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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01634
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 9, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01634

Full Text

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stand /A10


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50$ VOLUME 114 ISSUE 275


mmZXXIH


'Glimmers of hope'


Alhambra
Scholars work to
,decipher the Arabic
mystery./Page Cl


Associated Press


WASHINGTON - The pace of
layoffs slowed in April when em-
ployers cut 539,000 jobs, the fewest,
in six months. But the unemploy-
ment rate climbed to 8.9 percent,
the highest since late 1983, as many
businesses remain wary of hiring
given all the economic uncertain-
ties.


The Labor Department tally re-
leased Friday wasn't nearly as deep
as the 620,000 job cuts that econo-
mists were expecting, land was
helped by a burst of federal govern-
ment hiring of temporary workers
to prepare for the 2010 Census. The
rise in the unemployment rate from
8.5 percent in March matched econ-
omists' forecasts.
The new report underscored the


toll the longest recession since
World War II has taken on Amer-
ica's workers and companies. How-
ever, the slowdown in layoffs may
bolster expectations that the worst
of the downturn's hefty job losses is
past
'Although we have a long way to
go before we can put this recession
behind us, the gears of our economic
engine do seem to be slowly turning
once again," President Barack
Obama said Friday, hours after the
employment report was released.


On Wall Street, the employment
news gave stocks a lift The Dow
Jones industrials gained about 125
points in afternoon trading.
"There are glimmers of hope. We
are moving in the right direction in
terms of layoffs. They are measura-
bly less bad than what we've been
through," said Mark Zandi, chief
economist at Moody's Economy
.com.
Still, companies will remain cau-
tious in hiring, making it harder for
See ECONOMY/Page A5


S WALL STREET
SBetter
I . Stocks surge on
S relief about un-
"' * employment,
banks./Page A7

STAFFERS HIRED:
Can do
iThe Citrus County
Canning Center has
three part-trme workers
to operate it./Page A3
SANTA BARBARA:


Battling


bac


Wildfires
Fire rages along coastal
mountain slopes in
California./Page A10
OPINION:
I There
is no benefit
to the county
for individual
commissioners
to be in public
conflict with
the county
manager.- .


EDITORIAL. PAGE A8


Pet report
Keep cool while on the
go with your pets this.
summer./Sunday
COMING UIP:

SA-di


Mary Jefford explains how her massive head Injury occurred In February 2009. Three people were killed In the crash
Jefford sustained a closed-head injury, forcing doctors to remove a large portion of her skull to save her life.


HOW TO HELP'
* On June 13, a benefit for
Mary Jefford will include
raffles, a bake sale, door
prizes, motorcycle ride and a
bike show.
The ride begins at The
Mousetrap, 48 U.S..19 in
Inglis, and ends at Mike's
Friendly Pub on U.S. 19 in
Homosassa.
There will be live music from
4 to 8 p.m. and barbeque
pork plates for $5 at the
Homosassa pub. For more..:,
information, call 628-6896. ''
a An account at SunTrust Bank
has been set up for Mary
Jefford to help pay medical
costs. Donations can be made
in her name at any SunTrust
Bank.


Woman determined to reclaim herforme


CRISTY LOFTIS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
H er body is bro-
ken, but not
her spirit.
As Mary Jef-
ford, 25, recov-
ers from a car
crash that killed three others in
February, the life she knew is now
unrecognizable.
But she has her family's sup-
port. faith in God - and herself.
"I believe I'll be fine," Jefford
said.
MEI
The family moved to the Mini
Farms - about three miles north


of Crystal River - 20 years ago
from Safdty Harbor.
Jefford was home schooled
most of her life.
She took online college courses
with St Leo University and
earned an associates degree in
liberal arts studies. Her lowest
grade ever was an A-.
One day she hopes to earn her
Bachelor's degree.
She is the office manager at Ap-
praisals by Larry Washington and
has been there for three years.
Jefford bought her first house '
last summer. She enjoyed the in-
dependence that comes with mak-
ing it on your own.
A few years ago, she began ball-
room dancing.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
in northwest Citrus County, and


r life after collision

-or years, Jefford.has taken
voice lessons and loves to sing.
She dreamed of, one day, per-
forming on stage as a theatre ac-
tress.
"It's something that I wanted
for years, but I never got up the
guts to do it," Jefford said.
It wasn't until an aunt bought
her season tickets to Playhouse 19
that Jefford began considering au-
ditioning.
The confidence eventually
came. By the end of 2005 Jefford
caught the theater bug and since
has starred and worked on a host
of plays including "Phantom of
the Opera," "The Melody Lingers
On," "Born Yesterday," "Mouse-
See BATTLING/Page A9


Late night
Viewfinder adds sports
.listings, plus a grid for
weekend late-night TV
listings./Sunday


*Annie's Mailbox ... .C8
Comics ......... 09
.-Community .......C7.
Crossword , ....,C8
Editorial ,!... .... A8
Entertainment . ....B6
Horoscope . ....... . 08
Lottery Numbers ., .B4
Lottery Payouts ....B6
Movies ........... .09
.Obituaries , ..... A5
'Stocks ,, : ........ A6
Three Sections
1111111II I I II11111111111111111111111


Swine flu seems to have skipped Citrus


MIKE WRIGHT
mwrlght@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Like a hurricane forecast that never ma-
terialized, the much-heralded swine flu
skirted Citrus County but never invaded it.
Judy Tear, spokeswoman for the Citrus
County Health Department, said four of
seven suspected cases tested at the state
health lab in Tampa came back negative.
While the other three have not come back
yet, Tear said hospitals and schools are re-
porting that life is returning to normal.
'At this point, Citrus County is going to
treat this just like the regular flu season,"
Tear said Friday.
Earlier this week, doctors and the health
department were sending tests to the lab
whenever patients had fever and at least
another flu-like symptom, such as a sore


-:i. Citrus County
is going to treat this
just like the regular
flu season. ...1*.

Judy Tear
. spokeswoman, county health department.
throat or congestion.
Patients were also told to stay home from
work for 14 days: seven days to allow the flu
symptoms to ease and another seven days
to avoid spreading the flu.
Tear said doctors are now only taking test
samples from patients in high-risk cate-
gories: elderly and young children.
See FLU/Page A9


SWINE FLU IN FLORIDA


Probable
County Cases: Verified:
a Alachua 0 1


* Broward
a Clay
*Collier
A Duval
U Hillsborough
* Indian River
" Lake
* Lee
A Marion


2 ..5
6 1
1 0


1 0
2 3
1 0


Probable
County Cases: Verified:
uMiami.Dade 4 2
a Okaloosa 1 0


a Okeechobee
A Orange
* Palm Beach
* Pinellas


1 1


* Sarasota 3 0
ISeminole 0 1


I Total:


18 23


Source: Florida State Emergency Response Team


Job layoff slow to 539,000 in April





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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A2O o 9 2009


LARAASLE
1-1 011M E^


AW f I I










Page A3 - SATURDAY, MAY 9,2009



TATE


LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
COUNTY

Benefit planned today
for injured biker
Jim's Club 19 is hosting a
fundraiser today for Lyle Pot-
ter, who severely injured his
foot during a motorcycle acci-
dent and faces major surgery.
The family does not have in-
surance.
Organizers of the,
fundraiser say a poker run
will begin at 10 a.m. at Stixx
Billiards, 3283 S. Suncoast
Blvd. in Homosassa. Those
who want to ride should show
up between 9 and 10 at Stixx
to register. The poker run
ends around 2 p.m. at Jim's
Club 19, 3383 S. Suncoast
Blvd. in Homosassa.
Those who don't want to
ride in the poker run can join
the festivities beginning at
11 a.m. at Jim's Club 19. Fes-
tivities include a pool tourna-
ment at 2 p.m. and a
horseshoe tournament at
5 p.m. There will be music,
raffles and $2-per-plate bar-
becue.
For information, call Jim's
Club 19 at 628-6698.
NAMI Citrus
meets Monday
The regular May meeting

Citrus will
be Monday
at Good ..
Shepherd '
Lutheran
Church on
County
Road 486 Ken
in Citrus Heimann
Hills, with will discuss
doors drug
opening at interactions.
6:30.
The speaker will be local
pharmacist Ken Heimann,
who will present information
about drug interactions and
other pharmaceutical issues.
All those with an interest in
mental health issues are wel-
come.
Citrus Dems select
conference slate
The Democratic Executive
Committee has qualification
forms available to any regis-
tered Democrat interested in
running for a delegate posi-
tion to represent Citrus
County at the 2009 Florida
Democratic Party State Con-
ference.
The conference will be
Oct. 9 to 11, at the Disney
Yacht & Beach Club Resort,
in Lake Buena Vista.
All candidates must com-
plete qualifying forms and
sign a loyalty oath which
commits those who are se-
lected to active support of
Democratic candidates in the
2010 election cycle. These
completed documents must
be postmarked by May 11,
2009, and returned to the Cit-
rus County Democratic Exec-
utive Committee, POB 74,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
. For copies of the relevant
application forms, contact
'Deb DeVito, CCDEC chair, at
746-0638 or drdevitol@
yahoo.com.
Show to feature
Citrus High track
This week's Sports Spot-
light show on WYKE TV is in
two parts.
The Crystal River baseball
team will be featured in the
first half of the show. The
second half of the show is an
interview with Crystal River
High Athletic Director Tony
Stukes, who will discuss this
year's successes.
Mike Deem, Stan Solovich,
Dennis Jenkins and Rocky
Hensley conduct interviews
each week with coaches and
athletes of Citrus County high
school sports teams. Sports
Spotlight can be seen at
8 p.m. Thursday, 3 p.m. Fri-
day and 3:30 p.m. Saturday
on Bright House cable chan-
nel 16.


Chronicle hours for
Mother's Day
Phone lines for the Citrus
County Chronicle Circulation
Department will be manned
from 7 to 10 a.m. Sunday in
observance of Mother's Day.
-From wire reports


Budget heads to Gov. Crist


House Democrats

unanimous

in opposition

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE - Florida law-
makers passed the state's $66.5 bil-
lion budget Friday, which contains
tuition increases for college stu-
dents, higher fees for motorists and
a more expensive cigarette habit for
smokers.
The increases will fall heavily on
motorists like Claudia Ramirez, 44,
a self-employed event planner and
mother of two from Miami who will
now pay more to renew her driver's
license and for annual registration.
"The government comes out to
urge us to go out and buy houses
and cars to boost the economy, but
then they turn around and raise our
fees," she said while gassing up her
beige Toyota Corolla. "It's like the
government is inviting us out to a


buffet and then sticking us with the
bill."
La'Krystal Lewis, 33, is a married
mother of two and senior with a
double major in communications
and hospitality, recreation and re-
sort management at the University
of West Florida in Pensacola.
She works part-time for the uni-
versity as a student activities clerk
and relies on her mother to help
care for her children to avoid day-
care expenses. Her school expenses
now come to about $5,000 a year,
and she worries about how she'll
pay a tuition increase of at least 8
percent.
"I don't know how I'm going to be
able to do that unless I save up the
money in the summer," Lewis said.
The 8 percent increase applies to
all community and state colleges
and public universities. A separate
bill that has Gov. Charlie Crist's sup-
port will let individual universities
- but not the colleges - increase
tuition by up to 15 percent.
To balance the budget, the Legis-
lature is relying on the tuition in-
creases, motor vehicle, court and


other fee hikes, $5.3 billion in fed-
eral stimulus money, a $1-a-pack
cigarette tax increase and spending
reductions, including a pay cut for
some state workers.
Passage came on the final day of a
one-week extension of the Legisla-
ture's regular 60-day session with
few lobbyists or members of the
public on hand. The overtime re-
sulted when lawmakers were un-
able to resolve their differences
over the budget.
Friday's votes were 32-8 in the
Senate and 75-43 in the House,
where the Democrats voted unani-
mously against the spending plan.
The 2009-10 budget plan now goes
to Crist, who praised lawmakers
and said it "addresses the priorities
of the people of Florida and sus-
tains essential services, even dur-
ing these challenging times."
A fiery floor speech by Sen. Jim
King, R-Jacksonville, apparently
swayed several Senate Democrats
to vote for the budget.
"It's amazing what has been done
with the money we had," King said.
"No one has to go home and apolo-


Wet 'n' Wild!


! MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Forest Ridge Elementary School pre-kindergartener Steven Sams, 5, lands bottom first into a small, water-
filled pool Friday morning. He and his classmates, along with many of the children's parents, took part in an
activity-filled water day at the school. After enjoying all things water, the children had a picnic lunch with fam-
ily members as part of a year-end activity.




Mother's Day highlights weekend


CHERI HARRIS
charris@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
From learning how to
play it safe to helping Mom
celebrate her special day,
this weekend's events
should make a splash with
the whole family.
N Preparing for hurricane
season is never a barrel of
laughs, but it beats sweating
in the dark with a growling
stomach - or worse., The
annual Winds, Rains or
Flames all-hazard expo will
be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
today #t the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office Emergency
Operations Center at 7549
Saunders Way in Lecanto,
across from the Lecanto
Government Center
Highlights include gener-
ator safety demonstrations,


hurricane re-entry tag dis-
tribution, child ID services
including fingerprinting,
and guest speakers includ-
ing- meteorologists from
BayNews9 and the Na-
tional Weather Service. Ad-
mission is free. For in-
formation, call 746-6555.
* See what's been bring-
ing so many visitors to
downtown Crystal River
during Market Day with
Art, a monthly event, from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. today on the
grounds of Heritage Vil-
lage. Browse the shops and
check out a variety of out-
door vendors with items for
sale such as fresh produce,
baked goods and crafts. For
information, call 564-1400.
* The Italian Social Club
will host a Mother's Day
Dinner Dance at 5:30 p.m.
today The event includes
music and entertainment


Florida Park
Service will offer
free admission to
mothers with the
purchase of a
child's ticket
Sunday at
Homosassa
Springs Wildlife
State Park or
Weeki Wachee
Springs.

from DJ Allen O'Neil and
dinner with an entree of
chicken Parmesan. Cost is
$13. To make a reservation,
call John at 726-1328 or


Maria at 560-7916.
* In honor of Mother's
Day, Florida Park Service
will offer free admission to
mothers with the purchase
of a child's ticket Sunday at
Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park or
Weeki Wachee Springs
State Park. Admission to
Homosassa Springs for
children ages 3 to 12 is $5.
Admission to Weeki
Wachee Springs for chil-
dren ages 6 to 10 is $18.05.
For more information, visit
www.floridastateparks.org.
* "The Lucky O'Learys"
continues on stage this
weekend at the Art Center
Theatre, 2644 N. Annapolis
Ave., Hernando. Show
times are 7:30 p.m. today
and 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets
are $18. For information,
call 746-7606 or visit
www.artcenter.cc.


Bill could bring Chassahowitzka funds


Special to the Chronicle


Citrus County got some potentially
good news Friday from the Florida
Legislature.
A bill that ensures some unex-
pended funds appropriated in both
2007 and 2008 for the Chassahow-
itzka Area Water Improvement Proj-
ect are carried forward into the
upcoming year's state budget has
been passed out of conference com-


mittee in the state legislature.
Now the budget goes to the gover-
nor for his signature.
The bill, S.B. 2600, re-appropriates
the funds in question, about $300,000
that had been committed by the
county for the Chassahowitzka proj-
ect, but not yet received from a total
$1.3 million over the two years.
As funding was being cut in many
areas, State Sen. Mike Fasano, R-
New Port Richey, included language


in the budget for the upcoming year
that guaranteed the last part of the
money originally allocated would be
available. Fasano was instrumental
in getting the original appropriations
to help the project.
"I am very pleased that my col-
leagues in Tallahassee continue to
recognize the value of improving the
water system in Chassahowitzka,"
Fasano said in a press release Fri-
day


gize for anything."
Seven of 14 Senate Democrats
voted for the bill while Sen. Ronda
Storms of Valrico was the lone Re-
publican to cast a no vote.
"This is a tread water budget,"
said Sen. Dan Gelber, D-Miami
Beach, who voted against it. "For
decades we've been fueling this
state on growth and nothing else.
We clearly do not fund our system
adequately"
Virtually every fee affecting mo-
torists would go up. That includes a
35 percent increase in annual
motor vehicle registration fees
ranging from about $5 to $11.40. The
initial fee for vehicle registration
will shoot from $100 to $225. The
initial driver's license fee would in-
crease from $27 to $48, while a re-
newal would go from $20 to $48.
The new budget (S.B. 2600) is
about $1.5 billion more than the
state is spending in the current year
after lawmakers cut about $1 billion
at a special session in January. It's
still $5 billion less, though, than the
budget Crist signed into law two
years ago.


Canning


center


has new


workers


Three posts will

bepart-time

Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Can-
ning Center has three part-
time people who have been
hired by the county to oper-
ate the canning facility by
appointment. All three
have experience in canning
and are food safety certi-
fied.
The full-time position for
the center was cut April 17,
along with 39 other posi-
tions in a reduction of man-
power by the county. A total
of 18 people were laid off,
while the other 22 jobs elim-
inated were vacant at the
time.
Believing the center was
closing, some residents who
use the center for canning
and preserving complained
to the county commission at
its April 28 meeting.
The county staff said it
did not intend to shut the
center down but was look-
ing for a more cost efficient
way to man it and fund its
operation. They said the
plan could even include ex-
panding services such as
classes.
The center is now avail-
able for individual or family
canning of personal food on
an appointment basis. It is
not available for commer-
cial preparation or for
preparation of food for sale.
To make an appointment,
local residents can call 527-
5700.
According to the County
Extension Office, which
oversees the center, only
one person has made an ap-
pointment since the change
to the on-call use the last
week of April.
As of May 7, a survey
being conducted online by
the county had received 227
responses. Sixty-four per-
cent of the respondents said
they had not been to the
center in a year.
About 50 percent of those
who said they use the cen-
ter said they get their veg-
etables and fruit for
preserving locally Thirty-
three percent of those re-
spondents said they grow
those fruits and vegetables
themselves.
About 81 percent said
they would be willing to pay
a fee to use the center, and
about 61 percent said they
would not be opposed to a
daily rate.
Three-quarters of the re-
spondents said they would
prefer classes or workshops
at the center during the
week.









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A4 sATURDAYMAY 9 2009


Man stunned while




resisting arrest


SHEMIR WILES
swiles@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Police arrested a 54-year-old man Thurs-
day after he allegedly stole beer and then
resisted arrest, resulting in his being
stunned with a taser.
. According to a Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice arrest report, this is what happened:
The store manager at the Sweetbay Su-
permarket in Crystal River, along with
other employees, were standing outside the
store when a deputy arrived. When the
deputy left his vehicle, he saw a man later
identified .as Mark Allen Decumen yelling
obscenities.
The deputy saw'the manager had a cut
and swollen lower lip and the manager told
the deputy that Decumen was the one who
caused the injury.
Because Decumen kept yelling, the
deputy handcuffed Decumen, arrested him
for battery and attempted to place Decu-
men in the back of his patrol car However,
Decumen kept refusing and the deputy
then withdrew his taser, warning Decumen
that if he didn't enter the car he would stun
him. After several commands, Decumen
continued to resist and yell profanities and
threats at the officer and store employees.


The deputy then placed the taser on the
right side of Decumen's back and stunned
him, allowing the deputy to be able to place
Decumen safely in the patrol car.
According to the manager, Decumen
came into the store where he had tres-
passed in the past, and walked to the aisle
with the alcohol. The manager said Decu-
men then ripped open a cardboard con-
tainer, pulled out two cans of beer and
attempted to hide them. The manager said
he confronted Decumen and grabbed the
beer and Decumen's arm as an attempt to
retrieve the property. Decumen became
Physically aggressive and hit the manager
in the face several times with a closed fist.
Decumen also tried to swing at other store.
employees, but missed. He was eventually
escorted out of the store.
While the deputy transported Decumen
to the Citrus County Detention Facility in
Lecanto, Decumen reportedly made nu-
merous threats to Sheriff Jeff Dawsy, jail
personnel and "whatever judge I go to see."
Decumen was charged with felony bat-
tery, resisting an officer without violence,
resisting law enforcement or a merchant
during or after a theft, disorderly intoxica-
tion, trespassing in a structure or con-
veyance after warning, and petit theft His
bond was set at $4,000.


April 26 to May 2, 2009
* Nature Coast EMS responded to 384
medical emergencies and 255 patients
were transported to a hospital.
* Out of the 384 medical emergency calls,
based on the caller's information, 208 re-
quired an emergency response (with
lights and siren) to the scene.
* Average emergency response time was
6 minutes and 41 seconds.
* 28 of the patients transported required
an emergency response to the hospital
(where seconds/minutes may affect the
patient outcome).


CRITICAL CALLS '
* 4 Codes (Cardiac Arrests).
* 5 Cardiac Alerts.
E 5 Stroke Alerts.
N 2 Trauma Alerts (major or potentially
major trauma injuries).
TYPES OF CALLS
Care level provided for calls:
* 38 BLS (Basic Life Support).
* 214 ALS (Advanced Life Support).
* 3 ALS2 (Critical Advanced Life Support).
* Average calls per day: 54.8.
* Average transports per day. 36.0.


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic battery
arrests
* Phillip A. Luttrell, 32, of
Homosassa, at 1:07 a.m. Sun-
day on a domestic battery
charge. According to an arrest
report, a 26-year-old Homosassa
woman called police and told
them that she and Luttrell were
arguing when Luttrell became
irate and smashed her cell
phone on the garage floor. Then,
she said they went outside
where Luttrell pushed her on the
ground. The woman proceeded
to tell police that she got up and
then broke a windshield wiper
blade off Luttrell's truck. He then
reportedly took the blade from,
her and hit her on her right arm
with it. The deputy noted in the
report that the woman's arm was
swollen, had a cut and appeared
to be broken. Luttrell told the
deputy that he did smash the
phone, but didn't hit.the woman
with the wiper blade. No bond.
* James Ferland Garten, 36,
2909 E. Hooty Point, Inverness,
at 4:10 p.m. Sunday on a felony
domestic battery by strangulation
charge. According to an arrest re-
port, a 35-year-old Invemess
woman and her child said Garten
had come over to the house and
as the day went on became in-
creasingly argumentative. The
woman said she told Garten to
leave, but he refused and began
screaming. At one point, the
woman said Garten grabbed her
throat and started squeezing.
After the woman and her child
started screaming, Garten re-
portedly let go and took off in his
van. Garten later told police that
the woman began yelling at him
and he decided to leave. How-
ever, he denied the fight became
physical. No bond.
* James T. Johnson, 32, of
Inglis, at 9:13 a.m. May 1, on a
domestic battery charge. Accord-
ing to an arrest report, a 32-year-
old woman from St. Michael,
Minn., said Johnson shoved her


out of a doorway and began
grabbing her about her shoulder
area. She also told the deputy
Johnson hit her on the left side of
her face with an Igloo cooler.
Johnson then reportedly went
over to his truck, pulled out a knife
and slashed his tires. No bond.
* Joseph Robert Reynolds,
30, of Dunnellon, at 7:43 p.m.
May 1, on a felony domestic bat-
tery by strangulation. According
to an arrest report, a 27-year-old
Dunnellon woman said she and
Reynolds were arguing when
Reynolds threw her to the
ground, grabbed her by the
throat and started choking her.
After Reynolds let her go, she
said she ran to the car and re-
moved her daughter. Reynolds
and the woman reportedly
started tugging back and forth on
the car seat before Reynolds
was able to remove it from the
woman's hands. Reynolds told
police he was trying to get the
woman- away from the vehicle
and that the woman later
dropped the child on the ground.
When asked about the marks on
the woman's neck, he said those
came from when she fell against
the car door. No bond.
* Michael Allen Cheek, 23,
of Hemando, at 8:19 a.m. May 2,
on a domestic battery charge.
According to an arrest report, a
25-year-old CrystalRiver woman
said Cheek forced his way into
.her home and broke down the
door to her bedroom. The
woman told the deputy that once
in her bedroom, he held her
down on the bed and covered
her mouth with his hand as she
screamed for him to get off her.
The woman said when Cheek
broke down the door, it hit her in
the back of the head where she
sustained a hematoma. The
deputy found a butcher knife just
outside the bedroom on the floor,
which the woman said had been
in her kitchen utility drawer be-
fore Cheek entered her home.
She also said she bit his hand in
an attempt to get him to leave.
Cheek was later arrested at the


Citrus County Detention Facility
where he had been booked on
an unrelated charge. No bond.
Other arrests
* Aaron A. Panos, 30, 8382
Sunflower Drive, Spring Hill, at
11:45 p.m. Thursday on a Citrus
County warrant for a felony
charge of robbery where of-
fender carried a weapon. Panos
was off-bonded in Hemando
County and was transported to
Citrus County to face the armed
robbery charge. Bond $30,000.
* Raymundo Garza, 48, of
Bay Town, Texas, at 4:15 p.m.
May 2, on an active Palm Beach
County warrant for a violation of
probation on an original charge
of domestic battery. Bond $500.
* Jose Angel Neria, 23, 44
Arlington St., Lowell, Mass., at
11:19 p.m. May 2, on an active
Citrus County warrant for an
original charge of violation of an
injunction for protection against
domestic violence. According to
an arrest report, Neria said he
wanted to pick up a child he has
in common with a 21-year-old
Lecanto woman. No bond.
* Denise Arlene Andl, 43, of
an unknown address, at 11:42
a.m. Thursday on a felony
charge of fraud/illegal use of a
credit card. Bond $2,000.
* Christopher Aaron Black-
well, 19, 1317 S.E. Paradise
Point Road, Crystal River, at
12:27. p.m. Thursday on a mis-
demeanor charge of petit/retail
theft. Bond $250.
* 0 Edwin Allen Hampton, 20,
2825 E. FT King St., Ocala, at
4:16 p.m. Thursday on an active
Marion County warrant for a vio-
lation of probation on an original
felony charge of CTI burglary of
a dwelling. Bond $3,000.
* Robert Quinton Williams,
27, 1314 Cypress Cove Court,
Inverness, at 6:45 p.m. Thurs-
day on an active Citrus County
warrant for a violation of proba-
tion on an original felony charge
of resisting law enforcement with
violence. No bond.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


93 65 0.00 91 66 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 92 Low: 62


SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 92 Low: 62
Sunny to partly cloudy

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 62
Partly cloudy; 10% chance of a shower

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Friday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year
'As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11


90/64
94/46
87/63
77
+2

0.00 in.
0.00 in.
4.78 in.
13:95 in.


0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.02 in.


DATE DAY


SATUI
SUND


5/9
5/10





MAY


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. ' 64
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 45%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees and grasses were moderate
and weeds were absent.
**Light - only extreme allergic will show symp-'
, " u iT , m o d e ra te , IT , . il ,if 1: 1l u 'p e n in ,:
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
RDAY 5:59 - ' 6:24 12:11
AY 6:51 12:38 7:17 1:04


................. 8:11 P.M .
....................6:42 A.M
.................... 9:03 P.M
....................6:40 A.M .


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. A burn ban Is In effect.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
,.addresses ending In 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending In 2 or 3,
; or Fthrough J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.
r " - TIDES


*From mouths
City
Chassahowitzka'
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee'
Homosassa **


of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
High/Low High/Low
7:06 a/2:27 a 6:03 p/2:11 p
5:27 a/11:33 a 4:24 p/--
3:14 a/9:21 a 2:11 p/10:12 p
6:16 a/1:26 a 5:13 p/1:10 p


High/
7:43 a/3
6:04 a/1
3:51 a/9
6:53 a/2


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
Low High/Low
3:02 a 6:35 p/2:43 p
12:24 a 4:56 p/12:05 p
9:53 a 2:43 p/10:47 p
2:01 a 5:45 p/1:42 p


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


L F'cast
68 s
76 s
70 s
66 s
72 s.
68 s
71 s
70 s
69 s


City
Miami
Ocala-
,Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
S' . i'''


MARINE OUTLOOK
West winds from 5 to 15 knots. Seas Gulf water
1 to 3 feet. Bay and inland waters will tem perature
have a light chop. Skies will be mostly"
sunny today. 8 4 0

Taken at Arlpeka

LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
.Withlacoochee at Holder 27.98 27.94 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness ; 34.52 34.49 40.60,
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 36.41 36.37 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Rood stage for lakes arebased on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, 'SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Friday Saturday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L
74 47 .01 ts 78 51
90 61 s 82 56
75 51 .36 ts 80 55
82 68 ts 87 62
77 53 ts 81 53
94 73 pc 91 67
78 54 ts 83 57
55 40 .03 ts 62 41
85 70 pc 84 65
58 33 s 67 42
76 56 ts 76 54
68 52 ts 72 44
73 50 ts 75 50
90 68 s 94 72
77 53 .02 ts 78 51
77 59 .07 ts 90 62
75 53 sh 63 43
76 57 .44 ts 72 46
70 58 .01 ts 70 43
85 67 pc 94 67
72 56 .01 ts 72 44
74 44 ts 78 50
87 72 ts 75 58
67 40 c 57 39
75 56 .14 pc 66 46
73 52 .05 ts 67 43
98 67 s 94 64
73 63 .57 pc 70 49
76 50 ts 80 54
75 52 .01 ts 78 53
89 77 pc 89 74
70 58 .53 c 66 46
85 70 pc 88 67
92 69 s 97 73
85 73 ts 73 57
73 59 s 72 60
73 63 1.52 pc 72 51
83 74 ts 72 56
73 53 sh 60 42
63 48 pc 58 41
85 70 pc 89 69
87 65 pc 91 66
81 63 .78 ts 70 55


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY

Friday Saturday
City \ H LPcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 87 72 pc 88 72
New York City 74 56 ts 81 56
Norfolk 81 62 ts 91 65
Oklahoma City 85 73 sh 69 50
Omaha 78 60 pc 68 46
Palm Springs 10472 s 103 70
Philadelphia 78 55 ts 84 52
Phoenix 10373 s 102 76
Pittsburgh 70 55 ts 75 46
Portland, ME 68 48 .09 ts 68 48
Portland, Ore 62 43 .01 s 69 44
Providence, R.I. 72 51 ts 74 52
Raleigh 82 62 ts 91 62
Rapid City 54 40 .01' pc 64 39
Reno 69 41 s 77 45
Rochester, NY 74 51 ts 74 46
Sacramento 86 51 s 86 58
St. Louis 73 63 .67 pc 68 49
St. Ste. Marie 59 45 r 47 33
Salt Lake City 57 39 pc 65 43
San Antonio 10074 pc 94 71
San Diego 64 58 s 71 61
San Francisco 69 51 s 70 52
Savannah 90 66 s 93 68
Seattle 56 43 pc 65 45
Spokane 58 37 pc 62 41
Syracuse 75 52 .46 ts 76 47
Topeka 81 62 .21 pc 69 47
Washington 76 55 ts 86 57
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 109 Laredo, Texas LOW 11 Yellowstone
Lake, Wyo.
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 89f76/pc Madrid
Amsterdam 59/47/pc Mexico City
Athens 76/58/s Montreal
Belling 73/57/r Moscow
Berlin 63/44/s Paris
Bermuda 77/66/pc Rio
Cairo 78/55/s Rome
Calgary 60/34/sh Sydney
Havana 89/77/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 86/75/pc Toronto
Jerusalem 74/55/pc Warsaw


78/56/pc
55/39/c
82/57/ts
82/53/sh
62/43/sh
62/40/sh
63/46/sh
82/69/sh
78/59/pc
69/47/sh
81/62/s
63/44/sh
62/42/pc


crest


S C I R U S.. ' ,C O U N T IV



CHRONICLE
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34450


NATURE COAST EMS RECORD OF CALL


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
C SUNSET TONIGHT ........
SUNRISE TOMORROW.
MOONRISE TODAY.......
MAY 17 MAY 24 MAY80 MOONSET TODAY........


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy; dr-drizzle;
f.fair; h=hazy; pc-partly cloudy; r=raln;
rs=raln/snow mix; s-sunny; sh-showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=wlndy.
. 02009 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


aV alKL&, AA , ZU








Cimus COuNn' (FL) CHRONICLE SAIURDAY, M.~ 9, 2009 A5


Obituaries


Charles
Halleen, 83
CRYSTAL RIVER
Charles A. Halleen, age
83, of Westlake, OH, and
Crystal River, FL, died on
Tuesday, May 5, 2009, at the
Cleveland Clinic in Cleve-
land. OH.
He was
born June
22, 1925, in
Ashtabula,
OH, and
was a WW II
U.S. Navy
veteran. He
was the
owner of Charles
Halleen Halleen
Chevrolet-
Kia in North Olmsted, OH.
He belonged to the Cham-
ber of Commerce in North
Olmsted. He enjoyed golf
and boating and was a mem-
ber of the Southern Woods
Country Club in Homosassa,
FL.
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 62 years, Ruth
Halleen of Crystal River; a
son, Robert Halleen of Ho-
mosassa, FL; a daughter,
Janet Wolf of Columbia Sta-
tion, OH; grandchildren,
Chad Halleen and Aimee
Van Alstyne; great-grand-
children, Rachel and Emma
Jo Halleen and Riley Van
Alstyne.
Visitation will be Tuesday,
May 12,2009, from 1-3:00 PM
at the Strickland Funeral
Home Chapel in Crystal
River, FL. Graveside fu-
neral services with military
honors will be on Wednes-
day, May 13,2009, at 2:00 PM
at the Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell, FL.
In lieu of flowers a memo-
rial contribution may be
made to the Boys and Girls
Club of Citrus County, 3814
S. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto,
FL, or the American Dia-
betes Association Tampa Of-
fice, 4902 Eisenhower Blvd.
Suite 295, Tampa, FL 33634..
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline. com.


' William
Karaffa, 72
HOMOSASSA
William Karaffa, age 72 of
Homosassa, FL died on
Wednesday May 6, 2009, at
his home.
Private cremation
arrangements under the
care of the Strickland Fu-
neral Home with Crematory
Crystal River, FL.

Stevan
Logan, 76
HERNANDO
Stevan H. Logan, passed
from this life May 2, 2009.
He was born on October 26,
1932, in Alexandria, VA, to
Harold 0. and Marguerite
Cranford Logan. He leaves
many friends from his more
than 50-year
participa- ,
tion as a
member of , "
the Potomac *'
Speleologi-
pal Club, Ar- '
lington, VA,
and'the Na-
S i o n a I Stevan
Speleologi- Logan
cal Society
(NSS), Huntsville, AL.
i Steve leaves many caring
friends including Bill and
Lois who helped him learn
hiow to achieve recovery
apnd then to maintain that
joyous and free way of life.
Steve suffered many
years from COPD. He was
diagnosed with lung cancer
Year and a half ago. Be-
tween radiation treatment
and successful chemother-
apy, he lived out his life with
amazingly limited problems
from these diseases. He
loved the quiet and peace
he found in the woods"
around home. He passed
peacefully in his sleep.
! Steve was predeceased by
his parents. and daughter,
Nichola Cranford Bowen.
SHe is survived by his loving
Sife of 40 ydars, Caroline
Logan; his loving son,
Steven Luke and his wife
Patti Fredericks; his dear
granddaughter Sierra Luke,
all of Thurmont, MD; two
loving brothers, Gary and
his wife Janice Logan of
- Mountain Home, ID, and
SEric Logan of Alexandria,
VA; his brother-in-law Ed-
Ward Walters of San Mateo,
FL, with whom he was as
close as his natural broth-
ers; his granddaughter, Sab-
rina Bowen of Huntsville,


OBITUARIES
* The Citrus County Chronicle's policy permits both free
and paid obituaries.
* Obituaries must be submitted by the funeral home or
-society-in charge-of arrangements.
* Free obituaries can include: Full name of deceased;
age; hometown/state; date of death; place of death;
date, time and place of visitation and funeral services.
* A flag will be included for free for those who served in
the U.S. military. (Please note this service when sub-
mitting a free obituary.) Additionally, all obituaries will
be posted online at www chronicleonline.com.
* Paid obituaries are printed as submitted by funeral
homes or societies.
* Paid obituaries may include the information permitted
in the free obituaries, as well as date of birth: parents'
names; pre deceased and surviving family members;
year married and spouse's name (date of death, if
pre-deceased by spouse); religious affiliation: biogra
phical information, including education, employment,
military service, organizations and hobbies; officiating
clergy; interment/inurnment; and memorial contribu-
tions.
* Area funeral homes with established accounts with the
Chronicle are charged $8.75 per column inch. NJon-
local funeral homes and those without accounts are
required to pay in advance by credit card, and the cost
is $10 per column inch. Small photos of the de
ceased's face can be included for an additional
charge.
* Additional days of publication or reprints due to er
rors in submitted material are charged at the same
rates.
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next
day's edition.
* E-mail obits@chronicleonline.com or fax 563.3280.
* Phone 563-5660 for details.


Cory
Sibertson, 25
TRENTON
Cory M. Sibertson, age 25,
of Trenton, died suddenly
on Tuesday morning, May 5,
2009, as a result of a motor-
cycle accident.
Cory was born in Jack-
sonville, Florida, on Decem-
ber 31, 1983, grew up in
Inverness, and moved to
Ocala in 1999. He was em-
ployed by the Walmart Dis-
tribution Center as a
shipping clerk Cory en-
joyed working on motorcy-
cles and riding his
Harley-Davidson.
He is survived by his lov-
ing mother, Sherry L. Edson
of Trenton; his stepfather,
Robert "Gator" Edson of
Floral City; his sister,
Amelia Davis of Cut Off, LA;
maternal grandfather, Mar-
shall Sibertson of Ten-
nessee; maternal grand-
mother, Nova Gross of Win-
ter Haven, FL; his aunt, An-
drea Sibertson of Winter


Haven, FL; and his uncle,
Jack Edson of Tennessee.
The family will receive
friends on Saturday, May 9,
2009, from 2:00 to 4:00 PM. at
the Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home of Inverness, where
family & friends will cele-
brate Cory's life and share
memories at 3:00 PM. Cre-
mation arrangements will
follow under the care of the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory, In-
verness.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

Robert
Willsey, 76
BLOOMFIELD, N.Y.
Robert Willsey, 76, Blooln-
field, NY, a winter resident
of Hernando, died May 8,
2009, at his home.
Friends may call at the
Fuller Funeral Home, 190
Buffalo St., Canandaigua,
NY, Monday from 4 p.m. to 8
p.m. Services will be held at
9 a.m. Tuesday at the East
Bloomfield United Meth-
odist Church, Park Place,
Bloomfield, with burial in
the East Bloomfield Ceme-
tery. In lieu of flowers con-
tributions may be made to a
local hospice. Fuller Funeral
Home, Canandaigua, NY.

Donna
Young, 57
BEVERLY HILLS
Donna E. Young, 57, of
Beverly Hills, FL, died on
May 5, 2009, at her home.
Donna was born on De-
cember 4,1951, in Elizabeth,
NJ, the daughter of Donald
and Helen Young. She re-
ceived ,her Doctorate de-
gree from the California
College of Podiatric Medi-
cine. She was in. private
practice until retiring in
1996. She moved to Beverly
Hills in 2007 from Indian
Harbour Beach, FL. She
loved swimming and water
sports.
Survivors include her
parents, Donald and Helen
Young of Beverly Hills, FL;
her life partner, Linda S.
Park of Beverly Hills, FL;
her brother, Thomas J.
Young of Melvin Village,
NH; and several nieces and
nephews.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness, FL.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.


AL; his grandson, Michael
Bowen of Northern Vir-
ginia; and several great-
grandchildren.
It was Steve's wish to be
cremated without a formal
funeral. A Celebration of
Life will be held September
3, 2009, at the caver's 60th
Old Timers Reunion at Dai-
ley, WV Donations may be
made to the NSS, 2813 Cave
Ave., Huntsville, AL 35810-
4431, which is working hard
to. preserve the cave re-
sources underlying out
country, or to the American
Cancer Society. Heinz Fu-
neral Home and Cremation,
Inverness, FL.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline.com.

Mary Mason, 80
INVERNESS
Mrs. Mary T. Dabbraccio
Mason, age 80, of Inverness,
Florida, died Friday, April
24, 2009, in Inverness. She
was born January 26, 1929,
in New York City, NY,
daughter of the late Phillip
and Calogerai (Butera)
Taibi. She worked as a
homemaker and moved to
Inverness, Florida from Key,
Largo in 2001. Her hobbies
included sewing, baking
and crocheting. She was an
avid N.Y. Yankees fan and
loved her family Mrs.
Mason was a member of
East Citrus Community
Center where she enjoyed
baking and socializing and
was a volunteer at Citrus
Memorial Hospital.
Survivors include 2
daughters: Sally Ann Garcia
of Inverness, and Carolyn
Dabbraccio of Astoria, NY;
son, Salvatore M. (Lisa) Dab-
braccio of Ronkonkoma,
NY; sister, Josephine Taibi
of Astoria, NY; grandson,
Salvatore N. (Karen) Dab-
braccio of Long Island, NY;
2 granddaughters: Amanda
Garcia of Orlando and
Daniella Garcia of Inver-
ness, FL; great-granddaugh-
ter, Sophia Lyn Dabbraccio;
and former son-in-law, Ri-
cardo Garcia of Inverness,
FL.
Services for Mrs. Mason
will be held on a later date.
Online condolences may be
sent to the family at
w w w. Hooper Funera 1-
Home.com. Arrangements
and cremation are by the In-
verness Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes & Crema-
tory.


ON THE NET
N www.chronicleonline.com


&. �. 2avi
Funeral Home
With Crematory
JACK SCHRAMM
Service: Saturday 2pm
St. Margaret's Episcopal
OLIVENE McCLURE
Service: Sun. 2pm - Chapel
VIRGINIA CANDRILLI
Mass: Sat. 10am
Our Lady of Fatima
CORY SIBERTSON
Service: 3pmr - Chapel
PATRICIA DRISCOLL
Private Cremation Arrangements
CLIFFORD SPRING
Arrangements Pending
726-8323 .


ECONOMY
Continued from Page Al

laid-off workers to find new
jobs.
If laid-off workers who
have given up looking for
new jobs or have settled for
part-time work are in-
cluded, the unemployment
rate would have been 15.8
percent in April, the highest
on records dating back to
1994. The total number of.
unemployed now stands at
13.7 million, up from 13.2
million in March.
Companies also kept a
tight rein on workers' hours.
The average work week in
April stayed at 33.2 hours,
matching the record low set
in March.
Since the recession began
in December 2007, the econ-
omy has lost a net total of 5.7
million jobs.
As the recession eats into
sales and profits, companies
have turned to layoffs and'
other cost-cutting measures
to survive the storm, includ-
ing holding down workers'
hours, and freezing or cut-
ting-pay
Job losses in February
and March turned out to be
deeper, according to revised
figures: Employers cut
681,000 positions in Febru-
ary, 30,000 more than previ-
ously reported. They cut
699,000 jobs in March, more
than the 663,000 first re-
ported.
The deepest job cuts of
the recession - 741,000
came in January. That was
the most since the fall of
1949.
Employers last month cut
the texi est jobs since 380,000(
in October Nonetheless, the
April job losses were wide-
spread.


Construction companies
axed 110,000 jobs, down
from 135,000 in March. Fac-
tories got rid of 149,000 jobs,
down from 167,000 the
month before. Retailers cut
payrolls by nearly 47,000,
less than the nearly 64,000
cut in March. And job losses
in financial activities
dropped by 40,000, down
from 43,000 in the previous
month.
The slower pace of job
losses - along with 66,000
more federal jobs - helped
to temper the overall pay-
roll reductions in April. The
pickup in federal employ-
ment was mainly due to the
hiring of 63,000 temporary
Census workers.
Looking ahead, econo-
mists expect monthly job
losses for most- if not all -
of this year. However, they
hope the reductions won't
be as deep.
Labor Secretary Hilda
Solis wouldn't speculate on
the future pace of layoffs,
but warned that some of the
jobs lost "may not come
back" She urged jobseekers
to get the training and edu-
cation needed to be con-
tenders for work in growing
industries, such as health
care, which added nearly
17,000 jobs in April.
Obama asked states and
colleges to help jobless peo-
ple pursue education and
training without losing their
unemployment benefits,
which typically happens
when they enroll in school.
States generally require
people who collect unem-
ployment to be actively
looking for work, which can
make it difficult to sign up
for school or ijob training
Under Obama's plan, going
to school will satisfy the re-
quirement that they are
seeking new employment


average sale price will be $1000- quoted saying, "No prices will need
$3000 less than our normal low pric- to be negotiated and I can help you
es. The savings will be incredible! arrange financing if needed."
Love Chevrolet will have all these All used vehicles for sale at Love


used vehicles on display in the sales
area of Love Chevrolet by 9:00 am
Saturday, to give people time to look
at all of the vehicles before prices are
put on at 10:00 am. All the vehicles
will be unlocked. at 9:00 am and
whoever is sitting behind the wheel
at 10:00 am when the prices are put
on the windshield will be given first
opportunity to purchase the vehicle
at sale price.

Chad said, 'This innovative approach
to selling used vehicles should make
it easy and quick for anybody in
the market for a used vehicle to get
a great vehicle at a very low price
and with no hassle. Pick it out, drive
it if you like. You already know the
price. What could be easier" Bren-
den Prue, Business Manager, was


Chevrolet have
Seen inspected
Si and most carry the
:t : balance of their
warranty. Most ve-
hicles also qualify
for extended ser-
vice contracts.

S "Word of mouth
is the best form of
advertising, and
if you sell people
good cars like we
have for as long as we have, you get
a lot of loyal repeat customers," said
Steve Miller, expressing Love Chev-
rolets philosophy.

The cars and trucks will be located
in the sales area of Love Chevrolet.
Trade-ins will be accepted. Call for
special arrangements,
352-341-0018.


On HIGHWAY 44

WEST INVERNESS

352-341-0018

LOVECHEVYSALES.COM


Associated Press
Employment books are on display at the career center at
Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., Thursday, May 7,
2009. The pace of layoffs slowed in April, with employers
cutting 539,000 jobs, the fewest in six months.


ADVERTORIAL



Large New Car Dealer is Overstocked


with Used Cars and is Forced to Sell


Cars & Trucks as Low as $50 this


Saturday During A One-Day Sales Event.


SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009 A5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVERNESS, FL -
Love Chevrolet of Inverness,
one of the area's largest used car
dealers, has just announced plans
to repeat the larg-
est one-day sales
event in-their his-
tory. This event
will take place
Saturday, May 9th,
According to Chad
Halleen, Owner,. -
record sales in Feb- -- 4
mary and March
have resulted in
an extraordinary
number of used
vehicle trade-ins.
"We are repeating the successful
Sale from March to save a bunch of
people a bunch of money.-We have
program cars, trucks, SUVs - you
name it, we have it. We are going to
have to move a lot of used vehicles-
and fast... .or else they will go to the
(wholesale) auction,"

Rather than lose money wholesaling
these vehicles, plus carrying cost,
Love Chevrolet decided to slash
prices on their entire used vehicles
inventory in an attempt to sell at least
50 vehicles in one day.

"I've been given orders to sell some
cars for just $50 -just to move 'em,"
said Steve Miller, General Sales
Manager. Steve went on to say "The











A IVLA Y, LTRO


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MOPE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name ..Vol(0 L Last. Chg Name Vol( Last Chg Name Vol(00 Last Chg
Citigrp 7203815 4.02 +.21 PSCrudeDLn306750 3.50 +.21 FifthThird 1899511 8.49 +3.14
BkofAm 6372551 14.17 +.66 Hemisphrx 103506 1.38 +.54 PwShsQQ01744348 34.23 +.02
WellsFargo4087130 28.18 +3.42 . GoldStr g 29341 1.67 +.08 DItaPtr 982634 1.51 -.76
DirxFinBear4023359 4.49 -1.18 BootsCts 25628 1.30 -.12 DryShips 887176 8.00 -2.04
SPDR Fnd 2805675 13.02 +.90 EldorGldg 24896 8.49 -.13 HuntBnk 882509 5.20 +1.31

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg%Chq Name Last Chg %Chg_ Name Last Chg %Chg
AmAxle h 4.00 +2.49 +164.9 Geokinetics 7.95 +3.03 +61.6 DCAPGp h 2.20 +.95 +76.0,
Wabash 2.23 +.72 +47.7 Aerocntry 8.01 +2.53 +46.2 QuestEngy 2.88 +1.13 +64.6
CitigppfF 22.40 +7.15 +46.9 LazKap 2.25 +.62 +38.0 FifthThird 8.49 +3.14 +58.8
LINTV 2.90 +.86 +42.2 CagleA 4.10 +.94 +29.7 MedQuists 4.01 +1.46 +57.3
MirantwtB 2.54 +.72 +39.7 Graham s 14.50 +2.88 +24.8 PVF Cap 2.60 +.75 +40.5

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
ArborRT 2.40 -.70 -22.6 IncOpR 5.41 -1.17 -178 Crocs 2.52 -.96 -27.5
DirxFinBear 4.49. -1.18 -20.8 SagaCm rs 6.74 -1.37 -16.9 CarofTrBk 5.88 -2.02 -25.5
IntlRectif 13.61 -2.66 -16.3 NTSRIty 3.26 -.44 -11.9 GeneticTh 2.25 -.71 -24.0
Rdxlnv2xFs 9.27 -1.78 -16.1 InvCapHid 3.38 -.37 -9.9 Kreisler 3.20 -.92 -22.2
Heckmnun 5.05 -.95 '-15.8 PSCrudeDSnl26.31-13.82 -9.9 CrescntBk 2.33 -.66 -22.1


DIARY


DIARY


2,675 Advanced
438 Declined
56 Unchanged
3,169 Total issues
7 New Highs
8 New Lows
7,873,260,677 Volume


DIARY


398 Advanced
166 Declined
59 Unchanged
623 Total issues
4 New Highs
0 New Lows
164,127,181 Volume


2,105
690
119
2,914
28
6
3,084,251,793


Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. :
Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...
Stock Footnotes: cld - Issue has been called for redemption by company. d - New 52-week
low. dd - Loss in last 12 mos. ec - Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Emerging Company Marketplace. h - temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
ing qualification, n - Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
ures date only from the beginning of trading, pi - Preferred stock issue. pr - Preferences. pp -
Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt - Right to buy security at a specified price., s -
Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi -Trades will be settled when the
stock is issued, wd - When distributed. wt - Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock, u - New
52-week high. un - Unit, including more than one security. vi - Company in bankruptcy or re-
ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Name
AK Steel
AT&T Inc
AlliedCap
BkofAm
CapCtyBk
Citigrp
Disney
EKodak
Embarq
ExxonMbl
FPL Grp
FairPoint
FordM
GenElec
GnMotr
HomeDp
Intel


I ~~INES


52-Week
High Low Name
13,136.69 6,469.95Dow Jones Industrials
5,536.57 2,134.21Dow Jones Transportation
530.57 288.66Dow Jones Utilities
9,687.24 4,181.75NYSE Composite
2,433.31 1,130.47Amex Index
2,551.47 1,265.52Nasdaq Composite
1,440.24 666.79S&P 500
14,564.81 6,772.29Wilshire 5000
764.38 342.59Russell 2000


Net % YTD% 52-wk
Last Chg Chg Chg % Chg
8,574.65 +164.80 +1.96 -2.30 -32.73
3,351.17 +42.89 +1.30 -5,26-35.48
350.46 +5.02 +1.45 -5.48-31.12
6,000.39 +200.30 +3.45 +4.23-35.67
1,522.75 +54.61 +3.72 +8.96 -35.13
1,739.00- +22.76 +1.33+10.27-28.89
929.23 +21.84 +2.41 +2.88 -33.07
9,509.56 +239.78 +2.59 +4.65-32.27
511.82 +18.88 +3.83 +2.48-28.92


YTD
DIv YId PE Last Chg %Chg
.20 1.4 ... 13.85 +.25 +48.6
1.64 6.5 12 25.25 -.20 -11.4
... ... ... 3.45 +.45 +28.3
.04 .3 19 14.17 +.66 +.6
.76 5.3 28 14.31 +.77 -47.5
.04 1.0 ... 4.02 +.21 -40.1
.35 1.4 13 25.46 +.13 +12.2
... 14 3.12 +.10 -52.6
2.75 6.6 8 41.51 +.90 +15.4
1.68 2.4 9 70.80 +1.87-11.3
1.89 3.3 13 57.16 +.82 +13.6
... ... ... 1.82 +.16 -44.5
6.24 +.18+172.5
.40 2.8 9 14.53 +.57-10.3
... ... 1.61 +.01 -49.7
.90 3.5 19 25.50 -.11 +10.8
.56 3.7 20 15.29 -.48 +4.3


YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
IBM 2.20 2.2 11.101.49 -1.10 +20.6
Lowes .34 1.7 13 19.80 -.57 -8.0
McDnlds 2.00 3.6 14 54.92 +1.53-11.7
Microsoft .52 2.7 11 19.42 +.10 -.1
Motorola ... ... ... 6.50 +.28 +46.7
Penney .80 2.6 12 30.51 +.44 +54.9
ProgrssEn 2.48 7.0 12 35.44 -.14-11.1
RegionsFn .04 .6 ... 6.53 +1.30 -18.0
SearsHIdgs ... ... ... 57.16 -.82 +47.1
Smucker 1.40 3.4 13, 40.70 +.47 -6.1
SprintNex ... ... ... 5.24 +.02+186.3
TimeWrnrs .75 3.0 ... 25.20 +.46+13.0
UniFirst .15 .4 11 37.28 +.60 +25.6
VerizonCm 1.84 6.2 13 29.85 -.01 -11.9'
WalMart 1.09 2.2 15 50.14 +.25-10.6
Walgrn .45 1.4 15 31.39 +.87+27.2


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


NEW YORK..Sf*T 6CK XHNGE


Name Last Chg Autoliv 24.86
AvalonBay 58.39
AvisBudg 3.82
Avon 23.39
ABBLtd 16.52 +.49 AXISCap 25.26
ACE Ltd 43.52 -.21 BB&TCp 26.33
AESCorp 9.62 +1.48 BHPBilILt 54.45
AFLAC 37.66 +4.58 BJSvcs 16.62
AGL Res 30.62 -.50 BMCSft 33.70
AK Steel 13.85 +.25 BPPLC 48.34
AMBPr 19.57 +1.86 BRT 5.66
AMR 5.55 -.05 BakrHu 39.20
ASA Ltd 57.50 +1.36 BallCp 38.81
AT&T Inc 25.25 -20 BcoBrades 13.93
AUOptron 11.36 +.50 8kofAm 14.17
AXA 18.65 +1.98 BkNYMel 32.15
AbtLab 44.93 +.31 Barclay 17.76
AberFitc 26.53 -.05 BarrickG 34.04
Accenture 29.40 -.66 Baxter 50,26
AdamsEx 8.57 +23 BaylexEg 16.20
AMD 3.93 -.08 BeazerHm 3.06
AecomTch 31.03 +1.44 BectDck 62.82
Aeropostl 33.91 -127 BeslBuy 37.93
Aetna 27.72 +.93 Biovail 11.35
Agilent . 19.34 +.57 BlackD 35.70
Agnicog 49.76 +1.89 BIkHillsCp 20.68
Agriumg 45.20 +.58 BkDebtSt 2.75
AirProd 62.47 -.30 BikEnhC&I 11.96
AirTran 7.32 -.32 Blackstone 13.84
AlcatelLuc 2.60 +03 BlockHR 15.26
Alcoa 10.01 +16 Blockbstr 1.04
AlexREE 36.79 +2.17 BlueChp 252
AlEngay 29.30 +.98 Boeing 45.83
AllegTch 8.26 +.98 BoiseInc h 2.04
Alergan 48.81 +.78 Borders 2.45
Allete 27.10 +.04 BostBeer 29.21
AliData 42.90 +.99 BostProp 52.42
AlIiBGIbHi 9.87 +.10 BostonSdci 9.31
AlliBlnco 7.45 +.01 BoydGm 12.24
AltiBem 18.70 +.61 Brandyw 6.59
AlliedCap 3.45 +.45 Brinker 16.93
Aldlrish 3.32 +27 BrMySq 20.40
Allstate 26.12 -1.48 BrktdAsgs 18.42
AlphaNRs 30.19 +.11 BrdPrp 8.52
Aria 17,10 +07 Brunswick 7.08
AlumChina 24.54 +2.60 Buckeye 41.29
AmbacF 1.61 +29 BungeLt 55.36
Ameren 24.65 +39 BuigerKing 18.40
AMovilL '37.17 +1.17 BudNSF 72.76
AmAxleh 4.00 +2.49 CBREllis 9.37
AEagleOut 14.13 +.19 CBLAsc 7.99
AEP 26.15 -.08 CBSB 8.55
AmExp 28.40 +2.43 CH Engy 44.43
AmlntGp 2.01 +.06 CIGNA 23.68
AmOdBio 5.45 +.35 CITGp 3.12
AmSIP3 828 +.04 CMSEng 11.91
AmTower 29.48 -.53 CSS Inds 23.17
Amerigas 31.71 +.26 CSX 31.02
Amedripse 29.02 +2.12 CVSCare 32.12
Anadarko 51.96 +3.24 CablvsnNY 19.46
AnalogDev 20.67 -.89 CabotO&G 34.57
AnnTaylr 8.00 +.47 CallGolf 7.30
Annaly 14.86 +.47 Calpine - 11.72
Anworth 6.72 +.26 CamdnP 30.99
Aon Corp 37.00 +.40 Camecogs 25.64
Apache 84.89 +3.43 Cameron 30.50
Aptlnv 9.45 +1,22 CampSp 26.40
AquaAm 18.36 -.07 CdnNRsg 55.11
ArcelorMit 28.70 +1.64 CapOne , 31.34
ArchCoal 18.92 +1.47 CapitlSrce 4.16
ArchDan 26.97 +2.00 CapMpfB 13.25
ArenaRes 35.46 +4.37 CarMax 12.58
ArvMerith 3.10 -.09 Carnival 27.87
Ashland 25.95 +1.88 Caterpillar 39.64
AsdEstat 6.11 +17 Celanese .21.66
AssuredG 13.72 +2.59 Cemex 10.08
AstoriaF 9.00 +.83 Cemigpf. 15.53
ATMOS 25.65 -.22 CenterPrit 10.93
AutoNatn 16.63 -.29 ' Centex 10.96


+.35 CntryTel 30.52 +32
+3.78 ChampEh .60 +04
+.47 Checkpnt 14.07 +1.28 I
+.30 ChesEng 23.84 +1.92
+1.69 , Chevron 70.38 +2.40
+.99 i Chicos 8.25 -.10
+2.49 ChinaMble 49,85 +2.33
+.97 Chubb 40.88 +1.36
-.67 Cimarex 29.53 +.94
+2.17 CinciBell 2.74 +.06
+.25 CUgppfF 22.40 +7.15
+1.08 CihgppfG 22.46 +5.96
+.37 Ciligrp 4.02 +.21
+.53 Citigrp pP 22.64 +.67
+.66 CitigrppfU 17.50 +3.57
+2.64 CleanH 53.41, +.10
+1.61 CliffsNRss 31.02 +1.01
+1.23 Clorox 52.42 -.32
+.52 Coach " 26.03 +.11
+1.08 CocaCE 17.40 +.08
-.01 CocaCI 42.92 +.12
+1.22 Coeur 1.50 +.05
-1.11 CohStSUd 10.60 +.10
+1.03 CokPal 61.82 -.05
-.66 I CollctvBrd 15.62 +.13
+.89I ColBgp 1.08 +.28
+.14 Comerica 22.97 +.24
+.44 CVRD 18.81 +.49
+1.35 CVRDpf 15.78 +.59
Con-Way 28.35 +.20
+.1i ConAgra 17.57 +.04
+05 ConocPhil 46,91 +3,17
+2.30 ,Conseco 2.69 +.61
+.22 ConsoEngy 39.93 +2.61
+15 ConEd 37.58 +.27
+66 Constel[A 12.50 +.33
+3.65 ConstellEn 26.14 +42
+.52 ClAirB 12.72 +24
+.74 Cnvrgys 9.98 +.29
+.98 Cooper Ind 36.56 +2.24
-.28 Coming 14.57 -.09
+.48 CovenyH 19.12 +.72
+1.26 Covidierf 34.54 +.34
+56 CrownHold 22.96 -.04
+63 Cummins 34.02 +3.47
+1.27 Cvp __
+3.62
+71
+123 DCTIndl 4.97 +.53
+95 DJIA Diam 85.72 +1.55
+1 25 DNPSelct 7.38 +05
+.49 DPL 22.69 +.14
+.80 DR Horton 10.00 +21
+1.34 DTE 31.65 +.36
+.39 Daimler 37.91 +1.06
+.04 DanaHId h 2.24 +.55
+2.57 Darden 36.02 -1.04
+.75 DeanFds 17.72 +.11
+.33 Deere 44.91 +1.11
+.31 DetaAir 6.96 -.02
+2.08 DenburyR 18.01 +.62
+.01 DeutschBk 58.34 +5.24
+2.23 DevelDiv' 5.50 +.78
+2.02 DevonE 63.82 +3.48
+.71 DiaOffs 79.65 +2.98
+1.44 DiamRk 7.25 +.72
S+02 DianaShip 16.01 -.29
+3.71 DigitalRit 36.40 +1.04
+4.89. .DirxFinBul 12.55 +2.12
+.72 DirxFnBear 4.49 -1.18
+.02 DirxSCBear 25.05 -2.78
+24 DirxSCBull 29.01 +2.51
-.26 DirxLCBear 36.43 -2.93
+1.72 DirxLCBull 35.43 +2.35
+1.36 DirxEnBull 36.97 +4.13
+.10 Discover 10.66 +.30
+.24 Disney 25.46 +.13
+.08 DomRescs 31.87
+.61 Domtargif 1.75 +03


DonlleyRR
DEmmett
Dover
DowChm
DuPont
DukeEngy
DukeRlty
Dynegy
EMC Cp
EOG Res
EastChm
EKodak
Eaton


Ruors 45.17 +3.46
FordM 6.24 +.18
ForestLab 23.14 +.52
ForestOil 21.53 +1.61
Fortress 6.95 +1.26
FortuneBr 41.49 +1.02
FdtnCoal 24.14 +1.14
FrankRes 65.15 +4.39
FredMach .90 -.01
FMCG 51.80 +2.76
FriedBR h .42
FrontierCm 7.99 +.16
FrontierOil 16.26 +1.58


Hallibrtn 23.33 +.79
HanJS 10.67 -.13
HanPtDv2 7.16 +.26
Hanesbrds 16.83 +1.02
Hanoverlns 35.26 44.80
HarleyD 20.20 +.55
HarrisCorp 28.88 +30
HatfdFn 18.16 +2.36
Hasbro 26.06 -.42
HawaiiEl 16.68 +.10
HItCrREIT 34.49 +2.45
HItMgmt 4.99 -.01
HlthcrRlty 17.31 +1.19


iSEafe .
iSRMCVs
iShRsMd
iShC&SRI
iSRiKV
iSRIKG
iSRuslK
iSR2KG
iShR2K
iShREst
iShFnSv
iShFnSc
iShSPSm


45.95 +1.91
29.77 +1.08
65.79 +1.77
38.94 +2.46
49.30 +1.65
40.09 +.62
50.90 +1.28
54.55 +1.17
51.01 +1.71
34.81 +2.21
49.99 +3.27
46.01' +2.77
45.13 +1.37


�_~~~.____________ I------ --- i----------------
SC T IR U . N T Y
Pay for

your




Th e]ELZIway!






