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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01609
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: April 14, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01609

Full Text




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www.chronicleonline.com
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOLUME 114 ISSUE 250


U.S. eases Cuba sanctions


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - In a meas-
ured break with a half-century of
U.S. policy toward communist
Cuba, the Obama administration
lifted restrictions Monday on


Cuban-Americans who want to
travel and send money to their is-
land homeland.
In a further gesture of open-
ness, U.S. telecommunications
firms were freed to seek business
there, too. But the broader U.S.


trade embargo remained in place.
The White House portrayed its
changes, which fulfilled one of
President Barack Obama's cam-
paign promises, as a path to pro-
moting personal freedom in one
of the few remaining communist
nations. They also marked an-
other major step away from the
foreign policy priorities of the
Bush administration.
But the moves fell far short of


the more drastic policy adjust-
ments that some - including Re-
publican Sen. Richard Lugar -
have argued are required to pro-
mote U.S. interests in Latin Amer-
icq and to bring about change in
Cuba. For most Americans, Cuba
remains the only country in the
world their government prohibits
'them from visiting - a barrier to
potential travelers as well as to
the Cuban tourist industry that


would like to see them.
Cubans welcomed the changes
but said more should be done.
Few Cubans expect Obama to end
the trade embargo or allow Amer-
ican tourists to visit the island
without limits.
"He should do more and lift
travel restrictions for all Ameri-
cans," said Alberto Sal, a 68-year-
old retiree. "Until he does that, I
See CUBA/Page A2


Man takes


deal, won't


Serve time

S25-year-oldgiven

S~1 .0 lyearsprobation,

. cannot drive again
ji4 SHEMIR WILES
swiles@chronicleonline.com
SChronicle


'"si^ ^ f H i "' '7 ' I- " " : ,: � HH


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Liz Stacklin has been a volunteer at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center for 12 years. In addition to managing all the volunteers, she is
the buyer for the hospital gift shop.

Nature Coast Volunteer Center to hostfair Saturday at Crystal River Mall


CRISTY LoFTrI
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
ust over 13,000 hours - that's how
much time Liz Stacklin has volun-
teered in the past 12 years.
Through her service Stacklin is able to
help medical students pay for college, com-
fort patients and provide meaningful expe-
riences for the 126 other volunteers at
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center.
She's made friends.
She's made a difference.
"It's rewarding," Stacklin said, "and a
learning experience."
Agencies hope to find others interested
in donating their time and skills to the com-
munity at the ninth annual Volunteer Fair.


The Nature Coast Volunteer Center event
is from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the
Crystal River Mall. About 30 organizations
will have booths to teach the public about
what they do and what volunteer opportu-
nities are available.
"Our goal is to match people up with the
right opportunity," Volunteer Center super-
visor Heidi Blanchette said.
Organizations such as the Key Training
Center, Hospice of Citrus County, Her-
nando-Pasco Hospice, Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center, the Red Cross,
Citrus Abuse Shelter Association, Citrus
County Fire Rescue and a pet rescue
agency will be at the event Saturday
The event kicks off National Volunteer
Week is April 19 to April 25.
See T- , iL.Page A4


CATCH THE
VOLUNTEER SPIRIT
* The Nature Coast Volunteer Center
will host its ninth annual Volunteer
Fair from 10 a.m. to 3p:m. Saturday
at the Crystal River Mall. People can
learn about how they can get in-
volved in 30 organizations in need of
volunteers. There will be door prizes
throughout the day. For more infor-
mation, call 527-5950 or go to
www.naturecoastvolunteercenter.org.
BY THE NUMBERS
* 1,023 volunteers served 193,343
hours with the Nature Coast Volun-
teer Center in 2008.


Diana Balent held on tightly to
one of her most prized possessions
- a photo of Andrew Macrina.
"This is how I'll always remember
him," she said. "And no one can take
that away from me."
Matthew Bennett was charged
with DUI manslaughter, vehicular
homicide, DUI
with serious bodily
injury and reck-
less driving caus-
ing serious bodily
injury in the crash
that took Mac-
rina's life. Sched-
uled to begin his
trial Monday, Ben- Matthew
nett, instead, ac- Bennett
cepted a plea offer if he violates
of 10 years of pro- parole, faces
bation from the up to 20 years
state. in prison.
Macrina was killed in a Septem-
ber 2007 single-car crash. The
driver of the car, Bennett, now 25,
was traveling at 2:30 am. on South
Highlands Avenue in Inverness
when Florida Highway Patrol re-
ports state Bennett lost control of
the vehicle and began to spin on the
roadway. The car then entered the
road's west shoulder and collided
with several trees before flipping
over.
Macrina, 26, died at the scene of
the crash and the other passenger,
Paul L Liscum, received serious in-
juries.
Family and friends of both Mac-
rina and Bennett were given the op-
portunity to speak during Bennett's
sentencing.
Macrina's dad said the loss of his
son devastated the entire family, but
they realize no matter what, nothing
can bring him back Macrina's dad
admitted his son was no angel - his
son's license was suspended be-
cause of a DUI. So as a result, his
son didn't drive. He always made
See DEAL/Page A2


U.S. will combat piracy, Obama vows


President will look at available options


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The United
States is considering new strategies
in the aftermath of the high-seas
hostage drama, including adding
Navy gunships along the Somali
coastline and launching a cam-
paign to disable pirate "mother
ships."
The rescue of an American
hostage and the killing of three So-
mali pirates by Navy SEAL snipers
also increases pressure on U.S. and
international leaders to use au-


thority the United Nations granted
last December to hunt pirates on
land, where they plan and nurture
attacks.
One day after his direct order al-
lowing military force ended in suc-
cess, President Barack Obama
committed the United States to
"haltthe rise of piracy" without say-
ing exactly how his administration
and allies would do so. While stop-
ping short of a pledge to eradicate
piracy, the new U.S. president
added the lawlessness off the coast
of Africa to a lengthy must-fix list


that already includes two wars and
a struggling economy
"We have to continue to be pre-
pared to confront them when they
arise, and we have to ensure that
those who commit acts of piracy are
held accountable for their crimes,"
Obama said.
U.S. officials privately outlined
several options Monday, even as the
Pentagon cautioned that the solu-
tion to the piracy scourge won't
come at the point of a gun.
Obama and other U.S. leaders
pledged a hard look at Washington's
options following the piracy drama
that ended Sunday with the freeing
See PIRACY/Page A2


Associated Press
President Barack Obama, accompanied by Vice President Joe Biden,
said Monday that the U.S. will seek to halt the Increasing threat of
piracy off the Horn of Africa as he also praised the U.S. military's suc-
cessful rescue of merchant Capt. Richard Phillips.


Annie's Mailbox .............C9
Com ics .......................C10
Crossword ................ C9
Editorial ....................... A8
Horoscope ....................C8
Lottery Numbers ............B4
M ovies ................... ........C 9
Obituaries ......................A5
Stocks ......................... A6


SBack in style
STori Spelling returns to familiar ZIP code tonight./Page B6

S Money management Bankruptcies up./Page A10

Phils voice 'lost' In asing Marilyn Chambers found dead./Page A5
broadcaster,ldies/Page i Retrain yourself Workforce expo on tap./Page A3


Essential ed
We should bemoan the
demise of civics education
in our schools./Page A8


President Obama OKs money transfers,

travelfor Cuban-Americans to Cuba







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A2 TUi:SDAY, AI'I1. 14, 20(


CUBA
Continued from Page Al

don't think he's doing much."
Lifting or substantially eas-
ing the economic embargo, as
set forth in the Cuban Assets
Control Regulations and ad-
ministered by the Treasury
Department, would require
legislative action by Congress.
The White House made no
mention of any intention to
seek such changes; Obama
said as a presidential candi-
date that the embargo was a
form of leverage to press for
democratic reforms in Cuba.
"IfPresident Obama is seri-
ous about promoting change
in Cuba, this executive order
must be part of a larger shift
away from the U.S.'s unilat-
eral approach toward the
Cuban government," said Jose
Miguel Vivanco of Human
Rights Watch.
Taking the other side, three
Democratic lawmakers wrote
in a letter to Obama on Mon-
day that his decisions would
have "devastating conse-
quences."
They said the Cuban gov-
ernment takes 30 cents of
every dollar in U.S. remit-
tances that enters the country


DEAL
Continued from Page Al
sure to have a ride, Macrina's
dad said.
'"That was his ride that
night," he said.
Macrina's mother said she
hopes people will think before
they get into the car with
someone. She said their fam-
ily agreed to probation be-
cause she said they didn't want
two lives ruined. All they can
hope for, she said, is that Ben-
nett has learned his lesson and
will change his life around.
, Balent, who watched Mac-
rina grow up, said she fears
the light sentence will send the
wrong message to the commu-
nity that DUI is OK
"No parent should have to
bury their child," Balent said.
She told Bennett she hopes
he doesn't think he beat the
system.
"See this plea as a gift," Ba-
lent advised.
For the first time, Bennett
spoke to Macrina's family and
.expressed his regret for what
happened.


ALSO IN CUBA
Separately on Monday, a U.S. religious freedom watchdog
group said it had been forced to call off a fact-finding trip after the
Cuban government did not issue visas to its delegation. The U.S.
Commission on Intemational Religious Freedom said the visas
had been applied for weeks earlier and it had received no expla-
nation for why they were rot granted.
- From wire reports


as a usury fee.
"This income facilitates the
regime's finance of its repres-
sive state security apparatus,"
they wrote. The letter was
signed by Reps. Debbie
Wasserman Schultz of Florida
and Albio Sires and Robert
Andrews of New Jersey. They
recommended a more cali-
brated approach: doubling the
amount of allowable money
transfers to family members
in Cuba rather than allowing
unlimited transfers.
American policy toward
Cuba has been frozen since
1962, when the Kennedy ad-
ministration broadened a par-
tial trade embargo imposed by
the Eisenhower administra-
tion the previous year. The
original aim was to bring
down Fidel Castro's Marxist
government at a time when
U.S.-backed exiles mounted
the failed Bay of Pigs invasion
and Soviet missiles in Cuba

"I'm incredibly sorry for the
loss ofyour son," Bennett said.
He said Macrina was a good
friend of his and was over-
come with grief when he
heard he had died. He admit-
ted nothing he could do would
fix things, but he did ask for
forgiveness.
"I hope you can find it in the
bottom of your heart to forgive
me," he said.*
Rebecca Childs, who has
known Bennett since he was
15 years old, described Ben-
nett as a sweet, kind person
that made a bad decision.
Every since the crash, she
said, Bennett has been re-


pushed the world close to nu-
clear war.
Sporadic congressional ef-
forts to end the embargo since
then have failed, largely due
to the political influence of
powerful Cuban exiles, mostly
in Florida, who are deter-
mined to isolate Cuba, stran-
gle its economy and force
Castro out
Castro, now 82, ceded the
presidency to his brother last
year due to illness. Raul Cas-
tro, 77, shows no sign of mak-
ing any fundamental changes.
"All who embrace core
democratic values long for a
Cuba that respects the basic
human, political and eco-
nomic rights of all of its citi-
zens," White House press
secretary Robert Gibbs said in
announcing the decision.
"President Obama believes
the measure he has taken
today will help make that goal
a reality."


morseful.
Judge Richard "Ric"
Howard informed Bennett
from now on, it's up to him to
stay out of trouble. A violation
of his probation could land
him a 20-year prison sentence.
"And you know I'll pull the
trigger," Howard said.
In addition to probation,
Howard ordered Bennett to
pay restitution to the Macrina
family and Liscum. Bennett
will have a lifetime driving
suspension of his license and
he is not allowed to drink or
visit any bars during his pro-
bation. He will also have to
submit to random urine tests.


PIRACY
Continued from Page Al
of an American cargo ship
captain. Somali pirates say
they will retaliate for the
killing of three of the pirates
holding captain Richard
Phillips, and one pirate told
The Associated Press that
Americans are now enemy
No. 1.
Military officials said the
precision of Sunday's rescue
may be a testament to the skill
of the U.S. military, but it
should not become a ration-
ale for a major expansion of
the Pentagon's role in what is
fundamentally a criminal
problem, military officials
said.
One official, reflecting the
administration's view, said
bluntly that piracy is a crime,
not an act of war or even ter-
rorism. The official spoke on
condition of anonymity be-
cause no decisions have been
made, including about
whether to expand or change
the military's current role in
fighting piracy
Defense officials, speaking
under the same terms for the
same reason, said planners
will examine whether Navy


Because Bennett plans to at-
tend an out-of-state college,
Howard said he would allow
the probation to be transferred
out of the state for education
purposes.
Before leaving the court-
room, Howard said he had a
message for all the young peo-
ple in the audience.
"It can happen to you,"
Howard said. "You can end up
like Andrew oryou can end up
like Matthew."


ships could or should escort
or otherwise expand the pro-
tection they provide to private
U.S. commercial ships along
the Somali coast The U.S. has
already committed several
ships to an international pa-
trol force.
There are too many com-
mercial ships and too few mil-
itary ones to provide full
escorts, and additional U.S. or
international warships would
probably be a temporary re-
sponse.
As Somali pirates have be-
come bolder and more so-
phisticated they have begun
to capture more and larger
vessels for use as "mother
ships" or mobile command
and supply centers. Navy offi-
cials theorize that was the
goal of the attack on the
Maersk Alabama, which
would have been the largest
prize yet for the pirates.
Any new strategies'at sea
will have to take the mother
ships into account, officials
said, perhaps with new au-
thority to hunt for them.
U.S. officials are looking for
'things they can do unilater-
ally and in concert with other
nations to buttress a loose
strategy of seaborne patrols.
The top Navy official in the
region acknowledged Sunday


that the current strategy isn't
working.
Defense Secretary Robert
Gates said piracy will be a top
priority for the administra-
tion in the weeks ahead, even
as he called the dramatic res-
cue a "textbook" success
story
Nonmilitary responses in-
clude greater coordination
among nations trying to help
stabilize the weak, ineffectual
Somali government and'pro-
vide economic options be-
yond the ransoming of foreign
cargo crews.
A 24-nation response group
on Somali piracy, formed
under United Nations aus-
pices, is likely to meet soon to
discuss a recent spike in
hostage-taking.
"We're going to be looking
at a number of options and
mechanisms," State Depart-
ment spokesman Robert
Wood said Monday
"We clearly have an issue in
this region right now- piracy
- and we need to work coop-
eratively with a whole host of
countries as best we can to
prevent these things from
happening," Wood said.'"This
is not something we're going
to be able to solve overnight,
but I think we've got some
steps in place."


"We Cater to Cowards"

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S Page A3 -TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009



TATE &


LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Boat collision kills five


NTSB investigatingfatalpower boat

wreck in Jacksonville area


Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE - The Na-
tional Transportation Safety Board
has launched an investigation of
the fatal power boat accident that
killed five people and injured nine
on Florida's east coast
"We are looking at the man, the
machine and the environment,"
NTSB member Deborah A.P
Hersman said at a Monday after-
noon briefing.
Hersman revealed that there,
were 14 people in the 22-foot
power boat that crashed into the
rear of a tugboat at about 7 p.m.
Sunday near Palm Valley in St.


Johns County, about 25 miles
southeast of Jacksonville. Investi-
gators had earlier said 12 people
were aboard the boat.
The NTSB is working with the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser-
vation Commission, the U.S. Coast
Guard and the St. Johns County
Sheriff's Office.
NTSB investigators will look
over evidence collected by local
authorities and interview wit-
nesses and crash survivors.
Hersman said the NTSB doesn't
investigate many boating acci-
dents, but said this case with five
fatalities and nine injuries met
the agency's criteria for a serious


accident that warranted special
attention.
"Our investigations are very
comprehensive and we leave no
stone unturned," she said.
The primary focus is to learn
lessons that can be applied to pre-
vent future accidents, Hersman
said.
Six accident victims are being
treated at Shands Jacksonville
hospital. Two were in critical con-
dition Monday, one was in serious
condition and three were in fair
condition. Authorities have not
said where the other three victims
were being treated.
The victims' names have not
been released. Joy Hill, a spokes-
woman for the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion, said investigators were still
trying to verify their identities.


... . ---.
-- --- . -
Associated Press
On Monday, a Florida Fish and Wildlife Qommission officer walks past
the damaged 22-foot Crownline boat involved in an accident Sunday that
killed five people and seriously injured nine others in Palm Valley. The
boat slammed into a 25-foot tugboat moored to the under-construction
dock Sunday evening.


Re-training


expo set


Wednesday


Scholarships for

unemployed offered

Chronicle
Unemployed workers in Citrus
,County are invited to attend Work-
force Connection's Stimulus Re-
training Expo at 8:30 a.m.
Wednesday, at Withlacoochee
Technical Institute, Room 115, in
Inverness.
Attendees will learn more about
training programs and scholar-
ships for occupations that are pro-
jected to grow during the next few
years. After an opening general
session, attendees can visit break-
out sessions highlighting various
occupational areas.
Central Florida Community
College, Taylor College and With-
lacoochee Technical Institute will
showcase programs in health
care, welding, auto service tech-
nology, electrical, corrections, law
enforcement and business. Schol-
arship information and applica-
tions will be available from
workforce staff, as well
Workforce Connection, the local
organization that provides work-
force services to employers and
applicants, recently received ad-
ditional scholarship funding to as-
sist workers who have lost their
jobs and disadvantaged adults
who require training to compete
for jobs. These funds, made avail-
able through the Deptartment of
Labor's National Emergency
Grant and the American Recovery
and Reinvestment Act of 2009,
commonly referred to as the
"Stimulus Bill," are being made
available to assist persons in Cit-
rus, Levy and Marion counties.
Workers who have lost their jobs
because of the economy are en-
couraged to attend the Stimulus
Re-training Expo to explore train-
ing options and available scholar-
ship funding.
For more information, go to
www.clmworkforce.com or call
(800) 434-JOBS, ext. 5769.


State to seek

death penalty

for Anthony

Associated Press
ORLANDO - Prosecutors will
seek the death penalty against
Casey Anthony,
who is charged
with murdering
her young daugh-
ter, Caylee.
A spokeswoman
for the State Attor-
ney's Office in Or- .
land said Monday
that prosecutors .:..
have filed papers ' rre,
seeking the death mother of
penalty against Caylee.
Anthony if she is




found in woods near her home last
December.


Mending fences,


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Rob Flinchum and Sherwood Colton from JNT Fence Company replace the fences around the ball
fields recently at Whispering Pines Park in Inverness.




Two charged in burglary

Bridewell told deputies he had
One spectwas we ingpermission from one of the resi-
1 1* dents of 205 S. Fillmore St to enter
ankle-monitoring bracelet the home and retrieve the games
and DVDs, which he claimed were
his, the report states. The residents
KER LYNN ;- t k;. E Street Deputies issued a be-on-the- told deputies they knew Bridewell,
kmchale@chronicleonline.com lookout alert and found Bridewell but did not give him permission to
Chronicle on South Lincoln Avenue. enter their home nor was the stolen
'While searching him for property his, according to the re-
Deputies arrested two Beverly weapons, deputies discovered port.
Hills men Sunday on felony Bridewell was wearing an ankle- When deputies questioned
charges in connection with a bur- monitoring bracelet Bridewell about how he entered
glary. Awaiting tial the residence and about a broken
Dakota Michael Bridewell, 20,31 Bridewell is awaiting a May 11 side garage door window, he said
N. Jefferson St., will face felony trial in reference to an October he did not break the window and
charges of burglary of an unoccu- 2008 arrest on a felony charge of had entered through an unlocked
pied residence and grand theft and lewd and lascivious battery on a door in the back of the home, the
Joshua W Sullo, 22, 1 E. Murray St, child. Last year, Bridewell admit- report states.
will face a felony charge of acces- ted to having sex with a 14-year-old Sullo reportedly dropped
sory after the fact girl behind an apartment complex, Bridewell off near the residence
On Sunday afternoon, Citrus according to an arrest report. and then circled the block Sullo
County sheriff's deputies re- After deputies detained told deputies he was trying to find
sponded to a call regarding a possi- Bridewell on Sunday, two wit- Bridewell when they pulled him
ble burglary in progress on South nesses identified him as the man over, the arrestreport states..
Fillmore Street in Beverly Hills. they saw walking quickly with a bag Sullo said he was told Bridewell
A witness told deputies she saw through the backyard of their resi- had permission to enter the home
Bridewell cut through her back dence, located near 205 S. Fillmore to retrieve items for one of the res-
yard and walk toward a residence St idents; however, after a few min-
at 205 S. Fillmore St.; then, she During the deputies' investiga- utes, Sullo said he began thinking
heard glass break, the sheriff's of- tion, K-9 dog Dearden found 64 Bridewell might be doing some-
fice arrest report states, video games, 24 DVDs and a video thing wrong, the report states.
Shortly after deputies arrived on game system and controller next to No bond was set for Bridewell
scene, witnesses said they saw a residence on South Lincoln Av- because he was under GPS moni-
Bridewell running near Regina enue. Deputies determined the touring. A $2,000 bond was set for
Boulevard and South Fillmore items came from 205 S. Fillmore St Sullo.


Board


to hear


reactor


argument

Special to the Chronicle
An Atomic Safety and Licensing
Board (ASLB) panel will hear oral
arguments on a request for a hear-
ing in the Levy County Combined
License (COL) proceeding on
Monday and Tuesday, April 21, in
Bronson.
The ASLB is the NRC's quasi-
judicial arm dealing with licens-
ing matters.
Oral arguments will begin at 1
p.m. Monday in Courtroom A at
the 8th Judicial Circuit Court, 355
S. Court St. in Bronson. The oral
arguments will continue at 10 a.m.
April 21, at the same location;.
The sessions are open for pub-
lic observation, but participation
will be limited to the parties in-
volved in the proceedings. Early
arrival is suggested (to allow for
security screening) for all mem-
bers of the public interested in at-
tending. NRC policy prohibits
signs, banners, posters or displays
in the hearing room.
Although the Board has not
scheduled time for oral limited
appearances at this point, the
public may submit written limited
appearance statements regarding
the Levy County proceedings to
the Board using several methods:
By mail
* Office of the Secretary, U.S.
Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Attention: Rulemakings and Ad-
judications Staff
Washington, DC 20555-0001
* with a copy to:
Judge Alex Karlin
Mail Stop T-3E15
Atomic Safety and Licensing
Board Panel
U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Com-
mission
Washington, DC 20555-0001;
By e-mail
* Hearingdocket@nrc.gov;
* with a copy to the Board (c/o
Megan Wright, megan.wright@
nrc.gov).
By fax
* Office of the Secretary at (301)
415-1101. Call (301) 416-1966 to ver-
ify receipt.
* with a copy to the Board (c/o
Megan Wright) at (301) 415-5599.
Call (301) 415-7550 to verify receipt
Progress Energy Florida sub-
mitted a COL application July 28,
2008, to construct and operate two
nuclear reactors in Levy County,
near Crystal River. A request to in-
tervene in the proceeding was
submitted jointly by the Nuclear
Information and Resource Serv-
ice, the Ecology Party of Florida,
and the Green Party of Florida.
The ASLB panel will hear oral ar-
gument on the admissibility of
some of the issues raised in this
filing and determine, at a later
date, whether a hearing should be
granted.
* Documents related to the
Levy County COL application are
available on the NRC Web site at:
www.nrc.gov/reactors/new-react
ors/col/levy.html.
* Documents pertaining to the
ASLB proceedings are available in
the agency's electronic document
library at the site: www.nrc.gov/
reading-rm/adams/web-based
.html.
* More information about the
ASLB can be found at: www.nrc
.gov/aboutnrc/organiza tion/aslbp
funcdesc.html.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Report: Man caught peeping


KERI LYNN MCHALE
kmchale@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Deputies arrested a 49-year-old man
Sunday on allegations that he peeked
through a window to watch a 15-year-
old girl.
Otha Morgan Nelson Jr., of South
Boston, Va., faces a misdemeanor
charge of loitering/prowling at a time
or in a manner not usual to lawful citi-
zens. His bond was set at $500.
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
deputies arrived around 11 p.m. Sun-
day at a home on Sandberg Point in Ho-
mosassa Springs where a resident of
the home told deputies his neighbor
was constantly staring at his wife and


TIME
Continued from Page Al

With more than a decade of
service, Stacklin has spent a
great deal of time at the hos-
pital.
"It gives you kind of a lift
when you help somebody,"
Stacklin said.
She is currently the presi-
dent of the Friends of the Na-
ture Coast Volunteer Center
and the hospital's Volunteer
Service League.
Before Stacklin, of Inglis,
retired she worked at the
Federal Reserve Bank in
Jacksonville.
Now she interviews new
volunteers and places them
in various roles based on
their interest and skills. She
conducts training sessions,
buys supplies for the gift shop
and creates the master volun-
teer schedule.
Stacklin helps distribute
the proceeds from the volun-
teer-run gift shop, breakfast
cafe and uniform sales.
The money buys free


teenage daughter, the arrest report dent told his daughter to turn off the
states. lights to her room. Then, the resident
The resident told deputies earlier in looked out a window toward his daugh-
the day that Nelson was peek- ter's room and saw Nelson
ing through the resident's P standing directly outside a win-
fence and watching his wife. dow to the bedroom, looking in.
Later in the day, the resident " The resident confronted
reportedly saw Nelson staring , Nelson and Nelson went back
at his home. The resident said to his home, the report states.
due to Nelson's actions, he was Nelson told deputies he had
suspicious of him, so he went to B : been drinking all day and was
his own bedroom, turned off I . peeping, according to the ar-
the lights and looked out his Otha M. rest report
bedroom window to see what Nelson Jr. Nelson "did not elaborate on
Nelson was doing outside. bond set what he intended to do after
The resident reportedly at $500. peeping,.however, he did say
watched Nelson walk onto his that he had been away from
property and stand by a boat near the home for quite some time and was
daughter's bedroom window. The resi- lonely," the arrest report states.


copies of the newspaper for
hospital patients and sup-
ports scholarships for med-
ical students. Last year, the
volunteers gave $20,000 in
scholarships.
That's why she carefully se-
lects items to be sold at the
gift shop. The more money
earned means they can give
away more.
"The best-selling thing we
ever had was the Beanie Ba-
bies. I wish I could hit on
something like that again.
During the Beanie Babies
craze in the 1990s, the gift
shop would have days with
$5,000 in revenue because of
the popularity of the dolls.
Hospital volunteers range
from age 14 to 84, Stacklin
said. A typical shift is about
four hours.
Hospital spokeswoman
Dorothy Pernu said dedi-
cated people like Stacklin are
invaluable to the hospital.
"We couldn't do what we do
without the volunteers,"
Pernu said. "The volunteers
are vital to everything that's
happening here at Seven
Rivers."


Deputies: Man


shoots neighbor's


dog for barking

KERI LYNN MCHALE lying on the ground with
kmchale@ bullet wound to its rig
chronicleonline.com shoulder The resident to:
Chronicle deputies he looked acro


An Inverness man is fac-
ing misdemeanor charges in
connection with the shoot-
ing of his neighbor's dog.
Citrus County sheriff's
deputies -arrested Daniel
Lowell Clauson, 63, of 4700
E. Doeskin Loop, Thursday
night on charges of cruelty
to animals and using a
firearm while under the in-
fluence.
According to an arrest re-
port, an Inverness resident
said he was inside his home
when he heard a loud noise
outside, followed by his
dog's whimpers. He ran out
to his yard and found his dog


,a
ht
Id
ss


me street ana saw ulauson
holding a long-barrel .22-cal-
iber rifle, the report states.
Clauson told deputies he
shot the dog because it was
barking, the arrest report
states. He also told deputies
he'd had six or more alco-
holic beverages.
Clauson "began to discuss
how he was a sniper in the
Marine Corps and how he
used to eat dog when he was
in Vietnam," the arrest re-
port states. "He then stated
that he was not sorry and
did not have any remorse for
the dog."
Clauson's bond was set at
$750.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrests
* Peter T. Mobbs, 46, no
listed residence, at 2:53 a.m.
Monday on misdemeanor
charges of driving under the in-
fluence and knowingly driving
while license is suspended or
revoked. According to the arrest
report, deputies pulled Mobbs
over after they saw him driving
east in the westbound lane of
State Road 44. Deputies found
six empty beer cans in the vehi-
cle Mobbs was driving. Mobbs
refused to participate in field so-
briety tasks and would not sub-
mit to a breath test to determine
his blood-alcohol concentration.
Bond $10,500.
Other arrests
* Nathaniel Rodriquez,
32, 38525 Patti Lane, La-
coochee, at 10:10 a.m. Sun-
day on an active Citrus County
warrant for original felony
charges of burglary of an un-
occupied structure and grand
theft. Bond $10,000.
* Brent Wilson Drawdy,
23, 4666 E. Bow and Arrow
Loop, Inverness, at 12:23 p.m.
Sunday on an active Pinellas
County warrant for felony vio-
lation of probation in reference
to original charges of burglary
and failure to appear. No
bond.
* William Nathan Thieme,
22, 1552 N. Arkansas Road,
Hernando, at 12:22 p.m. Sun-
day on misdemeanor charges
of knowingly driving while Ii-


cense is revoked and posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia. Ac-
cording to the arrest report,
deputies pulled Thieme over in
Beverly Hills for driving too fast
and too close to another vehi-
cle. Thieme told deputies his li-
cense was suspended and the
deputies confirmed three sus-
pensions on his Florida
driver's license, the arrest re-
port states. Then, deputies
searched the vehicle and
found two used syringes and a
partially burnt spoon, the re-
port states. Although Thieme
told deputies the items were
not his, they arrested him on a
paraphernalia charge because
the items were found under
the driver's seat and the vehi-
cle belonged to Thieme's fam-
ily member, the report states.
Deputies also arrested Brent
Drawdy, a passenger in the
vehicle, on a Pinellas County
warrant. Bond for Thieme was
set at $10,500.
* Timothy Michael Varner,
21, 7290 W. Grant St., Ho-
mosassa, at 11:50 p.m. Sun-
day on an active Citrus County
warrant for failure to appear on
an original felony charges of
dealing in stolen property and
false owner information on
pawn items. No bond.
* Laurie Anne Copeland,
29, 9040 Hunt Club Lane, Port
Richey, at 2:38 a.m. Monday on
an active Citrus County warrant
for an original misdemeanor
charge of obtaining property by
means of worthless checks.
Bond $150.


ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests made by the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office, go to
viww.sheritfcitrus.org and click on the Public Infor-
mation link, then on Arrest Reports.
* Watch the "Arrested Developments" show from the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office at www.chronicle
online.tv.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.


r^\c t . . ,. -. _ " vp T


FLORIDA TEMPEiRAT RES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


89 67 NA 88 63 NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusie daly
S TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 77 Low: 50 *
Showers and thunderstorms with
gusty wind
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
High: 76 Low: 52
Increasing sunshine, breezy a bit cooler

THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
SHigh: 80 Low: 55
Mostly sunny and pleasant

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday 87/63
Record 90/39
Normal 82/58
Mean temp. 75
Departure from mean +5
PRECIPITATION*
Monday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.03 in.
Total for the year 3.49 in.
Normal for the year 12.04 in.
'As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 5
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Monday at 3 p.m. 29.96 in.


DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m. 62
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m. 46%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees were heavy, grasses were
moderate and weeds were absent.
*'Light - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Monday was moderate with pollut-
ants mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
4/14 TUESDAY 10:09 3:56 10:34 4:21
4/15 WEDNESDAY 11:04 4:51 11:29 5:16


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


0
MAY 9O
MAYS


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:56 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................7:04 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY.................. 12:09A.M.
MOONSET TODAY .................. 10:20 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. A burn ban is in effect.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through O can water
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addressed
ending in 8 or 9, orV through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay
Tuesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowltzka' 9:51 a/5:07a 8:41 p/4:40 '
Crystal River" 8:12 a/2:29 a 7:02 p/2:02 p
Wlthlacoochee' 5:59 a/12:17 a 4:49 p/11:50 a
Homosassa"' 9:01 a/4:06 a 7:51 p/3:39 p


"'At Mason's Creek
Wednesday
High/Low High/Low
10:42 a/5:49 a . 9:22 p/5:17 p
9:03 a/3:11 a 7:43 p/2:39 p
6:50 a/12:59 a 5:30 p/12:27 p
9:52 a/4:48 a 8:32 p/4:16 p


F'cast
ts

pc
ts
pc

ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


F'cas
pc
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OiTLOKt .
West-southwest winds from 10 to 25 Gulf water
knots. Seas 4 to 6 feet. Bay and inland temperature
waters choppy. Chance of showers
and thunderstorms today. 7 4 o

Taken at Arpeka


Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.07 28.02 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.30 33.27 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 35.02 35.00 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.24 37.20 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Food stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-721

THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M
TUESDAY


Monday Tuesday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 53 27 pc 59 33
Albuquerque 66 38 pc 74 47
Asheville 52 45 .21 ts 56 42
Atlanta 64 51 1.26 pc 65 43
Atlantic City 58 27 r 47 43
Austin 77 47 s 81 53
Baltimore 57 29 r 50 41
Billings ' 69 39 rs 43 32
Birmingham 7659 .27 pc 64 41
Boise 61 47 .02 rs 49 31
Boston 54 34 s 53 38
Buffalo 50 25 c 53 37
Burlington, VT 49 29 s 56 29
Charleston, SC 68 53 .21 ts 76 53
Charleston, WV 66 45 sh 59 45
Charlotte 60 51 ts 62 46
Chicago 46 36 .25 sh 46 37
Cincinnati 59 44 .34 sh 55 43
Cleveland 54 34 .01 sh 53 40
Columbia, SC 65 53 .10 ts 74 48
Columbus, OH 49 38 .24 sh 55 44
Concord, N.H. 52 30 s 58 26
Dallas 66 52 s 76 54
Denver 65 31 c 70 42
Des Moines 50 37 .48 s 58 39
Detroit * 45 32 sh 47 38
El Paso 76 46 s 83 54
Evansville, IN 69 48 .22 c 53 41
Harrisburg 54 29 r 50 37
Hartford 55 33 pc 59 34
Houston 76 58 s 81 56
Indianapolis" 52 39 .87 sh 48 39
Jackson 80 50 .02 s 68 46
Las Vegas 83 56 pc 77 52
Little Rock 61 51 .18 s 66 46
Los Angeles 65 52 pc 62 50
Louisville 70 47 .43 c 55 42
Memphis 65 54 .08 pc 61 45
Milwaukee 42 37 .05 sh 44 36
Minneapolis 58 43 pc 61 38
Mobile 76 63 1.36 s 71 47
Montgomery 71 61 1.78 s 70 43
Nashville 76 57 .07 pc 56 40
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c.cloudy; dr-drlule;
fnfair; h.hazy; pc.partly cloudy; r-raln;
rs.raln/snow mix; s-sunny; sh.showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w.wlndy.
02009 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


Monday Tuesday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 82 68 .28 s 73 53
New York City 57 34 c 54 4(
Norfolk 53 38 ts 59 48
Oklahoma City 57 42 .02 pc 72 51
Omaha 54 40 .01 s 63 41
Palm Springs 89 58 pc 78 50
Philadelphia 57 34 r 50 4(
Phoenix 85 58 pc 88 63
Pittsburgh 55 32 sh 53 41
Portland, ME 54 32 s 52 30
Portland, Ore 52 43 .09 sh 51 36
Providence, R.I. 53 31 pc 56 35
Raleigh 63 45 ts 60 46
Rapid City 64 36 pc 67 4;
Reno 68 39 rs 47 27
Rochester, NY 46 24 c 55 35
Sacramento 73 48 pc 64 41
St. Louis 52 46 .51 pc 51 4(
St. Ste. Marie 45 26 pc 49 28
Salt Lake City 67 39 sh 57. 38
San Antonio 80 51 s 83 58
San Diego 71 55 pc 65 55
San Francisco 61 50 pc 58 47
Savannah 72 59 1.32 ts 77 51
Seattle 48 39 .14 sh 50 36
Spokane 48 35 .04 rs 50 29
Syracuse 46 24 pc 56 35
Topeka 49 39 .10 s 63 43
Washington 54 39 r 51 43
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 100 Harlingen, Texas LOW 14 Wolf Creek,
Colo.
WORLD CITIES


TUESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/71/pc
Amsterdam 61/45/c
Athens 61/50/sh
Beijing 78/55/sh
Berlin 65/44/s
Bermuda 74/61/pc
Cairo 95/74/pc
Calgary 39/23/sn
Havana 86/70/ts
Hong Kong 82/71/ts
Jerusalem 88/68/pc


Lisbon 64/47/s
London 55/42
Madrid 67/42/s
Mexico City 82/52/t
Montreal 44/25,
Moscow� 48/31/p
Paris 62/46/
Rio 81/70/t
Rome 63/46/f
Sydney 82/65/
Tokyo 67/48
Toronto 46/34/p
Warsaw 60/42/p


t CHRONICLL
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N \ - Blvd

i ; z Inverness
SCourthouse office
i Tompkins St. oP square
I .1. 106 W. Main
I - - __ st.,
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Kathie Stewart .................................................... Circulation Director, 563-5655
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For the RECORD


APRIL17 P11IL124 MAY1I


1 %�- I UhND Y, �FIUL 1) 4UL,


A4 TUESDAYAPlul 14 2 9









CUrIIAUO IuUU FL- CROICETUSDYAPI 1, 00A


Obituaries ------ --


Theresa
Byrnes, 90
HOMOSASSA
Theresa L. Byrnes, 90, of
Homosassa, Fla., passed
away Sunday, April 12,2009,
at Sugarmill Manor, Ho-
mosassa.
Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa, Fla., is in
charge of the arrangements.

Masako 'Rae'
Gregory, 76
INVERNESS
Masako "Rae" Gregory,
76, Inverness, died Sat.
April 11, 2009, at her resi-
dence under the care of her
family and Hospice of Cit-
rus County. A native of
Japan, she was born Aug. 25,
1932, and moved to this area
in 1996 from Hampton Bays,
New York She enjoyed
cooking, sewing, gardening
and watching favorite tele-
vision shows.
Survivors include her
husband of 53 years,
Thomas A. Gregory; two
children, Steven Gregory
and wife, Elaine Fredrick of
E. Providence, RI; Susan
Gatto and her husband,
Charlie of Inverness; 4
grandchildren, Melissa and
Christopher Gatto and
Hanako and Pauline Gre-
gory.
A celebration of life me-
morial service will be held
on Thursday, April 16, 2009,
at 2:00 PM. from the Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home of In-
verness with Hospice Chap-
lain Daniel Lyman
officiating. There will be no
viewing hours.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline.conm.

Doris
Haselkamp, 74
Doris M. Haselkamp, 74,
passed away from this life at
Sharon Hospital, April 4,
2009. Doris was born Octo-
ber 15, 1934, in Bridgeport,
CT, the daughter of Charles
Edward and Emma
(Matthews) Criegmuss. She
was a homemaker and a life
member of the VEW, Citrus
Springs, FL.
Doris is survived by her
children, Debra Benjamin
and her husband Daniel of
Pleasant Valley, NY, Robert
Hasselkamp ofWassaic, NY,
and David Haselkamp and
his wife Roxanne of New
Hamburg, NY; grandchil-
dren, Robert Benjamin, Re-
becca Curtis, Cynthia
Benjamin, Carrie Kerbert,
Tiffany Laust; and three
great-grandchildren. She is
also survived by her broth-
ers, Charles, Robert and
Ronald Criegmuss, and her
sisters, Ellen Campbell and
Beverly Kovach. She was
predeceased by her hus-
band George arid sisters


Barbara Orosz and Emmy
Lou Delaney
Graveside services will be
held at 11:00 am, Tuesday,
April 14,2009, at the Florida
National Cemetery, Bush-
nell, FL. In lieu of flowers,
contributions may be made
to Geer Memorial Nursing
and Rehabilitation Center,
99 South Canaan Rd, North
Canaan, CT 06018 or the
American -Cancer Society.
Arrangements entrusted to
Purcell Funeral Home,
Bushnell, FL.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline.com.

Raymond
Keegan Jr., 51
INVERNESS
Raymond C. Keegan Jr.,
51, of Inverness, died April
12, 2009, at Citrus Memorial
hospital.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory in
charge of private arrange-
ments.

Thelma
King, 66
CRYSTAL RIVER
Thelma T King, 66, of
Crystal River, died Friday,
April 10, 2009.
Visitation is today, April
14, from 10 a.m. until service
time at 11 a.m. at the
Roberts Funeral Home of
Dunnellon.






Kay John
Larsen, 71 ...
BEVERLY HILLS
Kay John Larsen of Bev-
erly Hills, FL, passed away
on Saturday, April 11, 2009,
at Citrus Memorial hospital,
Inverness, FL.
Born in Grace, Idaho, he
had made
S Beverly
. Hills his
home for
S "- . the past
S four years,
-, movie ng
from Las
Vegas, NV
Kay John He worked
Kay John
- ars en - as a Super-
visor for
Clark
County and retired with 30
years of service. He served
in The U. S. Air Force. Mem-
ber of the Beverly Hills
Fishing Club and the Bev-
erly Hills Recreation Cen-
ter.
Preceded in death by his,
parents, mother- and father-
in-law, one brother, one
grandchild and three broth-
ers-in-law.
Survivors include: wife of
35 years Bonnie L. Larsen;


S782592


Hips go. Knees go.


The only question is where Will you go?


Don't let pain
interfere with your
everyday activities.
* Fracture Care
* Sports Medicine
* Hand Surgery
* Total Hips and Knees
* Shoulders
* Arthroscopic Surgery


R Crane

Couch, D.O.
Citrus Bone and Joint Specialists Orthopedic Surgery
Reclaiming Lives
Offices in Lecanto & Ocala
Lecanto 746-0654
Ocala 237-9298
3264 W. Audubon Park Path, Lecanto
4600 SW 46th Ct., Ocala


Staff privileges at Citrus Memorial Health System,
Seven Rivers Medical Center, and West Marion Community Hospital .







Spring Sale

Now Thru Sat., April.18"




10" OFF

riced Sandals & Purses


MADE IN AMERICA 795-4057

p.,~r llldA 0 I 6%all


OBITUARIES

* The Citrus County Chronicle's policy permits both free
and paid obituaries.
* Obituaries must be submitted by the funeral home or
society in charge of arrangements.
* Free obituaries can include: Full name of deceased;
age; hometown/state; date of death; place of death;
date, time and place of visitation and funeral services:
W Area funeral homes with established accounts with the
Chronicle are charged $8.75 per column inch for paid
obituaries. Non-local funeral homes and those without
accounts are required to pay in advance by credit
card, and the cost is $10 per column inch. Small
photos of the deceased's face can be included for an
additional charge.
* Additional days of publication or reprints due to er-
rors in submitted material are charged at the same
rates.
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next
. day's edition.


Children: Jason wife Gwen
Larsen, London, England,
Melissa husband Jason
Davis, Las Vegas, NV, Ken-
neth wife Lisa, Spanish
Fork, Utah, Brian wife
Vickie Larsen, West Jordan,
Utah; one brother, Ray
Larsen, Salt Lake City, Utah;'
4 sisters, Juanita Bair, Hen-
derson, N, Winona Hen-
derson, Phoenix, AZ,
Connie Litster, Bountiful,
Utah, Jackie Silvey, St.
Charles, MO; 12 grandchil-
dren and a host of relatives
and friends.
In lieu of flowers dona-
tions may be made to Hos-
pice of Citrus County, PO
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464.
A Memorial Service will
be held at 2:00 PM on Thurs-
day, April 16, 2009, at Fero
Funeral Home. Arrange-
ments by Fero Funeral
Home, 5955 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills, FL
34465.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline. corn.






Charles
'Cap'n Bud'
McGee Jr., 79
CHIEFLAND

- Charles "Cap'n Bud" Ed-
wards McGee Jr., age 79, of
Chiefland, FL, passed away
at home on April 12, 2009.
He was born on January 2,
1930 in Miami, FL to
Charles Sr. and Ruth
McGee. He served in the
United States Coast Guard
during the Korean War,
where he received the
Metal of Bravery. He moved
to Chiefland, FL, 15 years
ago from Inglis, FL. He was
of the Baptist faith. He
worked as a commercial
fisherman. He was a mem-




"Your Trusted Family-Owned
Funeral Home Since 1962"




* Burial
* Cremation
* Pre-Planning
Funeral Directors
C L,m.na. ilrr.i: jr.J i T,:.T L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


ber of the Organized Fisher-
man of Florida; McGee
Branch Hunting Club; he
was an Honorary Sheriff
Deputy of Glades County,
Florida; he was also a
County Commissioner for
Glades County. He loved to
fish, go hunting; loved lis-
tening and playing music;
he was a dedicated hus-
band; family man and fa-
ther.
He is survived by his wife
of 54 years, .Betty McGee;
sons, Buddy McGee (Lynn),
Daniel McGee (Dawn);
daughters, Betty Lou Mor-
ton (Harold), Eyvonne Mal-.
men (John); sister, Beverly
Sweeting; 6 grandchildren
and 2 great-grandchildren.
He was preceded in death
by his parents, Charles
McGee Sr. and mother Ruth
Bryan Sweeting; son, Mike
McGee; and sister, Pat
Gilbert.
' Family plans to hold a pri-
vate memorial service at a
later date. They ask that in
lieu of flowers, donations be
made to Haven Hospice, 311
N.E. Ninth St., Chiefland,
FL 32626. Arrangements are
under the care of Knauff Fu-
neral Home - Chiefland.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

Agnes
Mooney, 87
INVERNESS
Agnes R. Mooney, left
with Jesus Easter morning,
April 12, 2009. A native of
Brooklyn, NY, Agnes was
born Feb. 16, 1922, to the
late John and Margaret Hy-
land. She attended Our
Lady of Perpetual Help
Grammar School and Bay
Ridge High School. During



nia n- c.
U Prolessiornl HeannCg Cnters



"Helping
People '
Hear...

Quality 4* "
Care"






Denny Dingier, A C A.
Audloproslhologist
M DI, BC-HIS


211 S. Apopka Ave., Inverness
www.NerveDeafness.com


HunterDouglas


Citrus Paint & Decor Decorating center
(352) 795-3613 (352) 873-1300
724 NE Hwy. 19 * Crystal River .. 7470 S.W. 60th Ave. * Ocala
Mal uIth S U*,lI8nil5.ai 5<..i i I.��,,- t�a� i st4t hd' www.citruspaint.com
.1 Mwiltohxlual^ me U.1 ld la-1--t" �seN 01l.ll - 0 t.aa 1-l *�d TM .1 1 ln a RIu.i D II,,


WWII, she worked on bomb
sights, did various office
jobs, and was a school guard
for the NYPD. She moved to
Sussex, NJ, in 1961, taught
CCD at St. Monica's, and
came to Inverness in 1978.
Three sisters preceded
her in death, Margaret (Bar-
ney) Carey; Marie (Bud)
Dee; Theresa (Harold) Ger-
hardt; also preceded by 2
brothers, John (Gloria) Hy-
land and William (Peggy)
Hyland. She is survived by
her husband, Francis X.
Mooney; her daughter,
Noreen O'Brien; grand:
daughter, Tara (Bill) Man-
ning; great-grandchildren,
Jack and Zane Manning;
adopted daughter, Linda; a
sister, Dorothy (Thomas)
Maginley; a brother, Ed-
mund (Katherine) Hyland.
The Mass of Christian
Burial will be offered
Thursday, April 16, at 11:00
AM. from Our Lady of Fa-
tima Catholic Church with
Fr. Charles Leke, celebrant.
Burial at a later date in
Florida National Cemetery
Friends may call at the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home Wednesday from 5-7
PM where a Wake Vigil
Service will be offered at
6:00 PM. In lieu of flowers,
memorials to Citrus Co.
Hospice, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464 or
charity of your choice.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. corn.

Rosemarie
'Oma' Rector, 71
CRYSTAL RIVER
Rosemarie "Oma" Rector,
age 71, of Crystal River, Fla.,
died on Monday April 13,
2009, at her home in Crystal
River under the care of her
family and Hospice of Cit-
rus County. Born November
30, 1937, in Burghaun, Ger-
many, to Wilhelm and An-
naliese Scheffler. She came
here .32 years ago from
Dunkirk, MD. She was a
homemaker and was of the
Lutheran faith. She enjoyed
Crocheting, Ceramics and
Gardening.
She is survived by her
husband of 52 wonderful
years, George'Rector, whom
she married in Fulda, West
Germany, in 1956; a daugh-
ter, Kathy Rector; a son,
Michael Rector; and a
grandson, Corey Tyler, all of
Crystal River, FL; and a sis-
ter, Jutta Bruck and her hus-
band Manfred of
Frankenau, Germany.
A Memorial service will
be held on Friday, April 17,
782075

BROWN
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY


2009, at 6:00 PM at the
Strickland Funeral Home
Chapel in Crystal River, FL,
with Alida Langley presid-
ing. The family suggests that
in lieu of flowers those who
wish may make a memorial
contribution to Hospice of
Citrus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline.com.

Donald
Wertman, 73
DUNNELLON
Donald Wertman, 73, of.
Dunnellon, Fla., died
Thursday, April 9, 2009, at
the Crystal River Health &
Rehab. There are no known
survivors.
Strickland Funeral Home
Crystal River, Fla.

Death

ELSEWHERE


Marilyn
Chambers
ADULT FILM STAR
LOS ANGELES - A
friend of adult film star Mar-
ilyn Chambers says the ac-
tress has been found dead at
her home in northern Los
Angeles County.
Peggy McGinn says the 56-
year-old Chambers was
found by
/.4iz her 17-year-
old daugh-
ter Sunday
night and
e 14 the cause of
death has
not been de-
termined.
.... , Chambers
Chambers starred in
photographed the 1972
in 1973. film "Be-
hind the
Green Door," which was
more widely distributed and
attracted a more main-
stream audience than the
usual adult fare.
Chambers, whose given
name was Marilyn Briggs,
was once a model for Ivory
Snow. She was among the
first porn superstars when
the stag films of the 1940s
through 1960s gave way-to
the more polished sex films
of the 1970s.
-From wire reports


C2.E. &2avi
Funeral Home
With Crematory
HOMER A. BROWN
Graveside Services: Fri. 2:30 4/24
Florida National Cemetery
CHARLES MASDEN
Viewing: Tues.4-6
Services: Wed. 9am - Chapel
NAOMIMORAN
Services: Wed. 3pm - Chapel
NICK MITSAKOS
Private Arrangements
MASAKO "RAE" GREGORY
Services: Thurs. 2pm- Chapel
AGNES MOONEY
Viewing: Wed. 5-7pm
Mass: Thursday I1am
Our Lady of Fatima

726-8323


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1


TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 AS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL CLE


k














AS T'r., .. n A..,, n 91200n


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JO I UESDAY, AmIUL 14, ZUUY


THEMARET N RVIE


ISWT RA "A" RV


MO6 r ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE; MOST ACTIVE ($1 O MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(oo) Last Ch-. Name Vol()._ Last Chg Name Vo La s) Lt Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
Ctigrp � 7896819 3.80 +.76 PSCrudeDL n339428 3.06 -.18 PwShs QQQ1105230 32.89 -.05 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
BkofAFn 6631408 11.02 +1.47 EldorGldg 31040 7.87 +.33 FifthThird 637381 4.34 +.76 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name.(not abbrevia-
DirxFlBull 3193066 9.75 +1.04 Taseko 26388 1.68 +.21 Intel 444274 15.98 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
SPbRlFnd 2424675 11.08 +.45 GranTrrag 25506 2.55 -.09 HuntBnk 442414 2.86 +.71 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed forthe day.:
SPDFI 2050830 85.83 +.02 GoldStrg 17995 1.35 +.06 Microsoft 433663 19.59 -.08 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by..

Ai |A ERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS: ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) SlocK Fooenoles. o I s a are .ald k' ilrn', ,:,pn) , l . 5Ne wiew
1-0 10 - L,3 C r.- I ". r5r,, i :. 2t , n ,rpary nr .rir l li d m' r,' tr, eAm riSan E.cnar. cj .
Namiei, Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg_ Name Last Cho %Chog ,,,,,,)- : ,, .T P, iip-.;ih . r.p ry..', 8rW , r6,aQ apdrl a. urpuan
Doral nd 4.48 +1.80 +67.2 Gulfstream 2.95 +.84 +39.7 CarverBcp 5.94 +1.93 +48.1 -, , u ,,,,b , , , :,i krp . ,' r., u ,. , "Ir,.' i r . y a ''l r,,,h band Siu ,us il.
MSEngy12 17.00 +5.14 +43.3 StreamGSv 4.10 +1.15 +39.0 SterlingBks 2.00 +.60 +44.9 uie ,:li ir, ir.rr,.Ir..t.r e ir, ,.l l tra.g o i Pr.retrred a.I.5Au pr- Prewaer.l iE pp.
AlntGr77 3.95 +.92 +30.4 TravelCtrs 2.50 +.44 +21.4 HerzfldC 7.97 +2.32 +41.1 HUil.a,, i .,,' j.riiT,,rl .:.1 pur.:rIan s ,,c n R grl i10 tuv,:urry ala Pi.ri-r1d p,.c s
AlntG62 5.02 +1.07 +27.1 PSBMetDL n 8.65 +1.41 +19.5 TrBrdge 3.48 +.89 +34.4 i. .i ,na p.i1 .ir, iT ,ai 20 par,.1; aBt..rTr. last ,Ie ,. . Tr ii adeiS wlt.-e iniid r.er,n in
Citigrp 3.80 +.76 +25.0 B&HO 2.20 +.33 +17.6 AgFeed 3.21 +.80 +33.2 ri.::h ,k";.-uel ad. Oner .itinruti ie . Wiarrait aciinng a purcinhba ul a ,.u- New
S. . AcP r,lr, u'. Un1 inrit l.iri. Ir. i rr.. i l ,.r:.e ina - c cu nt I l C rampanid t t, arkrupnp r
S (ERS ($2 on MoRE) LOSERS 152 on ol RLOSERS IS 2O :.MoE c.., ..r,.p ,c.' en ,:,ra.'..rlald uri.n e ..e rupy lar Appe nr, , lrni c.o Ir,. nime
Name Last Chq %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name LaSl Cng .Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
PitnB r 442.50-210.50 -32.2 ManSang 2.22 -.48 -17.8 Harrington 2.03 -.97 -32.2
CitJSP10 7.78 -2.53 -24.5 TanzRyg 3.42 -.63 -15.6 FstBkshVA 2.25 -.71 -23.9
GMcv6-09 5.57 -1.23 -18.1 SDgopfC 16.38 -1.87 -10.2 SCMMic 2.35 -.55 -19.0
SPXCp 43.91 -9.72 -18.1 Emergentn 8.13 -.87 -9.7 NthnStat 5.44 -1.07 -16.4 52-Week Net' % YTD
GenwOrth 2.26 -.49 -17.8 GreenHntr 2.00 -.20 -9.1 PurpleCm 2.27 -.43 -15.9 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ch


DIARY
Aglyalced.
DIcliOed
Unchtnmed
Total Issues
New ighs
New oos
Volui4e 6,21
: *; :


DIARY


1,805 Advanced
1,266 Declined
88 Unchanged
3,159 Total issues
3 New Highs
8 New Lows
37,777,753 Volume


DIARY


329 Advanced
231 Declined
72 Unchanged
632 Total issues
3 New Highs
2 New Lows
106,165,858 Volume


1,? 5
1,382
141
2,908
24
9
1,796,522,327


13,136.69 6,469.95Dow Jones Industrials
5,536.57 2,134.21Dow Jones Transportation
530.57 288.66Dow Jones Utilities
9,687.24 4,181.75NYSE Composite
2,433.31 1,130.47Amex Index
2,551.47 1,265.52Nasdaq Composite
1,440.24 666.79S&P 500
764.38 342.59Russell2000
14,564.81 6,772.29DJ U.S. TotMkt


8,057.81
2,958.99
331.40
5,410.28
1,402.03
1,653.31
858.73
468.05
8,769.26


YTD
Name DIv YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name DIv YId PE Last Chg ,Chg
AT&Tlnc 1.64 6.3 12 26.02 -.08 -8.7 Lowes .34 1.7 14 20.28 -.04 -5.8
AlliedCap ......... 1.82 +.11 -32.3 McDnlds 2.00 3.6 15 56.11 -.56 -9.8
BkofAm .04 .4 20 11.02 +1.47-21.7 Microsoft .52 2.7 10 19.59 -.08 +.8
CapCtyBk .76 5.4 16 13.96 +.27-48.8 otoro 4.81 -.09 +8.6
Citigrp .04 1.1 3.80 +.76 .-43.4 Motorola .........4.81 -.09 +86
Disney .35 1.8 9 19.53 -.35-13.9 Penney .80 3.0 10 26.52 +1.10 +34.6
EKodak .50 11.6 4 4.32 +01-34.3 ProgrssEn 2.48 7.1 11 34.88 -.31-12.5
Embarq 2.75 7.5 7 36.50 -.80 +1.5 RegionsFn .40 8.0 ... 5.03 +.72-36.8
ExxonMbl 1.60 2.4 8 68.02 -1.82-14.8 SearsHldgs ......... 53.62 +1.13+37.9
FPLGrp 1.89 3.7 12 50.58 -1.74 +.5 Smucker' 1.28 3.3 13 38.61 -.20-11.0
FairPoint ......... .77 +.05 -76.5 SprintNex .........4.19 -.10+129.0
FordM . . 4.26 +.02+86.0 TimeWrnrs .........22.04 -.20 -1.2
GenElec .40 3.3 7 12.13 +.80-25.1
GnMotr . 1.71 -.33 -46.6 UniFirst .15 .4 11 37.89 +.11 +27.6
HomeDp .90 3.5 19 25.96 +.06+12.8 VerizonCm 1.84 5.8 14 31.74 -.36 -6.4
Intel .56 3.517 15.98 ... +9.0 WalMart 1.09 2.1 15 51.53 +.87 '-8.1
IBM 2.00 2.0 11 99.95 -1.75 +18.8 Walgrn .45 1.5 14 29.17 +.19 +18.2


)% 52-wk
ig %Chg


-25.57 -.32 -8.19 -34.50
-30.00 -1.00-16.35-38.78
-5.38 -1.60-10.62-33.78
+33.84 +.63 -6.02-39.37
+8.31 +.66 '+.32-37.80
+.77 +.05 +4.84-27.35
+2.17 +.25 -4.93-35.35
-.15 -.03 -6.29-31.78
+24.71 +.28 -3.50-34.61


Request stocks or mutual tunds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrebt

Blvd , Crystal River, FL 34429; or cal 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

lual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


F NEWYORKmSTOCK ECHANGE


Name Last Chg


ABBLtd 15.24 +23
ACELUd 47.51 +1.98
AESCorp 6.51 -.25
AFAL 25.76 +.81
AGL Rs 26.94 +.24
AKSteo1 10.80 +1.11
AMBPr 18.68 +.13
AMR - 4.69 +.13
ASALt 50.50 +1.37
AT&Tlpc 26.02 -.08
AUOpton, 9.87 +.49
AXA 15.35 -.02
AbtLab 44.38 +.75
AberFOt 24.02 -.74
Accenture 27.90 +.19
AdamSEx 7.96 +.10
AdvAu ' 41.22 -1.07
AMD O 3.61 -.14
Aeroptl 29.89 -.33
Aetna 27.52 +1.71
Agilenf 16,68 -.32
Agnicog 49.06 -.24
Agriu ng 39.53 +1.06
AiTranf 5.82 +17
Alcateiluc 2.14 +.06
Alcoa . 9.15 +.30
AlgEngy 24.37 -.51
AlegTh '29.25 +.95
Alergat 46.75 -.72
Alete 25.52 -.70
AlMDat . 43.79 -.03
AIIBGHi' 8.80 +.05
AlBBlncp 7.18 -.01
lhlM-m 19.22 +.42
40l.eac. 1.82 +.11
alirh 3 3.09 +.04
Alsate 2421 +1.18
AlphaNAst 19.19 +.73
Atia : 16.56 +.25
AlumChinal 19.12 +.40
AmbacF 1.14 +.17
Amdo � 19.51 -.47
Ameren 22.64 -.27
AMOvil ; 31.75 +.38
AmCaihput 20.15 -.11
AEagleut 14.06 +.08
AEP 26.09 -.31
AmExpl ! 20.46 +1.63
mirort. 1.42 +.26
.T ':' . 4.31 +.15
a.,TRPS 7.71 -.03
AliT..i,, 32.22 -.60
Amirai 7.99 -.01
AsTinr,. 29.56 +.56
Aminnsoe 24.31 +.13
Anadaro 43.96 +.78
A,.aK.�j - 20.55 -.21
Ar~.4tq 32.68 +1.49
an:., , 6.37 -.40
Anna , 1439 -.14
AdsnCtrp 39.52 +.50
ap,ine 69.48 +.56
nTorn.. . 6.69 -.39
Aquar : 19.04
antil .l ?27.22 +1.37
arrha:r.ml 15.79 +.51
Alb-Dtn 26.91 +1.06
Ashtr ' 14.79 +.44
AdEsst l 6.00 -.06
A 22.97 -.11
AWofcs 21.22 +.25
AutoNin 16.21 +.21
>>Arln i, 55.85 +.35
A.:-n 21.90 -.18
AXISCp' 26.51 +.23


BB&TCp 21.00 +.69
BHPBillLI 48.54 +1.76
BJSvcs 11.00 -.16
BMCSfI 33.48 -.15
BPPLC 39.92 -.09
BRE 24.89 +.33
BRT 4.19 -.03
BakrHu 30.75 -.22
BallCp 42.61 -.62
BcoBrads 12.08 -.17
BcoSantand 8.99 +.21
BkofAm 11.02 +1.47
BkNYMel 32.43 +2.78
Barclay 11.31 +.41
BarckG 28.71 +.15
Baxter 49.66 +.43
BaylexEg 12.98 -.07
BestBuy 41.05 -.04
BigLots 24.02 -.18
BioMedR 9.46 +.08
BIkHillsCp 18.78 -.11
BIkDebtStr 2.22 +.02
BlkEnhC&l 10.98 -.13
Backstone 7.80 +.17
BlockHR 15.67 +.09
BueChp 2.31 -.03
Boeing 37.15 -2.00
Borders h 1.37 +.21
BorgWam 25.75 -.13
BostBeer 23.29 -.71
BostProp 43.77 -.31
BoslonSi 8.98 -.02
BoydGm 6.87 +.70
Brandyw 4.91 +.36
Brinker 18.71 +.27
BrMySq 20.14 -.04
BrkfdAsgs 15.95 +.16
BrkfldPrp 6.84 +.32
Brunswick 4.03 -.12
Buckeye 35.66 +.01
BuriNSF 66.37 +.21
CBREIlis 5.80 +.49
CBLAsc 4.16 +.43
CBSB 5.47 +.11
CHEngy 45.91 -1.37
CIGNA 20.43 -.02
CITGp 4.16 +.47
CMSEng 12.07 -.15
CSS Inds 18.31 +.62
CSX 28.89 -.86
CVSCare 29.90 -.19
CablvsnNY 17.39 +.81
CabotO&G 27.97 -.57
CallGolf 7.99 -.09
Calpine 9.28 +.59
CamdnP 27.14 +.03
Camecogs 18.30 +.43
Cameron 24.07 -.26
CampSp 25.98 -.14
CdnNRyg 40.93 +.69
CdnNRsg 45.34 +.76
CapOne 19.21 +1.75
CapillSrce 2.15 +.14
CapMplB 13.17 +.03
CardnlHIth 33.61 +.65
CarMax 11.71 -.52
Carnival 26.20 +.60
Caterpillar 33.16 +.64
Celanese 17.98 +.43
Cemex 8.13 -.01
CenterPnt 10.18 -.05
Centex 9.74 +.26
CnryTel 27.04 -.63
ChampEh .57 +.06
Checkpnt 10.42 -.46
ChesEng 20.74 +.04
Chevron 67.98 -1.25
Chicos 7.00 +.08
ChinaMble 45.61 +.59


Chubb 44.04 +1.18
Cimarex 24.04 +.34
CinciBell 2.79 -.01
Ciligrp 3.80 +.76
CitigpplM 18.79 +.91
CiligrppfP 18.80 +1.15
CleanH 48.81 -.80
CliffsNRss 20.69 +.10
Clorox 53.14 -.94
Coach 18.47 -.39
CocaCE 14.48 -.07
CocaCI 44.73 -.26
Coeurh 1.16 +.06
CohStSUtI 9.37 -.16
ColgPal 58.49 -1.31
CollclvBrd 10.85 -.58
ColBgp .94 +.03
Comerica 21.41 +1.84
CmdMUs 13.75 +.41
ComScop 17.41 -.62
CmtyHIt 16.21 +.71
CVRD 16.37 +.40
CVRDpf 13.97 +.32
Con-Way 21.27 +.23
ConAgra 17.70 +.05
ConocPhil 40.06 -.34
Conseco 1.54 +.05
ConsolEngy 27.33 +.28
ConEd 38.90 +.01
ConstellA 11.04 -.14
ConstellEn 22.92, -.28
CAirB 13.19 -.13
Cnvrgys 9.46 -.13
Cooper Ind 28.51 +.04
Coming 14.79 -.31
CosanLtd 4.79 +.34
CoventyH 14.90 +.05
Covidien 32.08 +.15
CredSuiss 34.79 +1.16
CrwnCstle 24.89 -.22
CrownHold 21.93 -27
Cummins 30.16 +.14
CSemis 716 -18

DCTIndl 4.19 +.10
DJIADiam 80.55 -.34
DNPSelct 7.29 +.23
DPL 22.60 -.15
DRHorton 10.72 +.08
DTE 28.63 -24
Daimler 32.96 +.64
Danaher 55.68 -.90
Darden 37.97 +.93
DeanFds, 19.35 -.27
Deere 37.47
DeltaAir 7.51 +.12
DenburyR 16.98 -.15
DeutschBk 51.31 +1.68
DevelDiv 3.22 +.10
DevonE 48.81 -.10
DiaOfls 70.75 -.64
DiamRk 5.09 +.06
DigitalRlt 39.30 +.48
DirxFinBull 9.75 +1.04
DirxRnBear 9.26 -1.23
DirxSCBear 35.60 -.29
DirxSCBull 23.20 +.04
DirxLCBear 48.60 -.17
DirxLCBui 28.40 +.20
DirxEnBull 26.33 -.87
Discover 8.45 +.26
Disney 19.53 -.35
DomRescs 30.16 -.32
DonlleyRR 9.33 +.02
DEmmett 98.5 +.68
Dover 31.60 -.75
DowChm 11.24 +.30
DrPepSnn 19.08 -.39


DuPont 26.81 +.33
DukeEngy 13.92 -.04
DukeRlty 8.20 -.04
Dynegy 1.84 +.05
EMCCp 12.71 -.54
EOGRes 61.97 +.62
EaslChm 30.79 -.23
EKodak 4.32 +.01
Eaton 42.38 -1.45
EalnVan 25.53 +1.17
Edisonlnt 28.06 -.76
EIPasoCp 6.92 -.12
Elan 5.97 +.07


FootLockr 10.97 -.37
FordM 4.26 +.02
ForestCA 7.93 +.69
ForestLab 21.28 -.27
FortuneBr' 34.77 -1.04
FdtnCoal 16.71 +.25
FrankRes 61.50 -.22
FredMach .89 +.12
FMCG 45.59 +1.49
FrontierCm 7.61 -.07
FrontierOil 15.08 -.03


HRPTPrp 4.06 +.06
HSBC 34.65 -.37
HSBCcap 21.91 +.22
Hallibrtn 16.97 -.15
HanJS 9.99 +.03
HanPtDv2 6.71 +06
Hanesbrds 13.14 +.35
Hanoverlns 32.39 +.45
HarleyD 18.06 +.04
HarmonyG 9.32 +.25
HartfdFn 11.56 +.76
Hasbro 26.69 -.17
HawaiiB 15.68 -.19


563-5655 It's
*Charge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation star


