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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01614
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: April 19, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01614

Full Text

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TODAY & Monday morning
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83 chance of thunderstorms
LOW overnight and into morning.
63 PAGE A4
APRIL 19, 2009 Florida's Best Comrnunity


S C 0 U N T Y






www.chronicleonline.com
kNewspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOLUME 1


Love, loss


& loneliness

O N MONDAY, JUDGE RICHARD "RIc" HOWARD WILL DECIDE THE FATE OF KIM WOOTEN,
who entered an open plea to charges she caused the death of 20-year-old
Tiffany Powell while driving drunk Wooten faces a possible prison sentence of
15 years. It has been nearly a year and a half since the accident, and the victim's
mother, Patricia Powell, is still trying to put her life back together. This is her story.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
S'Patricia Powell remembers having her picture taken with her daughter, Tiffany, every year. Powell couldn't control her emo-
tions as she held the last portrait made of the mother and daughter. TOP: This is the last photo of Tiffany her family has. The black-
and-white image was taken on her cell phone shortly before the fatal crash.


SHEMIR WILES
swiles@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
I n the back of Patricia Powell's
home, her daughter's bedroom
remains untouched.
The mirror at the foot of
Tiffany Powell's bed will never
again show her reflection.
On top of the comforter,
clothes still wait to be hung in a
closet or stuffed in a drawer Colorful
poster paper covered with handwritten
mottos Tiffany lived her life by hang on
the wall, revealing the 20-year-old's in-
nermost thoughts.
"Be strong ... Dream big ... Wake up
call ... Live."
Tiffany loved life, Patricia said. But in
the early morning hours of Sept 16,
2007, her life was cut short when a
drunken driver rammed the back of Pa-
tricia's van, causing Tiffany to be
ejected.
Later, Patricia would find out the
woman who accidentally took her
daughter's life was Kimberly Wooten,
the now-ex-wife of former county com-
missioner Josh Wooten.
Patricia suffered minor injuries in the
crash and was treated at Citrus Memo-
rial hospital. She said she now has a
ridge across her leg where the steering.
wheel slammed into her. She also has
shoulder and back problems.
"But there's a pain greater than that
- in the heart You can't fix that," she
said.


Patricia Powell has kept her daughter Tiffany's bedroom just as she left it on the morn-
ing of her death. Tiffany Powell was killed when a car driven by Kim Wooten collided
with their van while the mother and daughter were delivering newspapers.


'I had an angel'
Patricia doesn't know her birth
mother. She was adopted.
Even though she had a happy child-
hood, Patricia said there was an
emptiness she felt because she always
wanted a daughter. As a child, she said
she cared for her baby dolls as though
they were real. In a family where she
didn't resemble anyone, she said she
wanted to have a girl who had her
likeness.


After the birth of her son, Anthony,
she was incredibly happy to be a
mother, but her desire for a daughter
was still strong. Soon, Patricia's dream
was fulfilled.
"God looked at me and said, 'Trish,
you look lonely. I'm gonna send you
Tiffany."'
On July 6, 1987, Patricia gave birth to
a baby girl she named Tiffany Victoria
Powell.
See POWER L L/Page A9


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Gary Benjamin brought his grandson Daniel
Lynds to the Tea Party held on the lawn of
the Old Courthouse. Benjamin is concerned
that with the current debt America is Incur-
ring, his grandson will have to pay for what
he believes are mistakes being made by the
Obama administration.



Partiers:


Taxes are


too steep

KERI LYNN MCHALE
kmchale@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Emotions boiled over Saturday at the Cit-
rus County Tea Party.
"The message is simple: Stop the
bailouts; repel the poor; cut spending; stop
printing money; stop exploding the na-
tional debt; and cut our taxes," said Edna
Mattos, event organizer
Close to 1,000 people, many clad in pa-
triotic gear and carrying posters, crowded
the grounds of the Old Courthouse in In-
verness to protest against government
spending and taxation.
"I'm not agreeing with anything the gov-
ernment is doing right now, the taxing, the
spending," said Beverly Hills resident
Becky Miller, 66, who had a tea bag dan-
gling from her sunglasses.
The handmade signs said it all: "Born
free but taxed to death;" "Stop out of con-
trol spending;" "Term limits for Congress;"
"Enough is enough;" "You're taxing my pa-
tience;" ".Cut taxes, not deals;" "Stop tread-
ing on me;" and "Don't tax me bro."
"The tea party effort is just a small piece
of a much, much larger effort," Mattos said.
Tea parties are part of an anti-tax move-
ment; many took place on April 15 in cities
around the nation, paying homage to the
Boston Tea Party.
,'America is experiencing an awaken-
ing," Mattos said. "Taxpayers everywhere
are revolting..This time, anger is being
transformed into action."
Mattos spoke of the tea parties being a
nonpartisan effort; however, many speakers
and protesters who addressed the crowd
spoke harshly of non-Republican political
parties and their leaders in state and fed-
eral government positions and President
Barack Obama and his administration.
Occasionally, conversations, chants and
speeches drifted from taxes and excessive
government spending to hot issues regard-
ing the outsourcing of employment, foreign
policy, education, health care, gun control
and abortion.
See TEA PARTY/Page A2


Agricultural approvals await attorney general's opinion


MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Citrus County officials have de-
cided to hold off creating a pro-
cedure for approving buildings
on agricultural lands.
Development Services Depart-
ment officials had crafted a
process that was identical to one
used in Marion County and was
put into practice in March.


However, commissioners and
interim county administrator
Eber Brown opted to delay the
practice any further while the
county waits for an attorney gen-
eral's opinion on the issue.
The county sought the formal
opinion in regard to a building
state Sen. Charlie Dean placed on
farmland he owns on the Withla-
coochee River east of Inverness.
Dean said the state Right to
Farm Act exempts non-residen-


tial structures from requiring
building permits'When they are
built on property with agricul-
tural classifications from the
property appraiser's office.
His two-story structure, which
he said is used as a working barn,
includes two bedrooms, bath-
room and kitchen. Dean said he
allows his children and grand-
children to stay there and he also
uses the property to entertain
business clients.


Dean never formally asked for
a waiver from building permits.
He said he spoke with Develop-
ment Services Director Gary
Maidhof and that Maidhof told
him he didn't need permits;
Maidhof said he doesn't recall
the conversation.
Commissioners asked Maid-
hof to find out how other coun-
ties sign off on agricultural
buildings. His staff checked with
Hernando, Marion and Sumter


counties, and the city of Ocala,
and all required property own-
ers to submit site plans to re-
ceive the building-permit
waiver.
County officials are asking the
attorney general to determine
whether Dean's structure is a
"residential dwelling."
A formal response should be
received in 60 to 90 days, County
Attorney Robert "Butch" Battista
said.


Annie's Mailbox............A17
Editorial ..................... C2
Entertainment.............B6
Excursions ................ A13
Horoscope ................A18
Movies ...................... A18
Obituaries ................... A6
Puzzles......................... A18
Together ....................... A17


No lottery
Because of early
production deadlines,
Saturday's lottery num.
bers were not available.
To see if you won, go
to www.flalottery.com.


Ten years later: Shoot first
The Columbine massacre changed the rules. Now, squads are taught
to rush toward gunfire and step over victims to stop gunmen./A12 j

Pirates ... let go? NATO encounter underscores dilemmas./A12
JO OSS Extension Service expert shares tips on how to cope./E6
Watching Waiting Obama weighs Cuba's next mo'es. A12 _.


Census time
Workers are out
and about./A3.




l84578 l 007' !


L14 ISSUE 255


ssNEaeW^~iMM-TE"ssssss









A2 SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 LOCAL


TEA PARTY
Continued from Page Al
During her speech, U.S. Rep. Ginny
Brown-Waite told protesters she is not in
support of government stimulus. Brown-
Waite is a proponent of the Fair Tax Bill
and said she understands
everyday, hardworking people ON Ti
have no problem paying their
fair share of taxes, but don't o To see m
want any more money taken of the te
out of their pockets, espe- chronicle
cially to support illegal immi-
grants and to pay increasing energy bills.
"I'm totally tea'd off about what's going
on in our country," Brown-Waite said.
"What we don't want is a government that
is going to force its will on every single
human being in our country."
Brown-Waite told protesters they proba-
bly wouldn't find too many orthopedic sur-
geons in Washington, D.C.
"There isn't a lot of spine there in Wash-
ington," Brown-Waite said.
Several protesters asserted that the is-
sues addressed at the tea party were not


only concerns of the Republican Party.
"This is an American issue," Hernando
resident Kathleen McWherter, 36, said.
Sally Quinn, 73, of Citrus Hills, said many
people are upset about the state of the
economy, excessive government spending
and the growing national debt.
It is irresponsible for today's politicians


IE NET
nore photos
a party, visit
eonline.com.


to dig such an enormous fi-
nancial hole for the citizens of
future generations to fill,
Quinn said.
"I can't say yes to this kind of
spending," Brown-Waite said
during her speech.


"We will not tolerate government-funded
bailouts and wasted spending," Mattos
said, echoing Brown-Waite.
Gary Benjamin, 52, of Brooksville, said
he is very worried about government offi-
cials spending money they do not have and.
the impact it will have on his children and
grandchildren.
"For too long the federal government has
acted without constitutional restraint,"
Mattos said. "Washington is looting the
American citizenry ...We must be vigilant
and make our voices heard."


UAVI Io lL /L/unronicle
Protesters hold up signs and American flags Saturday at the Citrus County Tea Party. Close
to 1,000 people crowded the grounds of the Old Courthouse in Inverness to protest against
government spending and taxation.


County BRIEFS

Participate in play
at Citrus Hills Lodge
Encore Ensemble will pres-
ent the audience participation
show' "The Wedding from Hell,
Italian Style" at 2 p.m. Sunday,
April 26, at Tuscany on the
Meadows, Citrus Hills Lodge,
350 E. Norvell Bryant Highway
in Hernando. Tickets are $30.
For information, call 527-4100.
Hikers welcome to
explore new trail
The Florida Trail Association
and Southwest Florida Water
Management District invites the
public to enjoy the new trail at
Pott's Preserve. The trail is
about two miles in length and
visitors may walk or hike it.
Meet representatives 9 a.m.
Saturday at the Hooty Point en-
trance just off Turner Camp
Road in Inverness.
Those who wish to hike far-
ther will have an option to con-
tinue on to other trails after the
short hike.
Bring a lunch and picnic
along the Withlacoochee River.
For information, call Linda
Dawson at 726-7293.
Charity golf tourney
scheduled June 6
The inaugural 'HOPE
Wildlife' Golf Tournament will be
Saturday, June 6, at Pine Ridge
Community Golf & Country
Club, in memory of Harry
Wendler.
HOPE Wildlife Rehabilitation
shelters several permanently
injured (non-releasable) hawks,
owls and falcons, licensed with
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,
that they use for their "Wings of
HOPE" educational programs
to help educate the community
about birds of prey.
Shotgun start is at noon for
the scramble-format charity
tournament, with registration
beginning at 11 a.m.
Prizes will be awarded for
first, second and third places.
There will be contests for
longest drive, closest to the pin'
and a putting.
Cost per player, including hot
dogs, hamburgers and pulled
chicken after golf, is $50 ($30 is
tax deductible). Proceeds will
help HOPE with the enormous
food and medical bills for the
injured and orphaned wildlife in
their care.
HOPE stands for Helping
Our Precious Environment
through the rescue, rehabilita-
tion and release of Florida's
native wildlife. The nonprofit
group does not receive any
funding from city, county, state
or federal agencies. HOPE
volunteers receive no salary or
compensation.
For an entry form or more in-
formation, call 628-9464.
-From staff reports

Symbolic

Treasures


CITRUS MEMORIAL






Thankful F(



500 Volun


Our


leers.


J. . *
- 0 0


* ., .. .
J -Of M
May erowk


* .0


Lloyd Hughes, 2nd Vice President; Evelyn McCow, Ireasurer; jack Condron,
1st Vice President; Sandi Phillips, President; and Pat Ansen, Secretary.


Hands That Serve Hearts That Care
783059


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


''o " -a










Page A3 - SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009



TATE


LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around

THE STATE

St. Augustine
Miss. fugitive gunned
down by deputies
Sheriff's deputies in north
Florida believe they have
killed a fugitive twice featured
on "America's Most Wanted"
for allegedly beating to death
his mother.
The St. John's County
Sheriffs Office was on the
lookout for 52-year-old Rod-
ney Joseph Lasseigne after
the U.S. Marshal's Service
said he might be in the area.
Three deputies responding
to a call early Saturday mom-
ing about a stolen semi saw
the Toyota Yaris associated
with the Gautier, Miss., man,
just off Interstate 95. They ap-
proached the car and opened
fire after the man brandished
a sawed-off shotgun.

Fort Lauderdale
Teenager accused of
killing to boost image
Investigators say a 16-
year-old in Lauderdale Lakes
robbed and fatally shot an-
other youth outside his high
school to make himself look
tough.
Janard Orange was ar-
rested on first-degree murder
charges. Gregory Smith, a
16-year-old freshman, was
apparently a random target.
Broward County Sheriff Al
Lamberti said Friday that Or-
ange pulled the trigger "to
boost his street image."
Investigators said Orange
was riding with three other
youths who spotted Smith
near Boyd Anderson High
School waiting for a ride. The
car circled back and three
gunmen wearing bandanas
emerged.
Smith had nothing but a
cell phone, and pleaded for
his life as he handed it over.
Detectives nab the
'Saggy Pants Bandit'
Authorities in South Florida
have finally nabbed a suspect
dubbed the "Saggy Pants
Bandit," accused of holding
up 28 restaurants and gas
stations. He and an alleged
accomplice were shot at and
wounded early Saturday be-
fore being caught. The sus-
pects weren't identified.

Miami
Man missing after
falling overboard
The 6oast Guard searched
Saturday for a 39-year-old
man who went overboard a
Norwegian Cruise Line ship
off the Bahamas.
The incident happened
early Saturday morning, some
S60 miles north of Nassau.
The man was not immedi-
ately identified.

Hollywood
Mom canoeing Gulf as
support for oceans
A mother of two will paddle
more than 1,000 miles in an
outrigger canoe to show her
support for environmental
legislation.
Margo Pellegrino will travel
from South Florida to New
Orleans over the next few
weeks. She's working in part-
nership with the Natural Re-
sources Defense Council,
and pushing for legislation to
protect beaches and coastal
waters. She's expected to be .
making stops in Sarasota,
Tampa and Tallahassee.
-From wire reports


Corrections

U The name of citizen jour-
nalist Oliver Simon was mis-
spelled in a caption for the


photo, "Suspicious container
investigated," on Page A4 of
Saturday's edition.
* A column on Page C1
today omits the phone num-
ber for Judge Richard
Howard. His office number is
341-6705.
The Chronicle regrets the
errors.


Plane parts gathered


Friday crash splits

home in half

Associated Press
OAKLAND PARK - National
Transportation Safety Board crews
have recovered all major parts of a
small airplane that crashed into a
home shortly after take-off near
Fort Lauderdale.
Still, the investigation is far from
over. Investigator Robert Gretz said
Saturday it would take months to
reach a conclusion.
Only the pilot was killed when the
twin-engine 'Cessna 421 crashed
around 11:20 a.m. Friday, and the
house burst into flames. The
owner's nephew barely escaped the
catastrophe, leaving just before the
aircraft hit to visit his aunt.
Gretz said the Federal Aviation
Administration estimated the plane


Associated Press
Investigators respond Friday to the scene where a Cessna 421 crashed into
a house after taking off from Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport in Oakland
Park. The pilot was killed.


never got higher than 300 feet
He also said pilot Cecil Murray
was flying to the Jacksonville area
to sell it. Murray's family described
the 80-year-old as an experienced
pilot.


Murray is a Costa Rica native who
spends only a few weeks a year in
Florida.
The smell of fuel hung in the air
hours after the crash, and the shell
of the aircraft was sandwiched be-


Si 'L LA.
Ext ii ,li ,' 95)


.Oa and
'Park
Fort i I. I
I' JL'u:.rdale Fi, Oi

'441 '
I - T7 0. .. 1I
SOURCES: ESRI; TeleAtlas


tweei two walls of the beige house.
The home's driveway was black, but
its white mailbox was still standing.
"The house was a total loss," said
Broward Sheriff's Office spokes-
man Mike Jachles. "The plane went
right into the center of the house."
The crash was at least the fifth in-
volving the airport, which caters to
small planes and jets, in the past 12
years.


County BRIEFS

Elections office to
verify addresses
The Citrus County Supervi-,
sor of Elections is conducting a
voter registration list mainte-
nance program as required by
law. Some voters will receive
an address confirmation card in
the mail from the elections of-
fice.
* If your name and address
are correct on the card, you do
not need to do anything.
* If you have changed your
name or address, complete the
card and mail it back.
* If you received a card to
your address and the voter no
longer lives at your address,
please returnmthe card to your
mail carrier. ,
For more information, call the
Inverness office at 341-6740.
Inverness sets
workshop dates
A schedule of public work-
shops relating to budget issues
has been announced by the
city of Inverness.
The city council will hold
these workshops at the govern-
ment center at 212 W. Main St.
as follows:
* 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, April
28 - Citywide five-year Capital
Improvement Plan (CIP).
* 5:30 p.m. Thursday, May.
21 - CIP workshop (if neces-
sary).
* 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 14
- Citywide budget workshop.
* 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 28
- Budget workshop (if neces-
sary).
* 5:01 p.m. Thursday, Sept.
3 - First public hearing.
* 5:01 p.m. Thursday, Sept.
17 - Final public hearing.
Any person who wishes to
appeal any decision from any
matter considered in work-
shops will need a record of the
proceedings and may need to
provide a verbatim record that
includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is
to be based.
For more information, call
726-2611.
Help sought for
injured woman
An account at SunTrust Bank
has been set up for Mary Jef-
ford, a 25-year-old Citrus
Springs woman who was seri-
ously injured in a February traf-
fic wreck that killed three
people.
The Mary Jefford Trust Ac-
count will help pay for medical
costs.
According to Florida Highway
Patrol, a 21-year-old Dunnellon
man was driving a four-door
Saturn at 8:45 p.m. west on
West Hunterhill Street at an ex-
cessive rate of speed when he
ran the stop sign at Velveteen
Point and collided with Jefford's
1998 Ford two-door car, which
was headed north on Velveteen
toward North Femandina Av-
enue. The accident occurred
two miles from her parents'
house.
The community is east of
County Road 495 and south of
Dunklin Avenue, in the Cit-
ronelle area. The driver and two
passengers died in the wreck.
-From staff reports


Special'to the Chronicle
The Census Bureau launched a
massive operation March 30 to verify
and update more than 145 million ad-
dresses as it prepares to conduct the
2010 Census.
Nationwide, more than 140,000 cen-
sus workers will participate in the ad-
dress canvassing operation, an
important first step in.assuring that
every housing unit receives a census
questionnaire in March 2010. All in-
formation is kept confidential. "A
complete and accurate address list is
the cornerstone of a successful cen-
sus," said Tom Mesenbourg, acting di-
rector of the U.S. Census Bureau.
"Building on the achievements of the
2000 Census, we have been testing
and preparing for the 2010 count all
decade, and we're ready to fulfill our
constitutional mandate to count
everyone living in the United States."
The first publicly visible activity of
the 2010 Census is ahead of schedule.
Address canvassing kicked off a week
earlier than originally planned and
should conclude by mid-July The op-
eration will use new hand-held com-
puters equipped with GPS to increase
'-geographic accuracy The ability to
capture GPS coordinates for most of
the nation's housing units will greatly
reduce the number of geographic
coding errors caused by using paper
maps in previous counts.
"The primary goal of the census is
to count everyone once, only once,
and in the right place," Mesenbourg
said. "Because the census is used for


CENSUS JOBS
* While some temporary census
jobs will be available over the
next several months, most hiring
will occur in the spring of 2010.
* Efforts to recruit for peak census
operations will resume n the fall
of 2009.
* In Florida, bilingual specialists
are needed for a variety ot lan-
guages. Visit the Census Re-
gional Offices Web site, select
Florida on the map provided and
then select the "Regional Em-
ployment" optic'n. .
Source: U.S. Census Bureau Web site,
www.census.gov

reapportioning seats in the U.S.
House of Representatives and the
distribution of more than $300 billion
in federal dollars every year to state
and local governments, it's essential
to get this first step right."
In the past several years, the Census
Bureau has been actively working on
updating its geographic databases and
master address files. From implement-
ing the Local Update of Census Ad-
dress program where more than 11,500
tribal, state and local governments par-
ticipated in a review of the Census Bu-
reau's address list for their area, to
increasing the precision of the GPS
mapping, many advances have been
made to compile the most comprehen-
sive listing of addresses in the nation.
The address canvassing operation
will be conducted out of 151 local cen-


sus offices across the United States;
most offices started April 6. In most
cases, census workers will knock on
doors to verify addresses and inquire
about additional living quarters on
the premises. This is the first census
to include group quarters (such as
dormitories, group homes, prisons
and homeless shelters) in the address
canvassing operation, which should
improve both the accuracy and cov-
erage of the final count.
There will be one final opportunity
to add new home construction in
early 2010, prior to the mailing of the
census questionnaires.
Census workers can be identified
by the official Census Bureau badge
they carry. During the address can-
vassing operation, census workers
may ask to verify a housing struc-
ture's address and whether there are
additional living quarters on the
property.
2010 Census workers will never ask
for bank or Social Security informa-
tion. All census information collected,
including addresses, is confidential
and protected by law. By law, the Cen-
sus Bureau cannot share respon-
dents' answers with the FBI, the IRS,
CIA, Welfare, Immigration or any
other government agency No court of
law or law enforcement agency can
find out respondents' answers.
All Census Bureau employees - in-
cluding temporary employees - take
an oath for life to keep census infor-
ination confidential. Any violation of
that oath is punishable by a fine of up
to $250,000 and five years in prison.


YMCA National Healthy Kids Day


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Justin Loktonicki, 6, and birthday girl Isabella Slusser, 4, play in the bubbles Saturday during the YMCA Na-
tional Healthy Kids Day activities at Whispering Pines Park. The day is intended to promote healthy lifestyle ac-
tivities for children and adults.




Census workers verify addresses








.CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUN[wy, APmi. 9,


Sheriff's Office
Domestic battery
arrests
* Christopher Michael Fra-
zier, 40, Inverness, at 12:56 a.m.
Tuesday on a domestic battery
charge. A 38-year-old woman
said Frazier hit the side of her
face. She also said "he only does
this when he is drunk," according
to the arrest report. Frazier said
nothing happened between
them. No bond.
* Anthony Darrell Gaskin,
39, Beverly Hills, at 8:16 a.m.
Monday on a domestic battery
charge. A 39-year-old woman
said Gaskin slapped her face
during an argument, according to
the arrest report. Gaskin said that
while they argued, nothing phys-
ical happened. No bond.
Other arrests
* Wendy Lynn Baker, 32,
2265 S. Rock Crusher Road,
Homosassa, at 10:44 p.m.
Thursday on charges of resisting
an officer with violence and dis-
orderly intoxication. Baker hit a
deputy in the shoulder and
kicked him while she was being
escorted out of a bar, according
to her arrest report. Bar employ-
ees wanted her to leave after she
was dancing with her pants
down. Bond $5,150.
* Denise A. Cohagan, 42,
388 N. Chameleon St., Crystal
River, at 12:35 a.m. Friday on
charges of possession of a con-
trolled substance and driving with
a suspended/revoked license
(knowingly). Bond $5,500.
* John Marvin Jones Sr.,
34, 4 Utah St., Beverly Hills, at
10:20 a.m. Friday on a charge of
a sexual offender failing to report
a name/address change within
48 hours. Bond $20,000.
* Tiffini Margaret Tamme,
29, 2279 N. Reynolds Ave.,
Crystal River, at 9:31 a.m. Friday
on a Hillsborough County war-
rant charge of violation of proba-
tion in reference to an original
felony case of grand theft and or-
ganized fraud. No bond.
* Robert James Tacy, 24,
4218 W. Glen St., Lecanto, at
4:19 p.m. Friday on a charge of


driving with a suspended/re-
voked license. Bond $500.
Burglaries
E A burglary, reported on April
6, occurred at about 10 p.m.
Sunday, April 5, to a conveyance
in the 4400 block of S. Chirper
Drive, Lecanto.
M A burglary, reported on April
7, occurred at about noon on
April 7, to a conveyance in the
7300 block of E. Gospel Island
Road, Inverness.
* A burglary and grand theft
occurred at about 9 a.m. Tues-
day, April 7, in the 2200 block of
W. Austin Drive, Citrus Springs.,
H A burglary occurred some-
time between March 20 and April
8 to a commercial structure in the
2800 block of N. Lecanto High-
way, Lecanto.
* Preliminary investigation re-
vealed that sometime between
April 5 at 6 p.m. and April 8 at
5:50 p.m., a burglary to two un-
secured vehicles occurred in the
3800 block of W. Klett Path,
Lecanto.
SA burglary, reported on April
9, occurred at about 12:30 p.m.
April 9, to a conveyance in the
1100 block of Jones Avenue, In-
verness.
* A burglary, reported on April
9, occurred at about 10 p.m.
Wednesday, April 8, to a con-
veyance in the 8800 block of S.
Zan Point, Floral City.
N A burglary, reported on April
9, occurred at about 8 p.m. Sun-
day, April 5, to a conveyance in
the 4700 block of S. Hatteray
Point, Crystal River.
* A burglary occurred on
Thursday, April 9, between 5
p.m. and 6 p.m. in the 1600 block
of N. Rock Cress Path, Crystal
River. .
* Preliminary investigation on
April 10 revealed vehicle burgla-
ries occurred at about 10 p.m.
April 9, in the 6500(block of E.
Sage Street, Inverness.
SA burglary occurred at about
10 p.m. Thursday, April .9, to an
unoccupied residence in the
8900 block of E. Roan Lane, In-
verness.
* A burglary and grand theft,


reported on April 10, occurred at
about 5:09 p.m. Tuesday, March
17, to an unoccupied structure in
the 9700 block of S. Pleasant
Grove Road, Inverness.
H A burglary, reported on April
11, occurred at about 12:01 a.m.
April 11, to an unoccupied struc-
ture in the 1500 block of N. U.S.
41, Dunnellon.
SA burglary occurred at about
.9 p.m. Friday, April 10, to a shed
in the 3300 block of S. Anatole
Way, Homosassa.
S.An attempted burglary, re-
ported on April 12, occurred at
about 12:22 a.m. April 12, to an
unoccupied structure in the 3100
block of W. Dunnellon Road, Cit-
rus Springs.
* A burglary to a business, re-
ported on April 12, occurred at
about 10:30 p.m. Friday, April 10,
in the 2000 block of Highway 44
West, Inverness.
* A burglary, reported on April
12, occurred at about 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, April 11, to a con-
veyance in the 3500 block of W.
Ivy Street, Dunnellon.
H A burglary, reported on April
12, occurred at about 9 p.m. April
11, to an unoccupied residence
in the 3400 block of E. Poet
Lane, Hernando.
* On April 12, about 3:55
p.m., a known subject was ar-
rested for burglary of an unoccu-
pied residence and grand theft
and a second known subject was
arrested for accessory after the
fact, in the 200 block of S. Fill-
more Street, Beverly Hills.
* An alleged burglary, re-
ported on April 13, 8 p.m. Sun-
day, April 12, to an unoccupied
residence in the 3100 block of N.
Buckhom Drive, Beveriy Hills.
SA burglary, reported on April
15, occurred at about 8:30 p.m.
April 14, to a conveyance in the
2600 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
H A burglary and grand theft,
reported on April 15, occurred at
about midnight on Tuesday, April
14, to an unoccupied residence


in the 8200 block of N. Sussex
Drive, Citrus Springs.
SA burglary, reported on April
15, occurred at about 6 p.m.
Sunday, April 12, to an unoccu-
pied residence in the 10200
block of N. Ocean Drive, Citrus
Springs.
M A burglary, reported on April
15, occurred at about midnight
on Wednesday, April 1, to a resi-
dence in the 900 block of N.E.
7th Avenue, Crystal River.
HA burglary, reported on April
15, occurred at about 3a.m. April
15, to a conveyance in the 2300
block of N.W. Highway 19, Crys-
tal River.
SA burglary occurred at about
5 p.m. Wednesday, April 15, to a
conveyance in the 2700 block of
E. Marcia Street, Inverness.
* An attempted burglary oc-
curred at about 1:46 a.m. Thurs-
day, April 16, to an unoccupied
structure in the 6900 block of N.,
Florida Avenue, Floral City.
Thefts
* Preliminary investigation on
April 8 revealed a grand theft oc-
curred at about 12:30 a.m. Mon-
day, April 6, in the 2400 block of
E. Marcia Street, Inverness.
* A grand theft, reported on
April 6, occurred at about 8 a.m.
Monday, March 16, in the 6600
block of S. PleasantAvenue, Ho-
mosassa.
* A petit theft and a criminal
mischief occurred at about 5 p.m.
Saturday, April 4, in the 300 block
of W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Lecanto.
* On April 6, at about 5:45
p.m., a female subject was ar-
rested for retail petit theft in the
400 block of S. Suncoast Boule-
vard, Homosassa.
* A petit theft occurred at
about 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, April
7, in the 2800 block of E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Invemess.
* An auto theft, reported on
April 7, occurred at-about mid-
night on Wednesday, March 4, in
the 6700 block of E. Forest Trail
Drive, Hemand6. -


For the RECORD


* A petit theft, reported on
April 7, occurred at about 5:20
p.m. April 7, in the 1400 block of
N. U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
* On April 7, about midnight,
a male subject was arrested for
grand theft in the 1200 block of
W. Main Street, Invemess.
M A petit retail theft occurred at
about 12:35 a.m. Wednesday,
April 8, in the 400 block of S.
Suncoast Boulevard, Ho-
mosassa.
* On April 8, about 11:20 a.m.,
an adult female was arrested for
retail petit theft in the 2800 block
of E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, In-
verness.
* On April 8, about 6:50 p.m.,
an adult female was arrested for
retail petit theft in the 2800 block
of E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, In-
vemess.
* A grand theft, reported on
April 9, occurred at about mid-
night on Sunday, June 1, 2008,
in the 13400 block of S. South-
point Avenue, Floral City.
* A grand theft, reported on
April 9, occurred at about mid-
night on Wednesday, April 8, in
the 8800 block of N. Salina Drive,
Citrus Springs.
* A grand theft of a camera
occurred at about 3:10 p.m.
Thursday, April 9, in the 8600
block of W. Crystal Street, Crys-
tal River.
* A petit theft, reported on
April 9, occurred at about 4 p.m.
April 9, in the 10300 block of E.
Victory Lane, Inverness.
* A grand theft, reported on
April 10, occurred at about 9 p.m.
Saturday, March 28, in the 7700
block of N. Carl G Rose High-
way, Hemando.
* A grand theft, reported on
April 10, occurred at about 8 p.m.
Friday, Apnl 3, in the 3900 block
of S. Highland Avenue, Inver-
ness.
* A grand theft, reported on
April-10, occurred at about 2 p.m.
Friday, March 27, in the 100
block of S. Hibiscus Avenue,
Crystal River.
* On April 11, about noon, a
known juvenile male was ar-
rested for retail petit theft in the


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City H
Daytona Bch. 81
Ft. Lauderdale 80
Fort Myers 84
Gainesville 81
Homestead 82
Jacksonville 80
Key West 82
Lakeland ' 85
Melbourne 82


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast,
pc
pc
pc
ts
-pc
ts
pc
pc
pc
.PC



PC


MARINE OUTLOOK


South winds from 10 to 20 knots.
Seas 2'to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters a moderate chop. Partly to
mostly sunny today.


83 55 0.00 82 52 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
forecast by:
� TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 83 Low: 63
Sunny to partly cloudy with a
southerly breeze


MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 80 Low: 56
Mostly cloudy with a 50% chance of
showers and thunderstorms


TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 77 Low: 46
Partly cloudy, cooler and less humid


Gulf water
temperature


68�
Taken at Aripeka


SLAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.12 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.25 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 34.99 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.17 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood,
the mean-annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in
any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District
and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey
be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you
should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 82/53
Record 92/34
Normal 82/59
Mean temp. 68
Departure from mean -3
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 1.12 in.
Total for the year 4.58 in.
Normal for the year 12.45 in.
"As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder-
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.14 in.


DATE DAY

4/19 SUNDAY
4/20 MONDAY


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 42
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 26%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees were heavy, grasses were
moderate and weeds were
absent.
"**Light - only extreme allergic will show
symptoms, moderate - most allergic will
experience symptoms, heavy - all allergic will
experience symptoms.


AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with
ants mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
MINOR MAJOR MINOR Mi
(MORNING) (AFTERNOC
1:49 8:00 2:11
2:29 8:39 2:50


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
O SUNSET TONIGHT....
( SUNRISE TOMORROW
MOONRISE TODAY.......
PRIL 24 MAY 1 MAY 9 MAY17 MOONSET TODAY ........

BURN CONDITION$


Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. A burn ban is in effei
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Fore
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness reside
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 car
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; adi
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on I
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 1:08 a/10:10 a 3:09 p/10:30 p
Crystal River" 1:30 p/7:32 a -- /7:52 p
Withlacoochee' 11:17 a/5:20 a 10:43 p/5:40 p
Homosassa*" 12:18 a/9:09 a 2:19 p/9:29 p


"***At Mason's
Monday
High/Low Hig
2:35 a/11:07 a 3:47 p
12:56 a/8:29 a 2:08
11:55 a/6:17 a 11:52
1:45 a/10:06 a 2:57 p


ST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
ollut- City H 'L Pcp. Fcst H L
Albany 65 50 s 59 35
Albuquerque 63 35 .03 s 70 45
Asheville 74 37 ts 64 50
Atlanta 72 45 ts 68 54
IJOR Atlantic City 79 44 c 56 44
ON) Austin 79 63 .23 's 81 49
8:22 Baltimore 76 40 sh 64 46
:01 Billings 64 39 pc 68 42
9:01 Birmingham 70 50 ts 73 52
Boise 65 40 s 76 44
Boston 65 46 s 48 36
Buffalo 58 43 c 54 42
.7:59 P.M. Burlington, VT 54 45 .01 s 53 29
.6:59A.M. Charleston, SC 76 40 c 73 63
..3:35 AM. Charleston, WV 77 39 ts 62 51
Charlotte 78 44 ts 72 57
.2:56 PM. Chicago 73 40 sh 51 41
Cincinnati 77 39 ts 61 50
Cleveland 73 41 sh 59 46
Columbia, SC 77 41 ts 75 59
ct. Columbus, OH 75 39 sh 60 49
Concord, N.H. 58 37 s 55 26
. For Dallas 75 61 s 73 50
estry's Denver 39 32 .66' pc 48 34
Des Moines 66 57 .11 sh 55 37
Detroit 75 43 sh 55 44
El Paso 77 47 s 77 48
Evansville, IN 76 48 ts 63 49
Harrisburg 77 46 sh 64 44
Hartford 76 44 pc 59 36
dents, Houston 72 652.98 s a 82 54
in 2 or 3, Indianapolis 76 47 sh 61 48
n water Jackson 72 60 .25 ts 74 52
dresses Las Vegas 80 53 s .86 62
Little Rock 67 60 .86 ts 73 49
their day Los Angeles 70 52 s 81 57
their day. Louisville 78 48 ts 62 48
Memphis 71 58 .32 ts 70 52
Milwaukee 74 44 sh 46 37
Minneapolis 66 50 sh 50 36
Creek Mobile 72 59 ts 81 58
Montgomery 76 49 ts 74 57
gh/Low Nashville 72 46 Is 65 51


/11:34 p
p/8:56 p
p/6:44 p
)/10:33 p


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 78 65 .09 ts 79 60
New York City 79 54 c 61 41
Norfolk 75 49 c 70 54
Oklahoma City 72 55 .04 pc 67 45
Omaha 65 52 .28 c 57 39
Palm Springs 92 57 s 99 68
Philadelphia 78 46 c 62 44
Phoenix 84 55 s 94 66
Pittsburgh 73 38 sh 64 47
Portland, ME 58 47 s 48 29
Portland, Ore 66 39 .01 s 76 50
Providence, R.I, 70 53 s 54 34
Raleigh . 83 45 sh 72 68
Rapid City 47 40 .07 pc 61 36
Reno 72 38 s 79 44
Rochester, NY 67 50 c 54 41
Sacramento 84 48 s 90 56
St. Louis 71 54 .01 sh 61 46
St. Ste. Marie 50 41 .04 c 48 33
Salt Lake City 60 41 pc 68 45
San Antonio 84 63 .60 s 83 50
San Diego 75 55 s 80 61
San Francisco 70 47 s 80 56
Savannah 77 42 c 77 62
Seattle 57 38 pc 69 47
Spokane 58 33 pc 67 42
Syracuse 63 51 pc 56 36
Topeka 66 55 .33 c 59 40
Washington 78 47 sh 67 48
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 94 Thermal, Calif. LOW 11 Leadville,
Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 93/73/pc
Amsterdam 58/41/pc
Athens 77/59/s
Beijing 61/49/sh
Berlin - 56/37/pc
Bermuda 70/64/s


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; Cairo 82/63/s
f-falr; h-hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r-raln; Calgary 60/37/pc
rsraln/snow mix; s=sunny; sh-showers; Havana 82/67/pc
sn=snow; ts-thunderstorms; w=wlndy. Hong Kong 88/76/ts
02009 Weather Central, Madison, WI. Jerusalem 80/59/s


Lisbon 66/44/s
London 58/44/pc
Madrid . 62/43/pc
Mexico City 82/54/ts
Montreal 45/31/s
Moscow 34/21/sn
Paris 58/42/sh
Rio 81/68/s
Rome 67/49/sh
Sydney 72/55/sh,
Tokyo 73/54/pc
Toronto 53/35/pc
Warsaw 49/32/s


ON THE NET
* For more about arrests
made by the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office,
go to www.sheriffcitrus
.org and click on the
Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.

2800 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Invemess.
* A grand theft, reported on
April 12, occurred at about 6 p.m.
Saturday, March 21, in the 12600
block of W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River.
* On April 11, a tag was re-
ported stolen in the 4000 block of
S. Oakhurst Drive, Homosassa.
* A grand theft, reported on
April 13, occurred at about 11:19
p.m. Saturday, April 11, in the
3500 block of N. Lecanto High-
way, Beverly Hills.
E A theft of utility services, re-
ported on April 13, occurred at
about 11:23 a.m. Thursday, April
9, in the 1700 block of N. Ribbon
Terrace, Lecanto.
Vandalisms
*A criminal mischief, reported
on April 6, occurred at about mid-
night on Friday, April 3, in the
8700 block of.W. Godfrey Lane,
Crystal River.
N A vandalism occurred at
about 10 a.m. Tuesday, April 7,
on N. Charles Avenue at E.
Ramsey Street, Inverness.
H A vandalism, reported on
April 8, occurred at about 4 p.m.
Saturday, April 4, to a mailbox in
the 5800 block of W. Riverbend
Road, Citrus Springs.
H On April 10, about midnight,
a known white male was ar-
rested for criminal mischief in the
1800 block of N.W. U.S. 19, Ho-
mosassa.
H A criminal mischief ($1,000
or more), reported on April 11,
occurred at about midnight on
April 11, in the 6200 block of S.
Candice Path, Homosassa.
* A criminal mischief, re-
ported on April 12, occurred at
about noon on April 12 in the
2700 block of S. Curt Terrace,
Lecanto.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


CHRONICLE
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S Courthouse Inverness
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Si ASt.,
41 44 Inverness, FL
A 34450


Who's in charge:
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Jeff Gordon . .................................. ........... Business Manager, 564-2908
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Report a news tip:
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By Citrus Publishing, Inc.
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.....................


A4 1 2009





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 A5


Quality Health Plans
A Medicare Advantage Plan
Healthcare Benefits
Created With Your
Special Needs In Mind.


$0 Plan Premium
^ No Deductible
j Part D Drug Coverage
(through the GAP)
^ Diabetic Supplies
it Over-the-Counter Meds


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A


Citrus County


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April 21 - 10 AM




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Quality Health Plans is an HMO with a Medicare contract available to anyone enrolled in
Part B and entitled to Part A of Medicare through age or disability. You must continue to
pay your Medicare Part B premium if not otherwise paid for under Medicaid or by another
third party. Members must use network providers except for emergency, urgently
needed, or out-of-area dialysis services. Limitations and Co-payments may apply. A
Sales Representative will be present with information and applications. For
accommodation of persons with special needs call 1-866-747-2700, 8;30AM to 5:00PM,
Monday - Friday. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or
co-payments/co-insurance may change on January 1, 2010. Please contact Quality
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I t 0


SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 A5


RTIC US CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CniRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICIX


Obituaries' -


Nathan Hall, 26
ST. AUGUSTINE
Nathan Douglass Hall, 26,
passed away on April 15th
in St. Augustine, Florida.
Born in North Conway, NH,
he moved to Crystal River in
1996. He at-
tended
Crystal
River Mid-
dle School
and gradu- .
ated from .- -
Crysta a"
River High -
School in Nathan
2001. Hall
He gradu-
ated from Full Sail Film
school in Orlando and
moved to Los Angeles, CA,
where he worked for 2 years
in film making. Heworked
with many stars and helped
film a special on Elton John
in Las Vegas and then
helped film several
episodes with Andy Dick for
MTV After 2 years in Los
Angeles, he moved to China
and taught conversational
English for two years at
North China University,
where he met his wife Shel-
bye. He was much loved by
all of his Chinese students
and sang them songs to
teach them English. He was
also quite accomplished in
the Chinese language. Re-
turning to Crystal River, he
most recently worked as a
graphic artist at the Signist
Sign shop. He had just
moved to St. Augustine be-
fore his death. He was an
accomplished artist and
completed dozens of inter-
esting paintings, drawings
and sculptures. He was
lover of animals, a talented
drummer, 'guitar player,
song writer and loved to
perform.
He is survived by his par-
ents Jeff Hall and Sally Dou-
glass, sister Kristen,
daughter Lydia and com-
panion Brooke Chekofsky.
We invite friends, neigh-
bors and family to Brown
Funeral Home & Crematory
in Lecanto, Wednesday,
April 22, at 2 pm for a cele-
bration of Nathan's life.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Rose Vitale, 92
INVERNESS
Rose Vitale, age 92, of In-
verness, died Thursday,
April 16, 2009, at the Life
Care Center in Lecanto.
Mrs. Vitale was born in
Brooklyn, New York, on No-
vember 6, 1916, to the late
John & Cologera (Fauci)
Paladino and moved here
with her husband, Carlo, in
1981 from Shelter Island,
New York Her member-
ships include Our Lady of
Fatima Parish, the Honey-
bees and the Library Craft
Group. She enjoyed working
with her hands including
crafts and gardening.
Rose is survived by two
sons: Vincent (Mimi) Vitale
of Hamburg, NY, and John
(Susan) Vitale of Durham,
NC; two daughters: Marie
(Harold) Merkel of Lecanto
and Lillian Vitale of Her-
nando; four grandchildren;


and two great-grandchil-
dren. She was preceded in
death by her husband,
Carlo, in 1982.
A memorial Mass will be
conducted on Monday, April
20, 2009, at 3:00 PM, from
Our Lady of Fatima Church
in Inverness. There will no
calling hours at the funeral
home. Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crematory
of Inverness is in charge of
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.






Anthony 'Doug'
Vollmer, 77
BEVERLY HILLS
Anthony Douglas "Doug"
Vollmer, age 77, of Beverly
Hills, died Wednesday, April
15, 2009, at the Hospice Care
Unit at Citrus Memorial
Hospital. Doug was born in
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,
on June 16, 1931, to the late
Edward & Gertrude (Kolb)
Vollmer and moved here in
1995 from Gloucester City,
New Jersey. He was a re-
tired railroad freight con-
ductor and was a U.S. Navy
veteran serving during the
Korean War. His member-
ships include: St Margaret's
Episcopal Church of Inver-
ness, Paulsboro-Swedes-
boro Masonic Lodge #157,
Springs Lodge #378 of Ho-
mosassa Springs, Civic As-
sociation where he served
as director, Surveillance
Unit where he served as
Sergeant, Emergency Net-
work where he served as di-
rector and the Fishing Club
all of Beverly Hills; the Mu-
nicipal Service Benefit
Unit, Community Council,
Florida Wheelers Camp-
ing/Square Dancing Club,
Florida Sun Gators Camp-
ing Club, Citizens Academy
Alumni Association and the
Inverness Moose Lodge
#2112.
Survivors include his lov-
ing wife of 20 years, Jeanne
C. Vollmer; son, Michael
Rounds of Florida; stepson,
David Richards of Pine Hill,
NJ; step-daughters: Saman-
tha Pinelli of Chapin, SC,
and Charlene Stinchcomb
of Reisterstown, MD; sister,
Linda K. Moore (Cauley) of
Beverly Hills, FL; nephew,
Russel Cauley of West
Collingswood Heights, NJ;
and four step-grandchil-
dren.
A celebration of Life Me-
morial Mass will be offered
on Thursday, April 23, 2009,
at 11:00 A.M. from St. Mar-
garet's Episcopal Church of
Inverness with Fr. Eugene
Reuman officiating. There
will be no viewing. In lieu of
flowers, memorials are sug-
gested to St. 'Margaret's
Episcopal Church Growth
Fund, 114 N. Osceola Ave.,
Inverness, 34450, Hospice of
Citrus County or the Ameri-
can Cancer Society. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline.com.


OBITUARIES
* The Citrus County Chronicle's policy permits both free
and paid obituaries.
* Obituaries must be submitted by the funeral home or
society in charge of arrarngemrrents.
* Free obituaries can include. Full name of deceased;
age; hometown,'state; date of death; place of death;
date, time and place of visitation and funeral services.
* A flag will be included for free for those vho served in
the U.S military. (Please note this ser .ice when sub-
mitting a free obituary.) Additionally, all obituaries will
be posted online at www.chro.nicleonline.com.
* Additional days of publication or reprints due to er-
rors in submitted material are charged at the same
rates.
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next
day's edition.
* E mail obits@chronicle online.corn or fax 563-3280.
* Phone 563-5660 for details.




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Associated Press
This April 13 photo shows an employee of Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Stewart Detention Center in Lump-
kin, Ga., waiting for the front gate to be opened so she can enter. The all-male detention center with a capacity of 1,924
detainees is operated on contract by Nashville-based Corrections Corporation of America, the country's largest private
prison firm.


Life lingers at Georgia


immigration detention center


KATE BRUMBACK
Associated Press

LUMPKIN, Ga. - In an
isolated corner of south-
west Georgia, about 20,000
illegal immigrants a year
pass through one of the na-
tion's largest federal immi-
gration centers, awaiting
almost certain deportation.
Like Immigration and
Customs Enforcement de-
tention centers around the
country, the Stewart Deten-
tion Center in rural Lump-
kin is a flash point in the
immigration debate.
Immigrant activists claim
inhumane treatment and
say the centers are proof of
a broken system, while ICE
defends its handling of de-
tainees and Americans an-
gered by illegal im-
migration say criminals
should be sent home. With
emotions high on all sides,
it is difficult to fully capture
the daily life of detainees.
Unable to leave the
premises, their freedom is
limited. But detainees cir-
culate the common area of
their units, except during
overnight lockdown from 11
p.m. to 5 a.m. and during
several headcounts a day.
They are allowed an hour
and 20 minutes in outdoor
yards surrounded by high
fences topped with barbed
wire each day
There are two types of liv-
ing units at Stewart: a clus-
ter of two-person cells and
dormitory-style layouts with
bunk beds. Each unit
houses between 62 and 88
men and has a common
area with tables, a mi-
crowave, a pay phone and
two televisions airing shows
in English and Spanish.
"I try not to think too
much about things, and I
spend a lot of time studying
the Bible," said detainee
Gilberto Vazquez Ovalles.
The 34-year-old from
Mexico has lived illegally in
the U.S. since December
2004. During that time, he
had been ticketed three
times for driving without a
license. The fourth time, in
mid-January, the restau-
rant cook was arrested and
sent to Stewart.
In interviews with The
Associated Press, arranged
with the help of an immi-
grant rights group, he and
two other detainees said
they aren't treated badly.
They said some guards
seem to yell for no reason
but most are reasonable.
The food isn't great, but not
terrible. Mostly, they are
frustrated at the slow pace
of the deportation process.


Gllberto Vazquez Ovalles, 34, of Mexico, poses for a photo
during an interview April 13 at Stewart Dptention Center.
Ovalles was arrested in January at a police roadblock in
north Georgia for driving without a license, and is awaiting
deportation.
ICE officials say the aver- nary hearing and there
age stay at Stewart is be- were too few toilets.
tween 30 and 45 days, but Webster denied the alle-
all three detainees inter- gations and said ICE deten-
viewed by AP had been tion centers must comply
there longer than that. with the agency's national
Michael Webster, ICE assis- detention standards, which
tant field office director at are verified by independ-
Stewart, said the length of a ent inspectors. In January,
detainee's stay is tied to the the center received further
immigration court system. accreditation from the
A case backlog combined American Correctional As-
with some foreign, govern- sociation, a private, non-
ments slow to issue neces- profit organization that
sary travel documents develops prison standards.
results in some deportees "You just couldn't get
facing an extended stay away with what was being
The most common com- said because of the over-
plaint from detainees is a sight that's in place here,"
lack of information about Swinton said.
the progress of their cases On a recent morning, it
and unwillingness by de- was raining too hard to go
portation case officers to outside, so detainees were
answer questions, said confined to their living
Adelina Nicholls, executive areas. In two areas visited
director of the Georgia by an AP reporter, some
Latino Alliance for Human looked bored while others
Rights. talked on the phone, chat-
"It's an issue of human ted with fellow detainees or
rights," she said. worked on puzzles.
Warden Michael Swinton Some pushed mops in the
said deportation case offi- hallway under seemingly
cers visit each detainee liv- minimal supervision, while
ing area at least once or others clipped fellow de-
twice a week, but detainees tainees' hair in a small bar-
are not required to speak bershop. Detainees who
with them. choose to do these and
Ovalles said in the other jobs - preparing
roughly three months since food, helping in the library,
his arrival at Stewart, he doing laundry - are paid
hadn't spoken with his case $1 to $3 a day.
officer. According to ICE Basic toiletries, slip-on
records, the officer visited shoes, three sets of clothes
Ovalles' living area 32 times and meals are provided.
between early January and With money earned from
mid-April. detention center jobs or
Nicholls' group is a part sent by their families, de-
of Georgia Detention tainees can buy extras at
Watch, an Atlanta-based the commissary, where top
coalition of immigrant sellers are fried pork skins,
rights groups and individu- flour tortillas and refried
als that recently released a beans.
report criticizing condi- Detainees' security risk
tions at Stewart. Based on level is indicated by the
interviews in December color of their uniforms:
with 16 detainees, the re- blue for low, orange for
port claimed food and med- medium and red ,for high.
icine were withheld as The level is determined by
punishment, individuals criminal history, but can be
were sent to solitary con- adjusted if they cause prob-
finement without a discipli- lems.


The most common disci-
plinary problem is chow
hall scuffles, Swinton said.
The offending detainee is
taken to a single cell and al-
lowed out for an hour a day.
The detainee can still write
letters, read and listen to a
radio. Each case must be
reviewed within 72 hours.
Stewart, an all-male cen-
ter, can house 1,924 de-
tainees,,. but the actual
number on site fluctuates
as new detainees arrive
from around the region and
others depart for their
home countries or another
detention facility. On a re-
cent Monday morning,
there were 1,699 detainees.
One consistent statistic is
the nationalities of the de-
tainees, Webster said.
About half of the detainees
on any given day are from
Mexico, 10 percent from
Guatemala, 10 percent from
Honduras and 5 percent
from El Salvador. The rest
hail from a variety of coun-
tries.
Stewart is operated by
Nashville-based Correc-
tions Corporation of Aiher-
ica, the country's largest
private prison firm. CCA
.has about 340 employees at
the center, including Swin-
ton, and ICE has an addi-
tional 60.
Immigrant advocates say
detention is often unmer-
ited because, in many
cases, illegal status is dis-
covered when someone is
arrested for a relatively
minor offense, such as driv-
ing without a license, that
wouldn't generally result in
jail time.
Webster said he and his
agents are enforcing the
law but emphasized deten-
tion centers are not prisons
and are not meant to be
punitive. One of the main
reasons for detention, Web-
ster said, is that illegal im-
migrants facing deportation
,are considered a high flight
risk
"For my officers here, we
personally don't care if they
get a green card or are re-
moved," Webster said. "We
just want the case cleared."
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Congress returns to a full plate


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - So far
this year, Congress has done
what it does best - spend a
lot of money and make a lot
of promises.
Now, as lawmakers return
from a two-week spring
break, comes the hard part,
the actual crafting of legis-
lation that will change how
banks are regulated, health
care is delivered and the na-
tion consumes energy.
Over the next five weeks,
leading up to the Memorial
Day break, much of the ac-
tion will come not in the full
House or Senate, but in
committee rooms.
The Senate Finance Com-
mittee on Tuesday holds the
first of several public dis-
cussions on the seminal
issue of this congressional
session, overhauling the
health care system. The
House Energy Committee is
expected to vote soon on cli-
mate change legislation that
could include a cap-and-
trade system for carbon
emissions.
The House Financial
Services Committee could
vote in early May on far-
reaching new rules aimed at
averting a repeat of the fi-
nancial meltdown, accord-
ing to the chairman, Rep.
Barney Frank, D-Mass.
"We're laying the ground-
work for the expected bat-
tles to come on energy,
education and health care,"
said Jim Manley, spokesman
for Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid, D-Nev.
Over the first months of
this session, the first in 14
years with Democrats con-
trolling the White House
and both chambers of Con-


Assoclateo fress
House Financial Services Committee Chairman Barney
Frank, D-Mass., concludes a hearing March 26 on Capitol
Hill in Washington.
gress, Democrats gave Pres- fense , Secretary Robert
ident Barack Obama a $787 Gates' proposals to scale
billion economic stimulus, back or eliminate some
package and a $410 billion high-cost weapons pro-
spending bill for this budget grams affecting jobs in hun-
year. The House and Senate dreds of congressional
approved slightly different districts.
versions of a $3.6 trillion The recession will be
spending outline for the front and center when the
next budget year, which be- Senate tackles legislation
gins Oct. 1. Monday that would
In the weeks ahead, law- strengthen the ability of the
makers must reach a com- Justice Department and
promise on that budget plan FBI to fight those who are
and take up a separate big- taking advantage of the
money item: a White House mortgage crisis to defraud
request for $83 billion to fi- homeowners.
nance military and diplo-
matic operations in Iraq and A
Afghanistan through the fall. M A
Congress probably will give
Obama the money, but with GetLAJl JlJ
grumbling from anti-war De-
mocrats seeking a quicker Please join us for a FRE
reduction of the U.S. mili- HOMOSASSA P1
tary presence in Iraq.
Military spending will . 4100 S. Grandmarch
come into the spotlight as Tuesday, April 2
summer nears and Congress
turns to the Pentagon Complimentary coffee a
budget, which includes De- TOPICS


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The Senate could act soon
on a bill backed by Obama
that would let cash-strapped
homeowners seek mortgage
relief through bankruptcy.
The Senate must first re-
solve differences with the
House, which voted to let
bankruptcy judges lower a
homeowner's interest rate
and principal. The banking
industry opposes this idea.
In another gesture to vul-'
nerable consumers, the
House and Senate could take
up a credit card bill of rights
bill. The aim is to limit the
ability of credit card compa-
nies to raise interest rates. on
existing balances and to re-
quire greater disclosure.
The Senate's legislative
calendar, never predictable
because of the minority's
powers to delay bills, could
be slowed by GOP opposi-
tion to several Obama ad-
ministration nominees.
Also on the Senate's plate
are House-passed bills to re-
strict bonuses at companies
receiving federal bailout
money and give the Food and
Drug Administration author-
ity to regulate tobacco prod-
ucts. The Senate is scheduled
to take up a railroad antitrust
bill aimed at removing
freight rail practices that
drive up shipping costs.



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Escapees suspected
in slaying caught
PALATKA - A Florida
sheriff said two men who es-
caped from jail there will be
charged with murdering a 66-
year-old woman hours after
the breakout this week.
Deputies captured Doni
Ray Brown and Timothy
Wayne Fletcher on Saturday
in Pomona Park in the north-
ern part of the state. The Put-
nam County Sheriff's office
said two deputies tackled the
men during a foot chase after
receiving a tip that they were
in the area.
Putnam County Sheriff Jeff
Hardy told reporters at a
news conference that the two
men will be charged with mur-
der in the death of Helen
Googe, who was found dead
after their escape early
Wednesday. The men also
face an escape charge.
A nationwide alert had
been put out for the two men
after a car stolen from
Googe's house was found in
Kentucky.


Mistake puts man
in jail for 8 days
FORT PIERCE -A Fort
Pierce man who was mistak-
enly arrested says he's "not
over it."
George Charles Barber was
arrested last month for failing
to appear in court for allegedly
committing some burglaries 17
years ago. After spending
eight days in jail, Barber was
able to prove he wasn't the
man police were after.
Authorities said the 42-year-
old Barber never knew some-
one used his name and
personal information on the
heels of a crime spree in Indian
River County in 1992. The sus-
pect is in prison, but for other
crimes he has committed.
Indian River County sheriff's
spokesman Jeff Luther said
law enforcement arrested the
proper.person based on the .
information they had.
Still, Barber said he's "not
over it" and wonders if the po-
lice will come back for him one
day.
-From wire reports


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Obama reaches
out at summit
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad -
President Barack Obama offered
a spirit of cooperation to Amer-
ica's hemispheric neighbors at a
summit Saturday, listening to
complaints about past U.S. med-
dling and even reaching out to
Venezuela's leftist leader.
While he worked to ease fric-
tion between the U.S. and their
countries, Obama cautioned
leaders at the Summit of the
Americas to resist a temptation to
blame all their problems on their
behemoth neighbor to the north.
Dalai Lama nephew
walks 900 miles
NEW YORK -The Dalai
Lama's nephew has walked
900 miles from Indiana to New
York City to protest what he
calls Chinese suppression of Ti-
betans.
Jigme Norbu led a rally Sat-
orday afternoon outside the
Chinese consulate in Manhat-
tan. His feet are blistered after
the four-week "Walk for Tibet."
The walk coincided with the
50th anniversary of the Ti-
betans' uprising against Chi-
nese rule. It ended Friday.
Norbu is the son of the late
Taktser Rinpoche, a lama who
fought for Tibetan rights along
with his brother the Dalai Lama.
A telephone message seek-
ing comment from the Chinese
consulate hasn't been returned.
China claims Tibet as part of
its territory, but many Tibetans


Associated Press
Jigme Norbu, left, nephew of the Dalai Lama, stands next to
Thupten Donyo, right, on April 8, 2008, while holding up a
photo of the Dalai Lama, as they rally with Tibetans and sup-
porters at City Hall in San Francisco. Norbu, who just com-
pleted a 900-mile walk from Indiana to New York on Friday,
attended a noon rally Saturday in front of the Chinese con-
sulate in New York to protest Chinese suppression of Tibetans.


say Chinese rule deprives them
of religious freedom and auton-
omy. Beijing accuses the Dalai
Lama of pushing for Tibetan in-
dependence and fomenting
anti-Chinese protests.
Police: Attacks have
'strong connection'
BOSTON - Boston police
said they believe the slaying of
a woman at a luxury hotel is
connected to an attack~on a
woman in a Rhode Island hotel
days later. They cite "a number
of similarities."
Boston police haven't explic-
itly said the same man commit-


ted both crimes, though the
suspects have similar descrip-
tions..They cite only "a strong
connection" in the cases.
Police say they've received
more than 150 tips about the
fatal shooting of Julissa Bris-
man at the Boston Marriott
Copley Place.
The New York City woman
advertised massage services
on Craigslist and had a mas-
sage table set up in the room
-where she was shot Tuesday.
The woman attacked Thurs-
day in Warwick, R.I., advertised
lap dances on Craigslist. She
was held at gunpoint before her


husband entered the room and
her attacker fled.
Iranian court: Eight
years for journalist
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran con-
victed an American journalist of
spying for the United States
and sentenced her to eight
years in prison, her lawyer said
Saturday, complicating the
Obama administration's efforts
to break a 30-year-old diplo-
matic deadlock with Tehran.
The White House said Presi-
dent Barack Obama was
"deeply disappointed" by the
conviction, while the journalist's
father told a radio station his
daughter was tricked into mak-
ing incriminating statements by
officials who told her they would
free her if she did.
It was the first time Iran has
found an American journalist
guilty of espionage - a crime
that can carry the death penalty.
Roxana Saberi, a 31-year-old
dual American-lranian citizen,
was arrested in late January
and initially accused of working
without press credentials. But
earlier this month, an Iranian
judge leveled a far more serious
allegation, charging her with
spying for the United States.
The Fargo, N.D:, native had
been living in Iran for six years
and had worked as a freelance
reporter for several news or-
ganizations including National
Public Radio and the British
Broadcasting Corp.

-From wire reports


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you want to say.
* After the beep, speak loudly, slowly and clearly.
* Or try the online Sound Off forum available at
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messages.



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CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


POWELL
Continued from Page Al

Tiffany grew up in Dun-
nellon right off the Rainbow
River. Patricia said she was
a good child who loved to
laugh and was always smil-
ing.
As she got older, Tiffany
developed a love for photog-
raphy and learned to play
musical instruments. She
also enjoyed singing. Patri-
cia said Tiffany lettered in
chorus at Dunnellon.High
School, from which she
graduated in 2005.
Patricia described her re-
lationship with Tiffany as
unique and profound.
"We were soul mates. I
feel that I had an angel," she
said. "We shared jobs. We
shared clothes. And we
shared secrets."
One of their favorite pas-
times was shopping at the
Bealls Outlet in Inverness.
Even though sales associ-
ates would remind them
about having more than one
dressing room, Patricia said
they didn't mind sharing.
"We were always together
. always," Patricia said.
"She was always next to
me."
Tiffany worked at AJ's
Pizza in Ocala with her
younger brother Nicholas,
but it wasn't unusual to find
her sitting next to her
mother helping deliver
newspapers. Patricia began
working for the Ocala Star-


Banneras a newspaper car-
rier in 1999. When she
started as a vendor, her
route took her into Citrus
County. Together: Patricia
and Tiffany would deliver
the papers, befriending
many people in the county
along the way
Patricia said she was al-
ways thankful for the help-
ing hand, but she didn't
know her daughter's kind-
ness would ultimately cost
Tiffany her life.
"You think your child's
going to be safe with you no
matter what," Patricia said,
fighting back tears. "But I
couldn't protect her that
night."

'She died in my arms'
Not wanting to get sleepy
on the route, Tiffany and Pa-
tricia ate a light dinner of
shrimp and salad the night
of Sept. 15, 2007.
Patricia said they wanted
to hurry up and do the route
so they could come home,
sleep and then get up to go
to the flea market the next
day
They piled into their 1994
brown and tan Ford
Aerostar van and went to
Dunnellon to pick up about
500 copies of the Star-Ban-
ner, teasing and laughing
the whole time.
"You're a freak," Tiffany
said to her mom.
"If I'm a freak, you're an
apple and you didn't fall too
far from this tree," Patricia
replied.


pocket and called 911.
As Tiffany lay bleeding to
death at the entrance of the
First Hispanic Church As-
sembly of God, Patricia took'
her daughter's head into
her hands and held the
', wound. Patricia described
feeling powerless sitting in
. the darkness, waiting for
help to arrive.
"It's a feeling I wouldn't
h', wish on my worst enemy,"
she said.
As the shape of her
daughter's eyes changed,
she knew it was the end.
"That was the last time I
heard Tiffany's voice
. again," she said. "She died
in my arms."

L U'Heroes don't
Special to the Chronicle fall down'


Tiffany is with her family after her graduation from Dunnellon High School.


After putting papers in a
box at County Road 486 and
Forest Ridge Boulevard, Pa-
tricia said they continued
down C.R. 486 so they could
turn on Croft Avenue to con-
tinue their route to Inver-
ness.
While approaching the
Croft Avenue intersection at
around 3:58 a.m., Patricia
said they saw a red Mit-.
subishi Eclipse coming
down the road, traveling er- -
ratically. The red sports car
made a U-turn and went
into the parking lot of Her-
nando Elementary School.
Patricia told Tiffany if
they were the police, they
would have gotten her.


"You got that right,"
Tiffany said as they high-
fived, according to Patricia.
But something told Patricia
to keep looking in her rear-
view mirror It wasn't long be-
fore the car turned out of the
school and started heading in
their direction at a high rate
of speed. Patricia said she
told her daughter, "Hang on,
this don't look good."
The sound of screeching
tires broke th6 early-morn-
ing silence. The car slid
under the van and the force
caused the van to flip sev-
eral times. After hitting a
tree, Tiffany was thrown
from the vehicle, as was Pa-
tricia. The van rolled over


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Tiffany, crushing her and
causing severe head
trauma. Patricia recalled
the headlights of her van
shining on Tiffany's body
Unable to find her phone,
Patricia dug a cell phone
out her daughter's back


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More than 400 people at-
tended Tiffany's funeral.
After the memorial service,
flowers filled Tiffany's bed.
Patricia said support came
pouring in.
"The love came from
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CaRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Penny slots making lots of cents


Associated Prcss
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Gamblers
may be cutting back like other con-
sumers, but one thing they're not
doing is pinching pennies.
Their spending on penny gam-
bling machines produced about
one-fourth of all slot machine rev-
enue in Nevada last year, and
more in other states. In Missouri,
one of few states where gambling
revenue rose in 2008, more than
half of all casino revenue came
from penny slots. For many casi-
nos, penny slots are producing the
only kind of revenue that's rising.
Gamblers say they like the ma-
chines - which were impractical
before quiet paper payouts started
replacing the tumbling bucketfuls
of coins in a jackpot - because
they can play longer for the same
amount of money
No matter that casinos like
penny slots because they're more
lucrative for the house.
"It's all just for recreation," said


Kansas City resident Cora Logan,
72, who was playing a penny slot
machine at Isle of Capri in Kansas
City on her 42nd wedding anniver-
sary. "When you come here, don't
expect to win. If you put a lot of
money in these you're crazy"
The four casinos in Kansas City,
like most across the country, serve
mainly local markets, as opposed
to "fly-in" markets like Las Vegas,
China's Macau and, to some de-
gree, Atlantic City in New Jersey
That means most casinos depend
heavily on low-rollers who visit
often. Logan, who said she hadn't
expected to win when she and her
husband walked in, was up $100
after three hours.
'"Affordability is why people love
them," said Frank Legato, a slot
machine expert and editor of Las
Vegas-based Global Gaming Busi-
ness magazine. "Casinos just love
them because the average bets are
the same as the quarter or dollar
games, but their house edge is big-
ger on these games.


