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Citrus County chronicle
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01607
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: April 12, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01607

Full Text



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Annie's 'vljab .. ............A14
Classifieds .................... D5
Crossword .................. A14
Editorial .......................... C2
Entertainment ................B6
Horoscope .................... A14
M ovies ........................ A14
Obituaries .................... A6
Together...................... A12


Sunrise
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The sun rises Wednesday over
the Roral City Pool of the Tsala
Apopka Chain of Lakes. With the
clear skies and Spanish moss
hanging down from the oak
trees, this view from the Moon-
rise Resort illustrates the still
wild and rustic beauty of nature.


Special section
Citrus County's annual medical and wellness directory./Inside

Losing it Man's weight loss inspires others./Page A3

Fugal Find money-saving tips and more./HomeFront

TV Visit www.chronicleonline.com for interactive listings./Online


Small
talk
Tax time
looms...
/Page D3


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A9 SUNDAY, APRIL Ao , C U)H


Join youth group
fundraiser April 18
The Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County and the city of In-
veress will host Music on the
Square from 6-10 p.m. Satur-
day in downtown Inverness.
Performing will be blues-rock
band Mocassin Slough, whose
repertoire will appeal to both
classic rock fans and friends of
the blues.
This is a free event. Bring
your lawn chairs.
For more information, call
621-9225.
Authorities search
for escaped inmate
BIG PINE KEY-Authorities
have expanded their search for
an inmate who escaped from
prison, posting his mugshot in
businesses throughout the
Florida Keys.
Department of Corrections
spokeswoman Gretl Plessinger
said Saturday that 38-year-old .
Steven Coccarelli is still on the
loose. Authorities have not re-
leased how he got away from.
Big Pine Key Road Prison on
Thursday.
Coccarelli was serving a 10-
year sentence for armed rob-
bery.
He is 5-foot-6, nearly 200
pounds, with a shaved head.
He has a tattoo of a heart on
his left shoulder and the name
"Lisa" on his right shoulder.
Officials are asking residents
to call 911 if they see him.
President Clinton
to speak at FAMU
TALLAHASSEE - Former
President Bill
Clinton has
been tapped
to speak at
Florida A&M
University's
commence-
ment in May.
School offi-
Bill Clinton cialssaid
will speak at Clinton will
school's com- share his life
mencement. lessons with
graduates.
and challenge them to trans-
form ideas into action.
Others scheduled to speak at
the graduation ceremony at the
historically black university in-
clude U.S. Congressman
Kendrick Meek, a FAMU alum,
and CNN anchor Soledad
O'Brien, who recently em-
barked on a project about
blacks in America.
Congresswoman's
bill faces pushback
MIAMI -After South Florida
Congresswoman Debbie
Wasserman Schultz revealed
she was a breast cancer sur-
vivor, she introduced legislation
to launch a national breast can-'
cer education campaign aimed
at young women.
But now that effort is facing
opposition from some cancer
researchers and advocates.
Donald Berry of M.D. Ander-
son Cancer Center says that
breast cancer is very rare for
women younger than 40 and
that, besides quitting smoking,
there's nothing a woman can
do to reduce her risk. He says
the bill's emphasis on self-ex-
aminations is also misplaced
because all young women have
bumps in their breasts.
Berry believes the legislation
will cause fear and unneeded
biopsies.
Wasserman Schultz, who's
42, says she underwent seven
major surgeries in the past
year, including a double mas-
tectomy. She was diagnosed
with cancer in December 2007.
Four teens killed
traffic crash
SEMINOLE - Tampa Bay
area police said four teenagers
were killed and another injured
in a traffic crash.
Authorities say preliminary
information shows a 2005
Lexus sedan carrying the five
teens tried to pass a 1993
Chevrolet sedan on the left in


Seminole, near St. Petersburg.
But the Chevy was making a
left tum late Friday, so the two "
cars collided.
Police said the fast-moving
Lexus hit a tree and burst into
flames, ejecting the passen-
gers. Three teens died at the
scene, while another died on
the way to a hospital. The fifth
was listed in serious condition.
Only the driver was wearing a
seatbelt, although he was
killed.
Police said the driver of the
Chevy was treated and re-
leased.
The Florida Highway Patrol
is still investigating.


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Children rush to find Easter eggs Saturday at the Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park. Hundreds of boys and girls gathered thousands of Easter eggs
during the annual hunt.


Shoplifters found
after leaving photos
PORT ST. LUCIE - Authori-
ties said two Port St. Lucie
woman tried to steal nearly
$200 worth of merchandise
from a Walmart but got caught
because they left packets of re-
cently developed pictures in
their abandoned shopping
carts.,
Police say a self-checkout
cashier noticed two women
scan and pay for $70 worth of
items Thursday, but the bagged
groceries in their carts ap-
peared worth much more.
When the cashier asked to see-
their receipt, the women took
off.
Among all the merchandise
that hadn't been paid for, store
officials found two packets of
recently developed pictures.
The cashier identified the
women in the photos, and the
name and phone number on
the envelopes turned out to be-
long to one of the women.
Both women face retail theft
charges.
Manager charged
with voyeurism
OCALA-Authorities said a
Marion County motel manager
hid a camera to record at least
one of the guests taking a
shower.
Marion County deputies ar-
rested 49-year-old Barry
Alexander on Thursday. A


Saturday, April 18
9 a.m. to 2 p.m.


Hernando United
Methodist Church
2125 E. Norvell
Bryant Hwy.


For more information call 726-7245


woman staying at the Tall Pines
Motel in Ocklawaha told .
deputies her shower had been
broken for three days and she
had been using the manager's.
She said she found the camera
in the floor vent.
Alexander initially told
deputies he hid the camera to
record drug use but later ac-
knowledged that he put it there
to look at naked people.
Deputies discovered that the
guest's shower had actually
been fixed, meaning she didn't
need to use the manager's.
Alexander was charged with
video voyeurism. He was re-
leased Friday on $5,000 bail.
Vending machine
worker killed
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS - Au-
thorities are investigating the
shooting death of a vending
machine maintainer at North-
west Florida State College.
DeFuniak Springs-Police ...
Capt. Mark Weeks said the-
man was found on campus Fri-
day aftemoon with two gunshot
wounds to the chest.
His identity hasn't been re-
leased.
Police are looking for some-
one named Thomas Ford
McCoy Jr. in connection with
the shooting, but would not
elaborate.
Weeks said the man's
shooter may have been a dis-
gruntled ex-employee of the
same Coca-Cola distributor.


8 a.m. registration
$5 per household
Bring 3 cans of
non-perishable
food for charity.
Awards at 1 p.m.
Best Truck
Beat Tractor
Beat Car
Beat or Show
People's Choice
Blessing of-Vehicle.


Trooper to spend 3
months in-wheelcbhar..
DEBARY- Authorities said a
Florida Highway Patrol trooper
will spend three months in a
wheelchair following an injury
he suffered during an accident
on Interstate 4 near DeBary.
An FHP spokeswoman'said
Trooper Ric gery on his wrist ahd pelvis Fri-
day morning. The trooper was
standing on the shoulder after
pulling over a sport utility vehi-
cle Thursday afternoon driven
by Luz Roman, who called 911
dispatchers for help with a do-
mestic disturbance. Another ve-


1624

100'

* Children
* Cookbo
* Best Se
* Referen
* Faith-B;
* Nature I
* Station
* Photo A
* Frames
* Weddin
* Books f
* African-
* Educati
* Toys an
* Art Proj
* Wall Pla
* Garden
* Baby Ite
* Decorat
* Calcula'
* Spa Pro
Customers not willing


Friday

9:01



CITi



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Oilers
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ased-Books
Books
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albums


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hicle driven by 78-year-old
Donola White lost control and
hit the SUV, causing it to hit the
trooper.
Zigler was taken by helicop-
ter to a Daytona Beach hospital
with a broken pelvis and wrist.
Roman was hospitalized with
minor injuries, and White was in
critical but stable condition.
Babysitter found
sleeping in bathroom
PORT ST. LUCIE -Author-
ities said a Treasure Coast
woman fell asleep in the bath-
room while a toddler she was
supposed to be watching wan-
dered the street.


Port St. Lucie police said
the 2-year-old boy was found
on a canal bank Friday with
two alligators in the water.
When police searched the
babysitter's home, officers
said they found 26-year-old
Brandy Lynn Albright asleep
on the toilet.
Officers also found an Oxy-
codone prescription bottle with
11 pills.
Jail records show that Al-
bright was arrested and
charged with child neglect.
She was later released on
$2,500 bail.

-From staff and wire reports


h April 17, 2009

0am - 5:00pm
U S COUNTY


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ig to .... .... . ... ... ..... .. r


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LOCAL/STATE


A2 S APRIL 12 2009


i










Page A3 - SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009



TATE&


LC LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County
Giacalone memorial
dedication set
A memorial service and
garden dedication for the late
Christina Giacalone will be
held in her memory, 8:30
a.m. Friday at SunTrust Cit-
rus Hills branch, 2525 N. For-
est Ridge Blvd., in Hernando.
The public is welcome to
attend.
Murdered on April 3, 2008,
Giacalone was an extraordi-
nary woman, mother, friend
and co-worker. She was a
member of St. Benedict's
Catholic Church, Crystal
River; the Order of Eastern
Star, Floral City; and a board
member with the American
Cancer Society of Citrus
County. Giacalone was a
business banker for SunTrust
Bank.
Brown-Waite to
attend protest
A group of citizens will
gather from noon to 3 p.m.
Saturday at the Historic
Courthouse
Sfor a "Tea
Party."
The
" gathering is
to protest
S govern-
Sment
Ginny spending
Ginny
:,.. i: and high
Waite taxation.
Con-
gresswoman Ginny Brown-
Waite will attend, as well as
speakers. There will be enter-
tainment.
For more information, call
Edna Mattos at 527-4951.
Help sought for woman
injured in crash
An account at SunTrust
Bank has been set up for
Mary Jefford, a 25-year-old
Citrus Springs woman who
was seriously injured in a
February traffic wreck that
killed three people.
The Mary Jefford Trust Ac-
count will help pay for med-
ical costs.
According to Florida High-
way Patrol, 21-year-old
Zachari Sipes, of Dunnellon,
was driving a four-door Sat-
urn at 8:45 p.m. west on
West Hunterhill Street at an
excessive rate of speed when
he ran the stop sign at Vel-
veteen Point and collided
with Jefford's 1998 Ford two-
door car, which was headed
north on Velveteen toward
North Fernandina Avenue.
The accident occurred two
miles' from her parents'
house.
The community is east of
County Road 495 and south
of Dunklin Avenue, in the Cit-
ronelle area.
Sipes and two passengers
died in the wreck.
Jessica Lunsford's
father has a new child
The father of Jessica
Lunsford, a Florida girl whose
abduction and murder
prompted better tracking of
sex offenders and harsher
punishment for repeat offend-
ers, says he has a new child.
The
Ocala Star-
Banner re-
ported
Saturday
that Mark
Lunsford
revealed in
Mark an inter-
Lunsford view this
week that
his girlfriend gave birth to a
boy on Oct. 6, 2007 - 12
years to the day after Jes-
sica's birth.
Mark Lunsford said he took
the new birth as a sign that
God was giving him a second


chance at being a father. He
tried to keep it a secret to
shield the infant from the
spotlight.
John Evander Couey, a re-
peat sex offender, was con-
victed in Jessica's 2005
murder and sentenced to
death.
-From staff and wire reports


Florida ranks the 37th most obese state in
the nation with 23.6 percent of adults in
Florida considered obese (defined as a BMI of
30 or greater) as of 2007.
Health experts call obesity a national
epidemic. However, there is also a related
epidemic - of people wanting to lose weight.
This is the second of a two-part series on
local people who are "losing to win."




Local man




wins big by




losing a lot


NANCY KENNEDY
nkennedy@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Although Dale Bramall won
$50,000 for losing 104 pounds,
that wasn't the real prize.
For Bramall, a 43-year-old
postal clerk, the real prize is
being fit and healthy and not a
source of embarrassment for
his kids.
Citrus Springs resident Bra-
mall was one of eight finalists in
the Beachbodycom's Million
Dollar Body Game grand prize
giveaway. The cash prizes were
awarded March 14, at Universal
Studios in Hollywood, Calif.
Contestants were judged on
before and after photos plus a
submitted essay detailing their
weight loss story.
"We didn't know who won
what until that night when it
was announced," Bramall said.
"It was between four of us guys,
and they eliminated two, which
left me and the eventual winner
on stage. The guy who won lost


190 pounds."
He said while in Hollywood
he was given the star treatment,
with all expenses paid, a photo
shoot and media interviews.
It's difficult to imagine that
the 185-pounder with six-pack
abs ever had a weight problem,
but Bramall said he carried at
least an extra 100 pounds on his
6-foot, 1-inch frame for more
than 20 years.
He ate to soothe a broken
heart after a traumatic breakup
with his college sweetheart.
"I gained weight to avoid fur-
ther heartbreak," he said. "I
was a yo-yo dieter, but I rarely
stayed at a good weight for more
than weeks at a time."
This time, he said, he's confi-
dent he'll keep the weight off,
mostly because he's motivated.
"I'm doing this for my daugh-
ter, who is 4 years old now," he
said. "Way back when my other
daughter, who's now 18, was
about 8, I went on a field trip
with her and she came up to me
crying. I thought they were teas-
ing her, but they were making


AFTER: Dale Bramall at 185
pounds. Last December he
won $10,000 in the Beach-
body.com's Million Dollar
Body Game monthly weight
loss contest and $50,000 as
runner-up in the grand prize
contest March 14.
Special to the Chronicle
BEFORE: At 278 pounds, Dale Bramall thought he didn't
look too bad. His "moment of truth" came when classmates
of his daughter made fun of him, which made his daughter
cry. He decided to lose weight so his kids wouldn't be
ashamed of him anymore.


fun of me, how fat I was.
"That was 10-years ago, and
that tore me down pretty bad,"
he said. "Now that my little one
is getting older, I don't want her
to go through that kind of shame
and ridicule because of me."
He had seen a commercial on
TV for Beachbody weight loss
products and decided to try
them. He credits his success to
using the exercise videos and
equipment plus the nutritional
supplements. He also changed
his eating habits from high-
calorie, high-fat, high-carbohy-
drates to eating lean meats and
lots of vegetables.
As he began losing weight, he
also began doing triathlons and
other races, including
marathons. Last November he
suffered a setback when he got
hit by a car and broke his foot.
"Instead of giving up at that
point, I decided to eat really
healthy and do what I could (at
the gym)," he said. "I entered
the December (Beachbody) con-
test and actually won that."
He was awarded $10,000 and


CHANGE program to change lives


NANCY KENNEDY
nkennedy@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Wanted: Five people who want to
change their lives.
Must be motivated to relearn years of
bad eating habits, undergo counseling
and engage in hard work and exercise.
Cost: Free.
Benefit: Added years to your life, in-
creased self-esteem - and cash prizes
for the Biggest Winner.
The newly formed CHANGE outreach
program (Citrus Health and Nutritional
Guidance Experience), led by local
health and wellness experts, is planning
its inaugural 12-week weight loss com-
petition.
Those interested need to apply and if
chosen will be assigned a personal
trainer. Participants will also work with
a nutritionist and mental health profes-
sional and be able to work out for free at
Dynabody Fitness Club.
"We're looking for people who have
the best potential to be successful," said
Andrew Moreno, owner of Dynabody
Participants must be at least 18 years
old.
Moreno said often when obese and
morbidly obese people first come into
the gym - if they come in at all - they
have lofty expectations.
"The tendency is to bail out," he said.
"A lot of psychological issues hold
people back, even though they have the
initial drive," said Otto Lecuona Jr, one
of the volunteer CHANGE personal
trainers.


They're intimidated by the equipment
and the other people who use it; plus,
they lack knowledge and a support sys-
tem at home.
"The intimidation factor is huge, and
we want to remove all the barriers to
success," he said.
Participants will work together as a
group and individually with CHANGE
members, including volunteers from Cit-
rus Memorial Health System, Dynabody
Fitness Club, Rutabaga's etc. Natural
Food Market and Genesis Women's Cen-
ter.
The trainers will act as "shadow bud-
dies," calling daily, going out to eat and
grocery shopping with participants.
Local psychologist Andy Nott will pro-
vide stress management and other be-
havioral strategies and coping skills.
Even Joe's Family Restaurant in Inver-
ness is adding diet-friendly items to the
menu.
Applications are being accepted now
through April 30. The 12-week program
begins June 1 and ends Labor Day, Sept
7.
"It's possible for someone to lose 60
pounds by the end of the program,"
Lecuona said.
"We're not looking for those who need
to lose 20 pounds and could if they'd just
stop being lazy," he said. "We're looking
for those who can't lose on their own and
who need help and intervention, who
are able to make the commitment and
who have the time and availability to do
it."
For application information, call 344-
3553 or 341-0712.


became eligible for the final
competition in March.
He said overall, his weight
loss has been a two-year
process of hard work.
"The pantry has been morph-
ing," he said, "from junk food to
dried fruit, nuts and power
bars."
He said he still struggles with
his eating and has times when
he eats poorly, but he knows he
feels better when he's not eat-
ing junk food.
"I believe you need more than
just one motivation," he said.
"Obviously my main motivation
is my daughter - my pride and
joy The contest was a big moti-
vation, too.
"Another motivation for me is
shame," he said. "I don't want to
come in last in a race, and the
other side of shame is pride.
I've won a lot of medals, and I
like that. It's hard to win a 5K at
230 pounds. It's much better at.
185."
For more information, and to
see Dale Bramall's video entry,
go to iww.beachbody.eom. ' "


Foodgained for

community as pounds lost
NANCY KENNEDY
nkennedy@chronicleonline.com
Chron ile

Employees of Walmart Superstore in Inver-
ness are eating less so others can eat more.
Tlu'ough the end of May, in a "biggest loser"
weight-loss competition. 30 Walmart associates
and managers are getting themselves in shape
and benefiting the commuruty For every pound
lost, Walmart is donating a pound of food to be
distributed withui the local area
-"We wanted to do something to get the people
in the store motivated," said Cheryl Boisvert, one
of the organizers ofthe competition. "Everybody
can do their own diet, and even though we're all
on teams, we're doing it together At lunch time.
people are walking together."
One employee. Linda Velez. is not only losing
weight, but giving up smoking as well.
Wamnart is just one of many local workplaces
jumping on the weight loss bandwagon inspired
by the popular TV show,
"The Biggest Loser."
Boisvelt said they .
haven't decided what "
the wiruing team will -
win at the end of the
competition in May .
"The biggest thing is ',
donating food to Citrus '
County," she said, "and
ou1r own personal .
goals The Walmart
(matching) ends then.
but we'll probably
keep going."


Transportation committee volunteers sought


Representatives needed

from county's five districts


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Com-
mission is looking for some
residents who want to play
an integral part in the fu-
ture of transportation in the
county. The board needs
volunteers to serve on the
Citizen's Advisory Commit-
tee for the 2035 Long Range
Transportation Plan.


The board will have a rep-
resentative from each of the
county commissioners' five
districts. The committee is
expected to meet four times
during 2009 at the Lecanto
Government Building.
The county is currently
developing the 2035 plan.
The goal is to establish a 25-
year transportation vision.
The committee will have


a special advisory role to
the board of county commis-
sioners. The board will so-
licit comments from the
committee during the three
phases of the plan develop-
ment: Phase I- Regional Vi-
sioning: Phase II-
Technical, Practical, and
Feasible Corridors; and
Phase III - Implementation
Actions.
The committee may also
provide help to the commis-
sion as it moves toward cre-
ation of a Transportation
(Metropolitan) Planning Or-
ganization.


The county's consultant
has advised that in addition
to representing the five dis-
tricts, committee members
would also represent some
of the following: a trans-
portation disadvantaged in-
dividual or service
provider; the development
community (such as a
builder, developer, or real
estate agent); a representa-
tive of local environmental
concerns; a representative
of the business community,
(chamber officer, for exam-
ple); member of a major
homeowners' association, a


representative of the goods
movement sector; or some-
one from a bicycle and/or
pedestrian advocate group.
Anyone interested should
contact his or her commis-
sioner through the commis-
sion office number,
341-6560. Commission dis-
tricts are: John Thrumston,
District 4, Gary Bartell, Dis-
trict 2; Dennis Damato, Dis-
trict 1; Joe Meek, District 3;
Winn Webb, District 5. For
more information and a dis-
trict map, see the county's
Web site at:
www.citrus.bocc.fl.us.


As











LocAl CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A4 SUNDY, Am'. 12, 2009 B


IRS tax deadline
set Wednesday
Free tax preparation is avail-
able in Citrus County for low-
and middle-income taxpayers.
Working individuals and fami-
lies may also qualify for the
EITC (Earned Income Tax
Credit), a refundable tax credit
as much as $4,800 for some
families.
For information about the
free tax preparation site nearest
you, call 2-1-1 from any phone.
This is an initiative of United
Way of Citrus County, Nature
Coast Volunteer Center, IRS
and Tax-Aide, working together
to help you keep more of your
hard-earned tax refund.

Hazardous waste
drop off April 25
The Citrus County Landfill
will be conducting a drop-off
program for residents for
household hazardous wastes
from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Satur-
day, April 25.
The county has expanded its
free Household Hazardous
Waste drop-off program for res-
idents to coincide with the paint
disposal program days from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Thurs-
days and Fridays.
The April 25 drop-off day is in
addition to that three-day-a-
week schedule to help people
who work during the week to
bring the wastes to the landfill
for proper handling.
Hazardous household waste
includes substances such as
pesticides, herbicides, oil-base
paints and stains, paint re-
mover and paint thinner, sol-
vents and degreasers, stale
gasoline, automobile fluids,
household cleaners and pool
chemicals.
Materials will be accepted
only in original containers, and
up to 60 pounds total per visit


will be accepted per household.
Additional information about
what constitutes hazardous
waste is posted on the county's
web site at: www.bocc.citrus.fl
.us/pubworks/swm.
Residents can also drop off
motor oil and filters, anti-freeze,
batteries, compact and fluores-
cent light bulbs, mercury ther-
mostats and thermometers,
electronics and empty propane
tanks six days a week in Recy-
cle Alley.
For details about what can
be disposed of at the landfill,
call Solid Waste Management
at 527-7670 during office hours.

Senior Companions
seeks volunteers
Senior Companions are in-
come-eligible* individuals age
60 or older who want to help
adults with unmet needs re-
main independent and living in
their own home. Volunteers
must have an insured vehicle
and be available for at least 20
hours of service each week.
Senior Companion volunteers
become part of a team of care-
givers, who strive to decrease
isolation and loneliness.
Senior Companion benefits
include:
* Modest compensation to
help cover the cost of serving
(may achieve $300 or more per
month).
* Pre-service and ongoing
training.
* Supplemental accident
and liability coverage.
* Recognition events.
* The joy of helping others.
* Income eligibility: Single
person - $13,538 per annum,
couple - $18,213 per annum.
For information about the
Senior Companion Program,
contact Sue Carscadden, SCP
assistant, at 527-5959 or e-
mail: ncvc@bocc.citrus.fl.us.


For the RECORD


Citrus County Sheriff's
DUI arrests
* Ruben Valdez, 49, 9161 N. Santos
Drive, Citrus Springs, at 12:22 a.m. Friday
on a charge of driving under the influence.
Bond $500.
* Laura A. Kellogg, 21, 6497 W. Appo-
mattox Lane, Homosassa, at 2:40 a.m. Fri-
day on a charge of driving under the
influence. Bond $500.
Other arrests
* Jason Randall Thompson, 27, 2995
E. Raccoon Court, Inverness, at 9:03 p.m.
Thursday on a charge of aggravated assault
with a deadly weapon without intent to kill
and criminal mischief. Bond $5,500.
* Jerrett Wayne Keller, 18, 2350 N.E.
County Road 337, Bronson, at 3:55 p.m.
Friday on a criminal mischief charge. Bond
$500.
* Mitchell J. Kohler Jr., 21, 6545 E.
Shadow Lane, Inverness, at 8 p.m. Friday
on Citrus County warrant charges of selling
cocaine, possession of cocaine with intent
to sell or deliver and selling marijuana. Bond
$19,000.
* James Nichols Gunn, 45, 10065 N.
Linden Drive, Citrus Springs, at 12:45 a.m.
Saturday on a charge of leaving the scene
of a crash with property damage. Bond
$250.
* William Carl Roddenberry, 42, 9155
N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River, at 11:14 a.m.
Saturday on a charge of driving with a sus-
pended/revoked license (knowingly). Bond
$500.
* Brandy Safawana Smith, 33,9155 N.
Citrus Ave., Crystal River, at 1:16 a.m. Sat-
urday on a charge of possession of drug
paraphernalia. Bond $500.
* Justin Neil Smith, 29, 6520 E. Glen-
coe St., Inverness, at 2:20 a.m. Saturday on
a charge of possession of marijuana. Bond
$500.
* Daniel Lowell Clauson, 63, Inver-
ness, at 8:05 p.m. Thursday on charges of
cruelty to animals and using a firearm under
the influence. Clauson said he had drank six
or seven fuzzy navel drinks when he shot a
dog in a neighbors yard because it was
barking too much. The dog was shot in the
shoulder.
The deputy said Clauson then began to
talk about when he was a sniper in the Ma-
rine Corps and that he would eat dogs when
he was in Vietnam. Clauson said he was not
sorry and did not have remorse for the dog.


ON THE NET

* For more information about ar-
rests made by the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to www.sherif-
fcitrus.org and click on the Pub-
lic Information link, then on
Arrest Reports.
* Watch the "Arrested Develop-
ments" show from the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office at
www.chronicleonline.tv.
* For the Record reports are also
archived online at www.chronicle
online.com.

When Clauson got to the jail, he complained
of chest pains and was taken to a hospital.
He was later released. The dog's status was
unavailable. Bond $750.
Burglaries
SA burglary, reported on March 30, oc-
curred at approximately 5 p.m. Sunday,
March 8, to a conveyance in the 5200 block
of W. Richland Lane, Homosassa.
SA burglary, reported on March 30, oc-
curred at approximately 8 p.m. Sunday,
March 29, to an unoccupied residence in the
6300 block of W. Avocado Street, Crystal
River.
* A burglary, reported on March 30, oc-
curred at approximately 6 p.m. Friday,
March 27, to a conveyance in the 6800
block of E. Red Robin Lane, Invemess.
* A burglary, reported on March 30, oc-
curred at approximately noon on Saturday,
March 14, to an unoccupied residence in the
10800 block of N. Coveview Terrace, Crys-
tal River.
SA burglary, reported on March 31, oc-
curred at approximately 1 p.m. Monday,
March 23, to an unoccupied residence in the
100 block of S. Harrison Street, Beverly
Hills.
* A burglary and petit theft, reported on
April 1, occurred at approximately 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, March 31, on S. Court Avenue at
W. Fishbowl Drive, Homosassa.
Thefts
* A theft of water utilities, reported on
March 30, occurred approximately Jan. 22,
in the 1000 block of N.E. First Street, Crys-
tal River.
* On March 30, at approximately 1:20
p.m., a known adult female was arrested for
retail petit theft in the 400 block of N. Sun-


County BRIEFS


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City H
Daytona Bch. 78
Ft. Lauderdale 84
Fort Myers 88
Gainesville 83
Homestead 86
Jacksonville 76
Key West 84
Lakeland 88
Melbourne 81


81 66 0.00 79 65 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusve aily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 84 Low: 61
SPartly cloudy and nice.

- MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
'- High: 86 Low: 66
Partly cloudy with a 30% chance of a
shower.
r TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 81 Low: 57
Mostly cloudy with a 60% chance of
showers.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10


82/62
91/43
81/58
72
+2

0.00 in.
0.03 in.
3.49 in.
11.86 in.


0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder-
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.05 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 64
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 55%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees were heavy, grasses were
moderate and weeds were
absent.
"*Lght - only extreme allergic will show
symptoms, moderate - most allergic will
experience symptoms, heavy - all allergic will
experience symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollut-
ants mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
4/12 SUNDAY 8:16 2:03 8:41 2:28
4/13 MONDAY 9:12 2:59 9:38 3:25

CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT............................ 7:55 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................7:06 A.M.


MAY


MOONRISE TODAY......................... 11:13 P.M.
MOONSET TODAY ............................8:45 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. A burn ban is in effect.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through O can water
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers


High/Lo
8:30 a/3:5
6:51 a/1:1
4:38 a/10
7:40 a/2:5


"At King's Bay
Sunday
iw High/Low
55 a 7:36 p/3:40 p
17 a 5:57p/1:02p
:50 a 3:44 p/11:40 p
54 a 6:46 p/2:39 p


"*'At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
9:09 a/4:30 a 8:07 p/4:09 p
7:30 a/1:52 a 6:28 p/1:31 p
5:17a/11:19a 4:15 p/-
8:19 a/3:29 a 7:17 p/3:08 p


L F'cast
65 pc
72 ts
67 ts
59 pc
69 ts
61 pc
75 ts
64 pc
69 pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
pc
pc
ts
pc
c
pc
pc
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK
Northeast winds from 5 to 15 Gulf water
knots. Seas 1 to 3 feet. Bay and temperature
inland waters a light chop. Partly
sunny today.- 7 2


Taken at Aripeka

LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.06 28.06 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.33 33.31 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 35.05 35.03 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.31 37.27 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood,
the mean-annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in
any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District
and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey
be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you
should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


S
City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


52 37
59 41
55 48
60 48
50 48
63 58
56 48
67 37
58 52
59 43
46 37
45 32
46 30
76 63
59 45
70 54
46 34
58 40
46 36
73 55
54 36
48 37
70 46
58 34
61 31
52 31
68 57
60 40
58 44
48 43
72 59
54 37
69 44
65 50
67 42
63 48
59 44
68 46
44 34
56 34
79 59
72 50
63 47


pc
.08 pc
s
pc
.80 s
ts
.87 s
pc
sh
pc
.49 pc
s
pc
.03 s
.26 s
s
s
s
s
s
.09 pc
ts
.03 sh
pc
s
.01 pc
pc
.30 s
.28 s
ts
s
ts
.02 s
r
s
s
s

sh
pc


46 23
63 41
66 41
69 55
52 37
78 48
55 31
62 37
73 60
65 40
47 32
42 25
39 23
68 53
62 35
67 43
55 38
59 40
47 31
71 49
57 34
46 19
71 51
50 34
56 37
48 29
72 47
62 48
51 28
49 26
78 61
57 43
73 58
77 58
63 52
67 55
65 45
70 57
45 32
57 39
72 64
77 59
68 53


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
affair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=raln/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn.snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02009 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 73 61 ts 77 68
New York City 50 43 .56 s 52 30
Norfolk 67 52 .26 s 54 39
Oklahoma City 70 37 sh 54 42
Omaha 62 25 sh 55 38
Palm Springs 74 52 s 81 56
Philadelphia 52 48 .44 s 54 31
Phoenix 64 50 .18 s 79 59
Pittsburgh 54 41 s 52 27
Portland, ME 45 36 .02 c 46 28
Portland, Ore 57 47 r 58 41
Providence, R.I. 47 37 .37 pc 49 28
Raleigh 72 57 s 64 39
Rapid City 53 29 sh 50 32
Reno 60 32 pc 69 40
Rochester, NY 44 33 s 41 22
Sacramento 66 41 pc 74 50
St. Louis 58 34 sh 60 43
St. Ste. Marie 42 29 s 48 22
Salt Lake City 54 42 pc 60 45
San Antonio 65 61 ts 83 52
San Diego 61 57 s 67 55
San Francisco 59 47 pc 62 49
Savannah 78 63 pc 72 56
Seattle 50 44 .06 r 53 42
Spokane 51 39 .07 sh 53 35
Syracuse 48 32 s 42 23
Topeka 63 32 r 52 38
Washington 60 48 .40 s 58 34
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 91 Stuart, Fla. LOW 9 Grand Marais,
Minn.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 88/73/pc
Amsterdam 65/44/sh


Athens
Beijing
Berlin
Bermuda
Cairo
Calgary
Havana
Hong Kong
Jerusalem


68/49/pc
83/65/pc
69/48/s
74/63/ts
88/65/pc
57/39/s
86/71/pc
83/72/ts
84/59/pc


Lisbon 62/45/pc
London 54/40/pc
Madrid 63/43/pc
Mexico City 83/54/pc
Montreal 39/28/sf
Moscow 38/27/pc
Paris 57/41/c
Rio 81/68/pc
Rome 65/44/pc
Sydney 77/56/sh
Tokyo 65/49/pc
Toronto 43/28/pc
Warsaw 56/39/pc


Sau T R S


C O U N T Y


coast Boulevard, Crystal River.
SA grand theft of a laptop computer, re-
ported on March 30, occurred at approxi-
mately 1 a.m. Sunday, March 29, in the 700
block of Shelly Terrace, Inverness.
SA petit theft, reported on March 31, oc-
curred at approximately 11:30 a.m. March
31, on Middle School Drive, Invemess.
* On March 31, a report was taken for a
stolen tag in the 8500 block of W. Mayo
Drive, Crystal River.
* On March 31, a report of a stolen tag
was taken in the 3200 block of S. Florida Av-
enue, Invemess.
S A grand theft occurred at approximately
6:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 31, in the 6900
block of W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River.
* A petit theft, reported on April 1, oc-
curred at approximately 10:28 a.m. Satur-
day, March 14, in the 2900 block of E.
Raccoon Court, Inverness.
* A grand theft, reported on April 1, oc-
curred at approximately midnight on Sun-
day, March 15, in the 9000 block of E. Point
O' Woods, Invemess.
* On April 1, at approximately 6:40 p.m.,
a known juvenile was arrested for retail petit
theft in the 2800 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
Vandalisms
A vandalism, reported on March 27, oc-
curred at approximately 1:30 a.m. March 27,
in the 2000 block of W. Astor Place, Citrus
Springs.
* Preliminary investigation on March 27
revealed an act of criminal mischief oc-
curred at approximately midnight on
Wednesday, Dec. 31, 2008, in the 1800
block of N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River.
A criminal mischief, reported on March
27, occurred at approximately 11:30 a.m. on
March 27, in the 200 block of E. Dampier
Street, Inverness.
IAvandalism, reported on March 29, oc-
curred at approximately 9:48 p.m. March 29,
in the 3800 block of N. Sagamon Point,
Crystal River.
IAvandalism, reported on March 30, oc-
curred at approximately 5 p.m. Sunday,
March 29, on Oak Village Boulevard, Ho-
mosassa.
* An act of criminal mischief occurred at
approximately 4 p.m. Tuesday, March 31, in
the 900 block of W. Roosevelt Boulevard,
Beverly Hills.


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AP1RL17 APRIL24 MAY1


city
Chassahowitzka'
Crystal River"
Withlacoochee'
Homosassa-"


_ _I_ I _I_ ~1_1_
~~ ___~____I~


I-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LOCAL














No strength in numbers for uninsured


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - If the
uninsured were a political
lobbying group, they'd have
more members than AARP
The National Mall couldn't
hold them if they decided to
march on Washington.
But going without health
insurance is still seen as a
personal issue, a misfortune
for many and a choice for
some. People who lose cover-
age often struggle alone in-
stead of turning their
frustration into political ac-
tion.
Illegal immigrants rallied
in Washington during past
immigration debates, but the
uninsured linger in the back-
ground as Congress struggles
with a health care overhaul
that seems to have the best
odds in years of passing.
That isolation could have
profound repercussions.
Lawmakers already face
tough choices to come up
with the hundreds of billions
it would cost to guarantee
coverage for all. The lack of a
vocal constituency won't
help. Congress might decide
to cover the uninsured slowly,
in stages.
The uninsured "do not pro-
vide political benefit for the
aid you give them," said
Robert Blendon, a professor
of health policy and political
analysis at the Harvard
School of Public Health.
"That's one of the dilemmas
in getting all this money. If
I'm in Congress, and I help
out farmers, they'll help me
out politically But if I help
out the uninsured, they are
not likely to help members of
Congress get re-elected."
The number of uninsured
has grown to an estimated 50
million people because of the
recession. Even so, advocates
in the halls of Congress are


Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers * Floors * Lanais
Cleaning Sealing
Residential & Commercial
586-1816 746-9868


Living without health coverage
There are some estimates that nearly 52 million will be without
medical coverage if the unemployment rate reaches 10 percent.


Number of uninsured
50 million

45
40 - 31 million
40

35

30
1987 90
*Estimates, no data for 2008


At 10% unemployment, 51.5
9%, 50.5
8%
49.4
2007, 45.7


-8 mos
95 0
95 00


16 mos-
05 09*


SOURCES: Census Bureau, Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage A
in the United States: 2007; Urban Institute


We didn't think we would have a
heart attack and it would change
our life forever.

wife of Lyle White, who had to retire early after a heart attack.


rarely the uninsured them-
selves. The most visible are
groups that represent people
who have insurance, usually
union members and older
people. In the last election,
only 10 percent of registered
voters said they were unin-
sured.
The grass-roots group
Health Care for America
Now plans to bring as many
as 15,000 people to Washing-
ton this year to lobby Con-
gress for guaranteed
coverage. Campaign director
Richard Kirsch expects most
to have health insurance.
"We would never want to
organize the uninsured by
themlsel es because .-tlelrl-
ianls see the problem as ai-
tilrdabilit. and that is the ke.
tlhing." lie said.
Besides, added Nrsch, tlhe
un insurled are too bus.
scrambling to make ends
meet. Mi.any Iare self-em-


played; others are holdir
two or three part-time job
"They may not have a lot
time to be activists," he saic
Vicki and Lyle White (
Summerfield, Fla., kno'
about such predicament
They lost their health insure
ance because Lyle had to r
tire early after a heart attack
left him unable to do his jo
as a custodian at Disne
World. Vicki, 60, sells real e;
tate. Her income has plunge
due to the housing collapse.
"We didn't realize that after
he had the heart attack n
one would want to insur
him," said Vicki. The on
bright spot is that Lyle, 6
has qualified tor lMedicar
disability benefits and e'
pects to be getting his card i
July
But fbr no\\. the WiVhte
hate to pa. out iot' poIket tfb
L, le's vist-s to the cardiol:
gist ancd Ills medications. Ti


bills came to about $5,000 last
year. That put a strain on
their limited budget because
they are still making pay-
ments on their house and car
"I never thought when we
got to this age that we would
be in such a mess," said Vicki,
who has been married to Lyle
for 43 years. "We didn't think
we would have a heart attack
and it would change our life
forever."
While her own health is
"pretty good," Vicki said she
suffers chronic sinus infec-
tions and hasn't had a
Checkup since 2007. "I have
just learned to live with it,"
she said.
The Whites' example
shows how the lack of guar-
anteed health care access un-
dermines middle-class
families and puts them at
risk, but that many of the
uninsured eventually do find
coverage. Lyle White has
qualified for Medicare, even
tg if the couple must still find a
s. plan for Vicki.
of Research shows that
i. nearly half of those who lose
of coverage find other health in-
w surance in four months or
s. less. That may be another
r- reason the uninsured have
e- not organized an advocacy
ck group. At least until this re-
ib cession, many have been able
ey to fix the situation them-
s- selves.
ed "The uninsured are a mov-


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* White House: www.whitehouse.gov/agenda/
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* Health Care for America Now: www.healthcarefor
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* Commonwealth Fund: www.commonwealthfund.org/
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age are only temporary, they
can be dangerous. "When-
ever you are uninsured, you
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"People don't plan very well
when they are going to get
sick or injured."
Indeed, the Institute of
Medicine, which provides
scientific advice to the gov-
ernment, has found that a
lack of health insurance in-
creases the chances of bad


outcomes for people with a
range of common ailments,
from diabetes and high blood
pressure to cancer and
stroke. Uninsured patients
don't get needed follow-up
care, skip taking prescription
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ing help when they develop
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Such evidence strengthens
the case for getting every-
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Schoen said. But she ac-
knowledges the politics may
get tough. "It certainly has
been a concern out of our
history that unorganized
voices aren't heard," she
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SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009 A5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NATION


I


!,








CITrus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE,


AG suNDAYAPlut 12 20 9


Obituaries


Homer
Brown, 87
Major (Retired) Homer A
Brown, who loved his coun-
try and served it well for
twenty-two years in the
Medical Corp of the United
States Army, died Friday,
April 3, 2009. He served in
France during WWII and in
the Korean Conflict. He was
a good soldier. Major Brown
was the Medical Advisor for
the National Guard for the
State of Georgia and taught
Disaster Preparedness. He
was born in Haines City,
Florida on November 30,
1921, and returned to Polk
County to live, after his re-
tirement from the Army He
then became the Purchas-
ing Agent for Winter Haven
Hospital, where he served
for twelve years.
Major Brown was pre-
ceded in death by his wife,
Lillian "Sammy" Brown in
2007. He is survived by his
daughter Sandy (Lane) Cobb
of Inverness, two grandchil-
dren: Chelle Selph and Greg
(Stephanie) Cobb; two great-
grandchildren: Austin and
Madison.
Graveside memorial serv-
ices for both Major and Mrs.
Brown will be conducted on
Friday, April 24,2009, at 2:30
pm from the Florida Na-
tional Cemetery in Bush-
nell. On Saturday, April
25th, an additional Memo-
rial Service for Mr. Brown
will be held at the Lake
Hamilton Presbyterian
Church at 2:00 pm. In lieu of
flowers, please consider a
donation in his memory, to
his church: Lake Hamilton
Presbyterian, PO. Box 116,
Lake Hamilton, FL 33851.
God Bless America.
Arrangements under the di-
rection of the Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home With Crema-
tory.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.





Robert
Casey, 76
SUGARMILL
WOODS
Robert Emmett Casey, 76,
of Sugarmill Woods, Ho-
mosassa, Fl, died Wed. April
8, 2009, at Crystal River
Health and Rehab Center in
Crystal River Born Nov. 4th,
1932, in Rochester, NY, and
moved to Sugarmill Woods
14 years ago from Pittsford,
NY.
Mr. Casey retired as Vice
President of Commercial
Lending for the Marine Mid-
land Bank of Rochester. He
was a Marine Corps Vet-
eran, member of St Bene-
dict Catholic Church,
Knights of Columbus, Sug-
armill Woods Country Club
and Southern Woods Golf
Club.
Survived by his wife of 52
years, Patricia A. (Alward)
Casey of Sugarmill Woods; 3
sons, Thomas (Linda) Casey
of Jasper, GA, John (Laura)
Casey of Rochester, NY, and
David (Christine) Casey of
Cleveland, OH; daughter,
Carolyn (Peter) Charleton of
Rochester, NY; brother,
William Casey of Bogart,
GA; 2 sisters, Eleanor
Chilbert and Kathleen Vesty
both ofSarasota, FL; grand-
children, R. J. Casey, Nolan
Casey, Palmer Casey, Jack-
son Casey, Daniel Charleton
and Mary Grace Charleton.
Funeral Mass will be held
11:00 A.M., Tuesday, April
14, 2009, at St. Benedict
Catholic Church, with Fr.
James Hoge Celebrant. Bur-
ial with Military Honors will
follow at Florida National
Cemetery. Friends will be
received from 4:00 P M until
7:00 P M, Monday at Wilder
Funeral Home, Homosassa
Springs. In lieu of flowers,
family requests Mass Cards
or donations to Hospice of
('iln.s County.


Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. corn.
782075

BROWN
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY
49 5,11" 1 -, (;5')W rllt to hik Hl ,
Sm i, I(, "lo id a 3 ',t1 4 5

(352)
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Richard 1. Brown
, 4l ;II, ",., , I


Kenneth
Haling Sr., 78
LECANTO
Kenneth Gordon Haling
Sr. age 78 of Lecanto, FL
died on Thursday April 09,
2009, at the Hospice House
of Citrus County. Born Au-
gust 07, 1930, in Arbor Vitae,
WI, to Frank and Grace Hal-
ing. He came to this area 22
years ago from Milwaukee,
WI where he retired from
Jaeger Baking Co. as a route
salesman with 20+ years of
service. He was a U.S. Army
Veteran of the Korean Con-
flict and a member of the
American Legion Post 155 of
Crystal River, FL, he en-
joyed Golfing, Fishing and
woodworking. He was a
Lutheran and a member of
the St. Timothy's Lutheran
Church of Crystal River, FL.
His wife Jean Haling pre-
ceded him in death in Janu-
ary of 2003, and 6 brothers
John, Frank, Gerald, Walter,
Clifford and Thomas Haling
and one Granddaughter
Sarah Glidewell. He is sur-
vived by a son Kenneth
(Brenda) Haling Jr. of
Elkhorn, WI. 2 daughters
Deborah Gatzke of Lecanto,
FL and Janice Glidewell of
Albany, NY 3 Brothers
Harold, Ronald and William
Haling and 3 sisters
Kathryn Kanios, Ellen
Wiesendanger and Eliza-
beth Thom and five Grand-
children Mark and Matthew
Gatzke, Angela (Glidewell)
Melton, David and Dylan
Haling. Five Great-Grand-
children.
A Memorial Service will
be held on Friday April 24,
2009, at 11:30 AM from the
St. Timothy's Lutheran
Church in Crystal River
with David Bradford offici-
ating. The family suggests
that those who wish in lieu
of flowers may make memo-
rial contributions to Hos-
pice of Citrus County @ PO.
Box 641270 Beverly Hills,
FL 34464. In Private Crema-
tion arrangements under
the care of Strickland Fu-
neral Home Crystal River,
FL.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.





Agostino 'Gus'
LoPorto, 89
CITRUS SPRINGS
Agostino "Gus" LoPorto,
89, of Citrus Springs, FL, en-
tered heaven on April 9,
2009, at Citrus Memorial
hospital in Inverness. Gus
was born August 12, 1919, in
New York City, New York
He was a loving husband
for more than 62 years to
Dolores T. LoPorto; and the
proud father of Lt. Col. Ron
LoPorto and his wife Cyn-
thia, Dolores Lasorsa and
her husband Francis "Sam,"
and son James LoPorto; and
grandfather to Joseph and
his wife Laura and Michael
Lasorsa. He was prede-
ceased by his grandson
Nicholas LoPorto. His sur-
viving siblings are his sis-
ters Marie and Betty and
brother Alia.
Gus served with distinc-
tion as a Technical Corpo-
ral, in the U.S. Army during
World War II where he was
wounded in combat and re-
ceived the Purple Heart in
addition to numerous
awards and decorations. e
was a proud member of
D.A.V, VFW, moose, and
the Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 of the military Order
of the Purple Heart.
Gus was a member of the
General Building Laborer's
Local Union No. 66, in
Melville, NY; the North
Babylon, NY, Fire Depart-
ment; and the past presi-

CIau . , atTiL
Funeral Home
With Crematory

* Burial * Shipping


OBITUARIES
* The Citrus County Chronicle's policy permits both free
and paid obituaries.
* Obituaries must be submitted by the funeral home or
society in charge of arrangements.
* Free obituaries can include: Full name of deceased;
age; hometown/state; date of death; place of death;
date, time and place of visitation and funeral services.
* A flag will be included for free for those who served in
the U.S. military. (Please note this service when sub-
mitting a free obituary.) Additionally, all obituaries will
be posted online at www.chronicleonline.com.
* Paid obituaries may include the information permitted
in the free obituaries, as well as date of birth; parents'
names; pre-deceased and surviving family members;
year married and spouse's name (date of death, if
pre-deceased by spouse); religious affiliation; biogra-
phical information, including education, employment,
military service, organizations and hobbies; officiating
clergy; interment/ nurnment; and memorial contribu-
tions.
* Area funeral homes with established accounts with the
Chronicle are charged $8.75 per column inch. Non-
local funeral homes and those without accounts are
required to pay in advance by credit card, and the cost
is $10 per column inch. Small photos of the de-
ceased's face can be included for an additional
charge.
* Additional days of publication or reprints due to er-
rors in submitted material are charged at the same
rates.
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next
* day's edition.
* E-mail obits@chronicleonline.com or fax to 563-
3280.
* Phone 563-5660 for details.


dent of the Riverhead, NY,
Exempt Fire Department.
He was a volunteer in the
Head Start Program and do-
nated his time to various
community programs. He
was a faithful member of the
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Church.
Gus, also known as "Aug-
gie," was an avid debater
and always had an opinion
to share and usually de-
bated until he had the final
word. His heart was bigger
than his ego and he gave
more than he received. His
friendships lasted a life-
time and his tales of memo-
ries spanned eight decades.
Visitation will be held
from 6:00 to 8:00 PM on
Tuesday, April 14, at Roberts
Funeral Home in Dunnel-
lon. A Funeral Mass of
Christian Burial with mili-
tary honors will be held at
the Florida National Ceme-
tery, Bushnell. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be
sent to the Aaron A Weaver
Chapter 776 in-Inverness,
FL.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

Naomi
Moran, 85
INVERNESS
Inverness, Fl. - Naomi
Moran passed away Thurs-
day, April 9, in her home, of
congestive heart failure.
She was at-
tended by I
daughter-in-
law Janice,
Irma Neu-
veu, Citrus . .
County Hos-
pice, and
Donna
Haslett Naomi
from Com- iviorr i
fort Keep-
ers of Inverness.
Born November 11, 1923,
in Houston, TX, she grew up
in Houston, and in 1943
married Army Air Corps
Lieutenant Charles K.
Moran of Salado, Texas.
This started a thirty-year
hitch as an Air Force wife
and mom which included
stops in Texas, Colorado,
Utah, Florida, Bermuda,
Maine, Massachusetts, and
Germany. After retirement
in 1972 and a two-year stay
in the ancestral hometown
of Salado, Texas, they built
their retirement home in In-
verness, Fl. Active in the
local art league Naomi de-
veloped a core group of
close friends which re-
mained with her for life.
Naomi was preceded in
death by son Timmy, daugh-
ter Penny, and husband
Charles K Moran. Surviving




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are her son Michael and
wife Janice, son Denny and
wife Natasha, son-in-law
Ted Sweeney Sr., grandsons
Ted Sweeney and wife
Cheryl, Matt Sweeney and
wife Diane, Jeremy Moran
and wife Lexie, Jacob
Moran and wife Jackie,
Chris Moran and wife
Gizelle, and granddaughters
Marcia Campbell, Laura
Campbell and husband
Bruce, Jamie Moran, and
Julie Moran, and eleven
great-grandchildren.
A memorial service will
be held at the Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home With Crema-
tory Wednesday, April 15, at
3:00pm with Hospice Chap-
lain L. B. Thomason offici-
ating. There are no calling
hours at the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers, memori-
als requested to Hospice of
Citrus Co., PO Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.cbin. o
Marjorie
Stohler, 87
DUNNELLON
N. Marjorie Stohler, 87, of
Dunnellon, Florida, died
Friday, April 11, 2009.
Visitation from 6 to 7:30
p.m. Monday, April 13, 2009.
Funeral service at 7 p.m.
Tuesday, April 14. Roberts
Funeral Home of Dunnellon
in charge of arrangements.
Death


Dwight Crandell
VULCANOLOGIST
SEATTLE - Dwight R.
"Rocky" Crandell, whose
persistent tracking of deep
layers of mud led to a pio-
neering reassessment of vol-
cano hazards in the Pacific
Northwest, died Monday. He
was 86.
Crandell, a U.S. Geologi-
cal Survey vulcanologist and
author of numerous books
and research papers, died at
a hospice in Wheat Ridge,
Colo. from a heart attack
While assigned to map the
Puget Sound lowlands south-
east of Seattle in the early
1950s, Crandell and his long-
time scientific partner Donal
R. Mullineaux, overturned
what was then the conven-
tional wisdom that the area's
landscape had been shaped
mainly by glaciers.
-From wire reports





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Dungeons & Dragons

co-creator dies at 61


!


Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS - Dave
Arneson, one of the co-cre-
ators of the Dungeons &
Dragons fantasy game and a
pioneer of role-playing en-
tertainment, died after a
two-year battle with cancer,
his family said Thursday.
He was 61.
Arneson's daughter,
Malia Weinhagen of Maple-
wood, said her father died
peacefully Tuesday in hos-
pice care in St Paul.
Arneson and Gary Gygax
developed Dungeons &
Dragons in 1974 using me-
dieval characters and myth-
ical creatures. The game
known for its oddly shaped
dice became a hit, particu-
larly among teenage boys. It
eventually was turned into
video games, books and
movies. Gygax died in
March 2008.
"The biggest thing about
my dad's world is he
wanted people to have fun
in life," Weinhagen said. "I
think we get distracted by
the everyday things you
have to do in life and we
forget to enjoy life and have
fun.
"But my dad never did,"
she said. "He just wanted
people to have fun."
Dungeons & Dragons
players create fictional
characters and carry out
their adventures with the
help of complicated rules.
The quintessential geek
pastime, it spawned copy-
cat games and later in-
spired a whole genre of
computer games that's still
growing in popularity.
Blackmoor, a game Arne-
son was developing before
D&D, was the "first-ever
role-playing campaign and


Associated Press
World War II veteran Russell Dunham, of Godfrey, Ill.,
poses for a portrait in this photo taken Oct. 23, 2007. Dun-
ham, a recipient of the Medal of Honor after killing nine
German soldiers and taking two others captive while
wounded during a World War II battle, died Monday of
heart failure at his home. He was 89.

Medal of Honor winner dies


Associated Press

ST. LOUIS - Russell
Dunham, an Illinois man
who was awarded the Medal
of Honor after killing nine
German soldiers and taking
two others captive while
wounded during World War
II, has died. He was 89.
Dunham died Monday of
heart failure at his home in
the southwestern Illinois
community of Godfrey, said
his stepdaughter, Annette
Wilson. He had moved there
just weeks ago from nearby
Jerseyville.
Dunham never consid-
ered himself a hero on Jan.
8, 1945, when he charged a
hill near Kayserberg,
France, despite being
wounded in the back, Wil-
son said Thursday.
'"You either fight your
way out or lose,'" Dunham


INVERNESS
COURTHOUSE


APRIL 18
6pm-lopm


would say after becoming
one of more than 3,400
Medal of Honor recipients,
Wilson said, adding that he
was extremely proud of the
honor.
Dunham was a technical
sergeant in the Army when
he "single-handedly as-
saulted three enemy ma-
chine guns," according to
the Medal of Honor's official
Web site.
By the end of the attack,
Dunham had fired about 175
rounds of ammunition and
used 11 grenades.
After the war, Dunham
spent more than three-
decades working for the
then-Veterans Administra-
tion before retiring in 1975.
He is survived by Wilson;
a daughter; a stepson; three
brothers; three sisters; three
grandchildren and nine
great-grandchildren.


evening of '







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PIIPYI__~~_^_____I~_______^~^~-�----~


Associated Press
This undated photo pro-'
vided by Malia Weinhagen"
shows Dave Arneson. Ame-
son, a co-creator of Dun-'
geons & Dragons, died
Tuesday in St. Paul, Minn.
the prototype for all (role-
playing game) campaigns
since," the company said.
Arneson and Gygax were
dedicated tabletop war-
gamers who recreated his-
torical battles with painted
miniature armies and
fleets. They met in 1969 at a
convention, and their first
collaboration, along with
Mike Carr, was a set of rules
for sailing-ship battles
called "Don't Give Up the
Ship!"
Weinhagen said her fa-
ther enjoyed teaching game
design at Full Sail Univer-
sity in Winter Park, Fla., in
recent years, where he
taught students to make a
solid set of rules for their
games.
"He said if you have a
good foundation and a good '
set of rules, people would,,
play the game again," Wein-;
hagen said.
Arneson is survived byp
Weinhagen and two grand-'
children. A public memo-
rial service was planned
from 4 to 8 p.m. Monday, i
April 20, at Bradshaw Fu-
neral Home in St Paul.












Ci rRLIS Couxiy (FL) C;rnoNIcu~ EASTER SUNDA~ APRIL 12, 2009 A7


Easter elsewhere


Associated Press
Christian Orthodox nuns walk in the Palm procession Saturday, on the eve of Palm Sunday,
on the Mount of Olives above Jerusalem's Old City. Christians around the world are mark-
ing the solemn period of Easter and the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.


People
stand in
front of
an Easter
bonfire
Saturday,
an old
German
ethnic
custom,
in El-
binge-
rode,
Germany.
Associated
Press


Associated Press
Sara Weaver, 2, of Chagrin Falls, tosses a plastic egg in her basket Saturday during the an-
nual Easter egg hunt in Riverside Park in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.


on(


SuDAt, APRIL 12, 2009 A7


EASTER


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










N Page A8 - sUNY', APRIL 12,2009



NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BREFS

Man jailed for
child-support debt
FLINT, Mich. -Authorities
in Michigan say a man fa-
thered 14 children with 13 dif-
ferent women and owes
more than $530,000 in un-
paid child support.
The Flint Joumal reported
42-year-old
Thomas
Frazier was
jailed
Thursday.
Court
records say
he hasn't
made a
Thomas
Frazier support
oiwes more payment in
owes more
than $530,000. six years.
The
newspaper says the unem-
ployed man could be held for
90 days if he doesn't pay
$27,900.
Frazier said he thinks he
fathered only three of the
children and that it's unrealis-
tic for authorities to expect
him to pay child support that
was $3,000 a month at one
point.
Frazier remains held at the
Genesee County Jail. It was-
n't immediately clear if he
had a lawyer who could
speak for him.
FAA: 2 killed in
plane crash
SANDWICH, Ill. - The
Federal Aviation Administra-
tion said two people flying in
a 1946-era airplane have
died in a crash in north cen-
tral Illinois.
FAA spokeswoman Eliza-
beth Isham Cory said the sin-
gle-engine aircraft went down
in a com field near the city of
Sandwich on Saturday after-
noon. She said both people
aboard were killed.
SThe DeKalb County coro-
ner's office identified the
dead as 53-year-old Randall
Hougham, who was flying the
plane, and 22-year-old pas-
senger Lauren Hamilton,
both of Sandwich.
They were pronounced
dead at the scene. The coro-
ner's office says the crash
happened just north of the
Sandwich Airport.


WorldBREFS

Pope


Associated Press
Pope Benedict XVI holds
up a gospel Saturday dur-
ing the Easter vigil mass in
St. Peter's Basilica, at the
Vatican.


Galapagos
volcano erupts
QUITO, Ecuador -
Ecuador officials say a vol-
cano is erupting in the Gala-
pagos Islands and could
harm unique wildlife.
The Galapagos National
Park says La Cumbre vol-
cano began spewing lava,
gas and smoke on uninhab-
ited Femandina Island on
Saturday after four years of
inactivity.
The park says in a state-
ment the eruption is not a
threat to people living on
nearby Isabela Island.
But it says lava flowing to
the sea will likely affect ma-
rine and terrestrial iguanas,
wolves and other fauna.
The Galapagos are home
to unique animal and plant
species that became the
basis for Charles Darwin's
theory of evolution.
Scientists say Fernandina
is the island with the most
volcanic activity in the archi-
pelago. La Cumbre last
erupted in May 2005.
-From wire reports


U.S. ship reaches Kenya


Captain still a hostage

Associated Press

MOMBASA, Kenya - Nineteen Ameri-
can sailors reached safe harbor on Satur-
day days after escaping a pirate hijacking
off the Horn of Africa, exhilarated by free-
dom but mourning the absence of the cap-
tain they hailed for sacrificing his freedom
to save them. �
With a throng of reporters shouting ques-
tions from shore, the crew of the Maersk Al-
abama described an ordeal that began with
Somali pirates hauling themselves onto the
deck from a small boat bobbing on the sur-
face of the Indian Ocean far below.
"They came from the stern of the ship
and came on with hooks and ropes and
were firing in the air when they got on
board," said ATM Reza, a father of one from
Hartford, Connecticut, who said he was the
first to see the pirates board Wednesday.
As the pirates shot in the air, Capt.
Richard Phillips, 53, of Underhill, Vt., told
his crew to lock themselves in a cabin and
surrendered himself to safeguard his men,
crew members said. Phillips was still held


Associated Press
Crew members of the ship Maersk Alabama
- from left: ATM Reza, and Ken Quinn, and
a man only identified as Andrew, and uniden-
tified man - aboard Maersk Alabama as
they talk to the media Saturday after dock-
ing at port in Mombasa, Kenya.
hostage in an enclosed lifeboat Saturday by
four pirates being closely watched by U.S.
warships in an increasingly tense standoff.
"He saved our lives!" second mate Ken
Quinn, of Bradenton, Florida, declared
from the ship as it docked in the resort and
port city of Mombasa. "He's a hero."
Reza said that he had led one of the pi-
rates to the engine room, where he stabbed
him in the hand with an ice pick and tied
him up. Other sailors corroborated that
story.