NO MORE

V Hassles! V Checks! V Reminders!





563-5655 It's EZ !
dChargie may vary at first tayra nstiogdat each vacation start.


Edisonlnt 3027
ElPasoCp 9.03
Elan 6.90
Embarq 41.51
EmersonE 36.46
EmpDist 15.25
EnbrEPtrs 37.55
EnCana 56.62
EnPro 17.29
ENSCO 34.33
Energy 74.70
EqlyRsd 24.26
ExcelM 8.73
ExcoRes 13.13
Exelon 50.15
ExterranH 19.51
ExxonMbl 70.80
FMC Corp 49.91
FPLGrp 57.16
FairchldS 5.90
FamilyDIr 30.32
FannieMae h .86
FedExCp 60.06
FedRity 58.02
FedSignl 8.85
Ferreligs 14.80
Ferro 4,67
FdlNRn 15.26
FidNInfos 18.86
FstHorizon 12.49
FTActDiv 9.38
FtTrEnEq 8.89
FirstEngy 42.48


+.48
+136
-.14 GATX 29.25
+.90 GabelliET 4.07
+1.00 GabHIthW 4.95
+.18 GabUtil .6.29
+457 GameStop 26.13
+.72 Gannett 548
+2.61 Gap 16.55
+.12 GencoShip 19.69
+2.66 GenDynam 55.88
-42 GenElec 14.53
+.60 GenMills 53.40
+1.9460 GnMotr 1.61
-.50 Genworth 5.28
+1.87 GaPw8-44 25.25
+2.68 Gerdaus 8.84
+.82 GlaxoSKIn 30.91
219 GoldFLtd 11.98
-1.21 Goldcrpg .32.63
02 GoldmanS 139.59
74 Goodrich 45.86
+4.22 Goodyear 13.30
+.56 viGrace 13.06
+.19 GrafTech 10.91
+.67 GtPlainEn 15.15
+.12 Grffon 9.88
+.12 GpTelevisa 17.58
+.17 GuangRy 25.21
+.13 HCP Inc 22.98
+.23 HRPT Prp 4.77
+.64 HSBC 44.20
HSBC cap 23.14


Heckmann 4.33
HeclaM 3.21
Heinz 35.47
HelxEn 11.30
HellnTel 7.96
HelmPayne 34.72
Hess 63.36
HewlettP 34.68
�-i ,., ,',.p 23.63
, i,,,,-l: . 25.50
"HonwillntI 34.72
HospPT 14.17
HostHotls 9.56
HovnanE 3.11
Humana 32.62
Huntsmn 5.70
IAMGIdg 9.92
ICICICBk 22.45
IMS Hth 13.35
ION Geoph 3.12
iSAstla 16.38
iShBraz 51.10
iSCan 21.35
iShHK -.
iShJapn
iSh Kor 37.03
iShMex 36.42
iShSing 9.02
iSTaiwn 10.59
iSfiSilvers 13.79
iShCh25s 35.91
iSSP500 93.23
iShEMkts 31.59


iStar 3.90 +.49
Idacorp 23.98 +.28
ITW 34.66 +1.06
Imaton 10.42 +.78
IngerRd 23.25 +1.56
IntegrysE 29.76 +51
IntcntEx 97.28 +2.12
IBM 101.49 -1.10
InltGame 15,00 -.14
IntPap 14.36 +1.17
IntRectif 13.61 -2.66
Interpublic 5.83 +.05
IntPotash 27.95 +1.81
invesco 16.74 +.88
IronMtn 28.81 +78
ItauUniMult 1457 +23

JPMorgCh 38.94 43.70
Jabil 8.41 +.15
JacobsEng 42.37 +78
JanusCap 11.93 +1.58
Jefferies 20.49 +1.92
JohnJn 54.98 +09
JohnsnCt 20.23 +1.03
JonesApp 9.51
KBHome 17.11 +1.02
KBR Inc 18.25 +1.20
KKRFn 1.77 -.08
KC Southn 17.01 +.91
Kaydon 32.98 +2.55
KA EngTR 16.05 +.39
Kellogg 42.83 +.18


KeyEngy 6.01 +1.01
Keycorp 6.97 +.19
KimbClk 51.95 +.24
Kimco 12.09 +1.02
KindME 47.66 +.77
KingPhrm 8.71 -.01
Kinrossg 16.64 +33
Kohls 43.90 -.35
Kraft 25.53 +49
KrispKrm 3.86 +26
Kroger 21.73 +.09
LDK Solar 9.61 -.10
LLE Roy hlf .54 +.02
LSICorp " 4.16 -.06
LTC Prp 18.42 +.48
LaZBoy 2.86 +.14
Laclede 33.42 -.20
LVSands 10.50 +1.01
LearCorp 2.50 +.58
LeggMason 21.23 +1.87
LennarA 10.32 +.51
LbtyASG 2.70
UbtProp 25.60 +1.86
UllyEli 35.95 +.10
Limited 12.38 +.38
LincNat 18.24 +2.34
Lindsay 39.49 +2.15
LockhdM 82.46 +2.78
Loews 29.01 +2.24
LaPac 4.59 +.33
Lowes 19.80 -.57

M&TBk 55.09 +2.19
MBIA 7.21 +.82
MDU Res 18.08 +.43
MEMC 17.49 +.25
MFAFndl 6.50 +32
MCR 7.78 -.03
MGIC 5.29 +1.11
MGMMir 12.58 +1.03
Macerich 19.30 +1.48
MackCali 26.30 +2.46
Macquarh 3.40
Macys 12.83 +.01
Madeco s 5.55 +25
Magnal g 38.81 +.94
Manltowoc 7.79 +.69
Manulifgs 20.74 +1.84
MarathonO 32.56 +.90
MktVGold 37.46 +.91
MktVRus 20.62 +.87
MarlntA 23.92 +.98
MarshM 20.50 -.16
Marshlls 9.82 +2.12
MStewrt - 3.62 +.05
Masco 10.84 +84
MasseayEn 21.60 +.41
Mattel 15.52 +29
McDemlnl 18.41 +.63
McDnlds 54.92 +1.53
McGrwH 33.71 +.80
McKesson 41.30 +1.72
McAfee 39.20 +.50
Mechels 7.74 +22
MedcoHlth 44.,96 -.52
Medtmic 34.22 +.38
Merck 24.82 -.39
Metavnte 24.94 +.47
MetUfe 35.50 +3.75
MetroPCS 17.37 +.42
MicronT 4.85 -.07
MidAApt 39.20 +2.65
Midas 11.16 +.82
Millipore 64.48 +4.69
Mirant 16.55 +1.92
MitsuUFJ 6.84 +.67
Mohawk 45.46 -.51
MoneyGrm 1.55 -.12


Monsanto 86.42 +.38
MonstrWw 14.04 +.65
Moodys 31.23 +1.62
MorgStan 28.20 +1.06
MSEmMkI 10.42 +.35
Mosaic 45.45 -.08
Motorola 6.50 +.28
MurphO 56.05 +2,49
NCRCorp 11.04 +.66
NRGEgy 21.19 +1.90
NYSEEur 25.72 +1.91
Nabors 18.57 +1.61
NatFuGas 33.00 +.27
NatGrid 43.85 +1.70
NOilVarco 36.04 +2,08
NatRetPrp 16.75 +.30
NatSemi 12.32 -.26
NatwHP 26.70 +2.45
Navios 4.44 +.10
NewAm rs 6.65 +.17
NJ Rscs 32.52 -.21
NYCmtyB 11.20 +.17
NewellRub 11.32 +.49
NewldExp 36.01 +3.05
NewmIM �43.78 +1.03
NwpkRsIf 3.00 +.17
Nexeng 22.15 +1.15
NiSource 11.40 +.21
Nicor 33,79 +.40
NikeB 54.42 +1.34
NobleCorp 30.90 +1.72
NobleEn 59.52 +.81
NokiaCp 14.75 +.28
Nordstrm 23.10 -.20
NorflkSo 38.01 +.98
NoeslUt 21.20 -.06
NorthropG 50.54 +1.70
NovaChem 5.71 -.03
Novartis 38.36 ,+.07
NSTAR 30.65 +.22
Nucor 43.59 +.81
NvFL 11.55 +.11
NvIMO 12.31 +.09
NvMuISI&G 4.93 +.29
NuvQPf2 5.47 +.34
OGE Engy 26,31 +.17
OcciPet 65,32 +2.85
OfficeDpt 3.93 +.48
OilSvHT 103.15 +4.32
OldRepub 10.32 +.34
Olin 12.90 +.21
Omnicom . 32.33 +.14
ONEOK 28.03 +.88
ONEOKPt 48.14 +1.43
Orbita[Sci 14.90 -1.20
OshkoshCp 11.56 +.92
Owenslll 25.90 +.84

PG&ECp 36.96 -.29
PMIGrp 1.86 +.59
PNC 53.08 +8.61
PNM Res 10.32 +.32
PPG 44.72 +.99
PPL Corp 32.58 +1.26
PaflCoip 27.65 +.88
ParkDri 4.33 +.72
PatriotCs 9.45 +1.07
PeabdyE 32.93 +1.42
Pengrth g 7.97 +.05
PennVaRs 13.68 +.11
PennWstg 13.18 +.58
Penney 30.51 +.44
PepBoy. 7.01 +.31
PepcoHold 12.66 -.37
PepsiBott 32.20 +.02
PepsiCo 49.75 +.26
PepsiAmer 25.48 +.21
Perini Cp 23.70 +4.78


Prmian 10.19
PetroCg 40.59
Petrohawk 26.18
PetrbrsA 31.68
Petrobras 40.00
PtroqstE 4.56
Pfizer 14.40
PhilipMor 41.10
PhnxCos 2.20
PiedNG 23.94
PimcoStrat 8.60
PioNtrl 29.87
PitnyBw 22.38
PlainsEx 24.98
PlumCrk 35.20
Polaris 35.32
PostPrp 14.17
Potash 96,15
PwshDB 21.80
PSAgri 26.73
Praxair 73.16
PrecDril 6.10
Pridelnt 24.00
PridnFncl 23.68
ProShtS&P 65.78
PrUShS&P 56.03
ProUltDow 29.57
PrUIShDow 48.19
ProUltQQQ 34.05
PrUShQQQ 37.20
ProUltSP 26.73
ProUShL20 52.24
PrUShCh25 15.20
ProUlSEM 23.52
ProUShtRE 19.78
ProUShOG 17.56
ProUShlFn 38.94
ProUtRE 4.16
ProUtO&G 30.30
ProUtFin 4.74
ProUBasM 19.16
ProUSR2K 44.83
ProUltR2K 19.47
ProUltCrude 9.81
ProctGam 51.57
ProgrssEn 35.44
ProgsvCp 16.13
ProLogiS 9.09
ProvETg 5.38
Prudentl 46.00
PSEG 31.99
PSEG pfA 72.00
PubStrg 66.32
PulteH 11.47
PPrIT 4.55
QuantaSvc 23.62
QtmDSSh 1.09
Questar 36.41
QksilvRes 10.21
QwestCm 4.44
RPM 14.59
RRI Engy 5.45
RadianGrp 3.30
RadioShk 13.91
Ralcorp 62.23
RangeRs 45.89
RJamesFn 18.98
Rayonier 39.68


Raytheon 48.27 +.80
RItyInco 22.18 +.77
RgcyCtrs 37.46 +3.59
RegBkHT 75.84 +7.18
RegionsFn 6.53 +1.30
Repsol 21.02 +.89
RepubSvc 23.77 +.90
RetailHT 79.98 +.10
RetailVent 3.05
Revlon rs 4.65 +.06
ReynldAm 40.50 +.69
RiteAidh' '.90 +.02
RockwlAut 34.68 +.88'
RockColl 39.93 +1.98
Rowan 19.06 +1.29
RylCarb 17.09 +.59
RoyDShllA 49.83 +1.99
Royce 9.26 +.29
Royce pfB 22.84 -.11
RdxSPEW 32.05 +1.28

SAP AG 39.26 +176
SCANA 30.85 +36
SKTncm 16.37 +.49
SLGreen 22.60 +3.17
SLM Cp" 6.64 +1.02
SpdrGold 89.98 +.54
SpdrHome 13.47 +.59
SpdrKbwBk 21.62 +2.09
SpdrLehHY 33.42 +.46
SpdrKbwRB 23.81 +1.60
SpdrRetl 27.32 -.03
SpdrMetM 37.14 +1.19
Safeway 19.45 -.18
SUoe 27.23 +2.47
StJude 36.45 +1.35
Saks 4.53 +.13
SJuanB 17.90 +1.09
SandRdge 11.11 +1.71
SaraLee 9.19 -.16
SchergPI 23.07. -.27
Schlmbrg 56.53 +2.43
SemiHTr 19.73 -.41
SenHous 16.45 +1.17
Sensient 23.49 +.67
SewriceCp 5.45 +.50
ShawGrp 30.11 -.01
SiderNac 21.63 +1.05
SilvWhtng 8.91 +.18
SimonProp 53.93 +1.88
Skecher 10.98 +.14
SmithAO 31.95 +.71
Smithlnt 31.72 +1.91
SmithfF 12.46 +.71
Smucker 40.70 +.47
SonicAut 7.20 +.49
SoJerlnd ', 35.06 +.26
SouthnCo 28.76 -.51
SthnCopps 20.43 +.69
SwstAid 7.36 +.14
SwstnEngy 41.32 +1.06
I- 1E 16.14 +57
:.,.,ll. 5.24 ' +.02
SPDR 92:98 �+2.12
SP Mid 106.41 +3.18
SP Matls 26.80 +.56
SP HhC 25.59 +.42


The remainder of the
NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.


AMEIAN TC xaNG


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 522 +.07
AdmRsc 15.80 +.02
AdeonaPh .53 +.04
Adventrx .14 -.04
AlexcoRg 1.52
AlIdNevG 6.05 +.16
AmApparel 6.10 +49
AmO&G .88 +08
Anooraqg 1.11 -.03
AntaresP .57 +05
ApolloGg .44 -.02
ArcadiaRs - .48


Augustag 1.96
Aurizon g 4.06
AuroraOG .07
Axesstel .25
BMBMunai 1.79
BPZRes 7.00
BarcAIG36 36.65
BarcGSOil 21.31
BrclndiaTR 39.47
BootsCts 1.30
CdnSEng .73
CanoPet .74
CasleBr .23
CelSd .30
CFCdag 11.65


CentGoldg 36.82 +.12
CheniereEn 4.12 -.28
ClaudeRg .77 +.00
ClghGIbOp 10.61 +17
Comforce 1.40 +12
CorNlexPh .32 -.03
CrSuislnco 2.71 +.04
CrSuiHiY 2.09 , +.06
CLvt3aLL2g.2 +01

DWSREII .60 -.01
DeerfCaprs 4.04 -.42
DenisnMg 2.22 +.14
DuneEngy .17 +00
EVInMu2 11.1 +.18


EVLtdDur 11.80 +.12
BdorGld g 8.49 -.13
ElitePh .12 -.02
BixirGam .13 +03
EllswthFd 5.52 +08
Endvrlnt 1.38 +10
EndvSilvg 1.79 +.11
EvglncAdv 7.99 +.15
FiveStar 2.68 +.03
FlaPUMI 12.81 +31
FrkStPrp 13:28 +80
Frontra 2.96 +.50

GHLAcwt .45 +.04
GascoEngy .51 +04


GastarEg '.56
GenMoly 1.84
Geokinetics 7.95
GIbEnHId .18
GoldStrg 1.67
Grahams 14.50
GranTrrag 2.71
GrtBasGg 1.29
Hemisphrx 1.38
Hyperdyn .30
IA Global .04
ImpOilgs 38.80
IntellgSys .75
IntlRyltyg 3.02


JavelinPh 1.22 -.02


Merimac 3.99 -.11
Metalico 2.94 +33
MetroHlth 1.86 -.02
Minefndtg 8.50 +27
NBRESec 2.19 +12
Nevsun g 1.20 +02
NDragon .23 +.04
NwGoldg 1.93 +05
NAPallg 2.56 -.14
NDynMng 6.83 +.13


NthnO&G 6.77 +59
NthgtMag 1.71 .08
NovaDeIP .32 +.01
NovaGldg 2.95 +.15
Oilsandsg .94 +13
On2 Tech .35 .02
OverhillF 4.77 -.19

PacRim .23 +01
Palatin .17
ParaG&S 1.58 +.17
PionDrill 6.84 +91
PolyMetg 1.55 +15
PSCrudeDSn126.31 -13.82
PSCrudeDLn 3.50 +21


ProceraNt .92 -.03
Proliance .21 +.02
PyramidOs 5.59 +.35
QuestCapg .78 +.08
RaeSyst 1.11 -.01
Rentech .69 -.01
RivieraH 2.04 +.24


Sapphire 9.60'
SeabGidg 23.74 +1.14
SilvrcpMgn 2.94 +.15
SulphCo 1.17 +.13
TanzRyg 2.98 +.03
Taseko 1.45 +.04


Telkonet .12 +.02
Tengsco .58 +.02
USGeoth .94 +.06
USGold 2.19 -.05
Uluru .18 -.01
UraniumEn 1.51 -.04


VangTotWn 35.24 +1.21
Walterlnv 11.24 +.46
Westmnd 9.50 +.90
WilshrEnt 1.75


NSAQ NATINA ARE


Name Last


A-Power 10.75
ACMooreIf 3.39
ACIWwde 1413
ADCT' i.43
AMAG Ph 54,54
APACC 5.53
ASMLHId 19.74
ATMI Inc 15.74
ATP O&G 8.89
ATS Med 2.85
AVI Bio .89
Aastrom .39
AcetoCorp 6.17
AcordaTh 23.25
ActvsBIzs 11.81
Adaptec 2.98
AdobeSy 25.42
Adtran 19.94
AdvATech 4.32
AdvBattery 3.73
AdvantaA .96
AdvantaB 1.19
AeroViron 28.09
Affymetrix 5.06
AgFeed 3.98
AkarnaiT 21.31
AkeenaSh 1.42
Aldila 3.76
Alexions 34.26
Alkerm _ 9.00
,, ,.,,,n 43.91
I, *.- il 12.28
AinylamP 19.96
AlteraCplf 15.51
AltraHIdgs 7.29
AltusPhm .40
Alvarion 3.04
AmTrstFin 10.02
Amazon 77.95
Amedisys 38.03
AmerBioh .19
AmCapLtd 3.45
AmerMed 15.34
AmPubEd 32.29
ASiE 65.00
AmSupr 25.06
AmCasino 21.46
Amgen 47.20
AmkorTIf 3.95
Amylin 11.70
Anadigc 3.04
AnadysPh 2.12
Anlogic 38.47
Analysts .56
Andrsons 21.50
Angitchg .68
AngloAm 12.50
Ansys 26.65
An�gncs .69
ApoloGrp 57.07
Apololnv 6.70
Apple Inc 129.19
ApidMatl 11.89
ArchCap 59.78
ArenaPhm 2.81
AresCap 7.46
AriadP 1.32
Arbainc 10.30
ArkBest 25.77
ArmHId 4.95
Anis 10.84
AnfTech 3.43
ArubaNet 4.69
Asialnfo 18.03
AsscdBanc 19.00
Astec 30.64
Athems 16.19
AtlasAns 17.29
Atmel 3.62
Audvox 5.15
Autodesk 19.70
AutoData � 36.84
AvizaTch. .17
AvoctCp 15.51


Chg Aware - 2.31
Axce h's .46
SAxsysTech 44.55
BEAero 13.52
+.73 Iadu Inc 246.00
+.02 BankUtd .63
+'09 Bankrate 28.94
-A. BaruEscei. 8.99
+1.6 BasinWater .42
-.02 .BeaconPw .82
-10 BeacnRfg 15.70
+.22 BeasleyB 2.46
+.82 BebeStrs 9.39
+.02 BedBath 28.50
-.03 BigBand 5.39
-01 Biocryst 2.95
-.66 BioFuelEn 1,21
+.05 Biogenldc 48.60
+�81 BioMadn 14.66
+.18 Biopurersh .25
-.21 Blkboard 30.20
+-19 BlueCoat 14.70
+.14 BlueNile 47.10
+.25 BobEvn 26.17
+.13 Borand .97
+.13 BostPrv 6.41
-.90 BreitBum 8.04
+.16 BrigExp 3.86
+.09 Brightpnt 5.78
+.03 Broadcom 21.55
+.05 BrcdeCm 5.94
-21 BrklneB 10.60
-14 BrooksAuto 5.07
+.27 BrukerCp 7.29
+.03 Bucyruss 27.81
+.03 BuffaloWW 35.53
+1-90 CAInc 17.53
-.16 CDCCpA 1.49
-+23 CH Robins 52.51
+05 CMEGrp 248.35
+17 CSGSys 13.57
+.60 CTC Media 11.08
-1.33 CVB Fncl 7.72
+23 Cadence 5.87
+.03 CdnSolar 8.50
+.09 CapCtyBk 14.31
+.64 CpstnTrb .72
-1.83 Caraustar 22
+5.33 Cardiomg 4.50
+1.23 CardioNet 17.67
+.68 CareerEd 20.17
+.12 CadbouC 4.69
Carrizo 19.29
-.01 CarverBcp 6.00
+.13 CaseliaW 3.20
-.18 CathayGen 16.00
+.81 CaviumNet 13.50
-.06 CeleraGrp 8.58
+1.83 Celgene 41.42
-.06 CellGensh .68
+92 CellTherrsh 1.15
-.06 CenlfCom 8.24
-.03 CenterFncl 3:68
+33 CentEuro 23.94
+77 CEurMed 19.84
+.13 CentAl 7.33
+04 Cephin 65.63
+2.49 Cepheid 10.81
+.16 Ceradyne 19.94
+.50 Cemrer 57.03
+.01 Changyoun 30.02
-.18 ChrmSh 3.35
+.08 Chartinds 19.85
-.09 ChkPoint 22.38
+.34 Cheesecake 16.27
+.25 ChildPlace 33.85
-.06 ChinaDir 1.57
+.77 ChinaPSil 2.80
+1.61 ChinaSun 3.77
+1.49 ChrchlD 39.94
-.66 CienaCorp 11.34
+77 CinnFin 24.72
-.02 Cintas 26.03
+14 Cirus 3.95
+.23 I Cisco 18.73
+.45 CiGzRep 1.90
+.01 CitrixSys 27.45
+.78 CleanEngy 10.10


Cleanwre 6.50 +51 I EvrgrSIr 2.39 +01 1 IAC Inters 15.79 -.07
CogrntC 7.3r -53 I Exelixis 4.79 +20 IdexxLabs 43.78 +,89
Cogent, 11.5b -.08 ExideTc 6.56 +.21 IP:H...:i 26.49 +1.06
CognizTech 25.19 -.11 Expedia 15.32 +.33 1: a, 1.50 +.10
CogoGrp 7.38 +.15 ExpdIritl 33.51 -.1 ! iShNsdqBio 65.66 +,47
Coherent 18.10 -.72 ExpScipts 61.29 -.59 IconPLCs 15.41 +.58
Coinstar 33.15 -2.28 Ezcorp 13.14 +.33 IconixBr 15.49 +.24
Coriarco I , ... F5Netwks 27.98 -.27 Illuminas 36.29 -.14
ComcasI 1575 +06 FEICo 20.00 +55 Immucor 16.49 +.36
Conmcspld 14.88 +.11 FLIRSys 26,55 +1.23 Imunmd 1.44 -.04
CmcBMO 36.00 +1.51 Fastenal 36.62 +.57 ImperlSgr 7.99 +.94
CmdVehd 1.70 +.47 FedMogul 10.13 +63 Incyte 2.54 +.09
CommSys 9.50 +.51 FiberTowr .57 +.10 Infinera" 8.60 +.26
CommVIt 12.68 +.13 RfthThird 8.49 +3.14 InfoGRP 5.24 +.16
Compuwre 7.45 +.01 FifthTpfG 92.25 +23.61 |InFocus .93 -.00
Comtech 27.34 -.64 Fncllnst 15.25 +.75 Informal ' 15.13 -.10
Comverge 8.48 +:98 Finisar .70 +.05 InfosysT 31.16 +.17
ConcurTch 28.50 +.28 FinLine 8.29 -.01 Innophos 15.81 +1.24
Conexantrs 1.26 -.08 FstCashFn 16.85 +.15 nsmed 1'.46 -.01
Conmed 14.05 +.58 FMidBc .11.59 +1.76 insulet 6.91 +1.21
Conns 12.1"0 +4 FstNiagara 1321 +.76 IntegLfqci 23.90 +.15
ConstantC 17.96 +2.08 i Solar 191.05 -4.00 ntgDv 5.44 +.01
ConvOrgan 1.58 +.00 FstMerit 20.75 +. 81 In ei 15.29 -48
CorinthC 15.27 -.05 Fiserv 40.13 +.52 interactBrk 15.83 +.48
CorpExc 16.38 +.33 Rextrn 3.93 -.05 InterDig 29.36 +.21
CorusBksh .37 -.04 FocusMda 7.80 +.49 InterMune 11.97 +.39
Costco 46.60 +.67 ForcePro 7.51 +55 I nterNAP 2.48 -.40
CrackerB 30.77 -.49 ForghINt h .19 +03 In5tBcsh 14.60 +.92.
Creelnc 27.03 -.29 FormFac 16.65 -.05 InlSpdw 24.78 +1.25
Crocs 2.52 -.96 FossilInc 20.12 +.88 Intersil 11.39 -.22.
CrosstexE 4.14 +.08 FosterWhl 24.98 +1.96 Intuit 24.06 +.20
CrosstxLP 3.26 -.12 FrontFncl 1.72 +.25 Intiur 158.77 -.31
Ctrip.com 33.02 +.02 FuelSysSol 22.36 +5.35 inVentv 12.89 +1.06
CubistPh 16.89 -.02 FuelCell 3.32 +.07 Isis - 15.50 +.43
CybrSrce 14.86 +.31 FultonFnd 7.15 +.69 Itron 48.85 +.65
CytRx .48 +.02 FushiCo 696 +.62 I vanhoeEn 174 +08

GFIGrp . 6.10 +.24 JA Solar 392 -07
DGFastCh 19.07 J-24 GMXRs 17.00 +1.98 JDSUniph 5.10 +.21
DataDom 16.63 +.66 GTSolarn 7.98 +.13 JackHenry 18.01 +37
Dawson 28.99 +3.25 GTCBioh .46 -.02 JackInBo 23.70 -.05
DealrTrk 14.73 -.04 Garmin 22.48 +.64 Jamba 1.08 +.13
DeckOut 59.00 +.92 GenPtobe 45.13 +1.00 JameRv 21.43 -.33
decodGen h .41 +.05 GenBiotch .49 +.07 JetBlue 6.23 +.38
Dell Inc 10.81 -.26 i Genopix 28.09 +.30 JosphBnk 36,75 -1.84
DItaPtr 1.51 -.76 Gentex 12.48 +.29 JoyGIbl 30.56 +2.11
Dndreon 19.24 -.52 Geniva 19.51 +1.19 JnprNtwk 21.85 +.55
Dennys 2.52 +.05 GenVec .61 -.07 KLATnc 26.18 -.70
Dentsply 29.75 +94 Genzyme 60.18 +1.33 ' Kendle 10.27 +.30
DigRiver 37.50 +.51 GeoMet 1.62 +.45 i KeryxBoh .41 +.06
Diodes 13.33 -1.16 GeronCp 6.23 +.14
DirecTV 24.75 +.67 GigaMed 6.43 +.08 Knot Inc 16.67 +.55
DiscCmA 20.27 +.18 GileadSci 44.01 -1.42 LHC 8.06 +.8
DiscvLabs .83 -.07 GlacierBc 18.97 +1.81 LCGrp 28.54 +.43
DishNetwk 15.31 +.73 Globlind 7.22 +.19 LKQCorp ,16.59 -.01
DllrTree 42.36 -.99 GolarLNG 6.66 +1.16 LSI ds 5.7081 +2.
DotHill If .70 +.01 Google 407.33 +10.72 LSndsd 5.7 +.40
DrmWksA 24.00 +.11 GreenMtC 80.50 +5.78 LTX-Crd . 53 +0
DressBarn 14.52 +.37 GrpoRn 2.60 +.48 LaJollPhh .42 +.02
DryShips 8.00 -2.04 GullponrE 4.00 +.56 Ladish 11.02 +2.29
DynMat 20.15 +3.44 Gymbree 35.00 +.22 LamResrch 25.60 -1.13
Dynavax 1.15 +.14 H&EEq 7.87 +.90 LamaAdv 22.38 +.26
ETrade 1.97 +.28 . HLTH 11.33 +.05 Landtar 37.6 -.57
eBay .17.38 +.64 HMN Fn 5.45 +.38 Langenh 1.06 +.69
ev3lnc 8.00 +.05 HMSHId 35.43 +.81 Latice 1.80 +.07
EagleBulk 7.70 +.08 HSNInen 8.82 +.42 LawsnSt 5.64 +.16
EaglRkEn 3.56 -.02 HansenMed 6.65 -.34 LeapWidss 38.49 +3.54
ErthUnk 7.49 ... HansenNat 42.55 +4.49 Leve3 1.18 +03
EstWstBcp 10.14 +1.39 Harmonic 5.87 +17 1 LUbGIobA 17.33 +.94
Edipsys 16.29 +.29 Harrisint .37 -.0 U bGob 17.25 +.96
Ed Bauer .71 +.02 HarrisStrA 6.42 +.83 ibtyMIntA 6.97 +.26
EdgePet .49 -.13 HawHold 5.23 +.19 LibMCapA 12.88 +.29
EduDv 5.30 -.21 HayesLm .23 +05 UbMEntA 26.02 +.42
EinsteinN 9.64 -1.73 HrttndEx 15.82 +16 LifeTechs 36.85 +1.25
ElectSci 8.97 +.54 HSchein 46.60 +1.78 UfePtH 27.27 +.70
ElectArts 20.18 +.72 HercOffsh 4.80 +.45 UhirGold 23.20 +92
Emcore 1.38 +.04 HercTGC 8.45 +1.22 Uncare 24.64 +.46
EndoPhrm 16.34 +.05 Hibbett 19.53 -.37 ULncEdSv 18.66 +14
Ener1 6.48 -.24 Hologic 12.14 +.04 I UncE 44.74 +1.54
EnerNOC 23.19 +1,37 I HorsehdH 6.75 -1.04 ULnearTch 21.37 -.20
EngyConv 17.01 +1.12 HotTopic 9.77 -.17 LinnEngy 17.18 +95
EnrgyRecn 8.20 -.13 HubGroup 24.50 +02 LodgeNet 4.65 +.26
EngyXXI .72 +.06 HudsCity 12.63 +.40 LogicVis 1.35 +.05
Entegris 2.06 +.17 HumGen 2.'11 +.02 Logitech 14.62 +.22
EntreMdh. .49 +.07 HuntJB 2829 -.19 LookSmart 1.52 +.11
Equinix 68.58 +2.41 HuntBnk 5.20 +1.31 lululemng 14.80 +.45
EncsnTels 8.66 +.08 Hydrogncs .55 +08 Luminex 15.63 -1.48


MCGCap 2.27
MDRNAH .97
MGE 30,79
MIPSTech 3.61
MKS Inst 15.14
MRV Cm hif .70
MTS 21.14
MacvsnSot 21.24
ManTech 37.41
MannKd 6.32
MarvelIT 10.57
Masimo 25.73
Mattson 1.53
Maximltgn 14.02
MaxwilT 9.21
McGrathR 24.04
Medarex 6.39
Mediacom 5.46
MedicActn 9.95
MelcoCrwn 6.00
MercadoL 24.29
Mercerlnll .96'
MesaAirh .16
Methanx 12.60
Microchp 21.51
MicrosSys 23.06
MicroSemi 13.48
Microsoft 19.42
Millicom 52.95
Misonix 2.91
Molex 16.76
MonPwSys 17.10
MorgHt 4.21
Move Inc 2.01
MulfiFnBc 19.12
Mylan 13.72
MyriadG s 30.63
NETgear 14.67
NGAS Res 2.81
NICESys 23.55
NIl HIdg 18.97
NaraBncp 4.71
NasdOMX 20.38
NashuaCp 6.47
NatPenn 8.22
NektarTh 5.31
NetServic . 8.35
NetLogic 32.95
NetApp 17.50
Netease 30.93
Netlx 40,22
NtScout 9.52
Neurogen h .31
NeutTand 28.15
NewsCpA 9.66
NewsCpB 11.10
NexMed .32
Nextwave h .44
NobityH 10.44
vjNoblehlf .24
NorTrst 55.29
NthltdLb .23
NovtIWrts 10.19
Novavax 1.77
Novell 3.88
Novlus 16.71
NuHorizlf 3.09
NuVasive. 38.71
NuanceCm 13.34
Nutritn21 h .29
Nvidia 9.25
OReillyA 36.01
OSI Phrm 33.59
OceanFrt 1.43
Odaro .67
OldDomFh 28.98
Omniture 11.32
OmniVisn 9.18
I OnAssign 3.74
OnSmcnd 5.61
OnyxPh 25.56
OpenTxt 31.26.
optXprs 16.34
Oracle 18.32
Orbcomm 1.75
Orexnen 2.79


OrionMar 18.03 +.91
Orthfx 22.31 +1.27
+12 OscientPh .28 -.04
+.06 OfterTail 2110 +.42
+.69
+10
-03 PDLBioh 7.00 -.10
+05 PFChng 31.03 -.35'
+11 PMCSra 7.22 -.26
+.4A7 PSSWrld 17.45 +1.22
+41 PacVWiBc 19.41 +1.10
+18 Paccar 33.59 +.58
-.34 Pacerlntll 4.12 -.17
+.54 PacCapB 7.44 +1.12
+.27 PacElhan .62 +.07
-.31 PacSunwr 4.46 +.18
+.53 PaetecHId 3.43 +.14
+4.21 Palm Inc 10.98 +.43
-.02 PanASIv 19.35 +.17
+37 PaneraBrd 52.92 -1.11
+.77 PapaJohns 28.26 -.21
+.46 ParagShip 4.17 -.01
+.71 ParPet 2.07 +.19
+18 ParamTch 11.15 +.20
| Parexel 10.36 +.55
+.33 Patterson 23.08 +.71
-1.16 PattUTI 15.08 +.84
+29 Pay'iex 27.87 +,83
-.26 PnnNGm 32.55 +.81
+.10 PeopUtdF 16.37 +.54
+2.32 Peregrine h .44 +.01
+16 Perrigo 27.16 +.28
+29 PetMed 15.39 -.06
-.43 PetroDev 20.58 +2.79
+15 PetsMart 21.83 -.28
-.02 PharmPdt 21.74 +1.06
-.11 PhaseFwd 14.18 +41
+.29 PhotrIn 2.29 +.17
-1.47 PlugPower 1.01 +D06
-.13 Polycom 17.54 +.07
+.19 PoolCorp 18.47 +.41
+1.98 Popular 3.51 +20
+1.15 PowerMedh .35 +.01
+.82 PwShsQQQ 34.23 +.02
+34 Powrwav 1.28 +.40
-.03 PremExhib .86 +.17
+50 Presstek 1.86 +.10
... PiceTR 40.94 +2.39
-.04 priceline 104.90 +4.10
-.17 PrivateB 25.29 +2.04
+.11 PrognicsPh 5.42 +.40
-.01 ProspctCap 10.48 +.57
+.25 ProspBcsh 30.06 +1.13
+.30 PrvBksh 9.37. +.44
+.02 PsychSol 20.71 +.83
... PureCycle 2.86 +.01
+.21 QIAGEN 16.35 +.03
+.33 Qlogic 12.92 -.09
-.09 Qualcom 41.79 -.55
+.04 QuantFuel .72. +.01
+1.69 QuestRes .72 +.24
+.08 QuestSft 14.44 +.19
+2.94 Questcor 4.78 +.26
-.03 RAM Hidgs .18 +.01
+1.58 RFMicD 2.56 +.19
-.01 RTIBiolog 4.16 +.49
-.02 RadNet 2.28 +.45
-.07 RAMEgy 1.03 +.16
+.22 Rambus 11.78 -.27
+.77 Ramtm 1.11 -.25
+.24 Randgold 58.03 +4.48
+.05 RealNwk 293 +.26
-1.48 RedRobin 22.00 -1.45
-.50 RegncyEn 12.29 +.40
+.78 Regenm 15.84 +.70
-.03 RentACt 19.71 +.47
+.02 RschMotn 73.77 +.41
-.06 RexEnergy 5.95 +.91
-34 Riverbed 17.60 +.60
-.04 RosettaR 9.24 +1.73
+18 RossStrs 36.47 -.23
-.10 RoyGId 39.90 +.21
+18 RuthsHosp 4.16 +,34
.03 'r 29.90 +2.30

-.10
+.16 SBACom 24.44 +,06
+.69 SEIInv 15.66 +.90


STEC 10.30
SVBFnGp 29.24
SXC HIth 20.92
SalixPhm 10.07
SanDisk 14.07
Sanmina .58
Sapient 5.63
SavientPh 5.10
Schnitzer 54.30
Schwab 18.74
SciGames 19.09
SeagateT 7.79
SearsHIdgs 57.16
Selectvlns 15.03
Semtech 14.55
Sepracor 14.49
Sequenom 3.34
Shanda 47.22
Shire 38.52
ShufflMstr 4.15
SiRFTch 3.39
SierraWr 5.62
SigmaDsg 13.59
SigmaAld 44.84
SilganHId 46.61
Silirnlmno 2.78
SienLab 31.14
Slcnware 7.28
Si;vStdg 20.06
Sina 28.17
Sinclair 1.59
SiriusXM .41
SkyWest 12.68
SkywksSol 9.05
SmartBal 8.21
SmithWes 6.33
Sohu.cn 55.19
Solarfun 5.49
Somaxon .55
SonicCorp 9.45
Sonus 1.89
SouMoBc 10.75
vSrclnllk .15
SouthFncl 2.19
SpectPh 3.66
Spreadtrm 1.96
Staples 19.90
StarBulk 3.87
StarScient 4.23
Starbucks 13.66
StarentNet 18.87
StDynam 13.28
StemCells 1.70
Stericycle 46.76
SterlBcsh 7.69
StrF WA 4.69
StewEnt 3.95
SumTotal 4.55
SunMicro 9.13
Sunesish .35
SunOpta . 1.89
SunPowerA 29.00
SuperWelt 15.25
SusqBnc 9.16
Sycamore 2.95
SykesEnt 17.92
Symantec 14.88
Symetricm 4.64
Synaptbcss 28.49
Synopsys 20.82
Synovis 14.39
SyntaPhm 3.81
T-3Engy 16.31
TBS InlA 9.68
TDAmerdtr 16.94
TFS Fncl 12.18
THQ 5.33
TLC Vision .31
twtelecom 10.19
TXCORes .68
TakeTwo 8.90
TaleoA 14.99
TargaRes 11.40
TargGene h .28
TASER 4.60
TechData 29.01
Tekelec 16.37
TICmSys 6.98


+23 Tellabs 5.21 +.14
+2.93 TescoCp 11.17 +.89
-.33 TesseraT 16.68 +.76
-.36 TetonEgy .46 +.02
-75 TetraTc 24.96 +.62
-.02 TevaPhrm 44.03 -.24
+.6901 TxCapBsh 15.50 +1.30
+2.05 TexRdhsA 10.85 -.32
+.87 thinkorswim 9.93. +21
+2.68 Thoratec, 30.09 +.50
+.09 3Com 4.10 +.07
-.82 TibcoSft 6.45 +.09
+1.17 Tktmstrnh 6.85 -.32
-.70 TilanMach 12.07 +1.02
+.75 TiVo Inc 8.15 +.15
-.15
-2.25 Towerstm .80 +.05
+.17 TractSupp 37.34 -.79
+.24 TdadGty .90 +.08
+.24 TrimbleN 21.55 +.31
-.13 TriQuint 3.90 +.23
-.23 TrueRelig 21.97 +37
+1.19 TrstNY 6.33 +.52
+.80 Trustmk 23.20 +1.31
TuesMm 3.85 +.46
-.02 UAL 5.57
-.13 UCBHHId 2.05 +.46
+.75 UMBFn 46.90 +.81
-.04 USCncrt 2.59 +.29
-.02 UTiWddwd 13.68 +.19
+.73 UTSircm 1.64 +.09
-.14 Ultrapetrol 4.80 +16
-.11 Umpqua 12.11 +1.42
+02 UtdNtdF 23.85 +.82
+1.02 UtdOnln 7.47 +.09.
S+.23 USEnr 2.05 -.05
S .42 UnivDisp 10.01 -.38
+.09 UnivFor 32.81 +1.31
UraniumR 1.25 +.02
+.08 UrbanOut 19.07 -.23
+.34 lrZEiu, --
+.09
+22 VCA Ant 26.38 +.88
-.11 VNUSMed 28.76 +7.44
-.06 ValenceTch 2.30 +.14
+.32 ValueClick 10.28 +.23
-.35 VandaPhm 8.45 +.61
+.75 VarianSemi 24.32 -.43
-.04 Veecolnst 9.04 +1.03
+65 Verenium .60 -.01
+.56 Veisign 24.26 +3.43
+65 VertxPh 30.45 +1.36
+35 Vignette 12.25 +.01
+,08 VirgnMdah 7.80 +.45
+.03 ViroPhrm 6.03 +27
-.02 VisnChina 5.35 -.05
-.05 VistaPrt 36.63 +2.38
+12.6 Vivus 4.45 +.05
+1.13 Volcano 12.31 -.51
+.07 WamerChil 11.37 +.18
+24 WarrenRs 2.39 +31
-.11 WashFed 13.45 +.95
+.32 Websense 17.01 +.44
-1.09 WemerEnt 17.58 +.28
-06 Westellh .51 +.01
+21 WetSeal 3.92 -.24
+57
+1.37 WhitneyH 14.03 +1.78
+.10 WholeFd 22.17 -.24
+.69 WindRvr 7.24 +.12
+2.8 Wintust 21.76 +2.44
+.61 WdwrdGov 21.83 . +1.96
-.04 WdghtM 15.94 +.94
+.62 Wynn 47.46 +3.25
-.01 XOMA .70 +.07
-.01 XenoPort 17.40 +1.12
+139 Xilinx 18.72 -.63
6201 YRCWwde 4.57 +.27
+.18 Yahoo 15.15 +.35
+83 Ziamrs .29 +.01
+26 ZionBcp 20.36 +4.34
-.13 Zoran 9.25 -.30


Argent
Australia
Bahrain
Brazil
Britain
Canada
Chile
China
Colombia
Czech Rep
Denmark
Dominican Rep
Egypt
Euro
Hong Kong
Hungary
India
Indnsia
Israel
Japan
Jordan
Lebanon
Malaysia
Mexico
N. Zealand
Norway
Peru
Poland
Russia
Singapore
So. Africa
So. Korea
Sweden
Switzerind
Taiwan
Thailand
Turkey
U.A.E.
Uruguay
Venzuel


Yesterday Pvs Day


3.7140
1.3289
.3769
2.1088
1.4996
1.1740
563.65
6.8213
2222.50
19.96
5.5710
, 35.95
5.6265
.7478
7.7501
209.38
49.220
10370.00
4.1190
98.99
.7087
1502.50
3.5245
13.2075
1.6930
6.4854
2.969
3.27
32.6030
1.4698
8.4275
1257.50
� 7.8989
1.1309
33.13
34.90
1.5639
3.6731
23.9498
2.1473


3.7200
1.2992
.3766
2.0715
1.5215
1.1513
563.25
6.8250
2207.50
19.61
5.4705
36.00
5.6375
.7341
7.7500
203.38
49.150
10375.00
4.0675
98.40
.7073
1501.50
3.5170
13.0675
1.6548
6.3439
2.975
3.19
32.3332
1.4584
8.2930
1242.40
7.6687
1.1065
33.05
34.87
1.5391
3.6730
23.9498
2.1470


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers sh,i.v dollar in foreign currency.


"I Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.50 0.50
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.18 0.15
6-month 0.30 0.29
5-year 2.14 2.02
10-year 3.29 3.17
30-year 4.27 4.08



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Jun 09 58.63 +1.92
Corn CBOT Jul09 421 +9
Wheat CBOT Jul 09 591 +203/4
Soybeans CBOT Jul09 1111V2 +91/2
Cattle CME Jun 09 82.97 +.95
Pork Bellies CME Jul 09 80.00 +1.60
Sugar (world) NYBT Jul09 15.27 -.22
Orange Juice NYBT Jul09 90.85 +.95

SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $914.40 $887.60
Silver (troy oz., spot) $13.935 $12.48U
Copper(pound) $2.14/U $2.1015
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$114/.1U $1096.4U
NMER = New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT =
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


ISTOC S O LCAITEES


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


THE MARKET IN REVIEW


I AMEX!^!^---


IBENE--H


I NYSE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STOCKS


A6 STURDAvMAY 9 20 9


p













ullir cc tUFNITV (Fl.) (Jkfn ICF UuNS STUDYr I 9,209I


Name NAV Chg
AIM Investments A:
ChartAp 12.62 +27
Constip 16.59 +.15
HYdAp 3.31 +.01
IntlGrow 19.79 +.41
SelEqtyr 13.26 +.30
AIM Investments B:
CapDvBt 9.49 +.20
AIM Investor Cl:
Energy 30.40 +1.37
SummltPp 8.54 +.06
Utilities 12.71 +.25
Advance Capital I:
Balancp 12.15 +.19
l.Retlnc 7.52 +.03
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGrt 4.12 +.10
AllianceBern A:
BalanAp 11.90 +.18
GIbThGrAp51.59 +1.28
IntValAp 10.96 +.41
SmCpGrA 19.10 +.33
AllianceBern Adv:
LgCpGrAd 18.07 +.32
AllianceBern B:
GIbThTGrBt 45.18 +1.12
GrowthBt 16.98 +.23
SCpGrBt 15.58 +27
AJllanceBern C:
SCpGrCt 15.66 +27
Alllanz Instl MMS:
NFJDvVI 9.02 +,28
SmCpvl 20.59 +.72
Allianz Funds A:
NFJDvVI t 8.94' +.28
SmCpVA 19.70 +.68
Allianz Funds C:
GrowthCt 17.32 +.34
TargetC t 9.28 +.29
Amer Beacon Insti:
LgCaplnst. 14.39 +.43
Amer Beacon Inv:
LgCap Inv 13.70 +.40
Amer Century Adv:
EqGroAp 15.35 +.36
Amer Century Inv:
Balanced 12.53 +.18
EqInc 5.80 +.06
GNMAI 10.65 -.01
Growthl 17.71 +.26
Herifagel 13.01 +.23
IncGr 18.23 +.47
IntDisc 6.77 +24
InUlGrol 7.74 +.25
UfeSci 4.43 +.04
NewOpp 4.65 +.10
OneChAg 8.90 +.17
OneChMd 9.08 +.15
RealEstl -10.98 +.83
Ultra A 15.56 +.21
Valuelnv 4.39 +.10
Vista 11.33 +.13
American Funds A:
AncpAp 13.67 +.27
AMutlAp 19.43 +-.31
BalAp 14.20 +.22
BondAp 10.89 +.04
CapWAp 18.55 +.15
CaplBAp 41.40 +.67
CapWGA p 27.76 +.72
EupacAp 30.57 +.90
FdlnvAp '27.15 +.72
GovtAp 14.04
GwthAp 22.76 +.48
HITrAp 8.75 +,05
HilnMunA 12.40 +.02
. coAp 1,03. +.19
SIntBdAp 12.80 +.01
ICAAp 21.64 +.36
LtTEBAp 15.01 +.01
NEcoAp 18.03 +.41
NPerAp 20.33 +.48
NwWddA 36.46 +.86
STBAp 9.93
SmCpAl p 23.75 +.56
TxExAp 11,52 +01
WshAp 21.00 +.46
American Funds B:
BalBt 14.14 +.22
CapIBBt 41.39 +.67
CpWGrBt 27.60 +.72
GnwthBt 22.03 +.46
"nlcoBt 12.93 +.19
IGABt 21.54 +.37
WashBt 20.85 +.45
Ariel Investments:
Apprec 25.93 +.92
Ariel 28.41 +1.01
Artlo Global Funds:
IntlEqI r 24.79 +.59
IntlEqA 24.23 +.58'
IntEqllAl ,9.99 +25
IntEqlllr 10.05 +.25
Artisan Funds:
Inti 16.06 +.43
MidCap 20.45 +.29
MidCapVal 14.67. +.35
Baron Funds:
Asset 38.74 +1.02
Growth 34.21 +.71
SmCap 15.57 +.31
Bernstln Fdas:,,,., - .
I.'|IDur 1223 .r
l ,Mu , . 14.25
NYMu 13.93
TxMgdlntl 12.33 +.41
IntPort 12.29 +.41
BlackRock A:
AurorsA 13.05 +.34
CapDevAp 12.00 +.14
EqtyDiv 13.33 +.32
GIAIAr '15.53 +.25
HiYlmvA 5.70
IntlOpAp 24.75 +.83
BlackRock B&C:
GIAlBt 15.14 +24
GAICt f4.52 +.23
BlackRock Insti:
BaVll 19.06 +.40
GIbAllocr 15.60 +.25
SBrandywine Fds:
BlueFdn 18.38 +.02
Bmdywnn 18.99 +.02
Brinson Funds Y:
HiYIdlYn 5.08 +.02
CGM Funds:
Focusn 26.65 +1.01
Mut n 22.02 +.32
Reallyn 15.58 +1.08
CRM Funds:
MdCpVII 20.43 +.48
Calamos Funds:
Gr&lncAp 23.67 +.39
GrwthAp 34.42 +.55
GrowthCt 31.71 +.51
Calvertd Group:
Incop 14.00 +.08
IntlEqAp 11.43 +.29
MuhInt 10.35 +.01
ShDuranAt 15.70 +.06
SocialAp 21.33 +23
SocBdp 14.27 +.05
SocEqAp 25.42 +.55
TxF Lt 9.50
TxFLgp 15.65 +.02
TxFVT 15.43 +.01
Cohen & Steers:
RItyShrs 34.81 +2.46
Columbia Class A:
Acornmt 18.79, +.52
21CntryAt 9.43 +.38
MarsGrAt 14.16 +.40
TxEAp 12.62 +.02
Columbia Class Z:
AemmZ 19.34 +.54
AcomlnIZ 26.22 +.81
CbreBdZ 10.16 +.01
IntBdZ 7.95 +.03
IntTEBd 10.04 +.01
LgCpldxZ 18.00 +.42
MarsGrZ 14.39 +.41
MdCpVIZp 9.13 +32
ValRestr 33.97 +1.34
OFA Funds:
InSrCorEqn 8.19 +.31
USCorEql n 7.68 +.22
USCorEq2 n 7.61 +25
DWS Invest A:
CommAp 12.07 +37
DrHIRA 26.19 +1.07
MgdMunlp 8.60 +.02
StrGovncA 8.57 +.01
DWS InvestS:
CorPIlnc 9.65 +.02
EmMkIn 9.15 +.02
EmMkGrr 12.72 +.32
EuroEq 18.19 +.73
GNMAS 15.01
GIbBdS r 9.59 +.08
GIbOpp 24.27 +.59
GIblThem 16.46 +.43
Gold&Pro 15.43 +.47
GrolncS 11.75 +.31
HiYldTx 10.85 +.04
IniTxAMT 11.15 +.01
Ini FdS 36.89 +1.69
LgCoGro 20.86, +.14
LatAmrEq 35.87 +1.25
MgdMuni S 8.61 +.01
MATFS 13.85 +.01
SP500S 12.34 +.29
Davis Funds A:


NYVenA 25.83 +.95
Davis Funds B:
NYVen B 24.79 +.91
Davis Funds C & Y:
NYVenY 26.11 +.96'
NYVenC 24.96 +.92
Delaware Invest A:
Dlverincp 8.24 +.04
.TrendA p 10.27 +.26
TxUSAp 10.58 +.02
Delaware Invest B:
SelGrB t 17.73 +.44
Dimensional Fds:
EmMCrEq ni2.95 +.37
EmMktV 22.09 +.64
IntSmVan 12.16 +.38
USLgCon 27.42 +.64
USLgVan 14.38 +.62
US Micron 8.57 +.33
USSmalin 13.16 +.49
USSmVa 15.60 +.71
Int1SmCon 11.27 +.34
EmgMktn 20.23 +.51
RFxdxn 10.27 -.02
InIVan 13.82 +.62
GIb5Fxlncn 11.05
2YGIFxdn 10.27
DFARIEn 12.95 +.95


Materil n 40.47 +1.62
MedDI n 32.59 +.54
MdEqSysn 19.79 +.37
Multmd n 25.91 +.44
NtGas n 28.00 +1.44
Papern 21.08 +1.13
Pharm n 8.48 +.05
Retain 35.52 -.14
Softwr n 52.94 +.45
Tech n 50.77 +.21
Telcm n 34.14 +.33
Trans n 30.13 +.50
UtilGr n 38.65 +.89
Wireless n 5.87 +.05
Fidelity Spartan:
Eqldxlnvn 32.91 +.77
ExtMklnn 24.69 +.82
500Snxlnvrn64.53 +1.51
Intllnxinvn 27.44 +1.00
TotMkllnvn 26.20 +.66
Fidelity Spart Adv:
EqldxAdn 32.91 +.77
500Adrn 64.54 +1.51
TotMktAd r n26.20 +.66
First Eagle:
GIlblA 34.32 +.66
OverseasA 16.85 +.31


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.


Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change In price'of NAV.
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


� El


StrlncB 5.55
John Hancock CIl1:
LSAggr 8.73 +.24
LSBalanc 9.99 +.19
LSConsrv 10.93 +.11
LSGrwth 9.53 +21
LSModer 10.23 +.16
Keeley Funds:
SmCpValA p 16.97 +.82
Lazard InstI:
EmgMldktl 13.39 +.38
Legg Mason: Fd
SplnvCp 19.26 +.83
ValTrCp 29.49 +1.36
Legg Mason Ptrs A:
AgGrAp 74.78 +1.87


Name NAV Chg
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced 54.34 +1.24
Income 12.14 +.04
IntlStk 24.94 +.96
Stock 78.94 +2.36
Dreyfus:
Aprec 28.13 +.56
CorVA 18.82 +.62
Dreyt 6.32 +.16
Dr500lnt 26.18 +.61
EmgLd 13.51 +.51
GrChinaAr 31.93 +.80
HIYIdA p 5.76 +,01
LgCStkAp 16.83 +.40
MunBdr 10.73 +.02
NYTaxr 14.09 +.01
StratValA 21.24 +.72
TechGroA 18.71 +.08
Driehaus Funds:
EMktGr 20.94 +.57
Eaton Vance CI A:
ChinaAp 17.33 +.25
AMTFMBI 8.96 +.02
MultiCGrA 5.74 +.22
InBosA 4.61 +.02
LgCpVal 14.28 +.50
NatlMun 8.75 +.03
SpEqtA 10.26 +.32
TrEdGvA 7.49 -.01
Eaton Vance CI B:
HBhSBt 8.04 +.11
NatIMB t 8.75 +.02
Eaton Vance Cl C:
GovtC p 7.4h -.01
NatlMCt 8.75 +.02
Evergreen A:
AstAl p 9.68 +.13
Evergreen C:
AstAIICt 9.38 +.12
Evergreen I:
SIMunil 9.58 +.01
FBR Funds:
Focuslnv 34.78 +.64
FMI Funds:
LgCappn 12.10 +.26
FPA Funds:
NwInc 10.99
Falrholme 24.72 +.77
Federated A:
AmLdrA 10.96 +.32
MIdGrStA 25.01 +.49
KaufmAp 3.72 +.10
MuSecA 9.65 +.01
Federated Instt:
KaufmnK 3.72 +.10
TotRetBd 10.37 +.02
Fidelity Adv FocT:
EnergyT 26.64 +1.33
HItCarT 15.06 +.13
Fidelity Advisor A:
DIvIntlAr 12.07 +.43
NwInsghp 13.93 +.25
StrInA 10.62 +.05
Fidelity Advisor I:
DIvIn m ' 12.25 +.44
EqGrIn a 38.47 +1.04
EqInI n 17.91 +.65
IntBdIln 9.84 +.03
Nwlnsgtl n 14.06 +.26
Fidelity AdvisorT:
BalancT 11.57 +.19
DivGrTp 8.07 +.32
DynCATp 12.79 +.29
EqGrTp 36.19 +.98
EqInT 17.65 +.64
GrOppT 22.00 +.43
HilnAdTp 6.91 +.10
IntBdT 9.82 +.02
MulncTp 12.24 +.01
OvrseaT 13.74 +.50
STFiT 8.74 +.01
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2000n 10.49 +.09
FF2010n' 11.02 +.19
FF2015n 9.12 +.16
FF2020n 10.78 +.23
FF2025n 8.84 +.19
FF2030n 10.45 +25
FF2035n 8.61 +.22
FF2040n 5.99 +.15
Income n 9.89 +.08
Fidelity Invest:
AggrGrrn 12.93, +.14
AllSecEq 9.90 +.25
AMgr50n 11.88 +.20
AMgr70rn 11.95 +.26
AMgr2Orn 10.87 +.08
Balancn. 14.03 +.24
BlueChGr n 29.36 +.49
CAMunn 11.58 +.04
Canada n 40.94 +1.73
CapApn 17.49 +.39
CapDevO n 722 +.20
Cplncrn 6.55 +.04
ChinaRgr 21.55 +A1
CngS n 356.28 +4.95
CTMunrn 11.22 +.02
Contra n .47.03 +.84
CnvScn 16.93 +.51
DisEq n 17.52 +.44
Divlntl n 22.85 +83
1reeS1.0 r. ,.JO i, * .
D.01hr. '18, '. * 714
EiTI r,. n I ") . 4
Eqlncn 32.93 +1.23
EQIIn 13.86 +.51
ECapAp 14.51 +.54
Europe 24.10 +.90
Exchn 244.67 +4.55
Export n 15.85 +.35
Fideln 2425 +.64
Fiy rn 12.48 +.33
FtRateHi rn 8.73 +.02
FrinOne n 20.71 +.49
GNMAn 11.31
Govtinc 10.76
GroCon 5429 +.97
Grolncn 13.46 +.35
Highlncrn 7.05 +.02
Indepnn 15.86 +.60
InProBdn 10.73 -.01
IntBdsn 9.42 +.02
IntGovsn 10.84 .
IntrnMu n 9.98
InltlDIscn 24.58 +.85
IntlSCprn 13.53 +.39
InvGrBd 10.75' +.02
InvGB n 6.51 +.01
Japan n 9.46 +.31
JpnSm n 6.84 +.23
LgCapVaI n 9.99 +.36
LCpVI r n 8.39 +.32
LatAmen 36.79 +1.16
LevCoStkn 17.80 +.86
LowP r n 25.61 +.63
Magellnxn 53.14 +1.10
MDMurn 10.58 +.01
MAMunn 11.45 +.01
MegaCpStk n7.27 +.20
MIMunn 11.60
MIdCapn 17.75 +.50
MNMunn 11.24 +.01
MtgSecn 10.11
Munilncn 12.13 +.02
NJMunrn 11.21 +.01
NwMktrn 13.19 +.05
NwMilln 19.61 +.54
NYMunn 12.50 +.01
OTCn 34.28 +.43
OhMunn 11.38 +.01
100lndex 6.71 +.14
OrWsea n 26.21 +.95
PcBasn 15.41 +.44
PAMunrn 10.60 +.01
Puritn n 13.75 +22
RealEn 14.13 +1.07
StIntMun 10.50
STBFn 8.01
SmCaplnder11.52 +.38
SmllCpSrn 11.70 +.3
SEAslan 21.05 +43
StkSlc n 18.09 +.42
Stratlnc n 9.48 +.04
StrReRt r 7.46 +.10
TaxFrBrn 10.45' +.01
ToialBd n. 9.63 +.02
Trend n 43.58 +.72
USBI n 10.78 +.01
UIity n 12.46 +.14
ValStratn 16.94 +.85
Value n 45.51 +1.84
Widwn 13.18 +.42
Fidelity Selects:
Aim 24:14 +.71
Banlingn 14.47. +1.36
Blotch n 55.1'2 +.20
Brokrn 39.31 +3.17
Chem n 59.38 +1.48
ComEquipnl5.52 i+.06
Comp n 30.43 +.02
ConDisn 15.41 +.13
ConStapn 50.13 +.60
CstHo n 25.48 +.71
DfAern 51.00 +1.80
Electr n 27.62 -.49
Enrgyn 37.90 +1.89
EngSvn 49.83 +2.45
Envirn 13.41 +.32
FRnSvn 51.05 +3.80
Goldrn 34.84 +1.10
Health n 84.26 +.75
HomFn 9.80 +.54
Insurn 33.36 +1.77'
Lelsr n 56.63 +.71


Name NAV Chg
First Investors A
BIChpAp 16.40 +.30
GlobhAp 4.86 +.12
GovtAp 11.11 -.02
GrolnAp 10.41 +.26
IncoAp 2.13 +.01
MATFAp 11.31 +.01
MITFAp 11.78 +.01
NJTFAp 12.66 +.01
NYTFAp 14.02 -.01
OppAp 17.70 +,45
PATFA p 12.74
SpSnAp 15.98 +.46
TxExAp 9.62 +.01
TotRtAp 12.00 +.17
ValueB p 5.38 +.12
Firsthand Funds:
Tech Val 24.99 +.08
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUS p 8.94 -.01
ALTFAp 10.84 +.01
AZTFAp 10.41 +.01
BaJlnvp 35.23 +1.27
CallnsAp 11.72 +.05
CAIntAp 11.05 +.02
CaiTFA p 6.60 +.02
CapGrA 8.36
COTFAp 11.16 +.02
CTTFAp 10.44 +.02
CvtScAp 10.74 +.17
DblTFA 10.71 +.03
DynTchA 19.24 +.18
EqlncAp 12.43 +.22
Fedlntp 11.15 +.02
FedTFAp 11.29 +.02
FLTFAp 11'.13 +.05
FoundAlp 8.26 +.14
GATFA p 11,51 +.01
GoIdPrMA 30.17 +.98
GwthAp 31.01 +.61
HYTFA p 9.05 +.03
HilncA 1.64
IncomA p 1.75 +,02
InsTFAp 11.51 +.01
NYITFp 10.77 +.01
LATFA p 10.80 +.02
LMGvScA 10.44
MDTFAp 10.62 +.02
MATFAp 11.19 +.01
MITFA p 11.65 +.01
MNInsA 12.02
MOTFAp 11.51 +.02
NJTFAp 11.55 +.01.
NYInsAp 10.69 +.01
NYTFAp 11.32 +.01
NCTFAp 11.73 +.01
OhiolAp 12.34 +.01
ORTFAp 11.42 +.01
PATFA p 9.92 +.02
ReEScA p 8.23 +.60.
RisDvAp 23.82 +.61
SMCpGrA 22.99 +.48
Stratlnc p 8.98 +.03
USGovAp 6.64
UtilsAp .9.93 +.12
VATFAp 11.22
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdvp ...
IncmeAd 1.74 +.02
Frank/Temp Frnk B:
IncomeBt 1.74 +.02
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
FoundAlp 8.14 +.14
IncomCS t 1.76 +.02
Frank/Temp MIt A&B:
BaacnA 9.55 +.17
DiscA 23.57 +.20
QualfdAt 15.11 +.19
SharesA 15.93 +.30
Frank/Temp Mtl C:
DiscCt - 23.36 +.19
Frank/TempTemp A:
DvMktAp 15.73 +.34
FbrgnAp 5.14 +.13
GIBdAp 11.95 +.03
GrwthAp 13.44 +31
WorldAp 11.24 +.19
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 13.44, +.30
Frank/TempTmp B&C:
DevMkIC 15.37 +.33
ForgnCp 5.03 +.13
GIBdCp 11.97 +.03
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S Inc 10.33 +.01
S&S PM 30.94 +.73
TaxEx 11.34 +.02
GMO Trust III:
EmMk r 9.26 +.27
FP.. '10.00 :,
Irilnhv' ' 17.68 * ')
Hu i.,r q 15.82 +13
GMO Trust IV:
EmCnDt 6.64 +.05
EmrMkt - 9.22 +27
IntlGrEq 16.90 +.44
IntllntrVI 17.67 +.59
GMO rust VI:
EmgMktsr 9.22 +27
StrFxInc 15.38 +.05
USOQtyEq 15.82 +.12
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 33.18 +.89
Gateway Funds!
GatlewayA 23.38 +.11
Goldman Sachs A:
HiYieldA 5.81 +.02
MdCVAp 23.51 +.76
Goldman Sachs Inst:
HiYield 5.82 +.02
MidCapV 23.69 +.77
Harbor Funds:
Bond 1i7-' +.10
CapAplnst .59's +.20
Intllnvt 42.28 +1.45
Intl r 42.67 +1.47
Hartford Fds A: -
OpAppA p 24.94 +.62
DivGthAp 14.59 +.42
Hartford Fds C:
CapApct 22.39 +.56
Hartford Fds L:
GnwOppL 418.46 +28
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 29.31 +.74
Div&Gr 15.00 +.44
Advisers 15.01 +.26
Stock 29.27 +.71
TotRetBd 9.95 +.02
Henderson GIbI Fds:
IntOppAp 17.29 +.65
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrIlOrIg 10.37 +.30
HussmnStrGr 12.62 -.34
ICON Fds:
Energy 15.44 +.74
Hthcare 10.80 +.18
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.60 +.03
Ivy Funds:
AasseISCt 18.88 +.17
AsselStAp 19.30 +.17
AsselStrYp 19.33 +.17
GINaIRsAp 14.86 +.62
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 10.79 +.02
MCpVall0 15.81 +.48
JPMorgan Select:
HBSMkNe p 16.04 +.07
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 10.78 +.02
HiYIdBd n 6.55 +.03
IntmTFBdn 10.78
IntrdAmern 16.57 +.42
ShtDur~dn 10.72 +.01
TxAwRRetn 9.63 +.02
USLOCCrPs n14.53 +.29
Janus:
Balanced 21.30 +.23
Contrarian 10.61 +.42
Enterpr 37.48 +.59
FedTE
FIxBnd 9.84 +.01
Fund 20.99 +.32
FundaEq 15.58 +.41
GlUfeSd 17.04 +.16
GtTechr 10.66 +.10
Grcnc 23.83 +.46
Odon 7.66 +.17
Ovrseasr 32.59 +.50
PrkMCVInv 16.73 +.50
Research 19.52 +.34
ShTmBd 2.98 +.01
Twenty 50.19 +.66
Ventur 33.02 +.89
WridW r 32.31 +.55
Janus Adv S Shrs:
Forty 25.63 +.32
JennlsonDryden A:
BlendA 12.02 +.30
HighlncA 8.62 +.02
HiYIdA p 4.46 +.01
InsuredA 10.04
UtilityA 7.52 +.16
JennlsonDryden B:
GrowthB 11.39 +.09
HidB t 4.46 +02
InsuredB 10.06
John Hancock A:
BondAp 12.74 +.01
RgBkA 12.88 +.87
StrinAp 5.55
John Hancock B:


Name NAV Chg
ApprA p 10.65 +.27
HilncAt 4.60 +.03
InAICGAp 6.41 +.21
LgCpGAp 17.65 +.06
MgMuAp 15.01 +.01
Legg Mason Ptrs B:
LgCpGBt 16.19 +.05
Longleef Partners:
Partners 19.78 +.39
Intl 11.65 +.33
SmCap 16.67 +.67
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 11.17 +.09
StrlncC 11.486 +.09
LSBondR 11.13 +.09
StrlncA 11.42 +.08
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 10.26 +.07
InvGrBdCp 10.20 +.07
lnvGrBdY 10.27 +.07
Lord Abbett A:
AffilA p 8.80 +.32
AIIValA 9.19 +.31
BdDebAp 6.33 +.02
MidCpAp 10.71, +.29
MFS Funds A:
MITA 14.40 +.35
MIGA 10.70 +.17
HilnA 2.68 +.01
MFLA ' 9.12 +.02
TotRA 11.73 +21
UtilA 12.31 +.43
ValueA 17.93 +.47
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 9.67 +.16
GvScBn 9.99
HilnB n 2.69 +.01
MulnBn 7.92 +.02
TotRB n 11.73 +.21
MFS Funds Instil:
IntlEq n 12.79 +.43
MainStay Funds A:
HIYIdBA 4.90 +.02
MainStay Funds B:
CapApBt 19.63 +21
ConvBt 11.58 +.14
GovtBt 8.59
HYIdBBt 4.88 +.03
IntllEqB 9.59 +.22
SmCGBp 9.13 +.18
TotRtBt 12.82 +.13
Maims & Power:
Growth 55.07 +1.54
Managers Funds:
Bondn 20.54 +.12
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 6.39 +.16
Marsico Funds:
Focus p 12.58 +.38
Matthews Asian:
India r 9.58 +.10
MergerFd 14.76 -.02
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 9.07 +.03
TotRtBdl 9.07 +.03
Midas Funds:
Midas Id 2.62 +.06
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 10.88 +.31
Morgan Stanley A:
DivGthA 11.69 +29
Morgan Stanley B:
DivGtB 11.79 +.30
GIbDivB 8.35 +.19
StratB 15.33 +.18
MorganStanley Inst:
IntlEqln 11.06 +.33
Under Funds A:
IntemtA '16.54 +.20
Under FundsY:
MCpCGrYrn18.24 +.36
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 9.65 +.17
DiscZ 23.85 +.20
QualfdZ 15.22 +.19
SharesZ 16.05 +.30
Neuberger&Berm inv:
Focus 14.75 +.34
Genaslnst 31.35 +.96
Intlr 11.66 +.36
Partner 19.20 +.74
Neuberger&Berm Tr
Genesis 32.64 +1.00
Nicholas Group:
Hilnoln 8.21 +.03
Nich n 33.23 +.81
Northern Funds;
HiYFxlnc 6.28
SmCpldx 5.61 +.20
Technly'" 924: +.04
Nuveen Cl A:
LtMBAp 10.64 +.01
Nuveen CI R:
IntDMBd 8.62 +.01
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhStOkSG n2629 +.06
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 22.43 +.33
Globall 15.70 +.48
Intl I r 13.00 +.46
Oakmarkr 29.15 +.67
Select r 18.80 +40
Old Mutual Adv II:
Tc&ComZ 10.95 +.03
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 6.20 +.03
GlbSMdCap 10.59 +.22
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 5.46 +.03
AMTFrNY 9.41 +.03
CAMuniAp 6.43 +.06
CapApAcp 31.70 +.48
CaplncAp 6.88 -+.09
ChmplncAp 1.59
DvMldAp 20.49 +.50
Discp 34.16 +.53
EquityA 6.52 +.16
GlobAp 41.66 +1.29
GIbOppA 19.15 +.33
Gold p- 25.59 +.84
IntBdA p 5.89 +.06
MnStFdA 23.89 +.568
MSSCAp 13,92 +.54
MidCapA 10.59 +.18
PAMunIAp 8,93 +.04
StrlnA p 3.47 +.02
USGvp 8.74
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 5.44 +.03
AMTFrNY 9.42 +.03
CplncB t 6.78 +.09
ChmplncBt 1.59
Equity. 6.06 +.14
StrlncB t 3.48 +.02
Oppenheimer C&M:
IntIBdC 5.87 +.06
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.03
RoMuAp 13.48 +.06
RcNtMuA 5.77 +.06
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9,55 +.02
TolRIAd 10.31 +.03
PIMCO InstIl PIMS:
AIlAsset 10.54 +.11
ComodRR 7,02 +.11
DevLcMkr 8.91 +.11
DIvInc 9.16 +.06
EmMkBd 9.20 +.04
FrgnBd 9.27 +.06
HIYId 7.28 +.05
InvGrCp 10.05 +.07
LowDu 9.65 +.05
ModDur 10.02 +.06
RealRet 9.90 +.04
RealRtnl 10.02 +.04
.ShortT 9.55 +.02
ToIRI 10.31 +.03
TR II 10.02 +.06
TRill 9.04 +.06
PIMCO Funds A:
LwDurA 9.65 +.05
RealRtAp 10.02 +.04
TotRtA 10.31 +.03
PIMCO Funds C:
ReaIRtCp 10.02 +.04
TotRlCt 10.31 +.03
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 10.31 +.03
Pamassus Funds:

Pax World:

Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 34.16 +.59
Pioneer Funds A:
CullenVal 13.97� +.30
BondA p 8.43 +.01.
EurSelEqA 18.48 +.70
IntlValA 15.72 +.62
MdCpGrA 9.82 +.18
PionFdAp 29.44 +.64
TxFreA p 9.13 +.03
ValueA p 9.02 +26
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 7.20 +.10
Pioneer Funds C:
HYIdCt 7.27 +.09
Price Funds Adv:
Growth pn 21.67 +.32
Price Funds:
Balance n 15.03 +27


USAA Group:
AgvGt 23.34 +.62
CA Bd 9.61 +.02
CrnstStr 16.34 +.33
GNMA 9.97 -.01
GrTxStr 10.93 +.13
Grwth 10.45 +.13
Gr&lnc 10.72 +.25
IncSIk 9.14 +.26
Inco 11.21 +.02
Intl 17.34 +.58
NYBd 10.94 +.01
PrecMM 25.19 +.75


Name NAV Chg
Intl G&I 10.01 +.34
IntlStkn 9.58 +.33
Japan n 6.15 +.19
LatAmn 31.73 +1.27
MDShrtn 5.24
MDBond n 9.91 +.01
MidCapn 38.04 +.86
MCapVal n 16.51 +48
NAmern 22.51 +.35
N Asian 10.30 +.06
New Eran 36.20 +1.68
NHorizn 19.92 +.48
NIncn 8.81 +.02
NYBondn 10.66
PSIncn 12.93 +.18
RealEsten 10.41 +73
R2010n 12.09 +21
R2015n 9.04 +.17
R2020n 12.20 +25
R2025n 8.77 +20
R2030 n 12.38 +.29
R2035 n 8.67 +.21
R2040n 12.33 +.30
SciTec n 16.43 +.05
ShtBd n 4.71 +.01
SmCpStkn 21.41 +.66
SmCapVal n24.47 +.91
SpecGrn 12.31 +.33
Specinn 10.76 +.10
TFInc n 9.43 +.01
TxFrH n 9.37 +.02
TxFrSIn 5.46
USTInt n 5.94 +.01
USTLgn 12.20 +.02
VABondn 11.15
Value n 16.79 +.50
Principal Inv:
BdMtgIn 8.55 +.03
DiscLCInst 9.43 +.22
LgGrIn 5.73 +.10
LT2030ln 8.31
LT2020ln 8.55
SAMBalA 9.7.1
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvA p 9.25 +.02
AZTE 8.62
CATxAp 7.28 +.03
Convp 14.01 +.18
DvrnA p 6.61 +.04
EqlnAp 11.44 +.38
EuEq 14.71 +.58
GeoAp 9.70 +.16
GIbEqtyp 6.67 +.22
GrIlnAp 9.99 +.31
GIblHIthA 38.65 +.63
HiYdA p 6.09 +.03
HiYId In 4.83 +.02
IncmA p 5.58 +.02
IntGrln p 7.46 +29
InvAp 9.19 +21
NJTxA p 8.86 +.01
NwOpAp 33.91 +.50
PATE 8.67 +.01
TxExA p 7.99 +.02
TFInAp 14.27 +.03
TFHYA 10.04 +.05
USGvAp 13.48 -.01
GIblUtilA 9.86 +.28
VstaA p 6.96 +.18
VoyAp. 14.97 +.39
Putnam Funds B:
DvrlnBt 6.56 +.04
Eqinct 11.33 +.38
EuEq 14.10 +,56
GeoBt 9.59 +.16
GIbEq t 6.04 +.21
GINtRs t 14.05 +.59
GrinBt 9.82 +.31
GIblHIthB 32.64 +.53
HiYIdB t 6.08 +.03
HYAdBt 4.75 +.01
IncmBt 5.54 +.02
IntGrnlt 7.39 +.29
IntlNopt 10.49 +.35
InvBt 8.28 +.19
NJTxBt 8.86 +.02
NwOpBt 29.65 +.43
TxExB t 8.00 +.03
TFHYBt .10.06 +.06
USGvBt 13.41 -.01
GIblUtilB 9.81 +.27
VistaBt 5.91 +.15
VoyBt 12.77 +.33
RS Funds:
IntGrA 12.51 +.42
LgCAIphaA 30.70 .+.79
Value 16.78 +.71
Rainier Inv Mgt:
SmMCap 21.13 +.58
RldgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 6.77 '+.06
RIverSource A:
BalanceA 7.87 +.13
DispEqAp 4.02 +.09
DEI 7.24 +.18
DivrBd 4.54 +.01
DvOppA 5.64 +.13
Growth 1.88 +.31
HiYdTEA 4.01
LgCpEqp 2.96 +.06
MCpGrA 7.31 +.19
MidCpVlp 5.17 +.17
RiverSource I:
TNEmgMktn6.31 +.17
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSv r 10.55 +.37
MiroCapl 10.26 +.29
PennMul r 7.53 +.24
Premierlr 13.36 +.38
TotRetl r 9.03 +.31
ValSvct 8.09 +.25
VIPISvc 9.02 +28
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 9.31 +.05
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 8.69 +.03
SEI Portfolios:
CoreFxAn 9.17 +.03
IntllEqAn 6.45 +.15
LgCGroAn 15.28 +.25
LgCValAn 12.27 +.38
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 14.27 +.34
Schwab Funds:
HIthCare 11.86 +.18
l000tnvt r 27.54 +.68
1000Sel 27.51 +.67
S&P Inv 14.42 +.34
S&P Sel 14.46 +.34
S&PlnstSl 7.37 +.17
SmCptny 13.39 +.50
Selected Funds:
AmShD 31.07 +1.15
AmShSp 31.08 +1.15
Seligman Group:
ComunAt 29.34 +.15
FrontrAt 7.62 +.19
GIbSmA 9.08 +.28
GIbTchA 13.42 +.09
HYdBArp 2.23
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 23.00 +.48
Sequoia n' 100.40 +.77
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 32.39 +.56
SoundSh- 24.04 +.70
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 41.55 +.83
Stratton Funds:
Dividend 16.26 +1.13
Multi-Cap 28.63 +1.24
SmCap 34.33 +1.35
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 9.77
TCW Funds:
TotRetBdl 9.36 +.01
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bondlnst 9.84 +,01
Tamarack Funds:
EnlSmCp 14.25 +.41
Value
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 15.60 +.32
Third Avenue Fds:
Inir 12.86 +.37
RIEstVI r 16.09 +.46
Value 38.50 +1.28
Thornburg Fds:
InIValAp 20.18 +.49
IntValue I 20.63 +.50
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.01 +.02
Incorn 7.15 +.03
Transamerica A:
Rexlncp 7.38 +.02
TA IDEX A:
TempGIbA p 19.90 +.47
TrCHYBp 7.16 +.02
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 20.51 +.39
Tweedy Browns:
GlobVal 16.60 +.18
UMB Scout Funds:
Intl 22.99 +.70
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 17.56 +.38
ChinaReg 6.70 +.16
GIbRs 6.86 +.29
Gld&Mtls 12.15 +.36
WIdPrcMn 12.11 +.38


Opptylnv 25.62 +.46
SCApValZp 20.77 +.86
Western Asset:
CorePlus 9.06 +.04
Core 9.22 +.03
William Blair N:
GrowthN 8.09 +.10
IntlGthN 14.42 +.43
Yacktman Funds:
Fundp 11.90 +.36


Chronicle staff do not provide
financial advice or real-time
quotes on stocks or funds.
consult a financial adviser.


Name NAV Chg
SciTech 8.13 +.06
ShtTBnd 8.59
SmCpStk 8.69 +.25
TxElt 12.19 +.01
TxELT 12.01 +.02
TxESh 10.40
VABd 10.45
WidGr 13.24 +.39
VALIC:
MdCpldx 13.55 +.44
Stkldx 19.20 +.47
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 12.87 +.11
Van Kamp Funds A:
CATFAp 15.94 +.04
CapGro 8.68 +.16
CmstAp 11.25 +.29
CpBdA p 5.75 +.02
EqlncAp 6.60 +.12
Exch 342.39 +4.91
GrinAp 14.15 +.39
HarbA p 12.52 +.11
HiYIdA 8.19 +.01
HYMuAp 8.16 +.02
InTFAp 15.64 +.03
MunlAp 12.01 +.02
PATFAp 14.63 +.01
StrMunlne 9.16 +.02
USMtgeA 12.46 -.01
UIIAp 15.63 +.24
Van Kamp Funds B:
EnterpBt 10.09 +.19
EqlncBl 6.48 +.12
HYMuBt 8.16 +.02
MulB 12,00 +.03
StrMunInc 9.15 +.02
USMtge 12.39 -.02
UIIIB 15.55 +.24
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmln 17.11 +27
CAITAdmn 10.64 +.01
CALTAdmn10.71 +.02
CpOpAdl n 53.59 +.46
EMAdm r n 25.20 +.72
Energy n 99.25 +4.36
ExplAdmln 42.70 +1.00
ExtdAdmn 26.37 +.92
500Admln 85.71 +2.00
GNMAAd n 10.65 -.01
HlthCrn 41.77 +.63
HiYldCp n 4.81 +.01
InflProAd n 23.33
ITBdAdmIn 10:32 +.03
ITsryAdmln 11.60
IntGrAdmn 42.77 +1.29
ITAdmI n 13.21 +.01
ITGrAdmn 8.75 +.04
UdTrAd n 10.91
LTGrAdmIn 7.91 +.07
LTsyAdmln 11.37 +.01
LTAdmln 10.65 +.01
MCpAdml n 59.07 +1.90
MorgAdm n 37.68 +.51
MuHYAdm n 9.72 +.02
NJLTAdn 11.36 +.01
NYLTAdn 10.72
PrmCaprn 48.99 +.63
PALTAdm n 10.73
STsyAdmln 10.81
STBdAdmlnlO.29 +.01
ShtTrAdn 15.85
,STFdAdn 10.87
STIGrAdn 9.98 +.01
TxMCaprn 45.48 +1.15
TtlBAdmln 10.11 +.01
TStkAdm n 22.72 +.57
WellslAdm n43.76 +.46
WelltnAdmn43.44 +.87
Windsorn 33.10 +.89
WdsrllAd n 35.00 +.98
Vanguard Fds: *
-AssetAn 18.87 +.35
CAITn 10.64 +.01
-CALTn 10.71 +.02
CapOpp n .23.20 +.20
Convrln 10.68 +.14
D nvdGron 11.29 +.19
Energy n 52.86 +2.32
Eqlncn 15.52 +.43
Explrn 45.89 +1.07
FLLTn 10.93 +.01
GNMAn 10.65 -.01
GlobEqn 12.73 +.36
Grolnon 19.86 +.49
GrthEqn . 7.50 +.10
HYCorp n 4.81 +.01
HlihCren 98.97 +1.50
InflaPfon 11.88
IntlExpIrn 10.68 +.33
IntlGrn 13.45 +.41
InllVal n 24.90 +.91
ITIGraden , 8.75 +.04
ITTsryn. 11.60
UfeConn 13.66 +.16
UfeGron 16.68 +.38
Ufelncn 12.43 +.08
UfeModn 15.61 +.26
LTlGraden 7.91 +.07
LTTsryn 11.37 +.01
Morgn 12.15 +.16
MuHYn .9.72 +.02
Mulntn 13.21 +.01
MuLtdn 10.91
MuLongn 10.65 +.01
MuShrtn, 15.85
NJLTn 11.36 +.01
NYLTtn 10.72
OHLTTEn 11.66 +.01
PALTn . 10.73
PrecMtlsrn 15.24 +.66
PnnrmcpCorn 9.71 +.14
Prmcprn 47.22 +.62
SelValurn 13.01 +.44
STARns 15.11 +.25
STIGrade n 9.98 +.01
STFedn 10.87
STTsryn 10.81
StralEqn 12.30 +.37
TgtRellncn 9.76 +.08
TgRe2010 n18.30 +.27
TgtRe2005nl 0.02 +.11
TgtRe2025n 9.71 +.20
TgtRe2015n9.95 +.17
TgRe2020 n17.31 +.32
TgRe2030 n16.33 +.37
TgtRe2035 n 9.74 +.23
TgtRe2040 n15.95 +.39
TgtRe2045n10.08 +.25
USGron. 13.26 +.20
USValue n 7.73 +.23
Wellslyn 18.06 +.19
Wellin n 25.15 +.51
Wndsrn 9.81 +.26
Wndsll n 19.72 +.56
Vanguard Idx Fds:
50Qn 85.70 +2.00
Balanced n 17.11 +.27
DevMkt n 7.75 +.28
EMktn 19.16 +.55
Europen 21.09 +.86
Extend n 26.36 +.91.
Growth n 21.82 +.30
ITBnd n 10.32 +.03
LgCaplxn 17.02 +.40
LTBndn 10.87 +.05
MidCapm 13.02 +.42
Pacific 8.40 +23
REITr n 11.15 +.82
SmCap n 22.05 +.80
SmlCpGth n13.19 +.35
SmIrCpVIn 10.75 +.50
STBndn 10.29 +.01
TolBndn 10.11 +.01
Tolllnl n 11.61 +.41
ToIStk n 22.72 +.57
Value n 16.10 +.55
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 17.11 +.27
DvMkllnst n 7.69 +.28
Eurolnstn 21.10 +.87
Exinin 26.37 +.91
Grwthlst n 21.83 +.30
InfProlnst n 9.50
Instldxn 85.16 +2.00
InsPIn 85.16 +1.99
TolBdlIdxn 50:80 +.02
InstTStldxan 20.53 +.52
lnsTStPlusen20.53 +.52
MidCplson 13.05 +.42
Paclnstmn 8.41 +23
SCInstn 22.06 +.79
TBIstn 10.11 +.01
TSlnst n 22.73 +.57
Valuelstn 18.11 +.55
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 70.80 +1.66
ITBdoSigna 10.32 +.03
MidCpldxn 18.65 +.60
STBdIdxn 10.29 +.01
ToIBdSgIn 10.11 +.01
TotstkSgln 21.93 +.55
Vantagepoint Fds:
Growth n 6.31 +.12
Victory Funds:
DvsSIA 11.75 +20
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 7.44 +.07
CoretnvA 4.15 +.11
ScTechA 7.44 +.10
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 23.96 +.74
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStkZ 13.44 +.35


Name Last
SPCnSt 22.76
SP Consum 23.99
SPEngy 51.84
SPDR Fnd 13.02
SP Minds 23.51
SPTech 17.09
SP Ulil 27.25
StdPac 2.42
Standex 11.97
StarwdHti 22.08
StateStr 43.75
Steris 26.29
StoneEngy 7.67
StratHolels 1.36
Stbyker 41.55
SturmRug 11.72
SubPpne 41.45
SunCmts 15.10
Suncorgs 32.39
Suroco 31.46
SunriseSen 2.79
SunstnHI 6.99
Suntech 16.45
SunTrst 20.77
Supvalu 16.73
Synovus 4.65
Sr cn 23.60
T ndI 16,15
TECO 12.20
TJX 28.06


TaiwSemi 10.44
TalismEgs 1444'
Target 43.79
TataMotors 7.84
Taubmn 27.37
TeckRes g 14.38
TelcmNZ 8.24
TelMexLs 17.20
Templelnld 12.76
Tenads 28,95
TenetHIth 238
Tenneco h 6.26
Teppco 29.20
Teradata 20.91
Teradyn 6.49
Terex 17.90
Terra 25.41
TerraNilro 126.23
Tesoro 16.72
TetraTech 8.47
Texlnst 17.30
Textron 11.96
Theragenh 1.16
ThermoFis 36.69
ThmBael 32.47
3MCo 60.09
Tiffany 28.78
TWCablers 35.82
TimeWm rs 25.20
Timrken 18.25
TtanMet 8.59
ToddShph 14.99


TollBros
TorchEnll
Trchmrk
TorDBkg
Total SA
TotalSys
Transocn
Travelers
Tredgar
TriConl
TycoEJec
Tycolnt
Tyson
UBS AG
UDR
UIL Hold
US Airwy
USEC
UltraPIg
UniRFrst
UnilevNV
UnionPacs
Unisys h
UtdMcro
UPS B
USBancrp
USNGsFd
USOiFd
USSteel
UtdTech
UtdhlthGp
UnumGrp


ValeantPh 19,41 +.38
ValeroE 23.30 +1.42
VangLgCp 42.07 +.95
VangTSMs 46.55 +1.03
VangREIT 33.39 +2.09
VangEmgs 30.57 +1.11
Vari Med 35.83 +.84
Vectren 23.10 +.39
Ventas 30.22 +2.34
VeoliaEnv 29.07 +1.56
VerizonCm 29.85 -.01
ViacomB 21.69 +58
VimpelCm 10.91 +.84
Visa 68.43 +2.90
Vishay 5.88 -.19
Vodafone 18.50 +.19
Vonageh .55 -.01
Vomado 51.83 +3.88
WGL Hold 30.55 -.08
Wabash 2.23 +.72
WalMart 50.14 +.25
Wagm 31.39 +.87
WalterEn 32.44 +2.53
WsteMInc 27.00 +.35
Weathflnts 19.20 +.90
WebsterFn 7.71 +1.09
WeinRIt 15.85 +1.37
WellPoint 48.86 +1.38
WellsFargo 28.18 +3.42


WendyArby 4.60
WestarEn 18.10
WAstEMkI 9.55
WstAMgdHi 4.80
WAstlnfOpp 11.13
WDigitIll 23.71
WslnUnion 17.90
Weyerh 35.66
Whril 49.79
WimCS 5.13
WmsCos 16.16
WmsPtrs 18.06
Windstrm 9.05
Winnbgo 9.20
WiscEn 38.89
WIdFuel 41.90
Worthgin 15.18
Wyeth 44.15
Wyndham 12.90
XLCap 11.12
XTOEngy 44.27
XcelEngy 18.26
Xerox 6.69
Yamanag 8.73
YingliGm 8.92
YumBmds 33.92
ZweigTi 3,39


NEYRKSOC XCAG


BIChip n 26.12 +.50
CABond n 10.31 +.02
CapAppn 15.51 +.23
DivGron 17.48 +.44
EmEurp 11.03 +.32
EmMktSn 21.20 +.50
Eqlncn 17.79 +.59
Eqlndexn 25.03 +.59
Europe n 11.38 +.42
GNMAn 9.66 -.01
Growth n 21.82 +.33
Gr&ln n 14.60 +.30
HthSci n 20.32 +.26
HIYield n 5.38 +.03
InllBondn 9.08 +.12
IntDIs n 27.43 +.69


Stocks surge on relief over



unemployment, banks


Associated Press in six months and much fewer than ana-
lysts had expected.
NEW YORK - As far as Wall Street is Bank shares surged after the govern-
concerned, there is no bad news anymore. ment released report cards on the nation's
At least for now, traders 19 largest financial insti-
are seeing news -about tutions. With the "stress
longtime trouble spots Market watch tests" results out and eas-
like banking and unem- May8,2009 ing fears about the stabil-
ployment in a strictly pos- ity of banks, investors
itive light. Dow Jones +164.80 could check another item
Surging bank stocks industrials 8,574.65 off their list of worries.
have lifted the Standard "Getting past the stress
& Poor's 500 index a Nasdaq +22.76 tests was a milestone,"
dizzying 37.4 percent composite 1,739.00 said Jim Dunigan, manag-
since early March, when ing executive of invest-
the benchmark for many Standard & +21.84 ments for PNC Wealth
mutual funds and other Poor's 500 929.23 Management. "That was a
investments skidded to a cloud hanging over our
12-year low. Russell +18.88a head for the past several
The index is still down 2000 51182 months. The good news is
40.6 percent from its high there were no surprises."
in October 2007. NYSE diary The dissipating worries
"We trust the rally," said Advanced: 2,652 sent the Dow charging
Chris Hyzy, chief invest- Declined: 436 higher by 164.80 points, or
meant officer at US Trust. Declined 436 2 percent, to 8,574.65. The
He said the rapid climb Unchanged: 67 Standard & Poor's 500
since March 9 is justified Volume: 8.16 b index rose 21.84, or 2.4
because investors are no percent, to 929.23, and the
longer running from wor- Nasdaq diary Nasdaq composite index
ries about a possible de- Advanced: 1,850 rose 22.76, or 1.3 percent,
pression. Declined: 542 to 1,739.00.
On paper, U.S. stocks Unch'ned: For the week, the Dow
have gained nearly $2.9 Unchanged: 78 is up 4.4 percent, trim-
trillion in value since the ' Volume: 1.2 b ming its losses for 2009 to
rally started. only 200 points, or 2.3 per-
The latest fuel for the SOURCE: SunGard AP cent.
ascent. came from news It was the eighth gain
that job losses slowed in April and that big for the index in nine weeks. The S&P 500
banks don't need as much capital as some index jumped 5.9 percent, while the Nas-
investors had feared. daq composite index rose 1.2 percent
The Labor Department said employers after logging bigger gains in recent weeks
cut 539,000 jobs last month - the fewest than other indicators.







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SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009 A7


RTfC US COUNTY (FL E


BUSINESS










Page A8 - SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009



'PINION


"Clapping with the right hand only
will not produce a noice."
Malay proverb

r


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan................................... publisher
- Charlie Brennan ...................................... editor
Neale Brennan ........promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ................................ managing editor
Cheri Harris .......................................features editor
Curt Ebitz.................................. citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ............................... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson ...................................guest member
"You may differ unth my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


PARTNERSHIP, NOT PARTISANSHIP




County





manager





needs full





support
C t -


It now appears that former
Citrus County commis-'
sioner and current county
employee Brad Thorpe will be
named county manager next
Tuesday.
From the outset, commis-
sioners Gary Bartell and Den-
nis Damato urged their fellow
commissioners to appoint
Thorpe, but the
commission voted THE IS
' k'alp icit. candi- ..
mates.'. After the BraTd'i
list of candidates expected
was narrowed to named
three, one with- manr
drew, and inter-
views for the OUR OF
remaining two
were set for next New man
week. Thorpe was need su
one of the two.
However,, with
Commissioner Joe Meek now
voicing support for Thorpe, it
� appears that the only barrier
remaining for appointing him
county manager is a formal.
vote of the commission, which
is expected during their next
meeting.
Thorpe brings many assets to
the position, including a
knowledge of the county, expe-
rience as a former commis-
sioner, and a thorough.,
understanding of Citrus
County government that nei-
ther of the two most recent
county managers brought to
the job.'
Once the manager is named,
the commission needs to get
busy and give him a vision of
where they want him to lead
the county. What has been con-
spicuously lacking has been a
vision that provides the basis
for a real county plan.
The importance of a plan is
underscoredby a favorite say-


ing of Texas oilman and entre-
preneur T. Boone Pickens that
"a fool with a plan can out-
smart a genius with no plan."
The commission's most re-
cent effort to articulate a vision
for the county was a train
wreck. With a new manager in
place, the commission needs to
resurrect the process and ar-


ISSUE
orpe
d to b
count
eager. ,

'INIC
ager
pport
miss

Thru


ticulate the key el-
" ements of their
vision as a guide
-: ' to the manager.
>e Though Thorpe's
ty appointment ap-
pears to be immi-
' nent, it is a
IN: concern that
will while he appar-
will ently has the votes
of to get the job. nei-
ion. their commission-
ers John
imston nor Winn Webb


placed Thorpe on their list of
suggested finalists.
For the good of the county,
we hope the manager will be
named in a-5-0 vote, and that
he will have the genuine sup-
port of the entire commission
after he is selected. There is no
benefit to the county for indi-
vidual commissioners to be in
public conflict with the county
manager. Commissioners need
to, articulate a vision for guid-
ance, and then give the man-
ager the space to carry out that
vision without trying to micro-
manage individual decisions.
After more than two years of
conflict, the county needs sta-
bility, and Thorpe has the po-
tential to provide that stability.
For the sake of everyone in-
volved, we hope he will step up
to that leadership role, and
that individual commissioners
will not let politics get in the
way of success.


Call Animal Cont
... I can't even sit on my
for the dogs barking. It's th
ers' fault for letting them'b
the time. My dog barks onl
someone comes in the
yard. Animal Control
should do something
about' barking dogs.
Control your dogs
This is to all those peo-
ple who write letters to'
the editor and Sound Offs
about cruelty to animals
and the guy shooting the.
dog and so forth: I love
animals probably more
than 90 percent of the
people out there, so I'm ve
pathetic with the situation.
ever, dog lovers, in particul
ought to control their dogs
are a nuisance. Cities have
ordinances and so forth. D


rol
porch,
le.own-
ark all


should fall under that rule. The
dog lovers are just pushing them-
selves too much on the public ...
Be considerate


y, hen I hate barking dogs. Call Ani-
, rmal Control. They have a
S 1f I.'that if two neigh-
ND boiTill it out and carry
it'to them, they can put a
stop to it. When you
. can't enjoy peace and
quiet in your own home
and yard, it can make
you crazy enough to
S'ant to kill it. Get a dog
CAL trainer, please. Be con-
563-0579' i'tlerate. Learn to keep it
' quiet, please.
ry em- Justice?
How- If a dog attacks a man, he is
ar, euthanized.'If a man shoots his
They neighbor's dog across a public
noise street,,he is charged with a mis-
ogs demeanor. Ah, justice.


Jack Kemp's warning


S 've taken showers," Jack
| Kemp loved to say, "with
the kind of people most
Republicans have never met."
By the time Kemp died last
week at 73, he was no longer a
force in the Republican Party, but
the warning contained in his joke
resonates more than ever. During
his 18 years in the House, repre-
senting the suburbs of Buffalo,
N.Y, and his failed run
for vice president in
1996, Kemp preached
the gospel of inclusion,
not exclusion.
He wanted the "big
tent" of the Republican
Party to cover the en-
tire football field
where he once starred I
as a quarterback for Cokld
the Buffalo Bills. The Steven
black linemen who
blocked for him and OTI
the blue-collar workers VOI
who cheered for him
should all have a place in the GOP
But as Sen. Olympia Snowe, a
Maine Republican, has, noted,
Kemp's old party is today more
like an umbrella than a tent,
"under which only a select few are
worthy to stand." And New York,
Kemp's adopted home, reflects
that decline. In 1980, the Empire
State supported Ronald Reagan
and elected a Republican, Al
D'Amato, to the Senate. Twenty-
five years ago,.Republicans held
14 of the state's 34 House seats.
Today, New York Republicans
control no Senate seats and only
three of 29 House districts. Last
fall, New Yorkers voted 63 percent
to 36 percent for Barack Obama.
Kemp's death came only days
after Sen. Arlen Specter of Penn-
sylvania announced he was leav-
ing the Republican Party and
joining the Democrats. Sure,
Specter was acting out of selfish


e

H
I(


motives. He was likely to lose a
Republican primary next year to
a hard-line conservative chal-
lenger. But the key point is why
Specter, a card-carrying moder-
ate, felt rejected. The right-wing
purists who have captured the
GOP in Pennsylvania would
rather burn heretics like Specter
at the stake than broaden the
party. Or win elections.
The purist creed
was articulated by that
great political thinker,
Rush Limbaugh, who
exulted over Specter's
departure by saying,
"We're weeding out
people who aren't re-
ally Republicans."
Clearly, the purists
and failed both political sci-
Robert, ence and arithmetic. In
the latest .ABC/Wash-
IER ington Postpoll, only 21
CES percent of the voters
called themselves Re-
publicans. On what planet can you
build a majority party by appeal-
ing to one out of five voters?
But wait, it gets worse for the
Republicans. Voters under 30
backed Obama by 66 percent to 32
percent, and that trend is even
more pronounced among non-
whites, whose political power is
rising steadily. Youthful Latinos
voted 76 percent to 19 percent for
Obama. (The electorate last year
was 74 percent white, down from
88 percent in 1980; four states are
already a majority nonwhite, and
six others are about to flip.)
Smart Republicans understand
this trend. 'Sen. John Cornyn of
Texas, who heads Republican re-
cruiting efforts, says he is looking
for Senate candidates like, well,
Arlen Specter, who can appeal to
independent swing voters. "Some
conservatives," he lamented to
the New York Times, "would


rather lose than be seen as com-
promising on what they regard as
inviolable principles."
Sen. Lindsey Graham of South
Carolina is even more biting
about the disaster of "Limbaugh-
ism:" "Do you really believe we
lost (young voters) or we lost HIs-
panic voters because we are nrot
conservative enough? No. Thi4 is
a ridiculous line of thought" '
This trend is not just about race
and demography. Views on criti-
cal social issues that helped build
the Republican majority are shift-
ing swiftly. For the first time in the
ABC/Post poll, more voters sup-
ported gay marriage (49 percent)
than opposed it (46 percent). Five
years ago, only 34 percent backed
same-sex unions and 62 percent
were against them.
Last year, conservative Repub-
licans thought they could rafly
their base by opposing "amnesty"
for undocumented workers, but
today 61 percent favor making
citizenship easier for illegal iin-
migrants and 35 percent' are op-
posed. Less than two years ago,
those numbers were almost even.
So will the Republican Party
now be a permanent minority? Of
course not Nothing is permanent
in politics. After the 2004 elec-
tions, Republicans held the presi-
dency and both Houses ;of
Congress and there was a lot'of
loose talk about a permanent 4e-
publican majority. Besides, the
Democrats are fully capable of
making mistakes: overregulating
the economy, ignoring the deficit
and responding too readily to
unions and liberal interest groups.

Cokie Roberts' latest book is'
"Ladies ofLiberty: The Women
Who Shaped Our Nation."
Steve and Cokie Roberts can be
reached at stevecokie@gmaikconm.
?


to the Editor


Spreading love .
The clergy and therapists help,
survivors cope with the emo-
tional effects of death but, in my
experience, only hospice guides
us through the unchartered jour-
ney of dying.
Hospice House of Citrus
County is a haven where dedi-
cated people give professional
care and offer cheerful hospital-
ity to all who visit, including the
family dog. There's a dignity and
grace to every aspect of the Hos-
pice operation.
We contribute to charity organ-
izations and we are bombarded
with plastic gimmicks, constant
phone calls and continuing mail
solicitations. Hospice sends out
one small envelope annually
with a simple message inviting
us, but not badgering us, to con-
tribute.
The Hospice people who come
into our home when we are over-
whelmed bring a calm profes-
sionalism, along with willing,
capable hands and are like the
extended family of another era.
I recall saying to my husband
when our children were babies,
"Love isn't the stuff of poetry; it's
a grubby thing." Hospice of Cit-
rus County spreads love in its
most sincere form.
Mary B. Gregory
Homosassa


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle 'editorials are the opinions of1
the editorial board of the newspa-
per.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
0 Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the ed-
itorial board, which meets weekly,
should call (352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
e-mail. Names and hometowns
will be printed; phone numbers
will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail.to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

Utilize resources
To Sen. Bill Nelson: I can't be-
lieve that a man with knowledge
of foreign affairs wouldn't know
that the Chinese, Cubans,
Venezuelans and Russians all
currently have plans to drill off
the coast of Florida. I can assure
you that they have far less con-


,qern for environmental regula-
tions than American companies.
As a constituent whom you
supposedly represent, I strongly
urge you to promote legislation
to tap all of America's natural ,
resources, in all states to allow
energy independence and an im-
proved national security.
Perhaps the current efforts to
repeal the 17th Amendment aid
return the Senate to the control
of the states will correct your
misguided behavior
Tapping offshore resources of
fossil fuels will improve the
economy of the sovereign state
of Florida, which as our elected
senator should be your duty.
In addition to so-called alter-
native fuels, it is incumbent on
we the people to utilize to the ut-
most our God-given natural re-'
sources to become energy
independent In the future, I ex-
pect your votes to reflect the ma-
jority, of your constituents who'
believe that the responsible har-
nessing of our natural resources
is the best to provide for the fua
ture of both the sovereign state
of Florida and the republic that
is the United States of America.
Study your history, senator; the
decision on how to best utilize-
natural resources is reserved tb
the states by the very Constitu-'
tion that you swore to uphold.
Kevin Tuite
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Hot Comrner: DOGS


- LETTERS








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SATURDAY~ MAY 9, 2009 AS


BATTLING
Continued from Page Al

trap," 'Anything Goes" and "Look
No Hans."
_ "It's a magic thing. It's really
awesome. It's incredible," Jefford
said.
One aspect of production Jefford
aas always loved is creating cos-
mtumes. Much of what Jefford wore
,pn stage, she made herself.
Her last performance was as
Mabel in Pirates of Penzance at the
fbld Playhouse 19.
In February, Jefford was prepar-
ing to audition for the lead in
''Guys and Dolls" at the Art Cefiter
IT *mmm
A The day of the crash Jefford was
'at her parents' house to cut her sis-
'er Emily's and Dad's hair The
,'ower had gone out that day and
Sshe finished up her dad's trim by
candlelight
" After the cuts, Jefford was
headed to Dunnellon to get a
*Valentine's Day gift for her
,boyfriend.
- mm
^ Just before 9 p.m. Feb. 13, Jefford
,was making her way through the
streets of her parents' winding and
,rural neighborhood.
1 According to Florida Highway
Y atrol, 21-year-old Zachari Sipes,
gif Dunnellon, was speeding in a
.our-door Saturn west on West
-Iunterhill Street when he ran the
stop sign at Velveteen Point and
,collided with Jefford's 1998 Ford,
which was headed north on Vel-
�yeteen toward North Fernandina
IAvenue.
, Sipes and two passengers, James
ST. Pritchard, 22, of Hernando, and
J)eanna Swagler, 30, of Crystal
JRiver, were pronounced dead at
te scene of the crash. A third pas-
:senger in Sipes' car, 19-year-old
'Stephanie ,Mocknick, of Crystal
River, survived. She was treated at.
even Rivers Regional Medical
Center and released.
Jefford was first taken to Seven


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
The area where Mary Jefford skull was removed on the side of her head, left, Is evident In the photograph.


Rivers Regional Medical Center
Later she was airlifted to Shands
Hospital in Gainesville.
um E
It's been months since the crash,
but Jefford's body still carries
bruises. ,
There's a scar about a foot long
that goes down the middle of her
torso.
Doctors removed her spleen and
took out a portion of her pancreas.
Her hip and collarbone were
broken. Her back and ribs were
fractured.
Jefford was unconscious the first
12 days she was in the hospital.
For weeks she was in a neck
brace and was tied down so she
wouldn't move and further injure
her healing body


She's battled infections.
To relieve pressure in her brain
and to take out large blood clots,
doctors cut away a portion of Jef-
ford's skull.
Because of that, Jefford must
wear a foam helmet much of the
time to protect her head. Eventu-
ally, a plastic piece will be put in
her head to replace the bone.
Jefford's neck itches from the
healing skin where her tra-
cheotomy was performed.
Her legs aren't strong enough to
support her body weight
She is acclimating to a Wheel-
chair.
But despite all this, her family is
thankful.
"Mary truly is a miracle," her
mother, Michele Jefford. said.