"People playing penny machines
are not concerned about that They
just want to have fun and play a
long time with little money"
To play penny slots - which in-
clude video poker machines and
slots with colorful video narra-
tives, as well as machines that look
and operate more like traditional
one-arm bandits -gamblers place
electronic bets in one- or two-cent
increments. The machines allow
wagers anywhere from one penny
to $10 or more per spin.
Gamblers feed the machines
cash - or credit cards, in some
states - and any winnings are
paid out with a paper ticket that
can be redeemed at a cashier's
cage or money machine or used to
place more bets.
With 3-D video graphics, bonus
spins and familiar story lines like
"Star Wars" or "Wizard of Oz," the
machines provide a form of "active
participatory entertainment" that
wasn't available with the old three-
reel slots. That makes them espe-


Associated Press
The reels of a penny slot machine are pictured March 18 at the Isle Of
Capri casino in Kansas City, Mo.


cially big among people who go to
casinos for the social aspect.
Missouri's 12' casinos hold
nearly 11,000 penny slots, more
than half their machines.
Statewide, penny slots brought in
$81.1 million in February alone,
which is about 55 percent of the
$146.6 million casinos won during


the month.
Missouri is among five states -
Iowa, Indiana, South Dakota and
Pennsylvania are the others -
where commercial gambling rev-
enue rose in 2008, while it fell 8.5
percent nationwide. Tribal casi-
nos' revenue is not counted in na-
tional tallies.


April 20 to 24 MENUS


ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Meals include milk, juice.
Monday:
Breakfast - MVP breakfast,
General Mills cereal, toast.
Lunch - Pepperoni pizza,
uncrustable grape PB&J, PB
dippers, garden salad, carrots,
peaches, apple crisp.
Tuesday:
Breakfast - Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, General
Mills cereal, tater tots, toast.
Lunch - Chicken & rice,
hamburger, salad shaker, gar-
den salad, green beans, apple-
sauce, crackers.
Wednesday:
Breakfast.- Cinnamon
twister, General Mills cereal,
toast, milk variety, juice variety.
Lunch - Turkey melt,
chicken nuggets, PB dippers,
garden salad, sweet potato
bake, corn, mixed fruit.
Thursday:
Breakfast - Scrambled eggs
with cheese, General Mills ce-
real, tater tots, tqast.
Lunch -- Spaghetti with
meat sauce, mozzarella
MaxStix, salad shaker, garden
salad, peas, baked french fries,
pears, crackers.
Friday:


Breakfast - French toast,
cheese grits, tater tots.
Lunch - Chicken tenders,
tuna salad on bun, PB dippers,
garden salad, green beans, ap-
plesauce.
MIDDLE SCHOOL
Meals include milk, juice.
Monday:
Breakfast - Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, MVP break-
fast, General, Mills cereals,
grits, toast.
Lunch - Pepperoni pizza,
chicken nuggets, breaded
chicken salad plate, garden
salad, green beans, sweet po-
tato bake, peaches, crackers.
Tuesday:
Breakfast - Mini cinnamon
pancakes, MVP breakfast, tater
tots, grits.
Lunch - Spaghetti with
meatballs, hamburger, chef
'salad plate, garden salad,
mixed vegetables, pasta salad,
baked french fries, roll, apple-
sauce, crackers.
Wednesday:
Breakfast - Egg and cheese
biscuit, MVP breakfast, General
Mills cereals, grits, toast, peach
cup.
Lunch - Corndog, chicken
and yellow rice, tuna salad


plate, garden salad, seasoned
noodles, corn, green beans,
mixed fruit, juice bar, crackers.
Thursday:
Breakfast - Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP breakfast,
tater tots, grits.
Lunch - Cheese pizza, or-
ange chicken plate, turkey sal-
ad plate, garden salad, carrots,
pears, crackers, apple crisp.
Friday:
Breakfast - Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, MVP breakfast,
General Mills cereals, grits,
toast.
Lunch - Chicken tenders,
tuna salad on bun, garden
salad, broccoli, peaches,
Minute Maid juice bar, cake
with vanilla icing.
HIGH SCHOOL
Monday:
Breakfast - Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, MVP break-
fast, General Mills cereals,
toast, tater tots, grits, toast, milk
variety, juice variety.
Lunch - Spaghetti with
meat sauce, hamburger, pizza,
hoagie, breaded chicken salad
plate, garden salad, green
beans, corn, sweet potato
bake, french fries, Minute Maid
juice bar, crackers, milk.


Tuesday:
Breakfast-- Mini cinnamon
pancakes, MVP breakfast, tater
tots, grits, milk variety, juice va-
riety.
Lunch - Chicken & yellow
rice, chicken sandwich, pizza,
chef salad plate, garden salad,:'c."
mixed vegetables, corn, baked
beans, Minute Maid juice bar,
french fries, pears, crackers,
milk.
Wednesday:
Breakfast - Egg and cheese
biscuit, MVP breakfast, General
Mills cereals, tater tots, grits,
toast, milk.variety, juice variety.
Lunch - Chicken tenders,
hamburger, combo hoagie,
pizza, PB dippers, turkey salad
plate garden salad, corn, peas,
french fries, mixed fruit, roll,
crackers, milk.
Thursday:
Breakfast - Breakfast pizza,
MVP breakfast, tater tots, grits,


milk variety, juice variety.
Lunch - Tacos, chicken
sandwich, pizza, breaded
chicken salad plate, garden
salad, Spanish rice, corn, green
beans, applesauce, french
fries, crackers, milk.
/.Friday:
Breakfast - Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, MVP breakfast,
General Mills cereals, tater tots,
grits, toast, milk variety, juice
variety.
Lunch - Orange chicken
plate, hamburger, hoagie,
pizza, chef salad plate, garden
salad, corn, carrots, french
fries, peaches, apple crisp,
crackers, milk.
Menus are subject to change
without notice.
CONGREGATE DINING
Monday: Chicken and yellow
rice casserole, green peas,
black beans, 1 slice white
bread, 1 packet raisins, low-fat


milk.
Tuesday: Sliced turkey and
cheese, three bean salad, dill
potato salad, 2 slices whole
wheat bread, mayonnaise and
mustard packets, 1 fresh ba-
nana, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Meatloaf with
brown gravy, au gratin pota-
toes, spinach, 1 slice whole
wheat bread, 1 fresh orange,
low-fat milk.
Thursday: Baked chicken
quarter with sweet and sour
sauce, mashed potatoes, broc-
coli cuts, 1 slice whole wheat
bread, mixed fruit cobbler, low-
fat milk.
Friday: Volunteer Apprecia-
tion Picnic. All sites closed.
Congregate.dining sites in-
clude: Lecanto, East Citrus,
Crystal River, Homosassa
Springs, Inverness and South
Dunnellon. For information, call
Support Services at 527-5975.


7807 '9



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14358 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville


Saturday, A april 25 1. What musician is portrayed on the
2009 Jazz Appreciation Month (JAM)
Noonf - 5 p.m poster printed and distributed by the
S 5 p.m . I Smithsonian Institution (Sl)?
2nd floor, Historic Courthouse A. Miles Davis
The Old Courthouse Heritage B. Louis Armstrong
I C. Benny Goodman
Museum D. Bill Clinton


One Courthouse Square
Inverness

Who'sP

S * Playing?


Noon - 1 p.m.
Richard Gilewitz,
Acoustic Guitar
I


1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Rich Dahlinger, Keyboard


2 p.m. - 3 p.m.
Nelson Dellamaggiore,
Saxophone & Flute

3 p.m. - 4 p.m.
Norman Bernard, Trumpet/Flugelhorn

4p.m. - 5 p.m.
Ted Stauffer, Drums



Sponsors:
Moring & Moring, PA
Central Florida Community College (ICA)
Citrus County Historical Society, Inc.
Ted & Judy Stauffer
Citrus County Chronicle
Regions Bank
Susan Gill
TLC Animal Hospital
Smithsonian Institution

Refreshments provided by:
Deco Cafe
C,~ N~


F o m o ei nfor ati n c l


(3:5)� 2,6 67


2. What does Public Law 108-72
declare?
A. Recognition of April as JAM
B A private law made public
C Banning smoking in jazz clubs
D. There is no such public law

3. What musician was instrumental in
launching JAM?
A Chris Botti
B. Quincy Jones
C. Wynton Marsalis
D None of the above

4. Why is JAM celebrated in the month
of April?
A. Many famous Jazz Musicians
were born this month
B. Near end of the school year
C. Coincides with the Cherry
Blossom festival in
Washington DC
D. Both Aand B

5. What are the best ways to celebrate
JAM?
A. Contact local Jazz Society
for programs
B. Attend a jazz concert
C. Hold a.church Vespers service
D. All of the above

6. What legendary jazz musician was
not born in April?
A. Duke Ellington
B. Lionel Hampton
C. Gerry Mulligan
' D. Dave Brubeck

7. What comprises the rhythm
section?
A. A musician snapping
fingers in time I
B. Two musicians snapping
fingers
C. Piano, bass, and drums
D. Fascinating musicians

8. What does not support jazz core
values?
A. Must read music
B. Improvisation
C. Never ordinary
D. Spontaneous


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A10 SI'N)Ak, ArIl. 19. 2009


1 "1 7




IIIw


CITRUs COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 All


Pope to visit quake-hit area


Associated Press
VATICAN CITY - Pope
Benedict XVI will tour towns
damaged by Italy's earth-
quake and visit a tent city of
survivors in an effort to re-
store hope and solidarity for
the area's reconstruction,
the Vatican said Saturday
The three-hour visit on
April 28 will include time at
the tent city on the outskirts
of Onna, a hamlet that was
completely leveled by the
powerful April 6 earthquake.
The quake claimed 295
lives, drove some 50,000 peo-
ple from their homes, and
toppled or heavily damaged
thousands of buildings, in-


eluding churches, schools
and other public buildings in
the Abruzzo region in the
central Apennine mountains.
In Onna, on the outskirts
of LAquila, about 40 of the
300 residents died.
Benedict also will go to
the site of a collapsed uni-
versity dormitory in
LAquila, where seven stu-
dents were killed, and to
the Basilica of Collemaggio,
the town's best known
church that suffered heavy
damage.
. The 82-year-old pope will
visit a military barracks on
LAquila's outskirts, which
has been hosting offices aid-
ing the victims.


By visiting the Abruzzo
quake area, the pope will
bring "hope and the church's
expression of solidarity,
which it had already shown
from the start by intensely
sharing in the sorrow of the
stricken people," the Vatican's
No. 2 official, Cardinal Tarci-
sio Bertone, said on the side-
lines of a ceremony in Rome.
Benedict "will give a
great sign of hope, as well as
a push to spur capabilities
to rebuild with the efforts of
the Lord and the solidarity
of so many good persons,"
the Italian news agency
ANSA quoted Bertone, the
Vatican's secretary of state,
as saying.


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DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Tiffany's family, including brothers Nicholas, left, and Anthony, right, along with Patricia and
her husband, have had to come to terms with losing Tiffany.


POWELL
Continued from Page A9

Since the crash, Patricia
said she tries to take life one
day at a time. She does miss
the simple things like put-
ting a plate in the mi-
crowave for Tiffany or
brushing her long, wavy
hair. But what she said she
misses the most are
Tiffany's hugs.
"It's lonely," she said.
"You look to your side and
'he's not there." ,
Nevertheless, Patricia


said she knew she had to
stay strong to make sure
Tiffany received justice.
She said on Tiffany's My-
Space page, she listed her
mom as her hero.
"Heroes don't fall down,"
she said. "What else do I
have to do, but take care of
this business?"
She could ask "why" or
rattle off a million "what
ifs," but Patricia said she
doesn't ask those questions
because there will never be
an answer.
She said she hopes the
tri�_-d.\ will serve as .a re-
minder to people that life is


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Wooten had a choice, she
said, and at 34 years old, she
should have known better.
However, regardless of
what happened, Patricia
said, she holds no ill feelings
toward Wooten. Right now,
she said she just does the
best she can every day and
lets God handle the rest De-
spite the immense pain of
losing a daughter, she said
she finds some comfort
when she remembers
Corinthians 13:13: "And now
these three remain: faith,
hope and love. But the
greatest of these is love."


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Page A12 - SUNDAY, APFR. 19, 2009



ATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Colorado


NATO frees 20 hostages


Associated Press
Covered in heavy, wet
snow, a pink flamingo lawn
ornament stands amid
plants Saturday outside a
home in the south Denver
suburb of Englewood, Colo.
The spring storm dumped
up to two feet of snow in
some parts of Colorado.


Family of five
dead in Md. home
MIDDLETOWN, Md.--A
father killed his wife and their
three young children before
fatally shooting himself in a
northwest Maryland home,
authorities said Saturday.
Christopher Alan Wood,
34, died from a self-inflicted
gunshot wound, Frederick
County sheriffs office
spokeswoman Jennifer Bai-
ley said. His wife Francis Bil-
lotti Wood, 33, and their three
children suffered "traumatic
cuts," but the causes of their
deaths weren't immediately
confirmed.
U.S. to boycott
racism meeting
WASHINGTON - The
Obama administration will
boycott "with regret" a U.N.
conference on racism next
week over objectionable lan-
guage in the meeting's final
document that could single
out Israel for criticism and re-
strict free speech, the State
Department said Saturday.
* . .The decision follows
weeks of furious internal de-
bate and will likely please Is-
rael and Jewish groups that
lobbied against U.S. partici-
pation. But the move upset
human rights advocates and
some in the black community
who had hoped that Presi-
dent Barack Obama, the na-
tion's first black president,
would send an official delega-
tion.


World - : .`


Easter


I Associated Press
Russian Orthodox Patri-
arch Kirill conducts Easter
service in the early hours of
Sunday in Moscow. East-
ern Orthodox churches,
which observe the ancient
Julian calendar, usually cel-
ebrate Easter later than
Western churches.


Shells hit Iraq's
Green Zone
BAGHDAD - Suspected
militants shelled Baghdad's
protected Green Zone on
Saturday in the first such
bombardment in more than
three months.
The back-to-back strikes
reverberated across the
Tigris River to a popular
promenade, sending families
packing up from fish restau-
rants and abruptly halting a
party at a club.
Violence across Iraq re-
mains sharply down com-
pared with past years, but
attacks and bloodshed have
edged up in recent weeks
and brought worries that it
could slow the return of
nightlife and commerce to
parts of Baghdad.
-From wire reports


Pirates seize Belgian ship


Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - NATO
forces rescued 20 fishermen
from pirates who launched
the latest attack in the Gulf of
Aden on Saturday, but let the
Somali hijackers go because
they had no authority to ar-
rest them.
The release underscored
the difficulties of stopping
the skyrocketing piracy
scourge in the Horn of Africa,


where sea bandits also seized
a Belgian-flagged ship carry-
ing 10 foreign crew near the
Seychelles islands and
started hauling it toward So-
malia.
"There isn't a silver bullet"
to solve the problem, said
Roger Middleton, a piracy ex-
pert at London-based think-
tank Chatham House. He
said it's common for pa-
trolling warships to disarm
then free brigands because


Associated Press
GOLDEN, Colo. - The first of-
ficers on the scene had never
trained for what they found at
Columbine High School: No
hostages. No demands. Just
killing.
In the hours that followed, the
nation watched in horror as the
standard police procedure for
dealing with shooting rampages
in the U.S. proved tragically,
heartbreakingly flawed on April
20, 1999.
Two officers exchanged fire
with one of the teenage gunmen
just outside the school door, then
stopped - as they had been
trained to do - to wait for a
SWAT team. During the 45 min-
utes it took for the SWAT team to
assemble and go in, Eric Harris
and Dylan Klebold shot 10 of the
13 people they killed that day.
The killers committed suicide
around the time the makeshift
SWAT team finally entered. But
the SWAT officers took several
hours more to secure the place,
moving methodically from room
by room.. One of the wounded,
teacher Dave Sanders, slowly
bled to death.
"It was really frustrating," said
Marjorie Lindholm, a grief
counselor and speaker at police
training seminars. Lindholm
was a 16-year-old student in a
science, classroom where two
classmates used their T-shirts to
try to stanch Sanders' bleeding.
"We were told, 'They're on their


they have rarely have juris-
diction to try them.
Pirate attacks have in-
creased in recent weeks, with
fishermen-turned-gunmen
from Somalia searching for
targets further out to sea as
ships try to avoid the anar-
chic, clan-ruled nation.
Pirates have attacked
more than 80 boats this year
alone, according to the Kuala
Lumpur-based International
Maritime Bureau. They now
hold at least 18 ships and
over 310 crew hostage, ac-
cording to an AP count


Richland County school resource officers carry out instructions
April 10 during Active Shooter training.


way, they're coming."'
Ten years later, Columbine has
transformed the way police in the
U.S. deal with shooting rampages.
After the tragedy, police across
the country developed "active-
shooter" training. It calls for re-
sponding officers to rush toward
gunfire and step over bodies and
bleeding victims, if necessary, to
stop the gunman - the active
shooter - first.
Sgt. A.J. DeAndrea, a patrol of-
ficer in the Denver suburb ofAr-
vada, and now-retired sheriff's
Sgt. Grant Whitus, two of the
SWAT team members who
searched Columbine High that
day, now train police with the
idea that a gunman, in a mass
shooting, kills a person every 15
seconds.
"Based on what we had been
through, we had decided that day
that we would prepare, and that
the lives lost at Columbine were


not going to be in vain," said De-
Andrea, team leader of the Jef-
ferson County Regional SWAT.
Police around the country now
employ so-called contact teams,
in which patrol officers from any
jurisdiction band together to
enter a building in formation to
confront the gunman and shoot it
out with him if necessary.
SWAT teams go in after that,
usually to make sure there are
no other gunmen or to rescue
hostages.
In another change prompted
by Columbine, SWAT teams
across the country have armed
medics and rescue teams
trained to drag the wounded out
under fire.
There was no such regular
training before Columbine. It
took SWAT team members 2 1/2
hours after entering the building
to reach Sanders, the wounded
teacher.


"- . -. - - I
Associated Press
This is a photo made available by NATO CC-MAR HQ In North-
wood, England, taken from the Dutch vessel HNLMS De
Zeven Provinclen off the Somali coast on Saturday, which
they claim shows 20 fishermen that they freed from the
Yemeni flagged dhow which had been seized by Somali pi-
rates earlier in the week.


Obama


watching


Cuba's


next moves
Associated Press
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad -
President Barack Obama says
America's estranged relationship
with Cuba will not change overnight
It just did - at least in tone.
Immersed for the first time in
Latin American politics, Obama now
is assessing whether a genuine
change in relations with the isolated
communist island is already under
way
While no one is talking of funda-
mental reform in Cuba soon - and
overtures by no means lead to ac-
tions - it is clear that U.S. dealings
with Havana have changed.
The White House on Saturday
sought again to insert some wait-,
and-see caution as analysts debated
whether a sudden conciliatory
flurry was a breakthrough or bluster.
As Obama talks of overcoming
"decades of mistrust," now he must
calibrate how to handle something
else: hope.
When the week started, Obama
lifted some travel and telecommuni-
cations restrictions on Cuba; before
it ended, he was hearing Cuban
leader Raul Castro admit "we could
be wrong" and having chummy mo-
ments with the man he once
branded a demagogue, Venezuela's
Hugo Chavez.
At the Summit of the Americas
here in Trinidad and Tobago, Cuba
is hethe only nation in the hemisphere
banned from taking part because of
its undemocratic rule. The White
House had called Cuba "the odd
man out" and wished openly it
would not dominate the event
Turns out, Cuba's shadow is every-
where. Obama got another earful
about it on Saturday when South
American leaders praised him for
the steps he's taken but pushed him
to do even more - lift the 47-year-
old U.S. trade embargo against the
nation.
"We will continue to evaluate and
watch what happens," said Obama
spokesman Robert Gibbs. "We're
anxious to see what the Cuban gov-
ernment is willing to step up to do."
The U.S. wants whaitit considers
real change - human rights, free
speech, free markets, democracy
Asked if the ball is still in Cuba's
court, Gibbs said: "It always has
been."
Castro can allow Obama's new
policies to happen without putting
up obstacles. The U.S. can agree to
pursue communication with Cuba,
perhaps through working groups of
both countries that would take on is-
sues that matter to them both, like
security in the region.


Yellow submarine to try again for Atlantic glide


Associated Press
In this undated photo released by Coastal Ocean Observa-
tion Lab, Rutgers University shows the launch of an un-
manned glider that can rise and dive, seeking out currents
that will carry it along without worrying about refueling.
Whenever It comes to the surface, it radios its findings back
to the scientists.


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A second try is about
to get under way at sending a little yellow
submarine gliding across the Atlantic
Ocean to collect scientific data from be-
neath the waves.
"The launching is tremendously exciting
because there is just so much that we don't
really know about what happens in the
oceans," said Jane Lubchenco, head of the
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Admin-
istration.
"The capacity to fly through the ocean,
across the Atlantic, taking data about tem-
perature, salinity and other properties of
the water gives us keen insight into what's
happening down there," she said in a tele-
phone interview.


The first glider was lost last year before it
completed its trip. The second, improved
version has been put together by the same
team at Rutgers University in New
Brunswick, NJ. If conditions cooperate, the
launch is set for Wednesday - Earth Day.
Rutgers professor Scott Glenn, who is
leading the glider project, points out that
Earth is the ocean planet
Unmanned and without a motor, the
glider can rise and dive, seeking out cur-
rents that will carry it along without worry-
ing about refueling. Whenever it comes to
the surface, it radios its findings back to the
scientists.
Glenn said the device will be able to take
a daily profile of water conditions and ma-
neuver, directed by radio messages from
student researchers.


Associated Press
Richland County school resource officers Johnny Scott, right, and Vincent Walker, left, rescue a wounded
Joseph Andaloro, center, during Active Shooter training April 10 in Columbia, S.C. Instructors with Texas
State University-San Marcos active-shooter program have trained 20,000 officers since 2002.


Columbine transformed tactics













E Page A13 -SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009

XCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Bye, bye peanuts, Cracker Jacks


Ar


r.~.


Associated Press
Concession worker Alex Carrasco cooks
sausages on a grill during an NCAA col-
lege baseball game between St. John's
and Georgetown on March 29 at Citi
Field in New York. The game was the
first played at Citi Field, the New York
Mets' new stadium.

New York's new

ballparks serve up

serious eats


HOWIE RUMBERG
Associated Press


NEW YORK- Hundreds of fans were
lined up for a taste of the fancy eats in
the food court behind the behemoth of a
center-field scoreboard at the Mets'
sparkling new ballpark when Carlos Bel-
tran laced an RBI single.
But when the cheers rang out, hardly
a person ran for a look at the action.
Priorities change a bit when you've
been waiting 30 minutes for a burger or
taco from James Beard award-winning
restaurateur Danny Meyer's snack
stands.
A day later at the Yankees' $1.5 billion
palace in the Bronx, several dozen peo-
ple snapped photos of a butcher in a
white coat carving up a hunk of beef in
front of a picture-window on the third-
base concourse as Mark Teixeira hit his
second home run of the day All the
gawkers had to do was turn around to
catch a glimpse of the Yankees' new star


Baseball fans Brian McVeigh, left, and Rob Wern, both of Patchogue, N.Y., watch the first game played at Citi Field.


rounding the bases, but the meat-carv-
ing spectacle in front of them was too
mesmerizing for them to bother.
"This is ridiculous," Steve Charles of
Great Neck said. "This is a baseball sta-
dium."
For sports While the Me
purists, it
might be dis- top chefs, the Y
concerting to
hear a bar- recognizal
tender shout,
"Who or-
dered the margarita?" or see someone
strolling a concourse with a plastic cup
of wine, but that's the new reality for
New York baseball fans.
There's a baseball renaissance in New
York that has little to do with what's hap-


opening on the field. Both the Mets and,
Yankees have unveiled amenity-laden
stadiums conceived in the era of credit
default swaps and easy money. One of
the main benefits for fans is both arenas
have dining
s went for the options re-
flective of
ankees went for their diverse
hometown.
�le names. Ifyou have
a high-
priced
ticket, you'll have access to menus wor-
thy of an upscale Manhattan restaurant.
But even those in the bleachers can buy
trendy, tasty fare for under $10 at some
of the new concessions.
The Mets' and Yankees' approach to


the task of feeding the 3 million-plus
fans who will pass through their gates
this year is about as different as their
ballparks are.
Take the No. 7 subway train to the
Mets' $800 million Citi Field, adjacent to
the 1964 Worlds Fairgrounds in Queens,
and you'll encounter a nostalgia trip in
brick and ironwork that pays homage to
those long-gone New York icons, Ebbets
Field, where the Brooklyn Dodgers
played, and the Polo Grounds, where the
Giants, Mets and Yankees played at var-
ious times.
Enter through Citi Field's grand
Jackie Robinson rotunda, and if you're
sitting in a high-level suite or in seats
that cost up to $695 a game, you can take
See BYE/Page A16


Still waters


In India, go with flow


Special to the Chronicle
Wayne and Donna Turner of Homosassa and all their family went on a seven-day
cruise to celebrate their 50th anniversary In July 2008. The weather was beauti-
ful in Glacier Bay, Alaska.


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the. year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Getting there is often
half the fun, but in
India it can double
the fun.
Traveling in India is a
kaleidoscope of activity
that's as colorful as it is
chaotic.
Knots of traffic, horns
honking, cows standing
around as if they owned the
street (cows are sacred and
protected, but they are not
controlled), and they are
oblivious to everything and
everybody Cows have a spe-
cial place in Hindu culture
and seem to invoke calm in
a n
other-
wise
tic
place
and
are
said to
bring
good
lu e k. Neil Sawyer
As to SPONTANEOUS
t h e TOUR GUIDE
traffic,
however, mayhem of the
first order- nothing moves,
or it moves at "mach speed!"
Entering an intersection
is done at one's own peril as
there are no traffic signals
(except in the major cities).
The convergence of nearly
every conveyance known to
mankind releases a cacoph-
ony of sounds unlike any


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
A street scene in Agra, India, home of the Taj Mahal,
shows some of the variety of conveyances that constitute
public and private transportation.


that we experience in the
United States. Imagine
sharing an intersection with
mopeds, pedi-cabs, pedes-
trians, trucks, buses, ele-
phants, tractors pulling
large flat-bed trailers
stacked 10 to 15 feet high, in
addition to automobiles and
bicycles. Driving in the
countryside or small towns
in India appears suicidal to
the uninitiated. There is
great comfort and security,
and certainly a better view,
when traveling in a large ve-
hicle, a bus in our case.


Public and private trans-
portation vehicles are usu-
ally packed to capacity with
passengers. We counted as
many as 15 people, includ-
ing some children,
crammed into or on a pedi-
cab, a small two seated ve-
hicle built on a bicycle
frame. Buses were always
packed full with some pas-
sengers hanging out the
windows or sitting on top of
the bus.
To add to this sensory
See FLOW/Page A16


Botswana and HBO partner on travel contest Who's Your No. 1 Lady?'


Associated Press
NEW YORK - The
Botswana Tourism Board is
partnering with HBO on a
contest called "Who's Your
No. 1 Lady?" to promote the
country where the new
HBO series "The No. 1
Ladies' Detective Agency" is
set and filmed.
Contest participants can
nominate the "No. 1 lady" in
their lives - whether a
wife, mom, daughter,
teacher, friend or even


themselves - to compete
for a trip to Botswana. De-
tails at www.mynumberone
ladycom.
Botswana Tourism also
launched a new Web site in
March at www.botswana-
tourism.us, where a variety
of tours are being adver-
tised, including an 11-night
"No. 1 Ladies' Detective
Agency Botswana Safari"
from the Eyes on Africa
Travel & Safari company,
with accommodations in
camps, lodges and hotels,


and stops in Gaborone, the
Okavango Delta, Chobe and
Victoria Falls.
The pilot for "The No. 1
Ladies' Detective Agency,"
which is based on the best-
selling books by Alexander
McCall Smith, was shown for
the first time to American
viewers March 29, although
it aired last year in Britain.


Seven additional weekly
episodes are being shown
new this season in both
Britain and the U.S. The
show stars Jill Scott, an
American actress and
Grammy Award-winning
R&B singer, as Precious
Ramotswe.
"Africa experts are hop-
ing this wonderful show will


inspire viewers to experi-
ence on their own the riches
that Alexander McCall
Smith evokes, from
Botswana's varied wildlife
and landscapes to its rich
tradition of music, culture
and art," said Don George,
editor in chief of the Adven-
ture Collection, a consor-
tium of adventure travel
companies.
The April-October dry
season is the best time of
year to to see wildlife in
Botswana, which includes


lions, leopards, giraffes,
water buffalo, zebras, rhinos
and elephants, along with
500 species of birds, and, of
course, the meerkats seen
standing on Precious' head
in the pilot. The country is
about the size of Texas but
has just 1.8 million people,
with 39 percent of the land
protected pristine wilder-
ness. About 35,000 visitors
from the U.S. traveled to
Botswana in 2005, the last
year for which statistics
were available.


The April-October dry season is the
best time of year to see wildlife.


b










VETERANS NomsCITRUS COUNIY (FL) CHRONICLE


A14 SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009


* Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call John Young at the
Hunger and Homeless Coali-
tion at 628-4357, or pass along
this phone number to the vet-
eran.
* Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40
East, Inglis (352) 447-3495.
Men's meeting is at 7:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly.
Ladies Auiiliary meets at 5
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday
monthly.
House Committee meets at 6
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 members, Men's
and Ladies Auxiliaries would
like to honor our young patriots
and active duty military person-
nel with a free chicken barbe-
cue from noon to 3 p.m.
Saturday, April 25, at VFW Post
8698, 520 E. Highway 40 (1
mile east of U.S. 19), Inglis.
Free chicken barbecue for any
in uniform: Boy Scout, Girl
Scout, Sea Cadet, Young Ma-
rine, ROTC Cadet, Civil Air Pa-
trol Cadet, Army, Navy, Marine,
Air Force, or Coast Guard, mili-
tary personnel. Family mem-
bers welcome for a $3
donation. Public $5.
* Beverly Hilsl Memorial
American Legion Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza invites inter-
ested veterans to apply for
membership or transfer. Sons
of the American Legion and
Ladies Auxiliary units are now
forming. Membership meeting
fourth Thursday at 7 p.m. Sun-
day darts at 3 p.m. with
karaoke following. Other activi-
ties being planned. All sporting
events available on five TVs.
Visit, or phone the post at 746-
5018.
* The Beverly Hills Me-
morial American Legion
Post 237 is seeking eligible
veterans and sons as mem-
bers. Visit or phone the post
home at 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, 746-
5018. Transferring members
are always welcome.
: Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
Sailors meet at Denny's in
Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 621-0617.
N American Legion Post
155 events for the week of April
19 to 25:
S Today: Breakfast 8:30 to 11
a.m., $5. Birthday/Anniversary
Bash potluck dinner 3 to 6 p.m.,
live music. Dart tournament 6
p.m.
Tuesday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Bingo 1 to 4 p.m.
Wednesday: Chicken "hot
wings" noon to 3 p.m. Special
Italian Dinner Night 5 to 7 p.m.,
$5. Live music 6 to 10 p.m.
Thursday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Bingo 1 to 4 p.m. Show
Me the Money 5 p.m.
Friday: Awesome steak din-
ner 5 to 7 p.m., $8.75. Live
music 6 to 10 p.m.
Saturday: Pool tournament 2
p.m. Northern Area Ball at Post
316, Jacksonville Beach.
Call Cmdr. Jim Woodman at
795-6526 or visit
www.post155.org.
* Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City, 637-
0100, week of April 19 to 25:
Today: Clam Bake - by
Men's Auxiliary $6.50, at 2 p.m.
Ladies Auxiliary 15th Anniver-
sary celebration and funny hat
contest 2 to 5 p.m.
Tuesday: Bingo starting at 3
p.m. sponsored by the Ladies &
Men's Auxiliaries. Guests wel-
come.
Wednesday: Wings three for
$1 served from 4 to 7 p.m.
Friday: All-you-can-eat fish
(fried, baked or blackened) $7
or a three piece fried chicken
dinner, served from 4 to 7 p.m.
Guests welcome. Karaoke at 7


p.m. by Jannie Faye.
Saturday: Home style meat-
loaf $6.50 served from 5 to 7
p.m. Guests welcome. To Go
orders are available for 25
cents extra.
M VFW Post 7991, 3107 W.
Dunnellon Road, Dunnellon,
(352) 489-1772.
Come join us for breakfast
from 8:30 a.m. to noon the sec-
ond and fourth Sundays
monthly. Full breakfast menu
for $5. Open to the public.
Today: Easter Breakfast,
serving from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. Full breakfast menu all for


$5. Come before or after
church. Bring your family,
friends and neighbors and
enjoy a great meal. Public wel-
come.
Wednesday: Bingo, starting
at 1 p.m. Hot dogs are avail-
able.
Friday: Bingo starting at 1
p.m. Hot dogs and sandwiches
are available.
Sunday, April 26: Breakfast,
serving from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Full breakfast for $5.
The flea market scheduled
for April 25 has been canceled.
It will be rescheduled at a later
date.
* Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 on Veterans Drive in
Homosassa, across from
Harley Davidson dealership,
announces events.
Mixed pool league every
Sunday at 3 p.m.
Bingo every Wednesday at 2
p.m. Lunch available.
Women's pool league at 7
p.m. Wednesday.
Bar bingo all day, every day.
Friday: Baked ziti at 5 p.m.
All events open to members
and guests.
For more information, call
795-5012.
* Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337, 906 State Road 44 E., In-
vemess,.phone 344-3495.
Karaoke is presented each
Sunday, Tuesday and Friday
evenings. Bar Bingo is played
Monday and Thursday after-
noons and Wednesday
evening.
We serve Wings each Tues-


day evening and fish or chicken
on Friday evenings.
"Show Me The Money" is
played each Saturday from 1 to
3 p.m.
* The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58, 10730
U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Regular meeting of the Post
and Auxiliary is on the first
Wednesday of the month start-
ing at 7 p.m.
Dunnellon Young Marines
meets every Tuesday evening
from 6 to 9 p.m.
. Bingo is every Thursday
evening. Doors open 4 p.m.
Games start at 6 p.m. Food
available.
Pancake breakfast every
third Saturday of the month
from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. is all
you can eat for a $4 donation.
Third Saturday Outdoor Flea
Market is monthly on our prem-
ises. Vendors $10. Call Larry
Jones for information at 522-
0177.
0 The H. F. Nesbitt VFW
Post 10087 in Beverly Hills off
County Road 491, across the
street from ROC's 491 Sports
Bar and directly behind the new
Superior Bank.
Today: Bingo in the big hall
beginning at 1 p.m. Monday:
The VFW Golf League plays at
different courses. Contact Dick
Sorrells or Jim Freiheit at the
post for tee times and locations.
The Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at 9 a.m. at
Twisted Oaks G.C. Check with
Lou Kempf for available tee
times. Dart tournament in the
canteen beginning at 7 p.m.


Tuesday: Pool tournament in
the canteen beginning at 1 p.m.
House Committee meeting and
staff meeting every third Tues-
day and post general meeting
every fourth Tuesday.
Wednesday: Bar bingo in
the canteen at 1 p.m. Wednes-
day is Ladies Night from 5 until
8 p.m. Cookout for a nominal
donation from 5 until 7 p.m.
Karaoke at 7 p.m. with a differ-
ent host each week.
Thursday: VFW Mixed Golf
League alternating between
Twisted Oaks Golf Club and
Pine Ridge Golf Club with an 8
a.m. tee time. Check with Dave
Nealey or Ray Galinski for
available tee times. Pool tour-
nament in the canteen at 7 p.m.
Friday: Dart tournament at 7
p.m.
Saturday: Karaoke in the
canteen from 7 to 11 p.m. fea-
turing a different host each
week.
* Marine Corps League,
Citrus County Detachment
819 will meet at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills., Call
Commandant Robert Deck at
527-1557.
* VFW Post 4252 and
Ladies Auxiliary.
All eligible persons are in-
vited to join. Stop in at the post
or call for information. Post
4252 is at 3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road
200, Hemando; phone 726-
3339. Send e-mails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
* The William Crow
AmVets Post 447 is at 33


Risher Ave. in Inglis. For more
information, call 447-4473.
* U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 726-5926.
* American Legion Post
166 will meet 1:30 p.m., Satur-
day, May 2 at the Dumas-Hart-
son VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley
Davidson.
All former and current post
members, as well as all inter-
ested veterans, are cordially in-
vited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For more in-
formation, call Bill at 382-1119.
* The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Anyone who has honorably
served within Korea or outside
Korea from June 25,1950, to
Jan. 31,1955, and anyone
serving within Korea from 1955
to present is eligible to join the
Korean War Veterans Associa-
tion (KWVA). Call Hank Butler
at 563-2496, Paul Salyer at
637-1161 or Neville Anderson
at 344-2529.
* Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Key Training
Center, 130 Heights Ave., In-


vemess. Potluck dinner at 6
p.m., meeting starts at 7:15.
Auxiliary Unit 77 meets at the
same time and place. Call Post
Cmdr. Paul Miller at 344-8277
or Auxiliary president Alice
Brumett at 860-2981.
* The Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II will conduct its next
meeting at 11:30 a.m. the sec-
ond Saturday, May 9, at Kally
K's, 3383 U.S. 19 in Spring Hill.
* Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 11:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Crystal Paradise
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Luncheon at 1 p.m. May 12
will be at The Supper Club in
Crystal River.
* Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shonk Chap-
ter 70 and Auxiliary 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41.
DAV Chapter 70 and Auxil-
iary meetings are at 2 p.m. on
the second Tuesday of each
month.
The DAV Chapter is open
from 9 a.m. to noon every
Tuesday to assist disabled vet-
erans. A service officer is avail-
able by appointment. Contact
Bill Geden at 341-6875.
For the Chapter, call Richard
Floyd, adjutant at 726-5031.
For the Auxiliary, call Lynn Ar-
mitage, adjutant at 341-5334.

See VETS/Page A15
. f


CyiNicLE c CITRUS COUNTY ALL-HAZARD & INFORMATIONAL EXPOS



amins or Flames


ro',, Are You Prepared?

CQ k.t . Saturday, May 91h~ 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Sher)^f fihl ' EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER ~ Citrus County Sheriff's Office
"at\726.47889, 7549 Saunders Way, Lecanto, FL (across from Lecanto Government Center)
\, . Special guests: Dan Noah, National Weather Service.
."===. -,,,,- Also: 6 Generator safety demos 6 Hurricane re-entry tag distribution, and more!







Your Devotion.



-r Appreciation.


Seven Rivers Regional


Salutes Our Volunteers


At Seven Rivers Regional, we have a passion for helping you live
your life to its fullest. And our dedicated volunteers are an important
part of our success.
From helping to make admittance into the hospital quicker
and easier, to ensuring patients are comfortable during their stay,
volunteers meet the needs of patients, physicians,
staff and guests.
Together, we're dedicated to helping you achieve optimum
health. So you can get back to doing the things you love to do.
In honor of National Volunteer Week, April 19 - April 25, we
salute our volunteers ..


Your Life. Our Story.

To learn more about volunteering at Seven Rivers Regional,
please call 352.795.8356.


; SEVEN RIVERS
-.- REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34428
352.795.6560 * 352.489.2022
srrmc.com


VETERANS NOTES


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 A15 -


I tweet, therefore


S I yammer
9:00:00: I signed up for the guy who sells those great
Twitter this morning to chicken tacos will be at
see what everyone is Fifth & Mulberry at noon.
making such a fuss about. 12:30: Still in line at the
This is my first Twitter mes- taco cart. It seems everyone
sage. in the world got
S9:00:30: This is the same tweet It
to apologize for used to take tvo
my first Twitter minutes to get a
message. I'm sup- taco, now it takes
posed to tell peo- two hours.
ple what I'm 1:30:33: The
doing, not what quality of the
I'm thinking, tacos has really
9:01:00: No one gone- downhill.'
seems to care JIM Maybe Tweeters
that I amTwitter- aren't the best
ing. MULLEN judges of food.
9:01:22; OK, I'm 1:33:18: I've got
writing my column now 30 people following my
about how Twitter is chang- tweets in just one morning.
ing the world. I type these They all want to know if I'm
short little messages on my 420 friendly Hey, I like
phone and ... everyone.
9:02:13: Whoops! I hit 1:34:44: OMG! 420 means
"send" by mistake. My marijuana! How was I sup-
thumb already hurts. How posed to know that? What has
can people type on these 420 got to do with marijuana?
Satiny keyboards? 3:20:18: I'm taking a break
9:08:42: My cats are fight- from the yard work and
ing, again, reading all the tweets I
10:02:18: I'm at the vet's missed for two hours.
having Fluffy's tail looked 3:21:33: There r hundreds
at The doc says he can reat- of tweets to read. It's run-
tach it. ning down the battery on my
11:09:03: Well, there's phone. Does each tweet cost
.$300 I'll never see again. I me something?
was going-to-my--4~aiean---325.14 --Fr-a-llthe .mes
buy a better phone with a saging, no one seems to be
bigger keyboard with that doing anything very impor-
money. It's easier just... tant.
11:09:55: Whoops. They re- 3:28:11:1 I have 122 people
ally mean it when they say a following my tweets now. I
message can only be 160 char- don't know any of them. I
acters long I'm leaving in my wish they all had something
tuyping mistakes from now on better to do with their time.
11:15:27: I JUST SHOW- 4:43:21: I didn't get much
ERED OFF ALL THE CAT done today. Wasted a lot of
HAIR. HOW DO I TURN time on Twitter.
OFF THE CAPS? 4:44:07:1 can see how this
11:35:55: THANKS. I mean, would be handy about once
thx. I haven't learned all the a week To let everyone
abbreviations yet Anybody know that it's my birthday.
wantto meet me atthe -brb. 4:45:11: Or that I'm taking
11:41:09: Sorry, I had to the day off, or that I'm start-
answer the phone; Someone--ing-my-vaeation or that my
called to TALK to me. Don't knee operation went well,
they know about Twitter? or you're getting married or
11:43:45: It was my sister having a baby.
She just wanted to chat. 4:47:43: This is my last
Doesn't she know about tweet for a while. I'm calling
Twitter? It's Talk, 2.0. We my sister just to catch up.
don't have to talkto catch up ___
anymore..
1;.;4500: I'm going to Reac4 author Jim Mullen at
lunch. Ijust got a tweet that jimmullen@(myway.com.


VETS
Continued from Page A14
* Seabee Veterans of
America Island X-18 All
Seabees, Honeybees, rela-
tives and friends are welcome
to our meetings and events.
Meetings are at 11 a.m. the
second Wednesday monthly
at the VA Office, 2804 Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto. We
have a short meeting, about
one hour, at the VA Office,
then we will eat lunch at a
local restaurant decided on at
the meeting. On the third
Wednesday monthly, we have
a luncheon.
Call Cmdr. David Puffer at
746-9327 or e-mail
puffels@tampabay.rr.com
* Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal River
(6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way). For more about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Richard Gannon at 637-1236;
for the Cabane, call La Presi-
dente Debi Gannon at 637-
1236 or visit www.Postl55
.org.
* Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
bimonthly at 1:15 p.m.'on the
third Tuesday of January,
March, May, July, September
and November at the Citrus
County Resources CenterNA
Clinic, 2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto (west side of
County Road 491 approxi-
mately 1 mile north of C.R.
486).
All combat wounded veter-
ans and lineal descendants of
Purple Heart recipients are in-
vited to attend q meeting. Life
memberships for combat
wounded veterans and lineal
descendants of Purple Heart
recipients are $50. There are
no chapter dues. To learn
more about Aaron A. Weaver
-Chapter 776 MOPH, visit
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 382-3847.
N The Dan Campbell Air-
borne'Association meets at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day monthly at American Le-
gion Post 155, 6585
.Gulf-to-Lake Highway.(State
, Road 44), Crystal River. All
current and previous Airborne


members and their wives are
welcome to join us. Call Steve
Leonard at 726-3693.
* The Marine Corps
League, Samuel R. Wall De-
tachment 1139 will conduct
its regular meeting at 7 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly �
at DAV Post 70 in Inverness at
the intersection of Independ- P-
ence Avenue and U.S. 41 A
North. All former Marines are S
welcome. Call Tom Heron at T
637-2724 or Joe Spoto at 746- A
3315. P
* Fleet Reserve Associa- _AL
tion, Branch 186 will meet at G-
3 p.m. the third Thursday N
monthly at the DAV Building, o
Independence Highway and M I
U.S. 41 North, Invemess. Call -A
Bob'Huscher, secretary, at.
344-0727. O
* Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets A
the third Thursday monthly at i
the Floral City VFW Post
7122, call to order 7:30 Si
p.m. The membership invites 4-19
all' eligible veterans to join the
Post.
* The Herbert Surber
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 225 meets at 7:30 p.m.
the third Thursday monthly at
the Floral City VFW Post 7122
on U.S. 41, Floral City. Con-
tact Marcia Gallagher, mem-
bership chairwoman, at
860-1629. Come and join this
newly re-chartered unit and be
a part of the great accomplish-
ments and projectsJin the.
American Legion Auxiliary. "
* Navy and Marine Corps
shipmates who served on the
USS Columbus CA-74/CG-12
from 1944 through 1976 and
the USS Columbus (SSN-762)
past and present,.if you would
like to share memories and
camaraderie with old friends 4,
and make new ones, contact
Allen R. Hope, president,
3828 Hobson Road, Fort
Wayne, IN 46815-4505.
Home: (260) 486-2221 8 a.m.:
to 5 p.m. Eastem Time. Fax:
(260) 492-9771. E-mail:
hope4391@comcast.net'. M
* USS Columbus CA- "
74/CG-12/CG-12/SSN-762
Reunion Sept. 30 to Oct. 3, at Y ou
Holiday Inn Select, Nashville, tir
Tenn.. Contact Allen R. Hope,
president, 3828 Hobson F
Road, Fort Wayne, 1N 46815-
4505. Home: (260)Y486-2221
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastem Time.
Fax: (260) 492-9771. E-mail:
hope4391 @comcast.net.


Sunday's PUZZLER


puzzle is on Page A18.


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� 2009 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.


S: . if so, call today if you have been suffering
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Mildred V. Farmer, MD, 12144 Cortez Blvd., (Route50)
Between US 19 & Mariner Blvd. Brooksville, FL 34613 - 7


4245 N. Bartley Terrace, Beverly Hills
491 N. to Mustang Bvid turn right on Mesa Verde,
Lefton Bartley.
Home offered by Summerwind Homes .-

5191 N. Pink Poppy Drive, Beverly Hills
US 19 to state road 44 east turn left on County rod
486, follow Pine ridge Blvd, turn left Comer of Pink
Poppy Drive and Pine Ridge blvd.
Home Offered by Dream Custom Homes of
Citrus

6393 W. Glory Hill, Beverly Hills
Pine Ridge Blvd, turn on Ponderoso, right o
Sarramenro, right on Glory Hill. 1st house on left.
Home offered by Middleton Sunshine
Properties

4260 W. Pine Ridge Bvid, Beverly Hills
Rt 491 t Pine ridge Blvd, follow Pine Ridge Blvd to
model on the left.
Home offered by SweetWater Homes of Citrus,
Inc. ___----------

4302 N. Breadnut Terrace, Beverly Hills
Pine Ridge at Breadnut terrace and Mustang
Home offered by Lou Miele, Era American
Realty

5759 N. Carnation Drive, Beverly Hills
Pine Ridge at Carnation Drive and Daffodil.
Home offered by Lou Miele, Era American
Realty

1865 W. Citrus Springs Bvid, Citrus Springs
N. Rt 41 to left on West Citrus Springs Blvd. Model
on right past Santos.
Home offeredby CitrusRidge-Relty--- --

9356 Jourden Drive, Citrus Springs
N. Citrus Springs BvId to left on Anson, Left on
Sandred, Right on Jourden.
Home offered by Citrus Ridge Realty

11145 W. Bentbow Path, Crystal River
US 19 2 miles north of the Crystal River Mall.
2 homes offered by Cosgrove Builders


Mark the weekend of April 18 & 19 to map out your tour of what could possibly lead you to your pei
and affordable, dream home All homes in this book will be open during the listed hours with a personE
to show you from room to room, answer your questions and then invite you to discover on your ov


263 NW Bay Path Drive, Crystal River
Hwy 9 S. Citrus Ave, 3 blocks on right.
Home offered by Edward RussellJohnston

25 N. Country Club Drive, Crystal River
From US 19 turn on Ft. Island trail, 1st left oon
Country Club Dr. go around golf course, home is
on the left, 3rd house before end of street.

"11ernilockCt S.(Sugarmill Woods),
Homosassa
US 19 to E. on Cypress Bvid. To right on Pine
street, to right on greentree St. to left on Hemlock
Ct.S. House on the left.
Home offered by Richard Van Orden/
.Distinctive Homes


Register to wi
one of these
gifts at any o
the above
open houses.


Weeping Willow Ct., Homosassa
Cypress Bvid W. to Douglas St. (left) Douglas
Linder Dr. right to Beech St. Model on left.
Home offered by SweetWater Homes of C
Inc.

11410 Waterway Drive, Homosassa
from Hwy 19 in Homosassa go west on Halls
rd about 3 miles ro-right on Riverhaven drive
right on Waterway drive.
Home offered by Moore & Moore Realty, In

9214S. Suncoast Bvld, Homosassa
Hwy 19just mile north ofHwy 98. .
Home offered by Adams Homes


Register to $If



We Have Over 30 Years Combined Experience
f 8915 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa, FL 34446
(Formerly Naber Kids Doll Granite Patio
Hospital) Chiller Table
Fax: 352 382.0216 valued at $1,300
\ 352.382.0709 7 i /-/7


5 Boxwood Ct. Sugarmill Woods, Homosassa
:. US 19 Cypress Blvd .left on Cypress Bvld E. to left
Corkwood Blvd. to left on Boxwwood Ct. house on
the right of cul-de-sac.
Home offered by Richard Van Orden/ Distinctive
Homes

1 Black Williow Ct. N. Sugarmill Woods,
Homosassa
US 19 to Cypress Bvld. W.to left on Cypress Blvd E.to
left on Black Willow St. to left on Black Willow Ct. N.
house on right.
Home offered by Richard Van Orden/Distinctive
Homes

2271 South Olympic Hills Terrace, Inverness
I Hwy 41S. of Inverness, turn left on Edendrive, take
homes,,,, IstrightatS. Olympic Hills.
'i"' Home offered by Encore Homes

"" 9710 E.White Egret Path, Inverness
.,hding From us 41 take hwy44 e. of County rd 470 (Gosperl
" Islandrd).Tun let one mile t6entrance(EasrGolf-
i.' ,, Harbor Path -
rfect, Home offered by The Moorings @Point of Woods
al guide
wn. 235 E. Foster Ct., Lecanto
from hwy 44 to Kensington Ave, veer left to
Buckingham, left on Foster
to
1773 S. Overview Dr., Lecanto
itrus, Hills of Avalon entrance is one mile east of Rock
Crusher Rd.at Gleneagle and Hwy.490
Home offered by Louie Lott HomeBuilder, Inc.

s River 5215W. Greensily Ln., Lecanto
et o Hills of Avalon entrance is one mile eastof Rock
Crusher Rd. at Gleneagle and Hwy.490
nc. Home offered by Constate Development

5265 W.Greensily Ln., Lecanto
Hills ofAvalon entrance is one mile east ofRock
Crusher Rd. at Gleneagle and Hwy.490
Home offered by Constate Development


11640 SW 49th Ave.,Ocala
Home offered by Dream Custom Homes of
Citrus, Inc.


OINJER


~81 845


SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 A15


CRnus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ITII


I


P








A16 SUNnAY, Ar'rur 19, 2009 Cimus CoUN�n' (FL) CHRONICLE


GUIDE
Continued from Page A13
overload, and feeling just p bit shameful for
gawking, we still took advantage of the col-
orful sights that were in constant view. The
women typically wear very colorful and flow-
ing saris, even those working in the fields,
and simply cannot be ignored as one of many
exotic sights. More exotic is a moped speed-
ing along, a vibrantly colored sari trailing in
the wind - a picture in motion.
We hosted an Indian medical doctor in
our home several years ago as part of a Ro-
tary Club cultural exchange and had
arranged to see him while we were visiting
Jaipur. We received a warm welcome and.
had dinner with him at our hotel. He ar-
rived on a moped, the family's only trans-
portation. He told us that he sometimes
makes two or three trips to take his family
to an event or on outings.
As we continued on the main highway to
New Delhi, we were practically surrounded
by trucks, farm equipment, elephants, and
an array of other vehicles on the highway.
We spotted occasional caravans of shep-


herds with their camels and flocks of sheep,
moving to higher elevations for grazing.
Luck was with us one day on a two-lane
highway when a mother with a small child
darted out in front of our bus. The alert
driver avoided a catastrophe by swerving
off the pavement, nearly tipping the bus
over. Everyone seems to think they have the
right-of-way regardless of the circum-
stances.
Our arrival in New Delhi ended a new
and exciting eye-opening adventure in
travel, a primer for our next trip to India,
possibly later this year. As before, we will
not be driving but will depend on the locals
who understand the river-like streams of
vehicles, so that we can sit back and appre-
ciate the sights and sounds.
-m-
Neil Sawyer is a 22-year Crystal River
resident and businessman. He and his
wife, Karyn, are extensive travelers,
venturing to foreign countries two to three
times a year in addition to taking several.
domestic excursions annually. They
prefer independent travel or with small
group guided tours. E-mail him at
gobuddy@tampabay.rrcom.


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chro lte
In India, intersections have no traffic signals,, except in major cities. This intersection
scene in Agra Is typical. ',,


BYE
Continued from Page A13
a short escalator ride to the
Delta Sky 360 Club, one of
six exclusive spots in the
park These include the
Acela Club, a multitiered
restaurant beyond the left-
field wall that offers incred-
ible views of the field and a
reasonable $48 prix fixe
menu conceived by a chef
from Myriad Group, the
company owned by Drew
Nieporent of Nobu and
Tribeca Grill.
At the new Yankee Sta-
dium, regular ticket holders'
can watch while those pay-
ing upward of $2,625 for
ONE seat - food, but not al-
cohol, included - sup on
white-clothed tables in the
glassed-walled Legends
Suite Club behind home
plate.
For the hoi polloi, there
are other options. At Citi
Field, bars and concession
stands serve stadium fa-
vorites: Nathan's hot dogs
($5.75), Brooklyn Burgers
($5.75 compared to $8.75 in
the Caesars Club), six types
of chicken sandwiches
($6.50-$7.50) and "Cracker
Jacks" (memo to Mets: it's
Cracker Jack). There are 17
types of beer, the cheapest a
12-ounce American draft at
$6.25. Calories are posted at
4oth ballparks, too (hot


dogs: 260).
The real treat at Citi
Field, though, is behind the
scoreboard in center field at
Taste of New York, a con-
crete picnic area with views
of the Whitestone Bridge.
Here one can find favorites
from Meyer's Shake Shack
and Blue Smoke; seafood
from David Pasternack, chef
at the popular Manhattan
restaurant Esca, and pizza
from Cascarino's, a Queens
chain known for brick-oven
pizza.
The lines are long and
there's little, if any, view of
the field, but if you don't
mind missing an inning or
two, it's worth the wait
The made-to-order
Shackburger ($5.75 single,'
$8.75 double), is one of the
most popular burgers in
New York, and.the single is
only $1 more at Citi Field
than at the original Shake
Shacks on Manhattan's
Upper West Side and in
Madison Square Park.
Crispy fries ($4.75) don't wilt
under heat lamps, and a
thick and rich shake goes
for $6.50.
Also at Citi Field: You can
have a delicate, pulled pork
sandwich on a brioche bun
($9) or Kansas City Ribs
($10) at Blue Smoke, or
order tacos at El Verano
Taqueria. Two pork carnitas
with a tangy salsa in a fresh
soft tortilla were a bargain
at $7.25.


Compare the Shake
Shack fries to the Belgian-
style ones at Box Frites
($6.50-$7.50) while leaning
on the railing of the arched
"bridge" leading to the
right-field concourse and
watch the action from about
500 feet away from home
plate. Then stop at Paster-
nack's Catch of the Day, for
a delicately fried Long Is-
land Flounder sandwich
($8.25) or a lobster roll ($17).
When asked why he chose
to run the Acela Club
restaurant at Citi Field
rather than work with the
Yankees, Nieporent said the
Yankees "went for the
money. They wanted every-
one to pay them."
A quick trip on the B, D or
No. 4 trains to 161st Street
and River Avenue in the
Bronx, and you're con-
fronted with an overblown
monument to all things in
pinstripes.
When you walk into the
imposing limestone, marble
and 31,000-square-foot gran-
ite Great Hall, more remi-
niscent of a federal building
than a stadium, you hear
recordings from famous
Yankees moments, such as
Lou Gehrig's "I am the luck-


iest man on the face of the
Earth" speech. As if one
needed one more reminder
that the team's new home is
supposed to evoke the origi-
nal stadium built in 1923,
there's an old-fashioned
pushcart selling fruit.
Unlike the dark cin-
derblock halls of Citi Field,
the Yankee Stadium con-
courses are light and roomy
- and windy, too. While-the
Mets went for the top chefs,
the Yankees went for recog-
nizable names.
There's a Hard Rock Cafe
with year-round street ac-
cess, and concessions by
Brother Jimmy's BBQ,
Boar's Head, Nathan's,
Tommy Bahama's, Johnny
Rockets and a Mohegan Sun
sports bar among others.
Walking the concourses
feels less like New York
than a middle-America
mall.
Seventy percent of the
concession stands have
equipment for cooking
rather than just reheating
under lamps, up from 14
percent in the old park, and
that makes all the differ-
\ence.
A Johnny Rockets double
burger ($12) is no match for


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Shake Shack but satisfying
nonetheless.
Embrace variety and fol-
low the field level con-
course starting in right field
at Carl's Philly Cheeses-
teaks, where you can have a
Philadelphia (where are
we?) specialty for $10.75 or
a burrito from La Esquina
Latina for $9. Head toward
left field fora spicy tuna roll
($9.75) or Brother Jimmy's
for a pulled pork or beef
brisket sandwich ($10 each).
While Mets have Shea
Stadium' favorite Mommas
of Corona, the Yankees
overload a food court with
Arthur Avenue Deli and
Mike's Deli (outlets of
beloved fixtures from the
Bronx's Italian Arthur Av-
enue market) and Boar's
Head. A turkey and pro-
volone ($12) is $2.50 more
than Momma's turkey and
fresh Mozzarella. Big Mike's


Combo or Da True Broft
Tale are $10 each. -
The many choices at Yand-
ke'p Stadium provide an ex-
cupe to comparison shopjli
A souvenir cup of BidL-
weiser on the 200 level coni-
course is $10.50. A similar
sized Coors Light on the
field level is $10. A Hebr~gt
National hot dog was $5:50,
but a Nathan's beef frankl'o
the main concourse was$5
or $6 near section 226. ,-, r.
Oh, that butcher wasn't
carving just. for show. Yod'
can sink your teeth into 'a
$15 steak sandwich m&d6
with beef from Lobel'gief
New York, which also stip-
plies the steaks for the NYY
Steak restaurant, which'is
located above the Ha'td
Rock Cafe in the right-field
corner. It offers no viewlbf
the field, but you don't nied
a ticket to the game to At
there. - r",


CHRONICLE A CITtRUS


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A16 SUNDAY, APIUL 19, 2009








SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 A17


SCTRus COUN'w


SFL) CHRONICLE


Father of child


"owes much more


than information


ear Annie: I'm a 40-
year-old woman.
Four years ago, I met
"Tom" online in a game
room and he swept me off
my feet. I knew he was mar-
ried but didn't care. He
li ved 100 miles away and we
*w6uld meet whenever we
colild.
-The last time we were in-
tigmate, I got pregnant. I
never planned on
telling him about
the baby, but
when my daugh-
.ter was born pre-
maturely, I
thought she
might die. I felt
guilty that her fa-
ther would never
kaow her, so I e-
,mailed Tom to
say he was the fa-
ther of a little ANN
girl. He was not
happy about it. MAIL
. I suggested he
give up his parental rights so
the could go on with his life,
built he never answered me. I
,e-mailed again to ask about
4,s medical history, and this
-time he became angry.
I know I got myself in this
mess, but was I wrong to
.want this information?
Doesn't he have an obliga-
kion to give me that? After
"all, it took two of us to make
babyb, and he is the one
who is going to be missing
out on his beautiful daugh-
ter's life. How do I get him
to cooperate? - Messed Up
in Illinois
- Dear Messed Up: Tom has
more than a moral obliga-
tion to give you family med-
ical information. He is
legally obligated to support
his daughter financially.
Don't be so nice about this
that you let Tom avoid re-
sponsibility for the life he
belped create. Talk to a
lawyer so you and your
daughter a re protected.
S.Dear Annie: I am the di-
Iector of nursing tbra short-
term rehab and long-term
arje facility. Thanks to the
Q EA rules and regulations
each month, I, along with a
pharmacist and a couple of
nly u nit managers, flush
tens of thousands of ana-
bolic steroids and narcotic
medications (such as mor-
� phine, Valium, fentanyl.
patches and Dilaudid) down
the drain. Why? Because
the law says we can't dis-
pense them to the patient at
the time of discharge or re-
turn them to the pharmacy
for repackaging. Medicare
pays for the majority of
these medications. We send
the patient home with writ-
ten prescriptions instead.
.Wyith 12 other facilities
within a 25-mile radius, you
do the math. Even worse,


what is this doing to our en-
vironment? Where do these
drugs end up? The public
should know about this hor-
rible waste. - R.N.
Dear R.N.: Recent studies
have found traces of
painkillers, estrogen, antide-
pressants, blood-pressure
medicines and other phar-
maceuticals in water sam-
ples from 30 states. The
medications you
cite are classified
as controlled sub-
stances and can-
not be legally
donated or dis-
pensed. However,
the DEA recently
issued updated
guidelines and no
longer recom-
mends flushing
them down the
IE'S toilet, except
where the label-
-BOX ing says to do so.
Instead, it encour-
ages bringing unwanted
medications to community
take-back collections.
Readers who want to get
rid of other unused medica-
tions also should not flush
them. They should be
ground up or dissolved in a
small amount of water or al-
cohol, and mixed with cof-
fee grounds or kitty litter,
then put in a small sealable
plastic bag and hidden in
the trash. Readers can also
check with their pharmacy
for drug recycling or com-
munity take-back programs
where medications can be
collected. Some unexpired
medications can be donated
to third-world countries or
given to animal hospitals.
Dear Annie: I, too, have
severe rheumatoid arthritis
and osteoarthritis, like
"Frustrated in Elgin, Ore.,"
whose husband is debili-
tated by these conditions. In
order to have moderate
movement, I was consuming
an unusual amount of
ibuprofen, especially when
officiating basketball.
Several weeks ago, a
friend recommended put-
ting a couple of tablespoons
of concentrated cherry juice
in my water once a day
Since then, I have not taken
even one ibuprofen, my
joints and muscles move
easily, and I feel wonderful.
- Omaha, Neb.
Dear Omaha: Thanks for
the suggestion. As with any
other home remedy, before
trying this, check with your
physician.

Please e-mail your
questions to anniesmail
box@comcastnet, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox,
.0. Box 118190,
Chicago, IL 60611.


Let
the
good
times
roll


Special to the Chronicle
TOP: Maj. Robert Hicks and his family, wife Patsy, sons
Jonathan, Robbie and Nicolas, and daughter Katelyn at-
tended the 2009 Easter Egg Roll at the White House.
ABOVE: Each participant received a souvenir wooden
egg with the signatures of the president and first lady on
them. They played basketball and soccer, made jump
ropes and hats, did the egg hunt and egg roll, all on the
front lawn of the White House. President Obama wanted
a fun day for all who attended. And it was.
Hicks is stationed at the Pentagon, but his parents, Bob
and Clara Hicks, sister Heather Stevens and her family,
Craig, David and Devon, grandparents Robert and Bar-
bara Schmidt and Merril and Joan Hawkins all live in Cit-
rus Springs.


News BRIEF -


BHRA trekking
to Hudson for show
Beverly Hills Recreation
Association is sponsoring a
trip to the Hudson Show
Palace, Friday, May 29,
evening Show to see "Viva I
Vegas," a musical salute to all
that glitters in Sin City. Filled
with classic songs, high-en-
ergy dance numbers and hi-
larious sketches, this show
has something for everyone.
The cost includes the show
and a lavish hot buffet. Be at
the parking lot 5 p.m. for car-
pooling, if needed. If you are
willing to drive, please let us
know when you register. S
Reservations can be made I
at the Beverly Hills Recreation
Center at 77 Civic Circle in
Beverly Hills; call 746-4882.










P H Y S I C I


Barbara and Edward
Borak of Inverness cele-
brated their 65th wedding
anniversary. They were
married on April 18, 1944,
in Meriden, Conn.
They have two sons and


two daughters, Barry, Bon-
nie, Bruce and Bethany,
nine grandchildren and 17
great-grandchildren.
The Boraks are retired
and have lived in Citrus
County 18 years.