Container ship , YEME .
reaches port b
The Maersk Alabama, carrying M'L*-- " :'
SOMALIA
emergency food relief from Evl E'
Djibouti reached its intended I ETHIOPIA
destination, Mombasa, Kenya,
Crew members had retaken .. A , ..
the ship from pirates, but the * cauon
captain is still being held in the/ o .
ships lifeboat at the location of okcg-adisnu, 0"
the hijacking. Three U.S. '
warships are now on the scene KENA .'
and negotiating for the release
of the Alabama s captain. Oe " M
Maerskl Albama basa


Type:
Capacity: 1,
Crew:


Container ship
100 containers
20


Width:
Displacement:
Speed:


82 ft.
17,000 tons
18 knots


---- Length: 509 ft. 0


SOURCES: ESRI; Maersk Line; GlobalSecurity.org


Survivor: 'Sounded like 7 freight trains'


Associated Press

MURFREESBORO.
Tenn. - The worst sound
Eric F'unkhouser said he
has ever heard was a 10-
second "voom" followed
by a man's screams
A tornado hit
Funkhouser's home in
Murfreesboro, about 30
miles southeast of
Nashv\lle, on Friday, part
of severe storms that
spawned tornadoes
across the Southeast
blamed for three deaths
and dozens of injuries.
"It sounded like seven
freight trains and 22 vac-
uum cleaners all going at
the same time,"
Funkhouser said Satur-
day as he returned to
what is left of his home
and neighborhood.
Funkhouser ran out-
side and found his neigh-
borJohn Bryant laying in
Funkhouser's front yard.
covered with blood and
scream ing.
"He kept saying that his
wife and baby were out
there with himi and he
had to find them,"
Funkhouser said.
Twenty minutes later,
Funkhouser and other
survivors found Bryant's
wife, Kori, dead in the
gravel driveway under
debris and 9-week-old
Olivia Bryant was found
dead buckled into her car
seat, beneath carpet and
a tree.
Family friend Laura
Lawrence said Bryant, a
self-employed construc-
tion worker, had just got-
ten home on his lunch
break
He, his wife and daugh-
ter were seeking shelter


Associated Press
Damaged homes Saturday show the path a tornado took the day after a storm hit Murfreesboro, Tenn. Storms
that spawned tornadoes Friday across the Southeast have been blamed for three deaths and dozens of injuries.


when the tornado rolled
through.
National Weather Serv-
ice officials say a prelimi-
nary report shows the
EF3 tornado tore a 15-
mile path through the
university town of about
100,000 with winds as
high as 165 mph.
Deputy City Manager
Rob Lyons said 42 homes
were destroyed, 140 were
damaged and 71 were af-
fected but habitable.
Several thousand cus-


tomers were still without
power Saturday.
More than 40 people
were injured. Seven peo-
ple were in critical condi-
tion Saturday afternoon,
said Rutherford County
Emergency Medical Serv-
ices director Randy
White.
Reports of destruction
were widespread across
the region Friday, with
funnel clouds spotted in
Kentucky and Alabama
and devastating winds,


huge hail and heavy rain
reported in several states.
In South Carolina, a
driver trying to avoid
storm debris in the east-
ern part of the state was
killed Friday, state Emer-
gency Management Divi-
sion spokesman Derrec
Becker said.
On Thursday night, a
black funnel cloud pack-
ing winds of at least 136
mph descended on the
western Arkansas hamlet
of Mena, killing at least


three, injuring 30 and de-
stroying or damaging 600
homes.
There, emergency offi-
cials are trying to collect
ice chests and tarps to
prepare for another
round of storms projected
to hit the area Sunday.
Crews have already
used 1,000 tarps to cover
damaged roofs, and work-
ers are struggling to keep
perishables refrigerated
because power is still out
in Mena.


Chinese drywall poses many potential risks


Associated Press
PARKLAND, Fla. - At the height of the U.S.
housing boom, when building materials were in
short supply, American construction companies
used millions of pounds of Chinese-made drywall
because it was abundant and cheap.
Now that decision is haunting hundreds of
homeowners and apartment dwellers who are
concerned that the wallboard gives off fumes that
can corrode copper pipes, blacken jewelry and
silverware, and possibly sicken people.
Shipping records reviewed by The Associated
Press indicate that imports of potentially tainted
Chinese building materials exceeded 500 million
pounds during a four-year period of soaring home
prices. The drywall may have been used in more
than 100,000 homes, according to some estimates,
including houses rebuilt after Hurricane Katrina.
"This is a traumatic problem of extraordinary
proportions," said U.S. Rep. Robert Wexler, a
Florida Democrat who introduced a bill in the
House calling for a temporary ban on the Chi-
nese-made imports until more is known about
their chemical makeup. Similar legislation has
been proposed in the Senate.
The drywall apparently causes a chemical re-
action that gives off a rotten-egg stench, which
grows worse with heat and humidity.
Researchers do not know yet what causes the
reaction, but possible culprits include fumigants
sprayed on the drywall and material inside it.


Associated Press
Wednesday, Mary Ann Schultheis displays the
black dust that is covering the copper tubes in
the air conditioner in the second story of her Park-
land, Fla., home, while speaking about the prob-
lems she is having with her house. Chinese
drywall was used in the construction of her house
and is now causing problems, including eroding
copper pipes and wiring and the house has a
smell.
The Chinese drywall is also made with a coal
byproduct called fly ash that is less refined than
the form used by U.S. drywall makers.
Dozens of homeowners in the Southeast have
sued builders, suppliers and manufacturers,
claiming the very walls around them are emitting


smelly sulfur compounds that are poisoning their
families and rendering their homes uninhabit-
able.
"It's like your hopes and dreams are just gone,"
said Mary Ann Schultheis, who has suffered
burning eyes; sinus headaches and a general
heaviness in her chest since moving into her
brand-new, 4,000-square foot house in this tidy
South Florida suburb a few years ago.
She has few options. Her builder is in bank-
ruptcy, the government is not helping and her
lender will not give her a break
"I'm just going to cry," she said. "We don't know
what we're going to do."
Builders have filed their own lawsuits against
suppliers and manufacturers, claiming they un-
knowingly used the bad building materials.
The Consumer Product Safety Commission is
investigating, as are health departments in Vir-
ginia, Louisiana, North Carolina, Florida and
Washington state.
Meanwhile, governors in Louisiana and
Florida are asking for federal assistance, and ex-
perts say the problem is only now beginning to
surface.
"Based on the amount of material that came in,
it's possible that just in one year, 100,000 resi-
dences could be involved," said Michael Fore-
man, who owns a construction consulting firm.:
The company has performed tests on some 200
homes in the Sarasota area and has been tracking
shipments of the drywall.











EPage A9 SUNDAY, APRIL 12, ;o00



XcuRSJONS_
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Pilgrimage to Pilsner roots


Something softer for

the American palate

has swept the world

DANIEL COVERING
Associated Press
PLZEN, Czech Republic - Order a
beer at a restaurant or bar, and unless
you've requested an ale, porter or stout,
you'll probably be served the clear,
golden brew behind our most familiar
brands: Pilsner.
And this is its ancestral home.
Mugs of frothy beer served in this cob-
blestone-studded city southwest of
Prague may resemble others the world
over, but a trip to the local brewery con-
firms these are no ordinary suds.
The faintly bitter lager first produced
in Plzen more than a century ago gave
rise to a style of beer that has since cir-
cled the globe. Much of today's lager-
style beer, in fact, owes its flaxen color
and crisp flavor to a brewing process for-
mulated in this small metropolis in the
Czech Republic's Bohemia region. Its
name still reflects its origins: Pilsner,
Pilsener, or sometimes just Pils.
The beer's precise birthplace, the Pil-
sner Urquell brewery, stands on the
city's fringes, enclosed by an ornate 19th
century double archway. Its copper ket-
tle-lined confines have changed with the
times, but visitors can still see hints of
the past, including a network of under-
ground tunnels once used to store huge
casks of fermenting beer.
The plant's distinctive heritage hasn't
been overlooked by its current owner,
London-based SABMiller, which has
built a large diorama of an old-time
brewery inside a sleek visitors' center
also furnished with a vending machine
that dispenses beer.
The Pilsner Urquell factory of today is
a marvel of modern brewing, operating
24 hours a day and churning out 120,000
bottles of beer per hour. But it has its ori-
gins in a brewing tradition that stretches
back to the late 1200s, when King
Wenceslaus.II granted brewing licenses
to more than 250 city residents. But the
quality of Plzen's beer was poor, accord-
ing to the brewery, and in 1839 protest-
ers dumped 36 barrels of the local brew
outside the town hall to show their dis-
content.
That prompted the citizen brewers of
Plzen to combine forces and build a


Associated Press
A bartender pours a glass of beer at a restaurant in the Pilsner Urquell factory in Pilsen, Czech Republic. The faintly bitter
lager first produced in the Pilsner Urquell factory more than a century ago gave rise to a style of beer that has since circled
the globe. Much of today's lager-style beer, in fact, owes its flaxen color and crisp flavor to a brewing process formulated
in this small metropolis in the Czech Republic's Bohemia region. Its name still reflects its origins: Pilsner, Pilsener or some-
times just Pils.


The malt's consistent quality yielded exceptionally
clear beer, and its emergence coincided with the
spread of glassware that allowed drinkers
to admire its appearance.


modern beer-making facility, which
opened in 1842, the same one that oper-
ates to this day.
A young brewmaster and reputed ruf-
fian, Josef Groll, took the helm and
began making the beer that became
known as Pilsner lager, fermenting bar-
ley malt, hops and water at a low tem-
perature, and adding yeast that
collected at the bottom of the mixture.
Among the beer's defining qualities
were its shimmering appearance and
subtle bitterness from locally grown


hops - the dried flowers of the hop
plant Other ingredients specific to the
region included soft water drawn from
328-foot-deep wells and malt madefrom
barley grown in the Czech regions of Bo-
hemia and Moravia.
The water used in today's Pilsner
Urquell, the company says, is from the
same underground source used to
make the original in 1842. And the
strain of yeast used to convert sugar
into alcohol during the fermentation
process reputedly is traceable to that


used in the original recipe.
The brewing of Pilsner Urquell has
remained largely unchanged since
Groll's time, according to a video shown
to tourists at the brewery. Ground malt
and water are boiled three times in cop-
per kettles, a procedure carried out per-
haps once or twice in the making of
other beers. Carmelization occurs at the
bottom of the kettles, producing flavor-
ful compounds.
The concoction is boiled with hops be-
fore being fermented at a low tempera-
ture, pasteurized and packaged in
bottles, cans, kegs and tanks. The total
brewing time remains the same as in the
days of yore, about five weeks.
Julie Johnson, editor of All About
Beer magazine in Durham, N.C., noted
that the beer's name, Urquell, means
See PiLSNER/Page A12


Egypt to open 'bent'


pyramid to visitors


PAUL SCHEMM
Associated Press
CAIRO - Travelers to
Egypt will soon be able to
explore the inner cham-
bers of the 4,500-year-old
"bent" pyramid, known for
its. oddly shaped profile,
and other nearby ancient
tombs.
The increased access to
the pyramids south of Cairo
is part of a new.sustainable
development campaign
that Egypt hopes will at-
tract more visitors but also
to avoid some of the prob-
lems of the urban sprawl
that have plagued the
famed pyramids of Giza.
Egypt's chief archaeolo-
gist, Zahi Hawass, said the
chambers of the 330-foot-
pyramid outside the village
of Dahshur, 50 miles south
of Cairo, will be opened for
the first time to tourists
some time in May or June.
"This is going to be an ad-
venture," he told reporters.
Dahshur's bent pyramid
is famous for its irregular
profile. The massive tomb's
sides rise at a
steep angle Dahshu
but then
abruptly pyral
taper off at a am
more shallow famouS
approach to irregular
the pyramid's irre
apex.
.. Archaeolo-
gists believe the pyramid-
builders changed their
minds while constructing it
out of fear the whole struc-
ture might collapse be-
cause the sides were too
steep.
* The pyramid is entered
through a cramped 260-
foot-long tunnel that opens


I


I
r


Associated Press
Birds fly over the 4,500-year-old "bent" pyramid, in
Dahshur, Egypt. Travelers to Egypt will soon be able to
explore the inner chambers of the "bent" pyramid,
known for its oddly shaped profile, and other nearby an-
cient tombs.


into an immense vaulted
chamber. From there, pas-
sageways lead to other
rooms including one that
has cedar
r's bent wood beams
believed to
lid iS have been im-
Sfor its ported from
ancient
profile. Lebanon.
S Ha w a s s
said archae-
ologists be-
lieve the 4th dynasty
founder Pharaoh Sneferu's
burial chamber lies undis-
covered inside the pyra-
mid.
The inner chambers of
the nearby Red pyramid,
also built by Sneferu, are
already accessible to visi-
tors. Hawass said several


other nearby pyramids, in-
cluding one with an under-
ground labyrinth from the
Middle Kingdom, would
also be opened in the next
year.
"It is amazing because of
a maze of corridors under-
neath this pyramid - the
visit will be unique," said
Hawass. about the pyramid
of Amenhemhat III, who
ruled during Egypt's 12th
dynasty from 1859-1813 BC.
"Twenty-five years ago, I
went to enter this pyramid,
and I was afraid I would
never come back, and I had
to ask the workmen to tie
ropes around my leg so I
wouldn't lose my way," he
recalled.
See BENT/Page A12


BETH J. HARPAZ
Associated Press
NEW YORK - If you're
on a budget but you'd like to
fly somewhere for your next
vacation, there's good news.
"Domestic fares are down
9 percent over a year ago
and summer fares to Eu-
rope are down 19 percent,"
said Mike Fridgen, product
manger for Farecastcom.
"Bargains are out there,"
agreed George Hobica,
founder of AirfareWatch-
dog.com.
Examples: JFK to Paris,
for under $500 roundtrip;
Southwest's $49 one-way
tickets, and once-in-a-
lifetime dream fares from
Newark to Hawaii, in the
mid-$400s, including taxes
and fees.
These and many other
deals are easy to find on-
line. But there are some
strategies you can use to
make sure you get the low-
est possible airfares. Here
are some tips from the ex-
perts.
Research: "The most im-
portant thing is to do your
homework," said Michele
Perry, spokeswoman for Tri-
pAdvisor.com, which just
launched a new flight
search aggregator.



DREAM
VACATIONS
vnaoo CLon�est

The Chronicle and The Ac-
cent Travel Group are spon-
soring a photo contest for
readers of the newspaper.


Associated Press
Delta Air Lines jets are parked at a John F. Kennedy Inter-
national Airport terminal in New York.


To do your research right,
you'll need to compare fares
from many different
sources. "Too many people
get cozy with their favorite
search engine, blithely
thinking that it's the best,"
said Hobica. If there were
one best Web site, he added,
"the rest would be out of
business by now."
Sign up for newsletters
and e-mail alerts from air-
lines that serve the routes
you're shopping for, and
from sites like Airfare-
Watchdog, JohnnyJet, Fare-
cast and others, including

Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
onet description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a panel
of judges will select the
best photo during the year


FareCompare, Kayak, Orb-
itz and Travelocity. Many
airlines post their best fares
only on their own Web sites,
including Southwest, Alleg-
iant Air, SAS, Aloha, Aer
Lingus, Qantas, Alaska, Air
New Zealand, and JetBlue,
Hobica said.
Absurdly cheap fares, like
a recent $14 flight on Jet-
Blue from New York to San
Francisco, don't show up on
booking sites because the
sites can't earn a commis-
sion on them. But that fare

See AIR/Page A12

and that photograph will
win a prize.
Please avoid photos with
dates on the print.
Photos should be sent to
the Chronicle at 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429 or dropped
off at the Chronicle office in
Inverness, Crystal River or


Some tips for booking



air travel on a budget








JLV 9UN'0AY , 1 t P i, 20U VC



Economy affecting services for veterans


As our troops return from
their tours of duty in Iraq
and Afghanistan, many of
us reflect on how the military ex-
periences we encountered af-
fected our lives and our family
members' lives on our return from
duty after a lengthy
separation.
Many memories are
resurrected during the
readjustment from mil-
itary discipline and the
rigors of combat. Get-
ting back to a normal
way of life and a family .
that sees a different
person than the one
they saw go off to their Larry M
tour of duty can be a VETEI
tough transformation. VIi
Families are having to
adjust to a lower in-
come than what 'they had built
their budgets on before being
called up, and the adjustment of
their spending habits with a
falling economy seems impossi-
ble. It goes without saying that fa-
cilities should be made available
to these families to assist in that
adjustment, both psychological
and economical. Many service-
men and women who were called
up from the National Guard have
returned to find that the jobs they
left were cut in their absence be-


s




I
E


cause of the economy, which is
adding to the price they paid for
defending their country
Due to the economic problems
the world is facing at this time,
state, county and city governments
in America have had to tighten
spending for services to
its citizens and to avoid
putting more taxes in
Place to compensate for
the deficits. But where
do we draw the line?
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Service Office
has heard the County
Commissioners pro-
pose cutting one of
acMillan three counselors offer-
RANS ing services to approxi-
EW mately 25,000 veterans
in the county. Add fam-
ily members who are
also involved and these are serv-
ices that could affect half of the
Citrus County population. Not all
veterans take advantage of these
services, but all of the veteran or-
ganizations support this office and
its personnel and are concerned
about the effects it will have on
providing services in an already
overloaded mode.
On a brighter note, the Welcome
Home Heroes Baskets continues
under the guidance of Barbara
Mills and the support of the com-


munity, veteran organizations and
local businesses that have con-
tributed to fill the baskets. To date,
Mills has presented 63 baskets to
returning men and women in the
military. The most inspirational
and satisfying presentation was
when Mills and 20 county resi-
dents visited Romulo "Romy" Ca-
margo at the James A. Haley
Veterans Hospital. Camargo re-
turned from his third tour in
Afghanistan and is recovering
from an ambush that left him
mostly paralyzed. Despite his con-
dition, Camargo was all smiles
during their visit. Here is another
family that faces a lifestyle change
from what they knew during his 12
years in the Army.
The Citrus County Veterans
Coalition wants to thank Ladies
Auxiliary VFW Post 7122 in Floral
City for adopting the Veterans
Food Pantry as their major proj-
ect. Last Sunday, they sponsored
the "Hobo Holiday" with food and
entertainment and brought in do-
nations of food and a $500 check
from retired Marine Gregory T.
Lybeck, currently in the Mideast
with a company under the State
Department. Jack O'Neal, a 100
percent disabled veteran, donated
$738 worth of canned goods. The
final count of donations was not
available at this writing. Food


bank coordinators Bill and Nancy
Geden were in tears on accept-
ance of these donations. They
have serviced more than 230 vet-
erans and their families since the
inception of this project. With the
economic hard times, the list con-
tinues to grow. With the commu-
nity support proceeds from the
April veterans yard sale, they are
seeing a light at the end of the tun-
nel for this great benefit for our
needy veterans.
The Department of Veterans'
Affairs continues its Notification
Process, improperly reprocessed
endoscopy equipment that may
have been used in their care at the
VA's Murfreesboro, Tenn., facility
from April 2003 to December 2008,
the VA's Augusta, Ga. Hospital
from January 2008 to November
2008 and the VAs Miami hospital
from May 2004 to March 2009. Vet-
erans in the Tennessee, Georgia
and South Florida areas were
among 10,555 veterans offered
free testing. If you have concerns,
contact the local VA facility for
testing. Some patients have tested
positive for Hepatitis B, Hepatitis
C and Human Immunodeficiency
Virus (HIV).
In closing, Veterans Health Care
reform has eliminated one of the
concerns brought up last month in
regard to returning armed forces


personnel with service-connected
injuries. They will not be required
to pick up the partial cost or co-
payment for treatment President
Obama apparently got quite a bit of
flack in regard to the Veterans
Health Care Reform and made a
decision about that area and prom-
ised to take a closer look at the bal-
ance of the issues that will affect
those who use the VA health care
system as the primary care facility.
Let's hope he takes a really close
look and realizes we all gave a por-
tion of our lives to keep America
strong whether it was during com-
bat situations, peacetime or cold
war era.
Until next month, continue to
support veterans' affairs issues
and help needy veterans in the
county and the country. We are all
comrades in arms and with all
those voices working to resolve the
same issues, there is no way we
won't be heard. Support our troops
and May God bless America.


Larry MacMillan is an 11-year
veteran of the U.S. Air Force
during the Korean and Vietnam
era and currently serves as the
public information officer for the
Citrus County Veterans Coalition.
He can be contacted by e-mail at
citrusvets@yahoo. com.


Veterans


* Beverly Hills Memorial
American Legion Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza invites inter-
ested veterans to apply for
membership or transfer. Sons of
the American Legion and
Ladies Auxiliary units are now
forming. Membership meeting
fourth Thursday at 7 p.m. Sun-
day darts at 3 p.m. with karaoke
following. Other activities being
planned. All sporting events
available on five TVs. Visit, or
phone the post at 746-5018.
* American Legion Post
155 events for the week of April
12 to 18:
Today: Breakfast 8:30 to 11
a.m., $5. Dart tournament 6
p.m.
Tuesday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Bingo 1 to 4 p.m. E-Board
meeting 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday: Chicken "hot
wings" noon to 3 p.m. Special
Italian Dinner Night 5 to 7 p.m.,
$5. Live music 6 to 10 p.m.
Thursday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Bingo 1 to 4 p.m. Show Me
the Money 5 p.m.Friday: Auxil-
iary Dinner Night 5 to 7 p.m.,
$6. Live music 6 to 10 p.m.
Saturday: Honor Guard
meeting 10 a.m. Pool tourna-
ment 2 p.m. Legionnaire of the
Year Dinner Banquet.
Call Cmdr. Jim Woodman at
795-6526 or visit
www.postl55.org.
* Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 on Veterans Drive in
Homosassa, across from
Harley Davidson dealership,
announces events for April.
Mixed pool league every
Sunday at 3 p.m.
Bingo every Wednesday at 2
p.m. Lunch available.
Women's pool league at 7
p.m. Wednesday.
Bar bingo all day, every day.
Friday: Pork and sauerkraut
or Polish sausage and potatoes
at 5 p.m.
Friday April 24: Baked ziti at
5p.m.
All events open to members
and guests.
For more information, call
795-5012.
* Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City, 637-
0100.
Today: Victor's famous two
for $1 wimpy burgers, served
hot and fresh, 2 to 6 p.m.
Canteen opens at 9 a.m.
Monday through Saturday and


at 1 p.m. on Sunday. Members
only, but guests are allowed with
a member in good standing.
* VFW Post 7991, 3107 W.
Dunnellon Road, Dunnellon,
(352) 489-1772.
The post serves breakfast
from 8:30 a.m. to noon the sec-
ond and fourth Sundays
monthly. Full breakfast menu
for $5. Open to the public.
Today: Easter Breakfast,
serving from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. Full breakfast menu all for
$5. Come before or after
church. Public welcome.
Wednesday: Bingo starting
at 1 p.m. Hot dogs are avail-
able.
Thursday: Post meeting. So-
cial hour from 5 to 6 p.m. Meet-
ing starts at 6 p.m. This is an
important meeting, come show
your support.
Saturday: Wedding reception
from 6 p.m. until 10:30 p.m.
The flea market scheduled
forApril 25 has been canceled
and will be rescheduled at a
later date.
* Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337, 906 State Road 44 E., In-
verness, phone 344-3495.
Karaoke is presented each
Sunday, Tuesday and Friday
evenings. Bar Bingo is played
Monday and Thursday after-
noons and Wednesday
evening.
We serve Wings each Tues-
day evening and fish or chicken
on Friday evenings.
"Show Me The Money" is
played each Saturday from 1 to
3 p.m.
* The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58,10730
U.S. 41, Dunnellon, has its reg-
ular meeting of the Post and
Auxiliary on the first Wednesday
of the month starting at 7 p.m.
Dunnellon Young Marines
meet every Tuesday evening
from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
AARP Tax-aide will be given
on Wednesday from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. until April 15.
Bingo is held every Thursday
evening. Doors open 4 p.m.
Games start at 6 p.m. Food
available.
Outdoor Flea Market and
Pancake Breakfast is every
third Saturday monthly from
7:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. All you
can eat for a $4 donation.
* The H. F. Nesbitt VFW
Post 10087 in Beverly Hills off
County Road 491, across the
street from ROC's 491 Sports


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Bar and directly behind the new
Superior Bank, will host a '50s
Sock Hop on Friday featuring
the band Blast Kats The Blast
Kats will take you all the way
back to the '50s and '60s with
some great music. For a dona-
tion of $10 per person your
VFW Post will provide you with
a great spaghetti dinner to go
along with some great music.
Tickets are available in the can-
teen and tables for a party of
eight can be reserved.
Today: Bingo in the big hall
beginning at 1 p.m.
Monday: The VFW Golf
League plays at different
courses. Contact Dick Sorrells
or Jim Freiheit at the post for
tee times and locations. The
Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at 9 a.m. at
Twisted Oaks G.C. Check with
Lou Kempf for available tee
times. Dart tournament in the
canteen beginning at 7 p.m.
Tuesday: Pool tournament in
the canteen beginning at 1 p.m.
House Committee rfieeting and
staff meeting every third Tues-
day and post general meeting
every fourth Tuesday.
Wednesday: Bar bingo in
the canteen at 1 p.m. Wednes-
day is Ladies Night from 5 until
8 p.m. Cookout for a nominal
donation from 5 until 7 p.m.
Karaoke at 7 p.m. with a differ-
ent host each week.
Thursday: VFW Mixed Golf
League alternating between
Twisted Oaks Golf Club and
Pine Ridge Golf Club with an 8
a.m. tee time. Check with Dave
Nealey or Ray Galinski for
available tee times. Pool tour-
nament in the canteen at 7 p.m.
Friday: Dart tournament at 7
p.m.


Saturday: Karaoke in the
canteen from 7 to 11 p.m. fea-
turing a different host each
week.
* Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shonk Chap-
ter 70 and Auxiliary 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Invemess, at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41.
DAV Chapter 70 and Auxil-
iary meetings are at 2 p.m. on
the second Tuesday monthly.
The DAV Chapter is open
from 9 a.m. to noon every
Tuesday to assist disabled vet-
erans. A service officer is avail-
able by appointment. Contact
Bill Geden at 341-6875.
For the Chapter, call Richard
Floyd, adjutant at 726-5031.
For the Auxiliary, call Lynn Ar-
mitage, adjutant at 341-5334.
* Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 11:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Crystal Paradise
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Luncheons will be at 1 p.m.
Tuesday at Margarita Grill in Ho-
mosassa, and at 1 p.m. May 12 at
The Supper Club in Crystal River.
* Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40
East, Inglis (352) 447-3495.
Men's meeting is at 7:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly.
Ladies Auxiliary meets at 5
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday
monthly.
House Committee meets at 6
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW


Post 8698 members, Men's
and Ladies Auxiliaries would
like to honor our young patriots
and active duty military person-.
nel with a free chicken barbe-
cue from noon to 3 p.m.
Saturday, April 25, at VFW Post
8698, 520 E. Highway 40 (one
mile east of U.S. 19), Inglis.
Free chicken barbecue for any
in uniform: Boy Scout, Girl
Scout, Sea Cadet, Young Ma-
rine, ROTC Cadet, Civil Air Pa-
trol Cadet, Army, Navy, Marine,
Air Force, or Coast Guard, mili-


tary personnel. Family mem-
bers welcome for a $3 dona-
tion. Public $5.
I The Dan Campbell Air-
borne Association meets at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 Gulf-to-Lake
Highway (State Road 44), Crys-
tal River. All current and previ-
ous Airborne members and their
wives are welcome to join us.
Call Steve Leonard at 726-3693.

See VETS/Page All


Citrus Springs Civic Association &
Citrus Springs Youth Committee present:


Family Fun Day

Saturday, April 18

10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Wesley Jones Park (Citrus Springs Blvd.)


Hot Dogs, Nachos &
Snow Cones .50 cents


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NEWS


All -...... (A.. I? 9ncn













Reports of our decline have been greatly exaggerated


I just got an e-mail from a Euro- want those cars. What we like is
pean friend, an exchange stu- American culture. Almost all you
dent who spent his senior year hear on the radio here is Ameri-
of high school in the States 40 can rap music and everyone goes
years ago. He hasn't been back, to American movies. Couldn't
but we've kept in touch. more Americans get
I hadn't heard from him jobs as rap singers or
in a couple of years and movie stars? That
while his English is still ' would seem to me a bet-
pretty good (usually ter idea. Or as basket-
better than mine) it ' . ball players? As
seemed a few things in everyone knows all
his e-mail got lost in Americans are good at
translation. .B playing basketball and
"How are you," he I it is a good, well-paying
wrote, "Is it as bad over JI M job. Why would you
there as we see on TV? want to make cars when
It made me very sad to MULLEN you could play basket-
hear that all Americans ball?
have lost their jobs and that they "I was sad to hear on the news
spend 12 hours a day looking for that all Americans have sold all
work in obsolete automobile fac- their houses for very little money
stories. I don't think-Europeans -Why? -Iwould be very sad to sell


my house for a very low price. It
has been in my family for over 300
years. But if I had to sell, I would
not take very little money
"How did all Americans lose all
their money? Some of my friends
here say Americans are greedy,
but I have been to America and I
know that you are not greedy. Be-
sides, I said, 'if they were all
greedy, they'd have money and you
just heard that none of them have
any money.' My friend said, 'Then
maybe they're just stupid.' So, I
won your honor with my arguing.
"How do you like living in a tent
under the interstate? It's just a
suggestion, but I think you should
be able to find a nicer place to put
a tent than under the interstate. If
you don't-have -tent, I have an
extra one I can loan you. I need it
back by August, we're going on a


month-long camping trip in the
mountains.
"It must be hard to buy food
without any money. I have a good
way to stretch a Euro. It's called
Catfood Helper.' It was something
my mother used to make after the
war. Here it is:
1 Can cat food
1 Pound Egg Noodles
1 Cup milk
1 Pound cheese, grated.
Boil the noodles. Crumble the
cat food and brown, then slowly
add the milk and cheese while stir-
ring. Drain noodles, return to pot,
mix in meat sauce. Salt and pepper
to taste. Serves 12 to 20. Because,
believe me, no one eats too much.
"Today I saw that many Ameri-
cans are getting rid of their yachts.
I didn't even know you had a
yacht. They said so many boats are


for sale that they are worth noth-
ing, so owners are setting them
adrift or sinking them so they
won't have to pay to dock them
anymore. You think they could
give them to a family living in a
tent under the interstate."
While I was writing back to tell
him that most of us weren't living
in tent cities and that most of us
didn't have yachts to sink and that
some of us even still had jobs, I
kept wondering where he heard
all this nonsense. And then I re-
membered that years ago he had
bought a satellite dish for his
house so he could keep up with
his English by watching all the
nightly American news shows.

Reach author Jim Mullen at
jim mullen@myway.com.


VETS
Continued from Page A10

* The Marine Corps
League, Samuel R. Wall De-
tachment 1139 will conduct its
regular meeting at 7 p.m. the
third Wednesday monthly at
DAV Post 70 in Inverness at the
intersection of Independence
Avenue and U.S. 41 North. For-
mer Marines are welcome. Call
Tom Heron at 637-2724 or Joe
Spoto at 746-3315.
* Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Invemess. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 344-0727.
* Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets the
third Thursday monthly at the
Floral City VFW Post 7122, call
to order 7:30 p.m. The mem-
bership invites all eligible veter-
ans to join.
* The Herbert Surber Amer-
ican Legion Auxiliary Unit 225
meets at 7:30 p.m. the third
Thursday monthly at the Floral
City VFW Post 7122 on U.S. 41,
Floral City. Contact Marcia Gal-
lagher, membership chair-
woman, at 860-1629. New
members welcome.
* Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call John Young at the
Hunger and Homeless Coalition
at 628-4357, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
* The Beverly Hills Me-
morial American Legion
Post 237 is seeking eligible
veterans and sons as mem-
bers. Visit or phone the post
home at 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the-BeverlyPlaza; 746.-.
5018. Transferring members
are always welcome.
* Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
Sailors meet at Denny's in
Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 621-0617.
* Marine Corps League,
Citrus County Detachment
819 will meet at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. Call
Commandant Robert Deck at
527-1557.
* VFW Post 4252 and
Ladies Auxiliary
All eligible persons are in-
vited to join. Stop in at the post
or call for information. Post
4252 is at 3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road
200, Hemando; phone 726-
3339. Send e-mails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.


* The William Crow
AmVets Post 447 is at 33
RisherAve. in Inglis. For more
information, call 447-4473.
* U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 726-5926.
* American Legion Post
166 will meet at 1:30 p.m., Sat-
urday, May 2 at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility located on Vet-
erans Drive, Homosassa, on
the west side of U.S. 19 at
Dixon's Auto Sales across from
Harley Davidson.
Former and current post
members and interested veter-
ans, are invited to be a part of
American Legion Post 166. For
information, call Bill at 382-1119.
* The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Anyone who has honorably
served within Korea or outside
Korea from June 25, 1950, to
Jan. 31, 1955, and anyone
serving within Korea from 1955
to present is eligible to join the
Korean War Veterans Associa-
tion (KWVA). Call Hank Butler
at 563-2496, Paul Salyer at
637-1161 or Neville Anderson
at 344-2529.
* Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Key Training
Center, 130 Heights Ave., In-
vemess. Potluck dinner at 6
p.m., meeting starts at 7:15.
Auxiliary Unit 77 meets at the
same time and place. Call Post
Cmdr. Paul Miller at 344-8277
or Auxiliary president Alice
-r-umett-at860-2981.- - - ---.
* The Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World


War II will conduct its next
meeting at 11:30 a.m. the sec-
ond Saturday, May 9, at Kally
K's, 3383 U.S. 19 in Spring Hill.
* Seabee Veterans of
America Island X-18 All
Seabees, Honeybees, relatives
and friends are welcome to our
meetings and events. Meetings
are at 11 a.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at the VA
Office, 2804 Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto. After a short
meeting at the VA Office, we
eat lunch at a local restaurant
decided.at the meeting. On the
third Wednesday monthly, we
have a luncheon.
Call Cmdr. David Puffer at
746-9327 or e-mail
puffels@tampabay.rr.com
* Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Richard Gannon
at 637-1236; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Debi Gan-
non at 637-1236 or visit
www.Postl55.org.
* Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart (MOPH) meets bi-
monthly at 1:15 p.m. on the third
Tuesday of January, March,
May, July, September and No-
vember at the Citrus County Re-
sources Center/VA Clinic, 2804
W. Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto (west side of County
Road 491 approximately 1 mile
north of C.R. 486).
Combat wounded veterans
and lineal descendants of Pur-
ple Heart recipients are invited
to attend a meeting. Life mem-
berships for combat wounded
veterans and lineal descen-
dants of Purple Heart recipients--
are $50. There are no chapter
dues. To leam more about -.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
MOPH, visit www.citruspurple-
heart.org or call 382-3847.


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Special to the Chronicle
From left are Ray Roby, second vice commander; John King, post adjutant; World War
II veteran Thomas Trout; and Ken Walker, first vice commander.


Post welcomes WW II veteran


Special to the Chronicle

The American Legion
Beverly Hills Memorial
Post 237 inducted World
War II veteran Thomas
Trout into its membership.
Born in 1926 in Marietta,
Ohio, Trout joined the U.S.
Navy in 1943 at the age of
17. After several years in
various duty stations


and assignments, he at-
tended the U.S. Naval
Academy in Annapolis,
Md., and was among the
graduating class of 1951.
He became a Naval Avia-
tor, where he spent time
aboard the USS Intrepid
and the USS Saratoga, and
piloted several types of air-
craft. During his 27-year mil-
itary career, Trout had duty


assignments in Naval Intel-
ligence and was an attache
in Madrid, Spain. He was
the recipient of two Navy
commendations. He retired
in 1970 with the rank of com-
mander.
Trout returned to Ohio
after his retirement and, in
1984, moved to Homosassa
where he resides in Sug-
armill Woods.


. ... .. .. .


.Min ,M -
_. . . ___. _o


Ilyilo'I


S \ CITRUS LEVY MARION

Stimulus Training Expo

SApril 15, 2009, 8:30 a.m.
-Withlacoochee


,
For more information, email
stimulus@clmworkforce.com
or call 1-800-434-JOBS,
extension 5769.


Technical Institute
Room 115, Inverness
If you have lost your job due to a lay off,
\'ou are encouraged to attend Workforce
Connection's Stimulus Re-training Expo on
April 15. Learn more about training
programs and scholarships for occupations
that are projected to grow over the next few
yea rs. Alter an opening general session,
you can visit breakout sessions highlighting
the following occupational areas:
Healthcare
Welding
Auto Service Technology
Electrical
Corrections
Law Enforcement
Business
Central Florida Community College, Taylor
College and Withlacoochee Technical
Institute will showcase their programs.
Scholarship information and applications
*will be available from Workforce staff in
these occupational areas, as well.
Scholarship funds are made available
through the Dept. of Labor's National
Emergency Grant and the American
Recovery and Reinvestment Act Funds.


Workforce Connection is a member of Employ Florida Marketplace and is an equal opportunity employeriprogram. Auxiliary aids and MEMBER
services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. All voice telephone numbers listed above may be reached by persons
using TTYfTDD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. If you need accommodations, please call 352-840-5700, ext. 7878 or
e-mail accommodalions@clmworkforce.com
782W3


SAttend


WORKFORCE

WUK11l11UKLE


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009 All






CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A12 SUNDAY, APIIL 12, 2009


Wedding


Patterson/

Russell II


Christie Patterson and
Robert Russell II were
united in marriage in a dou-
ble ring ceremony at 12:30
p.m. Saturday, Feb. 28,2009,
at the Cedar Bay Baptist
Church in Jacksonville. Of-
ficiating the ceremony was
the Rev. Bill Tyler. A yellow
rose bush was planted be-
hind the church in loving
memory of everyone who
has passed.
The bride is the daughter
of Tommy and Sandy Patter-
son of Jacksonville. The
groom is the son of Jean Rus-
sell of Inverness and Robert
Russell of Jacksonville.
The bride was given in mar-
riage by her parents and es-
corted by her father The bride
wore a strapless satin split
back A-line gown with a red
beaded cuff, hem and inset
She carried a bouquet of red
roses with pearl accents.
The bride chose Raeanne
Kline, her cousin, as her
maid of honor, Dolores Jor-
don, a close friend, as her
bridesmaid and Kayley
Kline, her cousin, as junior
bridesmaid. They wore red
multi style gowns. The
flower girls, Payton and
Mackenzie Curry, cousins of
the bride, wore dresses of
red and white with red ap-
pliques and carried baskets
of rose petals. The maid of
honor carried a bouquet of
red and white roses and the
bridesmaids carried bou-
quets of white roses.
Russell Howie, friend of
the groom, served as best
man. Steve Peters, friend of
the groom, served as
groomsman and Brandon
Kline, cousin of the bride,
served as junior grooms-
man. Riddick Fisher,
nephew of the groomm
served as ring bearer.
Diana Bakai of Jack-
sonville served as soloist,
she sang "You Will Never
Walk Alone" for the prelude
and "Love Can Build A
Bridge" during the pouring
of the unity sand.
The wedding reception
immediately followed the
ceremony at the Garden
Ballroom in the Holiday Inn
on Airport Road, music was
provided by Larry Bass. The
bride and groom danced the
first dance to a Lifehouse
song "Everything." The
bride's bouquet was given to
the longest-married woman,
Betty Patterson, grand-
mother of the bride, the
garter was placed on her by
her husband of 58 years,
Jack Patterson, grandfather
of the bride.
Following a honeymoon
cruise to the Caribbean, the
couple will reside in Jack-
sonville.


BENT
Continued from Page A9

Only 5 percent of tourists
coming to Egypt visit the
three pyramids of Dahshur,
Hawass said.
He hoped increasing ac-
cess to the monuments
would bring more visitors.
But he also cautioned that
the Western fast food restau-
rants and hundreds of hawk-
ers selling kitschy souvenirs
near the Giza pyramids
would not be allowed at
Dahshur, which is currently
surrounded by agricultural
fields on one side and open
desert on the other.
As part of an effort an-
nounced by Hawass and the
United Nations, villagers
near Dahshur will be given
economic opportunities to
increase local development,
including microfinance
loans for small businesses.


Thomas and Lorraine
Lombardo would like to
announce the engagement
of their daughter, Jamie
Lynn Lombardo, to Col-
orado native, Raymond An-
drew Bailey, son of Robert
and Joetta Bailey
Jamie is a 2001 Citrus
High School Alumni. Cur-
rently, she is studying
music education and com-
position at Metropolitan
State College of Denver
She is also a fulltime pri-
vate guitar and vocal in-
structor for her current
company The Voice Within.
Raymond received his
bachelor of arts in TV/film
production from Oklahoma
Christian University in
2001, at which point he
started his present com-
pany, Guiding Light Pro-


New ARRIVAL

Congratulations to the
following new parents:
* To Mark and Christa
(Bailey) Allen, Oviedo, a
son, Barrett William
Allen, born at 5:37 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2009 at
Winnie Palmer Hospital,
Orlando. He weighed 7
pounds, 15 ounces.


PILSNER
Continued from Page A9

"the original source" in
German.
"Pilsner beer is the an-
cestor of the kind of global
international lager style
that makes up 90-something
percent of the beer we
drink today," she said,
pointing to brands such as
Budweiser, Rolling Rock
and St. Pauli Girl. "Those
are all indebted to Pilsner."
In a nod to the beer born


AIR
Continued from Page A9
was mentioned in an alert
from AirfareWatchdog, in
JetBlue's e-mail stream and
on Twitter, Hobica said.
Airlines may also make
deals with some sites and
not others, so you may find
fares differ for the same
flight on different Web sites.
Another source for news
about cheap fares, DiScala
said, is the message boards
ofWebflyercom.
Finally, as crazy as it
sounds, check out package
deals. Sometimes it's
cheaper to book a hotel and
airfare package even if you
don't need lodging.
Now or Later: You'd need
a crystal ball to know for
sure whether fares will
keep going down or if
they're stabilizing.
TripAdvisor's Perry says
"there's anticipation that
we're fairly close to rock
bottom."
But Hobica says the news
on the economy just keeps


ductions.
Jamie and Raymond met
while life-guarding at Walt
Disney World in the spring of
2002. They reside in Castle
Rock, Colorado and plan to
marry April 8, 2010, at the
Lido Beach Resort in Sara-
sota, Florida After marrying,
their future aspirations are
to establish a local theater to
be used for both private les-
sons and theatrical perform-
ances.


Five generations


Special to the Chronicle
New addition to family makes five generations, from left: Charles Theron Lowe Jr.,
great-grandfather; Charles Theron Lowe Sr., great-great-grandfather holding Elina Jade
Clark, new baby; James Lowe, grandfather; and Tiffany Lowe Clark, mommy.


April 13 to 17


SPRING BREAK

CONGREGATE DINING
Monday: Easter Meal -
Sliced ham in au jus sauce,
whipped sweet potatoes, broc-
coli, carrot and cauliflower mix,
1 whole wheat dinner roll, 1
slice cake, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Orange juice,


in Plzen, American brewers
of the 19th century created
"something that was much
softer for the American
palate," she said. "That, in
turn, has swept the world."
Pilsner, and pale ales that
emerged around the same
time, stood out because
"they were light, they were
beautiful to look at," John-
son said.
The beers owed their at-
tractive look to malt made
from barley that had been
heated evenly using an in-
direct source - then a rev-


getting worse, and "the air-
lines are panicking again.
Spring fares softened and
they're softening more. I ex-
pect to see summer fares
soften, too."
If you book now and the
fare goes down later, some
airlines, including JetBlue,
Southwest and Alaska, give
a voucher good for future
travel for the difference,
said Hobica. Others will re-
fund the difference but
charge a fee of $150 or
more.
Watch the Hype: Some-
times a fare is so low it
seems too good to be true.
And it just might be.
First, a lot of really cheap
deals are one-way, and the
return fare may be more,
depending on when you
want to come back
Second, look for those
pesky little asterisks next to
the price. On international
flights, taxes and sur-
charges could add up to
several hundred dollars.
"You've got to be careful
about the hype around the
deals," Perry said. For ex-


oven broiled hamburger with
ketchup, baked beans,
coleslaw, 1 hamburger bun,
fruited yogurt.
Wednesday: Beef stew
with vegetables in gravy,
parsley white rice, warm ap-
plesauce, 1 slice whole
grain wheat bread with mar-
garine, 1 chocolate chip


olutionary technique. Ear-
lier malt may have been
partly burned, producing
beer with "a darker and
roastier taste," she said.
The malt's consistent
quality yielded exception-
ally clear beer, and its
emergence coincided with
the spread of glassware that
allowed drinkers to admire
its appearance.
"So you had a beer that
appealed to the eye, as well
as the nose and mouth,"
Johnson said, "and people
were just struck dumb by


ample, she recently
checked out one of South-
west's famous $49 fares,
"but when I priced it, it was-
n't the cheapest option with
taxes and fees, plus it's only
one-way."
TripAdvisor's new
Flights finder has a "Fees
Estimator" function that
can also help you keep
track of little things -
charges for food, checking
baggage, even headphones.
"If you're traveling with a
family of four and every-
body sends a bag, you could
end up spending the price
of a ticket on checking your
luggage," said Perry.
Dates Matter: Look for
deals early in the week: "A
lot of airlines release their
sale fares on Tuesday," said
Perry.
And be flexible about
when you travel. "It's usu-
ally cheapest to fly mid-
week," she said.
You could also save big
on summer fares if you fly
early or late in the season,
during the shoulder peri-
ods of May to mid-June or


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cookie, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Oven baked
chicken quarter with chicken
gravy, stewed tomatoes, pota-
toes Florentine, 1 slice whole
wheat bread, 1 fresh banana,
low-fat milk.
Friday: Tuna pasta, tossed
garden salad with French
dressing, carrot raisin salad, 1


how lovely and beautiful it
was."
Pilsner Urquell's flavor,
which is dry rather than
fruity like an ale, comes
from local ingredients such
as the locally grown hops,
known as Saaz hops, she
added.
Visitors to the brewery
can sample that flavor at
the end of a guided tour
that lasts about an hour
and-a-half and ends in one
of the underground cellars
used to store barrels of fer-
menting beer in the days


late August to September, in
the weeks before and after
peak summer travel, ac-
cording to Fridgen of Fare-
cast.com.
Hobica . recommends
using a flexible date search.
"Orbitz and CheapTick-
ets.com search over any 30-
day period, and include all
international routes; Trave-
locity and CheapAircom
search over a 330-day pe-
riod, but don't offer all in-
ternational routes," he said.
Compare Routes: "Con-
necting is usually cheaper
than a nonstop if you're
willing to take a connecting
flight," said Perry.
But weigh the risks: If
you're switching planes, is
there enough time to make
your next flight? If there's a
long layover, are you going
to blow a day of your vaca-
tion in the airport, spending
money on food?
And check out alternate
airports. Perry's home air-
port is Logan in Boston, so
she always looks at flights
out of Providence, R.I., and
Manchester, N.H., too.


slice whole grain wheat bread
with margarine, peach and
pear cup, low-fat milk.
Congregate dining sites in-
clude: Lecanto, East Citrus,
Crystal River, Homosassa
Springs, Invemess and South
Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 527-5975.


before refrigeration.
One guide, Katerina Sed-
lackova, attested to the
qualities of Plzen's name-
sake beer, offering cups of
the drink - freshly made,
unpasteurized and drawn
from one of a few remain-
ing wooden barrels kept in
service.
"You should know that
Pilsner Urquell is very
healthy," she exhorts, refer-
ring to nutrients such as vi-
tamin B. "If you drink a cup
of beer a day, you should
stay healthy."


"Sometimes nearby air-
ports will be'cheaper," she
said.
AirfareWatchdog has a
search option to see the
cheapest fares to any desti-
nation from a wide range of
cities at a glance - for ex-
ample you can ask to see all
the lowest fares to Paris
from anywhere in the U.S.
In Europe, the cheapest
destination airports in-
clude Dublin, Frankfurt,
Shannon, and London
Gatwick (not Heathrow),
Hobica said. Even if you're
not headed to those cities,
you might save money by
flying in and connecting to
a cheap European airline
like Ryanair or EasyJet to
get where you're going.
For a quick directory of
which budget airlines serve
which markets, visit Which-
Budgetcom.
Just remember that it's
not always easy to transfer
between two airports near
one city. It could take hours
and cost a bundle to travel
between London's Heath-
row and Gatwick airports.


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GREAT




G E T.AIVAY S


I Grup Dpartres






CITRUS ~uN'rY FL) CHRNICLE SNDAY, ARIL 12,2009 A1


Citrus County's




3ridal


Wedding


Guide


The marriage is for keeps.
The silverware goes backtomorrow.


China, silverware, linens, glasses, coffeemakers and candelabras,
Everything for the big day for rent.


IAYLORRETAL.
THE STORE THAT RENTS EVERYTHING!
Crystal River * 795-5600 Inverness * 726-1900
Swwwtaylorcrystalrivercom www.trinv.com


\. specializing in...
Weddings * Bridal Showers
Engagement Parties e Rehearsal Dinners
&b also...


* Anniversaries
* Birthday Parties
* Christmas Parties
* Baby Showers
* Seminars
* Reunions
* Fund-raisers
Please allow us the opportunity
to let ourprofessional staff
and our culinary experts
assist you with your event
or special occasion.


Say"! Do" with
Our Exquisite Wedding
SRing Collection


S-,' Jim Green Jewelers
,,. Cry.-al River Shoppng Center
5fST, 1665 SE Hwy. IY * Ne.t Io S.ettvlat Crv ,il RRer FL
. LW .n, ars: 352-563-0633' ES W
1 .7 - 4l1hb* Hours: Mon -Fri. 10am-5:15pm * Sat. 10am.1:30pm


The Bridal Gala
at


Golf Resort & Spa

Sunday, April 26th
1 -4pm


' . . -*


Meet with the area's finest
wedding businesses who can
help you plan the day
tin 're been dreaming of
Food, Fashion & Festivities
Door Prizes


Ai
4!* g
r �


93,


mE Reflnatioiz
Golf Resort & Spa
(I \\. Ft. Island Trail.
Crystal Ri\ er
IJust oft'H\%\ 19)


7Vdoinqirisandmorinfrm
352-817-0048 1


VENTS


* Wedding Ceremonies
* Receptions
* Bachelor and Bachelorette
Weekends
i Bridal Showers
* Bridal Luncheons
* Groomsmen Golf Outings
* Rehearsal Dinners
* Honeymoons


contact: catering manager phone: 352-746-6855
email: catering@citrushills.com
Oitrus Y lls
GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB


901 W.Fo Ila a ilCys t a lFL 442


SWedding & Bridal Party
SMothers & Special Occasion
Gifts
STuxedo Rental
563-0722


k1. ' w b 2i it 11 llitmi
Rentals & planning for weddings
Parties & special events
Invitations
794-3616 * 302-7876







, = tu",is A= E -.-


ForAllReasons , .
* Custom Cakes * Balloon D6cor .
613-1800 * 257-3781



2-7 shades whiter in 15 minutes
SThe most advanced light technology
* "Be beautiful in every way on your special day!"
AS. IC n Q A 7f AI


..I U 1CLLI


"Inspired Designs
* Fresh or Silk Florals Event Planners
* Gift & Gourmet
795-3333


CRYSTAL RIVER


+ Bridal Gowns
S + Special Occasion Dresses
+ Tuxedo Rentals & Men's Accessories
+ Bridal & Fashion Jewelry
(352) 860-1990
105 \ . Main, Inverness, FL 34450
I /itr ,.!f ,i([,[ ,,,''i. ,i ,' t /lil'e'


Whatever
.you envision
we can"


7795


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I


Ie


SUNDAY, APRII. 12, 2009 A13'


Crrnus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


1, .


.A


*<*'


I


II







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A14 SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009


Family members have



addiction problems


D earAnnie: I am a 46-year-old male,
never married, with no children.
My sister, "Stacy," has three daugh-
ters and a 15-year-old son from her first
marriage. She has since remarried, and
none of the kids gets along well with
Stacy's new husband.
I've always been close to my
nephew, "Steve." I recently
found out he has a serious
drinking and drug problem. A
month ago, Steve was with
some druggie friends at the
beach, drowning his sorrows
after a breakup with his girl-
friend. He drank too much and
woke up in the hospital. His
"friends" just left him face
down on a pier, where he was
discovered by a good Samari- .*,
tan who called an ambulance. M
I thought after this experi-
ence he would shape up, but I
was mistaken. He's made new friends with
a group of homeless people: He says they
are fun to be with and considers them his
family now. Stacy tells me he has decided
to leave home so that he can travel around
the state with them, eating at soup
kitchens and sleeping under bridges. He
believes the world is coming to an end in
2012 and wants to have a good time before
it does.
I lost a brother 28 years ago as a result of
his addictions. Stacy's older daughter had
the same problem, and they spent a lot of
money trying, unsuccessfully, to "fix" her.
They don't have the money to do the same
with Steve, so Stacy has completely given up.
Annie, my heart is breaking. I fear Steve
will end up dead in a gutter. I can't believe
Stacy won't do anything. Are there state
agencies that can help? - Crushed In Cal-
ifornia
Dear Crushed: Unfortunately, your fam-
ily history of drug and alcohol abuse
means Steve is predisposed.to be ad-
dicted, and unless he is willing to be
helped, there's not much Stacy (or anyone)
can do. The California Department of Al-
cohol and Drug Programs (adp.state.ca.us)
has an adolescent treatment program.
Find out whether someone there can help-
you. Good luck
Dear Annie: Another Mother's Day is
coming up and I'd like your opinion.
Should a husband honor his wife on
Mother's Day? My husband says I am not



o--------- T dy's
Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"Hannah Montana: The Movie" (G) 11:30
a.m., 2 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:30 p.m. No
passes.
"Observe & Report" (R) Noon,.2;30 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Fast & Furious" (PG-13) 11:40'a.m., 2:10
p.m., 4:40 p.m., 10:05'p.m. No passes.
"The Haunting in Connecticut" (PG-1.3)
11:45 a.m., 2:20 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Monsters vs. Aliens" (PG) 11:50 a.m.,
2:15 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:1.5 p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Knowing" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 9:55 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Dragonball Evolution" (PG) Noon, 2:30
p.m., 5 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Observe & Report" (R) 12:30'p.m., 2:45
p.m., 5:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:1.0 p.m.


his mother, so he is not obligated to buy me
a present or even a card. He also does not
take any initiative to help our young chil-
dren with a Mother's Day gift or card.
What do you think? Am I expecting too
much? - Sad Mother
Dear Sad: A thoughtful hus-
band sees that his young chil-
dren acknowledge their mom on
Mother's Day A loving husband
will also let his wife know how
much he appreciates her and
not ignore what she considers a
special occasion. Your husband
sounds like he's looking for,an
excuse not to be bothered.
. Becoming angry and resentful
solves nothing. Buy yourself a
nice gift and sign the card from
' ..,* : .your husband, and then gush to
-BOX him how much you love it.
Dear Annie: I had a good
laugh at "Not Trying to Be Burly
About Kimberly,'' whose husband's family,
even after being told, still insists on call-
ing her Kim.
My husband and I have been married for
13 years. We are of different races and re-
side in the North. All his family lives in the
Deep South They must know my name is
Julie by no\\ But even after being corrected
numerous times, they all call me Judy and
even send mail addressed that way
At first I was offended and thought they
didn't like me. I also considered that maybe
thl.e couldn't pronoullnce the letter "L." But,
alteryea rsi pt'knoi ing them, and the bonds
of love and caring that have formed, I've
learned that li e is too shortto wonry about
\v hat someone calls me. It's more important
h at they call. -Julie, Judy
Dear Julie: You sound like one classy
lady Thanks for your input.
Happy Easter to all our Christian read-
ers.
-----9*---
.Annie's Mailbox is written byKathy
.. ilrchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers column.
Please e-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, PO. Box 118190,
Chicago, IL 60611. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox, and read features
by other Creators Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate
SWeb page at wwwcreators.com.




"Hanna Montana: The Movie" (G) 11:30
a.m., 2 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:30 p.m. No
passes.
"Fast & Furious" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 2:50
p.m.', 5:20 p.m., 7:55 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No
passes.
"The Haunting in Connecticut" (PG-13)
12:10 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 7:35 p.m.,
10 p:m.
"12 Rounds" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 2:55
p.m., 5:30 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Monsters vs. Aliens" (PG) 11:45 a.m.,
2:15 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Knowing" (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:20 p.m.,
5:05 p.m., 7:50.p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"I Love You Man" (R) 11:55 a.m., 2:25
.p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 9:45
p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline. cor for area
movie listings and entertainment informa-
tion.


-Today'sHO OSCoe T


Your Birthday: You could experi- standing is likely to arrive through heart rule your head. Y
ence some pleasant surprises in a loved one who demonstrates far more fulfilling and s;
the year ahead. It may seem as if just how valuable relationships be a loving pragmatist.
everyone for whom you ever did a are. This insight will mean a lot to Sagittarius (Nov. 23-D
favor will want to find a way to do you. This can be a priceless
something nice for you. A couple Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - You unselfishness pays off
of them could be quite meaningful. could meet someone with whom - make sure that everyth
Aries (March 21-April 19) - you'll fall instantly in love, either out well for those you lI
Lucky you, because even though figuratively or literally. At any rate, you'll reap the rewards
you'll play no role in bringing it your life will become much more Capricom (Dec.22-Ja
about, there is a good chance you fulfilled because of this person as Without even trying, yo
could benefit from something that. time moves on. meanor will be exceptic
another has worked ard to put to- Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -A pealing to others. You'r
gether. spirit of cooperation and a sense come off like a sparklin
Taurus (April 20-Ma 20) - The .of fair play are your greatest as- captures the attention (
benefits of the day are not limited sets. These attributes will be in- Aquarius (Jan. 20-Fet
to sharing activities witi family and stantly recognized by your Depending upon how y
friends. Any situation here there companions and make them feel things, you're likely to t
is a large gathering coi Id find you -extremely comfortable around fortunate in drawing m<
smack-dab in the midd. . you. . sessions to you or extn
Gemini (May 21-June 0) - Be- Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - travagant with what you
cause your efforts are I dedicated to labors of I ve, this to pull off what we are hoping to Pisces (Feb. 20-Marcl
will turn out to be an e emely achieve; other times, we sail right What you know might i
productive and worthwhile day. through without a hitch. The latter more important than wl
You'll enjpy and take pri e in every s likely to be the case today. know. You could end .l
task you need to perform . Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - maker between two pe
Cancer (June 21-July 2 ) - When it comes to decision-making love because of sometl
Some new knowledge ad under- With'regard to loved ones, let your know.



CITRUS COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL PET PROFILES


The Citrus County Animal
Control Shelter has onlin list-
ings of impounded animal at
animal control.citrus.fl.us. elect
"Animal Type," etc. and seach.
The shelter is in Invemess
near the airport. The shelter


ing, and it is open for adoptions
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday,
STuesday, Wednesday and Fri-
day, from 10a.m. to 6 p.m.
Thursday and'from 10 a.m. to
2 p m. Saturday.
For more information, call


phone hours are 8 a.m. to clos4'.the Citrus County Animal Shel-


ter at 726-7660.
Financial assistance for
spaying and neutering of an
adopted pet is available
through the Humanitarians of
Florida at 563-2370 or from
the Humane Society of Citrus
County at 341-2222.


Heidi Frisky rar-. . (none) Aliyah Charlie Coco
AGE: 6yrs, AGE:?. I? AG ? AE-: 5.5yrs. ASGE: 4yrs. AGE: 3yrs.
SEX: SF .. r-!.-: M :;'" SF .7E': SF .SEX- NM SEX: SF
ID: 7441318,0 C. 7429242 ,'u:.: 7380236 ID: 7432937 ID: 7433124 10: 7224140




Sunday i----


Puzzle answer is on Page A12.