Embarq 36.50 -.80
EmersonE 31.60 -.40
EmpDist 14.96 -.16
Emulex 6.97 +.31
EnbrEPtrs 33.22 +.24
EnCana 46.07 +1.03
EnPro 19.11 -.42
ENSCO 29.90 +.62
Energy 64.44 -1.40
EqtyRsd 22.92 +.18
EsteeLdr 26.97 +.27
ExcelM -6.92 +.15
ExcoRes 12.06 +.42
Exelon 47.10 -.71
ExxonMbl 68.02 -1.82
FMCCorp 47.56 -.63
FPLGrp 50.58 -1.74
FairPoint .77 +.05
FamiyDIr 33.79 -.54
'FannieMaeh .88 +.14
FedExCp 50.98 +.06
FedRlty 57.23 +.14
FedSignl 6.06 -.08
Fedlnvst 24.05 +.55
Ferrellgs 14.41 +.03
Ferro 2.84 -.09
FidlNRn 22.60 -.23
FidNnfo s 19.50 -.06
FstHorioon 13.12 +.69
FTAclDiv 9.81 +.15
.FtTrEnEq 8.44 -.01
FirstEngy 39.57 -.64
Ruors 39.44 -.45


GATX 21.95
GabelliET 3.47
GabHIthW 4.94
GabUtil 6.04
GameStop 32.29
Gannett 4.06
Gap 14,98
GencoShip 15.33
GenDynam 44.01
GenEec 12.13
GnGrthPrp 1.05
GenMills 50.37
GnMot 1.71
Genworth 2.26
GaPw8-44 25.32
Gerdaug 430
Gerdaus 7.03
Gildan 10.96
GlaxoSKln 29.93
GoldFLtd 11.06
Goldcrpg 29.98
GoldmanS 130.15
Goodrich 41.60
Goodyear 8.79
Graffech 8.47
GtPlainEn 14.02
Grifon 8.58
GpTelevisa 16.30
GuangRy 21.36
Guess 22.97
HCPInc 21.25


HIICrREIT 35.31
Hltagmt 3.07 +.22
HHhcrRIty 16.08 +.24
HithSouth , 8.58 -.24
HeclaM 2.34 +.23
Heinz 33.83 -.12
HelixEn 8.41 -.16
HeilnTel 8.24 +.24
HelmPayne 28.81 -.16
Hess 57.83 -.61
HewlettP 34.52 +.09
HighwdPrp 24.88 +.94
HomeDp 25.96 +.06
Honwillntl 30.27 -.77
HospPT 9.31 -1.64
HostHotIs 5.60 +.10
Humana 29.66 +.78
Huntsmn 4.32 +.20
IAMGIdg 8,04 +.31
ICICIBk 17.67 +.92
ING 8.82 +.63
iSAslla 14.70 +.28
iShBraz 44.86 +.16
iSCan 18.26 +.25
iShHK 11.53 +.14
iShJapn 8.50 +.02
iShKor 32.60 -.09
iShMex 32.42 +.49
iShSing 7.02 +.05
iSTaiwn. 9.10 +.19
iShSilvers 12.57 +.40
iShCh25s 32.17 +.32
iSSP500 86.10 +10


iShEMkts 28.12
iShiBxB 95.29
ISSPGth 44.33
iShSPLAs 30.09
iSEafe 40.71
iSRMCVs 26.74
iShRsMd 59.63
iShC&SRI 34.41
iSR1KV 44.63
iSRIKG 37.61
iSRusiK 46.83
iSR2KV 44.23
iSR2KG 50.10


KCSouthn 15.48 +.18
Kaydon 28.23 -1.42
KAEngTR 12.93 -.17
Kellogg 39.24 -.31
Keycorp 9.23 +.98
KimbClk 48.30 +.10
Kimco 10.17 -.11
KindME 47.95 +.35
KingPhrm 8.03 +27
Kinrossg 14.78 -.18
KnightTr 16.52 +.43
Kohls 44.62 -.78
Kraft 22.46 +.11
KispKrm 2.28 +.01
Kroger 20.51 +26
LDK Solar 8.04 -.04
LLERoyhi .45 -.03
LSICorp 3.66 -.15
LTCPrp 19.39 -.46
LaZBoy 2.08 +.38
Ladede 36.57 -.85
LVSands 5.21 +.77
LearCorp 1.10 +.09
LeggMason 19.30 -.13
LennarA 8.22 +.04
LeucNatl 19.53 +.59
LexRItyTr 3.61 +.14
LbtyASG 2.60 +.04
ibtProp 22.90 +.86
UllyBi 32.57 -.07
Limited 10.29 -.38
LincNat 10.24 -.16
Undsay 32.08 +3.13
UzClab 4.33, +.22
LokhdM 73.79 +.47
Loews 25.53 +.98


LUwwa 2.28 -.u0

1 B11 1 ~M&TBk 55.67 +1.11
MBIA 5.42 +.39
MDURes 17.10 -.06
IEZ ! M0" LA
f MEMC 16.18 -2.76
MF Global 5.86 +.36
t MFA Fnd 5.87 -.21
MCR 7.51 +.02
iShR2K 46.66 +.02 MGIC 2.46 +.36
iShREst 30.87 +.39 MGMMir 6.25 +.95
iShFnSv 43.35 +2.14 Macedch 13.20 +1.12
iShFnSc 40.40 +1.44 MackCali 24.52 +71
iShSPSm 40.83 +.12 Macquarie 2.05 +.25
iStar 3.47 -.16 Macys 12.93 +1.05
Idaerp 23.36 -.29 Madecos 4.88 -.01
ITW 32.24 -.30 Magnalg 32.83 +.17
Imaton 8.95 -.07 MaguirePr 1.25 +.35
Infineon 1.92 +.05 Manowoc 4.57 +.27
IngerRd 16.53 -.09 Manul gs 15.53 +.48
IntegrysE 25.67 -.33 MarathonO 28.85 -.42
IntntEx 91.17 +2.05 MkVGld 3377 +.73
IBM 99.95 -1.75 MarlntA 19.36 +.17
IntlCoal 1.99 +.11 MarshM 20,62 +20
IntlGame 11.49 -.06 Marshls 05 +.83
IntPap 7.88 +.06 MStewrt 393 +.07
Interpublic 5.16 -.04 Mase 7.68 -.430
Invesco 17.00 +.50 Ma -.4
IronMtn 25.27 -.5 MassyE 127
2t5i MasterCrd 176.06 +3.60
ItauUniMult 13.38 -.25 _ 19
Mane 13.16 -.19
IvanhM q 6.25 +.06
McDermlnt 15.96 +20
McDnlds 56.11 -.56
JCrew 16.39 +.14 McGrwH 25.03 +.43
JPMorgCh 33.70 +.95 McKesson 35.21 -.06
Jabil 6.62 -.01 McAfee 34.96 -.50
JanusCap 8.63 +45 Mechels 6.54 +.45
Jefferies 16.17" +.65 MedcoHith 42.32 +.28
JohnJn 51.15 -.26 Medcis 13.12 +.12
JohnsnCtI 16.00 -.68 Medbnic 30.98 -.06
KBHome 14.83 +.06 Merck 26.05 -.25
KKRFn 1.05 -.03 Metavnte 25.78 -.04
MetLife 28.79 +1.77


MicronT 4.39 -.06 PepBoy 6.54 +.01
MidAApt 33.78 -.35 PepcoHod 12.27 -.14
Midas 9.90 -.40 PepsiCo 51.49 -.61
Millipore 58.77 -.77 PepsiAmer 19.71 +.09
Mirant 13.36 +.21 Prmian 9.70 -.13
Mohawk 32.25 -.47 PetroCg .32.17 -.17
MoneyGrm 1.30 +.15 Petrohawk 21.75 +.34
Monsanto 83.07 .+.27 PebldsAs 28.39 -.10
MonstrWw 11.82 +1.31 Perobrss 35.90 -.09
Moodys 25.46 +.97 Pfzer 13.48 -.07
MorgStan 26.89 +1.54 PhilipMor 37.08 -.63
MSEmMkt 9.10 +.28 PhnxCos 1.99 +.19
Mosaic 44.25 -.32 PiedNG 25.39 -.33
Motorola 4.81 -.09 Pier1h .86 +.01
MurphO 47.54 -.49 PimcoStat 7.89 +.36
NCIBId 3.83 +.02 PioNtd 20.07 +1.19
NCRCorp 9.77 +.18 PitnyBw .24.12 -.50
NRGEgy 18.33 -1.08 PlumCrk 32.80 +.82
NYSEEur 22.53 +1.02 Polaris 27.80 +.27
Nabors 12.18 -.26 Polo RL 51.51 +2.78
NalcoHId 14.84 -.26 PostPrp 13.10 -.02
NatFuGas 31.71 -.02 Potash 88.01 +2.51
NatGrid 39.35 +.56 PSFnPf 1124 +.29
NOilVarco 34.03 +.58 Pair 69.59 +.28
NatRetPrp 18.62 +.59 PrecCastpt 61.08 -2.05
NatSemi 12.29 -.31 Precril 3.55 +.05
NatwHP 24.46 -.19 Pridelnf 21.97 -.24
Navis 2.59 +24 PrinFnd 14.97 +.50
NewAmrs- 5.47 +.10 PrUShS&P 67.01 -.12
NJRscs 32.42 -.52 ProUitDow 26.15 -.17
NYCmtyB 12.28 +.60 PrUIShDow 55.61 +.46
NewellRub 7.50 -.07 ProUtQQ 31.57 -.08
NewmtM 42.08 +.30 PrUShQ 40.77 +.17
NwpkRs I 2.56 -.03 PmUtSP 23.01 +.11
Nexen g 19.58 +.03 ProUSL20 n 45.01 -.74
NiSource 10.40 +.01 PrUShE 31.47 -1.42
Nior 32.56 -.26 PmUShOG 23.24 +.6
NikeB 53.12 -.15 ProUSFn 59.92 -4.96
NobleCorp 26.07 -.06 ProUtRE 3.51 +.07
NokiaCp 14.03 +.23 ProUtO&G 24.07 -.27
Nordstrm 22.26 +35 ProltFin 3.82 +.34
NorkSo 36.99 -.36 ProUBasM 15.13 +.50
NoestUt 21.19 -31 PrmUSR2K 55.80 +.03
NorthropG 45.01 +27 PmUtR2K 16.55 +.07
NSTAR 309 - ProUltCrude 8.65 -.54
Nucor 43.60 +.84 ProctGa 48.04 -1.15
NL 10.77 -.01 ProgrssEn 34.88 -.31
NvIMO 11.64 +.01 ProgwCp 14.96 +.23
NvMulSI&G 4.04 +.06 PrLogis 8.56 +.69
NuvQPf2 4.72 +.17 ProvEg 4.27 +.12
Prudenif 28.97 +1.47
OGE Engy 24.25 -.42 PSEG 29.40 -.78
OcciPet 58.72 +.19 PSEG pfA 73.80
O foceDpt 1.5 - .03 PubStrg 64.45 -.58
OfficeMax 5.35 +.83 PulteH 10.21 +.10
OilSvHT 83.08 -.10 PPrIT 4.13 -.04
OldRepub 11.64 +.34 Q taSvc 21.87 -.12
Olin 16.54 +.12 Qunor 31.71 -.29
OmegaHt 15.18 -.40 ksivRes 7.89 +.06
Omniom 27.37 -27 QwestCm 3.85 +.02
ONEOK 24.43 +.21 RPM 14.21 +.06
ONEOKRP 43.02 +1.27 RadioShk 9.76 -.27
OshkoshCp 9.44 +.33 Racorp 53.02 +10
en i 176 -. RangeRs 42.31 -.41
01 . RJamesFn 19.51 +1.27
PG&ECp 3778 -.8 Rayonier 36.32 +.33
PMGr 76 03 Raytheon 42.07 -.42
PMI Grp .76 -.03 Rltyonon 21.69 -.33
PNC 40.30 +1.82 Rtylnc 219 -33
PNMRes 8.23 -.29
PPG 45.13 +.16
PPLCorp 28.32 -.59
Pactv 16.59 -.49
Par an 37.70 -1.43 The remains
PaiolCts 4.92 +.42
PeabdyE 29.01 +62 NYSE listing
Pengrthg 6.34 +16 i
PennVaRs 12.17 +.04 fund on the
PennWstg 10.90 +.30
Penney 26.52 +1.10


RegalEnt 14.62 -.01
RgcyChs 36.39 -.30
RegBkHT 63.56 +228
RegonsFn 5.03 '+.72
ReliantEn 4.49 -.11
ReneSola 3.67 -.15
Repsol 19.36 +.13
RepubSvc 19.81 +.37
RetaiHT 79.25 +.47
RetailVent 1.85 -.04
Revionrs 275 4.08
ReynldAm 39.51 +.36
ReAidh .42 -.02
RobtHall 20.20 -.32
RockwAut 28.37. -.46
RockColl 34.15 -1.01
Rowan 13.90 +.25
RoyalBkg 33.18 +.83
RylCarb 11.23 +1.15
RoyDShlIA 43.55 +.13
Royce 7.89 +.07
RoycepfB 22.66 +.10
Rvder 24.09 -1.34

SAIC 18.06 +.35
SCANA 30.79 -.09
SKTmon 16.42 +.48
SLGreen 13.75 +.73
SLMCp 6.32 -.37
SpdrGold 87.88 +157
SpdrHome 11.84 +10
SpdrKbwBk 18.04 +1.21
SpdrVWRE 32.22 '+.09
SpdrKbwRB 22.81 +1.12
SpdrRet 25.64 -.06
SPXCp 43.91 -9.72
Safeway 20.13 -.07
SUoe 22.26 +.12
StJude 35.04 +.40
StMaryLE 16.46 +.35
Saks 2.86 +.04
Salesforee 38.25 +.85
SJuanB 15.55 '+.32
SandRdge 8.50 +.16
SaraLee 8.57 -.13
Satyam 2.25 -.40
SchergPI 23.37 +.05
Schlmrg 44.25 '+.09
SealAir 14.78 -.30
SemiHTr 20.05 -.07
SenHous 17.00 .+.43
Sensient 24,65 +.15
ShawGrp 28.07 +.25
Sherwin 52.48 -'1.07
SiderNac 17.90 .1+.43
SilvWhIng 8.18 ,+.39
SimonProp 42.65 -.34
SbiFlagh .21 -.06
Skechers 8.08 -.07
SmiOhAO 28.47' -.61
Smithlnti 23.88 -.26
SmithF 11.52 -.07
Smucker 38.61 -20
SoJerlnd 34.33 -.61
SouthnCo 30.53 -.36
SthnCopps 21.12 +1.30
SwstAir 7.35 -.03




der of the

gs can be

e next page.


I AM.RIjAASTOCK EXCHANGE i


Last Chg


IALi},,x: 4.85 -.01
AIjAutE4 7.25 +.17
aoniRa 14.80 -.30
A4eernPhr .47 -.09
Advice .14 +.01
ANao . 6.16 -.04
Ala ol .64
pla4 p 1.06
AliApped 4.27 +.29
Atooralg .90 +.06
Apoloig9 .33 -.01
Alcadis' .44 -.02


AsiaSpSwt .19
Augustag 1.95 +.06
Aurizong 4.23 +.08
AuroraOG .07 +.00
BPZ Res 4.94 +.21
Banrog 2.07 +.17
BarcAIG36 34.41 +.24
BarcGSOil 19.28 -.71
BrclndiaTR 36.19 +.21
BootsCts 1.40 -.04
CanoPel .58 -.01
CFCdag 11.07 +.07
CheniereEn 4.98 -.21
ChShengP .81 +.27
ClaudeRg .56 +.02


ClghGlbOp 9.89 +.06
Corrienteg 5.71 +.33
Crossh.glf .13 -.00


DejourEg .23 -.00
DenisnM g 1.06 +.11
DuneEngy .15 -.02
EVInMu2 11.69 +.10
EV LtdDur 10.80 +.03
EldorGldg 7.87 +.33
EltePh .13 -.00
ElixirGam .12 -.01
EllswthFd 4.94 +.12
Endvrint 1.49 -.06


EndvSilvg 1.64 +.12
EvglncAdv 6.65
ExeterRg 2.90 +.06
RaPUI 0 9.80 -.19
FrkStPrp 14,14 -.13
FrontrD 2.38 +.14

GascoEngy .45 -.01
GastarEg .53
GenMoly 1.47 +.20
GenesisEn 11.79 +.04
GoldStrg - 1.35 +.06
Grahams 12.11 -.11
GranTrrag 2.55 -.09
GrtBasGg 1.25 +.04


Hemisphrx .51
HoaperH .50 +.01
IA Global .05 -.01
ImpOil gs 37.32 +.01
InSiteVis .36 +.07
IntellgSys .85 -:05
IntlRyltyg 2.35 +.11


KodiakOg .35 -.03
Kowabunga .14 -.00
LadThalFn .80 -.03
UbertyAcq 8.83 +.01
UbAcqun 9.00


NovaDelP .22 -.01
NovaGldg 2.83 +.06
MBFHcre 8.17 Oilsandsg .99 +.01
Mermmac 3.16 +.13 On2Tech .35 +.01
Metalice 2.38 +.11 OrsusXel 47 -03
MeboHth 1.63 +.07 -�
Minefndg 7.25 .25 Patn .15 -.02
NBRESec 1.55 +.04 Pion 443 -06
Nevsung 1.10 +.04 PolyMetg .77
NDragon .17 +01 PSCrudeDSnl62.00 +10.50
NwGoldg 1.81 +.07 PSCrudeDLn 3.06 -.16
NAPalg 1.90 +.23 PSUS1K 33.84 +.64
NDynMng 6.83 +.30 ProceraNt .68 +.01
NthnO&G 4.80 +.15 Proliance .36 +.14
NthgtMg 1.28 +.06 PyramidOs 3.91 -.09


Quaterrag .50 +.05
QuestCapg .66 +.02
RaeSyst ' .51 +.04
ReavesUt 10.86 -.11
RegeneRx .69 +.12
Rentech .67 -.05
RivieraH 1.25 +.01
Rubicon' 1.56 +.03

SeabGklg 21.55 +.36
SilrcpMgn 2.36 +.06
Sinovac 1.93 +.16
TanzRyg 3.42 -.63
Taseko 1.68 +.21
Telkonet .10


TravelCs 2.50 +.44
Tdplecm 9.40 +.03
USGeothn .90 +.04
USGodd 2.10 +.01
UrEnergyn .57 +.00


VantageDrl 1.79 -.02
WstGldfdg 1.73 +.04
Westmld 9.51 +.51
WilshrEnt 1.55 -.04
WzzardSft .69 -.03
YMBiog .44 +.02


NASDAQ NA AION ALA


Name Last Chg


A-PoWer 6.68 +.89
ACMorelf 2.20 -.09
ADCTel 5.21 +21
APACO 3.98 +.11
ASMLHId 19.43 +.26
ATPO&G 5.97 +.08
ATSMed 2.51 -.10
Adstro .32 -.02
Abiamed 5.59 -.23
Accuray 5.59 +.22
Acergy 6.74 -.02
AcordaTh 18.67 +.22
ActivsBlzs 10.65 -.04
Acairr. 9.11 -.27
A 2apte 2.78 -.04
Adoby 24.72 -.15
Adtrl"d 18.48 -.33
AdvB qler 2.71 +.01
Ad.LiStr, .36 +.04
A,..anra .72 +.13
Advanw o 1.00 +.21
Afyrnenix' 3.70 +.02
AgFed ' 3.21 +.80
Atamirt 2o.2O
4ltoi 4.92 -.09
Al. o', 37.19 +.04
AtllnTicn 8.83 +.15
aj ,l' 8.95 +.45
.T ;54.27 +5.28
Tlira 5.91 +.10
ak,T.p.1 '11.33 +.05
tfr i.. 1.1.47 +.07
..ra,. .17.45 -.30
tJIrHld.r 4.82 +.30
~tuiPTF1. .21 -.02
AmTrstFin 10.73 +.12
Amaz . 78.94 -.83
Amedis 33.06 +.17
AmerB)rh: .14 -.01
AmCaLtd. 2.72 +.22
ACmd in 4.41 +.26
AmEcdl I 14.61 +.29
AmllPdsta 33.93 -.31
AmerMed 11.95 -.06
AmPubEd 39.35 -1.93
AmRalpar 7.58 +.11
AmSupt 19.22 +.07
AmCaeno 14.12 +.12
Amgen ' 47.55 -.29
AmkorTIf 3.61 -.03
Amyin 9.79 +.13
Anadigo 2.98 +.15
Anlogic 34.85 -.37
Analysts .48 +.07
Anesivah .25 -.02
AnglAm "10.75 +.37
Anssys, 27.05 -.10
ApogdeE 12.74 -.27
ApaHorp 60.56 -.95
AtAolov 4.83 +.31
0Ni-| 120.22 +.65
A l.lEr.4,r, .53 +.11
,Tpi. .1%l 11.51 +.06
AMCC' 5.21 +.02
A inek 1.74 +.04
ArhD 59.16 +.01
ArcSi' 14.51 +.05
Arena V m 2.44 -.04
AresCap 5.67 +.36
AriadP 1.40 -.03
Aribalnc 9.12 +.02
ArkBest 22.25 +.59
ArmHid 5.11 +.01
Arris 8.95
ArtTecd 2.91 +.03
Asialnf6 16.41 +.34
Aspenolo. 2.08 +.30
AsscdBanc 18.30 +1.13
AystThlf .54 -.07
altie lth 29.59 +1.37
Atheroe 16.96 -.21
AtasAli 22.38 +1.32
AlasAms 13.06 +.09
Ahmel 3.66 -.10


Audvox 4.82 +.55
Autodesk 18.76 -.54
AutoData 36.05 -.15
Auxilium 24.17 +.06
AvoctCp 13.51 +.20
Aware 2.25 +.02
Axcelis .34 -.04
AxsysTech 42.33 -.50
BEAero 11.36 -.21
BOK 40.16 +1.79
BaiduInc 199.48 +9.16
BalardPw 2.43 +.30
BkOzarks 23.84 +1.43
BankUtd .28, +.01
BareEscent 5.90 +.15
BasinWater .43 -.03
BeaconPw .46 -.01
BeacnRIg 14.43 -.08
BeasleyB 2.37 -.05
BebeSIrs 7.60 +.05
BedBath 31.49 +.40
BigBand 5.68 -.19
Bogenldc 52.52 -.44
BloMarin 13.26 +.47
Biopurersh .21 -.02
BlueCoat 14.84 -.48
BlueNile 36.62 -26
BobEvn 25.32 -.42
Bookham .47 -.02
Borland .54 -.03
BostPrv 4.09 +.38
BigExp 1.80 -.05
Brightpnt 4.63 +.08
Broadcom 22.79 -.38
BrcdeCm 4.40 -.21
BrklneB 11.00 +.30
BrukerCp 6.65 +.08
Bucyruss 18.59 +.01
BufaloWW 38.51 +.16
CA Inc 17.89 -.19
CDCCpA 1.26 +.05
CH Robins 47.00 -1.25
CMEGrp 265.73 +7.83
CTC Media 7.25 +.34
CVThera 19.96
CVBFnd 7.60 +.52
Cadence 4.89 +.02
CaliPizza 14.79 -.11
CdnSolar 6.98 +.10
CapellaEd 48.05 +.54
CapCtyBk 13.96 +.27
CpstnTrb .79 -.03
Caraustar .14 -.00
Cardlomg 4.21 +.24
CardioNet 24.31 -1.93
CareerEd 20.07 -.29
Carrizo 11.56 -.74
CarverBcp 5.94 +1.93
CascadeBc 2.15 -.01
Caseys 27.33 -.09
CathayGen 14.05 +1.69
CaviumNet 12.35 -.04
CeleraGrp 7.62 -.20
Celgene 40.96 +.16
CellGensh .35 +.03
CellTherrsh .31 -.07
CentlCom 8.30 -.01
CentEuro 17.50 -.28
CEurMed 16.31 +1.72
CenGrdAll 8.51 +.02
CentAl 3.91 +.31
Cephln 67.79 +1.23
Cepheid 7.28 -.02
Cemer 45.78 +.15
Changyoun 28.00 +3.00
CharlRsse 11.21 +.81
ChrmSh 2.19 +.04
Chaftem 52.47 -.93
ChkPoint 24.05 -.20
Cheesecake 13.85 -.28
ChildPlace 24.75 +.12
ChinaArch 1.49 +.48
ChiFnOnI 11.34 +1.27
ChinaRre 8.50 +.40
ChinaMed 18.39 +.28
ChinaPSI 1.52 +.18
ChinaSun 3.18
ChrchllD 34.88 -.54


CienaCorp '8.97 -.10
CinnFin 26.71 +.81
Cintas 25.74 -.19
Cirrus .77 -.14
Cisco 17.89 +.07
CiizRep 1.66 -.03
CitixSys 25.93 +.29
CityBank 3.60 +.50
Clarienth 2.55 +.07
CleanEngy 7.19 -.03
Clearwire 5.22 -.37
ClickSft 4.57 +.32
CoStar 32.67 -.31
CogentC 8.34 +.25
Cogent 12.29 -.29
Cognex 13.80 -.87
CognizTech 23.52 -.10
CogoGrp 7.37
Coinstar 32.06 -.38
Comarco 2.03 +.14
Comcast 14.35 -.27
Comcspd 13.48 -.33
CmcBMO 39.25 +.58
CommSys 7.78 -.11
CommVIt 11.36 +.19
Compuwre 7.11 -.11
Comtech 27.51 +.20
Comverge 7.12 -.48
ConcurTch 24.00 +.12
Conmed 15.22 +.06
ConvOrgan ..86 +.09
CopanoEn 15.16 +.32
Copart 30.33 +.24
CorinhC 15.96 -.40
CorpExc 14.22 -.04
CorusBksh .29 -.06
Costco 46.41 -.49
CrackerB 33.49 +.49
Creelnc 26.75 -.17
Crocs 1.72 +.08
CrosstexE 1.95
Crip.com 29.96 +1.10
CubistPh 17.86 -.57
CybrSrce 15.25 -.17
Cydacel .41 +.03
Rx .41 +.00

DataDom 13.95 +.40
DeckOut 63.82 -.66
Dell Inc 10.45 -.31
DitaPr 2.72 +.23
Dndreon 7.30 +1.00
Dennys 2.11 -.03
Dentsply 26.92 -.17
DiamondF 28.96 +.47
DigRiver 34.10 -.05
DirecTV 24.37 +.11
DiscCmA 17.66 -.29
DiscvLabs 1.99 +.20
DishNetwk 13.51 -.17
DollrFn 9.35 +.15
DllrTree 43.88 -.21
DrmWksA 19.22 -.22
DressBam 14.01 -.14
DryShips 5.07 +.32
Dynavax .67 -.01
ETrade 1.74 +.39
eBay 14.63 -.39
EagleBulk 4.86 +.31
EaglRkEn 5.57 +.26
ErthLink 7.24 -.11
EstWstBcp 6.50 +.95
Eclipsys 11.64 +.67
EdBauer .43 +.03
EduDv 4.65 -.05
EleclSci 7.67 -.20
ElecOplSdc 6.37 +.53
EleclAris 19.42 -.27
Emcore .77 -.07
EncorW 23.59 +.09
EndoPhrm 17.71 +.05
EngyConv 15.80 +.78
EngyXXI .52 -.01
Entegris 1.51 +.01
EntreMd h .50
Entrust 1,80 +.13
Equinix 63.35 -.44


EricsnTels 9.28 +.12
Euronet 14.63 +.58
Euroseas 4.50 +.39
EvrgrSIr 2.23 -.01
Exelixis 4.99 -.10
ExideTc 4.82 -.02
Expedia 10.57 +.15
Expdlntl 31.89 +.01
ExpScripts 56.81 +7.64
Ezcorp 12.92 +.20
FSNetwks 26.64 -.26
FCStone 2.96 -.04
FLIRSys 21.82 -.21
Fastenal 38.18 -.25
FedMoguln 10.15 -.22
FiberTowr .44 +.06
FithThird 4.34 +.76
Fndllnst 11.97 -.03
Fjnisar '.65
FinUne 7.38 -.14
FstCashFn 17.42 +.04
FMidBc 11.61 +1.38
FstNiagara 14.03 +.53
FstSolar 144.10 +2.05
FstMerit 20.75 +.44
Fiserv 36.45 -.05
Rextm 3.45 -.12
FocusMda 7.12 +.13
ForcePr 7.23 +.27
FormFac 19.10 -.33
ForwrdA 16.70 -.26
Fossil Inc 18.71 +.04
FoslerWhl 20.49 -.19
Fredslnc 12.94 +.19
FrontFnd 1.53 +.02
FuelSysSol 14.29 -.26
FuelCell 3.06 +.09
FultonFnd 7.77 +.29

GFIGrp 4.04 +.13
GMXRs 6.63 -.35
GMarket 19,20 +1.08
GSICmmrc 14,56 +.65
GSIGrpIf .83
GTSolarn 6.64 -.33
Garmin 21.87 -.34
GenProbe 47.52 +.52
GenBiotch .25 -.00
Genomic 25.69 -1.29
Gentex 11.58 -.42
Gentiva 16.88 -.40
GenVec .49 -.07
Genzyme 55.48 -.90
GeronCp 4.88 -.04
GigaMed 6.18 +.42
GileadSci 47.53 -.10
GladerBc 17.64 +.84
GlobCrsg 6.89 -.76
Globllnd 4.95 -.06
Globalstar .58 +.07
Google 378.11 +5.61
GreenMtC 54.24 +1.07
Gymbree 28.39 +.93
HLTH 10.98 +.07
HMNFn 3.50 +.10
HSW Int .23 -.04
HancHId 36.22 +1.24
HansenNat 36.64 -.43
Harmonic 6.78 -.34
HawHold 4.50 +.06
HayesLm .21 -.01
Hayneslnt 21.58 -1.24
HrlndEx 15.69 +.05
HSchein 40.86 +.35
HercOffsh 1.94 +.02
HercTGC 6.45 +.51
HerzfldC 7.97 +2.32
Hibbet 20.12 +.05
HimaxTch 2.92 +.12
Hologic 13.83 -.22
Home Inns 14.03 +1.07
HorsehdH 6.65 -.10
HotTopic 12.83 +1.31
HubGroup 20.18 -.60
HudsCity 13.36 +.46
HumGen 1.07 +.20
HunJB 26.69 -.27


HuntBnk 2.86 +.71
HuronCon 40.00 -1.40
HutchT 1.77 +.03
Hydrogncs .54 +.09
IACInters 16.60 +.09
IdexxLabs 37.62 -.31
IPCHold 27.41 -.24
iShNsdqBio 65.92 -.27
IconPLCs 17.77 -.06
IconixBr 11.03 +.21
Illuminas 34.82 -.18
Immucor 22.68 -.38
ImunoGn 7.90 +.08
Incyte 2.48 -.17
IndBkMA 19,57 +1.30
Inergy 22.29 +.01
Infinera 8.59 -.07
InFocus .89 +.19
Informal 14.20 -.30
InfosyT 29.48 -.24
Insitc 15.85 -.11
Insmedh .92 -.01
IntegUSdc 23.04 +.51
IntgDv 4.86 -.04
Intel 15.98
InteraclBrk 15.86 +.06
InterDig 26.64 -.92
Intface 3.71 -.30
InterMune 15.48 +.30
IntlBcsh 9.54 +.34
IniSpdw 19.99 -.02
Intersil 13.50 -.22
Interval n 6.09 +.03
Intuit 25.79 -.85
IntSurg 114.72 +2.48
inVentiv 10.06 +.44
Isis 15.26 +.08
IsleCapri 7.67 +.44
IstaPh 2.18 +.30
Itron 46.05 -1.24
IvanhoeEn 1.45 +.03

j2Global 24.37 -.33
JASolar 3.58 +.15
JDSUniph 4.27 -.03
JackHenry 17.73 -.29
JacklnBox 25.45 -.25
Jamba .64 +.07
JamesRiv 14.61 +.35
JetBlue 4.93
JosphBnk 36.87 +.26
JoyGIbl 25.20 +.13
JnprNtwk 18.01 -.33
KLATnc 23.66 -.03
Kirklands 6.20 +.50
KnghtCap 16.24 +.22
Knology 5.08 -.06
KopinCp 3.00 -.15
Kulicke 3.48 +.02
LHCGrp 22.94 -.62
LKOCorp 16.05 -.05
LSIlnds 5.53' -.34
LTX-Cred .39 +.04
LaJollPh .17 +.02
LamResrch25.30 -.26
LamarAdv 14.34 +.69
Landstar 34.77 -1.52
Lattice 1.70 +.06
LawsnSft 4.89 +.04
LeapWirss 32.76 -1.26
Level3 1.03 -.01
UbGlobA 17.11 -.17
LibGlobC 16.86 -.02
UbtyMlntA 3.74
UbMCapA 9.97 +.36
UibMEntA 22.43 +.32
UfeTechs 33.46 -.05
UfePIH 21.27 +.35
UgandPhm 2.98 -.14
UhirGold 22.27 +1.02
Uncare 22.27 -.10
UncEdSv 15.77 -.88
incEl 36.03 -1.32
LnearTch 23.25 +.52
UnnEngy 15.26 +.01
LodgeNet 1.65 +.10
Logitech 11.40 -.61


LookSmarl 1.19 +.08 optXprs 13.76 +.03 SanDisk 14.42 -.06 TevaFhrm 45.80
LoopNet 8.01 +.02 Oracle 19.06 -.05 Sanmina .45 -.03 TexRdhsA 10.76
Lufkin 38.24 -.82 OiginAg 3.31 +.45 Sapient 5.42 +13 Theravnoe 15.75
lulule 1.7 ,95 Orthfx 19.98 -.18 SavientPh 4.78 -.04 thinkoswim 9.53
Ounemt OsdentPh .15 .. ScnanSource 20.98 +41 Thoralec 27.42
otterTail 23.02 Schntzerh 41.26 +1.96
MBFnd 17.04 +.89 KIo-i--,2 Schwab 17.48 +.51 3Com 3.66
MDRNAH .73 -.07 SciGames 15.27 +.31 TiboSft 6.31
MGE 31.46 -.37 PDLBioh 7.61 +.18 SeagateT 6.34 -.31 TVolnc 7.40
MRVCmhlf .43 -.01 PFChng , 26.99 +02 SearsHldgs 53.62 +1.13 TomoThera 3.04
MTS 21.70 -.53 PMCSra 6.95 -.03 Selectvlns 14.35 +.47 TractSupp 40.12
MacvsnSol 18.81 -.10 PSSWrld 14.32 -.01 Semtech 14.57 -.17 TrdeStatnh 7.43
MarvellT 10.23 -.24 Paccar 31.46 -.47 Sepracor 14.70 -.29 TransGIb 2.59
Masimo 29.88 -1.12 Pacerlnt 4.33 +.18 Sequenom 14.67 -.11 TadGy .25
MatrixSv 8.39 +.12 PacCapB 8.65 +.60 Shanda 52.18 +5.77 T t
Maximltgn 14.11 -.14 PacEthan .38 -.01 Shire 36.30 T entMh 150
MaxwllT 8.55 -.25 PacSunwr 1.68 +.01 SiRFTch 2.74 -.02 TrmbleN 16.32
Medarex 5.61 -.03 PaetecHId 2.46 +.05 SigaTechh 6.00 +.20 TrQuint 3.74
MedAssets 15.53 +.38 Palmlnc 9.38 -.07 SigmaDsg 12.72 -.43 TrueRelig 13.60
Mediacmh 4.84 -.09 PanASIv 16.57 +.59 SigmAld 40.79 +.09 TrstNY 7.06
MedicActn 9.87 +.15 PaneraBrd 57.51 -.09 SilganHId 50.72 -.05 Trustmk 20.18
MediCo 11.35 +.16 PapaJohns 25.12 -.05 SilicnGrph .26 -.05 TuesMm 1.62
MelcoCrwn 4.78 -.04 ParagShip 3.37 +.02 Silicnlmg 2.92 +.09 UAL 6.76
MentGr 5.67 -.09 ParamTch 11.04 -.23 SilcnLab 28.26 -.27 UCBH Hi 2.17
MercadoL 21.63 +.11 Parux 1.54 +.16 SilicnMotn 2.81 +.07 UMF
MeridBio 17.31 -.47 Patterson 19.68 -.19 SIcnware 6.63 -.05 UMBFn 48.40
MesaAirh .13 +.01 PatlUTI 11.76 -.12 SilvStdg 16.72 +.61 UTiWddwd 13.63
Methanx 8.64 -.01 Paychex 27.03 +.02 Sina 28.25 +1.07 UTStrcm 1.03
Micrel 7.40 -.15 PnnNGm 27.55 -.52 Sindair 1.35 -.02 UltaSaon 7.94
Microchp 22.59 -.55 PeopUtdF 18.23 -.06 SiriusXM .36 +.01 Ultrapetrol 2.74
MicrosSys 20.79 -.32 PerfectWId 16.99 +.39 SkillSoft 7.91 +.32 Umpqua 11.60
MicroSemi 12.40 -.02 Peicom 8.09 -.25 SkyWest 15.47 +.11 UBWV 20.17
Microsoft 19.59 -.08 Perigo 24.47 +.13 SkywksSol 8.92 -.30 UtdCBksGa 5.36
Micivisn 1.66 +.07 PetMed 15.49 -.50 SmithWes 6.32 . UtdNF 1.85
MiddleBk 1.35 -.02 PetroDev 14.71 +.63 SmithMiro 6.85 +.32 UtdNi
Middleby 38.95 +.61 PetsMarl 22.97 +.09 Sohu.cm 50.00 +1.89 UtdOnln 5.36
MillerHer 12.95 -.19 PharmPdt 23.58 -.17 Solarun 4.73 +.17 USEnr 1.93
Millicom 42.53 -.22 PhotrIn 1.36 -.11 Somaxon h .41 +.04 UtdThrp 63.41
Misonix 1.48 +.33 PinnadFn 22.27 +.27 SonicCorp 10.87 +.11 UnivFor 31.79
Mdex 15.65 -.23 Polycom 17.09 +.25 SncWall 5.31 +.18 UraniumR .64
MonPwSys 16.93 -.86 PoolCorp 14.51 -.03 Sonus 1.74 +.04 UrbanOut 17.17
MorgHtl 3.65 -.16 Popular 3.66 +.42 SouMoBc 10.80 -.10
MoveInc 1.77 +.05 Pwrlnteg 18.26 +.04 Srcelntik .13 -.02
Mylan 13.94 -.27 PwShsQQQ 32.89 -.05 Sourcefire 9.21 +1.01 VCAAnt 24.16
MynadGs 46.00 +.52 Powrwav .67 -.02 SouthFnd 1.48 +.08 ValVisA .74
NIIHkdg 15.27 +.23 Presstek 2.22 -.07 vjSpansnIf .20 +.01 1
NasdOMX 22.53 +.54 PriceTR 34.04 +.39 SparnMot 5.77 +.04 ValueClic 10.11
NatCineM 14.65 -.36 priceine 90.30 +.34 SpectPh 2.50 -.12 VarianSemi 22.26
NatPenn 10.44 +.27 PrivateB 18.09 +1.66 Staples 20.60 -.43 VascoDLa 6.52
NektarTh 5.45 +.01 PrognicsPh 6.84 +.44 StarSulk 2.93 +.24 Verenium .37
NetSeivic 7.89 -.22 ProspBcsh 30.77 +.25 StarScent. 4.76 -.08 Verisign 20.56
NetApp 16.72 -.24 PrvBksh 9.16 +.23 Starbucks 12.01 +.01 VertxPh 27.31
Netease 29.37 +.92 ProximWh .10 -.01 StarentNet 14.87 -.17 VirgnMdah 6.54
Netlix 49.42 +247 PsychSol 14.62 -.07 StDynam 11.25 +.56 ViroPhrm 5.19
NtScout 8.91 +.39 PureCyde 2.97 +.11 StemCells 1.61 +.04 snC a
NeutTand 24.64 +.10 QIAGEN 16.07 -.01 Stericyde 49.58 -.12 Vi a
NYMtgTrn 2.68 -.20 OLT 2.18 +.12 SterBcsh 7.54 +.52 VistaPrt 29.26
NewsCpA 7.73 -.09 OQogic 11.69 -.43 StrFWA 3.06 -.04 Viuss 3.84
NewsCpB 8.63 -.10 Qualcom 40.88 -.77 StewEnt 3.21 -.11 WamerChil 10.41
NexMed .15 +.01 QualitySys 48.03 -1.36 Strayer 164.58 +.23 WarrenRs 1.02
Nextwaveh .21 +.00 QuantFuel .83 -.01 SumTotal 3.00 .. WashFed 14.78
Nissan 10.52 +.67 QuestSft 13.68 +.12 SunMicro 6.42 -.26 Websense 16.03
NobltyH 8,07 +.27 Questcor 5.36 -.06 SunPowerA 25.36 -.68 WemerEnt 16.08
Noblelnth .29 -.01 Quidel 8.62 +.12 SunPwrBn 22.78 -.49 p 5.
NorTrst 65.54 +1.42 RFMiD 1.98 +.08 SusqBnc 9.74 -.84 WAmBc 51.2
Novell 3.75 +.01 RadNet 1.24 -.01 Sycamore 2.90 -.06 WetSeal 3.85
Novlus 17.81 -.19 RadioODh .49 +.04 SykesEnt 17.30 -.41 Whi�teyH 14.59
nTelos 19.57 -.69 Rambus 10.05 -.02 Symantec 16.36 -77 WholeFd 18.39
NuHorizf 2.09 +.07 Randgold 45.92 +.40 Symeincm 4.22 +.01 WindRvr 7.32
NuVasive 30.42 -.14 RealNwk 2.49 -.17 Synaptcss 31.00 +.45 Winn-Dixie 9.54
NuanceCm 12.58 -.09 RedRobin 23.73 +.92 Synopsys 21.35 -.48 Winnust 17.81
Nucrystsh .37 +.04 Regenm 13.44 -.50 Synovis 14.43 -.60 WdwrdGov 13.81
Nutrtn21h .20 -.02 RentACt 21.29 -.18 Synroleum 1.70 -.05 WIdAccep 21.48
Nvidia 11.65 -.39 RschMotn 64.00 -.18 TBS IntA 8.23 +.32
OReillyA 36.91 -.97 ResConn 16.46 +.09 TDAmeritr 15.97 +11 WrightM 15.31
OSIPhrm 35.34 +.36 Riverbed 15.36 -.47 TFSFnd 12.50 +.06 Wynn 31.44
OceanFrt 1.36 +.04 RofinSinar 18.82 -1.03 THQ 3.99 -.07 XOMA .44
OldDomFh 27.31 -39 RosettaR 6.87 +.11 twtelecom 9.34 +.15 XTLBioph .14
OmegaNav 3.90 -.11 RossStrs 39.02 -.66 TXCORes .70 +.03 Xilinx 20.31
OmniEnr 1.07 -.19 RoyGId 37.21 +.21 TakeTwo 9.45 +1.05 YRCWwde 4.19
Omniture 14.07 -.13 Ryanair 26.26 +28 TASER 5.40 +.16 Yahoo 14.42
OmniVisn 9.04 +.13 TechData 23.54 -.10 ZebraT 19.20
OnAssign 3.33 -.08 Tekelec 13.56 -.08 2lars .16
OnSmcnd 4.87 +.08 S&TBcp 24.94 -22 TICmSys 9.67 -.14
OnyxPh 28.12 -.45 SBACom 26.21 -.79 TeleTech 12.70 -.18 ZonBcp 13.44
OpenTxt 35.11 +.12 SE Ilnv 14.46 +.21 Tellabs 4.59 -.13 Zdtek 7.75
OpenTV 1.62 -.03 STEC 8.44 -.30 TesseraT 13.51 +.32 Zoran 9.58
OpnwvSy 1.34 +.06 SVBFnGp 18.28 +.15 TetraTc 22.36 +.47 Zumiez 8.56


i ITRU S .- -U C 0 L I I
Pay for T \,

your jIr N tl



The]jLZway!







NO MORE

V Hassles! V Checks! V Reminders!


Yesterday PvsDay
Argent 3.6810 3.6730
Australia 1.3708 1.39J14
Bahrain .3770 .3770
Brazil 2.1690 2.1715
Britain , 1.4831 1.4617
Canada 1.2204 1.22�1
Chile 578.65 578.65
China 6.8363 6.8355
Colombia 2392.50 2412.00
Czech Rep 19.76 20.12
Denmark 5.5804 5.6625
Dominican Rep 35.86 35.90
Egypt 5.6357 5.6287
Euro .7486 .7596
Hong Kong 7.7506 7.7503
Hungary 216.45 218.53
India 49.816 49.660
Indnsia 11025.00 11205.00
Israel 4.1393 4.1202
Japan 100.08 100.52
Jordan .7095 .7090
Lebanon 1500.50 1501.00
Malaysia 3.6295 3.6065
Mexico 13.1162 13.0805
N.Zealand 1.6914 1.7182
Norway . 6.5825 6.659
Peru 3.111 3.12
Poland 3.25 3.30
Russia 33.3868 33.6134
Singapore 1.5153 1.5180
Slovak Rep 21.49 21.49
So. Africa 9.0167 9.0805
So. Korea 1328.50 1317.50
Sweden 8.1699 8.2919
Switzerlnd 1.1346 1.1559
Taiwan 33.69 33.77
Thailand 35.50 35.50
Turkey 1.5741 1.5688
U.A.E. 3.6734 3.6734
Uruguay 23.9998 23.9998
Venzuel 2.1473 2.1473
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.50 050
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.18 0.20
6-month 0.37 0.40
5-year 1.78 1.89
10-year 2.84 2.93
30-year 3.69 3.75



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX May09 50.05 -2.19
Corn CBOT May09 3871/2 .-2
Wheat CBOT May09 5234 +11/4
Soybeans CBOT May09 10211/2+141/2
Cattle CME Jun09 84.60 ,
Pork Bellies CME Jul09 87.40 +.18
Sugar(world) NYBT May09 13.32 +.58
Orange Juice NYBT May09 84.25 +1.05

SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz.. spot) $894.70 $871.50
Silver (troyoz.. spot) $12./b3 $12.1U5
Copper (pound) $2.1255 $1 .r8b
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$124U.UU $1145.70
NMER = New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT =
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Colton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


-.47
-.05
+04
-.52
-.40
+.07
-.29
+.44
+.05
-.02
-.34
-.72
-.07
-.15
-.03
+.66
-.01
-.23
+1.32
-.09
+.68
+.03
-.09
-.30
+1.50
-.05
+1.98
+,31
+1.17
* -.02
+.01
-.09
-.05
+.95
-.75
-.02
+1,08
-.23
-.28
-1.13


I NASDAQ


NYSE


I AMEX


i















''CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Name NAV Chg
AIM Investments A:
'ChartA p 11,53 +.01
.Constp 15.99 -.03
HYdAp 2.97 +.01
IntlGrow 18.20 +.12
SelEqy r 12.46 -.02
AIM Investments B:
CapDvBt 8.85
AIM Investor CI:
.Energy 25.76 -.07
S.SummitP p 8.27 -.02
Uliities 11.84 -.14
Advance Capital I:
Balancp 11.45
Retinc 7.31
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGrt 3.86 -.01
,,AlIlanceBern A:
BalanAp 11.30 +.01
GlbThGrA p46.30 +.26
JntlValAp 9.68 +.11
SmCpGrA 17.79 -.10
- AllianceBern Adv:
LgCpGrAd 17.01 +.03
. AllianceBern B:
GIbThGrBt 40.57 +23
GrowthBt 16.22 -.03
SCpGrB t 14.52 -.08
- lianceBern C:
SCpGrCt 14.59 -.09
rtAllianz Instl MMS:
SNFJDvVI 8.18 +.01
jIllianz Funds A:
NFJDvVIt 8.10 +.01
SmCpVA 17.85
Allianz Funds C:
GrowthCt 16.21 -.04
TargetCt 8.20
, Amer Beacon Insti:
LgCaplnst 13.04 +.08
Amer Beacon Inv:
LgCap lnv 12.42 +.08
Amer Century Adv:
,EqGroAp 14.28 +.03
"*mer Century Inv:
,Balanced 11.95 +.02
fqtInc 5.59 -.01
GNMAI 10.71 +.01
Growth 16.80
S ,:,.i. l 12.13 +.04
: '.. ,,:1;, 16.83
'iIntlBnd 13.54 +.18
InlDisc 6.06 +.06
IntlGrol 6.97 +.06
SUfeSci 4.29 +.02
New Opp 4.44 -.02
OneChAg 8.37 +.02
OneChMd 8.61 +.02
,+ RealEstl 9.64 +.11
-Ultra 14.77 +.06
Valuelnv 4.05
Vista 11.11 +.02
SAmerican Funds A:
,, AmcpAp 12.53 +.04
AMullAp 18.24 -.01
'alAp 13.41 +.06
BondAp 10.64 +.05
. CapWAp 18.08 +.14
CaplBAp 38.92 +.12
.,pl.'GA p.` +" ,,.17
E.jp �.AP�-*2; "1? +.22
SFdlnvAp 24.97 +.12
GovtAp 14.16 +.03
GwthAp 21.10 +.08
. HITrAp 8.02 +.04
-HilnMunA 11.98
;IlnoAp 12.28 +.04
:-IntBdAp 12.76 +.04
ICAA p 20.26 +.07
'LtTEBAp 14.80 +.01
,'NEcoAp 16.52 +.11
NPerAp 18.72 +.14
'NwWrldA 33.13 +.21
STBAp 9.91 +.02
'SmCpAp 21.26 +.11
STxExAp 11.25 +.01
TECAAp 14.38
WshAp 19.53 -.04
American Funds B:
BalBt 13.36 +.06
CaplBBt 38.92 +.11
CpWGrBt 25.14 +.17
SGrwthBt 20.43 +.07
,IncoBt 12.19 +.04
ICABt 20.17 +.06
WashBt 19.40 -.05
'Ariel Investments:
Apprec 22.45 +.29
Ariel 23.44 +.38
Artio Global Funds:
IntlEqlr 21.88 +.06
InllEqA 21.38 +.05'
-InlEqllAt 8.84 +.02
IntEqll I r 8.89 +.02
Artisan Funds:
Intl 14.49
MidCap 19.01
MidCapVal 13.07
BNY Mellon Funds:
BondFd 12.56 +.04
,Baron Funds:
Asset 34.82 +.16
Growth 30.58
.SmCap 14.20 -.07
Pemstein Fds:
GAnlDur 11.91 +.05
DivMu 14.15 +.01
NYMu 13.85 +.02
TxMgdIlnt 11.08 +.12
IntlPort 11.02 +.12
BlackRock A:
-AuroraA 12.51
CapDevAp 11.60 -.03
EqtyDiv 12.42 +.01
GIAIAr 14.68 +.05
,linvA 5.28 +.02
nStlOpArp 21.91 +.23
BlackRock B&C:
.GIAB t 14.32 +.04
a IAICt 13.74 +.04
SlackRock Instl:
BaVII 17.37 +.03
c"GIbAllocr 14.74 +.04
. Brandywine Fds:
BlueFdn 18.35 +.13
Bmdywnn 19.18 +.01
Brinson Funds Y:
.SHiYldlYn 4.60 +.02
rCGM Funds:
r Focus n 24.40 +.28
IMutln 21.26 +.22
Realtyn 13.97 +.20
�IRM Funds:
,jMdCpVII 19.08 +.03
SCalamos Funds:
.Gr&lncAp 22.43 -.05
'GrwthAp 31.69 -.05
LGrowthCt 29.20 -.05
rCalvert Group:
-lncop 13.70 +.03
.lntlEqAp 10.40 +.13
,Munint 10.29 +.01
ShDurlnAt 15:40 +.02
'SocialAp 20.47 +.03
-,SocBdp 14.09 +.02
-,ocEqAp 23.38 +.11
TxFLt 9.51
''xFLgp 15.38 +.01
?7txFVT 15.38
.Cohen & Steers:
ipltyShrs 30.87 +.29
.polumbla Class A:
-Aorn mt 17.01 -.01
.iFocEqAt 14.75 +.13
l1CnliyAt 8.46 +.09
-.:arsGrAt 13.07 +.08
TxEAp 12.34
'olumbla Class Z:
'Acorn Z 17.51 -.01
jAcomlntZ 22.95 +.15
.foreBdZ 10.07 +.03
nBdZ 7.75 +.04
'IntTEBd 9.91 +.01
SLgCpldxZ 16.62 +.04
jIMarsGrZ 13.28 +.09
+iMdCpVIZp 8.23 +.04
-,ValReslr 29.94 +�29
''bFA Funds:
JintlCorEqn 7,12 +.09
.JSCorEq2 n 6.90 +.04
DWS Invest A:
-CommAp 10.73 +.09
DrHiRA 22,96 +.39
..gdMunip 8.31 -.01
(trGovSecA 8.58 +.03
iWS Invest S:
,JorPlslnc 9.61 +.04
EmMkln 8.68 +.03
-'EmMkGrr 11.14 +.07
jEuroEq 16.19 +.24
-.GNMAS 15.03
GIbBdSr 9.43 +.09
GIbOpp 21.67 +.13
OGIblThem 14.72 +.09
'.Gold&Prc 14.03 +.22
.,GrolncS 10.90 +.10
HiYtdTx 10.14 -.02
'lntTxAMT 10.97
'*Intl FdS 32.81 +.35


r-LgCoGro 20.06 -.06
rtArnrEq 31.61 +.11
.MgdMuniS 8.32 -.01
MATFS 13.50
SP500S 11.39 +.03
::avis Funds A:
,NYVenA 22.98 +.22
"Davis Funds B:
'"NYVenB 22.07 +.21
'Davis Funds C &Y:
'NYVenY 23.22 +.22
NYVenC 22.22 +.21
Delaware Invest A:
1_iverlncp 7.93 +.04
.TrendAp 9.22 -.05
TxUSAp 10.36
Delaware Invest B:
SelGrBt 16.19 +.04
Dimensional Fds:
EmMktV 19.11 +30
IntSmVan 10.55 +14
USLgCo n 25.32 +.06
,,USLgVan 12.57 +.20
,.USMicron 7.73
,:'ISSmaJln 11.74 -.01
USSmVa 13.98 +.05
IntlSmCon 9.88 +.11
EmgMktn 18.01 +.16
'Fixdn 10.27 +.01
IntGFxlnn 12.31 +.05
IntVan 11.92 +.17
Glb5Fxlncn 10.99 +.02


HomFn 10.07 +.22
Insurn 30.96 +.68
Leisrn 53.26 -.02
Materialn 34.80 +,31
MedDIn 28.60 +.85
MdEqSys n 18.69 +.08
Mutmd n 22.22 -.01
NtGasn 23.12 +.03
Papern 15.98 +.21
Pharm n 8,31 +.01
Retail n 34.64 -.21
Softwrn 51.98 -.09
Techn 46.51 -.14
Telcmn 31.46 -.29
Transn 28.01 -.08
UlilGrn 35.89 -.52
Wireless n 5.34 -.03
Fidelity Spartan:
Eqldxlnvn 30.38 +.08
ExIMklnn 22.42 +.04
500nxlnv rn59.56 +.15
Intllnxlnvn 24.35 +.22
TotMktlnvn 24.22 +.06
Fidelity Spart Adv:
EqldxAdn 30.38 +.08
T50Adrn 59.57 +.15
TolMktAdrn24.22 +.05


Name NAV Chg
2YGIFxdn 10.24 +.01
DFARIEn 11.A7 +.08
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced 48.79 +.27
Income 11.75 +06
IntlStk 21.64 +.23
Stock 69,23 +.38
Dreyfus:
Aprec 26.15 -.02
CorVA 17.20 +.10
Dreyl 5.90 +.02
Dr5001nl 24.18 +.06
EmgLd 12.26 -.04
GrChinaAr 26,23 -.31
HYiIdAp 5.44 +01
LgCStkAp 15.85 +.01
MunBdr 10.45
NYTaxr 13.82
StratValA 19.39 4.10
TechGroA 17.80 -.11
Drlehaus Funds:
EMktGr 18.65 +.08
Eaton Vance CI A:
ChinaAp 15.20 +.05
AMTFMBI 8.47 -.02
MultiCGrA 5.13
InBosA 4.15 +.03
LgCpVal 13.24 +.03
NatlMun 8.26
SpEqIA. 9.41 -.05
TradGvA 7.51 +.01
Eaton Vance Cl B:
HIhSBt 8.04 -.01
NallMB1 8.26 -.01
Eaton Vance CI C:
GovtC p 7.50 +.01
NatlMCt 8.26 -.01
Evergreen A:
AstAllp 9.25
Evergreen C:
AstAIICt 8.97
Evergreen I:
SIMunil 9.44 +.01
FBR Funds:
Focuslnv 32.14 -.52
FMI Funds:
LgCappn 10.96 +.12
FPA Funds:
NwInc 11.00 +.02
Fairholme 21.48 +.29
Federated A:
AmLdrA 10.06 +.03
MidGrStA 22.93 -.10
KaulmAp 3.48
MuSecA 9.44
Federated Insti:
KaulmnK 3.48
TotRetBd 10.24 +.04
Fidelity Adv Foc T:
EnergyT 22.40 -.03
HItCarT 14.42 +.07
Fidelity Advisor A:
DivlntlAr 10.80 +.08
Nwlnsghp 13.15 +.02
StrlnA 10.06 +.06
Fidelity Advisor I:
Divlnti n 10.95 +.07
EqGr n 35.81 +.11
Eqlnln 16.15 +.10
IntBdIn 9.58 +.03
Nwlnsgtin 13.27 +.02
Fidelity AdvisorT:
BalancT 10.86 +.04
DivGrTp 7.01 +.04
DynCATp 11.63 +.05
EqGrTp 33.70 +10
EqlnT 15.92 +.09
GrOppT 20.43 +.07
HilnAdTp 5.92 +.04
IntBdT 9.57 +.04
MulncTp 11.97 +.01
OvrseaT 12.23 +.11
STFiT 8.67 +.01
StrInT 10.05 +.05
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2000n 10.10 +.03
FF2010n 10.34 +.04
FF2015n 8.54 +.03
FF2020 n 9.98 +.04
FF2025n 8.17 +.04
FF2030n 9.60 +.04
FF2035n 7.89 +.03
FF2040n 5.48 +.03
Income n 9.56 +.02
Fidelity Invest:
AggrGrrn 12.20 -.07
AIISectEq 9.06 +.02
AMgr5On 11.05 +.05
AMgr70rn 10.94 +.05
AMgr20rn 10.45 +.04
Balancn 13.16 +.04
BlueChGrn 27.10 -.06
CAMunn 11.31 +.02
Canadan 35.61 +.38
CapApn 15.91 +.07
CapDevOn 6.68 +.02
Cpncrn 5.79 +.03
ChinaRgr 18.58 +.05
CngSn 341.06 -1.86
CTMunrn 11.09 +.01
Contra n 44.32 +.06
CnvScn 15.05 +.22
DisEqn 16.39 +.01
DiMlnl n 20.48 +18
(C,..:l ,:, . 9.03 +.02
DlyGthn 16.19 +.08
EmrMkn 14.07 +.04
Eq Incn 29.48 +.20
EQCln 12.48 +.07
ECapAp 12.83 +.13
Europe 21.33 +.22
Exchn 228.68 -1.19
Exportn 14.66 +.03
Fideln 22.30 +.07
Fiftyrn 11.11 +.08
FIRateHirn 8.39 +.02
FrlnOnen 19.17 +.07
GNMAn 11.33 +.01
Govtine 10.86 +.03
GroCon 50.83 +.07
Grolncn 12.53 +.08
Highlncrn 6.43 +.03
Indepnn 14.44 +.19
InProBdn 10.87 +.04
IntBdn 9.17 +.03
IntGovn 10.90 +.03
IntmMu n 9.88 +.01
InllDiscn 21.92 +.16
IntlSCprn 11.79 +.09
InvGrBd 10.57 +.04
InvGB n 6.38 +.02
Japan n 8.78 +.04
JpnSm n 6.41 +.05
LgCapValIn 9.09 +.05
LCpVI r n 7.64 +.06
LatAmn 32.74 +.13
LevCoStkn 14.76 +.21
LowPrn 23.43 +.10
Magellnn 49.00 +.12
MDMurn 10.40 +.01
MAMunn 11.27 +.01
MegaCpSlkn6.65 +.03
MIMunn 11.48 +.01
MidCapn 16.11 -.02
MNMunn 11.12
MlgSecn 10.12 +.01
Munilncn 11.88 +.01
NJMunrn 11.07 +.01
NwMktrn 12.37 +.01
NwMilln 17.74 +.09
NYMunn 12.27 +.01
OTCn 31.90 +.12
OhMunn 11.20 +.01
106lndex 6.26 +.02
Ovrsean 23.13 +.23
PcBasn 13.70 +.17
PAMunrn 10.48
Puritnn 12.98 +.04
RealEn 12.26 +.16
StlntMun 10.48 +.01
STBFn 7.95 +.01
SmCaplndr 10.06 +.01
SmllCpSrn lO.69 +.15
SEAsian 19.11 +.11
StkSlcn 16.91 +.10
Strallncn 8.97 +.04
StrReRtr 7.04 +.03
TaxFrBrn 10.24 +.01
TolalBOdn 9.37 +.04
Trend n 40.52 -.01
USBIn 10.75 +.04
Uliityn 12.02 -.14
ValSlratn 14.11 +.05
Value n 39.03 +.32
Wrddwn 11.96 +.10
Fidelity Selects:
Aimr 22.09 -.14
Bankingn 12.14 +.44
Biolch n 56.33
Brokrn 33.64 +1.69
Chem n 53.46 +.33
ComEquipnl3.63 -.10
Compn 29.02 -.34
ConDisn 14.37 -.06
ConStapn 46.99 -.14
CstHon 23.31 +.03
DfAern 44.60 -.70
Electrn 26.63 -.24
Enrgyn 31.84 -.05
EngSvn 40.13 -.09
Envirn 12.09 -.02
FinSvn 44.18 +2.18
Goldrn 31.60 +.56
Health n 80.86 +.40


IntemtA 15.57 +.14
Munder FundsY:
MCpCGrYrn17.16 -.05
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 8.93 +.01
DiscZ 22.58 +.03
OualfdZ 14.54 +.04
SharesZ 14.63 +.02
Neuberger&Berm Inv:
Focus 13.61 +.03
Geneslnst 28.55 -.18
Intlr 10.40 +.05
Partner 16.76 +.31
Neuberger&BermTr:
Genesis 29.73 -.18
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc I n 7.87 +.03
Nich n 30.20 -.01
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 10.14 +.03
SmCpldx 5.12
Technly 9.05 -.06
Nuveen CI A:
HYMuBdp 12.25
LMBAp 10.56 +.01
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 8.45 +.01
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhiOkSG n24.67 +.12
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 21.01 +.04
Globall 13.59 +.15
Intllr 11.21 +.17
Oakmark r 25.83 +.17
Selectr 16.48 +.10
Old Mutual Adv II:
Tc&ComZ 10.57 -.06
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 5.96
GIbSMdCap 9.87 +.02
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 5.01 +.01
AMTFrNY 8.90
CAMuniA p 6.05
CapApAp 29.58 +.13
CaplncAp 6.55
ChmplncA p 1.47
DvMktAp 17.82 +.06
Discp 32.92 -.17
EquityA 5.99 +.01
GlobA p 37.76 +.05
GIbOppA 16.84 +.01
Goldp 22.36 +.50
IntBdAp 5.72 +.04
MnStFdA 21.81 +.01
MSSCAp 12.07 +.01
MidCapA 10.18
PAMuniAp 8.27
StrlnAp 3.32 +.01
USGvp 8.77 +.04
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 4.99 +.01
AMTFrNY 8.90
CplncB 6.46 +.01
ChmplncBt 1.47
EquityB 5.58 +.02
StrlncBt 3.34 +.02
Oppenheimer C&M:
InllBdC 5.70 +.04
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 2.95
RoMuAp 12.64 +.02
RcNIMuA 5.22 +.01
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAd p 9.47 +.01
TotRtAd 10.19 +.04
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIIAsset 10.09 +.07
ComodRR 6.52 +.04
DevLcMkr 8.50 +.06
Divinc 8.70 +.06
EmMkBd 8.79 +.03
FrgnBd 9.01
HiYld 6.74 +.05
InvGrCp 9.74 +.06
LowDu 9.40 +.04
ModDur 9.79 +.06
RealRet 10.13 +.09
RealRtnl 10.00 +.05
ShortT 9.47 +.01
TotRI 10.19 +.04
TR I 9.83 +.05
TRIII 8.85 +.04
PIMCO Funds A:
LwDurA 9.40 +.04
RealRtAp 10.00 +.05
TotRtA 10.19 +.04
PIMCO Funds C:
RealRICp 10.00 +.05
TotRtCt 10.19 +.04
PIMCO Funds D:
TRInp 10.19 +.04
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 18.16 +.01
Pax World:
Balanced 16.97
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 32.67 +.36
Pioneer Funds A:
CullenVal 12.93 +.05
BondAp 8.25 +.02
EurSelEqA 16.42 +.24
IntlValA 13.99 +.12
MdCpGrA 9.22 -.03
PionFdAp 27.46
TxFreAp 8.71 +.01
ValueA p 8.36 +.03
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYIdBt 6.41 +.02
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYldCt 6.47 +.01
Price Funds Adv:
Growth pn 20.29 +.04
Price Funds:
Balance 14.02 +.08
BiChipn 24.55 +.10
CABondn 10.05
CapAppn 14.28 -.02
DivGron 16.13 +.05
EmEurp 9.22 +.09
EmMktlSn 18.35 +.13
Eqlncn 15.91 +.14
Eqlndexn 23.11 +.06
Europen 10.09 +.16
GNMAn 9.68
Growth n 20.42 +.03
Gr&lnn 13.59 +.05
HlthScln 19.45 +.13


BUIIIIrG 8.91 +.07
GlblHlthB 30.98 +.09
HiYldBt 5.57 +.04
HYAdBt 4.38 +.02
IncmBt 5.24 +.02
IntGrlnt 6.60 +.07
IntlNopt 9.56 +.11
InvB t 7.64 +.02
NJTxBI 8.66 +.01
NwOpBt 28.23 -.06
TxExBt 7.75 +.01
TFHYBt 9.61 +.01
USGvBt 13,05
GlblUtiIB 9,04 -.07
VistaBt 5.26 +.01
VoyBt 11.44 +.04
RS Funds:
IntGrA 11.03 +.13
LgCAlphaA 28.76 +.02
Value 15.32 +.05
Rainier Inv Mgt:
SmMapl. 20.18', -'.10-1:
RldgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 6.47
RiverSource A:
BalanceA 7.40 +.04
DispEqAp 3.75 +.02
DEI 6.73 +.05
DivrBd 4.46 +.02
DvOppA 5.19 +.01
Growth 17.50 +.01
HiYdTEA 3.90
LgCpEqp 2.76 +.02
MCpGrA 6.43 +.02
MidCpVl p 4.68 +.01
RiverSource I:
TNEmgMkt n 5.59 +.02
Royce Funds;
LwPrSkSvr 9.31 +.01
MicroCapl 9.08 +.03
PennMul r 6.75 -.03
Premierlr 12.15 -.01
TotRetIr 8.35
ValSvct 7.26 +.01
VIPISvc 8.18 +.02
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 9.09 +.04
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 8.34 -.02
SEI Portfolios:
CoreFxAn 8.96 +.03
IntllEqAn 5.81 +.02
LgCGroAn 14.31
LgCValAn 11.17 +.05
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkl 12.68 +.05
Schwab Funds:
HlthCare 11.38 +.08
10001nvr 25.40 +.06
100nSel 25.37 +.06
S&P Inv 13.31 +.04
S&PSel 13.35 +.04
S&PlnstSI 6.81 +.02
SmCplnv 11.92 +.02
Selected Funds:
AmShD 27.54 +.22
AmShSp 27.55 +.22
Sellgman Group:
ComunA 28.55 -.35
FrontrAt 6.89 -.06
GIbSmA 7.99 +.05
GIbTchA 13.07 -.13
HYdBAp 2.06 +.01
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 21.19 +.05
Sequoia n 94.85 +.04
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 30.38 +.03
SoundSh 22.37 +.02
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 38.99 +.04
Stratton Funds:
Dividend 14.87 +.11
Multi-Cap 25.59 -.06
SmCap 31.56 +.34
SunAmerlca Funds:
USGvBI 9.97 +.03
TCW Funds:
TotRelBdl 9.17 +.04
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bondlnst 9.81 +.03
Tamarack Funds:
EntSmCp 12.49
Value
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 13,79 +.17
Third Avenue Fds:
Intlr 11.28 +.13
RIEstVIr 14.42 +.14
Value 33.77 +.48
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 18.17 +.18
IntValuel 18.58 +.19
Thrlvent Fds A:
HiYId 3.69 +.02
Income 6.89 +.04
Transamerica A:
FlexIncp 7.06 +.03
TA IDEX A:
TempGIbAp18.14 +.11
TrCHYBp 6.39 +.06
Turner Funds:
SmICpGrn 19.01 -.06
Tweedy Browne:
GlobVal 15.01 +.08
UMB Scout Funds:
Intl 20.74 +.16
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 16.45 +.09
ChinaReg 5.95 +.01
GIbRs 5.91 +.04
Gld&Mtls 10.74 +,17
WldPrcMn 10.69 +.16
USAA Group:
AgvGt 21.70 +.12
CA Bd 9.24 -.01
CrnstStr 15.09 +.04
GNMA 10.02
GrTxStr 10.35 +.02
Grwth 10.02 +.01
Gr&lnc 9.86 +.03
IncSlk 8.44 +.03