New ARRIVAL


Congratulations to the
following new parents:
* To Patricia and JR
Domino, Inverness, a daugh-
ter, Hailey Rose Domino,


born at 6:30 a.m. Saturday,
April 11, 2009, at Citrus Me-
morial Health System, In-
verness. She weighed 5
pounds, 7 1/2 ounces.


GET THE WORD OUT


* Nonprofit organizations
are invited to submit
news releases about up-
coming community
events. Write the name
of the event, who spon-
sors it, when and where
it will take place and


WEIGHT Loss PROGRAM .
. . ... . . . . . ^


Medically supervised quick weight
loss with a high rate of success, our
results show Ihat our patients are" ..,
* Losing about 12-20 lbs
per month i
Improving health i
* Increasing metabolism
Developing a realistic maintenance
plan medically monitored ..
* No hidden contracts ''". "
SAlso offering HCG Weight Loss Program > .-


Se Habla Espariol


, . S -


Scott Redrick, M.D. FACOG


other details.
* Include a contact name
and phone number to be
printed in the paper.
* News releases are
subject to editing.
* Call 563-5660..


�8T "..\. , <
,,r " * .

,,| . ::
i -1
_ ' ' -


board Certified I


582 SE 7th Ave., Crystal River, FL 34429 * www.scottredrickmd.com|


S E R I E S


B


PG





. Thursday, May 7, 2009

; First session 3-5 p.m. f

Second session 6-8 p.m.
Citrus County Auditorium
S Hwy. 41 South, Inverness
(at the Citrus County Fairgrounds)
Parents of infants under 6 months
* .old are also invited.
Exhibits - Games - Scavenger hunt - Gifts for j
mom, dads and babies - Lots of door prizes.
For more information call '26-1 731 ei 258 Q .


When Neck Pain Is A "Real Pain"

Esther Wylen, M.D., Neurosurgeon
Saturday, April 25th * 10:30 a.m.
Silverthorn Country Club
4550 Golf Club Land, Brooksville
A Continental Breakfast Will Be Served



Heart Attacks & Coronary Blockages

Thomas Mathews, M.D., Cardiologist
Tuesday, April 28th * 5:30 p.m.
Sugarmill Woods Country Club
1 Douglas Street, Homosassa
A Light Dinner Will Be Served


Together =


65th ANNIVERSARY


The Boraks


MOMEN,


1














Today's HOROSCOPE


Your Birthday: If you choose to,
you'll become a more dominant in-
fluence in the year ahead with both
friends and colleagues. Don't under-
estimate your thinking about issues
or things you share with others.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -
There's more to you than meets
the eye, but chances are you
won't care whether or not others
know that. You feel secure about
who and what you are.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)-
Meeting a new group of like-
minded people will elevate your
belief in the fact that people in
general are good.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -
Without being aware of it, you
could have a considerable influ-
ence on those with whom you
spend time. You're fun, progres-
sive and care about bringing out
the best in others.


Cancer (June 21-July 22) - This
is a good day to gather knowledge
and collect bits of information.
These facts will come in handy
down the line.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -An in-
stinctual awareness about han-
dling your resources in an
effective manner enhances the
probabilities for success.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Ex-
changing ideas with fast-thinking
friends will stimulate your senses
in a most enjoyable manner.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Being
helpful to others could show ex-
actly how you fit into the big
scheme of things. Once you prove
your worth to yourself, you can
prove your value to anyone.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -
Your congeniality and the way you
treat others will make you popular
among your peers. That smile on

Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"17 Again" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"State of Play" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Observe & Report" (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:50.
p.m.
"Hannah Montana: The Movie" (G) 11:30 a.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Fast and the Furious" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10
p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Monsters vs. Aliens" (PG) 1:40 p.m.
"Knowing" (PG-13) 7:05 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Crank 2" (R) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:20
p.m.
"17 Again" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
9:55 p.m.


CITRUS COUNTY ANIMAL


The Citrus County Animal
Control Shelter has online list-
ings of impounded animals at
animal control.catrus.fl.us.
The shelter is in Inverness


near the airport.
mation, call the (
Animal Shelter a
Financial assi
spaying and neu


your face is medicine that can be
prescribed for everyone.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)-
When you do things for others,
you'll be inclined to exert extra ef-
fort. The tasks at hand won't seem
burdensome at all.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)-
Since this could be one of those
days when you enjoy socializing
with people from all walks of life,
you'll know how to transform
shared interests into a fun day.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)-
You're particularly sharp with
money issues, so take a little time
out of this relaxing day to work on
ways to solidify your financial base.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -
With the right motivation, you'll
come up with some constructive
ideas that you can apply to proj-
ects now under way. Spend some
quality time on doing just that.


"State of Play" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40
p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Dragonball Evolution" (PG) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.
"Observe & Report" (R) 1:25 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:25
p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Hanna Montana: The Movie" (G) 1:10 p.m., 4:10
p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:35 p.m. No passes.
"Fast and the Furious" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:45
p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"The Haunting in Connecticut" (PG-13) 2 pm., 5
p.m., 8 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Monsters vs. Aliens" (PG) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Knowing" (PG-13) 7:20 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"I Love You Man" (R) 9:45 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.

CONTROL PET PROFILES
For more infor- adopted pet is available
Citrus County through the Humanitarians of
rt 726-7660. Florida at 563-2370 or from
distance for the Humane Society of Citrus
utering of an County at 341-2222.


Bailey Granger Malachi Nala Name: (none) Name: (none)
AGE: 4 yrs. AGE: 3 yrs. AGE: ? AGE: ? AGE: ? AGE: ?
SEX: F SEX: M SEX: NM SEX: SF SEX: M SEX: F
ID: 7414620 ID: 7440790 ID: 7439848 ID: 7445355 ID: 7400137 ID: 7463735


Sunday PUZZLER
Puzzle answer is on Page A15.


ACROSS
1 Bothersome ones
6 Shoulder or
spaghetti
11 Goulashes
16Capture
21 Communion table
22Terre -
23Water wheel
24Hawaiian greet-
ing
25Hits
26Gone up
27Coral island
28Fear
29Metallic element
30Wrinkle
31 Joke
33Shuts with force
35Antlered animal
36Wine city in Italy
38lnsect
39"- Town"
40Drs.' org.
41 Dwelling (abbr.)
42Plunder
44Airman
48Composer
- Stravinsky
51 Resembling
onionskin
54FBI agent (hyph.)
55Pitcher
57Shoe part
61 Warning device
62Coconut fiber
63Coffee type, for
short
65Different
66Donated
67Tilted
70Kind of boom
72Wrath
73"What Kind
of Fool--?-"


74Game on horse-
back
75Underworld god
77Plastic material
79Pinch
80- the wiser
82Beast of burden
83Angry speech
85Stops
87Fierce look
89Sick room item
90Seaman
91 Metallic sound
92Maladjusted one
94Cheered
96Quid - quo
97Victory goddess
100 Elevation (abbr.)
101 Dull surface
104 Fish eggs
105 Don -
106 - de plume
107 City in Brazil
108 Hospital worker
110 Apply, as laws
112 Break suddenly
113 Waterway
116 Dye method
using wax
118 Danger
119 Silvery fish
120 City in Denmark
122 Simple
123 Yearn
124 Part of TGIF
125 Lazy
127 Most costly
129 Opening for mail
130--loss
133 Prohibit
135 Printing fluid
136 Books expert
(abbr.)
137 Amerindian
141 Bread roll


142 More ignoble
144 Spring
145 George Bernard
146 Panel truck
147 Run off to wed
149 Food fish
151 Legitimate
153 Wonderland visi-
tor
155 Kind of wave
156 Call forth
157 Vestige
158 Big boo-boo
159 Exhausted
160 Allude
161 Pulls
162 Put forth effort
DOWN
1 Macaroni
2 Immigrants'is-
land
3 Tricky feat
4 Schoolyard game
5 Upperclassmen
(abbr.)
6 Draw back
7 Contaminate
8 Stratagem
9 Had a meal
10Antarctic bird
11 Unexpected diffi-
culty
12Kiddie
13Love god
14American writer
- Cather
15Spicy sausage
16Berets
17Southern state
(abbr.)
18Printer ink
19Where Santiago
is


20Chops
30Like doilies
32Macaw
34'The Gift of the
37River in France
39Manifest
43Branch
44- acid
45Spread to dry
461s indebted
47Bounce back
49Yoko -
50Q-U connection
51 Irreligious one
52Texas landmark
53Brick used for pa-
tios
(2 wds.)
54Ambitions
56Hindu princess
58Touchy (hyph.)
59Strange
60Makes ready, for
short
62Near
64Fish paddle
67Austere
68 Newspaper em-
ployee
69Movie set VIP
(abbr.)
71 Violent storm
76Shiny fabric
78Pasture
81 Sprite
831n addition
84Pop
86- Arbor
88Point a weapon
89Reached a high
point
91 Narrow opening
92- Polo
93Greek epic


95 Foot digit
96Pucker
98Australian animal
99Hollow
102 Large open
container
103 Mine railway
105 Honky-tonk
109 Ireland
111 Pat down for
weapons
112 Metal worker
114 Cuckoo
115 Drug letters
117 Parrot
of New Zealand
119 Marquee notice
121 Isle of exile
123 Fine
124 Imperfection
126 Day for a pa-
rade
128 Tear
129 Outpourings
130 Furthers
131 A flower
132 Battery terminal
134 Effrontery
136 Young bird
138 Of sheep
169 Horse in a race
140 Sluggish
142 Black or safety
143 Housetop
144 Ending for pun
or fun
145 Read hastily
148 Skillet
150 Stringed instru-
ment,
for short
152. Nest egg letters
153 Honest -
154 Cured salmon


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Al8 SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










S Section B - SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009


PORTS


CITRUS COUNTY


Due to early deadlines, the results of
Saturday night's Subway Fresh Fit 500
were not available at press time. For
complete story, see Monday's Chronicle.


CHRONICLE


Brantley shines in spring game


QB throws for

three touchdowns,
runs for two more
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE - The Florida
Gators celebrated last season
Saturday by getting their na-
tional championship rings, then
took a look at what's in store for
the future.
With 16 starters sitting out,
many of them for precautionary
reasons, Florida's spring game
turned into a showcase for young


players who might not even make
an impact this fall.
Sophomore John Brantley
threw for 265 yards and three
touchdowns, ran for two scores
and led the Orange team to a 31-
21 victory over Tim Tebow's Blue
squad.
"He had a great spring," offen-
sive coordinator Steve Addazio
said, "You watch his presence in
the pocket, his poise. He took a
shot under the chin and delivered
a strike. All the signs and evidence
of a guy that's really developing
into one heck of a football player.
"He's a legitimate player, and
we have a lot of confidence in
him. That was a major deal for
the spring, and I think the excla-


mation point was out there for
him today."
Brantley was 14-of-23 passing,
with completions of 26, 47 and 50
yards. His 47-yarder to Frankie
Hammond Jr. highlighted a 90-
yard touchdown drive in the first
half. They also hooked up on a 50-
yard score on the second play of
the second half.
Hammond caught the ball in
See GATORS/Page B2
Florida's Orange team quarterback
John Brantley (12) runs for a
touchdown as Florida's cornerback
Moses Jenkins (36) defends during
the Orange and Blue football game
on Saturday In Gainesville.
Associated Press


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronlde file photo
Lecanto senior Nick Cortes represented District 8 In the Florida Athletic Coaches Association North-
South All-Star Classic In Orlando. District 8 Includes Citrus, Hernando, Pasco, Sumter and Lake counties.



Shining star

Lecanto's Cortes plays in North-South All-Star Classic


ALAN FESTO
afesto@chronicleonllne.com
Chronicle
Some of the best high school
basketball players in the state of
Florida converged on Orlando
Saturday for the Florida
Coaches Athletic Association's
North-South All-Star Classic.
Among those attending was
Lecanto's very own Nick Cortes.
Cortes scored five points and
saw just over a half of action.
Cortes was invited after being
named the FACA's 4A Player of
the Year for District 8, which in-
cludes Citrus, Hernando, Pasco,
Sumter and Lake Counties.
"It was a great experience for
him," Lecanto coach Chris
Nichols said. Nichols also
coached Cortes in the game as
the leader of the North squad.
"Having the added deal to be
able to coach him again was


pretty neat," he said.
By game's end the South had
defeated the North, 102-85, after
pulling away midway through
the second half. The game was
tied at 48 at the half and later at
68 before the South finally made
its move.
Cortes also competed in the 3-
point contest before the game
where he finished second to
American Heritage's Ray Taylor,
who will be attending FAU this
fall. Cortes made 8-of-15 shots
in the first round and six in the
final round, one short of Taylor.
"I always said the two best
small players in the state are
Ray Taylor and Nicky so It's
pretty cool it came down to
those two guys shooting,"
Nichols said.
Cortes averaged over 28
points per game for Lecanto his
senior year and led the Pan-
thers to the first round of the
state playoffs.


Cortes, by the

numbers

28.4
points per game

5.5
rebounds per game

4.9
assists per game

4.1
steals per game


Mistake-free Gay


takes 3-shot lead


Defending champ

Weekly at2-under
Associated Press
HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C.
- Brian Gay is a round away
from his second career victory -
and from validating his place
among PGA Tour winners.
Gay shot a 4-under 67 on Satur-
day and grabbed a three-stroke
lead over Tim Wilkinson through
54 holes in the Verizon Heritage.
The former two-time South-
eastern Conference champion at
Florida already owns a tour title.
But it was at the 2008 Mayakoba
Golf Classic in Mexico, when
most of the golf world was watch-
ing the bigger names at the
World Golf Championships
Match Play event.
In all, 2008 was a career-making
year for Gay: He won a personal
best of more than $2.2 million,
made 20 cuts and had 12 top-25
finishes.
And while most of tour stars
aren't at Harbour Town Golf
Links after last week's Masters,
Gay understands no one would
poke holes in this potential
victory.
"Who else is playing doesn't re-


Associated Press
Brian Gay lines up his'putt on the
second green during the third
round of the Verizon Heritage golf
tournament on Saturday In Hilton
Head Island, S.C.
ally matter," Gay said. "I think it
will be validation of winning last
year. I did it once and I'll do it
again."
Especially if Gay plays as
steadily as he has so far. He has
made one bogey in 54 holes, while
See PGNPage B4


CR's Hall defines what it

means to be a champion


he strength and resilience
of the human spirit was on
full display at The Villages
High School on Thursday after-
noon. Unbeknownst to the hun-
dreds of competitors, there was
one amongst them, Crystal
River's Kristen Hall, that was
running with a heavy heart.
Only hours earlier she had
learned of the untimely, tragic
death of her older brother
Nathan. Kristen could easily have
opted not to compete in the Class
2A-6 district meet And who could
blame her?
That, however, was a thought
that the 18-year old Pirates' sen-
ior never entertained.
"I never thought about not run-
ning," explained Hall shortly
after completing the 1,600-meter
run. "I could never let my team
down like that. Nathan would
have wanted me to run. He would
have expected me to run,"
In the world of sports the words


bravery and
courage are
way overused.
They should
be reserved
for young men
and women
like Kristen
Hall that
excel above
John Coscia and beyond
SPORTS the call of
duty For
TALK they're the
precious few
that look adversity in the face and
find a way to champion their way
through it.
I can't imagine the pain in Kris-
ten's heart that day. Or how diffi-
cult it must have been to just
compete, The heartache must
have been overwhelming, Coping
with the painful thoughts that
crowded her mind must have
See COSCI/NPage B4


JOHN COSCIA/Chronicle
Crytal River's Kristen Hall competed In the Class 2A-6 district meet
with a heavy heart on Thursday following the death of her brother.









Siv IRSCUNY(L HOIL


B2 SUNDAYAPRu19 2009


Nadal reaches final


Spaniard seeking

fifth straight title

in Monte Carlo
Associated Press
MONACO - Rafael Nadal beat
Andy Murray 6-2, 7-6 (4) Saturday
in the semifinals of the Monte
Carlo Masters, putting him within
one victory of his fifth straight
title in this French Open tuneup.
Nadal will play in Sunday's
championship against Novak
Djokovic, who rallied past Stanis-
las Wawrinka 4-6, 6-1, 6-3 in the
other semifinal. Djokovic, a
French Open semifinalist the past
two years, reached his first Monte
Carlo final.
Nadal extended his winning
streak at Monte Carlo to 26
matches. The top-ranked
Spaniard, preparing for next
month's clay-court major, has not
dropped a set at the tournament
since the 2006 final against Roger
Federer.
"I think he's the greatest clay
court player ever," Murray said.
Murray, seeded fourth, rallied
from 5-2 down in the second set to
push Nadal to play his best tennis
after cruising in the first set At
times, Murray was pushed 10 feet
behind the baseline, but this de-
fensive strategy afforded the Scots-
man little opportunity to attack.
Murray began the second set
more aggressively. He held serve
at love with a perfect drop shot at
30-0 and a backhand winner on
his next point
Nadal appeared in command at
5-2, but Murray roared back with
winners that not even Nadal
could chase down. Murray held
and kept his opponent behind the
baseline, finally converting a
break point with a smash that
drew him to 5-4.
"To beat him you have to play
great for three, five sets because
he's so solid," Murray said. "If you
give him one chance, he's one of
the best, probably the best, at tak-
ing them."
The players then held to force a
tiebreaker, which featured a 29-
stroke rally Nadal won with a
forehand for a 5-3 lead. Another
long rally went Nadal's way when
he found a narrow angle to hit a
crosscourt winner for 6-4. He then
clinched the match when Murray


GATORS
Continued from Page B1

stride, then juked Adrian Bushell
near the goal line and coasted into
the end zone. The redshirt fresh-
man finished with four catches for
131 yards and two scores.
"It feels good, but I still made
some mistakes," Hammond said.
"I'm just trying to contribute and
trying to fit in wherever it may be."
The receiver position was one
of Florida's main concerns this
spring. The Gators lost their top
two wideouts, Percy Harvin and
Louis Murphy, after beating Okla-
homa in the national title game in
January and weren't sure who
would replace them. But Ham-
mond, Deonte Thompson (four
catches for 44 yards), Carl Moore
(two for 49) and TJ. Lawrence (five
for 59) looked to be capable pass-
catchers.
"We do have guys," Tebow
said. "There's a lot of different
guys. There's no one guy. It's a
lot of guys competing for the
ball, competing for catches. I
think that's great because it's
going to make these guys work


Associated Press
Spain's Rafael Nadal plays a return to Andy Murray, of Britain, during
their semifinal match of the Monte-Carlo Tennis Masters tournament on
Saturday in Monaco


netted a backhander.
Murray took some consolation
from having reached a semifinal
on clay for the first time.
"I've obviously learned a lot this
week," he said. "The way I played
at the end will give me a great in-
dication of how I need to play."
In the opening match, Djokovic
raised his game after a shaky start
in the third set while Wawrinka's
play was littered with unforced
errors. After going a break down
and trailing 2-0 in the decider,
Djokovic won the next four games.
The third-seeded Serb ended play
on his third match point with a
forehand winner.
"I am very frustrated and dis-
appointed. I was up 2-0 and I had
the opportunity to go up (3-0),"
said Wawrinka, a Swiss seeded
13th. "I lost that game and the
game at 2-2. These two games
made me lose the match."
Djokovic set up match point
when he returned Wawrinka's an-
gled shot to the baseline with a


really hard this summer."
Tebow only played the first half
and was 7-of-9 passing for 81
yards, with a touchdown and an
interception. He also ran three
times for 21 yards.
Tebow, Thompson, running
back Chris Rainey and three of-
fensive linemen were the only
starters who played in the spring
game. The entire first-team de-
fense got the day off, which might
have benefited Brantley the most.
Instead of going against the first
unit, he faced second- and third-
teamers.
Nonetheless, he showed the
kind of game-management skills
of an experienced quarterback
"It's really clicked for me that I
can do this," said Brantley, who
played for both teams in the sec-
ond half and actually scored once
for the Blue squad. "Once Tebow
leaves, and if I'm fortunate
enough to get the starting job, I
can run the show."
Tebow took Brantley around
Florida Field for a victory lap after
the game, with the duo getting
high-fives from some of the about
50,000 on hand.
The day started with players get-
ting one of their three rings. They


Archan el Michael Greek Orthodox
Church invites you to join the...



Semi Greek




Al Festival

April 30, May 1-3


ATP World Tour
MonteCarlo Rolex Masters
Saturday
At The Monte-Carlo Country Club
Monaco
Purse: $3.62 million (Masters 1000)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Singles
Semifinals
Novak Djokovic (3), Serbia, def. Stanislas
Wawrinka (13), Switzerland, 4-6, 6-1, 6-3.
Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Andy Murray (4),
Britain, 6-2, 7-6 (4).
Doubles
Semifinals
Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, def. Lukas
DIouhy, Czech Republic, and Leander Paes (3),
India, 6-7 (3), 6-3,14-12.
Daniel Nestor, Canada, and Nenad Zimonjic (2),
'Serbia, def. Novak Djokovic and Viktor Troicki, Ser-
bia, 3-6, 6-1, 10-5.

stunning backhand down the line.
Wawrinka has lost six of his
eight meetings with Djokovic, in-
cluding the last five. He lost to
Djokovic in the Rome Masters
final last year on clay and re-
cently on the hard courts at In-
dian Wells, Calif.


ChkbNkiE~


Rain or shine
For information call 527-07it or
w'.�'i.ni chaetlgoc.or$ then click Fc.s/ival
ilinzilll8BM ...nsM ...;a mn...s>r25sa�:oe.


Wozniacki, Lisicki


to battle for title


Kirilenko, Vinci to

meet in Barcelona

Associated Press
CHARLESTON, S.C. - Caro-
line Wozniacki advanced to the fi-
nals of the Family Circle Cup on
Saturday, fighting off a furious rally
by Elena Dementieva to defeat the
tournament's top seed 64, 5-7, 7-5.
Wozniacki now meets 16th-
seeded Sabine Lisicki, who, after
ousting Venus Williams earlier in
the week, easily defeated sixth-
seeded Marion Bartoli 6-3, 6-1 in
the other semifinal.
Dementieva, ranked No. 3, saved
three match points in the second
set to force a third in a match that
lasted almost three hours on the
green clay.
Wozniacki, seeded fifth, was up
5-2 in the second set, serving for
the match, when Dementieva
broke her at love.
Dementieva then won her next
service game, fighting off three
match points, and the following
three games to force the third set
When she evened the set at 5-5,
Wozniacki threw her racket on the
court in disgust
But Wozniacki, an 18-year-old
Dane ranked No. 12, prevailed on
her fifth match point Wozniacki is
looking for her second straight tour
victory after winning last week on
clay at Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla.
Wozniacki said she was think-
ing too much about a victory when
Dementieva staged her second-
set rally
"I knew I had to close it out and,
you know, I was a little bit nerv-
ous," she said. "She started to play
some really good tennis, aggressive
and doesn't make so many errors,
and, you know, she wins the set and
I'm not so happy about that"
She said she hoped she would
not be tired going into the final.
"It hasn't been a factor until now,
and I've played quite a lot of
matches, so I hope I can pull the
last one through," she said.
But it could be a factor in Sun-
day's final, as Lisicki, the No. 63-
ranked German with the blazing
serve - she had one of 125 mph
Saturday-- needed only about an
hour to defeat Bartoli.
Dementieva said she couldn't


Associated Press
Florida quarterback Tim Tebow meets with the Florida fans following the
spring Orange and Blue football game on Saturday in Gainesville.


are still waiting on national cham-
pionship rings that players de-
signed. This one was a huge silver
one with an orange and blue "No.
1" etched between "National" and
"Champions."
"My arm's already a little bit sore


and I've only had it on a couple of
minutes," Brantley said.
With the 2007 Heisman Trophy
winner and the team's entire de-
fense back from last season, the
Gators expect to compete for an-
other title this fall. Even Meyer ac-


Associated Press
Sabine Usicki Is all smiles after her
two set victory over Marion Bartoll
on Saturday during Family Circle Cup
tennis action in Charleston, S.C.
overcome a slow start against Woz-
niacki after she fell behind 5-2 in
the first set
"I just saw too many mistakes in
the beginning of the match," she
said. "So for me to come back just
took a lot of energy, and I wish I
had a better start and so it would
have been a different game."
Dementieva has appeared seven
times in Charleston but never won.
It was the second straight year she
was in the semifinals. She made
the finals four years ago.
Kirilenko and Vinci to
play in Barcelona final
BARCELONA, Spain - Maria Kir-
ilenko will defend her Barcelona Open
title against Roberta Vinci, advancing to
the final with a 4-6, 6-1, 6-2 victory over
fifth-seeded Carla Suarez Navarro on
Saturday.
After dropping the first set, the sixth-
seeded Kirilenko broke Suarez Navarro
on seven of her following nine
chances.
It was the Russian's second match
of the day against a Spanish opponent.
Earlier she had defeated Maria Jose
Martinez Sanchez 6-1, 3-6, 6-0 in a
rain-suspended quarterfinal.
Vinci overcame fellow Italian
Francesca Schiavone 0-6, 7-6 (2), 6-4.
The 37th-ranked Kirilenko holds a 2-
1 advantage in career matchups
against Vinci after winning the last two,
including their only meeting on' day at"
Berlin in 2006.

knowledge the program is in
great shape right now.
"What we can't do is lose our
edge," Meyer said. "If we didn't
have all those minor dings, you
would have seen a hell of a team
jog out there today. What did we
envision? This is it This is where
we want to be. We just have to be
careful, put the pedal to the metal.
... We've got this thing about where
you want Now we've just got to
stay and keep recruiting our tails
off and keep working."
Meyer said he plans to make
summer drills and fall practice the
most difficult workouts his players
have ever faced, figuring that's the
best way to keep them from paying
attention to any preseason acco-
lades and lofty predictions that
might come their way.
"We'll be hungry and we'll keep
that edge because we have great
senior leaders," Tebow said.
"That's the most important thing.
.What makes us a good team is that
edge, wanting to win, wanting to
go out there and fight and domi-
nate teams."
And if Florida stays on edge?
"If we play the way we're sup-
posed to play, we'll be right back
in the big game," Brantley said.


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Thurs. ~ 4 -8 p.M. .Indoor dinner- onivL

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Deliciotis (ireek dinners *l.i\ *(irek pastries. desserls E; coffee shop
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-. rP. It


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS









Cnrous COUN'iV (FL) CHRONICLES


AL







NL


Toronto
Baltimore
New York
Tampa Bay
Boston



Florida
New York
Atlanta
Philadelphia
Washington


East Division
GB WCGB
1/2 --
2V1/2 1
3 1/2
3V2 2

East Division
GB WCGB

4 2
5 3
5 3
8� 61h


Kansas City
Chicago
Detroit
Minnesota
Cleveland



Chicago
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Houston
Milwaukee


Central Division
GB WCGB
1 1
1 1
2 2
3 3

Central Division
GB WCGB
- 1
1 2
1 2
3% 41/
4 5


Seattle
Oakland
Los Angeles
Texas


Away
4-2 Los Angeles
San Diego
3-1.1 Colorado
3 3 Arizona
2-4 San Fran.
1-4


DEADUNES

N Due to early deadlines
baseball games that "^ ,
started at 7 p.m. or
later were not available
at press time; this in- '
cludes the Rays' game.
For complete scores
please see Monday's
Chronicle.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games 1
Toronto 4, Oakland 2,y12 innings
Cleveland 22, N.Y. Yankees 4
Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay, late
L.A. Angels at Minnesota, late
Baltimore at Boston, late
Kansas City at Texas, late
Detroit at Seattle, late
Today's Games
Cleveland (Pavano 0-2) at N.Y.Yankees (A.Bur-
nett 2-0), 1:05p.m. . ''
Oakland (Braden 1-1) at Toronto (Romero 1-0),
1:07 p.m.
Baltimore (Uehara 2-0) at Boston (Lester 0-2),
1:35 p.m. -
Chicago White Sox (Floyd 1-1) at Tampa Bay '"
(Garza 1-0), 1:38 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Loux 0-0) at Minnesota (Perkins 0- Cleveland Indians pitcher Ma
1), 2:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Davies 1-0) at Texas (Padilla 1-1), the New York Yankees in the
3:05 p.m. Yankee Stadium in New York,
Detroit (Porcello 0-1) at Seattle (C.Silva 0-1),
4:10 p.m. Indians 22, Yankees 4
Monday's Games
Baltimore at Boston, 11:05 a.m. NEW YORK - The Cleve-
Oakland at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m. land Indians set the bar for Yan-
NATIONAL LEAGUE kee Stadium's new record book
Friday's Games Saturday, scoring 14 runs in the
Chicago Cubs 8, St. Louis 7 second inning of a 22-4 victory.
Florida 3, Washington 2, 10innings Asdrubal Cabrera hit a grand

Pittsburgh 3, Atlanta 0 slam and an RBI single in the
N.Y. Mets 5, Milwaukee 4 second as the Indians chased
Cincinnati 2, Houston 1 struggling starter Chien-Ming
San Francisco 2, Arizona o Wang and set several marks
Saturday's Games that could stand for a while at
Pittsburgh 10, Atlanta 0 New York's swanky new home.
Florida 9, Washington 6,11 innings Mark DeRosa and Shin Soo-
N.Y. Mets 1, Milwaukee 0 -.
Chicago Cubs 7, St. Louis 5,11 innings Choo each hit three-run
L.A. Dodgers 9, Colorado 5 homers, Travis Hafner, Grady
Adzona 2, San Francisco 0 Sizemore and Victor Martinez
Cincinnati at Houston, late
San Diego at Philadelphia, late had solo shots and manager
Today's Games Eric Wedge eamed his 500th
Milwaukee (Suppan 0-2) at N.Y. Mets (Figueroa victory. Jhonny Peralta had
0-0), 1:10 p.m.
Florida (Volstad 2-0) at Washington (D.Cabrera three hits and two RBIs after
0-1), 1:35 p.m. missing Friday's 6-5 loss with a
Atlanta (J.Vazquez 0-1) at Pittsburgh (Duke 2- strained left elbow.
0), 1:35 p.m.
San Diego (Geer 0-0) at Philadelphia (Park 0- Mark Teixeira and Melky
.'j p - rr, Cabrera each hit a two-run
Cincinnati (Volquez 1-1) at Housi6n (Paulino) ' homer for the Yankees, who
0), 2:05 p.m.
Arizona (Scherzer 0-0) at San Francisco have been embarrassed in two
(Ra.Johnson 0-2), 4:05 p.m. of their first three regular-sea-
Colorado (Jimenez 1-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Ja.Mc- son games at their new field.
Donald 0-1), 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Wellemeyer 1-1) at Chicago Cubs New York lost 10-2 in its home
(Lilly 2-0), 8:05 p.m. opener on Thursday.


Associated Press
sa Kobayashi delivers against
seventh inning on Saturday at

Cleveland NewYork
ab rhbi ab rh bi
Sizemrcf 4 3 3 1 Jeterss 2 0 0 0
Crowe cf 2 01 1 Ransm 3b 3 0 1 0
DeRosa 3b 7 2 4 6 Damon dh 1 1 0 0
VMrtnz c 4 2 2 2 HMatsu ph-dhl 0 1 0
Shppchc 2 00 0 Teixeirib 3 1 1 2
Hafnerdh -7 33 1 JMolinc 2 0 0 0
Peralta ss 5 3 3 2 Swisher rf 3 00 0
Choorf 4 2 1 3 Posadac-1b 4 0 1 0
Garkolb 6 1 2 1 Cano2b 4 1 1 0
BFrncs If 5 32 0 MeCarr If 3 1 1 2
ACarer 2b 6 3 4 5 Gardnr cf 3 0 0 0
R.Pena3b-ss 4 0 1 0
Totals 52 22 25 22 Totals 33 4 7 4
Cleveland 0141 140 011-22
NewYork 200 002 000-4
E-Choo 2 (4), Swisher 2 (3). DP-Cleveland
1. LOB-Cleveland 9, New York 8. 2B-Size-
more 2 (5), DeRosa (2), Hafner (4), Peralta (5),
B.Francisco 2 (3), H.Matsui (2). 3B-Ransom
(1). HR-Sizemore (4), DeRosa (3), V.Martinez
(4), Hafner (4), Choo (2), A.Cabrera (1), Teix-
eira (3), Me.Cabrera (2).
IP H RER BB SO


Cleveland
Carmona W,1-2
Kobayashi
Chulk
NewYork
Wang L,0-3
Claggett
E.Ramirez .
Veras
Marte


6 6 4 4 4 1
2 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 1 0


1 1-3 8
12-3 9
2 3
3 1
1 4


Claggett pitched to 2 batters in the 4th.
HBP-by Kobayashi (H.Matsui). WP-Wang,
Claggett.
Umpires-Home, Ed Hickox; First, Jerry Craw-
ford; Second, Tom Hallion; Third, Phil Cuzzi.
T-3:49. A-45,167 (52,325).


Blue Jays 4, Athletics 2,
12 innings
TORONTO - Lyle Overbay
hit a two-out, two-run homer off
Dan Giese in the 12th inning,
giving the Toronto Blue Jays a 4-
2 win over the Oakland Athletics
4-2 on Saturday.
After a two-out walk to Jose
Bautista, Overbay hit a towering
drive to center off Giese (0-1),
who was called up from Triple-A
earlier in the day.
Right-hander Jason Frasor (2-
0) got two outs for the win for
Toronto.
The Blue Jays put the winning
run at third base with one out in
the ninth but couldn't convert
against right-hander Santiago
Casilla. Marco Scutaro led off
with a walk, moved to second on
Aaron Hill's fly to center and
stole third on the first pitch to
Alex Rios, who walked.
But Scutaro was caught in a
rundown on Wells' grounder to
second and Adam Lind struck
out looking to send it to extra
innings


Oakland
ab rhbi


RSwny rf
OCarer ss
Giambi lb
Hollidy If
Cust dh
KSuzuk c
Ellis 2b
Crosby 3b
RDavis cf
Totals
Oakland
Toronto


Toronto


4 2 2 0 Scutaro ss
5 00 0 A.Hill 2b
5 0 1 2 Rios cf
5 00 0 Wells dh
5 0 1 0 Lind If
5 0 0 0 Bautist 3b
5 0 0 0 Overaylb
3 00 0 Barajs c
3 0 1 0 Sniderrf
40 2 5 2 Totals


ab r h bi
3 000
6 0 1 0
5 01 0
6 01 0
5 1 1 0
3 1 0 0
4222
3 00 0
5 01 2
40 47 4


100 001 000 00 000-2
000 101 000 002-4


Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Tallet (1), A.Hill (1). DP-Toronto 1. LOB-
Oakland 5, Toronto 13.2B-R.Sweeney (2), Gi-
ambi (3), Cust-(2), Wells (4); Overbay (3).
HR-Overbay (2). SB-Scutaro (1). CS-
O.Cabrera (2), R.Davis (1). S-Bautista, Bara-


jas.

Oakland
Cahill
Wuertz
Springer
S.Casilla
Giese L,0-1
Toronto
Tallet
Camp
Downs
B.J.Ryan
Carlson
Frasor W,2-0


IP H RERBBSO


51-3 5
2-3 1
1 0
2 0
22-3 1

51-3 4
11-3 1
21-3 0
1 0
1 1-3 0
2-3 0


HBP-by Cahill (Scutaro). PB-Barajas.
Umpires-Home, Greg Gibson; First, Andy
Fletcher; Second, Tim McClelland; Third, Ted
Barrett.
T-3:23. A-21,698 (49,539).


Cubs 7, Cardinals 5,
11 innings
CHICAGO -Aramis
Ramirez hit a game-winning
two-run homer in the 11th in-
ning and Derrek Lee hit a two-
run double to lead the Chicago
Cubs to a 7-5 win over the St.
Louis Cardinals on Saturday.
Dennys Reyes (0-1) walked
leadoff hitter Alfonso Soriano in
the 11th inning, then Kosuke
Fukudome bunted into a
fielder's choice.
With two outs, Ramirez hit a 1-
0 pitch from Reyes into the left-
center bleachers to win it with his
third homer of the season.
Khalil Green homered for the
Cardinals, who have dropped


their last two games.
St. Louis Chicago
ab rhbi
Schmkr2b 5 1 1 1 ASorin If
Ankiel of 6 0 0 0 Fukdm cf-rf
Pujols lb 4 0 0 0 D.Lee lb
Ludwckrf 5 02 2 ArRmr3b
Duncan If 3 11 0 Hoffpar f
YMolin c 4 0 1 1 RJhnsn cf
Greeness 3 2 1 1 Sotoc
Barden 3b 2 1 0 0 Theriot ss
Thurs&nph-3b1 0 0 0 Miles2b


ab r h bi
421 0
5 22 1
6 01 2
6 112
3010
2 00 0
2 1 0 0

4 0 1 2


Lohse p 2 0 0 0 Dmpstr p 2 0 0 0
McCllln p 0 00 0 Fontent ph 1 00 0
BrRyan ph 0 00 0 Cotts p 0 0 0 0
Motte p 0 00 0 Marml p 0 00 0
Rasms ph 1 0 0 0 Gregg p 0 0 0 0
Frnkln p 0 0 0 0 Bradly ph 1 00 0
C.Perez p 0 00 0 Heilmn p 0 00 0
Wnwrg ph 0 0 0 0 Gthrght ph 1 0 0 0
DReyes p 0 00 0 AGzmnp 0 00 0
Totals 36 5 6 5 Totals 42 7 107
St. Louis 003 100 010 00-5
Chicago 001 031 000 02-7
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Greene (3). DP-Chicago 1. LOB-St.
Louis 9, Chicago 10.2B-Ludwick (3), Duncan
(6), Y.Molina (2), Fukudome (6), D.Lee (3). 3B-
Theriot (1). HR-Greene (2), Ar.Ramirez (3).
S-Y.Molina, Wainwright.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
Lohse 5 5 4 4 2 4
McClellan 1 2 1 1 1 1
Motte 1 0 0 0 0 1
Franklin 2 2 0 0 1 1
C.Perez 1 0 0 0 2 1
D.ReyesL,0-1 2-3 1 2 2 1 0
Chicago
Dempster 6' 4 4 4 4 4
Cotts 0 0 0 0 2 0
MarmolBS,1-3 1 2 1 1 0 0
Gregg 2 0 0 0 0 2
Heilman 1 -0 0- 0 1 .0
A.Guzman W,1-0 1 0 0 0 1 1
Cotts pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Marmol pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by Marmol (Greene).
Umpires-Home, Dan lassogna; First, Charlie
Reliford; Second, Larry Vanover; Third, Sam
Holbrook.
T-3:50. A-40,878 (41,210).


Dodgers 9, Rockies 5
LOS ANGELES - Manny
Ramirez hit his first two home
runs of the season - and
dropped a flyball for his first error
- and Andre Ethier also homered
twice as the Los Angeles Dodgers
extended their winning streak to
seven games with a 9-5 victory
over the Colorado Rockies.
Ethier drove in four runs while
batting second for the first time
this season. Manager Joe Torre
shuffled the lineup to give short-
stop Rafael Furcal, third base-
man Casey Blake and catcher
Russell Martin the day off after
Friday night's come-from-be-
hind win.
Chad Billingsley (3-0) allowed
three runs and four hits over six
innings with six strikeouts and
three walks. The right-hander
was staked to a 5-0 lead before
the Rockies got on the board in
the sixth.


Colorado
ab rhbi


Los Angeles
ab r h bi


Splrghs cf 3 0 0 0 Hudson 2b 4 1 1 0
Hamml-p 0 00 0 Ethierrf 5 22 4
JeBakrph 0 00 0 MRmrzll 332 2
Emree p 0 00 0 Pierre ph-lf 1 00 0
RSpeirp 0 00 0 Loneylb 5 1 1 0
Quntnll ph 1 00 0 Kemp cf 3 1 1 1
S.Smithlf 3 1 1 0 DeWitt3b 4 0 1 0
Heltonlb 3 1 1 1 Ausmsc 3 1 1 0
Atkins 3b 4 00 0 JCastro ss 3 0 1 1
Hawperf 4 1 1 2 Blngsly p 1 00 0
Stewart 2b 3 1 1 2 Loretta ph 1 01 0
Tlwtzk ss 4 0 1 0 Mota p 0 00 0
Torreal c 3 1 0 0 Ohmanp 1 0 1 1
Cook p 1 00 0 Troncs p 0 00 0
Fowler ph-cf 3 0 2 0 Belisarip 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 5 7 5 Totals 349129
Colorado 000 003 011-5
Los Angeles 101 300 40x-9
E-Stewart (1), M.Ramirez 2 (2). DP-Col-
orado 1, Los Angeles 1. LOB-Colorado 8, Los
Angeles 7. 2B-S.Smith (1). 3B-Hawpe (1).
HR-Stewart (2), Ethier 2-(4),M.Ramirez 2?(2}.
SB-Fowler (2), Kemp (4}. S-Billingsley. SF-
Helton, Stewart, J.Castro.
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
Cook L,0-1 4 8 5 5 2 2
Hammel 2 1 0 0 0 2
Embree 0 1 3 2 1 0
R.Speier 2 2 1 1 1 1
Los Angeles
Billingsley W,3-0 6 4 3 3 3 6
Mota 0 1 0 0 1 0
Ohman H,2 12-3 1 1 1 0 1
Troncoso - 1-3~ - 1>'J.i1i.1 'gtO
Belisario 1 0 , 0 1 '2z"
Mota pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Troncoso pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
Embree pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
Umpires-Home, Bill Welke; First, Jim
Reynolds; Second, Tim Welke; Third, Angel
Hernandez.
T-3:24. A-36,765 (56,000).


Baseball Today
SCOREBOARD
Sunday, April 19
Cleveland at N.Y. Yankees (1:05 p.m. EDT).
Carl Pavano, a flop in four years in the Bronx,
starts for the Indians against A.J. Burnett and
the Yankees.
STARS
-Jason Kubel, Twins, completed the ninth
cycle in Twins history with a go-ahead grand
slam in the eighth inning that helped Minnesota
to an 11-9 victory over the Angels.
-Mark Teahen, Royals, went 5-for-6 with a
homer and three runs in Kansas City's 12-3 rout
of the Rangers.
-Ramon Hernandez, Reds, hit a two-run
homer in the ninth inning that gave Cincinnati a
2-1 victory over the Astros.
-Jonathan Sanchez, Giants, allowed two.
hits and struck out four in 6 2-3 ninings in San
Francisco's 2-0 win over Arizona.
-Scott Hairston, Padres, homered and hit a
pair of doubles, driving in four runs in an 8-7 win
over the Phillies.
-Ben Zobrist, Rays, went 2-for-2 with a
homer and four RBIs in a 6-5 win over the White
Sox.
-Paul Maholm, Pirates, allowed four hits and
three walks in seven innings, striking out two in
Pittsburgh's 3-0 win over the Braves.
-Ryan Ludwick, Cardinals, had three hits in-
cluding a pair of homers, driving in four runs in
an 8-7 loss to the Cubs.
FIVE ALIVE
Mark Teahen made Royals fans forget all
about injured third baseman Alex Gordon on
Friday night, going 5-for-6 with a homer in a 12-
3 rout of the Rangers. It was the first five-hit
game for a Kansas City player since Mike
Sweeney on July 9, 2005. Gordon is out for at
least 10 weeks after having hip surgery.
BRONX BOMBERS
The New York Yankees hit five solo homers in
a 6-5 victory over the Cleveland Indians. Derek
Jeter, Johnny Damon, Mark Teixeira, Melky
Cabrera and Robinson Cano all went deep.
TRI-CYCLE
Jason Kubel completed the nirith cycleTri
Twins history with a grand slam to cap a seven-
run rally in the bottom of the eighth inning and
lift Minnesota past the Los Angeles Angels 11-
9 on Friday night. It's the third cycle in the ma-
jors this season following Orlando Hudson and
lan Kinsler.
TIMETO BUY A VOWEL
The jerseys worn in the first three innings by
Adam Dunn and 3B Ryan Zimmerman had the
team's name misspelled as "Natinals." They
later donned tops with the team name spelled
correctly.
WHO'S HOT
The A's Andrew Bailey has not allowed a run
in six appearances this season.... Kevin Youk-
ilis and Jason Bay have both reached safely in
all 10 of Boston's games. ... Royals ace Gil
Meche has a 2.25 ERA in three starts this sea-
son. ... Tigers 1 B Miguel Cabrera had three hits
in a 6-3 loss to Seattle on Friday and is batting
.513. ... Ryan Ludwick homered twice for the
Cardinals in an 8-7 loss to the Cubs. Ludwick
has a 20-game hitting streak and Chris Duncan
an 11-game streak for the Cardinals. ... Jeff
Francoeur had three hits for Atlanta and is bat-
ting .526 (10-for-19) over his past five games.
WHO'S NOT
Blue Jays OF Alex Rios finished 0-for-4 on
Friday against Oakland and is hitless in his past
14 at-bats.... The Orioles have lost all four of
Jeremy Guthrie's career starts at Fenway.


D-Backs 2, Giants 0
SAN FRANCISCO - Chris
Young hit a two-run double in
the ninth and Doug Davis
pitched eight shutout innings as
the Arizona Diamondbacks beat
the San Francisco Giants 2-0
on Saturday.
Davis scattered eight hits and
struck out six while pitching out
of trouble all aftemoon to earn
his first win since Aug. 29, 2008.
Chad Quails worked the ninth
for his second save in three op-
portunities.t
Young struck out twice
against San Francisco starter
Tim Lincecum, but jumped on a
fastball from closer Brian Wilson
and lined it down the left-field
line for a double to drive in
pinch-runner Eric Byrnes and
Mark Reynolds.
Lincecum also pitched eight
shutout innings and matched
his career high with 13 strike-
outs but remains winless in
three starts this season.
The 2008 NL Cy Young win-
ner, who had been bothered by
a stomach ailment the past few
days, allowed five hits and only
two runners past first base.


Arizona


San Francisco


ab rhbi ab r h bi
Ojeda ss 4 02 0 Winn rf 4 01 0
CJcksnIf 4 0.0 0. Burriss 2b 3 0 2 0
FLopez 2b 4 0 1 0 Sandovl 3b 4 00 0
Tracylb 3 0 0 0 BMolinc 4 0 1 0
Byrnes pr 0 1 0 0 FLewis If 4 02 0
Clark lb 0 0 0 0 Rowndcf 4 0 1 0
RynIds3b 4 1 1 0 Ishikaw lb 4 00 0
CYoungcf 4 0 1 2 Renteriss 2 0 1 0
Monter c 4 0 0 0 Linccm p 2 0 0 0
Quallsp 0 00 0 Affeldtp 0 0 0 0
J.Upton rf 4 02 0 BWilsn p 0 00 0
DDavis p 2 0 0 0
Snyderc 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 2 7 2 Totals 31 0 8 0
Arizona 000 000 002-2
San Francisco 000 000 000-0
E-Ojeda (1), Burriss (2). DP-Arizona 1, San
Francisco 1. LOB-Arizona 6, San Francisco 7.
2B-C.Young (6), Renteria (2). SB-Burriss (3).
CS-Ojeda (1), Burriss (1). S-D.Davis, Burriss,
Lincecum.
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
D.DavisW,1-2 8 8 0 0 1 6
Qualls S,2-3 ' 0 0 0 0 3
San Francisco
Lincecum 8 5 0 0 0 13
Affeldt L,0-1 1-3 0 1 1 1 1
B.Wilson 2-3 2 1 1 0 1
PB-B.Molina.
Umpires-Home, John Hirschbeck; First, Wally
Bell; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Marvin Hud-
son.
T-2:40. A-37,409 (41,915).


Marlins 9, Nationals 6,
11 innings
WASHINGTON - Jeremy
Hermida hit a three-run homer
in the 11th inning after tying it
with a two-run shot in the ninth,
and the Florida Marlins beat the
Washington Nationals 9-6 Sat-
urday for their sixth straight win.
Hermida, whose two-run
homer tied it at 6 with two outs
in the ninth, hit a 1-2 pitch from
Wil Ledezma into the right-cen-
ter field stands for the lead.
The Marlins improved to a
big league-best 10-1. The Na-
tionals have the worst record
at 1-9.
Kiko Calero (1-0), Florida's
fifth pitcher, worked 1 1-3
scoreless innings for the win.
Ross Gload led off the 11th
with a walk off Julian Tavarez
(0-1).


Pirates 10, Braves 0
PITTSBURGH - Craig Mon-
roe hit a pair of three-run
homers and lan Snell allowed
four hits in seven-plus innings,
lifting the Pittsburgh Pirates to a
10-0 victory over the Atlanta
Braves on Saturday.
Monroe homered off Atlanta
starter Jo-Jo Reyes (0-1) with
two outs in the sixth inning and
off reliever Buddy Carlyle with
two outs in the seventh. It was
the fourth multihomer game of
the right-fielder's career and the
third time he had six RBIs.
Snell (1-2) walked three,
struck out three and benefited
from three double plays. The
right-hander was replaced by
Sean Burnett after walking Mar-
tin Prado to lead off the eighth.
Jesse Chavez worked a per-
fect ninth to complete the four-


Florida Washington hitter.
ab rhbi arndz b r h bi Pittsburgh, which entered the
Bonitac3b 4 0 0 0 AHrndz2b 4 1 1 0
Helmsph-3b2 1 0 0 NJhnsn ib 4 1 2 1 game with a major league-best
Hermid If 6 3 3 5 Zmrmn 3b 5 1 2 1 2.90 ERA, blanked Atlanta for
HRmrz ss 6 0 1 0 Dunn If 3 1 0 0 the second consecutive game.
Cantulb 5 02 0 Bardc 5 01 0
Meyerp 0 00 0 Kearnsrf 4 1 1 4 The Pirates have three
JoBakrc 1 0 0 0 Berndn cf 3 0 0 0 shutouts in their past five
Uggla 2b 6 1 0 0 Dukes cf 2 0 0 0 games.
Paulino c 4 1 2 2 AIGnzlz ss 5 0 0 0
Calero p 0 0 0 0 Olsen p 1 1 0 0 Atlanta Pittsburgh
C.Rossrf 5 0 1 0 Cintronph 1 00 0 ab rhbl abrhbi
Maybin of 2 00 0 Beimel p 0 00 0 KJhnsn 2b 4 00 0 Morgan If 4 00 0
Amezg ph-cl2 1 1 0 Hanrhn p 0 0 0 0 Infante ss 4 0 2 0 FSnchz 2b 5 1 2 1
JJhnsn p 2 00 0 Bellird ph 1 00 0 GAndrs If 4 00 0 McLoth cf 5 22 1
Carroll ph 1 00 0 Tavarz p 0 00 0 McCnn c 3 00 0 Doumit c 4 33 1
Kensngp 0 00 0 Ledezmp 0 0 C 0 Ktchmlb 3 01 0 AdLRclb 3 1 0 0
Pinto p 0 00 0 Flores ph 1 00 0 Francr rf 3 00 0 Monroe rf 4 22 6
Gload ph-1b 1 2 1 1 Prado3b 2 0 1 0 AnLRc3b 4 03 1
Totals 47 911 8 Totals 39 6 7 6 Schafercf 3 0 0 0 RVazqzss 3 0 0 0
Florida 020 010 003 03-9 JReyes p 1 0 0 0 Snell p 3 0 0 0
Washington 510 000 000 00-6 Carlylep 0 00 0 SBurnttp 0 0 0 0
E-N.Johnson (1), Alb.Gonzalez 2 (2). DP- Norton ph 1 00 0 Hinskeph 1 1 1 0
Florida 1. LOB-Florida 8, Washington 6.2B-- Parr p 0 0 0 0 JChavz p 0 0 0 0
Cantu (3), C.Ross (1). HR-Hermida 2 (3), Totals 28 0 4 0 Totals 36101310
Paulino (1), Kearns (2).SB-Paulino(1), A.Her- Atlanta 000 000 000-0
nandez (1). Pittsburgh 010 004 41x-10
IP H R ER BB SO DP-Atlanta 1, Pittsburgh 3. LOB-Atlanta 4,
Florida Pittsburgh 7. 2B-Kotchman (3), Doumit 3 (4),
Jo.Johnson 6 6 6 6 2 6 An.LaRoche 2 (2), Hinske (3). 3B-F.Sanchez
Kensing 1 0 0 0 1 3 (2).HR-Monroe 2(2).SB-McLouth (1).CS-
Pinto 1 1 0 0 1 0 Prado(1).
Meyer 12-3 0 0 0 1 2 IP H RER BB SO
Calero W,1-0 1 1-30 0 0 0 1 Atlanta
Washington J.Reyes L,0-1 52-37 5 5 3 4
Olsen 7 6 3 2 1 5 Carlyle 11-34 4- 4 1 1
Beimel H,3 1 1 0 0 0 0 Parr 1 2 1 1 1 0
Hanrahan BS,2-2 1 3 3 3 0 3 Pittsburgh
TavarezL,0-1 1 0 2 1 2 2 SnellW,1-2 7 4 0 0 3 3
Ledezma 1 1 1 1 0 1 S.Burnett 1 0 0 0 0 0
Tavarez pitched to 2 batters in the 11th. J.Chavez 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Jo.Johnson (N.Johnson). WP-Han- Snell pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
rahan, Tavarez. WP-Carlyle.
Umpires-Home, Rob Drake; First, Jeff Kellogg; Umpires-Home, Bruce Dreckman; First, Paul
Second, Mark Wegner; Third, Tim Timmons. Emmel; Second, Gary Darling; Third, Bill Hohn.
T-3:37. A-19,864 (41,888). T-2:22. A-20,755 (38,362).


Associated Press
Milwaukee Brewers' Ryan Braun is tagged out at second
base by New York Mets second baseman Luis Castillo to end
the ninth inning of a baseball game on Saturday in New York.


Mets 1, Brewers 0
NEW YORK - Johan San-
tana looked perfectly at home in
a ballpark built with him in mind.
The two-time Cy Young
Award winner breezed through
seven innings in his first start at
Citi Field, and the New York
Mets took advantage of a key
error to scratch out the only run
they needed in a 1-0 victory
over the Milwaukee Brewers on
Saturday.
A hard-luck loser so often his
first season-plus in New York,
Santana (2-1) allowed five hits
and struck out seven without is-
suing a walk. He never allowed
a Brewers baserunner past first.
Yovani Gallardo was just as
good for Milwaukee, cruising
through six scoreless innings
before giving way to reliever
Carlos Villanueva (1-2).
He issued a leadoff walk to
Ramon Castro, and after Omir
Santos came in to run for the
plodding catcher, pinch-hitter
Alex Cora laid down a sacrifice
bunt. Cora sprinted to first and
hit the bag just as Rickie Weeks
was dropping the throw, allow-
ing Santos to head for third.
Moments later, Jose Reyes
lined a pitch back at Villanueva
(1-2) for an RBI fielder's choice.
Turning it over to their sud-
denly stout bullpen, J.J. Putz


set the Brewers down in order
in the eighth, and new closer
Francisco Rodriguez worked
around a leadoff single to Ryan
Braun for his third save of the
season.
The game ended when K-Rod
struck out J.J. Hardy and Santos
gunned down Braun attempting
to steal second, eliciting a roar
from a packed stadium.


Milwaukee
ab rhbi


NewYork


ab r h bi


Weeks 2b 4 0 0 0 JReyes ss 4 0 2 1
Hartrf 4 0 1 0 Castillo2b- 4 02 0
Braun If 4 02 0 DWrght 3b 3 00 0
Fielder 1b 4 0 1 0 Delgad lb 4 0 0 0
Hardy ss 4 0 0 0 Beltran cf 4 0 1 0
Camrncf 3 00 0 Sheffild If 3 00 0
Hall 3b 3 0 1 0 Reed If 0 00 0
Villanv p 0 0 0 0 Church r 2 0 1 0
Kendallc 3 00 0 RCastrc 2 00 0
Gallard p 2 0 1 0 Santos pr-c 0 1 0 0
McGeh3b 0 00 0 Santan p 2 00 0
Counsllph-3b1 00 0 Coraph 0 00 0
Putz p 0 0 0 0
FRdrgz p 00 00
Totals 32 0 6 0 Totals 28 1 6 1
Milwaukee 000 000 000-0
NewYork 000 000 10x-1
E-Weeks (2). DP-Milwaukee 2, New York 1.
LOB-Milwaukee 5, New York 8. SB-J.Reyes
(3). CS-Braun (2). S-Cora.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
Gallardo 6 5 0 0 2 7
Villanueva L,1-2 2 1 1 1 1 0
NewYork
SantanaW,2-1 7 5 0 0 0 7
PutzH,3 1 0 0 0 0 2
FRodriguez S,3-3 1 1 0 0 0 2
HBP--by Gallardo (Sheffield).
Umpires-Home, Jim Joyce; First, Bill Miller;
Second, Brian Runge; Third, Derryl Cousins.
T-2:33. A-36,312 (41,800).


Home
3-1
2-4
3-3
4-3 --


West Division
GB WCGB

3 1/2
31/ 2
31/2 2


West Division
GB WCGB
V -
4 3V2
41/2 4
5� 5


SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 B3


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


-









S iCT SC, C-O)Cs-I


B4 sUNDAYAPRIL 19 20 9


GOLF
PGA Tour-Hilton Head
Verizon Heritage
ByThe Associated Press
Saturday
At HarbourTown Golf Links
Hilton Head, S.C.
Purse: $5.7 million
Yardage: 6,973; Par: 71
Third Round
Brian Gay 67-66-67-200 -13
Tim Wilkinson 71-67-65-203 -10
Lee Janzen 65-70-69-204 -9
Todd Hamilton 68-66-71-205 -8
Briny Baird 69-72-65-206 -7
Davis Love III 70-67-69-206 -7
Tom Lehman 70-69-68-207 -6
Tim Petrovic 68-70-69-207 -6
Alex Cejka 64-71-72-207 -6
Luke Donald 73-70-65-208 -5
Jose Coceres 74-67-67-208 -5
Bob Estes 68-71-69-208 -5
Bo Van Pelt 73-70-66-209 -4
Jeff Maggert 68-75-66-209 -4
Woody Austin 70-73-66-209 -4
Matt Weibring 70-70-69-209 -4
Jose Maria Olazabal 68-71-70-209 -4
Spencer Levin 72-72-66-210 -3
Aaron Baddeley 75-68-67-210 -3
Justin Leonard 70-73-67-210 -3
Nick O'Hern 72-70-68-210 -3
Heath Slocum 72-68-70-210 -3
Ken Duke 69-70-71-210 -3
Ted Purdy 67-71-72-210 -3
Rod Pampling 68-68-74-210 -3
Steve Marino 71-73-67-211 -2
Brett Quigley 72-72-67-211 -2
Peter Lonard 72-71-68-211 -2
Dean Wilson 69-74-68-211 -2
Tim Clark 72-70-69-211 -2
Nathan Green 70-71-70-211 -2
Zach Johnson 70-71-70-211 -2
Boo Weekley 69-72-70-211 -2
Charlie Wi 71-70-70-211 -2
JeevM.Singh 71-69-71-211 -2
Shaun Micheel 72-68-71-211 -2
Trevor Immelman 66-74-71-211 -2
Charley Hoffman 70-69-72-211 -2
Scott Verplank 72-66-73-211 -2
Rory Sabbatini 70-68-73-211 -2
Steve Lowery - 73-71-68-212 -1
Jason Dufner 70-73-69-212 -1
PaulCasey 73-70-69-212 -1
Vaughn Taylor 71-72-69-212 -1
Lucas Glover 74-68-70-212 -1
Chris Couch 73-69-70-212 -1
Tommy Gainey 71-68-73-212 -1
Ernie Els 68-71-73-212 -1
Tommy Armour III 70-68-74-212 -1
Greg Kraft 72-72-69-213 E
Fredrik Jacobson 76-68-69-213 E
Nicholas Thompson 73-71-69-213 E
Charles Howell III 69-74-70-213 , E
Camilo Villegas 70-72-71-213 E
Brad Adamonis 74-68-71-213 E
George McNeill 71-71-71-213 E
Ben Crane 73-69-71-213 E
Michael Alien 72-72-70-214 +1
Colt Knost 74-68-72-214 +1
Stewart cink 72-70-72-214 +1
Stephen Leaney 68-74-72-214 +1
Aron Price 68-73-73-214 +1
BillLunde 73-69-72-214 +1
Matt Kuchar 71-70-73-214 +1
Greg Owen 69-71-74-214 +1
Scott Piercy 69-70-75-214 +1
Joe Durant 73-71-71-215 +2
Rory Mcllroy 72-71-72-215 +2
Mathew Goggin 73-70-72-215 +2
MarkWilson 72-69-74-215 +2
Jonathan Byrd 70-73-73-216 +3
Brendon de Jonge 72-72-73-217 +4
Chris DiMarco 72-71-74-217 +4
Cliff Kresge 68-75-74-217 +4
Michael Letzig 73-71-74-218 +5
Robert Garrigus 70-74-75-219 +6
Glen Day 71-73-76-220 +7
Will MacKenzie 73-71-76-220 +7
Champions Tour-Outback
Steakhouse Pro-Am
Saturday
At TPC Tampa Bay
Lutz, Fla.
Purse: $1.7 million
Yardage: 6,828 yards; Par 71
Second Round


Nick Price
Mike McCullough
Larry Nelson
Jay Haas
Lonnie Nielsen
Hal Sutton
Mark McNulty
Larry Mize
David Eger
Tom Wargo
Loren Roberts
Des Smyth
Ronnie Black
Bruce Fleisher
Tom Purtzer
Bobby Wadkins
Mark O'Meara
John Cook
David Edwards
Mike Reid
Tom McKnight
Fuzzy Zoeller
Joey Sindelar
D.A. Weibring
Bernhard Langer
Jeff Sluman
Jim Thorpe
Gil Morgan
Phil Blackmar
Tim Simpson
Bob Gilder
Dan Forsman
Morris Hataisky
Andy Bean
Denis Watson
Brad Bryant
Scott Hoch
Tom Jenkins
Gene Jones
Mike Goodes
Mark James
Robert L. Thompson
R.W. Eaks
Mark Wiebe
Vicente Fernandez
Hale Irwin
Tom Watson
Craig Stadler
Tom Kite
Jerry Pate
Steve Thomas
Walter Hall
Jim Albus
John Harris
Don Pooley
Fulton Allem
Mike Hulbert
Andy North
Dana Quigley
James Mason
John Morse
Keith Fergus
Allen Doyle
J.C. Snead
Leonard Thompson
Ben Crenshaw
Gary Koch
Dave Eichelberger
Dave Stockton
Blaine McCalllster
Gary Hallberg
Chip Beck
Ken Green
Jay Sigel
Jim Dent
Curtis Strange


66-67-133
67-69-136
65-71-136
68-68-136
68-69-137
74-64-138
67-72-139
69-71-140
69-71-140
70-70-140
71-69-140
72-69-141
68-73-141
69-72-141
69-72-141
71-70-141
73-68-141
69-72-141
68-74-142
75-67-142
72-70-142
70-72-142
72-70-142
71-71-142
70-72-142
72-70-142
71-71-142
71-71-142
71-71-142
70-73-143
73-70-143
73-70-143
70-73-143
71-72-143
70-73-143
69-74-143
70-73-143
69-74-143
72-72-144
71-73-144
75-70-145
71-74-145
72-73-145
75-70-145
72-73-145
69-76-145
71-74-145
76-69-145
73-72-145
74-71-145
74-72-146
72-74-146
74-73-147
75-72-147
77-70-147
72-75-147
76-72-148
69-79-148
72-76-148
74-75-149
73-76-149
76-73-149
73-76-149
74-76-150
79-71-150
77-73-150
76-75-151
71-81-152
77-75-152
79-74-153
78-76-154
75-80-155
79-76-155
82-73-155
77-80-157
80-79-159


For the record


Florida LOTTERY


Foida Lottery
Here are the winning
numbers selected
Friday in the
Florida Lottery:


CASH 3 (early)
2-3-7
CASH 3 (late)
2-4-0
PLAY 4 (early)
2-8-7-7
PLAY 4 (late)
1-8-6-4


Due to early deadlines Fantasy 5, Lottery and
Powerball were not available at press time. Please
see Monday's Chronicle for winning numbers.