ACROSS
1 Kind of anes-
thetic
6 Thespian
11Weary, in a way
16Whistle sound
21 Western Indian
22Gleam
23Die down
24Matisse or
Rousseau
25Had a meal
26Clairvoyance (2
wds.)
28- Pradesh.
29Acquire
30Timber tree
31 The dawn per-
sonified
32Scorches .
34Native of (suffix)
35Love god
37Skill-
38Young bird
40- de Janeiro
41 Crimson
42Give off
44Dish
46Throw high up
49Spade
52Period of calm
53Kitchen item
55Weak
59Garmentpart
60Bluefin
61 Healthcare facility
64Was bold enough
65Form of "John"
66Crooned
67Servant
68Steal from
70Chimed
71 Long fish
72Antitoxins
73Listen!
74Money earned.
76Call - - day


77The patella
.79- passim
80Town in Okla-
homa
82British "Mac"
84Cabbage salad
85- avis
86Wrinkle
87Leave unmen-
tioned
88Difficult situation
90Declare
91 ndia -
92Paints
95United
96Uncanny
98Pointed arch
100 - -a-brac
101 Little island .
102 Make smooth by
rubbing
10.4 Demand pay-
ment from.
105 Portal
106 "Born Free" li-
oness
107 Norway's capital
108 Bring on oneself
110 In arrears
112 Campus org.
113 Javelin"
114 Move unsteadily
116 Water barrier
117'Resign
118 Ferocioius
119 River in France
121 Use a ruler
124 Cdntented
sound
125 Baste
128 Wager
130 Lane for bowling
131 Colleen
132 The rudiments
136 Hasten
137 Foundation
139 Armed conflict
140 Small room


141 Dead lang.
142 Potato state
144 Kind of light
.147 Tolerate
149 Whoop it up
150 Substantial
151 Notched, as a
leaf
152 Literary cate-
gory
153 River in England
154 Rims
.155 Hinder
156 More peculiar















DOWN
1 Rustic house
2 Willow rod
3 Bel - singing
4 Time
5 Directed
6 State firmly
7 Swindle
8 Clock sound
9 Yoko-
10Subscription
order
11 Long-eared
hound
12Kimono sash
13Cloths for clean-
ing
1401d anesthetic


15Particular
16Therefore
17Rainy
18Stage direction
19Rub out
20All in
27Dummy
30Kite appendage
33Housetop
36Playing card
38- podrida
39Lukewarm
430tt or Gibson
44Box-shaped
sleigh
45Howard or Perl-
man
47Nourished
48Salty drop.
49Glossy
5OPiace of refuge
51 Iridescent quality
52Moon goddess
54Harangue
56Challenging puz-
zle
57Slowly, in music
58- Rice Bur-
roughs
60Field cover
61 Jalopy
62More probable
63Gear tooth
66Alga
67Chewy cookie
69A flower
72Climb
73Charter
741n the - of an
eye.
75Tanning material
78Wapiti
79Rescue
81 Muses' number
83Energy
85Drizzled
88Take as a given


89Silly
92Formerly, for-
.merly "
93Pastel color
94Boutique
97Abrade;
99Deity
100 Raucous sound.
103 Something .
obligatory
105 A -- dozen
106 Cleveland's lake
107 "Aida" is one
109 Legal, matter
111 Showy actor
112 Rage
113 Knight's title
115 McEntire the
singer
117 Questioned
118 Sated
120 Take up anew
122 Eternally
123 Eastern Euro-
pean
124 Equivocate
125 Jersey.
126 Kind of duck
127 Use a loom
129 Like some roofs
131 Web-footed
birds
133 Kind of date or
alley
134 Army personnel
135 Direct
137 Run away
138 For men only
140 Coagulate
143 Farm animal
145 Itinerary (abbr.)
146 Mineral
147 In the past
148 Cot


"You feel so helpless when cancer hits. The American Cancer Society
aRelay For Life allows you to fight back, gives you hope that we are
.going to make a difference, find a cure, save lives."


American Cancer Society Relay For Life Volunteer


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atisfying to

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big. Just
ing comes
ove, and

an.19)-
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onally ap-
e apt to
g light that
of a crowd.
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be either
material pos-
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much joy.
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be much
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SPORTS


0 NBA, NHL/B2
0 Sports briefs/B2
0 MLB/B3
N Scoreboard/B4
0 Tennis/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
N Olympics, football/B5
0 Golf/B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Teen Logano wins on Nationwide


18year-oldemeges

firm Pepsi300 with

victory Saturday

Associated Press
GLADEVILLE, Tenn. - Teen
star Joey Logano raced to his sec-
ond career NASCAR Nationwide
Series victory, holding off Joe
Gibbs Racing teammate Kyle
Busch in the Pepsi 300 on Satur-
day at Nashville Superspeedway.
The 18-year-old Logano and


Busch ran in the top two and
traded the lead for most of the
race, with Logano leading the
final 10 laps and finishing 0.487
seconds in front.
Brad Keselowski, the Nashville
winner last June, was third, fol-
lowed by Kelly Bires was fourth
and series leader Carl Edwards,
Jason Leffler and David Ragan.
With the exception of two laps
under caution, either Logano or
Busch led over the final 89 laps
on the 1.333-mile track. Some
tense moments ensued immedi-
ately after Logano claimed the
lead for the last time when crash
sent Joe Nemechek's car tum-


bling near the finish line and
brought out the red flag.
"I wasn't too nervous. I was just
driving as hard as I could,"
Logano said. "I knew I had to have
a good restart but Kyle had one,
too and he was bearing down on
me in one and two, but he couldn't
get out to a lead."
A weekend of wild weather that
featured thunderstorms and tor-
rential rain Friday, was followed
by cloudy conditions that gave way
to bright sunshine during the race.
And 10 cautions for 40 laps, in ef-
fect shortened the race.
"We were really good on short
See LOGANO/Page B4


Associated Press
Joey Logano (20) passes Michael McDowell (47) during the NASCAR
Nationwide Series 300 auto race Saturday in Gladeville, Tenn.


masterful knot


r �


Associated Press
Angel Cabrera waves to the gallery after finishing his third round at the Masters golf tournament Saturday at the Augusta National
Golf Club in Augusta, Ga. Cabrera finished with an eleven-under par to co-lead the tournament with Kenny Perry.

Cabrera, Pey all tied up at 11-under heading intofinal day ofMasters


Associated Press
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Angel
Cabrera and Kenny Perry
have proven they can handle
the pressure on golf's biggest
stage. Next up is Sunday at Au-
gusta National, a test unlike
any other they have faced.
Cabrera, who won the U.S.
Open two years ago at Oak-
mont, made three birdies on
the back nine and scratched
out an important par on the
final hole Saturday at the Mas-
ters for a 3-under 69.
Perry, who thrived under the
spotlight of a Ryder Cup in his


native Kentucky last Septem-
ber, overcame two mistakes
with his putter around Amen
Corner and finished with five
straight pars for a 70 to join the
Argentine in the lead.
It will be the first time
they've played in the final
group at a major.
And not just any major.
They were at 11-under 205,
the lowest 54-hole score at the
Masters since the course was
supersized seven years ago.
The back nine at Augusta Na-
tional is among the most in-
tense in golf, and officials are
expected to set up the course


to allow for birdies and eagles.
"I'm lucky enough to be in a
very good position," Cabrera
said. "I haven't been in this po-
sition before so I'll try to make
the most of it"
Perry lost in a playoff at the
PGA Championship at Val-
halla in 1996, when he was
criticized for being in the
broadcast booth instead of
keeping loose on the practice
range. He never would have
imagined that all these years
later, he would have a chance
to become golf's oldest major
champion at 48.
"The first two days felt like I


was on vacation," Perry said.
"Today felt like a job."
They had a two-shot lead
over Chad Campbell, who led
briefly on the back nine until a
blunder on the 16th hole when
he took two shots to get out of
the bunker, made double
bogey and wound up with a 72.
Jim Furyk, another former
U.S. Open champion, shot 68
and was three shots behind at
8-under 208.
The Masters began with the
anticipation of Tiger Woods
and Phil Mickelson going
head-to-head in the final


See ',i'1 I;..Page B4


Associated rress
Kenny Perry, left, shakes hands with Chad Campbell on the 18th green following the third round of the Masters on Saturday.


Orioles


slam Rays

Mora's HR leads

to bigfirst inning

for Baltimore

Associated Press
BALTIMORE - Melvin Mora's
third career grand slam capped a
five-run first inning against Tampa
Bay rookie Jeff Niemann, and the
Baltimore Orioles got six shutout
innings from Jeremy Guthrie in a
6-0 victory Saturday night
Nick Markakis had two hits and
an RBI for the Orioles, who have
won two straight over the defend-
ing AL champions to clinch their
first series win against Tampa Bay
since Aug. 3-5, 2007.
Baltimore, which opened the
season by taking two of three from
the New York Yankees, is 4-1 for
the first time since 2000.
Guthrie
(2-0) al- RAYS BOX
lowed five
hits and I For the boxscore
w a 1 k e d from the Orioles-
none in Rays game,
lowering please see:
his ERA to PAGE B3
2.25. It's the
first time in
his career the right-hander has
won his first two decisions.
Relievers Matt Albers, Jamie
Walker and Chris Ray preserved
Baltimore's first shutout since
April 19,2008, against the Yankees.
Evan Longoria went 2-for-4 for
the Rays to up his batting average
to .455. But his run of four straight
games with at least one RBI ended.
The first six Orioles reached
base against Niemann, the only
rookie on the Rays' roster. Brian
Roberts led off with a double and
Niemann (0-1) hitAdam Jones with
a pitch before Markakis doubled in
a run. After Aubrey Huff walked,
Mora hit an 0-1 pitch over the cen-
ter-field wall, his first grand slam
since June 2005, at Detroit
Ty Wigginton followed with a sin-
gle before Niemann finally settled
down.
Guthrie, in contrast, retired the
first seven Rays before Gabe Gross
singled and took third on a double
by Jason Bartlett. Gross was
thrown out at the plate on a
grounder by Akinori Iwamura, and
Carl Crawford popped out
Longoria and Carlos Pena sin-
gled to open the fourth, but neither
advanced.
Baltimore went up 6-0 in the
sixth. Niemann was pulled after
giving up successive walks, and
Roberts greeted Brian Shouse with
an RBI single.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays pitcher Jeff Nie-
mann walks to the mound after giv-
ing up a grand slam home run to
Baltimore Orioles' MeMn Mora In the
first inning Saturday In Baltimore.














Bolts grounded by Thrashers


Panthers net 7

goals vs. Capitals

S-Assoiaitd Press

ATLANTA - Ilya Kovalchuk
scored his 43rd goal, and the At-
lanta Thrashers snapped a three-
game skid with a 6-2 victory over
the Tampa Bay Lightning on Sat-
urday night in final game of the
season for both teams.
Colby Armstrong scored twice,
Eric Perrin, Ron Hainsey and
Colin Stuart added goals, and
Kari Lehtonen made 24 saves.
Tampa Bay rookie Steven
Stamkos, the No. 1 overall draft
pick, scored his 23rd goal early in
the third period, and Matt Pet-
tinger added a goal. The Light-
ning closed the season with a
nine-game winless streak, drop-
ping the last four in regulation.
Flyers 3, Islanders 2
UNIONDALE, N.Y. - Martin Biron
stopped 30 shots and Simon Gagne
had the game-winning goal and an
assist as the Philadelphia Flyers beat
the New York Islanders 3-2 on Satur-
day.
Joffrey Lupul and Mike Knuble also
scored for the playoff-bound Flyers,
who can finish as high as fourth in the
Eastern Conference depending on
the outcome of several later games.
Sean Bergenheim and Tim Jack-
man scored for the Islanders, who
have lost three in a row.
The Islanders-took 13 of the
game's first 16 shots and Bergenheim
scored on No. 13 - taking a pass
from Doug Weight and beating Biron
for his 15th goal of the season at
14:06.
Lupul tied it up at 5:04 of the sec-
ond period during Philadelphia's first
power play. His wrist shot from the
top of the right circle got past Yanis
Danis.
The Flyers took a 2-1 lead on their
second power play, as Knuble fin-
ished off a scramble in front of the net
by putting the puck past Danis. Jack-
man tied the game at 15:23 on a shot
that surprised Biron.
Gagne restored Philadelphia's lead
52 seconds later on a wrist shot.
Devils 3, Hurricanes 2
NEWARK, N.J. - Dainius Zubrus
scored with 4:26 to play and the New
Jersey Devils took advantage of
some favorable bounces to beat the
Carolina Hurricanes 3-2 on Saturday
in a possible preview of a first-round
playoff series. " -
David Clarkson and Zach Parise
also scored for the Devils, who won
four of their last five games after en-
during a season-high six-game losing
streak.
Anton Babchuk scored two power-
play goals for the Hurricanes, who
gave star goaltender Cam Ward the
last day of the regular season-off after
28 straight starts.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning goaltender Mike McKenna (30) makes a save against Atlanta Thrashers right wing
Colby Armstrong (20) during the first period Saturday at Philips Arena in Atlanta.


Michael Leighton had 32 saves in
filling in for Ward, but he made a bad
clearing play on the game-winner by
Zubrus and also was embarrassed
when two bad bounces led to open-
net goals in the first period.
The loss was the second straight
for Carolina, which will have to wait to
find out its opening-round opponent.
If Philadelphia wins its last two games
this weekend, and Pittsburgh beats
Montreal on Saturday night, the Hurri-
canes will be the No. 6 seed in the
Eastern Conference and will face the
Devils, the No. 3 seed.
Blackhawks 4, Red Wings 2
DETROIT - Dustin Byfugliuen
scored on a penalty shot with 28 sec-
onds left, breaking a tie and lifting the
Chicago Blackhawks to a 4-2 win
over the Detroit Red Wings on Satur-
day.
SNikras Hjpalmarssbr netted his first
NHL-goal, and Ben Eagerand An --
drew Ladd also scored for Chicago.
Brian Campbell chipped in with two
assists, and Cristobal Huet stopped
21 shots.
Valtteri Filppula and Henrik Zetter-
berg scored for Detroit. Ty Conklin
made 22 saves.
Byfuglien was hooked by Niklas
Kronwall on a partial breakaway and


was awarded the penalty shot. He
beat Conklin with a high shot for his
15th goal.
SLadd added an empty-net goal with
10 seconds remaining.
Sabres 6, Bruins 1
BUFFALO, N.Y. - Thomas Vanek
scored two goals, including his 40th,
and had an assist in the Buffalo
Sabres' season-ending 6-1 win over
the Boston Bruins on Saturday that
clinched the Presidents' Trophy for
the San Jose Sharks.
Mikael Tellqvistmade 33 saves,
and Tim Connolly and Matt Ellis had
a goal and assist each for the Sabres,
who were eliminated from playoff
contention this week. Daniel Paille
and Chris Butler also scored in help-
ing Buffalo finish on a 7-2-1 run.
The Bruins (52-19-10), who close
the regular season at the New York
Islanders on Sunday, will settle for
having the best record in the Eastern
Conference. Their loss ended their
bid to catch San Jose for the NHL's
top mark.
Mark Recchi spoiled Tellqvist's bid
for a shutout by deflecting in Matt
Hunwick's point shot with 6:05 re-
maining.
Canucks 1, Avalanche 0, OT
DENVER - Henrik Sedin scored


40 seconds into overtime and
Roberto Luongo stopped 22 shots
for his second straight shutout, help-
ing the Vancouver Canucks clinch
the Northwest Division title with a 1-0
win over the Colorado Avalanche on
Saturday.
By edging Calgary for first place,
Vancouver's second division crown in
three seasons, the Canucks also
locked up the third seed in the West-.
ern Conference playoffs in their final
game of the regular season. Vancou-
ver (45-27-10) will enter the postsea-
son on a three-game winning streak.
Sedin scored by banking in a shot
off the skate of Colorado defenseman
Scott Hannan. It was his 22nd goal of
the season.
Kings 4, Sharks 3
LOS ANGELES - Wayne Sim-
monds had a goal and an assist, and
Jonathan Quick made 27 saves'as
the Los Angeles Kings finished their
season with a 4-3 win over the San
Jose Sharks, who still won the Presi-
dents' Trophy on Saturday.
The Sharks (53-18-11) secured the
top record in the NHL for the first
time in club history when the Boston
Bruins lost 6-1 at Buffalo earlier Sat-
urday.
Michal Handzus, Alexander Frolov


and Peter Harold also scored for the
Kings (34-37-11), who didn't qualify
for the playoffs.
Devin Setoguchi, Joe Pavelski and
Patrick Marleau had goals for San
Jose, which wrapped up the regular
season and will be the top-seeded
team in the Western Conference play-
offs.
Penguins 3, Canadiens 1
MONTREAL - Maxime Talbot and
Kris Letang scored short-handed
goals 27 seconds apart midway
through the third period to send the
Pittsburgh Penguins to a 3-1 win over
the Montreal Canadiens on Saturday
night.
Evgeni Malkin, poised to claim his
first NHL scoring title, increased his
point total to 113 with his 35th goal
1:09 into the game for Pittsburgh. The
Penguins will face Philadelphia in the
first round of the playoffs, with home-
ice advantage to be determined Sun-
day when the Flyers host the New
York Rangers.
Roman Hamrlik scored for Mon-
treal, which will be the No. 8 seed in
the Eastern Conference and face top-
seeded Boston in the postseason.
Panthers 7, Capitals 4
SUNRISE - David Booth had two
goals and three assists to lift the
Florida Panthers to a 7-4 win over the
Washington Capitals on Saturday
night in the regular-season finale for
both teams.
Steve Eminger and Michael Frolik
scored in an 8-second span to break a
4-4 tie in the third period. Nick Tar-
nasky added an empty-netter with 9
seconds remaining. '
Radek Dvorak and Bryan McCabe
also scored for the Panthers, who
were eliminated from playoff con-
tention on Thursday. Booth's goals
were his 30th and 31st of the season;
he became the sixth player in Florida's
franchise history to reach the 30-goal
mark.
Alexander Semin scored twice for
Washington, and Brooks Laich and
Alexander Ovechkin also got goals.
The Capitals clinched the second
seed in the Eastern Conference on
Thursday.
Wild 6, Blue Jackets 3
COLUMBUS, Ohio - Marian Ga-
borik had two goals and an assist to
lead the Minnesota Wild past Colum-
bus 6-3 on Saturday night, ruining the
Blue Jackets' celebration for their first
playoff berth. : -. ,-, '
Kurtis Foster and Mikko Koivu each
added a goal and an assist, and Marc-
Andre Bergeron and Martin Skoula also
scored for the Wild, eliriihated fromrthe
postseason picture on Friday night.
The Blue Jackets, who clinched
their first postseason trip in their eight
NHL seasons on Wednesday, entered
the night in sixth place in the Western
Conference.
Rick Nash, Jared Boll and Derek
Dorsett had goals for Columbus,
which led 2-0 after the opening 6
minutes.


Indiana outpaces Detroit


Nes tnick Magic

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS -
Danny Granger scored 24
points and the Indiana Pac-
ers stalled the Detroit Pis-
tons' bid for a higher playoff
seed with a 106-102 victory
Saturday night
Indiana led by 12 early in
the final quarter, but De-
troit rallied and took a 102-
101 lead on a basket by . .
Richard Hamilton with 56
seconds to go. The Pacers
went back in front on a-
spinning layup by Jarrett
Jack and iced the game
with one free throw by
Troy Murphy with 16 sec-
onds left and two foul shots .......
by Granger with 5 seconds
to go. 1
Hamilton led Detroit with
23 points.
Nets 103, Magic 93
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
- Vince Carter had 27 points
and nine assists, and the New
Jersey Nets ended Orlando's bid
for the No. 2 seed in the Eastern
Conference by beating the
Magic 103-93 on Saturday night.
The Magic (58-22) may have
lost more than the No. 2 seed.
Star forward Hedo Turkoglu
hurt his left ankle with 6:51 left
in the game and he had to be
helped to the locker room.
There was no immediate word
on his condition.
Keyon Dooling added 12
points and 10 assists for the
Nets, who played without All-
Star guard Devin Harris (shoul-
der). Rookie Brook Lopez Associated Press
added 13 points and 11 re- Detroit Pistons' Rodney Stuckey, left, is fouled as he shoot by Indiana Pacers' Roy Hib-
bounds for the Nets. bert in the first half Saturday In Indianapolis.


Florida's Moody has
surgery on hand
GAINESVILLE - Florida
running back Emmanuel Moody
underwent surgery Friday on
fractured bone in his hand but
could still play in next Satur-
day's Orange & Blue game.
Moody had several pins
placed in his hand to stabilize
the fracture and is expected to
return to practice on Monday.
He was hurt during practice
Wednesday and did not prac-
tice Friday or Saturday.
Moody rushed for 417 yards
and one touchdown on 58 car-
ries last season. The 6-foot,
210-pound redshirt junior sat
out the 2007 season after
transferring to Florida from
Southern Califomia. He rushed
for 459 yards (5.8 per carry)
and two touchdowns in nine
games for the Trojans in 2006.
Federer marries
longtime girlfriend
BASEL, Switzerland -
Roger Federer married long-
time girlfriend Mirka Vavrinec
Saturday in a small ceremony
in his hometown.
The second-ranked tennis
player announced the wed-
ding on his Web site, saying
the couple got married "sur-
rounded by a small group of
close friends and family."
Federer is set to play in next
week's Monte Carlo Masters
after accepting a last-minute
wild card invitation Thursday.
Federer is a three-time finalist
at the clay-court tournament
but has never won.
After struggling with his
form last year and losing his
No. 1 ranking to Rafael Nadal,
Federer is aiming for his sixth
Wimbledon title this summer.
He lost to Nadal in the Aus-
tralian Open final, the year's


first major.
Bills' Whitner zapped,
arrested in Cleveland
COLUMBUS, Ohio-
Cleveland police say Buffalo
Bills defensive back Donte
(DAWN'-tay) Whitner has
been shocked with a stun gun
and arrested by officers trying
to control a rowdy crowd out-
side a nightclub.
Lt. Thomas Stacho says the
23-year-old was jailed early
Saturday for aggravated disor-
derly conduct and resisting ar-
rest but hasn't been charged.
The former Ohio State
player has been released. A
prosecutor will decide whether
to file charges.
Police say they shocked and
handcuffed Whitner outside
the downtown House of Blues
when he forced his way past
them and then broke free from
officers trying to restrain him.
Whitner says in a statement
he regrets the incident. He's
the third Bills player to run into
trouble with the law this year.
Phoenix earns
2011 All-Star nod
PHOENIX - Commissioner
Bud Selig says the Arizona Di-
amondbacks earned the right
to host the 2011 All-Star game
with persistence and an im-
pressive bid.
Selig announced the selec-
tion Saturday at a news con-
ference at Chase Field, the
home of the Diamondbacks.
Phoenix becomes the first
first-time host of the All-Star
game since Denver in 1998.
Selig noted the tenacity the
Diamondbacks showed in pur-
suing the contest.
The Diamondbacks began
playing in 1998.


B2 sUNDAYAPRIL 12 20 9


Sports BRIEFS =


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AL


Toronto
Baltimore
New York
Tampa Bay
Boston



Atlanta
Florida
New York
Philadelphia
Washington


L Pet
1 .833
1 .750
2 .500
3 .400
3 400


East Division
GB WCGB

1 -
2 1
2/2 1'/2
2'2 1Hi

East Division
GB WCGB


1 1
2Y2 21/2
4 4


Detroit
Minnesota
Kansas City
Chicago
Cleveland



St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
Houston


Central Division
GB WCGB
- 1
- 1
- 1
'/2 1'/2
2V2 3V2

Central Division
GB WCGB

12 1
1 1'
1 112
2 2/2
21/2 3


Seattle
Texas
Los Angeles
Oakland


W
Colorado 3
San Diego 3
Arizona 2
San Francisco2
Los Angeles 2


West Division
GB WCGB
- -
1/2 12
1h 1V2


West Division
GB WCGB

H 1
1 1/2
1 12
1/2 2


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Toronto 5, Cleveland 4
Detroit 4, Texas 3
Seattle 8, Oakland 5
Chicago White Sox 8, Minnesota 0
Boston 5, L.A. Angels 4
Baltimore 6, Tampa Bay 0
N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, late
Today's Games
Toronto (Purcey 0-0) at Cleveland (A.Reyes 0-
0), 1:05 p.m.
Texas (Millwood 1-0) at Detroit (E.Jackson 0-0),
1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (J.Shields 0-1) at Baltimore (Eaton
0-0), 1:35 p.m.
Minnesota (Blackburn 0-0) at Chicago White
Sox (Buehrle 0-0), 2:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Chamberlain 0-0) at Kansas City
(Meche 0-0), 2:10 p.m.
'Boston (Beckett 1-0) at L.A. Angels (Moseley 0-
0), 3:35 p.m.. . ...._....
Seattle (Bedard 0-0) at Oakland (Cahill 0-0),
4:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Chicago White Sox (Floyd 0-1) at Detroit (Miner
1-0), 1:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Wang 0-1) at Tampa Bay (Kazmir
1-0), 7:08 p.m.
Baltimore (Uehara 1-0) at Texas (Padilla 1-0),
8:05 p.m.
Toronto (Litsch 0-1) at Minnesota (Slowey 1-0),
8:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Carmona 0-1) at Kansas City
(Greinke 1-0), 8:10 p.m.
Boston (Lester 0-1) at Oakland (Braden 0-1),
10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh 10, Cincinnati 2
St. Louis 11, Houston 2
N.Y. Mets 8, Florida 4
Atlanta 5, Washington 3
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, late
Philadelphia at Colorado;late ..
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, late
San Francisco at San Diego, late
Today's Games
N.Y. Mets (Santana 1-0) at Florida (Jo.Johnson
1-0), 1:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Snell 0-1) at Cincinnati (Harang 0-
1), 1:10 p.m.
Washington (Olsen 0-1) at Atlanta (Jurrjens 1-
0), 1:35 p.m.
Houston (W.Rodriguez 0-0) at St. Louis (Lohse
1-0), 2:15 p.m.
Philadelphia (Park 0-0) at Colorado (Cook 0-0),
3:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 0-0) at San Diego
(C.Young 1-0), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Wolf 0-1) at Arizona (Haren 0-1),
4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 0-0) at Milwaukee
(Suppan 0-1), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Houston (Moehler 0-1) at Pittsburgh (Duke 1-
0), 1:35 p.m.
Colorado (Jimenez 1-0) at Chicago Cubs (Lilly
1-0), 2:20 p.m.
Philadelphia (Moyer 0-1) at Washington
(D.Cabrera 0-1), 3:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Ra.Johnson 0-1) at L.A.
Dodgers (Billingsley 1-0), 4:10 p.m.
San Diego (W.Silva 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 1-
0), 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Volquez 0-1) at Milwaukee (Gallardo
1-0), 8:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Wellemeyer 0-1) at Arizona (D.Davis
0-1), 9:40 p.m.


' - " - " .. . . -- , - -- .. - .- - +

Associated Press
Boston Red Sox's Jason Bay watches a sblo homer against
the Los Angeles Angels during the ninth inning Saturday in
Anaheim, Calif.


Red Sox 5, Angels 4
ANAHEIM, Calif.- Jason Bay
homered twice and drove in three
runs; Brad Penny won'his American
League debut and the Boston Red
Sox beat the Los Angeles Angels 5-4
on Saturday.
Mike Lowell added a two-run shot
for the Red Sox, who ended a nine-
game regular-season losing streak
against Los Angeles. It's been a differ-
ent story in the postseason, however,
with Boston eliminating the Angels in
the first round of the playoffs three
times since 2004.
Jonathan Papelbon, who got the
final four outs, gave up a leadoff homer
to Torii Hunter in the ninth. The Angels
then loaded the bases with two outs
before Papelbon retired Howie
Kendrick - after seven foul balls on an
0-2 count - on a tricky line drive to
right fielder Rocco-Baldelli.
It was Papelbon's second save.
The Angels won the series opener
6-3 on Friday night following an emo-
tional tribute to teammate Nick Aden-
hart. The 22-year-old rookie pitcher
was killed along with two friends when
the car they were in was broadsided by


a minivan driven by a suspected
drunken driver hours after Adenhart-
pitched six scoreless innings against
Oakland on Wednesday night.


Boston


ab rhbi
Ellsurycf 4 0 1 0
Pedroia2b 4 0 0 0
D.Ortiz dh 4 00 0
Youkils lb 3 b0 0
Baldellirf 4 1 2 0
Bay If 3 32 3
Lowell3b 4 1 1 2
Lowriess 3 00 0
Varitek c 3 02 0

Totals 32 5 8 5
Boston 000 0


Los Angeles

Figgins 3b
Kndrck 2b
Abreu rf
Guerrr dh
Hunter cf
KMorls lb
Willits pr
JRiver If
Napoli c
EAyar ss
Totals
20 201-5


ab r h bi
3 1 1 0
501 0
3001
4000
4 1 1 1
4020
0000
4 0 0 0
3232
4 000
34 4 8 4


Los Angeles 101 010 001-4
DP-Boston 1, Los Angeles 2. LOB-Boston 3,
Los Angeles 7: 2B-Varitek (1), Figgins (2),
K.Morales (3), Napoli (2). HR-Bay 2 (2), Low-
ell (1), Hunter (1), Napoli 2 (2). SB-Ellsbury
(3), Figgins (4). CS-Ellsbury (1).
IP H RERBB SO
Boston
Penny W,1-0 6 5 3 3 2 2
R.Ramirez H,1 12-3 1. 0 0 0 1
Papelbon S,2-2 11-3 2 1 1 2 1
Los Angeles
SaundersL,1-1 7 7 .4 4 3 2
Jepsen 1 0 0 0 0 0
Speier 1 1 1 1 0 0
Umpires-Home, Ed Rapuano; First, Paul
Schrieber; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third,
Joe West.
T-2:54. A-40,163 (45,257).


Tigers 4, Rangers 3
DETROIT- Placido Polanco hit a'
tiebreaking double and five Detroit
Tigers pitchers combined.on a two-
hitter Saturday in a 4-3 victory over
the Texas Rangers.
Nate Robertson (1-0) earned the
win with two shutout innings of relief,
and Fernando Rodney struck out the
side in the ninth for his first save. De-
troit's bullpen didn't allow a baserun-
ner in four innings of work.
Tigers starter Justin Verlander
needed 97 pitches to get through five
Jiinnjgs. He allowed three runs -- one
earned -'ard two hits.;Hewalked.
Sfourand .struck out eight.
Matt Harrison (0-1) took the loss,
allowing four runs, nine hits and five
walks in 5 2-3 innings.
Hank Blalock homered and Josh
Hamilton drove in two runs for the
Rangers, who have lost seven straight
at Comerica Park.
Detroit has won the first two games
of the series after opening the season
by dropping three of four in Toronto.
Texas swept three games at home
from the Cleveland Indians to begin'
the season.
Polanco's two-out double off Harri-
son in the sixth scored Adam Everett
from first base to give Detroit a 4-3
lead. Everett had singled with one out.
It was Polanco's second double of
the game.


Texas

Kinsler 2b
MYong 3b
Hamltn cf
Blalock dh
N.Cruz rf
DvMrp If
C.Davis lb
Sltimch c
Andrus ss
Totals


ab rhbl
3 0 0 0
300 0
4 0 1
3 1 1 1
4 0 0 0
4 0 0 0
3 1 0 0
4 0 0 0
3 1 0 0
31 3 2 3


Detroit

S Grndrs cf
S Polanc 2b
Ordonz rf
MiCarr lb
CGuilln If
Thams dh
Laird c
Inge 3b
Everett ss


Totals


ab r h bi
4 0 1 0
5 1 2 1
3010
4000
2000
3 1 1 1
4 1 3 0
2000
3 1 2 2
30 410 4


Texas 010 020 000-3
Detroit 020 011 00x-4
E-lnge (2), Everett (2). DP-Texas 1. LOB-
Texas 5, Detroit 11. 2B-Polanco 2 (2), Laird
(1). HR-Blalock (2). CS-lnge (1). S-
Granderson. SF-Thames.
IP H RER BB SO
Texas
HarrisonL,0-1 52-3 9 4 4 5 2
Jennings 11-3 1 0 0 2 2
C.Wilson 1 0 0 0 0 0
Detroit
Verlander. 5 2 3 1 4 8
RobertsonW,1-0' 2 0 0 0 0 1
SeayH,3 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Perry H,1 1-3 0 0 0 0 '0
RodneyS,1-1 1 - 0 0 0 0 3
Umpires-Home, Gary Darling; First, Bill Hohn;
Second, Bruce Dreckman; Third, Paul Emmel.
T-2:30. A-28,693 (41,255).


Blue Jays 5, Indians 4 White Sox 8, Twins 0
CLEVELAND - Not even Cliff Lee CHICAGO - Bartolo Colon pitched
could stop Cleveland's slide, six strong innings and Carlos Quentin
The reigning Cy Young Award winner homered, leading the Chicago White
lost his second consecutive start and Sox to an 8-0 victory over the Min-
the Indians, expected to contend this nesota Twins on Saturday.
season, remained the ALs only winless After a rough spring training, Colon
team, losing 5-4 to Roy Halladay and handled the Twins' lineup with relative
the Toronto Blue Jays on Saturday to fall ease. He allowed just three hits with
to 0-5 for the first time in 24 years. two walks and two strikeouts, helping
Halladay (2-0), a 20-game winner the.White Sox end a three-game skid.
last season who finished second to theCh ite Sox en a wthreegame si
Lee in Cy Young balloting, held Cleve- Colon (1-0) is back with Chicago
land to one run and five hits in seven after going 15-13 in 2003 with a 3.87
innings, The right-hander struck out ERA. He went on to win the 2005 AL
seven, including two in a sticky second, Cy Young Award as a member of the
and was rarely in real trouble.- - -- Angels, buthasmace just 35 starts
Desperate for a clutch hit, theliidi- since because ofinjuries, _
ans finally got one in the ninth on Mark The White Sox took a chance on
DeRosa's two-out, three-run double off Colon in the offseason by signing him
closer B.J. Ryan to make it 5-4. But to a one-year, $1 million deal after he
with the potential tying run at second, was limited to seven starts with Boston
Jason Frasor struck out Victor Martinez last season because of back trouble.
for his first save. The burly right-hander, who had a
Lee (0-2) didn't drop his second de- 9.90 ERA in spring training, set down
cision until July 6 last season, when he the side in order in thersixth and
was already 11-1 and on his way to a walked off to apple fromtha
22-3 record. But the left-hander, who walked off to applause from the
shrugged off a shaky spring training as crowd of 33,935.
nothing to worry about, failed to get. Wilson Betemit hit a two-out double
past the fifth inning for the second time. in the fourth off Minnesota starter Fran-
He gave up four runs and seven cisco Liriano, and Alexei Ramirez
hits with four walks, and now has a snapped an 0-for-14 slump with an RBI
9.90 ERA. single to put Chicago ahead.
Toronto_ Cleveland M Minnesota Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi ab rhbi -abrhbi
Scutaross 1 11 1 Sizemrcf 4 11 1 SpanIf 2 0 0 0 Lillirdg2b 200 0
A.Hill2b 4 02 2 DeRosa3b 5 0 1 3 ACasill2b 40 0 0 Fields3b 4 1 1 0
Riosrf 3 00 1 VMrtnzlb 4 00 0 Mornealb 3 000 0Quentinlf 4 22 1
Wellscf 5 1 1 0 Choorf 4 02 0 Buschrph-lbl 00 0 Dyerf 3 1 1
Linddh 5 02 1 Peraltass 4 02 0 Kubeldh 4 01 0 Wiserf 10 0 0
Rolen3b 4 1 1 0 Garkodh 3 01 0 Cuddyrrf 4 02 0 Konerkdh 4 10 1
Millarlb 4 1 2 0 Shppchc 4 0 0 0 Crede3b 3 00 0 Betetntb 3 2 1 1
JMcDnlpr 0 1 0 0 BFrncsIf 4 1 1 0 Harrsph-3b 1 00 0 AIRmrzss 4 02 2
Overaylb 0 00 0 ACarer2b 2 20 0 Gomezcf 4 0 1 0 BrAndrcf 4 01 0
Barajs c 4 0 0 0 - . Rdmndc 4 00 0 CMillerc 4 12 2
BautistIf 4 0 20 Puntoss 2 0 2 0
Totals 34 5115 Totals 34 48 4 Totals 32 06 0 Totals 33 8108
Toronto 121 000 010-5 Minnesota 000 000 000-0
Cleveland 000 010 003-4 Chicago 000 140 30x-8
E-Rolen (1). DP-Toronto 2, Cleveland 1. DP-Chicago 1. LOB-Minnesota 10, Chicago
LOB-Toronto 12, Cleveland 8. 2B-Wells (3), 9.2B-Fields (1), Betemit (1). HR-Quentin (2).
Rolen (2), Sizemore (2), DeRosa (1), Peralta SB-Gomez2 (2), Punto (1), Lillibridge (1). S-
(1). SB-Sizemore (1), A.Cabrera (2). S-Bara- Lillibridge.
jas. SF-Scutaro, Rios. IP H R ER BB SO
IP H R ERBBSO Minnesota
Toronto Liinano L,0-2 42-3 6 5 5 4 3
HalladayW,2-0 7 .5 1 1 2 7 Guerrier 11-3 0 0 0 0 2
Downs 1 1 0 0 0 1 Humber- 2-3 4 3 3 2 1
B.J.Ryan 2-3 2 3 3 3 0 Crain 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
FrasorS,1-1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Ayala 1 0 0 0 0 2
Cleveland Chicago
CI.LeeL,0-2 5 7 4 4 4 5 Colon W,1-0 6 3 0 0.2 2
Chlulk . 21-34 1 1 0 0 Dotel 2-3 1 0 0 2 1
Jo.Smith 12-30 0 0 3' 1 Thornton H,1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
WP-CL.Lee. MacDougal 2 2 0 0 1 3
Umpires-Home, Randy Marsh; First, Lance HBP-by Liriano (Quentin).
Barksdale; Second, Mike Winters; Third, Umpires-Home, TedBarrett; First, Greg Gibson;
James Hoye. Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Tim McClelland.
T-3:08. A-20,895 (45,199). T-2:55. A-33,935 (40,615).


Braves 5, Nationals 3 Mariners 8, Athletics 5


ATLANTA - Kenshin Kawakami
pitched six effective innings to win his
major league debut, leading the Atlanta
Braves to a 5-3 victory over the Wash-
ington Nationals on Saturday night.
Kawakami allowed three runs and
four hits, walked four and struck out
eight. The 33-year-old right-hander is
the first Japanese-born ptayerinffrafi-
chise history. ,
Kelly Johnson went 3-for-4 and
drove in three runs one night after he
had the game-winning hit in the 10th in-
ning of a 6-5 win over the Nationals.
Chipper Jones andYunel Escobar had
run-scoring singles for Atlanta.
Ryan Zimmerman had a two-run
homer for the Nationals, who dropped
to 0-5.
Kawakami joined the Braves ih Jan-
uary, agreeing to a three-year deal as a
free agent. The 2004 Central League
MVP won 112 games in 11 seasons in
Japan.
Kawakami kept the Nationals off
balance with a fastball in the low 90s,
a slider in the mid-80sanda- a
changeup at 67-68 mph. He started a
little shaky, walking two with two outs
in the first and giving up Nick John-
son's RBI single. Zimmerman made it
3-0 with a drive into the right-field
stands in the third.

Orioles 6, Rays 0


Tampa Bay
ab rhbi
Iwamr2b 4 00 0
Crwfrdlf 4 0 1'0
Longori 3b 4 0 2 0
C.Penalb 4 01 0
Burrelldh 4 0 0 0
Joycecf 3 00 0
Navarrc 4 0 2 0
Grossrf 3 01 0
Bartlettss 4 01 0


Baltimore

BRorts 2b
AdJons cf
Markks rf
Huff lb
Mora 3b
Wggntn dh
Pie If
Zaun c
Clzturs ss


ab r h bi
5 1 2 0
4 1 1 1
5 1 2 1
3 1 1 0
3 1 1 4
3 0 1 0
4000
3 1 0 0
301 0


Totals 34 0 8 0 Totals 33 6 9 6
Tampa Bay 000 000 000-0
Baltimore 500 001 00x-6
DP-Baltimore 1. LOB-Tampa Bay 9, Balti-
more 9.2B-Longoria (3), Navarro (1), Bartlett
(2), B.Roberts (2), Markakis (2). HR-Mora (1).
SB-B.Roberts (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
Niemann L,0-1 51-3 6 6 6 4 3
Shouse 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
J.Nelson 2 2 0 0 1 3
Baltimore
GuthrieW,2-0 6 5 0 0 0 2
Albers 2-3 1 0 0 1 0
Walker 11-3 1 0 0 0 1
Ray 1 1 0 0 1 3
HBP-by Niemann (Ad.Jones).
Umpires-Home, Derryl Cousins; First, Jim
Joyce; Second, Bill Miller; Third, Brian Knight.
T-2:54. A-15,108 (48,290).


OAKLAND, Calif. - Kenji Johjima
had a two-run single in a four-run
eighth inning and the Seattle Mariners
rallied twice from deficits to beat the
Oakland Athletics 8-5 on Saturday.
Russell Branyan homered and
Franklin Gutierrez and Jose Lopez each
drove in two runs for the Mariners,who
Wodn their flircstfsaight. Mike Sweeney
added an RBI single in the ninth.
Seattle's eighth-inning rally began
when Bobby Crosby, making his debut
at third base, mishandled Sweeney's
grounder leading off. Adrian Beltre sin-
gled and Casilla walked Branyan to
load the bases.
A's closer Brad Ziegler took over
and gave up Lopez's two-run double
and Johjima's two-run single.
Miguel Batista (1-0) pitched two in-
nings in relief of Felix Hernandez.
Brandon Morrow recorded three outs
for his second save.
Jack Cust hit a two-run home run
and Landon Powell got his first major
league hit, a two-run double for the A's,
who lost their second straight.
Santiago Casilla (0-1) allowed
three runs - two earned - in one-
plus innings.


Seattle


ab rhbi
EnChvz If-rf 5 1 1 0
FGtrrzcf 4 0 1 2
MSwnydh 5 1 3 1
Beltre3b 5 1 1 0
Branynlb 3 22 1
Balentnrf 2 00 0
JoLopz2b 1 1 1 2
Johjim c 4 01 2
Cedeno 2b-lf3 1 0 0
YBtncrss 4 1 2 0
Totals 36 812 8
Seattle 000 120
Oakland 030 020


Oakland


ab r h bi
RSwnycf 5 0 1 0
OCarerss 3 02 1
Giambi b 4 12 0
Crosby3b 1 00 0
Hollidy If 4 0 0 0
Grcp.3b-1b5 0 1 0
Custdh 3 22 2
T.Buckrf 3 00 0
Ellis2b 3 1 0 0
Powellc 4 1 1 2
Totals 35 5 9 5
041-8
000-5


Cardinals 11, Astros 2 i Pirates 10, Reds 2


ST. LOUIS - Albert Pujols hit a grand
slam and a three-run homer to match a
career high with seven RBIs, leading the
St. Louis Cardinals to an 11-2 victory
over the Houston Astros on Saturday.
It was Pujols'24th multihomer game
and first since Aug. 16, 2008, against
Cincinnati. He matched his career best
for RBIs set Aug. 22, 2006, against the
New York Mets.
The All-Star first baseman went 2-
for-4 and is batting .429 with three
homers and nine RBIs in the team's
first six games.
Rick Ankiel and Joe Thurston had
three hits apiece for the Cardinals, who
finished with 19 hits overall. Adam Wain-
right (1-0) pitched five shutout innings.
Roy Oswalt (0-2) had a rare bad
outing at Busch Stadium, allowing six
runs and nine hits in six innings for the
Astros. He had a 1.83 ERA in five pre-
vious starts at the new Busch.
St. Louis scored five times in the
fifth inning to take a 6-0 lead. Pinch-hit-
ter David Freese doubled in a run be-
fore Skip Schumaker walked and
Colby Rasmus singled to load the
bases for Pujols, who hit Oswalt's first
pitch over the wall in left.


Houston

KMatsu 2b
Pence rf
Brkmn lb
Ca.Lee If
Tejada ss
Blum 3b
IRdrgz c
Quinter c
Bourn ct
Oswalt p
Michals ph
Wrght p
Hwkns p


ab rhbi
5 0 1 0
4020
2000
3 0 1 0
4000
4 1 1 0
3 0 1 0
1000
3 1 11
1000
1000
0000
0000


St. Louis


ab rh bi
Schm.2b-lf 4 2 2 1
Rasmsrf 4 22 0
Pujolslb 4 22 7
LaR.ph-1b 1 1 0 0
DuncanIf 4 1 1 0
Thmpsp 1 0 1 0
Ankielcf 5 0 3 1
YMolinc 5 02 0
Thur.3b-2b 4 2 3 1
BrRyanss 3 02 0
Wnwrgp 0 0 00
Freeseph 1 1 1 1
Motte p 0 00 0


E-Jo.Lopez (1), Crosby (1). DP-Seattle 1, JaSmth ph 0 0 0 1 Greene ph 1 0 0 0
Oakland 1. LOB-Seattle 5, Oakland 9. 2B- DReyes p 0 0 00
Jo.Lopez (1), O.Cabrera (2), Powell (1). HR- Bar.ph-3b 1 0 00
Branyan (2), Cust (1). CS-F.Gutierrez (1). Totals 31 2 7 2 Totals 38111911
S-FGutierrez. SF-O.Cabrera. Houston 000 000 002-2
IP H RERBBSO St. Louis 001 050 41x-11
Seattle DP-Houston 3. LOB-Houston 8, St. Louis 7.
FHernandez 5 7 5 5 2 8 2B-Thurston (4), Freese (2). 3B-Bourn (1).
Batista W,1-0 2 1 0 0 0 1 HR-Pujols 2 (3). CS-K.Matsui (2). S-Os-
M.Lowe H,1 1 1 0 0 1 0 walt, Br.Ryan, Wainwright. SF-Ja.Smith.
Morrow S,2-2 1 0 0 0 1 1 IP H R ERBBSO
Oakland Houston
Outman 41-3 6 3 3 2 3 Oswalt L,0-2 6 9 6 6 2 4
Wuertz 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 W.Wright 1 7 4 4 0 1
Springer H,1 1 1 0 0 0 0 Hawkins 1 3 1 1 0 1
S.Casilla L,0-1 H,2 1 1 3 2 1 0 St. Louis
Ziegler BS,1-3 1 2 1 1 0 0 Wainwright W,1-0 5 4 0 0 3 4
Gallagher 1 2 1 1 0 0 Motte 1 1 0 0 0 2
HBP-by F.Hernandez (Holliday). WP-FHer- D.Reyes 1 0 0 0 0 1
nandez, Outman. Thompson 2 2 2 2 1 1
Umpires-Home, Dana DeMuth; First, Kerwin WP-Wainwright,
Danley; Second, Doug Eddings; Third, Hunter Umpires-Home, Jerry Crawford; First, Tom
Wendelstedl. Hallion; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Ed Hickox.
T-2:57. A-19,560 (35,067). T-2:52. A-43,454 (43,975).


CINCINNATI - Paul Maholm al-
lowed only three hits in seven innings
Saturday and Ryan Doumit hit his first
career grand slam - one of three
Pittsburgh homers - as the Pirates
pulled away for a 10-2 victory over the
C irinrinni Reds,
Maholm-(1-0) got his first road win
since July 22, a stretch of futility that
was more a reflection of Pittsburgh's of-
fense than his pitching. The left-hander
gave up just seven earned runs in his
previous five road starts, but Pittsburgh
managed to score only eight runs.
The runs weren't a problem this time,
with the Pirates piling up a season high.
Nate McLouth.provided more than
enough with his two-run homer in the
first inning and run-scoring single in the
seventh. Pittsburgh pulled away in the
ninth, when Doumit hit his grand slam
off Mike Lincoln and Adam LaRoche fol-
lowed with his first homer of the season.
The Reds fell to 1-3 for the first time
since 2003, their first season in Great'
American Ball Park.
Johnny Cueto (0-1) struck ou nine
batters in six innings, but gave up five
extra-base hits - three doubles, a
triple and McLouth's second homer of
the season.
Pittsburgh Cincinnati
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Morgan If 4 23 1 Taverscf 3 00 0
FSnchz2b 5 1 1 0 HrstnJrIf 4 0 0 0
McLothcf 3 22 3 Vottolb 3 00 0
Doumitc 5 1 3 4 Phillips2b 3 22 0
AdLRclb 5 1 1 1 Encrnc3b 3 0 1 0
AnLRc3b 5 00 0 Bruce f 4 01 2
Mossrf 4 1 1 0 RHrndzc 4 0 00
JWilsonss 3 1 1 1 AIGnzlzss 3 00 0
Mahlmp 3 00 0 Cuetop 1 00 0
Grabowp 0 00 0 DMcDnph 1 01 0
Hinskeph 0 1 0 0 Herrerp 0 00 0
JChavzp 0 00 0 Burtonp 0 00 0
Owingsph 1 0 1 0
Lincolnp 00 00
Totals 37101210 Totals 30 2 6 2
Pittsburgh 200 200 105-10
iCincinnati 000 000 101--2
DP-Pittsburgh 1. LOB-Pittsburgh 5, Cincin-
nati 5.2B-F.Sanchez (3), Moss (2), J.Wilson
(2), Owings (1). 3B-Morgan (1). HR-McLouth
(2); Doumit (1), Ad.LaRoche (1). SB-Morgan 2
(3), Phillips (1). CS-J.Wilson (1). S-Taveras.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
MaholmW,1-0 7 3 1 1 2 3
Grabow 1 1 0 0 0 2
J.Chavez 1 2 1 1 1 0
Cincinnati
CuetoL,0-1 6 8 4 4 1 9
Herrera 1 1 1 1 1 3
Burton 1 0 0 0 0 0
Lincoln 1 3 5 5 3 0
Umpires-Home, Ed Montague; First, Jerry Layne;
Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Chris Guccione.
T-2:49. A-22,276 (42,319).


L..






S . ... -'


Associated Press
New York Mets third baseman David Wright, left, tags third
base for a double play after catching a line drive hit by Florida
Marlins' Hanley Ramirez during the third inning Saturday in
Miami. The Marlins' Emilio Bonifacio was out at third.


Mets 8, Marlins 4
MIAMI - Uvan Hernandez found a
way to beat the Florida Marlins: by throw-
ing curves slower than the team bus.
Hernandez used his off-speed stuff
to take a shutout into the seventh in-
ning, helping the NewYork Mets hand
the Marlins their first loss, 8-4 orrSatur-
day night.
Florida had been the last unde-
feated team in the majors, but Hernan-
dez tamed an offense that batted .309
and scored 31 runs as the Marlins won
their first four games. Meanwhile, Ricky
Nolasco (1-1) endured the poorest out-
ing so far by a Florida starter, allowing
four runs in five innings.
New Yorks Jose Reyes had his first
three RBIs of the season, including a
two-run homer. Luis Castillo went 4-for-
4, hiking his average from .100 to .357.
Carlos Delgado finished 3-for-4 with two
RBls for the Mets, who totaled 15 hits.
Although Florida proved to be beat-
able, Marlins leadoff hitter Emilio Bonifa-
cio continued to look unstoppable. He
went 3-for-5 with a double and an RBI
single, which raised his average to .583.
The game drew 39,412 fans, the
Marlins' largest crowd since Aug. 18,
2007, but not all were on the home
team's bandwagon. Many cheered for
the Mets, and they gave Hernandez (1-
0) a big ovation when he left the game
after 62-3 innings.
The 34-year-old right-hander
needed a strong spring to win the fifth
spot in the rotation after signing a
minor league contract in February. He
kept the Marlins off balance by chang-
ing speeds, such as when he struck


out rookie Cameron Maybin with a 60
mph curve..
A 62 mph curve sent Hanley
Ramirez almost spinning into the
ground when he swung and missed.
Ramirez and Jorge Cantu went a com-
bined 0-for-6 against Hernandez, who
.gave up-only six bits and two runs in the
longest outing so far by a Mets starter.
Four relievers completed the victory.


New York (NL) Florida
ab rhbi


ab r hbi


JReyesss 5 1 2 3 Bonifac3b 5 0 3 1
DnMrplf 4 2 1 0 JoBakrc 2 00 0
O'Day p 0 0 0 0 Paulino ph-c2 0 0 0
FRdrgzp 0 00 0 HRmrzss 5 01 1
DWrght3b 5 01 1 Cantulb 5 01 0
Delgadlb 4 03 2 Uggla2b 3 1 1 0
Beltrancf 5 01 0 HermidIf 3 0 1 0
Churchrf 4 12 0 Ross r 4 21 0
Schndrc 5 1 1 0 Maybincf 4 12 0
Castillo2b 4 34 1 Nolascop 1 00 0
LHrndzp 0 00 0 Carrollph 1 00 0
Stokesp 0 00 0 AMillerp 0 00 0
Felicinp 0 00 0 Helmsph 1 0 1 1
Cora ph 1 00 1 Pennp 0 00 0
Reed If 1 00 0 Gloadph D0 00 1
Totals 38 815 8 Totals 36 411 4
NewYork 001 031 030-8
Florida 000 000 202-4
E-D.Wright (1), Cantu (1), Bonifacio (1). DP-
New York 2, Florida 1. LOB-New York 10,
Florida 9.2B-J.Reyes (1), Delgado (1), Beltran
(1), Church 2 (5), Bonifacio (1). HR-J.Reyes
(1). SB-Hermida (1). S-Castillo, L.Hemandez
3. SF-Gload.
IP H RERBB SO
NewYork
L.HernandezW,1-0 62-3 6 2 2 3 4
Stokes 0 1 0 0 0 0
FelicianoH,1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
O'Day 11-3 3 2 0 0 1
FRodriguez 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Florida
Nolasco L,1-1 5 7 4 4 2 2
A.Miller 2 4 1 1 0 0
Penn 2 4 3 0 1 4
Stokes pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Umpires-Home, Tim Tschida; First, Bob David-
son; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Mark Carlson.
T-3:17. A-39,412 (38,560).


SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009 B3


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


I


I








Sr oUNtHIMr AUL 2IL, L20_


GOLF
Masters Par Scores
Saturday
At Augusta National Golf Club
Augusta, Ga.
Purse:TBA
Yardage: 7,435; Par: 72
Third Round
Angel Cabrera . 68-68-69-205 -11
Kenny Perry 68-67-70-205 -11
Chad Campbell 65-70-72-207 -9
Jim Furyk 66-74--68--208 -8
Steve Stricker 72-69-68--209 -7
Rory Sabbatini 73-67-70-210 -6
Shingo Katayama 67-73-70-210 -6
Todd Hamilton 68-70-72-210 -6
Tim Clark 68-71-72-211 -5
Seen O'Hair 68-76-68-212 -4
lan Poulter 71-73-68-212 -4
Lee Westwood 70-72-70-212 -4
Tiger Woods 70-72-70212 -4
Phil Mickelson 73-68-71--212 -4
NickWatney 70-71-71-212 -4
Stephen Ames 73-68-71-212 -4
Hunter Mahan 66-75-71-212 -4
Anthony Kim 75-65-72-212 -4
Steve Flesch 71-74-68-213 -3
CamiloVillegas 73-69-71-213 -3
Vijay Singh 71-70-72-213 -3
Dustin Johnson 72-772-214 -2
John Merrick 68-74-72-214 -2
Geoff Ogilvy 71-70-73-214 -2
Justin Rose 74-70-71-215 -1
Larry Mize 67-76-72--,15 -1
Padraig Harrington 69-73--73-215 -1
Sandy Lyle 72-70-73-215 -1
Graeme McDowell 69-73-73-215 -1
Aaron Baddeley 68-74-73-215 -1
Sergio Garcia 73-67-75-215 -1
Stuart Appleby 72-73-71-216 E
Rory Mcllroy 72-73-71-216 E
Luke Donald 73-71-72-216 E
Ken Duke 71-72-73-216 E
Henrik Stenson 71-70-75-216 E
Ryujilmada 73-72-72-217 +1
Trevor Immelman 71-74-72-217 +1
D.J.Trahan 72-73-72-217 +1
Robert Allenby 73-2-272-217 +1
PaulCasey 72-72-73-217 +1
Dudley Hart 72-72-73-217 +1
Bubba Watson 72-72-73-217 +1
Ross Fisher 69-76-73-218 +2
Ben Curtis 73-71-74-218 +2
Andres Romero 69-75-77-221 +5
Mlguel Angel Jimenez 70-73-78-221 +5
Rocco Mediate 73-70-78-221 +5
Kevin Sutherland 69-76-77-222 +6
Mike Weir 68-75-79-222 +6
Masters Tee Times
At Augusta National Golf Club
Augusta, Ga.
Sunday
10:25 a.m. - Kevin Sutherland, Mike Weir
10:35 a.m.- Miguel Angel Jimene, Rocco
Mediate
10:45 a.m. - Ben Curtis, Andres Romero
10:55 a.m. - BubbaWatson, Ross Fisher
11:05 a.m. - Paul Casey, Dudley Hart
11:15 a.m. - D.J. Trahan, Robert Allenby
11:25 a.m. - Ryuji Imada, Trevor Immelman
11:35 a.m. - Ken Duke, Henrik Stenson
11:45 a.m. - Rory Mcllroy, Luke Donald
11:55 a.m. - Sergio Garcia, Stuart Appleby
12:05 p.m. - Graeme McDowell, Aaron
Baddeley
12:15 p.m.- Padraig Harrington, Sandy Lyle
12:25 p.m.- Justin Rose, Larry Mize
12:45 p.m. - John Merrick, Geoff Ogilvy
12:55 p.m. - Vijay Singh, Dustin Johnson
1:05 p.m. - Steve Flesch, Camilo Villegas
1:15 p.m. - Hunter Mahan, Anthony Kim
1:25 p.m. - Nick Watney, Stephen Ames
1:35 p.m. -Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson
1:45 p.m. - lan Poulter, Lee Westwood
1:55 p.m.- Tim Clark, Sean O'Hair
2:05 p.m. - Shingo Katayama, Todd Hamilton
2:15 p.m. - Steve Stricker, Rory Sabbatini
2:25 p.m. - Chad Campbell, Jim Furyk
2:35 p.m. - Angel Cabrera, Kenny Perry

AU P IO HN :.:,' .

Nationwide Series
Nashville 300 Results
Saturday
At Nashville Superspeedway
Gladevllle,Tenn.
Lap length: 1.333 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (2) Joey Logano, Toyota, 225 laps, 143.3 rat-
ing, 195 points, $47,020.
2. (4) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 225, 133, 175,
$34,150.
3.(19) Brad Keselowski, Chevrolet, 225,114.5,
165, $32,893.
4. (10) Kelly Bires, Chevrolet, 225, 116.3,160,
$30,718.
5. (1) Car Edwards, Ford, 225, 118.6, 160,
$25,050.
6. (21) Jason Leffler, Toyota, 225, 104.5, 150,
$27,518.
7. (8) David Ragan, Ford, 225, 101.8, 146,
$17,050.
8. (7) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 225, 106.3, 142,
$22,418.
9. (6) Steve Wallace, Chevrolet, 225,90.2,138,
$22,143.
10. (38) Scott Lagasse Jr., Toyota, 225, 84.6,
134, $23,668.
11. (16) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 225,93.8,
130, $21,793.
12. (15) Jason Keller, Ford, 225, 87.8, 127,
$21,718.
13. (17) Burney Lamar, Toyota, 225, 91.9,124,
$24,118.
14. (35) Shelby Howard, Chevrolet, 225, 66.5,
121, $15,075.
15. (3) Michael McDowell, Toyota, 225, 91.9,
123, $24,718.
16. (12) Michael Watrip, Toyota, 225,76.2,115,
$14,925.
17. (14) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 225,
69.6,112, $21,318.
18. (18) John Wes Townley, Ford, 225, 64.5,
109, $14,750.
19. (13) Michael Annett, Toyota, 225, 73, 111,
$21,143.
20. (34) Dennis Setzer, Dodge, 224, 56.4,103,
$15,775.
21. (36) Jeff Green, Dodge, 224, 57.1, 100,
$14,550.
22. (23) Casey Atwood, Chevrolet, 224, 55.2,
97, $14,515.
23. (5) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 224, 77.2,
94, $21,348.
24. (37) Kenny Wallace, Chevrolet, 223, 43.7,
91, $20,913.
25. (24) Brian Scott, Toyota, 223, 69.5, 88,
$21,018.
26. (31) Eric McClure, Ford, 223, 49, 85,
$20,823.
27. (32) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 223, 41.8, 82,
$20,778.
28. (29) Scott Wimmer, Chevrolet, 222, 61.2,
79, $14,275.