Chronicle staff
financial advice
quotes on stock
Consult a finan


WelltnAdmn40.60 +.20
Windsorn 30.24 +.11
WdsrllAdn 31.82 +.14
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 17.79 +.05 I 7 |
CAITn 10.45 ...
CALTn 10.42
CapOppn 22.11 -.09 - l .
Convrt n 10.04 +.02
DivdGron 10.60 -.02
Energyn 45.45 +.01 A
Eqlncn 14.44 +.05
Explr n 42.23 -.07
FLLTn 10.74 . WASHINGT(
GNMAn 10.70 termTreasury
GlobEqn 11.46 09 term Treaury
Grolncn 18.36 +.08 to the lowest le
GrthEqn 7.04
HYCorpn 4.48 +.02 The Treasur
HlthCren 93.63 +.35 billion in three
InilaPron 12.05 +.04 i
lhiExplrn 9.44 +.10 of0.18 percent
IntlGrn 11.95 +.10
IntlValn 22.07 +20 week Another
ITIGraden 8.52 +.05 was au tioned
ITTsry n 11.82 +.06
UfeConn 13.09 +.04 cent, down froi
ieGron 1547 +05ee-m
ifelnc n 12.13 +.04 The three-m
i neModn 14.75 +.05 those bills aver
LTIGraden 7.89 +.10
L1Tsryn 12.03 +.11 Thesix-month:
Morgn 11.47 -.01
MuHYn 9.40 +.01
Mulnt n 13.00
Mulldn 10.87 ..
MuLongn 10.41 ...
MuShrtn 15.84
NJLTn 11.18
NYLTn 10.53 +.01 i
OHLTTEn 11.43
PALTn 10.58 +.01
PrecMtlsrn 13.05 +.28
,PrmcpCorn 9.20 -.02
Prmcprn 44.90 -.09
SelValurn 11.71 +.03 '
STARn 14.26 +.06
STIGraden 9.80 +.02 r" '' *: '
STFedn 10.89 +.02
STTsryn 10.84 +.02
StratEqn 11.20 +.01
TgtRetlncn 9.50 +.03
TgRe2010n17.44 +.06
TgtRe2005n9.67 +.03
TgtRe2025n 9.04 +.03
TgtRe2015n9.40 +.04 i '
TgRe2020n16.24 +.06
TgRe2030n15.12 +.05
TglRe2035 n 8.98 +.04
TgtRe2045n 9.29 +.04
USGron 12.50 +.01
USValuen 7.16
Wellslyn 17.33 +.05
Welltnn 23.51 +.12
Wndsrn 8.96 +.03
Wndslln 17.93 +.09
Vanguard IdxFds:
500n 79.11 +.19
Balanced n 16.24 +.05 B --
DevMkt n 6.86 +.06
EMktn 16.94 +.16
Europen 18.39 +.24
Extend n 23.84 +.03
Growth n 20.55 -.02
ITBndn 10.28 +.06
LgCaplxn 15.73 +.04
LTBndn 11.04 +.12
MidCapn 11.82 -.02
Pacific n 7.67 +.02
REITrn 9.89 +.07
SmCapn 19.71 +.02
SmiCpGth nhl.92 -.03
SmrCpVIn 9.51 +.05 i --
STBndn 10.26 +.03 i
TotBndn 10.10 +.03 W in 1
Totllntin 10.28 +.10
Totk 20. .04 Sim y fil
Valuen 14.58 +.09 ply
Vanguard InstlFds: w ill find
Ballnsin 16.24 +.04 w ill
DvMktlnsln 6.81 +.07
Eurolnstn 18.39 +.24 to the
Exltn n 23.85 +.04
Grwthlsl n 20.55 -.03 to win in
InPronstn 9.64 +.03 w in in
nstdxn 7860 19 f the
InsPin 78.60 +.19 for e 1
TollBdIdxn 50.78 +.16
InsTStPlus n18.89 +.04
MidCplstn 11.85 -.02 Drawing to be I
Pacnstn 7.68 +.02 Drawing to be I
SCInstn 19.72 +.02
TBIstn 10.10 +.03
TSInstn 20.92 +.04
Valuelstn 14.58 +.09
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 65.35 +.16
ITBdSign 10.28 +.06
MidCpldx n 16.92 -.04
STBdldxn 10.26 +.03
TotBdSgln 10.10 +.03 Name Last Chg
TotStkSgIln20.19 +.05 SwslnEngy 30.96 -.25
Vantagepoint Fds: SpecraEn 14.91
Growth 5.91 +.01 SpdntNex 4.19 -.10
Victory Funds: SPDR 85.83 +.02
DvsStA 1099 +.01 iSPMid 97.30 -.08
Waddell & Reed Adv: SP Mails 24.15 +.31
AsselS p 7.27 +.03 SPHIthC 24.32 +.19
CorelnvA 3.87 +.03 SPCnSt 21.61 -.06
ScTechA 7.18 -.03 SPConsum 21.92 +.01
Wasatch: SPEngy 45.10 -.50
SmCpGr 21.71 +.01 SPDRFnd 11.08 +.45
Wells Fargo Adv: SP Inds 20.54 +.06
CmStkZ 12.17 +.03 SPTech 16.73
Opptylnv 23.21 +.07 SP U1i 2573 -34
ppWestern Asset: Standex 1061 1.42
Western Asset: StarwdHtl 15.77 +.45
CorePlus 8.60 +.06 StateStr 39.03 +2.71
Core 8.74 +.08 Steds 2501 -.21
William Blair N: StaIHotels .88 -.04
GrowthN 7.48 -.02 Styer 35.35 +60
IntlGthN 12.79 +.05 SturmRug 11.50 -.03
Yacktman Funds: SubPpne 37.30 +.15
Fundp 10.09 +.01 SunCmts 13.71 +.14
Suncorgs 26.17 +.05
Sunoco 2848 -.55
SunstnHII 3.01 -.10
do not provide Sunech 14.49 09
SunTrst 1606 +t.92
9 or real-time supvalu 14.16 +.06
ks or funds. syswvus 436 +.23
cial Sysco 2337 +.35
cial adviser. TCFFncl 15.31 +52


TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 A7




session mixed


I


BUSINESS




a*Market

Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell Associated Press
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and dally net change.-
Name: Name of mutual fund and family. NEW YORK - Stocks
NAV: Net asset value. ended mostly higher Monday
Chg: Net change in price of NAV.
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern. ahead of a flurry of earnings
reports that could determine
Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg whether the economy is re-
First Eagle: Legg Mason Ptrs A: HiYieldn 4.95 +.03 Inco 10.98 +.06 ally getting better, as in-
GIbLA 31.78 +.21 AgGrAp 67.07 +.01 InllBondn 8.82 +.10 Intl 15.85 +.20
OverseasA 15.69 +.13 ApprAp 9.95 +.01 IntDisn 24.02 +.27 NYBd 10.69 +.01 vestors have been hoping
First Investors A HilncAt 4.07 +.02 IntlG&I 8.80 +.11 PrecMM 22.53 +.44 r th month the
BIChpAp 15.44 +.02 InAICGAp 5.73 +.04 IntlStkn 8.48 +.08 SciTech 7.77 -.02 over the past mon as ey
GloblAp 4.38+.01 LgCpGAp 17.06 ... Japann 5.86 +.01 ShtTBnd 8.48+.01 drove themarkethigher.
GovtAp 11.17 +.01 MgMuAp 14.31 -.01 LatAmn 27.31 +.30 SmCpStk 8.00 -.02
GrolnAp 9.60 -.01 Legg Mason Ptrs B: MDShrtn 5.24 ... TxEt 11.90 +.01 Early signs were good.
IncoAp 1.96 +.01 LgCpGBI 15.66 ... MDBondn 9.70 .. TxELT 11.63 +.01 Goldman Sachs Group Inc.
MATFAp 11.10 ... Longleaf Partners: MidCapn 34.64 -.12 TxESh 10.37
MITFAp 11.59 ... Partners 16.87 -.05 MCapValn 14.63 +.03 VABd 10.25 surprised investors after the
NJTFAp 12.45 .. ntl 10.46 +05 NAmern 20.91 -.01 WdGr 12.16 +.13 end oftrading Monday when
NYTFAp 13.80 SmCap 15.08 +.06 NAsian 9.04 +.12 VALIC:
OppAp 16.13 -.03 Loomis Sayles: NewEran 30.67 +.06 MdCpidx 12.34 -.02 it released better-than-
PATFAp 12.57 LSBondl 10.45 +.08 NHorizn 18.26 -.08 Stkldx 17.69 +.03 expected quarterly results
SpSitAp 14.73 -.12 StrlncC 10.68 +.08 Nlncn 8.67 +.03 Value LineFd: expected quarterly resu
TxExAp 9.46 ... LSBondR 10.42 +.08 NYBondn 10.45 ... LrgCon 12.44 +.01 and announced a $5 billion
TotRtAp 11.38 StrlncA 10.63 +.08 PSIncn 12.20 +.06 Van Kamp Funds A: stock f The
ValueBp 5.03 +01 LoomisSaylesnv: RealEstn 8.95 +10 CATFAp 15.42 +.01 tockoffering. The company
Firsthand Funds: InvGrBdAp 9.75 +.07 R201n 11.27 +.04 CapGro 7.79 +.06 had been scheduled to re-
TechVal 25.36 +.08 InvGrBdCp 9.69 +.07 R2015n 8.36 +.03 CmstAp 10.27 +.12
FrankFTemp FrnkA: InvGrBdY 9.75 +.07 R2020n 11.21 +.05 CpBdAp 5.52 +.03 port early today.
AdjUSp 8.94 +.01 LordAbbettA: R2025n 8.01 +.04 EqlncAp 6.21 +.02 The bank's $1.7 billion
ALTFAp 10.59 +.01 AffilAp 8.03 +.10 R2030n 11.27 +.05 Exch 319.87 -2.68
AZTFAp 10.15 +.01 AIIValA 8.44 +02 R2035n 7.87 +.04 GrlnAp 13.04 +.04 profit was just the sort of
Ballnvp 32.08 +.03 BdDebAp 5.96 +.01 R2040n 11.20 +.05 HarbAp 11.92 +.02 od su rise traders were
CallnsAp 11.43 ... MidCpAp 9.93 -.02 SciTecn 15.56 -.12 HiYldA 7.54 +.02 good surprise traders were
CAIntAp 10.85 MFSFundsA: ShBd n 4.67 +.01 HYMuAp 7.90 +.01 waiting for Monday as they
CaTFAp 6.42 +.01 MITA 13.41 +.03 SmCpStkn 19.35 -.02 InTFAp 1530 +.01ialst
CapGrA 7.81 MIGA 9.93 -.02 SmCapValn21.83 -.03 MunlAp 11.67 +.01 snapped up financial stocks.
COTFAp 10.86 +.01 HilnA 2.47 +.02 SpecGrn 11.14 +.06 PATFAp 14.29 +.01 Some traders are looking for
CTTFAp 10.20 +.02 MFLA 8.92 +.01 SpecInn 10.28 +.05 StrMunlnc 8.88
CvtScAp 9.93 +.02 TotRA 11.12 +.06 TFncn .9.17 +.01 USMtgeA 12.5 01 signs of recovery and others
DbITFA 10.35 +.04 UtilA 11.15 -.08 TxFrHn 896 .. UtilAp 14.74 -.16 don't want to get burned if'
DynTchA 18.34 +.05 ValueA 16.48 +.09 TxFrSIn 5.43 Van Kamp Funds B:
EqlncAp 11.68 MFS Funds B: USTintn 6.05 +.03 EnterpBI 9.04 +.08 banks beat the low expecta-
Fedlntp 10.97 +.01 MIGBn 8.98 -.01 USTLn 12.88 +.12 EqlncBt 6.09 +01 tons the market has set for
FedTFAp 11.02 +.01 GvScBn 10.03 +.02 VABondn 10.95 +.01 HYMuBt 7.89 tons the mar...
FLTFAp 10.89 .. HilnBn 2.48 +.02 Valuen 14.91 +.12 MulB 11.65 the industry.
FouncAlp 7.50 +.04 MulnBn 7.69 Principal Inv: SrMunlnc 8.88 +.01 in helped
GATFAp 11.27 +.02 TotRBn 11.11 +.05 BdMtgln 8.28 +.03 USMIge 12.45 +.02 The buying helped the
GoldPrMA 26.96 +.46 MFSFunds l: DiscLClnst 8.77 +.01 UtilB 14.67 -.16 Dow Jones industrial aver-
GrwthAp 28.59 -.12 RelnT 10.33 +.14 LgGrn 5.51 +.02 Vanguard Admiral: a i fii
HYTFAp 8.70 MFS Funds nstl: LT20301n 7.85 +.03 BalAdmln 16.24 +.04 age turn a 120-point deficit
HilncA 1.50 +.01 IntlEqn 11.66 +.15 LT2020n 8.10 +.02 CAITAdmn 10.45 into a modest drop of 26
IncomAp 1.60 +.01 MaInStay Funds A: SAMBalA 9.32 +.02 CALTAdmn10O.42
InsTFA p 11.23 +01 HiYIdBA 454 02 Putnam Funds A: CpOpAdln 51.06 -.22 points by the time the closing
NYITFp 10.68 +.01 MainStay FundsB: AmGvAp 9.11 +.01 EMAdmrrn22.27 +20 bell sounded. Broader in-
LATFAp 10.46 +01 CapApt 18.67 -.0 AZTE 8.40 +01 Energyn 85.34 +.03
LMGvScA 10.45 +.01 ConvBt 1090 +.02 CATxAp 7.07 +.01 ExplAdmln 39.29 -.07 dexes managed to post gains.
MDTFAp 10.36 +.01 GovtB 8.68 +03 Convp 12.93 +.03 ExtdAdmn 23.84 +.03h
MATFAp 10.95 +.01 HYIdBBt 4.52 +.02 DvrIlnAp 6.03 +.04 50OAdmln 79.11 +.19 Trading volume was light,
MITFAp 11.48 +.01 IntlEqB 8,77 +.05 EqnAp 10.51 .05 GNMAAdn10.70 which can skew the market's
MNInsA 11.86 +.01 SmCGBp 8.63 -.07 EuEq 13.04 +.15 HlthCrn 39.52 +.15
MOTFAp 11.28 +.01 ToIRtB 12.35 +.02 GeoAp 9.07 +.01 HiYIdCpn 4.48 +.02 moves.
NJTFAp 11.29 +.02 Malrs&Power: GIbEqtyp 6.00 +.06 InfProAdn23.67 +.09 The bouts of selling after a
NYInsAp 10.45 +.01 Growth 49.43 -.13 GrInAp 9.07 +.07 ITBdAdmln10.28 +.06
NYTFAp 11.10 +.02 Manaers Funds: GlblHlthA 36.67 +.12 ITsryAdmln11.82 +.06 long holiday weekend were
NCTFAp 11.42 +.02ondn 19.44 +.14 HiYdAp 5.58 +.03 IntGrAdmn 38.01 +.33rderly and suggested that
OhiolAp 12.14 HiYld In 4.45 �03 orderly and suggested that
ORTFAp 11.19 +.2 M : cmA 1 p 5.28 +.02 ITGrAdmn 8.52 +.05 traders were reluctant to
PATFAp 9.70+.01 Focusp 11.58 +.11 IntGrlnp 6.65 +.06 LtdTrAdn 10.87
ReEScAp 7.38 +.01 MatthewsAsian: InvAp 8.47 +.02 LTGrAdmin 7.89 +.10 give up on a five-week rally
RisDvAp 22.39 +.05 Indiar' 8.66 +-18 NJTxAp 8.67 +.01 LTsyAdmln 12.3 +.11 The earnings reports and
SMCpGrA 21.24 MergerFd 14.63 .11 NwOpAp 32.26 -.06 LTAdmn 10.41 e earnings reports an
Stratlncp 8.59 +.04 MetroWestFds: PATE 8.50 +.01 MCpAdmln53.61 -.10 economic figures due this
USGovA p 6.68 +,01 TotRetBd 8.92 +.03 TxExA p 7.75 +.01 MorgAdm n 35.56 -.04
UtilsAp 933 -.11 TotRtBdl 8.92 +.03 TFInAp 13.95 +.01 MuHYAdmn9.40 +01 week could reignite buying if
VATFAp 1098 +.01 MldasFund: TFHYA 9.59 +.01 NJLTAdn 11.18 they beat Wall Street's mod-
Frank'Tmp FrnkAdv: MidasFd 2.37 +.06 USGvAp 13.10 -.02 NYLTAdn 10.53 +.01
GIbBdAdvp Monetta Funds: GlblUtilA 9.08 -.06 PrmCap rn 46.59 -.09 estexpectations.
IncmeAd 1.59 +.01 Monetan 9.42 +.27 VstaAp 6.19 +.02 PALTAdmn10.58 +.01 "Ifyouget a couple earn-
'ranlfTemp Frnk B: Morgan Stanley A: VoyAp 13.41 +.06 STsyAdmln 10.84 +.02
IncomeBt 1.59 +.01 DivGthA 10.78 +.05 Putnam Funds B: STBdAdmln10.26 +.03 ings reports that are better
Frankfoemp Frnk C: Morgan Stanley B: DvrlnBt 5.98 +.03 ShtTrAdn 15.84
FoundAlp 7.39 +.04 DivGtB 10.87 +.05 Eqlnct 10.41 +.05 STFdAdn 10.89 +.02 than the worst that people
IncomCt 1.61 +.01 GibDivB 7.69 +.04 EuEq 12.51 +.15 STIGrAdn 9.80 +.02 expected then that might
Fran dlemp Mtl A&B: StratB 14.69 +07 GeoB 8.97 +01 TxMCaprn41.85 +.07 pecte n that might
BeacnA 8.83 MorganStanley Inst: GIbEqI 5.43 +.05 TtlBAdmln 10.10 +03 help," said Denis Amato,
DiscA 22.32 +.03 IntlEqln 10.07 +.12 GINtRst 12.20 +.03 TStkAdmn20.91 +.04
...... ... ...,,...F,.dA'.. .R...... ... . WellslAdmn4.9r s +.13 chief investment officer at


rates drop at weekly auction


Associated Press


ON - Interest rates on short-
bills fell in Monday's auction
levels since late January.
y Department auctioned $28
-month bills at a discount rate
, down from 0.20 percent last
$27 billion in six-month bills
at a discount rate of 0.37 per-
m 0.40 percent last week
month rate was the lowest since
raged 0.15 percent on Jan. 26.
rate was the lowest since they


averaged 0.345 percent, also on Jan. 26.
The discount rates reflect that the bills
sell for less than face value. For a $10,000
bill, the three-month price was $9,995.45,
while a six-month bill sold for$9,981.29. That
would equal an annualized rate of 0.183 per-
cent for the three-month bills, ard 0.376,per-
cent for the six-month bills.
Separately, the Federal Reserve said the
average yield for one-year Treasury bills, a
popular-index for making changes in ad-
justable rate mortgages, rose to 0.60 percent
last week from 0.58 percent the previous
week


I SA[] YAS'EN O R[


i
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.1IYr

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d


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S the cou Publishing this Saturday
n Senior Style, submit it inside the

ronicle for your chance .

our random drawing

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www.chronicleonline.com
held April 28, 2009. Coupon will appear with instructions in Senior Style on April 18, 2009.
*Gift card good for 6 months. Not redeemable for cash.




NE-YRKSTOKECANG


UualtdAt 14.44 +.04
SharesA 14.52 +.02
Frankilemp Mtl C:
DiscCt 22.14 +.03
FrankiTemp Temp A:
DvMktAp 13.95 +.101
ForgnAp 4.49 +.06
GIBdAp 11.50 +.05
GrwthAp 12.12 +.09
WoddAp 10.27 +.06
FrankTemp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 12.12 +.09
FrankT'empTmp B&C:
DevMk'tC 13.64 +.10
ForgnC p 4.40 +.06
GIBdC p 11.52 +.05
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S Inc 10.34 +.05
S&SPM 28.68 +.14
TaxEx 11.14 +.01
GMOTrust III:
EmMkr 8.16 ".06
For 8.95 +.05
IntlntrVI 15.96 +.16
USQItyEq 15.37 -.09
GMOTrust IV:
EmCnDt 6.26 +.04
EmrMt 8.12 +.05
IntlGrEq 15.64 +.07
Itnttnrtl 15.95 +.16
GMO Trust VI:
StrFxlnc 15.64 +.02
USQtyEq 15.37 -.09
Gabelll Funds:
Asset 29.63 -.01
Gateway Funds:
GatewayA 23.11 +.01
Goldman Sachs A:
HiYieldA 5.31 +.02
MdCVAp 21.56 -.04
Goldman Sachs Inst:
HiYield 5.32 +.02
MidCapV 21.71 -.05
Harbor Funds:
Bond 11.42 +.05
'CapAplnst 24.63 +.05
Intllnvt 36.65 +.30
Intlr 36.97 +.29
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 22.19 +.20
DivGthAp 13.27 +.03
Hartford Fds C:
CapApCt 19.93 +.18
Hartford Fds L:
GrCOppL 17.16
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 25.97 +.19
Div&Gr 13.61 +.03
Advisers 13.94 +.06
Stock 26.46 +.11
TotRetBd 9.71 +.03
Henderson.Glbl Fds:
IntOppAp 15.17 +.09
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig 9.44 -.05
HussmnStrGr13.18 -.04
ICON Fds:
Energy 13.30 -.07
Hlthcare 10.15 +.07
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.67 +.03
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCI 18.49 +.07
AssetStAp 18.90 +.08
AssetSrYp 18.93 +.08
GINaRsA p 12.55 +.12
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 10.78 +.02
MCpValp 14.64 -.01
JPMorgan Select:
HBSMkNe p 15.95
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 10.77 +.02
HiYdBd n 6.05 +.02
IntmTFBdn 10.67 +.01
IntrdAmern 15.39 +.06
ShtDurBdn 10.69 +.02
TxAwRRet n 9.63
USLCCrPs n13,51 +.04
Janus:
Balanced 20.28 +.09
Contrarian 9.33 +.06
Enterpr 33.83 -.17
FedTE
FxBnd 9.73 +.04
Fund 19.62 +.01
FundaEq 14.26 +.01
GliUfeSci 16.43 +.02
GITechr 9.71 -.10
Grinc 21.68 +.10
Orion 6.78 +.02
Ovrseasr 29.00 +.15
PrkMCVInv 15.28 +.06
Research 17.79 -.06
ShTmBd 2.94
Twenty 47.31 +.26
Ventur 29.43 -.13
WrddWr 29.36 +.13
Janus Adv S Shrs:
Forty 23.97 +.15
JennlsonDryden A:
BlendA 11.15 +.01
HighlncA 8.32
HiYIdAp 4.14 +.02
InsuredA 9.95
UtilityA 6.98 -.04
JennisonDryden B:
GrowthB 10.82 +.02
HiYIdB1 4.14 +.02
InsuredB 9.97
John Hancock A:
BondAp 12.28 +.05
RgBkA 11.75 +.43
StrlnA p 5.32 +.02
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 5.32 +.02
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 7.91 +.04
LSBalanc 9.20 +.05
LSConsrv 10.39 +.06
LSGrwth 8.73 +.05
LSModer 9.55 +.05
Keeley Funds:
SmCpValAp 14.71 +.01
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 11.99 +.16
Legg Mason: Fd
SplnvCp 16.70 +.16
ValTrCp 26.17 +.37


I ToddShph 13.19
i TollBros 17.91
STorchEn h 1.96
Trchmrk 31.57
TorDBkg 39.00
Total SA 49.51
TotalSys 1425
Transocn 66.48
Travelers 43.80
Tredgar 17.55
TriCont 8.87
Trimty 11.62
TycoElec 13.07
Tydolnti 21.20
Tyson 1123
UBSAG 10.86
UDR 10.06
UILHold 23.28
USAirwy 3.62
USEC 5.94
UltraPIg 40.27
UnFirst 37.89
UnionPacs 46.76
Unisys h .75
UtdMicro 2.80
UPSB 53.43
USBancrp 18.01
USNGsFd 14.60
USOlFd 29.68
USSteel 27.37
UldTech 46.3
UtdhlthGp 24.37
UnumGrp 14.96


ValeantPh 17.59
ValeroE 20.62
VangTSMs 42.93
VangREIT 29.70
VangEmgs 26.96
VarianMed 33.19
Vectren 20.09
Ventas 27.49
VnoliaEnv 23.83
VerizonCm 31.74
ViacomB 19.15
VimpelCm 9.55
Visa 61.11
VMware 31.53
Vodafone 18.29
Vomado 42.05
WGLHold 31.13
Wabash 1.39
WaddellR 21.79
WalMalt 51.53
Walgm 29.17
WREIT 21.41
WsteMInc 26.60
Weathflnt s 12.97
WeinRIt 14.23
WellPoint 43.58
WellFargo 19.67
WendyArby 5.50
WestarEn 17.66
WAstEMkt 8.65
WstAMgdHi 427


-09
-38
+.06
+.09
+.19
-.19
-.23
+.57
+.40
-.36
+.21
-.31
+2.32
+1,52
+.21
+.34
-.22
-.15
+.95
+.87
+.19
+1.33
+.35
-.02
-.39
+3.24
+.06
-.07
-.39
+.05
-.03


WAstlnfOpp 1082
WDOigd 21.34
WstnUnion 14.46
Weyerh 32.26
Whfp 34.47
WilmCS 4.53
WmsCos 12.78
WmsPtrs 1291
WmsSon 12.14
Windstrm 8.35
Winnbgo 6.85
WiscEn 40.47
Worthgtn 13.03
Wyeth 42.28
Wyndham 7.42
XLCap 8.13
XTOEngy 33.08
XcelEngy 18.17
Xerox 5.33
Yamanag 8.23
YingliGm 7.67
YumBmds 29.99
ZweigT 3.24


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Market watch
April 13, 2009

Dow Jones -25.57
industrials 8,057.81

Nasdaq +077
composite 1,653.31

Standard & +2.17
Poor's 500 873
858.73

Russell -0.15
2000
2000 468.05

NYSE diary
Advanced: 1,794
Declined: 1,255
Unchanged: 95
Volume: 6.42 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 1,182
Declined: 1,193
Unchanged: 98
Volume: 1.78 b

SOURCE: SunGard AP

Ancora Advisors.
Beyond banks, industrial
stocks ended mixed after
Boeing Co. and Chevron
Corp. said the weak economy
was hurting their results.
The market was unsettled
by a New York Times report
saying the Treasury has di-
rected General Motors Corp.
to lay the groundwork for a
potential bankruptcy filing
by June 1. GM might be
forced to file if it cannot com-
plete a plan to exchange debt
for equity, according to the
report.
According to preliminary
calculations, the Dow fell
25.57, or 0.3 percent, to
8,057.81.
Broader stock indicators
advanced. The Standard &
Poor's 500 index rose 2.17, or
0.3 percent, to 858.73, and the
Nasdaq composite index
rose 0.77, or 0.1 percent, to
1,653.31.
Boeing fell 5 percent as an-


TECO 11.27
TJX 2729
TNS nc 14.04
TamwSemi 998
TalismEgs 12.48
Target 4022
TalaMotors 7.72
TeckCmgs 8.99
TelcmNZ 699
TelMexLs 16.96
Templeinld 6.40
Tenaris 23.53
TenelHith 1.15
Teppco 24.30
Teradata 15.31
Teradyn 528
Terex 12.37
Terra 28.41
TerraNtro 13946
Tesoro 15.25
TetraTech 4.45
Texlnst 17.17
Textron 12.27
Theragenh 103
ThermoFis 37.16
ThmBet 29.32
ThomCrkg 485
3MCo 5335
Tiffany 23.63
TWCablers 28.14
TimeWm rs 22.04
Timken 16.42
TilanMel 7.28


alysts cut their ratings and
estimates for the aircraft
maker after it said it would
reduce production of some
jetliners next year due.
Chevron lost 1.8 percent
after saying first-quarter
earnings will be sharply
lower due to falling oil and
natural gas prices.
Investors are also looking
to a spate of earnings results
throughout the week, includ-
ing reports from JPMorgan
Chase & Co. and Citigroup
Inc. Financial companies
had been among the hardest
hit by the economic down-
turn and credit crisis, but
they have also helped lead a
rally over the past month.
Goldman rose 4.7 percent
before rising 3 percent in
after-hours electronic trad-
ing after the company re-
leased its earnings.
JPMorgan ended the day up
2.9 percent and Citigroup
rose 25 percent, while Bank
of America Corp. rose 15 per-
cent
Analysts said some of the
buying could reflect traders
stepping in to cover mis-
placed bets that banks would
fall when they post results
this week Traders who sell
stocks "short" are forced to
buy to avoid further losses.
In other market action, the
Russell 2000 index of smaller
companies slipped 0.15, or
less than 0.1 percent, to
468.05.
About three stocks rose for
every two that fell on the
New York Stock Exchange,
where volume came to 1.5
billion shares compared with
1.8 billion shares traded
Thursday
The dollar was mixed
against other major curren-
cies, while gold prices rose.
Light, sweet crude fell
$1.19 to settle at $50.05 a bar-
rel on the New York Mercan-
tile Exchange.












Page A8 - TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009



OPINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

A, EDITORIAL BOARD


Gerry Mulligan ..........................................publisher
Charlie Brennan ............................................editor
Neale Brennan ........promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ..................................managing editor
Cheri Harris...................................... features editor
Curt Ebitz................................ ...... citizen member
Mac Harris ...................................... citizen member
Cliff Pierson ....................................guest member


Founded
by Albert M.
Williamson


"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


IGNORANCE O:- T -,LISS





Knowledge




of civics




essential


Upon the conclusion of
the Constitutional Con-
vention of 1787, conven-
tion delegate Benjamin
Franklin was asked, "Well, doc-
tor, what have we got, a repub-
lic or a monarchy?" Without
hesitation, Franklin re-
sponded, "A republic, if you
can keep it."
Today, Franklin's reply has
become particu-
larly relevant
given the ap- THE I
palling lack of
civics knowledge Demise
among a growing educ
number of Ameri-


cans due, in large
measure, to a dra-
matic decline in
civics education.
Since the 1960s,
civics education ha


OUR 01
Treat
danger

is been


steadily pushed out of our na-
tion's classrooms with nearly
half of the states no longer re-
quiring civics education. Fur-
ther, a 2003 report by The
Center for Information and Re-
search on Civic Learning and
Engagement found that civics
education in most high schools
comprise only a single course
on government compared to
the 1960s when three courses
- civics, democracy and gov-
ernment - were the norm.
The lack of civics knowledge
about the most fundamental
tenets of our constitutional re-
public has evoked concern
from various quarters during
the past decade. Nonetheless,
there has been no marked im-
provement in civics education.
Retired U.S. Supreme Court
Justice Sandra Day O'Connor
is the most recent influential
voice concerned about our na-
tion treading a dangerous path
of civics ignorance. On a na-
tional tour, she is calling for a


Ditch the fee
I see the auto manufacturers,
the unions and the suppliers have
all decided they can cut back to
try to reduce expenses and sell
cars. However, the automobile
dealers, who get 3 percent back
when they sell a new car from the
manufacturer, are not doing
much. In fact, when they
add $300 to $600 admin-
istrative and service fees
to your sale, it makes a
big difference. I'd gladly
be looking at new cars if I
could get rid of that $300
to $600 service fee that
they want to charge for
selling me a car. CAit
- i
Hooking up 563-
Today in the April 2 edi-
tion of your paper, you
say that the county is going to ex-
tend sewer systems through areas
of Crystal River, which would be
near the waterfront, with an 85
percent grant to about 600
homes. Just wondering how much
money that will equal considering
what you charged the people in
Chassahowitzka for hookup fees.
An 85 percent grant seems like a
lot. I wonder if the people in
Chazz received anything near
that.


C
..a


renewed commitment to civics
education in our schools and
touting an interactive Web-
based civics course for sev-
enth- to ninth-grade students
called Our Courts (www.bur-
courts.org).
Addressing a joint session of
the Legislature last week, Jus-
tice O'Connor expressed confi-
dence that Florida's
lawmakers would
give civics educa-
SSUE: tion the attention
it merits. Unfortu-
of civics nately, the track
iton. record of Florida
lawmakers indi-


PINION: cates otherwise.
ding a For four years,
)us path. former state legis-
lator Nancy Ar-
genziano's efforts
to gain passage of a revenue-
neutral civics bill designating
American Government as a
core social science require-
ment for an associate degree at
Florida's community colleges
went nowhere. Now, a bill
sponsored by Rep. Charles
McBurney of Jacksonville call-
ing for a civics assessment test
in middle school may also go
nowhere since the PreK-12 Ap-
propriations Committee has
tabled it.
Until state lawmakers and
education leaders across our
land take serious action to re-
verse the pernicious trend of
moving civics education from
our nation's classrooms, Amer-
ica will continue down the dan-
gerous path of civics
ignorance. With the survival of
our constitutional republic at
stake, ignorance is not bliss.
As Thomas Jefferson cau-
tioned, "If a nation expects to
be ignorant and free, it expects
what never was and never will
be."


Off the grass
I'm calling about the article
"Grass grievance" in the April 1
Sound Off. The woman would like
to know how far on the grass
she's allowed to be with her dogs.
I'd like to say that I have a small
dog and I would never dream of
letting my dog walk on someone's
yard from the road and
VND urinate or defecate, es-
pecially around their
Mailbox. Even though
that property might be
owned by the county, it's
maintained by the prop-
*" erty owner and the
L'f^ homeowner. And I hope
\.�% that she will see that,
you know, that's not very
0579 good, it's nasty, and she
needs to take her dog on
vacant lot property.
Pine Ridge problems
Biggest joke in Citrus County -
Pine Ridge Property Owners Asso-
ciation. First you try to tell people
they were buying deed-restricted
property in your community. What
a joke that was. Now you want to
tell people what to do with their
property. You had your chance for
a cell tower. You blew it. What
next? You can't run your own
place. Pack it in. You're a joke.


.- "Education is the transmission
ofcivilization. "
Will and Ariel Durant


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Will Senate stop'unreasonable' pay bill?


/lem v .


House Republicans - half of
whom voted in favor of the AIG
tax - were united in opposition.
"The government can barely run
the government," Republican
Rep. Roy Blunt of Missouri said


iYork
IER
CES


during the floor de-
bate. "To try to tell
these companies how
to pay the people who
work for them is not
the right thing to do."
The fight got ugly
when Rep. Alan
Grayson, the freshman
Florida Democrat who
wrote the bill, told me
that the vote would
"show which Republi-
cans are so much on
the take from the fi-
nancial services indus-


It didn't get much coverage,
given all the attention paid to
Barack Obama's excellent
European adventure, but re-
cently the House of Representa-
tives debated and passed one of
the most radical
pieces of legislation to
come out of the finan-
cial crisis.
It's called the Pay for
Performance Act of -. i
2009. A successor to
the stalled plan to im-
pose a 90 percent tax
on the bonuses of AIG
executives, the new
bill would: Byror
* Impose govern- OTI
ment controls on the
salaries and bonuses VOI
of all employees - not
just top executives - of compa-
Snies that have received capital
investments through the Trou-
bled Asset Relief Program and
other federal initiatives.
* Give Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner the power to
prohibit those companies from
paying salaries or bonuses he
deems "unreasonable" or "exces-
sive."
* Allow Geithner to draw up a
set of "performance standards"
which the companies would be
required to use to calculate
bonuses and retention payments.
The measure isn't limited just
to those firms that received the
largest sums of money, or just to
the top 25 or 50 executives of
those companies. It applies to all
employees of all companies in-
volved, for as long as the govern-
ment is invested. And it would
not only apply going forward, but
also retroactively to existing con-
tracts and pay arrangements of
institutions that have already re-
ceived funds.


IN RECESS
E Congress is in spring recess
until Monday.

Reid hasn't shown any sense of
urgency in dealing with the new
bill. "We're going to take a look at
it when we get back from (spring)
recess," a spokesman for Reid
told me. "The Senate Banking
Committee will study the House's
proposal, and Sen. Reid will also
be looking at this idea and others
over the next few weeks, as well."
That doesn't sound like a .fast
track
Republican senators are skep-
tical for a variety of reasons.
They're afraid that Pay for Per-
formance is too broad - does it
have to cover every employee at
the companies in question, as op-
posed to just the top executives?
They're concerned that it vests
too much power in the secretary
of the Treasury. And they believe
that the House has, again, acted
in haste, without enough thought
"Now that the Senate has a lit-
tle bit of perspective, pulled back
from the heat of the moment, if
they decide to do something,
they'll do it in a more delibera-
tive manner," one well-connected
Republican aide told me. "Right
now, the chances are pretty slim."
So now the whole messy matter
is in the hands of Reid and his
colleagues. The Founding Far
others conceived the Senate as a
place where hastily-passed, ill-
conceived legislation could be
stopped. And that's what is likely
to happen this time.
---*--~~--
Byron York is chiefpolitical
correspondent for'
The Washington Examiner


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Dodging a bullet
Think tanks, tax-exempt foun-
dations and opportunists posing
as economic experts are target-
ing Social Security and
Medicare again.
William Greider, in The Na-
tion, says their swindle is the po-
litical equivalent of
bait-and-switch fraud. He says it
began under President Reagan,
who enacted massive tax cuts for
corporations and wealthy indi-
viduals in 1981 and offset the im-
pact with the huge payroll tax
increase in 1983.
Dr. Ravi Batra, economist with
Southern Methodist University,
calls Reagan a socialist, transfer-
ring from the poor to the rich.
Batra says if the 2 trillion sur-
plus from 1984 to 2007 had been
properly invested, it could have
earned another trillion by now.
Greider writes that the presi-
dent promises to hold a "fiscal
responsibility summit," which
could result in a "bipartisan
compromise." He says this could
be disastrous if Americans don't
step up and say "hands off our
Social Security money!"
Leading the attack against So-
cial Security is Pete Peterson,
who made a fortune doing cor-
porate takeover deals with Wall
Street Blackstone Group and is
147th on the Forbes list of 400
richest Americans. Peterson
placed a documentary in the-
aters and on TV and bought full-
page ads in the New York Times
to create a fiscal responsibility
commission.
The private pension system


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the editorial board of the newspa-
per.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Mike Arnold at
(352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
e-mail. Names and hometowns
will be printed; phone numbers
will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit let-
ters tor length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

has failed miserably, either
ended by companies or shriv-
eled in the stock market. Social
Security is not broke. With no
changes, it's good until at least
2040 and its surplus reduces the
perception of federal deficits.
But the boomers retiring and job
losses in the bad economy will
make Social Security draw on its
surplus.
The government must cut ben-
efits, borrow the money to repay
its debt or raise the tax beyond


the cap of $107,000. The latter is
fairest, most painless and makes
the most sense.
Led by Peterson, the Heritage;
Foundation, the Brookings Instij
tute, the American Enterprise !
Institute, the Concord Coalition
and others have mobilized to put
long-term caps on Social Secu-
rity. But organizations on the
other side will be mobilizing,
also. Early in his presidency,
George W Bush tried to privatize
Social Security. Considering the'
condition of the market, retire-
ment funds would have dwin-
dled.
Thanks to organizing on the
left, Social Security dodged the
Bush bullet. If the people are
vigilant, it will dodge the Peter-
son bullet, also.
Mary Gregory
HomosassB

How sad
It has come to my attention
that recently "deposed" (King)
Rick Wagoner of GM has been
contractually authorized to re-
ceive over $55,000,000 in sever-
ance, pension, etc. Count those
zeroes, folks. We're not talking
Monopoly money here.
Does something strike you as a
bit peculiar?
How sad for the peasants and
serfs of that far-reaching, finan-
cially embattled Kingdom of
General Motors; not to mention
other citizenry.
Nancy Arden Field Deutsch
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and ha/e less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


try that they're willing to actually
bless compensation that has no
bearing on performance and is
excessive and unreasonable."
Republicans resented the "on
the take" accusation - so much
so that they forced Grayson to
back down at a testy committee
meeting. And they really didn't
like it when Democratic Rep.
Barney Frank of Massachusetts, a
key proponent of the bill, de-
clared that GOP opposition was a
manifestation of"a psychological
disorder which I am not
equipped to diagnose."
In the end, the bill passed 247 to
171, on the strength of the Democ-
rats' overwhelming majority in
the House. It was a nearly party-
line vote; just 10 Republican law-
makers voted for it, and just eight
Democrats voted against it
Now Pay for Performance goes
on to the Senate, where chances
are it will suffer the same fate as
the AIG tax measure.
Just as he did with the AIG bill,
Senate Majority Leader Harry


.(








Crr~Rs COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE A


-..-...........- Letters to THE EDITOR


Successful party
The Nereids, associated
with the Crystal River
Power Squadron, hosted a
Military Card Party on
April 1 (no fooling), with re-
freshments, raffle baskets
and door prizes to raise
funds to make a donation to
a Citrus County charity.
The Chronicle was gener-
ous in their sponsorship of
this fundraiser.
The advertising was in-
strumental in increasing
the attendance at our func-
tion. Thank you, Citrus
,County Chronicle!
We also want to thank the
(participants. If we didn't
-ave you, there would not
be any fundraising.
Jennie O'Connor and
Neretta Brobst,
co-chairwomen

Common sense?
I am shocked and ap-
palled by the budget pro-
posal President Obama has
submitted to Congress. This
,is a time for our govern-
ment to set an example of
responsible monetary pol-
icy rather than the same
,borrow-and-spend policies
that have led to the eco-
nomic mess that we are in
7now. The last thing we need
now is to mortgage our fu-
ture for more giveaway
.programs to political con-
:tributors at AIG and Fannie
May and Freddie Mac.
I am so disappointed. I
-really believed that Presi-


.I


.1-E
3'


dent Obama would be dif-
ferent, but now I see that
he is not interested in com-
promise and is far more
partisan than any presi-
dent in my lifetime. Not a
single Republican voted for
this budget madness and
even some moderate level-
headed Democrats have
bravely opposed it
What happened to the
common sense that Presi-
dent Obama spoke about
during the campaign?
Terry Poupart
Crystal River

Shell game
Which shell is the
Progress Energy pea
under? Is it under pro-
posed energy increase?
No! Is it under the agreed-
on decrease? No! Is it
under the plan to pay for
the proposed new nuclear
plant? No!
I found it! It's under the
"fuel surcharge" on your
energy bill. Your energy
surcharge is more than 95
percent of your electricity
usage. Yet, oil has gone
down from more than $140
per barrel to less than $50
per barrel. But, the fuel
surcharge has not changed.
If your electric bill is, say
$200, you are paying more
than $95 for the fuel sur-
charge. This price greatly
exceeds all other items
Progress Energy has pre-
sented to us. They do not
want us to find the pea that


is hidden under the "fuel
surcharge" shell. It may
even be illegal.
Jack Brawner
Hernando

Nasty habits
The county commission-
ers should realize that
there is negligible risk in
potluck events. Allow me to
point out the real threat to
health and hygiene in our
communities. It is irrespon-
sible pet owners.
I have had arguments
with dog walkers who be-
lieve it is their right to
empty out their pets' in-
sides on my lawn. In these
supposedly enlightened
times, why is this practice
still legal? Because of dis-
ease and pollution, we hu-
mans must pay for septic
tanks or sewer systems to
dispose of our waste, yet
pet owners are permitted
to spread filth and disease
all over. Most pet owners
do not pick it up. The tons
of feces and urine from.
these pets are left to be ab-
sorbed by the aquifer. We
are drinking this stuff, we
make coffee with it, we
shower in it, children play
in it. Doesn't anyone care?
Jack Taeff
Beverly Hills

Pipe the water
We in Florida seem to be
running out of water.
There is a drought and it


$1500 Stimulus


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' - -''.": i Congress approved 1500 NC ta. credit for you.
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n.l ll' l"T li
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will get worse.
I pray for the pec
the Red River who
flooded out You wi
that the federal gov
would come up wit
to move the water
Back in the early '5
natural gas compare
the big and little ga
from Texas to Chic
Boston. They are b
to drive large truck
through. Why does
ernment not build
lines around the cc
and pipe the flood
to needed areas? V
money to fly to the
moving storm wate
needed areas will
homes from damage
duce the insurance
much-needed water
The government
make jobs, well, he
chance to do some
will get the public
them. Tax money v
to save lives and pr
Ger


Question
The recent Chro


I worked 15 years for a ra-
ople on diologist ostracized by CMH,
are being as were many other doctors
would think in the area. Many staffdoc-
vernment tors were also unhappy with
h a plan their CMH association for
around. many reasons.
50s, the Upon retiring several
nies built years ago, volunteer work in-
is lines terested me but CMH's reply
ago to was dictatorial - uniforms
ig enough at my expense, a certain
Ks number of hours weekly and
the gov- placement as a volunteer
water not necessarily of my inter-
)untry est Since then, my PPO in-
.ng water surance has been denied at
Ne spend CMH but is accepted at
moon; Ocala, Brooksville and Crys-
;rs to tal River hospitals. Why is
save that?
ge and re- Recently, my doctor's of-
Sand save fice made arrangements for
Ers. several tests on one day at
wants to Seven Rivers Regional Med-
*re's the ical Center with a minimum
thing that of waiting and the staff was
behind not only professional, but
vell spent very helpful and caring to
'operty me and my husband.
The 45-minute drive from
aid Ruble east Inverness was well
Inverness worth it and although I'm
sure CMH's staff would have
treated me professionally, I
ing question the administra-
tion's policies on these is-
nicle arti- sues.


Carolyn Mitchell
Inverness


cle of an upcoming CMH
audit caught my attention
for personal reasons.
I


Inside Sears
Crystal River Mall
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BE -ST i .., ..
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Criminality
Simply said, Bernie
Madoff only did what Wall
Street did to the entire
country and world, he just
went solo. After listening
to "Mad Money's" Jim
Cramer on the "Daily
Show," it is clear that the
people - us - haven't a
prayer against a Madison
Avenue-crafted style of
marketing lies, deceits
and irrationality. Cramer
said it himself, he's no
Eric Sevaried.
So where are the Sevar-
ieds? All we have are hy-
pers and snake oilers
empowered by the best ad-
vertising minds in the
world conspiring to whit-
tle down our objectivity
and common sense with
sales pitches.
"Greed" doesn't even
begin to cover the true mo-
tivations of these crimi-
nals. A new word needs to
be invented, one that in-
cludes arrogance, disdain
for common humanity,
egomania, absence of em-
pathy, entitlement and a
playful sense of being im-
mune to prosecution. So-
ciopathic comes to mind.

George Kaplan
Inverness


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... which position, mattress, and pillow
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... the foods that can help you and
which ones can make you worse.


Sciatica can be successfully treated. You
can recover. Healthy, pain-free living
should be yours.

Call today and we can get started with
your consultation, exam and x-rays as
soon as there's an opening in the
schedule.

Our office is called 7 Rivers
Chiropractic Center and you can find us
at 927 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River
(across from the Citrus Diagnostic
Center MRI Center).

Tell the receptionist you'd like to come
in for the Back Pain And Sciatica
Evaluation before April 30th, 2009.

I look forward to helping you get rid of
your pain so you can start living a
healthier, more joyful life.

Sincerely,
Dr. David Kreinbrook, D.C.

P.S. You've got too many dreams left
undone. Too many special moments
waiting to be experienced. Life is too
short to let pain slow you down.

Don't live another day like this. Call


... how to exercise the right way so you ' and schedule for your evaluation.
aren't making your pain worse. 352-794-3824.


Don't Let Your Sciatica Get Worse

Tim Mick, DC, an associate professor
and chair of the Department of
Radiology at Northwestern Health


OUR NO RISK POLICY: The patient
and any other person responsible for
payments has a right to refuse to pay,
cancel payment or be reimbursed for
payment for any service, examination,


Sciences University says ... or treatment which is performed as a
result of and within 72 hours of
"Untreated, sciatica can lead to a loss responding to the advertisement for the
of muscle strength and muscle size discounted service. Excludes PI, WC,
that may be irreversible. Eventually, Medicare, Medicaid or Federal
there can be problems with gait." Insurances.


TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 A9


- I~-----�X�--�llll -X-ll_-�-� -~C---
1 111~-------


OPINION


A













NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEF

An earful


Associated Press
President Barack Obama
pretends to talk into the
Easter Bunny's ear Mon-
day after his microphone
failed to work as he at-
tended the White House
Easter Egg Roll on the
South Lawn of the White
House.

Phil Spector found
guilty of murder
LOS ANGELES - Music
producer Phil Spector has
been convicted of second-de-
gree murder in the shooting
death of actress Lana Clark-



A Los
Angeles
Superior
Court jury
returned
Phil the verdict
Spector Monday
convicted for after an es-
killing actress. timated29
to 30 hours
of deliberations.
The 40-year-old Clarkson
died of a gunshot fired in her
mouth as she sat in the foyer
of Spector's mansion in
2003.

World; * L Er:;'


Pakistan leader
OKs Islamic law
ISLAMABAD - Pakistan's
pro-U.S. president signed a
regulation late Monday to put
a northwestern district under
Islamic law as part of a
peace deal with the Taliban,
goirfg along after coming
under intense pressure from
members of his own party
and other lawmakers.
AsifAli Zardari's signature
was a boon for Islamic mili-
tants who have brutalized the
Swat Valley for nearly two
years in demanding a new
justice system. It was sure to
further anger human rights
activists and feed fears
among the U.S. and other
Western allies that the valley
will turn into a sanctuary for
militants close to Afghanistan.
Whatever criticism may
come, Zardari can claim
some political cover - the
National Assembly voted
unanimously Monday to
adopt a resolution urging his
signature, although at least
one party boycotted. Earlier,
a Taliban spokesman had
wamed lawmakers against
opposing the deal.
U.N. condemns
N. Korea launch
UNITED NATIONS-A
week after North Korea's
rocket launch, the U.N. Secu-
rity Council on Monday con-
demned the action,
demanded an end to missile
tests and said it will expand
sanctions against the reclu-
sive communist nation.
The council's statement,
agreed on by all 15 members
and read at a formal meeting
of the United Nations' most
powerful body, said the
launch violated a council res-
olution adopted after the
North conducted a nuclear
test explosion in 2006 that
banned any missile tests by
the country.
The statement was a
weaker response than a U.N.
resolution, which was sought
by Japan and the United
States but was opposed by
China and Russia. U.S. Am-
bassador Susan Rice in-
sisted the statement is legally
binding, just like a resolution,
but other diplomats and offi-
cials disagreed.


Recession spurs more bankruptcies


Filings surge despite

law to curb them
Associated Press
RALEIGH, N.C. - The number of
U.S. businesses and individuals de-
claring bankruptcy is rising with a
vengeance amid the recession, de-
spite a 3-year-old federal law that
made it much tougher for Americans
to escape their debts, an Associated
Press analysis found.
"There's no end in sight," said
bankruptcy lawyer Bryan Elliott of
Hickory, N.C., who is working seven
days a week and scheduling prospec-
tive clients a month in advance. "To
be doing this well and having this
much business, it is depressing. It's
not a laugh-a-minute job."
Nearly 1.2 million debtors filed for
bankruptcy in the past 12 months, ac-
cording to federal court records col-
lected and analyzed by the AP Last
month, 130,831 sought bankruptcy
protection - an increase of 46 per-
cent over March 2008 and 81 percent
over the same month in 2007.


Bankruptcy rate grows 46 percent
An Associated Press analysis of filings in the 90 federal bankruptcy
court districts shows 130,831 debtors soughtprotection last month.
Change in bankruptcy filings, March 2008 - March 2009*
-3.5% 10 20 30 40 56%
asslma~ge~reggggg m


Bob Lawless, a professor at the
University of Illinois College of Law,
said bankruptcies could reach 1.5
million this year and level off at 1.6


million next year- around the same
time economists expect an economic
recovery to begin.
Congress voted in 2005 to make


bankruptcy more cumbersome after
years of intense lobbying from the na-
tion's lenders, who complained that
people were abusing the system. Be-
fore the move to change the law,
bankruptcies were running at what
was then an all-time high of about 1.6
million per year
The tighter requirements initially
appeared to work, with bankruptcies
plummeting from a record-shattering
2 million cases in 2005 - a total that
reflected a rush to file before the new
law took effect - to 600,000 in 2006.
But now bankruptcies are booming
again.
"You wouldn't get this large of a
rise without serious problems in the
economy," said Lynn LoPucki, a
UCLA law professor who researches
bankruptcy.
The bankruptcy rate is climbing, as
well. In the past 12 months, about
four people or businesses for every
1,000 people in the country filed for
bankruptcy, according to the AP
analysis. That is twice the rate in
2006, and close to the average of
about five for every 1,000 in the
decade leading up to the change in
the law.




Shelter


inferno


kills 21


Facility housed

many homeless

Associated Press
KAMIEN POMORSKI,
Poland - Survivors of a fire
that killed 21 people at a
three-story shelter for
homeless families in Poland
on Monday described a fast-
moving inferno that forced
some to jump from windows
into trees.
Six of the victims were
children and another 20
people were injured, most
of whom sustained broken
bones after leaping from the
building to escape the blaze
in the northwestern city of
Kamien Pomorski.
Poland's president, mean-
while, raised questions
about whether the building
met fire regulations. He sug-
gested flammable construc-
tion material may have
contributed to the fire's
speed and intensity.
Survivor accounts ap-
peared to support that
"I couldn't breathe, so I
opened the window and
looked out, and the door
was on fire because it was
essentially made of paper,"
a survivor told reporters at
the scene in footage shown
on TVN24 television.
"I put my pants on and
boots, and a friend gave me
a jacket, and there wasn't
any more time because it
was burning like a torch.
Some people jumped into
the trees," the unidentified
middle-aged man said.
The cause of the fire,
which began around 1 a.m.,
was under investigation.
The building is owned by
the county government
Police and fire investiga-
tors continued to comb
through the building's smol-
dering shell late Monday in
search of clues.
The first floor was built of
concrete and the top two
floors had a metal frame.
But officials said the walls
appeared to be made from a
highly flammable material.
Footage broadcast on
TVN24 television taken
when firefighters first ar-
rived showed the building
engulfed in flames. Later
video showed firefighters
picking through the build-
ing's blackened, gutted shell
with axes.
It was not immediately
clear what alarm systems
the building had. The build-
ing was unlikely to have had
smoke detectors, but likely


did have a sprinkler system,
national fire department
spokesman Pawel Fratczak
said.
Police said the death toll
could still rise, because 11
people are unaccounted for.


Some southern states still reeling fom earlier winds, rains
Associated Press son was killed in Atlanta after a tree yachts stored at the marina had to
fell on their car. That person's name be rescued after their vessels blev
ATLANTA - A swath of severe was not immediately released. into the river during the storm
weather moved across a storm- Many areas that were spared McBurnettsaid.
eary South on Monday, killing at from Monday's rain and hail were Some schools were closed in Ala
-asttwo, downing trees and cutting hit with high winds that blew over bama on Monday after crews wer
power to thousands of homes, trees weakened by several days of unable to get power back on for the
The storm system that hit Ala- soaking rain. buildings.
ama, Tennessee, Georgia, Ken- "The ground is so iet that the Florida emergency crews trying
cky and northern Florida brought root system is loose, so it doesn't to work on flood recovery and dam
)rrential rain, flooding, hail and take a lot to blow the trees over," age assessment Monday in the
usty winds to states still reeling said Nate Mayes, a meteorologist northern part of the state were
om strong storms and tornadoes with the National Weather Service halted by the severe weather as
st week in Peachtree City, Ga. high winds, hail and lightning
And the states braced for more High winds on the Tennessee threatened workers. Officials wer
)ugh weather expected later Mon- River in northern Alabama blew the worried about further flooding to
ay Tornado watches or warnings roof off covered boat slips at the areas damaged by a series of storms
ere in effect in several states. Guntersville Yacht Club, causing three weeks ago that caused rive
In eastern Tennessee, McMinn floating docks to pull apart and blow swelling throughout Florida's Pan
county Sheriff Steve Frisbie said 18- onto U.S. 431, said Anita McBurnett, handle.
ear-old Michael Aaron Byers Jr. emergency management director U.S. Highway 90 remained closed
as killed in'Etowah early Monday for Marshall County for a sixth day at the Suwannee
morning when a tree fell on his fam- No one was injured, but four peo- River about 65 miles east of Talla
y's home as he slept A second per- ple who live on big sailboats and hassee.


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bi
tu
to
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fr
la
re
dE


ye
w
m
il


Associated Press
VALLEY CITY, N.D. - Earthmoving equipment
and National Guard helicopters hauled sand
Monday to reinforce leaky dikes that led to evac-
uations of two parts of town threatened by the
Sheyenne River, the latest North Dakota stream
to rise above its banks.
Twice in 12 hours police had gone knocking on
doors, urging people to get out.
"It was just kind of disbelief, actually," said chi-
ropractor Jeff Brown, who lives near one dike that
had to be repaired Sunday night. He said he was
in his back yard Sunday afternoon when "my
daughter stuck her head out the window and said
'Dad, we have to evacuate."'
They were allowed to return Monday after re-
pairs to the nearby dike, but early Monday a weak
spot developed in a dike near Valley City State
University and residents of another part of town
were told to leave while crews reinforced the
dike.
Mayor Mary Lee Nielson did not know how
many people evacuated in the town of 6,875 peo-
ple.


The Sheyenne was headed for a crest at around
22 feet in the next couple of days in Valley City, 2
feet higher than the record set in' 1882, the Na-
tional Weather Service said. At that height, the
city could have to close all but one of its 11 scenic
bridges, officials said.
It's the latest threat from rivers swollen by melt-
ing snow that already have washed out roads,
damaged homes and turned farmsteads into is-
lands around North Dakota. The weather service
issued a flodd warning Sunday for large parts of
western and central North Dakota.
The Sheyenne River empties into the Red
River, expected to reach a second flood crest of its
own near Fargo this week
The Red River crested at Fargo and neighbor-
ing Moorhead, Minn., late last month just short of
41 feet, after volunteers filled thousands of sand-
bags to raise levees above that mark The Red's
River's second crest at Fargo is projected to reach
around 38 feet or 39 feet, slightly lower than ear-
lier forecasts.
In the meantime, Fargo is sending some of its
sandbags to Valley City, about 60 miles away, and
to the Sheyenne River town of Lisbon.


-From wire reports


o
w
I,
a-
e
e

g
l-
e
.e
s
g


r
1-


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2 die in severe storms


, ...

., - .- -.. .
: � ., .. ..



Associated Press
A felled tree lies on a car Monday after killing the occupant on Nacoochee Drive in Atlanta. A swath of severe
weather moved across a storm-weary South on Monday, killing at least two, downing trees and cutting power
to thousands of homes.


Guard helps another town battle rising river
/















PORTS


* NASCAR contest/B2
* MLB/B3
* TV, lottery/B4
* NBA, scoreboard/B4
* Sports briefs/B4
* The Game/B5
* Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Phillies broadcaster Kalas dead at 73


Voice ofthe Philadelphia P1

found unconscious before gi


Associated Press


WASHINGTON - Radio
and TV broadcaster Harry
Kalas, whose baritone deliv-
ery and signature "Outta
here!" home run calls pro-
vided the soundtrack to
Philadelphia baseball for
nearly four decades, died
Monday after collapsing in
the broadcast booth before
the Phillies' game against
the Washington Nationals.
He was 73.
"We lost our voice today,"
Phillies president' David
Montgomery said. "He has
loved our game and made
just a tremendous contribu-
tion to our sport and cer-
tainly to our organization."

Long-time Phillies broadcaster
Harry Kalas, pictured throwing
out the first pitch on April 8,
passed away Monday after col-
lapsing in the broadcast booth
prior to Philadelphia's game at
Washington. He was 73.
Associated Press


Familiar to mil
sports fans outside I
phia for his voiceoN
with NFL Films, "H
K" was
beloved at
home. Since
1971, he was
the man who 0
was the
bearer of
news - good
and bad - to Df
those who Phil
followed the
losingest
franchise in major
sional sports.
"Players come
Phillies radio broz
Scott Franzke sa
'Outta here!' -
forever."
When the Phill
their second Worl
title last fall, Kalas
normally called c
middle three inn
radio - was in the t
the last out of the (
He then joined the


"lles celebration, grabbing a mi-
HIUW'S crophone to sing Frank
Sinatra's "High Hopes."
rume That song was among sev-
eral Kalas standbys that en-
lions of deared him to Phillies
Philadel- supporters. Another: He
ver work would call homers off the bat
arry the of a certain Hall of Fame
third base-
Sman by noting
We lost the player's
full name -
)ur voice "MichaelJack
today. Schmidt."
T h e
Phillies had
avid Montgomery been sched-
Ilies president said following
the death of Harry Kalas. uled tomeet
President
Barack
r profes- Obama at the White House on
Tuesday, a day off, to be hon-
and go," ored as World Series champi-
adcaster ons, but the event was
id, "but postponed. A new date has
that's not been set, Obama
spokesman Josh Earnest said.
ies won Kalas didn't get to call the
d Series final out of Philadelphia's
s - who other title, in 1980, because
only the Major League Baseball pre-
lings on vented local broadcasts of


booth for
clincher.
on-field


See KALAS/Page B4


Mark "the Bird"
Fidrych dies at 54
BOSTON - Mark"the
Bird" Fidrych, the fun-lov-
ing pitcher who baffled hit-
ters for one All-Star
season and entertained
fans with his antics, was
found dead Monday in an
apparent accident at his
farm. He was 54.
Worcester County dis-
trict attorney Joseph D.
Early Jr. said a family
friend found Fidrych about
2:30 p.m. Monday beneath
a dump truck at his North-
borough, Mass., farm
about 35 miles west of
Boston. He appeared to
have been working on the
truck, Early said.
The curly-haired right-
hander was the American
League Rookie of the Year
in 1976 when he went 19-
9 with a 2.34 ERA and 24
complete games. But in-
juries cut short his career,
and he ended up spending
only five seasons in the
See FIDRYCH/Page B4


U


First day ofDistrict2A-5 tennis tournamentproduces no surprises


JOHN COSCIP
jcoscia@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Plenty of great shots a ndTew
surprises.
That might best summarize
the opening day 6fthe Class 2;A-
District 5 tournament that
kicked off at Crystal River High
School on Monday morn i ng.
The Citrus Lady Hurricanes.
queens of the hard court the
past two years, took a big step
towards repeating as district
champions by winning all fi\e
of their second-round singles
matches. On the boys side. hio\ -
ever, things are very much still
up in the air as Lecanto and
Citrus each pulled off tlhe
sweep, winning every singles
and doubles match in setting
up an all Citrus-Lecanto final
during today's finals.
The Lady 'Canes were domi-
nant, earning 10 points on the
day, as Ashton Connor. Sarah
Labrador, Stephanie Dodd and
Kaylee Larkin all won their re-
spective matches in straight sets
without dropping a single ea me.
In the only other singles
match for the Lady 'Canes, the
team's number one player Li nd -
sey Spafford avenged a late reg-
ular-season loss to Akslhura
Patel with a 6-2, 6-2, victor The
win sets up a much anticipated
rematch with Crystal River's
Kristin Tringali, who easil dis-
posed of Dunnellon's Al.ssia
Winston, 6-0, 6-0, in a match that
lasted only 53 minutes.
With an automatic state p)la -
off berth on the line, hou e% e:r
this morning's championship
match between Tringall a nd
Spafford figures to be much
longer. The district's two top fe-
male players have played two
marathon matches already this
year. In their first meeting Spaf-
ford won a three-hour plus
three-set thriller. But it was
Tringali that got the equalizer
in another three-set epic that
lasted nearly four hours.
"The challenges we faced the
last two weeks (including Spaf-
ford's losses to Tringali and
Patel) were the best thing that
could have happened to us as a
team," Citrus head coach
Michelle Connor explained.
"We're refocused and reener-
gized and have put any linger-
ing complacency in check.
Today we buckled down and
came away with the 10 points
we needed.
"(Tuesday) is a big day There's
a lot on the line," Connor contin-
ued. "I expect an all-out battle.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Citrus senior Lindsey Spafford returns a volley Monday from Lecanto's Akshura Patel during the
pair's No. I singles match in the District 2A-5 tennis tournament at Crystal River High School.
Lecanto senior Erik Ruben executes a ground stroke against West Port in a No. 4 boys singles match.
It should be fun to watch."
The only team with a chance
to dethrone Citrus is county
rival Crystal River Lady Pi-
rates, who also enter today's
final day with 10 points. They,
however, only have four girls in .. ..
singles match finals to the Lady
'Canes' five, which means
they'll have to win as many of
those matches as possible. . . .
"It's going to be interesting to . .
see how things play themselves , , ." .
out," said district tournament
director and Crystal River head .. '...,
coach Robin Wise. "Our girls
have fought hard all year and
now we've got a chance. You
See- 'I .PageB4


Bucs


ink QB


Tampa Bay

sign Leftwich

Associated Press
TAMPA - Byron Leftwich
is leaving behind his backup
role on a championship team
with hopes of starting in
Tampa Bay. *
The Buccaneers signed the
free-agent quarterback to a
two-year deal Monday.
Leftwich, heading into his
seventh NFL season, was a
backup for Ben Roethlis-
berger with the Steelers last
year and threw for two touch-
downs and a 104.3 rating in a
limited role. He'll get $7.5 mil-
lion over two years for the
Bucs, who also re-signed one
of their reserve quarterbacks,
Luke McCown, to a three-year
deal earlier this year.
Leftwich spent four seasons
as the starter in Jacksonville,
which selected him in the first
round (seventh overall) in the
2003 draft out of Marshall.


