olga
Korbut is 54. Actress MareF
Winningham is 50. Rock mu-
sician Boyd Tinsley (The
Dave Matthews Band) is 45.:
Rock musician Krist
Novoselic is 44. Singer Janet
Jackson is 43. Country
singer Scott Reeves (Blue
County) is 43. Actor BriarrF:
O'Byme is 42. R&B singer,
Ralph Tresvant (New Edi.









R Section C - SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009



RELIGION


* Worship services for area churches./C2
* Information about Angel Food, SHARE and other food
programs can be found in Monday's Chronicle.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


. . , ews, a
ree chaplain,
S e Base in the
1.ie'gpttbetw 1 pj air-evacs a
' Matthews,
dw et l1;id' s home in
Citrus S 'T at was ni 'pri ary n
istry. We had a16 edi4t Ba cases. It wasa .
very intense minis buflVe"y rewarding.
"Still, often after visiting with these guys all
' iay long, on the way home I'd break down
and cry."
Today is Armed Forces Day, a day for the
nation to thank members of the military tor
theirp.atriotic service. which includes chap-
"',Fr more than 200 years. military chaplains
Shave accompanied U.S. forces wherever they
have served. Their stated mission, according
to information from militarycom, is to "nur-
ture the living, care for the sick or wounded,
minister to prisoners or prisoners of war and
-honor the dead." '. ,
S- Chaplains also"assist mUi d -persnanel
and fahfily member' ini deal:ngwit personal
erns such as a,
* loyment oo dl
ethical values an ' ," .
Fbr1Matthews, it' oftenlast
iort . po le s.
i ,tbhtere are all the
gure ~ .e Vsickyou se
S r. f you lemS, there's .
9otha i'tlknow
S ..e . plain. and it's
n ;; .a ....f.0. tual problems."
He said one of the best aspects of the chap-
lairny is having privileged communication.
"Not even military doctors had that," he
said.
A lifelong Methodist and the son of a
Methodist minister from Evansville, Ind.,
Matthews didn't decide to enter the ministry
until his sophomore year at the University of
Evansville. Because he scored high in math
on his entrance exams, he majored in math.
"But math wasn't my calling," he said...
Neither was accounting, he also discov-
ered. But he did like socioldgyand psychol-
ogy. philosophy and-Bible:I
He wyas also in the Air Force ROTC pro-
gram and learned of a chaplain's program. If
accepted, he wouldd have to commit to serving'
three years active duty after graduation. With
an educational delay, Matthews went to semi-
nary for three years and did a year of pastoral
clinical education at a hospital in Atlanta,
then went into the Air Fbrce.
By then he had a wife. Gail, and three chil-
dren.
After two years in Michigan he went to the
Philippines. then Virginia, then Izmir. Turkey.


Lecanto Highway (County 491)
and Forest Ridge Boulevard. All
invited. Child care available for
ages 3 and younger. For re-
quired preregistration, call
Sheila or LeRoy at 527-4230.
N Weekly Bible study


faith


MATTHEW BECK/Chrodnicle
The Rev. Larry "Tony" Matthews served three decades as a chaplain in the United States Air
'Rrce. The Rev Matthews says one of the rewarding things about: chaplaincy .Ising ex-
posed to many different faiths and cultures. . ' i.,n 4, '


"I was the only Protestant chaplain in a
Muslim country, and the only Christian com-
munity' (off-base) was a small group of Greek
Orthodox and some Catholics," Matthews
said.'"Stateside, people often go to churches
off base. But there, they really didn't have
th'at'option.
"I knew there'd be (many) kinds of Baptists
and Pentecostals and highly liturgical peo-
ple," 'he said, "and I thought, "How am I going
to minister to all these different people?' So,
my first Sunday in chapel I told them, 'I'm
United Methodist, but I'm here to serve peo-
ple of all (denominations). I don'tknow if I
can be an effective minister to such a wide
spectrum of people, but we do have one thing
in common, Jesus Christ So that's where I'll
put. my emphasis."'
He said it turned out to be a beautiful expe-
rience.
"That's one of the rewarding things about
the chaplaincy, being with people of many


faiths and being exposed to so many different
.cultures," he said.
Matthews said except for bping separated
from his family at times, he opojdn't trade
any part of his 30-year military career, and
neither would his wife.
"I had told my minister that l wanted to
marry someone who'd take ineall over the
world," she said. "Our children have been
blessed, t6o. Moving around has made them
flexible and outgoing. They adapt easily."
- Some people, such as noted atheist Christo-
pher Hitchens, raise the question of whether
or not chaplains should be on the military
payroll. Matthews points to the First Amend-
ment to the Constitution and the right to the
free exercise of religion.
"Religion has always been part ofthe mil-
itary, and we interpret (the First Amend-
ment) in a positive way." he said. "We have
a right to practice our faith, and that in-
cludes the military."


Religion NOTES


Bible school
A VBS from 9 a.m. to noon
Monday through Friday, June 8
to 12, at Faith Lutheran
Church 935 S Crystal Glen
'Drive, Lecanto. Register online
at faithlecanto.com or call 527-
3325. Amazing crafts, games,
snacks, free T-shirts, Bible ad-
ventures and music. On the last
day, a circus-themed closing
program featuring the world's
smallest horse, enjoy sno-
,cones, popcorn, hotdogs and
more. "Where fearless kids
.shine God's light!"

Live & learn
2 Assertiveness training
workshop from 1 to 3 p.m.
today in Swenson Hall at Joy
Lutheran Church on S.W. State
:Road 200 at 83rd Place, Ocala.
Speaker Christopher Eric Ster-
,ling MSN, RN-BC, has been
working in the field of psychi-
atric nursing since 1974 and
has given many lectures and
presentations. For information
orto preregister, call Linda
Sterling at 873-2262.
* Nature Coast Community
Bible Study (CBS) will begin a
30-week study of the book of
Revelation on Thursday, Sept.
1.0, from 9:15 to 11:15 a.m. at
First Baptist Church of Beverly
Hills at the intersection of


416 U.S. 41 South, Inverness.
Learn about low-glycemic
index, eating, exercise, stress
reduction, etc. No charge. Call
John Soranno for information at
637-2394.
* Questions answered
about the Christian faith and
about God, in general, in dis-
cussion time at 5:30 p.m. Sun-
days in the fellowship hall at
First Baptist Church of Beverly
Hills, 4950 N. Lecanto Highway.
Free dinner and video presen-
tation precedes open conversa-
tion. Public welcome. Call
746-2970.
* Series on II Timothy
taught by Qr. Roy Swihart at 7
p.m. Wednesday in the sanc-
tuary of Inverness Church of
God, 416 U.S. 41 South, Inver-
ness. Public invited. Call the
church office at 726-4524.
Celebrate recovery
Celebrate Recovery is a bibli-
cally based program designed
to work through life's hurts,
habits and hang-ups in fellow-
ship with others. This program
is open to the community and
takes place at the following
churches:
* Gulf to Lake Church - In
the Ministry Complex, West
Gulf-to-Lake Highway in Crystal

See NOTES/Page C2


groups at First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River: Gospel
of Luke study group at 10 a.m.
Juesdays; "Character Witness"
study with Pastor Rob at 6:30
p.m. Wednesday at 6:30 p.m.
Call church office for informa-


tion at 795-2259. Church is at
1501 S.E. U.S. 19 in Crystal
River, north of Sweetbay.
* Transitions Lifestyle
System classes at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday in Overflow Room
"A" at Inverness Church of God,


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


'Egg-


cellent'


advice
Several years ago I
wrote a story for the
newspaper about
two local sisters who raise
chickens and sell the eggs.
As part of my, um, re-
search, I ate some fresh-
out-of-the-chicken eggs,
sunny-side up, if I recall.
That's the way I like my
eggs, but I also like them
scrambled with onions
and artichoke hearts, or
maybe mushrooms.
I'm so glad eggs are no
longer on the Evil Foods
list (and if they still are,
please don't tell me). I love
eggs!
A Facebook friend, Jen-
nifer Reeder in Lexington,
Ky., recently sent me an
encouraging note about
eggs and chickens and
God, which was well timed
and much appreciated.
I had posted a note say-
ing it looks like my book-
writing and
retreat-speaking career is
over. (No contracts and no
invitations on the horizon
equal no career.)
Jennifer wrote to tell me
about her new business,
gathering eggs from 30,000
chickens for a local hatch-
ery.
See GRACE/Page C5









Judi Siegal
JUDI'S
JOURNAL


Mimouna:

Unique

holiday
very year, at the
conclusion of the
Passover holiday,
Moroccan Jews celebrate
a unique holiday called
Mimouna. The festival has
interesting origins and
customs that give it a qual-
ity all its own.
Mimouna has been ob-
served for centuries.
Some believe the festival
derives its name from the
father of the famous rabbi
Moshe ben Maimon
whose birthday or death
the holiday commemo-
rates. There are some who
think the festival comes
from the Hebrew word for
faith, emunah. Still others
believe the name derives
from the Arabic word for
luck. Indeed, there are
both elements in the cele-
bration - religious con-
notations and cultural
folklore.
The religious aspect to
the holiday links several
events in the Passover
story to symbolism and rit-
uals connected with the
holiday The celebration
takes place on the evening
after Passover ends be-
cause it was felt that it was
an auspicious time for
prayers. The Passover
season traditionally is the
time of redemption and
the coming of the messiah
and even when this did
not occur, the faith of the
See JOURNAL/Page C5


Old-fashioned fun


Special to the Chronicle
Dove Award nominees The Marksmen Quartet are, from left: Earle Wheeler, Mark Autry,
Davey Waller, Mark Wheeler and Darn Chambers, appearing on a recent episode of
BlueHighwayTV's "Old Country Church." The group will perform today at 4 p.m. at an
Old-Fashioned Day at New Hope Baptist Church in Homosassa. The community is In-
vited to attend the event, which also features a free barbecue dinner and a pie bake-
off beginning at 6 p.m. Wear period piece clothing if you like, bring a pie and come and
enjoy gospel music.