�=On the AIRWAVES--

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) ALMS Racing - Long Beach
Grand Prix (Taped)
1 p.m. (SPEED) ARCA RE/MAX Series, Carolina 200
3:30 p.m. (VERSUS) IndyCar Racing Toyota Grand Prix of
Long Beach
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA, Southern Nationals, final eliminations

MLB BASEBALL
1 p.m. (TBS) Cleveland Indians at New York Yankees
1:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Marlins at Washington Nationals
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay Rays
8 p.m. (ESPN) St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs
NBA PLAYOFFS - FIRST ROUND
3 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) Western Conference - Game 1 -
Utah Jazz at Los Angeles Lakers
5:30 p.m. (TNT) Eastern Conference - Game 1 -
Philadelphia 76ers at Orlando Magic
8 p.m. (SUN) (TNT) Eastern Conference - Game 1 -
Miami Heat at Atlanta Hawks
10:30 p.m. (TNT) Western Conference - Game 1 -
New Orleans Hornets at Denver Nuggets
GOLF
9:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour- Volvo China Open
- Final Round
1 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) PGATour - Champions - Outback
Steakhouse Pro-Am - Final Round
3 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) PGA Tour - Verizon Heritage - Final Rd.
NHL PLAYOFFS - QUARTERFINALS
3 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) Eastern Conference - Game 3 -
Pittsburgh Penguins at Philadelphia Flyers
7 p.m. (VERSUS) Western Conference - Game 3 -
Vancouver Canucks at St. Louis Blues
10 p.m. (VERSUS) Western Conference - Game 2 -
Anaheim Ducks at San Jose Sharks
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) Texas A&M at Oklahoma
WTA TENNIS
1 p.m. (ESPN2) Family Circle Cup - Final


NBA Playoffs
FIRST ROUND
(Best of 7)
Saturday, April 18
Chicago 105, Boston 103, OT, Chicago leads
series 1-0
Cleveland 102, Detroit 84, Cleveland leads
series 1-0
Dallas at San Antonio, late
Houston at Portland, late
Today, April 19
Utah at L.A. Lakers, 3 p.m.
Philadelphia at Orlando, 5:30 p.m.
Miami at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Denver, 10:30 p.m.
Monday, April 20
Chicago at Boston, 7 p.m.
Dallas at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, April 21
Detroit at Cleveland, 8 p.m.
Houston at Portland, 10 p.m.
Utah at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday, April 22
Philadelphia at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Miami at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Denver, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday, April 23
Boston at Chicago, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Utah, 10:30 p.m.
Friday, April 24
Cleveland at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Philadelphia, 8 p.m.
Portland at Houston, 9:30 p.m.
Saturday, April 25
Denver at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
San Antonio at Dallas, 4 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 6:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Utah, 9 p.m.
Sunday, April 26
Boston at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Detroit, 3:30 p.m.
Orlando at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m.
Portland at Houston, 9 p.m.
Monday, April 27
Atlanta at Miami, TBA
Denver at New Orleans, TBA
Utah at L.A. Lakers, TBA, if necessary
Tuesday, April 28
Philadelphia at Orlando, TBA, if necessary
Chicago at Boston, TBA, if necessary
Dallas at San Antonio, TBA, if necessary
Houston at Portland, TBA, if necessary
Wednesday, April 29
Miami at Atlanta, TBA, if necessary
Detroit at Cleveland, TBA, if necessary
New Orleans at Denver, TBA, if necessary
Thursday, April 30
Orlando at Philadelphia, TBA, if necessary
Boston at Chicago, TBA, if necessary
Portland at Houston, TBA, if necessary
L.A. Lakers at Utah, TBA, if necessary
Friday, May 1
Cleveland at Detroit, TBA, if necessary
Atlanta at Miami, TBA, if necessary
San Antonio at Dallas, TBA, if necessary
Denver at New Orleans, TBA, if necessary
Saturday, May 2
Philadelphia at Orlando, TBA, if necessary
Chicago at Boston, TBA, if necessary
Houston at Portland, TBA, if necessary
Utah at L.A. Lakers, TBA, if necessary
Sunday, May 3
Miami at Atlanta, TBA, if necessary
Detroit at Cleveland, TBA, if necessary
Dallas at San Antonio, TBA, if necessary
New Orleans at Denver, TBA, if necessary


NHL Playoffs
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7)
Wednesday, April 15
N.Y. Rangers 4, Washington 3
Pittsburgh 4, Philadelphia 1
New Jersey 4, Carolina 1
Vancouver 2, St. Louis 1
Thursday, April 16
Boston 4, Montreal 2, Boston leads series 1-0
Detroit 4, Columbus 1
Chicago 3, Calgary 2, OT, Chicago leads se-
ries 1-0
Anaheim 2, San Jose 0, Anahem leads series 1-0


Friday, April 17
Pittsburgh 3, Philadelphia 2, OT, Pittsburgh
leads series 2-0
Carolina 2, New Jersey 1, OT, series tied 1-1
Vancouver 3, St. Louis 0, Vancouver leads
series 2-0
Saturday, April 18
N.Y. Rangers 1, Washington 0, N.Y. Rangers
lead series 2-0
Detroit 4, Columbus 0, Detroit leads series 2-0
Montreal at Boston, late
Calgary at Chicago, late
Today, April 19
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 3 p.m.
Vancouver at St. Louis, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Anaheim at San Jose, 10 p.m.
Monday, April 20
Boston at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, April 21
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Columbus, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Anaheim, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday, April 22
Boston at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Calgary, 10 p.m.
Thursday, April 23
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m., if neces-
sary
Detroit at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Carolina at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at Anaheim, 10:30 p.m.
Friday, April 24
N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 7 p.m., if nec-
essary
St. Louis at Vancouver, 10 p.m., if necessary
Saturday, April 25
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 3 p.m., if neces-
sary
Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m., if necessary
Columbus at Detroit, 7 p.m., if necessary
Calgary at Chicago, 9 p.m., If necessary
Anaheim at San Jose, 10 p.m., if necessary


Saturday's Sports
Transactions
BASEBALL
Major League Baseball
MLB-Suspended Cubs OF Milton Bradley
for two games for arguing balls and strikes and
making contact with umpire Larry Vanover in a
game against St. Louis on April 16.
American League
LOS ANGELES ANGELS-Placed RHP
Dustin Moseley on the 15-day DL. Purchased
the contract of LHP Dan Davidson from Salt
Lake (PCL). Recalled RHP Rich Thompson
from Salt Lake.
NEW YORK YANKEES-Optioned 1B Juan
Miranda to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Recalled
RHP Anthony Claggett from Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS-Optioned LHP
Jerry Blevins to Sacramento (PCL). Recalled
RHP Dan Giese from Sacramento.
TEXAS RANGERS-Purchased the contract
of LHP Derek Holland from Oklahoma City
(PCL). Designated RHP Josh Rupe for assign-
ment.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS-Placed C Michael
Barrett on the 15-day DL. Purchased the con-
tract of C Raul Chavez from Las Vegas (PCL).
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES-Recalled LHP Jo-Jo
Reyes from Gwinnett (IL). Designated RHP
Blaine Boyer for assignment.
HOUSTON ASTROS-Exercised their 2010
option on the contract of manager Cecil Cooper.
LOS ANGELES DODGERS-Placed RHP
Cory Wade on the 15-day DL, retroactive to
April 12. Recalled LHP Scott Elbert from Chat-
tanooga (SL).
NEW YORK METS-Purchased the contract
of RHP Nelson Figueroa from Buffalo (IL). Des-
ignated RHP Darren O'Day for assignment.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS-Purchased
the contract of INF Alex Cintron from Syracuse
(IL). Placed OF Roger Bernadina on the 15-day
DL.


Lundqvist leads Rangers



past Capitals in Game 2


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - For all
of the intrigue surrounding
whether the Washington
Capitals would switch
goalies - they did, going
with a barely used rookie -
Alex Ovechkin summed up
rather simply why the New
York Rangers won Game 2
of their first-round playoff
series.
"If you don't score," the
NHEs goal leader the past
two seasons said, "you lose
the game."
Henrik Lundqvist made
35 saves for his third career
playoff shutout, and Ryan
Callahan spoiled Simeon
Varlamov's surprising NHL
postseason debut by scoring
on New York's second shot
Saturday, giving the
Rangers a 1-0 victory over
the Capitals.


PGA
Continued from Page B1

driving it straight and true
on the course's narrow, tree-
lined fairways.
"Brian Gay is a fine
player," said Lee Janzen,
the two-time U.S. Open win-
ner "He doesn't get in trou-
ble off the tee and he's a
really good putter. I imagine
if he continues to play that
kind of steady golf, it will
take a great round to catch
him."
Wilkinson, a lefty from
New Zealand seeking his
first tour victory, finished
with a 65, tied for the low
third-round score.
Janzen hasn't won on tour
since the second of his U.S.
Open victories in 1998. He
had two late birdies for a 69
that kept him in third.
Todd Hamilton, the 2004
British Open champion, was
next, one shot further back
after his 72.
Gay moved into the lead
Friday with five straight
birdies on the front nine.


COSCIA
Continued from Page B1

seemed unbearable.
In all of my years of cov-
ering sports I have never
seen a more gutsy
performance.
But for those of you that
don't know by now, Kristen
didn't just run, she won.
Not once, but twice.
It wasn't, however, win-
ning that most stood out on
this day. It was how she won.
With 600 meters left in the
race and running straight
into a strong head wind,
Hall who was much taller
than the only other two girls
in the lead pack, moved up
front. From a tactical stand-
point there was nothing
right about that decision.
She was now blocking the
wind for her competitors,
who quickly tucked in be-
hind her to save their own
energy.
On this day, however, noth-
ing was going to slow down
the Crystal River Pirate.
At the 500-meter mark she
made her signature kick
move. But still she wasn't
able to break away.
And then something hap-
pened that left everyone in a
state of shock
We've all heard the stories
about mothers who, under
the strain of great emo-
tional pressure, somehow
react to an adrenaline rush
and lift a car off of their
trapped child. Somehow,
from somewhere, they re-
ceive strength that they
would never have exhibited
under normal conditions.
All I had ever done was
hear about those kind of ex-
amples. That all changed
four days ago.
As Kristen crossed the
start/finish line with two
runners still within striking
distance, the starter rang the
bell. It marked the beginning
of the final lap.
What happened next was
something nothing short of
incredible.
Kristen did more than just
find another gear. She
turned super human. With
each stride she widened the
gap. And by the time she took
the turn for the homestretch
her competitors were
nowhere to be found.
With 40 yards to go we
were all screaming for Kris-


The Rangers lead the
best-of-seven series 2-0, with
Game 3 in New York on
Monday.
"We're not trying to be
pretty," said Rangers cap-
tain Chris Drury, who
played after sitting out
Game 1. "We just want to
win. This time of year, that's
all that matters."
Led by Ovechkin, and
other high-scoring players
such as Nicklas Backstrom,
Alexander Semin and Mike
Green, the second-seeded
Capitals came into the se-
ries as the favored - and
flashier - team. But the
seventh-seeded Rangers,
led by Lundqvist and team-
mates who keep blocking
shots, have been solid.
"They're going to make
plays. They're going to get
chances," New York's Scott
Gomez said. "But Lundqvist


He kept it with his mistake
free-play.
Entering with a one-shot
lead, Gay's round got going
with a two-putt birdie on the
par-5 fifth hole. He ex-
tended things a hole later,
rolling in a testy, sloping 10-
footer. Gay's final birdie
came on the par-5 15th with
a nifty 20-foot putt.
He had consecutive
birdies on the fifth and sixth
holes to move to 11 under
Wilkinson began the day
five shots behind, but used
four consecutive birdies to
close his front nine and
jump up the leaderboard.
Wilkinson tied for second
in last year's Valero Texas
Open and won more than
$1.1 million in his first tour
season.
This year hadn't gone as
well so far, with Wilkinson
missing four cuts in his eight
events. His best finish was a
tie for 38th at Mayakoba.
Harbour Town is much
more to Wilkinson's liking.
'A course like this where
you have to position your
ball and things like that, it
suits me a lot better,"
Wilkinson said.

ten to push it To not givedfp.
To go.
I've never wanted some-
one to win a sporting event
that much in my entire life.
But Kristen didn't need
our help.
She was running like a
person possessed. It was
clear she was drawing
strength from deep within.
Kristen's only explanation
for the adrenaline rush was,
"when I ran that last lap I
was thinking about my
brother the whole time. It
was definitely my big moti-
vation down the stretch."
After the race I caught up
with Kristen's father, Jeff. He
was clearly numb from the
recent loss of his son. But he
was also beaming with pride
over what his daughter had
just managed to accomplish.
"We told her the choice
was hers as to whether she
wanted to compete or not
She looked at me once and I
knew what her answer was.
There was never a hesita-
tion. Not for one minute," he
explained. "She's one heck
of a girl. It's amazing how she
was really able to stay fo-
cused. She's incredible!
What else can I say?"
There's no need to say
anything else. Kristen's per-
formance said it all.
Later that day the Crystal
River senior would go on to
finish second in the 800-
meter dash. Single hand-
edly she was responsible
for 18 points in the meet.
Her team won the district
championship by 15 points.
Without her the team would
have lost.
And yet beyond winning
and losing, there are valu-
able lessons to be learned
by Kristen's spirited
performance.
Several of her teammates
weren't even at the meet that
day They thought enjoying
Spring Break was more im-
portant than remaining com-
mitted to their team.
Shame on them.
Kristen Hall had every ex-
cuse in the world not to run,
but it never entered her
mind. It was inconceivable
for her not to show.
Kristen's example helps
us put things into real per-
spective. It should make us
all think about what's truly
important
Earlier this week I
watched one of the most
competitive tennis matches


and the 'D' were outstand-
ing again."
Red Wings 4,
Blue Jackets 0
DETROIT - Brian Rafalski,
Pavel Datsyuk, Henrik Zetter-
berg and Jiri Hudler scored,
Chris Osgood posted his 14th
NHL playoff shutout, and the
Detroit Red Wings beat the
Columbus Blue Jackets 4-0 to
take a 2-0 lead in the first-round
Western Conference series.
Barring a stunning turn-
around, Detroit will become the
first defending Stanley Cup
champion to reach the second
round since the Colorado Ava-
lanche did it seven years ago.
Columbus hopes returning
home will help Tuesday night
when it hosts a playoff game
for the first time in franchise
history.


Outback Steakhouse
Pro-Am
LUTZ - Nick Price moved
into position for his first Cham-
pions Tour victory, shooting a 4-
under 67 to take a three-stroke
lead into the final round of the
Outback Steakhouse Pro-Am.
The 52-year-old Price, a
three-time major champion and
18-time winner on the PGA
Tour, had a 9-under 133 total at
TPC Tampa Bay. Making his
39th career start on the 50-and-
over tour, Price has taken the
lead into the final round of three
other Champions Tour events,
but failed to hold on.
First-round leader Larry Nel-
son (71) was 6 under along
with Jay Haas (68) and Mike
McCullough (69). Lonnie
Nielsen (69) was 5 under, fol-
lowed by Hal Sutton (64) at 4
under.
Volvo China Open
BEIJING - England's
Richard Finch shot a 6-under
66 to take a one-stroke lead
over Spain's Gonzalo Feman-
dez-Castano in the European
tour's Volvo China Open.

you'd ever want to see be-
- veen tlfe Crystal River and
Citrus girls.
While for the most part
good sportsmanship was the
order of the day, there were
the occasional arguments
over foot faults and the ques-
tionable in or out calls. We
needed to call in line judges
a few times.
Really, seriously At the
end of the day, is winning
that important that we
need to blur the lines to
win. When we think about
the heartache that Kristen
set aside to compete the
other day, those kinds of
things seem so trivial by
comparison.
I know it personally got me
thinking. Is there someone
that I haven't called? Have I
allowed petty differences
and pride to stand in the way
of picking up the phone?
If so it's time to put them
aside before it is too late.
Thanks to Kristen I did
just that last night
Pick up the phone. You'll
be glad you did.
On Friday morning I
talked to Kristen's mom
and she called her daugh-
ter "my hero. Her strength
has been a healing for all of
us. I don't know what we'd
do without her"
Kristen's spirit was also
an inspiration to her
coaches. In fact it was her
head coach Lisa Carter that
might have best summed up
the day After raising the
championship trophy she
said, "Kristen wanted to run
today. And she ran the race
of her life."
And in so doing what
Kristen did transcends
sports.
She showed us all what it
means to be a real team-
mate. But beyond that she
defined her character as a
person. The self-sacrificing
spirit that she put on display
is one that we should all
strive to emulate.
In this world there are
winners and then there are
champions.
Kristen has left no doubt
that she is both. We can
never begin to top what this
young lady accomplished on
that track Thursday after-
noon. But every day of our
lives we should make it our
goal to try and match it.
The world needs more
champions like Kristen
Hall.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS















Bulls beat Celtics, 105-103, in OT


LeBron, Cavs

roll over Pistons
Associated Press

BOSTON - Derrick Rose
scored 36 points in his play-
off debut and helped the
Chicago Bulls do something
not even Michael Jordan
could: beat the Boston
Celtics in the postseason.
Rose had 11 assists to go
with his career high in
points, and Tyrus Thomas
made a jumper from the
corner with 51 seconds left
in overtime to lead the Bulls
to a 105-103 victory over the
defending NBA champions
in Game 1 of their best-of-
seven first-round series.
Rajon Rondo scored 29
points with nine rebounds
and seven assists for Boston,
which was without Kevin
Garnett and without much
help from the rest of the Big
Three, either.
Paul Pierce scored 23
points on 8-of-21 shooting,
but missed the potential
game-winning free throw at
the end of regulation and
had a potential game-tying
basket blocked with 3.7
seconds left in overtime.
Ray Allen, who scored four
points on 1-for-12 shooting,
had a chance to send it
' into a second overtime but
his jumper from the right
side bounced off the back
of the rim.
Game 2 is Monday, the an-
niversary of the 1986 playoff
game when Jordan scored
63 points against Boston -
in a Bulls loss. In fact,
Chicago had not beaten the


Associated Press
Boston Celtics forward Glen Davis (11) dives for a loose ball as Chicago Bulls center Joakim
Noah (13) defends during the second half on Saturday in Boston.


Celtics in 10 postseason
games since the Chicago
Stags beat the Celtics in the
1948 NBA quarterfinals.
Too hurt to play and too


frustrated to watch, Garnett
took refuge in the locker
room after the first half
while his teammates rallied
from an 11-point deficit.


Rondo hit a short jumper
over Joakim Noah in the
lane to give the Celtics a 96-
95 lead, but Rose put
Chicago ahead on two free


throws with 9.4 seconds left
in regulation.
Noah fouled Pierce with
2.6 seconds left, but after
tying it 97-all with the first
free throw the Celtics cap-
tain missed the second and
the game went into over-
time.
Thomas scored six of
Chicago's eight points in the
overtime and finished with
16 points. Noah, who was
also making his postseason
debut, scored 11 with 17 re-
bounds for the Bulls.
Garnett injured his right
knee on Feb. 19 and played
just 66 minutes, 18 seconds
over the last two months of
the regular season as the
Celtics tried to get him back
in shape for the playoffs.
But the team kept pushing
back the date of his return
- from the final three
games, to the last two and
then to one before coach
Doc Rivers shocked every-
one on Thursday when he
announced that Garnett
wouldn't be back in time for
Saturday's playoff opener
and probably not at all.
Garnett hasn't traveled
with the team or been on the
bench during his recovery,
but Rivers and the players
all said that it would be vital
to have him out there to
cheer them on. That lasted
for 24 minutes of fist-pump-
ing, ear-chewing and butt-
slapping before Garnett
decided he couldn't take it
any more.
He missed Rose hitting a
hanging jumper in the lane
to give the Bulls a 55-44 lead
before Boston cut the lead
to four points and, with an 8-
0 run later in the third, take


a 68-67 lead on Rondo's 3-
pointer with four minutes
left in the quarter.
With the loss at home, the
Celtics showed they are in
for a long road - and prob-
ably a short playoffs - with-
out Garnett. As the No. 2
seed in the East, a team that
has two All-Stars and won 62
games - Boston was ex-
pected to advance to the
conference finals and a po-
tential matchup with Cleve-
land.
Cavs 102, Pistons 84
CLEVELAND - "One Goal"
is the Cleveland Cavaliers' new
playoff theme. On Saturday, one
field goal is about all they
needed.
LeBron James banked in a 3-
pointer at the halftime hom and
Cleveland's superstar finished
with 38 points, eight rebounds
and seven assists as the Cava-
liers embarked on their quest for
a first NBA championship with a
102-84 win over the Detroit Pis-
tons in Game 1 on Saturday.
James' 41-foot runner
stunned the Pistons and gave
Cleveland, the league's most
dominant team - home or
away - during the regular
season, a 12-point halftime
lead. The Cavaliers held off
one second-half push by De-
troit while James was on the
bench and closed out the Pis-
tons, who will try to even the
best-of-seven series in Game
2 on Tuesday night.
To do that, Detroit will have to
devise something to slow
James, who had his way for 41
minutes.
Joe Smith scored 13 points
and Zydrunas Ilgauskas had 12
and 10 rebounds for Cleveland.


Biffle wins Nationwide race


Associated Press

AVONDALE, Ariz. - Greg
Biffle and his Roush Fen-
way Racing team gambled
their way to a record win
Friday night
Biffle didn't pit on the last
ti.op in the Nation wide S -
ries race, holdingonto 'Ns
lead by staying on'the track
while almost all the compe-
tition ducked in for fresh
tires. But a series of late
cautions prevented anyone
from catching Biffle, and he
held on for the win at
Phoenix International
Raceway
"Man, I was really wor-
ried," Biffle said. "I thought
we were sitting ducks, but
these tires are so good."
The victory gave team
owner Jack Roush 100 wins
in the Nationwide Series.
It also was Biffle's second
victory in four races this
season. He snapped a 76-
race winless streak with his
win in Las Vegas last month,
and didn't race again until
Friday night.
He had to hold off Jason
Leffler over several late
restarts, and again on a final
two-lap sprint to the finish.
Leffler also chose not to pit
on the last stop, a decision
that moved him up to sec-
ond, where he finished be-
hind Biffle.
"We were running eighth
there. We didn't even think
about pitting there, track
position is so important,"
Leffler said.
But he knew catching Bif-
fle would be difficult.
"My only chance was on
a restart," Leffler said. "If
he made a mistake, I
would have been there to
capitalize."


Associated Press
Greg Biffle celebrates winning the NASCAR Nationwide Se-
ries Bashas' Supermarkets 200 on Friday in Avondale, Ariz.


Brad Keselowski finished
third for the third consecu-
tive week. Joey Logano, last
week's winner at Nashville,
was fourth and was followed
by Kevin Harvick.
David Ragan was, sixth,
followed by Brendan
Gaughan, Justin Allgaier,
Mike Bliss and Kyle Busch.
Busch had an early tire
problem that dropped him
two laps down, but he ral-
lied for the top-10 finish that
pushed him into the points
lead. He entered the race
trailing Carl Edwards by 23
points, but is now up by 47.
Edwards led 79 laps but


broke a valve spring in his
motor and finished 33rd.
Michael Waltrip led four
laps early in the race - he
took the lead by not pitting
during the first round of
stops - but was wrecked 60
laps in when Edwards ran
into the back of his Toyota.
"What the heck? I just
got run over," Waltrip said.
"Carl is always sorry, so
I'm sure I've got that going
for me."
Casey Atwood wrecked on
a restart with 15 laps to go
and was transported to a
hospital for further
evaluation.


Ki hits ofCo/i/inb s 1

Annual Fi "Willie"

Classic Golf Memorial

Saturday, May 2 (Rain Date- May 9. 2009)
8:30 a.m. Shotgun start
Pine Ridge Golf & Country Club

Entry fee $60
Fee includes, coffee/donuts, green and cart
fees, lunch at the club and prizes.

Proceeds will be donated to the Key Training Center.

Entnes must be received by Fnday, April 24, 2009.

For information call 746-7563

CHRIoCLEX


Nationwide-Bashas'
Supermarkets 200
Friday
At Phoenix International Raceway
Avondale, Ariz.
Lap length: 1.0 miles
(Start position In parentheses)
1.(4) Greg Biffle, Ford, 203 laps, 145.1 rating,
195 points, $71,420.
2. (8) Jason Leffler, Toyota, 203, 100.2, 170,
$63,543.
3. (7) Brad Keselowski, Chevrolet, 203,
110.2,165, $45,393.
4. (2) Joey Logano, Toyota, 203, 114.1,165,
$33,050 . . ' '- "'"
5. (6) Kevin tarvick Chevrolet, 203, 118.4,
155, $28,000.
6. (12) David Ragan, Ford, 203, 101.3, 150,
$24,200.
7. (14) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 203,
92.8,146, $30,428.
8. (42) Justin Allgaier, Dodge, 203, 90.6,142,
$27,938.
9. (10) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 203,108.6,138,
$26,843.
10. (5) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 203, 108.4, 139,
$20,075.
11. (27) Michael McDowell, Toyota, 203,77.7,
130, $25,218.
12. (41) Steve Wallace, Chevrolet, 203, 80.5,
127, $24,518.
13. (16) Burney Lamar, Toyota, 203, 83.4,
124, $24,343.
14. (3) Paul Menard, Ford, 203, 85, 121,
$17,100.
15. (23) Brian Scott, Toyota, 203, 78.6, 118,
$24,368.


16. (29) Michael Annett, Toyota, 203,71,115,
$23,118.
17. (17) Jason Keller, Ford, 203, 74.4, 112,
$22,918.
18. (34) David Green, Toyota, 203, 63.4,109,
c24 818
19. (15) Scott Wimmer, Chevrolet, 202, 72.3,
106, $22,543.
20. (11) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 201, 91.4,
103, $16,775.
21. (21) Danny O'Quinn Jr., Chevrolet, 201,
58.8, 100, $22,293.
22. (18) Eric McClure, Ford, 201, 58.2, 97,
$22,168.
23. (30) D.J. Kennington, Dodge, 201, 50.4,
94 , ' 44 ' , ,'. .... . ., -
:4 t3E) T.,r., Raines, Chevrolet, 200c-56.4,
91, $21,968.
25. (20) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet, 200, 56.5,
88, $21,993.
26. (38) Brandon Whitt, Ford, 200, 45, 85,
$21,768.
27. (43) Brian Keselowski, Dodge, 200, 38.4,
82, $15,200.
28. (40) Ken Butler, Chevrolet, 199, 37.5, 79,
$21,618.
29. (28) Kenny Wallace, Chevrolet, 194, 42.5,
76, $21,568.
30. (26) John Borneman III, Ford, 184, 41.9,
73, $15,350.
31. (24) Casey Atwood, Ford, accident, 181,
45.8, 70, $21,463.
32. (22) Scott Lagasse Jr., Toyota, accident,
180, 74.7, 67, $21,403.
33. (1) Carl Edwards, Ford, 178, 110.7, 69,
$19,000.
34. (35) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 173, 58.8,
61, $14,865.


35. (39) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, 169,
44.2, 58, $21,303.
36. (32) John Wes Townley, Ford, accident,
163, 44,55, $21,268.
37. (25) Daryl Harr, Chevrolet, engine, 142,
29.6, 52, $14,765.
38. (33) Mark Green, Chevrolet, brakes, 58,
37.2,49, $14,710.
39. (19) Kertus Davis, Chevrolet, overheat-
ing, 46,40.7,46, $14,670.
40. (9) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, accident, 29,
70.4, 48, $14,620.
41. (37) Kevin Hamlin, Chevrolet, accident,
21, 38.6, 40, $14,565.
42. (13) Terry Cook, Chevroletsuspegsion,
+7, 31.4,37, $1,525. auom.e shadoF
43. (31) Dave Blaney, Chevroletojg#jit 4,
27.8, 34, $14,472.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 92.965
mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 11 minutes, 1 second.
Margin of Victory: 0.338 seconds.
Caution Flags: Nine for 43 laps.
Lead Changes: Six among five drivers.
Lap Leaders: J.Logano 1-6; C.Edwards 7-23;
M.Waltrip 24-27; Ky.Busch 28-35; C.Edwards 36-
97; G.Biffle 98-203.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): G.Biffle, 1 time for 106 laps; C.Edwards, 2
times for 79 laps; KyBusch, 1 time for 8 laps;
J.Logano, 1 time for 6 laps; M.Waftrip, 1 time for
4 laps.
Top 10 in Points: 1. Ky.Busch, 1,075.2. C.Ed-
wards, 1,028.3. D.Ragan, 949.4. J.Leffler, 932.5.
Bra.Keselowski, 898. 6. J.Logano, 893. 7.
B.Gaughan, 822. 8. J.Allgaler, 818. 9. M.Bliss,
789.10. J.Keller, 779.


11th Annual Superintendent's Golf Classic
All proceeds benefit the Citrus County Education Foundation, Inc. and support school programs.
UsCO Saturday, May 2, 2009

The Superintendent's Golf Classic will take place at
Sugarmill Woods Golf & Country Club

4 FOUND�1 Shotgun start 10 a.m.
All registered golfers will receive an array of gifts
for attending, and the opportunity to win prizes.

Four person scamble (Field limited to first 144 players)
There will be three divisions (A, B, C) based on team handicap.
Each division will be awarded a 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place team prize.
Scoring will be based on team handicap and gross score.

$55 per person includes golf, lunch after golf, door prizes, hole contests.
For additional information, contact: Jack Brady at 726-2241 ext 233
or Jonny Bishop at 726-1931 ext 2239
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - AL -


Playe


Superintendent's Golf Classic Entry Form*
(Please make check payable to Citrus County Education Foundation)
Please send entry form with payment to:
Citrus County Education Foundation
P.O. Box 2004
Inverness, Fl 34451

Reserve your foursome today!
Payment deadline is April 24, 2009

r's Name Address, City, Zip Phone


Handicap


1.

2.

3.


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Team contact name


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SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 B5


SPORTS


CHRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











E Page B6 - SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009



ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE --

Chan: Chinese need
to be controlled
BOAO, China -Action
star Jackie Chan said Sat-
urday he's not sure if a
free society is a good
thing for China and that
he's starting to think "we
Chinese
need to
be con-
trolled."
Chan's
com-
ments
drew ap-
plause
Chane from a
Chart predomi-
nantly Chinese audience
of business leaders in
China's southern island
province of Hainan.
The 55-year-old Hong
Kong actor was partici-
pating in a panel at the
annual Boao Forum
when he was asked to
discuss censorship and
restrictions on filmmak-
ers in China. He ex-
panded his comments to
include society.
"I'm not sure if it's
good to have freedom or
not," Chan said. "I'm re-
ally confused now. If
you're too free, you're
like the way Hong Kong
is now. It's very chaotic.
Taiwan is also chaotic."
Chan added: "I'm grad-
ually beginning to feel
that we Chinese need to
be controlled. If we're not
being controlled, we'll
just do what we want."
The kung fu star has
not been a vocal sup-
porter of the pro-democ-
racy movement in his
hometown of Hong Kong.
Since the former British
colony returned to Chi-
nese rule in 1997, voters
have not been allowed to
directly elect their leader.
The theme at Satur-
day's panel discussion
was "Tapping into Asia's
Creative Industry Poten-
tial," and Chan had sev-
eral opinions about
innovation in China.
He said that early in
his career, he lived in the
shadow of the late mar-
tial arts star Bruce Lee.
He said that during his
first foray into Holly-
wood, he struggled to es-
tablish his own identity,
so he returned to Hong
Kong. After spending 15
years building his reputa-
tion in Asia, Chan finally
got rediscovered by Hol-
lywood, he said.
Chan said the problem
with Chinese youth is that
"they like other people's
things. They don't like
their own things." Young
people need to spend
more time developing
their own style, he added.
The action hero com-
plained that Chinese
goods still have too many
quality problems. He be-
came emotional when dis-
cussing contaminated milk
powder that sickened tens
of thousands of Chinese
babies in the past year,
Speaking fast with his
voice rising, Chan said, "If I
need to buy a TV I'll deft-
nitely buy a Japanese TVA
Chinese TV might explode,"

Woman says she
snooped for film
LOS ANGELES -A
woman arrested outside
Britney Spears' home is a
former "American Idol"
hopeful who says she's
making a paparazzi docu-
mentary.
Miranda Tozier-Rob-
bins says she wanted to
show the
efforts pa-
- parazzi go



because it
"might as
SMiranda well be
Tozler-Robbin someone


I'm interested in."
Deputies arrested the 26-
year-old Thursday after
guards caught her peeking
into windows at the singer's
home wearing camouflage
and carrying camera gear

-From wire reports


Coachella kicks off


Associated Press
INDIO, Calif. - Energized
by the desert air and memory
of his late wife, a playful and
passionate Paul McCartney
riffed on "Foxy Lady," led an
after-midnight "Hey Jude"
singalong and dedicated
songs to his former band-
mates at the Coachella music
festival that kicked off Friday
McCartney took off his
black jacket five songs in and
didn't put it back on for the
next 29, strutting the stage in
boots, black pants, a white
shirt and suspenders that he
tugged at wryly.
"It's going to be a good
weekend, dear," he told the
crowd of thousands gathered
for the three-day festival,
which erupted in cheers with
the first chords of Beatles
tunes like "Eleanor Rigby." It
was McCartney's first ap-
pearance at a U.S. festival as
a solo artist
In the 2 1/2-hour set, in-
cluding two encores, McCart-
ney dedicated "Long and
Winding Road" and "My Love
Does It Good" to his late wife
Linda, who died at the cou-
ple's ranch at Tucson, Ariz.,
11 years earlier to the day.
"It's an emotional day for
me. That's good, that's OK,"
he said, pounding his chest
"Lot of heart, lot of emotion."
Before a moving perform-
ance of "Blackbird," he noted
that it had been written in re-
sponse to the 60s civil rights
movement
"Now you've got President
Obama. Yeah, you know
we've come a long way."
Switching from serious to
cheerily self-aware, he led
call-and-response chants
only to wave them off quickly
as "messing around," and dis-
missed signs held by front-
row fans - including one
that asked for his guitar pick
"No! It's mine!" McCartney
said. "'Anyway, if I make a mis-


Associated Press
Paul McCartney performs Friday during his headlining set on the first day of the Coachella
Valley Music & Arts Festival in Indio, Calif.


take, I can blame the signs."
There were mistakes. Mc-
Cartney was proficient but
sometimes out-of-sync with the
four-man band backing him.
But he clearly enjoyed himself,
plowing through songs from
his "Fireman" album, "Band
on the Run" from the Wings,
and Fab Four favorites like
"Back in the USSR," "Paper-
back Writer" and, for the fi-
nale, "Sgt Pepper's Lonely
Hearts Club Band."
McCartney launched
brightly into "Something" with
only his voice and a ukulele he
said was givento him by George
Harrison, before his band
mates and the crowd joined in


The first day of the festival
also featured Morrissey,
Leonard Cohen, the Hold
Steady, Franz Ferdinand and
the Ting Tings. It drew a
number of young Hollywood
stars to this desert city south-
east of Palm Springs.
Anne Hathaway was spot-
ted in the VIP area wearing
patterned harem pants and a
cardigan, while Morrissey's
set drew the attention of
"Twilight" actor Robert Pat-
tinson, wearing skinny cut-off
jeans, and Kirsten Dunst in a
short-sleeve mini-dress. Kate
Bosworth, "Weird Al"
Yankovic, Chloe Sevigny and
Zoe Kravitz were also spotted


in the VIP area.
Police reported 18 arrests
for drug- and alcohol-related
crimes, and fire officials took
three patrons to hospitals.
Las Vegas-based The
Killers and M.I.A. headlined
a more youthful Saturday
lineup. My Bloody Valentine
and The Cure cap off Sunday
night
The recession has forced
music festivals nationwide to
lower prices or downsize, and
three-day, $269 tickets to
Coachella were available on a
layaway plan. Single-daytickets
were $120 at the door Organiz-
ers have not yet announced ot-
tendance or ticket sales.


Twitter wars continue: Ashton, meet Oprah


Associated Press

NEW YORK - For now,
Ashton Kutcher is the king
of Twitter But there is a new
challenger - Oprah.
Kutcher triumphed over
CNN in their much bally-
hooed race to be the first to
reach a million followers on
the microblogging Web site.
Kutcher surpassed that
benchmark in the early
morning hours Friday, nar-
rowly edging out the break-
ing news feed from the Time
Warner Inc.-owned network
Speaking in a live webcast
early Friday, Kutcher took
the tone of a revolutionary.
"We have shown the
world that the new wave is
here," Kutcher said on us-
tream.tv shortly after pass-
ing the million mark. "It is
present and it is ready to ex-
plode. You guys are all of it
because I can't follow me."
Kutcher had long trailed
CNN, but he staged a rally
in recent days that captured
the attention of the Web.
The million mark race was
taken by many as a symbol
of huge upswing of Twitter's
popularity.


Associated Press
Oprah Winfrey Is seen with Evan Williams, CEO of Twitter, on
April 17 during a live broadcast of "Oprah Fridays Live."


The site allows users to
type "tweets" of 140 charac-
ters or less on their comput-
ers or cell phones, which
others "follow" on Twitter like
a stock ticker
Kutcher, who's an avid user
of the site along with wife
Demi Moore, said Twitter is
democratizing media and re-
moving filters between
celebrities and fans,, big
media companies and their
customers.
"We can and will create our
media," said Kutcher, who
celebrated his victory with


champagne and by posting
the tweet: "Victory is ours!"
The 31-year-old Kutcher
had claimed he would "ding-
dong-ditch" CNN founder
Ted Turner if he won, and
pledged to make good on his
promise after winning.
CNN's Larry King posted a
video earlier in the week,
playfully threatening Kutcher:
"CNN will bury you!" Kutcher
was to appear on King's pro-
gram Friday evening.
King was far from the only
person sucked into Twitter by
the million-mark showdown.


Among the many new users to
join was Oprah Winfrey,
whose entry caused ripples
across Twitter
She gained more than
130,000 followers in less than
a day, suggesting Winfrey
would thrive on yet another
platform.
Kutcher, CNN and Winfrey
pledged to mark the occasion
by purchasing mosquito bed
nets to combat malaria.
Kutcher donated $100,000 to
the Malaria No More Fund,
the charity said Friday
Winfrey hosted alwitterspe-
cial on her show Friday with
Kutcher as a guest, connected
through the Internet communi-
cations service Skype. She also
sent her first tweet
"I'm still not sure I get it,"
Winfrey said before tentatively
typing "ASHTON IS NEXT"
into a laptop, announcing the
actor's appearance.
"OK, here goes," she said,
pressing a key.
It didn't go, actually. Win-
frey's representatives said she
hit the wrong key, Her next at-
tempt: "HI TWITTERS.
THANK YOU FOR A WARM
WELCOME. FEELING RE-
ALLY 21st CENTLIRY."


Day after plunking woman, Murray hacks away


Associated Press


LUTZ, Fla. - One day
after she was plunked on
the head by Bill Murray's
wayward tee shot, Gayle
DiMaggio had a request: a
signed copy of his movie
"Caddyshack."
The actor, meanwhile, was
back on the course Saturday
for the second round of the
Outback Pro-Am. And the
course marshals took no
chances: They wore hard hats.
DiMaggio lives on the
course where Murray
hooked his shot far to the left
of the No. 9 hole at TPC
Tampa Bay She was hit on
the left temple Friday as she
stood in her backyard to
watch the first round. She
never lost consciousness but
needed stitches at a hospital.
DiMaggio, who has lived


' on the course for eight years,
recounted her mishap and
her encounter with Murray.
"He came over and laid
down on the ground with me
and he was very concerned,
asking if I was OK," she said.
"Once he knew I was OK
and not seriously hurt, then
he started joking with me,
asking how many fingers he
was holding up."
DiMaggio was at it again
Saturday, watching the sec-
ond round, and was almost
conked again. This time, for-
mer Tampa Bay Buccaneers
linebacker Derrick Brooks
nearly hit her. But when
Murray was about to shoot,
she took cover. DiMaggio
stayed inside her screen en-
closure until the actor's
foursome teed off. Friends
and family stood in her yard
wearing hard hats.


Murray came to DiMag-
gio's backyard and asked
her how she was feeling.
DiMaggio said the only thing
she wanted from the actor
was his autograph on a copy
of"Caddyshack," the rollick-
ing golf comedy from 1980 in
which Murray starred.
Earlier, a large crowd
showed for Murray's 12:50
p.m. tee time. The 58-year-
old comedian joked through
most of his partners' tee
shots. When Murray stepped
up for his shot, the course
marshals also donned hard
hats and warned the crowd
for incoming shots from the
"Ghostbusters" star.
Murray laughed, and be-
fore teeing off told the
crowd, "This one is for a lit-
tle girl in a hospital."
His drive was a perfect
draw down the fairway.


Associated Press
Actor Bill Murray tees off on
the seventh hole at Pebble
Beach Golf Course Feb. 14
during the third round of the
AT&T Pebble Beach National
Pro-Am in Pebble Beach, Calif.


Flrida
LOTTERIES

FRIDAY, APRIL 17
Mega Money: 19-23-41 -44
Mega Ball: 17
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $500,000
4-of-4 2 $3,754
3-of-4 MB 51 $322.50
3-of-4 914 $53.50
2-of-4 MB 1,384 $24.50
2-of-4 27,931 $2
1-of-4 MB 12,703 $2.50
Fantasy 5: 3 - 5 - 11 - 14 - 34
5-of-5 2 winners $120494B
4-of-5 317 $122.50
3-of-5 10,996 $9.50
THURSDAY, APRIL 16
Fantasy 5:14 - 15- 24 - 28- 34
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4-of-5 273 $127.50
3-of-5 8,568 $11
INSIDE THE NUMBERS
i To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY=

Today is Sunday, April 19,
the 108th day of 2009. There
are 256 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:.
On April 19, 1775, the
American Revolutionary War
began with the battles of Lex-
ington and Concord.
On this date:
In 1897, the first Boston
Marathon was held; winner
John J. McDermott ran the
course in 2 hours, 55 minutes
and 10 seconds.
In 1933, the United States
went off the gold standard.
In 1939, Connecticut be-
came the last of the original
13 colonies to- ratify the Bill of
Rights, 147 years after it took
effect.
In 1943, during World War
II, tens-of thousands of Jews
living in the Warsaw Ghetto
began a valiant but futile bat-
tle against Nazi forces.
In 1951, Gen. Douglas
MacArthur, relieved of his Far
East command by President
Harry S. Truman, bid farewell
in an address to Congress in
which he quoted a line from a
ballad: "Old soldiers never
die; they just fade away."
In 1993, the 51-day siege
at the Branch Davidian com-
pound near Waco, Texas,
ended as fire destroyed the
structure after federal agents
began smashing their way in;
dozens, including leader
David Koresh, were killed.
In 1995, a truck bomb de-
stroyed the Alfred P. Murrah
Federal Building In Oklahoma
City, killing 168 people. (Tim-
othy McVeigh was later con-
victed of federal murder
charges and executed.)
Ten years ago: The U.S.
Supreme Court ruled that a
federal law aimed at limiting
e-mail smut did not violate
free-speech rights,
Five years ago: A Russian
rocket soared Into space carry-
Ing an American, a Russian
and a Dutchman to the Interna-
tional space station on the third
manned mission since the halt
of the U.S. shuttle program,
One year ago: A Russian
capsule carrying South
Korea's first astronaut, YI So-
yeon, touched down 260
miles off target in northern
Kazakhstan after hurtling
through the atmosphere in a
bone-jarring descent from the
International space station.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
Hugh O'Brian Is 84. Actress
Elinor Donahue Is 72. Rock
musician Alan Price (The Ani-
mals) Is 67. Actor Tim Curry is
63. Pop singer Mark "Flo" Vol-
man (The Turtles; Flo and
Eddie) Is 62. Actor Tony Plana
("Ugly Betty") Is 57. Actress
Ashley Judd Is 41. Actress
Kate Hudson Is 30. Actor Hay-
den Christensen is 28. Tennis
player Maria Sharapova is 22.


Thought for Today:
"There is a Law that man
should love his neighbor as
himself. In a few hundred
years it should be as natural
to mankind as breathing or
the upright gait; but if he does
not learn it he must perish."
- Alfred Adler, Austrian psy-
choanalyst (1870-1937).











Section C - SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009



COMMENTARY CHRONICLE
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Accidental heroes


Associated Press
Maersk-Alabama Capt. Richard Phillips, right, stands with USS Bainbridge Cmdr. Frank Castellano on April 12 after being rescued by U.S. naval
forces off the coast of Somalia. Phillips, who surrendered himself to Somali pirates to safeguard his crew, is being celebrated for his bravery and feted
as "Captain Courageous."


Awash in celebrities, the United States still hungers for heroics


NANCY BENAC
Associated Press


A nation awash in celebrities still
hungers for genuine heroes,
never more so than in dreary
times like these.
So it is that sea captain
Richard Phillips, who surren-
dered himself to Somali pirates to safeguard his
crew and boldly tried to escape their clutches,
is being saluted as "Captain Courageous."
The first stop on his journey home to Ver-
mont was Mombasa harbor in Kenya on Thurs-
day. He arrived aboard the USS Bainbridge to
the music of a Lynyrd Skynyrd song that in-
cludes the words "I'm coming home to you."
He maysoonfeel like a captive, ofsorts, once more.
We have seen this before: An everyday Amer-
ican does something extraordinary and is
vaulted into the celebrisphere. At least until
the country moves on to the next action figure.
In the three months since pilot Chesley
"Sully" Sullenberger safely landed his disabled
US Airways jet in the Hudson River, saving all
155 people on board, he has been given the
keys to New York City, been dubbed "Captain
Cool," been chatted up on Letterman and "60
Minutes," honored at the Super Bowl, deluged
with thankful letters and feted at the presiden-
tial inauguration.
He's got a deal to write two books, not to men-
tion speaking engagements handled by a major
agency
"I still don't think of myself as a celebrity,"
Sullenberger demurred amid all the hoopla.
"It's been a difficult adjustment, initially, be-
cause of the 'hero' mantle that was pushed in
niy direction."


Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger III, right, pilot of US
Airways FRight 1549 speaks Feb. 9 during an ap-
pearance on CBS's "The Early Show" in New York.
Sullenberger, like all pilots, was trained to do.
emergency landings and keep his cool.
Phillips, like all skippers, was expected to
look after those under his charge before him-
self.
They are both now instant "accidental
celebrities," joining a line that may have begun
in the modern, TV-obsessive era with Lenny
Skutnik.
On the afternoon of Jan. 13, 1982, Skutnik was


just a federal worker stuck in D.C. traffic when
an Air Florida plane plunged into the Potomac
River during a snowstorm. Skutnik slipped off
his coat and boots and dove into the icy waters
to rescue a drowning woman, a transfixing mo-
ment played over and over on television.
That evening, a limousine from ABC pulled
up unannounced outside Skutnik's townhouse
to take him to an appearance on "Nightline."
Ronald Reagan seated him in the president's
box during his State of the Union address two
weeks later and held him out as "the spirit of
heroism at its finest." Honors and accolades
poured in. Thousands of letters arrived. Offers
for free rent, a new car and speaking engage-
ments piled up.
Skutnik, 28 at the time, found it all rather em-
barrassing, and turned down much of what was
offered him. He still works for the government as
a computer specialist and rarely speaks publicly
about the episode that transformed his name into
a new noun: A skutnik came to mean a human
prop used by others to make a certain point
"I wasn't a hero," Skutnik said in a 2007 in-
terview. "We're surrounded by heroes. What
made this different was that it was caught on
film and went all over the world."
The explosion of media outlets has only in-
creased the appetite for someone new to obsess
over
"There is a vacuum that needs to be filled,"
says image consultant Eric Dezenhall. "It's a
mathematical issue, not just a cultural issue."
Beyond that, says Dezenhall, Americans tend
to interpret big events through the actions of in-
dividuals, "which is one of the reasons why we
create heroes."
A tough economy might intensify that need.
* See HEROES/Page C3


It's not too late to teach our children the truth


Editor's note: This guest column
is written in honor of Nationa
Holocaust Observance Day, Apri
21,2009.
M" y father, George Howard
I V was a member of "The
Greatest Generation." On
May 2, 1945, as a member of th(
82nd Airborne Division, he tool
part in the liberation of a small, bu
infamous concentration camp in
northern Germany The camp was
Wobbelin, which is on the outskirts
of the town of Ludwigslust
Before he died in 1968 he told my
brother and me of the horrors of the
Holocaust. His division ordered the
townspeople of the town, at gun
point, to bury the dead. I have seer
the photographs. That scene was
immortalized in the HBO series
"Band of Brothers." The town has
built a beautiful memorial to his di-
vision. The people of the town know
the truth because they see it every
day.


n He told us that the Jewish prison- Iran hosted an international confer-
I ers' dead bodies were assembled ence in Teheran for the express pur-
1 like cordwood "five by five by five." pose of furthering the lie that the
Dozens of these nightmarish piles Holocaust did not occur. Evil will
were stacked throughout the entire prevail when good people fail to act
, assembly area of the camp. He Several years ago I read my daugh-
e vowed to never let us for- ter's high school history
n get what he saw because ! book for any references to
e it was the truth. this event I was sickened
k As the years become . that the Nazi govern-
t decades, memories fade .-t ment's planned extermi-
i and people die. We are . nation of 10 million
s one generation from los- Y ., people only warranted
s ing the precious re- two paragraphs on the
source of the human ._ subject Far more space
y reminders of the darkest was dedicated to the cre-
e period in human history. Judge ation of "Rock and Roll."
e Across the world his- Richard Howard How pathetic!
a torical revisionists are Richard Howard We in the "Baby Boom"
a dedicated to re-write, to GUEST generation are failing to
s minimize, and even to COLUMN teach our children the
s deny the reality of the truth. It's not too late.
s Holocaust. Recently a Catholic While I. was presiding over the
- bishop was expelled from a country Couey trial in Miami in 2007, I vis-
v because he claimed the Holocaust ited the Holocaust Memorial on
y was a hoax invented by the Jewish Miami Beach. A towering bronze
people. Last year the president of sculpture of a human arm bearing


the tattoo by which the prisoners
were identified was cast into the
metal. We can give new life to the
surviving victims that their suffering
will never be forgotten. These peo-
ple are our grandparents and great-
grandparents. We must never forget
them.
I propose that if anyone has such
a number on their arm that we pho-
tograph it and create a visual poster
with as many arms, names and sto-
ries as we can assemble. These
posters should be posted in every
public school and office building.
The caption could be: It did hap-
pen, it is the truth, it happened to
me. Never again, never forget
I would gladly volunteer to help
assemble this archive. Please con-
tact me if you would like to start this
project so we can unveil the poster
on April 21,2010.
The mailing address for Circuit
Judge Richard Howard is 110 North
Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL, 34450.
His office telephone number is (352)


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Just keep

on smiling
People who smile are
more likely to have
a happy marriage.
In fact, a DePauw Uni-
versity study released
last week says there is a
link between how big you.
smiled in pictures during
your youth and whether
or not you will stay mar-
ried.
The study found that
people who did not smile
in these early photos are
three times more likely to
get divorced.
Don't they study geog-
raphy in college, any
more?
I have never been very
good at smiling. I laugh a
lot, but people tell me q
am better at growling
than smiling.
Part of my problem
with the lack of smiling is
that every time my par-
ents gathered my seven
brothers and sisters to-
gether for a family por-
trait, I had just recently
been punched in the
mouth.
I didn't get punched in
the mouth frequently; it
just seemed to happen
around family portrait
day. In family photos, I
was always the kid with
the fat lip.
It did prepare me well
for a career in journal-
ism.
I still don't like to have
my photo .taken, .because
I'm always afraid that
someone is about to
punch me in the mouth.
One of my best friends
is always smiling, but he's
been divorced four times.
So I'm not sure if this
smiling study holds any
water.
Smiling might make
you a better spouse, but
does it make you a better
leader?
Sen. Charlie Dean of
Inverness smiles a lot,
and he's happily mar-
ried. Let me warn you
though, Sen. Dean does
not-smile when you bring
up the subject of his
barn. Don't bring up re-
porter Mike Wright's-
name either, because
there won't be any smiles
with that one. A punch in
the mouth is a maybe.
County Commissioner
Joe Meek has a big smile.
And he has a nice wife
and family. Joe, smiles
even when you're telling
him bad news.
Commission Chairman
John Thrumston doesn't
smile a lot. His wife
smiles and she seems
much nicer than him. In
fact, if you think about it,
the wives of our county
commissioners all have,
nicer smiles than their
husbands and they all ap-'>
pear to be pretty darned
happy.
Maybe we should let
the wives of the commis-
sioners select our next
county administrator. Ex-
administrator Anthony
Schembri had a nice
smile and a good laugh.
All he has now is a nice
severance package.
Wives are often better
at making good decisions
than husbands. Just ask
them.
My own wife will meet
some new employee I
have brought on board at
the newspaper and after
five minutes she'll tell
me, "That person will
never work out."
Unfortunately, she's
usually right
So I would like to see
DePauw University con-
duct a study to see if the
wives of our county com-
See WINDOW/Page C4









Page C2 - SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009



OPINION


"w'Apologies only account for that:.
which they do not alter."
Benjamin Disraeli, July 28, 187:1
__�


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


RAW DEAL


Settlement is



appropriate-



so is apology


It was announced this past
week that Citrus County
has agreed to pay former
interim county administrator
Tom Dick a $120,000. settlement
so he would drop a lawsuit
against the county.
It was also agreed that Dick's
$75,000 legal bill would be paid.
The county's legal bill amounted
to yet another $86,000.
This was a hefty price tagfor
the taxpayers to assume for a
total lack of leadership on the


part of our county
commission.
Dick was a 25-
year county em-
ployee when he
was asked to step
up from his assis-
tant county ad-
ministrator role to.
serve as acting


THE I1
Settleme
Tom Dick

OUR OF
An apolto


county administrator while a
search was conducted for a
new county boss. Dick stepped
up and did a good job for-the
citizens of the community.
His efforts were so appreci-
ated that some' commissioners
suggested that he should apply
for the permanent,job. But
Dick decided he preferred se-
curity over the limelight and
chose to remain in the assis-
tant's position.
If he only knew what awaited
him.
. The county stumbled in its
search for a permanent county
administrator when their first
choice rejected the offer. Dick
continued to serve in the in-
terim until June Fisher was
quickly selected.
It became immediately evi-
dent that Ms. Fisher did not ap-
preciate having the former
interim administrator as a
member of her leadership
team. After quarter of a cen-
tury of service, Dick was fired
by Fisher on a trumped-up
charge of insubordination. She
' went on to make public accu- /
stations that Dick had come to
work while under the influ-
ence of alcohol.
While many in the community
were upset at the decision, the
members of the commission
showed a lack of leadership at
the time and stood behind


Questions for Nancy
This is in reference to Ms. Ar-
genziano's meeting ... If I am
unable to attend the meeting


with Mrs. Argenziano,
there are a few ques-
tions I hope get asked.
First let me say, the
lady's courage, integrity
and ability in govern-
ment, in my opinion, is -
second to none. I also
understand the Legisla-
ture governs and the
PSC regulates. Ques- CAL
tion 1: As I understand 563
it,:our Legislature, by 563
all accounts, did not
understand the magnitude of
the rate increases allowed
Florida Progress. Mrs. Argen-
ziano, when did the PSC be-
come aware of the rate
increases? Question 2: Florida
Power and Light looks to build
two new nuclear units. Do they
have the same thing similar to


Fisher without asking questions.
Dick said the dismissal was
personal, fueled by his friend-
ship with Sheriff Jeff Dawsy
and former county administra-
tor Richard Wesch, Fisher's
predecessor who was fired by a
county commission majority led
by then-Commissioners Vicki
Phillips and Joyce Valentino.
Last election season voters
tossed both Phillips and
Valentino from office. Fisher, who
never moved to Citrus County, left
- the job before the
SSUE: elections.
" Dick was hired
nt of the by the city of In-
klawsuit. vernfess, but the
damage to his rep-
PINION: utation and the
black mark on his
gy is due. service was made.
The current
county commission made the
correct decision in agreeing to
the settlement with Dick. The
poorly handled scenario cost
the taxpayers $100,000; the
county's insurance policy picks
up all costs over that.
If the county took the case to
court, it seemed pretty obvious
that petty politics cost a long-
time public servant his career.
We'd bet the court damages
would have been a lot higher
than the $120,000 Dick received.
But there was one thing miss-
ing from the announcement of
the settlement on Tuesday -
no one apologized to Tom Dick
for what happened to him.
When lawyers get involved, it's
often agreed that one of the
stipulations is that no party has
to admit they were at fault.
The taxpayers know who was
at fault in this case - it is the
party that's paying out the
$120,000. And while the county
commission may not say so
publicly, we will offer an apol-
ogy on behalf of the people of
Citrus County.
- Tom Dick - after 25 years of
service you got the boot be-
cause of politics and your rep-
utation was damaged in the
process. We, your fellow neigh-
bors in Citrus County, know
that you got a raw deal. We col-
lectively apologize for how you
were mistreated.


the Florida Progress rate in-
crease for their customers?
Question 3: Knowing Seminole
Electric generates power for
REA cooperatives, when Semi-
nole Electric falls short
JND in generation satisfac-
tion and the coopera-
tiyes purchase power
from Florida Progress,
- are REA's customers'
bills prorated usage ap-
plied to their bill and
the money sent to
*ij. Florida Progress for the
579 Florida Progress' new
)579 plants? Question 4:
When Florida Progress
talks about the enor-


mous cost of a new transmis-
sion right-of-way for the new
plants, did they mention that
since about 1965 they have
owned outright or have under
contract a 100-year lease for
their entire East-West transmis-
sion corridor through Citrus
and part of Marion counties? ...


Time to build a pirate defense'


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan....................................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ......................................... editor
Neale Brennan ........promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ............................... managing editor
Cheri Harris............. ..................features editor
Curt Ebitz ........................................citizen m em ber
Founded Mac Harris ................................... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson ................................. guest member
"'You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


DOUGLAS COHN Other V
AND ELEANOR CtLIFT ....._ V
A precision volley of three the water relatively calm, the
shots ended the five-day odds of the snipers succeeding
standoff between Somali were close to 100 percent, or they
pirates and the U.S. Navy, pro- wouldn't have taken the chance
viding a huge morale boost to the with Phillips sitting there.
military and prompting head- The question is what happens
lines that President Obama, who next now that piracy, a crime we
okayed the decisive strike, had thought ended with Thomas Jef-
passed his -first test as com- ferson's administration, has reL-
mander-in-chief. Itwas a beauti- surfaced to challenge the Obama
fully executed mission with the administration. It was refreshing
Navy SEAL snipers taking aim that there was none of the cow-
from the fan tail of the U.S.S. hoy brashriess that characterized
Bainbridge, the Navy destroyer so much of what the previous ad-.
sent to rescue the American cap- ministration did. Obama stayed
tain taken hostage when pirates out of the story, knowing almost
boarded his freighter, anything he said would escalate
What started as an almost rou- the stand-off into a bigger inter-
tine skirmish now that Somali pi- national incident than it needed
rates.control the ocean waters off to be. Once Phillips was safe,
Mogadishu threatened to' turn Obama resisted doing a victory
deadly with the capture of Captain dance, focusing instead on the
Richard Phillips. His safety be- continuing challenge to shipping.
came paramount, dictatingthe U.S. The last thing Obama wants is
response. When it appeared that to get drawn into a conflict in So-
the pirates might kill him or take malia, a place best remembered
him ashore, a military response be- as the site for "Black Hawk
came necessary Somalia is without Down," a book and then a movie
a cfib-idhing legal system- ad. its about the ill-fated humanitarian
government is too weak to comba-F 'mtAstion that turned deadly dur-
piracy, which has become a lucra- ing the first year of the Clinton
tive business for young, otherwise administration. :The pirates are
unemployed men, threatening to take revenge and,,
A successful outcome was as- instead of backing down after
sured once the Navy SEALs se- their confrontation with the U.S.,
cured a tow lihie to the lifeboat Navy, attempted to board another
carrying the pirates and Phillips. U.S. ship. They were unsuccess-
The wake generated by the much ful, but their brazenness under-
larger naval vessel eliminated scores the necessity for taking
the waves and created a glide immediate and ongoing steps to
path for the lifeboat some 75 feet protect vital shipping in the seas
away. At that distance and with off Mogadishu.


Irreplaceable time
I would like to respond to one
specific item regarding the com-
ments about Citrus Memorial
hospital made by Carolyn
Mitchell of Inverness in the "let-
ters to the editor" section of the
Chronicle's April 14 edition.
I have no knowledge of the
facts involved in most of Ms.
Mitchell's comments towards
CMH, and she certainly is enti '
tled to her opinion.
However, in one paragraph
she mentioned that after retiring
several years ago she was inter-
ested in volunteer work at CMH,
but the reply she received was . .
"dictatorial." To quote: "Uni-
forms at my expense, a certain
number of hours weekly and
placement as a volunteer not
necessarily of my interest"
As an officer of the CMH Auxil-
iary, I would like to clarify the cur-
rent policy regarding volunteers.
Volunteers are provided a uni-
form free of charge. This policy
has been in effect for approxi-
mately six years. They are "asked"
to commit to four hours per week,
but that is not mandatory. We have
volunteers who workfewer hours
and many who work far more.


OPINIONS INVITED
U The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the editorial board of the newspa-
per.
M Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Mike Arnold at
(352) 563-5660.
1 All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
e-mail. Names and hometowns
"Will be printed; phone numbers
will not be published or given out.
0 We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
0 SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

are giving their time, an item
that is irreplaceable.
Inkn r Condron


Volunteers are assigned jobs in First vice president
an area they choose if such a job CMH Auxiliary
is available at the time they sign
up. If not, they can wait until one Non-response
opens-up, they can.sqbstitute for n-respon
others, or they can take a-differ- - ....Eleven days ago, I e-mailed
ent job until a position that they each of the BOCC members ask-
prefer becomes available. ing a question and requesting that
Every attempt is made to pro- one or more of the members reply
vide each volunteer with a job with an answer to my question.
they enjoy doing, because they In the e-mail I pointed out two


pieces of information:
1. An article in the Chronicle
reported that the commissioners,,
were in agreement that the rea- _
son for the failure of Mr. Schem-.,
bri was that he did not have
experience as a county govern-.%
ment employee. This conclusion
resulted in a requirement that .
future candidates must have -,
such experience.
2. Another article in the Chron-
icle listed a chronology of the sig-.,',
nificant events which took place,'
during his tenure as administra-,..,
tor. This chronology listed six key,.
events which resulted in his
downfall; not one of these six neg-
ative events had anything to do ,.
with lacking experience in county,:
government work Each of the ,:'
events involved inappropriate be-
havior, which again I say has no
relation to having or not having
county government experience.
Does the BOCC have a policy
or guideline with respect to re-
spending to inquiries by resi-
dents of the county or are they :
just ignored?
People are criticized for not
taking an interest in government
but I wrote an e-mail requesting �
a reply 11 days ago and have not-i:
received a response. '
My specific question is as fol-
lows: If the events leading to Mr.
Schembri's failure were all be- :
havioral issues, then how do five.,
commissioners arrive at the il-
logical conclusion that attributes,
his failure to a lack of county
government experience?
William B. Allep "
Homosassa,-


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leve our name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


VOICES
The U.S. Navy in conjunction.
with the Navies of other coun-,
tries has established shippirQ'
lanes that are easier to patrol ff.,
ships stay within them than thie
million square miles of water"
which are potentially vulnerable.
When the Bainbridge answered
the distress call from the'
freighter Phillips commanded, i1
was 300 miles away. To patrol a'f
area that is four times the size &f
Texas, smaller, faster vessels that
the Coast Guard could provide.
would be able to get anywhere i'i"
an hour. They can carry more so--,,
phisticated surveillance equip-
ment and laser-guided firepower
than battleships did during Worldf
War II. They're far less expeii- ,
sive, require fewer men, an-'
could be dispatched in great '
enough numbers to intimidate-
and rebuff the Somali pirates.
The pirates carry AK-47 assault
rifles and rocket grenade launch-
ers that can tear a hole in the side
of a ship and sink it if they g6~
close enough. The snipers .did a
great job, but if the goal is to pre-
vent future incidents from getting-
*out of hand, bolstering the U.S.
military presence with smaller,
heavily armed vessels would be a
smart and cost-effective display
of power.
-m-

Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift
author the Washington Merry-
Go-Round column, founded in
1932 by Drew Pearson.


LETTERS to the Editor


I


-0

0-o








%-IMENARY SNDAYAI'lI Y19,1009,C


Photographic forensics prove prom faux pas didn't happen


\ f> heryl and I watch a
C multitude of crimi-
nal investigation-
themed television
programs. It's amazing
what we see and how little
it seems to bother us. After
several seasons of such
blood and gore, I can now
sit and watch a pretend au-
topsy while eating a snack
Tk e watchword for all of
those shows seems to be
"follow the evidence."
'jn real life, sometimes
tho same is true - the key
is the evidence. We all have
our personal opinions; and,
on point for this column, as
w_ grow older, we all have
ouy own versions of certain
slt red memories, for in-
stance:
Several months ago I re-
lted how on a particular
Saturday, my mind had run
to the summer of 1966 and
thU exciting days Cheryl and
I .shared leading up to our
wedding. I told of how I had
corralled a memory and
bi rted out, "The orchid I
bought for your senior prom


was pretty, put it paled in
comparison to you."
I had waited, expecting
Cheryl to respond with an
appreciative giggle, but in-
stead she replied pleas-
antly, but firmly, "You didn't
get an orchid for
me, it was
roses."
Ouch!
This certainly
wasn't as I re-
member the oc-
casion, but I -
knew if it was
the way Cheryl
remembered it, Fred B
her memory A SL
trumped mine
regardless of the OF I
facts. My only
option was to cop a plea of
temporary insanity. The
next day, while she took her
Sunday afternoon nap, I
went shopping; I bought a
card which helped me ver-
balize just how special she
was and is to me; and, I
bought her an orchid!
Most recently, evidence
has been discovered.


Nowadays, there are times
when modern forensic in-
vestigations, such as DNA
tests, reveal that an inno-
cent person has been con-
victed of a crime he or she
didn't commit. The discov-
ery in the "case
- of the courtship
faux pas" wasn't
all that dra-
S matic, but it
was, nonethe-
less, com-
pelling:
While going
through old
3rannen photographs, I
LICE happened upon
a picture of my
LIFE sweetheart and
me in front of a
huge poster depicting a
roulette wheel. The theme
of the Hernando High
School 1966 prom was "An
Evening in Las Vegas." It
was obvious the photo-
graph in question had been
taken at Cheryl's senior
prom. With my handy-
dandy magnifying glass, a la
Sherlock Holmes, I studied,


the corsage worn by the
love of my life on that spe-
cial night. Photographic ev-
idence prevailed and
revealed that the corsage
was indeed orchids - two
of 'em!
How did Cheryl's recol-
lection become skewed?
I'm not sure. Her theory is
that perhaps I'd teased her
about getting her roses in-
stead of an orchid, which
brewed a bit of jealousy
since she was aware that on
a previous occasion the girl
I'd escorted had an orchid.
What difference does it
make? Not much. But it was
nice to see that I had, in
fact, given Cheryl what
many consider to be the
world's most beautiful flow-
ers; and, it was nice to see
photographic forensids con-
firm once more that the or-
chids paled in comparison
to the girl.

Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist


FRED BRANNEN/Special to the Chronicle
Cheryl and Fred at the 1966 Hemando High School prom.