29. (9) Justin Allgaier, Dodge, 222, 77.1, 76,
$20,708.
30. (41) Brandon Whitt, Ford, 222, 36, 73,
$20,973.
31. (39) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, 221,
34.6,70, $20,638.
32. (22) Danny O'Quinn Jr., Chevrolet, 221,
36.4, 67, $20,593.
33. (27)Tim Andrews, Chevrolet, 220,40.4,64,
$14,060.
34. (26) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet, accident,
218,67, 61, $20,508.
35. (40) Kenny Hendrick, Dodge, oil leak, 194,
45.8, 58, $20,488.
36. (43) Benny Gordon, Ford, handling, 157,
28.8, 55, $14,000.
37. (30) Ken Butler, Chevrolet, accident, 145,
53.4,52, $20,448.
38. (42) David Green, Toyota, accident, 144,
56.5,49, $20,428.
39. (2) JeremyClements, Chevrolet, sway bar,
132,40.7,46, $13,930.
40. (20) Kertus Davis, Chevrolet, brakes, 46,


For the record


Floida LOTTERY


Here are the winning
numbers selected
Saturdayin the
Florida Lottery:


CASH 3 (early)
1-0-9
CASH 3 (late)
0-9-9
PLAY 4 (early)
3-0-8-5
PLAY 4 (late)
6-4-3-2


Due to early deadlines, Fantasy 5, Mega Ball and Lot-
tery numbers were not available at press time. Please
see Monday's Chronicle for the winning numbers.


On the AIRWAVES-

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
10 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Sportsman Series
(Taped)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (TBS) New York Mets at Florida Marlins
1:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Tampa Bay Rays at Baltimore Orioles
8 p.m. (ESPN) Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee Brewers
3 a.m. (ESPN2) Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee Brewers
(Same-day Tape)
BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) Dallas Mavericks at New Orleans
Hornets
3:30 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) Boston Celtics at Cleveland
Cavaliers
6 p.m. (SUN) New York Knicks at Miami Heat
2 a.m. (ESPN) Boston Celtics at Cleveland Cavaliers
(Same-day Tape) B
BICYCLING
5 p.m. (VERSUS) 2009 Paris Roubaix (Taped)
BOWLING
11 a.m. (ESPN2) PBATeam Shootout (Taped)
1 p.m. (ESPN) PWBA Series Showdown (Taped)
2 p.m. (ESPN) PWBA Series Showdown (Taped)
3 p.m. (ESPN) NCAA Championship (Taped)
GOLF
2 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) The Masters - Final Round
HOCKEY
2 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) Detroit Red Wings at Chicago Blackhawks
OUTDOORS
9 a.m. (ESPN2) Fishing Mad Fin Shark Tournament. (Taped)
SOCCER
5 p.m. (62 UNI) America vs. Indios de Ciudad Juarez
9 p.m. (47 FAM) English Premier League: Chelsea vs.
Bolton Wanderers. (Taped)
TRACK AND FIELD
4:30 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) Triathlon Ironman World Championship
70.3. (Taped)


51.6, 43, $13,850.
41.(33) Brian Keselowski, Dodge, handling, 32,
34,40, $13,825.
42. (11) Terry Cook, Chevrolet, brakes, 20,
31.6, 37, $13,805.
43. (25) Johnny Chapman, Chevrolet, brakes,
15, 28.4, 34, $13,727.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 118.145 mph.
Time of Race:'2 hours, 32 minutes. 19 iec-
ends.
Margin of Victory: 0.487 seconds.
Caution Flags: 10 for 40 laps.
Lead Changes: 19 among five drivers.
Lap Leaders: C.Edwards 1-18; J.Logano 19-32;
C.Edwards 33-48; J.Logano 49-80; Ky.Busch 81-
82; J.Logano 83; KyBusch 84-86; J.Logano 87-
97; Ky.Busch 98-123; J.Logano 124; C.Edwards
125-135; J.Logano 136-141; Ky.Busch 142-150;
J.Logano 151-169; KyBusch 170-185; J.Logano
186; M.Annett 187; M.McDowell 188-194;
Ky.Busch 195-215; J.Logano 216-225.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): J.Logano, 9 times for 95 laps; Ky.Busch, 6
times for 77 laps; C.Edwards, 3 times for 45 laps;
M.McDowell, 1 time for7 laps; M.Annett, 1 time for
1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. C.Edwards, 959. 2.
Ky.Busch, 936.3. D.Ragan, 799.4. J.Leffler, 762.
5. Bra.Keselowski, 733.6. J.Logano, 728.7. JAIl-
gaier, 676. 8. B.Gaughan, 676. 9. S.Lagasse Jr.,
672.10. J.Keller, 667.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a
race.
The formula combines the following categories:
Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Run-
ning Position While on Lead Lap, Average Speed
Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-
Lap Finish.



NHL Standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L OTPts GF GA
y-New Jersey 51 27 4106244 209
x-Philadelphia 44 26 11 99261 234
x-Pittsburgh 45 28 9 99 264 239
x-N.Y. Rangers 42 30 9 93206 215
N.Y. Islanders 26 46 9 61 199 273
Northeast Division
W L OTPts GF GA
z-Boston 52 19 10114268 194
x-Montreal 41 30 11 93249 247
Buffalo 41 32 9 91 250 234
Ottawa 36 35 11 83217 237
Toronto 34 35 13 81 250 293
Southeast Division
W L OTPts GF GA
y-Washington 50 24 8108 272 245
x-Carolina 45 30 7 97 239 226
Florida 41 30 11 93 234 231
Atlanta 35 41 6 76 257 280
Tampa Bay 24 40 18 66210 279
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L OTPts GF GA
y-Detroit 51 20 10112295 241
x-Chicago 45 24 12102 261 216
x-Columbus 41 31 10 92 226 230
x-St. Louis 40 31 10 90232 233
Nashville 40 34 -8 88 213 233
Northwest Division
W L OTPts GF GA
y-Vancouver 45 27 10100 246 220
x-Calgary 45 30 6 96 250 247
Minnesota 40 33 9 89 219 200
Edmonton 38 34 9 85 233 244
Colorado 32 44 5 69 199 256
Pacific Division
W L OTPts GF GA
z-SanJose 53 18 11117257 204
x-Anaheim 42 33 6 90 241 233
Dallas 36 35 11 83230 257
Los Angeles 34 37 11 79 207 234
Phoenix 35 39 7 77 203 248
Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss or shootout loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Friday's Games
Minnesota 8, Nashville 4
St. Louis 3, Columbus 1
Edmonton 5, Calgary 1


Anaheim 4, Dallas 3, SO
Saturday's Games
New Jersey 3, Carolina 2
Philadelphia 3; N.Y. Islanders 2
Chicago 4, Detroit 2
Vancouver 1, Colorado 0, OT
Buffalo 6, Boston 1
Los Angeles 4, San Jose 3
Toronto 5, Ottawa 2
PiTltjurgn 3. U,-,rlr3i1
Atlanta 6, Tampa Bay 2
Minnesota 6, Columbus 3
Florida 7, Washington 4
Anaheim at Phoenix, late
Edmonton at Calgary, late
Today's Games
Detroit at Chicago, 2 p.m.
St. Louis at Colorado, 5 p.m.
Boston at N.Y. Islanders, 5 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 5 p.m.
End of Regular Season


y-Bostoi
x-Philad


NBA Standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
n 60 19 .759
lelnhia 40 39 .506


New Jersey 32 47 .405
NewYork 31 49 .388
Toronto 30 49 .380
Southeast Division
W L Pet
y-Orlando 58 21 .734
x-Atlanta 46 34 .575
x-Miami 41 38 .519
Charlotte 35 44 .443
Washington 19 61 .238
Central Division
W L Pct
z-Cleveland 64 15 .810
x-Chicago 39 40 .494
x-Detroit 39 41 .488
Indiana 35 45 .438
Milwaukee 32 47 .405
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
x-Houston 52 28 .650
x-San Antonio 51 28 .646
x-Dallas 48 31 .608
x-New Orleans 48 31 .608
Memphis 23 56 .291
Northwest Division
1 W L Pet
x-Denver 53 27 .663
x-Portland 51 28 .646
x-Utah 47- 32 .595
Minnesota 24 55 .304
Oklahoma City 22 57 .278
Pacific Division
W L Pet
z-L.A. Lakers 63 17 .788
Phoenix 43 36 .544
Golden State 28 51 .354
L.A. Clippers. 19 60 .241
Sacramento 16 63 .203
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Friday's Games
Cleveland 102, Philadelphia 92
Atlanta 122, Indiana 118
Boston 105, Miami 98
Washington 100, Toronto 98
Memphis 106, Phoenix 89
Detroit 100, New Jersey 93
Oklahoma City 84, Charlotte 81
NewYork 105, Orlando 95
Dallas 100, New Orleans 92
San Antonio 105, Utah 99
Portland 106, L.A. Lakers 98
L.A. Clippers 109, Sacramento 78
Houston 113, Golden State 109
Saturday's Games
Indiana 106, Detroit 102
Orlando at New Jersey, late
Phoenix at Minnesota, late
Charlotte at Chicago, late
Oklahoma City at Milwaukee, late
Golden State at Utah, late
Portland at LA. Clippers, late
Today's Games
Dallas at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Boston at Cleveland, 3:30 p.m.
New York at Miami, 6p.m.
Philadelphia at Toronto, 6 p.m.
San Antonio at Sacramento, 9 p.m.
Memphis at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.


Hewitt makes Houston



Open clay court finals


Associated Press

HOUSTON - Lleyton
Hewitt reached his first clay
court final in a decade with
a 7-6 (4), 6-4 victory over
Evgeny Korolev at the U.S.
Men's Clay Court Champi-
onships on Saturday.
The former world No. 1
will meet Wayne Odesnik of
the United States in Sun-
day's title match. Odesnik
reached the final with a 6-4,
6-3 victory over Germany's
Bjorn Phau.
Hewitt won his 498th ca-
reer match, moving him
closer to joining Roger Fed-
erer and Carlos Moya as the
only active players with 500
wins. A victory Sunday
would give Hewitt his first
title on clay since Delray
Beach in 1999.
Hewitt failed to win a
tournament in 2008 for the
first time since he turned
pro in 1998. He ended 2008
ranked No. 67 and currently
is No. 88. He's still undergo-
ing rehab for hip surgery
last August.
"It's always nice to win
tournaments," Hewitt said.
"Doing all the rehab is
worth it when you start win-
ning tournaments again.
Last year was frustrating for




Prep star suspended
for playing in exhibition
BURLINGTON, Iowa -What
was supposed to be a great day
at the ballpark for Cody Gabella
and his father has wound up
costing the youngster his junior
season.
Gabella, a junior infielder at
Notre Dame High in Burlington,
has been suspended for the
upcoming prep season after
making two plate appearances
with the Class A Burlington
Bees - who are managed by
his father, Jim Gabella - in an
exhibition against a local com-
munity college.


LOGANO
Continued from Page B1

runs and that was a factor at
the end to get that clean air
back on the nose," Logano
said. "That worked against
Kyle but it's really cool to
have a 1-2 finish forJoe Gibbs
Racing and it's a big deal for
the guys at the shop."
Despite his second-place
finish, Busch was noticeably
angry after the race. He has
run well at Nashville, but has
won only once - in 2003 in an
ARCArace.
"He had a better short run
car and we were better on the
long run," Busch said. "It's
just a shame we weren't able
to get out there and win this
thing. It's kind of frustrating."
Logano led nine times for a
race-high 95 laps. Busch led
six times for 77.
Edwards led three times
for 45 laps and was in con-


MASTERS
Continued from Page B1

round, and that's what hap-
pened. Trouble is, both were
seven shots behind and still
trying to convince them-
selves that they still had a
chance.
Woods began his Saturday
charge by hooking his tee
shot into the trees and mak-
ing double bogey His tee shot
on the par-3 sixth hit the base
of the pin and tumbled off
the green. He rallied with
three birdies over the last six
holes for a 70.
Mickelson's rally was
slowed by three poor chips,
and he escaped with a 71
only after hitting a big slice
from the trees on the 18th
hole that started down the
10th fairway and wound up
on the green. -
They were at 4-under 212.
"A lot of things happen on
Sunday at Augusta, and I
would never put it past hap-
pening again," Mickelson
said. "I think that at this golf
course, funny things can hap-
pen, and if you get momen-
tum on your side and you're
making some birdies, you
can make a lot of them."
And then he offered an-
other scenario that he and
Woods desperately need.
"When it starts coming
apart, it's hard to get it back,"
Mickelson said. "And it's easy


me. It was the first year I
wasn't able to win a tourna-
ment. It would be nice to
win tomorrow. Back when I
was No. 1, I was winning five
or six tournaments a year
consistently."
There were no service
breaks in the match until
the final game of the second
set, when Korolev fell be-
hind love-40 and lost on the
first match point with a
backhand that sailed past
the baseline.
Hewitt faced no break
points in the match and
gained control of the first-
set tiebreaker on four
straight errors by the Russ-
ian. Korolev hit a backhand
into the net to bring on the
first set point at 6-2. Hewitt
won tle set with'a strong
forehand to the corner just
out of Korolev's reach.
"It was good serving by
both of us actually," Hewitt
said. "It was a pretty high-
quality match, especially on
clay court to be able to hold
serve like we did. I had a
couple of chances in the
first set and he played a cou-
ple of big points.
Hewitt kept pressure on
Korolev in the second set
"I was serving my game
quite convincingly through-


Sports BRIEF
The Iowa High School Athletic
Association ruled that Cody
Gabella violated a rule that pro-
hibits prep athletes from playing
with or against collegians in their
own sport.
The Bees, a Kansas City
Royals affiliate from the Midwest
League, played an exhibition
game against Southeastern
Community College on Tuesday.
Jim Gabella said he cleared it
with Southeastem's coach and
the Royals to allow Cody an at-
bat late in the game if possible.
Jim Gabella told The Associ-
ated Press on Saturday that he
had no idea the rule was on the
books and would have never


tention until loose lug nuts
forced him to pit under green
just past the halfway mark
Edwards, who has three Na-
tionwide wins at Nashville,
was shuffled back to 20th.
Defending race champion
Scott Wimmer started 29th
and never challenged for the
lead en route to an 11th-place
finish. He also touched off a
caution on lap 124 when he
exited his pit stall with the
catch can attached before
dropping it in turn three.
A crowd that appeared to
be half of the announced
25,000 turned out for the race.
Many took advantage of the
track's new All Access promo-
tion that includes pre-race ac-
cess to the garage, front
stretch and driver's meeting.
Busch was not particularly
pleased with how the promo-
tion played out
"There were a lot of peo-
ple with a lot more access
than typical," Busch said.
"Some fans need to respect


to tumble."
There was little sign of that
happening with Perry and
Cabrera on a breezy after-
noon, on a course where the
greens remained relatively
soft from an overnight down-
pour
Perry became the first
player to reach 12-under par.
at any point in the tourna-
ment since 2002 when he
rolled in an 8-foot birdie on
the 10th hole, and it allowed
him to wonder if this might
really be his week.
But he three-putted from
just off the front of the llth
green of his first bogey, then
fell out of the lead on the par-
3 12th. After hitting over the
green, Perry tried putting up
the slope and hit it too hard,
the ball bouncing over the
cup 15 feet away for another
bogey
He recovered with a 4-iron
to about 25 feet for a two-putt
birdie on the 13th.
Woods left the course
knowing that even having a
remote chance would de-
pend on how the leaders
played the back nine. They
helped slightly but not run-
ning away, with Campbell
shooting a 38 on the back and
Perry getting around in 36.
The world's No. 1 player
has never won a major when
trailing after 54 holes, and
only once has he won when
trailing by more than seven
shots going into the final
round of any tournament


out the second set and I was
serving first so I was always
putting pressure back on
him to hold serve," Hewitt
said.
Wozniak upsets
Petrova in Ponte Vedra
PONTE VEDRA BEACH -
Canadian Aleksandra Wozniak
upset top-seeded Nadia
Petrova 6-4, 4-6, 6-2 Saturday
in the semifinals of The MPS
Group Championships.
She will meet second-
seeded Caroline Wozniacki,
who beat Elena Vesnina in the
other semifinal 2-6, 6-3, 7-6 (4).
Wozniak, the tournament's
No. 5 seed, won the first set
and led 4-1 in the second be-
fore Petrova, ranked 10th in the
world, came back to win five
straight games.
"She stepped it up in the sec-
ond set," Wozniak said. "I
started backing up. Of course,
my emotions got involved, but I
found my composure in the third
set. It feels good to beat the top
seed and a top-10 player."
Wozniak, who had 35 win-
ners, built a 3-0 lead in the third
set. She withstood the Russ-
ian's rally with a variety of well-
placed shots to every area of
the court.




jeopardized his son's eligibility if
he did.
Jim Gabella said an appeal is
in.the works, and he's hoping
that the high school association
will factor in his lack of knowl-
edge of the rule.
"He wants to play at the next
level, and it was an idea of hav-
ing him play against a junior col-
lege who is recruiting him and
have a chance to see him play
myself," Jim Gabella said of
Cody. "It didn't work out the way
we planned."
It wasn't all bad for Cody
Gabella, though. He ripped a
single up the middle and fin-
ished 1-for-2.


the drivers a little more be-
cause they're bringing suit-
cases of diecasts for us to
sign. Yeah:it's ourjob to sign
for the fans and to treat
them nice, but when they
have three suitcases, that's a
little ridiculous."
Logano also won last year
at Kentucky
"We spent a lot more hours
working on the car than we
did sleeping," said Dave
Rogers, Logano's crew chief.
"We spent a lot of time trying
to figure out how much to
tighten up the front side and
how free to we leave the back
side.-We couldn't do both so
we just tried to shoot the gap.
"We got the win, but in
hindsight, we probably got it
a little too good on the front
and not good enough on the
back so the cautions did play
in to our favor. We adjusted
according to the conditions
and just kept tweaking it out,
little by little, as the race
wore on."


"That was a hell of a fight,"
Woods said. "I'm pretty
proud of the fact I got myself
back in the tournament, con-
sidering that I didn't hit it as
well as I wanted to and had
two three-putts."
The forecast was for sun-
shine and fireworks, perhaps
a back-nine charge not seen
this decade at Augusta Na-
tional.
Steve Stricker played
bogey-free for a 68 that put
him four shots behind at 7-
under 209, with former
British Open champion
Todd Hamilton (72), Shingo
Katayama (70) and Rory
Sabbatini (70) another shot
behind.
One player too far out of
contention is Padraig Har-
rington, who saw his hopes of
a third straight major end on
the second hole when he
twice hit a tree and took a
quadruple-bogey 9. He shot a
73 and was 10 shots back
Only once in the last 18
years at the Masters has the
winner not come out of the
final group) which bodes well
for Perry and Cabrera. Even
so, Perry glanced at the white
leaderboard behind the 18th
green and realized Sunday
would be no picnic.
"There are actually quite a
few guys who have a shot at
this thing tomorrow," he said.
"You will definitely see
something happen on the
back nine, where somebody
is going to win it"


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SCOREBOARD


Ia o ....Q.., ... . 17 ,?*o

















McIlroy's sand Midwest ames?
swipe causes fuss


Associated Press

AUGUSTA, Ga. - What a
kick Rory McIlroy has been at
Augusta.
The 19-year-old phenom
was surprised to discover he
had caused an uproar by
smoothing the sand after a
bad bunker shot Friday. The
rules committee got involved,
there was talk of disqualifica-
tion and the mop-topped teen
from Northern Ireland found
himselfas the center of atten-
tion at his first Masters - for
all the wrong reasons.
"It wasn't a tantrum," McIl-
roy said, looking far more
composed Saturday after-
noon than he had a day ear-
lier "In the rules it says a kick,
and a kick is when you take
your foot out of the sand and
back in. A smoothing of the
sand is what I did. I might
have done it a little vigorously,
but that was my intent It was-
n't my intent to test the sand."
When McIlroy failed to get
his ball out of the bunker on
the 18th hole, he took a
swipe at the sand with his
right foot Players are forbid-
den from testing the surface
before hitting any shots in a
hazard, and a penalty would
have disqualified McIlroy
because it would change his
score after he'd already
signed his card.
McIlroy was longgone from
the course when word fil-
tered out that the rules com-
mittee was reviewing what he


had done. It wasn't until a few
hours after play finished that
Mcllroy was cleared to play
the weekend.
"It's in the past now, and I
am looking forward to shoot-
ing a low round tomorrow,"
he said after a 1-under 71 got
him back to even for the
tournament
"It was probably a bit of a
fuss made of it," he added.
"But I will know in the fu-
ture not to smooth the sand
so vigorously"
McIlroy was the head ofthe
under-20 Kiddie Corps at this
year's Masters. The group in-
cludes Ryo Ishikawa and
Danny Lee and already
they're winning tournaments
- professional ones - and
setting records. They're tal-
ented, charismatic and, given
time, mightjust make a run at
Tiger Woods.
They're so good, it would-
n't have been a shock to see
any of the three on the
leaderboard. And sure
enough, there was McIlroy at
4-under through 15 holes
Friday But he had a spectac-
ular collapse on the last
three holes, dropping five
strokes to tumble out of con-
tention and onto the cut line.
McIlroy said he always
swipes the sand after his
bunker shots to clean up his
footprints before the sand is
raked. He did that very thing
Friday after failing to get his
first bunker shot out, never
giving it a second thought


Associated Press
Rory Mcllroy chips to the second green Saturday during the
third round of the Masters golf tournament in Augusta, Ga.


Assumlau rresa
A Chicago 2016 emblem appears in lights in a high rise building, left, as newly refurbished Buckingham Fountain welcomed
the Intemational Olympic Committee Evaluation Commission on Tuesday in Chicago. The fountain and the city have been
spruced up in time for the IOC's six-day visit with hopes of becoming the host city for the 2016 summer Olympic games.


Chicago gets high

marks for Olympics

presentation

Associated Press

CHICAGO-At the end of a long day
touring potential venues for the 2016
Summer Games, the head of the Inter-
national Olympic Committee's inspec-
tion team walked into the United
Center and right into a hug from gym-
nastics legend Nadia Comaneci.
If it looked like a reunion of old
friends, it was. But it also underlined a
key strategy by organizers who hope the
IOC will select Chicago for the games:
Show and let somebody else tell.
The IOC members had spent more
than 10 hours seeing for themselves
that most of the events would be in the
heart of the city, minutes not only from
each other but also from parks, muse-
ums and the aquarium. They'd been
driven down Lake Shore Drive and
saw right outside their windows many
venue sites, including the Olympic
Village and Lake Michigan itself.
Now came one of the world's most
famous gymnasts adding her voice to
a chorus that included President
Barack Obama, Secretary of State
Hillary Clinton, and two Chicagoans
whose first names - Michael and
Oprah - are quite enough, thank you.
Whether it all worked remains to


be seen. The IOC commission's chair-
woman, Nawal El Moutawakel, of-
fered a glowing assessment of
Chicago, the support the bid enjoys in
the community and some components
of the plan itself. But with Chicago's
competitors - Tokyo, Madrid and Rio
de Janeiro - left to visit, she ulti-
mately said little more than that
Chicago remains in the running.
Bid organizers and others agreed
that Chicago succeeded in presenting
its case to the IOC, which will select
the bid city during a vote in October.
"I think we were very pleased with
their reaction," Chicago 2016 leader
Patrick Ryan said.
Ryan was satisfied the IOC saw that
visitors could walk to many of
Chicago's venues, while the remain-
ing sites are within short drives of
each other and attractions such as
Millennium Park
"The IOC has had enough bad ex-
periences with bus schedules, buses
that never worked right," said A.D.
Frazier, chief operating officer for the
1996 Atlanta Games. "When (commis-
sion members) have got to defend
their choices to their colleagues, they
like to say 'It's a two-minute walk"'
Ed Hula, editor of Around The
Rings, a Web site devoted to
Olympics coverage, said he suspects
the venue locations were not lost on
the IOC team.
"Some of these cities you're going
to, it's 30, 45 minutes to get to this
place or that place," Hula said. Of
course, he added, they didn't take


them to the site of the equestrian
events near the Wisconsin border "or
put them on a Greyhound to Wiscon-
sin (the site of the cycling venue).
"They're wise," he said of the IOC.
"They know what they haven't seen."
Organizers also placed great
emphasis on the voices supporting
the bid.
By the time Comaneci and her hus-
band, Olympic gymnastics gold
medalist Bart Conner, were chatting
with El Moutawakel, commissioners
had seen videos from Obama and
Clinton and talked in person with top
Obama adviser Valerie Jarrett
Together, their message was clear:
The federal government, not to men-
tion a popular president who talks
wistfully about a games blocks from
his Chicago house, is behind the bid
and will do whatever it takes to make
sure they're successful.
Clinton's words, in particular,
about streamlining the process of get-
ting "the Olympic family" in and out
of the country may have resonated
with the IOC.
"That was a message they needed
to hear and they heard it from a per-
son at the highest level of govern-
ment," Hula said.
El Moutawakel admitted to being
impressed.
She should be, said Frazier, who
noted American bids simply don't get
this kind of federal support at this
stage. Atlanta, he said, never got it.
But it's a good sign of how things
would go in Chicago.


Defense,


during si
Associated Press

ATHENS, Ga. - The San-
ford Stadium scoreboard
said the Red team won
Georgia's G-Day spring
game on Saturday, beating
the Black team 13-3.
Rennie Curran said he
knew better.
The real winner of the an-
nual spring game was Geor-
gia's defense, which didn't
allow a touchdown until
Carlton Thomas scored on a
20-yard run with only 9 sec-
onds remaining.
The game matched Geor-
gia's first-string defense,
which played for the Black
team, against the starting of-
fense, which played for the
Red team.
When Thomas finally
scored in the final seconds,
the starters were not on the
field for the Black's defense.
When the first-string defen-
sive players were on the
field, they contained Joe Cox,
Caleb King, AJ. Green and
the other starters on offense.
Defensive end Justin
Houston capped his strong
spring with four tackles for
26 yards in losses, including
three sacks. Bryan Evans
had an interception and
starting linebackers Curran,
Akeem Dent and Darryl
Gamble each had two stops.
"I feel we took care of
business when we were all
out there," Curran said.
Marcus Washington had
three sacks for the Red
defense.
Former quarterback
Matthew Stafford, who
could be the No. 1 overall
pick in this month's NFL
draft, and tailback Know-
shon Moreno, also expected
to be a first-round pick,
watched from the sideline
as Cox, King and others
competed for the vacated
starting spots.
Cox and the Black team's
starting quarterback, Logan
Gray, each were hurt by
dropped passes.
Cox was 9-of-16 passing
for 105 yards. Gray was 9-of-
13 passing for 91 yards.
Freshman Zach Metten-
berger, playing behind Cox,
was 0-for-3 passing with an


e shines for UGA


ring football game
interception. Another fresh- real cool cat"
man, Aaron Murray, was 3- Thomas, a 5-foot-7, 170-
of-5 passing for 62 yards, pound freshman from Frost-
including a 43-yard comple- proof, Fla., had eight carries
tion to Marquise Brown. for 59 yards. King had seven
Cox, a senior, used the carries for 22 yards.
spring practice to affirm his Coach Mark Richt said


status as the heavy favorite
to replace Stafford. He
opened the game by com-
pleting a 35-yard pass to
Green on a flea-flicker.
The other highlight for
Cox came in the fourth
quarter when the game was
tied 3-3. Cox completed a 22-
yard pass to tight end Aron
White on a third-and-20 play
to set up Andrew Jensen's
48-yard field goal that gave
the Red a 6-3 lead.
"It definitely wasn't our
best offensive day, but we
did some good stuff," Cox
said.
Cox said he was "com-
pletely comfortable" while
playing before the crowd of
42,458 and ESPN national
TV audience.
"Joe just has a cool about
him," White said. "He's a


the tailback competition re-
mains "wide open."
Richard Samuel, who
joined King as backups be-
hind Moreno in 2008,
missed spring practice with
a wrist injury. Redshirt
freshman Dontavius Jack-
son was limited with a knee
injury. Walk-on Kalvin
Daniels missed time with a
shoulder injury, leading
coaches to give fullback
Fred Munzenmaier some
snaps at tailback
Freshman Washaun
Ealey will join the depth
chart at tailback in presea-
son practice.
"As of right now, I'd say we
would play more than one
guy," Richt said. "I don't
think we'd feature one guy
right now. That might
change."


Sunday, April 19, 2009
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club "The Oaks"
Scramble Shot-Gun Start at I p.m. Please chen
at 12 50 p.m
IPlease make checks payable and mail to: Project Graduation
P.O. Box 481
Lecanto, FL 34460
I -ENTRY FORM-
S PRINT NAME PHONE NUMBER
I1. I
S2. I
i 3.
4.







Includes golf green feest cart fees and pizza immediately
Hole Sponsorship





following on the wooden deck above the ProShop. Prizes
awarded for top 5 places and special door prizes will also
be given away. CI Ni L E.
OfRONWIE;


SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009 B5


SPORTS


CnIRus COUNTY' (FL) CHRONICLE
















ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spodight on
PEOPLE

Paparazzo likened
to zombie
LOS ANGELES -
Woody Harrelson is liken-
ing a paparazzo he tus-
sled with at a New York
airport to one of the un-
dead zom-
, bies he
' battles in
his up-
coming
film.
In a
statement
released
Woody Friday,
Harrelson Harrelson
jokingly
compares the scrutiny of
the paparazzi to the
packs ofundead he con-
fronted in "Zombieland."
"I wrapped a movie
called 'Zombieland,' in
which I was constantly
under assault by zombies,
then flew to New York,
still very much in charac-
ter," Harrelson said.
"With my daughter at the
airport I was startled by a
paparazzo who I quite un-
derstandably mistook for
a zombie."
Celebrity gossip site
TMZ posted a video on
Thursday of Harrelson
chasing one of their pho-
tographers who followed
the actor and his 12-year-
old daughter through La-
Guardia Airport. TMZ
said Harrelson broke the
photographer's main
camera, and the pa-
parazzo is heard repeat-
edly accusing Harrelson
of assault - while he con-
tinued to follow the actor.

O'Neal held
without bail
LOS ANGELES -A
judge on Friday ordered
the son ofFarrah Fawcett
and Ryan O'Neal to be
held without bail while
he awaits sentencing on a
probation violation.
Redmond O'Neal ap-
peared in court Friday
and admitted he had vio-
lated the terms of his pro-
bation for a previous drug
conviction, court records
show. A judge revoked
the 24-year-old's bail and
ordered a sentencing
hearing for next week
He faces up to three
years in state prison for
the violation, and still has
a pair of pending drug
cases.
O'Neal has been jailed
since Sunday, when he
was arrested at a jail
north of Los Angeles on
suspicion of carrying
heroin. O'Neal had been
sentenced to a drug diver-
sion program after plead-
ing guilty to
methamphetamine and
heroin possession
charges in June.

Actor's band halts
Canadian tour
TORONTO - Billy Bob
Thornton's band has can-
celed the rest of its Cana-
dian tour after the actor
compared the country's
fans to mashed potatoes
with no
gravy inma a
testy in-
terview
that
caused a
sensation
online.
The
Billy Bob Boxmas-
Thornton tears
opened
for Willie Nelson on
Thursday in Toronto,
where they reportedly
were booed and met with
catcalls of "Helre comes
the grayy"
A note posted on Nel-
son's Web site Friday said
the Box masters ere
canceling the rest of their
Canadian dates "due to
one band nimemnber and
several of the cre\w ha\-


Ing tile flu "
The cancellation came
two days after Thornton
made world head lines
with a belligerent ap-
pearance on CBC radio's
"Q."


Twitter friends meet - for first time - at dinner


JEFF HOUCK
The Tampa Tribune

VALRICO -
* t's a formal dinner party, so
/ there are knives and forks
and spoons and napkins at
each chair. A lovely, towering
flower arrangement anchors the
middle of the dining room. Wine
glasses sparkle in front of every
plate.
And two laptops sit humming on
the blood-red tablecloth.
This isn't just a dinner party; it's
a Twitter dinner party. The guests
know each other from the social
networking site, where members
become masters of electronic
ephemera. They may share their
innermost thoughts, as long as they
can be "tweeted" in fewer than 140
characters, but not many share
their real name.
In the kitchen, @DolceDebbie is
sliding mushrooms stuffed with
prosciutto into the oven. Debbie is
hosting this dinner of local Twitter
friends with @mmWine, a 38-year-
old IT specialist who works for a
security company in West Palm
Beach. He's not a sommelier. He's
just a guy who has a deep passion
for sharing and demystifying new
wines that taste more expensive
than they cost The two hit it off on
Twitter
He's pairing Italian styles with
Debbie's menu and broadcasting
live video of the party on a site
called Twitter Taste Live. The site,
started by Boston wine distributor
Craig Drollett, lets fans of wine,
beer and spirits gather to talk
about their favorite adult bever-
ages.
Fifteen minutes after the mush-
rooms emerge, @dolcedebbie
pushes Spiced Lamb Pillow pas-
tries into the oven for the first
course, while one of her guests,
@MissAttitude, pecks out observa-
tions on the keyboard of her Black-
Berry "I'm drinking prosecco!" she
tweets to her followers on Twitter
The menu for tonight isn't ex-
actly a mystery. Debbie posted it on
the social networking site earlier
in the week, right before she told
the hundreds of people who follow
her tweets that she was busy clean-
ing her house for the party
As the 12 guests arrive, they in-
troduce themselves first by their
Twitter names. Although they've
talked online, some for many
months, it's a room full of familiar
strangers meeting face-to-face for
the first time.
The rock star of the room, from a
Twitter point of view, is @TS-E1-
liott, who arrives with her hus-
band, @mikeelliott.
Being followed on Twitter (hav-
ing people actively choose to read
what you write) is the real cur-
rency of social media. If the num-
ber of followers reading her tweets
translated to offline fame, @TS-
Elliott's online clutch of 24,000 fol-
lowers would make her a celebrity.
How big? She's only a few thou-
sand shy of @schwarzenegger
The Elliotts live in Lithia and
run NetGenPr, a social media con-
sulting and public relations busi-
ness that helps companies "have
a con ersation" \i lth their
clients and cus-


Twitter glossary
Twitter (www.twitter.com) is a
social networking Web site where
users can blog up to 140 charac-
ters at a time either through their
computer or by phone or mobile
device. Here are some of the
basic terms:
* Tweet: A post published on
Twitter.
R Followers: Twitter users who
sign up to read another user's
tweets.
* Twitter Taste Live: A site
where Twitter users who like to
post about wine, beer and spirits
gather. Soon to change its name
to Taste Live (www.tastelive.com)
* FTW!: Shorthand for show-
ing enthusiasm or approval. An
acronym for the phrase, "For The
Win!"
* RT: To "retweet," or repeat a
tweet by someone else, identify-
ing the source in that post.
* Hashtag: A word posted im-
mediately after a '#" sign, the use
of which allows users to group
jheir tweet with a particular event
or conversation. (For example,
the hash tag for Twitter Taste Live
is #ttl.)
* Tweetup: A meeting of Twit-
ter users at a specific location of-
fine.
* Failwhale: An illustration of a
whale displayed by Twitter when .
the service has a technical mal-
function.

"She's the real social one," he
says. In her Twitter bio, @TS-El-
liott says she's a "Social Butterfly
- I believe in the butterfly effect
and chaos theory."
The guests stick to their Twitter
names throughout the dinner.
Even @BarryFrangiapane calls his
wife, @DolceDebbie, by her online
handle (without the trademark
Twitter @ sign, of course). He does
this in real life as well, she says.
The couple hosts culinary vaca-
tions to Italy twice a year through
their Savory Adventures tour
company. She also teaches local
cooking classes, is a personal
trainer at Shapes, works as a
caterer and personal chef, and
records online cooking instruc-
tional videos.
"Barry and a friend who does
our marketing and Web site de-
cided I needed to have a catchy
stage name," she says. Translated
from Italian, dolce means "sweet"
As dinner begins at 6:30 p.m.,
@mmWine starts broadcasting on-
line, talking about the Paolo Scav-
ino Dolcetto D'Alba 2006 he's
paired with the appetizers. The
wine's fresh, fruity flavor balances
well with the bold flavors of the
mushrooms and lamb, he an-
nounces into the camera, which
then relays the video into a panel
on Twitter Taste Live for several
hundred members who are fol-
lowing the party remotely
Every electronic publishing toy
imaginable is


welcome at this table, and within
a few minutes, an interesting dy-
namic begins to take shape in the
room. Each member of the party
begins to grapple with a complex
conundrum: Do I eat? Do I drink?
Do I reintroduce myself? Do I
chat or do I tweet? And how rude
would it be to tweet what some-
one just did or said?
At one end of the table, @The-
BeerWench decides not to choose.
Her laptop is perched precari-
ously on a corner, next to her
plate. She's also tapping out
tweets on a phone in between
bites of food and sips of Dolcetto.
And for good measure, she stops
over at @mmWine's electronic
perch to exchange tasting notes in
front of the camera.
As with any dinner party, occa-
sional gaps in conversation occur.
When they do, each guest finds an
outlet for the uncomfortable si-
lence. Personal chef and wine
blogger @chefjerseygirl is the
chattiest and most energetic con-
versationalist. Sitting across the
table next to @TheBeerWench,
@RebekahReidy, a 23-year-old
business student from St Peters-
burg, folds her hair behind her
ears and retreats to the keypad of
her phone. @MissAttitude and
@TS-Elliott do the same. Next to
her, @mikeelliott gets the nerve to
pull out his laptop to show off
sites that help Twitter users get
the most out of their tweeting.
It isn't until an hour into the
party that their real-life conversa-
tion begins to flow as easily as it
does online. While the guests sip a
hearty 2003 Sant Orsola Barolo
and nibble on beef tenderloin
with creamy herbed polenta, the
ice officially breaks. Several si-
multaneous conversations break
out as the floral centerpiece is re-
located. For a moment, it's as if
everyone is releasing their caged-
up conversation back into the
wild. While posting their thoughts
about that experience to Twitter,
of course.
'A year and a half ago, I didn't
know anything about Twitter, and
now, all of a sudden. it's, like, this
big thing," @MissAttitude says. A
news producer at a local TV sta-
tion and columnist for a Tampa
women's magazine, she's also a
devotee of other social sites such
as Facebook and Plurk Most
everyone else at the table con-
fesses to having a toe in one or
more online homes other than
Twitter as well.
"That was one of the most in-
triguing and interesting parts of
the event for me," Debbie says
after the party. "It's a dinner party,
but it's not. I heard comments
about how liberating it was to sit
there at the table, have your com-
puter and telephone, and be able
to freely talk to these people virtu-
ally and not be in trouble with
your host or your spouse."
By the time the baked stuffed
peaches make it to the table for
dessert, and the sweet, bubbly
2007 Sant Orsola Moscato D'Asti
fills their glasses, the vibe in the
room is that of a gathering of old
friends
Not inm ted' That's O)K You
can read about it on T'\ it-
Stetr


~;fL~i


-, ... a :, ir.,. - Irronicle


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Today in
HISTORY

Today is Easter Sunday,
April 12, the 102nd day of
2009. There are 263 days left
in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On April 12, 1861, the
American Civil War began as
Confederate forces bom-
barded Fort Sumter in South
Carolina.
On this date:
In 1606, England's King
James I decreed the design
of the original Union Flag,
which combined the flags of
England and Scotland.
In 1877, the catcher's
mask was first used in a
baseball game, by James
Tyng of Harvard in a game
against the Lynn Live Oaks.
In 1955, the Salk vaccine
against polio was declared
safe and effective.
In 1981, the space shuttle
Columbia blasted off from
Cape Canaveral, Fla., on its
first test flight.
Ten years ago: U.S. Dis-
trict Judge Susan Webber
Wright cited President Bill
Clinton for contempt of court,
concluding that the president
had lied about his relation-
ship with Monica Lewinsky in
a deposition in the Paula
Jones case.
Five years ago: Barry
Bonds hit his 660th home run
to tie godfather Willie Mays
for third on baseball's career
list.
One year ago: Boston
College won the NCAA
hockey championship, 4-1,
over Notre Dame.
Today's Birthdays: Coun-
try singer Ned Miller is 84. Ac-
tress Jane Withers is 83.
Actor Charles Napier is 73.
Jazz musician Herbie Han-
cock is 69. Actor Frank Bank
("Leave It to Beaver") is 67.
Rock singer John Kay (Step-
penwolf) is 65. Actor Ed
O'Neill is 63. Author Tom
Clancy is 62. Actor Dan Lau-
ria is 62. Talk show host
David Letterman is 62. Author
Scott Turow is 60. Singer
David Cassidy is 59. Actor-
playwright Tom Noonan is 58.
Rhythm-and-blues singer JD
Nicholas (The Commodores)
is 57. Singer Pat Travers is
55. Actor Andy Garcia is 53.
Country singer Vince Gill is
52. Rock musician Will Ser-
geant (Echo & the Bunny-
men) is 51. Folk-pop singer
Amy Ray (Indigo Girls) is 45.
Actress Alicia Coppola is 41.
Rock singer Nicholas Hexum
(311) is 39. Actor Nicholas
Brendon is 38. Actress Shan-
nen Doherty is 38. Actress
Marley Shelton is 35. Actress
Jordana Spiro is 32. Rock


musician Guy Berryman
(Coldplay) is 31. Actress
Claire Danes is 30. Actress
Jennifer Morrison is 30. Rock
singer-musician Brendon Urie
(Panic at the Disco) is 22.
Thought for Today:
"Rules are not necessarily
sacred, principles are." -
President Franklin Delano
Roosevelt (1882-1945).









Page C - SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009




OMM ENTARYONICLE
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Losing the


'war'


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press
President Barack Obama announces a new comprehensive strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan on March 27 in the Eisenhower Executive Office
Building on the White House campus in Washington. Behind him, from left, are: policy adviser Bruce Riedel; Joint Chiefs Chairman Adm. Michael
Mullen; National Security Adviser James Jones; Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton; Defense Secretary Robert Gates; Defense Undersecretary
for Policy Michele Fournoy; and Special Envoy to Afghanistan Richard Holbrooke.

Shift in administration's rhetoric signals a necessary transformation ofpolicy


REZA ASLAN
Los Angeles Times

S secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clin-
ton let slip last week
that the Obama admin-
istration has aban-
doned the phrase "war on
terror." Its absence had been
noted by commentators. There
was no directive, Clinton said,
"it's just not being used."
It might seem a trivial thing,
but the change in rhetoric marks
a significant turning point in the
ideological contest with radical
Islam. That is because the war
on terror always has been a con-
flict more rhetorical than real.
There is, of course, a very real,
very bloody military component
in the struggle against extremist
forces in the Muslim world, al-
though one can argue whether
the U.S. and allied engagements
in Iraq, Afghanistan and beyond
are an integral part of that strug-
gle, a distraction from it or,
worse, evidence of its subversion
and failure. But to the extent
that the war on terror has been
posited, from the start, as a war
of ideology - a clash of civiliza-
tions - it is a rhetorical war, one
fought more constructively with
words and ideas than with guns
and bombs.
The truth is that the phrase
"war on terror" always has been
problematic, not just because
"terror," "terrorism" and "terror-
ist" are wastebasket terms that


often convey as much about the
person using them as they do
about the events or people being
described, but because this was
never meant to be a war against
terrorism per se. If it were, it
would have involved the Basque
separatists in Spain, the
Hindu/Marxist Tamil Tigers in
Sri Lanka, the Maoist rebels in
eastern India, Israeli ultrana-
tionalists, the Kurdish PKK, rem-
nants of the Irish Republican
Army and the Sikh separatist
movements, and so on.
Rather, the war on terror, as
conceived of by the Bush admin-
istration, was targeted at a par-
ticular brand of terrorism -
that employed exclusively by Is-
lamic entities. Which is why the
enemy in this ideological con-
flict was gradually and system-
atically expanded to include not
just the people who attacked the
U.S. on Sept. 11, 2001, and the
organizations that supported
them, but an ever-widening con-
spiracy of disparate groups,
such as Hamas in Palestine,
Hezbollah in Lebanon, the Mus-
lim Brotherhood in Egypt, the
clerical regime in Iran, the
Sunni insurgency in Iraq, the
Kashmiri militants, the Taliban
and any other organization that
declared itself Muslim and em-
ployed terrorism as a tactic.
According to the master narra-
tive of the war on terror, these
were a monolithic enemy'with a
common agenda and a shared
ideology. Never mind that many


of these groups consider one an-
other to be a graver threat than
they consider America, that they
have vastly different and some-
times irreconcilable political
yearnings and religious beliefs,
and that, until the war on terror,
many had never thought of the
Uniited States as an enemy. Give
this imaginary monolith a made-
up name - say, "Islamofascism"
- and an easily recognizable
enemy is created, one that exists
not so much as a force to be
defeated but as an idea to be
opposed, one whose chief
attribute appears to be that
"they" are not "us."
By lumping together the dis-
parate forces, movements,
armies, ideas and grievances of
the greater Muslim world, from
Morocco to Malaysia; by placing
them in a single category
("enemy"), assigning them a sin-
gle identity ("terrorist"); and by
countering them with a single
strategy (war), the Bush adminis-
tration seemed to be making a
blatant statement that the war
on terror was, in fact, "a war
against Islam."
That is certainly how the con-
flict has been viewed by a major-
ity in four major Muslim
countries - Egypt, Morocco,
Pakistan and Indonesia - in a
worldpublicopinion.org poll in
2007. Nearly two-thirds of re-
spondents said they believe that
the purpose of the war on terror
is to "spread Christianity in the
region" of the Middle East.


Indeed, if the war on terror
was meant to be an ideological
battle against groups such as al-
Qaida for the hearts and minds of
Muslims, the consensus around
the globe seems to be that the
battle has been lost.
A September 2008 BBC World
Service survey of 23 countries,
including Russia, Australia, Pak-
istan, Turkey, France, Germany,
Britain, the U.S., China and Mex-
ico, found that almost 60 percent
of all respondents said the war
on terror either has had no effect
or that it has made al-Qaida
stronger. Forty-seven percent
said they think that neither side
was winning; 56 percent ofAmer-
icans have that view.
It is time not just to abandon
the phrase "war on terror" but
to admit that the ideological
struggle against radical Islam
could never be won militarily.
The battle for the hearts and
minds of Muslims will take place
not in the streets of Baghdad or
in the mountains of Afghanistan
but in the suburbs of Paris, the
slums of East London and the
cosmopolitan cities of Berlin
and New York.
In the end, the most effective
weapon in countering the appeal
of groups such as al-Qaida may
be the words we use.

Asian is the author of
"How To Win a Cosmic War:
God, Globalization, and the
End of the War on Terror."


Directions,

translation

and the

Viewfinder
was in St Augustine
the other day on vaca-
tion and picked up my
granddaughter at her pre-
school to take her home.
As we drove the streets
of the nation's oldest city,
Izzy gave me the directions
I needed to get back to her
house. She was so proud
that she was able to suc-
cessfully guide me to her
home that when we got
there she said: "You're the
best Grandpa I never had."
Hmmm.
I was pretty sure I knew
what she meant, but there
was a little lost in the
translation.
It is easy to lose things
in translation.
I have heard a lot from
Chronicle readers this
week about our
Viewfinder television
guide that appears in the
Sunday newspaper. We
tried to explain in ad-
vance, but the translation
isn't always that easy.
The new television
guide is not an improve-
ment on the old guide. It
is different and it does not
contain as much informa-
tion. And we knew that
going into the changes.
Now, some folks might
try to sugarcoat what we
did, but we've tried not to
do that. We made the
changes to the television
guide because we had a
real need to reduce ex-
penses at the newspaper
The new television
guide is less expensive
for us to produce and that
savings will help us re-
main a viable business.
That's one of the keys
here - the Chronicle is a
business, and during
these very tough eco-
nomic times, the newspa-
per must do whatever it
can to ensure its success.
The financial formula
for a newspaper is de-
pendent on advertising
from businesses. Because
the recession is so deep,
many businesses have re-
duced their advertising
budgets, and that means I
have less money to use to
produce the features and
services you want
My other option as pub-
lisher is to increase your
subscription rates, but most
households are experienc-
ing similar problems to
businesses-there is not as
much money to go around.
See WINDOW/Page C4


Lou Frey Institute gears up for 2009 symposium


he Lou Frey Institute
of Politics and Gov-
ernment is hosting its
12th semi-annual sympo-
sium at the University of
Central Florida's Student
Union on tax day, the 15th of
April. The institute is a non-
partisan organization whose
goal is to promote civic edu-
cation and engagement,
particularly among young
people. The program is free,
open to the public and be-
gins at 9:30 a.m.
The entire program fo-
cuses on President Obama,
what has happened so far
and what can happen in the
future. Former Congress-
man Bill Zeliff, R-N.H., and
former Congressman Jim
Slattery, D-Kansas, will look
at the early returns, both in
terms of the financial crisis
and the political waves that
President Obama has cre-
ated.


Congressman Allen Boyd,
D-Fla., one of the leaders of
the Blue Dog Democrats
and a key member of the
Appropriations Committee,
together with newly elected
Congresswoman Suzanne
Kosmas, D-Fla., will discuss
the budget and the deficit.
The institute is pleased to
have as the daytime keynote
speaker Dr. Stephen Wayne,
professor of government
from Georgetown Univer-
sity, whose most recent book
is "The Road to the White
House 2008."
He is a Washington in-
sider who has testified be-
fore Congress, advised both
the Republican and Demo-
cratic National Committees
in the presidential nomina-
tion process and worked as
a consultant on various film
documentaries of the Amer-
ican presidency
Dr. Jim M. Ludes, execu-


tive director, American Se-
curity Project and a mem-
ber of the Obama transition
team for foreign policy will
talk about security policy
and President
Obama. He will
be joined by
Mackenzie Ea-
glen, senior pol-
icy analyst for
defense and
homeland secu-
rity issues from
The Heritage
Foundation. This Lou
discussion will OTH
be timely, as
President Obama VOlI
just recently has
returned from his first
major European trip.
The final daytime session
will be the discussion of the
president, Congress, and the
bureaucracy, and the sepa-
ration of powers in the
Obama administration.


There appears to be no
question that the executive
branch is now the "most
equal" of the three equal
branches of government Dr.
Brian Gaines, De-
partment of Polit-
ical Science,
University of Illi-
nois, will be
I joined by Dr. Scot
Schraufnagel
from the Depart-
ment of Political
Science at UCF
Frey to discuss this im-
IER portant issue.
The evening
CES keynote address
begins at 7 p.m.
and allows many people in
the community to come out
and actually find a parking
place at the university. We
have had dynamic speakers
over the years. In 2004, our
keynote speaker was Bob
Woodward who discussed


the impact of Watergate, a
30-year retrospective. In the
spring of 2006 we had all the
Florida governors come to
one of the most heartwarm-
ing sessions we have had.
We have had many mem-
bers of Congress, Sens. Bob
Graham, Mel Martinez, Bill
Nelson and journalists such
as Bob Beckel (USA Today),
Cal Thomas (USA Today),
Dave Broder and Lisa
Myers (NBC News). We
haven't forgotten the young
people, as in the spring of
2008 the keynote speaker
was Ms. SuChin Pak (MTV
News).
Our keynote evening
speaker is Larry Wilmore.
His career started as an
actor and standup comic be-
fore transitioning to televi-
sion writing and producing
in the early 1990s. Most re-
cently he was a consulting
producer of NBC's "The Of-


fice." "The Daily Show" has
marked a return to perform-
ing for Mr. Wilmore and he
is currently developing a sit-
com for himself at HBO. He
has also written his first
book titled "I'd Rather We
Got Casinos and Other
Black Thoughts." He identi-
fies himself as "the senior
black correspondent" and
contributor, "The Daily
Show."
This is just one of the
many projects of the insti-
tute. You can find out more
about it by going to
www.loufrey.org.

Lou Frey Jr served as a
Florida representative in
Congress from 1969-79. He
is a partner in Lowndes,
Drosdick, Doster, Kantor &
Reed, PA, Orlando; and
can be e-mailed at
lou.frey@lowndes-law.com


I
H













Page C2 SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009



PINION


More than 900 individu-
als were cared for at a
local facility last year
where the main mission is to
serve those who have been in-
voluntarily committed under
Florida's Baker Act. Most of
the cases were potential sui-
cides. All of them were age 17
or younger.
This is not a pretty story and
never will be. But if our state
legislators continue on their
path to halt funds for this pro-
gram, our children in such dire
circumstances will have no
such place to go to be rescued.
The potential
ramifications of THE IS
this funding-cut
decision could be Mental
devastating. serv
Basically, the ax
began to quietly OUR OP
fall on The Cen-
ter'. 1(-bed Chil- Don't le
dri's Mental funding
Halth1 Crisis Sta-
bilization Unit in 2008 when leg-
islators shifted funds that
support this facility and other
mental health service facilities
from a recurring fund to a non-
recurring fund, which means
that each year the funding has to
be agreed upon. By allowing this
program's funding to lapse -
which is what is happening now
in the Florida House of Repre-
sentatives --the money will sim-
ply not be made available.
According to mental health
experts, without legislative ac-
tion, $16.2 million in funding for
community-based mental health
services will be terminated on
June 30 and another $7.6 million
in funding for lapsed projects is
also in jeopardy .
Included in this nightmare, if
the funding.for this commu-
nity's Children's Baker Act
beds - $850,000 - is lost, ad-
ministrators at the unit agree
that The Centers would be
forced to close the entire unit.
There could be no doctors and
no nurses - both required for
such an operation - no treat-
ment and no beds for the chil-
dren who are mentally ill and a
danger tothemselves or others.
Florida Council for Commu-
nity Health administrators are
warning that failure to provide
funding for these services
could have a destructive ripple


No camera, no problem
In regard to the sexting problem
with teenagers and such lately:
The best way to stop it is to only
buy them the cheapest cell
phones available. The reason they
need a cell phone is to be
available to the parents -
correct? - so parents can
get in touch with the kids.
So only buy them the
cheapest cell phone that
doesn't allow pictures to
be sent. Problem solved. J


Lost cash
This is a heads up for A
grandparents. I know 563
you're not supposed to
send cash in the mail,
but we all do it for the kids. My
St. Patty's Day card never did ar-
rive at its destination and I had a
return address on it, but it never
came back. Disappointed (the)


effect, compounding our state's
economic woes, endangering
our most vulnerable citizens
and wreaking havoc on our
families and communities.
Certainly this is no fun time to
be an elected official and no
doubt the "don't cut our fund-
ing" cry has become a haunting
mantra that offers no solace.
Very few elected officials are
racing up the popularity polls
because of budget cuts that di-
rectly impact the livelihoods
and lifestyles of their con-
stituents. But this is also no time
for our legislators to bury their
heads in the sand
SSUE: when it comes to
critical health and
health . safety issues that
ces. cannot be held at
bay until the storm
'INION: passes.
Today, Florida
critical ranks 48th in the
lapse. country in per
capital spending
for mental health services and
35th in the nation in per capital
spending for substance abuse
treatment. State leaders, even
during strangling economic
times, must understand the im-
portance of providing adequate
funding for these essential sys-
tems. If we must speak in dol-
lars to initiate action, we should
only need to whisper the re-
minder that without these facil-
ities, Florida will, in turn, be
spending more for prisons, jails,
hospitals, forensic facilities and
other deep-end services.
Research has also shown
that prevention and treatment
services for mental health and
substance abuse increase sav-
ings in medical care, welfare
payments and prison costs.
They also reduce homeless-
ness, child abuse and neglect,
crime, unemployment, poverty
and poor education.
Short-sighted, tunnel-vision
legislation that looks good on
paper could have profound
consequences when it comes to
this critical funding to address
severe and persistent mental
health problems, especially in
our youths. If our elected offi-
cials need to be reminded of
this, then it is most certainly
our duty to remind them -
passionately, consistently, un-
abashedly and without respite.


grandkids, but I can't afford to do
this again. So just remember, I
know we're not supposed to do it,
but for the kids we'd do anything.
Buttheads
To you smokers driving in cars
and flinging your ciga-
JND rette butts out the win-
Sdow: That is a very bad
thing to do. That could
possibly start fires. Think
before you throw. Use an
ashtray.


Saved my life


E


t

t


W I would like to publicly
thank the pharmacist at
)579 the Publix store on U.S.
19 and 98 for preventing
me from having a very
serious medical emergency due
to an allergic reaction to the nico-
tine patch. Thank you again for
possibly saving my life, and good
luck to you.


"The bow too tensely strung is easily broken."
Publilius Syrus, "Moral Sayings,"
first century B.C.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


We must be our brothers' keepers


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulllgan..........................................publisher
Charlie Brennan ............................................editor
SNeale Brennan ........promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ..................................managing editor
Cheri Harris.....................................features editor
Curt Ebitz.....................................citizen member
Founded Mac Harris .....................................citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson ....................................guest member
"You may dffr with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


Other VOICES
often become those infamous un- Food stamps would be issued on
funded mandates. premises. All of the basic needs
Only the federal government would be met, and the residents
has the means to eliminate would be free to live their lives as
poverty by providing they choose. Cer-
safety, food, shelter, Only the federal tainly there would be
and health care to problems and in-
every needy citizen. government has equities, but there
When the states at- th resources would alsobedignity
tempt this, failure al- ' SU c and opportunity, be-
ways follows. Public to COVer all of cause once basic
housing runs the needs are met, peo-
gamut from flop the elements pie are free to im-
houses to tenements prove their lives
known as "projects", necessary to through work and ed-
but these are often providee safe ucation. Even more
little more than man- important, their chil-
made jungles where dignified care dren, freed from want
survival of the fittest and danger, would be
drug lord rules be- for the needy. free to pursue their
cause anarchy reigns dreams, and, as a re-
-in the absence of police protec- sult, become contributing mem-
tion. It is no wonder that so many bers of society.
people prefer a cardboard box In the end, a nation is not
and a heating grate. judged by its affluence, but by its
Only the federal government use of affluence, by the way it
has the resources to cover all of treats the neediest members of
the elements necessary to provide society. We must be our brothers'
safe, dignified care for the needy. keepers.
The ideal would be a residential
building with an onsite nurse's sta-
tion and onsite police. The nurse Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift
would provide basic care and author the Washington Merry-
medicine and federally-funded re- Go-Round column, founded in
ferrals to hospitals and specialists. 1932 by Drew Pearson.