I


uniform







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CSTUDY M , 6. 20RLGN


NOTES
Continued from Page C1
River. Every Friday night din-
ner is at 6, followed by large-
and small-group time and a
Coffee Caf6 at 9 p.m. Call 795-
0649.
* Seven Rivers Presbyte-
rian Church-At 6 p.m. Fri-
days at 4221 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway in Lecanto at the
Seven Rivers Christian School
building (rooms 216/217), with
dinner, large and small group
time, and Coffee House gath-
ering at 9 p.m. The cost for
dinner is $4. Call 746-6200.
* Christian Recovery Fel-
lowship Church -At 7 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays at
2242 W. State Road 44. Call
726-2800.
Announcements
* The community has been
witnessing Cornerstone Bap-
tist Church's building, pro-
gressing from ,the land
clearing, to building and
paving, to the state of con-
struction now nearing comple-
tion at its new church home on
the comer of Montgomery Av-
enue and Highland Boulevard
(1100 W. Highland Blvd.).lt is
almost time for the big day of
walking through the church
doors to experience God in a


new setting. Come grow with
us, and start now by joining us
as we continue to meet in the
Citrus High School Cafeteria at
10:30 a.m. Sunday. Sunday
school classes currently take
place at the church's campus
at 1005 Hillside Court in Inver-
ness (at the corner of Hillside
Court and Old Floral City
Road.) Call the church office at
726-7335.
* First United Methodist
Church of Homosassa's UMW
Thrift Shop, 8831 W. Brad-
shaw Blvd., Homosassa. Great
prices, housewares, toys,
small appliances, books,
unique items, nicely used
clothing, and reconditioned
computers. Shop is open from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, Fri-
day and Saturday. Donations
accepted at sorting room dur-
ing regular.hours. Profits to
support the UMW's local, na-
tional and global missions.
* Golden Agers meet at 11
a.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at First Baptist Church
of Floral City. Ages 50 and
older are welcome to enjoy
.fun, fellowship and meeting
new friends. Speaker or pro-
gram followed by potluck
luncheon at noon. Every third.
month, the group goes out for
lunch or a trip. Not a church-re-
lated program. Yearly dues are
$2. Call 726-4296.


* Faith Baptist Church
scrapbooking club meets
from 6 to 9 p.m. Tuesday in
the fellowship hall, 6918 S.
Spartan Ave., Homosassa. Call
Sharon at 628-4360 or Carolyn
at 382-7868.
* Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady
of Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
5164 S. Florida Ave., in the
Heath Mini Storage Units. Call
726-2660.
* Courage Al-Anon Family
Group meets at First United
Methodist Church, 88831
Bradshaw St., Homosassa. For
day and time, call 270-3827.
* Meals on Wheels pro-
gram at First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness needs vol-
unteer drivers one to two hours
weekly to deliver noontime
meals. Call Fran at 726-0350.
* Our Lady of Grace Church
in Beverly Hills Catholic Char-
ities Respite Care Program
has openings for persons in
the early stages of Alzheimer's
disease or related dementia
disorders, from 12:30 to 4:30
p.m. Wednesday. Call (800)
242-9012, Ext. 22.
* Inverness First Church of
God gospel jubilees at 6 p.m.
the last Saturday monthly at
5510 E. Jasmine Lane. Call
726-4524.


Worship SERVICES-:


* St. Timothy Lutheran Church School of
Theology from 9:30 a.m. to noon today. Infor-
mal come-as-you-are worship service at 5 p.m.
today features bluegrass music. Pastor Brad-
ford's sermon for sixth Sunday of Easter: "Cho-
sen to Love." Worship services at 7:30, 8:30
and 11 a.m. Holy Communion offered. Nursery
provided. Coffee fellowship from 9:30 to 10
a.m. Sunday school classes for all ages from
10 to 10:45 a.m. Worship service brought to
residents of Cypress Cove at 2:30 p.m. Church
is at 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19), Crystal
River. Call 795-5325.
* Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church
celebrates the sixth Sunday of Easter with Holy
Eucharist services at 5 p.m. today and 8 and 10
a.m. Sunday. Adult Christian Formation is at 9
a.m. Sunday. Choir and Bible study at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. SOS from 9 a.m. to noon Thurs-
day.
* First Baptist Church of Inverness activi-
ties include the following. On Sundays: SON-
rise class at 7:45 a.m.; blended worship service
at 9 a.m.; Kid's church for ages 4 through fourth
grade during 9 a.m. service will spend the next
weeks on "Adventures in Science," featuring
Bible stories, skits, music and group activities;
Sunday school for all ages at 10:30 a.m.; youth
drama team at 3:30 p.m.; student youth choir
practice at 4 p.m.; Youth Discipleship at 5 p.m.,
evening worship service at'6 p.m., and AWANA
for ages 2 through fifth grade from 5:15 to 7
p.m.. On Wednesdays: Fellowship dinner from
5 to 5:45; IGNITE-Youth Fellowship at 6 p.m.;
worship at 6 p.m. with prayer and Bible study;
children's choir practice from 6 to 7 p.m.; and
adult choir practice at 7 p.m. Nursery available
at all services. Call the church at 726-1252.


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His"' house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA i


Welcome, bikers"


Special to the Chronicle
Pastor Marple Lewis and wife Judy Lewis of'
First Baptist Church of Beverly Hills wel-,
come bikers: Christian Motorcyclists Asso-
ciation members, on their motorcycles, will
be at First Baptist Church of Beverly Hills,
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy., on Sunday. River:.
Riders President Dave "P.K." VanderKlay
will speak at both the traditional service at
9:15 a.m. and contemporary worship Ot
10:45 a.m. All are welcome.


* St. Paul's Lutheran Church, 6150 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, conducts wor-
ship service at 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday morn-
ing. Evening midweek worship service at 6:30
p.m. Thursday. Bible class continues the topic
"Hearts in Focus" at 9:15 a.m. Sunday school
also at 9:15 a.m. Call (352) 489-3027.Visitors
welcome. ,-.,
See WORSHIP/Page (
� � � ,*|,


NO2 Crystal
ERiver
Foursquare
Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "'Christian Ed"
I 7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor Brona Larder


EL ST. ANNE'S
S'EPISCOPAL
CHURCH (Anglican)
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
I Celebrating 50 Years of
Serving God and the Community.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
Youth Group meeting 1st Sunday
of the month after 10:15 Mass
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-26176
wwwstannescr.org |


JC Cfys8t Qiver
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid'(ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nursery
Provided


FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
CRYSTALRIVER
700 N. Citrus Avenue
352-795-3367
Re%. Bruce hodge
Sunday AMl Services
8 45 - Contemporary Worship
10 15-Worship Service
Bible Study Session,
S S -45 and 10 15
(For all ages)
Sunday PM
Youth Bible Stud% 5.3"'
Wednesday PM Service
5 u0 Family Supper iRS\ Pi
5:30 Awana Clubs
5:30 Youth Service
6:00 Worship Service


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
--ASE --
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. - Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 - 4:30pni
L 795-4479


|First United
Methodist
.1 Church
A Stephen Ministry Church
8831 W. Bradshaw St,

Homosassa
West of US 19
(take Yulee Dr. at Burger King)

Rev. Mark Whittaker

628-4083
www. 1 umc.org
Traditional Worship:
8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M. & 11:00 A.M.
Nursery at All Sunday Services

Sunday School for
All Ages: 9:30 A.M.

Youth Ministries
(ages 11-18)
77731

Opn. eat
Ope.Mnd

Oel or


T St. Timothy t
Lutheran Churh
ELCA
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd.,
Crystal River
795-5325
Saturday Informal Worship
5:00pm
Monthly Bluegrass Service
5:00pm
Sunday Worship
7:30am, 8:30am & 11:00am
Sunday School
All Ages & Adults 10:00am
Nursery Provided
Youth Activities
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor

Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRI r
A Friendly Church Wityh
A. Bible Messcage.
Comer of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday


1 1:00 A-.ivM.
SunIiday Evening
6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
3Bible Stuidy
7:00 Pi.M.
Come Wcrshtipj
With Us!
Bible Questions.
Please Call
Chiarlie Oraihan

746- 1Z39


Sunday
10:30am & 6:30pm
Wednesday
7pm
Come worship with us
and see why we are
becoming the
People's Church
of our community.

795-LIFE
(5433)
www .abundantlifecitrus.org


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH
5. r c 1 .J s.it u'.-i i llfus C.jurii,

MASSES:
,aturday 4:30 P.M.
Sunday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.
.S 10 ' mile CSojutj of West
Cordinal Sr HcmosasiOS



- First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come, Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive * Homosassa
. 628-3858
Rev. J: Alan Ritter
Sunday
9 00 am Sunday School lAiiAgeo Gmw
10.30 am Worship Celebration
Choir I Special Music I "Kidz Worship'
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebrablon
Wednesday Night
7 pm Worship Celebration ,:
Children s Awanas Group E
Youth Activilres


EVANGELISTS
Melvin Curry
SDavid Curry v


wFirst

Assembly

of God

Come One
Come All!!!





Service Times:
Sunday School
9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship
10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible
Study
7:00 p.m.
Richard Hart Senior Pastor


4 MILES EAST OF Hwy. 19
ON Hwy. 44
(352795 259


Hy4 Cr~fystall R iver
795-077


Sunday Worship ,"
10:00amn
Nursery Provided
Sunday School
For all ages at 9:00am,

S.... First *
S% Presbyterian
(Us"i' 1501 SWHwy..19

352-795-2259
www.fpcofcrystalriver.co'




HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
, CKPIN(N FAMILY
IN CH T!

C KYSTL
RIVEK
VJNIT ED
MAETHODI1ST
CH UKCH

4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Gill, Pastor
Sunday Worship
8:00 Early Communion
9:30 Praise & Worship
11:00 Traditional
Bible Study
At 9:30 and 11:00 For All Ages.
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship Sunday, 4:30
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon.- Fri. 7a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
6. A Stephen Ministry Provider ,,


West Citrus
Church of,
Christ I


C2 SATURDAYMAY 16 2009


RELIGION '








CITRUS COUNn' (FL) CHRONICLE RELIGION S~TUI5DAY M~s 16 2009 C3


WORSHIP
Continued from Page C2
I St. Margaret's Episcopal Church Holy Eu-
charist services at 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday with
children's church at the 10:30 service. Feed My
SIeep feeding program for people in need at
11,;0 a.m., followed by a Holy Eucharist and
healing service. Church is at 114 N. Osceola
Ave4, Inverness. Call 726-3153.
i First Presbyterian Church of Inverness
traditional worship services at 8 and 11 a.m.
Sunday with contemporary praise and worship
services at 9:30 a.m, The Rev. Craig S. Davies
will preach on "What in the World Are We Sup-
posed to Do as Christians?" from Matthew
26:16-20. Sunday school classes are at 9:30
and,11 a.m. Everyone is invited to participate in


the church golf scramble at the Inverness Golf
and Country Club on Saturday, May 23. Tee-off
at 1 p.m. Golf costs $20. After the scramble,
spouses may join golfers for a sit-down dinner.
For required dinner reservations, call Greg An-
dreichuk at 860-0426 or Frank Mattox at 341-
2484. Youth mission trip spaghetti dinner
fundraiser from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May
30. Tickets are $8 per person. Call Denise Lay
for information. Church is at 206 Washington
Ave., Inverness. Call 637-0770.
* Hernando United Methodist Church,
2125 E. Norvell Bryant Highway, Hemando, of-
fers the following activities: Sunday school
classes for all ages at 8:30 a.m. followed by fel-
lowship and snacks at 9:30 a.m. Worship service
led by Pastor Tyler Montgomery at 10 a.m. Sun-
See WORSHIP/Page C4


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, vour spirits will be lifted!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO,


Frns ist

COMMUNITY CHURCH






PASTOR BRIAN AND
:0 KATHY BAGS
:2 Worship Service &
CiCldren'sChurch 10:00 AM
Reting at Knights of Columbis Bldg.
Comeunty Rd. 486, Lecantore!
LEC NE5TO














CHURCH OF CHRIST

Suie Road 44 & Rote Terrace
352-746-4919
PASTOR B RIANble NDStudyAAL





Snlayorship Service &00A.
Sunday Everch 10:00PM.
Wednesday BibleStudy-- 7..O.PAI.
"'In Search of he Lord's aBldg."
8:30 AM. Sunday
Ceveounty Rd. 486,Bible study:
S(3,52) 527-4253















lecantochurchofchrist.org
Eoy Cherry Minister.