Rays open


at home


in style


Tampa Bay

bombs Yanks

Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG - The
Tampa Bay Rays raised the
first division and league
championship banners in
franchise history, then went
out and played like a team ca-
pable of getting back to the
postseason.
Carlos Pena hit a second-in-
ning grand slam and drove in
six runs Monday night, help-
ing Scott Kazmir beat Chien-
Ming Wang and the New York
, Yankees 15-5 in the home
opener for the AL champions.
It got so bad for the Yankees
that first baseman Nick
Swisher pitched a scoreless
eighth inning, the first New
York position player to take
the mound since Wade Boggs
used his knuckleball in 1997.
The Rays celebrated last
year's improbable worst-to-
first turnaround by hanging
two large blue and white ban-
ners above the left field
stands during a festive
pregame ceremony at soldout
Tropicana Field.
They spent the rest of the
night pleasing the crowd of
See RAYS/Page B3










m EARN $25 IN THE CHRONICLE'S NASCAR CONTEST


B2 TUESDAY. APRIL 14, 2009


r- -----------------


= NASCAR STAN DINGS
Sprint Cup leaders 8 Jeff Burton, $1,274,588
9. Carl Edwards, $1,267,563
Through April 5 10. Tony Stewart, $1,207,407
Points 11. Kasey Kahne, $1,182,582
1. Jeff Gordon, 1,J54. 12. Greg Biffle, $1,173,413 .
2. Jimmie Johnson, 992. 13. David Reutimann, $1,150,132
3. Kurt Busch, 974. 14. Joey Logano, $1,138,378
4. Clint Bowyer, 967. 15. Juan Pablo Montoya, $1,133,557
5. "Tny Stewart, 963. 16. Kurt Busch, $1,121,363
6. Denny Hamlin, 938. 17. Reed Sorenson, $1,117,103
7. Kyle Busch,914. 18. Brian Vickers, $1,113,457
8. Carl Edwards, 889. 19. Elliott Sadler, $1,107,238
9. Matt Kenseth, 864. 20. David Stremme, $1,098,376
10. Kasey Kahne, 851.
11. David Reutimann, 845. Nationwide leaders
12. Jeff Burton, 835. Through April 11
13. Juan Pablo Montoya, 819. 1.Carl Edwards, 959.
14. Kevin Harvick, 796. 2. Kyle Busch, 936.
15. Greg Biffle, 775. 3. David Ragan, 799.
16. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 768. 4. Jason Leffler, 762.
17. Ryan Newman, 743. 5. Brad Keselowski, 733.
18. Mark Martin, 742.6. Joey Logano, 728.
19. Brian Vickers, 737. 7. Justin Allgaier, 676.
20. AJ Allmendinger, 731. 7. Brendan Gaughan, 676.
Money 9. Scott Lagasse Jr., 672.
1. Matt Kenseth, $2,645,930 10. Jason Keller, 667.
2. Kevin Harvick, $2,102,547 11. Mike Bliss, 651.
3. Jeff Gordon, $1,829,639 12: Steve Wallace, 649.
4. Kyle Busch, $1,697,993 13. Michael McDowell, 631.
5. Jimmie Johnson, $1,562,728 14. Kenny Wallace, 628.
6. Clint Bowyer, $1,364,363 15. Michael Annett, 589.
7. AJ.Allmendinger, $1,352,663 16. Kevin Harvick, 576.


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I.---------------------------------

CONTEST RULES
E Pick the winner ofthis Saturday's
Subway Fresh Fit 500 at Phoenix Inter-
national Raceway. The correct entrant
will win $25. In the event that more
than one contestant picks the same
driver, the tie will be broken by guess-
ing the average speed of the race.
* The closest contestant to the actual
average speed, over or under, will be
declared the winner If there is no win-
ner one week the $25 prize will carry
over to the following week making.that
week's race contest worth $50.
* You may enter as many times as
you like but every, entry form MUST
be an original entry form from the
Citrus County Chronicle. No copies
will be permitted.
* Please include your name, address
and telephone number on the printed
entry form. DON'T FORGET TO SUP-
PLY YOUR TIEBREAKER SPEED.
* You may drop off or mail entries to our
Meadowcrest office at 1624 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd, Crystal River FL, 34429. All
entrees MUST be in the office no later
than 5 p.m. on Friday, April 17.


SAYS



TO LAWN DAMAGING CHINCH
BUGS & MOLE CRICKETS!
Service for Annual Lawn Program
* Service inspections consisting of every month.
* Minimum of 6 insect sprays per year.
* 3 fertilizers per year consisting of
environmentally sound slow release fertilizer.
* Weed Control.
* Fungicide Application included.
* Shrub Programs Available.
* Free follow-ups anytime during the year.
GUARANTEED TO BEAT OUR COMPETITOR'S PRICES


(352) 563-6698
1-866-860-BUGS (2847)


* Best of the Best 7 years
* Established & Trusted Since 1998
406 NE 1st Street, Crystal River, PL
www.citruspest.com
Email: info@citruspest.com


Mr. Fred Miley poses with his $25 check from the Citrus County Chronicle
for correctly predicting Jeff Gordon as the winner of the Samsung 500 on
April 5. Miley won a tiebreaker by guessing 146 mph for the average speed.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NASCAR










() TEllS COIJNIT (FL) ChRONICLE MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 B3


Toronto
Baltimore
Tampa Bay
NewYork
A L Boston


NL


Atlanta
Florida
Philadelphia
New York
Washington


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Detroit 6, Texas 4
Cleveland 8, Toronto 4
Tampa Bay 11, Baltimore 3
Chicago White Sox 6, Minnesota 1
Kansas City 6, N.Y. Yankees 4
LA. Angels 5, Boston 4
Seattle 1, Oakland 0
Monday's Games
Chicago White Sox 10, Detroit 6
Tampa Bay 15, N.Y.Yankees 5
Baltimore at Texas, late
Toronto at Minnesota, late
Cleveland at Kansas City, late
Boston at Oakland, late
Today's Games
Chicago White Sox (Danks 0-0) at Detroit (Por-
cello 0-1), 1:05 p.m.
LA. Angels (Loux 0-0) at Seattle (C.Silva 0-1),
6:40 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (A.Burnett 1-0) at Tampa Bay
(Garza 1-0), 7:08 p.m.
Baltimore (Simon 0-1) at Texas (McCarthy 1-0),
8:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Pavano 0-1) at Kansas City (Davies
0-0), 8:10 p.m.
Toronto (Romero 1-0) at Minnesota (Perkins 0-
1), 8:10 p.m.
Boston (Matsuzaka 0-1) at Oakland (Eveland 0-
0), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Boston at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
N.Y Yankees at Tampa Bay, 4:08 p.m.
Baltimore at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Toronto at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Cincinnati 2, Pittsburgh 0
Florida 2, N.Y. Mets 1
Atlanta 8, Washington 5
St. Louis 3, Houston 0
Philadelphia 7, Colorado 5
San Diego 6, San Francisco 1
L.A. Dodgers 3, Arizona 1
Chicago Cubs 8, Milwaukee 5
Monday's Games
Pittsburgh 7, Houston 0
Chicago Cubs 4, Colorado 0
Philadelphia 9, Washington 8
L.A. Dodgers 11, San Francisco 1
San Diego 6, N.Y. Mets 5
Cincinnati at Milwaukee, late
St. Louis at Arizona, late
Today's Games
Florida (Volstad 1-0) at Atlanta (J.Vazquez 0-0),
7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 1-0) at Milwaukee (Parra 0-
1), 8:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Carpenter 1-0) at Arizona (Scherzer
0-0), 9:40 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Colorado at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 3:40 p.m.
Houston at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
San Diego at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Florida at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 8:05 p.m.
San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.


Associated Press
Chicago White Sox's Paul Konerkb rounds the bases after
hitting a home run against the Detroit Tigers in the second
inning Monday in Detroit.
White Sox 10, Tigers 6 , hits, including three homers, in 31-3


DETROIT - Jermaine Dye and Paul
Konerko reached 300 career homers
with consecutive drives in the second in-
ning and the Chicago White Sox beat
the Detroit Tigers 10-6 on Monday.
Carlos Quentin went 4-for-4 with
t(o homers and four RBIs for the
White Soy, who earned their third
straight win. Dye went 3-for-5, and
Konerko finished with four hits and
three RBIs.
Dye and Konerko became the first
teammates to hi century milestone
home runs of at least 300 in the same
game, according to Elias Sports Bureau.
Ramon Santiago hit a three-run
homer and Josh Anderson had three
RBIs for Detroit, which had won three
straight. Santiago finished with three hits.
Dye hit a 2-1 pitch from Zach Miner
(1-1) over the wall in left-center leading
off the second Konerko went deep on a
full-count offering to make ft2-O.lf was
the second homer of theyear for both.
The White Sox added four more in
the third. Quentin singled in a run, Kon-
erko doubled in a pair and Alexei
Ramirez's RBI single made it 6-1.
Miner allowed eight runs and nine


innings.
Gavin Floyd (1-1) lasted five innings
to get'the win.
Chicago Detroit
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Lillirdg2b 6 11 0 Gmdrscf 5 0-0 0
Fields3b 5 2 1 0 Polanc2b 4 0 1 0
Quentin If 5 33 4 Ordonzrf 2 2 1 0
.Thomedh 4 01 0 MiCarrlb 5 01 0
Dyerf 5 231 CGuillndh 3 31 0
Konerklb 5 24 4 Santiagss 5 1 3 3
Przynsc 4 01 0 Inge3b 3 00 0
AIRmrzss 5 0 1 1 JAndrslf 5 02 3
Wisecf ' 3 0 1 0 Treanrc 3 00 0
BrAndrct , 0 00 0 Larishph 1 00 0
Totals 42101610 Totals 36 6 9 6
Chicago 024 202 000-10
Detroit 013 020 000-6
DP-Detroit 1. LOB-Chicago 11, Detroit 12.
2B-Lillibridge (1), Dye (1), Konerko 2 (3), JAn-
derson (1). 3B-Polanco (1). HR-Quentin 2
(4), Dye (2), Konerko (2), Santiago (1). SB-
Bri.Anderson 2 (2).
IP H RERBB SO
Chicago
Floyd W,1-1 5 5 6 6 7 2
Carrasco '2 2 0 0 1 1
Thornton 1 1 0 0 1 2
Linebrink 1. 1 0 0 0 2
Detroit
Miner L,1-1 31-3 9 8 '8 3 1
Bonine 22-3 5 2 2 1 4
Rincon 3 2 0 0 -2 5
WP-Floyd.
Umpires-Home, Phil Cuzzi; First, Ed Hickox;
Second, Jerry Crawford; Third, Tom Hallion.
T-3:20. A-21,850 (41,255).


Baseball Today
SCOREBOARD
Tuesday, April 14
Florida at Atlanta (7:10 p.m. EDT).The Mar-
lins and Braves both are off to 5-1 starts.
Florida's Chris Volstad is slated to face Javier
Vazquez in the opener of the three-game se-
ries.
SSTARS
Sunday
-Aaron Harang, Reds, pitched a three-hitter
for his sixth career shutout, striking out nine
without issuing a walk, in leading Cincinnati to
a 2-0 win over Pittsburgh.
-Evan Longoria, Rays, went 3-for-5 with a
double and his fifth home run of the season in
Tampa Bay's 11-3 rout of Baltimore.
-Josh Johnson, Marlins, tossed a five-hitter,
giving up one walk while striking out seven, in
Florida's 2-1 victory over the New York Mets.
-John Buck, Royals, homered and finished
with three hits and three RBIs as Kansas City
rallied for a 6-4 victory over the New York Yan-
kees.
--Kyle Lohse, Cardinals, pitched a three-hit-
ter with four strikeouts and no walks in St. Louis'
3-0 victory over Houston.
-Erik Bedard, Mariners, went 81-3 innings
and allowed only three hits and a walk in Seat-
tle's 1-0 win over Oakland. Bedard struck out
seven and didn't allow a runner past second.
-Jim Thome, White Sox, hit a two-run homer
to help Chicago beat Minnesota 6-1.
-Vladimir Guerrero, Angels,. hit his first
home run of the season to lead Los Angeles to
a 5-4 victory over Boston.
-Nick Hundley, Padres, went 4-for-4 with an
RBI, finishing a home run shy of the cycle in a
San Diego's 6-1 victory over San Francisco.
BEEN A WHILE
Pittsburgh pulled off its first triple play in 16
years in the eighth inning of a 2-0 loss at Cincin,
nati. With Brandon Phillips on second base and
Jay Bruce on first, Edwin Encarnacion hit a
blooper into short left field that was easily
caught by shortstop Jack Wilson. Phillips was
out when Wilson threw to Freddy Sanchez at
second. Sanchez then threw to first to complete
the Pirates' first triple play since Aug. 10, 1993,.
at St. Louis. It was the first time the Reds had hit
into a triple play since April 21, 2007, against
Philadelphia.
NICE CATCH
Reed Johnson leaped to rob Prince Fielder
of a grand slam in the fifth inning of the Chicago
Cubs' 8-5 win over Milwaukee on Sunday night.
Johnson, who entered to replace injured Milton
Bradley in right field, timed a perfect jump to put
his glove on the deep fly, and Fielder tipped his
helmet to Johnson as he walked back to the
dugout.
ON THE BOARD
Anthony Reyes pitched six innings and the
Cleveland Indians beat the Toronto Blue Jays 8-
4 to earn their first victory of the season. Travis
Hafner and Mark DeRosa each hit a two-run
homer and Trevor Crowe doubled in two runs
for the Indians, who avoided their worst start in
95 y.-'j. Cleieland lost iti first s.i garrmes ;n
191e .Rl-. iV-p.t oP r ,pns ana tree rri
CY UGH
Tim Lincecum had another rough outing, al-
lowing four runs and a career-high 10 hits over
5 1-3 innings in the San Francisco Giants' 6-1
loss to the San Diego Padres on Sunday. The
reigning NL CyYoung Award winner tied his ca-
reer low by lasting just three innings in last Mon-
day's season-opening 10-6 win over Milwaukee.


RAYS
Continued from Page Bl


Bay's games and has five
homers and 12 RBIs.
In two starts since foot
surgery, Wang has allowed
15 runs on 15 hits in 4 2-3 in-


36,973 by beating up on a di- nings. He failed to get
vision rival that shelled out through the fourth inning of
more than $400 million in a loss at Baltimore last,
offseason acquisitions with week, and his earned run
hopes of regaining su- average ballooned from
premacy in the AL East. 17.18 to 28.93 after Monday
Kazmir (2-0) allowed three night
runs and six hits in 6 2-3 in- Tampa Bay got a boost
nings, including Swisher's from the return of B.J.
solo homer in the fourth and Upton, who missed the
Melky Cabrera's RBI single opening week of the season
in the fifth. The left-hander to rehab his surgically re-
struck out six and walked paired left shoulder. He was
none. 1-for-3 with two walks and
Earlier in the day, New two stolen bases, and the 24-
York's Alex Rodriguez re- year-old made a crowd-
sumed drills on a baseball pleasing, over-the-head
field five weeks after hip catch of Xavier Nady's drive
surgery and -said following to the center field wall in the
the workout in Tampa that second inning.
he eventually hopes to re- Upton also looked com-
turn as "good as new." fortable in his new role as a
The Yankees could use leadoff hitter, drawing a
some help with Derek Jeter walk in the first inning be-
- 1-for-his-last-20 - strug- fore stealing second base
gling and Cody Ransom and taking third as part of a
going 2-for-24 with two RBIs double steal with Carl
as A-Rod's replacement at Crawford.
third base. Rays 15, Yankees 5
Swisher may have been NewYork Tampa Bay
New York's most effective ab rhbi ab r hbi
pitcher. After giving up a Jeterss 300 0 Uptoncf 3 2 1 0
walk and Tampa Bay's 17th R.Pena ss 0 0 0 0 Crwfrd If 2 20 0
hit, he struck out Gabe Damon f 3 0 0 0 WAyar ph 2 0 1 0
and got Pena and PatGardnrcf 1 1 0 0 Longori3b 3 1 1 2
Kapler andgotPena an Pat Swisherlb-p3 2 1 1 Kapler If 2 00 0
Burrell to fly out. Posadac-1b4 02 2 C.Penalb 6 2 3 6
Pena had a two-run dou- Nadyrf 4 1 1 0 Burrelldh 5 32 2
ble in the first offWang, who Cano2b -4 11 0 Navarrc 5 1 2 0
continued to struggle in his HMatsudh 3 0 0 0 Gross 412 1
JMolinc 1 01 0 Iwamr2b 4 1 2 3
comeback from foot surgery Ransm 3b 4 0 1 1 Bartlett ss 4 2 3 1
that sidelined him for more MeCarr cf-lf 4 0 2 1 Zobrist ph 1 0 0 0
than three months last sea- Totals 34 5 9 5 Totals 41151715
son. The slugger drove in NewYork 000 110 120-5
Tampa Bay 451 011 30x-15
three f the eight run E-Cano (1). DP-Tampa Bay 2. LOB-New
charged to Wang in one-plus York 4, Tampa Bay 11. 2B-Posada (4), Nady
i ini rigs with the sixth grand (4), C.Pena 2 (2), Burrell (2), Iwamura (4). HR-
slam of his career off re- Swisher (3), C.Pena (3), Burrell (1), Bartlett (2).
liever Jonathan ,Abaladejo. SB-Upton 2 (2), Crawford (2) Bartlett (2).,
Burrell and Jason Bartlett NewYork
also homered for the Rays, Wang L,0-2 1 6 8 8 3 1
who got two more RBIs from Albaladejo 3 5 3 3 1. 2
hot-hitting Evan'Longoria, E.Ramirez 2 4 1 1 1 3
wJho drew a bases-loaded Coe 1 1 3 0 .-
a-S .e ,.r1 0 0
wiaik Cromin Wang in the sec- TsmpaBay - 1 1
ond and added a run-scor- KazmirW,2-0 62-3 6 3 3 0 6
ing single off Albaladejo in Cormier 11-3 2 2 2 2 0
the fifth. House 1 1 0 0 0 0
Longoria, the 2008 AL HBP-byWang,(Crawford).WP--Kazmir.
oo tUe , mpires--Hom,Tony Randazzo; First Chrisuc-
rookie of the year, has hit ciope; Second, Ed Montague;Third, Jerry Layne.
safely in all seven of Tampa T-3:29. A-36,973 (36,973).


Padres 6, Mets 5
NEW YORK -Their new home
was gorgeous. The Mets looked lost.
Jody Gerut christened Citi Field with
a leadoff homer, Adrian Gonzalez also
connected and the San Diego Padres
spoiled New York's first regular-season
game in its glittering new ballpark with
a 6-5 victory Monday night.
Pedro Feliciano balked in the go-
ahead run and the Mets made several
key mistakes, opening-Citi Field the
same way they closed Shea Stadium:
with a dud.
David Wright rallied New York from
an early four-run hole with a tying
homer, but it wasn't enough. Padres re-
lievers Duaner Sanchez and Heath
Bell, both former Mets, closed out the
fifth straight win for surprising San
Diego (6-2), expected to be one of
baseball's worst teams this year.
Gerut's shot off Mike Pelfrey marked
the first time in history that the first bat-
ter homered in a regular-season
opener at a major league ballpark, ac-
cording to the Elias Sports Bureau.
San Diego NewYork
ab rhbi ab rh bi
Gerutcf 4 22 1 JReyesss 4 1 1 0
Eckstn2b 4 1 3 2 DnMrplf 4 1 1 1
Gilesrf 5 01 1 DWrght3b 4 12 3
AdGnzllb 5 1 1 1 Delgadlb 4 00 0
HeadlyIf 3 00 0 Beltrancf 4 01 0
Kzmnff3b 5 01 0 Churchrf 3 00 0
Hundlyc 4 00 0 Schndrc 3 1 0 0
LRdrgzss 3 1 0 0 Castillo2b 3 0 1 1
W.Silvap 2 1 1 0 Pelfreyp 1 00 0
Mujicap 0 00 0 Sheffildph 1 1 0 0
EGnzlzph 1 00 0 Stokesp 0 00 0
Morenop 0 00 0 Felicinp 0 00 0
ECarerph 1 00 0 Reedph 1 01 0
DSnchzp 0 00 0 SGreenp 0 00 0
Bellp 0 00 0 Putzp 0 00 0
FRdrgzp 0 0 0 0
Tatis ph 1 00 0
Totals 37 69 5 Totals 33 57 5
San Diego 130 011 000-6
NewYork 010 040 000-5
E-Church 2 (2). LOB-San DiBgo 9, NewYork
5. 2B-Gerut (3), Eckstein 2 (4), D.Wright (2),
Castillo (2). HR-Gerut (1), Ad.Gonzalez (2),
D.Wright (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
San Diego
W.Silva 42-3 5 5 5 3 2
MujicaW,1-1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Moreno H,2 2 2 0 0 1 2
D.SanchezH,3 1 0 0 0 0 0
BellS,4-4 . 1 0 0 0 0 0
NewYork
Pelfrey 5 8 5 5 2 3
Stokes L,0-1 1-3 0 1 0 0 0
Feliciano 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
S.Green 1 0 0 0 1 1
Putz 1 0 0 0 2 0
FRodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 1
WP-Putz. Balk-Feliciano.
Umpires-Home, Bruce Dreckman; First, Paul
Emmel; Second, Gary Darling; Third, Bill Hohn.
T-3:fl. A-41,007 (41,800).


Dodgers 11, Giants 1
LOS ANGELES - Orlando Hudson
hit for the cycle, Andre Ethier drove in
four runs with a pair of homers and the
Los Angeles Dodgers beat Randy John-
son and the San Francisco Giants 11-1
to win their home opener on Monday.
Johnson lost at Dodger Stadium for
the first time in his 22-year career,
falling to 7-1 in just his second start in
Los Angelessince 2004. He was de-
nied his 296th career victory, although
the 45-year-old left-hander earned his
4,800th strikeout in the third inning
against James Loney.
Hudson completed the majors'first
cycle this season with a sixth-inning triple
off Brandon Medders. He slid into base
ahead of a throw by right fielder Randy
Winn, got up and pointed to the sky.
Hudson singled in the first, homered
in the third and doubled in the fourth -
all off Johnson - and became the first
Dodger since Wes Parker on May 7,
1970, and the ninth in franchise history
to complete the cycle.
Hudson is the first Dodger to do it at
Dodger Stadium; Parker accomplished
the feat at New York's Shea Stadium.
Chad Billingsley (2-0) allowed one
run and five hits in seven innings. The
right-hander struck out 11.
San Francisco Los Angeles
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Winnrf 4 0 1 0 Furcalss 5 1 1 2
Hinshwp 0 00 0 Mntkwlb 0 00 0
Renteriss 4 00 0 Hudson2b 5 3 4 2
FLewisIf 4 0 1 0 MRmrzIf 2 1 1 0
BMolinc 4 1 1 0 Ohmanp 0 00 0
Sandovl3b 3 00 0 Lorettaph 1 1 1 0
Ishikawlb 3 0 1 1 Loneylb 4 01 1
Rowndcf 3 0 1 0 Castross 0 00 0
Burriss2b 2 00 0 Martinc 5'1 2 2
Meddrsp 0 00 0 Ethierrf 4 22 4
JMillerp 0 00 0 Kempcf 4 1 1 0
Uribeph-2b 1 0 1 0 Blake3b 5 1 1 0
RJhnsn p 1 00 0 Motap 0 00 0
Valdezp 0 00 0 Blngslyp 2 0 1 0
Velez ph-2b-rf 2 0 0 0 Pierre ph-lf 1 0 0 0
Totals 31 1 6 1 Totals 38111511
Sah Francisco 000 100 000-1
Los Angeles 001 601 03x-11
DP-Los Angeles 2. LOB-San Francisco 3,
Los Angeles 9. 2B-B.Molina (3), Hudson (2),
M.Ramirez (3). 3B-Hudson (2). HR-Hudson
(2), Ethier 2 (2). S-Billingsley.
IP H RERBB SO
San Francisco
Ra.Johnson L,0-2 32-3 8 7 7 3 5
Valdez 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Medders 2 3 1 1 2 1
J.Miller 1 0 0 0 0 1
Hinshaw 1 3 3 3 0 1
Los Angeles
BillingsleyW,2-0 7 5 1 1 0 11
Ohman 1 1 0 0 0 0
Mota 1 0 0 0 0 0
Umpires-Home, Joe West; First, Ed Rapuano;
Second, Paul Schrieber; Third, Angel Campos.
T-3:01. A-57,099 (56,000).


Pirates 7, Astros 0
PITTSBURGH -Zach Duke lim-
ited the struggling Astros to four hits in
his third career shutout and Adam
LaRoche homered during a five-run
third inning, helping the Pittsburgh Pi-
rates extend Houston's losing streak to
five games with a 7-0 victory Monday.
Freddy Sanchez had three dou-
bles, two of them starting run-scoring
innings, and the normally slow-start-
ing LaRoche had three hits as the Pi-
rates won their home opener for the
first time since 2004.
Duke (2-0), coming off a 5-14 sea-
son, followed up a 7-4 win at St. Louis
on Wednesday in which he gave up
one earned run in 61-3 innings by
pitching even better, striking out five
and walking two while throwing 120
pitches. Duke's shutout was the first by
a Pirates pitcher in a home opener
since John Candelaria beat the Cubs
1-0 on April 7, 1978.
The Astros were shut out for the
second day in a row - they lost 3-0
Sunday in St. Louis to complete a
three-game Cardinals sweep - and
are 1-6 for the first time since 1984.


Houston


Pittsburgh


ab rhbi ab r hbi
KMatsu2b 3 00 0 Morgan If 5 01 2
Blum3b 1 00 0 FSnchz2b 5 23 0
Tejadass 4 02 0 McLothct 4 1 1 1
Brkmnlb 4 00 0 Doumitc 5 1 2 2
Ca.Leelf 4 00 0 AdLRclb 4 1 3 2
Pence rf 3 000 Mossrf 5 01 0
Michalscf 4 01 0 RVazqz3b 3 1 1 0
Kppngr3b 2 0 1 0 JWilsonss 3 1 1 0
Quinterc 3 000 0 Dukep '2 0 1 0
Moehlrp 1 0 0 0
Byrdakp 0 0 0 0
R.Ortizp 0 0 0 0
JaSmthph 1 0 0 0
Sampsnp 0 0 0 0
Wrght p 0 0 0 0
IRdrgzph 1 0 0 0
Geary p 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 0 4 0 Totals 36 714 7
Houston 000 000 000-0
Pittsburgh 105 000 01x--7
LOB-Houston 6, Pittsburgh 11. 2B-Tejada
(1), Keppinger (1), F.Sanchez 3 (6),
Ad.LaRoche (1), Duke (2). HR-Doumit (2),
Ad.LaRoche (2). S-Duke.
IP H RERBB SO
Houston
MoehlerL,0-2 21-3 7 5 5 1 0
Byrdak 2-3 1 1 1 2 0
R.Ortiz 1 1 0 0 0 1
Sampson 2 2 0 0 1 0
W.Wright 1 1 0 0 1 1
Geary 1 2 1 1 0 0
Pittsburgh
DukeW,2-0 9 4 0 0 2 5
Umpires-Home, Mike Winters; First, James
Hoye; Second, Randy Marsh; Third, Brian
Knight.
T-2:41. A-38,411 (38,362).


Cubs 4, Rockies 0
CHICAGO--Ted Lilly held Col-
orado hitless for 6 2-3 innings on a raw
day at Wrigley Field and the Chicago
Cubs won their home opener Monday
by holding the Rockies to one hit in a
4-0 victory.
Garrett Atkins grounded a clean
single between short and third on a
1-0 pitch with two outs in the top of
the seventh to end Lilly's no-hit bid.
After Seth Smith followed the single
with a walk, Chicago manager Lou
Piniella removed Lilly. The left-hander
left to a rousing ovation from a bun-
died-up crowd. Attendance was an-
nounced at 40,077.
Lilly (2-0) allowed just two walks
and the single, while striking out eight.
He also walked Chris lannetta in the
third. Relievers Angel Guzman, Aaron
Heilman and Kevin Gregg completed
the one-hit shutout.
On a wet and blustery day with the
game-time temperature at 36 degrees
and the wind blowing in at 10 mph, Lilly
shut down the Rockies with an efficient
assortment of pitches. The start of the
game was delayed one hour, 12min-


utes by rain.
Colorado
ab rhbi
Fowlercf 4 00 0
Splrghs If-rf 4 0 0 0
Heltonlb 3 00 0
Atkins3b 4 01 0
Hawperf 2 00 0
S.SmithIf 1 0 0 0
Tlwtzkss 3 0 0 0
JeBakr2b 3 00 0
lannettc 1 0 0 0
Jimenzp 0 00 0
Ruschp 0 0 0 0
Barmesph 1 00 0
Belisle p 0 0 0 0
Stewartph 1 0 0 0
RSpeirp 0 0 0 0
Totals 27 0 1 0


Chicago
ab r h bl
ASorinIf 4 12 0
Thetotss 4 1 0 0
Fukdmrf 2 01 1
D.Leelb 3 1 2 1
Fontent 3b 4 0 0 0
RJhnsncf 3 01 0
Miles2b 4 0 1 0
K.Hillc 3 1 2 1
Lilly p 1 0 0 0
AGzmnp 1 00 0
Heilmnp 0 00 0
Gregg p 0 0 0 0


29 4 9 3


Colorado 000 000 000--0
Chicago 010 200 01x-4
E-Je.Baker (1). LOB-Colorado 5, Chicago
13. 2B-D.Lee (2). CS-A.Soriano (1). S-
Jimenez, Theriot, Lilly.
IP H RERBB SO
Colorado
JimenezL,1-1 32-3 4 3 3 6 5
Rusch 11-3 3 0 0 1 0
Belisle 2 0 0 0 1 1
R.Speier 1 2 1 1 1 0
Chicago
Lilly W,2-0 62-3 1 0 0 2 8
A.GuzmanH,1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
HeilmanH,3 1 0 0 0 1 1
Gregg 1 0 0 0 1 3
HBP-by Jimenez (Re.Johnson). WP-A.Guz-
man. Balk-Jimenez.
Umpires-Home, Andy Fletcher; First, Tim Mc-
Clelland; Second, Ted Barrett;Third, Greg Gibson.
T-3:03. A-40,077 (41,210).


Associated Press
Philadelphia Phillies outfielder Shane Victorino, right, and
teammate Ryan Howard celebrate Howard's three-run home
run against the Washington Nationals during the seventh in-
ning Monday in Washington.
Phillies 9, Nationals 8 season off Clay Condrey in the sev-
WASHINGTON - Before Monday's enth, a two-run shot into the visiting
home opener, the Washington Nation- bullpen in left-center that got the Na-
als spoke about being happy to finally tionals within two. But Victorino's sac
be off the road, about knowing they fly in the eighth restored the three-
aren't as bad as their record, about run lead.
how long the season is. Philadelphia Washington
Then the Nationals went out and ab rhbi ab r h bi
lost 9-8.to a Philadelphia Phillies club Rollins ss 5 0 1 1 Miledgcf 5 1 1 0
- Victorncf 3 21 2 CGzmnss 5 2.5 2
mourning the pregame death of long- Utley 2b 4 1 0 0 AIGnzlz pr 0 1 0 0
time broadcaster Harry Kalas. Ryan Howard lb 5 1 2 3 Zmrmn3b 5 1 1 2
Howard, Raul Ibanez and Shane Vic- Werth rf 5 1 2 0 Dunn f 4 1 2 2
IbanezIf 5 22 1 Dukesrf 5 1 2 2
torino homered for Philadelphia, three Feliz3b 3 1 1 0 NJhnsn lb 4 0 0 0
errors by Washington contributed to Coste c 3 0 0 1 Flores c 4 0 0 0
three unearned runs, and the Nation- Moyer p 2 0 0 1 AHrndz2b 4 1 1 0
alsfell to 0-7--stillthe only club in the Condry p 0 0 0 0 DCarerp 1 00 0
Eyrep 0 00 0 Tavarzp 0 00 0
majors without a victory. Brntltt ph 1 1 1 0 Hinckly p 0 0 0 0
At least Washington gave its fans Madson p 0 0 0 0 Wlngh ph 1 0 0 0
something to cheer about late: Ryan Lidge p 0 0 0 0 SRiver p 0 0 0 0
Zimmerman hit a two-run homer off Ledezm p 0 0 0 0
Keamsph 1 0 00
Phillies closer Brqd Lidge, who hasn't Beimel p 0 0 0 0
blown a save since 2007. Totals 36 910 9 Totals 39 812 8
But Lidge struck out Adam Dunn Philadelphia 021 100 410-9
Washington 110 110 202-8
and Elijah Dukes before Nick Johnson E-Rollins (1), Dunn 2 (2), A.Hernandez 2 (2).
grounded out to first base to end it. It's DP-Washington 1. LOB-Philadelphia 7,
Lidge's third save this season and 47th Washington 7. 2B-Rollins (1), Ibanez (3),
consecutive converted chance. Bruntlett (2), Dunn (2), Dukes (2). HR-Victorino
(1), Howard (1), Ibanez (3), Zimmerman (2),
Howard's first homer of 2009, a Dunn (2), Dukes (1). SB-Milledge (1), C.Guz-
three-run shot off reliever Saul Rivera man (1). S-D.Cabrera. SF-Victorino, Moyer.
(0-1), broke a 4-all tie in the seventh in- IP H R ER BB SO
ning. One out later, Ibanez hit his third Philadelphia
MoyerW,1-1 6 8 4 4 2 5
of the season, making it 8-4. Condrey . 2-3 2 2 2 0 0
Jamie Moyer (1-1), the slow-throw- Eyre H,1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
ing lefty still going at 46, earned the Madson H,3 1 0 0 0 0 2
LidgeS,3-3 1 2 2 2 0 2
victory, allowing four runs and eight hits Washington
in six innings. He allowed Dukes'solo D.Cabrera 5 6 4 1 2 2
shot in the fifth that tied it at 4. Tavarez 2-3 0 0 0 1 2
The.Phillies went back in front the Hinckley 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
S.RiveraL,0-1 1 2 4 4 0 1
next inning, when Rivera came on and Ledezma 1 1 1 1 0 0
immediately hit Victorino and Chase Beimel 1 1 0 0 0 1
Utley before giving up Howard's drive HBP-by S.Rivera (Victorino, Utley).
Umpires--Home, Bill Miller; First, Derryl Cousins;
to center field. Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Jim Joyce.
Dunn hit his second homer of the T-2:58. A-40,386 (41,888).


East Division
GB WCGB
1 -
1 V2
2 11/
2h 2

East Division
GB WCGB

14 112
2� 2%
5'h 54


Central Division
GB WCGB

1/ 1
1 1
1 11
21 3


Home
3-3
3-1
1-2
2-2
1-2


Chicago
Detroit
Kansas City
Minnesota
Cleveland


Chicago
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
Houston


W
Seattle 5
Los Angeles 3
Texas 3
Oakland 2


W
San Diego 6
Los Angeles 5
Colorado 3
Arizona 2
San Fran. 2


Central Division
GB WCGB
- - �
- 1/4
1 1�%
2 2Y2
2� 3
4 41


West Division
GB WCGB

11 1
1� 1
2) 2


West Division
GB WCGB

1 1
2� 21
3 3
3� 3%


I


TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 83


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


RTIC us CouNTY (FL CLE


I


P
FA
I









SCRBAD iu OUT F) HOIL


B4 TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 20


CR 8, Dunnellon 3
Matt Garlock struck out 10
batters during a complete-game
effort as Crystal River improved
to 15-2 overall in a five-run vic-
tory over Dunnellon. Garlock
yielded just one eamed run.
Jared Marckese clubbed a
three-run home run for the Pi-
rates, now 11-2 in District 4A-6
while Zack Bidlack and Cody
Ewing hit solo shots.
Gehrig Hall also had a two-
run double for Crystal River,
who plays 6:30 tonight at home
against North Marion.



NBA Standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pet GB
y-Boston 60 20 .750 -
x-Philadelphia 40 40 .500 20
New Jersey 34 47 .420 26'/2
Toronto 32 49 .395 28'/
New York 31 50 .383 29�'
Southeast Division
W L Pet GB
y-Orlando 58 23 .716 -
x-Atlanta 46 34 .575 111/2
x-Miami 42 38 .525 15V2
Charlotte 35 46 .432 23
Washington 19 62 .235 39
Central Division
W L Pct GB
z-Cleveland 66 15 .815 -
x-Chicago 41 40 .506 25
x-Detroit 39 42 .481 27
Indiana 35 46 .432 31
Milwaukee 34 47 .420 32
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-Houston 53 28 .654 -
x-San Antonio 52 28 .650 Y2
x-New Orleans 49 32 .605 4
x-Dallas 48 32 .600 41
Memphis 23 57 .288 29�
Northwest Division
W L Pet GB
x-Denver 53 27 .663 -
x-Portland 52 28 .650 1
x-Utah . 47 33 .588 6
Minnesota 24 56 .300 29
Oklahoma City 22 58 .275 31
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
z-L.A. Lakers 64 17 .790 -
Phoenix 44 36 .550 19�
Golden State 29 51 .363 342
L.A. Clippers 19 61 .238 44Y2
Sacramento 16 64 .200 47�'
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Sunday's Games
New Orleans 102, Dallas 92
Cleveland 107, Boston 76
Miami 122, NewYork 105
Toronto 111, Philadelphia 104
San Antonio 95, Sacramento 92
L.A. Lakers 92, Memphis 75
Monday's Games
Cleveland 117, Indiana 109
Toronto 97, Washington 96
New Jersey 91, Charlotte 87
Chicago 91, Detroit 88
Milwaukee 98, Orlando 80
Houston 86, New Orleans 66
Minnesota at Dallas, late
Sacramento at Denver, late
L.A. Clippers at Utah, late
Memphis at Phoenix, late
Oklahoma City at Portland, late
San Antonio at Golden State, late
Tuesday's Games
Miami at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Boston at Philadelphia, 8 p.m.
Utah at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Toronto at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Miami, 8 p.m.
Charlotte at Orlando, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at Indiana, 8 p.m.
Washington at Boston, 8 p.m.
New Jersey at New York, 8 p.m.
Houston at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Cleveland, 8 p.m.
Denver at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Golden State at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
End of Regular Season


NHL Playoffs
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7)
Wednesday, April 15
N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 7 p m
Carolina at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Thursday, April 16
Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Calgary at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Anaheim at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Friday, April 17
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m
Carolina at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Vancouver, 10 p.m
Saturday, April 18
N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 1 p.m.


TENNIS
Continued from Page B1

never know what can hap-
pen. Like I always say, Any
given day"'
On the boys side of things,
there were no surprises as
Lecanto and Citrus earned
spots in every final and will
face off in the two teams'
third duel of the season.
The one match with all
the marbles on the line be-
cause it carries an auto-
matic state playoff berth is
the match between the two
teams' top players,
Lecanto's Tommy Saltsman
and Citrus's Victor Es-
pinosa. For Saltsman, the
Panthers decorated senior
who has had a great career,
he's looking to go out on a
high note. Standing in his
way, however, is Espinosa
who has already beat him
twice this year.
While that battle will have
individual bragging rights
on the line, the team title
figures to come down to


For the record


Florida LOTTERY


--On the AIRWAVES==

TODAY'S SPORTS
BASEBALL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Marlins at Atlanta Braves
BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (SUN) Miami Heat at Atlanta Hawks
8 p.m. (TNT) Boston Celtics at Philadelphia 76ers
10:30 p.m. (TNT) Utah Jazz at Los Angeles Lakers
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
8 p.m. (ESPN2) College Slam Dunk & 3-Point Championship
(Taped)
SOCCER
12 p.m. (FSNFL) English Premier League: Chelsea vs.
Bolton Wanderers (Taped)
2:30 p.m. (ESPN2) UEFA Champions League: Quarterfinal,
Leg 2 - Chelsea vs. Liverpool


- Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BASEBALL
6:30 p.m. North Marion at Crystal River
7 p.m. Citrus at Hernando
SOFTBALL
6 p.m. The Villages at Lecanto
6 p.m. Hernando at Citrus
7 p.m. Crystal River at Wildwood
BOYS TENNIS
9 a.m. District 2A-5 Tournament at Crystal River High School
GIRLS TENNIS
9 a.m. District 2A-5 Tournament at Crystal River High School


Columbus at Detroit, 6 p.m.
Montreal at Boston, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Chicago, TBD
Sunday, April 19
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 3 p.m.
Vancouver at St. Louis, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Anaheim at San Jose, 10 p.m.
Monday, April 20
Boston at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, April 21
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Columbus, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Anaheim, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday, April 22
Boston at Montreal, 7 p.m.
.Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m..
Chicago at Calgary, TBD
Thursday, April 23
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m., if neces-
sary
Detroit at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Carolina at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m., if necessary
San Jose at Anaheim, 10:30 p.m.
Friday, April 24
N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 7 p.m., if nec-
essary
St. Louis at Vancouver, 10 p.m., if necessary
Saturday, April 25
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 3 p.m., if necessary
Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m., if necessary
Columbus at Detroit, 7 p.m., if necessary
Anaheim at San Jose, 10 p.m., if necessary
Calgary at Chicago, 10 p.m., if necessary
Sunday, April 26
Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 2 p.m., if nec-
essary
Vancouver at St. Louis, 8 p.m., if necessary
New Jersey at Carolina, TBD, if necessary
Monday, April 27
Boston at Montreal, TBD, if necessary
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, TBD, if necessary
San Jose at Anaheim, TBD, if necessary
Detroit at Columbus, TBD, if necessary
Chicago at Calgary, TBD, if necessary
Tuesday, April 28
Carolina at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m., i necessary
N.Y Rangers at Washington, TBD, if necessary
St. Louis at Vancouver, TBD, if necessary
Wednesday, April 29
Montreal at Boston, TBD, if necessary
Anaheim at San Jose, TBD, if necessary
Columbus at Detroit, TBD, if necessary
Calgary at Chicago, TBD, if necessary


BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX-Placed INF Jed Lowrie
on the 15-day DL. Purchased the contract of
INF Gil Velasquez from Pawtucket (IL).
TAMPA BAY RAYS-Activated OF B.J. Upton
from the 15-day DL.

some other key matches.
Two weeks ago when the
two teams met, Lecanto's
Tamposi brothers, Jake and
Joe, were the only two Pan-
thers to defeat Citrus in sin-
gles. On the flip side
Espinosa, Austin Connors
and Zack Stanley gave the
Hurricanes the slight ad-
vantage headed into dou-
bles. Both coaches expect
today's final to be just as
hard-fought.
"We had a pretty good
week of practice and there
was no let down during our
first day," Citrus head coach
James Martone said. "We
came out today with a pur-
pose and (Monday) we played
that way We're looking for-
ward to competing against
Lecanto. I hope it's a long day.
Our kids are prepared.
"We're expecting Victor to
go out and set the tone for
us," Martone continued.
"The No. 2 and 3 matches
figure to have the same in-
tensity as last time. We're a
different team now than we
were at the beginning of the
year and Austin (Connors)


National League
ATLANTA BRAVES-Recalled LHP Jo-Jo
Reyes from Gwinnett (IL).
SLOS ANGELES pODGERS-Purchased the
contract of INF Juan Castro from Albuquerque
(PCL). Optioned INF Blake DeWitt to Albu-
querque. Reinstated OF Delwyn Young from the
15-day DL and designated him for assignment.
NEW YORK METS-Released OF Marion
Anderson.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS-Activated INF
Anderson Hernandez from the 15-day DL.
Placed INF Willie Harris on the 15-day DL.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
TORONTO RAPTORS-Signed G Quincy
Douby through the 2009-10 season.
Women's National Basketball Association
CONNECTICUT SUN-Announced the re-
tirement of G Jamie Carey.
FOOTBALL
National Football League.
GREEN BAY PACKERS-Traded LS J.J.
Jansen to Carolina for a future conditional draft
pick.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS-Signed LB Zack
Thomas. Waived WR Will Franklin.
NEW YORK GIANTS-Signed CB Kevin
Dockery to a one-year contract.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS-Agreed to
terms with LB James Harrison on a six-year
contract.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS-Signed QB
Byron Leftwich to a two-year contract.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ANAHEIM DUCKS-Recalled C Petri Konti-
ola, C Petteri Wirtanen, LW Josh Green, LW
Matt Beleskey, D Brian Salcido, D Brett Fester-
ling and G Jean-Philippe Levasseur from Iowa
(AHL).
BOSTON BRUINS-Assigned F Mikko
Lehtonen to Providence (AHL).
CALGARY FLAMES-Recalled F Dustin
Boyd, F Kyle Greentree, F Warren Peters, F
Brett Sutter, F David Van der Gulik and G Le-
land Irving from Quad City (AHL).
COLORADO AVALANCHE-Fired general
manager Francois Giguere.
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS-Recalled LW
Alexandre Picard, RW Mike Blunden, D Nick
Holden, G Dan LaCosta, RW Maksim Mayorov
and LWTom Sestito from Syracuse (AHL).
DALLAS STARS-Reassigned D Mark Fistric
to Manitoba (AHL).
.DETROIT RED WINGS-Recalled F Darren
Helm from Grand Rapids (AHL).
NASHVILLE PREDATORS-Reassigned F
Ryan Jones, Cal O'Reilly and Jed Ortmeyer to
Milwaukee (AHL).
NEW JERSEY DEVILS-Recalled C Rod
Pelley from Lowell (AHL).
PHOENIX COYOTES-Signed F Justin
Bernhardt.
SAN JOSE SHARKS-Signed G Alex
Stalock.

and Zack (Stanley) are a big
part of that difference."
But if Citrus wants to.de-
throne Lecanto as the
reigning kings of the dis-
trict, they're going to have
to take it away because
Lecanto doesn't figure to
go quietly.
"It's going to come down
to whoever makes more un-
forced errors," Lecanto
head coach Jack Hall said.
"We played Trinity last week
and that was a great tune-up
match for us. But honestly, at
the end of the day, unforced
errors are going to be the
key. At this level they usually
always are."
By day's end they'll be
four state qualifiers (the
male and female that wins
the No. 1 singles match and
the two duos that win the
No. 1 doubles matches) and
two teams that will be able
to lay claim to the title as
district champions. The sin-
gles finals kick off at 10 a.m.
on the Crystal River campus
in what figures to be a
thrilling day of competitive
tennis.


Bucks down Magic


Associated Press

MILWAUKEE - Richard
Jefferson scored 24 points
as the Milwaukee Bucks
beat an Orlando Magic team
missing Dwight Howard
and two other starters 98-80
on Monday - Orlando's
third straight loss to a sub-
par opponent.
Ramon Sessions added 19
points in the home finale for
the Bucks,;providing a late
high note in what has other-
wise been a disappointing
season for Milwaukee.
Courtney Lee had 17
points for Orlando. Add in a
potential wardrobe mal-
function by Howard, who
was not on the bench after
halftime because he appar-
ently was in violation of the
NBA's dress code, and it was
a rough night all around for
the slumping Magic.
Rockets 86, Hornets 66
HOUSTON - Yao Ming
scored 22 points, Luis Scola
grabbed 15 rebounds and the
Houston Rockets moved within
one win of the Southwest Divi-
sion title with an 86-66 victory
over the New Orleans Hornets
on Monday night.
The Rockets came in holding
the No. 4 seed in the Western
Conference, but with the same
record as San Antonio and
Portland, who both played later
in the night.
If the Rockets win their regu-
lar-season finale in Dallas on
Wednesday, they'll secure their
first division championship
since 1993-94. But in the jum-
bled Western Conference,
Houston could also slip to fifth
place - and lose home-court
advantage in the first round -
with a loss to the Mavericks.
Bulls 91, Pistons 88
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -
Ben Gordon made a tiebreak-
ing layup with 15 seconds left,
and the Chicago Bulls beat
Detroit 91-88 on Monday
night to lock the Pistons in the
No. 8 seed in the Eastern
Conference.
The loss means the Pistons
(39-42) will face Cleveland in
the first round of the playoffs.
Chicago (41-40) leads Philadel-
phia by a half-game for sixth.
Derrick Rose scored 11 of his
24 points in the fourth quarter
and added a key defensive play
as the Bulls overcame a dou-
ble-digit deficit in the second
half. Gordon added 19.
Richard Hamilton led the Pis-
tons with 25 points and


FIDRYCH
Continued from Page B1

major leagues, all with the
Detroit Tigers. He was 29-19
with a 3.10 ERA.
'"The entire Detroit Tigers
organization was saddened to
learn of the passing of former
player Mark Fidrych today,"
the Tigers said in a statement
"Mark was beloved by Tigers
fans and he was a special per-
son with a unique personality.
The Tigers send our heartfelt
condolences to his family and
friends."
Fidrych attempted a come-
back in 1982 and 1983 in the
Boston Red Sox organization.
He pitched for their Triple A
team in Pawtucket, R.I. But
he never pitched in the ma-



KALAS
Continued from Page B1

the World Series games. But
Phillies fans complained and
the rule was later changed.
A 2002 recipient of the
Baseball Hall of Fame's Ford
C. Frick Award for his contri-
butions to the game, Kalas
was one of the last longtime
announcers closely associ-
ated with one city. Another,
Vin Scully, threw out the first
pitch at the Los Angeles
Dodgers' home opener Mon-
day, marking his 60th year
with that club.
"He was not only a multi-
talented fellow with a won-
derful voice. He was a
lovely guy. I mean, every-


body liked Harry The city
of Philadelphia will just be
in mourning because they
loved him so much," Scully
said. "I'm happy for him
that his team was world
champions last yeat; so he
had the thrill of that"
The Nationals and Phillies
discussed whether it would
be appropriate to postpone
the game, but Montgomery
said Kalas "would have
wanted to play the game."


Associated Press
Orlando Magic's Courtney Lee, right, defends against Mil-'
waukee Bucks' Richard Jefferson, left, in the second half,


Monday in Milwaukee.
Tayshaun Prince added 19.
Cavs 117, Pacers 109
INDIANAPOLIS - The
Cleveland Cavaliers clinched
the NBA's best record and,
home-court advantage through-
out the playoffs Monday night
behind LeBron James' 37
points in a 117-109 victory over
the Indiana Pacers.
Getting the home-court edge
was especially important be-
,cause Cleveland has a 39-1
record at home, the best in the
league.
Delonte West scored 20
points, Mo Williams had 18 and
Zydrunas Ilgauskas added 16
points and 10 rebounds for
Cleveland, which won its fifth
straight.
Danny Granger scored 38
points, rookie Brandon Rush
scored 27 and Troy Murphy
had 17 points and 13 rebounds
for Indiana.
Raptors 97, Wizards 96
WASHINGTON - Chris
Bosh made the go-ahead 3-
pointer with 9.9 seconds left for
the Raptors. Trailing 93-80 with
6:30 remaining, Toronto
outscored Washington 17-3 to
pull off the win.
Bosh, who had 25 points and'
15 rebounds, converted his first
3-pointer since March 6. It was
his 42nd double-double of the
season, tying his 2006-07 fran-
chise high.
Shawn Marion had 25
points and 15 rebounds for
the Raptors.
Caron Butler scored 28

jors after 1980 and retired in
July 1983.
The Worcester, Mass., na-
tive later owned a trucking
business. State police detec-
tives are investigating the cir-
cumstances of his death,
Early said.
Fidrych acquired the nick-
name "the Bird" because of
his resemblance to the Big
Bird character on the Sesame
Street television show. During
games, he would bend down
and groom the mound with
his hands, talk to the baseball
and slap five with teammates
in the middle of the diamond.
But knee and shoulder in-
juries limited him to 58 major
league games.
"Baseball will miss him.
They missed him because he
didn't have as long as a career
as everybody would have

There was a moment of si-
lence in Kalas' memory be-
fore the first pitch in
Washington and at other
baseball stadiums around the
country Monday.
To a whole generation of
football fans, Kalas also was a
signature figure.
Joining NFL Films as a
narrator in 1975, he did the
voiceover for "Inside the
NFE' from 1977 through 2008.
Kalas predecessor John
Facenda "was the 'Voice of
God' and Harry Kalas was the
'Voice of the People,"' NFL
Films president Steve Sabol
said in a written statement
"In many ways, Harry is
the narrator of our memo-
ries. His voice lives on not
only on film, but inside the
heads of everyone who has
watched and listened to
NFL Films."
Kalas also was the voice
for Chunky Soup commer-
cials and Animal Planet's
annual tongue-in-cheek
Super Bowl competitor, the
Puppy Bowl.
The Phillies taped up a
color photo of their broad-
caster inside the dugout
Monday, with the words
"Harry Kalas 1936-2009"
written underneath. When


points and Antawn Jamison
had 23 for Washington in its
62nd loss. The Wizards must
win on Wednesday in Boston to
avoid tying their franchise
record for losses, set in 2000-
01 where they were 19-63.
Nets 91, Bobcats 87
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
- Jarvis Hayes hit two late 3-
pointers in a 37-second span
and the Nets rallied from a 12-
point, fourth-quarter deficit.
Rookie Brook Lopez added
18 points and a career-best
20 rebounds, and Vince
Carter had five of his 19
points in the final 4:47 as New
Jersey won its second
straight, but only its fourth in
12 games. Hayes finished
with 15 on 6-of-9 shooting.
Raymond Felton had 19
points for Charlotte in a game
in which coach Larry Brown
played four reserves with only
one starter in both the second
and fourth quarters, and it
ended up costing the Bobcats
in their third straight loss and
sixth in seven games.
Mavs 96, T-wolves .94
DALLAS - Dirk Nowitzki
keyed a late fourth-quarter rally
with great plays on both ends of
the court, then Jason Terry hit
an 18-foot jumper from the right-
side with 0.2 seconds left, giv-
ing the Dallas Mavericks a 96-
94 victory over the Minnesota
Timberwolves on Monday night.
Dallas kept hopes of claiming
the No. 6 seed in the Western
Conference.

liked in the first place. It's just
horrible," former Orioles
pitcher and Hall of Famer
Jim Palmer said. "He did em-
brace life. I remember him
trying to play golf when he.
couldn't play golf and enjoy-
ing every minute of it
"He was a marvelous
pitcher and I just hate to see
him go." \first
Fidrych's rst major,
league start was a complete,
game, two-hitter in which he'
beat the Cleveland Indians 2-
1. He won seven of his first
eight decisions and was the
AL starter in the All-Star.
game. He allowed two runs in
the first inning and put run-,
ners at second and third in
the second, but he got the
final two outs and left after
two innings trailing 2-0. The.
NL won 7-1.

Philadelphia's Shane Vic-
torino homered in the third,
inning, he paused after
touching home plate, crossed,
himself and pointed with his
index finger toward the
broadcast booth, where
Kalas would have been
working at Nationals Park
Instead, Tom McCarthy
handled Kalas' duties at the
start of the Comcast Sport-
sNet telecast of the game.
"The voice that carried all
the memories since 1971,
when the Vet opened, will
no longer be behind the mi-
crophone," McCarthy said
on the air.
Shortly after noon Monday,
Kalas was in the visiting.
clubhouse at Nationals Park,
jotting down the Phillies'
lineup so he'd be ready to,
help call the game. About
half an hour later, he was dis-
covered in the booth by the
Phillies director of broad-
casting. Kalas was taken to a
local hospital, where he was
pronounced dead, the
Phillies said.
"It sounds like he passed
in the place he would want
to," Phillies slugger Ryan
Howard said after Philadel-
phia beat Washington 9-8.
"He was up in the booth."


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SCOREBOARD


09o










rN


Citrus County
Parks & Recreation


C,. . tI - YOUR GUIDE TO CITRUS COUNTY COMMUNITY SPORTS

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE






Kickin' it with kickball


Coed league provides challenges

for all ages, welcomes newplayers


Special to the Chronicle
An unidentified player prepares to kick the ball during an at-bat in the Citrus County Parks and Recreation's coed kickball league.


Special to the Chronicle

Kimberly Macaluso would
like to thank Suncoast Der-
matology's Katie Douglas for
taking the time to answer
Citrus County Parks and Re-
cration's interview about
Coed Kickball.
Has your team played
kickball before this year?
No this was our first year.
Why did your team decide
to play kickball?
Initially we saw it on Bay
News 9. There was a kickball
league starting in Tampa
and it looked like something
anyone could play. It looked
like a lot of fun.
How did your team get put
together?
It started with posting it
Employees signed up, and
then their spouses and also
some people from one of our
labs decided to join.
What is your favorite part


of the game?
Just being able to get away
from every day stress. Hav-
ing a good time and lots of
laughs.
What do you find challeng-
ing about kickball?
(laughing) Realizing, in
some cases our bodies are
not 20 years old any more,
they are actually 40 and 50.
It's the physical challenges.
Does your team have any
rivals?
No, no rivals. We haven't
won a game yet, so maybe
they are all our rivals!
Do you foresee Citrus
County Parks and Recre-
ations sports leagues getting
larger?
I would think so, as long as
the word gets out!
Would you recommend
Citrus County Parks and
Recreations sports leagues
to others?
Yes, I certainly would!


The Game BRIEFS


Citrus County fields
closed for maintenance
While school is out for
Spring Break and everyone is
vacationing, Citrus County's
Grounds Maintenance division
will be out in the fields, hard at
work. On Monday, April 13, Bi-
centennial Park's baseball and
softball fields, as well as, Cen-
tral Ridge District Park's base-
ball and softball fields were
closed for bi-annual mainte-
nance. The fields will reopen
Friday for baseball and softball
Little Leagues' mid-season
tournaments. Regular field use
will reopen Monday, April 20.
Fortunately, Citrus County's
athletic fields see a high num-
ber of athletes. The fields are
utilized daily, often more than
once a day. Not only is preven-
tative maintenance an integral
part of successful field manage-
ment, but, it is also beneficial to
give the fields some time to
heal from all of the activity they
receive.
Each field will undergo vari-
ous ways of preservation,


some of which include aerifica-
tion, verticutting, fertilizing, her-
bicide and pesticide
application, irrigation mainte-
nance repair, infield recondi-
tioning, building and lighting
maintenance.
Though this break from the
fields may seem as an incon-
venience for some, it should be
seen as an essential means of
field upkeep. Proper field man-
agement produces an attractive
field, ready for the wear and
tear of typical athletic field use.
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation and Grounds Main-
tenance divisions would like to
thank you in advance for your
cooperation and we will see
you out on the fields in a week
Sports Horseshoes
Beverly Hills Horseshoe club
will be hosting the 49 Annual
Florida State Horseshoe
Championship Toumaments At
the Civic Circle in Beverly Hills
on April 22.
Mixed Distance Doubles 86
pitchers will start pitching at
2 p.m.


This is the initial competition
of the Championships. Each
team consists of one player
who pitches from 40 feet and
one player who pitches from 30
feet. The 30 foot pitcher may
be male or female. Teams are
assigned to classes based on
the combined averages-of the
two players.
April 23 Regular Doubles 96
pitchers will start pitching at
8:30 a.m. and afternoon at 12
p.m.
This competition has Men's,
Women's, and Elders'divisions.
Pairs are assigned to classes
within those divisions based on
the combined averages of the
two players.
April 24 singles Friday 100
pitchers will start pitching at 8
a.m. and at 12 p.m.
Saturday 25 single 37 will be
pitching at 8:00 a.m. and the 4
JR and the championship
event will be in the afternoon.
Singles competition will start
on Friday.and conclude on Sat-
urday in the afternoon with the
Championship event. Initially
all pitchers are assigned


classes based on their entering
NATSTAT averages. Following
the competition on Friday the
defending state champion and
the top six pitchers from
classes A; B, C, D, and E will
form the Championship Class
to play on Saturday afternoon
for the championship title.
All are to come and watch
while top Florida State champi-
ons pitch.
For more information, please
contact Louise Robison 746-
4058 or rrobi-
son2@tampabay.rr.com
Lecanto High School
hosts golf tourney
Lecanto High School Project
Graduation Golf Toumament is
slated for Sunday, April 19, at Cit-
rus Hills Golf and Country Club
"The Oaks." Scramble shotgun
start at 1 p.m. Please Check-in at
12:30 p.m. Come join the fun
filled with golf, pizza, and prizes.
Prizes will be awarded for
Closest to the Pin on (2) par 3s,
Longest Drive in the fair-way
(front and back nine). Individual
cost is $50 (open to all players)


includes golf (green fees), cart
fees, and pizza immediately fol-
lowing on the wooden deck
above the Pro Shop.
Prizes awarded for top three
places and special door prizes
will also be given away.
Hole sponsorship available,
contact Kathy Saltsman for more
details (352) 697-2719.
Make checks payable and mail
to: Project Graduation, P.O. Box
481, Lecanto, FL 34460. All en-
tries must be received by April 14.
Registration open for
annual kayak triathlon
The third annual "Ozello Ad-
venture Race," sponsored by the
Kiwanis Club of Central Ridge-
Crystal River, will be April 25 at
the Pirates Cove Boat Ramp in
Ozello. The triathlon race con-
sists of one and a half miles of
kayaking, seven miles of bicy-
cling and two miles of running.
To drive to Ozello, travel 10
miles on Ozello Trail (County
Road 494) west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and Ho-
mosassa. Check-in time is 9 a.m.
and the race begins at 10.


To register online, go to Ozel-
loAdventureRace.com, or call
Barry Schwartz at 7954780. The
entry fees are: $30 for an individ-
ual, $25 per person for two- or
three-member teams, $20 per
person for high school racers.
Registration is $40 on race day, if
available -the race is limited to
150 participants age 14 or older.
All the funds derived from this
event go directly to Kiwanis
Scholarships and Kiwanis local
youth activities.
Each racer must bring a
kayak/canoe, paddle, personal
flotation device, running shoes,
bicycle, helmet, water bottle and
snacks. A limited number of
kayaks, paddle and PFD will be
available to rent for $20, but must
be received in advance at the
time of registration. Each partici-
pant receives lunch, the satisfac-
tion of helping Citrus County
youths and a 2009 souvenir T-
shirt featuring the mascot "Ozzie."
Awards will be presented for
best overall team and individuals
in agelgender categories. The
Citrus County Chronicle is a co-
sponsor of the event.


Daytona Beach awaits local USTA Champions


Starting with this up-
coming weekend,
there will be three
chances for you to go and see.
some of our local USTA


Champions com-
pete in Daytona.
It will give you an
opportunity to
spend some time
on the beach and
at the same time
support some of
our local players.
First up are the
Super Senior Sec-
tion Champi-
onships from
April 17 through
April 19, followed
by the 3.5/4.5 Sen-
ior Sectional


.r




Eric va
Hoof
ON TE


Champi-


onships from May 1 through
May 3, and last but not least
the 3.0/4.0 Senior Section
Championships from May 15
through May 17. The easiest
way to get there; take 40
across Florida, take 95
South, get off at LPGA Blvd,
go west and after about 4
miles you will see the USTA
tennis complex with its 24
soft courts on your right
hand side.
Ever wondered what to do
with the accumulation of old
tennis balls? The Key Train-
ing Center could use them.
You can contact Jack Coyne
at 746-3982 or e-mail JJ-
Scoyne@mindspring.com. It
might be a good idea to set
Sup a collection box or basket
at your club which they
-could come and collect on a
regular basis.


Monday Night Ladies
Doubles League
The results for April 6 were
as follows:
Bicentennial Babes def.
Pine Ridge, 3-2;
\ Brooksville
. Kick Butt def
, Sugarmill Woods,
5-1.
SThis league is
'. geared towards
" ' the 3.5 and 4.0 fe-
male players who
cannot play dur-
n den ing the day and
en don't mind travel-
gen ing to get in those
NNIS great tennis
matches.
For more infor-


mation and to sign up, con-
tact Antoinette van den
Hoogen at 382-3138 or
hoera@juno.com.
Citrus County Tuesday
Womens Tennis Leagues
Tuesday Team Tennis
This league is geared to-
wards the 3.0 and 3.5 level
players. Each team consists of
four players (6 on roster is al-
lowed). New players, regulars
or subs, are always welcome.
To sign up or for informa-
tion about this league, con-
tact the chairperson,
Candace Charles, at 563-5859
or candacecharles@tam-
pabayrr.com
Senior Ladies
Tuesday 3.0-3.5 League
The results for April 7 were
as follows:
Pine Ridge Pintos def.
Riverhaven Ospreys, 4-0;


Crystal River'def. Meadow-
crest Racketeers, 4-0;
Citrus Hills def. Pine Ridge
Mustangs, 4-0;
Riverhaven Gators vs
Meadowcrest Aces,
rescheduled.
For information please
contact Charlyne Ankrom at
795-6212 or
boonies2@yahoo.com
Thursday Morning Citrus
Area Doubles League
The final standings were as
follows:
Citrus Hills Swingers, 117
points; Bicentennial Babes,
101; Skyview, 90; SkyviewAd-
vantage, 89; Sugarmill Woods
Oakies, 80; Pine Ridge Fil-
lies, 77; Citrus Hills Aces, 75;
Pine Ridge Mavericks, 71; Bi-
centennial TNT, 70; Sug-
armill Woods Smashers, 45.
For information please
contact Mary Jane Martin at
527-3754 or e-mail ten-
nis99111@earthlinknet
Ladies on the Court
The results for April 9 were
as follows: Barbara M/Kelley,
Barbara S/Tana.
Ladies on The Court play
at the Le Grone Park courts
in Crystal River on Thurs-
days at 8:30 am. Bring a new
can of balls and $0.50, sign up
ahead and play 2 out of 3 tie
break sets. For more infor-
mation please contact Bar-
bara Shook at
dshook@tampabay.rr.com or
795-0872.
The Friday Senior Ladies
Doubles 3.0 - 3.5 League
The results for April 10
were as follows:


Meadowcrest Swingers vs
Pine Ridge Mustangs, 2-2;
Meadowcrest Aces def.
Sugarmill Woods, 3-2;
Riverhaven Eagles def.
Pine Ridge Colts, 4-0.
For more information or to
sign up contact the chairper-
son Mary Jane Martin of the
Pine Ridge Colts, at 527-3754
or e-mail tennis99111@earth-
linknet
Ladies' Singles
Tennis League
Standings and scores for
the week April 6- April 12:
1. Carol Hirsch; 2. Susan
Goins; 3. Carrie Ingersoll; 4.
Soledad David ; 5. Sarah
Labrador; 6. Linda Martin; 7.
April Manley; 8. Lisa Steed; 9.
LeAnn Largo; 10. Lorie
Wilkes; 11. Linda Bracken;
12. Margie McLellan; 13. Joan
Kobayashi; 14. Jennifer
Dempsey; 15. Becky Fisher;
16. Pranathi Rao; 17. Mary
Catherine Spires; 18. Sherri
Trippett; 19. Gloria Phillips;
20. Suzy Carney; 21. Janelle
Johnson.
NEW RULE: Match times
are flexible for players to
arrange matches at their con-
venience, with a minimum of
one match per month.
New players are welcome,
including High School play-
ers. For more infor-
mation please contact Margie
McLellan at 476-5617 or
email: margiemclellan@tam-
pabay.rr.com.
USTA Adult Leagues
For information call or e-
mail Cathy Priest at (352) 361-
6350 or (352) 732-9574 or


sobeus@earthlinknet
3.5 Adult Women:
Sugarmill Woods def
Skyview, 4-1. Record 1-0.
Susan Goins won, 6-4, 64;
Terra Brady won, 6-0, 6-0;
Myrt Thomas/Maureen
Caruso won, 7-5, 7-5; Sam
Stiteler/Ann Finnin lost, 6-4,
6-3; Carla Chitwood/Virginie
Berron won, 6-3,7-6.
Skyview record 0-2.
4.0 Adult Women:
Skyview lost to Fort King,
4-1. Record 0-1.
3.5 Adult Men:
Skyview lost to Fort King,
3-2. Record 0-3.
Local Tournament dates:
May 2-3, 2009: Chroni-
cle/Pines Tennis Tournament
at Whispering Pines Park in
Inverness.
REGISTRATION
$20.00 ENTRY FEE PER
PERSON/ PER DIVISION
FEES $15.00 Additional
Fee for entering a SECOND
DIVISION
ALL Tournament Registra-
tion Fee's must be paid by
Monday April 27, 2009
DIVISIONS: SINGLES;
Men's and Women's; Open
(students 14 and over may
play Open divisions), B, 60 +
Juniors: 13 and under /14
and over
DOUBLES; Men's Open, B,
60 +/ Women's Open, B, 60+
Juniors: 13 & Under / Jun-
iorsl4 & up.
NOTE: Divisions that do
not produce full rounds will
be combined with other divi-
sions or eliminated
TOURNAMENT
FORMAT:


CONSOLATION ROUND,
BALLS PROVIDED.
WHERE: Whispering
Pines Park and Citrus High
School and other sites in the
County, as needed.
REGULATIONS: U.S.TA.
rules and the "Code". Penal-
ties and default rules for
being late will be observed.
DEADLINE: 5:00 pm
Wednesday, April 29h (In-
cluding Mail in Registration)
MAIL IN: Registra-
tion Fees are payable via
Cash, Check or Money Order
Please make checks
payable to the City of Inver-
ness Parks and Recreation
212 W Main Street, Inverness,
FL 34450.
AWARDS: Awards
will be presented to the final-
ists in each division.
Each Participant will re-
ceive a T-Shirt, one per per-
son.
STARTING TIMES: Phone
(352)726-3913 after 3:00pm on
Thursday, April 30th.
WEATHER: In the event
of inclement weather partic-
ipants may be required to
play at other local park facil-
ities or tennis clubs.
For additional information
please contact the Adminis-
tration Office (352) 726-3913.
October 17-18,2009,5th An-
nual Fall Fest Compass Tour-
nament at Crystal River High
School.
---S~---
Eric van den Hoogen,
Chronicle tennis columnist,
can be reached at
hoera@juno.com.


