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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01628
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 3, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01628

Full Text





Kentucky Derby: Mine That


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LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORYl320/I2
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GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


tory/B1


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TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Highs in the 80s with
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61 PAGE A4


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Newspaper Serving F orida's Best Community $1


VOLUME 114 ISSUE 269


Permits hit record low -


telling me they want to buy by
Dec. 1 to get the tax credit."
First-time buyers are not the
only customers.
"Many investors are buying up
foreclosures again and putting
them back on the market as
rentals," Haag said.
Of the 138 houses sold, Haag
said that eight were short sales
and 11 were foreclosures.
"Short sales take an average of
45 to 90 days to close," Haag said.
"But foreclosures are owned by the
bank and can close as soon as the
titles can be pulled, as little as five
days. That's not much of a wait"
Haag said banks are more
agreeable now to financing the
modestly priced houses.
"It's hard to get jumbo loans
now," Haag said. "The million-
dollar house sold for cash."
New construction is still down,
according to figures for permit


* The latest county statistics for
building permit applications
during the month of April
show only 10 applications
were made to build single-
family homes. Previously, the
lowest number in this cate-
gory for a month was 12.
Applications in this category
numbered 35 in April 2008;
in April 2007, it was 79.

applications released by the
county's building division.
During the first quarter, permit
applications for residential sin-,
gle-family dwellings sunk to the
previous lowest rate of 12, a
record set in November, for the
months of January and February.
For March, the number rose to 18
permit applications. One year
ago, the numbers were in the 30s.
Residential addition applica-


. CHRIS VAN ORMER
cvanormer
@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
''Low interest rates and a tax
credit are helping real estate
agents sell houses in Citrus County.
"We've been very busy," said
Melonie Haag, president of the Re-
altors Association of Citrus County.
"I've had one listing I've shown
eight times last week, and our
phones are ringing more. A lot of
people want to use the tax credit,
and interest rates are at 5 percent"
Statistics from the association
show that 138 existing single-fam-
i ly homes and 13 condominiums
Were sold in the month of March.
Ilealtors have 2,506 active listings
-fpr single-family homes, of which


about 10 percent are listed with
the asking price of $500,000 or
more. The median price of a
house that sold in March was
about $120,000.
"That's down a little bit from
the previous month, when it was
$120,000," Haag said. "But keep in
mind that we had a million-dollar
sale that bumped it up a bit"
In February, one house was sold
in the $1 million-price range. But
in March no houses with the ask-
ing price of $500,000 or more were
sold. The most of the 138 houses
sold, 19 houses, were in the
$100,000 to $119,999 range. Mod-
estly priced three bedroom
houses seemed to lead the market
"It looks like the majority of the
houses sold were to first-time
buyers," Haag said. "People are


again
tions did show some fluctuation. In
January, there were 74, in Febru-
ary there were 113 and in March
there were 88. Permit applications
for residential remodeling have
stayed fairly consistent in the past
months in the 50 to 70 range.
Permit applications for non-
residential new construction ta-
pered from seven to one to zero
for the first three months of 2009.
Although the figures for build-
ing permits for the first quarter of
2009 do not look good, they look
no worse than the figures of last
year, according to Randy Clark,
president of the Citrus County
Builders Association.
"I think we've hit bottom,"
Clark said. "There seems to be
more phone calls, generally, for
all types of construction. It's not
as quiet as it was. The more peo-
ple start looking around, the more
chance there is to get some work"


Ruffled feathers

A widower may have finally found lasting love. She's the same age.
They have similar life experiences. He dotes on her He fiercely protects her Could it be love?


She came back from a couple's vacation alone. Pushed away by her lover, she was distraught.
She called and called. He never answered. When she did see him he treated her with disdain,
disgust Brokenhearted she left. No one has seen her for weeks.


TED TRUE/Special to the Chronicle
Non-migratory whooping cranes Nos. 926 and 915 search for a meal in a low-lying area in Inverness. While many believe
the endangered birds mate for life, these two were involved in a love triangle documented by a Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission biologist.


This is a story of a lovers' spat involving
three whooping cranes that has played out
center stage in front of Inverness residents
and wildlife biologists.
CRISTY LOFTIS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
T hooping cranes are an endan-
gered species, with about 525 of
the birds in existence.
Named fortheir loud and penetrating uni-
son calls, whooping cranes live and breed in
wetland areas. They are distinctive animals,
standing 5 feet tall, with white bodies, black
wing tips and red crowns on their heads.
, Whoopers are the tallest flying birds in
North America.
; The endangered whooping crane once
regularly occurred in Florida. However,
habitat loss, hunting and egg collection
elminated most of the eastern population
of the birds by the 1920s.
See RUFFLED/Page A5


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Whooping crane No. 1646 begins spending time with sandhill cranes in
Inverness after her former mate, No. 926, took up with a new bird and
pushed her away. Now, No. 1646 has not been seen since the end of March.


TBARTA plan


links Citrus by


express bus route

MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Most people wouldn't recognize TBARTA if it
walked up and tapped them on the shoulder.
In the world of government acronyms, it doesn't
have the familiar ring of a DEP or FBI.
It doesn't tax anyone, levy a fee or charge admission.
But participants say the future of transportation
rests in its hands.
The Legislature created the Tampa Bay Area Re-
gional Transportation Authority two years ago. It
spans seven counties, from Citrus south to Sarasota.
It operates on $2 million that legislators allocated
at the start.
The idea is to create a medium- and long-range
transportation plan that connects these counties re-
gionally, allowing counties to pool financial resources
as leverage to receive federal money for projects.
Commissioner
� TBARTA is conducting a John Thrumston,
series of telephone meetings, who represents Cit-
called iTown Hall meetings. rus County on the
* The Citrus County meet- TBARTA board,
ing is 7 p.m. Thursday. says the regional
* The iTown Hall meetings approach is the
use a random sample of best way for'Citrus
40,000 residents who are called to improve itstrans-
and invited to participate. portation needs.
* Interested citizens wishing "Some people in
to participate may call toll-free this county feel
(877) 269-7289 and enter PIN TBARTAisgoingto
No. 14837 prior to each call. come in here and
* For more information take our money
and to view the master plan, south," he said.
visit www.tbarta.com. "That's just not
going to happen."
TBARTAs proposed mid- and long-term plans im-
pact Citrus County directly in just one way: express
bus service. The plan calls for an express bus route
connecting Citrus County to Hillsborough County
via the Suncoast Parkway.
Thrumston and Bob Clifford, executive director
of TBARTA, said the bus service could give Citrus
residents and an efficient and low-cost ride to the
Tampa International Airport, sporting events and
medical facilities.
The timetable and costs are uncertain. The long-
range plan for 2050 shows rail and rapid-transit systems
throughout Tampa Bay, but Clifford said the express bus
service to Citrus could be available in just a few years.
Because TBARTA is not a taxing authority, Citrus
County's participation depends on Citrus taxpayers
funding their share, Thrumston said.
Exactly how that could occur is uncertain, Thrum-
ston said. He said he believes Citrus County resi-
dents could, in time, support a sales-tax increase if
it combined with a reduction in the gasoline tax.
He said more is in line for Citrus than simply an
express bus service to Tampa. He said Citrus has al-
ready received state funding for local road projects
because of its participation in TBARTA.
Plus, he said that Citrus and Hernando counties
are considering combining their transit systems to
serve both counties.
"It's not cost effective for Citrus County to have its
own bus system and for Hernando County to have
its own bus system," Thrumston said.
Clifford said TBARTA's emphasis is on transporta-
tion links that provide options to building more roads.
"We don't have options or choices now," he said.
"The only way to get around is if you own a vehicle."
Thrumston agreed.
"It's about moving people," he said, "not cars."


Annie's Mailbox............A18
Crossword.................... 18
Editorial ........................C2
Entertainment................B6
Horoscope ................A17
Lottery Numbers............B4
Movies ......................A17
Qbituaries................. A6
together ...................A17


MOTHER'S DAY
* Chronicle reporter Keri
Lynn McHale needs
residents' help for
Mother's Day stories.
� E-mail kmchale@
chronicleonline.com,
or phone, 564-2922.


Sniffly souvenirs
The CDC finds that one-third of U.S. swine flu cases
were infected Americans returning from Mexico./A10

Daredevils Car and bike festival winds down./A3

Crunch time Legislature negotiates budget./A3
Wa in Iraq Two soldiers shot to death./A10


WANTED: CAMP INFO
* The Chronicle is compiling a list
of summer camps available for
children. E-mail Cristy Loftis, at
cloftis@chronicleonline.com with
dates, times, locations, activities,.
costs and requirements by May
5, or call her at 564-2925.
-i--.----------------


Tweet tussle
Idaho governor turns tables
on Twitter trickery./A9




6 I814 i7 20075 0o


Real estate showing a little action


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CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONIcLE


A2 s M 32009


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DYo d1havto travl far to get outstanding health care. :
Ini fact, youd'on't ee.ven have to leave your house.

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eh hd st e provide an array of services to our patients -
iiWho are unable to leave their homes. We are also a Medicare-certified home health agency with a

d edicated.staff, including registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, home health aides, physical
. ; therapists, occupational therapists and social workers. It's convenient. It's stress free.
WIMMX
An ld it's just another way we are striving to improve health of Citrus County rce,






For more information, please call 352-344-6425



CITRUS MEMORIAL


-- ----... . - At the Heart of Our Community

ww w. citrus-mh.comn
www.citrusmnh.corn


F82791


UNDAY, AY ,


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Page A3 -SUNDAY, MAY 3,2009



.TATE&


LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County
Straight Talk Medi-
cine to air Monday
Dr. Jeffery Kinnard, of Kin-
nard Chiropractic will be
launching a medical show
call "Straight Talk Medicine"
on WYKE TV, cable channel
16 starting Monday.
"Straight Talk Medicine"
will air three times every
week: 8 a.m. Monday; 8 p.m.
Tuesday; and 3 p.m. Thurs-
day.
The purpose of "Straight
Talk Medicine" is to educate
and inform members of our
community and surrounding
areas and encourage every-
one to become active partici-
pants in their own well being.
Every week Dr. Kinnard will
have a special guest to dis-
cuss various health related
issues.
If you would like more in-
formation on "Straight Talk
1Medicine" and upcoming
'guests, check out your local
newspaper or call Kathie
Henderson at 503-7091 for
more information. Upcoming
shows are also listed on the
'www.kinnardchiropractic.co
,m Web site.
Looking for retired
military chaplains
Armed Forces Day is May
16. We're looking for retired
military chaplains for a reli-
gion feature story about
serving God and country. E-
mail reporter Nancy
Kennedy at
nkennedy@chronicleonline.
com or call 564-2927.
Oakwood Village hosts
quarterly meeting
The Oakwood Village
Homeowners Association will
have its second quarterly
meeting starting at 1 p.m.,
Wednesday, at Central
Ridge Library.
The board, which has
been meeting with its attor-
ney, will be bringing forth
some news with regards to
foreclosures and Beverly
Hills Development Corp.
Please take notice that the
change of days has moved
the meeting to a Wednes-
day.
With the beginning of
spring, association officials.
hope all have noticed the
cleanup of our parks and
common properties and
hope all homeowners ad-
dress their properties ac-
cording to our deed
restrictions.
The president wants all
residents to know that this
meeting is of great impor-
tance to all homeowners liv-
ing in Oakwood Village and
urges all who possibly can to
attend this meeting.
Commemorative Elvis
T-shirts now for sale
A local group is working
with staff from the Old His-
toric Courthouse to com-
-memorate the 50-year
anniversary of the shooting
and airing of the Elvis film
"Follow That Dream," filmed
in Yankeetown and parts of
Citrus County.
As we approach that mile-
stone in Citrus County his-
tory, the creative core team
prepares for a commemora-
tive year of "Follow That
Dream-The King Retumrns." A
newly designed "The King
Returns" T-shirts are now for
sale in the Old Historic
-Courthouse Museum Store.
Proceeds to benefit the Old
Courthouse.
* Several events are being
planned to commemorate
the roughly one year's time
between 1961, when Elvis
filmed the movie, to its May
1962 premier in Ocala, in-
cluding a staged perform-
ance of "Follow That


Dream," an Elvis imperson-
ator contest and a celebra-
tion of Elvis' birthday.
For information about the
"Follow That Dream-The
King Returns" T-shirts, call
341-6488.


-From wire reports


Dr. Ride seeking more help


SHEMIR WILES
swiles@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
John Hessinger needs
volunteers.
As the program coordina-
tor for Dr. Ride, he said he
has seen his staff dramati-
cally shrink as snowbirds
head back up North and his
more mature drivers suffer
injuries that put them out
of commission.
Hessinger said he usually
has 60 drivers, but that has
been cut by 40 percent.
"If we want to keep the
wheels turning, we need
more help," Hessinger said.
Dr. Ride is a program that


provides rides to and from
medical appointments for
people 65 or older who
can't drive and who have no
one to take them. They also
provide rides for prescrip-
tion refills.
Hessinger said more and
more people are seeking
rides, but it's becoming
hard for his drivers to keep
up with the demand.
Though Hessinger said he
prefers to use a driver once
a week or even a few times
a month, he said some driv-
ers have had to double up
on rides.
"It's getting really haz-
ardous," he said.
Hessinger receives about
10 calls a day from people


NUMBERS NEEDED


* Five to six drivers
needed in Beverly Hills
* Five to six drivers
needed in Citrus Hills.
* Five drivers needed in
Crystal River.
* Five to ten drivers
needed in Hernando
* Six to eight drivers
needed in Horriosassa.
* Three to five drivers

who need assistance. In ad-
dition, he said the county
transit is fine, but it doesn't
reach those who live "off
the beaten path."
From May 2008 to May


needed in Inverness.
* Five to six drivers
needed in Lecanto.
* Six to eight drivers
needed in Pine Ridge.
* Five drivers needed in
Holder '
* Three drivers needed in
Floral City.
* Three drivers needed in
Walden Woods.

2009, the program has sup-
plied 1,800 rides for the eld-
erly who need the help.
Hessinger hopes the pro-
gram, which has been
around for about 13 years,


, Daredevil


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
"Cadillac Zack" Woodard and Gidget LeBanc perform Saturday for bikers and others attending the opening of
Love Motorsports and the new Love Honda grand opening along U.S.19 between Homosassa and Crystal River.
The stunt riders are part of the High Style Freestyle Team.

Events for inaugural festival end today

Chronicle I


Today is the final day
of the inaugural Ameri-
can Iron and Muscle
Weekend.

Car and
Bike show
Registration begins 7
a.m. for the judged car
and bike show at Crystal
Chevrolet and Eagle
Buick. The event opens
at 8. The car show is na-
tionally sanctioned.
The cars will be judged
by Corvette Fever maga-
zine and the bikes will be
judged by the Reverend
Jim of Full Throttle mag-
azine.
The award ceremony
will be at 2 p.m.
People can register for
the car and bike show in
advance at Harley-
Davidson or www.vette-
fest09.com.
There will also be a
2009 Limited Heroes edi-
tion Corvette 7R1 up for
raffle. The ticket price
has yet to be set.


"Cadillac Zack" appeared to pay little care to his well being while pushing the
limits of his equipment riding, pulling stunt after stunt for the pleasure of the
crowd.


Rock Concert
The gates open at noon
at Rock Crusher Canyon.
Headliners are 38 Spe-
cial and the Outlaws.
Other bands include Big


Engine, Bobby Friss and
the Ridge Runner Band.
The music begins at 12:45
p.m. and is expected to
end at about 10:30 p.m.
Tickets are $15 a per-
son or $25 for two. Pre-


mium seating tickets are
$20. Tickets available at
the door.
During the concert fam-
ilies with military mem-
bers serving overseas will
be honored.


will continue to offer the
much-needed service.
Hessinger wants to re-
cruit mature adults who are
55 or older to volunteer.
Volunteers are needed in
Homosassa, Inverness, Cit-
rus Springs, Lecanto, Bev-
erly Hills, Floral City,
Hernando, Crystal River,
Citrus Hills and Pine
Ridge. He also.hopes to re-
cruit some volunteers in
Holder, because Hessinger
said that lately he has
begun to receive a lot more
calls from people in that
area.
To volunteer, or to in-
quire about the program or
its service, call Hessinger
at 746-3796.


Budget


talks


continue


as issues


narrow

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE - Col-
lege students who get state
scholarships would be
spa red paying more for their
education under an agree-
ment lawmakers made in
budget talks Saturday.
The Legislature's top
budget negotiators began
meet ingto finish the last de-
tails of the spending plan for
the next fiscal year, which
starts July 1 and is expected
to be more than $65 billion.
Other lawmakers settled
most differences during the
past week. butthe hardest-
to-resolve issues remained-
Lawmakers agreed not to
cut the amount of Bright Fa-
tures scholarships, which
paid all or part of 160,000
Florida college students' tu-
ition last year. Lawmakers
had discussed saving the
state $7 million by reducing
the amount of the scholar-
ships by 1. percent They had
a I ready agreed that students
will have to pay an 8 percent
tuition increase.
In a series of meetings
throughout the day, the Sen-
ate's chief negotiator, JD
Aexa rider, exchanged offers
with House budget leaders
David Rivera and Marcelo
Llorente, both Miami Re-
publicans, but a number is-
sues remained' unresolved
Sat u rday afternoon.
"This is an interesting
process, as everybody
knows," Gov. Charlie Crist
said when he stopped at
the Capitol to check on the
talks early in the day.
"You're never really sure
what ends up in and what
ends up out until they fin-
ish and put it on the desk"
Lawmakers, for example,
were trying to restore
money for environmental
issues the governor has re-
peatedly pushed - Ever-
glades restoration and the
state's land conservation
program, Florida Forever.
Going into the weekend's
conference, Florida For-
ever money had been
stripped from the budget,
but the issue reappeared
Saturday The Senate pro-
posed spending $25 million
each on Florida Forever
and Everglades restora-
tion.
Negotiations also
brought up restoring
money to public libraries.
Earlier in the week, law-
makers cut more than $20
million in library money
the Florida Library Associ-
ation said would result in
some library branches clos-
ing.
Still outstanding are
agreements on sensitive is-
sues like whether commu-
nity colleges and
universities should be able
to use state money for
travel to Cuba and on stem
cell research. The biggest
issue, however, is expand-
ing gambling to raise
money for the state.









A4 SUNnAY, MAY 3, 2009 STAin/LOCAl. Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Immigrants push for reform at rallies


Associated Press

MIAMI - Immigrants
and their families gathered
at rallies across the coun-
try Friday to push for
changes to U.S. immigra-
tion policy, but as a swine
flu outbreak continued to
spread, attendance at some
events was smaller than or-
ganizers had hoped.
The area hardest hit by
the swine flu is Mexico,
also the native home of
many rally participants.
There were no immediate
reports of canceled events,
but Juan Pablo Chavez, a
Tampa-based community.
organizer for the Florida
Immigration Coalition,
said he and others were
monitoring the situation
and in close contact with
state health care officials.
"If they tell us to halt the
events, we will cancel im-
mediately. But for now, we
are simply asking people
who are sick not to come
out," Chavez said.
Organizers sought to
channel the political muscle
Hispanics flexed last fall for
Barack Obama into a new
cause: jump-starting stalled
efforts to forge a path to citi-
zenship for the estimated 12
million illegal immigrants
living in the United States.
They had hoped crowds
would equal or exceed
those of last year, which
was down from 2006 when
a stringent immigration bill
poised to pass in Congress
drew massive protests. But
early reports suggested
turnout would be far lower
than in previous years.
In Miami, more than 300
minority rights activists
joined with union officials
in one of the first local im-


Associated Press
Participants walk down South Jackson street Friday as an immigration protest/May
Day march takes shape winding through downtown Seattle.


migration rallies to be en-
dorsed by the AFL-CIO.
"We are not just here for
the immigrants, we are not
just here for the workers,"
said Maria Rodriguez, head
of the Florida Immigrant
Coalition. "We are here for
all the families who de-
serve a better life. Immi-
grants will not be pitted
against union workers -
our fates are intertwined."
The Miami marchers
gathered across from the
turquoise waters of Bis-
cayne Bay, waving signs for
immigration reform in
Spanish, English and Cre-.
ole. They also want tempo-
rary protection for the
state's large community of
Haitian immigrants, whose
native island has been dev-
astated in recent years by
hurricanes and floods.
"Wi Nou Kapab!" they
chanted in Creole, mean-
ing "Yes We Can."


Thousands were ex-
pected at events in Hous-
ton, Los Angeles,
Milwaukee, Denver,
Chicago, New York and
other cities - mostly in the
late afternoon, when work-
ers finished their shifts.
In Chicago, rally-goers
unfurled a banner of flags
stitched together from
countries across the globe.
Organizers said they ex-
pected about 15,000 at the
event, but the crowd ap-
peared to be much smaller.
Waukegan resident Ar-
mando Pena said he was
disappointed more people
didn't turn out and blamed
the low numbers on a com-
bination of the flu and
tough economic times.
A line of about 225
marchers made their way
down the main thorough-
fare in New Jersey's
largest city, Friday, stop-'
ping to recite chants and


gather for a vigil in front of
the federal immigration
building in Newark.
Thousands turned out in
Milwaukee and Madison,
Wis., despite a swine flu
threat that closed area
schools and forced the can-
cellation of weekend Cinco
de Mayo celebrations.
In New York City, partici-
pants gathered in Union
Square. Immigrant, labor
and faith communities also
gathered under a light driz-
zle at Madison Square Park.
One of the largest gath-
erings assembled outside
the White House. More
than 2,000 people rallied
there to call for change in
immigration policy
Graylan Hagler, the sen-
ior pastor at Plymouth
Congregational United
Church of Christ in north-
east Washington, encour-
aged the crowd to embrace
racial unity in the fight for


immigration reform.
Activists' hopes have been
buoyed by Obama's election
and a Democratic-controlled
Congress, in part because
they believe the Hispanic
vote, about two-thirds of
which went to Obama,
helped flip key battleground
states such as Colorado and
New Mexico. Many Hispan-
ics strongly back compre-
hensive immigration reform,
and they believe Obama
owes them for their support.
The White House an-
nounced this week that it
would refocus its resources
on prosecuting employers
who hire illegal immigrants.
And a Senate Judiciary sub-
committee took up immigra-
tion this week for the first
time in the new Congress.
But many immigrants are
wary. They say the immigra-
tions raids that grew com-
mon under the Bush
administration have contin-
ued since Obama took office.
On the West Coast, hun-
dreds of people gathered
under cold rain in San
Francisco's Dolores Park.
Students at the rally
called for passage of the
DREAM Act, which was
reintroduced in the Senate
in March. It would make
undocumented immigrants
brought into the U.S. under
the age of 15 eligible for in-
state tuition.
"Our future is here," said
Shayna Yang, 17, who
moved to the U.S. from In-
donesia five years ago to
join her father. She wants
to become an immigration'
lawyer. Without the
DREAM Act, her hopes for
college might be dashed.
'Allow us to show what we
can do if we are citizens of
the United States," she said.


For the RECORD

Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrests
* James Norman Ragsdale, 52,
401 E. Hartford Drive, Hemando, at
10:42 p.m. Friday, on a misdemeanor
charge of driving under the influence,
second offense. Bond $1,000.
* Heather Langston White, 38,
8980 W. Sue Lane, Crystal River, at
6:30 p.m. Friday, on an active Citrus
County warrant in reference to
charges of driving under the influ-
ence with damage to property or a
person and driving under the influ-
ence with serious bodily injury to an-
other. Bond $1,000.
Arrests
* Paul Steven Clark, 52, 10085
W. Riverwood Drive, Crystal River, at
12:34 p.m. Friday on an active Citrus
County warrant in reference to a pre-
vious charge of grand theft. Bond
$2,000.
* Reji Tyre Jamal Smith, 19,
9836 W. Arms Drive, Crystal River,
at 2:48 p.m. Friday, of a felony'
charge of possession of a controlled
substance and drug paraphernalia.
Bond $5,500.
* John Steve Gavalas, 21, 1214
S. Roxmere Road, Tampa, at 9:16
p.m. Friday, on misdemeanor
charges of possession of cannabis of
less than 20 grams and drug para-
phemalia. Bond $1,000.
* Carter Russell Anderson, 20,
4940 N. Melrose Ave., Tampa, at
9:16 p.m. Friday, on misdemeanor
charges of possession of cannabis of
less than 20 grams and drug para-
phernalia. Bond $1,000.
* William Raymond Becker, 40,
6188 W. Homosassa Trail, Ho-
mosassa, at 10:59 p.m. of a felony
charge of burglary of an occupied
residence and resisting and officer
without violence. Bond $5,500..
* Nalia Djourant Cleveland, 19,
700 Tompkins St., Inverness, at 3:54
p.m. Friday, on an outstanding, ac-
tive Lake County warrant, for viola-
tion of probation in reference to one
count of burglary, and violation of
probation in reference to one count
of grand theft. No bond.


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort.Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
.Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


89 63 0.00 87 61 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
r TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 89 Low: 61


MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low: 61
Sunny to partly cloudy

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low; 61
Sunny to partly cloudy with a 10% chance of a shower

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*.
Saturday 88/57
Record 96/47
Normal 85/62
Mean temp. 73
Departure from mean -1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.00 in.
Total for the year 4.78 in.
Normal for the year 13.49 in.
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9
high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.07 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 60
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 46%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees were moderate, grasses were light
'and weeds were absent.
"Light- only extreme allergic will show symptoms,
moderate - most allergic will experience symptoms,
heavy -all allergic will experience symptoms.
AIR QUALITY


Saturday was good with pollutant


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MI
(MORNING)
5/3 SUNDAY 1:43 7:54 2
5/4 MONDAY 2:25 8:36 2
i


MAY9
1ffi8


NOR MA
AFTERNOONI
2:06 8
2:48 8


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT........
( SUNRISE TOMORROW..
M Y I MOONRISE TODAY...
MAY 17 MAY 24 MA 80 MOONSET TODAY ...


nts mainly



JOR
N)
8:18
8:59


.8:07 P.M.
.6:47A.M.
.3:06 P.M.
.3:15 A.M.


- BURN CONDITIONS


Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. A burn ban is in effect.
For more information call Florida Division, of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flarrie.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending In 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 1:01 a/9:53 a 2:41 p/10:22 p
Crystal River" 1:02 p/7:15 a /7:44 p
Withlacoochee* 10:49a/5:03 a 10:44 p/5:32 p
Homosassa'" 12:11 a/8:52 a 1:51 p/9:21 p


High/I
2:36 a/1
12:57 a/I
11:30 a/
1:46 a/9:


*"At Mason's Creek
Monday
Low High/Low
0:53 a . 3:22 p/11:31 p
1:15 a 1:43 p/8:53 p
i:03a --- 6:41 p
52 a 2:32 p/10:30 p


L F'cast
66 s
71 s
67 s
61 s
65 s
64. s
70 ,s
66 s
68 s


City.
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
s
s
S
pc
. s
pc
s
s


MARINE. OUTLOOK .
South winds from 10 to 15 knots. Seas 2 Gulf water
to 3 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a tem perature
light to moderate chop. Partly cloudy and
pleasant conditions. 9 0


Taken at Aripeka

LAKE LMEVLS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.93 27.92 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 32.81 32.77 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 34.66 34.64 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 36.65 36.62 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-annual flood which
has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida
Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological
Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the
Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.


THE NATION


SUNDAY


y City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
S Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H,
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolls
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L City H L Pcp. Fcst H L


61 47
73 61
69 58
77 61
68 59
85 73
68 61
57 28
80 64
58 46
70 58
57 41
60 44
87 68
60 53
81 64
65 44
68 51
62 46
86 66
63 46
65 52
77 64
52 40
67 45
64 41
.88 73
63 51
68 57
68 54
86 76
64 45
84 69
83 66
73 55
64 58
62 51
75 60
65 45
63 42
84 68
86 67
64 59


.04 c
pc
.04 Is
.33 Is
sh
Is
.01 Is
c
.42 ts
.72 sh
sh
pc
.04 pc
pc
.15 sh
.29 Is
s
sh
pc
pc
sh
.03 pc
.77 c
c
s
s
s
.10 sh
.29 sh
.10 sh
Is
c
ts
3.33 ts
pc
.07 sh
1.97 ts
s
s
pc
pc
.27 ts


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h.hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=raln/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstonns; w=windy.
02009 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 85 70 pc 85 72
New York City 67 54 .11 sh 64 51
Norfolk 81 65 .01 ts 77 64
Oklahoma City 55 51 1.15 sh 63 49
Omaha 67 43 pc 71 45
Palm Springs 89 .71 s 93 68
Philadelphia 66 57 .12 sh 60 '49
Phoenix 88 76 s 92 71
Pittsburgh 62 50 sh 61 45
Portland, ME 67 53 .04 pc 53 43
Portland, Ore 63 53 .47 sh 60 45
Providence, R.I. 66 57 .01 sh 64 48
Raleigh 83 66 ts 80 61
Rapid City 57 29 pc 66 41
Reno 60 45 .02 sh 66 44
Rochester, NY 59 39 pc 65 41
Sacramento 61 54 .09 sh 72 54
St. Louis 66 50 .01 sh 65 49
St. Ste. Marie 50 32 pc 46 32
Salt Lake City 55 49 .65 sh 65 46
San Antonio 87 73 c 88 63
San Diego 70 62 s 68 60
San Francisco 61 56 .04 sh 63 53
Savannah 87 65 pc 86 65
Seallie 65 53 .05 pc 59 47
Spokane 65 42 sh 55 41
Syracuse 59 40 .01 pc 66 41
Topeka 62 50 c 66 46
Washington 69 63 .01 Is 63 53
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 101 Laredo, Texas LOW 16 Cut Bank, Mont.

WORLD CITIES
SUNDAY Lisbon 77/58/s
CITY H/L/SKY London 53/38/pc
Acapulco 87/73/s Madrid 81/55/s
Amsterdam 58/43/sh Mexico City 87/54/s
Athens 67/54/pc Montreal 61/45/pc
Beijing 85/61/s Moscow 59/36/pc
Berlin 66/47/s Paris 69/47/pc
Bermuda 78/67/s Rio 79/66/ts
Cairo 83/64/pc Rome 63/49/ts
Calgary 66/41/c Sydney 64/46/sh
Havana 86/72/s Tokyo 68/50/s
Hong Kong, 86/73/pc Toronto . 64/41/s
Jerusalem 86/68/pc Warsaw 64/44/s


' C I Y R U S.


O U N T Y I


UHRONICLE
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............. ......
... ........... ...


... . . .. . . . . . . . . ............................ I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A4 SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009


STATE/LOCAL


f









s a ouNTY ( ) n


RUFFLED
Continued from Page Al

Several wildlife organi-
zations have dedicated
themselves, to growing
whooping crane popula-
tions.
One of those is the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission.
Through the course of
her work, one FWC biolo-
gist's field notes, observa-
tions and findings
uncovered a story of the
bitterness, joy, fulfillment
and loss that comes with
love'- even'in the animal
kingdom.


No. 926 is a 10-year-old
non-migratory male
whooping crane.
He was born in captivity
and later released in the
hopes he would find a
mate, have children and
ultimately help his once-
crumbling species thrive.
His first mate produced
a healthy chick in spring
2006. Things were good.
But tragedy struck when
926's mate was found
dead from a suspected
bobcat attack.
' The chick later died.
"He tested the waters
with a few other single fe-
males and nothing really
stuck," FWC biologist
Kathy Chappell said.
A little over a year ago,
926 began spending time
with crane No. 1646-- a
young non-migri-atory fe-
male.
No. 1646 is considered a
juvenile at about three
years old. She was born in
the wild to a pair living in
Leesburg.
"I had great hopes of
her nesting with this
bird," Chappell said.
Sometimes juveniles
don't begin mating until
they are 4 or 5, but it is
possible No. 1646 was
ready to become a mother.
The two were insepara-
ble as they began, their
lives together near an In-
verness neighborhood.
During the winter, the
pair left Citrus for a vaca-
tion in Sumter County.
It was then the betrayal
occurred. 0': '-. . , - .
All Chappell knows is
that No. 1646 came to Cit-
rus by herself.


For days she called in
her whooping crane way.
It wasn't until February
that 926 was spotted show-
ing off his new flame - an
older female - in Citrus.
* No. 915 is a 10-year-old
non-migratory whooping
crane. Like 926, she was
born in captivity and re-
leased with the hope she
would reproduce.
She reportedly left her
mate and a chick about
two years ago and took up
with another male, who
later died.
She then began follow-
ing around another pair
in Sumter County, acting
as a third wheel.
"She has a history of
leaving her mate and
going with someone else,"
Chappell said.
. But so far, 915 and 926
have been steady. Com-
mitted.
Alone and confused,
1646 began hanging
around the new couple to
the chagrin of her old
beau.
Chappell watched the
squabble unfold.
"He chased her off as if
to say, 'Hey, I've got a new
girl now,"' Chappell said.
March 30 was the last
anyone has seen 1646.
People in the Inverness
neighborhood have nick-
named the birds after
characters involved in a
love triangle on the televi-
sion show, "Frasier."
Niles Crane, Daphne
and Maris.

ON

"Mate for life - that's
what they say," Chappell
said.
In the five years Chap--
pell has been following
the cranes, she's seen
swaps before.- especially
if the couple is unable to
fertilize an egg.
Times of drought affect
nesting and the survival of
unborn chicks - and
Florida is experiencing
drought.
She figures if 926 and
915 are able to success-
fully nest, they may ,stay
together.
Her fingers are crossed.
"Well, they look nice tq-
gether - don't you think?"
Chappell said.

People in his neighbor-

People in his neighbor-


CRISTY LOFTIS/Chronicle
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission wildlife biologist Kathy Chappell uses a
direction antenna in Inverness to track the whereabouts of non-migratory whooping cranes.
The FWC project was hoped to help grow a population of non-migratory whooping cranes in
Florida, however, FWV will no longer add birds into the program because the birds have had
unexpectedly short life spans and have had problems reproducing.


hood are aware of the
whoopers. - and some
wanted the location of
their neighborhood kept
vague in the story so peo-
ple wouldn't come and
scare off their winged
friends.
"We love to watch them
- see them drink out of
the bird bath," resident
Ted True said.
As a hobby, True has
been photographing the
whoopers as well as sand-
hill cranes.
"They're just beautiful.
I like to watch their man-
nerisms and stuff," True
said.
When their wings are
outstretched, it looks as if
they are conducting an or-
chestra, True said.
He and his wife Nancy
watched with interest
when he saw 1646 being
chased away by her for-
mer lover.
"I just hope it's safe
somewhere," True said.


As a wildlife biologist
for FWC, Chappell uses a
radio frequency receiver
to track signals being sent
by tracking -devices on
each of the cranes.
"This is how I spend my
day - driving around to


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SInverness, FL 34450
Gates Open at 5:30 pm
Show Starts at 7pm * Concludes at 11pm


A portion, of the proceeds will be given to the
Citrus County School Readiness Program and to the
Friends of Chassahowitzka (Save the Three Sisters Springs)

Organized by the Rotary Club of Inverness Charitable Foundation
in cooperation with the
Inverness Olde Towne Association
Tickets $25 General Admission/$35 Infield. Seating/$50 Preferred Infield Seating
Sold at various Citrus County Banks and other Locations or order your tickets online at
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Call (352) 400-4639 if you have any questions
Ai or are unable to access the website.


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and Water Available


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hear a chirp, beep, tweet,"
Chappell said.
There were 289 non-mi-
gratory, captive-raised re-
leased by FWC between
1993 and 2004. The last re-
leases took place in the
winter of 2004-05.
The idea was to estab-
lish a self-sustaining non-
migratory whooping crane
population in Florida.
Naturally occurring
whoopers in the south-
eastern United States dis-
appeared in the 1930s,
according to FWC.
The problems with the
project /have been with
the birds' survival and re-
production, which both
have been complicated by
droughts.
In November, FWC offi-
cials decided to discon-
tinue the project by the
end of 2009.
� Other factors influenc-
ing the decision were
shorter-than-expected
lifespans, scarcity of birds
for release, project costs'
and the loss of habitat due
to development.
Birds such as 926 and
915 shouldn't call a resi-
dential neighborhood
their home. They should-'
n't -be accustomed to hu-


mans walking within
yards of the animals. They
shouldn't rely on bird
feeders and baths for sus-
tenance.
The habitat and behav-
ior leads to higher mor-
tality rates, Chappell
said.
Officials believe the re-
sources used to produce
birds in captivity could be
better invested in other
whopping crane release
programs and put toward
maintaining a captive
flock.
Each fall since 2001, mi-
gratory flocks raised in
Wisconsin have been led
southward by ultralight
aircraft to the Chassahow-
itzka National Wildlife
Refuge in Citrus and Her-
nando-counties.
FWC is a partner in the
migratory reintroduction
project, which is consid-
ered a success.

ME N

For now, Chappell and
two other wildlife biolo-
gists track about 29
whoopers in Osceola,
Polk, Sumter, Lake, Citrus
and Alachua counties.
The birds like low, wet


areas, so Chappell keeps
wading boots in her truck
as well as binoculars, a
spotting scope and a di-
rectional antenna.
A well-worn, spiral-
bound notebook details
the lives of cranes she
finds.
The goal was to figure
out the birds' habitats and
isolate barriers to flock
growth.
She can identify each
whooper by the band lo-
cated above the bird's
hock, or knee.
"I have fallen in love
with the project," Chap-
pell said.
Her favorite pair lives
in Leesburg - Nos. 1291
and 898. The couple has
produced a wild hatch of
birds each year except for
this year, when the eggs
were found to be infertile.
A University of Florida
veterinarian said the area
where the eggs were laid
lacked enough water for
the eggs to thrive.
With the non-migratory
reintroduction project
coming to a close, Chap-
pell isn't sure what's in
her future. What she does
know is that she'll always
love the birds and she
hopes to continue study-
ing them.
"I feel extremely im-
'portant," Chappell said,
"to have been a part of
this."


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h LCRNCE


SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 A5


RUFFLED FEATHERS









UNDAY, AY ,


Derek Cline, 25
INVERNESS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr. Derek
William Cline, age 25, of In-
verness, Florida, will be
held 5:00 PM, Tuesday, May
5, 2009 at the First Baptist
Church of Inverness under
the direc-
tion of the
Inverness
Chapel of
Hooper Fu-

Home, with
Pastor Dou-
glas Alexan-
der, Sr. Derek Kline
officiating.
The family will receive
friends from 4:00 PM until
the time of service at the
church.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral-
Home.com. Derek was born
September 29, 1983, in St.
Petersburg, FL, son of Ron
and Kathy (Tummins) Cline.
He passed away, Thursday,
April 30, 2009. Derek was a
2002 graduate of Citrus High
School.
He worked as an electri-
cal service technician and
moved to Inverness, Florida
from St Petersburg 1988.
His hobbies included sports,
weightlifting, golf and fish-
ing. Derek was a member of
The New Church Without
Walls, Inverness, FL. Sur-
vivors include his loving
parents, Ron and Kathy
Cline of Inverness, FL; 2 sis-
ters: Sheri Bullard (daugh-
ters: Brittany, Lauren and
Sophia) of Springfield, VA
and Brandye Jackson of
Clearwater; grandmother,
Virginia Cline of Largo, FL;
uncle, Bill Cline and wife,
Jill of New York; 4 aunts:
Sue Olson and husband,
Tony of Clearwater; Bar-
bara McLoughlin of St. Pe-
tersburg; Laura Pitt and
husband, Sam (daughter,
Jessica) of Largo and Jean
and husband, Fred of Iowa;
girlfriend, Aleshia Davis of
Beverly Hills; and a host of
nieces, nephews, cousins
and many friends.

Katherine
Finley, 97
INVERNESS
Katherine B. Finley, 97,
Inverness, died.Friday, May
1, 2009 at Hospice of Citrus
County Care Unit at Citrus
Memorial Hospital. A cele-
bration of life memorial
service will
be held on
Wednesday,
May 6, 2009
at 1:00 PM.
at' the First
Presbyte-
rian Church
of Inver-,
ness. Chas. Katherine
E. Davis Fu- Finley
neral Home
with Crematory is in charge
of arrangements. There will
be no calling hours at the fu-
neral home. Katherine was
born August 5, 1911 in At-
lanta, Georgia to the late T.
Jack and Clara Bryan and
came to this area in 1978
from St. Petersburg. She
was a homemaker and also
was employed by the Pinel-
las County School System as
a secretary for 12 years. She
was a member of First Pres-
byterian Church of Inver-
ness and enjoyed her
church membership, as well
as her activity in many of
the ministries throughout
her life. She enjoyed social-
izing with her friends, fish-
ing, playing golf and bridge.
She is survived by grand-
children Richie A. and wife
Nancy Schlenker, Ithaca,
NY; Russell Schlenker and
fiancee Katherine Witt,
Hernando; Janie and hus-
band Tony Hough, Palm


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Harbor, FL; David and wife
Amy Schlenker, Ocala, FL
and one stepgrandson, David
Kinnunen, Gainesville, GA,
several great grandchildren
and two great-great grand-
children. She was preceded
in death by her husband, Dr.
Ferber A. Finley, Jr. in 1987,
her daughter Kay Kinnunen
in 2006, four brothers and
one sister.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline.com.

James 'Jim'
Hartley
LECANTO
Mr. James E: "Jim" Hart-
ley, 'age 78, of Lecanto,
Florida, died Monday morn-
ing, April 27th, 2009 at home
with his wife and soul mate,
LuAnn and his loving sister,
Sharon at his side, Born July
26, 1930, in Dayton, OH, he
was the son of the late
Martha'and Walter Hartley,
Sr.
Jim loved boating, flying
and building small air-
planes, golfing, and restoring
and driving old trucks and
cars. He also loved garden-
ing and has many beautiful
plants in his greenhouse
which he built. He loved
being in the fresh air and
spent every moment he
could, working and playing
outside. Jim is a member of
the Experimental Aircraft
Association and the Citrus
County Cruisers.
Jim will be missed by his
family and many friends. Jim
was preceded in death by his
brothers: Walter Jr., Robert,
and William; his grandson,
Jeremy; 'and his grand-
daughter, Amy Jim is sur-
vived by his wife, LuAnn;
.sister, Sharon; son, Steve;
daughter-in-law, Connie;-
grandson, Jason, and his
wife Stephanie; great grand-
daughter, Emilie; his son,
Jim Jr.; and granddaughter,
Jamie. Jim is also survived
by his stepson, Eric Sheaffer,
step daughter-in-law Lynn,
step grandchildren: Alex,
Taylor, Samantha, and Luke;
stepdaughter and step son-
in-law MariJo and Ben
Bright; his four legged
grandchildren: Elvis, Faith,
Nina, and Chance; his sis-
ters-in-law, Peggy and Joann
Hartley; his sister-in-law and
brother-in-law, DiAnn and
Jerry Smith; nieces and
nephews in Ohio, Canada,
Michigan, Pennsylvania, and
New York; Friends who wish
may send memorial dona-
tions in Jim's name to Her-
nando Pasco Hospice, 12107
Majestic Blvd., Hudson, FL
34667 or Citrus County Ani-
mal Services, 4030 S. Airport
Rd., Inverness, FL 34450, At-
tention: Special Needs
Fund.
Sign. the guest book at
www.chronicleonline.com.

Michele
Liana, 57
CRYSTAL RIVER
Michele E. Liana, age 57,
of Crystal River, FL, died
May 1, 2009 at her home.
Memorial services will be
held at 11:00 a.m. on Tuesday,
May 5, 2009 at Brown Fu-
neral Home in Lecanto FL
with Father Michael Suszyn-
ski officiating. Private cre-
mation will take place under
the direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crematory,
Lecanto FL.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory. Lecanto,

Edward
Matthews, 62
BEVERLY HILLS
Edward Matthews, age 62,
of Beverly Hills, FL, died
May 1,2009 at his home.
Services are under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto, FL.


Garnet
Miller, 85
CRYSTAL RIVER
Garnet Field Miller, age
85, of Crystal River, FL, died
May 2, 2009 at Life Care
Center in Lecanto, FL. Born
on March 25, 1924 to David
A. and Ruth McCallen Field
in Memphis, TN. She gradu-
ated from Southwest at
Memphis, now Rhodes Col-
lege and was a member of
Delta Delta Delta Soror-
ity.Garnet married the late
Samuel Rush Miller Jr. on
December 22, 1946 when he
returned from World War II.
She moved to Crystal River
in the spring of 1955' with
her husband Dr. Sam Miller
and her young family Gar-
net joined the First Presby-
terian Church of Crystal
River where she organized
a Sunday School, then the
Junior Choir, Junior Church
and Vacation Bible Schools.
She became involved with
Word of Life Fellowship and
formed a bible club for
teenagers in her home,.
fielding retreats and even
tour bus trips to camp in up-
state New York In 1970 she
took the role of director of
the Key Training Center
which, at that time, in-
cluded all special education
for Citrus, Hernando and
Pasco counties. After turn-
ing the reins over to Chet
Cole, she took the interim
role of social case worker.
She toured the state as a
speaker for Stonecroft Min-
istries and Christian
Women's Clubs. In January,
1983 she and her husband,
Sam, joined with a small
group to form what became
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church. When Seven Rivers
Christian School was
formed in 1988, she sat on
the original board of direc-
tors. Today, she joined her
beloved husband Sam in
heaven where the roses are
constant blooming. She is
predeceased by her older
sister Gwendolyn LaRue
and her husband of 59 years.
She is survived by six
children Vicki Morris, Suf-
folk, Virginia, Margie Miller,
Crystal River, Florida, Sam
Miller, Osprey, Florida,
Katie Boddie, Pendergrass,
Georgia, John Miller, Or-
mond Beach, Florida and
Dan . Miller, Orlando,
Florida; one sister, Mar-.
guerite Field Hoerl of An-
dover, MA; seventeen
grandchildren, and seven
great grandchildren.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory. Lecanto,
Florida. 352-795-0111

Gladys 'Betty'
Newsrom, 86
CRYSTAL RIVER
Gladys "Betty" Newsom,
age 86, of Crystal River, FL,
died April 21, 2009.
Graveside services will be
held at 2 p.m. on Friday, May
8, 2009 at the Fountains Me-
morial Park in Homosassa.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory Lecanto, Florida
in charge of arrangements.
352-795-0111.

Ole Lunde, 76
HERNANDO
Ole, A. Lunde of Her-
nando, FL passed away on
Wednesday , April 29, 2009,


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at Hospice of Citrus County.
Donations may be made
to Hospice of Citrus County
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, Fl 34464 or The Chris-
tian Broadcast Network 977
Centerhill Turnpike, Vir-
ginia Beach, VA 23465.
Arrangements by Fero Fu-
neral Home 5955 N. Lecanto
Highway Beverly Hills, FL
34465.

Sandra 'Sandy'
Passe, 71
DUNNELLON
Sandra K. "Sandy" Passe,
71, of Dunnellon formerly of
Pinellas Park passed away
suddenly April 26, 2009 of
cancer at Shands Hospital.
She was preceded in death
by her husband of 32 years,
Dave, her mother, Emily
and her
brother,"
Alan. 1
She is
survived by
her son,
Steve Passe
(wife Bev-
erly), daugh-
ters, Sharon Sandra
Ginley (hus- 'Sandy'
band Jim), Passe
Kris Passe
and grandsons, Kyle and
Jesse Ginley; sisters, Carol
Dennis, Diane Wallace and
Karen Zwissler; brother,
Ken Dennis.
Sandy loved going to her
grandson's ballgames,
watching Nascar, playing at
her computer and reading a
good book with her dog Lexi
beside her. Your spirit will
live on in your children and
grandchildren. We love you
and will miss you always, es-
pecially at the ballgames.
But we know you have the
best seat A Memorial Serv-
ice will be announced at a
later date. In lieu of flowers
donations may be made to
the Kristine Passe Trust
Acet
R. Lee Williams & Son,
49th St. No./727-527-1177
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

Jeanie Rose, 67
INVERNESS
Mrs. Jeanie A. Rose, age
67, of Inverness, Florida,
died Wednesday, April 22,
2009 at her
home in In-
verness.
She was
born June
23, 1941 in
Tampa,
Florida,
daughter of
Albert and Jeanie
Jean (Mor- Rose
ilacci )
Patrick She moved to Inver-
ness from Lady Lake,
'Florida in 1985. She was
one of the first female grad-
uates of the Animal Science
Department, University of
Florida receiving a Bache-
lors of Science Degree in


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1965. While there, she f
served as President of the f
Block and Bridle Club. Her B
life was filled with a passion ]
for animals with a remark-
able empathy for friends and i
people she met She worked (
at the Animal Research De-
partment at Shands for years
prior to the establishment of
the Veterinarian School sup-
porting her husband's edu-
cational efforts. She went on
to work as a Laboratory
Technologist for hospitals in
Leesburg FL. She began a
private Laboratory for Drs.
Schutz/Techman called Doc-
tors and Physicians Labora-
tory. The business was
purchased by Smith-Kline
and later became Quest Lab-
oratories. She was in charge
of the fund raising auctions
for Citrus County 4-H, a
member of the original Vi-
sion 20/20.committee for Cit-
rus County and a member of
the Friends of -Central
Florida Community College,
receiving their "Opening a
Window of Opportunity
award in 1997. She was also
on the Pastoral Care com-
mittee at St. Margaret' s
Episcopal Church during
which time she helped with
the establishment of the
Stephan's Ministry program,
and she took a personal re-
sponsibility for helping those
in need, especially those suf-
fering with Parkinson's dis-
ease as she did for 38 years.
Mrs. Rose was preceded in
death by her father, Albert
Patrick Survivors include
her husband, Andrew J.
Rose, Jr. of Inverness, FL;
daughter Debra Jean Rose
of Spencer, IN; mother Dr.
Jean Patrick and sister, Mau-
reen Patrick, both of Tampa,
Fl. and her beloved pets.
The family will receive
friends 6:00 - 8:00 PM,
Tuesday, May 5, 2009 at the
Inverness Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes & Crema-
tory followed by a light buf-
fet at their home in
Inverness. Plans are cur-
rently under way to honor
her wish of assisting 'in the
research into "the fight for
Parkinson's patients and re-
lief of their suffering." As de-
tails evolve, those interested
will be notified. On line con-
dolences may be sent to the
family at www.hooperfuner-
alhome.com or to her hus-
band Andy, at
ajroseu .fledu, . , ..

Eugene
Same, 78S
CRYSTAL RIVER
Mr. Eugene Edward Same,
age 78, of Crystal River, FL,
passed away April 29,2009.
Family will receive




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friends on Monday, May 4th
from 9 until 11 a.m. at the
Brown Funeral Home in
Lecanto, Florida. Services
will begin at 11:00 a.m. Bur-
al will be at the Magnolia
Cemetery in Lecanto, FL.

Raymond J.
Seman





Raymond J. Seman, 64.
Beloved father of Barbara
Like (James); loving grand-
father of Tesla, Ronni Raye,
and Laney; dear brother of
Thomas (Mary), Nancy
Sramek (Martin) and Carol
Seman (Dan Eggert); dear
son of the late Rudolph and
Bernadine; dear friend of
Paula Bais and Yvonne
House; uncle and nephew.
Ray was a U.S. Army Viet-
nam Veteran. Graveside
services 'will be held
Wednesday May 6 at the
Florida National Cemetery,
Bushnell Florida at 1:00
PM. Arrangements by Pre-
miere Funeral Services.

See DEATHS/Page A9

OBITUARIES
* The Citrus County' Chron
icle's policy permits
both free and paid obit-
uaries.
* Obituaries must be
submitted by the fu-
reral home or society
in charge of arrange.
ments.
* Free obituaries can in-
clude: Full name of de-
ceased; age;
hometown, state, date
of death; place of
death: date, time and
place of visitationand
funeral services.
* A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili
tary. (Please note this
service when submit
ting a free obituary.)
Additionally, all obituar-
ies will be posted online
at www.chronicleon
line.corm.
* Additional days of pub-
lication or reprints due
to errors in submitted
material are charged at
the same rates.
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
* E-mail obits@chronicle
online.com or fax to
5633280.
* Phone 563-5660 for
details.


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AG s M 32009


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CITRUS CouNr~ (FL) CHRONICLE NATION SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 A7


Resistance to

Obama high court

pick may be modest


Associated Press

WASHINGTON-Awaiting
President Barack Obama's
first Supreme Court pick, ac-
tivists expect a less-spirited
nomination battle than would
have been anticipated ifa con-.
servative justice had stepped
down or Democrats held a
slimmer edge in the Senate.
Retiring Justice David HI
Souter is part ofthe court's lib-
eral wing, and his replacement
by a Democratic administra-
tion probably won't change the
ideological balance.
With Democrats holding a
nearly filibuster-proof margin
in the Senate, the confirma-
tion process maybe noisy But
it also may lack the same en-
ergy and tension were Re-
publicans in a reasonable
position to block the nominee.
That doesn't mean conser-
vative groups won't use the
occasion to air their views
and communicate with their
members.
"Obama's own record and
rhetoric make clearthathe will
seek left-wing judicial activists
who will indulge their pas-
sions, not justices who will
make theirrulings with dispas-
sion," said Ed Whelan, presi-
dent of the conservative Ethics
and Public Policy Center
Democrats doubt there will
be much punch in a Republi-
can-led pushback
"I'd venture a guess that
the most politically astute
conservatives are not enthu-
siastic at the prospect of ig-
niting a culture war over a
Supreme .Court nominee"
under these circumstances,
said Jennifer Palmieri, a for-
mer Clinton White House
aide now with the Center for
American Progress.
Souter, 69, announced Fri-
day that he would step down
at the end of the court's term
in late June. His retirement
after almost two decades of
unpredictable decisions gives
Obama an early chance to
place his stamp on the nine-
member high court, possibly
by naming a minority or a sec-
ond woman.
Obama promised to name a
Supreme Court justice who
combines "empathy and un-
derstanding" with an impecca-
ble legal background. Obama
pointedly referred to his plan
to have "him or her" on the
bench in time for the Supreme
Court'fs session that begins the
first Monday in October
"I will seek someone who
understands that justice isn't
about some abstract legal the-
ory or footnote in a case book
It is also about how our laws
affect the daily realities of
people's lives," Obama told
reporters after speaking with
Souter by telephone. Word of
the impending retirement
had leaked Thursday night
As a candidate for the White
House, Obama said he would
not use a litmus test for nomi-
nees, but observed that he
thought the landmark 1973
Roe v. Wade ruling that gave
women the right to end their
pregnancies was correctly de-
cided. Obama's selection will
be the first high court nomina-
tion by a Democrat in 15 years.
Some of the names that
have been circulating outside
the White House inclutle re-


cently confirmed Solicitor
General Elena Kagan, U.S.
Appeals Court Judges Sonia
Sotomayor, Kim McLane
Wardlaw, Sandra Lea Lynch
and Diane Pamela Wood, and
Leah Ward Sears, chiefjustice
of the Georgia Supreme Court.
Massachusetts Gov. Deval
Patrick, Harvard Law profes-
sor Cass Sunstein and U.S.
District Judge Ruben Castillo
of Chicago have also been
mentioned.
In urging the Senate to act
promptly on his selection, he
said he hoped "we can swear
in our new Supreme Court
justice in time for him or her
to be seated" by early October.
His spokesman said Obama
intended to have a nomina-
tion before the Senate "well
before the end of July."
Souter was named to the
court in 1990 by the first Pres-
ident Bush, a Republican.
But on abortion as well as
other issues, the New Hamp-
shire native quickly proved
himself to be less than the
strong conservative the GOP
had expected. In 2000, he was
one of four dissenting justices
on a ruling that declared
President George W Bush the
winner of the disputed na-
tional election.
Democrats, who control 59
seats in the Senate, will be in
a strong position when
Obama's nominee arrives for
confirmation proceedings.
Democratic Sen. Patrick
Leahy of Vermont, who will
preside over confirmation
hearings as chairman of the
Judiciary Committee, issued
something of a gentle chal-
lenge. "I hope that all sena-
tors will take this opportunity
to unify around the shared
constitutional values that will
define Justice Souter's legacy
on the court," he said.
Senate Republican leader
Mitch McConnell, in a written
statement of his own, said, "I
trust the president will choose
a nominee for the upcoming
vacancy based on their expe-
rience and evenhanded read-
ing of the law, and not their
partisan leanings or ability to
pass litmus tests."
Souter, who is expected to
return to his native New
Hampshire, is the youngest of
three members of the court
who have figured in retire-
ment speculation in recent
years. Justice Ruth Bader
Ginsburg is 76 and recently un-
derwent cancer surgery. Jus-
tice John Paul Stevens is 89,
the oldest member ofthe court
But one of the ironies con-
fronting Obama is that even
replacing all three would not
allow him to fundamentally
alter the court's makeup on
key cases in which there
often are four judges pre-
dictably on one side, four on
the other, and Justice An-
thony Kennedy in the middle,
in effect the deciding vote.
Sen. Arlen Specter of
Pennsylvania, a Republican
who turned Democrat earlier
in the week, said the court
"could use some diversity
along a number of lines," in-
cluding blacks and Hispanics.
The current court has one
black justice, Clarence Thomas,
and Ginsburgis the only woman.
There has never been a His-
panic on the Supreme Court


GOP heavyweights launch rebranding tour


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - With
its party struggling to define
itself, a group of prominent
Republicans launched a lis-
tening tour Saturday in a
bid to boost the GOP's sag-
ging image and regroup for
future elections.
Former presidential can-
didate Mitt Romney, former
Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and
House Minority Whip Eric
Cantor, R-Va., held a town-
hall style meeting at a pizza
restaurant in the Demo-
cratic suburb of Arlington,
Va., to hear about people's
concerns on issues from the
economy and health care to
the rising costs of college tu-
ition.
"You can't beat something
with nothing, and the other
side has something," Bush
told a group of about 100
people at the Pie-Tanza
pizza parlor. "I don't like it,
but they have it and we have
to be respectful and mindful
of that.
"I hope across the country
people will be excited about
the prospect of sharing their
ideas to bring about a better
America," he said.
, It was the first meeting of
the GOP group National
Council for a New America,
which was created to re-
brand the party's image.
The meeting comes after a
bad week in which Pennsyl-
vania Sen, Arlen Specter
announced he was switch-
ing to the Democratic party
and Democrat Scott Murphy
won a close U.S. House race
in a GOP district in upstate
New York.
An Associated Press-GfK
poll released in April shows
that Democrats outnumber
Republicans by 46 percent
to 28 percent, including
those leaning toward either
party.
The national council,


An Associated Press-GfK poll
released in April shows that
Democrats outnumber Republicans by
46 percent to 28 percent, including
those leaning toward either party.


which plans listening ses-
sions in other cities, also in-
cludes Louisiana Gov.
Bobby Jindal, Mississippi
Gov. Haley Barbour and
Sen. John McCain. Republi-
can aides on Capitol Hill
disclosed the group this past
Wednesday just before
Obama started a news con-
ference to mark his first 100
days in office. The group is
partly highlighting their dif-
ferences with the Republi-
can National Committee's


political strategy.
That group and a similar
one - Resurgent Republic,
a collection of the party's
senior strategists - are
meant to be Republican
roadshows outside Washing-
ton's circus tent.
Still, notably absent from
either group's rosters are
the 2008 GOP vice presiden-
tial nominee, Alaska Gov.
Sarah Palin, and former
Speaker Newt Gingrich,
who has his own policy


group. Others mentioned as
potential 2012 candidates
and missing are South Car-
olina Gov. Mark Sanford and
Minnesota Gov. Tim Paw-
lenty, although the latter is a
close McCain ally.
Cantor said he wanted to
focus the meeting on "bread
and butter" issues such as
the rising costs of education
and health care, which res-
onate the most with Ameri-
cans right now.
"These are discussions
that need to occur with the
American people of any po-
litical stripe," he said. "We
need to make sure, the dis-
cussiorns, I believe, should
be focused on the principles
that have made America
great - the principles of
freedom and opportunity."


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SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 A7


NATION


RTIC US COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


tj








AS SUNDAY' MAY 3, 2009 NATION/WORLD CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICI.Ii


Anatomy of an 'inside' ambush in Iraq


Associated Press

BAGHDAD - U.S. sol-
diers and Iraqi police had
just sat down for lunch in-
side a police building in
Mosul. Flak vests and other
protective gear were re-
moved.
A door to the room was
left ajar- just wide enough
for the barrels of Iraqi po-
lice AK-47s to be poked in-
side. The attackers fired.
Then again.
The suspected gunmen -
an Iraqi police officer still in
his teens and a young ser-
geant - ran toward a wait-
ing car with return fire
kicking up dust around
them. The car swerved
around a checkpoint and the
attackers were gone. They
are still missing.
The Feb. 24 shooting -
which killed a U.S. soldier
and an interpreter and
wounded five others - was
an alarming inside job that
reinforced what many fear:
insurgents and sympathizers
possibly infiltrating the
ranks of Iraq's security
forces.
The U.S. military called it
an "isolated incident"
This is true in one regard:
The shooting was one of the
few irrefutable examples of
deadly turncoats inside the
Iraqi forces.
On Saturday, an Iraqi sol-
dier killed two American
soldiers and wounded three
at a combat outpost 12 miles
(20 kilometers)
south of Mosul, 0 For m
the U.S. military from I
said. Iraqi author- please
ities described Page,
the attacker -
who was killed in the gun-
battle -- as a rank-and-file
soldier who also served as a
Sunni Muslim preacher for
his unit
But the worry of infiltra-
tion is not a new one.
During the early stages of
the Sunni insurgency in
2004, officials in Baghdad
and the Pentagon suggested
moles in the security forces
were leaking information
about troop movements or
helping carry out attacks.
Years 9f internal setting
and-purges follow ed. Now;
the-Shiiteted governmeritis
under pressure to absorb a
new crop of fighters in the
security ranks as part of
promised reconciliation
with Sunnis.
The main effort is to re-
ward Sunni tribal militia-
men who turned against
al-Qaida in Iraq and its al-
lies. But Shiite leaders -
and even some Sunni politi-
cal bosses - say it's critical
to try to weed out potential
insurgent sympathizers
even as the U.S.-backedgov-
ernment moves ahead with
its outreach to Sunnis.
"It's not an easy thing to
bring these Sunnis into the
security forces. It can be'
messy. But it has to be done,"
said Stephen Biddle, a sen-
ior fellow of defense policy
at the Council on Foreign
Relations in Washington.
The investigation into the
late February attack- from
accounts built on U.S. mili-
tary and Iraqi reports - is a
narrative that traces the
Sunni tumble from privilege
after Saddam Hussein's
ouster, and highlights the
current struggles to secure
the northern city of Mosul.
About 225 miles (380 kilo-
meters) up the Tigris River
from Baghdad, Mosul is one
of the last bases for Sunni in-
surgents and could be
among the lingering urban
battlegrounds for U.S. forces
as they prepare to move out
of cities by June 30.
Much depends on
whether. Iraqi security
forces can rise to the chal-
lenges. On Feb. 24, a U.S.
military team, including
members of the Tennessee
National Guard, visited one
of the main Iraqi police
training sites for a firsthand
update.
Among the guards on duty
were 19-year-old officer
Sa'ad al-Jubouri and Sgt.
Mohammed Mouwafaq al-
Nueimi.