S.
After seven weeks in the hospi-
tal and a few days in rehabilita-
tion, Jefford was sent home.
For now, she is staying with her
parents, Michele and David and
sisters, Emily, 13, and Cali, 8.,
"It was just so good to see her,"
Emily said - who had to wait about
three weeks after the crash before
she could visit her sister.
Jefford's brother, David. 23, vis-
its to lift her spirits, along with
other friends.
When Jefford must leave the
family's stilted home, her parents
maneuver her in her wheelchair
down 14 steps. It's difficult and un-
comfortable, but the three take it
one step at a time ... the same way
Jefford must take life now


Jefford passes the time by mak-
ing beaded jewelry. She tries to
help out by folding laundry.
"I hate not being able to get up
and do things, so I do what I can,"
Jefford said.
Jefford spends about an hour a
day exercising in the pool. Her dad
built a ramp so she could easily get
in.
She. hopes to try standing in
June or July.
Jefford's long curly hair has
been buzz cut short so her hair
would all be one length. She has a
bald spot on the back from having
to lie flat for so long.
Her family and friends have
been helping to pay her $700 mort-
gage payment
So far Jefford's medical bills are
about $420,000. She had no health
insurance.
"Really the only thing I can do
with the big bill is pray that it will
be met," Jefford said.
Her Jack Russell terrier, Millie,
is being cared for by a friend.
While everyone in Jefford's life
is being supportive, all the
changes have been tough to take.
"I missed out on a lot because I
got hit," Jefford said.
She missed the audition for
"Guys and Dolls."
Missed seeing close friends per-
form in several plays.
She missed taking care of her
dog, her new house.
She was supposed to sing in a
benefit concert with the Citrus
Community Concert Choir
She was supposed to be work-
ing.
"I want to get back into my house
and back into my job," Jefford said.
Her boss is keeping her job open
for when she gets healthy enough
to work again.
"I don't like depending on other
people," Jefford said.
Jefford hopes to be in a Beatles
tribute concert in July.
She plans to be back in her
house by the end of the year.
"I'm determined to do every-
thing again," Jefford said.


FLU STATEWIDE SWINE FLUHOTLINE
Continued from M The public can call (800) 342-3557 for information.
Continued from Page Al


Cases are considered sus-
pect if patients exhibit
symptoms. If the state lab
confirms the samples as in-
fluenza A, the case becomes
probable.
Those samples are then
sent to the Centers for Dis-


ease Control in Atlanta,
which determines if the pa-
tient ,has H1N1, or the
Swine flu.
Marion County this week
reported a probable case in-
volving a West Port High
School student.


Citrus has had no proba-
ble cases, Tear said.
She said health officials
would watch for clusters of
flu outbreaks, such as in
nursing homes. Other than
that, she said, the crisis ap-
pears to have passed.


Tear said she thinks the
health department's warn-
ings were appropriate.
"We learned a lot," she
said. "It made us much
stronger It's just like a hur-
ricane.
"People are going to think
we make a mountain out of
a molehill. If the molehill
had come, they'd be yelling
because we didn't tell them
about it"


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SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009 A9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I










N Page Al0 - SATURDAY, MAY 9,2009



IN ACTION


&
CITRUS COUNi


WORLD


rY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Bear can


Associated Press
A grizzly bear at the Alaska
Zoo in Anchorage, Alaska,
tosses a trash can Friday,
showing how easy it is for
bears to get into trash after
the bears failed to get into
a bear. resistant can that
was tested at the zoo. The
test is in conjunction with
the zoo's bear aware pr6-
gram that teaches basic
bear safety concepts.

Boy killed as tree
falls on home
ROSSVILLE, Ga. -A boy
died and two other people
were injured by a giant oak
tree that toppled onto a home
in northwest Georgia, nearly
slicing the house in half, au-
thorities said.
Christian Lucas, 7, was pro-
nounced dead at a hospital
after the tree fell (ate Thurs-
day, officials said. A woman
was in serious condition at a
hospital in Chattanooga,
Tenn., and her 22-month-old
child was treated for injuries
and released.
Walker County fire chief
Randy Camp told the Chat-
tanooga Times Free Press
that rescue crews were called
around 11 p.m. Thursday and
worked first to free the 7-
year-old boy.

WorldBRIEFS

Pope expresses
respect for Islam
AMMAN, Jordan - Pope
Benedict XVI began his first
trip to the Middle East on Fri-
day, ex-
S pressing
S.his "deep
-" f ' respect" for

hopes that
the
Catholic
Church
Pope would be a
Benedict
xvI force for
peace in
the region as he traded
carefully following past mis-
steps with Muslims and
Jews.
The pope was given a red-
carpet welcome at the airport
by Jordan's King Abdullah II
and Queen Rania and
praised the moderate Arab
country as a leader in efforts
to promote peace and dia-
logue between Christians
and Muslims. An honor guard
wearing traditional red- and
white-checkered headscarfs
played bagpipes and waved
Jordanian and Vatican flags.
The trip to the Holy Land is
the first for the German-bomrn
Benedict, who will travel on
Monday for a much-antici-
pated four days in Israel and
the Palestinian territories.
Angry mob kills
robbery suspects
QUITO, Ecuador-- Police
said an angry mob dragged
two suspected robbers from
.a police station in Ecuador
and burned them to death.
A police statement says
the crowd of about 800 peo-
ple also set fire to the station.
Eighteen officers were in-
jured.
Pedro Cruz is a resident of
the southern coastal city of
Valencia, where the brutality
took place on Friday.
Cruz told Teleamazonas
TV It "was the only solution
we had because everybody.
was getting robbed. We
couldn't even walk the
streets."
Prosecutor Cesar Manzo
promised an Investigation.
He called the incident "a bar-
barity that cannot continue in
civilzed society,"
-From wire reports


Fires force evacuation


.Associated Press
A helitanker drops fire retardant Friday along mountain slopes In Santa Barbara, Calif. The 4-day-old blaze has
spread to 3,500 acres. Containment is estimated at 10 percent.

30,000 ordered to flee California wildfire

Associated Press __ . ____" --".-... _-


SANTA BARBARA, Calif. -
Turning the horizon a lurid orange
and raining embers on roofs as it
advanced, a raging wildfire that
has destroyed scores of homes in
the hills menaced this celebrity en-
clave and other coastal towns Fri-
day, and the number of people
ordered to flee climbed to 30,000.
Authorities warned an addi-
tional 23,000 to be ready to leave at
a moment's notice.
Columns of smoke rose off the
Santa Ynez Mountains as the 4-
day-old blaze - fanned by "sun-
downer" winds that sweep down
the slopes in the evening - blew
up from 2,700 acres to 3,500 in less
than a day, creating a firefighting
front five miles long.
"It's crazy. The whole mountain
looked like an inferno," said Maria
Martinez, 50, who with her fiance
hurriedly left her /home in San
Marcos Pass, on the edge of Santa
Barbara. The couple went to an
evacuation center at the University
of California, Santa Barbara.
An unknown number of homes
were destroyed in the blowup that
began Thursday night, in addition
to the estimated 75 houses that
burned the night before on the
ridges and in the canyons above
Santa Barbara.
No deaths or serious injuries
were reported.
The number of people ordered to
evacuate rose to 30,500 from 12,000
the night before as the blaze


growing
More than
30,000 people
have fled the
Santa Barbara
area under
mandatory
evacuation
orders as the
Jesusita wildfire
expanded
Friday.


Mandatory .
evacuation area
- -*..'- ? -
"'"1, . -- - - - �
m - .' " *
o mi- SANTA BARBARA - -
0 1 km . "


SOURCES: National Interagency Fire Center; Santa Barbara County; ESRI AP


pushed west toward neighboring
Goleta and east toward well-to-do
Montecito.
"Literally last night, all hell broke
loose," Santa Barbara Fire Chief
Andrew DiMizio said Friday morn-
ing, recounting firefighters' efforts
to put out roof fires and keep flames
out of his section of the city.
The eight-member Wasjutin fam-
ily arrived at the university campus
in three cars and a trailer packed
with four dogs, eight baby chickens,
two cockatiels, an iguana, a rat
named Cutie and an African spur
tortoise. They fled their 40-acre
San Marcos Pass property after
watching the flames grow closer.
They left three horses and three
hens behind.
"We drove down through fire on
both sides," said Silvia Wasjutin,
48, a speech pathologist


In a scene of strange contrasts,
students bicycled to classes and
midterms as ash fell on campus,
and boats bobbed in Santa Bar-
bara's harbor as smoke rose from
the mountains above town. ,
The Santa Barbara area has long
been a favorite of celebrities.
Oprah Winfrey has an estate in
Montecito, where Charlie Chaplin's
old seaside escape, the Montecito
Inn, has stood since 1928. A ranch.
in the mountains that Ronald and
Nancy Reagan bought became his
Western retreat during his presi-
dency.
More than 2,300 firefighters bat-
tied the blaze, using at least 246 en-
gines, 14 air tankers and 15
helicopters. A DC-10 jumbo jet
tanker capable of dumping huge
loads of retardant began making
runs on the fire in the afternoon.


Pakistan


vows to

oust


Taliban
Associated Press
MARDAN, Pakistan -
Pakistan's army vowed Fri-
day to eliminate militant
from a northwestern valley
but warned that its under-
equipped troops face thou-
sands of Taliban extremists
who have seized towns,
planted bombs made from
pressure cookers, and dra-
gooned children to be sui
cide bombers.
As air force jets roaredji
overhead and gunbattle'.
raged, terrified civilian."
from the Swat Valley anri.
neighboring d districts jacce -'
erated their exodus, with
U.N. and Pakistani officials
predicting 1 - million
refugees will soon burden
the turbulent Afghan border
region.
The army formally an-
nounced Friday that an of-
fensive was under way. It,
has drawn praise from U.S ,
officials alarmed at the Taj
iban's recent advance tP
within 60 miles of the capi-
tal, Islamabad.
Washington describes the
militants as an existential
threat to nuclear-armed
Pakistan itself, as well as to
U.S. chances of destroyirjg
al-Qaida or of winning the
war against their insurgent
allies in neighboring
Afghanistan.
"The army is now en-
gaged in a full-scale opera-
tion to eliminate the
militants, miscreants and
anti-state elements from
Swat," said Maj. Gen. Athar
Abbas, chief army
spokesman. "They are on
the ruin and trying to blqckl
the exodus of civilians froqi
the area."
There are doubts about
the ability and resolve of the,
army and the government tj
sustain the kind of grinding'
counterinsurgency warfare,
needed to defeat extremists
whose rhetoric resonates
widely in a Muslim nation,
deeply skeptical of U.s.,
goals in the region. -.
Abbas sought to counted
portrayals of the military as,
ill-trained, saying that they
had learned a lot in eight
years of fighting along the'
border. But he said they,
need helicopters, surveil-,
lance drones and night-vii.
sion equipment, which thb
U.S. is scrambling to pro-,
vide.


Obama won't fight global warming with bear rules


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The
Obama administration,
which promised a sharp
break from the Bush White
House on global warming,
declared Friday it would
stick with a Bush-era policy
against expanding protec-
tion for climate-threatened
polar bears and ruled out a
broad new attack on green-
house gases.
To the dismay of environ-
mentalists, Interior Secre-
tary Ken Salazar refused to
rescind a Bush administra-
tion rule that says actions
that threaten the polar
bear's survival cannot be
considered when safeguard-
ing the iconic mammal if
they occur outside the bear's
Arctic home.
The rule was aimed -at
heading off the possibility
that the bear's survival could
be cited by opponents of
power plants and other facil-
ities that produce carbon
dioxide, a leading pollutant
blamed for global warming.
' The Endangered Species
Act requires that a threat-
ened or endangered species
must have its habitat pro-
tected. Environmentalists
say that in the case of the
polar bear, the biggest threat
comes from pollution -
maihly carbon dioxide from


I Associated Press
This photo from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Alaska Image Library shows a polar
bear. The Interior Department Is letting stand a Bush administration regulation that limits
protection of polar bears from global warming.


faraway power plants, facto-
ries and cars -that is warm-
ing the Earth and melting
Arctic sea ice.
Salazar agreed that global
warming was "the single
greatest threat" to the bear's
survival, but disagreed that
the federal law protecting
animals, plants and fish
should be used to address
climate change.
"The Endangered Species
Act is not the appropriate
tool for us to deal with what


is a global issue, and that is
the issue of global warming,"
said Salazar, echoing much
the same view of his Repub-
lican predecessor, Dirk
Kempthorne, who had de-
clared the polar bear offi-
cially threatened and in
need of protection under the
federal species law.
Kempthorne at the same
time issued the "special
rule" that'limited the scope
of the bear's protection to ac-
tions within its Arctic home.


The iconic polar bear -
some 25,000 of the mammals
can be found across the Arc-
tic region from Alaska to
Greenland - has become a
symbol of the potential rav-
ages of climate change. Sci-
entists say while the bear
population has more than
doubled since the 1960s, as
many as 15,000 could be lost
in the coming decades be-
cause of the loss of Arctic
sea ice, a key element of its
habitat.


Environmentalists and
some members ofCongre. g
had strongly urged Salazair
to rescind the Bush 'regula-
tion, arguing the bear is not
being given the full protec-
tion required under tle
species law.
Others, including most of
the business community,
argue that making the bear a
reason for curtailing green-
house gases thousands of
miles from its home would
cause economic chaos.
Reaction to Salazar's de"
cision Friday was sharply di-'
vided.
Alaska Gov. Sarah Palitf
hailed the decision as ',a
"clear victory for Alaska)'
because it removes the link
between bear protection'
and climate change and.
should help North Slope off
and gas development. Both
of Alaska's senators and its
only House member alsW
praised the decision and re-
jected claims the bear won't
be protected.
Sen. James Inhofe of Okla-.
homa, a global warming
skeptic and the ranking Re,
publican on the Senate En-
vironment Committee,
applauded , Salazar "for'
making the right call and
applying a common-sense
approach to the Endan-,
gered Species Act" and cli-
mate.


-I.-- "~' --










Section B - SATURDAY, M 09




CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Golf, NFL/B2
I MLB B3
0 Sports briels B3
M TV, Lottery B4
E 4NHL B4
M Auto Pacing B4-B5
0 Entertainment 'B6


Chronicle to announce award winners at annual sports banquet on June 1


Chronicle


On Thursday the Citrus County
Chronicle announced its eight
nominees for Athlete of the Year.
Below is a small synopsis of each of
the respective candidates for the
Chronicle's top athlete. Over the
course of the next two weeks we
,ill be running individual articles
on each athlete to help you get to
lmow them better.
'This year's male and female ath-
letes of the year will be announced
dt the Chronicle's 2nd annual
ports banquet at the Inverness
Golf & Country Club. The banquet
Will begin with dinner-at 6 p.m. on
June 1. followed by the awards cer-
eihony. In addition to the male and
A male athlete of the year various
Other awards will be given out
4Tickets for the Citrus County
Chronicle annual sports banquet
Ere available for $30 per ticket To
order your tickets, call sports edi-
tdr John Coscia at 564-2928. Tickets
dan be picked up at the Chronicle's
mlain office on 1624 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., off State Road 44 in
Crystal River.


VOTE FOR
YOUR FAVORITE!!
* Fans can now help select their Athletes of the Year by visiting
chronicleonline.com. Look for the link on the upper right side of
the home page and register to make your vote count.


Quite a few tickets have already
been sold. Therefore, it is recom-
mended that you buy your tickets
early because this year there will
be assigned seating. The seating
arrangement will be based on a
first-come, first served basis deter-
mined by when you buy your tick-
ets. For example the earlier you
buy your tickets, the closer to the
stage your seats will be.
The Female Athletes of the Year
are as follows;,
Carolyn Allen
Seven Rivers Warriors, Sr.
Volleyball, Basketball, Softball
Allen started in all three of the
team sports she played in. The
Warrior set, spiked and dug on the
district-winning volleyball squad
and averaged over 10 points per
game on the basketball team.
Allen also played for a softball
i


team that won seven games in
2009 after not winning any the
previous two seasons.
Carleigh Williams,
Lecanto Panthers, So.
Volleyball, Soccer, Track
One of the best volleyball players
in the county, Williams was a stand-
out as a hitter for the Panthers.
Soccer, though, is probably her best
sport and the Panther was the best
defender in the county on a district
winner. Williams also qualified for
the state track meet in the high
jump."
Summer Dupler,
Lecanto Panthers, Sr.
Cross Country, Volleyball,
Weightlifting, Softball, Track
The first-ever female athlete
from Lecanto to earn five varsity
letters in one season and total 16
for a career, Dupler starred on the


Panthers softball teaml as an out-
fielder and leadoff hitter by batting
.491 with over 50 stolen bases, was
pound for pound the best female
weightlifter in the county and also
made contributions as a back-row
player in volleyball.
Briahanna Jackson,
Lecanto Panthers, So.
Basketball
Very rarely does an underclass-
man have the impact that Jackson
did upon her transfer to Lecanto.
The point guard, already being
looked at by Division I programs,
averaged 21 points, 4.4 steals, and
3.5 rebounds per game as the Pan-
thers finished 21-2 overall after
going 8-18 the year before.
Candace Smith,
Citrus Hurricanes, Sr.
Soccer, Softball
Smith was a lockdown defender
for the district runner-up Citrus
girls soccer team and also batted
.400 while stealing 31 bases as an
outfielder. Furthermore, the senior
set up a breast cancer awareness
game to be played between Citrus
and Crystal River annually that
should become a legacy.


Ashton Connor,
Citrus Hurricanes, Sr.
Golf, Tennis
Connor is not only a good athlete
but also a proven winnerfor Citrus.
The senior helped the Hurricanes
to the Class IA golf championship
yet again as the team's No. 2 golfer
and helped deliver Citrus to a dis-
trict title as the No. 2 singles and
doubles player.
Becca Reynolds,
Crystal River Pirates, Jr.
Volleyball, Soccer, Softball
Reynolds excels at all three
sports she plays as a starter on the
volleyball team, a player who filled
in at several different positions ad-
mirably on the soccer field and
also a member of the softball team.
Sarah Wygle,
Crystal River Pirates, Sr.
Diving, Weightlifting, Softball
A diver through and through,
Wygle capped off an illustrious ca-
reer by winning the district and
finishing fifth in the region as a
senior on her way to a state tour-
nament berth. Wygle also lifted for
the Pirates and competed for the
Crystal River softball team.


Magic best Celtics in Game 3

Howarddominatesd

inside as Orlando

tops Boston, 117-96
Associated Press

ORLANDO - The Orlando
4agic seem to be at their best
when they're shorthanded.
Dwight Howard had 17 points,
14 rebounds and five blocks to lift
the Orlando Magic to a 117-96 vic- .
tory over the Boston Celtics on --
Friday night and a 2-1 series lead
im their Eastern Conference
semifinal.
.,Rashard Lewis had 28 points,
inid Hedo Turkoglu scored 24 for
Wrlando, which played without
!tarting point guard Rafer Alston.
14e was suspended by the NBA
fpr slapping Eddie House in the
back of the head in Game 2.
.Paul Pierce broke out of his se-
ries slump to score 27 points, and '
Rajon Rondo added 15 for the de-
fending champion Celtics, who
trimmed a 20-point deficit to..
seven before the Magic regained
See MAGIC/Page B4

Orlando Magic center Dwight
"' Howard (12) takes a shot over
a Boston Celtics center Kendrick
Perkins during the first half on Fri-
day night In Orlando.
Associated Press


Lecanto freshman


steals show at state


Pole vaulter takes

fourth place;

Cooke finishes 8th

JOHN COSCIA
jcoscia@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
WINTER PARK - The
Lecanto freshman's steely blue
eyes were locked in on the con-
versation between the Merritt Is-
land coach and his pole vaulter.
Three hours earlier and what
now seemed like an eternity ago,
Anna Heinzman had competed in
her first-ever state competition in
the pole vault
But the 14-year old Lady Pan-
ther showed no signs of nerves. If
she was supposed to be intimi-
dated, someone forgot to deliver
her that memo. Instead, Heinz-
man went out and jumped 10-0
feet, which was good enough for
a fourth-place all-state finish.
"It's just been an awesome ex-
perience," Heinzman said. "I've
only been vaulting for two
months. I just plan on continuing
to try and improve. Whatever
God lets me do."
Heinzman's jump wasn't only
her personal best...it was also a


new Lecanto school record.
"Coach Spivey has done a great
job with helping these kids
vault," Lecanto girls head coach
Dan Epstein explained. '"Anna's
still trying to figure out what
she's doing. Right now she does-
n't have a clue how good she is.
And thank God for that. Every
time she PRs (personal record),
it's a new school record."
What made Heinzman's vault
all the more impressive was that
a week ago her doctor told her
she will need to have left shoul-
der surgery as soon as possible.
That operation is scheduled
for next Friday. But on this night,
that surgery was the farthest
thing from Heinzman's mind.
Right now she was going to
school.
Merritt Island's pole-vaulting
coach Bobby Haeck was barking
instructions to his pole vaulter,
Mike Vani. The senior had al-
ready won the state meet but now
he.was making a run at the state
record of 16-7 feet. And Heinz-
man was soaking up every word
as if she was watching an episode
of American Idol.
'Are you learning anything,"
Lecanto head boys track coach
John Verhelst asked.
"I'm trying," the teenager
See TRACK/Page B4


fm .wi' 1,r f.q3 -,`I.wx `A. ..-`7 -'V:!'-.-1; *-4;;'P s,< ,"'-. *' � , i,",*'*" " - - .'" I'.'. .













Ceika leads by two at TPC


Woods lurking

7hhied hi ad-
Associated Press

PONTE VEDRA BEACH
-Alex Cejka began his sur-
prising run to the lead Fri-
day in The Players
Championship with a 10-
foot birdie putt in the still-
ness of a glorious morning.
A smattering of applause
drowned out the chirping of
birds. .-
There were 14 fans, 13
marshals.
"It felt like a Monday af-
ternoon practice round,"
Cejka said after a 5-under
67 gave him a two-shot lead
over Ian Poulter.
That figures to change
on the weekend full of
possibilities.
The Players Champi-
onship is among the more
unpredictable tournaments
in golf. The TPC Sawgrass
is so devilish that small
mistakes can lead to big
numbers. The field is so
strong that even guys who
started the week as an al-
ternate have a chance to
wfi. J5on6rifDufner is proof.
of that, among those in a tie
for third.
Tiger Woods hit a rake
and a spectator and almost
the wrong fairway. From 45
yards away on a par 5, he
tried to keep his chip short


of the green, did just that, elude Masters champion
and made an important par. Angel Cabrera (65), former
It added to a 69 that put him PGA champion David.Toms
s-even shots behind-afd left (70) and Dufner (70), an al-
a smile on his face. ternate when he showed up
"I got myself back in the Monday who earned a tee
ball game," Woods said. time through someone
Not many figured Cejka else's misfortune.
would be in the lead. Cejka didn't seem overly
It was only two weeks ago surprised to be leading, de-
when he couldn't feel his spite his recent health is-
right arm, the product of a sues. He had surgery to
pinched nerve from sur- replace a disk in his neck
gery last year to replace a last year and everything
disk in his neck He had an was going well until he
epidural last week, the couldn't feel his arm two
numbness is almost gone, weeks ago. He had an
and Cejka nearly left the epidural, regained some
field in his wake. feeling in his arms, hands
He had six birdies in 11 and fingers, then got right
holes and built a four-shot back to work.
lead over the morning "In New Orleans, where I
starters, a lead that held didn't feel anything at all, I
for most of the day until really played from tee-to-
Poulter limited his mis- green phenomenal," he
takes and finished with a said. "I just had no feeling,
birdie for a 68. and I couldn't make putts.
"If you play the golf The feeling is better, and I
course properly, with good can see it on the. greens. So
play you can score very we'll see what happens the
well," Poulter said. next two days."
Cejka was at 11-under .Phil Mickelson is thank-
133 and will be playing in ful he gets to play for-tw&-
the final group going into more days. He struggled
the weekend for the first with his putting most of the
time in nearly five years., round and shot 1-under 71,
..Neither of. the .top. two--making birdie on the last
players have ever won on hole to make the cut on the
the PGA Tour, and only one number.
player in the 35-year his- "You never want to give
tory of this event has ever up here, because too many
made this his first PGA things can happen on this
Tour victory. An eclectic golf course," Mickelson
group four shots behind in- said.


Associated Press
Alex Cejka blast from the bunker on the 8th hole during the second round of The Players
Championship golf tournament on Friday at TPC Sawgrass in'Ponte Vedra Beach.
** . "A


Associated Press
Lorena Ochoa watches her tee shot on the 11th hole during the
.i.T.ii oldd-fthe-I.PGA Michelob Ultra Open golf tournament
on Friday at the Kingsmill Golf Club in Williamsburg, Va.


Ochoa looking


to runaway

at Kingsmill
at O n




Associated Press fishing off a record-tying 63
and In-Kyung Kim was pol-
WILLIAMSBURG, Va.. - fishing offa 64 that put them
.Lorena Ochoa is threatening in the lead at 10 under,
to turn the Michelob Ultra Ochoa started with three
Open into a runaway in an- straight pars and then
other of her annual dominat- made birdies on six of the
ing runs. next eight holes to retake
She's also probably the the lead.
person least likely to say so. "I just thought I need to be
"It's never good to think patient and take advantage
that way," Ochoa said Fri- of the easy holes and the par
day after shooting a 6-under 5s, and, go from there, and
65 for a tournament-record that's what I did," Ochoa
13-under total and a three- said. "And then right away, I
shot lead. started making birdies and
"You always need to be felt very comfortable.
ready and you always need "It think it was important
to be humble and tomor- to get those first couple of
Srrow's.goingo.be.a.new day, birdies to get me going."
a new start. I'm going to play It proved crucial; too,-
like if I'm behind for two or when others kept posting
three shots. I never like to low numbers on a day when
think I'm winning." the fairways were still soft
But she is, and looking on the 6,315-yard layout, but
mighty comfortable. soft greens made the.pins:
The world's top-ranked popular targets.
player and first-round Rookie Michelle Wie,
leader took advantage of eight back after an up-and-
perfect playing conditions down 67, had one of the
and soft greens to get eight shots of the day, holing her
Birdies, matching her first- approach for eagle on the
round total. Only two bogeys par4 10th; her first hole of
in her last four holes kept the day. She immediately
her from making the out- followed with a bogey,
come look like a foregone though, and had three more
conclusion, to minimize six birdies.
And it's not as if the rest of Song-Hee Kim, who tied
the field rolled over On the the course record shared by
contrary, In-Kyung Kim, six others, three times al-
Song-Hee Kim and Cristie most holed shots from off
Kerr all finished at 10 under, the green, and rolled in a 30-
and all three played better foot putt on the difficult
than Ochoa. eighth for birdie.
Still, coming off a wire-to- "I had a- perfect day
wire victory two weeks ago today," she said through a
in her native Mexico, Ochoa translator.
has been the leader after six In-Kyung Kim was 5 under
consecutive rounds and after six holes, finished with.
looks as if she might be on an eagle and two birdies on
one of ler irlls'" ... . -the three par-5s-and came -
. She has won at least three within a shot of the course
tournaments in a row once record despite a pair of bo-
in each of the last three sea- geys. Her eagle came when
sons, and last season won she hit a 58-degree wedge 80
five of her first six events, yards on the 473-yard 15th
including the last four in and it spun into the cup.
succession. "It was pretty cool," she
Teeing off around the time said. "I didn't see it, but
that Song-Hee Kim was fin- everyone liked it"


Favre questions continue on



Favre questions continue on


V*i*kins sl need major surgery. If he
VikingS Still does, according to the
source, he'll stay retired.
mum on But Favre's agent, Bus
Cook, told a different ESPN
situation reporter he was unaware of
any X-rays being sent to the
Ss-.team. .Cook reiterated
Associated Press that the famously
fickle quarterback
MINNEAPOLIS - Ihas not told him he
Brett Favre.. healthy and~v wants to' come
hungry enough to end his back for a 19th
retirement again? And how NFL season.
badly do the Minnesota "Brett would
Vikings want him? have to be men-
The questions and confu- tally ready to go play,
sion continued Friday. physically ready to go play,
ESPN, again citing un- and want to go play," Cook
named sources, reported X- told the network, "and I'm
rays ofFavre's injured right not sure all three of those
shoulder have been sent to things are there right now."
the Vikings for evaluation. Cook is the only central
The network said Favre figure in the story'who has
will play for Minnesota if actually spoken on the
it's determined he doesn't record this week. He did


not return phone calls Fri-
day from The Associated
Press.
Vikings officials were un-
available for comment and
have yet to address the
drama since Childress ac-
knowledged last
S week it was likely
the team would
assess its interest
Sin signing the
man who owns
. most of the
league's major pass-
ing records. Favre be-
came a free agent-last month
when, upon his request, he
was ,formally released from
the reserve-retired list by
the Jets.
Favre declared his play-
ing days over in February
after one season with New
York, where he went after
forcing a trade from Green


Bay when the Packers told!
him last July it was too late'
to come back for another
year. He'd first retired ear-j,
lier in 2008.
His health appears to be
at the crux of this latest'
drama - if, indeed, Favre
has any interest in return-
ing to the NFL. Considering
all the conflicting and in,,r
curate reports of the la-
few days, no one can be cer'
tain of that
Favre's torn biceps ten-_
don has caused pain in his,
shoulder, part of the reason
he struggled down the
stretch last season while
the Jets missed the playoffs.
He threw nine intercept
tions over the last five'
games and needed a corti-m,
sone injection after one of!
them. New York went from
8-3 to 9-7.


Heyward-Bey gets introduction to NFL


Associated Press
ALAMEDA, Calif. - Dar-
rius Heyward-Bey ran an
inside route against
Nnamdi Asomugha only to
see the pass from JaMar-
cus Russell broken up by
the Raiders' All-Pro
cornerback .. .. ...
"I 'came back and I just
went, 'All right. I'm not in
college any more,"' Hey-
ward-Bey said. . ...
Heyward-Bey began" his
indoctrination into the
NFL on Friday at the first
day of Oakland's mandatory
minicamp, showing signs of
the big-play ability that at-
tracted the Raiders, and
the inexperience he has to


overcome after leaving col-
lege a year early.
Take that play against
Asomugha. Heyward-Bey
tipped off the route with his
eyes, a mistake that might
not have been an issue
against college .cornerbacks
but is a big mistake against
the more experienced com-
petition in the NFL.
"There's some easy give-
aways right now. I'll talk to
him about that stuff," Aso-
mugha said. "I saw his eyes.
He can't give it away with
his eyes, but this was his
first practice. I wasn't
watching him so I don't
know how well he did. But
he has speed and speed is
always a threat."


Heyward-Bey didn't get
to show off the blazing
speed that made him the
fastest player at the NFL
combine and helped con-
tribute to the Raiders'
much-questioned de-
cision to pick him
seventh ahead of
more heralded're- -e
ceivers Michael
Crabtree and Je-
remy Maclin.
But he still ini-
pressed his - new
teammates.
"He's going to open a lot
of eyes," Russell said. "No
matter who you're up
against they always have to
account for him."
Coach Tom Cable praised


Heyward-Bey for his intel-,
ligence and ability to
quickly learn an NFL of-
fense. But Heyward-Bey
knows the adjustment won't,
be easy, saying at one
I1N time it was "too
bad you can't red-
shirt here."
Heyward-Bey:
knows the
n Raiders can't be
patient after los-
ing at least 11 games
for an NFL-record sixth-
straight season. The-
Raiders need plenty of
help at wide receiver after
getting just 82 .catches
from the position last sea-
son, led by Johnnie Lee
Higgins' 22.


Saints get first look at top draft pick


Jenkins makes

splash in N.O.
Associated Press
METAIRIE, La.- Mal-
colm Jenkins already talks
a good game.
That would be fitting
for the communica-
tions major from -
Ohio State, who
envisions himself
becoming a moti-
- - national speaker -
when his pro
playing days - now
just beginning - come to
an end.
Time will tell if the New
Orleans Saints' first-round
draft pick looks as comfort-
able in an NFL defensive
backfield as he does speak-


ing to reporters in New Or-
leans or school kids and
church groups back in
Columbus, Ohio.
For now, coach Sean Pay-
ton is at least willing to
compliment Jenkins' com-
portment
"He's a sharp kid," Pay-
ton said Friday after
the first practice of
rookie camp at
the Saints' sub-
urban head-
quarters.
i r "He's a pretty
mature kid who
learns -quickly ...
We draft these players
and we're hoping that they
all can contribute, but
we'll see." ?'
Jenkins began rookie
camp practicing only as a
cornerback, though he also
appears to have the size (6-


foot, 204 pounds) and skill
set to be a good fit at free
safety.
Coming. into the draft,
some scouts figured he was
best suited for safety be-
cause his 40-yard time at
the combine of 4.51 was
slow among cornerbacks.
Jenkins would argue
there are other attributes
cornerbacks must possess
besides speed, such as his
ability to jam receivers off
the line of scrimmage and
knock them off their de-
signed routes. He suspects
the Saints considered those
factors in giving him a shot
to play cornerback first
"It obviously shows me
they didn't care about the
40," Jenkins said. "If you
can play, you can play.
They're starting me off at
corner, so I guess that's


where they think I fit best.',
Indeed, speed can mean?
little for a cornerback who"
finds himself misreading a"
play or biting on a fake,
things that lead to receivers
getting wide open for big
plays - and something the"
Saints have seen against
them too often over the past
two seasons.
When Payton discussed
what he wanted to see from'
Jenkins, speed wasn't high
on the list
"You start with just the
familiarity with the scheme
and how quickly he picks
things up from a technique:
standpoint, his alignment,-
his ability to key and diag-
nose," Payton said.
Jenkins said he won't
take it as a setback if he:
doesn't start, but rather a
challenge to improve.


B2 sKrURDAYMAY 9 2009


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS








CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009 B3

East Division Central Division' West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away W L Pet GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Toronto 20 11 .645 - - 6-4 L-1 11-4 9-7 KansasCity 18 11 .621 - - 8-2 W-6 11-6 7-5 Texas 16 13 .552 - - 7-3 W-1 8-6 8-7
Boston 19 11 .633 Y2 - 6-4 W-2 12-3 7-8 Detroit 15 13 .536 2� 3 5-5 W-1 8-5 7-8 Seattle 15 14 .517 1 3% 3-7 L-4 7-7 8-7
NewYork 14 15 .483 5 41 5-5 W-1 6-7 8-8 Chicago 13 15 .464 4Y 5 4-6 L-1 7-7 6-8 LosAngeles 13 14 .481 2 41. 7-3 W-1 7-7 6-7
Tampa Bay 14 17 .452 6 51 6-4 L-1 6-7 8-10 Minnesota 13 16 .448 5 5% 4-6 L-3 9-8 4-8 Oakland 10 16 .385 4% 7 4-6 W-1 5-8 5-8
Baltimore 12 18 .400 7% 7 3-7 L-1 9-9 3-9 Cleveland 11 19 .367 71 8 4-6 L-2 5-8 6-11


pL


Philadelphia
New York
Florida
Atlanta
Washington


East Division
GB WCGB
14 1
1 1�4
3 3Y2
6� 7


Home
7-8
9-6
6-7
5-9
5-7


St. Louis
Milwaukee
Chicago
Cincinnati
Houston
Pittsburgh


Central Division
GB WCGB
2 -
2� Y2

6� 41�
6� 4�


Los Angeles
San Fran.
San Diego
Arizona
Colorado


West Division
GB WCGB
- - I
5� 1�4
8 4
8� 41�
8� 4Y�


Away
8-8
4-9
5-11
4-7
6-10


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Kansrs City 3, Seattle 1
Oakthnd 9, Texas 4
Bati ore 5, Minnesota 4
Tam ,Bay 8, N.Y.Yankees 6
Bost 13, Cleveland 3
Chic o White Sox 6, Detroit 0
LA. Angels 6, Toronto 1
Friday's Games
N.Y. nkees 4,-Baltimore 0
Detn 1, Cleveland 0
Bost 7, Tampa Bay 3
Texa 6, Chicago White Sox 0
Sea at aMinnesota, late
Toro' o at Oakland, late
Kanas City at LA. Angels, late
' Today's Games
Tam Bay (Kazmir 3-3) at Boston (Lester 2-2),
3:40 �.m.
Toro~o (Tallet 1-1) at Oakland (Galagher 1-0),
4:05s.m.
Texd~ (Millwood 3-2) at Chicago White Sox
,(Darns 2-2), 7:05 p.m. .
Detrt (E.Jackson,1-2) at Cleveland (Carmona
1-3)7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Pnkees (Hughes 1-1) at Baltimore (Eaten
1-3), 7:05 p.m. "
Seattle (F.Hemandez 4-1) at Minnesota (Lidriano
1-4)':10 p:m.
Kans City (Greinke 6-0) at LA. Angels (Saun-
ders 4-1), 9:I p.m. '
D * ' Sunday's Games
Deiraq at Cleveland 1 05 p m
N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
Texas at Chicago White. Sox, 2:05 p.m.
Seafe at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Kansas City at LA. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Torodto at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Boston, 8:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Atlanra 4, Florida 2
St. Louis 5, Pittsburgh 2
Sa Francisco 8, Colorado 3
San Diego 4, Arizona 3,10 innings
N.Y. Mets 7, Philadelphia 5
Cincinnati 6, Milwaukee 5
Chicago Cubs 8, Houston 5
Washington 11, LA. Dodgers 9
Friday's Games
Philadelphia 10, Atlanta 6
N.Y. Mats 7, Pittsburgh 3
Cincinnati 6, St. Louis 4
Houston 2, San Diego 0
Milwaukee 3, Chicago Cubs 2
Florida at Colorado, late
Washington at Arizona, late
San Francisco at LA. Dodgers, late
Today's Games
Pittsburgh (Maholm 3-0) at N.Y. Mets (Maine 2-
2), 1:10 p.m.
San Francisco (J.Sanchez 1-2) att.A. Dodgers
(Stuits 3-1), 3:40 p.m.
Atlanta (J.Vazquez 2-3) at Philadelphia (Blan-
ton 1-2), 3:40 p.m.
San Diego (Correia 0-2) at Houston (Moehler 0-
2), 7.05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 2-1) at Milwaukee
(Gallqrdo 3-1), 7:05-p.m. .
St. Louis (Lohse 3-1) at Cincinnati (Harang 2-
3), 7:10 p.m.
Florida (Jo.Johnson 2-0) at Colorado (De La
Rosa-0-2), 8:10 p.m.
Washington (Lannan 1-3) at Arizona (D.Davis
2-4), 8:10 p.m.


Associated Press
Boston Red Sox hitter Jason Bay watches his three-run home
run off Tampa Bay Rays starter James Shields In the sixth In-
ning on Friday night at Fenway Park in Boston.


Red Sox 7, Rays 3
BOSTON - Jason Bay and J.D.
Drew homered in Boston's second
straight big sixth inning and the Red
Sox stopped the Tampa Bay Rays'
longest winning streak of the year with
a 7-3 win Friday night.
. One night after the Red Sox equaled
a modem major-league record and set
an AL mark with 12 runs against Cleve-
land before making an out in an inning,
five batters scored before the first but
was recorded in the sixth.
Bay tied the game with a three-run
homer and Drew made it 5-3 with a
two-run shot off James Shields (3-3).
Bay also hit a three-run homer in the
sixth inning of the 13-3 win over the In-
dians, the last hit in the barrage.
The Red Sox improved to 17-5 in
their last 22 games. Tampa Bay's win-
ning streak ended at three.
Brad Penny (3-1) faced Shields for
the second time in six days. He al-
lowed three runs in his first four innings
and left with runners at first and sec-
ond with one out in the seventh. Hideki
Okajima then retired Carl Crawford on
a fly out and struck out Evan Longoria.
Crawford had his second straight
outstanding game against Penny and
the Sox. Five days earlier in a 5-3 win
over Boston, he tied a modern major.-
league record with six stolen bases
and went 4-for-4, including 2-for-2 with
a walk against Penny.
On Friday, Crawford singled, stole
second and scored on Pat Burrell's sin-


gliein) the first then tripled and made it
2-0 on a sacrifice fly by Longoria in the
third. He hit a ground-rule double in the
fifth but was stranded.
Just before Crawford came to bat in
the seventh, Boston manager Terry
Francona lifted the right-handed
Penny for the lefty-lefty matchup that
Okajima won.
The Rays had taken a.3-0 lead in
the fourth when Jason Bartlett doubled
home Gabe Gross, who had singled.
. Then came the inning when the
Red Sox bats come alive.
Tampa Bay Boston
ab rhbi abrhbl
BUptoncf 4 00 0 Ellsurycf 5 1 2 1
Crwfrdlf 5 23 0 Pedroia2b 5 14 1
Longori3b 2 00 1 D.Ortizdh 4 1 0 0
C.Penalb 4 00 0 Bay If 4 1 2 3
Burrelldh 3 01 1 Lowell3b 4 1 3 0
Grossre 3 1 1 0 J.Drewrf 4 1 1 2
Zobristph-rfl 0 0 0 JBaileylb 4 0 1 0
Iwamr2b 4 00 0 Varitekc. 4 0 1 0
Bartlettss 4 03 1 Lugoss 4 1 1 0
MHmdc 4 0 1 0
Totals 34 3 9 3 Totals 38 715 7
Tampa Bay 101 100 000-3
Boston 000 005 02x-7
DP-Boston 1. LOB-Tampa Bay 8, Boston 8.
2B--Crawtord (6), Bartlett 2 (6), Ellsbury (5),
Lowell (10). 3B-Crawford (2), J.Bailey (1).
HR-Bay (9), J.Drew (4). SB-Crawford (21).
SF-Longoria.
IP H RERBBSO


Tampa Bay
J.Shlelds L,3-3
Balfour
Boston.
Penny W.3-1
Okaima H 5
R.Ramirez H,5
Papelbon


6 10 5 5 1 7
2 5 2 2 0 2
6.1-3 8 3 3 2 2
1 0 0 0 1 1
2-3 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 0 2


Umpires-Home, Bill Welke; First, Tim Welke;
Second, Scott Barry; Third, Angel Hemandez.
T-2:52. A-37,745 (37,373).


Tigers 1, Indians 0
CLEVELAND - Justin Veriander
struck out 11 and outpitched reigning
Cy Young Award winner Cliff Lee for the
second time in a week, and the Detroit
Tigers beat the Cleveland Indians 1 -0
Friday night.
Curtis Granderson made a leaping
catch at the wall with a runner on first
in the ninth to preserve the win for the
Tigers.
Verlander (3-2) pitched a two-hitter
for the third shutout and fourth com-
plete game of his career to improve to
2-7 at Progressive Field and 6-10 over-
all against the Indians.
The Tigers scored in the eighth off
Lee (1-5) when second baseman Luis
Valbuena couldn't get the ball out of
his glove in time to get the third out of
the inning.
Granderson walked with one out,
stole second and went to third on a
groundout by Placido Polanco. Clete
Thomas then hit a slow grounder that
Valbuena fielded, but double-clutched
on the throw. Thomas hustled down the
line to beat the throw for an RBI single.
Verlander allowed Victor Martinez's
double with one out in the seventh and
Asdrubal Cabrera's one-out single in
the first, but Cabrera was thrown out
trying to stretch it to a double. He also
walked two: Valbuena in the third and
the ninth.
After giving up the leadoff walk in the
ninth, Verlander fielded a bunt by Kelly
Shopplach and threw out Valbuena at


second.
Detroit
Gmdrsct
Polanc 2b
Thoms if
MiCarr lb
Ordonz dh
Inge 3b
Rabum If
Everett ss
Sardinh c


Cleveland


ab rhbi
3 1 0 0 Sizemrcf
4 0 1 0 ACarerss
4 0 2 1 VMrtnzlb
4 01 0 Choorf
3 01 0 DeRosa3b
4 0 1 0 Delluccdh
4 00 0 BFmcsIf
3 0 1 0 Valuen2b
3 00 0 Shppch c
Bartild pr


ab r h bi
4000
4010
3 01 0
30 0 '0
3 000
3 000
3000
1 00 0
3000
0000


Totals 32 1 7 1 Totals 27 0 2 0
Detroit 000 000 010-1
Cleveland 000 000 000-0
DP-Detroit 1, Cleveland 2. LOB-Detroit 6,
Cleveland 2.2B-Polanco (13), V.Martinez (10).
SB-Granderson (4). CS-MI.Cabrera (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
VerianderW,3-2 9 2- 0- 0 2, It
Cleveland
CI.LeeL,1-5 8 7 1 1 2 5
R.Betancourt . 1 0 0 0 0 1
Umpires-Home, Jim Wolf; First, Brian O'Nora;
Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, Chad Fairchild.
T-2:12. A-27,492 (45,199).


Yankees 4, Orioles 0
BALTIMORE - Alex Rodriguez an-
nounced his return to the Yankees by
hitting a three-run homer on the first
pitch of his late-starting season, CC
Sabathia pitched a four-hitter and New
York ended a five-game losing streak
by defeating the Baltimore Orioles 4-0.
Tormented by stories of his steroid
use and slowed by hip surgery that
forced him to begin the season on
the disabled list, Rodriguez could fi-
nally turn his attention toward playing
baseball when he stepped to the
plate in the first inning against Je-
remy Guthrie (2-3).
As a dozen fans waved plastic foam
syringes a few rows behind the plate,
A-Rod stepped into a fastball and sent
it soaring into the left-field seats. It was
his 554th career home run, and for
sheer theater, it just might have been
in the Top 10.
The shot sure came at the right time
for the Yankees, whose five-game skid
was their longest under second-year
manager Joe Girardi. During that los-
ing streak, New York went 6 for 43 with
runners in scoring position.
Rodriguez struck out in the third
and fifth innings against Guthrie, then
grounded out against Bob McCrory in
the seventh to finish 1 for 4. But that
one hit was a doozy;,while A-Rod was
gone, New York third basemen hit a
combined .202 with no homers and 10
RBIs over 28 games.
Rodriguez's home run was all the
support the Yankees needed for
Sabathia '-3), who stopped a run of
'our starts without a victory.
NewYork Baltimore
ab rhbi ab. r h bl
Jeterss 5 0h0 0 BRorts2b 3 0'2 0
Damon If 4 1 1 1 AdJonscf 4 01 0
'Teixeirib .3 1 0 0 Markksirf 4 00 0
ARdrgz3b 4 1 1 3 Mora'3b 4 00 0
HMatsudh 4 0 1 0 Hufflb 3 00 0
Swisherrf 4 0 1 0 Wggntn dh 3 00 0
CanQ2b .4 0 2,0 Montnz'lf 3 0 0 0
MeCarrcf 4 02 '0-Moellerc 3 00 0
Cervellic 2 1 1 0 CIztursss 3 0 1 0
Totals 34 4 9 4 Totals 30 0 4 0
NewYork 300 000 100-4
Baltimore , 000 000 000--0
LOB-fiew York 7 Baltimore 4. 2B-Damon
(6), Swisher (9), Cano (7). HR-A.Rodriguez
(1). CS-Ad.Jones (2). S-Cervelli. .
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork'
SabathiaW.2-3 9 4:.0, 0 1 8.
Baltimore
Guirr., L.2-3 6 7 3 3 2 8
McCrory 2 2 1 1 1 1
C.Ray 1 0 0 0 0 1
Umpires-Home, Bob Davidson; First, Jeff Nel-
son; Second, Mark Carison; Third, Tim Tschida.
T-2:32. A-36,926'(48,290).'


Rangers 6, White Sox 0
CHICAGO - Matt Harrison threw a
four-hitter in his second career shutout,
leading the Texas Rangers defeated
the Chicago White Sox 6-0 on Friday
night.
lan Kinsler and Omar Vizquel each
drove in two runs, and David Murphy
scored three runs for the Rangers, who
have won six of seven.
Harrison (3-2) hasn't allowed a run
in 19 straight innings. He didn't allow a
runner passed second base and only
allowed one walk while striking out five.
Jose Contreras (0-5), who helped
the White Sox win the 2005 World Se-
ries allowed five runs, three earned on
six hits. He also hit one batter, threw
two wild pitches and walked two.
After allowing a single to Jermaine
Dye in the second inning, Harrison re-
tired the next 11 batters. The left-han-
der picked up his second victory
against the White Sox this week after
throwing five scoreless innings in Sun-
day's win at Texas.
After Contreras struck out Nelson
Cruz in the second inning, Murphy,
reached on Josh Fields' throwing error.
Contreras then gave up back-to-back
singles to Chris Davis and Taylor Tea-
garden to load the bases. Murphy
scored on Kinsler's fielder's choice and
Davis scored on Contreras' wild pitch.
Texas Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Kinsler2b 3 1 1 2 Getz2b 4 01 0
Vizquel ss-3b50 2 2 Fields 3b 4 0 1.0
MYong3b 3 00 0 Quentin if 4 00 0
Andrusss 2 01 0Thome dh 4 000
AnJonsdh 3 01 0 Dyed 3 01 0
Byrdcf 5 0.1 0 Konerk lb 3 00 0
N.Cruz rf 5 00 0 Przyns.c 3 0 0 0
DvMrp If 4 32 0 J.Nlxss 2 00 0
C.Davislb 4 1 1 0 Ullirdgcf 3 0
Tegrdnc 3 1 2 1'
Totals 37 611 5 Totals 30 0 4 0
Texas 120 201 000-6
Chicago 000 000 000-0
E-Kinsler (3), Fields. (5). DP-Texas 2,
Chicago 1. LOB-Texas 9, Chicago 4. 2B-
Vizquel (3), Byrd (12), Dav.Murphy (3), Teagar-
den (1). SB-Kinsler (8), 'Vizquel (1):
CS-Fields (2). S-Klnsler.
IP H RER BBSO
Texas
Harrison W,3-2 9 4 0 0 1 5
Chicago
Contreras L,0-5 32-3 6 5 3 2 3
Carrasco 3 4 1 1 0 -5
Richard 11-30 0 0 0 3
Broadway 1:<~ 0-0-'t 1' 0''
HBP-by Contreras (Teagarden). WP-Contr-
eras 2, Carrasco.
Umpires-Home, Mike Winters; First, Lance
Barksdale; Second, Brian Knight; Third, Randy
Marsh.
T-2:28. A-21,326 (40,615).


Astros 2, Padres 0
HOUSTON -Wandy Rodriguez
threw eight sharp innings and Hunter
Perne's two-run single in the fifth inning
lifted the Houston Astros to a 2-0 vic-
tory bver the San Diego Padres.
Ivan Rodriguez was hit by a pitch
and Kaz Matsui walked before Pence
hit a sharp liner to the right side of the
infield. First baseman Adrian Gonzalez
dove and just missed stopping it as Ro-
driguez and Matsui scored.
In his longest outing of the season,
Rodriguez (3-2) allowed five hits with-
out issuing a walk. He struck out seven
and lowered his ERA to 1.80, third-best
in the league.
LaTroy Hawkins pitched the ninth for
hI fourth save in five tries.
Chad Gaudin (0-2) went seven in-
nings and allowed two runs on five hits
for the Padres. He struck out five and
walked three.
Rodriguez retired 16 in a row from
the second through the seventh in-
nings. The impressive streak came- .
after he worked his way out of a jam
with runners at second and third in the
second inning with a strikeout and a
groundout.
Rodriguez is one of four pitchers in
the league not to allow a home run
this year.
Gaudin was in trouble in four of the
first five innings with men in scoring po-
, sition each time, but managed to wiggle
out of the jams.
San biego Houston
ab rhbi ab rh bi6
Ecksin2b 4 01 0 KMatsu2b 3 1 1 0
Giles.rf 4 00 0 Bourn cf 3 00 0
Hairstncf 4 0 1 0 Pencerf 4 02 2
AdGOzllb 4 0,0 0 Ca.Leeif 4 02 0
Headlyif 4 00 0 Hwknsp 0 00 0
Kzmnff3b 3 00 0 Tejadass 4. 00 0
Hundlyc 3 02 0 Blum3b 2 0 00
- LRdrlzss 3 01 0 Erstadlb 3 00 0
Gaudinp 2 00 0 IRdrgzc 2 1 0 0
EGnlIzph 1 .00 0 WRdrgp 3 00 0
Metdthp 0 0 00 Michalsif 0 00 0
Totals 32 0 5 0 Totals 28 2 5 2
San Diego 000 000 000-0
Houston 000 020 00x-2
E-Gaudin (1). DP-San Diego 1. LOB-San
Diego 5, Houston 6. 2B-Hairston (7), L.Ro-,
driguez (4),Ca.Lee (8). CS-Blum (1).
IP H RERBBSO
San Diego
GaudinL,0-2 7 5 2 2 3 5
-Meredith 1 0 0 0 0 1
, Houston
W.dWdriguezW,3-2 8 5 0 0 0 7
SHawkins S,4-5 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Gaudin (I.Rodriguez).
Umpires-Home, Andy Fletcher; First, Ted Bar-
rett; Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Greg Gib-
son.,
T-2:19. A-28,139 (40,976).


Brewers 3, Cubs 2
MILWAUKEE-Ryan Braun hita .
two-run homer in the eighth and the Mil-
waukee Brewers rallied for a 3-2 victory
over the Chicago.Cubs, who may be
without third baseman Aramis Ramirez
for an extended period after he dislo-
cated his left shoulder.
J.J. Hardy homered in the sixth ahead
of Braun's big hit, which came off Aaron
Heilman (2-2) after the Cubs reliever en-
tered and threw five straight balls to walk
Corey .Hart and fall behind Braun.
Braun admired his opposite-field
drive for a moment, then stuck his
tongue out in a Jordan-esque display
while slapping hands with first base
coach Ed Sedar. Milwaukee has won
four of five and 13 of the last 17.
It was an unfortunate end for the
Cubs, who sent reserve outfielder Joey
Gathrightto Triple-A and traded him to
Baltimore for utility player Ryan Freel be-
cause of the lack of infield depth.
That move allowed the Cubs to call-
up pitcher Randy Wells, who threw five
scoreless innings in his first major
league start. Wells is in Carlos Zam-
brano's spot in the rotation with'the ace
recovering from a hamstring injury.
Chicago Milwaukee
ab rhbl ab rh bl
ASorin If 2 00 1 Weeks 2b 4 01 0
Theriotss 4 0 1 0 Hartrf 3 1 1 0
Fukdmcf 3 01 0 Braun If 3 1 2 2
Sotoph 1 0 0 0 Fielder 1b 4 0 0 0
Heilmn p 0 0 0 0 MCmm cf 4 01 0
ArRmr3b 1 00 0 Hardyss 3 .1 1 1
Miles2b 3 0 0 0 Hall3b 3 00 0
Hoffparlb 4 00 0 Kendallc 3 01 0
Bradlyrf 4 1 1 1 Bushp 20 0 0
Forent2b3b3 0 0 0 Duffyph 1 0 0 0
K.Hill c 3 0 1 0 Villanv p 0 0 0 0
R.Wellsp 1 00 0 Stetterp 0 00 0
Scales ph 1 .1 1 0 Hoffmn p 0 00 0
AGzmnp . 0 0 00
RJhanph-cf 1 0 0 0
Totals 31 2 5 2 Totals 30 3 7 3
Chicago 000 011 000-2
Milwaukee 000 001 02x-3
E-Hall (2). DP-Chicago 1. LOB-Chicago 4,
Milwaukee 6. 2B--K.Hill (2), Kendall (3). 3B-
Scales (1). HR-Bradley (3), Braun (7), Hardy
(5). SB-Theriot (7). CS-Fukudome (4). SF-
A.Soriano.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
R.Wells 5 5 0 0. 2 5
A.GuzmanH,2 2 1 1 1 0 4
HeilmanL,2-2BS,2-2 1 1 2 2 1 1
Milwaukee
Bush 7 4 2 2 0 4
Villanueva 2-3 1 0 0 1 0
StetterW,2-0 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
HoffmanS,5-5 1 0 0 0 0 2
WP-Heilman. .
Umpires-Home, Tom Hallon; First, Jerry
Crawford; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Todd
Tichenor.
T-2:25. A-42,025 (41,900).