""~"~"~"~"~~"~'~~1~1"--~I~
~


~
~









Page B6-TUESDAY, APRIL 14,2009



ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE













Associated Press
Anna and Josh Duggar
pose Friday in Springdale,
Ark. The couple, who were
married in September, say
Anna is due Oct. 18.

Duggar family
awaits grandchild
SPRINGDALE, Ark--
Josh and Anna Duggar are
following in the family tra-
dition.
Josh Duggar, the eldest
of Michelle and Jim Bob
Duggar's 18 children, has
announced that he and his
bride, Anna, are about to
start their own brood. The
couple, who were married
in September, say Anna
Duggar is due Oct 18.
The Duggars live in
northwest Arkansas.
They're featured on TLC's
"18 Kids and Counting."
Michelle Duggar most re-
cently gave birth in De-
cember, to daughter
Jordyn-Grace. The couple
have 10 sons and eight
daughters.
Josh, who is 21, and
Anna, who is 20, live in
Springdale, where he
works at a car dealership.

Mel Gibson's wife
files for divorce
LOS ANGELES -
Court records show Mel
Gibson's wife has filed for
divorce after 28 years of
marriage.
Robyn Gibson filed the
petition in Los Angeles,
citing ir-
reconcil-
able
differ-
ences.





son is seeking jewelry and
some otherproperty, and



has suggested joint cus-
tody for their 9-year-old
tuition




The records show the
couple were married in
doesn't









June 1980.
about the split. Robyn Gib-



son is seeking a jewelry and
stateme otherproperty, saying
has suve "always strived



to maintain the privacy
and integrity of our family
and will continue to do
son.
Gibshe records one of Holly-




wood's biggest names,
with a pair of Oscarriedin
June 1980.
They issued a joint



for statement picture anday sayingrec-
they have "always strived
to maintain the privacyttle
and integrity of our familysts





NEW YORK - Stephen
Colbertand will continue to dohis musical
SO."
Gibson is one of HDecemolly-
wood's biggest names,
with a pair of Oscar wins
for best picture and direc-
tor for "Braveheart"

Colbert to battle





The Decemberists an-
nounced Monday that
they will
perform
on Com-
edy Cen-
tral's
"The Col-


April 27.
Stephen Colbert
Colbert and th
and the
band engaged in a mock
feud in 2006 after Colbert
accused the Decemberists
of copying his idea of a
fan-created "green screen
challenge." The feud cul-
minated in a much bally-
hooed "ShredDown" in
which Decemberists gui-
tarist Chris Ftmk took on
Colbert in a guitar solo


contest
Colbert claimed victory
in one of the show's most
star-studded episodes that
featured Henry Kissinger,
Morley Safer, Peter
Frampton and former
New York Gov. Eliot
Spitzer.
- From wire reports


BACK IN STYLE
Spelg returns to th Cody, 30. "I think they were superior to a lot
pellg Tetu othe of female role models you see on television
'90~210' ZIP code today."
'90210'ZIP code Cody, playing herself in tonight's
anienrin -'"inei-n nn n nr


LYNN ELBER asks it
AP television writer miere
knock,
-LOS ANGELES Donnr

blo Cody swans her way up a red herdr
carpet The only thing awry: ditsy with tl
Donna Martin, who has rhanaged on tie
to snag herself in Cody's gown. pet
That's "Beverly Hills 90210" Donna, who Spe
is returning to her old stomping ground for who p
two episodes of CW's second-generation nounc
version, "90210" - and, to Tori Spelling's her w<
delight, the character she played for a on the
decade hasn't changed. spinot
"What I love about Donna is she's never "a gre;
jaded," Spelling says. "Donna can kind of go peiler
through anything and she still has that girl- said si
ish quality about her I think that's some- treasu
thing she'd have at any age.:.. That's Donna Donna
to me." gaffes.
Spelling's run on "90210" starts with "'Th
today's episode, which includes an appear- story I
ance by 'Juno" screenwriter Cody Donna been g
has come back to her hometown as a fa- next e
mous fashion designer, married and with a some g
baby. comec
"I getto be a mom, which is fun. It's so in iL I
crazy to think of Donna as a mother," physic
Spelling said, smiling. "Sometimes, I can't edy; tl
believe that I'm a momma, too." Donna
The actress is wed to Dean McDermott said.
(they teamed on the 'Tori & Dean" reality
series), has two children, and says she can't
help but bring her own experiences and
maturity to the role.
"There's a sense of calmness,'I think, to
your being after growing up so much, and a
sense of security.... You definitely bring that
to your character, naturally," she said.
She and Jennie Garth, her fellow "Bev-
erly Hills 90210" alumna who plays a guid-
ance counselor on the CW series, made
waves during the filming of a scene in
which the pair cruised Beverly Hills' famed
Rodeo Drive in a convertible Rolls-Royce.
A pack of a dozen or more photographers
gathered to grab shots.
'Just another day out," Spelling said later,
her tone even. "We all have paparazzi every
day."
In her case, that's likely no exaggeration.
The daughter of the late Aaron Spelling,
who produced the 1990s hit "90210" and a
host of other successful TV shows, she came
of age in the spotlight after being cast in her
dad's series.
It was only faux photographers taking
part in the "90210" red-carpet scene shot,
and they had a willing victim in Cody.
The Oscar-winning writer had related
her fascination with the original and re-
vamped versions of "90210" in Entertain-
ment Weekly columns, which caught the
eye of those in charge of the CW drama.
"The producers called and said,'If you
love the show so much, why don't you come
on and do a cameo?"' Cody recounted. "I
thought, 'Oh my God, this is my biggest
dream come true."'
Meeting Spelling and Garth - "ab-
solute idols to me" -was a "huge
thrill," Cody said. "Getting to be in a
scene with them is beyond my wildest
dreams. And the new cast I think is
tremendous."
Is there, by chance, a facetious aspect to
her admiration?
"Are you kidding me?" Cody replied,
aghast '"This is 100 percent sincere. I love
the show. I think it's great, and if everybody
watched they would certainly agree with
me."
Her passion for the original, she says, car-
ries added emotional weight
"I think it's sort of egg memory. I feel so
closely connected to that show because I
was watching it during my formative years,
and those girls were my role models," said
Tori Spelling returns to the 90210 ZIP code,
reprising her role as Donna in the "90210,"
a spinoff of "Beverly Hills 90210."


h
li


Madonna still hopes to adopt Malawian child
Associated Press - now final.
_ But her plans to take Mercy wit
BLANTYRE, Malawi - Madonna her last month foundered when Judg
ias told a newspaper in Malawi that Esme Chombo said Madonna did nc
h sill wxrnts to adrlt a cnirl from the nn- tItM nln 01i't-i er;-"t Afinition o"r f


poor African nation despite legal ob-
stacles, to educate her and empower
her to help people in her country.
The pop star told The Nation that
she would appeal against a court rul-
ing that she wasn't eligible to adopt a
3-year-old orphan, Chifundo "Mercy"
James, because she hasn't lived in
Malawi.
"I want to provide Mercy with a
home, a loving family environment
and the best education and health
care possible," she said in an e-mailed
response to questions from the news-
paper.
''And it's my hope that she, like
David, will one day return to Malawi
and help the people of their country,"
Madonna told The Nation on Sunday


Associated Press
Madonna told The Nation that she
would appeal against a court ruling
that she wasn't eligible to adopt a 3-
year-old orphan, because she hasn't
lived in Malawi.
On Monday, Madonna's office con-
firmed the interview and the quotes.
Madonna spotted both David and
Mercy in an orphanage in 2006. She
was able to leave the country immedi-
ately with David and the adoption is


h
;e
ot
R-


imee Iiaa wis oivki.inlIIIoIi i rese-
ident" Noting that Madonna had last
visited Malawi in 2008, the judge said
the pop star "jetted into the country
during the weekend just days prior to
the hearing of this application."
Malawi requires prospective par-
ents to live in the country for 18 to 24
months while child welfare authori-
ties assess their suitability - a rule
that was bent when Madonna was al-
lowed to take David to London in 2006.
Madonna has two other children,
Lourdes, 12, and Rocco, 8.
No date has been set for a court
hearing to appeal the judge's ruling.
Madonna said she could not say
anything else before the ruling, but
thanked her friends in Malawi and
around the world for their support


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
I Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

SUNDAY, APRIL 12
Fantasy 5:6 -16 -17 -19 - 32
5-of-5 1 winner $160,526.99
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3-of-5 6,455 $11
SATURDAY, APRIL 11
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Powerball: 20 :
Power Play: 4
5-of-5 PB No winners
5-of-5 4 $200,000
Lotto: 13 - 17 - 42 - 48 - 49 50
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3-of-6 53,935 $6.
Fantasy 5:10 - 11 - 12 -21 - 36
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3-of-5 13,095 $9

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call (850) 487-7777,,-,


Today in
HISTORY==:
Today is Tuesday, April 14,
the 104th day of 2009. There
are 261 days left in the year-
Today's Highlight in His-
tory:
On April 14,1865, President
Abraham Lincoln was shot
and mortally wounded by J6hh
Wilkes Booth while attending
the comedy "OurAmerican-
Cousin" at Ford's Theater in
Washington. (Lincoln died the
following moving.)
On this date:
In 1912, the British liner
RMS Titanic collided with an
iceberg in the North Atlantic
and began sinking.
In 1939, the John Steinbeck
novel 'The Grapes of Wrath"
was first published.
In 1949, at the conclusion of
the so-called 'Wilhelmstrasse
Trial," 19 former Nazi Foreign
Office officials were sentenced
by an American tribunal in
Nuremberg to prison terms
ranging from four to 25 years.
In 1956, Ampex Corp.
demonstrated the first suc-
cessful videotape recorder at.
the National Association of
Radio and Television Broad-
casters Convention in
Chicago.
Ten years ago: Independ-
ent Counsel Kenneth Starr
told Congress the Watergate-
era law that gave him the
power to probe actions of ex-
ecutive branch officials was
flawed and should be abol-
ished. NATO mistakenly
bombed a convoy of ethnic Al-
banian refugees.'
Five years ago: In a his-
toric policy shift, President
George W. Bush endorsed is:
rael's plan to hold on to part of
the West Bank in any final
peace settlement with the
Palestinians; he also ruled out
Palestinian refugees returning
to Israel, bringing strong criti-
cism from the Palestinians.
One year ago: Delta Air
Lines Inc. and Northwest Air-
lines Corp., announced they
were combining. Kidnapped
British journalist Richard Butler
was rescued by Iraqi troops
from a house in Basra after:
two months in captivity.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
Bradford Dillman is 79. Actor
Jay Robinson is 79. Country
singer Loretta Lynn is 74. Ac-
tress Julie Christie is 69. For-
mer baseball player Pete
Rose is 68. Actor John Shea is
60. Actor Brad Garrett is 49.
Actor Robert Carlyle is 48.
Baseball player Greg Maddux
is 43. Actor Anthony Michael.
Hall is 41. Actor Adrien Brody
is 36. Actress Sarah Michelle
Gellar is 32. Actress Abigail
Breslin is 13.
Thought for Today: "His-


tory repeats itself and 'History
never repeats itself are about
equally true ... We never knqw
enough about the infinitely
complex circumstances of any
past event to prophesy the fu-
ture by analogy." - George
Macaulay Trevelyan, English
historian (1876-1962).














HI-EALTH


T CY IFE
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Making green'

choices isn't as

simple as it seems
TAMMY WEBBER
Associated Press
- CHICAGO
he messages come
from everywhere:
Save the planet. Reduce
your carbon footprint Be
eco-wise.
But how do consumers
decide which product or
action is healthier or more envi-
ronmentally friendly? Sometimes
the choices are clear; other times
they're more murky.
Here are some examples:
* Paper vs. plastic.
Both can be made from recy-
cled materials and are recycla-
ble. Paper is made by cutting
down trees - which help absorb
greenhouse gases - but then
again, they're renewable. Plastic
bags are often made of polyethyl-
ene, produced from natural gas,
which is abundant but not renew-
able.
But it takes more water and en-
ergy to make paper bags than it
does to produce plastic bags. Nei-
ther breaks down particularly
fast in a landfill, though paper is
compostible; plastics don't biode-
S grade easily.
An alternative is taking your
own reusable cloth
or plastic bag to
the store. But con- U For more c
sumers shouldn't interactive
stress too much, as this story i
long as they're re- www.chroni,
cycling or reusing
store bags, whether
by filling paper with newspapers
for recycling or carrying their
lunch in plastic,'said Chris New-
man, an environmental scientist
with the U.S. Environmental Pro-
tection Agency.
* Compact fluorescent light
bulbs vs. incandescent.
CFLs last longer and use less
energy, but also are more expen-
sive and contain toxic mercury.
That means consumers must be


d
o
c


careful how they clean up the
bulbs if they break and dispose of
them properly.
But mercury also is a byprod-
uct of burning coal. And the extra
electricity needed to power in-
candescent bulbs often comes
from coal-fired power plants. The
toxin, which can cause neurologi-
cal damage in chil-
etails, see an dren, can get into
feature with the food chain
line. after settling into
leonline.com lakes and streams.
Eventually both
CFLs and incan-
descent bulbs probably will be
replaced by solid-state, or LED,
lighting. But until then, environ-
mental groups generally advo-
cate consumers use CFLs, though
people with children will want to
take extra caution.
* Organic vs. conventionally
grown food.
It's true that organic food,
grown or raised without pesti-
cides and herbicides, could be


Prevention tips and


'rehabilitation for falls
ast week, you may recall, we val is six to 12 months, depending
discussed the causes for on what is noted at your initial visit
falling, which is a problem and what your physician suggests.
that affects many of us If your vision and hear-
4nd can result in serious ing are impaired, you
health issues and drasti- are losing important
cally affect the quality of cues that help you main-
life. Causes were dis- tain your balance and
cussed and we touched . not fall.
lightly on prevention. Get up slowly A mo-
This article focuses mentary drop in your
mostly on health preven- . blood pressure due to
tion and rehabilitation. drugs or aging can cause
For the patient who has dizziness and cause you
not sustained a fall and Dr. Denis Grillo to fall if you get up too
requires no medication EAR NOSE quickly Try to maintain
intervention, but sus- EAR your balance and foot-
pects that his or her bal- & THROAT ing. If you sometimes
ance is off and who has feel dizzy, use a cane or a
some difficulty, here are some valu- walker to help you bal-
able tips. ance yourself or if you are on un-
even ground or slippery surfaces.
* Have your vision and hearing
checked regularly The usual inter- See GRILLO/Page C6


better for your health and the
ecosystem. But if it is shipped
from thousands of miles away,
there is an environmental trade-
off because of the pollution
caused by trucks traveling cross-
country.
Some experts say you might
want to consider passing on or-
ganic produce, for example, if it
has a thick skin, like bananas, or
outer leaves, like corn. Or you
could make a point of buying lo-
cally grown food.
* Pesticides vs. doing nothing.
Bugs in the house aren't just
creepy and crawly. In the case of
cockroaches, they can cause
asthma in children. But spraying
pesticides is not necessarily great
for little.lungs, either, and it's
often just a matter of time before
the critters return.
A better alternative is using
baits - the roaches eat the poi-
son, then take it back to their
families, helping to end the roach
See 'GREEN'/Page C4


"AROLYN KASTER/ sic-ated Press
In this March 20, 2008, file photo,
a high-efficiency compact fluores-
cent light (CFL) bulb glows in the
home of Darrell Brubaker in Eliza-
bethtown, Pa. Energy Star-qualified
CFLs use about 75 percent less en-
ergy than standard incandescent
bulbs and last up to 10 times
longer, according to Energy Star.


Healthy rhythms


I recently attended a weekend
wellness retreat. It was a de-
lightful experience. I have ad-
vocated wellness ways of life for a
long time, but I still
learned new things at
this retreat. In addition,
it was pure joy to be with
a group of people who
fully enjoyed and under- , "'
stood the great value of '.
wellness lifestyles.
One of the things I
learned about was NIA.
NIA has been around for
more than 25 years, but I Dr. Ed
had never been exposed PASI
to it before. Created in FOR H
California, NIA origi-
nally stood for Non-Im-
pact Aerobics, but it evolved into a
type of dance movement that I
would describe as a cross between
structured aerobic exercise and
freestyle dancing. It is structured


S'


5
IE


enough to need a facilitator and yet
students can follow in free-flowing
ways.
We had a wonderful facilitator
who was a qualified
"brown belt" NIA in-
structor on her way to
becoming a black belt.
She started us off with
basic kinds of gentle
movements, similar to
S~ tai chi, but we then grad-
ually progressed to
dancing kinds of move-
ments that involved mov-
Dodge, ing our legs, bodies, and
'ION arms around in many
EALTH variable, free-flowing
positions. As we moved
around the room in this
way, everyone had similar and yet
different movements. The one con-
stant was that everyone wore a
great big smile!
See DODGE/Page C6


Eco-knowledge


Dr. Sunil 'Gandhi
CANCER &
BLOOD
DISEASE


Complete

blood

count

Editor's note: This is
the first in a two-part se-
ries about the components
of the complete blood
count laboratory test
What is a complete
blood count
(CBC)?
This is one of the most
common blood tests per-
formed in doctors' offices
in the United States. This
gives us lots of. informa-
tion. Many of my patients
ask a lot of questions
about this. This article is
an attempt to explain
what the test means.
A complete blood count
(CBC) is not just one test;
it includes many different
tests in one. Some of these
tests are important in
See GANDHI/Page C6


SMore than 1,000 hearts given new life,

T right here on the Nature Coast.

.' They say practice makes perfect. That's why we're proud to announce a major milestone:
The Citrus Memorial Heart Center has performed more than 1,000
F' open-heart surgeries since opening in January 2004. Thanks to the
S expertise of our cardiovascular team, we celebrate 1,000 hearts healed,
!. 1,000 lives saved, 1,000 families kept whole And it all took place here in Citrus County.
For more information, call the Heart Center at 352-344-6416


CITRUS MEMORIAL

At it Heart of Our Communiy


-i ,r
-; 1S1


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY


Triple

therapy

Ask anyone who has
tried to quit smok-
ing. They will tell
you the same thing: It is
hard. Tobacco and its ad-
diction are difficult to
shake, but new research
shows that a three-tiered
approach might be more
successful.
Compared with stan-
dard therapy with a nico-
tine patch, combination
therapy with a patch, a
nicotine oral inhaler, and
Buspar (bupropion) for as
long as required almost
double quit rates at 26
weeks among smokers
with medical illnesses.
Buspar is an anti-anxiety
agent. These findings
were recently published
from a randomized trial
by a research team in
New Jersey and were re-
ported in the Annals of In-
ternal Medicine.
This can be especially
See BENNETT/Page C6


DAVID LUBARSKY/Associated Press
This June 1, 1989, file photo shows a group of babies wearing a variety of different diapers and wraps. Clock-
wise from top left: Tropical-print cloth pants from the R. Duck Co.; Nylon diaper wrap from R. Duck; magenta
disposable diaper from Dandees Enterprises; Proctor and Gamble Co.'s Luvs for girls; and last two babies
wear cotton Nikkys diaper wraps.


'; ,;:* ,,-** , .l '-t4 " .,"' ;'','*r
� ' -' **. :/ ^ ' :"'t i ;' .": '* *
. , }, �,- ,.? ear









C2 T~FSDAY, APRIl 14, 2009 HEAlTH & LIFE ciTRUS COUNTY (FL,) CHRONICLE


Natural, sunless tanning


W ith summer well on its way, every-
one is getting the tanning fever The
healthy glow of a bronze tan makes
everyone feel slimmer and more beautiful.
Here are some tips for a natu-
ral-looking tan.
Natural tanning products react
with your skin's amino acids and
melanin to give you a natural glow.
The active ingredient is called
DHA. This product comes in
many forms and strengths.
Cream forms can be applied .
yourself and have a lighter cover-
age due to the weaker strength of -
DHA. Sprays work well, as long as Lill
you can spray yourself evenly. Yai Yai
Professional spray tanning is
the best for full body coverage and YA
the highest level of DHA. There ST
are many companies producing
spray-tanning products, and they are not all
the same. I have experienced some to be hor-
rible, some OK, and some to be excellent
The solutions with the highest level of DHA
are very expensive, last the longest, give ex-
cellent coverage and have the best color I
have experienced the color to be very bronze
and natural looking.
The product adjusts with your melanin, so
your spray tan will appear as a natural sun-
tan. You will not look "fake" or overly dark if
you are pale.


I


I


Professional spray tanning usually lasts
seven to 10 days, depending on your skin.
The care tips are easy:
* Pre-tan: Exfoliate, no lotions, no make-
up.
S* Tan process: Tech should
lightly mist the hands, feet, elbows
and knees with the tanning solu-
tion. To prevent over-pigmenta-
tion in these areas, apply a small
amount of oil-free lotion
To avoid staining of the feet, do
not stand on the bare floor during
the tanning process; always cover
your hair with a plastic bag. Al-
lan ways wear loose-fitting clothing or
Knipp a sundress.
A * Post-tan: Shower 12 hours
YA later. Use all oil-free products on
ILE your skin. Do not lounge in hot
tubs or hot baths. Use oil-free sun-
screen to protect yourself from the sun's dam-
aging rays as this tan is only on the surface of
your skin.

Lillian Yai Yai Knipp is an internationally
trained hair designer, make-up artist,
skin-care specialist, fashion designer and
Citrus County business owner A former
model, modeling agency owner and fitness
instructor, she can be reached at
yaiyaistyle@hotmail. com.


Keeping FIT


* Back and Core Stability
with yoga and gym ball start-
ing at 2 p.m. Tuesday, May 5.
One-hour class. Six classes for
$42.Bring a friend and get a $5
discount. Arrive 15 minutes
prior to class to register. Bring
mat. All exercise balls will be for
sale, or bring your own. Better
Health Chiropractic, 6166 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River (795-8911).
* Water Fitness classes
from 1 to 2 p.m. daily in the
heated pool at Bicentennial
Park, Crystal River. Purchase
20 classes for $40 or pay the
daily fee of $2.50. Call Citrus
County Parks and Recreation
at 795-1478.
* Yoga at the Yoga and
Wellness Center, 1925 S.E.
U.S. 19, Crystal River, is sched-
uled as follows:
* 10 to 11 a.m. and 5:30 to
6:30 p.m. Monday.
S9 to 10 a.m. and 4 to 5
p.m. Wednesday.
* 9 to 10 a.m. Saturday.


* Also, 6 to 7 p.m. Thurs-
days at Lions Club Historic
Crystal River Train Depot, 109
Crystal Ave.
Cost is $5 per class. Bring a
mat or towel and wear clothes
that allow for easy physical
movement. Classes are appro-
priate for 8 years and older and
are multi-level. All certified in-
structors. Call 795-3710, 795-
3662, 795-1645, 860-1305 or
563-6535.
* Hatha Yoga classes 6:15
to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday at Beverly Hills
Recreation Center, 77 Civic Cir-
cle. Instructor has 30 years
teaching experience. $6 per
class. No experience needed.
Bring a mat or towel.
* Weekly yoga class, 10:30
a.m. Tuesday at the Nature
Coast Unitarian Universalist
Fellowship, 7633 N. Florida
Ave., (U.S. 41), Citrus Springs,
tum left on 41 at the Holder
flashing light. Payment will be
$7 per class or six sessions for
$35. Bring a mat and wear


loose-fitting clothing. Call Bar-
bara Ewing-DeRemer at 795-
5736.
* Weekly yoga classes
from 6 to 7 p.m. Wednesday
and Thursdays at the Citrus
Springs Community Building
and from 11 a.m. to noon Mon-
days and Wednesdays at Citrus
County Auditorium in Invemess.
Cost is $8 per class. Register
online at
www.citruscountyfl.org, click on
Parks & Recreation to register.
Call 527-7677.
* Inverness Sports & Ortho-
pedic Rehab Team (SPORT)
offers free screening, by ap-
pointment, for individuals with
neck/back pain, headaches, or-
thopedic injuries, carpal tunnel,
tennis elbow, osteoporosis and
general fitness. Call 341-3740.
* "Medically Speaking," a
30-minute health awareness
program, airs at 5 p.m. Mon-
days on WYKE TV, channel 16,
hosted by April Saxer, market-
ing director for Gulfcoast
Aquatic and Rehabilitation.


* LifeSouth bloodmobile
schedule. To find a donor cen-
ter or a blood drive near you,
call 527-3061. Anyone 16 or
older who is in good health
and weighs at least 110
pounds is eligible to donate.
0 1 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, April
14, Cypress Cove Care Cen-
ter, 700 S.E. Eighth Ave., Crys-
tal River.
* 8 a.m. to noon Tuesday,
April 14, Walden Woods Com-
munity, 7086 W. Eatonshire
Path, Homosassa.
0*2 to 5:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, April 15, All Saints Council
Knights of Columbus, Atlas
Drive, Homosassa.
* 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednes-
day, April 15, Homosassa Ele-
mentary School, 10935 W.
Yulee Drive, Homosassa
Springs.
0 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday,
April 16, MidwayAnimal Hospi-
tal, 1635 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
* 2 to 6 p.m. Thursday, April
16, Walmart, 3826 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa.
* 1 to 5 p.m. Friday, April
17, Citrus Health & Rehab,
701 Medical Court E., Inver-
ness.
* 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday,
April 19, Winn-Dixie, 6450 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River.
* 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday,
April 20, Walmart, 3826 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
* 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tues-
day, April 21, Personal Mini
Storage, 7742 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, Hernando.
* Seminar on Smart Detox-
ing by Dr. Cynthia Valenca,
Ph.D.,.N.D., HMD, 11 a.m.
Saturday, at Doctor Vitamin
Store, 3930 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa. Call 628-7036, as
seating is limited.
* Health education pro-
grams from Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center, in the
community room on the sec-
ond floor of the Medical Offices
Building (across the street
from the hospital), unless oth-
erwise noted. Call 795-1234 or
(800) 436-8436 or visit
www.srrmc.com to register.
* Grief Support Group: 2:30


Health NOTES

Health department to
host 'Day of Dentistry'
Special to the Chronicle


The Citrus County Health Department's "Citrus Day
of Dentistry" will mark the beginning of CCHD's efforts
to increase access to dental care to low-income adults.
CCHD staff realize that there is a tremendous need in
the community for adult dental care. They are seeking
volunteer dentist, dental hygienist and dental assis-
tants to help continue to provide this project
The first "Citrus Day of Dentistry" will be from 7 am.
to 5 p.m. Friday, May 1, at the George A Dane Commu-
nity Health Center, 2804 W Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto.
* Intended for low-income adults who do not have
dental insurance.
* We will offer choice of one extraction or one sim-
ple filling only.
* No appointment necessary - we will see people
on a first-come, first-served basis.
* We will provide service to the first 100 people. We
will t tto afford services to more iftime allows.
* Bring proof of income, photo ID and.or Social Se-
curity number:
* No baby-sitting service available.


p.m. Tuesday. Registration
required. Call (800) 486-8784.
Free
* Pre-Surgery Ortho Camp:
1 p.m. Monday. Call 795-0534
to register. Free.
* Are You Taking Care of
Your Kidneys? 1 p.m. Thurs-
day, April 23. Free.
* Diet Therapy for Diabetes:
6 p.m. Tuesday, April 28. Free.
. Visit www.srrmc.com for a
complete health library avail-
able 24/7.
* Diabetes classes are of-
fered from 9 to 10 a.m. Mon-
days at the Citrus County
Health Department in Lecanto.
Classes are free. No registra-
tion is required.
* Avoiding complications -
Monday.
* Sick days - April 27.
* Medications and monitor-
ing - May 4.
Fasting blood sugars are of-
fered from 8 to 9 a.m. Monday
through Friday in all three Cit-
rus County Health Department
sites. There is a $10 fee for
this service. No appointment is
necessary. Every Monday be-
fore the Lecanto class: to take
a blood sugar test, come fast-
ing.
Call Lynece Hand, R.N.,


527-0068, ext. 245 or Carol
Burke, R.D., 726-5222.
* CMHS to host heart dis-
ease seminar
On Tuesday, April 21, Citrus
Memorial Health System will
present a free seminar on the
diagnosis and treatment of
heart disease. Featured
speakers will be cardiovascu-
lar anesthesiologist Dr. S
Michael Mikowski and Heart
Center Director Marcy Frisina,
R.N., BSN.
The talk will begin at 6 p.m.
at the Southern Woods Golf
Club at 1501 Corkwood Blvd.,
Homosassa.
Topics of discussion will in-
clude: heart risk; available
treatment; and health informa-
tion. Resources will also be
available.
For information or to regis-
ter, call 726-1551, ext. 1559.
* Health Fair 9 a.m. to
noon Sunday, April 26: fasting
blood work, free total choles-
terol and glucose, results in
five minutes. Additional tests
available. The Health Fair will
be at the Hemando Seventh-
day Adventist Church, 1880 N.
Trucks Ave., Hemando. Call
527-1904.


See .Page C3

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Friday, April 17, 2009

9:00am - 5:00pm
CITRUS COUNTY


IRONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com

Main Lobby

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River

100'S OF BOOKS AND GIFTS


* Children's Books
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~____llf_____~1_______I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C2 TUESDAY, APRII. 14, 2009


HEALTH & LIFE












Colonoscopy preparation medications carry risks


9 Are products
* for bowel
* cleansing be-
fore a colonoscopy
safe?
A: The FDA recently
announced that it will
add a Boxed Warning to
the prescription label-
ing for Visicol and Os-
moPrep to warn Richard
consumers about the ASK
potential risk of acute PHARF
injury to the kidneys
when using these prod-
ucts. People routinely take these
products to cleanse the bowel be-
fore a colonoscopy and other pro-
cedures.


H
h*
v


The FDA is also con-
Scerned about the risks
associated with the use
of similar products that
are available over-the-
counter, such as Fleet
Phospho-soda, which
may be used in high
doses for bowel cleans-
ing. Current informa-
loffmann tion, however, does not
THE show a risk of acute
IACIST kidney injury when
these non-prescription
products are used in
lower doses for laxative use. The
FDA is recommending that con-
sumers do not use over-the-
counter products like Fleet


Phospho-soda for bowel cleans-
ing. These oral prescription and
non-prescription products contain
sodium phosphate, which can
form deposits in the kidney and
cause permanent damage. While
this side effect is rare, it is recom-
mended that these products be
used with caution for bowel
cleansing in the following risk
groups:
* People over 55 years of age.
* People who suffer from dehy-
dration, kidney disease, acute co-
litis, or delayed bowel emptying.
* People taking certain medica-
tions that affect kidney function,
such as diuretics (water pills), cer-
tain blood pressure medications


(ACE inhibitors or ARBs), and
possibly nonsteroidal anti-inflam-
matory drugs like ibuprofen or
other arthritis medications.
In addition, these oral phos-
phate products should not be used
by children under 18 years of age
or in combination with other laxa-
tive products containing sodium
phosphate. Please check with
your physician and pharmacist if
you have any questions in using
bowel cleansing/laxative prod-
ucts.
The majority of colonoscopies
performed in the United States
are for colorectal cancer screen-
ing. Colon cancer is the second
leading cause of death in the


United States.
Nearly one in 18 Americans will
develop colon cancer, with 90 per-
cent of cases occurring in those
older than 50. While it is recom-
mended that anyone older than 50
have a colonoscopy performed
every 10 years, it has been esti-
mated that 66 percent of patients
avoid colonoscopy because of
reservations about the bowel
prep.


Richard Hoffmann has been a
pharmacist for more than 20
years. Send questions to him at
1135N. Timucuan Trail,
Inverness, FL 34453.


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

* "Living With Grief: Diver-
sity & End-of-Life Care" the
annual teleconference, 1:30 to
4:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 29,
at the Seventh-day Adventist
Church at 1880 N. Trucks Ave.
in Hernando, sponsored by the
church, Hospice of Citrus
County and the Hospice Foun-
dation of America. CEUs of-
fered. Complimentary lunch
served at 12:30 p.m.
Free, but reservations are re-
quired and seating is limited.
RSVP to Grief Services Man-
ager Jonathan Beard at 527-
2020. Visit the Web at www.hos
piceofcitruscounty.org.
* SPRING HILL-- "Wom-
en's Health at Any Age" by
David F. Marler, M.D., commu-
nity education series, 5 to 6:30
p.m. Tuesday, May 5, at Silver-
thom Country Club, 4550 Golf
Club Lane, Brooksville (about
2.5 miles south of Cortez
Boulevard, State Road 50) on
Barclay Avenue. Topics will in-
clude appropriate screenings,
medications, illnesses, diagno-
sis and prevention of major dis-
eases relating to gynecological
concerns. A hot buffet will be
served. Seating is limited and
reservations are required. Call
628-6060 in Citrus.
* The Lighthouse for the
Visually Impaired offers serv-
ices to Citrus County residents.


All workshops are free. Call
(866) 962-5254 or 527-8399
The workshops will from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday at the
Center for Independent Living
of North Central Florida at 3774
W..Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Lecanto.
* Free balance screenings,
11:15 a.m. to noon the first and
third Wednesday monthly at
Seven Rivers Rehab & Wound
Center, 1675 S.E. U.S. 19, in
the Crystal River Shopping
Center (next to Sweetbay). No
appointment necessary. Call
795-0534.
* Free or low-cost child-
birth-related education pro-
grams by the Women's &
Family Center at Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center, in-
cluding Early Pregnancy, Sib-
ling Preparation, Infant Care
and Childbirth Refresher. Make
an appointment at 795-BABY
(2229).
* The Center for Independ-
ent Living of North Central
Florida in Lecanto offers free
Social Security workshops, SSI,
SSDI, Medicare and Medicaid.
All questions are answered the
third Wednesday monthly from
10 a.m. to noon. Call for reser-
vations, 527-8399.
N SHINE (Serving Health Insur-
ance Needs of the Elders) is a
free program where volunteers
assist clients with Medicare,
Medicaid, private health insur-
ances, long-term care options,
benefit and claim issues, pre-
scription drug assistance pro-


grams and much more. To re-
ceive assistance to solve health
insurance problems or inquire
about becoming a volunteer,
call 527-5956 and a SHINE
counselor will contact you.
* Citrus Hearing Impaired
Program Services in Crystal
River, provides assistance with
hearing aids and devices. Call
795-5000 (voice) or 795-7243
(TTY) to find out more about
this program. CHIPS is open
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
* Free Medical Loan
Closet offers wheelchairs,
crutches, shower chairs and
more, sponsored by the Yan-
keetown Inglis Woman's Club.
Call volunteer chairwoman Dee
Dixon at (352) 447-0164. Dona-
tions of money or items wel-
comed, especially small
wheelchairs.
* The Citrus County Health
Department offers child safety
seat checks by appointment at
the Inverness office, 120 N.
Montgomery Ave. Call Sue Lit-
tnan at 726-1731, ext. 242. Visit
citruscountyhealth.org.
* Citrus County "World's
Greatest Baby Shower" will
be May 7 at the Citrus County
Auditorium. We welcome dona-
tions of any new baby items
such as strollers, high chairs,
cribs, toys, gift baskets, hand-
made quilts and blankets as
well as prizes for parents such
as tool kits, oil changes, sports
tickets and gift certificates to
grocery stores, restaurants,


movies, etc. Donations of
money are also welcome;
checks should be made
payable to Citrus County Home
& Community Educators
(CCHCE). Donations are tax
deductible and 100 percent of
the donations go to the event.
Donations of all types may
be dropped off at, or mailed to,
the Inverness Health Depart-
ment, attention Lee Brannon,


120 N. Montgomery Ave., Inver-
ness, FL 34450. Indicate that it
is for the "Baby Shower," and
make sure your or your group's
name and address are on the
donation. Call Lee Brannon
726-1731, ext. 258.
* Friends and Family CPR
course Tuesday, May 19; three
sessions: 10 a.m., 2 p.m. and
5:30 p.m. at Nature Coast EMS
American Heart Association


Training Center, 3876 W. Coun-
try Hill Drive, Lecanto, one
block off State Road 44 on
County Road 490. The class is
free, book is included. Call to
reserve your seat: 249-4750.
* For those who have put off
getting a flu shot, can't afford
it, and with no insurance will be
able to come into the B&W

See NOTES/Page C4


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Saturday, April 25 1. What musician is portrayed on the
a I 2009 Jazz Appreciation Month (JAM)
on - 5 p poster printed and distributed by the
Noon - 5 p.m . I Smithsonian Institution (Sl)?
2nd floor, Historic Courthouse A Miles Davis
The Old Courthouse Heritage B. ouisArmstrong
Museum D. Benny Goodman
Museum D. Bill Clinton


One Courthouse Square
Inverness

Who's

W6lPlaying?


Noon - 1 p.m.
Richard Gilewitz,
Acoustic Guitar


1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Rich Dahlinger, Keyboard


2 p.m. - 3 p.m. I
Nelson Dellamaggiore, I
Saxophone & Flute

3 p.m. - 4 p.m.
Norman Bernard, Trumpet/Flugelhorn
I
4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Ted Stauffer, Drums



Sponsors:
Moring & Moring, PA
Central Florida Community College (ICA)
Citrus County Historical Society, Inc.
Ted & Judy Stauffer I
Citrus County Chronicle
Regions Bank
Susan Gill
TLC Animal Hospital
Smithsonian Institution

Refreshments provided by:
Deco Cafe


ONI . I


2. What does Public Law 108-72
declare?
A. Recognition of April as JAM
B. A private law made public
C Banning smoking in jazz clubs
D. There is no such public law

3. What musician was instrumental in
launching JAM?
A Chris Both
B. Ouincy Jones
C. Wynton Marsalis
D. None of the above

4. Why is JAM celebrated in the month
of April?
A. Many famous Jazz musicians
were born this month
B. Near end of the school year
C. Coincides with the Cherry
Blossom festival in
Washington DC
D. Both A and B

5. What are the best ways to celebrate
JAM?
A. Contact local Jazz Society
for programs
B. Attend a jazz concert
C. Hold a church Vespers service
D. All of the above

6. What legendary jazz musician was
not born in April?
A. Duke Ellington
B. Lionel Hampton
C. Gerry Mulligan
D. Dave Brubeck

7. What comprises the rhythm
section?
A. A musician snapping
fingers in time
B. Two musicians snapping
fingers
C. Piano, bass, and drums
D. Fascinating musicians

8. What does not support jazz core
values?


A. Must read music
B. Improvisation
,C. Never ordinary
^M w~ PI. ^ D. Spontaneous


,l


1


I-


TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 C3


HEALTH & LIFE


CrrRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








C4 TUESDAY, A'PRl. 1-, 2009


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

Rexall Drugs to receive their
free flu shot. This is only until
the vaccination supply that Ken
Heimann has at the pharmacy
runs out.
* Maxim Health Systems
has launched its annual in-
fluenza vaccination program,
making flu shots available
throughout the Citrus and Her-
nando County area. Find the
nearest location in the area by
typing in your ZIP code on
www.FindAFluShot.com. This
will provide the address, driving
directions, dates and times for
flu shots at local clinics. Maxim
provides a toll-free number at
(877) 962-9358.
Support G - :

* Scleroderma Support
Group organizing for North
Central Florida. All persons in-
terested, call Melba Withrow at
746-7752.
* The Citrus County Multi-
ple Sclerosis Support Group



'GREEN'
Continued from Page C1

life cycle, according to Tom
Neltner, of the National
Center for Healthy Housing
and founder of Indianapo-
lis-based Improving Kids'
Environment. But parents
have to be careful that chil-
dren and pets don't come in
contact with the baits, he
said.
* Drive-thrus vs. getting
out of the car.
Idling a car engine for
more than 10 seconds emits
more pollution than turning
it off and back on again. So
if you're able, environmen-
talists recommend that you
park your car and walk into
the fast-food restaurant or
the bank. Many cities rec-
ommend that drivers avoid
idling as much as possible,
especially on days when
alerts are issued because of
ground-level ozone and
soot.
Or better yet, walk to the
restaurant. If you can safely
walk or bicycle, there is no
environmental or health
downside. And riding the
bus or train helps take cars
and trucks off the road, cut-
ting down on tailpipe emis-
sions, which account for a
large percentage of air pol-
lution in most urban areas.
* Cloth vs. disposable dia-
pers.
Disposable diapers are


HEALTH & LIFE


will not hold its monthly meeting
this month. Please search fu-
ture notices of its May meeting,
in the Chronicle during the
month of May. Contact Peg
Morisi at 344-4855 or Florence
Cicarelli at 637-4014 for more
information. Guests welcome.
* Head and Neck Cancer
Support Group meets 11 a.m.
to noon the third Wednesday
monthly at the Robert Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute,
522 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, north of State Road
44. Call Dr. Patrick Meadors,
(352) 342-1822.
* SPRING HILL-- Look
Good Feel Better Support
Group, 3:30 to 5 p.m. third
Wednesday monthly at the
Florida Cancer Institute - New
Hope's Spring Hill Center,
10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203,
in the Medical Arts Building
next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call
Peggy Dome, R.N., group facili-
tator, at (352) 688-7744.
* Alzheimer's caregivers
support, 5:15 p.m. the third
Thursday monthly at the Mem-
ory Unit at Barrington Place,
2341 W. Norvell Bryant High-


Hernando-Pasco Hospice
to host workshops
Special to the Chronicle

Hernando-Pasco Hospice (HPH) will hold Advanced
Directives and End-of-Life Decisions workshops that
will address important issues including advanced di-
rectives, durable power of attorney, guardianship, do not
resuscitate orders, organ donations and hospice care
and services. The workshops are designed for adults
who would like information about these topics ex-
plained in easy to understand terms with no obligation.
They are being offered at no charge but reservations are
requested due to space limitations.
The interactive workshops will take place from 1 p.m.
to 3 p.m. The first will be on Wednesday, April 22, at the
Central Citrus Resource Center, 2804 W Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto. Attendees are encouraged to arrive be-
tween 12:30 and 1 p.m. for check-in and refreshments.
Speakers will be Elder Law Attorney, John Clardy. PA
from Crystal River; Dr. David McGrew. HPH's medical di-
rector; Sister Anne Stango. Sc.D.M in. education special-
ist for St. Joseph Hospital and Jane Bedford, RN, CCP
from the Nature Coast Emergency Medical Services.
To register, call HPH's colnmunit. relations depart-
ment at 527-4600.


way, Lecanto, 34461, for care-
givers and their dementia pa-
tients, by the Citrus team of
Hernando-Pasco Hospice.
Dinner served to patients


while caregivers attend the 5:30
p.m. support group. Free. Call
Wendy Hall at 527-4600.
* If interested in a day pro-
gram and support group for


RICHARD DREW/Associated Press
This Aug. 16, 2006, file photo shows organic produce on sale at the stand of Keith's Farm,
from Westtown, N.Y., at the Union Square Greenmarket, New York City. It's true that or-
ganic food, grown or raised without pesticides and herbicides, could be better for your
health and the ecosystem. But if it is shipped from thousands of miles away, there is an en-
vironmental tradeoff because of the pollution caused by trucks traveling cross-country.


convenient, but can be
costly over time and raise
heath concerns over ab-
sorbent chemicals used to
keep infants dry, such as
sodium polyacrylate (SAP).
But cloth diaper services
can be harmful to the envi-
ronment because of chemi-
cals used in laundering and
carbon emissions released
in pick-up and delivery.
However, if laundering at
home, cloth diapers can be
a cost-effective option.


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1 IATIMNI H iASN iOm BlEN tlE h i nD BYHE OOD t A ODUG AMINISTlON,TSHI PRODUCT IS H INOT oilN I lEN TOIAGNOSuE,II Lu nIOR nmm I o SL I I2


Also efficient are all-in-
one or "hybrid" diapers that
usually consist of a wash-
able cotton pant and a dis-
posable diaper refill that
can be flushed or used as
wet compost. Organic dis-
posable diapers offer an
eco-friendly alternative to
plastic, non-biodegradable


ones left in landfills indefi-
nitely
Many parents use a com-
bination of cloth and dis-
posable diapers, depending
on the circumstance and
time of day.
Associated Press Writer
Tania Fuentez contributed
to this report


Alzheimer's and dementia pa-
tients, call 344-5228 for more
information.
* The Fibromyalgia Sup-
port Group of the First United
Methodist Church of Ho-
mosassa meets the first and
third Thursday in the confer-
ence room of the administration
building at the church. All are
welcome to join us. For more
information call 628-4083.
* NEW PORT RICHEY-
Lymphedema support group, 3
to 4 p.m. third Thursday
monthly meetings at Florida
Cancer Institute - New Hope's
center at 8763 River Crossing
Blvd., New Port Richey, Call
Community Hospital's Outpa-
tient Healthcare Center at (727)
845-0757.
* FFRA (Families and
Friends of Real Adults) will
meet Friday, April 17, at the Key
Training Center, 130 Heights
Ave., Inverness. Social Time
and business meeting begin at
9 followed by the speaker at 10
a.m. Officer David L. Michal-
icka, of the Crime Prevention
Task Force of Florida, based in
Spring Hill, will speak about


I1


CiTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

staying safe in our homes and
in the community. Call Ron
Phillips at 382-7819, or
Stephanie Hopper at 344-0288.
* The Ostomy Support
Group of Citrus County meets
at 2 p.m. the third Sunday
monthly in the Cypress Room
on the first floor in the Citrus
Memorial Health System's Ad-
ministration's Annex Building,
across the street from the Med-
ical Offices Building at 131 S.
Citrus Ave., Invemess. Call Mel
or Betty at 726-3802, Sally at
637-2055 or Frank at 341-
0005. Send e-mail to:
OSGofCC@yahoo.com.
* Beyond Grief Support
Group, Christian-based meet-
ing for people who have lost
someone through death, 1:15
p.m. the third Tuesday monthly
at the ministry complex room
behind the SunTrust Bank in
Meadowcrest, off Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Call
Betty Jo at 628-2933 or the
church office at 795-8077.
* Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization, serving Central
Florida, offers monthly support
See GROUPS/Page C5


HEALTH NOTE GUIDEUNES
* Support group information will list monthly meetings
first, as space is available, then v.'eekl.y meetings.
* It is the responsibility of each organization to inform
the (hhr-ni'rl,,e about changes to existing listings.
* To submit inltrrnation about upcoming seminars,
health related events open to the public or support
group meetings, e mail newsdesk@chronicleonline
.c:mn attn Health IJotes: fa.. 563 5660 or write to:
Health rlotes ,: o Citruw. Court Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.


Grief Support Group
Tuesday, 2:30 pm
Hernando-Pasco Hospice presents
ongoing grief support for anyone who has
experienced the sudden loss of a loved
one. A trained bereavement counselor
leads the group. Workbooks provided.
Registration required. Call 800.486.8784.
FREE

Balance Screening
1st & 3rd Wednesday of each month
11:15 am - 12:00 noon
Seven Rivers Rehab & Wound Center,
1675 S.E. US Hwy. 19, located in the
Crystal River Shopping Center (next to
Sweetbay). No appointment needed. Call
352.795.0534 for details. FREE

Pre-Surgery Ortho Camp
Monday, April 6 * April 20, 1 pm
If you're having knee or hip replacement
surgerN, consider attending Ortho Camp.
At Camp. pjtienis learn about pre- and
post-surgery exercises, using a \Ialer.
knee and hip precautions and adaptie
equipment for activities of daily living.
Call 352.795.0534 to register. FREE

Good News About Knee
& Hip Pain
Wednesday, April 15, 1 pm
If \ou are oper 55 and have knee or hip
pain, stiffne,, or swelling, chances are
\ou haie arthritis. The good news is
many treatments are available allowing
ou to m1o\e eafil) jnld \\ without pain once
again. FREE

Are You Taking Care
of Your Kidneys?
Thursday, April 23, 1 pm
Kidney disease affects one in nine adults.
Sanji\ 1. Shah. MD explains kidney
disease and how early detection of
problems and proper treatment play an
important role in kidne\ health. FREE

Diet Therapy for Diabetes
Tuesday, April 28, 6 pm
Diet is an essential part of controlling
diabetes. Understanding how food affects
blood glucose levels empowers you to
make choices that best fit your lifestyle,
food preferences and achieve good blood
sugar control. Product samples available.
FREE

Childbirth-Related Education
The Women's & Family Center offers a
variety of free or low cost childbirth-
related programs including Early
Pregnancy, Sibling Preparation, Infant
Care and Childbirth Refresher. To make
an appointment, call 352.795.BABY
(2229).

SSE VEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
www srrmn cnm


548-0414TUCRN
NOTICE OF ESTABLISHMENT OR
CHANGE OF A REGULATION
AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND,
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CHANGE
AND/OR CHANGE OF LAND USE

The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners (BCC) proposes to
adopt or change by ordinance: A regulation affecting the comprehensive
plan and/or the use of land within and for the area shown on the map in
this advertisement. The overall impact of this proposal may be significant.
The Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) has reviewed and
discussed the proposed 2009 1st Cycle Large Scale Cycle Amendment to
the Citrus County Comprehensive Plan (Ord. No. 89-04). This is the
transmittal phase of the review.
Comprehensive Plan Amendment 09-10 - Department of Development Services
CPA-09-10 - Chapter Nine Utility Element/Chapter Ten Future Land Use Element
Request for modification to the text of the Comprehensive Plan to remove
the restrictions on increase in residential density within a five-mile radius
of the Progress Energy nuclear plant in Crystal River, as directed by the
Board of County Commissioners.

LOCATOR MAP
roclawrou nr












following dates:
Transmittal Public Hearing: Tuesday,April 28,2009,5:15 P.M.
.K.':..' -' -f B










The meeting will beheld in the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N.Apopka
Avenue, Room 100, Inverness, Florida.
Persons are advised that any individual who might wish to appeal any
Interested parties may appear at the hearmeeting and be hearing regarding any matter is hereby
proposed amendment.The PDRB will need a record old publiroceedings for such purpose




and that they may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings
folois made which record shall include the testimony and evidence upon




which such appeal is to be based.
Transmittal Public Heasonable accommodation at this meeting becauseM.




of a disability or physical impairment should contact the County
The meeting will be held in the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N.orthApopka




Avenue, Room 100, Inverness, Florida34450 (352) 3416560. If you are
Persons are advised that any individual who might wish to appeal any6580.
decision made at this meeting/hearing regarding any matter is hereby




Copies ofthat they will proposed amendments will be proceedingslable for such purpose an
and tpurchat they may nbetwee to insures of 8:00 averbatim record of the proceedings
throughis made which record shall include the testimony and eviceCitrus County
which s uch appeal is to be based canto Govement Center,3600




West Sovereign Path, Suite 140, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person requiring regarding the accommodation at this meeting because
of a disabilityment or physical impairment should contact the County527-5239.





Chairman
Administrator's Office, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka
CitrAvenueRoom Inverness,Florida,34450 (352) 341-6560. If you are
hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Copies of the proposed amendments will be available for inspection and/
or purchase between the hours of 8:00 a.m.and 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday in the Department of Development Services, Citrus County
Division Community Development, Lecanto Government Center, 3600
West Sovereign Path, Suite 140, Lecanto, FL 34461.
For more information regarding the proposals discussed herein, contact
the Department of Development Services at (352) 527-5239.
Chairman
Board of County Commissioners
Citrus County, Florida 7��8ai


ST":








H~rii & Lni~ TUFSDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 C5


CITRUS COUNTY' (FL) CHRONICLE


GROUPS
Continued from Page C4

group meetings. Public is in-
vited.
* 2 p.m. Tuesday, April 21,
Highland Terrace, 700 Medical
Court E., Inverness. Call Ellen
Mallon or Valerie Taylor at 860-
2525.
The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization branch office in Cit-
rus County is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. the second Mon-
day monthly. Call the Citrus
County community service rep-
resentative Ellen Mallon at 860-
2525.
* Look Good ... Feel
Better, a free two-hour session
for women undergoing radiation
or chemotherapy, at 3 p.m. the
second Wednesday monthly at
the Cancer & Blood Disease
Center, Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the
fourth Wednesday monthly at
the Robert Boissoneault Oncol-
ogy Institute, Lecanto. Call Mil-
dred Roseberry (746-7212) or
the American Cancer Society
(800) 395-LOOK (5665) to reg-
ister.
* Emotions Anonymous
12 step support group, noon
the second and fourth Thurs-
days monthly at Central Ridge
Library, Forest Ridge Boulevard
and Roosevelt, in Beverly Hills.
Call Meg at 527-2443.
* SPRING HILL- Stroke
Support Group, at noon on the
fourth Thursday monthly at
HealthSouth Rehabilitation
Hospital in the private dining
room. Call Pam McDonald at
(352)346-6359.
* Celiac support meeting
for all people who have celiac
disease or dermatitis, from 10
a.m. to noon fourth Saturday
monthly, in the Community
Room at the Coastal Region Li-
brary, 8619 W. Crystal St.,
Crystal River. Call Mary Lou
Thomas at 628-9559.
* Fibromyalgia Support
Group, 1:30 to 3 p.m. the
fourth Saturday monthly at
B&W Rexall in Invemess. Call
637-3364.
* Caregiver Support
Group, 1 p.m. the second and
fourth Monday monthly at the
Central Citrus Community Cen-
ter, at 2804 W. Marc Knigfiton
Court in Lecanto, by Hospice of
Citrus County. Free and open
to the public. No reservations
are required. Call Mary
Williams at 527-2020.
* The Hepatitis C Support
Group meets from 6:30 to
7:30 p.m. the fourth Monday
monthly at the home of the
Rev. Glenn C. Mosley, 5001 W.
Sanction Road, Lecanto. Call
for directions, 527-4432.
* SPRING HILL - Am-
putee Support Group, 7 p.m.
the last Monday of every month
at HealthSouth Rehabilitation
Hospital in the private dining
room. Call Eva Baker at (352)
592-7232.
* National Osteoporosis
Foundation Citrus County
Support Group, 1 p.m. the last
Tuesday monthly at the Citrus
County Resource Center, 2804
W. Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto. Call Laura Henderson
of Gulfcoast Spine Institute at
341-4778.
* SPRING HILL-
Leukemia/ Lymphoma Sup-
port Group, 5.to 6:30 p.m. the
fourth Tuesday monthly at the
Florida Cancer Institute - New
Hope's Spring Hill Center,
10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203
in the Medical Arts Building
next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call
Jeff Haight, R.N., support group
facilitator, at.(352) 688-7744.


Weekly meetings
* Independent Living
Skills, Peer Support and Lit-
eracy workshops held from 9 to
11:45 a.m. Monday at the
Center for Independent Living
of North Central Florida, 3774
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Lecanto. Call Cathy Jackson at
527-8399.
* Beverly Hills Community
Church Community Support
Group, a 12-step program,
meets at 6 p.m. Tuesday in
the fellowship hall, 88 Civic Cir-
cle. Free. All are invited. Call
the church at 746-3620 or Meg
at 527-2443.
* Support group meetings
are in the CMHS Administration
Building unless otherwise indi-
cated.
* ACS Man to Man
Prostate Support and Educa-
tion Program will meet in the
conference room at the Robert
Boissoneault Oncology Institute
at 522 N. Lecanto Highway in
the Allen Ridge Medical Mall.
Spouses and caregivers are
welcome. Call 527-0106.
* Bariatric Support Group:
6:30 p.m. every three months,
Cypress Room. Call Claudia
Blotz at 697-0051 or Bette
Clark at 860-0383.
* Breast Cancer Support
Group: noon the second Fri-
day, Robert Boissoneault Can-
cer Institute. Call Judy Bonard
at 527-4389.
* Citrus Cancer Support:
4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday,
cafeteria meeting room. April
21: Nutritional Update, CMHS
Clinical Dietician. Call Carol at
726-1551, ext. 6596 or ext.
3329.
* Cancer Support: 3 p.m.
last Thursday, Cancer Treat-
ment Center. Call 746-1100.
* Diabetes Support Group:
.11:30 a.m. the fourth Wednes-
day, Cypress Room. Call Carol
McHugh at 341-61'10.
* Hospice of Citrus
County support groups for
2008. Free, but reservations
suggested. Call Jonathan
Beard at 527-2020.
* Caregiver support group, 1
p.m. second and fourth Monday
monthly at the Citrus County
Community Center, 2804 W.
Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto.
* Newly Bereaved Work-
shop, 1 p.m. Thursday at the
Hospice of Citrus County Clini-
cal Office, 326 S. Line Ave., In-
vemess.
* Grief support group, 11
a.m. Tuesday at Our Lady of
Grace Parish Life Center, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
* Grief support group, 1 p.m.
Tuesday at the Hospice of Cit-
rus County Clinical Office, 326
S. Line Ave., Inverness.
* Grief support group, 10:30
a.m. Saturday at First United
Methodist Church, 831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.




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New support group
to meet at CMHS
Special to the Chronicle

A support group for people with Charcot-Marie-Tooth
disorders is forming in west Central Florida.
The group will conduct its first meeting from 10 a.m.
to noon Saturday, May 9, at Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem. The meeting will be in the Gulf Room of the "His-
torical School Building" just north of the main hospital
building on Citrus Avenue in Inverness.
The first meeting will provide an opportunity for pa-
tients and family members to meet one another and to
determine speakers for future meetings. Light refresh-
ments will be served.
For questions or directions, call Ronnie Plageman at
860-1578, or leave a message and you will be called back


* Christian-based grief sup-
port group, 1:15 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Gulf To
Lake Ministry Complex, 1506
N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River.
* Social support group, 10
a.m. Tuesday at Crystal Para-
dise Restaurant, 508 N. Citrus
Ave., Crystal River.
* Social support group, 3:30
p.m. Friday at Joe's Family
Restaurant, 911 W. Main St.,
Inverness.
* LIFT luncheon (for widows
and widowers), 11:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Citrus
,Hills Golf & Country Club, Her-
nando. Call Teddi Holler at 746-
6518 for reservations and
details.
* Parents support group, a
chapter of Bereaved Parents of
the USA, 7 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at First
Presbyterian Church, 1501 S.E.
U.S. 19, Crystal River.
* Hernando-Pasco Hospice
presents free grief support
programs, 2:30 p.m. Tuesday
at Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center for anyone who has
experienced the sudden loss of
a loved one. Registration re-
quired. Call (800) 486-8784.
* Celebrate Recovery, 7 to
9 p.m. Friday at Seven Rivers
Christian School in rooms
216/217 of school building C.
Dinner available before the
meeting from 6 to 7 p.m. for $3
donation and a coffee house
after. Call SRPC at 746-6200.
* Celebrate Recovery, 7
p.m. Wednesday and Fridays
at the Christian Recovery Fel-
lowship Church, 2242 W. State
Road 44. Call 726-2800.
* Celebrate Recovery at
Gulf to Lake Church Ministry


Complex, West Gulf-to-Lake
Highway in Crystal River. Din-
ner at 6 p.m. Friday, followed
by large- and small-group time
and a Coffee Caf6 at 9. Call
795-0649.
* Beverly Hills Gay and
Lesbian Support Group
meets weekly. Free, open to
everyone. Group organizer is
PamelaRae and co-organizer is
Wayne Thomas. Call Pame-
laRae at 560-3247 for direc-
tions and details.
* Citrus Abuse Shelter As-
sociation (CASA), 1100 Tumer
Camp Road, Inverness, offers
two free weekly women's do-
mestic abuse support groups:
* 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday.
* 10:30 a.m. to noon
Wednesday.
Child care available.
Call CASA at 344-8111.
* Overcomers Group for
people recovering from addic-
tions to drugs, alcohol or other
out-of-control habits meets at 8
p.m. Monday at the Sanctuary,
7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Call Paul at 628-2874.
* Dunnellon Life Recovery
group for adults where addic-
tion, compulsion and co-depen-
dency issues are dealt with, at
7 p.m. Monday at Rainbow
Springs Village Church, 20222
S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnel-
Ion. Call Char at (352) 465-
1644 or Nancy at (352)
794-0017.
* Al-Anon groups meet reg-
ularly in Citrus County. Call
(352) 697-0497.
* Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S.
41.
* Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m.
Tuesday, St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S. Sun-


coast Blvd.
* Last Resort AFG: 11:30
a.m. Wednesday, First United
Methodist Church, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road, Inver-
ness.
* Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unity Church of Cit-
rus County, 2628 Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
* Courage AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
Open meeting.
* Crystal River AFG: 11:30
a.m. Thursday at YANA Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
* Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday, St.
Margaret Episcopal Church,
114 N. Osceola Ave., Inver-
ness.
* Beginners Al-Anon: 10
a.m. Satdrdays at Yana Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
* Alcoholics Anonymous:
If you drink, and want to stop,
call Alcoholics Anonymous Na-
ture Coast Intergroup at 621-
0599. Web site:
www.ncintergroup.com.
* AC Group meets at 7 p.m.
Tuesday at Church Without
Walls, 3962 N. Roscoe Road,
Hernando. Call Laveme at 637-
4563. Web site: www.alcoholics
forchrist.com.
* Overeaters Anonymous:
Call 746-7749 or 341-0777.
* 3 p.m. Monday at the
senior center (VA building) on
County Road 491, Lecanto.
Call Delores, 746-5019..
* Noon Thursdays at Our
Lady of Grace Parish Hall, 6
Roosevelt Blvd, Beverly Hills.
Call Francisca, 746-7749.
* "Circle of Love" 1 p.m.
Thursday at Our Lady of
Grace Church, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call 746-
7749, 726-9112 or 341-0777.
* 7 p.m. Friday at Our Lady
of Grace Parish Hall, 6 Roo-
sevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call
Carolyn, 341-0777.
* CEA-HOW, for people who
have an eating disorder, at
noon Wednesdays at the First
Presbyterian Church, 206
Washington Ave., Invemess.
Call Judi M. at 726-5882.
* Reiki clinic meets from 7
to 9 p.m. most Wednesdays at
the Beverly Hills Community
Center, 1 Civic Circle, Beverly
Hills. Call Ann Thonen at 795-
5116 or Kristi Kobler at 628-
5537.


* Narcotics Anonymous:
* Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Mon-
day and Saturday, Lions Den,
U.S. 41, Floral City.
*'It Works How and Why, 7
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Saturday and noon Sunday,
YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh
St., Crystal River.
* Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m.
Thursday, First Christian
Church, Grover Cleveland
Boulevard, Homosassa.
* Recovery on the River, 8
p.m: Monday and Friday,
Lecanto Church of Christ, State
Road 44 and County Road 491,
Lecanto; 8 p.m. Sunday 797 S.
Rowe Terrace, Lecanto, east of
County Road 491 and State
Road 44.
Narcotics Anonymous is not
affiliated with any of the meet-
ing facilities listed. Information
line: 382-0851.
* Narconon provides an-
swers to drug addiction, pro-
vides free assessments,
evaluation and referral services
to intemationally recognized al-
temative and traditional treat-
ment facilities. When continuing
relapse is occurring, call (800)
468-6933 or visit www.stopad-
diction.com.
* Depression and Bipolar
Support Alliance of Citrus
County at 7 p.m. Thursday in
Bailey Hall, First Lutheran
Church, 1900 State Road 44
W., Inverness. Doors open at 6
p.m. Call 503-3262. The Na-
tional DBSAAssociation's num-
ber is (800) 826-3632.
* The Encouragers Sup-
port Group has been helping
people deal with depression,
anxiety, bipolar and more for
more than 15 years. Weekly
meeting. Call 628-3831 or 637-
3196.
* Alzheimer's Association-
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter
support groups:
* Cedar Creek at Kings Bay
Assisted Living Residence, 231
N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, 3
p.m. first Thursday monthly.
Call Wendy Hall at 527-4600.
* Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41
S., Inverness, 11 a.m. first
Tuesday monthly. Call Wendy
Hall at 527-4600.
* SPRING HILL - Parkin-
son's Tai Chi Group, 2:30 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday in the pri-
vate dining room at Health-
South Rehabilitation Hospital of
Spring Hill. Call Charissa ;'
Haffner at (352) 346-8864."


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Thursday, May 7, 2009

First session 3-5 p.m.


Second session 6-8 p.m.
Citrus County Auditorium
Hwy. 41 South, Inverness
(at the Citrus County Fairgrounds)


Parents of infants under 6 months
old are also invited.
Exhibits - Games - Scavenger hunt - Gifts for
mom, dads and babies - Lots of door prizes.


For more information call 726-1731 ext 258


I'1
0i


13 Annual Gospel Jubilee Celebrat
Celebrating 44 years together
Saturday, May 2, 2009
House of Power Churcl
County Road 491 and Dawson DriA
1 mile south of State Road 200
Come join us for a showcase of talent from 3 - 5










DAVID & RUSTY


The Singing Reflectsons
* Free refreshments
* Fun for the whole family


ion




re,


��-'


TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 CS


HEALTH & LIFE


.


I








C6 Tul SDAY, APRIl 14, 2009 HEALTH & LIFE CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DODGE
Continued from Page C1

The NIA Web site de-
scribes classic NIA as being
healing aerobic movement
that is not only healing for
the body, but also for the
mind, heart, and soul be-
cause it teaches people to
cultivate moving and living
in joy, to express them-
selves using emotional en-
ergy, and to connect to their
own unique spirit. I can
vouch that it was great fun
for all of us.
Another rhythmic kind of
class that we had was one of
drumming. I had experi-
enced a drumming circle
previously, but this took me
to a new level of under-
standing about the value of
drumming. Our facilitator
in this class was an excel-
lent musician and teacher


GANDHI
Continued from Page C1

many patients.
Normal or reference.
ranges are simply calculated
from the range of values of
various samples of the
healthy population. Different
labs sometimes use slightly
different reference ranges, so
if the reference ranges on
your lab work report are not
identical, do not let that
alarm you.