They had become close
since al-Jubouri joined the
force a year earlier. Both
were from villages in the
palm-dotted flatlands south
of Mosul, where Sunni tribal
loyalties were firmly with
Saddam during his rule and
some turned to the insur-
gency after the Americans
moved in.
Authorities believe the
pair had already hatched a
plot to ambush the U.S. sol-


diers. They were just wait-
ing for the right moment.
"They didn't need to be
highly trained for this. It's
not like a sniper They just
had to open fire when they
had an opportunity," said
Abdul Kareem Khalaf, a
spokesman for Iraq's Inte-
rior Ministry "They were
prepared for this mission."
Attackers in Iraq have
sometimes disguised them-
selves in uniforms to bypass
security checks. On April 20,
a suicide bomber wearing
an Iraqi army uniform at-
tacked a U.S. military dele-
gation visiting the mayor in
Baqouba northeast of Bagh-
dad, killing three Iraqi civil-
ians and wounding at least
eight American soldiers.
"But this ambush in Mosul
was from the inside," Khalaf
said. "For the credibility of
Iraqi forces, we cannot let
this happen."
The younger suspect, al-
Jubouri, was still a boy dur-
ing the U.S.-led invasion in
2003.
His village, Harara, was
spared U.S. airstrikes. The
battles in Mosul were rum-
blings over the northern
horizon. But it meant his
family's time of local influ-
ence was over
His father was an elder in
the area's prominent al-
Jubouri clan and had served
as village mayor More im-
portant, he had risen to be-
come a leading figure in
local Baath Party affairs.
This brought fa-
ore news vors from Sad-
Iraq, dam's regime,
e see including enough
A10. extra money to
build a small fam-
ily compound with fruit
trees and date palms.
The U.S.-led invasion re-
ordered the political hierar-
chy Iraq's majority Shiites
- long suppressed by Sad-
dam - took sway over the
government and security
forces. The Kurds began
looking beyond the borders
of their self-ruled northern
region to exert influence in
cities such as Mosul.
Like many Baathists,
members of the al-Jubouri's
,- . * - -


Associated Pregs
Iraqi Army soldiers look at a book of Arabic phrases as U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Williams, 37, assigned to Delta Co*
1st Combined Arms Battalion, 67th Armor Regiment, looks for, help in communicating in Mosul, 225 miles northwest
Baghdad, Iraq. The Feb. 24, 2009 shooting, which killed a U.S. solider and an interpreter and wounded five others, was
an alarming Inside job that reinforced what many fear: insurgents and sympathizers possibly infiltrating the ranks of Iraq's
security forces.
family faced sweeping deci- triotic act to attack Ameri- anonymity, described al- as a security guard at
sions: leave for Syria or Jor- cans," said the official, who Nueimi as a midlevel Baath Mosul's airport and joined
dan or try to adapt to the spoke on condition of Party operative who worked the police force a yeat.
occupation. His parents de- anonymity because he was in the Mosul area fixing later, possibly hiding his
cided to lay low in'the village. not allowed to comment on water tanks before the family's Saddam-era backJ
But some relatives, such as the case. war. ground, the officials said.'
cousin Brig. Khalaf al- "We're sure there are a lot In 2004, he landed a job They also claim that all
Jubouri of the Mosul police, of people who support him
joined the new security and will shelter him."
forces - and hired a family Al-Jabouri's views could
member as a personal body- have been shaped by his
guard, said a village resident growing friendship with al- * - - . 00 * *
who gave his name only as Nueimi, a 25-year-old ser- al, ^s*
Abu Jassim. geant who was once . . . - * - * * .
Then, in 2007, the younger questioned for suspected .
al-Jubouri quit high school to links to insurgent factions.
become a police recruit, tak- (Like many Iraqis, the two Grief Support Group
ing up the government offers attackers use last names that Tuesdays, 2:30 pm
to bring more Sunnis aboard. identify their family and clan Hernando-Pasco Hospice presents ongoing grief
A police official who ties, but the wanted poster is- support for anyone who has experienced the sudden
loss of a loved one. A trained bereavement counselor
knows his family said al- sued by the U.S. military leads the group. Workbooks provided. Registration
Jubouri showed no outward identifies them by their for- required. Call 800.486.8784. FREE
signs of anger at U.S. forces mal names: Sa'ad Ahmed '
and their Iraqi allies. He Jasim Hweesh for al-Jabouri Balance Screening
even took part in several and Mohammed MowfhqAb- 1st & 3rd Wednesday of each month
raids against suspected al- dulrahman Isa for al- 11:15 am - 12:00 noon
Seven Rivers Rehab & Wound Center, 1675 SE. US
Qaida in Iraq cells. Nueimi.) ' Hwy. 19, located in the Crystal River Shopping Center
"Someone must have con- Kurdish security officials, (next to Sweetbay). No appointment needed. Call
vinced him that it was a pa- speaking on condition of 352.795.0534 for details. FREE


Pre-Surgery Ortho Camp
Monday, May 4 & May 18, 1 pm
If you are scheduled for knee or hip replacement
surgery at Seven Rivers Regional, consider attending
Ortho Camp. At Camp, patients learn about pre- and
post-surgery exercises, using a walker, knee and hip
precautions and adaptive equipment for activities of
daily living. Call 352.795.0534 to register. FREE
Final Gifts: Caring for Aging
Loved Ones
Tuesday, May 12. 1pm
Intended for artone %ho v caring for agirg loied
ones Topics to be covered include ho, o lie nkith
different medical conditions. undersLnding options
and 0hen io reach out to professionals and community.
resources Preserntd bN \ end\ Hall,MISW.
Hernando-Pasco Hospice in Citrus Registrjtion
required. Call the Citrus Office of Hernando-Pasco
Hospice, 352.527.46(0. FREE
Alzheimer's & Dementia:
10 Warning Signs & More
Wednesday, May 13,.1 pm
Alzheimer's Associjuon Flonda Gulf Coast Chapter
presents free information for caregiers on dementia
and Alzheimer's disease, arnming signs, sN mptoms.
sidisnrcs, stages of the disease, communication and
behavior changes, caregi% er concerns, safety issues
arid .nr oer, ,i.c of the ser, ices offered by the
Alzheimer's Association. To register, please call Jerry
Fisher at 352.088.4537. FREE
Patriotic & Proud
Friday, May 15,1 pm
This presentation veplains how veterans can restore
dignity and peace through local resources if diagnosed
%% ith j life-ihrgatening illness. Insight is offered as Ito
li'.. Hospi.e can benefit the unique and specialized
needs of a veteran. This program will address the
concems of veterans regarding the utilization of
HospiLe service; Registration required Call [he
Citrus Office of Hernando-Pasco Hospice,
352 527 4600. FREE
Open House: Inpatient Rehabilitation
Saturday, May 16, 2 pm - 4 pm
Be one of the first see the hospit:.l' ne,% est addition
a I6-bed inpatient rehjbilitaiion unit theonlv one of -
it'\, tind within a 50-mile radius Learn ho,' the nef
q�c ',ces rma', he .,hle to10 help )ou or \our fImild in the
future NM. apl..initmeni or reservaiIon needed. Enter
through the hospital's main lobby.
Good News About Knee & Hip Pain
Wednesday, May 20, 1 pm
If you are over 55 and have knee or hip pain, stiffness
or swelling, chances are you have arthritis. The good
news is many treatments are available allowing you to,
move easily and without pain once again. FREE
Diet Therapy for Diabetes
Tuesday, June 2, 6 pm
Diet is an essential part of controlling diabetes.
Understanding how food affects blood glucose levels
empowers you to make choices that best fit your
lifestyle, food preferences and achieve good blood
sugar control. Product samples available. FREE
Childbirth-Related Education
The Women's & Family Center offers a variety of free
or low cost childbirth-related programs including
Early Pregnancy, Sibling Preparation, Infant Care and
Childbirth Refresher. To make an appointment, call
352.795.BABY (2229).

SEVEN RIVERS
O- REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
www.srrmc.com


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICmLE


A8 SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009


NATION/WORLD


I
e
/







SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 A9


DEATHS
Continued from Page A6

Adelaide
Teller, 88
BEVERLY HILLS
The Service of Remem-
Irance for Mrs. Adelaide A.
seller, age 88, of Beverly
fills, Florida, will be held
4:00 PM, Thursday, May 7,
009 at the Beverly Hills
chapel of Hooper Funeral
tomes with Pastor Stewart
amison officiating. Crema-
%tion will be under the direc-
,tion of Hooper Crematory,
Inverness.
Those who wish may send
memorial donations to


Alzheimer's Association Re-
search, 225 N. Michigan
Ave., Fl. 17, Chicago, IL
60601. Online condolences
may be sent to the family at
w w w. Hooper Fu neral
Home.com. She was born
October 28, 1920 in New
York City, NY, daughter of
the late Samuel and Emily
(Cook) Kenny.
She died April 28,2009 in
Lecanto, FL. She was an of-
fice worker by trade. She
moved to Beverly Hills,
Florida from Morris Plains,
NJ 21 years ago. Mrs. Teller
was preceded in death by 3
brothers, Robert, Douglas,
and George and sister,
Edna. Survivors include her
husband of more than 65,
years, Albert W Teller of


Beverly Hills; son, Paul A.
(Lorraine) Teller of May-
wood, NJ; niece, Suzanne
(John) MacLeod of Citrus
Hills, FL; and 2 brothers:
James and Stratford Kenny,
both of North Carolina.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Beverly
Hills Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Homes & Crematory.
Sign the guest book at
www.ehronicleonline.com.
James
'Jim' Thurmond
Sr., 78
James (Jim) Bryan Thur-
mond, Sr., 78, died Thursday,
April 23, 2009. Mr. Thur-
mond was a member of In-
verness VFW Post. and


served in the Korean War.
Survivors include his son,
James Bryan Thurmond, Jr.
of Fort Valley, Ga., and sister,
Ann Aultman of Homosassa
Springs, Fla.
Rooks Funeral Home,
Fort Valley, Ga.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
a The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
both free and paid obit-
uaries.
* Obituaries must be
submitted by the fu-
neral home or society
in charge of arrange
ments.


Tweaked about fake tweets,

Idaho governor joins Twitter


Associated Press
BOISE, Idaho - A bogus
Twitter account set up five
weeks ago in the name of
Idaho Gov.
C.L. "Butch" * Follow th
Otter has at twitter
been shut CitrusCh
down - only
to reopen with the real gov-
ernor sending out tweets.
The popular social net-
working and micro-blog-
ging site allows messages,
called tweets, of 140 char-
acters.
The Idaho Attorney Gen-


r.
r


eral's Office tracked down
the creator of the fake ac-
count, who said he was en-
gaging in satire.
State officials weren't
amused and
e Chronicle complained to
corn/ Twitter offi-
ronicle cials, who on
Thursday
closed the fake account
Later ,that day it re-
opened and the real gover-
nor sent out his first two
messages, one of which
was an update on what the
state is doing about swine
flu.


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T Page A10 -SUNDAY, MAY 3,2009



IN ACTION


& WORLD
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Canadian pigs found with virus


might have
Associated Press


OTTAWA - Pigs on a Canadian
farm have been infected with the
new swine flu virus - apparently
by a farm worker back from Mexico
- and are under quarantine, offi-
cials said Saturday. It is the first
known case of pigs havingthe virus.
But officials quickly urged cau-
tion. Swine flu regularly causes out-
breaks in pigs, and the pigs do not
pose a food safety risk, Dr Brian
Evans, executive vice president
with the Canadian Food Inspection
Agency, told a news conference.


infectedpigs
The officials said the pigs in the
province ofAlberta were thought to
be infected by a Canadian farm
worker who recently visited Mexico
and got sick after returning to
Canada.
The traveler has recovered, and
the estimated 200 sickened pigs are
recovering as well, officials said.
No pigs have died, and officials
said they don't think the flu has
spread beyond the farm.
Normally, detecting influenza in
pigs would not generate a response
from food safety officials, but the
current circumstances are different


with the international flu outbreak,
Evans said.
"The chance that these pigs could
transfer virus to a person is re-
mote," he said, adding that he
would have no issue eating pork
from the infected pigs.
The World Health Organization
has insisted there is no evidence
that pigs are passing the virus to hu-
mans, or that eating pork products
poses an infection risk
And the U.N.'s Food and Agricul-
ture and World Health Organiza-
tion, along with the WTO and the
World Organization for Animal
Health, issued a joint statement
Saturday saying there's no justifica-
tion for any anti-pork trade meas-
ures as a result of the swine flu
epidemic.


CDC: Third ofU.S. flu cases visited Mexico


Associated Press
ATLANTA- About a third of
the confirmed U.S. cases ofswine
flu are people who had been to
Mexico and likely picked up the
infection there, a federal health
official said Saturday
But investigations indicate
many cases are getting the illness
here, and that it probably still is
spreading, said Dr. Anne
Schuchat of the U.S. Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention.
In a press briefing, CDC offi-
cials said the agency knows of
confirmed cases from 21 states,


with Connecticut, Florida and
Missouri the latest to join the list.
The CDC's count of 160 con-
firmed cases released Saturday is
believed to already be outdated.
Some states can now do their own
tests for the swine flu virus and
don't have to send samples to the
CDC. States have reported about
a dozen more cases, bringing the
national total to more than 170.
The swine flu cases range in
age from 1 to 81. but the majority
are people younger than 20. said
Schuchat, the CDC's interim
deputy director for science and
public health.


"''a


Fishing fellows


* '.. I.





ft.,-

-Ct





- r. -*,, - t. C - *


A�M-e.;:.atlher PrEf
Men row their boat to a fishing spot Saturdayiih the Brahmaputra river in Gauhati, India.


Clinton to promote bombing memorial


Board to honor Oklahoma City victims


Associated Press


Associated Press
Former President Clinton speaks to
a crowd at the Oklahoma City Na-
tional Memorial & Museum, Satur-
day In Oklahoma City.


OKLAHOMA CITY - Recalling
the profound impact the Okla-
homa City bombing had on the na-
tion and himself, former
President Bill Clinton announced
Saturday he will join a hew na-
tional board to promote the mis-
sion of the Oklahoma City
National Memorial and Museum.
Clinton, who was president
when a truck bomb tore through
the -Alfred P Murrah Federal
Building on April 19, 1995, and
killed 168 people, took a private
tour of the memorial and museum
and then was given an award for
the support he has given the me-
morial.
The award featured a wood
carving from a limb of the memo-


rial's Survivor Tree mounted to a
stone base of granite salvaged
from the wreckage of the Murrah
Building.
"I generally don't think people
who serve as president of the
United States should ever get any
award - the job was honor
enough," Clinton told a group of
about 200 museum supporters,
bombing survivors and rescue
workers. "But I will really treas-
ure this."
Clinton, making his fifth visit to
the site of the bombing, said the
hope and resilience Oklahomans
showed in the aftermath of the
bombing taught the country that
people gain strength from one an-
other and can thrive despite fac-
ing "the worst in humanity."
"My life has been indelibly


marked by the people I met here
and the stories they told me,"
Clinton said. "I came here, more
than anything else, to say 'thank
you."-
Clinton said the bombing also
provided an impetus for Congress
to push forward legislation he en-
dorsed to strengthen laws aimed
at preventing and countering ter-
rorist attacks.
"Between 1995 and the day I
left office, 'several very serious
terrorist attacks were thwarted,"
he said. "Your country owes you a
lot, and I thank you."
The new Honorary National
Board of Trustees will work with
the staff and board of the memo-
rial to further the memorial's mis-
sion of remembrance and
education on a national level,
said Bill Scheihing, chairman of
the Oklahoma National Memorial
Foundation.


Iraqi


soldier


kills 2


soldiers
Associated Press
BAGHDAD - An Iraqi-
soldier opened fire on a U.S:
military team Saturday,
killing two American sol-'
diers and wounding three,'
the U.S. military said, in an'
attack that could sharpen
worries about the extent of
militant infiltration in
Iraq's security forces.
Iraqi officials described
the attacker - who was
killed in the gunbattle - as
a soldier who also served as
a Sunni Muslim preacher
for his unit near Mosul.
-which is one of the last
urban strongholds for Surnni
insurgents.i
Sueha ,bkbus.-eould in-
crease pressure on the Shi-
ite-led government to try to
root out possible turncoats
and slow efforts to bring
Sunni militiamen into the
police and military as re-
wards for helping battle al-
Qaida in Iraq and other
insurgent factions.
But any possible slow-
down of the Sunni outreach
will meet resistance from
Washington, which sees the
sectarian reconciliation as
essential for Iraq's stability
and to keep security gains
from rolling back
A U.S. military statement
said the attacker was killed
after firing on the U.S. sol-
diers near the entrance to a
combat outpost 12 miles (20
kilometers) south of Mosul.
A separate gunman fired
at other U.S. soldiers at the
outpost, then fled, accord-
ing to Maj. Derrick Cheng, a
spokesman for American
forces in northern Iraq.
In the past, attackers
have used military and po-
lice uniforms to bypass,
checkpoints and gain ac-
cess to heavily guarded
bases. But several Iraqi mil-
itary officials said the gun-
man was a low-ranking
Iraqi soldier.


Nation BRIEFS


Upstate NY nmen accused
of stealing, eating calf
PALMYRA, N.Y.- Two unem-
ployed, hungry men stole a calf from a
neighbor's barn, shot it with an arrow
and slit its throat before roasting the
meat, police said.
, David Lochner, 21, and Timothy
Welch, 18, were camping outside
Palmyra, 20 miles southeast of
Rochester, several weeks ago when a
dairy farmer reported his calf missing,
said State Police Investigator John
Stubbe.
Authorities found a bloody bow and
remains near the barn and in a river.
The two Palmyra men first said they
had shot a deer. But Stubbe said au-
thorities later determined that the two
had walked from their campsite to
Brandon Hoad's barn and broke in.
The pair lived together in a house
just down the road from the dairy
farmer.
"They were out camping and de-
cided they wanted something to eat,"
said Stubbe. "One guy led the calf by a
rope around its neck, and the other


shot it twice with an arrow. It still would-
n't die, so he cut its throat."
The two gutted the animal and
sliced off steaks, leaving the carcass
behind, the investigator said.
They were arrested and arraigned
Wednesday on burglary charges. Po-
lice said more charges are pending, in-
cluding cruelty to animals.
Lochner and Welch remain jailed on
$25,000 bail each. County police didn't
know whether they have attorneys.
"I've seen farm animals stolen, but I
don't recall anything like this, where
two kids were out camping and they
thought they needed a meal," Stubbe
said.
Rescuers find hiker who
vanished from Va. trail
RICHMOND, Va. -A legally blind
hiking magazine editor who went
missing along the Appalachian Trail in
Virginia has been found in good condi-
tion.
Authorities say 41-year-old Kenneth
Knight of Ann Arbor, Mich., was found
around 5 p.m. Saturday. He was last


seen on Sunday.
Friends had reported him missing
when he didn't meet up with his hiking
group and then missed his flight home
Wednesday.
Knight is a production editor for
Backpacking Light magazine.
Backpacking Light chief executive
officer Ryan Jordan says Knight set a
brush fire several miles from where he
was last seen that attracted the atten-
tion of firefighters.
Knight was being taken to a local
hospital, but Jordan says he did not
think Knight was injured.
Hundreds rally for
convicted U.S. journalist
FARGO, N.D. - Hundreds of peo-
ple supporting a U.S. journalist impris-
oned in Iran have gathered for a vigil
on a bridge connecting Fargo and
Moorhead, Minn.
North Dakota Gov. John Hoeven
said the rally Saturday at the Veterans
Memorial Bridge recognizes Roxana
Saberi's plight and asks that she and
her family "be allowed to return home."
Saberi's father says the Fargo na-


tive went on a hunger strike after she
was convicted of espionage in Iran
and sentenced to prison last month.
The trial was not made public and
lasted one day.
Her parents are in Iran trying to per-
suade the government to release her.
Concordia College president
Pamela Jolicoeur says Saberi is an
"inspiration." Saberi had been sched-
uled to speak at her alma mater's
commencement this weekend.
Prom limo driver charged
with drunken driving
LOWELL, Mass. -A limousine
driver hired to take a group of high
school students to the prom has been
arrested after the students suspected
he had been drinking.
Lowell police say 45-year-old Brian
Harrison of Tewksbury, Mass., was
charged late Friday with operating a
motor vehicle while under the influ-
ence.
Police say two female students that
Harrison picked up suspected he may
have been drunk. One called a parent,
who called police.


The students, from Lowell Catholic
High School, refused to get into the
limo, and the driver left. Police say he
returned later, told the students he
was sorry and tried to persuade them
to get into the vehicle.
Harrison was released on bail and
will be arraigned Monday in Lowell
District Court.
Obama: Wall Street will
play less dominant role
WASHINGTON - Wall Street is not
going to play as dominant a role in the,
economy as regulations reduce "some,
of the massive leveraging and the
massive risk-taking that had become
so common," President Barack
Obama says.
The changes in the role of Wall
Street and the huge profits that came
from that risk-taking could mean other
adjustments as well, Obama said in an
interview in this week's New York
Times Magazine.
"That means that more talent, more
resources will be going to other sec-
tors of the economy," he said.
-From wire reports


Officials say farm worker












E Page All -SUNDAY, MAY 3,2009


EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Few tourists enjoy a nearly empty beach Friday In the resort city of Cancun, Mexico. While Mexico fights to contain a swine flu outbreak, the tourism Industry is hurting nationwide.

Swine flu reshapes ..........- . Q&A: Is traveling safe
..*... * " . '. ': ..&.. B am id sw ine flu fears?


imexican wtourn
NATALIA PARRA
Associated Press writer
ACAPULCO, Mexico - Aca-
pulco's mayor is telling tourists
from.Mexico City to go home, and
,residents are stoning their cars.
C lcun's hotels are pleading for
vyritors to fill their empty rooms.
The swine flu outbreak is remak-
ing tourism in strange ways in a
country heavily dependent on it.
Tourism to Mexico has plum-
meted since the swine flu out-
break was declared a week ago,
causing the tourism secretary to
say Friday that he's shelving funds
earmarked for a publicity cam-
paign until after the epidemic
subsides. Rodolfo. Elizondo ac-
knowledged itisn't the best time to
promote Mexico as a vacation
spot,
Treasury Secretary Agustin
Carstens said the flu will be a
heavy blow to tourism, Mexico's
third-largest legal source of for-
eign currency.
Mexico's resorts, however, are
experiencing the crisis in very dif-,
ferent ways.
The top destination, Cancun,
caters largely to foreigners, who
are steering clear of Mexico. The
city has lost an estimated $2.4 mil-
lion in the past week as occupancy
dropped 40 percent below usual


Tourists Scott Edgar, left, and Matt Metlege, of Canada, sunbathe
Wednesday at the pearly empty Gran Carlbe Real hotel's terrace in Can-


cun, Mexico.

levels for this time of year, said
Rodrigo de la Pena, president of
the Cancun Hotel Association.
Businesses are doing every-,
thing they can to woo tourists, he
said: Restaurants are offering
two-for-one dinners and bars two-
for-one drinks, while handicraft
stores have $1 specials on dolls
and necklaces.
"It's imperative that our hotels
have tourists," Pena said. "We are
in a serious economic crisis."
Occupancy is down similar lev-
els in Acapulco, but the city seems .
to want it that way for now.
Acapulco caters more to visitors
from Mexico City, a five-hour drive
away, but residents are afraid the!,


tourists are bringing swine flu
from the capital, where most cases
have occurred. .
"Someone who has flu symp-
toms shouldn't think they can
come to Acapulco for the weather
and get better - that some fresh
air and tequila arid discos are
going to make them forget about
everything," Mayor Manuel
Anorve said. "So we ask them to
be responsible and not come."
Acapulco officials are putting
out the word that bars, restaurants
and tour boats are closed, and that
the only things open for business
are hotels ..


BETH J. HARPAZ
AP travel editor

NEW YORK- Here are some
questions and answers for trav-
elers regarding swine flu, flights
and cruises to Mexico, travel in-
surance, and how to protect
yourself while traveling.
Q. Can I travel to Mexico?
A. Yes. Flights continue from
the U.S. to Mex'ico, with most air-
lines reporting few cancellations
and no changes in schedules be-
cause of the swine flu outbreak.
Q. Should I continue with a
planned trip to Mexico?
A. The U.S. Centers for Dis-
ease Control and Prevention
states that "continued travel by
U.S. travelers to Mexico presents
a serious risk for further out-
breaks of swine flu in the United
States" and "recommends that
U.S. travelers avoid all
nonessential travel to Mexico."
That said, some individuals are
going ahead with planned trips.
according to interviews with
tour group leaders, travelers and
online forums.
Q. What about cruises to Mex-
ico?
A. Some cruise lines have sus-
pended port calls in Mexico,
with ships scheduled for Mexico


See FLU/Page A16


spending additional time at sea
or substituting port calls else-
where. Check your cruise line's
Web site or call for details.
Q. If I cancel a planned trip be-
cause of the swine flu scare, will
I get a refund?
A. It depends. Most airlines
are waiving fees for rebooking
flights at least for the next week
or two. Some resorts with hotels
in Mexico and other locations
are permitting travelers to
switch destinations if they have
availability at say, a hotel owned
by the same company in the
Caribbean. But you'd have to re-
book your airfare to a new desti-
nation, which depends on airline
availability and may cost more
than your original flight. Some
travel suppliers are providing
refunds or credits toward future
vacations; some are not Call and
ask.
Q. If I have travel insurance
and cancel a planned trip be-
cause of the swine flu scare, will
I get a refund?
A. Again, it depends. If you
have a "cancel for any reason"
insurance policy, you would get
a partial refund. But most tradi-
tional trip cancellation insur-

See Q&A/Page A16


Special to me Chronicle
In September 2007, Art and Dayle Caterino of Hernando and Old Orchard Beach, Maine,
enjoyed a trip to Italy: viewing the Vatican, Coliseum and TreviFountain In Rome; a
week In a Tuscan villa; day trips to Pisa, Sienna, Cinque Terra and Assisi; three nights
In Venice and four at Lake Como. "We experienced such a wonderfully different lifestyle
In each area," the Caterinbs write. They climbed the Leaning Tower of Pisa.


Rainy day
Blair Currie and his wife,
residents of Edenton,
N.C., took a trip to the
Mediterranean In 2008.
They flew in to
Barcelona, Spain, to con-
nect with their cruise
ship, then visited Monte
Carlo, Pompeii, Pisa and
Rome. "The Leaning
Tower of Pisa was re-
markable," Currie writes,
"perhaps even more so
since we visited it in the
pouring rain." Currie
stands at the tower in
the photo at right. "St.
Peter's in Rome was
breathtaking In splendor,
and as we toured the
Coliseum and the Forum,
we tried to visualize the
events of centuries ago.
... At the Trevi Fountain
we marveled at the
beauty, and yes, we did
make a wish, but the
memories and experi-
ences of the spots vis-
ited will be with us for a
lifetime, more than any
wish could ever bring."
Special to the Chronicle


The Chronicle and 'The Accent Travel
Group are sponsoring a photo contest for
readers of the newspaper.
Readers are invited to send a photograph
from their Dream Vacation with a brief de.
scription of the trip. - . ....
If it's selected as a winner, it will be pub-


lished in the Sunday Chronicle. At the end
of the year, a panel of judges will select
the best photo during the year and that
photograph will win a prize.
Please avoid photos with dates on the
-print. - .
Photos should be sent to the Chronicle'


at 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429 or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inverness, Crystal River
or any Accent Travel Office.
Qualified candidates from past years
will remain in the running for future con-
tests.


DREAM
VACATONS








CrITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES =


* The Citrus County Veter-
ans Coalition invites all honor-
ably discharged veterans, their
wives, widows and widowers to
their open business meeting at
6 p.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly in the County Veterans
Service Office classroom at the
Citrus County Resource Center
in Lecanto next to the VA Clinic.
Come see what the Citrus Vet-
erans Coalition is all about and
if you feel you can assist in the
'Veterans Helping Veterans"
program, please come on
board as a member,
We are a service to needy
veterans organization, provid-
ing food supplements and non-
perishable foods through our
'Veterans Food Pantry." We are
providing assistance to needy
and disabled veterans and their
families with minor repairs to
their homes through the gen-
erosity of volunteers who are in
the plumbing, electrical and
construction industry. We are
also providing funds for annual
scholarships to veteran family
members who apply through
their school counseling serv-
ices. We have also assisted in
the CFCC building fund re-
cently.
Annual membership donation
is $10 during a calendar year or
$25 for three years. The CCVC
is a nonprofit corporation and
your donations are tax de-
ductible.
The next Veterans Benefit
Yard Sale is set from 7 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. Saturday at Our Lady
of Fatima Church on U.S. 41
South, Inverness. The yard sale
has grown to 120 spaces and
reservations are on a first come
first served basis by calling
Richard Floyd between 5 and 7
-p.m. Monday through Friday at
726-5031. Spaces are a $10
donation per space and we
welcome all non-perishable
food donations at the registra-
tion tent on site, so bring some
food for the Veterans Food
Pantry. This will be our final
Yard Sale until September.
Get the golf clubs out and
make a tee time for the Vet-
eran's Benefit Golf Tournament
at Brentwood Farms set for
Sunday, May 24. It's a nine-
hole scramble, best ball, with
prizes for closest to the pin,
fewesIj:;utts,10owest-score and
much more. $15 entry fee is ta'
ddurfibl6 to include a cart and'
greens fees. Food and drink
proceeds will be going to the
Citrus County Veterans Coali- �
tion to help needy veterans and
their family members. Call 527-
2600 for tee times starting at 8
a.m., 10:30 a.m. and if neces-
sary another will be scheduled
for 1 p.m. Don't miss this op-
portunity to help a veteran and
have fun doing it.
U All Purple Heart recipients
arid their guests are invited to
attend an Armed Forces Day.
picnic hosted by Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart.
The picnic will take place from
11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Satur-
day, May 16, at the pavilion in
Bicentennial Park, off U.S. 19 in
Crystal River.
Come and share the cama-
raderie of fellow Purple Heart
recipients and learn more about
the Military Order of the Purple
Heart, which is the only veter-
ans service organization com-
prised exclusively of combat
veterans. Special guest will be
U.S. Rep. Ginny Brown-Waite,
5th Congressional District,
Florida.
Join Chapter 776's combat-
wounded veterans on May 16
by e-mailing info@citruspurple


'What the American Flag Means to Me'


Special to the Chronicle
Recently, The Fleet Reserve Association Branch/Ladies Unit 186 sponsored an essay contest to all grades 7 through 12.
The theme of the essay was "What the American Flag Means to Me." The winning essays were reviewed by members of
the FRA and the first place winners in all grades were then forwarded to the Southeast Regional Competition for additional
Judging. There, any winners would be forwarded to the National competition for scholarship grants of more than $15,000.
Ninth- and 10th-grade winners, Sarah Harrison, ninth grade; and Chandler Brothers, 10th grade, both of Lecanto High
School. Chandler also placed third in the regional competition. Sarah and Chandler are presented their certificates and sav-
ings bonds by members of the FRA/Unit 186 and Kelly Tyler, principal of Lecanto High School.

Eighth-grade win-
ner, Robert
Sheffield of
Lecanto Middle
School being pre-
sented his certifi-
S�cate and savings
i bond with mem-
bers of the FRA
S and Principal
-James Kusmaul.

. OT', 11i ,.
Seventh grade
winner, Melanie
Dodd, home
schooled of Inver-
ness being pre-
sented her
certificate and
1H savings bond with
Usher family pres-
ent.

No photo was
- available for the
11th-grade win-
ner, Anh-My
Nguyen from
Ridgewood High
School in Port
Richey. No photo
_ was available for
� . . .. - the12th-grade
, ..... :winner, Eric k.
cHall of St. John's
Lutheran High
School in Ocala.


heart.org or calling Curt at 382-
3847..
* The Veterans Apprecia-
tion Week Ad Hoc Coordinat-
ing Committee will conduct its
monthly coordination meeting
for Citrus County's 17th Annual
Veterans Appreciation Week at
1:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 20,
in the Conference Room of the
Citrus County Chronicle build-
ing, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River.
All veteran service organiza-
tions and individual veterans
are welcome and encouraged
to send representatives to par-
ticipate in the planning process.
Any organization or person de-
siring additional information
should contact Chairman Fred
Daniels by e-mail at fredinfloral
city@wildblue.net or by phone
at 422-2449.
* Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call John Young at the
Hunger and Homeless Coali-


BUY ONE
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tion at 628-4357, or pass along
this phone number to the vet-
eran.
* The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Anyone who has honorably
served within Korea or outside
Korea from June 25, 1950, to
Jan. 31, 1955, and anyone
serving within Korea from 1955
to present is eligible to join the
Korean War Veterans Associa-
tion (KWVA). Call Hank Butler
at 563-2496, Paul Salyer at
637-1161 or Neville Anderson
at 344-2529.
* Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Key Training
Center, 130 Heights Ave., In-
vemess. Potluck dinner at 6
p.m., meeting starts at 7:15.
Auxiliary Unit 77 meets at the
same time and place. Call Post
Cmdr. Paul Miller at 344-8277
or Auxiliary president Alice
Brumett at 860-2981.
* American Legion Post
155 events for the week of May
3 to 9:
Today: Breakfast 8:30 to 11
a.m., $5. Dart tournament 6
p.m.
Tuesday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Bingo 1 to 4 p.m. SAL
meeting 7 p.m.
Wednesday: Chicken "hot
wings" noon to 3 p.m. Italian
spaghetti dinner 5 to 7 p.m., $5.
Live music 6 to 10 p.m.
Thursday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Bingo 1 to 4 p.m. Show
Me the Money 5 p.m. Friday:
Fish fry dinner 5 to 7 p.m., $6.
Live music 6 to 10 p.m.
Saturday:' Pool tournament 2
p.m. Fourth District Boys State
Briefing at Post 155 from 1 to 4
p.m. with dinner for the Boys
State Delegates and their fami-
lies.
Call Cmdr. Jim Woodman at
795-6526 or visit the Web at
www.postl55.org.
* The Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War 11 will conduct its last meet--
ing before the summer break at
11:30 a.m. Saturday at Kally
K's, 3383 U.S. 19 in Spring Hill.
* Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122,'8191 S..
Florida Ave.,; Floral City, 637r
0100, week of May 3 to 9:

See NOTES/Page A13


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from Research In Motion Limited. Screen images are simulated. �2009 AlItel Communications, LLC. All rights reserved.


A12 SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009









CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, M~ 3, 2009 A13


In the SERVICE


Greenlee graduates
basic combat training
Army Pfc. Samantha D. Greenlee
has graduated from basic combat
training at Fort Jackson, Columbia,
S.C.
During the nine weeks of training,
the soldier studied the Army mission,
history, tradition and core values,
physical fitness, and received instruc-
tion and practice in basic combat
skills, military weapons, chemical war-
fare and bayonet training, drill and cer-
emony, marching, rifle marksmanship,
armed and unarmed combat, map
reading, field tactics, military courtesy,
military justice system, basic first aid,
foot marches and field training exer-
cises.
Greenlee earned distinction as an
honor graduate.
She is the daughter of Raymond
Greenlee of Riverview and Debra
Case of Citrus Springs.
Greenlee is a 2006 graduate of East
Bay Senor High School, Gibsonton.
Trimarche retires
from military service
Chief Petty Officer Sereno P. Tri-
marche II was born Feb. 22, 1970, in
Staten Island, N.Y. After.moving to In-


vemess and graduating from Citrus
High School, he attended basic train-
ing in Orlando in June 1988 and re-
ported to Naval Aircrew Candidate
School in Pensacola. After successful
completion, he reported to Aviation
Electrician's Mate (Al) training in
Millington, Tenn.
He transferred to Patrol Squadron
Thirty (VP-30) at Naval Air Station
Jacksonville in May 1989, where his
duties included utility aircrewman,
schedules petty officer and duty flight
crew. He served on the command
auxiliary security force and attended
Florida Community College at Jack-
sonville as a part time student. It was
here he was promoted to second class
petty officer.
His next assignment was to Strike
Fighter Squadron 131 (VFA-131) on
Cecil Field, Jacksonville, in August
1991, where he served as the AB work
center night shift supervisor and trou-
bleshooter. He attended Florida A&M
University and eamed his qualification
as an enlisted aviation warfare spe-
cialist. He participated in many work
up cycles and made a deployment on-
board the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower
(CVN-69) and the "shakedown cruise"
onboard the USS George Washington
(CVN-73).


Special to the Chronicle
Aviation Electrician's Mate Chief
Petty Officer Sereno P. Trimarche
11.

Hearing the call of flight, he applied
for and was accepted to E6-A Flight
Engineer school onboard Naval Avia-
tion Training Unit, Tinker Air Force
Base, Oklahoma City, Okla. Here, he
graduated first in his class and was
promoted to first class petty officer.
In September 1996, he reported to
Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron 3
(VQ-3), and immediately rolled into


duty as a flight engineer, deploying all
over the continental United States in
support of the National Command Au-
thority's communication mission.
While attached to VQ-3, he earned
his first Humanitarian Service Medal
for actions taken during the aftermath
of the tornado to his Oklahoma City in
1999.
In May 2000, he reported to Naval
Air Technical Training Center, Pen-
sacola, to attend Advanced Avionics
and Weapons Systems maintenance
(Cl) school. After completion of C1
school, he attended Basic Instructor
Training down the road at Naval Tech-
nical Training Center, Corry Station.
After completing instructor school,
he reported to Aviation Electrician's
Mate Al school as an instructor. Here
his duties included Core and upper
unit instructor, duty section leader, and
'A' school leading petty officer. He was
vice president of the First Class Asso-
ciation and president of the Pensacola
Association of Sports Officials.
In November 2003, he reported to
the USS.Essex in Sasebo, Japan.
While serving as the IM3 division LPO,
he found out he was to be promoted to
chief petty officer.
After receiving his anchors, Chief
Trimarche served as the Safety


LCPO, AIMD's quality assurance offi-
cer and ER09 LCPO. Chief Trimarche
made a deployment to the Arabian
Gulf and participated in numerous ex-
ercises throughout the South Pacific,
Indian Ocean and Southeast Asia. He
also led a team ashore in Indonesia to
assist with the relief effort following the
tsunami in 2004.
Chief Trimarche reported to his final
duty station, VFA-106, in November
2006, where he served as mainte-
nance control chief petty officer, avion-
ics division LCPO, first lieutenant
LCPO and the squadron anti terrorism
officer. He received his Bachelor of
Science in Professional Aeronautics in
August 2008 from Embry-Riddle Aero-
nautical University.
His personal awards include three
Navy and Marine Corps Achievement
Medals, the Presidential Unit Citation,
five Good Conduct Medals, two Hu-
manitarian Service Medals, the Global
War on Terrorism Expeditionary
Medal, the Global War on Terrorism
Service Medal, and the Armed Forces
Service Medal.
Trimarche is the son of Sereno "Sal"
and Rita Trimarche of Lecanto. He
and his family - wife Michelle and
sons Collin, Cameron and Coda -
hope to relocate to Citrus County.


NOTES
Continued from Page A12

Today: Chinese Auction -
fundraiser for Ladies Auxiliary
Cancer Research from 2 to 5
p.m. Barbecued chicken and
ribs $5 a plate from 2 to 5 p.m.
- fundraiser for "Lucky Dog."
Music by DL.
Monday: House Committee
meeting 7 p.m.
Tuesday: Bingo starting at 3
p.m. sponsored by the Ladies &
Men's Auxiliaries, guests wel-
come.
Wednesday: Wings three for
$1 served from 4 to 7 p.m.,
guests welcome.
Friday: All-you-can-eat fish
(fried, baked or blackened) $7,
or a three piece fried chicken
dinner, served from 4 to 7 p.m.
Karaoke by Mr. T from 6 to 9
p.m. Guests welcome.
Saturday: Dinner/Dance.
Lasagna dinner $8.50 served ,
from 5 to 7 p.m. Music by Re-,
Bop from 6 to 9 p.m. Guests
welcome.
Sunday, May 10: Victor's
wimpy burgers two for $1
served from 2 to 5 p.m.
* VFW Post 7991, 3107 W.
Dunnellon Road, Dunnellon,
(352) 489-1772.
Wednesday: Bingo, starting
at 1 p.m. Hot dogs are avail- .
able. Open to the public.
Friday: Bingo starting at 1
p:m. Sandwiches or hot dogs
are available. Open to the pub-
lic.
Sunday, May 10: Happy
Mother's Day. Bring your
mother, wife or friends in for a
great breakfast. Full breakfast
menu includes eggs, bacon,
sausage, biscuits, home fries,
pancakes, grits, toast, coffee
and juice for $5. Children 12
and younger $3.
We are a non smoking post,
but we do have a large smok-
ing patio available.
X Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 west on Veterans
Drive across from Harley
Davidson dealership an-
nounces events for May.
Tuesday: "Cinco-De-Mayo"
party with all Mexican foods,
special on drink prices, Best
Sombrero "win a prize" dinner
at 5 p.m. but party all day long.
Open to members and friends.'
Wednesday: 2 p.m. bingo
and lunch open to public.


Friday: Wet burritos, open to
public.
Sunday, May 10: Happy
Mothers Day to all. Mixed dou-
bles pool at 3 p.m.
Wednesday, May 13:2 p.m.
bingo with lunch open to public.
Friday, May 15: Beef tips,
open to public $6.
Sunday, May 17, District
meeting in Floral City 1 p.m.
Wednesday, May 20: Bingo
and lunch open to public.
Friday, May 22: Cold plate
stuffed tomatoes with tuna or
chicken salad, open to public.
Sunday, May 24: Bingo with
lunch 2 p.m., open to public.
Monday, May 25: Memorial
Day, 2 p.m. hot dogs and ham-
burgers for all.
Wednesday, May 27: Bingo
with lunch open to public.
Friday, May 29: Shepherd's.
pie meal.
Sunday, May 31: Mixed dou-
bles pool league 3 p.m.
For information, call 795-
5012.
* Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337, 906 State Road 44 E., In-
verness, phone 344-3495.
Karaoke is presented each
Sunday, Tuesday and Friday
evenings.,
Bar Bingo is played Monday
and Thursday afternoons and
Wednesday evening.
We serve Wings each Tues-
day evening and fish or chicken
on Friday evenings.
"Show Me The Money" is
played each Saturday from 1 to


3 p.m.
* The Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association (AFA) will con-
duct its May meeting at 10 a.m.
Saturday, May 16, at VFW Post
4337, 906 State Road 44 E., In-
verness. It is very important that
AFA members in South Marion,
Citrus and Sumter counties at-
tend this meeting. Guests are
always welcome to our meet-
ings. Call Mike Emig (352) 854-
8328.
* The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58, 10730
U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Regular meeting of the Post
and Auxiliary is on the first
Wednesday of the month start-
ing at 7 p.m.
Dunnellon Young Marines
meets every Tuesday evening
from 6 to 9 p.m.
Bingo is every Thursday
evening. Doors open at 4 p.m.
Games start at 6 p.m. Food
available.
Pancake breakfast every
third Saturday of the month
from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. All you
can eat for a $4 donation.
Third Saturday Outdoor Flea
Market held monthly on our
premises. Vendors $10. Call
Larry Jones for information at
522-0177.
* The AmVets William
Crow Post 447, 33 Risher
Ave., Inglis, will have a
fundraiser and open karaoke
from 2 to 6 p.m. Saturday, May
16. Dinner will include sirloin tip


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A18.

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JOINT

REPLACEMENT
so you can get back to
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roast, baked potato, gravy, but-
tered corn, salad, roll and
dessert. $8 donation. Public in-
vited. To Go orders, call 447-
4473.
0 The H. F. Nesbitt VFW
Post 10087 in Beverly Hills off
C.R. 491, across the street
from ROC's 491 Sports Bar and
directly behind the new Supe-
rior Bank.
Today: Bingo in the big hall
beginning at 1 p.m.
Monday: The VFW Golf
League plays at different
courses. Contact Dick Sorrells
or Jim Freiheit at the post for
tee times and locations. The
Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at 9 a.m. at
Twisted Oaks G.C. Check with
Lou Kempf for available tee
times. Dart tournament in the
canteen beginning at 7 p.m.
Tuesday: Pool tournament in
the canteen beginning at 1 p.m.
House Committee meeting and
staff meeting every third Tues-
day and post general meeting
every fourth Tuesday.
Wednesday: Bar bingo in
the canteen at 1 p;m. Wednes-
day is Ladies Night from 5 until
8 p.m. Cookout for a nominal'
donation from 5 until 7 p.m.
Karaoke at. 7 p.m. with a differ-
ent host each week.
Thursday: VFW Mixed Golf
League alternating between
Twisted Oaks Golf Club and
Pine Ridge Golf Club with an 8
a.m. tee time. Check with Dave


Nealey or Ray Galinski for
available tee times. Pool tour-
nament in the canteen at 7 p.m.
Friday: Dart tournament at 7
p.m.
Saturday: Karaoke in the
canteen from 7 to 11 p.m. fea-
turing a different host each
week.
* VFW Post 4252 and
Ladies Auxiliary invites all eli-
gible persons to join. Stop in at
the post or call for information.
Post 4252 is at 3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, S.R. 200, Her-
nando; phone 726-3339. Send
e-mails to vfw4252@tam-
pabay.rr.com.
* Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 11:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Crystal Paradise
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Luncheon at 1 p.m. May 12
will be at The Supper Club in
Crystal River.
* Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shonk Chap-
ter 70 and Auxiliary 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the in-:
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41.
DAV Chapter 70 and Auxil-
iary meetings are at 2 p.m. on
the second Tuesday of each
month.
The DAV Chapter is open
from 9 a.m. to noon every
Tuesday to assist disabled vet-


erans. A service officer is avail-
able by appointment. Contact
Bill Geden at 341-6875.
For the Chapter, call Richard
Floyd, adjutant at 726-5031.
For the Auxiliary, call Lynn Ar-
mitage, adjutant at 341-5334.
* Seabee Veterans of
America Island X-18 All
Seabees, Honeybees, relatives
and friends are welcome to our
meetings and events. Meetings
are at 11 a.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at the VA
Office, 2804 Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto. We have a
short meeting, about one hour,
at the VA Office, then we will
eat lunch at a local restaurant
decided on at the meeting. On
the third Wednesday monthly,
we have a luncheon.
Call Cmdr. David Puffer at
746-9327 or e-mail
puffels@tampabay.rr.com
* Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E.,Gulf-to-Lake. Highway). -For
more aboutthe 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Richard Grio ni
at 637-1236; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Debi Gan-,
non at 637-1236 or visit
www.Postl55.org.
* Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
See NOTES/Page A14


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SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 A13


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ai4 SUNDAY1\hy 3 2009


Veterans welcome home soldiers


Special to the Chronicle

On April 7, a well-deserved he-
roes' welcome was observed at the
VFW Post 4337 for Staff Sgt. John
Andrews and PFC James Schegal,
who recently returned home from
a long tour of duty in the Iraq and
Afghanistan Theaters of Opera-
tions.
More than 150 members of the
community came to VFW Post
10087 for this hero's welcome as
Citrus County Heroes Committee
of Barbara Mills, Jay Conti Sr. and
members of other veterans organ-
izations welcomed home Andrews
and Schegal with a basket full of
donated gifts. During the welcome
home celebration, American Le-
gion Post 155 Adjutant Jay Conti
Sr. awarded both Staff Sgt. John
Andrews and PFC James Schegal
with the official American Legion
"Thank You for Serving" Chal-
lenge Coin. Bob Huscher from the
Fleet Reserve Association Branch
186 awarded each soldier with a
gift certificate to Walmart.
Andrews, a 2003 graduate of Cit-
rus High School, was forward-de-
ployed in the area called the
triangle of death in Iraq, bordered
on one side by the Euphrates
River. While deployed for 14
months in Iraq as a combat medic,
Andrews made many MedEvac
missions by Humvees and by the
Black Hawk helicopter and saved
many of his fellow soldiers' lives
during his long tour. Andrews is
stationed at Fort Bragg, N.C., with
the 47th CASH.
Schlegal, a 2004 graduate of Cit-
rus High School, deployed to
Afghanistan for the past 12 months
with the 101st Airborne Division
(Air Assault) "Screaming Eagles"
from Fort Campbell, Ky. He spe-
cializes in signal air intelligence,
providing early warning informa-
tion to the rest of the units on the
ground.
Another hero's welcome
On April 11, another hero's wel-
come was held at VFW Post 10087
in Beverly Hills for Sgt. Jimmy Ro-


Special to the Chronicle
From left are: Jay Conti.Sr., American Legion 4th District public relations officer; Don Saylor, senior vice com-
mander VFW Post 4337; Billy Wein, U.S. Submariners Association; Jerry Webb, past commander VFW Post
4337; Jack Townsend, US Submariners Association; PFC James Schegal; SSG John Andrews; Barbara Mills,
Citrus County Heroes coordinator; Reggie Thurnlow and Reggie Clarke of the U.S. Submariners Association;
and Bob Huscher, Fleet Reserve Association Branch 186.


From left are: Bob Huscher, Fleet Reserve Association Branch 186; Jay Conti Sr., Citrus County Heroes;
Gene Perrino Sr., past commander VFW4337; Sgt. Jimmy Rodriguez; Jim Freihet, senior vice commander;
Prudy and Jose Rodriguez; and Barbara Mills, Citrus County Heroes.


driguez, who returned home from
the ongoing fight on the Global
War on Terrorism. Rodriguez re-
turned home from his second tour
of duty from the Iraqi Theater of
Operations.
He was honored by numerous


veterans from VFW Post 10087,
American Legion Post/Unit 155,58
& 166, Fleet Reserve Association
Branch 186, U.S. Submarine Vet-
erans, Citrus 40/8 Voiture/Cabane
1219 and Mr. and Mrs. Flanagan.
More than 150 members of the


community came to VFW Post
10087 for this hero's welcome as
Citrus County Heroes Committee
of Barbara Mills, Jay Conti and
Bob Huscher along with the above
veterans organizations welcomed'
home Sgt Rodriguez with a basket


full of gifts that were donated by
Citrus County merchants, veter-
ans organizations and the Citrus
County community. During the
welcome home celebration, Amer-
ican Legion Post 155 Adjutant Jay
Conti Sr. awarded Rodriguez with
the official American Legion
"Thank You for Serving" Chal-
lenge Coin. Bob Huscher from the
Fleet Reserve Association Branch
186 awarded him with a gift cer-
tificate to Walmart.
Rodriguez, a 2001 graduate of
Lecanto High School, is no
stranger to veterans organizations,
as he is a member of the American
Legion and VFW
During Rodriguez's second tour
of duty in Iraq he was in charge of
base security at Al Taji Airfield
and is directly responsible for
training the Iraqi Army (IA) and
Iraqi Police (IP) forces. He went
on numerous mounted (in tanks
and Humvees) and unmounted
patrols in the Taji Marketplace.
Rodriguez has been selected for
the Army's Warrant Officer Pro-
gram and will be headed to War-
rant School and accepting a
commission in the U.S. Army

This Welcome Home a Hero
Project is funded fully by dona-
tions only and would not be possi-
ble if it weren't for the generosity
of the Citrus County merchants,
the American Legion, VFW, Fleet
Reserve Association and other
veteran organizations donating
items or funds to fill these wel-
come home baskets.
If you, your community, store or
veterans organization would like
help the Citrus County Heroes
Welcome Home Baskets program
for our local veterans to continue
through 2009 and beyond or help
out in any way, call Mrs. Barbara
Mills at 422-6236 or visit the Web
site www.CitrusCountyHeroes.org.
You can also send a donation to:
Barbara Mills, PO. Box 1046, In-
verness, FL 34451-1046; make
checks payable to VFW Woman's
Auxiliary 4337.


NOTES
Continued from Page A13

Purple Heart (MOPH) will con-
duct its bimonthly meeting at
1:15 p.m. Tuesday, May 19, at
the Caf.,of the Citrus County
Resource Center/VA Clinic,
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto (west side of C.R. 491
approximately 1 mile north of
C.R. 486).
All combat wounded veter-
ans and parents, spouses, sib-.
lings and lineal descendants of
living or deceased Purple Heart
recipients are cordially invited
to attend the meeting and to
become a Chapter 776 mem-
ber. Military Order of the Purple
Heart life membership is $50.
There are no chapter dues. To
learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit the Chapter 776 Web site
at www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 382-3847.
E Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
bimonthly at 1:15 p.m. on the
third Tuesday of January,
March, May, July, September
and November at the Citrus
County Resources Center/VA
Clinic, 2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto (west side of
C.R. 491' approximately I mile
north of C.R. 486).
All combat wounded veter-
ans and lineal descendants of
Purple Heart recipients are in-
vited to attend a meeting. Life,
memberships for combat
wounded veterans and lineal
descendants of Purple Heart
recipients are $50. There are
no chapter dues. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit www.


Legion Post 155 to observe Memorial Day


Special to the Chronicle

American Legion Post 155 in Crys-
tal River will honor all veterans on
Memorial Day: Monday, May 25, with
services at three cemeteries. Ser,-
ices at the post will be followed by a
Memorial Day picnic and party.
During the ceremony, which starts
at 11 a.m., there will be guest speak-
ers with Ron Kitchen, mayor of Crys-
tal River, and Dennis Flanagan. Sgt.
Dennis Flanagan Foundation, a Blue
Star Event and presentation and ded-
ication ceremony of the late Rheuben
M. Hair Sr., past post commander and
American Legion Department of
Florida commander'
For the Blue Star Event, the post is
still taking requests for presenting
Citrus County residents with a Blue
Star: If you have a son or daughter,


citruspurpleheart.org or call
382-3847.
* The Dan Campbell Air,-
borne Association meets at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 Gulf-to-Lake
Highway (State Road 44), Crys-
tal River. All current and previ-
ous Airborne members and
their wives are welcome to join
us. Call Steve Leonard at 726-
3693.
. The Marine Corps
League, Samuel R. Wall De-
tachment 1139 will conduct its
regular meeting at 7 p.m. the
third Wednesday monthly at
DAV Post 70 in Inverness at the
intersection of Independence
Avenue and U.S. 41 North. All
former Marines are welcome.
Call Tom Heron at 637-2724 or
Joe Spoto at 746-3315.
* Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40


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grandson or granddaughter who is
currently serving on active duty and
will be attending the Memorial Day
services, the post would like to honor
you w ith a Blue Star Banner Award.
Call Amerlcanism Chairman Steve
Mikllas at i352) 503-5325 or Blue Star
Coordinator Jay Conti Sr. at 3444122.
The deadline for Blue Star Banner
request is May 10.
On Memorial Day, Post 155 will
start its rounds with services at three
cemeteries The ceremonies will
start with an opening prayer by Post
155 Chaplain Garry Justice, with a
gun salute followed by Taps in menm-
ory of fallen heroes. The entire Le-
gion family will be on display, with
American Legion Post 155 Auxiliary,
Sons ofthe American Legion and Le-
gion Riders members placing Ameri-
can flags on veterans' gravesites and


E., Inglis (352) 447-3495.
Men's meeting is at 7:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly.
Ladies Auxiliary meets at 5-
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday
monthly,
House Committee meets at 6
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
* Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ,
ence Highway.and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary,-at 344-
0727.









- ,.













RALPH E. MASSULLO. M D, F.A A
WILLIAM WELTON, N D., FA.A.D
MICHAEL WARTELS. M.D., F.A.A.r
MARGARET COLLINS, M.D., FA.A
BRIAN ONOMO, PA.-C
K.,iRISTY CHATHAM, P.A.-C
,* ELIZABETH ESTES, ARNP ME
ERIN WATKINS, P.A -C
MkhU,. kti, Br- A. * ..aT i l


back at the post b. 10 a m.
At 11 a.m., a special service will be
conducted in front of the post. The
service will begin with the Amern-
canism chairman opening the cere-
mony to honor all veterans past and
present and the chaplain offering an
opening prayer, then each dignitary
will speak
The service will be temporarily
stopped just before noon for the
honor guard to raise the flag from
half-stalt to full-staff in accordance
with the U.S. Flag Code. The service
will end with a gun salute by the
honor guard and Taps played by the
post bugler in memory of our fallen
heroes. The public is invited and en-
couraged to attend.
Call Cmdi: Jim Woodman or Auxil-
iary President Sandy White at 795-
6526, or visit www.postl155.org.


* Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets the
third Thursday monthly at the
Floral City VFW Post 7122, call
to order 7:30 p.m. The mem-
bership invites all eligible veter-
ans to come and join us as we
plan for the future of our Post.
* The Herbert Surber
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 225 meets at 7:30 p.m. the
third Thursday monthly at the
Floral City VFW Post 7122 on
U.S. 41, Floral City. Contact
Marcia Gallagher, membership
chairwoman, at 860-1629.
Come and join this newly re-
chartered unit and be a part of
the great accomplishments and
projects in the American Legion


Auxiliary.
* Beverly Hill Memorial
American Legion Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza invites inter-


ested veterans to apply for
membership or transfer. Sons
of the American Legion and
Ladies Auxiliary units are now
forming. Membership meeting
fourth Thursday at 7 p.m. Sun-
day darts at 3 p.m. with
karaoke following. Other activi-
ties being planned. All sporting-
events available on five TVs.
Visit, or phone the post at 746-
5018.
* Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
Sailors meet at Denny's in
Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 621-0617.
* Marine Corps League,
Citrus County Detachment
819 will meet at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. Call
Commandant Robert Deck at
527-1557.
* 0 U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.


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Midwest hopes for 'Public Enemies' tourism


CARRIE ANTLFINGER
Associated Press writer

MILWAUKEE - John
Dillinger: America's most no-
torious criminal or Robin
Hood of the Great Depres-
sion?
It doesn't matter to the
Wisconsin Department of
Tourism, which wants peo-
ple to visit Wisconsin locales
related to his gang's time
here in the 1930s and the
movie filmed in the state,
"Public Enemies." It stars
Johnny Depp as Dillinger.
The movie doesn't open
until July 1 but Wisconsin, In-
diana, Illinois and Arizona
are readying for the on-
slaught of attention related
to the film, which features
Dillinger's escapades
through those states.
The Wisconsin tourism de-
partment has created itiner-
aries on its Web site of state
locales from the movie and of
those related to other notori-
ous criminals, such as Al
Capone, as well as an illus-
trated map and video guide.
"Visiting the old battle
sites of the war on crime, it's
eerie," said author Bryan
Burrough, whose book "Pub-
lic Enemies, America's
Greatest Crime Wave and the
Birth of the FBI 1933-34" was
used to help craft the screen-
play for "Public Enemies."
"Almost all these places
still exist," he said. 'A few of
them have historical mark-
ers, but ... if you walk down
the pavement where
Dillinger was killed, you
would never know. You
would have had to read a
book or know something
about Dillinger"
Universal Studios and the
group that promotes filming
in Wisconsin, Film Wiscon-
sin, also plan movie pre-
mieres and parties June 30
in Oshkosh, Madison and
Milwaukee - where crews
filmed.
"Public Enemies" director
Michael Mann filmed in the
Midwest where Indiana-born
Dillinger's gang killed 10
men, wounded seven, robbed
banks and police arsenals,
and staged three jail breaks,
according to the FBI.
Crews filmed in Manitow-
ish Waters, Wisconsin Dells,
Columbus, Darlington,
Beaver Dam, and around
Mirror Lake in Wisconsin,
and Crown Point, Ind.,
Chicago and Los Angeles.
Depp stars as Dillinger,
and Christian Bale co-stars
as FBI agent Melvin Purvis.
Oscar-winner Marion Cotil-
lard is Depp's love interest,
Billie Frechette.
One of the most dramatic
events happened at Little
Bohemia Lodge in northern
Wisconsin in. April 1934.
Dillinger and his gang went
there to relax and hide from
the FBI, but a family mem-
ber of the owner told the
FBI. Agents staged a disor-
ganized and disastrous raid,
firing hundreds of bullets. An
FBI agent and a bar patron
were killed and another FBI
agent, a constable and two
other guests were wounded.
Dillinger and others jumped
from a second-floor window
and escaped through the
woods.
One of the few people still
alive who was there is Emil
Wanatka, 83, who now lives
in Ashland, Wis. He was 8
when the six men and four
women came to stay at his fa-
ther's lodge and restaurant.
He remembers playing catch
with Dillinger and George
"Baby Face" Nelson and hav-
ing to end the game because
Nelson threw too hard.
He said Dillinger gave him
a quarter so he could buy
everyone ice creams at an


Associated Press
This April 2009 photo released by TravelWisconsin.com show an area where crews from the Depression-era movie "Pub-
lic Enemies" filmed in downtown Columbus, Wis., last year. The entire downtown commercial area is on the National His-
toric Register.


This late April 1924 photo released by the Federal Bureau of Investigation shows a view of Little Bohemia Lodge, in Man-
itowish Waters, Wis., taken by FBI personnel following a raid. John Dillinger and his gang lived there for three days, until
federal agents nearly caught up with them. Two men were killed and four were wounded during a gun battle as the gang
escaped. A film depicting Dillinger's escapades called "Public Enemies" is scheduled to be released in July 2009.


In this March 17, 2008, file photo, actor Johnny Depp is
seen driving in downtown Columbus, Wis., during the filming
of the movie "Public Enemies."


upcoming birthday party. He
didn't realize the men's iden-
tities until he heard about
the shootout the next day.
Wanatka, who later took
over the business for 31 years
before selling it, said the
lodge's history helped busi-
ness, with "Bullet hole cus-
tomers" coming to see the
holes - still visible today.
"All the other things that
have happened in the world
and .... this has just never
died," he said.
"It's been part of my life
ever since I can remember,"
he said.
He is mentioned in Bur-
rough's book, but he doesn't
know if he will make it into
the movie. He was on set last
summer and took a photo
with Depp and other cast
members.
Officials plan to go all out
in Oshkosh, where tourists
spent an estimated $3.5 mil-


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lion during more than three
weeks of setup and filming,
said Wendy K. Hielsberg of
the Oshkosh Convention &
Visitors Bureau.
The Oshkosh Public Mu-
seum will educate visitors
about Depression-era crime
with an exhibit called "The
Era of Public Enemies: A
Wave of Crime in a Troubled
Time." Artifacts include
Dillinger's death mask, a vin-
tage Thompson submachine
gun and a hat worn by Depp
during filming. It runs June
27 through Oct 18.
Crews filmed in two down-
town buildings and in an air-
plane hangar at the EAA
AirVenture Museum, Hiels-
berg said.
Hielsberg said a gallery
walk on July 4 will include
photos and artifacts from
filming. Extras will dress in
period costumes. They also
will open the bank vault


where crews filmed, and pro-
vide maps and spot markers
showing visitors filming loca-
tions.
Other places with possible
movie-related events:
* The Biograph Theater in
Chicago is now a live theater
called Victory Gardens Bio-
graph Theater. Spokesman
Jay Kelly said they hope to
run 1934's "Manhattan Melo-
drama" around the time
"Public Enemies" opens.
Dillinger was watching the
film on July 22, 1934, at the
Biograph before he walked
out and FBI agents shot him
to death.
* Dillinger and others
.were arrested Jan. 22, 1934,
after a fire at the Hotel Con-
gress in Tucson, Ariz. They
reportedly paid firefighters
to get their guns and money
but firefighters recognized
them. David Slutes, enter-
tainment director at Hotel
Congress, said the hotel is
having a Dillinger renact-
ment, drink specials, a band
and a tour of the hotel the
day the movie opens.
* The city of Crown Point,
Ind. -where Dillinger broke
out ofjail in March 3, 1934 -


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is featuring films that star
"Public Enemies" cast mem-
bers during its "Movies In the
Park" series this summer.
Also, the old sheriff's house
and jail, one of the film's lo-
cations, will be open for tours
this summer.
* At the Indiana State Li-
brary in Indianapolis, the In-
diana State Archives and
others are putting on
"'Dillinger! Forging a Hoosier
Legend" after the movie
opens. The exhibit will fea-
ture Department of Correc-
tion files, mug shots,
investigative documents and
information about the jail es-
cape.


IF YOU GO
Here are some places
around Wisconsin
where "Public Enemies"
was filmed, along with
some events related to
the movie. Details at
Wisconsin Department
of Tourism - www.
travelwisconsin.com./
* Little Bohemia Lodge, a
resort near Manitowish
Waters, has bullet holes
and artifacts from an
FBI shootout with John
Dillinger, George "Baby
Face" Nelson and other
gangsters in April
1934.
* Mirror Lake State Park
in Lake Delton hosted
several nights of film
ing, complete with late-
night gunfire and
squealing tires.
* Oshkosh was turned
into a movie set with
refaced buildings and
"30s.era billboards,
window displays,
awnings and marquees.
Crews filmed two fa-
mous Dillinger rob
benes here, with a
downtown bank - office
t:uilding standing in for
the Security [Jational
Bank and Trust in Sioux
Falls, S.D., and
Oshkosh's Masonic
Temple standing in for
the American Bank and
Trust Co. in Racine,
Wis. The actual bank in
Racine, now the Racine
Museum of Art, fea
tures "The Scene of the
Crime: Warrington Co-
lescott Depicts
Dillinger," May 24 to
Sept. 6, and the Racine
Police Department
lobby has a Dillinger
submachine gun, mug
shots and press clip
pings on display.
* Columbus, Wis., was
turned into Greencas-
tie, Ind., where a
$75,000 bank robbery
took place, filmed in
Columbus at West
James Gallery, a former
bank. Columbus' down-
town, which is on the
National Register of
Historic Places, will
host a July 25 celebra-
tion that will include a
parade, old cars and
extras from the movie,
music and dancing
from the 1930s, a look-
alike-contest, treasure
hunts, tours and there
may even be a Johnny
Depp look-alike
* Ishnala Restaurant in
Wisconsin Dells is near
the site of a chase
scene involving Depp.
* Oshkosh, Madison and
Milwaukee will host
movie premieres and
parties June 30.


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CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mexicans turn to humor, creativity to endure flu


Associated Press

MEXICO CITY - Televisa is
cutting all "nonessential" kisses
from its soap operas. A song called
the "Influenza Cumbia" is climb-
ing the charts. Cringe-worthy
swine flu jokes are spreading
faster than the illness ever could.
As Mexicans lock themselves in-
side in fear of the virus, they can't
help but have a little fun with it, as
well.
The surgical masks that Mexi-
cans have donned by the millions
have become canvases for creativ-
ity, with some adorning their pro-
tective coverings with painted-on
monkey mouths, outsized mus-
taches or kissyy lips." Newspapers
offer smiley cutouts for people to
paste to their masks, and some
drivers have fashioned masks for
their cars.
Dog lovers walk the streets of
Mexico City with matching masks
for their pooches, though doctors
have yet to confirm that chi-
huahua-to-chihuahua transmis-
sion is a major public health
threat.
Mexico's ebullient, spontaneous
culture is still trying to adjust to
the new anti-flu campaign, in
which kissing, hugging, hand-
shakes, eating on the street and
standing in crowded places - all
part of daily life in this city of 20
million - are now discouraged.
There might not be much traffic
on Mexico City's streets, but gal-
lows humor about what some call
"The Aporkalypse" has been cir-
culating around the metropolis.
"Did you hear that Mexico has
become a world power?" goes one
joke. "When it sneezes, the whole
world gets the flu."
Mexico has decreed an almost
total nationwide shutdown for the
next five days, creating a particu-
lar challenge for parents. They
need to keep their little ones from
going stir crazy, while also making
sure they heed the government's


Associated Press
A tourist wearing a face mask to prevent swine flu infection stands next to a shop selling Mexican wrestling
masks Friday at the San Ysidro crossing port in Tijuana, Mexico.


public safety instructions.
But as any parent will tell you,
there is always a way
Regina Martinez, 2, wouldn't
wear a mask, so her mother, Jane,
got creative. On Thursday, Regina
pranced down a Mexico City
street, her mask decorated with
embroidered hearts.
"I made it for her because she
didn't want.to wear it, so I made
her a special one," Jane Martinez


said.
"I'm Tinkerbell," Regina
chimed in, speaking shyly through
the mask
With no place to go, television
has become one of the only avail-
able distractions. But even on the
small screen, the disease has
made its mark on that most Mexi-
can form of entertainment: the te-
lenovela.
Nothing.defines the formulaic


soap operas more than overly dra-
matic kisses. But Televisa, the.
world's biggest producer of the
soaps, has decreed smooching will
be reduced to a minimum in ac-
cordance with government guide-
lines to avoid close contact.
"When the script of a telenovela
requires a kiss, the kiss will be
give in accordance with the guide-.
lines so as not to expose the actors
to any risk," a Televisa spokesman


said on condition of anonymity be-
cause he was not authorized to
speak to the press.
He played coy on exactly how
the new "safe kisses" would be
carried out - air kisses? cheek
kisses? - leaving observers to
speculate.
"Until this thing is over, they
will have to give telepathic
kisses," joked author and cultural
critic Carlos Monsivais.
Mexico's music culture has also
embraced a lighthearted ap-
proach to the epidemic. The band
Agrupacion Carino came out with
the song "Influenza Cumbia" just
two days after the health alert was
issued. The lyrics are not the most
sophisticated, with references to
Superman and Indiana Jones.
"It's better to commit suicide
with tacos," the singer croons to a
bouncy synthesizer. "They say it's
the perfect flu. They don't know
Mexico City folks live in the
smog."
And like swine flu, dark humor
has spread beyond Mexico's bor-
ders.
A U.S. company has rolled out T-
shirts featuring a pig-shaped Mex-
ican flag. "I went to Mexico and all
I got was swine flu," it reads.
And of course the Internet is
alive with dark, swine-flu fun. In a
game called "SwineFighter," play-
ers blast viral-looking piggies with
a hypodermic needle.
And what global catastrophe
would be complete without its
own Facebook page?
Actually, "Swine Flu" has sev-
eral pages on the popular social
networking site. The most popular
- set up April 26 with a profile
picture of a cute white pig - has
accumulated more than 20,000
fans.
The page's creator, who identi-
fies himself only as John, boasts
on the page: "There's more people
infected on Facebook than in real
life."