Methodist
Church
: LECANTO
















SL tfe Sanctuary for Children and Families"

2S5uiE Norveiyantgwy(486):00P.
A ( miles from Hwy. 41) P.
n SFor information call
8:30 Sunday.M. Sundchoolay
8:3045 AM - 9:30 AM
Channellowship 15 (ADEL.)
ChMinistries and Activite for all Ages.
Rerend Tyl Cherryontgo MiniyPastor
United













"A4efe Sanctuaryfor Children and Families"
25 E, NorvefllBryant Hwy. (486)
G (V miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
* (352) 726-7245
* Sunday School
8:45 AM - 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM



Reverend Tyler Montgomery, Pastor


IGLESIA HISPANA
CASA DE ORACION
"Donde la Palabra de . *,
Dios es el lenguaje del
Espfritu Santo"

Escuela Dominical......9:30 AM
Adoraci6n...............10:15 AM
Martes ..................9....9:30 AM
Mi6rcoles ....................7:00 PM
Dr. Teddy Aponte &
Hayi Aponte, Pastores
3220 N. Carl G.Rose
Hwy. (200) * Hernando
352-341-5100


Ancient Worship... Timelss Faith
1928 Book of Common Prayer -
Traditional Epicopal Worship
S Anglican Church
"of the Holy Spirit
1023 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
352-637-5922
or 352-621-3323
Fr David Sokol - Priest
Adult Bible Study - 9:30
Holy Communion - 10:15


o lShepherd of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith
known for engaging
all persons in the
love and truth of
Jesus Christ.
The Rev. Ladd K. Harris
Priest in Charge
527-0052
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:00 am
Adult Christian
Formation
9:00 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
, wwwSOTHEC.org /


- Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St. a
(across from Floral City School) g
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M.
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Steven Todd Riddle
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


LC,

935 S. Crystal Glen Dr. Lecintmi
'� Crystal Glen Subdivisionw-
' -Hwy. 44 'just E. of 490.-:
527-3325













Pastor - Rev, Frederick W. Schielke
www.faithlecanto.com


FLO


Sunday Schedule
9:30 AM Sunday School
10:45 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available -


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week-Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


S ,c J ! The New Church
Without Walls
Grace Bible "Ai Exciring&Growing
Church Multi-Cultural
C rNon-Denominational
CCongregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders


Sunday .
9:30 AM..................Discovery Time
11:00AM.................Praise& Worship �
6:00 PM..................Evening Service '
Monday

Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. - Apr.)
Wednesday -
Wednesda Douglas & Teresa
7:00 PM...................Bible Study & DougAlexa & under Sr.
Prayer Meeting Alexander Sr.
Pastor: Sunday School 9am
Rev. Ray Herriman Sunday Service 10:30 AM
(352) 628-5631 Wednesday Bible Study 7pm
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS, 3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Infant & Toddler Nursery Hernando, FL
'2 mi.eastofUS.19 Ph: 352-344-2425
6382 W. Green Acres St. www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
P.O. Box 1067 Email:cwow@tampabay.rr.com
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org "The perfect church for
e-mail: gbc@tampabay.rrncom people who aren't"
775724


Gospel sing

From left: Jim Potts (lead),
Joy Potts (tenor), Ron Hes-
keth (baritone) and Ernie
Dorrell (bass) of Tuned to
Revival. For three years, the
quartet has been singing a
repertoire of gospel fa-
vorites from Albert Brunley
to George Beverly Shea and
Bill and Gloria Gaither. The
public is invited to hear the
singing gospel group per-
form at 9:30 a.m. Saturday,
May 23, at the Seventh-day
Adventist church on Cardi-
nal Street in Homosassa.
Special to the Chronicle

FAITH BAPTIST

CHURCH
Homoiassj Sprin-s
Re-.\\n, Li\erle CojEt.
SUNDAY
SUNDAY SCHOOL: 9:45 am
WORSHIP: 11:00 am & 6pm
WEDNESDAY
WORSHIP: 7pm
YOUTH: 6:30pm
Indeperde, a Fundarn nijl
O n Spart ri - l'2 ,TI k I 'l iri Ll _ I'.
off Cai,,,jal 628-4793


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship,
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
775729 Floral City, FL.


GOOD

SHEPHERD

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
ELCA
Come Worship
With Us!

Worship
8:30 & 10:30 A.M.
* Sunday School
8:30 A.M.

* Fellowship after
Worship

* Weekly
Communion

* Nursery
Provided
Building Is Barrier-Free
746-7161
Hwy. 486
Across From
Citrus Hills Boulevard
Rev. Kenneth C. Blyth, Pastor
http://gslutheran.googlepages.com
or


RAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


,& ^.Hernando
lRjlra Church of
T nh e
s TheNazarente
4Place tot ll'hin.v,

2101 N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided
"The Church with the big

*CHILDREN
*YOUTH
*SINGLES
*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M,
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed,) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 C3


RELIGION









SATURDAY, A ,


WORSHIP
Continued from Page C3
days includes children's church. Nurs-
ery provided. Individual hearing de-
vices provided for the hearing
impaired. Communion offered to all
the first Sunday monthly. Holidaze
crafters from 9 to 11 a.m. Tuesday.
Choir meets at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday
under the direction of Debbie Thomp-
son, accompanied on the organ by
John Petro. Share, praise and fellow-
ship at 6 p.m. the second and fourth
Sunday monthly. UMW meet at 9:45
a.m. the second Thursday monthly
September through June. UMM meet
the fourth Saturday monthly with
breakfast. Call 726-7245.
* Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church Sunday worship hours at 8:30


and 10:30 a.m. Hear Pastor Kenneth
Blyth give an inspirational sermon at
both services and hear the chancel
choir under the direction of V. Lionel
King at the 10:30 service. Coffee hour
follows both services. Free tape min-
istry, large prints and hearing devices
available. Youth studies at 8:30 a.m.
Nursery attendant available for chil-
dren 3 and younger. VBS from 5 to 8
p.m. June 8-12 with free supper at 5
p.m. The Caregiver Ministry from
12:30 to 4 p.m. Friday provides an
opportunity for caregivers of loved
ones to have free time for themselves.
The loved ones, who come under our
care for 3-1/2 hours, are entertained
with singing, trivia, games, exercise,
etc. Caregivers interested in this free
program may call the church office at
746-7161 for an application. Church is
on County Road 486, opposite Citrus


Hills Boulevard in Hernando.
* Inverness Church of God Sun-
day worship services at 8:30 and
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday school
classes for all at 9:30 a.m. Christian
education opportunities for all ages at
7 p.m. Wednesday include: Mis-
sionettes and Royal Rangers Clubs for
children from the age of 3. Teens are
invited to "Frontline" with Youth Pastor
Kyle Holtzhower. Adult class in sanctu-
ary. Church is at 416 U.S. 41 South,
Inverness. Call 726-4524.
* Calvary Chapel of Inverness,
960 S. U.S. 41, offers Bible study
classes Sunday mornings at 9 for
adults, teens and children, followed at
10 a.m. with contemporary worship
and a biblically based message from
Senior Pastor Kevin Ballard. Chil-
dren's church available. All invited.
Bible study with Pastor Mike DiSanza


on Bible prophecy at 7 p.m. Sunday.
Weekly events include: Men's prayer
at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday; dinner at 6 p.m.
Wednesday ($5 fundraiser for the
Founded on God Teens July Mission
Trip to Jamaica, West Indies) followed
by Bible study at 7 p.m. for adults,
teens and children; ladies prayer
group at 10 a.m. Thursday; Feed the
Hungry free meal at noon Thursday
with food pantry open at 1 p.m. Call
726-1480.
* Victory Baptist Church, 5040 E.
Shady Acres Drive, Inverness. Coffee
and doughnuts served at 9 a.m. Sun-
day in the fellowship hall, followed by
Sunday school classes at 9:45 and the
morning worship service at 10:45.
Sunday evening service begins at 6.
Wednesday night "hour of power" with
prayer petitions, hymns and a study of
the Book of Revelation led by Pastor


Beehler. Call 726-9719.
* First Christian Church of Inver-
ness study on "What We Believe" at 9
a.m. Sunday, This.multi-week pres-
entation is facilitated by John Scott,
minister, with video presentation by"
Bob Russell. Study workbooks avail-'
able for purchase. All invited. Call
FCCI at 344-1908. FCCI is at 2018'
Colonade St., Inverness.
* First Baptist Church of Her-
nando starts Sunday mornings with.
coffee and doughnuts at 9. Special
prayer and introduction to lesson at-.
9:20 a.m. Family life classes for all,
ages at 9:30 a.m. Services at 11 a.m.
and 6 p.m. Wednesday prayer meet-
ing at 7 p.m. c,
* Come worship and enjoy fellow-
ship at Faith Lutheran Church, 938
See WORSHIP/PagecC5


Places of worship that

offer love, peace and

harmony to all..

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE,


Redemption

(hristian Curch
SUNDAY
Bible School...............9:00
Worship.................10:00
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30
Currently meeting at.
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing Light)
For more
information call
352-422-6535
Pastor
Todd
Langdon


nature Coast

Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.M.