ROCKET MAN


LETTERS


For good of all
I wish I were a proud Republi-
can. Proud Republicans, as well
as a majority of those Republi-
cans who consider themselves
affluent, better educated and
having status in the community,
have an apparent ability to ig-
nore the social needs of our less-
fortunate citizens.
Lack of employment, food and
health care is not a concern. For
them it is a NIMBY situation. It
is naiiral for those who have
much, to care little for those who
have nothing.
I'm an ashamed and modest
Democrat, concerned about the
thousands of Citrus County resi-
dents and elsewhere throughout
the country who are out of a job,
are hungry and need health
care. I write to media sources, to
the President, and to my legisla-
tors asking their aid in ensuring
help by increasing funding for
job creation, better education
and universal health care. I am
not ashamed to be called a lib-
eral and a Democrat because to
me it means that I'm willing to
help the needy, including sup-
plying some assistance to the
Homosassa Civic Center in their
service to the needy.
I'd like to take this opportu-
nity to ask all Republicans, as
well as Democrats and inde-
pendents, to support the presi-
dent's program for increased
employment, improved educa-
tion and universal health care.
Ours will never be a socialist
government, but we all must be-
lieve in a social society for the
good of all.
Frances Harbin
Homosassa

Prom Cinderellas
Cinderella's Closet is a prom
dress giveaway whose mission is
to show God's love by providing
young ladies with a dress and ac-
cessories for prom, and memories
to last a lifetime. The giveaway


OPINIONS INVITI
" The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are th
ions of the editorial boarc
newspaper.
* Viewpoints depicted in pc
cartoons, columns or letti
not necessarily represent
opinion of the editorial bo
* Groups or individuals are
to express their opinions i
ter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to addre
editorial board, which me
weekly, should call Mike A
at (352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed
include a phone number a
hometown, including lette
via e-mail. Names and ho
towns will be printed; pho
numbers will not be publiE
given out.
I We reserve the right to ec
ters for length, libel, fairn
good taste.
* Letters must be no longer
350 words, and writers wi
limited to three letters pe
month.
M SEND LETTERS TO: The
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blv
Crystal River, FL 34429. C
to (352) 563-3280, or e-n
letters@chronicleonline.c

was once again held at Cot
stone Baptist Church of In
on March 6 and March 7.
The free services also i
hairstyling, makeup and
services. There were over
dresses available this yea
Eighty-one dresses have 1
given away to date for 200
The first year for Cinde
Closet was 2008 and was f
available for only Citrus I
School due to time restrict
(only the Prom Day service
themselves were not avai
the other schools); howev
dresses were available to
high schools. This year it,
was possible for Crystal R
High School and Lecanto
School to be included in t
Prom Day services portion
well as the dress giveawa:
year showed a marked in
in prom dresses selected


to the Editor
available. There are still many
ED dresses available with more
n coming in every day The main
e opin- giveaway is past, but do not miss
d of the out and let this opportunity pass
you by. Your dream of the "per-
Dlitical fect dress" for the prom is still
ers do within reach. Call Cornerstone
the
board. Baptist Church at 726-7335 Mon-
Sinvited day through Friday for further
n a let- information regarding opportu-
nities for obtaining a dress.
ss the We want to thank all involved
ets with this year's Cinderella's
krnold Closet, beginning with all who
donated dresses and other
and items, and all who worked so
*rs sent tirelessly to make this year's
me- giveaway the success it was. The
ned or following is a list of businesses
that have helped in many ways
lit let- to make Prom Night 2009 all it
ess and should be.
Abitare' Paris Day Spa and
r than Salon, Bealls of Crystal River
ll be and Bealls of Inverness, Beverly
r Hills Print, Bryant's Photogra-
phy, Cornerstone Baptist
Editor, Church, Daniel Haag Stucco,
dr, fax Family Cuts Inc., Gulf to Lake
nail to Church, Hair Hut, Hitch Central,
:om. Jackie's Place, JCPenney of
Crystal River, Margaret's Cakes
rner- for all Reasons & More, Mary
verness Beth's Bridal and Formal Wear,
Merle Norman Cosmetics Stu-
nclude dio, Oak Grove Baptist Church,
nail NC, Profile T-Shirts, Quality
r 500 Cleaners, Scissors Hair Salon,
.r. Shear Sisters, Street Smart
been Shoes & Skate Shop, The Hagar
)9. Group, Urban Suburban Hair
*rella's Studio and WTI School of Cos-
iully metology.
High Jean Sankle
ions Inverness
ces
lable to
er, the Great food
all We had a wonderful Italian
has meal catered by Jimmy T's
liver restaurant near Citrus Hills on
High County Road 486. Seems like the
the best restaurants are not chains,
n, as just good home cooking.
y. This
crease Cher Mason
and Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


DOUGLAS COHN
AND ELEANOR CLIFT
Government's first respon-
sibility is to provide for
the public safety, but there
are other responsibilities. Gov-
ernment must be responsible for
feeding the hungry, housing the
homeless, and caring for the im-
poverished sick Future genera-
tions will look back upon us with
incredulity that We failed to rec-
ognize these obligations. They
will look with horror at pictures
of people sleeping under bridges,
of malnourished men, women,
and children scrounging through
garbage in search of food, and of
the walking dead who are dying
from a lack of basic medical care.
Complexity is at the root of the
problem, which is often the case
when-the simplicity of a tree is
lost in the complexity of a forest.
For America, this means federal-
ism. The problems of the needy
are problems of 50 different
states, states that have many of
the duties of the national govern-
ment, but not the means. The fed-
eral government can print money,
borrow low-interest money, and
reap income from sources not
available to states. Further, the
federal government can impose
laws on the states, but the states
cannot do the reverse, and these


CUT ELSEWHERE


Mental health



services worth



the investment


IB~E


-


M














That whosoever believeth in him shall not perish


Today is Easter Sunday,
the day on which
Christians celebrate
the resurrection of a living
Saviour. Those of you who
read this column regularly
will probably recognize the
following piece, it has been
published before, but I don't
know a better way of saying it
"For God so loved the
world, that he gave his only
begotten son, that whoso-
ever believeth in him
should not perish, but have
everlasting life." John 3:16,
King James Version.
What could be simpler or
more straightforward?


Sometimes we get con-
fused and begin to concen-
trate too much on the
theological theories which
are thrust at us from every
angle, but in truth, the sav-
ing grace of god's son, Jesus
Christ, is just as simple as
believing in Him.
When I was a child, I
couldn't understand how
anyone could NOT believe.
The people I loved and
trusted said it was true. It
was written in the Bible. The
Bible's not just words on
paper, it's the word of God.
How could anyone doubt?
But as I grew older, while I


maintained my faith, I began print of the nails and thrust
to understand doubt. Even my hand into his side, I will
one of the 12 dis- notbelieve."John
ciples, Thomas, 20:24-26, King
doubted. James Version.
"But Thomas, As a child,
one of the 12, was with the pre-
not with them cious commodity,
when Jesus " childlike faith, I
came. The other had no room for
disciples there- doubt. But like
fore said unto most folks, as the
him, we have Fred Brannen years passed, I
seen the lord. But A SLICE learned skepti-
he said unto cism.
them, except I OF LIFE "Then came
shall see in his Jesus, the doors
hands the print of the nails, being shut, and stood in the
and put my finger into the midst and said, peace be


unto you. Then he said unto
Thomas, reach hither thy fin-
ger and behold my hand and
thrust it into my side, and be
not faithless, but believing.
And Thomas answered and
said unto him, my Lord and
my God. Jesus saith unto
him, Thomas, because thou
hast seen me, thou hast be-
lieved; blessed are they that
have not seen me and yet
have believed." John 20:26-
29, King James Version.
Today, I understand that
the basic Christian dogma is
not quite as self-evident as it
seemed to me when I was a
child. It goes against the


laws of nature to believe that
a baby could be born of a vir-
gin and that a man could die
on a cross, then, on the third
day, walk out of the tomb.
Yet, herein lies the beauty
and simplicity of it all: The
Son of God is not subject to
the laws of nature. If we can
just accept that "God gave
his only begotten Son," then,
in faith believing, we "shall
not perish, but have ever-
lasting life."
---*-~---
Fked Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist


4-9, Mw


Letters to THE EDITOR


Severely impaired
Please spare us disparities ofEnvi-
ronmental Health Department health-
iness issues. Controlling service of
food is not the direction of health har-
vest, such as keeping everyone safe
from illness, it is cost of licensing to
clubs or - for the most part - the eld-
erly. In Citrus County that expendi-
ture, per Environmental Health, is
between $110 and $200, just to serve
potluck If governmental interests
were to provide safe health crops, we
the people would all have health care
coverage, the same coverage govern-
mental employees procure by the very
tax dollars we the people provide.
Let us not forget invasions of some
clubs by agents collecting petty gam-
bling currency, but allow companies
to scam thousands of reimbursement
moneys from schools or our children.
A conviction of fraud is a crime, when
someone misrepresents intentions of
reimbursed funds, but the lottery
which each state offers is that same
gambling currency ceased from local
clubs. It is time to act on convictions
of fraud, disclose itemizations of how
much cash is really collected by a
state lottery, rehire teachers so "No
Child Is Left Behind," and if citizen
wholeness is really a factor, the
health department needs to put their
licensing cash in a fund to maintain
reality.
Circumstances that Citrus County
representation and state government
cannot decide definition of a resi-
dence or a barn, suggest many did get
"left behind!" It also insinuates, we
the people, need more than Nina,
Pinta and the Santa Maria, to free us
to a New World or discover a west-
ward route to disproportion, because
we have already sailed into a genera-
tion of avidity, witnessed portrayal
leadership, connivance rule and pre-
text of reason.
If correctiveness and diversity
were ever needed in government, it
was wasted yesterday, for we have de-
parted from the United States of
America to become severely im-
paired in spirit, health and effective-
ness among those organized
geopolitical units we claim ideology
of"we the people."
SSandra Brasmeister
Inverness


All in it together
Carl Hiaasen in "Higher taxes no
fuin, but necessary" (column of April
2), supports the president's call for
higher taxes on the wealthy including
lower deductions for charitable con-
tributions.
While Mr. Hiaasen is right that
higher taxes are necessary, I for one
do not think that next year is the time
for such action. Given this prolonged
recession, our economy needs invest-
ments in the stock market, the hous-
ing market and new and existing.
businesses. The rich can do their part
by spending their money in these
areas. The result will be healthier
pensions/retirement accounts, an end
to runaway foreclosures and a return
to a decent housing market and more
jobs for working Americans.
Underlying the Obama policy is the
notion that the majority can take ad-
vantage of the minority. This is a long-
standing political ploy. Witness
Florida's tendency to tax heavily
tourists and "non-homesteaders." Not
a bad idea to tax people who can't
vote. Except when tourists stop com-
ing to Florida and second-home own-
ers just say no by protesting loudly by
voice or moving out of state.
Hiaasen says he gets a higher and
unfair tax deduction for his charita-
ble contribution than his mother
(who apparently is part of the 98 per-
cent who earn less than $250,000 per
year). What he does not say is that the
wealthy already contribute more than
50 percent of the federal taxes col-
lected annually.
There can be no doubt that higher
taxes are coming. Bailing out the auto
industry and the banks, and shoring
up the housing market is costing bil-
lions. The rich need to pay their fair
share, and so do you and I. Scape-
goating and placing the burden on a
few will not do the trick
To paraphrase our president dur-
ing his campaign, it is time to stop
name calling and creating divisions
in our society. Both the rich and the
not-so-rich are in this together. Wise
policies would encourage contribu-
tions in a variety of ways for the com-
mon good. It's no fun, as Mr. Hiaasen
has written, but it is necessary!
Earle Pratt
Lecanto


Hot Comner:DEAN'S BARI


Barn issue
Chronicle's front page
April 3, "AG office to weigh
in on Dean's barn." Opinion
page, "Sen. Dean's barn is a
*. nonissue," by Jim Spratt.
Why is everyone putting the
cart before the horse - pun
intended, since this is a
barn issue. This is a no-
- brainer. Is this a political
scheme? Does the property
qualify for an agricultural
classification? The Chroni-
cle's March 10 publication
stated that Dean's parcel of
land has an agricultural
classification from the prop-
erty appraiser's office for
cattle grazing. It's simple
unless one wants to ignore


the facts. No cattle, no agri-
cultural classification. No
agricultural classification,
no exemption from permits.
No exemption from permits
means Dean has to pay up.
Those responsible for the
mess should also have to
pay.
It's a duck
This is in reply to the
guest column today in the
Chronicle written by Kenneth
Smith ... Here we have an-
other politician trying to
cover another politician. I'm
talking about Charlie Dean.
He says he didn't have to
pull a permit for his ag
barn. Well, let me tell you
something, friend: That's a


house. It was built as a
house. It doesn't matter if
anybody lives in it or not. It
has two bedrooms, a bath-
room and a kitchen. If it
walks like a duck, quacks
like a duck, it's a duck, my
friend.
It's a residence
I have friends up North
who have a large two-story
five-bedroom, three-bath
place on a lake that they call
a cottage. Also, other
friends call theirs a camp.
They are residences. We
have Charlie Dean with a
barn with bedrooms, a bath
and kitchen. People reside
in there whether it's for a
weekend, two weeks or


Failure not an option
Thenews read today that.President
Obama asserted unprecedented gov-
ernment control over the auto indus-
try.
I also read that the government
would guarantee the auto warranties.
My question is a simple one: Why
should Ford Motors even try to be a
successful company when failure is
what's currently being rewarded by
the United States government? GM
and Chrysler should have gone into
bankruptcy. Ford Motors will now be
punished for being successful. This
gives GM and Chrysler an unfair ad-
vantage over Ford.
The United States government has
seen fit to interfere with capitalism.
I would like to know exactly what
it is that the United States govern-
ment is going to do to make this busi-
ness profitable. The only business
that I've ever known the United
States government ran and actually
made money on was the Panama
Canal, and President Jimmy Carter
gave that away.
What used to be a representative
republic is slowly turning into a gov-
ernment dictating to the people. Why
not tell designers what to make, tell
manufacturers how much and what to
sell. The United States government
stepped in to help businesses before,
like loaning money to Chrysler in the
past, but this money was a loan and
was paid back by Chrysler. Chrysler
didn't give up ownership or manage-
ment and because of that they were
able to pull themselves out of dire sit-
uations and be a viable company (un-
fortunately, they're back in the same
situation). Ford decided not to take
any bailout money and has been able
to stay afloat on its own. What is it
Ford is doing right that GM and
Chrysler are doing wrong? Instead of
asking for a plan from GM and
Chrysler, the president should ask
Ford their advice on how to be suc-
cessful, because this president has
never run a business, admitted to not
knowing anything about economics
and is now trying to micromanage
privately owned businesses.
Welcome to America, where failure
is not an option and it's not a choice.
SJimmie T. Smith
Inverness


whatever. That makes it a
residence. Have a great day.
Guest barn
It's interesting that Sen.
Dean - pardon me, rancher
Dean - is having so much
trouble with his guest barn
on the river ranch. I've lived
next door to the river ranch
for a number of years and
I'd like to know what rancher
Dean has been raising on
the river ranch. Is it the cell
towers? That's the only thing
I've seen raised on the river
ranch. How it qualifies as
agricultural property is be-
yond me. I'll never know
where he must be hiding the
herd. Must be a hidden val-
ley someplace else.


Space out
I'm calling in (because) I
have a perfect way to bal-
ance the budget of the
United States. Let's cut the
space program; $600 mil-
lion to find another earth-
like planet is not in the
budget. We can use it oth-
erwise. Healthcare, educa-
tion seems to be where
they always cut. Let's cut
that space program. An-
other $800-some-million to
send the shuttle up? Let's
cut the space program.
Local trimmers
I'm calling in and won-
dering why Citrus County
is bringing out-of-state
people in to trim the trees
for the county. I was driv-
ing down Roosevelt Boule-
vard a week or so ago and
there were trucks trim-
ming trees from Aniston,
Ala. Now are you
telling me there
are no tree trim-
mers in Florida or
in Citrus County
that could use
that money, that
they have to come
and pay for room
and board and CA
gas the job all the
way from Aniston, 563-
Ala.? Let's put the
Citrus County and
the Florida people to work.
State involvement
I have no intention of
adding more fuel to the
fire over Sen. Dean's barn,
but I would like to express
our own experience. Over a
year ago we replaced an
old mobile home with a
new manufactured home.
The first thing that came
into the picture was the
state with the septic tank.
We had to have the tank
pumped, we had to have
the tank certified and we
had to add to the existing
drain field. This was a
state permit. The house
was then permitted and it
was permitted to be put
back on what the county
phrased as the footprint of
the old house. It took time,
but it did accomplish what
we wanted. And certainly,
there was a lot of cost in-
volved for permitting and
the additional drain field
and septic. But remember,
the state got involved, too.
Walk around
I'm calling about the
people that you see at the
grocery stores and the big
department stores...the
people that come up to the
store and get in a handi-
capped cart because
they're too lazy to walk
around the store and get a
little exercise. Those carts
are specifically there for
handicapped individuals,
and they're using them just
to get around ... Now I
think they should be able
to display proof that
they're handicapped before
they should be allowed to
use one of those carts ...
You know you owe
I have a message for
Charlie Dean and Ron
Kitchen: You know you owe.
You need to 'fess up, man
up and pay up. If you all re-
ally need help, I don't think
you all are poor, but if you
all really need help, us wid-
ows maybe could pass the
hat and help you all out a
little bit. Pay what you owe,
for goodness sakes.
Not for you!
In the last week I've spo-
ken to two couples who are
British. Both of them own
property in Citrus County,
they pay taxes and they
live here. Unfortunately,
due to U.S. regulations,
they can only be here for a
total of six months accu-
mulative through a calen-
dar year. They have to go


back to their home coun-
try. If they were illegals,
they could get everything
they want. They could get
Medicaid, they could get
food stamps, and they
could get anything to start
a business. Oh, that's
right, these are British
people; they speak Eng-
lish. No wonder they can't
get anything.
Total jerks
After watching "American
Idol" last night, I'm totally
convinced that some of
those people are on some-
thing. That girl that got
kicked off last night, if she
wasn't on some drug or
something, then I don't un-
derstand. I mean anybody
that gets a chance to have
a career path designated
for her and acts as stupid
as she did, can't be sane.
And I think that's
ND the best one that
LJNy got dumped off.
L PShe should have
been dumped off
a lot earlier. It's to-
tally ridiculous to
see them getting
on and acting like
total jerks in front
. . of a crowd of mil-
)0579 lions of people
0U5 9 like that and then
expect somebody
to go out and buy their
records in the future. I'm
glad she's gone and I hope
the others straighten their
act up and make this show
a little better
Hefty dog
I was reading in:the
paper where the German
shepherd sheriff's dog Mito
is on recovery. I raised Ger-
man shepherds and I am
very glad to see that hap-
pen. I don't like to see any
dog hurt, killed or mali-
ciously attacked, especially
a German shepherd, since
I'm so pro to them. But
what I am kind of con-
cerned about is, according
to the picture in the paper,
he looks awfully heavy to
be a police attack dog. I
just was a little surprised
to see them because usu-
ally the ones you see in
other areas are usually
under 75 pounds or so and
they're sleek and they're
fast. So I don't know if this
one probably is good, but
just from the picture, I was
just amazed. He looks like
a fairly heavy dog, but if he
does his job, I guess that's
all that matters.
Bottle profits
Regarding the water
ban: How come
Zephyrhills and others can
bottle up 10,000 bottles
of water per day for sales
and profit?
Stamp 'em out
I can't believe that the
post office is coming out
with Simpsons stamps.
Aren't they several billion
dollars in the red? Unbe-
lievable.
Divide, conquer
Divide and conquer. The
Democrats know very well
every proposal they have
pits one section of the
American public against
the other section of the
American public. Now it's
going to cost the smokers
a ton of more money. But
he said no new taxes on
the poor...Tucked in the
paper yesterday, another
one of his appointees
failed to pay her income
taxes. That's about 50 per-
cent of all his appointees
never paid their income
tax. And how about 26
more weeks of jobless
benefits? Another half a
year, about $7,000 goes to
just a small segment of
the population. What
about the rest of the
Americans that are hurt-
ing? They don't get a dime.


~
~""~~""~"~"~~"""""""""""""""""""


-^-~11111~--~
-~ 1111111111~


I~-----"------~l-U~II-.
~ll-r


SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009 O3


CnaRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COMMENTARY


I
(










%F P �WNDAY, AN RIL IZ, ZUUY



Keeping the government in the sunshine

MICHAEL BENNETT Last week, my committee .the principle that you, as cit- access to the Internet
Special to the Chronicle heard its first bill on this it IS reasonable - and right - izens, must be given the op- In addition, an average of
t'- - it. .t it d 4---- 1__ _ . -1.. , M , qn 0 ri f L. nt n 1 ll T-Tji nic


As chair of the Senate
Committee on Com-
munity Affairs, I
have the job of moving mul-
tiple areas of legislation
dealing with issues that af-
fect our communities.
Among those issues this
year is legislation that ad-
dresses newspaper adver-
tisements and notices and
how such notices are to be
made public and the fre-
quency with which they
must appear.
Specifically: Should pub-
lic notices no longer be re-
quired to be posted on the
traditional printed page?
Further: Should public
notices now only appear on
the Internet? And, who
should control the dissemi-
nation and archiving of
those notices - government
or the private sector?


subject wnen Sen. nonua
Storms presented Senate
Bill 2292, titled "Advertise-
ments & Notices by Govern-
mental Entities" that would
allow local governments to
place legally required pub-
lic notices on a government-
sponsored Web site as
opposed to printing them in
local newspapers. The
measure was temporarily
passed (or postponed).
My recommendation for
this bill and six other simi-
lar bills moving in the Leg-
islature this year is to hold
all legislation dealing with
public-notice requirements
until an interim study may
be conducted this summer.
Several factors must be ad-
dressed if we are to remain
a "government in the sun-
shine" in providing trans-
parency and accessibility to
public information.


to continue to provide a printed
record for those without access to
the Internet as well as an electronic
record for those who have access.


Floridians have a right to
know how their local, state
and federal entities are
spending their hard-earned
tax dollars, as well as a right
to know about the govern-
mental decisions that affect
their daily lives. Independ-
ent public notice and your
right to due process of law
remain among our most im-
portant checks and bal-
ances.
Public notices of govern-
ment actions originated in
the 17th century, and shortly
after the adoption of the
Constitution, the First Con-
gress codified public no-


tices by requiring the secre-
tary of state to publish all
bills, orders, resolutions
and congressional votes in
at least three publicly avail-
able newspapers.
Examples today of public
notice include information
on community changes,
fraud prevention and debt
collection, and monitoring
government transactions.
The printed page has
served as the trusted source
for community information,
and in particular, the pub-
lishing of notices of govern-
ment action.
I have always believed in


porUlnllLt yo monorlU a
participate in your govern-
ment. I am deeply con-
cerned that if we place this
information solely on a gov-
ernment-sponsored Web
site, what measure will be in
place to prevent the shut-
down of electronic media
access for convenience's
sake or when controversial
hearings and issues arise?
Media suppression and
censorship have long been a
source of controversy in
countries around the globe.
Even if you disagree with
media coverage and/or edi-
torial comments (which I
often do), it is a small sacri-
fice considering the possi-
ble alternative -
government-controlled and
-biased media and news.
Recent research shows
close to 60 percent of
Florida seniors do not have


Ju percent VL Coi A pAsAOncAA
and black Americans do not
use the Internet at all.
So it is reasonable - and
right - to continue to pro-
vide a printed record for
those without access to the
Internet as well as an elec-
tronic record for those who
have access. To replace one
system of public notice
with another will deny mil-
lions the opportunity to
keep up with important in-
formation.
Combining Florida's tra-
dition of open government
for public inspection with
new technologies and tradi-
tional newspaper printing
of public notices is just com-
mon sense.
- m -

Sen. Michael S. "Mike"
Bennett represents District
21 in the Florida Senate.


Common sense
I am in my 70s and have attended
church dinners, potluck dinners, family
reunions, etc., all my life, and have never
gotten sick at any of them. I have, however,
gottIn sick eating at restaurants that are
insp acted and licensed by the state of
Florida. I have found the recent informa-
tion about whether they are "legal" or not,
and the fact that the food was prepared in
unlicensed kitchens, interesting.
I went through the March 14 Chronicle
carefully and listed the announcements
for dinners. There were 22 in all.
In one edition of the newspaper: Ameri-
can Legion Riders, Chapter 155, corned
beef and cabbage dinner; Highlands Civic
Center, corned beef and cabbage dinner;
West Citrus Elks, corned beef and cabbage
and Mulligan Stew; FOE 4272 Auxiliary,
corned beef and cabbage; St. Margaret's
St Patrick's Day Dinner, plus breakfast;
First Baptist Church, Wednesday fellow-
ship dinner; Hernando Methodist Church,
monthly breakfast; Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church, Wednesday potluck;
First Christian Homosassa Springs,
Wednesday meal; Nature Coast Unitarian
Universalists, Sunday potluck; Peace
Lutheran Church dinners; Hernando
United Methodist, pig roast sandwiches;
Hope Evangelical Lutheran, soup and
bread supper; First Baptist Church of
Beverly Hills, Sunday dinner; Gulf to Lake
Church, Friday night dinner; Seven Rivers
Presbyterian, Friday meal; First Baptist
Church, Floral City, potluck; St. Anne's
Episcopal Church, Saturday noon meal;
New Church Without Walls, homecoming
barbecue; Hernando United Methodist
Church, dinner on the ground; St. Mar-
garet's, corned beef and cabbage; Floral
City Methodist, chicken dinner; and Epis-
copal Church of the Advent, lunch.
This list of 22 dinners does not include
all the organizations, churches, etc., men-
tioning dessert, cookies and punch,
snacks, refreshments, strawberry socials,
coffee and finger foods. Nor does it men-
tion more than once the churches that do
it on a weekly basis. I know there are
other churches that have dinners every
week and are not even on the list.
Bottom line: If the Health Department
has decided to start inspecting and monitor-
ing the activities of churches and civic or-
ganizations when it comes to serving food,
they are certainly going to be busy. Maybe
it's time for a little common sense to prevail.
Jean Maurer
Inverness

Laws are for everyone
Since Sen. Dean does not know the dif-
ference between a barn and house, I will
offer some ideas. First, Webster's defines
"barn" as "a large building for the storage
of farm products, feed, farm animals or
farm equipment." Secondly, Webster's de-
fines "house" as "a building that serves as
living quarters for one or a few families."
In my past agricultural experience, our
barn housed cows, pigs, feed, straw, hay, trac-
tor, wagon, plow, drag, combine, etc. Sen.
Dean's "barn" has a bathroom and a kitchen.
In our barn, the cows never sat on a toilet!


Our barn had a gutter for the bathrooms,
and I cleaned it out with a shovel. Our barn
had beds made of straw and the kitchen con-
sisted of stanchions for each animal.
Senator Dean is a representative of the
people of Florida, and we pay his salary.
His "spin" on the situation is that no law
was broken; however, the intent/spirit of
the law certainly was! Sen. Dean did not
construct a barn. He constructed a lie,
cheating the county out of impact fees, per-
mit fees and property tax income. Sen.
Dean said that since no one resides there
all of the time, it is, consequently, a barn.
This claim has negative consequences.
Many people in this state do not live in
their houses all of the time; perhaps they
could have their houses declared barns for
the months that they are vacant Ordinary
citizens prefer lower taxes, too. Addition-
ally, since Sen. Dean treats his business as-
sociates to "stays in the barn," it would
seem reasonable to expect that the citi-
zens who pay his salary will be invited to
stay for a week or two. Or, perhaps if he is
truly concerned about his fellow citizens,
he will provide housing for the hundreds
of homelesspeople in his oversized barn.
His is not a barn. It is a house/home, or
a second home, or a vacation home, or a
B&B, or a retreat center or... Please, the
laws are for everyone - rich and poor,
representatives and the represented. We
want leaders we can respect.
E. Kellay
Hernando

Old enough to choose
On Sunday, April 5, the Chronicle
printed an editorial concerning the cur-
rent fad of teenagers taking part in what is
called "sexting." In this ludicrous fad,
teens send cell phone photos of them-
selves in the nude to friends and peers.
The opening sentence of the editorial says
that, "Teenagers do stupid things. Not all
of them. Not all the time. But more than
enough to earn a reputation for making
some spectacularly bad decisions."
In the editorial, it explains the legal con-
sequences of sending what are, by law,
pornographic photographs. In a later para-
graph, the editorial says, "Because teens
and common sense often don't go together,
elected leaders might also waht to consider
changing the laws so that minors don't face
the same consequences as hardcore
pornographers for sexting compromising
photos of themselves to their peers."
My question is: Why should the punish-
ment for this kind of behavior be waived for
teenagers? Pornography is against the law
and they have chosen to defy that law. Cer-
tainly we cannot say that they are not old
enough to make decisions, for the law says
that a teenage girl (and even a girl in the
'tween years) has enough "common sense"
to choose an abortion (a surgical procedure)
without parental consent, or even knowl-
edge. So the law confirms that a teenager
has the ability to choose her own decisions,
whether it is getting an abortion or sending
photos of her naked body into cyberspace.
Isn't sexting simply their "choice?"
Carol Swiderski
Homosassa


Still there
Just adding my 2 cents about this
crossing guard thing. I don't have kids. I
don't go in the morning. I'm not worrying
about groceries melting. I'm just saying
the one at the intersection of Line Avenue
and Highland Boulevard in Inverness at
the hospital corner there by the (primary)
school, this lady (is there) in the afternoon
at the 3 o'clock time area ... It looks like
the same lady's been there for years ...
She's still there ...
Worth the tolls C
Peaceful ride. The people that
object to the Suncoast Parkway 2
extension must not travel to the
airport or Tampa very often. We
tell our friends and relatives to fly
into Tampa Airport so we can
take the peaceful ride to pick
them up. It's worth the tolls each CA
way. You save on gas and there 5
are no cars cutting in and out like 05
on (1-75). We really looked for-
ward to the Parkway 2 extension coming
to Citrus County where we live. U.S. 19
has so much traffic and it's getting worse
and I'm sure that in the future, there will
be more jobs in Tampa and Citrus County.
Parkway 2 would really be a big asset to
the business community. We are so sorry
that it has been suspended.
Embezzling
This is about Social Security...President
Lyndon Johnson started dipping in to So-
cial Security, and every other president
since has used Social Security - billions


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

In this country we are
used to every new devel-
opment being "new and
improved."
In this case, we were
looking for "less expensive
and still relevant"
A number of you made
good recommendations on
how we can improve the
television section, and we
will be implementing some
of those suggestions over
the next few weeks. We
have listened to and ap-
preciate the input
The good news from my
perspective is that the
Chronicle is a profitable
business with a good fu-
ture. You may have read
some news stories that
have discussed big-city


I


and now trillions - for government use.
This is right-out embezzling, as the gov-
ernment never put a dime in Social Secu-
rity. Employers and employees put in to
Social Security. This does not bother the
politicians, as most are rich and do not
depend on Social Security for retirement.
Cheap gift
An iPod. The president of the United
States gives the Queen of England an
iPod. What kind of gift is that for the
S Queen of England? ... that's like a
ND slap in the face. They gave him a
beautiful desk made from the
FF wood of an old slave ship - a
very thought-out, very, very, you
know, from-the-heart type of gift
- and he gives them an iPod?
What a cheap, cheap president.
Hire locals
S 9 That Zachery Company - they
579 need to start hiring some local
people. I've lived next door to
three people from Texas working
there for a few months now and they told
me that there is an opening. When I went
down there, they said they aren't hir-
ing...They need to start hiring some peo-
ple from Crystal River. I suppose the
same thing's going to happen when they
drop these impact fees. A bunch of out-
of-county and out-of-state contractors are
going to come in bringing illegal Mexicans
with them to help build all the houses. I
don't think there's going to be anything
left over for all the local people here
who're trying to earn an honest living.


newspapers which have
shut down or filed for bank-
ruptcy in recent months.
Small-town newspapers
like the Chronicle are in a
very different situation.
While we are suffering
from the economic down-
turn, we are still growing
readership and our Inter-
net site is the largest in the
county.
The Chronicle's focus
has always been local news
and information, and it
will remain that way.
A very important busi-
ness factor is neither the
Chronicle nor our parent
company have debt. While
we have repeatedly ex-
panded over the past 25
years, we have never bor-
rowed money to make that
happen. Many of the big-
city newspapers now suf-
fering are crippled with
unusual amounts of debt


they accumulated during
the boom years.
I share that with you so
you know we are a conser-
vative company that will
live within our means. The
relevance to you is that, at
times, we will have to re-
duce costs so we can keep
things in balance.
That is why we down-
sized our television guide
and changed the format
In the big picture ofthings,
I don't think many people
would want us to risk the
franchise to provide prod-
ucts we can't currently af-
ford. That's what got our
nation in trouble in the first
place, and we're going to do
all we can to avoid that route.

Gerry Mulligan is the pub-
lisher of the Chronicle. His
e-mail addressisgmulligan
@chronicleonline.com.


Winning is sy! STYLE
Simply fill out the coupon that yo Pu blushing this Saturday
will find in Senior Style, submit it inside the
to the Chronicle for your chance ,. . ou
to win in our random drawing C iK
for the $100 Gift Card* U
www.chronicleonline.com
Drawing to be held April 28, 2009. Coupon will appear with instructions In Senior Style on April 18, 2009.
*Gift card good for 6 months. Not redeemable for cash.


R R T


Letters to THE EDITOR


COMMENTARY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C4 s A L 12 2009


q


P


I ATTENTION SAVVY SENIORS I












CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE COMMENTARY SUNDAY, Ai'iw. 12, 2009 C5


DROP it
How many people are in
the DROP Program in Citrus
County that they're talking
about? How much money
would we actually be saving
if we hired new people in-
stead of using the old ones
at their salary? Has anybody
investigated that? Times are
bad right now and I think it
should be looked into.
Get back home
I hope you people are sat-
isfied that you elected
Obama in because now he's
over in Europe taking care
of those people when he be-
longs in the White House
fixing our economy, getting
the men the 4 million jobs
that he promised them and
doing the things that he has
promised. He has not done
a darn thing. How many
days has he been in the
White House? What is he
doing over in Europe for
when he belongs home here
taking care of everything
that has to be done here?
He finished everything that
he did in less than 100
days? Boy, he's a miracle
worker and I'm so glad you
elected him, because I
didn't.
Expensive toys
Hey, it makes me laugh,
the sheriff's (office). Don't
they realize that we're in a
budget crunch right now?
Those two kids that stole
that stuff from the sheriff's
(office); they got a head
unit, an amplifier, four
speakers, a Sony Playsta-
tion, a DVD player. Was that
really necessary? And they
drive around in a Lincoln
Navigator? We definitely
don't have a, the sheriff
doesn't realize that we have


a budget crunch right now.
What in the world are they
doing with all those toys?
You can't tell me that those
are necessary to fight crime
in Citrus County.
Stupid stamps
Our postage stamps
wouldn't be going up so
much if they didn't make so
many different kinds of
stamps, especially the stu-
pid Simpsons. It costs
money to make those
stamps, and we're going to
have to pay for it.
No flood coming
Al Gore's falsehoods. He
says if we don't stop global
warming, water will be to


the top of the Washington
Monument. Al Gore forgot
what God said. He said,
"When I plant the rainbow, it
will tell you that we
will never have a
flood again on this
Earth."
Crummy job
To "Probation pe-
riod": Where have
you been? No ad-
ministrator lasts
one year or more or CAL
less with these (Q i
commissioners. No UUU'
one in their right
mind would even apply for
the job without a hefty
farewell package. They know
beforehand they're out of a


I


job in the near future. This
searching for a new one
with all the skills is a waste
of time and money. They've
had them, but the
D commissioners do
U D not want anyone to
fE buck them or step
on their toes. Save
the money. Anyone
want to bet on this
one?


SEggheads
Oh, I was just
1 Q watching TV here
579 and I see that now
they have Disney
eggs. Get real, people. We
raised chickens. There is no
such thing as a cholesterol-
free egg. There is no such


thing as a better egg. An
egg is an egg. It may have a
smaller yolk, but it's still an
egg. Oh, I can't believe they
can fool us like this and
people fall for this to pay
more money for a Disney
egg.... Get real.
Taxing the future
Where's the money for the
new tax, the cigarette tax
money, going? It's going to
take care of people that are
too dumb to quit when they
get sick and have to go on
Medicare or the medical
system.
Pick it up
To the lady that's wonder-
ing about walking her dog


ez8 ^ wW m
! >f ^. S a


SUNDAY, APRL. 12, 2009 C5


COMMENTARY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


on someone else's lawn:
She didn't say that she car-
ries a bag to pick up the de-
posits left by the dog. I walk
my dog regularly. I always
take a couple bags and I
think everyone should do
that. I have never heard a
complaint against my doing
so.
Dollars well spent
Wow, the dreaded Health
Department officials are at
it again, picking on poor lit-
tle bobcats in their territory.
Wait a minute, they followed
the state's rules again. This
time, rabies vaccines to
save a little boy and an
older fellow from dying. Just
like the potlucks. I'll bet
those employees even had
to work on the weekend,
too. Really, if you think
about it, all of us with com-
mon sense know that our
tax dollars are well spent.
Why so high?
I would like to know why
we are paying higher gas
prices, 10 to 12 cents a gal-
lon more today, when a bar-
rel of oil is below $47 and
it's the lowest it's ever been.
Stop tailgating
Every weekend my hus-
band and I are out and about
in Inverness. Every weekend
we have to have an encounter
with a red flatbed tow truck.
This guy needs to slow down
and stop tailgating. He's
going to kill someone.
Had enough?
Had enough? Come to the
Citrus County tea party on
(April 18) at the old histori-
cal courthouse, 1 Court-
house Square, Inverness.
It's time for the silent major-
ity to be heard in this coun-
try. Have a good day.


mi~Bs


0









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* 0v:" '-C


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B Section D0 SU , APRIL 12,2009


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Mutual Funds: 10 questions to test your IQ


buy into a fund, expressed as a per-
centage of how much you invest
(b) The fee charged to manage the
fund and cover other ongoing ex-
penses, expressed as a percentage
of the fund's assets
(c) The fee you pay to a broker
who sells you the fund
5. What's a fund's turnover ratio?
(a) A measure of how often a
fund's managers are replaced (b)
How frequently the fund trades
stocks or other investments in and
out of its portfolio (c) How often the
fund gets new investors and loses
existing clients
6. True-or-false: An open-end


fund can issue as many or as few
shares as investors demand, with
potentially no limits on the number
of investors in the fund, or the
amount of money it can hold.
(a) True (b) False
7.True-or-false: Mutual funds are
prohibited from using investing
strategies that unregulated hedge
funds can employ.
(a) True (b) False
8. True-or-false: You -can lose
money in a fund that's called an
"absolute return" fund.
(a) True (b) False
See TEST/Page D4


MARK JEWELL
APpersonal finance writer
Although you probably haven't
gotten rich off them lately, mutual
funds remain a cornerstone of re-
tirement planning. But they're
widely misunderstood, and invest-
ing ignorance can really cost you.
So can you tell a fund expense ratio
from a turnover ratio? What about
an open-end fund from a closed-
end? Try this quiz, and check out
the answers at bottom:


CHRIS VAN ORMER
cvanormer@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle


The new owners of Midway Animal
Hospital say services will go on
seamlessly for their four-legged
clients.
"We are continuing along the same
lines as Dr. Nayfield," said Dr. Rachel
Day, who, with Dr. Robin Dearden, has
taken over from the founder, K.C. Nay-
field.
Recently, Day and Dearden hosted an
open house to announce the change of
ownership.
"We've been here about six and a half
years," said Day, "and we will continue to


1. What percentage of American
households own mutual funds?
(a) 10 percent (b) 27 percent (c) 45
percent
2. When was the key law govern-
ing mutual fund operations
adopted?
(a) 1924 (b) 1933 (c) 1934 (d) 1940
3. How many mutual funds are
there in the U.S.?
(a) About 1,000 (b) About 4,000 (c)
about 8,000
4. What's a fund's expense ratio?
(a) The sales fee paid when you


offer the highest level of care in
serving Citrus County and the * Midn
surrounding areas." Hospital is
Day joined the Homosassa S,-Suneoi
clinic for pets in June 2001. She Homosas
is a graduate of the University 795-7110,
of Florida College of Veteri-
nary Medicine, and is raising her family
here.
Likewise. Dearden and her family
have made Citrus County their home.
She joined Midway in 2002, and also is a
grad uate of the University of Florida
College of Veterinary Medicine.
Two years ago, Nayfield celebrated
Midway's 25th anniversary, then sold it
in December 2008 to Day and Dearden to
give himself more time to specialize in


Young adults urged to

smarten their money habits


EILEEN CONNELLY
AP personal
finance writer
NEW YORK - Saddled
with student loans and
credit card debt and ad-
dicted to $4 lattes, do young
adults stand a financial
chance?
Two new books aim to
give the Millennial genera-
tion the information they
need to set themselves on
the right path, using strik-
ingly different approaches.
In "I Will Teach You to Be
Rich," author Ramit Sethi
writes with a laidback, ir-
reverent style that has made
his five-year-old blog of the
same name popular. While


Beth Kobliner, in an update
of her 1996 best-seller "Get
a Financial Life," uses a
more sober tone. But both
authors are serious about
trying to nudge, push or ca-
jole young people into pay-
ing attention to money
matters to provide them-
selves with long-term finan-
cial security.
"The point of this book is
behavioral change," Sethi
said in a recent interview.
He hopes that by using lan-
guage and situations young
people are comfortable
with, his message will get
through. Personal finance
advice is typically aimed at
older people, he said, and
can often seem like "old


white guys talking (about)
confusing subjects."
"It's not broken out in a
way that we care about," the
26-year-old said.
Sethi aims at helping
young people achieve both
short-term goals - buying a
new iPhone or taking a
dream vacation - and long-
term goals like paying off
debt and saving for retire-
ment.
The book offers a six-
week program that takes
readers step by step through
setting up banking and in-
vestment accounts, paying
down debt and improving
credit scores. And it advo-
See YCO.I i.11. Page D4


WE
s
as
s


canine knee surgery.
ay Animal Day said that Midway also
at 1635 would continue to support its
st Blvd., rescue and charity groups.
a; phone "We actively support a
golden retriever rescue
group," she said, "and South-
east Guide Dogs, as well as 832 K-9's
Deputy Dogs," which trains bloodhounds
to be used in law enforcement.
Nayfield will be available at Midway
as a consultant. Also on the staff is Dr.
Mark Lowe, who has been with Midway
since 1985, and is well known for his
work in wildlife care.
Other veterinarians on the siaff in-
clude Dr. John Peterlin, Dr. Jodi Acosta
and Dr. Nancy Kicherer.


'- .-.i'
OET F. .
' ,. ^ L.
/. ^1

i qsr~7,c- 1 '
Ir(1 5LP


Artwork ... -..
from the -. -' T ,, '
cover of "Get . ,
A Financial . .' "
Life: Personal .. '
Finance In Your
Twenties and
Thirties" by Beth
Kobliner, is
shown.
Associated Press


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Same vets for your pets


See MONEY/Page D5


Investment ignorance can be costly


Get"


house


in order

DEAR BRUCE: I
earn $60,000 a
year. My mortgage
is $75,000, and the home is
worth about $110,000. My
total does include a sec-
ond mortgage, which I
used to pay off a bunch of
credit card debt, but now
I am back in the same po-
sition. I owe $20,000 on
my credit cards. I would
like to borrow the rest of
the balance on my home
to pay off these obliga-
tions. What do you think?
- Reader, via e-mail
DEAR READER.: I
think that you have a very
bad habit of spending
more than you earn. I
don't see where your
home has enough equity
to borrow to pay off these
debts. Even if you do that,
if you continue your bad
habit of spending so much
money, what will you do
the next time? It is time to
get your house in order,
which means putting
yourself on a strict budget
and if necessary working
at a second job to in-
crease your income. Your
plan to borrow yourself to
prosperity is flawed.
DEAR BRUCE: I am 75
and a recent widow. My
son and his family live out
of state, and I only see
them a couple of times a
year. I have adequate, my
home is much too large
for just me. I would like to
sell it and get a smaller
home. What do you think?
- I.R., Missouri
DEAR I.R.: I certainly
endorse the idea of sell-
ing your larger home, but
I suggest to you that you
seriously consider renting
rather than buying an-
other place. Why do you
need all the aggravation
of home ownership? You
can rent for the same
amount of money or less.
You should take into ac-
count the lost income on
whatever money you
would invest in a home. At
your age, why not make
new friends and have less
responsibility? Since your
family is not taking an ac-
tive interest in you, I'd be
out joining clubs, travel-
ing and doing those things
that are fun and will help
keep you young.
DEAR BRUCE: We are
in our late 70s and have
about $600,000 in the fam-
ily trust. My husband re-
cently had some major
health issues, and it has
caused us to consider set-
ting up an amount outside
the trust which either of
our two children can ac-
cess in case of an emer-
gency What do you think?
- M.C., California
DEAR M.C.: At your
age, I think you should
consider giving one or
both of your children a
power of attorney to act in
your behalf. You should
have enough money avail-
able so that they can at
least act in an emergency.
There should also be
some consideration of the
possibility of both of you
not being able to handle
things. This is a problem
as people get along in
years. Inheritance taxes
are not a factor for you
and your husband, but
having enough money
available to handle emer-
gencies should be set up.


BRIAN LaPETER/Crronrcle
Dr. Robin Dearden, right, and Dr. Rachel Day, the new owners of Midway Animal Hospital in Homosassa, watch a demonstration recently by
Duke Snodgrass of Deputy Dogs bloodhound breeders during an open house at the veterinarian clinic. The two vets, who have worked at the
clinic for years, bought the business from Dr. K.C. Nayfleld in December. Nayfield decided he wanted to concentrate on surgeries and had
less time to spend with regular patients.


Midway Animal Hospital changes hands to staffers


--------


j .:i. . 'I- " :- -.-.- .* ,"';'-' A.' ik..- *<*- ,-t.i. ."S-V -













D2

SUNDAY
APRIL 12, 2009


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce






Chumbe nneti


Likwid Communications


Sunflower Springs Assisted Living


Likwid Communications Inc. is excited to be a member of the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce. Pictured above are: Ambassadors John Porter, Jessica Holcomb, Owner Christo-
pher Smith and Ambassadors Jackie Marx and Rhonda Lestinsky. Likwid Communications
is a local telephone company that offers business telecommunications monthly savings of
up to 40 percent when compared to traditional telephone service. Likwid Communications
prides itself on being Local, Affordable, Reliable and Flexible. As a locally owned and oper-
ated company we have limited our focus geographically to provide customers with a higher
level of service than competitors who you have to call out of state or out of country to
speak with. Our prices are set with small businesses in mind. We are the most affordable
phone system and service and we back that up with our 10 percent price match guaran-
tee. With the reliability of a traditional phone company and the flexibility of a small business
we provide our customers with the excellent reliable service they deserve. The flexibility of
our company can be best be defined by our out of the box methods. With our custom de-
signed systems options are virtually limitless. If you have needs that are outside the box
we work hard to make them a reality. Likwid Communications Inc. can be reached by mail
at PO Box 1927. Inverness, FL 34451, by telephone at 352-726-1236, Toll free at 888-854-
5943 or on the web at www.golikwid.com. Please feel free to contact us for any reason we
are happy to help.


The UPS Store


The Citrus County Chamber recently held a ribbon cutting ceremony, welcoming the UPS
Store in Crystal River as new members. Representing the UPS Store is Deb Shackelford,
Greg Rodrick, Marjorie Pulcini, Deanna Rodrick, Owner Jerillyn Clark, Manager Dan Allen,
Martika Dominguez. Also present are Ambassadors Janet Mayo, Rhonda Lestinsky, Wendy
Hall, Nancy Hautop, James Segovia and John Porter. The UPS Store located at 6752 W. Gulf
to Lake Hwy in the Crystal River in the Publix Shopping Plaza, offers shipping (pick-up avail-
able), printing, copying, notary services, office supplies and mailbox services with 24 hours
access and a street address. Give us a call today at 352-795-0033. We are here to offer
you excellent customer service while fulfilling your business needs.


American Legion


Post 155


American Legion Post #155 Jim Woodman Commander cuts the Ribbon as The "American
Legion #155 Family" joins Citrus County Chamber of Commerce on President Lincolns
200th Birthday! Included in the Legion Family is American Legion Post #155, American Le-
gion Auxiliary Unit #155, Sons of The American Legion Squadron #155, Legion Riders Chap-
ter #155 and Citrus 40/8 Voiture & Cabane #1219. Commander Jim Woodman cuts the
Chamber Ribbon; included in the photo are: American Legion Post #155 Vice Commanders
Larry Pink and Larry Riviere, Adjutant & 4th District Public Relations Officer Jay Conti Sr.,
Sgt @ Arms John Garvey, American Legion Auxiliary Unit #155 President Sandy White, Vice
President Barbara Logan, Secretary Marie Pink, Chaplain Johnnie Hair, Legion Riders Chap-
ter #155 Cindy Heather, Citrus 40/8 Voiture & Cabane members Chef de Gare Richard
Gannon, Rick Logan, Tom & Cheryl Smith with the award winning American Legion Post
#155 Honor Guard with Captain Joe Barry, Jimmy White, Neal Colbath and Harold Beville.
Representing the Chamber Ambassador Program is Janet Mayo, Wendy Hall, Diane Smith,
Betty Murphy, Tammy LaVelle and John Porter. For more information, visit our website at
www.Postl55.org.


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The community of Citrus County gathered on February 24th 2009 to celebrate the Ribbon
Cutting Ceremony for Sunflower Springs Assisted Living Community located on Yulee Drive
in Homosassa. Representing Sunflower Springs was Michelle Arevalo, Community Rela-
tions Director; Delma Lord; Evelyn Schere; Laura Messier, Executive Director. Also present
were Chamber Ambassadors John Porter, Jennifer Duca, Diane Smith, Tammy LaVelle,
Rhonda Lestinsky and Wendy Hall. An estimated 400 people came to welcome Sunflower
Springs to the area. Enjoyment was apparent by all in attendance, be it the gourmet style
hors d'oeuvres, the enchanting entertainment, or tours of the lavishly appointed community
with the striking architecture, the pleasure of seeing a community like Sunflower Springs
become a reality for seniors of Citrus County was embraced with delight and satisfaction.
Several healthcare organizations were represented at the ceremony including members of
staff at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, Senior Home Health Care, and Life Care
Center of Lecanto. Numerous physicians attended to extend their support for the premier
resort style living that Sunflower Springs has to offer. This community brings to life the sen-
ior lifestyle so many have always imagined, providing unique lifestyles with independent
and active assisted living. Sunflower Springs is the perfect place to enjoy the best times
of your life. Give us a call today at 352-621-8017.


Hampton's Edge Trailside Bicycles


':.* ** h '
*.a%.


Recently, the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce welcomed Hampton's Edge Trailside Bi-
cycles as new members! Pictured above are owners Regis Hampton & Cindy Messer with
friends and customers. Also present were Ambassadors Lillian Smith and John Porter. Hamp-
ton's Edge has been in business in Citrus County since 1995. Moving to their new location
in downtown Floral City on the bicycle Trail in Oct. They specialize in High Performance
Trikes, Recumbent, Comfort and Hybrid bicycles, along with bicycle repair, service and
rentals plus a good selection of cycle related clothing and accessories. www.hamp-
tonsedge.com Open: Wednesday thru Sunday. Visit us today at 8294 East Orange Ave. in
Floral City or give us a call at 352-419-4809.


Courses on tap at CFCC


CFCC will be offering Senior Computers
IV a continuation of the Microsoft Office
Suite of Products with an introduction to
Powerpoint. Learn basic uses of spread-
sheets, such as how to automate a check
book register. Look at how to use the many
templates in MS Office to make your com-
puter a valuable tool.
This class will be on Fridays, April 10
through April 24, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. in
Building L2, room 201B.
CFCC is offering a Basic Digital Camera
class. Learn how to manipulate, transform
and rotate images and to transfer images
from a digital camera or disk to a hard
drive or other storage medium. Bring your
digital camera and instruction manual.
Class will be on Thursdays, April 30 - May
7"' from 5:30 pm to 8:30 pm. For more infor-
mation or to register, call Continuing Edu-
cation at the Citrus Campus, 352-249-1210,
or visit www.CFCCtraining.com.
Have you thought of getting your Real Es-
tate License? CFCC is offering a Real Es-
tate Sales Associate - Pre License class.
This course is required for all persons
seeking Real Estate Certification with the
Florida Real Estate Commission. Class will
be on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday
from 9am to 5pm starting 4/27 - 5/14.


Wall re


Course fee is $300. For more information or
to register, call Continuing Education at the
Citrus Campus, 352-249-1210, or visit
www.CFCCtraining.com.
CFCC is offering "Red Flags, Property
Inspection Guide". This class will help one
learn what is considered a "red flag". Learn
to look at soils, cracks, drainage, ventila-
tion, mold and other residential issues.
Find out who you contact in regard to red
flags. Class will be held on Thursday, April
16"' from 9am - 1pm. Class fee is $50.00. Of-
fered in partnership with the Ponds Insti-
tute. For more information or to register,
call Continuing Education at the Citrus
Campus, 352-249-1210, or visit www.CFCC-
training.com.
Learn about property management when
you attend CFCC's class "Property Man-
agement & Managing Risk" This class is an
introduction to professional property man-
agement. It will explore the manager -
owner relationship and leasing and tenant
issues. Class is held on Thursday, April 21
from 9am - 1pm. Class fee is $50.00. Of-
fered in partnership with the Ponds Insti-
tute. For more information or to register,
call Continuing Education at the Citrus
Campus, 352-249-1210, or visit www.CFCC-
training.com.


raising



Bank of
America
employees:
Joan &
Rick La-
- -- boda, Jose
Correa,
Charley,
Sarah Wren
and Julio

join with
Habitat for
Humanity
' homeown-
ers Scott
and Krystal
Kartune at
the wall-
- raising of
their new
L home in
Inverness.


E" --- ---""""""""~~~""""""""""""""""~











Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builder's Association




Builder Connection


3D


SUNDAY
APTIL 12, 2009


Spring is a busy season for CCBA members


Notes fom the

CCBA President
It appears spring is here to stay.
Spring is always a very active time for
the CCBA Spring is when the Florida
legislature is in session, and members
from our State association, as well as
members of our local association,
push for favorable legislation for our
industry. Many times it's not obvious


what is done on the State level, be-
cause many times the most important
issue is what the FHBA was able to
stop or eliminate, before it ever had a
chance to negatively affect our indus-
try
Spring is very busy now on the local
level as well. Right now, the CCBA has
just wrapped up the Spring Parade of
Homes and the Inaugural Citrus
County King of the Wing, and we are
working on the 14th annual Family
Fishing Tournament coming up on


April 25 and 26. These events take an
enormous amount of planning to be
as successful. During these difficult
times, it has meant that the chairs of
these committees and our CCBA staff
have had to give their heart and soul
to get the participation and sponsor-
ships needed to put these events on.
For that I cannot express how proud
I am, to represent an organization
with such dedication, and I wish to
extend a sincere thanks to all that
have made these events possible. I


truly believe this is the strength of
our organization, and when out-
siders see the dedication exhibited,
it entices them to join this organiza-
tion, which is our life blood. We have
our annual membership drive going
on, and extend our invitation for you
call the CCBA office 746-9028 and
find out how you can join a quality
organization.
Randy Clark - Clark Construction
President, Citrus County


King of Wing crowned


rjl


Pictured left to right are Cinnamon Sticks Restaurant Owner, Kim Dillon, Manager Chad McPherson, Chef Scott Kartune,
and Presenting Sponsor Cyndi McRee.

Cinnamon Sticks is the 2009 Citrus County King ofthe Wing


In the midst of all the recent strange
weather, Mother Nature gave the com-
munity a beautiful day of fabulous,
breezy sunshine with which to enjoy
the inaugural Citrus County King of the
Wing hosted by the Citrus County
Builders Association in partnership
with the Inverness Olde Towne Associ-
ation and presented by Progress En-
ergy.
More than 2,000 people brought their
friends, families and their appetites to
sample wings from 16 different food es-
tablishments in Citrus County ,while
being serenaded by Christi Vale and
the Sequel Band sponsored by Citrus
Cardiology Consultants.
Consumers, competitors and over 35
local Citrus County commerce booths
witnessed as a panel of 11 "celebrity"
judges, in a blind judging, carefully
chose one winner that rose above the
others to be crowned the 2009 King of
the Wing; Cinnamon Sticks Restaurant
Congratulations to Cinnamon Sticks
Restaurant for claiming the mammoth
5 1/2 foot trophy that screams "I am the
King of the Wing!" The winner will dis-
play their prize at their establishment
for all to see and will have exclusive
bragging rights as 2009 Citrus County
King of the Wing until the time comes
to defend their title in 2010. This year's


Honorable Mention goes to B & W Rex-
all the Restaurant who missed the title
by only a very narrow margin.
The CCBA would like to sincerely
thank all of the fine Citrus County food
establishments and business ex-
hibitors that participated in this event
Event participants, as well as sponsors,
will be listed on the website at www.cit-
ruskingofthewing.com until promotion
begins for the second annual event
Please patronize these fine businesses
that support our community.
The King of the Wing Committee
would like to issue a special thanks to
the following sponsors that made this
event possible:
* Presenting Sponsor: Progress
Energy
* Entertainment Sponsor: Citrus
Cardiology Consultants
* Gold Sponsors: Citrus 95, Fox
Classic Hits, and Nature Coast Web
Design
* Silver Sponsors: Bright House
Networks, Citrus County Chronicle
and WYKE TV
Thank you King of the Wing Judges:
* John Thrumston, Chairman, Cit-
rus County Board of County Commis-
sioners
* Joe Meek, Citrus County Board of


County Commissioners
* Sam Himmel, Superintendant,
Citrus County School Board
* Bob Plaisted, Mayor of Inverness
* Ken Hinkle, Inverness City Coun-
cil
* Randy Clark, President, Citrus
County Builders Association
* Jeremy Anderson, Citrus Cardiol-
ogy Consultants
* David Allen, 96.3 Fox Classic Hits
* Brenna Bidlack- Honorary Teen
Judge, Crystal River High School
* Nicholas Tarr - Honorary Teen
Judge, Citrus High School
* Nicholas Cortez - Honorary Teen
Judge, Lecanto High School
Thank you King of the Wing Conmittee:
* Chairman Roger Carlson,
Franklin Realty Consultants
* Co-Chair Cyndi McRee, Progress
Energy
* Tommy Long, Long Enterprises of
the Nature Coast
* Doug Lobel, Inverness Olde Town
Association
* Charlie Richer, Inverness Olde
Town Association
* Lisa Kiddon, BrightHouseNetworks
A special thanks to all of the volun-
teers that made this event possible!
Events don't happen without people!


CCBAis fishing


for participants

The CCBA will hold its
The CCBA will hold its CCBA 14th Annual Fam-
14th Annual Family Fishing ily Fishing Tournament.
Tournament at the Ho-
mosassaRiverside Resort on 0 April 25and 26 at the
April 25 and 26. Sponsored in Homosassa Riverside
part by B & W Rexall Drugs, Resort.
Citrus 95, Fox Classic Hits, * Regular Entry includes
True Oldies 106.3, Sherwin three anglers, two T-
Williams and Capital City shirts, two Captain's
Bank, the 14th Annual Fish- Meeting tickets. (entries
ing Tournament boasts more may be accepted after
than $12,500 in cash and April 17 subject to
prizes based on 125 paidboat availability and $25 late
entries and is open to all, in- fee) is $195.
cluding professional guides. U Extra Anglers in my
With a totally separate Youth boat at $45 each (three
Division that is sponsored by anglers included in
Coastal ConservationAssoci- each entry this year).
action, the 14th Annual CCBA
Family Fishing Tournament A All participants aboard
truly offers something for my boat agree to abide
everyone. by amended IGFA rules.
There are still many levels
and opportunities left to get ter, sponsor or volunteer, call
involved in this very well at- Executive Officer Donna
tended and advertised tour- Bidlack at (352) 746-9028, ext.
nament For more 3, or go to the fishing page on
information on how to regis- www.citrusbuilders.com.


Apn'lv...P.