Mets 7, Pirates 3
NEW YORK- Carlos Delgado hit a
three-run homer in a five-run eighth in-
ning and finished with five RBIs, helping
the surging New York Mets beat the
Pittsburgh Pirates 7-3 on Friday night
for their fifth straight win.
Jonathon Niese plugged a hole in
New York's rotation with six effective in-
nings and Carlos Beltran had a
tiebreaking RBI single for the Mets, who
improved to 3-0 on their eight-game
homestand.
Nyjer Morgan had two hits and
reached base five times for the slump-
ing Pirates, who have lost six straight
and 10 of 11 overall. Pittsburgh also
has lost six consecutive road games.
Jose Reyes got the winning rally
started with a single to center off Tyler
Yates (0-2). Luis Castillo then walked
before Beltran sliced a single down
the third-base line to give New York a
3-2 lead.
Pittsburgh New York
ab rhbl abrhbl
Morgan If 3 1 2 1 JosRys ss 4 22 0
FSnchz2b 5 0 1 1 Castillo 2b 4 22 0
McLothcf 5 02 1 Beltrancf 4.11 1
AdLRclb 401 0 Delgadlb 4 13 5
AnLRc3b 4 01 0 DWrght3b 4 00 0
Moss f 4 0 0 0 DnMrpif 4 1 1 0
R.Diazc 4 00 0 Reed If 0 00 0
Bixlerss 4 1 2 0 Santosc 4 0 1 1
Karstns p 1 00 0 Church rt 4 01 0
DiwYn ph 1 0 0 0 Niese p 2 01 0
Yates p 0 00 0 SGreen p 0 00 0
SBurntt p 0 00 0 Takhsh p 0 00 0
Vealp 0 00 0 Coraph 1 01 0
Hinske ph 0 1 0 0 Parnellp ' 0 00 0
Sheffild ph 0 0 0 0
Putzp 000 0
Totals . 35 3 9 3 Totals 357137
Pittsburgh 002 000 001-3
NewYork , 200 000 05x-7
E--Jos.Reyes (4). DP-Pittsburgh 1. LOB-
Pittsburgh 9, New York 7. 2B-McLouth (3),
Bixler (3), Dan.Murphy (4). HR-Delgado (4).
SB-Morgan (8), Jos.Reyes (8), Castillo (2).
CS-Morgan (4), Cora (1). S-Karstens.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
Karstens 6 7 2 2 0 3
Yates L,0-2 1 3 3 3 1 1
S.Bumett 2-3 3 2 2 1 0
Veal 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
NewYork
Niese 6 7 2 2 0 5
S.Green 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Takahashi 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
ParnellW,1-0 1 0 0 0 0 2
Putz 1 1 1 1 2 1
Yates pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by S.Green (Morgan). WP-S.Bumett.
PB-R.Diaz.
Umpires-,Home, Jerry Layne; First, Tony Ran-
dazzo; Second, Chris Guccione; Third, Ed Mon-
tague.
T-3:13. A-38,496 (41,800).


Reds 6, Cardinals 4
CINCINNATI - Right-hander
Johnny Cueto extended his scoreless-
inning streak to 15 before giving up his
only run Friday night, and the Cincin-
nati Reds won their second in a row
with a depleted lineup, 6-4 over the St.
Louis Cardinals.
Cueto (3-1) had his way with a team
that hit him hard during his brief career.
He limited the Cardinals to a run and five
hits in seven innings, leaving with a 6-1
lead. The 23-year-old pitcher appears to
be maturing at the start of his second
season in the majors, allowing only three
earned runs in his last fSe starts.
David Weathers gave up three runs
in the eighth, including Tyler Greene's
first career homer - the first runs off
the reliever in 11 appearances this
season. Francisco Cordero pitched the
ninth, remaining perfect in his nine
save chances.
Jerry Hairston Jr. doubled home a
run in the first inning off Joel Pineiro (4-
2) and singled home another in the
second, helping the Reds pull out to a
5-0 lead.
St Louis' Cincinnati
ab rhbi ab r h bl
Schmkr2b 3 0 1 0 Taverscf 3 1 2 1
Roinsn ph-cf2 00 0 HrstnJr2b 4 1 2 2
Rasmscf 3 00 0 Brucerf 4 01 1
TGreenph-2b 1 1 1 1 RHmdzlb 30 1
1
Pujols lb 4 00 0 L.Nixlf 4 00 0
Ludwckrf 2 1 0 0 ARosls3b 4 1 2 0
Duncan If 4 22 1 Hanign c 3 1 2 0
YMolinc 4 02 1 Janishss 4 01 0
KGreen ss 4 02 0 Cueto p 2 20 1
Thurstn 3b 2 0 0 0 Rhodes p 0 0 0 0
Pineirop 1 00 0 Wethrsp 0 00 0
Bardenph 1 0 0 0 Burtonp 0 0 00
C.Perezp 0 00 0 Dickrsnph 1 00 0
BThmpp 0 00 0 Corderp 0 00 0)
LaRueph 1 000
Totals 32 4'8 3 Totals 32 6116
St. Louis 000 000 130-4
Cincinnati 230' 000 10x--6
E-Pineiro (1). DP-St. Louis 2, Cincinnati 1.
LOB-St. Louis 6, Cincinnati 6. 2B-Duncan
(9), K.Greene (4), Hairston Jr. (3), Janish (3).
HR-T.Greene (1). SB-Ludwick (2). CS-
Thurston (1). S-Pineiro, Hanigan, Cueto.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
Pineiro L,4-2 6 8 5 4 0 3
C.Perez 1 2 1 1 2 0
B.Thompson 1 1 0 0 0 1
Cincinnati.
Cueto W,3-1 7 5 1 1 2 3
Rhodes 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
'Weathers 1-3 3 3 3 1 0
Burton H,3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
CorderoS,9-9 1 0 0 0 1 1
WP-C.Perez. PB-Y.Molina.
Umpires-Home, Marvin Hudson; First, John
Hirschbeck; Second, Wally Bell; Third, Marty
Foster.
T-2:54. A-18,016 (42,319).


Associated Press
Philadelphia Phillles' Cole Hamels connects on a pitch by
Atlanta Braves starting pitcher Jo-Jo Reyes In the second in-
ning on Friday in Philadelphia.


Phillies 10, Braves 6
PHILADELPHIA - Cole Hamels
pitched six impressive innings to earn
his first win since the World Series, and
the Philadelphia Phillies beat the At-
lanta Braves 10-6 on Friday night.
Jayson Werth, Chris Coste and
Chase Utley homered for the NL East
leaders, who snapped a two-game los-
ing streak.
Making his first start since spraining
'his left ankle on April 28, Hamels (1-2)
allowed two runs, three hits and struck
out seven. Hamels was MVP of the NL
championship series and World Series
last year, but struggled the first month.
He lowered his ERA to 6.17.
Atlanta's Casey Kotchman hit a
three-run homer off Brad Lidge in
the ninth, and Qmar Infante also
went deep. .
Braves starter Jo-Jo Reyes (0-2)
lost his ninth straight, allowing eight
runs - four earned - and five hits in
five innings.
The left-hander hasn't won since
beating the Los Angeles Angels last
June 13.
Hamels has been plagued by in-
juries this season. His first start was
pushed back because he had minor
elbow problems in spring training. He
left his third outing against Milwaukee
on April23 after getting hit in the shoul-
der by a line drive in the fourth inning.
He exited his next start when he hurt
his ankle chasing a bunt in the fifth in-
ning against Washington.
The ace lefty looked like his old self
against the Braves, mixing a sharp


fastball with his trademark changeup.
Hamels retired the first 11 batters be-
fore Chipper Jones reached on an in-
field single in the fourth.
The Phillies-scored four unearned
runs on just one hit off Reyes in the
second, taking advantage of a pair of
errors.
Atlanta Philadelphia
ab rhbl ab rh bi
Infante 2b 5 1 1 1 Rollins ss 5 0 1 2
Escoarss 3 00 0 Victom cf 5 00 0
C.Jones3b 3 1 1 0 Utley2b 4 1 1 1
GAndrsIf 4 1 1 0 Howard lb 4 1 1 0
McCnnc 3 11 2 Werthrf 2 31 2
Francr r 4 1 1 0 Ibanezlf 4 1 1 0
Ktchmlb 4 1 1 3 Feliz3b 4 1 1 1
Schafercf 3 00 0 Costec 2 21 1
JoReysp 2 00 0 Hamelsp 2 10 0
Parrp 0 00 0 Cairoph 1 00 0
Pradoph 1 00 0 Tschnrp 0 00 0
OFIhrt p 0 00 0 I'ondry p 0 0 0 0
Bennettp 0 00 0 Dobbsph 1 01 1
Nortonph 1 00 0 Udgep 0 00 0
Totals 33 6 6 6 Totals 3410 8 8
Atlanta 000 200 013- 6
Philadelphia 042 110 02x-10
E-Jo.Reyes (1), Escobar (2). LOB-Atlanta 4,
Philadelphia 4.2B-G.Anderson (4), Francoeur
(4), Rollins (6), Howard (7), Feliz (6). HR--n-
fante (1), Kotchman (2), Utley (9), Werth (6),
Coste (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
Jo.ReyesL,0-2 5 5 8 4 2 6
Parr 1 0 0 0 0 0
O'Flaherty 1 0 0 0 0 1
Bennett 1 3 2 2 1 0
Philadelphia
HamelsW,1-2 6 3 2 2 2 7
Taschner 1 0 0 0 1 0
Condrey 1 1 1 1 0 0
Lidge 1 2 3 3 1 2
HBP-by Bennett (Werth).
Umpires-Home, Jerry Meals; First, Mike
DiMuro; Second, James Hoye; Third, Dale
Scott.
T-2:29. A-45,312 (43,647).








srURDAY, AY ,


SPORTS


GOLF
Players Championship
Friday
AtTPC Sawgrass, Players Stadium Course
PonteVedra Beach, Fla.
Purse: $9.5 million
Yardage: 7,215; Par: 7r
Second Round
Alex Cejka 66-67-133 -11
lan Poulter 67-68-135 -9
Kevin Na 71-68-137 -7
Angel Cabrera 72-65-137 -7
Jason Dufner 67-70-137 -7
John Mallnger 66-71-137 -7
Henrik Stenson 68-69-137 -7
David Toms 67-70-137 -7
Ben Crane 65-73-138 -6
RIchardS. Johnson 66-72-138 -6
Tim Petrovlc 68-70-138 -6
Jeff Overton 71-67-138 -6
CamiloVillegas 67-72--139 -5
Robert Allenby 73-66-139 -5
Paul Casey 70-69-139 -5
Michael Letzig 71-68-139 -5
Ryan Moore 71-68-139 -5
Jonathan Byrd 67-72-139 -5
Justin Leonard . 70-69-139 -5
Relief Goosen 67-72-139 -5
Charley Hoffman 70-69-139 -5
Kevin Sutherland 73-67-140 -4
Brian Davis 71-69-140 -4
Boo Weekley 73-67-140 -4
Tiger Woods 71-69-140 -4
Daniel Chopra 75-65-140 -4
Tim Clark 72-69-141 -3
Mark Wilson 69-72-141 -3
Stephen Ames 70-71-141 -3
Michael Allen 71-70-141 -3
NickO'Hern 68-73-141 -3
Scott Verplank 67-74-141 -3
John Senden 72-69-141 -3
Justin Rose 70-71-141 -3
John Merrick 70-72-142 -2
Aaron Baddeley 71-71-142 -2
Geoff Ogilvy 70-72-142 -2
Steve Stricker 71-71-142 -2
Jim Furyk 68-74-142 -2
Ryuji Imada 72-70-142 -2
Chez Reavie 70-72-142 -2
Bubba Watson 67-75-142 -2
Jeev M. Singh 68-74-142 -2
Johnson Wagner 69-73-142 -2
Ernie Els 73-69-142 -2
K.J. Choi 73-69-142 -2
Brad Adamonis 67-76-143 . -1
Scott Plercy 71-72-143 -1
Nathan Green 74-69-143 -1
Rod Pampling -70-73-43 -1
Jeff Qulnney 73-70- i43 -1
Jeff Klauk 71-72-.1 43 -1
Martin Laird 71-72---143 -1
Bob Estes 75-68-143 -1
Fredrlk Jacobson 70-73-143 -1
Ben Curtis 71-72-143 '-1
Stewart Cink, 70-73-143 -1
Zach Johnson 72-71-143 -1
Vljay �lngh' 71-72-143 -1
Jason Bohn 72-71-143 -1
Hunter Mahan 73-71-144 E
Cameron Beckman 72-72-144 E
Padraig Harrington 72-72-144 E
Kenny Perry 73-71-144 E
Phil Mickelson 73-71-144 E
Dustin Johnson 72-72-144 E
Pat Perez 72-72-144 E
Steve Marino 72-72-144 E
Matt Kuchar 72-72-144 E
Robert Karlsson 74-70-144 E
Martin Kaymer 71-73-144 E
Heath Slocum 75-69-144 E
Rocco Mediate 73-71-144 -E
John Rollins 68-76-144 E
Graeme McDowell 71-73-144 E
Fred Funk 73-71-144 E
Woody Austin 72-72-144 E
Mike Weir 72-72-144 E
Sergio Garcia 71-73-144 E
Steve Flesch 75-69-144 E
Luke Donald 74-70-144 E
Billy Mayfair 70-74-144 E
Tommy Armur IIll 74-70-144 E
Failed To Qualify
Troy Matteson 73-72-145 +1
Will MacKenzle 73-72-145 +1
Adam Sott 71-74-145 +1
Jerry Kelly 73-72-145 +1
Bart Bryant 74-71-145 +1.
Ken Duke 70-75-145 +1
Andres Romero 74-71-145 +1
Joe Ogilvie 72-73-145 +1
George McNeill 70-75-145 +1
Soren Kjeldsen 70-75-145 +1
Scott McCarron 74-72-146 +2
Chad Campbell 75-71-146 42
Todd Hamilton 74-72-146 +2
NickWatney 68-78-146 +2'
Charles Howell III 73-73-146 +2
Steve Elkington 73-73-146 +2
Nicholas Thompson 73-73-146 +2
Greg Kraft 74-73,17 +3
D.J.Trahan * 74-7:"-047 +3
Eric Axley 72-75-147 +3
Bill Haas 74-73-1:47 +3
Cliff Kresge 72-75-1,47 +3
Davis Love III 73-74-147 +3
Stuart Appleby 71-76-147 +3
Bo Van Pelt - 71-76-147 +3
Ross Fisher 74-74-148 - +4
BrettQulgley 2 72-75-148 +4'
Sean O'Hair 73-75-148 +4
Kevin Streelman 74-74-148 +4
Briny Baird 72-76-148 +4
VaughnTaylor 72-76-148 +4
Lucas Glover 73-75-148 +4
Charlie Wi 74-74-148 +4
J.B. Holmes 72-76-148 +4
Paul Goydos 78-70-148 +4
Thongchai Jaldee 74-74-148 +4
J.J. Henry 73-76-149 +5
Parker McLachlln 75-74-149 +5
DeanWilson 77-72-149 +5
Ryan Palmer 75-75-150 +6
Tim Herron 75-75-150 +6
Peter Lonard 77-73-150 +6
Y.E.Yang 73-77-150 +6
Fred Couples 80-71-151 +7
Corey Pavin 74-77-151 +7
MarcTurnesa 76-75-151 +7
Rory Mcllroy 74-77-151 +7
Tom Pernice, Jr. 74-79-153 +9
Rory Sabbatini 81-72-153 +9
Webb Simpson 76-77--153 +9
MathewGoggin 76-77-153 +9


MAGIC
Continued from Page B1

control.
Game 4 is Sunday in
Orlando.
It was the second time


this postseason the Magic
won with a starter sus-
pended.
Howard lost his cool and
elbowed Samuel Dalonbert
in the head to draw sus-
pension for Game 6 of their
first-round series against
Philadelphia - but Orlando
still managed to get a
blowout win and eliminate
the 76ers.
This time, it was the
Magic's big man who made
sure a teammate wasn't
missed.
The defensive player of
the year had four blocks in
the first half, forcing the
Celtics into a jumpshooting


For the record

--- Flo LOTTERY


-i



Florida Lottery
Her are the winning
numbers selected
Friday in the
Florida Lottery:


CASH 3 (early)
0-0-5
CASH 3 (late)
6-5-5
PLAY 4 (early)
3-2-0-9
PLAY 4 (late)
1-0-3-1
MEGA MONEY
3-32-33-44
MEGA BALL
13
FANTASY 5
4-5-7-9-19


On the AIRWAVES-

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
8 a.m. (SPEED) - Formula One, qualifying for Spanish
Grand Prix
12 p.m. (VERSUS) IndyCar Racing Indianapolis 500 Pole
Day - Qualifying
7 p.m. (13, 51 FOX) Sprint Cup - Southern 500
MLB BASEBALL
3:30 p.m. (13, 51FOX) Tampa Bay Rays at Boston Red Sox
7 p.m. (WGN) Texas Rangers at Chicago White Sox
8 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Marlins at Colorado Rockies
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida State at Georgia Tech
8 p.m. (SUN) Florida at LSU
4 p.m. (SUN) Mississippi State at Mississippi
NBA PLAYOFFS - SEMIFINALS
5 p.m. (ESPN) Western Conference - Game 3 -
Denver Nuggets at Dallas Mavericks
8:15 p.m. (9,20, 28 ABC) Eastern Conference - Game 3 -
Cleveland Cavaliers at Atlanta Hawks-
BOXING
9:30 p.m. (HBO) Chad Dawson vs.'Antonio Tarver
GOLF
9:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour - BMW Italian Open
- Third Round (Same-day Tape)
2 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) PGA Tour - The Players Championship
-Third Round
2 p.m. (ESPN2) LPGA Tour - Michelob Ultra Open at Kingsmill
-Third Round
NHL PLAYOFFS - SEMIFINALS
7 p.m. (VERSUS) Eastern Conference - Game 5 -
Pittsburgh Penguins at Washington Capitals
10:30 p.m. (VERSUS) Western Conference - Game 5 -
Chicago Blackhawks at Vancouver Canucks
COLLEGE LACROSSE
12 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAATourament First Round - Brown
at John Hopkins
MLS SOCCER
9 p.m. (ESPN2) FC Dallas at Houston Dynamo
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
1:30 p.m. (SUN) SEC Tournament Final -
Florida/Tennessee vs. Alabama
MEN'S NCAA VOLLEYBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA Toumament Final


Tim Wilkinson
Anthony Kim
Matt Bettencourt
Trevor immelman
'Michael Bradley
Steve Lowery
Dudley Hart
Brian Gay
Carl Pettersson


77-77-154 +10
73-821-55 -11
76-79-155 *11
73?. 82--155 �11
80-78-158 +14
81-78-159 +15
73-WD
80-WD
WD


NASCAR

Nationwide-Diamond:
Hill Plywood 200
Friday
-At Darlington Raceway
Darlington, S.C.
Lap length: 1.366 miles
(Start position In parentheses)
1 i 6t Mt Kenseth Ford 153laps. 128.7 ral-
inag 10 pG,nis
2 17) Ja-on Lefltr,. Toyota 153 116 '8:170
3. (3) Carl Edwards, Ford, 153,118.1,170.
4. (5) Erik Darnell, Ford, 153, 114,160.
5. (16) Justin Allgaier, Dodge, 153,107,155.
6. (2) Ryan Newman, Chevy, 153, 103.1,150.
7. (19) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 153, 91.6,146.
8. (9) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 153,101.4,142.
9. (31) Scott Wimmer, Chevy, 153, 90.7,138.
10.(10) Brian Vickers,Toyota, 153,94.7,134.
11. (8) Brad Keselowski, Chevy, 153,88:5,130.
12. (4) Joey Logano, Toyota, 153, 93.7,127.
13. (24) Scott Speed, Toyota, 153, 79.9,124.
14. (14) Steve Wallace, Chevy, 153,86.2,121.
15. (11) Jason Keller, Ford, 153, 69.8,118.
16. (1) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 153,134.2,125.
17.(23) Patrick Carpenler, Toyota, 153,76.9,112.
18. (17) Kenny Wallace, Chevy, 153,73.9,109.
19.(15) BrendanGaughan, Chevy, 152,63,106.
20. (21) Brian Scott, Toyota, 152, 67,103.
21. (18) Tony Raines, Chevy, 152, 68.5, 105.
22. (13) Scott Lagasse Jr., Toyota, 152,74.1,97.
23. (32) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, 151, 64.8, 94.
24.(29) Brian Keselowski, Dodge, 151, 61.9,91.
25. (30) Brandon Whitt, Ford, 150, 51.7, 88.
26.(25) Kevin Hamline, 150, 56.1,85.
S27.(28) Danny O'Quinn Jr., Chevy, 150,55.5,82.
28. (27) Eric McClure, Ford, 149, 45,79.
29. (20) Michael Annett, Toyota, 149,45.9,76.
30. (26) Jeff Fuller, Chevrolet, 148, 39.4, 73.
31.(33) Morgan Shepherd, Chevy, 148,37.7,70.
32. (22) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet, accident,
142, 60.2, 67. *
33.(12) Michael McDowell, Toyota, 140,75.8,64.

team much like the Magic
did to win Game 1. On the
first play of the second quar-
ter, Howard soared so high
he had to brace his left hand
against the backboard so he
wouldn't smack his head,
swatting Stephon Marbury's
layup attempt into the
stands.
It was no different on
offense.
Howard sprinted down
the middle of the lane to
take a pass zipped from the
wing by J.J. Redick, gripping
the ball with two hands for a
thunderous dunk that gave
Orlando a 43-31 lead. The
Magic would eventually go
ahead by 14 points in the pe-
riod.
But it didn't end there,
The Magic took a 20-point
lead early in the third quar-
ter before Howard picked
up his fourth foul, and the
Celtics ended the period on
a 12-2 run capped by a


34.(35) John WesTownley, Ford, throttle, 117,
466 61 ,;
36 37) inLepge.Ford acck:et' 57-i 3 53 .
3E, t., K He.n-o, DK.lge, 3,>,ar>-t :6 2, 5'.
37.(43) Mike Harmon, Chevy, brakes, 36,34,52.
38.'(38) Travis Kitleson, Chevy, overheating, 19,
36.1,49.
39.(40) MarkGreen, Chevy, brakes, 17,35.1,46.
40.(39) Kertus Davis, Chevy, ignition, 15,33,43.
41.(41)Teny Cook,Chevy, vibration, 13,313,40.
42. (42) Johnny Chapman, Chevy, ignition, 12,
31.4,37.
43. (34) Casey Atwood, Chevrolet, transmis
sion, 11,32.4,34.
Race Statistics
Winner's Average Speed: 116.596 mph.
Time of Race: 1 hour, 47 minutes, 33
seconds.
Margin of Victory: Under caution.
Caution Flags: 10 for 32 laps.
Lead Changes: 4 among 4 drivers.
Lap Leaders: K.Busch 1-39; C.Edwards 40-
44; TRaines 45; K.Busch '46-149; M.Kenseth,
150-153.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): K.Busch, 2 times for 143 laps; C.Edwards,
1 time for 5 laps; M.Kenseth, 1 time for'4 laps;
T.Raines, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 In Points: 1. K.Busch, 1,539.2. C.Ed-
wards, 1,502.3. J.Leffler, 1,386. 4. J.Logano,
1,340. 5. Bra.Keselowski, 1,331. 6. J.Keller,
1,181. 7.-D.Ragan, 1,139. 8. S.Lagasse Jr.,
1,095.9. J.AIIgaier, 1,089.10. S.Wallace, 1,088.
MOVES
BASEBALL
American League
NEW YORK YANKEES-Activated 3B Alex
Rodriguez from the 15-day DL. Placed C Jose
Mollna on the 15-day DL. Purchased the con-
tract of C Kevin Cash from Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre (IL). Optioned RHP Mark Melancon to
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. Designated RHP
Steven Jackson for assignment.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS-Acquired INF
Adam Kennedy from Tampa Bay for a player to
be named and assigned Kennedy to Sacra-�
mento (PCL).
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS-Named A.J.
Hinch manager, Jack Howell hitting coach and
Mel Stottlemyre Jr. pitching coach.
ATLANTA BRAVES-Activated C Brian Mc-
Cann from the 15-day DL. Optioned C Clint
Sammons to Gwinnett (IL).

breakaway dunk by Rondo.
The Celtics trimmed the
deficit to seven in the fourth,
and just when it appeared
they would' complete the
comeback, center Kendrick
Perkins lost his cool.
Perkins was called for a
flagrant one foul with 10:15
remaining for an elbow on
Mickael Pietrus. Replays
showed Perkins' elbow hit
Pietrus in the chin while the
two were battling for posi-
tion away from the ball, the
kind of play the NBA has
been reviewing - and
sometimes giving out sus-
pensions - in a postseason
that's only becoming more
physical.
Pietrus made the free,
throws, and the Magic
built another 20-point lead
that put the game out of
reach, with Celtics coach
Doc Rivers pulling his
starters with about four
minutes to play


Busch gets flat tire,



Kenseth soars to win


Associated Press

DARLINGTON, S.C. -
Matt Kenseth found one of
the few ways to beat Kyle
Busch these days.
Kenseth took advantage
when Busch's dominant car
got a flat with two laps to go
Friday night, lifting him to
his first Nationwide Series
win this year and capping a
record-setting day at Dar-
.lington Raceway.
"That's a lot that went
down those last five laps,"
Kenseth said with a grin.
Nothing was bigger than
Busch's tire going down.
He led 143 laps and
looked like he would ease to
victory. Then a late collision
between Scott Legasse Jr
and Joe Nemechek brought
out the race's 10th caution
and set up a two-lap sprint


to the finish.
As Busch ran through the
wreckage, he got a flat in his
right rear tire. Busch tested
the tire for several laps be-
fore rolling into the pits to
loud cheers from Darlington
fans.
Kenseth, who earlier set a
track record to' win the
Southern 500 pole, still
faced a green-white-
checkered finish. That, too,
went Kenseth's way when
Morgan Shepherd spun out
on the restart, ending the
race.
"It's been a good day for
us," Kenseth said. "Let's
hope it continues."
Jason Leffler finished
second, followed by Carl Ed-
wards, and Nationwide
rookies Erik Darnell and
Justin Allgaier.
Busch wound up 16th, a


disheartening finish to what
figured to be his third
straight NASCAR win after
last week's sweep at Rich-
mond.
Busch did not speak to the;,
media after the race, jumpL'
ing on a golf cart and pulling''
away. His crew chief, Jason)'
Ratcliff, said the team was"
disappointed by the dra--
matic turn. "But hey, that's' -
part of this sport," Ratcliff-'
said.
Not when Busch i-'
rolling.
The 24-year-old has beeoR
an upstoppable NASCAR-
force the past two seasons.'
Last week, he reached 50'
victories in the sport's''-
three touring series and
was ready to check off No.-
51 at Darlington, where he's-
the defending Sprint Cup":
winner.


Penguins score 3 early to



even series with Capitals


Associated Press

PITTSBURGH - The
Pittsburgh Penguins finally
discovered a few holes in
rookie goalie Simeon Var-
lamov's game, and his glove,
and are now in a familiar po-
sition in the playoffs against
Washington. They're surging,
and the momentum-less
Capitals are slipping.
Tne Penguins shook off an
opening-minute Washington
goal, scored three times in
less than 12 minutes in the
first period against a sud-
denly vulnerable Varlamov
and beat the Capitals 5-3 Fri-
day night to even the East-
ern Conference semifinals
at two games each.
The Capitals won't get
much time to regroup and
try to regain the momentum
they gave up by losing twice
in Pittsburgh, with Game 5
set for their home ice Satur-
day night
Washington scored one-
goal victories at home in
each of the first two games
as Alex Ovechkin scored a
combined four goals, but he
was shut out for the first
time in the series Friday
while being constantly shad-
owed by defenseman Rob
Scuderi.
Ovechkin wasn't a factor
while being held to only two
shots, while Penguins star
Sidney Crosby had a goal
and an assist
Capitals owner Ted Leon-
sis is unhappy at playing
twice in two nights in two
cities, all because of a Yanni


'TRACK
Continued from Page B1

replied, a wry smile shining
through. "But they're talk-
ing so fast I'm trying to fig-
ure it all out."
That's something she'll
have three more years to do.
Right now she was more fan
than student. And when
Vani cleared 16-8 to set a
new state record, Heinzman
jumped out of her skin. In
fact so did Vani, who began
his record-setting celebra-
tion on his descent. ,
"This is so cool,' Heinz-
man admitted. "What, a
jump!"
But Heinzman wasn't the
only Lady Panther to find
her way onto the medal
stand. Paige Cooke, last
week's regional champion,
cleared 5-2 in the high jump
to finish eighth.
"I'm a little disap-
pointed," admitted Cooke,
while still managing to flash
that signature smile. "That's
the worst I've jumped all
season. It just wasn't my day.
But that's okay. I'll be back
next year"
Her teammate, Carleigh.
Williams, one of the Citrus
County Chronicle's eight
nominees for Female Ath-
lete of the Year, cleared 5-
0 and finished tied for
10th place.
"I'm okay with .how I
jumped. I wish I had gone
higher. It's not my best by
any means," Williams ex-
plained. "But I came out for
track to stay in shape. My
first love is soccer and vol-
leyball is a close second.
This has been a great expe-
rience just being here."


concert in Pittsburgh on
Tuesday. He may be even
more displeased with the
Capitals' first major letdown
in the series, which may
have prevented them from
taking a 3-1 lead back home'
for a possible close-out
game.
Instead, the Penguins
have a chance to do what
they did against the Capitals
in 1992 and 1996, when they
trailed 2-0 in both series only
to rally and win. Washington
trailed the Rangers 3-1 in the
first round before winning
the next three games.
Sergei Gonchar, who was
injured later in the period,
Bill Guerin and Ruslan Fe-
dotenko scored in the first
for Pittsburgh to quickly
turn a one-goal deficit into a
two-goal lead. The surge left
Varlamov - who had only
six games of NHL experi-
ence before the playoffs -
shaking hi� head at his in-
ability, to stop not-difficult
shots.
Gonchar was helped off
the ice late in the period
after absorbing a knee-on-
knee hit 'from Ovechkin.
There was no immediate
word about the injury, or
how long it would sideline
the Penguins' most experi-
enced defenseman.
Varlamov, arguably the
best player on the ice while
making 39 saves during
Pittsburgh's 3-2 overtime
win in Game 3, probably
couldn't be blamed for
Guerin's go-ahead goal on a
rebound of Crosby's in-close

Competing in the boys'
.pole vault, the event in
which Vani broke the state
record, were Lecanto
vaulters junior Jason
Roberts and senior Javanth.
Charles.
Charles' best vault of
the day was 12-6 feet, a
jump that he was not
thrilled with.
"Today is my 18th birth-
day," Charles said. "I wish I
could have done better Now
I have to regroup and get
ready for two weeks from
now when we compete in
another event Hopefully I'll
do better then."
Roberts, Lecanto's best
chance at a medal coming
into the event, finished
13th with a pole vault of 13
feet, which is what he
jumped last week at the re-
gional meet where he fin-
ished third.
"I'm definitely expecting
more of myself for next
year," Roberts said. "To-
morrow I start my quest to
come back here and break
that record next year. I'm
the same size as Riley who
won it last year and I'm
jumping higher than he was
at this point of his high
school career.
"It's not going to be easy
I'm going to have to put in
the time," Roberts contin-
ued. "But I know what it
takes and I'm committed to
making it happen."
The last Lecanto Panthers
athlete to compete at the
Class 3A state meet was an-
other Chronicle Athlete of
the Year nominee, Tory
Webb in the 800 meter run.
Webb knew going into the
race that he was facing an
uphill challenge racing
against the fastest field of


forehander midway through,'..
the period. But he had a
good look all the way on Gon-.!
char's tying goal from near.
the blue line, which came'
slightly more than 3 minutes-,
after Nicklas Backstrom,:
gave Washington a seem-).
ingly big lift by scoring in the
opening minute.
Maybe that was a bad
omen for,the Capitals, since
the team scoring first has
lost all four games in the,
tightly played series. 4+
much-worse omen came;
when Varlamov, looking
shaky for the first time in the'
series, was beaten by a
seemingly harmless 50-foot
wrist shot that Fedotenko
was merely trying to throw>
on net at 15:25 of the first'
making it 3-1 - Pittsburgh's,
first multiple-goal lead of:
the series.
Hurricanes 4, Bruins 1 -
RALEIGH, N.C. - Eric StaalF:
scored two goals to break the
club career playoff scoring
record, and the Carolina Hurri-,
canes pushed the top-seeded
Boston Bruins to the brink of
elimination, pulling away late for..
a 4-1 victory Friday night.
The Hurricanes lead the -
Eastern Conference semifinal
series 3-1. Game 5 is Sunday ,.
night in Boston.
Jussi Jokinen scored the go-.,
ahead goal at 2:52 of the third .,,"
and assisted on the two goals ,"
that followed, and Sergei Sam--:-
sonov added a goal for the
Hurricanes.

his entire career.
Seeded eighth in the.',
faster of the two heats, Webb;l
was never able to get inside ,
and the quick field ran a
blistering first lap.
"Tory ran his race but it,,
was a fast field and they ran,
their race of 50, 51s in the-,
first lap and that just took,
his kick away," Verhelst,,
said. "He had a great yean.
What a gutsy kid."
While Webb tried to stay-1
close he finished eighth inm
his heat and ran a 1:59.62 for
a 13th place finish overall. -.
"I just tried to stay with
the lead pack but they went.-
out so fast that it burnt me:'.
out for the last 400," Webbt.
admitted. "I was running(
from the outside the whole.-
race and could never get in-
side so I was taking the
longer way around. I had a'
great season. I just wish I
could have placed better at
this meet but stuff happens.
I can't let it discourage me
and the year I've had..
These guys were fast today,
real fast."
While the Panthers in
general didn't finish as well
as they wanted to, with-
Williams, Cooke, Roberts
and Heinzman all set to re-:
turn next season, the future*
is bright for Lecanto track..'
"I expect us to get better,.
faster and stronger,",'
Lecanto girls assistant'
coach Freddie Bullock said.
"Carleigh, Paige and Anna
are all self-motivators. They,
are definitely a great foun-*
dation for our future. We're,
fortunate to have good ath-,
letes with great attitudes-'
here at Lecanto. This was a
weird year for us but it was -
also at the same time a
great year." ''


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


84 s M 92009













Stewart looks to conquer Darlington


Driver is 0-16

on S. C track
Associated Press

pDARLINGTON, S.C. -
There's only three active
tracks on the NASCAR
schedule where Tony Stew-
art has yet to win a Cup
race, and he'd like to cross
Darlington Raceway off the
list this weekend.
The best of the best have
conquered NASCAR's old-
est superspeedway. From
David Pearson's record 10
wins to Richard Petty's
three trips to Victory Lane,
the trophy sports the names
of NASCAR biggest stars.
But Stewart has yet to join
their company. The two-time
series champion goes into
Saturday night's Southern
500 a frustrating 0-for-16 on
"The Track Too Tough To
Tame."'
"I'd win on my roof and on
fire here. I'd take it anyway I
could get it," Stewart said,
Friday.
The egg-shaped, 1.366-
mile .track has never been
overwhelmingly good to
Stewart, who scraped the
wall shortly after Friday's
first practice session began.
Stewart was sixth in his
1999 rookie race here, but
has finished inside the top-
10, in just 50 percent of his
starts. He was hospitalized
overnight following a 2002
accident that led to his ca-


Associated Press
NASCAR Sprint Cup Series driver Tony Stewart, center, walks through the garage area after
practice for the NASCAR Southern 500 on Friday at Darlington Raceway in Darlington, S.C.


reer-worst 36th-place finish.
Although he won the Na-
tionwide Series race here
last year, he finished 21st in
the Cup race, an event won
by then-teammate Kyle
Busch.
"We won a Nationwide
race here last year, and it
was an awesome-feeling to
finally win at Darlington. But
to win a Southern 500, that's
a big one," Stewart said.
"Darlington is such a tough
track to get a handle on and
to be good at all day. You
don't see a lot of guys who
have a lot of success. You see


only a handful of guys who
religiously run well there.
"If you can have a good
day and win there, it's a
track that's like winning at
Bristol. It's the same type of
feeling - knowing that you
conquered something that's
very hard to obtain."
Ordinarily, Stewart might
.be dismissed from the list of
contenders at Darlington. A
notoriously slow starter,
Stewart has failed to win a
race before the 11th event of
the year in all but two of his
first 10 seasons.
Darlington is the 11th race


this year.
But Stewart can't be
counted out at anything this
season, his first as owner of
Stewart-Haas Racing, Al-
though many people pre-
dicted Stewart would
struggle with the dual role of
owner and driver, he's found
remarkable success in a job
so many before him had
trouble balancing.
Haas CNC Racing, a non-
competitive team he re-
branded after claiming a 50
percent ownership stake,
has quickly developed into
one of NASCAR's most solid


organizations. Stewart, who
has seven top-10 finishes
through 10 races, is third in
the points. Ryan Newman,
the second SHR driver, has
rallied to 10th in the stand-
ings after a poor opening
month to the season.
Either could break
through with a victory at any
time - a win would be the
first for the organization,
dating back to its first seven
seasons as Haas CNC - but
it's Stewart who seems clos-
est to Victory Lane. He's had
two runner-up finishes over
the past three races, and is
seeking to become the first
owner/driver to win a race
since Ricky Rudd at Mar-
tinsville in 1998.
Darian Grubb, in his first
year as Stewart's crew chief,
thinks the win can come any-
time over the next few
weeks. Stewart has a strong
record at several of the up-
coming tracks - he's won at
Charlotte, Dover, Pocono and
Michigan, site of five of the
next six races - but Grubb
isn't ruling out a Saturday
night win at Darlington.
"I don't think I have to
pick a track where we can
win, because every single
week we've surprised our-
selves," Grubb said. "We're
learning more "and more
about Tony each week, and
we're getting more and more
comfortable with what he
wants from the car.
"I don't see why we can't
win at Darlington. I think
we can. His confidence level


is high and his momentum
is rolling."
Grubb, who was unaware
until earlier this week that
Stewart doesn't have a Dar-
lington Cup win, spent time
preparing the No. 14 team
for what could be a long,
humid night in South Car-
olina. The race-time fore-
cast called for temperatures
near the 90s, which makes
for a hot 500 miles for driver
and crew.
But in molding his race
team, Stewart has assembled
an organization of employ-
ees who dig deep for the
boss. Although Stewart's pri-
mary home is in Indianapo-
lis, Grubb said Stewart
spends a surprising amount
of time in the North Carolina
shop with his guys.
It's one aspect that's
helped SHR achieve this
start.
"I always sort of thought
he was a hands-off driver
who showed up and drove
his butt off," Grubb said.
"But in reality, he's really in-
volved. He's very visible. He
makes his rounds through
the whole shop and makes
sure everything is good.
"When you develop a per-
sonal relationship with a
driver, you care more. You
aren't just a name and num-
ber collecting a paycheck for
building cars for Joe Schmo.
Well, Jo6 Schmo just came in
and patted you on the back.
That makes these guys want
to work hard for him, and
they do."


Kenseth takes


Sprint Cup pole


- Associated Press

DARLINGTON, SC.- Jeff
Gordon left his car with
hands shaking and heart
pounding after another har-
roQving experience at Dar-
lington Raceway.I
Gordon's teammate at
Hendrick Motorsports,
three-time Sprint Cup cham-
pion Jimmie Johnson, wasn't
as luc qualifyiii Friday,
crashing before he could fin-
ish his lap.
"This is a nail-biter, white-
knuckle experience qualify-
ing here," said Gordon,
who'll start second Saturday
night in the Southern 500.
Matt Kenseth set a track
record to win his' first pole
since 2005, his 179.514 mph
eclipsing Greg Biffle's mark
from a year ago. And Gordon
marveled at Kenseth's
record-setting performance
at the track "Too Tough To
Tame."
"You've got to push really
hard. You've got to be com-
mitted," Gordon said. "This
track is -narrow. It's got a lot
of'grip, but the edge is right
there. It's really easy to
break loose."
That's what happened to
Johnson, a two-time winner
at' Darlington. His, No. 48
Chevrolet slid in turn two,
the back end crunchirfg the
wall then the front side
bounding into an interior
wall and coming to a stop.
Johnson's crew ran out to
help. He was taken the in-
field care center for evalua-
tion and released a short
time later.
Johnson qualified on
owner's points and will start
42nd, his worst opening spot
in< 11 career Cup races at
Darlington.


Sprint Cup
4t Darlington Raceway
Darlington, S.C.
Lap length: 1.366 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 179.514 mph.
2. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 178.861 mph..
3. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevy, 178.757 mph.
4. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 178.744 mph.
5. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 178.549 mph.
6: (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 178.510 mph.- -
7. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 178.407 mph
8. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 178.400 mph.
9. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 178.019 mph.
10. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, 177.826 mph.
11. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 177.646-mph.
12. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 177.300 mph.'
13. (07) Casey Mears, Chevy, 177.300 mph.
14. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 177.039 mph.
15. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 177.007 mph.
16. (1) Martin TruexJr.; Chevy, 176.911 mph.
17. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevy, 176.892 mph.
18. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevy, 176.594 mph.
19. (19) Elliott Sadler, Dodge, 176.555 mph.
20. (26) Jamie McMurray, Ford, 176.422 mph.
21.(00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 176.347 mph.
22. (13) Max Papis, Toyota, 176.328 mph.
'23. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 176.264 mph.
24. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevy, 176.138 mph.
25.(42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy,176.050 mph.
26. (88) Eamrnhar Jr., Chevy, 175.981 mph.
27. (96) Bobby Labonte, Ford, 175.968 mph.
28. (7) Robby Gordon, Toyota, 175.735 mph..
29. (78) Regan Smith, Chevy, 175.629 mph.
30. (71) David Gilliland, Chevy, 175.441 mph.
31. (25) Brad Keselowski, Chevy, 175.434mnph.
32 8i.7 J:.oe rlme,:r, T",oia 175 2r6 rrpr,
33. (66) Dave Blaney, Toyota, 175.247 mph.
34. (12) David Stremme, Dodge, 175.053 mph.
35. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 174.860 mph.
36. (55) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 174.773 mph.
37. (36) Scott RIggs, Toyota, 174.724 mph.
38. (44) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 174.525 mph.
39. (34) Tony Raines, Chevy, 173.847 mph.
40. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, owner points.
41. ,(43) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, owner points.
42. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevy, owner points.
43. (09) Sterling Marlin, Dodge, 174.402 mph.
Failed To Qualify
44. (41) Jeremy Mayfield, Toyota, 174.229 mph.
45. (82) Scott Speed, Toyota, 174.013 mph.


Pole Day at Indy a guessing game


Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS - Pole
Day qualifying for the Indi-
anapolis 500 is the ultimate,
guessing game.
With six hours of time tri-
als scheduled Saturday,
when do you use one or
more of your three chances
to earn a spot up front for
the May 24 race? )
"Until we see what the
weather is tomorrow, we
don't make a decision., said
Roger Penske, whose team
has won 14 poles and 14
races, both records at the In-
dianapolis Motor Speedway.
"You have to see where
you are in (the. qualifying)
line, what the competitors
... you have to beat are going
to do and where are they in
the line," Penske added Fri-
day before the day's prac-
tice began. "Do you go out
when it's warm? Is it going
to be cooler later? Is it
going to rain? You have lots
of variables."
Thirty-one cars that have
been on track this week
will be eligible to take a
run at the $100,000 pole on
Saturday, the first of four
days of time trials to. fill the
33-car field.
The pole-winning driver
will be the one who can put'
together the. best four-lap
average on the historic 2.5-
mile oval.
Penske has three shots at
adding a 15th pole, with two-
time pole-winner and two-
time race-winner Helio
Castroneves, Ryan Briscoe
and Will Power.
To d9 it, they will have to
overcome more than nerves
and changing'track condi-
tions. The National Weather
Service forecast was calling
for winds gusting from 15 to
25 mph.
The last time Castron-
eves won the pole was in
2007, when he managed to
beat out Andretti Green
Racing's Tony Kanaan de-
spite having to deal with
gusts up to 45 mph.
"You've got to analyze
what's going on in that situ-
ation and you just got to take
(it) step by step," Castron-
eves said.


Associated Press
Danica Patrick, left, chats with teammate Tony Kanaan
during practice fbr the Indianapolis 500 auto race on Friday
at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis.


The wind was negligible
on "Fast Friday," but Cas-
troneves, among the fastest
competitors in practice,
said it was still important to
get as much track time as
possible to prepare for
qualifying. ,
"You always learn some-
thing, even if sometimes
you're not changing any-
thing in the car," the Brazil-
ian said. "The track changes
itself and you're about
learning that day.
"Whatever happens,
you've got to follow what
your instincts and the track
is telling you to do. So,
(you've) got to wait and see
tomorrow. All we can do
today is continue working a
little bit on speed and see
what happens."
With so much track time
there was nearly constant
action, with 31 of 32 cars
over 218 mph and some in-
evitable mishaps.
Rookie Robert Doornbos


and former pole-winner
Scott Sharp both crashed in
single-car incidents. Both
were immediately cleared
by the speedway medical
staff to drive. Doornbos,
from The Netherlands, got
into his backup car late in
the day for six laps, getting
up to 217.716. Sharp had to
wait to try his backup Satur-
day.
Briscoe and Castroneves
topped the speed chart with
laps of 225.981 and 225.438,
respectively.
Close behind were Target
Chip Ganassi Racing team-
mates Dario Franchitti
(224.984) and Scott Dixon
(224.822), winners of the last
two Indy 500s.
Danica Patrick (224.755)
and Marco Andretti
(224.724), teammates for An-
dretti Green Racing, were
next, followed by Power
(224.588) and 2005 Indy win-
ner Dan Wheldon (224.357),
in his first season driving for


Panther Racing.
"You know, yesterday we
ran very safe and just got
some confidence in the car,
and I'm just taking little
steps," said Power, who is
being mentored by four-time
Indy winner and longtime
Penske driver coach Rick
Mears.
"Rick has been a huge
help," added Power, in his
second year at Jndy but first
with Penske Racing. "I think
he'll be there all month and.'-
we're-looking for a good re-
sult at the end, not at the be-
ginning."
~'he top 11 cars will qual-
ify Saturday, with 11 more
on Sunday and 11 more next
Saturday. After the field is
full, the slowest qualified
cars can be bumped out on
next Sunday, the final day of
time trials.
Patrick, who flirted with
winning the pole here as a
rookie in 2005 before start-
ing fourth, said she is just fo-
cused ,on the first day of
qualifying.
"I want the pole pretty
'bad," she said. "I at least
want to be on the front row.
It's all about keeping your
cool all day.
"It seems to be more an
art form on Pole Day. The
competition has gotten so
close, especially with those
11 spots to fill. That can
make some people really
anxious."
Castroneves, who has
started second, first and
fourth here the last three
years, said he may not be as
patient as some of the other
drivers.
"It's hard to predict," Cas-
troneves said. "With the
rules (allowing) three at-
tempts, no question it cre-
ates more competition. It
gives you sometimes a little
more edge to try to squeeze
a little bit more, a little more
speed into the car
"But Roger and (team
president Tim) Cindric, we
always talk before (about)
what are our chances. We
never take unnecessary
chances. We always' know
what we need to do. It isn't
like a secret. You just have
to feel it"


PY HOUR:49t WINGS&2 FOR1 4PM-7PM EVERYDAY


Associated Press
NASCAR Sprint Cup Series driver Matt Kenseth gets out of
his car after winning the pole on Friday for the Southern 500
at Darlington Raceway in Darlington, S.C.


SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009 B5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AUTO RACING










E Page B6 - SATURDAY, MAY 9,2009



ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE =

Jury clears rap star
of man's beating
SANTA MONICA, Calif.
- A civil jury says Snoop
Dogg didn't hit a man
who came up on stage
during a 2005 concert
near Seattle.
The rapper wasn't in
court Friday when the
jury's verdict cleared
him of civil assault and
battery claims. The jury
did find that Richard
Monroe Jr. suffered seri-
ous injuries during the
concert and awarded him
$449,400 in damages to be
paid by a record label,
another performer and
others involved in the
concert,
The damages awarded
were substantially lower
than the $22 million Mon-
roe sought when he sued
the rapper in 2006.
Jurors. found that
Snoop Dogg, whose real
name is Calvin Broadus,
doesn't personally owe
Monroe anything.
, During two weeks of
testimony, jurors were re-
peatedly shown a video
of a melee that Monroe
said left him uncon-
scious, badly bruised and
nearly naked.
Monroe's attorney,
Brian E. Watkins, said ju-
rors did believe his
client's contention that
Broadus' people were in-
volved in a savage beat-
ing.
"We're very pleased
that the jury found that
this incident was not
something to be taken
lightly," Watkins said.
Responsibility for pay-c
ing the judgment falls on
Doggystyle Records,
which Broadus founded;
rapper Soopafly, whose
real name is Priest
Brooks; and other un-
named parties.
While Broadus was not
present for the verdict,
he attended part of the
trial and testified, deny-
ing that he struck Mon-
roe.

Pageant to decide
on violations
.LOS ANGELES - The
co-director of the Miss
California USA pageant
says the fate of current
title holder Carrie Pre-
jean will be decided by
Monday.
Keith Lewis said Fri-
day that he, fellow co-di-
rector Shanna Moakler
and Prejean's represen-
tatives are close to a res-
olution.
The state pageant has
been investigating
whether the 21-year-old
Prejean violated her con-
tract by making public
appearances with groups
opposed to same-sex
marriage and by failing
to reveal that she had
posed in her underwear
as a teenager.
Lewis says the runner-
up Miss California, Tami
Farrell, will attend a
news conference sched-
uled for Monday on the
issue. He says he doesn't
know ifPrejean will at-
tend.

'Dr. Dolly': Parton
receives Ph.D.
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -
Award-winning enter-
tainer, businesswoman
and education advocate
Dolly Parton has a new
title.
"Just think, I am Dr.
Dolly!" she said Friday
after receiving an hon-
orary doctorate of hu-
mane and musical letters
from the University of
Tennessee in Knoxville.
Always joking about
her buxom figure, she
added, "So when people


say something about
'Double-D,' they will be
thinking of something en-
tirely different."
The audience of 1,069
new graduates from the
College of Arts and Sci-
ences roared with laugh-
ter and gave Parton a
standing ovation.
-From wire reports


Hometown hurrah


Associated Press
Adam Lambert, a finalist on the singing competition series, "American Idol," performs for fans during a visit to his alma
mater, Mt. Carmel High School in San Diego on Friday, May 8, 2009. Lambert, who is one of three finalists on the show,
is visiting locations in his home state.

American Idol'contestantAdam Lambert goes back to his roots


Associated Press


SAN DIEGO - Adam Lambert's
old high school ppt on a show Friday
for the "American Idol" finalist, with
cheerleaders, a marching band and
thousands of fans and students cele-
brating their hometown music hero.,
In return, Lambert, 27, offered the
crowd at Mt. Carmel High School two
songs and a few words of apprecia-
tion.
"This is so weird," he said, thank-
ing the crowd from a makeshift stage
on the packed stadium's field. He ad-
vised students to "believe in your-
self" no matter what others may say
His entrance - -in a cherry-red
convertible - was heralded by the
screams of cheerleaders. The march-
ing band played as Lambert slowly
cruised the stadium track, drawing
shouts from the bleachers.
Lamberths renditions of Michael
Jackson's "Black or White" and "Mad
World" won applause despite a tinny
sound system.
His '"American Idol" competitors,
Danny Gokey of Milwaukee and Kris


Allen of Conway,Ark., Were also feted of 2000 with him and attended the
by their towns Friday, with Fox tap- celebration Friday
ing the events to air next week on "He was definitely good," said
"Idol." Clark, who recalled seeing Lambert
The winner of Fox TV's singing perform at pep rallies and other
contest will be announced on the school events. "I'm proud of the guy.
May 20 "American Idol" finale. It's always good to see people making
In San Diego, a woman wearing a their dreams happen."
sports bra but sans blouse rushed the Geri Johnson, along with grand-
stage to get closer to Lambert and daughter Olivia Mercado and her
was quickly hustled off. When Mayor young friends, had been on Lam-
Jerry Sanders stepped up to declare bert's trail since 5 a.m. Friday, when
Friday "Adam Lambert Day" in San he' visited local radio and TV sta-
Diego, he jokingly vowed to keep his tions..
shirt on. "It was pretty rowdy," Johnson, of
The stadium was draped with ban- nearby El Cajon, said of the early
ners reading, "Mt. Carmel (Hearts) morning crowd. So why did they
Adam!" and, "You're Our American make the effort? ,
Idol." A poster toted by a fan pro- "He's really cute," said 12-year-old'
claimed, "Adam, You're a Rock God" Mercado. Friend Quiana McMorris,.
- echoing show judge Kara Dio- 15, who brought along a stuffed ani-
Guard i's assessment of La mbert,'who mal as a gift for Lambert, offered her
has performed in musical theater. view: "He's a really good singer."
He's been a consistent favorite Robin Andersen came to Mt.
with the "Idol" judges, even the Carmel High from nearby Carlsbad
tough-minded Simon Cowell. .with her 13-year-old daughter,
Lambert was a standout in high d'Lainey Forrester, because "you al-
school, too, said Bryan Clark, 26, of ways have to support hometown peo-
San Diego who graduated in the class ple. Plus, I think he's going to win."


'Wizard of Oz' Munchkin dies at 89


Associated Press

ST. LOUIS - Mickey Car-
roll, one of the last surviving
Munchkins from the 1939
beloved film "The Wizard of
Oz," died Thursday. He was
89.
His caretaker, Linda
Dodge, said Carroll died in
his sleep at her home in sub-
urban Crestwood. He had
heart problems and re-
ceived a pacemaker in Feb-
ruary. Until January, he had
lived in his own home in
suburban Bel-Nor.
Carroll was one of. more
than 100 adults and ch i Idren
who were recruited to play
the movie natives of what
author L. Frank Baum
called Munchkin Country in
his 1900 book "The Wonder-
ful Wizard of Oz."
Carroll told The Associ-
ated Press in a 2007 inter-
view that the Munchkins
made only $125 a week
while filming the movie that
would become a classic.
"The Wizard of Oz" was
Carroll's only movie. When
it appeared on television in
the. 1960s, he found a new
career at charitable events,
retail events and Oz-related
events.
"It's not me; it's the
movie," Carroll said. "When
they see me, they think of
their childhood, and it
makes them smile."
Carroll was born Michael
Finocchiaro on July 8, 1919,
in St. Louis. The son of im-
migrants, he grew up in an
Italian neighborhood on the
city's north side with a twin
sister and four older sib-
lings. All preceded him in
death.
A pituitary condition
caused .Carroll's short
stature. Stephen Cox, a
friend of Carroll's and the


Associated Press
One of the last surviving Munchkins from the 1939 classic film, "The Wizard of Oz" has
died. The St. Louis actor Mickey Carroll died Thursday at age 89.


author of a book on the
Munchkins, told the St Louis
Post-Dispatch that Carroll
was 4-foot-3 when he
stopped growing in his 40s.
Carroll danced at the
Muny Theater in St. Louis
when he was in grade
school, he once said, and in
the 1920s worked in Chicago
clubs and on the Orpheum
Theater vaudeville circuit
His .gift of gab and
comedic timing helped his
popularity. He warmed up
crowds for President
Franklin Roosevelt while
campaigning in New York
City and served as a crowd-
getter in President Harry
Truman's whistlestop cam-
paign.
He did Phillip Morris live
radio ads and appeared in
shows with Mae West He


later did radio shows with
George Burns, Gracie Allen,
Jack Benny and Al Jolson.
But it was his role as one
of the "Oz" Munchkins that
defined him.
Carroll played the part of
the Munchkinland "Town
Crier," marched as a
"Munchkin Soldier" and
was the candy-striped "Fid-
dler" who escorted the
movie's wide-eyed orphan,
Dorothy Gale, played by
Judy Garland, down the yel-
low brick road toward Emer-
ald City.
In the mid-1940s, Carroll
returned to St Louis to run
the family business making
cemetery monuments. After
he sold it in 1996, he filled his
time with charity work,
Dodge said.
In November 2007, Carroll


and six other surviving
Munchkins received a star
on the Hollywood Walk of
Fame.
Carroll was joined on that
occasion by former
Munchkin colleagues Ruth
Duccini, Jerry Maren, Mar-
garet Pellegrini, Meinhardt
Raabe, Karl Slover and
Clarence'Swensen. Swensen
died in February
At a special screening of
the film in 2005 in Los Ange-
les, Carroll said talking to'
longtime fans about the
movie brought back their
childhoods.
'They have tears," hd said.
"I'll say, 'May the magic of Oz
always be with you.' And,
'Follow the yellow brick
road!'And they're all excited.
I bring back their childhood.
Ain't that something?"