SK Chicken, musical
I S .2 . DISPAt l 2W , * ,


chairs andego


Letters to THE EDITOR


Thanks for the help
We wish to thank all the l5eople
who helped us in our time of need
due to our house burning down; it
was a complete loss. Thank you to
our neighbors and friends from
Crosbeck, Berrigan, Holiday and
Skylark; we especially want to thank
Vivian Camp for renting us a fur-
nished house for now. Fran had
worked with her at the Homosassa
Wildlife State Park She now man-
ages the subway in Crystal River.
I can't thank my beautiful neigh-
bors and friends enough: Tina and
B4b Maine, Janet Crosley, Ddhna
S and Rich Bassett, John ahd Cristy
Hecker and Sabnastia, Sam and
Mary Damon, and all the rest on the
block. I would also like to thank Deb-
bie and Jim McElhaney and girls for
all their help. Thanks also to Sara
Cutts, Cathy Urman, Martha and
Sam Schiedwll.
Our deepest thanks to Charles
Wesoloski and my granddaughter
Tawnya Turner and her friend
Melissa for trying to salvage what
they could, which was not a whole
lot. Thanks to our cousins from
Imach/Atlas Van Lines, Doug and
Jean Imlach, Ken and Lynn Imlach
froin Michigan; also, Greg and Jan-
ice Imlach from Irving, Texas.
-We especially want to thank the
quick response from the fire depart-
ment, police, fire marshal, EMS,
Citrus Memorial hospital, Red
Cross, U.S. Marines, Citrus County
Chronicle, Regions Bank of Ho-
mosassa, Rich from Daystar, Chris-
tine and Darlene from Anne
Johnson Center.
Our greatest thanks to Dr. Swan-'
son of Family Dentistry of Crystal
River and his staff and Jarimiah of
the Inverness Dental Lab for making
me, Fran, a bottom denture (to re-


place the one I lost in the fire).
Thanks to Dr. Sannon and staff of.
Beverly Hills, Diane Toto of the Ho-
mosassa civic center, the staff at the
property appraiser's office, the VA
staff and everyone else I might have
, forgotten - I know are many.
Again, our deepest thanks to all.
Frances Dunchock and Darlene Turner
Homosassa

Proud of CMHS
I have read with interest the re-
cent articles concerning the issue
. with the audit and evaluation of Cit-
rus Memorial hospital. Unfortu-
nately, a lot of the side issues revolve
around "politics" and old grudges
concerning the involved parties. If it
were only an issue of transparency,
I'm sure it wouldn't have received
the attention it has gotten .
However, one point I can reliably'
comment upon (versus the other par-
ticipants in the articles who are ei-
ther retired or are marginally
involved at CMHS) is the quality of
care in our little community hospital.
'I have practiced for over 25 years as
an attending surgeon in Chicago, Ill.,
and Green Bay, Wis.; communities
both considerably larger than Citrus
County. I am very impressed with the
care our citizens receive at Citrus
. Memorial. The staff is dedicated, car-
ing and they have excellent creden-
tials. For a nontertiary care center,
we provide top-notch cardiac, inter-
nal medicine, gynecological, ortho-
pedic and primary care. Speaking
firsthand, the surgical services are
top-notch with outcomes to prove it!
We are very up to date or surpass
most comparable facilities in laparo-
scopic and surgical technology
The politicians and those who cap-
italize on situations for secondary


gain can probably talk rings around
me; I'm just a practicing doctor in
the trenches daily, caring for the
people of our community. But the
disparaging remarks made with an-
ecdotal evidence, spoken as if they
are indisputable, must be addressed.
Surveys performed, sponsored by
CMHS, done by independent audi-
tors show a definite trend of im-
proved morale, outcomes and,
quality of care. The physical plant,
after years of neglect, is getting a
facelift, and the welfare of our citi-
zens is a foremost priority of the
staff and administration of CMHS. I
am proud to be associated with
CMHS and happy that the citizens of
Citrus have a facility they can de-
pend on to serve the needs profes-
sionally and up to date.
Michael H. Bernacki, M.D.
Hernando

Please recycle
My interest is in recycling. We live
in a wonderful part of the country._
Isn't there anything we can do to en-
courage the people in the city of In-
verness and Floral City to recycle?
In Miami they have recycle bins for
people to recycle. In Cocoa Beach
they issue three recycle bins for
newspaper, cans and plastic. They
set aside a special day to pick up
your recyclable waste.
I live in Floral City and they have
recycle dumpsters for your recy-
cling. It's amazing how much less
you have in garbage if you take the
time and effort in consolidating your
recyclable items. Our landfills are
full of recyclable waste. Let's get the
word out, "please recycle" and help
save our planet and landfills.
Sharron J. Gunn
Floral City


It is frustrating that as
soon as one campaign is
over another starts. For
instance, there is jockeying
in the Republican Party
among some governors who
did not make the cut last
time, a former congressman
from Ohio, and as always
some U.S. senators, as to
who will be the Republican
presidential nominee in
2012.
At this point it looks like it
does not make any differ-
ence, as 'Presi-
dent Obama is
still popular. .
.However, don't
forget that after
Gulf War I in Jan-
uary and Febru-
ary of, 1992,
George H. W
Bush's popular:
ity was in the 90 Lou
percent, range. . OT
No major Demo-
crat wanted to VOI
run against him,
as it appeared certain Bush
would be the winner An ob-
scure Arkansas governor
named Bill Clinton decided
to run and because of
Bush's perceived popularity
did not have any heavy-
weight primary opposition,
Bush managed to dissipate
nearly all his popularity and
Clinton won a relatively
easy victory in a three-per-
son race.
The jockeying has started
in many states around the
country, especially where
there is an open seat or the
incumbent appears vulner-
able. Florida, as usual, has
'its own brand of intrigue.
Gubernatorial candidate
Charlie Crist ran a perfect
race in 2006, running as a
moderate in the Republican
Primary, leaving Demo-
cratic candidate Jim Davis
no place to go when he re-
ceived the Democratic nom-
ination.
Crist had primary opposi-
tion from Tom Gallagher
who billed himself as the
conservative in the race.
When Gallagher's primary
challenge failed, Crist had
an easy general election.
Crist is trying to follow the
same path in setting up his
race for the Senate, i.e., in
2010, get everybody out of
the primary so he can run as
a moderate. For instance,
pressure has been put on
U.S. Rep. Connie Mack IV to
withdraw from the race.
Several other individuals
are looking to run, such as
the former speaker of the
Florida House Marco Rubio
from the Miami area.
Crist believes that in the
general election, Republi-



t
(


can )voters will have
nowhere else to go. The De-
mocrats are looking for at
least two more seats in the
Senate to take total control
of that body (60 is the key
number). Republicans will
rally around Crist, as the
last thing the conservative
Republicans in Florida
want to do is give President
Obama a free ride when it
comes to the nomination of
Supreme Court judges.
There are a number of
Democrats who
are talking about
running for the
Senate, but so far
no real heavy-
weight. U.S. Rep.
Kendrick Meeks
is the frontrunner
at the moment
and has. raised
Frey well over $1 mil-
IER lion. Potential,
Democratic can-a
CES didates are sitting
back to see where


Charlie Crist ends up.
The other key race in
Florida is the governor's
race. If Crist stays he will
have little Republican op-
position. The only Demo-
cratic Cabinet officer, Alex
Sink, who now plans to run
for governor, will pass or
may run for the Senate if
Crist stays where he is. It is
no secret that Attorney Gen-
eral Bill McCollum is inter-
ested in running for,
governor if Grist doesn't run.
It is extremely doubtful that
he will challenge Crist if
Crist runs for re-election.
Just recently Charlie
Bronson, secretary of Agri-
culture, who is term-limited
out, has announced that he
is looking at running for gov-
ernor if Crist doesn't
Lurking in the back-
ground is the 800-pound go-
rilla, former governor Jeb
Bush. He and Crist are not
close. Many insiders believe
that Rubio is supported by
Bush and will get out if Bush
decides to run. If Bush runs
for the Senate, Crist will run
for governor. If this sounds
like a Chinese crossword
puzzle, it is. Crist and Bush
are the two key players.
It is just another year of
Florida politics where mu-
sical chairs, chicken (who
blinks first) and whose ego
is the biggest, is involved.
-U

Lou Frey Jr served as a
Florida representative in
Congress from 1969-79. He
is a partner with Lowndes,
Drosdick, Doster, Kantor &
Reed, PA, Orlando; and
can be e-mailed at
lou.frey@lowndes-law.com.


HEROES
Continued from Page Cl

It was during the Great
Depression in the 1930s,
when Americans hungered
for someone to look up to,
that cartoon superheroes
Batman and Superman
were created, says Peter
French, a professor of phi-
losophy at Arizona State
University.
"Maybe we don't have any
grandiose heroes at the mo-


ment, but we have these
heroic things that individu-
als do, and so they gain a
certain amount of fame for a
short period of time,"
French said.
University of Southern
California 'professor Leo
Braudy, author of a book on
the history of fame called
"The Frenzy of Renown,"
said Americans distinguish
between celebrity and hero-
ism, and seize on the latter
"to reassure us about
human nature" in a time of
rampant cynicism.


The nation has plenty of
celebrities, said Braudy, but
"not all celebrities are he-
roes by any means."
Those who take heroic ac-
tion, Braudy says, "can be-
come an instant celebrity.
But there's something kind
of tinny about celebrity as a
concept."
Plenty of Americans have
filled the instant hero's role
in recent years.
In the horror of the Sept 11
attacks, Americans found a
hero in Todd Beamer, one of
the passengers who is be-


lived to have overwhelmed
the terrorists aboard United
Flight 93, perhaps averting
another attack on Washing-
ton. Beamer is remembered
for telling fellow passen-
gers, "Let's roll," after the
hijackers seized the air-
craft, which crashed in
Pennsylvania.
In some cases, American
heroes have been knocked
from their pedestals almost
as quickly as they were in-
stalled there, and not just
disgraced athletes.
Security guard Richard


Jewell was initially hailed
as a hero when he spotted a
suspicious backpack and
moved people out of harm's
way before the 1996
Olympic bombing in At-
lanta. But days later word
leaked that he was a "focus"
of the investigation, and
Jewell found himself under
siege. Jewell was cleared by
the FBI three months later,
and Attorney General Janet
Reno later apologized for
the leak that had kept him
under suspicion.
In 1986, President Reagan


called former White House
aide Oliver North a "national
hero" for his efforts to win
the release of U.S. hostages.
But by the next January,
when North had emerged
as the central figure in the
Iran-Contra scandal, Rea-
gan made no mention of he-
roes in his State of the
Union address.
"Heroes don't last very
long, and part of the prob-
lem is that when we start to
look at them more carefully,
we find reasons not to ad-
mire them," said French.


SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 C3


COMMENTARY


07Rus CouNTY (FL) E


IL


i







C4 SUNDAY. APRIL 19. 2009


COMMENTARY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Editor's note: The opinions and conclusions presented in Dr Dixon's column, Dr Berlew's guest column and the guest column from Dreama and Mark
Waldrop are those of the authors, not positions taken by the Citrus County Chronicle editorial board or information verified in Chronicle news stories.


Taxpayers should
C itrus Memorial is an are concerned. Most rely on Brooksvill
outstanding hospital. the hospital to care for pa- money for
The medical and tients who require admis- admission,
nursing staffs are highly sion for serious illnesses the large n
skilled and caring. Hospital and for major surgical pro- admissions
technology and facilities cedures. If CMHS services the actual
are "state of the art." But or facilities were to deteri- charity car
Citrus Memorial is losing orate as the result of finan- million an
money at an alarming rate. cial failures, staff less than ti
Since 2003 the hospital physicians would have to tax support
has received about $37 mil-, refer their patients to Another
lion from county taxpayers physicians at other hospi- out is the
to cover operational losses, tals. tively g
Projected losses for this fis- It is difficult to determine number o
cal year are $10 million to what is causing operational ployees i:
$12 million. In addition, losses. Even neighboring tient care
Citrus Memorial owes hospitals that might be administra
bondholders about $60 mil- used for comparison have CMHS in
lion and must pay down substantial differences in prison to
that debt. types of patients admitted, ally all
County citizens have a services.offered and hospi- neighboring
right to ask whether the tal ownership. But some pitals. Th
hospital (Citrus Memorial numbers stand out. pense
Health System) will be able CMHS admits more "Self- admission
to maintain its current level Pay" patients, many of much grea
of quality. Will it be able to whom have little ability to well. Is this
pay salaries for nurses and pay for their care. This is the losses
technologists? Will CMHS consistent with the hospi- number of
be able to afford new tech- tal's role in providing char- essary?
nologies as they come ity. However, the numbers Lastly, C
along? How much more, in are proportionately greater its services
the way of property taxes, than at Brooksville Re- time period
will the hospital need to gional, which provides were susta
continue its services? most of the charity care for heart unit
Physicians in the county Hernando County. And brought mu


demand


e collects more
each "Self-Pay"
. Why? Despite
lumbers of these
s, CMHS reports
cost of providing
re at less than $2
nually. This is far
he $12 million in
t they receive.
stand-
Srela-
reater
f em-
n pa-
and in
tion at
com-
virtu-
other
ng hos- 'Dr. WilliE
e ex- OTI
per
is VOI
water as
s what is driving
? Is the larger
employees nec-
,MHS expanded
rapidly over the
)d when losses
gained. The new
was costly but
ich-desired serv-


a
iH



scrutiny


ices to the county. It is said governor) provide the pri-
to be profitable. What about vate Hospital Foundation
the hospital-owned physi- Board is effective. More is
cian practices and outpa- needed.
tient diagnostic facilities? An outside consultant not
Is it certain that they are paid by and beholden to the
profitable as well? hospital is needed to exam-
Hospitals around the ine each and every compo-
country have found owner- nent of CMHS. Which parts
ship of physician practices of the business are prof-
a losing enter- itable and should be sup-
prise, and they ported? Which should be
have abandoned eliminated? Are there
that business problems with billing and
model. CMHS collections? Howv many em-
persists, and it ployees are needed in pa-
costs them some tient care and how many in
goodwill. A sig- administration? Does the
nificant number management structure fit
of local physi- the mission? Are salaries
im Dixon cians resent the and benefits appropriate?
lER fact that the hos- CMHS has engaged legal
IER pital uses its tax- counsel to "manage" the
CES exempt status audit. It is said they hired a
and money the PR firm to counter adverse
physicians paid in property publicity. These are poor
taxes to pay the salaries of uses of taxpayer money.
their competitors. , The business-as-usual
CMHS will undergo a, approach the hospital and
state audit to examine foundation board seem to
where the tax money it re- have adopted for turning
ceives is being spent and to around the losses may not
determine whether the. be effective. As taxpayers
oversight the five hospital who will pay for hospital
trustees (appointed by the losses, we have the right to


ol


MICHAEL E. BERLOW.
Special to the Chronicle


I am a member of the active medical staff
practicing at Citrus Memorial hospital.
I have listened to various discussions,
and read with interest and curiosity the re-
cent articles and op-ed pieces in the Citrus
County Chronicle over the past several
weeks debating and alleging improprieties
with the operations at Citrus Memorial.
My interest and concerns are based upon
my experience of over 25 years of clinical
practice in Diagnostic Imaging, much of
which has included leadership positions at
my practices as well as within medical
staffs and various professional society or-
ganizations. This includes private and pub-
lic institutions such as the Cleveland Clinic
Foundation.
SOver the past two years, I have served as
the Medical Director of Diagnostic Imaging
at the hospital. My partners and I maintain
a private practice centered at the hospital.
One important misrepresentation in the
original article suggests that a substantial
number of our medical community is in
support of raising these concerns. How-
ever, I am not aware of any formal discus-
sions at a medical staff meeting, or a
specific polling of the membership to form
an opinion. There are many personal in-
terests and agendas that present them-
selves between the lines and words that
are written in these articles.
We as physicians are all concerned with
our practices and the ever-increasing dif-
ficulties in managing our own fiscal affairs.
Some approaches to support our practices
are seen now as competitive with hospital
initiatives, particularly in the delivery of
outpatient care and services, and we may
feel threatened by this. While this is un-
derstandable, it does not mean the hospital
has acted wrongly in pursuing its public
mission to deliver superior care and access
to care to all the citizens of Citrus County
regardless of financial means, and whether
they live a block from the hospital or 15
miles away. This would include the devel-
opment of a new clinical satellite in Ho-
mosassa. One caveat I learned as an MBA
student is that competition is not neces-
sarily a "bad thing" if it creates opportunity
and fosters a higher standard of whatever
business it involves.
A second important misconception is the
suggestion that the standard of excellent
care at the hospital, as well as employee
morale, has deteriorated. Some of the com-
ments published quote physicians who
have little if any clinical practice interac-
tion at Citrus Memorial. What evidence ex-
ists to validate these contentions, and these
individuals should have produced specific


Great job
I am calling in response to the Sound Off
"Shelter shines." I, too, have been very im-
pressed and pleased with the caring and
kindness shown by the people who
care for the dogs at the animal shel- fr
ter. This is a very difficult job and 0
the love they show these'stray or
abandoned dogs is very heartwarm-
ing. They are very overwhelmed and
could use more support in all ways,
by volunteering, financial support or
an encouraging word and a "thank
you" for the great job they do.
Bus us, too CAL
How can a six-month pilot pro- 563-
gram for a fixed bus route be effi-
cient when only covering part of
the county? The west side of (County
Road) 491 includes a mall, restaurants, a
Walmart, as well as the Wildlife Attraction.
Let's stimulate our economy. People on the
west side of the county need fixed bus
routes, too. It's discriminating,


(


supportive documentation (not anecdotal)
before such comes to publication.
Furthermore, such quality data is main-
tained by various third-party organiza-
tions, as well as the Florida Department of
Health, and is public record, and I know of
no such support of this contention.
I invite all readers of the Chronicle to do
their own due diligence in this regard. I
have little doubt as to the positive outcome.
My personal perspective on the quality
of care is quite different My standard of
comparison is the likes of the Cleveland
Clinic where I acted as Chairman of a Di-
agnostic Radiology department at a much
larger public hospital. Since I commenced
practice at Citrus, the hospital has pro-
vided tremendous support to upgrade the
standards of practice, including the pur-
chase of new equipment and technology, at
our hospital campus as well as our other
imaging facilities in the Medical Office
building near the hospital, and at the Allen
Ridge Health campus on the west side of
the county.
We have achieved American College of
Radiology certification of all our examina-
tions and procedures across all our sites as
well, which never would have been possi-
ble without the hard work and support of
the hospital. I believe ,our staff morale is
high, and we have had very minimal
turnover despite many changes and transi-
tions as we have developed many new
processes and standards in the pursuit of
excellence.
I believe the public's trust has not been
violated and as a taxpayer, I can sleep
nights without any such concerns. While
everyone is entitled to have a perspective
and opinion, and things are 'never perfect,
I have confidence in our hospital leader-
ship and its dedicated staff. I can attest by
experience, having worked with many hos-
pitals over the years. I see this every day
on a first-hand basis.
What my friends and neighbors in Citrus
County should know is that the hospital is
being fiscally prudent and protecting the
public's interest to remain competitive and
deliver and provide access to superior care,
24 hours a day, 365 days a year, wealthy or
indigent, to all reaches of the county.
I am proud to live and practice here, and
I am sorry that perhaps as this has played
out in the newspaper rather than through
discussion by reasonable parties, it has
cast a negative public opinion on a fine
group of hard-working and dedicated med-
ical professionals in the community.

Michael E. Berlow, M.D., FACR, MBA,
is Medical Director, Department of
Diagnostic Imaging, at Citrus Memorial.


Rude, uncaring
I'm calling because I'm really upset about
the letter that was put in your Sound Off
about the buyers for steers in the Citrus
County Fair. My children have been
IN D in the fair for many years now. I
NDJ have three that show pigs, I have a
niece who shows a steer, and I find
that that letter that was sent to the
buyers and done in your Sound Off
was extremely rude and uncaring.
These people have worked very
hard to do what they do, and not for
the money. My children do make a
little bit of money, but it's not a lot
579 w of money and what they do make,
579 they put into next year's project. It's
a great learning experience and r
found that it was very appalling to
hear that this was sent. I have people who
come to do the buying for my children and
other people. They have to go around and
ask for them, but I don't imagine that there
will be a lot of buyers next year after the rude
comments that were made.


Citrus Memorial is


hurting local businesses


DREAMA WALDROP
AND MARK WALDROP
Special to the Chronicle
The actions of Citrus Me-
morial Health Systems
(CMHS) are directly impact-
ing the local privately
owned health care profes-
sionals in Citrus County.
How is CMHS allowed to
expand and compete with
private entities while the
owners of these very enti-
ties are supporting CMHS
with their tax dollars?
We have owned and oper-
ated an outpatient therapy
business in Citrus County
since 1996. Two years ago,
Citrus Memorial hospital
decided to expand the hos-
pital services into outpa-
tient physical therapy by
purchasing a local privately
held therapy company at a
substantial price. We won-
der how they were able to
make such a sizable pur-
chase while losing hun-
dreds of thousands of
dollars each year.
Where is the money com-
ing from and why isn't
CMHS required to be ac-
countable for meeting their
budgets and spending our
tax dollars wisely? In the
real business world, your
revenue must exceed your


expenses or, over time, you
will go out of business.'
What message does it send
to private business owners
who must run an efficient
operation when an entity
such as CMHS can lose
money, not run an efficient
operation and simply make
up their shortfalls with tax
payer dollars?
We certainly support
CMHS's mission to provide
care to those individuals
who cannot afford it and we
even support the taxes we
pay to make this possible,
but we do not support pay-
ing taxes that fund this or-
ganization's ability to build
new facilities and compete
with the private sector
when there are already ad-
equate services available.
CMHS has over time posi-
tioned its physical therapy
offices to be in direct com-
petition with us as well as
other privately held therapy
groups within Citrus County.
We are fine with fair compe-
tition; but now that they are
building a new state-of-the-
art health complex 'near
Sugarmill Woods, we have
to wonder, what objective
analysis was performed to
justify the need to build this
complex using our tax payer
dollars. The health care


complex will provide diag-
nostic testing, physical ther-
apy and .physician office,
once again, using taxpayer
dollars to compete with pri-
vate practices, including an-
other recently completed,
state-of-the-art medical
complex offering similar
services within walking dig-
tance of CMHS's new facil-
ity as well as our clinic, TLC
Rehab. i
Most private health care
providers have supported
CMHS over the years, send-
ing patients and. family
members 'there for a vast
array of care from diagnos-
tics to surgical intervention,
to name a few. Fbr CMHS to
state it has not been properly
supported by the medical
community appears to be ali
unsubstantiated statements
We, as business owners,
have to work harder .arid
smarter every day to maii-
tain our existing business,
meet budget, control e4-
penses and keep the loyalty
of our employees and pq-
tients. We have to wonder
why CMHS is not held to th
same standards.

Dreama and Mark Waldrol
are owners of TLC Rehal
Inc., Homosassa.


-------- - - ---------------------------------------------------__________ I
Letters to THE EDITOR
Right steps ing the river access points into the lakes
should be busy deepening, widening and,
I believe that Commission Chairman clearing the two main feeders to our lakes
John Thrumston deserves a lot of credit from the Withlacoochee and the Green 4
for his work in getting our county $10 mil- Swamp, the Leslie Heffner and Orange
lion from D&T as part of the federal stim- State. Those two small obstructed, mud-;
ulus plan. We all know that good roads to filled, overbuilt waterways cannot handle
travel on are a must in our lives in Citrus. a major input of water that would result'
We have such a diverse mix of shopping, from a storm or heavy rain season. ru
restaurants, attractions and public recre- I have not heard any reports (public) r.-
ation available here that the need to travel guarding the relatively new Waterways
across the county is a necessity to enjoy Restoration Council; however, I do be-
and appreciate the good of Citrus County. lieve they are meeting periodical . .
The new board of commissioners, under Perhaps county commissioners need to0
the lead of Thrumston, is making obvious have input from this group and a little :",
and commendable inroads toward im- oversight of what they are doing. We, the. ,
proving not only the roads we travel, but citizens and lakefront, canal front property
in protecting the quality of our lives. owners deserve some answers regarding
There has been far too much negativism the health of the East Citrus Waterways. 4
toward the board lately, but if we stop to
look and listen we will see a good future. Jim Adki
Although it has been six months since Inverne
they promised us on our trip to the Flying Just say no
Eagle wildlife area, I understand from Just Say no
the Southwest Florida Water Manage- (Arecent) letter from Suzan Franks,
ment District that the fix of the sinkholes "ue a shock," was quite an eye opene
in Morrison Pool are under way with the "Quite a shock," was quite an eye openert
placement of a water/sediment barrier athe I have called Tallahassee and register .
the trestle over the inlet to the pool from my complaint by saying no to Progress En
the trestle over the inlet to the pool from ergy's request for another price hike, and,
Little Lake Henderson. Then, as the also registered for my husband.
water level drops, work on the sinkhole Come on, people, let's really help get nd
berms should begin. Our waterways in the word out The number to call is (850)
east Citrus are in a deplorable state. Pri- 413-6038;-leave a message for PSC Com- \
mary reason: no rain. No agency or gov- .
ernment can fix that But, while we wait missioner Nancy Argenziano.
on divine intervention to get water into June Ashton Clarf
the lakes, those responsible for maintain- Hold r

I five men should stay home couldn't do worse th4h
and send their wives to the their husbands.
commission chambers for
Continued from Page C1 a day of decision-making.
And smiling. Gerry Mulligan is
missioners would make Citrus County has run the publisher of the '\
better decisions than their, through five county admin- Chronicle. His e-mail l
husbands. Maybe just one istrators in the last five address isgmulligan@
meeting each quarter the years. The wives certainly chronicleonline.com.


/


CMHS is protecting


the public's interest


f CMHS
demand a complete non-bi-
ased evaluation of CMHS to
return the hospital to via-
bility.
Disclaimer- Dr. Dixon has
no financial interest in any
medical practice or related
medical facility that com-
petes with CMHS. He is an
emeritus member of the
Florida Wellcare Alliance,
LLC, an organization com-
prising 90 physicians and
which does not own or man-
age medical facilities: '

(,
William Dixon graduated
from Columbia College in
New York City from New
York Medical College and
. from the College ofBusi-
ness Administration at the
University of South
Florida. He was an assis;,
tant professor at the Uni-,
versity of Georgia and hq
has worked in the veterans
administration system. He
served 11 years in the Army
as a surgeon and as speciAl
forces officer, achieving te
rank of lieutenant colonel.
Dr Dixon can be reached
at Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


I








'CITRIJS COUNIY (FL) CHRONICLE COMMENTARY SUNDAY APRIL 19, 2009 C5


Sad attempt
.' I'm looking in Monday's
paper about this Citrus
County Transit, I'm looking
.t that bus. I tell you it
4oks like it's a sad attempt
Oat a public transport sys-
tem. From what it looks like,
it might only fit about 16
people on the bus. If they
-paid $2.50 to ride it all day,
you're only looking at a $40
-take on the bus for the peo-
vple to ride it all day. Now it's
'going to run more than 12
hours a day, 12 hours and
:40 minutes. They're going
,to burn more than that $40
,in gas, I feel, because it
looks like a gas hog. Once
'-you figure in what it's going
-to (cost) to pay for the bus
driver, the maintenance guy,
the maintenance supplies
on the bus, we're already in
the hole. That's a sad at-
tempt at a transit system.
Decking the walls
As everybody knows,
times are hard and, you
know, if you're lucky enough
to have a job, you know,
you'ree lucky. I have one
workingg for a nursing home
.\. and my hours have been
'dut severely, they claim be-
'cause of no money. Yet the
patient census is up and
With no other explanations,
We just lost personnel and
lost wages and hours. But I
notice that the administra-
tor saw fit to spend thou-
sands of dollars on new
-'pictures to put on the walls.
Doggone
To the man who wrote in
about the dog, he said "Sur-
Srising lessons": It would
ave taken him less time to
call the Chronicle and place
-a free ad, that he had found
-.hat little black pug, than it


17
L C CAEFUL-f
THESE ARE
LMIMYST- INFESTEP
WATER !


took him to write this long
story for letters to the edi-
tor. People need to learn
that somebody is looking for
this dog.
On the way
I watched a program on
television last night about
"Che" Guevara and Fidel
Castro taking over Cuba
with their leftwing policies.
My husband and I both
looked at each other and
said, "Boy, doesn't that par-
allel your President Obama
and his buddy Rahm Em-
manuel?" My friends,
whether you realize it or
not, you are on the way to a
socialist government. I hope
you're happy with the
change.


Keeping us safe
This is a message to the
person who called in to
Sound Off a couple
of days ago and 0
said that the Citrus
County sheriff's
(deputies) are gun
crazy now, that
they're just shoot-
ing everybody with-
out trying to take
them alive. This CAL.
guy that they got
from Dunnellon 563-
there, shooting at a
school bus and po-
lice cars, I suppose you ex-
pected them to pull him off
to the side and talk him out
when the guy was shooting
a gun as fast as he can


I


shoot it at the people and
at school buses and at offi-
cers' cars. Sol I think you-
need to think before you
make a statement
LND like that again,
LO 'that what is the


r o
thin
ple
cou
and
ger


0 1�


57j9 TI
to t
and
Call List, the
needs help. I
cess to the c
can go to do
which takes i


or you can-call a number
which is (888) CALLFCC,
which is actually (888) 225-
5322. That's your other op-
tion.
Abuse of power


st important Talk about elected offi-
ig for the peo- cials abusing power. An-
involved, the other local example: The
rity involved mayor of Crystal River is
potential dan- getting an exemption on his
. house when he's publicly
Options declared in meetings of
council that his residence
his is in regards is his yacht. Now he says
today's paper it's nobody's business
the Do Not where he sleeps. So we ll
person that just drop it and nothing fur-
f you have ac- their is said or done. He has
computer, you demonized his accuser, and
notcall.gov, we all drop it. Are we afraid
up to 30 days, of him?


Geezers on water
I'm 72 years old. I may
be considered an old geezer
by some. But I myself don't
worry so much about old
geezer drivers as I do the
old geezer boaters.
Go to Gallery
This is for the person who
called in referring about the
movie, "The Wrestler," with
Mickey Rourke. It was a low-
budget movie. Therefore, it
will not be out here, only
New York and California.
Check out the Movie Gallery
and I'm sure you can rent
the video, because it is out.
Well watered
To the person who wrote
in and said they planted
,bahia grass and they don't
have to water it because it
turns brown and then a little
bit of water brings it up:
That's true to a point, but
all grass needs some form
of moisture to survive. If
you don't water bahia for-
ever, it's going to die. But
her comment was that peo-
ple should have this type of
grass. She said, "So what's
more important, a beautiful
lawn or a drink of water?"
Well, I water my lawn with a
well and I don't drink well
water because it's not safe.
So I have a nice-looking
lawn and I also have a glass
of water. So not everybody
has the same problem she
does.
Who's there?
I'm an honest, law-abid-
ing citizen of Citrus County
in, my personal andcbusi-
ness life, yet all my phone
conversations are being lis-
tened in on. Is anyone else
experiencing this problem?
If so, please call Sound Off.


jkm


h^Mw'rH^^B


SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 C5


\CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COMMENTARY


.u







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B Section C - SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009



BUSINESS
T-- CIT


UNTY CHRONICLE


Drinkers save money
EMILY FREDRIX
Associated Press
food industry writer


Thinking of getting wine to drink at
home but don't want to spend a lot of
money? It's possible to get an inex-
pensive bottle of wine - say $10 or
less - and still have one that tastes
good, says Phil Bilodeau, owner of
Thief Wine bar and shop in Milwau-
kee.
Here are some tips:


by taking it home


BIMILWAUKEE -
ad economy or not, Marty Stogsdill still likes
his scotch
But the 26-year-old computer consultant is more
apt to enjoy it at his condo with friends than in a bar
these days. Going out, he pays $10 to $18 for a glass
of scotch At home? He can buy a bottle for $35 to
$50.
"You're not really giving anything up," he said.
"You're( i~gLu.tg out the markup, essentially"
A grow~ number of consumers are spurning
drinki restaurants and bars to save money.
They're so choosing less expensive beer, wine
and liq r to take home. Some are even trading
down m wine and spirits to beer, which typi-
cally) ts less,
St dill says when he does go out in Milwau-
kee, s only tb happy hours and often for cheaper
bee - anything to cut his drinking budget.
S es of liquor, wine and beer meant to be con-
su d at home are now expected to rise 4.8 per-
ed this year to $79 billion, according to Mintel
I national Grqup. The Chicago-based research
recently had to revise its 2009 forecast to
ep up with how quickly people are changing
.ir behavior.
Mintel expects this to be the first year since at
ast 2003 that Americans cut their spending on al-
hol in bars and restaurants. Alcohol sales in
ars and restaurants are forecast to drop 1.2 per-
ent. to $54.2 billion.
So it's not that we're drinking any less; spending
th| r


i~.
A
~


* Ask your local wine store for
help. The employees have likely tried
everything and can make recommen-
dati ns based on your previous pur-


during the reces-
sion is just shift- i
ing to stores. 4 .'
Already in the 12
months ending
in February.
Americans
spent 7.2 per-
cent more on
wine at food,
drug and mass-
merchandise
stores than
they did in
the same pe-
riod a year Thief Win ecO wnea
earlier, ac- in Milwae co.wne.rs Phil BI 1
cording to u.aue. A growing Modau aCn
Nielsen restaurants and bars to save money.
When people social-
ize at home, not only is there no one to tip,
there's also no bar or restaurant mark-up. Having
even one glass of wine at a bar can cost as much as
a whole bottle to take home - especially as peo-
ple have gravitated to buying less-expensive
wines.
Not to suggest that bars and restaurants are
empty But customers aren't spending like they
used to.
Nick Terpolilli, a 30-year-old bartender in
Chicago, said people are now asking him more
often how big their bar tab is getting and are set-
ting lower limits for themselves.
"They're more likely to have just a couple of


'
U


See CHEERS/Page D3


chases or ask you questions to figure
out what you'd like.
* Don't be afraid to try new regions
and varietals. Look for lesser-known
ones, since they can offer good value
because there's no premium on their
reputation.
* Try wines from Spain, Portugal
and South America. Those areas
have hot wines for low prices, such as
Mallbcs from Argentina and
Grenache from Spain.
* Avoid wines from Califomia and


Australia if you want to spend less
than $10 a bottle. For the most part,
wines at that price can taste mass-
produced.
* Newer is better when it comes to
cheaper wine, and be sure to drink
them while the fruit is still fresh. Inex-
pensive wines are not meant to age.
They come from larger areas, so cli-
mate conditions have less of an ef-
fect, and bottles from year to year will
taste similar.
-From wire reporls


. .


Disaster prep doesn't have


to be an overwhelming task


NEW YORK -
The harsh
weather of
spring, including
hard rains, flood-
ing and torna-
does, has already
hit parts of the
Midwest and the
South. It's a re-
minder to small
business owners
everywhere that
they need to be


Joyce Rosenberg
SMALL TALK


ready when disaster strikes.
Preparing for disaster
might not seem like a prior-
ity to a company owner
who's trying to bring in sales
and cut costs during the re-
cession. But the kind of
planning that goes into mit-
igating the impact of a dis-
aster can also help your
company's operations when
all is well.
Donna Childs, whose fi-
nancial services firm was
dislocated by the attacks on
the World Trade Center in
2001, said disaster planning
is often neglected since
"most small business own-
ers feel overwhelmed be-
cause they see disaster
preparation as a huge task"
A disaster doesn't have to
be an extraordinary event
wrought by nature - fires
and vandalism can disrupt a
business as much as the
weather can. And it doesn't
have to damage or destroy


your premises; a
road that washes
out and prevents
you from getting
to your building
can do plenty of
harm to your
sales and profits.
The way to
ease disaster
prep anxiety and
get the job done
is to break it
down into man-


ageable components and
tackle them one by one: pro-
tecting your
data, creating Editor's n
a backup f ito c
communica- firstoftwo col
tions net- businesses ae
work, setting Next week: Ho
up an alter- panles recover
native power esters,
supply.
Childs, who has written
"Prepare for the Worst, Plan
for the Best," a guide to dis-
aster planning for small
business, noted that many of
the problems that occur in a
disaster are also ones that
could happen in the best of
times. For example, she
said, "a power outage can
happen on a standalone
basis, but it commonly fol-
lows a major disaster like a
hurricane."
So, if your company has
backup generators to help it
through summer brownouts,
it can also keep running if a


hurricane or tornado
knocks out power.
Childs said she had done
disaster planning for her
company, Childs Capital
LLC, before the 9/11 attacks.
She was ready to relocate
because she had thought
about the possibility of a fire
in the subway station near
her office that conceivably
could have prevented her
from entering her premises.
"The plan I put in place
addressed that but it helped
us to get through something
unimagin-
te: This i the able," she
said.
minsonsmell Similarly,
d disasters. every com-
w some corn- pany should
ed from dis- be thinking
about back-
ing up its
data for the most mundane
reasons: an employee acci-
dentally deletes an impor-
tant file or a hard drive
crashes and the data cannot
be salvaged. Having an off-
site data backup and recov-
ery system is a good way to
be sure your data is retriev-
able, and this will also make
it easier for a company to
keep operating after a dis-
aster.
Companies that are serv-
ice providers and don't need
to rely on stationary equip-

See SMALL/Page D3


o
I'
1
U


Opportunity abounds in

battered REIT market


BOSTON -
When a sea-
soned real es-
tate investor like
Ross Meredith
admits to being
scared, you
know it's time to
do your home-
work before
leaping back
into a battered
market.
Meredith, a
63-year-old re-


tired bank examiner from
Salt Lake City, has traded
shares of real estate in-
vestment trusts for more
than three decades. REITs
are companies that own,
and often operate, income-
producing real estate. If
you own REIT shares, you
can buy into the commer-
cial real estate market,
without worrying about
keeping tenants or wheel-
ing and dealing in huge
sums like Donald Trump.
Meredith is a self-de-
scribed "dividend-aholic"
who relies on REITs' quar-
terly payouts to supple-
ment retirement savings
and earn spending money
for travel. After all, REITs
are mostly about divi-
dends. To escape corpo-
rate taxes, REITs must
distribute at least 90 per-
cent of their taxable in-
come to shareholders each
year.


Meredith was
savvy enough to
scale back his
REIT holdings
in 2006 when he
saw property
values and
REIT share
prices continue
rising even as
the industry
took on too
much debt.
Now, with
commercial


real estate teetering, the
good times are long gone.
Real estate mutual funds,
which mostly hold REITs,
have been the worst per-
forming domestic stock
fund category of late.
They're down more than 50
percent over the past 12
months, including 15 per-
cent year-to-date, accord-
ing to Morningstar Inc.
Real estate funds are mid-
dle-of-the-road based on
five-year performance,
with an average annual
loss of 3.9 percent.
But these days, Meredith
mostly likes what he sees
in REITs - even if he finds
it "terrifying" to try sorting
those mostly likely to re-
bound from the ones that
will continue foundering.
"The prices of some
pretty well-run companies
have dropped signifi-
See MUTUAL/Page D5


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Owners.


in title


bout
EAR BRUCE:
About 20 years ago,
I bought a piece of
property with a problem.
The previous owners did
not get title insurance,
and it seems as if the man
they bought it from wag
granted ownership to it il-
legally. A title insurance
company insured it for the
purchase price, but I was
advised to upgrade it Did
I screw up? I am desper-
ate as this has caused a
fight between my husband
and me. - Reader, via e-
mail
DEAR READER: A�
long as you are able to
cover it with title insur-
ance, your interests are
protected. However, the
company may be charging
you a premium because
there is this problem: Why
not hire an attorney tQ
have the title cleared?
The problems that you
have outlined in your let-
ter are not insurmount,
able, although there will
be some costs involved"
Since you have no reason
to sell the property now,
this would be the- appro-
priate time to get the title
straightened out. There is
no reason for you and
your husband to squabble
over this.
DEAR BRUCE: Could
you please tell me how
much money one person
can give another person
in a year without having to
pay taxes? Do the people
exchanging money have to
be related? My mother
would like to give a gift to
each one of her children
but doesn't know how
much she can give without
anyone having to pay
taxes. - S.T, Arizona
DEAR S.T.: Not to
worry. Your mom can give
$13,000 to anyone she
chooses in any one year.
Relationship is not a fac-
tor. If you or your siblings
are married, she can also
gift them up to the $13,000
limit If you have children,
she can gift them, too.
DEAR BRUCE: I know
that you have stated many
times that you prefer a 30-
year mortgage to a 15.
Could you explain to me
why? I am currently set-
ting up to refinance and
am planning on going with
a 15-year term to save
about $82,000 in interest.
- Reader, via e-mail
DEAR READER: Ordi-
narily, unless there is a
very significant difference.;.
in the interest rate, I pre-
fer the 30-year because
you are getting cheap
money. And I would bQor
row as much as I could
and invest it as a compen-:
sating balance against the
mortgage. The reason thli
you are "saving" so much
money on the 15-year
mortgage is that you have
use of their money for a
significantly shorter pe.
riod of time. This is fine if.
the money is costly money,
but the cheap money, uni
less you are into your 60s,
should be reinvested else-
where.
DEAR BRUCE: Can youi
tell me what a viatical is? I
see them mentioned occa-
sionally and have no idea
what they are. - Reade,
via e-mail
DEAR READER: Viati-
cals are a system whereby
a terminally ill person
with life insurance can
collect on the policy be-
See MONEY/Page D3
.;, .- -., ..,: . o-_. = .,.- _ ** - -,-._;-.. rf,


Ways to spend less on wine to drink at home


Mark Jewell
OF MUTUAL
INTEREST





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


D2 SUNDAY , APRIL 19, 2009


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SMALL
Continued from Page D1

ment in a specific location
probably will have the easi-
est time with disaster
preparation. Laptop com-
puters and
smart phones Many (
equipped for
Internet ac- address
cess allow
business prepa
owners and premi
their employ- P
ees to take hurric
the company
with them. tornado
They can stay
in touch with Other d
each other S
and with cus- so OU
tomers and, to mitig
depending
on the kind dama!
of work they
do, keep might
their opera-
tions going.
Childs said the benefits
of disaster preparation go
beyond ensuring that a
company can get back to
work quickly if the worst
happens.
She said owners could
use their plans as a selling
point with potential cus-
tomers who want to be sure
they won't suffer if disaster
strikes. This is particularly
important for companies
with far-flung clients or cus-
tomers.
"To the extent you can
show you have a disaster
plan in place, you'll be
more competitive to win
their business," she said.


O


r
f



0
i

I
94


BUSINESS


Another way to make dis-
aster planning easier is to
put together a checklist of
what you need to do, decide
which items are a priority
and start addressing them,
delegating as much as you
can to employees (for exam-
ple, creating and maintain-
ing a contact
f these list that will
let you know
how to how to reach
your staff
e your and cus-
5es for tomers).
If you're
anes, not sure what
should be on
es and that list,
there are dis-
sasters aster-plan-
try ning books,
can iry and the In-
ate the ternet also
has re-


ge that sources.
Many of
occur. these ad-
dress how to
prepare your premises for
hurricanes, tornadoes and
other disasters so you can
try to mitigate the damage
that might occur.
The Institute for Business
& Home Safety has a check-
list on its Web site, www.dis-
astersafety.org, and the
federal government also has
guides at
www.ready.gov/business,
and the Small Business Ad-
ministration Web site,
www.sba.gov/beawareand-
prepare/business.html.
Insurance brokers can
also be a resource, and so
can other small business
owners in your area or in
your line of work.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

die by having an investor put up to 60
percent of the money to be paid by
the insurance company upon their
death. The investor then becomes
the beneficiary of the policy and pays
the premiums. Upon the death of the
insured, they receive their money
back plus their profit. Viaticals cer-
tainly have a very important place in
our spectrum of financial vehicles.
For anyone looking to get a viatical,
be very careful and do your home-
work Unfortunately, this has been in-
vaded by scoundrels, and it's very
important to know who you are deal-
ing with before you become involved.
DEAR BRUCE: Our son is 30 and
will soon be married for the second
time. Later on in life he is going to in-
herit a substantial amount of money
We want to protect him if something
goes wrong with his second marriage.
We have talked to him about getting a
prenuptial agreement to protect him-
self and his inheritance. However,
his wife-to-be is offended by this no-
tion. If he does get a prenup, and they
have children, will this affect or can-
cel the agreement? - Worried par-
ents, via e-mail
DEAR WORRIED: If the bride-to-
be will not agree to this, then your
son will have to decide whether he
wants to go through with the wed-
ding. You mentioned that he will in-
herit a great deal of money, which I
assume is from you. You can always
control the inheritance by putting
that into a trust fund where he is the
beneficiary or some other arrange-
ment. Whether this is a reasonable
request is open to conjecture.
DEAR BRUCE: I have been dating
my girlfriend for eight months now.
We are in our mid 20s. We do not live
together, but she has decided that she


Given that set of
conditions, unless you
have very substantial
funds, it would seem
to me that the
less speculative
investments would be
more appropriate and
certainly easier to go
to bed with.

wants to open a joint account to put
our money in. I am not comfortable
with this at all. How do I tell her that
I don't think this is a good idea with-
out getting her upset? -ET. Nevada
DEAR PT.: You've got to be kid-
ding? You are 100 percent correct.
You shouldn't be co-mingling your
money with someone you are not
married to, let alone an acquain-
tance of eight months. It would be a
very, very foolish idea and if you
want to blame not doing it on me, feel
free.
DEARl BRUCE: I received an e-
mail that claimed they could elimi-
nate anyone's bad credit by ordering
a book through their company, guar-
anteed. Is this possible? - Reader,
via e-mail
DEAR READER: With so many
people losing their jobs during these
rough times, there are going to be
scam artists out there looking for
someone like you. There is a good
reason for credit information to be
available to credit grantors, and
there is no way that all items can be
eliminated legally All these guys are
going to do is to sell you a book with
all kinds of promises but very short
on delivery. Save your money.


SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 D3

DEAR BRUCE: My husband's step-
brother passed, away and we'reN- t
sure if he left anything to my 4l-
band and his sister. His half-brotlps
are not saying a word. We know-e
had substantial life insurance nd
about $100,000 in a 401(k). How do wb
find out if there was a will and whit
it says? - Reader, via e-mail 0
DEAR READER.: You can inquiry
of the county Surrogate Court where
the decedent passed away. If a will
was filed, it is a public document. It
no will has been filed, he will have
been deemed to have died in,the
laws of intestacy, and whether ybur
husband would come into that as'ix6
heir is something that I can't tell yMn.
However, a quick check with anf at-
torney in your state can answer thit
one.
DEAR BRUCE: Is your investment
advice the same in general for serin
iors and non-seniors? We are 76 N2
70 with three children and 10 grai$-
children. - M.R., via e-mail -
DEAR M.R.: The older one
the more conservative one tend&
be, and with some good reason.
30-year-old can weather a buft
road in the market since he
plenty of time to recover, especiul
with what our economy has beti
doing of late. One who is long in years
doesn't have that privilege. Give
that set of conditions, unless yowu
have very substantial funds, it would&
seem to me that the less speculative,
investments would be more appre-
priate and certainly easier to gbojb
bed with. "o

Send your questions to: Smart.
Money, PO. Box 2095, Elfers, EL",
34680. E-mail to: bruce@bruce Wi
liams.com. Questions ofgeneral Hi-
terest will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volumeaq
mail, personal replies cannot be.
provided.


CHEERS
Continued irorr Page Dl

rounds of drinks, ask about
specials. what's the cheap-
est beer:" said Terpolilli.
who himself is spending
more time at home parties
socializing with friends,
rather than going out.
David Duncan also finds
himself drinking more at
home, among other meas-
ures to trim his budget The
56-year-old from Portland.
Ore., is bidding "adieu' to
French red wines and say-
ing 'hello' to domestic opes.
He's aiso replacing some of
his wtlle caisum filn with
craft beers; sayingthere are
plenty of delicious deals to
be had there.
"I'm definitely looking
for, I wouldn't call it bar-
gains - I still like a good
bottle of wine - but for
deals," Duncan said as he
shopped the aisles of local
grocer Fred Meyer, where
he picked up a bottle of
wine along with a few es-
sentials.
Phil Bilodeau, the owner
of Thief Wine store and bar
in Milwaukee, is spending
plenty of time these days
helping customers looking
for wine to take home.
Chris VanMeter, a 51-
year-old who stops in regu-
larly for wine to drink at
home with his wife, happily
left with two Spanish wines
Bilodeau suggested, each
about $10.
"I'm getting good wine for
this price point, rather than
guessing," he said.
While Bilodeau says sales
at the bar portion of his
business are holding steady
- especially as he lowered
the range of his per-glass
prices - the shift toward
drinking at home is bad
news for brands heavily de-
pendent on sales in bars
and restaurants.
Miller Lite, for instance,
saw its sales volume fall 7.5
percent in last year's fourth
quarter, in part due to weak
sales in those places. Owner


Top under $10
Here are some recommendations from Phil Bilodeau, the
owner of Thief Wine shop and bar in Milwaukee, for red and
white wines that cost $10 a bottle or less:
REDS:
* Protocolo 2006 Tempranillo, Tierra la Castilla, Spain -
Strawberry and cherry with a hint of Tempranillo's classic
leathery character. Pairs well with food or on its own.
* D'Aragon 2007 Grenache Carinena, Spain - Full-bodied
red berry fruit flavor, good balance.
* Luis Felipe Edwards 2007 Reserva Carmenere, Colch-
agua Valley, Chile - Dark fruit, good for Cabernet fans.
WHITES:
* El Hada 2007 ViuraNerdejo, Rueda, Spain - Crisp and
refreshing with citrus fruit and brisk acidity. Look for wines from
Rueda.
* The Ruins 2008 ChardonnayNigonier, Robertson, South
Africa - Lush, creamy lemon flavors, peachy apricot notes.
N,* Santa Florentina Torrontes, Famatina Valley, Argentina- ....
A great example of a lesser-known grape, Torrontes is floral,
with undertones of stone fruits and minerality.

Alcohol sellers from neighborhood
stores to multinational companies
are featuring more products at
lower prices - like $10 wines -
and massaging their marketing,
including offering recipes to help
customers play bartender at home.


MillerCoors, a venture of
SABMiller's U.S. unit and
Molson Coors, is now going
after consumers who drink
at home with a new $100
million-plus ad campaign
that includes displays in
grocery stores.
"We want to be where the
consumers are going to be
shopping the most,"
spokesman Julian Green
said.
Bilodeau says he's been
seeing the strongest de-
mand for wines that cost
less. When he first opened
his shop in a posh market
last summer, he put his
cheapest offerings on a high
shelf. Fast forward a month,
and they were front and
center in two carts, one for
reds under $10 and another
for whites. Now he stocks 75
wines under $10, more than
double what he carried
when he opened.


"People just gravitate to
it," Bilodeau said of the 10
bucks and under bins.
Alcohol sellers from
neighborhood stores to
multinational companies
are featuring more prod-
ucts at lower prices - like
$10 wines - and massaging
their marketing, including
offering recipes to help cus-
tomers play bartender at
home.
"They're trying to make it
clear you don't have to be in
the fanciest restaurant to
enjoy good wine," said
Mintel analyst Marcia Mo-
gelonsky.
More time at home means
fewer chances for drunk
driving, experts say In gen-
eral, people drive less in a
down economy since
they're cutting out trips that
aren't essential, said Adrian
Lund, president of the In-
surance Institute for High-


MORRY GASH/Associated Press
In this recent photo, white
wines priced under $10 are
displayed at Thief Wine in
Milwaukee.
way Safety.
"What you can curtail is
driving to the game, driving
to the bar," he said, and that
could mean fewer serious
accidents.
AP Retail Writer Sarah
Skidmore in Portland, Ore.,
contributed to this report.


The Office Stop, Inc.
Let Us Be Your "HELPING HANDS"


Avoid the High Cost
'" '' of Hiring Employees

www.theofficestopinc.com
S352-726-5050
^R^ 7^


Spend an evening in Tropical Paradise


P $40
per person


We thank you for
supporting our school!
k Casual


Please join us at
Pope John Paul II Catholic School
April 25th for our annual Goods
and Services Auction
Cocktail hour begins at 5 p.m.
with tropical cuisine for dinner
and live music to follow

There will be a silent and live auction
We also will be auctioning off
some fabulous desserts
Baskets filled with all sorts of items
worth $400 each to be raffled offi
I attire CHRON


M












D4

SUNDAY
AIRIL 19, 2009


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce






Chamber Connection


Likwid Communications
-i , '


Sunflower Springs Assisted Living


Likjid Communications Inc. is excited to be a member of the Citrus County Chamber of
CImerce. Pictured above are: Ambassadors John Porter, Jessica Holcomb, Owner Christo-
phle Smith and Ambassadors Jackie Marx and Rhonda Lestinsky. Likwid Communications
is -local telephone company that offers business telecommunications monthly savings of
up to 40 percent when compared to traditional telephone service. Likwid Communications
prides itself on being Local, Affordable, Reliable and Flexible. As a locally owned and oper-
ated company we have limited our focus geographically to provide customers with a higher
leVel of service than competitors who you have to call out of state or out of country to
sqehk with. Our prices are set with small businesses in mind. We are the most affordable
phbne system and service and we back that up with our 10 percent price match guaran-
te. With the reliability of a traditional phone company and the flexibility of a small business
wei provide our customers with the excellent reliable service they deserve. The flexibility of
o6r 'company can be best be defined by our out of the box methods. With our custom de-
signed systems options are virtually limitless. If you have needs that are outside the box
wbv work hard to make them a reality. Likwid Communications Inc. can be reached by mail
aiPO Box 1927. Inverness, FL 34451, by telephone at 352-726-1236, Toll free at 888-854-
5943 or on the web at www.golikwid.com. Please feel free to contact us for any reason we
are happy to help.


,The UPS Store


I ;.r


The community of Citrus County gathered on February 24th 2009 to celebrate the Ribbon
Cutting Ceremony for Sunflower Springs Assisted Living Community located on Yulee Drive
in Homosassa. Representing Sunflower Springs was Michelle Arevalo, Community Rela-
tions Director; Delma Lord; Evelyn Schere; Laura Messier, Executive Director. Also present
were Chamber Ambassadors John Porter, Jennifer Duca, Diane Smith, Tammy LaVelle,
Rhonda Lestinsky and Wendy Hall. An estimated 400 people came to welcome Sunflower
Springs to the area. Enjoyment was apparent by all in attendance, be it the gourmet style
hors d'oeuvres, the enchanting entertainment, or tours of the lavishly appointed community
with the striking architecture, the pleasure of seeing a community like Sunflower Springs
become a reality for seniors of Citrus County was embraced with delight and satisfaction.
Several healthcare organizations were represented at the ceremony including members of
staff at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, Senior Home Health Care, and Life Care
Center of Lecanto. Numerous physicians attended to extend their support for the premier
resort style living that Sunflower Springs has to offer. This community brings to life the sen-
ior lifestyle so many have always imagined, providing unique lifestyles with independent
and active assisted living. Sunflower Springs is the perfect place to enjoy the best times
of your life. Give us a call today at 352-621-8017.


Hampton's Edge Trailside Bicycles


K7


BIYCLAs I


Recently, the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce welcomed Hampton's Edge Trailside Bi-
cycles as new members! Pictured above are owners Regis Hampton & Cindy Messer with
friends and customers. Also present were Ambassadors Lillian Smith arid John P6iter. Hamp-
ton's Edge has been in business in Citrus County since 1995. Moving to their new location
in downtown Floral City on the bicycle Trail in Oct. They specialize in High Performance
Trikes, Recumbent, Comfort and Hybrid bicycles, along with bicycle repair, service and
rentals plus a good selection of cycle related clothing and accessories, www.hamp-
tonsedge.com Open: Wednesday thru Sunday. Visit us today at 8294 East Orange Ave. In
Floral City or give us a call at 352-419-4809.


Courses on tap at CFCC


, ,� . . ' , ...... . ..
T e Citrus County Chamber recently held a ribbon cutting ceremony, welcoming the UPS
S ore in Crystal River as new members. Representing the UPS Store is Deb Shackelford,
Greg Rodrick, Marjorie Pulcini, Deanna Rodrick, Owner Jerillyn Clark, Manager Dan Allen,
Ij artika Dominguez. Also present are Ambassadors Janet Mayo, Rhonda Lestinsky, Wendy
alt, Nancy Hautop, James Segovia and John Porter. The UPS Store located at 6752 W. Gulf
to Lake Hwy in the Crystal River in the Publix Shopping Plaza, offers shipping (pick-up avail-
able), printing, copying, notary services, office supplies and mailbox services with 24 hours
a cess and a street address. Give us a call today at 352-795-0033. We are here to offer
y u excellent customer service while fulfilling your business needs.

Smerican Legion Post 155


CFCC will be offering Senior Computers
IV a continuation of the Microsoft Office
Suite of Products with an introduction to
Powerpoint. Learn basic uses of spread-
sheets, such as how to automate a check
book register. Look at how to use the many
templates in MS Office to make your com-
puter a valuable tool.
This class will be on Fridays, April 10
through April 24, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. in
Building L2, room 201B.
CFCC is offering a Basic Digital Camera
class. Learn how to manipulate, transform
and rotate images and to transfer images
from a digital camera or disk to a hard
drive or other storage medium. Bring your
digital camera and instruction manual.
Class will be on Thursdays, April 30 - May
71' from 5:30 pm to 8:30 pm. For more infor-
mation or to register, call Continuing Edu-
cation at the Citrus Campus, 352-249-1210,
or visit www.CFCCtraining.com.
Have you thought of getting your Real Es-
tate License? CFCC is offering a Real Es-
tate Sales Associate - Pre License class.
This course is required for all persons
seeking Real Estate Certification with the
Florida Real Estate Commission. Class will
be on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday
from 9am to 5pm starting 4/27 - 5/14.


Course fee is $300. For more information or
to register, call Continuing Education at the
Citrus Campus, 352-249-1210, or visit
www.CFCCtraining.com.
CFCC is offering "Red Flags, Property
Inspection Guide". This class will help one
learn what is considered a "red flag". Learn
to look at soils, cracks, drainage, ventila-
tion, mold and other residential issues.
Find out who you contact in regard to red
flags. Class will be held on Thursday, April
16th from 9am - 1pm. Class fee is $50.00. Of-
fered in partnership with the Ponds Insti-
tute. For more information or to register,
call Continuing Education at the Citrus
Campus, 352-249-1210, or visit www.CFCC-
training.com.
Learn about property management when
you attend CFCC's class "Property Man-
agement & Managing Risk" This class is an
introduction to professional property man-
agement. It will explore the manager -
owner relationship and leasing and tenant
issues. Class is held on Thursday, April 21
from 9am - 1pm. Class fee is $50.00. Of-
fered in partnership with the Ponds Insti-
tute. For more information or to register,
call Continuing Education at the Citrus
Campus, 352-249-1210, or visit www.CFCC-
training.com.


Wall raising


American Legion Post #155 Jim Woodman Commander cuts the Ribbon as The "American
Lfgion #155 Family" joins Citrus County Chamber of Commerce on President Lincolns
200th Birthday! Included in the Legion Family is American Legion Post #155, American Le-
gion Auxiliary Unit #155, Sons of The American Legion Squadron #155, Legion Riders Chap-
t(r #155 and Citrus 40/8 Voiture & Cabane #1219. Commander Jim Woodman cuts the
C amber Ribbon; included in the photo are: American Legion Post #155 Vice Commanders
Lirry Pink and Larry Riviere, Adjutant & 4th District Public Relations Officer Jay Conti Sr.,
Skt @ Arms John Garvey, American Legion Auxiliary Unit #155 President Sandy White, Vice
P resident Barbara Logan, Secretary Marie Pink, Chaplain Johnnie Hair, Legion Riders Chap-
ter #155 Cindy Heather, Citrus 40/8 Voiture & Cabane members Chef de Gare Richard
G nnon, Rick Logan, Tom & Cheryl Smith with the award winning American Legion Post
# 55 Honor Guard with Captain Joe Barry, Jimmy White, Neal Colbath and Harold Beville.
Representing the Chamber Ambassador Program is Janet Mayo, Wendy Hall, Diane Smith,
Betty Murphy, Tammy LaVelle and John Porter. For more information, visit our website at
w4hw.Postl55.org.
Li -


Bank of
America
employees:
Joan &
Rick La-
boda, Jose
Correa,
Amy
Charley,
Sarah Wren
and Julio
Garbalosa,
join with
Habitat for
Humanity
homeown-
ers Scott
and Krystal
Kartune at
the wall-
raising of
their new
home in
Inverness.


.. -7 - -








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE BUSINESS SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009



Locking in: Save a lot - or pay the price.,


Associated Press Natui
fallen
DALLAS - At TXU En- only aff
ergy, the biggest electric owners
company in Texas, the price of
fastest-growing billing plan by pow(
is one that lets customers gas.
lock in the price of power for Hom(
one or two years. what ma
"It's easier to plan that do to gu
way, and I think you're sav- creases
ing money," says Brian Bell, moditie
an advertising salesman oil to ch
who signed a 2-year, fixed- They
price contract for electricity Locki
at the 1,500-square-foot Dal- or hedg
las town house he bought spikes I
last year. nancial
Other homeowners across reducing
the country are locking in budget-I
prices now on electricity for as with
summer coolingand heating- -these-di
oil for next winter. Heating moil, th
oil prices are nearly 60 per- ways wo
cent lower than they were at Airlin
this time last year, according costs by
to Energy Department fig- nancial
ures. buying i



MUTUAL
Continued from Page Dl

cantly," he said. "But boy, you have got
to be real selective - real selective."
REITs boast particularly attractive
dividend yields - the amount of the
dividend paid .divided by. the-share
price. (For example, if a company's
annual dividend is $1.50 and the
stock trades at $25, the dividend yield
is 6 percent) Historically, REIT divi-
dend yields average around 5 percent
to 6 percent. The yield now? About 8
percent. As recently as February, be-
fore REIT shares managed a modest
comeback, the average was an even
loftier 11 percent
If you find current yields too entic-
ing to pass up, you'll probably do OK
if you're a long-term investor. But
good luck if you're looking to get in
and out of a REIT fund or stock
quickly, or aren't willing to examine
the lingering debt and other troubles
that cloud the outlook for many
REITs.
"The industry faces refinancing
risks, falling rents and continued div-
idend cuts on top of high leverage,"
said Rob Ivanoff, an analyst with fund
industry tracker Financial Research
Corp. in Boston. "Investors should
stick to REITs that have stronger bal-
ance sheets and high-quality assets."
Any investor, looking .to get into.
REITs now should also be aware that
the currently attractive yields are
something of an illusion. Both com-
ponents that go into the yield equa-
tion appear certain to shift in ways
that will bring yields back down.
As for stock prices, experts believe
REIT shares have been beaten down
so much that they're likely to rise -
at least eventually - from prices that
are near 10-year lows. That expecta-
tion assumes the government's efforts
to ease the credit crunch will con-
tinue gaining traction.
With respect to dividends, yields
are inflated because they're based on
the level of payouts over the past four
quarters. So if a REIT cut its dividend
just last quarter, its current yield re-
flects a combination of the current
payout level, and the higher level in
the three quarters before the cut was
made. Most REITs that cut recently
aren't expected to return payouts to
the old levels anytime soon.
The reality is that current dividend
levels are in many cases unsustain-
able - debt troubles will eventually
compel more REITs to cut payouts so
they can shore up balance sheets.
While such cuts . should help .a-
REIT maintain long-term health,
REITs must not cut so deeply that
they jeopardize their tax-favored sta-
tus. Many pay out greater than 100
percent of taxable income as divi-
dends, so they've still got some room
to cut.
The industry ran into so much trou-
ble last year that its trade organiza-
tion, the National Association of Rea I
Estate Investment Trusts, persuaded
the IRS to give REITs a new opt ion
for meeting the 90 percent rule.
REITs can meet the requirement
mostly by giving investors new shares
of stock, rather than paying out only
in cash. At least seven REITs have
paid dividends in part stock and part
cash this year, including shopping
mall owner Simon Property Group
Inc.
Such a step reduces the value of ex-
isting shares because more are out
there in the marketplace - known as
dilution. On the positive side, holding
more shares can be attractive to a
long-term investor. But that's only if
the stock price eventually bounces
back
Meanwhile, Meredith, the amateur


REIT investor, still likes REITs over-
all as good sources of income - even
if many of the first-quarter numbers
that REITs begin reporting this
month will be accompanied by di\i-
dend cut announcements.
"I think if the company is not so
deeply in debt that its cash flow is se-
riously impaired, there is a lot of stay-
ing power in the average REIT,"
Meredith says. "There are quite a fe\I
of them today that are real bargains."
Questions? E-mail investorin-
sight@ap.org.


ral gas prices have
as well, which not
ects the price home-
pay for gas but the
electricity produced
er plants that run on

owners are doing
any large companies
ard against sharp in-
in prices for com-
s ranging from crude
icken feed.
hedge.
ng in an electric rate
ing against oil price
)ring a degree of fi-
certainty, hopefully
.g the chance of a
busting surprise. But
many strategies in
ays of financial tur-
he results don't al-
ork out as expected.
es try to hedge fuel
making offsetting fi-
transactions, such as
futures contracts on


related commodities like
crude and heating oil.
One of the most acclaimed
of all hedgers is Southwest
Airlines Co. For several
years, Southwest had a huge
advantage over competitors
.because it aggressively
struck financial deals to
guard against rising oil
prices. Southwest estimates
that hedging saved it $4.5
billion since 1999.
But as Southwest learned,
hedging can lead to huge
losses if markets move in the
other direction.
Last week, Southwest re-
ported a first-quarter loss
due to $71 million in charges
to cover the falling value of
its fuel hedges after oil
prices collapsed late last
year. That was on top of $360
million in charges to write
down the value of its fuel
hedges in the last two quar-
ters of 2008.


Despite those setbacks,
the airline says it is hedging
fuel again after seeing oil
prices rise nearly one-third
since February.
Few ordinary homeown-
ers can hedge gas or elec-
tricity costs like Southwest
hedged fuel, but they too can
seek protection from rising
costs by locking in some
prices. And just like the air-
lines, they could end up pay-
ing too much.
At Dead River Co., a heat-
ing oil supplier in New Eng-
land, some customers signed
up last summer to buy fuel at
the going rate of more than
$4 a gallon. The price fell by
half by the middle of winter,
but they were stuck - the
company wouldn't cut the
agreed-upon price because,
it said, it had struck similar
fixed-price deals with
wholesalers to guarantee
enough fuel.