GRILLO
Continued from Page C1

Wear sturdy, low-heeled
shoes with wide, non-slip
soles.
* Exercise regularly. Reg-
ular exercise improves your
strength, muscle tone, re-
flexes, circulation, and coor-
dination. Also, it reduces the
severity of injury if you do
fall. An excellent form of ex-
ercise is walking regularly
* In the home, there might
be certain obstacles that
need to be addressed. Re-
move raised doorway thresh-
olds in rooms, rearrange
furniture so that it is easier to
navigate, keep electrical
cords across the floor to a
minimum, and fasten carpets
to the floor with double-stick


with abundant knowledge
and experience in drum-
ming. She began by teach-
ing us simple drumming
rhythms, and gradually pro-
gressed to more involved
ones.
There were enough
drums and other kinds of
percussion instruments for
each of us to be actively in-
volved. A unique experi-
ence for many of us was that
of receiving a drumming
massage. When two drum-
mers stood beside me and
began drumming at ankle
level fairly vigorously, then
moving upward only inches
away from me, my body
began vibrating in re-
sponse. It was an amazing
but pleasant experience
that each of us enjoyed.
The Drumming Circles
Web site states that drum-
ming is both recreational
and therapeutic. It strikes a
deep chord in us because of

N Red Blood Count (RBC)
is the count of red blood cells.
These cells carry oxygen
throughout the body Though
RBC is very important, most
physicians rely on hemoglo-
bin and hematocrit to assess
anemia or polycythemia (too
many RBCs).
* a Hemoglobin (HgB) is a
protein inside the RBC. It
carries oxygen from the lungs
to the rest of the body. The
amount of hemoglobin deter-
mines how much oxygen the
RBCs are capable of carrying
to other cells. Smokers often


tape and avoid the use of
throw rugs.
Other issues include diffi-
cult-to-reach shelves. Do not
overreach or extend your-
self. Never stand on a chair
And be sure that stairwells
are well lighted and have
sturdy handrails. If there is a
vision problem such as glau-
coma or cataracts, brightly
colored tape affixed to the
first and last steps will assist
you in navigating throughout
the house.
* The bathroom is an area
where many injuries occur
Make sure there are non-skid
mats inside as well as out-
side the shower and tub and
near the toilet And the use of
a small bench in the shower,
so that you may be seated, re-
duces the risk of falling or
being off balance.
Putting a lamp or light


our own innate rhythms,
and it stimulates healing
rhythms in us at multiple
levels, both as individuals
and as communities.
In addition to these expe-
riences, we also had yoga
and nutritional classes,
among others. All told, it
was a marvelous kind of ex-
perience that I can heartily
recommend for anyone.
In the poem "Slow
Dance" recited at the re-
treat, the poet writes:
"When you worry and hurry
through your day, it is like
an unopened gift... thrown
away. Life is not a race. Do
take it slower. Hear the
music before it is over"
We heard the music at
this retreat!
--ne--
Dr Ed Dodge is a retired
physician now living in
Texas. Visit his Web site,
wwwpassionforhealth.info.

show an increase in their he-
moglobin level due to dam-
age to the lungs. Procrit is an
injectable drug that stimu-
lates the production of red
cells. It is used in anemic pa-
tients to reduce the fre-
quency of transfusions.
* Hematocrit (HCT) is the
volume of red blood cells ex-
pressed as a percentage of
the total blood volume. Ifyoui
spin a sample of blood so that
the cells settle to the bottom
of the tube, the percentage of
volume occupied by the cells
alone is called the "hemat-

switch by the side of the bed
so that you are able to turn
on the light before you get up
out of bed reduces the
chance of falling and injur-
ing yourself. Night-lights are
a great addition to not only
the bedroom, but also hall-
ways and bathrooms.
What about the people
who have already fallen and
now the preventative meas-
ures are no longer an option?
Rehabilitation is most
likely the best choice. It is not
perfect, but it certainly can
help. The first thing that
needs to be done following
an injury, of course, is to be
completely evaluated by
physicians. This includes a
thorough medical- history,-
physical exam, and evalua-
tion of a patient's central
nervous system, as well as
joint and limb function.


BENNETT
Continued from Page C1

helpful for those trying to
quit While facing other med-
ical illnesses and the stress
associated with them. Even
though persons with med-
ical illnesses smoke at high
rates, they are often not pre-
scribed intensive smoking
cessation therapy because
of concern about adverse
events and side effects.
However, very few studies
have looked at interven-
tions for these high-risk pa-
tients.
The trial included 127
smokers who expressly
wanted to quit, with ill-
nesses such as cardiovascu-
lar disease, lung disease,
cancer, and diabetes, but
with no contraindications to
treatment, including severe
heart disease or seizure dis-


ocrit" The hematocrit shows
the oxygen-carrying capacity
of the blood. The hematocrit
value is approximately three
times the hemoglobin value,
and doctors will refer to ei-
ther of the values inter-
changeably
* Mean Corpuscular Vol-
ume (MCV) is the average vol-
ume of the individual red
blood cells. A low MCV indi-
cates the cells are smaller
than normal. This most com-
monly occurs because of an
iron deficiency or chronic
disease. High MCV can be

If true room-spinning
dizziness is a problem, a bal-
ance test should be done and
an otolaryngologist, or ear,
nose, and throat doctor,
should evaluate the patient.
As we mentioned previously,
the inner ear has an influ-
ence on the balance but is
not the only thing that causes
one to be off balance or fall.
Testing of higher mental
function is important to
make sure that the fall is not
a sign of a more serious men-
tal problem. Medications, es-
pecially ones that are taken
for anxiety or depression,
and medications that have,
been switched from a short-
acting to a long-acting med-
ication, which is a trend
nowadays, should also.be re-
viewed. These medications
that are taken once a day or
once a week have a great


order. Patients were ran-
domized to a standard 10-
week, tapering course of
nicotine patch therapy or to
a nicotine patch, a nicotine
oral inhaler to be used as
needed, and sustained-re-
lease bupropion at a dose of
.150 milligrams per day
Abstinence rates at 26
weeks were 35 percent in
the combination group vs.
19 percent in the patch-
alone group. Median time to
relapse was significantly
longer in the combination
group, 65 vs. 23 days. The
authors note that adverse
events leading to trial dis-
continuation was 6 percent
in each group, and no events
were directly related to the
patients' other illness,
So why is the combination
of the three more success-
ful? The simultaneous use
of nicotine medications
with bupropion addresses
tobacco withdrawal through


due to vitamin B-12 or folic
acid deficiency or due to
chemotherapy
* Platelets are. important
for clotting, and are formed
in the marrow. Low platelet
count is called thrombocy-
topenia, and is quite common
during chemotherapy. Dur-
ing thrombocytopenia, the
risk of bleeding and bruising
is higher Dangerously low
platelet counts of less than
10,000 can put the patient at
risk for life-threatening
bleeding. High levels of
platelets can cause circula-

deal of residual effect and
could be a factor in the risk
of falling.
All correctable problems
should be treated, such as vi-.
sion impairment with proper
eyeglasses, improvement of
hearing with hearing aids,
adjustment of medications
and correction of underlying
problems such as hyperten-
sion.
Actual physical rehabilita-
tion to increase the range of
motion and physical strength
is an important factor This
will avoid future injuries.
When a fall and injury oc-
curs, rehabilitation should
be started as soon as possi-
ble and when your doctor
deems it is appropriate.
A return to activity, both
physical and social, is very
important so that the patient
has resumption of interac-


different mechanisms of ac-
tion, while the combination
of a patch with an inhaler to
be used in response to crav-
ings allows more individu-
alized delivery of
medication as needed.
The authors also noted
that the flexibility to extend
treatment might have con-
tributed to the results.
These findings support
using these medications for
as long as you see a poten-
tial advantage of this treat-
ment regimen.

Dr Bennett is a
radiation oncologist, past
president of the Citrus
County Unit of the
American Cancer Society
and a member of the Board
of Directors and Executive
Committee of the Florida
Division of the American
Cancer Society E-mail
cjbennett@rboicom.


tion problems as the blood
becomes too '"thick"
Next week, I will continue
to explain the complete
blood count

Dr Sunil Gandhi is a
hematologist and
oncologist He is the
volunteer medical adviser
of the Citrus Unit of the
American Cancer Society
Write to 521 N. Lecanto
Highway Lecanto, FL
34461, or e-mail to
sgandhi@tampabay.rrcom.

tion with family and commu-
nity. Otherwise, the patient
will spiral into inactivity, a
reclusive type of lifestyle,
and further progressive de-
terioration.
As an ear, nose and throat
doctor, we see many dizzy
patients and patients who
fall. But we are not the only
ones who need to be in-
volved in the treatment
process. Sometimes your eye
doctor, your neurologist,
your orthopedic surgeon,
and your general practi-
tioner are important compo-
nents in assessing and
evaluating problems of bal-
ance and falls.

Denis Grillo, D.0., FOCOO,
is an ear nose and throat
specialist in Crystal River
Call him at 79.5-0011.


4245 N. Bartley Terrace, Beverly Hills
491 N. to Mustang Bvid turn right on Mesa Verde,
LeftonBartley.
Home offered by Summerwind Homes

5191 N. Pink Poppy Drive, Beverly Hills
US19 to state road 44 east turn left on County rod
486, follow Pine ridge Blvd, turn left Corner of Pink
Poppy Drive and Pine Ridge blvd.
Home Offered by Dream Custom Homes of
Citrus

6393 W.Glory Hill, Beverly Hills
Pine Ridge Blvd, turn on Ponderosa, right -
Sarramento, right on Glory Hill. 1sthouse on left.
Home offered by Middleton Sunshine
Properties

4260 W. Pine Ridge Bvld, Beverly Hills
Rt491 tPine ridge Blvd, follow Pine Ridge Blvd to
model on the left.
Home offered by SweetWater Homes of Citrus.
Inc.

4302 N. Breadnut Terrace, Beverly Hills
Pine Ridge atBreadnut terrace and Mustang
Home offered by Lou Miele, Era American
Realty

5759 N. Carnation Drive, Beverly Hills
Pine Ridge at Carnation Drive and Daffodil.
Home.offered by Lou Miele, Era American
Realty

1865 W. Citrus Springs Bvld, Citrus Springs
N. Rt41 to left on West Citrus Springs Blvd. Model
on right past Santos.
Home offered by Citrus Ridge Realty

9356 Jourden Drive, Citrus Springs
N. Citrus Springs Bvld to left on Anson, Left on
Sandred, Right on Jourden.
Home offered by Citrus Ridge Realty

11145 W. Bentbow Path, Crystal River
US 19 2 miles north of the Crystal River Mall.
2 homes offered by Cosgrove Builders


5 Boxwood Ct. Sugarmill Woods, Homosassa
US 19 Cypress Blvd .left on Cypress Bvld E. ro left
Corkwood Blvd. to left on Bo.xwwood Ct. house on
the right of cul-de-sac.
Home offered by Richard Van Orden/ Distinctive
Homes

17 Black Williow Ct. N. Sugarmill Woods,
Homosassa
US 19 to Cypress Bvld. W. to lefton Cypress BlvdE. to
left on Black Willow St. to left on Black Willow Cr. N.
house on right.
Home offered by Richard Van Orden/Distinctive
Homes


h.I


New and resale honres
'"-a . available throughout
"1Catrus Countyj
0 "l } A. ,, A,-,

TheYear.!. area
Mark the weekend of April 18 & 19 to map out your tour of what could possibly lead you to your perfect,
and affordable, dream home. All homes in this book will be open during the listed hours with a personal guide
to show you from room to room, answer your questions and then invite you to discover on your own.


263 NW Bay Path Drive, Crystal River
Hwy 19 S. Citrus Ave, 3 blocks on right.
Home offered by Edward Russell Johnston

25 N. Country Club Drive, Crystal River
From US 19 turn on Ft. Island trail, 1st left oon
Country Club Dr. go around golf course, home is
on the left, 3rd house before end of street.

11 Hemlock Ct. S.(Sugarmill Woods),
Homosassa
US 19 to E. on Cypress Bvld. To right on Pine
street, to right on greentree St. to left on Hemlock
Ct.S. House on the left.
Home offered by Richard Van Orden/
Distinctive Homes


Register to wi
one of these
gifts at any o
the above
open houses.


Weeping Willow Ct., Homosassa
Cypress Bvid W. to Douglas St. (left) Douglas to
Linder Dr. right to Beech St. Model on left.
Home offered by SweetWater. Homes of Citrus,
Inc.

11410 Waterway Drive, Homosassa
from Hwy 19 in Homosassa go west on Halls River
rd about miles to right on Riverhaven drive to
right on Waterway drive.
Home offered by Moore & Moore Realty, Inc.

9214S. Suncoast Bvld, Homosassa
Hwy 19just mile north of Hwy 98.
Home offered by Adams Homes


Register to


n

We Have Over 30 Years Combined Experience
f 8915 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa, FL 34446
(Formerly Naber Kids Doll granite Patio
Hospital) Chiller Table
Fax: 352382.0216 valued at S,300
S352382.0709


2271 South Olympic Hills Terrace, Inverness
Hwy 41 S. of Inverness, urn left on Edendrive, take
Ist right at S. Olympic Hills.
Home offered by Encore Homes

9710 E.White Egret Path, Inverness
From us 41 rake hwy44 e. of County rd 470 (Gosperl
Island rdl. Turn let one mile to entrance(East Golf
Harbor Path)
Home offered by The Moorings @Point of Woods

235 E. Foster Ct., Lecanto
from hwy 44 to Kensington Ave, veer left to
Buckingham, left on Foster '

1773 S. Overview Dr., Lecanto
Hills of Avalon entrance is one mile east of Rock
Crusher Rd. at Gleneagle and Hwy. 490
Home offered by Louie Lott HomeBuilder, Inc.

5215 W. Greensily Ln,, Lecanto
Hills ofAvalon entrance is one mile east of Rock
Crusher Rd. at Gleneagle and Hwy. 490
Home offered by Constate Development

5265 W. Greensily Ln., Lecanto
Hills ofAvalon entrance is one mile east of Rock
Crusher Rd. at Gleneagle and Hwy. 490
Home offered by Constate Development

11640SW 49th Ave., Ocala
Home offered by Dream Custom Homes of


57il8-


---


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C6 TUESDAY, APRil. 14, 2009


HEALTH & LIFE











�2009 UNIVERSAL MEDIA SYNDICATE, INC. SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE ADVERTISEMENT FOR PATENTHEALTH, LLC 3939 EVERHARD RD., CANTON OH 44709



Powerful new joint pill set to hit U.S. drug stores


Clinical trial; remarkable increase in human joint mobility instantly felt in 72 hours


By Dan Cottrell
UniversalMedia Syndicate
(UMS) - Imagine a pill that can
help you get around more easily in
just a matter of hours.'
Then think of how great it would be
for your joints to feel better too.
Well there's no reason to imagine,
a team of scientists has delivered an
amazing new joint health supplement
that's been clinically shown to quickly
improve mobility and joint comfort.2
Now, after years of development and
testing it's about to hit the shelves at all
major U.S. drug stores.
This remarkable new joint health pill
is called Fast Acting Trigosamine". It
has been clinically shown to produce
amazing results; 83% of the partici-
pants felt better just days after taking
the recommended dosage and an in-
credible 100% reported their joints felt
better just midway through the clinical
trial.2,8'5
"I've never seen relief like this be-
fore," said Dr. Joseph Dietz.'
"Our goal was to formulate new
Trigosamine so that people would
feel relief quickly, and based on the
feedback from consumers along
with the clinical results I'd say we
hit the bulls-eye with this new pill,"
added Dietz.
National drug store shipments are
on the way, but as of today there's no
way to know which stores actually
have product on their shelves.
"Until we know all the shelves
are stocked we'll ship Trigosamine
directly to people's homes. As an
added bonus, all local residents who
call the Regional Health Hotline at
1-866-941-7632 before the 48-hour
deadline expires can also qualify for
a significant discount," said Darla
Miller, Distribution Director for the
company.
"We're shipping pills on a first-
come, first-served basis; callers just
have to be sure they givethe-bonus-
approval code of TG7863 when they
call and we'll take care of everything
for them," she said.
"We know that people suffering with


joint discomfort want new Trigosamine,
the phones have been ringing like
crazy. We strongly recommend that
local readers call right away to make
sure they get their fair share," said
Miller.
The new Trigosamine formula has
a special combination of ingredients
that until now have never been blend-
ed into a pill. It's this special mixture
that was clinically tested and is re-
sponsible for delivering the incred-
ible results.
One of the key ingredients is hy-
aluronate, which is a building block of
"human joint oil" and known by medi-
cal professionals as synovial fluid.
This remarkable molecule can
absorb up to 1000 times its own
weight in water helping to lubricate
the joints which reduces friction
while acting as a "shock absorber"
allowing for effortless comfortable
motion."
"Synovial fluid is part of what al-
lows young people to be highly active
without getting sore joints. But as
we age we produce less of this fluid
which can force bones and joints to
grind together causing nagging dis-
comfort," said Dr. Dietz.
"This remarkable combination of in-
gredients is what makes Trigosamine
work so well. It really helps people to
move more freely and with greater
flexibility," said Dietz.6
New Trigosamine's powerful re-
sults are all supported by a recent-
ly completed randomized, double-
blind placebo controlled clinical
study which is considered to be
the "gold standard" for joint health
supplements.
While no pill works for everyone,
during this clinical trial, 100% of the
participants that took this new sup-
plement reported an improvement
in their joint comfort. The data also
shows that their joint comfort just
kept getting better the entire time
they were taking new Trigosamine
during clinical study.2,'
On the other hand, the clinical
participants that were taking the
placebo experienced much different


How Nev
Trigosamine' W
New Fast Acting Trigosam
to quickly improve joint co
1. HYALURONATE-13T:
One tiny molecule of this ren
ir, 1 10n0 tirnmes, r .-a,,h ,i r


I PROOF THAT IT WORKS: Dr. Philip Howren was so astounded by new Fast Acting Trigosamine's� clinical results that he
said; "Yes, I am thoroughly impressed with the clinical data, in fact I now take the pill myself to get the joint relief I need." "It's my
number one recommendation to anyone that suffers with joint discomfort," added Dr. Howren.4


results. Those taking the placebo
developed increased joint discom-
fort and soreness during the clinical
study, which is the exact opposite of
what happened to participants tak-
ing the new Trigosamine pills.2
"For participants to get this type
of relief is simply amazing," said Dr.
Joe Dietz.
"In all my years of clinical re-
search, I've never seen that type of
a response before. This new supple-
ment is simply remarkable for those
suffering with sore joints," he added.
The tough part now will be-low to
get it.
"National pharmacy shipments are
on the way, but as of right now there's
no way to know which drug stores


II
N
works
orks Actual Size)
ine combines 3 poweerful compounds
imfort.:

miarkable compound can hold an ama,-
n ,vatI, This allow, ,.-s n t, ,riillh, vri ,rrnn I


hyaluronate to bind water, making the orints extremely slippery allow.
ing them to slide smoothly over one another -
2.GLUCOSAMINE SULFATE-15:
Review studies show glucosamine maintain healthy cartilage in
the joints by inhibiting loint destroying enzymes. The compound
also builds up naturally present amounts in the blood stream used
to build healthy cartilage
3. RAPIDFLEX FORMULA-61:
The patented ingredients in RapidFLEx Impro.e oi.erall loint per
formance and one ingredient increases the speed in which nutr,
ents are absorbed
a HEALTHY JOINT: A Diagnostic x-ray reeals a human knee joint
that has the proper amount of syno,.ial fluid to lubricate the ioint
and act as a comfortable shod absorber.


' THESE STATEMENT HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY EASE


have it and which ones don't," said
Darla Miller.
But for those that want to be among
the first to get it the company has
opened a Regional Health Hotline so
people can have it shipped directly to
their homes.
Local readers can also qualify for a
huge discount if they're lucky enough
to get through before the 48-hour
deadline expires. The number to call
right now is 1-866-941-7632.
"Until shipments get to all the drug
stores we're shipping it directly to
people ithat calf our hotline," said


Miller. "All they have to do is give the
bonus approval code of TG7863 when
they call and we'll take care of the
rest," she added.
That makes the next 48 hours criti-
cal for those living in the local area
who want this new joint supplement.
Those getting through to the hotline
within the next 48 hours are not only
guaranteed to get the pills delivered
directly to their homes, but they can
save money too.
Otherwise, those that don't getthrough
may be hard pressed to get their hands
on this medical breakthrough. .*


How to get the new pill:

Local residents can have new Fast Acting TrigosarrTne' delivered
directly to their homes simply by calling the Regional Health Hotline
before the 48 hour deadline expires Just call the toll free number
that's shovn below; pro';ide the operator with the bonus approval
code of TG7863 and the company will take care of the rest. No pre-
scription is necessary. Those beating the deadline can also qualify for
a significant discount.


Begin Calling:
Bonus Approval Code:
Toll-free number:
Deadline:


8:00 AM
TG7863
1-866-941-7632
48hrs


Pharmacy Update:
Pharmacies are set to start receiving new Fast Acting Trigosamine�.
It has been confirmed that CVS'pharmacy, Rite Aid, Walgreens and
Walmart will be the first stores to stock this new formula.
On the web: www.Trigosamine.om
'_ X i _ _ ____r.HEALTH LLC P4447A OF7531R I
1 Dr. Joseph Dietz, PhD currently conducts full time research for PatentHEALTH,
LLC., as Director of Health Science, Research Development. 2The 8-week clinical
study was completed with 54 participants. On day 3 of the study, those participants
taking New Trigosamine experienced a statistically significant increase in the
distance they were able to walk, which shows an increase in mobility after just 3
days. 3 Individual results may vary.4 Dr. Howren is an emergency room physician
and medical consultant to PatentHEALTH, he is remunerated for his services.


Clinical strength diet pill delivers 5 times more weight loss


Drug store sales soar; clinical study data confirms results


By K. Tedeschi
Universal Media Syndicate

(UMS) - Over 10 million doses have
already been shipped to dieters so far;
and sales are expected to climb even
higher for the diet pill called Apatrim*.
"We knew we had a great product,
but it's even exceeded our expecta-
tions," said Ken Geis, Manager of Call
Center Operations.
"People just keep placing orders, it's
been pretty amazing" he said.
There are some very good reasons
for this diet supplement's remarkable
success.
The results from the clinical trial
were very impressive. Participants
taking Apatrim's active ingredient
lost an average of 5 times more weight
than those taking a placebo during
the 4-week U.S. study.'
These results were achieved without
changing the participant's daily diet or
exercise routine.1'
An amazing 100% of the partici-
pants taking Apatrim as directed
either lost weight or inches off of
their waistline during the 4 week
clinical study. Some participants
experienced great results, losing as
much as 8 lbs and up to 3 inches off
their waist.'2
The U.S. clinical study was conduct-
ed in Los Angeles; the study included
healthy, overweight individuals be-
tween the ages of 31 and 73. The calor-
ic intake and level of exercise was not
disclosed.
The participants were instructed


not to change the food they were eat-
ing and not to add any exercise. They
were specifically told not to change
their daily routine; just take two pills'
30 minutes before lunch and dinner.
Apatrim's active ingredient has a
known ability to help control hunger
pangs, this allows people to eat the
foods they want and always seem to
be craving; because they'll just want
to eat less.'
Industry researchers believe that
Apatrim works by suppressing a per-
son's appetite.!
"By suppressing their appetite, diet-
ers consume fewer calories which can
lead to weight loss," said Dr. Joseph
Dietz, Director of Health Science, Research
6aM-7. __�- --


& Development for PatentHEALTH. "But
consumers should always keep in mind
that there is no substitute for proper
diet and exercise when it comes to losing
weight!'
Professionals in the weight loss
and fitness industries also agree that
Apatrim is the real thing.
Mark Loy, a personal trainer has had
some of his clients use Apatrim with
amazing success.2
"I heard about Apatrim so I checked
out the facts then decided to try it as
a part of my training program," Loy
said.
"It's really helped some of my clie-n
to control their eating. I've seen people
get unbelievable results while taking


M GREAT RESULTS: Allison Garwood (front) and Renee Pellegrini pick up a bottle of
Apatrim'" at the drug store. Incredibly, 100% of the participants in the U.S. Clinical
trial got results taking Apatrim. Consumers unable to find it can call 1-866-964-2349
to have Apatrim shipped directly to their homes.


Apatrim," said Loy.
"Sign me up, I'm a believer."
Dr. Joseph Dietz was impressed with
the quality of the clinical trials as well
as the U.S. patent.
"When I read over the clinical re-
sults, the U.S. patent and all of the
other scientific support I immediately
knew we needed to use this weight loss
compound," said Dietz.
"The results are real; Apatrim is a
great product that's been shown to help
people lose weight"'
All of the big retail pharmacies
including CVS/pharmacy and_
Walgreensihiave placed orders for
Apatrim.
But to make it easier for people to
get it now, the company has set up
a Direct Order Hotline for the next


48 hours.
Starting at 8:00 am today, all con-
sumers have to do is call 1-866-964-2349
and ask for Dept. AP3812; orders will
be filled on a first-come, first-served
basis.
"For those people that call the order
line to have Apatrim shipped directlyto
them right now, we'll guarantee they'll
get product and they can also qualify
for a 33% discount," said Ken Geis.
"But this discount will only be avail-
able through the order hotline for the
next 48 hours," he said.
So for those that choose not to call
or miss the deadline you-fhiy hiWe
to pay more for Apatrim or possibly
run the risk of not finding it at the
drug store. E
On the web: www.Apatrim.com


1. IMMEDIATE HOME DELIVERY: For the next 48 hours call the
Apatrim National Order Center at 1-866-964-2349 and ask for
Dept. AP3812 (ask about the local readers discount*). Begin
calling at 8:00 AM EST.

2. AT THE PHARMACY: It has been confirmed that CVS/pharmacy and
Walgreens have placed orders for Apatrim.

* local readers discount ends in 48 hours.

1. Primary study based on 26 participants over a 4-week period. Participants were directed not to add any ex-
ercise or change eating habits. Participants level of caloric intake and exercise were not measured or disclosed.
2. Mark Loy is a personal trainer and fitness consultant to PatentHEALTH, he is remunerated for his services.
3. THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION.
THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.


TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 C7


CzTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










Page C8 - TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009




COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Christian Women
host speaker
The Christian Women's
Club of Homosassa invites
you to a brunch at 9 a.m.
today at Southern Woods
Clubhouse.
Special feature will be ac-
claimed wildlife photographer
Paul Simison, with music by
Lucille Davis. The speaker
will be Jill McGahan. The
price for the festivities is $12.
Contact Hazel at 382-7990
for reservations.
Our next event is May 12
and our special feature is
Louise Whitney of Whitney's
Glass Works (stained glass).
There will be no brunches in
June, July or August, so we
hope you can join us for one
of these, or both.
Golden Agers to
host clown today
Clown Day-z will have the
program at the Golden Agers
meeting at 10:45 a.m. today.
It is in the fellowship hall at
the Floral City Baptist
Church. She will paint faces,
make animals from balloons,
do tricks and "clown around."
A short meeting precedes
this, then lunch is served
after the program. Seniors,
come out and have fun.
'Flowers with Flair'
luncheon today
The public is invited to at-
tend the "Flowers With Flair"
by Color Country luncheon at
noon today, sponsored by the
Crystal River Christian
Women's Club, at The Sup-
per Club in Crystal River. Jill
Gahan will bring the mes-
sage.
For luncheon reservations,
call Ginny at 746-7616.
Toastmasters
welcome guests
The next meeting of the
Dunnellon Toastmasters will
be today. The group meets at
6:30 p.m. the second and
fourth Tuesdays monthly in
the Dunnellon Chamber of
Commerce building.
Guests are welcome at
any meeting. The second
April meeting will be April 28.
To learn more about Toast-
masters, visit www.toast
masters.org, dunnellon.free
toasthost.ws or call Distin-
guished Toastmaster John
Ryan at (352) 489-0959.
Citrus 20/20
board to meet
The Citrus 20/20 Board of
Directors will meet at 5:30
p.m. Wednesday in Room
117, Lecanto Govemment
Building, 3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Lecanto.
All directors are urged to
attend. Interested persons or
organizations are invited.
For more information about
Citrus 20/20 Inc., visit its Web
site at www.citrus2020.com
or call 344-5955.
Knights plan
200 Club dinner
Join All Saints Council
6954 in Homosassa Springs
for its 200 Club Dinner from 4
to 6 p.m. Wednesday.
A complete dinner of roast
beef and all the fixings,
dessert and beverage is fea-
tured. The dinner is open to
the public for $8 per person.
For information, call 382-
2404. The Knights of Colum-
bus is on Atlas Drive, off U.S.
19 across from Love Motor-
sports.
The bloodmobile will be in
the parking lot from 2 to 5:30
p.m.
Grumman retirees
go to Buffet City
The Grumman Retiree
Club Florida Midwest Chap-
ter will meet at 11:30 a.m.
Thursday at Buffet City
Restaurant, 13235 Cortez


Blvd. (State Road 50), across
from Walmart.
The buffet is $13 per per-
son, paid in advance. Reser-
vations are required. Call
Hank, (352) 686-2735. Web
site: www.geocities.com
/grumrets//HOME.html.


Annual gatherings abound


sit Retirees of Florida,
Chapter 9 Citrus County, will
have its annual picnic Wed-
nesday, April 22, at Bicen-
tennial Park in Crystal
River. The cost is $5 per cou-
ple.
Call Judy Redd at 527-8418
if you plan on attending or
for additional information.
We look forward to seeing all
members.
Masons meeting
The 19th Masonic District
serving Citrus, Sumter, Her-


nando and Pasco counties,
will have its Annual Outdoor
Master Mason Degree,
hosted by Floral City Ma-
sonic Lodge No. 133, on Sat-
urday, April 25. This is a
tyled meeting, and dues
cards are required to attend.
Registration at 10 a.m. with
coffee and doughnuts,
Lodge will open at 11 a.m.
Location: The Honorable
Charles Dean property,
County Road 48, 1/2 mile
west of the Withlacoochee


River. A special note: The
Grand Master of Masons of
Florida and supporting
Grand Lodge Officers will be
in attendance. Sojourning
Masons always welcome, but
must pass the tyler.
Lunch will be served after
completion of the first sec-
tion. Contact Bob Jackson,
secretary, e-mail bobp-
grp@aol.com or phone 344-
4074. Computer users, visit
the Web page for District 19
www.FloridaLodges.com.


Special to the Chronicle

The Wisconsin Club will
have its annual picnic
Wednesday at Whispering
Pines Park in Inverness. The
traditional brats and burg-
ers will be served. This will
be the last event for the year


Club members are asked to
bring a non-perishable food
item to be donated to one of
the food pantries.
For information and res-
ervations, call Joyce at 860-
1292 or Betty at 637-0560.
NYC Transit Retirees
The New York City Tran-


Special to the Chronicle
In commemoration of 100 years of Florida 4-H, local 4-H'ers from then and now planted a White Cedar tree on the grounds of the Citrus County
Fair. From left are: (standing) Marie Dumas, Eloise VanNess, Dr. Ronald Dumas, Amy Duncan, Monica Frank, Debbie Frank, Kriss Dixon, Chrissy
Uzar, Naomi Ward, Jenny Frank, Hannah Rowe, Patricia Uzar, Mare Holloway, Sherri Sanders; (kneeling next to White Cedar tree) Mariah
Dixon, Taylor Granda, Brianna Saltmarsh, Hannah Jo Dixon; (seated in front) Nikki Uzar.

Youth organization began in the state in 1909, area 4-H'ersplant tree


Special to the Chronicle
itrus County 4-H recently cele-
brated a century of youth success
with a tree planting ceremony.
Florida 4-H Youth Development
strengthens communities by providing a
positive future for youths. As the youth de-
velopment program of the University of
Florida IFAS Extension, Florida 4-H uses a
learn-by-doing approach to enable youths,
ages 5 to 18, to develop the knowledge, atti-
tudes and skills they need to become com-
petent, caring and contributing citizens of
the world.
In 1909, Florida 4-H began with corn
clubs for boys and tomato clubs for girls
were organized in 1912. Here in Citrus
County, we can trace our roots back as far as
1915 and the '20s with records of Walter E
Allen, the "Farm Demonstration Agent" and
Elizabeth Moore, "Home Demonstration
Agent." Each conducted 4-H youth develop-


ment for boys and girls through afterschool
programs.
Today, 4-H is the largest youth organiza-
tion in the world with more than 8 million
members nationwide, 263,000 members in
Florida, including over 330 4-H club mem-
bers and 4,300 school enrichment contacts
here in Citrus County.
In commemoration of 100 years of Florida
4-H, local 4-H'ers from then and now
planted a White Cedar tree on the grounds
of the Citrus County Fair. The ceremony
was attended by current 4-H'ers as well as
past 4-H alumni.
Two notable guests who recalled their
years as members were Ms. Eloise VanNess
and Dr. Ronald Dumas. Dumas, a Citrus
County 4-H'er in the 1940s, remembered
summers at 4-H Camp Cherry Lake. In ap-
preciation for what 4-H does for local
youths, Dumas has volunteered his veteri-
narian services to the youth livestock pro-
gram at the Citrus County Fair for the past


four decades. VanNess remembers going to
4-H summer camp in 1936 with Ms. Moore
and has continued her involvement as a 4-H
volunteer for 50 years.
The tree planting ceremony was headed
by the 4-H County Council president, Nikki
Uzar. Monica Frank shared a "tree poem"
and Jenny Frank led a "tree song," both are
Nature Explorers 4-H club members.
County 4-H Agent Amy Duncan also spoke
about 4-H history and the new book "Flor-
ida 4-H: A Century of Youth Success," fea-
turing local 4-H history, currently on sale.
For more information about 4-H, visit
www.florida4h.org. Citrus County Extension
connects the public with the University of
Florida/IFAS's knowledge, research and re-
sources to address youth, family, community
and agricultural needs. Programs and activ-
ities offered by the Extension Service are
available to all persons without regard to
race, color, handicap, sex, religion or na-
tional origin. .


'Curious' comedy teaches true essence of living


It's always a pleasure to
travel back in time to the
fabulous'50s, the heyday
of my high school and col-
lege days experience.
The Citrus County Art
Center Theatre's lively and
thought-provoking produc-
tion of "Curious Savage"
written by John Patrick and
directed by Peter Abrams
was a sheer delight.
With Frank Sinatra's
"Young at Heart" heard
throughout the theater as we
gathered and with Abrams'
welcoming comments, we
knew that we were in for a
fanciful afternoon.
The scene is the living
room of "The Cloisters," a
private New England sani-
tarium and Ethel Savage
played superbly by Citrus
patrons of the Arts favorite
Fran Barg, has inherited $10
million from her late hus-
band which she is planning
to use to help people realize
their dreams with a fund she
plans to establish. Her
greedy stepchildren have
other plans, and they have
committed her to "Clois-
ters." Here she befriends a
likeable group of misfits
who have difficulty adjust-
ing to the real world and are
just the ones she wants to
help.
An intense yet mar-


velously humorous battle
ensues and as the plot un-
folds we grow to love the
Ethel Savage character's
clever spunk, skillfully por-
trayed by Barg, a veteran of
over 40 theatrical
productions
singing, acting
and directing for
the Art Center
and Gulf Islands
Civic Theatre.
Jim Farley, as
Titus Savage, is a
stern leader for
the Savage family.
David Kuhn, as Ruth]
Samuel, a local AROUr
owner of Home- COMM
land Handyman,
grasped the typi-
cal greedy heir portrayal
with vigor and knowing
agreeability. Sharon
Farnsworth perfected an air
of haughtiness and the art of
a selfish demeanored
stepchild Lilly Belle, who
continuously offers put-
downs with a steady stream
of lines punctuated with fa-
cial expressions and body
movements worthy of a Hol-
lywood screen test.
The "Cloisters" guests
were fascinating to watch as
they revealed so much. They
gave us pause for reflection
and along the way they un-
cannily taught us the true


essence of living and meet-
ing the expectations of living
and responding to the mar-
velous expectations of inter-
personal relationships.
Kathy Capelle as Flo-
rence, Chuck
Keller as Hanni-
bal, Aphrodite
Kocieda'as Fairy
May, Edwin Mar-
tin as Jeffrey,
Jane Vicari as
Mrs. Paddy and
John Alex Garcia
as John Thomas
(also portrayed by
Levins Noah McGinnis
ID THE on other nights),
UNITY each in their own
way enlightened
us about realities
that truly matter.
Childlike behavior was
skillfully portrayed by
Capelle with her beheaded
doll child and Mrs. Paddy's
Raggedy Ann and her habit
of turning off the lights. Do
we, sometimes seek atten-
tion childishly as well? Do
we wish we could turn off
life's harsh lights?
Nurse Bonita Martin as
Mrs. Wilhelmina is the
essence of thoughtfulness
and gets a gold star for her
understanding through en-
couraging helpfulness ...to
the residents.
Chuck Keller's Hanibal


character is a priceless per-
sonification of the dreams
we persistently pursue as he
tries to play his beloved vio-
lin.
Phil Isasi, as Dr. Emmet, is
upstaged on several occa-
sions by Barg as she begins
to question him as he ques-
tions her with lines like
"What makes a firefly light
up? Are they mating?" Just
who is questioning who
gives us hope when next we
pay a visit to a seemingly un-
concerned health care
provider in our attempt to
gain intelligent insights
about our condition.
We applaud Barg's amaz-
ing sensitivity to each of the
resident's needs ... to Fairy
May, who always wants the
residents to say "I Love
You." Does this strike a fa-
miliar chord with you? Can
we not listen to the many
ways people say "I love
you"?
Are there those like Barg
who wish to send a thousand
children around the world
while there still is a world?
With statements like
"There are bars on the win-
dows to keep people out"
and "The only thing wiser
than saying little is not say-
ing anything at all" and
"Never say goodnight be-
cause it means there is no


tomorrow" and "I realize the
importance of unimportant
things," we were astounded
with the profound literary
efforts the writer brought to
this play
Life's contrasting ele-
ments was beautifully and
insightfully portrayed by
Edwin Martin as the Hani-
bal character who really
could play the violin but
wouldn't and the Chuck
Keller character who at-
tempted to play it but could-
n't Have we those traits?
Truly, without a doubt, the
astute direction of Abrams,
the flair for believability by
Barg, the clever lines deliv-
ered flawlessly by the resi-
dents of Cloisters, the
humorous side of greedi-
ness, the in-depth story of
the human condition made
for a self realization for all
of us.
We want to say "Bravo!
Bravo! Bravo!" to the Citrus
Art Center Theatre! There
was much to be learned that
memorable afternoon.

Ruth Levins participates in
a variety of projects around
the community Let her
know about your group's
upcoming activities by
writing to PO. Box 803,
Crystal River, FL 34423.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 563-3280; or e-mail to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed
a Expect notes to run no more than once.


Clubs gather members for

picnics, dinners, more


Florida 4-m centennial


L
!









Cn'Rrj.~ CouNry (FL) CJIRONWLE ENTERTAINMENT TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009C9


TUESDAY EVENING APRIL 14, 2009 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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4 BBC World News Nightly Business The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer (N) Nova An update on the seven doc- 400 Years of the Telescope (N) (In Frontline/World "Children of the Independent Lens (N) (PA)'PG' m
(WEI PBS 0 3 3 14 6'G' a Report (N) a (In Stereo) n tors first profiled in 1987. (N)'PG' Stereo)'G' a (DVS) Taliban" (N)'PG' R (DVS)
(WUEi PBS 0 5 5 5 5 5 16 BBC News Business Rpt. The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer Nova "Doctors' Diaries" (N)'PG' Human Senses'Touch; Vision" Frontline/World (N)'PG' Capitol Update Tavis Smiley
H NBC 8 8 8. . 8 8 8 News (N) NBC Nightly Entertainment Extra (N)'PG' S The Biggest Loser The contestants receive complete makeovers. (N) (In Law & Order: Special Victims Unit News(N) The Tonight'
WF NBC 8 8 8 8 8 8 News (N)'G' Tonight (N)'PG' Stereo PG' s "Stranger"(In Stereo)'14' Show-Jay Leno
T News (N) (In World News- Jeopardy! (N) Wheel of Fortune According to Jim According to Jim Dancing With the Stars One celeb- Cupid "The Great Right Hope" (N) News (N)(In Nghtline (N)
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S10 0 10 News CBS Evening Inside Edition Who Wants to Be NCIS "Nine Lives" Gibbs hunts for The Mentalist "Red Rum" Patrick Without a Trace The team looks for News Late Show With
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X 13 13 News (N) T TMZ (N)'PG'B The Insider (N) American Idol Remaining finalists Fringe A scientific en ineered ani- News (N) a News (N) a TMZ (In Stereo)
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N, 11 1 11 News (N) World News- Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) According to Jim According to Jim Dancing With the Stars One celeb- Cupid "The Great Right Hope"(N) News (N) Nightline (N)
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- IND m 12 12 Family Guy'14'B Family Guy'14' ] Frasier"Sliding Frasier"Frasier Law & Order: Criminal Intent'The *. "Ringmaster"(1998, Comedv4.rama) Jerry Springer, Jaime Pressly. Still Standing Still Standing
-W__M_ _IND _ 12 12__ Frasiers"'PG' Grinch"'PG' Pardoner's Tale"'14' s People reveal sordid details on aTV host's program.'R' sa 'PG' s 'PG' a
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WV r) TBN M 21 21 21 -Assembly-God The 700 Club 'PG' a Pastor Barber Power of Praise Manna-Fest'G' Variety Thompson Variety Claud Bowers This Is Your Day Tims Ministries
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PHILUIP AJLDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
Playwright Edward Albee said,
"Sometimes a person has to go a
very long distance out of his way to
come back a short distance cor-
rectly."
At the bridge table, sometimes a
defender has to go a very long dis-
tance out of his way to signal cor-
rectly to defeat a contract.
This deal is an example. How
should the defense card to beat
four spades?
East bid the limit when he
jumped to four hearts at unfavor-
able vulnerability. South momen-
tarily wondered if he was missing a
slam, but a quick look at those two
low hearts left him feeling at ease,
not uneasy.
West led the heart eight, high
from his doubleton. Although
South falsecarded with the nine
under East's queen, East knew that


-.-- Bridge

North 04-14-09
A J3
V J 10
+ Q J 10
A A K J 9 8 7
West East
4 Q4 2
S 85 AK Q 7 6 4 3
* K98643 * A75
4 10 5 2 4 6 4
South
A A K 10 9 8 7 6 5
V 92
* 2
A4 Q3

Dealer: North
Vulnerable: East-West

South West North East
1 , 4
4 4 Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: Y 8


his partner would have led the two
from 8-5-2. (Lead the bottom of
three low cards when it is partner's
bid suit and you have not raised the
suit.)
So East cashed the heart ace,
everyone following. Now East led
the diamond ace. With which card
should West have signaled?
At first glance, it looked obvious
to encourage enthusiastically with
the nine. But West paused a mo-
ment, letting his imagination wan-
der. What if declarer had a
singleton diamond? He would ruff
the second diamond and, if he
could draw trumps, claim.
West discouraged with the dia-
mond three, apparently denying
the king. This persuaded East to
lead a third heart, which promoted
West's spade queen to the setting
trick
Before you play any card, con-
sider the alternatives.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I OVER I


RAWSUL


NEWJUMBLE NINTENOwww.jumble.com/ds
KUNFLY



Answer: , THE
sL ^^


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

I get two weeks vacation
V/lA | and weekends off


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers tomorrow)


ACROSS 39 Knight's
journey
Omelet need 40 Metal source
Yellow 41 Wordplay
vehicle 42 Self-assurance
Easy victoryy 45 Ballgame fare
Ostnch look-alike 49 Economic
3mnia vincit - upturn
Hairy animals 50 1939 Lugosi
DEL neighbor role
Uncovered 52 Olive yield
Squirrel food 53 High-fashion
Returns the mag
avor 54 Ballet
Glitterati (2 wds.) costume
Diner coffee 55 Veld grazer
Sooner than 56 Revealed
3ach 57 Turkey or cat
instrument 58 - out a living


27 Low-pH
30 Third-rate
31 Loan figure
32 Hot spring
34 Luggage ID
35 Scrooge
expletives
36 Not bogus
37 Earthmovers,
briefly


DOWN


Arab prince
Auctioneer's
cry
Pant
Ravine
Do a
comedian's job


Answer to Previous Puzzle


ADAM MIEN_ FDA
PECUNIARY ALl

SATSIRIO MOREL
FIELD WORMED
ALAI DAZE POW
NE V BURY WIC K
SEALED LIC KS
A IL L CU IL
GALAS INH A.LE
USA TRIGGERED
RPM ETNA RUNE
USE REAR NON


6 Physique,
slangily
7 Harangued
S8 Beethoven piece
9 Allot
10 Furtive whisper


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


4-14


13 Turns down
19 Nearly shut
21 Old barge
canal
24 Make a choice
25 Freeway
26 Kind of dancer
(hyph.)
27 Contented
murmurs
28 Aha!
(2 wds.)
29 Balance-sheet
gurus
31 Cheese dish
33 Elev.
35 Canal bank
36 Undersized
pup
38 Rushed by
39 Voting number
41 Snapshot
42 Help go wrong
43 Game with
mallets
44 Laze about
46 Ruler of
Venice
47 Porker's plaint
48 Stick
together
51 Kind
of instinct


� 2009 by NEA, Inc.


Dear Annie: My brother is
married to a woman I will
call "Devon." She is an
only child and accus-
tomed to having her
way.
Our last surviving
parent recently passed -'
away, and Devon tried
to manipulate the divi-
sion of the estate. My
brother took posses-
sion of almost all of my
father's belongings,
and I should have had
most of Mom's things,
but Devon wanted ANNi
them for herself. And MUI
she got them.
I recently discov-
ered she and my brother de-
ceived me about certain estate
items that were supposed to go to
me but are now in their posses-
sion. I have grandchildren (which


I


Devon will never have) and
would like some of those heir-
looms to pass on to them.
My brother is hen-
pecked and does
whatever Devon
wants. Should I con-
front them or remain
silent? - Florida Sis-
ter
Dear Florida: Who
handled the estate?
Was there a legal will
Giving you possession
of these items? If your
parents had a lawyer,
IE'S there should be a writ-
BOX tes record of how the
estate was to be dis-
tributed. If there was
only a verbal understanding, you
can still take your brother to
court and a judge might agree
that you are entitled to these
things.


Before taking legal action, we
suggest you talk to your brother
directly. Explain how unfair it is
that he got the bulk of both Dad's
and Mom's estate, and that for the
sake of your relationship, he
needs to be more equitable. If he
still won't part with anything, ask
whether he would be willing to
specify in his will that these heir-
looms go to your grandchildren at
his death.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. E-mail annies
mailbox@comcastnet, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, PO. Box
118190, Chicago, IL 60611. To
find out more abbutAnnie's
Mailbox, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
wwwcreators.com.


Today's HOROSCOPE


Your Birthday: You might have to make
revisions in your plans in the year ahead.
However, these changes will come about
because you'll recognize the necessity
of doing what events dictate in order to
achieve your goals.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -There are
opportunities from which you could profit,
but you may choose to ignore them and
waste your time on frivolous interests.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -An associ-
ate who should know where the opportu-
nities lie may want to help you at this
time. However, take ample time to check
things out. It might be wrong for you.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Owing to a
lack of resolve, you'll accomplish only a
small percentage of what you had hoped
to do. Playtime might mean more to you
than work time.


Cancer (June 21-July 22) - Since you
are able to submerge your pride and
ego, you have the ability to win or lose
with grace.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Even though
you know what is best for you, a nega-
tive attitude might not let you follow
through on your convictions.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - You and
your mate might be at odds with one an-
other at times. Whether or not this is a
good day will depend on whether you're
together on the important things.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - You know
how to recognize good deal, business-
wise; but you won't know what to do with
the proposition once you've got it.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - If you are
insensitive to the feelings of family mem-
bers, there is a good chance you could


make members of the clan feel that
you're more concerned about outsiders.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - Be-
cause your level of competency may be
a notch or two higher than your co-work-
ers', it could create problems with the
production line. If you can't bring them to
your level, unite with theirs.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -You
might be slow and out of sorts, but this
doesn't mean that you should hold back
just because you're getting a late start.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -There
will be plenty of material opportunities
around - time is of the essence in
order to take full advantage of them.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - There
might be a lesson to be leased about
not pretending to be something you're
not. Let the real you emerge.


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TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 C9


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE












CI1O I 'Vy. AiRIL. 14, 20(9


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THAT'S NOT
TRUE


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For Better or For Worse


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,Tx PREP 50FTWARE...



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I'M RECALIBRATING
MY' HOPES AND DREAMS
TO BE CONSISTENT
UJI-TH THE STATE OF
THE ECONOMY.


SITH E VOU GOT
NO LATE-NIGHT ANXIET/
BAG5 OF CHIPS...
NO "PITN /E" PIZZIAS...
NO FRLISTRATIODt
EPISODES WITH ICE CREAM...

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HOW MUCH DID WE SAVE ??
13,500 CALORIES!
NO TAX PREP
SOFTWARE COULD
DO THAT!!

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Beetle Bailey

GET SOME PIRT WHAT IN IT
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STOPRI6HT NO, YOU
THERE... NO PON. THE
WAY I'M ET- MGTIPOR-
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Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"', I I4 -1 I
'YU'RE OO GROWN UP TO HAVE A CLOWN AT YOUR
BIRIHPAPAARV,'A,0V.T6LLYOURMoM TO GET
A SUPER RO INST1AR"
Betty


-- sie!.. & Ernest


"Are you looking' for a cookie taster?"


Monn . Today S

Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"Hannah Montana: The Movie" (G) 11:30 a.m., 2
p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:30 p.m. No passes.
"Observe & Report" (R) Noon, 2:30 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Fast & Furious" (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:10 p.m.,
4:40 p n., 10:05 p.m.
"The Haunting in Connecticut" (PG-13) 11:45
a.m., 2:20 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Monsters vs. Aliens" (PG) 11:50 a.m., 2:15 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Knowing" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7:10
p.m., 9.55 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Dragonball Evolution" (PG) Noon, 2:30 p.m., 5
p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Observe & Report" (R) 12:30 p.m., 2:45 p.m., 5:15
p.m., /:45 p.m., 10:10 p.m.


"Hanna Montana: The Movie" (G) 11:30 a.m., 2
p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:30 p.m. No passes.
"Fast & Furious" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 2:50 p.m.,
5:20 p.m., 7:55 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"The Haunting in Connecticut" (PG-13) 12:10
p.m., 2:40 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 10 p.m.
"12 Rounds" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 2:55 p.m., 5:30
p.m., 8 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"MonsterS vs. Aliens" (PG) 11:45 a.m., 2:15 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Knowing" (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:20 p.m., 5:05
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"I Love You Man" (R) 11:55 a.m., 2:25 p.m., 4:55
p.m., 7:20 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 9:45 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


.. ---- . Local RADiIO
WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix
WXCV-FM 95-3 Adult WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious
Contemporary WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies


WIFL-FM 104.3 Adult Mix
WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


ALTHOUGH I POINT
S5EEM TO RECALL
MY TEENS

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MY NEW GOAL IS TO
NOT BE SMOTHERED TO
DEATH BY AN OLD
MATTRESS THAT FALLS
OFF A SALVAGE TRUCK.


THANKS FOR THE i
:5^ SUGGESTION







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AND I AM SAVING
MONEY BY DRINKING
NOTHING BUT MUGS
OF STALE AIR.


YOU iiHAS ANYONE llRlllImUl lll
WANT l EVER SAID,
TO NOPE', "IM GOOD:' !,!
JIN IM AND SEEMED
US' pGOOD' - LESS GOOD/ I
, C.CtHEAR
CRICKETS.

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CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another
Today's clue: J equals B


"SCKW VR WCX ERX NH K CNERX VH ONE



CKTXB'W DNW K WNYXMKJYX UYKBXW


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WCNMXKE

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Men, I want you just thinking of one word all season. One word
and one word only: Super Bowl." - Coach Bill Peterson
(c) 2009 by NEA, Inc. 4-14


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CoMIcs










Canus Couwly (FL) CHRO E


American Italian Club to Red Hatters answer President Obama's call
host dinner Wednesday , -


Citrus American Italian Club of In-
verness is planning a cruise to the Ba-
hamas, four nights, five days. Cost is
all inclusive, two per cabin. Also plan-
ning a bus to and from cruise out of
Cape Canaveral. Date is Dec. 7 to 11.
Call Martha at 476-8727 or Barbara at
560-3857 for booking or more informa-
tion.
Remember our Wednesday dinner:
sausage, peppers and potatoes. Call
Dolores at 476-5019.
Also, our breakfast is 8 to 11 a.m.
Saturday: all you can eat for $4.50 per
person. We also have bingo every
Sunday. Games start at 1 p.m.
Big night in works for
Big Brothers Big Sisters
Big Brothers Big Sisters of Citrus
County invites the public out for a "Big
Night at Beefs" at Beef 'O' Brady's,
6738 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway in
Crystal River, for dinner between 5
p.m. and closing on Thursday. This
"Big Night at Beefs" gives our commu-
nity a chance to have a great dinner
and help Big Brothers Big Sisters just
by being there.
Kids who stop by Beefs throughout
the month will get a free ticket for a
special drawing for a bicycle that is
given away on the Big Night! Come
out, meet and greet mentors, children
and staff from Big Brothers Big Sisters
and many guests who support Big
Brothers Big Sisters. Twenty percent
of all meal purchases will be donated
to support Big Brothers Big Sisters'
one-to-one mentoring programs.
For more information about this
event or to learn more about donating
to or volunteering with Big Brothers
Big Sisters programs, call 464-3968.
Singles club open
to BHRA members
The Beverly Hills Singles Club will
meet at 4:30 p.m. Thursday at the
Recreation Center for an evening of
cards and games. Bring a lunch and
beverage.
Any single who is a member of the
Beverly Hills Recreation Association is
invited for an evening of fellowship.
For questions, call 746-4882.
Pinellas retirees plan
luncheon in Inverness
Pinellas County retirees will have a
luncheon at 12:30 p.m. Thursday at
Joe's Family Restaurant, 911 W. Main
St., Invemess.
Call Ruth Embree at 726-2162 if
you plan to attend.
Come, dine with, join
Seminole Club members
The public is invited to attend and
affiliate with the Crystal River Semi-
nole Club at its dinner meeting at 6
p.m. Thursday at the historic club-
house at 135 N.E. Third St. in Crystal
River.
For membership information, call
Jim Wazel, president, at 621-1960, or


Special to the Chronicle
The Rebel Red Hat Sistahs support President Obama's call for public service by singing and dancing for the
residents of the Crystal River Health and Rehabilitation Center on March 27. Center, seated, are Queen
Mother Laura Martinez and Vice Queen Pauline Bowe. From left are Sistahs: Gerri Watkins, Flo Resetar, Cindy
Paquette, Lydia Valentine, Carol Bowers, Lois Statum, Barbara Cave, Judi Redd, Maria Toromanides and
Michelle Bailey.


Rhonda Johnson at 795-6282.
Parks to offer Bob Ross
painting class Friday
Citrus County Parks and Recreation
is proud to announce that Margaret
Messina, certified Bob Ross instructor,
will offer a four-hour class from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday at the Lecanto
Community Building or Wednesday,
April 22. This wet-on-wet painting
technique is open to beginners. Cost
per class is $50 per person. The in-
structor supplies all materials. It is rec-
ommended to bring a snack and drink.
Register online at www.citruscounty
fl.org, click on Parks & Recreation to
register. For information, call 527-
7677.
Nurses to learn about
hearing impairments
Retired Registered Nurses of Citrus
and Marion Counties will meet for
lunch Monday, April 27, at West Mar-
ion Medical Building, in room 202.
The speaker for the monthly meet-
ing will be Denny Dingier, an Audio-
prosthologist B.S. B.C. HIS, ACA. The
topic will be causes and assists for
hearing impaired.
Members who attend are asked to
bring non-perishable foods for the
Marion County Food Bank. All Regis-
tered Nurses are welcome to attend.
Call Mary Jane at (352) 697-1532 or
Gladys at (352) 854-2677 by Friday
for reservations.
Enjoy lunch Friday
with New Englanders
"The New Englanders" will lunch at


2 p.m. Friday at The Olive Tree
Restaurant on U.S. 19 in Crystal
River. The speaker will be a represen-
tative from The Citrus County Support
Services Department. Maybe we will
learn something that will come in
handy in the future.
Come and enjoy the food and con-
versation with old or new friends. Call
Jack Wells at 746-1571.
Blast Cats to play Friday
at VFW's sock hop
VFW Post 10087 in Beverly Hills is
having a sock hop Friday. Tickets are
available at the post for $10 per per-
son. Spaghetti and meatballs dinner
with salad and garlic bread will be
from 6 to 7 p.m. The Blast Cats will
play from 7 to 10.
Everyone is welcome.
Enjoy Friday movie:
'Motorcycle Diaries'
Friday Flicks continue at 7 p.m. this
week. "Motorcycle Diaries" is the April
film.
Based on a true story, it inspires
and thrills as it traces youthful origins
of a revolutionary spirit. The Latin
American scenery is spectacular.
Flicks are shown every third Friday
of the month and are non-religious
films never, or not recently shown, in
this area.
Everyone is invited to the Nature
Coast Unitarian-Universalist Fellow-
ship, 7633 N. Florida Ave., Citrus
Springs, (U.S. 41, just north of the
Holder intersection).
Donation is $3; soda and snacks
are sold. Information: (352) 465-5646.


Ballroom dance slated
Friday in Beverly Hills
The public is invited to a ballroom
dance from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Friday
at the Beverly Hills Recreation Center,
77 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Music
will be provided by D.J. Bob Arthur,
who plays a variety of dance music in-
cluding two-step, waltzes, cha-chas,
rumbas, tangos, swing and more. He
invites requests.
Tickets are $6, which includes cof-
fee and ice. A singles table will be pro-
vided. Tickets are available at the
office 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday
to Friday, or at the door.
For questions, call 746-4882.
Rummage sale set at
Peace Lutheran Church
The ladies of Peace Lutheran
Church are preparing for their annual
rummage sale, which will take place
on Saturday. This is a huge event,
which residents of Dunnellon and sur-
rounding communities look forward to.
If anyone has items they wish to do-
nate to the sale, please call Thelma
Grams at 465-3877.
Peace Lutheran Church (The
Church On The Hill) is at 7201 S. U.S.
41, five miles north of downtown Dun-
nellon.

Have a blast at
Bunco Bash at PJPII
The Council of Catholic Women of
St. Scholastica Church will host a
"Bunco Bash" on Saturday at Pope
John Paul II School Hall, Homosassa
Trail, Lecanto. Doors will open at noon


and play will begin at 1 p.m. Tickets
are $12 each. There will be door and
cash prizes and refreshments will be
served.
For tickets, call Theresa at 341-
1116 or Jeannette at 527-2638.
Family Fun Day slated
at Citrus Springs park
Family Fun Day is scheduled from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at Wesley
Jones Park on Citrus Springs Boule-
vard, sponsored by the Citrus Springs
Civic Association and the Citrus
Springs Youth Committee.
A few of the activities are children's
games, prizes, clowns, face painting,
bounce rides (25 cents), fire trucks,
sheriffs department vehicles, etc.
There will be a small charge for
food this year: hot dogs 50 cents; bot-
tled water 25 cents; sno-cones 50
cents; nachos 50 cents due to the
economy.
Plants for sale from
Floral City Garden Club
Anne Propp, chairwoman, for the
Floral City Garden Club's annual Plant
Sale and her committee have been
busy harvesting and making ready na-
tive, home grown and special interest
plants.
Plants will be sold Saturday from 8
a.m. until all plants are purchased.
This year's Plant Sale will be held at
the Floral City Church of Christ pavil-
ion located at 8599 E. Marvin St., Flo-
ral City. Follow the signs from traffic
light at U.S. 41 and County Road 48.
A natural fertilizer, "Rabbit Berries,"
will be available this year at $8.50 per
bag.
For additional information, call
Propp at 560-0047.
Free movie Saturday:
'American Dream'
All are invited to see an acclaimed
documentary film, "American Dream,"
at noon Saturday at the Nature Coapt
Unitarian Universalist Fellowship,
7633 N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), Citrus
Springs.
Academy Award Winner for Best
Documentary, 1990, this motion pic-
ture captures the start reality of work-
ing people making tough choices
during a time of extreme economic cri-
sis. Set in Minnesota.
A brown-bag lunch is OK. Informa-
tion: (352) 465-4225 or www.ncuu.org.

Shop for book bargains
at sale in Yankeetown
The Friends ofA. F. Knotts Public
Library plans a gigantic, what-a-bar-
gain book and white elephant sale
from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. Saturday on
the library grounds at 11 56th St. in 1
Yankeetown.
The sale will continue in the library
from 3 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 21, and
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday and
Thursday, April 22 and 23.
The Yankeetown Woman's Club is
also having a yard/plant sale right next
door Saturday.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds

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Fa: 32)56-65 1TllF ee: 88) 82-340 1 mai: *asifieds 6 *6 *onin 6 *6, * i:ww~croicleolin*co


ALONE?
Senior Dating Bureau
SAFEST since 1977 Ages
45-90.1-800- 922-4477
(24hrs) or
log onto: Respected
Dating.com
Retired Caucasian
Gentleman seeks
companionship with an
attractive, intelligent
Lady. Ethnicity/Age is no
problem. Will consider
sharing my home with
an acceptable person.
Blind Box 1540p
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144

Your World


CHr opNcIi
Clasostled
twit


Excell. Home for any
unwanted birds, poultry
U-R unable to care for
726-9874
FREE Over 50 large bags
of small oak leaves.
Come & get them.
(352) 628-2340
HAVE SOMETHING TO
GIVE AWAY?
Place your
ad 24 hrs a day.
Go to:
chronicleonllne.com
1 Select Place an Ad
2 Create an Account
3 Select Cust. type
4 Select Heading of
Special Notices
5 Select Free
6 Create Ad


$400 REWARD
Lost Yellow Lab
male. March 20th
Citrus Springs - Deltona
& Elkam
352-228-7893


Sand read
My name is Elvis and I
live at 5234 West Corral
Place in Pine Ridge.
If you are reading this
ad, and you have
found a large solid
black cat and have
taken him into your
home, please call me.
You may have found
Elvis. Elvis has been
missing since
February. He is
declawed and
neutered plus he has
two serious health
conditions which if not
treated properly can
be fatal. We are
heartbroken and des-
perately miss him.
Thank you for
keeping him safe.
Please call MariJo.
352-220-2032
REWARD $$$$$$
$$$$$$SS

a ftr. 010
Your world first.

EtC a/fied)
Classified


WICS un a ua u.
Mix, 3 yrs. old, small tan.
Lost in old Homosassa
answers to cookie. Re-
ward.(352) 628-2825
(352) 422-6580
LOST BIKE HELMENT
& GPS IN CENTRAL RIDGE
PARK (352) 270-3807
WEDDING RING SET
Lakes Regional Library
Inverness. April 6th.
Much sentimental value.
REWARD
352-637-2306


Prescription Glasses
w/neck rope. Found
on sweetgum ct. N.
(352) 382-1074
TERRIER LIKE DOG
ON WITHLACOOCHEE
TRAIL IN HOLDER AREA
(352) 270-3807


TR ST


Get Results
In The Homefront
Classifieds!


Bank Probate
SDivorces lEvictions
* 352-613-3674





www.adoota
rescued petcom
View available pets on
our website or call
(352) 795-9550
Adoption Locations
PET SUPER MARKET
every Saturday 11-2p
Inverness
MERCANTILE BANK
Inverness
April 20th Monday
12-2pm
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT




\--- .Jt

$$ SAVE $$
LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
*ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY


352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com


Top Hat Airport
Serv.352-628-4927
Rates for Tampa Int.
S75 & Orlando $85
w/some restrictions
/us out zoomcitrus.com

CAT
ADOPTIONS


Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 Atill 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4
All Cats and Kittens are al-
tered, tested for Feline Luk
and Aids. Up to date on
vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofspha.ora.
or stop by our offices at
1149 N ConantAve. Comer
of 44 and Conant.
Look for the big white build-
ing with the bright paw
prints.


Every day hundreds of people like you turn to the Classifieds
to find the items they need at prices they can afford.
If you've got something to sell, go to www.chronicleonline
and place your classified ad with us!


C " . ONIC

I CLASSIFIED


What is ez?
It's the 24-hour,
do-it-yourself website
for creating ads that will
appear in the Chronicle's
classified section


1. - * r n-ic


fr


I


TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 Cll


COMMUNITY


i'.......... r ......... /CT T I rTt)-nrrfr r


W7 -1










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C12 TUESDAY, APIuIL 14, 2009



t7 L 98 6





�~~~~ 9 ^^ ^8 T

T Z e
Z T-64S� 981
L-t4 : ~


KEY WEST SHRIMP
$4/LB Today thru Sun.
LIMITED TIME Call
Mark 727-726-8617




Lot to Sell
in
FERO Gardens
$400
(352) 628-3329




A FREE Report of Your
Home's Value
www.naturecoast

missionincitrus.com
Citrus County Only
Emergency Homeless
Shelter 794-3825

















































BECOME A CNA
For Career and
Test Preparation
Call 352-564-8378
CNA PREP CLASSES
EZ Learning Services
For Information 352-
586-2715; 586-2716
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
CNA TEST PREP
Now Offering Day
& Evening Classes
352-341-2311
Scholarships Available

Full Time
Lic. Lab Tech &
Phlebotomist.

For busy Physician
Lab. Competitive
Salary & Benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 746-6333

IMMEDIATE OPENING
CNA for doctors
office. OBGYN exp.
a plus. Fax resume
(352) 794-0877
LPN/MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Experience needed.
Please send resume to
P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447

*R~iiiaurat/
Loungej


AGENTS

ActNn



Ready for an
EXPLOSIVE Career

We offer the
opportunity to
reach$75K to $100Kl in
your 1st year.

Licensed Insurance
Agents or quality
unlicensed people
may apply.
*We provide free
preset apts, no
prospecting.
*We advance 1st
year comm.
*We give large
monthly bonuses
*We take trips all
over the world
*We offer 1st yr
renewals







Call Micah Buck for
interview
352-726-7722
Fax Resume:
352-726-6813


HOME SHOW CASE
Pool & SPA
seeking Sales Help
Exp. in the Pool & Spa
Industry preferred .
Please fax Resume
to:
352-375-7706

SALES PERSON
EXPERIENCED
TOP $$$ PAID
Benefits, company
vehicle.
Apply In Person
ray's Pest
Control
3447 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Inverness
(352) 746-2990

WORTH A
LOOK- START
IMMEDIATELY!
If you have in home
sales experience
selling vacuums,
alarms, home
Improvement, etc.
WE WANT TO TALK TO
YDUII
We have a product
every one wants and
needs.
We have Leadsl
Paid training, car
allowance & benefit
package
Call Randy
727-919-5738




DRIVER NEEDED
Immediate Opening:
Experienced Driver
needed for our
Roll-Off & Porto-let
Routes. Qualified
candidate must have
a clean Class B CDL,
Submit to random
drug and alcohol
screening, & pass
back ground checks.
Must have good work
history, be dependa-
ble & available on
weekends. Fill out
applications betwn
8am and 4pm at
Advanced
Waste Solutions Inc.
124 N. Florida Ave.
Inverness
EXP'D TOW TRUCK
OPERATOR

Class A CDL
Clean driving record
a must. Mon - Fri
Advance Towing
(352) 400-0360
Experienced A/C
Installer & A/C Tech
Must be cert. & have
own tools. Valid D.L. a
must. Knowledge of
area helpful. Call
(352) 860-2522 or apply at
304 N. Pine Ave. Inv.
Mon- Fri 10a-3p

r EXP. SERVICE
PLUMBERS

I Only plumbers with I
i service exp. APPLY,
352-621-7705

YAQ-- - S


YMCA seeking
qualified Individuals
to serve as a life-
guards and swim
lesson Instructors
Aquatics Programs In
Citrus County. Submit
application/resume
to Amber Slusser, at
the Citrus County
YMCA-2805 Hwy 44
W, Inverness, FL
34453. Phone:
352-586-4390 Email:








APPOINTMENT


Serious minded individ-
uals will earn great $$$
setting appts for our
very busy local com-
pany. Call Steve @
352-628-0254

FRONT DESK
Hotel experience
required.n Great
benefits. Full-time.
Apply in person:
BEST WESTERN
614 NW Hwy 19
Crystal River.
No calls please

HELP WANTED

Experienced
Roll Off/Dumpster
Delivery Driver.
Must have CDL for
minimum of 2 yrs.
clean driving record.
Apply in Person @
Lecanto






You0 world first


Need a job

or a

qualified

employee?


This area's

#1


employment

source!