465-4225
WWW.NCUU.ORG


New Location: i
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41) Citrus Springs


ST LUTHERM
CH -LCMS,
5sNorth Ave. West Brooksvlle
he church that is a family"
SUNDAY SERVICES
' Morning Worship
8:15 AM & 11:00 AM.
Nursery Available
ntmday School & Bible Class
9:45 A.M.
Pastor Paul Meseke
352-796-8331 &











* Hwy.44 E @ 1
SWashington Ave.,Inverness 0
* Sunday Services
i Traditional
S8:00 AM & 11:00 AM -
* Contemporary m
* 9:30 AM
* 11:00 AM Service 7 0
* Tapes & CD's available 0
a Sunday School for all ages 0
S 9:30 AM N
S Nursery Provided
* Fellowship & Youth Group m
S 6:00 PM U
. 24-HourPrayer Line '
m 563-3639
* Web Site: www.fpcinv.orgi
S Podcast: FPCinv.com *
m Church Office 637-0770 *
SPastors: Craig Davies
Sand Michael F. Fonfara


F.- 41 Years of
|i RST Bringing Christ to
" FIRST' Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Divine Services:.7:45 & 10am
Holy Communion
7:45 Every Sunday: 10:00
1st& 3rd Sun. -
Sunday School
& Bible Class
8:45 AM.
726-1637
sCry Room
S www.lstlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


7 CONGREGATION
BETH SHOLOM
Beverly Hills Jewish Center
CIVIC CIRCLE,
BEVERLY HILLS, FL. 34465
Services:
Fri. @ 7:30 P.M.
Sat. @ 9:30 A.M.
All Jewish Holidays
All those of Jewish
faith & their families
are invited to join us.

for information
,gngregation: 746-5303


Hope
Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
SUNDAY Worship
8:00 apn.& 10:45 a.m.
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Communion - Every Sunday
information: 489-5511


St. Elizabeth
Ann Seton
Catholic Church
1401 W. Country Club Blvd.
in Citrus Springs
The little church on the hill
With a warm welcome
Masses
Saturday Vigil....4:30 PM
Sunday..............8:30 AM
.....................& 11:00 AM
Weekday...........8:30 AM
Holy Day............8:30 AM
.......................& 7:00 PM
Confessions before all masses

489-4889
We support Pope John Paul II
Catholic School


Im


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
U.S, Hwy, 41 South, Inverness,
Florida
Sunday Masses '
7:30 A.M., 9 00 AM & 11,00 A.M.
Saturday Vigil
4:00 P.M.
Weekdays 8 00 A.M.
Confessions 2:30 - 3:30 P.M.

726-1670


Ra lsed 2"orAlip!
Come 'n? t 2k .
SUNDAY
10:00 AM - Worship Service
Bible Study
Wednesday - 7:00 PM


I


Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL. 34433 /
489-1260


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Wednesday Praise and Worship /
Bible Study 6 p.m.
Saturday Bible Study /
Breakfast Hour 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School, Adults/Children 9 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 10 a.m.
Where Christ is Proclaimedl





f'fCHRISTIAN
I CENTER
"Big Enough To Serve,
Small Enough To Care"

637-5100



* Clean & Safe Nursery
* Exciting Children & Youth Services
* Warm Fellowship
* Powerful Worship
* Practical Messages
Sunday Worship.
8:30 A.M. & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday*
Prayer 6:00 P.M.
Discipleship 7:00 P.M.
Friday Youth Service
* 7:00. P.MVL
Agape Kids Preschool & Davcare
1 yr old - Pre K 4
Before & After School Care
Mon-Fri 6:30 A.M.- 6:00 P.M.
Two miles from Hwy. 44'on the
corner of Croft & Harley
2728 Harley St., Inverness FL


Sunday\ Sertices:
Trjditiri l Ser\ ce . ...S.30
Sundj\. School .. 9 30 \
Contemporjrv Serxie I0 30 .M
E.enmng Ser ,ice . 6 ii)PM
Wednesday Night
Adult Clj es. . . 7.1:0 : PM
Bo.', and Girls Bnadce. 7-11 PM
Teens .. .. ...... .- . i5 P
"Welcome Home"
L....: ,.1 Jl J!I , .." 41 I uth
,r i,'.':r, . lu-i F-J i u.r.r kirn
i.-h, "'Oll'r.a _"r.4'n-.
\s. on .ln e "illltk Frinds Da arne and
Lt.irn _ni Cinler"








A friendly church where
Christ is exalted!!!

Sunday School 9:00 A.M.
Morning Worship 10:15 A.M.
Evening Service 6:00 P.M.

Bible Study & Prayer 7:00 P.M.
Awana (K-6 grade) .6:45-8:15 P.M.
Q;








Inverness
Bible Church
Independent, Fundamental,
Non-denominational
Bible School 10:00 A.M.
Sunday Worship 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Afternoon Service 2 P.M.
9119 Gulf To Lake Hwy,
Inverness, FL 32250
877-872-0302
wwwinvernessbiblechurch .com
Pastor Mike Lindvig


First
Baptist
Inverness

Sunday Mornings
@ 10:00am on WYKE
Channel 16 on Brighthouse
SUNDAY MORNING
SONRise Class 7:45am
Worship Service
9:00am
Children's Church 9:00am
(4 years thru 4th grade)
Sunday School
all ages 10:30am
SUNDAY EVENING
Evening Worship 6:15pm
Awana 5:15-7:00pm
Youth Choir 4:00pmr
Youth Discipleship 5:00pm
WEDNESDAY
Fellowship Dinner 5:00-6:00pm
Children's Choir 6:15pm-7:15pm
Ignite "Youth" 6:00-8:00pm
Bible Studies 6:15pm-7:15pm
Adult Choir 7:15pm-8:30pm
Nursery Provided All Services
Interpretation For The
Hearina Imnaired


550 Pleasant Grove Rd. |
726-1252
www.firstbaptistinverness.com


SPRIMERA IGLESIA
SHISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM - Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM -Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM - Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:






First Baptist
Church of
Beverly Hills
MNlarple LewisI. HI
Pa ,or
Alan Sanders
A7P -i'ucti,. s P BlCor
4950,\. Leqanta HiHv.
S-everly Hills. FL
Located at Ine intersecLion of
Hwy 491 . Lecanto hwy.)
and Forest Ridge Blvd
Sunday Services
Bible Study
9:15 A.M. & 10:45 A.M.
Traditional Worship
9:15 A.M.'
Contemporary Worship
10:45 A.M.
Evening Discipleship
6:00 P.M.
Wednesday Services:
Bible Study, Prayer
and Youth Activities
6:00 P.M.
For more information call
(352) 746-2970
Office Hours
9-3 P.M.
or email us at:
beverlyhillsbaptist@tampabay.rr.com
www.fbcbh.com


GRACE
BAPTIST
CHURCH

Independent
2672 W. Edison PI. at Elkcam Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL
* Expositional Bible Teaching
* Mature, well balanced ministry
* Conservative Music
* Caring, family atmosphere
Sunday School 9:45 am
Sun. Services 11:00 am & 6:00 pm
Kids Klub (ages 6-13): Thurs. 6-8 pm
Wed. Prayer & Bible Study 7:00 pm
Rev. Richard W. Brosseau, Pastor
Phone (352) 445-9013






Download our pastor's
messages in mp3 format
Hear sound Bible
teaching every week
Find real help for life's
difficult situations
Learn what we believe
Search our database for *
answers to controversial *
Bible questions


Mission Possible
MINISTRIES
V. David Lucas, Jr.
Senior Pastor 0 1
', 9921 N. Deltona BouleVdrd
I (352) 489-3886
www.missionpossibleministries.com
Sunday |
Worship .................. 10:30 am
Spanish Translation Provided
(Nursery Care & Children's Church Provided)
[ Wednesday .
Youth Group, Bible Study &
Kid's Programs..........7 pm
(Nursery Care Provided) "
ARMS OF MERCY FOOD PANTRY
1st & 3rd Tuesday of the month
8:00 am-11:00 am


VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 PM. & 6:00 P.M,;

SUNDAY MASSES:"
8:00 AM. & 10:30 A.IL

SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P.M.

CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.M. to 3:30 P.M. Sat
orBy Appointment,;

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM. >


6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills ,.
7, 46-2.44 ,
(1 Block East of S.R. 491),,'-


ESS:


OMEN",


. L


mill 11.1"


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RELIGION


C4 s MY 162009


I


I









CrFRuS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE RitLIGIoN SATURDAY MM 16, 2009 C5


GRACE
Continued from Page C1
She said to make the grade, the eggs have
to be a certain size and sometimes the hens
don't produce big enough eggs for commer-
cial use. However, the smaller eggs aren't
discarded. Instead, they're given away to
local charities and friends.
No egg is wasted.
She wrote to tell me not to be discour-
aged and that maybe I'm in a time of for-
mation, much like a hen that needs to
produce bigger eggs. She said for hens to
produce high-quality eggs, they need three
things: food, light and ventilation.
-' I happen to be a huge fan of food, so I
paid close attention to her words. She re-
minded me that I needed to stay in God's
Word, especially during non-productive
times. She added, "I know you do." How-
',:ver, she's wrong.
My Bible has dust on it I'm hungry and I
'.,need to eat!
She wrote, "Your next call to speak (or
write another book) may come tomorrow,
but God may give you the words of that mes-
sage today."
. Through the prophet Isaiah, God tells his
, people who are hungry and thirsty to come
to him. He says, "Why spend money on what
is not bread, and your labor on what does
not satisfy? Listen, listen to me; and eat
what is good, and your soul will delight in
the richest of fare" (Isaiah 55:2).
Lately, I've been reading about the im-
, lortance of eating enough protein to build
' muscle and keep insulin and glucose levels
-balanced. I need to eat, but not junk food. I
need to dig in and chew and digest all the
food that's in the Bible.
Truthfully, I'd much rather eat cupcakes
4nd watch "American Idol" and read chick
lit books, but I need more nutrition. I need
,God's Word.


Jennifer said chickens need light. A few
weeks ago Lexington had overcast skies
and egg production dropped significantly.
Jennifer likened the need for light to the
need tcrstay close to Jesus, who is our light
and our salvation.
She, too, is a speaker, or wants to be, and
she said she's tempted to be envious. She
jokingly said she'll be at a conference and
pray that the speaker passes out, then when
someone yells, "Is there another speaker in
the house?" she can jump to the rescue.
She said when we draw close to Jesus, it
doesn't matter who gets a turn in the lime-
light "Because with a slight move of the
Master's hand, we could be next," she
wrote.
Also, if our focus is Jesus and. not on the
thing we want him to do for us, we find his
light is enough.
Third, Jennifer said hens need ventila-
tion. She said her usual response to a dry
season is to hide away. Me too! She encour-
aged me to keep myself available and ex-
pectant and open, to breathe deep and not
grow weary, to keep writing my column
each week and not put my pen down unless
or until God says it's time.
Then she quoted a passage from a devo-
tional she had read - and I recognized the
words as ones I had written years ago. That
in itself was a tremendous encouragement.
It was as if she showed me an "egg" - one
of my eggs.
So thank you, Jennifer Reeder, for your
timely message. Next time, maybe you
could Facebook me over an omelet?


Nancy Kennedy is the author of "Move
Over, Victoria -I Know the Real Secret,"
"Girl on a Swing," and her latest book,
"Lipstick Grace." She can be reached at
564-2927, Monday through Thursday, or via
e-mail atnkennedy@chronicleonline.com.