"We've heard from so
of our customers,"
Claudette Townsend, a
gional manager in Maine
Dead River. "I wish we
an out, but our suppliers
holding us to our ag
ments, and we have to do
same."
Christopher Abts, a fin
cial planner in Reno, N
said a good alternative
seniors and people of m
est income is paying ut
bills in 12 equal monthly
stallments during the y
instead of facing high
conditioning bills in s
mer or budget-bus
heating bills in winter. M
utilities offer such plans
"If you're on a fixed
come, that can be a great
tion because you don't v
any surprises," he said.
Whether it meets an ec
omist's definition of he
ing, any attempt to loc


More companies are becoming hesitar


Associated Press

These days, it's not what com-
panies say about the past as much
as what they say about the future
that matters most to investors.
. Increasingly, though, compa-
nies are dialing back what they're
willing to forecast
Consider what happened to
Intel on Tuesday. The company
reported stronger-than-expected
first quarter results after the close
of trading. It even said the per-
sonal computer market had bot-
tomed out
But Intel declined to provide a
specific revenue forecast because
of the uncertainty in the economy.
The next day Intel shares
dropped as much as 7 percent
A third of the 600 companies re-
sponding to a recent survey by the
National Investor Relations Insti-
tute said their policies about fi-
nancial guidance had changed.
Most eliminated or limited the
amount of guidance they provide
about earnings and revenue.
"If you don't know what the fu-
ture holds and you can't accu-
rately predict it, you don't want to
be out there telling somebody
something you don't have confi-
.dence in," said the Institute's
Chief Executive Jeff Morgan.
Other companies reporting
first-quarter results this week are
taking similar action.
Manpower Inc. declined earlier
to provide a first-quarter EPS es-
timate. "We believe it would be
cavalier of us to use such a limited
visibility to guide to an earnings-
per-share range," Chief Executive
Jeffrey A. Joerres said in a Febru-
ary conference call with analysts.
1..Management consultant The
Hackett Group Inc. says its recent
research shows companies are
finding it increasingly difficult to
estimate cash flow accurately,


making in harder to zero in on ac-
curate quarterly estimates.
Much of the reason for the diffi-
culty goes back to the current
credit crunch. Companies are
finding it more difficult to draw
down credit, predict customer de-
mand and anticipate other issues
that impact the ability to foresee
the short-term future.
The Hackett Group's study
shows that more than 60 percent
of companies say they cannot ac-
curately forecast cash flow within
10 percent and more than 90 per-
cent cannot forecast within 5 per-
cent
Still, investors and economists
will be looking closely at corpo-
rate earnings this week for any
signs that the economy is improv-
ing. Here is a look at six compa-
nies that will report this week
Each could provide some indica-
tion about where the economy is
headed.
Caterpillar Inc.
* Why it's important: Caterpil-
lar's backhoes, bulldozers and
scrapers are used worldwide to
build everything from roads and
bridges to homes and office build-
ings. Its engines power freighters
that carry goods across oceans.
Caterpillar's turbines and engines
pump oil and natural gas from
miles under the earth's surface,
and its mining trucks haul mate-
rials such as copper, which is used
in products like computers and
TVs.
* When it will report: Tuesday,
April 21.
* What the experts say: Cater-
pillar is expected to earn 8 cents
per share on revenue of $8.71 bil-
lion, compared with profit of$1.45
and revenue of $11.8 billion in the
same period a year ago.
* You'll know the economy is
improving if: Caterpillar is ramp-
ing up production of its distinctive


yellow-and-black excavators,
trucks and loaders. That could
mean the government is spending
money to lay new roads, build
bridges and renovate schools
under the $787 billion stimulus
program approved by Congress
earlier this year It would also be a
sign mining companies are buying
more equipment in anticipation
of higher prices for coal and met-
als.
* You'll know the economy is
not improving if: Caterpillar lays
off more workers and idles more
assembly lines. Since the start of
the year, the company has an-
nounced plans to cut more than
22,000 jobs, or 19 percent of its
work force.
* The quote: "These are very
uncertain times, and it's impera-
tive that we focus ... on dramati-
cally reducing production
schedules and costs," Caterpil-
lar's CEO Jim Owens said earlier
this year
. Delta Air Lines Inc.
* Why it's important: Delta is
the world's biggest airline com-
pany. Subsidiaries include North-
west Airlines, Comair, Compass
and Mesaba. It has hubs in cities
such as New York, Atlanta, Ams-
terdam and Tokyo. The company's
airlines serve more than 170 mil-
lion passengers a year and em-
ployees 80,000 people.
* When it will report: Tuesday,
April 21.
* What the experts say: Delta is
expected to lose $1.01 per share,
excluding one-time items, on rev-
enue of $6.7 billion, compared
with a net loss of $16.15 and rev-
enue of $4.77 billion a year ago.
The earlier quarter was before
Delta's acquisition of Northwest
* You'll know the economy is
improving if: Revenue declines
stabilize. Any improvement is wel-
come for an industry that has


ome prices can be affected 1y
said factors ranging from com-
re- modity prices or stock mar-
e for kets to simple, raw emotion.
had Jennifer Lerner, an expliug
Share mental social psychology t
ree- and director of the Decision
the Science Laboratory at Har-
vard University's John,. E
nan- Kennedy School of Govern-
Sev., ment, said the desire to lock
for in prices is often driven bo',
nod- the kind of fear that in- :
ility creases during a recession.
y in- "When people are afraid,',:
year they want to do things that
air- will provide more certainty,"
um- Lerner said. "Fear moti-
ting vates locking in."
[any The fear of uncertainty is
3. so strong that even people
in- burned by price declines ,
top- after they locked in -'-as
want happened with heating oilI
customers last summer -
con- often feel better despite
edg- having spent more money
k in than if they'd done nothing.



it to forecast I

been struggling to fill seats. An-
other good sign would be opti-
mism from the company abouti)
ability to raise money.
M You'll know the economg'i,
not improving if: Delta says do,
mand for air travel is shrinking
a faster pace than expected. If d-"
vance bookings for travel durft
the usually busy summer perro.
are much lower than a year agi,.
that would be another sign oftrotl-
ble. ' qJ
* The quote: "Bottom line, aso
global economic downturn !
worse than many economists a'-
ticipated," Delta CEO Rich"..
Anderson and President Ed Bast.
ian said in a recent memo to e
ployees. "We will continue to a0.,
quickly and decisively to address-
these economic pressures looki.pg
ahead for the remainder of 20Q09
and into 2010." .,
Manpower Inc. ; su
* Why it's important: Man-
power is one of the largest staffing-
firms, and it's a gauge of the global,
work force since about 90 percent
of its revenue comes from over-
seas. The employment industry
has shrunkto levels not seen sinl.q
the 1980s because.temporary st
are usually cut before permanmei
workers, particularly in Europe-'1
where full-time employees ar4
often protected by long-term con;
tracts and strict labor laws. .
* When it will report: Tuesda ,1
April 21.
* What the experts say: Maiq-
power is expected to lose 8 cenits
per share on revenue of $4.03 bii -
lion, compared with profit of 94
cents and revenue of $5.26 billion I
a year ago.
* You'll know the economy'fi
improving if: Manpower's rev-.1
enue decline is less than the 20
percent drop it earlier forecast.
That would indicate job losses
might be stabilizing.


Cl, I .\1Kl,

Delivery Routes

Available
),i


Be a Newspaper distribution is a'I
Partner reat way to make extra cash
Part r V Early Morning Hours
iM v .... V Avg. 3-4 Hours Daily


in Tour

Own

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775489


* 2 reliable vehicles required
* Must be 18 years old

Apply in person, Monday or Tuesday 1-3 AM
ask for Kevin
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River


SKick Off

Spring

With a New :.

SCareerelf
NE ! .nptintCo prhes iv Mdia


I


At Seven Rivers Regional, we're dedicated to helping patients get bac '�
to doing the things they love to do. Be an important part of our success. .
Nurse Manager
Rehab Staff RNs (FT and Per Diem)
PCAs (Per Diem)
Physical Therapist
Experience in the area of physical rehabilitation preferred.
Other Opportunities: -': -'
RNs: MedSurg, Telemetry
ICU, PACU, OB *
Pharmacist ,
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We offer flexible scheduling, competitive wages
and a comprehensive benefits package. ' '
For these and other opportunities, visit our web site at I:
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Inpatient Rehabilitation Your Life.


ShVFN IlIVERS I(EIONA MI-DICAL CFN'IER


Our Story.


AT THE 'HEART OF OUR COMMUNITY


- 0 ARING ...FOR MANY YEARS,

IN MANY WAYS.

For 5n years, Citrus Memorial Health \st[em iC(lmHSi has been providing
qualiR care to the community. Although we're embracing the future %with
innovate technology and an energetic atmosphere, vwe re sull a close-knit
team vho greets people by name It's just our wa\.

RNs
C\'PCU * PCU * Emergenc- * Mtled, Surg * Ortiopedjics* Neur_ I elemcntr
Extemal Services Clinical 'uperv.nor * Educator-LD;C\' eriMces
Nurse Manager Medi'surg * Horn Health-(Ca_,e Mlanager Home Health-Superxisor
Documentation Impnroement Speciahst oualhin impr,:ovment Danieor
CathLab -CCL

LPNs/MAs
Alen Ridge Famil\ Care Center - C1MH Ortho and loint Specuihsts
CMA-Homo ,assa

Physical Therapists
Positions area aaiiaable in both our Rehabilitiaon and Home Health
departments. Floridad lenseleligibilir required.

Manager of Accounting
Requires a Bachelor's d greL in Business idministrano'n and Accounung: 5 years
ex-perience in Finance/Accounting'Business Management- and CPA Hospital
experience preferred.

Come ioin u- in Inrierness. our scnic tow.n on Florida s Nature Coast, just
north ol the Tampa Ray area Citrus mlernorial offers a compeutile salary. a
generous ben-fits package and relocation assistance. If you're looking for a
friendly workplace where people truly care. make ',urself at home here.


PIcasc apph orlinc at
www.citrusmh.com


CITRUS MEMORIAL RAO


,-t.Ih-S . i-.i.:T .l .p..r-ur-, m..pl,.'I


I I











CLASSIFIED


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




To place an ad, call 563-5966


D6 SUNDAY, Allul. 19, 2009












Classifieds


Classifieds



In Print



and



Online



All



The Time


Fx ( 2 5 3 6 1.l . 8 )8 - 4 1 E i a i_________I___wc r il n n c

S 6 Ill I ' * IF~ . * 0 *M: 3


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
CASH PAID all
vehicles.Trades welcome
Used PARTS avail
352-628-9118
WANTED
Junk Lawn Mowers
& Power Quip.
Free Pick-up (352)
564-8014/601-5053
/Us out zoomcitrus.comr



English Setter.
Half-grown, male,
all shots, de-wormed, hse
bkn, very friendly & in-
telligent.
637-1755
Excell. Home for any
unwanted birds, poultry
U-R unable to care for
726-9874
FREE jack russell terrier.
female, about 2 years
old. she has some inse-
-curity issues that needs
someone to have pa-
tients with her. she is
looking for a loving home.
all accessories included.
please call 352-445-2822
HAVE SOMETHING TO
GIVE AWAY?
Place your
ad 24 hrs a day.
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
1 Select Place an Ad
2 Create an Account
3 Select Cust. type
4 Select Heading of
Special Notices
5 Select Free
6 Create Ad
KITTENS FREE TO GOOD
HOME 8 weeks old
(352) 249-7371
National Geographic
Magazines
1970's - 1980s'
Must Take All


A .


. .. '


CALYPSO IS MISSING,
PLEASE HELP US FIND
HIM. FAMILY IS HEART
BROKEN.REWARD. 2
.. YEARS OLD.LAST
SEEN ON S.APOPKA
AND HIGHLANDS
- AREA.ANY INFORMA-
TION PLEASE
CALL(352)476-4439.

Sand read
My name is Elvis and I
'live at 5234 West Corral
" Place in Pine Ridge.
If you are reading this
ad, and you have
found a large solid
black cat and have
taken him into your
home, please call me.
You may have found
Elvis. Elvis has been
missing since
February. He is
declawed and
neutered plus he has
two serious health
conditions which if not
treated properly can
be fatal. We are
heartbroken and
desperately miss him.
Thank you for
keeping him safe.
Please call MariJo.
352-220-2032
REWARD $$$$$$
$$$$$$$$









Your world first


Need a job

or a

qualified

employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!


C MCL,,'I,
nl (KIF /j


Black & white tiger
striped. Declawed
Black spot on left side of
nose.About 3 yrs. old.
(352) 400-5625



Chihuahua
Older female, found in
Lake Panasoffskee.
(352) 568-3345




Bank Probate
Divorces lEvictions
352-613-3674

ATTEND
COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical,
"Business, *Paralegal,
*Computers,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement
assistance. Computer
available.
Financial Aid if
qualified.
Call (800)443-5186,
www.CenturaOnline.c
om.
Top Hat Airport
Serv.352-628-4927
Rates for Tampa Int.
$75 & Orlando $85
w/some restrictions
/us out zoomcitrus.com













rescued pet.cam
View available pets on
our website or call
(352) 795-9550
Adoption Locations

PET SUPER MARKET
every Saturday 11-2p
Inverness
Inverness
April 20th Monday
12-2pm

ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT








$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
*ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com

CAT
ADOPTIONS









Come see

our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A till 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4
All Cats and Kittens are al-
tered, tested for Feline Luk
and Aids. Up to date on
vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofspha.ora.
or stop by our offices at
1149 N ConantAve. Comer
of 44 and Conant.
Look for the big white build-
ing with the bright paw
prints.



FRESH FLA KEY WEST
SHRIMP. Today $41b.
Limited supply - Call
now! 727-726-8617



SKILLED MASTER
CARPENTER. 25 yrs
exp at all home construc-
tion & improvements.
I am looking for FT or
temp work. Call Scott
352-560-7609



Lot to Sell
in
FERO Gardens
$400
(352) 628-3329


A FREE Report of Your
Home's Value
www.naturecoast
living.net

missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
Shelter 794-3825




FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH OF FLORAL
CITY
Nursery Coordinator
needed. Approx. 8 hrs.
or more. (352) 726-4296




Adm. Assistant

Strong computer and
clerical skills required
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1543P
Citrus Co. Chronicle
106 W. Main St.
Inverness Fl. 34450

Administrative
Assistant
Part-time Administra-
tive Assistant for stable,
established non-profit
In central Citrus
County, Approx. 25-30
hours wkly. In creative
environment. Some
weekend work req.
Computer literacy
and familiarity with
Word and Excel req.
Self starter with good
people skills Reply to
Blind Boxl542P
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River
Florida 34429









Central Florida
Community College
Our Promise....
Your Future....
Auditorium
Manager-Visual &
Performing Arts
PT-Student Life &
Special Events
For additional
information visit
www.cf.edu or
e-mail: hr@cf.edu.
Fax transcripts to:
352-873-5885. CFCC,
P.O. Box 1388. Ocala,
FL 34478-1388.
CFCC is an EEO/AA/
DFW employer.













































Confi

ACCOUNT
MANAGER

Home Health exp.
Sales Professional
needed to
Develop/Strengthen
new/existing
customer referral
base. Full time, salary
plus Bonus Plan
and benefits.

Fax resume with
cover letter to:
352-291-9423 or call
Administrator at:
352-291-9422.
ConfiCare Home
Health Solulions
Chap certified. EOE


ADMISSION
COORDINATOR

Crystal River Health
and Rehabilitation
is seeking an
admission coordina-
tor for Citrus County
and surrounding
area. The qualified
candidate will
possess a
background In health
care sales, strong
closing skills, superb
customer satisfaction
skills, and the ability
to develop and
Implement a
comprehensive sales
plan. Acute care and
long-term experience
knowledge a must.
Our company offers
a competitive salary,
bonus and benefits
.package.
Please contact by fax
or mail resume to
Administrator
Crystal River Health
Rehabilitation
136 NE 12th Avenue
Crystal River, Florida
34429 or Fax to
352-795-5848
DFWP/EOE

ARBOR
VILLAGE
NURSING
A 210-bed SNF seeks
CNAs
TO JOIN OUR
DEDICATED
TEAM OF CARING
AIDES '
7-3 - FULL-TIME
3-11 - PART-TIME
WE OFFER GREAT
SALARY
COMPETITIVE BENEFITS
GREAT WORK
ENVIRONMENT
DRUG/BCKGRND
CHK REQ,
CALL 800-442-1353
FAX 877-571-1952
JOBS@CQCARE.COM
490 S. OLD WIRE RD.
Wildwood

ARBOR VILLAGE
NURSING
A 210-bed SNF seeks

COOK
TO JOIN OUR
SUPERB DIETARY
TEAM
FULL-TIME OPENING!
PRIOR EXP. REQUIRED
GREAT SALARY +
BENEFITS!
CALL 352-787-2910
FAX 352-748-7609
490 S. Old Wire Rd

BECOME A CNA
For Career and
Test Preparation
Call 352-564-8378

CERT. MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
For Family Practice
Call(352) 795-2273 or
Fax resume to:
352-795-2296

CNA PREP CLASSES
EZ Learning Services
For Information 352-
586-2715; 586-2716
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
CNA TEST PREP
Now Offering Day
& Evening Classes
352-341-2311
Scholarships Available

CNA/HHA'S
Live in Needed
$175. a Day
Interim Health Care
(352) 637-3111

Dietary Aides

IS CURRENTLY
SEEKING
TO JOIN OUR SUPERB
DIETARY TEAM!
FULL-TIME OPENINGS!
GREAT PAY +
BENEFITS
CALL 352-787-2910
FAX 352-748-7609

ARBOR VILLAGE
NURSING
490 S. Old Wire Rd.

DIETARY
MANAGER

Join an exciting
Team!
Are you a leader?
Are you looking
for a chance to
make a difference?
Are you seeking an
opportunity to use
your management
skills? We are a
116 bed progressive
skilled nursing
and rehab facility.
Certification required
with 2 years
experience in LTC,
Excellent benefits.
Apply in person
or fax resume to
352-637-1921.
email: adharris
@southernltc.com
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, FL 34453
EOE


FLA. LICENSED
NURSE
FOR
WOUND CARE
Crystal River Health
and Rehabilitation Is
accepting applica-
tions for a Florida
Licensed Nurse to
manage and
provide care for our
residents for the
facility wound care
program. This
position requires a
nurse with a
minimum of 3 years
clinical experience
and 1 year wound
care experience,
Computer literacy for
this position Is essen-
tial and the ability to
follow the facility
formulary and proce-
dures. We offer Life
Insurance, Health
and Dental Insurance
and 401K.
Mail or fax resume:
Aft: Laurie Coleman
136 NE 12th Ave.
Crystal River, FL 34429
Fax (352) 795-5848
CONTACT Laurie Via
Mall or Fax ONLYII
DFWP/EOE

FOOD SERVICES
DEPT
Join the
Arbor Trail Teaml
Now accepting
applications for:
DIETARY AIDE
Evening Shift
Apply In Person
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, FL, EOE

Full Time
Lic. Lab Tech &
Phlebotomist.

For busy Physician
Lab. Competitive
Salary & Benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 746-6333

LPN/Certified
Medical
Assistant-
Allen Ridge
Medical Center
We are seeking a
certified medical
assistant. Must be
able to handle a high
volume of patients.
Skills include: wound
care, EKG's, PFT's
phlebotomy, assist
physician and front
office duties. High
school diploma or
GED and medical
assisting certificate.
Please Apply online:
www.citrusmh.com
CMH is EOE

LPN/CMA -CMHS
ORTHO and
JOINT SPECIALISTS
We are seeking a
LPN/CMA. Current FL
license. Responsible
for scheduling various
tests and surgeries,
direct contact with
patients and ortho
experience a plus.
Must be able to multi
task and handle a
high volume of
patients. Must be
certified and experi-
enced In a clinical
office setting.
Please apply online:
www.cltrusmh.com
CMH is EOE

LPN/MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Experience needed.
Please send resume to
P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447

Medical
Assistant-
CPC Homosassa
We are seeking a
certified medical
assistant. Must be
able to handle a high
volume of patients.
Skills include: wound
care, EKG's, PFT's
phlebotomy, assist
physician and front
office duties. High
school diploma or
GED and medical
assisting certificate.
Please apply online:
www.cltrusmh.com
CMHS is EOE

NURSES
Full-Time 11-7
If you are dedicated
to the higher stand-
ards of elder care,
good documenta-
tion and a genuine
caring attitude, we
have a place for you.
We offer great
benefits.
Mail or fax resume:
Att: Laurie Coleman
136 NE 12th Ave.
Crystal River, FL 34429
Fax (352) 795-5848
CONTACT Laurie Via
Mall or Fax ONLYII
DFWP/EOE


P/T Med. RECEPTIONIST
for MD's office. Exp.
w/computers a plus.
Fax resume to
352-794-0877

RN MDS/PPS
FULL TIME

Crystal River Health
and Rehab currently
has a position open
for a FL. Licensed RN
that has a min. of 2
years exp. In MDS.
This position
requires a working
knowledge of RUG
rates. State of
Florida guidelines
and developing
Resident Care
plans. Computer
literacy, good
communication skills
and a strong clinical
background are a
requirement.
Competitive salary
based on verifiable
experience with
great benefits. On
call every 4th week.
Mail or fax resume:
Aft: Laurie Coleman
136 NE 12th Ave.
Crystal River, FL
34429
Fax (352) 795-5848
CONTACT Laurie Via
Mall or Fax ONLYII
DFWP/EOE

RN NEEDED

If you are an RN
looking for a career
in dialysis; in Crystal
River, Fl.
WE ARE ONE
of Fortune 500's
Top 125 AWARD
WINNING
COMPANIES I
(877)-482-7625

RN Unit
Manager

North Campus
Rehab & Nursing

SEEKS EXP'D. RN TO
MANAGE ADMIN.
CLINICAL
& SPRVY FUNCTIONS
PRIOR LTC/ SPVR EXP.
REQ
2+ YRS EXP. REQ.
COMPETITIVE SALARY
GREAT BENEFITS
CALL 800-442-1353
FAX 877-571-1952
JOBS@CQCARE.COM
700 Palmetto St. N

VET TECH

With solid lab skills.
Must handle heavy
appointment
schedule. Have
superior client
communication skills.
Vet experience &
resume a must.
Call 352-843-8387




Solid Waste
Management
Director
Announcement
#09-12

The Citrus County
Board of County
Commissioners are
seeking a Solid
Waste Management
Director. Requires
Bachelor's degree
In Engineering,
Environmental
Science or closely
related field.
Requires over four
years related
experience. Requires
a current Landfill
Operator certificate.
Salary range
$1,912.02 - $2,868.05
B/W. DOQ Submit
current resume to the
Citrus County Office
of Human Resources,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
EOE/ADA For more
information, please
visit our website at
www.bocc.cltrus.fi.us




BARTENDER
Will train right person.
Friendly, energetic
and outgoing.
Apply in Perso
10131 N. Citrus Ave.
New applicants only
The Loft Bar & Grill




Health / Life
Agents
Interested in work-
ing in a recession
proof industry?
Affiliated Health
Insurers has open-
ings for 3-4 Top m
m Producing Agents
m for Citrus, Marion &
Hernando County
SToo Commissions -
Leads - All A-Rated
Call Jim Hicks
352-341-0712


NEW YEAR/
NEW CAREER

The best opportunity
In Citrus County.
Average income for
2008 was $58.000.
Our 18
representatives
enjoy company trips,
bonuses, and
many other
Incentives.
Qualifications:
* Self-motivated
e* Team Player
* Outgoing
Personality
and the
* Willingness to Learn
2 POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY
Mon. through Fri.
No late evenings,
weekends or holidays.
No experience
necessary,
training available.
Take control
of your future-
call todayll


Micah Buck
(352) 726-7722



REAL ESTATE
BROKER

National Real
Estate
Company is look-
ingfor
Exp. Broker to
handle
listings &
sales.
Offering
national lead
generation
through a
network of
50,000 +
referral
sources.
Call for more
info.
(888)
831-1919
Ext.64.



WANTED
Highly self motivated
Sale's people
Company truck is
provided. Yearly
paid vacation.
Holidays paid.
Benefits available.
Positions open in
Citrus, Hernando,
and Sumter Counties.
Apply in Person
ONLY, from 9 am to
4 pm Mon-Fri, At
A-1 Termite &
Pest Control,
1840 Hwy 44 West,
Inverness. FL 34453.
Located across
from Applebee's.
Only well groomed
and properly dressed
applicants will be
considered.


GRAPHIC DESIGNER
Seeking free-lance
designer for
brochures, print ad-
vertising & Internet
e-blast. Aggressive
marketing offers
steady stream of
work. Must be highly
experienced with
strong portfolio.
Forward resume to
nancv@citrushllls.com

INSTRUCTORS
WANTED
Heavy
Eauipment
OPERATOR
SCHOOL
Minimum 5 Yrs.
Exp. H.S. Diploma
motivated self starter.
Must possess
Excellent People &
Communication skills.
& be able to
Instruct in the Class-
room, as well
as Hands on Skill.
Fax resume to
352-628-0823
or Email To:
alex.v@atsdigs.com
IRRIGATION TECH
Exp. preferred
PRESERVE GC
(352) 854-9199

r EXP. SERVICE
PLUMBERS
* Only plumbers with I
| service exp. APPLY,
= 352-621-7705
--333-SI^



APPOINTMENT
SETTERS NEEDED
2 Positions Available
Professional &
Friendly Office.
Monday thru Friday
Daily & Weekly '
Bonuses Available






Apply @
217 E. Highland Blvd.
Inverness
Ask for Ten or Lri
(352) 726-7722

HELP WANTED
Experienced
Roll Off/Dumpster
Delivery Driver.
Must have CDL for
minimum of 2 yrs.
clean driving record.
Apply in Person @
711 S. Adolph Pt.
Lecanto

LAWN
TECHNICIAN

F/T clean Dri. Lic.,
Lawn experience
preferred.
Will train; benefits
Apply in person
CITRUS PEST MGT.
406 N.E. 1st. St.
Crystal River, Fl.
34429



Your World





C IRpONICI.AI


wwfo'renlc5i.F-tnline oam


HANDY PERSON

w/ valid drivers license
Call Ted, 352-257-0657
Maintenance
, PT, Candlewood/
Knollwood, Inverness,
Florida, Call for an
Appoinment
(352) 344-1010
Fax Resume:
(352) 344-4965

P/T SECURITY
OFFICER
Uniforms supplied.
Security lic. Req. Mon.
thru Fri. 20/40 hrs.
U.S. Securities/ Local
(352) 688-5300




PT Secretary/
Cashier/Recept.
Exp. Only, Mon-Thurs,
8am-4pm, Able to pass
background check.
Respond to
PO Box 485 Inverness
Florida 34451-0485.

STAFF NEEDED
For Bovs & Grls
Ciubs
Summer Program.
Must love Kids & be
able to
Implement
prepared activities
30 to 40 hrs per
week
Call
352-621-9225

TRANSPORTATION
DRIVER - P/T
For Indep/A.L. facility.
Includes weekends.
Must have CDL w/
pass. endorsement.
Vacation & benefits
available. Apply in
person Brentwood
Retirement Comm.
1900 W. Alpha Ct.
Lecanto. 746-6611
EOE - DFWP








CosmetoogyDay


Kick Off

Spring


With a New

Career




At Seven Rivers Regional, we're dedicated to helping patients get back
to doing the things they love to do. Be an important part of our success.

Nurse Manager
Rehab Staff RNs (FT and Per Diem)
PCAs (Per Diem)
Physical Therapist
Experience in the area of physical rehabilitation preferred.
Other Opportunities:
RNs: MedSurg, Telemetry
ICU, PACU, OB
Pharmacist
Coder

We offer flexible scheduling, competitive wages
and a comprehensive benefits package.
For these and other opportunities, visit our web site at
www.srrmc.com and click 'Career', email
Linda.Macaulay@hma.com or apply in person to Human
Resources, 6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34428.
EOE/Drug and Tobacco-Free Workplace



Inpatient Rehabilitation Your Life.
S.V.E.N RIVE-.R.S R-..ONAl M niCACA (...*I 1 Our Story.









CITRUS COUN'IY (Fl.) CHRONICLE/


Small SHOP
Trophy's Awards, Signs,
Advertising prom., turn
key. (352) 564-8758









25x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry Door, 2 Vents.
4" Concrete Slab.
$14.895. INSTALLED
30x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$16.795. INSTALLED
35x50x 12(3:12 pitch)
Roof overhang.
2-10x10 Rollup Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$30.995 Installed
+ Fl. Engineered Plans
4 A local Fl Manufact.
* Meets or exceeds
Florida wind codes.
+ Conc/Inst by others.
+ Many sizes available
* We specialize in
Commercial Buildings
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC1256991
www. metal
structuresllc.com
- Sheds & Garages of
I Any Size I
| *SHEDSNOW* I
I We Move & Buy
I Used Sheds
Independence/41
(352)860-0111
L � � � �ll


BIKE 1950's 26" Western
Flyer fair to good cond.
$35.00 352-489-3914
DOLL
Original Chatty Cathy.
Exc. cond. $125/obo.
(352) 726-7421.



Civil War, Nautical &
wildlife prints, Go to
www.mariners
international.com




A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
-4 2 Ton $780.00
-42-' Ton $814.00
-4 3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
*Prof, Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Free Del. Lic.#CAC
057914 746-4394
ABC Briscoe Appl.
Refrig., washers, stoves.
Serv. & Parts
(352) 344-2928
APPLIANCES Whirlpool
Gold Appliances.
Fridge,Micro,Gas Stove
and Dishwasher. All in
great cnditiondition.S500
takes all. 352-795-4708
352-317-0306
KENMORE Refrigerator
white,18.5 c.f. & ice
maker, like new, $195;
Tappan Electric Stove,
almond, self clean $125
(352) 746-4779
Washer & Dryer
Kenmore, Like new,
$400. for both. After
5:00 p.m. (352) 746-9155



HOMOSASSA- Walden
Woods North - Sat.
4/25. Doors open 9am
Auction at 10am
Hwy 19 South


220/20 GALLON -IORI-
ZONAL COMPRESSOR
With Hose $145.00
464-0316




HITACHI 58"
PROJECTION TV
Excellent condition.
Asking $500/obo.
352-465-1653 or
682-3568
Panasonic, 42" digital
HD plasma TV w/ home
cinema, surround
sound, never used, still
in wrappings. Cost
$2,565 asking $1,500
(352) 560-3677
TELEVISION Samsung
high definition television
hardly used.Pristine
condition with stand $100
352 560 3677




PATIO DOOR
80 inch - slide by.
$100. 352-503-7548




COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
DELL COMPUTER
Includes everything.
Like new. $250.
352-637-0046
DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts & up-
grades. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
www.rdeeii.com
DIRECWAY DW7000
SATELLITE SYSTEM
High speed modem and
dish with roof mount $150
ph. 352-564-1219


SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic inch
S&S Stroker
motor w/Slaggered Hooker
headers. New Gangster
while walls, seal in all
leather bik ostrich skin,
Paint by Jesse James
painter of Calf., w/Double
Damon signature, House of
Color paint, Bik w/colored
ghost flames on all sheet
metal. 2" Carlini handle
bars. Chrome to max, This
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart $30k in-
vested, may trade for nice
tractor w/bucket or bobcat
etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815

SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather bik os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Bik w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more into.
352-302-2815





2 LARGE PIECES MIR-
ROR GLASS 40" by 70"
Excellent condition $125
352-465-6551

Pre Owned FurrLiure
Unbeoaltable Prices
NU 2 U FURNITURE
Homosassa 621-7788

CHAIR New cypress
wooden rocker for
indoors or outdoors.
$85. (352) 382-5951


CLASSIFIED



COMPUTER DESK light
oak color, has hutch,
monitor stand, file drawer.
$60 465-3841
COUCH & LOVESEAT
Excellent condition.
Floral design. $300
352-860-0212
Curio cabinet, oak
wood, lighted with 3
glass shelves, 21" wide,
10-1/2" deep, 70" tall.
Mint cond.$125
(352) 697-0256
DINING ROOM TABLE
Older, drop leaf dark oak
with two chairs in excellent
condition. $135.
352-634-2253
DRESSER with match-
ing nighttable and mirror
$40 (352) 746-7680
FORMAL DINING TABLE
6chrs, 2 leafs, Entertain.
center, oversized leather
recliner, want best offer.
(352)419-4343
Furniture for sale!
Exercise equipment
Pine Ridge area
352-746-6806
HIDE A BED COUCH
& LOVESEAT Light blue.
Exc, cond. best offer
ROCKER RECLINER
Mint color. Best offer
Exc. cond. 352-522-1938
Hutch
Cherrywood, w/glass
doors. $45.00
Micro Wave Cabinet.
$35.00. (352) 249-6800
HUTCH Older,
1940's-50's circa. Dark oak
with lighted cabinet in excel-
lent condition. $175.
352-634-2253
KINGSIZE WATERBED
EMAIL PIC $300
LM(TALK SLOW)
also teen elec. scooter
$150 ADELA
352-628-7215
MIRRORED 9-dwr
DRESSER. Light wood,
$150. VINTAGE DRESSER
9-drwrs, walnut, lited
mirror & alcove shelves.
$175. 352-503-7548


KING SIZE SOFA BED
Like new $400 obo, Desk
w/ file cabinet $200 obo
(352) 795-0022
MIRRORED DRESSER,
blond wood 8-drawer
$200; Pink velvet chair,
$15; Wicker Table, small,
white $15. all in exc.
cond. (352) 527-6807
MODERN BIRCH
FRAME SOFA, WHITE
COTTON CUSHIONS
IKEA easycare $125
352-465-6551
Office Filing Cabinets
$10.00 each.
Twin Bed. $35.00
(352) 249-6800
Patio/Porch furniture
white PVC with cush-
ions, 9 pc set, 4 chairs
table, love seat, side
chair, ottoman coffee
table excel cond. $300
obo (352) 621-3679
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Wants Your Business
Clip this ad for 15% off
Tues.-Fr. 9-5 Sat. 9-1
Homosassa 628-2306
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40.Qn
$50; Kg $75. 628-0808
Queen size sleeper
sofa.Loveseat and end
table,Navajo Indian Print
GOOD CONDITION
$250.00 OBO
352-560-7378
ROLL AWAY BED
$75 Good shape.
(352) 795-0818
SET OF BUNK BEDS - $350
w/ mattresses or $150 for
just the frame. Kenmore
Dishwasher, like new
$330 (352) 341-0314
Table, dark oak
pedestal, round,
42' with 12" leaf,
4 chairs, $175.
(352) 228-7670
TRIPLE CHERRY DRESSER
w/blfolding mirror. $225.
(2) TWIN MATTRESSES
w/boxsprings & frames.
$50 ea. $75 both. All
like new. 352-527-8176
or 352-212-6918


g


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Twin Bed
Maple head & foot
boards. New mattress &
box spring. $150.
(352) 270-8250
VANITY DRESSER w/
Mirror & Bench $150,
2 Deacon Benches $50
each (352) 795-0022
YOUR FURNITURE
DONATIONS
SUPPORTS THE PATH
HOMELESS SHELTER
Call (352) 746-9084




CRAFTSMAN 8HP
CHIPPER SHREDDER
$175. 352-726-6084
CRAFTSMAN RIDING
LAWN MOWER 42 In.
deck 19.5 hp $550
(352) 746-7357
LAWN SWEEPER
4 ft. wide, good shape.
$125 (352) 795-0818
LAWN TRACTOR MTD
Yard Machine 17HP 42"
Looks and runs like new
Bagger Attachment and
Dump Cart in-
cluded.$475.00 Rainbow
Springs 352.465.8495
Pressure Washer
RIdgid, 3000 PSI
used only 3 times
$300
(352) 341-1962
RIDE ON MURRAY
14.5 hp, 42 in. cut.
barely used
Immaculate $450;
352-382-3195
Riding Lawn Mowers
Excellent cond.
Nursery equip.
(352) 795-0762
RIDING LAWNMOWER
runs & mows good
$350 (352)601-5053



Large Hanging
Ephifillum
$15
(352) 746-0488


BEVERi
Fri. - Sun
3526 N. Ta

CITRUS
5700 N. M
Yard Sal
Sun./19 E
wall unit.,
& chair
many hi
bicycles
DS/SP &
Too many












LEC
Sat. & S
All house h
wide variety
250 N. Ker
RIVERHA
SALEd
Garage &
Everyth
11967 Br

n si

Clothing va
petite 14,
shoes size
purses, lik
new al
(352) l
Variety
Coia
14, 16,
good
(352)5




2 MOTOR
METS 1 Mi
Street $2
464


SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 D7



n AUAR aMSallsi
LY HILLS most are complete,
. 9-? HG systems, many access &
amarlsk Ave. rack systems, all for $2;4
obo call after 12 noep
SSPRINGS (352) 341-0483
latheson Dr. 110/20 GALLON COI-
e Sat./18 & PRESSOR Horizonal cdi
Entainment wheels $120 00
TV, kit table 464-0316
s, clothes,
ome items, ALUMINUM RUNNING
s Nintendo BOARDS For Small'
t& Games. Bronco or Blazer $40 Op
'items to List 464-0316 -
Bird cage med -o
* H w/accessories & tab i
$50. deep fryer GE r e.
taurant style $30 *-
(352) 341-6920 ,
BOXSPRING Queen siz, ,
new in plastic $75.00, cof$
table wood/glass excellfi
$90.00. 352-270-390j
BUFFET TABLE front'';
the 40's, fair condi- A
tion.$100 352-795-64c1i
Carpet Factory Direct,
ANTO Repair Clean ' SalSi
3un 7AN 4P Laminate, shop at",
old & garage, home. 352-341-0909
y. No early bird CHANGING TABLE FOIW
nsington Ave. BABY. LIGHT COLORED
WOOD. '
VEN ESTATE GOOD CONDITIONED I ON?
Sat & Sun $25.00 563-5206 ,
Household,
iing goes COVER FOR POPUIR
ookside Ct. CAMPER NEW in BOX'
With Case 12x14 only
$40.00 464-0316 0;
CRIB BASSETT LIGIl
WOOD COLOR. GOOt1
CONDITION. MATTRESS
valued at $800, NOT INCLUDED. g
med., large, $50.00 563-5206 .
ed 8 1/2 -9
Snew & are D E GRIDS 18 inch new
II for $225 and complete $99.00
503-7385 New dome awning
C L 81x25x20 $99.00
Sof Ladles 352-382-1191
thing. Dishwasher
all for $75. Clean, works goodY
Second. $100. Electric Stove
746-0488 Clean used stove, _
works perfectly. $50.00
(352)201-9004
Dog Kennel
8 X 12, Good cond. $100.
CYCLE HEL- Golf Cart
otorcross & 1 Incl. battery charger. -
25.00 each Good cond. $450. 'Il
-0316 (352)476-3681. L,
,l


~2

K;


DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Repairing gas & diesel
engines. No job too big
or small. 352-228-2067




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd friendly
serv. Lowest rates Free
est.
352-860-1452
All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/ us out zoomcilrus.com
COLEMAN TREE SERV.
Trim & Removal. Lic.
Ins. FREE EST. Lowest
rates. 352-270-8462
/ out zoomcitrus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852





OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Work Free Est.
LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins
R WRIGHT TreeService
Tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Lic
0256879 352-341-6827
Ricky Mills Tree Service
Trim, haul, top,
removal, Free Est
Reasonable Rates
(352) 398-9881

Computer&-


At Home Computer Re-
pairs & custom comput-
ers.
Call(352)228-7823
COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
On-Site Same Day
Service Available
*All Computers
*Affordable Rates
* Certified Tech's
* Networking
*Virus/Spyware/
Pop- Removal
(352) 341-4150
www.fastteks.com



REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch * Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-1728


Your World






Un , itNicie tan

*. wiv chronlsolemumlnmg, i


RV CARPET &
FLOORING
REPLACEMENT
(352) 628-1164



Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
work fully coated. 30 yrs.
Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-795-6533
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CheapCheapCheap
DP press, clean/paint
Many references.
'5S37-3765
ALL HOME REPAIR
painting, drywall flooring,
pwr. wash Malley's Home
Maint
220-9486 (lic0259169)
4us out zoomcitrus.com








FERRARO'S
Painting Service
Int/Ext. Free Est. Press
Cleanin 352 465-6631
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




AFFORDABLE Mobile
Boat Maint. & Repair
Technical/Electrical
Custom Rigging
John (352) 746-4521
V us out zoomcitrus.com
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
27 yrs. exp. Certified
Best prices/guaranteed
352-220-9435
PHILIP TOMKO
V us out zoomcitrus.com
SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149. Up
BOAT COVERS,$189. Up
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
-ALE


DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Gas / Diesel Engines
No iob too big or small,
352-228-2067












The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic//ns. #2441.
352-634-1584


SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149. Up
BOAT COVERS,$189. Up
352-563-0066
/us out zoomcitrus.com




PRIVATE DUTY
CAREGIVER
Looking for work.
(603)661-9054
THERE ARE OTHER
SOLUTIONS Besides
Nursing Home.Private.
Home 1 on 1 care
Alzheimer/Dementia, No
problem, References
503-7052




4 SEE THROUGH
Window Washing
All Aspects (352)
489-4189; 322-0962
/ us out zoomcitrus.com




HERNANDO AREA
MOM will provide your
children w/excellent
care. Ages newborn &
up. Affordable rates.
352-726-9423




HOME SERVICES
Serving Citrus Co. for 10
yrs. Cell. (727) 642-7757
MAIDS ON CALL
Serving Citrus 3Yrs.
Windows/Free Est.
(352) 726-8077
Malou's House
cleaning, $12.00 Per hr. 2
hr. min. Homosassa area.
(352) 476-9676




Affordable CABINETS &
COUNTER TOPS
New & Remodel
352-586-8415




PREMIER BUILDING
New, Remodels, Alum
const.barns,comm'rl,
decks, lic/ins 793-3654
/ out@zoomcitrus.com
QUALITY CRAFTED
BUILDERS New, Renova-
tions & Commercial
15 Yrs in Citrus County
352-726-5507
REX MULLIS LLC
JESSE MOORE Const.
Roofs, additions,
remodel, handyman
352-564-0969
rc0066915/cbc057605
We will beat any price
by far without com-
promise. Dunham Con-
struction roofing, re-
modeling, home maint.
painting, press, wash,
etc. talk to owner
422-6575 (crco452543
/us out zoomcilrus.com


ROGERS Construction
New Homes & All
Construction (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rovers,
wood decks, fla rms,
windows, garage scrns
(CBC1257141) 62-0562



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996











#1 A+ Mr. Fix - It!
All repairs, painting,
gutter & yard clean-
ups. 352-382-3647
Vus out zoomcitrus.com
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash &
Gutters Lic. 5863
(352) 746-0141
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

' NATUREE COAST
HOME REPAIR
& MAINT. INC.
I Offering a Full
Range of Services
www.naturecoast
homerepair.com
Lic. 2776/lns,,
352-634-5499
Visa/MC/Discover


r ------I.

Sheds & Garages of
Any Size
*SHEDSNOW*
We Move & Buy
I Used Sheds
I lndependence/41 |
(352) 860-0111 �

El-ctrical


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash &
Gutters Lic.5863
(352) 746-0141
#1 AT SERVICE
MALLEY's ELECTRIC
352-220-9326 or
255-4034. #ec0001840
V us out zoomcitrus.com
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699
SALTMARSH
ELECTRIC
Comm/Resid. & Sign
Lighting. CR13012391
352-344-3810
/ us out zoomcitrus.com



C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264 /201-1422



Carpet Factory Direct
Repair ' Clean * Sales
Laminate, shop at
home. 352-341-0909



PAVING & SEAL COAT
VIGLIONE LLC-lic/Ins
www. TAR-MAX com
Free EstI3521726-3093


AARON'S FENCE
All Types, Best Price
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
24/7(352) 795-7373
/ us out zoomcitrus.com


1st Choice
PEST CONTROL, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE


LAWN GOT

PROBLEMS?

Call 503-6821
Owner/Operators
Lloyd Smith * Bill Biedensle-in * JimC ,"
7W2168 5340W. GlenBrook St.


ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Fence Work Free
Est. LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins




John Gordon Roofing
WE'VE MOVED New
Location - Same Great
Services (cccl325492)
352-382-7003
REX MULLIS LLC
JESSE MOORE Const.
Roofs, additions, re-
model, handyman
352-564-0969
rc0066915/cbc057605
ROOF REPAIR 15-yrs
Quality work, reason-
able rates. Call Ted
O'Brien, 352-257-0657




BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Estimates
Lic#2579/lns, 257-0078
Decorative concrete,
Landscape curbing
River rock resealing
344-4209 (Lic.6960)
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack repair,staining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
m 352-464-3967 v
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
LIc. #1476, 726-6554


Remodeling


Additions, Garages
Decks, Bathrooms &
Handyman Services
40 Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768


Installations by
Brian CBC 1253853
Wu'e&t y ed4 S4 wo iw .*
352-628-7519






Siding, Soffit & Fascia, Skirting,
Roofovers, Carports, & Screen Rooms.
www.advancedaluminum.info


---M ULLS LLC
JESSE MOORE Const.
Roofs, additions, re-
model, handyman
352-564-0969
rc0066915/cbc057605




A Cutting Edge
Tile Job
Showers. Firs etc
(352) 422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




REPAIRS
Wall & Ceiling Sprays
Int./Ext. Painting
Lic/Ins 73490247757
352-220-4845
ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs, Tex-
ture, Additions
Free est.220-9016
Lic.#SCC131149747



Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone Drive-
ways & Tractor work
341-2019 or 257-1562
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,
Hauling, Site Prep,
Driveways. Lic. & Ins.
(352) 795-5755
*TOP SOIL SPECIAL*
3 Yd -$60/ 5 Yd $85
10Yd $175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436



All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/us out zoomcitrus.com
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,HaulingSite
Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins795-5755
/ us out zoomcitrus.com



BANG'S LANDSCAPE
Sod, grass plugs,
plants, trees. Please
Lv. Msg.352- 341-3032


#1 AGAIN! Pro Tech
Lawn Service. Family
owned & operated.
Serving central Citrus
Cty since 1999. Call
for free estimate
302-7800 - Lic/Ins.
Affordable Lawn Care
Dependable Service
Professional Quality
352- 601-7086
3us out zoomcitrus.com
Andersen's Lawn Serv
Mowing, Trimming, Clean
Up, Low Rates
352-277-6781

BARKERS LAWN
Guaranteed to
Beat the Current Price
You Pay for Lawn Care
Service. Monthly/Per
cut rate.352-232-8166
Bob's Pro Lawn Care Re-
liable, Quality Work Resi-
dential / Comm. Lic./Ins.
352-613-4250
Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Specials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
/us out zoomcitrus.com
DUN-RITE LAWN SERV
Clean up, tree trim,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681
/ out@zoomcitrus.com
HALLOCK & SON
LAWN CARE - Reliable,
Complete, Detailed
Service Since 1994
Uc/Ins. 352-746-6410
HARRY EVERSON'S
LAWN & MAINTENANCE
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
(352) 302-2585
v us at zoomcltrus.com
HEDGE TRIMMING,
HAULING(ANY KIND),
LAWN MOWING,
MULCH. FREE ESTI-
MATES. 352-344-9273
OR 352-201-9371

Lawn Care 'N' More
Mow, clean up
brushes, beds
Friendly Service since
1991
Residential/Commrl
(352) 726-9570
/ out zoomcitrus.com

OSBORNE'S
Quality Work - Free
Est. LOWEST RATES
352-400-6016 Lic/Ilns
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic,.& Ins.
(352) 797-3166


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One..l
Tub to Shower Conversions Toot!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-58S-8827
BATHFITTER.COM


ZIEGLER'S LAWN
& LANDSCAPE a
SINCE 1999 (Lic/Ins)
628-9848 or 634-0554
V us out zoomcitrus.com



AQUA AZURE
Cert. Pool Operator
All Citrus County I
352-344-4796
EVERCLEAR POOL
SERV. & Maint.
Concrete Pools Onlyi
(352)344-5122
POOL BOY SERVICES-
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
- 352-464-3967 w-
PURDY POOLS
St. Certified, Serv. & Main
(352) 220-7301




MOBILE RV
SERVICE
SWE COME TO YOU
Motor Homes �i
5th Whis/Rv's i
Master Tech
352-586-5870
Storage Available "




WATER PUMP SERVICE'
& Repairs- ail makes &
models, Anytime,
344-2556, Richard



ELITE PAVING &
SEAL COATING
All types - Res/Commr
352-302-3030 Licltns I
/us out zoomcitrus.comf




Circle T Sod Farms,
Inc. Tired of your dead
lawn'? I
Replace it with i
Bahia. Delivery 1
Avail (352)400-2221 (

New Systems & Repairs
Lic/ Ins #3000
(352) 422-0641
/ out zoomcitrus.com
Tear out your lawn and
replace. Comm/
Res. Free est. J & J Soe
352-302-6049


Cope's Pool & Pavers:
* Pool Refinishing
. Interlocking Brick Paver
* Patio & Donveways

- ' ORDER YOUR
SPOOL TODAY
& BE SWIMMING?
BY SUMMER-
' "FREE QUOTES;'
n Lic. & Insured
. 352CPC14565653188
352.400.3188


"^ " 1i

i I i,
! ;It
i ,


SServices for People Who Want Results




- In Print and Online Daily -


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CINIC LE










D8 SINiY, AR, AiL. 9,) 20




SMItH CORONA SUR Dbl bowl stainl
112 $40 travel play yard w/Hdwr liecik
Cosco Fun Sport $40. AlHdwr 1 medi
(352) 527-1418 All for $50 35
FISHERMAN SELLING NEW WE
All fishing & boating VACUUM 10
equip., rods, reels, NEW in Bi
anchors, pumps, radio, 352-489-
etc Woirth $4,300 buy Iall Vacuu
$995 abo(352)249-1187 Sebo, Exc c
FLEA MARKET ITEMS $700. asking
all kinds of stuff for (352) 746
$40.00 352 637 0046
FRESH FLA KEY WEST I T
SHRIMP. Today $41b
Limited supply - Call
now! 727-726-8617 AB LOUNG
INVERSION TABLE $100 New! $50 00.
Sharp 27" TV 10 years old -ELECTRIC TF
(352) 563-1073 Good Condit l
. ,,- ' -t.. 464-03
Act Now E HOME GYF
MWM 950, 15(
stack. Brand n
ITS FREE Call 352-382
11 IE 0 leave mes

Place any General Mer- STATIONARY
chandise Ad for FREE on WORKS AR!
our all new Digital ReadoL
CLASSIFIED SITE. 464-03

5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 Items totaling less than
$100.00 each.
'91 CLUB
Go to: Golf cart. Ne
chronicleonline.com ies, cables, hi
and click place motor, lift k
an Ad in the top right chrome rims
hand corner. 607-387-
MOVING BOXES 7, C
fledium-Large about 15 w/ '97, Club
|some bubble wrap $15 for Golf Ca
all 352-489-3914 curtains, I
---windshield,
PUB SET Steel&cane (352)windsh 54.ield,
lass top table 4 chairs $99. (352) 564
viobile home axels 12 wide CLUB CAR G(
$99. 746-1186 563-1073 New batierie:
RANGE HOOD cover, include
$25 $1,000 (352).
BATH SINK $25 Concealed VC
563-1073 Permit Cc
SALE DAN'S GUN
BIMINI TOPS $149. Up (352)726-
BOAT COVERS,$189. Up FRESH FLA KI
352-563-0066 SHRIMP. Tod
/ us out zoomcitrus.com Limited supp
TIRES (3)- size 225/60/16 nowl 727-72
3ood Tread $20heach or all PRIVATE COL
3 for $50 352-489-3914 Buying G
-----------Buying G
TYPEWRITER $99 Ammur niti
small nuker (352)563-1073 reloading sa
VERY NICE Old Oak (352) 586.
Fireplace Mantle and Old RIFLE AK47 talc
Oak Swivel Desk Chair 2 mags, 100 r
each $99.00 ammunition w/
352-212-8555 Ammo 762x
ALAN NUSSO rounds brass c
INSURANCE AGENT (813) 789-
Rods & Reels
.,it,' " :. fishing equip]
rods, hooks &
. r tools (352)52
WE BUY (
On Site Gun t
' (352) 726-


$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
*HEALTH 6 x 12 Cargo
*ANNUITIES Side door, & di
*DISABILITY GBWR 2,900 Ib
$2,000 abo, 6
352-422-6956 Cell (352) 58
www.ANIISSO.com 12X6 UTILITY
121/2X6 UTILITY


NURIT 2085 POS
CREDIT CARD TERMI-
NAL Barely used still in
box. $75.00
ph.352-564-1219



2 MANUAL WHEEL
CHAIRS Grod Condition
no foot rests $50.00
464-0316
4 PRONG CANE Adjust-
able Height $25.00
464-0316
JAZZY SELECT 350
,WHEELCHAIR. Exc. cond.
$350.
352-220-3983
MANUAL WHEEL
CHAIR FOR CHILD OR
SMALL ADULT no Foot
Rests fair condition
$40.00 464-0316
ROLLING SHOWER
CHAIR/TOILET CHAIR
t Like New with Foot Rests
& Brakes Light Weight
$70.00 464-0316
USED SCOOTERS
) & Power Chairs Lifts
$500 & up Quality
0 Mobility (352) 564-1414
/ out zoomcitrus.com




Buying Silver Coins
$.10, .25, .50, $1.00
Pre- 1965,
352- 302-8159
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676


I


ess w/Hdwr
s (cream)
cine cabinet
2-489-3914
T/DRY
0 Gallon-
ox $70
3914
Lm
oend Pd
$199.00
-7044




ER Like
464-0316
READ MILL
n $140.00
316
M Marcy
0 lb weight
ew. $300.
2-1727 &
ssage.
BICYCLE
MS TOO
it $100.00
16




CAR
w batter-
gh torque
it, tires,
. $3500.
6639
Car
art,
rights,
$ 1.200
-2756
3LF CART
s, full rain
is charger
464-1476
Weapons
course
N ROOM
5238
EY WEST
ay $41b
ly - Call
26-8617
LLECTOR
uns,
on&
supplies
-7516
ling stock
ounds of
/gun $900;
39, 500
ase, $300
0592
, various
ment, fly
more, plus
27-0802
GUNS
Smithing
5238




o Trailer
rop back
s. asking
628-7389
84-5011
' TRAILER


in good. sturdy
condition. $575/obo
352-344-9810
813-404-2260
30FT ENCLOSED
TRAILER. 5th wheel hitch,
can be easily changed
to goose neck ball.
$6500 352-341-1143
CAR HAULER
'06, 32 Ft. Dominator XT.
By Classic C. Trpl.'
axels. $14,800. Like
new.(352) 835-4273




CHERRY STAINED CRIB,
sleigh bed style, 4 -mo.
old. Includes firetruck
patterned bumper pads,
quilts & sheets $125
637-0511 or 302-9168



--: Act Now.

PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad




LEAF MULCHER in good
condition (352) 447-3022
WANTED:
Large or extra large
clean, used dog crate.
(352) 726-9369




DrawTite, 16K 5th wheel
hitch with slider.
Bed bars not included.


Finder Jazz $495 obo(352) 447-4858
Electric Base
r Exc. cond. no scratches.
Like new. $600.
(352) 637-4476
Spinet Piano Boston Terrier Pups
' with Bench CKC Reg. 2 females,
Excel. cond. recently 1 male, ready w/health
tuned, $600 obo cert. April 17 $500.
(352) 794-3407 (352) 212-8111 Iv.msg.







450 FLORIDA HOMES

including 53 in the Tampa area

THURSDAY

MAY 7th * 7:00 PM

Tampa Marriott Westshore

Get your next home at the price you set
with NO STARTING BIDS. If you're buying
your first home or your 10th, today's
housing market and low interest rates
make this an ideal time for you to buy!



pTampaFLHouseAuction.com

OR CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE

866-519-2837




\l \INI \l,,

OPEN HOUSE:
Saturday & Sunday
May 2-3
1:00 to 3:00 PM
$3,000 down in a cashiers check for each
property. 5% premium on each sale.
All sales subject to seller's approval.
Ic I!!;: H & M t1 AB110,
, B. G. Hudson, Jr. s, BK300W;G1f f Al230


CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES I
have 6 puppies available
for sale. I have both
male's and female's. Two
month old, has their first
shot/are de-wormed.
$400 asking price.
352-228-3442

DACHSHUND
IFern Red. 1 M
lan/white, 10 weeks
$400(352) 586-9217
DAIRY GOATS Pure Bred
Nubians and Alpines.
Pygmys and crosses. All
ages. Prices vary.
(352) 463-9492
peacebound7@aol.com








EXOTIC HIPPIE
BUNNY RABBITS

Order Now For
Easter & 4-H

New small breed, $15.- $35
ea.
All colors, adults
2 to 3.5 Ibs.
352-621-0726
Cell (352) 422-0774







German Shephard
Puppies. AKC champion
line, Mom & Dad on sight.
Home raised. 9 Wks.old.
$750. to $1000.
(352) 568-0250
GERMAN SHEPHERD
WHITE MALE PUP PURE
BRED AKC 4 MONTHS
OLD ALL SHOTS MOSTLY
HOUSE BROKEN
$750.00 CASH
(352) 465-3139
MALTESES PUPS
CKC,1 male &
5 females $600-$650.
shots, 8 weeks old
(352) 586-5747
MINI DASHUNDS
AKC reg, champion
blood lines. H. cert. 1st
shots/wormed. Variety
of colors, 352-897-4422:
816-0121 Iv msg.
Pomeranian puppies
14-wks old, 2 males
great temperament,
Parents on premises
(352) 860-2004
REWARD FOR LOST
DOG
Maddie is a large
brown, curly hair
shitzu. Very skittish,
ran when family home
caught fire. Last
seen in area of 7 Riv-
ers C. C. Family is
heartbroken.
Call if found or any
sighting of her.
352-586-8539

Shih-Tzu Puppies
Home raised w/ love.
All shots included. $300+
3902 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827
(305) 872-8099
WEIMARANER
PUPPIES
Born 1/7, ready now,
H/C, Tails Cropped,
M/$350. F/$400.
(352) 628-0206




2 Arabian Studs
1 is registered. 1 Older
Tennessee Walker,
great w/kids & riding. All
under $700. each.
(352) 563-9985
Pretty Paint Filly
Coming 2 yrs, old. $450.
Registered
Buckskin Colt.
$750,No reasonable
offer refused. Quiet & gen-
tle. (352) 873-6033

Summer Horse
Camp
(352) 382-5400
www.rymarranch.com




BABY GOATS SHEEPs
& PIGS For pets only.
Mini Farm off 495
(863) 843-2495 cell
Chickens,production
Red's, polish purebred
bantans, different types
of duckling, quail, guinea
pigs & pigeons $4/up
795-6381/476-3319




50HP JOHNSON
Outboard, runs good.
$595/obo
FT ISLAND MARINE
SUPPLY
352-436-4179
91/2 hp Evinrude.
Ultraltght Fisherman, short
shaft, man. staor.$395;
9.9 hp Johnson short shaft,
man. start, low hours.
$725 Bill 352-436-4179
BOAT MOTOR
'01 Yamaha, F-40 HP.
4 strk. short shaft,
elec.,tiller, Like new.
$3,500.(352) 628-1072




12 ft. Aluminum Boat
w/trailer, 5hp engine
$650 obo (352) 726-4227
18 FT PONTON 1994
landau 1800obo good trl
35 evenrude needs a little
work fishfinder
352-628-5899
352-287-9793
24 fT PONTOON
w/new trailer
old boat 86 Johnson


50hp $2000
Call (561) 248-4200
1993 17' Sylvan
Boat & trailer
85h.p. Yamaha motor
Good cond. $3,500
(352) 344-0457
19FT DILKS Fishin'
Ski Barge. Trailer, 90HP
Suzuki, trolling mtr, CC.
Elec winch on trailer,
$4000. 352-726-4745
21' Wellcraft Fisherman,
C/C, 200 Merc., custom
T-top, outriggers, just
tuned, extras. Moving.
$6400 (513) 260-6410
(In Crystal River)
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale!
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'98 MAKO 252
CC, 25fl, twin 150HP
More, trailer. Well main-
lained GCreat cond.
24000. 352-634-2769


Big 13 Ft. haul,
2 seats. Approx. 375-400
HP 8 blade warp drive.
2-1 reduction gear box.
Used 100 hrs.+ Trl.
$18,500 invest. Sell
for $10,000 firm.
(352) 302-4535
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
AQUA SPORT '05
175 Osprey, 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual bait.
w/switch, bimini, easy load
trailer. Low hours.
$10,800/obo 352-860-0277
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
$.JQMQll 352-746-5856
Cabin Cruiser
24 ft.
Owner died, 6 cyl. 10, al-
pha one/OD, used in
fresh water, tan. gal. tri
incl.'d $2,500 464-0316
CENTURY
'01- Bay, 21ft.
'02, 150HP Yamaha w/
trlr., custom cover
dep/find, VHF, Iw hrs.,
like new, $13,950.
(352) 442-7772
Deck Boat
95' 19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ ra-
dio & fishfinder. New Bat-
tery switch. 2 batteries,
power pk.
prop./hub.$7,000
(352) 726-0838
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras!
$14,500/obo. (352)
489-9640: 220-6508
FRESH FLA KEY WEST
SHRIMP. Today $41b
Limited supply - Call
nowl 727-726-8617
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
115HP, stroke Yamaha,
w/trir. $15,900. will
trade (352) 503-3778
I WANT YOUR BOAT
Will trade New Heat
Pump, any size, any
SEER, fully Installed,
permit included.
(352) 746-4394
JON BOAT
'03 14 ft. w/trailer
aluminum haul, 9.9 4 strk.
Merc.& troll, motor. Exc
con. $3550 352 341-2154
OSPREY
1994 - 16ft, CC, bay boat.
88 HP Evinrude, Garmin
GPS/recorder $4500.
352-621-4711
POLAR 2310, 2006
23FT. POLAR BAYBOAT
250HP YAMAHA
4-STORKE, CUSTOM
TRAILER,
T-TOP,GPS,VHS, GAR-
AGE KEPT. $25,000
FIRM 352-795-7766
PONTOON
'85 20' JC, 50 HP
Johnson. Low hrs. needs
TLC, No trailer.
$3,000 (352) 621-0987
PONTOON BOAT
08' 20 Ft. To many
options to list. $13,000
Call for info. 628-7926
Pontoon Boat
1996,18 ft., 40HP Yamaha,
4 stroke, $8,500
(352) 860-1490
Pontoon Boat
2004, 20fft; Must Sell! &
Kawaski Jet Ski $2,400.
(575) 430-7927
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras $12,000
(352) 628-0281
PROLINE
03 32ft center console,bunk
under, twin OB 160 hrs. like
new, loaded, incl trir. may
consider newer Corvette
as trade $48K (352)
201-1833
PROLINE 20.5' Bay 2002
Mercury 150-$9950
352-331-5204
PROLINE
23' W. A.C. 200 Hp.
Johnson. Bim. top. GPS.
F.F.NHF. Low hrs.
$4,250 (352) 563-5628
PROLINE
WICUTTY
'95, 20' 120 HP
Merc. Dep/find.
Radio, fish rigging.
Includes trailer. Good
cond. REDUCED!
$5,900.Call Pete @
(352) 746-4969
SEAARC JOHN BOAT
1652PCC, 100 gage all
welded .alum., 72 in.
beam. Side console, live
well, bilge pump. 50hp
Johnson & troll, motor,
new E-Z load trailer
$3,500 (352) 628-1847
T-CRAFT
23'L, 6'W, '02 150H
Evin. mtr. w fuel enj. like
new, trlr. w/brks
$7750 352-489-3661
Ultimate Scallop
Boat 03, 25' Sun
Tracker, 05 Merc 90hp, Io
hrs. tandem trail. like new
exc. value $11,500.
352-586-1676
Wanted to buy Boat
Trailer for a 9 ' Dinghy.
Leave Message.
(352) 344-4505

WE NEED

BOATS
SOLD AT NO FEE
Selling Them As Fast
As They Come In!
352-795-1119
Mercury Auth Parts
and Service



US 19 Crystal River
(just north of the Mall)

WELLCRAFT
1987, 250 Sportsman,
25', Gas eng., 30" draft,
260 hp I/O, alum.
trlr.$8.000


(352) 344-9651




05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
26inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
'07 NEW MAR
Cypress 32ft 5th wheel.
2 slides. Separate bath,
Extras, 3 yr ext. war-
ranty $39,900/obo
352-794-3534
38FT BOUNDER '96
Class-A - basement
model. 49K ml. 14mpg,
new tires & brakes. (4)
TV's. Ready for long trip.
$ 0, 352-563-0615


CLASSIFIED




Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 38 K Mi.
Dual air. $36,000 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
SAUTO. BOAT
* &M *
DONATIONS
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
(352) 795-9621
* Tax Deductible *

CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CHEVY
'86 Class c. Very good
cond. $4,350. Call
anytime. (352) 446-6329
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane 30Q, class
A motor home, 31% ft., 22k
mi. V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed, etc.
Saturn tow Avail. $35,000.
Lets talk (352) 397-5007
GEORGIE BOY
'05, Pursuit, Class A,
30ft.
Excel. cond. 8k mi.,
2 slide outs, 2 TV's, back
up camera, all the bells
and whistles and much
more, must see this
coach, Asking $50,000.
obo (352) 746-7626

GULF STREAM
'07 BT Cruiser, 22' 8K.MI.
Hitch & tow bar. Like new.
$37,500
(352) 875-8890
GULF STREAM
BT Cruiser 03, 22' fully
loaded, ready to travel
$29,800....
(352) 341-1297
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool, club-
house etc.
$29,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
Holiday Rambler
'03, By Monico, 300 Cum-
mins, 2 slides, incl. tow
vehicle,
mint cond. $84,900.
(352) 302-7073
Holiday Rarrbler
Admiral Motor Home 36' 2
slides, 340hp, gas eng. all
options transf ext. warr.
$51,900
352 795-3970
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$55,995. 352-464-0371
JAMBOREE
29',2005, V-10 Class C
12,400 mi., Loadedl Pert.
Condition! Ready to go!
$39,000 (352) 465-2138
Keystone 07
Big Sky 5th Wheel Prem.
Pkg 340RLQ every option.
Center Island Kit. incls
sep.W/D, added 2nd a/c in
bedroom
Price to Sale $52K firm
352-794-3068
PACE ARROW
04, 38' 3 SLIDES
21k mi fully loaded
3 tv's $92,500 obo
352-302-0743
Winnebago
'94 32' class A,
Clean no pets/or smoke.
$9,500 Or Obo.
(352) 746-1169