FLU
Continued from Page All

Some residents were going
further to drive home the
message: Federal highway
police said at least four vehi-
cles with Mexico City license
plateshave been stoned as



Q&A
Continued from Page All

ance will not provide cover-
age for a trip canceled due
to a health warning or fear
of traveling, according to
Dan McGinnity, vice presi-
dent of TravelGuard. These
plans would only provide
coverage for travelers who
need.tocancel or interrupt
a trip because thieybecome
sick
Q. Should I wear a face
mask if I'm flying or i f I' m i n
an airport?
A. The CDC has not rec-
ommended the use of masks
by the general public. Swine
flu is thought to be transm it-
ted by touching something
with the virus and then
passing it to the nose or
mouth or through coughing
or sneezing.
Q. Should I fly if I'm feel-
ing.sick?
A. The CDC says: "Do not
travel while you are sick. ex-
cept to get local medical
care."
Q. How can I protect my-
self from illness while trav-
eling?
A. CDC recommendations
are as follows: Wash hands
often with soap and water
Use waterless alcohol-
based hand gels (containing
at least 60 percent alcohol)
when soap is not available.
Cover mouth and nose with
a tissue when you cough or
sneeze; if you don't have a
tissue, cough or sneeze into
your upper sleeve, not your
hands. To keep germs from
spreading, don't touch your
eyes, nose or mouth.

GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes
tips from readers about
breaking news.
* Call the newsroom at
563-5660, and be pre-
pared to give your
name, phone number,
and the address of the
news event.
* To submit story ideas
for feature sections, call
563-5660 and ask for
Cheri Harris.
* Again, be prepared to
leave a detailed mes-
sage.


they entered Acapulco. walked by on the beach in a
Those who do make it to bikini and a surgical mask
Acapulco are getting a chilly "I don't let it affect me,"
reception - though there's she said, watching her chil-
already a bias against resi- dren, 12 and 16, build sand
dents of the capital, consid- castles.
ered loud and pushy by many Gas station attendant
in Mexico's interior. Miriam Arizmendi said many
Visitor Martha Rubio said of her fellow workers were
employees at a,beach restau- refusing to fill the tanks of
rant laughed at her when she Mexico City cars. She wasn't


joining them, but said she paign to win back tourists, ships are changing routes to
understood. Elizondo said he'll send offi- avoid Mexico. Continental
"They can infect us," she cials to China and Canada to Airlines Inc. said Friday it
said, wearing a mask and learn how those countries re- will halve flights to Mexico
rubber gloves. "They should- vived their industries after because planes are taking off
n't come. The Mexico City being slammed by bird flu six empty.
government should declare a years ago. That's no wonder as T-
quarantine so they don't But for now, U.S., Cana- shirts hit the market with a
leave." dian, Japanese and Euro- new spin on the tourist
Mexico has said it will take pean tour operators are cliche: "I went to Mexico and
an intense publicity ;am:- canceling trips, and cruise - all I got was swineflu.".. ;
" ' ,.. . ..... .. . .. . ','i~.. ...+;..:\, : ;... " :,


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Wedding Wedding ---= - - First BI RT HDAY


McAdams/DiLorenzo


April Annetta McAdams
and Erik Stephen
DiLorenzo were married at
2 p.m. Saturday, March 7,
2009, at the Estes Church of
Christ in Henderson, Tenn.,
McAdams is the daughter
of Weldon and Toni
McAdams of Clinton, Okla.,
and DiLorenzo is the son of
Al and Judy DiLorenzo of
Inverness.
McAdams is a 2007 gradu-
ate of Colby High School
and attended Freed-Harde-
man University in Hender-
son. She. is a pharmacy
technician for Walgreens in
Crystal River.
DiLorenzo is a 2004 grad-
uate of Citrus High School.
He graduated from Freed-
Hardeman in ,2008 with a
bachelor's degree in busi-


ness management and is an
assistant manager for Wal-
greens in Inverness.
The couple resides in In-
verness.


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for weddings, en-
gagements, anniversaries, births and first birthdays.
* For more information, call 563-5660.


- d Tdoday's MOVIES----


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"X-Men Origins: Wolver-
ine" (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 11:45
a.m., 1:50 p.m., 2:20 p.m., 4:25
p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30
p.m. No passes.
"Ghosts of Girlfriends
Past" (PG-13) 11:40 asm., 2:30
p.m., 5 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Obsessed" (PG-13) 11:30
a.m., 2:15 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:20
p.m.
"17 Again" (PG-13) 11:20
a.m., 1:45 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:10
p.m.
"State of Play" (PG-13)
Noon, 7:15 p.m. .
"Fast & Furious" (PG-13)
2:40 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"X-Men Origins: Wolverine"
(PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 11:45
a.m., 12:15 p.m., 2:20 p.m.,


2:50 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 4:55 p.m.,
5:25 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 8
p.m., 9:35 p.m., 10:05 p.m.,
10:35 p.m. No passes.
"Ghosts of Girlfriends Past"
(PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 2:40 p.m.,
5:05 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Fighting" (PG-13) 12:20
p.m., 2:55 p.m., 5:20 p.m., 7:45
p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Obsessed" (PG-13) 12:30
p.m., 3 p.m., 5:30 p.m., 7:55
p.m., 10:25 i.m.
"17 Again" (PG-13) Noon,
2:25 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
9:45 p.m.
"State of Play" (PG-13) 11:30
a.m., 2:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Fast & Furious" (PG-13)
12:05 p.m., 2:45 p.m., 5:10
p.m., 7:35 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline
.corn for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


----- Community BRIEFS-


Letter carriers to
take food Saturday.
On Saturday, May 9, letter
carriers will be collecting non-
perishable food donations
along their routes for delivery
to local food pantries in Citrus
County. This is the annual
"Stamp Out Hunger" drive con-
ducted by the National Associ-
ation of Letter Carriers - the
largest one-day food drive in
the nation.
To contribute; simply place
your food donation by your
mailbox before your mail is de-
livered. Letter carriers and vol-
unteers will deliver the food to
local food banks, food pantries
and charitable organizations,
which dispense food to those
in need. For information, call
344-2239.
Lions to host
pancake breakfast
The Beverly Hills Lions Club,
72 Civic Circle Drive, will have
its "Mothers Day Pancake
Breakfast" from 7:30 a.m. until
noon Sunday, May 10. The
cost for breakfast is $3.50 for
adults and $1.75 for children
younger than 12. You will get
all the pancakes you can eat,
your choice of sausage, bacon
or "combo," orange juice and
coffee. Call Lion Gail Blandino
at 527-7410.
Drum circle planned
at Fort Island beach
All are invited to a Drum Cir-
cle at 6 p.m. Sunday, May 10,
at the far end of Fort Island
Trail Gulf Beach in Crystal
River. We will drum until sun-
set. Bring a chair; we have a
few drums to share. Dancers
and children invited. Free.
The circle is the second
Sunday of every month, start-
ing about 6 p.m. - one and a
half hours before sunset.
Call Charlotte at 344-8009.
Humanitarians slate
cat adopt-a-thon
On Sunday, May 10 and
May 24, the Humanitarians of
Florida Inc., will conduct its fe-
line adopt-a-thon. Come and
visit kittens and cats from noon
to 4 p.m.
All our felines are
spayed/neutered, litter box
trained, and tested for feline
leukemia and AIDS. They have
been given age-appropriate
vaccines and flea preventative,
and their nails trimmed and
ears cleaned.


The Humanitarians' Man-
chester House - look for the
white building with the brightly
colored paw prints - is on the
comer of State Road 44 and
Conant Avenue, east of Crystal
River.
To view kittens and cats, go
online to www.hofspha.org, or
call 563-2370.
Volunteers needed
for Guardian group
A serious need exists for
Guardian ad Litem volunteers
in Citrus County, and training is
scheduled for May in Inver-
ness.
The Guardian ad Litem Pro-
gram recruits, trains and super-
vises volunteers who\become
Court appointed to advocate
for the best interests of chil-
dren who have been abused,,
abandoned, or neglected and
are now in the Foster Care
System. Through these volun-
teers, local foster children are
able to have their voices heard
in the dependency court
process.
There are currently 354 chil-
dren in the foster care system
in Citrus County, but there are
only enough volunteers to ad-
vocate for 310 children and
speak on their behalf. Some of
the remaining children are han-
dled by staff, but the rest go
through the system without the
benefit of a volunteer advo-
cate. You can help!
The Guardian ad Litem Pro-
gram will conduct training May
12, 13, 19, and 20 at the With-
lacoochee Technical Institute in
Inverness. We currently have
seats available.for this free
training. Call Murray McMahon
today at 344-1147 or toll free
(866) 341-1425 for information
on how you may qualify to be-
come a Guardian ad Litem.


Peter Joseph Mitros and
Maria De Los Angles Orozco
were married on Dec. 4,
2008. The wedding took
place at the home of the
groom's aunt and uncle,
Walter and Marianna Walus
of Hernando and was offici-
ated by Sheriff Jeffrey J.
Dawsy.
The bride is the daughter
of Rosa Albe Orozco and Je-
orge Orozco of New Jersey.
The groom is the son of
Peter Thomas and Diane J.
Mitros of Hernando.
Given in marriage by
Peter Thomas' Mitros, the
bride wore a strapless white
wedding gown and carried a
bouquet of red roses.
Out of town guests in-
cluded friends and family
The bride and groom hon-
eymooned at Walt Disney
World in Orlando.
Mr. and Mrs. Mitros, along
with daughter Isabella, will
reside in Neshanic Station,
N.J. Mrs. Mitros will be at-
tending school while per-


ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Meals include milk, juice.
Monday:
Breakfast - MVP breakfast,
cereal, toast, milk variety, juice
variety.
Lunch - Cheese pizza, un-
crustable grape PB&J, PB dip-
per, garden salad, carrots,
Italian pasta salad, pears.
Tuesday:
Breakfast - Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, cereal,
tater tots, toast.
Lunch - Tacos, chicken ten-
ders, salad shaker, garden
salad, green beans, mixed fruit,
crackers, apple crisp.
Wednesday:
Breakfast - Cinnamon
twister, cereal, toast
Lunch - Baked chicken,
corndog, PB dipper, garden
salad, turnip greens, comrn-
bread, peaches, juice bar.
Thursday:
Breakfast - Scrambled
eggs with cheese, cereal, tater
tots, toast.
Lunch - Chicken nuggets,
turkey wrap, salad shaker, gar-
den salad, peas and carrots,
applesauce, crackers, gelatin.
Friday:
Breakfast - French toast,
cheese grits, tater tots.
Lunch - Chicken & noo-
dles, fish patty on bun, PB dip-
per, garden salad, black-eyed
peas, mixed fruit, juice bar.
MIDDLE SCHOOL
Meals include milk, juice.
Monday:
Breakfast - Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, MVP
breakfast, cereal, grits, toast.
Lunch - Pepperoni pizza,
corndog, chef salad plate, gar-
den salad, corn, seasoned
noodles, sweet potato bake,
peaches, crackers.
Tuesday:
Breakfast - Mini cinnamon
pancakes, MVP'breakfast, tater


From left: Peter Mitros, Is-
abella Bathan, Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy and Maria Mitros.
forming duties as a social
worker. Mr. Mitros attended
Middlesex College and
earned an associates degree
in criminal justice, and is a
police officer in Linden,
N.J.


tots, grits.
Lunch - Tacos, chicken ten-
ders, tuna salad plate, garden
salad, broccoli, Spanish rice,
mixed fruit, crackers, apple
crisp.
Wednesday:
Breakfast- Egg and
cheese biscuit, MVP breakfast,
cereal, grits, toast, peach cup.
Lunch - Orange chicken
plate, hamburger, breaded
chicken salad plate, garden
salad, green beans, cornbread,
pears, juice bar, crackers.
Thursday:
Breakfast- Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP breakfast,
tater tots, grits, milk variety,
juice variety. -
Lunch - Sausage pizza,
turkey wrap, turkey salad plate,
garden salad, carrots, black-
eye peas, applesauce, gelatin,
crackers.
Friday:
Breakfast - Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, MVP breakfast,
cereal, grits, toast.
Lunch - Spaghetti with
meat sauce, ham and cheese
on bun, tuna salad sandwich,
garden salad, baked beans,
corn, mixed fruit, juice bar.
HIGH SCHOOL
Monday:
Breakfast - Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, MVP
breakfast, cereal, toast, tater
tots, grits, toast, milk variety,
juice variety.
Lunch - Spaghetti with
meat sauce, hamburger, pizza,
hoagie, breaded chicken salad
plate, garden salad, green
beans, corn, sweet potato
bake, french fries, juice bar,
crackers, milk.
Tuesday:
Breakfast - Mini cinnamon
pancakes, MVP breakfast, tater
tots, grits, milk variety, juice va-
riety.
Lunch - Chicken & rice,
chicken sandwich, pizza, chef
salad plate, garden salad,


t /


A.N


mixed vegetables, corn, baked
beans, french fries, pears,
crackers, milk.
Wednesday:
Breakfast - Egg and
cheese biscuit, MVP breakfast,
cereal, tater tots, grits, toast,
milk variety, juice variety.
Lunch - Chicken tenders,
hamburger, combo hoagie,
pizza, PB dipper, turkey salad
plate, garden salad, corn, peas,
french fries, roll, mixed fruit,
crackers, milk..
Thursday:
Breakfast - Breakfast pizza,
MVP breakfast, tater tots, grits,
milk variety, juice variety.
Lunch - Tacos, chicken
sandwich, pizza, breaded
chicken salad plate, garden.
salad, Spanish rice, corn,
green beans, applesauce,
french fries, crackers, milk.
Friday:
Breakfast - Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, MVP breakfast,
cereal, tater tots, grits, toast,
milk variety, juice variety.
Lunch - Orange chicken
plate, hamburger, turkey wrap,
pizza, chef salad plate, garden
salad, carrots, corn, french
fries, peaches, apple.crisp,
crackers, milk.
Menus are subject to change


I t-- 1 " - - Ar ,, -.th


Lane Robert Komara cel-
ebrated his first birthday on
March 31. He is the son of
Mike and Amy Komara and
little brother to Gage and
Cole of Crystal River.
Grandparents are Donna
Shiver of Homosassa,
Daniel Nichols of Inglis,
Bernard and Valerie Ko-
mara of Crystal River. His
great-grandmother is Fern
Corradi of Midland, Pa.


PHOTO GUIDEUNES
* Photos need to be in sharp focus. Photos need to be
in proper exposure: neither too light nor too dark.
* Include your name, address and phone number on all
photos.
* Photos printed on home printers do not reproduce
well, submit the digital image via disk or e-mail. Staff
will color correct and otherwise "work up" the image
to Chronicle publication standards.
* Photos submitted electronically should be in maxi-
mum-resolution JPEG (.jpg) format.
* Photos cannot be returned without a self-addressed,
stamped envelope.


Today's HOROSCOPE


Birthday: This should be an exception-
ally good year ahead for Taureans who
possess special knowledge or expertise in
select areas. What you have to offer could
be of immense value to the world, and you
could prove to be in great demand.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - Others will
find your commanding presence quite
gratifying when you use it to direct a social
event intended to be fun for everyone.
Don't hesitate to be the social director.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Taking
bows isn't important to you, but getting the
family singing off the same song sheet is.
You'll function as a director who gets
everyone harmonizing with each other.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - Whether
you realize it or not, your influence over an
intimate circle of friends could be quite as-
tounding. Use it in.ways that will benefit.
everyone and not just yourself.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Even though


this may be a day of rest on which you're
not doing anything that is work-related,
you are still likely to reap some kind of
benefit through a financial transaction.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Some kind
of current enterprise has greater potential
than you or the other participants realize.
Events are in the making that will soon
bear this out.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Circum-
stances might let you cut yourself into a
good deal that some other acquaintances
have going. They'll welcome you if you
have something to offer.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -A new ally
will prove to be an important player in fill-
ing the gaps that have stymied you and
your friends with regard to an event the
group is trying to pull off.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - Even
though you are in a good achievement
cycle, you will still have to earn what you


hope to gain. Striving for your rewards will
prove to be both educational and fun.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - You
won't have to do anything special in order
to make a favorable impression, just be
yourself. If you can relax, you'll enjoy being
a standout.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - Even if
events and early indicators start on the
boring side, situations should eventually
turn out to be exciting once your friends
enter the picture.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - A situa-
tion might present itself, making this a
good day to discuss a delicate matter with
a sensitive friend whose feelings are vul-
nerable. Don't waste this opportunity.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - Good
work efforts will not go unrewarded,
whether you're doing a job for someone or
laboring on a private project. Tenacious-
ness pays off in a big way.


without notice.
CONGREGATE DINING
Monday: Meatballs with Ital-
ian tomato sauce, Italian blend
vegetables, carrots, whole -
wheat hot dog bun (for meat-
ball sub), chocolate brownie,
low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Chicken quarter
with Spanish sauce, fiesta rice,
green beans, slice of whole
wheat bread with margarine,
fresh orange, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Orange juice,
pork chop patty with brown
gravy, broccoli cuts, corn, slice
of whole wheat bread with mar-
garine, fruited yogurt.
Thursday: Chef salad
(turkey, ham, cheese and
boiled egg) with ranch dress-
ing, 2 slices whole wheat
bread, applesauce, low-fat
milk.
Friday: Mother's Day Meal
- Baked chicken with gravy,
mashed potatoes, mixed veg-
etables, slice of whole wheat
bread, cherry jubilee dessert,
low-fat milk.
Congregate dining sites in-
clude: Lecanto, East Citrus,
Crystal River, Homosassa
Springs, Inverness and South
Dunnellon. For information, call
Support Services at 527-5975.


Saturday, May 1o"'

12 p.m. - 6 p.m.


National Guard Armory
CRYSTAL RIVER

- . . .. . . . . .
Bronze * - . " _1 nronze s o on t C s oun


Goia Sponsors
Chronicle


Silver Sponsors
BrightHouse
Microsoft
StorageCraft
Embarq
CWN1a www


Bronze Sponsors
Workforce Connection
Citrus County SWM
Citrus Networking Solutions Group
Integrity Consulting Group
Suncoast Plumbing & Electric
Technology Conservation Group
Atlantic.Net


For more information go to
.citaexpo.net or call 352-746-4699


Orozco/Mitros


May 4to 8 MENUS


Q Il OfVEleventh Annual


H M Informational Fiesta


Hosted By: The Citrus Hills Civic Association
Join your neighbors and friends at an Informational Fiesta wine &
cheese fete on Thursday, May 7 at 6:30 p.m. in the Hampton Room
at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club. This event is open to all
Citrus Hills residents and especially newcomers. Representatives
from local businesses, organizations and government officials will
be on hand to answer all of your questions.

For more information call . ,rQ ,r
( ^ mDJ Russo at 746-0844' w.lIt , . -


I


SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 A17


TOGETHER


OTRUS COUNTY (FL) g


^as









A%.,OCTUNA Y,MYv, C S T ) o


Sciatica giving me the munchies


lot of states have already approved
the use of medical marijuana. Like,
six of them, I think. Six out of 54 or
something like that It used to be that if they
found three seeds in your glove compart-
ment, you were looking at life in
prison. Now it's like ibuprofen in
an easy-open sack. I use it for my
sciatica. It's working on the sci-
atica, but now I think I'm getting
bong elbow. Maybe I, should be
taking a larger dose. That's the
hard part, getting the dosage
right I can never remember how
much I smoked yesterday Still,
instead of waking up every night
with a sharp, raw nerve pain, I
wake up with the munchies. MUL
Usually, Sue has made some of
her famous special brownies so
there's always something to snack on, but a
lot of the time, they just make me hungrier.
I wonder if medical marijuana can lower
my cholesterol, too? I'll volunteer for that
study
We were all sitting around Wii bowling
last night and since all of us were using
medical marijuana that we got from our
doctor down on.. the corner of 12th and
Bridge Street, none of us were feeling any
pain. Bobby said maybe we should get a
second opinion from the doctor on the cor-
ner of 13th and Bridge or 10th and Bridge.
There used to be a doctor on the corner of
11th and Bridge, but the kids at the high
school set up their own "clinic" and priced
him out of business. That's the funny thing
about doctors, they always look so young.
Anyway, while we were bowling, we got
this great idea that instead of selling cook-
ies, the Girl Scouts should go door to door
selling medical marijuana. It's a cinch and


they'd make a lot more money And in about
two hours, they could return and sell all of
their cookies at ridiculous prices. People
would buy them by the carton. That's the
great side effect of medical marijuana. It fo-
cuses your thinking.
It seemed like a good idea last
night, but now that I'm typing it
up in the light of noon, it sounds
a little twisted. I have friends
who think medical marijuana is
a big scam, that people who
aren't really sick will use it just
to get high. I tell them that's
crazy talk; that's what Prozac is
for.
M I've heard that 16 percent of
.LEN the country is taking some kind
of antidepressant. That's, like, 46
million people. A million people
in each of our 46 states. That's a lot of peo-
ple on mind-bending drugs, perfectly legal
mind-bending drugs that do pretty much
the same thing as medical marijuana. Of
course, everyone knows that the trouble
with marijuana is that the money goes to
the drug kingpins who waste it on fancy vil-
las and fast cars, whereas the Prozac money
and the Zoloft money goes to health care
CEOs who invest it in fancy villas and fast
cars.
Wow! I just had a flash. I wonder if all
those guys they arrested in the '60s after
they found three seeds in their glove com-
partments are still in jail? How old are they
now, 70? I wonder if doctors are prescrib-
ing medical marijuana to them for their
arthritis pain?


Reach author Jim Mullen at
jimmullen@myway.com.


CITRUS COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL PET PROFILES


The Citrus County Animal
Control Shelter has online list-
ings of impounded animals at
animal control.citrus.fl.us. Select
"Animal Type," etc. and search.
The shelter is in Inverness
near the airport. The shelter
phone hours are 8 a.m. to clos-


N: Cuddles Name: Rex
AGE: n/a, AGE: n/a
SEX: F SEX: M
ID: -740 7400137


ing, and it is open for adoptions
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday and Fri-
day, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Thursday and from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday.
For more information, call
the Citrus County Animal Shel-


ter at 726-7660.
Financial assistance for
spaying and neutering of an
adopted pet is available *
through the Humanitarians of
Florida at 563-2370 or from
the Humane Society of Citrus
County at 341-2222.


N: Snowman N: Malachai Name: Piper
AGE: n/a AGE: n/a AGE: 4 mo.
SEX: NM SEX: NM SEX: F
ID: 7515987 ID: 7439848 ID: 7474881


Name: Storm
AGE: 2 years
SEX: NM
ID: 7466516


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0487026


Wife: Make-up sex couple's


only form of iiftimacy

D earAnnie: What do you tl4nk about reach bottom so she ogn start climbing
a married couple whose only inti- back up? I tried Al-Anon, but the members
macy is make-up sex? My husband only offer support and friendship to each
says he loves me and I believe he is faith- other, which is nice, but it doesn't change
ful, but he never initiates any- my daughter. She is an intelli-
thing in the bedroom, and we gent, beautiful woman who has
have sex only if I pitch a fit be-, thrown her life away and it
cause I feel neglecil. I don't do breaks my heart - Concerned
this often, so we've frad sex only Mom
twice in the past 15 months. Dear Concerned: Al-Anon is
We are both healthy 42-year- not intended to change the al-
olds. We have a 3-year-old child coholic's behavior, only your re-
who requires a lot of attention, sponse to it. Choosing not to
but even so, I can't understand stay in touch would be for your
how he doesn't esire intimacy mental health, not hers. No one
He is an awd~ome husband, can "fix" Serrie until she ad-
who cooks, cleans, bathes our mits she ha a problem, and she
child, and doesn't go out with ANNIE'S doesn't seem ready Many who
the guys or do things I disap- are bipolar self-medicate with
prove of..He just doesn't seem to MAILBOX alcohol and drugs, and there
want me. are treatment programs that
I am attractive and still get looks from address both disorders. If Terrie wants
other men. A mofith ago, I came very close help, she should contact a university med-
to an affair. I was not in love with the guy, ical center department of psychiatry for a
but it sure was nice for a'man to let me referral. And you should contact NAMI
know he thinks I'm pretty. I told my hus- (nami.org) about their Family to Family
band about the encounter and guess what? program.
We had sex. See what I mean? Dear Annie: This is for "Frustrated in
My husband is a good guy and I love him, Elgin, Ore.," whose husband has rheuma-
so should I just get someone on the side to toid arthritis. My husband has severe
satisfy me physically? - Sex-less Lady onset rheumatoid arthritis. The first thing
Dear Sex-less: We'll be frank with you. you have to do is get a thicker skin. Who
Here are the likeliest possibilities: Your cares what others think?
husband's testosterone levels are very low, Next, see a specialist.- a rheumatolo-
he is having an affair, he is asexual or he is gist. There also are new medications that
gay. Please ask him to see his doctor for a can work wonders. Ask the rheumatologist
complete checkup and specifically ask for about them. We've gone from my husband
his testosterone to be checked. We hope being in a wheelchair, barely able to lift a
that's all there is to it. coffee cup, to having a decent quality of
Dear Annie: My unmarried 30-year-old life. We still have bad days, but nothing
daughter has a drinking and behavioral compared to what we were living with be-
problem that has escalated over the past fore: Good luck and best wishes. - Been
year. "Terrie" gets jrunk at family gather- There in Florida
ings, insults peopl(eand starts arguments Dear Florida: We appreciate all the sug-
that often end with her throwing things gestions that have come in from our read-
and shoving people. A lot of her anger ers. Bless you all for caring.
seems to be directed at me.
We have encouraged Terrie to get alco-
hol counseling or attend AA. She tried it Annie's Mailbox is written bylKathy
once and quit. Believe she is bipolar, but Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime
mental health c unselors will not treat her editors of the Ann Landers column.
until she quits drinking. After her last out- Please e-mail your questions to annies
burst, I sent her a text message and said mailbox@comcastnet, or write to:
we could no longer have a relationship un- Annie's Mailbox, PO. Box 118190,
less she gets help. Shortly after, she left Chicago, IL 60611. To find out more about
town and move to Florida with a friend An-nie's Mailbox, and read features by
who also drinlm other Creators Syndicate writers and
Should I keep the lines of communica- cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate'
tion open, or will my ultimatum help her Web page at www.creators.com.

- Sunday PUZZLER

Puzzle answer is on Page A13.


ACROSS
1 Throng
6 Flowed back
11Fuzzy fruit
16Prize
21Pulled oars
22Came to be
23Ne plus -
24Courage
25De Mille
or Moorehead
26Perch
27Ceremonies
28Efface
29Billiards rod.
30Leafy tree
31 Love god
33School in England
35Estuary
36Frog Muppet
39Shaky
43- de vie
44Sweater size
(abbr.)
45Covered passage-
way
47Jeweled crown
49Dry, as wine
51Native
of New Zealand
54Fake tattoo
57Stand for hot '
dishes
59Corpusc%
63Timetable abbr.
64Masculine title
66Handle
68Sour
69McEntire of TV
700odles
72Here and -
74Performs
760bi
78Sign on a door
79Ersatz


82Alliance alnym
84Cousin to a close
call
(2 wds.)
86"-- a Hot Tin
Roof"
87Abound
89Helicon
91 Palter
92Poor grade
931ntelligence
95Ragout
97Kind of cherry
99Batck talk
101 "I-- Cam-
era"
104 Scrap of food
106 Eastern Euro-
pean
108 Greek letters
110 :|ideo game
player
114 Ruling authority
117 Soapstone
119 Inducement
121 Throws in a
curve
122 Minerals
124 Rain hard
126 Political
acronym
127 Uppity one
128 Ait
129 Drunkards
131 Boast
133 Scot's cap
135 Cousin to a gui-
tar
136 Lager
137 Where Monte
Carlo is
139 Seaside
141 Canvas stand
143 Sheep
145 Hits


149 Family member,
for short
152 Big bird
154 Sensitive to oth-
ers
,157 Horn
161 Prov. in Can.
162 Nobleman
164 Hodgepodge
165 Devilkin
167 The "I"
168 In the air
170 Karloff or Go-
dunov
173 Beast
175 Scarlett of Tara
177 Tea type
178 Love
179- Park, Col-
orado
180 Studied (with
"over")
181 Direct
182 Observed-
183 Woodwinds
-184 Pavilions

DOWN *
1 Fissure
2 Scoundrel
3 Proprietor
4-Very small
5 Dental degree
6 James - Carter
7 Trite saying
8 Scary yell
9 Letters
lORaison -
11Quest
12Whitney or Wal-
lach
13ABA mem.
14Western Indian
15Hurry


147 City in Germany lotreet


17Armed conflict
18Kind of-clock
190'Donnell or
Perez
20Fear
30Commoni abbr.
32Fall mo.
34Kiln
371mpair
38A flower
40Bottle part
41- avis
42Clapton and Se-
vareid
46Skillful
480f birds
50Shot in billiards
51Sorcery
52Smell
53Satellite's path
55Plus
56Crazy as a -
58Flop of a Ford
60Lukewarm
61Really fat.
621mposing resi-'
dence
65Loan charge
(abbr.)
67Pummel
71Pack
73Troubles
75Ticket remnant


102 Elk
103 Waill leisurely
105 Human trunk
107 Shapeless mass
109 Diving duck
111 Less
112 Call forth
113 Mutineer
115 River in France.
116 Bright signs
118 Mongrels
120 Clean-air org.
123 Hackneyed
125 Go, team!
130 Swindle
132 Desert In Asia
134 Chicken chow

137 Office note
138 Resisted
140 Said from mem-
ory
142 Insect
144 Mare's nest
146 --soda
148 Once around a
track
149 Detergents
150 Stretch of water
151 Feed a fire
153 Citified
155 River in Italy
156 Steed


77Word in a forecast 158 Memorize
80Charged particle 159 Leggy bird
81Yields as profit 160 Paved ways
83Theater award 163 Extinct bird
85Hold sway , 166 Army meal
88Encounter 169 Antagonist
90Against . 171 Decay
94Musical group 12 Wrath
96Outer garment 174 Amerindian
98Crew 175 Make a choice
100 Butter squares 176 Farm imple-
101 Extemporize ment
(hyph.)


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A18 s DAYMAY 3 2009


11


1 r








S Section B SUNDAY, MAY 3,2009


PORTS


*M Golf, NHL, Boxing/B2
* MLB/B3
* Scoreboard/B4
* NASCAR/B4
* Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Underdog takes Kentucky Derby


Associated Press
Calvin Borel rides Mine That Bird to a victory In the 135th Kentucky
Derby horse race at Churchill Downs on Saturday in Louisville, Ky.


Mine That Bird
stuns horse racing
a 0 wa
community in win
Associated Press
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - Calvin
Borel was in a familiar place,
along the rail and urging Mine
That Bird to fly through the mud.
Trainer Bennie Woolley Jr. was
someplace he never imagined -
the Kentucky Derby, with his
horse in the lead.,
Together they pulled off one of
the greatest upsets in 135 years of
America's most famous horse race.
"It was a Street Sense move,"
Borel said Saturday, referring to
the same rail-hugging ride he gave
that colt to win the Derby two


years ago. "They can only go so
fast, so far. When I hollered at him,
he just went on." i
Sent off at 50-1 odds, Mine That
Bird pulled away in the stretch to
score a 6%-length victory at
Churchill Downs, the second-
biggest upset in Derby history. His
margin was the largest since As-
sault won by eight lengths in 1946.
The gelding ran 11/4 miles on a
sloppy dirt track in 2:02.66 and
paid $103.20 to win - second-
largest payout inDerby history be-
hind Donerail ($184.90) in 1913.
Pioneerof the Nile finished sec-
ond for freshly minted Hall of
Fame trainer Bob Baffert, a three-
time Derby winner Musket Man
was another nose back in third,
followed by Papa Clem.
Friesan Fire, the 7-2 wagering
favorite of 153,563 fans, was 18th
in the 19-horse feld.
Earlier, I WantRevenge became


the first morning-line favorite to
be scratched on Derby Day after
inflammation was detected in the
colt's left front ankle. The injury
wasn't believed to be career-
threatening but worrisome
enough to prompt trainer Jeff
Mullins and owner David Lanz-
man to withdraw.
Mine That Bird got squeezed
coming out of the starting gate, but
Borel took a firm hold and wres-
tled the horse to the rail while
they were in last place.
They were 12th and going strong
with a quarter mile to go, after
working their way around Atomic
Rain. Borel quickly angled Mine
That Bird back to the inside with
three-sixteenths to go and shot the
gelding through a tight spot ap-
proaching the eighth pole.
"I had enough room," Borel
See DERBY/Page B4


derell


st


WILLIE J. ALLEII.'S Pelersburg Trmes
Crystal River runner Kristen Hall, far left, competes during the 1600-meter run at the Class 2A state track meet at Showalter Field in Winter Park on Sirday. Hall took
seventh place in the event to earn all-state honors and capped off an impressive run over the last two weeks that included district and regional titles ine event.

Crystal River's Hall writes final chapter; earns spot on state podium with 7th-pie finish


JOHN COSCIA.
jcoscia@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
WINTER PARK - On a day
filled with speed it was one act
of final perseverance that stole
the show at the Class 2A state
track meet at Showalter Field
in Winter Park..
For the past two weeks, Crys-
tal River runner Kristen Hall's


heart-wrenching story has been
an example to us all. With each
stride around the track she has
put the strength of the human
spirit on full display. And on
Saturday evening the Pirates'
Homecoming Queen put a Cin-
derella ending on what she
called, "the most emotionally
exhausting time of my life."
As Hall crossed the start/fin-
ish line, however, her body fi-


nally said, "no more."
The senior completely col-
lapsed. The physical, mental
and emotional strain had
drained every ounce of her 18-
year old body's energy.
But through the pain Kristen
still was able to manage a smile.
"I got my medal. I finally got
my medal," said Hall, as she
laid on the track unable to
move.


Track officials lifted her up
but her legs wouldn't move. She
had just finished seventh in the
most grueling 1600-meter run of
her life. And she was hurting.
But she finally had her
medal. And no cramps, fatigue
or pain were going to slow her
from making the one step of
which she had long dreamed.
The Crystal River senior had
waited four years and now she


was standing the podium as
an all-state fisher.
And she aked up every
beautiful seld of the glorious
moment.
"Good jcl'm so proud of
you," said'ystal River girls'
head tracPach Lisa Carter
through a aming face full of
tears. "Yoid it! You did it girl!
See TRACK/Page B4


Celts drop Bulls in Game 7


Boston moves

on to 2ndround

againstMagic
Associated Press
BOSTON - After a
record-setting seven over-
times in the first six games,
-the Celtics made an early
night of it with a dominating
stretch in the second.
That's second quarter, not


second OT. The Celtics will play Or-
Ray Allen fol- lando in the Eastern
lowed his 51-point Conference semifi-
Game 6 perform- nals starting Mon-
ance with 23 on day The
Saturday night, seventh-seeded
Paul Pierce added Bulls return to
20 and Boston Chicago knowing
pulled away from they took the de-
Chicago just before fending NBA cham-
the half to finish Rajon pions to the limit -
the Bulls off 109-99 Rondo and quite often be-
-a rare regulation Celtics guard, yond.
victory in what Ben Gordon
might have been be the scored 33 for Chicago and
best first-round playoff se- Kirk Hinrich scored 14 of
ries in NBA history. See CELTICS/Page 84


Former Bills QJ Kemp


succumbs to illhss at 73


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Jack
Kemp, the ex-quarterback,
congressman, one-time
vice-presidential nominee
and self-described "bleed-
ing-heart conservative,"
died Saturday. He was 73.
Kemp died after a
lengthy illness, according to
spokeswoman Bona Park
and Edwin J. Feulner, a
longtime friend and former


campaign adviser. Park saguished public servants.
Kemp died at his home Jack was a powerful voice
Bethesda, Md., in the Wa in American politics for
ington suburbs. more than four decades."
Kemp had announce( Kemp, a former quarter-
January 2009 that he -back for the Buffalo Bills,
been diagnosed with" represented western New
cer. He said he was ur York for nine terms in Con-
going tests but gavP gress, leaving the House for
other details. an unsuccessful presiden-
Senate Repurn tial bid in 1988.
leader Mitch McConrR- Eight years later, after


Ky., called Kemp "-of
the nation's most in-


See KEMP/Page B4


I








MIS sCTRICON, Y IE,)CH, ONcL


B2 sUNDAYMAY 3 2009


Johnson snares lead


Woods tied with 3

others in 2nd at

9-underpar

Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Zach
Johnson had the slightest feeling
of panic Saturday when he saw his
7-iron hug the left side of the 17th
green, wondering for a moment if
he would stumble for the second
straight day along a three-hole
stretch called the "Green Mile."
Relief set in when he saw his
ball on green grass, and the 12-
foot birdie that followed made a
world of difference.
Tiger Woods faltered on the
final holes for the second straight
with two bogeys. George McNeill
did the same. And when a storm
system cleared and the third
round finally finished, Johnson
had a two-shot lead at the Quail
Hollow Championship.,
Now comes the hard part.
"I've got a two-shot lead. I'm
happy to be there," Johnson said.
"At the same time, on this golf
course, that's a matter of one
hole. Maybe even one shot"
Johnson's par-birdie-par finish
- this one day after he went
bogey-bogey-bogey - gave him a
4-under 68 and a two-shot lead
over Woods, McNeill and Lucas
Glover, all of whom dropped at
least one shot over one of the
toughest closing stretches on the
PGA Tour.
Johnson was at 11-under 205
and in position to win for the sec-
ond time this year.
The final two groups, including
Johnson and McNeill, had to wait
out a 1 hour, 12-minute storm
delay before finishing the 18th
hole. PGA Tour officials blew the
horn to stop play right after


Woods staggered to the finish line
with a 70.
Woods birdied all the par 5s, in-
cluding a two-putt from 12 feet on
the 15th hole that put him in the
outright lead at 11-under par for
the first time in a third round that
featured seven players atop the
leaderboard at some point -
That he would drop two shots
at the end was not terribly
shocking, given the difficulty of
the holes.
What bothered Woods was he
had a 7-iron in his hand both
times - a poor approach to the
17th that led to a three-putt from
60 feet, and a slight shift in the
wind that kept his ball right of the
green on the 18th, followed by a
poor chip to 6 feet and failure to
save par.
"That's not the way you want to
finish," Woods said "But I've got
a shot going into tomorrow."
He's not alone.
Glover got into the mix with an
eagle on No. 7 and did not drop a
shot until he pulled his tee shot
near the creek on the 18th,
missed the green to the right and
took bogey for a 68.
McNeill also was bogey-free
until he three-putted from 40 feet
on the 17th, then found a fairway
bunker on the 18th that kept him
from reaching the green, giving
him a 70.
A dozen players were within
four shots of the lead, a group that
does not include Phil Mickelson.
Hle was only two behind going
into the third round, but missed
three birdie chances on the open-
ing five holes, and right when
Lety seemed to get it together, it
all2ame undone.
Tiger Woods chips to the 18th
green Saturday during the third
r nd of the Quail Hollow Champi-
oniip golf tournament at the Quail
Hollow Club in Charlotte, N.C.
Associated Press


Caps nip


Pens, 3-2

Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Alex
Ovechkin contributed a power-
play goal, yet it was a few of his
unheralded teammates on the
Washington Capitals who made
the difference in Game 1 of
their showdown against Pitts-
burgh Penguins.
Tomas Fleischmann scored the
tiebreaking goal with 18:14 re-
maining, rookie goaltender
Simeon Varlamov stopped 34
shots, and the Capitals got the
jump on their Eastern Conference
rivals with a 3-2 victory Saturday.
David Steckel contributed his
first goal of the playoffs to help
Washington to its first four-game
winning streak in the playoffs
since 1991. The Capitals ad-
vanced to the second-round se-
ries by winning the last three
games against the New York
Rangers.
Game 2 is Monday night in
Washington.
: Sidney Crosby and Mark Eaton
scored for the defending Eastern
Conference champion Penguins,
who went 0-for-5 on the power
play after going 1-for-18 in the
final four games of their first-
round series against Philadelphia.
The Penguins and Capitals
have met seven times previously
in the playoffs; Pittsburgh has
won six of those series. Seven-
teen of the 43 playoff games be-
tween the teams have been
decided by one goal, including
this thriller.
Late in thl second period, Var-
lamov twisted his body and
stretched his stick across the goal
line to deny Crosby, who had
taken a shot from the left of the
crease after receiving a cross-ice
pass from Chris Kunitz.


Fistfight under the lights of Las Vegas


A big underdog in ht lastfight,

boxer Pacquiao is nw favored


Associated Press
LAS VEGAS - The last
time Manny Pacquiao dis-
played his many talents he
stopped Oscar De La Hoya in
a fight no one thought he
could win. The beating he
administered that night not
only sent De La Hoyainto re-
tirement, but cemented Pac-
quiao's status as boxing's
newest star
Pacquiao
returned to LATE
the ring Sat- E Qe to an:
urday night ET start, t
much the Pcquiao.R
same fighter figt was nc
he was five prs time.
months ago, thChronic
taking on secon on I
Ricky Hatton theesults.
in a lucrative
140-pound


fight matching two gu who
love to brawl. The bigffer-
ence now, though, that
everybody expects ht to
win.
One big fight can cree a
lot of expectation, anmhe
biggest task for% Pacqao
may be managing thelin
the ring.
His trainer isn't worjni
Pacquiao, says Frece
Roach, is more focuj
than ever.
"The win over Oscar j:


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gave hir more confidence,"
Roach std. "So many people
said he Duldn't do it but he
did., Oscr could still beat a
lot ofguv but he didn't win a
second that fight"
Once gain, Pacquiao will
be facing a fighter who is big-
ger tharhim as he fights for
only thehird time above 130
pounds Pacquiao weighed
in at 38 pounds Friday
while Hatton
was at the
TAR' class limit of
1:30 p.n. 140 pounds.
he Manny But odds-
icky Hatton makers who
At over at saw him dis-
Please see mantle an
le's sports even bigger
Mlonday for De La Hoya
make him a 2-
1 favorite to
beat the once-


beaten Hatton and win a title
in his sixth weight class since
turning pro. Coming off a
rugged training camp that
Pacquiao believes was his
best ever, he's not about to
argue the point
"I believe that I am im-
proving and everybody
knows and can see that by my
last few performances," Pac-
quiao said.
Those last few perform-
ances have made Pacquiao
(48-3-2, 36 knockouts) a


fighter in demand in a sport
desperate for stars. He's such
a hero in his native Philip-
pines that he talks about one
day running for president
there, but the win over De La
Hoya in particular cata-
pulted Pacquiao into rarified
status in the sport
He'll make $12 million to
square off for a minor title
against Hatton, who will earn
$8 million in a fight that sold
out the MGM Grand hotel's
arena and will be televised
on HBO pay-per-view with
the main event beginning
about 11:30 p.m. EDT.
"I do feel different now
than before I fought Oscar,"
Pacquiao said. "There is a
big difference in my popu-
larity now and I think that
was because Oscar was pop-
ular too."
Hatton, who will be backed
by his usual throng of singing
and chanting English fans, is
coming off a knockout win
over Paulie Malignaggi that
seemed to help him regain
any confidence lost in the
only loss of his career, a 10th
round stoppage in December
2007 at the hands of Floyd
Mayweather Jr.
Still, he knows there are a
lot of people in boxing that
look at him as little more
than a tough guy brawler
who likes to party a bit too
much between fights.
"People say (I'm) over-
hyped, overprotected, a fat,
beer-drinking Englishman,"
Hatton said at the final pre-


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Associated Press
Manny Pacquiao, left, and Ricky Hatton, right, face off at the weigh-in for their junior wel-
terweight boxing match Friday in Las Vegas. The two fought Saturday night but due to the
late start, the match was not over at press time.


fight press conference. "Well,
I'm going to shock the world
again."
Though both fighters love
to mix it up, they go about it
in different ways. Hatton (45-
1, 32 knockouts) tends to


throw wide punches while
moving constantly forward
and trying to smother his op-
ponent, while Pacquiao
fights down the middle with
hands held high from his
southpaw stance.


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Both say they plan to box
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start trading punches when
they get hit
"I don't see it being a tick-
ling contest," Hatton said.


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SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


41 -





)UNTY (FL) CHRONICLE MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


AL







NL


Toronto
Boston
NewYork
Tampa Bay
Baltimore



Florida
Philadelphia
Atlanta I
New York
Washington


East Division
GB WCGB
- - I
1% -
3 112
6 41,/
7 5V2

East Division
GB WCGB

1 -
21/2 112
3N 2/2
7� 62 '


Home
5-4
6-8
5-6
6-6
4-7


Chicago
Detroit
Kansas City
Minnesota
Cleveland



St. Louis
Chicago
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Houston


L Pct
10 .545
11 .522
11 .522
11 ,522
15 .375


L Pct
8 I lv''

11 c'.: .
121 .500
14 .417


Central Division
GB WCGB

Y2 2
1'/ 2
1/2 2
4 51/2


Central Division
GB WCGB L10
- - 7-3
4 �2 4-6
4 � * 5-5
4 1/2 5-5
414 1 7-3
61 3 5-5


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Cleveland 6, Detroit 5
N.Y.Yankees 10, L.A. Angels 9
Toronto 8, Baltimore 4
Tampa Bay 6, Boston 2
Chicago White Sox 4, Texas 3
Minnesota 7, Kansas City 5
Seattle 8, Oakland 7t

LA. Angels 8, N.Y. Yankees 4
Toronto 5, Baltimore 4 , 11 innings g to improve 2mp


Chicago White Sox at Texas, ate 1 .
De , e S - - ,,2,
Oakland at Seattle, late in te
Today's Games -
L.N. Angels'(Saunders 3-1) at N.Y. Yankees '. . . .
(Hughes 1-0), 1:05 p.m.
Cleveland (CI.Lee 1-3) at Detroit (Verlander 1- Associated Press
2), 1:05 p.m. 8 Boston Red Sox baserunner Jason Bay (44) steals second as
Baltimore (Guthrie 2-1) atToronto (Richmond 3- Tampa Bay Rays' Akinori Iwamura fields the late throw dur-
-0), 1:07 . Ing the third inning Saturday in St. Pet ersburg
Boston (Penny 2-0) at Tampa Bay (J.Shields 2- ing inning Saturday Petersburg.

Kansas City (Meche 1-2) at Minnesota (S.Baker Red Sox 10, Rays 6 for the loss, s ' once in the fourth
-.0-3), 2:10'p.m. aTERSBURO GMXL. and three es in the fifth to trail 6-5.
Oakland (Outman 0-0) at Seattle (Jakubausk homer wa the first off
1-3), 4:10 p.m. homered an Kevin Youkilis and Nick Wakeie hi seaso Een Lgoria
Chicago WhiteSx(Da1 So O e . s i o ack Wakefield this season Evan Longoria
rlson 1-2), 8:05 pm m.-1) at Texas (Har- Green each drove in three runs to back had a two-run double in the fifth, giving
os, " Atlanta� .... ..... 1 I T -, hd-, ;a,-, I ' n two-run doOule in the fifth, giving
P la ondepa 6, N 5 InTim Wakefield's pitching and help the him 1RBI's against the Red Sox this
-a atn ra '5 Games Boston Red Sox beat the Tampa Bay him 15RB's against the gamRed Sox this
Mr ..Pitoh , 7:05 p.m. Rayt 1 O S atrd 19-year2- in the first three games o
oson at ' Yankees,7:05 p.m. Rays 10-6 on Saturdy night.this seies
Cleveland at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Wakefield (3-1) allowed five runs in isseries.
haltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:08 p.m. five-plus innings to improve to 20-5 life- Boston a rh Tampa Bay b r h bi
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 8:10 . te against the Rays,including a 13 Elsury 6 2 2 0 BUptonof 4 1 0 0
iLA Angels atOakland 10:05 p.m record atTropicana Field, where the Red Pedroia 2b 3 22 1 Crwfrd If 5 1 2 0
Teas at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. LEAGUE Sox won for just the second time in their D.Ortizdh 2 0 0 0 Longori 3b 5 2 2
NATIONAL LEAGUE last 13 games in the domed stadium. Youkilslb 3 1 1 3 C.Pena lb 3 1 2 2
Friday's Games Lowell hit a solo homer in the sev- J.Drewrf 5 0 1 2 Burr6lldh 5 0 2 2
Chicag o Cubs 8, Floridaae . a . n Bay If 3 1 1 0 Zobristss 5 0 1 0
Cincinnati 4, Pittsburgh0 . enth off Brian Shouse. Youkils had a JBailey ph-tf2 0 0 0 Iwamr 2b 4 0,1 0
C'St. Louis 6, Washington 2 two-run double off the left-hander in Lowell 3b 5 2 2 1 Kapler rf 3 0 1 0
.Y. Mts 7, Phladelphia 4 the sixth, while Greendid most of his Kottarsc 4 1 1 0 Gross ph-rf 1 0 0 0
ranta; wh.Moe h reedn2 st ofsstarter ie- NGreenss 5 1 3 3 Navarrc 2 1 0 0
Ana 7. ilouson 2 damage against Rays starter Jeff Totals 38101310 Totals 37 611 6
Ar zona 5. M Sn Diego 0 mann (2-3). Boston 231 002 200-10
San FraIltDoO 3, Colorado 2 Carlos Pena hit his major league- Tampa Bay 100 130 001-6
Saturday Gadmes leading 1th home run for Tampa Bay, E-N.Green (6), Kapler (1), Iwamura (4). DP-
Saturday's Gmes leading 11th home run for Tampa Bay, Tampa Bay 2. LOB-Boston 10, Tampa Bay 9.
Chicago Cubs 6, Florida 1 a solo shot off Wakefield, who allowed 2B-Pedroia (8), Youkilis (11), J.Drew (7), Kot-
Wasimrton 5, Atlanta 1 seven hits, walked two and struck out taras (2), N.Green (6), Longoria (12), Burrell (4).
Philadelphia 6, N.Y. Mets 5,10 innings five. The 20 wins against the Rays are HR-Lowell (5), C.Pena (11). SB-Ellsbury 3
olorado 5, San Francisco 1 his most against any team. . (13), Bay (3), Crawford (11). CS-N.Green (2).
Colorado 5, San Francisco 1 hS-Navarro.
Pittsburgh 8, Cincinnati 6 Outscored 19-2 in the first two SP HrR ER BB SO
Arizona 4 M Dtw1aukeae 1 games of the series, the Red Sox Boston
Today's Games pounced on Niemann for two runs in Okajima H,3-1 2 2 0 0 1 5
NY t M aiame 1-21 at Pn,l3daelpra lBia,,Ton the first, three in the second and one in R.Ramirez 1 0 0 0 0 0
0-2). 1 35 pm the third to build a 6-1 lead. Saito 1 2 1 1 0 2
St Loui4S ILtoe 3-0) at Wazhington (Larnan - Green, who had three hits, got his Tampa Bay .
3).1 35pm ianL -3 3 7 6 5 3 3
Hou'Sion W.Raoriquez -2.2 at Aianta tJO- firsttwoRBI'sonasecond-inningin- Cormier 2 1 0 0 0 1
Rea Q).1 35 pm field singlethat glanced off the glove of Balfour 1-3 1 F,2 2 2 1,:.
Cilcinrat! Guet 1-iI at Pittsburgh (Karstens diving second baseman Akinori Iwae-: house ., 11-3 3 ' 2 2 2
10),.,1'~mura.Hedroveinthefinalrunoffthe J.Nelson 11-3 0 0'. 0 0 1
Anrzona tfPiw tit.0'- at Miiwaukee (BuOn -01u Percival 1 1 0 0 0 0
05 ...Rays starter with a single in Ihe third ,Per oiva 1taner o, e o
Fi 31') at Chcg,: Cub IZ.m. Niemann, who won the No 5 HBP-t.-, ' J..ela ilavaric, hi . r,ouje

CollF-p 0 r ;-1 .Asan Fran rco1.1 FB-a--:, ,,i
n0-2)., 4:F :ipc Six runs and seven hits in three in- Ferpirt.i-- HT,, 311r nll,1,.arryF.
San Daga _ (Gaur 0,-01 al L A Ociger.- nings, the shortest start of his career. s,.,,,ra .,,r, Hu,1.:.r, Tr,,ird JocnHritcrr,
I.Blingsinjy 40 4 1 . The Rays nearly got him off the hook T-: ., A-734 '1,:, .'..3


Angels 8, Yankees 4
NEW YORK - Matt Palmer out-
pitched CC Sabathia for his second
major league win, and the Los Angeles
Angels broke open a tight game in the
late innings to beat the New York Yan-
kees 8-4 on Saturday.
Kendry Morales homered and drove
in two runs, Torii Hunter chased
Sabathia with a two-run double in a
four-run seventh and the Angels ended
New York's four-game winning streak.
Palmer (2-0) pitched three-hit ball
for 6 1-3 innings before Los Angeles'
struggling bullpen closed it out. The
right-hander, filling in for an Angels ro-
tation decimated by injuries, retired 14
straight batters between Hideki Mat-
u's RBI single in the first and Derek
Jeter's leadoff double in the sixth.
It was another disappointing outing
for Sabathia (1-3), the free-agent prize-
who signed a $161 million, seven-year
contract in the offseason. The big lefty
is winless in his last, four starts since
beating Kansas City on April 11.
The 30-year-old Palmer spent
seven seasons in the minors before
making his big league debut with San
Francisco last season.


Los Angeles
ab rhbi
Figgins dh 3 .0 0 0
MthwsJ rf 5 00 0
Kndrck2b 5 1 2 1
'Hunter cf 5 2 1 2
Napolic ' 2 1 1 1
KMorls lb 4 2 2 2
JRiverlIf ' 5 0'2 1,
B.Wood3b 4 1 2 0
EAyar ss 0 0 0 0
Mlztursss 4 1 1 0


NewYork
ab r h bl
Jeterss 4 1 1 0
Damon If 5 00 0
Teixeirlb 3 0 0 0
.HMatsudh 4 0 1 1
Cano2b 4 0 0 0
MeCarrrf 3 1 1 0
JMolin c 2 0 0 0
Berroa 3b 1 0 0 0
R.Pena3b 2 0 0 0
Posadaph 2 1 1 2
Gardnrcf 2 1 0 0


Totals 37 811 7 Totals 32 4.4 3
Los Angeles 000 001 412-8
NewYork 100 000 003-4
E-Matthews Jr. (1), Jeter (1), Me.Cabrera (1).
LOB-Los Angeles 9, New York 7. 2B-Hunter
(7), Jeter (5). HR-K.Morales (4), Posada (5).
SB-Hunter (2), Napoli (2), M.Izturis (3), Jeter
(5). CS-Napoli (2). S-Figgins.
IP H RER BB SO
Los Angeles
Palmer W,2-0, 61-3 3 1 1 2 2
Arredondo H,7 2-3 0 0 0 1 1
S.Shields 1 0 0 0 0 0
F.Rodriguez 2-3 1 3 2 2 1
Bulger 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
New York
Sabathia L,1-3 62-3 8 5 4 1 5
Albaladejo 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Veras 1. 1 1 1 2 0
D.Robertson 1 1 2 1 2 2
HBP-by Palmer (Jeter), by Sabathia (Napoli).

jmpire,--H.,.,n-e [an DeMlV; First, Todd
Tichenor; Second, Doug Eddings; Third,
Hunter Wendelstedt.
T-3:21. A-44,970 (52,325).


Tigers 9, Indians 7
DETROIT - Curtis Granderson hit
a two-run homer in Detroit's three-run
eighth inning and the Tigers beat the
Cleveland Indians 9-7 on Saturday.
Detroit blew a 5-0 lead and trailed 7-
6 before its big inning against Rafael .
Betancourt (0-1), rallying to end an
eight-game losing streak to Cleveland.
Pinch-hitter Josh Anderson led off
the eighth with a single and Grander-
son followed with his eighth homer.
Carlos Guillen tacked on a sacrifice fly
later in the inning.
Joel Zumaya (1-0) picked up the win
with 1 2-3 shutout innings of relief, and
Fernando Rodney finished for his fifth
save. Cleveland had runners on the
corners with one out in the ninth, but
Rodney struck out Mark DeRosa and
Jhonny Peralta to end the game.
Adam Everett hit his second career
grand slam in the fourth for the Tigers.
Both starters struggled but ended
up with no-decisions. Cleveland's
AaronLaffey allowed five runs - as
many as in his previous three starts
combined - and six hits with five
walks in just 3 1-3 innings. Detroit's
Zach Miner gave up five runs in five
innings.,


Cleveland'
ab rhbi
Sizemrcf 5 1 2 0
ACarer2b 4 1 2 3
VMrtnzc 3 2 2 1
Choo If 4 02 2
DeRosa 3b 4 0 0 1
Peralta ss 5 0 0 0
Dellucc dh 4 1 2 0
Garkolb 3 1 1 0
BFrncsrf 4 1 2 0


Detroit
ab r h bi
Grndrsof 4 1 2 2
Polanc2b 4 1 2 0
Ordonzrf 4 0 1 1
Santiag ss 0 0 0 0
MiCarrIb 4-1 1 0
CGuilln dh 4 0 0 1
Laird c 3 1 1 0
Inge 3b 3 1 1 0
Raburn4f 2 2 1 1
Everettss 2 1 1 4
JAndrsph 1 1 1 0


Totals 36 713 7 Totals 31 911 9
Cleveland , 000 050 200-7
Detroit 000 501 03x-9
E-A.Cabrera (1). DP-Cleveland 2, Detroit 2.
LOB-Cleveland 8, Detroit 9. 2B-Sizemore
(6), A.Cabrera (6), V.Martinez 2 (7). 3B-Choo
(1). HR-Granderson (8), Everett (1). SB-Size-
more (5). S-A.Cabrera, Everett. SF-DeRosa,
C.Guillen.
IP H RERBBSO-
Cleveland
Laffey 31-3 6 5 .5 5 1
Chulk 22-3 2 1 1 2 2
SippH,2 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
Betancourt L,0-1 12-3 3 3 2 1 1
Detroit
Miner 5 6 5 5 3 5
Lyon 1: 2 0 0 0 0
SeayBS,1-1 1-3 2 2-2 1 0
ZumnayaW,1-0 , 12-3 1. 0 !0 0 -1
"d,:,-,r, 'I ,,I ;.:, 2 ,O0 ,0:.2 .
'.vP-n-Mr,er "
Umpires-Home, Laz Diaz; First, Scott Barry;
Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Mike Reilly.
T-3:19. A-34,646 (41,255).


Blue Jays 5, Orioles 4,
11 innings
TORONTO - Aaron Hill hit an RBi
single in the 11th inning to give the
Toronto Blue Jays a 5-4 victory over
the Baltimore Orioles on Saturday.
Rod Barajas led off the 11th with a
base hit off Brian Bass (0-1). After
Travis Snider popped his bunt attempt
to the mound, Barajas took second on
Marco Scutaro's sacrifice and scored
on Hill's single to right-center.
Jason Frasor (4-0) pitched one
scoreless inning for the win.
It was a wild final two innings for
Hill, who homered in the 10th after his
error in the top half helped the Orioles
take a 4-3 lead.
Nick Markakis went 0-for-4 with a
pair of walks for Baltimore, ending his
hitting streak at 17 games. The Ori-
oles have lost five straight.
Adam Jones hit his third homer
into the second deck in left in the first,
but Toronto scored three times in the
second. Adam Lind drove in a run
with a groundout and Raul Chavez
and Scutaro each had RBI singles to
make it 3-1.


Baltimore

BRorts 2b
AdJons cf
Markks rf
Huff lb1
Mora 3b
Scott dh
Wggntn ph
Pie pr-dh
Montnz If
Zaun c
Clzturs ss


ab rhbl
5 00 0
6 23 1
4 20 0
5 02 2
5 01 0
4 00 0
*1 0 0 1
0 00 0
4 01 0
4000
5 02 0


Toronto
ab r h bi
Scutaro ss 6 0 1 1
A.Hill 2b 6 1 2 2
Rios rf 5 0 2 0
V.Wellscf 5 1 2 0
Lind dh 3 0 1 1
Bautist 3b 2 1 1 0
Overaylb 2 1 0 0
Millarib 2 0 0 0
RChavz c 4 0 1
JMcDnlpr 0 00 q
Barajsc 1 1 1 0
Snider If 5 00 0.


Totals 43.4 9 4 Totals 41 511 5
Baltimore 102 000 000 10-4
Toronto 030 000 000 11-5
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Ji.Johnson (1), Markakis (3), A.Hill (4). DP-
Baltimore 3. LOB-Baltimore 11, Toronto 10.
2B-Huff (7), Montanez (3), V.Wells (8). HR-
AdJones (5), A.Hill (6). SB-Ad.Jones (3);
Mora (1), C.Izturis (5). S-Scutaro.
IP H RER BBSO
Baltimore
Bergesen 6 6 .3 3 3 1
Baez -12-3 1 0 0 2 1
Walker 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Ji.Johnson 1 0 0 0 0 0
SherrillBS,2-6 1 ' 2 1 1 1 1
BassL,0-1 . 2-3 2 1 1 0 0
Toronto
Ray 52-3 4 3 3 4 2
Carlson ' 12-3 1 0 0 0 0
League 12-3 2 0 0 0 3
Downs 1 1, 1 0 0 2
FrasorW,4-0 1.. i 0 0 a 0 0' .
HBP-by Ray (Zaun). PB-R L rC r..v:
Umpires-Home, Chris Guccione; First, Chris
Tiller; Second, Jerry Layne;Third, Tony Randazzo.
T-3:24. A-18;331 (49,539).


D-backs 4, Brewers 1
MILWAUKEE - Dan Haren struck
out 11 to win his third straight start and
Justin Upton hit a homer to lift the Ari-
Zona Diamondbacks over the Milwau-
kee Brewers 4-1 on Saturday night.
With Diamondbacks ace Brandon
Webb sidelined with a nagging
shoulder strain, Haren (3-3) has
,picked up the slack and Arizona is
-beginning to hit, winning five of the
last seven.
With Haren, the Diamondbacks
know they don't need tQ score much.
He scattered one run off four hits over
'" eight innings and has given up three
funs over his last three starts to lower
his ERA to 1.47. Chad Quails pitched
foaround a one-out double in the ninth
for his sixth save,
Brewers starter Braden Looper has
Been strong himself since signing a
free-agent deal to join Milwaukee in the
offseason, but one inning cost him
against Haren.
Looper (2-1) retired the first 12 bat-
.ters he faced, but gave up three straight
hits to start the fifth inning to the Dia-
.mondbacks, who came in hitting .231
as a team, worst in the majors.
. Mark Reynolds doubled to the gap
in right-center field, Upton laid down a
bunt and ran past the tag of first base-
man Prince Fielder and Conor Jack-
son's RBI single scored Reynolds.
Arizona Milwaukee
ab rhbi ab rhbi
FLopez2b 4 01 0 Weeks2b 3 1 1 0
Ojedass 4 0 1 0 Counsllss 4 0 0 0
Tracylb 4 00 0 Hart rf 4 00 0
.Rynlds3b 4 1 1 0 Fielder lb 3 0 1 1
JJUptonrf 4 22 1 Camrnof 4 0 1 0
CJcksnit 4 0 2 1 Duffy If 4 0 0 0
Byrnesct 3 1 0 0 Hall3b 4 01 0
CYoungci 1 00 0 Kendall c 3 01 0
Stnyderc 4 0 2 2 Looperp, 1 0 0 0
Harenp 3000 McGehph 1 00 0
Clark pn 1 00 0 McCIngp 0 00 0
OUalis p: 0 00 0 Juliop 0 00 0
Totals 36 4 9 4 Totals 31 1 5 1
Arizona 000 030 100-4
Milwaukee 000 001 000-1
E-Oleda (2). DP-Arizona 1. LOB-Arizona 5,
MIaukee 6 2B-Reynolds (4), Snyder (2),
Weeks (4). Cameron (10). HR--J.Upton (3).
SB-C Jackton (41 S-Looper.
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
HarenW,3-3 8 4 1 1 2 11
Qualls S,6-7 1 1 0 0 0 1
-Milwaukee 4
LooperL2-1 7 6 4 4 0 3
McClung 1 2 0 0 0 1
Juito 1 1 0 0 0 3
WP-Haren
Ompires-Home, Mike Everitt First, Gerry Davis;
Second, Brian Gorman; Third, C.B. Bucknor.
T-2:26. A-42,422 (41,900).