Lisa Kiddon earns

this month's honor


Spring Hill resident Lisa
Kiddon serves as a National
Association of Home
Builders Director, an Associ-
ate Director of the Florida
Home Builders Association,
a Board of Director on the
Hernando Builders Associa-
tion, a member of the Polk
Builders Association, as well
as a member of the Citrus
County Builders Association
& the Realtors Association of
Citrus County.
At her primary associa-
tion, the Hernando Builders
Association, Lisa has chaired
and served in many posi-
tions, including the Parade
of Homes, Golf Committee,
Truck Night Explosion, and
Casino Night She has served
on the Citrus County
Builder's Association's Pa-
rade of Homes, and King of
the Wing Committees. She
has also served as a past
Board member for Her-
nando Habitat for Humanity
in addition to her Home
Owners Association of Ster-
ling Hill, the Chamber of
Commerce and Hernando
County Association of Real-
tors.
Lisa has worked for Bright
House Networks for 20 years.
During that time she has


worked in both Advertising
and Marketing. Currently in
Market Development, she
provides complimentary in-
stallation, Digital home
phone service, High Speed
Internet and Digital Cable
for the first month of service
to homeowners whose
builders participate in the
Builder program. The
Builder program utilizes
structured wiring that pro-
vides the "electronic founda-
tion" for telephone, fax,
modem, Cable TV high
speed internet, computer
networking, audio, security,
and home management
Lisa Kiddon Bright
House Networks 7175
Coastal Blvd.
Brooksville, FL 34613


2009 Spring Parade of Homes Winners announced at banquet


The Citrus County
Builders Association hon-
ored award winning
builders on the red carpet
at the Academy Awards
themed 2009 Citrus & Her-
nando County Spring Pa-
rade of Homes Awards
Banquet on Thursday,
March 26, 2009. The follow-
ing winners were pre-
sented with awards
sponsored by Bright House
Networks
Category A:
First Place Best Overall
"Adams Homes "3000
Model"
Second Place
"Richard Van Orden
"Islander"
Third Place


"Artistic Homes
"Versailles"
Category B:
First Place Best Overall
"Artistic Homes
"Grand Bahama"
Second Place
"Artistic Homes
"Grand Cayman"
Third Place
"Dream Custom Homes
"Don Calais"
Category C:
First Place Best Overall
"Dream Custom Homes
"Don Mercado, Spring
Hill"
Second Place
"Dream Custom Homes
"Don Mercado, Beverly
Hills"


The CCBA is pleased to announce
the following winners of the 2009
Spring Parade of Homes WOW
Awards sponsored by Bright House
Networks. WOW Awards are pre-
sented to each Builder in the 2009
Spring Parade of Homes for Citrus &
Hernando Counties, which is spon-
sored by Progress Energy WOW
Awards are in recognition of the most
outstanding feature of the Builder's
model. WOW Award winners for 2009
are: Adams Homes: The 3000 Model
for Master Suite, Artistic Homes: Key
West for Efficient Use of Space, the St
Augustine for Entry Impact, the Palm


Third Place
"Richard Van Orden
"Oasis w/Media Room"
Category D:


Beach for Curb Appeal, the Versailles
for Common Area Layout, the Rose-
mont for Tray in the Dining Room
Ceiling, the Grand Cayman for Floor
Plan, the Grand Bahama for Living
Room/Kitchen Area, and the Grand
Floridian for Front Elevation, Car-
rollwood Development: Blue Marlin
II for Best Use of Natural Light &
View Enhancement Dream Custom
Homes: The Don Calais, Spring Hill
for Master Suite, the Don Mercado,
Beverly Hills for Interior Entry, the
Don Mercado, Spring Hill for Master
Suite. Edward R Johnston: The
Springs on Kings Bay for Interior


Frist Place Best Overall
"Edward Russell John-
ston "The Springs on Kings
Bay"
The 2009 Spring Parade


Entry. Richard Van Orden: the Oasis
with Den for Floor Plan with Atten-
tion to Detail, the Oasis with Media
Room for Curb Appeal, the Nautilus
Elite with Theatre for Theatre Room,
the Islander for Curb Appeal, and the
Islander Elite for Family Room
Space. Sweetwater Homes: the Drift-
wood for Master Bath and Wheeler
Homes: the Madison for Built In Wall
Unit
For more information about the
WOW Awards winners or the Parade
of Homes, please go to www.citruspa-
radeofhomes.com or call (352) 746-
9028.


of Homes for Citrus & Her-
nando Counties, sponsored
by Progress Energy. For
more information on how
to see these award winning


models and more, go to
www. citrusparade-
ofhomes.com or call (352)
746-9028.5 Parade of
Homes








04 I, ,iwAp, 12 2CHVVs


Social workers honored


The Nature Coast Unit of
the National Association
of Social Workers recently
presented two Citrus
County residents with the
unit's 2009 prestigious
awards. Joan Smiley, pic-
tured left, resident of In-
verness was selected as
"Social Worker of the
Year." Smiley is a licensed
clinical social worker and
has been involved in the
Nature Coast Unit for
more than nine years. She
has worked in many ven-
ues of social work and is
respected by her peers for
her diligence and profes-
sionalism. Mary Blakely,
ACSW, pictured right, re-
ceived the "Retired Social
Worker of the Year"
award. Blakely retired
from a long career with
the Onondaga County De-
partment of Social Serv-
ices in Syracuse, New
York and moved to Beverly
Hills in 2004. She has con-
tinued to work in medical
social work and spends a
large amount of time vol-
unteering for the local
SHINE (Serving Health In-
surance Needs of Elders)
program. For more infor-
mation on the Nature
Coast Unit (Hernando,
Pasco and Citrus coun-
ties) of NASW, call unit
chair Wendy Hall, LCSW at
Hernando-Pasco Hospice
(352) 527-4600.
Special to the Chronicle


Tax planning should be year-round process


NEW YORK -
It can be tempting
for small business
owners, once
their income tax
returns are filed,
to put the whole R
issue of taxes be-
hind them.
Resist that
urge. Joyce Ro
Owners who SMAL
don't grasp the
idea that a com-
pany's tax planning - in re-
ality, overall business and
financial planning - is a
year-round process could be
setting their businesses up
for an even tougher time in
this difficult economy. They
might also miss out on some
tax law changes that are de-
signed to help small busi-
nesses get through the
recession.
"They've got to keep their
eyes open relative to what's
happening on the budget
level," Barbara Weltman, a
tax attorney in Millwood,
N.Y, and author of "J.K.
Lasser's Small Business
Taxes," said of business own-
ers.
It's hard to run a business
and keep up with tax law or
economic stimulus legisla-
tion. That's a good reason to
stay in touch with a tax or fi-
nancial adviser whose job is


to know what
changes are com-
ing down. And it's
not just the fed-
eral government
that's making ad-
justments; states
are also passing
laws, and some,
including Cali-
3senberg fornia, need to
L TALK raise taxes to
close budget
deficits.
Some changes in federal
tax law for this year are al-
ready known. The IRS Web
site, www.irs.gov, has a sec-
tion devoted to the provi-
sions on its home page. Click
on "Update on Recovery Tax
Provisions for Individuals
and Businesses."
Among the small business
provisions:
* Companies that incur
net operating losses can
carry them back five years
instead of the usual two, ap-
plying those losses against
taxes paid in the past and ob-
taining refunds.
* When making estimated
tax payments, businesses
are required to pay only 90
percent of their previous
year's taxes, down from the
usual 110 percent
Weltman noted that this
change might be a big help
to companies. "What this


does is improve cash flow,"
she said.
* The sharply higher de-
ductions for new equipment
purchases enacted for 2008
are being extended into
2009. One ofthese provisions
is the Section 179 deduction,
which allows small busi-
nesses to deduct upfront the
cost of equipment such as
computers, furniture, manu-
facturing machines and ve-
hicles, up to $250,000. The
second is the bonus depreci-
ation measure that in-
creases the portion of a
purchase price that can be
deducted for the first year.
There is also a break for
people who invest in small
businesses - if they hold
their investments for five
years, 75 percent of their
capital gains will be exempt
from taxes.
Some of these provisions
are straightforward, espe-
cially the carryback and es-
timated tax changes. But the
others are more complex be-
cause they depend on strate-
gic business decisions that
are made throughout the
year - and that probably
should be made in consulta-
tion with a financial profes-
sional such as an
accountant or tax attorney
whose expertise goes be-
yond the Internal Revenue


Code.
Weltman said owners
should be sure the profes-
sionals they hire are "more
than just tax advisers, that
they're business advisers....
Maybe you're not doing
things right with your inven-
tory, maybe you should be
warehousing differently.
Whatever the issue is, you
need someone who can help
you."
Owners need to take ad-
vantage of that help on a
continual basis. That means
not just calling for advice
about big purchases or
other strategic decisions,
but also scheduling semian-
nual or, even better, quar-
terly meetings with their
accountants or advisers.
Some owners go further,
giving their accountants fi-
nancial data each month.
You can argue that work-
ing closely with an adviser is
a good business practice in
the best of times. Given the
flux in the economy and
therefore the evolution in
laws that affect small com-
panies, right now it can be
critical. It not only keeps
your company operating
better, it frees you to focus
on your customers and em-
ployees and preparing your
business to benefit from an
economic recovery.


I

I
.1


Business DIGEST


Job fair on tap in
Tampa Bay
Looking for a new job? How
about a new career? Come on
out to the employment event of
the season, the Tampa Bay Job
& Career Fair on April 20,
Meet 30 to 40 local compa-
nies who have immediate em-
ployment needs, from entry
level positions to skilled trade,
health care jobs and even top
managerial positions. There is
something for everyone at The
Tampa Bay Job & Career Fair.
This is a special event designed
to help put you face to face with
companies that have open po-
sitions which they are looking to
fill immediately.
For additional information,
call at Dave LaBell (727) 893-
8523.
Dunnellon gets
fresh Winn-Dixie
Winn-Dixie Stores Inc. cele-
brates the completion of its re-
modeled store at 10051 S. U.S.
Highway 41 in Dunnellon today.
Customers will find upgraded
departments and expanded
services in their neighborhood
store.
In addition to an expanded
produce department, customers
will also find a well-stocked
wine department and expanded
deli offerings. In the deli, a fresh
salad bar, wood-burning rotis-
serie and wing bar await shop-
pers looking for quick meal
solutions.
The bakery now provides


been a member of the medical
staff since 1980.
Board certification demon-
strates to the public that physi-
cians have met the highest
standards of internal medicine
and its subspecialties. Board
certification is voluntary and in-
cludes an exam that tests a
physician's ability to diagnose
and treat patients with a broad
range of conditions.
Women's networking
event on tap
The Business Women's Al-
liance will host a Business to
Business Networking Luncheon
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 13
at Plantation Golf Resort & Spa
in Crystal River. Guest speaker
is Sartura Shuman Smith.
Reservations are required. Cost
is $20 per person if paid by May
6 or $25 for registration May 7
to 11. Vegetarian meals must
be requested with reservation.
For more information, call
Rhonda Lestinsky at 563-3103.
Group welcomes
new member
The most recent member of
the Citrus Business Network is
Sherony Sheldon, AAA South.
She was welcomed into mem-
bership on March 27.
The Citrus Business Network
meets every Friday morning at
Tuscany On The Meadow, Cit-
rus Hills Lodge, 350 E. Norvell
Bryant Highway, Hemando.
Breakfast starts at 7 a.m., and
the meeting is conducted from
7:30 to 8:30 a.m. Members ben-


efit by exchanging information
and referrals with other busi-
ness owners.
Guests are always welcome.
Attendees should bring busi-
ness cards, brochures,
coupons, etc., to exchange with
other business owners. Each
person is given an opportunity
to introduce their products or
services.
For more information call Liz
Koehlinger, membership direc-
tor, 527-9790 or Ron Radford,
president, 795-0003, or visit
www.citrusbusinessnetwork.co
Council aims
to help vets
The Veterans Economic
Development Council under
the auspices of American Le-
gion Post 155 Crystal River is
now actively engaged in re-
cruiting Disabled American
Veteran (DAV) and veteran-
owned businesses to obtain
state and federal contracts.
Regulations permit other non-
vet small businesses to team
up with the vets. A DAV is de-
fined as a veteran receiving at
least 3 percent disability from
the VA.
The VEDC does not assist
in resume preparation or busi-
ness plans. It provides registra-
tion, training and direct
marketing to the government.
The prime objective is to
create jobs using the govern-
ment marketplace.
Call 527-5957 for informa-
tion and registration and visit
-From staffreports


shoppers with loaves of
warm bread, and the meat,
seafood and frozen food de-
partments were expanded to
better meet the needs of the
neighborhood. Additionally, the
grocer has expanded the in-
store pharmacy and floral de-
partment.
Dr. Potu earns
board certification
Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center affiliated physician
R. Prasad Potu, MD, has suc-
cessfully
eamed his
board certifi-
cation in nu-
clear
cardiology
from the Cer-
tification
Board of Nu-
clear Cardiol- R. Prasad
ogy (CBNC). Potu
CBNCisa
not-for-profit corporation estab-
lished to develop and adminis-
ter practice-related
examinations in the field of nu-
clear cardiology.
"I took part in this examina-
tion to test my knowledge in the
field of nuclear cardiology and
compare myself to my peers,"
said Dr. Potu.
Dr. Potu is also board certi-
fied in internal medicine and
cardiovascular disease and
holds a master's degree in
health care administration from
the University of Florida. He is
the chairman of the hospital's
outcomes committee and has


smart trades, a higher ratio
can boost short-term re-
turns. But a fund with high
turnover increases fund


YOUNG
Continued from Page D1

cates what Sethi calls "con-
scious spending," meaning an
awareness of where money is
going and why
Sethi does not advocate a
step that Kobliner suggests:
keeping a log of daily spend-
ing to track where money
goes. "You obviously need to
be aware of what you're
spending, but should you be
aware of it on a day to day
basis?"
Kobliner doesn't think such
an exercise is necessary for
the long term. But she main-
tains that for a week or two,
writing down every dollar (or
keeping track of spending in
the Blackberry notes func-
tion) can be an eye-opener "It
sounds so obvious, but I think
the revelation that people
have when they do that is
pretty amazing," she said in
an interview.
Kobliner's book offers both
an overview to give readers a
quick start toward under-
standing their finances, and
substantial detail on topics
such as banking and investing
along with intensive run-
downs on mortgages, insur-
ance and taxes. Young
military families may also be
interested in her chapter on
military benefits.
As for those lattes, Sethi
breaks with the personal fi-
nance pack when he says it's
perfectly OK to keep high-
priced coffee habit or even to
spend hundreds on Jimmy
Choo shoes - as long as the
bills are paid, the 401(k) con-
tributions are flowing in and
the savings accounts are set
up. "Personal finance I think
traditionally has been so



TEST
Continued from Page D1

9. FAnd managers' inter-
ests should be aligned with
their investors'. But what
percentage of managers
don't invest in their funds -
in other words, how many
don't "eat their own cook-
ing"?
(a) 10 percent (b) 35 per-
cent (c) More than 50 per-
cent
10. True-or-false: After
losing money on stocks, I
played it safe by investing
in a money-market mutual
fund last October. The gov-
ernment is temporarily
guaranteeing most money
funds through Sept. 18. So
I'm protected if something
bad happens, right?
(a) True (b) False

ANSWERS:
1. (c) A survey by the In-
vestment Company Insti-
tute, a fund industry
organization, found 45 per-
cent of U.S. households
owned mutual funds at the
end of 2008, representing
more than 92 million indi-
vidual fund shareholders.
2. (d) The main law is the
Investment Company Act of
1940, although funds also
are subject to the Securities
Act of 1933 and the Securi-
ties and Exchange Act of
1934.
3. (c) The Investment
Company Institute counted
8,039 funds in February,
holding about $9 trillion.
The two most common
types of funds are stock
funds, numbering more
than 4,800, and taxable
bond funds, with nearly
1,300.
4. (b) A fund's expense
ratio covers the fund com-
pany's costs before distrib-
uting earnings to investors.
This amount can have a
much bigger impact than
any upfront sales costs -
also known as loads, or
commissions - since ex-
penses can eat into returns
for years to come.
5. (b) The turnover ratio
measures the percentage of
a fund's holdings that have
been replaced over the past
year. If the manager makes


much about people tellingyou
notto do things," he said. "Not
to buy lattes, not to buy $150
jeans or enjoygoing outto eat
Personal finance is not about
more and more willpower"
Kobliner also supports the
concept of "mindful spend-
ing," but offers a somewhat
more traditional approach.
She suggests that readers
identify short-term and long-
term goals, and find ways to
cut spending so they can
reach them. "I hate the
cliched advice," she said. "But
it's true, you have to have a
one-time sit down and ask,
'Where do I want to be? What
are my goals?"'
"Thinking that through is
very helpful for people be-
cause then it gives you some-
thing concrete to work
toward," she said.
When it comes to the crush-
ing debt load that young peo-
ple carry, both writers offer
similar approaches for how to
get out from under it, includ-
ing suggestions on how to talk
to credit card companies and
consolidating student debt
And they both focus on
built-in saving and investing
"I think it's human nature to
wantto spend whatyou have,"
said Kobliner "It's so impor-
tant to build savings into your
budget"
Looking ahead, they also
agree that the current finan-
cial crisis may have an upside.
"If there's any silver lining in
this (economic) frenzy that
we're in now, I think it's going
t~force some awareness with
this generation," said
Kobliner When her book was
first issued, she recalled,
many said young people did-
n't care about the topic. "Now
I think it's clear, not only do
young people care about it,
but they have to care about it"


trading costs, and can boost
an investor's tax bill.
6. (a) True. Open-end
funds are structured so that
they can add investors and
assets. Far less common are
closed-end funds, where the
fund company decides up
front how many fund shares
will be issued, limiting the
number of investors. Those
initial investors can later
trade shares to others.
7. (b) Falke. Regulations
limit how much mutual
funds can borrow to invest
in derivatives, such as fu-
tures and options. But, de-
pending on the guidelines
in its prospectus, a fund can
adopt some of the same
strategies that hedge funds
use, including short-selling.
8. (b) True. These funds
generally employ the same
strategies as many hedge
funds to smooth out returns
in good times and bad. But
you can still lose money,
even if you'll fare better
than most investors in a
downturn. The same goes
for "stable value" funds.
9. (c) A Morningstar Inc.
study found 46 percent of
U.S. stock funds reported
no manager ownership last
year. For other types of
funds, the percentages were
higher - for example, 59
percent for foreign stock
funds, 65 percent for tax-
able-bond funds and 78 per-
cent for municipal bond
funds.
10. (b) False. The guaran-
tees apply only to assets in
money funds as of Sept. 19,
2008, just after one such
fund exposed investors to
losses. So any money in-
vested after that isn't cov-
ered. However, risks are
very low because money
funds generally invest in
the safest forms of bonds
such as Treasury bills.

SCORING SYSTEM:
* 0-3: It's time to take Mu-
tual Funds 101.
* 4-5: You're progressing,
but how about picking up a
few mutual fund books or
checking out some Web
sites?
* 6-7: Pretty good, but
your knowledge gaps could
put you at risk of getting
into the wrong fund.


* 8-9: Very good, your
fund acumen is admirable.
* 10: Perfect! You're a
mutual fund master - live
long and prosper.


L~


ED SERRA ( (352) 560-6130 |
Certified Public Accountant m coueon- www.edserra.com
6118 W. Corporate Oaks Dr., Crystal River, FI.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


D4 SUNDAYAPRIL 12 20 9


BUSINESS










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



MONEY
Continued from Page D1

DEAR BRUCE: My
daughter has a two-year
lease on her car with an
18,000-mile-per-year limit
(for a total of 36,000 miles).
She now has more than
42,000 miles, and it's still
climbing. Most of this is job-
related, and she gets $350 a
month for automobile ex-
penses. I cautioned her to
avoid leasing. She wouldn't
listen. Now what can she
do? - Reader, via e-mail
DEAR READER.: Not
much. She will have to ex-
ercise the purchase option
when the lease is up. Given
the miles she's racking up, I
don't know how it would
benefit her to pay for the
extra mileage. She would
be better off under almost
all circumstances to pick up
the car at the sale price and
then dispose of it. She had a
lower lease payment be-
cause she told the leasing
company that she wouldn't
be driving these kinds of
miles. While that may have
been a good plan, she has
put herself into a corner
where there really are no
other options.
DEAR BRUCE: I am
about to pay off my house
and wanted to know if you
have any words of wisdom
regarding the deed and how


BusINEss SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009 D5


to clear the lien on my
house. - C.C. in Pennsylva-
nia
DEAR C.C.: While you
can easily handle this trans-
action yourself, you would
be far better off getting a
local attorney to take care
of having the mortgage can-
celed and put into your
name. The few dollars in-
vested ensures that it will
be done professionally, with
no glitches.
DEAR BRUCE: I have be-
tween $12,000 and $14,000
in retirement funds from a
previous employer. I can ac-
cess this in four years, at
age 55. I have $70,000 in a
401(k) with my current em-
ployer. Would it be more
profitable to take this re-
tirement fund at 55 and roll
it over into my 401(k), or
should we invest it into an
IRA? - R.S. Cincinnati,
Ohio
DEAR R.S.: If your 401(k)
is doing well and you are al-
lowed to roll that money in,
fine. If not, put it into a self-
directed IRA and mirror its
investments with your
401(k) if you are comfort-
able with how it's going.
Given that rolling it into
your 401(k) does not in-
crease your tax shelter, I
would be just as comfort-
able putting it into a self-di-
rected IRA.
DEAR BRUCE: We were
being transferred away
from our home for a couple


of years. We determined
that it would be difficult to
sell our home at a reason-
able price, so we decided to
rent it out. However, there
were considerable repairs
necessary to make it
rentable. We made a verbal
deal with a friend. He was
to give us about $5,000
worth of repairs, we would
then pay him with com-
puter services that his com-
pany required. The work
got done, but we were
shocked when we received
a bill from a local contrac-
tor. It was a detailed list of
the repairs for about $5,000,
however, our "friend" did
nothing himself. He then
filed for bankruptcy Now
who do we settle with? Our
original verbal contract
says that there was to be no
exchange of money, only a
trade of services. The man
who did the work says that
he wants to get paid. Where
do we go from there? - S.P,
via e-mail
DEAR S.E: Get your
checkbook out. In most
states, he could still file a
mechanic's lien against
your home, which would
make it impossible for you
to sell until you settle with
him (and, of course, the in-
terest meter would keep on
going). Your friend, and I
suspect that word is not ap-
propriate, is the guy that
you should be angry with.
Since he went bankrupt and


very likely named you in
the filing, you are fresh out
of luck Verbal contracts are
"not worth the paper they
are written on." Dealing
with friends can often be
ruinous, as you have come
to find out.
DEAR BRUCE: We de-
cided to go on a lengthy va-
cation that we paid for and
took out trip insurance. The
day the tour began, my hus-
band had a panic attack and
we could not go. The insur-
ance company will not re-
turn any of our money. What
do we do to get our money
back? This is why we took
out the insurance. -
Reader, via e-mail
DEAR READER.: With-
out seeing the policy that
you purchased, I wouldn't
know whether his panic at-
tack would be covered.
Since you bought this trip
through a tour operator or a
travel agent, as well as the
insurance, those are the
folks that should be in your
corner showing you how to
make and process a claim.
In the absence of any coop-
eration from them, you
might call upon your com-
missioner of insurance in
your state to intercede on
your behalf.
DEAR BRUCE: My wife
and I made a bid on a home
at the full asking price be-
cause we still thought it was
a great buy. The sellers,
however, would not give us


a reasonable amount. of
time to secure a mortgage.
They want to close within 20
days and are reluctant to
allow us to inspect the prop-
erty. This is absurd. They
only gave us three days to
have our attorney review
the contract, and that was
just not enough time. We
need time to raise the
money, and we are certainly
not going to have it done
without an inspection. What
are your thoughts? -
Reader in Nevada
DEAR READER.: Walk
-away from the deal. If the
real estate market is a very
hot one, there's a chance
that they can get away with
a stunt like this; but in this
down economy, this is not
the case. Under normal cir-
cumstances, it is necessary
to give a potential buyer the
opportunity to secure a
mortgage, which can take
upward of six weeks. It
sounds like they are in trou-
ble with the house and need
to unload it quickly. In addi-
tion, to purchase a home
without a proper inspection
is guaranteeing disaster
and, clearly, your attorney
should be given a proper
amount of time to review
the documents. There are
other homes out there. I
would be looking for one.
DEAR BRUCE: I am cur-
rently renting a townhouse
for $1,250 a month. I can buy
a new one for $260,000 with


about the same monthly ex-
pense after paying $105,000
down. I will probably be
leaving this area in the next
five years, and I am con-
cerned about having to sell
the townhouse. Should I
continue to rent and remain
flexible or buy a townhouse,
build equity and get the tax
advantage? - J.H. Los
Alamos, Calif.
DEAR J.H.: You have
painted a bright picture of
the financial advantages of
owning a home, but you've
overlooked that you've
given up $105,000 invested.
In today's marketplace, ag-
gressively investing the
'$105,000 could easily be
turned into $15,000-$20,000
a year. Put another way, how
much equity will you have
developed in a house over
your down payment in the
first year? In this circum-
stance, even if you weren't
thinking about moving, as-
suming you can rent a unit
about the same size and
quality for $1,250 a month,
it's a no-brainer.

---B--I--

Send your questions to:
Smart Money, PO. Box
2095, Elfers, FL 34680. E-
mail to: bruce@brucewil-
liams.com. Questions of
general interest will be an-
swered in future columns.
wing to the volume of
mail, personal replies can-
not be provided.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds



In Print



and



Online



All



The Time


mm _SS I. 6 .0 * S *S - m -6 *
--~~~WA IA~ .HTeS50[A I- I


ALONE?
Senior Dating Bureau
SAFEST since 1977 Ages
45-90. 1-800- 922-4477
(24hrs) or
log onto: Respected
Dating.com
Retired Caucasian
Gentleman seeks
companionship with an
attractive, intelligent
Lady. Ethnicity/Age is no
problem. Will consider
sharing my home with
an acceptable person.
Blind Box 1540p
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429
Widower, Male, 60's,
would like to meet nice
lady for long term
relationship.
Respond to:
Blind Box 1541P
Citrus County Chronicle
106 W. Main St.
Inverness, Florida 34450



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
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Electric Dryer
Works needs belt.
(352) 637-4825
(352) 586-3741




Your world first

Need a job
or a
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employee?

This area's
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Class.Uieds


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HAVE SOMETHING TO
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Lost Yellow Lab
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MINIATURE POODLE
3 yrs old Apricot with
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name is Foxy. Lost in
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(352) 601-0279

a and read
My name is Elvis and I
live at 5234 West Corral
Place in Pine Ridge.
If you are reading this
ad, and you have
found a large solid
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home, please call me.
You may have found
Elvis. Elvis has been
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February. He is
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two serious health
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Thank you for
keeping him safe.
Please call MariJo.
352-220-2032
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Papillon
small white & brown
male
lost In the Highlands in
Invereness 3/28/09
WEDDING RING SET
Lakes Regional Library
Inverness. April 6th.
Much sentimental value.
REWARD
352-637-2306


SBank Probate -
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352-613-3674

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INSURANCE AGENT








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(352) 628-3329



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www.naturecoast
livina.net


ADMINISTRATIVE
BEHAVIORAL
ASST.
For ICF/DD Residential
Faciltiy. P/T, 20
Hrs. per week. Exp.
preferred, strong
organizational skills &
High School Diploma
req. AA Degree a plus.
Call:(352) 746-3262
or Email:
bai)kevyinevillaae.
com

BECOME A CNA
For Career and
Test Preparation
Call 352-564-8378
Build a career
with us!
If you are interested
in a career in Social
Work, have a
Bachelor's degree-in
a field of Human
Services & a min of
1 yr exp working with
children daycaree,
Internships, working,
etc.) visit
www.thecenters.us
to learn about our
Family Care
Manager position
working In the Child
Welfare arena.
Training provided.
Starting salary is
$15.20/hr. plus
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE Fax or
e-mail resume to
HR, The Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
iobs@thecenters.us
CNA PREP CLASSES
EZ Learning Services
For Information 352-.
586-2715; 586-2716
/ us out zoomcltrus.com
CNA TEST PREP
Now Offering Day
& Evening Classes
352-341-2311
Scholarships Available

Full Time
Lic. Lab Tech &
Phlebotomist.

For busy Physician
Lab. Competitive
Salary & Benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 746-6333

IMMEDIATE OPENING
CNA for doctors
office. OBGYN exp.
a plus. Fax resume
(352) 794-0877
MDS
Coordinator
Great opportunity to
join an exciting team.
Candidate must
have a FL RN or LPN
license, MDS and
care plan
experience, PPS
knowledge, and be
detailed oriented.
Excellent benefits.
Apply in person
or send resume to:
dlspangler@
southernltc.com
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness. FL EOE


LPN/MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Experience needed.
Please send resume to
P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447
NURSING
SUPERVISOR
HOME HEALTH
We are seeking a
Nursing Supervisor for
Home Health. Ideal
candidate will have
a current FL RN
license, completion
of an accredited
school of professional
nursing, BSN
preferred. Current
FL driver's license and
automobile liability
Insurance. One-two
years current
med/surg experi-
ence, one year prior
home health
experience.
Supervisory experi-
ence preferred.
Please apply online
www.cltrusmh.com.
CMHS Is an EOE.

Outpatient
Therapist
The Centers Lecanto
Campus Is seeking a
Therapist to provide
assessments,
outreach. Individual,
family therapy &
groups In an
outpatient setting.
Must have a working
knowledge of human
growth & develop-
ment & family
systems. Master's
degree Inrhuman
service related
discipline & 3 yrs
related exp required.
Full benefits pkg
DFWF EOE Fax or
e-mail resume to
HR, the Centers, Inc.
352-291-5580.
jobs@thecenters.us
For more into visit


RECREATIONAL
THERAPIST

For ICF/DD Residential
Facility, P/T, 16 to 24
Hrs. per week. Exp.
preferred. Must have a
High School Diploma or
Equiv. a valid Florida
Drivers License & be
lifeguard certified, or
certifiable. Call:
(352) 746-3262 or
Email:rr
kevoinevillaae.com

WEEKEND
RECEPTIONIST
Saturday and Sunday
10:00am-6:00pm
Come join a fun
team! Multi-phone
system and com-
puter experience
required.
Dependability
a must.
Apply in Person
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, FL EOE


TAtW1flM.

YMCA seeking
qualified individuals
to serve as a life-
guards and swim
lesson instructors
Aquatics Programs In
Citrus County. Subnit
application/resume
to Amber Slusser, at
the Citrus County
YMCA-2805 Hwy 44
W, Inverness, FL
34453. Phone:
352-586-4390 Email:
aslusser@suncoasivm-
ca.91g
DFW/EEO






APPOINTMENT

Up for a challenge?
Serious minded individ-
uals will earn great $$$
setting appts for our
very busy local com-
pany. Call Steve @
352-628-0254

FRONT DESK
Hotel experience
required. Great
benefits. Full-time.
Apply ih person:
BEST WESTERN
614 NW Hwy 19
Crystal River.
No calls please

HELP WANTED
Experienced
Roll Off/Dumpster
Delivery Driver.
Must have CDL for
minimum of 2 yrs.
clean driving record.
Apply In Person @
711 S. Adolph Pt.
Lecanto

uIIMl�u agABAI
Military Police - Serve and
protect your community and
your countryas a member of
the National Guard Military
Police! A part time career
with full time rewards.
SSG Rodney Medina
(352)-586-8526
RODNEY.MEDINA@
US.ARMY.MIL
1-800-GO-GUARD.COM

IDAY CAMP


YMCA seeking
qualified Individuals
to serve as a Camp
Leaders and Life-
guard for Summer
Day Camp Programs
in Citrus County.
Submit
application/resume
to Amber Slusser. at
the Citrus County
YMCA-2805 Hwy 44
W, Inverness, FL
. 34453.
Phone: 352-586-4390
Email:
aslussesuncoastvm-
DFW/EEO


ears and tail. Male, no
collar. Answers to Mars,
Big Pines Mobile Home
Park on Hwy 491 in
Lecanto. 352-586-5386



NECKLACE & CHARM
at Hunter Springs.
Call to Identify.
352-795-2911
Prescription Glasses
w/neck rope. Found
on sweetgum ct. N.
(352) 382-1074



Top Hat Airport
Serv.352-628-4927
Rates for Tampa Int.
$75 & Orlando $85
w/some restrictions
/us out zoomcltrus.com












www.adopta
rescued pet.com
View available pets on
our website or call
(352) 795-9550



Inverness
MERCANTILE BANK
Inverness
April 20th Monday
12-2pm

CAT
ADOPTIONS







- Speci n Pw t ,t Mng rt,*l3

Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A till 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4
All Cats and Kittens are al-
tered, tested for Feline Luk
and Aids. Up to date on
vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofspha.org.
or stop by our offices at
1149 N Conant Ave. Comer
of 44 and Conant.
Look for the big white build-
ing with the bright paw
prints.


Office Assistant
Probation/Part time
poss perm position
4 - 6 mos. send
CV med office
POB 1056, CR, Fl
34429




COME
GROW
WITH US!
I ,
\ i I


I-s i'I 'l


Hospice House
FT RN
3p-1 1p
Mon-Fri
A full description
this job as well as a
application can be
found here:
www.hosplceofcitrus
county.org
Fax: 352.527.9366
hr@hospice
ofcitruscounty.org
Hospice
of Citrus County
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, FI 34464
DFWP/EOE
INSURANCE
220 & 440 Licensees
Fast growing local
agency. Looking for high
energy, quality person,
homea TedLhnday
352-563-1117
or email resume to
insuranceresume
@hotmall.com



Cook, Prep Cook
Min 5yrs exp.
Waitress &
Bartender
Apply In Person
10a-3p Mon- Fri
HICKORY ISLAND
RESTAURANT
Inglis, Hwy. 19 DFWP



HOME SHOW CASE
Pool & SPA
seeking Sales Help
Exp. In the Pool & Spa
Industry preferred.
Please fax Resume
to:
352-375-7706

SALES PERSON
EXPERIENCED
TOP $$$ PAID
Benefits, company
vehicle.
Apply in Person
Bray's Pest
Control
3447 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Inverness
(352) 746-2990


Busin. to Busin. Flex.
8/10 hrs.wk352-527-2551




A/C SERVICE
TECHNICIAN

With Florida's Lead-
ing Carrier Residential
Dealer, Must have
experience in
residential service &
replacement,
Benefits Include:
Health Insurance
401K, vacation & sick
days, commissions,
Apply at BAY AREA
AIR CONDITION
8021 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy Crystal River
Phone 352-795-2665

DRIVER NEEDED
Immediate Opening:
Experienced Driver
needed for our
Roll-Off & Porto-let
Routes. Qualified
candidate must have
a clean Class B CDL,
Submit to random
drug and alcohol
screening, & pass
back ground checks.
Must have good work
history, be dependa-
ble & available on
weekends. Fill out
applications betwn
8am and 4pm at
Advanced
Waste Solutions Inc.
124 N. Florida Ave.
Inverness

EXP'D TOW TRUCK
OPERATOR
Class A CDL
Clean driving record
a must. Mon - Fri
Advance Towing
(352) 400-0360
Experienced A/C
Installer & A/C Tech
Must be cert. & have
own tools. Valid D.L. a
must. Knowledge of
area helpful. Call
(352) 860-2522 or apply at
304 N. Pine Ave, Inv.
Mon- Fri 10a-3p
Experienced Pet
Groomer needed for
busy veterinary hospi-
tal. Part-time initially,
full time as business
grows. Start immedi-
ately. Please send re-
sume with references to
aninaldoc24z
@yahoo.com
PLUMBER/DRAIN
CLEANER

Must have exp. &
driver's license.
Accepting Apps.
from 9A.M. to 11 A.M.
Call Roto Rooter
Plumbing Service
(352) 621-1993

EXP. SERVICE
I PLUMBERS I
I Only plumbers with
service exp. APPLY, .I
352-621-7705
L � � � I


Classifieds


PHONE SALES


,I


SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009 Db


BUSINESS














D6 SIINDAY APRIl. 12, 2009


INFANT/TODDLER

Teacher Needed
(352) 795-6890

Telephone Sales,
Stocking,
order filling,
general labor.

Hrs of work M-F, 8-5p,
Crystal River
(817) 437-4988






HOUSE KEEPING

Exp,.Only,
Weekends,Able to
pass a background
check
(352) 795-3774


P/T TENNIS

Local Tennis Club,
in need of Part time
counter help. $7 hr.
Flexible hrs, a plus
This Is a smoke free
facility. Call 249-1115





















































Restaurant For Sale
An established
profitable franchise in
Crystal River. $240K.
(352) 746-6596


DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Repairing gas & diesel en-
gines. No job too big or
small. 352-228-2067




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd friendly
serv. Lowest rates Free
est.
352-860-1452
All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
COLEMAN TREE SERV.
Trim & Removal. Lic.
Ins. FREE EST. Lowest
rates. 352-270-8462
/ out zoomcitrus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design. Bob-
catwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272
OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Work Free Est.
LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins



At Home Computer Re-
pairs & custom comput-
ers.
Call(352)228-7823
COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
On-Site Same Day
Service Available
*All Computers
*Affordable Rates
* Certified Tech's
* Networking
*Virus/Spyware/
Pop- Removal
(352) 341-4150
www.fastteks.com




REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch * Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-1728



RV CARPET &
FLOORING
REPLACEMENT
(352) 628-1164

aCltonotive
Your world first.
Every Day



CIlasif/iied'l


MERLE NORMAN
COSMETIC STUDIO
Crs. Riv. Sweetbay PIz
(352) 795-9542




DESK & FREEZER
computer desk with
hutch$60, small outside
freezer $30 Call 465-3841,
leave message if no
answer







I AL


25x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Cverhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry Door, 2 Vents,
4" Concrete Slab.
$14.895. INSTALLED
30x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$16.795. INSTALLED
35x50x12(3:12 pitch)
Roof overhang,
2-10xO10 Roliup Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$30.995 Installed
* Fl, Engineered Plans
* A local FI Manufact.
* Meets or exceeds
Florida wind codes.
+ Conc/Inst by others.
4 Many sizes available
+ We specialize in
Commercial Buildings
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC1256991
www. metal
structuresllc.com
Flex Space 400+Sq. ft.
areas of warehouse/
affordable & secure. (352)
400-4295

r Sheds & Garages of
Any Size
I *SHEDS NOW*
We Move & Buy
Used Sheds
Independence/41
* )8i
(35) 860-0111




1990 MIKE HAMPTON
ROOKIE CARD First
Mike Hampton card
everll Pictured in Crys-
tal River Pirates Uni-
formll VERY RAREIII
$15 352-220-9163
Civil War, Nautical &
wildlife prints. Go to
www.mariners
international.cam




A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
- 2 Ton $780.00
4 2-2h Ton $814.00
4 3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Free Del. LIc.#CAC
057914 746-4394


Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
work fully coated. 30 yrs.
Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-795-6533
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int/ Ext.Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ALL HOME REPAIR
painting, drywall flooring,
pwr. wash Malley's Home
Maint
220-9486 (lic0259169)
4us out zoomcitrus.com
DAVID RODGERS
Int/Ext. repaints. Satisfac-
tion Guar, 20 yrs exp.
lic/Ins 212-3160
3us out zoomcitrus.com
FERRARO'S
Painting Service
Int/Ext. Free Est. Press
Cleanin 352 465-6631
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




AFFORDABLE Mobile
Boat Maint. & Repair
Technical/Electrical
Custom Rigging
John (352) 746-4521
V us out zoomcitrus.com
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
27 yrs. expo. Certified
Best prices/guarnted
352-220-9435
3us out zoomcitrus.com
SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149. Up
BOAT COVERS,$189. Up
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcitrus.com




AT YOUR HOME
Mower & Generator Repair.
352-220-4244
Lic#99990001273
DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Gas / Diesel Engines No
job too big or small.
352-228-2067




ALL ABOUT BATHS
New life for old
bathroom.Tub reglazing-
acrylic systems,
allaboutbaths.com
(352) 637-2299
V us at zoomcitrus.com

The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149. Up
BOAT COVERS,$1189. Up
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcitrus.corn


Businssr


THERE ARE OTHER
SOLUTIONS Besides
Nursing Home.Private-
Home 1 on 1 care
Alzheimer/Dementia, No
problem, References
503-7052




*" SEE THROUGH
Window Washina
All Aspects (352)
489-4189; 322-0962
/ us out zoomcilrus.com




HOMOSASSA AREA
Safe envoriment, play
area, ages 4-10
Ref's (352) 503-6795




HOME SERVICES
Serving Citrus Co. for 10
yrs. Cell. (727) 642-7757
MAIDS ON CALL
Serving Citrus 3Yrs.
Windows/Free Est.
(352) 726-8077
Malou's House
cleaning, $12.00 Per hr. 2
hr. min. Homosassa area.
(352) 476-9676




Affordable CABINETS &
COUNTER TOPS
New & Remodel
352-586-8415




Dotson Construction
Decks, Remodeling Etc.
#CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708
3 out zoomcitrus.com
QUALITY CRAFTED
BUILDERS New, Renova-
tions & Commercial
15 Yrs in Citrus County
352-726-5507
REX MULLIS LLC
JESSE MOORE Const.
Roofs, additions,
remodel, handyman
352-564-0969
rc0066915/cbc057605


,


ROGERS Construction
New Homes & All
Construction (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872
We will beat any price
by far without com-
promise, Dunham Con-
struction roofing, re-
modeling, home maint.
painting, pres. wash,
etc. talk to owner
422-6575 (crco452543
/us out zoomcitrus.com




SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla rms,
windows, garage scrns
(CBC1257141) 628-056




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash &
Gutters Lic. 5863
(352) 746-0141

Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs Pres-
sure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job too
small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

S NATURE COAST
HOME REPAIR
& MAINT. INC.
,- Offering a Full
Range of Services
www.naturecoast
homereoalr.com
S Lic. 2776/Ins.,
352-634-5499
Visa/MC/Discover
I -ic i.6023



35-860008


Inqallationf hb Th
Brianii' i, I
7E , 7 , ', ,U4 T .- 4
352-628-7519
Siding,


ABC Briscoe Appl.
Refrig, washers, stoves.
Serv. & Parts
(352) 344-2928
Double Sink
stainless w/della faucets.
& Garbage Disposal.
$45.00
Dishwasher
Whirlpool, Black/white.
Quiet cycle. $50.
(352) 476-2267
DRYER AND KITCHEN
SINK Whirlpool gas or
propane dryer excellent
condition $60.00 and
Kohler Kitchen sink white
cast/porcelain with white
spray facuet 100.00
352-621-8067
GE REFRIGERATOR
18cuft, white, 2 yrs old.
Excellent condition,
clean. $200.
352-436-4109
Micro Wave
GE Space maker, X- Lg
over counter. White.
$30.00
Electric Range
Whirlpool, black/white,
self cleaning. $70.00
(352) 476-2267

RANGE
Gas, 30" very clean,
works great $135
(352) 563-2385




ELECTRIC SAWS
Craftman miter. Delta
Band 9" both on stands
$60. each
(352) 527-9415




HITACHI 58"
PROJECTION TV
Excellent condition.
Asking $500/obo.
352-465-1653 or
682-3568
PHILLIP SURROUND
SOUND Digilal Center.
5 speakers & sub-wltfer
$50. 352-726-9708
Television
Mitsubishi, 48" Projec-
tion. Great cond. $499.
(352) 564-4214




Kitchen Cabinets
Custom formica w/inlaid
doors. Comes w/micro
wave, hood, countertop &
3 well sink & faucets.
$750.(352)382 -2904




COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839

Computer
New. $299
7" GPS System. $200.
(352) 628-2007
DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts & up-
grades. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
www.rdeeii.com


#1 A+ Mr. Fix - It!
All repairs, painting,
gutter & yard clean-
ups. 352-382-3647
Vus out zoomcitrus.com




Sheds & Garages of
Any Size
I *SHEDSNOW* I

S Used Sheds
Independence/41
(352) 860-0111




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash &
Gutters Lic.5863
(352) 746-0141
l#1 AT SERVICE
MALLEY's ELECTRIC
352-220-9326 or
255-4034. #ec0001840
V us out zoomcitrus.com
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699




C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/201-1422




Carpet Factory Direct
Repair * Clean * Sales
Laminate, shop at
home. 352-341-0909




PAVING & SEAL COAT
VIGLIONE LLC-lic/Ins
www. TAR-MAX.com
Free Est(3521726-3093


Debt Holding You Down?

Pay off Bills, Improve your
Home, Solve all your
.k' financial problems,
- Apply for a

Sloan today.
� *J i i . - .1.,, l , .24hrs.
' Call Now

[_L 1-888-964-7111


SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic inch
S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered Hooker
headers. New Gangster
white walls, seal in all
leather bilk ostrich skin,
Paint by Jesse James
painter of Calf., w/Double
Damon signature, House of
Color paint, Blk w/colored
ghost flames on all sheet
metal. 2" Carlini handle
bars. Chrome to max, This
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart, $30k in-
vested, may trade for nice
tractor w/bucket or bobcat
etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815




2 Window Air
Conditioners $45. ea.
1 Sump water pump
$50.
(352) 344-2062 or
(352) 344-8905
5 pc. wrought iron
Patio Set grape design
$400. Ozite Carpet,
12x30 green $35.
(352) 344-2062 or
(352) 344-8905
High Style TABLE, 4
SWIVEL ARMCHAIRS,
UMBRELLA, cream, nearly
new b.o. 352-465-6551




2 Memory Foam
Mattress Twin size,
like new $50 each
(352) 628-3570
2 recliners, like new,
mauve, very clean, $75
ea. Glass top Table, 4
chairs, olive green, $50.
Cash only
(352) 637-2580
2, Camping Grills
Table top $35.00 each.
(239) 229-2643
4 Dinette Chairs
Floral design
on casters
$125.
(352) 854-8598
42" Round
Oak Pedestal Table
& 4 chairs $250.
352-586-8576,
or 352-527-3176
Area Rug 5.5 X 7'
$40.00
Patio Set
7 piece PVC w/umbrella.
$150.00 Obo.
(239) 229-2643
BROYHILL
Oval dining room
table & 6 chairs, China
Cabinet good cond.
$500.(352) 344-8291
CARLETON KEY WEST
STYLE SOFA
rattan and tropical print
$275
352-465-6551
Changing Table
& Crib, Pali, Natural
wood finish. Both w/
mattress. Bed comes
w/toddler rail. $550. for
all. Exc. cond.
(352) 249-0851
Custom oak
Entertainment Center,
showroom new, will up
to hold 42" flat screen
cost $1,500 reduced
$475. 795-0494


AARON'S FENCE
All Types, Best Price
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
24/7(352) 795-7373
3us out zoomcitrus.com
ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencina.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BARNYARD II Fencing
Serving Citrus Co.
Since 1973. FREE Est.
(352) 726-9260
OSBORNE'S
LawnfTree/Shrub
Quality Fence Work Free
Est. LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED!
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins




John Gordon Roofing
WE'VE MOVED New
Location - Same Great
Service! (cccl325492)
352-382-7003
REX MULLIS LLC
JESSE MOORE Const.
Roofs, additions, re-
model, handyman
352-564-0969
rc0066915/cbc057605




BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Estimates
Lic#2579/lns, 257-0078
Decorative concrete,
Landscape curbing
River rock resealing
344-4209 (Lic.6960)
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete tex-
tures, Stamp,spray crack
repair,staining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Acrylic Decking
A 352-464-3967 g
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic, #1476, 726-6554


CLASSIFIED




Queen w/mattlresses,
new cover & bolsters.
$140. Twin Bed
Maple head & foot
boards. New mattress &
box spring. $175.
(352) 270-8250
Dining Room Set
Pine w/tile top, bench +
4 chairs. $95.00
Bedroom Set Queen, 6
pce. wood, marble look.
$95.(352) 249-6800
DINNING ROOM SET
Solid Wood 5 foot table
with 2 leafs, 6 chairs and
brand new cushions.
Light brown pine.
Build to last. $350.00
Cell phone 802-578-7932
Futon Bed
Black Metal, $75.00
OBO. (352) 249-6800
Micro Wave Cabinet.
$35.00. (352) 249-6800
Glass Coffee & End
Table. $200. for both
SMW.(352) 382-2449
JEWELY BOX Oak 43in
high w/8felt drawers top &
side storage exc con $75.
352.249.9164
KITCHEN SET
Oak tbi w/20" leaf & 4
upholst. swivel chairs on
castors $300. TV/Printer
Stand, Lt wood,
w/1 shelf 2-door storage
$65 (352) 697-9906
LARGE ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
Light wood, with or
without TV. $500/obo
352-422-4560
MIRRORED DRESSER,
blond wood 8-drawer
$350; Pink velvet chair,
$25; Wicker Table, small,
white $20. all In exc.
cond. (352) 527-6807
Modern Key West Style
RATTAN & PRINT SOFA
$275 352-613-2712
MODERN SAGE GREEN
SOFA Very clean $225 or
obo 352-613-2712
MOVING SALE. Sofa
w/chair, It. blue love seat,
end tables, coffee table, din-
ning room set,
dresser/mirror and night-
stands.
Great Condition. Make an
offer. Cell 802-578-7932


ORIENTAL DINING
ROOM SET, SOUTH-
WESTERN DINING
SET, Queen size
Sleep Comfort adjust-
able bed orig.3000.00
asking 800.00 or best
offer, oriental dining
set(must see to ap-
preciate). Call
352-257-1178
ORIENTAL STYLE
Hiboy, Loboy dressers &
2 mirrors to match.
$75.00. Call Ruth
352-382-1000
OUTDOOR HIGH
DINING SET, CREAM,
4 swivel chairs & umbrella
$250 352-465-6551
OVER SIZE PLAID
WING CHAIR
Excellent condition $75
352-795-8774
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Wants Your Business
Tues.-Fri. 9-5 Sat. 9-1
Homosassa 628-2306
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40.Qn
$50; Kg $75. 628-0808


Additions, Garages
Decks, Bathrooms &
Handyman Services
40 Years ExpI
Lic. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768
REX MULLIS LLC
JESSE MOORE Const.
Roofs, additions, re-
model, handyman
352-564-0969
rc0066915/cbc057605




A Cutting Edge
Tile Job
Showers. Firs etc
(352) 422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




REPAIRS
Wall & Ceiling Sprays
Int./Ext. Painting
Lic/Ins 73490247757
352-220-4845
ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs, Tex-
ture, Additions
Free est.220-9016
Lic.#SCC131149747



Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone Drive-
ways & Tractor work
341-2019 or 257-1562
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,
Hauling, Site Prep,
Driveways. Lic. & Ins,
(352) 795-5755
*TOP SOIL SPECIAL*
3 Yd -$60/ 5 Yd $85
10Yd $175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436




All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear.
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/us out zoomcitrus.com
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, HaulingSite
Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins795-5755
/ us out zoomcitrus.com


Cope's Pool & Pavers
*Pool Refinishing
SInteirlocking BrickPaver I
Patio & DrAveways

ORDER YOUR
*- POOLTODAY
& BE SWIMMING
R7f ~BY SUMMER
* . , "FREE QUOTES"
'- . Lic. & Insured
P CPCc1456565
I -- 352400.3188


Tan Leather. $300.
For both.
SMW (352) 382-2449
SAGE GREEN CHAISE
LOUNGE
Excellent condition $125
352-465-6551
TRIPLE CHERRY DRESSER
w/bifolding mirror. $225.
(2) TWIN MATTRESSES
w/boxsprings & frames.
$50 ea. $75 both. All
like new, 352-527-8176
or 352-212-6918
TWIN D-BED new white
iron,w/mat.&shts.is also
trundle.697-5524 $200
WilCKER FURNITURE
Weather and fade resist-
ant woven resin loveseat,
2 chairs, coffee table and
matching cushions. $375
352-860-0444
YOUR FURNITURE
DONATIONS
SUPPORTS THE PATH
HOMELESS SHELTER
Call (352) 746-9084



4 WHEEL EDGER 3 HP
$150.
DUMP TRAILER 30"X40"
pull behind lawn
mower. $60.
(352) 489-4687
10 h.p. Chipper
& Shredder $225
(352) 795-6639
Lawn Mower
Murray 22", very good
cond. $75.00
(352) 382-2449
Pressure Washer
RIdgid, 3000 PSI
used only 3 times
$300
(352) 341-1962
Riding Lawn Mower
Dixon commercial 44"
deck. O-turn.A-'1 cond.
$1,200.(352) 746-7357
Riding Lawn Mower
MTD, 42 " deck, 11 HP.
$350. (352) 746-7357
Riding Mower
Murrary 42" Cut. Auto.
w/bagger. $700.
Riding Mower
Murray 42" cut. Stand.
14.5 Hp. $350.
(352) 860-2505



BOOK STORE
Howards Flea Mrkt.
Sec. A wing for info.
(352) 628-7521
(352) 601-5491



LADIES CLOTHING
Quality clothes size XL-3X.
Spring cleaning of closets.
Reasonable. (352)
794-3067
NIKE AIRS
red brown & black.very nice
and well kept.size 9 men $40
795-6481
PROM DRESSES Two
prom dresses for sale
$50.00 dollars a piece.
352-419-4720



"KING JACK" VEGAS
LIKE SLOT MACHINE
Lots of fun. Coins included.
Great condition. $99.00
352-212-8555


BANG'S LANDSCAPE
Sod, grass plugs,
plants, trees. Please
Lv. Msg.352- 341-3032
D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design. Bob-

& sod 352-563-0272




#1 AGAIN Pro Tech
Lawn Service. Family
owned & operated.
Serving central Citrus
Cty since 1999. Call
for free estimate
302-7800 - Lic/Ins.
Affordable Lawn Care
Dependable Service
Professional Quality
352- 601-7086
3us out zoomcitrus.com
Andersen's Lawn Serv
Mowing, Trimming, Clean
Up , Low Rates
352-277-6781
BARKERS LAWN
Guaranteed to
Beat the Current Price
You Pay for Lawn Care
Service. Monthly/Per
cut rate.352-232-8166
Basic to Full Serv
Tree & scrub trimming
clean-up & hauling.
wkly/biwkly 613-7934
3 out zoomcitrus.com
Bob's Pro Lawn Care Re-
liable, Quality Work Resi-
dential / Comm. Lic./Ins.
352-613-4250
C.R /Homosassa
mowing, beds, brushes,
mulch/haul
Commrl & Resdntl since
1991 220-6761
/ out zoomcitrus.com
Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Specials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
/us out zoomcitrus.com
DUN-RITE LAWN SERV
Clean up, tree trim,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681
/ out@zoomcitrus.com
FINISHING TOUCH
Quality lawn care. Call
Great Todavl
352-527-2719
3us out zoomcitrus.com


1st Choice
PEST CONTROL, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE


LAWN GOT
PROBLEMS?

Call 503-6821.
Owner/Operators
Lloyd Smith * Bill Biedenstein * Jim Crr
7n-M.u 5340W.GlenbrookSt.


- �GeralB


HEDGE TRIMMING,
HAULING(ANY KIND),
LAWN MOWING,
MULCH. FREE ESTI-
MATES. 352-344-9273
OR 352-201-9371

OSBORNE'S
Quality Work - Free
Est. LOWEST RATES
352-400-6016 Lic/Ins
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up. Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
& LANDSCAPE
SINCE1999 (Lic/Ins)
628-9848 or 634-0554
V us out zoomcitrus.com




AQUA AZURE
Cert. Pool Operator
All Citrus County
352-344-4796
EVERCLEAR POOL
SERV. & Maint.
Concrete Pools Only
(352)344-5122
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Acrylic Decking
i 352-464-3967 m
PURDY POOLS
St. Certified, Serv. & Main.
(352) 220-7301




r MOBILE RV
SERVICE
WE COME TO YOU
Motor Homes
1 5th Whls/Rv's
Master Tech
352-586-5870
SStorage Available




WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard




ELITE PAVING&
SEAL COATING
All types - Res/Comm
352-302-3030 LIc/Ins


Circle T Sod Farms. Inc.
Tired of your dead lawn?
Replace it with
Bahia. Delivery
Avail (352)400-2221
SQO
Cut Outs, All Varieties
Installed/Rolled
Irrigation (352) 422-0641
/ out zoomcitrus.com
Tear out your lawn and
replace. Comm/
Res. Free est. J & J Sod
352-302-6049


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1 0


3000 watt GENERATOR
8 HP Brlggs & Straton.
Very good cond. $250.
352-726-9708
2- PERSON HOT TUB
w/cover, like new
$500 obo; Waterfllled
massage table w/heat
$100 obo (352) 746-5043
5th Wheel RV Frame
for Sale
$500.
(352) 726-1585
A Good Running
Donated Vehicle for
Mom to take autistic
son to school
(352) 628-0526
Carpet Factory Direct
Repair ' Clean " Sales
Laminate, shop at
home. 352-341-0909
ENTERTAINMENT
Center $100.
2 filing cabinets $50.
(352) 344-8291
FALKEN TIRE (1)
Falken Ziex 235/40/18
Tire $50.
Call 212-5222
FISHERMAN
Selling all fishing equip-
ment. Rods & Reels.
$495. 352-249-1187





ITS FREE

Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad for FREE on
our all new
CLASSIFIED SITE.

5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 Items totaling less than
$100.00 each.

Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an Ad in the top right
hand corner.
KEY WEST SHRIMP
$4/LB Today thru Sun.
LIMITED TIME! Call
Mark 727-726-8617
Kohler, bypas shower
door, max 55 x 70, clear
glass 10mm thick
$75 obo, excel cond.
2 Chase lounges, white,
pvc, foldable lawn
chairs, excel. cond $80
obo (352) 527-0347
LARGE
CONTEMPORARY PRINT
51"w 39"h gold alum.frame
paid $200.00 sell $50.00
(352)527-9982
Nascar Memorabilia
Books, tapes, cars, &
more, from early 70's
and up. $175.00 for all.
(352) 621-3673
NIKE AIRS red brown &
black, very nice and well
kept.size 9 men $40
795-6481
PATIO SET
11 piece. $200
WINDOW AIR CONDI-
TIONER w/Remote.
$100 352-697-2460
Printer
Cannon Pixma, MP530
All in one. Brand new.
$125.(352) 382-5550
RYOBI TRIMMER
w/edger. Like new. $75
Weber BBQ w/stand.
Cost $260 for $100.
352-249-1187


k-


5ALE
BIMINI TOPS $149. Up
BOAT COVERS,$189. Up
352-563-0066
/ us out zcomcitrus.com
SPEAKERS - Pair of Bos-
ton accoustics.
23Hx12Wx9D $40
(352) 527-8276
TAPPAN (2) OVEN
Elec. Range. Very good
cond. $75, (2) LOVE-
SEATS. Grey/white strip.
$45 ea $75 both
352-527-8176; 212-6918
TREADMILL DIGITAL
READOUT, POWER IN-
CLINE FOLDS UP $130
MED BIRDCAGE $45
352-341-6920
Vacuum Cleaner
Hoover, Power Max.
Self propelled. $50
(352) 746-7083
VARIETY furniture lamps
general household
stuff.have to see..
352-613-0788
Wanted
your left over yarn , so I
can crochet blankets
for homeless animals
(352) 465-8938

ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT









$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
ANNUITIES
DISABILITY

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com




8 Zone Radio Shack
Burglar/Fire Alarm
system, complete $100
(352) 628-5606




GOGO TRAVEL
SCOOTER GoGo Ultra
X by Pride travel
scooter. Less than 6
months old, like new.
$600.00. (352)
563-0097

HOVEROUND MPV5
MOBILITY VEHICLE
MPV5 Power Wheel-
chair like new. Joystick
controller, adjustable
armrests, anti-tip
wheels. $1200. Phone:
(352) 563-0097


Power Wheelchair
Golden Alante
model GP201F, holds
300 lbs, perfect cond.
$1,000.
(302) 242-1418




Buying Silver Coins
$.10, .25, .50, $1.00
Pre- 1965,
352- 302-8159


Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676




TWO 3/4 SIZE DEAN
GUITARS Acoustic, Like
new condition, Accesso-
ries Included.$150 all.
Will sell separate.
352-419-4008







Leg Press/ Hack
Space Squat. Gym
quality $550.
(352) 621-7774



AMMO 400 ROUNDS
223PMC Brass case FMJ
55GR $350;
250 ROUNDS, 40CAL
Remlngton/UMC, FMJ
$140 (813) 789-0592
AMMO 500 ROUNDS
762X39, FMJ Brass Case
on stripper clip $350;
300 ROUNDS 308 Brass
case FMJ $250
(813) 789-0592
Basket Ball Hoop
Free Standing like new.
$125.00 (352) 249-6800
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
INSTEP TANDEM BIKE
TRAILER $30.00 Blue
detachable bicycle trailer,
like new condition. Great
for kids learning to ride
two-wheeler. Call
630-854-7625
KEY WEST SHRIMP
$4/LB Today thru Sun.
LIMITED TIME Call
Mark 727-726-8617
PRIVATE COLLECTOR
Buying Guns,
Ammunition&
reloading supplies
(352) 586-7516
RIFLE AK/47, Folding
stock, extra mags. $1100
obo (813) 789-0592
SUN MOUNTAIN GOLF
PULL CART Rarely used,
Fold down design, fits in
trunk of car, pneumatic
tires,adjustable front wheel,
easy rolling, 2 years old.
Cost $299 New, asking
$125 270-8184
TIPPMAN MODEL 98
paintball gun. good condi-
tion, just the gun. $20
795-6481
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




96 DOOLITTLE BOX
TRAILER 5'x 9' enclosed
box trailer. $1,000 or best
reasonable offer. Nice
shape! call 785-447-0599
or 785-447-0583
CAR HAULER
'06, 32 Ft. Dominator XT.
By Classic C. Trpl.
axels. $14,800. Like
new.(352) 835-4273














CITRUS COIUN7Y (FL) CHRONICLE


Act NowI

PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Goto:
chronicleonllne.com
and click place
an ad




Boston Terrier Pups
CKC Reg. 2 females,
1 male, ready w/health
cert, April 17 $500.
(352) 212-8111 Iv.msg.
BOXER PUPPIES
9 wks, reg. health
cert./shots, tail,
dewclaws done.
$300 (352) 563-1479
DACHSHUND
1Fem Red, 1 M
tan/white, 10 weeks
$400(352) 586-9217







EXOTIC HIPPIE
BUNNY RABBITS

order Now For

New small breed, $15- $35
ea.
All colors, adults
2 to 3.5 Ibs.
352-621-0726
Cell (352) 422-0774







GERMAN SHEPHERD
WHITE MALE PUP PURE
BREDAKC 4 MONTHS
OLD ALL SHOTS MOSTLY
HOUSE BROKEN
$750.00 CASH
(352) 465-3139
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip, tested,
shots some declawed
$85-$150 352-476-6832
MIN PIN PUPS, AKC
3 females, tails crop
H. cert/shots. $300-$350
352-726-9730
SHI-A-POO &
YORKI-POO
SHIH-TZU multi
colored. $350/up
YORKIES: Males $600;
Females, $800
Paper trained, CKC
reg.'d, health cert.
NO SHEDDING
(352) 489-6675
WEIMARANER
PUPPIES
Born 1/7, ready now,
H/C, Tails Cropped,
M/$350. F/$400.
(352) 628-0206




GOING HOME SALE
Saddles & Tac, new &
used, something for
everyonel(352) 873-6033
Pretty Paint Filly
Coming 2 yrs, old. $450.
Registered
Buckskin Colt.
$750,No reasonable
offer refused. Quiet & gen-
tle. (352) 873-6033




BABY GOATS SHEEPs
& PIGS For pets only.
Mini Farm off 495
(863) 843-2495 cell
Chickens,production
Red's, polish purebred
bantans, different types of
duckling, quail, guinea pigs
& pigeons $4/up
795-6381/476-3319




9.9HP YAMAHA
4 stroke, elect, start,
tiller handle. $695
FT ISLAND MARINE
SUPPLY
352-436-4179
91/2 hp Evnrude.
Ultalight Fisherman, short
shaft, man. start.$395;
9.9 hp Johnson short shaft,
man, start, low hours.
$725 Bill 352-436-4179
BOAT MOTOR
Mercury. Out board 5 Hp.
Low hours. $700.
(352) 503-3105




14 ft JON BOAT
w/traller 9.8 Mercury
motor. & electric motor
$1,025 (352) 419-4478
or cell 352-563-8807
24 FT CRESTLINER
PONTOON
14 passenger w/traller
$65,000 obo
(352) 382-7039
1981 15' BOSTON
WHALER SPORT 1993
48hp Johnson, new 2008
trailer, all great condition
$7,500 352-201-0096
1993 17' Sylvan
Boat & trailer
85h.p. Yamaha motor
Good cond. $3,500
(352) 344-0457
AIR BOAT
Big 13 Ft. haul,
2 seats. Approx. 375-400
HP 8 blade warp drive.
2-1 reduction gear box.
Used 100 hrs.+Trl.
$18,500 invest. Sell
for $10,000 firm.
(352) 302-4535


AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
Aluminium 18'
C/C, 92 Johnson 48hp
T/T w/tril Great shape
$3000 call Bob
(352) 860-0513
AQUA SPORT '05
175 Osprey , 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual batt.
w/switch, bimini, easy load
trailer. Low hours.
$10,800/obo 352-860-0277
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson Just
rebuilt 5 yr. war. Ready to
fish. Reduced$10.5001
352-746-5856
Cabin Cruiser 24 ft.
Owner died, 6 cyl. 10,
alpha one/OD, used In
fresh water, tan, gal. tri
Incl.'d $2,500 464-0316


15hp. 4-stroke Yamaha,
Trailer, extras $4.895
(954) 632-1104
CAPE HORN
'94 17'2, 8ft. wide.
C/C. Merc.90 HP. outboard
W/Trailer
$4,100(352)634-4793
CENTURY
'01- Bay, 21ft.
'02, 150HP Yamaha w/
trlr., custom cover
dep/find, VHF, Iw hrs.,
like new, $13,950.
(352) 442-7772
Deck Boat
95'19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ ra-
dio & fishfinder. New Bat-
tery switch. 2 batteries,
power pk.
prop./hub.$7,000
(352) 726-0838
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras!
$14,500/obo. (352)
489-9640: 220-6508
Fiberglass 18'
C/C., trailer, great
shape $900 Call Bob
(352) 860-0513
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
115HP, stroke Yamaha,
w/trir. $15,900. will
trade (352) 503-3778
KEY WEST SHRIMP
$4/LB Today thru Sun.
LIMITED TIME Call
Mark 727-726-8617
NEW 2021 Tahoe
Boat Trailer Disc brakes
on both axles. Never
had a boat on it.
$2,475. (352) 527-3555
OSPREY
1994- 16ft, CC, bay boat.
88 HP Evinrude, Garmin
GPS/recorder $4500.
352-621-4711
POLAR 2310, 2006
23FT. POLAR BAYBOAT
250HP YAMAHA
4-STORKE, CUSTOM
TRAILER,
T-TOP,GPS,VHS, GAR-
AGE KEPT. $25,000
FIRM 352-795-7766
PONTOON BOAT
08' 20 Ft. To many
options to list. $13,000
Call for info. 628-7926
Pontoon Boat
1996,18 ft., 40HP Yamaha,
4 stroke, $8,500
(352) 860-1490
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras $12,000
(352) 628-0281
PROLINE
03 32ft center console,bunk
under, twin OB 160 hrs. like
new, loaded, incl trlr. may
consider newer Corvette
as trade$48K (352)
201-1833
PROLINE 20.5' Bay 2002
Mercury 150-$9950
352-331-5204
PROLINE
23' W. A.C. 200 Hp.
Johnson. Bim. top. GPS.
F.F.NHF. Low hrs.
$4,250 (352) 563-5628
PROLINE
W/CUTTY
'95, 20' 120 HP
Merc. Dep/find.
Radio, fish rigging.
Includes trailer. Good
cond. REDUCED/
$5,900.Call Pete @
(352) 746-4969
SAILFISH 18'
C/C, Yamaha 115hp
equipment, clean, trll
one owner $5300
(352) 503-7102
T-CRAFT
23'L, 6' W, '02 150H
Evin. mtr. w fuel enj. like
new, trlr. w/brks
$7750 352-489-3661
TRACKER
2002, 17FT, 75HP
4 stroke Mercury,
$5,000 (352) 637-2638
Ultimate Scallop
Boat 03,25'Sun
Tracker, 05 Merc 90hp, lo
hrs. tandem tril. like new
exc. value $11,500.
352-586-1676

WE NEED

BOATS
SOLD AT NO FEE
Selling Them As Fast
As They Come Inl
352-795-1119
Mercury Auth Parts
and Service



US 19 Crystal River
(just north of the Mall)




05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
26Inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
'07 NEW MAR
Cypress 32ft 5th wheel.
2 slides. Separate bath.
Extras. 3 yr ext. war-
ranty $39,900/obo
352-794-3534
38FT BOUNDER '96
Class-A - basement
model. 49K mi. 14mpg,
new tires & brakes. (4)
TV's. Ready for long trip.
$22.000. 352-563-0615
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 38 K Mi.
Dual air. $36,000 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
ALLEGRO
'85, New motor,
generator, 27 ft.,
A1 cond. $6,350
352-634-4793
* ATQO.BQAT *
*&RV*
DONATIONS
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.


Maritime Ministries
(352) 795-9621
* Tax Deductible *

CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
conslgnmentusa.org
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane 30Q, class
A motor home, 31% ft., 22k
mi. V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed, etc.
Saturn tow Avail. $35,000.
Lets talk (352) 397-5007
GEORGIE BOY
'05, Pursuit, Class A,
30't.
Excel. cond. 8k mi.,
2 slide outs, 2 TV's, back
up camera, all the bells
and whistles and much
more, must see this
coach, Asking $50,000.
obo (352) 746-7626


'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273

GULF STREAM
'07 BT Cruiser, 22' 8K.MI.
Hitch & tow bar. Like new.
$37,500
(352) 875-8890
GULF STREAM
BT Cruiser 03, 22' fully
loaded, ready to travel
$29,800....
(352) 341-1297
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool, club-
house etc.
$29,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
Holiday Rambler
'03, By Monico, 300 Cum-
mins, 2 slides, incl. tow
vehicle,
mint cond. $84,900.
(352) 302-7073
Holiday Rambler
Admiral Motor Home 36' 2
slides, 340hp, gas eng. all
options transf ext. warr.
$51,900
352 795-3970
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$55,995. 352-464-0371
JAMBOREE
29',2005, V-10 Class C
12,400 ml., Loaded! Perf.
Conditions Ready to gol
$39,000 (352) 465-2138
Keystone 07
Big Sky 5th Wheel Prem.
Pkg 340RLQ every option.
Center Island Kit. Incls
sep.WID, added 2nd a/c in
bedroom
Price to Sale $52K firm
352-794-3068
PACE ARROW
04, 38' 3 SLIDES
21k mi fully loaded
3 tv's $92,500 obo
352-302-0743
STEHL TOW DOLLY
Uke new $600
(937) 336-2212
Winnebago
'94 32' class A,
Clean no pets/or smoke.
$9,500 Or Obo.
(352) 746-1169



Want to Buy
Small Motor home
good gas mileage a
must (20 mpg) approx
$5000 cash
(352)795-9728



'04 COACHMAN
Clipper 086 Sport
Pop-up. A/C, furnace,
refrig & awning. $2500
352-344-5006
BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig. Like
new. $9,995.
352-489-3661
BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig. Like
.new. $9,995.
352-489-3661
FIFTH WHEEL
30 Ft. Aljo W/slide-out.
SGood cond. Moving must
sell. $5,200 or trade.
Obo. (352) 214-3688
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO
'06, 18ft, self contained.
like new, awning,
sleeps 4, ultra llte wght
$7,950, 352-339-5158
JAYCO
07 Jay Flight
28' used twice, smells &
looks new, green
clean, sips 6 $16,800
(352) 503-7431
KODIAK
'04, Hybrid Travel Trir. AC,
Heat, Micro. Tub/ Shwer,
toilet exc cond $9,500.
352-564-4151
MEADOWBROOK
5th Wheel, 2000 Excel-
lent. Photos at
htup'opicasaweb.googco
meadowbrook.Glenn
-$13,995.00 (352)302-6055
or (727)692-9045
Montana
'03, 5th wheel, 3 slides
like new,$34,000.
Truck avail also for tow
(352) 422-5731
TRAIL CRUISER '04
17FT, light weight,
fully loaded. Used
10 times. $6800.
352-628-4522
VOLKSWAGON '68
bus/transporter. Con-
verted to camper. Runs
well. New brakes.
$5,000. 352-726-5926



99 Mitsubishi Eclipse,
wrecked, for parts, exc. 2.0
16 val eng. auto. trans. 2
sets of wheels /tires 117km .
302-2781 464-0220
'06-'08 Dodge Truck new
chrome air deflector
w/fog pockets, $285;
Chrysler Pacifica factory
hitch w/electric plug $65
(352) 795-6639 or
BMW Wheels
8 x 17 Cross spoke com-
posite wheel 5 made by
BBS 5 x 120 bolts pat-
tern, incl. center caps &
lugs $350. for all 4
(352) 249-0851



$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts


352-628-4144
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CASH BUYER
Buvina Used Cars
Trucks & Vans
For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333



08 CUSTOM BUILT
Pontiac Convertible
Show Car. Invested over
$15k See to appreciate
Only valid offers I
(352) 382-7039


1987 FORD Crown
Victoria, 2-door, hardtop.
cold air-automatic.
Very good cond. $1.350
(970) 412-5560 Lecanto
1993 GEO Tracker
4x4, Auto, low miles
fair cond. air works
$2,000 (352) 344-9931
1998 Buick LaSabre
Showroom condition
Fully power equipped
61k original miles
$4,995 obo (352)
560-4251
'97 MAZDA MX5
Miata - Only 72k miles.
New tires. NLCEl $4500.
352-382-9004
BMW
'03, 745 LI, NAV, black, sun
roof. all options $29K Mint
(352) 746-2696
r � B
BUICK
S 2004, Century
S #P6143B |
I Won't Last $5,988
1866-838-4376

BUICK
2005, Lacrosse. Alloy
Wheels & Much More
Take over pmt $199 per
mol-800-733-9138
BUICK Century 1995
Looks and runs like new!
Lots of extras. 117K Miles
$ 1,700 Call Andy at
352 344-2125
CADILLAC '01
Catera, 34k mi, MINTf
White w/leather. $6300/obo.
845-282-3504
CADILLAC
'06 DTS, 66K.MI.
$16,300. wl warranty.
(352) 746-3663
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715
F----- i
CHEVROLET
2003, Impala
#I H13134A Outstand- I
I ng Value $7,988 I
I 'i .. I
866-838-4376
L . --. - . A


CHEVROLET Corvette
1967 coupe, $3500, 8
cylinder, exterior
color: Yellow, interior
color: White, 93,655
miles, manual, rare
and great muscle car,
for details e-mail me
trishashatsern@g maLcom
orcal me
(702)548-7707
CHEVY
2007 IMPALA LS
Bronze, excellent cond.
full power. 9.000 mi.
$11,000
(352) 637-4317
CHEVY '79
Malibu wagon V8, 4
barrel, auto, new ex-
haust, great potential.
Needs finish. $1495/obo
Mark 352-302-2258
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Conv. rare
5 spd, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
blk, depend.
$4700 352- 563-0615
CHRYSLER
2007, PT Cruiser Full
Power, Like New, Low
Miles, Take over pmt
$179mo 1-800-733-9138
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail,
US19, Across Airport
(352)461-4518
Consignmentusa.org
CORVETTE
02, Z06,
Black, low ml., over
30 mpg hwy. $24,400.
(352) 613-5355
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 miles
on this rare silver on sil-
ver on silver vette, power
convertible top, 6 sp
auto, paddle shift, heads
up display, magnetic F55
suspension, navigation
system, all options availa-
ble are on this gorgeous
vette, Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
included, Your's
for only, $49,000.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, 86K mil.
T -top roof, Excellent con-
dUlMn $12,000., will trade
for truck. 352-563-6428
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, 86K
mil. T -top roof, Excel-
lent condition $12,000.,
will trade for truck.
352-563-6428

DODGE
S2005,Neon#P6179
I Low, low miles I
* 1866-838-4376

DODGE CALIBER
' 07 Ocala Volvo.$12,995
(352) 629-7299
FORD '02
TAURUS SEL. Moon roof,
6 disk CD player. All
power. $3800/obo.
352-697-2460
FORD
'03 Mustang Conv. auto,
V-6, leather, all pwr, 80k,
great cond. $6,999.
352-382-2755
FORD
2004, Mustang
I #P6349 Low, low I
1866-838-4376
Em III= Iml
HONDA
'06 Civic,$10,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
HONDA
2000, Insight
| #H13131M
50 MPGII $7,988
1866-838-4376
L J---- ml


HONDA
2002, Accord
S#H11822B Bestbuy
$8.988
1866-838-4376

HONDA
2003, Accord
S#H12776A Gorgeous
$9,988
1866-838-4376

HONDA CIVIC 97
$5001 Police
impounds! For listing
800-366-9813 x4246
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well maintained.
$2650. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
r - -- - q
MAZDA
S 2001, Mllenia
S #H13094A I
Hard to find $8,988
1866-838-4376
L== , == =d


CLASSIFIED




'07, $11,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'01 CLK,$16,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'05, $25,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCURY
'02 Grand Marquis LS
83K.Mi. Leather int. 1
own. Exc. cond. $6,500.
(352) 382-3596
MGB
Convertible 1977, 57k mi.
Blue, many xtras Excellent
Condition
$10,500 (352)628-0281

MITSUBISHI
2006, Galant #P6313
acquire low pymt.
of $299.03-zero out
of pocket
1866-838-4376

MITSUBISHi
2007, Lancer #P6338
acquire low pymt.
Of $198.38-zero out
S of pocket
1866-838-4376
im �i i i i
NISSAN
'07 Altima, $13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
F -----
2000, Maxima I
S#H12908A Low, low
miles $7,988
1866-838-4376
rE -Ng-- mi
NISSAN
S2007 Sentra #P6326
Low, low miles
$11,988
1866-838-4376

OLDS '94
Delta 88 - 173k ml, V-6
Runs great -Looks good
$1250. 352-697-0889
OLDSMOBILE
'90 Toronado Trofeo
Coupe. Loaded, V-6,
Leather, 132K. Mi. Exc.
Cond. $2,100.
(352) 382-9977
SATURN
'04 VUE, AWD, 4 dr.
auto, 39K. pampered Mi.
Silver, nice car. $7,480.
Wooten's.(352) 637-7117
SATURN
2007, ton, P6304,
Excellent Condition
$7,988,
1866-838-4376
SMART CAR 08
Passion Loaded 40mpg
red/black only 2700mi
352-341-0316
SUZUKI
'07 Forenza. 30K mi, w/100k
warr. LOADED w/touch
scm nav. $12,800.
352-613-6613
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 mi.
warranty. $23,000.
(352) 382-1857
TOYOTA
'08 Corolla $13,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
2001, camry,
H13076B, Excellent
Condition $7,988,
1866-838-4376
VOLVO
'04 S-60 $8,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'05 S60,$13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-60, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC 70, $21,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC90,$22,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 S-60, $18,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S40, S$20,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S-80, $28,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
2007, S40 Uke New &
Loaded Take over pmt
$199 per mo
1-800-733-9138
VW
2005, Beetle Coupe
LOOK, P6320
acuire low pmt of
$231.71 zero out
1866-838-4376
F -------
VW
I 2007, Jetta, Wolfs- I
I burg Edit., H12822B I
LOOK, aqulre low �
i pmt of $299.03 zero i
out 1866-838-4376




1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's
Dream. $6500.obo
352-228-0597
'53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, 350 V-8, auto,
May trade in part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door se-
dan. 6 cyl auto. $9,500.
Will consider trade for
travel trailer of equal
value.
(352) 628-4053
CAMARO IROC Z


'88 Red, LT -1 eng.
PS./PB. Cold A.C.
62,000 Mi. Great
Condition. $6,900.
Camaro Z 28, '79
Black 4 spd. super
T-10 Tran. Cam.more,
Must see $6,900.
(352) 422-5663
CHEVROLET
Camaro'68,coupe, 107K
miles, auto, white with
black interior $4,000
stevystewart@gmail.com
CHEVY
'69 Classic C10 SHT BD
350/350 AC, PS,
$15K or trade
(352) 746-9212
CORVETTE
'87 Convertible, Drives,
looks great, 2nd owner, new
top & paint, $9,000 obo
(352) 302-1524
DODGE
'1938, Pro street Coupe,
runs, needs TLC. $12,900
(352) 978-0658
(352) 447-3842


DODGE
Challenger 383/335 HP,
77K mi, manual trans, 8
cyl, interior green, black
interior, $2,900 Contact
angelalansing@
gmail.com(253)276-4784
EL CAMINO
'81 305 auto. All new
interior, & paint. Crager
mags & tires. 4 " raised
hood.$3,250.
(352)341-3613.
GM El Camino
'84, -owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint; 63K
mi., $8,900 obo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MERCEDES BENZ
1985 380SL, 2 top road-
ster. Drives, looks great.
Many new Mercedes
parts. New A/C. Must
see! REDUCED! $7,900.
David 352-637-6443.
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
trans. & parts. $4,000.
(352) 621-0126
THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$12,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122


nnar^^^


SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009 D7


mm1 I -


CHEVY
TRAILBLAZER
'06 $12,995. Ocala
Volvo. (352) 629-7299
CHRYSLER
2007, Pacifica
Low Miles, Fully Equipd
Payment of $195 per
mo 1-800-733-9138
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air &
exhaust, Exc. Cond.
$6,000 obo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whldrive,
class 3 hitch, Orig owner.
Great shape & price.
$8,750. 352-564-1128:
703-338-7177

FORD
2003, Explorer
#H13139B, One owner
$9,988
1866-838-4376

GMC SUBURBAN
1993 4 WD, 454 rebuilt
eng., new transm., great ti-
res, good cond. $3,700
obo
(352) 201-1413

HONDA
2005, CR-V EX
#I H12557A Eye- I
catching $13,988
1866-838-4376 �
---m --- m mi
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, $9,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, V6,
Like new. $9,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299


Chevy Silverado r- JEEP
'02, Ext. cab, 4 dr. auto, I 2004, Grand Chero
AC, Sport wheels, CD, I 2ee #H12970A Mus-
$5,995. Wooten's kee 12970A Mus-
(352) 637-7e7 17 cular, Strong $7,988
(352) 637-7117 1866-838-4376
CONSIGNMENT USA L -i
*Clean Safe Auto's* KIA
Financing Avail. 2008, Rondo Hatch-
US19, Across Airport back, Perfect for
(352) 461-4518 FamllylTake over pmts
consignmentusa.org $199mo 1-800-733-9138
DODGE MERCEDES BENZ
'05, Quad Cab, Awe- '01 ML. 55 AMG. Silver
some Hemi-pwrd, special W/black int. Loaded,
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded 57K.Mi. New $64K.Ask
every special feature. Sr. $20K. (352)489-7674
own, gar. kept., 27K mi, PONTIAC
$40K 2006, Vibe, Perfect
invested Sale $21,750 Cond., Low Mi. Take
See online ad photos over pmt $197 mo
www.autotrader.comlatca 1-800-733-9138
ridlat-f3fd39f
John (352) 726-1076 PONTIAC
m m - m - 2008, Torrent Sm SUV,
r DODGE Perfect for Family
2002, Ram 1500 Loaded, Low Miles
S#P6376A, Super $279mo 1-800-733-9138
I Value $8,988 1 TOYOTA
1866-838-4376 1994,4 Runner SR5
I ii i iJ 3.liter, V6 Tow pack-
DODGE age 114,803 ml. $3500
2008, Dakota Pickup OBO(352) 621-6892
Quad Cab, Low Miles
Take over pmts $233
mo. 1-800-733-9138
DODGE DAKOTA
'05 $11,995 CHEVY '82
Ocala Volvo. Blazer, V8 . auto, 4" lift,
(352) 629-7299 lots of extra parts,
FORD needs trans. $1300.
'02 F 350, Crew Cab Mark, 352-302-2258
Dual whls. 7.3 Diesel. FORD '06 F-150
33K. Mi. Exc. cond. Crew cab XLT. Tow pkg
$18,000 (352) 794-3081 & topper, 47K mi.
FORD Exc cond. LOADED
'03 Ranger XLT. Super $18,900/obo. (352)
Sanger L. Super 634-1378; 795-2053
Cab. 4.0 Eng.1 owner 634-137;
14K Mi. Like new. JEEP
$10,300 (352)341-3292 '05 Wrangler,
FORD 04 Unlimited. $15,995 Ocala
Ranger, REDUCEDI Volvo
X-cab. Exc. cond. (352) 629-7299
38k mi. $9,700/obo
(352)746-3919
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway, serve. 1996 DODGE CARGO
van. 41K Mi./5.4 L. Eng. VAN $1,800 obo
Auto.Knapheide Serv.
body/dble lock drs. $20.000 (352) 572-7984
Obo. 1997 DODGE CARAVAN
(352) 726-9397 Runs and Looks Great!
(678) 617-3767 New Parts,Rebuilt Tranny
S- - - $1450.00 OR Best Offer!
FORD 4 Cyclinder 176,000 Miles
2003, Ranger #P6362 (352)476-7185
I Low, low miles I CHEVY
*I $8,988 3 '94 Handicapped Van.
1866-838-4376 Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
. (352) 726-8996
KEY WEST SHRIMP
$4/LB Today thru Sun. CHRYSLER
LIMITED TIME Call '03 Town & Country LXI,
Mark 727-726-8617 75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
TOYOTA res, & brakes. $7,495.
2006, PreRunner (352)467-0872
Quad Cab, Don't Miss (35
This Take over pmt DODGE
$349mo 1-800-733-9138 '86, Ram, Conversion
Van, Runs good, Low top,
rtrtiy I V8, 23K mi., Garage Kept.
V i$1,800 352-563-9834
DODGE
ACURA '94, Ram 350,
2006, TSX, Loaded. Full size, work Van
Like New, Rare find $1,500 abo
Take over $279 mo (352) 527-2241
1-800-733-9138 Ford
AZTEK 1996 Windstar GL V6,
Pontiac' 04 Low 112k, mi, loaded, cold
miles, loaded! a/c, great shape, 8
Reduced price pass .$2500
$8,500 obo 352-726-5715 (352) 422-2611
CADILLAC MAZDA
'05 Escalade, low mi. all '06 MPV.$9,995
power, sun roof, Ocala Volvo.
exc. cond. $28,000 (352) 629-7299
(347) 266-9328 ONE OWNER/CREAM
CHEVY BUFF '88 CHEVY Hlghtop
BLAZER '99 LS 4dr. 126k van 5.0 engine, auto,
mi. loaded, great cond. sun- 137Kml. New WW
roof, $4k obo tires/battery. $1495.
352-422-0065 352-465-1892







450 FLORIDA HOMES
Including 53 In the Tampa area

THURSDAY

MAY 7th * 7:00 PM

Tampa Marriott Westshore

Get your next home at the price you set
with NO STARTING BIDS. If you're buying
your first home or your 10th, today's
housing market and low interest rates
make this an ideal time for you to buy!


TampaFLHouseAuction.com


OR CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE

866-519-2837



HUDSON &






1:00 to 3:00 PM
$3,000 down in a cashiers check for each
property. 5% premium on each sale.
All sales subject to seller's approval.
Lic #s: H & M #AB110;
73o9B. G. Hudson. Jr. #s; BK3006464 & AU230


I
I
I
























i
















I

I
























i


ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT









$$ SAVE $$
LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com




HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains & tows
heavy loads. $4700/or
trade. 352- 563-0615
Crystal River
SUZUIKI 05
Vinson 500, camo color
large tires, $4K OBO
call JR (352) 613-0572



2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900ml. HD custom
'wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. Hi pert.
Over $43,000 in receipts.
17k mi. $12,000
352-563-0615
Crystal River
Harley Davidson
2005, XL1200 Custom. Un-
der 7k mi.Screamin Eagle
Performance Pkg & more.
Garkept $7500 (352)
209-7495
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80", com-
pletely serviced, good
shape. Ex.
access. $5,895. obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 Mi.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
3 746-3069


HONDA 04
1300 VTX, thousands in
ooans. mint condition
$6900 obo
(352) 302-7073
Honda Rebel
05, 250 Street bike
like new, great ladles
bike 3,600 ml $1900
(352) 860-0513
HONDA
Shadow Arrow 06, 714K
,mi. garage kept, not in
rain, floorboard $6200 obo
(347)223-7269 aft 3:30
KAWASKI
'00 1100 CC,15K.
Mi. Very fast many
extra's. $4k
obo.(352)621-3764
SCOOTER
'06 Suzuki, 400
Bergman. 4,200 Mi. Like
new cond. $4,500
(352) 382-2715
SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic inch
S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered Hooker
headers. New Gangster
white walls, seat in all
leather bik ostrich skin,
Paint by Jesse James
painter of Calf., w/Double
Damon signature, House of
Color paint, Bik w/colored
ghost flames on all sheet
metal. 2" Cartini handle
bars. Chrome to max, Thil
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for nice
tractor w/bucket or bobcat
etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
SUZUKI '06
Boulevard, C50, mint cond.
Only 600 miles.
Call Gary 352-563-5502
VENTO PHANTOM
Scooter, 318 miles, 150CC,
Like new. $2,190/obo.
352-422-2433
YAMAHA
'05 YZ125 DIRT BIKE
Race ready. Many ex-
tras. $2500. 352-
586-1683: 586-9349


323-0412 SUCRN
Ellg. To Vote Notice- Supervisor of Elections
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice Is hereby given:
David K. Collett, Jr.
Last Known Address of
911 Russell Ave., Post Office Box 1444
Inverness, Florida 34453
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is In
question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of
Elections, In Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond
will result in a determination of Ineligibility by the Super-
visor and your name will be removed from the state-
wide voter registration system. If further assistance Is
needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections at the
below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 North Apopka Avenue
Inverness, Florida, 34450
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle
April 12.2009.

324-0412 SUCRN
4/22 meeting Citrus County Construction lcensing
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
THE CITRUS COUNTY CONSTRUCTION LICENSING AND
APPEALS BOARD WILL CONDUCT A MEETING ON APRIL
22, 2009 AT 2:00 P.M., AT THE LECANTO GOVERNMENT
BUILDING, 3600 W. SOVEREIGN PATH, RM 166 LECANTO,
FLORIDA 34461.
SCHEDULED TO MEET THE BOARD ARE:
1. DAVID R. NABER SR., to meet the Board for approval
to take the exam for Plastering & Stucco Contractor.
2. ROSCILLO P. BENEDETTO, to'meet the Board for ap-
proval for a Concrete Competency Card.
3. ALBERT E. BURFORD. to meet the Board for approval
for a Irrigation Competency Card.
4. DONALD P. SICILIANO II, to meet the Board for ap-
proval for a Underground Utility Competency Card.
OLD/NEW BUSINESS:
DISSCUSION:
ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DECISION
MADE BY THE CONSTRUCTION LICENSING & APPEALS
BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT
THIS PUBLIC HEARING, HE/SHE WILL NEED TO INSURE THAT
A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS MADE,
WHICH RECORD SHALL INCLUDE THE TESTIMONY AND
EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.
(SECTION 286.0101, FL. STATUTES.)
ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMO-
DATION AT THIS MEETING BECAUSE OF A DISABILITY OR
PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE COUNTY
ADMINISTRATOR'S OFFICE, MASONIC BUILDING, 111
WEST MAIN STREET, 3rd FLOOR, INVERNESS, FL. 34450.
(352) 341-9801AT LEAST TWO DAYS BEFORE THE MEET-
ING. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR SPEECH IMPAIRED, USE
THE TDD TELEPHONE (352-341-6580) OR LECANTO GOV-
ERNMENT BUILDING (352-527-5312).
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
April 12,2009.

309-0412 SUCRN
Lecanto HS- Main Electrical Service Improvement
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and per-
forming all work necessary and incidental to
LECANTO HIGH SCHOOL - MAIN ELECTRICAL SERV-
ICE IMPROVEMENT will be received by the Citrus County
School Board prior to 2:00 PM. local time 21 APRIL 2009 in
the Purchasing Department, Citrus County School Board,
Building 300, 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida,
34450-4698. Immediately following all bids received will be
opened and read aloud in Building 300, Purchasing Depart-
ment.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid
bond in the amount of not less than five percent (5%) of the
maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee that the Bidder, if
awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after
written notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a
written Contract with the Citrus County School Board, in ac-
cordance with the accepted Bid, and give a surety bond satis-
factory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hun-
dred percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30)
days after the date set for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School
Board Certificate of Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County
School Board construction projects. Prime contractors must
be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to
submitting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the
bid limits specified on their pre-qualification certificate. For
contractor pre-qualificatlon information call the Citrus
County School Board Facilities and Construction Depart-
ment at 352/726-1931, ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime
Contractors, and optional for sub-contractors, will
start at LECANTO HIGH SCHOOL MAIN OFFICE IN
LECANTO EDUCATION COMPLEX.
B. Conference will occur: 02 APRIL 2009, 10:00 A.M.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract
Documents from VERRANDO ENGINEERING CO., INC.,
1111 NE 25th AVENUE, SUITE 401, OCALA FL 34470,
PHONE (352) 854-2664 upon deposit of a check made paya-
ble to the Citrus County School Board in the amount of
$50.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will be made upon the
return of these Documents In satisfactory condition within ten
(10) days after the opening of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right
to award the Bid to the lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive
any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to reject any and
all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination
of the best interests of the School District.
CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVERNESS, FLORIDA
BY: Sandra Himmel
Superintendent of Schools
Published there (3) limes in the Citrus County Chronicle,
March 29, April 5 and 12. 2009.





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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E2 SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009


Preparing for emergencies


P reparation
is smart.
Emergen-
cies can be man-
made or natural
and happen
when you least
expect them.
Maybe you've
had a nagging
feeling that you Sara
should be doing FRJ
something. But LIV
what? There are
a few basic ways
to plan ahead so you can
have peace of mind. First,
consider some of the top
items that are needed in an
emergency That includes a
generator, water and filters,
money, clothing, firewood,
oil lamps, hand-crank radio,
cook stove and first-aid kit
(including medication, non-
perishable foods, tools and
batteries), to name a few.
It's also important to stay
informed. Preparedness in-
formation isn't intended to


IN oel
IGAL
ING


scare you. It's to
help ease any
anxiety or fears
you might have.
While some plan-
ning costs money,
the information,
supplies and re-
sources are well
worth it
Here are a few
ways to help you
plan.
LOCAL-GOV-


ERNMENT IN-
FORMATION: Look at your
state-preparedness Web
site. A statewide directory is
available at www.readygov/
america/local/index.html.
This will give you specific
resources for your area such
as what disasters could
occur and locations of emer-
gency shelters.
FAMILY EMERGENCY
PLAN: Include your family
in activities that can help
you plan for emergencies.
Web sites such as Sesame


Street (www.sesamestreet.
org/ready) offer games,
printables and videos that
teach kids and families how
to learn about local weather,
put together an emergency
kit, create a contact list, and
plan a meeting place.
PRACTICE AND HAVE
EMERGENCY DRILLS:
Make sure that your family
knows how to exit your
home, basic fire and
weather safety, how to con-
tact help and is aware of
your evacuation route. Part
of your emergency kit
should include a bug-out
bag. This portable bag will
contain at least 72 hours'
worth of items needed for
basic survival. One reader,
Karen in Kansas, says:
"We've scanned our impor-
tant papers and identifica-
tion and have them on a Zip
drive in each of the back-
packs." Each family mem-
ber should have his or her
own bag, and it should be


Jaclde & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
A^ (352) 634-2371 Cell .
AI (800) 476-2590 Toll Free ..
lERA For a Visual Tour of our listings i.
REAL ESTATE and all MLS: bidavis.com


I I


easily accessible. It's often
recommended to have a kit
located outside of your
home, such as in a shed or
your car. Captain Dave's
(www.captaindaves.com)
has all the information
you'll need to create a kit.
LEARN FIRST AID: If
you haven't learned or up-
dated basic first-aid skills,
consider taking a class.
Classes are often available
at hospitals, colleges and
fire departments. There are
classes on first aid for pets,
too. Visit the American Red
Cross (www.redcross.org) or
the American Heart Associ-
ation (www.american-
heart.org) to find local
educational classes.
BORROW BOOKS: Learn
more about water, food,
home and generator safety.
Borrow books from the li-
brary on topics such as food
prepping and storage, gar-

See FRUGAL/Page E7


Real Estate DIGEST

RE/MAX welcomes tothe oppor-
Sarita Harty tunity to help
others take
The associates and staff of advantage of
RE/MAX Realty One would like this market
to welcome Sarita Harty to - and find their
their team of professionals in' place on the
Citrus County. Sarita joins the Nature
firm in their Central Ridge office Sarita Coast.
located on Highway 491 in Harty Having
Lecanto. She intends to focus RE/MAX lived here for
on waterfront and commercial Realty One. over 25
real estate sales. Sarita has years, she
been a Realtor in the local area knows the area well and is
for 3 years and has helped ready to share her knowledge
many families find their dream of the market. Sarita can be
home here. She looks forward reached at 527-7842.

DIGEST DEADLINES
* Submit information for the Real Estate Digest by 4
p.m. Thursday for publication Sunday.
* Submit material, attn: HomeFront, at Chronicle offices
in Inverness or Crystal River: fax to 563-3280; or e
mail to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.


Lou Miele, Realtoi r 2
4511 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Office: 352-746-3600 &
Cell: (352) 697-1685 BOE
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU AMERICAN ERA
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU REALTY & INVESTMENTS ""."
PINE RIDGE BEAUTY - Tr..: r.r .
Sa, a:...I o jl ,.Ara o . ..l I r.- lu ar. I. n :,. r.

0LeS 2r9 2.r 1+ Acres , ly ... 1 , F ; l -a .1 .i" . $. " . "I S2. 6,9
1. HOME - rr.i; 3 i T. c .: L.-ii� , r,i.:900, :
FrP.; t S TEA I `IC *13I- WOUL L,3 h54990
S h """ ~hpre p 170 L eE lY r y,', 0,-Yll ",] 1 0. i ' ,,' , T :, ,y', GotIl
MLS#321: + Acres,- MyLSa'33l'9) .349,000... $ ,00
iL 1 7 7"''' r . Y.s Spn.] r.:..i . r...i T i.. .. , .i l.3.I,r l . l.. i r..;r,
*:^ ^ S "E Sa " ra: * I 'T-1 r , R1 ,.: . u. lTr. . ll',. r -3: ! '-i:'
I .i:1SOirbLE OFFER REFUSED lli - i : .. :.r.:r, l ,hi , i . .. ,-. 1. ll i
iI�"^ -,:S,, i(.,:,,,,i Ii.tl. J 'r .l S149.900
t ~LECANTO - .c,, a-I ,Tanl,,i-,, :, ic.rc,..-m
,L � rJclrT.,. ,:-n r-, I.ll T . z r,. Vle lv,'1i r .Ji'.e
A I C . , a i a ru lc u . L ,. 5- ,E , 1 1 ,. ',: r � , '.d s c . m u : r .
"1 I-' s~~moc Trl...; OT.� ,TIJ~i r l , , lt : ) rE & ' l'l '3
' * ' ' Take 3 low0' i j L"S-3 1 $149,900 ___
j ji | eLOVELY AND COZY 2 tr.-E S "l, 7:a,-, a.:. i:..
iEBlo.'W^g - ". r e h i 'm b .'' i l" i � . :. * ,.* ' ly H .llI , ? I-

_I - _ .T|,:.. ` ".' 1. 'Ml e:" -... 589,900
P ^ f 8 PRICED FOR IMMEDIATE SALE � rr-,: ,.T,,.:.jlWA v.,,:1


,|,L.. ^: ir,-L r,.,-.;) n. i [. �,:,.. ML" , .i j r l S 317 S184,990 _
LOTS AND ACREAGE ALSO AVAILABLE!
MLS#326201: 0.23 Acre, Citrus Springs...........................$7,500
MLS#329512: 1+Acres, Hwy. 41, Floral City..................$20,000
MLS#331076: 7+ Acres, Crystal River..........................$159,000









CITRUS C'OUNIY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY. APRIL 12, 2009 E3


I wra -


Christi Office 352-527-1112
C h t Cell 352-302-4046

Doll dollhouses@hotmail.com


GORGEOUS GOLD CREST HOME w/thousands in upgrades including zodiac kitchen countertops. .:ncrr,
wood cabinets, stainless steel appliances, large lagoon style pool w/heated spill-over spa, lanal pa.,ri
outdoor shower, lighted tray 12' ceilings, wood floors, ceramic & porcelain tile, central vac, 3 car gar .ge.
circular drive and the list goes on! complete list of upgrades in file. Large acre plus lot over looking great
view of open farm land. MLS 330919. $365,000



BECKI (352) 634-4880

SSZYMCZAK beckiagent@msn.com
REALTOR'

r L ik


Beverly Hills 527-1112


John P. Maisel Ill REALT


(352) 302-5351 * www.FlaMLSonline.com


. ,:.',..... '" OPR:TUNIT


, ., a GREAT HOME IN GREAT LOCATION . , :.
breakfast Bar Relain Lana wih paers and Bed 2 Bath Home Built in 2005, Ha Been Gently Workshop with Roll up Door. Close to Salt & Fresh
screened Inground Pool with Waterfall Too Much to Used By The Current Owner. At This Price, Why Water Boat Ramps. Furniture is Negotiable. Call
st Are you a good candidate for this Spectacular Waste Time On a Foreclosure Or Short Sale? MLS Today, You Won't Be Disappointed. MLS 333322
lome? MLS 332534. $39 900 333023 $139,900 $99,900

DEB (352) 302-8046

INFANTINE debinfantine@yahoo.com

THES GO!


-- ;'AKE OFFER-


'} . ' ." ..
IOT A SHORT SALE BRING US OFFERS!! F..,. .... :...
.jll.. I i..L: . 11. ',"- I 1 .: i.'' , I.. *.: .:.?- .l.C.i... :, . .r
r.:] '', , , ., ..l ,. If , l ,, ,', "1 ; 1= r.. ! " 3;


-ws . .. *-. .- .-',-', ;-: -. ' � .

BE AUTIFUL SETTING - -,-,,i,-,. ... ,., i,,-. i .< ,-,;.. ,.
.r,l l] I ,I..t I, ,Ir -99.900 :,
.. , ':',,,, $99.900


HAS MANY LOTS TO CHOOSE FROM!! BUILDER LOTS ALL THE
I A ALCRe CATrAC IM DIMi Rl nifA. rAI ll tril IAD RETANl Cl"


GNC ""MOTIVATED
SELLER!!"" OPEN TO
OFFERS! Curi-.,ll, i. i a j13
a Bar & Piml, C.i.l.. A.ir,
Go,:'d renrol Inc,::,T,i Lji',E
tbuIlOil, ,.,Ir, G'Jl uIi'." l';h '
l .C-.' H..gr.a, a Fi,.,l,,;r. ,,
Bu.., I-IS J11 PI'lr.-.v-, .:
h i'l.r., :.Il.;.] R '1 filai6
O--I r.UL'E 3-'6: "; $224,900


-ALL OFFERS CONSIDERED"
' -" ..- . MUST SELL!!! ii.. ',, ..]
.i- :...l. r. ..


. ..


.POOL L .u.,r.i, L . .


IF Vl' HAVE BEEN WAnUIG I r



WATERFROH ;
: . ... r.. . .I r.e . . ,


..._:. .i , -.,- li, Ii:iS154.900
:1".i 1:,,,,', ,..: ,',i ��i�., ',,,,,, f11." }) ll,:,, S 154 ,0 0


9.5 ACRES WITH MOBILE.
r.IAKE OFFE, ui :i .l. iil ic, :eme
Ir .ii, l.' i P.,:i_.en, *:..:,.,,.i r.il ni
,:. l' u r O, c i',:,,:,lTR .:,,,: 13'0r, 19r 2


A.Ir, -i.A T, : ,l:l r r,.-ri," MLS
:'0;:-: $99,900


F . "'f - .--




MOTIVATED SEi.ER!! Come & See This REDUCED Lakefront Beauty! Swim year
Spectacular Sweetwater Ridgewood Model round in your solar heated pool while you
Home!! Move into your family dream home take in the view of Lake Henderson. This
w/4 bedroom/3 bath plus an office. MLS home is immaculately kept! Florida Living at
324654 it's best! MLS 330778
CHARLENE ANGELO 352-464-4179 CHARLENE ANGELO 352-464-4179







SERENE & PRIVATE P,..A. a P' ra er l WANT A QUIET SECLUDED RETREAT?
'i'ap aru~,d p,',r mr,Jr. a.r eo ire ' ' I Tr . sri 6 .;paciiroua 1H rin.lude a OaAord
Screened porch off the master bedroom. fireplace in the family room, large kitchen,
Elevator. Natural landscaping provides easy master bedroom with an office/sitting
maintenance. Additional features include a area...plus 3 more bedrooms and a 30x11
fireplace, vaulted ceilings, workshop in screened porch. Privacy and nature are
garage, greenhouse and great views! MLS yours on this lovely 2.5 acre property just
327148 outside Pine Ridge. MLS 326129
MARY GULLNG 352-422-2994 MARY GULUING 352-422-2994


EVERYDAY IS PARADISE! F-.r:., Ir..
' aOul t.a.: , ,. F, I', I.:,r. , ,,:,u, F.". A]' '3':":|
I3nd Il',i p 'J ' ,, :,i'' " .. . r r.:.j.. , 1. : ..3: .'
Wonderful open floor plan 2/2/2 home is
tiled through out, new paint and most
appliances and fixtures are brand new,
storage galore. Just over half an acre on a
culdesac. MLS 328902
CHARLENE ANGELO 352-464-4179


GREAT CUSTOM built two story family
water access home featuring boat slip at
end of street, solid oak floors, hickory
cabinets,stainless appliances, wrap around
porch, fenced corner lot, and much more.
MLS 331348
BRENDA HANNIGAN 352-257-9135


. 4




"SHORT SALE" Sugarmill Woods is the
place to be!! This home is the place to bel!
4/2 built in 2006. Only minutes to the
Suncoast Pkwy. MLS 329171
CHARLENE ANGELO 352-464-4179


CHARMING VILLA ... ir., - . I:..n

.,rr, .:..: ' .1 .: E.,:.',] l. r-.j .j. :., n .:.oi.. l
sunshine on your 38'x10' (380 sq. ft.) deck
overlooking the palms on this beautiful
corner lot, or enjoy the covered, front porch
of this quiet cul-de-sac location. Freshly
painted and ready to move-in-tol MLS
332943
NANCY AYRES 352-279-5058


I I


I �

SUGARMILL WOODS BEAUTY bu.il ...
l_,i.lr vnlr, rl.: ,:,l ..i .:,T. �. T na Ii.., l: :r C "I
.il.:.,T, pj0,,-, i . ii,,.:.,,,',. I ir.:iuj i SUGAR ILL WOODS C: ,;,1n rl la
F,:,.,:,T, , .I, :I,... l i.j FI:..,, .. ,T, F :.,:,.:,T,: Fi 15- Ei ' ,:i ':-i,:ei II-i . l ni :.nnng
Office. Gourmet/island kitchen. Beautiful on your screened porch, overlooking the
landscaping with lighting. Includes large 8th fairway of the Cypress Course. Very
patio areas and wonderful children's play & spacious home with bright, open floor plan
outdoor entertainment area. 3700 SQ. FT. and fireplace. Come enjoy a wonderful
living area. MLS 331939 Florida lifestyle! MLS 328229
MIKE STOKLEY 352-206-9096 MIKE STOKLEY 352-206-9096

.... ... _y . 4


MAKE US AN OFFER ON THIS ONE!
resident or investor! Current tenant through COME SEE, to appreciate, the roomy
July '09. Split floor plan with separate kitchen in this 2 bedroom, 2 bath, well-kepl
entrance to second bedroom-perfect home. Amenities that add to the value
situation for roommates! Nice fenced include a private yard off of the family room.
backyard for children and/or pets. MLS Some furnishings negotiable. Ready for
328758 your immediate occupancy! MLS 330167
NANCY AYRES 352-279-5058 NANCY AYRES 352-279-5058


Crystal River 794-0888


Inverness 341-1233


I


,


I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009 E3


7"4C*^^wT^^^

lai" ;" -,"-^.
. . ., :: ,: ,- ;:-,. . .,... --
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)tl







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


How sinkholes form


Q I have found the
house I want to
* buy. The seller in-
formed me that there have
been sinkholes in the prop-
erty and will forward the re-
port from the engineering
company that fixed them.
Should I buy a property that
has reported sinkholes?
Would they appear again?
What are the chances of it?
A: Sinkholes appear all
over the country and are
found in areas where there


....

Dwight

. ' 5 \ :*,* .


;are old abandoned mines and utilities,
and ergtround springs, broken water or
sewer lines and natural geological for-
mations. You can also find information
oi sinkholes through a U.S. Geological
Survey Web page, ga.water.usgs.
gov.edu/earthgwsink holes.html.
The agency explains: "Sinkholes are


common where the rock
" ,a below the land surface is
limestone, carbonate rock,
salt beds or rocks that can
naturally be dissolved by
groundwater circulating
i through them. As the rock
: . dissolves, spaces and cav-
ems develop underground.
Sinkholes are dramatic be-
cause the land usually stays
Barnett intact for a while until the
' ; underground spaces just get
-.. ,;'", too big. If there is not
enough support for the land
above the spaces, then a sudden col-
lapse of the land surface can occur"
The size of the sinkhole and the
time it takes for a sinkhole to appear
will often offer clues as to the source
of the problem.


.Page E7


'icial to the Chronicle

itrus County's Divi-
sio;i of Housing Services
a d Extension Services
. ,- offering first time
homebuyers classes to
interested individuals.
Two classroom sessions
will be held at the
Lecanto Government
Building at 3600 W Sov-
ereign Path, Lecanto, in
Room 280.
There is no charge for
these classes. Those in-
dividuals attending both
sessions will receive a
certificate of comple-
tion. Any person who re-
quires a special
accommodation (ADA)
for a disability must call


72 hours in advance.
Session 1 will be from
5:30 to 9 p.m. Thursday,
April 16, and will cover
introduction to SHIP,
credit, family budget,
pros and cons to building
and buying existing, ap-
plying and qualifying for
a mortgage, and finding
a real estate agent and
the contract signing.
Session 2 will be from
5:30 to 9 p.m. Thursday,
April 23, and will cover
home security, home
maintenance, fair hous-
ing, homeowners insur-
ance, energy conser-
vation, landscaping, ter-
mite prevention and
homestead exemption.
Other presenters will


include Citrus County
Cooperative Extension
Service, Citrus County
Department of Code En-
forcement, Citrus
County Fire Rescue,
Community Legal Serv-
ices, David Ivory with
Exit Realty Leaders and
Luke Thomas with Bank
of America.
For more information
and to reserve your seat,
call the Citrus County
Division of Housing
Services at 527-5388.
Limited seating space
available. Only those
preregistered will be al-
lowed to attend classes.
If you plan to attend, call
immediately to reserve
your chair.


Specializin in1 Ter VAI!8 D[istaUI~*


I~I
& BentoodResle
�1t. lk&7C Z?11ww.TraGstRaOyUopPo


*. * '.. . . +
-. . isi . ,



Detached Villa / 3Bd-2Bath-
2Car / Hillside Villas
Popular Lantana model with enclosed lanai
and spectacular view of preserve lot.
TVRG# 1065 $275,000.





Single Family I 3Bd+Den-
2.5Bath-3Car / Foxfire
BREATHTAKING Davinci Deluxe pool home.
Gourmet kitchen. Luxurious master bath.
TVRG# 1079 $699,000.





Detached Villa I 3Bd-2Bath-
2Car / Hillside Villas
Centrally located overlooking Skyview
Driving Range.
TVRG# 1010 $310,000.

I - ------, --. . .

,: .. !..- i ' . . 1. . -;. ,

Single Family I 3Bd+Den-
2Bath-2Car / Bellamy Ridge
Beautiful custom home in gated Estate
Community of Bellamy Ridge.
TVRG# 1089 $639,000.

. - **-- .



Detached Villa / 3Bd-2.5Bath-
2Car / Skyview Villas
Brand new customized villa w/ oversized
Garage & Golf Cart Storage.
TVRG# 1020 $449,000.


Detached Villa / 3Bd+Den-
2.5Bath-2 Car / Hillside Villas
Check out this popular Windward Model on a
cul de sac. Landscaped and priced to sell.
TVRG# 1100 $339,000.





Single Family / 3Bd-2.5Bath-
2Car / Hillside South
Attractive comer lot pool home with
upgrade kitchen and so much more.
TVRG# 1034 $549,000.

, ,- , "


Detached Villa / 2Bd+Den-
2Bath-2Car / Woodview Villas
Priced to sell Lantana model on a preserve
lot. Granite countertops, tile/ wood floors.
TVRG# 1078 $315.000.


GET THE WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news releases about upcom-
ing community events.
* Write the name of the event, who sponsors it, when and where it will take
place and other details.
* Include a contact name and phone number to be printed in the paper.
* News releases are subject to editing. Call 563 5660 for details.


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 * (800) 323-7703


Office in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center


Detached Villa / 3Bd-2Bath-
2Car / Brentwood Villas
Corian Countertops, Maple Cabinets and so
much more!
TVRG# 1036 $219,900.


Detached Villa / 3Bd-2Bath-
2Car / Hillside Villas
Beautiful pool home loaded with upgrades �
on private homesite.
TVRG# 1012 $319,000.


County to offer class for


irst-time homebuyers


Single Family I 3Bd+Den-2.5
Bath-2 Car / Hunt Club
Roomy home on wooded lot. Pool with
heated spa.
TVRG# 1047 $424,900.


E4'--N APRIL; 2000 IV/ ~


783167


Fd~r,,rn*v d~uoll ~ ?nno








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TRULY A "BEST BUY!"
*GOLF COMMUNITY -REDUCED PRICE
*LG. FAMILY RM. HEATED POOL
*PORCH+ LANAI Over 2000 sq. ft liv
Kelly Goddard 476-8536
Ellie Sutton 287-3997 '
Virtual Tours @ www.Floridalistinlgnfo.om a


LECANTO SCHOOL DISTRICT
Immaculate 2005 BUILT, 3 Br, 2 bath, 1 car gar.
Laminate floors; fenced backyard for privacy and a
beautiful view; Office off kitchen.
Don't miss this terrific buy
located in Lecanto.
Vicki Love 352-697-0712 : .0 -
Email: VickiLove@Remax.net
www.VickiloveHomes.com


�ii�,;. "


Located in maintenance free "Hammocks" of SMW.
3/2/2. Upgrades galore. Florida living at its best!
DIR: 19 S to SMW, left on Cypress Blvd. Right on Pine St., left on
Byrsonima Or., right Into Hammocks, Ist right Byr. Loop #7 on left
Val Mahoney (352)220-4023
Email v mahoney@tampabay.r.com
Sally Cure (352)-220-3001 !
Email: scure@tpgbahy.rr.com


1560 Sq. ft. living space. Fenced garden area.
Family room w/triple sliders.
Screened porch.
$1000 PAINT/CARPET AIIOWANCE
Danny Underwood
Integrity Selling Specialist
(352) 586-1743
Email: Florida.LifeSyle@hotmail.com


Ra~ U :r


i. gc e.. iiii


REDUCED TO SELL!!
* GOLF-TENNIS-EQUESTRIAN & FITNESS
* LIKE NEW BEAUTY* CORIAN & TILE
* Pavers around pool * Lg. family rm.

Kelly Goddard 476-8536
Ellie Sutton 287-3997 1
Email: kellyg@remax.net


LOTS OF EXTRAS!! This doublewide mobile home has COUNTRY CLUB LIVING ON A SLIM
3BR, 2BA, on .95 MOL acres and features indoor
laundry, updated kit. cab. & counters, stainless steel BUDGET. SUGARMILL WOODS 2BR,
appliances. New roof in 2006. Recent 2BA immaculate home w/30' vinyl
interior painting. Home has a serene enclosed lanai, 2 car garage,
S GRA IT NOW ' ... deep greenbelt.
DAWN WRIGHT . . NANCY BOWDISH * (352) 628-7800
(352) 400-1080 Direc: (352) 422-0296
Emai: dawn.rightl' lampabay.rrn.om Visual Tours at www.buyritruscounty.com


WHAT COULD BE BETTER -esi le lol on
golf course, heated pool, FR/FP, 3 large
bedrooms, 2 baths, tastefully decorated.
SUGARMILL WOODS
at it's best.
NANCY BOWDISH * (352) 628-7800
Dired: (352) 422-0296
Visual Tours at www.buycitruscounty.com


Bi.ii r'" " -iT i
17 ACRE ISLAND!!
*COMFY COTTAGE * GREENLEAF BAY
* Becric/AC * Native plants/foliage
* Gorgeous terrain * Great getaway
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997
Email: elliesutton@remax.net


CRYSTAL ACRES
Affordable & many extras go with this Merit 3BR/2BA
doublewide. Incl. LR/DR, breakfast bar, Pergo wood
floors & newer carpets, SS appls.
Enjoy the rec. rm. w/bar, TV, WB fpl. +
more. Boat storage/carport and
12'x12' storage, bldg. -a
Lou Halley-
(352) 257-9016
Email ounolley@tampabay.rr.com i


3750 W. COGWOOD CIR.
PINE RIDGE
* 3BD/2BA/2+CG Attached + 4 Car Detached
* All Hardwood Floors Lg. Screened Patio
* Screened Lanai * Many Extra Features
Peter & Marvia Korol, Realtorse
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


11004 W. COVE HARBOR DR.
CRYSTAL RIVER
* 2BD/2BA/Carport * Waterfront w/Dock
* Pelican Cove Condo *1159SF Living ,- ,
* Screened porch * Maintenance Free
Peter & Marvin Korol, Realtorse I
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


11655 N. BASIN COVE, DUNNELLON
*4BR/3BA/2CG Gas Fireplace
SHardwood Floors 'Lanai & Pool Area
SGorgeous Landscaping
SBeautiful View with Lots of Privacy
Len Palmer (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


HOMOSSASSA!!
Newer 3BR, 2BA doublewide mobile home, built in
1995. New laminate flooring, tile floors, drywalled
walls, large 1 2x16 workshop with
12x1 2 overhang, split plan, eat-in
kitchen, dead-end street.
Dianne MacDonald
212-9682
Email djmfl@yahoo.com


NORTH CAROLINA IN FLORIDA? That's what
you'll think when you see the back yard of this
unbelievable home. Stunning views of the
adjoining lake with elevation drop-offs you
didn't know existed in Florida. Quiet, secluded
1 acre lot but close to shopping, etc. At only
$179,900, you'll fall in love.
John Holloway Sr., c, GRI, ABR, ePRO (352) 212-6002
Email: JohnHolloway@tampabay.rr.cam
www.TheHollowayTeam.com


SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009 E5







CrITus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ArE�rl nrintl9 9fl00


Ways to protect Cit us


County's water supplies


HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
It is also distributed to approximately
300 business locations throughout Citrus County.
display advertising information........................... ............. 563-5592
Classified advertising information................................ ............563-5966
News information.......................................................... ..... ...563-5660
...............................................................newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listings..... ................. www.naturecoasthomefront.com
Sign up for www.naturecoasthomefront.com ........................563-3206
Advertise online........................................... .......................................... 563-3206
. . ............................................................NCCsales@chronicleonline.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CHi ONi CLE _ _ _ _ _ _


To have your news in the Chronicle's HomeFront section, you may mail, fax or e-mail the
information to the Chronicle, 1624 North Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. The
newsroom fax number is 563-3280 and email is newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.
You may also drop off your information at the Meadowcrest office or the newspaper's
Inverness office at 106 W. Main Street.
When submitting information, please make sure it is printed or typed, is concise and includes a
contact telephone number.
If you have any questions or comments, contact the section editor, Mike Arnold, at 563-5660
e-maill - newsdesk@chronicleonlinc.comi).
HOW TO GET YOUR PHOTOS INTO THE PAPER:
-We accept color and black and white photos. We also accept negatives. We do not accept Polaroid prints
-All photos need to e cropped tightly. That mean, no wasted space in your photo.
- Photos need to be in sharp focus. We do not accept photos that are out of focus.
- Be sure that photos or negatives you submit are taken using 35 mm film. Others will not be accepted.
- Please include your address and phone number on any photos or negatives submitted
- Phos or negatives submitted will be returned if supplied with a return envelope and postage.
- When identifying persons in your photo, please do so from left to right. front to back.
- For more information, please contact Malt Beck, photo team leader, at 563-5660.


Joan Bri
FLOR
FRIEE
LIVI


To provide clean, fresh drink-
ing water for household use, municipal
water supplies undergo treatment to re-
move existing contaminants. After water
is used within a household, it is treated
again to remove contaminants accumu-
lated in wastewater before it is returned
to the environment. Protecting water is
good for the earth, your family, and your
community.
When you use water wisely, you protect
the environment and help preserve drink-
ing water supplies. Conservation also
eases the burden on wastewater treatment
facilities - the less water you send down


april is water conserva-
tion month! Now more
than ever it is vital that
we protect this valuable re-
source during these dry times.
Some may ask "If water is con-
stantly being recycled and
cleaned through the earth's nat-
ural water cycle, why do we
need to conserve it?" The an-
swer is simple: People are
using our planet's fresh water
supply at a faster rate than it
can naturally be replenished.