1973 29 ft. AIRSTREAM
New carpet, new
upholstery, 2 double
beds, 2 cots, very nice,
clean condition. $8k or
trade. (305) 619-0282
$500! Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig. Like
new. $9,995.
352-489-3661
BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig. Like
new. $9,995.
352-489-3661
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Ca/ll Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO
07 Jay Flight
28' used twice, smells &
looks new, green
clean, sips 6 $16,800
(352) 503-7431
KODIAK
'04, Hybrid Travel Trir. AC,
Heat, Micro. Tub/ Shwer,
toilet exc cond $9,500.
352-564-4151
MEADOWBROOK
5th Wheel, 2000 Excel-
lent. Photos at
http'/picasaweb.google.come
meadowbrook.Glenn
-$13,995.00 (352)302-6055
or (727)692-9045
Montana
'03. 5th wheel, 3 slides
like new,$34,000.
Truck avail also for tow
(352) 422-5731



'06-'08 Dodge Truck new
chrome air deflector
w/fog pockets, $285;
Chrysler Pacifica factory
hitch w/electric plug $65
(352) 795-6639 or


PICK-UP TAILGATE,
Fifth Wheel Louvered.
Custom flow. Fits 99-2005
Ford Super Duty $225
(352) 447-4858




$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$500! Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org


Buvina Used Cars
Trucks & Vans
For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333




1993 GEO Tracker
4x4, Auto, low miles
fair cond. air works
$2,000 (352) 344-9931
1998 Buick LaSabre
Showroom condition
Fully power equipped
61k original miles
$4,995 aobo (352)
560-4251
$500 1 Police
Impounds for salel
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
BMW
'03, 745 LI, NAV, black, sun
roof. all options $29K Mint
(352) 746-2696
BUICK
'05 Lacrosse CX, 3.8
V6.Gas sav.low mi. CD.
Onstar.$9,995.
Wooten's 637-7117
BUICK
2005, Lacrosse, Alloy
Wheels & Much More
Take over pmt $199 per
mol-800-733-9138
CADILLAC
'06 DTS, $15,500, certified
warranty $100,000
(352) 746-3663
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715

ill . J.M
CHEVROLET Corvette
1967 coupe, $3500, 8
cylinder, exterior
color: Yellow, interior
color: White, 93,655
miles, manual, rare
and great muscle car,
for details e-mail me
trishashansen@gmaicom
or cal me
(702)548-7707
CHEVY '79
Malibu wagon, V8, 4
barrel, auto, new ex-
haust, great potential.
Needs finish. $1200/obo
Mark 352-302-2258
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Conv. rare
5 spd, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
blk, depend.
$4700 352- 563-0615
CHEVY corvette 1984
corvette runs great looks
good must see $3900.00
obo call 352-628-3299
CHRYSLER
2007, PT Cruiser Full
Power, Like New, Low
Miles, Take over pmt
$179mo 1-800-733-9138
CHRYSLER
'95 LBeron, Cnv. New
tires & brakes. 86K.Mi.
$1,650. Runs great.
(352) 302-9217
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US 19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
conslgnmentusa.org
CORVETTE
02, Z06,
Black, low mi., over
30 mpg hwy. $24,400.
(352) 613-5355
,CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 mi-
les on this rare silver on
silver on silver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are on
this gorgeous vette,
Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
included, Your's
for only, $48,500.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, 86K mil.
T -top roof, Excellent con-
dition $12,000., will trade
for truck. 352-563-6428
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, 86K
mil. T -top roof, Excel-
lent condition $12,000.,
will trade for truck.
352-563-6428
DODGE CALIBER
' 07 Ocala Volvo.$12,995
(352) 629-7299
FORD
'00 Focus, 4 dr. AC,
Auto. New tires & brakes
runs great,30 mpg.
$3,950.(352) 302-9217
FORD
'03 Mustang Conv. auto,
V-6, leather, all pwr, 80k,
great cond. $6,999.
352-382-2755
FORD '95
Thunderbird LX- 2dr, V6
.QA4Ef 71korig. ml.
Ex. cond. ONLY $26001
352-341-0004
HONDA
'06 Civic,$10,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well maintained.
$2650. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
MAZDA 3
'07, $11,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'01 CLK,$16,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'05, $25,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCURY
'02 Grand Marquis LS
83K.Mi. Leather int. 1
own. Exc. cond. $4,900.
(352) 382-3596
MERCURY '87
Grand Marq, new gas


tank, radiator, batt,
point, vinyl top. 27k orig
mi. Blown head gasket.
$600/firm 352-503-7548
MGB
Convertible 1977, 57k mi.
Blue, many xtras Excellent
Condition
$10,500 (352)628-0281
NISSAN
'07 Altima, $13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
OLDS '94
Delta 88 - 173k mi, V-6
Runs great -Looks good
$1250. 352-697-0889
SUZUKI
'07 Forenza. 30K mi,
w/100k warr. LOADED
w/touch scrn nav.
$12,800. 352-613-6613
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid, ,100,000 mi
warranty. $23,000.
(352) 382-1857


'08 Corolla $13,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
' 04 S-60 $8,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'05 $60,$13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-60, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC 70, $21,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC90,$22,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 S-60, $18,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S40, S$20,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S-80, $28,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
2007, S40 Like New &
Loaded Take over pmt
$199 per mo
1-800-733-9138




1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's
Dream. $6500.obo
352-228-0597
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door se-
dan. 6 cyl auto. $9,500.
Will consider trade for
travel trailer of equal
value.
(352) 628-4053
Best buy I Camaro
1969 Z28, clear title,
$3700, 8cyl. ext.blue,
int.white, 69000 miles,
manual, original
paint, for more info
(801)937-8453 or
willgoveia@gmail.com
CAMARO IROC Z
'88 Red, PS./PB. Cold
A.C. 62,000 Mi. Great
Condition. $6,900.
(352) 422-5663
CHEVROLET
Camaro '68,coupe, 107K
miles, auto, white with
black interior $4,000
stevystewart@gmail.com
CHEVY
'69 Classic C10 SHT BD
350/350 AC, PS,
$15K or trade
(352) 746-9212
CORVETTE
'87 Convertible, Drives,
looks great, 2nd owner,
new top & paint, $8,500
obo (352) 302-1524
DODGE
'1938, Pro street Coupe,
runs, needs TLC, $12,900
(352) 978-0658
(352) 447-3842
EL CAMINO
'81 305 auto. All new
interior, & paint. Crager
mags & tires. 4 " raised
hood.$3,250.
,, (352)341-3613.
GM El Camino
'84, 1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint; 63K
mi., $8,900 abo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MERCEDES BENZ
1985 380SL, 2 top road-
ster. Drives, looks great.
Many new Mercedes
parts. New A/C. Must
see! REDUCED! $7,900.
David 352-637-6443.
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
trans. & parts. $4,000.
(352) 621-0126
THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$12,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122


$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
Chevy Silverado
'02, Ext. cab, 4 dr. auto,
AC, Sport wheels, CD,
$5,995. Wooten's
(352) 637-7117
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
conslgnmentusa.org
DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awe-
some Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded
every special feature. Sr.
own, gar. kept., 27K mi,
$40K
invested Sale $21,750
See online ad photos
www.autotrader.com/atca
rid/at-f3fd39f
John (352) 726-1076
DODGE
2008, Dakota Pickup
Quad Cob, Low Miles
Take over pmts $233
mo. 1-800-733-9138
DODGE DAKOTA
'05 $11,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
FORD 04
Ranger, REDUCED
X-cab. Exc. cond.
38k mi. $9,700/obo
(352)746-3919
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway, serv.
van. 41K Mi./5.4 L. Eng.
Auto.Knapheide Serv.
body/dble lock drs. $20.000
Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
06 F 150 XL Reg Cab.
Silver, V6 auto. 26k mi.
fact, warrantyS9000
352-302-0999
FORD
'96 F 150, Eddie Bauer
w/fiberglass cap. 5.0 V8.
Good Cond., new tires,
well maintained. $3,995
(352) 563-2583


4A4, LICRW OAB,
114000 MILES, WELL
MAINTAINED, ONE
OWNER, V-10, GOOD
CONDITION. $10,500.
352-726-7715
FRESH FLA KEY WEST
SHRIMP. Today $41b
Limited supply - Call
nowl 727-726-8617
TOYOTA
2006, PreRunner
Quad Cab, Don't Miss
This Take over pmt
$349mo 1-800-733-9138
TRIFECTA TONNEAU
Cover & Nerf bars for
4 door GMC or
Chevy truck. $500.
352-302-2584




$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'93 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE , 4-wheel
drive, runs & looks great.
$1,950 (352) 464-1476
ACURA
2006, TSX, Loaded,
Uke New. Rare find
Take over $279 mo
1-800-733-9138
AZTEK
Pontiac' 04 Low
miles, loaded!
Reduced price
$8,500 abo
352-726-5715
CADILLAC
'05 Escalade, low mi. all
power, sun roof,
exc. cond. $28,000
(347) 266-9328
CHEVY
BLAZER '99 LS 4dr.
126k mi. loaded, great
cond. sunroof, $4k obo
352-422-0065
CHEVY
TRAILBLAZER
'06 $12,995. Ocala
Volvo. (352) 629-7299
CHRYSLER
2007, Paclflca
Low Miles, Fully Equlpd
Payment of $195 per
mo 1-800-733-9138
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air &
exhaust, Exc. Cond.
$6,000 obo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl drive,
class 3 hitch, Orig owner.
Great shape & price.
$8,750. 352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
GMC SUBURBAN
1993 4 WD, 454 rebuilt
eng., new transm.,
great tires, good cond.
$3,500 obo
(352) 201-1413
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, $9,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, V6,
Like new. $9,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
KIA
2008, Rondo Hatch-
back, Perfect for
FamilylTake over pmts
$199mo 1-800-733-9138
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG Silver
W/blackint, Leaded, . t
57K.Mi. New $64K.Ast"
$20K. (352)489-7674
NISSAN '93
PathfinderXE -V6, auto,
cold air, great shape.
104k ml. ONLY $28001
352-341-0004
PONTIAC
2006, Vibe, Perfect
Cond., Low Mi. Take
over pmt $197 mo
1-800-733-9138
PONTIAC
2008, Torrent Sm SUV,
Perfect for Family
Loaded. Low Miles
$279mo 1-800-733-9138




$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CHEVY '82
Blazer, V8 , auto, 4" lift,
lots of extra parts,
needs trans. $1000.
Mark, 352-302-2258
FORD '06 F-150
Crew cab XLT. Tow pkg
& topper, 47K mi.
Exc cond. LOADED!
$18,900/obo. (352)
634-1378; 795-2053
JEEP
'05 Wrangler,
Unlimited. $15,995 Ocala
Volvo
(352) 629-7299



'94 Dodge Caravan
7 pass., good running,
ood looking, asking
1275 (352)637-5394
CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872
CHRYSLER '99
Voyager, 8-pass., 4cyl,
auto, cold air, 108k ml.
ONLY $2800.
352-341-0004


1996 Cargo VAN
$1;800 obo
(352) 572-7984
FORD '91 Econollne
E150 - Handicap, lift/ pwr
seat/hand controls. 61k
orig. miles. $3,500.
352-220-3983
MAZDA
'06 MPV.$9,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
NISSAN '96
Quest, green, V6,.auto,
frt/rear air, 133kmi, over
$300 new parts. NICLE
$1595. 352-465-1892
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT









$$ SAVE $$
LIFE INSURANCE
HEALTH
ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com




HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains & tows
heavy loads. $4700/or
trade. 352- 563-0615
Crystal River
SUZUIKI 05
Vinson 500, camo color
large tires, $4K OBO
call JR (352) 613-0572



2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900mi. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. Hi pert.
Over $43,000 in receipts.
17k mi. $12,000
352-563-0615
Crystal River
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
DIRT BIKE
2 Cycle, for kids. Good
condition. $250
352-637-0046
Harley Davidson
2005, XL1200 Custom. Un-
der 7k mi.Screamin Eagle
Performance Pkg & more.
Garkept $7500 (352)
209-7495
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80", com-
pletely serviced, good
shape. Ex.
access. $5,895. obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109
HD Screaming Eagle
exhaust pipes, slide on
$100; New Milwaukee XL
cycle rain geer top of
the llne.$100
352-238-6869
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 Mi.
' 124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
lilONDA 04
1300 VTX, thousands in
options. mint condition
$6900 obo
(352) 302-7073
HONDA
Shadow Arrow 06, 714K
,mi. garage kept, not in
rain, floorboard $6200 obo
(347)223-7269 aft 3:30
KAWASKI
'00, 1100 CC,15K.
Mi. Very fast, many
extra's. $4k
obo.(352)621-3764
SCOOTER
'06 Suzuki, 400
Bergman. 4,200 Mi. Like
new cond. $4,500
(352) 382-2715
SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, BIk w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k
invested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815
SUZUKI '01
1500 INTRUDER. 26k ml.
Windshield, saddle
bags, back rest $4.500/
obo. 352-637-1033
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
TRIUMPH '09
SPEEDMASTER - Black,
shield, bags & pipes.
6K miles. $7500
352-637-2273
VENTO PHANTOM
Scooter, 318 miles, 150CC,
Like new. $2,190/obo.
352-422-2433
YAMAHA
'05 YZ125 DIRT BIKE
Race ready. Many ex-
tras. $2500. 352-
586-1683: 586-9349


325-0419 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
ANNOUNCING THE RELEASE OF ANNUAL REPORT
As required under Section 644 of the Head Start Act (as
amended December 12, 2007) Administrative Require-
ments and Standards (42 U.S. C 9839) (a) (2). notice is
hereby given that Childhood Development Services,
Inc. Head Start has published and released Its Annual
Report for program year 2007-2008.

Please see the electronic version on the agency's
website at www.chlldhoodevelopment.org
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
April 19, 2009.


326-0419 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Childhood Development Services, Inc., the Head
Start/Early Head Start grantee operating programs In
Marion, Citrus and Levy Counties. Is accepting propos-
als from child care centers and family crild care
homes. If you are Interested In providing services dur-
ing the school year 2009-2010, please plan to attend
the mandatory training on April 30, 2009. frorm'10:00 AM
- 12:00 PM at Childhood Development Services, Inc.,
1601 NE 25th Ave., Ocala, FL 34470. You are welcome
to stop by the office to pick up the Invitation (6 Bid (ITB)
Packet prior to the training. If you have any questions,
contact Cynhla Graham at (352) 629-0055, exh 293.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle,
April 19.2009


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I








Crr --- C-NT (F)C-^NciSN ,ARL1,20


.


INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE: UUU U


a-FREE
Info and Special Pricing. 24 hour
Recorded Message. Call the Listen Line:
800-325-1415 Ext. 188
$22,990


'08 NISSAN XTERRA





&-FREE
Info and Special Pricing. 24 hour
Recorded Message. Call the Listen Line:
800-325'1415 Ext. 192
S15,880


'06 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER

,,

- FREE
Info and Special Pricing. 24 hour
Recorded Message. Call the Listen Line:
800-325-1415 Ext. 196
$9,590


'04 GRAND MARQUIS

.,, :. .'l -


&-FREE
Info and Special Pricing. 24 hour
Recorded Message. Call the Listen Line:
800-325-1415 Ext. 200
$6,990


'09 TOYOTA COROLLA 'F09 GRAND CARAVAN


$08 HYUNDAI SONATA '(08 TOYOTA SIENNA


-WFREE
Info and Special Pricing. 24 hour
Recorded Message. Call the Listen Line:
800-325-1415 Ext. 193
$12,990


'06 GRAND CARAVAN


&,-FREE
Info and Special Pricing. 24 hour
Recorded Message. Call the Listen Line:
800-325-1415 Ext. 197
$11,590


'05 NISSAN TITAN





L-FREE
Info and Special Pricing. 24 hour
Recorded Message. Call the Listen Line:
800-325-1415 Ext. 201
$10,990


-FREE
Info and Special Pricing. 24 hour
Recorded Message. Call the Listen Line:
800-325-1415 Ext. 194
s16,990


,gl-FREE
Info and Special Pricing. 24 hour
Recorded Message. Call the Listen Line:
800-325-1415 Ext. 198
$16,990


'05 PONTIAC GRANDAM




&-FREE
Info and Special Pricing. 24 hour
Recorded Message. Call the Listen Line:
800-325-1415 Ext. 202
$6,990


6-FREE
Info and Spedal Pricing. 24 hour
Recorded Message. Call the Listen Line:
800-325-1415 Ext. 191
$16,990


'08 MAZDA 3




&-FREE
Info and Special Pricing. 24 hour
Recorded Message. Call the Listen Line:
800-325-1415 Ext. 195
$12,990


'05 NISSAN ALTIMA


6-FREE
Info and Special Pricing. 24 hour
Recorded Message. Call the Listen Line:
800-325-1415 Ext. 199
$9,990


Want to hear more? Call the "24 Hour Listen Line"
+ Vehicle
T 800-325-1415 Extension
I \ K t IFast, Free, No-Hassle, Pre-Recorded Info with Special Pricing
UI . 0 I ".I."-


7 U220?


r'09 NISSAN MAXIMA"


'09 NISSAN MURANO


mlFREE
Info and Special Pricing. 24 hour
Recorded Message. Call the Listen Line:
800-325-1415 Ext. 189
$20,990


i-FREE
Info and Special Pricing. 24 hour
Recorded Message. Call the Listen Line:
800-325-1415 Ext. 190
s12,990


'06 SUZUKI FORENZA




*-FREE
Info and Special Pricing. 24 hour
Recorded Message. Call the Listen Line:
800-325-1415 Ext. 203
$4,990


SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


YOU NEED TO KNOW EXACTLY
WHAT YOUR CAR IS WORTH,
NO MATTER WHERE
YOU PLAN TO BUY!


CALL THE


INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE... IT'S FREE!

800-440-9054


FREE 24 HR RECORD ITHSINFOAND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 4114
s21,999*
'08 LIBERTY


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 4133
s12,999 or 229 mo.,
'07 PT CRUISER


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 4144
8,999 or 059 I,'*
'06 300C 1'06 LIBEl


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 4155
$15,999 or'284mo


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 3133
s14,999 or '264 mo.


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE NFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 3154
$10,999 or 194 mo.*


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 3156
9,999 or 176mo,'


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSED WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 4119
1 6,999*
'08 CHEROKEE


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESS=A WTH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 3155
'11,999 or $211 mo.*


LOOK AROUND. EVERYONE'S DRIVING ONE.


c rn-u u~Y~ ~ E~


LjC.2C Ca


INVERNESS BROOKSVILLE HOMOSASSA
2077 Hwy. 44 W. 14358 Cortez Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd.
S5t5 Ext. 1
All1 princesp a' eni' Ircluae all IrI]ectlr l 3c',r, r incanile , a RGDae, , imust qualll ( . 1~ l .} DIl r r. c rC n . .r Trai. EiuI, I 6 ',, . Ci,00 ,O.-'"r L,:,yalIV TaX tlc 1 ,le ' ': , ,ar, ealer 3 -3. *,ap a ',luOw HayT. .r, s
S - ai '99A PR R fc 72 , r..,nlr, j W A C F'rilc, ' .. , alia ,'na ,.ii mn a, i,,, ,l lI .ma, i',' (r :r, a ,iir ,,.r f M. R , , 11 �' i T,.i.,-, , ,:.urar, M.IHP :'J :.', 1':I 1r 'n,, f.i' P :i. .r.:,i l.I, 1 Te, l P,: Ra f'c 1, h R a'aI.. , .. , , o. , -" .


�j~L


I


'09 T


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 3109
$18,999*


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 4134
'16,999 or '298 mo,*


'06 SEBRING


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext.3157
19,999 or 176 mo,'


'05 RAM


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 4138
18,999 or 159 mo,'


'05 NEON


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 3158
'5,999 or '105 mo,


D10


SINIH, Am.RL 19, 2009


.


I


Jeep






Section E. SUNDAY, APRIL 19,200



iOMEFR3 NT
. l*^


CITRUS COUNTY
- tA.
'-- .a


CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE
e-: ' -'


-4--


71r


I

54


773)


.71
44


ri-4






CTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


~fl4V App,, ic) 900Q


4245 N. Bartley Terrace, Beverly Hills
491 N. to Mustang Bvld turn right on Mesa Verde,
Left on Bartley
Home offered by Summerwind Homes

5191 N. Pink Poppy Drive, Beverly Hills
US 19 to state road 44 east turn left on County rod
486, follow Pine ridge Blvd, turn left Corner of Pink
Poppy Drive and Pine Ridge blvd.
Home Offered by Dream Custom Homes of
Citrus

6393 W. Glory Hill, Beverly Hills
P:ne Ridge Blvd, turn on Ponderosa, right o
Sarromento, right on Glory Hill. I st house on left.
Home offered by Middleton Sunshine
Properties

4260 W. Pine Ridge Bvld, Beverly Hills
Rt 491 t Pine ridge Blvd, follow Pine Ridge Blvd to
model on the left.
Home offered by SweetWater Homes of Citrus,
Inc.

4302 N. Breadnut Terrace, Beverly Hills
Pine Ridge atBreadnut terrace andMustang
Home offered by Lou Miele, Era American
Realty

5759 N. Carnation Drive, Beverly Hills
Pine Ridge at Carnation Drive and Daffodil.
Home offered by Lou Miele, Era American
Realty

1865 W. Citrus Springs Bvld, Citrus Springs
N. Rt 41 to left on West Citrus Springs Blvd. Model
on right past Santos.
Home offered by Citrus Ridge Realty

9356 Jourden Drive, Citrus Springs
N. Citrus Springs Bvld to left on Anson, Left on
Sandred, Right on Jourden.
Home offered by Citrus Ridge Realty

11145 W. Bentbow Path, Crystal River
US 192 miles north of the Crystal River Mall.
2 homes offered by Cosgrove Builders


Mark the weekend of April 18 & 19 to map out-your tour of what could possibly lead you to your perfect,
and affordable, dream home. All homes in this book will be open during the listed hours with a personal guide
to show you from room to room, answer your questions and then invite you to discover on your own.


263 NW Bay Path Drive, Crystal River
Hwy 19 S. Citrus Ave, 3 blocks on right.
Home offered by Edward Russell Johnston

25 N. Country Club Drive, Crystal River
From US 19 turn on Ft. Island trail, 1st left oon
Country Club Dr. go around golf course, home is
on the left, 3rd house before end of street.

11 Hemlock Ct. S. (Sugarmill Woods),
Homosassa
US 19 toE.on Cypress Bvld.Torighton Pine
street, to right on greentree St. to left on Hemlock
Ct. S. House on the left.
Home offered by Richard Van Orden/
Distinctive Homes


Register t(
one of tl
gifts at an
tie abo
opbn hoL


Weeping Willow Ct., Homosassa
Cypress Bvld W. to Douglas St. (left) Douglas to
Linder Dr. right to Beech St. Model on left.
Home offered by SweetWater Homes of Citrus,
Inc.

11410 Waterway Drive, Homosassa
from Hwy 19 in Homosassa go west on Halls River
rd about 3 miles to right on Riverhaven drive to
right on Waterway drive.
Home offered by Moore & Moore Realty, Inc.

9214 S.Suncoast Bvld,Homosassa
Hwy 19just mile north of Hwy 98.
Home offered by Adams Homes


5 Boxwood Ct. Sugarmill Woods, Homosassa
US 19 Cypress Blvd.left on Cypress Bvid E. to left
Corkwood Blvd. rto left on Bo% vwood Ct. house on
the right of cul-de-sac.
Home offered by Richard Van Orden/ Distinctive
Homes

17 Black Williow Ct. N. Sugarmill Woods,
Homosassa
US 19 to Cypress Bvld. W. to left on Cypress Blvd E. to
left on Black Willow St. to left on Block Willow Ct. N.
house on right.
Home offered by Richard Van Orden/Distinctive
Homes

2271 South Olympic Hills Terrace, Inverness
Hwy 41 S. of Inverness, turn left on Edendrive, take
1st right at S. Olympic Hills.
Home offered by Encore Homes

9710 E.White Egret Path, Inverness
From us 41 take hwy44 e. of County rd 470 (Gosperl
Island rd). Turn let one mile to entronce(East Golf
Harbor Path)
Home offered by The Moorings @Point of Woods

235 E. Foster Ct., Lecanto
from hwy44 to Kensington Ave, veerleft to
Buckingham, left on Foster

1773 S. Overview Dr., Lecanto
Hills of Avalon entrance is one mile east of Rock
Crusher Rd. at Gleneagle and Hwy. 490
Home offered by Louie Lott HomeBuilder, Inc.

5215 W. Greensily Ln., Lecanto
Hills ofAvalon entrance is one mile east of Rock
Crusher Rd. at Gleneagle and Hwy. 490
Home offered by Constate Development

5265 W. Greensily Ln., Lecanto
Hills ofAvalon entrance is one mile east of Rock
Crusher Rd. at Gleneagle and Hwy. 490
Home offered by Constate Development


Register to 1f

owin
Sese We Have Over 30 Years Combined Experience
y of 8915 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa, FL 34446
ve (Formerly Naber Kids Doll ranite Patio
ises. Hospital) Chiller Table
Fax: 352382.0216 Valued at $1,300
352382.0709


81845


E2 QuN APPJL 10 200Q




* � .


CriRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


REALTY LEADERS


Crystal River 794-0888


Inverness 341-1233


Beverly Hills


SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 E3


\\Of THE/


527NNE2
527-1112


Iiti


'10


'i C


NEH WI.1STING - Pristine
and '.rie! You must see
lh, r. Jtiful maintenance
S. in desirable Fox
H.II. II features an open
I .: as well as 3
berT., plus a den. Huge
. ..,.. - rd" ,., Ir.. A...r..]e Tul
n3,,,, i,-,m ir,, [,3,:� p- nlu 315, �lrll 3S IA>:,
,',-,J l . ,'l r,, :, _,,:'. l; ,'1, ri l ..r, ,TI-nc - i k Z
G~jllii-i~j '*;". ' 4I 4'. l- 1


BILL
HUTCHINGS
352-697-3133


uIU
GARCIA
S352-302-9129


NEW LISTING � ,. .o-, I. ., l.:. I .i;,; .r , .r, ili I..,,
'. T_ . .' JT ,:,:,l l,,,,i '..',:,. | I 1 $204,900. '-3 r;q3
FpnP: I. '- :r:.-=, r'


1667 N. FOXBORO
LOOP
MeL iow.. ;Ie . I L1 i--'
in Ma Vic,a RICHT ,-
F,.. r. , -.i:. .
s; ' 1 i15.000 ri,,-,


OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY APRIL 19TH. 2009 1:00-3:00
1',.i ,I .-,: - . J l 1- I, lJ . , :1-. , -I I , -, ] ,... ,,. ,-,1-, I ,
:.,,:.-, ,I F ,-,:, , I-' F,: :,.'_ :,:,-ll :


Ij~ aIniy ri~ *
Er -
--- -~


RANDY LILI
SNOWDEN GARCIA
352-527-1112 352-302-9129

GREAT INCOME INVESTMENT
PROPERTY! Hard to find 3
Bedroom 2 Bath unit with one car
garage. All new block construction,
live in one unit, rent out the other.
Units come appliances included,
. sprinkler system, cathedral ceiling
fans in all rooms, tiled bathrooms
g, x and shower stalls with seat. Great
room has slider opening large lanai.
MLS 324085. $269,900


i;\. *;'. - . - .* ** TURN-KE HOME r ul . ... O-, O ,r ir..
rr , I' , ,a,- l : ,, '-3 ,rj,, , ,UT l'Ous r..ngq - 30
GREAT INVESTMENT PROPERTY *,. ..l..j'. - ir ,, , ,.,.- , ' Pu,:.-, r :uET. a.. ,r nariandlei up.grarc-J,3
0,-, l. I .ll : = _ - _ , - I-:,: , I1-, i,-, .. r' i1 . :. - ,,r:. 1.1w s r-, jh l 1: , r ,r :, r,:, .,., l I ; , O WS , tra r.--3r
$114.100 .1. $99,900
BARBARA 1111[; 4
STONE W
352-586-3072
'-snj~ ^aaA.


806 HILLSBOROUGH CT.

REDUCED TO $135,500


86 GRANDVIEW AVE.
A 3i' 2 t b atii, wih ,pa
DIR Rie l 4I H nr.c nV
1! n rir & I 1.i ler Cii -.i6
I.. E ' ri on Keller II or.
FrEsn-C no n Pearscn II
or. Urarn.I'.. -
N1LS 330..195
REDUCED TO $ 177,700


322 S. ADAMS ST.
Perfeciion piu
in inis 2/2/2
DIR -191 Io Truman
ri on S Adams
MLS 330158
$119,900


20 S. COLUMBUS
2/2/1 new roof. water
healer & windows
DIR 491 to Beverly
Hills Blvd Righl on
Columbus
MLS 332601
$83,500


I I - II


'---'V


I*


I ;
|


Ye


I ll


S1I,


vAT.


F


BILL
HUTCHINGS
352-697-3133


OPEN'HOU-


* L1 1r, I I k"


,^.''~







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'~,isnav Ann,, itS 9150


Real Estate '


Grannan joins
Keller Williams
Keller Williams Realty is
proud to welcome Paul
Grannan to their Keller
Williams team. Paul is a fourth-
generation Citrus County resi-
dent. He possesses a vast
knowledge of the history of Cit-
rus County,
and he envi-
sions what it
can be in the
future. His
extensive
knowledge of
the commer-
cial develop- Paul
ment of this Grannan
area is price- Keller Williams
less, making Realty.
him a huge
asset to the Keller Williams
family. Paul has been a Realtor
for over 7 years and owned and
operated his own real estate
firm, Grannan Properties LLC,
for over 3 years. He can be
reached at 746-7113.


ERA
Realty
taps top
agents
ERA Sun-
coast Realty
is proud to
announce
that the
Home Team
of Janice
Ayers and
Bill Moore
closed over
$1 million in
sales.
They can
be reached at
the office at
795-6811,
422-0488 or
697-1613.


Janice
Ayers
ERA Suncoast
Realty.










Bill
ERA Suncoast
Realty.


Schabruch earns
CPDE certificate
Gerry Schabruch of
RE/MAX Realty One has
eamed the prestigious Certified


11716 BAYSHORE DR.,
. 2. CRYSTAL RIVER
S2 s o, home featujrin:] full',
' '"- . ...4 ' . .. .. - 3r. p,' inte.l a larmn-ienr I.'.th
S- ' - . L", 1.. eniran,:e ,j.ig -r

r,,.h i,- ir,; r $595O0
'C;ll Alarie f.r do'uil,

KELLER WILLAMS. and directions 586-9166
IR A I Y Debbie Rector s Team



HAMPTON HILLS OF CITRUS HILLS
Directions: From downtown Inverness, 44 W to 41 N to L on 486 W,
to L on Essex, to Ron Ipswich, Ron Abalone, L on Britain.


$1,099,999


." , .. . .



(3521 228-9408

610 W. BRITAIN ST.
4bds, 6600+ sq. ft.

igm ERA AMERICAN
ERA 117 S HWY 4:
'EAL ESTATE 35


$699.000







S 352-464-0501

304 W. BRITAIN ST.
5 bds, 4000 sq. ft.

REALTY & INVESTMENTS
1, INVERNESS FL 34450
2-726-5855


Distressed .
Property Ex- "
pert (CDPE)
designation,
having com-
pleted exten-
sive training .,
in foreclosure :. -
avoidance Gerry
and short Schabruch
sales. This is RE/MAX
invaluable Realty One.
expertise to
offer at a time when the area is
ravaged by "distressed" homes
in the foreclosure process.
Short sales allow the cash-
strapped seller to repay the
mortgage at the price that the
home sells for, even though it is
lower than what is owed on the
property. With plummeting
property values, this can save


many people from foreclosure
and even bankruptcy. More and
more lenders are willing to con-


sider short sales because the
are much less costly than fon
closures.
Call Gerry Schabruch, P.A.
C.D.P.E. at 795-2441.
Landmark gives
kudos to Wells
Landmark - ...


Realty of In-
verness is
very pleased
to announce
that as of the
first quarter of
2009, agent
Michelle
Wells has
closed in ex-
cess of $5


iy
e-


-Ii


Landmark
Realty.


. . . - . .. . . .. .
3 Bedrooms, 2 baths, 2-car garage (housing 3-cars),
heated pool, living room, fabulous kitchen, formal dining room,
family room, and Citrus Hills Membership. MLS#333310
Directions: Hwy. 44W, R into Clearview Estates through
Belmont's gate, L on Secretariate, R on Seattle Slew.
American Realty & Investments
EKr' Jackie & Bob Davis * (352) 634-2371 Cell


NEE & investments
E I 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy. Realtor
REAL..STAT Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 746-3600 cell 302-0569
Email: tasiaera@yahoo.com

OWNER
FINANCING

- - - AVAILABLE.
Hwy. 19.
SGreat
SALE OR LEASE location -


million in real estate.
Michelle's area of real estate
expertise centers around fore-
closures and investment prop-
erties.
If you are looking for an in-
vestment inventory of foreclo-
sures, be sure to give Michelle
a call at Landmark Realty at
726-5263.
-From wire reports


* Submit information for
the Real Estate Digest
by 4 p.m. Thursday for
publication Sunday.
* fJev.s notes are pub
listed as space is avail
able. Submit material,
3ttn: HomneFrint, at
l.ihronif.le offices in In.
verness or Crystal
River; fa> to 563 3280:
or e mail to newsdesk@'
chronicleonline.corm.


I


WITH OPTION
Building newly built. 5,000
sq. ft. of warehouse space,
1,000 sq. ft. office space
with central heat & air.
Also second level can be
built for more space. 3 bays,
I is a loading bay.
$329,000


S. of
Sugarmill
Woods
entrance,
N. of
new
Publix.
$285,000


E4SUN APIUL 10 2000


Balmlfff.iantillsT^"
Tcodcffy ut 1


u


Lou Miele, Realto'r r
4511 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Office: 352-746-3600 A___
A j Cell: (352) 697-1685 OEM
AMERICAN ERAX
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU REALTY & INVESTMENTS .1- .EAT
V .-' PIiNE RIDGE BEAu Y - Tr..: l.1l,.:r. .i. ',,:.:..l :. , - ,3i
= Captiva Model is a must see. As you pull up the driveway,
you can't help but to be in awe of the lush landscaping
* with hundreds of flowering shrubs and trees. And once
inside, you'll be ready to call this home. With 3 bedrooms,
- 3 baths, loads of extras, and a huge lanai (31x10) and
huge screened patio (50x18), this is the perfect home for
both relaxing and entertaining. See it today!!
MLS#331767 $276,900
FABULOUS TERRA VISTA COURTYARD/
CABANA HOME - This 3 bedroom, 3 bath home
. 'b--'- oasts over 2000 sf of living including a private separate
cabana with bedroom and bath for guests/in laws. The
S, . . very private courtyard/pool area will be great for
entertaining or just relaxing. Too many upgrades to list
here. Come see for yourself And yes, it's on the Skyview
Golf course. MLS#332950. $349,000
CITRUS SPRINGS POOL HOME. Bring your offers.
"-nO CEOr ,? %- 1 ' '" Citrus Springs pool home. This beautifully decorated
well-kept home has new Berber carpet, spacious living,
. vaulted ceilings, wood floors, tiled bathrooms and inside
S " laundry room. The entrance has a leaded glass door.
The rear of the house has a 22x10 retractable awning
over the porch. All appliances included. Call for
appointment. MLS#329651 $129,900
LECANTO - Very well maintained 3 bedroom
home on two lots. This home features large
S'' bedrooms, beautiful parquet wood flooring, newer
A/C, a fabulous screened porch, and so much
SE . more. This home must be seen to be appreciated.
Take a look today!! MLS#330341 $149,900
LOVELY AND COZY 2 bed, 1.5 bath, spacious 2
SU . " " car garage home in nice area of Beverly Hills. Well
?--'"* - ' ' * maintained split plan, with new carpet and paint
S.I�" I I , Newer A/C, roof shingles, and soffit. Features privacy
"a- ..r . screen on garage door, sprinkler system, and window
blinds. Nice golf course, tennis, and near shopping.
Home is ready to move in! MLS#328856. $89,900
PRICED FOR IMMEDIATE SALE - This immaculate
"-'C, ' _. ' gpand well maintained home in the much sought after
- single family section of Meadowcrest is sure to
please. With 3 bedrooms, a large kitchen with breakfast
nook, a fabulous and huge glassed-in lanai overlooking
the park-like setting, this comfortable home is just
waiting for you. Come take a look and your searching
will be over! MLS#331766 $184,990
3 BEDROOM POOL HOME ON
2 LOTS. Over 1500 sq. ft. of living
with a heated pool in Flying Dutchman
- or .. . Estates. Home has newer room AC &
'~- ' " " stove. MLS#328416 $139,999o
AFFORDABLE AND IMMACULATE! 3/212 in
. ' beautiful Pine Ridge Estates. This fine home is
situated on an elevated corner lot, has a fenced
'. backyard, newly remodeled kitchen with maple
cabinets, and lots, lots more. Free Health Club
member ship This home is truly a must see!!
MLS#333478 $199,900
LOTS AND ACREAGE ALSO AVAILABLE!
MLS#326201: 0.23 Acre, Citrus Sprirgs........ ................ $7,500
MLS#329512: 1+ Acres, Hwy. 41, Floral City...................... $20,000
MLS#331076: 7+ Acres, Crystal River................................ $159,000
B * ..S l Ifu n t
an ALIfr �Ctlt~gig t.




. . .


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CIIRONICLE


SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 E5


LAUREL RIDGE
SNear TWISTED OAK GOLF COURSE* LOVELY SETTING
- 3/2/2 w/Ig. fam. rm. Screened porch & lanai
SLaminate & tile ---
PRICE REDUCED -
- LOTS OF VALUE HERE!
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997
Virtual Tours @ www.FloridaListinginfo.com


SPECIAL PRICE: $459,900



. .. ~ --..", "


2V, Acres and NO DEED RESTRICTIONS.
Granite counters, cherry cabinets, porcelain tile,
FP and more in this 3/2/2
totally updated home.
NANCY BOWDISH * (352) 628-7800
Direct. 1352) 422-0296
Visual Tours at www.buvcitruscountv.com


2000' mobile, mfg'd in 2001 on half acre lot.
4BRs, 2% baths, master w/den,
large eat-in kitchen, FR and shed.
Must see!
NANCY BOWDISH * (352) 628-7800
Direct: (352) 422-0296
Visual Tours at www.buycitruscounty.com


NICE SIZED LOT
* LR plus FAMILY ROOM * 2/2 with 1 car garage
* Lovely porch w/tile * Lots of cabinets
* Very nice condition ..
* Many upgrades j
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997
Email: kellyg@remax.net



FACING FORECLOSURE??
NEED TO SELL SHORT SALE??

Perhaps We Can Help!


U Certified
Distressed
Property Experts


KELLY GODDARD 476-8536
OR
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997 1


PINE RIDGE -
3505 W. VILLANOVA CT.
* Elegant Estate
* On the Golf course
* 3BD/2BA/2.5 CG
- Almost 3000 sf liv.
- Heated Pool/Spa
- Tile Roof
Directions: Pine Ridge Blvd. to North on Elkcam,
to left on Lantana, left on Daffodil, left on
Vilanova Ct., to end of cul-de-sac. _
MLS #325899
PETER & MARVIA KOROL *
Realtors
(352) 527-7842
t2Wc)l AV2i7-oT i


CRISTAL RIVER WIERFROiT M .. . ... .. , .

.I I,, , . , , . . ," hI .- , . , ,1 , i. .i.,..,

RICHARD VENTICINQUE
(352) 795-2441
Email: richardv@remax.net
www.dtruscounty-florida-realestate.com


LIIKU HIlLL LUNUU
* Updated 2BD / 2 BA
* Golfing Community
* Bright & Cheery
* Glassed In Lanai
* Overlooks Heated Pool
DEBRA PILNY (352) 637-6200
HomelnCitrusCounty.com


3/2 WITH 1802 SO. FT. LIVING SPACE
Partially furnished. 5 Acres - partially fenced. NEW
Well pump '07. 24xl 8 Workshop.
Eat-in kitchen & formal dining room.
Horses & livestock allowed.
Danny Underwood
Integrity Selling Specialist
(352) 586-1743
Emait Florido.LifeStyle@hotmailcom


MAINTENANCE FREE VILLA ON THE GOLF COURSE.
3/2/2, 2168 Living Area.
Dir. 19 S to SMW Cypress Blvd., right on Pine SL Left
on Byrsonima Cir, right into Hammocks, follow
a Byrsonima Loop around to #90.
VAL MAHONEY (352)220-4023 FI
imitil ehteoy@1amPdfy.r.aTm
SALLY CURE (3521-220-3001
ima.I. scuirEtampabay.jr.com


UE lVEV| 91. A.IKE
* Split Floor Plan - Spacious Master Suite
* Large Screened Deck - Fireplace
* Gourmet Kitchen w/granite countertops
� Waterfront on Canal to River I .
SUPER BUYI MUST SEEIII "
CHERYL LAMBERT ,
352-637-6200
Email: cheryllambert@remax.net


CITY LIMITS OPEN LAKE HOME
2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage. 2358
sq. ft. Storage area, screened
room, city water and sewer.

BARBARA MILLS
(352) 637-6200
Emaihl: barbarajmills@earthlink.net


3/2 HOME W/FAMILY ROOM,
LIVING ROOM, SPLIT FLOOR PLAN,
FENCED YARD WITH POOL.
Big shed. Affordable living with
room to roam. New price.
JENNIFER STOLTZ
(352) 637-6200
Emaf: lnfo@GtrusCouatyHomes.com
www.CitrusCountyHomes.com


REDUCED $90,000
This large waterfront home has been
abandoned by it's owner! Must sell
DRASTICALLY REDUCED
TO $299,000
Kim DeVane 352-257-5353


BEAUTIFUL VILLA STYLE HOME PRICED RIGHT! Very
spacious 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on low maintenance
lot in exclusive Oakwood Village area of Beverly Hills
Very large kitchen and dining r 1,m ir
conditioned Florida r. ...-, ...... [ - ]
room and big 2 care ... -. .: I ..
designand recently ,p -,, .: F,... r ,,-, . j
Steve Varnadoe
795-2441 or 795-9661
Email: stevevarrad ei',emax.net


DON'T RENT IT ... OWN IT!!
Terrific buy on this 2006 built home. 3/2/2 in
Citrus Springs. Split plan. Large kitchen.
SELLER SAYS SELL
AND REDUCED IT!
VICKI LOVE 352-697-0712
Email: VickiLove@Remax.net
www.VickiloveHomes.com


POOL HOME WITH 1953 SQ. FT. OF LIVING SPACE
3 bed/2 baths. Raised patio overlooks the caged pool
and the spacious backyard. Home has sliders to pool
area from master bedroom, great room and eat-in
kitchen. A little TLC could make this a
wonderful place to call home.
Financing Availablel
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


LARGE HOME +XTRA BLDG. LOT!
Huge reduction on this beautiful home featuring over
1920 sq. ft. of liv. space. 373/2 w/2 fam.. rms., fireplace
remodeled w/tile throughout; new windows in 2007,
custom paint; newer AIC; brand new septic.
This home is a must see and the attached
building lot is included in the price -
VICKI LOVE 352-697-0712 ,-
Email VickiLove@Remax.net ..
www.VickiLoveHomes.com







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EG Sunday, April 19, 2009


HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chmnicle.
It is also distributed to approximately
300 business locations throughout Citrus County.
Display advertising information ........................................................ 563-5592
Classified advertising information..................................................... 563-5966
News information..........................................................................563-5660
..................................................... .............. newsdesk@chronideonline.com
Online real estate listings.......................... www.naturecoasthomefront.com
Sign up for www.naturecoasthomefront.com.....................................563-3206
Advertise online ................................................ ..... 563-3206
.........................................................................NCCsales@chronicleonline.com
"The market leader in real estate information"
C 0 L



To have your news in the Chronicle's HomeFront section, you may mail, fax or email the
information to the Chronicle, 1624 North Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. The
newsroom fax number is 563-3280 and email is newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.
You may also drop off your information at the Meadowcrest office or the newspaper's
Inverness office at 106 W. Main Sheet.
When submitting information, please make sure it is printed or typed, is concise and includes a
contact telephone number.
If you have any questions or comments, contact the section editor, Mike Arnold, at 563-5660
(email - newsdesk@chronicleonline.com).
HOW TO GET YOUR PHOTOS INTO THE PAPER:
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- When identifying persons in your photo, pla do from leas d so ft to right, front to back.
- For more information, please contact Matt Beck, photo team leader, at 563-5660.


Coping with a job loss

I n today's economy, the prospect of los- sult of a job loss. The risk of health prob-
ing one's job is becoming a reality for lems can increase after losing one's job due
more and more people. Most of us have to a heightened level of stress. So it's im-
beeh affected by job loss in one portant to take care of yourself
way or another. Many experts . during this stressful time by:
say that unexpected job loss can ' Eating right
create an emotional reaction , Getting at least 7 to 8 hours
similar to that felt by other sig- . - of sleep a night
nificant losses, such as death. ." ' Exercising regularly
All or some of the following Seeking emotional support.
stages will be experienced by Engaging in activities that
most people following a layoff: you enjoy (even if just for 5-10
* Shock or denial - even if it minutes a day).
was somewhat expected. . U Thinking positively .
* Anger. Monica Bonsett This last tip is just as impor-
* Resistance-may resist the CONSUMER tant as the others. How we view
job loss by trying to change the the things that happen to us de-
situation, such as taking a pay SCIENCE termines how well we cope with
cut or agreeing to work less the situation. We will still get sad
hours in order to keep the job. or angry at times and that is normal. How-
* Sadness. ever, it is important to try to frame our situ-
* Acceptance. ation in a positive light by telling ourselves
Not all people will experience all these that we've gotten through tough times be-
stages, and they might not occur in this � fore or that this is only a temporary setback'
order Some people will go back and forth This information is adapted from Dr Heidi
through the stages before finally accepting Liss Radunovich's UF fact sheet, "Coping
the job loss. The good news is that this is a with Stress During a Job Loss."
normal process and you can work through For more information, call Monica Bon-
these feelings and feel better. If you or sett at the Extension office at (352) 527-
someone you know gets stuck or has diffi- 5713. Citrus County Extension links the
culty with the process, professional help public with the University of
may be needed.
Anxiety or depression can occur as a re- See LOSS/Page E7


Inside*...
!iQile


! .


Safer colors
PAGE Ell
Jane Weber
PAGE E10
Ask the Plumber
PAGE E7
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E4
For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the Web site for the Citrus
County Property Appraiser's Of-
fice, www.pa.cilrus.fl.us.


Pitcher is excellent example of French 'Art Nouveau' style
D ear John: I found decanter ' train with Dear B.S.: Railroad rial number on the Ace
the pitcher in the epitomizes sleeper cars memorabilia covers a of Spades is S6284. I can
enclosed photo- the Art Nou- " and two ca- huge range of collecting tell they are old, but the
graph at a garage sale veau style, . booses. I interests. Fhll-size Pull- thing I have been won-
decades ago. To the tip with its flow- **, t have a book man cars, cabooses, and during about is that they
of the girl's head it is 12 ing floral en- I about differ- the like are generally are advertising Carlton
1/2 inches tall. The casing the , f. ent types of not what most collectors snuff. On the side of the
metal is a flat gray and glass, topped . .' restored tray- have the space for or box it says "Carlton is
lies on top of the glass. off with a lid eling houses, can afford. However, lowest," their old slo-
Should I polish it? The and bust of a with a small there is a collectors gan, and on the back of
detail is pretty good. I young lady. John Sikorski chapter on club, The American As- the cards, instead of the
am interested in what it The metal SIKORSK&IS restored sociation of Private normal back, there is an
was used for and how overlay is sleeper cars, Railroad Car Owners. Indian head in the cen-
much is it worth. - L.R., pewter and ATTIC obviously The club is in Washing- A
Crystal River should not be owned by ton, D.C. They produce a See ATTIC/Page E8
Dear LR.: What a polished. I think your very rich collectors. The magazine titled "Private This pewter decanter is
beautiful way to serve Art Nouveau decanter values inthis book are Varnish," a quarterly done in the popular "Art
wine. The style of your was made in France, listed as hundreds of publication. There are Nouveau" style, which ,
decanter is Art Nou- circa 1900. The overall thousands of dollars. I also charters available is characterized by sinu-
veau, circa 1890-1910, a quality appears to be just wondered if there for private rail travel. ous, flowing lines and ' .
popular decorative arts good and the condition really is collector inter- What a great way to floral patterns and often a
style initiated by the excellent. Potential dol- est in full size train cars. travel and sightsee. The features, a beautiful
French. The name lar value is $250 to $500, I have seen some small Web site is young woman as a de-
means "new art." It is perhaps more on a good train cars in people's www.aaprco.com. sign motif. This example '.
characterized by sinu- day. yards around here in Dear John: I have a probably dates from
ous, flowing lines and Dear John: My wife Hernando County and deck of playing cards around 1900, and might
floral forms, often and I were driving one restored caboose. that I was wondering sell for between $250
swirling about a beauti- around on some back As I said, it is just a cu- about. They are Aviator and $500.
ful young woman, .Your. roads and saw, an.entjre, rjosity., -B.S., In(,er1eqt brqnc q;rd.sand the se- , ,,. seciaitPthqCh~picgi . . . .





* * ,


CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 E7


Frugal tips for enjoying rest and relaxation


oom-and-gloom stories are
everywhere. At every turn,
we're hearing about unem-
ployment, foreclosures, bailouts,
crime and violence or the reces-
sion. It's frustrating, depressing
and downright annoying. You're
busier than ever, too. It's impor-
tant to be informed, but no one
wants to become Chicken Little
and it's tough to unwind after a
long day. This is especially true
when you're on a budget Fortu-
nately, many ways to relax can be
experienced at home. And on the
cheap. Develop a routine of taking
time every day to relax. It only has


to be 10 to 15 minutes for yourself,
but it can become something to
look forward to.
RECALL HAPPY MOMENTS:
Recognize when something makes
you happy. Happiness is often
found in the little things. When
you come across something that
gives you happiness, acknowledge
it. You can write these moments
down or silently say it to yourself
to keep it a memory that you can
recall during stressful times. And
this helps you to count your bless-
ings, too.
GARDEN: Start a garden. It can
be as simple as a small herb gar-


den or adding a bird vorite magazine or
feeder to your back- book, music, beverage
yard. It will force you to and candles. Fill the
take time outside, tub, and add some bub-
breathe fresh air, and bles. Shut the door, and
be close to nature. You ' - enjoy your comfortable
can keep a garden jour- - haven. Don't hop into
nal and add personal the tub and immedi-
thoughts to it, too. ately start washing.
EXERCISE: Whether S Noel Practice being mindful
it's walking or a home- Sara Noe and living in the mo-
fitness DVD, exercise is FRUGAL ment. Start by taking
going to alleviate stress LIVING control of your breath-
and make you feel great ing. Close your eyes,
This will encourage you to eat and listen to yourself breathe.
smart and get plenty of rest, too. Take a deep breath and then
SPA AT HOME: Gather your fa- slowly breathe out. Listen to the


sound of your breathing and feel
the warmth of the bath water, and
try to concentrate on only that. It
will get easier and easier for you
to relax after you've practiced a
few times.
Many spa products cost under
$15, too. One reader, Tina in New
Hampshire, shares: "I would
rather pay a bit more for hair con-
ditioner. I buy decent concentrate
that I don't need to pay a ton of
money on, and it works well on my
hair. I usually add it to my hair in
the beginning of my shower, pin

See FRUGAL/Page E8


Drain backup trouble with new tub LOSS
Continued from Page E6


Q, Ed, I love to read
your column be-
cause I always
learn something new from
the questions sent in. This
time, can you please help
me? We live in a one-story
house with one bathroom
and just had a new bathtub
installed. It looks great, but
now when I do laundry the
dirty wash water backs up
into my beautiful new bath-
tub. The old tub drained
very slowly, but we never
had water from the washer
back up into it. Where do I
go from here, and how do I
get this corrected? -Bill in
Alabama
A' I hope you hired a li-
censed contractor with a
good reputation to do this
job, because the first step
when you encounter prob-
lems right after a new home
project has been completed
is to call the contractor to
see how the problem can be


WORD OUT
* Nonprofit or-
ganizationrs
are invited to
submit news
releases
about up-
coming
events. Call
563-5660 for
details.


corrected and
who is responsi-
ble for the repair.
If you didn't
use a licensed
contractor, this
may be up to you
to correct. Either
way, it's pretty ob-
vious that you
have a partially
blocked main
drain line, and
since the old tub
drained slowly, it


Ed Del Grande
ASK THE
' . ' ,r r:


was probably an existing
condition. Knowing that this
problem existed, you should
have snaked out the drains
when the tub was being re-
placed. Somehow this was
overlooked by whoever in-
stalled the tub, but even if it
were snaked out at that
time, it would have been an
extra job anyway.
In a way, it might even
work to your advantage to
have the drain lines cleaned


out now that
everything is
completed.
Whenever drains
are opened dur-
ing remodeling,
it's very easy for
debris to find its
way into the
lines, and often
some contractors
may clear the
drains before and
after a big re-
modeling job.


Plus, when you're a contrac-
tor dealing with subcontrac-
tors, you never know what
they may be pouring into
the lines when you're not
around. I once returned to a
job site to find the painters


dumping all the extra paint
down the toilet!
The key word here is
"once." That never hap-
pened to me again. Anyway,
your issue is a clogged line
that has to be cleaned. If you
worked with a licensed con-
tractor, contact him to see if
he is willing to help you out
with the clog, since this
should have been addressed
during construction. If you
worked with a "friend of a
friend," you will probably be
on your own, and you need
to contact a rooter company
yourself. Odds are, this is
just a partial clog, not a
sewer or septic issue. And,

See P ,Page E14


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Directions: Hwy. 486 to Pine Ridge Blvd.,
to home on left
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separate 2-car garage workshop. Too
many upgrades to list here, so come and
see it for yourself. Seller says "Make An
Offer!!" MLS#331985 $449,500


ences are open to all persons
with non-discrimination with
respect to race, creed, color,
religion, age, disability, sex,
sexual orientation, marital


Florida/IFAS' knowledge, re- status, national origin, politi-
search, and resources to ad- cal opinions, or affiliations.
dress youth, family, com- - N
munity, and agricultural
needs. All programs and re- Monica Bonsett is the Fam-
lated activities sponsored for, ily and Consumer Sciences
or assisted by, the Institute of Agent for Citrus County
Food and Agricultural Sci- Extension.


TERRA VisTA

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PROPER1iES FOR SALE & RENT


Nl. ..... T-" P I


I









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ES SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009


Sapling giveaway ATTIC
Continue


to mark Arbor Day ter circle. The
identical to th


Chronicle

The city of Inverness will
host an Arbor Day Celebra-
tion at 5:30 p.m. Friday at
Liberty Park. The event in-
cludes a tree planting, dedi-
cation and sapling giveaway.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

my hair up in a large plastic
clip, do my shaving and
everything else, then I rinse
it out last Gives you the
most 'bang' out of the prod-
uct Totally worth it to me."
Witch hazel or a damp tea
bag works as an astringent,
epsom salt with a little es-
sential oil makes a great
bath salt, and cornmeal on a
wet washcloth is a good
body scrub.
CLOTHING: Change into
a set of comfy clothes, such
as sweat pants and a T-shirt
or pj's. This helps you make
a full transition from work
mode to home comfort.
1 1 .
Frugal living seems filled
with sacrifices. You can feel
as if you're alone and swim-
ming against the current It
can be tough to convince
your family to waste less
and spend wisely to reach
your goals if they view fru-
gality as deprivation. It's
often through your cheerful
frugality that others will fol-
low suit While showing the
numbers - a decreased
utility bill or shopping re-
ceipt - works well, some-
times more subtle proof that
your frugality is working
can get your point across,
too. They'll come around in
time.
CONTENTMENT: Fru-
gality teaches you to priori-
tize the way you handle your
money through identifying
wants versus needs. You
gain a new perspective on
what you already have. You
have a road map. You find
peace because emphasis is


The event is sponsored by
Sumter Electric Coopera-
tive Inc. with saplings pro-
vided by Salmon's
Wholesale Nursery, Ocala.
For information, call 726-
2611, ext. 1309 or visit
www. Inverness-Fl.Gov.

placed on what matters to
you. Your satisfaction will
be noticed. One reader, EC.
in North Carolina, shares:
"My favorite thing about fru-
gal living is that I am con-
tent. I went to Walmart with
my husband tonight. I did
not see anything that I
wanted. Months ago, I would
have wanted everything in
sight! I am content with my
life, my belongings and my
home. I just feel that way."
KNOWLEDGE: You'll
feel increased joy by simply
learning new ways to cut
costs. Even if you don't
apply everything you learn,
it's empowering to know
cheaper alternatives if and
when you want or need to.
For example, if you have a
tight week money-wise, in-
stead of being anxious or
afraid, you'll know how to
manage. Your strength is
passed onto your family.
They see you enjoying your-
self while you learn new
things. Your happiness is
contagious, too. They learn
from you! One day, one of
them might surprise you
and share something frugal
they've done. It helps every-
one prepare if a larger hard-
ship occurs.
HELPING OTHERS:
Your frugality teaches you
lessons that you naturally
want to share with others. It
might be simple, such as
how to make something on
your own or when your store
has markdowns. Or maybe
you share your abundance
through donations or with
family and friends. This
shows your family to look
outward and not focus only
on themselves. Another

See iGAL/Page E9


ed from Page E6

Indian head is
e old Carlton


logo. I was wondering the ap-
proximate age, and where I
can find more information on
them. -J., Internet
Dear J.: Playing cards have
been produced for hundreds


of years. Starting in the 19th
century, they were being
used for advertising, as they
are today.
Playing cards and advertis-
ing memorabilia are two sep-
arate specific categories of
collector interest Your deck
of cards is currently low on
both totem poles of collector
interest
Potential dollar value is
catch-as-catch-can.


-m-
John Sikorski has been a
professional in the antiques
business for more than 20
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show on WJUF (90.1
FM) Saturdays from 11 a.m.
to noon. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, c/o The Cit-
rus County Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429, or e-
mail asksikorski@aol.com.


FORMS
AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has
announcement
forms available for
wedding and en
gagement an
nouncements,
anniversaries, birth
announcements and
first birthdays.


L.n, Green, Lowe s. - cto -. $197,000 -.�,� - ^rPBp
303 .I Hrt- | 2637 W AleutsDr 240 E Classboro Ct- 1
15 W Ipswich Ln . $309,000 $115,000 9644 N Genoa Dr
$395,000 2006 3/3+den, Granite enters, Maple cabs, Greenbriar townhouse, close to community $89,900
Beautiful 4/2.5/3+offce,in Citrus Hills, liv rm, stainless apples, upgraded lighting, 3 full pool. Wonderful seasonal or fulltime home, Uke Brand New Home..kitchen & appliances,
dining rm, family rm, w/12ft ceilings, crown baths, crown molding w/ 10 foot ceilings in fully furnished. Turn Key!! Lots of closets, carpet tile, paint never lived in since
molding, gas fireplace, tray ceilgs, office & main area, tile flooring, front porch, and lanai. porch off master suite and living room. Citrus remodeled WOW! This home is a steal!!
master bath, upgraded apple, window treatmts, Beautiful landscaping. Hills Membership, New A/C. DIRECTIONS: US 41 to west on Country Club,
caged ingrnd pool & more. DIRECTIONS: Hwy 491 to Pine Ridge Blvd, left DIRECTIONS: Hwy 486 to south on Citrus Hills right on Sandree, left on Almont to right on
DIRECTIONS: Hwy 486 to Right on Essex Ave. on Goldwood Drive, left on Aleuts to home on Blvd, to west (right) on Glassboro Ct to Bldg Genoa, home on left.
to Right on Ipswich Lane. left. 16 - Unit 6B Dick Hildebrandt 352-746-0744
Jo Ann Martin 352-7462-746-Richard Silva 352-746-0744 Helen Forte 352-746-0744 MLS# 332709
MLS- 333363 MLS2 332774 MLS# 333087




303 E. Hartford St A III.. .
$72,900 2285 N. Brentwood Circle 7121 N. Outrigger Terr 250 N Kensington Ave
Best Buy In Greenbriar, lower level condo, well $197,000 $159,900 $149,000
shady screen porch. Tiled kitchen, laundry, Magnificent expanded, open villa 3/2/ 4 BEDROOMS, 2300 L/A in a nice Great 2/2/2 with pool on a beautiful 1
dining area & Baths. Membership Available. 2, 6x11 pool, with Jacuzzi jets, f Citr rin with nwr acre lot. Formal living room wth
i Must See Today! upgraded landscape, beautiful tile in area o rus springs wi newer separate family room & fireplace. New
DIRECTIONS: Hwy 486 to South on Citrus front BR, outside entry & lanai, mirror homes all around. THIS IS A A/C & Pool Pump. This house is neat a
Hills Blvd. to west on Hartford to Bldg 4, Unit w/attached hutch & additional build-in SHORT SALE ** pin. Furniture can be purchased
3A Dotti Lindia 352-746-0744 storage. 352-527-1820 separately
MLS# 324749 352-527-1820 MLS# 333672 MLS# 333689 352-746-0744 MLS# 333594


220 E. Liberty Street 18 N Tyler St 465 E Dakota Ct 402 W Blueflax Ct
$120,000 . $54,900 $169,000 $144,500
Lovely original owner 2/2/1.5 home w/ art i , hom w ON THE GOLF COURSE! 3/22 poo home at the end of a quet
workshop in garage & great FL room. h cul-de-sac. Split floor plan, formal
S. ' aseler a 2nd BR. Central heat/air, newer Overlooking.10th tee Meadows. I dna r ass aed
water. Furniture available. Golf roof & kitchen apple , fenced yard, Move-in condition. Hurry, GREAT double insulated windows, tile, new
shopping & schools all near by. carport, shed & 2 covered screen PRICE! carpet, complete house water softening
352-527-1820 MLS# 333713 porc he, . 352-746-0744 system, and more. ,
352-527-1820 MLS# 328995 MLS# 327805 352-746-0744 MLS# 332906


0




* , ."


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 E9


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E8

reader, Tigo in Kansas,
shares: "I see how stress-
free our lives are compared
to others around us. The
kids are also seeing how it
impacts them to do things
frugally and how their
friends are starting to have
issues. My son's girlfriend's
dad was laid off. We are hav-
ing our own issues, but were
able to share from our stock-
pile to give them basics. My
son helped the dad get a job
(he is now the son's boss),
but he hasn't said a word


about how silly mom is for
shopping salvage stores for
stuff."
Sometimes, sales are so
great you want to stock up.
But you hate to wipe out the
store shelves. The first tip is
one solution. You can't pick
and choose exact amounts,
but you can buy a lot at one
time. I visited the Web site
and liked that they shared
what $20 buys.
EASY BULK BUY: I just
found out by looking at my
receipt that you can order
online in bulk at the Dollar
Tree. They sell nonfood
items by the case. If you are
a serious stocker like me of


health and beauty aids and
maybe cleaners, you should
go take a look
They will do free shipping
for store pickup. Can't beat
that! And everything is $1
plus sales tax, www.dol-
lartree.com. - Cricket,
Texas


CHEAP SHEETS: Buy
cheap sheets at Wal-Mart for
duvet covers. Sew two to-
gether, and put buttons and
buttonholes on top. Sew
some twill tape in on the
sides to tie around the duvet
and hold it in place. Also,
buy old king- and queen-size


sheets at garage sales. Cut
them down to twin size, and
make a couple of pillow-
cases from the excess fabric.
-Jean, Canada

Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www.fru-


galvillage.com), a Web site
that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for
everyday living. Write to
Sara Noel, c/o United
Media, 200 Madison Ave.,
4th Floor, New York, NY
10016, or e-mail sara@
frugalvillage.com.


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EIO Suress~ APIUL 19.2009


Vibrant viburnums a good fit


S weet viburnum, '-
Viburnum odoratissi-
mum, is a common
landscape shrub used
throughout Florida.
This exotic, drought-toler-
ant Asian species ranges -*
naturally from Japan and
the Philippines westward to
the Himalayas in Zones 9 to
11. Perennial, evergreen Jane
"Vo" (pronounced Vee-oh)
survives in the warm to hot JAIN
climate of central and south- GAIR
ern Florida. Further north,
freezes kill the leaves though the main
trunk and thicker branches usually sur-
vive and sprout new leaves in spring
About 150 species in the viburnum
genus inhabit temperate to warm re-
gions in the northern hemisphere.
Most are Asian. A few come from Eu-
rope and Northern Africa. Several are
native to North America including
Maple-leaved viburnum, V aceri-
folium; Arrow-wood, V dentatum; Pos-
sum-haw, V nudum; and the lovely
Walter's viburnum, V obovatum.
These four Florida viburnums grow
naturally in wetter situations such as
flat woods, stream banks, ditches and
swamp margins, but adapt to drier
garden soils amended with moisture-
retaining organic matter or compost
Provide adequate irrigation during
the first year of establishment I will
share more on irrigation next week.
All viburnums have big, showy clus-
ters of tiny, fragrant flowers in winter
between January and March. Prune im-
mediately after flowering for size and
shape. Unfortunately, pruning removes
fruit that birds and wildlife could for-
age upon in summer. Don't clip vibur-
nums after early fall or you will stymie
the developing flowers. Some selected
cultivars, Walter's viburnmun "Densa"
and "Whorled Class" in particular, also
bloom sporadically in the fall
Sweet viburnum is a thick-trunked
tree with a low, dense branching habit
It is a beautiful 20- to 30-foot-tall tree
with a canopy spread of 25 feet You
will soon tire of sheering this vigorous
beauty if you try to keep it butchered
under a windowsill. As a privacy
screen along a property line, well
away from a building, sweet viburnum

WE WA YOUR PHOTOS
E Include your name, address and
phone number on all photos. Pho-
tos cannot be returned without a
self-addressed, stamped enve-
lope. Call 563-5660.