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
* Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, MAY 7
Fantasy 5: 5-8-19-26--35
5-of-5 winners $71,167.11
4-of-5 359 . $95.50
3-of-5 9,647 $9.50.
TUESDAY, MAY 5
Mega Money: 9-- 10 - 12 --27
Mega Ball: 10
4-of-4 MB N6 winner
4-of-4 5
$1;412.50
3-of-4 MB 69 $224
3-of-4 1,334 $34.50
2-of-4 MB 1,889 $17
1-of-4 MB 13,329 $2
2-of-4 . 35,564 $2
Fantuy ---8=11= 12-20=26:
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$1800,06,76

INSIDE THE NUMBERS ,'
* To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY=-

Today is Saturday, May 9,
the 129th day of 2009. There
are 236 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in His-
tory:
On May 9, 1754, a cartoon,
in Benjamin Franklin's Penn-
sylvania Gazette showed a
snake cut into sections, each
part representing an Ameri-
can colony; the caption read,
"JOIN, or DIE."
On this date:
In 1883, Spanish philoso-
pher Jose Ortega y Gasset
wag born in Madrid.
In 1936, Italy annexed
Ethiopia.
In 1945, U.S. officials an-
nounced that a midnight en-
tertainment curfew was being
lifted immediately.
In 1961, FCC chairman
Newton N. Minow deplored
the majority of television pro-
gramming as a "vast waste-
land" in a speech to the
National Association of
Broadcasters.
Ten years ago: A char-
tered bus carrying members.
of a casino club on a Mother's
Day gambling excursion ran
off a highway in New Orleans,
killing 22 people.
Five years ago:. Come-
dian Alan King died in New
York at age 76.
One year ago: Democrat
Barack Obama picked up the
backing of nine superdele-
gates, all but erasing Hillary
Rodham Clinton's once-im-
posing lead
Today's Birthdays: CBS
News correspondent Mike
Wallace is 91. Actress Geral-'
dine McEwan is 77. Actor-
writer Alan Bennett is 75.
Rock musician Nokie Ed-
wards (The Ventures) is 74.
Actor Albert Finney is 73. Ac-.
tress-tumed-politician Glenda
Jackson is 73. Musician
Sonny Curtis (Buddy Holly
and the Crickets) is 72. Pro-*.
ducer-director James L.
Brooks is 69. Singer Tommy
Roe is 67. Singer-musician
Richie Furay (Buffalo Spring-,
field and Poco) is 65. Actress
Candice Bergen is 63. Rock
singer-musician Tom Peters-
son (Cheap Trick) is 59. Ac-
tress Alley Mills is 58. Actress
Wendy Crewson is 53. Actor
John Corbett is 48. Singer
Dave Gahan (Depeche
Mode) is 47. Rapper Ghost-
face Killah is 39. Country mu-
sician Mike Myerson
(Heartland) is 38. R&B singer
Tamia is 34. Rock musician
Dan Regan (Reel Big Fish) is
32. Rock singer Pierre Bou-
vier (Simple Plan) is 30. Ac-
tress Rosario Dawson is 30.


Thought for Today:
'There is nothing to fear ex-
cept the persistent refusal to
find out the truth, the persist- -
ent refusal to analyze the .
causes of happenings." - '-
Dorothy Thompson, Ameri-
can journalist and author
(1894-1961).











R 'i LIGIN9,

..ELIGION


* Oldifashionad fun at Homosassa church,/C6
* Information about Angel Food, SHARE and other food
programs can be found In Monday's Chronicle,


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Deciphering the mystery of the


VICTOR R. CAIVANO/Associated Press
Lead researcher Juan Castilla poses recently at the Alhambra in Granada, Spain. Spanish researchers unveiled the first fruits of a gargantuan proj-
ect to translate and catalogue every last carving from the 14th-century Moorish citadel Alhambra, an estimated 10,000 words, and render a seem-
ingly impenetrable slice of medieval history readily accessible - all with the click of a mouse - revealing individual words, poems and verses from
the Quran. "It is hard to believe that this had never been done before," said lead researcher Juan Castilla.

Spain strives to translate Arabic inscriptions of Moorish citadel
DANIEL WootLs
Associated Press Writer A .


- GRANADA, Spain
hambra quietly speaks. Walls,
columns, fountains and other pieces
of the Moorish citadel boast ornate
Arabic inscriptions that even native
speakers might struggle to decipher.
This month Spanish researchers unveiled
the first fruits of a gargantuan project to
translate and catalog every last carving - an
estimated 10,000 - from individual words to
poems to verses from the Quran. The goal is
Sto render a seemingly impenetrable slice of
medieval history readily accessible with the
click of a mouse.
"It is hard to believe that this had never
been done before," lead researcher Juan
Castilla told The Associated Press.
The dream of understanding and recording
the inscriptions at Europe's crown jewel of
Muslim architecture goes back to King Ferdi-
nand and Queen Isabella. Their forces cap-
tured Granada in 1492, expelled the sultans
who lived in scented splendor at the'14th-cen-
tury palace complex and ended nearly 800
years of Muslim rule in much of Spain.
The Spanish royal court quickly hired
translators to tackle the inscriptions at the Al-
hambra and on other buildings throughout
this handsome, whitewashed city in southern
Spain. But records of that effort were lost over
time, and later ones addressed only certain cat-
egories of inscription, a far cry from the ex-
haustive study that Castilla and two other
Arabic lanage specialists have been conduct-
ing since 2002.
Today some inscriptions are illegible be-
cause of routine decay. And if a natural disaster
like an earthquake were to strike Spain's single
most visited tourist site, with 2.2 million people
a year, the losses would be unfathomable,
Castilla said.
"We needed to be able to say, as of the 21st
century, this is what was here and this is what
it said,'" Castilla said.
During a three-hour tour of the Alhambra, he
pointed out inscriptions in every conceivable
corner of the complex, running from floor to
ceiling and back down again, on or atop
columns, or around the rims of fountains. Some
carvings are so.intricate that to an untrained
eye they look like elaborate drawings.
For now, about a third of the inscriptions are
- available on an interactive CD that provides
Spanish-language translations and a wealth of
other information, such as their source. Once
the project is completed in 2011, the idea is to
download a sample of the material onto the In-
ternet.
Castilla, who works for the Spanish National
r- ' : . 'l -_..


VBS
* "CAMP EDGE" VBS for
all children from 8:30 a.m. to
noon Monday through Friday,
June 8-12, at First United
Methodist Church of Ho-
mosassa, 8831 W. Bradshaw
Blvd,. VBS teaches kids their
strength and might come from
God, with contemporary music,
recreation games, science ac-
tivities, sports videos and crafts.
To register, call the church of-
fice at 628-4083.
* "Crocodile Dock" VBS


A bird's-eye view of the Alhambra, top, in uranad
Research Council and learned Arabic while
living in Iraq and Egypt, said that understand-
ing the writing is extremely hard, even for the
average native Arabic speaker, in part because
it sometimes employs an archaic script called
kuific.


. quicklyhired
^translators to tackle the.(
inscriptions at the '
Alhambra and on other
buildings t ghout ,..h'
\ . this handsome,
' I whitewashed city in
southern Spain.


Mansour al Marzouqui, a 16-year-old tourist
from the United Arab Emirates, called the task
tough but not impossible. "You can't get it the
first time. You have to look really hard," he
said.
Through the centuries, the popular belief
was that most of the writings were verses from
the Quran or poetry But on the basis of the Al-
hambra building that has been studied so far,
the Comares Palace, those amount to less than
10 percent of the total, Castilla said.


Religion NOTES -


for children ages 4 through 10,
at Episcopal Church of the Ad-
vent from 9 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Monday through Friday, June
15-19, at 11251 S.W. County
Road 484 (two miles west of
State Road 200), Dunnellon,
Crocodile Dock is filled with
Bible-learning, Bible Point
crafts, team-building games,
Bible songs and tasty treats, To
register, call (352) 465-7272 or
(352) 237-0001,
* "Crocodile Dock, Where
Fearless Kids Shine God's
Light" VBS for ages 2 through


seventh grade from 5:30 to
8 p.m. Monday through Friday,
June 15-19, at First Lutheran
Church, 1900 Highway 44
West, Inverness. Call 726-
1637. Pick up a registration
form, fill it out and return by
June 7.
Groovy movies
* Friday Flicks continue at
7 p.m. May 15 at Nature Coast
Unitarian Universalist Fellow-
ship, 7633 N. Florida Ave,, Cit-
rus Springs (U.S. 41, north of
the Holder intersection).The


In fact, the phrase repeated most often -
hundreds upon hundreds 6otimes - is a sen-
tence considered the slogan of the.Nazrid dy-
nasty, one of the successions of rulers that
passed through the Alhambra. It says: "There is
no victor but God." It shows up on tiny shields,
inside eight-pointed stars and myriad other
places.
One of the reasons for so much inscription
was that the Alhambra's sultans.wanted to
leave a record of their presence, Castilla said.
Also, such writings are a way of professing faith
in God and of simply decorating the place:
Islam discourages any kind of representational
ait
Other inscriptions are single words like
"happiness" or "blessing"-with the idea that
they are to invoke such things from God for the
room where they are carved or for the ruling
sultan himself.
As for the poetry, it can range from a few
verses to longer pieces, like one that spans 25
meters (yards) as it runs along all four walls of
a room. It was penned to celebrate the circum-
cision of a sultan's son. ,
Elsewhere, poetry runs up one side, across
the top and down the other flank of a small al-
cove of the kind where the Moors would place
a pitcher of water with rose petals as incense.
This poem compares-the image of a pitcher
being poured with that of a Muslim leaning for-
ward in prayer
Castilla feels the content of all the poetry is
less appealing than its presentation in such a
rich variety of places throughout the Alhambra.
"As you walk along, it seems as if you are
opening a book of poetry and turning the
pages," he said.


film is "Chicken Run," set in
1950s England on a sinister
farm. An animated film, not a
chick flick and not for young
children, this is a story about
banding together against op-
pression. It Is a comedy/es-
cape/drama with a touch of
passion. Flicks are shown the
third Friday monthly and are
non-religious films never, or not
recently, shown in this area.
Everyone invited. Donation is
$3; soda and snacks are sold.
Call (352) 465-5646,
I See the free movie "Fire,"


an acclaimed documentary film
at noon Saturday, May 16, at
the Nature Coast Unitarian Uni-
versalist Fellowship, 7633 N,
Florida Ave. (U.S. 41) Citrus
Springs. Banned in India, this Is
a taboo-breaking portrayal of
contemporary life and hidden
desires that defy traditional ex-
pectations, A brown bag lunch
is OK. Call (352) 465-4225,
I Movie night at First Pres-
byterian Church of Crystal
River at 7 p.m. the fourth Friday
monthly, May's featured film is
See NOTES/Page C2


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Lessons

from the

'Gilmore

Girls'
Those who know-me
know my two grand
passions: cake with
butter cream frosting and
the "Gilmore Girls."
Currently, I'm watching
season two on DVD.
For those who don't
know about the "Gilmore
Girls," it's a now-canceled
TV series about a single
mother and her teenage
daughter who live in Stars
Hollow, a quirky little
town outside Hartford,
Conn. The mother, Lorelai
Gilmore, is young, gor-
geous, witty, talks a mile a
minute, loves movies and
TV and eats like a horse.
Her daughter, Rory, is
studious, thoughtful, also
witty, also talks a mile a
minute, loves movies and
TV and eats like a horse.
The two are best friends,
as well as mother and
daughter.
Lorelai is the only child,
of wealthy parents,
Richard and Emily. The
-elder Gilmores are proper
Hartford-society types
and have difficulty ex-
pressing their love (but no
difficulty expressing their
disappointment) for their
'See GRACE/Page C5


Terry Mattingly
ON
RELIGION


Surprising

degree for

Baptists
on Whitney knows
what happens
when people hear
that a Southern Baptist
seminary is offering a doc-
tor of philosophy degree
in spirituality.
"For many people, con-
necting 'Baptist' and 'spir-
ituality' is like 'military'
and 'intelligence.' They
just can't picture those
two words together," said
Whitney, director of the
new Center for Biblical
Spirituality at Southern
Baptist Theological Semi-
nary in Louisville, Ky.
But for Baptists, he
stressed, it's crucial to un-
derline the word "bibli-
cal" in front of
"spirituality," to stress the
center's ties to Protestant
reformers who rejected
what they believed were
the errors of Rome.
When Whitney and his
colleagues talk about spir-
ituality, they emphasize
images of the great
Charles Spurgeon spend-
ing hours in Bible study
before preaching, laypeo-
ple meditating on the sym-
bolism in John Bunyan's
"The Pilgrim's Progress"
and missionaries weeping
while praying for the lost
They do not focus on
monks chanting ancient
prayers day after day,
night after night, genera-
tion after generation.
"Why should we go to
See RHLIGION/Page C8


4*.cW .


I Il,�l WV. IW- ,








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RELIGION


C2 s M 92009


NOTES
Continued from Page C1
"Walking Across Egypt," star-
ring Ellen Burstyn. Free admis-
sion. Popcorn available. Church
is at 1501 S.E. U.S. 19 in Crys-
tal River.
Music & more
* Patriotic concert by the
Citrus Concert Band at 7 p.m.
Wednesday at Hemando
Church of the Nazarene, 2101
N. Florida Ave. (U.S.41), Her-
nando. Community invited. Call
726-6144 for information.
* Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church Spring Concert Series
presents internationally ac-
claimed artists Jonathan Hel-
ton, saxophone, and Steven
Thomas, Violoncello, at 3 pm.
Sunday, May 17. The church is
at 20641 Chestnut St., in the
Dunnellon Historic District. Call
(352) 489-2682.
* First Baptist Church Crys-
tal River will host multiple-
Grammy-winning gospel singer
Larry Ford in concert at 6
p.m. Sunday, May 24, in the
sanctuary. For free tickets, call
the church at 795-3367. The
church is at 700 Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River.
Fun for kids
* Upward Soccer, a Chris-
tian sports program for children


from K4 through sixth grade,
final sign-up from noon to 5
p.m. today at Crystal River
United Methodist Church, 4801
N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River.
Registration fee is $60 per
child. Practice begins Monday,
May 18 with the first games
scheduled Saturday, June 13.
Call Paul Ingram at 697-3209, ,
or Rick Yerton at 257-3595.
* Inverness Church of God
classes at 7 p.m. Wednes-
days: Teens are invited to
"Frontline" with Youth Pastor
Kyle Holtzhower. Missionettes
and Royal Rangers Clubs for
children from the age of 3.
Church is at 416 U.S. 41 South,
Inverness. Call 726-4524.
* EBADOC Academy
(Everyone Becoming A Disciple
Of Christ) meets at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday at First United
Methodist Church of Ho-
mosassa, 8831 W Bradshaw
Blvd., Homosassa. In its rotat-
ing curriculum, the third unit of
2009 will begin June 7. "VIC-
TORY" is a 10-week children's
church curriculum for prekinder-
garten through eighth grade,
which takes kids into the center
of the major battles of the Bible.
Each week will focus on a new
battle and learn valuable les-
sons.
� AWANA from 5:15 to 7
p.m. Sunday at First Baptist
Church of Inverness features
games, devotions, Scripture


memorization and theme
nights. Classes for Puggles,
Cubbies, Sparks and Truth &
Training for ages 2 through fifth
grade. All welcome. Call the
church at 726-1252.
* AWANA classes for chil-
dren from kindergarten through
sixth grade from 6:30 to 8:15
p.m. Wednesday at Heritage
Baptist Church's fellowship hall
at 2 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills.
Call 746-6171 for information.
* Little Vines Daycare, at
the south end of parking lot of
Calvary Chapel, is accepting
applications for infants, tod-
dlers, preschool, and before-
and afterschool day care. Also
accepting applications for sum-
mer day camp. Call Miss Twilla
at 726-2875.
Special events
* Abbot Francis Sadlier
Council 6168 Knights of Colum-
bus annual on Monday. Bus
leaves council hall at 9 a.m.
Coffee and doughnuts served
at 8:30 a.m. Bus trip costs $18.
For reservations, call Larry
Nestor at 746-7019. Lunch at
Red Lobster.
* Citrus Christian Clergy
Association (CCCA) monthly
meeting Thursday at First As-
sembly of God, 4201 S. Pleas-
ant Grove Rd., Inverness, with
Pastor Dariold Rushing. Prayer
begins at 11 a.m. followed by
lunch at noon and business


meeting at 12:30 p.m. All Chris-
tian leaders and associates in-
vited. Call 726-1480.
* The Altar and Rosary So-
ciety of St. Benedict Catholic
Church will attend a Mass cele-
brated by the Very Rev. Michael
Suszynski, VF at 11 a.m.
Thursday prior to installation of
2009-2011 officers of the Soci-
ety. Following the installation of
officers, members will have a
potluck luncheon in Hilgert Hall
at 455 S. Suncoast Blvd., Crys-
tal River.
* Spaghetti supper from 4
to 6 p.m. Friday in fellowship
hall at Beverly Hills Community
Church, 86 Civic Circle, Beverly
Hills. Donation of $7 per person
includes salad, spaghetti with
meat sauce, Italian bread, cof-
fee or tea, and dessert. Takeout
available. Suppers are the third
Friday monthly.
* N Hernando United
Methodist Women's annual
luncheon honoring all daugh-
ters at noon Saturday, May 16.
Theme: "Hats Off to All Daugh-
ters." Cost is $7. Wear a hat in
keeping with theme. Prizes
awarded for some hats, plus
door-prize drawings. Lunch in-
cludes "butterfly" chicken salad
sandwiches, salads, lemon tea-
cake, dessert and drinks. Lunch
prepared by Sandy Ashcroft
and helpers, and served by the
Hemando United Methodist
Men. For tickets, call Helen at


726-0398 or Carmen at 270-
9180 or purchase at the church
by Sunday. All ladies welcome.
Proceeds used to further mis-
sion pledges of the unit. Church
is at 2125 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hernando.
* Old Fashioned Day with
Bluegrass gospel singing by
"The Marksmen," at 4 p.m. Sat-
urday, May 16, at New Hope
Baptist Church, 8635 W. Good-
man Lane, Homosassa. Wear
old-fashioned clothing. To par-
ticipate in the pie bakeoff, bring
a homemade pie. Two cate-
gories: fruit filled or all others.
Crust does not have to be
homemade. Put name on pie.
Call 795-5391.
* First Baptist Church of
Lecanto celebrates its 116th
anniversary Sunday, May 17,
during the 11 a.m. worship
service. Former pastors and
members to be recognized.
Ralph Walker and The River
Jordan Quartet, a southern
gospel group, in concert during
morning service and at 1 p.m.
Photo albums and scrapbooks
available for those interested in
the church's history. Dinner on
the grounds after morning serv-
ice. All current members, for-
mer members, former pastors
and friends of the church in-
vited. The church is at 1020 S.
Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491), one-half mile south
of the intersection of State


Road 44 and C.R. 491 in
Lecanto.
* Fifth Annual Elder Leroy
and Pricilla Bellamy Scholar-
ship Program at 4 p.m. Sun-
day, May 17, at Grace Temple
Church of the Living God, 7431
Old Floral City Road, Floral
City. Pastor Larry McReynolds
invites everyone to attend. Call
726-0501.
* Bible Lands cruise-tour
to four countries led by the Rev.
Mark Whittaker, pastor of First
United Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa, from Nov. 11-22.
More information and
brochures available from
church office at 8831 W. Brad-
shaw St., Homosassa. Call
628-4083.
* Beverly Hills Community
Church Christian community
support group at 6 p.m. Tues-
days at the church, 82 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills. Healing
steps for relationships, the
economy, addictions, co-depen-
dency and emotions. Free and
operfto the public. Call Meg at
527-2443.
* Mother's Touch (a min-
istry for women who parent chil-
dren from birth through high
school) meets from 10 a.m. to
noon the first Thursday
monthly, September through
May, at Gulf to Lake Church,
1454 N. Gulf-to-Lake Blvd.,
Crystal River. Child care pro-
See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

I Come on over to "His" house, yourr spirits Will be lifted!!!


SERVICING THE






Church
Heart




Commu ty





St. BenedictE



U.S. 19 at Ozello R..
- MSS-
S Vigil: 5 :00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am


| Mon. - Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced


CONFESSION
| Sat.: 3:30 - 4:30pm
S........795-4479


GULF-TO-

LAKE

CHURCH
(SBC)





Rev. &Mrs. Bertinc
"Exciting &
Contagious Worship"
Sunday 8:00, 9:30
and 11:00 am
* Adult Worship
* Kid's Worship -
(Worship just for Kids)
5:30 pm Evening
Activities:
* Adult Bible Studies
* Teen Program
(Grades 6-12)
* Kids Connection
(3 yr. old - 5th Grade)
^BHw44CrsaRie
795-8077


rr.O



...... 'I


COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA
, - ....go-W a;.- - "-*^'.^ *.";^.*^,*f,,i^ A ?- % ."-- " , ,... ", "."*-'�;,'k.A,


Crystal Diver
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nursery


t St. Timothy t"
Lutheran Church
ELCA
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd.,
Crystal River
; 795-5325 L
Saturday Informal Worship
5:00pm
Monthly Bluegrass Service
5:00pm
Sunday Worship
7:30am, 8:30am & 11:00am
Sunday School
All Ages & Adults 10:00am
Nursery Provided
Youth Activities
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor




2First


Assembly

of God

Come One
Come All!!!





Service Times:
Sunday School
9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship
10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible
Study
7:00 p.m.
Richard Hart Senio Postor


4 MILEs EAST OF Hwy. 19
ON Hwy. 44
(327529*


"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive * Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Sunday
9 W 3i. , Suniay ,S.lOOIl |A '.,urp,.i
1( 30Ji am Worsrhip Clebrawion
Choir I Speci3l Mus,,: I Kid Worship'
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebr3tion
Wednesday Night
7 pm Worship Celebration
Chldren's Aeanas Group
Youth Activites


Sunday Worship
10:00am
Nursery Provided
Sunday School
For all ages at 9:00am
S First

Presbyterian
os^ 1501 SW Hwy. 19

352-795-2259 |
wwwfpcofcrystalriver.com


T. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH
r' nOS ' ..uthse ' tu:.. ' , ..ur, t

MASSES:
Saturday 4:30 P.M.
Sunday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.


U , I9 ' nle,'
* C.r3in'.:c l S't


$cijtri :4 W.~. I


FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
CRYSTAL RIVER
700 N. CitrusAenue
352-795-3367
Re% Bruce Hodge
Sunday AM Sern ices
S.45 - Contemporar,' Worship
10- 15 - Worship Service
Bible Stud% Session
S.45 and l10 I5
(For all age-sl
Sunday PNM
Y'outh Bible Srud 5,
Wednesday PM Ser% ice
5 0 F 1niily Supper iRS\ Pi
5:30 Awana Clubs
5:30 Youth Service
6:00 Worship Service


__First United
Methodist
Church
A Stephen Ministry Church
8831 W, Bradshaw St.

Homosassa
West of US 19
(take Yulee Dr. at Burger King)

Rev, Mark Whittaker

628-4083
www.1umc.org
Traditional Worship:
8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M. & 11:00 A.M.
Nursery at All Sunday Services

Sunday School for
All Ages: 9:30 A.M.

Youth Ministries
(ages 11-18)
775731
0.- '


El.
Opn. ors1


Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRISTr
A Frie-ndly Church With
A Bible message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday
Bible Study
10:00 A.M.
Suinidaiy VWovrslip
1 1:00 A.Av.
S-1-nd ay Evenirig
6:00 P'.M.v
Wednesday
Bible Study
7:00 iP.m.
Come Womrs hip

Eible Questions
Please Call

746- It2394


fl Crystal
HRiver

Foursquare
Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pmrn

Pastor Brona Larder


Sunday
10:30am & 6:30pm
Wednesday
7pm
Come worship with us
and see why we are
becoming the
People's Church
of our community.

795-LIFE
(5433)
www.abundantlifecitrus.org

"Place ofFa ith,

IIIeI&Lo1.1"


West

Citrus
Chlurll of Clrist
9592 \V. Deep Woods
Crystal River. FL 34465
352-564-8565
ww\W.wes.tcit ruscoC.corn
W. Deep Woods Dr.
;a



?

US Hwy. 19


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
� Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday'
PM
Bible Study 7:00
EVANGELISTS
[ Melvin Curry
David Curry





HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
, CAPKIN FAMILY
IN CHP-KIST!

CKY5TXL
RIVE -
VN IT ED
METHODIST
CHURCH

4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Gill, Pastor
Sunday Worship
8:00 Early Communion
9:30 Praise& Worship
11:00 Traditional
Bible Study
At 9:30 and 11:00 For All Ages.
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship Sunday, 4:30
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. - Fri. 7a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
,. A Stephen Ministry Provider.:


�g ST. ANNE'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH (Anglican)
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
Celebrating 50 Years of
Serving God and the Community
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
. '10:15a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
Youth Group meeting 1st Sunday
of the month after 10:15 Mass
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org |


SATURDAY, AY ,


[ 628-7li


I


* **.'* -" ;*, ;. *


i I








oTI RUS LUUIVY(1LA Y


NOTES
Continued from Page C2
vided. Home-schooled children
welcome. Call 795-8077.
* "Fun and Games Time"
from 1 to 4 p.m. the third Thurs-
day monthly at First Presbyte-
rian Church of Crystal River,
1501 S.E. U.S. 19 in Crystal
River. Everyone invited. Events
include ping-pong, football,
chess and card. games.
Live & learn
* Assertiveness training


workshop from 1 to 3 p.m. Sat-
urday, May 16, in Swenson Hall
at Joy Lutheran Church on
S.W. State Road 200 at 83rd
Place, Ocala. Speaker Christo-
pher Eric Sterling MSN, RN-
BC, has been working in the
field of psychiatric nursing since
1974 and has given many lec-
tures and presentations. For in-
formation or to preregister, call
Linda Sterling at 873-2262.
* Nature Coast Commu-
nity Bible Study (CBS) will
begin a 30-week study of the
book of Revelation on Thurs-
day, Sept. 10, from 9:15 to


11:15 a.m. at First Baptist
Church of Beverly Hills at the
intersection of Lecanto High-
way (County 491) and Forest
Ridge Boulevard. All invited.
Child care available for ages 3
,and younger. For required pre-
registration, call Sheila or
LeRoy at 527-4230.
* Weekly Bible study
groups at First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River: Gospel
of Luke study group at 10 a.m.
Tuesday; "Character Witness"
study with Pastor Rob at 6:30
p.m. Wednesday at 6:30 p.m.
Call church office for informa-


tion at 795-2259.
* Questions answered
about the Christian faith and
about God, in general, in dis-
cussion time at 5:30 p.m. Sun-
days in the fellowship hall at
First Baptist Church of Beverly
Hills, 4950 N. Lecanto Highway.
Free dinner and video presen-
tation precedes open conversa-
tion. No one required to speak ,
unless desired. Public wel-
come. Call 746-2970.
* Series on II Timothy
taught by Dr. Roy Swihart at 7
p.m. Wednesday in the sanc-
tuary of Inverness Church of


God, 416 U.S. 41 South, Inver-
ness. Public invited. Call the
church office at 726-4524.
Announcements
* Community House of
Prayer is open from 1 to 5 p.m..
Sunday at First Baptist Church
of Beverly Hills, 4950 N.
Lecanto Highway. The public is
invited to come and join in
prayer for personal requests,
salvation, healing, family,
churches, the community, the
nation and the world. Prayer in-
tercessors are also invited to
come and pray.


* First United Methodist
Church of Homosassa's UMW
Thrift Shop, 8831 W. Brad-
shaw Blvd, Homosassa. Shop
is open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Thursday, Friday and Saturday.
Donations. accepted at sorting
room during regular hours.'
Profits to support the UMW's
local, national and global mis-
sions.
* Faith Baptist Church
scrapbooking club meets
from 6 to9 p.m. Tuesday in
the fellowship hall, 6918 S.
See NOTES/Page C5


I Places


of worship


I Come on over t


I


FAITH BAPTIST

CHURCH
Homosassa Springs
Rev. Wm. LaVerle Coats
SUNDAY
SUNDAY SCHOOL: 9:45 am
WORSHIP: 11:00 am & 6 pm
WEDNESDAY
WORSHIP: 7pm
YOUTH: 6:30pm r
Independent & Fundamental
On Spartan� 210 mile m U Li S 19
off Cardinal 628-4793

LECANTO
CHURCH OF CHRIST
State Road 44 & Rowe Terrace
352-746-4919
Sumley Bible Stud....10-:0AAM.
Sunday W-inp -IIOAM.
WminedayBieStudy 700 PM.
"In Search oflhe Lord's %a}"
8:30 AAJI. Sunday
Channel 22 (TWC 2)
8:30 PM. Friday
Channel 15 (ADEL.)
Check our webslte for Info,
events, Bible study:
lecantochurchofchrist.org
Fov Cherry Minister


IGLESIA HISPANA
CASA DE ORACION
"Donde la Palabra de
Dios es el lenguaje del
Espiritu Santo"

Escuela Dominical.....9:30 AM
Adoraci6n.............10l15 AM
Martes.......................9:30 AM
MiWrcols........................7:00PM
Dr. Teddy Aponte &
Hayi Aponte, Pastores
3220 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy. (200) * Hernando
352-341-5100 I

HHernando
K ChuIrchof
The Nazarene
A Place to Behm,

2101 N,. Florida Ave.
-Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided
"The Church with the big 9"

*CHILDREN
*YOUTH
*SINGLES
*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor


to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


IGS


Homosassa Springs
Ji SRVNTH, Y AtWEN S-r'CHURCH






Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services'
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


Ancient.Worship... Timeless Faith
1928 Book of Comion Prayer -
Traditional Episcopal Worship
prAnglican Church
1of the Holy Spirit
1023 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
352-637-5922
or 352-621-3323
Fr David Sokol - Priest
Adult Bible Study - 9:30
Holy Communion - 10:15



j Shepherd of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH

Our mission is to. be
a beacon offaith
known for engaging
all persons in the
love and truth of
Jesus Christ.
The Rev. Ladd K. Harris
Priest in Charge
527-0052
Services:
Saturday
'5:00pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:00 am
Adult Christian
Formation
9:00 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (CR.486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
SwwwSOTHECprg


P.M
Wenedy rae


PASTOR BRIAN AND
KATHY BAGGS
Worship Service &
Children's Church 10:00 AM
Meeting at Knights of Columbus Bldg.
County Rd. 486, Lecanto
(352) 527-4253


U Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Steven Todd Riddle
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


LUTHERAN

CHURCH
ELCA
Come Worship
With Us!
Worship
8:30 & 10:30 AM.

* Sunday School
8:30 AM.

* Fellowship after
Worship

* Weekly
Communion

* Nursery
Provided
Building Is Barrier-Free

746-7161
Hwy. 486
Across From
Citrus Hills Boulevard
Rev. Kenneth C. Blyth, Pastor
http://gslutheran.googlepages.com


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lifting Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
9:30 AM Sunday School
10:45 AM TraditionalWorship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church |
Nursery Available





Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM...................Discovery Time
11:00 AM...............Praise & Worship
6:00 PM...................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM......Awana (Sept.- Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM...................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev.Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1% mi.eastofUS.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O.Box 1067
Homosassa,FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
e-mail: gbc@tampabay.rr.com
7755724


2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1Yz miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245

Sunday School
8:45 AM - 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Ministries and Activities for all Ages.
Reverend Tyler Montgomery, Pastor


Douglas & Teresa
Alexander Sr.
Sunday School 9am
Sunday Service 10:30 AM
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm
3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hernando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
wwwnewchurchwithoutwalls.corn
Email:cwow@tampabayxr.com
"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.


SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRING


,..935 S. Crystal Glen Dr. Lecanto
',Crystal Glen Subdivision .
It Hwy. 44 just E. of490 '
S" 527-3325







III ,A.! unday School





Pastor - Rev. Frederick W. Schielke
www.faithlecanto.com


r"


mmmmmmm


SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009 C3


RELIGION


C COUNTY (FL) CHRO e


.1







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C4 ssrURDAYMAY 9 2009


Daid.Hamilon Pasto
A friendly church where
Christ is exalted!!!


Sunday School
Morning Worship
Evening Service


9:00 A.M.
10:15 A.M.
6:00 P.M.


Bible Study & Prayer 7:00 P.M.
Awana (K-61 grade) 6:45-8:15P.M.








Yased Worsip.p
Corner Llsit Uc.
SUNDAY
10:00 AM - Worship Service
Bible Study
Wednesday - 7:00 PM

Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL. 3443S
489-1260 I







, Hwy.44E@ �
Washington Ave., Inverness *
" Sunday Services U
" Traditional
8:00 AM & 11:00 AM i
I Contemporary m
n_ . 9:30 AM U
11:00 AM Service
* Tapes & CD's available E
* Sunday School for all ages E
* 9:30 AM U
I Nursery Provided U
SFellowship & Youth Group m
S . 6:00 PM U
m 24-Hour Prayer Line U
* 563-3639
Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
Podcast:FPCinv.com
m Church Office 637-0770
Pastors: Craig Davies
and Michael E Fonfara


Independent
2672 W. Edison l. at Elkcam Blvd.
Citrus'Springs, FL
* Expositional Bible Teaching
* Mature, well balanced ministry
* Conservative Music
* Caring, family atmosphere
Sunday School 9:45 am
Sun. Services 11:00 am & 6:00 pm
Kids Klub (ages 6-13): Thurs. 6-8 pm
Wed. Prayer & Bible Study 7:00 pm


Rev. Richard W. Brosseau, Pastor
Phone (352) 445-9013


Hope
Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonthra
Q425 N Citrus Spnngs Bkd
Citrus Springs
SUNDAY Worship
8:00 a.n.& 10:45amn.
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Communion - Every Sunday
Information: 489-5511


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Wednesday Praise and Worship /
Bible Study 6 p.m.
Saturday Bible Study /
Breakfast Hour 8:130 a.m.
Sunday School, Adults/Children 9 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 10 a.m.
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


^ First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452


nature Coqst

Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.M.




465-4225
WWW.NCUU.ORG


New Location:
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41) Citrus Springs


Inverness
Bible Church
Independent, Fundamental,
Non-denominational
Bible School 10:00 A.M.
Sunday Worship 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Afternoon Service 2 P.M.
9119 Gulf To Lake IHwy.
Inverness, FL 32250
877-872-0302
wwwinvernessbiblechurchjcom"
Pastor Mike Lindvig


St. Elizabeth
Ann Seton
Catholic Church
1401 W. Country Club Blvd.
in Citrus Springs
the little church on the hill
With a warm welcome
Masses
Saturday Vigil....4:30 PM
Sunday ..............8:30 AM
...... ..............& 11:00 AM
Weekday...........8:30 AM
Holy Day............8:30 AM
.......................& 7:00 PM
Confessions before all masses

489-4889
We support Pope John Paul II
Catholic School


PLEASANT GROVE
CHURCH OF CHRISr
3875 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34450
"Come Be A Part Of
God's Family"
Minister: Michael Raine
' .(352) 344-9173


Mission Possible
MINISTRIES
V. David Lucas, Jr.
Senior Pastor
'1 9921 N. Deltona Boulevard
' (352) 489-3886
www.missionpossibleministries.com
I Sundays
Worship ...............10:30 am
Spanish Translation Provided
(Nursery Care & Children's Church Provided)
Wednesday
Youth Group, Bible Study &
Kid's Programs..........7 pm
(Nursery Care Provided)
ARMS OF MERCY FOOD PANTRY
1st & 3rd Tuesday of the month.
8:00 am-11:00 am

CHRIST LUTHERAN
CHURCH - LCMS
475 North Ave. West. Brooksville
4"The church that is a family"
SUNDAY SERVICES
Morning Worship
8:15AM & 1-00A.M.
Nursery Available
Sunday School & Bible Class
9:45 A.M.
Pastor Paul Meseke
352-796-8331
AglFoMi nitre


First - -
Baptist
Invernes's -ftsCHRISTIAN
,.a,- I I CENTER


@ 10:00am on WYKE
Channel 16 on Brighthouse
SUNDAY MORNING
SONRise Class 7:45am
Worship Service
9:00am
Children's Church 9:00am
(4 years thru 4th grade)
Sunday School
all ages 10:30am -
SUNDAY EVENING
Evening Worship 6:15pm *
Awana 5:15-7:00pm
Youth Choir 4:00pm
Youth Discipleship 5:00pm
WEDNESDAY
Fellowship Dinner 5:00-6:00pm
Children's Choir 6:15pm-7:15pm
Ignite "Youth" 6:00-8:00pm
Bible Studies 6:15pm-7:15pm
Adult Choir 7:15pm-8:30pm
Nursery Provided All Services
Interpretation For The
Hearing Imnaired


I 550 Pleasant Grove Rd.
726-1252 I
www.firstbaptistinverness.com


At
Victory
Baptist Church
General Conference
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Sunday Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong.A place to become."


First Baptist
Church of
Beverly Hills
NMarple.Lewis, III
Pri .-)jr
Alan Sanders
,4sstCiaic Pa1or
4950 N. L ecanto Hwvy.
Beveriy Hills. FL
Located at the inlersection of
Hwy 491 (Lecanio Hwy I
and Forest Ridge Blvd
Sunday Services
Bible Study
9:15 A.M. & 10:45 A.M.
Traditional Worship
9:15 A.M.
Contemporary Worship
10:45 A.M.
Evening Discipleship
6:00 P.M.
Wednesday Services:
Bible Study, Prayer
and Youth Activities
6:00 P.M.
For more information call
(352) 746-2970
Office Hours P
9-3 P.M.
or email us at:
beverlyhillsbaptist@tampabay.rr.com
www.fbcbh.com


"Magniythe ing&i


CONGREGATION
BETH SHOLOM
Beverly Hills Jewish Center
CIVIC CIRCLE,
BEVERLY HILLS, FL. 34465
Services:
Fri. @ 7:30 P.M.
Sat. @ 9:30 A.M.
All Jewish Holidays
All those of Jewish
faith & their families
are invited to join us.

for information-
pqngregation: 746-5303

.-








VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 PM.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM. & 10:30 AM.

SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P.M.

CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P. to 3:30 P. Sat.
orBvAnpointment


"Big Enough To Serve, ..
Small Enough To Care"
S_7WEEKDAY MASSES:
637-5100 8:00 AM.


6 Roosevelt Blvd.,


* Clean & Safe Nursery ,
* Exciting Children & Youth Services
* Warm Fellowship
* Powerful Worship t
* Practical Messages


Prayer 6:00 PM.
Discipleship 7:00 P.M.
Friday Youth Service
7:00 P.M.
Arape Kids Preschool & Daveare
1 yr old - Pre K 4
Before & After School Care
Mo-Fri 6:30 A.M.- 6:00 P.M.
Two miles from Hwy. 44 on the
comer of Croft & Harley
2728 Harley St., Inverness FL


You're invited to
our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


Beverly Hills
746-214t 41
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)


l


A LITTLE STRESSED?
FIND RELIEF HERE!

First United
Methodist

-Church
Sof Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
KIPYOUNGER
Senior Pastor
9:00 AM & 10:45 AM
Sunday School Classes
for all ages
5:00 PM - Student
Connection Time
6th Grade thru 12th
Nursery care available starting at 900 AM
WEDNESDAYS
6:15 PM Bible Studies &
Connection Groups for everyone
Join us for a casual
uplifting service with family
praise & worship on
Sunday at 9:00 AM
Additional Sunday Worship
Opportunities
WE ALSO OFFER
8:00 AM
Holy Communion
10:45 AM
Traditional Worship
Signing. for hearing impaired
available upon request
Open Hearts,
Open Minds, !
Open Doors
wuuii m.ornoecfirctlim nrn


"Weeeeynei pca!

"JesusCE:r352s72-cenra07em


, I III II I'I l



Places of worship that

offer love, peace and

harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS










CITRUS COUN'1Y (FL) CHRONICLERELIGION SArURDAY, MAY 9, 2009 C5


Worship SERVICES


* Men of St. Timothy
Lutheran Church (MOST)
meet at 8 a.m. today for break-
fast at Olive Tree Restaurant
followed by regular meeting at
church. Boat/Fish Club potluck
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. today.
Church members prepare and
serve hot meal at Our Father's
Table Outreach from 11:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. today at St.
Anne's Episcopal Church in
Crystal River. Informal come-
as-you-are worship service at 5
p.m. Pastor Bradford's sermon
for fifth Sunday of Easter: "Wel-
coming the Stranger."Worship
services at 7:30, 8:30 and 11
a.m. Holy Communion offered.
Nursery provided. Coffee fel-
lowship from 9:30 to 10 a.m.
Sunday school classes for all
ages from 10 to 10:45 a.m.
Church is at 1070 N. Suncoast
Blvd. (U.S. 19), Crystal River.
Call 795-5325.
* Women of the ELCA of
Hope Evangelical Lutheran
Church in Citrus Springs will
observe Rachel's Day at both
worship services Sunday.


Rachel's Day, the first Sunday
in May, took its name from Jer-
emiah 31:15-17. In those
verses, Rachel grieves for her
children. Rachel's Day is a way
to speak to the fears of children
about drugs, guns, hunger,
gangs, 'and many other current
problems that plague our na-
tion. The entire congregation is
asked to participate in a special
offering to go to "Covenant Chil-
dren's Home." Call (352) 489-
5311.
* Calvary Chapel of Inver-
ness, 960 S. U.S. 41, offers
Bible study classes for all ages
at 9 a.m. Sunday followed at
10 a.m. with contemporary wor-
ship and a biblically based
message from Senior Pastor
Kevin Ballard. Children's
church available. All invited.
Sunday evening Bible study
with Pastor Mike DiSanza on
Bible prophecy. Weekly events
include: Men' s prayer at 8:30
a.m. Tuesday; Wednesday din-
ner at 6 p.m. (everything is $1)
followed by Bible study for all
ages at 7 p.m. Feed the Hungry


free meal at noon Thursday
with food pantry open at 1 p.m.
Call 726-1480.
* Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church celebrates
the fifth Sunday of Easter with
Holy Eucharist services at 5
p.m. today and 8 and 10 a.m.
Sunday. Adult Christian Forma-
tion is at 9 a.m. Sunday. Choir
and Bible study at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. SOS from 9 a.m.
to noon Thursday.
* First Baptist Church of
Inverness activities include the
following. On Sundays: SON-
rise class at 7:45 a.m.; blended
worship service at 9 a.m.; Kid's
church for ages 4 through
fourth grade during 9 a.m. serv-
ice will spend the next weeks
on "Adventures in Science,"
featuring Bible stories, skits,
music and group activities;
Sunday school for all ages at
10:30 a.m.; youth drama team
at 3:30 p.m.; student youth
choir practice at 4 p.m.; Youth
Discipleship at 5 p.m., evening
worship service at 6 p.m., and
AWANA for ages 2 through fifth


grade from 5:15 to 7 p.m.. On
Wednesday: Fellowship dinner
from 5 to 5:45; IGNITE-Youth
Fellowship at 6 p.m.; worship at
6 p.m. with prayer and Bible
study; children's choir practice
from 6 to 7 p.m.; and adult choir
practice at 7 p.m. Nursery avail-
able at all services. Call the
church at 726-1252.
* St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church Holy Eucharist serv-
ices at 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sun-
day with children's church at
the 10:30 service. Feed My
Sheep feeding program for
people in need at 11:30 a.m.
followed by a Holy Eucharist
and healing service. Church is
at 114 N. Osceola Ave., Inver-
ness. Call 726-3153.
* First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness tradi-
tional worship services at 8 and
11 a.m. Sunday with contempo-
rary praise and worship serv-
ices at 9:30 a.m. and Sunday
school classes at 9:30 and 11
a.m. Mother/daughter banquet
luncheon at noon today with
entertainment by Beverly Hills


Chorus. All women of the
church invited, not just mothers
and daughters. Donation is $8.
Everyone is invited to partici-
pate in the church golf scram-
ble at the Inverness Golf and
Country Club on Saturday, May
23. Tee-off at 1 p.m. Golf costs
$20. After the scramble,
spouses may join golfers for a
sit-down dinner. For required
dinner reservations, call Greg
Andreichuk at 860-0426 or
Frank Mattox at 341-2484.
Church is at 206,Washington
Ave., Inverness. Call 637-0770.
* Hernando United
Methodist Church, 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway, Her-
nando,, offers the following ac-
tivities: Sunday school classes
for all ages at 8:30 a.m. fol-
lowed by fellowship and snacks
at 9:30 a.m. Worship service
led by Pastor Tyler Montgomery
at 10 a.m. Sunday includes
children's church. Nursery pro-
vided. Individual hearing de-
vices provided for the hearing
impaired. Communion offered
to all the first Sunday monthly.


Holidaze crafters from 9 to 11
a.m. Tuesday. Choir meets at
5:30 p.m. Tuesday under the
direction of Debbie Thompson,
accompanied on the organ by
John Petro. Share, praise and
fellowship at 6 p.m. the second
and the fourth Sundays
monthly. UMW meet at 9:45
a.m. the second Thursday
monthly September through
June. UMM meet the fourth
Saturday monthly with break-
fast. Call 726-7245.
* Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church Sunday wor-
ship hours at 8:30 and 10:30
a.m. Hear Pastor Kenneth Blyth
give an inspirational sermon at
both services and hear the
chancel choir under the direc-
tion of V. Lionel King at the
10:30 service. Coffee hour fol-
lows both services. Free tape
ministry, large prints and hear-
ing devices available. Youth
studies at 8:30 a.m. Nursery at-
tendant available for children 3
and younger. VBS from 5 to 8
p.m. June 8-12 with free supper
See WORSHIP/Page C6


GRACE
Continued from Page C1
daughter, yet they adore their
granddaughter.
The family dynamics fascinate
me. Every time Lorelai and one or
both of her parents make a move.
toward a loving moment or ges-
ture, just when you think there's
hope of them reconciling their
years of estrangement, something
happens to ruin it. That's espe-
cially true with Lorelai and Emily.
Even though I've seen each
episode at least a dozen times, I
still can't help rooting for a differ-
ent outcome. I so want Lorelai
and Emily to have what Lorelai
and Rory have.
Yesterday I watched the
episode-where Lorelai and Emily
go to a spa together. Lorelai acts


like a pouty 4-year-old because
she's there with her mother, until
dinnertime comes and they real-
ize that neither of them wants to
eat the tofu and cucumbers on the
menu, so they escape to a steak-
house.
Just when they're truly enjoying
their time with each other, an
older man asks Emily to dance,
and she accepts. Then, feeling
guilty and adulterous, she blames
Lorelai for pushing her into such
a compromising situation and
leaves angry.
Back at the spa, in a rare mo-
ment of vulnerability, Emily asks
Lorelai, "Why can't we have what
ypu and Rory have?" She's envi-
ous of them, and wistful. She
wants to love her daughter and be
loved in return, but she knows
that what she and Lorelai have
will always be strained at best.


It breaks my heart every time I
see it.
I have two daughters and two
completely different relation-
ships with them. With one daugh-
ter, it's easy. She's easy. We're far
from being BFFs like Lorelai and
Rory, but there's no drama be-
tween us.
With my other daughter - let
the drama begin, with me being
the bigger drama queen. If she
doesn't call, I start thinking she's
mad at me, so I don't call her.
Since I don't call her, she doesn't
call me and we're both mad, plus
I get sad, thinking that my daugh-
ter doesn't like me.
This goes on until my husband
says, "Just call!"
Believe me, I know how utterly
childish it all is, but...
The other day I called my oldest
daughter and lamented that I'm


such a fruitcake.
"I don't want to be an Emily," I
said. (She knows all about my
"Gilmore Girls" obsession.)
"You're not, Mom," she said.
"You're nothing like Emily."
That made me feel a little bet-
ter, but I had hoped she'd say I
was a Lorelai, that she and her
sister are still "Mommy's girls." I
don't know what happened to
change that other than they've
both grown up.
I know it's silly and bordering
on neurotic to compare myself to
fictional TV characters. In my
saner moments I realize that
Emily Gilmore can never change
and neither can her relationship
with her daughter. The show's
been canceled and their dysfunc-
tion sealed permanently.
Not so with me and my daugh-
ters. Even if things aren't as I'd


like them to be, there's always
hope that they'll change, that we
can and will change as God re-
veals our insecurities and neu-
roses and sin and as we confess
and learn to forgive.
And even if things don't change,
God's grace and comfort are suffi-
cient. Besides, we all need some-
thing that breaks our hearts so we
will be forced to seek God.
Maybe a broken heart is God's
gifts to us.


Nancy Kennedy is the author
of "Move Over, Victoria -I Know
the Real Secret," "Girl on a
Swing," and her latest book, "Lip-
stick Grace." She can be reached
at 564-2927, Monday through
Thursday, or via e-mail at
nkennedy@chronicleonline. com.


RELIGION
Continued from Page C1
people who have locked
themselves behind a door
for 50 years if we want to
learn about true spiritual-
itr,.!Jhen the Bible tells us
to go out and be salt and
light in the world? ... This
is not to say that we should-
n't go outside our tradition
in order to learn, but we
are saying that it's impor-
tant to go to our own guys
first," said Whitney.
"We believe that biblical,
evangelical spirituality has
not been tried and found
wanting. It simply has not
been tried."
The potential impact of
this project is great, if only
because 20 percent of all
students attending U.S.
seminaries study on South-
ern Baptist campuses. The
center opened in January;
seminary leaders believe
they can handle five stu-
dents in the Ph.D. program
and 10 in the doctor of min-
istry program. While grad-
uate. programs teaching
spirituality exist in a few
U.S. seminaries, this Ph.D.
program is the first target-
ing scholars and clergy
among evangelicals.
One of the center's first
challenges is defining
"spirituality," a word that
means one thing on "The
Oprah Winfrey Show" and
something else altogether
when it appears in text-
books describing traditions
in various world religions.
For modern Americans,
the word is so vague that




NOTES
Continued from Page C3
SpartanAve., Homosassa. Call
Sharon at 628-4360 or Carolyn
at 382-7868.
* Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
5164 S. Florida Ave., in the
Heath Mini Storage Units. Call
726-2660.
* Our Lady of Grace Church
in Beverly Hills Catholic Chari-
ties Respite Care Program
has openings for persons in the
early stages of Alzheimer's dis-
ease or related dementia disor-
ders, from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Call (800) 242-
9012, Ext. 22.
* Inverness First Church of
God gospel jubilees at 6 p.m.
the last Saturday monthly at
5510 E. Jasmine Lane. Call
726-4524.


it's almost meaningless,
said church historian
Michael Haykin, who
teaches in the Southern
Seminary programs.
Nevertheless, the word
has great power, and its ap-
peal must be understood
by anyone who wants to un-
derstand contemporary
American religion.
When most Americans
hear "spirituality," said
Haykin, they think of "all
of those areas in their in-
ternal experiences in
which they come into con-
tact with things that tran-
scend daily life. ... It's all
incredibly nebulous. The
key is that the whole ritual
of institutionalized, formal


inverness r first nurcn oh oroa
Non-denominational
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Phone: 726-8986
Pastor: Jerry Baker
Services: Sunday:
10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed. - Study 6:00 PM
Home of the: R
"Gospel Jubilee"
Every last Saturday of the month

41 Years of
F IRST Bringing Christ to
Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Divine Services: 7:45 & 10am
Holy Communion
7:45 Every Sunday: 10:00
1st & 3rd Sun.
Sunday School
J & Bible Class
8:45 A.M.
726-1637
I Cry Room
www.lstlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


religion has nothing to do
with this, for most people
today."
Thus, researchers keep
running into increasing
numbers of unchurched
adults who identify them-
selves as "spiritual" but
not "religious."
These seekers are inter-
ested in "spirituality"-that
is connected to emotions
and personal experiences,
but not in formal "religion"'
that comes packaged with
history, doctrines and
rules.
Meanwhile, many
Protestant believers are
eager to escape what they
believe is the dry, formal,
merely rational approach


Come,
To
ST.
MARGARET' S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr. Gene Reuman, Pastor


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH

U.S. Hwy. 41 South, Inverness,
Florida

Sunday Masses
7:30A.M., 9:00 A.M & 11:00A.M.
Saturday Vigil
4:00 P.M.
Weekdays 8:00 A.M.
Confessions 2:30 - 3:30 P.M.

726-1670 I


to worship and prayer that
dominates mainstream
churches. Some turn to
charismatic or Pentecostal
churches. Some turn to so-
called "emerging
churches" that weave an-
cient Christian prayers
and disciplines into their
progressive, "postmodern"
take on faith.
"What unites all these
people is an emphasis on
personal experience," said
Haykin. "For all of them,
'religion' is a bad word,
something they are trying
to get away from."
The Southern Seminary
programs, he added, will
emphasize that Protestant
pioneers such as John


WHERE EVERYBODY IS SOMEBODY
AND JESUS IS LORD
MOUNTAIN ASSEMBLY
10117 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Inverness, FL 34450-5430
East Hwy. 44 * (352) 637-3110
Sunday School 10:00 A.M.
Sunday Worship 10:30 A.M.
Sunday Evening 6:30 P.M.
Thursday 7:00 P.M. __

Rev. & MAfrs ]r
Junior Branrson
(352) 341-2884



fcc'
7 6 "FirstFor Christ'..John 1:41
774562
FIRST |||
CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
John A. Scott, Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:30 P M. Bible Study

WAAAAl l t i


Calvin and Martin Luther
were interested in early
Christian spirituality but
rejected .what they be-
lieved' were newer
Catholic traditions.
Students also will study
the works of latter reform-
ers, such as the Puritans,
who stressed personal
piety while criticizing what
they saw as the formalized,
ritualized traditions of the
Presbyterians, Lutherans
and others.
This cycle keeps repeat-
ing itself, generation after
generation.
"We already have people
accusing' us of trying to
smuggle a kind of Roman
Catholic approach to faith


Sunday) Serices:
TrAdttinal Serite $ 0%.M
SSundja So,:-ol 9 li , k
Conenmporarj Serx'ice il. 3i M N
Evening Ser ice 6 i1 pM
\\ednesdai Night
Adull Cla s . . 7.(iqi PM
1Bo% s and Girl Brngjde 7.1n1i PM
Teen 15 FI
"Wdelcome Home"
,r I ..".r., 1uI l'.1 Hlu,.. ',,'.
C'hui. ..j I .t " :'l..e ; .
A,,jn -ilt "Link- friends Daicar and
Learning Cnitr"
... . ....-J ...---


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School...............9:00
Worship ......... 10:00
WEDNESDAY
Bible School................6:30
Currently meeting at
Eqst Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing Light)
For niore F ,
information call / \
352-422-6535. i ,
Pastor
Todd
Langdon 784402


into an evangelical semi-
nary," said Haykin.
"What we are saying is
that the Protestant reform-
ers were trying to get past
the whole medieval
Catholic world and recon-
nect with the ancient
church and its approach to
the spiritual life. That's
what we are trying to do,
too."


Terry Mattingly directs
the Washington Journalism
Center at the Council for
Christian Colleges and
Universities. Contact him
at tmattingly@cccu.org or
wwwtmattnet.


-PRIMERA IGLESIA
a HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM - Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM - Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM - Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:











All are invited to our
Healing


Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM

774566 352-726-4033


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! ! !

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


SATrURDAY, MAY 9, 2009 C5


RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICIJu










IV% OK UnA, Y, RLI)


Dove nominees to bring traditional sounds to Homosassa


NANCY KENNEDY
nkennedy
@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Back in the day.
Back in the day, folks mo-
seyed. They brought home-
made pies and fried chicken
to church and had dinner on-
the grounds.
At 4 p.m. today, New
Hope Baptist Church in Ho-
mosassa will be bringing
some "back in the day" fla-
vor at an Old-Fashioned Day
-featuring-a concert by the
Marksmen Quartet, the four-
time Contemporary Blue-
grass Gospel Group of the
Year and four-time Country
Gospel Quartet of the Year
winners from the Country
Gospel Music Guild.
Their hits include "He Is
I Am," "Meet Me in
Heaven," "Potter's Wheel,"
"Preach the Cross" and
"Grandpa Was a Farmer."
They will also sing songs
from their Dove-nominated
CD "God's Masterpiece."
The Marksmen are well
known and are regulars at


the Withlacoochee Blue-
grass Festival.
Their sound has been de-
scribed as "traditional
mountain." The group re-
cently contributed to the
charity fundraiser "An Ap-
palachian Musical Revival:
Live at the Ringgold Depot"
in Georgia.
The community is invited
to attend the day's event,
which also features a free
barbecue dinner and a pie
bake-off beginning at 6 p.m.
Wear period piece cloth-
ing if you like, bring a pie
and come and enjoy gospel
music.
Admission is free; a love
offering will be taken.
"We just wanted to have a
fun, old-fashioned day at the
church," said church pastor,
the Rev. Eric Justice. "The
costumes are optional, of
course, but it's fun for our
ladies to come in late 1800s
dresses. The men don't have
too many options. A lot of
them just wear bib overalls.
"We just want people to
come and have a good
time," he said.