JOURNAL
Continued from Page C1
Moroccan Jews still re-
mained strong. The split-
ting of the Red Sea took
place at this time, and the
faith of the ancient Is-
raelites was renewed
when Pharaoh's men
drowned in the frothy foam
of the sea.
The festival table is set
with objects that symbolize
the holiday. There are fish
(some use live ones), gold
coins, gold or silver jew-
elry, fig leaves, honey,
wheat, yeast, white flour,
jams and beans. The first
few items are symbolic of
the Red Sea salvation with
the coins and jewelry rep-
resenting the Egyptian
plunder, while the rest of
the items have to do with
prosperity and abundance.
There is also a practical
and cultural side to the
holiday. At the conclusion
of Passover, it was custom-
ary for the Moroccan Jews
to bring a food basket con-
taining matza, meat pies,
salads and an egg to their
Muslim neighbors in a ges-
ture of goodwill and hospi-
tality for guarding the
Jews' leavened items for-
bidden during the eight
days of Passover. In return,
the Muslims would give
the Jews a food basket con-
taining yeast, butter and
flour - items needed to


make bread. Since these
items were not available to
the Jews during Passover
because of ritual restric-
tions, these were welcome
gifts and they served as a
bridge of friendship with
their Muslim neighbors.
The festival also pro-
vides a separation be-
tween the sacredness of
Passover and its promise
of redemption with the
rest of the secular year,
much like the havdalah
ceremony separates the
Sabbath from the rest of
the week. There is much
joy and happiness, and it is
also a time when matches
between young men and
women are made.
There is much folklore
and superstition associ-
ated with the holiday as
well. Jews have always
adopted the customs of the
countries where they have
lived. With this in mind,
there are elements in the
festival that are cultural in
origin.
For instance, the word
mimouna could be a deriv-
ative of the Arabic word
mimoun, meaning luck or
good fortune. Because the
festival occurs in the
spring and the time of new
beginnings, it is a perfect
time to honor Lady Luck,
whose honor is exalted in'
special songs sung at the
Mimouna table. This con-
cept of honoring luck dates
back to biblical times to


the pagan Canaanite deity
Ba'al Gad or god of good
fortune. This aspect of the
holiday was frowned upon
by the rabbis but was in-
cluded nevertheless as
part of folklore.
Writings in the 15th cen-
tury mention a demon
named Mimoun and his
partner Mimouna. Gradu-
ally as time went on, Mi-
moun faded into history
while the she-devil, Mi-
mouna, continued to have
importance. Like many
festivals throughout the
ages, customs and rituals
changed and developed so
that Mimouna eventually
became a festival of luck
and good fortune just as
Halloween became a holi-
day of masquerade and
trick-or-treating despite its
pagan origins of demons
and the haunting of the
dead.
In the state of Israel, the
festival is celebrated in
Moroccan communities
and has taken on impor-
tance due to the large Mo-
roccan population.
Whatever its origins, the
festival continues to play a
part in the lives of Moroc-
can Jews.

Judi Siegal is a retired
teacher and Jewish
educator She lives in
Ocala with her husband,
Phil. She can be reached
atniejudis@yahoo.com.


WORSHIP
Continued from Page C4

S. Crystal Glen Drive, Lecanto.
Worship services are 9:30
a.m. Sunday and 6 p.m. Sat-
urdays. Adult Bible study and
-,Sunday school classes at 11
a.m. Visit faithlecanto.com for
. services, upcoming events
and to sign-up for VBS.
, First Christian Church
'of Homosassa Springs Bible
;school classes for all ages at
9:30 a.m. Sunday, followed by
iiomrning worship at 10:30 (chil-
Sren's church provided for
4 kindergarten through third
grade). Evening worship at 6
p.m. Sunday. Wednesday
meal at 6 p.m. followed by
Bible study and youth program
at 7. Church is at 7030 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd.
* Discovery time classes
:begin Sunday at 9:30 a.m.
with worship service at 11 a.m.
at Grace Bible Church, 6382
W. Green Acres, Homnosassa.
Choir practice is at 5 p.m. and
evening service at 6. Teens
meet at 6:15 p.m. Monday.
Tuesday morning ladies Bible
study is at 10 a.m. and
AWANA for children begins at
6:10 p.m. Wednesday prayer
meeting begins at 7 p.m.
Thursday evening ladies Bible
'study meets at 7. Call 628-
5631.
* Faith Baptist Church
Sunday school classes at 9:45
a.m. followed by worship at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. Bible study .
a.d prayer meeting at 7 p.m.
SWednesday with "Warriors"' for
grades 6 through 12 and
"King's Kids" for K-5 grades
From 6:30 to 8 p.m. Church is
-pt 6918 S. Spartan Ave. (one
rf Nile from U.S. 19, off Cardinal
Street). Call 628-4793.
* All welcome to learn to be
inspiredd by God's Word in an
''open format at 10 a.m. Sun-
Vays at The Little House,
i-429 Shady Acres Drive, In-
Serness. Call Joe Hupchick at
"1V26-9998.
0 Crystal River Church of
' Christ Sunday morning Bible
:,study at 10 with worship serv-
?3es at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Communion served. Public in-
yvted. Evangelist Charlie Gra-
.ffam will preach. Church is on
, State Road 44 one block east
;,cf U.S. 19 next to the Credit
,pnion. Call 795-8883 or 746-
1239.
0 U Church of Christ serv-
ijes at 304 N.E. Fifth St.,
;rystal River. Bible classes at
.!0 a.m. Sunday, 7 p.m.
.:ednesday and by appoint-
ment. Worship services at 11
a.m. Sunday. Everyone in-
.ited. Call 795-4943 or 563-
56.
*A E Living Word of God
.hurch, on Cason Boulevard
i l Inglis, offers Sunday school
Sasses at 10 a.m. and Sunday
�,vening worship at 6. Every-
,one is welcome. Jessie Lolley
Sis the pastor. Call 621-7260 for
# formationo.
* Unity Interfaith devo-
tional at 10 a.m. Sunday at
,.;G's Italian Express, 1916 U.S.
,;*9, Crystal River. All faiths
SWelcome. Refreshments
, served. Call 795-5555.


* Parsons Memorial Pres-
byterian Church coffee fel-
lowship from 10 to 10:55 a.m.
Sunday in fellowship hall,
5850 Riverside Drive, Yankee-
town (next to Coast Guard
Station). Sunday school at
9:30 a.m. Nursery available.
Traditional church service be-
gins at 11 a.m. Holy Commun-
ion served the first Sunday
monthly. Call (352) 447-2506.
* Nature Coast Unitarian
Universalists invite the public
to weekly .services at 10:30
a.m. Sunday. The Rev. John
Higgins will speak on diversity.
Refreshments and discussion
follow the service. The fellow-
ship meets at 7633 N, Florida
Ave. (U.S. 41), Citrus Springs.
For information call (352) 465-
4225.
* Citrus Vineyard Com-
munity Church meets in the
First Christian Church of Inver-
ness Family Life Center, be-
hind Cinnamon Sticks
Restaurant at 2018 Colonade
St. Sunday services are at
10:30 a.m., with child care up
to age 5 provided. Home.
groups meet in Heatherwood
and Hernando on Thursdays.
Call the church at 586-2000.
* First Church of Christ,
Scientist, Inverness worships
Sunday mornings at 10:30 and
Wednesday evenings at 5 at
.224 N. Osceola Ave. Sunday
school class is the same time
as the church service. All are
welcome.
* German-language
church services at 3 p.m. the
first Sunday monthly at Joy
Lutheran Church, 7045 S.W.
83rd Place and State Road
200, Ocala. Followed by cof-
fee and cake fellowship. Call
Gerhard Gross, at (352) 489-
0023, with questions.
0 Heritage Baptist Church
services led by Pastor David
Hamilton, at 2 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills. Call 746-6171.
* Christ Lutheran Church
services led by the Rev. Paul
R. Meseke, senior pastor, at
475 North Ave. W.,
Brooksville. Call (352) 796-
8331. E-mail
pastor@clcfla.org. Visit
www.clcfla.org.
* Beverly Hills Commu- .
nity Church weekly contem-
porary worship service is now
at 6 p.m. Wednesday in the
fellowship hall at 86 Civic Cir-
cle, Beverly Hills. Families
welcome. Call the church of-
fice at 746T3620.
* Unity Church of Citrus
County healing/prayer service
at 6:30 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at 2628
W. Woodview Lane, Beverly
Hills. Call 746-1270.
* Butterfly Ministries wor-
ship, Bible study and personal
ministry from 10 am. to 2-p.m.
the third Saturday monthly at
The Sanctuary, 3888 S. King
Ave., Homosassa.
Food and fellowship follow.
Call Margie Sipes at 212-
4320.
* Grupo Misionero Ad-
ventista del 7 mo. Dia de Cit-
rus County. Horario de
Reuniones. Miercoles 7 p.m.
Sabados 11 a.m. Address:
1880 N. Trucks Ave., Her-
nando. Call 535-7141.


774562 "First For Christ..John 1:41
FIRST A
CHRISTIAN =
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
John A. Scott, Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Setvice
Wednesday:
6:30 P M. Bible Study









All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
, Sunday School 10:30AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5;00 PM
774566 352-726-4033


PLEASANT GROVE
CHURCH OF CHRIST
3875 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34450
"Come Be A Part Of
God's Family"
Minister: Michael Raine
(352) 344-9173




.ei V Seric . ..6:00


BEBve.ning Bible C


AND JESUS IS LORD
MOUNTAIN ASSEMBLY
10117 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Inverness, FL 34450-5430
East Hwy. 44 * (352) 637-3110


At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Sunday Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care

Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong.A place to become."


First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452


OFFICE: (352) 726-1107









Srevoiad
Je tist-





91VillageWest Plaza
Invernessday
(2 miles west on Hwy. 44
past Wal-Mart on right)

You're invited to


Sunday School
10:00 AM

Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM

Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
STerry Roberts
S Ph: 726-0201


Inverness First Church of God
- Non-denominational
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Phone: 726-8986
Pastor: Jerry Baker
Services: Sunday:
10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed. - Study 6:00 PM
Home of the: i
"Gospel Jubilee"
Every last Saturday of the month


A LITTLE STRESSED?

FIND RELIEF HERE!

First United
Methodist

tChurch
,% I..,n ..a n .


I ] I uinv Iniss
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
KIP YOUNGER
Senior Pastor
9:00 AM & 10:45 AM
Sunday School Classes
for all ages
5:00 PM - Student
Connection Time
6th Grade thru 12th
Nursery care available starting at 9:00 AM
WEDNESDAYS
6:15 PM Bible Studies &
Connection Groups for everyone
Join us for a casual
uplifting service with family
praise & worship on
I Sunday at 9:00 AM
Additional Sunday Worship
Opportunities

WE ALSO OFFER
8:00 AM
i Holy Communion
10:45 AM
Traditional Worship
Signing for hearing impaired
available upon request
Open Hearts,
Open Minds, R
Open Doors
www.invernessfirstumc.org
I- - - - e--X-


Places of worship that

offer- love, peace and

harmony to all.