Classifieds
1 11.111 i n


INFANT/TODDLER

Teacher Needed
(352) 795-6890


Military Police - Serve and
protect your community and
your country as a member of
the National Guard Military
Police! A part time career
with full time rewards.
SSG Rodney Medina
(352)-586-8526
RODNEY.MEDINA@
US.ARMY.MIL
1-800-GO-GUARD.COM





Stanley Steemer
Looking for FT Carpet
Cleaner. Will train,
clean FL driver's lIc. &
at least 21 years old.
Background check &
DFWP. Apply at
911 Eden Drive
Inverness


YOAY CAMP


YMCA seeking
qualified Individuals
to serve as a Camp
Leaders and Life-
guard for Summer
Day Camp Programs
In Citrus County.
Submit
application/resume
to Amber Slusser, at
the Citrus County
YMCA-2805 Hwy 44
W, Inverness, FL
34453.
Phone; 352-586-4390
Email:
aslusser@suncoastvmc
a.org
DFW/EEO





HOUSE KEEPING
Exp..Only,
Weekends,Able to
pass a background
check
(352) 795-3774

P/T TENNIS

Local Tennis Club,
In need of Part time
counter help. $7 hr.
Flexible hrs. a plus
This is a smoke free
facility. Call 249-1115




BARBER^^


Restaurant For Sale
An established
profitable franchise in
Crystal River. $240K.
(352) 746-6596
Small SHOP
Trophy's Awards, Signs,
Advertising prom., turn
key, (352) 564-8758




DESK & FREEZER
computer desk with
hutch$60, small outside
freezer $30 Call 465-3841,
leave message if no
answer










25x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry Door, 2 Vents,
4" Concrete Slab.
$14.895. INSTALLED
30x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$16 795. INSTALLED
35x50x12(3:12 pitch)
Roof overhang,
2-10x10 Rollup Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$30.995 Installed
+ Fl. Engineered Plans
+ A local Fl Manufact.
* Meets or exceeds
Florida wind codes.
* Conc/Inst by others,
+ Many sizes available
+ We specialize in
Commercial Buildings
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC1256991
www. metal
structureslic.com
Flex Space 400+Sq. ft.
areas of warehouse/
affordable & secure. (352)
400-4295
;h mi ii ii
F Sheds & Garages of
I Any Size I
S*SHEDS NOW*
SWe Move & Buy
I Used Sheds
I lndependence/41
(352) 860-0111 �
Lk iii=iiii ii 1iiiiii =l


Civil War, Nautical &
wildlife prints. Go to
www.mariners
International.comr




A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
4 2 Ton $780.00
4-2-/2hTon $814.00
-4 3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
* Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Free Del. Lic.#CAC
057914 746-4394
ABC Briscoe Appl.
Refrig., washers, stoves.
Serv. & Parts
(352) 344-2928
Double Sink
stainless w/delta faucets.
& Garbage Disposal.
$45.00
Dishwasher
Whirlpool, Black/white.
Quiet cycle. $50.
(352) 476-2267
KENMORE WASHER &
DRYER SET. Excellent
condition. $150.
352-212-3699
Micro Wave
GE Space maker, X- Lg
over counter. White.
$30.00
Electric Range
Whirlpool, black/white,
self cleaning. $70.00
(352) 476-2267



Thurs. Estate Auction
April 16 Sale- 4PM
EZ-Go golf cart, w/cust.
lift kit, lots of turn. Riding
mowers, tools, coins,
plenty of surprises
4000 S. 41, Inverness
dudleysauction.com
AB1667-AU2246 12%BP



CORDLESS RYOBI SET
sawsall, skill saw,brad
nailer, part of estate sale,
$150.obo 352-232-7790
PORTER CABLE
ROUTER Model 890
Heavy Duty 8902 Motor
120V60 HZ127 $75.00
1-352-489-7141




HITACHI 58"
PROJECTION TV
Excellent condition.
Asking $500/obo.
352-465-1653 or
682-3568
PHILLIP SURROUND
SOUND Digital Center.
5 speakers & sub-wolfer
$50. 352-726-9708
Television
Mitsubishi, 48" Projec-
tion. Great cond. $499.
(352) 564-4214



Kitchen Cabinets
Custom formica w/inlaid
doors. Comes w/micro
wave, hood, countertop &
3 well sink & faucets.
$750.(352)382 -2904



COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts & up-
grades. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
www.rdeeii.com
MINI CAM SAMSUNG
hi 8, used once, tri-pod part
of estate sale $125 abo
352-232-7790

HEquipmen


SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic inch
S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered Hooker
headers. New Gangster
white walls, seat in all
leather bik ostrich skin,
Paint by Jesse James
painter of Calf., w/Double
Damon signature, House of
Color paint, Blk w/colored
ghost flames on all sheet
metal. 2" Carlini handle
bars. Chrome to max, This
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for nice
tractor w/bucket or bobcat
etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815



High Style TABLE, 4
SWIVEL ARMCHAIRS,
UMBRELLA, cream, nearly
new b.o. 352-465-6551

F urniture


2 Memory Foam
Mattress Twin size,
like new $50 each
(352) 628-3570
2 recliners, like new,
mauve, very clean, $75
ea. Glass top Table, 4
chairs, olive green, $50.
Cash only
(352) 637-2580
2, Camping Grills
Table top $35.00 each.
(239) 229-2643
8 LIGHT CHANDELIER
part of estate sale
antique/crystal $150.obo
352-232-7790
42" Round
Oak Pedestal Table
& 4 chairs $250.
352-586-8576,
or 352-527-3176
Area Rug 5.5 X 7'
$40.00
Patio Set
7 piece PVC w/umbrella.
$150.00 Obo.
(239) 229-2643
BROYHILL
Oval dining room
table & 6 chairs, China
Cabinet good cond.
$500.(352) 344-8291
Changing Table
& Crib, Pali, Natural
wood finish. Both wl
mattress. Bed comes
w/toddler rail. $550. for
all. Exc. cond.
(352) 249-0851
Custom oak
Entertainment Center,
Showroom new , will hold
up to hold 42" flat screen
cost $1,609 reduced
$475. 795-0494
Glass Coffee & End
Table. $200. for both
SMW.(352) 382-2449


SLOUVEISAIB L/I ni UIUe.
Exc. cond. 350.
ROCKER RECLINER
Mint color. $100. Exc.
cond. 352-522-1938
Hutch
Cherrywood, w/glass
doors. $45.00
Micro Wave Cabinet.
$35.00. (352) 249-6800
Ivory Leather Sectional
$390, Plus other furniture
for sale Pine Ridge area
352-746-6806
LARGE ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
Ught wood, with or
without TV. $500/obo
352-422-4560
MIRRORED DRESSER,
blond wood 8-drawer
$350; Pink velvet chair,
$25; Wicker Table, small,
white $20. all In exc.
cond. (352) 527-6807
MODERN SAGE GREEN
SOFA Very clean $225 or
ab o 352-613-2712
MOVING SALE. Sofa
w/chair, It. blue love seat,
end tables, coffee table, din-
ning room set, �
dresser/mirror and night-
stands.
Great Condition. Make an
offer. Cell 802-578-7932
Office Filing Cabinets
$10.00 each.
Twin Bed. $35.00
(352) 249-6800


ORIENTAL DINING
ROOM SET, SOUTH-
WESTERN DINING
SET, Queen size
Sleep Comfort adjust-
able bed orig.3000.00
asking 800.00 or best
offer, oriental dining
set(must see to ap-
preciate). Call
352-257-1178
OVER SIZE PLAID
WING CHAIR
Excellent condition $75
352-795-8774
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Wants Your Business
Tues.-Fri. 9-5 Sat. 9-1
Homosassa 628-2306
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40.Qn
$50; Kg $75. 628-0808
Recliner & Sofa
Tan Leather. $300.
For both.
SMW (352) 382-2449
SAGE GREEN CHAISE
LOUNGE
Excellent condition $125
352-465-6551
SET OF BUNK BEDS - $350
w/ mattresses or $150 for
just the frame. Kenmore
Dishwasher, like new
$330 (352) 341-0314
STAR BURST MIRROR
perfect for above fireplace.
$75.obo part of estate sale
353-232-7790
Table, dark oak
pedestal, round,
42" with 12" leaf,
4 chairs, $175.
(352) 228-7670
TRIPLE CHERRY DRESSER
w/bilfoldlng mirror. $225.
(2) TWIN MATTRESSES
w/boxsprings & frames.
$50 ea. $75 both. All
like new. 352-527-8176
or 352-212-6918
Twin Bed
Maple head & foot
boards. New mattress &
box spring. $150.
(352) 270-8250
YOUR FURNITURE
DONATIONS
SUPPORTS THE PATH
HOMELESS SHELTER
Call (352) 746-9084



10 h.p. Chipper
& Shredder $225
(352) 795-6639
CRAFTMAN LAWN
MOWER - 6hp self
propelled. 22 inch cut.
$100. Excellent cond.
352-527-2981
Lawn Mower
Murray 22", very good
cond. $75.00
(352) 382-2449
Pressure Washer
Ridgid, 3000 PSI
used only 3 times
$300
(352) 341-1962
Riding Lawn Mower
Dixon commercial 44"
deck. O-turn.A-1 cond.
$1,200.(352) 746-7357
Riding Lawn Mower
MTD, 42" deck, 11 HP.
$350. (352) 746-7357
SMOKER/GRILL OF
WHEELS part of estate sale
$35.obo 352-232-7790



4 ARTIFICIAL FICUS
TREES potted in/outdoor
part of estate sale $ 75. obo
352-232-7790



BOOK STORE
Howards Flea Mrkt.
Sec. A wing for info.
(352) 628-7521
(352) 601-5491


BEVERLY HILLS
1 Day...4/14, 10-4pm
tools, turn. medical
equipment & More
31 Beverly Hills Blvd.



25 PAIRS,hi heels,
sandals, dress size 6 to
8part of estate sale 125 or 5.
each 352-232-7790
Clothing valued at $800,
petite 14, med., large.
shoes sized 8 1/2 -9,
purses, like new & are
new all for $225
(352) 503-7385
MINK STOLE, ERMINE
brown ladies medium $100.
obo part of estate sale
352-232-7790
NIKE AIRS
red brown & black.very nice
and well keptsize 9 men $40
795-6481




2 MOTOR CYCLE
HELMETS 1 Motor cross
& 1 Street $30.00 each
464-0316
3000 watt GENERATOR
8 HP Briggs & Straton.
Very good cond. $250.
352-726-9708
2- PERSON HOT TUB
w/cover, like new
$500 obo; Waterfllled
massage table w/heat
$100 obo (352) 746-5043
A Good Running
Donated Vehicle for
Mom to take autistic
son to school
(352) 628-0526


BOARDS For Small Bronco
or Blazer $40.00 464-0316
Carpet Factory Direct
Repair" Clean * Sales
Laminate, shop at
home. 352-341-0909
COVER FOR POPUP
CAMPER 12x14 $40.00
464-0316
ENTERTAINMENT
Center $100.
2 filing cabinets $50.
(352) 344-8291





ITS FREE
Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad for FREE on
our all new
CLASSIFIED SITE.

5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 Items totaling less than
$100.00 each.
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an Ad in the top right
hand corner.
KEY WEST SHRIMP
$4/LB Today thru Sun.
LIMITED TIME Call
Mark 727-726-8617
Nascar Memorabilia
Books, tapes, cars, &
more, from early 70's
and up. $175.00 for all.
(352) 621-3673
PATIO SET
11 piece. $200
WINDOW AIR CONDI-
TIONER w/Remote.
$100 352-697-2460
SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149. Up
BOAT COVERS,$189. Up
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcltrus.com
TAPPAN (2) OVEN
Elec. Range. Very good
cond. $75. (2) LOVE-
SEATS. Grey/white strip.
$45 ea. $75 both
352-527-8176; 212-6918
Vacuum Cleaner
Hoover, Power Max.
Self propelled. $50
(352) 746-7083
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT









$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
*DISABILITY
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com




2 MANUAL WHEEL
CHAIRS Good Condition
without foot rests
$50.00 464-0316
4 PRONG CANE
Adjustable height $25.00
464-0316
MANUAL WHEEL CHAIR
FOR CHILD OR SMALL
ADULT No Foot Rests Fair
Condition $40.00 464-0316
Power Wheelchair
Golden Alante
model GP201F, holds
300 lbs, perfect cond.
$1,000,
(302) 242-1418
ROLLING SHOWER
CHAIR/TOILET CHAIR
With Foot Rests And Breaks
Light Weight Like New!
$70.00 464-0316
TUB CHAIR & BED SIDE
COMMODE
$25.00 Each 464-0316




Buying Silver Coins
$.10, .25, .50, $1.00
Pre- 1965,
352- 302-8159
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676



20 HOT AIR CORN
POPPERS @ $2.00 each
aLL $40.00 1-352-7141
AIR CONDITIONER
15,000 BTU, 220 Watts,
clean, works excellent
$100.00. 352-249-7195

Fitness^
Equipment


AB LOUNGER
Like New $50.00
464-0316
ELECTRIC TRED MILL
Good Condition $140.00
464-0316
HOME GYM Marcy
MWM 950, 150 lb weight
stack. Brand new. $300.
Call 352-382-1727 &
leave message.
Leg Press/ Hack
Space Squat. Gym
quality $550.
(352) 621-7774



2 SETS GOLF CLUBS
mens and women, part of
estate sale $25. each or obo
352-232-7790
AMMO 400 ROUNDS
223PMC Brass case FMJ
55GR $350;
250 ROUNDS, 40CAL
Remington/UMC, FMJ
$140 (813) 789-0592
AMMO 500 ROUNDS
762X39, FMJ Brass Case
on stripper clip $350;
300 ROUNDS 308 Brass
case FMJ $250
(813) 789-0592
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
KEY WEST SHRIMP
$4/LB Today thru Sun.
LIMITED TMEICall
Mark 727-726-8617
PRIVATE COLLECTOR
Buying Guns,
Ammunition&
reloading supplies
(352) 586-7516
RIFLE AK/47, Folding
stock, extra mags. $1100
obo (813) 789-0592
SUN MOUNTAIN GOLF
PULL CART Rarely used,
Fold down design, fits in
trunk of car, pneumatic
tires,adjustable front wheel,
easy rolling, 2 years old.
Cost $299 New, asking
$125 270-8184
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238


L^^eneral
ja~uflNiN


96 DOOLITTLE BOX
TRAILER 5'x 9' enclosed
box trailer. $1,000 or best
reasonable offer. Nice
shape! call 785-447-0599
or 785-447-0583
CAR HAULER
'06, 32 Ft. Dominator XT.
By Classic C. Trpl.
axels. $14,800. Like
new.(352) 835-4273






- Act Now -

PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY AT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad



Boston Terrier Pups
CKC Reg. 2 females,
1 male, ready w/health
cert. April 17 $500.
(352) 212-8111 lv.msg.
BOXER PUPPIES
9 wks, reg. health
cert/shots, tail,
dewclaws done.
$300 (352) 563-1479
DACHSHUND
1Fern Red, 1 M
tan/white, 10 weeks
$400(352) 586-9217
DAIRY GOATS Pure Bred
Nubians and Alpines.
Pygmys and crosses. All
ages. Prices vary.
(352) 463-9492
peacebound7@aol.com


EXOTIC HIPPIE
BUNNY RABBITS



New small breed, $15.-$35
ea.
All colors, adults
2 to 3.5 lbs.
352-621-0726
Cell (352) 422-0774






GERMAN SHEPHERD
WHITE MALE PUP PURE
BRED AKC 4 MONTHS
OLD ALL SHOTS MOSTLY
HOUSE BROKEN
$750.00 CASH
(352) 465-3139
MALTESES PUPS
CKC,1 male &
5 females $600-$650.
shots, 8 weeks old
(352) 586-5747
MIN PIN PUPS, AKC
3 females, tails crop
H. cert/shots. $300-$350
352-726-9730
SHI-A-POO &
YORKI-POO
SHIH-TZU multi
colored. $350/up
YORKIES: Males $600;
Females, $800
Paper trained, CKC
reg.'d, health cert.
NO SHEDDING!
(352) 489-6675
WEIMARANER
PUPPIES
Born 1/7, ready now,
H/C, Tails Cropped,
M/$350. F/$400.
(352) 628-0206




Pretty Paint Filly
Coming 2 yrs, old. $450.
Registered
Buckskin Colt.
$750,No reasonable
offer refused. Quiet & gen-
tie. (352) 873-6033
Summer Horse
Camp
(352) 382-5400
www.rymarranch.com




BABY GOATS SHEEPs
& PIGS For pets only.
Mini Farm off 495
(863) 843-2495 cell

11TI 1*;11


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR, $425./mo avail.
Now (612) 226-0091
Free 1st Mo Rent
1& 2 Br turn & Unfurn
No Pets Details
Homos.352-628-4441
HOMOSASSA
2/1, $350/mo.
$350 dep. No pets.
(352) 621-4721
HOMOSASSA
2/2/1 $775/mo F/US Pets
ok. 352-434-1235
HOMOSASSA
Lg. 2/1 Addition + deck.
Fenc'd yd. & shed,
$575 352-628-5244
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park,
2BR, 1-/2BA, $425.
1 BR,1 BA, $350 Incl.
water 352-476-4964


100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
*Low income applicants can
quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or no credit
OKAY
"recent bankruptcy
OKAY*
CAll TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
*Credit and income
restriction apply*
Florida licensed mortgage
lender




OPPORTUNITY
ANK

FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181
Floral City 3/2
Double wide.
Excellent condition. 1973
model. 24x66. $5,000.
(352) 344-1521
INVERNESS
55+ Waterfront Park,
1BR, water Incl. A/C
$3,500 + $270 mo. lot
rent. 352-476-4964
REPOS! I
REPOS!REPOSI
(352) 621-9181




BANK
FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181
HERNANDO/off 200 2/2/1
carprt, cov por. Lg. encl.
lanai,fenced bk yard
130x129, 2
sheds,W/D,S59,900
MOVE IN READY
(352) 341-4520
HOME-N-LAND
New Home 3/2
10 Yr. Warranty
Sacrificel $3,000 down
$676.43/mo.
Call to Qualify
352-621-3807
HOMOSASSA
3/1.5, Scr rm w/con-
crete firs. nice shade
trees, over level 1 + ac.
approx 1 mi E. of 19
$49,900(352) 564-4598
LECANTO 3/2
DW, 1/2cre, new
paint/carpet. Appls,
CHA, rfovers, porches,
shed. GOOD CONDI
$44,900. 352-746-0714
NEW JACOBSEN
TRIPLE WIDE
High end home on
2 %V Acres, 2150 sq ft,
3/2, glamour kitchen,
marble in bathroom, ap-
pliance pkg.
Must Sell $179,900 or
$787/mo. Call
(352) 621-9181
Nice 3BR, 2BA
doublewlide on 1 acre.
w/garage or barn.
East Inverness
$575 mo. WAC
(352) 726-9369
REPOS!
REPOS!REPOS!
(352) 621-9181


55+ Open Floor Plan,
2/2, cathedral ceilings,
14 x 56, lots of
upgrades, low rent
$13,500
(352) 527-3821
CRYSTAL RIVER
55+ Park, '98, 2/2
14 x 66, Carport, screen
porch, beautiful new
wood floors, appl., excel.
cond. lot $235 -mo.
$32,500 352-563-2865
Crystal River
Suncoast M. H. P.
2/2+ addition, fully furn.
wsh./dry. incl. CHA.
storage shed. $11,500
firm.) (603) 486-2412
Floral City, Singing For-
est, 2 BR, 1-%' BA
Exc. cond., lot rent $154
mo. 352-344-2420
518-598-2248, cell
FOREST VIEW ESTATES
Great Loc. Pools, clbhs.
& more. Move-in ready,
comp. turn. 2/2 DW,
wheelchair acc., shed
& sprinkler. New heat
pump. $39,900
563-6428/563-1297
Homosassa 55+ Park
2/2 '92 Jacobson,52 X
26.Many upgrades.
Heated pool $39,500
(352) 382-0795
Inverness 2/1/Carport
Nicely furnished,
remod. kit, ba &
windows,scrrm.$17,500
shed (352 344-1380
(614)226-2336
NEWER DBLWIDE
In 5 star park, 3/2
Vinyl Fl. room, shed,
carport. Exc. cond.
$37,500
(352) 382-2356
WALDEN WOODS
55+ 3yrs. old, turn. 2/2,
scrn. porch, carport,
shed, good cond.
Reduced to $39,500
Call (352) 697-2779


24x56 Skyline w/garage
Like New-Adult Park.
Trade for house in
Dunnellon 352-628-3363
WEST WIND VILL 55+
(2) NEW 2005's 2/2
Below cos/ Carport,
shed, scm prch, furn'd,
pet ok. Resales avail.
352-628-2090




HOMOSASSA & CRYS-
TAL RIVER 3 bedroom. 2
bath. Homosassa custom
3/2 waterfront home on 4
ac with 2 docks private
and quiet $1000. Crystal
River 3/2 near Plantation
$650. Homosassa water-
front 2/1 furnished $900.
Property Management &
Investment Group
Broker/Realtor
352-628-5600.
POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - Waterfront
homes, Wkly priv. rms, RV
lots.352-628-0011




J.W. e R� EW. , W.
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT

Invernes
2/2/2 fireplace - $675
3/2/2 nice yard -$700
2/2/2 den - $775
2/I- $500
2/2 carport - $595 MH
3/2/2- $750
2/11//I -$625
Beverly Hills
2/2/1 scrn rm - $625
2/2/1 frt porch - $650
2/1 carport - $650
Pritchard Island
3/2/1- $875
2/2/2- $800
See our website:
wwwjwmortonreal
estate.com
Jennifer Fudge
Sherry Scruggs
352-726-9010




FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025

-=

-r,----
1 & 2 BEDROOM
APARTMENTS
Avail, for Immed.
Occupancy.
CANDLEWOOD
COURT
APARTMENTS
& KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
for information call
(352) 344-1010
MON. thru FRI.
9am - 4pm
Ask About our Move
In Soecialsll
1BR sec. dep. $150
1st mo. Rent $150.
2BR sec. dep. $200
1st mo. Rent $200.
HUD Vouchers
Accepted
foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op

1 & 2 BEDROOMS
Call 352-257-8048 for
the move in speciaL
FLORAL CITY
2BR 1/2 BA, MH, just 150
yards from fishing dock,
$475. + $300 dep. Near
Floral City, 10 min. from
Inverness.
Trails End Camp
352-726-3699
INGLIS VILLAS
Is now accepting
applications for our
1, 2, 3 BR Apts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Crys. Riv.
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: M,W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglis Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity
LECANTO
1 BR Apartment (352)
746-5238/613-6000
ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2
dpix, all ktchn appls, pa-
tio, W/D hook-up, nice
yard, Exc. Cond. $625
(352) 634-1341
Pinewood Villas
Is now Accepting
applications for our
1,2,3 BR Apts.
Located in Bronson
Rental/ Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-486-2612
Or Apply Tues & Thur
7291 NE 92nd Ct. #17,
Bronson, Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity








PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronlcleonllne.com
and click place
an ad


7B0517

Sudoku ****** 4puz.com


31 5i 6 14
. . . . . ........ _3 _ _ .. . -. . - - . .... . -




543




7 41 ^ 12


619 2:. 14

-- ------

9 1






61-
6 ____ 1281




Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9,


C(T.A SZ.FIEDS

















Real Estate Services
Beverly Hills Area
Lynn Davis, Agent
352-422-2522
hedickgroup.net
We Have Rentals
Starting at $425/mo +
Many others LAND-
MARK
REALTY
352-726-9136
Kathy or Jane
311 W Main St. Inv



OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507



= 2nd MONTH FREE
SUMMERHILL AT
MEADOWCREST
Limited time! Call agent
for details. 352-563-5657
V us out zoomcitrus.com
CITRUS HILLS
Home, Villa, Condo
GREENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-5921
(888) 446-5921
oreenbrirrental.cow



CITRUS SPRINGS
New, 2/2, all appl.
Wash/Dry. $600.-$625.
(954) 557-6211
INVERNESS 2/1/1
Lawn Maint, $550 mo
352-359-5241
ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2
dplx, all ktchn appis,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341



LECANTO
Lg.Modern camper
roof over, priv ac. Incis
until $675, 352-621-4725

LOOK
AIVALUEINN.com
Hernando: New Renvt'd
Effic. $260wk. Pool.
Luxury homes $450wk
(15mi from power plant)
352-726-4744




SUNSET VILLAS
Senior Community
Chiefland Fl.
Accepting
Applications for
1 & 2 BR APTS
Please Apply
M, W, F, 8am-12p
124SW 14th Ave.
(352) 493-0220
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.



YOur \ arld first.
Every Day



Classifieds


FURNISHED RENTALS
Crossland Realty
352-726-6644
NEW HOMES 3/2/2
1st, last, sec, & ref
$800 mo. (352) 302-3927



BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, $575/mo
F/S, No Pets
(352) 527-4347
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2 + Bonus Rm.
$750 mo.(352) 212-5894
Beverly Hills
2Br poss 3 Br. C/H/A
First Month Free. $650
352-422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
4, Della St., 2/1, FL Rm
W/D, No pets/smoking
$550. mo. 352-422-6263
CITRUS HILLS
PRESIDENTIAL
3/2/2 $850 mo.
(352) 212-5812
CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 3/2/2, Near Sch.
$900mo 352-816-0010
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 V2 on water, reas. Call
(352) 746-5092 or
(352) 563-9594 for appt.
DUNNELLON
CITRUS SPRINGS
Rent or Rent to Own
Commute CR River
3 LOVE HOMES
2/2/1, Cit Springs $649
3/2, Dunnelon $749
4/2/2 Rnbow. Lakes,
Gorgeous $895.
352-527-0493
352-427-7644
HOMOSASSA
3/2 Split plan on 1 acre.
No pets. Close to town.
$600. Mo. Fst./Lst.
(352) 634-1764
HOMOSASSA
Beautiful, 3/2, 2/2
Pool on 1 acre
Lease Opt .Flexible
Financing Imm. Occ
352-795-0088
INVERNESS
2/2/2 in quiet south side
area, fl. rm., w/d, fenc'd.
yd. $825. (352)382-1373.
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/11/1,
$600/mo lst//st/Dep.
(352) 344-2560
SOUTHERN WOODS
4/3/2 Luxury executive
home on golf course,
great views, $1,300/Mo.
(813) 390-7109
SUGAR MILL
WOODS
2 Masters/2/2, Remodeled,
new appliances, new A/NC
$900 mo. 352-302-4057
SUGARMILL
3/2/2 $900.
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $900.
(352) 400-0230


Rental
Houses


Spacious 3/2/2
golf courselpool
One mo Free. $800.
908-322-6529
SUGARMILL
WOODS
4/3/2, Wsh/Dr. $900 Mo.
Eddie (305) 608-9973



. HOMOSASSA
2/2 with carport,
352-746-9400
Homosassa/Chass
2/1, CHA, washer, New
paint/carpet, no pets
$495. mo. 727-415-1805
Inverness Lakefront!
2/2/2home. 9108 Gospel
Island w/Florida room
and lanaidock, fenced
yard. $800. ' 344-8532



CITRUS Springs
4/2/2 Rent $900/mo.
F/L/S. Sale $130K
423-404-0903
INVERNESS
Highlands 3/2/1
totally remolded, new gran-
ite kit & Bath$850/mo rent
$#69K Own finances
avail(352) 726-2523



HOMOSASSA
Mobile to Share. $75.
Wk 352-628-9412

LOOK
A1VALUEINN.com
Hernando: New Renvt'd
Effij $260wk. Pool.
Luxury homes $450wk
(15 miles to power plant)
352-726-4744




LOOK
AlVALUEINN.com
Hernando; New Renvt'd
Effic: $260 wk. Pool.
Luxury homes $450wk
(15mi from power plant)
352-726-4744



OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507





LOOK
A1VALUEINN.com
Hernando. New Renvt'd
Efficg $260 wk. Pool.
Luxury homes $450wk
(15mi from power plant)
352-726-4744




AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50

Ad includes 20 lines of copy
w/ photo.


Crystal River
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
WatefrontBeautul,complely
renovated inside
and out,must see. Owner
financing. 300K
727-798-7077

Picture Perfect Homes
NEW HOMES STARTING
At $75,000 On Your Lot
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
.Lic.# CBCO59685

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to
advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
discrimination.
" Familial status
includes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing
custody of children
under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is in
violation of the law:
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



Homea Lso
OPPO5TUt ry






100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
*Low income applicants can
quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or No credit
OKAY
.recent bankruptcy
OKAY*
CAll TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
*Credit and income
restriction apply*
Florida licensed mortgage
lender



" , ,


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Reai Slect

(352) 795-1555





Your world first

Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classifieds


eriels NI


CITlRUS COUIN'ITY (FL-) CIIRONICLEt


BETTr MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Rie(352) 795-1555

(352) 795-1555


e


CLASSIFJEDS



2 Great Commercial lo-
cations, $650 to
$850/mo Perfect for any
small business/ office etc.
Call Lisa 352-634-0129
Plantation Realty
BEVERLY HILLS 491
Great Loc! 1500sf Spac.
Bus. Office/Home + 800sf
updated out bldg. Comm.
Easy Acess.Can live in.
$150K (352)795-6282
CRYSTAL RIVER -GREAT
LOCATION Citrus Ave.
Remodeled. 1353sqft
w/security fence &
parking. Over /2acre.
Zone GNC. $250K. Call
Gary, 352-564-4228



2/2/1 CB,
Tile, New Carpet,
Newer Appl.Lg. shed,
Fen'cd back yd, Patio,
1,600 Sq. Ft. CHA
$68,900(561) 313-5308
(561) 313-5291
ATTENTION!!
BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
$37,900. Delivered
and Set, $0-Down
Land/Home $650. mo.
Repos Available
Kinder Mobile
Home
(352) 622-2460
By Owner
3/2/2, Built 2005, like
new. Lease to Own
Option 352-302-0810
352-422-3922




RealtySelect
Citrus.comrn


FOR SALE BY OWNER
88 SJ Kellner, Bev. Hills
2/2%1/2, FP, OPEN HOUSE
on SUNDAYS
11A-3P $120K firm
(352) 746-6093





Crystal Oaks 3/2/2
For Sale
By Owner
Price Reduced
Split plan. Pool home
w/private back yard, on
cul de sac, move in con-
dition. Asking $170,000
(352) 746-7088





FOR SALE BY OWNER
2133 Brentwood
Circle . 3/2/2. $180,000.
352-527-1789





BRAND NEW
For Sale, 3/2 w/ alot
of upgrades
Beck St. Inverness
352-637-4138
Lic # CBS059685


Foreclosures
& Deals
Everywhere

CALL ME NOWI









Deb Infantine
EXIT REALTY
LEADERS
(352) 302-8046

OWNER FINANCING
3/2/2/ Pool & spa.
Village Green Gospel Is-
land, $60K below
market. 1800 sqft.
Purchase w/$13,700 dn.
$1050 mo. or no $$$
down w/620
credit.727-992-1372

RealtySelect
Citrus.comr


For Sale By Owner
Custom 3/2.5/2,
large lanal/summer kit
No Pool 2454 sf
cul de sac, $229.000
(352) 382-3322


$8000 Tax

Rebate
for first tim home buy-
ers if you have not
owned a home in 3 years.
Call for info
Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
Kellers Williams RIty


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI

Your SATISFACTION
Is MvyFuturel

(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC
\
Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


TITE













Your World







clsRNICn.E



wwF cro o- rlH'ne x.am


77?
.8 \4w#


DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Repairing gas & diesel
engines. No job too big
or small. 352-228-2067




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd friendly
serv. Lowest rates Free
est.
352-860-1452
All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
COLEMAN TREE SERVE.
Trim & Removal. Lic.
Ins. FREE EST. Lowest
rates. 352-270-8462
/ out zoomcitrus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design. Bob-
catwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272
OSBORNE'S
LawnTree/Shrub
Quality Work Free Est.
LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins



At Home Computer Re-
pairs & custom comput-
ers.
Call(352)228-7823
COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
On-Site Same Day
Service Available
*All Computers
*Affordable Rates
* Certified Tech's
* Networking
*Virus/Spyware/
Pop- Removal
(352) 341-4150
www.fastneks.com




REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch * Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-1728



RV CARPET &
FLOORING
REPLACEMENT
(352) 628-1164



Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
work fully coated. 30 yrs.
Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-795-6533
352-464-1397


All Int./ Ext. Painting
.Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ALL HOME REPAIR
painting, drywall flooring,
pwr. wash Malley's Home
Maint
220-9486 (1ic0259169)
4us out zoomcitrus.com
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



AFFORDABLE Mobile
Boat Maint. & Repair
Technical/Electrical
Custom Rigging
John (352) 746-4521
V us out zoomcitrus.com
SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149. Up
BOAT COVERS,$189. Up
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomctrus.com



AT YOUR HOME
Mower & Generator
Repair. 352-220-4244
Lic#99990001273
DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Gas / Diesel Engines
No iob too bia or small.
352-228-2067












The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic//ns. #2441.
352-634-1584




SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149. Up
BOAT COVERS,$189. Up
/ us out zoomcitrus.com



THERE ARE OTHER
SOLUTIONS Besides
Nursing Home.Private.
Home 1 on 1 care
Alzheimer/Dementia, No
problem, References
503-7052



" SEE THROUGH
Window WOshing
All Aspects (352)
489-4189; 322-0962
/ us out zoomcltrus.com


HERNANDO AREA
MOM will provide your
children w/excellent
care. Ages newborn &
up. Affordable rates.
352-726-9423
HOMOSASSA AREA
Safe envoriment, play
area, ages 4-10
Ref's (352) 503-6795



HOME SERVICES
Serving Citrus Co. for 10
yrs. Cell. (727) 642-7757
MAIDS ON CALL
Serving Citrus 3Yrs.
Windows/Free Est.
(352) 726-8077
Malou's House
cleaning, $12.00 Per hr. 2
hr. min. Homosassa area.
(352) 476-9676



Affordable CABINETS &
COUNTER TOPS
New & Remodel
352-586-8415



QUALITY CRAFTED
BUILDERS New, Renova-
tions & Commercial
15 Yrs In Citrus County
352-726-5507
REX MULLIS LLC
JESSE MOORE Const.
Roofs, additions,
remodel, handyman
352-564-0969
rc0066915/cbc057605
ROGERS Construction
New Homes & All
Construction (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872
We will beat any price
by far without com-
promise. Dunham Con-
struction roofing, re-
modeling, home maint.
painting, press. wash,
etc. talk to owner
422-6575 (crco452543
/us out zoomclltrus.com



SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, corports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla rms,
windows, garage scrns
(CBC1257141) 62&-0562



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash &
Gutters LIc. 5863
(352) 746-0141


#1 A+ Mr. Fil,- Ift
All repairs, painting,
gutter & yard clean-
ups. .352-382-3647
Vus out zoomcitrus.com
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs Pres-
sure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job too
small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

r NATURE COAST
HOME REPAIR
& MAINT. INC.
S- Offering a Full
I Range of Services
www.naturecoast
I homerepair.com
Lic, 2776/lns.,
352-634-5499
Visa/MC/Discover












SSheds & Garages of
I Any Size 1
1 *SHEDSNOW* 1
SWe Move & Buy p
S Used Sheds
I lndependence/41
(352) 860-0111




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also


Gutters Lic.5863

#1 AT SERVICE
MALLEY's ELECTRIC
352-220-9326 or
255-4034. #ec0001840
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696

ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699




C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/201-1422



Carpet Factory Direct
Repair Clean Sales
Laminate, shop at
home. 352-341-0909


PAVING & SEAL COAT
VIGLIONE LLC-lic/Ins
www. TAR-MAX.com
Free Est(352=726-3093




AARON'S FENCE
All Types, Best Price
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
24/7(352) 795-7373
V us out zoomcitrus.com
ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencina.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BARNYARD II Fencing
Serving Citrus Co.
Since 1973. FREE Est.
(352) 726-9260
OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Fence Work Free
Est. LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins




John Gordon Roofing
WE'VE MOVED New
Location - Same Great
Services (cccl325492)
352-382-7003
REX MULLIS LLC
JESSE MOORE Const.
Roofs, additions, re-
model, handyman
352-564-0969
rc0066915/cbc057605




BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Estimates
Lic#2579/lns, 257-0078
Decorative concrete,
Landscape curbing
River rock resealing
344-4209 (Lic.6960)
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete tex-
tures, Stamp,spray crack
repair,staining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Acrylic Decking
w 352-464-3967 g
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




Additions, Garages
Decks, Bathrooms &
Handyman Services
40 Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768


REX MULLIS LLC
JESSE MOORE Const.
Roofs, additions, re-
model, handyman
352-564-0969
rc0066915/cbc057605




A Cutting Edge
Tile Job
Showers. Firs etc
(352) 422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




REPAIRS
Wall & Ceiling Sprays
Int./Ext. Painting
Lic/Ins 73490247757
352-220-4845
ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs, Tex-
ture, Additions
Free est.220-9016
Lic.#SCC131149747




Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone Drive-
ways & Tractor work
341-2019 or 257-1562
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,
Hauling, Site Prep,
Driveways. Lic. & Ins.
(352) 795-5755
ATOP SOIL SPECIAL*
3 Yd -$60/ 5 Yd $85
10Yd $175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436



All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog. tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/us out zoomcitrus.com
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,HaulingSite
Prep, Driveways
Lic/lIns795-5755
/ us out zoomcitrus.com




BANG'S LANDSCAPE
Sod, grass plugs,
plants, trees. Please
Lv. Msg.352- 341-3032


Affordable Lawn Care
Dependable Service
Professional Quality
,352- 601-7086
3us out zoomcitrus.com
Andersen's Lawn Serv
Mowing, Trimming, Clean
Up, Low Rates
352-277-6781
BARKERS LAWN
Guaranteed to
Beat the Current Price
You Pay for Lawn Care
Service. Monthly/Per
cut rate.352-232-8166
Basic to Full Serv
Tree & scrub trimming
clean-up & hauling.
wkly/biwkly 613-7934
3 out zoomcitrus.com
Bob's Pro Lawn Care Re-
liable, Quality Work Resi-
dential / Comm. LicJIns.
352-613-4250
C.R /Homosassa
mowing, beds, brushes,
mulch/haul
Commrl & Resdntl since
1991 220-6761
/ out zoomcitrus.com
Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Soecials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
/us out zoomcitrus.com
DUN-RITE LAWN SERV
Clean up, tree trim,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681
/ out@zoomcitrus.com
FINISHING TOUCH
Quality lawn care. Call
Great Todavl
352-527-2719
3us out zoomcitrus.com


HALLOCK & SON
LAWN CARE - Reliable,
Complete, Detailed
Service Since 1994
Lic/lns. 352-746-6410
HEDGE TRIMMING,
HAULING(ANY KIND),
LAWN MOWING,
MULCH. FREE ESTI-
MATES. 352-344-9273
OR 352-201-9371

OSBORNE'S
Quality Work - Free
Est. LOWEST RATES
352400-6016 Lic/Ins
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
& LANDSCAPE
SINCE 1999 (Lic/Ins)
628-9848 or 634-0554
V us out zoomcitrus.com




AQUA AZURE
Cert. Pool Operator
All Citrus County
352-344-4796
EVERCLEAR POOL
SERV. & MaInt.
Concrete Pools Only
(352)344-5122
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Acrylic Decking
, 352-464-3967 �
PURDY POOLS
St. Certified, Serv. & Main.
(352) 220-7301


\1st Choice I


PEST CONTROL, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE


LAWN GOT

PROBLEMS?

Call 503-6821
Owner/Operators-
Lloyd Smith * Bill Bledenstein * Jim Crry
782283 5340W. Glenbrook St.


D's Landscape & d,4 aaumed cttu u m
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design. Bob- Installations by
catwork fill/rock Brian CBCl1'2S53
& sod 352-563-0272 82 u , , , .

. 352-628-7519
I -* ----- I Siding,
/ So/fit &
#1 AGAINI Pro Tech l Fascia,
Lawn Service. Family Skirting,
owned & operated. Roofovers,
Serving central Citrus Caports,
Cty since 1999. Call
for free estimate Screen Rooms,
302-7800 - Lic/Ins. www.advancedaluminum.info


r OBl "R
SERVICE |
WE COME TO YOU
Motor Homes
S 5th Whls/Rv's
Master Tech
| 352-586-5870
Storage Available
Lmmmm.m



WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard




ELITE PAVING &
SEAL COATING
All types - Res/Comm
3.52302f3030 i icfins


Circle T Sod Farms. Inc.
Tired of your dead lawn?
Replace it with
Bahia. Delivery *
Avail (352)400-2221

Cut Outs, All Varieties
Installed/Rolled
Irrigation (352) 422-0641
/ out zoomcitrus.com
Tear out your lawn and
replace. Comm/
Res. Free est. J & J Sod
352-302-6049


Debt Holding You Down?

Pay off Bills, Improve your
Home, Solve all your
financial problems.
' , Apply for a
loan today.
I .t pp3r.' .Lj in i-Jhri
. Call Now
1-888-964-7111


-S6e


Cope's Pool & PamVers




- _ ORDER YOUR
POOL TODAY
&MBE SWIMMING
BY SUMMER
"FREE QUOTES"
Lic. & Insured
CPC1.456565
,...... 352-40013188


'rTUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 C13


w. -
BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI
Your SATISFACTION

(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123

Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC


RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON

2.8% COMMISSION

Reea Seiect

(352) 795-1555





3/2 + Office Home
Remod. W/fireplace,
on 1 acre, fenced. Large
oaks, workshop. No flood
zone $149,000
Owner/Broker.
(352) 634-1764


Crystal Riu:
Homes I


Citrus Cou
Homes


FINANCING^
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


I












CjL4 TUEiSDAY, APRIL 14, 2009



WO D.U.Y B.Y TRICKY RICKY KANE
capital (2) Every answer is a rhyming
1. Too loud Idaho capital (2) pair of words (like FAT CAT
S|Il and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
they will fit in the letter
2. North Dakota city freight (2) they will it In the letter
squares. The number after the
SI definition tells you how many
3. Tour of duty in Michael Moore's hometown (1) syllables In each word. To win
S$10, send your original rhymes
with your definitions to this
4. Delaware capital shorebird (2) newspaper. All entries become
llll the property of UFS, Inc.
� 2009 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
5. Uncomfortably cool 76ers' city, in brief (2)
Sl m l Thanks and $10 to
Donna Wassmuth of
6. Perch-sleepin' in the Texans' city (2) Rocky Point, NY for
#5. Send your entry
to this newspaper.


7. Maine or Oregon city apple type (2)


I I I 1 1 1 � 1 1 I I I

(INV'ILIO3 aNV'LLHOd 'L NIISOO NOJLSlOHIJ' ATI9 d ATImH'sL
H)AO'Id cl AO(I', INILS iJNlI'A d003'Vo ODhV 'z SIO ASION'I
4-14-09 sH SNK


For Sale .
CITRONELLE 3 bed-
room, 2 bath. Mini Farms
2.5 Acres, Trailer, Water
with softener, septic. As
is $49,000.00.
813-695-0853

For Sale By Owner
3 BR, 2 BA, 2-car gar.,
Cement block, north
Dunnellon Low down,
EZ terms w/$3,500
down $575 mo.
(352) 726-9369

OWNER FINANCING
4/2/office, 2.5 ac, 2005
Doublewide
Like new. 1800sqft,
S9,700/dn, $882/mo. or
$23,700 down, $582/mo.
727-992-1372




OWNER Financing
Handyman, 2/2, 1981
Dbwd, 1,13 acre, $40K,
below market, needs
mostly cosmetic repairs.
Purchase $4,472 dn &
$364 mo.
727-992-1372




4 Sale By Owner,
Crystal River 1 BR, 1BA,
completely
remodeled, heated comm.
pool, wd firs.
$74,600. (352)563-5844

FLORAL CITY
2/1, all appl. stay, plus a
shed & water access,
Move In cond., Reduced
to $49,995 (352)
746-0850


SWSEEr
IHorne"^


3/2/2
Inverness, Fl.
Must See !!
Open Lakefront, Breath-
taking View,
on Lake Henderson.
538 San Remo
Circle. Vaulted
ceilings, oak floors, trav-
ertine counter tops.
Caged pool, spacious la-
nal, dock, & board-
walk.
$395,000
Barb Malz
(352) 212-2439
Keller Williams
Realty

FLORAL CITY
New 2/1, canal front,
large deck, dock.
Upgrades throughout.
$135k (352) 422-0294

HOMOSASSA
3-story stilt. 3/3, Next to
head spring. 163' wfrt,
dock/slip. Brand
new/unoccupied.
2 frpls, granite. $579K
727-808-5229

Inverness, Fl.
Lake Henderson
3/2.5/2 on 1/2 acre.
Exclusive Beautiful
Home w/open water view,
on Private
Waterfront Peninsula.
Tile floors, travertine
countertops, dock, ga-
zebo.
$395,000
Must See 11
1170 S. Estate Pt.
Barb Malz
(352),212-2439
Keller Williams
Realty


Hme
LET OUR
OFFICE
GUIDE YOUI


Plantation Realty. Inc
(352) 795-0784
Cell 422-7925
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner
See all of the
listings in Citrus County
at
www.olantation
realtvinc.com

RealtySelect
Citrus.com










BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Re- ;Seiect

(352) 795-1555




INVESTORS NEEDS
Homes Any: Size, cond,
location, price, situation.
Over finac'd, dblwide
& mobile homes okay.
1-727-992-1372
Seeking 100+ acres of
pasture land for Cattle.
Will sign 6 mo-lyr lease.
352-669-2253
ask for Cindy



HOMOSASSA
1.2 acres, fenc'd, water,
elec., sewer, sprinkler sys.
(2) out bldgs. Deadend st.
$44K. 352-302-5775



Business/Home 3/2 Great
location on Trout Ave. Inver-
ness $165,000 . Rhema
Realty 228-1301



7 Rivers Golf & C.C.
priv. member owned.
corner lot 1 ac (mol)
$30K (813) 766-9354 or
sweetscaoeauest@
verizon.net




9.9HP YAMAHA
4 stroke, elect, start,
tiller handle. $695
FT ISLAND MARINE
SUPPLY
352-436-4179
91/2 hp Evinrude,
Ultralight Fisherman, short
shalt, man. slart.$395;
9.9 hp Johnson short shaft,
man. start, low hours.
$725 Bill 352-436-4179
BOAT MOTOR
Mercury. Out board 5 Hp.
Low hours. $700.
(352) 503-3105


24 FT CRESTLINER
PONTOON
14 passenger w/traller
$65,000 obo
(352) 382-7039
1981 15' BOSTON
WHALER SPORT 1993
48hp Johnson, new 2008
trailer, all great condition
$7,500 352-201-0096
1993 17' Sylvan
Boat & trallor
85h.p. Yamaha motor
Good cond. $3,500
(352) 344-0457
'05 11ft. ZODIAC.
15hp. 4-stroke Yamaha,
Trailer, extras $4,895
(954)632-1104
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
AIR BOAT
Big 13 Ft. haul,
2 seats. Approx. 375-400
HP. 8 blade warp drive.
2-1 reduction gear box.
Used 100 hrs.+Trl.
$18,500 invest. Sell
for $10,000 firm.
(352) 302-4535
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
AQUA SPORT '05
175 Osprey , 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual batn.
w/switch, bimini, easy load
trailer. Low hours.
$10,800/obo 352-860-0277
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
S10.5001352-746-5856


C/C, 92 Johnson 48hp
T/T w/trll Great shape
$3000 call Bob
(352) 860-0513
Cabin Cruiser
24 ft.
Owner died, 6 cyl. 10, al-
pha one/OD, used In
fresh water, ta , gal. trl
Incl.'d $2,500 464-0316
CAPE HORN
'94 17'2 , 8ft. wide.
C/C. Merc.90 HP. outboard
W/Trailer
$4,100(352)634-4793
CENTURY
'01- Bay, 21ft.
'02, 150HP Yamaha w/
trir., custom cover
dep/find, VHF, Iw hrs.,
like new, $13,950.
(352) 442-7772
Deck Boat
95'19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ ra-
dio & fishfinder. New Bat-
tery switch. 2 batteries,
power pk.
prop./hub.$7,000
(352) 726-0838
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras!
$14,500/obo. (352)
489-9640: 220-6508
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20fl.,
115HP, stroke Yamaha,
w/ trlr. $15,900. will
trade (352) 503-3778
KEY WEST SHRIMP
$4/LB Today thru Sun.
LIMITED TIME!Call
Mark 727-726-8617
OSPREY
1994- 16ft, CC, bay boat.
88 HP Evinrude, Garmin
GPS/recorder $4500.
352-621-4711
POLAR 2310, 2006
23FT. POLAR BAYBOAT
250HP YAMAHA
4-STORKE, CUSTOM
TRAILER,
T-TOP,GPS,VHS, GAR-
AGE KEPT. $25,000
FIRM 352-795-7766
PONTOON BOAT
08' 20 Ft. To many
options to list. $13,000
Call for info. 628-7926
Pontoon Boat
1996,18 ft., 40HP Yamaha,
4 stroke, $8,500
(352) 860-1490
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras $12,000
(352) 628-0281
PROLINE
03 32ft center consolebunk
under, twin OB 160 hrs. like
new, loaded, incl tdr. may
consider newer Corvette
as trade $48K (352)
201-1833
PROLINE 20.5' Bay 2002
Mercury 150-$9950
352-331-5204
PROLINE
23' W. A.C. 200 Hp.
Johnson. Bim. top. GPS.
F.F./VHF. Low hrs.
$4,250 (352) 563-5628
PROLINE
W/CUTTY
'95, 20' 120 HP
Merc. Dep/find.
Radio, fish rigging.
Includes trailer. Good
cond. REDUCED
$5,900.Call Pete @
(352) 746-4969
SAILFISH 18'
C/C, Yamaha 115hp
equipment, clean, tril
one owner $5300
(352) 503-7102
T-CRAFT
23'L, 6' W, '02 150H
Evin. mtr. w fuel enj. like
new, trir. w/brks
$7750 352-489-3661
TRACKER
2002, 17FT, 75HP
4 stroke Mercury,
$5,000 (352) 637-2638
Ultimate Scallop
Boat 03, 25' Sun
Tracker, 05 Merc 90hp, Io
hrs. tandem trial. like new
exc. value $11,500.
352-586-1676



05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
261nch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
'07 NEW MAR
Cypress 32ft 5th wheel.
2 slides. Separate bath.
Extras. 3 yr ext. war-
ranty $39,900/obo
352-794-3534
38FT BOUNDER '96
Class-A - basement
model, 49K ml. 14mpg,
new tires & brakes, (4)
TV's, Ready for long trip,
i22.O0. 352-563-0615
'98 ENDEAVOR

352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
ALLEGRO
'85, New motor,
generator, 27 ft.,
A1 cond. $6,350
352-634-4793
* AUTO. BOAT *
* &RV*
DONATIONS
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
(352) 795-9621
* Tax Deductible *

CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
conslgnmontuss.org


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


L:R 0cr S
Vehicles^^


Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles
J.W. 352-228-9645
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CASH BUYER
Buyina Used Cars
Trucks & Vans
For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333


Hmes


Impounds for salel
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane 30Q, class
A motor home, 31/ ft., 22k
ml. V0I gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed, etc.
Saturn tow Avail. $35,000.
Lets talk (352) 397-5007
GEORGIE BOY
'05, Pursuit, Class A,
30ft.
Excel. cond. 8k mi.,
2 slide outs, 2 TV's, back
up camera, all the bells
and whistles and much
more, must see this
coach, Asking $50,000.
obo (352) 746-7626

GULF STREAM
'07 BT Cruiser, 22' 8K.MI.
Hitch & tow bar. Like new.
$37,500
(352) 875-8890
GULF STREAM
BT Cruiser 03, 22' fully
loaded, ready to travel
$29,800....
(352) 341-1297
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool, club-
house etc.
$29,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
Holiday Rambler
'03, By Monico, 300 Cum-
mins, 2 slides, incl. tow
vehicle,
mint cond. $84,900.
(352) 302-7073
Holiday Rambler
Admiral Motor Home 36' 2
slides, 340hp, gas eng. all
options transf ext. warr.
$51,900
352 795-3970
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$55,995. 352-464-0371
JAMBOREE
29',2005, V-10 Class C
12,400 ml., Loadedl Perf.
Condition! Ready to gol
$39,000 (352) 465-2138
Keystone 07
Big Sky 5th Wheel Prem,
Pkg 340RLQ every option.
Center Island Kit. incls
sep.W/D, added 2nd a/c in
bedroom
Price to Sale $52K firm
352-794-3068
PACE ARROW
04, 38' 3 SLIDES
21k mi fully loaded
3 tv's $92,500 obo
352-302-0743
STEHL TOW DOLLY
Like new $600
(937) 336-2212
Winnebago
'94 32' class A,
Clean no pets/or smoke.
$9,500 Or Obo.
(352) 746-1169



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel.Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig. Like
new. $9,995.
352-489-3661
BONAIR '01 -
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed, .
microwave, Irg refrig. Like
new. $9,995.
352-489-3661
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call// Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO
'06, 18ft, self contained,
like new, awning,
sleeps 4, ultra llte wght
$7,950, 352-339-5158
JAYCO
07 Jay Flight
28' used twice, smells &
looks new, green
clean, sips 6 $16,800
(352) 503-7431
KODIAK
'04, Hybrid Travel Trir. AC,
Heat, Micro. Tub/ Shwer,
toilet exc cond $9,500.
352-564-4151
MEADOWBROOK
5th Wheel, 2000 Excel-
lent. Photos at
httpJfpicasaweb.googt.comn
meadowbrook.Glenn
-$13,995.00 (352)302-6055
or (727)692-9045
Montana
'03, 5th wheel, 3 slides
like new,$34,000,
Truck avail also for tow
(352) 422-5731
TRAIL CRUISER '04
17FT, light weight,
fully loaded. Used
10 times. $6800.
352-628-4522
VOLKSWAGON '68
bus/transporter. Con-
verted to camper. Runs
well. New brakes.
$5,000. 352-726-5926



99 Mitsubishi Eclipse,
wrecked, for parts, exc. 2.0
16 val eng. auto. trans. 2
sets of wheels/tires 117km,
302-2781 464-0220
'06-'08 Dodge Truck new
chrome air deflector
w/fog pockets, $285;
Chrysler Paclfica factory
hitch w/electric plug $65
(352) 795-6639 or
BMW Wheels
8 x 17 Cross spoke com-
posite wheel 5 made by
BBS 5 x 120 bolts pat-
tern, incl. center caps &
lugs $350. for all 4
(352) 249-0851




$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,


08 CUSTOM BUILT
Pontiac Convertible
Show Car, Invested over
$15k See to appreclatel
Only valid offers I
(362) 382-7039
1987 FORD Crown
Victoria, 2-door, hardtop,
cold alr-automatic.
Very good cond. $1,350
(970) 412-5560 Lecanto
1993 GEO Tracker
4x4, Auto, low miles
fair cond, air works
$2,000 (352) 344-9931
1998 Buick LaSabre
Showroom condition
Fully power equipped
61k original miles
$4,995 obo (352)
560-4251
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'97 MAZDA MX5
Miata - Only 72k miles.
New tires. MCB $4500.
352-382-9004.
BMW
'03, 745 LI,'NAV, black, sun
roof. all options $29K Mint
(352) 746-2696
r -BUICK -'
m 2004, Century
#P6143B
IWon't Last $5,988 |
1866-838-4376
-M -- E=1
BUICK
2005, Lacrosse, Alloy
Wheels & Much More
Take over pmt $199 per
mol-800-733-9138
BUICK Century 1995
Looks and runs like newly
Lots of extras. 117K Miles
$ 1,700 Call Andy at
352 344-2125
CADILLAC '01
Catera, 34k ml, MMNTI
White w/leather. $6300/obo.
845-282-3504
CADILLAC
'06 DTS, $15,500, certified
warranty $100,000
(352) 746-3663
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500,
(352) 382-2715
SCHEVROLET
2003, Impala n
#H13134A Outstand- |
Ing Value $7,988
* 1866-838-4376 J
IS-"-"-7'


CHEVROLET Corvette
1967 coupe, $3500, 8
cylinder, exterior
color: Yellow, interior
color: White, 93,655
miles, manual, rare
and great muscle car,
for details e-mail me
rishashansen@gmall.com
or call me
(702)548-7707
CHEVY '79
Mallbu wagon, V8, 4
barrel, auto, new ex-
haust, great potential.
Needs finish. $1495/obo
Mark 352-302-2258
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, C6nv. rare
5 spd, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
bik, depend.
$4700 352- 563-0615
CHRYSLER
2007, PT Cruiser Full
Power, Like New, Low
Miles. Take over pmt
$179mo 1-800-733-9138
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CORVETTE,
02, Z06,
Black, low ml., over
30 mpg hwy. $24,400.
(352) 613-5355
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 miles
on this rare silver on sil-
ver on silver vette, power
convertible top, 6 sp
auto, paddle shift, heads
up display, magnetic F55
suspension, navigation
system, all options availa-
ble are on this gorgeous
vette , Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
Included, Your's
for only , $49,000.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 mi-
les on this rare silver on
silver on silver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are on
this gorgeous vette,
Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
Included, Your's
for only, $48,500.
352-270-3193
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, 86K mil.
T -top roof, Excellent con-
dillon $12,000. will trade
for truck. 352-563-6428
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, 86K
mil. T -top roof, Excel-
lent condition $12,000.,
will trade for truck.
352-563-6428
= D"OD'GE" "m
S2005, Neon #P6179
S Low, low miles I
S 1866-838-4376 I
, --=: --. = ,11
DODGE CALIBER
*07 Ocala Volvo.$12,995
(352) 629-7299
FORD '02
TAURUS SEL. Moon roof,
6 disk CD player. All
power. $3800/obo.
352-697-2460
FORD
'03 Mustang Cony. auto,
V-6, leather, all pwr, 80k,
great cond. $6,999.


$5001 Polce
Impoundsl For listing
800-366-9813 x4246
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k ml,
white. Well maintained.
$2650. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370


2001, Millenla
| #H13094A |
Hard to find $8,988
I 1866-838-4376 =

MAZDA 3
'07, $11,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'01 CLK,$16,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'05, $25,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCURY
'02 Grand Marquis LS
83K.M.L Leather Int. 1
own. Exc. cond. $6,500.
(352) 382-3596
MGB
Convertible 1977, 57k mi.
Blue, many xtras Excellent
Condition
$10,500 (352)628-0281
M " fSUBISHI
2006, Galant #P6313
acquire low pymt.
of $299.03-zero out
I of pocket
1866-838-4376

I m m= m m m I
MITSUBISHI
2007, Lancer #P6338
acquire low pymrnt.
Of $198.38-zero out
of pocket
1866-838-4376

NISSAN
'07 Altima, $13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299


2000, Maxima
#H12908ALow, low |
miles $7,988
1866-838-4376
I---- -=-..= El

NISSAN
2007 Sentra #P6326 m
Low, low miles I
$11,988
1866-838-4376 I
OLDS '94
Delta 88 - 173k ml, V-6
Runs great -Looks good
$1250. 352-697-0889
OLDSMOBILE
'90 Toronado Trofeo
Coupe. Loaded, V-6,
Leather, 132K. Mi. Exc.
Cond. $2,100.
(352) 382-9977
SATURN
'04 VUE, AWD, 4 dr.
auto, 39K. pampered Mi.
Silver, nice car. $7,480.
Wooten's.(352) 637-7117
SATURN
2007, Ion, P6304,
Excellent Condition
$7,988,
1866-838-4376
SMART CAR 08
Passion Loaded 40mpg
red/black only 2700mi
352-341-0316
SUZUKI
'07 Forenza. 30K mi,
w/100k warr. LOQAED
w/touch scrn nav.
$12,800. 352-613-6613
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 mi.
warranty. $23,000.
(352) 382-1857
TOYOTA
'08 Corolla $13,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
2001, Camry,
H13076B, Excellent
Condition $7,988,
1866-838-4376

VOLVO
' 04 S-60 $8,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'05 S60,$13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-60, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC 70, $21,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC90,$22,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 S-60, $18,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S40, S$20,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S-80, $28,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
2007, S40 ULike New &
Loaded Take over pmt
$199 per mo
1-800-733-9138
VW
2005, Beetle Coupe
LOOK, P6320
acuire low pmint of
$231.71 zero out
1866-838-4376


2007, Jetta, Wolfs- I
Sburg Edit., H12822B
LOOK, aquire low u
pmt of$29903 zero |
out 1866-838-4376 '
I = m==== =


$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale!
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
Chevy Silverado
'02, Ext. cab, 4 dr. auto,
AC, Sport wheels, CD,
$5,995. Wooten's
(352) 637-7117
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awe-
some Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded
every special feature. Sr.
own, gar. kept., 27K mi,
$40K
invested Sale $21,750
See online ad photos
www.autotrader.comlatca
rid/at-f3fd39f
John (352) 726-1076

DODGE
2002, Ram 1500
| #P6376A, Super |
Value $8,988
1866-838-4376
--- - - E
DODGE
2008, Dakota Pickup
Quad Cab, Low Miles
Take over pmts $233
mo. 1-800-733-9138
DODGE DAKOTA-
'05 $11,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
FORD
'02 F 350, Crew Cab
Dual whis. 7.3 Diesel.
33K. Mi. Exc. cond,
$18,000 (352) 794-3081
FORD
'03 Ranger XLT. Super
Cab. 4.0 Eng.1 owner
14K Mi. Like new.
$10,300 (352)341-3292
FORD 04
Ranger, REDUCED
X-cab. Exc. cond.
38k mi. $9,700/obo
(352)746-3919
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway, serv.
van. 41K Mi./5.4 L. Eng.
Auto.Knapheide Serv.
body/dble lock drs. $20.000
Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767


2003, Ranger #P6362 I
I Low, low miles I
$8,988
* 1866-838-4376

KEY WEST SHRIMP
$4/LB Today thru Sun.
LIMITED TIME Call
Mark 727-726-8617
TOYOTA
2006, PreRunner
Quad Cab, Don't Miss
ThisI Take over pmt
$349mo 1-800-733-9138


$5001 Police
Impounds for salel
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
ACURA
2006, TSX, Loaded,
Like New, Rare find
Take over $279 mo
1-800-733-9138
AZTEK
Pontiac ' 04 Low
miles, loaded!
Reduced price
$8,500 obo
352-726-5715
CADILLAC
'05 Escalade, low ml. all
power, sun roof,
exc. cond. $28,000
(347) 266-9328
CHEVY
BLAZER '99 LS 4dr. 126k
ml. loaded, great cond. sun-
roof, $4k abo
352-422-0065
CHEVY
TRAILBLAZER
'06 $12,995. Ocala
Volvo. (352) 629-7299
CHRYSLER
2007, Paclfica
Low Miles. Fully Equipd
Payment of $195 per
mo 1-800-733-9138
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air &
exhaust, Exc. Cond.
$6,000 abo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl drive,
class 3 hitch, Orig owner.
Great shape & price.
$8,750. 352-564-1128:
703-338-7177


Camaro '68,coupe, 107K
miles, auto, white with
black interior $4,000
stevystewart@gmall.com
CHEVY
'69 Classic C10 SHT BD
350/350 AC, PS,
$15K or trade
(352) 746-9212
DODGE
1938, Pro street Coupe,
runs, needs TLC, $12,900
(352) 978-0658
(352) 447-3842
DODGE
Challenger 383/335 HP,
77K mi, manual trans, 8
cyl, interior green, black
interior, $2,900 Contact
angelalansing@
gmail.com(253)276-4784
EL CAMINO
'81 305 auto. All new
interior, & paint. Crager
mags & tires. 4" raised
hood.$3,250.
(352)341-3613.
GM El Camino
'84, 1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupel
Silver, new paint; 63K
mi., $8,900 obo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MERCEDES BENZ
1985 380SL, 2 top road-
ster. Drives, looks great.
Many new Mercedes
parts. New A/C. Must
see! REDUCED! $7,900.
David 352-637-6443.
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
trans. & parts. $4,000.
(352) 621-0126
THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$12,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122


$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CHEVY '82
Blazer, V8 .auto, 4" lift,
lots of extra parts,
needs trans. $1300.
Mark, 352-302-2258
FORD '06 F-150
Crew cab XLT. Tow pkg
& topper, 47K mi.
Exc cond. LOADED/
$18,900/obo. (352)
634-1378; 795-2053
JEEP
'05 Wrangler,
Unlimited. $15,995 Ocala
Volvo
(352) 629-7299



1997 DODGE CARAVAN
Runs and Looks Great!
New Parts,Rebuilt Tranny
$1450.00 OR Best Offer!
4 Cyclinder 176,000 Miles
(352)476-7185
'94 Dodge Caravan
7 pass., good running,
Stood looking, asking
1275 (352) 637-5394
CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Countri LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872
DODGE
'94, Ram 350,
Full size, work Van
$1,500 abo
(352) 527-2241
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT









$$ SAVE $$
LIFE INSURANCE
HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
DISABILITY
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com


FORD
2003, Explov
#H13139B, One owo i
$9,988
1866-838-4376
GMC SUBURBAN
1993 4 WD, 454 rebuilt
eng., new transm., great ti-
res, good cond. $3,700
obo
(352) 201-1413

F HONDA
I 2005, CR-V EX I
S #HI12557A Eye- m
I catching $13,988 1
* 1866-838-4376 �
L m. .= =. i
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, $9,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, V6,
Like new. $9,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299

JEEP -
2004, Grand Chero- I
I kee#H12970AMus- I
cular, Strong $7,988
1866-838-4376

KIA
2008, Rondo Hatch-
back, Perfect for
FamilylTake over pmts
$199mo 1-800-733-9138
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG. Silver
W/black int. Loaded,
57K.Mi. New $64K.Ask
$20K. (352)489-7674
PONTIAC
2006, Vibe, Perfect
Cond., Low Mi. Take
over pmt $197 mo
1-800-733-9138
PONTIAC
2008, Torrent Sm SUV,
Perfect for Family
Loaded, Low Miles
$279mo 1-800-733-9138



$501Poic


2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900ml. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. Hi pert.
Over $43,000 in receipts.
17k mi. $12,000
352-563-0615
Crystal River
$500! Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
Harley Davidson
2005, XL1200 Custom. Un-
der 7k mi.Screamin Eagle
Performance Pkg & more.
Gar.kept $7500 (352)
209-7495
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80", com-
pletely serviced, good
shape. Ex.
access. $5,895. obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109
H-D, SOFTAIL
'01 6 Spd. 8,700 Mi.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
HONDA 04
1300 VTX, h ousands I
opton& mint condition
$6900 obo
(352) 302-7073
Honda Rebel
05, 250 Street bike
like new, great ladles
bike 3,600 ml $1900.
(352) 860-0513
HONDA
Shadow Arrow 06, 714K
,mi. garage kept, not in
rain, floorboard.$6200 obo
(347)223-7269 aft 3:30
KAWASKI
'00, 1100 CC,15K.
Mi. Very fast many
extra's. $4k
obo.(352)621-3764
SCOOTER
'06 Suzuki, 400
Bergman. 4,200 Mi. Like
new cond. $4,500
(352) 382-2715
SOFT TAIL'88
Just broke in 113 cubic inch
S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered Hooker
headers. New Gangster
'white walls, seat in -illt
leather blk ostrich skin,
Paint by Jesse James
painter of Calf., w/Double
Damon signature, House of
Color paint, BIk w/colored
ghost flames on all sheet
metal. 2" Carlini handle
bars. Chrome to max, ThIs
bad bo, Is not for the
faintof heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for nice
tractor w/bucket or bobcat
etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600; Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
VENTO PHANTOM
Scooter, 318 miles, 150CC,
Like new. $2,190/obo.
352-422-2433
YAMAHA
'05 YZ125 DIRT BIKE
Race ready. Many ex-
tras. $2500. 352-
586-1683: 586-9349


549-0414 TUCRN
4/21 meeting- Affordable Housing Adv. Comm.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the AFFORDABLE
HOUSING ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet at 5:00 PM
on the 21st day of April, 2009, at the Lecanto Govern-
ment Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 166
Lecanto, Florida.
Any person desiring further Information regarding this
meeting may contact Rebecca Schwenk at the Hous-
Ing Services Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path - Suite 147.
Lecanto, FL 34461 (352) 527-5388.
Any person who requires a special accommodation
(ADA) must provide us at least 72 hours notice.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to ap-
peal any decision of the Governing Body with respect
to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may
need to provide that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceeding is made, which record Includes testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal Is to be based
(Section 286.0101, Florida Statute)
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
April 14. 2009.