Inside*..


the drain, the less work these
operations have to do to make
water clean again.
When you use water wisely,
you save energy. You save the
S.energy that your water supplier
' uses to treat and move water to
you, and the energy your family
uses to heat your water.
adshaw When you use water wisely,
IDA- you save money. Your family
pays for the water you use. If
IDLY you use less water, you'll have
NG more money left to spend on
-other things.
Water conservation actions:
* Check household faucets for leaks. A
faucet with even a slow drip takes 10 to 25
gallons of water. Just think, 15 drips per
minute add up to almost 3 gallons of water
wasted per day, 65 gallons wasted per
month, and 788 gallons wasted per year!
* Keep showers to 5 minutes or less in
length. A five-minute shower takes 10 to 25
gallons of water.
* Keep a pitcher of water in the refrig-
erator Then you won't have to run tap
water to cool it.
See : Page Ell


Silver spoons and watches; creepy painting has clever secret


Dear John: My wife and I enjoy
your newspaper column in the
Chronicle very much. Many of
our "antiques" are inherited from our
grandparents and parents.
The enclosed photos of spoons de-
pict a set I found
while going
through my fa- ,
their's posses-
sions after his 4 -
passing in 1998.
I believe that "
they were with
his 1960s Rolex
watch.
The six spoons John Sikorski
are 4 inches in SIKORSKIS
length and have
the Rolex and A
Bucherer wat-
ches logos at the top of the handle. The
spoon bowl has a lion in relief with a
Swiss cross and the town name
Lucerne underneath. On the back of
the spoon handles there is a stamped
relief with the numbers B or 8 100 12.


See ATTIC/Page E8


Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE: These silver spoons were part of a promotion for Rolex and Bucherer watches. Though
the watches themselves are highly collectible, these spoons are of no specific interest to
collectors. ; , This illusionist painting, titled "All is Vanity," is by Charles Allen Gilbert.
From a distance, the painting appears to show a skull, but a closer look reveals that it is ac-
tually a picture of a woman looking in a vanity mirror.


FA -Z A -;112 20OGI� VV/


Asian flair
PAGE E9
Jane Weber
PAGE E14
Home Maintenance
PAGE E4
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E2
For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the Web site for the Citrus
County Property Appraiser's Of-
fice, www.pa.citrus.fl.us.









Gimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE5UNDA~ Apim. 12, 2009 E7


SINKHOLES
Continued from Page E4

First, the deeper the source of the
problem, the larger the sinkhole will
be at the surface.
Second, sinkholes that appear sud-
denly are generally caused by the loss
of bedrock support, as explained by
the USGS.
Third, smaller sinkholes seem to
grow slowly as the surface soils sift into
voids in the ground, or moving water
beneath the soil carries the soils away.
These smaller sinkholes are usually lo-
cated near buried pipes such as gutter
drains, sewer pipes or water mains.
Fourth, abandoned mines can create
sinkholes in a process known as "mine
subsidence." As abandoned mines col-
lapse, the soils above the mines hour-
glass into the voids. Mine subsidence
can affect whole neighborhoods and


can cause major structural damage to
homes above the sinkhole or near the
rim of the sinkhole. Once the mines
are located, they are filled with a con-
crete slurry to prevent further ground
failure. The engineer's report on the
property you are purchasing should
reveal the cause and effect of the sink-
hole and the repairs that were made.
With this information, you should be
able to make an informed decision on
whether you should purchase this
home.
You are fortunate that you are work-
ing with honest, knowledgeable sellers.
~---H----
Dwight Barnett is a certified master
inspector with the American Society
of Home Inspectors. Write to him
with home improvement questions at
C. Dwight Barnett, Evansville
Courier & Press, PO. Box 286, Evans-
ville, Ind. 47702 or e-mail him at
d.Barnett@insightbb.com.


Visit the


Sweetwater


Homes


Model


Center

For A
3 B
Guided


Tour.










www.sweetwaterhomes.com


Located on Hwy. 19,4.5 miles south of Homosassa Springs. CC0490
8016 S.Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, Fl 34446 (352) 382-4888 Email:swhsales@tampabay.rr.com


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E2

dening, bartering, home can-
ning, pest control and cooking
without electricity. Knowledge


gained can be useful at any
time, not just for emergencies.
One reader, Gayle in Oklahoma,
says: "I am one of those who be-
lieves that 'old skills' could
come in handy at any time.: I
garden because I want to know
where my food comes from. I


have friends who know how to
kill a chicken and get it on the
table for dinner, as well as
those whose husbands hunt
and know how to clean and
butcher what they kill. I can

See FRUGAL/Page E8


.ra, J.W. MORTON
G1nm REAL ESTATE, INC.
'.... l 1645 W. Main St., Inverness, FL
Email: cent21@infionline.net SALES: (352) 726-6668 . 1-800-543-9163 Q
www. jwmortonrealestate.com Property Management (352) 726-9010 q"'


COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON BUSY
HWY. 41 SOUTH. Over an acre -
surrounded by all types of business.
Property is partially cleared, has a well
and backs to Rails to Trails. Owner wants
offer. #322982 ASKING $99,000.
Call Martha Snyder
at 352-476-8727


A REALLY HAPPY COUPLE . . . ...II
have this on a quiet W. Highlands 1.25A site.
A cozy, immaculate 3/2/2 masonry home,
attached carport, lots of parking plus huge
open lanai and at the rear, the tinkerer's
delight - not one but two large metal sheds
for hobbies galore! #333466. $130,000.
Call Marilyn Booth 637-4904


FLORAL CITY - Horse property. Come
see 5 acres with singlewide mobile, on a
paved road, with lots of room to roam.
Priced for land only but mobile needs
TLC, so come save the impact fee.
#315665. $84,900.
Call Martha Snyder
352-476-8727


GREAT DEAL IN INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS! Great winter or starter home! I
This 2 bedroom, 1 bath, 1 car garage home
has 2 extra lots. Very neat home withloads of
room for the kids or for gardening. Close to
town, shopping and much more. Give us a
call to see it today! #327824
Call Maxine Hellmers 352-212-4147
or Kimberly Miner 352-586-9549


DRASTIC REDUCTION! Absolutely stunning 3BR, 2BA,
2 car gar home in the gated community of Arbor Lakes.
This is a lovely waterfront comm. w/many activities, pool,
library, clubhouse and more. This home offers Corian
counters, upgraded lighting, 2 pantries, inside laundry,
pricy screened gar, instant hot water in kit & master
bath, Jacuzzi tub, dual sinks, dual walk-in closets, wood
floors, a 20x7 bonus rm. perfect For that home office,
newer paint, newer AC and mature landscaping. Make
sure to take a look at this home. #323713. THIS HOME
IS NOW LISTED FOR $158,500.
Call Maxine Hellmers @ 352-212-4747
for your appointment to see this home.


OPEN
LAKEFRONT.
I -,: M C. ,':.:r L
vvAltk. 2/ I/ I
COTTAGE PLUS ADDITIONAL BUILDING SITE.
Beautiful water, Huge Grandfather Oaks. Close
to Rails to Trails. Seller will consider some
owner financing. ASKING 5258,900.
Pat Davis, Agent (352) 212-7280
Email: c2 Ipatdavis@earthlink.net
or website: c21patdavis.com


The Newest Concept in

Sugarmill Woods!


Maintenance-free condo living
with the privacy of a villa

bedroom * 2 Bath . 2 Car Garage
Over 2,100 sq. ft. of Living Area /3,


CAN'T BEAT THIS PRICE. 8 ACRES,
PLATTED. Floral City area. City water
available. Paved road. Must sell to settle
estate. #330888. $80,000.
Pat Davis, Agent (352) 212-7280
Email: c2 partdvis@earthlink.net
or website: c2 patdavis.com


THIS 2/2/1 VILLA SPARKLES! New ceramic
tile and wood flooring throughout. Freshly
painted in decorator colors. Large, 21 x 8
screened porch is private All appliances convey.
$85/mo includes exterior maintenance, roof,
landscaping, pool, clubhouse, termite control
and road maintenance. #333512. $95,000.
Ask for Jeanne or Willard Pickrel
352-212-3410
www.CitrusCountySold.com


GET RID OF HIGH ELECTRIC BILLS! This home
is Custom Designed and Built with ENERGY
EFFICIENCY in mind. Immaculate 3BR, 2BA home
on a 1 ACRE homesite has a lot of flexibility. It
could be considered 2 master suites with this
perfect split plan. Constructed with the REWARD
Wall System For strength and Wind Resistance,
energy efficiency, durability, sound barrier and Fire
Resistance. A must see! $229,900. #329799.
Ask for Jeanne or Willard Pickrel
352-212-3410
www.CitrusCounrtSold.com


'� -I


mmmmm


I I


SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009 E7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


J ,I


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E8 SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009


English Ivy can pose problems for trees FRUGAL,
Continued from Page E7


E english Ivy !
can be a
real prob-
lem if not con- | a
trolled from the
outset. English
Ivy is usually a -
good ground
cover.
It is low main- Kerry
tenance, and T
grows well in
most soils. If con- ARBC
editions are right,
this plant clings by means of
small roots and will take


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

My questions for you are:
Do the numbers on the back
indicate silver, silver plate
or some other metal? Does
this set come with purchas-
ing a Rolex watch? What is
the value of the spoons? Is
there any collector market
for them? -EW, Hernando
Dear EW: Both Rolex and
Bucherer are recognized
worldwide for high-quality
production wristwatches.
Vintage Rolex wristwatches
are aggressively sought
after by collectors.
The souvenir advertising
spoons you have are of no
specific collector interest
The metal is perhaps .800
silver content or silver
plated with .800 silver.
Dear John: Sorry to have
to take you to task, but here
it is. Early Saturday you
were guilty of a bit of sloppy
coverage. It concerns your
piece about the Illusionist
painter, you gave his name,
a fact I did not have and am
hopingyou will print in your
Sunday column for the Cit-
rus County Chronicle.
Now to it: You described
the photo in your possession
as two young women, wear-
ing pretty dresses that from
a distance appear to be a
human skull. WRONG. Not
entirely, but you did miss
the real kicker.
Firstly: It is not two, but
merely one woman, in a dres-
singgown ofthe period, look-
ing at herself in the mirror of


over an area rap-
idly
English Ivy
uses trees as a
host Once it
roots on a tree, it
can be a very ag-
gressive plant I
have seen situa-
tions where it
takes over every-
thing in its path.
It can be con-
trolled and with


proper thinning and prun-
ing, you should not have a

a dressing table, the curve of
the upper skull is created by
the rounded mirror, the dark
haired head and reflected
head are the eyes, the nose is
the blaze of the candle flame,
the perfume bottles and lo-
tions and creams create the
teeth and the dresser scarf
curves below to become the
chin. You were correct when
you said that it is a painting of
a skull when you stand back
from it, but when you ap-
proach you see the woman,
the tools for primping, and
the title! That title is 'All is
Vanity" Isn'tthat wonderfully
creepy?
When I was growing up in
Syracuse, my mother was a
great fan of this artist The
Sunday rotogravure in the
Syracuse Herald Journal
ran a series of his illusion
paintings. Mom was espe-
cially enthralled by "All Is
Vanity," so she cut it out, had
it framed rather spectacu-
larly and hung it in our
home. It always got the reac-
tion she hoped for. It hangs
today in my cottage in up-
state New York and I enjoy
the same pleasure observing
first time visitors' reactions
and their struggle to not ask
aloud what in the wide
world of sports I am doing
with a framed dead skull on
my wall. - PR., Internet
Dear PR: Well perhaps I
was sloppy if you insist Your
description ofthe skull image
titled'"All is Vanity" is totally
correct - well done. The
artist is Charles Allen Gilbert,
1873-1929. The one I had in
mind with the two women is
titled "Gossip, and Satan


problem.
If left to grow unattended,
it could choke out a tree or
a group of trees. In some
cases, it grows into the
canopy oftrees. If the tree is
deprived of sunlight (photo-
synthesis), then you could
have a bigger problem.
English Ivy also harbors
rodents and insects. If you
would like to get rid of this
plant, repeated cutting gen-
erally does not kill the plant
Digging out the plant's
roots, I have found, is the

came also," by George Woth-
erspoon. A current artist
working in the illusion art
field is Octavio Ocampo,
whose work I find impres-
sive. All of these works and
more can easily be found on
the Internet and your local li-
brary.
---B--
John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-


FORMS
AVAILABLE
The Chronicle
has forms avail-
able for wed
ding and en
gagement an-
nouncements,
anniversaries,
birth announce
ments and first
birthdays.


most effective solution. In
certain situations, English
Ivy can be bad for trees.
---SBH----
Kerry Kreider is a practic-
ing arborist, a member of
the International Society of
Arboriculture, a tree
preservationist and presi-
dent ofAction Tree Serv-
ice. Ifyou have any
questions he can be
reached at 302-2815 or
email actionpro
arborist@yahoo.com

tiques business for more
than 20 years. He hosts
a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from
11 a.m. to noon. Send
questions to Sikorski's
Attic, c/o The Citrus
County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River FL 34429,
or e-mail asksikorski
@aoLcom.


Move In Special
1-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $150
2-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $200
Exp. 4/30/09
Call Monday Through Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm
We accept HUD Vouchers, Foreclosures Accted.

(352) 489-1021


;:,:.'


.-A



Spacious 3/2/2 on cul-de-sac in Sugarmill with
immense screened lanai overlooking gorgeous
greenbelt. Xeriscaped for water conservation and
ease of maintenance. $198,000


filet a fish with the best of
them and dress out small
wild birds. So if I can gar-
den, forage for plants, hunt,
sew and do other things or
barter for what I need, then
I am ahead of the game, so
to speak How lost are peo-
ple without their cell
phones and computers?
We've seen that, too. I be-
lieve that knowledge is a
powerful tool, and the more
you have, the better you can
care for your family and
yourself."
EN
If you hate climbing into a
cold bed, you'll like the first
tip. It's a great alternative to
an electric blanket or a
Snuggle. The only problem
is that you'll want more than


one set. I recommend you
do research before buying.
They vary considerably in
quality brand to brand. If
your heart is still set on a
Snuggie, here's a similar,
free pattern so you can
make one yourself: www.sis-
sonfamily.com/Sewingroom/
images/2006projects/thesnu-
glet.pdf.
BETTER THAN FLAN-
NEL: Polarfleece sheets
will easily allow you to turn
down the heat in your house
at night. I'm always cold -
cold feet, cold hands. etc. I
tend to wear socks to. bed.
Now I don't have to. - Vail,
Washington
Note from Sara: You can
find them at stores such as
Costco, Wal-Mart and Ca-i
bela's.
SURPRISE DESSERT:
When we have a pie, cake or

See FRUGAL/Page E11


DEBBIE
DEBBE KELLER WIUAMS
FIELDS R E A L T Y
352-637-1500
Realtor'5 ' dAM bb.rb6 ilda-ka comr.
.-,- ,J hbIiici rcomr


TARAWOOD SPECIAL Adull
GREAT CENTRAL LOCATION with community. Move right in with furniture
a short distance to the Withlacoochee and all. Sparkles like a diamond!
Forest. 3 bed 2 bath 2 car, over 1700 Perfect floor plan 2 bed and 2 bath and
living area on n fenced acre. Split plan, 2 car, over 1500 living area. A single
family and living room, eat in kitchen, family home. Glassed Florida room plus
Lots of privacy. Reduced to lanai. Drastic price reduction to
$132,900.00. MLS 330204 $112,900.00 MLS 330586


.., ., , .


- . .. --.. THE BEST LOCATION lor shopping
BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS schools and hospital. City limits. 3 bed
HOME. Sparkling! 3 bed 2 bath 2 car. 2 bath 2 car. Great room effect.
Great room effect with living, dining and Cathedral ceilings, formal dining, formal
kitchen combo. All updated appliances, living and family room with fireplace,
Abundance of Kitchen counters. Tile split floor plan and over 1800 living
throughout. Huge Florida room 32 x 10. area. Move right in. Must see for
Located on awesome 1 acre. Only special offer of $142,000.00 MLS
asking $165,000.00 MLS 331513 331706.



A HOME BUILT WITH PRIDE ,i
- ,rn � 'i hyp 'S , t.do.:.u o 2 n ,5ir, ...- ~....
home with 3 car attached garage. Over LOOKING FOR HISTORIC? Perfect
2000 living area. A kitchen for the location. Across from Crystal River
master chef, granite counter tops, Middle School. 3 bed 3 bath pool home,
stainless still appliances, convection built in 1940. 2 story with original
oven & convection microwave, wine hardwood floors, updated spacious eat
cooler. Split plan and so much more in kitchen, 2 fireplaces, updated master
extras. Peaceful setting huge lanai with suite with separate shower and jetted
Jacuzzi included. Don't miss this tub. Cozy and comfortable. Updated
opportunity for a 2006 built home at with roof and Central Heat & Air. Must
$249,900. MLS 332427 see $210,000.00 MLS 331200


Creider
!E
)RIST


1" . ' .4












Family room with Far East flavor


SHNS photo courtesy HGTV
The trick in this space was to combine Eastern minimalism and modem convenience, while bringing in the stylish serenity of the spectacular Japanese garden out back.

Couple ges chic, modem Asian-inspired design update


CANDICE OLSON
Home and Garden Television
Suzanne and Les have an
exceptionally beautiful
Japanese-inspired back-
yard garden. It's a wonderful
expression oftheirAsian her-
itage - he's Japanese, she's
Chinese and their daughters
Amy and Leanne were
adopted from China.
Beautifully sculpted trees
and greenery, stone walks and
soothing waterfalls have made
it a popular stop on the neigh-
borhood garden tour. But if the
garden was the perfect combi-
nation ofyin and yang, the out-
dated sunken family room
looking onto it was far from
being in balance! It's a mish-
mash of styles and inspiration
- modern, shabby chic and
even French country, with a


area. I used that warm, golden
tone and offset it with con-
trasting Japanese-inspired
S ebony A cool stormy gray color
on the walls was the backdrop
dash of kid-toy overload for fantastic gold accents.
thrown in. Job one was to get the space
Suzanne and Les asked me organized. Custom cabinetry
to bring the serenity of their provided plenty of storage and
Japanese minimalist garden a strong focal point for the
into the family room, while still room. The base was stained a
accommodating their need for golden tone, with black-
modern North American con- framed upper cabinets with
venience and room for all the Shoji screens providing a mod-
kids' toys. Kids and minimal- er Asian feeling. Putting deli-
ism? I took some deep, medita- cate rice-paper screens in
tive breaths and called in my reach of kids is inviting disas-
crew to raise this sunken fam- ter, so instead I opted for
ily room to a new level, sturdy white acrylic panels.
One thing the room had The minimalist form of the
going for it was the wood. This cabinets also provides a con-
space was blessed with beauti- temporary function; one end
ful honey-oak floors, railings houses a flat-screen TV with
and trim in both the family
room and the elevated dining See DESIGN/Page E10


Suzanne and Les wanted their outdated sunken family room to be in balance with
their Japanese backyard garden.


SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009 E9


CImRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONIC:








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E10 SUNDAY. APRIL 12. 2009


DESIGN
Continued from Page E9

cables and media compo-
nents hidden behind
drawer faces below, while
the other end has plenty of
storage for games and toys
right by a kids' table and
chairs. .
The overstufl diAarcoa I
velvet sofa is a super-comfy
place for the family to get in
some quality TV time. In-
spired by the Japanese
style, I chose rice-paper and
cherry-wood lantern-style
lighting pendants and a
chandelier. The area rug
picked up the golden tones
of the wood, and I added a
few really cool kimono-style
throw pillows in gold and
chalky blue. Two contempo-
rary chairs in ebony wood
and cream upholstery book-
end the space.
In the elevated dining
area, a leather-look-
textured vinyl seat provides
both storage and easy
cleanup for messy kids. An
oak pedestal table pushed
snugly into the bench and a
few simple cream contem-
porary chairs complete the
setting.


The most important de-
sign element in this room is
the view of the fantastic
back garden, but it was hid-
den behind outdated hori-
zontal blinds. I replaced
them with hanging Shoji-in-
spired translucent stacking
blinds that retract They
open to reveal a full view of
the amazing garden and,
when closed, bathe the room
in soft. diffused light Gold-
painted graphics of koi fish
and :cherry branches on the
walls enhance the illusion of
bring the outdoors in.
The trick in this space
was 'to combine Eastern
miniunalism and modern
convenience, while bringing
in the stylish serenity of the
spectacular Japanese gar-
den out back The result is a
space that reflects the bal-
ance of yiin Suzanne and
Les' Asian heritage with the
yang of modern North
American family life. How
divine!
,----- -----
Interibr decorator Candice
Olson is host ofHGTV's
"Divine Design. "For more
ideas, information and
show times visit
www.HGTVcom or www.
divinedesign.tv


S^"- Peter & - RM, '
Marvia REALTY ONE
KOROL Office: 35.527.7842
Reafllor
, . . Cell: 352.422.3875 l,
- 1 www.TheKorolTeam.com -

$112,000 MLS#325709 $99,900 MLS#325407
.--- - -----

J: -," .."1 i"; -"|-' < 1 * " w B
3555 N. WILOW1REE PT. LAKESIDE VILLAGE 227 S. JACKSON ST. BEVERLY HILLS
*Maintenance free Villa *2BD/2BA 1CG . Lovely 2BD/2BA/2CG * Newer Roof &A/C
*Split bedroom plan * Florida room * Living & Family Rms. * Well maintained
*Certified over 55 * Many upgrades * Pretty neighborhood * 1644 sf. living


4681 N. LENA DR. PINE RIDGE
*4BD/3BA/3CG 3412 SF Living
* Built in 2007 * Heated Pool/Spa
- Many, Many Upgrades * Office/Den


$99,000 MLS#331625



2034 W. SHINING DAWN LN. LECANTO
S3BD2BA/1CG 1136 SF living
SBuilt in 2004 p Fenced comer lot
* Upgraded appliances 0 Above ground pool


- 9 U


$425,000 MLS#331585



5592 N. BEDSTROW BLVD. PINE RIDGE
S3BD/2BA3CG/Den * Detached 3CG
* Heated Pool * Motor Home Garage
SHome 2,218 SF/AC * Garage 1,716 SF/AC


$110,000 r.u: . -::_-e-..



3934 N. HUCKLEBERRY PT. BEVERLY HILLS
* 2BD/2BA/1CG - Maintenance Free
SVilla in Parkside 1156 SF Living
* 2 Master Suites - Screened Patio


the link between plans and reality .


SDennis amato
State Certified | CGC-004344

GENERAL CONTRACTOR, INC.
S A TRADITION OF QUALITY SINCE 1972
* Consultation & Project/Plan Review I
* Design Services
S * Cost Estimating * Design-Build Construction
SCustom Crafted Homes * Waterfront Homes
S * "Cracker-Style" Homes & Buildings
SResidential Renovations
S* Commercial Construction & Remodeling
S* Adaptive Re-Use & Restoration of Buildings

430 NE3rd Street, P.O. Box 1312, Crystal River, FL34423-1312
3 7 7 I 7


VACANT LOTS
OAKS GOLF COURSE
11/2 ae Lil $69,900
CITRUS HILLS
1 Acre with Central Water... $29,900 RIDE YOUR GOLF CART!
BAYMEADOWS Inverness Country Club close by for this well
BAMAt WS) located 3BRI/2BA with Florida room.
(4) 1/2 Acre Lots - Buy 1 or All $24,899 lo$117,500 M LSo331547r

CALL Roy Bass TODAY (s52)726-2471
Email:roybass@tampabay.rrcom www.allitrusrealtycom AfterHours os2302-6714


USlRYiDE M
-w -

465,3000o .i" 746E9000
9542 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., 3521 N. Leto Hw
Citrus Springs lBeverly Hills, FL 34465
I.ri.� . '.m.I , .. , , li r it 1 . ,i 7. . i M. t t, II n.

1-866-465-3500 1-888-789-7100


CITRUS S NGS R SPRINGS CCrrR SPRINGS CIRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS


9356 JOURDEN DR.
6712 N DANDELION 2472 PINEGROVE 3li H BURGUNDY DR 3502 W BURGUNDY 129.900 7140 GRACKLE PT.
1159900 . 179.90000 s .90 134.900 - .. -15.000
CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS
:- ". .... �- - . . t : M.-' .
II.I - ..l.....
815 N FOCONO DR 11 .8 W BRIDGE DR 2297 . TEE CIRCLE 3381 WEBSTER PL I 2728 . EDISON PLACE 9930 CHERRY' LAKE
1129(00 1.140500 .134 700 1 135000 1 149.700 1319.900
CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS
i "� 'w < .....z IIm

157w LAVENDER LN 2225 N NAUTILUS N 939 N. GOLFVIEW DR 2599 W DIANE LN 9199 GOLF'IEW 8595 * GOLFNIEW DR
.39.900 S83.900 i 124.900 I 134 900 1195000 118.000
CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS CITRUS SPRINGS
AA




" GREEBRIAR *
I33 0E G LA RO CT 11 E HILL ST 679 E ALASKA LN4 . 86330 N I NS SP R BL aM 9260 BN ELLOT L 39.50 D
675.900 1107.600 1 0000 5399000 i4.9 00




.. ... . . o.l i_... . 1 - 0 33 33
CITRUS HILLS PARKSOIE VILLAGE QUAIL RUN MINI FARMS 40.E E 000 BEVERLY HILLS
F -1'EE'BRI-RI ..:;.1. i .'.7 �- " " VIIB

11 E. HARTFORD S A CHERRY LAUREL C 1045 E BLUEBIRD . 7597 R 394 N SPANISH MO
$127500 i $1149907 $240,000 $1369800 2'1 e$114500
Beaulluli 2-2 Condo #320673 |1 /111 wndo #331997 4 1202.1 0 are #330000 4/2 mobllo on 5 acres #329658 "'3329a / 5/1 -1mer- 325965


, A


-- -- --








Qmus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, APIUL 12, 2009 ElI


WATER
Continued from Page E6

* Use a broom to sweep your drive-
way, garage, or sidewalk instead of
using water.
* Use a bucket of water to wash
your bike or the family car and rinse
quickly with a hose.
* If you sprinkle your landscape, do
it during the early morning to avoid
evaporation. Be careful to water only
the lawn and not the sidewalk or
street
Typically, outdoor water use accounts
for up to 50 percent of water consumed
by households. Let your lawn and land-
scape plants tell you when to water and
water only as needed!
For more information, call Citrus
County Extension at 527-5700.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of Florida's
knowledge, research, and resources to
address youth, family, community, and
agricultural needs. Programs and activ-
ities offered by the Extension Service
are available to all persons without re-
gard to race, color, handicap, sex, reli-
gion, or national origin.


Dr Joan Bradsha w is Director of Cit-
rus County Extension and the natural
resource conservation faculty for
specialized programs in Citrus,
Hernando, Pasco and Sumter
County University ofFlorida/IFAS
Extension Service.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E8

no one else's business. But why not
consider making some green and fru-
gal decisions? Frugal people can iden-
tify wastefulness with an eagle's eye. I
surveyed readers and compiled the
most popular items they considered to
be the dumbest wastes of money.
I'm sure you can come up with some
of your own, but here's the top six from
the survey
LENDING MONEY: Don't do it.
Most of the time, you'll never see it
again.
WEDDINGS: There are many deci-
sions to make when getting married,
but you end up just as happy or miser-
able whether you spend $50 or $50,000.
Regardless of who is paying for it and
whether you can afford it, green wed-
See -4/Page E16






352-795-7357
888-795-7356
www.rhemarealtv.com



PROPERTIES FOR SALE & RENT


WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS
* Photos need to be in sharp focus. Include your name, address and phone number on all pho-
tos When identifying persons in your photo, do so from left to right. We discourage the use of
Polaroid prints.
* Photos submitted electronically should be in maximum resolution JPEG (.jpg) format. Photos
cannot be returned without a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Call 563-5660.


MEET AND
GREET
Clubs are in-
vited to submit
information
about regular
meetings for
publication in
The Meeting
Place each
Thursday.
Send in infor-
mation attn:
The Meeting
Place, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal
River, FL
34429, or fax
to 563-3280,
attention: The
Meeting Place.
E-mail to com-
munity@chroni
cleonline.com.
For special
events or fund-
raisers, submit
a news release.


KEY
Ery
REAL
ERA


"Always There For You"
GAIL COOPER
Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
Cell: (352) 634-4346
OFFICE: (352) 382-1700x309


Email me @ homes4u3@mindspring.com









EASY ACCESS TO TENNIS, POOL & GYM!
* 3+office/2/2 home with 2131 living area * Brick front gas fireplace in Great Room
* Extra large island kitchen w/walk-in pantry * Oversized Master with 3 bay windows
* Pocketing sliders out to Florida Room * All rooms are vaulted
#331584 $187.000


See' "eI V u lTo r s i-i " oii.r a. I In[ '


Homes from $120,900 on your lot



www.encorehomesofcitrus.com (352) 726-2179


SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009 Ell


CrrRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








E12 SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


*mmmm m mkmjm


Free 1st Mo Rent
1& 2 Br furn & Unfurn No
Pets Details
Homos.352-628-4441
HOMOSASSA
2/1, $350/mo.
$350 dep. No pets.
(352) 621-4721
HOMOSASSA
Lg. 2/1 Addition + deck.
Fenc'd yd. & shed,
$575 352-628-5244
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park,
2BR, 1-V2BA, $425.
1 BR,1 BA, $350 Incl.
water 352-476-4964




100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
*Low income applicants can
quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or no credit
OKAY
*recent bankruptcy
OKAY*
CAII TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
*Credit and income
restriction apply*
Florida licensed mortgage
lender




OPPOfRIUNiT

BANK
FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181
Floral City 3/2
Double wide.
Excellent condition. 1973
model. 24x66. $5,000.
(352) 344-1521
INVERNESS
55+ Waterfront Park,
1BR, water Incl. A/C
$3,500 + $270 mo. lot
rent. 352-476-4964


REPOSI
REPOSIREPOS!
(352) 621-9181



3/2, DW 'A acre, excel
cond. Green Acres, Own
fin. avail $79,900
813-503-8594
BANK
FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181
HERNANDO/off 200 2/2/1
carprt, cov por. Lg. end.
lanai,fenced bk yard
130x129, 2
sheds,W/D,$59,900
MOVE IN READY
(352) 341-4520
HOME-N-LAND
New Home 3/2
10 Yr. Warranty
Sacrifice! $3,000 down
$676.43/mo.
Call to Qualify
352-621-3807
HOMOSASSA
3/1.5, Scr rm w/con-
crete firs. nice shade
trees, over level 1 + ac,
approx 1 mi E. of 19
$49,900(352) 564-4598
LECANTO 3/2
DW, '/2acre, new
paint/carpet. Appis,
CHA, rfovers, porches,
shed. GOOD COND!
$44,900. 352-746-0714
NEW JACOBSEN
TRIPLE WIDE
High end home on
2 2 Acres, 2150 sq ft,
3/2, glamour kitchen,
marble in bathroom, ap-
pliance pkg.
Must Sell $179,900 or
$787/mo. Call
(352) 621-9181
Nice 3BR, 2BA
doublewide on 1 acre,
w/garage or barn.
East Inverness
$575 mo. WAC
(352) 726-9369

REPOSI
REPOSI REPOSI
(352) 621-9181


55+ Open Floor Plan,
2/2, cathedral ceilings,
14 x 56. lots of
upgrades, low rent
$13,500
(352) 527-3821
CRYSTAL RIVER 55+
55FT 2/1, 50 x 10 vinyl prch,
deck, shed, carport. Part.
furnished. All appls. $24k.
Lot rent only $235 mo. Call
Cindy, 352-563-5502
CRYSTAL RIVER
55+ Park, '98, 2/2
14 x 66, Carport, screen
porch, beautiful new
wood floors, appl., excel.
cond. lot $235 -mo.
$32,500 352-563-2865
Crystal River
Suncoast M. H. P.
2/2+ addition, fully furn.
wsh./dry. incl. CHA.
storage shed. $11,500
firm.) (603) 486-2412
Floral City, Singing For-
est, 2 BR, 1-'2 BA
Exc. cond., lot rent $154
mo. 352-344-2420
518-598-2248, cell
FOREST VIEW ESTATES
Great Loc. Pools, clbhs.
& more. Move-in ready,
comp, furn. 2/2 DW,
wheelchair acc., shed
& sprinkler. New heat
pump. $39,900
563-6428/563-1297
Inverness 2/1/Carport
Nicely furnished,
remod. kit., ba &
windows,scrrm.$17,500
shed (352 344-1380
(614)226-2336
NEWER DBLWIDE
In 5 star park, 312
Vinyl Fl. room, shed,
carport. Exc. cond.
$37,500
(352) 382-2356
Trade: 2006 DW Mobile
24x56 Skyline w/garage
Like New-Adult Park.
Trade for house in
Dunnellon 352-628-3363

WALDEN WOODS
55+ 3yrs. old, furn. 2/2,
scrn. porch, carport,
shed, good cond.
Reduced to $39,500
Call (352) 697-2779


WEST WIND VILL 55+
(3) NEW 2005's 2/2
Below cos/ Carport, shed,
scrn prch, furn'd, pet ok.
Park rent $256mo. Re-
sales avail. 352-628-2090






CITRUS RENTAL
MANAGEMENT &
REALTY LLC
527-2428
Full Service
Full Time
www.citruscountv
rentals.cam

2/2/1 te 650
2/2/1 Villa..............$750
2/2/2 waterfront...$650
2/1/1 .....................$600
2/2 Condo ............ $675
3/2/2 Pool .............$995
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1/1 CP............. $525
2/2/1 CP............$625
2/1 Duplex........ $495
2/1.5Duple . 475
LECANTO COMMR'L
1125sq ft.......... $9 0+tx
More Inventory
Available
Jennifer Foreman
Realtor PRM
Alex Griffin Realtor


HOMOSASSA &
CRYSTAL RIVER 3
bedroom. 2 bath.
Homosassa custom 3/2
waterfront home on 4
ac with 2 docks private
and quiet $1000.
Crystal River 3/2 near
Plantation $650.
Homosassa waterfront
2/1 furnished $900.
Property Management
& Investment Group
Broker/Realtor
352-628-5600.


POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - Waterfront
homes, Wkly priv. rms, RV
lots.352-628-0011


C _rym21.
J.W. Uc* RM& EWmu, t.
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
Inverness
2/2/2 fireplace- $675
3/2/2nice yard -$700
2/2/2 den - $775
2/1 - $500
2/2 carport - $595 MH
3/2/2-$750
2/12/1 - $625
Beverly Hills
2/2/1 scr rm - $625
2/2/1 frt porch - $650
Floral Citr
2/I carport - $650
Pritchard Island
3/2/1 - $875
2/2/2- $800
See our website:
www.jwmortonreal
estate.com
Jennifer Fudge
Sherry Scruggs
352-726-9010


SINGLE FAMILY
HOMES,
DUPLEXES,
WATERFRONT,
MOBILE HOMES

FURNISHED/
UNFURNISHED,
WE HAVE THEM ALL
THROUGH OUT THE
COUNTY GIVE US A
CALL...From
$475/mo to
$1350/mo
Alexander
Real Estate, Inc.
Crystal River
352-795-6633 ph
352-795-6133 fx







FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


& 2 BEDROOM
APARTMENTS
SAvail. for Immed.
Occupancy.
CANDLEWOOD
COURT
APARTMENTS
& KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
Sforinf formation call
(352) 344-1010
S MON. thru FRI. I
I 9am - 4pm
Ask About our Move
1 In Specialsll I
1BR sec. dep. $150
I 1st mo. Rent $150. I
I 2BR sec. dep. $200
1st mo. Rent $200.
1 HUD Vouchers *
Accepted
I foreclosures
S Welcome
SEqual Housing Op

1 & 2 BEDROOMS
Call 352-257-8048 for
the move in special.

FLORAL CITY
2BR 1/2 BA, MHjust 150
yards from fishing dock,
$475. + $300 dep. Near
Floral City, 10 min. from
Inverness.
Trails End Camp
352-726-3699

GATEHOUSE
APARTMENTS
Now accepting
applications for 1,2 &
3 bdrms. Rent starting
at $462. Occasionally
handicap units
become available.
Pet friendly. Some
restrictions apply.
Background
screening.
For information call
352-726-6466,
9:00 am-4:00 pm
Mon. thru Fri.
Equal Housing
Opportunity

INVERNESS
2/2/2 in quiet south side
area, fl. rm., w/d, fenc'd.
yd. $825. (352)382-1373.

LECANTO
1 BR Apartment (352)
746-5238/613-6000


INGLIS VILLAS
Is now accepting
applications for our
1, 2, 3 BRApts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Cryd. Riv.
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: M,W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglis Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity


5 Act Now

PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad

THE HEDICK GROUP
Real Estate Services
Beverly Hills Area
Lynn Davis, Agent
352-422-2522
hedickgroup.net


We Have Rentals
Starting at $425/mo +
Many others LAND-
MARK
REALTY
352-726-9136
Kathy or Jane
311 W Main St. Inv


OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507



* 2nd MONTH FREE
SUMMERHILL AT
MEADOWCREST
Limited time! Call agent
for details. 352-563-5657
V us out zoomcitrus.com
Citrus Hills
2/2, patio W/D, pool, Unf.
No Dogs $699 (718)
833-3767
CITRUS HILLS
2/2, pool turn /unfum
(352) 613-5655
CITRUS HILLS
Home, Villa, Condo
GREENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-5921
(888) 446-5921
greenbriarrental.com



CITRUS SPRINGS
New, 2/2, all appl.
Wash/Dry. $600.-$625.
(954) 557-6211
INVERNESS 2/1/1
Lawn Maint, $550 mo
352-359-5241
LECANTO
2/1, cha, H20 inc.
$500/m 352- 382-1344


Lecanto
Newer 2/2, dsh/Wsh.
W/dry, H20 incl. No pets.
Lg.Yd. (352)628-2815



LECANTO
Lg.Modern camper
roof over, priv ac. incis
until $675. 352-621-4725

LOOK
AlVALUEINN.com
Hemando: New Renvt'd
Effic $45dly; $250wk.
Pool. Trails $185wk.
Homes 3bd - $450 wk.
352-726-4744




OLD HOMOSASSA
Lrg 1/1, Iv & fam rm,
scr prch, lots of stor-
age, newly remodl'd,
dock w/access to
gulf. $975 furnished,
incis all utils. or $800
unfurnished incis H20
& garbage lst/L/Sec.
352-628-2261

Get
Results in
the
home ront
classified!


BEVERLY HILLS 1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms.. .$475750/Io0.
CITRUS SPRINGS 2 & 3 Bedrooms.'.$600$1050/Imo,
INVERNESS 2 & 3 Bedrooms.............$450800/mo.
CITRUS HILLS 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms....$825-1050/mo.
PINE RIDGE 3 & 4 Bedrooms............$80041800/m0,
HERNANDO 1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms......... $475800/mo.
Check Out Our Website At
www.castrorealtvl com
Rental Inventory changes daily
Furnished rentals also available.
|See Our RentalAdIn The Real Estate News Magazine.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


*I^ChronJieu


"r









CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ACTIONM

352-795-7368
www.citruscohome
rental.com

NEED AN
AFFORDABLE
RENTAL?

HOMES
MOBILES
APARTMENTS

Featured Properties

BLACK DIAMOND
$1000.
CRYSTAL RIVER
$700.
HOMOSASSA
3/2. DW $725.
INVERNESS
2/2 Townhouse $650.
Call for information
OVER 40 TO CHOOSE
FROM.....CALL TODAY!

SUNSET VILLAS
Senior Community
Chiefland Fl.
Accepting
Applications for
1 & 2 BR APTS
Please Apply
M, W, F, 8am-12p
124 SW 14th Ave.
(352) 493-0220
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.

- I -


FURNISHED RENTALS
Crossland Realty
352-726-6644
NEW HOMES 3/2/2
1st, last, sec, & ref
$800 mo. (352) 302-3927
OLD HOMOSASSA
2/1/1, wsh./dry. Incl.
dishes & linnens. $850.
Mo. (352) 220-6371



BEVERLY HILLS
2/1,
$575/mo
F/S, No Pets
(352) 527-4347
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, scrn. larrai,
immediate occupancy
$650 mo + until. AC.
(732) 688-6054
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2/ + Bonus Rm.
$750 mo.(352) 212-5894
Beverly Hills
2Br poss 3 Br. C/H/A
First Month Free. $650
352-422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
4, Della St., 2/1, Fl. Rm
W/D, No pets/smoking
$500. mo. 352-422-6263
BEVERLY HILLS
Clean 2/2/2, near
school. Avail 5/1/09
$800 mo, w/purchase
options. (352) 726-7543
CITRUS HILLS
2/2/2, on Golf course
$750. mo.352-422-4298
CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 31212 , Near Sch.
$900mo 352-816-0010


CITRUS HILLS
PRESIDENTIAL
3/2/2 $850 mo.
(352) 212-5812
Citrus Springs
4/2/2, New, Split Plan,
Cath.ceilings,2,150sq. ft.
$900.Mo.352-341-1859
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 /2 on water, areas. Call
(352) 746-5092 or
(352) 563-9594 for appt.
HOMOSASSA
3/2 Split plan on 1 acre.
No pets. Close to town.
$600. Mo. Fst.lLst.
(352) 634-1764
HOMOSASSA
Beautiful, 3/2, 2,/2
Pool on 1 acre
Lease Ot .Flexible
Financing Imm. Occ
352-795-0088
INVERNESS 3/2/1. Gospel
Island area. On cul-de-sac
by lake. $850/mo,
Ist/last/sec. NO PETS.
352-860-2146.
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1/1,
$600/mo Ist/lst/Dep.
(352) 344-2560
SOUTHERN WOODS
4/3/2 Luxury executive
home on golf course,
great views, $1,300/Mo.
(813) 390-7109
Spacious 312/2
golf course/pool
One mo Free. $800.
908-322-6529

SUGARMILL
3/2/2 $900.
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $900.
(352) 400-0230
SUGARMILL
WOODS
3/2/2 Fla. rm.deck, new
appls. $850. Mo.
(352) 503-6794
SUGARMILL
WOODS
413/2, Wsh/Dr. $900 Mo.
Eddie (305) 608-9973




HOMOSASSA
2/2 with carport.
352-746-9400
Homosassa/Chass
2/1, CHA, washer. New
paint/carpet, no pets
$495. mo. 727-415-1805




INVERNESS
Highlands 2/1 Block
Home. Nice & quiet
$400, 1st, last, + sec.
deposit. Ask for Jim
(727) 542-0127




CITRUS Springs
4/2/2 Rent $900/mo.
F/L/S. Sale $130K
423-404-0903

INVERNESS
Highlands 3/2/1
totally remolded, new gran-
ite kit & Bath$850/mo rent
$#69K Own finances
avail(352) 726-2523


LOOK
AlVALUEINN.com
Hernando: New Renvt'd
Effi: $45daily; $250wk.
Pool. Trailers $185wk.
Homes 3bd - $450wk.
352-726-4744




OLD HOMOSASSA
1BR furn. cottage
$750 mo. /$200 wkly
(352) 795-0553

LOOK
AIVALUEINN.com
Hernando; New Renvt'd
Effic: $45 dly; $250 wk.
Pool. Trailers $185 wk.
Homes 3bd. - $450 wk.
352-726-4744




OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507





LOOK
AlVALUEINN.com
Hernando. New Renvt'd
Effic: $45 dly; $250 wk.
Pool. Trailer $185 wk.
Homes 3bd - $450 wk.
352-726-4744


- 3l stt


Richard (Rick)
Couch
Lic. Real Estate Broker


1045 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
Office: 352 344-8018
Cell: 352 212-3559
www.Rcouch.com

AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50
Ad indudes 20 lines of copy
w/ photo.

Crystal River
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
WaterlontBeauiful,mmpletely
renovated inside
and out,must see. Owner
financing. 300K
727-798-7077


Picture Perfect Homes
NEW HOMES STARTING
At S75 000 On Your Lot
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
LI.: i CBCC'O685



PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to
advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
discrimination.
"Familial status
includes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing
custody of children
under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.














100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
*Low income applicants can
quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or No credit
OKAY
*recent bankruptcy
OKAY*
CAII TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
'Credit and income
restriction apply*
Florida licensed mortgage
lender




, ,. *


Lu&a� : frtcaliros
0-l Ti M HuL.J',r
i _ '- * . ,




April 6 - April 12
Register to be one
of up to 2500
homeowners to
receive free
loan modification
representation and
negotiation
services. For details
visit the web site.
www.RealtyRight.com
Loan modification
provided as a service
of Realty Right, Inc.
Restrictions apply. See
web site for details




2 Great Commercial lo-
cations, $650 to
$850/mo Perfect for any
small business/ office etc.
Call Lisa 352-634-0129
Plantation Realty
BEVERLY HILLS 491
Great Loci 1500sf Spac.
Bus. Office/Home + 800sf
updated out bldg. Comm.
Easy Acess.Can live in.
$150K (352)795-6282
CRYSTAL RIVER -GREAT
LOCATION! Citrus Ave.
Remodeled. 1353sqff
w/security fence &
parking. Over V2acre.
Zone GNC. $250K. Call
Gary, 352-564-4228




2/2/1 CB,
Tile, New Carpet,
Newer Appl.Lg. shed,
Fen'cd back yd, Patio,
1,600 Sq. Ft. CHA
$68,900(561) 313-5308
(561) 313-5291

ATTENTION!!
BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
$37,900. Delivered
and Set, $0-Down
Land/Home $650. mo.
Repos Available
Kinder Mobile
Home
(352) 622-2460





RealtySelect
I Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Re(i)y lect

(352) 795-1555


FOR SALE BY OWNER
88 SJ Kellner, Bev. Hills
2/21/2/2, FP, OPEN HOUSE
on SUNDAYS
11A-3P $120K firm
(352) 746-6093



Crystal Oaks 3/2/2
For Sale
By Owner
Price Reduced
Split plan. Pool home
wlprivate back yard, on
cul de sac, move in con-
dition. Asking $170,000
(352) 746-7088



CANTERBURY LAKE ES-
TATES 4 bedroom, 2 bath.
2004 on small lake, commu-
nity pool
and rv/boat storage availa-
ble
$199,000 352-7261354
FOR SALE BY OWNER
2133 Brentwood
Circle. 3/2/2. $180,000.
352-527-1789




BRAND NEW
For Sale, 3/2 w/ alot
of upgrades
Beck St. Inverness
352-637-4138
Lic # CBS059685

Foreclosures
& Deals
Everywhere

CALL ME NOW!


Deb Infantine
EXIT REALTY
LEADERS
(352) 302-8046
OWNER FINANCING
3/2/2/ Pool & spa.
Village Green Gospel Is-
land, $60K below
market. 1800 sqft.
Purchase w/$13,700 dn.
$1050 mo. or no $$$
down w/620
credit.727-992-1372




Your World


a9=waseade


CIIN(():icI
Clasifiteds


wwchronlcleonllne.co


m
RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON

2.8% COMMISSION

Ri3a ySiect

(352) 795-1555


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI
Your SATISFACTION
Is Mv Futurell
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC

RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Rea-j elect

(352) 795-1555




3/2, DW % acre, excel
cond. Green Acres, Own
fin. avail $79,900
813-503-8594
3/2 + Office Home
Remod. W/fireplace,
on 1 acre, fenced. Large
oaks, workshop. No flood
zone $149,000
Owner/Broker.
(352) 634-1764




For Sale By Owner
Custom 3/2.5/2,
large lanai/summer kit
No Pool 2454 sf
cul de sac, $229,000
(352) 382-3322


$8000 Tax

Rebate
for first time home buy-
ers ,if you have not
owned a home in 3 years.
Call for info
Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
Kellers Williams Rlty




.Eb� " ....




$75,000
ON YOUR LOT
Includes all impact
fees. Several other
plans available.
Atkinson
Construction, Inc.
352-637-4138
www.atklnsonconstruct
onnc.co059685
Lic # CBC059685


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI

Your SATISFACTION
Is Mv Future!l

(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC


smCiiuon


Michele Rose
REALTOR
"Simply Put-
I'll-Work Harder"
352-212-5097
thorn@atlantic.net
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


VIC MCDONALD
(352) 637-6200









Realtor
My Goal is Satisfied
Customers

REALTY ONE
Outstanding Agents
Ontsuanding Resalts







For Sale' *
CITRONELLE 3 bed-
room, 2 bath. Mini Farms
2.5 Acres, Trailer, Water
with softener, septic. As
is $49,000.00.
813-695-0853


For Sale By Owner
3 BR, 2 BA, 2-car gar.,
Cement block, north
Dunnellon Low down,
EZ terms w/$3,500
down $575 mo.
(352) 726-9369


OWNER FINANCING
4/2/office, 2.5 ac, 2005
Doublewide
Like new. 1800sqft,
$9,700/dn, $882/mo. or
$23,700 down, $582/mo.
727-992-1372


Help you sail th=ll
yourBt


closing.oWF'

Fromt now' toIh
7/31109.'t'l^^^
All FqSBO Seller


SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009 E13







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E14 sUNDAYAPRIL 12 2 9


OWNER Financing
Handyman, 2/2, 1981
Dbwd, 1/3 acre, $40K,
below market, needs
mostly cosmetic repairs.
Purchase $4,472 dn &
$364 mo.
727-992-1372




4 Sale By Owner,
Crystal River 1 BR, 1BA,
completely
remodeled, heated comm.
pool, wd firs.
$74,600. (352)563-5844
FLORAL CITY
2/1, all appl. stay, plus a
shed & water access,
Move in cond., Reduced
to $49,995 (352)
746-0850
MARYVILLE, TN
Brick 3/2/2, fireplace
enclsd sunrm & deck, ft of
Smokies, low txs & maint.
$189,900 (865) 773-2232




312/2
Inverness, Fl.
Must See !!
Open Lakefront, Breath-
taking View,
on Lake Henderson.
538 San Remo
Circle. Vaulted
ceilings, oak floors, trav-
ertine counter tops.
Caged pool, spacious la-
nai, dock, & board-
walk.
$395,000
Barb Malz
(352) 212-2439
Keller Williams
Realty

FLORAL CITY
New 2/1, canal front,
large deck, dock.
Upgrades throughout.
$135k (352) 422-0294

FLORAL CITY. TWO
HOUSES ON ADJ.
LOTS, ONE PRICE!!
$215,000 Newly reno-
vated. CHA. Screened,
in ground pool. Dock,
seawall. For sale by
owner. 352 586 - 9498
HOMOSASSA
3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to
head spring. 163' wfrt,
dock/slip. Brand
new/unoccupied.
2 frpls, granite. $579K
727-808-5229

Inverness, FI.
Lake Henderson
3/2.5/2 on 1/2 acre.
Exclusive Beautiful
Home w/open water view,
on Private
Waterfront Peninsula.
Tile floors, travertine
countertops, dock, ga-
zebo.
$395,000
Must See II
1170 S. Estate Pt.
Barb Malz
(352) 212-2439
Keller Williams
Realty


LET OUR
OFFICE
GUIDE YOU!


Plantation Realty. Inc
(352) 795-0784
Cell 422-7925
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner
See all of the
listings in Citrus County
at
www.plantation
realtvinc.com

RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Rea-yelect

(352) 795-1555




INVESTORS NEEDS
Homes Any: Size, cond,
location, price, situation.
Over finac'd, dblwide
& mobile homes okay.
1-727-992-1372
Seeking 100+ acres of
pasture land for Cattle.
Will sign 6 mo-lyr lease.
352-669-2253
ask for Cindy



HOMOSASSA
1.2 acres, fenc'd, water,
elec., sewer, sprinkler sys.
(2) out bldgs. Deadend st.
$44K. 352-302-5775




Business/Home 3/2 Great
location on Trout Ave. Inver-
ness $165,000 . Rhema
Realty 228-1301




7 Rivers Golf & C.C.
priv. member owned.
corner lot 1 ac (mol)
$30K (813) 766-9354 or
sweetscapeauest@
verizn.net


Hollies more than seasonal decor

he Aquifoliaceae family con- 'i
tains 11 Species of holly na-
tive to Florida. According to . 4 , :.. ,
the famed, loveable, persnickety 4:-- -
plants man Gil Nelson in his 1994
book, "The W
Trees of
Florida," the ,,
family name r - -..
translates to -,' .
"trees with o . i -
needles on . - --.
their leaves." '
All hollies
have simple :.
alternate " . ' Ak
leaves on lit- Jane Weber ' ~~-, " R
tle stems that .-
have tiny stip- .. ,
ules where GARDEN . -".
they join the - - -
twigs. Pull off a leaf and study it . .. - ' . .
under a magnifying glass or micro- =- "-.: .-.
scope. ..... " , -
Gil says seven Florida hollies are ..' .-: . -
evergreen. Four deciduous species . ._ -
lose their leaves in winter. There -
are many hybrids and selected cul- - -z
tivars available in pots. About 400
species of holly trees and shrubs .
circle the world in Africa, Asia, Eu- .

hundred fifty, including all the
Florida species, are in the wide-
spread Ilex genus. Generally, one
species does not cross breed with . .--.
another. ' 4:
The 35-foot-tall evergreen tree -. ;f.%
American Holly, I. Opaca, and the -.-
smaller wetland Dahoon Holly, I. -
Cassine, do manage to pollinate ..
each other upon occasion. The re- .- *~
suiting variable hybrids may have "
attractive characteristics. Hybrid
seeds are often sterile and would _ - -
not produce identical seedlings. ".
Sixteen of these crossbreeds are '",
commonly cloned by growers for the' -- '
nursery trade. All these cold-hardy,
drought-tolerant trees are labeled
"Ilex x attenuata" and then have a -
cultivar name such as "Eagleson" .
(from the Mississippi/Alabama re-
gion) or "Fosteri" or "Foster's
Holly" (originally from Alabama), ::
"Savannah" (Georgia), and the pop-
ular "East Palatka" (Florida).
The first wild "East Palatka" holly
was discovered in 1927 near Palatka . ' .~ .
on the banks of the St. Johns River.
Cuttings of that particular plant are I ... .
still cloned and rooted today. If cut- ..
tings are grafted on a different, ...
more frost-hardy or vigorous holly - .
rootstock, they may grow faster. Do JANE WEBER/For the Chronicle
not let vigorous suckers from the With 11 holly species native to Florida, homeowners should be able to find one that suits their land-
See JANE/Page E15 scaping needs.


E14S ,- R








Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009 E15


JANE
Continued from Page E14

rootstock take over from the
desired hybrid.
Ilex hollies have tiny,
white male or female flowers
on separate dioecious plants.
Females need male pollen to
be fertilized. Females de-
velop fruit containing four or
five seeds. Males never have
fruit Pollinators include in-
sects, such as beetles, bees
and butterflies; birds; small
mammals and reptiles; as
well as the wind. Florida hol-
lies flower from April to June
depending on latitude and
time after the last frost
Unwittingly pruning male


plants too early lops off male
flowers and pollen so
"Schellings" Holly, Ilex vom-
itoria, may never have
blooms. That explains why
female "Weeping Yaupon,"
also a selected cultivar of the
same species and probably
originating in Texas, has a
poor crop of fruit The devel-
oping berry-like fruit, called
drupes, are green, ripening
to red as winter approaches.
This important food source
is a favorite of small mam-
mals, wildlife and resident
and migratory birds such as
American robins, mocking-
birds, cedar waxwings and
other fruit eaters.
Dr. Schellings first discov-
ered his compact, dense
sport in the 1930s in


CAROLYN LISTER i
A- -Multi-Million Dollar Realtor "
Scell: 422-4620 KE
EIS.. Office: 382-1700 "
View virtual tours @ www.listerlistings.com


V4 ..4_




3 CAR GARAGE AND MORE! JUST REDUCED! 2 BR, 2 BA
3/2/2 w/family room, Florida Cypress Run condo w/screened
room & screened porch. balcony & all appliances. Nicely
Fireplace, hot tub, workbench, decorated in neutral colors,
carpeted garage, pool table, ceramic tile & Berber carpet.
eat-in kitchen, newer Master tub + shower, breakfast
appliances, new tile, glass front bar. Swimming pool on
door & cathedral ceilings, grounds. Furniture negotiable.
#319747 $187,000 #320741 $125,000


ri S I I


Louisiana. The millions of
clones vegetatively culti-
vated from it are identical.
Purists in the Association of
Florida Native Nurseries,
www.afnn.org, consider this
particular cultivar a non-na-
tive, although a very similar
Panhandle Grower selec-
tion, I.v"South Harbor,"
with excellent salt and
shade tolerance, hales from
Little Sabine Bay on Pen-


sacola Beach, so it is consid-
ered native. Enjoy Florida's
hollies in the garden.


Jane Weber is a profes-
sional gardener and nurs-
ery owner She welcomes
weekend visitors to her
Florida Friendly Yard and
Wildlife Habitat at 5019 W.
Stargazer Lane, Dunnellon.
Call (352) 465-0649.


George E L Heureux, Broker 09 "
CURB '' E .'';,I"' ' L e i H, iorrms. FL (352) 637 - CURB (2872)
APPEAL www.curbappealcitrus.com '.mEh cuinscountyli. an aFlcla)
naE..A--V First Time Burers) Up to 18.000 in Cashi Call Today.
5913 ROSEWOOD DR.
3/3/3 with oversized detached 2 car
garage and custom pool. This
home is truly a cut above the rest.
Call Today! $447,500.
*B CAT SS ROOSEVUELT T .ATIm _N S914 LN.
Se i , *. SEWOODDR
h... -s I OT. :h.:i .,i l : rh1 I ' . .
a cover tis home will need some work but ..
prcd acordingly. See this Home today! $37,500 :I .... ,i,. I�i ..n ., 19,000


781877


Prudential Florida Showcase Properties


CITRUS HILLS OFFICE


PINE RTDGE OFFICE


20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. 4�1 1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Hernando, FL 34442 Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 746-0744 COSED EASTER (352) 527-1820
1-888-222-0856 SUNDAY 1-888-553-2223


LENDER


Citrus County's Best Priced Home....
BEAUTIFUL LANDSCAPED
3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car gar, 1985 Sq. Ft.


C 'ITRUS License # RB0033452 r
CITDER .. 352-527-8764
BUILDER
ULUSAVE THOUSANDS

VISIT OUR WEBSIME: www.cirusbuildeonline.com


'o'er


I I ,~


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7818E


SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2009 E15


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NK1






CnIus CoUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE 1


E18 s m APRIL 12 2009


G A L E 1 cup all-purpose flour
FRUGAL 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
Continued from Page Ell a 1/2 teaspoon salt


time, and my family doesn't even no-
tice! -PattyA, Utah
SELF-RISING FLOUR: I no longer
buy it!


Makes 1 cup. -Brenda, New York
CHUNKY SAUCE: I shred carrots
into spaghetti, and they double the
bulkiness of it, making it seem
meatier -Kathryn, Louisiana


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal Vil-
lage (www.frugalvillage.com), a Web
site that offers money-saving strate-
gies for everyday living. Write to her
c/o United Media, 200 Madison Ave.,
4th Floor, New York, NY 10016, or
e-mail sara@frugalvillage.com.


^4te~xacciie
REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
office: (352) 795-6633


FOS ROVE MANY PLANS AVAILABLE
* Open Monday-Friday 8am-4pm
s D W a^ After Hours & Saturday By Appointment Only
Call today for more information
3. 1 352-637-3912
5134 Many FW r Plan to Chbooe From CBC5752 www.homesbycosy.com
. *prices subject to change

11145 W. Bentbow Path, Crystal River, FL 34428
U.S. Hwy. 19, 2 miles north of the Crystal River Mall


HOMOSASSA, Wil.t Etn rsai Oneam.
160 Acres In Wildfe Management Area,
IELLON 2 Bedroom, 1.5 Bath 2000 S/ Secuded, 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Home & Huge
I On 2.5 Acres. Front Porch WI Handicap Screened Porch For Watching Al The Critters
Rear Porch Is 10 X 17 W/Handicap Walk By. Al Self Relant Utities SolarPhoto
SWasher/Dryer, Microwave, Dishwaher. Cel Panels/Generator & Batteries For Electric,
#327710 $69,900 Wel & Septic #332070 $975,000



INTO - ONe Oi A Kmr VI V Berms 3 LECANTO - H1s OI Avalon WonaerItl
2 Kitchens, 2 Living Rms. 2 Ding Home W3 Bedrooms 2 Baths, Inside
2 Screened Porches, SolariunFanly Landry. Formal Diing. Upgrade Appaes,
Heat Pumps, A On 1+Acre. WelAnd French Door Frig WBottom Drawer Freezer.
Shed And Fencing, Center Of County. Gass Top Stoe. Dishasher, 2 Car Garage,
S70 252.000 &Shed. #330419 $149900


1kp


C&Ci


FIAQ APRIL 12, 2vvI


-PRICE REDUCEM. LIMITED TIME OFFER!,


I, -