Special to thaChronicle
Dove Award nominees The Marksmen Quartet are, from left: Earle Wheeler, Mark Autry, Davey Waller, Mark Wheeler and
Darrin Chambers, appearing on a recent episode of BlueHighwayTV's "Old Country Church."


Religion BRIEFS


Bishop criticizes college
about Casey speech
SCRANTON, Pa. -The Roman
Catholic bishop of an eastern Pennsyl-
yania diocese has criticized a local
Catholic college's decision to have
....SU.S.Sen.Bob Casey.speak at its
graduation ceremony later this month.
Bishop Joseph Martino of the
Scranton diocese called the choice of,
SCasey, D-Pa., to speak at the May 17
commencement at King's College in
Wilkes-Barre "an affront to all who
value the sanctity of life."
Martino said in a statement that
Casey's vote to confirm Kathleen Se-
belius as Secretary of Health and
Human Services despite her abortion
rights stance showed that Casey was
"a reliable vote for President Barack
Obam?'s aggressive pro-abortion
agenda." He said Casey lacked '"the
moral stature" to address graduates.
Casey opposes abortion and has
said he favors overturning the
Supreme Court's 1973 ruling guaran-
teeing abortion rights. Martino ac-
knowledged that the college invited
him long before he voted to confirm
Sebelius and against reversing


Obama's decision to end a ban on the
use of federal funds for groups over-
seas that provide abortions or abortion
information.
Casey spokesman Larry Smar said
the senator believed it would be irre-
sponsible to leave the health position
vacant.
"He disagfees-with hler on abortion,
but feels that she has the required ex-
pertise to help pass health care reform
and provide health care to the unin-
sured - one of our country's top prior-
ities," Smar said.
Archdiocese report says
finances improving
BRAINTREE, Mass.- The fi-
nances of Boston's Roman Catholic
Archdiocese are slowly improving from
the clergy abuse crisis, but a priest
pension fund could run out of money
in two years unless changes are
made.
That's according to the archdio-
cese's annual report for fiscal 2008.
Funds for disabled and retired priests
are short $114 million.
The church said it hopes to balance
its budget by the 2010 fiscal year. It re-
ports a $4 million administrative deficit


for fiscal 2008. Contributions to
parishes rose 4 percent.
It expects a continuing decline in
church school enrollments, and a
need tohire more lay people to bal-
ance a shortage of priests and reli-
gious workers.
The archdiocese began its reports
four years ago as it emerged from the
abuse crisis, including an $85 million
settlement with more than 550 victims.
Baptist seminary to
merge music school
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - The Southern
Baptist Theological Seminary is folding
its decades-old music school into an-
other school because of the sluggish
economy and waning popularity with
students.
The seminary's School of Church
Music and Worship has trained thou-
sands of choir directors, organists and
other church worship leaders for 65
years. But it will no longer be a free-
standing school.
. Seminary President Albert Mohler
said the recession forced a sooner
merger of the school after the semi-
nary laid off 35 non-faculty workers
earlier this year.


But Mohler said the trend of
churches moving to guitars and praise
choruses has eroded the school's en-
trants over several years.
The music school's enrollment of
167 students is down from a peak 20
years ago of 539.
"What we've been looking at is a
major sea change in music in the
larger culture, music in our churches
and the role of our seminary in meet-
ing those needs," Mohler said.
The school is moving into the a new
School of Church Ministries, so it can
be combined with the School of Lead-
ership and Church Ministry, which has
taught future education ministers,
youth leaders and other specialized
ministries.
Hawaii church ignored
warning about remains.
HONOLULU - Kawaiahao Church
was cautioned more than four years
ago that construction on its $17.5 mil-
lion multipurpose center could unearth
human remains.
, An April 2005 report written by a
church consultant, Cultural Surveys
Hawaii Inc., urged Kawaiahao officials
to conduct a subsurface archaeologi-


cal study to determine the presence of
bones and artifacts.
The church did not agree and
began construction on the 30,000-
square-foot center. But work was
halted in March after workers un-
earthed 69 remains, mostly intact
coffins.
That discovery is one of the largest
on Oahu, exceeding those found at
Walmart's Keeaumoku location and
the Ward Village Shops in Kakaako,,
whose building plans were delayed for
months.
Dawn Chang, a cultural consultant
for the church, said the 2005 study
isn't applicable today because it con-
templated a large underground park-
ing lot. However, the project has since
been scaled back significantly and in-
cludes no parking lot, she said.
The church anticipated unearthing
remains but not in such great num-
bers, she added.
The 58-page Cultural Surveys re-
port documents century-old burials on
the Kawaiahao Church property, in-
cluding many in the area of the new
multipurpose center. It included .
1912 and 1920 land survey.
-From wire reports


WORSHIP
Continued from Page C5
at 5 p.m. The Caregiver Min-
istry from 12:30 to 4 p.m. Fri-
days provides an opportunity
"foicaregivers of loved ones to..
have free time for themselves.
The loved ones, who come
,under our care for 3-1/2 hours,
are entertained with singing,
trivia, games, exercise, etc.
Caregivers interested in this
free program may call the
church office at 746-7161 for an
application. Church is on
County Road 486, opposite Cit-
rus Hills Boulevard in Her-
nando.
* Inverness Church of God
Sunday worship services at
8:30 and 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Sunday school classes for all at
9:30 a.m. Christian education
opportunities for all ages at 7
p.m. Wednesday include: Mis-
sionettes and Royal Rangers
Clubs for children from the age
of 3. Teens are invited to "Front-
line" with Youth Pastor Kyle
Holtzhower. Adult class in sanc-
tuary. Church is at 416 U.S. 41
South, Inverness. Call 726-
4524.
-*. Victory Baptist Church,
5040 E. Shady Acres Drive, In-
verness. Coffee and doughnuts
served at 9 a.m. Sunday in the
fellowship hall followed by Sun-
day school classes at 9:45 and
the morning worship service at
10:45. Sunday evening service
begins at 6. Wednesday night
"hour of power" with prayer peti-
tions, hymns and a study of the
Bopk of Revelation led by Pas-
tor Beehler. Call 726-9719.
* First Christian.Church of*
Inverness study on "What We
Believe" at 9 a.m. Sunday.
This multi-week presentation is
facilitated by John Scott, minis-
ter, with video presentation by
Bob Russell. Study workbooks
available for purchase. All in-
vited. Call FCCI at 344-1908.
FCCI is at 2018 Colonade St.,
Inverness.
* First Baptist Church of
Hernando starts Sunday mom-
ings with coffee and doughnuts.
at 9. Special prayer and intro-
duction to lesson at 9:20 a.m.
Family life classes for all ages
at 9:30 a.m. Services at 11 a.m.
and 6 p.m. Wednesday prayer


- meeting at 7 p.m.
* Come worship and enjoy
fellowship at Faith Lutheran.
Church, 935 S. Crystal Glen ,
Drive Lecanto. Worship serv-
ices are 9:30 a.m. Sunday and
6 p.m. Saturday. Adult Bible
study and Sunday.school -.
classes at 11 a.m. Visit faithle-
cantc.com for services, upcom-
ing events and to sign-up for
VBS.
* First Christian Church of
Homosassa Springs Bible
school classes for all ages at
9:30 a.m. Sunday followed by
morning worship at 10:30 (chil-
dren's church provided for
kindergarten through third
grade). Evening worship at 6
p.m. Sunday. Wednesday meal
at 6 p.m. followed by Bible
study and youth program at 7.
Church is at 7030 W. Grover
Cleveland Blvd.
*. Discovery time classes
begin Sunday at 9:30 a.m. with
worship service at 11 a.m. at
Grace Bible Church, 6382 W.
Green Acres, Homosassa.
Choir practice is at 5 p.m. and
evening service at 6. Teens
meet at 6:15 p.m. Monday.
Tuesday morning ladies Bible
study is at 10 a.m. and AWANA
for children begins at 6:10 p.m.
Wednesday prayer meeting be-
gins at 7 p.m. Thursday
evening ladies Bible study
meets at 7. Call 628-5631.
* Faith Baptist Church
Sunday school classes at 9:45
a.m. followed by worship at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. Evangelist Dan
Hawtree will speak on Mother's
Day. Bible study and prayer
meeting at 7 p.m. Wednesday
with "Warriors" for grades 6
through 12 and "King's Kids" for
K-5 grades from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Church is at 6918 S. Spartan
Ave. (one mile from U.S. 19, off
Cardinal Street). Call 628-4793.
* Sunday service at 10 a.m.
at First Presbyterian Church
of Crystal River with guest
speaker the Rev. Sheryle
Lyman, chaplain for Hospice of
Citrus County, speaking on
"Doing to Others." Meet-and-
greet fellowship follows the
service in Webster Hall. Church
is at 1501 S.E. U.S. 19 in Crys-
tal River. Call 795-2259.
M All welcome to learn to be
inspired by God's Word in an
open format at 10 a.m. Sun-


days at The Little House, 4929
Shady Acres Drive, Inverness.
Call Joe Hupchick at 726-9998.
* Crystal River Church of-
Christ Sunday morning Bible
study at 10 with worship serv-
ices at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Com-
munion served. Public invited.
Evangelist Charlie Graham will
preach. Church is on State
Road 44 one block east of U.S.
19 next to the Credit Union. Call
795-8883 or 746-1239.
* Church of Christ services
at 304 N.E. Fifth St., Crystal
River. Bible classes at 10 a.m.
Sunday, 7 p.m. Wednesday
and by appointment. Worship
services at 11 a.m. Sunday.
-Everyone invited. Call 795-
4943 or 563-0056.
* Living Word of God
Church, on Cason Boulevard
in Inglis, offers Sunday school
classes at 10 a.m. and Sunday
evening worship at 6. Everyone
is welcome. Jessie Lolley is the
pastor. Call 621-7260 for infor-
mation.
* Unity Interfaith devo-
tional at 10 a.m. Sunday at
C's Italian Express, 1916 U.S.
19, Crystal River. All faiths wel-
come. Refreshments served.
Call 795-5555.
* Parsons.Memorial Pres-
byterian Church coffee fellow-
ship from 10 to 10:55 a.m.
Sunday in fellowship hall,
5850 Riverside Drive, Yankee-
town (next to Coast Guard Sta-
tion). Sunday school at 9:30
a.m. Nursery available. Tradi-
tional church service begins at
11 a.m. Holy Communion
served the first Sunday
monthly. Call (352) 447-2506.
* On Mother's Day at 10:30
a.m. Sunday, the Nature Coast
Unitarian Universalists invite
the public to a sermon by the
Rev. Mary Louise DeWolf. The
topic is "For rhe Common Good
- Is that possible?" Service is
followed by discussion and a
potluck. All invited. The fellow-
ship meets at 7633 N. Florida
Ave. (U.S. 41), Citrus Springs.
Call (352) 465-4225.
* Citrus Vineyard Commu-
nity Church meets in the First
Christian Church of Inverness
Family Life Center, behind Cin-
namon Sticks Restaurant at
2018 Colonade St. Sunday.
services are at 10:30 a.m., with
child care up to age 5 provided.


Home groups meet in Heather-
wood and Hernando on Thurs-
days. Call the church at
586-2000.
* First Church of Christ,
Scientist, Inverness worships
Sundaymornings at 10:30 and
Wednesday evenings at 5 at
224 N. Osceola Ave. Sunday
school class is the same time
as the church service. All are
welcome.
* German-language ,
church services at 3 p.m. the
first Sunday monthly at Joy
Lutheran Church, 7045 S.W.
83rd Place and State Road
200, Ocala. Followed by coffee
and cake fellowship. Call Ger-
hard Gross, at (352) 489-0023,


with questions.
* Heritage Baptist Church
services led by Pastor David
Hamilton, at 2 Civic Circle, Bev-
erly Hills. Call 746-6171.
* Christ Lutheran Church
services led by the Rev. Paul R.
Meseke, senior pastor, at 475
-North Avenue West,
Brooksville. Call (352) 796-
8331. E-mail pastor@clcfla.org.
Visit www.clcfla.org.
* Beverly Hills Community
Church weekly contemporary
worship service is now at 6
p.m. Wednesday in the fellow-
ship hall at 86 Civic Circle, Bev-
erly Hills. Families welcome.
Call the church office at 746-
3620.


* Unity Church of Citrus
County healing/prayer service
at 6:30 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at 2628 W.
Woodview Lane, Beverly Hills.
Call 746-1270.
* Butterfly Ministries wor-
ship, Bible study and personal
ministry from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
the third Saturday monthly at
The Sanctuary, 3888 S. King
Ave., Homosassa. Food and
fellowship follow. Call Margie
Sipes at 212-4320.
* Grupo Misionero Adven-
tista del 7mo. Dia de Citrus
County. Horario de Reuniones.
Miercoles 7 p.m. Sabados 11
a.m. Address: 1880 N. Trucks
Ave., Hernando. Call 535-7141.


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eg sARADAYMAv 9 2009


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RELIGION












Page C7 SATURDAY, MAY 9,2009



COMMUNITY
, CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Ridge Masons
slate meeting
Ridge Masonic Lodge 398
will have its monthly meeting
at 10:30 a.m. Monday at'
'5060 S. Memorial Driva, Ho-
mosassa. The club wil install
the three remaining officers,
discuss plans for Grand
Lodge on May 25 through 27
and have lunch afterward.
Call Lucky et 795-9561 for
additional information.
CFCC to offer GPS
class in Ocala
Pathways Life Services at
Central Fbrida Community
College hvites seniors to a
new technology workshop.
Learn about GPS Navigation:
Global Positioning Systems
' will meet from 10 to 11 a.m.
Monday at the Ocala Cam-
.pus, 3001 S.W. College
Road. The course fee is $20.
Individuals who are inter-
ested in purchasing a GPS
will learn what features to
look for that will meet their
needs. Students will learn
about Bluetooth technology,
text-to-speech technology,
wide screen, real-time traffic,
,weather options and more.
*They will explore whether
they want an in-dash setup, a
portable GPS that is easy to
install or a handheld unit that
can be used in a car, on the
water or on trails.
For infibrmatioh or to enroll,
call (352) 854-2322, ext.
1675. This course is offered
.'as part of the Plus 50 Initia-
tive of CFCC, the American
Association of Community
Colleges and the Atlantic Phi-
lanthropies.
CRUG to learn
about Ubuntu
Crystal Rivers User Group
(CRUG) will meet at 6 p.m.
Wednesday at the Crystal
Oaks Clubhouse ...
At the meeting, Hal Butler
.will tell us of his experience in
S-learning Ubuntu. Attendees
will learn about this commu-
nity-developed, Linux-based
operating system. This sys-
tem can be installed and run
as the operating system or
run as a program within Win-
dows. The applications in
Ubuntu contain a Web
browser, presentation, docu-
ment and spreadsheet soft-
ware, instant messaging and
much more.
Coffee and refreshments
will be served at 6 p.m., with
a short meeting at 6:30, fol-
.lowed by the presentation.
Meetings are open and free
to everyone. For more infor-
mation, check the club's Web
site at CRUG.com.
German club
to end season
The German American So-
cial Club of West Central
Florida will have its last meet-
ing of the season at 7 p.m.
Wednesday at the Beverly
Hills Recreation Center, 77
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills.
After a brief business meet-
ing, there will be a social hour
with horse racing games and
,refreshments.
Members are encouraged to
attend and guests are always
welcome. For information, call
637-2042 or 746-7058.
SPublic invited to
council meeting
The Citrus County Council
is proud to announce that the
guest speaker for the meet-
ing Wednesday will be Eric
Zamora, noted photographer
'from the Florida Museum of
*Natural History in Gainesville.
The meeting is open-to the
Public and all are encouraged
.to come and participate.
a The meeting begins at 9
'a.m. at the Lions Den in Bev-
erly Hills.
-* Sertoma club
seeks members
Citrus Sertoma needs vol-
unteers interested in support-


ing club projects in the
community.
* For more information, call
795-5000 or 795-1088.


Special to the Chronicle
In honor of Mother's Day, the
Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection Florida Park
Service is offering free admission to
mothers with the purchase of a
child's ticket at Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park or Weeki Wachee
Springs State Park on Sunday.
"Mother's Day is a special time for
families, and we are pleased to ob-
serve this important day," said DEP
Florida Park Service Director Mike
Bullock "Homosassa and Weeki
Wachee state parks provide a
unique atmosphere for families to
reconnect and honor moms across
Florida."
Homosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park, in Homosassa, showcases na-
tive Florida animals along the
park's "Wildlife Walk," including


West Indian manatees, a Florida in Spring Hill, features the world-fa-
Panther, black bears, bobcats, white- mous mermaids that have delighted
tailed deer, American alligators, visitors since 1947. Weeki Wachee is
American croc- also home to
odiles, river ot- Florida's only
ters and a Mother's Day is a spring-fed
variety of birds special time for water park,
and reptiles. Buccaneer Bay,
Lu, Florida's families, and we are and is open
only resident weekends dur-
hippopotamus, pleased to observe ing May Visi-
also resides at_ tors can
the park Visi- this important witness the
tors can also day. magic of the
enjoy nature Mike Bullock mermaids, take
.trails, picnick- � Department of Environmental Protection a river boat
ing .and boat Florida Park Service director about the free cruise and
tours. Admis- admission for mothers on Sunday. canoe or kayak
sion for chil- on the Weeki
dren ages 3 to Wachee River.
12 to Homosassa Springs is $5. Admission to Weeki Wachee Springs
Florida's newest state park, for children ages 6 to 10 is $18.05 to
Weeki Wachee Springs State Park, enjoy the entire park


Free admission is available for
mothers with the purchase of a
child's ticket at one of the above
parks..
The first two-time Gold Medal
winner honoring the nation's best
state park service, Florida's state
park system is one of the largest in
the country with 160 parks, which
are open 365 days a year.
Florida's state parks, which span
more than 700,000 acres and include
100 miles of sandy white beach, pro-
vide an affordable outings for peo-
ple of all ages. Caladesi Island State
Park, just off the coast of Pinellas
County, was honored with the cov-
eted Best. Beach in the Nation
award in 2008.
For more information about
Florida State Parks, visit www.flor
idastateparks.org.


Post 7122 Auxiliary helps CCVC Food Bank


Special to the Chronicle
On April 5, the Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Post 7122 in Floral City hosted a fundraiser for the Citrus County Veterans Coalition Veterans
Food Bank. Hobo stew was served from a large pot on the back porch, and people provided their own tin cans to eat from. The stew was
free for $5 worth of nonperishable food items. More than $800 worth of food items were collected and donated to the CCVC. A check
for $476 was sent from Auxiliary President Shareen Simon's brother, Greg Lybek, lifetime VFW member currently stationed in Bagdad,
to help support veterans. From left are: Fred Daniels, CCVC; Simon; and Bill Geden, CCVC Veterans Food Bank.


Preparedness important at all levels


Recently attended a Local agencies like the
statewide conference on sheriff's office know that
CERT (Com- after a disaster,
munity Emer- they need all of
agency Response the help from vol-
Team) training. unteers they can
This is quite soon - get. These volun-
after completing teers will serve as
the local course trained eyes and
given by the sher- ears in a commu-
iff's office. nity to spot where
The local help is needed
course included and how much
triage training - DuWayne Sipper help is needed to
assessing in- THE PATH make the use of
juries after a dis- HOME professional serv-
aster - and lots ices much more
of information efficient.
that also might help after a After the 2004 hurricanes,
disaster The Path was just as help-


less as most of our citizens
when the power went out.
Our little 5-kilowatt genera-
tor kept our meat frozen, but
not much more than that.
Our phones, cells and power
were gone. We could not
serve our community very
well. Keeping this in mind,
we have recently installed a
17-kilowatt generator and a
HAM radio antenna for the
staff who have completed
the radio course.
Our beds will double in
the event of an emergency.
Our radios now will be
able to talk to the new Emer-
gency Operation Center just
built by the sheriff's office,


Freedom From Smoking course slated


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Health
Department will offer the
next Freedom From Smok-
ing classes from 4 to 5:30
p.m. beginning Monday, May
18, at the Citrus County
Community Resource Cen-
ter, 2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto.
The Community Resource
Center is on County Road
491 approximately, 1 mile
north of County Road 486 in
the same building as the Vet-


erans Administration Cen-
ter and George A. Dame Ur-
gent Care Clinic.
The classes will run for
eight weeks according to the
following schedule:
Monday, May 18 - Orien-
tation/Session 1; Tuesday
May 26 - Session 2; Monday,
June 1 - Session 3; Monday,
June 8 - Session 4 (Quit
Night); Wednesday, June 10
- Session 5. (48 hour sup-
port); Monday, June 15 -
Session 6; Monday, June 22
- Session 7; and Monday,


June 29 - Session 8 (End
Session).
The program follows the
American Lung Associa-
tion's "Freedom From Smok-
ing" guidelines utilizing
education and support.
There is no charge for this
program thanks to grant
funding from the Florida
Department of Health To-
bacco Prevention and Con-
trol Program. Registration is
required. For more informa-
tion, or to register, call 527-
0068, Ext. 240.


and we will be able to coor-
dinate needs even if the
power is down. The HAM
radio is very reliable at any
time, let alone when the
power is out. It operates at
several frequencies and we
can talk locally or across the
state. My special thanks to
Jerry Dixon, who has spent
many hours helping us get li-
censes and our radios in-
stalled.
I encourage any retiree
who is looking for something
that is physically easy to do
and could help save lives
during an event to take the
HAM course offered by the
local HAM group. A HAM


could get started at the
2-meter level for less than
$200.
Although it feels like we
have an ice pick and we are
picking at an iceberg, this is
all working toward housing
people and getting them
back 'into housing when
their lives are hit by the un-
expected.

DuWayne Sipper is the
executive director of
The Path of Citrus County a
faith-based homeless
shelter Contact him
at 527-6500 or
sipperd@bellsouth.net


Elks Lodge 2693 plans

Country Western night


Special to the Chronicle

Celebrate Memorial Day,
May 30, with our Country
Western Night at West Cit-
rus Elks Lodge 2693 with
entertainment by the popu-
lar The Band featuring B.J.
Bear. B.J. Bear is an excel-
lent guitarist, keyboard
player and singer who pre-
viously played with the
popular bands Minus One


and Top Heavy.
An old-fashion barbecue
with ribs and chicken and
all the fixings will be served
at 6 p.m. This will be tick-
.eted in advance in the
Lounge at $13 each. This af-
fair is for members and
their favorite guy or gal.
Festivities will start at 5
p.m., with entertainment
from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. Don't
forget the 10-gallon hat


M Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
0 U Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but " Crystal River; by fax at 563-3280; or e-mail to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


Parks give moms break











%#%P OAICTU YCINY(L HRONCL


gg SATURDAYMAY 9 2009


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(ia) 30 60 30 30 51 ** "The Mummy Returns"(2001) Brendan Fraser 'PG-13't *s "X-Men: The Last Stand"(2006, Action) HughJackman, lan McKellen 'PG-13' * "The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen"
iGOLF] 67 Big Brpak Prince Edward Island Live From the Players Championship (Live Lve From the Piayer; Chrampionship Players Championship
(H L 39 68 39 39 45 54 *,* "FollowtheaStarsHome" "The Good Witch"(2008, Drama) Catherne Bell. Chris Poner r& "The Good Wltch's Garden"(2009, Drama) Catherine Bell a * ' "Follow the Stars Home"
0M*) 2 2 **, "The Golden Compass"(2007 Fantasy) Nicole ** "Fred Claus"(2007, Comedy) Vince Vaughn Premnere. Santa's ne'er- Boing Chrad Dawson vs Antonio Tarver. Chad Dawscn lakes iri Anionio Tarver in a ignt
2 2 Kidman, Daniel Craig. (In Stereo) 'Pd-13' a, do-well brother puts Christmas in jeopardy (In Stereo) 'PG' , heavyweights ile bout From Las Vegas jin Stereo Livel i,
[H 23 57 23 23 42 52 Get it Sold G |Designed to Sell Curb Appeal G' House Hunters Oivire Design IDear Genevieve Coir Spla G HoueurHouse Huniers House Hurters House Hunters Rare My Space |My Kitchen
I 51 25 51 51 32 42 Art of War *'PG a Modern Marvels PG' l Ancient Aliens PG i Star Trek Beyond the Final Froriler A tribute to 'Star Trek' PG
(LIFE) 24 38 24 24 31 "rueConfessions" *I "OddGirMOul"12005,Drama)AexaVega, LisaVidal s *\'"BecauseISaidSo"(2007)DianeKeaton .PG-13'gr |* "Because ISaldSo"a
"Tempted"(2003, Drama Vir inia Madsen, Lainle Kazan, Jason Momoa ** "Message In a Bottle"(1999, Rornmance) Kevin Costner, Robin Wright Penn, Paul ** "Bed ofRoses"(19961 Chnstan Slater A florist
ili 50 A married woman is attracted -o a young Hawaiian 9a NeAman. A woman seeks Ihe author of a letter that washed ashore 'PG-13' s brightens up the life of a lonely businesswoman
** "BASEketball" (1998) Trey Parker.Two men Invent * * "Knocked Up" (2007, Romarice-Comedy) Seth Rogen, Katherine Heigl Paul Rudd A *'* "The Incredible Hulk" (2008, Action) Edward Norton. Bruce Banner
(m X) 3 3 a successful sport. (In Slereol R'a one-night stand has an unforeseen consequence. tin Stereo) R'as faces an enemy known as The Abomination. PG- 13' a,
S 42 41 42 42 MSNBC Documeniary MSNBC Documentary MMSrBC Documentary - MShBC Documenlary MSNBC Documentary IMSINBC Documenlary
(M ) 97 66 97 97 39 Made (In Stereo) PC Real World-Road Rules C'olilege Lile 14 |Coilege Lie '14 Taking the Stage |in Siereol PG ,"'| The Prone 'The Conspra.:y"'4 Thne Phone '14
S65 44 53 Fishzilla- Snakehead invasion Eplirer Mariuarina action" 14' Deadly Dozen (I 'PG' The Pirale Code G Lost on the Allanli. (Il Deadly Dozen 'PG
) 28 36 28 28 35 25 SpongeBob |SpongeBob iCarly 'Y7 i Carly Y7iT, iCarly (N) (n StereolYV7 T i Carly /7 ,i |iCarlyn'7 E George Lopez George Lopez Home improve |Home improve
(44 ** : 'Rumor Has It..." (2005, Comedy) Jennifer Anislon. 'PG-13 ** "'Steel Magnolias" (1989. Comedy-Drama) Sally Field, Dolly Parton PG �*, "Steel Magnolias"(r 989) Salry Field 'PG'
I, 62 ** 'To Kill a Mockingbird" * '"Tortilla Soup" (2001) Hector Elizondo A veteran chef's three * * "PeariHarbor" (2001, War) Ben Alfleck, Josh Hartnett, Kale Beckinsale. Fnends join a war effort after the
1 )___62 (1962) Gregory Peck 'NR' a daughters add spice to his life (in Stereo) 'PG-13' Japanese attack Hawaii in Stereo) 'PG-13' a
(31 59 31 31 26 29 "Death Tunnel" 12005. Horror) 'R' f , '*See No Evil" 12006, Horror) Kane. Christina Vidal R' * "The Descent" (2005) Shauna Macdonaid. Premiere 'NR' "Lake Dead" 1(2007) Tara Gerard
EE 122 112 122 122 NASCAR RaceDay (Live) On the Edge (N) |Hyundaa Test Monster Jam World Finals (~Ni AMA Pro Prime Time 11it
(SP -EI 37 43 37 37 27 36 The Ultimate Fighter'14, L,V . The Ultimate Fighter'14, L,V The Ultimate Fighter'14' |The Ultimate Fighter'14, L,V The Ultimate Fighter'14, L,V The Ultimate Fighter'14, L,V
(M ) 36 31 36 36 College Baseball Gatr-Hall of Fame Banquet '09 College Baseball Florida at LSU. (Live) Gators Orange & Blue Debut '09
I) 49 23 49 49 16 19 King of Queens |King ol Queens ** "Ocean's Eleven"|2001)GeorgeClooney 'PG-13'i |* "Catch Me if You Can"(2002, Comedy-Drama) Leonardo DiCapno, Tom Hanks.'PG-13'
S**** "TheAdventuree of Robin Hood"l1938,Advernture)Errol Flynn. o** "Mutiny on the Bounty"|1935, Adventure) Charles L3ugnion Clark Gable. Franchot *o,. "Captain Blood"(1935) Errol Flynn An
Te 53 30 35 The outlaw pits his Merry Men against the evil Prince John 'PG' Tone An officer and shipmates overthrow a cruel captain 'NR (f DVS) enslaved Bnish doctor turns Caribbean pirate 'NR'
( 53 34 53 53 24 26 Man vs Wild "Yukon' 'PG 0 1 Out ot ihe Wild Alaska Out t Ithe Wrid Alaska Ou o i[he Wild Alaska Out ol rhe Wild Alas;ika Out Ci ihe Wild Alaska
(T'__ ) 50 46_ 50 50 29 30 E>lreme Forensics '14 na 48 Hours Hard Evidence PG 48 Hours Hard Evidence PG' 48 Hours Hard Evidence PG 48 HOurs Hard Evidern,:e PG 48 Hours Hard Evidence PG
ITil 48 33 48 48 31 34 * "Men in Black f' (2002) Tommy Lee Jones 'PG-13' a[ ,, "Kill Bill: Vol. 1"12003 Acton) Uma Thurman R' a * * "Kill Bill: Vol. 2"(2004 Adiorn) Uma Thurman.'R Ra
S 9. '54 9 9 44 World PokerTour From Los Angeles PG, La ,1 Man v Food G Man v Food G Today Show On-Loc:ation Browr.Wk.encd Brown-WVernd The Amazing Race 14 'PG B'
25 55 25 25 98 98 Speeders'14' Speeders 14 Speeders'14 ISpeeders'14' Speeders 14 Speeders'14 WoiiasDumbes 14' WorldsWildestil4 Forenrit :File Forensic Files
32 49 32 32 4 24 **s "PalrdotGames"(1992, Suspense) Harnson Ford. Anne Archer.'R ,Andy Gfirh Andy Grtrh |Andy Grifinh Andy Gnrfinn 3rd Ro.:ckSur 3rd Rock-Sun 3r d Rock-Sun
( 47 32 47 47 17 18 Law& Order SpecialVictims Unit *Si "Liar Llar"(1997. Comedy) Jim Carrey.'PG-13'" s **"Bruce Almighty"(2003, Comedy) Jim Carrey 'PG-13 a Law Order Crimira1irtent'14'
S 140 69 117 117 The FBI Files 'PG iFa The FBI Files Beirayed"PG' ' The Loc:aor IThe LOator The LoCator I Want KI Save I Want i. Save I Warnt o Save I Wan10 o Save
(T33 18 18 8 8 18 18 20 Boston Legal '14'm _ MLB Baseball Texas Rangers at Chicago White Sox. Frdm U.S. Cellular Field in Chicago. , WGN News at Nine (N) a,' Scrdbs'14' Scrubs'14'


- PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.


To end our week looking at re-
doubles, here is the biggest penalty
conceded .in a world champi-
onship. It occurred in Jamaica dur-
ing the 1987 Bermuda Bowl
semifinal between Great Britain
and Sweden.
Two no-trump showed 7-10
points with at least 5-5 in two suits
excluding clubs. Three hearts was
to play if East had hearts. After two
passes, the Swedish South bal-
anced with three no-trump, an-
nouncing a minor two-suiter.
West doubled to show interest in
a penalty, and North passed be-
cause he had equal length in the
minors. With hindsight, South
would have run to four diamonds,
but he redoubled, asking partner to
pick a minor-
North, though, thinking this
promised extra values, suddenly


Bridge-


North 05-09-09
SA K 8 5 4
T Q J 10 2
* Q5
46 10 3
West East
4 10 6 4 Q 9 7 3 2
V 7 6 5 . AK 9 8 4
* A K 7 3 * 2
4 A764 4 J 9
South
^J,
' 3
* J 10 9 8 6 4
, ;K Q 8 5 2'
Dealer: East
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
2 NT
Pass 3 V. Pass Pass
3 NT Dbl. Pass Pass
Redbl. Pass ' Pass Pass
Opening lead: V 7

fancied their chances for nine
tricks in no-trump. But South had


to be limited because he had not
,bid immediately over two no-
trump.
The defense was perfect, cutting
declarer's communications before
endplaying the dummy to concede
tricks to East.
West's heart lead went to the 10
and king. East returned the heart
nine, which was allowed to hold,
then shifted to the club nine, de-
clarer playing his king and West
ducking. South led a spade to
dummy's ace and called for the
heart jack, East taking his ace and
leading the club jack, covered by
the queen, ace and 10.
West cashed his diamond win-
ners, then played the spade 10.
Declarer ducked in the dummy,
but East overtook with his queen
and endplayed dummy with a
heart. South cashed the spade king,
and East took the last two tricks.
That was down five, minus 2,800.


To THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
JTU by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, Adouble
one letter to each square, chocolate cone
to form four ordinary words. /
I PHECO


SMIDOW


NEW JUMBLE NINTENDO www.jumble.conm/is
DUMEGS|
7~ 1T^ ^
1 __ / I I


AFTER THE BOXER.
LO-ST THE FIGHT,
HE L-ICKEP --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here:
(Answers Monday)


c12
a.
<�
3U (DN

CD L E

-in I
Z (D
t15




*Sn
o Ei



0 0
= S2


�i L:
(D
.0
E


ACROSS
.1 CEO degree
4 Battery
chemical
8 Urchin
12 "Cal" of song
13 Canned fish
14 "Fernando"
band
15 Like horror
flicks
17 Secluded valley
18 Lazy-
19 Black gem
20 High school
21 Metalsource
22 Wear jauntily
25 Not as good
28 Sleep-stage
acronym
29 Rani's servant
31 Back-fence
yowler
33 - Holm
of"Alien"
34 To boot
36 Not their'


37 Start a fire
40 Window parts
42 Mongkut
portrayer
43 Merchandise ID
44 Icy crystals
46 Sahara
wanderer
49 Trail mix
50 Health-club
staffers
53 Bryce Canyon
state
54 Leaf source
55 Paris street
56 Dice throws
57 TV hookups
58 Geological
period
DOWN
1 Food additive
2 Words from
Scrooge
3 Felipe or Matty
4 Homeof CNN
5 Prompting
6 Successful


Answer to Previous Puzzle

UTA HE WN UCLA
GEM OGEE REAL
MYRIlADS BAC K
URL THANK
THIN IBSEN
DOG OAR RE BAR
FEAL ROO
IOTA V A MAGAM


SC U,D REND [ON

AL-CE � WAN. A DEF


candidates
7 Lah-di- -
8 German
composer
9 Capably
10 Wild goat


Want more puzzles?.
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


11 Cooling device
16 Net surfer
19 Pizarro's
quest
21 tasps
of delight
22 - Lanka
23 Crest
24 Science
magazine
25 Faded
26 007's alma
mater
27 Casanova type
30 Teen hangout
32 Half
a couple
35 Combats
38 Dryads
39 Requiring
payment
41 Summit
43 Auto-racing
family
44 From memory
45 Mideast power
47 Vibes
48 Pharmacy buy
49 Kind
of reaction
50 Cable rock
station
51 Orbit path
52 Get the
message


Dear Annie: May I use your
column to defend our
beautiful state of West Vir-
ginia? For the
umpteenth time, I've
heard someone com-
ment that people here
have no teeth and
marry, their siblings.
While most of us take
this with a smile and a
shrug, I want to tell
people that if you think
our governor wears
bib overalls and
smokes a corncob
pipe, then you are ANN'
showing YOUR igno- MAIL
rance.
West Virginians are
wonderful, smart, decent, hard-
working people with a great
sense of humor. We invite every-
one to come see our beautiful
seasons, and our mountains,
parks, forests, rivers and streams


- but most of all, to experience
our small-town . hospitality.
Thanks for letting me vent -
Grammie in Fairmont,
WVa.
Dear Grammie:
Feeling better? We're
happy to give tourism
a boost. As anyone
who has visited knows,
West Virginia is a
beautiful state with
lovely scenery and a
gracious population.
All stereotypes show
the speaker's igno-
IE'S rance, but they are
.BOX hard to eradicate, so
it's a good thing you
also have such a great
sense.of humor.
DearAnnie: I'm a member of a
family that has dealt with mental
illness for years. I would like to
pass on some good information
for "Total Loss," whose son may


be suffering from mental illness,
Getting an adult son to a doctor
may be impossible (if he doesn'
think he is ill), but she can cal
911 and ask the police to take hin
to the local psychiatric emer
agency room for an evaluation
She also can check with the Na
tional Alliance on Mental Illnes!
(nami.org) at (800) 950-NAMI (1
800-950-6264) for a family support
group near her. Mom should als(
know that she is not responsible
for his medical expenses since h(
is over 18. That is what Social Se
curity is for. The hospital wil
help them with this. My hear
goes out to her, as my family hat
seen this happen too many times
- California


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugai
E-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast net


Today HOROSCOPE


Your birthday - Your prospects for the
year ahead look very promising and
hopeful, but only if you are diligent about
taking advantage of all the many oppor-
tunities that will be provided for you.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - If you're
taking on a collective endeavor, make
sure that everyone understands the proj-
ect and what's expected.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Keep a
close eye on the clock if you've made
numerous promises to do something at a
certain time.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - People in
general can be bit edgy, so social graces
could become far more important than
usual.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Be kind and
tolerant of youngsters or those in your


charge, but don't go so far as to
overindulge them.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Don't at-
tempt to manipulate others with impossi-
ble-to-keep promises. Things could
become extremely unpleasant and diffi-
cult.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Be disci-
plined in all your material affairs, make
due with what you have, and don't be-
come more indebted. Avoid gambling
with funds you can't afford to lose.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - It's OK to
listen to the suggestions of others, but
rely more on your judgment than on the.
advice of those who lack all the facts.'
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)-You
like to sweep things under the rug hop-
ing that, if left alone, these problems will


work themselves out.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -This
isn't a bad day, but gratifying extravagan
desires that exceed your budget could
make it so.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - Serious
matters should not be treated indiffer- -
ently or shelved until a later date in order
to indulge in frivolous activities. Matters
that deserve priority should be taken
care of promptly.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - Treat oth-
ers with consideration, but not to the
point of insincerity. It could damage a re-
lationship.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - Unless
you are realistic with regard to your fi-
nances, you could easily spend far more
than you can afford.


� 2009 by NEA, Inc.


CITRUS COUNTY (IL) CHRONICLE


ENTERTAINMENT


*










Cmius COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE Coi~ucs SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009 CO


Peanuts

WE COULD STANP HERE
FOREVER,ANP A BUS
WOULD NEVER 5TOF FOR U5


Cathy


Sally Forth


Garfield




THE CAT
PLEASE
IS OUT.
SWAT
YOURSELF



For Better or For Worse


Beetle Bailey


Dilbert


*Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Doonesbury


pig Nate


The Grizzwells


Blondle
YOU GUYS
lS RTlEC--EKl F. WITH ALL TH
CLoE..TOTIAE.MN POT

LEY (TV 5TOV4 IN
EYA35TEVACE-!


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"If you happen to get breakfast in bed
tomorrow, Mommy, which is your fave
- Sugar Oats or Corny Crinkles?"


Betty


Frank & Ernest


"... And if it's real value you're looking for,
this is our most popular model."


Arlo and Janis


Ci'us Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
S"Stir Trek" (PG-13) 10:45 a.m., 1:40 p.m., 4:35
p.m., 730 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes.
"X-Ien Origins: Wolverine" (PG-13) 11 a.m.,
- noon, 1130 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 5 p.m., 7 p.m.,
7:50 p. ., 9:30 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Gh of Girlfriends Past" (PG-13) 11:45
a.m., 2: p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Obsssed" (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 1:50 p.m., 4:25
p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"17 AIin" (PG-13) 11:10 a.m., 1:45 p.m., 4:30
.p.m.
"Statef Play" (PG-13) 7:10 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
Crystal River Mail 9; 564-6864
"Star Trek (PG-13) 10:15 am., 10:45 a.m., 1:10
p.m., 1:40 drm., 4:05 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30
Times subject to


p.m., 9:55 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes.
"X-Men Origins: Wolverine" (PG-13) 10:30 a.m.,
11 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 2 p.m., 3:30
p.m., 4 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 8:10
p.m., 9:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m., 10:40 p.m. No passes.
"Ghosts of Girlfriends Past" (PG-13) 11:10 a.m.,
1:35 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"The Soloist" (PG-13) 10:20 a.m., 1:20 p.m., 4:15
p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Fighting" (PG-13) 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Obsessed" (PG-13) 10:50 a.m., 1:50 p.m., 4:20
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"17 Again" (PG-13) 10:40 a.m., 1:15 p.m., 3:40
p.m.
Visitwww.chronicleonline.corn for area movie list-
ings and entertainment information.


change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious
WXCV-FM 95-3 Adult
Contemporary


Local RADIO


WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious
WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies


WIFL-FM 104.3 Adult Mix
WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: R equals V


"KZY ZYNBK XD N JXKZYB MI N HYYG


NSOII NK KZY SXKKXJ


XD' PZMVZ OXF


PMCC NCPNOI DMWH DXBUMRYWYII."


ZXWXBY


HY SNCENV


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Hope costs nothing." - Colette "It's hard to beat a person who
never gives up." - Babe Ruth
(c) 2009 by NEA, Inc. 5-9


adoT y's M OV IES


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COMICS


SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2009 C9










010 sATURDAY 191AY 9 9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


Classifieds


To place an ad, call 563-5966


-I ]
- t-e Off-- ., . .-.c t' 11. . .... . . ....i ....... H p Help


ALONE?
Senior Dating Bureau
SAFEST since 1977
Ages 45-90. 1-800-
922-4477 (24hrs) or
log onto: Respected
Dating.com



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
WANTED
Junk Lawn Mowers
& Power Quip.
Free Pick-up (352) "
564-80141601-5053
/Us out zoomcltrus.com


FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale, Hshold,
& Furniture Items
Call 352A476-849A
CASH PAID all
vehicles.Trades welcome
Used PARTS avail
352-628-9118



5 EIGHT WEEK OLD
CUDDLY KITTEN'S.
LITTER TRAINED AND
READY FOR A LOVING
HOME.527-4834
Black German
Shepherd, female,
5 mosold, need
fenced yard
352-287-1364
Devon, Rex, Cats
unusual, lovable,
neutered male
&-female. Indoor
(352) 270-3640


Excell. Home for any
unwanted birds, poultry
U-R unable to care for
726-9874
Female Spayed Siamese
Cat to good home. Very
loving. Approx 4yrs old.
Prefer no small children.
476-5604
Free Baldwin Electronic
piano, 7 yrs old, does
not play, looks great,
(352) 860-1541
FREE HORSE MANURE
All natural feed. You
come and get It. Easy
access. (352) 527-9530
FREE KITTENS
Cute & Adorable
8wks Utter trained
(352) 503-3392
FREE METAL STORAGE)
SHED 6X8 In Crystal River
(352)598-2232
FULL SIZE WHEEL CHAIR
Great Condition
(352) 637-1817
HAVE SOMETHING TO
GIVE AWAY?
Place your
ad 24 hrs a day.
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
1 Select Place an Ad
2 Create an Account
3 Select Cust. type
4 Select Heading of
Special Notices
5 Select Free
6 Create Ad
KITTENS 8wks
Litter trained & wormed
All long haired. 3
wh/black & 1 yellow/wh
(352) 794-3579
SHEPARD MIX
45 lbs., 2 yrs old, Very
friendly. Loves other
dogs, neutered. All shots
up to date. Caged
trained. Free to good
home. (352) 503-7145
Southern Yellow
Pine Trees,
good for lumber or logs
FREE YOU CUT
(352) 726-3093,



MADDOX FARMS


You pick Green Beans,
Dug Red Potatoes
Hwy 475 N. (352)
303-0105



Bi-focal riding glasses
brown frames, in black
zipper case. Lost in the
vicinity of Applebees on
Rt 44. Please
call 352:270.9145
Thanks Amy
Boxer Mix
Female, fawn colored.
White feet, long tail. 77
Ibs. Black collar w/rabies
tag. Shy wlpeople.
A W L(352) 476-7469
FEMALE ADULT CAT
9 ' \ '.. White/tan, with a Ittle
black. She Is an older
cat. Lost In the vicinity
of Fun Court In the
Sportsman bowling ally
& Dan's Gun room area
of Inverness
352-302-5651
Great Dane
Blue Merle, male, 11
rig t aps mos. old. Lost in the area
of Marquet Acres.
(352) 302-6388
MALE RUST COLORED
POMERANIAN wlwhite
tail. 1-yr old. Name Is
Harley. no collar. Lost
In the vacinity of New
Hampshire Drive &
Porpoise Circle. His
, family.really misses
him.,


REWARD
Lost Shih Tzu
named Buttons lost
near E Bernice St in
Inverness on
04/26109. Call Geri or
Ralph 352-560-3531
or
631-291-3682.Buttons
is almost blind and
She is white and tan.,
She is missed very
much._
'EJ, 16

Sudoku ******4puz.com


38;2 9 59

7!:t


4-i
7 6 _1 *
7




335



4 '[6
8� 6 1









Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers I through 9.


male, young large,
Reward
last Duvall Island
Floral City 352-637-6189
Springer Spaniel Mix
17 yrs old, B/W Went
missing on 5/2 Last seen
Sun. 5/3 3pm on Sugar
Maple & Forest Ridge
Blvd far side of Forest
Ridge Elementary
forwards the woods. Has
a heart condition.
(352) 362-1606
(352) 726-7831



Found
Black/Brown Dog
on Bike Trail
btw. 491, & Cit Springs
Call (352) 726-9693
to Identify.
Pit Bull
Red nose, female.
Found on Hidden Oaks
Way in C.R.
(352) 302-6388


1Earb 6 MaL
Fhotography
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits
Indoor or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed






www.adoota
rescued oetcom
View available pets on
our website or call
(352) 795-9550
Adoption Locations
PET SUPER MARKET
every Saturday 11-2p
Inverness
MERCANTILE BANK
Inverness
May 18th Monday
12-2pm

CAT
ADOPTIONS









Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A till 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4,
All Cats and Kittens are al-
tered, tested for Feline Luk
and Aids. Up to date on
vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofsha.ora.
or stop by our offices at
1149 N ConantAve. Comer
of 44 and Conant.
Look for the big white build-
ing with the bright paw
prints.


I96.8 T' gtl?: g
S R T9 � '-t Z


^L 6 1l s9'Z
e 9s 8ZieZ T t,-
8'ZT 1 S 659 L.
1'-bJ 6 5 -'S8 E:


Bank Probate
I Divorces /Evictions
352-613-3674








ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT



- -*,




$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com




A FREE Report of Your
Home's Value
www.naturecoast
living.net

missionincitrus com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
Shelter 794-3825

missioninctrus.com
Citrus County's Only







CARE GIVER
NEEDED
F/T, Experienced
only need apply.
CDA Required
Call 352-212-2708
or 352-341-3244










































NAIL TECH
NEEDED
Immediately in Citrus
Hills area, booth
rental/commission, Lv.
Msg. (352) 220-8039


Due to our expansion, Love Honda is currently
seeking several experienced automotive
professionals to sell new and used vehicles.
Experience is preferred but we will train the
right candidates.
We offer an excellent benefits package including:
* Signing Bonus!
* Paid medical benefits
S401(k)
* Progressive pay with up to
35% commission
* Monthly bonus program
* Paid vacation
* Flexible schedule
No phone calls. Please apply in person at':
Love Honda
2219 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
Between 10am and 2pm Mon. - Fri.
(352) 628-4600
Applications will be accepted until
,,3,5, Saturday, May 9th


Live in Assistant
To help elderly man.
628-4339




BECOME A CNA
For Career and
Test Preparation
Call 352-564-8378

CNA PREP CLASSES
EZ Learning Services
Day & Evening Classes
352-382-EASY; 586-2715
/ us out zoomcltrus.com
CNA TEST PREP
Now Offering Day & Eve.
Classes Free CPR training
wlenrollment 341-2311
Scholarships Available

Full Time
Lic. Lab Tech &
Phlebotomist.

For busy Physician
Lab. Competitive
Salary & Benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 746-6333


GYN OFFICE IN
CRYSTAL RIVER
LOOKING FOR:

Medical Assistant
Receptionist
Proactive, one year
experience In
Medical Offices.
Knowledge In
medical software
Please fax resume to:
352-564-8201

Instructors
Needed for PN
Program
Part Time - Clinicals &
classroom. Exp.
preferred. Days and/or
e. er,ir.a: Fax Resume:
(3W2) 245-0276

MEDICAL HELP
Seeking Surgical Tech
Nurse Or Med. Assist.
Must be energetic,
self motivated &
interested in pursuing
an excellent
opportunity for career
growth. The selected
Individual should be
able to work in a fast
paced environment
and easily handle
multiple medical tasks
efficiently with a
willingness to
learn surgery.
Please Fax resume to:
352-746-9320
No phone
Calls please.
References required

WA fEA
It's E-Z @ E-Z Learning
Services
Offering CNA Test
Prep Courses
Day/ Evening Classes
CPR Included
10.% FThru May '09
Refer a Friend and re-
ceive an additional dis-
count. Enroll on line @
EZLeamingservices.com
or call 352-382-EASY
(3279) or 586-2715





. EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
Needed for Citrus
County Education
Foundation. Must
have experience
In creating public
awareness,
fundralsing, budget
management, and
event planning. Com-
plete job description
and application
Information at www.
citruseducatlon.ora


ninunce iVUanager
Quickbooks, excel, &
word process. req'd.
Fax resume:
352-795-0722
Temporary Armed
Security Officer

Securitas Security
Services Inc. is
currently hiring for
Security Officers for
the Crystal River site
located at the Progress
Energy Nuclear Facility
in the Citrus County
area. This Is a
Temporary position
(6-9 months) without
benefits. If you enjoy
working in a physically
demanding, profes-
sional environment,
have excellent
customer service skills,
and are dedicated to
doing a great job, this
may be the opportunity
for you!
Minimum
Requirements:
Reliable'Transportation.
Eligible to work in the
U.S.
21 years of age or older
High School Diploma
or GE.D.
Good written and'
verbal communications
skills.
Military background or
previous Security
experience is preferred,
but
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED.
Willing to submit to
background
procedures
including drug screen
and background check.
ALL APPLICANTS
ARE WELCOME.
To learn more about
Securitas Security
Services Inc. In your
area, visit us at www.
securitasinc.com
beginning ratesof pay
are as f6ollows:Whileiri
training $13.25 per
hour. Classes are set to
begin June 8,2009.
ALL interested
applicants PLEASE
VISIT
wewsecuritasiobs.com
and find your location
to apply; once you
have done so select
Armed Security Officer
(ENERGY) CRYSTAL
RIVER as your
selection. We will NOT
be accepting any
phone calls all
interested applicants
must submit online.
Applications will be
accessible online.form
May 3, 2009 through
May 9, 2009




Exp Line Cook
Apply in Person
at Cracker's
Bar & Grill
NOW TAKING
APPLICATIONS
Breakfast cook, exp.
only apply Ip-2p.
Rooster's Cafe,
715 W. Jefferson St
Brooksville, FL

O lomo0ve

Your world first.
Every Day


CHRONILE
C _____ tfazEic/


I Health / Life
Agents
Interested In work-
ing In a recessibn
proof Industry?
Affiliated Health
Insurers has open- I
wings for 3-4 Top 0
Producing Agents I
Sfor Citrus, Marion &
Hernando County
Too Commissions -
Leads -All A-Rated
Carries.
Call Jim Hicks
352-341-0712

WANTED
Highly self motivated
Sale's people
Company truck Is
provided. Yearly
paid vacation.
Holidays paid.
Benefits available.
Positions open In
Citrus, Hernando,
and Sumter Counties.
Apply in Person
ONLY, from 9 am to
4 pm Mon-Fri, At
A-I Termite &
. Pest Control,
1840 Hwy 44 West,
Inverness, FL 34453.
Located across
from Applebee's.
Only well groomed
and properly dressed
applicants will be
considered.





ADVANCED
'ALUMINUM
Looking for
experienced, quality
installers.1352-628-2764

AUTO & RV COMBO
PAINT & BODY TECH
See Rick or Jerry
At Como RV & Truck
1601 W. Main St.
Inverness, FL

Exp. A/C Tech/
Installer
Call (352) 344-8088
DFWP

Exp. AC Tech
/Installer
Refrigerant exp. a
PLUS. Drug and
Alcohol Free work
place. Complete
resume w/ reference
and pay history
Must have clean
Driving record. Imme-
diate Opening. Call
between the hrs of
1pm to 3pm only. M-F
(352) 746-7710

PLUMBER/DRAIN
CLEANER

Must have exp. &
driver's license.
Accepting Apps.
Call Roto Rooter
(352) 621-1993





AC INSTALLERS
Experience Only
Great Pay & Benefits
352-726-1002, Ron

APPT. SETTER
Top Pay for Your Exp.,
Benefits, Call Diane
352-726-1002


SINGLE COPY NEWSPAPER


ROUTES AVAILABLE.

There are immediate opportunities for
single copy independent contractors to
service the Citrus County areas.










* Be at least 18 years of age.

* Possess a valid driver's license.

* Possess proof of liability insurance.

* Have 2 dependable vehicles.

Routes are 7 days a week,
early morning hours.


AUTOIU UDETAILER
PT or F/T, Exp. Needed
CONSIGNMENT USA Inc
352-461-4518
EXPERIENCE ONLY

Well rounded person to
fab/install case/mill
work around Florida.
Apply at Built-Rite
8-10am only
438 E. Hwy 40, Inglis

HERON POINTE
HEALTH AND
REHAB

IS HIRING FOR
ASSISTANT
MAINTENANCE
PERSON
Day shifts. Must be
available for rotation
and on call hours. 2
yrs exp pref.
Apply
in person to:
1445 Howell Ave.
Brooksville, Fl. 34601
or Fax Resume to:
(352) 796-3149

LAWN SERVICE P/T
w/flex sched., Exp. a
plus. Own Transportation
Leave msg 352-726-0646

WANTED: F/T
GENERAL SERVICE
AUTO TECHNICIAN
"Batteries, tires, oil
changes." Experience
is required. Apply in
person
Dunnellon Tire & Auto
12038 S. Williams Street.
Dunnellon




Fundraising
Assistant
P/T job for a creative,
energetic, self-starter
, air, E, cEini.people
;ii: C'uij ir,.:iuae :-
liciting donations.
Computer skills req.
Apply at:
130 HEIGHTS AVENUE
Inverness, 352-341-4633

Y[oTi o. fnoI
11.11 111'N "












COSMETO [LOGYhd:





IBARBER.'f.


- -, - I - 71











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

I'1 I


"He's not house-trained, but who cares?"