Nationals 6, Cardinals 1
WASHINGTON - Shairon Martis
pitched a five-hitter, Adam Dunn hit a,
three-run homer and the Washington
Nationals beat the St. Louis Cardinals
6-1 on Saturday.
Dunn connected in the fifth after first
baseman Chris Duncan dropped Ryan.
Zimmerman's foul pop that would have
been the last out of the inning.
Martis (3-0) retired the first 14 hitters
he faced before Yadier Molina grounded
a single through the middle ia the fifth.
The right-hander, who had never gone
'more than 61-3 innings, struck out six
and walked none in a 110-pitch effort,
Colby Rasmus hit his first career
homer for St. Louis..
Ryan Zimmerman doubled in the
first, extending his Nationals-record hit-
ting streak to 21 games, the longest in
the majors this season.
SJoel Pineiro (4-1) held Washington
scoreless until the fifth. Martis reached
on a fielders choice when he failed on
a sacrifice attempt and went to third on
Cristian Guzman's single to right. Nick
Johnson followed with a sacrifice fly to
deep center that Rick Ankiel caught be-
fore stumbling into the wall.
Zimmerman singled to left in an at-
bat prolonged when Duncan dropped a
foul pop near the right-field stands and
Dunn hit his seventh homer, a shot to
right field. It was his fourth career
against Pineiro in 16 at-bats.
Rasmus hit Martis' first pitch of the
seventh into the right-field stands to cut
it to 4-1.
St. Louis Washington
h1 rhlh ,nu hrhi


ar
Schmkr 2b 4
Rasms If 4
Ludwck rf 4
Duncan lb 4
Anklel cf 3
YMolin c 3
Thurstn3b 3
Barden ss 3
Pineiro p 2
KGreen ph 1
Walters p 0
Totals 31
St. Louis
Washington


h rnbi
4 0 0 0

4000
. 0 0 0
3 0 1 0

3 0 0 0
2 000

1010
151


a r n bi
CGzmnss 4 1 1 0
NJhnsn lb 2 0 0 1
Zmrmn3b 4 12 0
Dunn f 3 1 1 3
Dukes pr-lf 0 1 0 0
Kearnsir 4 1 2 1
WHarrscf 4 00 0
AHrndz2b 4 0 2 1
Nieves c 4 01 0
Martisp 3 1 0 0

Totals 32 6 9 6
000 000 100-1
000 040 02x-6


E-Duncan (3). DP-Washington 1. LOB-St.
Louis 3, Washington 5. 2B-Zimmerman (9).
3B-Kearns (2).'HR-Rasmus (1), Dunn (7).
SF-N.Johnson.
IP H R ER BB SO
St. Louis
,PineiroL,4-1 7 7 4 1 1 4
Walters 1 2 2 2 1 0
Washington
MartlsW,3-0 9 5 1 1 0 6
Umpires-Home, Angel Hernandez; First, Bill
Welke; Second, Kevin Causey; Third, Tim Welke.
T-2:07. A-19,950 (41,888).


Astros 5, Braves 1
ATLANTA- Lance Berkman hit
first-inning homer, Hunter Pence had
three hits and the Houston Astros re-
sponded to their managers call for
more offense with a 5-1 victory over
the Atlanta Braves on Saturday.
Before the game, manager Cecil
Cooper said, "Our big horses have
got to hit. If they don't hit, the wagon
don't move!'1
The Astros had 12 hits, including
Berkman's sixth homer, a liner off
Jair Jurrjens that barely cleared the
left-field wall.
Houston still led 1-0 in the second
inning when a rain delay of 1 hour, 37.
minutes took both starting pitchers out
of the game.
Tim Byrdak (1-0) gave up two hits in
21-3 scoreless innings.
Chipper Jones' error helped the As-
tros score three runs off Buddy Carlyle
(0-1) in the fourth.
Felipe Paulino gave up a tying run
in the second when Jeff Francoeur
doubled and scored on a wild pitch.


'Houston
ab rhbi
KMatsu 2b 5 0 2 1
Bournof 5 0 1 1
Brkmn lb 5 1 1
tCa.Lee If 4 12 0
Michals If 0 0 0 0
Tejadass 4 1 0 0
Pence r 4 1 3 0
Blum 3b 3 0 1 0
Sampsn p 0 0 0 0
JaSmth ph 1 00 0
Brocail p 0 00 0
Hwkns p 0 00 0
IRdrgzc 4 1 2 1
Oswalt p 1 0.0 0
FPauln p 0 0 00
Erstadph 0 00 1
Byrdakp 0 0 0 0
Kppngr3b 2 0 0 0
Totals 38 512 5
Houston
Atlanta


Atlanta
ab r h bl
Schafer cf 5 0 2 0
Escoarss 2 0 0 0
Parr p 0 0 0 0
M.Diazph 1 00 0
C.Jones 3b,3 0 0 0
Ktchmlb 3 01 0
OFIhrtp 0 00 0
Infantess 1 00 0
Francrrf 4 1 1 0
KJhnsn 2b 3 0 2 0
D.Rossc 4 00 0
B.Jones If 4 0 1 0
Jurrjns p 0 0 0 0
Norton ph 0 00 0
Carlylep -1 0 0 0
Prado 1b 1 0 0 '0

Totals 32 1 7 0
100 300 001-5
010 000 000-1


E-C.Jones 2 (4). DP-Houston 1, Atlanta 1.
LOB-Houston 7, Atlanta 10, 2B-I.Rodriguez
(4), Schafer (6), Francoeur (3), K.Johnson (3).
3B-Bourn (3). HR-Berkman (6). CS-Pence
(2), Schafer (1). SF-Erstad.
IP H RER BB SO
Houston
Oswalt 1 0 0 0 1 2
F.Paulino 2 .3 1 1 2 3
ByrdakW,1-0 21-3 2 0 0 2 0
Sampson H,4 12-3 1 0 0 0 1
BrocailH,2 1 1 0 0 0 1
Hawkins 1 0 0 0 1 2
Atlanta
Jurrjens 2 4 1 1 0 0
CarlyleL,0-1 3 4 3 1 0 2
O'Flaherty 2 2 0 0 0 0
Parr 2 2 1 1 0 1
WP-F.Paulino.
Umpires-Home, Chad Fairchild; First, Phil Cuzzi;
Second, Jerry Crawford; Third, Paul Nauert.
T--2:48 (Rain delay: 1:37). A-28,203 (49,743).


Phillies 6, Mets 5,
10 innings

PHILADELPHIA- Shane Victorino's
bases-loaded walk off Sean Green with
two outg in the 10th inning lifted the
Philadelphia Phillies to a 6-5 victory over
the New York Mets on Saturday.
Green (0-2) retired the first batter he
faced before Pedro Feliz reached on
an infield single, Green. hit pinch-hitter
Matt Stairs with a pitch, but retired
pinch-hitter Greg Dobbs on a fly ball.
After pinch-hitter Chris Coste
walked to load the bases, Victorino
walked on a 3-2 pitch to give the
Phillies a split in the first two games of
the series against theirrival,
Daniel Murphy and Ramon Castro
hit consecutive homers for the Mets off
-Jamie Moyer in the sixth.


NewYork
ab rhbi
JosRys ss 5 00 0
Castillo 2b 3 1 1 1
Felicin p 0 0 0 0
Parnell p 0 00 0
Delgadph 0'00 0
Mainepr 0 00 0
Putz p . 0 00 0
Churchph 1 0 1 0
SGreen p 0 00 0
Beltran of 5 0 2 0
Sheffildrf 4 1 1 0
DWrght 3b 2 0 0 1
Tatislb 5 00 0
DnMrplf 2 1 1 2
Reed If 0 0 0
RCastrc 3 1 2 1
Santos pr-c 1 0 0 0
OPerezp 1 0 1 0
Takhsh p 1 0 0 0
Cora ph-2b 21 2 0
Totals ' 35 511 5
NewYork
Philadelphia


Philadelphia
ab r h bi
Victorn cf 5 2 2 1
IbanezlIf 4 1 2 2
Werth r f 4 1 1 1
Howard 1b 5 01 0
Rollinsss 4 1 1 1
Feliz3b 5 1 2 0
Brntltt 2b 2 0 0 0
Stairsph 0 00 0
Ruiz c 2 0 0 0
Dobbs ph 1 00 0
Moyer p 2 0 0 1
S.Eyrep 0 00 0
Condry p 0 00 0
Madson p 0 0 0 0
Utley ph 1 00 0
LIdgep. 0 0 0 0
Tschnrp 0 0 0 0
Coste ph 0 0 0 0

Totals 35 6 9 6
011 003 000 0-5
211 001 000 1-6


Two outs when winning run scored.
DP-New York 2, Philadelphia 2. LOB-New
York 13, Philadelphia 11. 2B-Sheffield (2), Vic-
torino (4), Ibanez (6), Werth (6). 3B-Cora (1),
Victorino (3). HR-Dan.Murphy (3), R.Castro
(2), lbanez (8). SB-D.Wright (4). S-Cora.
SF-D.Wright, Dan.Murphy, Ibanez.
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
O.Perez 21-3 5 4 4 6 2
Takahashi 22-3 1 0 0 1 1
Feliciano BS,1-1 1 1 1 1 0 1
Parnell 1 1 0 0 0 0
Putz 2 0 0 0 0 2
S.Green L,0-2 2-3 1 1 1 2 0
Philadelphia
Moyer 52-3 7 5 5 4 2
S.Eyre 0 1 0 0 1 0
Condrey 11-3 0 0 0 0 0
Madson 1 1 0 0 2 1
Lidge 1 0 0 0 2 0
TaschnerW,1-0 1 2 0 0 0 1
S.Eyre pitched to 3 batters in the 6th.
HBP-by S.Green (Stairs), by S.Eyre (Beltran).
Umpires-Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Mike Win-
ters; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third, James Hoye.
T-3:43. A-45,069 (43,647).


Associated Press
Chicago Cubs outfielder Kosuke Fukudome catches a fly ball
hit by Florida Marlins' Wes Helms in the seventh inning Sat-
urday in Chicago. The Cubs won, 6-1.


Cubs 6, Marlins 1
CHICAGO - Ted Lilly struck
out 10 in eight strong innings
and hit a two-run double, pow-
ering the Chicago Cubs to a 6-1
victory over the Florida Marlins
on Saturday.
Ryan Theriot homered for
the second consecutive day
and Derrek Lee added a solo
shot for the Cubs, who won
their second straight after losing
seven of nine.
Lilly (3-2) allowed a run and
five hits with no walks, giving
the bullpen a much-needed rest
after Cubs relievers pitched 11
1-3 innings over the previous
three games. Aaron Heilman
struck out the side in the ninth.
Anibal Sanchez (1-3) gave
up six runs and nine hits over
four innings for Florida.
Hanley Ramirez went 0-for-4
with two strikeouts in his return
to the Marlins' starting lineup.
Ramirez entered Friday's
game in a double switch for his
first appearance since being
hit on the right hand in New
York on Monday. '
Theriot, who also tripled, had
gone 620 at-bats without a
homer before his grand slam in
Friday's 8-6 win. Then in his first


at-bat on a windy Saturday af-
ternoon, he lifted a 1-0 fastball
,over the left-field wall to give
Chicago a 2-0 lead in the first.
Mike Fontenot also had a
RBI single in the first, and Lilly
extended the Cubs' lead to 5-0
when he doubled.


Florida


Chicago
ab rhbi ab rh bi


Bonlfac2b 4 01 0 ASorinlf 5 1 2 0
Hermidlf 4 00 0 Theriotss 5 1 2 2
HRmrzss 4 0 0'0 Fukdmcf-rf2 1 0 0
Cantu lb 4 0 1 0 D.Lee lb 4 1 1 1
RPauln c 4 01 0 Hoffpar rf 3 1 2 0
Helms3b 3 00 0 Gthrghtpr 0 00 0
C.Rossrf 3 1 1 1 Fontent3b 3 0 1 1
Maybin cf 3 01 0 Soto c 4 0 1 0
ASnchzp 1 00 0 Miles2b 3 1 1 0
Carrollph -1 00 0 Lilly p 3 0 1 2
Pennp 0 00 0 Zamrnph 1 00 0
Amezgph 1 00 0 Heilmn p 0 00 0'
Calerop 0 0 00
Totals 32 1 5 1 Totals 33 611 6
Florida 000 010 000-1
Chicago 302 100 OOx-6
DP-Florida 1. LOB-Florida 4, Chicago 8.
2B-Lilly (1). 3B--Therlot (2). HR-C.Ross (4),
Theriot (2), D.Lee (2). SB-Fukudome 2 (3),
Miles (1). CS-Gathright (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Florida
A.Sanchez L,1-3 4 9 6 6 4 5
Penn 3 1 0 0 1 4
Calero 1 1 0 0 0 2
Chicago
Lilly W,3-2 8 5 1 1 '0 10
Heilman 1 0 0 0 0 3
Balk-Lilly 2.
Umpires-Home, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Brian
Knight; Second, Jim Wolf; Third, Brian O'Nora.
T-2:34. A-40,083 (41,210).


West Division
GB WCGB

3V2 31
4 4
41/2 '41h


Seattle
Texas
Los Angeles
Oakland


Los Angeles
San Fran.
San Diego
Arizona
Colorado


West Division
GB WCGB

4 1
4� 1t4
5 2
6 3


Home
8-0
9-4
6-4
8-10
4-5


SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 B3








COREB ARD CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PGA Tour
Quail Hollow Champ.
Saturday
At Quail Hollow Club
Charlotte, N.C.
Purse: $1.17 million
Yardage: 7,442; Par: 72
Third Round
Zach Johnson 70-67-68-205 -11
Lucas Glover 68-71-68-207 -9
Tiger Woods 65-72-70-207 -9
George McNeill 69-68-70-207 -9
Brendon de Jonge 72-69-67-208 -8
Sean O'Hair 69-72-67-208 -8
Bubba Watson 71-65-72-208 -8
Relief Goosen 68-68-72-208 -8
Y.E.Yang 72-71-66-209 -7
David Toms 71-71-67-209 -7
Ross Fisher 73-67-69-209 -7
Davis Love III 70-69-70-209 -7
Jason Dufner 67-71-71-209 -7
Martin Kaymer 71-70-69-210 -6
Danny Lee 71-69-70-210 -6
Jeff Klauk 69-71-70-210 -6
Jim Furyk 71-66-73-210 -6
Nick Watney 71-71-69-211 -5
Fredrik Jacobson 71-70-70-211 -5
lan Poulter 71-70-70-211 -5
Bo Van Pelt 69-71-71-211 . -5
Charles Warren 69-71-71-211 -5
Bill Haas 69-71-71-211 -5
Ted Purdy 70-69-72-211 -5
Geoff Ogilvy 71-73-68-212 -4
Joe Ogilvie 71-72-69-212 -4
Tim Petrovic 71-70-71-212 -4
Brendon Todd 70-70-72-212 -4
Camilo Villegages 71-67-74-212 -4
John Huston 73-71-69-213 -3
Kent Jones 72-70-71-213 -3
Boo Weekley 71-70-72-213 -3
Cliff Kresge 69-72-72-213 .3
Steve Marino 67-72-74-213 -3
Jeff Maggert 68-70-75-213 -3
Phil Mickelson 67-71-75-213 -3
Jonathan Byrd 72-72,70-214 -2
Martin Laird 74-70-70-214 -2
Matt Bettencourt 72-71-71-214 -2
Rocco Mediate 72-70-72-214 -2
Jeff Overton 70-71-73-214 -2
Ben Curtis 74-70-71-215 -1
Will MacKenzie 70-74-71-215 -1
MichaelAllen 70-73-72-215 -1
Brian Davis 72-71-72-215 -1
David Mathis 70-73-72-215 -1
Ken Duke 70-72-73-215 -1
Chad Campbell 72-70-73-215 -1
Hunter Mahan 68-72-75--215 -1
Cameron Beckman 73-71-72-216 E
Shaun Michael 74-69-73-216 E
John Senden / 71-72-73-216 E
Peter Tomasulo 74-69-73-216 E
Mathew Goggin 71-71-74-216 E
Jonathan Kaye 70-72-74-216 E
Steve Lowery 73-71-73-217 +1
Mark Calcavecchla 69-74-74-217 +1
Anthony Kim 70-69-78-217. +1
Robert Karlsson 70-69-78-217 +1
Bill Lunde 72-72-74-218 +2
Parker McLachlln 73-71-74-218 +2
Kevin Sutherland 71-72-75-218 +2
Robert Allenby 67-74-77-218 +2
Tom Pernice, Jr. 72-69-77-218 +2
Trevor Immelman . 73-70-76-219 +3
John Rollins 70-74-76-220 +4
Gary Woodland 70-74-76-220 +4
Pat Perez 74-70-76-220 +4
Rich Beem 71-73-76-220 +4
Steve Wheatcroft 70-73-77-220 +4
Chris Stroud 73-69-78-220 +4
Steve Flesch . 69-74-78-221 +5
Aron Price 71-73-78-222 +6
Brad Faxon 74-69-80-223 +7



NHL Playoffs
lRS.T ROUND
(Best-of-7)
Wednesday, April 15
N.Y. Rangers 4, Washington 3
Pittsburgh z Pliiro.c-r,,a i
New Jersey 0,flIoIn-r, 1
Vancouver 2, St. Louis 1
Thursday, April 16
Boston 4, Montreal 2
Detroit 4, Columbus 1
Chicago 3, Calgary,2, OT
Anaheim 2, San Jose 0 ,
Friday, April 17
SP ,t- u,,.w r, Pr. F 'r ,Iipal:r,,.a 2 ,T
Carolina2, Ne .lers.e I OT
Vancouver 3, EI L-:u,' 0 . U
Saturday, April 18,'
N.Y. Rangers 1, W - rir.jopf ,
Detroit 4, Colum:u..u ,:
Boston 5, Montreali 1
Chicago 3, Calgary 2
Sunday, April 19
Philadelphia 6, Pittsburgh 3
Vancouver 3, St. Louis 2
New Jersey 3, Carolina 2, OT
Anaheim 3, San Jose 2
Monday, April 20
Boston 4, Montreal 2
Washington 4, N.Y. Rangers 0
Calgary 4, Chicago 2
Tuesday, April 21
#Detroit 4, Columbus 1 *
Pittsburgh 3, Philadelphia 1
Carolina 4, New Jersey 3
Vancouver 3, St. Louis 2, OT, Vancouver wins
series 4-0
San Jose 4, Anaheim 3
Wednesday, April 22
Boston 4, Montreal 1, Boston wins series 4-0
N.Y. Rangers 2, Washington 1
, Calgary 6, Chicago 4
Thursday, April 23
Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 0
Detrdit 6, Columbus 5, Detroit wins series 4-0
New Jersey 1, Carolina 0
Anaheim 4, San Jose 0
Friday, April 24
Washington 4, N.Y. Rangers 0
Saturday, April 25
Pittsburgh 5, Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh wins
series 4-2
Chicago 5, Calgary 1
San Jose 3, Anaheim 2, OT .
Sunday, April 26
Washington 5, N.Y. Rangers 3
Carolina 4, New Jersey 0
Monday, April 27
Chicago 4, Calgary 1, Chicago wins series 4-2
Anaheim 4, San Jose 1, Anaheim wins se-
ries 4-2
Tuesday, April 28
Washington 2, N.Y. Rangers 1, Washington
wins series 4-3
Carolina 4, New Jersey 3, Carolina wins se-
ries 4-3
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7)
Thursday, April 30
Vancouver 5, Chicago 3, Vancouver leads se-
ries 1-0


Friday, May 1
Detroit 3, Anaheim 2, Detroit leads series 1-0
Boston 4, Carolina 1, Boston leads series 1-0
Saturday, May 2
Washington 3, Pittsburgh 2, Washington
leads series 1-0
Chicago at Vancouver, late
Today, May 3
Anaheim at Detroit, 2 p.m.
Carolina at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Monday, May 4
Pittsburgh at Washington, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, May 6
Vancouver at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Anaheim, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 6
Washington at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Boston at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 7
Vancouver at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Anaheim, 10:30 p.m.


For the record Kyle Busch wins NASCAR


Here are the winning
numbers selected
Saturday in the
Florida Lottery:


CASH 3 (early)
8-1-0
CASH 3 (late)
7-9-5
PLAY 4 (early)
7-5-5-8
PLAY 4 (late)
3-5-0-5
FANTASY 5
13-14-17-18-33
POWERBALL
3-20-38-42-45
POWER BALL
27
POWER PLAY
3
LOTTERY
3-4- 22 - 42- 45- 47


==On theAIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
3 p.m. (VERSUS) Drag Racing American League (Taped)
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing: O'Reilly Midwest
Nationals - Final Eliminations (Same-day Tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Virginia Tech at Florida State
MLB BASEBALL
1:30 p.m. (FSNFL, TBS) Boston Red Sox at Tampa Bay Rays
2 p.m. (WGN) Florida Marlins at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m. (ESPN) Chicago White Sox at Texas Rangers
3 a.m. (ESPN2) Chicago White Sox at Texas Rangers
(Same-day Tape)
BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) Eastern Conference First Round
Game 7 - Miami Heat at Atlanta Hawks, If necessary
3:30 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) Western Conference Semifinal.
Game 1 - Dallas Mavericks at Denver Nuggets
BICYCLING
5 p.m. (VERSUS) 2009 Tour de Romandie (Taped)
BILLIARDS
1 p.m. (ESPN) WPBA San Diego Classic - Semifinal (Taped)
2 p.m. (ESPN) WPBA San Diego Classic - Semifinal (Taped)
3 p.m. (ESPN) WPBA San Diego, Classic - Final (Taped)
EQUESTRIAN
5 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) Rolex Championships (Taped)
GOLF
8:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Open de Espana -
Final Round (Same-day Tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Quail Hollow Championship -
Final Round
3 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) PGATour: Quail Hollow Championship-
Final Round
HOCKEY
2 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) Western Conference Semifinal Game 2 -
Ahaheim Ducks at Detroit Red Wings
7:30 p.m. (VERSUS) Eastern Conference Semifinal Game
2 - Carolina Hurricanes at Boston Bruins
OUTDOORS
9 a.m. (ESPN2) Fishing Mad Fin Shark Tournament (Taped)
RODEO
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Bull Riding PRCAXtreme Bulls (Taped)
1 p.m. (ESPN2) Bull Riding PRCA Xtreme Bulls (Taped)
10 p.m. (VERSUS) Bull Riding PBR Worcester Classic (Taped)
SOCCER
5 p.n. (62 UNI) Santos vs. San Luis
9 p.n. (47 FAM) English Premier League: Wigan Athletic
vs. Bolton Wanderers (Taped)


Friday, May 8
Washington at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
.Boston at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 9
Pittsburgh at Washingt :i ,r, ,i 1 :�. r�
Chicago at Vancouver, 1i'I 30 pT, 1 i.,.,:, :. ry
Sunday, IVay 10
Anaheim at Detroit, 5 p.m., if necessary
Carolina at Boston, 7:30 p.m., if necessary'
Monday, May 11f
Washington at Pittsburgh, TBD, if necessary
Vancouver at Chicago, 9 p.m., if necessary
Tuesday, May 12
Boston at Carolina; 7 p.m., if necessary
Detroit at Anaheim, TBD, if necessary
Wednesday, May 13
Pittsburgh at Washington, 7 ::. ,r, I - :e. r,
Thursday, May 14
Carolina at Boston, TBD, if necessary
Anaheim at Detroit, TBD, if necessary
Chicago at Vancouver, TBD, if necessary



2009 Kentucky Derby
Finish Order
1. Mine That Bird
2. Pioneerof the Nile
3. Musket Man
4. Papa Clem
5. Chocolate Candy .
6. Summer Bird
7. Join in the Dance.-
8. Regal Ransom
9. West Side Bernie
10. General Quarters
11. Dunkirk
12. Hold Me Back
13. Advice
14. Desert Party
15. Mr. Hot Stuff
16. Atomic Rain
17. Nowhere to Hide
18. Friesan Fire
19. Flying Private
Kentucky Derby Winners
2009 - Mine That Bird
2008 - Big Brown
2007 - Street Sense
2006 - Barbaro
2005 - Giacomo
2004 - Smarty Jones
2003 - Funny Cide
2002 - War Emblem
2001 - Monarchos
2000 - Fusaichi Pegasus
1999 - Charismatic
1998 - Real Quiet
1997- Silver Charm
1996 - Grindstone
1995 -Thunder Gulch
1994- Go for Gin
1993- Sea Hero
1992 -LII E.Tee
1991 - Strike the Gold
1990 - Unbridled
'1989 - Sunday Silence .
1988 - Winning Colors
1987 - Alysheba
1986 - Ferdinand
1985- Spend A Buck
1984- Swale
1983- Sunny's Halo
1982--Gato Del Sol
1981 - Pleasant Colony
1980 -Genuine Risk
1979- Spectacular Bid
1978-Affirmed
1977- Seattle Slew
1976 - Bold Forbes


1975 - Foolish Pleasure
1974 - Cannonade
1973- Secretariat
1972 - Riva Ridge
1971 - Canonero II
1970 - Dust Commander
1969 - Majestic Prince
1968 - Forward Pass
1967- Proud Clarion
1966 - Kauai King
1965 - Lucky Debonair
1964-- Northern Dancer
1963-- Chateaugay
1962- Decidedly
1961 - Carry Back
1960 -Venetian Way
1959-Tomy Lee
1958-Tim Tam
1957 - Iron Liege
1956 - Needles
1955 - Swaps
1954 - Determine
1953 - Dark Star
1952- Hill Gail
1951 -Count Turf
11950 - Middleground
1949 - Ponder
1948 - Citation
1947- Jet Pilot
1946 -Assault
1945 - Hoop, Jr.
1944 - Pensive
1943- Count Fleet
11942 - Shut Out
1941 -Whirlaway
1940 - Gallahadioi
1939 - Johnstown
f938 - Lawrin
1937- War Admiral
1936- Bold Venture
11935- Omaha
.1934 - Cavalcade
1933- Brokers Tip
1932 - Burgoo King
1931 -Twenty Grand
1930- Gallant Fox
1929 - Clyde Van Dusen
1928 - Reigh Count
1927- Whiskery
1926 - Bubbling Over
1925 - Flying Ebony
1924- Black Gold
1923-Zev
1922 - Morvich
1921 - Behave Yourself
1920 - Paul Jones
1919 - Sir Barton
1918- Exterminator
1917 - Omar Khayyam.
1916 - George Smith
1915- Regret
1914- Old Rosebud
1913- Donerall
1912--Worth
1911 - Meridan
1910 - Donau
1909 - Wlntergreen
1908 - Stone Street
1907- Pink Star
1906 - Sir Huon
1905 - Agile
1904 - Elwood
1903- Judge HImes
1902- Alan-d-Dale
1901 - His Eminence
1900 - Lleut. Gibson
1899- Manuel
1898- Plaudit
1897-Typhoon II
1896 - Ben Brush
1895 - Halma


race on 24th bir


tory Lane at Richmond In-
ternational Raceway
Busch passed Jeff Gor-
don for the lead with 48
laps to go in Saturday
night's race to complete a
sweep at Richmond. He
passed Carl Edwards with
22 laps to go to win Friday
night's Nationwide Series
race.
It is Busch's series-best
third Cup win of the season.


Victory gives

driver sweep at

Richmond

Associated Press

RICHMOND, Va. - Kyle
Busch celebrated his 24th
birthday with a trip to Vic-


thday

He's just the second
driver in NASCAR history
to celebrate his birthday
with a victory. Cale Yarbor-
ough did it twice, celebrat-
ing his March 27th birthday
with wins at North Wilke-
soboro in 1977 and Atlanta
in 1983.
Tony Stewart was second,
followed by Jeff Burton,
Ryan Newman and Mark
Martin.


millionaire. Los Angeles Chargers as a
K EM P " His style didn't win over free agent in 1960. A waivers
everyone. In his memoirs, for- foul-up two years later would
Continued from Page Bl mer Vice President Dan land him with the Buffalo
Quayle wrote that at Cabinet Bills, who got'him at the bar-
serving a term as President meetings, Bush would be gain basement prce of $100.
George H.W Bush's housing irked by Kemp's habit of Kemp led Buffalo to the
secretary, he made it onto the going off on tangents and not 1964 and 1965 AFL Champi-
national ticket as Bob Dole's making "any discernible onships, and won the league's
running-mate. point" most valuable player award
With that loss, the Republi- Kemp also signed on with in 1965. He co-founded the
can bowed out of political of- numerous educational and AFL Players Association in
flee, but not out of politics. In corporate boards and chari- 1964 and was elected presi-
speaking engagements and a table organizations, including dent of the union for five
syndivated column, he con- NFL Charities, which kept terms; When he retired from
inued advocate for thetax him connected to/his football football in 1969, Kemp had
reform and'sup -side poli- roots. enough support in blue-collar
cies-- the idea hat more Kemp was a. 17th ro Buffalo and its suburbs to win
taes are cutathea1 ra - the n open congressional seat
taxes are cut the more i 1 re gathering during
economy Will grow - that he Detroit Lions but was cut be- H-2007 that he
pioneered. fore the season began. After a return trip tch as many
Kemp's rapid and wordy being released by three more still tried to c- "ible
style made the enthusiastic NFLteams and the Canadian Bills games as p . at
speaker with the neatly side- Fbotball League over the next mostly on television. Efforts to
parted white hair a favorite three years, he joined the be in the stands were re-
on the lecture circuit, and a American Football League's served for family.


CELTICS
Continued from Page Bi

his 16 in the fourth quarter
to help Chicago cut it to
three points - thanks in
part to a bizarre scoring
change that added a point to
the Bulls' score two quar-
ters after a first-half 3-
pointer was mistakenly
ruled a 2.
But Boston made all 11 of
its free throws in the last 2
minutes to hold on and keep
its drive for an 18th NBA
title alive.
Kendrick Perkins had 13
rebounds, Rajon Rondo had
11 assists and Eddie House
scored 16 points - going 5-
for-5 from the floor, includ-
ing four 3-pointers.
/After three consecutive
overtime games, the series
went from Odyssey to oddity
when an unusual scoring
correction helped the Bulls
cut the deficit to three
points in the fourth quarter.
NBA Playoffs
FIRST ROUND
(Best of 7)
Saturday, April 18
Chicago 105, Boston 103, OT'
Cleveland 102, Detroit 84
Dallas 105, San Antonio 97


DERBY
Continued from Page BI

said. "He's a small horse."
Once free, Mine That Bird
quickly accelerated toward
an improbable victory.
"I salute Calvin for his ter-
rific ride," said trainer Todd
Pletcher, whose Derby los-
ing streak extended to 0-of-
24. "It's an amazing story. It
just shows you how special
this race. is. Anything can
happen."
Woolley, a former quarter-
horse trainer who 'spent
time on the rodeo circuit as
a bareback rider, hobbled
on crutches to the win near's
circle. The 45-year-old sell-


TRACK
Continued from Page BI

You are just so amazing. I'm
so proud of you. Way to go."
For those unfamiliar with
the magnitude of the accom-
plishment, just over two
weeks ago Kristen's older,
brother Nathan tragically
died. A few hours later, Kris-
ten took to the track in what
she called, "the hardest race
of her life:"
Not only did Hall win that
race but in a spirit of self-
sacrifice that redefined
what it means to be a team-
mate, she also finished sec-
ond in the 800-meter run.
Those 18 points were ex-
actly what the Lady Pirates
needed as they edged out
the district championship
by 15 points.
A week later, and a day
after the memorial service
for her brother, Kristen was
back at it. This time she
slashed 11 seconds off of her
personal best time from a
week earlier and blitzed the
field by an astonishing four


Houston 108, Portland 81
Sunday, April 19
L.A. Lakers 113, Utah 100
Philadelphia 100, Orlando 98
Atlanta 90, Miami 64
Denver 113, New Orleans 84.
Monday, April 20
, Boston 118, Chicago 115
San Antonio 105, Dallas 84
Tuesday, April 21
Cleveland 94, Detroit 82
Portland 107, Houston 103
L:A. Lakers 119, Utah 109
Wednesday, April 22
Orlando 96, Philadelphia 87
Miami 108, Atlanta 93
Denver 108, New Orleans 93
Thursday, April 23
Boston 107, Chicago 86
Dallas 88, San Antonio 67
Utah 88, L.A. Lakers 86
Friday, April 24
Cleveland 79, Detroit 68
Philadelphia 96, Orlando 94
Houston 86, Portland 83
Saturday, April 25
New'Orleans 95, Denver 93
Dallas 99, San Antonio 90
Miami 107, Atlanta 78
LA.A, Lakers 108, Utah 94 '
Sunday, April 26
Chicago 121, Boston 118, 20T
Cleveland 99, Detroit 78, Cleveland wins se-
ries 4-0
Orlando84,, Philadelphia81<. ' " . -
Houston 89, Portland 88
Monday, April 27
Atlanta 81, Miami 71
Denver 121, New Orleans 63
L.A. Lakers.107, Utah 96, L.A. Lakers win se-
ries 4-1
Tuesday, April 28
Boston 106, Chicago 104, OT
Orlando 91, Philadelphia 78
Dallas 106, San Antonio 93, Dallas wins se-
ries 4-1
Portland 88, Houston 77


described cowboy from New
Mexico broke his right leg in
a motorcycle accident two
months ago.
"I'm feeling like I never
have before," Woolley said.
"I was just blown away."
He met up with a tearful
- Borel, whose mind was on
his parents and paid them
tribute by crossing the finish
line with his whip pointing
to the overcast sky.
"If they could only be
here to, see what I accom-
plish in my life," he said, his
voice choking.
Borel became the first
jockey since 1993 to com-
plete the Oaks-Derby dou-
ble, having ridden Rachel
Alexandra to an eye-popping
20' 4-length victory Friday.


seconds.
Two, days ago tragedy
once again struck the Crys-'
tal River Pirates family
when Ron Cline, one of
Kristen's coaches, also
learned that his son had
tragically died.
"If I were to dedicate this
race to anyone I would ded-
icate it to Coach Kline," said
an unprompted Kristen. "I
completely know he's going
through as much as me right
now. But all we can do now
is never look back and just
keep pushing forward."
While Kristen's was by far
the most emotional-stirring
story of the day, she wasn't
alone in earning all-state
honors.
Kristen's Pirate teammate.
Jessica Frometa finished
eighth with a pole vault of 9-
6 feet and Caleigh Boyington
of Citrus cleared 10-6 feet for
fourth place. On Friday
there were two other Citrus
County representatives that
made the podium as all-state
qualifiers. Seven Rivers
Christian's Markindey
Sineus finished fifth in the
boys' discus throw and


Wednesday, April 29
Atlanta 106, Miami 91
Denver 107, New Orleans 86, Denver wins
series 4-1
Thursday, April 30
-Orlando 114, Philadelphia 89, Orlando wins
series 4-2
Chicago 128, Boston 127, 30T
Houston 92, Portland 76, Houston wins se-
ries 4-2
Friday, May 1
Miami 98, Atlanta 72, series tied 3-3
Sifday, May 2
Boston 109, Chicago 99, Boston wins series
4--3
Today, May 3,
".hl n, r ,larlr,niI, pm
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7)
Today, May 3
Dallas at Denver, 3:30 p.m.
' Monday, May 4
Houston at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 5
Dallas at Denver, 10:30 p.m.
\ Wednesday, May 6
Houston at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Friday, May 8,
L.A. Lakers at Houston, 9:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 9
Denver at Dalla, 5 p.m.
Sunday, May 10 - .
L.A Lakers at Houston, 3:30 p.m.
Monday, May 11
Tuesday, May 12
Houston at L.A. Lakers, TBA, if necessary
Wednesday, May 13
Dallas at Denver, TBA, if necessary.
Thursday, May 14. y ,
L.A. Lakers atHouston, TBA, if necessary
Friday, May 15
Denver at Dallas, TBA, necessary
Sunday, May 17
Houston at L.A. Lakers, TBA, if necessary
Dallas at Denver, TBA, if necessary
REST OF SCHEDULE, TBD

Woolley joined a parade
of trainers who won with
their first Derby starter, the
sixth time in seven years it
has happened.
Still, he outfoxed Baffert
and three other Hall of
Fame trainers. Bill Mott was
12th with Hold Me Back,
while Nick Zito was 17th
with Nowhere to Hide, and
D. Wayne Lukas was last
with Flying Private.
"Those cowboys," Baffert
said. "They came with a
good horse."
Mine That Bird, the son of
2004 Belmont Stakes winner
Birdstone, became the.ninth
gelding to win the Derby
and just the second in the
last 80 years. Funny Cide
won in 2003.


Jonathan Woods took sixth
place in the 800-meter run.
It's pretty awesome for
Seven Rivers track," War-
riors head coach Tim Bow-
man said. "We only took two
boys to the state track meet
and to have them both
medal it pretty cool."
Several minutes after
running the crowning race
of her career, Kristen Hall's
exhaustion was still clearly
evident
"I'm 'so tired," she said.
"Ever since last year when I
didn't do very well I wanted
to get back here. I promised
myself then that I was com-
ing back and was going to
'make the podium. It feels so
great right now. But this has
been an exhausting part of
my life."
The emotional roller
coaster ride that Kristen
Hall has endured over the
past few weeks is one that
we could never begin to un-
derstand. But one thing is
certain, for this Crystal
River princess, hers is a
Cinderella story that will
never strike the midnight
hour.


B4 SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 9


-O 7t id-


B4 SUNDAY, \Y 3, 2009





SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 B5


us COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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ENTERTAINMENT
I CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE ----


Spotligbt on


Madonna adoptionn
meets with tsfavor
NEW YORK - ie fa-
ther of an African g.1
Madonna hopes to aot
says he wants to take cre
of his daughter himself -
even though he's never
met her.
James Kambewa, be-
lieved to be the biological
father of Chifundo
"Mercy" James, said he
doesn't want the pop star
to adopt the 4-year-old.
"I want to take care of
her, and I'm capable to
take care of my baby," he
told CBS' "The Early
Show" in an interview to
be aired Monday. "Mercy,
she is a Malawian - so (I)

a eMalaw-
rand says he
well with
has only seen hour cul-



ture.face to face."
Kam-
bewa
Madonna wears a
necklacebearingbhis
daughter's name but hase
never met her and says he
has only seen her "in
newspapers and TV--not
face to face ."
Madonna spokes-
woman Liz Rosenberg
saidinane-mail message
Saturday she doesntying her
know if Kambewa is the
father of the girl, who
lives in an orphanage.
, 'All I know is that Mercy
has been in an orphanage
since the day she wasi
boMalawi," Rosenberg said.
Madonna's appeal of aG
court ruling denying her
request to adopt the girl is
to be heard Monday in
Malawi, in southeast
Africa. The "Material Girl"
and "Like a Virgin" singer
already has adopted a son,
David, from there.
Malawi requires
prospective parents to live
there'for 18 to 24 months
while Child welfare au-
thorities assess their suit-
ability.' The rule wasn't
applied when Madonna
was allowed to take David
to London in 2006.

Winehouse blocks
paparazzi from home
LONDON -Amy Wine-
house has won a court
order banning the pa-
parazid from pursuing
her outside her London
home, a source close to
the singer's management
team said Saturday
The
singer
sought the
order to
ban pho-
togra-
phers if
they fol-
low her or
inAmy useapproach
Winehouse her within
100 yards of her home, ac-
cording to the source,
who spoke on condition of
anonymity because he
was notdirectly involved
in the case.



problems have been front
page news in Britain,
where she was pictured
puffing on what ap-
peared to be a crack pipe
last year.

Comedian arrested
iln assault case
CALABASAS, Calif. --
Standup comic Robert
Schimmel has been ar-
rested on suspicion of
beating his wife.
Los Angeles County
Sheriff's Sgt. Jay Royal
says the 59-year-old co-
median was taken into
custody early Saturday
after an alleged fight at
his home in Calabasas.
Schimmel was booked


in the county jail for in-
vestigation of spousal as-
sault. He was later
released on $50,000 bail.
A call seeking comment
from Schimmel's agent
was not immediately re-
turned.
-From wire reports


Seeger celebrates 90


Associated Press

NEW YORK - When Ennii.- Iu
Harris was a young girl trying to ilz-
ure out whether she could lia\e a
career in music, she decided to:
seek advice from the wisest mani
she could think of-- so she wrnte a
note to Pete Seeger.
She didn't know him, and he did n't
know her: Seeger was already ap-
proaching legendary status, while
she hadn't recorded a single tune
Vet, Harris was inspired by hik in-
rrity, and she'd learned to pla the
gttar by listening to his classIce
"Here Have All the Flowers Gone "
"actually wrote him a lotte:r,
han printed, front and back, I don't
know ow many pages, sa \in I
want toting folk music, but I don't
think I\ suffered enough." -,he
said, laug~ng. "He actually wrote
me back ... sically saying li te v. ill
catch up tori, and encouraged me
to be bound L. glory. Just hearing
from him was-c of the most amaz'
ing things that Id ever happened
to me, up to that int."
Today, Harris ill perform at
Madison Square Gazer in a tribute
concert to Seeger on ;s 90th bi tilh-
day The event will so, feature
Bruce Springsteen, DavMait lews,
Eddie Vedder, John Meericaimp.,
Arlo Guthrie, Joan Baez at dozens
of others.
The concert will surely be '.ho,, - ,,
age to one of music's most reed
voices, a man known for his po'gunt
protest songs and social actrkn,
from the fight for racial equal I ,
labor rights and world peace.
He has been a fervent anti-\%.
activist and is credited for popu lar-
izing the civil rights anthem "We
Shall Overcome." His leftist politics
(he was once a member of the Com-
munist party, which he later re-
nounced) got him blacklisted
during the 1950s.
While his politics sometimes
overshadowed his music, the Rock
and Roll Hall of Fame member is
considered one of folk music's
greatest artists, and inspired artists
ranging from Bob Dylan to Bruce
Springsteen, who in 2006 released
the album "We Shall Overcome: The
Seeger Sessions," which features
the Boss singing Seeger's songs.
But Seeger is not interested in cel-
.ebrating past achievements at Sun-
day's event. He says he only agreed.
to take part in the event because it
will benefit the Hudson River Sloop
Clearwater, a nonprofit organization
he founded more than four decades
ago to help preserve the river, which
has suffered from pollution.
Funds from the concert will help
restore the Clearwater, the huge
boat Seeger built to draw people's


Associated Press
4te Seeger performs April 25 at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festi-
V9n New Orleans.
attejon to the organization. (Tick- he said. (His many iconic songs in-
ets red from $19.19, the year he clude "If I Had a Hammer" and
was b ,to $250, with the majority "Turn! Turn! Turn!")
of sea $90 to honor his birthday.) Seeger, whose many honors in-
"we ,n to raise an endowment clude a Presidential Medal of the
fund" for ,boat, said Seeger, who Arts, is typically humble when
lives alonghe Hudson River in asked which song he'd most like to
Beacon, in state New York. "I hear during the anticipated four-
agreed to thencert, although I hour concert.
don't like big thgs." "They don't need to sing my
Harris said ng the focus of songs, there are a lot of good songs,"i
the concert on thearwater is an- he said.
their example of eger's princi- Seeger recently released a new
ples being paramo'uo his music. album, "'At 89," his first in five years.
"It's ever been a Pete," said He played during the inauguration
Harris, who will.perfoi two of his festivities for President Barack
songs. "It's always beeibout the Obama in January and performed
world and what he belies n and at the New Orleans Jazz and Her-
doing the right thing and ming the itage Festival in April.
world a better place. He's rea lived But he prefers to sing and strum
what he believes; I think it' in- his signature banjo for children:
spring example for all genera s." "For the rest of my life I hope to sing
Seeger will perform one son .only for the children ... and I like to
but he's not saying which one. sing with the kids in the school.
one knows except me. It's a secure Kids are the hope of the future."

Game : w =
,,. : ;..


'Star Trek' game veers awayfrom movie


DERRICK J. LANG
AP Entertainment Writer

LOS ANGELES - Gamers
won't be able to relive J.J.
Abrams' highly anticipated
"Star Trek" reboot on their
consoles or computers.
The only video game
being released alongside
the film premiering May 8
- "Star Trek: D.AC." - is a
simple downloadable ar-
cade-style space shooter
that allows players to join
either Federation or Romu-
lan forces and engage in
galactic online battles.
"We made a conscious
choice in making this game
that we weren't going to
retell the story of the film,"


capture that sensibility in
this game.".
The Xbox 360, PlayStation
3 and PC game does take a
.w cues from its big-screen
Counterpart "Star Trek:
D. C." features film com-
pos Michael Giacchino's
origihl score. The three Fed-
eratioi and Romulan star-
ships thiplayers can captain
in death watch, assault and
conquest _ uffles were in-
spired by thtovie's designs,
including the)nterprise.
"There's a eat sense of
responsibility, especially
with a title like ' ar Trek,'"
said Solimon. "Yo want to
stay true to the br d. You
don't want to go too r out
there."


said lead designer Tarik
Soliman. "The film itself is
awesome. It's a new take on
'Trek.' It's fresh. It's excit-


ing, and it appeals to a much
wider audience I think than
other 'Trek' films may have
in the past. We wanted to


Hollywood delays blockbusters in Mexico


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES - With
movie theaters in Mexico
shut down to contain the
spread of swine,flu, Holly-
wood studios have delayed
plans to kick off the summer
movie season there. The
country is regularly among
the top 12 foreign markets
for U.S. movies.
Actors who had plans to
promote films in the coun-
try, such as Hugh Jackman
and Miley Cyrus, are also
staying away for now.
That has left some fans,
stuck at home as public life
in the country has slowed,
relying on movie rentals
and TV for entertainment.
Gibran Valencia, 23, has
spent time watching rented
movies, cooking and clean-


ing his Mexico City home
since his admission exam
for a music college was post-
poned recently.
Valencia was looking for-
ward to the debut of"X-Men
Origins: Wolverine," but the
premiere was pushed back
from this weekend. Even if
theaters open soon, he's
wary of mingling with the
crowd and said he'll avoid
theaters for a month.
"I'd let things settle down
more in case there's someone
with the virus there," he said.
News Corp.'s 20th Century
Fox now says "Wolverine" is
set for a tentative May 14
start in Mexico, although the
film opens in the rest of the
world this weekend. Fox
said it expected theaters in
Mexico, most of which
closed last weekend, to re-


open May 10, but is watching
the situation closely
"Wolverine" star Jackman
is scheduled to go to Mexico
on May 12 or 13, making up
for an appearance he can-
celed this week. Cyrus, the
star of "Hannah Montana:
The Movie," also recently
canceled an appearance in
Puebla, 65 miles southeast
of the capital.
Sony Corp. moved the
Mexico release of "Termi-
nator Salvation" to July 31
from June 5 and '"Angels &
Demons" to June 12 from
May 15. "Star Trek" is set for
worldwide release May 8,
but Viacom Inc.'s Para-
mount Pictures said its
opening in Mexico is being
delayed indefinitely.
Time Warner Inc.'s
Warner Bros. pushed the re-


lease of the romantic com-
edy "Ghosts of Girlfriends
Past" to June 12 from May 8
in Mexico. It was released
Friday in the U.S.
One of the big challenges
for the studios in reshuffling
the release dates is avoiding
having their summer block-
busters go head-to-head on
the same weekend.
If the crisis continues,
Warner Bros. might also
delay the Mexico release of
"Harry Potter and the Half-
Blood Prince," which is
slated for July 15.
"This is obviously a very
fluid situation," said Warner
Bros.' president of interna-
tional distribution, Veronika
Kwan-Rubinek "Dates could
continue to change based on
current events as well as how
competitive dates line up."


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Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, May 3,
the 123rd day of 2009. There
are 242 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On May 3,1909, a wireless -
news dispatch was transmit-
ted from The New York Times
to the Chicago Tribune in the
first such communication be-
tween the two cities.
On this date:
In 1469, political theorist
Niccolo Machiavelli was born
in Florence, Italy.
In 1802, Washington, D.C.,
was incorporated as a city.
In 1916, Irish nationalist
Padraic Pearse and two oth-
ers were executed by the
British for their roles in the
Easter Rising.
In 1933, Nellie T. Ross be-
came the first female director
of the U.S. Mint.
In 1944, U.S. wartime ra-
tioning of most grades of
meats ended.
In 1945, during World War II,
Allied forces captured Rangoon,
Burma, from the Japanese.
In 1948, the Supreme
Court, in Shelley v. Kraemer,
ruled that covenants prohibit-
ing the sale of real estate to
blacks or members of other
racial groups were legally un-
enforceable.
In 1979, Conservative Party
leader Margaret Thatcher was
chosen to become Britain's
first female prime minister as
the Tories ousted the incum-
bent Labor government in par-
liamentary elections.
Ten years ago: The Dow
Jones industrial average
closed above 11,000, just 24
trading days after passing
10,000.
Five years ago: The U.S.
military said it had repri-
manded seven officers in the
abuse of inmates at Bagh-
dad's notorious Abu Ghraib
prison, the first known pun-
ishments in the case; two of
the officers were relieved of
their duties.
One year ago: Big Brown
won the Kentucky Derby by 4
3/4 lengths. (Filly Eight Belles
\ finished second and then
broke both front ankles; she
was euthanized on the track.)
Today's Birthdays: Folk
singer Pete Seeger is 90. Ac-
tress Ann B. Davis is 83.
Singer Frankie Valli is 75.
Sports announcer Greg Gum- -
bel is 63. Pop singer Mary
Hopkin is 59. Singer Christo-
pher Cross is 58. Country
musician Cactus Moser
(Highway 101) is 52. Rock
musician David Ball (Soft
Cell) is 50. Colts running back
Joseph Addai is 26.
S Thought for Today: "God,


give us grace to accept with
serenity the things that can-
not be changed, courage to
change the things which
should be changed, and the
wisdom to distinguish the one
from the other." - Reinhold
Niebuhr, American clergyman
and author (1892-1971).


In this video screen image released by Bender/Helper Im-
pact, a scene is shown from the game "Star Trek: D.A.C."










Section C - SUNDAY, MAY 3,2009



MMCITRUS COUNEN TA RYONICLE
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


t's a rainy spring morning, and Tamara Ogier plants herself
at a table in a Spartan room in the Atlanta federal
courthouse, computer and tape recorder at hand,
ready to hear another day's stories of financial ruin.


Couples facing foreclosure. Down-and-out
real estate agents. Merchants who've shut
their doors. Some clutch folders, some couples
hold on to each other as they sit on pew-like
benches, waiting to tell the court-appointed
bankruptcy trustee how they ended up deep
in debt
"I understand the assumption that we're the
guys in the black hats," Ogier says, but "there
are a lot of times when I'm actually able to do
a lot of good."
It's a sunny morning 745 miles away, as Jerry
Miller tools along Iowa's back roads, grum-
bling about folks who can't manage their
money. He has just one credit card. He has no
debts, but at almost 75, he feels he needs to
keep working just to keep poe. He wonders,
too, if he'll have to sacrifice fMr other people's
,mistakes.
"I can't believe because they got themselves
in this situation, it's falling on us to pay it
back," he' says, heading to the first pharmacy
where he'll make deliveries on this day. "Lord,
you're going to set a college kid loose with a
credit card? Buy# house that costs 10 times
your salary?"
He punctuates his d isapproval with his fa-
vorite expression: Pffffft
It's morning in America - but it's not a good
morning.
The nation is suffering in a deep recession,.
there's no denying that: Unemployment is at
its highest level in more than 25 years. The
auto industry is on the skids. Foreclosure and
for-sale signs are as common in some commu-
nities as street lights.
And more bleak days seem to be ahead.
'Many private economists expect the
monthly jobless rate will climb to 10 percent
by the end of the year - it already has sur-
passed that level in states such as Michigan,
South Carolina and Rhode Island.
The bankruptcy rate is.rising, too. Nearly 1.2
million debtors filed for bankruptcy in a year
period ending in April, accordingg to federal
court records collected and analyzed by The
Associated Press. In March, nearly 131,000
sought bankruptcy protection - an increase
of 46 percent over a year earlier.
Those are the numbers. Then there are the
people.
This is the story of one day, and.how Ameri-.
cans spent those hours in the shadow of eco-
nomic distress, from worried debtors in a
Georgia courthouse to a prospective home
buyer in, Michigan, from a worker in the
Rhode Island food pantry to an Arizona con-
tractor struggling to find jobs.
On this April day, no one person typifies
hard times: In California, it's a homeless Army
Reservist who joined up when he couldn't find
work and sleeps in his 17-year-old car In
Florida, it's a Jaguar-driving pawn shop cus-
tomer who sells DVDs for gas money. In South
-Carolina, it's an unemployed factory worker
who finds comfort in prayer.
And in Greenwich, Conn., home to hedge
fund billionaires, it's David Rabin, who lost
his $100,000 job last October as a senior vice
president for a small financial services firm.
He spends part of his morning in his base-
ment, job hunting.
In better times, Rabin would be preparing
for his annual spring golfing trip with three
buddies at his condo in Myrtle Beach, S.C. In-
stead, the 48-year-old Rabin, wearing jeans, a
blue hockey sweat shirt and white sneakers, is
poring over Monster.com and other online job
boards. He sends out 10 resumes a day, but has
had few nibbles in six months.
A day earlier, he learned he didn't get a job
recruiting members for a gym. That hurt.


"I didn't sleep a freakin' wink," he says. "If I
don't fitthat job, what the hell am I goingto do?"
Rabin's wife, Lauren, has a marketing job.
And he receives $476 weekly unemployment
--about a quarter of his former salary - that
runs out in July. Both checks keep them afloat
Rabin copes by keeping busy. He and Lau-
.ren compile a daily list of chores. Each time
he completes one, he checks offa box'..
Today's list: Drive his 19-year-old son to
school. Search online for cheaper auto and
home insurance. (No luck there.) Look for
work; his target area has expanded to Buffalo,
N.Y., Ohio and Florida - any city where he
" has friends or relatives. Walk the dog. Buy flip
flops for his Florida-bound wife. Work out at
the YMCA. Paint the basement
"'You have no idea how humbling all this is,"
he says. "It's extremely humbling. I'm ready to
go to Stop,& Shop and start bagging groceries."
"I've been in this situation before and I was-.
n't nearly as frightened," he says. "This is the
Great Recession we're in.."
, But watching Jim Juristy work, you wouldn't
know that we're in hard times.
A nursing supervisor in Morgantown, WVa.,
Juristy will spend his 12-hour shift at Ruby
Memorial Hospital trying to fill jobs, calling,
cajoling and charming nurses to come to work
Not only is Juristy in a relatively secure pro-
fession, but he lives in a thriving area (the
county's jobless rate is a relatively low 4 per-
cent), home of West Virginia University and
some recession-proof employers.
A former coal miner, the 54-year-old Juristy
made the unlikely transition in the mid 1990s
after his nihne closed. With baby boomers
aging, he thought health care would be a
growth industry. So he went to nursing school.
"I figured I could adapt or become a di-
nosaur. And dinosaurs became extinct, so I
thought I'd darn well better adapt," he says.
On this April morning when WVU Hospitals
- which include Ruby Memorial - had 200
job openings, TV news is announcing higher-
than-expected March unemployment rates.
Juristy doesn't hear a word. He's telling a su-
pervisor: "We need seven nurses at 11, and we
have three. It's a good day!"
He calls charge nurses and approves over-
time. He tells his wife, Stephanie, a part-time
clerical worker at the hospital, to start calling
contractors, a pool of nurses from Maryland,
Pennsylvania and West Virginia who earn $42
an hour (but no benefits) by working extra
shifts:
When she starts dialing around 10:30 a.m.,
there are 11 jobs to fill.
At the opposite end of the country, in Scotts-
dale, Ariz., 36-year-old Mark Zimmerman is
struggling, too, The contractor's printer spits
out an estimate for a project he never would
have taken two years ago: replacing concrete
blocks supporting a carport.
The numbers aren't pretty: Three days of
labor. About $35 an hour for his workers. An-
other $250 in material. Zimmerman does some
fast math on a handheld calculator. He gets 10
percent, so he'll make a meager $109.
"That doesn't cover me for anything - not
my time sitting and putting the bid together,
not my time driving out to go look at it," he
says. "I'm actually losing money"
But Zimmerman wants to make sure his two
full-time workers don't leave to find other jobs
before the construction industry picks up. He
hands the estimate to his assistant
"$1,594?" she asks, eyebrows raised. "That's
it?"
See MORNING/Page C3


TOP TO BOTTOM: Marilyn Heidenfelder, of Alto, Mich., sits outside a Real Estate Disposition home auction
April I in Grand Rapids, IVch. Contractor Mark Zimmerman, of Desert Metropolitan, talks about his dwin-
dling business April I during the economic downturn in Scottsdale, Ariz. An unemployed real estate broker
identified only as Joe carries some DVDs and video games he will try to pawn for gas for his 2005 Jaguar,
seen parked, April 1 at Best Value Jewelry & Pawn in Fort Pierce, Fla. Best Value Jewelry Pawn co-man-
ager Gerg Childress shows some jewelry to customer Denise Torgersen, 16, on April lat the store in Fort
Pierce, Fla. Vic Profughi, of Greenville, R.I., a volunteer at the Woodlawn Baptist Church food pantry in Paw-
tucket, R.I., pours garlic into a pot of soup April 1 before the arrival of food recipients at the food pantry.
Lynette Davis, 53, who has been out of work for nine months, is seen at her home April 1 in Marion, S.C.
David Rabin searches for jobs and researches costs of auto insurance April 1 in an office area he plans to
paint at his home In Greenwich, Conn. Jerry Miller, 74, of Conrad, Iowa, makes a delivery April I at an area
pharmacy In Nevada, Iowa. Former coal miner Jim Juristy, now a registered nurse and house supervisor, co-
ordinates staffing and planning beds April 1 by monitoring a Sony LCD display panel and taking phone calls
in Ruby Memorial Hospital in Morgantown, W.Va.


Charlie Brennan
SHADES
OF GRAY


Music is

intheair
When it comes to
music, I'm a
mutt. I could lis-
ten to a half dozen genres
on a half dozen days and
each time convince myself
that the particular genre
is the best to ever have
come down the pike.
I mention this because
there's some good music
coming to Citrus County.
Today, country rock
bands .38 Special and The
Outlaws are playing at
Rock Crusher Canyon.
On Friday, May .15,
Blood, Sweat and Tears
and folfer Three Dog
Night'er Chuck Negron
are playing at the Citrus
County Speedway.
On Saturday, Dec. 12,
country star Blake Shelton
will headline the Mike
Hampton Pitching-In Fobun-
dation's Country Rocks the
Canyon at, you guessed it,
Rock Crusher Canyon.
For that matter, the free
jazz clinic offered last
weekend at the Old Court-
house in conjunction with
Jazz Appreciation Month
was outstanding We could
only stay for a portion of it,
but it was as educational
as it was entertaining.
The reason for writing
about this is transparently
self-serving: the more Cit-
rus Countians support live
entertainment, the more
concerts we're likely to
see - and I really like'
concerts.
See SHADES/Page C4


a''1~~'~-I -~


By Sharon Cohen - Associated Press


I


All photos by the Associated Press


I - . I . . 7 %-.


J - .<*', * . . *.. . * ,' .


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


The loss

of a good

journalist
here was sad news
last week from Dav-
enport, Iowa, where
former Chronicle reporter
Tom Saul died suddenly
from a heart attack
Tom, 55, was working
for the Quad City Times.
He is survived by his wife,
Dawn.
During the 1980s, Tom
was the government re-
porter for the Chronicle,
and he managed to anger
just about every elected of-
ficial in town. He was some-
what famous in the
Chronicle newsroom for ac-
tually breaking a phone
when he slammed it down
because some politician
was giving him a line of bull.
Longtime readers of the
newspaper will remem-
ber that TVm was tena-
cious in his digging into
the shenanigans of county
government He was the
Mike Wright of his time.
The Chronicle was only
published three times a
week back in the 1980s,
and we competed against
three other daily newspa-
pers - the Tampa Trib-
une, St. Pete Times and
-See WINDOW/Page C4










Page C2- SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009



PINION


;:- "In the space age, man will be able to go around
the world in two hours - one hour for flying
and the other to get to the airport."
Neil Mc Elroy, "Look," 1958


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


SMART PLANNING


TBARTA plans



keep Citrus



in the loop


Despite the unfamiliar
ring to its name,
TBARTA has a plan
than means good things for the
future of the Tampa Bay region,
Swhicl includes Citrus County.
The NTampa Bay Area Re-
gional Transportation Authority
has created medium- and long-
range transportation plans that
connect the seven counties re-
gionally, allowing
them to pool finan- THE |1
cial; resources as
leverage to re- TBARTA
ceive federal transport
money for proj-
ects. � OUR 01
Without being a Citrus C
part of this re- Cirus
gional approach particip
to building trans- good bL
portation infra-
structure, Citrus County could
never be able to gain access to
the, federal and state dollars it.
will now be able t6 utilize.
Naysayers worry all the dol-
lars..Citrus County residents
contribute will go south. They
point to what happened with
-Ahe.$Suthwest Florida Water
Management District (SWift-
mud), when the smaller out-
lying counties were forsaken as
all the dollars went to building
a desalination plant in Tampa.
All seven counties with
TBARTA are represented
equally, , unlike Swiftmud
where three counties - Polk,
Pinellas and Hillsborough -
have seven of the 13 seats on
the governing board that over-
sees 16 counties. ,
Also, all seven counties con-
trol their own destiny. If they
don't want to raise any money,
then they don't have to. The
money they do raise is spent in
their own county.


The beauty of the arrange-
ment is the counties can take
advantage of state and federal
governments' preference for re-
gional approaches to trans-
portation -solutions when
handing out money. In fact, local
money will account for between
25 and 40 percent of the cost for
any project, with the rest com-
ing from federal and state
matching funds.
SSUE: In the short
SU term, TBARTA of-
unveils ficials hope to pro-
tion plans. vide an express
bus route connect-
PINION: ing Citrus County
to Hillsborough
county'ss County via the
)ation is Suncoast Parkway.
jsiness. This could give Cit-
rus residents an ef-
ficient and low-cost ride to the
Tampa International Airport,
, sporting events and medical fa-
cilities. In the long term, if Cit-
rus County so chooses, it could
have those express bus lines ex-
tending all the way to Inverness
and Crystal River.
Citrus has already benefited,
recently receiviiig $10 million
in state funding for local road
projects because of its partici-
pation in TBARTA.
Building better connections
in the region has a long-term
economic impact as well. If we
are better able to move goods
and people, we will be able to
take advantage of future eco-
nomic opportunities. TBARTA's
plans will help us do that.
Additionally, bringing these
communities together will help
prevent future sprawl. With
Citrus County getting in on the
ground floor, we will be guar-
anteeing a better quality of life
for our children.


Hot Corner. SWINE FLU


Swine time
This is about the swine flu. I
think it's ridiculous not to close
the border. We could be stopping
future Mexicans from coming in
who have the virus. Homeland Se-
curity says it's not good for the
economy. Well, is it just me or are
we already in a recession? What
money could the Mexicans possi-
bly bring to America? I think the
president should be more on top
of this. We are already at a Level
S5 ancdschools-are-being-shut- -
down. It's ludicrous to stand by
and wait for the whole world to be
infected and have thousands
more die. I don't think that we
should be in a panic. Something
should be done - something
more efficient. Americans, stop
going to Mexico; and Mexicans,
quit coming to America. There's
no jobs here anyway.


Random drawings
Florida Lottery sec-
ond-chance drawings.
So much for the ran-
domness of. drawings
for the second-chance
drawing for scratch-offs.
In the.first three draw-
ings;, 11 people took
302 of the Winnings,
one person got 45, one
took 44, and others tak-
ing tnany wins. There


Uh?
In reference to the president's
speech on April 29 concerning the
swine flu and the vaccination: What
,is the government going to tell us
next, that we all have to stand in
line and get a vaccination? Don't go
to the movies, don't go to any pub-
lic places? What are they going to
tell us next? What I also would like
to know is why Obama's adminis-
tration, they can't speak. All they
keep saying is, "Uh, uh and uh."
Why don't they-put the average Joe
in his audience and let us ask him
our concerns, not for it to be a pre-
questioned before his speeches.
That's what I'd like to know.
Porcine pun
I think I know where this swine flu
is coming from. I think it's all the
pork the Democrats put in the stim-
ulus package. Oh, just a thought.


were many multiple win-
ners in the five-, six- and
seven-win ranges.
Thanks a bunch
To the person going
down Isabel Street on
Saturday afternoon
who could not slow
down for the gopher
tortoise: I sure hope
you made it to your ap-
pointment on time.
Thanks a lot.