ICome on over to "His" house, vour spirits ill be lited!!!

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


Come,
To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr. Gene Reuman, Pastor


SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 C5


. GrriTRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RELIGION










CPage C6 - SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Club to end season
with trips, picnic
Citrus Newcomers Club
will end the year with two day
trips and a picnic in the park
at Fort Cooper. It's still not
too late to join and be a part
of Newcomers, and the fun
new friends become good
friends.
For more information, about
Citrus County Newcomers
Club, call Judy at 860-0232
or Sharon at 270-3908,'or
visit the club's Web site at
www.citrusnewcomersclub.h
omestead.com.
PGE council
slates meeting
The next meeting of the
Pleasant Grove Elementary
School's Advisory Enhance-
ment Council will be at 7 p.m.
Monday in the PGE Tech
Lab. Parents and interested
community members are
welcome to attend.
Waters Week
committee to meet
The Citrus 20/20, Inc.
Save Our Waters Week
Committee will meet at 10
a.m0 Monday Room 219,
L.ecanto Government Center,
3600 West Sovereign Path,
off County Road 491.
The purpose of the meet-
ing is to plan and coordinate
activities for Citrus County's
14th Annual Save Our Wa-
ters Week, Sept. 18 to 26. All
interested organizations and
persons are welcome to at-
tend and encouraged to par-
ticipate. Any organization or
person desiring additional in-
formation should call Bema-
dine at 527-7646.
Woman's club
thrift shop sale
The Yankeetown-Inglis
Woman's Club Thrift Shop
will have its end-of-the-year
sale. Everything in the shop
will be 50 percent off. All mer-
chandise is included in the
sale Tuesday through May
29. The thrift shop is behind
the woman's club on 56th
Street next to the library and
is open from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Tuesday and Friday and
noon to 3 p.m. Wednesday.
All proceeds generated by
the thrift shop are donated to
our community.
EMS offering free
CPR training
Nature Coast EMS Ameri-
can Heart Association Training
Center is offering a Friends
and Family CPR Course on
Tuesday - Three free ses-
sions: 10 a.m., 2 p.m. and
5:30 p.m., at the Nature Coast
EMS Administration and Edu-
cation Building, 3876 W.
Country Hill Drive, Lecanto,
one block off State Road 44
on County Road 490.
The class is free, the book
is included.
Call 249-4750to reserve a
seat.
Sierra Club
welcomes public
Sierra Club will have a
general meeting at 7 p.m.
Tuesday at Universal Unitar-
ian Church, 7633 N. Florida
Ave. (U.S. 41 North), Citrus
Springs; call 628-7540 for di-
rections. Last meeting before
summer break. Discussion of
proposed nuclear plant.
Sierra Club meetings are
open to the public and all are
invited.
Master gardener
offers program
Master Gardener Peter
Dobbs helps gardeners at 1
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly at the Citrus Springs
Memorial Library. His pro-
gram is devoted to questions,
answers and tips about keep-
ing plants and gardens
healthy. Dobbs' next pro-
gram, operating under the
auspices of the University of
Florida's Extension Service,


will be at 1 p.m. Wednesday,
at the library, at 1826W.
Country Club Blvd. in Citrus
Springs.


Landscape Florida-friendly way


Special to the Chronicle

Did the past winter and recent
dry weather leave your landscape
brown and dead? Is your yard dying
of thirst on once-a-week watering
restrictions? Citrus County's unique
climate can present gardening chal-
lenges if you are unaware of a few
basic rules. Audrey Durr, Citrus
County UF/IFAS Extension, in an
Introduction to Florida-Friendly
Landscaping will discuss how to


* WHAT: Introduction to Florida-
Iriendly Landscaping.
* WHEN: 1 p.m. Tuesday.

make existing lawns and landscapes
more resistant to drought and how
to select new plants that thrive in
drought and winter.
The Florida Yards and Neighbor-
hoods (FYN) Program of the Citrus
County Extension Service is a pub-


* WHERE: 4-H Room in the
Hernando Historic School.
* CONTACT: 302-1429.

lic education and outreach program
of the University of Florida, funded
jointly by the Board of County Com-
missioners and the Coastal Rivers
and Withlacoochee River Basin
boards of the Southwest Florida
Water Management District. FYN


can help you create a Florida-
friendly yard that saves water, keeps
water clean and provides habitat for
birds, butterflies and other wildlife.
The program will be at 1' p.m.
Tuesday at the Hernando Historic
School in the 4-H Room and is spon-'
sored in part by the Hernando Her-
itage Council of the Citrus County-
Historical Society Inc.
Seating is limited, call 302-1429 to
reserve a space


2009 Leadership Citrus Class receives March KCCB award


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Keep Citrus County Beautiful presented the March Beautification Award to the 2009 Leadership Citrus Class. Participants, from-left, are:
Vickie LaMarche; Dave Pieklik; Paula Wheeler, representing the Crystal River City Council and KCCB; Rachelle Garrett; Rick St. Clair; Marj
Dewey, executive director, KCCB; Joe Turck, treasurer, KCCB; Art Jones, Kings Bay Association and Leadership Citrus; Amy Holaday; Frank
Yetner, vice president, KCCB; Samantha Brown; Susie Metcalfe, secretary, KCCB; Ginger Grice; Jennifer Duca; Raenee Franklin; and Bonnie
Rosenberger.


ESA Sorority


RUTH LEVINS/Special to the Chronicle
Local poet Natalie Warrick was the guest speaker at the Crystal River Alpha Gamma
Chapter of Epsilon Sigma Alpha Sorority meeting at the home of Lee Knerr in Homosassa.
From left are: Janet Baker, educational director; Eleanor Strickland, president; Lee Knerr,
treasurer; and Warrick.


Seminole Club


Betty
Berger,
author of
"Back
Roads" and
. Citrus
County
" . Chronicle
' ; columnist,
was the
. guest
-' 4,. speaker at
v\ �a recent
dinner
meeting of
the Crystal
River
Seminole
Club. She
S is shown
with Jim
Wazel,
president.
RUTH
LEVINS/Special
1 to the chronicle


'Big' Night with sheriff, friends


Special to the Chronicle
Crystal River Beef '0'
Brady's will have an
evening with Sheriff Dawsy
and his team of Celebrity
Waiters on Thursday. Learn
ways to help keep kids on
the right path, plus, get an
inside look at the Sheriff's
new Mobile Command Post,
and the cool FOCUS car
with interactive multi-
media for youngsters.
All kids in attendance
will be "deputized" with
special gold star badges,


and will receive other good-
ies from the sheriff's office.
This is your opportunity to
help Big Brothers Big Sis-
ters help children, share a
fun evening with the Sher-
iff and some of his staff and
enjoy a delicious meal.
Come anytime during the
evening hours of 5 to 10 p.m.
Kids who stop by Beef's
throughout the month will
get a free ticket for a special
drawing for a bicycle that is
given away on the Big
Night! Come out, meet and
greet mentors, children and


staff from Big Brothers Big
Sisters and celebrity guests
who support Big Brothers
Big Sisters. Be ready to give
some extra special tips to
the celebrities for their out-
rageous service. All of the
tips will be donated to sup-
port Big Brothers Big Sis-
ters' one-to-one mentoring
programs.
For more information
about this event or to learn
more about donating to or
volunteering with Big
Brothers Big Sisters pro-
grams, call 464-3968.


Free vessel safety examinations


Special to the Chronicle
Vessel Examiners (VEs)
from the Crystal River
Power Squadron will be
available from 8 to 11 a.m.
Thursday at the boat lock-
up area in Sugarmill Woods
to do safety exams for boats


on trailers. Vessels that
meet all the safety require-
ments receive a U.S. Coast
Guard sticker for display on
the vessel. These stickers
demonstrate the owner's
adherence to safety regula-
tions and are an indication
to law enforcement officers


that your vessel is safe to
operate in area waters.
Due to the recent lost-at-
sea tragedies, float plans
will also be available and
VEs will cover use.
For more information
about vessel exams, call
Doug Jordan at 382-7614.


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Health
Department will conduct a
Child Safety Seat Check-Up.
How safe is your child's
car seat? Believe it or not,
four out of five car seats are
not used correctly or in-
stalled securely. Even the
newest car seat cannot pro-
tect a child if it is not used
correctly.
An inspection of each
child's car seat will be pro-
vided at no cost. Car seats
will be checked for misuse
and corrected if possible.
Car seats will also be
checked for manufacturer
recalls, damage, missing
parts and expiration date.


* WHAT: Child Safety
Seat Check-Up.
* WHEN: 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Friday, May 22.
* WHERE: Historic
Hernando School
, parking lot.
* INFO: Call 726-1731,
ext. 242.
The check-up will be from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, May
22, in the parking area in
front of the Historic Her-
nando School on the corner
of U.S. 41 North and County
Road 486 in Hernando.
Bring the child and car
seat instructions if you have
them.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 563-3280; or e-mail to
community@chronicleonline.com..


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


CCHD to


check child


safety seats








C', rnus Cotii'er' (FL) CHRONICLE ENTERTAINMENT SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 C7
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N' PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.


Was it great minds thinking
alike? I found three quotations on
the same theme.
Samuel Johnson wrote, "But if
he does really think that there is
no distinction between virtue and
vice, why, Sir, when he leaves our
houses, let us count our spoons."
Ralph Waldo Emerson penned,
"T.. La louder he talked of his
honor, the taster we counted our
spdons." And Logan Pearsall
Smith typied."w'heri people come
and talk to yoL of their aspira-
tions, before they leave, you had
better count your spoons."
At the bridge table, count the
tricks, the points, the hands, any-
thing you-can! In this deal, you are
East, defending against four
hearts after the given auction.
West starts the defense with
three rounds of clubs. After ruff-


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East
8 6 4 7 4
7 7543
* A 10 8 7 6
48 2
South
A AK 9 32
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Vulnerable: North-South


South
2
3 V


Opening lead: * A


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Pass
Pass


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Pass
All pass


IAndy urittilni Andy Gnirilh Ar'Jy'Gniththl /0 'Arn vn Gnyrsin~ruuui" :~ in u~v,~
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|The LOCaler |The LOGlor The Loolor The LOCSlor |1 Wani 10 Save |1 Want to Save


ing the third, what would you do
next?4
North's two-no-trump rebid in-
vites game, showing 10-12 points
with something in clubs, fewer
than three spades, and fewer than
four hearts. But when South re-
bids three hearts, he shows 5-5 in
the majors; hence North's raise to
four hearts. (On this deal three no-
trump is tricky to defeat, needing
a low diamond or spade lead, but
it is hard for North not to go with
the eight-card heart fit.)
South is known to have 10 cards
in the majors and three clubs. So
he must be void in diamonds.
Do not even think of trying to
cash your .diamond ace - South
will ruff it. Instead, shift to a
trump. If you do that, declarer
must lose one more trick.
If, though, you switch to a spade
(or a low diamond!), South will
crossruff home.