784216


25x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
'1 Entry Door, 2 Vents,
4" Concrete Slab,
$13.795. INSTALLED
30x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$14,995. INSTALLED
35x50x12(3:12 pitch)
' Roof overhang,
2-10x10 Rolluo Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$29.995 Installed
* Fl. Engineered Plans
* A local FI Manufact.
*. Meets or exceeds
Florida wind codes.
'*. Conc/Inst by others.
, Many sizes available
*, We specialize In
Commercial 'Buildings
- METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Uc # CBC 1256991
www. metal
structuresllc.com

Sheds & Garages
of Any Size
| *SHEDS NOW* |
We Move & Buy
Used Sheds
I lndependence/41 i
S(352)860-0111




SEWING MACHINE
Singer pedal. Very nice
with owners manual. $90
or best offer
352-465-0089


DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Repairing gas & diesel
engines. No job too big
or small. 352-228-2067




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd
friendly serve. Lowest
rats Free est.
352-860-1452
All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
. bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/ us out zoomcflrus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852





OSBORNE'S'
Lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Work Free Est.
LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins
R WRIGHT TreeService
Tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Uc
0256079 352-341-6827




Ricky Mills Tree Service
Trim, haul, top,
removal, Free Est
Reasonable Rates
(352) 398-9881



". At Home Computer
Repairs & custom
computers.
Call (352)228-7823



REPAIR SPECIALIST
- Reslretch-Installation
Call for Fast Service
C& R SERVICES
Sr. DI count 58il=28



Chris Stchell Painting
work full coated. 30 yrs.
Exp. ic. Ref. Ins.
* 352795-6533
S352J164-1397
CALL S CELLAR BLUE
All lnt./d xt. Painting
Needs. Lid & Ins. FREE
EST (351 586-2996


LONG PLAYING REC-
ORD 33RPM Buddy Max
the late great flea market
cowboy.Never used. $15
352 560 3677



SUN BELT SPA
top of line, 2 person
space saver, cost $3500,
asking $1200 obo
(352) 628-5186



A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
- 2 Ton $780.00
4 2-'/2Ton $814.00
4 3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Free Del: Uc.#CAC
057914 746-4394
ABC Briscoe Appl.
Refrig., washers, stoves.
Serv. & Parts
(352) 344-2928
ALL NEW WHIRLPOOL
REFRIGERATOR- Whi &
Electric range wlhood &
micro (11,500 btu). $800
for all. 352-897-4116
cell- 313-318-6032
CLOTHES DRYER -
PROPANE GAS Slightly
used propane gas
clothes dryer. In good
shape, runs good. $75
obo. Must pick up in
Homosassa. Call
352-628-2726

Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


Weap eop.eap
DP press, clean/paint
Many references.
637-3765
ALL HOME REPAIR
painting, drywall flooring,
pwr. wash Malley's
Home Maint
22019486 (lc0259169)
/ out zoomcltrus.com







FERRARO'S
Painting Service
Int/Ext. Free Est. Press
Cleanin 352 465-6631
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick LIc./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Mike Anderson
Painting Int/Ext
& Pressure Washing
Call a Professional,
(352) 464-4418
/ Us out zoomcitius.com



AFFORDABLE Mobile
Boat Maint. & Repair
Technical/Electrical
Custom Rigging
John (352) 746-4521
V us out zoomcitrus.com
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
27 yrs. exp. Certified
Best prices/guaranteed
352-220-9435
check out zoomcitrus.com



AT YOUR HOME
Mower & Generator
Repair. 352-220-4244
Lic#99990001273
DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Gas / Diesel Engines
No lob too bid or small.
352-228-2067


Kice0


Eled ric tove,.
Whirlpool, good cond.
$150.
(352) 527-3644
GE FREEZER CHEST
3 mo. never been used
$75 (352) 601-3654
GE Refrigerator
6' top freezer, ice maker
White, exc.cond $150.
(352) 489-7616
GE UPRIGHT FREEZER
FOR SALE for $35.00.
You can contact us at
352-628-2769 for more
information.
REFRIGERATOR
$85 (352) 795-7613 .
Washer & Dryer
Kenmore, white.
Lg. Capcity. Good
Condition. $250. for both
or Obo.(352) 794-0211
(352) 613-7890
SWasher & dryer,
large capacity.
$175 or best offer
(352) 697-9580



2 TON Larin HOIST
w/leveler $150
'Clarke 10 gal. sand
blaster $100
Both like new
601-2232 '
AIR COMPRESSOR
20HP Kohler/Champion
Gas Compressor
Electric start, 80 gal tank,
1.5" main hose. $1200
352-266-6756
SHAPER, Floor model.
Jet JWS-22CS. 1.5hp
motor, enclosed cab.,
.5 & .75 Interchangeable
spindles, .5 & .25 router
bit collets, microadju-
stable fence, Internet
price $949, sell $500
Includes mobile base
$45 value (352) 527-6909


m

The Tle Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634A1584




certified caregivers/sitters
20 + yrs exp, Trans. Avail
Lisa 352422-4765,
Dee Dee 352-422-1267




, SEE THROUGH,
Window Washing
All Aspects (352)
489-4189; 322-0962'
/ us out zoomcitrus.com



HOUSE CLEANING
$35.00 for most 2/1.
Experienced & reliable,
w/references 228-1789
MAIDS ON CALL
Serving Citrus 3Yrs.
Windows/Free Est.
(352) 726-8077
Malou's House
cleaning, $12.00 Per hr. 2
hr. min. Homosassa
Sarea. (352) 476-9676




PREMIER BUILDING
New, Remodels, Alum
const.barns.comm'rd,
decks, Ic/Ins 793-3654
/ out@zoomcftrus.com
ROGERS Construction
New Homes & All
Construction (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872
Schnettler
Construction, LLC
Lic & Ins CBC1253348
Renovations,
room additions,
decks, barns, garages,
various home repairs.
637-4629 cell
352-266-6756
We will beat any price by
far without compromise.
Dunham Construction
roofing, remodeling,
home maint. painting,
pres. wash, etc. talk to
owner 422-6575
(crco452543
us out zoomcitrus.com


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old OneWt
Tub to Shower Conversions Tooll!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827

BATHFITTER.COM


Metal Brake
36"w/stand, 12 Ga. milz
steel. Heavy.Exc. cond.
$180.00 (352) 637-7248
Table Saw, Ryobi 10".
Band Saw, Sears12".
Oscillating Sander
Sears. $200. for all.
(352) 382-5698


T^sSteeo


PANASONIC 42"
HD PLASMA TV
Never used still in
boxcost $2565.asking
$1200 obo
(352) 560-3677
PANASONIC DVD
PLAYER AND THEATER
SURROUND SYSTEM 5
. speakers,sub woofer etc
$200 352 560 3677
Television &
Home entertainment
center, w/32" Toshiba.
Exc. cond. $250. for all.
(352) 726-7815
TELEVISION 19 in
phillips tv in 'excellent
condition, asking 50.00
obo ask for john
352-382-1436
TV 36 inch RCA TV $75,
JVC CHX470 automobile
compact 12 disc CD $25
Hemando 352-344-4357
phone




DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
New & Used systems
upgrades. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
www.rdeeil.com
PLAYSTATION 2 con-
troller games included
$50.00 352-422-1453



. SOFT TAIL '88
Just'broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white wails,
seat in all Feather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
'w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, BIk w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carini handle bars.
Chrome to max, Tbhis
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may tradelfor
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.,
Call for more info.
352-302-2815



2 CHAISE LOUNGE
aluminium $80 for both.
Sharp upright vacuum
$10. office desk $25.
(352) 322-1160
WHITE ALUM. ROUND
Glass top table w/4 teal
sling back chairs $150;
Ivory wicker sofa w/teal
print cushions & match
glass top coffee table
$125 (352) 746-0183


SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla rms,
windows, garage scms
(CBC1257141) 2g352




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs, Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996








Mike Anderson
Painting Int/Ext
Pressure Washing
(352) 464-4418




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES,
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash &
Gutters Lic. 5863
(352) 746-0141
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repalrs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. Nc~iob
too smalllReli able ,ins.
0256271352-465-9201

NATURE COAST 1
HOME REPAIR
& MAINT. INC.
I Offering a Full I
Range of Services
www-naturecoast
homerepalr.cbm
Llc. 2776/Ins.,
352-634-5499
VIsa/MC/Dlscover

A HANDYMANN
Master Craftsman
Repairs at Affordable
Rates. 352-628-6960
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
EXP'D ADYA


Cope's Pool & Pavers
* Pool Refinishing
* Interlocking Brick Paver
,Patio & Driveways

ORDER YOUR
POOL TODAY.
& BE SWIMMING
BY SUMMER
"FREE QUOTES"
Lic. & Insured
CPC1456565
^. 352400.3188


CLASSIFIED



2-PIECE WALL UNIT
7ft 41n wide x 7ft tall x
lft depth. Custom
made, white pine
w/doors & shelves. $269
obo. 352-560-7966
Armoire Dresser,
brown, 53"H x 41Wx19D
$40. Double Dresser,
white, 7 drawer 31H x
63Wx17D both In great
great cond. solid wd.,
$50. 352-419-4008
BIRCH HUTCH Open
storage and closed stor-
age on the top. Doors
and Drawers on the bot-
tom. Like New $250
352-344-4654
BLUE, 4-PIECE SOFT
LEATHER SET BY
BENCHCRAFT. Sofa, love
seat, chair & ottoman.
Serious Inquiries only.
(352) 382-1422
Bunk Bed
Double on bottom
Single top, 3 drawers,
like new w/ mattresses
$225.
(352) 503-5064
BUSINESS SOLD
CLOSING SOON
All new plecesi Sofa
$199; recllner $199;
twin mattress set $99;
queen matt. set $179;
MANY MORE ITEMS
Elite Furniture
Next to Howards Flea
Market in Homosassa
(352) 621-0558
Couch
W/Recliners on ends.
Futon and love seat.
. $250 for all.
(352) 795-7513
DARK WALNUT DESK
66" long, 4 drawers,
'.casters. $110
352-860-0444
Dining Room Set
wileaf, 8 chairs,
buff. & serve. cabinet.
$2,100.(352) 795-3334
DINING ROOM TABLE
Older, drop leaf oak with
two chairs in excellent
condition. $125.
352-634-2253
Dining RoomTable
w/2 leaves and 6 chairs.
Lt. wood. Well kept.
$175.(352) 746-6509
DINING TABLE ONLY
Light beige wood
w/glass Insert 4 ft.
across.$200
(352) 746-3745
ENTERTAINMENT CTR,
LIGHT WOOD holds tv
32"x29",lots storage. $75
352-860-0444
FURNITURE Love seat
$125,Recliner $75,Solid
Oak Entertainment center
$225,Solid Oak roll top
computer desk $600 or
b/o -527-2906
FUTON
CLIK-CLAK,CAMEL,
EXC. COND LIKE NEW
$75.(352) 795-7764
352-212-7202
HUTCH Older, 1940's
dark oak with lighted cab-
inet in excellent condition.
$150. 352-634-2253
KING MATTRESS & BOX
SPRING
Sealy Pillow Top
Exc. condition. Moving
must sacrifice! $400.
352-410-0891


Free Est;. Uc#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *


---^---I

F Sheds & Garages of I
I Any Size I
*SHEDS NOW*
I We Move & Buy *
Used Sheds
I lndependence/41 |
(352) 860-0111




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash &
Gutters Lic.5863
(352) 746-0141
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est. 726-2907
EC13002699
SALTMARSH
ELECTRIC
Comm/Resid. & Sign
Lighting. CR13012391
352-344-3810
/ us out zoomcitrus.com



FASTI AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs
Free Est., Llc#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *
Kurt Mac Intyre Plumbing
All Phases Of Plumbing
325-422-5269



C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/20.1-1422




AARON'S FENCE
All Types, Best Price
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
2417(352) 795-7373
, us out zoomcitrus.com


ngUze room e
Basset, Rattan
w/2 night stands & ig.
dresser $300.
Dinette Set Light Oak
w/leaf & swivel chairs.
$50.(352) 598-4690
Lawn Mower
Push type, Toro 21"
Orig. price $499. asking
$200.(352) 249-1187
MAHOGNY DESK
5-drawer w/ glass top
& computer chair $75
(352) 601-3654
Motion Cocktail Table
Hesse, solid oak &end
table. Lg matching pair.
New in Dec. Must see,
asking $350.
(352) 726-7537
'Murphy Bed
Single, in vintage cherry
solid wood cabinet. Like
new, cost $2,500 asking
$1,000.(352) 628-3070.
(352) 628-2899
NEEDED DONATION
Furniture & Appls. For
The Agape Community
Thift Store, Inverness
Serving the emergency
needs of our community
'Free Pick up available
(352) 726-2287
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30; Full
$40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
QUEEN SIZE SLEEPER
SOFA, BROWN TWEED
COLOR, $150; Small.
metal school desk $15
(352) 382-2942
QUEEN SIZE SOFA BED
and 2 chairs. Good
condition. $200
352-613-6317
Roll Top Desk
56" x 25"x49 H.$500.
2 Curio Cabinets
w/lights. $800.for
both.(352) 795-3334
ROUNDED GLASS TA-
BLE TOP Bevelled glass
45" wide. Unused and still
in box $70 obo 352 560
3677
Sectional Sofa
Lg. 4 piece w/queen
sleeper & recliner. $350.
Recliner
Lane, off white leather.
$60.(352) 598-4690
SOFA & MATCHING
CHAIR. Dark Blue/Beige
Plaid. $125 obo
(352) 726-7805
Swivel Bar Stools 2-6"
Counter,upholstered
wlarms. Originally $275.
each, asking $75.00
each.(352) 249-1187
TWIN BEDS WHITE METAL,
w/ white laquer dresser,
chest & night stand. Like
new. $450 (352)
382-0722
or (352) 423-9221
twin bunk beds w/built
in computer desk,
shelves & dresser draw-
ers, never slept in. Paid
$700, asking $450 obo
(352) 860-0589, eves.
WOODEN KITCHEN
Table & 4 chairs $40.
Wooden entertainment
center $35
� (352) 527-1069
YOUR FURNITURE
DONATIONS
SUPPORTS THE PATH
HOMELESS SHELTER
Call (352) 746-9084


WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352.422-7279
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
SOSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Fence Work Free
Est. LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins




AAA ROOFING
Free est. 30 yrs exp.
352-563-0411
John Gordon Roofing
For a hole In your roof
or a whole new roof.
Free est. 352-795-7003



BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Estimates
Lic#2579/Ins, 257-0078
Decorative concrete,
Landscape curbing
River rock resealing
344-4209 (Uc.6960)
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack repairstaining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097
Quality Concrete Serv.
Layout to Lentil
ALL TYPES, Tractor
352-726-2383, Lic#2567
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




Additions, Garages
Decks, Bathrooms &
Handyman Services
40 Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768


42" TROYBILT Riding
Mower. 8 mths old, good
condition. $450
352-476-3661
CRAFTSMAN RIDER
42" cut, nice mower,
good cond. great
price$700 obo
(352) 795-0088
CRAFTSMAN RIDING
LAWN MOWER 42 in.
deck 19.5 hp $500
(352) 746-7357
CRAFTSMAN RIDING
mower 17.5 Hp. 42 inch
deck. $550.
(352) 746-7357
MANTIS DUAL
COMPOST TUMBLER
on stand. $600 new,
6 months old. $300/obo
352-212-3191




BEVERLY HILLS
408 S. Adams Street
Fri-Sat 9-12
CITRUS SPRINGS.
Moving /Sat & Sun 8-2pm
8165 N. Ibsen Dr.
CITRUS SPRINGS
Moving sale Sat 7-3pm
7946 N Primrose Dr.
CRYSTAL RIVER
BIG SALE, Sat. 9th 9am
214 NE 2nd Ave. W. Side
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. Sat. & Sun. 9A./5P.
1114 N.E. 1st. Terr.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Moving Priced to Sell
Sat 9a-3p
3159 N. Holiday Dr
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat 8am 1p
9901 W. Hawthorne St
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat 8-noon/no early birds
'228 NE 3rd St
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. 9 am.lpm. Corner
of 5th St. & Citrus Ave.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat., 8A./2P. Tools, Etc
9410 W. Milwaukee Ct
GOSPEL ISLAND
Multi -Fri & Sat 8-2pm
9115 E. Aqua Vista Dr
HOMOSASSA
HUGE MOVING SALEI
.Sat & Sun 8a-5p
3700 S. Eastpark off
Hombsassa Trail
Inv.Golf & CC Area
Sat only 8-3. Nice
clothes, turn., & kids stuff
9123 E. Cashiers Ct.
INVERNESS
Saturday, 8am-?
Large MuM-Family
LEISURE PT.
off Turner Camp.
Inverness
Veterans Yard Sale
Our Lady of Fatima
Church. May 9
7:30-1:30
550 US HWY 41 S
LECANTO
Huge Sale.
Rubber stamps
& Scrap booking.
Supplies.
Sat. 10A.M.- 4RP.M.
587 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Rt. 44 (352) 637-4200


REPAIRS
Wall & Ceiling Sprays
Int/Ext. Painting
Lic/Ins 73490247757
352-220-4845
ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs,
Texture, Additions
Free est.220-9016
Lic.#SCC131149747




Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone Drive-
ways & Tractor work
341-2019 or 257-1562
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,
Hauling, Site Prep,
Driveways. Lic. & Ins.
(352) 795-5755
*TOP SOIL SPECIAL*
3 Yd -$60/ 5 Yd $85
O10Yd $175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436




All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/us out zoomcitrus.com
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,HaulingS/te
Prep, Driveways
Lic/lns795-5755
/ us out zoomcitrus.com












p s. 32-2


r -MOBILE RV
- SERVICE
BARKERS LAWN WE COME TO YOU
A Cutting Edge Guaranteed to Motor Homes
Tile Job Beat the Current Price 5th Whls/Rv's
Showers. Firs etc You Pay for Lawn Care Master Tech
(352) 422-2019 Service. Monthly/Per , 352-586-5870
Lic. #2713, Insured, cut rate.352-232-8166 Storage Available
---- m m


1st Choice .
PEST CONTROL, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE


.AWN GOT

PROBLEMS?,

o 503-68s
Owner/Operators _', .
Uoyd Smith BwilBleeenstein Jim i
7U248 5340W. GlenbrookSt.


Garden/!awn
supple


� Laughingstock Intemrnational Incidlst. by UFS Inc., 2009


1 5-9


SATURDAY, M




Fri & Sat 8-noon
4795 Bow N Arrow Lp
LECANTO
Fri & Sat 8-4pm/tools
hsehld, fishing, canoe
1739 Squirrel Tree
PINE RIDGE
EST SALE/ Fri Sat 8am
antiques, collectibles,
guns, wicker, saddle &
tack, wagon wheels
4485 W. Pinto Lp
PINE RIDGE - Moving
Sale Sat May 9, 8A-2P
1225 W Sphere Place
3 fam, hh Items,
plantsipots, clothing,
garden equip
Too much to list



BEVERLY HILLS
Saturday Only 9a-3p
Electric wheel chair,
lowrey 2 layer organ
w/bench, Full sz. adj:
bed, queen sleeper
sofa, matching love
seat, wicker, antinque
Items, (vanity, desk,
piano stool, brick a
Brack, old books, &
collectibles. ALL priced
very reasonable.
CASH ONLY
4301 N. Bacall Loop
Hwy. 491 to Bev. Hills,
Left on N. Forest Ridge,
Rt. on Lincoln Ave.
Rt on W. Gleason, Left.
on N. Bacall Loop.



BRAND NEW
WEDDING DRESS
Halter brand new size16
$150.00 352-422-1453



40 FT ALUM. PV Radio
Tower. New rotor & con-
trol box. $450
FARM POLE LIFT
3PT HITCH: $75.
352-726-3093
1 HP, Submersible
pump,-$75. Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485
Air Conditioners
1/12,000 BTUS.
1/ 5,000 BTUS.
Work good.
(352) 628-4766
ALL KIND WIRE SETS
TV WIRES, PHONE
WIRES $30
352 382 1191
BARBIE JEEP NEW
BATTERY IN VERY
GOOD SHAPE W BUILT
IN RADIO -100.00
601-4882
BLACK N DECKER
PORTABLE WORK BENCH
$15; Hoover steam
vacuum w/brushe $60
Walter (352) 527-3552
CAMERA
'90 Minolta, RZ33QSI.
2 lenses/micro af 3x-lx
Zoom lenses. $300.
for all. Like new..
(352) 382-7046
Chain Saw
Echo,16" $75.
Blower
Echo, Backpack.
$100.(352).527-4319















mowing', beds,
brushes, mulch/haul
,Commrd & Resdntl
since 1991 220-6761
out zoomcitrus.com
CLEMENTS LAWN &
Landscape Main.
"Complete Lawn Care"
(352) 489-3070
Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Soecials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
3us out zoomcitrus.com
DUN-RITE LAWN SERV
Clean up, tree trim,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681
check zoomcitrus.com
HALLOCK & Son
Lawncare/Landscaping
Covering all your lawn
care needs. Detailed
work. 746-6410 Lic/lns.
HARRY EVERSON'S
LAWN & MAINTENANCE
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
(352) 302-2585
" us at zoomcItrus.com
Lawn Care 'N' More
Mow, clean up
brushes, beds
Friendly Service since
1991
Residential/Commri
(352) 726-9570
out zoomcitrus.com

OSBORNE'S
Quality Work - Free
Est. LOWEST RATES
352-400-6016 Lic/Ins
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Uc. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
& LANDSCAPE-
628-9848 or 634-0554
V us out zoomcitrus.com



POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
* 352-464-3967 *


--- --- Eu


-A ONW- 352-795RENT



HOMES * MOBILES * APARTMENTS
--FEATURED PROPERTIES---
BEVERLY HILLS ...................SrtngAt$575
CITRUS SPRINGS mZ' .....................$750

CRYSTAL RIVER ....................SangAt$550

HOMOSASSA ..................$00 oves YouIn
INVERNESS 21/1 House..........................$650
Caltfor moreinkfamfion, OVER40 TOCHOOSEFROM


Service for A/C, Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator & Morel

* CallAnytime * Same Day Service
* 42 Years Experience

- One Man
Low
Serving Citrus and Overhead
Marion Counties Low
352-445-0072 Prices
Doc Johnson RAooe0067081


LAY 9, 2009 Cil




4 In 1 printer, fax, copy
& scanner. Uke New. $5
352-382-2088
CONAIR ELECTRIC
HAIR TRIMMER Used
twice.All accessories
$10.00 352 560 3677
Copier
Xerox Work Center Pro
4165021 used once.
$800. Copy cartridge &
Toner. $75. for both.
(352) 795-3334
Entertainment Center
$50.
2 filing cabinets
$25. ea
(352) 344-8291
FLAG POLE STAND
CAST MODEL CARS
STAND $10.00 CARS
$8.00 352 382 1191
Gun Cabinet
Walnut, enclosed holds
5 rifles- storage, $125.
05 Dell PC flat screen 17"
w/hp scanner & printer
$75. (352) 795-9966
INDOOR OUTDOOR
RUNNERS
27"X20'$15.00 24"X10'
$10.00 352 382 1191


C Act Now


ITS FREE
Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad for FREE on
our all new
CLASSIFIED SITE.

5 Days, 5 Lines.,
2 Items totaling less than
$100.00 each.

Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an Ad in the top right
hand comer.
LG FLATRON
1520B 15" FLAT PANEL
LCD MONITOR.
No dead pixels.
Like new. $45
BROTHER INTELLFAX
775 Plain paper fax
machine. Excellent
condition. $10.
352-382-2088
MINI FRIDGE,
LARGE BIRDCAGE with
playarea on top,$150.00,
Mini fridge $50.00
352-341-4847
Motor Home Items
misc. $50. for all
New 4gal solo back pack
sprayer $50. Like new
10" Sear Tab saw 15amp
motor w/legs $75.
(352) 249-1187
Oil Paintings,
36x48 were $300, now
$99 -$149 (352) 746-2892
POOL PUMP HAYWARD
Northstar, model
4015X20NS, 2hp, for
Inground pool, Internet
price $527; sell $200,
reconditioned
motor (352) 527-6909
QUEEN PLATFORM
foundation for mattress
new in plastic $50. Coffee
table $85. 352-270-3909
Salt water FISH TANK
(approx 100 gall.) built
in cabinet - $400
Jacuzzi - $500
(352) 302-6082


WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard

^^lllllk�


arb *Mal
photogra ph

Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits. Indoor
or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed



ELITE PAVING &
SEAL COATING
All types - Res/Comm
352-302-3030 LIcIns


Circle T Sod Farms.
Inc. Tired of your dead
lawn?
Replace it with
Bahia. Delivery
Avail (352)400-2221
LAWN RESTORATION
All types of Grasses
Low maint Lawns Avail.
J & J Sod 352-302-6049
SOD All Varites
cut-out,installed,rolled
Lic/Ins #3000
(352) 422-0641
check out zoomcitrus.com

axtomnorive
Your world first.
Everv Day

CiQ )NICLE
C-lanr't.cdi


*.I POOLS/AVERS


-1











012 SATURBtDAY, MAY 9, 2009



IWORI GUW TRDCYIRKYW


1. Became torrid (1)


. Soi-fl hero Rogars' formal wear (1)


. Brit Bh welfare intention (1)


4. Actor Brad's BBq skewer (1)


I II I I 1U il I


I I I I I . . . . ..'k'
S, More drenched cardSpan or V,-neck 12)


6. Increases the number of little stones by
I I I 1 1 i t1i i- 1. i1


Every anisworls a rhyming
pall ofwords (Ilke FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
they will fit In the letter
squaresl The number after' he
definition tells you how many
syllables In oah word, To winl
$10, send yor' original rhymes
with your definitions to this
newspaper, All entries become
the property of UFS, Inc.
@2009 Uniled Feature Syndicalo, In0,
Thanks and $10 to
Anil Finger of
) Melvlle, NY for #4,
~S' endyour entry to
thil newspaper,


7, More modest discontented mutterer (2)


HIEM IIi I I fH SHIEWd S I 519 I 8 HI lMS HHI11UM ' 9
SIdS SuAId T' WIVODO a' 't' XI SIDfa1 ' 10H 0D0 'I
5-9-09 SlHMSNVV


rarely used, was In RV,
$75.
Hover Upright
$35.
(352) 726-1296
SLENDERTONE
FLEXMAX Abdominal
toner. $30.00 352 560
3677
SMALL LAMP AND
DOLL SMALL LAMP
10.00 DOLL 9.00 352
382 1191�
Stand Alone Filing
Cabinet Lt. oak. $60.
Exceutive Chair
Leather, like new. $95.
Cost $200: Both in exc.
cond.(352) 249-6800
TIRES
4 LT275/70R 18.
Load Range E. $250.
Obo.(352) 212-8997
VHS MOVIES
50 Tapes -$25
Cassette Music 50 tapes
$20. 352-489-3931
White wood kitchen
cabinet, free standing,
w/microwave shelf. $45..
(352) 249-6800
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT








$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
*ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com



JAZZY 1100
$850.
352-220-3983
POWER WHEEL CHAIR
bran new only used 2
times $500.00or b.o.
(352) ,2490815
-' RASCAL SCOOTER
" $250.
352-726-0891
SCOOTER LIFTS
& POWER CHAIR LIFTS
$500 & up
(352) $564-1414



Buying Silver Coins
$,10, ,25, .50, $1.00
IPre-1965s,
362-.302-815S9
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-.776
ENGLISH CARTWHEEL
PENNIES Dated 1797
and In good condition
$50.00 each 352 560
3677
ENGLISH SILVER AND
COPPER COINS King
George 3rd onwards.
From $50.00 352 560
3677



CLARINET
and Electronic
Metronome both for
$125. (352) 837-2193
LOWREY ORGAN
Exc. condition, manual
bench AOC Rhythm,
MUST SELL Asking $300
obo (352) 628-5186
Wurlltzer Piano
Console, Pecan finish,
matching bench, very
nice, $898.00
(352) 212-2718



CEILING LAMP &
YOUTH BED antique trim
hanging lamp - $45.00 &
Cinderella youth bed -
$35,.00 352-422-1467
MR COFFEE MULTI
PRO.GRAMER COFFEE
MAKER Hardly used.
Perfect condition $20
(352) 560-3677
ROOSTER KITCHEN
STUFF
marstashcan,gaessrooserand
more. $50,00



BOWFLEX EXTREME
w/leg attachment $480
Exc. cond. U-haul.
352-341-1650 Call 9a-7p
TREADMILL Smooth Fit-
ness model 5,25
$200(orlg
$801)352-419-4302



4 SALE. GUNS & AMMO
AR-lBs - AK-47's - Shot
Guns * Pistols. wAu(.
BOLA 382*489-4870
AMMO 223 FMJ Brass
oase, new production,
800 rounds w/ammo
can *3001 38 SpecIal FMJ
Winchester 100 rounds
*70(813) 789-0892Cystal
River Area
AMMO 800 rounds
762 x 39 brass case,
(813) 789,0892 Crystal
River area
AMMO 9mm FMJ
Winchester 800 rounds
$2801 40 CAL PMJ
WInflahstelr 300 rounds
2008 (813) 789-0892
In Crystal RIver Area,


Rea weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CART SEAT Club
Car,Beige
Excel. Condit. $25
Phone 527-6425
GUN ACCESSORIES
& Magazines, AK-47 $30;
AR-15 $25; M-14 $30. Call
for pricing (813)
789-0592
In Crystal River area.
GUN SHOW
Sat. May 9 * 9-5
Sun. May 10 * 9-4
Crystal River Armory
Hwy 19 & Veneable
www.GunTraderGun
Shows.com
HUFFY 10-SPEED 26" Girls
Bicycle $75; Brand new
24" Girls Roadmaster 18
speed. $75 (352)
601-3654
MARLIN 1895
CENTURY LIMITED
45/70 caliber, 125th An-
niversary Model, NIB.
$1200. Call after 5pm
352-489-4172
Mossberg/Maverick 88
Home defence/18.5
barrel NIB pump
12 gauge $300
(352) 860-0556 8a-7p
PRIVATE COLLECTOR
Buying Guns,
Ammunition&
reloading supplies
(352) 586-7516
Quality Brand Name
Fishing Rods & Reels.
Shimano, Penn, Finn
Nor, etc. Spinning,
baitcasting, saltwater
& freshwater. Bargain
priced from $10.00 to
$85.00 (352) 634-0278
Recumbent Bike
Trail Mate Joy Rider.
3 Whepeled. $100.
(352) 382-5698
REMMINGTON 870
Tacticle 12 gage combo,
pistol grip, collapsible
stock, rifle slug barrel &
vent rib barrel. $600
(813) 789-0592 - Crystal
, River area
Shot Gun 10 gauge
Mag. 36" barrel, $200
38 Special Derringer
$150. both excel.
(352) 464-0926
SLATE POOL TABLE
7-1/2 FEET, & loaded w/
accessories Package
deal $750 obo.
(352) 270-8121,
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238



30FT ENCLOSED
TRAILER, 6th wheel hitch,
can be easily changed
to goose neck ball.
$6500 352-341-1143
CAR HAULER
'06, 32 Ft, Dominator XT.
By Classic C. Trpl.
axels. $14,800. Like
new.(352) 835-4273
UTILITY TRAILERS
7x16 (Factory) Dual
axle. $9856
4x8 -2ft sides - $350
362-464-0316



EVENFLO PORTABLE
PLAYARD Great cond 1
owner baby changer and
mobile Included. $50.00
352-422-1453

KIRA BY GRACO FULL
COLLECTION
Stroller, carseat, swing,
playpen, hlghchalr,'new
condition, Cost $800
All for $300 601-2232




PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY AT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chroniclaonline.com
and click place
an ad:



RIDING LAWN
MOWERS
zero turn, Die or Alive
Will pay cash 746-7357



ALL BREED RESCUE
Now available; Westle,
Schnauzer, Shlhtzu,
Maltese mix,
352-583-2604
BOXER PUPPIES 9
WEEKS OLD NO
PAPERS PARENTS ON
PREM. HEALTH CERTS.
$300 352-564-0710 OR
423.967-4566
BOXER PUPS AKC
CERTIFIABLE 9wks
$350 M/D on premises.
(362)344-3138
CHIHUAHUAS
AKC -9wks- Gorgeous,
healthy babies for adult
homes. $450
352-637-1111
' CHIHUAHUA'S I have
6 puppies available,
They are de-wormed
and have their first
shots. $280 asking
rice352228.3442
FREE KITTENS
8 wke old
(352) 621-9218
GERMAN SHEPARD
AKC rag, Male, 4mths
old, Housebroken, well
mannered, crate
trained. 382-249-7266


Puppies, 21 Wks. 2
males, 2 fems.,1 is blue
all the rest black & tan.
papers, & health carts.
$300.(352) 201-0111
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
LARGE DOG CAGE
36x24x22. Like new.
Cost $90, sell for $55.
352-503-7053
LONG HAIR CHIHUAHUA
Female Puppy 8wks old
$250 (352) 476-6393
Male Peek A Poo
1 yr. old neutered,
Micro chipped, all shots.
$300.
(352) 503-6218
MINIATURE SCHNAU-
ZERS For sale pure bred
miniature Schnauzers
puppies, spit & pepper
mix, 2 males $375 each.
352-795-7470
PITBULL.PUPPIES
Thick headed Colby,
mild, Intelligenetics.
Reg., 8 Pups available
Simply the Best
$200. (352) 621-0268
PUGGLE PUPS
(pug/beagle); Sheltie,
Papillon & maltepoo
pups $375-$450
(352)216-1481
Pure Bred Collies
1 yr. old
Can be breed, both
sold together
S$395. ob
(352) 795-7513
Shlh-Tzu Puppies
Home raised w/ love.
All shots Includ'd. $300+
3902 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827
(305) 872-8099
Yorkie Male Pup
6 weeks, taking deposits
ready in 2 weeks
(352)'628-6914



2 Arabian Studs
1 Is registered. 1 Older
Tennessee Walker,
great w/kids & riding. All
under $700. each.
(352) 563-9985
HORSE BOARDING
Pine Ridge Property
Owners. Outstanding
facility, good pastures,
12x12 stalls w/12x12
runout. (352) 527-9530
Summer Horse
Camp
(352) 382-5400
www.rymarranch.com



BABY GOATS SHEEPs
& Pigeons
For ners onlv.
Mini Farm off 495
' (863) 843-2495 cell
Chickens,production
Red's, polish purebred
bantans, different types
of duckling, quail, guinea
pigs & pigeons $4/up
795-6381/476-331%a "


CINNAMON RIDGE
Wanted responsible
tenant. Remodel 2/2
Must Sela $75
352-796-8963
CRYSTAL RIVER
Remodel 2/1,$500 (352)
220-3147/1697-1891
HERNANDO
S2/1 Cornerlot. $300.
Mo.(863) 968-0698
HOMOSASSA"
1& 2Br furn&Unfurn,
1 br. RV $300 mo,
No Pets Call 628-4441
HOMOSASSA
1/1 1st/last/sec. $375mo
382-634-2368
HOMOSASSA
1/1 No/smoke/pets. Fst.
Lst./Sec. Elec. & H20 Incl.
$450. Mo. (352)628-0545
(352) 212-0888
HOMOSASSA
2/2 Furn. Great area.
352-746-0524
HWY 488
Large 2/2, fenced, car-
port, scrn. par, $550 mo
No Pets 352-795-6970
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+. Park,
2BR, 1-'/aBA, $426.
1 BR,1 BA, $350 Incl,
water 352-476-4964
LECANTO
2/1, $535/MO
HOMOSASSA
2/1 $550.
Call 352- 464-3159
COUNTRY
SETTING
2/2 in Country Setting,
$500/mo, + $500 Sec.
No. pats. For application
Call Lee at 362-314-6092
or 800 -692.4162.
LECANTO/HOMO.
2BR $426. mo, + sec.
28R $450, mo + see,
2BR $475, mo. + sec.
DON CRIGGER
REAL ESTATE
(362) 746-4056,
(362) 746-0062 Eve,




BANK
FORECLOSURES
(362)621-9181
For Sale or Rent 2 bed/2
bath In Singing Forest
MHP Floral City, + .
parkDW, on nomer lot
$860 a mo.Inhelslot rent
382-637-2854 after 8pm


655 Wotorfront Pork,
1IR, woter Inhl, A/C
43,500 * $270 me, lot
rent, 3852-476-4964
INVERNRIB/ MOS8Y
OAK PARK, + COMM,
211 Carport/Wmn'd poroh,
CHAurn,, Wah./dryor,
New oleotfisl wirfing,
Close to downtown,
110,000.,(32) 837-3438
Palm Harbor 3/2
8lnglewlde
Introductory Model
$299/mo woo, 10
models to choos4 from
On Your Lot
Call 1-800=622-2832
I I-1-__ B


8018W Oaklawn 2/2,91,
14x865 fixer, 1,25 acres,
$37,900, www.zlllow.com,
813-695-0890 or
352-382-1002
Homosassa
S BANK
FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181
CRYSTAL RIVER
2br 2ba sw on 1/2 acre
new carpet & stove.
very clean.alum roof
over.10x14 work-
shop.$35000 cash or
offer 813-792-1355
CRYSTAL RIVER
5 Acres + 1600 sq ft.,
'99, Doublewide
fenced, paved road
352-212-8794
Floral City
2/2 DW on 3.5 + or-
acres. Withlacoochee
Forest area great for
horse riding.Priced to
sell. (352) 341-6281
(352) 634-0787
(352) 634-1290.
HERNANDO
Neat & clean 2/1,14
Wide. Carport & covered
area. 12 X 36 scrn'd
porch. Ready to move in.
Parsley Real Estate I.nc.
$48,500 Carl
Gareth Roulllard.
(352) 422-5731
HOME-N-LAND
New Home 3/2
10 Yr. Warranty
Sacrificel $3,000
down $676.43/mo.
Call to Qually
352-621-3807
Receive'$8,000 -
Cash Back

New 2009
2 bed, 2 bath, large
rms. appliance pkg.
2x6 construction,
10 yr. warranty. Must
Seel $39,900 Includes:
A/C, steps, skirting.
Call for more details
352-621-9182.

NEW JACOBSEN
TRIPLE WIDE
High end home on
2 12 Acres, 2150 sq ft,
3/2, glamour kitchen,
'marble In bathroom,'
appliance pkg. �
Must Sell $179,900
or $787/mo. Call
(352) 621-9181
Recelye $8,000
Cash Back.


55+, Nice, 2 BR, 1 Bath,
corpor' :crear, porcl,
fuin C'...ner lironce
$8,500 @ $150 m. + lot
rent or discount for
cash, (352) 726-9369
Crystal River
Suncoast M. H. P.
2/2+ addition, fully furn.
wsh./dry, Incl. CHA.
storage shed. $11,500
firm.) (603) 486-2412
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE 55 + comm. 3/2
with a lovely view of the
Lake. Call The C.R.
Village office $75K abo
352-795-7161
FLORAL CITY
14x56, 2/1, renovated,
new CHA, carport,
screen room, work
shed, hot tub, 5S+, Lot
rent $166, only $13,600
(352) 860-1796
FOREST VIEW ESTATES
Great Loc. Pools, clbhs.
& more, Move-In ready,
comp, furn. 2/2 DW,
wheelchair acc,., shed
& sprinkler, New heat
.pump. $39,900
563-6428/563-1297
Furn. 6 mos. lot rent w/
full price offer, 3/2
Encl. tiled lanal, dbl
carport,'tape &
textured throughout,
Kathy (352) 228-7991
Homosassa
55+ Park
22"92
Jacobson,52 X
26.Many
upgrades.
Heated pool.
$39,500
(352) 382-0795
Stone Ridge Landing
Inverness, Must Step
Inside. 2/2 DW. Furn.
New roof, barber.
$39,900.(352) 613-2767
Walden Woods
65+ Upscale comm,
28 x 56, upgrades &
decorator touch, 3/2/2
Carport, scrn & encl.
lanal, 6-mo, Free Rent
w/ full price. Must Seel'
(352) 503-5164
(352) 228-7991
WEST WIND VILL 55+
(2) NEW 2005's 2/2
BaelowcstI Carport,
shed, scr prch, furn'd,
pet ok. Resales avail.
352.6282090Q





__,__ l:-I
JR lst, aw. e.
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT

2/2/ - $650
Hernando
2/2 CondO-$650
Invernes
3/2/1 - $750
2/2/I - $675
2/I/cirpod - $600
2/2/1- $675
2/1, Townhouse $550
2/1 Apartment $800
10x20 $-84,80 per
month, $50 deposit
See our webstfe:
wwwlwmotonreail
estate.com
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Sctugg
382-726-9010


I


*- "
* 1 &2
BEDROOM UNITS
CANDELWOOD
COURT
I Inverness
' 'CALL 344-10101
TU, TH, FRI.
8-12 & 1-5
NO PETS
HUD VOUCHERS
ACCEPTED
Equal Housing
S Opportunity
-;----,E


BEDROOM UNITS
* MOVE IN SPECIAL
MUST MOVE IN BY
KNOLLWOOD
Inverness
IB/R SEC DEP. $150
1B/R Ist MO $150
2B/R SEC DEP. $200.
2B/R IST MO $200.
CALL 344-1010
TU, TH, FRI.
8-12 & 1-5 NO PETS
HUD VOUCHERS
ACCEPTED
Equal Housing
Opportunity

1 &2
BEDROOMS
Starting at

352-257-8048

INGLIS VILLAS
Is now accepting
applications for our
1,2,3 BR Apts.
Located 10 minutes
', North of Crys. Riv.'
Rental Asst,. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
SOr Apply: M,W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglls Florida
' Equal Housing
Opportunir

INVERNESS
2/1 Buplex $525;
2/1 hd ne $550, f/ll/s
(382) 422-2393
' INVERNESS
1/1 near Publx, 55+
$450 mo. Call Karen
Morton (362) 344-0156
INVERNESS
2/1Trl-plex, Great Loc,
clean & roomy. No
smoke/no pets $600
Mo. Fst/Lst/Sec.
352.341-1847
INVERNESS 3/212
$1000/mo pets ok apple
lnfo@www.cdtruscounty
sales.com

INVERNESS
Great Neigh. 2/1 W/D
'- Hkup, Icd's water,
trash, lawn, $650, mo,
+sec, (352) 634-8499
LECANTO
I BR (352)746-5238
613-6Q00/613-5974
ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2
dpix, all ktohn appli, pa-
tio, W/D hook-up, nice
yard, Exc. Cond. $625
(352) 634-1341
Plnewood Villas
Is now Accepting
applications for our
1,2, 3 BR Apts.
Located In Bronson
Rental Asst. Avail,
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 362-486-2612
Or Apply Tues & Thur
7291 NE 92nd Ct. #17,
Bronson, Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity




INVERNESS
2/1- $600; 2/2- Irg scrn
prch, quiet. $600, W/D
hk-ups, 727-446-8871
727-688-7866,





-1Act NOWI
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY AT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronlclaonllnn.com
and click place
an aa
We Hove Rentals
Starting at 428/mo +
Many others
LANM ARK
REALTY
352-726-9136
Kathy or Jane
311 W Maln t81 Inv


CiTRU, COUNTY (FL) CHRONI/CG


CLASSIFiMDs




aI furn' DW $700



St441 U $I 1400 9
RENTALS




3/2/2 Pool/pool maint
188W ieSoyma St
966 N, Paru St Way

838 W.Miaesahusette
St, $1400
3/2/2 Pool/pool main
27NowYork Blvd
$800
188 W, Seymerla St
42 S, Monroe St $600
14 Plaza St. $600
HEDICK GROUP
REALTY
352-422-2522
hedlckgroup.net




r BEVERLY HILLS
All util + TV hookup
SIncluded $475.
352-228-2644

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1BR, boat dock, refr.
stove, wlW&D, cbl. TV
air, util. Inc. $700. mo. +
sec, 352-628-6537

RENTALS AVAIL.
FROM $585.
(352) 795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investment LLC
Kim~n~E


CITRUS HILLS
Home, Villa, Condo
GREENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-5921
S(888) 446-5921
greenbriarrental.com





FREE RENT!
SUMMERHILL .
AT
MEADOWCREST
Luxury Condos
Limited Timel
Call agent for
details.
352-563-5657
/ out zoomcitrus.com

INVERNESS
2/2..5 Townhs., Cypress *
Cove, tile. Pets. New
Carpet $650 mo.,
352-220-8254
INVERNESS
Extra Irg. 2/2/1 Lakeside
Community, pool, dock,
no smoke, no pets. $665
mo. + sec. (866)637-2631
TOLL FREE
INVERNESS
Waterfront 2/2/2 Com-
munity Pool/Boat Ramp
All apple's $700. mo
352-400-0731
MEADOWCREST
Summerhill, 2/2 w/large
1 car garage, ground
floor, new, never lived
in, near shopping.
Reduced to $900..
Mo./unfum. $1200/furn.
(352) 746-9770
(352) 697-0375
Gloria Bonder P & R
Mid Florida Reality
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, Completely turn.
$850. mo. 352-746-4611


E. INVERNESS
1 BR Modern, energy
eff., cleqn, country
setting, C/H/A, $550.
352-726-1909

INVERNESS
1t1 w/scrnd prch. W/D
Near dwn twn.& lake
$495/mo. (352)274-1594
INVERN~SS
2/1 W/D, garb?/water
Incl,, fenced, pets ok
$650,mo, 1st,, last $300
sec. 352-746-4611
, Lecanto
Newer 2/2, dsh/Wsh.
W/dry, H20 Incl. No pets.
Lg.Yd. (352)628.2815
ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appls,
patlo, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond,
$626 (352) 634-1341



HIRNANDO
' ,Watson's Fish Camp
Qblet park like setting.
Effic., cabins,'
& mobiles. $350, to
$650 Mo. Pets. ok
(352) 726-2225
INVERNESS /ll
$450 mo. Incis all utils. +
cable. 352-270-8298









DUNNELLON
2/1 Rainbow Lakes Est,,
$650/mo. 239-438-8085
or 239-455-8858

HOMOSASSA
Large 2/2/2, nice yard
$850 mo.
561-469-6247


















SUNSET VILLAS
Senior Community
Chlefland FI,.
Accepting
Applications for
1 & 2 BR APTS
Please Apply
M, W, F, 8am-12p
124 SW 14th Ave.
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.



Citrus HIIIs'
Townhouse 2/2%I1.
Terra Vista Club incl,
$1,000 Mo + util.
(816) 001-5747


HERNANDO
ALESCI'8
CORNER PLAZA
HWY. 468
OFFICE/RETAIL
1000 Q., FT,
INCLUDE COMMON
AREA
MAINTAINENCE,
WATER, WASTE
GARBAGEI &
SIGNAGE. ONLY
$780,MO, + SALES
TAX,$796, TOTAL, NO
SEC,, NO LAST MO,
RENT, FIRST MO,
RENT ONLY, ALSO
1,194SQ, FT., 1,250
SQ, FT, & 2,000 SQ,
FT, AVAILABLE,
(352) 447-1244
OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv,
352-726-8507
PINE RIDGE
1000 sqft unit, (currently
beauty salon).
352-527-9013


Call Dan at:
(813) 716-5605

CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/2 Lg. master
suite, granite, stainless
steel apple. Large lanai.
Lease, + Dep. No pets,
$950.Mo.(352)697-3133
CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 3/2/2 , Near Sch.
$875. mo 352-628-0731
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 3/2/2, Pool
Home 3,300 sf, Fam.
Rm. w/ FP Form Din.,
Liv. Rm., office, new
roof, fence. yd. Lease
opt $1,395 mo.
(352) 489-9239

CRYSTAL RIVER
Rent or Rent to Own
3/2 & Large Fam. Rm.
Tiled and carpeted
throughout, spotless
Newly Remodeled
$750. mo.
352-527-0493
352-427-7644

FLORAL CITY
Beautiful 4/2 On 1.2 ac.
Nice area 1,900 Sq. Ft.
Off CR 439, new carp.
appl. AC & landscape.
$825. Mo.(813) 949-6205
(813) 505-0894
HERNANDO
2/2/1, Florida Room
Completely remodeled
(352) 796-0711
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550/mo, 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
2/2/1 fenc'd yd, large
deck, great location.
$650+sec. 352-628-2384
HOMOSASSA
2/2/2 SMW $650up
3/2/2 Meadows $675up
River Links Realty
352-628-1616
HOMOSASSA
2/2/2+, pool, $650 mo.
let & last. (352)787-8925
HOMOSASSA
4/2, newer, acre lot.
$875 mo., Immed.
occupancy, Ref. Req.
352-628-3543 or
305-804-6168

Homosassa SMW
2/2/1 & carport, screen
back porch, private
wooded area , Newly
painted, carpet & tile
Unfurn. $700. No Pets
No smokers
(352) 650-5986
HOMOSASSA
SMW, 3/2/2, w/ FP
W/D, eat In kit, din. rm.
llv rm. laital, mas, suite,
prlv. yrd. Immed, oc-
cup. w/ opt. $825 mo/
352-726-7543/201-0991
INV. Highlands 2/2
VERY Nice $750/mo +
352-726-7486/726-5588
, INV. WATERFRONT
2/2/2 -$750 mo. Appl./
carpet. 352-464-0316
INVERNESS
3/2/1, FIL/S $800 mo.
(352) 726-7692
INVERNESS 3/2/2
$1000/mo pets ok appIs
Info@www.citruscounty
sales.com
Inverness Highlands
area ,Beautiful, 3/2,
LeaseOat .Flexible
Financing Imm. Occ
352-795-0068
INVERNESS
Waterfront Townhouse
2/2-%, with 3 decks &
balconies, private
community pool, very
quick access to Lake
Henderson, less than
3 rin. drive to
downtown Inv. &
access to Rails to
. Trails.
$700 mo + sec. dep.
(352) 817-3185 appt
PINE RIDGE
3/21/o/2, Screen Pool
$310 Yuma $1100/mo
(352) 302-6025


3I2/2 Waterfront Furn,
8 rm, hous� on Lake
Ru�so, boot ramp &
private do k, 1,200 Mo
RV. sight also avAil,
$390.Moa(B60) se6.4105
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lovely, Spaeious 3/2/1,
includes all utilities
$1300/mo,3582 0 01140
INVERNESS
2/1/1 1550 PET OK
18T/SEC(3S2)422-20_5



BEVERLY HILLS 2/1
$700 monthly,
382-746-0330
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2 + Bonus Room
$750 mo,(382) 212-8894
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2, near school, li-
brary, nice Street, W/D,
very clean, nice yard,
$775. w/ opt, Immed.
Occup. (352) 726-7543
BEVERLY HILLS
Nice 21/11, Fl. rm, $695.
E-Z Termsl 400-4275
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/1, $825. mo. $1000
sec: 352-746-9436
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2- 1995sqft.
$850/mth 352-522-0235
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, 2007 HOME,
$900 mo. (352)
601-0818
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, Fenced Yard.
$800. Mo. FstJ./Sec.
118 W. Frisco Lane
(352) 560-0229
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1 Carport/fenced
yard. $500. Mo.
Fst./Sec.
31 E. Lemon St.
(352) 560-0229
Citrus Springs
4/2/2, New, Split Plan,
Cath.cellings,2,150sq.
ft.$900.Mo.352-697-1820
CITRUS SPRINGS
Lovely modern '04,
4/2/2 built by
Mercedes Homes.
This 2600 Sq. ft. home
on large corner lot.
Large patio, fenced
back yard, sprinkler sys
Near Great Schools,
Churches, Parks, &
Shopping. Located at
8249 N. Triana Drive.

Want to Rent?
12 Mo. lease, $1,200
Mo.$'1,000 Sec.
deposit.
Want to Buy?
$8K Dwn./$925. Mo.
$5K Dwn./$1,000. Mo.
$3K Dwn./$1,100 Mo.


Hernando
3bed 2bath w/ 24ftx36ft
two story barn, fenced
pastures,and open pas-
ture. house is not a mo-
bile tiled baths,kitchen,
andlaundry,large cov-
ered porch,nice front
wood deck.will lease
part,or all.pdssible.
sale,no realtors
please,property on
30+,- acres, for
infopics 352-270-3292




CRYSTAL RIVER
Share Condo w/own
S.priv. rm & Bth quiet &
nice neighbors .Full kit.
prlv & pool $100/wk
(352) 795-7263
HOMOSASSA
Adult Mobile Home Park
Non-smoker, Term Neg.
352-621-3588
HOMOSASSA
Country Setting.
Furnished, kitchen
privileges, washer,
cable TV, & utilities
Included. Large yard.
$90.Wk.(352)628. 5244




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 furn. pool home.
$1,000. 2/1 forn. $900.
(352) 746-9770
(352) 697-0375
Gloria Bonner, P & R
Mid Florida Reality



OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv,
.352-726-5507




AGENT ADs

Advertise your
Services for
30 days for
only$54.50

Ad includes 20 lines of copy
w/ photo.

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper Is
subject to Fair
Housing Act which
makes it Illegal to
advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an Intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
discrimination.
SFamilial status
Includes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing
custody of children
under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is In
violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on aen equal
opportunity basis,
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired Is
1-800-927-9275,


'n,.


RENTALS AVAIL,

harloette Realty
.6 Inveitmnt LLC
SASSER OAKS
2/2/1, all appl, fenced
yard, shea, lanal, NO
EMOKE NO PETS $650 me
(382) 628-7449
SOUTHERN WOODS
4/3/2 Luxury exeoutllve
home on golf eoume,
great views, *1,300/Mo.
(013) 300-7100
Sugar MIll Woods
3/2/2 2000 sq ft, plus
large iscreend anal, no
smokIng $750 me + until,
(861) 674-8083

SUGARMILL Woods
2 Masters /2/2 (large)
Screen lanal, oversized
gar, new appl. & A/C
$850 mo.
(352)302-4057



CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2, newly remodeled
fenced , priv. dock gulf
access $1200/mo F/L Pet
dep. w/Purchase Option
(352) 746-3613
CRYSTAL RIVER
Adorable furnished
waterfront
2BR/Boatslip, Lanai
Avail May 1st, Pets?
352-220-6593
CYRSTAL RIVER
Unfurn, 3/2/2 $1050
River Links Really
352-628-1616
INVERNESS 2/2
Lake Pocono, 2 story, %
ac lot, 60ft dock.
Tile/wood floors. $750
352-362-3435

INVERNESS
3/2% Villa
Tile, Washer & Dryer
Scrn'd. Pch. on Lake
Tsalsa Apopka.
Community pool, tennis
& dock. $900. Mo.
352-812-3213

POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - Waterfront
homes, Wkly priv. rms,
RV lots. 352-628-0011

IMMACULATE
WATERFRONT 10591
W Lenz Ln,Homosassa
2/2/1
Adorable,spaceousopen floor
plan, ground
level block home. Lg
corner lot,
863-944-7295 email
MICHELLESTAG@
gmall.com


Rent or Sal


FOR SAlE BY OWNERi
8 SJ Kolner, Bev. HillsA .
2/2%/1, PP, OPEN
HOUSBon SUNDAY
11A.30 $t18K firm
Call toBeo, 746-68093


LJ


I


Lak@froit 7 Aoreg, Pe-
ral City Lake Tsala
Apopka 2 dwellings 2
hes see@a
pleturog/detail�
floraloitylalefront,oom
ekyetravBrtfallt.net



a ur It


Lia,# CBSC se


Home loans


100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
'Low Income applicants
can quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or No credit
OKAY
*recent bankruptcy " .
OKAY* * .
CAll TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
'Credit and income
restriction apply*
Florida licensed mort-
gage lender



"gPI'L RruqTY,




HERNANDO --
ALESCIrS
CORNER PLAZA '
HWY. 486 ' . .
OFFICEIRETAIL -
1000, SQ. FT.
INCLUDES COMMON
AREA
MAINTENANCE,
WATER, WASTE,
GARBAGE &
SIGNAGE. ONLY
$750.MO. + SALES , "
TAX. $795. TOTAL. NO,
SEC., NO LAST MO.
RENT. FIRST MO. -. .
RENT ONLY. ALSO
1,194 SQ. FT., 1,250
SQ. FT. & 2,000 SQ.
FT. AVAILABLE.
(352) 447-1244



3/2/2 For Sale or Rent
Citrus Springs Newer .
Home , ow/dn, easy
terms 352-361-6551
ATTENTIONII
BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
$39,900. Delivered
and Set, $0-Down
Land/Home $650. mo. " -
Repos Available .
Kinder
Mobile Home
(352) 622-2460
By Owner
3/2/2, Built 2005, like
new. Lease to Own-
Option 352-302-0810 .



All appliances, includes'-
several locations to
choose from. $159,900
Citrus Ridge Realty
352-465-3000
THE MERLE MODEL
3/2/2 - FHA approved . .
with 2/10 warranty. -,
Builder will pay $5000 of'
buyers closing costs, .
$129,900. Citrus Ridge
Realty. 352-466-3000 I



BROOKHAVEN MODEL.
3/21/2/3 nearly 3000 sqft,
Volume ceilings
Corlan top/sinks
Lots of upgrades
Summerwind Homes
Inc. 352-527-8035 -
COUNTRY HOME ".
4/3/2 Fabulous home .
' on 2 landscaped ac-
res. Hardwood & tile.
Huge caged pool,
25x14 pool, spa w/ wa-
terfall & outdoor bar.
40x60-workshop/RV
garage w/12' ceilings,,
9000b lift and office.
$499,900. Middleton
Sunshine Properties
352-476-2871
Don Mercado Model .
'4/3/3 Grand column en-
try, spacious kitchen, ex-
quisite master suite with '
award winning master
bath. Base price
$214,900
Dream Custom Homes'.
of Citrus. 352.527-7171:
RealtySelect
Citrus.com .










BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION



(352) 795-1555
THE OAKWOOD MODEL
3/2/2 -Open floor plan
w/formal living & family,'
room, den and spec-
tacular master bath.
Sweetwater Homes of .
CIfrus, Inc. . . . .
352-382-4M ." '



MOVE IN TibN
Forest Ridge ctea 2/1/, ". .
CHARLOTTE 4 REALTY
CALL BONNIE 0
352-8866921
FOR SALE 't OWNER i
13 Donro Street
2/1141200apo/t, - -
16x20 fam bom, 12x16 ,.
workshop, 8x 10 shed,
Fenoedyd. OPEN " "
HOUSE SNDAY'S 1-3
$97k. 3.-527.s848