563-0579


Swine flu will change social mores


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
j.........Mu.lligan .... .. .. ......... . ....... ..........publisher
Charlie Brennan ............................................ed tor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ...................... managing editor
Cheri Harris.................................. features editor
Curt Ebitz..................................... citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ........... .................... citizen member
Willianson Cliff Pierson ................................. guest member

"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
I - - David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


DouGLAS COHN
AND ELEANOR CLIFT
The influenza pandemic of
1918 that sickened and
killed millions was known
as the Spanish flu even though it
likely began at Fort Riley, Kan.
Anywhere'from 20 to 100 million .
people succumbed worldwide,
more than died in World War I. It
was the worst flu epidemic ever
recorded, and it looms over
everything the Obama adminis-
tration is doing.
Public health officials and
politicians understand how rap-
idly the flu can spread, and that's
why at times it seems like they're
over-reacting when there is mini-
mal illness in the United States.
They're taking the right precau-
tions because they don't know
where this is going and how fast,
or whether the virus could sub-
side in the warm weather only to
return with a vengeance in the
fall, which was the pattern in 1918.
In a typical year, 37,000 people
die in the U.S. of the flu. Many are
elderly or very young, and health
officials generally just advise
people to get a flu shot as a pro-
tective measure. Now they're
shouting warnings over cable tel-
evision, and ..Presijdent Obama is
advising people to frequently
wash their hands and cover their
mouths when they cough, admo-
nitions more typically given by
pre-school teachers than a presi-
dent. Obama knows how quickly
the rate of transmission can ex-
plode, and how difficult it is to
challenge social mores in the


Burning issue
Each week I read in the
Chronicle the number of people
who violated the burn ban. Since
April 23, 2009, that information
has a whole different meaning.
On April 23 at 2:00 a.m., while
visiting friends in North Myrtle
Beach, South Carolina, we were
rudely awakened by the police de-
partment We were told to evacu-
ate the house immediately with
only the clothes on our back; the
neighborhood was on fire. While
driving out of the subdivision
through thick smoke, with burning
embers blowing over our car, we
wondered if our friends' house
woiiTdbeathere when-we returned. -
Fobrtunately, when our friends -'
were allowed back on April 25,
their house was still standing.
Seventy-six houses in their neigh-
borhood were not that lucky They
were totally destroyed by the fire.
Another 100 were damaged.
The above-mentioned fire
started 20 miles from our


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the editorial board of the newspa-
per.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
9 Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Mike Arnold at
(352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and in-
clude-a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
e-mail. Names and hometowns
will be printed; phone numbers
will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
.- good taste.,
* Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


friends' house by someone burn- closed since the end of January,
ing leaves in his back yard. If it a three-week project into the
happened there, it can happen , third month, in the peak of the
here. If common sense will not business season.
stop these burn ban violators, We opened the bistro in Octo-
perhaps printing their names ber 2007 hoping to add another
and addresses in the paper will. dimension to the historic down-
Nick Cocuzzi town district, by offering healthy
Hernan menu choices, entertainment and
Hernando outside dining, all in a historic
Tax dollars at work setting. This was a huge expense
Tax dollars at work to me personally, and I do pay a
In response to the gentleman lot of taxes on this property.
who could not find a parking My question to taxpayers is: Why
spot in the downtown area (of In- would a project like this be started
verness). I own property at 207 during our winter season? We
North Apopka Ave., formerly have friends and relatives visiting
kniw WoaTe'Mcteod-House_ and would like to share the beauty
Bistro. The municipal parking. 'ofthe-historic district with them,
lot on Pine Avenue has been but we cannot find a place to park


My other question is: Now that
approximately $100,000 of tax-
payers' money has been spent to
beautify the parking lot, why is it
weight restricted? I'm sorry, but
it seems like laying carpet and
only lightweight people can walk
on it; Uncle Henry is 190
pounds. He cannot come in.
I'm curious, am I the only tax-
payer who feels this way?
- Sandra Dixon
Crystal River

Dental help
I would-like to let the people
of Citrus County know that if
they are having any dental prob-
. lems, and would like a free eval-
uation, including X-rays, it really
is possible!
There is a dentist just off State
Road 200 in Ocala, approxi-
mately 2 miles north of the Wal-
mart SuperCenter, who offers
this service.
If you can drive or have some-
one drive you to Ocala (about 30
minutes), the doctor's name is
Thomas Harter. He even has a
toll-free number to make an ap-
pointment at (888) 873-1335.
He is located at 8615 S.W
103rd St, Ocala (about one half
block off S.R. 200).
I thought this might be of help
to people who cannot afford the
upfront money to find out what
their problem is, without any
out-of-pocket expense.
If you decide not to have any
work done, at least now you know
what your problem is, you merely
say thank you and walk out the
door owing absolutely nothing.
David Williams
Beverly Hills


� ... THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call 'Soud Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.
',: "r. "� i


Other VOICES

face of a public health threat masses canceled. Soccer teams
In Japan, where people learn to competed over the weekend with-
live in close proximity, it is as comrn- out fans in the stadium to cheer
monplace to wear a them on, a scary glimpse
mask on the streets of History of things to come when a
Tokyo as it is to apply virus takes hold.
sunscreen on the repeats Another incubator for
beaches of Miami. In itself, but is illness is the airplane,
Mexico, the epicenter of where air is re-circu-
the current swine flu this 1918, lated and air quality
outbreak, people poor. Travel was al-
protested outside a hos- or 1976? ready down because of
pital demanding masks the recession, and now
as supplies began to run out Many more people will decide they're
Mexicans are also accustomed to not going to get on a plane and
wearing masks because of the poor risk contracting swine flu. Poor
air quality in congested urban air quality is a problem the air-
areas. These paper masks are not line industry has long known
fitted and offer very minimal pro- about; will they take this opportu-
tection to an airborne virus. nity to do something about it and
Depending on the progression of install filters? If not, the airline
the virus, masks could become stan- industry could get clobbered, a
dard fare in American cities and major blow to economic recovery.
communities along with the hand- Obama must decide now
washing packets that politicians whether to order a vaccine to
routinely use because of all the combat swine flu that would then
hands they shake. It's amusing but be ready in six months should it
also instructional to hear a Na- be needed. Faced with a similar
tional Public Radio report suggest- decision in 1976, President Ford
ing music lyrics adults can recite to ordered the vaccine for a swine
make sure they're washing, with flu pandemic that never materi-
soap and water for a full 20 seconds, alized. Worse, the hastily pro-
just as preschoolers are taught to duced vaccine increased the risk
say their ABC's as they scrub. for Guillain-Barre syndrome, and
Schools are a major breeding 25 people died. History repeats
ground for the virus, and officials itself, but is this 1918 or 1976?
;in both Queens, N.Y and in Texas
.have made the right decision in
Iclosingbuildings where there have Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift
,been outbreaks. Mexico is in vir- author the Washington Merry-
tual lockdown with schools and Go-Round column, founded in
:museums closed, and church 1932 by Drew Pearson.


LETTERS to the Editor


at


p


U














Sydney: A life well-lived is cause for joy


dards I try to main-
tain with my writings
- the foremost is to seek
subject matter which will
uplift and bring joy, not ma-
terial which will sadden or
depress. My hope continues
to be that my work will bring
smiles to the faces of read-
ers each Sunday morning.
In considering today's
topic, I had to have a long
talk with myself. At first, I'd
decided to forgo the subject,
but after full consideration,
I came to realize that even
when a life passes, if it was a
life well-lived, there's no
reason for sadness, but in-
stead, every reason to cele-
brate the joy it brought. ..


On April 21, 1995, Lasse's
Lil Sydney, as she is identi-
fied by her pedigree papers,
was born. She was a dachs-
hund who would bring hap-
piness not only to her
"mommy and daddy" -
Kurt and Becky - but to
Emily and Eric once they
were born and, further, to all
of her extended family
members, including "grand-
mom and granddaddy" -
Cheryl and me.
Sydney's big little heart
gave out on April 13, 2009.
She was 14 years old, which
based on the 7 to 1 ratio
often used, would be equal
to 98 years of age had she
been human, which is a ripe
old age in anybody's book "


I scanned my archives ify that there wasn't yet a
and found the 1995 column grandchild in the offing,
in which I introduced the but that Cheryl and I did
readership to indeed have a
our grandpuppy. grandpuppy -
In said column, ' as Becky put it,
I discussed how "the cutest,
it was inappro- sweetest little
private for par- dachshund
ents of puppy ever -
newlyweds to Sydney"
ask questions Sydney was
regarding the very much a part
prospects for Fred Brannen of our lives for
progeny, but ap- A SLICE all of hers.
parently it was She began life
OK for them to OF LIFE as a frisky little
tease about the thing with a
matter. The gist of the work "licker license" and she
was that Becky had phoned never relinquished it. When
and teasingly called me we visited with Becky and
"gralhddaddy" only to clar- her family in Dallas last


month, I was still dodging
Sydney's rough tongue by
drawing my bare feet up
under me while I sat on the
sofa.
A few years ago, Sydney
experienced sudden onset
blindness. Some suggested
perhaps it would be best to
put her down, but her fam-
ily didn't agree.
Our concept?
People have used seeing-
eye dogs for years, why
shouldn't a dog have seeing-
eye people?
With surprising ease, Syd-
ney adapted to her world
without sight; and after a
few months, she had memo-
rized her environment and
unless observers knew she


was blind, they would never
have guessed.
As an aside to Sydney's
rather uncommon affliction,
she was loaned to the Uni-
versity of Oklahoma for a
few days and participated in
a study in hopes of helping
other dogs with the goal
being to find a way for an
earlier diagnosis - a diag-
nosis which might result in
such blindness being
avoided.
Sydney had a long, event-
ful, full-and well-lived life. It
was cause for joy.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist -


Waiting for enlightenment


CHANDRA PATEL
Special to the Chronicle

It's been two hours since
I signed in at my new
eye surgeon's office. I
expect it will be another
hour before I get out of here.
I wonder who manages
the schedules for him; obvi-
ously no one.
All the half-blind people
in the waiting room seem to
have developed enormous
patience. All of us just sit
and wait without creating a
riot, though several are agi-
tated. Not that any of us
have any energy left to stand
up, let alone fight Why is it
that people who have the
least time left have the most
patience? Must be part of
the aging process.
There is a lady in a wheel-
chair. She must be in her 90s.
She is alert and talkingto her
companion, probably her 65-
year-old son. She is loud, as
most 90-year-olds are.
Chris, who drove me to
Tampa, is trying to read a
book over the old lady's con-
stant chatter. He finally puts
on his iPod headphones to
drown out the chatter. Al-
ways carry earplugs when
waiting in a doctor's office
or you are likely to come out
with the headache you did
not go in with.
They'finally call my name.
It feels like winning a huge
prize. I should have
screamed "Bingo!" Afterthe
nurse checks my eye pres-
sure, I am directed to an-
other waiting: room, yes,
more patience is called in
from my vast reserves.
There are a couple of ladies
waiting their turn. I seem to
be the youngest in the room,
notthat it is any consolation.
Statistically, any one of us
can drop dead any time!
One of the ladies launches
in to her life story. She is 69,
daughter of a veteran. She
was born in Mississippi, one
of nine brothers and sisters.
This lady worked in a smoke-
filled bowling alley for over
15 years. She went to a pul-
monologist as she thought


she had developed emphy-
sema from second-hand
smoke. They treated her and
she got a little better over the
years. Then she developed
osteoporosis, and the 'doc-
tors put her on a pill she has
to take once a month. She
had forgotten the name of
the medicine. I reminded
her it was Actonel.
The lady has a 49-year-old
son in a wheelchair. He was
born after she had taken
what must have been
Thalidomide. This drug was
first marketed in Europe in
the late 1950s. It was used as
a sleeping pill and to treat
morning sickness during
pregnancy. At that time, no
one knew Thalidomide
caused birth defects. I re-
member I was in England in
the early 1960s when fami-
lies were faced with this in-
comprehensible problem
where hundreds of babies
were born with deformities.
You do not want to see the
pictures of any of these ba-
bies. This 69-year-old lady
has to take care of her 49-
year-old mentally -chal-
lenged son in a wheelchair,
on top of all her ailments. So
what is your problem?
Oh yes, I have not yet told
you why she is in this wait-
ing room. A few years back,
her left eye became irri-
tated, as though she had
sand in it. She visited her
doctor, who took out what
seemed like a thread from
her eye. She has no idea
how it might have gotten
into her eye or what it was.
He recommended her to see
an ophthalmologist, which
brought her to this office.
They found fingerprint-like
imprints onher cornea, and -
some wavy lines. There is a
name for this condition,
though I don't recall it. She
is being treated for this
cornea problem with sev-
eral eye drops and a
monthly visit to this clinic,
with the customary three-
hour wait I am afraid I am
headed that way, too.
They finally took me to
the exam room to see the


doctor. He checked me out
and summarized what I had
known all along. Took him
about 10 minutes to do that.
I wondered why they inflict
so much pain on people by
making them wait for three
hours. Surely the doctor
peeks in the waiting room
once in a while to see how
his patients are coping with
his office's lack of compas-
sion for those who are truly
hurting. They seem to take
pride in letting everyone
know that the waiting time
is over two hours!
As I left the office, dread-
ing that I will have to return
time and again, my
headache was a lot more
tolerable knowing that
there are so many more
souls out there hurting
much more than I, just like
the lady with whom I spent
maybe 30 minutes. I knew
life was good as Chris and I
sat in the Indian restaurant
getting stuffed on Tandoori
chicken, and my daughter
called with excitement to
tell me how well the first
day went for my grand-
daughter at her new school.
So what if I am half blind? I
can see it all!
Iialways say you've got to
make the best of the hand
you are dealt, and of course
play to win. No sense brood-
ing over what comes our
way, just deal with it and get
on with living. The best you
can. And, of course, make
each day the most enjoyable
it can be.
There is a price to be paid
for the wisdom you gain
from waiting three hours in
some doctor's office. If you
don't have to be in that wait-
ing room, thank your lucky
stars. In the grand scheme
of life, you have no problem.
Just look around and you
will see that you are luckier
than most. Enjoy life, like
my grandson would de-
mand: Now!


Chandra Patel is president
and CEO of Champs Software
Inc., Crystal River'


Water Pigs' play had big


impact on students


BERNADINE
FLOOD-NICHOLS
Special to the Chronicle
he Florida Legisla-
ture designated April
as Water Conservation
Month because April is typi-
cally the time when water
needs are most acute and the
temperatures begin to climb.
In support of this designa-
tion, the Citrus County Com-
mission proclaimed the
month of April 2009 as.
"Water Conservation
Month" and called upon all
citizens to work together to
increase awareness of the
need to save and protect our
precious area waters.
Thanks to combined fund-
ing from Citrus County Util-
ities, the Coastal Rivers and
Withlacoochee River basin
boards of the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District and Withlacoochee
Regional Water Supply Au-
thority, the stage production
version of"The Water Pigs"
was performed at Rock
Crusher Elementary and
Crystal River Primary.
Through song, dance and a
little spraying of water, the
Big Bad "Rapping" Wolf and
the adult .Pig inform the
younger pigs that their pig-


gish ways have wasted water sponded from an emotional
After the play, the more level and said they would be
than 700 students at Rock furious and disappointed,
Crusher critiqued the play., Needless to say, many our
Overall, the students and the youths have an appreciation
teachers enjoyed the per- for the importance of water
formance and shared their in their daily lives.
thoughts about the impor- Unfortunately, when faced
tance of water conservation. with a shortage of water,
Most interesting was the many of us are not blessed to
consideration the young stu- have a grandma's home to
dents gave to the question of run to, and we would quickly
what would happen at their overstay our welcome with
home if they had no water daily visits to the homes of
for a week or more. The stu- friends or neighbors.
dents quickly recognized Chances are - since
the fact that they could not many of us access water
shower/bathe, brush-.their- from the same aiquifer -
teeth, wash their hands, family, friends and .neigh-
flush the toilet or cook bors would be faced with
If faced with this sce- the same problem.
nario, some kids became The bottom line is that we
very creative in suggesting all make choices throughout
that: they could move to the day. Now is the time to get
grandma's house; they everyone involved in water
could buy a new house; conservation because the fu-
their parents could take ture of our water supply in
them out to a restaurant Citrus County is in our hands.
every night; or they could Take the time to think
just drop in on neighbors about the ways you use water
and friends every day. every day and look for ways
Some kids thought about that you can use water less.
the health and safety of hav-
ing to go without water and
felt that they would stink; Bernadine Flood-Nichols
the house would stink; they is the conservation and
would go insane; they'd outreach coordinator for
have a heart attack; or they Citrus County in the Water
would die. Some kids re- Resources Department


SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 C3


COMMENTARY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MORNING
Continued from Page C1

The downturn in construction has
rippled across the Sun Belt, from
Arizona to Florida, where the pawn
shop is often the stop of last resort.
At Best Value Jewelry and Pawn in
the working-class town of Fort
Pierce, manager Scott Herman first
noticed trouble signs about 18
months ago. As construction dried
up, so many workers wanted to pawn.
or sell tools that Herman had to stop
accepting them.
In St. Lucie County, the jobless rate
in construction hovers around 40
percent; foreclosures (about 10,000 in
2008) more than doubled from a year
earlier.
Standing behind glass cabinets in a
store filled with diamond rings, pearl
bracelets, stereos, televisions, even cen-
turies-old silver Spanish coins, Sher-
. man says he hears a similar refrain.
"I need to make sure my electric
bill stays on ... I can't make my mort-
gage payment."'
At 10:55 a.m., Tim Salyer, a 42-year-
old unemployed construction
worker, proffers an acoustic guitar in
a beat-up case. He lives with his
mom, who just lost her job as a nurse.
"Trying to hang in there," he says,
sunglasses covering his left eye,
blinded in a car crash at 16. ''There
is no work out there." ,
Salyer pawns his guitar for $50.
He'll need $62 to retrieve it.
"I can't believe I gotta part with it.
I played it all night last night, so
hopefully I got it out of 'my system.
Hopefully, I'll be able to get it back,"
he says with a heavy sigh. "But I'm
riding on reserve in my car Gotta put
a little gas in there."
Outside, Salyer clutches the cash,
glancing at his 2004 purple Chrysler.
He and his mother can no longer
make the $300 monthly payment
Soon he'll head to the dealership
to give it up.
"So long PT Cruiser," he says, wip-
- ing his brow in the sun.

By late morning, Tamara Ogier, the
Atlanta federal bankruptcy trustee,
has wrapped up about 30 interviews.
She is a gentle-but-firm interroga-
tor, sifting through the financial
records of the debtors, looking for
anything of value - a home, a car, a
diamond ring - that can be sold to
satisfy creditors.
It takes just five minutes to hear
how a life has unraveled.
A 40-year-old former accounting
consultant, looking forlorn and wear-
ing a button-down shirt and dark
pants, tells Ogier in a near whisper
that his clothes are all he owns. His
business fell off last summer.
"I'm just hoping things will turn
around," he says later, adding that he
plans to return to school to take more
accounting courses.
A Vietnamese couple who owned a
hair and tanning salon explain,
through a translator, they have a stag-
gering $600,000 credit card debt. The
husband was getting free credit cards
in the mail, and using one to pay off
the other.
Over and over, Ogier calmly asks the
same questions: Will they receive any
life insurance or inheritance within
the next six months? Have they bought
a vehicle in the last six months?
These kinds of crushing debts are
unimaginable to Jerry Miller, the fru-
gal Iowan. He'has never bought a
new car and still lives in the house he
got for $8,500 in 1960, the house
* where he and his wife of 54 years,
Barbara, raised six kids.
This is a man who once logged
every purchase he made in a yehr -
down to a .29 cent pint of ice cream.
As the silver-haired grandfather
heads toward another pharmacy on
his five-stop, 160-mile route, Miller
talks about fiscal responsibility. It's
not just about money, he says. It's
reputation, too.
"If you've got a good name, they
can't take that away from you," he
says, jabbing a finger in the air to
make a point.
It would have been nice, he adds, if
he had a choice about retirement But
Miller says he needs the cash from
this 15-hour a week job to 'pay for
health care for himself and his wife.


Just after 12:30 p.m., Miller arrives
home in Conrad, Iowa and the vet-
eran of many recessions has some
parting words:
"This, right now, is something dif-
ferent," he says. "You've got to have
faith in the system. But can you tell
me, where did all the money go?"

It's just past 1 p.m. in Morgantown,
W.Va., and Jim Juristy still needs 10
nurses to cover all shifts.
No sweat.
"If you had 10 people call off in a
coal mine, that's a whole unit," he
says. We have the resources and the
people we can call who are willing to
come in. It's an opportunity to make
more money. That's why people
work"
The search goes on.

In San Francisco, Khaaliq Parker,
32, is mounting his own search.
The unemployed auto mechanic is
holed up in a cubicle at Career Link
employment center in the Mission
District, checking e-mail for re-
sponses to resumes he has sent out
"The job market is really tough,"
he says. "It's crazy I don't give up."
Parker was laid off a year ago and
has been homeless since December
Until then, he had lived in Oakland
with his wife and 4-year-old son and
her parents, but he says they kicked
him out when he wasn't making
progress looking for work
So he sleeps in his 1992 red Mus-
tang.
Today is a good day, all things con-
sidered. Parker receives his first
$422-monthly -workfare assistance
check; he washed city buses in the
morning to help earn that. He also
squeezes by with food stamps and
$60 a month from the Army Reserve.
Parker, clad in a gray ARMY T-
shirt, joined several months ago to
bolster his resume and get job train-
ing. He may be headed to
Afghanistan within a year. He's re-
signed to it.
Parker is far from alone. In March,
the nation's jobless rate rose to 8.5
percent -' more than 13 million
Americans. The recession, experts
say, has eliminated more jobs as a
proportion of the work force than any
downturn since 1958.
The crash in the housing market is
partly to blame.
Take Joe (no last name, please.) He
says he was a well-known real estate
agent before the housing bubble
burst. Now he's jobless, driving a
2005 Jaguar, carrying some DVDs and
a red suitcase-like tool kit into the
Fort Pierce, Fla., pawn shop.
"It's sad, it's real sad," he says over
his shoulder. "And it's embarrassing."
Moments later he returns, hopping
into his Jaguar, looking defeated.
"Got some gas money now," he
says, "so I guess I'm doing OK"
Paul Maples quit his job as a med-
ical technician in January and can't
find a replacement. Doing odd jobs
around his girlfriend's downtown
clothing store is not enough.
He enters the pawn shop, hauling a
big box of stereo speakers in one arm
and a chain saw in the other.
"Fridge is empty," he announces,
"but we're getting by."
The news isn't good. The pawn
shop dealer has no need for the
chain saw. And $15 is his final offer
for the speakers.
"No, those are $200 speakers!"
Maples protests.
"Sorry, that's the best I can do," the
dealer says.
Maples shakes his head in disgust,
plunks the speakers in a red wheel-
barrow and wheels -them -down. the
street
"Times are tough," he says, "but
they ain't that tough."

Rhode Island has weathered some
of the toughest times in this reces-
sion. In March, the state's unemploy-
ment was 10.5 percent
SAt the Woodlawn Baptist Church,
in a poor section of Pawtucket, the
number of families visiting the
weekly food kitchen has doubled
since the winter.
By 3:15 p.m., workers have stacked
tables with boxes of red tomatoes and
yellow apples, containers of onions,
kaiser rolls and whole-grain bread,
lemon meringue pie and crumb cake.
See MORNING/Page C5













It's here: Taxation without representation


id you make a bad full support of our elected
decision to buy more officials.
home than you could Labor unions, organized
afford? Has your unwise welfare recipients (think
spending caused your credit ACORN) and racial minori-
card debt to become over- ties provide the majority
whelming? Are you an alco- Democrat's margin of vic-
hol or substance abuser? tory. These voters, to be
Are you raising a child or frank, are less educated,
two out of wedlock? Did you earn less income and pay
"forget" to get an education much less in taxes than does
or learn a trade when you the average American. They
had the chance? Do you lack are apt to be receiving ben-
the self-discipline or social efits from government far in
skills needed to hold a full- excess of contributions they
time job? Not to worry! Fail- make toward the cost of gov-
ure is not an option. The ernment services.
government will write you a Civil servants and teach-
check! Oh, and be sure you ers, major supporters of De-
vote for the candidate who mocrats, pay taxes., But
really cares about you! many don't pay the Social
This nation's founders Security tax. Most receive a
warned us that once citizens larger share of their earn-
discovered they could voteq ings as tax-free benefits and
themselves money from the a generous retirement,
Treasury, they would surely thereby lowering their tax
do so. And they would, bills. They constantly de-
thereby,,destroy the nation. mand higher taxes on the
It is happening today with private sector of the econ-


omy to pay for increases in
their salaries and benefits.
There is another bloc of
Democrat supporters for
whom taxes are a minor
consideration:
Wall Street
bankers, CEO's,
venture capital-
ists and celebri-'
ties of all sorts.
They have
achieved a level
of wealth that
sets them apart
from middle- Dr. Willi
class working OTI
Americans. What
taxes they pay VOI
have no effect on
their lifestyles. These peo-
ple support redistributing
tax money to the unproduc-
tive segments; of society in
the name of "economic jus-
tice" or "social justice."
They have little apprecia-
tion for howl government
programs and taxes affect


ia
'H
I1


American productivity and
wealth creation.
What we are living
through now is the "taxation
without representation"
voiced by work-
ing Americans at
recent "tea par-
ties." Those who
elected this gov-
ernment pay lit-
tle or no taxes
and receive
handouts from
the government.
am Dixon They have strong
HER representation in
Washington the
CES state capitols.
The 40 percent of
Americans working in the
private, non-government
sector, those who pay 90 per-
cent of the income taxes and
produce virtually all of the
nation's wealth, now have
little say in what our gov-
ernment does. They lack
representation.


Our current administra-
tion seems to have forgotten
the lessons of history. The
welfare state, sold to us as a
kinder more just way, has
never been able to provide
the personal freedoms, indi-
vidual opportunities and
high standards of living
achieved by "cruel" capital-
ist states. As former Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher
said, socialist governments
all fail when they run out of
other people's money to give
away.
How much more in the
way of taxes on income, in-
vestments, wealth creation,
death and energy consump-
tion can we withstand be-
fore the collapse of our
economy? Responsible,
hard working, tax-paying
Americans must not stand
silent while politicians of
both parties redistribute
wealth and bankrupt the
country to buy votes.


Unless government
changes course soon, there
may be little left to save. If you
want to learn what your gov-
ernment is doing, read the ed-
itorial pages ofthe Wall Street
Journal (wsj.com - $57 on-
line) or try free online: con-
gress.org and grassfire.org.

William Dixon graduated
from Columbia College in
New York City from New
York Medical College and
from the College of Busi-
ness Administration at the
University of South
Florida. He was an assis-
tant professor at the Uni-
versity of Georgia and he
has worked in the veterans
administration system. He
served 11 years in the Army
as a surgeon and as special
forces officer, achieving the
rank of lieutenant colonel.
Dr Dixon can be reached
at Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


~FAKLFR.
TNE ~LU(~ 9ISPA~H.


Appreciate freedom
Open letter to the Honorable Judge
Richard Howard:
I read your guest article in the Chron-
icle dated April 19, in honor of National
Holocaust Observance Day on April 21.
I applaud your effort to create an
awareness in our public-schools and
office buildings as to the atrocities of
the Holocaust in Germany during
World War II.
I am writing this letter in the hopes
that your effort to educate and inform
our schoolchildren and our elders
how horrible life was under the Hitler
regime. I cannot offer you any real de-
tails other than would hope that the
message you will be sending will
make our children and some elders
appreciate the great country we live
in and the many freedoms we have.
In spite of the many difficulties we
are having now and the severe hard-
ships many in our country are having,


Letters to THE EDITOR
I may suggest that those in that posi-
tion will take consolation in that we
are all in a free society and not being
oppressed and tortured, as those were
in the previous conflicts.
I hope you receive a large response
and support in your great idea to inform
and give a wake-up call and awareness
to all that we still live in the greatest
country in the world and should appre-
ciate the many freedoms we still enjoy.
John E. Hartley
former Sgt. U.S. Marine Corps
Homosassa

Dark Ages
In view of the depressed market,
one would think that Realtors would
.readily see that the same old 6 to 7
percent commissions are too high for
the times. I was a Realtor and know
what I say. It isn't that much work or
expense to sell most properties.
Stop and think about it; a $150,000 sale


at 6 percent is $9,000. While many work-
ers earn somewhere near the $20 per
hour rate, let's take $50 per hour for a Re-
altor That would equal 180 hours to serv-
ice a sale. It isn't realistic. One would
think that in these trying times that a 3
percent commission would ensure more
listings; $4,500 is a lot of money, almost
half of what many make in a year
Greed and tradition are the only
conclusions I can come to.
Naturally, there are some sellers
who might opt for more expensive mar-
keting. Traditionally, a Realtor pays a
desk fee, MLS charges, some advertis-
ing, gas and telephone expenses.
Surely there are some other expenses,
but nothing to justify $9,000 to sell a
$150,000 house. Sellers who want to
sell have discounted, lenders have low-
ered interest rates, but most Realtors
are still operating in the Dark Ages.
Frank Hill
Homosassa


Sending stuff
I am calling about the
article that was in the
paper on Saturday, April
25. I am one of the fam-
ilies that is upset about
the snack prices for in-
mates. I do send $100 a
month for my family
member to buy
things there 0
and he did send
me a canteen
listing and the
prices have
gone up. And I
don't know why
the wardens of
these prisons CAt
won't allow us
to send the 563-
treats that they
need with the
store receipt because we
do send stamps, en-
velopes and papers to
them with the receipt
from the post office. Sp
sweets and shampoo
and whatever they need,
with the receipt, is pos-
sible and could be done.
Why not recycle?
The disposal company
that I took from, or
starting taking from 15,
16 years ago, gave me a
free recycling bin but
they have never picked
up anything. They don't'
recycle anymore. I still
have the bin. Why don't
they recycle anymore?
Test for drugs
I have a way to cut
crime in Citrus County
and all over the country
and save the govern-
ment, our government,
money, as well as put-
ting the drug dealers out
of business. Why don't
we implement'that
everybody that is on wel-
fare, anybody that's on
unemployment, anybody
that's getting assistance
from the federal govern-
ment, must be able to
sign up and authorize a
random drug test prior
to accepting that partic-
ular month's check. So


when they sign up to get
their check for the
month, they have to take
a test randomly. Maybe
take one out of every
three people and drug
test them. If you fail,
you do not get your
check for that particular
month. That
IND way we'll see
UNDU how many peo-
ple would rather
be on drugs or
get food with
their food
stamps. Also, it
would put the
drug dealers
out of business
957A because nobody
05 7 would be buy-
ing drugs be-
cause they want their
money.
Should be a felony
I read a letter in the
Chronicle about a neigh-
bor shooting another
neighbor's dog. He shot
this dog from across a
residential street. Any-
one could have been
walking, driving a car or
riding a.bicycle down
this street. He could
have easily shot or killed
someone. Would he have
been charged with a
felony then? His actions
were intentional...(He)
should have been"
charged with a felony.
Jerky sales
We can't have any
potluck dinners any-
more, but they can sell
that wildlife jerky. God
knows how long it's been
cooked or how or where.
I can't-see how they can
allow to sell it ...
How dumb
One person maintains
a business. That person
gets fired. The business
must close. Why should
someone so dumb they
can't realize this be al-
lowed to make deci-
sions? They should not
even be allowed to
drive.


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

Ocala Star-Banner - all of
which had offices in Inver-
ness and local news sections.
Tomwas our most aggressive
reporter and helped us keep
a competitive edge.
Speaking of making those
in county government un-
comfortable, one of the most
significant things a county
commission does is select
its administrator
Administrators run gov-
ernment; the elected county.


commissioners set the pol-
icy that the administrator
implements. It's critical to
select someone who can
take that direction from the
majority of the board.
Currently, the members of
the commission are getting
ready to replace Anthony
Schembri, who replaced
June Fisher, who replaced
Tom Dick, who replaced
Richard Wesch, all in the
past couple of years.
This selection makes
everyone nervous because
the administrator sets the
tone of what's going to hap-.
pen in local government.


When the county brought
Schembri in for the top job,
the board members wanted
things shaken up.
He shook things up pretty
wel4. When he shook too
much, he was shown the door
It's my guess our leaders
are going to back away from
the let's-shake-things-up
philosophy and instead go
with someone they know
and understand.
Brad Thorpe, the director
of the county's Department
of Community Services, is
the safe bet as the new
county administrator.
Thorpe, a former commis-


sioner himself, was runner-
up for the job when Schem-
bri was appointed last year.
Commissioners Gary
Bartell and Dennis Damato
have made it clear since the
day Schembri was removed
that they want Thorpe for
the job. The other finalist is
Walter Munchheimer, also
of West Palm Beach.
Commission Chairman
John Thrumston is still big
on the need for change in
county government, and he
doesn't think that change
can come from within. It
was Thrumston's very ptib-
lic battles with Schembri


that led to his ouster Ironi-
cally, it was Thrumston who
was a big supporter when
Sehembri was first selected
for the job.
Things change quickly in
county government, and
"change" certainly worked
well for Obama in the na-
tional election last November
But with all the turmoil
the county has been going
through in recent years, the
desire for change may have
ebbed.
The most significant ob-
stacle for any new adminis-
trator is going to be the need
to further reduce the county


workforce. That means
more layoffs are going to be
in the mix.
The projected decrease in
property tax revenue is
going to be significant in Cit-
rus County over the' next
two years, and the only way
to create a balanced budget
will be through further re-
ductions to the staff.
No matter who gets the
job, that won't be a lot of fun.

Gerry Mulligan is the pub-
lisher of the Chronicle. His
e-mail address is gmulligan
@chronicleonline.com.


SHADES
Continued from Page Cl

Back to the "mutt" thing.
I received a wonderful
birthday present from
spouse Neale, a $50 certifi-
gate to the used (and new)
CD store in Inverness. Last
Saturday I spent an hour
picking out my musical
treats. They are:
* The Dillards, '"A long
Time ago." The Dillards are
the bluegrass band that had
occasional guest spots on
the "'Andy Griffith Show."
* Don Henley, "Building
the Perfect Beast." Henley
co-founded The Eagles.


* Ray Charles, "The Best
of Ray Charles." Ray
Charles is Ray Charles.
* The Beatles, 'Help."
* A compilation called
"The Folk Years - Blowin'
in the Wind." It has all sorts
of songs by all sorts of folks.
Kingston Trio, Brothers
Four, Jimmie Rodgers, The
Byrds, Pete Seeger, Chad
Mitchell Trio and a bunch of
others who I came to know
early on in life.
While I didn't buy John
Lee Hooker's "18 Greatest"
on this particular visit, I did
buy it just a few days before,
so I'll throw that in the mix
for the heck of it.
Back to concerts: For us,
concert venues, are logical


destinations. There are a lot
of good places to see shows
that, conveniently, work out
to be good day trips. The
Brennan Concert Tour '09,
to date, includes an inter-
esting mix of shows.
* Itzhak Perlman at the
Curtis M. Phillips Center at
the University of Florida,
Gainesville. The venue is
close, easy to get in and out
of and the sound is great. I'd
never heard anyone play vi-
olin at that level before.
Wow!
* Pinetop Perkins with
Steady Rollin' Bob Margolin
on guitar at Tampa's funky
Skipper's Smokehouse.
Pinetop is about 95 and still
plays a fierce bluesy, boogie-


woogie piano. He's played
with a bunch of blues musi-
cians over the years includ-
ing Muddy Waters.
Skipper's isn't much farther
than Gainesville.
* Arlo Guthrie at the
Christian Home and Bible
School Field House in
Mount Dora. These days,
coming up on 40 years since
Woodstock, Arlo is enter-
taining as ever. He's just a
naturally funny, talented
guy. He seemed as surprised
to be playing at the Bible
School Field House as I was
to discover he was playing
there. Like the other places,
Mount Dora's not a far drive
and the concert was a good
excuse to hang out there for


the afternoon.
* Gregg Allman and
Friends at Busch Gardens,
Tampa. Once again, a rela-
tively short drive and the
music was a real treat. To
keep this column from be-
coming a novel, I won't get
into the reverence with
which I hold The Allman
Brothers Band, its various
members, eras of the band,
etc. My enthusiasm can bor-
der on annoying.
* Tampa Bay Blues Festi-
val featuring, among others,
Delbert McClinton, Tommy
Castro and Ruthie Foster.
The fest was at the Vinoy
Waterfront Park in St. Pete
- right along the water-
front. It's a bit more of a


haul than the other places,
but an easy day trip. The
music was outstanding, as
was the locale.
OK, so that's more than
anyone wanted to know
about my musical interests
and exploits, but let me re-
state my purpose for writing
about this: There's some
good music coming to Citrus
County. You won't have to
drive to Tampa or
Gainesville or Mount Dora
or St. Pete - it's here! Get
out and enjoy it

Charlie Brennan is editor of
the Citrus County Chronicle.
E-mail him at cbrennan
@chronicleonline.com.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COMMENTARY


04 S Ab 3 2009


I


!










Cimus Counn' (FL) CHRONICLE COMMENTARY SUNDAY M.&y 3, 2009 C5


MORNING
Continued from Page C3

Carolyn Profughi, the church
clerk who runs the pantry,
spends a lot of time listening to
other people's troubles.
"You want to try to help them
as much as you possibly can," she
says. "Some of them bring their
children with them - your heart
just goes out to these kiddos."
This day, Christine Fuss, 46,
sips a paper bowl of Italian wed-
ding soup in the church base-
ment and talks of how she lost
her job as a hairdressing instruc-
tor last year because of compli-
cations from multiple sclerosis.
She shares a leaky, bare-bones
apartment with her cats and
goldfish.
"No food, no money, no help,"
she explains.
She pauses, holding a spoonful
of soup near her mouth.
"Spent out," she continues,
adding that she has 'recently
begun feeling desperate.
"There's a lot of God in me,"
she adds, "because otherwise I
wouldn't keep getting up,"
Lynette Davis leans on her
faith, too. Tonight, the widow
joins a friend for a weekly Bible
study group at a red-brick church
a dozen miles from her South
Carolina home, where about two
dozen parishioners sit on folding
chairs. They begin with a hymn
and prayer, then turn to the book
of Matthew.
Over three decades, Davis has
worked at a now-shuttered Rus-
sell Stover candy plant, a textile
mill that closed when the jobs
moved overseas and an auto
parts factory that trimmed its
work force - leaving her unem-
ployed since last June.
Finding work in Marion
County, where unemployment
exceeds 20 percent, seems near
impossible. Davis recently en-


rolled in a technical college, hop-
ing to become a pastry chef.
She's not one to despair.
"I have running water," she
says. "I have lights. I have my
kids and I have my family I feel
good about life. There is always
someone out there worse off than
I am. ... I was brought up to know
,the Lord will make a 'way and
that's what he has been doing."
One day, she says, her light and
water bills were due "and I didn't
have a dime. I went to the mail-
box and there was a check All I
could say was 'Thank you, Jesus.'
I know it wasn't nobody but him."

As night approaches, Jim Ju-
risty has fqur open beds and fig-
ures the 11 p.m. shift will get by
OK if he can just get two more
nurses for the West Virginia hos-
pital.
"Actually, this has not been that
bad a day," he says.
Enough people call in. At 6:35
p.m., he has reached his goal.

Ten minutes later, Ballroom B
at the DeVos Place convention
center in downtown Grand
Rapids, Mich., is humming with
anticipation.
About 450 people are waiting
to bid on nearly 75 foreclosed
homes being auctioned off this
night. For the right price, one
family's misfortune can become
another's American dream.
Auctioneer Mike Carr tries to
break the tension with a mock
auction, supposedly for a Las
Vegas home. When the bidding
stops at $1 million, a photo is
flashed on a large TV screen -
an old flatbed truck carrying a
rundown shack How could
someone fork over $1 million for
a house, Carr asks, without see-
ing it first?
Laughter ripples through the
crowded ballroom.
Tonight's first property for sale
is a mobile home on 3.62 acres.
Its previous value: $199,900. The


starting bid: a lowly $1,000.
Within two minutes, the home is
sold for just $15,000.
Next up is one of four houses
that Marilyn Heidenfelder wants
to bid on - three bedrooms,
2,280-square-feet, valued at
$204,000. She's hoping to buy a
place for her 41-year-old daugh-
ter, a school bus driver and
mother of three, who recently
lost her house when her mort-
gage increased $350 a month.
Heidenfelder hasn't told her
daughter, so she wouldn't get her
hopes up.
The 61-year-old retiree is bar-
gain hunting tonight She doesn't
want to spend any more than,
$20,000. But the bidding quickly
exceeds her limit The first home
she wanted goes for $105,000.
The auction continues at a
breakneck pace, with tuxedo-
clad men in the audience prowl-
ing the aisles, shouting the latest
bids to the auctioneer as houses
are flashed on five TV screens.
Carr doesn't stop for an instant
Heidenfelder is no more suc-
cessful when the three other
houses she had scouted out are
sold. The cheapest one goes for
$45,000 - more than twice what
she was willing to pay. And it did-
n't even have a furnace.
Shortly after 7 p.m., she leaves
with her $2,500 cashier's check
- and without a home. There
were $10,000 houses, she notes,
but "they were trash."
Heidenfelder is disappointed.
"There were too many people,"
she says. "It was too competi-
tive."
Lynette Davis is heading
home, too. Her Bible study js
over, the hymns sung, thp prayers
spoken.
"This takes a lot of things off
my mind," she says.
As she makes her way outside,
the birds are singing, the leaden
sky brightens and finally a glim-
mer of sun breaks through the
clouds.


Khaaliq Parker looks for a job April 1 at the
San Francisco.


Associated Press
Mission Unk Career Center in'


or Flames

Are You Prepared?

Saturday, May 9" - 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

EMERGENCY 'OPERATIONS CENTER -
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
3549 Saunders Way, Lecanto, FL
(across from Lecanto Government Center)


S1 1 1 22 23 Special guests: Dan Noah, National Weather
1 1 1 22 23 Service; Judi Tear, Citrus County Health Department;
MeriLd Health MLancr Capt. Joe Eckstein, Emergency Management Director;
Chief Larry Morabito, Citrus County Fire Chief;
Brian McClure, Bay News 9 Meteorologist
ALSO: & HURRICANE RE-ENTRY TAG DISTRIBUTION, AND MOREl

For more information, contact the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office at
726-4488


* Citrus Jazz Society
* Manalee Festival
* CFCC - Tommy Dorsey Orchestra
* ACT - Lost in Yonkers
* 20th Anniversary Gala
* Martin Luther King
Community Worship Service
* Martin Luther King Parade
* Martin Luther King Community Picnic
SSgt. Dennis Flanagan Foundation
Sports Celebrity Auction Dinner
* Sgt. Dennis Flanagan Foundation
Annual Golf Tournament
* Garden of Fashion
* Truck and Tractor Pull and Show
* Kiwanis Concert Live
*USA Yoga Day
* Light Shine-John Audubon's Travels
* Red Dress Affair of the
Heart Wine and Music
An Afternoon Delight - Frankies Back


ACT - Lost in Yonkers
Fitness in Citrus
Mirage Book Signing
Citrus Has Talent
Light Shine-Florida's Wacky History
Jr. Achievment Bowl-A-Thon
CFCC - The Lowe Family
African American Read In
Jazz Concert-My Funny Valentine
Red Dress Heart Dinner
Red Dress Heart Walk
Anthony Kearns
Sell Your Own Treasures
On Our Own Expo
Cattle Barons' Ball
*'School'ashc Golf Tournament
Rosa's Sophisticated Seconds
Altrusa Monte Carlo Night
Citrus Jazz Jam
K of C Military Card Party
Beverly Hills International Festival
Singing Valentines
Grand Ole Opry
Citrus Memorial Health Systems Fundraiser
4th Annual Boy Scout Golf Classic
Yard Sale - Community Educators


* Manatee Car & Truck Show


Luminary Art Nights
CIIrus Jazz Jam
CFCC - Laughing With the Legends
Steak & Steak
Strawberry Festival
Homosassa Heritage Day
The Wedding From Hell -
Gulf Island Theatre
Corvair 5th Annual Car & Truck Show
Floral City Library Book Sale
Wood Wind & Water
Fort Cooper Days
Quilts on Parade
Citrus County Fair
Clean Air Ride
ACT - The Curious Savage
Affair To Remember
Corvettes in the Sunshine
Building Dreams
Swing For A Cure
St. Patrick's Day Golf Classic
Spring Community Craft Show
Spring Time Fun - West Citrus
Ladies of the Elks
SFriends of the Library Book Sale
Tricky Tray
Pilot Club of Crystal River Golf Tournament
SSpring Fling
SKidfetti
SRed Ribbon Tour of Homes
SCharity Ball
SFashion Cares
SAppraisal Fair and Marble Expo
SAs Long As There Is Music
SUnited Way Awards Luncheon
SScope it Out 5K
SJames Rogers Concert
STOO Far Art Show
SRotary Blood Screening
SSCORE Golf Classic
SSugarmill Chorale
SCitrus County's Amazing Race


SACT - The Cunous Savage
SCitrus Jazz Jam
SLight Shine - Annie & Tim's
United Bluegrass
Inverness Relay For Life
SCCBA Fishing Tournament
Wildlife Park Easier Egg Hunt
Jazz Appreciation Month Celebration
Ozello Adventure Race
Volunteer Fair


SCitrus County Bass Challenge
SSuperintendent's Golf Tournament
SSheriffs Summer Safety Expo
SSkyview Bum the Mortgage Tournament
SNeried's Military Card Party
SCentral Citrus Rotary Golf Classic
SMayor's Ball
SComedy Dinner Show with
Homer Noodleman
SAmerican Irish Club Golf Tournament
Floral City Garden Club Plant Sale
We are the Earth
SVolunteer Fair
SCrystal River Relay for Life
SLecanto High Project
Graduation Golf Tourney
SAnnual Musicale
SINISHEER Irish Dance Company
SFamily Fun Day
SNot So Blue Monday
SMusic on the Square
SPJPII Goods-Services Auction

I[r i ; -'.. 1
SACT - The Lucky O'Learys
Citrus Jazz Jam
Hurricane/Disasler Expo
SGospel Jubilee
SLecanto Relay For Life
SInformational Fiesta
World's Greatest Baby Shower
Spring Greek Festival
Winds, Rains or Flames
SFather Willie Golf Tournament
SHome and Garden Show
SCITA Technology Expo
Trip to Vienna Fundraiser
Stamp out Hunger Food Drive
Mental Health Matters
SCamp Good Hope Scramble
SHave a Heart for the Homeless
SSenior Foundation Rays Tnp
SChronicle Pines Tennis Tournament
I rL- -
SInverness Flag Day Ceremony
SBIGS Golf Tournament
SCobia Big Fish Toumament
SCHS Project Graduation
SHomosassa Fireworks Show
SFlag Day at Fort Cooper
SSenior Foundaton Rays Trip


SPatriotic Evening
SCrystal River Fireworks
SRun For The Money Auction
SKey Run For the Money
SKey Center Telethon


* Ovarian Cancer 5K Run
* Bowl For Kids Sake


SVeterans Golf Tournament
SJazz Society Jam Session
SIndustry Appreciation Luncheon
SHarvest Moon Craft Show
SSpanish American Golf Tournament
SUnited Way Kick Off
SSave our Waters Week
Save Our Waters Week Fundraiser
Christmas in September
SGerman Club Oktoberfest
SCraft Show
SEDC Barbecue
832 K- 's Deputy Dog Fundraiser
Beat The Sheriff 5K Run


SSertoma Oktoberfest
Friends of the Library Fall Book Sale
SHabitat For Humanity Golf
SJazz Jam
SRails to Trails Bike Ride
''Spike' Fitzpatrick Memorial
Golf Tournament
SNight of the Heron
SDay of Caring/Make a Difference Day
SNational Wildlife Refuge Week
SScarecrow Festival
SWest Citrus Elks Arts & Crafts Show
SCRWC Arts and Crafts Festval
SNature Coast Fine Arts Show
SHomosassa Rotary Chili Cook Off
SBlackshear Memorial Golf Outing
SWest Citrus Elks Annual Card Party
SArtisian Boutique
SSouthern Heritage Days
SFun Horse Show
SJazz Concert
SCooler Blast
Haunted Tram Ride
Halloween Haunted House
SGreat American Cooler Festival


Pumpkin Festival
Ozello Crafts Sale
Zeke Lapinski Memorial Golf
Cooterwbn
Festival of the Arts Wine Tasting
Taste of Citrus
Greek Festival
So You Think You Can Dance


SBH Lions Arts & Crafts Show
SCharity Tennis Tournament
SFestival of The Arts
SJazz Society Jam
SRotary Blood Screening %
SBlues & Bar-B-Que
SHomosassa Library Book Sale
SVeterans Fair
SVeterans Day Parade/Memorial Service
SVeterans Appreciation Show
Stone Crab Jam
West Citrus Elks Annual Craft Show
SCCBA Home & Outdoors Show
SCaruth Camp Challenge
SParade of Trees
Citrus Stampede Rodeo
Winter Wonderland Craft Show
SInglislYankeetown Arts and Seafood Festival
SOzello Arts & Crafts Festival
Jazz Concert


SFather Christmas Ball
SNights of Lights
SFloral City Heritage Days
SBeverly Hills Christmas Parade
SChristmas Craft Show
SInverness Rotary TV Auction
SCRWC Silver Bells
SCrystal River Christmas Parade
SJazz For the Holidays
SJazz Jam
SInverness Christmas Parade
SHomosassa Boat Parade
SSugarmill Chorale Christmas Concert
SAirboat Chnscmas Parade
SCitrus Springs Christmas Parade
SNutcracker Ballet
SCelebration of Lights
SRichard Gilewitz
SThe Messiah '


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SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 C5"


COMMENTARY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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1996 Chevrolet Cavalier $94&
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1999 Buick LeSabre $1 MA
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B tis2009



BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


SENIOR


SLU


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


IRGAN KHAN/Los Angeles Times
"You better know that the kids are chasing your job, that they want your $95,000 salary," says Tom Fallon, 62, of Seal Beach, Calif., shown
at a FedEx Office store. He has been seeking a sales job in material handling for three months.

Job market is especially cruel for older workers


TIFFANY Hsu
Los Angeles Times
Their savings in shambles from the eco-
nomic downturn, jobless seniors are dusting
off their briefcases and trying to head back
to work Many, like Jim Mitchell, a 63-year-
old former sales executive, are finding a
merciless job market where decades of ex-
perience aren't necessarily an asset
The Long Beach, Calif., resident rises be-
fore dawn each day and dresses in business
attire to keep himself motivated. He pops in
brilliant blue contacts to brighten his eyes
and combs back his graying hair to look
more youthful.
Not that it matters. He's not getting much
face time.
Many recruiters these days want only e-
mail applications and refuse to take phone
calls. Mitchell is at sea when it comes to
using online sites such as LinkedIn and
Facebook for networking. He leaves his col-
lege graduation date off his resume. But in
two.years of full-time job hunting, he hasn't
received a single callback
"I don't want to think it's about age, but
sometimes you suspect it is," he said. "But
60 is supposed to be the new 40. I just want a
fair hearing."
The recession has not been kind to older
workers. With their 401(k)s battered, home
values deflated and health care costs rising,
many have resigned themselves to staying on
the job indefinitely. The trend was well
under way before the downturn, as many
continued working to pad their savings or to
stay active.
Now it's about necessity. Over the past two.
years, the number of Americans age 55 or


JAY L. CLENDENIN/Los Angeles Times
Jim Mitchell of Long Beach, Calif., 63, a former sales executive, has been seeking work for
two years.


older who are still working has climbed by
nearly 1.5 million, to just over 26 million in
March, according t6 the Bureau of Labor
Statistics.
Those are the lucky ones.
The number of people 55 or older who
want a job but can't find one has more than
doubled over the same period, to nearly
1.8 million. Many are struggling in a largely
digital job-search process that's vastly dif-
ferent from what they have known.
Millions entered the work force straight


Disaster recovery is


emotionally taxing


Editor's note: This is the
conclusion of a two-part se-
ries on small businesses'
dealing with disasters.
NEW YORK - When a
fire destroyed the Manhat-
tan office ofAtlantis Health
Plan, the company was so
well prepared it lost just
one day of work But that
didn't make disaster recov-
ery easy.
Small business owners
who contend with disasters
find that the recovery
process involves much
more than finding space
and getting Internet and
phone service again. Relo-
cation and disruptions in a
company's routine can take
an emotional and physical
toll that's as hard as the dis-
aster itself. Owners and em-
ployees can feel pushed to
extremes.
An early morning electri-
cal fire Nov. 25 wiped out
everything in Atlantis'
10,000 square feet of space,
Chief Operating Officer
Tom Dwyer said.
"It was basically a com-
plete loss," Dwyer said.
Their data loss was zero


because Atlantis,
a health insur-
ance company,
uses a Web-en-
abled software i
application
hosted in Hous-
ton.
The company
also had a reloca-
tion plan, having Joyce R1
already con- SMALL
tracted to use
space in Carl-
stadt, N.J., near New York,
that had phones and com-
puters. The result of all this
advance planning was just
one missed day of work.
"By 9 a.m. on the 26th, we
were back up," Dwyer said.
But there were still plenty
of problems. While the main
phone number was quickly
switched to the New Jersey
location, secondary num-
bers such as fax lines took
as long as several weeks to
be moved.
At first, it was easy for the
staff to adapt. "There's an
adrenaline rush because
it's new, exciting, different,
making calls on the fly,
going by the seat of your


pants," Dwyer
said.
But, he said,
"after a few
weeks, it settles
down, you get
.. ;- back to your rou-
tine, and every-
one realizes it's a
longer work day
)senberg and longer com-
L TALK mute for our
folks. It starts to
sink in."
Atlantis rented a bus to
take the staff to work, but
Dwyer noted that workers
had to start their workday at
7:30 a.m. during the holiday
season. "It was a challenge
on our managers' part,
keeping the morale up."
The company .expects to
move into new quarters
soon, in a building near
their original location.
Jocelyn Wiebe and her
husband, Ryan, are also in
the midst of disaster recov-
ery right now. The couple
had separate businesses in
brand-new offices in Oost-
burg, Wis., between Milwau-
See SMALL/Page D2


from high school or college, earning steady
promotions and salary increases. Some; like
Mitchell, hadn't updated their resumes in
years. There was no need.
But with unemployment the highest it has
been in more than a quarter of a century -
8.5 percent nationally in March and 10.5 per-
cent in California in February - older job
seekers are competing with younger, less ex-
pensive rivals.
See . ' -.'Page D2


Business 0: cE S -


Watson to receive
Ray Kroc Award
Inverness is home to one of
the nation's top McDonald's
restaurant managers. Shan-
non Watson recently received
the Ray Kroc Award, an an-
nual performance-based
award that recognizes the top
performing
McDonald's
restaurant
managers in
the country.
Named after
McDonald's
corporate
founder Ray
Kroc, the Shannon
award was Watson
established
ten years ago in 1999 to honor
hardworking restaurant man-
agers - those who make Ray
Kroc's vision of excellence
come to life in restaurants and
for customers each day.
A select 139 managers
were chosen this year to re-
ceive the Ray Kroc Award, an
honor that comes with a cash
award, a Ray Kroc award tro-
phy and pin and a trip to
Chicago for an awards gala on
March 3 hosted by McDon-
aid's USA President, Don
Thompson and Chief Operat-
ing Officer, Jan Fields. The
banquet took place in Chicago


at the Sheraton Hotel & Tow-
ers.
"McDonald's has meant the
world to me," said Watson.
"The opportunities that this
company has allowed me to
pursue are outstanding, and I
feel truly lucky to be a part of
such an amazing organiza-
tion."
Ray Kroc built the McDon-
ald's business on the belief
that greatness can only be
achieved through the dedica-
tion and support of a Com-
pany's people. The award was
named after him based on his
commitment to people and
recognizing their contributions
to the organization he helped
establish. Each year, this pres-
tigious award is given to the
top 1 percent of McDonald's
U.S. restaurant managers to
recognize their superior per-
formance and achievement.
Watson has worked at the
Inverness McDonald's for nine
years as a valued manager.
She is also involved in a vari-
ety of career development ac-
tivities at Citrus High School,
as well as supporting their
yearbook that reinforce her
commitment to being a con-
tributing member of the com-
munity, as well as a valued
McDonald's employee.
See DIGEST/Page D2


o
I


Take


the


money


and sun
DEAR BRUCE: We
purchased a home
on an acre in cen-
tral California for
$350,000. It is now worth
more than $600,000. I just
retired at 65, and my hus-
band, a schoolteacher, will
retire in another 10 years.
We are thinking about
staying in our current
home and building an ad-
dition consisting of an
artist studio for $30,000 to
$40,000. We could alterna-
tively buy several acres
for about $450,000 and
build guest quarters and
then later build a large
main residence. We could
even trade down. What do
you think? - Reader, via
e-mail
DEAR READER: Why
build an artist studio?
What are you going to do
with it? I cannot believe
that even a long-term
schoolteacher is earning
the sort of money re-
quired for the adventures
you are proposing. As to
building guest quarters
and a large main resi-
dence, once again, I have
to ask, since you are retir-
ing, why do you need yet a
bigger home? The idea of
trading down makes the
most sense. With housing
values dropping, I think
you might want to check to
make sure that you have
that much equity in your
home. If you do, you are
indeed fortunate to have
the appreciation, as many
have had the bubble burst
In the absence of other in-
formation, it seems to me
the idea of staying where
you are and continuing to
pay a mortgage you have
been able to afford makes
sense. Again, if you do
have the equity you say
you have, you might con-
sider selling the home,
taking your money and
buying a smaller home.
DEAR BRUCE: We are
retired, have a high five-
figure income, a small
mortgage and good health.
Our current residence has
appreciated significantly,
making it possible to real-
ize a sizeable six-figure
gain. We can sit tight or
sell. Is there any advan-
tage in taking the gain and
relocating to a more af-
fordable community? -
PJ. in Arizona
DEAR PJ.: You realize
that since this is your pri-
mary residence, unless
it's going to profit more
than $1 million, you and
your wife can keep every-
thing that you have
gained. Not a bad deal. As
to whether you would like
to live in a more afford-
able community, that's en-
tirely up to you. Since you
have what appears to be
sufficient income, the
choice is yours to stay or
leave. Do what is best for
you, not only financially,
but achieving the best pos-
sible comfort level.
DEAR BRUCE: My son
is a sophomore in college.
He has saved to pay for
college, but he wants to
borrow money as well. He
claims that there is noth-
ing improper about bor-
rowing the money and
investing it Since there is
no interest being charged,
whatever he earns is
gravy I'm not sure if his
See MONEY/Page D2









s&sCUNDu CUNTAF)CHRN


D2 s AYAbY 3 2009


SENIOR
Continued from Page Dl


The daily hunt begins around
7 a.m. in his home office, where
Mitchell scans online job leads.


"You better know that the -
kids are chasing your job, He admits he isn't a
that they want your $95,000
salary," said Tom Fallon, 62, computers. Secretary
of Seal Beach, Calif., who previous posts handle
has been searching for a
sales position in material Many positions now rec
handling for three months.
America's youngest work- and PowerPoint fil
ers aren't faring well either
In March, the unemploy- Skills he's trying to mast
ment rate for U.S: workers from friends.
ages 16 to 24 hit 16.3 per- from friends.
cent. But these youths--
aren't saddled with mort- to earn - I just never job-spea
gages and dependents to needed it," he said.. old.' I've
the same degree as their Robust and gregarious, the past
elders,'nor do they have the he projects the earnest en- Since
same-medical and retire- thusiasm of a born sales- worked
ment concerns. man. But gone are the days PR ager
And although joblessness of cornering an executive in entering
among older workers is an elevator and pitching she nee(
lower than that offthe-ove-r-yourselfin person.- - Her ex
all labor force, it is growing Over the past two years, dramatic
much faster. In.March, 6.2 Mitchell, has blown through pleted
percent of workers 55 or $80,000 in retirement sav- ment he
older were unemployed, up ings to cover his mortgage To boc
from 3.4 percent in March and living expenses. He has tended
2008. retreated from his large so- mnar, an
For mature workers who cial network, save for the volunteo
spent years building up stel- occasional Friday-morning to a job.
lar credentials and largely ' coffee with friends. "I di
defined themselves by their "The hardest time' is at she sai
careers, the ego-crushing night, when the TV goes off tough."
inactivity of unemployment and the lights go down and Amid
can be unbearable, said it's quiet and there's noth- ior job-
Steven J. Greenberg, ing else in my head," he boomed
founder of Jobs 4.0, a list- said. "I have to think posi- tiremen
ings site for job seekers tively then, because other- 500,000
over age 40. wise the agony will come in Febr
"For many, it's a brutal out in phone conversa- August,
experience - like going tions." 4.0 doubt
through a divorce," he said. Older employees often riod.
Up until two years ago, are perceived as overquali- Retir
Mitchell had worked flied, overpriced, technolog- tradition
steadily since joining Gen- ically challenged and older v
eral Motors Corp. in 1968 as inflexible, said Gene make a
a production foreman Burnard,
straight out of college. He publisher, of Jeanne Fede
gravitated to sales and mar-Wthe job-list- Jeanne Fede
Jetiing,.herhe figtreshe Ing Web site hasfelt the
has sold more than$5l"-W r -- rk---- hasfelt the
million worth of consumer force50.com. sting despite
products over the years, in- Some re-
cluding toothpaste and cruiters as- "resume thai
trash bags. sume that
In 2006, when his brother because could choke
became ill, Mitchell took a: older appli- horse."
leave-from his job as a na- cants are .ors.
,tional sales manager at a vying 'for .
brokerage representing jobs that pay less than their fie up
pharmaceutical and health- previous positions, they'll months.
care product suppliers to jump ship as soon as the Grayi
run the family grocery busi- economy improves. flocking
:ness in Connecticut. When "In this market, it's twice commu
he returned to Southern as hard for older job seek- prove t
California the next year, he > ers, because however desir- said. I
said, he found himself able they' were at 27, they. reserve
Ssquiezd out. of the full-: Just aren't as much at 54," cumula
time job that had paid moire said Greenberg of Jobs 4.0. the wc
than $100,000 annually. "Recruiters don't give much themsel
He's been looking ever of an opportunity to go into Since
since. your life story. They give pany h
The daily, hunt begins your resume two seconds." lapsed,
around 7 a.m. in his home Jeanne Feder has felt the hours a
office, where Mitchell scans sting despite a"'resume that His 401
.online job leads. He admits could choke a horse." At 59, cent, an
he isn't a wiz with comput- she worries thaf. she's past ning ou
ers. Secretaries at his pre-- an unspoken cutoff age. shirt a:
vious posts handled that. "YIpply for jobs online business
Many positions now require with a description that ex- He ne
Excel and PowerPoint flu- actly matches my rsume, BlackB(
ency, skills he's trying to but the classic expression "May
master - with help. from you hear when they see you too tireE
friends. is,'Oh, gee, you're overqual- "But ri
"It's not that I didn't want ified,' " she said. "That's I'm 39."


wiz with
es at his
led that.
quire Excel
uency,
ter with help


ak for 'You're too
heard it 20 times in
year."
2006, she has
at a mariketing-and
icy. But with her son
g college, she said,
ds a higher income.
penses have risen
cally, and she's de-
her savings to aug-
r salary.
ost her skills, she at-
a grant-writing sem-
d she's hoping her
er work might lead
offer
dn't plan for this,"
d. "Lucky thing I'm

t the recession, sen-
-search sites have
[ in popularity. Re-
itJobs.com had
more unique visits
uary than it did in
while traffic to Jobs
)led in the same pe-

reeWorkforce.com
nally has attracted
workers looking to
Afew extra bucks
working payr
time or at
r seasonal jobs.
But with re-
tiremenft sayv-
a i n g s
hammered by
t the .--.down-
turn, seniors
a ; looking for
full-time
posts have
pushed traf-


150 percent in six

ng job seekers are
g to technical and
nity. colleges to im-
heir skills, experts
Many are tapping
irs of discipline ac-
ted from decades in
workplace to keep .
lves focused.
the start-up com-
e worked for' col-
Fallon has spent 60
week job hunting.
(k) is down 60 per-
id his savings is run-
t. He wears a dress
nd tie and carries
s cards everywhere.
ver turns off his
erry.
be in a year I'll be
d to dothis," hesaid.
ght now I feel like


DIGEST
Continued from Page DI

Mike Wheeler joins
business network
The most recent member of
the Citrus Business Network is
Mike Wheeler, Caregivers for
Seniors. Wheler was wel-
comed into membership April
10.
The Citrus Business Net-
work meets every Friday mom-
ing at Tuscany On The
Meadow, Citrus Hills Lodge,
350 E. Norvell Bryant Highway,
Hernando. Breakfast starts at
7, and the meeting is con-
ducted from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m..
-Membersbenefit by exchang-
ing information aid-referrals
with other business owners.
Guests are always wel-
come. Attendees should bring
business cards, brochures,
coupons,- etc., to exchange
with other business owners.
Each person is given an op-
portunity to introduce their
products or services.
For more information call Liz
Koehlinger, Membership Direc-
tor, 527-9790 or Ron Radford,
President, 795-0003, or visit
www.citrusbusiness
network.com.
John J. Ceparano
earns certification
Joseph Capital Manage-
ment, LLC is proud to an-
nounce that John J. Ceparano,
CPA/PFS,.CFP@, M. Tax has
been awarded the Personal Fi-


nancial Specialist Credential
(PFS) by the American Insti-
tute of Certified Public Ac-
countants, as well as the
Certified Financial Planner
(CFP) designation by the Certi-
.fied Financial Planner Board of
Ocala hospice pro-
fessional to board
OCALA- Kevin Barrett, as-
sistant director of admissions
for Hospice of Marion County
Inc., has been appointed by
Gov. Charlie Crist to the
Florida Board of Respiratory
Care. Although Barrett heads
the organization's admissions
department, he is a certified
respiratory therapist with many
. years experience. Prior to as-
suming the administration of
, admissions, Barrett was the
coordinator for Hospice's
Heartbeats and Inspirations
specialty programs, which help
patients with cardiac and pul-
monary conditions learn how
to live a higher quality of life,
despite limitations.
"It is an honor to be chosen
by the Governor to serve on
this board," says Barrett. "I'm
committed to offering my serv-
ice and increasing awareness
about the respiratory profes-
sion, as well as hospice care,
to our community. I'm in a very
Unique position to make a
valuable contribution on-both
levels."
Barrett's four-year term
began immediately following
I Senate confirmation on April
14. The board consists of five
licensed respiratory therapists
and two consumer advocates.