II Want to Save I11Wani to Save


THAT SCRAMBLED. WORD GAME
by Mike Argirionand Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I NOMUT


CEITED


NEW JUMBLE NINTENDO www.
BLOGIE
I


umble.com/ds


Ans: A


A MOPEL- WITH A
NICE FIGURE C.AN
OET THIS.,
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers Monday)


_O

ci






-
ca


-5. <


ACROSS 39 Web-site
language
Candle lover 41 USN rank
Wool 1 42 Most eager
producer 45 Conditions
PC system 48 Relay race
CFL's - Cup portion
Zero in on - 49 Listen!
Playing card 52 Spring croaker
Thumbnb (2 wds.)
through 55 Be pouty
Whole 57 Cry out
Creole 58 Before
veggie now
Frat letter 59 Patella site
That muchacha 60 Green-skinned
Says comics hero
confidently 61 Pond maker
Vote in 62 Observed


favor
James T. -
Cinnamon
goody


Answer to Previous Puzlzle


YA W LGILLNED Y
ARIAMENYA R -1M
'A N NIDIIN G FIfN ES
VERED TESOTOS

CPA S TIR LE GO
REDS IONS ILE
E ITHER LON ER
COED LEA
BRAWLEBO WK NOT
LIL PEA I ME
AL M RE L IA
HE YUL Y YET=


DOWN


Boss, briefly


Zanier 2 Two-color 5 - Claire
Small porch cookie 6 Solstice sea
Concluded 3 Salad bowl 7 Leave
Warrior woman wood on a trip
The - the 4 Nine-headed 8 Roswell cra
limit! monster 9 Adidas rival
Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


ison

sher
1I


10 Noted
lithographer
11 Warrior
princess
17 Dull routine
19 Inquired about
23 Polite word
24 Baja Ms.
25 Singing
brothers
26 Jerk
27 Swirling water
30 Exude
moisture
31 Diving bird
32 RN
assistants
34 Cubicle filler
35 Batter
37 Forum hello
39 Hissed at
40 Longhaired
cat
43 Goblin
44 Chores
45 Get poison ivy
46 Herr's wife
47 Find a buyer
50 Viking letter
51 "Fish Magic"
artist
53 Lodge
member
54 Topaz or opal
56 Barble's beau


Dear Annie:' This is in re-, worth is based on many qualities, and flirt back My husband is a
sponse to "Had Enough," and the right-hand side of my, good-looking guy, so this happens
who had a colostomy and stomach isn't one of them. a lot
is no longer interested Options (options-os- I can no longer bear it It is al-
in intimacy. tomycom), an online most like he is trying to make a
I had my ostomy sur- company, makes won- connection with these women. I
gery 21 years ago, at derful undergarments. have tried to get him to go to
the age of 21. I have There are online sup- counseling, but he says it's my
since learned that the port groups, too. An os- problem and he can't help "notic-
ostomy is only a 4-by-4 tomy is created to save ing" women. - Maybe It's Time
inch -square with a our lives, and now we To Leave
pouch. My face, eyes, have to decide how to Dear Maybe: Your husband
arms, legs, smile, mind, live them. I choose joy gets a charge out of the attention
etc. are still the same. I and happiness. If she from these women. He may never
have found that taking can find her way down act on it, but you don't sound con-
care of my body helps the same path, that 4- vinced of his fidelity. Ask him
me feel better about it, ANNIE'S by-4 inch square with again to come for counseling, this
and the ostomy doesn't MAILBOX a pouch won't seem so time explaining that you are
have to change any- big anymore. - The ready to walk out If he won't go,
thing except how I use Happy "Bag" Lady go without him.
the restroom. I exercise, scuba Dear Annie: My husband and I
dive, travel and love life. My hus- have been married for 15 years:
band and I have been together for Whenever we go out, he stares at E-mail anniesmailbox@
15 years, and the ostomy affects , attractive women. He's so obvious comcastnet, or write to: Annie's
nothing in our relationship be- that many of these women as- Mailbox, PO. Box 118190,
cause I have learned that my self- sume he is interested in them Chicago, IL 60611.


Today HOROSCOPE


Your Birthday: Unless your objectives
are clarified in the year ahead, you are
likely to waste more time pursuing hol-
low victories. Focus on goals of signifi-
cance that offer substantial rewards.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -Although
you enjoy competitive sports, your ego
might not be able to handle losing too
well. That slow bum will eventually place
you in a foul mood.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Make
every effort not to accidentally reveal
something told to you in confidence, or
that longtime friendship might never be
the same.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - Be wary of
doing business with a person whose rep-
utation is suspect. Make sure that all
agreements are put in writing.


Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Don't be un-
duly influenced by someone with a dis-
reputable history, no matter how
enchanting the person is.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Your mind
is as sharp as a razor, but its workings
could either be that of an inventive pro-
ducer or a clever rationalizer.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Because
you rarely take any kind of game seri-
ously, you might be tempted to bend the
rules just to keep things competitive and
fun.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - It's apt to
be a bad move to make a commitment
that you have no intention of keeping. If
you don't honor it, things will not go well.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - Mis-
takes are likely, so it might be smart not


to try to fix an expensive item yourself.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - There
are no guarantees that you will have a
good time regardless of company and
money spent.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - Unless
you are totally committed to your en-
deavor, regardless of its importance, the
results could be sketchy.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20)-- You are
gifted with accurate hunches and per-
ceptions, but this might not be a good
time to place much importance in-any of
them. Place all your faith in logical, prov-
able assessments.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - If your so-
cial companions are all big spenders,
that fat wallet you're carrying around
could get thinner.


r 1


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C8 SATURDAY. MAY 16. 2009


Peanuts


I'M GOING TO HAVE A DOSISNOOPY'S 'TIOU'RE CRAZ'Y,RERUN.. I WONDER I KNOW 5PIKE..
BROTHER IS COMING FROM THE DESERT, I MOM WILL NEVER LET IF HE'S THE E'P H0WL AT a
AND HE'S 60ING TO BE MY 006!O OU HAVE A DOgk KIND WHO A NIGHT LIGHT..
'B HOWLS AT
i -'/ ""- THE. MOON,,/~2,-1-T


Cathy


' YOU'RE CALLED THE
"SA NDwICH GENERTION"
BECAUSE 40U HAOE TO CARE
FOR 'foUING CHILDREN ON
ONE 5iDE, AND Af N&
PORENT5 ON THE OTHER.


Dilbert


The Born Loser

U ,IA- -I O.E'.E.E k tAET
COLA, BUT TWIS IS A , UL-.
COLW


The Grizzwells


0VE t LOOK AUlKE. MA> kST
50 S.LWR-ROW CM 1O
S- ________ TELL.7


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Doonesbury


-"'ou CANPvo iT, 0'o'e. JusT PR rFTNP ITS
A SCCOoTMRWiTHLOUTA HANPLE."


w�ww.amilous.=
"They 'LICKED the platter'?
Isn't that bad manners?"


Betty


Big Nate


Arlo and Janis


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"Angels & Demons" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Star Trek" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15
p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Ghosts of Girlfriends Past" (PG-13) 1:30
p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"X-Men Origins: Wolverine" (PG-13) 1:15
p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"The Soloist" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Obsessed" (PG-13) 1:25 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Angels & Demons" (PG-13) Noon, 12:30
p.m., 3 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Star Trek" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 12:45 p.m.,


3:15 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10
p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"X-Men Origins: Wolverine" (PG-13) 12:20
p.m., 2:50 p.m., 5:20 p.m., 7:55 p.m., 10:25
p.m.
"Ghosts of Girlfriends Past" (PG-13) 12:35
p.m., 2:55 p.m., 5:15 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 9:55
p.m.
"The Soloist" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 3:35 p.m.,
,7:05 p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Fighting" (PG-13) 7:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Obsessed" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 3:25 p.m., 7:15
p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"17 Again" (PG-13) 12:10 p.m., 2:40 p.m.,
5:05 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area
movie listings and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious
WXCV-FM 95-3 Adult
Contemporary


Local RADIO


WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix .
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious
WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies


WIFL-FM 104.3 Adult Mix 4
WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WFJV-FM 163.3 '50s, '60s, '704
WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standard*


Garfield


Frank & E-,:,.. -


/ , N ...AND THE CADDY
W5,HIS CHANCE
A HA HA LOWS HIS CHE
WAlit% I lA HA FOR A POST- ROUND
*IN EHA i E ROOT EEP.
N H, HA HE00



i NA IjI .0j ,.


CELEBRITY CIPHER'
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: K equals P


"THP SM ITMA BHNTHWP AD PZH ZADABI-


ETH MHBJCWH AN ASB RHD IDO YARHD


AN PZH S.M. IBRHO NABWHM." - S.M.


BHK. GAZD TCDOHB

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "You believe in God, then you don't believe anymore and when
you have a big problem, you pray anyway." - Alain Delon
(c) 2009 by NEA, Inc. 5-16


COMICS ,






SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009 C9


CITRUS COUNT


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MSRP................................................ $15,748
FACTORY REBATE........................ ($1,750)
MILITARY REBATE...........................($500)
CUSTOMER DOWN PAYMENT
OR TRADE EQUITY.......................($3,999)
COLLEGE GRADUATE REBATE........($500)


FROM


A WO JlSl LS?