Weber
IE'S
[DEN


could be maintained as a
tall, thick hedge for 10 years
or so.
It grows well and rapidly
in containers of daily-irri-
gated bark medium. Nurs-
ery workers sheer the
young trees several times a
year to produce a dense
plant within one growing
season. Constant pruning
without disinfecting the
loppers between plants is
often the practice at grow-
ers' farms.


Pruning may allow disease and in-
sects to enter the wounds, so routine,
precautionary spraying keeps the
crop healthy, although viburnums are
generally pest-free and disease-resis-
tant Fertilizer should be applied


every few months.
Sheered plants look great to unsus-
pecting homeowners. Few purchasers
do homework to research plants in a
recently published book or at a uni-
versity Web site before buying.
Asking sales clerks may yield little
useful information and a lot of misin-
formed folklore. Ask a knowledgeable,
ethical, professional and certified
nurseryman for accurate facts. A
phone call to a trained master gar-
dener at the local extension office at
527-5700 will give you accurate, re-
search-based information and per-
haps the number of a fact sheet you
can print from the Internet
If a dense, flowering evergreen
shrub pruned into a 3-foot-tall hedge

See JANE/Page E19


JANE WEBER/For the Chronicle
Four kinds of viburnum grow in Florida. Water's viburnum,
can be pruned into an attractive flowering hedge.


* Clubs are invited to submit information about regular
meetings for publication in The Meeting Place each
Thursday. E-mail to community@chronicleonline.com.


AGE HILLS - HOMOSASSA Loel,
Ii Sune'n Lr,.ng pm Farn pn, Im n hr. m
, Inground Pool All On 2 Acres Which INVERNESS 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath Home W
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NSAnONAL SUNSETS & Olpen V,e, i a; .B.-'K'-.
ring Fed Laxor, & Kng, Bay OpeiBrghm CRYSTAL RIVER Bedrm. 2 B.In DW MIH
ory Home W/ 3 Bdrms, 2 Baths, 2 Car Gar. On 1+ Acre. Center Island Glass Cook Top,
led Pool, Heated. Boat House W/Lift/Dock. Breakfast Booth, Large Panf, Ceiling Fans, *
h. Ceilings, New(A/C=08, Roof=07, Laundry Rm, FormaluDining Rm, Split Fir Plan, i
pet=08). Lts Of Kit Cabinets & Island.. Central Heat & Air. #320146 REDUCED,


OF CITRUS, INC.

Building
throughout
the Nature
Coast!

Model Centers
located on
New Hwy 19 at
mance Free - Sugarmill
Villas Woods and on

' Pine Ridge
Blvd.
SiI in Pine Ridge
A,.


Please Ask
About Our
* Standard *
-Ar A nt.f7.ii r 4


OF CITRUS, INC.
20 years of Excellence 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, Fl 34446
(352) 382-4888 * (352) 746-6668
www.sweetwaterhomes.com Email: swhsales@tampabay.rr.com -


CnIus COUNTY (FL) CRmoMCW


E10 Sumw&, Aiim 19 2009


........ ........ ---F








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRor','IcI.e Sunday, April 19, 2009 ElI


Many homeoumers and remodelers are

opting fr eco-fiiendly, non-toxic paints


JENNIFER FORMER
Associated Press

pring often brings the urge to
clean, perhaps to liven up a
room with a fresh coat of paint
Now that can be done with eco-
friendly paints that don't give off
noxious odors.
The non-toxic arm of the house-
hold paint world is booming, and
many companies have entered the
market
AFM's Safecoat brand is the
granddaddy of the non-toxic paint
business, having been in the market
for 25 years. Boutique brands, in-
cluding Mythic and YOLO Color-
house, have cropped up in recent
years, and industry giants tout their
own non-toxic, latex brands.
Sherwin Williams has its Harmony
line, while Home Depot sells Fre-
shaire Choice. Benjamin Moore al-
ready sells its low-toxic Aura but is
rolling out a new, zero-VOC interior
paint called Natura that it says will
be available in all of its nearly 3,000
colors.
"Everyone is trying to paint a
green face on themselves," said
David Johnston, 58, of Boulder, Colo.,
a building consultant who wrote
"Green from the Ground Up: Sus-
tainable, Healthy and Energy-Effi-
cient Home Construction" (Taunton,
2008).
"That 'new house smell,' as much
as we've come to love it, is really a
flag that there's something in the air
that we don't want our kids to
breathe," said Johnston.


VOC refers to volatile organic com-
pounds, those chemical additives
that make regular paint work its
magic: They help it roll on smoothly,
dry fast and prevent mildew. Some of
these chemicals are natural (but still
toxic), such as formaldehyde, which
is added to curtail chipping.
Not all paints have the same types
and frequency of VOCs, which can
cause smog and deplete the ozone.
Some of the compounds have been
linked to cancer, and the paint smell
that lingers for days or weeks after
painting is the "off gassing" of these
chemicals.
The Environmental Protection
Agency reports that exposure to
paints high in VOCs can cause
headaches, dizziness and vision
problems, among other symptoms,
depending on which chemicals are
in the paint, how long the exposure
is and a person's age (kids are more
vulnerable). These paints are regu-
lated, to some degree, and cannot in-
clude more than 250 grams per liter
of VOCs.
Non-toxic latex paint is not regu-
lated. The most eco-friendly paints
have zero VOCs, but some paints are
low-VOC, with 50 grams per liter.
So how does a consumer know if a
paint brand really is non-toxic?
Industry insiders suggest a simple
sniff test: If the paint smells noxious,
it has VOCs, perhaps a lot of them. If
it's odorless, or smells like fresh
milk, then it's likely a non-toxic
paint

See HUES/Pag E17


wvrp.in.mC


Sunday, April 19, 2009 Ell


CrrRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Rea


Cla


[ Estate


[ssifieds


sy,

Ag5
. lA .2f ..- Ai"
,-'. , f ....*^ ^ * ' '

f .- . rV . ' ' ,

" " " _' U:. : * '^ " . "


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


11


A.J~.. ~


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, CHA $400 mo.
(352) 563-0964
(352)220-0200
HOMOSASSA
1& 2 Brf urn & Unfurn.
1 br. RV $300 mo.
No Pets Call 628-4441
HOMOSASSA
2/1, part. urn., private
fenced acreage. Avail.
5/1. Pets/horse allowed,
$475. info (352) 621-3110
HOMOSASSA
3/2 -D/W $650 mo., 1st,
last, sec. Very nice
home. Ask for Walter
(561) 248-4200
HOMOSASSA 55+
2/2 Stonebrook Estates
Unfum. Car Prt. Pool,
Club hse. Boat & RV star.
$595. Mo.(352) 422-7887
INVERNESS
Extra Irg. Doublewide
3BR/2BA CH/A,
kitch.equlp. good
neighborhood.
Convenient to
everything $675 mo.
352-344-8313
INVERNESS
Furn. 1BR, $475 mo.
waterfront, fishing,
clubhouse, 55 and over
352-476-4964
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park,
2BR, 1-1/2BA. $425.
1 BR,1 BA. $350 Incl.
water 352-476-4964
LECANTO
2/2 DW. on 10 acres.
Horses allowed $950. Mo.
(352) 212-9682




BANK
FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181
For Sale or Rent 2 bed/2


REPOS!
REPOSI REPOS!
(352) 621-9181




BANK
FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181

CRYSTAL RIVER
5 Acres + 1600 sq ft.,
'99, Doublewide
fenced, paved road
352-212-8794
HOME-N-LAND
New Home 3/2
10 Yr. Warranty
Sacrifice! $3,000 down
$676.43/mo.
Call to Qualify
352-621-3807
HOMOSASSA
3/1.5, Scr rm w/con-
crete firs. nice shade
trees, over level 1+ ac.
approx 1 mi E. of 19
$49,900(352) 564-4598
NEW JACOBSEN
TRIPLE WIDE
High end home on
2 % Acres, 2150 sq ft,
3/2, glamour kitchen,
marble in bathroom, ap-
pliance pkg.
Must Sell $179,900 or
$787/mo. Call
(352) 621-9181
Nice 3BR, 2BA
doublewide on 1 acre,
w/garage or barn.
East Inverness $3,500
down, $575 mo. WAC
(352) 726-9369

REPOSI
REPOS! REPOSI
(352) 621-9181


bath in Singing Forest
MHP Floral City, 55+ Iinnrl1 illl
parkDW, on corner lot
$550 a mo.incls.lot rent
352-637-2854 after 6pm
55+ Open Floor Plan,
INVERNESS 2/2. cathedral ceilings
55+ Waterfront Park, 14 x 56, lots of
1 BR, water incl. A/C upgrades, low rent
$3,500 + $270 mo. lot $13,500
rent. 352-476-4964 (352) 527-3821

. . . . . -...... . . ...... .. - .-.. -


I


CRYSTAL RIVER
55+ Park, '98, 2/2
14 x 66, Carport, screen
porch, beautiful new
wood floors, apple , excel.
condo. lot $235 -mO.
$32,500 352-563-2865
Crystal River
Suncoast M. H. P.
2/2+ addition, fully turn.
wsh./dry. incl. CHA.
storage shed. $11,500
firm.) (603) 486-2412
FOREST VIEW ESTATES
Great Loc. Pools, clbhs.
& more. Move-in ready,
camp. turn, 2/2 DW,
wheelchair acc., shed
& sprinkler. New heat
pump. $39,900
563-6428/563-1297

Homosassa
55+ Park
2/2'92
Jacobson,52 X
26.Many
upgrades.
Heated pool.
$39,500
(352) 382-0795
Inverness 2/1/Carport
Nicely furnished,
remod. kit., ba &
windows,scrrm.$17,500
shed (352) 344-1380
(614)226-2336
NEWER DBLWIDE
In 5 star park, 3/2
Vinyl Fl. room, shed,
carport. Exc. cond.
$37,500
(352) 382-2356
Trade: 2006 DW Mobile
24x56 Skyline w/garage
Like New-Adult Park.
Trade for house in
Dunnellon 352-628-3363
WALDEN WOODS
55+ 3yrs. old, furn. 2/2,
scm. porch, carport,
shed, good cond.
Reduced to $39,500
Call (352) 697-2779

WEST WIND VILL 55+
(2) NEW 2005's 2/2
Blow cos Carport,
shed, scrn prch, furn'd,
pet ok. Resales availl
352-628-2090
'F -i''~.\ > jl.(> . '


LECANTO 2/1
SW. Cute, nice fenc'd
yard, owner finance.
352-564-0856;628-3090



CHASSAHOWITZKA
2/2 waterfront DW $600
2/2 furn'd DW $700
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furn'd $900
Agent, 352-382-1000
CITRUS RENTAL
MANAGEMENT &
REALTY LLC
527-2428
Full Service
Full Time
www.citruscountv

Beverlv Hills
2/1/1 Carport.... 475
2/I/1 ..................... $565
2/1/1 Carport......$550
2/1.5/1...................$550
2/2/2 pool........... $650
2/2 Condo furn.,..$850
3/2/2 Pool....... $1000
3/2/2 pgae.$850
3/2/2 Pool, furn..$1 100
Canterbury Lakes
3/2/2............$1000
Crystal River
900 s�1p e � $800
1160 sf Office,,.,$800
Jennifer Foreman
Realtor PRM
Alex Griffin Realtor

HOMOSASSA & CRYS-
TAL RIVER 3 bedroom. 2
bath. Homosassa custom
3/2 waterfront home on 4
ac with 2 docks private
and quiet $1000. Crystal
River 3/2 near Plantation
$650. Homosassa water-
front 2/1 furnished $900.
Property Management &
Investment Group
Broker/Realtor
352-628-5600.


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!
- , : j- .,- ., . l


"PROPERTY"
MANAGEMENT
Inverness
2/2/2 fireplace - $675
3/2/2 nice yard -$700
2/2/2 den -$775
2/1 - $500
2/2 carport - $595 MH
3/2/2- $750
2/1'/2/- $625
2/2/1 scrn rm - $625
2/2/I frt porch - $650
Floral City
2/1 carport - $650
Pritchard Island
3/2/1 - $875
2/2/2- $800
See our website:
www.jwmortonreal
estate.com
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
352-726-9010

SINGLE FAMILY
HOMES,
DUPLEXES,
WATERFRONT,
MOBILE HOMES

FURNISHED/
UNFURNISHED,
WE HAVE THEM ALL
THROUGH OUT THE
COUNTY GIVE US A
CALL From
$475/mo to
$1250/mo
Alexander
Real Estate, Inc.
Crystal River
352-795-6633 ph
352-795-6133 fx




FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




I & 2 BEDROOMS
Call 352-257-8048 for
the move In special.
*tlW "j'


S1&2 BEDROOM I
APARTMENTS
Avail. for Immed.
Occupancy.
CANDLEWOOD
COURT
APARTMENTS
& KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
for information call
(352) 344-1010
MON. thru FRI.
9am - 4pm
Ask About our Move
In Specials!
I1BRsec. dep.$150
I 1st mo. Rent $150.
S2BR sec. dep. $200
1 st mo. Rent $200.
HUD Vouchers
Accepted
foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op

L m .m ..m md
r BEVERLY HILLS
All util + TV hookup I
included $475.
352-228-2644

FLORAL CITY
2BR I/2 BA, MH, just 150
yards from fishing dock,
$475. + $300 dep. Near
Floral City, 10 min. from
Inverness.
Trails End Camp
352-726-3699

HOMOSASSA
2/1, Apt. $475. mo. +
elec. 1st & last or buy Du-
plex other side will pay
your payment $130,000
352-344-3125

INGLIS VILLAS
Is now accepting
applications for our
1, 2, 3 BR Apts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Crys. Riv.
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: M,W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglis Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity


LECANTO
I BR Apartment (352)
746-5238/613-6000


ONE MONTH FREE!
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appls, pa-
tio, W/D hook-up, nice
yard, Exc. Cond. $625
(352) 634-1341
Pinewood Villas
Is now Accepting
applications for our
1,2,3 BRApts.
Located in Bronson
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-486-2612
Or Apply Tues & Thur
7291 NE 92nd Ct. #17,
Bronson, Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity






-t ActNois E

PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad




ERA
REAl. ESTATE


THE HEDICK GROUP
Real Estate Services
Beverly Hills Area
Lynn Davis, Agent
352-422-2522
hedickgroup.net
We Have Rentals
Starting at $425/mo +
Many others LAND-
MARK
REALTY
352-726-9136
Kathy or Jane
311 W Main St. Inv




OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507



CITRUS HILLS
2/2, pool fum /unfurn
(352) 613-5655

CITRUS HILLS
Home, Villa, Condo
GREENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-5921
(888) 446-5921
oreenbriarrental.com


HOMOSASSA
Condo Furn. w/util.,
2/2 firepl, pool, scrn rm,
W/D. Available weekly
or mo. (352) 628-1254

INVERNESS
Extra Irg. 2/2/1 Lakeside
Retirement, pool, dock,
no smoke, no pets. $700
mo. + sec.
(352)637-6572

MEADOWCREST
Summerhill, 2/2 w/large
1 car garage, ground
floor, new, never lived
in, near shopping.
Reduced to $850. Mo.
(352) 746-9770
(352) 697-0375
Gloria Bonner P & R
Mid Florida Reality



FREE RENT!
SUMMERHILL AT
MEADOWCREST
Limited Time!
Call agent for
details.
352-563-5657
/ out zoomcitrus.com


BILL MOORE
REALTOR�

(352) 795-6811 Office


SUNCOAST REALTY (352) 563-1756 Home
a.*..^-..u: r..,- n-.n.. ..... (352) 697-1613 Cell I


FANTASTIC 3/2/2 POOL HOME COMPLETELY REMODELED
New roof this year, new A/C & duct work, flooring throughout, both bathrooms
w/gorgeous tile & fixtures, towel warmer in the master. Refreshing pool
w/waterfall added in '06. Large beautifully done kitchen w/wood cabinets,
newer appliances & quartz countertops. Completely landscaped yard w/
panoramic views of water & sawgrass (state land) & outside shed w/AC &
electric. 10,000 lb. boat lift, newer docks, new pergolas & easy access to
world class fishing complete this tropical paradise. MLS #333330 ,549,900


Chroicl


E12 SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009








. ^ .. ..


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sumia, APm. 19,2009 E13


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1,$550 mo 1st & sec
(352) 464-3521 Carol
(352) 464-3522 Tim
INVERNESS 2/1 /1
Lawn Maint. $550 mo
352-359-5241
LECANTO
2/1, cha, H20 incl.
$500/m 352- 382-1344
Lecanto
Newer 2/2, dsh/Wsh.
W/dry, H20 incl. No pets.
Lg.Yd. (352)628-2815
ONE MONTH FREE!
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appls,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341




HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
Quiet park like setting.
Effic., cabins,
& mobiles. $350, to
$650 Mo. Pets. ok
(352) 726-2225
INVERNESS 1/1
$475 mo. Inds all utils. +
cable. 352-270-8298

LOOK
AIVALUEINN.com
Hemando: New Renvtd
Effic: $260wk. Pool.
Luxury homes 3bd,fum'd
$450wk (15mi to power
plant) 352-726-4744







352-795-RENT
(7368)
www.c irscountvhome-


NEED AN
AFFORDABLE
RENTAL?

HOMES
MOBILES
APARTMENTS

Featured Properties
BLACK DIAMOND
$1000.
CRYSTAL RIVER
$700.
HOMOSASSA
3/2, DW $725.
INVERNESS
2/2 Townhouse $650.
Call for information
OVER 40 TO CHOOSE
FROM.....CALL TODAY
DOWNTOWN i
INVERNESS $685mo
3/2/1 close to parks,
schools, new A/C, 3cr
porch (352) 419-0103

OLD HOMOSAS�A
Lrg ]/1, Iv & famrm,
scr prch. lots of tor
age, newly remdI'd,
dock w/access to
gulf. $975 furnished,
incls all utils. or 3800
unfurnished incls H20
garbagedge 1st/b/Sec.
.352-628-2261


SUNSET VILLAS
Senior Community
Chiefland Fl.
Accepting
Applications for
1 &2 BRAPTS
Please Apply
M, W, F, 8am-12p
124 SW 14th Ave.
(352) 493-0220
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.




BEVERLY HILLS
1/1/1 W/D, inrcis until ,
$765 + sec. 249-1127
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, 3,000 sf Jacuzzi
bath 1 acre, fenced,
$1,500 mo shrt term ok,
Close to Pwr Plant, util.
incl'd. (352) 794-0035
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lovely, Spacious 3/2/1,
includes all utilities
$1300/mo.352-628-1149
FURNISHED RENTALS
Crossland Realty
352-726-6644
NEW HOMES 3/2/2
1 st, last, sec, & ref
$800 mo. (352) 302-3927



BEVERLY HILLS
2/1,
$575/mo
F/S, No Pets
(352) 527-4347
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, Newer Home,
$600 mo.
Immediate Occupacy
(732) 688-6054
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, scrnm rm, $595
E-Z Terms! 352-270-0029
Beverly Hills 2/2/1
MOVE IN SPECIAL!
Lg. firm. $600mo. + sec
23 S. Harrison St.
Agent/727-463-1804
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2 + Bonus Rm.
$750 mo.(352) 212-5894
BEVERLY HILLS
4, Delia St.. 2/1, Fl. Rm
W/D, No pets/smoking
$550. mo. 352-422-6263
BRENTWOOD @ TERRA
VISTA 3/2/2 $950 mo.
incl. social memb.,lst.
last, sec. No smoking,
no pets (352) 302-9787
CITRUS HILLS
PRESIDENTIAL
3/2/2 $850 mo.
(352) 212-5812-
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1. Great Location.
$600 Mo. Easy terms to
move in. 352-476-5573
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2, laun. rm., util. rm,
fncd bk yrd new remod.
$650 + sec. (352)
74o-9583
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/1, $850mo. $1000
sec. 352-746-9436
Citrus Springs
4/2/2, New, Split Plan,
Cath.ceilings,2,1 50sq.
ft.$900.Mo.352-341-1859
CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 32/22, Near Sch.
$900mo 352-628-0731
0


CITRUS SPRINGS
Rent to own 4/2/2, 2,600
s.f. $3k down w/ $1,000
mo.pymts (813)716-5605
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $850/mo
795-6299 697-1240
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 3/2/2, Pool Home
3,300 sf, Far. Rm. w/ FP
Form Din., Liv. Rm., of-
fice, new roof, fenc. yd.
Lease opt $1,595 mo.
(352) 489-9239
DUNNELLON
CITRUS SPRINGS
Rent or Rent to Own
Commute CR River
2 SPOTLESS HOMES
3/2, Dunnelon $749
4/2/2 Rnbw. Lakes
$895. Very spacious
352-527-0493
352-427-7644
HOMOSASSA
2/2/1 $775/mo F/L/S Pets
ok. 352-434-1235
HOMOSASSA
Beautiful, 3/2, 2/2
Pool / ac.DW on /2 ac
Lease ODt .Flexible
Financing mm. Occ
352-795-0088
INVERNESS
3/2/1, Pool Home $900
mo. (352) 726-7692
INVERNESS 3/2/1. Gospel
Island area. On
cul-de-sac by lake.
$850/mo, Ist/last/sec.
NO PETS. 352-860-2146.
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1/1,
$600/mo Ist/lst/Dep.
(352) 344-2560
PINE RIDGE
3/21/2, Screen Pool
5310 Yuma $1100/mo
(352) 302-6025
SOUTHERN WOODS
4/3/2 Luxury executive
home on golf course,
great views, $1,300/Mo.
(813) 390-7109
SUGARMILL
3/2/2 $900.
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $900.
(352) 400-0230
SUGARMILL WOODS
2 Masters /2/2 (large)
Screen lanai, oversized
gar. new apple. & A/C
$895 mo. (352)302-4057
SUGARMILL
WOODS
4/3/2, Wsh/Dr. $900 Mo.
Eddie (305) 608-9973
TERRA VISTA
3/2/2, Gated comm.
$995. mo. Clb. mem.
incl. (81.3) 215-3446
Charles Rutenberg RE




INV. LAKEFRONT
2/2/2, Lrg. home,
great area, tiled, New
carpets. City water.
$750 mo. 352-476-4896
INVERNESS
3/2/1, Super clean,
tiled, great area.
Irg. Bdrms. $800. mo.
352-476-4896
Inverness Lakefront!
2/2/2home. 9108 Gospel
Island w/Florida room
and lanaidock. fenced
yard. $800. 344-8532


POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - Waterfront
homes, Wkly pnriv. rms,
RV lots.352-628-0011




CITRUS Springs
4/2/2 Rent $900/mo.
F/L/S. Sale $130K
423-404-0903



CRYSTAL RIVER
Rm & Bath, share kit. &
comm. facilities, $400.
(352) 794-3689 or
(352) 344-3375
HOMOSASSA
Fum, kit privs, cbl-TV,
utils incl, Ig yd. single
ocup.$90wk.628-5244
HOMOSASSA
Room for rent
$100/wk. incls Utils
(352) 563-2896

LOOK
A1VALUEINN.com
Hernando: New Renvt'd
Effic: $260wk. Pool.
Luxury homes 3bd,furn'd
$450wk (15mi to power
plant). 352-726-4744



BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 furn. pool home.
$1,100. 2/1 fum. $1,000.
(352) 746-9770
(352) 697-0375
Gloria Bonner, P & R
Mid Florida Reality

LOOK
AIVALUEINN.com
Hernando; New Renvt'd
Effic: $260 wk. Pool.
Luxury homes 3bd,
fum'd. $450wk (15mi to
plant) 352-726-4744



OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507




LOOK
A1VALUEINN.com
Hernando. New Renvt'd
Eff/c: $260 wk. Pool.
Luxury Homes 3bdfurn'd
$450wk (15mi to power
plant). 352-726-4744




AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50
Ad includes 20 lines of copy
w/ photo.

Floral City
2.3 acres, 1,400 Sq. ft.
shop w/1/2 bath, fen'cd.
2 wells. No impact fee
S/restrictions. asking
$150,000.(352) 586-2590


Couch

SfRealty
& Investments, Inc.
For All Your
Real Estate Needs.








Richard (Rick)
Couch
Lic. Real Estate Broker


1045 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hemando, FL 34442
Office: 352 344-8018
Cell: 352 212-3559
www.Rcouch.com

Crystal River
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
renovated inside
and outmust see. Owner
financing. 300K
727-798-7077

Picture Perfect Homes
NEW HOMES STARTING
At $75.000 On Your Lot
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lir # CBC059685


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to
advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
discrimination.
Familial status
includes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing
custody of children
under 18. This
newspal ,er will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is in
vic-ation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



( m ,


HOMOSASSA
3/2/2 On 1/2 acre fen'cd.
wrk. shop, quiet/no build
behind. Sat. 9A./1P.Sun.
11P./3P. 6171 W.
Wayward Wind Loop.
Joanna Morris
Century 21 Alliance
Reality. (352) 397-8081




Nature Coast
Special Stimulus
Package
Sunday 1-3PM
Visit & Register to win
$221,000 in the C-21
Path to Your Dreams
Sweepstakes
HOLIDAY HEIGHTS
10105 W. Ohio Dr
$73,900 MLS332649
BEVERLY HILLS
234 Valarien Ct.
$90,000 MLS332370
MEADOWCREST
6224 Weston $110,000
MLS333473
SUGARMILL WOODS
5 Astr Ct$128,000
MLS328617
88 Douglas St.
$137,000 MLS332834
69 Oak Village
Blvd S. $199,000
MLS332657
CITRUS HILLS
1059 Getty $175,000
MLS332342
CITRUS SPRINGS
8327 N. Dutch Way
$205,000 MLS333048
For directions and
details visit
www.Centurv21
NatureCoast.com
Click on Search All
Citrus Listings type in
the MLS number
or call 352-795-0021
or 800-624-5634

SPRING
SHOWCASE
Of Homes

FOR SALE BY
OWNER
OPEN HOUSES
Sat April 18 * 10-4
Sun April 19 * 12-4
KENSINGTON ESTATES
235 E. Foster Ct.
352-341-1012
CRYSTAL RIVER
25 N Country Club Dr
352-220-1388




Your World


o 9aa.e sadea








Claeificd



,w.c irlroniclanline rom


SPRING
SHOWCASE
of Homes
OPEN HOUSES
Sat April 18 * 10-4
Sun April 19 *12-4

BEVERLY HILLS
PINE RIDGE
4245 N Bartley Terr
5191 N Pink Poppy Dr
6393 W Glory Hill
4260 W Pine Ridge Bid
4302 N Breadnut Terr
5759 N Carnation Dr
CITRUS SPRINGS
1865 W. Citrus Springs
Blvd
9356 Jourden Drive
CRYSTAL RIVER
11145 W Bentbow Pth
263 NW Bay Path Dr
25 N Country Club Dr
SUGARMILL
WOODS
11 Hemlock Ct South
5 Boxwood Ct
Black Willow Ct North
HOMOSASSA
Weeping Willow Ct
11410 Waterway Dr
9214 S. Suncoast Blvd
INVERNESS
2271 South Olympic
Hills Terrace
9710 E White Egret
Path.

LECANTO
235 E Foster Ct
1773 S Overview Dr
5215 W Greensily Ln
5265 W Greensily Ln
OCALA
11640 SW 49th Ave





100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
*Low income applicants
can quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or No credit
OKAY
*recent bankruptcy
OKAY'
CAll TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
*Credit and income
restriction apply'
Florida licensed mort-
gage lender










2 Great Commercial Io-
c.:tions, $650 to
$850/mo .Perfect for any
small business/ office etc.
Call Lisa 352-634-0129
Plantation Realty


BEVERLY HILLS 491
Great Loc! 1500sf Spac.
Bus. Office/Home + 800sf
updated out bldg. Comm.
Easy Acess.Can live in.
$150K (352)795-6282
CRYSTAL RIVER -GREAT
LOCATION! Citrus Ave.
Remodeled. 1353sqft
w/security fence &
parking. Over $Yacre.
Zone GNC. $250K. Cal
Gary, 352-564-4228
HOMOSASSA
appx 200 ft. on Hwy 19
fenced in, flood lights
on prop. (352) 628-7682




2/2/1 CB,
Tile, New Carpet,
Newer Appl.Lg. shed.
Fen'cd back yd, Patio,
1,600 Sq. FL CHA
$68,900(561) 313-5308
(561) 313-5291

ATTENTION!!
BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
$37,900. Delivered
and Set, $0-Down
Land/Home $650. mo-
Repos Available
Kinder Mobile
Home
(352) 622-2460

By Owner
3/2/2, Built 2005. like
new. Lease to Own
OOtion 352-302-0810
352-422-3922


Pine Ridge


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION



(352) 795-1555


FOR SALE BY OWNER
88 SJ Kellner, Bev. Hills
212'I2, FP, OPEN HOUSE
on SUNDAYS
11A-3P $120K firm
(352) 746-6093




Crystal Oaks 3/212
For Sale
By Owner
Price Reduced
Split plan. Pool home
w/private back yard, on
cul de sac, move in
condition. Asking
$169,900
(352) 746-7088




'95 GRAND Beauty!
3/3.5/3 w/Cabana
pool side &In-Law suite/
3250 LivSF 1 Acr $368K
T.Pduano/Keller
Wimns212-1446
TheRlDream.Com
FOR SALE BY OWNER
2133 Brentwood
Circle. 3/2/2. $180,000.
352-527-1789




2 HOUSESlpool
Italian file, 3000sf
on ac. $800 1 mo free
908-322-6529

BRAND NEW
For Sale, 3/2 w/ alot
of upgrades
Beck St Invemess
352-637-4138
lc # CBS059685

Foreclosures
& Deals
Everywhere

CALL ME NOW!


Deb Infantine
EXIT REALTY
LEADERS
(352) 302-8046


BEVERLY HILLS 1, 2 & 3 Bed )oms...$475$750/Bl
CITRUS SPRINGS 2 & 3 Iedrcoms... O0$1050/111o.
INVERNESS 2 & 3 Bedrooms.............45$00/li.
CITRUS HILLS 2,3 & 4 Bedrooms....$8251050/Io.
PINE RIDGE 3 & 4 Bedrooms............$i004 810/m,
HERNANDO 1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms......... $475800/O,
Check Out Our Website At
www.casitrorealrta l
Rental Inventory changes daily
SFurnished rentals also available.
.See Our Rental Ad ln The Real Estate News Magazine.









E14 SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 Cimus COuNm' (FL) CHRONICLE


Fromlt now t
Al SOSllers .

cq",losin (,"u iill


Homsas


ROLLI S/HISD

!� ENTS 1
" 'L' o


Ineres rytl Ri
HoJ^mes I Ho^meH


Plantation Realty. Inc
(352) 795-0784
Cell 422-7925
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner
See all of the
listings in Citrus
County at
www.olantation
Sealtyvic'cbm


CirsCut


For Sake,*
CITRONELLE 3 bed-
room, 2 bath. Mini Farms
2.5 Acres, Trailer, Water
with softener, septic. As
is $49,000.00.
813-695-0853
For Sale By Owner
3 BR, 2 BA, 2-car gar.,
Cement block, north
Dunnellon Low down,
EZ terms w/$3,500
down $575 mo.
(352) 726-9369
OWNER FINANCING
4/2/office, 2.5 ac,
2005 Doublewide
Like new. 1800sqft,
$9,700/dn, $882/mo. or
$23,700 down, $582/mo.
727-992-1372



OWNER Financing
Handyman, 2/2, 1981
Dbwd, 1/3 acre, $40K,
below market, needs
mostly cosmetic repairs.
Purchase $4,472 down
& $364 mo.
727-992-1372



4 Sale By Owner,
Crystal River 1 BR, 1BA,
completely
remodeled, heated comm.
pool, wd firs.
$74,600. (352)563-5844
FLORAL CITY
2/1, all oppl. stay, plus a
shed & water access,
Move in cond., Reduced
to $49,995 (352)
746-0850



FLORAL CITY
New 2/1, canal front,
large deck, dock
Upgrades throughout.
$135k (352) 422-0294
HOMOSASSA
3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to
head spring. 163' wfrt,
dock/slip. Brand
new/unoccupied.
2 frpls, granite. $579K
727-808-5229

LET OUR
OFFICE
GUIDE YOUI


Open Lake Front Villa
In Inverness, on
Lake Henderson.
Spectacular View,
Private Dock.
538 San Remo Cr.
Completely remod-
eled inside. Must
see II 3/2/2 + pool.
Reduced to $349,000.
Call: Barb Malz
(352) 212-2439
Keller Williams
Reality

RealtySelect
Citrus.coml


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Reai Select

(352) 795-1555

Spectacular Home
Lake Front Peninsula
1170 S. Estate Pt.
Inverness, Fl. 3/2.5/2
Private Dock on 1/2
acre. Completely
remodeled. One of
a kind property I
Bargain at $349,000.
Call Barb Malz
(352) 212-2439
Keller Williams
Reality

-'-

INVESTORS NEEDS
Homes Any: Size, cond,
location, price, situation.
Over finac'd, dblwide
& mobile homes okay.
1-727-992-1372
Seeking 100+ acres of
pasture land for Cattle.
Will sign 6 mo-lyr lease.
352-669-2253
ask for Cindy



HOMOSASSA
1.2 acres, fenc'd, water,
elec., sewer, sprinkler sys.
(2) out bldgs. Deadend st.
$44K. 352-302-5775



Business/Home 3/2 Great
location on Trout Ave. Inver-
ness $165,000 . Rhema
Realty 228-1301



7 Rivers Golf & CC.C
priv. member owned.
corner lot 1 ac (mol)
$30K (813) 766-9354 or
sweetscapeauesf@. .
verizon.net


the commercial market and
many hotel chains have al-
ready started to adopt water
conservation methods in
day-to-day operations. For
instance, many hotels now
have high-efficiency shower-
heads and toilets along with
the options of washing towels
or letting the guests simply
air-dry them in the bath-
rooms. Hotels also use sys-
tems to cut down on wasted
cold water while waiting for
the hot water to kick in.
I enjoyed your passion for
conservation. Thanks for
helping to get the message
out that water conservation
is for everyone.


Master Contractor/Plumber
Ed Del Grande is known in-
ternationally as the author
of the book "Ed Del
Grande's House Call" and
for hosting TV shows on
Scripps Networks and
HGTVPro.com. For infor-
mation, visit eddel-
grande.com or write
eddelgrande@hgtvpro.com.
Always consult local con-
tractors and codes. Distrib-
. .ted by Scripps Ho.wQrrc
News Service.


Tree replacement



not simple process

Our office has received planting, evaluate a site for
quite a few calls with your new tree. Since every
concerns tree will not suit
of losing the valu- every site, a little
able shade, beau- detective work
ty and many other ,.. will pay off in this
benefits that trees vw, . situation.
provide. It seems . After losing a
a lot of removals , large tree, the
are inevitable due - shade will be
to the stress from . greatly missed, In
our dry condi- this case, a couple
tions. of fast-growing
My number Kerry Kreider shade trees may
one answer to THE be an option. The
these concerns is ARBORIST key to successful
that a tree can be tree replacement
removed only if is quality work-
the tree is first diagnosed by manship performed by an
a professional arborist and, arborist, and, in this situa-
without a doubt, cannot be tion, the quality of the tree to
saved, be installed is also impor-
Then, pick a suitable tree tant
for replacement after the
tree is removed. Before See ARBORIST/Page E16


PLUMBER
Continued from Page E7

once cleared, your brand-
new tub will no longer have
to double as an expensive,
oversized, laundry sink
Q: I read your recent arti-
cle on conserving water in a
home. Over the years, I have
read similar articles telling
homeowners to conserve
water by installing water-
saving showerheads, high-
efficiency toilets, etc.
Why don't you write about
the need to save water for
business and industry?
Have you used a shower in
a hotel in the past few
years? Here at my home I
can take a shower with very
little water by adjusting the
flow while soaping up. At
most of the hotels I have
stayed at, the water pours
out of the showerhead at a
very high rate and there is
no way to adjust the flow. So
please let the commercial-
plumbing market know that
it, too, has to start conserv-
ing water. - Tom in Indiana
. A .Well,. you just, told .it.
yourself, Tom! In all fairness,


E14 SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


---


Cirs Cu


Crystal Riuar
Homes^gH




* . .


SuNDA APR.L 19, 2009 E15


ftmffC CnVnrtM'T /Kr C rooJ ,ir , I


S"Nancy Kno
� NAN


� PONTI
� nii Diect 352-4
�VA H L




ENJOY YOUR PRIVACY FROM SUN ATRIUM!
* 2 Bed/2 Bath/2 Car * Terrific Open Floor Plan
@* New Roof Shingles May 2009 * Cathedral Ceilings
MLS#333718 $117,000
wiliTakemy virtual tours':=


ws Sugarmill Woods"�
Ic.'yc *t marrolli �exds*
| ^^ ^^ Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
I o . Ke 1 Realty Inc.
*H- 48015 S. Suncont Blvd.
634-2ER ......... Ho8mosasa, FL
34-4225 92R 382-1700


INCREDIBLE RELAXING PARK-LIKE SETTING!
* 3 Bed + Office/ 2 Car * Pool has Jacuzzi Jets
* Fabulous All Brand NEW Kitchen AND Baths
MLS#329342 $224,000


l !ri ll













- .


A TEFRONT POOL HOME avERfA SS0LF& CC
Beautiful 2BR, 2BA, 2 car garage, sea wall. This home surrounds the caged pool on 3 sides.
boathtose boat ramp pontoon boat included, RV There are 5 sets of sliders leaig out to the pool


crus Springs-Beverly Hills, FL 34465.
S homesParking. Nice open flne oor plan wiot th great room, that features a bricked BBQ area. This 32 is
family room, screened porch, patio, beautiful right around the comer from the clubhouse,
OPPORTUNIT caged pool, central HA, public water, located on community pool, tennis courts and pro shop. YouNew



Sshoig Lake Henders loal acnies. can drive your gofin cart to fW tee in a mf inute.2008
________ ____ _NOW $U14,900 #301671 $1159,900 #�329






9542 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., 3521 N. Lecanto Hwy.
1-866-465-3500 1-888-789-7100 obieL NVCSSW-






WI .r WISPERING PINES VIUAS INVERNESS N N11W
2 Bedmom, 2 bath, 1 car arid amge end unit. Large 2/211 located in inveness City nits. amthal
O I- screened porch with sliding glass door from the H/A, city waterisewer. Close to shopping,
living room. The $85 monthly fee includes Whispering Pines Park and oler local activities.
--.- ... .. . exteriorr maintenance, roof, RV parking area, Home includes a 12 x 20 shed as well as a
clubhouse, pool, termite control and road 7x10 shed.
3: $139900 9.0 ,$132 900 129 900 125900 122 900 maintenance. HURRY! PR�DFORRSrSAlE
S$89,000 #332532 $79,900 #321151


P2 $1162 900 6 60000 J4 9900 1279900


r- ., . . - Nice clean *14x66, remote control fireplace, BEVRIIZES
B ...... BIB rI '. " , > glassed-in rear porch, 2 car carport, 3 sheds just Rental, winter residence or fulltime home-your
Ss" waiting for a new owner. The water is currently choice. 2 bedroom, 1 bath home. living rm. plus
S . OWNER FNANCED low but once it returns you are approx 500 ft FL nn., newer carpet and some updating.
. , $195,000 ,000 , .. $109,500 from the rver Fenced backyardaseas well astorageshed



S. 27 00 . , $11 $13900 $19,900 : $229 000
ATTENrON INVESTORS!!
' ' : . . lam insate flooring ^a well as a glassed front porch Great for winter retreat or permanent residence
S. - - i - * ' . " '-' with tile The other mobile is in need of repairs. Nice and dcean 2BR, 1.5BA Mobile home on 3
S.' -' Live in one and rent the other out or use both for Wteris o ter
7., -9 0. . rentals Wat00909902ris.0#wnowutot 0900 129003epnce
84900 179900 109900 12900 $54,900 #332734 $44,900 #331514
7 j Wiif *. . . . . .1 .*-- . . . . . . .k. L.. . .


.; . M, 'l Vic McDonald
REALTY ONE Orfce (352) 631-6200
R| ALTY ONE enr.,,i ,,,um.sr .k1as nare L^
S "Serving Citrus County
Charles Kelly ' 110 W Main t., Reaor
Realtor ' 0 s, Futti-maon
Cell: 35222387 Inverness, FL 34450l Po c



S5 B , , bis home 4/2.5(2custom nhoewith
WAUIERFRONF POOL HOME a kitchen that is out of thisworld featuring Cheny
On canal leading to the Gulf of Mexico in popular cabinets, quartz countetops and stainless steel
Crystal Water Estates. 3BR, 2BA, appliances. Hornme features 10 fol engswl
2 car garage, 66 ft. boat dock, caged self - crown moulding. Relax in your living room wilh a
cleaning pool, enclosed lanai, open split floor remotestart fireplaceorenjoy thepoolarea
plan, dining rm., breakfast nook, lots of which includesasummer Kitchen. AMENITES
amenities. 000 #329152 GALORE!
6479.000 #329152 $389.900 #332409


I







E16 SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009

SARRBRI T to start these little guys off
AR ODU Ul I on the right foot -- or the
right root. Proper tree in-
Continued from Page E14 stallation requires more
than a tree and a hole in the
Like children, the first few ground.
years of a tree's life will With a little time, care
have a big impact on its and effort, we can help to
health and structure for shade and beautify our
adulthood. So it is important neighborhoods.



SAME ROB HARD

SN. Leanto Hwy ell (352) 270.0130
Bvey wills offie (352) 746.3600



OPEN HOUSE
SUN., APR. 19TH 11AM-3PM
:...






S * O . .- . . . .


PRICE REDUCED FROM $169,500 TO $159,900
2410 W. Tall Oaks Dr., Beverly Hills, FL
PINE RIDGE ESTATES .- Home with 3 bedrooms, 2 baths
and 2-car garage, split floor plan, on a full acre with a
fenced backyard. Vaulted ceilings, garden tub, lots of
extras. MLS#330783. $159,900


CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I recommend replace-
ment after any removal, be-
cause trees are a renewable
resource. Replacing trees is
also essential for wildlife
habitats.


Kerry Kreider is a practic-
ing arborist, a member of


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classifieds!


the International Society
ofArboriculture, a
tree preservationist
and president ofAction
Tree Service. If you
have any questions he
can be reached at
302-2815, or e-mail him
at actionproarborist@
yahoo.com


-. 78o653 Michele Klemm
a":"' 382-1700
A^E V MC228-1440 S i

OPEN HOUSE 12:00 - 3:30 PM
#9 Big Leaf Court
Hwy. 19 to cypress Blvd. East to left Black Willow St.
to Rt. on Big Leaf.




4 bedroom, 2 bath 2 car garage, saltwater heated
pool might give a hint in what is to be expected.
So Many Amenities Come To See!


I1 J WI .i I [ I " I KI, I i U I. 1&1 I MCI DI Df

. 4.n I . 3- z F IF . 1 - .r,
JIC1-_ I 1L _ j
F - - . : . .
i I4; 6r 352-67 -2' 77r


-' E'r ,t ri,',w ti: me nre..r it, ,1 , I, r ,1
-. ,"'. i ,-% .z "' ' l" ","ein', 3rry 112.2 .pliI itr, Onl ,i ,1 |te lea I

S * . . I:' ,il 1 i ri ,,,w: l ir.i ,,,u: e tnii t 1iit h
71 W Citrus Springs Blvd dand community
Citrus Springs, FL 34434 ......y^ --r.. ffiCS
. Dir: 41 N. to Left on W Citrus SDrings Blvd. to first home on Right.


J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE KAREN E. MORTON
O �-,- 1645 -.1 '.v..,n Il KAREN E. IMORTON
o,* In.err.e.: FL 3-1-150 Hall of Fame Cen.luron member ,
o " 'a.' he..t .a .,.0 -n (352) 726-6668 . (352) 212-7595 -m . - r a -p es * ..
ANDEPN N D COiPEP4TED TOLL FREE 1-800-543-9163


rea 0 a. -1-1- .


5 ACRES OF WOODS AND PRIVACY 2 HOMES PLUS WORKSOl0P/RV STORAGE 3OxO- WiLL HOUSE 2 MOTOR HOMESII
* 3BR, 2BA, great rm. with floor to ceiling stone fireplace. 2.3 ACRES SURROUND THE "SUPER-SIZED" HOMES OF MERIT * Exceptionally well-maintained CBS home has formal liv. and din. rms.
* Wonderful open kitchen w/wood cabinets, brick pavers. * New 26x14 family room, fully equipped eat-in kitchen * 20xl 8 Bonus or music rm. is incl. in LA- could easily convert to 3rd BR
* All SS appls., oversized master suite, wood laminate firs. * Split BRs, screened lanail PLUS 28 X 26 WORKSHOP/GAR. * Family room w/fireplace, screened lanal, endless possibilities
* Inside laundry PLUS 28X34 det gar., LOOKS LIKE NEW!!! * Paved roads, great location, retired owner moving north. * Add'l adjoining home optional - 2/1/1,1248 sq. ft., on 4.96 acres.
MLS #332773 $230,900 MLS #332444 S134,000 MLS #328602 $300,000




PREMIER DEED RESTRICTED COMMUNITY W. HIGHLANDS CHARMER ON DOUBLE LOT- CUL DE-SAC ST. NEW HOME WITH A COUNTRY STYLE OF IT'S OWN!
- 3BRs, 2BAs, split BRs, light & bright, tray ceilings. � 2BR 2BA home, newly updated kit and appis * 3 Spacious BRs, 2 fully tiled BAs, oversized 2CG, fully equipped kit.
* Open kit. w/nook & pantry, great rm. w/formal din. Dining area w/bay win overlooking backyard * Sunning wood floors., open great rm. w/large breakfast bar
* Oversized 2 car gar, tiled screened lanal. 15 x 20 Screened lanai w/cathedral ceilings. * Inside laundry, decorator lighting, cabinets, upgraded doors
SCounty water sidewalks, community pool, tennis. Lush gardens surround this lovely home on quiet st. Therma widows,operating dormer windows14
MLS #331788 3109,900 MLS #328707 GREAT BUY AT $70,000 MLS #323548 S214,0___


pr ';



center
a


CURIOUS about how much house you can afford?
I can help!
GREAT 1ST TIME HOME BUYER INCENTIVES!
For a FREE, no obligation consultation,
Call Liz Rodriquez at 352-228-7957 _,
Keller Williams Realty of Citrus County KE!.IMWIiAMS.


P&X ivd.-Florida
Realty Services, InXc.
"[jt: 746-9770 - 1-800-329-7002
S , S3 W. LEMON ST., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465
* Visit us on the Web at: p trealty.com - E-mail pahdr639@earthlink.net
CLEAJVIEW ESTATES REraL.s
I . . i r...J. r . - . IE . - , I c I, , SIaE o.
a ,I-, . eper 1 -.r. BEVERN HILLS
189,000 . I
MLS R< 3I-1-142 4"' Ot'o
,kr, S en'klar. ' :'" '
3 -52 .5' i 2 65R , ,
SPRUCE CREEK LOCATI/LOCATION
, .i J . I J T .......... I " 1 . I _... .l.
r.,,tt .,,,S,,1.l ,m ,,, r ,IJ ,,- . , , ,1 ,, , r,

t ..,-,n ,. . Sl,000/mo H. , r. ..r,. i h ,.a.,
l'. 4 - 8149,000
( t . ir , ,ta i " .'. ' i ".. " .f . t.. r l s ,'/ .fUa,, .i ; o f l.'" i, '
RENTALS AVAILABLE AND WANTED- ORLANDO CONDO
I RENTAL BY WEEK OR MONTH ALSO FOR SALE.
TIE SHABE RENTAL AVAILABLE FOR RENT 0O TRADE WEEKS



S2 KICE Realty Inc.
O EM Cell (352) 634-4346 ' en
E A office (352) 382-1700 - '" r
REAL ESTATE 8015 South Suncoast Blvd. I
See Virtual Tour at www.homes4u3.com Gail Cooper
www.resalehomes4u.com * E-mail: homes4u3@mindspring.com




LU Y


- Open liv. room w/wood floors, 3 full baths, Florida room.
* County water & sewer. WILL QUALIFY FHA /VA!
* BUYERS WARRANTY INCLUDEDTl
MLS #332015 PRICED RIGHT AT S3118,000


PRICE JUST REDUCED!
3/2/2 villa in the Hammocks
2246 living on the golf course
Interior painted March 2009
New roof in 2000
Fully maintained yard
Short walk to heated pool
#331499 $210,000


L a, ... ..
ON THE BOULEVARD
* Expanded Driftwood with 3/2/2
Beautiful private pool setting
* New 13-soorAC in 2005
* Spacious kitchen open to family room
* Extra large laundry w/exterior door
22x24 garage with 6x20 bump-out
#333175 $259,000


* Incredible condition and care.
* 2BR, 2BA, great room, country
* Garage plus carport, furnishing
MLS #323989 311


ANlll~ � - -


m


-. J





* . .


CITus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 E17


HUES
Continued from Page Ell

"If something smells pun-
gent, or if it burns your nose
or your eyes, you know
that's probably not some-
thing you want to paint
with," said Carl Minchew,
director of color technology
at Benjamin Moore in Mont-
vale, N.J.
However, because some
toxic chemicals are odor-
1--- T--1---... L. .-.- -- -' -- -- &l- .i-


Green Seal, that a brand is
eco-friendly
Not all paints that adver-
tise as eco-friendly actually
are, warn industry insiders.
Colorants added to the non-
toxic base paint at the retail
store can shoot up the levels
of VOC, said Minchew, with
darker colors, such as reds,
carrying the highest levels.
Benjamin Moore uses a
new, waterborne colorant
system that adds no toxins to
Natura, he said.
AFM is rolling out a new
b A ll d 4- S T 4tN


Homes from $120,900 on your lot



fncor0e hotrms , cc. 2
www.encorehomesofcitrus.com (352) 726-2179


'78M RENTALS & RESALES
A0 n O-�~ / SERVING TERRA VISTA
Assurance EE & CITRUS HILLS
GROUP REALTY 28S.KensgtonAve.,Lecao, L
1-1111N RO-Ur R\y-MAlT i Located in Kensington Plaza
AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 726-2246
For all your real estate needs call Betty 352-422-6417 or call the office directly 352-726-2246
BE ASSURED, WE ARE HERE TO SERVICE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS


r-, @L J.W. MORTON
_y i REAL ESTATE, INC.
,1_o____ 1645 W. Main St., Inverness, FL
Email: cent2l@infionline.net SALES: (352) 726-6668 * 1-800-543-9163
www. jwmortonrealestate.com Property Management (352) 726-9010


eSS, jonnston advises that ran cau e a cua a- -'
consumers read labels and rals that will use zero-VOC
Look for certification, such
as from Greenguard or See F Page E18

George E. L'Heureux, Broker u: : "r
CURB '. .rl E.uat Gulf to Lake Hwy., nveress, FL (352) 637 -CURB (2872) ti
APPEAL www.curbappealcitrus.com (Search Citrs CountyandAlofForida)
.-L I".-f First Time Buyers) Up to $8,000 in Cashi Call Today.
STOP FORECLOSURE!
_A- /3 -5913 ROSEWOOD DR. 4 Bedroom, 2 bath home on
- L 3133 overszed delached 2 car 2+ acres, fenced. #327095
garage and custom pool This Call Martha Snyder
home is truly a cut above the rest at 352-476-8727
- Call Today' $447,500. at 352-476-8727


HERNANDO: 2006 Doublewide on two lots
with boat slip. This home offers three
bedrooms and two baths, open living with
great room and kitchen with breakfast nook,
island with sink, inside laundry, nice deck and
wheelchair ramp. Ready to move right in.
PRICED AT ONLY $69,900 for fast sale.
(Not a short sale). #333693.
Call Deb Thompson 634-2656


I' U L.JJ.I a I . 4n729 N. ' il, i 2196 W KENMORE . , - "
JADEMOOR �- . ,..,,, ,,, ,r, .'.-

"t balhs and traded carpetng in the bedrooms A must seel
golf course home overlooks the 3rd hole of the Twisted $127,00 ir 41 take Citrus Springs Bvd. at the fountains
Oaks Golf Course! Priced for a quick sale $169,999. to lefl on Santos to light on Kenmore to home on the ht ... . .
,= .F-.u-


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
,,,wgw 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
(352) 634-2371 Cell 4 .
(800) 476-2590 Toll Free
ERA For a Visual Tour of our listings '
REAL ESTATE and all MLS: bjdavis.com '
EXQUISITELY REMODELED




i, ' 1 1 .,i , '
if,,- J ir r-i,,-, I. , r I, . =,'r. , .

t331863 $215 000
TI 2 BEDp.i0--.M - 6 TH 'j- iE i '.


:.* . , * ' .: ,, ." *.,.- ....... . .-.. .,I..- . , .... . -... . .. .. 11

�"-"1: . h : "1 " l, i', l ,
- 1 - , , I




S .. A ROW HOUSE IN THE
/ CENTER OF HISTORIC
-. /" * ; ,' INVERNESS - '.Ir, e, ..-,,:,.,-



1 331530 $82.000
"-4 - A 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH
" ." DOUBLEWIDE J,.n. :..:.:-c..J ,- .h.


� hb ,,,, ,',:,lO,0331188 ,. .5- ,4. . 900

B331188 $54900


$309,900
WOODED ESTATE
Be close to town with that country feel onyour
own 4.5 acres. Beautifully decorated 4/2/2
home; elegant designer touches and a great
kitchen. This entire property is set up for your
enjoyment and makes for easy entertaining.
Call today! Mary Parsons
352-422-5437







-- - - -*
$119,000. 3/2/1 - WATERFRONT VILLA.
Completely furnished w/all appliances and 32"
TV. Other features include eat-in kitchen and
enclosed lanai. Mo. fee includes lawn care, trash
PU (twice weekly) boat launch and RV/boat
storage, cable TV, comm. pool, shuffleboard,
nature walk and more. Roof & AC recently
replaced. #331201.
Call Tim Donovan 352-220-0328







WONDERFUL WINDERMERE.
Maintenance-free living, 3BR, 2.5BA.
Beautifully kepi with newer appliances and
new carpet. Tile foyer, den or 4th BR.
Gorgeous clubhouse and pool. Lake access
and dock for residences. Just minutes to
shopping. $153,000. #332771.
Ask for Jeanne or Willard Pickrel
352-212-3410 800-543-9163
vvwww.CitrusCountySold.com


IDEAL IN-TOWN LOCATION - Just min. from
shopping, dining, schools, hospital, etc. This 2BR,
2BA home has Ig. great rm. w/vaulted ceiling and
real [pl. Both BRs have walk-in closets. 2nd BR has
built-in bookcase & crown molding making it a
perfect option for library or office. Kit. has lots of
cab. space and countertop area- Pass-thru to din.
area- Screened rm. w/vinyl win. and lovely brick
paved, enclosed patio. New carpeting, paint. Truly
move-in ready. #331403. ASKING $104,800.
Pat Davis, Realtor







GATED COMMUNITY 55+ PARK IN
CRYSTAL RIVER. Lovely 2002 Palm Harbor
home, hardly lived in, with split bedrooms, large
eat-in kit., porch with vinyl windows. Park has
pool, clubhouse, catch & release fish pond. This
park is right in the heart of Crystal River - no need
ao travel far for anything. OWNER
FINANCING AVAILABLE - NO INTEREST.
#1 9852MHP ASKING $49,900.
Call Martha Snyder today at
352-476-8727 to preview this
and others available.


NATURE LOVERS PARADISE - This new
3BR, 2BA home has so many features to make
life good. Family rm. w/fpl. adjoins eat-in kit.
area. Large liv. rm. and master suite overlooks
estuary land and large farm. Over 2500 sq.
ft. LA. Lake access at your back door. Bird and
wildlife abound here. Very private. Situated
on 1.16 acres. Additional acreage available.
#332321. $258,900.
Call Pat Davis (352) 212-7280


$139,900
WOW! LOOK AT THIS DEAL!
Job relocation forces owner's move. Priced to
sell, this 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage
home with big beautiful fenced backyard and
inground heated caged pool with Jacuzzi is
the perfect home for your family! Come see
today! Call for showing.
Call Mary Parsons 352-422-5437


ESTATE SALE. Royal Oaks 2BR, 2BA, 1,
Villa. HOA offers clubhouse, pool, billiards,
shuffleboard, library, exercise room, tennis
courts, RV & boat parking, sewer, water,
cable, lawn & trim for low maintenance-fee.
Home warranty provided. $110,000.
#333321.
Ask for Jeanne or Willard Pickrel
352-2 2-3410
www.CitrusCountySold.com


782306

-1'



Centurion Office
1993- 2006


l
l






E18 SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009


HUES
Continued from Page E17

colorants, said AFM vice
president Jay Watts in San
Diego, Calif.
Alex Rossi, 34, a Denver-
area house painter, uses
only non-toxic paints, and
says they are as simple to
use and durable as regular
latex or oil paints. They dry
faster than regular latex
paints because the water in
zero-VOC paints evaporates
faster than the other paints'
petroleum products.
Years ago, the zero-VOC
paints didn't work as well as
regular latex paints, Rossi
said. They didn't cover a
surface as easily or thor-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


oughly, he said. Today, Rossi
has found that's not the
case.
"What the green paint
companies have done is
they've found ways to make
their paint more 'scrub-
bable' and more user-
friendly to compete with
the old, traditional coat-
ings," he said. "With two
coats of the two products
(latex and zero-VOC latex
paint) side by side, I see no
difference."
Some of his customers,
such as Laurie Tamm, 52, of
Boulder, Colo., are chemi-
cally sensitive. Tamm said
that immediate exposure to
toxic chemicals such as
VOCs in paint (or other
household products, such as
carpets and cabinetry) can


give her headaches, anxiety, this for 20 years," she said, Non-toxic latex paints are
depression and even para- adding that she cannot similar in price to high-end
noia. She thinks of herself enter newly constructed latex ones. For example,
and other chemically sensi- buildings because of fumes. Benjamin Moore's Natura
tive people as the prover- "If anyone is going to start line will retail for about $50
bial canaries in the the trend (of using non-toxic a gallon.
coalmine. paint), it has to start with Minchew thinks con-
"I've been going through people like me." sumers will appreciate the


non-toxics' faster drying
time.
"You can paint in the
room in the morning and eat
in there in the evening,"
said Minchew. "That's some-
thing you couldn't do with a
traditional, latex paint"


the link between plans and reality i

Dennis amato
State (en'/i-I J CGC-004344

GENERAL CONTRACTOR, INC.
A TRADITION OF QUALITY SINCE 19727
S* Consultation & Project/Plan Review
- Design Services
- Cost Estimating * Design-Build Construction
- * Custom Crafted Homes - Waterfront Homes
A * "Cracker-Style" Homes & Buildings
RA * Residential Renovations
- * Commercial Construction & Remodeling
- Adaptive Re-Use & Restoration of Buildings .

430NE3rdSl .P-O -Box 1312,Crystal River,FL34423-1312 *

352i) 7 o 3 - e 5


Citrus County's Best Priced Home....
BEAUTIFUL LANDSCAPED
3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car gar, 1985 Sq. Ft.

I, CITRUS License # RB0033452
SBUILDER 352-527-8764
LtBUILDER SAVE THOUSANDS
" su dE Wit %Lou 3m Aiad"
VISIT OUR WSME: wwwciarsbuilderonline.com
HB w n -^f :tinfif j81 ww


TE BANK-OWNED BUY IN DOWNTOWN
RNESS. r..:...- . ... - a p.r BANK-OWNED 3 BEDROOMS, 2 BATHS,
d ceilings & eat-in kitchen. Home requires TLC!!! 2-CAR GARAGE HOME IN RAINBOW ACRES -
\LMAGE AVENUE - $49,900 MLS#332868 Call 19981 SW 57TH STREET - $150,000 MLS#333123
'a Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 or Michelle Call Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 or
352-400-0263. Michelle Wells 352-400-0263.
i p s lA'- 9 nIl l * A. U





* 0 .


RTIC US COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2009 E19


JANE
Continued from Page E10

along the back of the pool
cage is required, then
choose the burgundy-leaved
"Plum Delight" variety of
Chinese fringe flower,
Loropetalum chinense, or
the cultivar "Whorled
Class" Walter's viburnum.
Rhododendron hybrid "Red
Ruffle" azalea grows only 2
feet tall and 2 to 3 feet wide
without pruning and takes
full sun. Salmon colored

I ", I -aff "


"Fashion" azalea naturally
matures at 3 feet height and
width.
Prune flowering shrubs
only after flowering has fin-
ished for the season. Put the
right plant in the right
place.


Jane Weber is a profes-
sional gardener and nurs-
ery owner She welcomes
weekend visitors to her
Florida Friendly Yard and
Wildlife Habitat at 5019 W.
Stargazer Lane, Dunnellon.
Call (352) 465-0649.


REALTY GROUP


6 - - ----- 7.
Detached Villa / 3Bd-2Bath-
2Car / Lakeview Villas
Popular Malibu model. Upgraded Kitchen
Cabinetry. Expanded lanai.
TVRG# 1082 $264,900.


Spcalzn in Ter Vit
& BentoodResle
9w.TrIa isaIaly rop-o


Single Family / 3Bd+Den-
2.5Bath-2Car / Hillside South
Large Custom Home on Skyview Golf Course
homesite. Expanded lanai w/screen enclosure.
TVRG# 1088 $499,000.


Detached Villa / 3Bd-2Bath-
2Car / Hillside Villas
Centrally located overlooking Skyview
Driving Range.
TVRG# 1010 $310,001


3351 S. STROUD TERRACE, INVERNESS
3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH
Best priced home near Inverness Golf& Country Club area!
$112,500!!
Directions: Hwy. 41 South, left on Eden Drive, right on Old Floral City Road,
left on Sandpiper, left on S. Stroud Terrace, to home on right.
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352) 726-2471
Email: oybass@tampabay.rrom www.alldtrusrealty.com After Hours 32)302-6714


$159,900 MLS#328295 | | $113,500 MLS#329421 I



8826 N. GOLFVIEW DR. 3600 N. I E .
CITRUS SPRINGS BV11 niLY NIo"
2D2.5BA/2CG New Roof & NC - 2BD/2BA/1CG * Maintenance Free
* Sits on 2 lots, .66 ac. -Solar Heated Pool * 1481 sf living area * Community pool
Close to Golf Courso -*Fam. Room/3rd BD * Living & Family Rooms * 2 Master suites


6045 N. OAKMON. 3175 . aV S ASAW WAY U
: 3BD/28A2+CG � Lg. Screened Patio o Immaculate 2BD/1.5 Baths � 1 Car Garage
* Great Room * Office or Den Florida Rm with tinted glass Berber Carpeting
* Garage Workshop � Pristine Condition - AC new in 2004, Appliances new in 2005


Detached Villa / 3Bd+Den-
2.5Bath-2Car / Hillside Villas
Spectacular Windward Villa located on the 6th
fairway of Skyview golf course. Priced to sell.
TVRG# 1077 $399,000.





Detached Villa / 3Bd+Den-
3Bath-2Car / Hillside Villas
Bright home w/Guest BR Suite. Tile in wet
areas, Bay Window in Master.
TVRG# 1018 $329,000.


Detached Villa / 2Bd-2Bath-
2Car / Hillside Villas
Customized Villa with great open floor plan.
Amazing view of the golf course.
TVRG# 1061 $329,000.





Detached Villa / 3Bd-2Bath-
2Car / Hillside Villas
Expanded Lantana model perfectly located
on 1st tee of the Skyview Golf course.
TVRG# 1064 $344,900.


Single Family I 3Bd-2Bath- Detached Villa / 3Bd-2Bath-
3Car / Hillside South 2Car / Woodview Villas
Breathtaking Home w/Pool & Jacuzzi. Many Malibu on Preserve Lot. Hardwood/tile
great upgrades throughout home. floors. Move in Ready!
TVRG# 1011 $369.000. TVRG# 1067 $254,900.


Single Family / 3Bd-2Bath- Detached Villa / 3Bd-2Bath-
2Car / Hunt Club 2Car / Woodview Villas
Home sits on rustic homesite.Upgraded ap- Home with side entry garage on oversized
pliances and so much more. lot. Loaded with upgrades
TVRG# 1019 $255,000. TVRG# 1022 $289,900.










Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 * (800) 323-7703


Detached Villa / 3Bd-2Bath-
2Car / Woodview Villas
Lovely Malibu villa on preserve lot loaded
with upgrades.
TVRG# 1063 $269,000.


Single Family I 4Bd+Den-
2.5Bath-2.5Car / Foxfire
Immaculate pool home loaded with up-
grades. Meticulously landscaped comer lot.
TVRG# 1058 $574,900.


Office in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center


CI COUNTY (F CHRONICIX


g




CmRs CouNTY (FL) CHRowNcu


E20 SumwYAPRIL 19 2009


" , ,


KELLER WILLIAMS.
R E A L T Y
Now The 3rd Largest
And Fastest Growing Real
Estate Company In The US.


Belief System DI�lWEHMI
Win-Win Or no deal
Integrity Do the right thing
Customers Always come first
Commitment In all things
Communication Seek first to understand
Creativity Ideas before results
Teamwork Together everyone achieves more
Trust Starts with honesty
Success Results through people
Mission: To build careers worth having,
businesses worth owning and lives worth living.
CALL US TO HEAR MORE!!!
(352) 746-7113
VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT
www.kellerwilliamofcitruscounty.com
Centrally located on Hwy. 44 in Lecanto (next to board of Realtors office)
-" . - " ', . ., ". , �


72,794 Agents
693 Ofices