-SMALL
- SiI~

Continued from Page Dl
keeandt Green Bay, and were dislocated
after a Jan. 9 arson fire in the office next to
theirs.
Although their office had only minor fire
damage in addition to damage from smoke
and water, it had to be gutted. Jocelyn, a
sales representative for health insurer
AmeriPlan, is working mostly out of her
home office while Ryan, whd has a new fi-
nancial services company, is in temporary
space. But Wiebe estimated that he lost
about a month of work while:he had to get
his business up to speed again, including
getting phone and Internet service.
Neither lost any data. Jocelyn had taken
her laptop, and therefore all her- client in-
formation, home with her. Her husband's
work was stored entirely on his PC in the
office, but it was luckily rescued by offi-
cials soon after the fire and hot damaged.
They're hoping to be back in their of-
fices soon. First, they need to go through
all their furniture and equipment, which
has been stored in a trailer, see how much
of it is salvageable, and then clean it
Jocelyn isn't looking forward to wiping
ash and soot off everything. And, she said,
"'everything reeks" of smoke|
Paul Lewis found himself pushed to the
limit at times after 9 feet of snow col-
lapsed part of the roof of the Warren, N.J.,
building that housed his firm in January
-1996.
Lewi'Tcomputer networking company
was one of several tenants. His offices


Two-day class
on tap
The Salon Professional
Academy is offering a two-day
Cosmetology Class for
prospective students from 9
a.m. to noon on Thursday and
Friday, May 7 and 8, with a
pizza party on Friday at 12:30
p.m . Scholarships are avail-
able for a limited time.
Call Barbara in admissions
at 341-3500, ext. 240.
The Salon Professional
Academy is at 1522 U.S. High-
way 41 North, Inverness.
Seminar coming up
in Homosassa
Doctor Vitamin Store's na-
tional representative, Michelle
McColley, CNHP, will be con-
ducting a seminar on "Building
Hormone Health for Men and
Women" at 11 a.m. Saturday,
May 9. McColley is a' Master
Herbalist and certified Natural
Health Professional. Call 628-
7036 now as seating is limited.
The store is at 3930 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa, in the
Publix Shopping Center.
Doctor Vitamin is a national
vitamin and herb company with
.a new doctor-formulated pure
products with no chemical ad-
ditives. Visit their Web site:
www.doctorvitaminstore.com.
Markey Day
elebrates moms
Market Day with Art is on
Mother's Day week-end, Sat-
urday, May 9 in Crystal River.
Call 564-1400.
-Fromstaff reports


were unscathed, but the building was con-
demned, he wasn't allowed in and the
server he needed to run the business was
locked inside. So, nearly three weeks
after the collapse, Lewis staged a "mid-
night raid," breaking in to get the server.
Lewis said his company couldn't have
survived otherwise. In 1996, the technol-
ogy that allows companies to back up their
data remotely or on the Internet was in an
embryonic stage. Backing up data often
meant copying files to floppy disks placed
right next to the PC.
Lewis also had to recreate the company
in a temporary location and with none of
the equipment and conveniences he and
his staff relied on. Friends came to his aid,
lending him computer and phone net-
works, but that meant -everyone had to
learn a new way to work
During the six months that it took for
Lewis' business to get back to its prem-
ises, Lewis said he was often in tears on
the way to work, and "a month into it, I
was really considering throwing in the
towel." I
But, he said, "I realized that my em-
ployees, everyone was going through this
stressful, high anxiety period and I real-
ized the best thing for me to do was put a
smile on my face and say, 'We're going to
get through this,' "he said.
They did. One benefit of the disaster
was that Lewis was able, in a different set-
ting, to see that his company needed to be
restructured; after he did that, it was
stronger. Lewis sold it three years later,
arid now owns a computer forensics and
security operation in Asbury, N.J.


MONEY
Continued from Page D1


Are. You. KIDDING! Who is
the parent here, you or this
kid? She doesn't want to
ride on a bus with "little
kids." She is demonstrating


thinking is right, and I cer- her immaturity given the
tainly don't want him getting lack of substance in her ar-
into .trouble. - PR., via e- guments. The idea that she
mail needs to get to work may
DEAR PR.: If the loan have some merit, but the an-
doesn't specifically address swer there is how come she
where the money is being wasn't working up until now
spent, I don't see where he's to save money so she could
doing anything wrong. I buy her own car? Insurance
think he's a very smart is another matter and a sig-
young man. If there's inter- nificant one. There is no
est-free money around that way in the world that I
he can legally borrow, why would cater to this very im-
in the world would he not? mature child. If she wants a
The other part of the equa-i car, let her go and earn one
tion is,'let's get it paid back the same way her parents
before the interest meter did. Until that time get used
starts to run. to that yellow bus ride. If
DEAR BRUCE: Our you wish to help her get
daughter, 17, recently re- 'back and forth to a part-time
ceived her driver's license, job, that is not unreason-
She has taken training able. Where do these kids
courses in high school and -get the idea that a car is a
seemstf 'b6resp-onsiblte.-We -right? It is-a-privilege and--
are having a great deal of one that should be earned.
family discord over her in- DEAR BRUCE: I hope
sistence that she have a car you can help me. I have a lot
to go to school and possibly of money from France. I
to a job. Her point, which is would like to find where I
valid, is there is no public could cash the euros in for
..transportation that can get U.S. dollars. - B.R., via e-
her to and from a part-time mail
job, and, now that she is an DEAR B.R.: I don't see
"adult," she shouldn't be re- where there's a problem.
quired to ride on a school The money desk at your
bus with "little kids." No- local bank should be able to
body gave her mom a car, arrange a transfer from
and certainly nobody ever euros to dollars. Stay away
gave me one. I want to be a from the moneychangers at
good parent, but this would airports or similar places,,
entail a financial burden., since the commission will
Frankly, I am wearing thin be very high. Your local
listening to this kid's whin- bank should be able to
ing. My wife and I have dis- arrange it at a very modest
cussed this and have agreed commission. You can check
to give a good deal of weight in the daily paper and find
to your opinion should you out precisely what the value
chose to give one. - Frus- is of the euro versus the dol-
trated Father, via e-mail lar on any given day. You
DEAR FRUSTRATED: will not receive that full


value, since there is a com-
mission charged on the
transaction.
DEAR BRUCE: I like to
think of myself as a good
neighbor. If you own your
house, you should be able to
do within reason what you
chose to do. Up until the
home next door was sold
several months ago, I had
good relations with the oc-
cupants. I am a pet owner,
and I believe that I am a re-
sponsible pet owner. The
new owners of the house
next door are anything but
They have two large dogs.
They are kept outside al-
most all of the time. They
bark continuously. Any
noise will set them off. We
have discussed this with the
neighbors, and they said to
mind our own~busTOffS.
How they take care of their
animals is their business,
and if the barking bothers
us close the windows. Do we
have any redress? - LJ.. in
Mississippi
DEAR LJ.: In .a.warm
neighborhood like yours,
keeping the windows closed
all the time could be an in-
convenience. The attitude
expressed by your inconsid-
erate neighbors is not one to
be tolerated. Talk to the
local animal-control office
and find out precisely what
ordinances apply Most do
not allow a disruption of
neighbors, particularly dur-
ing the evening. You might
also want to petition your
local governing body to
adopt ordinances that re-
strict this activity. As a for-
mer public official, I can tell
you that when we received
complaints such as yours,
we took them seriously.
These kinds of people have
no respect for humans or


animals and. should be
pulled up tight
DEAR BRUCE: My hus-
band and I have a serious
disagreement. We are
$10,000 in hock to credit
card companies. We have
consulted a credit-counsel-
ing agency, and we have
three years left on our plan.
We would like to pay it off
faster. I would like to take
our income tax refund, his
bonus check and any extra
income to pay this off as
quickly as we can. He says
that a home equity loan is a
better way to go. I totally dis-
agree. Do we cut back on
our retirement savings to
pay down our debt? Do we
borrow from our 401(k)? We
have a daughter getting
married, and we will have to
help--eouLwith that very
shortly. - Readaef, vite-mail
DEAR READER: Your
husband's idea is stbstitut-
ifig one kind of debt for an-
other. While it may be that
the interest rate might be a
bit less, that doesn't solve
the problem,, only transfers
it I think your idea ihakes a
great deal more sense, par-
ticularly in squeezing more
money out of your incomes.
The amount of money that
you mentioned equated
against your income could
make that possible. The
idea of your daughter's wed-
ding is a whole other matter
While expensive weddings
certainly have a lot to rec-
ommend them for memo-
ries, I'm totally opposed to
parents going deeply into
hock to pay for a wedding. If
the money is available, fine.
If it is not, then either the
bride and groom should pay
for it or they should settle
for a much smaller cere-
mony.


DEAR BRUCE: My
mother, 80, has dementia
and is very difficult to deal
With. She insists that she
will continue to drive. She is
a terrible driver, and I know
she is going to have an acci-
dent I went to my insurance
agent and raised her insur- '
ance to $250,000 for one per-
son and $500,000 in the
aggregate. Is there anything
else I can do to protect her
assets? This is a difficult
thing facing many people. -
Reader, via e-mail
DEAR READER: The an-
swer is not more insurance.
The unhappy answer is that
you should immediately call
your local motor vehicle de-
partment or sheriff's office
and apprize them of the fact
that your mother is still
driving with a valid license
even though she is suffering
from this mental disorder,
which almost always gets
progressively worse. Her li-
cense and registration
should be revoked. I know
this is very strong medicine
and it will make you very
unhappy, but buying insur-
ance is in no way going to
prevent harm to her or
someone else. If she were to
go out and cause and acci-
dent, in many cases no
amount of money could re-
turn things to normal, and
you would have to live with
this for the rest of your life.
DEAR BRUCE: I know
that you have repeatedly
Said that a landlord should
get at least 1 percent of the
value of the property in rent
What do you base this on,
and what do you suggest I
do? I'm 33 and want to know
what kind of rental property
I ought to be looking into. -
Matt, via e-mail
DEAR MATP. First, 1 per-


cent of the value of the prop-
erty per month is simply a
guideline. It is a minimum,
but there are many real es-
tate investments where one
can do better You must un-
derstand that buying real es-
tate is not a passive activity.
Owning real estate requires
management such as main-
tenance, collecting rent, etc.,
and unless you are planning
to devote yourself to this, you
might look elsewhere for in-
vestments. If you are think-
ing about buying a home for
yourself, you might consider-
a two- or three-family home
where you occupy one apart-
ment and the others are
rented to produce income. I
believe that for people be-
ginning with their first
home, this is a very, very vi-
able way to go. It allows you
to get your feet wet in terms
of real estate investment, it
cuts your living expense ma-
terially and it allows you to
build equity a great deal
more quickly. Let us assume
for the sake of discourse that
you would buy a starter
home for $75,000. You could
purchase a triplex in the
$200,000 range, build equity
much more quickly in the
larger value property and
have less going out of your
pocket every month. Not a
bad way to begin. But re-
member, the 1 percent illus-
tration is simply a general
rule of thumb.


Send your questions to:
Smart Money, PO. Box 2095,
Elfers, FL 34680. E-mail to:
bruce@brucewilliams.com.
Questions of general inter-
est will be answered in fu-
ture columns. Owing to the
volume of mail, personal
replies cannot be provided.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


. I










Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Ba


number onnectionMAY 32009


Thai-Phoon Restaurant


Business spotlight: CenterState Bank





' , : ': "/-' - g.
a sa ^ S l W' ,. .r. ...-A ... .. ., .; -:*.;�,-a M


CenterState Bank


Recently, a ribbon cutting ceremony was held for Thai-Phoon Restaurant, welcoming them'
as new members of the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce. Representing the Chamber
Ambassadors were Jennifer Duca, Tammy LaVelle, Bonnie Hardiman, Dan Pushee, Wendy
Hall, Lillian Smith and Betty Murphy. Thai-Phoon specializes in Thai Food. They offer lunch
and dinner specials for Chamber members They are open for lunch on Monday - Saturday
from 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. and Sundays from Noon - 3 p.m. Their lunch hours are Monday -
Friday from 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. and on Sunday from 4 p.m. - 8 p.m. They are located in the
Kings Bay Plaza at 238 US Hwy 19 in Crystal River.


Inverness Liquors


The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce would like to welcome Inverness Liquors as new
members! Welcoming Inverness Liquors, during a recent ribbon cutting ceremony, were Am-
bassadors Tammy LaVelle, David Heinz, Diane Smith, Janet Mayo, John Porter and Lillian
Smith. Owner Kenny Patel was also present. Inverness Liquors is located at 3177 E. Gulf to
Lake Hwy in Inverness. They offer a full range of beverages and are a great place to stock-
up for your sports party, celebration or get together. Givethem a call tgday at 726-2543.


* 151 E Highland Blvd. In-.
verness, Florida 34452
* 352-860-0204
* www.centerstatena.com
* Contact Person: Rocky
Hensley,Vice President/Com-
munity Banker hhensley@cen-
terstatebankna.com
* Business Hours:
* Monday-Thursday Lobby
9:00-4:00 PM,Friday 9:00 AM-
6:00 PM,


* Drive In 8:00 -5:00 Mon-
day-Thursday,Friday 8:00-6;00
* How long have you been
in business? 5 Years
* What service/product do.
you offer?
* Banking Services/Busi-
ness & Personal
Deposits/CD's/Consumer &
Commercial.Loans, Safe De-
posit Boxes, ATM/Free Online
Banking/Bill Pay


Last month, we featured Chamber mem-
ber businesses that provide services to
spruce up the inside of your home or busi-
ness. This month, we are featuring those
Chamber member businesses that can help
the outside look as good as the inside. First
appearances can speak volumes! Let these
Chamber members help you reach your:
goals in attracting-your visitors' eyes at the
very onset of'theirarrival!
Aluminum Products/Services /
Advanced Aluminum 628-7519,
White Aluminum Products 746-3312
Disposal Service
Florida Express Environmental (352)369-
544 "
Waste Mgmt of Central Florida, Inc. (800)
223-4825
FDS Disposal, Inc. 746-0617
Fences
Fences by Dallas 795-1110
C & S Vinyl Fence, Inc.
Foam Interior/Exterior Design
Central Florida Foam & Design, L.L.C.
(352) 489-0006
Gen.Maint, Painting, Pressure Washing,
Trim work
Healy's Home Repair 344-1502
Glass Sales/Service
K & K Glass 795-6446
MidState Glass of Citrus County 726-5946
Weber Glass, Inc. 795-7723
Granite .
Precision Marble & Granite 795-2981
Home Repair
Larry Ellis 795-7456
Healy's Home Repair 344-1502
Nature Coast Home Repair & Mainte-


* At CenterState Bank, we
Strive to give you the best
quality banking services that
you can get, "Professional"
with a friendly hometown man-
ner! We offer you fast, courte-
ous service, with decisions
made locally, We offer you the
security of banking in a place
where you have an interest
and where people know your
name.


nance, Inc. 628-4282
Hurricane Safety Products
Hurry-Cane Securing Systems 795-4623
R & D Tri Enterprises Inc. 794-0002
Landscaping & Lawn
Maintenance/Care/Service
1st Choice Pest Control 503-6821
A Whole Hauling & Tree Service 697-
1421
Altman's Family Pest Control 597-9373.
Nursery/Garden Center
Anson Nursery, Inc. ,628-4554
Color Country Nursery 746-6465
O'Connell's Nursery 628-6700
Pool Construction/Service
Alpine Pools & Spas, Inc 860-1235
Colbury Pools, Inc. 564-9111
Pool Supplies
Pinch-A-Penny 563-0677
Roofing
AAA Roofing 563-0411
All Counties Roofing, Inc 637-3677
C & S Residential Roofing, Inc. 637-0049
Screen Rooms
Advanced Aluminum 628-7519
Septic/Sewer Service & Installation
A-Able Septic Sewer Service, Inc. 795-
1554
Ace Septic Tank Service, Inc. 726-6646
Bonded Septic Tank Inc 726-0974
Stone Installation, Custom
Top It With Stone 212-7837
Storage Sheds
Al American Mini Storage 795-2004
D&B Enterprises 726-2483
Tree Services
A Whole Hauling & Tree Service 697-
1421


Member NEWS


Market Day with Art is on
Mother's Day week-end, Satur-
day, May 9th. This event is on
grounds of Heritage Village,
Crystal River. Come enjoy -
Fresh Produce, Herbs, plants,
flowers, orchids, and baked and
canned pantry items. Local
Artists and Crafters are selling
their creations just in time for
Mom. Nature and wildlife edu-
cation is always welcome. If
you would like to set up or want
more information contact 352-
564-1400
Mom
Big Brothers Big Sisters in
Citrus County currently has 50)
children on the waiting list, wait-
ing on community volunteers to
be big brothers and-sisters. As
a community-based Big you are
matched one-to-one with a Lit-
tle and you are able to set your
own flexible schedule of fun.
You and your Little can go out
or stay in, spending time to-
gether in any way you both
enjoy. Big Brothers, Sisters and
Big Couples are adults 18
years of age or older, have
available transportation, and
are residents of Citrus County.
Children accepted into the pro-
gram are between the ages of
5 and 13. The most important
quality is a pledge to be consis-
tent. See your new friend on a
regular basis, for a couple


hours on average each month,
and devote at least one year to
building the friendship. We also
need office volunteers to help
us with clerical duties. Please
call our office at 352-344-0400
or apply online at www.bbb-
spc.org.
ME N
Three wonderful, fun-filled
weeks of ballet, hip-hop, acro-
batics, jazz, character, musical
theatre, crafts, dress-up, hair,
make-up and games! Each
week has a really cool theme,
so you will not want to miss a
single day!
Perfectly Princess (June 15-
19)
Fantastic Fairies (June 22-
26)
Hang Loose Hawaiian Style
(June29 -31)
Arrive no earlier than 8:00am
and leave by 5:30p.m. All you
need is a bag lunch, any color
leotard, pink tights, ballet slip-
pers and pillow/blanket. Ages 5
- 12 Cost per week: $100.00
Special for all three weeks:
$275.00. To register please
contact School Of Dance Arts
at 301 North Apopka Avenue in
Inverness or call (352) 637-
4663.
Enu
Commercial Real Estate
Classes offered at Central
Florida Community College -


Citrus Campus. Register for
"Listing Properties for Commer-
cial Real Estate" and learn
about commercial real estate
opportunities, land descriptions
and uses, as well, as retail prop-
erties and industrial buildings.
Text is included in the class fee
and class will be offered on
Tuesday, May 12 from 9am to
4pm. The class fee is $65.00.
Understanding Investments in
Commercial Real Estate will be
offered on Tuesday, May 19
from 9am -L 4pm. Learn about
different types of investment
properties, as well as the princi-
ples of investments. There will
be an introduction to financial
analysis, value of investments
and forecasting cash flow.
These classes are offered in
partnership with the Ponds In-
stitute, and is state approved
for continuing education credits.
For more information or to reg-
ister for these courses, call 352-
249-1210 or visit
www.CFCCtraining.com.
nU.
Central Florida Community
College - Citrus Campus. Our
Basic Digital Photography
Class will be offered Thursdays,
May 14 - May 28, from 5:30 -
8:30 pm. For more information
or to register for this course,
call 352-249-1210 or visit
www.CFCCtraining.com.


Business Women's Alliance grows


The Business Women's Al-
liance welcomes Sue Fuller-
'ton into the Alliance.
Should anyone be inter-
ested in applying for mem-
bership, it is first necessary
to attend at least three Al-
liance meetings. The meet-
ings are held on the last
Wednesday of the month at
8 AM at the Board of Real-
tors in Lecanto. You will
need a sponsor who is al-
'ready a member and they
can provide you with a ap-
plication.
The next quarterly Net-
working Luncheon will be
held on May 13, 2009 at the
Plantation in Crystal River.
The networking begins at 11
AM. and this is a great way


to expand your contact base
and share your business
and services. The cost is
$20. paid before May 5, 2009
- after May 5th to May 11,
2009 the cost will be $25. No
late reservations will be ac-
cepted after May 13. For
reservations please e-mail
Rhonda Lestinsky at
rlestinsky@naturecoast-
bank.com
The Scholarship Commit-
tee has selected four stu-
dents to receive
scholarships and will be
proudly making those
awards at Citrus aid Crys-
tal River High Schools dur-
ing the month of May. The
Committee will be award-
ing one more scholarship to


a WTI student in the coming
months.
Many women from the
membership have been
contributing toiletries to
CASA and we encourage
anyone to join in with the
Alliance in the giving of
these much needed items to
CASA. In addition to help-
ing CASA, the membership
is encouraging everyone to
give a hand and donate cans
of food to Citrus United
Basket (CUB).
Each and every member
of BWA looks forward to
meeting you at one of our
functions or at a Chamber
function. We would take
great pride in telling you
our story.


Let a Chamber


member do the work


"A









0Classifieds











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o 563-5966


on- -1ULo.u-g- He-p


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GoodThings~fff
to Eat Aj


and read
lost Shih Tzu named
Buttons lost on
4/26/09. Please call
geri or ralph at
352-560-3531 or cell
631-291-3682. But-
tons was lost near E
Bernice and Snap off
of Rooks in Inverness
REWARD


I -Foud:


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To Make

Your

Washer


Disappear...


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in the Classifieds

and get results

quickly!


(352) 563-5966




wwwmhrnicleonline,com S


I I
? � ^^
8 " ^

IL . _ _ _ . �J


barb Malz
Fhotographj
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits
Indoor or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed


W IL
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DIV RCE


rescued oet.com
View available pets on
our website or call
(352) 795-9550
Adoption Locations
PET SUPER MARKET
every Saturday 11-2p
Inverness
MERCANTILE BANK
Inverness
May 18th Monday
12-2pm

ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT




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* LIFE INSURANCE
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352-422-6956
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' CAT
ADOPTIONS









Come see
our
. adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A till 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4
All Cats and Kittens are al-
tered, tested for Feline Luk
and Aids. Up to date on
vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofsnha.ora.
or stop by our offices at
1149 N ConantAve. Comer
of 44 and Conant.
Look for the big white build-
ing with the bright paw
prints.




0O o 0


Seafood
LCSJ


missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
. Shelter 794-3825








Nal Technology











Massage H
Therapy

1C [,UP1- 1 ;Days

I- JLT l J-I:= i
May , mo 5


Conti .,"

ACCOUNT
MANAGER
Home Health exp.
Clinical Sales,Profes-
sional needed to
Develop/Strengthen
new/existing
customer referral
base. Full time, salary
plus Bonus Plan
and benefits.
Fax resume with
cover letter to:
352-291-9423 or call
Administrator at:
352-291-9422.
ConfiCare Home
. Health Solutions
Chap certified. EOE

Administrator
Local, private not for
profit organization is
seeking MBA with
Healthcare
Administration
experience to oversee
business
operations of Human
Service Agency.
Please submit resume
and salary
requirements to
Administrator,
P.O. Box 773402,
Ocala, FL 34477-3402

ADMISSION
COORDINATOR

Crystal River Health
and Rehabilitation
is seeking an
admission coordina-
tor for Citrus County
and surrounding
area. The qualified
candidate will
possess a
background in health
- care sales, strong
closing skills, superb
customer satisfaction
skills, and the ability.
to develop and
implement a
-comprehensive sales
plan. Nursing back-
ground & long term
care exp. a plus. Our
company offers a
competitive salary,
bonus.and benefits
package.'
For confidential con-
sideration mail or fax
resume to:,
Administrator
Crystal River Health
Rehabilitation
136 NE 12th Avehue
Crystal River, Florida
34429 or Fax to
352-795-5848
DFWP/EOE.

ADMISSIONS
CLERK
Full-time position' In
busy Admissions
Office for 180 bed
sub-acute nursing
home. Appllcant
should have a profes-
sional appearance,
good people &
organizational skills,
with at least two
years of data entry
exp. Knowledge of
medical terminology
or medical experi-
ence preferred. Must
be available M-F,
9to5. Excellent salary
and benefits to quail-
fled candidates..
Apply In person at
TimberRidge Nursing
& Rehab Center
9848 SW 110 St. Ocala
EOE/DFWP

CNAs

GET THE
RECOGNITION
YOU DESERVE AT
ARBOR VILLAGE
NURSING
FULL/PART-TIME
OPENINGS
3-11 & 11-7 AVAIL
LONG-TERM CARE
EXPERIENCE
REQUIRED!
GREAT WAGES &
BENEFITS
GREAT WORK
ENVIRONMENT
DRUG/BCKGRND
CHK REQ. ' ,
CALL 800-442.1353
FAX 877-571-1952
JOBS&MCQCARE.
COM
490 S. OLD WIRE RD.
Wildwood


Need a job".
or a
qualified
i employee? ,,

This area's
#1
, employment
source!


CNAs

JOIN OUR QUALITY
TEAM OF AIDES AT
North Campus
Rehab & Nursing
FULL-TIME
OPENINGS
GREAT SALARY &
BENEFITS
LTC EXP. REQUIREDI-
DRUG I BCKGRND
CHK REQ.
CALL & APPLY
TODAY
CALL 800-442-1353
FAX 877-571-1952
JOBS@CQCARE
COM
700 Palmetto St. N
Leesburg

COME
GROW
WITH US!




iL' _ 'IL.


FT RN
Hospice House
3p-1 Ip
Mon-Fri
PRN Staff
RN's
LPN's
CNA's

A full description
these jobs as well as
an application can
be found at our site:
www.hospiceof
citruscounty.org
Fax: 352,527.9366
hr@hosoiceof
citruscountv.org
HOSPICE OF CITRUS
.. COUNTY
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, Fl 34464
DFWP/EOE

Full Time
Lic. Lab Tech &
Phlebotomist.

For busy Physician
Lab. Competitive
Salary & Benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 746-6333


LPN/RN

Join our team of
quality Health Care
Professionals. Shifts &
weekend differentials
Part-tlme/Baylor/PRN
Positions available
Excellent Benefits
TimberRidge Nursing
& Rehab. Center
9848 SW 110th St
SR200, 1 miN of CR484
EOE/DFWP

RN/LPN
Unit Manager
North Campus
Rehab & Nursing
SEEKS EXP'D.
NURSE TO
MANAGE ADMIN,
CLINICAL
& SPRVY
FUNCTIONS
PRIOR LTC/ SPVR
EXP. REQ
2+ YRS EXP. REQ.
COMPETITIVE
SALARY
GREAT BENEFITS
CALL 800-442-1353
FAX 877-571-1952.
JOBSOiCQCARE
700 Palmetto St. N


Sr. Child
Welfare
Workers

The Centers is seek-
Ing State Certified
Senior Child Welfare
Workers for Marion &
Citrus County posi-
tions. This position
works with
community based
care initiative in
providing continuity
of care, with goal of
permanent placement
for children through
� care management
model that
includes developing,
expanding, accessing
& linking resources in
the community to
needs of the child,
while documenting
progress. Current
(PDC) Family Services
Counselor
Certification required.
Bachelor's degree in
field of
Human Services &
1 yr exp reqd. Send
Salary Requirements.
Full benefits pkg
DFWPIEOE Fax or
e-mail resume to HR,
the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
iobs@ithecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us

WAWJ BE A
It's E-Z @ E-Z Learning
Services
Offering CNA Test
Prep Courses
Day/ Evening Classes
CPR Included
10% OF Thru May '09
Refer a Friend and re-
ceive an additional dis-
count. Enroll on line @
EZLeamlngservices.com
or call 352-382-EASY
(3279) or 586-2715




CIVIL ENGINEER
McKean & Associates
Surveyors, Inc.
is seeking a
Licensed Professional
Civil Engineer..
Applicant should be
experienced! in all
phases of land
development and
computer capable.
Please call, fax or
e-mail your resume to
McKean &
Associates
Surveyors, Inc.
625 US Highway
41 South, Inverness,
Florida 34450
(352)344-3555, phone
or Fax (352) 344-8254,
email: mckeaninc
- @earthlink.net'

EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
Needed for Citrus
County Education
Foundation. Must
have experience
In creating public
awareness,
",j-..h'3ilr.a t-u, f3- t
management, and
event planning. Com-
plete job description
and application
*Information at www.
cltruseducatlon.ora

HR
COORDINATOR
TMC is seeking an exp
HR Coordinator for a
FT position located in
Homosassa, FL.
3+ years of related HR
exp, HR certification
preferred. Must be
team player, results ori-
ented & ADP exp. pref.
Competitive salary, ex-
cellent
benefits and 401K.
Submit resume to
humanresources@
therapymgmt.com


11 / L) L


Due to our expansion, Love Honda is currently
seeking several experienced automotive
professionals to sell new and used vehicles.
Experience is preferred but we will train the
right candidates.
We offer an excellent benefits package including:
" Signing Bonus!
* Paid medical benefits
* 401(k)
" Progressive pay with up to
35% commission
* Monthly bonus program
* Paid vacation
* Flexible schedule
No phone calls. Please apply in person at:
Love Honda
. 2219 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
Between 10am and 2pm Mon. - Fri.
(352) 628-4600
Applications will be accepted until
783958 Saturday, May 9th


JUVENILE
CORRECTIONS
Cypress Creek
Juvenile Offender
Correctional Center,
a residential program
for 96 high and -
maximum risk males
committed to the
Dept. of Juvenile
Justice is recruiting for
Juvenile -Corrections
Officer. Supervise
and maintain
custody of male
offenders in a secure
and controlled
atmosphere.
Must be 21, have
a satisfactory
background
screening and
complete required
training in
accordance with DJJ
rules & regulations.
Apply in person at:
Cypress Creek
2855 W Woodland
Ridge Dr.
Lecanto, FL 34461

Temporary Armed
Security Officer

Securitas Security
Services Inc. is
currently hiring for
.Security Officers for
the Crystal River site
located at the Progress
Energy Nuclear Facility
in the Citrus County
area. This is a
Temporary position
(6-9 months) without
benefits. If you enjoy
working in a physically
demanding, profes-
sional environment,
have excellent
customer service skills,
and are dedicated to
doing a great job, this
may be the opportunity
for you!
Minimum
Requirements:
Reliable Transportation.
Eligible to work in the
U.S.
21 years of age or older
High School Diploma
or G.E.D.
Good written 'and
verbal communications
skills.
Military background or
previous Security
experience is preferred,
but
NO EXPERIENCE.
NEEDED.
Willing to submit to
background
procedures
including drug screen
and background check.
ALL APPLICANTS
ARE WELCOME.
To lean more about
Securitas Security
Services Inc. In your
area, visit us at www,
securitasinc.com
beginning rates of pay
are as follows: While in
training $13.25 per
hour. Classes are set to
begin June 8,2009.
ALL interested
applicants PLEASE
VISIT
wwwsecbritasiobs.com
and find your location
to apply; once you
have done so select
Armed Security Officer
(ENERGY) CRYSTAL
RIVER as your
selection. We will NOT
be accepting any
phone calls all
interested applicants
must submit online.
Applications will be
accessible online form
May 3, 2009 through
May 9, 2009


Your World





C1-11lk )(I) NIf 11"

w .. *"r -il- lin nlnive corn


THE GROVE
DOWNTOWN
OPENING MAY
15TH.
NOW HIRING EXP.
Cocktail Servers,
Bartenders, Kitchen
Prep & Dishwashers.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 341-5558
210 Tompkins St.
Inverness, Fl.



S----------
o
I !I





I I
I B
I B






WHO'S SAYS
REAL ESTATE
NOT BUSY!

We need a
classic smart Realtor
with strong selling
. background. We will
provide leads.
All inquires will be kept
confidential. Call
SLisa 352-634-0129




P/T DUMP TRUCK
DRIVER

Class A License req.
Retirees Welcome.
Inverness area.
Call (352) 344-8989

PLUMBER/DRAIN
CLEANER

Must have exp. &
driver's license.
Accepting Apps.
Call Roto Rooter
(352) 621-1993




ADMISSIONS
CLERK
Full-time position In
busy Admissions
Office for 180 bed
sub-acute nursing
home. Applicant
should have a profes-
sional appearance,
good people &
organizational skills,
with at least two
years of data entry
exp. Knowledge of
medical terminology
or medical experi-
ence preferred. Must
be available M-F,
9to5. Excellent salary
and benefits to quali-
fled candidates.
Apply in person at
TimberRidge Nursing
& Rehab Center
9848 SW 110 St. Ocala
EOE/DFWP

, O ll ti

Sourworld first.
r ..-... n ),


Claissfieds


CHRONICLE
Sl',it', WW Chronicleanlne cor







450 FLORIDA HOMES
including 53 in the Tampa area

THURSDAY

MAY 7th * 7:00 PM
Tampa Marriott Westshore
Get your next home at the price you set
with NO STARTING BIDS. If you're buying
your first home or your 10th, today's
housing market and low interest rates
make this an ideal time for you to buy!


TampaFLHouseAuction.com

OR CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE

866-519-2837






OPEN HOUSE:
Saturday & Sunday
May 2-3
1:00 to 3:00 PM
$3,000 down in a cashiers check for each
property. 5% premium on each sale.
All sales subject to seller's approval.
Lic #s: H & M # AB110;
7831o9 B. G. Hudson, Jr. #s; BK3006464 & AU230


I


nopqormrrrmpm"


I Free Off


CITRUS MAIDS
Cleaning Person
needed. Must have
flex. sched., own
transp. & DL. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925
Experienced Only
VPK TEACHERS
CDA TEACHERS
(352) 201-2770

o9-






HERON POINTE
HEALTH AND
REHAB

IS HIRING FOR
ASSISTANT
MAINTENANCE
PERSON
Day shifts. Must be
available for rotation
and on call hours. 2
-yrs exp pref.
Apply
in person to:
1445 Howell Ave.
Brooksville, Fl. 34601
or Fax Resume to:
(352) 796-3149





I I :l (I Q






* * I* .









NaiTechnoIloyI

I , * I i*
-Cae.


















Your World
SK bIN ALCa sses l











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOME BASED
MAGAZINE FOR
LOCAL AREA. Christian
format. No exp. nec.
High annual Income
Guaranteed local
clients. P/T hrs. $25,900
(941)685-8291







0 V






How
To Make
Your

Dining

Room

Set

Disappear...

Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!

- 'SSS

(352) 563-5966

CHrM- NI-c
www.chrnicleonline.com rn


25x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
2 1 Entry Door, 2 Vents.
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.795. INSTALLED
30x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$14.995. INSTALLED
35x50x12(3:12 pitch)
Roof overhang.
2-10x10 Rollup Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$29.995 Installed
4 Fl. Engineered Plans
* A local Fl Manufact.
* Meets or exceeds
Florida wind codes.
* Conc/Inst by others.
* Many sizes available
* We specialize In
Commercial Buildings
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Uc # CBC1256991
www. metal
structuresllc.com
r - - - I
Sheds & Garages
of Any Size
| *SHEDS NOW*
W e Move & Buy
I Used Sheds I
I Independence/41 |
(352) 860-0111 0
I--, -- -- m= l I




2 Dolls
Paradise Galleries
20" Circa, 1998.
Milly & Ann Marie.
$75.each. Like new.
(352) 212-9131


SINGLE COPY NEWSPAPER

ROUTES AVAILABLE.
There are immediate opportunities for
single copy independent contractors to
service the Citrus County areas.


Civil War, Nautical &
wildlife prints. Go to
www.mariners
international.comr
Gold Mirror
Bamboo style Approx.
32"x 25" $45.
Queen Comforter
White, down filled. $60.
Like new.(352) 212-9131




SUN BELT SPA
top of line, 2 person
space saver, cost $3500,
asking $1200 obo
(352) 628-5186




A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
4 2 Ton $780.00
4 2-Y2 Ton $814.00
-4 3 Ton $88200.Q
*Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Free Del. Uc.#CAC
057914 746-4394
ABC Briscoe AppI,
-Refrig., washers, stoves.
Serv. & Parts
(352) 344-2928
Electric Stove,
Whirlpool, good cond.
$150.'
(352) 527-3644.
GEORGE FOREMAN
GRILL George Foreman
Grill. Used twice Excel-
lent condition. $20 obo.
352-560-3677
MR COFFEE PRO-
GRAMMABLE 12 CUP
COFFEE MAKER Hardly
used. $30.00 obo
352-560-3677




Sun. May 3 Antique
& Collect. Auction
Preview 10 AM
Auction 1 PM
3W0 pc. thimbal collect.
Ant. & collect, from
primitive country to mid
century modem. Sterl-
ing key set, flatware,
+++ Coins, jewelry, cast
Iron stoves, baskets,
quilts, early farm equip.
500+ lots
4000 S. 41, Inverness
dudleysauction.com
* AB1667-AU2246 12%BP


SBe at least 18 years of age.
* Possess a valid driver's license.
* Possess proof of liability insurance. - SHAPER, Floor model
Jet JWS-22CS, 1.5hp
* Have 2 dependable vehicles, motor, enclosed cab.,
Roules are 7 days a week. .5 & 75 interchangeable
early morning hours. spindles, .5 & .25 router
bit callers, microadju-
in a n l- stable fence, internet
S phon numbprice $949, sell $500
Includes mobile base
$45 value (352) 527-6909


-m --


AIR COMPRESSOR
20HP Kohler/Champion
Gas Compressor
Electric start, 80 gal tank,
1.5" main hose. $1200
352-266-6756
Shop Tools
Complete wood working
shop tools. Call for appt.
(352) 527-2289
Table Saw, Ryobi 10".
Band Saw, Sears12".
Oscillating Sander
Sears. $200. for all.
(352) 382-5698
WERNER 14FT
Aluminum Extension
Ladder. $75
PORTABLE WORK
BENCH. $50
352-527-2574



27"PANASONIC
TVNCR 27" tv/vcr great
picture$75 obo
352 270-3641
MAGNOVOX Projection
TIV 46 inch. Exc. cond.
$300 (352) 503-6018
PANASONIC 42"
HD PLASMA TV
#Th42px600u
never used in box,cost
$2565.asking $1200 obo
352) 560-3677
Television &
Home entertainment
center, W/32" Toshiba.
Exc. cond. $350. for all.
(352) 726-7815



DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
;New & Used systems
/upgrades. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
www.rdeeli.com



SOFT TAIL'88 I
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather bik os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Bik w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini, handle bars.
Chrome to max, IhIs.
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815




5 pc. Wicker Set,
w/ cushions
$300. obo
For more info
Call (352) 637-2450


CLASSIFIEDS



C. ee fff er 2 Craftsman Riding
Sectional Mowers. 12.5 & 15 Hp.
$500. 36" cuL $300. Each.
(352) 746-3745 (352) 489-0194
-BUSINESS SOLD BRICKS one pallet red
CLOSING SOONI bricks, you haul. make
All new pieces Sofa offer. (352) 795-3708
$199; recliner $199; CADET RIDING MOWER
qewin mattress set $99; 10 registered used
quenmaN tthours.$1900 new, asking
MANY MOREITEMS[ $10ae(3
Elite Furniture obo (352)
Next to Howards Flea 527-0448
Market In Homosassa CRAFTSMAN RIDER
(352) 621-0558 42" cut, nice mower,
CHINA HUTCH good cond. great
CHINA HUTCH price$950 obo
maple finish great (352) 795-0088
condition 6ftx3ft.x19in. (5 750
$75.00 352-257-9462 CRAFTSMAN RIDING
LAWN MOWER 42 in.
COUCH deck 19.5 hp $500
Excellent condition. (352) 746-7357
Floral design. $150.
352-860-0212 CRAFTSMAN RIDING
Couch mower 17.5 Hp. 42 inch
Couch deck.$550.
W/Recliners on ends. (352) 746-7357
Futon and love seat.
$250 for all.
(352) 795-7513
DINING ROOM SET
6 chairs, light wood, - UGUSTRUMS
Island Theme. 3gal $175
Comes w/server. 3 gal.-$1.7
$300 (352) 382-2209 (352) 586-2590
DINING ROOM TABLE
Older, drop leaf oak with two
chairs ip excellent condition.
$125. 352-634-2253 ADULT WALKER AND
DRESSERS ' CAMCORDER all are in
2 white crackle finished good shape $40.00
dressers {real 352 476 8433
wood}$50.00 each
352-257-9462 Aussie Grill
_FOUPOSTRE-9462 '- Brand newnever used
FOUR POSTER BED w/gas.$125.
full size cream colored White wood kitchen
bed in great condition cabinet, free standing,
$50.00 352-257-9462 w/microwave shelf. $45.
FURNITURE Love seat 1 (352) 249-6800
$125,Recliner $75,Solid AWNING new seven foot
Oak Entertainment center wide dome awning for
$225,Solld Oak roll top window cost 477. now 99
computer desk $600 or 352 382 1191
bno -527-2906 BARRACUDA G3 AUTO-
HUTCH Older, 1940's dark MATIC POOL CLEANER
oak with lighted cabinet in Used once. $250.
excellent condition! $175. 352-527-2574
S352-634-2253
SMAPLE "WINMBEDnpROOM BIRDCAGE - MEDIUM
mAplee Tw/dIssEr WITH ACCESSORIES &
full inens.$450; Enter. ctr FRYER - GE $30
w/radlo, dual-cass. & 352-341-6920
CD player $65
(352)634-4329 Carpet'Factory Direct
Murphy Bed Repair' Clean * Sales
Single, in vintage cherry LamInate, shop at
solid wood cabinet. Like home. 352-341-0909
new, cost $2,500 asking COCKATIELS I have 4
$1,000.(352) 628-3070. cockatiels and 1 canary.3
(352) 628-2899 are talkers and all hand
Preowned Mattress raised and gentle.Large
Sets from Twin $30; Full cage included. $99 firm.
$40.Qn $50; Kg $75. 352-341-0759
628-0808 GLASS TABLE TOP
TRIPLE CHERRY DRESSER rounded,45 inches
w/blfolding mirror. Like wideiStill in box
new'$200. 352-527-8176 ' $70.00 obo
or 352-212-6918 352-560-3677
twin bunk beds w/bullt Gun Cabinet
in computer desk, Walnut, enclosed holds
shelves & dresser draw- 5 rifles- storage, $125.
ers, never slept In. Paid 05 Dell PC flat screen 17"
$700, asking $450 abo w/hp scanner & printer
(352) 860-0589, eves. $75. (352) 795-9966
YOUR FURNITURE HIGH WHEEL
DONATIONS MOWERS Weed Eater
SUPPORTS THE PATH 22" push, year old - $85.
HOMELESS SHELTER Scotts 22" self propelled,
Call (352) 746-9084 $100. 352/726-1469


SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 D5


INFLATABLE KAYAK
has paddle, life vest, and
electric airpump $75obo
352 270-3641





ITS FREE
Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad for FREE on
our all new
CLASSIFIED SITE.
5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 Items totaling less than
$100.00 each.
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an Ad in the top right
hand corner.
JUMBO FLA SHRIMP
True 10ct per lb. $6/lb
Call now! 727-726-8617
Large Office Desk,
w/ seven drawers $50.
Wheel Barrow,
never used $20.
(352) 322-1160
MANS PADDED WIN-
TER JACKET As
new,size 42-46.warm lin-
ing $20 352-560-3677
NEW DE GRIDS 7 full
grids 18"complete
withmanifold paid269.
now 99. 352 382 1191
POOL PUMP HAYWARD
Northstar, model
4015X20NS, 2hp, for
inground pool, Internet
price $527, sell $200,
reconditioned
motor (352) 527-6909
REFRIGERATOR
w/lIcemaker. Beige
$350
52" Hitachi Flat screen
TV. Floor model. $500
352-476-3661
Sharp SVHS, VCR
rarely used, was in RV,
$75.
Hover Upright
$35.
(352) 726-1296
Stand Alone Filing
Cabinet Lt. oak. $60.
Exceutive Chair
Leather, like new. $95.
Cost $200. Both in exc.
cond.(352) 249-6800
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT








$$ SAVE $$

* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com


BIMINI TOPS $149. Up
BOAT COVERS,$189. Up
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcltrus.com
TIRES
4 LT275/70R 18.
Load Range E. $250.
Obo.(352) 212-8997
Washer & Dryer
whirlpool duet front
load w/ pedestals &
warraty. $800. both
'08, Mower Troybuilt
Self propelled
rear bagger $200.
(352) 322-1160



IBM (Lexmark)
wheel writer II elect type-
writer, exc. cond.$45.00
DESK $5. Bev.Hills
(352) 476-1896



BATTERY OPERATED
WHEELCHAIR, regular
heavy duty & battery
charger $600
(352) 527-0448
ELECTRIC WHEEL
CHAIR new used 2 times
$500.00 352 249 0815
not after 8pm
SCOOTER LIFTS
& POWER CHAIR LIFTS
$500 & up
(352) 564-1414




Buying Silver Coins
$.10, 25 .50, $1.00
Pre-1965,
352- 302-8159
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676



LOWREY ORGAN
Exc. condition, manual
* bench AOC Rhythm,
MUST SELL Asking $300
obo (352) 628-5186



KIRBY VACUUM
Heritage II, upright,
w/attachments & extra
belts. Exc. cond. $150
(352) 746-0176



BOWFLEX EXTREME
w/leg attachment $450
Exc. cond. U-haul.
352-341-1650 Call 9a-7p



4 SALE- GUNS & AMMO
AR-15's - AK-47's - Shot
Guns - Pistols. WE BUY
GOLD. 352-489-4870


AMMO 500 rounds
762 x 39 brass case,
$250
250 rounds 40 CAL., $100
(813) 789-0592 Crystal
River area
AR15 PROJECT Multi-cal
lower,RRA trigger,5 posi-
tion sopmod slock.DPMS
Lo-Pro upper, M4 and 4radi
guards $400 call 586-4022
COLT CUSTOM 45 CAL.
Model XSE Combat
Commander, box &
papers, $900; trade
considered.
(813) 789-0592
Crystal River area.
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
CZ 82 9mm Makarov
DBL action-2 12 rd mags
VG+cond. $300
(352) 860-0556 8a-7p
GOLF CLUBS
Slazenger H-Bred 3, 4, 5
4 mos old $50. each &
other misc clubs
(352) 341-2830
GUN ACCESSORIES
& Magazines, AK-47 $30;
AR-15 $25; M-14 $30. Call
for pricing (813)
789-0592
In Crystal River area.

GUN SHOW
Sat. May 9 * 9-5
Sun. May 10 9-4
Crystal River Armory
Hwy 19 & Veneable
www.GunTraderGun
Shows.com
JUMBO FLA SHRIMP
True 10ct per lb. $6/ib
Call now! 727-726-8617
M/t Garand
Military Rifle w/ ammo
$2,500
(352) 586-7645
PRIVATE COLLECTOR
Buying Guns,
Ammunition&
reloading supplies
(352) 586-7516
Recumbent Bike
Trail Mate Joy Rider.
3 Wheeled. $100.
(352) 382-5698
REMMINGTON 870
Tacticle 12 gage combo,
pistol grip, collapsible
stock, rifle slug barrel &
vent rib barrel. $600
(813) 789-0592 - Crystal
River area
SLATE POOL TABLE
7-1/2 FEET, & loaded w/
accessories Package
deal $750 obo.
(352) 270-8121
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




30FT ENCLOSED
TRAILER. 5th wheel hitch,
can be easily changed
to goose neck. ball.
$6500 352-341-1143


A7


DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
SRepairing gas & diesel
. engines. No job too big
or small. 352-228-2067




A-TREESURGEONI
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd friendly
serve. Lowest rates Free
est.
352-860-1452
All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
COLEMAN TREE SERVE.
Trim & Removal. Lic.
Ins. FREE EST. Lowest
rates. 352-270-8462
/ out zoomcitrus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP,
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852





OSBORNE'S
Lawn/TreelShrub
Quality Work Free Est.
LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins.
R WRIGHT TreeService
Tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Uc
0256879 352-341-6827




Ricky Mills Tree Service
Trim, haul, top,
removal, Free Est
Reasonable Rates


employee?




This area's

#1

employment

source!




Classifieds


VS -, *


At Home Computer
Repairs & custom
computers.
Call (352)228-7823 Removal
COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Bx(352 360(352)344-4839

On-Slte Same Day
Service Available

* Certified Tech's
*work fuNetworking
*Virus/Spyware/
Pop- Removal
352) 341-464-139750





REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch./nstll. Paition
Call for Fast Service
CNeeds. L&R SERVICES
Sr. Discount(352) 586-172996




Chris Satcheal Painting
& Wallcovering.
work fully coated. 30 yrs.
EManyp. rxc. Ref. Ins.
352-795-6533
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CheapCheapCheap
DP press. clean/paint
637-3765
ALL HOME REPAIR
painting, drywall flooring,
pwr. wash Malley's
Home Maint
220-9486 (lic0259169)
/ out zoomcitrus.com









Painting Service
Int/Ext. Free Est. Press
Cleanin 352 465-6631
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
,(352) 726-9998
Mike Anderson
Painting Int/Ext
& Pressure Washing
Ca/ll a Professional,
(352) 464-4418
V Us out zoomcitrus.com




AFFORDABLE Mobile
Boat Maint. & Repair
Technical/Electrical
Custom Rigging
John (352) 746-4521
V us out zoomcitrus.com
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
27 yrs. exp. Certified
Best prices/guaranteed
352-220-9435
PHILIP TOMKO
S/ us out zoomcltrus.com
SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149. Up
BOAT COVERS,$189. Up
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcitrus.com


AT YOUR HOME
Mower & Generator1
Repair. 352-220-4244
Lic#99990001273

DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Gas /Diesel Engines
No lob too bi or small.'
352-228-2067













The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-)634-1584





SALE'
BIMINI TOPS $149. Up
BOAT COVERS,$ 189. Up
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcitrus.com




Will Care For Your
Loved One. Affordable,
excellent refs. Call
Kathy. (352)527-7982





Window Washing
All Aspects (352)
489-4189; 322-0962
/ us out zoomcitrus.com




HOUSE CLEANING
$35.00 for most 2/1.
Experienced & reliable,
w/references 228-1789
MAIDS ON CALL
Serving Citrus 3Yrs.
WindowsFree Est.
(352) 726-8077

Malou's House
cleaning, $12.00 Per hr. 2
hr. min. Homosassa
area. (352) 476-9676
SOTO'S CLEANING
SERVICE Uc. & Ins.
352-489-5893/216-2800




PREMIER BUILDING
New, Remodels, Alum
const.barnscomm'rl,
decks, lic/Ins 793-3654
/ oul@zoomctrus.com
QUALITY CRAFTED
BUILDERS New, Renova-
tions & Commercial
15 Yrs In Citrus County


JESSE MOORE Const.
Roofs, additions,
remodel, handyman
352-564-0969
rc0066915/cbc057605


New Homes & All
Construction (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872
Schnettler
Construction, LLC
Lic & Ins CBC1253348
Renovations,
room additions,
decks, barnsigarages,
various home repairs.
637-4629 cell
352-266-6756
We will beat any price by
far without compromise.
Dunham Construction
-* roofing, remodeling,
home maint. painting,
pres. wash, etc. talk to
owner 422-6575
(crco452543
us out zoomcltrus.com



SUBURBAN IND INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla rms,
windows, garage scrns
(CBC1257141) 2



QALL STELLAR BLUE'
All Int./ Ext. Painting.
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996







Mike Anderson
Painting Int/Ext

S (352) 464-4418




#1 A+ Mr. Fix -Ilti
All repairs, painting,
gutter & yard clean-
ups. 352-382-3647
v'us out zoomcitrus.com
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash &
Gutters Lic. 5863
(352) 746-0141
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too smalllReli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

S NATURE COAST
HOME REPAIR
& MAINT. INC.
w Offering a Full
Range of Services
www.naturecoast
Shomereuo lr.com
Lic. 2776/Ins.,
352-634-5499
SVIsa/MC/Dlscover
A #1 HANDYMAN
Master Craftsman
Repairs at Affordable
Rates. 352-628-6960
. us out zoomcltrus.com



EX'DHADYA


Sheds & Garages of
Any Size, I
S*SHEDS NOW*
We Move & Buy
Used Sheds
I Independence/,41
(352)860-0111
E l mc m ri l



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash &
Gutters Lic.5863
(352) 746-0141
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
'Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696

ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New cost. Remodel
Free Esf 726-2907
EC13002699
SALTMARSH
ELECTRIC
Comm/Resid. & Sigh
Lighting. CR13012391
352-344-3810
/ us out zoomcltrus.com




Kurt Mac Intyre Plumbing
All Phases Of Plumbing
325-422-5269




C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/201-1422



Carpet Factory Direct
Repair * Clean ' Sales
- Laminate, shop at
home. 352-341-0909




AARON'S FENCE
All Types, Best Price
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
24/7(352) ,795-7373
V us out zoomcitrus.com
ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
OSBORNE'S
Lawnrrree/Shrub
Quality Fence Work Free
Est. LOWES
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins




AAA ROOFING
Free est. 30 yrs exp.
352-563-0411
REX MULLIS LLC
JESSE MOORE Const.
Roofs, additions, re-
model, handyman
352-564-0969
rc0066915/cbc057605


BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks: Estimates
Lic#2579/Ins, 257-0078
Decorative concrete,
Landscape curbing
River rock resealing
344-4209 (Uc.6960)
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack 'repairstaining
& Garage Floors
, 352-527-1097
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total.Pobl.Care
Decorative Concrete
i 352-464-3967 i
Quality Concrete Serv.
Layout to Lentil
ALL TYPES, Tractor
352-726-2383, Lic#2567
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic..#1476, 726-6554
--7


Additions, Garages
Decks, Bathrooms &
Handyman Services
,40 Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768

REX MULLIS LLC
JESSE MOORE Const.
Roofs, additions, re-
model, handyman
352-564-0969
rc0066915/cbc057605




A Cutting Edge
Tile Job
Showers. Firs etc
(352) 422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




REPAIRS
Wall & Ceiling Sprays
Int/Ext. Painting
Lic/Ins 73490247757
352-220-4845
ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs,
Texture, Additions
Free est.220-9016
Lic.#SCC131149747




Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone Drive-
ways & Tractor work
341-2019 or 257-1562
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,
Hauling, Site Prep.
Driveways. Uc. & Ins.
(352) 795-5755
*TOP SOIL SPECIAL*
3 Yd -$60/ 5 Yd $85
10Yd $175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436



All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/us out zoomcitrus.com
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,HaulingSite
Prep, Driveways
Liclins795-5755
/ us out zoomcltrus.com


#1 AGAIN! Pro Tech
Lawn Service. Family
owned & operated.
Serving central Citrus
Cty since 1999. Call
for free estimate
302-7800 - Lic/Ins.

BARKERS LAWN
Guaranteed to
Beat the Current Price
You Pay for Lawn Care
Service. Mbnthly/Per
cut rate.352-232-8166
C.R /Homosassa
mowing, beds,
brushes, mulch/haul
Commrl & ResdntIl
since 1991 220-6761
out zoomcltrus.com
CLEMENTS LAWN &
Landscape Main.
"Complete Lawn Care"
(352) 489-3070
Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Soecials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
3us out zoomcitrus.com
DUN-RITE LAWN SERVE
Clean up, tree trim,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681
/ out@zoomcltrus.com
HALLOCK & Son
Lawncare/Landscaping
Covering all your lawn
care needs. Detailed
work. 746-6410 Lic/Ins.
HARRY EVERSON'S
LAWN & MAINTENANCE
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
(352) 302-2585
V us at zoomcltrus.com


HEDGE TRIMMING,
HAULING(ANY KIND),
LAWN MOWING,
MULCH. FREE ESTI-
MATES. 352-344-9273
OR 352-201-9371

Lawn Care 'N' More
Mow, clean up
brushes, beds
Friendly Service since
F 1991
Residential/Commrl
(352) 726-9570
out zoomcitrus.com

OSBORNE'S
Quality Work - Free
Est. LOWEST RATES
352-400-6016 Lic/Ins
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
& LANDSCAPE
SINCE 1999 (Lic/lns)
628-9848 or 634-0554
V us out zoomcitrus.com



POOL BOY SERVICES
. Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
I 352-464-3967 w




MOBILE RV
SERVICE
WE COME TO YOU
Motor Homes
1 5th Whis/Rv's
Master Tech
S 352-586-5870
* Storage Available




WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard


Brian CBCi253853


7 nsa lins b
352-628-7519
www.advancedalumninum.info


1st Choice,..-"}
PEST CONTROL, INC.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE


LAWN GOT

PROBLEMS?