M SRP.............................................. $19,919
FACTORY REBATE...........................($1,500)
MILITARY REBATE..........................($500)
OWNER LOYALTY REBATE...............($750)
CUSTOMER DOWN PAYMENT
OR TRADE EQUITY......................($3,999)
COLLEGE GRADUATE REBATE.......($500)
FROM


MSRP......................................... $19,319
CUSTOMER REBATE............($3,000)
MOTORCYCLE/ATV/
MARINE OWNER DISCOUNT...($500)
MILITARY REBATE ....................... ($500)
CUSTOMER DOWN PAYMENT
OR TRADE EQUITY...............($3,999)
COLLEGE GRADUATE REBATE.($500)
FROM


1 I


Mode;#-611A2C9


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Torture debate prompts soul-searching


Associated Press

Among evangelical lead-
ers, debate over the use of
harsh interrogation tech-
niques against suspected
terrorists has prompted in-
trospection about faith,
ethics, the Golden Rule, just
wars, Jack Bauer and Jesus.
A number of evangelical
leaders have made opposi-
tion to torture without ex-
ceptions a moral cause over
the past three years, part of
a broadening of the move-
ment's agenda beyond tradi-
tional culture war issues.
Others in the movement, in-
cluding many Christian right
leaders, have largely resis-
ted or stayed silent
Now, President Barack
Obama's release of Bush ad-
ministration memos justify-
ing harsh interrogation
techniques and a new poll
showing white evangelicals
more sympathetic to torture
have leaders taking stock of
whether evangelical opinion
has shifted on the topic. -
"I have said before that
torture is like a bone caught
in our throat - we can't
swallow it and we can't spit
it out," said David'Gushee, a
professor of Christian ethics
at Mercer University in At-
lanta and president of Evan-
gelicals for Human Rights.
"I think.we're still there."
The poll data from a sur-
vey of 742 U.S. adults re-
leased April 29 by the Pew
Forum on Religion and Pub-
lic Life found 62.percent of
white evangelical Protes-
tants said torture:of a sus-
pected terrorist could be


Associated Press
In this photo, taken through a glass wall, reviewed by the U.S. military, shackled Guan-
tanamo detainees sit together May 12 in a common area at Guantanamo's Camp 6 maxi-
mum-security detention facility, at Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, Cuba.


often or sometimes justified
to obtain important informa-
tion.
By contrast, 51 percent of
white non-Hispanic
Catholics, 46 percent of
white mainline Protestants
and 40 percent of the reli-
giously unaffiliated held
that position.
Those who attend reli-
gious services at least once a
week were more likely than
those who rarely or never at-
tend to say torture is some-


times or often justified in
that scenario - 54 percent
to 42 percent.
The findings immediately
prompted questions for
evangelicals: How exactly
did poll participants define
torture, since the survey did
not? Did evangelicals reach
their conclusions because of
their religious beliefs, or
their politics or ideological
leanings? How do you un-
tangle those factors froii
each other?


Pew officials later up-
dated the analysis to em pilia-
size that religion "is only one
of many factors" - and that
political party and ideology
are much better predictors
of opinions on torture than
religion and most other de-
mographic factors. At the
same time, the report noted,
religion itself can play a
strong role in shaping parti-
sanship and ideology.
"My experience is that
people who are comfortable


supporting torture support it senses 'a "deep moral, spiri-
because they think it's going tual and theological prob-
to produce information our lem" in evangelical support
country needs," said the for torture.
Rev. Richard Killmer, a "There is a version of
Presbyterian Church Christianity in America that
(U.SA.) minister and execu- I think is not adequately
tive director of the interfaith committed to the Bible's
National Religious Cam- teachings about the sacred-
paign Against Torture, ness of every human life, in-
which formed in 2006. "I cluding the lives of our
don't think they would shy enemies," Gushee said. "It's
away from use of the word also insufficiently commit-
'torture."' ted to the peacemaking
"During the last eight teachings of Jesus and the
years, people have been example of Jesus as one who
concerned about this ticking did not resort to violence or
time bomb thing and Jack cruelty to accomplish any of
Bauer and '24' and all that," his goals and instead suf-
said Killmer, referring to the fered violence instead of in-*.
TV drama in which the pro- flicting it"
tagonist takes a by-any- Gary Bauer, a former Re-
means-necessary approach publican presidential candi-'
to , extracting information date affiliated with several
from terror suspects. Christian right groups over
Among evangelicals, the years, said the discus-
Gushee has been a leading sion should not come down
anti-torture advocate., He to "Would Jesus torture?"
led the effort to draft, in "There are a lot of things
2006, "An Evangelical Decla- Jesus wouldn't do because
ration Against Torture: Pro- he's the son of God," he said.
tecting Human Rights in an "I can't imagine Jesus being
Age of Terror." The docu- a Marine or a policeman or
ment, which has 250 signa- a bank president, for that
tures, renounced torture matter The more appropri-
arid "'cruel, inhuman, and ate question is, 'What is a
degrad ing treatment of de- follower of Jesus permitted
tainees.". to do?'"
Last fall, a poll commis- Bauer said the answer is
sioned by Faith ih Public "it depends" - but the
Life and Mercer University moral equation 'changes
found that 44 percent of when the suspect is not a
white Southern evangelicals soldier captured on a battle-
rely on life experience and field but a terrorist who may
common sense to form opin- have knowledge of an im-
ions on torture. By contrast, pending attack He said. he
28 percent said they relied does not consider water-
on Christian teachings or be- boarding r- a form of inter-
liefs. rogation that simulates
' Even so, Gushee said he drowning-to be torture.


To place an ad, call 5635966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


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F 8 Fe Or6A n tdi .al
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SWMseklng SWF 40's
early 50's. Am off of,
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$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144


$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for your junk car,
truck or van
(352) 634-5389
CASH PAID all
vehicles.Trades welcome
Used PARTS avail
352-628-9118
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles
J.W. 352-228-9645
FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale, Hshold.
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Call 352-476-8949
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564-80141601-5053
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(2) KIrEfEJS, female.
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5 yr. old Malti-Poo
F ' ie 1I :. ,ui : l i l' u lJ h - .r l .E
no o.' '3 ilhr crildJerl,.
(352).628-4668
100 ft MOL, Anchor
fence, like new, you
remove. Call after 5pm.
(352) 637-0909
Chocolate Lob/
Rottie.MIX,
Need good home
Male
(352) 419-0172 "-
Excell. Home for any.-
unwanted birds, poultry.
U-R unable to pare for'
726-9874
FREE CAT
Mix colored striped,-
sweet w/other animals'
Needs a good home.
(352) 897:4201 ,.
FREE KITTENS '. ''
Cute & Adorable- :
8wks Litter trained,
(352) 503-3392
HAVE SOMETHING TO
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Place your
ad 24 hrsa dayY
Go to:
chronicleonlione.com
1 Select Place an Ad
2 Create an Account
3 Select Cust. type
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i-ree Puppies
To Good Home
(352) 220-9652
Free to Good Home
Male Beagle Mix
- prlrox. 9 mos old
(412) 651-0622
KIITENS/CATS/DOGS
To good home.
352-344-1401
LOVESEAT
,Twin sleeper. You pick
up, 352-563-5640



Blackberries
Organically Grown.
U-pick, starting May
23th. Sat.& Tues.A./3P.
$3.50 per pound.
9333 Hwy 48 Floral City.
MADDOX FARMS
Sat 5/16 -U pick peas,
corn &. beans. , A7K 7 .


BLAUIK WHIIE
CHIHUAHUA MIX
Male- 4 mo., old'
Amanda & Oak Lawn'
Homosassa.
352-220-2036
Boxer Mix
Female, fawn colored.
White feet, long tail. 77
lbs. Black collar w/rabies
tag. Shy w/people.
(352) 476-7469
CAT
Black with white paws,
white whiskers, white
belly, Lost In Citrus Hills
North, Long Valley Rd.
Area (727) 992-4173
ROTTWEILER -
male, young large,
Reward
last Duvall Island
Floral City 352-637-6189



Black Lab Mix
Male, young with red
collar.(352) 465-1662
CAT
Mostly white, long hair
Black stripe
Inverness Acres
(352) 726-1270
LARGE BLACK & WHITE
MALE DOG - w/chain
collar no tags. Very
friendly. Near Key
Training Center.
352-302-5821


*-----s

SBank Probate
Divorces /Evictions I
352-613-3674
. - - -. i Ja
S FACING R
FORECLOSURE?
CALL (352) 302-9140


Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits
Indoor or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed













www.adopta
rescued pet.com
View available pets on
our website or call
(352) 795-9550
Adoption Locations
PET SUPER MARKET
every Saturday 11-2p
Inverness
MERCANTILE BANK
Inverness
May 18th Monday
12-2pm
BIG LOTS
Crystal River
May 22nd Friday
12-2pm

ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT







$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSU ANCE
HEALTH
ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com


CAT
ADOPTIONS








Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for-
' adoption.
We are open
10:00 A till 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions"
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4
All Cats and Kittens are
and Aids. Up to date on
Vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
' Visit us at
www.hofspha.ora.
or stop by our offices at
1149 N ConantAve. Comer
Sof 44 and Conant.
Look for the big white build-
ing with the bright paw
' prints.



NANNY
Will take care of
your children,
Call 352-613-0300'
TUTORING - All subjects
& Spanish. Exp. Certified
teacher. Reading
specialist (619) 307-9277
Citrus Counly
WIDOW/COMPANION
71 to 83 yrs old. Refs
req'd. No drinking/
smoking. Will provide
room & board.
352-447-1242



(2) BURIAL LOTS
Beverly Hills Memorial
Gardens. Asking $3000
for both. 972-471-1041
Memorial Gardens
Beverly Hills, Section
Peace, Lot 89 Space A.
(832) 636-8462, To view
Call, (352) 746-4646



A FREE Report of Your
Home's Value
www.naturecoast

nmissionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
Shelter 794-3825


BECOME A CNA
For Career and
Test Preparation
Call 352-564-8378
CITRUS SURGERY
CENTER, AN
OUTPATIENT
FACILITY

IS SEEKING AN EXP.
OPERATING ROOM
RN CIRCULATOR.
Prefer Ortho & Ent.
Exp. Scheduled Pool
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or Holidays. No Call,
Great Place to Work
&.Top Moneyll
Fax Resume To:
(352) 527-1827
CNA PREP CLASSES
EZ Learning Services
Day & Evening Classes
352-382-EASY; 586-2715
/us out zoomcflrus.com


Your World





Ctni eNiatE

S Classiftads

ew.cronicleonline.cOn


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Lic. Lab Tech &'
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For busy Physician \
Lab. Competitive
Salary 8 Benefits
Fax Resume to:
(352) 746-6333

GYN OFFICE IN
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LOOKING FOR:
Medical Assistant
Receptionist
IPN Nurse
Dietician
Proactive, one year.
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Knowledge in
medical software
Please fax resume tot
352-564-8201

'HOME HEALTH
COMMUNITY LIAISON'
RN Field/Psych nurse%'
exp a plus. -
PHYSICAL
THERAPIST
Possible F/T position w/
exc. benefits.
Advocate Home "
Health Care
Lecanto. -
352-746-2549
Fax resume to
352-746-2952 1
Lic# HHA299991842.


WANTED


783


Experienced auto salespeople
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Applications are accepted at
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any time from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday, or call
352-726-1231.
Ask for a sales manager for the chance to join our
sales team and see the difference.
i?.5�, DRUG FREE WORK PLACE


I _-;- 6 9 . -. � i -- -8S

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Ji6'S1 1:-8,-!9/ ^ : L: �:l,
I I'L 8 T-�Ei 69 "I-

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784218
SuclOKku ****** 4puz.com

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Fill In the squares so that each row, column, and,-
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


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(727) 848-8415
BEWS
International School
of Beauty, Barber &
Massage Therapy
7027 U.S. Hwy. 19
New Port Richey,
FL 34652


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLEL


C10 SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2009


RELIGION


L-1