550-0421 TUCRN
2008-CP-1104 Daniel Thorp Savage Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2008-CP-1104
Division
IN RE: ESTATE OF DANIEL THORP SAVAGE,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate estate of Daniel Thorp
Savage, deceased, whose date of death was Dec. 17,
2007, Is pending In the Circuit Court for Citrus County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which Is 110 N.
Apopka. Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and
addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons hav-
Ing claims or demands against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice Is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WINTHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBUCATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE. ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice Is 4/14/2009.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Valolse Savage
7140 North Golden Point
Hernando, Florida 34442
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Robert D. Hines, Esq. Florida Bar No. 0413550
Attorney for Valolse Savage
Hlnes Norman Hines, PL.
1312 W Fletcher Ave.. Ste. B, Tampa, FL 33612
Telephone: (813) 265-0100 Fax: (813) 265-4848
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle
April 14 and 21,2009,


(352) 572-7984
Ford
1996 Wlndstar GL V6,
112k, ml. loaded, cold
a/c, great shape, 8
pass .$2500
(352) 422-2611
MAZDA
'06 MPV.$9,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
. ONE OWNER/CREAM
BUFF '88 CHEVY Hightop
van 5.0 engine, auto,
137Kml. New WW
tires/battery. $1495.
352-465-1892



HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains & tows
heavy loads. $4700/or
trade. 352- 563-0615
Crystal River
SUZUIKI 05
VInson 5 0, camo color
large tlres, $4K OBO
call JR (352) 613-0572


2007rHR leY s


r m -FORD-
I 2004, Mustang I
I #P6349 Low, low I
S miles $9,988
S 1866-838-4376
-- -M -Em - J
HONDA
'06 Clvic,$10,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
S HONDA 1
* 2000, Insight I
| #H13131M |
50 MPGII $7,988


- - HONDA
2002, Accord n
| #H11822B Best buy |
S $8,988
1866-838-4376
--- ---
HONDA
* 2003, Accord
#| H12776A Gorgeous I
I 8$9988 7
* 1866-838-4376
L - - -m d


1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's
Dream. $6500.obo
352-228-0597
$5001 Police
Impounds for salel
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, 350 V-8, auto,
May trade in part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door se-
dan. 6 cyl auto. $9,500.
Will consider trade for
travel trailer of equal
value.
(352) 628-4053
CAMARO IROC Z
'88 Red, LT -1 eng.
PS./PB. Cold A.C.
62,000 Ml. Great
Condition. $6,900.
Camaro Z 28, '79
Black 4 spd. super
T-10 Tran. Cam.more,
Must see $6,900.
(352) 422-5663


C LA ;SSFIEDS











April 14, 2009


A weekly advertising supplement of the Citrus County Chronicle

pg3 ---Autos, Trucks, RVs, ATVs, Motorcycles, Campers & More!


By JIM GORZELANY CTW FEATURES
One of the few segments in the automotive
industry that's still expanding is the luxury
crossover sport-utility vehicle market. Es-
chewing a traditional SUV's truck-based chassis for
a more car-like unibody construction, they afford a
lower ride height, a well-mannered ride with more
nimble handling and improved fuel economy.
Car-based crossovers are on the rise both in terms
of sales and the sheer number of models becoming
available. Through the end of 2008 they accounted
for 68.7 percent of all SUV sales, according to CNW
Marketing Research, Bandon, Ore.
The genre's growing popularity goes beyond its
quantifiable advantages over behemoth, opulent
SUVs like the Lincoln Navigator and Cadillac Es-
calade, according to Lonnie Miller, director of in-


dustry analysis for the market research company
R.L. Polk & Co., Southfield, Mich. "In terms of
styling and appeal to women drivers, car-based
crossovers have the edge," he says.
Especially popular these days are a growing num-
ber of upscale, sporty compact models that include
the Land Rover LR3, BMW X3 and the Acura
RDX. These are gaining traction among those who
want to drive something more expressive and exhil-
arating than the norm, but can't otherwise justify
buying something less practical. "It's a nice way for
luxury brands to get younger buyers in the door,"
says Miller.
Here's a quick look at four all-new luxury
crossover SUVs that are just coming to market as
early 2010 models.
* Lincoln MKT. The handsome and luxurious
MKT is essentially Lincoln's version of the recently


ijtr"


released Ford Flex, although U ps C
unlike that model's boxy
shape, it comes wrapped in are b
sleeker exterior styling,
capped by the brand's bold, cars
split "waterfall" style front
chrome grille. Inside, the thos
crossover features three rows
of seats, with second-row
riders treated to foot rests ,1
worthy of a first-class cabin.
A four-panel Vista Roof pro-
vides an expansive view of
the sky.
The MKT offers a choice
of a 268-horsepower 3.7-liter
V6 engine or a 3.5-liter tur-
bocharged version that nets a
more substantial 355 horses,
but with no appreciable
penalty in fuel economy. An array of available high-
tech amenities includes Collision Warning with
Brake Support, which alerts driver if a crash is pos-
sible and automatically primes the brakes to full
force to prepare for a panic stop. An Active Park As-
sist function automatically steers the vehicle into
parallel parking spaces.
* Audi Q5. A compact luxury crossover SUV, the


ale crossover SUVs

becoming the family

s of choice among

e who want to ride

n style without

relinquishing

a smidge of

substance.


Audi Q5 is both practical and fun to drive. It comes
powered by a strong 27' lip. 3.2-liter direct-injec-
tion V6 engine that drives all four wheels via a six-
speed automatic transmission; under normal
circumstances, the all-wheel-drive system is rear-bi-
SEE CROSSOVERS 2010,
PAGE 2


71


I I T I~~ '. - w -


I'.











D2 TUiSDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











CnRUS COUNTY (FL) CF1RoNIcu~ TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 D3


MAP 18 FOR ILLUSTRArION PURPOSES ONLY, LOCATION OF ADVERTISERS MAY NOT BE EXACT
1. Hernando Suzuki 6. Love Motorsports
(352) 684-7200 795-7996
2. Crystal Nissan 7. Jenkins Acura & Auto USA
866-434-3057 (800) 718-9597
3. Crystal C/D/J 8. Nick Nicholas Ford
866-434-3064 726-1231
4. Crystal Chevy 9. Love Chevrolet
866-434-3065341-0018
5. Jenkins Hyundai of Ocala
(800) 728-8413


Pictures and story by: i . ..
Brian A. Bisson 1* 8-o BU1C




GRAND



NATIOn,
Owner Rick JegI


R ick Jegl has
been the
proud owner
of his .'87
Grand National
for the pj.rit ,e\en
years ''il n "Wi ht uEnI
hesitation Rick
explained, "I was never involved in a
restoration project. I was always involved
with my kids in sports and Boy Scouts and
never had space for a project car. So when I
could afford to buy a muscle car I still did not
have the space for a restoration project.
Therefore, I decided to buy a nice muscle car.
With that in mind, I was going to buy a big
block MOPAR or GM. I had a couple of big
block MOPAR's and a 327/350hp Corvette in
the 60's and 70's and was looking for a nice
big block car."
All it took was a quick
drive in his son's Grand
National and Rick Jegl was
hooked. The Grand National
bug bit him the day his
youngest son Jason, who
worked at a Buick Dealer as a
mechanic, came home with a
Buick Grand
National he had
purchased.
"I could not
believe the
acceleration of the
turbocharged V-6
and the overall
looks of the car,"
explained Rick.
"When my wife,
Judy, saw the car,
she reminded me of
the time in 1985 /
when we were on
vacation in Orlando
and my seeing a Grand National for the first
time. I had read about the Buick Grand
National but had never seen one up close. She
reminded me that I walked around the car for
at least a half hour with my mouth wide open
and drooling. She said, 'I needed a bib.' Now
I can say I finally have my own Buick Grand
National.
"What I like best about the Grand
National is the drivability and comfort along
with outstanding performance with fuel
economy. It has theV6 economy with big
block performance.
"When others see the car at shows or
cruise-ins, they say something like, 'Look a
Grand National. You don't see a lot of them
around.' they are surprised. Some people
cannot believe the car is a Buick. Some think
it is a Monte Carlo."
When asked the question,
what is the nicest
,chicle I
h


The fastest

U. S. production

car built in 1987
ever seen? Rick's reply was like most received
on the Memory Lane Questionnaire. "The vast
majority of the vehicles I see at shows and
Cruise-ins are really nice, so I
,- would have to say the list is
too long. I love all c#gs, and
they all have special features.
However, my dream car
would be the 1987 Buick
GNX."
Rick has been a member
of the Grand Sport Club of
America, which
includes all
performance
Buicks, for the past
seven years
including four years
as sponsor co-
coordinator for
their national event,
which just so
happens to be held
this year in
Bowling Green,
' Kentucky, May
12th through the
16th. Rick is also a
member of our own Citrus County Cruisers.
He enjoys the camaraderie, the tech tips, event
news and of course the cars.
1987 was the last year of production for
the Buick Grand National in which Buick
spared no expense when it came to producing
one of the fastest production cars known.
Total production of the Turbo Regals sold was
26,555 of which 20,194 were Grand
Nationals. Most notably was the increased
power produced by Buick's mighty V6.

Maybe you're a restoration enthusiast and
have some stories or memories to share.
Perhaps you own a muscle, classic, or vintage
car that is your pride and joy. Feel free to call
352-563-3291, or e-mail Brian A. Bisson at
bbisson@chronicleonline.comn. We would like
to get some pictures, and possibly a story in
our Wheels section so you can sit back
WSW _ and eniov the ride down
% L in,, ..tl


o, n, ly GI
I It


TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 D3


CITRUS COUNrTY (FL) CHRONICUE







D4 TUESDAY. APRIL 14. 2009


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


MAAERSGEM SMNAE'SSEIASPAWG -� PEIL MNGE' PEIL
147W
5rr�~L~ ~�, TI --JEW1


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CITRUS COUNIr (F.) CHRONICLE


Steenng


Too


ch


Technology?


SOMETIMES SIMPLIFYING A CAII'S MYRIAD DASHBOARD
CONTROLS ONLY MAKES THEM MORE DIFFICULT TO USE.


MIRRORED VIEWS

Q: I read your answer explaining why "objects are smaller than
they appear" in the side-view mirror. It reminded me that most peo-
ple have the side-view mirror incorrectly positioned to look straight
behind them rather than to the side/rear if the car, which is the blind-
spot area. I wish you'd remind people of the correct positioning and
use of the side view mirrors.

A:Most people adjust them so they can see the side of the car and
farther back. And that's pretty much the same area that your rear-
view mirror covers.
Here's the approach that's most often recommended by the ex-
perts. For the driver's side mirror, press your head against the window
and adjust the mirror so you can just barely see the very edge of the
car. For the passenger side mirror, situate yourself so your head is
right behind the inside mirror mount and adjust the outside mirror so
you can see the edge of the car.
When you're in normal driving position, you can't see the sides of
the car but you will see vehicles in lanes that are next to the one you're
traveling in, almost regardless of where they're positioned in relation
to your car.
But once you've made the adjustments, practice some before you
hit the highway to make sure you're comfortable.

For more information, go to www.motorists.org,
the site of the National Motorists Association.
Type "side view mirror" into the search function
and you'll get an article with diagrams
and a complete description of how to
best adjust the mirrors.


Q:We want a new SUV, and one feature we'd like is a back seat
that slides backwards or forwards depending on whether we're car-
rying large people in the back seat, or small people in the back seat
and more cargo than usual. Does anyone make such a thing? Or if we
want that sort of feature do we have.to go the minivan route?

A: A few SUVs offer second-row seats that can silid fore and aft
by a few inches to better accommodate either people or cargo. A
quick check includes the Audi Q7, BMW X5, Chevrolet Equinox,
Ford Expedition, Toyota Sequoia and the Volvo XC 90. If anyone
knows of other SUVs that offer this feature, please let us all know.


Q: What's the difference between conventional oil and synthetic
oil? When I went to the oil-change place last week they asked me
which I wanted. I had not really not heard those terms before.

A:Conventional oils are mineral-based. They come from crude oil.
Synthetic oils are man-made compounds and because the molecules
are all the same size and shape (unlike mineral-based oil) there is less
friction and they have a longer service life. Synthetic oils also cost
more.
� CTW Features



What's your question?

Sharon Peters would like to hear "hat's on sour mind when it
comes to caring for. dnm ng. repairing and making the most of
your vehicle. Send your question-, to sharonu,,cr\ features corn


By JAY KOBLENZ
CTW FEATURES

In certain science fiction scenarios,
technology goes haywire. Robots turn
against the human race or computers
take over the world. Thankfully these
plots are all fantasy. But in the car busi-
ness, technology occasionally seems to
stretch beyond a human's ability to mas-
ter it, particularly when it comes to mul-
timedia control systems. These controls
combine an increasing number of func-
tions for the sake of efficiency, but they
often do so
using an in-
terface that's
difficult to
understand.
One of 4
the first ex-
amples of
auto technol-
ogy that
proved too
smart for the I I
average user
was the
menu-driven
knob control
BMW first
introduced
in 2002.
BMW's
"iDrive"
system in the
7 Series
sedan included a knob-like control
mounted on the center console. It was
designed to control a myriad of ameni-
ties, from climate and audio to naviga-
tion and communication, in conjunction
. with a series of menus dispi\ed ,:n '.:,
small screen. Although I'. -i11-1.:
mediately apparent that the control ac-
tually made these systems more difficult
for users to operate, rather than less so,
iDrive was quickly imitated by other up-
scale automakers, including Audi (with
something called MMI) and Mercedes-
Benz (with COMAND). For the most
part, automotive reviewers slammed the
devices. Even today, the term "infuriat-
ing" is the descriptor most likely to pre-
cede the word "iDrive" in the pages of
the enthusiast magazine Car and Driver.
The first generation of BMW's iDrive
"was a slick system and could do a lot of
cool things, but it wasn't user-friendly,"
says Stephen Lovett, a director with the
market research firm Harris Interactive,
Rochester, N.Y.
The idea behind the system was to re-
duce dashboard clutter resulting from
electronic features, especially in top-of-


the-line models, that had proliferated in
the name of making autos more luxuri-
ous and desirable. Single-knob controls
working in tandem with dashboard-
mounted display screens seemed like an
elegant way to avoid an abundance of
buttons. But the ostensible advancement
forced users to contend with layers of
computer-style menus in order to oper-
ate what were once simple functions.
Consumer Reports auto content special-
ist Mike Quincy outlined the nine steps
required to set the clock in a BMW 650i.
His ninth step starts with the words,


"Start swearing..."
Where an old-fashioned button or
knob delivered desired results instantly,
with a single click or twist, unified mul-.
timedia sytemt take -heir s\.ee(t tui. A
.'ir'pr '.IniSL tici press ., Iiit.n. andl at i
t.-r the s'.. rci, i.) con'rirn rlhe oc mrnii nd
before proceeding to the next step. It
took 40 seconds for one reviewer to
switch from AM to FM radio using
BMW's iDrive interface.
What's more, many models now in-
corporate voice control, which allows a
motorist to operate various functions
just by talking. Although some people
may find speaking to an inanimate ob-
ject uncomfortable, voice systems do
allow the driver to keep both hands on
the wheel and maintain a constant view
of the road ahead. Unfortunately, users
also usually need to learn a precise set
of commands in order to make the sys-
tem work. Issuing an 'incorrect com-
mand may force an errant motorist to
start again from the beginning. What's
more, most voice-control systems have
difficulty recognizing commands when
there is excessive background noise (in-


eluding passenger conversations) or
when the user speaks with an accent.
Nevertheless, these systems are im-
proving, however incrementally. The lat-
est generation of BMW's iDrive,
appearing on its 3 Series cars for 2009, is
light years ahead of the original. "The
new iDrive is spectacular and very easy
to use. I can't imagine anyone having a
difficult time using this system," raved
one reviewer in Automobile magazine.
Among the biggest improvements: the
new system's response time is as quick
as a button or touch-screen control.
Automak-
ers have
learned that a
knob does not
Necessarily
eliminate the
need for all
other buttons.
- As BMW
o- t _ gradually re-
fined iDrive
- over the past
few years, it
c--- reintroduced
buttons for
radio presets

switching
from AM to
FM reception.
- The latest
generation in-
cludes handy
buttons that afford direct-entry control
of the radio, CD player, telephone and
navigation.
To help make voice command sys-
lerns more rituiri.e [, operJate, Le\us in-

,,r,1 2T1iV R1 5l0 cros, , R r 'U s e
new voice recognition system was de-
signed to allow the driver to speak
"more flexible, conversational com-
mands for easier access and control."
For example, earlier voice systems
required a user to speak specific com-
mands in a precise order: "Phone. Dial
by name. Dial Bob." Using the new sys-
tem a driver may simply say, "Call Bob
at home." Lexus claims the system will
recognize and respond to other casual
phrases, including "Make it cooler," "I
want a Japanese restaurant" and
"Where's the nearest gas station?"
Future generations of computer-aided
interfaces may make it even easier for
automakers to upgrade a vehicle's tech-
nology, adding electronic functions that
users will master with ease as they
motor boldly toward whatever strange
new worlds lie ahead. cTW Features


CROSSOVERS 2010, FROM PAGE 1


ased for sportier handling. The
standard stability control system
includes selectable on- and off-
road modes as well as one that as-
sumes a higher center of gravity,
for times when a roof carrier is at-
tached to the vehicle.
The Q5's exterior styling is
sleek and fairly understated inside
and out, and the vehicle offers sev-
eral top-shelf features, including a
blind-spot detection system and an
audiophile entertainment hard-
ware from Bang &
Olufsen.
* Mercedes GLK The
350. Another sporty mid.
upscale crossover, Volvo
the midsize GLK
350 is styled to re- CrosS
semble its larger js b
showroom sibling, Sty
the GLK-Class, al-
though it's a livelier an
ride overall. Here a family-f
268-hp, 3.5-liter V-6
engine teams with a
sophisticated, seven-speed auto-
matic transmission to produce a
quick 6.5-second 0-60 mph time
with respectable fuel economy: 16
mpg in the city and 22 mpg on the
highway.
With rear-wheel-drive stan-
dard, an available "4Matic" all-


wheel-drive system is tuned to en-
hance both its cornering abilities
and foul-weather prowess. The
five-passenger crossover comes
packed with a long list of safety
systems and convenience features.
The options list includes such gad-
getry as a voice-activated multi-
media control system with
hard-drive storage for digital
media, a rear backup camera and
adaptive headlamps that automat-
ically pivot to help light the way
through turns.
* Volvo XC60.
new More station wagon
size than SUV, the new
XC60 midsize Volvo XC60
crossover is both styl-
;over ish and family-
oth friendly, with an
ish array of high-tech
features and expres-
d sive coupe-like exte-
riendly. rior styling. Based on
the next-generation
S60 sedan that will
debut later this year, the crossover
delivers sporty driving dynamics
with a relatively well-mannered
ride. It also affords ample acceler-
ation, thanks to a 281-hp tur-
bocharged 3.0-liter V6 engine and
six-speed automatic transmission.
A standard "Instant Traction"


*ltLY*


all-wheel-drive system improves ing a launch from a standing start.
the vehicle's grip on slick roads A new "City Safety" feature
and aids acceleration and stability works to prevent low-speed
when traveling in a straight line fender benders by automatically
by kicking in automatically dur- applying the brakes if the system


determines the driver isn't react- for connecting iPods and other
ing fast enough to avoid hitting a portable audio devices comes
stopped vehicle ahead. A pro- standard, as does a Bluetooth
mium audio system with both hands-free cell phone interface.
satellite and HD Radio and inputs � CTWFeatures


�ilL � I~*5;.


I


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T[!,SAy, APR, 14, 2009 D5


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Vacationing by car?

Prepare your vehicle properly for trouble-free travel


By JIM GORZELANY
CTW FEATURES

Needless to say, these are far
from being the best of times for
the "Big Three" U.S. automak-
ers. Still, automotive enthusiasts
are looking forward - and back-
ward at the same time - to a trio
of true American sport coupes
that have been or are about to
become reborn. Each captures
the spirit of the bygone "muscle
car" era, but with contemporary
engineering, impressive levels of
performance and the latest in
comfort and convenience fea-
tures.
One, the Ford Mustang, has
had a consistent presence in the
market since its launch in 1964
as the original "pony car." An-
other, the Chevrolet Camaro,
was initially conceived as a
Mustang fighter when it bowed
for the 1967 model year; it con-
tinued in various iterations be-
fore production ended in 2002.
A third, the Dodge Challenger,
had a comparatively brief but
noteworthy run from 1970-74;
the name was revived and ap-
plied to a rebadged Mitsubishi
model in the late '70s, though it
was in no way related to the
original iteration.
Here's a quick look at this trio
of good old - but still new -
two-door, rear-drive American
muscle machines:
* Dodge Challenger.
Wrapped in unabashedly retro
styling that accurately channels
the classic muscle car from the
early 1970s, the Dodge Chal-
lenger coupe was unveiled as a
concept model to overwhelm-
ingly positive reaction at the
2006 North America Interna-
tional Auto Show in Detroit. It
was subsequently rushed into
production and was released at
mid-year 2008, but only in its
top SRT8 trim level for a short
initial run.
Other versions were recently
added to round out the line. The
base SE model comes with the
same 250-horsepower, 3.5-liter
V6 engine and four-speed auto-
matic transmission that's other-
wise found in the Dodge


Charger. The power hungry will
likely be more attracted to the
R/T trim level and its consider-
ably stronger 376-horsepower
5.7-liter "HEMI" V8. This en-
gine is able to seamlessly deacti-
vate half its cylinders when not
necessary to help boost fuel
economy without sacrificing
performance; it will make a 0-60
mph run in under six seconds.
In the meantime, the SRT8
follows the traditional muscle
car formula, which is to pack the
largest and most powerful en-
gine possible - in this case a 6.1-
liter V8 - with just enough
performance tweaks elsewhere
to make the best use of its boun-
tiful 425 hp. It's able to reach 60
mph from a standing start in just
under five seconds.
The Challenger's two V8s
can be mated to either a five-
speed automatic with Autostick
manual-shift capability that op-
erates sufficiently for most mo-
torists, or a six-speed manual
gearbox for true enthusiasts.
MSRP: $21,820-$39,820.
* Ford Mustang. With more
than nine million units built
since its introduction, the
long-running Mustang gets a
complete makeover this spring
as an early 2010 entry, though
its changes are more evolu-
tionary than revolutionary. A
new "power dome" hood and
an aggressive-looking front
grille highlight an enhanced
muscular appearance. New
three-segment LED taillamps
flash sequentially from the in-
side to indicate turns in an en-
gaging manner.
As before, buyers can choose
between a fuel-friendly V6 en-
gine and a biceps-flexing V8.
The 4.0-liter V6 produces a suf-
ficient 210 hp, while the 4.6-liter
V8 is responsible for a quicker
315 hp. Either powerplant can
be mated to a five-speed manual
or a five-speed automatic trans-
mission. The Mustang rides on
larger wheels and tires and a re-
tuned suspension for improved
handling, while AdvanceTrac
stability control, all-speed trac-
tion control and antilock disc
brakes are standard to help keep


all four wheels planted firmly on
the pavement.
Inside, the revamped Mus-
tang boasts increased sound-
deadening materials for a quieter
ride and sports a new instrument
panel. An available ambient illu-
mination array allows owners to
change lighting colors for such
things as the gauges, foot wells,
cup holders, and door map pock-
ets.
A higher-performance Shelby
GT500 rendition will follow
later in the year. MSRP:
$22,000-$35,000 (estimated).
* Chevrolet Camaro. Reborn
with brawny styling that honors
the 1960s original, an all-new
rendition of the classic Camaro
arrives for a mid-year introduc-
tion this summer as a 2010
model.
No mere retro-poseur, the
rear-drive coupe rides on con-
temporary underpinnings, with a
choice of either a fuel-efficient
300-hp, 3.6-liter direct-injection
V6 engine under its long hood in
LS and LT models or an author-
itative 6.2-liter V8 in the top SS
version. The latter engine, which
it shares with Chevy's- Corvette,
is estimated to generate a rous-
ing 422 horses with the standard
six-speed manual transmission.
Those choosing the available
six-speed automatic gearbox get
a 400-hp version of this power-
plant that shuts down half the
cylinders at cruising speeds to
help boost its mileage.
A fully independent suspen-
sion at all four corners prom-
ises steadfast cornering
prowess, particularly in the
SS, which receives its own
performance-oriented setup
with a slightly lowered ride
height. Stability control is
standard and on the SS in-
cludes an adjustable Competi-
tive/Sport mode that affords
more aggressive driving.
What's more, a Launch Con-
trol feature is included with
the manual transmission that
enables tire-squealing takeoffs
without the stability control in-
tervening to spoil the fun.
MSRP: $22,245-$33,430.
� CTW Features


Each captures the spirit of the bygone "muscle car" era,

but with contemporary engineering, impressive levels of

performance and the latest in comfort and convenience features.


\__ . ..


CHEVY
CAMARO


By JAY KOBLENZ
CTW FEATURES
Going on vacation is often filled
with last-minute duties. Arranging for
mail and newspaper pickup. Board-
ing the pet. Taking care of a thousand
little things at work so you'll still
have a job when you get back.
Add one more crucial item to
the list if you're taking to the road
this summer: Maintaining the car.
If "getting there is half the fun," ar-
riving at your destination and driv-
ing back home safely without
having to interrupt your trip with an
untimely and costly mechanical
breakdown is an even greater joy.
If your vehicle needs a repair,
don't wait until the last minute.
Many repairs take longer than pre-
dicted, parts availability could be
an issue and other required work or
undetected damage can be discov-
ered while it's in the shop. Also, the
bigger the job, the more likely mis-
takes could be made. It's not un-
common to bring a vehicle back to
have the service department fix
something they missed the first
time around. It's obviously impos-
sible to do this when you're hun-
dreds of miles away.
Even if your vehicle is dutifully
maintained, it's always a good idea
to take it in for an oil change before
a long trip. That gives you extra
range before the oil begins to dete-
riorate, and a decent mechanic will
also look over important wear-and-
tear items such as your car's engine
coolant and brake pads.
Tires deserve special mention
because they are critically impor-
tant to vehicle safety and per-
formance. If your tires are several
years old and are near the wear
limit, it's relatively easy to shop
around for a new set before you
leave, but far less so while you're
out of town on vacation. Tires
wear faster on extended highway
journeys, particularly in a heavily
laden vehicle. New tires will also
have deeper tread that will per-


CHEVY * NISSAN *
CHRYSLER * JEEP * DODGE


SERVICE


R SPECIALS
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SALIGNMENTApplies to

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FREE COMPUTER SCAN' ' l
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FREE 27 POINT INSPECTION F
FACTORY TRAINED TECHNICIANS WILL PERFORM A 27
POINT VEHICLE INSPECTION AT NO CHARGE TO YOU.
These Technicians will conduct an analysis using the I I
latest electronic equipment and will provide you with a I I
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Please present coupon when order is wntten and rior sales excluded. Valid Please present coupon when order is wntten and prior sales excluded. Valid
at any Crystal Location- Sales tax and shop supplies excluded. Not in con- at any Crystal Location - Sales lax and shop supplies excluded Not in con
Junction th otheroffers. Applies to most vehicle. Expires6/30/09 junctionwth other offers. Apples to mostvehicle. Expires6/30/09
Courtesy Transportation Available * Warranty Work Done
_E u: s rn�7 ----T -T---


S - . _ " %- - ' ....... .


form better should you face a sud- more quickly it will reach an ac-
den downpour. ceptable temperature.
Even if your tires have plenty of When you first get in the car,
tread, checking the air pressure at roll all the windows completely
all four wheels is an important down. Set the air conditioning con-
maintenance item that's all too trols to recirculate or "MAX" and
often ignored. Under-inflated tires use the highest blower speed. As
can cause your vehicle to consume soon as you are comfortable, close
more fuel and run a greater risk of the windows and switch the system
damage, particularly at higher to the normal air-circulation setting
speeds. with a lower fan speed. The lower
If you're so squeezed for time the blower speed, the colder the air
that you're unable to bring your ve- will be coming from the system.
hide in for maintenance before hit- Loading your vehicle properly is
ting the road, there is one an important topic on its own.
alternative - rent a car for the trip. Since vacation trips frequently in-
This gives you the advantage of volve packing some of the heaviest
finding a vehicle that may be more cargo your vehicle will ever carry,
suitable for vacation (like a mini- this is the time to check its payload
van or SUV) or is more fuel-effi- capacity. This specification is usu-
cient than your own. With the cost ally listed in a vehicle's glovebox
of fuel heading toward four dollars and/or owner's manual along with
per gallon this summer, renting a 30 the proper air-pressure setting for
mpg car instead of driving your 12 your tires. Estimate the weight of
mpg SUV could actually wind up people and cargo and don't exceed
saving you money in transportation the stated limit.
costs. You'll also save extra wear There's usually a safety margin
and tear on your personal vehicle, built into this figure, and sometimes
Just be sure to rent from a reputable upgrading to different tires can com-
company, and look for one that has pensate slightly for heavier loads.
offices along your route and at your But when you've got a thousand
destination. pounds of people, a couple hundred
Because this is summer travel, more in luggage and then put a hun-
your air conditioning might need dred-pound canoe on top of a vehicle
special attention. Don't forget to that's rated to cany only 800 pounds,
make sure it's working properly be- you're asking for trouble.
fore hitting the road. The Mobile Even if you stay within the rec-
Air Conditioning Society (MACS) ommended limits, keep in mind
offers advice on the best way to that carrying all that extra weight
achieve the quickest interior cool- will extend your vehicle's stopping
down. If possible, leave the win- distances and slow its cornering
dows down slightly when parked abilities. Anticipate this and adjust
on hot sunny days. Temperatures in your driving accordingly. Operate
a closed car can exceed 140 de- your car or truck like your family's
grees, and the cooler the interior is well being depends on it - it does.
when you first turn on the air, the � CTWFeatures


THREE PUREBRED AMERICAN COUPES

PAY HOMAGE TO CLASSIC MUSCLE CARS,

BUT WITH THOROUGHLY MODERN MECHANICALS.


D6 TUI[SI)AY, AIllUl. l4, 2009


_I~e~f~at~
s ~~ssiri








ITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


fft i


TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 D7


Ii' I


T he Insight is back with more power, a
more practical design and a new mission
as the most-affordable gasoline-electric
hybrid on the block.
The original Insight, available from 2000-'06, was
a fuel-sipping marvel. Unfortunately, its two-passenger
capacity kept it in niche-market territory, while Toyota's
category-leading Prius four-door hybrid hatchback stole
the show. Meanwhile, Honda briefly tried marketing an
Accord hybrid and continues to sell a similar Civic, but
still trails the Prius by a considerable distance in terms
of sales.
Honda is now pinning its hopes on a brand new In-
sight squarely aimed at urban professionals seeking
great fuel economy while helping protect the environ-
ment. The Japanese-based automaker also hopes to ap-
peal to the fearlessly frugal by keeping the sticker price
in the $20,000 range (the actual price won't be set until
closer to the Insight's launch on Earth Day, April 22).
As with the similar-looking Toyota Prius, the Insight
has been designed for maximum practicality as well as
fuel efficiency. The cabin feels particularly roomy and
the storage space beneath the hatchback beats the cur-


rent Prius by about 14 percent (Toyota will launch an
all-new and enlarged Prius later this spring).
Although the Insight is a dedicated hybrid, which
means it's not merely converted from another Honda
model, its basic structure has been lifted from the entry-
level Honda Fit and the view out the generously sized
windshield is virtually identical. However, the car's
aerodynamically shaped nose helps it more efficiently
slice through the air, which increases fuel economy.
Motivating the Insight is an 88-horsepower 1.3-liter
gas engine functioning with a 13-horsepower electric
motor for a net total of 98 horses. By comparison, both
the current Prius and the Honda Civic hybrid are each
rated at 110 horsepower.
The power system is connected to a continuously
variable transmission (CVT) of a type favored by most
hybrid manufacturers.
Fuel economy is estimated at a respectable 40 mpg
city, 43 mpg highway and 41 mpg, overall. However,
dash-mounted monitors encourage drivers to beat these
numbers. The gauge display includes an "Eco Assist"
speedometer that changes background color from blue
(inefficient) to green (the most fuel efficient), depend-


ing on your driving style. When questioned why orange
or red wasn't displayed for leadfoot types, Insight chief
engineer Yasunari Seki said that he "did not wish to
scold drivers" for their fuel-wasting habits, but use gen-
tle persuasion to teach them.
The Insight also comes with an ECON button that,
when pushed, induces the gas engine to shut down
sooner when stopping, limits power and torque by four
percent and runs the air conditioning and fan motor
more efficiently.
Finally, an Eco Guide display rates driver perform-
ance by displaying an increasing number of "tree
leaves" earned per trip as an indication of an efficient
driving style.
During a 60-mile city/highway leg, the Insight
achieved its estimated 43-mpg city rating for overall
consumption, while a dedicated 'hyper-miler' driving
partner, using every fuel-saving trick imaginable, beat
that number by nearly 30 mpg. With practice, and the
help of the Insight's ever-present reminders about driv-
ing efficiency, it was easy to attain figures in the low-60-
mpg range, but only by using the kind of slow-motion
driving tactics that would aggravate most passengers


and anyone sharing the road.
In the real world, the fully equipped base Insight LX
proved a comfortable, capable and an enjoyable way to
get around, while the optional EX added to the fun with
cruise control, heated outside mirrors, upgraded audio
system and an optional navigation package.
Honda has obviously tried to
make Illh inr g ht .ippea.hril
to all kinds o) buI'h -r
and, 1i h, c,)mpi.
holds Ls, io, Ii l.k-.
price jpproa, Ii
will nr, d:,ubl r1 ,-
tice mrrjn, h,, brd
fancic r, In't. Ihe
Hond., ciimp


"I
ii.. . -,~,


Motivating the Insight is an 88-horsepower 1.3-liter gas engine
functioning with a 13-horsepower electric motor for a net total of 98 horses


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CrrRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


D8 TursDAY, APRIL. 14, 2009


Smile!





You're on a













CAMERA


BIG BROTHER IS NOT JUST

WATCHING, HE'S READY TO

ISSUE A TICKET IF YOU

RUN A STOPLIGHT.



By JEFFREY STEELE I CTW FEATURES


Red-light cameras are becoming a fixture at a
growing number of American intersections, and
their flash bulbs are unlikely to make many
motorists smile and say "cheese." While they do appeal
to municipalities for their revenue-increasing potential,
their official purpose is to limit red-light infractions that
are reported to lead to more than 100,000 collisions and
one thousand deaths annually in the U.S.
The cameras are designed to provide high-definition
images of offending motorists' license plates and, in
some instances, their faces. Far less clear, say some
watchdog groups, are arguments that the cameras ulti-
mately reduce red-light running, minimize crashes at
intersections and promote highway safety.
When the Escondido, Calif. city council renewed the
contract of red-light camera provider REDFLEX in De-
cember 2008, it did so with the argument that the cam-
eras reduced crashes. Collisions at seven major
intersections where the cameras were installed in the
municipality were slashed by 32 percent from 2004 to
2007, according to police lieutenant Mike Loane.
The argument in Escondido is typical of others being
voiced nationwide. The federal Transportation Re-
search Board reported in 2003 most jurisdictions adopt-
ing red-light cameras experienced decreases in
accidents. In Charlotte, N.C., for instance, all crash
types fell 19 percent and crash severity was down by
16 percent. Sacramento saw a one-year decline of 39
percent in red-light crashes, and Baltimore County, Md.
a 30 percent drop over a one-year period.
These reports have spurred the cameras' growing ac-
ceptance, despite cries that the red-light photography is
a signal Big Brother is out of control.
However, some researchers who have studied the
r$d-light camera,phonomenon at length argue the tech-
nology does not, in fact, lead to greater safety. And a
few observers have gone so far as to maintain red-light
cameras can actually increase collisions.
An executive summary of the report "Safety Evalua-
tion of Red-Light Cameras," published by the National
Highway Traffic Safety Administration in April 2005,
examined both right-angle crashes and rear-end crashes
in seven jurisdictions. "There is a significant decrease
in right-angle crashes, but there is also a significant in-
crease in rear-end crashes," the summary concluded,
finding a decline of 379 right angle crashes and an in-
crease of 375 rear-end crashes in the period studied.
In March 2008, a report in the publication Science
Daily went a step further. Researchers at the University
of South Florida College of Public Health in Tampa
studied crash data in the Sunshine State and found red-
light cameras significantly increase crashes and lead to
higher insurance premiums, the Science Daily report
concluded.
"The rigorous studies clearly show red-light cameras
don't work," says Barbara Langland-Orban, professor
and chair of health policy and management at USF
College of Public Health. "Instead, they increase
crashes and injuries as drivers attempt to abruptly stop
at camera intersections... Used in Florida, cameras
could potentially create even worse outcomes due to
the state's high percent of elderly who are more likely
to be injured or killed when crashes occur."
The USF report also stated "major design flaws"
cloud some research studies purporting to prove red-
light cameras reduce collisions, and further noted some
of the studies were conducted by researchers linked to
the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, the trans-
portation industry's leading red-light camera advocate.
"Insurers can profit from red-light cameras, since their
revenues will increase when higher premiums are
charged, due to the crash and citation increase, the re-
searchers say," according to Science Daily.
The USF researchers asserted that their findings sup-
port other research conducted in North Carolina, Vir-
ginia and Ontario that found the cameras were strongly
linked with increases in crashes, increases in crashes in-
volving injuries and increased crash costs, Science
Daily reported.
Another take on the red-light camera controversy
comes from Wired magazine's online Blog Network. It
reported some municipalities have begun dispensing
with their red-light cameras because they are so effec-
tive that traffic citation revenues have declined.


The Wired article, which noted a recent shutdown of
red-light cameras in Charlotte and Fayetteville, N.C.,
indicated Dallas had originally anticipated the red-light
cameras would generate a gold mine in municipal rev-
enues.
"Unfortunately, local drivers responded by simply
driving legally, making the cameras an effective deter-
rent - but an ineffective investment," Wired writer Bob
Beschizza noted. "Police forces are not only profiting
from crime that it's ostensibly their duty to prevent, but
are becoming bluntly honest about it.
"The cameras work just fine - but isn't something
wrong with this picture?" � CTW Features


I


ACROSS
2. AMX derived from this
6, Shift on the __
8, Power feature available in '56
9. Freeway barrier
10. Gas pedal (slang)
13. Floor protectors
'14. First to feature pop-up
headlights
15. First U.S. "production car"
1 8. Gas ___ (thirsty auto)
21. Oil or power steering
23 Pontiac two-seater
24. Two-seat gas-electric hybrid
25. Morgan .............. 8


26. Super Seven designer
27. Truck named for Arctic region
28. 1940s coupe style
31. Grand Marquis offshoot
33. Climate or cruise
34. Early six-cylinder design
36-. Created "three-eyed" sedan
37. M ini m odifier John ........................
38. Suburban, only shorter
39. Cross-drilled and slotted refers
to this
41. Harley Earl-designed sports car
44. Windstar replacement
45. Yearly Colorado hill-climb averi


CO Y I 0 W I c L e A 5 O M M N I C At IO N


24 FT CRESTLINER
PONTOON
14 passenger w/traller
$65,000 obo
(352) 382-7039
1981 15' BOSTON
WHALER SPORT 1993
48hp Johnson, new 2008
trailer, all great condition
$7,500 352-201-0096
1993 17' Sylvan
Boat & trailer
85h.p. Yamaha motor
Good cond. $3,500
(352) 344-0457
'05 11 ft. ZODIAC
15hp, 4-stroke Yamaha,
Trailer, extras $4,895
(954) 632-1104
AIRBOAT
1996, 15'. 500cubic inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
Aluminium 18'
C/C, 92 Johnson 48hp
T/T w/trll Great shape
$3000 call Bob
(352) 860-0513
AQUA SPORT '05
175 Osprey , 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual batt.
w/switch, bimini, easy load
trailer. Low hours.
$10,800/obo 352-860-0277
� AQUA SPORT
190 ,Osprey, 2001
11 5-,h'J tbnson just
rebuilt 5y. oar, eady to
fish. Reduced $0O.5001
352-746-5856
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
I0.50QQL352-746-5856
Cabin Cruiser 24 ft.
Owner died, 6 cyl. 10,
alpha one/OD, used In
fresh water, tan. gal. trl
Incl.'d $2,500 464-0316
CAPE HORN
'94 17'2 , 8ft. wide.
C/C. Merc.90 HP. outboard
W/Trailer
$4,100(352)634-4793
CENTURY
'01- Bay, 21ft.
'02, 150HP Yamaha w/
trir., custom cover
dep/find, VHF, Iw hrs.,
like new, $13,950.
(352) 442-7772
Deck Boat
95' 19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ ra-
dio & fishfinder. New Bat-
tery switch. 2 batteries,
power pk.
prop./hub.$7,000
(352) 726-0838
DONZI '90
23ft. OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras
$14,500/obo. (352)
489-9640: 220-6508
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
115HP, stroke Yamaha,
w/trlr. $15,900. will
trade (352) 503-3778
NEW 2021 Tahoe
Boat Trailer Disc brakes
on both axles. Never
had a boat on It.
$2,475. (352) 527-3555
POLAR 2310, 2006
23FT. POLAR BAYBOAT
250HP YAMAHA
4-STORKE, CUSTOM
TRAILER,
T-TOP,GPS,VHS, GAR-
AGE KEPT. $25,000
FIRM 352-795-7766
PONTOON BOAT
08' 20 Ft. To many
options to list. $13,000
Call for info. 628-7926
Pontoon Boat
1996, 18 ft., 40HP Yamaha,
4 stroke, $8,500
(352) 860-1490
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras $12,000
(352) 628-0281
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras $12,000
(352) 628-0281
PROLINE 20.5' Bay 2002
Mercury 150-$9950
352-331-5204
PROLINE
S23' W. A.C. 200 Hp.
Johnson. Bim. top. GPS.
F.F./VHF. Low hrs.
$4,250 (352) 563-5628
SAILFISH 18'
C/C, Yamaha 115hp
equipment, clean, trial
one owner $5300
(352) 503-7102
T-CRAFT
23'L, 6'W, '02 150H
Evin. r. mtr. w fuel enj. like
new, trir. w/brks
$7750 352-489-3661
TRACKER
2002. 17FT, 75HP
4 stroke Mercury,
$5,000 (352) 637-2638



05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
26inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
'07 NEW MAR
Cypress 32ft 5th wheel.
2 slides. Separate bath.
Extras. 3 yr ext. war-
ranty $39,900/obo
352-794-3534


38FT BOUNDER '96
Class-A - basement
model. 49K mi. 14mpg,
new tires & brakes. (4)
TV's. Ready for long trip.
$22. 0o. 352-563-0615
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 38 K Mi.
Dual air. $36,000 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane 30Q, class
A motor home, 31�% ft., 22k
mi. V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed, etc.
Saturn tow Avail. $35,000.
Lets talk (352) 397-5007
GEORGIE BOY
'05, Pursuit, Class A,
30ft.
Excel. cond. 8k mi.,
2 slide outs, 2 TV's, back
up camera, all the bells
and whistles and much
more, must see this
coach, Asking $50,000.
obo (352) 746-7626

GULF STREAM
'07 BT Cruiser, 22' 8K.Mi.
Hitch & tow bar. Like new.
y.'--36521 875-8890
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
greatRV Park, pool, club-
house etc.
$29,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$55,995. 352-464-0371
Winnebago
'94 32' class A,
Clean no pets/or smoke.
$9,500 Or Obo.
(352) 746-1169



'04 COACHMAN
Clipper 086 Sport
Pop-up. A/C, furnace,
refrig & awning. $2500
352-344-5006
AIRSTREAM
25ft. Safari, Unused,
stored 4 yrs. as new
loaded SAVE. 30K
Tel (352) 563-2668
Cell (352) 308-1431
BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. On bed,
microwave, Irg refrig. Like
new. $9,995.
352-489-3661
BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. QOn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig. Like
new. $9,995.
352-489-3661
FIFTH WHEEL
30 Ft. Aljo W/slide-out.
Good cond. Moving must
sell. $5,200 or trade.
Obo. (352) 214-3688
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO
'06, 18ft, self contained,
like new, awning,
sleeps 4, ultra life wght
$7,950, 352-339-5158
KODIAK
'04, Hybrid Travel Trir. AC,
Heat, Micro. Tub/ Shwer,
toilet exc cond $9,500.
352-564-4151
MEADOWBROOK
5th Wheel, 2000 Excel-
lent. Photos at
http:'J/picasaweb.google.com/
meadowbrook.Glenn
- $13,995.00 (352)302-6055
or (727)692-9045
TRAIL CRUISER '04
17FT, light weight,
fully loaded. Used
10 times. $6800.
352-628-4522
VOLKSWAGON '68
bus/transporter. Con-
verted to camper. Runs
well. New brakes.
$5,000. 352-726-5926



99 Mitsubishi Eclipse,
wrecked, for parts, exc. 2.0
16 val eng. auto. trans. 2
sets of wheels/tires 117km
302-2781 464-0220



08 CUSTOM BUILT
Pontiac Convertible
Show Car. Invested over
$15k See to appreciate
Only valid offers l
(352) 382-7039
1993 GEO Tracker
4x4, Auto, low miles
fair cond. air works
$2,000 (352) 344-9931
1998 Buick LaSabre
Showroom condition
Fully power equipped
61k original miles
$4,995 obo (352)
560-4251
S BUICK
2004, Century
| 1#P6143B |
* Won't Last S5,988
1866-838-4376


Miata - Only 72k miles.
New tires. NICE! $4500.
352-382-9004
BUICK
2005, Lacrosse, Alloy
Wheels & Much More
Take over pmt $199 per
mol-800-733-9138
BUICK Century 1995
Looks and runs like new!
Lots of extras. 117K Miles
$ 1,700 Call Andy at
352 344-2125
CADILLAC '01
Catera, 34k mi, MIflNT
White w/leather. $6300/obo.
845-282-3504
CADILLAC
'06 DTS, 66K.MI.
$16,300. w/ warranty.
(352) 746-3663
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715

S CHEVROLET
2003, Impala
I #H13134A Outstand- I
SIng Value $7,988 *
1866-838-4376



CHEVROLET Corvette
1967 coupe, $3500, 8
cylinder, exterior
color: Yellow, I terir 'r
color: White, 93,655
miles, manual, rare
and great muscle car,
for details e-mail me
ishashansen@gmail.com
or call me
(702)548-7707
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Conv. rare
5 spd, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
bik, depend.
$4700 352- 563.-0615
CHRYSLER
2007, PT Cruiser Full
Power. Like New, Low
Miles, Take over pmt
$179mo 1-800-733-9138
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 mi-
les on this rare silver on
silver on silver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are on
this gorgeous vette,
Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
included, Your's
for only , $48,500.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, 86K ramil.
T -top roof, Excellent con
edition $12,000. , will trade
for truck. 352-563-6428
S "DODGE
* 2005, Neon #P6179 I
I Low, low miles |
$7,988
* 1866-838-4376

DODGE CALIBER
' 07 Ocala Volvo.$12,995
(352) 629-7299
FORD '02
TAURUS SEL. Moon roof,
6 disk CD player. All
power. $3800/obo.
352-697-2460
r FORD
2004, Mustang
S#P6349 Low. low |
miles $9,988 �
1866-838-4376
HONDA
'06 Civic,$10.995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299

2000, Insight
#H13131M
* 50 MPG $7,988
1866-838-4376
HONDA
* 2002, Accord
#H11822B Best buy
$8,988
1866-838-4376
16-- - - --
SHONDA
2003, Accord
S#H12776A Gorgeous I
* $9,988
1866-838-4376







MR-EDE- a
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well maintained.
$2650. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
r MAZDA
2001, Millena
S #H13094A |
SHard to find $8988 I
1866-838-4376
MAZDA 3
'07, $11,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'01 CLK,$16,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'05, $25,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCURY
'02 Grand Marquis LS
83K.Mi. Leather int. 1
own. Exc. cond. $6,500.
(352) 382-3596

I 2006, Galant #P6313 I
I acquire low pymt. i
of $299.03-zero out -
S of pocket |
1866-838-4376
S-- - -- MJ


Convertible 1977, 57k mi.
Blue, many xtras Excellent
Condition
$10,500 (352)628-0281

MITSUBISHI
2007, Lancer #P6338
acquire low pymft.
Of $198.38-zero out
S of pocket
1866-838-4376

NISSAN
'07 Altima, $13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
S NISSAN
2000, Maxima
#H12908A Low, low
miles $7,988
1866-838-4376
-- - -A- a
N NISSAN
2007 Sentra #P6326
Low, low miles
$11,988
1866-838-4376

OLDSMOBILE
'90 Toronado Trofeo
Coupe. Loaded, V-6,
Leather, 132K. Mi. Exc.
Cond. $2,100.
(352) 382-9977
SATURN
'04 VUE, AWD, 4 dr.
auto, 39K. pampeoreo M
Silver nice car '
Woolen's t352) 637.7117
SATURN
2007, Ion, P6304,
Excellent Condition
$7,988.
1866-838-4376
SMART CAR 08
Passion Loaded 40mpg
red/black only 2700mi
352-341-0316
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid, , 100,000 mi.
warranty. $23,000.
(352) 382-1857
TOYOTA
'08 Corolla $13,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
2001, Camry,
H 13076B, Excellent
Condition $7,988,
1866-838-4376
VOLVO
' 04 S-60 $8,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'05 S60,$13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-60, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC 70, $21,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC90,$22,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 S-60, $18,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S40, S$20,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S-80, $28,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
2007, S40 Like New &
Loaded Take over pmt
$199 per mo
1-800-733-9138
VW
2005, Beetle Coupe
LOOK, P6320
acquire low pint of
$231.71 zero out
1866-838-4376
:--v--- U

I 2007, Jetta, Wolfs-
I burg Edit., H12822B
LOOK, aquire low
| pmt of $299.03 zero
" out 1866-838-4376




'53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, 350 V-8, auto.
May trade in part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door se-
dan. 6 cyl auto. $9,500.
Will consider trade for
travel trailer of equal
value.
(352) 628-4053
CAMARO IROC Z
'88 Red, LT -1 eng.
PS./PB. Cold A.C.
62,000 Mi. Great
Condition. $6,900.
Camaro Z 28, '79
Black 4 spd. super
T-10 Tran. Cam.more,
Must see $6,900.
(352) 422-5663
CHEVROLET
Camaro '68,coupe, 107K
miles, auto, white with
black interior $4,000
stevystewart@g mal.com
CHEVY
'69 Classic C10 SHT BD
350/350 AC, PS,
$15K or trade
(352) 746-9212
CORVETTE
'87 Convertible. Drives,
looks great, 2nd owner, new
top & paint. $9,000 obo
(352) 302-1524


Classic-----


'1938, Pro street Coupe,
runs, needs TLC, $12,900
(352) 978-0658
(352) 447-3842
DODGE
Challenger 383/335 HP,
77K mi, manual trans, 8
cyl, interior green, black
interior, $2,900 Contact
angelalansing@
gmail.com(253)276-4784
EL CAMINO
'81 305 auto. All new
interior, & paint Crager
mags & tires. 4 " raised
hood.$3,250.
(352)341-3613.
GM El Camino
'84, 1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint; 63K
mi., $8,900 obo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MERCEDES BENZ
1985 380SL, 2 top road-
ster. Drives, looks great..
14n- re,, Merced-?
-seeMRBI; ICU Jlg'H, :I
L a.,3 352 63?"-6443.
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
trans. & parts. $4,000.
(352) 621-0126
THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$12,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122



DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awesome
Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded every
special feature. Sr. own,
gar. kept., 27K mi, $40K
invested Sale $21,750 See
online ad photos
www.autotrader.com/atca
rld/at-f3fd39f
John (352) 726-1076
r " DODGE
2002, Ram 1500
#P6376A. Super
Value $8,988
1866-838-4376

DODGE
2008, Dakota Pickup
Quad Cab, Low Miles
Take over pmts $233
mo. 1-800-733-9138
DODGE DAKOTA
'05 $11,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
FORD
'02 F 350, Crew Cab
Dual whis. 7.3 Diesel.
33K. Mi. Exc. cond.
$18,000 (352) 794-3081
FORD
'03 Ranger XLT. Super
Cab. 4.0 Eng.1 owner
14K Mi. Like new.
$10,300 (352)341-3292
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway, serve.
van. 41K Mi./5.4 L. ing.
Auto.Knapheide Serv.
body/dble lock drs. $20.000
Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
-'-e~----.
- FORD
2003, Ranger #P6362 -
Low, low miles 3
� $8,988 |
1866-838-4376
O- T-- ad
TOYOTA
2006, PreRunner
Quad Cab, Don't Miss
This! Take over pint
$349mo 1-800-733-9138




2006, TSX. Loaded,
Like New, Rare find
Take over $279 mo
1-800-733-9138
AZTEK
Pontiac' 04 Low
miles, loaded!
Reduced price
$8,500 abo
352-726-5715
CADILLAC
'05 Escalade, low mi. all
power, sun roof,
exc. cond. $28,000
(347) 266-9328
CHRYSLER
2007, Pacifica
Low Miles, Fully Equlpd
Payment of $195 per
mo 1-800-733-9138
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air &
exhaust, Exc. Cond.
$6,000 obo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl drive,
class 3 hitch, Orig owner.
Great shape & price.
$8,750. 352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
FORD
2003, Explorer
#H 3139B, One owner
$9,988
1866-838-4376
GMC SUBURBAN
1993 4 WD, 454 rebuilt
eng., new transm., great ti-
res, good cond. $3,700
oab
(352) 201-1413


TRAILBLAZER
'06 $12,995. Ocala
Volvo. (352) 629-7299
HONDA
2005, CR-V EX
#H12557A Eye-
catching $13,988 *
1866-838-4376
---m - - a
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, $9,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
JEEP
2004, Grand Chero- I
I kee#H12970AMus- I
I cular, Strong $7.988
1866-838-4376
KIA
2008, Rondo Hatch-
back, Perfect for
FamllylTake over points
$199mo 1-800-733-9138
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG. Silver
W/black int. Loaded,
57K.Mi. New $64K.Ask
$20K. (352)489-7674
PONTIAC
2006, Vibe, Perfect
Cond., Low Mi. Take
over pmt $197 mo
1-800-733-9138
. PONTIAC
2008, Torren ,T, .

$279mo 1-800-733-9138
TOYOTA
1994, 4 Runner SR5
3.liter, V6 Tow pack-
age 114,803 ml. $3500
OBO(352) 621-6892



FORD '06 F-150
Crew cab XLT. Tow pkg
& topper, 47K mi.
Exc cond. LOADED
$18,900/obo. (352)
634-1378; 795-2053
JEEP
'05 Wrangler,
Unlimited. $15,995 Ocala
Volvo
(352) 629-7299



1996 DODGE CARGO '
VAN $1,800 obo
(352) 572-7984
1997 DODGE CARAVAN
Runs and Looks Greatl
New Parts,Rebuilt Tranny
$1450.00 OR Best Offer!
4 Cyclinder 176,000 Miles
(352)476-7185
CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872
DODGE
'86, Ram, Conversion
Van, Runs good. Low top,
V8, 23K mi., Garage Kept.
$1,800 352-563-9834
DODGE
'94, Ram 350,
Full size, work Van
$1,500 obo
(352) 527-2241
MAZDA
'06 MPV.$9,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299



HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains & tows
heavy loads. $4700/or
trade. 352- 563-0615
Crystal River



2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900ml. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. Hi perf.
Over $43,000 in receipts.
17k mi. $12.000
352-563-0615
Crystal River
Harley Davidson
2005, XL1200 Custom. Un-
der 7k mi.Screamin Eagle
Performance Pkg & more.
Gar.kept $7500 (352)
209-7495
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 Mi.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
HONDA 04
1300 VTX. thousands In
options. mint condition
$6900 obo
(352) 302-7073
KAWASKI
'00 1100 CC,15K.
Mi. Very fast many
extra's. $4k
obo.(352)621-3764
SCOOTER
'06 Suzuki, 400
Bergman. 4,200 Mi. Like
new cond. $4,500
(352) 382-2715
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. IncIs. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3.500.
(352) 527-0679
VENTO PHANTOM
Scooter, 318 miles, 150CC,
Like new. $2,190/obo.
352-422-2433


WELCCVIE to ilnternatl,-.IionjuIutC.ro) E .-t.
a puzzlo dlodicatoed to I"o mut.z.,rilot1,o rdnthu'-.afl.I

AutoCross .ill lost your I N T E R N A T 1 0 M 'It L

knovlodgo of cars t rrand nramos :and

aulo-rolalod people from all over the w vorld GCcod luckl



DOWN
SD O W N
1 Hornet's relative
3 FOOt race once began this event
4. Peugeot's mascot
5 Road-map upgrade
6 Ferris Bueller's ride
7 Gone in 60 Seconds car star
8 Kaiser sports car
1 1 Actress died in car crash in '67
1 2 Type of performance intake
manifold
14 "First-place" Studebaker
1 5 British soft top
1 6 '50s Chevrolet pickup
1 7 Fender add-on
1 9 Orange peel refers to this
20 Slows down big rigs
22. Clutch problem
25 a.k.a. coolant
26 Vehicle weight
29. Spanish car maker
30 Interior dress-up trim
3 1. Original minivan
32 Brake replacement item
35 Technically, it's not a Ferrari
38 Deleted on 'Vettes after '62
40 Trap or limit
42 VW's hardtop convertible
43 Tops off the exhaust


t









CrITusrI CoUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


If you lose your income in the first year of ownership,

During these uncertain economic times, Hyundai Motor Corporation Is offering PEACE OF MIND for America's divers.
For a limited time, the company that protects your car with a 10 YEARI 00,000 MILE WARRANTY Is now protecting YOU.
A decade ago, Hyundai pioneered Americas Best Waranty to show people the faith we have In our cars. Today, in addition to or waranty,
we are Introducing HYUNDAI ASSURANCE, to show you the faith we have In our customers. HYUNDAI ASSURANCE is the fist and only
automotive manufacturer vehicle return program. It lets you return your vehicle In case of certain Wfe altering circumstances.
Hyundai also will pay your vehicle loan or lease for 90 days during the year while you look for work.
If the you keep the car, the payments do not need to be repaid.


Closed Today
Closed Today \


2009 ELANTRA 2010 GENESIS


TOURING
,,..


COUPE


111 36 mo Lease" . 36 mo Lease


2009 ACCENT


20 TIBURON

UP 33 p


2009 TUCSON GLS


"2 ELANTRA GLS

'39=


2009 SONATA


SOR9.119
irl %WOSu


I20" SANTA FE GLS

U p=


2009 GENESIS


VA..^S~'^^^


up 21 mpa



jp


I ., J


UP MMPG
Tou J30 H
SO I ||HW
LOUS8,


$[ 36ese0
I^^^UJMELease


AMERICA'S BEST WARRANTY" 5 Year 160,000 Mile .,."rr",,f,.f
PROTECTION PLTAN
Bumper To Bumper Coverage

10 YEAR/100,000 MILE 5 Year Unlimited Miles | Ca OfIh,
POWERTRAIN WARRANTY 24 Hr Roadside Assistane "Car of theeYear
Advertised prices are plus tax, tag and $599 dealer fee, are before any dealer installed options and include all available manufacturer rebates & incentives. 0% apr on select models, may affect final offer. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Vehicles subject to prior sale. *Expected range for most drivers, your
actual mileage may vary depending on how you drive and maintain your vehicle.As listed on Monroney sticker. 2009 Genesis; $399 mo, 36 month lease requires $2599 cash and/or trade equity plus tax, tag & $599 dealer fee due at signing, 12k miles/year. t 2010 Genesis Conpe, $259 mo. lease x 36 months requires
$1999 cash and/or trade due at signing. 2009 Elantra Touring, $239 mo. lease x 36 months requires $2499 cash and/or trade due at signing. All offers with approved credit. Some vehicles may require financing through H.M.F.C


WE'LL DOUBLE YOUR CASH AND/OR TRADE EQUITY UP TO $5000


1992 Toyota Camry $90
H8903A.... .......................
1998 Chevrolet Cavalier $i
H8974C... ... ...........................
2003 Hyundai Accent $1 i
H9113A..................................
2002 Ford Taurus $. V i1
H9I20A....... ...............
2000 Kia Sephia , ,
H9108A.................................... -
2002 Hyundai Elantra $ ..
H8953B.... .......................
2000 Ford Taurus ,
H8407B............... .................. ; -
2000 Cadillac Seville
H9289A.. ........................... .
2001 Hyundai Sonata $S ) .
H8294C..................... ......... -


2002 Kia Sedona ' " ) I
H9043A................................. e
2003 Pontiac Sunfire $
H9255A.................................... "
1999 Oldsmobile Silhouette ,
H9130A................................
2001 Chevrolet Cavalier $
H9259A..............................
2000 Honda Odyssey
PH2302B...................................
2003 Chrysler PT Cruiser $
H9047A..............................
2001 Toyota Comry
H9170A................... ...........
2005 Hyundai Sonata {
H8777A......................
2001 Ford Taurus $ ' -
H8830C..... .......................


90",I .


LIST PRICE ........ $8,990
YOUR CASH OR TRADE... s2,500
DOUBLE ............ $2,500
YOU PAY e
-aaaJ~


2003 Kia Sedona $
H9070A..... ............................ $ n o
2001 Chevrolet Blazer $4 .
H8875B.... .......................
2006 Hyundai Elantro $S , i
H9143A.... ..................
2005 Hyundai Accent
H8601A.... ...................
2005 Suzuki Forenza
H9015B................... ........
1999Toyota RAV4
H9010B.................. ..... '.. ;
2005 Hyundai Elantra
H9128A .................................... ..
2002 Honda Accord $� t
H9263A ....................................
2005 Hyundai Sonata $, f 9 Q
H8960A ....................................


2005 Hyundai Elantra
H8926B.... .....................
2000 Lincoln Town Car
H8880A.... .....................
2005 Honda Element
H9107A.... .....................


5 ,990
$5,990
$6,990


Ad itiona
5 ,,EAR/000*gM

S * .*. s l
WARRANTY.


Ie:i




1:'


TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 D9


/t2MqfJ3
$123t3987_/


syw^"iy^^ SfOO





D10 TUESDAYAPRIL 14 9


THIS WEEK THANYTESTDRIVE
ON LY Citrus County Residents Only
S*Limit (1) Per Family Before 4/30/09


GO ONE YEAR WITHOUT
A CAR PAYMENT


No

Payment

i1


OR


On Selec
Models



APR

Financing


*


TOLL FREE
1-866-32-SUZUKI
(1-866-327-8985)


15265 Cortez (S.R. 50)
Just East of Suncoast Pkwy. Exit 46
In Beautiful Brooksville


Local
352-799-9999


All offers with approved credit.Some offers cannot be combined. All offers must be requested at time of original negotiation All previous deals or negotiations excluded All vehicles in limited supply, some may require factory order. All prices based on Dealer retaining all rebates and incentive that customer must
qualify for.All prices plus tax, tag, title and include $499 Dealer deliver fee. No payments il 2010/One Year and 0% Financing offers on select models w/740 Beacon Score and dealers select Lenders final approval.Dealer may elect to compensate Buyer/Customer for normally scheduled payments during No Payment
Period.Customer/Buyer may elect to waive or shorten no Payment period in lieu of further discount or financing incentive. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Test Drive offer limit (1) per family per month,limit 25 maximum thru 4/30/09. Scheduled Test Drive appointment suggested. Please see dealer for complete
details.Test Drivers must be at least year old with valid Drivers License and proof of insurance.


CInus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


, , % I liYAY AKL


CRYSTAL RIVER


U-
I-
a,
SR50 0
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TAMPA


0$


41~EE) E








MEGAET NT LE ENT

,, j( ^ ' ^j ,t - ' J rtu, ....... .. " .. .. .. ........ ..... .,.,. . .,, .w *..m
-� '\ ^M-I *- -^"^1<;
$0�H L EyV ^-o
"sL^ ^\am.\a


Only At Jenkins Acu


PUBLIC NOTICE
Jenkins Acura & Auto USA brings you a gigantic tent event
offering hundreds of new Acura's and quality pre-owned vehicles,
both imports and domestic available for immediate delivery.
.1* i I NAN(IN(3 AVA!I AHLI. $S$

wLIYvEit4iI H


ra & Auto USA

CREDIT PROBLEM?
NO PROBLEM!
NO ' ModeiYe s trict Il
S9Br i;i , . . . ..ii i i i. .
* 6'6. ll pt^ t B


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APPRAISERS ON SITE
TO BUY YOUR CAR EVEN IF
YOU DON'T BUY FROM US!


u^^W i ,' ..,. .#-: ,c "'
eA~i �dDlob'
"Airw e en


- .. . .. ,, , . 2-1


I V up
Rome To^ o
11"W'Mm"` t^^: EMS^^" dB


A FEW EXAMPLES ABOVE * MOST MAKES & MODELS AVAILABLE!
DON'T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY TO $AVE THOUSAND$!


CrnRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2009 Dll


I


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


012 TUESDAYAPRIL 14 9


AUTOS


COM


LOOK AROUND. EVERYONE'S DRIVING ONE.

CRSTI RIY ST I �, ' 'oII


Protect your vehicle
Protect your family
Protect your paycheck


Protect your
SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS


100k mile Warranty
OnStar safety and security
Payment Protection
Vehicle Value Protection


investment


'09 HHR


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 1108
1.m p 189 ml ,*
$18,940


'08 MALIBU


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 1131
110,999 or'1941 mc.


'09 EQUINOX


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 i. 1120
S, 229 2mo,*
$24,290 *! 'II~


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 1132
13999MorV47 mC'


'06 EXPLORER '05 TAHOE
- _, -
,~ BB ""'11 :^ XaaMOB f,,


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 1151
'M,999orS1l7yoMCI'


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 1152
4 999 oy'


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 1134
43,5999 or 247 mo'

'05 IMPALA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 1153
3"1 14
i,^iri fi�


'09 SILVERADO


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 1115
13,988 or '229 mo,*

.AZER '09 TAHOE


$MUP $399 mo,*


'07 SILVERADO '07 EQUINOX


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584-8755 Ext. 1149 800-584-8755 Ext. 1150
10,999 or S194 N MCI '13,999 or 24mollAC
'04 SILVERADO '03 CADILLAC


Things You Must Know Before You Buy Your Next Car
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
800-5 -8i755 Ext. 91


CRYSTAL AN mJE RM=IWiON


ONLINE
crystalautos.com


IN PERSON
1035 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA


OVER THE PHONE
800-584-8755 Ext. 1


PrnicePamI niio inciu Il ALL fa'lor, a081er Ir,:enil.oI 1 ratgres ,Balla,1o Ii mua ,uali u l ad i gri eet r or i llnr Sl C'i2 0 .r 251. C.'.2n vrCaBt r rra.ie E ulril ,r. i 1,i Toc.) Ieic yi0T r an. , odeis Pr .n PBs, rro.'i ue. luJIes r aP rdg nile 'oa o r "en SIn .. a'a a iler eas Pn,m noa' are aTor ? . A PR f-r 72
monil ,win ll a proed creoil B l�'ri mull quliy, fr aollrninil.Ol . speciAO l hpr',In~i In LLou' RoFIBereba l ' AC , ri Ro3 Lricilori p., . Tol ail er fordelal'l r el r.i rsil, e. ritic rT ap.nlric alerrori ) P'.:,urer req f ri, rai 'n ir c , . , . .., .e ' . ... o ',' ' e2


0


OF


'09 AVEO


$12,170
FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 1101
'8,988 or '159 mo.'


'09 MALIBU

$21A75
FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 1104
16,988 or '269 mo,*


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIALPRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 1121
MSRP A99 o *
$20,975 m IV


mi.. - _IIlI


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 1154
7,999or f141 mo,


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 1155
8,999 orf159 Mo.'


wa [.IUSA, t , -f LV