Call 503-6821
Owner/Operators ,\/ ,
Lloyd Smith * Bill Biedenstein * Jim Cury
76-.248 5340W. Glenbrook St.


arb Malz
'hotographu

Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits. Indoor
or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed




ELITE PAVING &
SEAL COATING
All types - Res/Comm
352-302-3030 Lic/Ins
/us out zoomcitrus.com




Circle T Sod Farms.
Inc. Tired of your dead
lawn?
Replace it with
Bahia. Delivery
Avail (352)400-2221
LAWN RESTORATION
All types of Grasses
Low main Lawns Avail.
J & J Sod 352-302-6049

SOD All Varities
cut-out,installed,rolled
Lic/ Ins #3000
(352) 422-0641
check out zoomcitrus.com


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bothtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!i!
Tub to Shower Conversions To7o6!
Call now for a FREE

In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827

BATHFITTER.COM





SPool Refinishing
' Patio & P Deways


'S ORDER YOUR
POOL TODAY
L & BE SWIMMING
BY SUMMER
"FREE QUOTES'
Lic. & Insured
CPC 1456565
7, .J 352400.3188












D6 SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009


'06, 32 Ft. Dominator XT.
By Classic C.Trpl..
axels. $14,800. Like
new.(352) 835-4273
Goose Neck Trailer
8 x 26 w/ Heavy duty
ramps, Elec. brakes
$4,000. (352) 637-1391







PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonllne.com
and click place
an ad



Birds For Sale:
African Greys- $350
Cherryhead Connard-Call
for pricing
Golphin Cockatoo-$350
Yellow Nape-Call for
pricing.
and more......
Ralph Sr 352-795-3840
BOXER PUPS AKC
CERTIFIABLE 9wks
$350 MID on premises.
(352)344-3138
CHIHUAHUAS
AKC -9wks- Gorgeous,
healthy babies for
adult homes. $500
352-637-1111
CHINCHILLA babies.
Grey. 9 weeks old.
1M/1F. $100 each.
352-201-7576

THIS OUT!
ENGLISH BBtiIEfOBG'
vet checked, current
tionkaterdewimned$400
email:jerniainrothl@yah
oo.com
German Sheppard
Puppies, 21 Wks. 2
males, 2 fems:,1 is blue
all the rest black & tan.
papers, & health certs..
$300.(352) 201-0111
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
LARGE DOG CAGE
36x24x22. Like new.
Cost $90, sell for $55.
352-503-7053
LONG HAIR CHIHUAHUA
Female Puppy 8wks old
$250 (352) 476-6393

Low Cost Pet
Vaccinations

Inalis Fire Station
Inglis, Tues. May 5
5:30-7PM
Exotic Pets
Inverness Sat. May 9
9:00-10AM
Hay Barn
Floral City, Sat. May 9
1:00-2PM

Hernando
Veterinary
Clinic
Visit our web for
;:ri Oore locations
. www.flpetvac
cinations.com
(352)-637-0368
MALTESE PUPS
CKC 9wks ,a) 2 small
adorable females $650
ea. Shots (352) 586-5747
ROTWEILLER PUPPIES
Absolutely Beautiful,
8wks, AKC,big b oned,
shots, wormed. Parents,
$650 + (352) 503-6316
SAINT BERNARD
Several adults and young
adults available for adop-
tion to approved homes,
no puppies. $300.00
adoption fee. Visit
www.floridasaintrescue.
com or leave message at
561-689-1911 or
352-726-1532. 'Tele-
phone or Website
ShIh-Tzu Puppies
Home raised w/ love.
All shots Includ'd. $300+
3902 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827
(305) 872-8099



2 Arabian Studs
1 is registered. 1 Older
Tennessee Walker,
great w/kids & riding.AII
under $700each. .
(352) 563-9985
GORGEOUS, 7 1/2 yr
old Chestnut Gelding
15.1H Big trot & sweet
canter, UTD, great horse,
godd home $1,500 obo
(352)341-0923



BABY GOATS SHEEPs
& PIGS For pets only.
Mini Farm off 495
(863) 843-2495 cell
Chlqkens,production
Red's, polish purebred
bantans, different types
of duckling, quail, guinea
pigs & pigeons $4/up
795-6381/476-3319


9.9 Suz. 4 strk. tiller
long shaft, 21"
new 2004 never used,
$1195 (513) 260-6410
Crytsal River
'03 PERFORMANCE
BOAT TRAILER. Like new.
galv., single axle w/
buddy bearings. Holds
18-20ft boat, $1,000/
obo. 352-382-4442
Boat Trailer 19'
galvanized
holds V bottom or flat
$1500(352) 563-2253



ACHILLES INFLATABLE
BOAT Model SD124
12ft4ln. Red, wheel kit,
wood floor, 15HP
Johnson, $1500.
352-447-1865



1993 17' Sylvan
Bow rider bimini top
Boat & trailor
85h.p. Yamaha motor
Good cond. $3,500
(352) 344-0457
16FT CAR. SKIFF,
'96, like new, $5.800
40HP Evinrude, center
console, trolling motor,
b-top, many extras
(352) 344-5858
'98 MAKO 252
CC, 25ft, twin 150HP
Merc, trailer. Well main-
tained. Great cond.
$24,000. 352-634-2769
AIR BOAT
Big 13 Ft. haul,
2 seats. Approx. 375-400
HP. 8 blade warp drive.
2-1 reduction gear box.
Used 100 hrs.+ Trl.
$18,500 invest. Sell
� ,for,$10,000 firm.
(352).302-4535
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt.
(352) 560-3019
AQUA SPORT '05
175 Osprey , 90hp Yat,
VHF, depth finder, dual bait.
w/switch, bimini, easy load
trailer. Low hours. $9,990
352-860-0277
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
SI.500! 352-746-5856
AQUA SPORT
'86 25FrCuddy Cabin,
W/twin 'Q6 Optimax
150hp & double
axle trailer. $16,900
(352)257-1355
CENTURY
'01- Bay, 21ft.
'02,150HP Yamaha w/
trir., custom cover
dep/find, VHF, Iw hrs.,
like new, $13,950.
(352) 442-7772
Deck Boat
95'19 FtSlyvan, w/ ra-
dio & flshfinder. New Bat-
tery switch. 2 batteries,
power pk.
prop,/hu6.$6,000
S(352) 726-0838
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras
$14,500/obo. (352)
'.A489-9640: 220-6508
< .HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
I iHl 4strke Yamaha,
j,0;. Pir. $15,900. will
trade (352) 503-3778
Jon Boat
12 ft., Eeciri,- lat
8HP r.1orlri, ,3 1.il i",:. �
$1,300. Homosassa
(765) 278-9315
JUMBO FLA SHRIMP
True l0ct per lb. $6/lb
'Call Now! 727-726-8617
OLD TOWN
17' 3" Canoe, & Trailer,
+ accessories,
$450. (352) 697-2105
OSPREY
1994 - 16ft, CC, bay boat.
88 HP Evinrude, Garmin
GPS/recorder $4500.
352-6214711
PONTOON '08
Sweetwater 21ft. 25
hours. 90hp Yamaha.
$18,000. Paid $26,000.
352-503-6797
Pontoon
40HP, Boat, motor, &
trailer, very good shape
$2,500. Homosassa
(765) 278-9315,
PONTOON BOAT
08' 20 Ft. To many
options tolist. $13,000
Call for info. 628-7926
Pontoon Boat
1996, 18 ft., Good Cond.
40HP Yamaha, 4 stroke,
$8,500/obo
(352) 860-1490
PONTOON BOAT
2002,24 Ft. w/ motor
Needs TLC $5,000
, , (352)461-4518
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras
� $12,000 (352) 628-0281
SEA PRO
'00 19 FT. C/C. Loaded.
Elec. Pkg. 115 Fl 4 Strk.
Yam. 100 hrs. BIm. top.
Best offer(352)533-3093
T-CRAFT
23'L, 6' W, '02 150H
Evin. mtr. w fuel enj. like
new, trlr. w/brks
$7750 352-489-3661


oU�t uo, U ounl
Tracker, 05 Merc 90hp, lo
hrs. tandem tril. like new
exc. value $11,500.
352-586-1676



















WELLCRAFT
1987, 250 Sportsman,
25', Gas eng., 30" draft,
260 hp I/O, alum.
trlr.$8,000
(352) 344-9651



05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
26inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
'07 NEW MAR
Cypress 32ft 5th wheel.
2 slides. Separate bath.
Extras. 3 yr ext. warranty
$37,900/ob0
352-794-3534
38FT BOUNDER '96
Class-A - basement
model. 49K mL 14mpg,
new tires & brakes. (4)
TV's. Ready for long trip.
$22.000. 352-563-0615
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 36 K Mi.
Dual air. $37,700 bo.
352-637-5149 or


* AULTO. BAT A*
352-7,9-3596



DONATIONS
43 year old



* Tax Deductible *

CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
conslgnmentusa.org
COACHMAN 26'
1987, 71k ML. GOOD
COND, READY TO GO!
$5000 aba (352)
503-7304/ 813-405-5023
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane New
deal. 30Q, class A motor
home, 31% ft., 22k mi.
, V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed,
etc. Saturn tow Incl.
$35,000. (352) 397-5007
GEORGIE BOY
'05, Pursuit, Class A.
30ft. Excel. cond. 8k mi.,
2 slide outs, 2 TV's, back
up camera, all the bells
and whistles and much
more, must see this
coach, Asking $50,000.
obo (352) 746-7626 '
CA RUI . A
GULF'STREAM
'07 BT Cruiser, 22'
8K.Mi. Hitch & tow bar.
Like new. $37,000 Obo.
(352) 875-8890
GULF STREAM
BT Cruiser 03, 22'fully
oal.3led Qeas> 10 travel
$29.800....
� (352) 341-1297
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool, club-
house etc.
$29,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
Holiday Rambler
'03, By Monico, 300
Cummins, 2 slides Incl.
tow vehicle,
mint conk . $84,900.
(352) 302-7073
Holiday Rambler
Admiral Motor Home 36'
2 slides, 340hp, gas eng.
all options transf ext.
warr. $51,900
352 795-3970
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. God mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$52,995. 352-464-0371
KeystOne 07
Big Sky 5th Wheel Prem.

tion. Center Island Kit.
incis sep.W/D, added 2nd
a/c in bedroom
Price to Sale $52K firm
352-794-3068
LA PALMA
'03 By Monaco, 2 push
outs, 13,000K. Mi:
It is a steal for $34,900.
(352) 527-3186
PACE ARROW
04, 38' 3 SLIDES
21k mi fully loaded
3 tv's $92,500 obo
352-302-0743


'02 Cedar Creek 5th
Wheel 29"1, 2-slldes.
queen bed bath/shower,
low mileage, loaded.
good cond. $16,800
(352) 746-4969
AWARD 1993 24 ft.
Great condltionl
$4500 (352) 795-6795
BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig. Like
new. $9,995.
352-489-3661 '
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO
07 Jay Flight
28' used twice, smells &
looks new, green clean,
sips 6 $16,800 (352)
. 503-7431
KODIAK
'04, Hybrid Travel Trir. AC,
Heat, Micro. Tub/ Shwer,
toilet exc cond $9,500.
352-564-4151'
MEADOWBROOK
5th Wheel, 2000 Excel-
lent. Photos at
http://plcasaweb.google.c
ambneadowbrook.Glenn-
$13O,99500
(352)302-6055 or
(727)692-9045
Montana
'03, 5th wheel, 3 slides
like new,$34,000.
Truck avail also for tow
(352) 422-5731
SKYLINE 04
32' sleeps 8, used
once $11,500 .
(352) 586-9614



4 Truck Toppers'
$200.00 forall.
(352) 464-0220




$$CASH PILd$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto. Patls
352-628-4144
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles
J.W. 352-228-9645
CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19, Across Airport
(352) 4614518
consignmetiusaorg
CASH BUYER
Buyina Used Cars
Trucks &Vans
For usedgarlot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES
Hwy 19 S Co.ial stIer
Since 1973 564-8333
We Buy Junk Cars
Running, or Not
Cash Paid, $'150 & Up
(352) 771-6191



1998 Buick LaSabre
Showroom condition
Fully power equipped
61k original miles
$4,995 obo (352)
560-4251
BMW
'03, 745 LI, NAV, black,
sun roof. all options $29K
Mint
(352) 746-2696
BUICK I
2000, Centiry (stom
Nicely Equ 1v.l owner ,
V6, $4900- BEt19-4Hurryl
Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
BUICK j
2004, LeSabrfW Ldather,
Alloys. 44K MIlle$9980
or $189/m6 W.AC
Jenkins IMazia
1-800-714 9813
BUICK.
2005, LACROSSE LOW
MILES LOOKING FOR
RELIABLE PERSON TO.
ASSURE PAYMENTS OF
$239 1866-838-4376

BUICK
2002, Park Averue
Alloys, Lthr, Pwr Seats
$7988 or $149 ma
Scoft 1-800-733-9138
CADILLAC '02
Seville STS4-,MT
ii.. er .,'gr ,a ,her
"i i s r -' I il 6pilor,,
$9,200. 352-746-1308
CADILLAC "
2001, De ile'
Very Glean, Lw Miles
$7,988 or 51, rmo
Pete 1-800-733-9138
CADILLAC ,
2003, CTS, Exdulslfe i,
Luxury 4 LessI $11,488 or
$199 mo'Call Pete
1-800-733-9138
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715
CHEVY
'08, Impala, Stunning
Looking for de- \
pendable person to
Assure Payments of
$259 1866-838-4376

CHEVY
2003, IMPALA
XXX - CLEAN $7988
1866-838-4376


CLASSIFIED



CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Conv. rare
auto, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
black, dependable.
$4700 352- 563-0615
CHEVY HHR
2008 Black with option
pkg, 17,500 mi,
$14,500 obo
Call 352-746-4219
CHRYSLER
'03 PT Cruiser LE. Like
new, 22K. Mi. Senior
owned & gar. kept.$8,500
Obo.(352) 795-2024
CHRYSLER
'04 Seabring Cony.
Touring, V-6 Auto. To
much to mention. Make
offer. (352) 628-5708
CHRYSLER
2001, PT Cruiser Ltd
Lthr, Sunroof. Alloys,
Well Serviced
Only $4988 or $99 mo
Pete 1-800-733-9138
CHRYSLER
2002, Sebring, Cony.
Ltd. Ed. 43k Mi., Lthr.
Infinity Stereo +
$7,988 or $149 mo
Sundog 1-800-733-9138
CHRYSLER
2006, 300C HemI
Leather, Sunroof, 12k
MI $399/mo or Take
over pmnts Jenkins
Mazda 1-800-714-9813
CHRYSLER
'95 LBeron, Cnv. New
tires & brakes. 86K.Mi.
$1,650. Runs great.
(352) 302-9217
CHRYSLER ptcruser
2002 excellent condition.
fully loaded except sun
roof only 54,400 miles
asking $7,400.00 352
249 0815 no calls after
8pmr
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
,US19, Across Airport
(352)461-4518
consignmentuso.org
CORVETTE
02, Z06,
Black, low mi., over
30 mpg hwy. $24,400.
(352) 613-5355
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 mi-
les on this rare silver on
silver on silver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are on
this gorgeous vette,
Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
included, Your's
for only, $48,500.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, 86K
mil. T -top roof, Excel-
lent condition $12,000.,
will trade for truck.
352-563-6428
DODGE
2007 CALIBER Clean-
est In Ocala Looking
for trustworthy person
to Assure Pymnts of
$177 1866-838-4376

FORD
'00 Focus, 4 dr. AC,
Auto. New tires & brakes
runs great,30 mpg.
$3,950.(352) 302-9217
FORD
'05 Taurus SE, V-6
Loaded, low mi. extra
clean. Must see. $7,880.
Wooten's (352)637-7117
FORD
'06 Focus, ZX4
4dr. Loaded, low mi.
Like New $8,995
Wooten's(352) 637-7117
FORD
2007, FUSION SE
Dazzling Looking for.
trustworthy person to
Assure Payments of
$267 1866-838-4376
FORD
2007, Taurus SE
Low Miles, Full Power
Only $9990 or $189 mo
Pete 1-800-733-9138
FORD ,
'99 Crown Victora,
former detective; car. Cold
AC. Runs great. $3,000.
Obo.(352) 613-5776
HONDA
1998, Accord LX
Low Miles, 1 Owner, 30
MPG $4990 Buys Iti
Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
HONDA
2000, Prelude SI
V-Tech, 1 Owner, Low
Miles, Showrm Cond.
$8900 OBOJenklns
Mazda ]-800-714-9813
HONDA
2002, Accord Coupe
EX, Sunroof, Alloys,
Sporty, Quality $6990 or
$149/mo WAC Jenkins
Mazda 1-800-714-9813

HONDA
2005, CIVIC
WON'T LAST $8988
1866-838-4376

HONDA
2007, ACCORD
Best Buy $11988
1866-838-4376
HONDA
2007, Civic, Only 5800
ml, Exc. On GasI Only
$16,988 or $259 moa
Scott 1-800-733-9138


'06. $14,500, certified
1000 mile warranty
(352) 746-3663
HONDA
2008, Civic Hybrid Low
Miles, 1 Owner, 50 MPG
Call for Deal! Jenkins
Mazda 1-800-714-9813
HYUNDAI
2001, Sonata GLS,
Leather, Sunroof, Mint
$3900 Buys It! Jenkins
Mazda 1-800-714-9813
HYUNDAI
2006, SANTA FE
Outstanding Value
Take on Payments for
$267, 1866-838-4376

LEXUS
1999, ES 300
LUXURY 4 LESS
$10988
1866-838-4376
-LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well maintained.
$2650. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
MERCEDES
1997, E-320, Leather,
Sunroof, All Records
Mintl $7900. ab o Jenkins
Mazda 1-800-714-9813
MERCURY '04
Grand Marquis LS, bik
w/tan int., O3K, adult
owned. Non smoker,
all options. Estate car.
$9800/neg.
352-465-8722
MGB
Convertible 1977, 57k mi.
Blue, many xtras
Excellent Condition
$10,500 (352)628-0281
MITSUBISHI
2007 LANCER
Practical Need relia-
ble person to Assure
Payments of $196
1866-838-4376

NISSAN
2007, SENTRA
Amazing Take on
Payments for $229
1866-838-4376

PONTIAC
2008, G6 GT, Fully
loaded, Don't Miss!
$16,988 or $269 mo
Sonny 1-800-733-9138
SATURN
2007, ION Excellent
Condition Seize
Payments for $199
1866-838-4376
SATURN
2007, ION
SUPER CLEAN
$9988
1866-838-4376
SUZUKI
'07 Forenza. 30K mi,
w/100k warr. LOADED
w/touch scrn nav.
$12,800. 352-613-6613
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 mi.
warranty. $19,995.
(352) 382-1857
TOYOTA
2001, CAMRY
MUST SEE $8988
1866-838-4376

TOYOTA
2005, Avalon Ltd,
Ed Has it AllII Low Miles
Only $17,988 or $299mo
Sonny 1-800-733-9138
TOYOTA
2008, Corolla, Won't
Last Looking for de-
pendable person to
Assure Payments of
$259 1866-838-4376
TOYOTA SUPER '89
All original, red, 79k mi.,
6 cylinder, all power,
targa roof. Original
owner. Garaged, $7,695
(352) 726-3427
V W Cobrio Cony.
1998. Great Dealt
110k mi.Well maintained
27mpg $2,200
(352) 503-6659
VOLVO
2007, S40, Alloys,
CD, Low Miles,
Great on Gas Hurry!
$13,488 or $210 mo
Scofft 1-800-733-9138




1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's
� Dream. $3500/obo
352-228-0597
'53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, 350 V-8,
auto, May trade in part.
A52-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door se-
dan. 6 cyl auto. $9,500.
Will consider trade for
travel trailer of equal
value.(352) 6284053

AUTO/SWAP/CAR
CORRAL SHOW
Sumter Co.
Fairgrounds
Sumter
Swap Meets
May 3rd 2009
1-800-438-8559
CHEVROLET El Camino
1967 $2700,o10w mi-
les,350 V8
engineautomatic
transmission,black
exterior,brand new
interiornon smoker
car,londaavin aol.com
9285048916


'88 Red, PS./PB. Cold
A.C. 62,000 Mi. Great
Condition. $6,900.
(352) 422-5663
CHEVY
'69 Classic C10 SHT BD
350/350 AC, PS,
$15K or trade
(352) 746-9212
CORVETTE
'87 Convertible, Drives,
looks great, 2nd owner,
new top & paint, $8,500
obo (352) 302-1524
EL CAMINO '81
305 Auto, All new
interior, & paint. Crager
mags & tires. 4" raised
hood. $3,250.
(352)341-3613.
GM El Camino
'84, 1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
JAGUAR
76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint;
63K mi., $8,900 oab
. (352) 5274221
(908) 763-8384
MERCEDES BENZ
1985 380SL, 2 top road-
ster. Drives, looks great.
Many new Mercedes
parts. New A/C. Must
seel REDUCED! $7,900.
David 352-637-6443.
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
trans. & parts. $4,000.
(352) 621-0126
THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$12,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122


'94 CHEVY
Ext. cab, 8 ft bed. New
motor, good cond. 2
wheel drive Z71 pkg.
$3,900.
352-563-1518 Iv msg
'94 TOYOTA PICKUP
Ext. Cab, 4 cyl, 5-spd,
new clutch, shocks &
more, tool box, and full
new audio system.$3,500
aba (352) 302-0033
CHEVY
2002, Avalanche
Leather, Low Miles, 1
Owner Mint Cond -
Call for Deal! Jenkins
Mazda 1-800-714-9813

CHEVY
2006, COLORADO
Pick up Need reliable
person to take pay-
ments on of $199
1866-838-4376
CHEVY
'92, Pickup, cap on
back, 6 cyl. good
shape $1,500.
(765) 278-9315
Homosassa
Chevy Silverado
'02, Ext. cab, 4 dr. auto,
AC, Sport Wheels, CD,
$5,995. Wooten's
(352) 637-7117
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
SFinancing Avail.
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
DODGE
'03 Ram 1500, auto,V-8
* chrome whis. cold air,
really nice. $7,995
Wooten's(352) 637-7117
DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awe-
some Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded
every special feature. Sr.
own, gar. kept., 27K mi,
$40K
invested Sale $21,750
See online ad photos
www.autotrader.com/atca
rid/at-f3fd39f
John (352) 726-1076
DODGE
2002, RAM 1500
READY 2 WORK
$8988
1866-838-4376

DODGE
2005, RAM 1500
Muscular Looking for
dependable person
to Assure Pymnts of
,$239 1866-838-4376

DODGE
2007, 1500 SLT
Tonneau Cover, Low
Miles Lots of Extras, Must
See $16,990 or $329/mo
WAC Jenkins Mazda
1-800-714-9813
DODGE RAM '00
Std cab, rare 5spd, hemi,
V8, a/c, 25mpg, new 22"
rims & tires. Dependable
$3700. 352-563-0615
FORD 04
Ranger, REDUCED
X-cab. Exc. cond.
38k mi. $9,700/obo
(352)746-3919
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serv. van. 41K Mi./5.4 L.
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serve. body/dble lock drs.
$20.000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
06 F150 XL Reg Cab.
Silver, V6 auto, 26k ml.
fact. warranty$9000
352-302-0999


Your Comm unity,




*NOTICED .>


/ .,v~1 C)L~j-~











z~i~ jI,.~j~f%% j4jjr11J~1


Find out about public notices in:

Citrus County Chronuicle

Or search online at:


www.floridapublicnotices.com


2001, F150 Lariat
Low Miles, Stepslde,
Lthr, Loaded Beauty!
Only $8995 Call Pete
1-800-733-9138
FORD
2003, RANGER
ONLY 44,368 MI $8988
1866-838-4376
FORD 94
F -150 4x4 XLT
$3250 obo (352)
503-7304/813-405-5023
JUMBO FLA SHRIMP
True 10ct per lb. $6/lb
Call nowl 727-726-8617
TOYOTA TACOMA
XTRA Cab, '98, well
malnt., rated best truck
In Consumer's Report
$3,800 obo (352)
621-3256
r-1 11-171


AZTEK
Pontiac' 04 Low
miles, loaded!
Reduced price
$8,500 obo
352-726-5715
CADILLAC
'05 Escalade, low mi. all
power, sun roof,
exc. cond. $28,000
(347) 266-9328
CHEVY
BLAZER '99 LS 4dr.
126k mi. loaded, great
cond. sunroof, $4k obo
352-422-0065


CHEVY Tahoe 2002
Original owner. 107 K
miles. EXCELLENT
CONDITION, both
body and mechanical.
All scheduled mainte-
nance has been as
per manufacturer
specifications. Fully
loaded. 4 wheel drive,
tow package, new ti-
res, Garmin GPS.
Book value
$12,715.00 sell
$10,750.00. Bought
new truck, don't need
this one. Call 532
527-6909

CHRYSLER
2007 Pacifica, Only 27k
Ml. Like newly Don't Miss
$13,988 or $199 mo
Pete 1-800-733-9138'
DODGE
2004, Durango SLT
Hemi 4x4, Lthr, DVD +++
$12,988 or $199 mo
Pete 1-800-733-9138
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air &
exhaust, Exc. Cond.
$6,000 obo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl
drive, class 3 hitch, Orig
owner. Great shape &
price. $8,750.
352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
FORD
2005, ESCAPE XLT
Gorgeous Selze
Payments for ,$249
1866-838-4376

GMC SUBURBAN
1993 4 WD, 454 rebuilt
eng., new traf'sm.,
great tires, good cond.
$3,500 obo
(352) 201-1413
HYUNDAI
2005, Tucson Auto,
Low Mi, 6 CD $9980 or
S 189/mo WAC Jenkins
Mazda 1-800-714-9813
JEEP
2006, LIBERTY One of
a kind Looking for
trustworthy person to
Assure Payments of
$259 1866-838-4376
KIA
2004, Sorrento EX
Leather, Sunroof. 1
Owner $6900 or
$159/Mo WAC Jenkins
Mazda 1-800-714-9813
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG Silver
W/black int. Loaded,
57K.Mi. New $64KAsk
$20K. (352)489-7674
NISSAN '93
Pathfinder XE-V6, auto,
cold air, great shape.
104k mi. ONLY $2800
352-341-0004
PONTIAC
2008. Torrent Sm SUV,
Loaded, Lke New Only
$13,988 or $199 mo Call
Al G 1-800-733-9138



FORD '06 F-150
Crew cab XLT. Tow pkg
& topper, 51K mi.
Exc cond. LOADED1
$18,500/obo. (352)
634-1378; 795-2053



CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'02 Town & Country LXI
Loaded, leather, 95K.mi.
$4,200. (352) 228-1930
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.


i
I


332-0503 SUCRN
(5/13 sale) Mini Storage 200) -Shader Brothers Corp.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE FOLLOWING TENANTS WILL
BE SOLD FOR CASH TO SATISFY RENTAL LIENS IN
ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF STORAGE
FACILITY ACT. SECTIONS 83-806 AND 83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE 200
CONTENTS WiViAY INCLUDE KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD ITEMS.
BEDDING, LUGGAGE, TOYS. GAMES, PACKED CAR-
TONS, FURNITURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING, TRUCKS, CARS,
ETC. THERE IS NO TITLE FOR THE VEHICLES SOLD AT UEN
SALE. OWNERS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
UNIT 212 THERESA V ROZMUS
LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON THE PREMISES 05/13/2009 AT
2:30 P.M. VIEWING WILL BE AT THE TIME OF THE SALE
ONLY. @ 7742 CARL G. ROSE HIGHWAY, HERNANDO FL
34442
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
April 26 and May 3,2009.

336-0503 SUCRN
Elig, To Vote Notice- Supervisor of Elections
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given:
Erik Abbott
Lost Known Address of
4785 North Tanglewood Avenue
Hemando, Florida 34442
Ronald M. Sinecoff, Jr.
Last Known Address of
7662 East Spanish Trail
Floral City, Florida 34436
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in
question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of
Elections, In Inverness. Florida, no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond
will result In a determination of Inelilglblity by the Super-
visor and your name will be removed from the state-
wide voter registration system. If further assistance Is


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


School District Budgets


Locol Tax Changes


Property Auctions


Public Hearings


Adoptions


CHRYSLER
2007, Town & Country
More convenient
Take on Payments for
$199 1866-838-4376
ECONOLINE VAN '01
White, Wheelchair
accessible, $4k
(352) 341-7798
FORD
'99 Windstar,125 K. Mi. 7
psg. In good cond.
$3,900. (352) 628-5708
FORD FREESTAR '04
Good cond. 2 new
tires, many extras, Well
maintained hwy miles
93,500 mi. $5,200
(352) 341-4754
KIA
2005, SEDONA Safe
Looking for dependa-
ble person to Assure
Payments of $238
1866-838-4376
KIA
2007, Sedona EX
Leather, power
Everything Low Miles
$14,988 or $225 mo
Al G. 1-800-733-9138
MAZDA
2003, MPV ES, Leather,
Dual Pwr Doors 33K MI.,
I Owner, Deall Jenkins
Mazda 1-800-714-9813
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT








$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com




HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains & tows
heavy loads. $3200/or
trade. 352- 563-0615
Crystal River



2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900ml. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. Hi pert.
Over $43,000 in receipts.
17k mi. $11,700
352-563-0615
Crystal River
HARLEY
'96 Sporster 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes.chro. Ex. clean
$4,850.(352) 637-5143
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80", com-
pletely serviced, good
shape. Ex.
access. $5,895. obo
352-746-7655; 7264109
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 Mi.
124 S &S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
HONDA 04
1300 VTX, thousands in
options, mint condition
$5900 abo
(352) 302-7073
HONDA
Shadow Arrow 06,714K
,mi. garage kept, not in
rain, floorboard $6200
obo (347)223-7269 aft
3:30
KAWASKI
'00, ZRX 1100
CC,15K. Mi. Very
fast, many extra s.
$4k obo.
(352)621-3764
SCOOTER
'06 Suzuki, 400
Bergman. 4,200 Mi. Like
new cond. $4,500
(352) 382-2715
SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, BIk w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This
faiot of heart. $30k
invested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Cal for more info.
352-302-2815
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
VENTO PHANTOM
Scooter, 318 miles,
150CC, Like new.
$2,190/obo.
352-422-2433
YAMAHA
'05 YZ125 DIRT BIKE
Race ready. Many ex-
tras. $2500. 352-
586-1683: 586-9349











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections at the
below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 North Apopka Avenue
Inverness, Florida, 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle
May 3.2009.

337-0503 SUCRN
5/8 collective bargaining talks
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County
Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida will begin
collective bargaining talks with The Professional
Flreflghters of Citrus County, Local 4562 on May 8, 2009
at the Lecanto Government Building located at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Suite 219. Lecanto, FL 34461 at
1:30 P.M. These discussions are open to the public.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
the meeting because of a disability or physical impair-
ment should contact the Human Resources Office,
3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 178, Lecanto FL 34461,
352-527-5370 at least two days before the meeting. If
you are hearing or speech. Impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone 352-527-5504.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County' Chronicle
May 3,2009.

329-0503 SUCRN
(5/13 Sale-Dunnellon) Shader Brothers Corp.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE FOLLOWING TENANTS WILL
BE SOLD FOR CASH TO SATISFY RENTAL LIENS IN
ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF STORAGE
. FACILITY ACT, SECTIONS 83-806 AND 83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STGRAGE- DUNNELLON
UNIT # 134 JASON RILEY
UNIT # 2 SHERI TRIBBLE
UNIT # 34 STEVE ROOF
UNIT # 155 LINDA WILSON
UNIT # 20 CITRUS DRY CLEANING INC.
UNIT # 163 NORA LEGGETT
UNIT # 165 CHRISTINE HURT
UNIT # 186 TAN Z PRODUCTIONS
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD ITEMS,
BEDDING, LUGGAGE, TOYS, GAMES, PACKED CAR-
TONS, FURNITURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING, TRUCKS, CARS,
ETC. THERE'IS NO TITLE FOR THE VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN
SALE. OWNERS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
UEN'SALE TO BE HELD ON'THE PREMISES, 05/13/09 AT
2:00 P.M. VIEWING WILL BE AT THE TIME OF THE SALE
ONLY. Personal Mini Storage Dunnellon
11955 N. Florida Ave., Dunnellon, FL 34434
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
April 26 and May 3,2009.

333-0503 SUCRN
5/13 meeting CC Tourist Development Council
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN. that the CITRUS COUNTY
.TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a regular busl-
ness meeting Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 9:00 a.m. at
the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Lecanto, FL 34461, Room 166.
Any person desiring further Information regarding this
meeting may, contact the Executive Offices -of the
Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Ave-
nue, Inverness, Florida. 34450 - (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical. Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida,
34450 - (352) 341-6560, at least one day before the
meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
JOHN THRUMSTON, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBULIC: Any person who decides to
appeal any decision of the Governing Body with' re-
spect to any matter considered at this meeting will
need a record of the proceedings' and for such pur-
pose may need to provide that a verbatim record of
the proceeding Is made, which record Includes testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal Is to be
based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
Published one (1) time In the' Citrus County Chronicle,
May 3,2009.

334-0503 SUCRN
5/26 Hearing Chass. Water Spec. Assessment DIst.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County
CorTinrr iI.:.rrer .� i . rrj;: CI ..j.-i.r, Fjrlao .iii r.,la .3 Dj D-
I': h ,arng . r, Iu : 3,: I, .". . -" U'y.. a' 1 .2 i:PII In
the Board of County CommissIoners' Meeting Room,
Citrus Couhty Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida, for the purpose of hearing public
comment regarding the addition of Altemate Key No.
1183821 & 1183758, 3 D .& L.Inc., to the 2006
, Chassahowltzka Water Special Assessment District as-
sessment roll, confirmed and adopted on July 22, 2008,'
* and for hearing objections to the correctioh of such
assessment roll.
The nature of the Improvements made consisted'of
construction of a water system and water system Im-
provements in Chassahowltzka and the surrounding
areas more particularly described as the'Ipnstallation of
water mains, valves, backflow preventers, water
meters, and other miscellaneous appurtenances In or-
der to connect to the County's water facilities and also
included and embraced, the Installation of water
mains, laterals, Individual water meters, and other facilll-
ties necessary to, provide for the health, safety and
welfare of-all 'residents of Chassahowltzka and the sur-
rounding areas. Said Improvements were constructed
on all streets and roads described In Exhibit "A' which Is
attached hereto and madd a part hereof.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the Board of County Commissioners with respect to
any matter considered at this public hearing, they will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings Is made which record shall Include the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical. Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Floridd 34450,
(3.2, 3J I -6660 a, least seven days before the meeting.
If cou aie nearing or speech Impaired, use the TDD Tel-
ephone (352) 341-6580.
JOHN THRUMSTON, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CHASSAHOWIIZKA WATER SPECIAL
ASSESSMENT DISTRICT
EXHIBIT "A"
The Chassahowltzka Water Specldl Assessment District
consisting of oiall lots and parcels which abut the streets
and roads In which a water system and water system
improvements are constructed or reconstructed and
all lots and parcels whlch are served or to be served by
a water system and water system' Improvements, lo-
cated In Section 25, Section 26, and Section 35 of
Township 20 South, Range 17 East, Citrus County, Flor-
ida. Said Improvements shall be constructed on all
streets and roads listed below,


West Alton Court.
West Bounty Court
West Crane Court
South Devon Terrace
West Dixie Court
West Drew Court
West Egret Court
West Heron Court
South Jade Drive
West La Parade Loop
South Le Baron Avenue
South Le Baron Drive
South Mandelay Loop
South McClung Loop
West Mesa Lane
West, Mlo Court
West Miss Maggie Drive
West Nectar Lane


South Nova Terrace
West Peacock Court
West Pebble Lane
West Pinoak Court
South Pitcher Point
South Plymouth Terrace
South Riviera Drive
South Riviera Point
South Sandra Terrace,
West Scoff Court
South Sherry Loop
West Slmrl Court
West Southampton Court
West Tropical Lane
West Turkeyneck Court
South Woodward Point
South York Way
South Zaneri Circle


Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 3,2009.'

335-0503 SUCRN
' 5/26 Hearing Cit.SpringsWater Line Extension
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County
Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida, will hold a pub-
lic hearing on Tuesday, May 26, 2009, at 2:45 P.M. in
the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting Room,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida, for the purpose of hearing public
comment regarding the addition of properties shown
In Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part
hereof, to the Citrus Springs Water Une Extension 2008
Special Assessment District assessment roll, confirmed
and adopted on July 24, 2008, and for hearing objec-
tions to the correction of such assessment roll.
The nature of the Improvements made consisted of
construction of a water, system and water system Im-
provements In the Citrus Springs area more particularly
described as the Installation of water mains, valves,
backtiow preventers and other miscellaneous appurte-
nances In order to connect to the County's water facll-
ities and also Include and embrace the Installation of
water mains, laterals and other facilities as may be
necessary In order to provide for the health, safety and
welfare of all residents of the Citrus Springs area. Said
Improvements were constructed on all streets and
roads described In Exhibit "B" attached hereto and
made a part hereof.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the Board of County Commissioners with respect to
any matter considered at this public .hearing, they will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceed-


CLASSIFIED


Wings Is made which record shall Include the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
(352) 341-6560, at least seven days before the meeting.
If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use the TDD Tel-
ephone (352) 341-6580.
JOHN THRUMSTON, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CITRUS SPRINGS WATER LINE EXTENSIONS
2008 SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT
EXHIBIT "A"
OWNER'S NAME ALT KEY
ATTWOOD R DEANE JR & SUSAN F 1416281
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 101500090
BROWN EVERTON N & JENNIFER 1416302
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10150 0110
D AMICO EGIDIO GINO 1416248
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10150 0050
DE LA CRUZ ABNER & CONSUELO 1416680
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10160 0270
DYER ANGELINA TRUSTEE 1299519
PARCELID 18E175100050 04810 0010
DYER ANGELINA TRUSTEE 1299527
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04810 0020
FABIAN GERDA 1416655
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10160 0240
FAGAN THOMAS J ET AL 1315727
PARCEL ID ' 18E17S100060 05650 0100
FAGAN THOMAS J ET AL 1315735
PARCELID 18E17S100060 05650 0110
FERGERSON JEREMY & 1416272
PARCELID 18E17S100180 10150 0080
CALENDA KATHLEEN & ANTHONY 1343593
PARCEL ID 18E17S100090 06090 0310
CASAMENTO KAREN & SALVATORE 1343607
PARCEL ID 18E17S100090 06090 0320
GARCIA REINALDO & 1416698
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10160 0280
GULLO ANTHONY S & LISA 1299560
PARCELID 18E17S100050 04810 0060
GULLO ANTHONY S & LISA 1299586'
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04810 0080
GULLO ANTHONY S & LISA 1299578
PARCEL ID 18E1 7S100050 04810 0070
HUTCHINSON DEBBIE 1416612
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10160 0200
JONES PAUL L 1299730
PARCEL ID 18E17SI100050 04820 0150
KENT RAY S & ETTA B 1416221
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10150 0036
LAMBORN THOMAS R JR 1416647
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10160 0230
LOUCK RICHARD & 1299713
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04820 0130
VAN NESS THOMAS M 1416591
PARCELID 18E17S100180 101600180
MARK JOHN K & MARIA SUSAN 1299543
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050048100040
MARK JOHN K & MARIA SUSAN 1299551
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04810 0050
MEYER WENDY J 1299721
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04820 0140
MINOR EDWARD M & CHARLES C 1299705
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04820 0120
MINOR EDWARD M & CHARLES C 1299691
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04820 0110
NEW VISTA PROPERTIES INC 2041498
PARCEL ID 18E17S100230 16620 0020
NEW VISTA PROPERTIES INC 1315751
PARCEL ID 18E17S100060 05650 0130
PERKINS JOHNNY J & ZANNA P 1299748
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04820 0160
PLATT TODD AUSTIN 2041536
'PARCEL ID 18E17S100230 16620 0040
RAMIREZ MELVIN & NANCY 1315743
PARCELID 18E17S100060 05650 0120
RAMOS CLARA EDEUA 1416299
PARCEL ID . 18E17S100180 10150 0100
RAMOS:RAPHAEL & 2041510
PARCEL ID 18E17S100230 16620 0030
RASHID ISHRAT 1315654
PARCEIID 18E17S100060 05650 0030
RCT LLC . 1418801
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10280 0140
SHTAYNMETS BORIS & MARINA 1415942
PARCELID 18E17S100180 101300010
SIMON MICHAEL J & 1315662
PARCEL ID 18E17S100060 05650 0040
SOMMERS VIRGINIA M 1299683
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04820 0100
SOMMERS VIRGINIA M 1299675
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04820 0090
SOOKLAL VISHWA P 2156864
PARCEL ID 18E17S100220 15380 0120
STICKLAND CLIFTON L JR & SUZAN 1416230
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10150 0040
TEJEDA FERMIN & SYLVIA 1418453
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10260 0190
TOYAMA JANE F 1315689
PARCELID 18E17S100060 05650 0060
TREITZ JOHNA MILLER & RICHARD 1418160
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10250 0100
V & K PROPERTIES LLC 2041471
PARCELID 18E17S100230 16620 0010'
VIDALJOSE ' 1416604
PARCEL ID 18E175100180 10160 0190
YAMADA LAWRENCE R 1315697
PARCEL ID 18E17S100060 05650 0070
CITRUS SPRINGS WATER LINE EXTENSIONS 2008
SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT
'EXHIBIT "B"
The Citrus Springs Water Line Extensions 2008 Special As-
sessment District consisting of all vacant lots; and par-
cels which abut the streets and rodds In which a water
system and water system Improvements are con-
structed or reconstructed and all vacant lots and' par-
cels which are to be served by a water system, and
water system Improvements, located in Citrus County,
Florida, further described as follows:
CITRUS SPRINGS (Description of Territory Served)
Township 16 South, Range 18 East
Section 34: The Southeast 1/4 of said Section 34: and
the Southwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of said Section
34.
Township 17 South, Range 18 East
All of Sections 10, 11.12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 21; 22, 23, 24. 25,
26, 27 and 28.
Section 1: All of said Section 1 lying and being South-
westerly of the Withlacoochee River less and except
the following parcels: The East 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4
and the North 770' of the West 330' of the Northwest
1/4 of said Section 1.
Section 2: The Southwest 1/4 of said Section 2; and
the South 1/2 of-the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 2;
and all that portion of the West 1/2 of 'the Northwest
1/4 of said Section 2 lying Westerly of the Seaboard
Railroad R.O.W.; and the South 1/2 of the Northeast 1/4
of the Northeast 1/4; and all that portion of the South-
east 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of said Section 2 lying
North of State Road 39.
Section 3: All of said Section 3 LESS and EXCEPT the
West 1/2 of the Northwest 1/4.
Section 20: The East 1/2 of said Section 20.
Section 29: The East 1/4 of said Section 29: and the
Southwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4; and the Northwest
1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 29.
Section 32: All that portion of the East 1/2 of said Sec-
tion 32 lying and being 570 feet more or less North of a
line North of and parallel to the South boundary AND
the Northeast 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of said Section
32. '
Section 33: All those portions of Citrus Springs Units 22
and 25 as recorded In Plat Book 7, Pages 93 through
109, and Plat Book 8, Pages 19 through 24, respectively
and Inclusively of the Public Records of Citrus County,
Florlda.
Section 34: All those portions of 'Citrus Springs Units 22,
23, and 25 as recorded In Plat Book 7, Pages 93
through 109, and Plat Book 7, Pages 115 through 133
and Plat Book 8, Pages 19 through 24, respectively and
Inclusively.
Section 35: 'All those portions of Citrus Springs Units 23
and 25 as recorded In Plat Book 7, Pages 115 through
133 and Plat Book 8, Pages 19 through 24, respectively
and Inclusively.
Section 36: The North 3/4 of said Section 36.
Township 18 South, Range 18 East
Section 1: All those portions of Citrus Springs Units 23
and 25 as recorded In Plat Book 7, Pages 115 through
133 and Plat Book 8, Pages 19 through 24 respectively
and conclusively.
Section 2: All those portions of Citrus Springs Units 23
and 25 as recorded In Plat Book 7, Pages 115 through
133 and Plat Book 8, Pages 19 through 24 respectively
and conclusively.


Township 17 South, Range 19 East
All of Sections 18 and 19.
Section 6: All that area southwest of the
WIthlacoochee River lying In the Southwest 1/4 of the
Southwest 1/4 of said Section 6.
Section 7: The Southeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of
said Section 7; and the West 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of
said Section 7: and the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 7;
and the West 1/2 of the Northwest 1/4 of said Section
7.
Section 17: The Southwest 1/4 of said Section 17; and
the East 1/2 of the Northwest 1/4 of said Section 17.
Section 20: The West 1/2 of said Section 20; and the
South 1/2 of the Northeast 1/4: and the Southeast 1/4
less and except the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4
of said Section 20.
Section 30: All Section 30 less and except the Southeast
1/4 of the Southeast 1/4.
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 3, 2009.


SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 D7


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Culture Icon
is someone
that makes
decisions that
are right for ..
the market
center re-
gardless of
individual im- -
pact. Doing Tom
something ..i .-u .
right without Keller Williams
wanting to be Realty.
recognized or
acknowledged for it. Being part
of the solution and not part of
the problem. Who is this per-
son? Debbie Rector, team
leader, Keller Williams Realty
of Citrus County, who proudly
represents over 50 agents, is
pleased to announce our Cul-
ture Icon for May, Tom Mc-
Murray. He can be reached at
(352) 302-1419 or at the Keller
Williams office (352) 746-7113.
Len Palmer joins
Million Dollar Club
The associates and staff of
RE/MAX Realty One are


GET THE
WORD OUT
* Nonprofit or- sW
ganizations av
are invited to - W
submit news -
releases 141
about up-
coming com-
munity _
events. Cggli
S3200+ t
* Wonder,
* Write the .*urrnet
name of the
event, who gI
sponsors it,
when and
where it will
take place w Mi
2BR, 21
and other de Dining
tails. *15
* News re-
leases are
subject to ed
citing.
* Call L
563.5660 for Great
details.


pleased to
announce
that Len
Palmer has
qualified for
the 2009 Mil-
lion Dollar
Club. Len is a
veteran asso-
ciate in the
Lecanto office
of RE/MAX


Len Palmer
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Realty One. He is a consistent
multimillion dollar producer in
the area with hundreds of satis-
fied customers. His efforts con-
tinue produce results even in
this challenging market.

DIGEST DEADUNES
E Submit information for
the Real Estate Digest
by 4 p.m. Thursday for
publication Sunday.
News notes are pub-
lished as space is avail-
able. Submit material,
attn: HomeFront, at
Chronicle offices in In-
verness or Crystal
River: fax to 563-3280;
or e-mail to news-
desk@chronicle
online.com.


Fun, inexpensive


merce or in your newspa-
per. While independent play
fosters creativity and confi-
dence, you'll still have to
plan some activities, or kids
might start climbing the
walls.
Many old-fashioned activ-
ities and outdoor games are
making a comeback, but
with a fresh twist They're
homemade and often with
materials you already have


for kids


options

Families are redefin-
ing fun. Many are
staying home more
often. Some are canceling
summer camps,
too. That leaves a
lot of hours to fill
to combat bore-
dom. Your com-
munity offers
many free activi-
ties. You can
often find where
to go and what to
do on the bulletin
board at your Sar
local library, by FRU
calling your LIV
chamber of com-


See FRUGAL/Page E7


Forbuyingorseling...
Allyn uneed is LOVE! '., ; ,-


S 24211 N.LecantoHwy
REAL Y ONE 352-527-7842
Multi-Million F Virtual Tours Available:
$ Producer L www.VickiLoveHomes.com L


POOL O AilhArd b..bV I in I .c.

O Re immediate occupancy. $137,900
OPPORTUNITY!. Remodeled in MLS#333931. Call Vicki
2004... Handicap access... Roof 4
new in 2004... Bullet proof glass...
8500 psi concrete and steel floor...
Hurricane sheeting... Die bold
walk-in safe... Alarm system... 3
restrooms... Wood & granite ... .
counters... 2 Outbuildings with an Rus SPRINGS -- Almost new...
add'l 1440 sq. ft, in addition to the Great location of newer homes. 3/2/2 with
,000 feet. $1,250,000 MS covered lanai to quiet, prvate backyard!
3,000 eet. Reduced,250,000 M R $107,900 MLS#328286.
#333579. Call Sarita NOT a short sale Call Vicki


631 W. DOMR PMH O105 L. HmCALA . 457 N. JADEMOO DR.

ACRES S85.900
7059 LECANTO HWY.
1,, C l h - REL $100,000

N w :Se. CsOERAs . ACRE. s17.4000
wcoSMr P. 3 W OW M ACRE ......................... $44,900


Real Estate DIGEST


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E 2 sUNDAYMAY 3 2009


I.


at home. Coincidentally,
they're frugal, too. What
types of frugal activities
have you done?
Here are a few
fun ideas.
SENSORY
BAG: You can
make a sensory
bag that-kids (and
you) will love to
squish. You'll
need a' plastic
zip-closure bag-
, gie, hair gel, craft
Noel foamies, glitter
GAL and clear Contac
ING paper. Fill the
bag with the craft
supplies and gel. Seal the
bag closed and then sand-
wich the bag between two
pieces of Contac paper. This
will prevent leaking.
SHAVING PAINT: You
can also combine non-gel
shaving cream with a couple
of drops of food coloring.
Let your child use construc-
tion paper, a sliding glass








Cinius COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, MAy 3, 2009 E3
U


Crystal River 794-0888


Inverness 3


LEADERS



141-1233 Beverly Hills 527-1112


ALISON A (352) 697-0761 1 and
MARKHAM (352) 422-.3998 g CCLORY erry
www.naturecoastlivg.com * info@natirecoastving.com R bradfordpottssr@aol com * sherylpotts@aol.com


5t4~ ~


N;


SHORT SALE! SUGAR?
-q h 4 Berroornr. 2 Bain.
Preerve. MLS 33034-18




7- '- 7,


)DS - Over 2.000
rage Backs up 10


BEST VALUE IN CRYSTAL OAKS - -1 Bedroom. 3
Bain. 2 Car Garage Clubrriouse offers p.ooi.
shurnleboarid lnrs Boat/Rv storage aailarble
.II c, 'i r.- 1 I eiq nAAnn


THIS SWEET LITTLE
COTIrAGE i i r. w.alerrc.r.ir
barL r. ,.1 u .6 t1-,er
l:,k.ng :,r' Mre .r. real,
SGorgeous wa1err6,r.l 1C.
TrM,;ell ,l ,.le.115-N5


TAKE THIS OPPORTUNITY
1' rnBpi p.: ,: ..u r ;. B p .,- '. ...

, , B.h 5, r,, n. i n i
: Aicl ^ ,:r,',l CreiJu. 5r." DON T
LET THIS ONE GETAWAY
NIMLS 2.'0-. $159.900


www.pottsteam.com
(352) 697-1368
(352) 697-5500
- 9 SELLER'S LOSS IS YOUR
GAJNI T 3.ielulI, up, .a-I.,
with hardao, nv,:,:, ,-, ,
d,.,'r r.. e r rco,, H'. AC
rTni : te I.:. . , el

- ' .. -' Tr, 1IT, I L. "L JJ ;
$69,900


' - AKE OFFER
SHORT SALE!

,n 1 .3 . , I,- u ,; ,,
r5 .s c. .
A ~. - li . e 1,i:, acp,,' :,5.. ir,.
.iEj6 ML', :'3;: "
$110.000


Cell: 352-422-2994
Email:
mygulling@comcast.net


. WATERFRONT - Beauliful
.+ - s - - Rerfror loto Close to 301. acre
NEW LISTING - Pristine & serene! You must on LaKe Rousseau with upscale
see this beautiful maintenance free villa in 21 ACRES - 21 mol acres homes surrounding it.
desirable Fox Hollow. It features an open zoned CLM. Property can Approximately 124 ft. on the
kitchen as well as 3 bedrooms plus a den. be accessed via an water. Partially cleared in the
Huge pantry. This roomy floor plan is warm, easement on Dunnellon Rd. middle but many nice trees
inviting and easy to love. Enjoy the wonderful Seller will provide new remaining. If you're looking for
view of the lush landscaping from the back quiet and serenity, what a great
patio as well as two community pools, park survey to buyer following place to build your dream home
and tennis course and much more. MLS closing. MLS 327166 including a wonderful view of the
an-, -tiao and l t 100_000 wItaer lMI 11 q41IA I 1aCoofa


ADVANTAGES OF JACKIE SOURINI
Empowered with knowledge and 28 years of experience

* Advertising 50% more vs. Competitors
* Professional References
* Personal Website
t--'Determination. There is NO substitution for Expertise arid most
important "POSITIVE ATTITUDE"
"You make a living by what you get, You make a life by what you give."
S'' Portions of my commissions go back into OUR Community to teach
.'*I, - "! *. "ni .the Handicapped through Horse Therapy.
, , . I can be reached through
EXIT REALTY LEADERS
DIRECT 352-527-6585 CELL 352-634-4436
Sww.jshomes.com
^ : t, - JACKIE SOUIUNI, Broker/Associate


r-r
.....U.. - W.


, MAY 3RD. 2009 * 1:00-3:00 SUNDAY MAY 3RD, 2009 * 1:00-3:00 ,--; .- RE A IN FRONT OF YOUR REPLACE ENJOY THE PEACEFUL VIEW or a :,
CHERRY LAUREL COURT. 10294 W. MONTYCE CI. MOTIVATED SELLER! M.:..e ..-lv ur YOU WILL LOVE THE UPGRADES ir.i ,r-~r o ia r..- jl.ruI Fl.:.,r, ;u.-. I... ia pIr- ' ,3 r.T inh .., A@ii .a,,,.
, , HIL ES "' .:5,1in: J'.9 |Fl,-r, l O r.i.:r: H f, w tL. E :,ri L3rjc. r,-:u lamIT,r ,, - tIrr , iT ' Dla ,', r.,5 r, r. ia.. b--,r. r, dOu' I.:, ir " .s nerrul 3 .-I M',:i.,Ti ,j,j,' . :,'i,- .. .3 p i,,.:h Tri. l ,i-' l WnI. ,i T ,,- I ,l:-I:I in , are :. Cr,.3l .J3 ..3.i �
3u? Fi i.,'" Lot tr'-. -rr) O," ,C- ,,:: | �I n, r,,. - ui"' Er'.-anr,-,Tel .,,.,, 3'iOu'"', .*,* *:, ., r i 5 , a-,,3,:u . .:,ep r, Ii:.,).' fIa, 1, 7 in-l rlreina I iull Ira in ,,'jI r,,.:., Ti ,- ,['"' lyaelly I , I ar-lI] ,,rLa'n | ,:,rL n-1c , * ."i-'1' ii.':.:ir pl~r, 3 C, r,3 ,Ti 2 Lath |t ruin--: ',uiriu.l,:l *:il a a,.,1 -, ' ri,-
Parkside Village (on N. Parkside sign and tumrn right on Pamondeho turn left a heated pool, summer kitchen m designer teaturing a gourmet kitchen and a huge home on a completely fenced acre comes even a large air-conditioned workshop
Terrace) and next (R) on Cherry on Montyce. Home on left almost at end of- kitchen, corian counters, fireplace, & so workshop in the detached- garage. Priced complete with an over sized workshop and 3 Close to the Country Club and Golf Course






-h'. ,.:.u a, r.ir ir.,i, T.. .r.,Ar.:..T.; ,r..,r. MAKE US AN OFFERON THIS ONE!
Y,3 garage SMW home built inCourse Very spacious home with bright, plan and all the extra space with the sliding glass I1- resden or Investom.r! m C uret tenan ou a Ts
a nice cul-de-sac. Large master r floor plan and fir.plac 6x16 patio for doors, froom bth th kitchen and master bedroom, -resident or investor! Current tenant through GREAT CUSIOM BUI2 T story famil
Lt rang s asher, n . o n mo ea 3 bl en apn s usad l
suite. All bedrooms have lots of open rplan firpl leading you to the endosed Florida roomn/den, which BRIGHT AND AIRY OPEN FLOOR July '09. Split floor plan with separate water access home featuring boat slip at ene
Electric range, dish washer, outside cooking, oversized garage with door leads you through the back door to relax on the PLAN. Located on a comer lot with partial entrance to second bedroom-perfect of street, solid oak floors, hickory cabinets
ceiling fan, Garage door openers opener, extra driveway pad for 2nd car/ screen-enctosed wood deck! The kitchen has a bualt in fencing. Screened porch and family room situation for roommates! Nice fenced stainless appliances, wrap around porch
rkler system, and lV satellite dish' guests, & nice landscaping. Come enjoy a dsk arid bght and space NewA/C a compliment the large eat-in kitchen. Newer backyard for children and/or pets. MLS fenced comer lot, and much more. ML5
st wonderful Floda lifestyle. MLS 328229 want to cl T on YOUR new ho floor in the living room MLS 33057 32758 331348
ESOIKLEY 352-206-9096 KE STOKLEY 352-206-9096 NAPNCY MlES 352-279-505 NANCY RIES 351-279-5058 3 NANCY AlfS 35279-5058 BRENDA HA GAN 352-27-935


GULIUNG
REALTOR'


I


I www.exitrez�


. SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 E3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


5UNBglAl1
580 W
BEVElu
(R) into
Village
Laural Co
NAM
hi� sS


4,








E4 SUNDAY, MAY 3r 2009 Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CFCC to offer rel estate classes Miele, Reo
C F C C t or4511 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Office: 352-746-3600
Special to the Chronicle opportunities, land descrip- contingency adjustments in real estate listing agree- Cell: (352) 697-1685 MEN
tions and uses, gathering fi- and expenses, property val- ments, forms for successful ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU R EALTY & INVESTMENTS
ALAY THR FO YO iIT 8l INETET EA iESTAiTl


Central, l Fl . rida Cot , u-
nity College is accepting
registration for real estate
courses at the Citrus Cam-
pus, 3800 S. Lecanto High-
way in Lecanto.
* Listing Properties for
Commercial Real Estate
will meet from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Tuesday, May 12. Stu-
dents will learn about com-
mercial real estate


1nan1.ca I rm liLI onuii, an
about office buildings, retail
properties and industrial
buildings and their physical
characteristics.
* Commercial Real Es-
tate: Understanding Invest-
ments will meet from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Tuesday, May 19.
Learn about types of invest-
ment properties and clients,
principles of investments,


oes, so IuuuictIon tUo nan-lu
cial analysis, value of
investments and forecasting
cash flows.
* Smart Marketing Prac-
tices for Commercial Real
Estate will meet from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Thursday, May 28.
Learn how to understand
the commercial market-
place,. where to find cus-
tomers and clients, clauses


Ucommu erca brokerage e,
dealing with other brokers,
and marketing for success.
These classes meet in
Building L2, Room 201A.
The fee for each course is
$65 and includes the re-
quired textbook. For infor-
mation or registration, call
(352) 249-1210. Register on-
line at www.CFCCtrain-
ing.com.


WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS

* Photos need to be in sharp focus. Photos submitted
electronically should be in maximum-resolution JPEG
(.Ipg) format. Photos cannot be returned without a
selt-addressed, stamped envelope. Call 563 5660.


CITRUS HILLS CONDO .
END UNIT - REGENCY PARK Refurnished 2BR/2BA upstairs end unit. Caorpo I . - - 7.
Furnished 2BR/2BA condo with fireplace. Wood flooring Immediate occupa ncy. SPACIOUS 212/1 VILLA on cul-de-sac in Inverness. Enjoy maintenance free
Community pool & clubhouse. $70,900 $105, 00 MLS#334001 I living with community dock and club house with free form heated pool. $112,000


VACANT LOTS
OAKS GOLF COURSE
1/2 Acre Lot ........... $69,900
CITRUS HILLS
1 Acre with Cenhtl Water .... $29,900 RIDE YOUR GOLF CART!
LECANTO Inverness Country Club close by for this well
Ec NO S Nc k Tre C located 3BR/2BA with Florida room.
5 Acres, Paved St 8 Nice Oak Trees $58,000 $107,500 MLS#331547

CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352) 726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allciftuseaelty.com After Hours (352) 302-6714. lIii I


Jackie & Bob Dais
American Realty & Investments
n*ar .117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
|me (352) 634-237-1 Cell
| ** (800) 476-2590 Toll Free '_
E R A For a Visual Tour of our listings
REAL ESTATE and all MLS: bidavis.com b ..


SCAR ENTHUSIAST, HOBBiEST,
SiFISHERMAN? Here's a waterfront home
. a- r,:r r, " a : " garage that's 50' deep
, , .' wAr, r r, ,,"vrl iH/A system. A cozy
S 1 i D eir .m - ,tath, split-plan home.
A ..r,,,-, rc.rr, ,' interior laundry, wood
fiior A qra, rc:..iom with a brick fireplace.
-' Er.lp, t., '. r,,r.. on Lake Pocono.
3 . Isi334n23 lSin n0n


PINE RIDGE BEAUTY - This Mitch Underwood extended
Captiva Model is a must see. As you pull up the driveway,
you can't he ep but t be in awe of the lush landscaping
with hundreds of flowering shrubs and trees. And once
inside, you'll be ready to call this home. With 3 bedrooms,
3 baths, loads of extras, and a huge lanai (31x10) and
huge screened patio (50x18), this is the perfect home for
both relaxing and entertaining. See it today'!
- FABULOUS TERRA VISTA COURTYARD/
" - CABANA HOME - This 3 bedroom, # bath home
-�. .boasts over 2000 sf of living including a private separate
cabana with bedroom and bath for guests/in laws. The
very private courtyard/pool area will be great for
entertaining or just relaxing. Too many upgrades to list
here. Come see for yourself! And yes, it's ont the Skyview
Golf course. MLS#332950. $349,000
'' " CITRUS SPRINGS POOL HOME. Bring your
offers. Citrus Springs pool home. This beautifully
decorated well-kept home has new Berber carpet,
r i 'spacious living, vaulted ceilings, wood floors, tiled
. bathrooms and inside laundry room. The entrance
" " - has a leaded glass door. The rear of the house has
a 22x10 retractable awning over the porch. All
appliances included. Call for appointment.
MLS#329651 $129,900
AS YOU DRIVE THE PRIVATE ROAD lined by lush
.- shady trees, you immediately know -you are somewhere
Special. There you'll find your new home. Updated kit., wood
laminate floors, 4BR, 3BA, gas fpl., 2-car det gar., and a
view you'll never fire of coming home to. Imagine yourself
relaxing by your heated pool watching the sun set over your
220-feet of lakefront property. Refurbished dock and boat lift
. . - . . will have you cruising beautiful Lake Henderson in a
moments notice. Don't let this one slip away! Call today for
' -- your private tour. MLS#334073. $589,000
LOVELY AND COZY 2 bed, 1.5 bath, spacious
2 car garage home in nice area of Beveriy Hills. Well
maintained split plan, with new carpet and paint.
Newer A/C, roof shingles, and soffit. Features privacy
screen on garage door, sprinkler system, and window
. Blinds. Nice golf course, tennis, and near shopping.
Home is ready to move in! MLS#328856. $89,900
-' - '- . PRICED FOR IMMEDIATE SALE -This immaculate
and well maintained home in the much sought after
single family section of Meadowcrest is sure to
please. With 3 bedrooms, a large kitchen with breakfast
nook, a fabulous and huge glassed-in lanai ovedooking
the park-like setting, this comfortable home is just
waiting for you. Come take a look and your searching
will be over MLS#331766 $184,990
3 BEDROOM POOL HOME ON
2 LOTS..Over 1500 sq. ft. of living
- with a heated pool in Flying Dutchman
. i Estates. Home has newer room AC &
- stove. MLS#328416 $139,999
AFFORDABLE AND IMMACULATE! 3/2/2 in
b,t iilui Pr,,-, .,,� - Etates. This fine home is
' 3 , ,l. . comer lot, has a fenced
0, a SdSw, .'..:,aeled kitchen with maple
,,- 1t,,,- ,-. .:.1 i.:., more. Free Health Club
rr..'.. '-r,1., Tr,,; r,:,e is truly a must see!!
f.1iLS iS 5199,900
1 MITCH UNDERWOOD BUILT HOME.
IN': deed resicticoi r-s here Spa'.:ci.s nome
on over 2 acrez wilh plenty ii r)rmr for all
your loys or arimas31 SHORT SALE
flM "I ' I 9LS#3:'.'3 $9 aS149,900
BEAUTIFUL HOME sits on two
lots. Ceramic tile. Frencrh doors, great
light, near shopping and amenities
Make your appointment today Defore
this one slips away MLS#334007
$134,900
LOTS AND ACREAGE ALSO AVAILABLE!
MLS#326201: 0.23 Acre, Citrus Springs.:...................$7,500
MLS#329512: 1+ Acres, Hwy. 41, Floral City ........... $20,000
MLS#331076: 7+ Acres, Crystal River....................$159,000


E4 SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONIC







SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 E5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



:i\I>t4


2005 BUILT
* LOTS OF TILE. - Dream kitchen with granite counters.
* Large pool - entertain guests on huge lanai.
* Formal DR.
*3 Car garage, circle drive.
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536
EWE SUTTON 287-3997
Email: kellyg@remax.net


ESTATE SALE
* A MUST SEE AT THIS PRICE - Fairmont Village villa
* Lovely great rm. w/bay window in
dining area, eat-in kitchen, enclosed : ''* 1
porch, patio, 2 car garage.
KELLY GODDARD 4768536
ELLE SUTTON 287-3997
Email: kellyg@remax.net


- / , /'

>/ \ , '


�.,',., 'i; .

**?''a % In
,'* ... '; " *,W t'
"...*�,. ,,|


5592 N. BEDSTROW BLVD. - PINE RIDGE
* 3BD/2BA/3CG/Den * Detached 3CG
* Heated Pool * Motor Home Garage
* Home 2,218 SF/AC - -
Garage 1,716 SF/AC '
PETER & MARVIA KOROL -
Realtors@
(352) 527-7842 * (352) 422-3875


REDUCED $90,000
This large waterfront home has been
abandoned by it's owner! Must sell
DRASTICALLY REDUCED . se
TO $299,000 I


5335 S. ALICE PT. - HOMOSASSA
* 2BD/2BA/2CG Ceramic, Carpet & Laminate
* Freshly Painted In & Out * Oversized Lanai
* Newer Appliances
*1,435 LA
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
Realtors@
(352) 527-7842 * (352) 422-3875


9610 W. OZELLO TRAIL
YOUR OWN WOODED RETREAT. Very private multi-level
stilt home on 7 acres. Huge great rm., stone FP. Lg.
unique kit. w/center island cooktop. Huge din. rm.
Romantic loft bedroom & bath. Enjoy
2 large outside decks.
Visual tour at www.buydtrscounty.com
NANCY BOWDISH * (352) 628-7800 .
Diredt: (352) 422-0296
Visual Tours at www.buydtruscounty.com



www.Ctrusi onty s �iBtne
~ *i1Z4


4.I


.1b i'T a -!:.


0 D. nAIR3EK2 UK. - URI Lr r WILLAD
* 2BR/2.5BA/2C+CG * Over 1800 SF Living
* GR/Frml DR/Lg. Kit. * Fresh Paint
* Wet Bar/FL RM * Roofover 2006
Directions: US 19 to L on Cypress, to R on
Pine St Ia L o Byrsnimna, teR n Masters,
t e nd CDS.
Lou Nalley
(352) 257-9016
Email: Iounalley@tampabay.rr.com


8917 W. RIVERGLEN CT.
BUDGET BUYERS BONANZA. 2/2/2 caged ingmund
pool home, great for entertaining, w/large Fla rm. under
air. Lovely fenced-in deep backyard w/2 sheds. Quiet
de d dtrF t
V,Sal lio ato
v wvw .lwtji rusi ounty.com
NANCY BOWDISH * (352) 628-7800
Direct: (352) 422-0296
Visual Tours of ,ww*.jycitruscounty.com


3/2 WITH 1802 SQ. FT. UVING SPACE
Partially furnished. 5 Acres - partially fenced. NEW
Well pump '07. 24x1 8 Workshop.
Eat-in kitchen & formal dining room.
Horses & livestock allowed.
Danny Underwood
Integrity Selling Specialist
(352) 586-1743
Emai Florida.JifeStyle@hotmailcom


A never lived in, 2006 built, 3/2/2 for only $149,0001
YES and this well constructed home is just waiting for your
family. Located near boat ramps, hospital,
shopping and schools. Don't miss out on
this awesome deal. Owner is ready to sell,
and wants to hear your offer. HI I
Cheryl Nadal
(352) 302-3555
Emai cndol@earthlink.net


BRING OFFERSI Great home, great location, great pricell
Come see this 2BR, 2BA, 1 car carporfhome with a shed
utility building to store tools and lawn mower. This home has
an add'l rm. that can be used as an
office/den or 3rd BR.'Great locations in
Inverness Highlands South close to
shopping, hospital, and area amenities.
DAWN WRIGHT
(352) 400-1080
Emailh: dawnwrlght@tampabay.rr.com


3/2/2 WITH 1554 SQ. FT.
OF LIVING AREA
Open floor plan, wood cabinets,
screened patio, built-in 2006. -1 '
Short Sale.
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200:, I
Email kmcunnngham@remaxinst


912 SPRUCE STREET
1404 Sq. ft. liv., 2 car gar., tile kit. floors,
fam. rm., updated kit.,
new roof.
BARBARA MILLS
(352) 637-6200
Email: barbaraimills@earthlink.net


YOUR HOME AWAITS YOU!!
* 3/2/2, 1987 Home * Large Kitchen
* Large Master Bedroom * Split Floor Plan
SDining Area
* Enclosed Lanai
* All on 1 + Acres with Waterfront I"-
CHERYL LAMBERT , I
352-637-6200
Email: cheryllambert@remax.net


2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage.
Dir: 19 S to SMW Cypress Blvd., right on 2nd
Sycamore Cir. See Home on elft, # 25.
VAL MAHONEY (352)220-4023
Ema.1 bibaton'arity.'apabon rr oam
SALLY CURE (352)-220-3001
Imna.l ' r' laimptaby.r..om o


NORTH CAROLINA IN FLORIDA? That's what
you'll think when you see the back yard of this T ..f"
unbelievable home. Stunning views of the ' . i
adjoining lake with elevation drop-offs you
didn't know existed in Florida. Quiet, secluded
1 acre lot but close to shopping, etc. At only
$179,900, you'll fall in love. i
John Holloway Sr., cRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO (352) 212-6002
Email: JohnHolloway@tampabay.rr.com
www.TheHollowayTeam.com


I THE KLY/EL TEA @ REM







E6 SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009


D
C
"N
0
Si
A
�..


HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
It is also distributed to approximately
300 business locations throughout Citrus County.
display advertising information...........................................................563-5592
classified advertising information.................................................. 563-5966
ews information..................................................................................563-5660
................................................................ newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
inline real estate listings............................. www.naturecoasthomefront.com
ign up for www.naturecoasthomefrontcom..................................563-3206
dvertise online............................................ ......................................563-3206
....................................................................NCCsales@chronicleonline.com
"The market leader in real estate information"
n.i.EDAM


To have your news in the Chronici.:' H-...r.:I -...,. you may mail, fax or email the
information to the Chronicle, 1624 N.i.-I. 1 M. ..i... ,.I .i .i, Crystal River, FL3134429. Thet
newsroom fax number is 563-3280 and email is neWsdekslc@chronicleonline.com.
You may also drop off your information at the Meadowcrest office or the newspaper's
Inverness office at 106 W. Main Street.
When submitting information, please make sure it is printed or typed, is concise and includes a
contact telephone number.
If you have any questions or comments, contact the section editor, Mike Arnold, at 563-5660
(email - newsdesk@chronicleonline.com).
HOW TO GET YOUR PHOTOS INTO THE PAPER:
-We accept color and black and white photos. We also accept negatives. We do not accept Polaroid prints.
- All photos need to e cropped tightly. That means no wasted space in your photo.
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- Be sure that photos or negatives you submit are taken using 35 mm film. Others will not be accepted.
- Please include your address and phone number on any photos or negatives submitted.
- Photos or negatives submitted will be returned if supplied with a retum envelope and postage.
- When identifying persons in your photo, please do so from left to right, front to back.
- For more information, please contact Matt Beck, photo team leader, at 563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Inside..,


Helpful tips to prevent


the spread of swine flu

any people are concerned about vent others from catching your illness.
swine flu, and while it is impor- 0 Wash your hands properly and fre-
tant to stay calm, we quently for germ protection.
also need to be diligent about. E " Avofd touching your eyes,
following prevention prac- nose, or mouth.
tices to help stop the spread of N U Engage in healthy behaviors
swine influenza and other - such as getting plenty of sleep,
types of flu. The symptoms of being physically active, manag-
swine flu in people, accord ing ing stress, drinking plenty of flu-
to the Centers for Disease ids, and eating nutritious foods.
Control, are the same as the Many people fail to wash their
seasonal human flu vIirus hands often enough or they wash
symptoms. Typical flu symp- incorrectly Hands should be
toms are: Monica Bonsett, washed after:
t Fever (often a high fever). CONSUMER * Visiting the restroom.
" Cough. SCIENCE - Covering your nose or mouth
. Body- aches and when coughing or sneezing.
headaches. ' , ; ,, .- ,Wor ingrwith aw foods.
SiLack ofappetite.. 11.:.. Changing diapers.
0 Fatigue. N Engaging in outdoor activities.
Some people report runny or stuffy U Doing any activity that could contam-
noses or sore throats. Gastrointestinal inate hands.
symptoms, such as vomiting and diarrhea Always wash your hands before eating
may also occur, or preparing foods, touching serving uten-
To prevent the spread of swine flu and sils, preparing formula for infants, han-
other flu, follow.these steps: dling ready to eat foods, or serving foods.
* Avoid close contact with people who - When washing hands, make sure to re-
are sick move jewelry, except for a plain wedding
* Stay home when you are sick to pre- See FLU/Page E13


Painting is
Dear John: I have this West-
ern landscape painting by
Anton Otto Fischer (1882-
1962). He attended Academie
Julien in Paris under Jean Paul
Laurens. His
first illustra-
tion was
done for
"Harper's
Weekly,"- ,.
which led to
more than 40
years of illus-
trating for
"The Satur-
day Evening John Sikorski
P o s t , " SIKORSKI'S
"Everybody's ATTIC
Life," and �
"Scribner's."
He was best known for his marine
paintings. I am wondering what the
value of this painting might be. I
would appreciate your advice. -
JB., Internet

:-. - ---. - See ATTIC/Page E13


by noted- artist; more Gouofis glass, Hummels


Special to the Chronicle
-,'3.>v This is a Goofus glass compote, made about 100 years
ago. It was made in a mold and then painted. Goofus glass was
very popular from the late 19th century up until the 1920s.
RIGHT: This landscape painting was created by Anton Otto Fis-
cher, an illustrator known mainly for his marine paintings. It
might sell for between $1,500 to $3,000. -- ---


A "great" room
PAGE E8
Home Maintenance
PAGE E7
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E2

WHERE'S JANE?
* Gardening columnist
Jane Weber is taking a
break from her column,
Jane's Garden. It will re
turn later this year.

For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the Web site for the Citrus
County Property Appraiser's Of-
fice, www.pa.citrus.fl.us.







Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 E7


Fans not always FRUGAL, o
S not Continued from Page E2


FK r-ia 3 * da arr.-Uent] .1,1 U iaLrWai g'U [a rEi s�Wai~ igIE'


1$314,900


.fA


best choice for


attic ventilation


Q When I purchased
* my house in 1995,
* it had a gable attic
fan. The fan was somewhat
noisy and eventually died.
How energy effi-
cient is this type .
of fan? I have a
single-story -.
home, about '
1,450 square feet
Are they helpful
in removing the
hot air from the '
attic, and there-
fore keeping the
house cooler? Dwight
Are the newer HO
models any qui- MAINTI
eter - than the
older ones?
A: Knowing the square
footage of the attic is impor-
tant, but you also need to
have some idea as to the vol-
ume of the attic space. -
By measuring the dis-


tance from the peak of the
attic roof to the attic floor
and then multiplying that
figure by half the width of
the attic floor, you will have
the volume of a
� triangle. Then
multiply that fig-
ure by the length
4 " of the home and
this will give you
the volume of the
attic.
As an example,
let's consider -a
gable-roofed
Barnett home that is 45
ME feet across the
NANCE front and 32 feet
in depth, which
would total 1,440
square feet. Assuming a
medium pitched roof with a
rise of 6 inches in 12 inches,
the peak of the roof would
See FANS/Page E14


door, a section of foil,.a cookie sheet or
just sit in a tub for finger-foam fun.
Easy to clean from household sur-
faces. Simply rinse with water Puffy
paint can be made from shaving
cream, too. Use equal parts glue and
shaving cream. Add a couple of drops
of food coloring or tempera paint for
color Use a paiitbrush and paint onto
construction paper.
SIDEWALK PAINT: You'll need 1/4
cup of cornstarch, 1/2 cup water and
food coloring. Combine the cornstarch
and water. Using a small container,
mix until smooth. Add a few drops of
food coloring. You dan make a few
batches of different colors. Kids can
use paintbrushes, foam paint rollers
or sponges to paint the sidewalk.
WINDOW PAINT: Mix together
equal parts dishwashing liquid and
washable liquid paint or powdered
tempera. Mix until it's a creamy con-
sistency. Use paintbrushes. Easy to
clean from windows with a moist
paper towel, too.
FLUBBER: This makes oozing,
gooey, cold and wet play goop.
See FRUGAL/Page E13


54'

C -., - E - ,




Dolphir


N EWHOMS * IMMEIA O-CCUPANCY


SPECIAL
* Elegant Granite Island Kitchen .
w/SS Appliance. Pkg.,
* Wood Cabinets Throughout
* Spa M. Bath (Jetted Tub & Walk-In
Shower)
* Tile Floor Pkg.
* Alarm, Central Vac, Intercom/
Music
* Dry Bar w/Wine Frig.


FEATURES
* Floratam Sod, Landscaping Pkg. &
Sprinklers
* Double Pane Insulated Windows &
Sliders
* Radiant Attic Heat Barrier
* Decorative Stepped CIgs.
* Designer Light/Fan Pkg.
* Screen Enclosed
Waterfall Pool


(352) 688-6864 * www.vanordenhomebuilder.com I
NE HOE O AL


NEW
Homes from


75 o0 ed Time
For Limited Time


of'"""
'"ill .


,i_] TE


Rose-1


._., , EE' U I..
CATH.
CEIUNG
'" e' [ ... ., 6 - .-.,,


1 -" I.i A 2 IT
;i la-a"T


*prices subject to change


C G 0 ROVE MANY PLANS AVAILABLE
Open Monday-Friday 8am-4pm
After Hours & Saturday By Appointment Only
CALL TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION
SL Y *352-637-3912
cEas3 ManyMoFPlanetoChoosVrom CB.cosrs2 WWW.homesbycosy.com
I 11145 W. Bentbow Path, Crystal River, FL 34428 * U.S. Hwy. 19,2 miles north of the Crystal River Mall
----------------


Sf{4 ~


NEW MODEL CENTER NOW OPEN!


' " -_'i� . .ag"r _ ,
,� - - - ~ - in-.. .- n ^ ^ '


SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 E7


CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


]


(!
E










Making a greater great room


Wi a few finishing touches - Including track lighting and lamp - this room s now bright, beautiful and perfect for the famnl to kick back and enjoy the view.
Bringing in izght ad. touch ofserenity


CANDICE OLSON
Home and Garden
Television


AL: 71 L T ~ f'4


C indy and John V U-"
have a "room with
a view." In fact, the
wooded ravine in the Oversized furniture Cindy and John called
back yard is the reason made the dark room me in to shed some light
they originally fell in feel small and cramped. on this dark, cluttered,
love with their home. Add to that the moun- not-so-great room and
Inside the house, tain of plastic storage create a bright, comfort-
though, the view was binis holding their three able gathering space. As
less than spectacular kids' toys and Cindy's the first room you see .
Wood paneling on the collection ofJapanese when you walk into the
14-foot-high ceiling and dolls, and the clutter house, it needed to be
a dark brick wall ab- factor was high enough beautiful, inviting and .
sorbed all the natural to block out the view. plastic-free, incorporate
light, and the bulky This great room sure storage and display
hearth took up a huge didn't live up to its CIndy and John's great room had notlhgt - w r d, k md piled h1i with plas-
famoun ft.lomo r p e 2 nameag I.a ii.,o ..a 3...,4m q .1 -, 9i, -See DESiGNI. eE- Ab,_w a I I . V. ,q A 1,._ 4 a , , � � i . 1 j I % � t. I. - f - - ._ 1 ; ". Si


E8 SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









Cimus CouNn' (FL) CEIIoNIcI.e SUNDAY MAY 3r 2009 E9


DESIGN
Continued from Page E8


space, and provide room for the
whole family to watch TV play
games, read or just hang out together
in style.
The family told me they wanted a
casual cottage feel, so I started with
warm white and ivory, and chose a
complementary palette of sandy
tones, pale blues and light greens.
Add furnishings in distressed leather
and distressed wood, and we have the
makings of a room that's a beautiful
extension of the natural surroundings.
But before we could start lighten-
ing things up, we needed to do some
heavy lifting. We built faux beams


WEEKLY
UNEUP

* Nearly a
dozen med-
ical profes-
sionals
contribute
their expert-
ise to
columns in
Health &
Life./
Tuesday

* Read up on
all things
schoolJre-
lated in the.
Chroncle'Is
Education
section./
Wednesday

* Plan menus
for the week
from the
Tempting
recipes in the
Flair for'Food
section. '
Thursday

* Get a jump
on weekend
entertain.
ment with
the stories in
Scene /
Friday

* See what
local houses
of worship
plan to do for
the week in
the Religion
section./
Saturday


and installed molding on the ceiling
to add architectural interest, and -
painted it all creamy ivory to
brighten things up.
Then we took a jackhammer to that
clunky hearth to open up some floor
space. We built a mantel and painted
the brick above it white. A gorgeous
sandy-tone marble mosaic-tile sur-
round and a new gas-log insert make
this fireplace a beautiful focal point
We covered the rest of the over-
powering dark brick wall with light-
colored custom cabinetry, which
serves double duty as storage for all
the kid stuff and a display area for;,
Cindy's Japanese dolls. It solves tli
problems of the "bin there, done
that" plastic clutter and the dom inat-
ing ugly brick in one stroke.
We hung a fan 36 inches below the


I lE KEY Your Supgrmill Woods Specialists
KE R.A.E. i8015 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446
Office 382-1700 * 1-800-237-Ill * Fax: (352) 382-5580 0


9 Medinah $
i* J.'/ m i , r Ilrian-- I'ree G
S 3 -o ln i .,, r.- :.. T. :. 2 .La ir. ,


Tony & Louise Schmid

352-382-5579
www.goFLhomes.com



1-4 DEEP CHANNEL WATERFRONT






$169,900 5561 S. Island Dr. $225,000
rjir Course Hr.mmrao- a R..'zl
* Lc I , 1" 3 IrC.t WiS E36 11
S , , 2 o or One o rie re n , r...r, ,c a r .I ,,r,


Great-room/dining & Kitchen w/l Gulof Mexico.
Vaulted ceilings * Palm & Oaks planted about building
Directions: Sugarmill entrance on site
Cypress to rt @ golf course; rt on Directions: Yulee Dr. to left on Mason
Byrsonima to next comer. Creek; rt on Garcia; rt on Island Dr.

CAROLYN LISTER 1h
f Multi-Million Dollar Realtor ".
S m cell: 422-4620 KEY
ER A Office: 382-1700 """-
View virtual tours @ www.llsteristings.com
CYPRESS VILLAGE OPEN HOUSES
SUNDAY, MAY 3,1 - 3 PM


ceiling to give the area a more inti-
mate feel. A sectional sofa with wash-
able slipcovers (slipcovers and kids: a
match made in heaven) is a perfect
place for the family to cozy up for
some quality time. And where the
hearth once awkwardly projected into


the room, we now have an ideal space
for a gorgeous leather armchair. Ac-
cent cushions, an area rug and a rus-
tic coffee table complete the space.
In the dining area, I framed the

See DESIGN/Page E12


* E-mail
obits@
chronicle
online.com
for obit pric.
ing options.


S jawJ.W. MORTON
REAL ESTATE, INC.
�-� 1645 W. Main St., Inverness, FL -
Email: cent21@infionline.net SALES: (352) 726-6668 * 1-800-543-9163
www. jwmortonrealestate.com Property Management (352) 726-9010 ,"i.2


- :t-

FLORAL CITY - Dr..a-n.. i-one o., nl� 2 ore
rn..:l .rn pa.r. rd Ho.,e ha' Icneli ,.hk ar.d
WHISPERING PINES. 2BR. 2BA home 30', cr,' i,1' Pi-n' Ho,7e b.w /3 ;2t:
has open floor plan, split bedroom' a'o "IIlo,.,a .qc ,den tub diio.. ke ""nr-.
-.etactosed entry and a r..ce screened fItn.,, o , ..r ,',, ,iF, r.;rtrlrAc l6.7'i
porch wilh v.ew of nature This one i. in a,'ao M-d I.ir. II c.-breir ;.,de ih.ori and a
Sthe newer secrior Conaimunry pool and Io.elr 9,rdEn a,'ea ..h boaurtul Ii.e,'s - pla.-r
clubhouse close io all amene.l,e, cloe j .P '", ia,, ! had & .% parall ler-rd ASKING
Whispering Pne Park 579,900 RICE I ydr35476-8727 today
Call Rut Frederick 1-352-563-6866 to preview and ask for fife r325934.


--- - - S''- -: -3---


ESTATE SALE cAoal Oai 26BR 2BA
I ' 0l oFler. cl.,bhou,% pool 6b1li..d,
1i01uttl Labid ibrory e.ercd loo,'n I1ns -q
cu-.1l Rv & b.ai por.rg -urer. w�fter cable, .
la* r,, & ir.,T Ic-r low. rr,ioninance iee.- ia
Warranr, pro..ded 5110,000 1333321
Ask for Jeanne or Willard Pickrel
352-212-3410
wsw.CrtrusCounr5old.com

THIS IS THE OLD FLORAL CITY HOTEL
DURING THE PHOSPHATE MINING DAYS
n.- C , .-. ,




uT.r, '.l M jn i L, & 'A. d: .r,' .r
i ne He. 3 lmers 352.-2 2-4147i
n', t ad OFi wi.-. j i, :k .:,.i I.. % liri. f.n . n1 al
j..i-i I.. *. i.:. * o r,. H Ji >
trr is.. ir rh ,T,.-.rc ? I . ar T u .'r. 0 N- 1rrur
9ahnum'si .in-6r USTED FOR S299,900
Conteat Ruth Frfdenck 352-563-6866 or
Maxire HNltrers 352272-42147 or
Kimberty Miner 352-586-9549









HERNANDO WITH WATER ACCESS.
Thai'r rghr - this Cunorn bull 2,2 hirh a
GREAT k. hani, all 2BRs 2BAi ,l.rde
laundry unew of the lake across the streel
Private access Faor 7ou to put your boal ,n
Th;s home has never been lvid in, still
,mells new Own.er will hold mortgage,
call for deia.ls S99,900 0329333
Deb Thompson 634-2656


MAKE OFFER. NeIl budy .r. 2007 IThs aBR
28A4 tce' h.s 2 071 1 h oF '.. ae includes
t1i .l- r h.:.o Eullr e.qu.pped ti ,n-,dr laurr),
,lr..al a.-d tarera.din., area. l2di asindti
'. barti .[.h i" ted' r'b doublte- o,. yr.cal re
Sha er � Ve t poeniArAr bat-i '-
* - p,.:ha , ,.,r,~d ,- ,d r, Crio O ', rO.i' erred
n33-:43 5189,000
Ask for Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 3 52
212-3410 vwww.CitrusCoaunnlySoId.cam


HERNANDO WATERFRONT Sue,,r ,. cr,
i,.- %od u 6Be read, -irh ih-t 3/2
dr.uble,.de Road, ro rnic .:ae o lhs home
-Fre.'. a :.pl, ficor plan A.. h uFpen i. great
r..cr d.r nmq and k.lrchnn Deck o'h drng
and dock ir f,l,hng and yOuw boar Ownie
.i11 hold the mortgage Call for dcriai
REDUCED TO 5109,000 91329328
Deb Thompson 634-2656


BAYMEADOWS. ... .
Nre ,rgou: s the card
to do 'i be l ,he hoah , -. "1e' - '
ad re,,.lhborh..,d ras homra hat 4000- 'q h
u.-.dfr rol. marte. bath and cld:ae . a muo tce
- clowrser ' !Z6 .om.e bedro.rrs i4pcu. and
npy-n r,,oias [arm.l rocin has Jean Aire ranre
o,-d a- mT.e ne of Lake C.Oil. Has a p'ertyl
doel, a..d I' on 1/2 acre 5358,900
Call Ruth Frederick 1-352-563-6866


SALE OR RENT NO LOT RENT IN CASTLE
LAKE PARKI GREAT PLACE TO WINTER Or
-ALL YEAR ROUNDI 2/2 inh added glos
_ano-.d( , f.tled Family room Loeeiy lanuiated
fooirig in living area Carport and shed.
Control located Walkin shower Owner will
consider hnanrmg GREAT BUY AT $42,000.
l332123
CaU Doris Miner at 352-422-4627
or 726-6668

F--


808 OLD FLORAL CITY .
GREAT PRICEFOR THIS 4 BEKDbM
. Great locatin.._oCte-ftq-ideim.e
- Irtivrnmeis, shopping, hospital, dodors.,
Newi metal roof a great plus Wood-'-
buming fireplace. $115,000. #332521
Call David Kurtz 954-383-8786 cell -.
or office 352-726-6668 n
- - . - - -_ so ..-( " '


THIS IS A SUPER DEAL' I 8 ACRES WTH
BEAUJTifUL TREESi 5 BEDROOM MOBILE-
BURNED AND LEF THE OVERSIZED SEPTFC,
FOWEP POLE WELL FENCING AND SHED
ALSO SAVE ON IMPACT FEE (si S 7A 9 �
yod brTiir a yer of rammerd LOVELY NEWER -
HOME Tr.o roble) acr., th street -
S28,900.
Call Doris Miner at 352-422-4627
or 726-6668


COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON BUSY
HIGHWAY 41 SOUTH. Over an acre - .
surrounded by all types of business
' Property is partially cleared, bas.a well
and backs to Rails Io Trauk. Owner wants
offer ASKING S99.000. 1322982 '1
Call Martha Snyder 352-476-8727 ,


CiTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY MAY 3, 2oo009 E9


i t' 11 h il i; .1 * ; . t c ;.













To place an ad, call 563-5966


Real Estate Class..ieds


Classifieds In Print


and

.. Online


All


The Time


.111 = 4I O

I I I. Ii I I I I K mI aT F1- 1


WOODS
Watr, Sew. Garb.
Lawn Care incl.No
pets. $650. Mo.+ $700.
Sec.(352) 596-2750
CR Riv./Hemando
RENT/SALE 2 BR's,
SNo Pets, 352-795-5410-
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, CHA $395. mo.
(352) 563-0964-'
(352)220L0200
HERNANDO
2/1 Corer lot. $300.
Mo.(863) 965-0698
HOMOSASSA
1& 2 Br furn& Unfum .
i o.r RV .3100 m.:.
hc. Pets Can 628-4441
HOMOSASSA
1/1 No/smoke/pets. Fst.
Lst./Sec. Elec. & H20 incl.
$450. Mo. (352)628-0545
(352) 212-0888
HOMOSASSA
2/1, scr. porch, private
$495/mo(352) 344-5597
HOMOSASSA
2/1.5 $500. Mo.
(352) 628-5696
HOMOSASSA
2/2/Corport, Clean!
No pets! $475 + Util. +
Sec. (352) 586-2976
HWY488 �
Large 2/2, fenced, car-
port, scm. por. $550 mo
No Pets 352-795-6970
INVERNESS
3/1, $500, 1st, last,
sec. No Pets
(352) 287-9268
Inverness
3/2, DW scm. por., WID,
Great Loc. Nice & clean.
$650 mo. (352)560-3355

INENS -


LECANTO
2/1, $535/MO
HOMOSASSA
2/1 J,551)
Call 352- 464-3159
COUNTRY
SETTING
2/2 in Country Setting.
$500/mo. + $500 Sec.
No. pets. For application
Call Lee at 352-250-0664
or 800 -692-4162:




� BANK
FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181
For'Sale or Reni 2 I-adl'
bath inr Sriging Forei
MHP Floral City, 55+
parkDW, on corner lot
$550 a mo.incls.lot rent
352-637-2854 after 6pm
INVERNESS
55+ Waterfront Park,
1BR, water incl. A/C
$3,500 + $270 mo. lot
rent. 352-476-4964
Palm Harbor 3/2
Singlewide
lhtroductory Model
$299/mo wac. 10
models to choose from
On Your Lot
Call 1-800-622-2832



6018 W Oaklawn 2/2,91,
14x65 fixer, 1.25 acres,
$37,900, www.zillow.com,
813-695-0890 or
352-382-1002
S Homosassa
BANK
FORECLOSURES
(352),621-9181


INVERNESS UYR IAL R'IVe'
Extra Irg. Doublewlde 2br 2ba sw on 1/2 acre
3/2 C H/A, kitch.equlp. new carpet & stove.
Giood neighborhood.' ,very clean.alum roof
Convenient to over.10x14 work-
everything. No pets , shop.$35000 cash or
$625 mo. 352-344-8313 offer 813-792-1355
INVERNESS CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront 55+ Park,:- 5 Acres + 1600 sq ft.,
2BR, 1-ihBA, $425. .'99, Doublewlde
1 BR,1 BA, $350 Incl.- fenced, paved road
water 352-476-4964. 352-212-8794-


Floral City
212 DW on3.5.+or-
acres. Withladoochee
Forest area.great for
horse riding.Priced to
sell. (352) 341-6281
(352) 634-0787
(352) 634-1290.
HOME-N-LAND
New Home 3/2
10 Yr. Warranty
Sacrifice! $3,000
down $676.43/mo.
Call to Qualify
352-621-3807.
Receive $8,000
Cash Back
HOMOSASSA
3/1.5, Scr rm w/con-
crete firs. nice shade
trees, over level 1 + ac.
approx 1 ml'E. of 19'
$49,900(352) 564-4595
HOMOSASSA
3/2 on lot, well, septic,
and electric.
REDUCED to $20000
352-634-2471. Broker
LECANTO 3/2
DW, acrer, new
paint/carpet. Appls,
CHA, shed. Owner
Fin. avail. GOOD CONDI
$48,900. 352-746-0714
New 2009 -
2 bed, 2 bath, large
rms. appliance pkg.
2x6 construction,
10 yr. warranty. Must
Seel $39,900 includes:
A/C, steps, skirting.
Call for more details
352-621-9182

NEW JACOBSEN
TRIPLE WIDE
High end home on
2 12 Acres, 2150 sq ft,
3/2, glamour kitchen,
marble in bathroom,
appliance pkg.
Must Sell $179,900
or $787 mo. Call
(352) 621-9181
Receive $8,000
Cash Back.




55+, Nice, 2 BR, I Bath,
carport, screen porch,
furn. Owner finance
$8,500 @ $150 mo. + lot
rent or discount for
cash, (352) 726-9369


Crystal River '
Suncoast'M. H. P.
2/2+ addition, fully fum.
wsh./dry. incl. CHA.
SEioragE cnc,1 $11,500
firm.) (603) 486-2412
FOREST VIEW ESTATES
Great Loc. Pools, clbhs.
& more. Move-In ready,
camp. turn. 2/2 DW,
wheelchair ace., shed
& sprinkler. New heat
pump. $39,900
563-6428/563-1297
Furn. 6 mos. lot rent w/
full price offer, 3/2
Encl. tiled lanai, dbl
carport, tape &
textured throughout,
Kathy (352) 228-7991

Homosassa
55+,Park-
212J92
Jacobson,52 X
26.Many
upgrades.
Heated pool.
$39,500
(352) 382-0795
Stone Ridge Landing
Inverness, Must Step
Inside. 2/2 DW. Furn.
New roof, barber.
$39,900.(352) 613-2767
Walden Woods
55+ Upscale comm.
28 x 56, upgrades &
decorator touch, 3/2/2
Carport, scm & encl.
lanal, 6 mo. Free Rent
w/ full price. Must See!
(352) 503-5164
(352) 228-7991
WEST WIND VILL 55+
E(2) NEW 2005's 2/2
Below cost Carport,
shed, scm prch, fum'd,
pet ok. Resales avail.
352-628-2090


CITRUS RENTAL
MANAGEMENT &
REALTY LLC
527-2428
Full Service
Full Time
www.citruscountv
rentatlsom

2/1/1 Carport..$475
2/1/1.............. :......$565
2/1/1 Carport.....,$550
2/1.5/1...................$550
2/2/2 pool........... $ 650
2/2 Co 50
3/2/2 Pool........... $1000
3/2/2 Upgraded850
.3/2/2 Pool, fum..$1100
Canterbury Lakes
3/2/2............$1000
Crystal River.
Commercial -
900 . sf .: .Trp
Towers$800
1160 sf Office....$800
Jennifer Foreman
Realtor PRM
Alex Griffin Realtor



=aW. ..m. . .... 2E . 2
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
Beverly Hills
2/2/I - $650
Hernando
2/2 Condo - $650
Inverness
3/2/1 - $750
2/2/1 - $675
2/1/carport - $600
2/2/1 - $675
2/1.5 Townhouse $550
2/1 Apartment $500
StoraQe Units
10x20 $84.80 per
month. $50 deposit
See our webslte:
www.jwmortonreal
estate.com
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
352-726-9010


vorld first.
' very d Day


Classifieds


SINGLE FAMILY
HOMES,
DUPLEXES,
WATERFRONT,
MOBILE HOMES

FURNISHED
UNFURNISHED,
WE HAVE THEM ALL
THROUGH OUT THE
COUNTY GIVE US A
CALL..From
$500/mo to
$1250/mo
Alexander
Real Estate, Inc.
Crystal River
352-795-6633 ph
352-795-6133 fx




,FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
IBR, boat dock, refr.
stove, w/W&D, cbl. TV
air, util. inc. $700. mo. +
sec, 352-628-6537
RENTALS AVAIL.
FROM $585.
(352) 795-9123
Charlotte GJRealty
& Investment LLC




S- 1& -
BEDROOM UNITS
CANDELWOOD
COURT
Inverness
I CALL 344-1010
TU, TH, FRI.
8-12 & 1-5
S NO PETS
HUD VOUCHERS
I ACCEPTED
SEqual Housing,
Opportunity


P BEVERLY HILLS
All until + TV hookup I
Included $475.
352-228-2644
L-- _ _=-- - _


*--^- -

BEDROOM UNITS
* MQVE SPECIALL
MUST 'MOVE IN BY--
SKNOLLWOOD
' Inverness I
1B/R SEC DEP $150
IB/R lst MO $150
S2B/R SEC DEP. $200.
2B/R ILST MO $200.
TU, TH, FRI.
I 8-12 & 1-5 NO PETSI
I HUD VOUCHERS
ACCEPTED
| Equal Housing
= Opportunity

CR RIVER- Nice 2/1
$575 mo. No dep. if in
by 5/7. 352-476-9565
FLORAL CITY ..
: 2BR 1'. BA. MH. iusi
150 yara, fIrom, I.h.rr,
dock, $475. + $300 dep.
Near,
Floral City, 10 min. from
Inverness.
Trails End Camp
352-726-3699
INGLIS VILLAS
Is now accepting
applications for our
1,2,3 BR Apts.
Located 10'minutes
North of Crys. Riv
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: M,W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglis Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity
INVERNESS
2/1 Duplex $525;
1/1 $400, 1st, last, sec.
(352) 422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1 near Publix, 55+
$450 mo.,Call Karen
Morton (352) 344-0155
INVERNESS
2/ITri-plex, Great Loc,
clean & roomy. No
smoke/no pets $500
Mo. Fst/Lst/Sec.
352-341-1847

LECANTO
1 BR (352)746-5238
613-6000/613-5974


INVERNESS
Great Neigh. 2/1 W/D
Hkup. Icld's water,
trash law .$5. to.
+se. (352) 634-
ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appis, pa-
tio, W/D hook-up, nice
yard, Exc. Cond. $625
(352) 634-1341

Pinewood Villas
Is now Accepting
applications for our
1,2; 3 BR Apts.
Located in Bronson
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-486-2612
Or Apply Tues & Thur
7291 NE 92nd Ct. #17,
- Bronson, Florida
Equal Housing
* Opportunity




INVERNESS
2/1- $500; 2/2- Irg scrn
prch, quiet. $600. W/D
hk-ups, 727-446-5871
727-688-7866.




THE HEDICK GROUP
Real Estate Services
Beverly Hills Area
Lynn Davis, Agent
352-422-2522
hedickgroup.net


PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad

We Have Rentals
Starting at $425/mo +
Many others t
LANDMARK
REALTY
352-726-9136
Kathy or Jane
311 W Main St. Inv




OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507
PINE RIDGE
1000 sqft unit, (currently
beauty salon).
352-527-9013





CITRUS HILLS
Home, Villa, Condo
GREENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-5921
(888) 446-5921
areenbriarrental.com


Move In Special
1-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $150
2-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $200
Exp. 4130/09
Call Monday Through Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm
We accept HUD Vouchers, Foreclosures A d.

(352) 489-1021 ,


. 10 sUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FREE RENT!
SUMMERHILL
AT
MEADOWCREST
Luxury Condos'
Limited Timel
Call agent for
details.
352-563-5657
/ out zoomcitrus.com

INVERNESS
2/2..5 Townhs., Cypress
Cove, tile. Pets. New
Carpet $650 mo.,
352-220-8254
INVERNESS -
Extra Irg. 2/2/1 Lakeside
Community, pool, dock,
no smoke, no pets. $665
mo. + sec.
(866)637-2631
TOLL FREE
MEADOWCREST
Summerhill, 2/2 w/large
1 car garage, ground
floor, new; never lived
in, near shopping.
Reduced to $900.
MoJunfum. $1200/furn.
(352) 746-9770
(352) 697-0375
Gloria Bonner P & R
Mid Florida Reality




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, trash+lawn incl.
$575 352-795-1722
Lecanto
Newer 2/2, dsh/Wsh.
W/dry, H20- inc. No pets.
Lg.Yd. (352)628-2815
ONE MONTH FREE!
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appis,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625(352) 634-1341




HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
Quiet park like setting.
Effic., cabins,
& mobiles. $350, to
$650 Mo. Pets. ok
(352) 726-2225

















Beverly Hills 2/1 t/2
Fla. rm w/ingrnd. pool
new cent. air. Garage
W/D, fcnd yard. Pets OK
$790/mo.(954) 294-0531


SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 El1


HOMOSASSA 6368
Gross Ave. Spacious 2/2
with 2 car garage. Large
yard. Convent loca-
tion. $850/month Dusty
561-459-6247




















IACNRON
Rental Management
Realty, Inc.

352-795-RENT
, 352-795-(7368) '

www.cltruscountvhome
Rentalonemen

NEED AN
AFFORDABLE
RENTAL?

HOMES
MOBILES
APARTMENTS



starting @ $575.
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2 waterfront
CITRUS SPRINGS
312/1 ...$750.
HOMOSASSA
2/1 $600. moves u in !
4/2/2 house ...$900.
INVERNESS
2/1/1 house...$650.
Call for information

SUNSET VILLAS
Senior Community
Chiefland FI.
Accepting
Applications for
1 & 2 BR APTS
Please Apply
M, W, F, 8am-12p
124 SW 14th Ave.
(352) 493-0220
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.




Citrus Hills
Townhouse 2/22/1.
Terra Vista Club incl.
$1,000 Mo + util.
(516) 991-5747
CITRUS SPRINGS
1/1/1 incls utils/cable
$775 + sec. 249-1127
FURNISHED RENTALS
Crossland Realty
352-726-6644

LECANTO 3/2
3 acres. No pets/smoke
$600+sec. 352-746-6345


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 $525
(352) 795-1722
BEVERLY HILLS 2/1
$700 monthly.
352-746-0330
Beverly Hills 2/2/1
MOVE IN SPECIAL!
Lg. firm. $600mo. + sec
23 S. Harrison St.
Agent/727-463-1804
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2 + Bonus Room
$750 mo.(352) 212-5894
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2, near school,
library, nice Street, W/D,
very clean, nice yard,
$775. w/ opt, Immed.
Occup. (352) 726-7543
BEVERLY HILLS
4, Della St., 2/1, Fl. Rm
W/D, No pets/smoking*
$550. mo. 352-422-6263
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/1, $825. mo. $1000
sec. 352-746-9436
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2- 1995sqft. $1000
1st/L/S. 352-522-0235
Citrus Springs
.i 2 2:00 ;q i l..ng,
j 3,'. u io ed 21, 0 ir
f-.me� 801-103:8340

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, Fenced Yard.
$850. Mo. Fst./Sec.
8105 N. Tiny Lily Dr.
(352) 560-0229

BEVERLY HILLS
1/1 Carport/fenced
yard: $525. Mo.
FstJSec.
31 E. Lemon St.
(352) 560-0229

CITRUS SPRINGS
CUTE 21/2 remodeled,
w/screen lanai, newer
appl.,plus washer/dryer,
CHA $700 mo. & 1 mo.
sec. 352 -465-2434

CITRUS SPRINGS

Lovely modem '04,
4/2/2 built by
Mercedes Homes.
This 2600 Sq. ft. home
on large comer lot:
Large patio, fenced
back yard, sprinkler sys
Near Great Schools,
Churches, Parks, &
Shopping. Located at
8249 N. Triana Drive.
Want to Rent?
12 Mo. lease, $1,200
Mo.$1,000 Sec.
deposit.
Want to Buy?
$8K Dwn./$925. Mo.
$5K Dwn.l$1,000. Mo.
$3K Dwn./$1,100 Mo.
Call Dan at:
(813) 716-5605

CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/2 Lg. master
suite, granite, stainless
steel apple. Large aIsnai.
Lease, + Dep. No pets,
$950.Mo.(352)697-3133
CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 3/2/2, Near Sch.
$875. mo 352-628-0731
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550/mo. 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210


CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 3/2/2, Pool
Home 3,300 sf, Fam.
Rm. w/ FP Form Din.,
Liv. Rm., office, new
roof, fenc. yd. Lease
opt $1,395 mo.
(352) 489-9239

CRYSTAL RIVER
Rent or Rent to Own
3/2 & Large Fam. Rm.
Tiled and carpeted
throughout, spotless
Newly Remodeled
$750. mo.
352-527-0493
352-427-7644
FLORAL CITY
Beautiful 4/2 On 1.2 ac.
*Nice area 1,900 Sq. Ft.
Off CR 439, new carp.
apple. AC & landscape.
$825. Mo.(813) 949-6205
(813) 505-0894
HOMOSASSA
2/2/2 SMW $650up
3/2/2 Meadows $675ul5
River Links Realty
.352-628-1616

,Hornosassd SMW
. ,.i ..:,.t-�.:. screen
' back porch,. private
wooded area. Newly
painted, carpet & tile
Unfurn. $700. No Pets
No smokers
(352) 650-5986
INV. Highlands 2/2
VER Nice! $750/mo +
352-726-7486/726-5588
INVERNESS
2/1/1 $650 mo.,
Ist/L/sec. 352-746-9436
INVERNESS 3/2/1 Gospel
Island Area. On cul-de-sac
by lake. $850/mo,
lst/last/sec. NO PETS.
352-860-2146
INVERNESS
312/1, F/L/S $800 mo.
S(352) 72647692
Inverness Highlands
area Beautiful, 3/2, 2/2
Pool / ac.DW on % ac
Lease Oot .Flexible
Financing mm. Occ
352-795-0088
INVERNESS
Waterfront Townhouse
2/2-%, with 3 decks &
balconies, private
community pool, very
quick access to Lake
Henderson, less than
3 min. drive to
downtown Inv. &
access to Rails to
Trails.
$700 mo + sec. dep.
(352) 817-3185 appt
PINE RIDGE
3/21/2/2, Screen Pool
5310 Yuma $1100/mo
(352) 302-6025
RENTALS AVAIL.
FROM $585.
(352) 795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investment LLC
SOUTHERN WOODS
4/3/2 Luxury executive
home on golf course,
great views, $1,300/Mo.
(813) 390-7109

SUGARMILL Woods
,2 Masters /2/2 (large)
Screen lanal, oversized
gar. new appl. & A/C
$865 mo.
(352)302-4057


SUGARMILL
WOODS
2/2/2 +Lanai,1600 sq.ft.
$875.mo + util.
(727) 804-9772
Sugarmill Woods
NEW 4/2/2, Huge lot!
$950/mo 786-402-9748




Crystal River
3/A.5 2 story on canal, dock
& lift, remodeled, 4 mth min,
$1900/mth 352-622-1825
sales@atlantic-pub.com
CRYSTAL RIVER
Adorable furnished
waterfront
2BR/Boatslip, Lanai
Avail May 1st, Pets?
.352-220-6593
. CYRSTAL RIVER
Unfurn, 3/2/2 $1050
River Links Realty
352-62S.-1616
INV. LAKEFRONT
2/2/2. Lrg. home,
great area -tiled. New ;
.: jrpei. City water.
$750 mo. 352-476-4896
INVERNESS 2/2/2
$750 mo. Appliances/
carpet. 352-464-0316
INVERNESS
3/2/1, Super clean,
tiled, great area,
Irg. Bdrms. $800. mo.
352-476-4896

INVERNESS
3/21/2 Villa
Tile, Washer & Dryer
Scrn'd. Pch. on Lake
Tsalsa Apopka. -
Community pool, tennis
& dock. $900. Mo.
352-812-3213

POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - Waterfront
homes, Wkly priv. rms,
RV lots. 352-628-0011




CRYSTAL RIVER
Share Condo w/own
priv. rm & Bth quiet &
nicv neighbors Full kit.
priv & pool $125/wk
(352) 795-7263
HOMOSASSA
Adult Mobile Home Park
Non-smoker, Term Neg.
352-621-3588
Homosassa
close to town, $75. week
everything icluded(352)
503-7304/813-405-5023

HOMOSASSA
Country Setting.
Furnished, kitchen
privileges, washer,
cable TV, & utilities
included. Large yard.
$90.Wk.(352)628- 5244





BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 fum. pool home.
$1,000. 2/1 furn. $900.
(352) 746-9770
(352) 697-0375
Gloria Bonner, P & R
Mid Florida Reality


OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507




AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50
Ad indudes 20 lines of copy
w/ photo.
Picture Perfect Homes
NEW HOMES START-
ING At 575.000 On
Your Lot
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
LIc.# CECO59685

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
subr I Ii.) Fa;r
.' Art rcr.,

advertise "any -
preference, limitation
or.discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
discrimination.
Familial status
includes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing
custody of children
under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in thfiis newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.









Your World

4 9aMeadesa






CHKONiCLE
tiosiifieds


100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
*Low income applicants
can quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or No credit
OKAY
.recent bankruptcy
OKAY'
CAll TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
*Credit and income
restriction apply*
Florida licensed mort-
gage lender




;. . . . , . ..





2 Great Commercial lo-
cations, $650 to
$850/mo Perfect for any
small business/ office etc.
Call Lisa 352-634-0129
Plantation Realty
BEVERLY HILLS 491
Great Loc! 1500sf Spac.
Bus. Office/Home + 800sf
updated out bldg. Comm.
Easy Acess.Can live in.
$150K (352)795-6282




3/2/2 For Sale or Rent
Citrus Springs Newer
Home, low/dn, easy
terms 352-361-6551

ATTENTION!!
BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
$37,900. Delivered
-and Set, $0-Down
Land/Home $650. mo.
Repos Available
Kinder Mobile
Home
(352) 622-2460

By Owner
3/2/2, Built 2005, like
new, Lease fo Own
Option 352-302-0810
352-422-3922
THE BRITTANY MODEL
3/2/2- Hugh master
bath & screened lanai.
All appliances, includes
several locations to
choose from. $159,900
Citrus Ridge Realty
352-465-3000
THE MERLE MODEL
3/2/2 - FHA approved
with 2/10 warranty.
Builder will pay $5000 of
buyers closing costs.
$129,900. Citrus Ridge
Really. 352-465-3000





BROOKHAVEN MODEL
3/2'//3 nearly 3000 sqft.
Volume ceilings
Corian top/sinks
Lots of upgrades
Summerwind Homes
Inc. 352-527-8035


COUNTRY HOME
4/3/2 Fabulous home
on 2 landscaped ac-
res: Hardwood & tile.
Huge caged pool,
25x14 pool, spa w/ wa-
terfall & outdoor bar.
40x60 workshop/RV,
garage w/12' ceilings.
90001b lift and office.
$499,900. Middleton
Sunshine Properties
352-476-2871
Don Mercado Model
4/313 Grand column en-
..try, spacious kitchen, ex-
quisite master suite with
award winning master
bath. Base price
$214,900
Dream Custom Homes
of Citrus. 352-527-7171

RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Reiai lect

(352) 795-1555
THE OAKWOOD MODEL
3/2/2 - Open floor plan
w/formal living & family
room, den and spec-
tacular master bath.
Sweetwater Homes of
Citrus, Inc.
352-382-4888




MOVE IN CONDITION
Forest Ridge area 2/I/I
CHARLOTTE G REALTY
CALL BONNIE @
352-586-6921
BEVERLY HILLS
Lakeside Villa 55+ com.,
maint. free,2/2 1/2, liv.rm,
din. rm., den, screened
lanai, eat in kit., great
cab. space. Oversized 1
car gar. Fum. optional,
1481liv space 2062 un-
der roof, pics on request.
$114,900 (352)
746-0176
(352) 249-6783


FOR SALE BY OWNER
13 Donna Street
2/1 2/2 carport,
16x20 fam room, 12x16
workshop. 8x10 shed.
Fenced yd. OPEN
HOUSE SUNDAY'S 1-3
$87k. 352-527-8548
FOR SALE BY OWNER
88 SJ Kellner, Bev. Hills
2/21/2/2, FP, OPEN
HOUSE on SUNDAYS
11A-3P $118K firm
Call to See. 746-6093
Must Sell 2 BR, 2 BA,
CH/A, completely re-
done 15 S. Barbour St.
Make offer. After 7PM
(352) 637-3614




Crystal Oaks 3/2/2
For Sale
By Owner
Price Reduced
Split plan. Pool home
w1private back yard, on .
cul de sac, move in
condition. Asking
$169,900
(352) 746-7088




FOR SALE BY OWNER
2133 Brentwood
Circle. 3/2/2. $180,000.
352-527-1789
POOL HOME
4/3/3 - built '04
Tile, pavers, Citrus Hills
membership available.
. To view listing
www.1605wredding.com
$299,900. 352-464-1316
REDUCED!,
POOL HOME '
4/3/Ext: 2 Car Garage
on 1 Acre.
Membership Available
$277,900.352-527-7856




BRAND NEW
For Sale, 3/2 w/ alot
of upgrades
Beck St. Inverness
352-637-4138
Lic # CBS059685

EDGEWATER II MODEL
3/2 - Great Value!
Upgraded appliances,
pantry,large walk-in
closet & more.
Encore Homes, Inc.
352-726-2179


BEVERLY HILLS 1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms... $475$750/mo.
CITRUS SPRINGS 2 & 3 Bedrooms...$600$1050/Il0O.
INVERNESS 2 & 3 Bedrooms........ ....45800/mo.
CITRUS HILLS 2,3 & 4 Bedrooms....$825$1050/111
PINE RIDGE 3 & 4 Bedrooms ........$800.$1800/110.
HERNANDO 1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms .........$475800/1110,.
Check Out Our Website At
www.castrorealtvl .om
Rental Inventory changes daily
] Furnished rentals also available.
MSee Our Rental Ad ln The Real Estate News Magazine.








E12 SUNDAY MAY 3, 2009 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Foreclosures
& Deals
Everywhere

CALL ME NOW!


Deb Infantine
EXIT REALTY
LEADERS -
(352) 302-8046
OWNER FINANCING
3/2/2/ Pool & spa.
Village Green Gospel Is-
land, $60K below
market. 1800 sqft.
Purchase w/$13,700 dn.
$1050 mo. or NO
$$$ down w/620
credit.727-992-1372
RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

ReaiSlect

(352) 795-1555



3/2/2 1991 Close to
school. Lrg corner lot.
$125k (352) 726-2038

Cry ta River
Homes


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI
Your SATISFACTION
- Is My Futurell
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC

CONNELL HEIGHTS
2/2, Great Rm,'vaulted
ceiJ. open kit. b/bar,
fenced back yrd.
scm. por., new apple's,
1600 sf,(mol) 6172 W.
Pine Cir IC.R. Priced to
Sell (352) 795-9603


RealtySelect -i GREAT COUNTRY pay Sale *
Citrus.com PLACE For Sle
C c PCITRONELLE 3 bed-
. .- room, 2 bath. Mini
k Hi ! .= " ~ Farms 2.5 Acres,
R " " Trailer, Water with
softener, septic. As
is $49,000.00.
813-695-0853
For Sale By Owner
3 BR, 2 BA, 2-car gar.,
Whether You Are OUR SPECIALTY Cement block, north
Buying or Selling SIN~CE 1982 Dunnellon Low down,
BETTY MOREAL ESTATE, EZ terms w/$3,500
BETTY MORTON Let Me Work www.crossland down $575 mo.
2.8% COMMISSION FOR YOU! �realcomr (352) 726-9369
OWNER FINANCING
2.% -L O BETTY HUNT, REALTOR Crossland 4/2/office, 2.5 ac,
Rea lSect ERA KEY'1 Realty, Inc. Realty Inc. 2005 Doublewide
A.U�,Ifw 352 586-0139 (352) 726-6644 Like new. 1800sqft,
(352) 795-1555 $9,700/dn, $882/mo. or
(352) Co3t795-1555 LevtADVANTAE $23;700 down, $582/mo.
Homes TTLE 727-992-1372
_ moa . RAINBOW LAKE
Homes-I Hl ;us ilI EST.
Nice 3/1, fam. rm, W/D,
S312 + Office Home $675 +sec. Close to
Remod. W/fireplace, Hwy 41 (352) 427-3078
on 1 acre, fenced. Large '"I F n '
oaks, workshop. No flood 7 CoIn sj
zone $149,000 .
Owner/Broker.
(352) 634-1764 Price Reduced
BYOWNER-3/2 b eted Crystal River 1/1 fully
Suaernice Less than $8000 Tax a 7 fturn. $69,800. Buy
1 yr old, approx 1 acre. $ 0 Tax aiben Owner.com. 34429
incs most furn. Beautiful Rebate Cr-ule (352) 563-5844
-lot, close to town.
$128,500. Call Dan for first time home CalIl Now!!T
312-343-8329; Moving buyers ,if you have Watef
out of state, not owned a home in 327601Ho e
7289 W. Pompey Ln 3 years. Call for info
Homosassa, FL 34446 Phyllis Strickland BLUE MARLIN I�MODEL
RIVERHAVEN I MODEL Kellers Williams RIty free waterfront living.
New - 4/2/2 - Want the -__ _The Moorings at Point of
best of both worlds at Woods. 352-637-3391
a reasonable price?
Best quality - located Call About Saving
on the Grand Canal of Your Home
Riverhaven Village We Have Ideas!
offers easy gulf access
& a terrific community. . . -
$439,000. Moore &
Moore Realty, Inc. $75,000 Michele Rose
352-621-3004 ON YOUR LOT REALTOR .
Includes all impact "Simply-P!t-
fees. Several other I'll Work Harder"
plans available. 352-212-5097
Atkinson thom@atlantic.net
3/2/2 w/den Construction, Inc. Craven Realty, Inc.
screen porch 352-637-4138 352-726-1515
Built 2005, $164,000 www.atkinsonconstruct NEW LISTING!
Owner Financing ioninc.com 145,000!Private Crystal
(352) 410-9316 Lic # CBC059685 River 3/2 country-style .
_____41_-yl II house w/fireplace, -
BEACHWOOD POINT garagecarportshed Plantation Realty. Inc
VILLAS 3/2/2 352-564-0424 J352) 795-0784
Maintenance free 32795
condo living w/the . Homes NEW HOMES Lisa VanDeboe
ri Hvacy of a villa. TARTING At $75,000 Broker (R)/Owner
Citrus, In..c. On Your Lot Atkinson See all of the
352-382-4888 Construction listings in Citrus
352-382-4888 352-637-4138 County at
FANTASTIC FAMILY L. F ic.# CBC059685 www.lana
HOME on 8th tee. realtvinc.com
Granite island kitchen, BONNIE VC DNLHM A
Grecian arched salt PETERSON VICMCDONALD HOMOSASSA
pool w/spa, fountain & Realtor, (352) 637-6200 3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to
waterfall. Four en- Realtor, GRI . .head spring. 163' wfrt,
trances to pool/lanai. dock/slip. Brand
Large elevated lot. Your SATISFACTION new/unoccupied.
www.flodrdoestatehome Is My Futurel! , .. 2 frpls, granite. $579K
ongolfcourseforsale.info , .586-6921" 727-808-5229
352-382-3202 Iv msg. (352)586-6921 -
or (352)795-9123 Spectacular Home
For Sale By Owner Charlotte G Realty Lake Front Peninsula
Custom 3/2.5/2, & Investments LLC 1170 S. Estate Pt.
large lanai/summer kit nverness, F. 32.52
No Pool 2454 sf Inverness, Fl. 3/2.512
cul de sac, $229,000 CRYSTAL RIVER Realtor Private Dock on 1/2
(352) 382-3322 , The Springs on Kings My Goal is Satisfied acre. Completely
Boy 3/21/2 - Luxurious Customers remodeled. One of
SUGARMILL WOODS home - 4,276 sq ft. V * a kind property
3/2, heated pool, well, 20ft ceilings In foyer & Bargain at $349,000.
oversized lanai, fully family room. Hardwood REALTY ONE B, Call Barb Malz
equipped, upgrades floors. Edward Russell Outstadig Agents Keller Williams212-2439
$175k (352) 382-1794 Johnston/Builder ous~ading Res Ke liams
or cell (631) 805-3690 352-795-2200 Reality


Open Lake Front Villa
In Inverness, on
Lake Henderson.
Spectacular View,
Private Dock.
538 San Remo Cr.
Completely remod-
eled inside. Must
see I! 3/2/2 + polI.
Reduced to $349,000.
Call: Barb Malz
(352) 212-2439
Keller Williams
Reality
RealtySelect
Citrus.comr


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

ReiityIeiect

(352) 795-1555.



INVESTORS NEEDS
Homes Any: Size, cond,
location, price, situation.
Over fina'd, dblwide
& mobile homes okay.
1-727-992-1372



Business/Home 3/2 Great
location on Trout Ave. Inver-
ness $165,000. Rhema
Realty 228-1301



7 Rivers Golf & C.C.
priv. member owned.
-corner lot I ac (mol)
$30K (813) 766-9354 or
sweetscapeaueste@
veriznn net


Why you should


mulch around trees


When applied cor-
rectly, mulch has a
great benefit to the
soil, as well as the tree:
We know mulch can pre-
vent loss of water
from the soil by
evaporation.
Moisture moves
by capillary ac- I
tion to the sur-
face, and eva- ..
porates when the -
soil is not cov-
ered by mulch. r
Mulch also
helps' suppress Kerry I
weeds (if the TI
mulch material -,
itself is weed-
free). If applied
deeply enough, it will pre-
vent germination to existing
weeds.
Mulch also can maintain
more uniform soil tempera-
ture. The mulch acts like an
insulator to keep the soil
cool under intense sunlight,
and warm during the cool
weather.
Mulching -also helps pre-
vent crusting of the soil sur-
face, which then improves
the absorption and move-
ment of water and nutrients
into the soil while at the
same time reducing erosion.
Mulching can prevent soil
splash, which not only stops
erosion, but keeps soil-.


BLOW OUT PRICES! S I
Lots From $2,900
Some seller finan.
flalandandrealtv.com Continued from I
772-321-7377


3 INGLIS WF LOT
w/Gulf Access $165K
@ 1.6 Acers Per Lot
T. Paduano/KW
352-212-1446


Your World
, . ,a, e -n, ,,





* ww chronicrhoorie.aam


Page E9


windows (and that great
ravine view) with striped
cotton panels in white and
wispy sky blue. Woven grass
blinds provide privacy and
add texture. Cindy and
John's existing wood
pedestal table took on a
whole new look in these sur-
roundings, complemented
by soft white upholstered
dining chairs. Overhead, a
mother-of-pearl chandelier
is a natural but contempo-
rary fixture that picks up all
the colors of the room.
A few finishing touches -


borne disease from splash-
ing up onto the tree.
Mulch, composed of or-
ganic materials, will also
improve soil structure - as
mulch decays,
the material be-
comes topsoil.
, Decaying mulch
- y also adds nutri-
ents to the soil.
". , Mulched trees
S will produce
roots in the
mulch that sur-
rounds them.
Creider These roots.are
IE produced as an
.* ;,T addition to the
roots that a tree
already produces
in the soil. As a result,
mulched trees have more
roots than unmulched trees.
Remember, never mulch
up to the trunk Stay about
two or three inches from the
trunk


Kerry Kreider is a practic-
ing arborist, a member of
the International Society of
Arboriculture, a tree
preservationist and presi-
dent ofAction Tree Serv-
ice. Ifyou have any
- questions he can be
reached at 302-2815 or
email actionpro
arborist@yahoo.com


including track lighting and
lamps - and the room was
complete. Before, Cindy and
John's great room had noth-
ing going for it-but its win-
dows. It was cramped, dark
and piled high with plastic
storage. Now it's bright,
beautiful and perfect for the
family to kick back and
relax in and enjoy the view.
It's better than great - it's
divine!


Interior decorator Candice
Olson is host ofHGTV's
"Divine Design. "For more
ideas, information and
show times visit -
wwwHGTVcom or
www.divinedesign.tv


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E12 SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009








Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, M~ 3, 2009 E13


FLU
Continued from Page E6

band (pathogens can hide in and
around jewelry). Use soap and run-
ning water, lather hands and wrists
with soap for 20 seconds ( approxi-
mately the time it takes to sing the
Happy Birthday song twice). Wash the
backs of hands and wrists, between
fingers, and under fingernails using a
nailbrush. Rinse your hands and


wrists under running water and use a
paper towel to turn off the water. Fi-
nally, dry hands and wrists with clean,
disposable, paper towels. If you use a
hand sanitizer, you can apply it now.
Hand sanitizers should never be used
in place of proper hand washing!
For more information, go to the Cen-
ters for Disease Control website at
www.cdc.gov/swineflu, or call Monica
Bonsett at the Extension office at 527-
5713. Citrus County Extension links
the public with the University of
Florida/IFAS' knowledge, research,


and resources to address youth, fam- sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
ily, community, and agricultural needs. national origin, political opinions, or
All programs and related activities affiliations.
sponsored for, or assisted by, the Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
are open to all persons with non-dis- Monica Bonsett is the Family and
crimination with respect to, race, Consumer Sciences Agent for Citrus
creed, color, religion, age, disability, County Extension.


* The Chronicle
has forms
available for
wedding and
engagement
announce
ments.


FRU An one container, mix 2 cups warm
water, food coloring and glue. Stir
until glue has dissolved. In a separate
Continued from Page E7 container, combine 1/3 cup warm,
water and borax. Stir until borax has
S2 1/3 cups warm water dissolved. Add borax solution to glue
M food coloring, optional mixture, and mix with hands for about
S2 cups Elmer's school glue 5 minutes. Pour out extra water. Let sit
3 3 tablespoons borax . See FRUGAL/Page E14


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

Dear J.B.: You have a beautiful
painting. I can almost see the clouds
moving across the sky. You are correct
about the painter's history. It was
likely his eight years at sea that had an
influence on his direction toward ma-
rine paintings. As an illustrator, his
subject matter was predominantly ma-
rine, although he did produce illus-
trations for Western books. It would
make a difference in value if your
painting is notated relative to place. I
think it would sell in the $1,500 to
$3,000 range, perhaps more on a lucky
day.
Dear John: Attached are pictures of
glass I think might be Goofus. It stands
2 inches tall, is 4 1/2 across at top, and
3 inches across the base. The painted
areas are indented approximately 1/32
inch. There seem to be three seams,
each running through a large flower
and through the leaf on the base. It is
as though it were made in a mold and
painted later. Thanks for your help. -
M.L., Internet
Dear ML.: I. am glad you sent good
clear photographs of your compote.
Yes, it is Goofus glass and made very
close to, if not exactly 100 years ago.
You are correct it was made in a mold
and then painted afterwards.
Goofus glass was made in America
from the late 19th century to the 1920s
by many glass companies. It was
cheap, highly decorated glass hol-
lowware and tableware often used as-
premiums or giveaways.
Dear John: First let me say I am a
faithful reader of your column in the
Chronicle. I have two items; I would


like you to give me your opinion of
their worth and if there is any market
for them. I do not plan to sell them, but
at my age I would like to have the
knowledge of their worth so I may list
that for the benefit of my children.
The Hummel I purchased as part of
a pair when I visited Germany in 1972.
The other one was a girl with the same
pose as this boy. They were listed as
bookends. My children did not under-
stand that they had any worth, and the
other one was broken by one of them.
The Dale Earnhardt encased 1957
Chevy Racer is of an unknown age. I
do not know if it has any value or if
there is a market for it. - S.H., Floral
City
Dear S.H.: The other Hummel fig-
urine bookend was a young girl with
two geese. The official title of the
Hummel bookends is "Farm Boy and
Goose Girl Bookends." The identifica-
tion is Hum 60/A and Hum 60/B. What
a shame Goose Girl was broken, with-
out it the value drops to the catch-as-
catch-can range for the one leftover. I
think you ended up with the cuter of
the two.
Dale Earnhardt memorabilia gets
bought and sold throughout the sec-
ondary market; prices are very afford-
able. I suggest you hang on to your
piece for now.
-m-
John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
more than 20years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from 11 a.m, to
noon. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, c/o The Citrus County Chroni-
cle, 1624 N. Mead-owcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429, or e-mail
asksikorski@aol.com.


SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 E13


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







E14 SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E13

for a few minutes on a tray
before playing. Store in air-
tight container.
TABLE-TENNIS FUN:
Two or more people sit on
either side of a table or
kneel if it's a lower table.
Each person blows the ping-
pong ball and tries to get it
to fall off the table.
. POOL NOODLES: Not
just for swimming pools.
Drag them out of storage.
Visit your local library, and

See FRUGAL/Page E15


KEY
REALTY

ERA


MOVE IN CONDITION
* 3/2/2 with 1874 living
* Freshly painted inside and out
* New roof in 2006
* New carpeting, tile & laminate
* Central vacuum system
* Deep greenbelt w/extra easement
#330887 $149,900


FANS
Continued from Page E7

be 8 feet above the attic
floor. The total volume of
this attic would be 5,760
cubic feet.
One of the gable vent fans
I researched will move ap-
proximately 1,140 cubic feet
per minute and costs
around $110, not installed.
In this scenario, the fan
would be capable of re-
freshing all the attic air
once every five minutes.
Unless you have an opening
to the attic that can supply
1,140 cubic feet per minute,


"Always There For You"
GAIL COOPER
Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
Cell: (352) 634-4346
OFFICE: (352) 382-1700x309


then some of the air being
pulled through the attic
might come from the condi-
tioned air inside the home
- and that's not good.
Any system you choose
needs to be balanced with
additional venting at the
roof's soffits or at the oppo-
site gabled end to supply the
attic with fresh intake air.
I am not a big fan of fans
because they are just one


784361
















).E O'GV


- - . - ... -
GREAT PRICE - GREAT POOL HOME
* Custom 3/2/2 pool home w/2477 living
* AC replaced in 2004
* New roof in 2008
* 23x13 Master suite w/pool access
* All c Eln-,i.3" .aull ea
* ' t.oo,. r-urr.r.9g 1in . pi . :.r. GrE ai Room.OT
#330601 $209,000


CIT


more of the many mechani-
cal items in a home that can
break down and just one
more item that uses the
home's energy supply. There
are solar-powered fans
available that are quiet and
are capable of moving 1,200
cubic feet per minute, but
they cost more than $400.
If you choose to replace
the attic fan, I would recom-
mend having a humidistat


installed in parallel to the
fan's thermostat so the fan
works to remove both heat
and humidity.
My preference for attic
ventilation is a ridge vent sys-
tem balanced with soffit
venting. The ridge vent can
be installed easily when it's
time to replace the roof shin-
gles. To find out how much
ridge and soffit venting your
home needs, use the handy


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
online calculator at www.cor-
a-ventcom/v300.cfm.


Dwight Barnett is a certi-
fied master inspector with
the American Society of
Home Inspectors. Write to
him at C. Dwight Barnett,
Evansville Courier & Press,
PO. Box 286, Evansville,
Ind. 47702 or e-mail him at
d.Barnett@insightbb.com.


LENDER

ORION


I HURLEY

LMEr

I SMITH


SeeIVirtual T. our @ r II. ! -I [, -I IB


Lou Miele a
I a Realtor
Cell: (352) 697-1685


SAMERICAN A
ERA REALTY & INVESTMENTS
" 4511 H. Lecanto Hw. i
5eC Me:'352746-3600 |


2215 W. Shinning Dawn Ln., Lecanto
Very well maintained 3 bedroom home on two lots. This home
features large bedrooms, beautiful parquet wood flooring,
newer AC, a fabulous screened porch, and so much more.
This home must be seen to be appreciated. Take a look today!!
MLS #330341. $149,900
Din 486 to N. Brandywine Terr. to right on Shinning Dawn to home on left.


Prudential Florida Showcase Properties

RUS HILLS OFFICE' PINE RIDGE OFFICE


20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442.
(352) 746-0744
1-888-222-0856


Email me @ homes4u3@mindspring.com


1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820
1-888-553-2223


For a Visual Tour or Multiple Photos, Go to:www.floridashowcasepropertiescom

L.-. 4


I


I


on
7 Davs
For you,
convenience


_72
mHIE'l


40E WOS








Cimus COUkVfl' (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 E15


FRUGAL
Continued from. Page E14

find the book "50 Ways to Use Your
Noodle" by Chris Cavert and Sam
Sikes. It offers hours of ideas for fun.
CAT'S CRADLE: All you need is
some yarn or string. Don't remember
how to do string games? Directions
can be found at www.ifyoulove-
toread.com/book/chten_catsll05.htm,
or look for the book "Cat's Cradle: A
Book of String Games" by Camilla
Gryski.

DEAR SARA: If not eBay, where? It
seems as if eBay may not be the best
place to try to sell things. What other
online avenues are available? We
have lots of things from personal col-
lections or personal businesses that
we would like to sell other than at


yard sales. What works for you? -
Marilyn, Hawaii
DEAR MARILYN: You can try other
online auction Web sites such as
www.bonanzle.com,
www.bidville.com, www.ecrater.com
or www.blujay.com. You might like
classified-ad Web sites such as
craigslistcom; oodle.com, which pow-
ers Facebook marketplace; Wal-Mart
classified; and MySpace classified.
Or try Kij iji. com, but note that Kij ij i is
owned by eBay.


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal Vil-
lage (www.frugalvillage.com), a Web
site that offers practical, money-sav-
ing strategies for everyday living. To
send tips, comments or questions,
write to Sara Noel, c/o United Media,
200 Madison Ave., 4th Floor, New
York, NY 10016, or e-mail sara@
frugalvillage.com.


S Sc

onl $11 ,90


_=Y -SI


SPECTACULAR FAIRVIEW ESTATES
MANSION priced to sell quickly! Enjoy the
luxury throughout this custom 4,598 SF 4/3/3
pool home. Distinctive architecture in a
prestige neighborhood affords you the
lifestyle you deserve. Call today for your
personal AiwIng MLSi332J88 $449,000


Citrus County's Best Priced Home....
BEAUTIFUL LANDSCAPED
3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car gar, 1985 Sq. Ft.


R ITR US License # RB0033452
I UILDER - 352-527-8764
SAVE THOUSANDS
"ViT U&WLtilfou wJn . idt" e
VISIV OUR WEBSfEl: www.cilhsbwldrefnMne.eom -


* Forinformation about arrests made by the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriffcitrus.org-and
click on the Public Information link, then on Arrest Re-
ports.

823 THE McPHERSON 1TAM

KELLE W'ILI L $$ Multi-Million Dollar Producers
R E A L T Y Call direct: 352-212-0309
CABIN ON THE OUTSIDE - CASTLE ON THE INSIDE
IMMACULATE HOME on over 2
acres of wooded property.
. .. Impressive architectural details
' V including a square cupola with


wood ceiling in the great room
for lots of natural light. 1,200 sq.
ft. 3 car garage has separate
guest area. Must see to
appreciate all the workmanship
in this home. MLS# 331487
$239,900


S 0 * -4^ ^l [g^J M iS EOUAL HOUSING S 0\
� OPPORTUNITY
"i I 1 IIe - 1 3 I t/ [] i II ,,I - ' I ='' ' ,I


nVCNnCOO -Jt4 1I:al r'ILb'
Nce Kiicnen. Landscaping
S84,900 #333149
i ' i i KII 11 1


BEVERLY HILLS- 2/2 Stainiees
steel app. lacuzzi. ench. decorative
pona 5139,900 #333791


I lt.i I lu O a INIUo - M'-i/ rui-idi
Dinning. large Kichen Inside
laundry S104,900 #333301


INV - 3BR & each has i's own full
Dahl .hardwood floors Eal-.n
Kiichen. eic. $198,750 #332396


Z~ .. % i. h r'. *fl:- - !..~r. Us- '~yi.in~'


..... . ... ... . . ..www_"' u *- M ....I.WW43


- - -


SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009 E15


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I IL. NE HOME]-' I NE HOME.�"-[] ' I NEW HOME' - ,]: I NE RO ""MEt , '


NEW HOM Pt'' .]7 JIN R"1 !IDG 2le A-CRES


I NEW,' HO[]ME-


BEVRL Hl' 1 "ILLS! I


�]=A= k -II BEVRL H ILL "Io HO OS SS I0._


:BE=VERL H1; d ILLS I


I






EIS SUNDAY, MMr 3, 2009 Crnuus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
~jW~)sN1IVAIuB8ImUK~p'5LtI~


* Clubs are invited to submit information about regular
meetings for publication in The Meeting Place each
Thursday. Send in information attn. The Meeting
Place, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River, FL
34429, or fax to 563 3280, attention: The Meeting
Place.


Speiaizig n err Vst

& Brnwo Resales0


the link between " plans and reality [

SDennis amato
State Crnfitd CGC-004344
GENERAL CONTRACTOR, INC.
A TRADITION OF QUALITY SINCE 1972
S-Consultation & Project/Plan Review
* Design Services
* Cost Estimating * e gfo-Build Construction
* Custom Crafted Homes * Waterfront Homes
* "Cracker-Style" Homes & Buildings
* Residential Renovations
* Commercial Construction & Remodeling
* Adaptive Re-Use & Restoration of Buildings a,


O0 3BR, 2 BA, 2 CARGARAGE
'2O,90O on your lot
www.encorehomesofcitrus.com





SBuilding homes in Citrus County since 1986
(* C^^t ( Monday-Friday 1:00am-4:00pm ''

2271 South Olympic Hills Terrace (352) 726-2179
Directions: Hwy. 41 S. of Inverness, turn left on Eden Drive, take 1st right at South Olympic Hills.


Terra Vista & Brentwood

Rentals."
Terms- 6 Months or More


E16 SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2009


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE