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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01602
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: April 7, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01602

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35 PAGE A4
APRIL 7, 2009


L. N...


Chase turns deadly


CATHY KAPULKA/Chronicle
Michael L. Wolff, 48, shot at a Citrus County Sheriff's deputy during a chase Monday morning that began at a home in South Dunnellon and
ended in Marion County. The deputy driving the car was able to avoid the bullet, which went through the windshield and grazed the seat's
headrest. Wolff was later shot and killed by a pair of Citrus County Sheriff's deputies.

Cruisers, school bus shot before pair of deputies kill 48-year-old suspect


CRUSTY LOFTS
cliftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
A Citrus County deputy shot and killed a
fleeing 48-year-old man Monday in Marion
County, who earlier had shot at law enforce-
ment officers and into a school bus.
Michael L. Wolff, of South Dunnellon, was
pronounced dead after he was flown to Shands
Hospital in Gainesville.
No one else was injured, according to Citrus
County Sheriff's spokeswoman Gail Tierney
The incident began when the Citrus sheriff's
office received a call about a domestic dispute
at 5:47 a.m. Monday from a home in South Dun-
nellon.
When deputies arrived, Wolff was leaving
the house and began firing shots with an auto-
matic handgun.
A car chase ensued and went on for about an
hour as he drove west on County Road 488, al-
most to U.S. 19 near Crystal River, then back
into Citrus Springs and eventually onto County
Road 39. Along the way, Wolff zigzagged
through Citrus Springs neighborhoods, Tier-
ney said.
Wolff then headed into Marion County on
State Road 200 and finally onto County Road
484.
Throughout the chase, Wolff fired shots at
authorities. Speeds ranged from 60 to 65 mph
through most of the chase, but occasionally
went faster than 100.
At one point, Wolff shot into a Marion County
public school bus, narrowly missing the driver
He shot again into the bus near seats where
students usually sit
"If there had been kids on that bus they


STORY HIGHLIGHTS
* A 48-year-old Dunnellon man was shot
and killed by a Citrus County Sheriff's
Office deputy after he fled from. author-
ities - shooting at law enforcement of-
ficers and a school bus
during the chase.
* No one was injured in
the hour-long pursuit
that led from Citrus
Springs to Marion
County.
8 The Florida Depart.
Michael ment of Law Enforce-
L. Wolff ment is investigating
was shot and what happened.
killed by two
sheriff's This is the second per-
deputies. son killed in the past
month by Citrus County
deputies. A preliminary FDLE report
found that the deputy, who shot and
killed a man in Crystal River on March
23, used appropriate force.

would have been injured or killed," Citrus
County Sheriff Jeff Dawsy said.
Dawsy, who said he was up early this morn-
ing, participated in the chase and was at the
back of the pursuit
"The deputies did a phenomenal job,"
Dawsy said.
Wolff shot directly into the windshield of a
Citrus County deputy. The bullet missed the
deputy and grazed the headrest of his seat
Spiked stop sticks were placed in the road
twice to puncture the truck's tires. The first at-
tempt destroyed two of the tires, the second at-


tempt got the other two.
The chase ended on C.R. 484 about a,quaiter
of a mile west of Interstate 75, near the com-
munity of Marion Oaks.
Wolff was inside his blue Dodge Ram when
he was shot The truck had bullet holes on the
back and sides of the vehicle and the back win-
dow was shot out
The Citrus County Sheriff's Office, Dunnel-
lon Police Department, Florida Highway Pa-
trol and Marion County Sheriff's Office were
involved in the pursuit
Marion County School District bus driver
Frelda Harris had been on her way to pick up
elementary schoolchildren when the shooting
happened. She was OK after the incident and
later returned to work, said Kevin Christian,
Marion County school board spokesman.
County Road 484 was closed in the area of
the death for about five hours.
The Florida Department of Law Enforce-
ment will investigate law enforcement actions
in the death. FDLE spokeswoman Kristen
Perezluha said these types of investigations
usually take about 30 days.
Wolfflegally changed his name from Michael
Rash sometime in the past, Tierney said.
According to the sheriff's office, Wolff has a
history of arrests for the offenses of battery, lar-
ceny and resisting a law enforcement officer in
South Florida. He also had a battery and vio-
lation of probation arrest in Citrus County.
According to the Florida Department of Cor-
rections Web site, Wolff has not served time in
prison. A reporter was unable to confirm con-
victions for any of Wolff's other arrests Monday
afternoon.
According to standard operating procedure,
the two Citrus deputies involved in Wolff's
See CHASE/Page A4


Rate hike


on hold
Droves of furious and dis-
heartened residents Monday
showed up at the Citrus
County Water and Wastewater
Authority's meeting to hear
the verdict regarding the
Meadows rate case.

The Issue:
J County staff made the rec-
ommendation to the water
regulators to approve new
utility rates for Meadows Util-
ity Company Inc. customers.
If approved, the water and
sewer rates, which are the
second highest in the county,
for residents in the approxi-
mate 144-home Homosassa
community would double,
even triple and become the
highest in Citrus County. The
rate increases are the result
of capital improvements to
the sewer and water system.
The Discussion:
For more than four hours,
the five-member.water au-
thority board heard from
dozens of speakers, including
their hired consultants, the
utility company owners and
residents. Paul LaFond,
owner of Meadows Utility,
said his company's survival
depended on the money and
that he was forced by the
state and county to make the
capital improvements. The
residents said the rate in-
creases would have a detri-
mental effect on their already
critical financial situations
and questioned LaFond's
business practices.

The Decision:
The water regulators voted
4 to 1 to continue the rate
case hearing next month and
gave direction to Charles
Howard, utilities regulation
operations director, to negoti-
ate a new contract with the
existing consultant The con-
sultants will now analyze
Meadows Utility's operations
and determine why its rates
are higher than most in the
county, if the business' ex-
penses are practical and if
possible, where money could
be saved; the contract will not
exceed $5,000 and will be
paid by the water and waste-
water authority.
- Complied by
Keri Lynn McHale


Official targets Defense Department's budget


Gates pitches


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The nation
should stop pouring billions into
futuristic, super-expensive F-22
jet fighters, pull the plug on new
presidential helicopters and put
the money into systems U.S. sol-
diers can use against actual foes,


big cuts for F-22,


Defense Secretary Robert Gates
declared Monday.
Major overhaul plans laid out
by the Obama administration's
Pentagon chief would slash sev-
eral giant weapons programs -
and thousands of civilian jobs
that go with them. With recession
unemployment rising, Congress


may balk at many of the cuts in
Gates' proposed $534 billion
budget for the coming year
Still, despite all the talk of cuts,
the total figure would rise from
$513 billion for 2009, and Gates
spoke of using money more
wisely, not asking for less.
Gates, a holdover from the
Bush administration, said he is
gearing Pentagon buying plans to
the smaller, lower-tech battle-
fields the military is facing now
See BUDGET/Page A2


Defense Secre-
tary Robert
Gates, left,
accompanied
by Joint Chiefs
Vice Chairman
Gen. James
Cartwright,
takes part In a
news conference
Monday at the
Pentagon.
Associated Press


Annie's Mailbox ..........C8
Comics ..................... C9
Crossword ....................C8
Editorial ............. .......A8
Horoscope ......................C8
Lottery Numbers ............ B4
M ovies ............................ C9
Obituaries ...................... A5
Stocks ............................A6


Talking in Turkey
President Obama is in Turkey
for meetings./Page AO10


Women rule roost at CMAs
Carrie Underwood nabs elusive award in country circles./Page B6,,

Fat children i in 5 preschoolers is obese./R A5

Delayed Murder trial postponed until May./Page A3

Wall Street After a week of gains, market retreats./Page A6 '


Sooner
High-tech image of
heart can spot disease
before it's felt.'Page C1



6 1iIII I W11III,


other big weaponsprograms


Im m�. .


Ar AMIMLjr















Manufacturers BUDGET
Continued from Page Al


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - The
end of a fighter jet built for
the Cold War and cancella-
tion of a new fleet of presi-
dential helicopters sparked
concerns of job cuts at Lock-
heed Martin Corp. and its
partners - but did not ap-
pear to shake Wall Street's
confidence in defense
stocks.
Defense Secretary
Robert Gates said Monday
the Pentagon will end the F-
22 fighter jet and White
House helicopter programs
run by Lockheed, but would
increase production of the
company's Joint Strike
Fighter
Job and other budget fig-
ures released by Gates
sought to assuage fears of
deep cuts at the nation's
largest defense contractor
and its suppliers, helping
Lockheed shares to rise
nearly 9 percent
Gates recommended
more than doubling the
number of Joint Strike
Fighters to 30 in the upcom-
ing budget, which would in-
crease funding to $11.2
billion from $6.8 billion.
According to the Penta-
gon, there already are
38,000 employees working
on the next-generation
stealth fighter jet, known as
the F-35. That number is an-
ticipated to jump to 82,000
in fiscal 2011.
Still, Bethesda, Md.-based
Lockheed has said almost
95,000 jobs - mostly in Cal-
ifornia, Texas, Georgia and
Connecticut - could be at
risk if the Pentagon didn't


buy more F-22 jets.
Gates offered a very dif-
ferent employment picture,
saying the number of direct
jobs would fall to 13,000 in
fiscal 2011 from 24,000 this
year
JSA Research Inc. analyst
Paul Nisbet said the dispar-
ity of F-22 and Joint Strike
Fighter job figures ap-
peared to "surprise a few
people" and was enough to
offset Lockheed losing two
major programs.
Military analysts widely
expected the radar-evading
supersonic F-22 jet - con-
sidered an outdated
weapon system - would not
go beyond the 187 already
planned. The planes cost
$140 million each.
Lockheed said it's assess-
ing the impact of Gates' de-
cision on several defense
programs.
Most of the F-22's are
being built in Marietta, Ga.
and Fort Worth, Texas. Boe-
ing Co. manufactures the
wings and other parts in
Seattle. The engines are
supplied by Pratt & Whit-
ney, a United Technologies
Corp. unit, in Middletown,
Conn.
Plans to buy a new fleet of
White House helicopters
also were among the pro-
grams terminated by Gates.
With a price tag of $13 bil-
lion and a six-year delay, the
helicopters were consid-
ered at risk to be cut in the
2010 budget
Obama has said he would
closely examine the pro-
gram, noting that his cur-
rent ride seemed "perfectly
adequate."


Fernando Bueno, MD is no longer associated
with Citrus Gastroenterology, PA. All records of
patients treated by Dr. Bueno will remain at the
main office at 3653 E. Forest Drive, Inverness, FL.

Nbu are welcomed to continue your
gastrointestinal care with
Dr. Johannes Martensson, MD.

For an appointment please call (352) 344-8080.


raise concerns


about F-22 cuts


:.. :. - .
)'-e ' z'*


PIGMENT LESIONS




I Before


POTENTIAL LOSERS
* Boeing would not make any more C-17 cargo planes
and saw its missile defense plans pared back as
Gates seeks to trim $1.4 billion from the overall mis-
sile shield program.
* Lockheed Martin would stop at 187 F-22 fighter jets
priced at $140 million each.
* Northrop Grumman and General Dynamics would not
make more than three of the new DDG-1000 destroy-
ers for the Navy.
* Programs in development also would be scrapped,
like plans to build a new search-and-rescue helicopter
sought by Boeing, Lockheed and United Technologies
Corp. Lockheed and Boeing's competition for the $26
billion transformational satellite, known as TSAT, also
will be ended.
POTENTIAL GAINS
* Boeing and Northrop again having the chance to bid
on the long-delayed $35 billion Air Force refueling
plane contract, which Gates wants to reopen this
summer.
* Helicopter makers like SiVorrsly getting a chance to
build the new Marine One presidential helicopter if
Lockheed loses it.
* The Army still needs the tanks and armored vehicles
General Dynamics makes for the service's Future
Combat Systems program.


and expects in coming years.
He also said he hopes law-
makers will resist temptations
to save outdated system that
keep defense plants humming
in their home districts.
The Pentagon, he said,
wants to move away from both
outdated weapons systems
conceived in the Cold War and
futuristic programs aimed at
super-sophisticated foes.
Gates said he would expand
spending on equipment that
targets insurgents, such as $2
billion more on surveillance
and reconnaissance equip-
ment That would include
funding for 50 new Predator
drones such as those that have
rained down missiles on mili-
tants hiding along the
Afghanistan-Pakistan border.
"We must rebalance this de-
partment's programs in order
to institutionalize and finance
our capabilities to fight the
wars we are in today and the
scenarios we are most likely to
face in the years ahead," he
said.
Major programs facing cuts
include the F-22 Raptor, the
military's most expensive
fighter plane at $140 million
apiece. An action movie come
to life, sleek, fast and nearly
invisible, the Raptor is ill-
suited to deterring roadside
bombs in Iraq or hunting in-
surgents who vanish into the
Afghan mountains.
Gates says the Pentagon
won't continue the F-22 pro-


would be reduced, too, as
would plans to build a shield
of missile interceptors to de-
fend against attacks by rogue
countries. The Navy would re-
vamp plans to buy new de-
stroyers.
A new communications
satellite would be scrapped,
and a program for a new Air
Force transport plane would
be ended.
Congress reacted cau-
tiously.
Large defense contractors
and their supporters on Capi-
tol Hill scrambled to assess
how the changes would affect


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CrrRUS COUN'IY (FL) CHRONICLE

them. Gates had demanded
total secrecy during weeks of
Pentagon discussions, even
requiring senior military offi-
cers to swear in writing that
they would not talk out of
school.
Rep. John Murtha, D-Pa.,
chairman of the House Ap-
propriations Defense Sub-
committee, called the
proposals an important and
overdue attempt to balance
want and need at the Defense
Department
"However, the committee
will carefully review the de-
partment's recommendations
in the context of current and
future threats when we re-
ceive the detailed fiscal year
2010 budget request," Murtha
said.
Some programs would
grow
Gates proposed speeding
up production of the F-35
fighter jet That program
could end up costing $1 tril-
lion to manufacture and main-
tain 2,443 planes. The military
would buy more speedy ships
that can operate close in to
land. And more money would
be spent outfitting special
forces troops who can hunt
down insurgents.
The recommendations are
the product of Gates' frustra-
tion at weapons systems that
take on lives of their own,
even when their missions are
no longer relevant or costs
balloon. The frustration ex-
tends to military services and
defense contractors accus-
tomed to measuring success
by how big a piece of the
budget pie they can claim.


gram beyond 187 planes al-
ready planned. Bethesda, Md.-
based Lockheed, the nation's
largest defense contractor, has
said almost 95,000 jobs could
be at stake.
Gates also said no to a new
fleet of Marine One presiden-
tial helicopters--with a price
tag of $13 billion, more than
double the original budget He
said new helicopters would be
needed at some point but he
wants time to figure out a bet-
ter solution.
A $160 billion Army system
of combat vehicles, flying sen-
sors and bomb-hunting robots


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Page A3 -&TUESDAY, APRIL 7,2009



TATE&


SOCIAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Judge relates murder trial


Defendant to

return to court

in May

SHEMIR WILES
swiles@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Judge Richard "Ric" Howard
postponed a 35-year-old Crystal
River man's murder trial until
May on Monday, allowing the at-
torneys more time to prepare.
Gianni Spagnolo is charged
with third-degree murder and
child abuse.
Spagnolo was arrested in April
2008. According to records, Spag-
nolo was playing with his girl-
friend's 1-year-old when he threw


the baby into the air, caus-
ing the baby to hit the ceil-
ing and then fall to a
concrete floor, hitting fur-
niture along the way.
Spagnolo reportedly
waited about an hour for
the boy's mother to come
home, and then another Gil
hour before taking the Spas
baby to receive help. faces
The baby boy suffered se- of third
vere head trauma, an in- mur
jury to his brain stem and child's
massive retinal hemorrhag-
ing. He was flown to a hospital and
died a day later from his injuries.
Spagnolo's trial was scheduled
to begin April 13 with jury selec-
tion, but Howard ruled for the
trial to be continued. Spagnolo
will return to court May 18 for a
pre-trial hearing. His trial was
reset to start the week of May 26.


a
g
ci
d-
d
s (


Also in court:
* Howard ordered a 25-
year-old Inverness man
. 10 Monday to return to court
April 13, when jury selec-
i tion is set to begin in his
trial.
Matthew Bennett faces
nni charges ofDUI manslaugh-
'nolo ter, vehicular homicide,
charges DUI with serious bodily in-
degree jury and reckless driving
er in causing serious bodily in-
death. jury The charges stem from
a Sept 27,2006, car crash.
According to a Florida Highway
Patrol report, Bennett was driving
a 2005 Toyota Scion at about 2:30
a.m. on South Highlands Avenue
in Inverness. He had two passen-
gers in the car, the report states. At
some point, Bennett lost control of
the vehicle and began to spin on
the roadway. The car then entered


the road's west shoulder
and collided with several
trees before flipping over.
Passenger Andrew M.
Macrina, 26, died at the
scene of the crash and the
other passenger, Paul L. "
Liscum, 24, received seri-
ous injuries. Mat.
After an analysis of Ben- Ben
nett's blood, the test found slated
there were traces of mari- next w
juana in Bennett's system. DUI-r
He also had a blood alco- chain
hol concentration of 0.06
percent, which is slightly below
the state's legal limit of 0.08 per-
cent, according to the toxicology
report from the Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement.
However, a process called retro-
grade extrapolation has been
used in the case to try to estimate
Bennett's BAC at the time of the


crash. Bennett's blood was
drawn three hours after
the accident due to cir-
cumstances that pre-
vented medical personnel
from finding a vein to
draw blood from, Assistant
State Attorney Bill Catto
thew said.
nett Bennett's attorney,
for trial Daniel Snow, attempted to
eek on have Bennett's case con-
elated tinued, but Howard in-
ges. formed Snow that if there
were any loose ends, to
work through the holiday to finish
preparing for trial.
"We're going to get this trial
done," Howard said.
Jury selection for the trial is set
to begin at 8:30 a.m. in Howard's
courtroom on the second floor of
the Citrus County Courthouse in
Inverness.


Stormy weather


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Boaters on Monday morning slowly make their way across King's Bay as an unusually strong cold front pushes through the area bringing heavy winds, rain and unseason-
ably cold temperatures to the region. Temperatures tonight into Wednesday morning are forecast to dip into the upper 30s and lower 40s across Citrus County. Highs for
the week are expected to be in the mid 60s to low 70s until the weekend, when warmer weather is expected to return.


AroundTH E STATE


Citrus County

Boil water issued for
Hernando road
Citrus County Utilities is-
sued a precautionary boil
water notice for East Hartford
Street in Hernando.
All water used for consump-
tion and cooking purposes
should be roll boiled until fur-
ther notice.
Call 527-7650 for additional
information.
Landfill closes
early Good Friday
The Citrus County Central
Landfill will close at 2:30 p.m.
on Friday, April 10, in obser-
vance of Good Friday.
For information on landfill
hours, call 527-7672 during
office hours our go to the
county's Web site at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us. Click on
Departments, then Public
Works, then Solid Waste.
* The Citrus County
Chronicle Business offices will
be closed Friday.
Fire Service reports 28
illegal burns last week
The Citrus County Fire
Rescue Service said there
were 28 illegal burns reported
during the week of March 29
to April 4.
County fire officials have
been urging all residents to
abide by the burn ban be-
cause of the extreme danger
of wildfires due to the extraor-
dinarily dry conditions.
Citrus Fire Chief Larry
Morabito said occasional rain
in various parts of the county
have had little effect on the
dry conditions, as the dead
vegetation dries out again
very quickly.
There have been 421 illegal
bums reported since the bum
ban was put into effect by the
county commission on Jan. 9.
Illegal burns of yard and
household trash are one of
the prime causes of brush
fires, and this is the driest time
of the year, making the land-
scape very susceptible to
wildfires.
There were six brush fires
in the week of March 29 to
April 4. There have been 92


brush fires since the burn ban
was put into effect on Jan. 9.
The only outdoor burning
allowed is in a barbecue appli-
ance designed to contain the
cooking fire. A citation for ille-
gal burning can result in up to
a $500 fine and 60 days in jail.

Everglades

Panther tracking
program cut in park
State wildlife officials say
they will cut part of a program
that tracks endangered
Florida panthers with GPS-
equipped collars.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission says panther tracking
has been suspended in Ever-
glades National Park, at least
for this year. Officials had
planned to put new radio col-
lars on the cats there. The
agency says sending officials
to track cats in the park just
costs too much money right
now.
They say the cut won't
jeopardize their overall pro-
gram, which continues
throughout the rest of south-
west Florida.
Since the 1980s, officials
have collared panthers to
track their population, be-
lieved to be about 100 cats
now, up from just 30 two
decades ago.
Panthers were placed on
the endangered species list in
1967.

Miami

Officials believe
boater's body found
Authorities found what they
believe is the body of a miss-
ing boater Monday and con-
tinued to search for his
8-year-old daughter.
Miami-Dade Police said
Phil Burke, 49, and his daugh-
ter, Tara Ann Burke, left the
Black Point Marina in south
Miami-Dade County on Sun-
day afternoon in a 17-foot Key
West boat. When the pair did-
n't return later that evening,
family members called author-
ities.
The Coast Guard launched
a search early Monday morn-


ing. A state officer found the
boat near mangroves on the
shore about four miles north
of the marina; the motor was
in the off position and there
was no evidence of a collision.
At 1 p.m., a boater discov-
ered a body in the water and
alerted authorities. Lt. Eddy
Ballester of Miami-Dade Fire
Rescue said the body "fits the
description" of the missing
man.

Mayport

10 nations to send
ships to regional meet
Ships from 10 nations are
getting together at Mayport
Naval Station for a two-week
event designed to help the re-
gion's Navies work together.
Ships are coming to Unitas,
which is Latin for unity, from
Argentina, Brazil, Canada,
Chile, Colombia, Ecuador,
France, Germany, Mexico and
Peru for the event beginning
April 20.
Much of the work of the
U.S. Navy with the other gov-
emments is looking for drug
smugglers and searching for
pirates.
This is the 50th year the
event has been held. It is
being hosted this year by the
4th Fleet, which is based at
Mayport.
-From staff and wire reports

Correction
A note about area food pro-
grams on Page A13 of Mon-
day's edition contained errors.
* Sign-up for Angel Food
Ministries is from 9:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. and 5 to 7 p.m.
Wednesday, April 8, and 9:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday,
April 11, at First Baptist
Church of Inverness. Call the
church at 726-1252 or Marti
Consuegri at 344-8843.
* Sign-up for Nature Coast
Ministries is from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Wednesday, April 8; 1 to
7 p.m. Thursday, April 9; and
9 a.m. to noon Friday, April
10. Orders are taken at the
Depot, 109 Crystal St., Crystal
River, phone 795-4046.
The Chronicle regrets the
errors.


ft �.


CATHY KAPULKAIPioneer
Curt Fennema drives the Citrus County Bus south on U.S. 41 headed to the Citrus
County Auditorium on its new route between Central Ridge and Inverness. Carol
Johnson, 84, reflected in the mirror, said she wanted to take a ride on the fixed
route to see where it would take her. "I've been waiting for this," Johnson said,
explaining that she has been a resident of Inverness since 1980. "I've been talk-
ing it (the new bus) up, and I'd recommend it. I want people to ride because I
want it to be a success."





Traffic stop leads to arrest


SHEMIR WILES
swiles@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Police arrested a 20-year-old Inverness
man Sunday after a routine traffic stop
yielded driving-under-the-influence, grand
theft and various other charges.
According to a Citrus County
Sheriff's Office report, a deputy
spotted a yellow and black Jeep
traveling west on Gospel Island |
Road with no rear lights or a tag. , <
After pulling over the vehicle, the L
deputy reportedly spoke with the -
driver, Nathan S. Ruska, of 508
Zephyr St. The deputy noted in the
report he couldn't make out any- Nat
thing Ruska was saying, concluding Ru.
that was due to Ruska being intoxi- arrested
cated. traffic
The deputy reportedly asked Sur
Ruska if he had been drinking and
Ruska mumbled, "Yes." Not being able to
receive any clear information about the
Jeep, the deputy placed Ruska in the back
of his patrol car and ran the vehicle identi-
fication number. According to the report, it
was determined the Jeep was stolen from


Citrus Collision in Inverness.
The deputy went to speak with Ruska
again, but Ruska had reportedly passed out
in the back seat of the patrol car. The
deputy woke Ruska, handcuffed him and
advised him he was under arrest, the report
states.
After getting Ruska's name, the deputy
learned that Ruska's driver's li-
cense was suspended in September
2008 for DUL. The deputy also wrote
in the report that Ruska was too in-
' toxicated to perform any field so-
- briety tasks.
- After being transported to the Cit-
, rus County Detention Facility,
Ruska reportedly refused to submit
han to a breath test. The deputy also
ska noted that Ruska has numerous
I during burglary and theft charges and that
stop he refused to speak to police about
day. this alleged incident
Ruska was charged with DUI,
driving with a suspended/revoked license,
refusal to submit to an approved chemi-
cal/physical test for alcohol, burglary of an
unoccupied structure and grand theft of a
vehicle.
His bond was set at $18,500.


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A4 Ttuis'DAY, Al'Rll. 7, 2009


1 )


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1L~;~ 'iii


;1


CATHY KAPULKA/Chronicle
Citrus County Sheriff Jeff Dawsy approaches reporters Monday morning in Marion County after a Citrus deputy shot and
killed Michael L. Wolff, 48. Wolff had fled authorities, shooting at law enforcement officers and into a school bus.


CHASE
Continued from Page Al

death have been placed on
administrative leave without
loss of pay
Deputy Juan Berrios, 32,
joined the Sheriff's Office as
a road patrol deputy in Feb-
ruary 2006.
Sgt Ryan Glaze, 33, was
hired in July 2000 as a road
patrol deputy. He joined the
agency's K-9 Unit in April
2002, and became team
leader in October 2007, with
the rank of corporal. Glaze
was promoted to a road pa-
trol sergeant in January 2008
and was named the Toughest
Competitor - better known
as Top Cop - at the 2008
Florida Law Enforcement
Games.
This is the second time a
Citrus deputy has shot and
killed someone in the past
month. On March 23, Do-


* ,, "~lr~~ l~*J~?,..�.


The Dodge Ram 48-year-old Michael Wolff drove during a
police chase Monday had bullet holes throughout the body
of the truck. The back window was also shot out and all
the tires were flattened or destroyed.


minic Giacobbe, 26, was shot
and killed in Crystal River
after he stabbed a police dog
and charged at deputies.
A preliminary report from
FDLE found Deputy Todd
Cridland used appropriate
force in the incident, Dawsy
said.
A full report is not yet
available.
The K-9 dog, Mito, is recov-


ering from the attack.
Citrus County has had two
other officer-involved shoot-
ings in the past 10 years.
* In 2002, Yukio Aijalon
Allen, 21, of Inverness, was
killed when authorities say
Allen left an Inverness house
he had been holed up in, then
pointed one of two handguns
he had at sheriff's deputy.
Allen was told to drop the gun


several times before the
deputy shot and killed him in
front of the home.
It was later determined
that Allen had toy guns.
FDLE determined excessive
force was not used.
E In 1999 an Inverness Po-
lice Department officer shot
and killed Mark Robert
Bransfield, 39, of Inverness,
on the Withlacoochee State
Trail as Bransfield ran from
a store with stolen compact
discs. Bransfield pulled a .380
semi-automatic out and
pointed it at the officer from
about 4 feet away.
The officer fired four shots,
hitting Bransfield, who died
on the scene from his
wounds. Bransfield's loaded
pistol had jammed, investiga-
tors later said. The sheriff's
office conducted the investi-
gation into the shooting and
they, along with the State At-
torney's Office, determined
the officer's actions were ap-
propriate.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD=


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrest
* Scott A. Watson, 38, 8385
Snapdragon Way, Crystal River,
at 2:56 a.m. Sunday on misde-
meanor charges driving under
the influence and refusing to sub-
mit to an approved chemical
/physical test for alcohol. Accord-
ing to an arrest report, Watson
failed all field sobriety tasks but
refused to submit to a breath test.
Bond $1,000.
Other arrests
* John A. Boiter, 50,8925 W.
Halls River Road, Homosassa, at
12:52 a.m. Saturday on a misde-
meanor charge of trespassing
after warning. Bond $500.
* Matthew E. Mullins, 22,
2416 S. Zellner Drive, Inverness,
at 3:45 a.m. Saturday on a felony
charge of grand theft. Bond
$2,000.
* David Allen Whitley, 32,
928 Sunfish Ave., Inverness, at
4:45 a.m. Saturday on a misde-
meanor charge of driving with a
suspended/revoked license.
Bond $500.
* Kyle W. Spangler, 20,6409
W. Liberty Lane, Crystal River, at
7:15 a.m. Saturday on a misde-
meanor charge of driving with a
suspended/revoked license.
Bond $500.
* Richard Donald Hopkins
III, 27,226 S.W. Third St., Jasper,
at 1:45 p.m. Saturday on an ac-
tive Citrus County warrant for a
violation of probation on an origi-
nal felony charge of driving with a
suspended/revoked license. No
bond.


* Carl Lee Gilliland, 33,5549
S. Oldfield Ave., Homosassa, at
1:59 p.m. Saturday on a misde-
meanor charge of petit theft.
Bond $250.
* Geoffrey Alan Cormier, 24,
2855 E. Dove Court, Inverness,
at 7:01 p.m. Saturday on a felony
charge of grand theft. Bond
$2,000.
* Tonya Sue Hammond, 30,
7625 MarechalAve., Port Richey,
at 10:19 p.m. Saturday on an ac-
tive Levy County warrant for a
failure to appear on an original
felony charge of worthless
checks. Bond $15,000.
* David Kenneth Collett Jr.,
29, 911 Russell Ave., Inverness,
at 11:45 p.m. Saturday on a
felony charge of battery by a de-
tainee on a person detained. Ac-
cording to an arrest report, an
inmate at the Citrus County De-
tention Facility told police Collett
smacked him with an open hand
in the face and punched him in
the arm. Collett reportedly re-
fused to answer any questions or
provide a statement. A correc-
tions officer allegedly told police
he saw Collett pushing the in-
mate, causing the inmate to fall
on the floor. Bond $2,000.
* KristoforA. Pennewill, 22,
9212 N. Elliot Way, Citrus
Springs, at 3:22 p.m. Sunday on
a felony charge of grand theft.
Bond $2,000.
* Brian Keith Treacy Jr., 18,
3290 E. Murray St., Inverness, at
10:25 p.m. Sunday on felony
charges of possess/intent to
sell/dispense/deliver Hy-
drocodone and possession of
cannabis. Bond $2,500.


ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests made by the Cit
rus County Sheriffs Office, go to www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the Public Information link, then on Ar-
rest Reports.
* Watch the "Arrested Developments" show from the Cit
rus County Sheriff's Office at www.chronicleonline.tv.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


78 65 0.10 78 70 0.10

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclus ye daily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
" . ^High: 62 Low: 35
Cloudy, windy and chilly with a few
Sprinkles or light showers.
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
High: 68 Low: 45
After a chilly start, sunny and cool

S I THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 77 Low: 55
. . Sunny and nice

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Monday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10


91/69
92/34
81/57
80
+11

0.00 in.
0.03 in,
3.49 in.
11.38 in.


0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Monday at 3 p.m. 29.83 in.


DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m. 59
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m. 68%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees were heavy, grasses were
moderate and weeds were absent.
* Light - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Monday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DAY MINOR MAJOR MII
(MORNING)
TUESDAY 4:14 10:26 4
WEDNESDAY 4:56 11:08 5


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT......
SUNRISE TOMORROW.
MOONRISE TODAY
APRIL 17 APRIL 24 MAY 1 MOnnNSET TOflAY


NOR MAJOR
(AFTERNOON)
:37 10:49
:19 11:31


.................... 7:52 P.M .
....................7:12 A.M .
.................... 6:14 P.M .
....................5:46 A.M .


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. A burn ban is in effect.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Tuesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka' 4:58 a/12:41 a 5:21 p/1:06 p
Crystal River" 3:19 a/10:28 a 3:42 p/10:48 p
Withlacoochee* 1:06 a/8:16 a 1:29 p/8:36 p
Homosassa'** 4:08 a/12:05 p 4:31 p/--


***At Mason's Creek
Wednesday
High/Low High/Low
5:48 a/1:26 a 5:48 p/1:41 p
4:09 a/11:03 a 4:09 p/11:29 p
1:56 a/8:51 a 1:56 p/9:17 p
4:58 a/12:25 a 4:58 p/12:40 p


F'cast
pc
s
s
pc
s
pc
pc
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cas
s
pc
pc
pc
pc
PC
pc
pc
s


MARINE OUTLOOK
West winds from 15 to 25 knots. Seas Gulf water
3 to 4 feet. Bay and inland waters will tem perature
be choppy. Partly cloudy skies today.


72�
Taken at Aripeka

LAKE LEVELS
Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.15 28.16 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.47 33.43 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 35.19 35.16 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.51 37.47 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use o
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M
TUESDAY


Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. FcstH L
Albany 43 31 .26 sh 47 34
Albuquerque 59 33 s 71 45
Asheville 57 38 sf 42 27
Atlanta 63 42 pc 47 33
Atlantic City 59 49 .71 c 50 38
Austin 66 47 s 75 49
Baltimore 62 50 .19 c 50 32
Billings 61 25 pc 64 34
Birmingham 57 43 pc 52 31
Boise 68 37 pc 71 41
Boston 50 39 1.05 c 49 37
Buffalo 45 32 .17 sn 35 28
Burlington, VT 45 38 .14 rs 45 32
Charleston, SC 74 61 .09 pc 55 33
Charleston, WV 57 39 .24 sf 39 29
Charlotte 70 50 .07 pc 53 30
Chicago 40 32 pc 43 29
Cincinnati 53 39 .13 sf 38 28
Cleveland 42 32 .22 sn 35 28
Columbia, SC 70 54 pc 57 31
Columbus, OH 54 36 .04 sn 37 28
Concord, N.H. 46 27 1.02 c 49 28
Dallas 60 38 s 69 50
Denver 48 16 s 68 39
Des Moines 41 27 pc 49 30
Detroit 37 33 .49 sn 38 30
El Paso 65 43 s 79 54
Evansville, IN 44 36 .05 pc 46 31
Harrisburg 57 48 .10 c 46 29
Hartford 50 38 .58 c 51 32
Houston 63 48 s 69 48
Indianapolis 44 33 .02 sf 41 29
Jackson 58 47 s 57 35
Las Vegas 75 53 s 83 57
Little Rock 54 42 s 57 35
Los Angeles 79 55 sh 68 53
Louisville 50 37 .03 sf 44 31
Memphis 47 42 s 53 38
Milwaukee 41 33 pc 45 30
Minneapolis 45 29 pc 45 29
Mobile 67 47 s 64 37
Montgomery 68 47 s 54 32
Nashville 47 37 .04 pc 46 30
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
�2009 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Monday


City H L Pcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 63 48 s 63 45
New York City 52 45 .55 c 51 37
Norfolk 72 55 .46 pc 55 34
Oklahoma City 52 31 s 63 39
Omaha 40 24 s 53 32
Palm Springs 86 58 s 82 54
Philadelphia 60 49 .39 c 50 36
Phoenix 89 57 s 91 61
Pittsburgh 56 34 .05 sn 36 28
Portland, ME 48 31 .69 c 44 34
Portland, Ore 77 41 .02 pc 73 43
Providence, R.I. 54 35 1.76 c 49 33
Raleigh 71 57 .46 pc 51 30
Rapid City 28 6 pc 49 31
Reno 67 31 sh 67 37
Rochester, NY 55 37 .24 rs 38 28
Sacramento 83 44 sh 64 48
St. Louis 43 35 .04 pc 48 34
St. Ste. Marie 35 27 sn 33 26
Salt Lake City 60 32 pc 69 44
San Antonio 65 49 s 75 51
San Diego 79 55 pc 65 56
San Francisco 72 48 sh 61 50
Savannah 75 56 .09 pc 56 31
Seattle 70 40 s 64 42
Spokane 63 35 s 67 38
Syracuse 48 37 .33 rs 38 28
Topeka 45 28 s 55 33
Washington 63 52 .15 c 50 34
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 93 Kendall, Fla LOW -10 Yellowstone Lake
Wyo.
WORLD CITIES


TUESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 93/73/pc
Amsterdam 56/42/sh
Athens 67/48/c
Beijing 75/54/s
Berlin 64/42/pc
Bermuda 76/65/ts
Cairo 83/64/s
Calgary 54/34/pc
Havana 77/61/pc
Hong Kong 77/66/pc
Jerusalem 75/53/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


64/43/p
53/38/s
65/47/s
79/49/s
35/23/s
39/28/p
57/40/s
88/76/t
63/43/p
68/51/s
59/47/p
36/25/s
61/36/p


S ; . .i Nr Y


* CHkONICLE

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DATE

4/7
4/8





A.L.


I


_VW - -


Tuesday


I


,V ...... ....I ..........


pt;









Ciw ONI F)CHOIL TI5A, PI , 09A


Ronald 'Ron'
Corsi, 65
HOMOSASSA
Ronald "Ron" Corsi, age
65, of Homosassa, FL, a re-
tired manager from NCR in
New York, NY, and Eagle
Buick in Homosassa, FL,
died on Sunday, April 5,
2009, after complications of
an existing illness.
Mr. Corsi, a 1961 graduate
of Monsignor Bonner High
School and various NCR
training and management
programs, was a loving hus-
band to Linda and a devoted
father to his children
Robert, Stephanie, Diane
and Gregory. He was a
proud grandfather to Alexis,
Sara, Doug, Erica, Ashley,
Alec, Brad and Danny. Ron
loved to garden and was an.
avid photographer. Ron and
Linda traveled frequently
and enjoyed touring. Their
most recent adventure was
to Italy. Ron was a selfless,
devoted husband and proud
father. His gentle and gen-
erous nature will be missed
by his family and friends.
A Memorial Service in
Celebration of Ron's life will
be held on Wednesday April
8, 2009, at 2:00 PM from the
Gulf to Lake Church in Crys-
tal River, FL. The family re-
quests that in lieu of
flowers, donation may be
made to the American
Heart Association (https:
donate., americanheart.
org/ecommerce/aha/ahain
dex.jsp) in Ron's name.
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

Mary
Freeman, 49
CRYSTAL RIVER
Mary G. Freeman, 49, of
Crystal River, FL, died April
3, 2009, at her home.


Family will receive
friends today, Tuesday, from
6 until 8 p.m. at the Brown
Funeral Home in Lecanto,
FL. Mass will be offered at
10 a.m. on Wednesday at the
St. Scholastica Catholic
Church in Lecanto, FL. In-
terment will follow Mass at
the Crystal River Memorial
Cemetery, in Crystal River,
FL. In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions can be made to the
Pregnancy and Family Life
Center.

Oran
Freeman, 89
INVERNESS
Oran Freeman, 89, of In-
verness, FL, died on April 2,
2009, in Inverness. A memo-
rial service for Mr Freeman
will be held at2.p.m..on.May-
9, 2009, at the Seventh-day
Adventist Church, 638 E.
Eden Gardens Ave., Inver-
ness. Arrangements by
Heinz Funeral Home & Cre-
mation, Inverness, FL.

John Harris, 82
N. HORNELL, NY
John J. Harris, 82, of
North Hornell, NY, died on
April 5, 2009, at Citrus Me-
morial hospital in Inver-
ness, FL. Arrangements by
Heinz Funeral Home & Cre-
mation, Inverness, FL.






Graham
Jones, 74
HERNANDO
Graham Charles Jones,
74, of Hernando, FL, died
April 4, 2009, in Inverness,
FL. Arrangements and cre-
mation are under the direc-
tion of the Inverness Chapel


OBITUARIES

* The Citrus County Chronicle's policy permits both free
and paid obituaries.
* Obituaries must be submitted by the funeral home or
society in charge of arrangements.
* Free obituaries can include: Full name of deceased;
age; hometown/state; date of death; place of death;
date, time and place of visitation and funeral services.
* A flag will be included for free for those who served in
the U S. military. (Please note this service when sub-
mitting a free obituary.) Additionally, all obituaries will
be posted online at www.chronicleonline.com.
* Paid obituaries may include the information permitted
in the free obituaries, as well as date of birth; parents'
names; pre deceased and surviving family members;
year married and spouse's name (date of death, if
pre-deceased by spouse); religious affiliation; biogra-
phical information, including education, employment,
military service, organizations and hobbies; officiating
clergy; interment/inurnment; and memorial contribu-
tions.
* Area funeral homes with established accounts with the
Chronicle are charged $8.75 per column inch. Non-
local funeral homes and those without accounts are
required to pay in advance by credit card, and the cost
is $10 per column inch. Small photos of the de-
ceased's face can be included for an additional
charge.
* Additional days of publication or reprints due to er-
rors in submitted material are charged at the same
rates.
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next
day's edition.
* E-mail obits@chronicle online.com or fax to 563-
3280.


of Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory.

Anne
Kyser, 91
LECANTO
Anne R. Kyser, 91, of
Lecanto, FL, passed away
on Monday, March 30, 2009,
at Citrus Memorial hospital.
Ms. Kyser was a
Lutheran, born in Iron-
wood, MI. She was a secre-
tary for a large law firm -
Mueller, Holmes & Meuller
Inc. She moved here from


Detroit, MI, 31 years ago.
She was an active member
of her church in New Port
Richey for 15 years. Anne
loved family get-togethers
and vacations at their house
in Gaylord, MI. She owned
cats all her life - they
could do no wrong. She also
loved children and good
food.
Ms. Kyser is survived by
two daughters: Darlene
Earnhart of Lecanto, FL,
and Arlene Levoska of Com-
merce, MI; nine grandchil-
dren: Maureen Lynn


McKenzie, Shannon Dee
McKenzie, Thomas Lev-
oska, Bryan Levoska, Jack
Levoska, Kurt Kokko, Kris
Kokko and Kari Lehn; one
sister: Mrs. Rose Boynton,
94, of Troy, MI; and several
nieces and nephews.
National Cremation Soci-
ety, Fruitland Park.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline.com.


John
Majczuk, 67
HERNANDO
John G. Majczuk, 67, of
Hernando, FL, died on
Sunday, April 5,2009, in In-
verness. John was born on
September 8, 1941, in
Philadelphia, PA, the son
of John and Theresa Ma-
jczuk. He was a computer
programmer for Bookspan
Publishing in Hanover, PA.
John moved to Hernando
in 2003 from Hanover, PA.
Survivors include his
wife, Carol Kennedy-Ma-
jczuk of Hernando, FL; two
sons, Joseph Majczuk
(Gabrielle) of Beachwood,
NJ, and Kenneth Majczuk
(Joyce) of Hanover, PA; two
stepchildren, Keri
Kennedy and Matthew
Kennedy, both of Her-
nando, FL; and three
grandchildren, Dominick
Majczuk and Andy Ma-
jczuk, both of Beachwood,
NJ, and Darren Majczuk of
Hanover, PA.
Arrangements by Heinz
Funeral Home & Crema-
tion, Inverness, FL.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Michael
O'Connor, 51
SPRING HILL
Michael W O'Connor, 51,
of Spring Hill, FL, died
April 4, 2009.


Services and Interment
will be in New York.
Brown Funeral Home
and Crematory, Lecanto,
Florida, in charge of
arrangements.


Angela
Smith, 78
Angela Smith, 78, was
born in Ohio on May 19,
1930 and died at Memorial
Hospital in Tampa on
March 26, 2009.
She was preceded in
death by her husband, Erie
Smith, and is survived by
her sisters, Martha Stock-
hausen, Mary Sue Anlage,
and brother, James Bowers,
all of Miami; son, Vernon
Smith and his wife Mary of
Tanzania, Africa; grandchil-
dren, Nathan and Bonnie
Smith, and many nieces and
nephews.
Interment service will be
held at Bay Pines Cemetery
in St. Petersburg, FL, on
Friday, April 10, at 10:45
AM. A memorial Mass will
be held in Miami at St.
Thomas the Apostle
Catholic Church at noon on
Saturday, April 25, 2009. In
lieu of flowers, the family
asks that donations be
made in Angela's name to
Holy Angels, 6600 Wilkinson
Blvd., PO. Box 710, Belmont,
NC, or to the charity of your
choice. Please sign the on-
line guestbook at
www.BlountCurryMacDill
.com.

Kathy
Spencer, 49
INGLIS
Kathy Spencer, 49, of In-
glis, FL, died April 4, 2009,
at her home.
Private Cremation
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto, FL.


Study: One in five U.S. 4-year-olds is obese


Rates fluctuate according to race


Associated Press

CHICAGO - A striking
new study says almost one
in five American 4-year-
olds is obese, and the rate
is alarmingly higher among
American Indian children,
with nearly a third of them
obese.
Researchers were sur-
prised to see differences by
race at so early an age.
Overall, more than half a
million 4-year-olds are
obese, the study suggests.
Obesity is more common in
Hispanic and black young-
sters, too, but the disparity
is most startling in Ameri-
can Indians, whose rate 'is
almost double that of
whites.
The lead author said that
rate is worrisome among
children
so young,
even in a ON TH
population U Archives:
at higher www.archped
risk for
obesity be- E Association (
cause of Indian Physic
o t h e r http://tinyur!
health
problems and economic
disadvantages.
"The magnitude of these
differences was larger than
we expected, and it is sur-
prising to see differences
by racial groups present so
early in childhood," said
Sarah Anderson, an Ohio
State University public
health researcher. She con-
ducted the research with
Temple University's Dr.
Robert Whitaker.
Dr. Glenn Flores, a pedi-
atrics and public health
professor at University of
Texas Southwestern Med-
ical School in Dallas, said
the research is an impor-
tant contribution to studies
documenting racial and
ethnic disparities in chil-
dren's weight.
"The cumulative evi-
dence is alarming because

782075

BROWN
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY


within just a few decades,
America will become a 'mi-
nority majority' nation," he
said. Without interven-
tions, the next generation
"will be at very high risk"
for heart disease, high
blood pressure, cancers,
joint diseases and other
problems connected with
obesity, said Flores, who
was not involved in the new
research.
The study is an analysis
of nationally representa-
tive height and weight data
on 8,550 preschoolers born
in 2001. Children were
measured in their homes
and were part of a study
conducted by the govern-
ment's National Center for
Educational Statistics. The
results appear in Monday's
Archives of Pediatrics &
Adoles -
cent Medi-
IE NET cine.
Almost
iatrics.com 13 percent
of Asian
of American children
cians: w e r e
!com/c8raox o b e s e,
along with
16 percent of whites, al-
most 21 percent of blacks,
22 percent of Hispanics,
and 31 percent of American
Indians.
Children were consid-
ered obese if their body-
mass index, a
height-weight ratio, was in
the 95th percentile or
higher based on govern-
ment BMI growth charts.
For 4-year-olds, that would
be a BMI of about 18.
For example, a girl who
is 4 1/2 years old, 40 inches
tall and 42 pounds would
have a BMI of about 18,
weighing 4 pounds more
than the government's




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Preschool obesity
A new-study says 18 percent of
preschoolers are obese, with
higher percentages among
most minorities.

Prevalence of obesity
4-year-olds, 2005


American Indian/
Native Alaskan


Hispanic
Black, non-
Hispanic
White, non-
Hispanic
Asian


SOURCE: National Center
for Education Statistics


upper limit for that age,
height and gender.
Some previous studies of
young children did not dis-
tinguish between kids who
were merely overweight
versus obese, or they exam-
ined fewer racial groups.
The current study looked
only at obesity and a spe-
cific age group. Anderson
called it the first analysis of
national obesity rates in
preschool kids in the five
ethnic or racial groups.
The researchers did not
examine reasons for the
disparities, but others of-
fered several theories.
Flores cited higher rates
of diabetes in American In-
dians, and also Hispanics,
which scientists believe
may be due to genetic dif-

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ferences.
Also, other factors that
can increase obesity risks
tend to be more common
among minorities, includ-


NEED A REPORTER?
* Approval for story ideas
must be granted by
the Chronicle's editor
before a reporter is
as-signed. Call Mike
Arnold, managing
editor, at 563-5660.


ing poverty, less educated
parents, and diets high in
fat and calories, Flores
said.
Jessica Burger, a mem-
ber of the Little River Ot-
tawa tribe and health
director of a tribal clinic in
Manistee, Mich., said many
children at her clinic are
overweight or obese, in-
cluding preschoolers.
Burger, a nurse, said one
culprit is gestational dia-
betes, which occurs during
a mother's pregnancy That
increases children's
chances of becoming over-
weight and is almost twice
as common in American In-
dian women, compared
with whites.
She also blamed the fed-
eral commodity program
for low-income people that
many American Indian
families receive. The offer-
ings include lots of pastas,
rice and other high-carbo-
hydrate foods that con-
tribute to what Burger said
is often called a "commod
bod."
"When that's the pre-
dominant dietary base in a


household without access
to fresh fruits and vegeta-
bles, that really creates a
better chance of a person
becoming obese," she said.
Also, Burger noted that
exercise is not a priority in
many American Indian
families struggling to make
ends meet, with parents
feeling stressed just to pro-
vide basic necessities.
To address the problem,
her clinic has created ac-
tivities for young Indian
children, including sum-
mer camps and a winter
break "outdoor day" that
had kids braving 8-degree
temperatures to play
games including "snows-
nake." That's a traditional
American Indian contest in
which players throw long,
carved wooden "snakes"
along a snow or ice trail to
see whose lands the far-
thest.
The hope is that giving
kids used to modern seden-
tary ways a taste of a more
active traditional Ameri-
can Indian lifestyle will
help them adopt healthier
habits, she said.


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TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 AS


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CITRus COUN'i (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries "-= :-.-" - .- : ".'. ..


I FREE


1VA11Mtk


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,1












A f T-..^... . -7 nn


STOCKS


ADTUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009


TH ARKTI R VE


I HowTo RAT H KTI" R I


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on te New York stock Excange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00 Last Chg Name Vol(OO) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 2832072 7.48 -.12 PSCrudeDL n198157 3.07 -.10 PwShs QQQ01502829 32.27 -.08 can Stock Exchange.Tables show name, price and net change.
SPDR 2531135 83.60 -.66 GoldStrg 55111 1.29 -.12 SunMicro 838763 6.56 -1.93 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
DirxFinBull 2444564 6.71 -.49 EldorGldg 40408 7.80 -.38 Cisco 624485 17.53 -.63 tlion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
FordM 2285290 3.77 +.52 NthgtM g 19454 1.25 -.05 RschMotn 489279 63.97 +4.68 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
Citigrp 1866025 2.72 -.13 NovaGld g 15609 2.79 -.13 Intel 467847 15.86 -.09 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes fa. - . ue n- + er, caled o r ,Lemprr, me cA, npany a. lNae 52.wae
lo0w d0-- LE ,r. Ia I-1 1- w.i e.: . C yi,rnr rurrrvi0y Ilrl,3 ,1 trma Ameria n' E,:nanr.,6'
Name Last Chq %Chq Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chq %Chq Ere.ein'g Company M rU.,iar.ae r, . lemporar i-amln, treia Nuada.I cp.ilAad surlus .i:i
FstMarblhd 2.12 +.65 +44.2 PhrmAth 2.75 +.28 +11.3 TecOpsSv 2.71 +1.60 +144.1 ,,,g ,quica,,uc,, , S ,- o rs., new ,Aue.-', ie lir , r Tno S wev, rgn ara low ig-
Satyam 2.80 +.82 +41.4 ReadyMix 2.64 +.23 +9.5 Harrington 2.98 +1.13 +61.1 ure.i dalte rly tio iTr 5.ir. ei.3.r.mr.g ,1 tar.3g . I releneo E,.-' ue pr Freren,:o p'.
Raythn wt 8.38 +1.88 +28.9 StreamGSv 3.25 +.25 +8.3 SumTotal 3.00 +.99 +49.3 older r i.ee ,-lIImeru .:.purr,,e pr..e n.r, . 1. Rlyr., i u buy c r al ;rBeD ,price il -
MSFord31 7.35 +1.42 +23.9 OrleansH 2.32 +.17 +7.9 Mod-Pac 2.03 +.54 +36.6 Sicc ra Wpi i t,Y at lear 20 percent wir.,m in, 1ear ,.o Tr3e a. me . t-Ai mer-ia wr en r.e
ChinaMM 2.29 +.43 +23.1 TravelCtrs 2.09 +.15 +7.7 LegacyRes 12.98 +2.95 +29.4 ,Iu: ,: .�aued wd Wner, diir.tumed m i Warra, llowinj l pur.irc ,:,1 a .sioi u ine
5-A . 1 r,yr, *,j Un,' .lu.,'..] ,T..:re Ih.a', or.,e ':.l�, ar C rrirp v l i ar ruo lc, c r re
LOSERS ($20R MORE) LOSERS li2 OMORE I LOSERS (52 ..-R MR:RE) ,a' r.p ror e,n, iaorjarze. uzndr rrIe Ab.nl.upiy I,- A[,pear ,n Irm.,,1 o ir .ie ,'me
Name Last Chg %Chg Name LAsl Chq 'Cng Narme _Last Cnq 'lChq Source:The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
StratDCX 16.01 -2.83 -15.0 Velocityrs 2.17 -.53 -19.6 SunMicro 6.56 -1.93 -22.7
Talbots 3.81 -.62 -14.0ZionO&Gwt 9.80 -2.20 -18.3 VestJnRMII 2.12 -.51 -19.4
CobltFON2812.52 -1.74 -12.2 WacSP09 9.40 -1.00 -9.6 HFFind 10.75 -2.54 -19.1 .
NACCO 31.69 -4.31 -12.0 Aurizong 4.24 -.44 -9.4 BrdwyF 4.25 -.99 -18.9 52-Week Net % YTD
SantndBcp 6.60 -.90 -12.0 CnsTom 31.32 -2.81 -8.2 DblEgl 4.08 -.92 -18.4 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Chg


DIARY


934 A,.ja.nrC
2,112 Declined
102 Unchanged
3,148 Total issues
0 New Highs
3 New Lows
5,262,706,522 Volume


DIARY


S .. 40Oar..:ed?
326 Declined
60 Unchanged
622 Total issues
5 New Highs
3 New Lows
92,902,609 Volume


8:id
1,897
148
2,883
14
6
1,973,120,094


13,136.69 6,469.95Dow Jones Industrials
5,536.57 2,134.21Dow Jones Transportation
530.57 288.66Dow Jones Utilities
9,687.24 4,181.75NYSE Composite �
2,433.31 1,130.47Amex Index
2,551.47 1,265.52Nasdaq Composite
1,440.24 666.79S&P 500
764.38 342.59Russell 2000
14,564.81 6,772.29DJ U.S. TotMkt


YTD YTD
Name DIv YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name DIv YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AT&T Inc 1.64 6.2 12 26.59 -.24 -6.7 Lowes .34 1.8 13 19.40 +.28 -9.9
AlliedCap ...... ... 1.64 -.13-39.0 McDnlds 2.00 3.6 15 55.94 -.70-10.0
BkofAm .04 .5 14 7.48 -.12-46.9 Microsoft .52 2.8 10 18.76 +.01 -3.5
CapCtyBk .76 6.2 14 12.23 -.59 -55.1 Motorola .........4.69 +.13 +5.9
Citigrp .04 1.5 2.72 -.13-59.5 9 2204 -102+119
Disney .35 1.8 9 19.62 -.38-13.5 Penney .80 3.6 9 22.04-1.02 +11.9
EKodak .50 12.2 4 4.09 -.28-37.8 ProgrssEn 2.48 6.9 11 35.93 +.10 -9.8
Embarq 2.75 7.2 7 38.11 +.56 +6.0 RegionsFn .40 9.5 ... 4.23 -.33-46.9
ExxonMbl .1.60 2.3 8 70.05 -.39-12.3 SearsHIdgs ......... 51.22 -3.47 +31.8
FPLGrp 1.89 3.7 13 51.56 -1.31 +2.4 Smucker 1.28 3.4 12 37.70 -.29-13.1
FairPoint ... ... ... .77 -.07 -76.5 SprintNex ... ... ... 4.41 +.22+141.0
FordM . 3.77 +.52 +64.6 imeWrnrs .........21.56 -.66 -3.3
GenElec .40 3.6 7 11.19 +.25-30.9
GnMotr ......... 2.27 +.17 -29.1 UniFirst .15 .4 10 35.75 -.95 +20.4
HomeDp .90 3.6 19 24.85 -.15 +7.9 VerizonCm 1.84 5.6 15 33.03 +.24 -2.6
Intel .56 3.5 17 15.86 -.09 +8.2 WalMart 1.09 2.0 16 53.43 -.37 -4.7
IBM 2.00 2.0 11 101.56 -.66 +20.7 Walgm .45 1.7 13 26.93 +.02 +9.2


% 52-wk
g % Chg


7,975.85 -41.74 -.52 -9.12 -36.76
2,923.93 -54.39 -1.83-17.34-41.38
332.76 -4.55 -1.35 -10.25 -33.24
5,249.48 -69.27 -1.30 -8.82-42.85
1,387.53 -15.88 -1.13 -.72-38.90
1,606.71 -15.16 -.93 +1.88-32.06
835.48 -7.02 -.83 -7.50 -39.13
447.56 -8.57 -1.88 -10.39 -37.20
8,518.08 -81.26 -.94 -6.26 -38.48


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

Ihe Cnronicle, Atn: Stock Requests. 1624 N Meadowcrest

Blvd . Crystal River. FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and licker symbol. For mu-

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ol the fund Staff will not provide real-time quotes


N EWYRKSTOKECANG


Name Last Chg BMCSft 33.15 -1.19
BP PLC 40.71 -.62
BRT 3.70 -.01
BakrHu 30.37 -1.13
ABB Ltd 14.91 -.29 BallCp 43.28 -.90
ACELtd 4366 -.21 BcoBrads 11.31 -.05
AES Corp 6.28 +01 BcoSantand 7.87 -.23
AFLAC 20.66 -.39 BkofAm 7.48 -.12
AGCO 22.89 -.04 BkAmpfD 10.50 -.25
AGLRes 27.16 -.19 Bklreind 5.04 +.55
AK Steel 8.82 -.43 BkNYMel 28.16 -.84
AMBPr 17.48 -.38 Barclay 10.22 -.68
AMR 4.03 +.28 BarrickG 28.75 -1.68
ASA Ltd 49.23 -2.45 Baxter 47.21 -1.40
AT&TInc 26.59 -.24 BaytexEg 12.92 -.29
AU Opton 9.18 +.22 BestBuy 39.02 -1.24
AXA 13.50 -1.51 BigLots 21.79 -.56
AbtLab 43.36 -.76 BlackD 33.00 -.97
AberFidc 26.01 -.93 BIkHillsCp 18.37 -.13
Accenture 28.23 +.19 BIkDebtStr 2.17 +02
AdamsEx 7.74 -.04 BIkEnhC&l 10.63 -.20
AdvAuto 40.30 -.21 BlockHR 17.28 -.52
AMD 3.53 +10 BlueChp 2.30 -,04
Aerpostl 27.06 -1.21 Boeing 38.16 +.47
Aetna 24.77 +.64 Bordersh .93 -.06
Agilent 15.98 -.48 BorgWam 25.74 +1.11
Agnicog 5024 -1.04 BostBeer 23.04 +.51
Agriumg 3828 -.93 BostProp 40.18 -1.51
AirProd 58.61 -1.92 BostonSci 8.46 +.07
AirTran 5.13 +.04 BoydGm 5.62 +.12
AlcatelLuc 2.19 +02 Brandyw 3.76 +.41
Alcoa 7.91 -.26 Brinker 16.25 -.43
AlexREE 37.20 -4.56 BrMySq 20.51 +,34
Allergan 47.70 -.88 Brk0dPrp 6.46 -.25
Allete 25.51 -1.55 Brunswick 3.99 -.31
AliData 39.35 +.95 Buckeye 386.0 -.08
AlliBGIbHi 8,33 -.23 BungeLt 58.11 -.91
AlliBInco 7.14 BudNSF 64.04 -2.48
AliBem 16.76 -.17 CBREis 4,82 -.20
Aldlrish 325 +.11 CBLAsc 3.37 +.37
Alstate 20.54 -.72 CBS B 4.89 +.04
AlphaNRs 18.52 -.69 CFInds 72.71 -1.83
Altria 16.16 ... CHEngy 46.96 -.24
AmbacF .92 +.02 CIGNA 17.90 -.44
Ameren 23.17 -.10 CITGp 3.31 -.19
AMovilL 29.70 -1.21 CMSEng 12.00 -.20
AEagleOut 12.71 -.37 CSScInds 17.05 -.05
AEP 26.32 +.02 CSX 28.70 -.75
AmExp 15.16 -.17 CVSCare 28.99 +.54
AmlntlGp 1.10 -.04 CabhvsnNY 14.96 +.25
AmSIP3 7.70 +.20 CabotO&G 27.24 +.02
AmTower 32.69 -1.70 CallGolf 7.89 -.26
Amerillges 28.61 -.01 Calpine 8.26 +.35
AmeBprise 22.11 -.73 Camecogs 17.34 -.27
Amphenol 31.19 -.07 Cameron 22.81 -.71
Anadarko 42.40 -1.07 CampSp 26.63 -.80
AnalogDev 20.34 -.29 CdnNRyg 37.44 -1.55
AnglogldA 30.99 -.39 CdnNRsg 43.13 -.60
AnnTaylr 6.09 -.35 CapOne 12.82 -1.00
Annaly 14.09 -.41 CapitlSrce 2.02 +.12
AnthCap .51 +.11 CapMplB 13.07 +.02
Aon Corp 39.90 -.10 CardnlHIth 32.95 +.49
Apache 65.90 -2.10 CarMax 11.76 -.35
Aptlnv 6.40 -.01 Carnival 24.75 -.77
AquaAm 19.54 +.07 Caterpillar 31.31 -,84
ArcelorMit 24.61 -.95 Celanese 15.96 -.61
ArchCoal 14.55 -.33 Celesticg 4.35 +20
.AilhDan 28.71 -.19 Cemex 7.41 -.06
AnowB 19.63 -1.03 CenterPnt -10.49 -.07
Ashland 13.25 -.40 Centex 8.29 -.16
AsdEstat 5.84 ... CntryTel 28.28 +.46
ATMOS 22.98 -.19 ChampEh .52 -.01
AutoNato 15.35 -.03 Checkpnt 10.03 -.19
Aultoliv 22.53 -.42 ChesEng 19.81 -.14
AvalonBay 53.04 -.51 .Chevron 69.89 -.59
Avon 21.05 -.19 Chicos 6.43 -.06
BB&TCp 17.36 -.80 ChinaMble 44.83 -.28
BHP BillLt 47.53 -1.81 ChinaUni 9.95 +.09
BJSvcs 10.75 -.20 Chubb 41.79 -1.24


Name Last Chg


A-Power 4.70 +.33
ACMooreIf 2.22 +.10
ADCTel 4.90 +.01
AMAGPh 39.90 -.22
APACC 3.82 -.01
ASML Hid 19.01 +.03
ATMI Inc 16.74 -.79
ATPO&G 5.63 -.16
ATSMed 2.54 -.09
Aassrom .37 +.01
Accuray 5.12 +01
AcordaTh 18.85 -.84
ActvsBIzs 10.83 -.28
Acxiom 9.03 +.57
Adaptec 2.61 -.07
AdobeSy 23.19 -.97
Adtran 17.45 -.93
AdvEnvh .70 +.15
AdvantaA .50 -.05
AdvantaB .73 -.02
AeroViron 24.15 +1.46
Affymetix 3.50 -.27
AgFeed 2.49 -.04
AirspanNh .11 +.00
AkamaiT 19.60 -.46
AkeenaSh 1.21 +.02
Akom 1.09 -.01
AlaskCom 6.63 -.17
Aldila 5.39 -.03
Alexion s 36,70 -1.06
AlignTech 8.09
Alkerm 8.86 -.63
AllegiantT 47.15 +1,73
AllosThera 5.95 -.16
AlscriptM 10.53 -.31
AlmostFam 23.21 +.92
AltairNano 1.27 -.21
AlteraCplI 17.54 -.41
AltraHIdgs 4.83 -.07
AstusPhm .23 -.01
Alvarion 3.16 -.08
Amazon 77.99 -.18
Amedisys 30.22 +.25
AmerBioh .16 +.01
AmCapUd 2.25 -.25
ACmdUn 4.07 +.01
AmltPastan 32.29 +.03
AmerMed 11.33 -.19
AmPubEd 46.40 +1.21
AmSupr 18.98 -.60
AmCasino 13.74 -.48
Amgen 47.84 +1.27
AmkorTIf 3.19 -.01
Amylin 9.32 -.36
Anadigc 2.25 -.20
AnadysPh 6.14 -.24
Anlogic 3422 -.23
Analysts .42 -.03
AngioAm 9.92 -.38
Ansys 27.53 +.13
ApogeeE 11.90 +.06
ApolloGrp 69.44 +.69
Apololnv 4.30 -.35
Apple Inc 118.45 +2.46
ApidEnerg .57 +.26
ApidMatI 11.56 -.25
AMCC 5.03 -.15
ArabAmDv 1.45 -,03
ArchCap 57.74 +.67
ArcSight 11.82 -1.18
ArenaPhm 2.61 -.11
AresCap 5.17 -.43
AribaInc 8.81 +.17
ArkBest 19.67 -.88
ArmHid 5.18 +.07
Arris 8.00 -.10
ArtTech 2.78 -.07
ArubaNet 3.76 +.20
Aslalnfo 17.80 -.28
AspenBio 1.89 +.09
AsscdBanc 16.17 -.31
AsystTchtl .26 -.02
athenahlit 24.94 -1.61
Atheros 15.86 -.79


AtlasAmns 11.82 +.44
Atmel 3.76 -.04
Audvox 3.92 -.25
Authentdth .53 +.17
Aulodesk 18.27 +.28
AutoData 36.22 -.45
Auxilium 24.00 +.01
AvalonPh .47
AvoctCp 12.85 -.81
Aware 2.21 -.04
Axcells .38
AxsysTech 40.92 -1.78
BEAero 10.32 +.53
BOK 36.03 -.98
Baldu Inc 186.41 -1.09
BallardPw 1,69 -.23
Bankrate 25.65 +.35
BareEscent 4.85 -.17
BeaconPw .47 -.02
BeacnRfg 14.05 -.17
BeasleyB 2.24 +.16
BebeSfts 7.20 -.28
BedBath 26.37 -1.25
BigBand 6.94 -.24
Blogenldc 49.63 -.69
BioMain 11.92 -.33
Biopure rsh .18 +.01
Bckbaud 13.18 -.32
Blkboard 31.84 +.13
BlueCoat 13.73 +.22
BobEvn 24.15 -.36
Bookham .51 -.03
BostPrv 3.59 -.26
BrigExp 1.80 -.06
Brightpnt 4.58 -.22
Broadcom 21.61 -.45
BrcdeCm 4.01 -.07
BrklneB 9.90 -.09
BrukerCp 6.07 -.21
Bucyrusas 17.52 +.02
BuffaloWW 37.07 -.63
CAInc 17.63 -.54
CH Robins 47.36 -.96
CMEGrp 245.53 -10.36
CSG Sys 14.94 -.47
CTC Media 5.50 -.08
CVThera 19.93 -.01
CVB Fnd 6.53 -.49
CabotMic 25.39 -.97
CadencePh 8.90 -.62
Cadence 4.48 -.06
CaliPizza 14.56 +.21
CdnSolar 7.02 +.29
Candela .60 +.14
CapCk 12.23 -.59
Cpstnb .75 -.05
Cardiomg 3.10 -.04
CardioNet 25.20 -1.04
CareerEd 22.40 +.05
Carrizo 11.42 -.36
CarverBcp 3.43 -.52
CascadeBc 2.00 -.08
Caseys 26.98 -.33
CathayGen 11.53 -.41
CaviumNet 11.50 -.49
Beyond 18.49 -.03
CeleraGrp 7.54 -.25
Celgene 42.31 +.16
CellGensh .34 +.02
CefTherrsh .40 +.01
CentlCom 8.34 +.03
CentEuro 14.78 -.26
CEurMed 14.09 +.50
CentAl 3.42 -.30
Cephin 68.51 +.06
Cephekl 6.71 +.29
Ceradyne 18.81 -.40
Cemer 42.92 -.37
Changyoun 21.63 +2.23
CharRsse 9.43 -.16
ChrmSh 1.94 -.18
vjChartCm .02 -.01
Chattem 52.80 +.80
ChkPoint 23.22 +.51
Cheesecake 12.47 -.54
ChildPlace 22.87 -1.81
ChlnaMed 16.61 +.14
ChInaPSt 1.27 -.01


Cimarex 22.02 +1.06
CinciBell 2.72 -.02
Citigrp 2.72 -.13
CleanH 48.87 -1.14
ClifsNRss 19.85 -.84
Clorox 53.42 +.11
Coach 17.886 -79
CocaCE 14.00 -.09
CocaCi 44.99 +.02
Coeurh 1.04 -.08
CohStSUIt 9.51 +.01
ColgPal 61.11 +.67
CollctvBrd 11.12 -.40
ColBgp .95 -.03
Comerica 18.72 -.82
CrdMts 12.69 -.23
ComScop 14.73 -.11
CVRD 14.92 -.42
CVRDpI 12.86 -.40
Con-Way 19.32 -.62
ConAgra 17.12 +.02
ConocPhil 41.16 -1.20
Conseco 1.41 +.06
ConsolEngy 27.43 -.84
ConEd 39.10 -.15
ConstellA 11.85 -.35
ConstellEn 22.11 -.50
CtlAirB 11.26 +.99
Cnvrgys 9.13 +.03
CooperlInd 27.10 -.34
Coming 15.72 -.24
CorrectnCp 14.45 +.25
Cosan Ltd 4.13 +.63
GovenryH 13.78 +.93
Covidien 31.19 -.08
CredSuiss 31.44 -2.31
CrwnCsle 23.85 -.16
CrownHold 22.34 -.30
Cummins 29.39 -.31


DCT Indl 3.71 -.15
DJIA Diem 79.76 -.40
DNP Selt 7.06 +.03
DPL 22.81 -.18
DR Horton 11.01 -.52
DTE 28.68 +.14
Daimler 30.97 -1.15
Danaher 54.05 +.21
Darden 35.83 -.66
DeanFds 19.06 -.22
Deere 36.96 -.34
DefaAkr 6.94 +.30
DenburyR 16.32 -.71
DeutschBk 47.24 -1.34
DBGOIdDL 17.54 -1.09
DevelDiv 2.65 -.06
DevonE 48.39 -1.56
DiaOffs 68.22 -.74
DiamRk 3.81 +.01
DianaShip 13.23 -.20
DicksSptg 16.29 -.31
DigitalRIt 37.00 -1.60
DirxRFnBull 6.71 -.49
DirxFinBear 16.50 +.90
DirxSCBear 41.65 +2.03
.DirxSCBull 20.91 -1.03
DrxLCBear 53.64 +1.33
-DirxLCBull 26.39 -.58
DirxEnBull 26.81 -1.34
Dicover 6.56 -.19
Disney 19.62 -.38
DomRescs 30.21 -.23
DonlleyRR 8.36 -.23
DEmmett 8.61 +.19
Dover 29.42 -.22
DowChm 10.78 -.22
DuPont 25.44 -.53


ChinaSun 3.19 +.02
ChrchllD 32.87 +.46
CienaCorp 8.43 -.44
CinnRn 24.44 -.21
Cintas 25.54 -.05
COnus 4.09 -.14
Cisco 17.53 -.63
CiTrends 22.89 -.61
CikzRep 1.54 -.11
CirixSys 24.16 -.19
CleanEngy 7.12 +.01
Clearwire 5,23 +.16
CickSft 4.24 +.14
Cogent 12.17 -.10
CognizTech 23.10 +.34
CogoGrp 7.03 +.04
Coinstar 32.92 -.93
Comarco 1.60 +.01
Comcast 14.36 -.07
Comcspcl 13.63 -.10
CmcBMO 37.90 -.63
CommSys 7.79 +.24
CmptrPr 33.91 -.50
Compuwre 6.94 -.16
Comtech 25.68 -1.15
Concepts 11.24 -.49
ConcurTch 21.21 -.73
Conmed 14.17 -.74
ConstantC 14.77 +,24
ConvOrgan .83 -.18
Copart 29.56 -.46
CorinthC 18.74 -.08
CorusBksh .27 -.03
Costco 47.74 -1.17
CrackerB 31.07 -.91
Cree nc 26.61 +.39
Crocs 1.66 -.14
CrosstexE 1.91 -.10
Ctip.com 28.76 -.15
CubislPh 17.87 -1.58
CybrSrce 15.37 -.23
C ori 1.7 -.03

DTS Inc 23.42 -.02
Dakronics 7.65 -.22
DataDom 13.15 -.04
DealrTrk 14.58 +.03
DeckOut 58.25 -.71
Dell Inc 10.33 +.01
DItaPr 2.13 -.13
Dndreon 6.58 +.59
Dennys 1.65 -.07
Dentsply 26.18 -.15
DiamondF 28.28 -.40
DigRiver 32.06 -.23
Diodes 11.35 -.47
DirecTV 24.49 +.13
DiscCmA 17.84 -.19
DiscCmCn 16.47 -.16
DiscvLabs 1.56 +.15
DishNetwk 12.66 +.23
DollrFn 9.19 -.99
DlIrTree 42.42 +.17
DrmWksA 20.02 -2.28
DressBam 13.23 -.02
drugstore 1.31 -.12
DryShips 5.11 -.14
DyaxCp 2.20 -.17
Dynavax .68 -.02
ETrade 1.30 -.06
eBay 14.02 -.29
EPIQ Sys 16.54 -.71
eResrch 5.69 -.08
ev3 Inc 7.33 -.43
EagleBulk 4.57 -.07
ErthUnk 7.05 +08
EstWstBcp 4.78 -.24
Eclipsys 9.78 -.54
EdBauer .50 +.00
EdgePet .23 +.01
EduDv 4.00 +.02
8x8 Inch .85 +.05
ElectSci 7.17 -.11
BecOptSd 5.88 +.45
ElectArts 19.69 -1.01
Emocore .81 +.01
EmplreRst 1.10 +.17


DukeEngy 14.06 -.13
DukeRIty 6.97 +.08
Dynegy 1.64
EMCCp 1237 -.12
EOG Res 60.70 -2.44
EastChm 29.82 -.25
EKodak 4.09 -.28
Eaton 41.44 -.57
Edisonlnt 29.00 -.52
EIPasoCp 6.63 -.14
Elan 5.93 -.14
Embarq 38.11 +.56
EmersonB 30.89 -1.07


EndoPhrm 17.79 -.14
Enerl n 5.80 -.28
EngyConv 14.19 -.35
EngyXXI .45 -.01
Entegris 1.15 +.02
EntreMdh .47 -.03
EnzonPhar 5.92 -.20
Equlnix 61.61 -2.02
EdcsnTels 9.18 +.22
Euronet 13.86 -.20
EvrgrSIr 2.24 +.04
Exelixs 4.99 +.13
ExideTc 4.23 -.01
Expedia 10.37 +.11
Expdlntl 30.91 +.25
ExpScripts 49.04 +.41
Ezcorp 11.97 -.48
FS Netwks 23.09 -.01
FEICo 15.55 -.44
FLIRSys 21.60 -.28
Fastenal 37.29 +.29
FedMoguln 8.20 -.05
RberTowr .24 +.01
FifthThird 3.07 -.21
Fndclnst 10.63 -.49
Fnisar .53 +.02
RnUne 7.16 -.27
FstCashFn 16.61 +.48
FMidBc 9.26 -.52
FstNiagara 11.19 -.27
FstSolar 138.16 +3.78
FstMerit 19.25 -.60
Rserv 36.76 -.25
Rexlm 3.18 -.15
FocusMda 6,90 -.09
ForcePro 6.12 +.08
FormFac 18.05 -.65
Fortresswt .01
FossillInc 17.05 -.56
FosterWhI 19.01 -.65
Fredslnc 11.74 -.35
FrontFnd 1.40 -.17
FuelSysSol 14.63 -.54
FuelCell 2.71 -.04
FultonFncl 6.85 -.30

GFIGrp 3.80 -.14
GMX Rs 7.09 -.15
GTSolarn 6.32 -.40
Garmin 22.12 -.98
GenBiotch .28 -.01
Genoptix 27.99 -1.23
Gentex 10.84 -.51
Gentiva 16.33 +.44
Genzyme 56.02 -.02
GeoEye 23.95 -.62
GeronCp 4.95 +.44
GigaMed 5.59 -.13
GileadSd 48.37 +1.39
GlacierBc 15.76 -.53
GladstnCap 5.71 -1.00
Globllnd 4.62 -.06
Google 368.24 -1.54
GreenMtC 50.54 +.34
Gymbree 22.22 -.55
HLTH 10.61 -.35
HMNFn 3.25 +.18
HMS HId 30.17 +1.07
HSNIncn 5.21 -.14
HSWInSU .16 -.02
HainCel 15.64 -.49
HansenNat 36.70 -.48
Harmonic 6.84 -.10
HawHold 3.98 -.37
HayesLm .20 -.01
HrItndEx 15.47 -.52
HeidrkSIr 18.61 -1.42
HSchein 40.28 -.16
HercOflsh 1.75 +.03
HercTGC 5.99 +.32
Hibbett 19.54 -.21
HimaxTch 2,63 -.17
HollisEden .30 +.01
Hologic 13.57 +.05
HorsehdH 6.59 -.07
HotTopic 11.89 -.36
HubGroup 19.03 -1.05


ForestLab 21.87 -.27
FortuneBr 32.08 +2.02
FdtnCoal 16.09 -.69
FrankRes 59.18 -.95
FredMac h .72 -.01
FMCG 41.75 -.92
FronoierCm 7.61 -.04
Fronferi 1 3 +.

GATX 21.90 -.81
GabelliET 3.20 -.08
GabHlthW 4.94 +.15


HudsCity 11.89 -.37
HumGen .87 +.05
HuntJB 25.96 -.52
HuntBnk 1.94 -.07
HuronCon 40.94 -.68
HutchT 1.75 -.04
Hythlam .31 -.05
IAC Inters 16.14 +.23
IdexxLabs 36.68 +.44
IPCHold 26.40 -.27
iShACWI 30.11 -.31
iShNsdqBio 65.10 +.05
Iberiabnk 47.65 -2.75
IconlxBr 10.19 +.20
IGo Inc .54
Illuminas 34.83 -.19
Immucor 24.06 -.48
ImunoGn 7.58
ImpaxLbn 4.91 -.29
Incyte 2.28 -.11
Infipera 8.38 -.07
Informal 14.18 +.15
InfosysT 28.31 -.75
Insight If 3.76 -.17
Insteel 6.99 -.94
Integrals 8.35 -.41
IntgDv 4.72 -.12
Intel 15.86 -.09
InteractBrk 15.98 -1,05
InterDig 26.64 -.35
Intrface 3.39 -.01
InterMune 15.63 -.55
IntlBcsh 8.53 +.11
InolSpdw 24.43 -.31
Intersil 13.02 -.01
Intuit 27.31 -.42
IntSurg 98.88 +2.15
Isis 14.70 -.28
IsleCapri 6.98
Ibron 46.11 -1.77
IvanhoeEn 1.38 -.01

j2Global 23.39 +.46
JA Solar 3.52 +.05
JDSUniph 3.89 -.18
JackHenry 17.62 -.07
JacklnBox 24.02 -.74
JamesRiv 13.87 -.58
JetBlue 4.41
JosphBnk 29.53 -.89
JoyGIbl 24.01
JnprNtwk 16.06 -.97
KLATnc 22.41 -.69
Kendle 21.67 -.85
KeryxBioh .17 +.00
Kirklands 5.61 +.44
KnghtCap 15.30 -.39
KopinCp 2.77 -.05
Kulicke 2.88 -.17
LCA Vis 3.15 +.02
LHCGrp 23.48 -.99
LKQCorp 15.21 -.31
LSI Inds 5.66 -.37
LTX-Cred .35 +.01
LaJollPh .18 +.04
LamResrch 24.90 -.75
LamarAdv 14.02 +1.33
Landstar 35.76 -.32
Latcer 1.51 -.06
LawsnSft 4.87 -.07
LeapWirss 35.08 -.43
LegacyRes 12.98 +2.95
Level3 1.04
LUbGIobA 17.03 +.13
LUbGobC 16.69 +.19
UbtyMIntA 3.41 -.06
UbMCapA 7.33 +.14
UbMEntA 22.02 +.53
iUfeTechs 32.89 +.33
UfePtH 21.02 -.21
UgandPhm 2.91 -.08
UhirGold 20.01 -1.00
Uncare 22.31 -.12
UncEl 35.73 -.89
UnearTch 22.75 -.39
UnnEngy 14.94 -.03
LodgeNet 1.68 -.02


HadeyD 17.10 +.54
HarmonyG 9.24 -.53
HarrsCorp 30.05 -.44
HartfdFn 9.41 +.67
Hasbro 26.83 +.09
HawaiiEl 14.50 +.03
HItCrREIT 33.85 +.17
HIthcrRIty 15.97 -.21
HealthNet 15.00 +.69
HeclaM 2.03 -.03
Heinz 33.97 -.51
HelixEn 6.03 -.13
HelinTel 7.75 -.10


iS Eafe 39.70 -.84
iShRsMd 57.59 -.66
iShC&SRI 32.22 -.58
ISR1KV 42.84 -.42
iSR1KG 36.88 -.49
iSRusIK 45.60 -.45
iSR2KV 42.23 -.70
iShR2K 44.85 -.78
iShREst 28.84 -.47
iShFnSv 36.60 -1.28
iShFnSc 35.20 -.80
IShSPSm 39.14 -.59
iStar 2.91 -.36


Pay for C I.T I
your -





Thee]EZway!







NO MORE
V Hassles! V Checks! V Reminders!





i 563-5655 It's EZ!
iCharge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation start.


EmpDist 14.63 -.25
EnbrEPtr 32.22 +.30
EnCana 44.16 -.62
EnPro 18.52 -.19
ENSCO 27.81 -2.27
Energy 68.23 -.99
EqtyRsd 21.47 -.20
EsteeLdr 26.83 +.15
ExcelM 6.40 +.23
ExcoRes 10.70 -.52
Exelon 47.71 -.89
ExxonMbl 70.05 -.39
FMCCorp 46.82 -1.36
FPLGrp 51.56 -1.31
FairchldS 4.54 -.06
FamilyDIr 33.31 +1.41
FannleMaeh ,69 -.01
FedExCp 48.31 -1.71
FedRlty 51.74 +.93
FedSignl 6.02 -.25
Ferreligs 14.07 +.09
Ferro 2.18 +.21
FidlNFin 19,77 -1.12
RFidNnfo s 18.58 +74
FstHorizon 11.08 -.22
FstMarblhd 2.12 +.65
FTActDiv 9.15 +.23
FtTrEnEq 8.14 -.15
rstEngy 38.63 -.81
Fluors 38.67 +1.27
FootLociv 11.11 -.39
FordM 3.77 +.52
FordCpfS 11.20 +1.75


GabUfil 5.70 +.10
GameStop 28.62 -1.16
Gannett 2.75 +.20
Gap 14.48 -.70
GenDynam 45.56 +2.90
GenBec 11.19 ' +.25
GnGrthPrp .97 +.25
GenMills 50.81 -.05
GnMotr 2.27 +.17
Genworth 2.14 +.12
GaPw8-44 ,25.05 -.36
Gerdaus 6.45 -.16
GlaxoSKIn 30.36 -.75
GoildFLtd 10.50 -.29
Goldcrp g 30.37 -.75
GoldmanS 116.65 -2.75
GooddrIch 39.90 +,05
Goodyear 7.57 +.17
GtPlainEn 13.62 +.07
Griffon 8.46 +.06
GuangRy 20.65 -.15
Guess 21.69 -1.33
GushanEE 2.52 +.20
HCP Inc 20.27 +.10
HRPTPrp 3.64 -.12
HSBC 33.49 +.88
HSBCcap 21.88 +1.00
Hallibrtin 16.99 -.34
HanJS 9.85 -.05
HanPtDv2 6.50 -.07
Hanesbrds 11.38 -.25
Hanoverlns 30.86 -.09


HelmPayne 27.80 -.76
Hess 57.80 -1.96
HewlettP 33.76 -.39
HighwdPrp 22.58 -1.30
Hill-Rom 11.39 +.11
HomeDp 24.85 -.15
Honwlllnt 29.79 -.41
Hospira 30.65 +.21
HospPT 13.58 -.19
HostHotls 5.12 +.11
HovnanE 1.62 -.11
Humana 26.31 +.85
Huntsmn 3.87 +.21
IAMGId g 7.33 -.65
ICICIBk 14.85 -.43
IMS Hlth 13.06 -.04
iSAstls 14.32 -.24
iShBraz 42.23 -.72
iSCan 17.55 -.19
iShHK 11.19 +.06
iShJapn 8.17 -.18
iShKor 31,65 -.31
iSMalas 7.56 +.06
iShMex 30,06 -.41
IShSing 6.84 +.01
iTaiwn 8.81 -.09
iShSilvers 11.94 -.66
iShS&P100 39.43 -.26
iShCh25s 30.90 -.05
iSSP500 83.75 -.70
iShEMkts 27.01 -.34
iSSPGth 43.68 -.40
iShSPLAs 28.34 -.62


ITr Corp 39.02 +1.01
Idacerp 23.39 -.39
fIW 32.15 -.29
Imanson 8.36 -.34
Infineon 1.51 +.23
IngerRd 16.30 -.24
IntegrysE 26.64 -.01
IntcnOEx 82.42 -2.85
IBM 101.56 -.66
IntlGame 11.60 -.06
InlPap 7.43 -.53
Intorpublic 4.81 -.03
Invesco 15.64 -.24
IronMtn 24.59 -.36
ItauUniMui 12.64 -.15


JCrew 16.34 +.29
JPMorgCh 28.20 -1.08
Jabil 6.08 -.22
JacobsEng 42.81 -.36
JanusCap 7.36 -.20
Jefferies 14.78 -.35
JohnJn 52.20 +.05
JohnsnCt 15.13 -.44
KB Home 14.44 -.32
KKR Fn .90 +.07
KCSouthn 14,04 -.16
Kaydon 29.27 -.49
KAEngTR 13.14 -.43
Kellogg 38.54 +.53
Keycorp 7.94 -.60


Logitech 11.65 +.30 optXprs 12.84 -.21
LookSmart 1.20 -.05 Orade 19.11 -.13
luluemn .87 -.33 Orthfx 18.62 -.55
mik&NA OscientPh .13
OfterTail 23.17 -76
MDRNAH .74 +.02
MGE 31.80 -.44
MKSInst 15.06 -1.00 PDLBioh 7.18 -.32
MRVCmhif .39 +.01 PFChng 24.28 -.14
MTS 21.76 -.59 PMCSra 6.64 -.26
MacrvsnSol 18.16 +.38 PSSWrld 14.19 -.48
MagelnHI 36.74 +.24 Paccar 29.09 -1.17
ManTech 42.76 -.84 Pacerlnt 3.82 -,22
Martek 18.10 -.44 PacEthan .30 -.02
MarvellT 9.73 -.33 PacSunwr 1.52 -.15
Masimo 29.74 +.06 PaetecHId 2.07 +.07
MatrixSv 8.39 -1.36 PainTher 3.93 -.12
MatthInt 28.95 -.43 Palm Inc 9.57 +.15
MaxCapital 16.76 -.72 PanASIv 15.72 -.97
Maximlign 13.55 -.02 PaneraBrd 57.46 -.50
MaxwlIr 7.97 -.27 ParPet 1.66 +.06
Medarex 5.56 +.06 ParamTch 10.30 -.32
MedicActn 8.67 -.27 Parexel 10.37 -.23
MediCo 10.88 +.21 Patterson 18.76
MelcoCrwn 4.51 -.07 PattUTI 10.38 -.52
MentGr 5.21 +.21 Paychex 26.91 -.43
MercadoL 19.59 +.02 PeerossSyh 1.83 +.03
vjMeruelo .05 +.00 PnnNGm 26.40 -.91
MesaAirh .13 -.01 PeopUtdF 17.79 -.04
Methanx 8.61 -.04 PerfecIWId 16.15 +1.07
Micrel 7.13 -.16 Perrigo 23.85 +.08
Microchp 22.63 -.34 PetDRxwt .01 +.00
MicrosSys 20.46 -.17 PetMed 16.44 -.24
MicroSemi 11.99 -.36 PetroDev 13.22 -.16
Microsoft 18.76 +.01 PetsMart 21.13 -.65
MillerHer 12.06 -.35 PharmPdt 23.22 -.08
Millicom 42.31 -1.23 PinnaclFn 21.98 -1.12
Mindspdrs 1.69 +.12 Plexus 15.06 -.43
Misonix .81 -.06 Polycom 15.81 -.17
Molex 15.36 -.23 PoolCorp 14.38 -.28
Moment 10.81 -.30 Popular 2.29 +.07
MonPwSys 16.88 -.28 Pwrlnteg 17.65 -.75
Momstr 31.78 -.39 PwShsQQQ 32.27 -.08
Mylan 14.37 +.33 Powrwav .63 -.05
MyriadGs 43.47 -.11 Presstek 2.12 -.30
NI HIdg 14.31 -3.19 PriceTR 31.16 -1.08
NPSPhm 3.96 -.09 priceline 89.12 +.49
NasdOMX 20.76 -.55 PrivateB 14.93 -.69
NatCineM 14.48 +.01 ProgniasPh 6.31 -.49
NatPenn 9.18 -.23 ProspBcsh 28.02 -1.20
NatusMed 7.92 -.09 PsychSol 14.60 -1.22
NektarTh 5.09 -.01 PureCyde 2.79 -.09
NetServic 7.83 -.31 QIAGEN 15.98 -.26
NetLogic 28.45 -.94 QLT 1.85
NetApp 15.57 -.56 QiaoXing 1.73 +.41
Netease 28.60 +1.34 Qlogic 11.63 -.24
Netflix 44.50 +1.43 Qualcom 40.66 -.53
NtScout 7.48 -.24 QuaitySys 46.23 -.99
NeutTand 24.60 -1.22 QuantFuel .73 -.07
NewsCpA 7.56 -.24 QuestSft 13.08 -.27
NewsCpB 8.55 -.24 Questcor 5.15 -.11
NexMed .13 -.01 Quidel 8.65 -.21
Nextwaveh .19 -.01 RAMHIdgs .18 -.02
Nissan 9.09 -.30 RFMicD 1.76 +.01
NobltyH 7.26 ... RHIEntn 3.27 +.67
Noblelntl h 29 +.01 Rambus 9.94 -.22
NorTrst 59.41 -1.97 Randgold 46.69 -3.15
NthfldLb .39 -.02 RealNwk 2.53 -01
NovuWrIs 6.88 -.09 Regenm 13.59 +57
Novell 3.89 -.20 RentACt 20.65 -.19
Novlus 17.14 -.61 RschMotn 63.97 +4.68
NuHorizlf 238 +.17 ResConn 15.98 -.42
NuVasive 29.84 -.65 RigelPh 6.27 -.43
NuanceCm 12.05 +.08 Riverbed 15.07 -89
Nvidia 11.35 +.03 RosettaR 620 +.03
OReillyA 36.83 +.33 RossStrs 37.64 +.69
OSI Phrm 34.99 -.97 RoyGld 40.52 -2.90
OceanFri 1.37 -.02 Ryanair 24.76 -.71
OdysMar 3.51 -.18
OIdDomFnh 25.10 -89
Omniture 1465 -.19
OmniVisn 881 +28 SBACom 25.97 -.95
OnAssign 3.02 -.17 SEIlInv 13.51 -.08
OnSmcnd 4.66 -.25 STEC 8.36 +.02
OnyxPh 27.20 -.46 SVBFnGp 21.31 -.60
OpenTxt 33.64 +.06 SarixPhm 9.95 -.25
OpenTV 1.65 -.01 SanDisk 13.69 -.40
OpnwvSy 1.24 +.10 Sanmina .35


KimbClk 48.99 -.01
Kimco 9.33 -.07
KindME 47.60 -.14
KingPhrm 7.13 +.29
KInross g 15.49 -.52
Kohls 45.80 +.49
Kraft 22.60 -.40
KrispKrm 1.94 +.04
Kroger 21.33 -.15
LDKSolar 7.32 +.33
LLE Royhlf .55 +.06
LSI Corp 3.47 -.21
LTCPrp 19.12 -.27
LaZBoy 1.49 -.12
Ladede 37.99 -1.03
LVSands 4.96 +.48
LearCorp 1.03 +.05
LeggMason 17.44
LeggPlat 13.60 -.70
LennarA 7.55 -.13
LeucNal 16.87 +.03
Lexmark 16.97 -.49
LbtyASG 2.53 +.03
UbtProp 22.01 +.18
LilyEli 32.84 -.17
Umited 9.75 -.44
LincNat 6.38 -.52
Undsay 27.58 -1.14
UzClaib 3.07 -.12
LockhdM 73.28 +5.97
Loews 22.90 -.59
Lodillard 60.59 -1.97


M&TBk 47.42 +.11
MBIA 5.07 -.11
MDURes 16,58 -.37
MEMC 18.21 -.48
MFGlobal 5.05 +.40
MFAFnd 6.10 -.05
MCR 7.35 -.02
MGIC 1.46 -.21
MGMMir 5.53 +.88
Macesrh 9.80 -.04
MackCale 21.95 -.76
Macquarie 1.66 -.09
Macys 9.95 -.41
Madeco s 4.97 +.37
Magnalg 33.47 -.23
Manitowoc 4.09 +.01
Manulifgs 13.48 +.12
MarathonO 28.46 -.61
MktVGold 33.20 -1.67
MarlntA 19.09 -.28
MamshM 20.51 -.44
Marshlls 5.88 -.38
MStewrt 2.77 +.02
Masco 7.83 +.17
MasseyEn 11.90 +.11
MasterCrd 171.53 -2.52
Maltel 12.86 -.09
McDermlnt 15,02 -.54
McDnlds 55.94 -.70
McGrwH 24.09 -.32
McKesson 34.04 +15
McAfee 34.79 -.30
MeadWvco 13.30 -.02
Mechel s 4.88 -.28
MedcoHlth 42.70 +.97
Medtmic 29.81 -.02
Merck 26.67 +21
Metavnte 24.37 +.94
MeotUfe 25.10 -.24
MetroPCS 17.95 -.38
MicronT 4.52 +.02
MdAApt 33.02 -.74
Midas 9.05 +.05
Millipore 58.42 +.89


Sapient 5.04 +.03
SavientPh 4.76 -.24
ScanSource 20.93 -.48
Schnitzerh 35.27 -.31
Scholastic 17.23 -.22
Schulmn 14.11 -.14
Schwab 15.84 -.53
SciGames 14.29 -.59
SeagateT 6.40 -.33
SearsHktgs 51.22 -3.47
SelCmflt .62 -.15
Selectvlns 12.88 -.20
Semtech 14.36 -.23
Sepracor 14.18 -.38
Sequenom 13.93 -.32
Shanda 42,71 -.17
Shire 36.99 +.56
ShufflMstr 3.42 +.18
SiRFTch 2.49 -.13
SierraWr 4.59 +.25
SigmaDsg 13.63 +.18
SigmaAld 39.54 -.37
SignalBk 25.70 -1.75
SiicnGrph .49 +.37
Silicnlmg 2.60 -.05
SilenLab 27.11 -.73
Slcnware 6.33 -.22
SilvStdg 15.43 -.38
Sine 26.15 -.25
SiriusXM .36 +.01
SkyWest 14.24 +.12
SkywksSol 8.56 -.28
SmartBal 6.80
SmithWes 5.68 -.25
SmithMicro 6.21 +.08
Sohu.cm 46.23 +1.23
Solarfun 4.49 +.17
Somaxon h .75 +.16
SonicCorp 9.89 -.88
SncWall 4.92 -.02
SonoSite 16.70 +.74
Sonus 1.65 -.08
SouMoBc 11.00
SouthFnd 1.19 -.06
vjSpansnIf .14 +.05
SpartnMot 4.89 -.08
SpeclPh 2.01 +.19
Staples 19.31 -.11
StarBulk 2.62 -.14
StarScient 4.61 -.26
Starbucks 11.42 -.27
StarentNet 14.67 -.33
SIDynam 10.04 -.54
StemCells 1.70 +.04
Stericyde 52.05 +.90
SteriBcsh 6.74 -.52
SIFWA 2.23 -.22
SMadden 19.81 -.88
StewEnt 3.29 -.09
SumTotal 3.00 +.99
SunMicro 6.56 -1.93
SunPowerA 24.62 -.05
SunPwrBn 21.24 -.27
SuperHosp .93 +.06
SusqBnc 9.77 -.32
Switch&DI 9.98 -.52
Sycamore 2.86 -.02
Symantec 16.08 -.15
Symetrincm 3.84 -.16
Synapbcss 29.55 -.23
Synopsys 21.31 -.02
Synovis 13.47 -.39
SynthEngy .84 +.06
Syntroleum 1.68 -.07
TBS IntA 7.77 -.41
TDAmeritr 14.38 -.36
TFSFnd 11.96 -.24
THQ 3.71 -.12
TTMTch 6.19 -.36
vTVI Cph .06 +.00
twtelecom 9.67 -.06
TXCO Res .80 +.26
TakeTwo 7.97 -.33
TASER 4.93 +.13
TechData 23.22 +.01
Tekelec 13.51 -.49
TICmSys 10.07 +.32
TeleTech 12.53 -.05


Mirant 12.72 +.32
MitsuUFJ 5.06 -.33
MobileTel 33.68 -1.57
MoneyGrm 1.16 -.01
Monsanto 79.13 -2.13
MonstrWw 9.08 -.18
Moodys 23.07 -.47
MorgStan 23.31 -.75
MSEmMkt 8.59 -.01
Mosaic 44.89 -.75
Motorola 4.69 +.13
MurphO 47.81 -1.07
NCIBld 3.22 -.19
NCRCorp 8.82 -.30
NRGEgy 19.30 -.10
NV Energy 9.74 -.06
NYSE Eur 19.99 -.63
Nabors 11.49 -.55
NaFuGas 31.12 -.66
NatGrid 39.01 -.41
NOiVarco 31.50 -.92
NatRelPrp 17.85 -.23
NatSemi 11.88 -.34
NatwHP 24.43 +.12
Navistarn 31.93 +1.18
NewAmrs 5.29 -.17
NJ Rscs 33.22 -.26
NYCmtyB 10.67 -.68
NewellRub 7.17 -.13
NewfldExp 25.87 +.36
NewmtM 42.80 -1.09
NwpkRslf 2.39 -.05
Nexeng 18.73 -.32
NiSource 9.98 -.13
Nicor 33.04 -.46
NikeB 51.27 -.60
NobleCorp 25.32 -.78
NobleEn 59.79 -.07
NokiaCp 13.29 +.13
Nordstrm 18.75 -.73
NorfikSo 36.39 -1.06
NoestUt 21.22 +.14
NorlhropG 47.94 +3.96
NSTAR 31.96 -.28
Nucor 42.81 -.89
NvFL 10.74 -.03
NvIMO 11.76 -.02
NvMulSI&G 3.80 -.04
NuvQPf2 4.25 -.04
OGEEngy 24.19 -.11
OcdPet 57.72 -2.67
OtfficeDpt 1.66 -.13
OilSvHT 80.50 -2.16
OldRepub 11.07 -.12
Olin 15.17 -.8
OmegaHIt 15.33 -.25
Omnicom 26.66 -.44
ONEOK 23.83 -.28
ONEOK Pt 40.75 -.74
OshkoshCp 8.38 -.35
OwenslIl 16.45 -.49

PG&ECp 36.79 -.39
PNC 33.81 -1.99
PNM Res 8.33 -.08
PPG 44.27 -.29
PPLCorp 28.14. -.53
Pacfv 15.70 -.10
ParkerHan 37.93 -.62
PariotC s 4.24 -.05
PeabdyE 27.67 -1.21
Pengrthg 6.08 -.07
PennVaRs 11.71 -.57
PennWstg 10.53 +.08
Penney 22.04 -1.02
PepBoy 5.23
PepcoHold 12.37 -.17
PepsiBott 24.00 -.21


IIA EIA N . CK XCANG


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 4.96
AdmRsc 14.15 -.55
AdvTecAcq 7.84
Adventrx .14 +.01
AlidNevG 5.85 -.02
AlmadnMg .71 -.08
AmApparel 3.10 -.14
Anooraqg .78 +.03
ApolloGg .31 -.03
Aurizong 4.24 -.44
AuroraOG .06 -.01
BMBMunai .69 -.06


BPZRes 4.23
Banrog 1.62
BarcAIG36 33.81
BarcGSOil 19.65
BrclndiaTR 33.31
BootsCts 1.37
BritATob 46.23
CanoPet .42
Carderog 1.14
CelSd .24
CFCdag 11.25
CheniereEn 4.85
ClaudeRg .52
CighGlbOp 9.61
Corrienteg 5.18


Crosshglf .11 -.01
C tallx .22 -02

DejourEg 20 -.02
DenisnM g .99 +.21
DuneEngy .11 -.02
EVInMu2 11.64 +.33
EVLtdDur 10.55 -.20
EldorGldg 7.80 -.38
BrtePh .13 -.03
BixirGam .11 -.02
EllswtbFd 4.74 -.06
Endvrlnt 1.42 -.12
EndvSilvg 1.40 -.08
EvglncAdv 6.47 -.15


ExeterRg 2.64 -.09 IAGlobal .06 -.01
RaPUil 9.65 -.05 ImpOilgs 38.12 -.04
FrkStPrp 13.15 -.09 InSteVis .28 -.03
FrontD 2.16 -.10 IntellgSys .90 ...
- 2002
GabGldNR 14.13 -1.02
GascoEngy .43 -.01 JavelinPh 1.37 -.07
GenMoly 1.22 -07 KodiakOg .37 -.02
GeoGloblR 1.46 +51 LadThalFn .67 +.01
GoldStrg 1.29 -.12 LibAun 8.95 +.04
Grahams 10.16 +.60
GranTra gn 2.80 -.09
GrtBasGg 1.19 -.07 Merrimac 2.35 -.17
HooperH .38 +.01 Metalico 1.98 -.04
Hyperdyn .26 -.03 MetroHlIth 1.51 +.05


MdwGoldg .40 -.04
Minefndg 7.12 -.37
NIVSIntTn 3.60 -.01
NBRESec 1.45 -.06
Neuralstem 1.23 -.04
Nevsung 1.04 +.01
NDragon .17 -.00
NwGoldg 1.78 -.15
NAPallg 1.44 -.13
NDynMng 6.46 -.05
NthnO&G 4.29 -.28
NthgtMg 1.25 -.05
NovaDelP .26 -.01
NovaGldg 2.79 -.13
Oilsandsg .98 +.13


On2Tech .33 -.03
OrsusXel .70 +28

Palstn .13 +.01
PeoRes .21 -.01
PhrmAth 2.75 +.28
PionDrill 3.91 -.20
PolyMetg .75
PSCrudeDSnl58.47 +8.95
PSCrudeDLn 3.07 -.10
PSS&PBW 17.40
ProceraNt .63 +.02
Proliance .15 -.01
PyramldOs 3.80 -.08
QuestCapg .57 -.03


Rentech .64 -.02
RivieraH .93 +.12
Rubicon o 1.53 -.08

SeabGIdg 20.00 -1.33
SilvrepMgn 2.12 -.10
SoftBmds .24 -.03
SulphCo .93 -.13
TanzRyg 4.25 +.03
Taseko 1.43 -.03
Telkonet .11
TravelCtrs 2.09 +.15
Tdplecm 9.38
USGeothn .74 -.06
US Gold 1.99 -.02


UraniumEn .51 -.09


VangMega 29.13 -.16
VantageDri 1.66 +.21
VictoryAwt .14
VistaGold 2.05
WstGIdfdg 1.71 -.18
Westmrid 8.08 -.62
WilshrEnt 1.60 +.09
WzzardSft .46 +.01


Tellabs 4.62 -.24
TesseraT 13.47 -.70
TetraTc 22.18 +.06
TevaPhrm 45.49 +1.09
TexRdhsA 10.17 +.12
Therawce 16.33 -.96
thinkorswim 8.94 -.12
Thoratec 27.21 +.06
3Com 3.56 +.01
TibcoSft 6.20 -.02
Tktmstr nh 3.91 -.23
TiVoInc 7.33 -.11
TowerS h .28 +.07
TractSupp 39.37 +.03
TransGIb 2.45 -.13
TriadGty .23 -.02
TridentMh 1.57 -.04
TrimbleN 16.22 -.29
TriQuint 3.49 +.37
TrueRelig 12.34 -1.11
TrstNY 6.38 -.16
Trustmk 18.77 -.64
UAL 5.86 +.57
UCBHHId 1.68 -.13
USA Mobl 9.16 -.36
UTiWridwd 12.88 -.06
UTStrcm .90 -.03
Umpqua 9.62 -.35
UAlndem h 4.31 +.22
UBWV 18.30 -.81
UtdCBksGa 4.31 -.09
UtdNtriF 19.59 -.28
UtdOnin 5.07 +.12
USEnr 1.80 -.01
UtdThrp 64.06 -.75
UnivFor 28.54 -1.29
UrbanOut 16.04 -.58

VCAAnt 23.23 -.20
Va[VisA .67 +.02
ValueClick 9.20 -.34
Varian 24.35 -.13
VarianSemi 23.42 -1.07
Verenium .28 -.01
Verigy 8.70 -.54
Verisgn 20.58 +.42
VertxPh 27.05 -.28
VirgnMdah 5.83 +.27
ViroPhrm 4.88 -.43
VistaPri 29.44 +.11
Vrvus 4.29 -.08
Vocus 14.85 -.20
Volcano 13.29 -.42
Volcom 10.90 -.50
Volterra 9.45 +.22
WamerChil 10.49 +.02
WarrenRs .98 -.09
WashFed 13.44 -.20
Websense 13.21 -.13
WemerEnt 15.71 -.51
WAmBcp 47.66 -1.28
WetSead 3.57 -.13
WhitneyH 12.04 -.32
WholeFd 18.53 -.11
WindRvr 7.14 -.17
Winn-Dixe 10.23 -.65
WdwrdGov 12.84 +.30
WrghtM 13.20 -.01
Wynn 31.20 +1.55
XOMA .47 -.03
Xilinx 19.78 -.21
YRCWwde 5.45 -.21
Yahoo 13.23 -.11
ZebraT 19.99 -.14
ZCorph .77 +.01
Zlars .18 +.0
ZonBcp 10.99 -.26
Zoltek 7.85 -.43
Zoran 9.67 -.42


PepsiCo 52.67 -.02
PepslAmer 18.57 -.09
PerkBEm 13.38 +.05
Prmian 10.03 -.23
PetroCg 29.15 -.07
Petrohawk 21.65 -.24
PetrbrsAs 27.25 -.46
Petrobrss 34.30 -.80
Pfizer 13.71 +.16
PhilipMor 37.33 +1.13
PiedNG 25.64 -.19
PimcoStrat 7.92 -.01
PioNtrl 17.32 -.53
PtnyBw 24.58 -.01
PlainsEx 19.72 -.41
PlumCrk 30.64 -.12
Polaris 26.04 -.12
PoloRL 45.06 -2.16
PostPrp 12.79 +.13
Potash 83.48 -2.23
PwshDB 20.78 -.26
PSAgri 24.80 -.20
Praxair 69.40 -.93
PrecOril 3.39 -.06
Pridelnt 19.97 +.13
PrinFnd 10.63 +.10
PrUShS&P 71.13 +1.03
ProUltDow 25.68 -.25
PrUIShDow 56.99 +.61
ProUtQQQ 30.44 -.18
PrUShQQQ 42.62 +.26
ProUltSP 21.80 -.32
ProUSL20 n 45.84 +.41
.ProUShtRE 39.17 +1.07
ProUShOG 23.22 +.76
ProUShtFn 84.30 +3.35
ProUItRE 3.13 -.10
ProUltO&G 24.14 -.86
ProUltFin 2.95 -.14
ProUBasM 14.08 -.54
ProUSR2K 61.50 +2.00
ProUtR2K 15.36 -.51
ProUltCrude 9.01 -.45
ProctGarn 49.65 +.02
ProgrssEn 35.93 +.10
ProgsvCp 13.82 +.09
ProLogis 7.86 -.19
ProvErg 4.16 +.04
Prudeni 22,81 -1.03
PSEG 30.41 -.61
PSEGpfA 73.00
PubStg 62.27 +.16
PulteH 11.57 +.03
PPrIF 4.18 +.04
Questar 31.14 -.62
QksilvRes 6.35 -.24
QwestCm 3.95 +.04
RPM 14.18 +.02
RadloShk 9.16 -.41
Ralcorp 54.55 -.01
RangeRs 43.85 -1.26
RJamesFn 18.77 -.86
Rayonier 33.74 +1.35
Raytheon 41.66 +3.19
Rlitylno o 20.86 -.47
RedHat 18.41 -.21
RegalBel 35.34 -1.12
RegalEnt 14.33 -.15


Argent
Australia
Bahrain
Brazil
Britain
Canada
Chile
China
Colombia
Czech Rep
Denmark
Dominican Rep
Egypt
Euro
Hong Kong
Hungary
India
Indnsia
Israel
Japan
Jordan
Lebanon
Malaysia
Mexico
N. Zealand
Norway
Peru
Poland
Russia
Singapore
Slovak Rep
So. Africa
So. Korea
Sweden
Switzerlnd
Taiwan
Thailand
Turkey
U.A.E.
Uruguay
Venzuel


RgcyCtrs 32.58 +.89
RegBkHT 52.75 -1.90
RegtonsFn 4.23 -.33
ReliantEn 4.00 +.13
Repsol 18.71 -.18
RepubSvc 18.71 +.53
RetailHT 77.45 -.49
RetailVent 1.79 -.11
Revlonrs 2.86 +.01
ReynldAm 38.51 +20
RiteAidh .43 -.03
RockwIAut 24.21 -.09
RockColl 34.14 +.51
Rowan 13.03 -.66
RoyalBkg 31.09 -.26
RylCarb 9.98 -.11
RoyDShlIA 45.23 -1.77
Royce 7.63 -.05
RovceapB 22 45 +.27

SAIC 18.66 +.19
SAPAG 37.13 -27
SCANA 30.59
SKTIcinm 15.54 +.03
SLGreen 12.08 -1.19
SLM Cp 5.56 +.21
SpdrGood 8527 -2.32
SpdrHome 11.50 -.13
SpdrKbwBk 14.72 -.56
SpddrtwCM 27.41 -.61
SpdrRetl 24.38 -.38
SpdrOGEx 29.50 -.49
SpdrMetM 27.89 -.78
Safeway 20.71 -.47
StJoe 19.02 -.34
StJude 34.57 -.80
Saks 2.50 -.11
SJuanB 15.11 -.51
SaondRge 7.57 -.36
Sanoi 27.72 -.11
SaraLee 8.43 -.03
Satyam 2.80 +.82
SchergRPI 23.63 +.09
ScIlmbrg 43.95 -1.12
SemiHTr 19.59 -.41
SempraEn 45.62 -1.23
SenHous 15.78 -.16
Sensient 24.05 -.52
SiderNac 16.65 -.31
ShlvWhtng 7.55 -.48
SimonProp 40.32 -.98
Skechers 7.67 -.58
SmithAO 26.38 -.02
SmithInt 23.03 -1.33
Smucker 37.70 -.29
SonicAut 2.09 +.02
SoJerlnd 35.37 -.46
SouthnCo 30.98 -.10
SthnCopp s 18.52 -.43
SwstAid 7.34 +.48
SwstoEngy 31.84 , -.48
SpelraEn 14.70 -.17
SpdntNex 4.41 +.22
SPDR 83.60 -.66
SPMid 94.15 -1.13
SP Mats 23.39 -.42
SPHItiC 24.13 +.23


The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.





Yesterday Pvs Day


3.6920
1.3952
.3766
2.1997
1.4817
1.2306
578.05
6.8374
2414.50
19.69
5.5249
35.82
5.6305
.7418
7.7500
219.39
49.905
11455.00
4.1680
100.28
.7078
1500.50
3.5800
13.5405
1.7041
6.5385
3.135
3.30
33.3356
1.5040
21.49
9.0561
1335.70
7.9618
1.1315
33.28
35.28
1.5761
3.6730
23.9998
2.1470


British pound expressed In U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar In foreign currency.



Yesterday PvsDay

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.50 0.50
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.20 0.195
6-month 0.40 0.42
5-year 1.89 1.72
10-year 2.93 2.71
30-year 3.75 3.60



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX May09 51.05-1.46
Corn BOT May 09 40512 +1
Wheat CBOT May09 557 -61/2
Soybeans CBOT May09 994 -11/2
Cattle CME Jun09 84.37 +.20
Pork Bellies CME Jul09 86.55 +.90
Sugar(world) NYBT May09 12.22 -.33
Orange Juice NYBT May 09 76.60 +.70

SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz.,.spot) $871.50 $915.50
Silver (troyoz., spot) $12.105 $13.UZ3
Copper (pound) 1.Mbbh $1.7610
Platinum (troy oz., spot) $1145.7U $1113.60
NMER = New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


3.6760
1.4052
.3771
2.2233
1.4726
1.2404
582.45
6.8374
2409.50
19.88
5.5617
35.47
5.6350
.7465
7.7502
220.60
50.005
11280.00
4.1424
100.93
.7084
1500.50
3.5565
13.6000
1.7028
6.5730
3.135
3.33
33.3678
1.5077
21.49
9.0800
1304.40
8.0257
1.1372
33.25
35.29
1.5899
3.6732
23.9998
2.1470


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DIARY


Adar nC.ed
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


NASDAQ ATI AL


I NYEiH


I AMEX


I NASDAQ


I












l.:iliju , Anl. 7, Uoou A7


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chlg ! ,
AIM Investments A: Dodge&Cox:
ChartAp 1122 -.07 Balanced 47.31 -.27 Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
Constp 15.84 +.05 Income 11.62 +,01 price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
HYdA p 2,93 +.01 InttStk 20.79 -256
ntlGrow 18.09 -.14 Stock 66.58 -.59 Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
SelEqtyr 12.26 -10 Dreyfus: NAV: Net asset value.
AIM Investments B: Aprec 25.94 -.14
CapDvBI 859 -10 CorVA 16.55 -.18 Chg: Net change in price of NAV.
AIM Investor CI: Dreyf 574 -.07 Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.
Energy 2537 -56 Dr5001nt 23.51 -.20 ----------------
Summip 821 +.03 aAr26EmgLd 11.73 -22 Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital 1: HIYIdA p 5.40 +.01 FIrst Investors A HiIncA t 4.02 +.01 Japan n 5.66 -.10 Intl 15.57 -.29
Balancp 11.30 -.06 LgCStkAp 15.37 -.17 BIChpAp 15.11 -.09 InAICGAp 5.66 -.06 LatAmn 25.56 -.40 NYBd 10.66
RelInc 7.29 .. MunBdr 10.43 GloblAp 4.27 -.04 LgCpGAp 16.68 -.18 MDShrIn 5.24 PrecMM 21.96 -1.04
Alger Funds B: NYTaxr 13.79 -.01 i GovtAp 11.14 +.01 MgMuAp 14.28 MDBondn 9.68 -.01 ScTech 7.64 -.07
SmCapGrt 3.77 -.05 StratValA 18.63 -25 GrolnAp 9.31 -.06 Legg Mason Ptrs B: MidCapn 33.81 -.46 ShtTBnd 8.45 +.01
AllianceBern A: TechGroA 17.52 -.17 IncoAp 1.94 +.01 LgCpGBt 15.32 -.16 MCapValn 14.02 -.12 SmCpStk 7.72 -.14
BalanAp 11.11 ... Drlehaus Funds: MATFAp 11.07 ..Longleaf Partners: NAmern 20.42 -.17 TxElt 11.88 +.01
GIbThGrAp44.84 -.86 EMktGr 17.96 -.02 MITFAp 11.58 Partners 16.53 -.43 NAsian 8.69 +.08 TxELT 11.60 +.01
IntlValAp 9.42 -.10 Eaton Vance Cl A: NJTFAp 12.42 -.01 Intl 10.20 -.05 NewEran 30.04 -.67 TxESh 10.38
SmCpGrA 17.23 -.23 ChinaAp 14.93 +.01 NYTFAp 13.77 -.01 SmCap 14.61 -.06 NHorizn 17.80 -.31 VABd 10.24
AllianceBern Adv: AMTFMBI 8.46 +.03 OppAp 15960 -.25 Loomis Sayles: NIncn 8.61 +.01 WIdGr 11.88 -.15
LgCpGrAd 16.68 -.12 MultiCGrA 4.89 -.07 PATFAp 12.55 LSBondl 10.26 +.01 NYBondn 10.43 +.01 VALIC:
AllianceBern B: InBosA 4.08 +.01 SpSitAp 14.44 -.19 SirtncC 10.48 +.01 PSIncn 11.96 -.05 MdCpldx 11.92 -.14
GIbThGrB t 3929 -.76 LgCpVal 12.88 -.12 TxExAp 9.45 ...LSBondR 10.22 RealEstn 8.34 -.04 Sikldx 17.19 -.13
GrowthBt 1594 -.12 NatlMun 8.24 +.02 TotRtAp 11.16 -.04 StrincA 10.43 +01 R2010n 11.03 -.06 Value Line Fd:
SCpGrBt 14.06 -.20 SpEqtA 9.18 -.11 ValueBp 4.91 -.05 Loomis Sayles Inv: R2015n 8.17 -.05 LrgCon 12.30 -.04
AllianceBern C: TradGvA 7.49 .. Firsthand Funds: InvGrBdAp 9.61 -.01 R2020 n 10.93 -.07 Van Kamp Funds A:
SCpGrCt 14.14 -.19 Eaton Vance ClB: TechrVal 24.90 -.15 InvGrBdCp 9.55 -.01 R2025n 7.80 -.05 CATFAp 15.40
Allianz Insti MMS: HIthSBt 7.97 -.04 FrankfTemp Frnk A: InvGrBdY 9.62 R2030n 10.96 -.08 CapGro 7.52 -.07
NFJDvVI 7.94 -.11 NatIMBt 8.24 +.01 AdjUSp 8.94 ... LordAbbettA: R2040n 10.88 -.08 CmstAp 9.85 -.13
Allianz Funds A: Eaton Vance CI C: ALTFAp 10.57 AfilAp 7.55 -.10 SciTecn 15.25 -.10 CpBdAp 5.45 -.01
NFJDvVII 7.86 -.11 GovtCp 7.48 ... AZTFAp 10.13 ... AIIValA 8.21 -.09 ShIBdn 4.65 .. EqlncAp 6.08 -.07
SmCpVA 17.32 -21 NatIMCt 8.24 +.01 Ballnvp 30.94 -.41 BdDebAp 5.94 +01 SmCpStkn 18.56 -.35 Exch 320.93 -2.75
Allianz Funds C: EvergreenA: CallnsAp 11.42 -.02 MidCpAp 9.65 -.11 SmCapValn20.91 -.41 GrlnAp 12.70 -.21
GrowthCt 15.91 -.10 AstAlIp 9.20 -.03 CAIntAp 10.84 MFSFundsA: SpecGrn 10.79 -.09 HarbAp 11.71 -.05
TargetCt 7.85 -.13 Evergreen C: CaITFAp 6.40 ... MITA 13.07 -.10 Speclnn 10.13 -.02 HiYIdA 7.46 +.01
Amer Beacon nsti: AstAIICt 8.92 -.04 CapGrA 7.64 -.08 MIGA 9.72 -.07 TFIncn 9.15 +-01 HYMuAp 7.89
LgCaplnst 12.53 -.13 Evergreen 1: COTFAp 10.83 -.01 HiInA 2.43 TxFrHn 8.95 +.01 InTFAp 15.28
Amer Beacon Plan: SIMundi 9.42 .. CTTFAp 10.16 . MFLA 8.90 TxFrSI n 5.42 .. MunlAp 11.65 ...
LgCpPIn 11.93 -.12 FBR Funds: CvtScAp 9.71 ... TotRA 10.89 -.03 USTIn 6.02 PATFAp 14.26
AmerCentury Adv: Fouoslnv 31.32 -56 DbITFA 10.26 . UtitA 11.05 -.08 USTLgn 12.79 -.05 StrMunlnc 8.87 ...
EqGroAp 14.01 -.09 FMI Funds: DynTchA 18.01 -.10 ValueA 16,05 -.06 VABondn 10.92 USMIgeA 12.47
Amer Centurylnv: LgCappn 10.58 -.10 EqlncAp 11.45 -.08 MFSFunds B: Valuen 14.24 -.11 UlilAp 14.80 -.13
Balanced 11.78 -.05 FPA Funds: Fedlntp 10.94 MIGB n 8.79 -.06 Principal Inv: Van Kamp Funds B:
Eqnc 5.57 -.04 Nwnc 10.97 ... FedTFAp 10.99 0 GvScBn 10.00 BdMIgln 8.22 ... EnterpBt 8.71 -.08
GNMAI 10.67 Fairholme 20.28 +.04 FLTFAp 10.87 -.01 HilnBn 2.44 +.oi DiscLCInst 8.55 -.07 EqlncBt 5.97 -.07
Growth 16.38 -.13 Federated A: FoundAlp 7.35 -.06 MulnBn 7.68 LT20301n 7.72 ... HYMuBt 7.88
Heriagel 11.80 -.14 AmLdrA 9,85 -.07 GATFAp 11.23 -.01 TotRBn 10.89 -.03 LT202OIB 7.97 ... MulB 11.64 ...
IncGro 16.48 -.12 MIdGrStA 22.45 -.32 GoldPrMA 26.25 -1.21 MFS Funds I: SAMBalA 9.17 ... StrMunlnc 8.87
InBnd 13.51 -.10 KautmAp 338 -.05 GrwthAp 28.16 +.05 RenT 10.06 -.18 Putnam Funds A: USMtge 12.41 +.01
IntDisc 5,92 -.07 MuSecA 9.42 HYTFAp 8.70 MFS Funds InstI: AmGvAp 9.05 +.01 UtilB 14.73 -.13
IntlGrol 6.86 -.08 Federated InstI: HincA 1.48 +01 I"nlEqn 11.49 -17 AZTE 8.38 Vanguard Admiral:
UfeSci 4.24 +.04 KaufmnK 3.39 -.04 ncoA p 1.56 MainStay Funds A: CATxA p 7.05 BalAdml n 15.91 -.09
NewOpp 4.32 -.09 TotRelBd 10.17 InsTFAp 11.20 HiYIdBA 4.48 +.01 Convp 12.64 -.03 CAITAdmn 10.43
OneChAg 8.20 -.06 Fidelity Adv Foc T: NYjTFp 10.65 MainStay Funds B: DiscGr 12.26 .. CALTAdmn10.41 -.01
OneChMd 8.46 -.05 EnergyT 21.81 -.46 LATFAp 10.43 CapApBt 18.47 -.09 DvrInAp 5.92 +.01 CpOpAdIn 49.60 -.27
RealEstl 8.97 -.07 HIICarT 14.17 +.01 LMGvScA 10.43 ConvBt 1061 03 EqIAp 10.14 -.8 EMAdmrrn21.38 -.04
Ultra 14.48 -.10 FidelityAdvisor A: FAp 1033 -.02 GovlBI 8.64 EuEq 12.85 -.20 Energyn 83.98 -1.68
Valuelnv 3.97 -.03 DivlntlAr 10.59 -.17 MATFAp 10.93 HYIdBBI 4.46 +.01 GoAp 8.88 -.05 ExplAdmln38.01 -52
Visla 10.90 -.12 Nwlnsghp 12.93 -.09 MITFAp 11.46 nlEqB .71 -.14 p 585 -.04 EdAdmn 22.89 -.34
American Funds A: StrnA 9.92 +01 MNIsA 11.3 SmCGBp 8.38 -.14 GrnAp 8.68 -.09 500AdmIn 76.93 -.64
AmpAp 12.08 -.10 FldelityAdvlsor h MOTFA p 11.27 ToIRtB t 12.17 -.04 GIbIHIIhA 36.02 +.05 GNMAAdn 10.67 +.01
AMutlAp 17.98 -.13 Dirntln 10.75 -17 NJTFAp 11.24 Mairs & Power: HiYdAp 5.49 +.02 HthCrn 38.98 +.01
BalA 13.10 -.08 EqGrln 34.75 -.31 NYInsAp 10.43 Growth 4730 -69 HIA 4 38 +-.1 HldCpn 4.43 +.01
BondAp 10.54 EqIHln 15.47 -.23 NYTFAp 11.07 +.01 Managers Funds: 4GAp 65021 - +.0 Irdmn 2355 +.03
CapWAp 17.96 -.03 IntBdIn 9.51 NCTFAp 11.37 Bondn 19.12 -.01 p 6p .5-.08 ITBnAdmn1. 18 .
CapIBAp 38.53 -.17 Nwlnsglln 13.04 -.10 hioAp 12.12 MarsicoFunds: N A 25 -p7 IrAdmln 11.75 -02
CapWGA p 24.79 -.21 Fidelity Advisor T: RTFAp 1116 Focus p 11.23 -.05 OpANJT 8864 -01 TAdmln12.97
EupacAp 27.12 -.26 BalancT 10.60 -.08 PAT p 7 . MatthewsAsi Ap 5.20 ... ITGrAdmln 8.42 +.
FdInvAp 24.24 -28 DrvGrT p 6.69 -.08 ReEScvp 7021 -1 Indiasr 8.04 +13tAp . TrAdn .42 .
GotAp c14.11-.01 DnnCATpy11.19st.07 p 21.75-.t1Adr 9.04r+130.
GwtihAp 20.55 -.1 nEqGrTp 32.71 - SMCpGrA 20.74 -.25 Mergerd 14.70 -.03 TxExAp 7.73 ... LTGrAdm n 7.76
weiAp 7.B -.1 0 Eqir0 p n 3.1 -.2 QStratlncp 8.50 +.02 MetroWestFds: TFInAp 13.92 LTsyAdmln 11.95 -.05
HIrAp 7.91 +.02 EqlnT 15.26 -.22 USGovAp 6.65 TotRetBd 8.87 +.01 TFHYA 9.57- -.01 LTAdmIn 10.3
HinMunA 11.97 GrppT 19.95 n -.23 UisAp 9.38 -09 TotRBdl 86 '" USGvAp 13.03 +.02 MCpAdml n 51.94 -.57
IntBdAp 12.70 -. nBdT 49 + VATFAp 10.95 s 2Midas Funds: G blUtilA 9.02 -.03 MorgAdm n 34.82 -.32
ICAA p 192.03 -.11 nTp 11.94 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: MdasFd 2.27 -09 VstaAp 5.96 -.11 MuHYAdmn 9,37 ..
LtTEBAp 14.76 +.01 OvrseaT 12.01 -..1 GIbBdAdvp ... ... M ettaFn VoyAp 12.89 -.03 NJLTAdn 11.15 ..
NEoAp 15.9A5 -.12 STFn7 IncmeAd 1.55 -.01 Monesan 98.82 -.02 Putnam Funds B: NYLTAdn 10.50
NerAp 18.30 -.2 StT .2 +0 Frank/TempFrnk B: Morgan StanleyA: CapAprt 10.64 ... PrmCap r n 45.55 -.48
NwWfrldA 32.26 -.23 FIdelity Fr eedom IncomeB t 1.56 ... DivGthA 10.43 -.05 DiscGr 11.04 ... PALTAdmn1O.56 +.01
STBA p 9 .88 FF2000 n 9.98 -.03 Frank/Temp Frnk C: Morgan Stanley B: DvrlnBt 5.88 +.01 STsyAdmI n 10,81 ...
SmCpAp 20.58 -.13 FF201n 10.14 -.0 FoundAlp 7.25 -.06 DIGB 10.52 -.04 Eqnct 10.05 -.08 STBdAdmln10.21 ...
TxExAp 11.22 +01 FF2015n 837 -.05 InomC1 1.57 -.01 GIbDiv 7.69 -.03 EuEq 12.32 -.20 ShtTrAdn 15.84 ...
TECAA p 14.3 FF2020n 976 -.07 FrankSTemp Mtl A&B: StratB 14.44 -.07 GeoBit 8.79 -.04 STFdAd n 10.85
WshAp 19.20 -.16 FF2025n 797 -.06 BeacnA 8.63 -.06 MorganStanley nst: GIbEqt 5.30 -.03 STIGrAdn 9.74 +.01
American Funds B: FF2030 n 9.36 -.08 DiscA 22.27 -06 IntlEql n 9.90 -.15 GINtRst 12.05 -.25 TxMCap r n 40.71 -.35
BaB 13.05 -.09 FF2035n 7.69 -.07 ualdAt 14.30 -.03 Munder Funds A: GrInBt 8.53 -.09 TllBAdmn 10.05
CaplBBt 38.54 -.17 FF204On 5.33 -.05 SharesA 14.30 -.08 IntemtA 15.01 -.09 GIbHhB 30.44 +.04 TStkAdmn 20.31 -.19
CpWGrBt 24.67 -.21 Incomen 9.46 -02 FrankTemp Mtl C: Mutual Series: HiYdB 5.47 +.01 WellslAdmn4.55 -.11
GrwnhBt 19.90 -.17 Fidelity nvest: DiC 22.09 -.06 Beacn 8.72 -.06 HYAdBt 4.31 +.01 WelltnAdm n39.83 -.26
IncoBt 12.05 -.04 Aggrrr 11.88 -22 Frank/Temp TempA: DiscZ 22.53 -.06 IncmBt 5.17 ... Windsorn 29.25 -.29
ICABt 19.74 - 8 -.12 ASectE 8.75 11 DvMktAp 13.5 - QuafdZ 14.40 -.04 IntGrlnt 6.44 -.08 WdsriAdn 30.80 -.28
WashBt 19.08 -.15 AMgrn 101 -06 ForgAp 4.40 -.03 SharesZ 14.40 -.08 IntlNopt 9.40 -.12 Vanguard Fds:
Arielnvestments: AMgr70rn 10.66 -.08 GIBdAp 11.41 +.06 Neuberger&BermInv: InvB1 7.44 -.06 AssetAn 17.33 -.15
Apprec 20.85 -.29 AMgr2Orn 10.32 -.02 GrwthAp 11.93 -.11 Focus 13.18 -.17 NJTxBI 98.4 CAfTn 10.43
Anel 21.72 -36 Balancn 1284 -.10 WorldAp 10.13 -.06 Geneslnst 28.02 -.2 8 NwOpBt 27.82 -.22 CALTn 10.41 -.01
Artio Global Funds: BlueChGrn 26.57 -35 FrankTemp Tmp Adv: .Intl r 10.25 -.15 NwValIp 7.93 ... CapOppn 21.47 -.12
In Eqr 21.61 -24 CA Munn 11.27 GrthAv 11.92 -.12 Partner 15.59 -.17 OTCBt 4.56 ... Covrtn 9.83 -.03
InlEqA 21.12 -.24 Canadan 34.30 -.35 Frank/TempTmpB&C: Neuberger&Berm"r : TxExBt 7.73 -.01 DivdGron 10.51 -.07
ntEqAt 8.73 -.10 CapApn 15.32 -.09 DevMktC 13.24 +.01 Genesis 29.18 -.30 TFHYBt 9.59 -.01 Energyn 44.73 -.90
IntEqIIlr 8.78 -.10 CapDevOn 6.52 -.07 ForgnCp 4.31 -.03 Nicholas Group: USGe~t 12.99 +02 Eqtncn 14.01 -.14
Artisan Funds: Cptncrn 5.66 +.02 GIBdCp 11.43 +06 Hilncln 7.79 +.01 GIblUtilB 8.99 -.03 Explrn 40.86 -.56
Intl 14.31 -.18 ChinaRgr 18.18 -.08 GEEIfunS&S: Nichn 29.17 -.06 VistaBt 5.07 -.09 FLLTn 10.72
MidCap 18.29 -.27 CngSn 339.79 -.46 S&Slnc 10.27 Northern Funds: VoyBt 11.00 -.03 GNMAn 10.67 +.01
MidCapVal12.70 -.21 CTMunrn 11.06 +01 S&SPM 27.59 -.28 Bondldx 10.08 -.01 RS Funds: GlobEqn 11.17 -.07
BNYMeonFunds: Contra n 43.61 .32 TaxEx 11.12 SmCpldx 4.90 -.09 InlGrA 10.88 -.10 Grolncn 17.85 -.12
BondFd 12.48 +01 CnvScn 14.29 -.15 GMOTrustII: Techly 8.85 -.07 LgCAIphaA 28.17 -.22 GrthEqn 6.93 -.04
Baron Funds: Dis2 En 16.11 -06 EmMkr 7.86 +.01 NuveenCIA: Value 14.85 -.20 HYCorpn 4.43 +.01
Asset 33.97 -.38 Divntln 20.04 -29 For 880 -12 HYMuBdp 12.22 +.01 Rainier Inv Mgt: HIthCren 92.37 +.03
Growth 30.22 -29 DivSkOn 8.63 -.12 IntlnlrVI 15.62 -23 LtMBAp 10.53 .. SmMap 19.51 -.30 Inl5aPron 11.99 .+.01
SmCap 13.96 -.12 DivGth n 15.46 -.20 USgQItlyEq 15.45 -.04 Nuveen CLI R: RidgeWorth Funds: IntlExplrn 9.21 .06
Bernstein Fds: EmrMkn 13.62 -07 GMOTrustl V: IntDMBd 8.42 +.01 LCGrStkAp 6.35 -.05 IntGrn 11.66 -.16
IntDur 11.81 +01 Eq Incln 29.14 -.41 EmCnD1 6.21 +.02 Oak Assoc Fds: RiverSource A: IntlVal n 21.67 -.22
DivMu 14.12 Emin 11.96 -.17 EmrMk 7.82 +.01 WhmOkSGn23.79 -.22 BaanceA 7.22 -.05 ITIGraden .42 +.01
NYMu 13.81 ECapAp 1261 -.23 ntlGrEq 15.55 -.18 OakmarkFunds : DispEqAp 3.65 -.03 IlTsry3 n 11.75 -.02
TxMgdlnt 10.87 -.16 Europe 21.01 -36 IntIlntrVI 15.61 -.23 Eqtylncr 20.74 -.02 DEI 6.49 -.08 LifeCons 12986 -.06
InPort ' 10.81 -.16 Exchn 226.14 -1.3 GMO TrustVl Global 13.06 -.17 DirBd 4.43 ... feGron 15.08 -.13
BlackRockA: Exportn 14.35 -.16 StrFxlnc 15.59 Intl Itu10.85 .17 DvOppA 5.08 -.05 Ufelncn 11.97 -.04
AuroraA 1211 -.17 FidelIn 21.609 -.21 USQItyEq 15.45 -.04 Oakmarkr 24.60 -.30 Growth 17.08 -.09 UfeModn 14.43 -.10
CapDevAp 11.45 -.06 Fiftyrn 10.96 -.06 Gabelli Funds: Selectr 15.84 -.22 HiYdTEA 3.89 LTIGraden 7.76
EqtyDiv 12.25 .10 FItRateHirn 8.29 +.02 Asset 28.97 -.27 Old Mutual Adv I: LgCpEq p 2.67 -.03 LTTsryn 11.95 -.05
GWIAr 14.44 -.09 FrlnOnen 18.69 -.16 GatewayFunds: Tc&ComZ 10.42 -.07 MCpGrA 6.11 -.10 Morgan 11.23 -.11
HiYInvA 5.22 +01 GNMAn 11.30 ... GtewayA 22.94 +03 OldWetburyFds: MidCpVI0p 4.48 -.02 MuHYn 9.37
IntlOpAp 21.37 -27 Govtlnc 10.83e Goldman Sachs A: GlobOpp 5.89 +.01 RiverSource : Mulnt n 12.97 .
BlackRock B&C: Groo n 49.64 -.50 HiYiedA 5.24 +.01 GIbMdCp 9.68 -.06 TNEmgMk n 5.37 -.03 MuLtd n 10.86
GIAIB I 14.09 -09 Grolncsn 12.12 -.11 MdCVAp 20.96 -.22 Oppenheimer A: Royce Funds: MuLong n 10.38
GIAICt 13.51 -.09 Highoncrn 6.33 +.02 Goldman S9achs nst: AMTFMu 5.00 LwPrSkSvnr 8.91 -.22 MuoShrtn 15.84
BlackRock lnst: - Indeprnn 13.69 -.11 HiYield 5.25 +01 AMTFrNY 8.85 +.01 MicroCapl 8 .73 -.12 NJLTn 11.15 .
BaVI 16.96 -.17 InProBdn 10.83 +.01 MidCapV 21.11 23 CAMuniAp 6.05 PennMulr 6.51 -.12 NYLTn 1n0.9
GIbAllocr 14.50 -.9 n0 nnd 9.10 ... Harbor Funds: CapApAp 28.87 -.23 Premierlr 11.61 -.25 OHLTTE n 11.40
BrandywlneFds: IntGovn 10.86 ... Bond 11.27 CapincAp 6.46 -.01 TotRetlr 8.04 -.14 PALTn 10.56 +.01
BluoeFdn 18.23 -.07 ntmMun 9.85 . CapApnsT 24.33 -.02 ChmpncAp 1.46 +.01 VaISvct 6.96 -.19 PrecMfTlsrn 1251 -.45
Bmdywnn 19.04 +.05 IntlDiscn 21.49 -.34 Tentlnvt 36.08 -. 44 DvMktAp 17.12 VIPISvc 7.82 -.18 Prmcporn 8.99 -.09
Brinson FundsY: lntlSCp r n 11.49 -.11 Intl r 36.39 -.45 Disc p 32.57 -.so Russell Funds S: Prmcp r n 43.90 -.47
HiYldYn a 4.52 +.01 InvGrBd 10.50 VHartford Fds A: EqutyA 5.81 -.04 Stratd .98 ... SelValurn 11.32 -.09
CGM Funds: InvGBn 6.34 CpAppAp 21.29 -.13 GIobAp 36.99 -.59 RydexAdvisor: STARn 13.97 -.08
Focus n 23.29 -.26 Japann 8.40 -.15 DivGthAp 12.96 -.14 GIbOppA 16.31 -.09 NasdaqAdv 8.19 -.02 STIGraden 9.74 +.01
MFu n 20.8 -2.17 JpSmn 6.03 -06 HartfordFdsC Goldp 21.69 -1.04 SEI Portfolios: STFedn 10.85 ...
Reatln 12.8 -.21 LgCapVain 8.80 -.13 CapApCt 19.13 -.11 IntBdAp 5.66 -.02 CoreFxAn m 8.88 . STsryn 10.-1
R nds288 - LCpVIlrn 7.35 -08 Hartford Fds L: MStFdA 21.19 -.23 IntEqAn 5.74 -02 SratEqn 10. -.18
MdCpVR I 19.55 -.21 LatAmn 31.11 -.47 GrwOppL 16.85 -.15 MSSCAp 11.36 -.23 LgCGroAn 14.03 -.11 TgtRetlncn 9.38 -.03
CalamosFunds: LeCoStkn 13.82 -.22 HartordHLSIA MidCapA 10.03 -.09 LgCVaIAn 10.79 -.15 TgRe2010n17.12 -.09
GrCalamos Funds: 22.03 .13 LowPrn 22.48 -.18 CapApp 2492 21 PAMSniAp 8.249 SSgA Funds: TgtRe2005n 9.53 -.03
GrwthAp 30.83 -.28 Maglln 47,69 -50 Div&Gr 13.29 -.14 SGrInAp 3.2 0 EmgMkt 12S27chwab +01 TgtRe202n .3 .07
Calvert Group: MAMurn 10.37 Advisers 1351 13 p 8.73 -.01 Schwab Funds: TgRe2 n9.20 -.0
a Gcoup 13:S MAMunn 11.24 -.01 stock 2541 -.33 OppenhelmerB: HIthCara 11.13 +01 TgPRe2020n15.88 -.11
Ino 13.61 + .01 MegaCpStkn6.40 -.04' To tBd 9 3 01 AMTFMu 4.98 ... 1000lnvr 24.69 -.21 TgPRe2O30n14.74 -.12
MnIntlEqA 10.09 M-.10 iMunn 11.46 H ero I AMTFrNY 8.85 1000Sel 24.66 -22 TglRe2035 n 8.74 -.08
Munlnt 10.26 . 15.63-.21 Hendersop2 CplncBt 6.36 -.01 S&P Inv 12.94 -11 TgtRe2045 n 9.04 -.08
.12 MIMNMunn 11.10 IntOppAp 14.85 -.22 ChmplncBt 1.46 +.01 S&PSel 12.98 -.11 USGron 12.24 -.10
Soc Ap 2 02 MIgSecn 10.09 +.01 HennessyFunds: Equ 5.41 -.03 S&PIlnstSI 6.62 -06 USValuen 6.98 -.05
SocE[Ap 22.44 -20 Munilncn 11.84 . CorrIlOrig 9.23 -.12 StrtncBt 3.30 ... SmCplnv 11.34 -'20 Welslyn 17.15 -.05
TxFLt 956 NJMunrn 11.04 HussmnSltrGr 13.14 -.01 Oppenheimer C&M: Selected Funds: Wellitn 23.06 -.15
TxFLgp 15.32 NwMk2tl 17.1 +. Eg ICONFds: 1 IntIBdC 5.64 -.02 AmShD 26.28 -42 Wndsrn 8.67 -.08
Cohen & Steers: NwMlln 17.13 24 Energy 13.12 -.26 Oppenhelmer Roch: AmShSp 26.30 -.42 Wndslln a 17.35 -.16
F 1 NMln 1223 -., Hlthcare 9.99 +.03 LIdNYA p 2.95 +.01 Seligman Group: Vanguard Idx Fds:
PtyShs 28.75 -.20 OTCn 30.88 -.21j 1 Funds: RoMuAp 12.54 -.02 ComunAt 27.87 -.26 500n 76.92 -.65
Columbia Class A: OhMunn 11.17 NoAm p 7.60 -02 RcNtMuA 5.20 -.01 FrontrAt 6.72 -.08 Balanced" 15.91 -.09
Acomnt 16.51 -.25 l0lndex 6.10 -.04 ivy Funds: PIMCOAdmln PIMS: GlbSmA 7.76 -.11 DevMktn 6.72 -.09
FocEqAt 14.31 -.08 Ovrsean 22.63 -31 AsseISCt 18.29 -.08 ShtTmnAdp 9.42 +02 GIbTchA 12.75 -12 EMktn 16.25 -.03
21CnlryAt 8.13 -.11 PBusns 13.06 +02 AsseIStAp 19.68 -.08 TotRAd 10,10 +.01 HYdBAp 2.04 . Europen 18.09 -.25
MarsGrAt 12.70 -.08 PAMunrn 10.46 AsselStrYp 18.71 -.08 PIMCOinstl PIMS: Sentinel Group: Extend" 22.89 -.34
TxEAp 12.32 +.01 Puntnn 1274 - GINatRsAp11.97 -.20 AtAnsset 9.99 -.02 ComSAp 20.62 -15 Growtha 20.18 -.14
Columbia Class Z: PealE 11.3 -20 JPMorgen A CIsas: CoodPRR 6.39 -.07 Sequoia n 93.08 -:71 Ta n 150 -.'1
AcomZ 17.09 -.25 StlIntMun 10.47 +.01 CoreBdA 10.73 -.01 DevLcMkr 8.35 -.02 SIt Funds: Lgcaptxn 5.30 -13
AcomlntZ 22.32 -.17 STBFn 7.94 +01 MCpValp 14.12 -.11 Divnc 9.56 +.01 LrgCpGr 2087 -22 LiTBadn 10.90 -.02
CoreBdZ 10.01 SmCaplnd, 9.65 -.18 JPMorgun Select: EmMkBd .69 +.05 SoundSh 21.89 25 MidCapn 11.45 -.13
IntBdZ 7.69 +.01 SmllCpSrn 9.97 -.16 HBSMkNep15.98 +.01 FrgnBd 8.97 ... StFarmAssoc: RPilcrn 7.7 -.10
IntTEBd 9.88 . SEAsian 18.78 +14 JPMorgan Sel CIs: HiYtd 6.61 ... Gth 3867 - pEITrn 9.27 -.09
LgCpldxZ 16.16 -.14 StkSIc n 16.37 .15 CoreBd n 10.72 -.01 InGrCp 9.60 .,. Stratton Funds:-. SmCupG5 19.91 -.33
MarsGrZ 12.90 -.08 Stratlncn 8985 +01 HiYldBdn 5.97 +.01 LowDu 9.31 ... Drdend 14.15 -12 SmlCpGVhn8.46 -.19
MdCpVIZp 7,89 -.11 StReRtr 6.90 .03 IntmTFBdn 10.64 +.01 ModDur 9.65 Multi-Cup 25.16 -.08 S'CnVIn 8.99 -.17
ValRestr 28.46 -.53 TaxFrBrn 10.219.9 IlntrdAmern 14.92 -.15 RealMet 9.99 -.0 SmCap 29.79 -.66 TotBndn 10.21

USCorEq2n 6.61 -.09 USBIn 10.69 USLCCrPIsn13.12 -.15 Tott 10.10 +:01 TCW Funds: Valven 14.03 -.14
DWS Invest A: Utility n 12.15 -.09 lanus: TR II 9.70 +01 TotRetBdl 9.11 +.01 Vanguard null Fda:
CommAp 10.35 -.02 ValStratn 13.42 -.26 Balanced 20.04 -.02 TRill 8.76 +01 TIAA-CEF Funds: BanuIn 1. -:
DrHiRA 21.52 -.23 Valuen 36.90 -.79 Contrarian 8.98 ..PIMCOsFundsA: Bondntn 9.75� -0 O"tlnu 15.91 -.09
MgdMunip 8.30 +.01 Wdwsn 11.65 -.16 Enterpr 32.99 -.33 P 9.31 BondlnsT 9.75 -.01 DvMktEnsln 6.66 -.09
StrGovSecA 8.53 ... Fidelity Selects: FedTE PEuuolnstp 9.9 +02 S p 1 24 Echos 18.09 -26
DWS InvestS: Aim 20.59 +39 FIxBnd 9.6 To"ItA 10.10 +01 ValSu 2.01- E lnn 22.89 135
CorPlunc 9.55 ... Banking 10.34 -45 Fund 19.34 -.08 PIMCO Funds C: Temp l eo Isil Gwthlstn 20919 -13
EmMkIn 8.56 +.06 Biotchn 5597 -06 FundaEq 13.98 -.12 PRIRtCOp 9.91 +02 FuiEqS 13.60 -.09 tn stlldn 76.43 .-04
EmMkGrr 10.66 -.07 Brokr 30.31 -44 Gti feSci 16.22 -.02 ToIRtCt 10,10 +01 ThirdAvenueFds: InsPi n 76.43 -.64
EuroEq 15.85 -.23 Chemn 51.42 -.97 GrTechr 9.53 -.06 PIMCO Funds 0: tIrdr 11.02 -.08 TotlBd4dx 99.99 -.02
GNMAS 15.01 ... CoEquipn13.20 -.17 Grlnc 21.32 -.07 TR^np 10.10 +01 RIEstVIr 13.03 +.09 InsTStPlssn18.34 -.17
GIbBdSr 9.37 -.06 Compn 28.79 -.21 Onon 6.61 -02 Parnassus Funds: Value 32.23 +01 MidCpTsln 11.48 -.12
GIbOpp 20.99 -.20 ConDis n 13.93 -.16 Ovrseas r 27.93 -.08
GIblThem 14.35 -.10 ConSlapn 47.36 -.10 PrhMCVInv 14.88 -.07 Eqtylncon 17.70 17 Thornburg Fds: Paclasts 7.45 -.09
Gold&Prc 13.79 -.60 CstHon 22.42 -.14 Research 17.48 -07 PaxWorld: lntValAp 17.87 -.07 SCInstn 18.82 -.33
GrolncS 10.55 -.09 DIAern 44.24 +1.40 ShTmBd 2.93 Balanced 16.75 -.12 InIValuel 18.27 -.07 TBIstn 10.05
HiYldTx 10.13 +.03 Eleclrn 26.13 -.42 Twenty 46.62 +.3i Perm Port Funds: Thrivent Fds A: TSInstn 20.31 -.19
IntTxAMT 10.95 +.01 Enrgyn 31.01 -.65 Ventur 28.71 -.53 Permannt 31.83 -.44 HiYId 3.64 ... Valuelstn 14.04 -.14
Intll FdS 32.03 -.40 EngSv n 38.64 -1.02 WrldW r 28.85 -.24 Pioneer Funds A: Inorm 6.79 ... Vanguard Signal:
LoCoGro 19.85 -.15 Pn�irn 1irI - n Janus Adv S Shrs: CullenVl 12.70. -.07 Transamerica A: 500Sgln 63.54 -.54


LatAmrEq 30.15 -.49 FinSv 38.79 -.91 Forty 23.52 +.15 BondA p 8.19 Flexlncp 6.98 +.01 ITBdSigJn 10.18
MgdMuniS 8.31 +.01 Goldrn 31.04 -1.21 JennisonDrydenA: EurSelEqA 16.10 39 TAIDEXA: MdCpldxn 1640 -.18
MATFS 13.48 +.01 Healthn 79.47 +06 BlendA 10.85 14 IntlVatA 13.65 -.27 TempGIbAp17.70 -.16 STBdIdx n 10.21
SP50OS 11.08 -.09 HomFn 9.13 -.22 HighlncA 8.31 MdCpGrA .97 -.12 TrCHYBp 6.28 +.02 TolBdSgln 10.05
Davis Funds A: Insurn 28.57 -.25 HiYldAp 4.09 +.1 PioFdAp 26.73 -35 Turner Funds: TotStkSgln 19.60 -.18
NYVenA 21.87 -.34 Leisrn 53.23 -.62 InsuredA 9.96 +.01 TxFreAp 8.69 -.02 SmlCpGrn 18.38 -.31 Victory Funds:
Davis Funds B: Mateal n 33.25 -.75 UtilityA 6.95 -.09 ValueAp 8.18 -.08 Tweedy Browne: DvsStA 10.73 -.11
NYVenB 21.00 -.34 MedDI n 26.92 +.38 JennisonDryden B: Pioneer Funds B: GlobVal 14.83 -.01 Waddell & Reed Adv:
Davis Funds C &Y: MdEqSysn 18.15 -.14 GrowthB 1069 -.01 HiYIdB 6.30 UMB Scout Funds: AssetSp 7.19 -.03
NYVenY 22.10 -.34 Multmdn 21.66 -20 HiYIdBt 4.08 Pioneer Funds C: Int 20.36 -.23 CorelnvA 3.73 -.04
NYVen C 21.15 -.33 NtGas n 22.21 -.56 InsuredB 9.98 . HiYIdC 6.37 US Global Investors: ScTechA 7.09 -.01
Delaware invest A: Papern 15.16 -.24 John Hancock A: Price Funds Adv: AIIAm 15.91 -.17 Wasatch:
Diverlncp 7.84 .. Pharmn 8.33 +.01 BondAp 12.17 +.01 Growthpn 19.98 -.06 ChinaReg 5.89 +.03 SmCpGr 21.13 -.26
TrendAp 8.91 -.09 Retail n 32.93 -.34 RgBkA 10.45 -.30 Price Funds: GIbRs 5.72 -.13 Wells Fargo Adv:
TxUSAp 10.34 ... Sofwrn 50.66 -.29 StrInAp 5.28 +.01 Balancen 13.70 -.08 GId&Mtls 10.46 -.45 CmStkZ 11.80 -.14
Delaware Invest B: Tech n 45.28 -.49 John Hancock B: BIChipn 23.88 -.17 WIdPrcMn 10.29 -.47 Opptylnv 22.32 -.23
SelGrBt 15.65 -.11 Telcmn 31.65 +.05 StrincB 5.28 +.01 CABondn 10.03 USAA Group: Western Asset:
Dimensional Fds: Trans n 27.29 -.43 John Hancock Cl 1: CapAppn 13.96 -.07 AgvGt 21.10 -.15 CorePlus 8.49
EmMktV 18.16 +.03 UtilGrn 36.01 -.46 LSAggr 7.67 -.08 DivGron 15.64 -.14 CABd 9.25 ... Core 8.59 -.01"
IntSmVa n 10.25 -.08 Wireless n 5.32 . LSBalanc 8.98 -.04 EmrnEurp 8.38 -11 CmslStr 14.69 -.12 William Blair N:
USLgCon 24.62 -.21 Fidelity Spartan: LSConsrv 10.22 -.01 EmMktSn 17.61 -.03 GNMA 9.99 ... GrowthN 7.30 -.08
USLgVan 11.82 -.17 Eqldxlnvn 29.53 -.25 LSGrwth 8.49 -.06 Eqlncn 1519 -.16 GrTxStr 10.20 -.04 IntlGthN 12.60 -.18
US Micro n 7.39 -.15 ExtMkIn n 21.59 -.31 LSModer 9.36 -.04 Eqlndexn 22.46 -.19 Grwth 9.85 -.07 Yacktman Funds:
USSmalln 11.18 -.21 5001nxlnlvrn57.91 -.48 Keeley Funds: Europe n 988 -.17 Gr&lnc 9.53 -.10 Fund p 9.62 -.13
USSmVa 13.17 -.28 Intllnxlnvn 23,86 -.31 SmCpValAp14.11 -.25 GNMAn 9.65 +.01 IncStk 8.21 -.06
IniSmCon 9.64 -.08 ToMkllnv n 23.51 -.23 Lazard Instl: Growth 20.11 -.07 Inco 10.86 +.01
EmgMktn 17.40 -.04 FidelitySpart Adv: EmgMktl 11.55 +.01 HlthSdn 19.04 -.03
Fixd n 10.27 +.01 EqldxAd n 29.53 -.25 Legg Mason: Fd HiYiSdn 194 .01 Chronicle staff do not provide
InIGFxinn 12.24 -.01 50OAdrn 57.91 -.49 SplnvCp 15.68 -.19 Ineld n 4 8.7 0 Chronicle staff do not provide
IntVan 11.53 -.17 TotMktAdrn23,51 -.23 ValTrCp 24.36 -.33 IntDsn 23.38 -15 financial advice or real-time
Glb5Fxlnc n 10.95 . First Eagle: Legg Mason Ptrs A: IntG&I 8.61 -12 quotes on stocks or funds.
2YGIFxdn 10.22 . GIbIA 31.39 -.12 AgGrAp 64.86 ItlStkn 824 -10 Cnsult a financial adviser.
DFARIEn 10.75 -.09 OverseasA 15.51 -.04 ApprAp 9.78 -08 Consult a financial adviser.


Stocks stumble


Associate

NEW YOB
Street pulled
first time in fi
day as invest
about balance
banks and the
sults that but
start releasing
Investors we
pointed that t
Corp.'s $7 billit
Sun Microsysti
stalled - a s
market is still
support big m(
The Dow Jo
als fell 41.74, o
to 7,975.85 after
as much as 155
The Standa
500 index fel
percent, to 835
Nasdaq coml
fell 15.16, or 0
1,606.71.
Technology
lower follow
Sun news. Di,
tween the tech
had been in
stages, but Th



Treas

Associate

WASHINGT
est rates or
Treasury bills
in Monday's a
on three-mont
up while rates
bills dipped.
The Treas:
ment auction
in three-month
count rate of 0.
from 0.195
week Another








April 91
Come out a
your favorite


. "










































^*I7t


















Name Last Chg
SP CoSt 2198 +.06
SPConsum 21.09 -30
SP Engy 45.09 -.93
SPDR Fncl 9.43 -,26
SP Minds 19.92 +05
SPTech 16.54 -.17
SPUSl 25.93 -.22
Standex 9.25 -.30
StanlWk 31.28 -1.06


StarwdH 15.64 -.44
StateStr 3317 -01
Steds 2374 -.31
Stedlie 7.49 + 25
StratHotels .85 +.06
Stryker 33.72 +43
SturmRug 11.62 -28
SubPpne 3720 -.10
SunCmts 13.84 +.22
SunLUFng 20.03 +.14
Suncor gs 24.02 -.22
Sunoco 28027 -27
Suntech 13093 -07
SunTrst 12.70 -112
Supvalu 14.77 -23
Sybase 3056 -126
Synovus 339 -.20
Sysco 22.79 -.14
TCFFnc 13.25 -.13
TECO 1099 -.10
TIM Paric 12.01 +.02
TJX 25.94 -.74
TRWAuto 535 +21


ted Press

RK - Wall
back for the
ve days Mon-
tors worried
e sheets at
quarterly re-
sinesses will
this week.
ere also disap-
talks for IBM
on deal to buy
ems Inc. have
sign that the
not ready to
mergers.
.nes industri-
or 0.5 percent,
*r being down
5 points.
.rd & Poor's
1 7.02, or 0.8
5.48, while the
posite index
.9 percent, to

stocks were
ng the IBM-
scussions be-
nology giants
their final
he Associated


Market watch
April 6, 2009

Dow Jones -41.74
Industrials 7,975.85

Nasdaq -15.16
composite 1,606.71

Standard & -7.02
Poor's 500 835.48

Russell -8.57
2000
2000 447.56

NYSE diary
Advanced: 928
Declined: 2,100
Unchanged: 103
Volume: 5.35 b
Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 682
Declined: 1,665
Unchanged: 98
Volume: 2 b
SOURCE: SunGard AP

Press learned that IBM took
its offer off the table Sunday
after Sun terminated IBM's
status as its exclusive nego-
tiating partner.


A jump in stocks of de-
fense contractors helped the
market pull off its lows. De-
fense Secretary Robert Gates
recommended halting pro-
duction of the F-22 fighter jet
as he outlined deep cuts to
many of the military's biggest
weapons programs, but
pointed to spending increas-
ing in other areas. Lockheed
Martin Corp. jumped $5.97,
or 8.9 percent, to $73.28,
while Northrop Grumman
Corp. rose $3.96, or 9 percent,
to $47.94.
Ford Motor Co. jumped 52
cents, or 16 percent, to $3.77
after the company said it re-
tired debt that would re-
duce what it owed by 38
percent and save millions of
dollars in interest costs.
Among the biggest declin-
ers in the financial industry
were Wells Fargo & Co.,
which dropped $1.09, or 6.7
percent, to $15.25, and PNC
Financial Services Group
Inc., which fell $1.99, or 5.6
percent, to $33.81. Regional
bank stocks also posted big
losses.


Sury bill auction rates mixed


ed Press


ON - Inter-
n short-term
s were mixed
auction. Rates
;h bills edged
on six-month

ury Depart-
ed $30 billion
i bills at a dis-
.2 percent, up
percent last
$28 billion in


six-month bills were auc-
tioned at a discount rate of
0.4 percent, down from 0,42
percent last week
The three-month rate was
the highest since the bills
averaged 0.225 percent two
weeks ago. The six-month
rate was the lowest since
they averaged 0.39 percent,
also two weeks ago.
The discount rates reflect
that the bills sell for less
than face value. For a
$10,000 bill, the three-month


th * 6 p.m. 'til Last Call
and cheer on
e bartender! Richard Rice
I TCG


Nill go to
n K y9l 7?i.e "t
oderma
r Resear��
rity


-vs-

Scott Retter
Progress
Energy

IMISH MUTIC BY
JOHNSTON & KELLY


price was $9,994.94 while a
six-month bill sold for
$9,979.78. That would equal
an annualized rate of 0.203
percent for the three-month
bills, and 0.406 percent for
the six-month bills.
The Federal Reserve said
Monday the average yield
for one-year Treasury bills,
a popular index for making
changes in adjustable rate
mortgages, fell to 0.58 per-
cent last week from 0.59 per-
cent the previous week


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TaiwSemi 9.80
TalismEgs 11.96
I Target 35.45
STaubmn 18.23
TeckCm gs 6.87
TelcmNZ 7.03
TelMexLs 16.62
Templeinid 5.74
Tenaris 22.37
TenetHIth 1.12
Tepp o 2330
Teradata 1609
Teradyn 5.09
Terex 11.09
Terra 27.38
TerraNitro 141.04
Tesoro 15.23
TetraTech 3.78
Texlnst 16.51
Textron 8.26
Theragen h 1.00
ThermoFis 36.28
ThmBet 26.78
3MCo 52.08
Tiffany 22.62
TW Cable rs 2673
TimeWm rs 21.56
Timken 15.78
TilanMet 6.39
ToddShph 14.24
TollBros 19.01
TorchEn I 1.97
Trchmrk 29.05


TorDBkig 36.90 -.63 VangTSMs 41.69
Total SA 49.70 -1.70 VangREIT 27.81
TotalSys 14.29 -.29 VangErnmgs 25.76
Transocn 64.34 -1.18 VadianMed 30.31
Travelers 42.14 -.47 Vectren 21.28
Tredgar 17.31 -.62 Ventas 25.42
TriConif 8.73 -.05 VeoliaEnv 22.76
TrinaSolar 12.24 +1.09 VerizonCm 33.03
TycoBEec 12.57 -.25 ViacomB 18.63
TycolntI 20.85 -.19 VimpelCm 7.87
Tyson 10.25 -.28 Visa 59.13
UBSAG 10.02 -.69 VivoPartrs 14.50
UDR 8.95 -.42 VMware 27.88
UILHold 22.72 -.66 Vodafone 18.77
US Airwy 3.14 +.17 Vonage h .43
USEC 5.47 +.04 Vomado 39.66
UniFrst 35.75 -.95 WGL Hold 31.89
UnilevNV 19.72 -.61 WMS 27.32
UnionPac s 44.06 -2.03 Wabash 1.43
Unisys h .84 +.14 WalMart 53.43
UtdMcro 281 -.01 Walgm 26.93
UPS B 52.58 -.17 WsteMInc 26.59
USBancrp 1524 -.73 Weathflnts 12.74
USNGsFd 15.07 -.25 WeinRit 12.36
USOilFd 30.23 -.70 WellPoint 38.74
USSteel 25.16 -.71 WellsFargo 15.25
UtdTech 46.31 +.68 WendyAsby 5.23
UtdhlthGp 21.93 +1.39 WesnarEn 17.66
Un nGr 13.64 -28 WAstEMkt 8.42
W gHi 4.14
WAstlnfOpp 10.67
ValeantPh 17.72 -.08 WDngitlf 20.65
ValeroE 1968 -16 WstnUnion 13.39


Weyerh
Whrpl
WilmCS
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CITRus COUNTY (Fl.) CHRONICLE.


BUSINESS











0Page A8 -TUESDAY, APRIL 7,2009



PINION


I "I kissed my first girl and smoked my first
cigarette on the same day. I haven't had
time for tobacco since."
Arturo Toscanini, 1867-1957


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


4


EDITORIAL BOARD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


At.


Gerry Mulligan.......................................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ............................................editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ..................................managing editor
i Cheri Harris......................................features editor
Curt Ebitz........................................ citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ...................................... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson .................................... guest member


"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


COSTLY HABIT


Tobacco




taxes good




for health


Even at a time when
smoking was widely ac-
cepted as a harmless
practice and considered fash-
ionable, common sense
warned that smok-
ing was hazardous THE I
to one's health.
World War II Increase i
service members tax
called the ciga-
rettes provided OUR 01
with their K-ra-
tion meals coffin It make
nails. The 1947 hit
song "Smoke, Smoke, Smoke
That Cigarette" repeatedly
proclaimed the danger of
smoking with its refrain,
"smoke, smoke, smoke that cig-
arette; puff, puff, puff until you
smoke yourself to death.".
The health risk of smoking
was not conclusively estab-
lished until a 1964 U.S. surgeon
general's report that linked it
to lung cancer. On the heels of
the report, the federal govern-
ment ordered cigarette manu-
facturers to include warning
labels on cigarette packages
and banned tobacco advertis-
ing on TV
Since then, America has
gone from a society where
seemingly everyone lit up to a
society where only one in five
smoke. While this is a remark-
able transformation, cigarette
smoking still results in an esti-
mated 443,000 premature
deaths nationwide each year at
a cost of $193 billion to the na-
tion's economy.
Given the now-indisputable
health hazards posed by smok-
ing, the federal government's
recent tobacco tax increase
that raised a pack of cigarettes
nearly 62 cents to $1.01 makes
sense. It makes sense because
studies have found that smok-
ing rates are higher among


Ah, heil
The way our government is
stopping potluck dinners
and anything else we get
together to have fun, how
long before we have to
"Heil, government"?
Use the buses
Once again I have to A
call on the school buses.
In this critical economic CA
time, I cannot believe the 560
line of parents dropping 0563
off their kids to take their
kids to school, and the
five or six kids on every 0 For
bus. I mean I was at For- Sou
est Ridge Boulevard the Pi
other day for the middle
school and it's amazing how
many parents were dropping off
their kids in this economic time.
Please, where's the school board?
Where's the school committee?
Let's do something here. The
money is crazy we're spending on
this stuff, and they're not using it.
Put cameras on the buses if par-
ents are afraid to use the buses.
It's crazy.
Do Not Call
I was wondering if somebody
would call in and tell me what the
phone number is for the Do Not
Call (list). I had one number for


S
in


P
s


people of low income who can
least afford the costly habit and
that smoking declines with
each tax hike. Further, by un-
derwriting a major expansion
of health insur-
SUE* ance for children,
SUE*: the added rev-
Stobacco enue will be put to
es. good use.
Struggling to
I|NION: balance Florida's
state budget amid
sense. plummeting rev-
enues, a proposal
being considered by state law-
makers to hike the state tax on
cigarettes by an additional $1
per pack also makes sense. It
makes sense because while
Florida spends about $1.3 bil-
lion a year on Medicaid for to-
bacco-related illnesses, it
collected only $425 million in
cigarette taxes last year. The
proposed tax hike, therefore,
would reduce the burden
placed on the state's health
care system by tobacco-related
illnesses.
Not surprisingly, tobacco
manufacturers and users
lament that the increased to-
bacco taxes are punitive. How-
ever, their lament rings hollow.
Tobacco manufacturers have
seen fit to raise the price on
many brands by more than 70
cents a pack this year. And, for
those who can least afford the
health and financial costs of
smoking, bearing the burden of
their habit is a personal choice.
Thus, considering the per-
sonal and societal costs of
smoking and the fact that in-
creased tobacco taxes result in
a decline of smokers, why not
increase tobacco taxes to gen-
erate needed health care funds
while encouraging smokers to
kick the habit before they puff,
puff, puff themselves to death?

that and it didn't work. Please
help me out. I'm tired of all these


calls.
Editor's note: You can
register online for the Na-
tional Do Not Call Registry
at www.donotcall.gov or
call toll-free (888) 382-
1222 (TTY 866-290-
4236) from the number
you wish to register. Regis-
tration is free.
Good work


"U) I u I am a snowbird from
Michigan and I spend
four months a year down
more here. I just want to thank
und Off the Chronicle for putting
age C10 out such a good newspa-
per. Every morning when I
get up, I look forward to reading it
and look forward to doing the
puzzles in it. Keep up the good
work.
Miss Vicki
I was watching the county com-
missioners' meeting the other
evening and what a shame. I
sorely miss this Mrs. Phillips with
her common sense approach to
monetary matters. These guys
that they've got in there now,
those five guys, particularly Dam-
ato. His credo is, "Live within your
means even if you have to borrow
to do it." It's a shame.


Obama tax hike inevitable


B arack Obama
used to get very
upset about fed-
eral budget deficits.
Denouncing an "orgy .
of spending and enor-
mous deficits," he \
turned to John McCain
during their presiden- A
tial debates last fall
and said, "We have Byro]
had, over the last eight OTH
years, the biggest in-
creases in deficit VOI
spending and national
debt in our history ... Now we
have a half-trillion deficit annu-
ally ... and Sen. McCain voted for
four out of five of those George
Bush budgets."
That was then. Now, President
Obama has produced a budget
with a deficit three times the size
of the one that so disturbed can-
didate Obama just a few months
ago. And Obama foresees, for
years to come, deficits that dwarf
those he felt so passionately
about way, way back in 2008.
Everywhere you go on Capitol
Hill, you hear echoes of the last
campaign's spending debate.
With the fight raging, I asked Mc-
Cain about the president's seem-
ingly forgotten concern about
deficits. McCain doesn't like to
rehash the campaign - "The one
thing Americans don't like is a
sore loser," he told me - but
when I read him Obama's quote
from the debate, he said, "Well,
there are a number of statements
that were made by then-candi-
date Obama which have not
translated into his policies."
That's an understatement. The
deficit issue could be one of the
most, if not the most, consequen-
tial of Obama's unkept campaign
promises. Just how consequen-


H
(


tial was made clear re-
cently in a little-no-
ticed conference call
featuring budget direc-
tor Peter Orszag.
Orszag was trying to
explain to reporters
how the Obama ad-
:. , ministration calcu-
lated its rather rosy
York forecasts for economic
!ER growth. Near the end
of the call, he was
CES asked whether deficits
along the lines of those
predicted by the Congressional
Budget Office are sustainable.
Orszag at first dodged the ques-
tion, saying he was sure the final
Obama budget will "reflect a fis-
cally sustainable path." But the
questioner persisted: Are those
deficits sustainable? Relenting,
Orszag said such deficits, in the
range of 5 percent of the gross do-
mestic product, "would lead to
rising debt-to-GDP ratios in a
manner that would ultimately not
be sustainable."
The simple version of that is: If
the Congressional Budget Office
projections are correct, we're
headed for hell in a handbasket.
I asked McCain what might
happen if Obama and Orszag get
their way. First, the U.S. could
have to print a lot of new money,
"running the huge risk of infla-
tion and returning to the situa-
tion of the 1970s, only far worse,"
McCain said. The second option
is to raise taxes.
Recently, former Clinton
budget director Alice Rivlin con-
ceded that Obama's budget could
present a "scary scenario" which
would "raise deficits to unsus-
tainable levels well after the
economy recovers." Writing in
the Washington Post, she argued


that the only solution is higher
taxes, and not just for the richest
of the rich.
Of course, that's what McCain
said during the campaign. And
it's what the much-maligned Joe
the Plumber said, too. Remember
when he took so much flak for ob-
jecting to Obama's plan to raise
taxes only on those Americans
making more than $250,000 a
year? Joe didn't make anything
near that, the critics said, so why
was he worrying?
The point was not that Joe
made that much, or that anybody
at McCain's rallies made that
much - the vast majority didn't.
The point was that Obama was
promising so many things that to
pay for them he would eventually
have to raise taxes on people
making far less than $250,000.
Look out, McCain warned -
someday he'll, come after you.
And now that's where we ap-
pear to be headed. At some point,
Obama will likely have to bow to
those in his party who say he
must raise taxes if he wants to
pay for health care and other ex-
pensive initiatives.
Some skeptics believe that was
the plan all along. McCain would-
n't go that far, but when I brought
up the idea, he did sound a bit
suspicious. "Well, you set up a sit-
uation that puts spending at an
unprecedented amount of GDP,
and then you turn around and
say, 'Of course we're going to have
to raise taxes to pay for this,"' Mc-
Cain told me. "I'm not saying it
was their plan, but it certainly
was inevitable."
-m--
Byron York is chief political
correspondent for The Washing-
ton Examiner


LETTERS to the Editor .


Shoot to stop
Though I agree in principle
with your editorial of March 29,
"No alternative to deadly force
in confrontation," I must take
issue and disagree with your ed-
itorial board's view with respect
to the training of a deputy or any
law enforcement officer in their
response to an incident where
"deadly force" is used.
Your written statement,
"When there is a split-second to
react to an attacker, deputies are
appropriately trained to 'shoot
to kill.'" I respectfully submit
that you did not get that from a
training manual, the standard
operating procedure of any law
enforcement department or any
certified law enforcement offi-
cer All law enforcement officers
are trained to "shoot to stop,"
not "shoot to kill." If there are
any out there with the desire or
mentality to shoot to kill, well,
they need to be off the street.
The use of deadly force is cov-
ered under state statute. The use
of deadly force is also covered
under departmental standard
operational procedures. The
use of deadly force by law en-
forcement is justified when it is
"reasonably" necessary to de-
fend himself/herself or others
from bodily harm.
The only group of people that
I am aware of who are trained to
"shoot to kill" are our military
people. There are those who
think or would think that "shoot
to kill" or "shoot to stop" are a
play on words. Not so. There is
an absolute difference. Your
training involving the use of
deadly force re-occurs on a


yearly basis. This traini
continue for as long as y
an active law enforcemi
cer The one constant in
training is "shoot to store
center mass," double ta
bam." You, as a law enfc
officer know that the dr
your weapon in defense
self or another can resu
death of the individual
you face.
I would close by asking
itorial board to be more
in its choice of words w
editorialize.
Michae


ng will
you are
ent offi-


counties. We are truly grateful for
the support of our business com-
munity. You invested a total of
$262,608 at the sales this year
We hope the livestock pro-
grams will teach many enriching
life lessons to our youth ex-
hibitors, which will assist them
in their future business ven-
tures. The livestock committee
will continue to educate bur ex-
hibitors that all projects are a
learning opportunity that can be
taken advantage of to broaden
their future endeavors.
The youths in our programs
are some of the most outstanding
students in our county and we
believe that they are definitely
worth your investment


i your Thanks again for supporting
p," "shoot our youth programs in this time
p "bam, of economic unrest. You can be
brcement assured that your support is ap-
'awing of preciated by a vast majority who
> of your- know and realize that this proj-
lt in the ect would not be possible with-
whom out you.
The Fair Association always
ig the ed- welcomes input from our com-
� careful munity. We appreciate and en-
hen they courage your input to help us
make each year a positive event
for the buyers, as well as the ex-
el E. Pitts hibitors. Please contact the of-
Inverness fice at 726-2993 with any
questions or concerns.


Great livestock sales
The Citrus County Fair Associa-
tion would like to thank all the
buyers for attending and support-
ing the 2009 Livestock Sale Pro-
grams. We auctioned 80 steers and
60 swine. We are very pleased at
the outcome of our sales. The av-
erage selling prices were higher
than many of our surrounding


Nell Mayberry, fair president;
Hal Porter, fair manager;
Nancy J. Rooks, sales superin-
tendent; Larry E. Rooks, sales
co-superintendent and fair
vice president; Debbie Parker,
livestock chairwoman
Editor's note: Look for the re-
sults of the auctions in a special
section to be featured in the
April 25 edition of the Chronicle.


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the editorial board of the newspa-
per.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


L


fAvnf7











(E'1'1I ,, (.Co)l .\1 (FL) (AIRNI( .1


S:Letters to -. EDITOR


Thanks to all
On behalf of thlie Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce, I would like to take
this opportunity to thank
everyone who assisted in
the 22nd annual Little Miss
Strawberry and Miss Straw-
berry Princess Pageant in
Floral City. Congratulations
is extended to all the young
ladies who participated,
and special accolades to
the pageant winners, Little
Miss Strawberry Princess
Bethany Herndon and Miss
Strawberry Princess Mak-
ensie Wang.
My sincere appreciation
is also extended to the pag-
eant sponsors, the VFW
Post 4337 Color Guard, the
pageant judges, and pag-
eant assistants.
Pageant sponsors were:
Arnold Virgilio Insurance
and Retirement Planning;
Beef'O' Brady's of Inver-
ness; and Super Walmart of
Inverness. The VFW Color
Guard was: Jim Black, Vic-
tor Podolak, John Lowe,
Jim Janicki and Carl Cyr.
Pageant judges were:
Debbie Berry, Buddy Grant,
Joe Meek and Linda Pow-
ers. Special acknowledge-
ment is offered to my
assistants, Sara Di Sario
and Arnold Virgilio.
If you missed this year's
Strawberry Princess Pag-
eant, you will have another
opportunity next year at the
Chamber of Commerce's
23rd annual Strawberry
Princess Pageant. Hope to
see you there!
Mary-Ann Virgilio
chairwoman, Strawberry
Princess Pageant


Surprising lessons
I was in my front yard
when I noticed a little dog
in the middle of the street.
I determined he must be
lost. He was a black pug
and cute as could be. He let
me pick him up and I car-
ried him into my yard and
introduced him to my dogs.
I made calls to those who
could terminate my respon-
sibility of this little guy,
without being advised of
any positive steps I could
take to find its owner. I
started thinking, "Why
me?" The first step was to
drive him about the area
and question people if they
had ever seen him. The
second step was to visit the
vet to determine if a chip
had been imbedded. None
had been. To prevent any
contagious disease or fleas
into my house I stuck a
screwdriver in the grass
and slipped a spare leash
over the handle. He now
had a 20-foot radius to ex-
plore.
I made signs that read
BLACK DOG FOUND -
PUG and tied them to trees
and posts surrounding the
area of my house. (When I
returned) he was there to
meet me, twirling in circles
and making that grunting
little noise. We had just
eaten dinner and I pre-
pared him a meal from
leftovers, which he de-
voured. I let him stay in the
garage on some towels near
the back door. The follow-
ing morning he was again
overjoyed at seeing me and
jumped up, all the time
making that little grunting,
snorting noise while I real-


ized my heart was affected
by this little guy By late af-
ternoon it was now appar-
ent he'd been abandoned.
Why had I picked this little
guy up off the street? At
twilight a lady approached,
having seen my signs, and
asked to see the pug - a
dog she had always wanted.
Later that afternoon, with
her husband present, it was
agreed by all if he wasn't
claimed by the following
day she would adopt him. I
felt a deep loss, yet was
overjoyed he'd found a new
home.Why me? It was all
for the joy of knowing a lit-
tle dog and realizing the
best relationship is one in
which your love for each
other exceeds your need
for each other. Another les-
son: Change the way you
see things and the things
you see will change. Inter-
esting what big lessons
come in such disguised and
beautiful little packages.
Rod Woodbury
Homosassa

Gun support
I read the letter in
today's Chronicle from
John Cassell in which he
defended the right to own
guns. If it were not for that
right, I would not be able to
write this reply
Decades ago when I was
a young man, my girlfriend
and another couple were
playing canasta, the big
rage at the time, when we
heard a noise at the front
door. It was about mid-
night, so we immediately
called the police. The noise
got louder, so I went to in-


Leg Pain?


See Your Cardiologist.

Yes... Your Cardiologist.

It could be peripheral arterial disease (PAD).
Caused by artery blockage, the most common
symptom of PAD is discomfort or pain in your
legs after walking that goes away after rest, or
tightness, cramping, or weakness in your leg
during activity. One in 3 people age 70 or older
has PAD, increased by those who smoke or
have diabetes.
Detection is fast and easy.
Your cardiologist who is trained in PAD will
conduct a patient history and exam and may
order a simple ankle-brachial index (ABI) test,
which compares the blood pressure in your arms
and legs. He may also order blood tests for
cholesterol or recommend an ultrasound, pulse
volume recording, an MRA, or angiography.


Vishnu P. Srinivas
Yelamanchi, Attanti,
MD, FACC MD, FACC


L,

Shrikanth P.Y.
Upadya,
MD, FACC


Treatment options
can include lifestyle changes,
medication, walking
exercises or surgery.


Walk away from leg pain by Consultants PA.
walking into the Inverness
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vestigate - with my pistol
in hand.
The crook was surprised
when I opened the door
and he saw the gun. He
went for his gun - not
quickly enough - and I
shot him. He was bleeding
badly and I told him to wait
for the police (they still
weren't there) to take him
to the hospital, but he stag-
gered to his car and drove
off.
The police were arriving
as he was driving off-- and
they were mad at me for
not killing him outright!
Seems he was a burglar
that they had been trying to
catch for some months.
If I hadn't had my gun,
the police would have been
standing over my body and
the crook would have es-
caped. As to the response
time - it was about 10 min-
utes - and I lived one
block from police head-
quarters!
Lesson learned: Don't try
to take guns away from
honest people just because
criminals might use them.
Put the criminals in jail
and leave honest people
alone.
Harry Cooper
Hernando

Subsidy questions
As expected, Mary Gre-
gory responded to my re-
sponse to her initial letter
advocating a state income
tax. As expected, she is a
Democrat.
She imperiously intro-


duces Sociology 101 as if it
is a manifesto for justifica-
tion of socialism. I must
admit, I flunked the course
because of logarithms. She
introduces class warfare: "I
would pay ... less than the
multimillionaires ..." In
other words, take from the
rich to give to the poor.
Pure socialism.
I am no where nearly as
rich as the multimillion-
aires, but I feel that the
rich do not owe me any-
thing.
My point was that gov-
ernment waste could go a
long way toward reducing
the need for any additional
taxes. I bet if the county
budget was publicized in a
manner that laymen could
interpret, there would be
many thousands of dollars
that could be eliminated. I
don't believe I should have
to pay for health care, edu-
cation and housing for ille-
gal immigrants who bleed
us for billions. Democrats
do. Nancy Pelosi thinks it's
un-American to raid work-
places to round them up. If
anything is un-American,
it's them. We have a system
to become a citizen, but
they violate our laws and
we pay dearly to subsidize
them.
Sociology doesn't sum up
the difference between De-
mocrats and Republicans. I
believe in less government,
less taxes and that the rich
don't owe me anything. You
know as well as I that a
state income tax will not
fall on the retirees. But, I
don't want my children


having to subsidize me or
you.
We are all born with the
same opportunities to fail
or succeed. If I chose to buy
beer and cigarettes rather
than health insurance, why
should the government bail
me out? I don't believe I
should bail out the finan-
cial institutions that oper-
ated in a greedy manner,
nor the Big Three, nor pay
for bad mortgages that
were forced upon the
lenders by some in our gov-
ernment I have struggled
to pay my debts without
government help.
To paraphrase, the
power to tax is the power to
control, and that is the big
difference in our political
philosophy, though the Re-
publicans are far from per-
fect, too.
We don't need another
tax; they need to cut spend-
ing.
Frank B. Hill
Homosassa


YOUR OPINION
* Follow instructions
on page A8 for
submitting a letter
to the editor.
* Or call the
anonymous Sound
Off line at
563-0579.
* Be prepared to leave
a brief message.
After the beep,
speak loudly, slowly
and clearly.


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6 CITRUS
CARDIOLOGY


�_I~ IIIII~__IIY__CUI__^___________----�I~-


NEW :

PATIENT -

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TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 A9


OPINION


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ATION


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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


150 die in quake


Another 1,500

injured in Italy;

tens of thousands

left homeless
Associated Press
EAQUILA, Italy - Rescue work-
ers using bare hands and buckets
searched frantically for students be-
lieved buried in a wrecked dormi-
tory after Italy's deadliest quake in
nearly three decades struck this me-
dieval city before dawn Monday,
killing more than 150 people, injur-
ing 1,500 and leaving tens of thou-
sands homeless.
The 6.3-magnitude earthquake
buckled both ancient and modern
buildings in and around EAquila,
snuggled in a valley surrounded by
the snowcapped Apennines' tallest
peaks.
It also took a severe toll on the
centuries-old castles and churches
in the mountain stronghold dating
from the Middle Ages, and the Cul-
ture Ministry drew up a list of land-
marks that were damaged, including
collapsed bell towers and cupolas.
The quake, centered near
EAquila about 70 miles northeast of
Rome, struck at 3:22 a.m., followed
by more than a dozen aftershocks.
Firefighters with dogs and a crane
worked feverishly to reach people
trapped in fallen buildings, includ-
ing a dormitory of the University of
LAquila where a half- dozen stu-
dents were believed trapped inside.
After nightfall Monday, rescuers
found a scared-looking dog with a
bleeding paw in the half-collapsed
dorm. Relatives and friends of the
missing stood wrapped in blankets
or huddled under umbrellas in the
rain as rescuers found pieces of fur-
niture, photographs, wallets and di-
aries, but none of the missing.
The body of a male student was
found during the daylight hours.
"We managed to come down with
other students but we had to sneak
through a hole in the stairs as the
whole floor came down," said Luigi
Alfonsi, 22, his eyes filling with tears
and his hands trembling. "I was in
bed - it was like it would never end
as I heard pieces of the building col-
lapse around me."
Elsewhere in town, firefighters re-
ported pulling a 21-year-old woman
and a 22-year-man from a pancaked
five-story apartment building where
many students had rented flats.
Amid aftershocks, survivors
hugged one another, prayed quietly
or tried to call relatives. Residents
covered in dust pushed carts of
clothes and blankets that they had
thrown together before fleeing their
homes.
Slabs of walls, twisted steel sup-
ports, furniture and wire fences were
strewn in the streets, and gray dust
was everywhere. A body lay on the
sidewalk, covered by a white sheet.
Residents and rescue workers
hauled debris from collapsed build-
ings by hand or in a bucket brigade.
Firefighters pulled a woman covered
in dust from her four-story home.


Associated Press
Bianca, a dog whose owners are missing, wanders Monday past the rubble
of collapsed buildings in the village of Castelnuovo, central Italy. A power-
ful earthquake in mountainous central Italy knocked down whole blocks of
buildings early Monday as residents slept.


Earthquakes in Italy kill more than 150 people ,


More than 1 500 people
"r r.p j.n i ar e m
o.. c.- - .
. :,: : , :br. l,'31 If ly
f ',-nj j, 'ama , ,






S R Ui.
SOURCE: USQS


Rescue crews demanded quiet as
they listened for signs of life from in-
side.
RAI television showed rescue
workers gingerly pulling a man clad
only in his underwear from a crum-
bled building. He embraced one of
his rescuers and sobbed loudly as
others placed a jacket around his
shoulders. Although shaken and cov-
ered in dust, the man was able to
walk
Some 10,000 to 15,000 buildings


Magnitude of earthquakes


were either damaged or destroyed,
officials said. EAquila Mayor Mas-
simo Cialente said about 100,000 peo-
ple were homeless. It was not clear if
his estimate included surrounding
towns.
Premier Silvio Berlusconi said in
a TV interview that more than 150
people were killed and more than
1,500 were injured. He had already
declared a state of emergency, free-
ing federal funds for the disaster, and
canceled a trip to Russia.


Anger erupts


in Iraq after


bombs kill 37

Officials: Blasts timed with

anniversary ofBaath founding


Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Anger
boiled over in Baghdad
streets at Iraqi soldiers and
police after they failed to
prevent a stunning series
of coordinated bombings
across the city Monday that
left 37 dead and more than
100 wounded.
Iraq's government
blamed the attacks on sup-
porters of Saddam Hussein
"in cooperation with the al-
Qaida terrorist organiza-
tion" and suggested the
blasts were timed for
today's anniversary of the
founding of the late dicta-
tor's Baath party.
The attacks, which one
Interior Ministry official
called the worst breach of
security in Baghdad this
year, occurred as the U.S.
military is drawing down
its forces in the capital.
Some Iraqis pondered
whether their own soldiers
and police can maintain
order if Shiite-Sunni vio-
lence flares again once the
Americans have gone.
At the site of one blast, in
the former militia strong-
hold of Sadr City, angry
crowds hurled stones at
Iraqi soldiers in a display


of bitterness that they
failed to prevent a car
bomb from entering a busy
market, where it exploded.
"We see nothing from
them, they are useless,"
complained Mohammed
Latif, a government em-
ployee who lives in Sadr
City.
"They are responsible
for what happened today.
They are just sitting at the
checkpoint doing nothing
and after that they open
fire randomly."
According to police,
none of the six blasts
claimed more than 12 lives,
far fewer than the 30 peo-
ple who died in a March 8
suicide attack at Baghdad's
police academy and the 33
killed in a suicide bombing
two days later at a market
on the outskirts of the city.
But the attacks Monday
were stunning in their
scope, striking widely dis-
persed targets from the
northeast to the southwest
of this sprawling city over a
four-hour period.
That cast doubt on U.S.
and Iraqi claims that mili-
tants were no longer capa-
ble of the sort of mass
attacks that shook Baghdad
in 2006 and 2007.


John Demjanjuk

Splansappeah4


Associated Press
CLEVELAND - A U.S.
immigration judge in Vir-
ginia on Monday revoked
John Demjanjuk's stay of
deportation. Demjanjuk
plans to appeal the deci-
sion, which would clear
the way for him to be sent
to Germany nearly three
decades after officials first
alleged he was a guard at a
Nazi death camp.
The 89-year-old subur-
ban Cleveland man, a re-
tired autoworker, is
accused in a German ar-
rest warrant of 29,000
counts of acting as an ac-
cessory to murder at the
Sobibor death camp in
Nazi-occupied Poland in
1943. He has denied in-
volvement in any deaths.
Authorities in Germany
had initially expected him


to arrive in that country on
Monday. But Demjanjilk
won a reprieve Friday
after arguing that his case
should be reopened and
that being forced to go to
Germany would amount to
torture because of his poor
health.
Judge Wayne R. Iskra,
who granted the initial
stay of deportation, re-
versed the decision Mon-
day without a hearing. He
agreed with the U.S. Jus-
tice Department's re-
sponse that the matter
should be handled by the
Board of Immigration Ap-
peals, which has previ-
ously upheld Demjanjuk's
removal.
His son, John Demjan-
juk Jr., says an appeal will
be filed in Falls Church,
Va., at the Board of Immi-
gration Appeals.


President says ties

'critical' to all
Associated Press
ANKARA, Turkey - Declaring
the U.S. "is not and never will be at
war with Islam," President Barack
Obama worked Monday to mend
frayed ties with NATO ally Turkey
and improve relations with the
larger Muslim world.
Obama acknowledged still-raw
tensions over the Iraq war but said
Muslims worldwide have little in
common with terrorists such as al-
Qaida and have much to gain in op-


posing them. Reaching out, he also
spoke of Muslim connections in his
own background.
"We seek broader engagement
based upon mutual interest and
mutual respect," Obama said in a
speech to Turkey's Parliament
It was his first visit to a predom-
inantly Islamic nation as president,
and he struck a balance between
extending a hand to Muslims in
general and discussing Turkey's
central role in helping to bring sta-
bility to a post-war Iraq and the
wider Middle East
"Our partnership with the Mus-
lim world is critical, not just in
rolling back the violent ideologies
that people of all faiths reject but


also to strengthen opportunity for
all its people," he said. He por-
trayed terrorist groups such as al-
Qaida as extremists far removed
from the vast majority of Muslims.
Turkey has NATO's largest Army
after the U.S., but relations be-
tween the two countries soured
after the 2003 invasion of Iraq,
which the Turks opposed. Turkey
barred U.S. forces from going
through its country to attack Iraq.
Now, however, since Obama is
withdrawing troops, Turkey has be-
come more cooperative.
Sharing parts of its southern bor-
der with Iraq, Turkey's role in
maintaining security will be pivotal
after U.S. combat troops are gone.


Associated Press
President Barack Obama and
Turkey's President Abdullah Gul fin-
Ish a joint news conference Monday
In Ankara, Turkey.


Adviser: U.S. policy on Cuba evolving under new administration


Associated Press
Gertrude Balnes poses Mon-
day as she celebrates her
115th birthday at the West-
ern Convalescent Hospital In
Los Angeles. Guinness World
Records on Monday pre-
sented Balnes with a certifi-
cate naming her the oldest
person living.


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President
Barack Obama will soon move to
ease travel and financial restrictions
on Cuba as his administration con-
ducts a broad review of its policy to-
ward the communist nation, a senior
American official said Monday
"We can expect some relaxation,
some changes in terms of the re-
strictions on family remittances and


family travel," said Jeffrey Davidow,
the White House adviser for the up-
coming Summit of the Americas,
which Obama will attend.
Davidow said Monday that the
changes - which officials say would
allow unlimited visits to Cuba by
American families and remove caps
on money transfers - are intended
not only as a moral step for the esti-
mated 1.5 million Americans who
have relatives in Cuba, but also to


foster change there.
"Cuban-Americans are the best
possible ambassadors of our system
and our values," Davidow said. He
added, however, that the high hopes
that some have for reforms since
Fidel Castro ceded power to his
brother Raul last year have not yet
been realized.
Davidow and other officials say
the administration is also looking se-
riously at calls from some lawmak-


ers to allow all Americans to travel
to Cuba, appoint a special envoy to
oversee policy toward the island and
possibly end U.S. opposition to
Cuba's membership in the Organi-
zation of American States.
"We are engaged in a continual
evaluation of our policy and how
that policy could help result in a
change in Cuba that could bring
about a democratic society," Davi-
dow said.


Nation BRIEF

Birthday


Obama to Muslim world: No war with Islam


.- . *"*": � -'^ w .eAf "'











SI Ut-ct U l..I i.7,t2009t



S e"tjIIpO RTS


MLB opening day in
the books, see Page B3.


l - '


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE '


N NASCAR/B2
I MLB/B3
0 Sports briefs/B4
E TV, Lottery/B4
N Tennis Column/B5
0 Local Racing/B5
N Entertainment/B6


UConn one win away from perfection


Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - Even though his
team has been mowing down
every team in its way, Geno Au-
riemma wants you to believe
UConn could lose the national
championship.
To a team it's beaten twice - by
28 and 39 points.
"It's way too much familiarity
for both teams," the Hall of Fame
coach said. "A lot more than you'd
,like to have this time of year."
Auriemma insists he has reason
to worry about Tuesday's tile
game against Louisville. He's seen
a big difference in the Cardinals
from the team UConn dismantled
in the Big East championship a
.month ago.


ON THE TUBE
* Who: UConn vs.
Louisville
* Time: 8:30 p.m.
* TV: ESPN

"What we did in the second
game, I don't think it has any effect
on today," he said. "Different en-
vironment. Different day. Differ-
ent attitudes among the players."
UConn (38-0) stands on the
doorstep of the third unde-
feated season in school history
and just the fifth ever in
women's basketball.
Louisville (34-4), which is look-
ing to become the fourth team to


knock off three No. 1 seeds on its
way to a title, will have to have a
new game plan against Connecti-
cut Second-year coach Jeff Walz
was hard-pressed to find a weak-
ness with the Huskies last time out
"I think I saw their manager
drop a bottle of water," he said
laughing. "That's the scary thing
about them. They've got three of
the top 10 players in the country.
Then you've got Tiffany Hayes
who's shooting the ball extremely
See UCONN/Page B4
Connecticut players celebrate
after beating Stanford, 83-64, on
Sunday in the semifinals of the
women's Final Four in St. Louis.
Associated Press


once a ain
0000 4810


Associated Press
North Carolina's Tyler Hansbrough, right, celebrates with coach Roy Williams, left, at the end of the championship game at the men's NCAA
Final Four college basketball tournament on Monday in Detroit. North Carolina won, 89-72.

North Carolina rides dominatingfirst half to second NCAA title in five years


Associated Press
DETROIT - Forget 40 min-
utes. North Carolina didn't even
need 40 seconds.
Block, rebound, rebound, put-
back Strip, rebound, putback.
Game.
Those two possessions, lasting
all of 33 seconds early in the first
half, put the Tar Heels in control
and Michigan State never recov-
ered. Oh, the Spartans managed
to rally in the second half- or as
much a rally as it can be when it
cuts the deficit to 13 - but that
early display removed any doubt
that North Carolina really is the


best team in the country.
Speed, power, athleticism,
depth - the Tar Heels had it all.
And now they have a fifth NCAA
title, their second in five years,
after a 89-72 thrashing of Michi-
gan State on Monday night
North Carolina embarrassed
the Spartans on this very floor in
December, a 35-point victory that
was Michigan State's most lop-
sided loss since 1996, Tom Izzo's
first year as a coach. This game
was supposed to be different.
Not only did the Spartans have
big man Goran Suton back, but
they were a different team than
they were even three weeks ago.


They bulldozed overall No. 1
Louisville in the Midwest Re-
gional final, running at the Car-
dinals from the opening tip. Did
the same thing to another top
seed, Connecticut, in the Final
Four on Saturday night. They
were fierce, physical and utterly
relentless, never giving either
opponent a chance to find any
kind of groove.
Now they know how the Cardi-
nals and the Huskies feel.
Only five minutes into the
game, Kalin Lucas sprinted for a
fast-break layup that would have
pulled the Spartans within sin-
gle digits and might have given


them some momentum. But Ed
Davis blocked it and came up
with the rebound. Davis dished
off to Ty Lawson and, when Law-
son missed a jumper, was right
there again to collect the re-
bound and score on the putback
There was a Tar Heel or two
who hadn't even gotten across
midcourt when Lawson
stripped Draymond Green.
Bobby Frasor missed a 3, but
Wayne Ellington grabbed the
ball and scored on a layup.
With 14:26 still to play in the
first half, North Carolina had a
14-point lead and the game was
as good as over.


Winslow


extends


contract

Bucs, TE agree to

six-year deal with

worth $36.1M
Associated Press
TAMPA - Kellen Winslow and
the Tampa Bay Buccaneers
agreed Monday to a six-year, $36.1
million contract extension that
will make the one-time Pro Bowl
selection the highest-paid tight
end in NFL history.
Agent Drew Rosenhaus said the
deal includes $20.1 million guar-
anteed, a record for
a tight end. With
incentives, it
could be worth
up to: $42
million.
Contract
talks began
soon after
the Feb. 27 trade
that sent Winslow, who partici-
pated in the Bucs' voluntary mini-
camp last week, to Tampa Bay
from Cleveland in exchange for a
second-round pick in this year's
draft and a fifth-rounder in 2010.
"The Bucs were open to some-
thing long-term," Rosenhaus said.
"It's nice to get it done."
Winslow was the sixth overall
pick in the 2004 draft, and his ca-
reer has been marked by plenty of
highs, lows and controversy.
The 25-year-old had 219 recep-
tions for 2,459 yards and 11
touchdowns in five seasons with
the Browns, and the Bucs are
counting on him to play a major
role in an overhauled offense
next season.
Winslow had 89 catches for 875
yards and three touchdowns in
2006 and followed with 82 recep-
tions for 1,106 yards in 2007. He
survived a serious motorcycle ac-
cident and battled injuries
throughout his stay in Cleveland,
and last season squabbled with
the Browns' front office.
The Bucs fired coach Jon Gru-
den in January after losing their
last four games to miss the play-
offs following a 9-3 start. Upgrad-
ing the offense has been the top
priority under successor Raheem
Morris, who brought in former
Boston College coach Jeff
Jagodzinski as his offensive
coordinator.


No. 52: Gary Player to compete in final Masters event


Golfer has three

victories atAugusta
Associated Press
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Fifty-two
years ago, Gary Player arrived at
the Masters with less than $5,000
to his name but an unwavering
confidence that he could beat
anyone.
Arnold Palmer? Jack Nicklaus?
Bring 'em on.
For one decade after another,
Player teed it up with the greats of
the game at Augusta National,
watching the rise of Tiger Woods
and hanging around long enough
to see yet another wave of promis-


ing young golfers arrive on the
scene, mere teens born long after
the South African won the last of
his three green jackets.
But no one lasts forever, not
even a fitness buff such as Player
Instead of dropping to his knees to
rip off some push-ups, the Man in
Black announced Monday this will
be his final Masters.
"I'm exercising profusely, but
it's very difficult at 73 to build
strength," Player said. "The golf
course is so long. It is just so long.
I mean, I'm hitting a wood to al-
most every single hole."
Even when his chances of win-
ning had long since passed, Player
reveled in more modest accom-
plishments such as making the
cut, or outlasting contemporaries


such as Palmer and Nicklaus.
And now, playing a course that
grew while his game was shrink-
ing, Player always took pride in
being the link to another genera-
tion, strolling proudly through the
Georgia pines, occasionally
pulling off a shot that would cause
the patrons to say, "Wow, look at ol'
Gary, hanging with the kids."
Those shots were getting
harder and harder to come by,
however. He hasn't made the cut
since 1998, when at age 62 he be-
came the oldest player to reach
the weekend at Augusta (a record
eclipsed two years later by 63-
year-old Tommy Aaron).
"I've managed to break 80 the
last two years," Player said. "It's
See PLAYER/Page B4


Associated Press
Three-time Masters champion Gary Player, right, chats with defending
Masters' champion Trevor Immelman before their practice round on Mon-
day for the Masters golf tournament at in Augusta, Ga.


i













EARN $25 IN THE CHRONICLE'S NASCAR CONTEST


r


ABOVE: Chronicle sports writer Alan Festo presents a check for $25
to Suzanne Blazinkski for correctly guessing Jimmie Johnson as the
winner of the Goody's Fast Pain Relief 500 at Martinsville.
RIGHT: Chronicle copy editor Laura Isaacs, left, presents a check for
$25 to Aubrie Cioe for also correctly guessing Johnson. Both had a
tie-break speed of 75 mph with the actual speed being 75.938 mph.


S*-----------------












I10 z





IZI
U









































will Tin $25. In the event that more
Z 4) *





















than one contestant picks the same















average speedover or under, will be
declared the winner Ifthere is no win-
ne0 one week the $25 prize will carry

week's race contest worth $50.
SMeadowerest officeat 624N.Meadow-










e sBlvd,Cuys aRiver, FL, 34429. All
Entrees MUST be in the offie no lat er









than 5 p.m.onnFeiday, Aprilc 7.
N Pick the av nera ofnthraces




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ner one week the $25 prize will carr
over to the following week making that
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e You may enter as many times as

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B2 TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009


NASCAR- ..-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TUFSDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 B3


Baltimore
Toronto
Boston
Tampa Bay
New York



Atlanta
Florida
New York
Philadelphia
Washington


East Division
GB WCGB


� �
1 1

East Division
GB WCGB


1 1
1 1


Chicago
Kansas City
Minnesota
Cleveland
Detroit



Chicago
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
Houston
St. Louis


Central Division
GB WCGB
- 1
- -
- '
� 1
� 1

Central Division
GB WCGB

- �h
1 1
1 1
1 1


Texas
Los Angeles
Oakland
Seattle




Arizona
Los Angeles
San Fran.
Colorado
San Diego


West Division
GB WCGB

1 -
1 /



West Division
GB WCGB


Y 'h
1- 1
1 1


Home
1-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-1


AMERICAN LEAGUE -'
Sunday's Games
No games scheduled Ae
Monday's Games " 0
Texas 9, Cleveland 1
Kansas City at Chicago, ppd., rain
Tampa Bay at Boston, ppd., rain
Baltimore 10, N.Y. Yankees 5
Toronto 12, Detroit 5
Seattle at Minnesota, late
Oakland at L.A. Angels, late
Today's Games
Kansas City (Meche 0-0) at Chicago White Sox
(Buehrle 0-0), 2:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 0-0) at Boston (Beckett 0-
0), 4:05 p.m.
Detroit (Jackson 0-0) at Toronto (Purcey 0-0),
7:07 p.m. .
Seattle (Bedard 0-0) at Minnesota (Blackburn
0-0), 8:10 p.m.
Oakland (Cahill 0-0) at L.A. Angels (Moseley 0- .
0), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
N.Y. Yankees (Wang 0-0) at Baltimore (Uehara
0-0), 7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Miner 0-0) at Toronto (Litsch 0-0), 7:07
p.m.
Tampa Bay (Kazmir 0-0) at Boston (Lester 0-0),
7:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Carmona 0-0) at Texas (Padilla 0-0),
8:05 p.m.
Seattle (Silva 0-0) at Minnesota (Slowey 0-0),
8:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Greinke 0-0) at Chicago White Sox Former President George Bu
(Floyd 0-0), 8:11 p.m. Former President George Bu
Oakland (Eveland 0-0) at L.A. Angels (Adenhart first pitch before the baseball
0-0), 10:05 p.m. Indians and Texas Ranger on
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday's Games Rangers 9, Indians 1
Atlanta 4, Philadelphia 1
Monday's Games ARLINGTON, Texas - The
N.Y. Mets 2, Cincinnati 1 Texas Rangers can still hit. Cliff
Arizona 9, Colorado 8 Lee can attest to that
Florida 12, Washington 6 Lee can attest to that.
Pittsburgh 6, St. Louis 4 The AL Cy Young Award win-
L.A. Dodgers 4, San Diego 1 ner allowed seven runs and 10
Chicago Cubs 4, Houston 2 hits in five innings, including
Today's Games
Milwaukee (Suppan 0-0) at San Francisco Hank Blalock's three-run
(Lincecum 0-0), 4:05 p.m. homer, and the Rangers routed
Atlanta (Jurdens 0-0) at Philadelphia (Moyer 0- the Cleveland Indians 9-1 Mon-
0), 7:05 p.m.
Washington (Olsen 0-0) at Florida (Johnson 0o- day in their season opener.
0), 7:10 p.m. Kevin Millwood allowed one
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 0-0) at Houston (Ro- run over seven innings in his
driguez 0-0), 8:05 p.m. ) R fu n se ve oning -a
Pittsburgh (Snell 0-0) at St. Louis (Lohse 0-0), fourth consecutive opening-day
8:15 p.m. start for Texas. The 34-year-old
Colorado (Jimenez 0-0) at Arizona (Haren 0-0), right-hander lost his first three.
9:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Wolf 0-0) at San Diego (Young 0- Lee was 22-3 with an AL-
0), 10:05 p.m. leading 2.54 ERA last season,
Wednesday's Games when the left-hander never gave
Washington (Cabrera 0-0) at Florida (Volstad 0- up more than six runs in a game
0), 12:10 p.m. up more than six runs in a game
Atlanta (Vazquez 0-0) at Philadelphia (Blanton - one of those starts was in a
0-0), 3:05 p.m. victory at the Rangers.
Colorado (Morales 0-0) at Arizona (Davis 0-0), Texas had 15 hits against four
3:40 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 0-0) at Cincinnati (Volquez 0- pitchers, including Saltalamac-
0), 7:10 p.m. . chia's solo hQmeriithe eighth.
Chicago Cubs (Lilly 0-0) at Houston (Moehler It matched the most hits for the
0-0), 8:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Duke 0-0) at St. Louis (Wellemeyer Rangers in a season opener.
0-0o), 8:15 p.m. Texas jumped ahead with four
L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 0-0) at San Diego S in the second off Lee, who
(Silva 0-0), 10:05 p.m. runs in the second off Lee, who
Milwaukee (Gallardo 0-0) at San Francisco allowed only four earned runs in
(Cain 0-0), 10:15 p.m. his first seven starts a year ago.


Associated Press
sh throws the season opening
I game between the Cleveland
Monday in Arlington, Texas.

Blalock hit a one-hopper that
ricocheted off Lee's arm in the
second. Cleveland manager
Eric Wedge and a trainer went
out to check on Lee, who threw
one warmup pitch and said he


was OK.
Cleveland


Texas


ab rh bi
Sizemr cf 4 0 1 0 Kinsler 2b
DeRosa 3b 3 0 0 0 Young 3b
Martinz lb 4 0 1 0 Hamltn cf
Hafnerdh 4 1 1 0 Cruzrf
Peralta ss 3 0 0 0 Blalock dh
Choo f 3 0 1 0 Byrd If
Shppchc 3 00 0 Davislb
Frncsc If 3 0 1 0 Sltlmch c
Carera 2b 3 0 0 0 Andrus ss
Totals 30 1 5 0 Totals


ab r h bi
5 1 3 2
4 02 1
5 1 2 0
5 1 2 0
4 22 3
4 1 1 0
4 00 0
4 22 3
4 1 1 0
39 9159


Cleveland 000 000 100-1
Texas 040 030 02x-9
DP-Texas 2. LOB-Cleveland 3, Texas 7.2B-
Kinsler 2 (2), Byrd (1), Andrus (1). HR-Blalock
(1), Saltalamacchia (1).
IP H RERBBSO


Cleveland
Lee L,0-1
Kobayashi
Perez
Lewis .
Texas
Millwood W,1-0
Wilson
Francisco
WP-Millwood.


7 5 1 1 1 5
1 0 0" 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 1


Umpires-Home, Jerry Crawford; First, Tom
Hallion; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Ed Hickox.
T-2:33. A-49,916 (49,170).


Dodgers 4, Padres 1
SAN DIEGO - Joe Torre's
trust in Hiroki Kuroda paid off
with an opening-day win for the
Los Angeles Dodgers.
Kuroda outpitched San
Diego Padres ace Jake Peavy,
leading the defending NL West
champions to a 4-1 victory
Monday without a hit from
Manny Ramirez.
The enigmatic slugger went
0-for-3 with a walk and a run on
his first opening day with the
Dodgers. Matt Kemp drove a
418-foot homer to straightaway
center field off Peavy, and
James Loney had three hits, in-
cluding a two-run single.
The crowd of 45,496 was the
largest in Petco Park's six-year
history.
Torre said he figured Kuroda
could handle the pressure of an
opening-day start based on his
two big wins in the postseason,
against the Chicago Cubs in
the division series and the
Philadelphia Phillies in the NL
championship series.
The right-hander came
through, holding San Diego to
four hits in 5 2-3 innings.
Los Angeles San Diego
ab rhbi ab r h bi
Furcalss 5 1 2 0 Gerutcf 4 1 1 0
Hudson 2b 4 1 1 0 Eckstn 2b 2 01 0
Ramirz If 3 1 0 0 Gilesrf 4 0 1 1
Ethierrf 4 02 1 Gonzalzlb 2 00 0
Martin c 3 00 0 Kzmnff 3b 4 00 0
Loneylb 4 03 2 Headlylf 4 0 1 0
Kempf 3 1 1 1 Blancoc 3 00 0
Blake 3b 4 0 0 0 Macias ph 1 00 0
Kuroda p 2 0 0 0 Rodrigz ss 4 0 1 0
Wadep 1 00 0 Peavyp 1 00 0
Kuo p 0 00 0 Gonzalz ph 1 00 0
Mntkw ph 1 00 0 Mujica p 0 00 0(
Broxtn p 0 0 0 0 Grgrsn p 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 4 9 4 Totals 30 1 5 1
Los Angeles 201 000 100-4
San Diego 100 000 000--1
E-Peavy (1). DP-San Diego 1. LOB-Los
Angeles 6, San Diego 7. 2B-Gerut (1),
Headley (1). HR-Kemp (1). SB-Furcal (1),
Hudson (1), Loney (1). S-Eckstein, Peavy.
IP H RERBBSO


Los Angeles
Kuroda W,1-0
Wade H,1
Kuo H,1

San Diego
:'- .' L.0-1
Mujica
Gregerson
WP-Kuo.


52-34
1.1-3 1
1 0
10

1 1
1 1


1 2
0 0
2 1


2 8
0 1
1 2


Umpires-Home, Tim McClelland; First, Ted
Barrett; Second, Greg Gibson; Third, Andy
Fletcher.
T-3:01. A-45,496 (42,691).


Orioles 10, Yankees 5 Blue Jays 12, Tigers 5


BALTIMORE - CC Sabathia
and the new-look New York
Yankees absorbed an old-fash-
ioned beating on opening day.
Sabathia allowed six runs
and failed to get through the
fifth inning in his first start with
New York, and the Yankees lost
to the Baltimore Orioles 10-5 on
Monday.
After missing a postseason
for the first time since 1993,
New York spent $423.5 million
on free agents Sabathia, A.J.
Bumett and Mark Teixeira dur-
ing the offseason. Sabathia got
a $161 million, seven-year deal,
butitie left-hander hardly
looked like an ace against the
Orioles, who finished last in the
AL East in 2008 - their 11th
straight losing season.
Sabathia (0-1) gave up eight
hits in 4 1-3 innings, walked
five, threw two wild pitches and
did not record a strikeout for the
first time since July 25, 2005.


NeviYork'


Baltimore


ab rhbi ab r h bi
Jeterss 5 0 3 0 Roberts2b 4 2 3 0
Damon If 3 12 1 Jonescf 3 33 2
Teixeirlb, 4 00 0 Markksrf 4 22 2
Matsu, n 5 1 1 2 Mora3b 3 0 1 0
Posadac 3 1 1 1 Huff lb 5 0 1 3
Cano2b 3 1 1 0 Wggntndh -4 0 1 0
Nady rf 4 0 1 1 Scott If 2 0 0 1
Ransm 3b 3 0 0 0 Pie If 0 00 0
Swisher ph 1 0 1 0 Zaun c 4 1 1 0
Pena pr-3b 0 0 0 0 Izturis ss 4 2 2 2
Gardnrcf 3 1 1 0
Totals . 34 511 5 Totals 33101410
NewYdrk 001 002 200-5
Baltimore 003 030 04x-10
DP-New York 2, Baltimore 1. LOB-New York
11, Baltimore 8. 2B-Nady (1), Swisher (1),
Roberts (1), Huff (1), Zaun (1). 3B-Damon (1),
Jories (11 MR--Mlu. Iii Posada (1), Izturis
it1 SB-iziur. ii CS-R.oberts (1).S-Gard-
rer SF-D- Tj. M.ar . ,i.
IP H R ER BB SO


NewYork
Sabathia L,0-1
Albaladejo
Coke
Brudey
Marte
Baltimore


41-38
11-32
12-3 2
1-3 1
1-3 1


GuthrieW,1-0 6 7 3 3 3 3
RayH,1 1-3 2 2 2 1 0
Walker 0 1 0 0 0 0
Sarfatel H 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
joianS-Hdi - i j 0 0.4-,_. ,
Sre..rnri 1 0 0 1 1
Walker pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by Guthrie (Posada). WP-Sabathia 2,
Bruney. .
Umpires-Home, Randy Marsh; First, Mike
Winters; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third,
James Hoye.
T-3:31. A-48,607 (48,290).


TORONTO -Adam Lind
homered and drove in six runs,
Roy Halladay coasted with a
big lead and the Toronto Blue
Jays beat the Detroit Tigers 12-
5 Monday in an opener delayed
when fans littered the field.
Umpires waved both teams
off the field for nine minutes in
the bottom of the eighth inning
after two balls were thrown
from the stands in the direc-
tion of Tigers left fielder Josh
Anderson.
Groundskeepers cleared
paper airplanes and empty
beer cups from the warning
track as the public address an-
nouncer read a message warn-
ing the crowd of 48,027 that the
game could be forfeited.
Lind had four hits and set a
team record for RBIs in an
opener. The Blue Jays roughed
up Justin Verlander (0-1), who
matched a career worst by al-
lowing eight earned runs in only
3 2-3 innings.
Rookie Travis Snider also
homered, one of the Blue Jays'
15 hits.


Detroit

Grndrs cf
Polanc 2b
Ordonz rf
Carera lb
Guillen dh
Laird c
Inge 3b
Everett ss
Andrsn If
Totals
Detroit
Toronto


Toronto
ab rhbi


3 1 1 1 Scutaross
4 00 0 Hill2b
4 1 2 0 Riosrf
4 0 2 0 Wells cf
4 1 1 1 Linddh
4 1 1 1 Rolen3b
4 1 2 Overay lb
4 00 0 Barajs c
3 0 0 0 Snider If
34 5 8 5 Totals 3
000 100
400 500


ab r h bi
4 21 0
4 1 1 1
3320
4 22 1
5246

5012
5 01 0
4 1 2 1
37121512
400- 5
I 03x-12


E--Ordonez 2 (2), Everett (1). DP-Detroit 1,
Toronto 1. LOB-Detroit 3, Toronto.8. 2B-
Guillen (1), Rios (1), Wells (1), Overbay (1),
Snider (1). 3B-Scutaro (1). HR-Granderson
(1), Inge (1), Lind (1), Snider (1). SF-Hill,
Rolen.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
Verlander L,0-1 32-3 8 8 8 2 4
Bonine 21-3 5 1 1 0 1
Robertson 1 0 0 0 0 2
Rincon 1 2 3 3 2 1
Toronto
HalladayW,1-0 7 6 5 5 1 2
-Crlson 1--3.-0- 0. -,0�i 0
League 1-;. ' C0 0 '0 i
Downs H,1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Tallet 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Verlander (Rolen).
Umpires-Home, Ed Montague; First, Jerry
Layne; Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Chris
Guccione.
T-2:43. A-48,027 (49,539).


Cubs 4, Astros 2
HOUSTON - Carlos Zam-
brano pitched into the seventh
inning to get his first opening-
day win in five chances, leading
the Chicago Cubs to a 4-2 vic-
tory over the Houston Astros on
Monday night.
Zambrano allowed one run
and five hits over six-plus in-
nings in his first start against
Houston since his no-hitter on
Sept. 14 in Milwaukee. That
game was played at Miller Park
after Hurricane Ike damaged
the Houston-area.
Alfonso Soriano hit his 50th
career leadoff home run and
Aramis Ramirez also went
deep against Houston's Roy
Oswalt. Mike Fontenot had
three hits for Chicago.
Cubs manager Lou Piniella
said before the game that the
27-year-old Zambrano would
get too nervous and excited on
opening day in years past. But
things were different this time
around.
Zambrano (1-0) struck out
six and walked three.


Chicago Houston
ab rhbi
Soriano lf 5 1 2 1 Matsui 2b
Fukdm cf 4 0 0 0 Rodrigz c
Greggp 0 00 0 Brkmn lb
Lee lb 4 00 0 Lee If
Bradly rf 3 0 0 0 Tejada ss
Ramirz3b 4 1 1 1 Blum3b
Fontent 2b 4 2 3 0 Pence rf
Sotoc 4 0 1 0 Bourn cf
Theriot ss 2 0 1 1 Oswalt p
Zamrn p 3 0 0 0 Erstad ph
Heilmn p 0 0 0 0 Michals ph
Cots p 0 0 0 0 Geary p
Marmi p 0 00 0 Smith ph
Hoffparph 1 0 1 1
Gthrght cf 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 4 9 4 Totals


ab r h bi
3 0 1 0
4 00 0
2 01 0
4 000
4230
3 01 0
3 00 1
4 02 1
1 00 0
0 0 0 0
1 00 0
0 0 0 0
1 00 0


30 2 8 2


Chicago 110 100 001-4
Houston 000 000 101-2
DP-Chicago 1, Houston 1. LOB-Chicago 6,
Houston 7.2B-Fontenot (1). HR-Soriano (1),
Ramirez (1). CS-Tejada (1). S-Oswalt. SF-
Theriot, Pence.
IP H RER BBSO
Chicago
ZambranoW,1-0 6 5 1 1 3 6
HeilmanH,1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
CottsH,1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
MarmolH,1 1 0 0 0 1 0
GreggS,1-1 1 2 1 1 0 0
Houston
OswaltL,0-1 7 7 3 3 1 2
Geary 2 2 1 1 1 2
WP-Geary,
Umpires-Home, Derryl Cousins; First, Jim
Joyce; Second, Bill Miller; Third, Brian Runge.
T-2:39. A-43,827 (40,976).


Pirates 6, Cardinals 4 D-Backs 9, Rockies 8 Marlins 12, Nationals 6


ST. LOUIS - Jack Wilson
gave the Pittsburgh Pirates a
dramatic opening-day victory.
With the Pirates down to their
last strike, Wilson hit a.three-
run double to cap a four-run
ninth inning off rookie closer
Jason Motte, leading Pittsburgh
over the St. Louis Cardinals 6-4
Monday.
In a game played in 41-de-
gree chill, Ryan Ludwick broke
a 2-2 tie with a leadoff homer in
the eighth off Tyler Yates, and
David Freese added a sacrifice
fly off John Grabow (1-0) for a
4-2 lead.
Freddy Sanchez led off the
ninth with a double off Motte,
Adam LaRoche singled in a run
with one out, pinch-hitter Eric
Hinske doubled LaRoche to
third, Brandon Moss was hit by
a pitch and Wilson doubled to
left-center on an 0-2 fastball.
Pittsburgh St. Louis
ab rhbi ab r h bi
Morgan If 5 03 2 Ryan2b 5 1 1 0
Sanchz 2b 5 1 2 0 Ankiel cf 4 00 0
McLothcf 3 00 0 Pujolslb 4 03 0
Doumit c 5 00 0 Greene ss 5 0 1 1
LaRoch ib 5 1 2 1 Ludwckrf 5 1 2 2
LaRoch3b 3 1 0 0 Molina c 4 0 0 0
Yates p 0 0 0 0 Duncan If 3 0 1 0
Grabow p 0 0 0 0 Thurstn pr-3b 0 1 0 0
Hinske ph 1 1 1 0 Barden 3b 3 00 0
Capps p 0 0 0 0 McCilln p 0 0 0 0
Moss rf 3 2 0 0 Schmkr ph-lf 1 0 1 0
Wilson ss 5 0 1 3 Wnwrgp 2 1 1 0
Mahlm p 1 0 1 0 Kinney p 0 00 0
Vazquz 3b 2 0 1 0 Miller p 0 0 0 0
Freese 3b 1 0 0 1
Motte p 0 0 0 0
Totals 38 611 6 Totals 374104
Pittsburgh 000 002 004-6
St. Louis 002 000 020-4
E-Grabow (1), LaRoche 2 (2), Greene (1).
DP-Pittsburgh 1. LOB-Pittsburgh 12, St.
Louis 10.2B-Sanchez (1), Hinske (1), Wilson
(1), Pujols (1), Duncan (1), Wainwright (1).
HR-Ludwick (1). SB-Morgan (1), Schumaker


(1). SF-Freese.

Pittsburgh
Maholm
Yates
Grabow W,1-0
Capps S,1-1
St. Louis
Wainwright
Kinney H,1
Miller BS,1-1
McClellan
Motte L,0-1 BS,1-1


IP H RERBBSO


62-37 2
2-3 1 2
2-3 1 0
1 1 0


51-3 4
1-3 0
1 2
11-31
1 4


HBP-by Maholm (Ankiel), by Motte (Moss).
WP-Maholm. PB-Molina.
Umpires-Home, Joe West; First, Ed Rapuano;
Second, Paul Schrieber; Third, Marvin Hudson.
T-3:02. A-45,832 (43,975).


PHOENIX - Tony Clark and
Arizona newcomer Felipe
Lopez each homered from both
sides of the plate, and the Dia-
mondbacks beat the Colorado
Rockies 9-8 in a home run
derby of an opener Monday,
Eight home runs were hit in
the game, including the decisive
shot by Chad Tracy leading off
the seventh inning against re-
liever Jason Grilli (0-1).
Lopez and Clark became the
first switch-hitting teammates to
homer from both sides of the
plate in a game since Jorge
Posada and Bernie Williams
did it for the New York Yankees
on April 23, 2000. It had never
been done on opening day.
Lopez, signed as a free
agent in the offseason, is the
first Arizona player to homer
twice in his first game with the
team.


Colorardo
ab rhbi


SpIrghs cf
Smith If
Helton lb
Atkins 3b
Hawpe rd
Stewart 2b
Speier p
Emree p
Baker ph
Grilli p
Tlwtzk ss
lannett c
Cook p
Rusch p


Arizona


4 1 1 0 Lopez2b
5 1 1 2 Young cf
4 1 1 0 Drew ss
3 1 0 0 Tracy3b
4 1 3 3 Qualls p
3 0 1 1 Byrnesrf
0 00 0 Clark lb
0 0 0 0 Jacksn If
1 0 0 0 Snyderc
0 0 0 0 Webb p
4 1 1 1 Slatenp
3 1 1 1 Bucknrp
1 1 1 0 Roberts ph
1 00 0 Schnws p


Barmes 2b 2 0 0 0 Pena p
Ojeda ph-3b
Totals 35 810 8 Totals


ab r h bi
4 22 2
5 1 1 0
3 1 0 0
4 23 2

3 00 1
4 22 3
4 1 1 0
3 0 1 1
2 00 0


34 912 90 0
1 0 1 0


b 1 0 1 0
34 912 9


Colorado 004 210 100-8
Arizona 114 110 10x-9
LOB-Colorado 4, Arizona 5. 2B-Spilborghs
(1), Hawpe 2 (2), Young (1), Snyder (1), Ojeda
(1). HR-Smith (1), Tulowitzki (1), lannetta (1),
Lopez 2 (2), Tracy (1), Clark 2 (2). SB-Smith
(1). CS-Hawpe (1), lannetta (1). SF-Byrnes.
IP H RERBBSO


Colorado
Cook 21-3 7 6
Rusch 2 2 2
Speier 1 1-3 1 0
Embree 1-3 0 0
Grilli L,0-1 2 2 1
Arizona
Webb 4 6 6
Slaten 2-3 2 1
Buckner 11-30 0
Schoeneweis BS,1-1 2-3 2 1
Pena W,1-0 11-3 0 0
Qualls S,1-1 1 0 0


HBP-by Webb (Spilborghs). WP-Buckner 2.
Umpires-Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Brian
O'Nora; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, Jim
Wolf.
T-2:58. A--48,799 (48,652).


MIAMI - The Florida Mar-
lins' new leadoff hitter is so fast
he can beat out a home run.
Emilio Bonifacio became a
crowd favorite in his Marlins'
debut Monday, hitting the ma-
jors'-first inside-the:park hQmer
on opening day since 1968 and
going 4-for-5 in a 12-6 victory
over his former team, the
Washington Nationals.
Florida also hit three homers
over the fence, including Han-
ley Ramirez's grand slam.
The offense was a bonus
coming from Bonifacio, who
joined Florida with a reputation
as a slick-fielding but light-hit-
ting speedster. He was sum-
moned for a curtain call
following his first big league
homer.
The last inside-the-park
hnmp m r in n n onnin da was'


Associated Press
New York Mets' Daniel Murphy (28) is congratulated by third
base coach Razor Shines (52) after Murphy hit a solo home
run off Cincinnati Reds pitcher Aaron Harang in the fifth in-
ning on Monday in Cincinnati.


Mets 2, Reds 1


lIe Fu IIUl ul.uli.l Il I " CINCINNATI - One game
by Boston's Carl Yastrzemski ne game
on April 10, 1968. in, that new Mets bullpen sure
on April 10, 1968. looks good.
Washington Florida Daniel Murphy drove in both
ab rhbi ab rh bi New York runs with a homer
Milledg cf 4 0 0 0 Bonifac 3b 5 44 2
Guzmnss 4 2 2 0 Bakerc 4 2 1 1 and a groundout Monday, a
Zmrmn 3b 4 1 0 0 Ramirz ss 3 2 2 5 memorable showing in his first
Dunn If 4 2 2 4 Cantu lb 4 1 2 3 big league opener, and the
Johnsnib 4 1 1 0 Uggla2b 4 0 0 0
Kearns rf 4 0 1 1 Hermidif 4 1 1 1 Mets' rebuilt bullpen made it
Bellird 2b 3 0 0 0 Calero p 0 0 0 0 hold up for a 2-1 victory over
Shell p 0 00 0 Meyerp 0 00 0 the Cincinnati Reds on a raw,
Hinckly p 0 0 0 0 Helms ph 1 0 0 0
Dukes ph 1 0 0 0 Kensng p 0 0 0 0 cold afternoon.
Flores c 4 0 2 1 Ross rf 4 0 0 0 The Mets became known for
Lannan p 1 0 0 0 Maybin cf 4 1 1 0 meltdowns the last two sea-
Tavarzp 0 00 0 Nolasco p 1 0 0 0
Bard ph 1 0 0 0 Carroll ph-lf 2 11 0 sons, blowing division leads in
Ledezm p 0 0 0 0 September. They tried to fix
Harris 2b 2 0 0 0 their biggest problem - the
Totals 36 6 8 6 Totals 36121212 balky bullpen - y signing
Washington 000 203 001- 6 y bullpen b
Florida 204 204 00x-12 Francisco Rodriguez and trad-
E-Belliard (1), Zimmerman (1), Bonifacio (1). ing for J.J. Putz at the winter
LOB-Washington 3, Florida 6. 2B-Dunn (1), meetings, bringing in two All-
Kearns (1), Baker (1), Ramirez (1), Cantu (1), Sa wi
Maybin (1). HR-Dunn (1), Bonifacio (1), Star pitchers with a history of
Ramirez (1), Cantu (1), Hermida (1). SB-Boni- Success closing games.
facio 3 (3). S-Ramirez, Nolasco. The first time out, they were
IP H RERBBSO
Washington nearly perfect.
Lannan L,0-1 3 6 6 6 0 1 Johan Santana (1-0) went 5
Tavarez 1 2 2 2 0 0 2-3 innings, extending his
Ledezma 1 2 3 2 2 2 streak without a loss since July
Shell 2 2 1 1 0 3
Hinckley 1 0 0 0 2 0 9, and the bullpen didn't allow a
Florida hit the rest of the way. Putz
NolascoW,1-0 6 6 5 4 0 6 gave up a walk in the eighth.
Calero 1 0 0 0 0 1
Meyer 1 0 0 0 0 1 Rodriguez retired all three in
Kensing 1 2 1 1 0 1 the ninth, which was a huge
WP-Kensing. problem last season when San-
Umpires-Home, Gerry Davis; First, Brian Gor- r
man; Second, C.B. Bucknor; Third, Mike Everitt. tana pitched. The left-hander
T-2:55. A-34,323 (38,560). watched the bullpen blow five


of his leads in the ninth inning
last year.
- Cincinnati managed only
three hits overall.
NewYork Cincinnati
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Reyesss 4 0 1 0 HrstnJrIf 4 00 0
Murphy If 5 1 1 2 McDnldcf 3 1 1 0
Rodrigz p 0 0 0 0 Dickrsn ph-cf 0 0 0 0
Wright3b 3 01 0 Vottolb 3 01 0
Delgad lb 4 0 2 0 Phillips2b 2 0 0 1
Beltran cf 4 01 0 Bruce rf 4 01 0
Church rf 4 02 0 Encmc 3b 2 00 0
Schndrc 4 0 0 0 Hmndz c 4 0 0 0
Castillo 2b 3 1 1 0 Gonzalz ss 3 00 0
Santan p 2 00 0 Harang p 1 00 0
Green p 0 000 Owings ph 1 00 0
Andrsn ph 1 00 0 Herrer p 0 00 0
Putz p 0 00 0 Lincoln p 0 00 0
Reed If 0 00 0 Rhodes p 0 00 0
Nix ph 1 0 0 0
Wethrs p 0 0 0 0
Corderp 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 2 9 2 Totals 28 1 3 1
NewYork 000 011 000-2
Cincinnati 000 001 000-1
E-Beltran 2 (2), McDonald 2 (2). LOB-New
York 12, Cincinnati 6. 2B-Castillo (1), Bruce
(1). HR-Murphy (1). SB-Reyes (1), Church
(1). CS-Wright (1). SF-Phillips.
IP H RERBSSO


New York
Santana W,1-0


5 2-33 1 1 4 7


Green H,1 11-3 0 0 0 0 0
PutzH,1 1 0 0 0 1 1
RodriguezS,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1
Cincinnati
Harang L,0-1 5 7 1 1 3 2
Herrera 2-3 1 1 1 2 0
Lincoln 1-3 0 0 0 1 .0
Rhodes 1 0 0 0 0 0
Weathers 1 0 0 0 0 0
Cordero 1 1 0 0 1 1
Umpires-Home, Tim Welke; First, Angel Her-
nandez; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Jim
Reynolds.
T-3:17. A-42,177 (42,319).


TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 B3


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICIEs


I










I ,A I,,CL


'** " C:" iEY

NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W LOT Pts GF GA
x-New Jersey 49 26 4102 237 201
Philadelphia 42 25 11 95 255 229
Pittsburgh 42 28 9 93 249 233
N.Y. Rangers 40 30 9 89 201 213
N.Y. Islanders 26 43 9 61 196 255
Northeast Division
W LOT Pts GF GA
z-Boston 51 17 10112 260 181
Montreal 41 28 10 92 243 236
Buffalo 38 32 9 85 236 231
Ottawa 35 34 10 80 210 227
Toronto 32 34 13 77 240 287
Southeast Division
W LOTPts GF GA
y-Washington 48 23 8104 260 234
x-Carolina 44 28 7 95 227 218
Florida 39 29 11 89 223 223
Atlanta 34 39 6 74 247 271
Tampa Bay 24 37 18 66 202 263
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W LOTPts GF GA
y-Detroit 51 19 9111 290 233
x-Chicago 43 24 11 97 250 208
Columbus 40 29 10 90 218 218
Nashville 39 32 8 86 203 218
St. Louis 38 31 10 86 224 231
Northwest Division
W LOTPts GF GA
x-Calgary 44 28 6 94 244 237
x-Vancouver 42 27 10 94 240 219
Edmonton 37 33 9 83 227 241
Minnesota 37 33 9 83 202 192
Colorado 32 44 2 66 197 251
Pacific Division
W LOTPts GF GA
y-San Jose 52 16 11115 252 196
Anaheim 41 33 6 88 237 230
Dallas 35 34 10 80 223 248
Phoenix 34 38 7 75 198 242
Los Angeles 32 35 11 75 200 225
Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss
or shootout loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Sunday's Games
Detroit 3, Minnesota 2
Washington 6, Atlanta 4
Chicago 1, Columbus 0, OT
Florida 4, Pittsburgh 2
San Jose 3, Anaheim 2
Colorado 4, Vancouver 1
Monday's Games
Detroit 4, Buffalo 1
Ottawa 3, Montreal 2
Los Angeles at Calgary, late
Today's Games
Washington at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Florida at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Toronto at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Montreal at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Boston at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
St. Louis at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Calgary at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Colorado at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Buffalo at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Buffalo at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Florida at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Los Angeles at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Phoenix'at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
NHL Scoring Leaders
Through April 5


Malkin, Pit
Ovechkin, Was
Crosby, Pit
Datsyuk, Det
Parise, NJ
Kovalchuk, Atl
Getzlaf, Ana
Iginia, Cal
Thornton, SJ


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
y-Boston 58 19 .753
x-Philadelphia 40 36 .526
New Jersey 32 45 .416
Toronto 30 46 .395
New York 30 47 .390
Southeast Division
W L Pct
y-Orlando 57 19 .750
x-Atlanta 43 34 .558
x-Miami 41 36 .532
Charlotte 34 43 .442
Washington 18 60 .231
Central Division
W L Pct
y-Cleveland 62 15 .805
Chicago 37 40 .481
Detroit 37 40 .481
Indiana 33 44 .429
Milwaukee 32 46 .410
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
x-San Antonio 49 27 .645
x-Houston 49 28 .636
New Orleans 47 29 .618
Dallas 46 31 .597
Memphis 22 54 .289
Northwest Division
W L Pct
x-Denver 52 26 .667
x-Portland 48 28 .632
x-Utah 47 30 .610
Minnesota 22 55 .286
Oklahoma City 21 55 .276
Pacific Division
W L Pct
z-L.A. Lakers 61 16 .792
Phoenix 42 35 .545
Golden State 28 49 .364
L.A. Clippers 18 59 .234
Sacramento 16 60 .211
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Sunday's Games
Cleveland 101, San Antonio 81
Dallas 140, Phoenix 116
New York 112, Toronto 103
Detroit 104, Charlotte 97
Utah 108, New Orleans 94
Denver 110, Minnesota 87
Indiana 117, Oklahoma City 99
Houston 102, Portland 88
New Jersey 96, Philadelphia 67
Golden State 105, Sacramento 100
L.A. Lakers 88, L.A. Clippers 85
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Today's Games
Atlanta at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Portland at Memphis, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
New York at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Orlando at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Minnesota at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.


For the record

S Fl0rida LOTTERY


2-9-4

CASH 3 (late)
2-9-7
PLAY 4 (early)
L9 -U99-9-2-6
PLAY 4 (late)
Here are the winning 0-6-1-6
numbers selected 0 - 6 - 1 - 6
Monday in the FANTASY 5
Florida Lottery: 12 - 18 - 20 - 29 - 33


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
MLB BASEBALL
8 p.m. (WGN) Chicago Cubs at Houston Astros
WOMEN'S FINAL FOUR
8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Louisville vs. Connecticut
NBA BASKETBALL
8:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Houston Rockets
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Pittsburgh Penguins at Tampa Bay Lightning
8 p.m. (VERSUS) Dallas Stars at Minnesota Wild
UEFA CHAMPIONS LEAGUE SOCCER
2:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Quarterfinal, Leg 1 - Manchester
United vs. Porto


SPrep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BASEBALL
4:30 p.m. Central Florida Christian at Seven Rivers
6:30 p.m. Berkeley Prep at Crystal River
6:30 p.m. Belleview at Citrus
SOFTBALL
7 p.m. Grove City (Ohio) at Citrus
7 p.m. Crystal River at Belleview
BOYS TENNIS
3:30 p.m. Citrus at West Port
GIRLS TENNIS
4 p.m. West Port at Citrus
TRACK
4 p.m. Meet at Citrus
4 p.m. Lecanto Senior Tribute Meet


Wednesday's Games
Memphis at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Portland at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Washington at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Denver, 9 p.m.
Utah at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
NBA Leaders
Through April 5
Scoring
G FG FT PTS AVG
Wade, Mia. 76 813 564 2268 29.8
James, Clev. 77 753 560 2190 28.4
Bryant, LAL 77 760 451 2082 27.0
Durant, OKC. 68 617 419 1741 25.6
Nowitzki, Dall. 76 720 447 1945 25.6
Granger, Ind. 62 519 361 1567 25.3
Roy, Port. 72 595 382 1650 22.9
Anthony, Den. 62 506 343 1417 22.9
Bosh, Tor. 71 567 471 1615 22.7
Paul, N.O. 72 570 422 1618 22.5
Jamison, Wash. 78 653 333 1747 22.4
Harris, N.J. 66 445 488 1442 21.8
Parker, S.A. 66 584 254 1441 21.8
Johnson, Atl. 75 589 285 1600 21.3
Howard, Orl. 74 538 488 1564 21.1
Carter, N.J. 76 563 313 1579 20.8
West, N.O. 70 546 349 1446 20.7
Gordon, Chi. 77 553 315 1577 20.5
Pierce, Bos. 77 510 448 1575 20.5
Harrington, N.Y 68 495 219 1367 20.1
FG Percentage
FG FGA PCT
O'Neal, Phoe. 486 . 795 .611
Nene, Den. 402 663 .606
Howard, Orl. 538 929 .579
Biedrins, G.S. 295 513 .575
Gasol, LAL 552 975 .566
Okafor, Char. 421 747 .564
Lee, N.Y. 495 897 .552
Yao, Hou. 529 969 .546
Stoudemire, Phoe. 404 749 .539
Millsap, Utah 380 712 .534
Rebounds
G OFFDEF TOT AVG
Howard, Orl. 74 319 717 1036 14.0
Lee, N.Y. 76 243 652 895 11.8
Murphy, Ind. 68 129 670 799 11.8
Duncan, S.A. 70 188 551 739 10.6
Okafor, Char. 77 260 526 786 10.2
Yao, Hou. 73 195 525 720 9.9
Bosh, Tor. 71 192 508 700 9.9
Gasol, LAL 76 243 480 723 9.5
Love, Minn. 76 255 425 680 8.9
Jamison, Wash. 78 189 507 696 8.9
Assists
G AST AVG
Paul, N.O. 72 791 11.0
Williams, Utah 63 667 10.6
Nash, Phoe. 69 669 9.7
Calderon, Tor. 62 539 8.7
Kidd, Dail. 76 651 8.6
Rondo, Bos. 75 633 8.4
B. Davis, LAC 60 477 8.0
Wade, Mia. 76 570 7.5
Duhon, N.Y. 74 544 7.4
James, Clev. 77 558 7.2


Monday's Sports
Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
CHICAGO WHITE SOX-Sent RHP Ehren
Wassermann outright to Charlotte (IL).
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Placed INF-OF
Jamey Carroll on the 15-day DL. Purchased
the contract of INF Tony Graffanino from
Columbus (IL).
National League
CINCINNATI REDS-Purchased the contract
of OF Laynce Nix from Louisville (IL).
LOS ANGELES DODGERS-Purchased the
contracts of RHP Ronald Belisario, INF Doug
Mlentkiewicz and LHP Will Ohman from Las
Vegas. Placed RHP Claudio Vargas on the 60-
day DL and OF Delwyn Young on the 15-day
DL. Released LHP Greg Miller.
SAN DIEGO PADRES-Placed OF Cliff
Floyd on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF Drew Ma-
clas from Portland (PCL).
Atlantic League
CAMDEN RIVERSHARKS-Signed RHP
Dewon Brazelton.
LANCASTER BARNSTORMERS-Slgned
RHP Josh Hall and C Jed Morris.


LONG ISLAND DUCKS-Signed OF Raul
Gonzalez.
Frontier League
GATEWAY GRIZZLIES-Signed 1B-OF
Chad Rothford and RHP Eric Ridener.
KALAMAZOO KINGS-Signed INF-OF Kyle
Higgins and RHP Ben Shivers..
ROCKFORD RIVERHAWKS-Signed LHP
Roy Bringelson, OF Mike Kalina, RHP Jay
Monti and INF-OF Carlos Pupo. Released C
Craig Cant, RHP Mathew Wilson, LHP Matt En.
derle, RHP Charlie Hahn, C-1B Jeremiah
Parker and OF Carlos Rivera.
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS-Signed OF
Blaine Rutledge and INF Tyler Kmetko.
WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS-Signed OF
Brandon Harrigan.
Northern League
FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS-
Agreed to terms with INF Yurendell DeCaster.
WINNIPEG GOLDEYES-Signed RHP-Matt
Davis, RHP Andrew Cruse and RHP Jordan
Stewart.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
LOS ANGELES CLIPPERS-Suspended F
Zach Randolph two games after he was ar-
rested for investigation of drunken driving.
NEW YORK KNICKS-Signed G Joe Craw-
ford through the remainder of the season.
CYCLING
USA CYCLING-Named Jim Millerinterim di-
rector of athletics.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ATLANTA FALCONS-Traded WR Laurent
Robinson to St. Louis Rams for the right to ex-
change fifth-and sixth-round picks in the 2009
draft.
BALTIMORE RAVENS-Agreed to terms
with CB Samari Rolle on a four-year contract.
DALLAS COWBOYS-Re-signed DE
Stephen Bowen to a one-year contract.
DENVER BRONCOS-Waived QB Darrell
Hackney.
GREEN BAY PACKERS-Re-signed TE Tory
Humphrey. Released LB Kenny Pettway.
HOUSTON TEXANS-Signed LB Cato June.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS-Signed DT Fred
Evans.
OAKLAND RAIDERS-Agreed to terms with
QB Jeff Garcia.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS-Re-signed LB
Keyaron Fox, to a two-year contract.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ATLANTA THRASHERS-Recalled D Clay
Wilson from Chicago (AHL).
CALGARY FLAMES-Recalled F Warren Pe-
ters from Quad City (AHL). Assigned D John
Negrin to Quad City.
DETROIT RED WINGS-Signed RW Fran-
cis Pare.
MINNESOTA WILD-Reassigned C Krys
Kolanos to Houston (AHL). Signed D Marco
Scandella.
MONTREAL CANADIENS-Recalled D
Doug Janik from Hamilton (AHL). Assigned G
Marc Denis to Hamilton. Assigned G Loic La-
casse from Hamilton to Cincinnati (ECHL).
American League
AHL-Suspended Peoria RW Eric Neilson
one game for his actions during an April 4 game
at Quad City.
SYRACUSE CRUNCH-Signed LW Matt
Greer. Announced G Sebastian Dahm was re-
assigned to the team from Johnstown (ECHL).
TORONTO MARLIES-Announced F Greg
Scott was reassigned to the team from Seattle
(WHL).
COLLEGE
NCAA-Denied Florida State senior WR
Corey Surrency's request for another year of el-
igibility.
ALBION-Named Jacob DeCola men's
lacrosse coach.
BOSTON U.-Named Patrick Chambers
men's basketball coach.
FLORIDA STATE-Agreed to terms with
men's basketball coach Leonard Hamilton on a
five-year contract.
MEMPHIS-Named Josh Pastner men's
basketball coach.
MINNESOTA STATE-MANKATO-Named
Pam Gohl women's basketball coach.
NEBRASKA-Announced men's basketball
sophomore G Cookie Miller and freshman F
Alonzo Edwards will transfer.
NEW JERSEY CITY-Named Nicole Tallar-
ida women's volleyball coach.
PENN STATE-Named Isang Jacob men's
assistant soccer coach.
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS-Announced the res-
ignation of women's basketball coach Dana
Elkenberg.
SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA-Named
Kelsi Bond women's basketball coach.
XAVIER-Announced the resignation of
men's basketball coach Sean Miller to take the
same position at Arizona.


Wings top Sabres, 4-1


UCONN
Continued from Page B1

well. We're going to have to
try and control the tempo of
the game."
Walz knows that his team
can ill-afford a similar start
to the semifinal game when
they missed their first 13
shots before rallying to beat
Oklahoma.
"If we come out and play
the first five minutes the
same way tomorrow night, in-
stead of losing 11-0, it's 25-0."
The Cardinals feel no
pressure, though, and Walz
likens his undersized, over-
achieving team to the lov-
able Bad News Bears.
"We might not have been
the most talented team on
the floor the last few games.
We've been the tougher
team and the team with
more heart," he said. "We
have ' group of players here
that are buying into a system
and buying into a role."
Like the fictional Bears,
the Cardinals relish the role
of being the underdog.
Louisville players want


PLAYER
Continued from Page BI

getting to a stage now where
I don't know whether I can
do that out here. It's so long
and I'm getting weaker"
He did play long enough
to set the mark for most
Masters appearances, snap-
ping a tie with Palmer by
playing in his 51st last year.
No. 52 will be his last.
"There's a great saying
that the Chinese have. They
say, 'Everything shall pass.'
And that's what we have got
to realize," Player said.
"There's nothing worse than
you see these boxers and
athletes saying they are re-
tiring and they come back
and they get their knees
knocked in and they end up
punch-drunk
"I've had such a wonder-
ful career," he continued,
getting on a roll. "My good-
ness, when I think of the ca-
reer I've had. You can't have
it all, and I did have it all.
I've had it all. You can't be
greedy"
He's already accom-
plished.plenty, most notably
a career grand slam and
nine major titles in all.
Player won his first Masters
in 1961, another in '74, his
final one in '78 at age 42. Not
surprisingly, that third title
is his favorite, a testament to
his lifelong obsession with
fitness, a crusade he carries
to this day.


Red Wings. With 111 points,
Detroit, coming off a 3-2 win
over Minnesota on Sunday,
moved to within four points
of league-leading San Jose.
The Sabres' playoff
chances grew slimmer as
Buffalo lost its second
straight. With three games
left, Buffalo is 10th in the
Eastern Conference, four
points behind the New York
Rangers and Florida at the
postseason cutoff.
Osgood made 32 saves,
picking a fitting game to


Associated Press

BUFFALO, N.Y. - Mar-
ian Hossa scored twice and
Chris Osgood tied Dominik
Hasek for 10th on the NHL
career wins list in helping
the Detroit Red Wings to a 4-
1 victory over Buffalo on
Monday night
Hossa, who reached the
40-goal plateau for the third
time, added an assist. Brad
Stuart and Nicklas Lid-
strom also scored for the
Central Division-leading



Lecanto 13,
West Port 3
Five Lecanto seniors went
out in style on Monday night, as
the Panthers' softball team
dominated the West Port Wolf
Pack, 13-3, in Lecanto.
Seniors Holly Eckstein,
Amanda Dixon, Rachel Tirpak,
Laura Demangone and Sum-
mer Dupler all started the con-
test and played to its
conclusion in the fifth inning.
"When I took this job four
years ago it wasn't just about
winning it was about citizen-
ship," Lecanto coach Robert
Dupler said. 'The legacy they
(the seniors) are leaving behind
in athletics and academics is
something we're going to strive
to keep year in and year out."
Dupler noted the five seniors
have an average GPA of 3.99.
The group also moved to 4-0
when playing in Senior Night
games thanks to two strong of-
fensive innings. After falling be-
hind by one, the Panthers
plated seven in the bottom half
of the second to take the lead
for good.
Rachel Tirpak tripled in the
inning, while Dixon and Denise
Aleman both added doubles.
Lecanto pushed four more


the media "to keep saying
the other team's going to
win," star Angel Mc-
Coughtry said. "I hope they
wish Connecticut wins to-
morrow. That's what we've
been thriving off of, so we
don't want that to change."
While it's the Cardinals
first appearance in the title
game, the Huskies are vying
for their sixth national
championship and first
since 2004. UConn was suf-
fering through its longest
"drought" since first win-
ning in 1995. Expectations
are so high back home, that
it was like the Huskie pro-
gram had fallen off a cliff,
Auriemma said.
In some ways, the strug-
gles only make this title
game sweeter, he said.
"It's one of those validat-
ing things where no matter
how many times you've
been in you always wonder
if there's a next time," Au-
riemma said. "Sometimes it
takes those couple of years
off where it makes you go
'Wow, this is a big deal.'
When you start to think its
not a big deal you need to
get out of it"


Player would prefer to
forget the '62 Masters, when
he squandered a chance to
become the first golfer to
win back-to-back at Augusta.
With three holes left, he
thought the title was his. But
Palmer made an improba-
ble birdie from the fringe at
16, another birdie at 17 and
won a three-man playoff.
"I've always said, when
you finish second, only your
wife and your dog remem-
ber it," Player quipped.
"That's if you've got a good
wife and a good dog."
Northern Ireland phe-
nom Rory McIlroy, only 19
and getting ready for his
first Masters, struggled to
grasp just how long Player
has been around.
"Gary has been a tremen-
dous competitor for, I don't
know, since the '60s, would
it be, or the 70s? Something
like that," McIlroy said.
Try the 1950s, Rory. In
fact, only six other players
in the field - all former
champions - were even
born when Player made his
Augusta debut in 1957.
"The '50s? Really?" McIl-
roy said, breaking into a big
smile. "He could still play. I
think it's great that at this
event, you could see all the
past winners. They can
come back and they can
play. It just makes it a little
more special and a little dif-
ferent I think that's what
the Masters is about"
Player played a practice


earn his 389th victory and
tie Hasek, the former Red
Wings starter who spent
most of his career with
Buffalo.
Senators 3, Canadlens 2
MONTREAL-- Dany Heat-
ley scored two goals 38 sec-
onds apart to put Ottawa ahead
with 7:59 remaining in the third
period and the Senators dealt a
big blow to the Montreal Cana-
diens' playoff chances with a 3-
2 win on Monday night.


walks. Both Marissa Maggiore
and Sautee Braddock each
scored twice.
Alex McAfee picked up the
win for Citrus, throwing two
strong innings.
"Alex did a great job shutting
them (Lake Weir) down," Citrus
coach Butch Miller said.
The lady Hurricanes will go
back to work tonight, hosting
Grove City (Ohio) at 7 p.m.
Seven Rivers 18,
Ocala Christian 2
The Seven Rivers softball
team made short work of Ocala
Christian Academy on Monday,
winning 18-2 in five innings.
Melina Kacer picked up the
win for the Warriors, striking out
seven with one walk in the
game. Kacer was also 2-for-3
at the plate with one RBI.
Other offensive leaders for
Seven Rivers included: Alex
Iwaniec, who went 2-for-4 with
two RBIs and three runs
scored; Amy Green, who
scored four runs and had one
RBI; Nicole Zettle was 1-for-2
with two RBIs; Allison Green,
Tessa Kacer and Taylor Frowick
each had one RBI.
Seven Rivers improved to 6-
9 on the season.


Auriemma has never lost
a championship game, but
as Louisville guard Deseree
Byrd was quick to point out
neither has Walz, who was
an assistant on Maryland's
2006 title team. *
Connecticut has run
through its opponents this
season, winning by 31 points
a game. No one has. come.
within single digits and the
Huskies are poised to be-
come the first team ever -
men's or women's to finish
the season unbeaten with
every win coming by double
figures.
A victory would put this
group in the same class as
UConn's other unbeaten
teams in 1995 and 2002. Be-
sides Connecticut, only Ten-
nessee and Texas have run
through a season undefeated.
No matter who wins the
title game on Tuesday night,
the Big East is guaranteed
to be the first conference
ever to sweep the NCAA and
WNIT championships in the
same season.
South Florida topped
Kansas 75-71 on Saturday to
win the WNIT title, which
began in 1998.


round Monday with defend-
ing Masters champion
Trevor Immelman, a fellow
South African who posed for
a picture with his idol at age
5, then captured his first
green jacket 30 years after
Player won his last
On Tuesday, Player will
introduce Immelman at the
champions dinner.
"The people I've met over
the years, the battles that I
had with Arnold and Jack
and others, and now to see
all of these young fellows
coming along," Player said.
What will he be thinking
about when he walks up the
18th fairway for the final
time?
"I'll be very nostalgic,"
Player said. "The love, this
is the thing - the love that
I've been given by the gal-
leries at this golf tourna-
ment. I'm already telling
myself not to start blubber-
ing. You know what blub-
bering is? Crying. And I'm a
damn big baby."
Besides, he'll return to
Augusta next year to attend
the champions dinner. And
if club officials ask him to
join Palmer in hitting the
ceremonial opening shot -
is there any doubt they will?
- Player will grab his
driver and head to No. 1, no
doubt after doing a few
push-ups.
"I'll even exercise
harder," Player vowed, "to
make sure I out-drive
Arnold."


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS


B4 TUESDAYAPRIl7 9


9


Prep SOFTBALL

across in the third and one in
each of the final two innings.
Demangone ended the game in
the fifth with a little "dinker" in
the infield that scored a run and
invoked the 10-run rule.
Summer Dupler and Taylor
Upchurch both went 3-for-3 at
the plate with two runs scored.
Both Aleman and Kayla Lukes
each scored two runs. Deman-
gone and Dixon both scored
once.
Lecanto improved to 9-5
overall and will host district rival
Crystal River on Wednesday at
6p.m.
Citrus 14,
Lake Weir 13
The Citrus Hurricanes soft-
ball team escaped with a 14-13
victory over Lake Weir on Mon-
day night.
Citrus was down 13-10 head-
ing into the sixth inning before
scoring its last four runs.
Every position in the batting
order scored at least one run.
McKenzie Brisson highlighted
the evening with a grand slam
in the second inning.
The 'Canes' Chelsea Usher
had a stellar night at the plate
as well with three hits, two
triples, three runs and two
















Chronicle/Pines tourney will end season


Most of you are well aware
of the fact that our Citrus
County tennis season runs
from basically the beginning of
October till the end of April, ex-
cept for some USTA matches.
In the last couple of months
there have been some
tournaments added and
others switched dates ..
on our event calendar.
As a result we now have _ i
a tournament that will. :
start off our season, The " -
Fail Fest Compass Tour-
nament at Crystal River
High School, scheduled
for October 17-18. The
one that will end it this Eric vw
year is the Hoc
Chronicle/Pines Tour- ON T
nament at Whispering
Pines Park on May 2-3.
Matches may be scheduled on
Friday, May 1 after 6 p.m. if
needed.
Entry fee is $20 per person per
division entered. If you enter a sec-
ond event, the additional fee is $15.
All tournament registration fees
must be paid by Monday, April 27.
DIVISIONS: Singles; Men's and
Women's; Open (students 14 and
over may play Open divisions), B,
60 + ; Juniors: 13 and under / 14
and over.
Doubles; Men's and Women's
Open, B, 60 +/Juniors: 13 & Under
/Juniorsl4 & up.
Note: Divisions that do not pro-
duce full rounds will be combined
with other divisions or eliminated
TOURNAMENT FORMAT:
Consolation round, balls will be
provided.


WHERE: Whispering Pines
Park and Citrus High School and
other sites in the County, as
needed.
REGULATIONS: U.S.TA. rules
and the "Code". Penalties and de-
fault rules for being late will be
observed.
DEADLINE: 5 p.m.
Wednesday, April 29.
(Including Mail in Reg-
istration)
MAIL IN: Registra-
tion fees are payable
via 'cash, check or
money Order.
Please make checks
payable to the City of
an den Inverness Parks and
gen Recreation 212 W. Main
..... Street, Inverness, FL
34450.
AWARDS: Awards
will be presented to the finalists in
each division.
Each Participant will receive a
T-Shirt, one per person.
STARTING TIMES: Phone
(352)726-3913 after 3 p.m. on
Thursday, April 30
WEATHER: In the event of
inclement weather participants
may be required to play at other
local park facilities or tennis
clubs.
For additional information
please contact the Administration
Office (352) 726-3913.
Monday Night Ladies
Doubles League
The results for March 30 were
as follows:
Pine Ridge def. Sugarmill
Woods, 4-2.
This league is geared towards


the 3.5 and 4.0 female players who
cannot play during the day and
don't mind traveling to get in those
great tennis matches.
For more information and to
sign up, contact Antoinette van
den Hoogen at 382-3138 or
hoera@juno.com.
Citrus County Tuesday
Womens Tennis Leagues
Tuesday Team Tennis.
This league is geared towards
the 3.0 and 3.5 level players. Each
team consists of four players (6 on
roster is allowed). New players,
regulars or subs, are always wel-
come. To sign up or for informa-
tion about this league, contact the
chairperson, Candace Charles, at
563-5859 or candacecharles@tam-
pabay.rr.com.
Senior Ladies Tuesday
3.0-3.5 League.
The results for March 31 were
as follows:
Riverhaven Gators vs Citrus
Hills , 3-3; Crystal River def. Pine
Ridge Pintos, 4-0; Meadowcrest
Racketeers vs Meadowcrest Aces,
2-2;
Riverhaven Ospreys def. Pine
Ridge Mustangs, 4-0.
For information please contact
Charlyne Ankrom at 795-6212 or
boonies2@yahoo.com.
Thursday Morning
Citrus Area Doubles League
The final standings were as fol-
lows:
Citrus Hills Swingers, 117
points;
Bicentennial Babes, 101;
Skyview, 90;
Skyview Advantage, 89;
Sugarmill Woods Oakies, 80;


Pine Ridge Fillies, 77;
Citrus Hills Aces, 75;
Pine Ridge Mavericks, 71;
Bicentennial TNT, 70;
Sugarmill Woods Smashers, 45.
For information please contact
Mary Jane Martin at 527-3754 or e-
mail tennis99111@earthlinknet
Ladies on the Court
The results for March 26 were
as follows: Kelley, Shirley and
Betsy, Joyce/Donna.
Ladies on The Court play at the
Le Grone Park courts in Crystal
River on Thursdays at 9:00 am.
Bring a new can of balls and $0.50,
sign up ahead and play 2 out of 3
tie break sets. For more informa-
tion please contact Barbara Shook
at dshook@tampabay.rr.com or
795-0872.
The Friday Senior Ladies
Doubles 3.0 - 3.5 League
The matches for April 3 were
rained out.
Riverhaven Eagles def. Pine
Ridge Mustangs , 4-1; Meadow-
crest Swingers def. Sugarmill
Woods, 4-0; Meadowcrest Aces def.
Pine Ridge Colts, 4-1.
For more information or to sign
up contact the chairperson Mary
Jane Martin of the Pine Ridge
Colts, at 527-3754 or e-mail ten-
nis99111@earthlink.net.
Ladies' Singles Tennis League
Standings and scores for the
week March 30 - April 5:
1. Carol Hirsch; 2. Susan Goins;
3. Carrie Ingersoll; 4. Soledad
David ; 5. Sarah Labrador; 6.
Linda Martin; 7. April Manley; 8.
Lisa Steed; 9. LeAnn Largo; 10.
Lorie Wilkes; 11. Linda Bracken;
12. Margie McLellan; 13. Joan


Kobayashi; 14. Jennifer Dempsey;
15. Becky Fisher; 16. Pranathi
Rao; 17. Mary Catherine Spires;
18. Sherri Trippett; 19. Gloria
Phillips; 20. Suzy Carney; 21.
Janelle Johnson.
Linda Martin def. Pranathi Rao,
6-0, 6-1
NEW RULE: Match times are
flexible for players to arrange
matches at their convenience,
with a minimum of one match per
month.
New players are welcome, in-
cluding High School players.
For more information please con-
tact Margie McLellan at 476-5617
or email: margiemclellan@tam-
pabay.rr.com.
USTAAdult Leagues
For information call or e-mail
Cathy Priest at (352) 361-6350 or
(352) 732-9574 or sobeus@earth-
linknet
3.0 Adult Women
SMW def. Fort King, 5-0. Record
1-0.
Margie McLellan, 0-6, 6-3, 1-0;
Janelle Johnson, 6-0, 6-0; Marlee
Bainbridge/Sueann Doherty, 7-5,
6-0; Lana Shale/Tana Hubbard, 6-
2, 6-2; Kristine Hibbard/Lorie
Wilkes, 6-0, 6-0.
3.5 Adult Women
Skyview lost to Fort King, 3-2.
Record 0-1.
3.5 Adult Men
Skyview lost to CFCC, 3-2.
Record 0-2.


Eric van den Hoogen,
Chronicle tennis columnist, can
be reached athoera@juno.com.


Neumann logs second Late Model win at Citrus


LARRY MACMILLAN
Special to the Chronicle

The economic conditions
are hitting us all and it is
showing in a big way in the
high dollar Super Late
Model division with short
fields showing for big purse
races. The invitation was
out to the best in Florida
this weekend for a 75-lap
Late Model race, paying big
money and only ten cars
showed up. There are
plenty of Late Models out
there but raking the trip to
Citrus County Speedway,
buying tires and fuel, plus
the wear and tear on those
very expensive engines ap-
parently is just not enough
incentive to attract even
the big money racers.
Despite the short field
the second season race for
the Super Late Models
turned out to be very excit-
ing with the top four finish-
ers making the show. Herb
Neumann kicked off the
night with fast qualifying
time of 13.803 seconds fol-
lowed by former record
holder Scott Grossen-
bacher just 2/100ths of a
second off Neumann's pace
at 13.823 seconds.
Kyle Maynard made his
first trip to Citrus payoff
winning the pole position
with John Gerstner on the
outside lane when the
green flag flew Gerstner
won the race into turn one
and two followed by May-
nard, Dale Sanders,
Grossenbacher and Neu-
mann. Gerstner started off
strong but ran into han-
dling problems early relin-
quishing his lead to
Maynard. Scott Grossen-
bacher and Herb Neumann
managed to use the outside
groove to their advantage
to get around the traffic. By
lap 25 Grossenbacher and
Neumann were on the
point in a nose to tail run
that lasted until lap 50
when Neumann flexed his
horsepower, got under
Grossenbacher and they
spent the next eight laps


fTell us what you think

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wwe.pulres',eeroh.com./america

You couldwin


j - ~AMEXgiftCard

, i


Super Late Model Feature
75 Laps - 10 Cars
1.#98 Herb Neumann Jr.- 2nd Season Win
- Fast Qualifier 13.803 seconds
2. #09 Scott Grossenbacher- San Antonio
3. #127 Kyle Maynard -?
4. # 1 Dale Sanders - Lecanto
5.#62 John Gerstner- Eustis
Mini Stock Feature
20 Laps - 21 Cars
1. #98 James Ellis - Brooksville - 1st Sea-
son Win
2. #20 Travis Hoefler- Floral City
3. #7 Clint Foley- Dunnellon
4. # 6 Chris Hooker- Inverness
5. #44 Mike Lawhom - Claremont
1st: Heat Winner - #44 Mike Lawhorn
2nd Heat Winner - #05 Rick Sirmons - St. Pe-
tersburg
Street Stock Feature
20 Laps -15 Cars
1. #42 Richie Smith - Hernando - 2nd

side by side, swapping the
lead several times before a
caution came out. This set
up a restart with Neumann
in the lead and Grossen-
bacher saving whatever he
had left for the final 10
laps. Meanwhile Dale
Sanders and Kyle Maynard
were in a side by side bat-
tle for third well behind the
leaders. Sanders took the
spot away from Maynard
for about ten laps before
his tires started going away
in the final five laps. When
the checkers flew Neu-
mann chalked up his sec-
ond 75-lap win of the
season followed by Scott
Grossenbacher, Kyle May-
nard, Dale Sanders and
John Gerstner who fin-
ished one lap down.
Mini Stocks used their
fifth race of the season to
tune up for next week's
Curry Roofing 100 that will
probably see twice the
number of cars making a
run for the big money
Twenty-one cars took the


Season Win
2. #91 David Foster - Wildwood
3. #62 Hall Robertson - Oxford
4. #31 Tom Potts- Floral City
5. #4 Jay Witfoth - Beverly Hills
1st Heat Winner - # 4 Jay Witfoth
2nd Heat Winner - #007 - Mark Fallows -
Crystal River
Pure Stock Feature
20 Laps -17 Cars
1. #24 Tommy Smith- Hernando - 3rd Sea-
son Win
2. #39 John Drye- Inverness
3. # 7 Chuck Franklin - Hernando
4. #68 Drew Matissek - New Port Richey
5. #88 Victor Shahid - Floral City
1st Heat Winner - #24 Tommy Smith
2nd Heat Winner - #92 Cory Swanston -
Aripeka
V8Thunder Stocks Feature
20 Laps - 17 Cars
1. #7 Arden Franklin - Hernando - 2nd

green flag for a 20-lap fea-
ture with the heavy hitters
starting in the back of the
pack. David Mothershed
took the early lead off the
pole which lasted for just a
few laps before Travis Hoe-
fler shot from third to the
lead when Mothershed
went wide and opened the
door to the point.
Meanwhile Robbie
Yoakam ran into mechani-
cal trouble early and fell
out of the race falling from
the points lead to fourth
with his first DNF of the
season. James Ellis chased
Hoefler right up to the final
couple of laps before
snatching the win away for
his first of the year followed
by Hoefler. 20th starter
Clint Foley made his way
through heavy traffic to fin-
ish third after winning last
week Rounding out the top
five were Chris Hooker in
his first race of the year fol-
lowed by Mike Lawhorn
who also won his heat and
has looked strong all season


Season Win
2. #30 Tom McKay - Loxahatchee
3. #99 Cody Stickler-
4. #31 Austin Roberts - Inverness
5. #45 Scott Werstein - Belleview
Mini Cup Feature
20 Laps-18 Cars
1. #20 Brady Marshall
2. #11 Brenton Franklin
3. #24 Mike Holt
4. #07 Jacob Calloway
5. #23 Blake Haddock
1st Heat Winner - #48 Carlos Pinto
2nd Heat Winner - #20 Brandon Marshall
Outlaw Modified Feature
25 Laps -7 Cars
1. #11 Billy Campbell
2.#15 Doug Hopper
3. #19 Kevin Campbell
4. #04 Tom Meyer
5. #63 Jon Doucette

in his new ride. Rick Sir-
mans won his heat and ran
into mechanical problems
for a DNF in the feature.
Richie Smith pulled an-
other last to first feature
run in Street Stock action
with a 15-car field taking
the green. Jay Witfoth
looked like he was on his
way to his second win of
the season right from the
start before he got caught
up in five car crash that left
him limping to the finish
from the back end of the
field. David Foster man-
aged to come from 14 th to
the lead before Smith man-
aged to make his way
through the slower traffic
to over take him before the
caution came out for the
big wreck. When the dust


settled and the checkers
came out Smith logged his
second win of the season
followed by David Foster,
Hall Robertson, Tom Potts
and Jay Witfoth rounding
out the top five. Heat wins
went to Witfoth and Mark
Fallows.
Pure Stocks were back in
action after a four-week
break for the fair and not
on the card for the restart
of the season last week.
Tommy Smith is batting 750
after launching from 15th
of 17 starters to take his
third win out of four races
and tops the points' race in
the early going.
Curtis Flanagan moved
from his 14 th starting spot
to take the checkered flag
but was disqualified in post
race inspection in what
was another action packed
event. Early leader John
Drye held out for a second
place finish followed by
pole sitter Chuck Franklin,
Drew Matissek and outside
pole sitter Victor Shahid.
Smith also won the first
heat And Cory Swanston
held out for the win in the
second heat.
Rounding out the local
race card Arden Franklin
drove his V8 Thunder
Stock from his 15th starting
spot and added his second
feature win of the season to
his rookie resume. Tom
McKay, Cody Stickler,
Austin Roberts and Scott
Werstein locked down the
top five spots at the check-


ers out of the 17-car field.
Mini Cup cars came to
Citrus County Speedway
with 18 cars and put on a
great show. These little
NASCAR look alikes
chased Brady Marshall's
No. 20 for all 20 laps with
Brenton Franklin, the only
driver that really had any-
thing for him, but had to
settle for second. Mike Holt
took his Jeff Gordon #24
from 15th to third at .the
checkers followed by Jacob
Calloway and Blake Had-
dock. Heat wins went to
Carlos Pinto and Brady
Marshall
Topping off the visitors
show were the Outlaw
Modifieds who brought in a
seven-car field. Billy
Campbell moved quickly
from to the point and the
win in their 25-lap feature
run. Doug Hopper had a lit-
tle more trouble getting
through traffic from his
sixth starting spot but man-
aged to pick up a second
place finish after taking the
win in their last outing at
Citrus. Kevin Campbell
locked down third followed
by Tom Meyer and heat
winner Jon Doucette.
Next Saturday will fea-
ture the Mini Stocks in the
Curry Roofing 100 plus the
Open Wheel Modifieds,
Sportsman, Pure Stock, V8
Thunder Stocks, 4 Cylinder
Bombers and Figure 8's
make their first appear-
ance of the year.


,SLcat igh Scoo


Sunday, April 19, 2009
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club "The Oaks"
Scramble Shot-Gun Start at I p.m. eat2e clwp.n.
-----------*I
Please make checks payable and mail to: Project Graduation
I P.O. Box 481 |
Lecanto, FL 34460
ENTRY FORM
PRINT NAME PHONE NUMBER
I1. I_____________


I 2.


I-.aiizman rmo details
**^aW ^ (352) 697-2719

Individual cost $50 (open to all playetrsi
Includes golf (green fees, cart fees and pizza immediately
following on the wooden deck above the ProShop. Prizes
awarded for tup 3 places and special door prizes will also
.be given away. C i. ..


I


Join us in celebrating the


2009 Citrus County Fair Winners



w chronicleonhne com

Call for More Information

Advertising Deadline: Wednesday, April 8, 2009
Publication Date: Saturday, April 25, 2009
For more information, contact your sales representative at (352) 563-5592
'02675


Citrus County Speedway Results (4-4-09)


TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 B5


SPORTS


CIRnus CoumN' (FL) CfHRONICLE

















ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE===
Nebraska, Cable
Guy 'git-r-done'
LINCOLN, Neb. -
Larry the Cable Guy and
the University of Ne-
braska-







Larry the reached
Cable Guy for Ne-
braska-
born Dan Whitney, aka
Larry the Cable Guy, to
put on a July 4 perform-
ance at Memorial Sta-
dium.
Athletic director Tom
Osborne said Monday the
$4 ticket cost, plus $2
handling charge, will
allow Whitney and the
university to break even.
Whitney had an-
nounced the show on a
syndicated radio pro-
gram March 9. The next
day Osborne said the uni-
versity had not given ap-
proval for Memorial
Stadium to be used.
Football season-ticket
holders have first dibs on
the 50,000 tickets.
, The show will be taped
for a "Comedy Central"
special.

Lucas sets cast
for 'Red Tails'
LOS ANGELES - Lu-
casfilm has just an-
nounced the cast of "Red

Lucas Tskegeewill
sAirmen, a combat Cuba




Dealing with racial preju-ng
Jrice along with the and
Terrence
Howard.s
The
drama isv
based onw
reacted by Antheony
its incLucas Tuskegee
Airmen, a combat-unit
made up of black pilots
dealing with racial preju-
dice along with the pres-
sures of warliver
"Star Wars" creator
George Lucas is executive
producer and her liveras a story
hasit on the film, which
a compritten by John Ridley.
routirected by Anthony-
Hemingway, whose cred-
its include episodes of
"The Wire" and "Bat-
tlestarrGalactica."
Shooting gets under
way soon in Europe.

Fawcett's cancer
spreadsoto liver
NEW YORK-- Farrah
Fawcett is being treated-
for anal cancer that has
. spread to her liver and
has been hospitalized for
a complication from a
routine treatment, a pro-
ducer who worked with
the ac-d
tresstand
her doc-in 2006,
tor said.
In sepa-
ratea
phone in-
terviews









wiwith chemotherapy and The
Farrahtion - not surgerysoci-
as some have reported,
Press, Fawrett's producer, Craig








her producer, Craig


Nevius said.
She was declared in re-
mission on Feb. 2,2007,
but three months later,
scans showed "not only
had it recurred, it metasta-
sized to her liver," Nevius
said.
- From wire reports


Underwood,

Swift, Hough

dominate CMAs

Associated Press

LAS VEGAS - The women of
country have taken the wheel.
Carrie Underwood captured en-
tertainer of the year Sunday night
at the Academy of Country Music
Awards, winning the top honor that
has eluded women for nearly a
decade, while Taylor Swift won
album of the year and Julianne
Hough snagged top new artist
Country music's boys' club was
adjourned for the year when Un-
derwood broke Kenny Chesney's
four-year win streak and became
the first woman to hold the title
since the Dixie Chicks in 2000. The
significance wasn't lost on the 26-
year-old superstar.
"I accepted that award on behalf
of myself and my fans, but also on
behalf ofother women %k ho came
before me that kicked butt but
never got the recognition they de-
served." Underwood said "I can't
%wait tobr the day. i% which I hope is in
the very near future, w here having
females in the category, is no big
deal whatsoever "
In 39 years of recognizing a top
entertainer: the academy has
granted the honor to a %\oman
seven times, including Linderi ood.
The others w ere Loretta lylun,
Dolly Parton. Barbara
Mandrell, Reba
. McEntire. Sha-
Snia Twain and
the Dixie
Chicks. Each
won once
who missed
'-i tlhe chance ,.
-: to tie Ala-
S - bama fbr
-o : most en-
' , . ter-


trainer of the year awards, kissed
Underwood as she walked up to ac-
cept the honor
"He told me he was proud of
me," said Underwood, who's en-
joyed astounding success since
winning "American Idol" in 2005
with eight No. 1 country hits in-
cluding the signature single, 'Jesus
Take the Wheel."
Swift, another woman dominat-
ing not only country music but the
.entire industry, won album of the
year for her sophomore disc "Fear-
less." Both of Swift's albums have
topped the 3 million mark - a rare
feat today. She's connected with
fans both young and old for her in-
tensely personal songs, which she
writes usually on her own or with a
co-writer
Backstage, Swift told reporter
that she "obsessed" over making
"Fearless."
"I labored over this album for
two years," she said. "The fact that
you can write songs in your bed-
room about your feelings and boys
and can win
album of the
year at the .A


ACMs. I just didn't think that was
possible."
Swift, who had four nominations
going into Sunday's show, also got a
special honor as McEntire pre-
sented her with an ACM Crystal
Milestone Award for bringing so
many young people to country
music.
A tearful Hough, who added
country singer to her "Dancing
with the Stars" credentials,
thanked "everybody that has fol-
lowed me from the beginning and
believed in me." She bested Jake
Owen and the Zac Brown Band for
the honor
Other winners included Jamey
Johnson, Sugarland, Trace Adkins
and Brad Paisley, but the evening's
most memorable moments came
during the performances. Adkins
performed '"Til the Last Shot's
Fired," a somber salute to U.S.
troops, with the West Point Glee
Club in honor of servicemen and
women. The performance was in-
troduced by Lt Andrew Kinard,
who had been wounded. He told
the crowd, "As you listen to this
song, please consider that it's not
about the war, it's about the \%ar-
.L or."


Jason Aldean rocks hard on new (


MICHAEL MCCALL
Associated Press

Jason Aldean,
"Wide Open"
(Broken Bow)
Country music openly parades its
hard-rock influences these days, and
no one flaunts that aggressive edge
more than Jason Aldean. The
grunge-metal stomp Aldean puts into
his songs has made him one of
Nashville's few big-selling acts on an
independent record label.
The title of his third album, "Wide
Open," suggests he's not about to
throttle his rock edge. The songs
"Crazy Town" and the title cut rock
like Guns N' Roses or Motley Crue,
but with a fiddle and a swampy beat
Aldean's big, dramatic voice sounds
best with a fast-thumping tune push-
ing him into overdrive.
But, surprisingly, the best songs on


Music REVIEW


"Wide Open" find Aldean taking time
to reflect He's not the most nuanced
of ballad singers, but as with many
rockers who soar through a power
ballad, there's a sense of drama and
dynamics in how Aldean sings the
tender emotions expressed in "Don't
Give Up On Me" and "Fast"
Aldean occasionally slips into
modern-country cliches, as in the
stereotypical redneck traits listed in
"She's Country," which wastes a
solid, countrified AC/DC arrange-
ment on predictable lyrics. Aldean is
right to add crunching chords to
country; he just needs to stay as
ahead of the curve in his lyrics as he
does in his rocking arrangements.
* CHECK THIS OUT' At his best,
Aldean captures that hyper way a
rural southerner can talk as fast as
any northern counterpart when ex-


pressing emotions within a cli
story, which is why
"OnMy High- '| B
way" features

most
ex-
pres-
sive
vocal per- '
formances
Jason Aldean's
latest album
s ti
"Wide Open"
and features the
track "On My
Highway."
Aldean played
at last year's
"Country
Rocks the
Canyon."
,. s nto -,,? s:


A4T NUAL CMA RECAP







'OMEN I S I


Today is Tuesday, April 7,
the 97th day of 2009. There
are 268 days left in the year.
Ith Today's Highlight in His-
tory:
ds. On April 7,1862, Union
forces led by Gen. Ulysses S.
Grant defeated the Confeder-
ates at the Battle of Shiloh in
Tennessee.
On this date:
In 1859, Walter Camp, the
"Father of American Football,"
was born in New Britain,
Conn.
In 1927, an audience in
New York watched as the
image as well as voice of
Commerce Secretary Herbert
Hoover were transmitted live
S from Washington in the first
successful long-distance
demonstration of television.
In 1969, the Supreme
Court, in Stanley v. Georgia,
unanimously struck down
laws prohibiting private pos-
session of obscene material.
In 1978, President Jimmy
Carter announced he was de-
ferring development of the
neutron bomb, a high-radia-
tion weapon.
In 1983, space shuttle as-
tronauts Story Musgrave and
Don Peterson took the first
U.S. space walk in almost a
decade as they worked in the
open cargo bay of Challenger
for nearly four hours.
Ten years ago: NATO
stepped up its airstrikes in Yu-
goslavia after rejecting Presi-
dent Slobodan Milosevic's
cease-fire declaration. Yu-
goslav authorities, mean-
while, closed the main exit
route where a quarter-million
ethnic Albanians had fled
Kosovo.
Five years ago: Mounir el
Motassadeq, the only Sept.
11 suspect ever convicted,
was freed after a Hamburg,
Germany, court ruled that the
evidence was too weak to
hold him pending a retrial.
One year ago: Anti-China
protesters disrupted the
ID Olympic torch relay in Paris,
at times forcing Chinese or-
ganizers to put out the flame
and take the torch onto a bus
imactic to secure it.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
R.G. Armstrong is 92. Actor
James Gamer is 81. Country
... singer Cal Smith is 77. Actor
Wayne Rogers is 76. Country
singer Bobby Bare is 74.
Rhythm-and-blues singer
Charlie Thomas (The Drifters)
is 72. Movie director Francis
Ford Coppola is 70. Singer
Patricia Bennett (The Chif-
fons) is 62. Singer John
Oates is 60. Actor Jackie
Chan is 55 Football Hall-of-
Famer Tony Dorsett is 55.
Actor Russell Crowe is 45.
Former football player-tumed-
analyst Tiki Barber is 34
Thought for Today: "No
. date on the calendar is as im-
portant as tomorrow." - Roy
W. Howard, American news-
paper publisher (1883-1964)


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
* Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

SUNDAY, APRIL 5
Fantasy 5:3-4-8-10-13
5-of-5 5 winners
$36,718.88
4-of-5 420 $70.50
3-of-5 11,321 $7
SATURDAY, APRIL 4
Powerball: 14 - 21 - 50 - 57 - 58
Powerball: 7
Power Play: 3
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 3 $200,000
Lotto: 8 - 16 - 31 - 37 - 45 - 48
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 68
$5,797.50
4-of-6 3,917 $81.50
3-of-6 83,348 $5
Fantasy 5:4 - 7 - 10 - 18 - 34
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 452 $555
3-of-5 13,453 $14

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num.
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY=


1













HEALTH


&
CITRUS COUNTY


LIFE
CHRONICLE


Catching a killer


DAVE SIGLERlCnru,.C,,e
Dr. Riccardo M. DeGirolami at Inverness Medical Imaging in Inverness looks at cutting-edge images showing the heart and vessels around the
heart. DeGirolami has recently been certified in the use of the new technology that allows doctors to evaluate the condition of a patient's heart
without any invasive procedure.

Coronary CT imaging can be a boon for preventive medicine for heart disease


CHRIS VAN ORMER
cvanormer@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The sooner you recog-
nize the enemy, the bet-
ter chance you have to
survive.
Cardiovascular disease
is the No. 1 killer in the
United States for men and
women, according to Riccardo
DeGirolami, M.D. But with the
use of cardiovascular computed
tomography, early signs of dis-
ease can be seen before they are
felt.


"It gives really exquisite im-
ages of coronary arteries non-in-
vasively," DeGirolami said. "It
looks at the walls of coronary ar-
teries and gives wonderful detail
of the function and structure of
the heart." "'
In the past, coronary artery
disease usually was not diag-
nosed until it reached an ad-
vanced stage, giving the patient
chest pains. Now, it can be de-
tected before the patient gets to
the advanced stage.
DeGirolami, one of four radiol-
ogists practicing at Inverness
Medical Imaging, recently


ON THE NET
* www.cbcct.org

achieved board certification in
cardiovascular computed tomog-
raphy. In fact, he was among the
first, and so far only, group of
physicians to take the new exam,
so he is one of only 715 to be cer-
tified, according to a letter to De-
Girolami from the Certification
Board of Cardiovascular Com-
puted Tomography.
A county resident since 1993,
DeGirolami said the boom in


technology during the past 15
years has changed his field
tremendously. And he keeps his
training up to date.
"I'm a fourth-generation physi-
cian," he said. "I like to take care
of people."
The imaging center, which
opened in 2006, offers cutting-
edge technology and a friendly
environment, he said.
"We wanted to create a differ-
ent dynamic, more oriented to-
ward patient care," said
DeGirolami.
See KILLER/Page C6


Why do we fall? Discovering San Antonio
- 1- 1,T lP -.....11- _-A+....-


Editor's note: This is the first of a
two-part series about falls.
E very year, more
than 2 million
Americans fall
and sustain injuries that
cost more than $3 billion.
Hidden costs include
pain, disability, lawsuits,
and deterioration in gen- j
eral well-being.
Falls have become one .AL
of the elderly's most seri- Dr. Den
ous health issues. The
causes of these injuries EAR1,
are many and include & "' 9
damage to our bodies
throughout the years.
This includes our body as a whole.
Vision diminishes with advanc-
ing age. Sensory information we re-
ceive from our body and body
movements likewise deteriorate
with age. And the complex brain


i


inner connections that take all of
this information and process it
chemically starts to dete-
riorate after age 50.
Probably the worst dis-
ease that affects the cen-
tral nervous system and
brain is hardening of the
arteries. This, as we all
know, is affected by high
blood pressure, smoking
Sand diabetes. More seri-
s Grillo ous and abrupt causes of
diminished circulation
S,.-. include stroke and head
.7r injuries.
Whether it is an
abrupt or a gradual in-
sult that has caused the problem,
physical activity is the key to recov-
ery. If one has a serious stroke,
physical therapy is implemented
and if there is no stroke issue, daily
See GRt .I.' Page C6


Imink i'm falling in
love. We arrived in
San Antonio just 10
days ago, and already I
have symptoms of falling
in love with the place.
My wife, Carol, has loved
San Antonio for a long
time, which is why we
moved here. However,
this is a new place for
me, and discovering San
Antonio is proving to be
a wonderful experience.
Last Sunday afternoon


L'. A
Dr. Ed Dodge
PASSION
FOR HEALTH


we went to see the San Antonio
Botanical Garden. We wandered
through its gardens and along its
trails for nearly two and a half
hours. What a delightful place it
proved to be. The first garden we
encountered was named the Sen-
sory Garden. Dedicated to the
blind, it features scented plants and
statuary that appeal as much to the


senses of smell and toucn
as the eyes. Helen Keller
would have loved it, and
we did, too.
Next up was the Ku-
mamoto Japanese Gar-
den donated by San
Antonio's sister city in
Japan. Featuring ponds,
gently moving streams
and typical Japanese
greenery, it is a place of
absolute serenity. We
could have easily stayed
there the entire after-


noon.
There were many other gardens
to explore, with themes ranging
from tropical to desert Each had its
own delights on exhibit One of the
most striking specimens was the
Hong Kong Orchid tree, its 30-foot
canopy completely covered with
gorgeous pink blooms. On a more
See DODGE/Page C6


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY


Cancer

from

hot tea?
Findings from a
study conducted in
northern Iran sug-
gest that drinking hot tea
is strongly associated with
the development of a par-
ticular form of esophageal
cancer, namely, squamous
cell cancer.
The Golestan province
of Iran has one of the
highest rates of this malig-
nancy in the world, yet
typical risk factors for the
cancer, namely smoking
and alcohol use, are not
major contributors. More-
over, unlike elsewhere,
men are no more likely
than women to develop
the cancer.
Tea and water are virtu-
ally the only beverages
consumed in the province,
and prior research has
suggested that consump-
See BENNETT/Page C6








Dr. Sunil Gandhi
CANCER &
BLOOD
DISEASE


Meat


and


health
Many times patients
ask me, "Is there
any food I should
eat or not eat to prevent
my cancer from return-
ing?" This is a common
question.
Even for healthy peo-
ple, it is important to
avoid certain food. Re-
cently, Dr. Sinha and col-
league published a large
study in the Archives of
Internal Medicine.
The researchers as-
sessed meat consumption
and mortality, using data
from the National Insti-
tutes of Health-AARP Diet
and Health Study. In that
study, approximately
See GANDHI/Page C6


MIVore than 1,000 hearts given new life,

right here on the Nature Coast.

NY They say practice makes perfect. That's why we're proud to announce a major milestone:

open-heart surgeries since opening in January 2004. Thanks to the
expertise of our cardiovascular team. we celebrate 1,000 hearts healed,
1,000 lives saved, 1,000 families kept whole. And it all took place here in Citrus County.
For more information, call the Heart Center at 352-344-6416


CITRUS MEMORIAL

At the Heart of Our Community

' , ' r''4, - 11"'


4


.,. '_ -.�l.o w.., .....


.,X,, `U l : ? , '








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C2 'LUI SDAY, APRIL 7,21 1109 HEALTH & LirE


New oral spray approved to treat insomnia


9 I heard that an
* oral spray was
* approved to
tre insomnia. What
can you tell me about
it?


A: The FDA recently
approved Zolpimist B
oral spray for the short- . ;...
term treatment of in-
somnia characterized Richard]
by difficulties in falling ASK
asleep. Zolpimist con- PHARIV
tains the active ingredi-
ent zolpidem, which
has been available as an oral
tablet for many years in products
like Ambien or Ambien CR and is
also available as a generic prod-
uct


Hoffmann
THE
RACISTT


Zolpimist oral spray
is administered as two
sprays (10 milligrams)
directly into the mouth
over the tongue once
daily immediately be-
fore bedtime. A lower
dose of one spray (5 mil-
ligrams) is recom-
mended in elderly or
debilitated patients or
in patients with liver
impairment or those
taking central nervous
system depressants.


This new oral spray provides for
rapid absorption from the oral
mucosa and gastrointestinal tract
Zolpidem is classified as a seda-
tive-hypnotic drug and is used for


the short-term treatment of in-
somnia. It is not chemically re-
lated to barbiturates like
Phenobarbital or the benzodi-
azepine drugs used for sleep like
Dalmane (flurazepam), Restoril
(temazepam), or Halcion (triazo-
lam).
Exactly how zolpidem induces
sleep is not exactly known, but it
appears to interact (bind) with
certain receptors in the brain be-
lieved to be responsible for seda-
tion and sleep. Zolpidem has been
shown to reduce the time to fall
asleep, decrease the number of
awakenings and to increase total
sleep time. The sleep induced by
zolpidem seems to be more natu-
ral and causes less sedation the


next day compared to some of the
other drugs mentioned above.
The most common side effects
of zolpidem during short-term
treatment (up to 10 nights) were
drowsiness, dizziness and diar-
rhea. During longer-term treat-
ment (28 to 35 nights), the most
commonly observed side effects
were dizziness and drugged feel-
ings.
However, many other side ef-
fects can occur. Because it can
cause drowsiness, patients taking
zolpidem need to be cautioned
about performing tasks requiring
alertness, coordination or physi-
cal dexterity. Alcohol and other
CNS depressants should also be
avoided when taking zolpidem.


About one in three American
adults complain of some type of
insomnia, and 20 million Ameri-
cans suffer from chronic insom-
nia. Insomnia is characterized by
difficulty in falling asleep, diffi-
culty staying asleep, or poor qual-
ity of sleep, leading to impairment
of next-day functioning. It has
been linked to a variety of health-
care problems including obesity,
diabetes, hypertension, heart dis-
ease and depression.

Richard Hoffmann has been a
pharmacist for more than 20
years. Send questions to him at
1135 N. Timucuan Trail,
Inverness, FL 34453.


Health NOTES


* GriefShare seminar and
nondenominational support
group, 6 p.m. today, at Genesis
Community Church, next to the
Knights of Columbus on County
Road 486 in Lecanto. Grief-
Share features nationally rec-
ognized experts on grief and
recovery topics in a 12-week
video series. There is no
charge. To register or request a
GriefShare workbook, call facili-
tator Wendy Hall at 746-1072.
* Free vision, cataract and
glaucoma screening Wednes-
day at Crystal Eye Center, on
U.S. 19 South, Crystal River.
For your free appointment, call
795-0212.
* LifeSouth bloodmobile
schedule. To find a donor cen-
ter or a blood drive near you,
call 527-3061. Anyone 16CQ or
older who is in good health and
weighs at least 110 pounds is
eligible to donate.
* 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednes-
day, Walmart, 3826 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa.
* 3 to 6 p.m. Wednesday,
West Citrus Elks Lodge 2693,
7890 W. Grover Cleveland
Blvd., Homosassa. Donors re-
ceive a coupon for a free dinner
served every Tuesday during
Karaoke night at the Lodge.
* 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday,
Citrus Memorial Health System,
502 Highlands Blvd., Inverness.
* 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday,
Citrus Memorial Health System,
502 Highlands Blvd., Inverness.
* 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday,
Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park, 4150 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
* 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday,
Big Lots, 445 W. Highlands
Blvd., Inverness.
* 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday,
Walmart Super Center, 2461 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inver-
ness.
0 1 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, April
14, Cypress Cove Care Center,
700 S.E. Eighth Ave., Crystal
River.
* 8 a.m. to noon Tuesday,
April 14, Walden Woods Com-
munity, 7086 W. Eatonshire
Path, Homosassa. .
* Donate blood during April
at LifeSouth's centers to be eli-
gible to win a two-night get-
away at Plantation Inn & Golf
Resort in Crystal River. The
Lecanto branch is at 1241 S.
Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491) and the Inverness
branch is at 301 W. Main St.
Both centers are open from
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays
and 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Satur-
days. The centers stay open
late Thursdays, until 7 p.m. The
Lecanto center is also open
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sun-
days. Donate on the following
days for a complimentary meal:


Blood bank open on
Easter Sunday
Special to the Chronicle

While Easter Sunday is typically a festive, busy day
for families with church, tasty big meals and egg hunts,
on April 12, LifeSouth Community Blood Centers will be
open and hunting for donors.
The center in Lecanto at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway will
be open from 10 a.m. 1 p.m. Easter Sunday. The Blood-
mobile will be at Big Lots in Inverness from 11 a.m. to 2
p.m.
The need is particularly acute for platelet donors.
Platelets, the component of blood that is important for
clotting, are needed daily for trauma and cancer pa-
tients. Because platelets have a shelf life of only five
days after donation, stopping collections for only a sin-
gle day can have a serious impact on supply.
To donate, a person must be at least 17, or 16 with writ-
ten parental permission, weigh a minimum of 110
pounds and be in good health. A photo ID is also re-
quired
For details, go to www.lifesouth.org or call 527-3061.


* Wednesday: ham and
cheese sandwiches.
* Wednesday, April 15: ham
and bean soup.
* Saturday, April 18: 14th an-
nual Galloneer Picnic, 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. at Fort Cooper State
Park, Inverness.
* Wednesday, April 29: pie
party.
Anyone 16 or older who is in
good health and weighs at least
110 pounds is eligible to do-
nate. Visit www.lifesouth.org for
details.
* Health education pro-
grams from Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center, in the
community room on the second
floor of the Medical Offices
Building (across the street from
the hospital), unless otherwise
noted. Call 795-1234 or (800)
436-8436 or visit www.srrmc
.com to register.
* Grief Support Group: 2:30
p.m. Tuesday. Registration re-
quired. Call (800) 486-8784.
Free
* Pre-Surgery Ortho Camp:
1 p.m. Monday, April 20. Call
795-0534 to register. Free.
* Are You Taking Care of
Your Kidneys? 1 p.m. Thursday,
April 23. Free.
* Diet Therapy for Diabetes:
6 p.m. Tuesday, April 28. Free.
Looking for the latest health
information? Visit www.srrmc
.com for a complete health li-
brary available 24/7.
* Donna Watrous, from
Senior Home Care, will speak
at Sugarmill Manor at 2 p.m.
Thursday about COPD. The
public is invited to attend and
refreshments will be served.
For reservations, call Sugarmill
Manor at 382-2531.
* Debbie Stefa, hearing
specialist from Beltone Hearing
Centers, will be at Sugarmill
Manor at 1 p.m. Monday to do
free hearing evaluations on the


Manor's residents and mem-
bers of the public who might be
interested in having their hear-
ing tested. For reservations, call
Sugarmill Manor at 382-2531.
* Diabetes classes are of-
fered from 9 to 10 a.m. Mon-
days at the Citrus County
Health Department in Lecanto.
Classes are free. No registra-
tion is required.
* More about meal plans -
Monday.
*Avoiding complications -
April 20.
* Sick days -April 27.
* Medications and monitor-
ing - May 4.
Fasting blood sugars are of-
fered from 8 to 9 a.m.-Monday
through Friday in all three Cit-
rus County Health Department
sites. There is a $10 fee for this
service. No appointment is nec-
essary. Every Monday before
the Lecanto class, anyone who
would like to have a blood
sugar test should come fasting.
Call Lynece Hand, R.N., 527-
0068, ext. 245 or Carol Burke,
R.D., 726-5222.
* SPRING HILL- "Wom-
en's Health at Any Age" by
David F. Marler, M.D., commu-
nity education series, 5 to 6:30
p.m. Tuesday, May 5, at Silver-
thorn Country Club, 4550 Golf
Club Lane, Brooksville (about
2.5 miles south of Cortez
Boulevard, State Road 50) on
Barclay Avenue. A hot buffet will
be served. Seating is limited
and reservations are required.
Call 628-6060 in Citrus.
* The Citrus Team of Her-
nando-Pasco Hospice (HPH)
and its not-for-profit Homecare
affiliate, HPH Homecare, pro-
vide ongoing education to Cit-
rus County residents about
their many programs, services
and volunteer opportunities.
There is no charge for a
speaker and the solicitation of


Frfmmfl


Plant Sa

, Saturday, April 18 3

8 a.m.

Floral City
Church of Christ
8599 E. Marvin Street
ti Floral City


.. ...'- .


ile




&IA


IN


funds is never involved. Educa-
tional materials are provided at
no charge. Call Wendy Hall,
community liaison, at 527-4600.
* The Citrus County Health
Department offers child safety
seat checks by appointment at
the Inverness office, 120 N.
Montgomery Ave. Call Sue Lit-
tnan at 726-1731, ext. 242. Visit
citruscountyhealth.org.
* Citrus County "World's
Greatest Baby Shower" will
be May 7 at the Citrus County
Auditorium. We welcome dona-
tions of any new baby items
such as strollers, high chairs,
cribs, toys, gift baskets, hand-
made quilts and blankets as
well as prizes for parents such
as tool kits, oil changes, sports
tickets and gift certificates to
grocery stores, restaurants,
movies, etc. Donations of
money are also welcome;
checks should be made
payable to Citrus County Home
& Community Educators
(CCHCE). Donations are tax
deductible and 100 percent of
the donations go to the event.
Donations of all types may
be dropped off at, or mailed to,
the Invemess Health Depart-
ment, attention Lee Brannon,
120 N. Montgomery Ave., Inver-
ness, FL 34450. Indicate that it
is for the "Baby Shower," and
make sure your or your group's
name and address are on the
donation. Call Lee Brannon
726-1731, 'ext. 258.
* Friends and Family CPR
course Tuesday, May 19; three
sessions: 10 a.m., 2 p.m. and
5:30 p.m. at Nature Coast EMS
American Heart Association
Training Center, 3876 W. Coun-
try Hill Drive, Lecanto, one
block off State Road 44 on
County Road 490. The class is
free, book is included. Call to
reserve your seat: 249-4750.
* For those who have put off
getting a flu shot, can't afford
it, and with no insurance will be
able to come into the B&W
Rexall Drugs to receive their
free flu shot. This is only until
the vaccination supply that Ken
Heimann has runs out.
* Find the nearest influenza
vaccination-program location
in the area by typing in your ZIP
code on www.FindAFluShot
.com. This will provide the ad-
dress, driving directions, dates
and times for flu shots at local
clinics. Maxim provides a toll-
free number at (877) 962-9358.
Support GROUPS

* Scleroderma Support
Group organizing for North
Central Florida. All persons in-
terested, call Melba Withrow at
746-7752.
* The Citrus County Multi-
ple Sclerosis Support Group


r R Kefresnments
S will be available


- - - - - -- - - -
Name: # of Tickets: __
Address:
City: State: __ Zip:
Phone: State:_-_Zip.
M lail with SASE and make checks payable to:
Beverly Hills Jewish Center
P.O. Box 640024, Beverly Hills, FL 34464
Write INISHEER on the envelope Qi


will NOT hold its monthly meet-
ing this month. Please search
future notices of its May meet-
ing, in the Chronicle during the
month of May. Contact Peg
Morisi at 344-4855 or Florence
Cicarelli at 637-4014 for more
information. Guests are always
welcome.
* BROOKSVILLE - Wo-
men's breast cancer support
group, 6 to 7:30 p.m. the first
Tuesday monthly at Florida
Cancer Institute - New Hope
Center at 7154 Medical Center
Drive, Spring Hill. Call Tambra
Randazzo at (352) 592-8128.
* Citrus County Continuity
of Care Council meets at 10


II


a.m. the second Wednesday
monthly at Nature Coast
Lodge, 279 N. Lecanto High-
way, Lecanto. Call Ann Grant,
president, at 563-0880.
* Look Good ... Feel
Better, a free two-hour session
for women undergoing radiation
or chemotherapy, at 3 p.m. the
second Wednesday monthly at
the Cancer & Blood Disease
Center, Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the
fourth Wednesday monthly at
the Robert Boissoneault Oncol-
ogy Institute, Lecanto. Call Mil-
dred Roseberry (746-7212) or
the American Cancer Society
(800) 395-LOOK (5665).
See GROUPS/Page C4


Grief Support Group
Tuesday, 2:30 pm
- Hemando-Pasco Hospice presents
ongoing grief support for anyone who.has
experienced the sudden loss of a loved
one. A trained bereavement counselor
leads the group. Workbooks provided.
Registration required. Call 800.486.8784.
FREE

* . Balance Screening
1st & 3rd Wednesday of each month
S11:15 am - 12:00 noon
Seven Rivers Rehab & Wound Center,
- 1675 S.E. US Hwy. 19, located in the
- * Crystal River Shopping Center (next to
Sweetbay). No appointment needed. Call
a 352.795.0534 for details. FREE

Pre-Surgery Ortho Camp
Monday, April 6 * April 20, 1 pm
If you're having knee or hip replacement
surgery, consider attending Ortho Camp.
At Camp, patients learn about pre- and
post-surgery exercises, using a w alker,
knee and hip precautions and adaptive
equipment for activities of daily living.
Call 352.795.0534 to register. FREE

Good News About Knee
& Hip Pain
Wednesday, April 15, 1 pm
if you are over 55 and have knee or hip
pain, stiffness or swelling, chances are
you have arthritis. The good news is
many treatments are available allowing
, ou to mo'e easily and without pain once
again. FREE

Are You Taking Care
of Your Kidneys?
Thursday, April 23, 1 pm
Kidney disease affects one in nine adults.
Sanjiv 1. Shah, MD explains kidney
disease and how early detection of
problems and proper treatment play an
important role in kidney health. FREE

Diet Therapy for Diabetes
Tuesday, April 28, 6 pm
- * Diet is an essential part of controlling
diabetes. Understanding hok food affects
blood glucose levels empowers you to
S n make choices that best fit \our lifestyle.
food preferences and achieve good blood
sugar control. Product samples available.
FREE


Childbirth-Related Education
The Women's & Family Center offers a
variety of free or low cost childbirth-
related programs including Early
Pregnancy, Sibling Preparation, Infant
Care and Childbirth Refresher. To make
an appointment, call 352.795.BABY
(2229).

SEVEN RIVERS
, REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
www.srrmc.com


I For0more.infor m ,1o c10650


Floral City Garden Club's
A


Sunday, April 26 - 3 p.m.
Beverly Hills Recreation Center

Tickets

10 in advance - 12at the doorE


----


- ----~--~ ----~--I--~^---~--~---


.i1 1I


ftill


!A


IL-


HEALTH & LIFE


009


C2 TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 20


II


I i u u" mm POm












CITRUS Couxn' (FL) GHRoN.'cIf TUESDAY APRIL 7, 2009 C3


�2009 UNIVERSAL MEDIA SYNDICATE SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE


ADVERTISEMENT


R OF PATENTHEAL 9


Sales are booming for clinical strength diet pill


Participants in clinical study lost an average of 5 times more weight


without additional exercise or diets; 48-hour time limit now in place


By K. Tedeschi
Universal Media Syndicate

(UMS) - Over 10 million doses
have been shipped to dieters so far,
and sales continue to climb every
day for the diet supplement called
Apatrim�.
"We knew we had a great prod-
uct, but it's even exceeded our
expectations," said Ken Geis, Man-
ager of Call Center Operations for
PatentHEALTH the company that
developed the clinically tested
weight loss supplement.
"People just keep placing orders,
it's been pretty amazing," he said.
But a closer look at this weight
loss sensation suggests that maybe
the company shouldn't have been
caught off guard by its success.
There are some very good reasons
for Apatrim's surging popularity.
To begin with, the clinical test
results were very impressive. Par-
ticipants taking Apatrim's active
ingredient lost an average of 400%
more weight than those taking a pla-
cebo during the 4-week U.S. clini-
cal study. These remarkable results
were achieved without additional
exercise or diets.'*
Apatrim comes from a natural
edible plant source. It's safe, as well
as easy to use. This weight loss sup-
plement can actually begin work-
ing the very first day. And since
researchers believe Apatrim works
to suppress appetite, most people
can eat what they want and still lose
weight.*
"By suppressing their appetite,
most people will consume fewer cal-
ories which can lead to weight loss,"
said Dr. Joseph Dietz, Director of
Health Science, Research & Devel-
opment for PatentHEALTH. "Con-
sumers should always keep in mind
that there is no substitute for proper
diet and exercise when it comes to
losing weight."*

Impressive clinical results
Apatrim's active ingredient has a
known ability to help control hunger
pangs. This allows people to eat the
foods they want and always seem to
be craving because they'll just want
to eat less.*
The U.S. clinical study was con-
ducted in Los Angeles. The study
included healthy, overweight indi-
viduals between the ages of 31 and
73. The caloric intake and level of
exercise was not disclosed.
The participants were instructed
not to change the food they were eat-
ing and not to add any exercise. Spe-
cifically, no changes to their daily
routine; just take the recommended
dosage 30-minutes before lunch and
dinner.
A remarkable 100% of the partic-
ipants taking Apatrim as directed
either lost weight or inches off of


M POPULAR PILL: Allison Garwood (front) and Renee Pellegrini pick up a bottle of the breakthrough weight loss supplement called Apatrim� at the pharmacy.
An amazing 100% of the participants in the U.S. clinical trial got results taking Apatrim and its popularity is soaring. Consumers can call 1-866-964-2349
to have Apatrim shipped directly to their homes.


their waistline during the 4 week
clinical study. Those losing weight
lost an average of 5 times more than
study participants who were taking
the placebo pills.*
Some participants experienced
fabulous results, losing as much as 8
lbs and up to 3 inches off their waist-
line. These amazing results were
achieved without changes in life-
style. All they did was take the pills
as instructed.2*

Professional support
Industry trends along with pro-
fessional's support in the weight
loss and fitness industries indicate
that Apatrim is the real thing. This
amazing pill is being recommended
to companies and clients across the
country.
Mark Loy, a personal trainer has
had some of his clients use Apatrim
with great success.?
"When I'm working with my cli-
ents I can control what they're eat-
ing," said Loy. "But when they leave
they're on their own and that's when
the tendency to cheat comes into
play," he continued.
"I heard about Apatrim so I
checked out the facts then decided
to try it as a part of my training pro-
gram," Loy said.
"It's really helped some of my
clients to control their eating. I've
watched people get some amazing
results while taking Apatrim," said
Loy. "Sign me up, I'm a believer."'
Dr. Joseph Dietz was impressed


with the quality of the clinical
trials as well as the U.S. patent
(#7,060,308). This patent protects
the proprietary method of extract-
ing the active ingredient. This pro-
cess is what the developing scien-
tists believe is the key to the active
ingredient's effectiveness.
"When I read the clinical results,
the U.S. patent and all of the other
scientific support I immediately
knew we needed to use this weight
loss compound," said Dietz.
"The results are real; Apatrim is a
great product that's been shown to


help people lose weight."*

Where to get it
All of the national retail pharma-
cies including CVS and Walgreens
have placed orders for Apatrim.
There have been some reports
of out-of-stocks, so to make it eas-
ier for people to get it right away a
Regional Health Hotline has been
put in place for the next 48 hours.
Starting at 8:00am today, all consum-
ers have to do is call 1-866-964-2349 and
ask for Dept. AP3975; orders will be
filled on a first-come, first-served


basis.
"For those people who call the
hotline to have Apatrim shipped
directly to their homes, we guar-
antee they'll get product and they
can also qualify for a direct-to-home
discount," said Ken Geis. "But this
discount is only available through
the hotline for the next 48 hours,"
he said.
So for those who choose not to call
or miss the deadline you may have
to pay more for Apatrim or possibly
run the risk of not finding it at the
drug store. 0


Here's how to guarantee you get it:
,;.To make it easy for people fo get ApatrA m qui.- : I.,, the.'- p. , has set up a Regional Health Hotline.
Follow the instructions listed belic. (,. ha e Ap-atr i ,hipp,ed dire.:tl, to your home or ,ou can check your
local drug store to see if they have it in stock. For consumers who call the hotline, ad.ise the operator
that you ',.ant Apatrirn shipped directly, to your home so they can see if you qualify, for the direct-to-home
shipping discount.
Regional Health Hotline; 48-hours only
Consumers can begin calling promptly; at 8:00am today. The hctlirii .,.ill be available tor the next 48
hours. Call 1-866-964-2349 and ask for Dept. AP3975. All orders will be processed on a first-come,
first-served basis.

Retail Pharmacies:
National chains across the country that have ordered Apatrim include CVS/pharmacy and Walgreens. All
of these chains ha.e confirmed that they have received their initial shipments of Apatrim and are working to
make certain they ha..e stock available. Consumers not able to find Apatrim at their local pharmacies can call
the hotline and have it delivered directly to their homes. You may also qualify for a special discount.


On the web: www.apatrim.com


1. Primary study based on 26 participants over a 4-week period. Participants were directed not to add any exercise
or change eating habits. Participants level of caloric intake and exercise were not measured or disclosed. 2. Individu-
al results may vary. 3. Mark Loy is a personal trainer and fitness consultant to PatentHEALTH, he is remunerated for his services.
*THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.


Drug stores load up with powerful joint pill


Sales skyrocketing; news of its amazing results spread across the U.S.


By G.W. Napier
Universal Media Syndicate
UMS - Consumers can't seem
to get enough of it and drug
stores are selling it as fast as
they can get it.
"Unbelievable, that's all I
can say," said Darla Miller,
Operations Manager for
PatentHEALTH the company
that developed the break-
through joint supplement.
Miller was referring to the
fact that in just one day a drug
store chain sold 2,000 bottles
of the powerful joint health sup-
plement called Trigosamine�.
"We've already shipped over
500,000 bottles of Trigosamine
and sales just keep growing,
it's been crazy," said Miller.
Scientists have developed
this amazing oral tablet that
doesn't require a prescription
and is taken only once a day.
It's so impressive that one
key ingredient has the abil-
ity to retain fluid up to 1000
times its own weight; this
helps increase lubrication for
the joints allowing them to
move with ease.*
Trigosamine's key ingredi-
ent is Hyaluronate also called
HA-13 which is the building
block of "natural joint fluid,"
medically known as synovial
fluid.
This joint fluid reduces fric-
tion in the joints allowing for
effortless motion. It not only


lubricates the joints, but it also
acts as a comfortable shock
absorber.
"As we age, the body's nat-
ural production of this fluid
declines and this can force
the bones in our joints to
grind together which can re-
sult in nagging discomfort,"
said Dr. Joseph Dietz.1
"Using Trigosamine is like
taking a can of oil and applying
it directly to your joints," said
Dr. Dietz.*
Trigosamine combines HA-13
with the essential blend of glu-
cosamine and chondroitin which
have been clinically shown to
help build healthy cartilage in
the joints allowing for increased
flexibility and range of motion.*
A clinical study conducted
by the United States govern-


ment found that glucosamine
and chondroitin, similar to
those found in Trigosamine,
had a 79.2% effective rate for
those with moderate to severe
joint discomfort.?*
But it's the results that
make this joint supplement so
impressive.
"We get messages from con-
sumers all the time telling us
how great Trigosamine works
for them," said Miller.
"Everybody wants it," added
Miller.
"CVS/pharmacy was one
of the first ones to order
Trigosamine and they've load-
ed up their shelves. We've re-
ceived reports that show they
have some inventory left," said
Miller.
"And to make it easier for people


who can't find Trigosamine or
don't want to go to the store,
we've set up a National Or-
der Hotline so they can have
it delivered directly to their
home," said Miller.
"We'll be offering a direct
delivery discount for the
next 72 hours, and consumers
should know they can't get
this discount at drug stores,"
she added.
Otherwise those living in
the local area that miss the
deadline won't be able get
the discount. They'll have to
go to their local drug store
to try and get Trigosamine
and may be hard pressed to
find it. 0

Or, visit us online at:
www.trigosamine.com


Local Readers Discount Deadline
You may be able to find Trigosamine at CVS/pharmacy since they have received
shipments. If you want Trigosamine shipped directly to your home and would like
the local readers discount, call the National Order Hotline listed below before the
72-hour deadline expires. Otherwise you'll have to get Trigosamine at the drug
store and may run the risk of not being able to find it.

Begin Calling at 8:00AM TODAY
1-800-924-2109
Approval Code: TG8026
Discount Ends in 72 hours
1. Dr. Joseph Dietz, PhD currently conducts full time research for PatentHEALTH, LLC. as Director of Health Science, Research Development.
2. Statements herein are based upon published public information and do not imply affiliation, sponsorship or endorsement of
Trigosamine by the United States Government.
* THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE


0 HEALTHY JOINTS: X-rays reveal joints that have the proper amounts of
synovial fluid to lubricate the joints. HA-13, one of Trigosamine's key ingre-
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7 . _- r . -. l"' . I ."



: w'.� -^r":


0 ALMOST GONE: Sales of the joint pill Trigosamine are soaring which could
lead to out of stocks as shown in this photo illustration. Consumers unable to
find it can call 1-800-924-2109 and have it shipped directly to their homes.


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P,;::,I,-,l I H-,ALTM LLI: FPL-IA4OFi)5,-l 1


TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 C3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICIF










CURus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C4 TUiSDAY, APl.i 7, 2009 ALTH&LI______ _________________ ___



Urologic problems can occur during pregnancy


A pregnant patient presents
unique management prob-
lems to the urologist. Atten-
tion must be given to the specific
physiologic changes that occur
during pregnancy, as
well as to the impact of -
diagnostic and thera-
peutic procedures on
the fetus. This article
will review the com-
mon urologic problems
that occur during preg-
nancy and discuss an
approach to their man-
agement.
The prevalence of Dr. Th'
bacteria in the urine Stri
(bacteriuria) of preg- E , .: _-
nant women ranges TO[
from 2.5 percent to 11
percent. This is not dis-
similar from sexually active
women of childbearing age. Be-
cause symptoms may not predict
infection, all pregnant women
should be screened with urine
cultures. This is to prevent com-
plications of bacteriuria in preg-
nancy. Twenty percent to 40
percent of women with untreated
bacteriuria will develop
pyelonephritis (kidney infection)


c


with potential for renal damage.
Maternal bacteriuria is also as-
sociated with risks for the fetus.
There are increased risks for pre-
maturity in pregnant women with
pyelonephritis. Most in-
W WT vestigators recommend
" an antibiotic course of
treatment for seven to
agf .' .10 days for urinary tract
infections in pregnancy
If bacteriuria persists,
there is an increased
risk of structural uri-
i nary tract abnormali-
ties and a thorough
)mas F. urologic evaluation
nger should be performed
..'.: y after delivery. Peni-
MY cillins, cephalosporins
-AY - and erythromycin can
be used without known
consequences to the fetus or the
mother.
Renal calculi occur in one in
1,500 pregnancies. Most stones are
diagnosed in the second and third
trimesters of pregnancy. The ini-
tial management should be con-
servative since 50 percent to 80
percent of stones diagnosed dur-
ing pregnancy will pass sponta-
neously Urinary stones, however,


can jeopardize the pregnancy by
causing significant fever or pain,
and stones have been reported to
initiate premature labor.
The incidence of renal calculi is
the same with pregnant women as
it is in non-pregnant females. Cal-
cium excretion can double during
pregnancy
If initial conservative therapy of
urinary stone disease fails, then
some form of intervention is indi-
cated. However, because of dila-
tion of the urinary tract associated
with pregnancy, diagnosis of stone
disease and obstruction is not al-
ways straightforward.
The use of radiation for diag-
nostic studies during pregnancy
remains controversial. The first
trimester is the most significant
risk period for limited ionizing ra-
diation exposure during preg-
nancy However, childhood cancer
risk data suggests that urologists
should make every effort to avoid
fetal exposure to even low doses of
radiation. After the first trimester,
risks for birth defects and sponta-
neous abortion appear minimal.
Radiographic studies may con-
tinue to be required in some cases
of renal colic in pregnancy. Trans-


abdominal ultrasound is limited
in accuracy because of underlying
urinary tract dilation. However,
Doppler ultrasound increases the
accuracy of diagnosing ureteral
stones. Transvaginal ultrasound
also enhances the diagnosis of
ureteral stones that are close to
the bladder.
Intervention includes consider-
ation for placement of a ureteral
stent with ultrasound guidance. If
a ureteral stent cannot be placed
from below, then either uretero-
scopic stone management or
placement of a percutaneous
nephrostomy tube should be con-
sidered.
A common complication of both
ureteral stents and nephrostomy
tubes has been stone encrustation.
Increased levels of uric acid and
calcium in the urine exacerbate
this during pregnancy Pregnant
patients with stents or nephros-
tomy tubes should be encouraged
to hydrate and should be consid-
ered for tube exchange at eight-
week intervals.
Both ureteral stents and
nephrostomy tubes can cause pa-
tient discomfort. Ureteroscopic
stone management has been advo-


cated by some. If employed, it
should be performed without flu-
oroscopy. Extracorporeal shock-
wave lithotripsy has not been
approved for usage during preg-
nancy.
The incidence of malignancy in
pregnancy is approximately 1 in
1,000. This can include cancer of
the kidney and bladder. If surgery
is necessary after the first tri-
mester, it is reasonable to continue
the pregnancy to 28 weeks with
fetal survival rates of 90 percent
In summary, the entire range of
urologic problems from urinary
tract infection to malignancy can
be encountered in pregnancy. Ra-
tional management will result in
decreased risks to both the fetus
and the mother.

Thomas F Stringer, M.D., FACS,
is president of Citrus Urology
Associates, immediate past
president of the Florida
Urological Society president of
the Southeastern Section ofAUA
Inc., and a clinical professor in
the Division of Urology at the
University of Florida,
Gainesville.


GROUPS
Continued from Page C2

* Emotions Anonymous
12-step support group, noon
the second and fourth Thurs-
days monthly at Central Ridge
Library, Forest Ridge Boulevard
and Roosevelt, in Beverly Hills.
Call Meg at 527-2443.
* Suicide support group
for any adult who is trying to
cope with complex feelings of
grief, shock, confusion, anger
and guilt due to the impact of
suicide by a family member or
friend; 6:30 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Her-
nando-Pasco Hospice Office,
3545 N. Lecanto Highway, Bev-
erly Hills. Free. Call Wendy Hall
at 527-4600.
* SPRING HILL-- Care-
giver Support Group, 4 to 5
p.m. second Thursday monthly
at the Florida Cancer Institute
- New Hope's Spring Hill Cen-
ter, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite
203 in the Medical Arts Building
next Spring Hill Hospital. Call
Dorothy Hiller, MLT, support
group facilitator, at (352) 688-
7744.
* SPRING HILL - Spinal
Cord Injury support group, 5
p.m. second Thursday monthly
in the gym at HealthSouth Re-
habilitation Hospital. Call Dee
Hardee at (352) 592-7237.
* Friends of the Blind
meets from 9 a.m. to noon the
second Friday monthly at the
Church of the Nazarene in Her-
nando. Call Butch Shultz at
344-2693 or Bob Johnson at
563-1890.
* FFRA (Families and
Friends of Real Adults) meets
the second Friday monthly at
the Key Training Center in In-
verness at 130 Heights Ave.
Social time and business meet-


ing at 9 a.m. is followed by a
speaker at 10 a.m. who will ad-
dress issues pertaining to the
developmentally disabled. Call
Ron Phillips at 382-7819.
* The Area 13 Family Care
Council, 10 a.m. to noon the
second Monday monthly at the
Wildwood DCF/APD office,
1601 W. Gulf Atlantic Highway
(State Road 44). Call Dominic
Christofaro, (352) 489-6279.
* The monthly meeting of
NAMI-Citrus, locally chartered
group of the National Alliance
on Mental Illness will meet at
6:30 p.m. Monday at Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church on
County Road 486. Meeting day
has changed to the second
Monday of the month. Dr. Para-
manand Gurnani, who has
been a long-time friend of
NAMI, will speak.
All those with an interest in
mental health issues are wel-
come. There will be a ques-
tion-and-answer and social time
following the speaker.
* Caregiver Support
Group, 1 p.m. the second and
fourth Monday monthly at the
Central Citrus Community Cen-
ter, at 2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court in Lecanto, by Hospice of
Citrus County. Free and open
to the public. No reservations
are required. Call Mary
Williams at 527-2020.
* Head and Neck Cancer
Support Group meets 11 a.m.
to noon the third Wednesday
monthly at the Robert.Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute,
522 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, north of State Road
44. Call Dr. Patrick Meadors,
(352) 342-1822.
Weekly meetings
* Independent Living
Skills, Peer Support and Lit-
eracy workshops held from 9 to
11:45 a.m. Monday at the
Center for Independent Living


Crime prevention
officer to visit FFRA
Special to the Chronicle

The du\,s when persons with developmental disabili-
ties stay ed home or in very protected environments are
long gone Now. our friends and family members are liv-
ing. ,working and enjoying the same community activi-
ties as everyone else. But with this greater
independence comes a need for more education. How
can we help our loved ones remain safe as well as inde-
pendent?
Officer David L Michalicka. ofthe Crime Prevention
Task Force of Florida, based in Spring Hill, will speak
about sta% ing sae in our homes and in the community at
the ne\t neetin of FFRAon FridayApril 17, atthe Key
Train i ne Center: 130 Heights Ave., Inverness. Social time
and business meeting begin at 9 a.m., followed by the
speaker at D10.
The public is invited to attend the monthly meetings of
FFR\ There is u-itially a speaker on topics of interest to
per'.ons with dI(iabilities and their families. For more
information on this meeting or FFRA in general, call
Ron Phillips at 382-7819, or Stephanie Hopper at 344-
0288


of North Central Florida, 3774
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Lecanto. Call Cathy Jackson at
527-8399.
* Beverly Hills Community
Church Community Support
Group, a 12-step program,
meets at 6 p.m. Tuesday in
the fellowship hall, 88 Civic Cir-
cle. Free. All are invited. Call
the church at 746-3620 or Meg
at 527-2443.
* Support group meetings
are in the CMHS Administration
Building unless otherwise indi-
cated.
* ACS Man to Man
Prostate Support and Educa-
tion Program will meet in the
conference room at the Robert
Boissoneault Oncology Institute
at 522 N. Lecanto Highway in
the Allen Ridge Medical Mall.
Spouses and caregivers are
welcome. Call 527-0106.
* Bariatric Support Group:
6:30 p.m. every three months,


Accepting New OB/GYN Patients "
Saturday Appointments Available '

Rose Mlary Sobel NID- , ii i I.... '' ' '1 N F.COG
Jackie Duncan,ARNP- Ni- L| ,.,|,i,,I , Hch.' - 1-cli,

i\ '^ iCrsta('k-ver omn 's a*th Center

ill1. . .. .. . ' 794.08 7
, . .' r , ,, . .n , n a ,] ,,, ,:.�� .. .... ... , , .. 1 7 U U.





GOING NORTH?


Go Sign up today for your


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CCIT kpNICELE




) Snowbird Edition

Call us at: (352)563-5655 E-mail us at:
Fax us at: (352)563-5665 Home_Delivery@ChronicleOnline.com
- ---------------------------- ---


Mail us at:

Chronicle


Name: I
Address: (Up North)


11624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429 Phone: (Up North)
E-mail:_
*Chronicle subscribers only, E-mail
- -774 --- - - - - - - - - - -


Cypress Room. Call Claudia
Blotz at 697-0051 or Bette
Clark at 860-0383.


* Breast Cancer Support
Group: noon the second Fri-
day, Robert Boissoneault Can-
cer Institute. Call Judy Bonard
at 527-4389.
* Citrus Cancer Support:
4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday,
cafeteria meeting room. April
21: Nutritional Update, CMHS
clinical sietician. Call Carol at
726-1551, ext. 6596 or 3329.
* Cancer Support: 3 p.m.
last Thursday, Cancer Treat-
ment Center. Call 746-1100.
* Diabetes Support Group:
11:30 a.m. the fourth Wednes-
day, Cypress Room. Call Carol
McHugh at 341-6110.
* Hospice of Citrus
County support groups for
2008. Free, but reservations
suggested. Call Jonathan
Beard at 527-2020.
* Caregiver support group, 1
p.m. second and fourth Monday
monthly at the Citrus County
Community Center, 2804 W.
Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto.
* Newly Bereaved Work-
shop, 1 p.m. Thursday at the


Hospice of Citrus County Clini-
cal Office, 326 S. Line Ave., In-
verness.
* Grief support group, 11
a.m. Tuesday at Our Lady of
Grace Parish Life Center, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
* Grief support group, 1 p.m.
Tuesday at the Hospice of Cit-
rus County Clinical Office, 326
S. Line Ave., Inverness.
* Grief support group, 10:30
a.m. Saturday at First United
Methodist Church, 831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
* Christian-based grief sup-
port group, 1:15 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Gulf To
Lake Ministry Complex, 1506
N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River.
* Social support group, 10
a.m. Tuesday at Crystal Para-
dise Restaurant, 508 N. Citrus
Ave., Crystal River.
* Social support group, 3:30
p.m. Friday at Joe's Family
Restaurant, 911 W. Main St.,
Inverness.
See; Page C5


Medications Linked to Movement Disorder
According to the FDA, Regain� (generic name Metoclo-
" ,n pramide) and Geodon�have been linked to the condition
I4ILA-N tardive diskinesia which causes involuntary movements
of the mouth (tongue and lip smacking), face, neck
lf m9 and sometimes the arms, trunk or legs. They can also
" ','" cause Parkinson's-like symptoms, dystonia and other
involuntary muscular reactions. Children and the elderly
appear to be the most susceptible.
. . There is no known treatment.

If you or a loved one have suffered any of the serious side effects after taking
Regain or Geodon�,

YOU MAY BE ENTITLED TO

MONEY DAMAGES
Call Zebersky & Payne toll free at 1-888-435-7541.




Fosamax (genenc name - Alendronate) is a drug used primarily to treat osteoporosis
in post menopausal women. The FDA issued an analysis of Fosamax linking it to a
senous bone disease known as osteonecrosis of the the jaw (ONJ) or "dead jaw."
Symptoms of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) include:


* Ulcers and Sores
* Exposed Bone


* Tooth Extractions
* Swelling * Jaw Pain


Recent reports show that the psoriasis prescription drug Raptiva may
be linked to several serious side effects including:
*Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML)


S"I


* Pneumonia with Neutropenia
* Tuberculous Pneumonia
* Invasive Fungal Disease
* Necrotizing Fasciitis


* Hemolytic Anemia
* Brain Infection
* Bacterial Sepsis
*Viral Meningitis


If you or a loved one has taken Raptiva and have any of the above
symptoms, call Zebersky & Payne toll free at 1-888-435-7541.


Lawyers at Zebersky & Payne are admitted to practice low in FL. In other jurisdictions, we work with local council.
*Past results do not guarantee future outcomes.

zebersky I payne
S 0 ATTORNEYS |
pilMi C M 4000 Hollywood Blvd. Suite 675, South Hollywood, Florida 33021

CAL I **4


* Loosening of Teeth
* Severe Infections


14 v r ,w-r At, T i vr


if you or a loved one has taken FOS.AX and have min of the above symptoms,
call Zebersky & Payne toll free at 1-888-435-7541.









,'U1r 7rvv(Y HfNCI ELH&LETISAARL7 09C


Mom faces Disney dilemma


I've had a major epiphany in my
parenting and here it is: Every bad
habit my daughter has learned is
from Disney
OK, I am exaggerating a
little, but right now it seems
as though my battles with
Emmy have been derived
from one of my favorite mo-
nopolies in life! I mean, let's
face it: Disney runs the
world when it comes to
child entertainment, travel,
television, and toys. If you Sha
can't trust Disney, whom Shaly
can you trust? FULL
It started with a minor in-
cident when she was 2 years old. After
watching "Finding Nemo," Emmy said
to me "I hate you" - just the way
Nemo tells his daddy in the movie.
Patrick and I reprimanded the mega-
power like any parent would: with an-
nual passes to the theme parks and
multiple weekend trips to the dirty
culprit!
But lately, Disney's offenses are get-
ting a little more serious. To begin
with, Emmy loves Tinkerbell (like
most little girls her age do), and when



GROUPS Cit
Continued from Page C4 ani

* LIFT luncheon (for widows
and widowers), 11:30 a.m. the Hosp
third Tuesday monthly at Citrus Church
Hills Golf & Country Club, Her- sponsor
nando. Call Teddi Holler at 746- Diversi
6518 for reservations. Wed ne'
* Parents support group, a Church
chapter of Bereaved Parents of Da)rin
the USA, 7 p.m. the second has exp
Wednesday monthly at First lenges
Presbyterian Church, 1501 S.E. about a
U.S. 19, Crystal River. Cmeric
* Hemando-Pasco Hospice p.m.. p
presents free grief support Ther,
programs, 2:30 p.m. Tuesday require
at Seven Rivers Regional Med- Manage
ical Center for anyone who has Hosp
experienced the sudden loss of credit
a loved one. Registration re- tegrity o
quired. Call (800) 486-8784. of serve
* Celebrate Recovery, 7 to %wwiv.h
9 p.m. Friday at Seven Rivers
Christian School in rooms 0 Dunn
216/217 of school building C. group for
Dinner available before the days at R
meeting from 6 to 7 p.m. for $3 lage Chur
donation and a coffee house 102nd St.
after. Call SRPC at 746-6200. Call Char
* Celebrate Recovery, 7 Nancy at
p.m. Wednesday and Fridays 0 AI-Ai
at the Christian Recovery Fel- ularly in C
lowship Church, 2242 W. State (352) 697
Road 44. Call 726-2800. * Invei
* Celebrate Recovery at Mondays,
Gulf to Lake Church Ministry Catholic (
Complex, West Gulf-to-Lake 41.
Highway in Crystal River. Din- * Crys
ner at 6 p.m. Friday, followed Tuesdays
by large- and small-group time Catholic (
and a Coffee Caf6 at 9. Call coast Blv
795-0649. 0 Last
* Beverly Hills Gay and a.m. Wed
Lesbian Support Group Methodist
meets weekly. Free, open to Pleasant
everyone. Group organizer is ness.
PamelaRae and co-organizer is 0 Leca
Wayne Thomas. Call Pame- Thursday
laRae at 560-3247 for direc- rus Count
tions and details. Lane, Lec
* Citrus Abuse Shelter As- 0 Coui
sociation (CASA), 1100 Turner Thursday
Camp Road, Inverness, offers Methodist
two free weekly women's do- Bradshaw
mestic abuse support groups: Open me
* 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday. * Crys
* 10:30 a.m. to noon a.m. Thur
Wednesday. 147 Seve
Child care available. enue), Cr
Call CASA at 344-8111. 0 Awa
* Overcomers Group for AFG: 12::
people recovering from addic- Margaret
tions to drugs, alcohol or other 114 N. Os
out-of-control habits meets at 8 * Begi
p.m. Monday at the Sanctuary, a.m. Satu
7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd. 147 Seve
Call Paul at 628-2874. enue), Cr


I


Emmy gets angry or doesn't want to
speak to someone, she copies Tinker-
bell. She will cross her arms, stick her
nose in the air, and sound
out a little "hmmmfff!"
Even more like Tinkerbell,
she'll punch her fists down
E6; by her sides and stomp one
foot in place. Thanks, Dis-
- ney!
What I like even less than
the imitation of Tinker-
bell's demeanor is the imi-
tation of Jasmine's looks.
Barker Emmy makes everything
PLATE she wears into a half-top,
sways her hips to one side
and asks me if "she looks like Jas-
mine." Not only do I think this "look"
is too young for a 4-year-old, but do I
really want Emmy worrying about
what she looks like already? Should a
preschooler even be thinking about
showing off her stomach?
Never in a million years did I think
that these consequences would come
from watching a Disney movie. Never-
theless, there they are. And it's not
Disney's fault - it's my fault.
I am the parent and I should moni-


krus Hospice to hi
nual teleconfereM
Special to the Chronicle

pice of Citrus County, the Seventh-day Ad
i and the Hospice Foundation of Amer
r the annual teleconference, "Living Wit
ty & End-of-Life Care" from 1.30 to 4:
sday., April 29, at the Seventh-day Ac
at 1880 N. Trucks Ave. in Hernando.
ng the past 15 years, our understanding
perienced major modification. Changes ai
are likely to continue to affect how w
nd respond to loss.
s will be offered through Hospice Found
a. Complimentary lunch will be served
rior to the start ofthe event.
e is no cost to attend: however, reservati
>d and seating is limited. RSVP to Grief S
er Jonathan Beard at 527-2020.
pice of Citrus County, licensed in 1985
d by the Joint Commission, is preserving
of the hospice philosophy in the finest tra
ing you. Call (8661 462-0962 or on the
ospiceofeitruscountyorg.


nellon Life Recovery
adults, 7 p.m. Mon-
ainbow Springs Vil-
rch, 20222 S.W.
Road, Dunnellon.
at (352) 465-1644 or
(352) 794-0017.
non groups meet reg-
;itrus County. Call
-0497.
rness AFG: 8 p.m.
, Our Lady of Fatima
Church, 550 S. U.S.

;tal River AFG: 8 p.m.
s, St. Benedict
Church, 455 S. Sun-
id.
Resort AFG: 11:30
nesdays, First United
t Church, 3896 S.
Grove Road, Inver-

into AFG: 8 p.m.
s, Unity Church of Cit-
y, 2628 Woodview
canto.
rage AFG: 8 p.m.
s, First United
t Church, 8831 W.
St., Homosassa.
eting.
stal River AFG: 11:30
sdays at YANA Club,
nth St. (off Citrus Av-
ystal River.
reness Lunch Bunch
30 p.m. Friday, St.
Episcopal Church,
sceola Ave., Inverness.
nners Al-Anon: 10
rdays at Yana Club,
nth St. (off Citrus Av-
ystal River.


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* Alcoholics Anon
If you drink, and want
call Alcoholics Anonyr
ture Coast Intergroup
0599. Web site: www.
group.com.
* AC Group meets
Tuesday at Church V
Walls, 3962 N. Rosco
Hernando. Call Laverr
4563. Web site: www.
forchrist.com.
* Overeaters Ano
Call 746-7749 or 341-
* 3 p.m. Monday
senior center (VA built
County Road 491, Lec
Call Delores, 746-501
* Noon Thursdays
Lady of Grace Parish
Roosevelt Blvd, Bever
Call Francisca, 746-77
* "Circle of Love" 1
Thursday at Our Lad
Grace Church, 6 Roo!
Blvd., Beverly Hills. C,
7749, 726-9112 or 34
* 7 p.m. Friday at
of Grace Parish Hall,
sevelt Blvd., Beverly I-
Carolyn, 341-0777.
* CEA-HOW, for p
have an eating disord
noon Wednesdays at
Presbyterian Church,
Washington Ave., Inve
Call Judi M. at 726-58
* Reiki clinic mee
to 9 p.m. most Wedne
the Beverly Hills Corn
Center, 1 Civic Circle,
Hills. Call Ann Thonen
5116 or Kristi Kobler a
5537.


tor everything Emmy watches and
does. I would never have thought of
these consequences coming from
watching these movies until they hap-
pened to me.
That said, I can't protect her from
everything, so it's my job to talk to her
about it. I want her to know the differ-
ences between good behavior and bad
behavior - and what's appropriate
for a little girl to wear or say.
You can't trust Disney - better yet,
you can't trust anyone to raise your
children the way you want them
raised. But the next time Disney does
something to corrupt my child's be-
havior and innocence, I am writing a
letter to them!
Better yet, I'm going to do it right
now - in my Mickey Monitor (the an-
nual passholders' newsletter) I read
about an essay contest for a one-night
stay in the castle!

Shalyn Barker resides with her
husband, Patrick, daughter, Emmy,
and son, Graham, in the Beverly Hills
area. She can be reached at
citrusamom@yahoo.com.


os * Narcotics Anonymous:
oSt * Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Mon-
day and Saturday, Lions Den,
ic U.S. 41, Floral City.
* It Works How and Why, 7
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
dventist Saturday and noon Sunday,
ica will YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh
h Grief: St., Crystal River.
30 p.m. 0 Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m.
dentist Thursday, First Christian
Church, Grover Cleveland
of grief Boulevard, Homosassa.
id chial- * Recovery on the River, 8
e think p.m. Monday and Friday,
ation fLecanto Church of Christ, State
at 12:30 Road 44 and County Road 491,
Lecanto; 8 p.m. Sunday 797 S.
ons are Rowe Terrace, Lecanto, east of
services County Road 491 and State
Road 44.
and ac- Narcotics Anonymous is not
the in- affiliated with any of the meet-
aditions ing facilities listed. Information
Web at line: 382-0851.
* Narconon provides an-
swers to drug addiction, pro-
nymous: videos free assessments,
to stop, evaluation and referral services
nous Na- to internationally recognized al-
at 621- ternative and traditional treat-
ncinter ment facilities. When continuing
relapse is occurring, call (800)
s at 7 p.m. 468-6933 or visit www.stop
Without addiction.com.
e Road, N Depression and Bipolar
ne at 637- Support Alliance of Citrus
alcoholics County at 7 p.m. Thursday in
Bailey Hall, First Lutheran
nymous: Church, 1900 State Road 44
0777. W., Inverness. Doors open at 6
at the p.m. Call 503-3262. The Na-
ding) on tional DBSAAssociation's num-
canto. ber is (800) 826-3632.
9. * The Encouragers Sup-
at Our port Group has been helping
Hall, 6 people deal with depression,
rly Hills. anxiety, bipolar and more for
749. more than 15 years. Weekly
p.m. meeting. Call 628-3831 or 637-
y of 3196.
sevelt E Alzheimer's Association-
all 746- Florida Gulf Coast Chapter
1-0777. support groups:
Our Lady * Cedar Creek at Kings Bay
6 Roo- Assisted Living Residence, 231
Hills. Call N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, 3
p.m. first Thursday monthly.
people who Call Wendy Hall at 527-4600.
er, at * Our Lady of Fatima
the First Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41
206 S., Inverness, 11 a.m. first
erness. Tuesday monthly. Call Wendy
382. Hall at 527-4600.
ts from 7 N SPRING HILL - Parkin-
3sdays at son's Tai Chi Group, 2:30 to
munity 3:30 p.m. Tuesday in the pri-
Beverly vate dining room at Health-
at 795- South Rehabilitation Hospital of
it 628- Spring Hill. Call Charissa
Haffner at (352) 346-8864.


Many steps in the


making of a crown


Have you ever won-
dered what your
dentist was doing
when you went for a crown?
For the purposes of this col-
umn I am going to assume
that you already know that
you need a crown and that
you know what a
crown is from the
past columns in
the Chronicle or
your experiences
with your dentist.
The first thing ' 4
that will happen
is that you will
have some im-
pressions made.
The first impres- Dr. F
sion taken will be Vasc
on the opposite SOUNID
arch that the


crown is being
made on. This impression is
taken using alginate - a
material that starts as a
powder and, when mixed
with water, turns into a ma-
terial with the consistency
of a cake mix. Once placed
in a tray and then in your
mouth, it takes about a
minute to set. It will be
taken out of your mouth
with a snap and then
poured with dental stone to
make a duplicate of your
jaw and teeth in stone.
After this, your dentist
will take what is
called a face bow The pu
transfer. The pur-
pose of this is to of 1
duplicate the po-
sition of your tempo
upper teeth and to pr(
jaw for the labo- i
ratory The face the t
bow transfer is
taken by placing until
an apparatus in
your ears, lining permc
up a few land- crov
marks and then,
finally, recording made
the position of the
jaw and teeth. to en
Once these that
things are done, that
your dentist will too
numb up the area. �
that he or she will doe!
be working on.
The dentist will mo
initially use a top-
ical gel that numbs up the
area before you get numb.
There are many new anes-
thetics that are pH-bal-
anced and, therefore, go in
with virtually no pain. In ad-
dition, there are anesthetics
that have varying lengths of
duration. Because of this,
they can be tailored to the
length of the procedure,
thereby allowing you to go
home from the office with
almost no numbness.
Once this has been ac-
complished, the dentist will
shave down that amount of
tooth structure necessary
for the placement of the
crown. It is important that
the proper amount of tooth
is reduced so that the final
crown is neither too bulky
nor unaesthetic. There are
some teeth that have had
excessive breakdown.
These teeth will need to
have what is referred to as a
build-up.
A build-up is done with a
material that is bonded to
the tooth with an adhesive.


The purpose of the build-up
is to reestablish the proper
shape and size of your tooth.
After the above is finished,
your dentist or dental assis-
tant will pack cord between
the tooth and the gums. The
purpose of the cord is to
move the gums
Saway from the
tooth so that a
good impression
can be recorded.
The cord is re-
moved before the
S ' impression is
Taken, leaving a
trough around
the tooth.
rank There is also
mini another material
0 BITES available that re-
places the use of
cord. It is much
more comfortable than plac-
ing cord and just as effec-
tive. Following the removal
of the cord, your dentist will
take the impression with a
material of their choice.
There are many materials
on the market, ranging from
an adequate to a superior
resulting impression.
This impression will be
poured with the proper type
of stone and used by your
dentist's lab to make the
final crown. Your dentist
will take what is called a
bite registration at
irpose this point. The
purpose of the
the bite registration is
to allow the lab to
rary IS relate the model
otect taken with the al-
ginate to the
ooth model taken of the
tooth upon which
the the lab will make
the crown.
anent The bite regis-
vn is tration material
starts out with a
, and creamy consis-
tency and hardens
Sure within one
minute. The final
the thing to do is
)th make a temporary
crown-and cement
isn't it with temporary
cement. Your den-
Ve. tal assistant will
make and cement
this temporary crown.
The temporary crown is
made using various tech-
niques; however, they are
all made of some type of
plastic or composite. The
purpose of the temporary is
to protect the tooth until the
permanent crown is made,
as well as to ensure that the
tooth doesn't move between
your appointments.
As with many things in
life, the choice of materials
used by the dentist and the
lab will have an effect on
the end result, not only in an
esthetic fashion, but also in
the restoration being a long-
lasting, functional and com-
patible result that is
accepted by the body.

Dr Frank Vascimini is a
Homosassa
dentist. Send your
questions to 4805 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa, FL
34446 or e-mail them to
him at info@masterpiece
dentalstudio.com.


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TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 C5


HEALTH & LIFE


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CITRus COUNiT (FL) CHRONICLE


* Yoga at the Lions Club
Historic Crystal River Train
Depot, 109 Crystal Ave., is
scheduled as follows:
* 10 to 11 a.m. and 5:30 to
6:30 p.m. Monday.
* 9 to 10 a.m. and 4 to 5
p.m. Wednesday.
* 6 to 7 p.m. Thursday.
* 9 to 10 a.m. Saturday.
Cost is $5 per class. Bring a
mat or towel and wear clothes
that allow for easy physical
movement. Classes are appro-



KILLER
Continued from Page C1

He and his partners,
Michael Herron, Robert
Weaver III and Charles
Zachar, put together a multi-
modality center represent-
ing all branches of radiology.
DeGirolami trained in in-
ternal medicine before he
turned to radiology and did
a fellowship in cardiology.
He acquired a state-of-
the-art CT scanner in 2003.
"The first coronary CT
was done on me," he said. "I
believe in it so much that I
scanned myself."
CT scans are considered a
highly effective diagnostic
tool, and used frequently
"I've done 1,500 scans in
three years," DeGirolami
said. "I'm doing three today"
It requires 20 to 30 min-
utes to interpret a scan. The
scan generates 7,000 images
in less than five seconds.



BENNETT
Continued from Page C1

tion of hot tea may increase
the risk of esophageal can-
cer. However, in the study,
the risk did not vary accord-
ing to the amount of tea con-
sumed. It seemed the risk
factor was the temperature
of the tea at the time of con-
sumption.
To clarify the association
between drinking hot tea
and esophageal cancer, re-
searchers from the Interna-
tional Agency for Research
on Cancer in Lyon, France,
assessed tea use among 300
subjects with esophageal
squamous cell carcinoma
and 571 matched controls
who did not have cancer.
The subjects were tested
with temperature-measured
tea samples to allow quan-
tification of how they nor-
mally drank their tea.



GRILLO
Continued from Page C1

exercise is the key to keep-
ing muscles in good tone
and circulation at its best.
There is a perception that
the inner ear is the sole
organ for balance and this is
not true. There are many
things that send information
to the brain including the
eyes. Diseases such as glau-
coma and cataracts, which
decrease vision, diminish
the amount of sensory infor-
mation sent to the brain to
be processed. Injuries to the
knees, hips and back often
do not completely heal and
leave some limited range of
motion.
Arthritis can cause per-
manent crippling and non-
reversible effects and
osteoporosis leads to weak
bones and instability and
falls, which can sometimes
result in a spontaneous frac-
ture, which leads to further
physical limitations and ac-
celerating or exacerbating
the potential for falling and
being off balance.
Muscle strength gradually
decreases with age. Joints,


Don't let pain
interfere with your
everyday activities.
* Fracture Care
* Sports Medicine
* Hand Surgery
* Total Hips and Knees
+ Shoulders
* Arthroscopic Surgery


private for 8 years and older and
are multi-level. All certified in-
structors. Call 795-3710, 795-
3662, 795-1645, 860-1305 or
563-6535.
* Hatha Yoga classes 6:15
to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday at Beverly Hills
Recreation Center, 77 Civic Cir-
cle. Instructor has 30 years
teaching experience. $6 per
class. No experience needed.
Bring a mat or towel.
* Weekly yoga class, 10:30


"A lot of things have to be
integrated to do this scan,"
DeGirolami said. "Pre-
paredness is critical. All
these parameters have to be
in place to get a good scan. It
takes longer to interview the
patient and put them on the
table than it takes to scan
them. The whole scan may
take only one minute."
In the geriatric patient
group, cardiovascular dis-
ease is the most common
cause of death, he said. Men
should be aware of it after
the age of 40, and women
after they are menopausal,
because their hormones
protect them from coronary
disease. But after meno-
pause, the risk starts to
climb.
"What we are looking for
is atherosclerosis, damage
in the wall of a vessel from
the buildup of atheromatous
plaque," DeGirolami said.
"It builds in stages. Initially,
it is soft as it has no calcium.
But then it goes to calcifica-


Overall tea use and other
characteristics were as-
sessed in a large cohort
study of 48,582 subjects, ac-
cording to the report in a re-
cent edition of the British
Medical Journal.
Ninety-eight percent of
cohort subjects drank black
tea on a regular basis and
the average amount was 1
liter per day In terms of tea
temperatures, 39 percent of
subjects drank their tea at
less than 140 degrees, 38.9
percent at 140 to 148 de-
grees, and 22 percent at 149
degrees or hotter.
Drinking hot (149 to 156
degrees) or very hot (158 de-
grees or more) tea increased
the odds of esophageal can-
cer by two- and eight-fold,
respectively, relative to
drinking lukewarm or warm
tea (149 degrees or less).
Similarly, drinking tea
two to three minutes or less
than two minutes after
pouring increased the risk


tendons and ligaments lose
their flexibility and limit
our ability to move around.
Combine the ravages of age
and injury to our body, eyes
and balance center in the
ears, and you can see how
easily the results in the body
that cannot carry out motion
commands initiated by the
brain. And as a result, we
may end up falling or being
off balance at the very least.
Prevention and slowing
the inevitable aging changes
as best we can is the key to
reducing the chance of fall
and injury Many of the
problems that are responsi-
ble for falls develop early in
life and throughout middle
age, and are brought on by
inactive lifestyles including
self-inflicted damage from
smoking, poor diet and lack
of exercise.
Early diagnosis of such
diseases such as diabetes
and hypertension can make
a difference in the progress
and seriousness of this dis-
order If simple conserva-
tive measures such as
exercise are not adequate,
medications to reduce hy-
pertension, heart disease,
insomnia, stomach prob-
lems, and depression have a


R Crane

Couch, D.O.
Citrus Bone and Joint Specialists * Orthopedic Surgery
Reclaiming Lives
Offices in Lecanto & Ocala
Lecanto 746-0654
Ocala 237-9298
3264 W. Audubon Park Path, Lecanto
4600 SW 46th Ct., Ocala


ANCIENT EXERCISE
* Yoga has been practiced in Eastern cultures for about
5,000 years and has become quite popular in Western
society. The word yoga means "to bring together or
merge" - as in joining the mind and body into a sin-
gle harmonious unit. The purpose of yoga is to create
strength, awareness and harmony in both the mind
and body. Why do yoga? Yoga makes you feel better.
Practicing the postures and breathing exercises makes
you healthier in body, mind and spirit. Yoga lets you
tune in, chill out, shape up - all at the same time.


a.m. Tuesday at the Nature


tion. It's been called harden-
ing of the arteries."
Cardiovascular CT has
been a breakthrough in
fighting coronary artery dis-
ease.
"We can detect it at the
earliest possible time," De-
Girolami said. "The plaque
buildup can cause a rup-
ture, form blood clots, or
cause a heart attack that
could result in sudden
death."
Once the scan has been.
done, DeGirolami said he
would have three possible
outcomes. First, the normal
scan shows no signs of dis-
ease.
Second, disease is de-
tected, and assessed for
severity, extent and symp-
toms.
"If it is soft plaque, not
showing narrowing of the ar-
teries, it can be treated with
stations, which are well-toler-
ated," he said. "Statins can
reverse soft plaque, and are
decreasing the number of


of the malignancy by two
and a half- and five and a
half-fold, relative to waiting
four or more minutes before
drinking.
Now, these findings are
not cause for alarm, and
they should not reduce pub-
lic enthusiasm for the time-
honored ritual of drinking
tea.
However, allowing tea to
cool for five minutes before
drinking is advisable.


DrBennett is a
board-certified radiation
oncologist, past president
of the Citrus County Unit ofI
the American Cancer
Society and a member of
the Board of Directors and
Executive Committee of
the Florida Division of the
American Cancer Society.
Contact him at 522 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
FL 34461 or e-mail
cjbennett@rboi. com.


significant influence on how
the brain processes all of
this information and can in-
fluence the likelihood of!
falling.
We all think of
Alzheimer's disease as af-
fecting the memory, but also
it severely affects the nerv-
ous system function, which
can result in balance prob-
lems and falling.
Overuse of prescription
and over-the-counter medi-
cines, such as antihista-
mines, sleeping medica-
tions, pain medications and
cough suppressants all have
side effects and impair
judgment and as a result af-
fecting movement, need to
be watched closely Coordi-
nation of your medical care
through a single primary
care physician and pharma-
cist with their ability to use
computer systems and warn
about drug interactions is
an important factor.
Next week, I will talk
about prevention tips and
rehabilitation.

Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO,
is an ear, nose and throat
specialist in Crystal River.
Call him at 795-0011.





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heart attacks."
With significant plaque,
the patient will require
coronary angiography, and
then, possibly, would have to
consider having bypass sur-
gery
An angiogram is a more
invasive procedure, requir-
ing a catheter to be inserted
in the groin or arm, DeGiro-
lami said. The more invasive
a procedure, the more it in-
volves the risk of complica-
tions.
A primary care physician
is typically the one who
refers patients to have coro-
nary CT scans.
"We deal closely with pri-
mary care physicians and
some pretty knowledgeable
cardiologists in the area," he
said. "Usually, the primary
care physician looks at such
risk factors as family history,
hypertension (high blood
pressure), diabetes and
smoking."
As it is non-invasive, the
risk of complications is low



GANDHI
Continued from Page C1

545,000 men and women
aged 50 to 71 years were as-
sessed in 1995 and then fol-
lowed through 2005. People
were recruited from AARP
members.
These study subjects
resided in six states (Cali-
fornia, Florida, Louisiana,
New Jersey, North Carolina
and Pennsylvania) and two
cities (Atlanta and Detroit)
at enrollment. During the
10-year follow-up, 47,976
men and 23,276 women
died.
The researchers took into
account other habits such as
smoking, family history of
cancer or heart diseases or
their body mass index (BMI)
to assess for obesity. These
are known risk factors for
cancer and heart diseases.
Those who eat one quar-
ter-pound hamburger or an
equal amount of red meat a
day had a 30 percent to 35
percent higher risk of dying
from cancer or heart prob-
lems compared to those who



DODGE
Continued from Page Cl

prosaic level, but equally
wonderful, was the Chil-
dren's Vegetable Garden,
planted and cared for by el-
ementary and middle
school children.
Worthy of special mention
is the Texas Native Trail,
featuring three distinct re-
gions of this vast state: The
Hill Country, The East
Texas Pineywoods and the
South Texas dry land trees,
shrubs and wild flowers.
Meandering along these
trails in the 33-acre botani-
cal garden, it was easy to
forget we were in one of
America's largest cities.
After leaving the Botani-
cal Garden, we dived back
into the city and enjoyed
dinner at one of San Anto-
nio's many fine restaurants.
My entree was pasta pri-
mavera, and the zesty color-
ful vegetables bountifully


Fellowship, 7633 N. Florida
Ave., (U.S. 41), Citrus Springs,
turn left on 41 at the Holder
flashing light. Payment will be
$7 per class or six sessions for
$35. Bring a mat and wear
loose-fitting clothing. Call Bar-
bara Ewing-DeRemer at 795-
5736.
* Yoga classes with instruc-
tor Laura Boetto, 6 to 7 p.m.
Wednesday and Thursdays at
the Citrus Springs Community
Building and from 11 a.m. to


for cardiovascular com-
puted tomography But not
all patients can be good can-
didates for the CT scan, De-
Girolami said. They will
need to tolerate an intra-
venous contrast agent, a dye
injected to make tissues
stand out for better images.
They will be screened for al-
lergies and medication con-
flicts.
"We can't do it in patients
with active arrhythmia be-
cause they have no constant
interval between each
heartbeat, so you don't get a
good image," he said.
A person with a pace-
maker can have a cardiovas-
cular CT scan, but the
radiologist would work with
the person's cardiologist to
bring down the heartbeat
rate.
"We give beta-blockers
one hour before the test,"
DeGirolami said. "Ideally,
the heart rate would be
below 70. In three years, I
can count on my hand the


noon Mondays and Wednes-
days at Citrus County Audito-
rium in Inverness, hosted by
Citrus County Parks and Recre-
ation. Yoga is a combination of
exercise and meditation. It is an
excellent exercise for toning of
the muscles and is beneficial to
all, no matter what shape, size
or age.
Cost is $8 per class. Register
online at www.citruscountyfl.org
and click on Parks & Recre-
ation to register. Call 527-7677.


number of people we can't
get a heart rate below 70."
A lot of work takes place
before the patient gets his
one minute in the scanner
"You do the work up front
to get the good images on the
back end," DeGirolami said.
In three current major
studies, early detection is
showing effectiveness in de-
creasing morbidity and mor-
tality, he said.
"The earlier you detect
coronary artery disease, the
better chance of a good out-
come," DeGirolami said.
And stations have been
shown to be effective in
treatment.
For heart disease, early
detection and treatment
seems to make all the differ-
ence.
"People will have a better
lifestyle and spend less time
in the hospital," DeGirolami
said. "And there will be a sig-
nificant drop in the burden
on the health care delivery
system."


Everyone should restrict red meat
and processed meat consumption.


ate 5 ounces or less a week
Increased risk was slightly
higher in women than men.
Similarly, processed
meats such as hot dogs,
bacon and cold cuts in-
crease risk of cancers and
dying, but the risk is some-
what lower than red meat.
High intake of processed
meat increased mortality in
men by 16 percent and in
women by 25 percent.
The study was supported
in part by a grant from the
National Cancer Institute,
and the authors did not re-
port any financial disclo-
sures. The study is
extremely large and one of
its kind. It should be taken
seriously.
In an editorial comment
accompanying the report,
Barry M. Popkin, Ph.D., said
the findings lend further
support to physicians in ad-
vising their patients to con-
sume smaller amounts of
red and processed meats to
lower the risk of chronic
diseases and improve


covering the dish made it a
delight.
Speaking of food, another
of our marvelous discover-
ies is the Whole Foods Mar-
ket. The wide range of
wholesome organic foods of-
fered there at reasonable
prices is amazing. For the
health-oriented food con-
sumer, browsing through
this market is heavenly We
have already made it a habit
to pick up fresh produce
there several times a week.
There is much more of
San Antonio to discover
than I can mention in this
brief article, but a final
point worth making is the
gentle joy of discovering
San Antonio on foot. I have
not strolled along the fa-
mous River Walk yet, but I
enjoy taking a two-mile
walk early every morning.
Going in a different direc-
tion each day helps me be-
come better acquainted
with the city as I make small
discoveries along each
route. The novelty may wear


longevity.
The results also suggest
that popular high-protein
diets such as the Atkins diet
may reduce weight but do
not benefit the long-term
health of individuals if they
rely on red and processed
meats as important protein
sources, noted Dr. Popkin of
the University of North Car-
olina, Chapel Hill.
In short, everyone should
restrict red meat and
processed meat consump-
tion. White meat .can help,
and should be eaten in mod-
eration.

Dr Sunil Gandhi is a
hematologist and
oncologist. He is the
volunteer medical adviser
of the Citrus Unit of the
American Cancer Society.
Send questions or
comments to 521 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
FL 34461 or e-mail to
sgandhi@tampabay.rrcom
or call 746-0707.


off after a while, but the joy
of walking the city will re-
main constant
I look forward to learning
more about San Antonio, its
people and its colorful his-
tory Meantime, thank you,
San Antonio, for a warm and
gracious welcome.


Dr Ed Dodge is a retired
Inverness physician. Visit
his Web site, www.passion
forhealth.info.

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C6 "tIiM)AY, Ai'RI. 7, 2009


Yoga : .


Hps go. Knees go.


The only question is where will you go?


OPTIF -i




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CPage C7 TUESDAY, APRIL 7,2009



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Votes help
Humane Society
The photos are.in and the-
voting has begun for the
2009 Humane Society of Cit-
rus County Pet Photo Con-
test. Voting will end at
midnight Sunday. Vote by
going to www.humanesociety
citrus.com or votes can be
mailed to Humane Society of
Citrus County, P.O. Box
2283, Inverness, FL 34451.
Votes can also be dropped
off at the adoption center at
751 S. Smith Ave. in Inver-
ness. Be sure to tell us who
you are voting for when you
make your donation. All pro-
ceeds from this contest will
go toward the rescue of"
abandoned pets in the Citrus
County area.
Vote rates: $1 - one vote;
$5 - six votes (includes one
free); $10 - 12 votes (in-
cludes two free); $25 - 30
votes (includes five free); $50
- 60 votes (includes 10
free); $100 - 120 votes (in-
cludes 20 free).
Taste of Citrus
preps for 20th
Central Florida Community
College Foundation's 20th
annual Taste'of Citrus with
the theme "Taste for Suc-
cess" will be from 6 to 8:30
p.m. Sunday, Oct. 25, at the
Citrus Campus, 3800 S.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Tickets are $25 in advance or
$30 at the entrance. Tickets
can be purchased on line at
www.CFCCfoundation.org/ev
ents.
To date, Taste of Citrus
has raised approximately
$400,000 for scholarships for
local students to attend
CFCC.
For general event informa-
tion, call MaryLou Shevlin at
613-4290.
Museum hosts free
speaker series
The Old Courthouse-Her- .
itage Museum will host a free
public program in its Coffee
and Conversation Speaker
Series. At 10:30 a.m. Thurs-
day, Chef Haywood "Hap"
Hough, the culinary chef/in-
structor for the Withla-
coochee Technical Institute in
Inverness, will present Cook-
ing on a Shoestring.
Coffee and light refresh-
ments will be served. For
more information or to re-
serve your seat at this ses-
sion, contact Kathy Turner
Thompson at 341-6436. This
program is free and open to
the public.
Sign up for dinner
show in Hudson
The Beverly Hills Recre-
ation Association is selling
tickets to the Hudson Show
Palace Dinner Theatre's pro-
duction of "Thoroughly Mod-
ern Millie," written by Mel
Brooks, for Thursday. The
cost includes the show and a
hot buffet.
We will be carpooling. Be
at the parking lot 9:45 a.m. If
you are willing to drive, let us
know when you register by
calling 746-4882.


PET SPOTLIGHT
* The Chronic e invites
readers to submit
photos of their pets
cfor the daily Pet Spot-
light feature.
* Photos need to be in
sharp focus Include a
short description of
the pet and owners,
including.names and
hometowns.
* Photos cannot be re-
turned without a self-
Saddressed, stamped
envelope.
* Group photos of
more than two pets
cannot be prin't ed.-
* Send photos and in-
formation to Pet Spot-
light, c/o Citrus


County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River,
FL 34429.


Clowns yuk it up at Capitol


Special to the Chronicle by seniors, especially for
seniors.
Citrus Clowns, all-volun- Corporate sponsors dis-
. teer clown group, again per- play their information and
formed for the Florida wares with special empha-
Department of Elder Affairs sis for seniors.
Ambassadors for Aging Day A free barbecue lunch is
Celebration in March in Tal- provided.
lahassee at the Capitol During the event, Gov.
This annual event brings Charlie Crist gave a speech
some of Florida's senior cit- praising the accomplish-
izens together for a fun- ments of seniors, as did
filled day of entertainment other state dignitaries.


From left are: Jewels the
Clown aka Mary K. Hall;
Dr. Yar, aka Ray Thomp-
son; Sparklelet aka Sandy
Ferrell; Sunny aka Vicky
lozzia, with her puppet
boys, Little Sunny and Big
Sunny; and Gov. Charlie
Crist.
Special to the Chronicle


Citrus Clowns is the only
clown group to be invited
and to entertain at the event
Citrus Clowns has been fea-
tured in the Elder Update
newspaper and on their Web
site. -
For information, call Mary
K. Hall, director, Citrus
Clowns, at 628-3414.


Monthly fundraiser helps Big Brothers Big Sisters


Special to the Chronicle
Sondra, a Crystal River girl, was this month's winner of a new bicycle, provided by Crystal River Beef 'O'Brady's at its March Big Night
at Beef's, a monthly fundraising event for Big Brothers Big Sisters from 5 to 10 p.m. the third Thursday. The March event raised almost
$500 for BBBS. A bicycle is given away to a child each month, and drawing tickets are free to children who come by Beef 'O'Brady's at
6738 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway in Crystal River. For more information, call Beef 'O'Brady's at 564-0544 or Big Brothers Big Sisters at 344-
0400. Big Brothers Big Sisters served more than 200 children in 2008 in Citrus County, and helps children reach their full potential by
providing professionally matched and supported one-to-one mentoring relationships with measurable impact. From left are: Dan Heavrin,
owner, Beef 'O'Bradys; Sondra; and Sheree Monroe.


Chorale celebrates through music


g A s long as there is
music" was the
theme of this
year's Sugarmill Chorale
concert in celebration of the
group's 30 years.
Directed by Deb Allen,
with accompani-
ment of Rick
Dahlinger, and
featuring soloists
Marty Bachthaler
and Rick
Dahlinger and
guest musicians
William Gibson
on trumpet, Mon-
ica Keasey on pic- Ruth
colo and Rick
Yerkeson on AROUN
banjo, the added COMMI
audience partici-
pation was enthusiastically
applauded.
Filling the hall with music
has been a timeless forte of
the Chorale since its incep-
tion Music is the universal
language spanning the years
joyously with classics, patri-
otism, imaginative humor
and lasting appreciation of
the artistry it evokes.
Michael Newman served
as master of ceremonies. A
Brooklyn native, his
provocative jokes and in-


tended puns kept director
Allen wondering what he'd
do next.
The selection of "That's
Entertainment" was an apt
opening piece providing the
Chorale an opportunity to
shine. Fast paced
"Alexander's Rag-
time Band" was
proof of their ver-
satility.
Pinch hitting
.- ^ for an ill member,
Allen soloed with
the deeply mov-
ing and inspira-
Levins tional "God
.evs Calling," letting
4D THE the audience in
UNITY on a well-kept se-
cret, the magnifi-
cent vocal range of the
group's leader.
Monica Keasey's skill on
piccolo shone with the
Chorale's "Come to the
Music" piece.
The classic spiritual "Eli-
jah Rock" featured the tenor
section.
A highlight of the anniver-
sary performance was the
solo performance of "Moon-
struck Mozart," based on
"Einekleine Nachtmusic,"
performed and arranged by


Marty Bachthaler, a 13-year
Chorale accompanist. It was
a magical weaving of moon
songs evoking emotions of
sadness, joy, longing, tri-
umph and love. From "Full
Moon and
Empty Arms," Filling t
"Blue Moon,"
"Shine on Har- with I
vest Moon," "On
Moonlight Bay" has b
to "I'll Be Seeing timeleS
You," he skill-
fully brought us of the (
full circle and .
punctuated the SinC'
concert theme to
our delight. incep
"Make Mine
Country Style" complete
with square dance steps and
western hats was a spirited
version leading up to inter-
mission.
Afterward, that comical
emcee appeared as investi-
gator Colombo, dressed in a
familiar trench coat inquir-
ing, "The main thing is: Did
you enjoy our show?"
Several Chorale members
were given an opportunity to
direct the audience in a de-
lightful sing-along.
Rick Yerkeson, a 20-year
entertainer on the Delta


Queen entertained on banjo
with the classic banjo piece
"Alabama Bound" with
Bachthaler accompanying
'on piano.
We thrilled to the ladies


the hall
music
een a
ss forte
Chorale
e its
option.


ensemble "Dia-
monds Are a
Girl's Best
Friend" (what
large ' "dia-
monds" they
were wearing)
directed by
Sharon Dra-
heim.
Former mem-
bers were in-
vited to stand
and be recog-


nized by director Allen.
Amazingly, the Chorale
impersonated the various
orchestral instruments with
their voices in staccato with
the "William Tell Overture."
My favorite part of the
concert was the entertain-
ment showcase songs as
recorded by Frank Sinatra,
including "My Kind of
Town," "Young at Heart,"
"High Hopes," "Nice and
Easy" and "My Way."
Soloist Rick Dahlinger's
flawless performance of
"Malaguena," the original


"Penthouse Blue" and
"Polonaise" highlighted the
Chorale's concert mission to
provide diverse music of the
highest standard.
A special recognition vet-
erans Armed Forces salute
concluded this year's con-
cert as members of the
Chorale greeted their fans
in the lobby.
The concert was sponsored
by the Chronicle. The group's
elegant gold and black en-
sembles were handmade.
The Chorale promises
summer activities and enter-
tainment will be forthcom-
ing. Watch for announc-
ements in their sponsor the
Citrus County Chronicle or
by calling Director Allen at
(352) 697-2309. Experience
the Chorale. New members
welcome.
As long as-there is music...
as long as there is the Sug-
armill Chorale.-
---A---

Ruth Levins participates in
a variety ofprojects around
the community Let her
know about your group's
upcoming activities by
Writing to PO. Box 803,
Crystal River, FL 34423.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. N Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 563-3280; or e-mail to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


L
[

|










TUESDAY EVENING APRIL 7, 2009 c: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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E] PBS 0 3 3 14 6'G' Report (N) a (In Stereo) a first profiled in 1987. (N)'PG' s (DVS) on international bribery.'PG' Rhino" (N) (PA)'PG'
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NBC 8 8 News(N) NBC Nihty Entertainment Extra (N) 'PG' The Biggest Loser The contestants are faced with a temptation challenge. Law & Order: Secial Victims Unit News (N) The Tonight
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PHILLIP ALDER
SNewpaper Enterprise Assn.
Albert Einstein reportedly said,
"If the 'facts don't fit the theory,
change the facts."
Quite right too. Probably you
have been asked about a bridge
deal, and after giving your answer,
not the one your friend wanted, she
or he said, "Oh, no, hold on a mo-
ment. I have gotten the .hand
wrong."
When bidding, you hope to find a
good trump fit with your partner.
Normally you learn this when part-
ner raises your suit, but sometimes
it happens indirectly by partner-
ship agreement. A singular way to
show a love of partner's suit is by
using a splinter bid. If opener bids
one of a suit and responder makes
a double jump shift, he shows a big
fit for partner's suit, a singleton (or
void) in the bid suit, and at least
game-forcing values. Here, North's


Bridge :=====

North 04-07-09
V K Q 7 5
* 4
4 A 10 9 8 6
West East
S Q 9 4 4 J10 8 6 5
V J 10 3 2 V -
* K QJ J10 * 9 8 6 3 2
4 5 2 4 7 4 3
South
4 A 2
V A 9 8 6 4
* A75
4 K QJ
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both

South West North East
1 v. Pass 4 * Pass
4 NT Pass 5 * Pass
5 NT Pass 6 V Pass
7 V Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: * K


jump to four diamonds sends that
message. Now South, who can ruff
his low diamonds on the board,
uses -Blackwood before bidding,
seven hearts.
How would you plan the play
after West leads the diamond king?
There seem to be 13 tricks: two
spades, five hearts, one diamond
and five clubs. However, you must
draw trumps safely If the four
missing hearts are 2-2 or 3-1, there
isn't a problem. But what if they are
4-0?
If East has all four, you may
grumble about your bad luck. If
West has the four, though, you can
pick them up. After winning with
your diamond ace, cash your heart
ace, keeping dummy's queen and
king over West's 10 and jack
When East discards, lead
through West twice, picking up his
honors and making your grand
slam.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I COTTE


RYVETS|


NEWJUMBLE NINTENDOwww.jumble.com/ds
HERTIE
/ (
-" ^^" ^
b _ _ _


WHAT IT CAN MEAN
WHEN A HU5BANP
BRINGS HOME
FLOWE R.5
FOR "NO REAsON'.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A:(Answers tomorrow)
(Answers tomorrow)


ACROSS 36 Use poor
judgment
Denver hrs. 37 Eight bits
Nautical 38 Univ.
greeting degrees
Slangy 39 False
coffee 41 Hey, youl
Wallach or Lilly 43 Pass a law
First-century 47 Recipe means.
emperor 49. Saffron dish
Glen or dale 50 Envelope
immediately sealer
2 wds.) 53 Dislike
Popular cookie 55 Grandeur
High 56 Pull the lever
standards 57 Hang loosely
Natural resin 58 Dine
- Haute, Ind. 59 Big pitcher
Cold feet 60 Prizefighter's stat


24 UesK
compartment
28 Atom
fragment
30 Cool time
33 Campaign
money gp.
34 Exam choice
35 "- -,
old chap"


DOWN
Value
Playground
gear
Wild cat
Horn
Some layers
Galleon cargo


Answer to Previous Puzzle


FLUL ETOC MACE
TODO BLEACHED
WITHIT NESS
AAA AGE
LUE



O VERT SLUSHEYC
LARD PETS EEL
DIG OLEO WRAP
NOBLER BRASS
LID ROI1

CHATEAUS GLAE
BOTH ARE LIAR
SHOE HRS YA[E


7 Caterwaul
8 Vase, often
9 Bullring yell
10 Want-ad abbr.
13 Sotto -
15 Just barely


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


19 Olduvai loc.
22 Breezy
23 Send packing
25 Jungle
swingers
26 Kind of
merchandise
27 Neutral
color
29 Society
column word
30 Harmless lie
31 Cousin of
PDQ
32 Bonny miss
34 Juicy steaks
(hyph.)
39 Qt. parts
40 More
expensive
42 Dance move
- 44 Top choices
(hyph.)
45 Outer
garment
46 Ballroom num-
ber
48 Blacktop
49 Townshend or
Seeger
50 Family MDs
- 51 "Skip to
My--"
- 52 Ballpark figure
54 Oath


ear Annie: My I -
grandfather
molested me
when I was a child, and
I have been in therapy
much of my adult life
as a result. My entire
family has a disturbing
history of sexual abuse
and incest, passed
along from father to
son.
My youngest sister ANN
was molested by two of
my brothers, "Tim" and MAI
"Jim," when they were
teenagers. She told our parents
when it first occurred, but they
did nothing and continue to deny
our family history. She is in ther-
apy, but her life has been one bro-
ken relationship after another.
Last summer, my sister sent let-
ters to all the siblings disclosing
what happened to her. Tim apolo-
gized, but Jim won't talk about it
My sister refuses to directly con-


I.


front him. I'm not sure
Jim's wife is aware he
is an abuser They have
two grown daughters
and four young grand-
daughters.
Our parents' actions
encouraged an envi-
B ronment where inap-
\ propriate behavior
thrived. It seems to me
they should be the
(IE'S ones to tell their
daughter-in-law, so she
LBOX can talk to her kids.
However, my parents
haven't demonstrated responsi-
bility in the past and probably
won't now. Isn't there a possibility
Jim may have molested his own
daughters and granddaughters?
How does incest end? What can
we do? - Dysfunctional in Utah
Dear Utah: There is more than
a possibility that your brother has
abused his daughters and grand-
daughters, especially since he is


unrepentant about what he did to
your sister. Although she should
be the one to inform Jim's wife, if
she is unwilling, we hope you will
speak up. You have a moral obli-
gation to protect those children.
Dear Annie: If "Pennsylvania
Innkeeper" does not consider the
shampoo, conditioner and hand
lotion to be items that the guests
purchase each day with their
room charges, then he should
offer them for sale, like items in a
mini-bar.
Frankly, as much as hotel
rooms cost, these items should be
for the guests to keep whether
they use them that day or donate
them to a shelter
I hope I never have the misfor-
tune to stay in that cheapskate's
establishment - Memphis, Tenn.
Dear Memphis: You weren't the
only one who felt this way. Sev-
eral readers wished we had
printed the name of the place so
they could steer clear.


Today's HOROSCOPE


Your Birthday: You have the talent to
attempt several ambitious undertakings
at the same time, and you might do so in
the year ahead.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - In your
haste to move ahead quickly, you could
take on something you're ill-prepared to
handle.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - Unless you
have no choice, avoid all types of risky
ventures and undertakings. Do not ex-
pect something for nothing.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Some
days, it's extremely difficult to please
anyone, especially those close to you -
but give it your best shot anyway.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - If you find
yourself a bit more loquacious than


usual, be careful not to reveal something
meant for not just anyone's ears.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Lock the barn
doors early in the day when it comes to
spending your money - or more will
have escaped than you intended.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Stay self-di-
rected, and don't let others tell you what
to do and how to do it.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Be careful
not to leave anything up to chance that
could adversely affect your work or job.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - Be careful
not to be drawn into a petty situation be-
tween two friends that has nothing to do
with you.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -Al-
though your ambitions may be ad-


mirable, owing to poor planning, tactics
or procedures, you could get thrown off
track quite easily. Think carefully.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - It be-
hooves you to listen to advice or sugges-
tions offered by associates, but follow
your own common sense, as well.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -This is
not the time to make unwarranted
changes in your financial affairs, espe-
cially if they are running smoothly or
doing as well as can be expected.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - There are
times when we all react poorly and pro-
voke the opposite of what we intended. If
a friend should do so, be diplomatic as to
how you handle the situation and forgive
him or her.


F-
LU
(D I
O0


co
0�

w>.


z CC
>
Iz 0




o







IA


1
4
8 !
11
12 F
13 G
14 I
(
16 P
17 H
s
18 N
20-
21 C


� 2009 by NEA, Inc.


_ I~I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C8 TUESDAY, APRIL. 7, 2009


ENTERTAINMENT












CIfRIJS COUNTY (FL) C'HRoNICLE COMICS TUESDAY, APR11. 7, 2009


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


IS IT, FAYE! I CAN FEEL IT! " THIS IS THE YEAR M UH, THE ENTIRE CLASS CAN HEAR YOU.
I FINALLY BEAT MOM
AT HER OWN EASTER SGH...AT LEAST IT DIDbN SOUND
NGAEN I iB NANY WEIRDER OUT OF CONTEXT
Y i Fr ' THAN IN CONTEXT


Dilbert


DO YOU WANT TO
LAY OFF THE HIGHLY
SKILLED, WHINY
JERK WHO IS TOXIC
TO THE WORKPLACE
OR...






The Born Loser


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Doonesbury

CANI57 NO, OKAY! THENI' JUST ABSOLUTELY.
YOU 5OME- 6000 LT You TWo eET TO YOUI X won lrAY
r1AO nTO S S ,nS KNOW ONE ANOTHER! OR. A ,L'Ai HI










Big Nate


I CAM'T FORGET
BELIEVE ABOUT IT,
ARTUP TEDDY WE'LL
BAILED HIT THE BIG
ON US' TIME EVEN
---WITHOUT ARTUR







Arlo and Janis -


"TWIST WAIT. '
AND WE'RE PLAY-
SHOUT ING 'TWIST
AND SHOUT"?
YES, WE'RE
PLAYING
'TWIST AND
SHOUT"!

IIil


I WAS
PLAYING I THOUGHT
THE WE WERE
THEME JUST DOING
FROM A SOUND
KUNG - CHECK.
FU
CRl IPIEE


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"MARIARET LIKES TO TALK Tl"IN&S OVER...
...ANPOVER.., ANP OVEI !"


"I hope the passengers got their
seat backs and tray tables into
an upright position!"


Betty
HOWU DO YOU

c\ i CH KNIFe? ./s WHAT SIUSEV 6irPOZN


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"Fast and the Furious" (PG-13) Noon, 2:30 p.m., 5
p.m., 7:45 p.m. No passes.
"The Haunting in Connecticut" (PG-13) 12:20
p.m., 2:40 p.m., 5:05 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Monsters vs. Aliens" (PG) 12:10 p.m., 2:35 p.m.,
4:55 p.m., 7:20 p.m. No passes.
"Knowing" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Duplicity" (PG-13) 12:40 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"Race to Witch Mountain" (PG) 12:15 p.m., 2:45
p.m., 5:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Fast and the Furious" (P-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"The Haunting in Connecticut" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:50., 10:15 p.m.


"12 Rounds" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40
p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Monsters vs. Aliens" (PG) 1 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 4
p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:25 p.m., 9:55
p.m. No passes.
"Knowing" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"Duplicity" (PG-13) 1:05 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.
"I Love You Man" (R) 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:25
p.m.
"Race to Witch Mountain" (PG) 1:10 p.m., 4:10
p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:35 p.m.


Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious
WXCV-FM 95-3 Adult
Contemporary


Local RADIO


WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious
WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies


WIFL-FM 104.3 Adult Mix
WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: G equals D


"BK AJXN WHKK DJHXKCZKX DW NPK


PDMK NPTN NPK XKT BRCC KZKH HKXN.


BK AJXN CKTHE ND XTRC RE PRIP


BREGX."


- PTEAKH M. IHTEN


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Moses Kiptanui... the nineteen-year-old Kenyan, who turned
twenty a few weeks ago." - Commentator David Coleman
(c) 2009 by NEA, Inc. 4-7


Peanuts


Cathy


YOU MADE AN I'M SORRY, SIR,
ABSOLUTE FOOL JUST TELL ME HOW YOU
OF YOURSELF WANT METOACTANP
T !I'LL IT


E
S... THE PLEASANT BUT
INCOMPETENT GUY
WHO WILL LEAD US
TO RUINATION?


Frank & Ernest


Today's MVI ES


TUESDAY, APl'u 7, 2009 U9


COMICS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










010 TwnYI.la, A 20oC C F H L


Get real
I see the budget-cutting
county commission is slap-
ping the face of the taxpay-
ers again. Never any
mention of taking $5 million
or $10 million out of the
sheriff's budget. The sheriff
seems to be sainted here in
this county. He can spend
and spend and spend. Never
will they mention touching
that budget. It's super-in-
flated. What about his
$100,000-a-year attorney?
Does he need that? What
about all these high-paid of-
ficials? Nobody talks of any-
body getting a pay cut. How
about making everybody pay
for their own health insur-
ance? How much would that
save the county? Everybody
else has to pay for their own
insurance. Why should the
government get a free ride?
Let's get real.
Boo to you
I live in Chassahowitzka.
For the past couple of
months I've been getting
county water. I had no prob-
lem when I had well water.
Now in the newspaper,
(March 25), I've been ad-
vised to boil my water. Now
that's extra electric I'm pay-
ing for, plus the sewage,
plus the water. It's about
$100 difference a month
from last year. Is that fair to
me? Boo to you people who
voted for water and sewage.
Corrupt country
What a corrupt country
we live in. All you big offi-
cials think that you can get
away with everything se-
cretly, and you do. Agricul-
tural means you must have
animals on your property.
Does Dean have animals on
his property? And it has to
be a business. No, he does
not. Therefore, that is not
agricultural property. I had
agricultural property when I
moved into my place on
Cardinal Street ... Right


after that, they took the
agricultural away from me
and I was told the reason
they took it away. Agricul-
tural means animals on
your property ...
Love God, but ...
Listen, I'm an American
and proud of it. But when I
tell you this, I think we're all
going to be disgusted. But I
have to say one thing: I ap-
plied for food stamps and
they want to give me $10. I
applied for help from
Medicare and they want to
give me about $500 or
$600. The only thing is, I'm
not looking for charity. I
served my country and
everything else. I've never
been in jail. You know, the
government went after AIG,
which, OK, that was good
and they stopped them. But
why don't the government
stop the churches, the
churches that give food to
the poor people and help
give them money. They
don't do nothing ... I love
God, but let me tell you,
these churches can spend
millions of dollars but they
give us 5 cents ...

Nuclear queries
Nobody seems to know
what the fault modes are for
the local nuclear power
plant. If they have a melt-
down or other catastrophe,
will there be a big explosion,
a deadly gas leak or what? I
live downwind and most of
the time when they sound
the alarm on Friday, I don't
hear it. And the second ques-
tion: Where can we find out
if there's ever been a release
of radioactivity? If things go
as planned, this area will be
one of the largest nuclear
power centers in the United
States. A reliable source
needs to provide these an-
swers to the public.

Looks good to leave
How much money has Cit-


rus County paid out in sev-
erance packages during the
history of the county ad-
ministrator? Perhaps this is
something that should be '
left off future packages.
Also, maybe the salary is
slightly too high. It does not
appear we can keep these
men very long, and the sev-
erance package appears to
be very attractive for depar-
ture.
Real culprits
I'd like to thank you for
Cal Thomas' article on
March 25. I'd just like to
add something to his sug-
gestion. They were trying to
divert our attention from the
real culprits in Washington,
specifically the Barney
Franks, the Nancy Pelosis
and the Chris Dodds. Yes,
that should be addressed.
But I think that all those rep-
resentatives who voted for
the package without reading
the bill and authorized these
AIG bonuses without read-
ing the bill should have to
rescind their raises. We
should not be paying our
representatives for not doing
their job. They're no better
than the AIG people who
took the bonuses.
Get well, Mito
This is for Mito, the
deputy K9 dog. Get well
soon, buddy. We need you.
Love, kisses.
Street to nowhere
Somewhere around a year
ago, just up the street from
where I live, bulldozers and
tree-removal equipment
came into the area and took
out a swath of trees and un-
derbrush some 40 or 50 foot
wide and proceeded to make
a new graveled street
through the wetlands. I
would like to know just what
this street is to be used (for).
It's been finished now about


eight months now and it is
now just a path through the
weeds that have grown up
through the gravel. There has
been three street signs in-
stalled, all of which have
been stolen. The last one
stolen was just last week.
The street name was Boon-
docks Point. Can anyone tell
me why this street was made
or was it to keep up with the
times, a street to nowhere, or
was it just another way to
spend our tax money?
Practice, practice
... President Obama and
his health care plan. It
sounds to me like the
United States government
wants to practice medicine.
I suggest that we all start
practicing law.
Expand bus route
Citrus County's having
this new bus transportation
route and I would like to see
it expanded to go to Crystal
River and have an evening
run, maybe one day a week
on a Saturday, going out to
Crackers area, Citrus Av-
enue, and then stop at the
mall. And maybe, like, leave
the Inverness area around 7
and'come back around mid-
night on a Saturday. Maybe
from the fairgrounds, peo-
ple that want to go watch a
race could take a bus to the
racetrack, stop at Stump-
knockers. Other people
could get off at Walmart,
then you've got the Supper
Club and the Manatee bowl-
ing alley ...
Green, green grass
When I moved to Florida I
had Bahia grass - or what I
call "pasture grass" - put
down. I watered it every
night the first week, but in
the 11 years since then, I've
never, ever watered it. Dur-
ing dry spells, it looks a lit-
tle brown, like the


SoundOFF


more-expensive lawns. The
difference being, just a little
bit of rain brings it back to
a lovely green. People, make
wise choices. Do you want
to look out and see pretty
grass or do you want a
drink of water?

Abuse of power?
Why is it OK for our fed-
eral legislators to have a
conference at a five-star re-
sort in Virginia? Why is it OK
for our president to fly there
on Air Force One and then
fly to Ohio, California, Illi-
nois, etc.? Why is this not
OK for CEOs but no prob-
lem for government offi-
cials? Why do Republicans
abuse their power when
they are in power? Why do
Democrats abuse their
power when they are in
power? Why do people not
understand that our country
will never get straightened
out until we hold legislators
to term limits? Because
they know they can abuse
the system, us, and still get
re-elected without term lim-
its - that's why.

Piece of the pie
See, it's like this: The gov-
ernment, they're not against
gambling; they're just
against not getting a piece
of it, like the lottery tickets
that's supposed to support
our schools. How come we
have one of the worst
schools and they're always
still crying for money, but
everybody buys lottery tick-
ets. And I think they want to
have gambling, but only if
the state can have their piece
of it, see. So these potluck
dinners, these church chari-
ties, they don't like that be-
cause they don't get their
fingers in the pot. When are
you people going to wake up
and realize our government
is corrupt. Just check out
Barney Frank and Chris
Dodd and Nancy Pelosi.
They're all getting rich ...


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds.


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Chronile Crn FreeOffes Los Annunceent] cemee0y Peronal

Concto I- r _ c L -nj I Lts/-ypts Beauy_-I


ALONE?
Senior Dating Bureau
SAFEST since 1977 Ages
45-90. 1-800- 922-4477
(24hrs) or
log onto: Respected
Dating.cam
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NOT/CE what's going on in your community.
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> Adoptions


(:1 iRpNicI.E


Find out about public notices in:
Citrus' County Chronicle
Or search online of:
www.floridapublicnotices.com


SSudoku ****** 4puz.co2m


6 945 5 6 2








4 5
2 _ 12 9









571 _ _




51 3 2 5
Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


I LOVE YOU DEARLY JU-
LIE
SINCERELY AND SO
TRULY.
FOR OUR 20TH
ANNIVERSARY
I'LL GET YOUR COORS
LITE
AND YOUR COOLEE. I
LOVE YOU, AJ
Retired Caucasian
Gentleman seeks
companionship with an
attractive, Intelligent
Lady. Ethnicity/Age Is no
problem. Will consider
sharing my home with
an acceptable person,
Blind Box 1540p
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429
SWM, 57, Looking for a
lasting relationship.
Enjoys outdoor
activities and boating
& fishlng.making crafts,
flea markets,
Looking for a SWF
slim to medium 45-57.
Bob (352) 563-0627
Widower, Male, 60's,
would like to meet nice
lady for long term
relationship.
Respond to:
Blind Box 1541P
Citrus County Chronicle
106W. Main St.
Inverness, Florida 34450



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
CASH PAID all
vehicles.Trades welcome
Used PARTS avail
352-628-9118
WANTED
Junk Lawn Mowers
& Power Quip.
Free Pick-up (352)
564-8014/601-5053
3Us out zoomcitrus.com



(2) PUPPIES
Medium size.
352-302-6377
Excell. Home for any
unwanted birds, poultry
U-R unable to care for
726-9874


Female adult tabby cat
spayed and litter
trained, call 601-5592
Free Rabbit/Chicken
Cages
Kinda Beat Up But The
Work
Take All.
352-220-4171
Free to a good home 4
year old male dog. Neu-
tered, dark brown, white
and black in color, goes
by snuggles. He is a
barker(good for protec-
tion) please call
352-860-3184 located in
Inverness highland area.
HAMMOND ORGAN
30 yrs old good cond. has
a few superficial
wear & tear, w/bench
(352) 726-7886
HAVE SOMETHING TO
GIVE AWAY?
Place your
ad 24 hrs a day.
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
1 Select Place an Ad
2 Create an Account
3 Select Cust. type
4 Select Heading of
Special Notices
5 Select Free
6 Create Ad
LAB/BOXER MIX
Female, very good with
kids, appx. 1 year old.
(352) 410-6381 or
352- 601-0722
Sugar Gliders babies for
sale to a good home
must have large cage
352-628-0645



2 YELLOW LABS
Lost of vicinity at corner
of Hwy 40 & 41
(352) 489-6921 or
(954) 803-6592


$400 REWARD
Lost Yellow Lab
male. March 20th
Citrus Springs - Deltona
& Elkam
352-228-7893


KElN l O,.US I iMLE
BLACK LAB IN BEV-
ERLY HILLS OFF S.
DESOTO ST. LAST
SEEN BY BANK OF
AMERICA. WEARING
CAMO COLLAR.
PLEASE CALL 220-4171
OR 220-4928.
Lost Black Lab/ Mix,
male
Citrus Springs area
302-7100
MINIATURE POODLE
3 yrs old Apricot with
blondhish hints. Her
name is Foxy. Lost in
Beverly Hills corner of
Harrison & Roosevelt.
(352) 601-0279



FEMALE GOLDEN
RETRIEVER
Found on Luary Terrace
Highlands In Inverness
(352) 344-1528
FOUND BIRD
Inverness
Near Dawson Drive
Call to identify
637-1954
NIKE FLIP FLOP
Size 9/10, white insole,
black tread. Wallace
Brooks Park.
352-341-6218



r Bank Probate
Divorces /Evictions
352-613-3674
3/2 HUD Homel $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704





www.adopta
rescued net.com
View available pets on
our websile or call
(352) 795-9550
Adoption Locations
PET SUPER MARKET
every Saturday 11-2p
Inverness
MERCANTILE BANK
Inverness
April 20th Monday
12-2prn


Top Hat Airport
Serv.352-628-4927
Rates for Tampa Int.
$75 & Orlando $85
w/some restrictions
/us out zoomcitrus.com















LIFE & HEALTH
I INSURANCE
SLONG TERM CARE
* LIFE SETTELMENTS
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com
CAT
ADOPTIONS


Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A till 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4
All Cats and Kittens are al-
tered, tested for Feline Luk
and Aids. Up to date on
vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofspha.org.
or stop by our offices at
1149 N Conant Ave. Comer
of 44 and Conant.
Look for the big white build-
ing with the bright paw
prints.


2 Crypts + 1 Interment
at Fero's Memorial
Gardens, Beverly Hills F1
Mausoleum Bldg. # C
garden side , 4th level
Value $12,300 asking
S9,800. Call Bob
1-(718) 894-6804



A FREE Report of Your
Home's Value
www.naturecoast




TEACHER ASST'S
F/T & P/T
Exp., CDA preferred.
Substitutes needed.
Bright Beginnings
Preschool. 795-1240












//e


HAIR STYLIST
F/T, Immed.
Openings, Call Sue
352-628-0630



Uve-In Caretaker
Hernando area for eld-
erly blind man light
housekeeping & meals
(352) 560-3153/ aft 5pm



BUSY GYN OFFICE
LOOKING FOR:
Medical
Receptionist
Medical Assistant
One year experience
Proactive, skills to
work under stress
Please tax resume to:
352-564-8201
CHIROPRACTIC
ASSISTANT
Responsible, caring
Individual needed to
provide TLC to patients
In chiropractic office.
(352)726-1557
CNA PREP CLASSES
EZ Learning Services
For Information 352-
586-2715; 586-2716
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
CNA TEST PREP
Now Offering Day
& Evening Classes
352-341-2311
Scholarships Available
Full Time
Lic. Lab Tech &
Phlebotomist.
For busy Physician
Lab. Competitive
Salary & Benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 746-6333


Your World
ej94449. mfeJ


C.ko ....


Under limit
I agree with the article in
the Sound Off titled "Blame
the teens." The last sen-
tence states, and I quote, "I
don't see any old people
getting tickets for driving
carelessly." Naturally you
will not get a ticket for driv-
ing carelessly, because you
drive 35 mph in a 55 mph
zone. That's why you don't
get any tickets. You go 20
under the limit.
Have a ball!
To respond to the person
who called in "What free-
dom?" Right on. Maybe if
we build a barn, all of the
organizations can have their
meetings there and we can
have potluck, 50/50, casino
night. Let's really make it
legal. All of us dress up as
cows, chickens, whatever.
What a ball we would have.
Freedom question
I enjoyed reading "What
freedom?" in Sound Off. I
was thinking the same thing
while reading it. We ordi-
nary citizens are strictly
governed, but government
officials can do as they
please, like build a house
with a barn attached with-
out permits. What kind of
farming goes on there? I've
never seen any. I'm curious.
We need post office
Well over 30 years ago,
the Post Office Department
- as it was known then -
was told it was top-heavy
with management people;
too many supervisors for
the number of workers.
They ignored the finding of
an independent analysis
they had asked for. ... Now
they want to cut service and
lay off delivery people. A lot
of people still depend on
the post office because they
don't have a computer or
even a phone. If we had
money for AIG, why not
bailout the post office?.


C. .., i iE �,-. . V- I-
"8 , 9 6! !': �^

S---1- -' .---
Sislz-. Z!i9 "1t:f'S;6
z~t~i�:Z1T .SiG
T i T 6 ,1 9,


OPINION


CITRus CouNYr (FL) CHRONICLE


010 TUESDAYAPRIL 7 2 9











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


m
Home Health
Agency needs
RN & LPN

Exp. preferred.
Excellent pay.
352-596-4205

LPN/MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Experience needed.
Please send resume to
P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447

MEDICAL
RECEPTIONIST

F/T for busy office.
Experience req'd.
Knowledge of
Visionary Medical
Systems is a plus
Must possess
excellent customer
service skills & have
ability to muti - task,
Salary based upon
experience.
Non-Smoking
Environment
Mail Resume to:
Blind Box 1512P
C/O Citrus County
Chronicle, 106 W.
Main St. Inverness, FL
34450

NURSING
SUPERVISOR
HOME HEALTH

We are seeking a
Nursing Supervisor for
Home Health. Ideal
candidate will have
a current FL RN
license, completion
of an accredited
school of professional
nursing, BSN
preferred. Current
FL driver's license and
automobile liability
Insurance. One-two
years current
med/surg experi-
ence, one year prior
home health
experience.
Supervisory experi-
ence preferred.
Please apply online
www.citrusmh.com.
CMHS Is an EOE.

Veterinarian
Receptionist

Must have outstand-
ing organizational
skills, busy phones &
superior customer
service skills,
Veterinarian
experience &
resume a must.
Please Call
352-843-8387
to
Arrange for an
Interview





P/T BARTENDER

Apply in Person
10131 N. Citrus Ave.
New applicants only
The Loft Bar & Grill


A/C SERVICE
TECHNICIAN

With Florida's Lead-
ing Carrier Residential
Dealer, Must have
experience In
residential service &
replacement,
Benefits Include:
Health Insurance
401K. vacation & sick
days, commissions,
Apply at BAY AREA
AIR CONDITION
8021 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy Crystal River
Phone 352-795-2665
Electrician
Short term 6-8 wks.
Fax resume 726-7723
EXP'D TOW TRUCK
OPERATOR

Class A CDL
Clean driving record
a must. Mon - Fri
Advance Towing
(352) 400-0360
Experienced Pet
Groomer needed for
busy veterinary hospi-
tal. Part-time initially,
full time as business
grows. Start immedi-
ately. Please send re-
sume with references to
animaldoc24z
@yahoo.com
PLASTERER &
TENDER

Call between 9a-4p
352-302-1240
ROOFERS NEEDED
Immed. Own tools.
6771 N. Florida Ave.
Hernando 10a-12p




$$600 Weekly
Potential$$$

Helping The
Government PT. No
Exp., No Selling. COST
Call:1-888-213-5225
Ad Code A-73




******
APPOINTMENT
SETTERS

Want to join a
winning team? Very
busy office looking for
serious minded people.
Call Steve @
352-628-0254

MAINTENANCE
PERSON

Experienced
preferred.
Apply in person
Best Western
Crystal River

PRO-SHOP
HELP WANTED

Golf exp. a plus.
Apply in person.
D/F/W/P EOE
El Diablo Golf &
Country Club
No Phone Calls


mUU
NMnONAL 9UAIO
Secure Your Future
Call your local recruiter!
SSG Rodney Medina
(352)-586-8526
RODNEY MEDINA@
US.ARMY.MIL
1-800-GO-GUARD.COM
















































Hair Salon, Gift Shop
Retiring, 8 yrs. exc.
Low rent $30K all
(352) 422-7190
JOB FAIRN

Worried about
the Economy?
Supported by
a $10 billion+
Global Company,
you Can be in
business for Yourself
but not by Youiself
Minimal start up
.cost 50% Commis-
sion to Start
Unlimited earning
potential

Join Gina on
Thurs, April 9th
From 6pm-8pm
Citrus County
Chronicle 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL
Any questions?
Call me or e-mail:
gina~starr@live.com
Gina Starr, Ind.
AVON Rep.
352-228-2648
See you there!
AVON i
the 1s tme!mi


Restaurant For Sale
An established
profitable franchise in
Crystal River. $240K.
(352) 746-6596




MERLE NORMAN
COSMETIC STUDIO
Crs. Riv. Sweetbay PIz
(352) 795-9542







1--

25x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry Door, 2 Vents,
4" Concrete Slab.
$14.895. INSTALLED
30x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
2 Vents. 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$16.795. INSTALLED
35x50x12(3:12 pitch)
Roof overhang,
2-10x10 Rollup Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$30.995 Installed
+ Fl. Engineered Plans
+ A local Fl Manufact.
* Meets or exceeds
Florida wind codes.
+ Conc/Inst by others.

METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
LIc # CBC 1256991
www. metal
structureslic.com
Flex Space 400+Sq. ft.
areas of warehouse/
affordable & secure. (352)
400-4295

SSheds & arages of
I Any Size I
I *SHEDS NOW* I
We Move & Buy
I Used Sheds
I Independence/41 I





Wooden Hangers
(50)
advertising hangers
Good cond, $100.
obo(352) 726-3631




A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
4 2 Ton $780.00
4 2-'/ Ton $814.00
4 3 Ton $882.00
* Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Free Del. Lic.#CAC
057914 746-4394

ABC Briscoe Appl.
Refrig., washers, stoves.
Serv. & Parts
(352) 344-2928


CLASSIFIED



Double Sink
stainless w/delta faucets.
& Garbage Disposal.
$45.00
Dishwasher
Whirlpool, Black/white.

(352) 476-2267
KENMORE
WASHER/DRYER SET
Transferrable warranty,
$275 cash (352)
489-4495
Micro Wave
GE Space maker, X- Lg
over counter. White.
$30.00
Electric Range
Whirlpool, black/white,
self cleaning. $70.00
(352) 476-2267
RANGE
Gas, 30" very clean,
works great $135
(352) 563-2385
REFRIGERATOR
Hot Point, side by side,
24 c.f., white Indoor, ice
& water rmaker. Brand
new w/warranty. Exc.
cond. $350
(352)527-2408
Refrigerator
Kenmore, Almond side
by side, ice maker. 25 cu.
ft. 8 yrs. old. $300.
Stove, Whirlpool almond,
black ceramic cook top,
self cleaning w/range
hood. 8 yrs. old. $200.
(352) 795-0918




OFFICE DESK Has cast-
ers for easy moving, 2 file
drws and 2 reg drws,
$125 352-860-0444




2 bench grinders,
1-3/4HP, $35. 1 box
hand tools, $30
Call 8-10AM or 6-8PM
(352) 344-1310
110/20 GAL. AIR COM-
PRESSOR Horizonal On
Wheels $95.00 464-0316
220/20 GAL. HORI-
ZONAL AIR COMPRES-
SOR With Hoses
$140.00 464-0316
ANTIQUE HAND
TRUCK Wood & Steel
With Heavy Duty Rubber
Tires $45.00 464-0316
CRAFTSMAN 10" RA-
DIAL SAW & DELTA
ROCKWELL BANDSAW
RADIAL SAW WITH 10
GALLON WOOD
VACCUM, AT-
TRACTMENT AND VER-
TICAL BAND SAW
BOTH FOR $120.00
542-7110
DeWalt 1/2" SR drill, like
new, $35. Milwaukee
saws all, exc. cond.,
new blade, $35
Call 8-10AM or 6-8PM
(352) 344-1310
ELECTRIC SAWS
Craftman miter. Delta
Band 9" both on stands
$60. each
(352) 527-9415
HUSKEE CONCRETE
MIXER - Like new. $200
352-628-6585


ENTERTAINMENT CTR
Light wood w/Glass cab.
below and tape/dvd stor-
age on both ends. $75
352-860-0444
ONE VISONIK 10 INCH
SUBWOOFER works
great, well kept, no box,
just speaker.$20
795-6481
PHILLIP SURROUND
SOUND Digital Center.
5 speakers & sub-wolfer
$50. 352-726-9708
Television
32' Sony, HD. Needs
repair. $200. Make offer.
(352) 637-0654
TV 25 inch Magnavox
color TV. $99.00
352-726-2278

2 EPI and 2 KLH
speakers. All work great
for surround sound, good
for stereo.$100 795-6481



2-5 GAL. CONTAINERS
OF FLOOR ADHESIVE
$20.00 each or $35.00
for both 464-0316
Kitchen Cabinets
Custom formica w/inlaid
doors. Comes w/micro
wave, hood, countertop &
3 well sink & faucets.
$750.(352)382 -2904







Computer
New. $299
7" GPS System. $200.
(352) 628-2007
DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts up
grades. Visa $299MCard
352-637-5469
www.rdeeii.com
GUITAR HERO III LEG-
ENDS OF ROCK for
PS2.works great.comes
with disc and wireless
guitar.$30 795-6481
LEXMARK FAX MA-
CHINE works great with
phone on the side.$20
795-6481
PS2 bigger black ver-
sion, works great.$40
795-6481



SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic inch
S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered Hooker
headers. New Gangster
white walls, seat in all
leather bilk ostrich skin,
Paint by Jesse James
painter of Calf., w/Double
Damon signature, House of
Color paint, Blk w/colored
ghost flames on all sheet
metal. 2" Carlini handle
bars. Chrome to max, This
g fboy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for nice
tractor w/bucket or bobcat
etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815


2 Window Air
Conditioners $45. ea.
I Sump water pump
$50.
(352) 344-2062 or
(352) 344-8905
5 pc. wrought Iron
Patio Set grape design
$400. Ozite Carpet,
12 x 30 green $35.
(352) 344-2062 or
(352) 344-8905
GLASS TOP PATIO TA-
BLE White whicker base.
$25.00 No chairs.
352-341-4118
PATIO FURNITURE
Weather and fade resist-
ant woven resin loveseat,
2 chairs, coffe table and
matching cushions. $375
352-860-0444




2 DRESSERS antique
mahogany.excel.cond.
$200@ 352-697-5524
2, Camping Grills
Table top $35.00 each.
(239) 229-2643
4 Dinette Chairs
Floral design
on casters
$125.
(352) 854-8598
42" Round
Oak Pedestal Table
& 4 chairs $250.
352-586-8576,
or 352-527-3176
9-DRAWER DRESSER,
W MIRROR, MATCHING
NIGHT TABLE $80 for
set 352-746-7680
Area Rug 5.5 X 7'
$40.00
Patio Set
7 piece PVC w/umbrella.
$150.00 Obo.
(239) 229-2643
BEAUTIFUL LEATHER
COUCH, LOVESEAT
& Recliner. Dark green
from Grace Nicole.
KITCHEN SET
42" rd oak w/ 18" leaf &
4/chairs. All $500.00
352-527-4108
BEDROOM SET Queen
white headboard, with
frame, dresser, mirror
and boxspring/mattress
$350.00 cell phone
802-578-7932
BEDS
King mattress, box spr-
ing. Complete & clean,
$99. Queen mattress,
box spring. Clean. $99
352-794-3826

BROYHILL
Oval dining room
table & 6 chairs, China
Cabinet good cond,
$500.(352) 344-8291
Custom oak
Entertainment Center,
like new, will hold 42"
flat screen cost $1,500
asking $525. 795-0494
Dining Rm. Table
& 5 Chairs,
drk. wood finish
$175
(352) 628-9485


FU


TUESDAY, As


twinsize, excellent condi-
tion $200. phone
1352-257-9462
Dining Room Set
Pine w/tle top, bench +

Bedroom Set Queen, 6
pce. wood, marble look.
$95.(352) 249-6800
DINING ROOM TABLE
Older, drop leaf oak with
two chairs in excellent
condition. $135
352-634-2253
DINING SET FOR 4
AND BAKERS RACK
neutral, modem glass &
metal like new $175
352-613-2712
DINNING ROOM SET
Solid Wood 5 foot table
with 2 leafs, 6 chairs and
brand new cushions.
Light brown pine.
Build to last. $350.00
Cell phone 802-578-7932
DRESSER drawer
dresser 49x16x30
$50 phone
352-527-3463
Electric Bed
After 10am (352)
382-4456
Entertainment Center
light wood, 3 shelves,
cabinet underneath
for CD's $80.
(352) 302-7824
ENTERTAINMENT CEN-
TER Solid cherry, beau-
tiful, holds up
to31" tv. 3pcs.$100e.
352-410-0891
four poster full size bed
cream color $170. phone
352-257-9462
Futon Bed
Black Metal, $75.00
OBO. (352) 249-6800
Micro Wave Cabinet.
$35.00. (352) 249-6800
FUTON new & wooden
w/iupgrades.$200
352-804-4818
HUTCH Older, 1940's
dark oak with lighted cab-
inet in excellent condition.
$175 352-634-2253
KITCHEN SET
Oak tbi w/20" leaf & 4
upholst. swivel chairs on
castors $300. TV/Printer
Stand, Lt wood,
w/1 shelf 2-door storage
$65 (352) 697-9906
LARGE ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
Light wood, with or
without TV. $500/obo
352-422-4560
MIRRORED DRESSER,
blond wood 8-drawer
$350; Pink velvet chair,
$25; Wicker Table, small,
white $20. all in exc.
cond. (352) 527-6807
MODERN IKEA BIRCH
AND COTTON SOFA
cream, easycare cush-
ions $150 352-465-6551


ORIENTAL DINING
ROOM SET, SOUTH-
WESTERN DINING
SET, Queen size
Sleep Comfort adjust-
able bed orig.3000.00
asking 800.00 or best
offer, oriental dining
set(must see to ap-
preciate). Call
352-257-1178


'RIL 7, 2009 C11




the 70's. $100 795-6481
Modern Key West Style
RATTAN & PRINT SOFA
$275 352-613-2712
NEW twin
daybed/mattress.white
ironrod frame.$175@
352-697-5524
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Wants Your Business
Tues.-Frt. 9-5 Sat. 9-1
Homosassa 628-2306
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40.Qn
$50; Kg $75. 628-0808
RECLINER Lazy Boy,
Exc condition, also a
rocker. 85.00
352-410-0891
RECLINER/MASSAGE
CHAIR Blue, with full
control panel.
Great buy $80.
352-410-0891
YOUR FURNITURE
DONATIONS
SUPPORTS THE PATH
HOMELESS SHELTER
Call (352) 746-9084



4 weed wackers, $10
2 prs. loping cutters,
$10 ea.
Call 8-10AM or 6-8PM
(352) 344-1310
4 WHEEL EDGER 3 HP
$150.
DUMP TRAILER 30"X40"
pull behind lawn
mower. $60.
(352) 489-4687
battery charger, $20.
small drill press, USA
made, $20. Push
mower, 22" exc. cond.,
$35. Call 8-10AM or
6-8PM (352) 344-1310
CRAFTSMAN LAWN
TRACTOR 18.5 HP, 42"
cut, Auto Trans, Only used
2 years. Includes tow behind
poly cart. $850. Cash.
Also, WEIDER 8525
WEIGHT STATION
$60.Cash 352-527-8238
Lawn Tractor 42" cut
V Twin eng. auto.trans.
w/dump cart, good
cond. $595. 1OFT
wood ladder, $20.
(352) 341-3949
Quality Yard
Maintainance
at an affordable price.
Will maintain weekly or
monthly.
Licensed & Insured
Call Chris for free
estimates @
(352)220-7365
Riding Mower
Murrary 42" Cut. Auto.
w/bagger. $700.
Riding Mower
Murray 42" cut. Stand.
14.5 Hp. $350.
(352) 860-2505
Riding mower, new
battery & Sol., $300
Call 8-10AM or 6-8PM
(352) 344-1310
TORO RIDING MOWER
Zero turn, 42" cut, 16hp.
Like new condition.
$1499. 352-503-7565
TRACTOR
Isecki, 2500, 4 x 4 loader,
3.3PTH, PTO, 4ft. bushhog,
new 4' box blade,- 4' york
rack 100 hrs., $8,500. (352)
726-6864


MON O -


DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Repairing gas & diesel en-
gines. No job too big or
small. 352-228-2067




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd friendly
serv. Lowest rates Free
est.
352-860-1452
All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
COLEMAN TREE SERVE.
Trim & Removal. Lic.
Ins. FREE EST. Lowest
rates. 352-270-8462
/ out zoomcitrus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup, Mulch,
Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc



LawnfTree/Shrub
Quality Work Free Est.
LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins
R WRIGHT TreeService
Tree removal, stump grind,
trim, Ins.& Lic 0256879
352-341-6827



At Home Computer Re-
pairs & custom comput-
ers.
Call(352)228-7823
COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
On-Site Same Day
Service Available
*All Computers
*Affordable Rates
* Certified Tech's
* Networking
*Virus/Spyware/
Pop- Removal
(352) 341-4150
www.fastteks.com




BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714


RV CARPET &
FLOORING
REPLACEMENT
(352) 628-1164



Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
work fully coated. 30 yrs.
Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-795-6533
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
NeedsL. L& I. & FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ALL HOME REPAIR
painting, drywall flooring,
pwr. wash Malley's Home
Maint
220-9486 (lic0259169)
4us out zoomcitrus.com
DAVID RODGERS
Int/Ext. repaints. Satisfaction
Guar, 20 yrs exp. lic/Ins
212-3160
3us out zoomcltrus.com







INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic/Ins.
(352) 726-9998




BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714



AFFORDABLE Mobile
Boat Maint. & Repair
Technical/Electrical
Custom Rigging
John (352) 746-4521
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
27 yrs. expo. Certified
Best prices/guarnted
352-220-9435
3us out zoomcltrus.com
SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149. Up
BOAT COVERS,$189. Up
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcltrus.com


AT YOUR HOME
Mower & Generator Repair.
352-220-4244
Lic#99990001273

DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Gas / Diesel Engines No
iob too biq or small.
352-228-2067






The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149. Up
BOAT COVERS,$189. Up
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcltrus.com




PRIVATE DUTY
CAREGIVER
Looking for work.
(603)661-9054
THERE ARE OTHER
SOLUTIONS Besides
Nursing Home.Private
Home 1 on 1 care
Alzheimer/Dementia, No
problem, References
503-7052




- SEE THROUGH
Window Washing
All Aspects (352)
489-4189; 322-0962
/ us outzoomcitrus.com




HOME SERVICES
Serving Citrus Co. for 10
yrs. Cell. (727) 642-7757
MAIDS ON CALL
Serving Citrus 3Yrs.
Windows/Free Est.
(352) 726-8077
Malou's House
cleaning, $12.00 Per hr. 2
hr. min. Homosassa area.
(352) 476-9676


Affordable CABINETS &
COUNTER TOPS
New & Remodel
352-586-8415




Dotson Construction
Decks, Remodeling Etc.
#CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708
3 out zoomcltrus.com

ROGERS Construction
New Homes & All


We will beat any price
by far without com-
promise. Dunham Con-
struction roofing, re-
modeling, home maint.
painting, press. wash,
etc. talk to owner
422-6575 (crco452543
/us out zoomcilrus.com




SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rovers,
wood decks, fla rms,
windows, garage scrns
(CBC1257141) 628-0562




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996












#1 A+ Mr. Fix - It!
All repairs, painting,
gutter & yard clean-
ups. 352-382-3647
vus out zoomcitrus.com
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash &
Gutters Lic. 5863
(352) 746-0141


Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs Pres-
sure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job too
small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

NATURE COAST
S HOME REPAIR
& MAINT. INC.
S Offering a Full
I Range of Services
Est. March '04
Chamber mem.
Lie. 2776/lns.,

Visa/MC/Discover





lellll-ii
--- ---





SSheds & Garages of
I Any Size I
I *SHEDSNOW* i
SWe Move & Buy *
S Used Sheds
I ndependence/41
(352)860-0111 '
--- --m me



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash &
Gutters Lic.5863
(352) 746-0141
#1 AT SERVICE
MALLEY's ELECTRIC
352-220-9326 or
255-4034. #ec0001840
s/ us out zoomcitrus.com
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699
SALTMARSH
ELECTRIC
Comm/Resid. & Sign
Lighting. ER13012391
352-344-3810
/ us out zoomcitrus.com


C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264 /201-1422




PAVING & SEAL COAT
VIGLIONE LLC-lic/Ins
www. TAR-MAX.com
Free Estf352726-3093




AARON'S FENCE
All Types, Best Price
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
24/7(352) 795-7373
3us out zoomcitrus.com
ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic.& Ins.,
* 352 422-7279
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BARNYARD II Fencing
Serving Citrus Co.
Since 1973. FREE Est.
(352) 726-9260
OSBORNE'S
Lawn/TreetShrub
Quality Fence Work Free
Est. LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED)
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins




John Gordon Roofing
WE'VE MOVED New
Location - Same Great
Service l (cccl 325492)
352-382-7003




BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Estimates
Lic#2579/lns, 257-0078
Decorative concrete,
Landscape curbing
River rock resealing
344-4209 (LIc.6960)
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete tex-
tures, Stamp,spray crack
repair,staining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097


POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Acrylic Decking
i 352-464-3967
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




Additions, Garages
Decks, Bathrooms &
Handyman
Services, 40 Yrs Exp
Lie. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




A Cutting Edge
Tile Job
Showers. Firs etc
(352) 422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




REPAIRS
Wall & Ceiling Sprays
Int./Ext. Painting
Lic/Ins 73490247757
352-220-4845
ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs, Tex-
ture, Additions
Free est.220-9016
Lic.#SCC131149747




Fill, Rock,Stone Drives
Land clearing, Demo.
All Kinds of Tractor Wk
564-1411-302-9023
3us out zoomcitrus.com
Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone Drive-
ways & Tractor work
341-2019 or 257-1562
*TOP SOIL SPECIAL*
3 Yd -$60/ 5 Yd $85
10Yd $175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436




All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/us out zoomcitrus.com


BANG'S LANDSCAPE
Sod, grass plugs,
plants, trees. Please
Lv. Msg.352- 341-3032
D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design. Bob-
catwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272




Affordable Lawn Care
Dependable Service
Professional Quality
352- 601-7086
3us out zoomcitrus.com
Andersen's Lawn Serv
Mowing, Trimming, Clean
Up, Low Rates
352-277-6781
BARKERS LAWN SERV-
ICE Guaranteed to beat the
current price you pay for
service. 352-232-8166
Basic to Full Serv
Tree & scrub trimming
clean-up & hauling.
wkly/biwkly 613-7934
3 out zoomcltrus.com
Bob's Pro Lawn Care Re-
liable, Quality Work Resi-
dential / Comm. Lic./Ilns.
352-613-4250
C.R IHomosassa
mowing, beds, brushes,
mulch/haul
Commrl & Resdntl since
1991 220-6761
/ out zoomcltrus.com
Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Specials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
/us out zoomcitrus.com
DUN-RITE LAWN SERV
Clean up, tree trim,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681
3 out@zoomcltrus.com
FINISHING TOUCH
Quality lawn care. CaLl
Great Todavl
352-527-2719
3us out zoomcitrus.com
HEDGE TRIMMING,
HAULING(ANY KIND),
LAWN MOWING,
MULCH. FREE ESTI-
MATES. 352-344-9273
OR 352-201-9371

OSBORNE'S
Quality Work - Free
Est. LOWEST RATE
352-400-6016 LietIns
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166


---I
& LANDSCAPE
SINCE 199 (Lie/Ins)
628-9848 or 634-0554
v us out zoomcitrus.com



AQUA AZURE
Cert. Pool Operator
All Citrus County
352-344-4796
EVERCLEAR POOL
SERV. & Maint.
Concrete Pools Only
(352)344-5122
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Acrylic Decking
a 352-464-3967 u
PURDY POOLS
St. Certified, Serv. & Main.
(352) 220-7301



--- --- Eu
r MOBILE RV
S SERVICE
WE COME TOYOU Moor
Homes
I 5th WhIs/Rv's I
Master Tech
i 352-586-5870 I
Storage Available
-----ii



WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard

DrivewaysB


Circle T Sod Farms. Inc.
Tired of your dead lawn?
Replace It with
Bahia. Delivery
Avail (352)400-2221
SOD
Cut Outs, Al Varieties
Installed/Rolled
Irrigation (352) 422-0641
/ out zoomcltrus.com
Tear out your lawn and
replace. Comml
Res. Free est. J & J Sod
352-302-6049


REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch * Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-1728


arolltotive
Your world first.
Every Day


CJikbpMjiE


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1.866-585-8827

BATHFITTER.COM


Debt Holding You Down?

Pay off Bills, Improve your
Home, Solve all your
. financial problems,

- Apply for a
i loan today.
r . ,\. rppr-,,tji , 24hrs.
S"'Call Now

L -888-964-7111


1st Choice
PEST CONTROL, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE


LAWN GOT

(PROBLEMS?
Call 503-6821,

Owner/Operators'L V.-
Lloyd Smith * Bill Bledenstein - Jim C y
|722e3 5340W. Glenbrook St.


I OLS/PABR I


oli & Pavers 4 /4daanced tawi auem
Installations by
aver Brian CBC12R53tS


ORDERYOUR 352-628-7519 I
POOL TODAY Siding,
SBE SWIMMING offit&
BY SUMMER Fascia,
BY SSkirting,

FREE QUOTES" Roofovers,
Lic. & Insured Carports, &
CPC1456565 Screen Rooms,
52-4003188 www.advancedaluminum.info


I ALUMNUMIE


I












C12 TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009


4-7 � LaughingStck International Inc /dist. by UFS Inc., 2009


"I don't want to worry you, but the guy
who delivered the pizza was your
financial planner."780519


Troy Built, Gas powered.
Used 3 times. $75.00
(352) 621-0778



4 MOTORCYCLE HEL-
METS 2 Motorcross & 2
Street $35.00 Each
464-0316
3000 watt GENERATOR
8 HP Briggs & Straton.
Very good cond. $250.

2- PERSON HOT TUB

$500 obo; Waterfilled
massage table w/heat

5th Wheel RV Frame
for Sale


'94 Club Car golf cart,
elec. or gas, top, side
curtains, many spare
parts, $1,495.
(315) 783-7196
ALUMINUM RUNNING
BOARDS For Small
Bronco or Blazer $35.00
464-0316
Bamboo Straight
cut 16ft 12 ft 8ft
680 If $100 obo
(352) 726-3631





livery avail. 746-0714
BOXSPRING Queen
size new in plastic $75.00
352-270-3909
COUCH N LOVE SEAT
WHITE IN GOOD
SHAPE NEEDS TO BE
CLEAN 200.00 OBO
464-5881
COVER FOR POPUP
CAMPER New in Box
12x14 $45.00 464-0316
DIGITAL CAMERA
FUJIFILM 5.1 mega
pixels. Exc. cond. Bought
new one. $50
352-746-4160
Double Sink
Almond, $25.
Micro wave
White, 1.4 cu. ft. w/turn
table. $50.
(352) 795-0918
Down Sizing Sale
Couches, chairs, enter-
tainment center, glass ta-
bles, TV, & accent pieces
All contemporary Furn.
(352) 382-7418
ENTERTAINMENT
Center $100.
2 filing cabinets $50.
(352) 344-8291
EURO-PRO
Sewing machine.
Model 7130,48 stitch.
Like new. $185.
352-746-4202
FISHERMAN
Selling all fishing equip-
ment. Rods & Reels,
$495. 352-249-1187
GARDEN TILLER gar-
den tiller 6.5 hp 85.00
352-560-7492
Hitch
For RV, Blue Ox, $100.
Water Softener
For Rv, $75. Both in
exc.cond.(352)503-3154
HUBCAPS 1960'S SS
Great condition. Chevy
60's era. (352) 794-3067
INCONTINENT BRIEFS
18 pkgs., over 300 pairs,
size med., all for $95.
(352) 628-2340


-E� Act Now -S


ITS FREE

Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad for FREE on
our all new
CLASSIFIED SITE.

5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 Items totaling less than
$100.00 each.
Go to:
chrlonicenline.com
and click place
an Ad In the top right
hand corner.
Kohler, bypas shower
door, max 55 x 70, clear
glass 10mm thick
$75 bo, excel cond.
2 Chase lounges, white,
pvc, foldable lawn
chairs, excel. cond $80
obo (352) 527-0347
OAK BUTCHER BLOCK
6'x3' TABLE w/6 chairs.
$475/obo. BOSE sur-
round sound. Model
SP-PWM505 + JVC
sub-wolfer incl. $450/
obo. 352-726-1991
OLYMPUS TAPE RE-
CORDER about 47 hours
or voice record. brand
new, never used.paid
$50, take $20 795-6481
Printer
Cannon Pixma, MP530
All in one. Brand new.
$125.(352) 382-5550
REMOTE CON-
TROLLED HUMMER H2
great for kids. working
horn and changes
gears.$40 795-6481
RYOBI TRIMMER
w/edger. Like new. $75
Weber 8BQ w/stand.
Cost $260 for $100.
352-249-1187
SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149. Up
BOAT COVERS,$189. Up
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
SECURITY LIGHT On @
dusk, off @ dawn. Great
for back yard. $25,
352-746-4160


Ima Sears asP6
$125.
15 windows $75 for all
new & used
(352) 726-3093
SPARE TIRE (FULL
SIZE) for Cadillac
w/Michellin 225x60R16
Exc tread.$35.
352-746-4160
SPIDERMAN JACKET
4XL barely warn, colorful.
zips all the way up with
eye holes, cost $130
asking $80. 795-6481
STEREO HEADSET RA-
DIO Great for JOGGING
or enjoy @ beach,comes
w/clip & head set. Exc re-
cep. $25 352-746-4160
STIHL TRIMMER stihl
straightshaft trimmer
85.00 352-560-7492
TRAILER TIRES (BOAT)
NEW 4.80x12 -4 lug
galv. rims. $40 ea or both
for $75. 352-746-4160
TRUCK TOPPER Fiber-
glass full size Tonneau
cover for P/U $99.00 call
352-527-9303
Vacuum Cleaner
Hoover, Power Max.
Self propelled. $50
(352) 746-7083
Van Shelves
Steel, 3 sets. 4 Ft. Long.
Good Cond. $150. for all.
(352) 263-1011
Wanted
your left over yarn , so
can crochet blankets
for homeless animals
(352) 465-8938
ALAN NUSSO
Licensed Broker












8 LONG TERM CARE
DISABILITY
LIFE SETTELMENTS







Burglar/Fire Alarm
system, complete $100
(352) 628-5606






$55.00 464-0316
4 PRONG CANE Fully
Adjustable $25.00



X by Pride travel
scooter. Less than 6
months old, like new.
$600.00. (352)
563-0097

HOVEROUND MPV5
MOBILITY VEHICLE
MPV5 Power Wheel-
chair like new. Joystick
controller, adjustable
armrests, anti-tip
wheels. $1200. Phone:
(352) 563-0097


PRIDE LIFT/RECLINER
CHAIR - Tan. Fully elec-
tric. Good condition,
$450, 352-249-1127
ROLLING SHOWER
CHAIR/ TOILET CHAIR
Like New with Locking
Foot Rests only $75.00
464-0316

COMMODE $25.00 Each
464-0316




Buying Silver Coins
$.10, .25, .50, $1.00
Pre-1965,
352-2302-8159

BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676



ACCORDIAN
Acmette-Italy
$100 Good Cond.
Books & stand Includedl
(352) 464-1304



ULTRAAB LOUNGER &
PROFORM X BIKE Both
like Cnew. $200 or will sap.
352-860-0444



AMMO 400 ROUNDS
223PMC Brass case FMJ
55GR $350:
250 ROUNDS, 40CAL
Remington/UMC, FMJ
$140 (813) 789-0592
AMMO 500 ROUNDS
762X39, FMJ Brass Case
on stripper clip $350;
300 ROUNDS 308 Brass
case FMJ $250
(813) 789-0592
Bike Built
for 2 (TTrail mate)
$100.
(352) 795-2323


CIaoo=
Free Standing like new.
$125.00 (352) 249-6800
Cobra Irons new $799
sell for $350 4-AW ,
Graphite.. Cobra Driver,
3, 5, 7 woods graphite,
like new $225.
(352) 860-0048
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM

CORE TRUCKS, ZERO
WHEELS, BEARING,
AND HARDWARE trucks
scratched but work good.
$40 795-6481
PRIVATE COLLECTOR
Buying Guns,
Ammunition&
reloading supplies
(352) 586-7516
RIFLE AK/47, Folding
stock, extra mags. $1100
obo (813) 789-0592
SPORTSCRAFT
Tread Mill TX 50 RC
$100.00
Wesi Tursult E25 exercise
bike $60. 352-628-9485
TOP OF THE LINE CASEY
PRO PITCHING MACHINE
Paid $1900, asking $1500.
Top speed 105 mph.
Used only 3 times
(352) 726-0514
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




CAR HAULER
'06, 32 Ft. Dominator XT.
By Classic C. Trpl.
axels. $14,800. Like
new.(352) 835-4273
Dual axle, 7x16
utility trailer, 7,000 lbs.,
needs work, $200 firm
cell, (315) 783-7196



BABY CRIB
Natural wood, w/ matt. $60;
High Chair, off-white color
$20
(352) 445-1224
NEW Baby Trend
Snap-N-Go Carrier
Stroller $25! NEW
crib/toddler mattress $20!
352-726-3327 or
305-915-0486.




PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY AT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad




ANOTHER NEW
LITTER
Shih -Tzu & Shih- Poo
PUPS. $300/up
Call (352) 270-8827
Boston Terrier Pups
CKC Reg. 2 females,
1 male, ready w/health
cert, April 17 $500.
(352) 212-8111 Iv.msg.
BOXER PUPPIES
9 wks, reg. health
cert/shots, tail,
dewclaws done.
$300 (352) 563-1479
COCKATIEL BREEDERS
80 Beautiful males &
females $450 takes alll
(352) 628-6390




. W1


EXOTIC HIPPIE
BUNNY RABBITS

O NowFor

New small breed, $15.- $35
ea.
All colors, adults
2 to 3.5 Ibs.
352-621-0726
Cell (352) 422-0774







KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip, tested,
shots some declawed
$85-$150 352-476-6832
MIN PIN PUPS, AKC


SHI-A-POO &
YORKI-POO
SHIH-TZU multi
colored. $350/up
YORKIES: Males $600;
Females, $800
Paper trained, CKC
reg.'d, health cert.
NO SHEDDING
(352) 489-6675
Shih-Tzu Sale
Shih-poo @$300 & up.
Up to date on shots.
Open Mon, Wed
& Fri 1:30 to 4pm
3902 N. Lecanto Hwy.
352-270-8827 or
cell (305)-872-8099
WEIMARANER
PUPPIES
Born 1/7, ready now,
H/C, Tails Cropped,
M/$350. F/$400.
(352) 628-0206


GOING HOME SALE
Saddles & Toc, new &
used, something for
everyonel(352) 873-6033
Pretty Paint Filly
Coming 2 yrs, old. $450.
Registered
Buckskin Colt.
$750,No reasonable
offer refused. Quiet & gen-
tle. (352) 873-6033



Chickens,production
Red's, polish purebred
bantans, different types of
duckling, quail, guinea pigs
& pigeons $4/up
795-6381/476-3319




2/2, NEAR
CINNAMON RIDGE
Water, sewer, garbage
Lawn maint incl., Pets
neg. $450. mo. + $500.
sec. 352-746-7595
3/2 NEAR
SUGARMILL
WOODS
Water, Sew. Garb.
Lawn Maint. incl.No
pets. $650. Mo.+ $700.
Sec.(352) 302- 0822
FLORAL CITY
2/1, Big yard, big shed,
$550 + sec. South Old
Oaks (352) 726-6197
Free 1st Mo Rent
1& 2 Br furn & Unfurn No
Pets Details
Homos.352-628-4441
HOMOSASSA
Lg. 2/1 Addition + deck.
Fenc'd yd. & shed,
$575 352-628-5244
INVERNESS
3/1, $500, 1st, last,
sec. No Pets
(352) 287-9268
Inverness
3/2, DW scrn. por., W/D,
Great Loc. Nice & clean.
$650 mo. (352) 560-3355
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park,
2BR, 1-/2BA, $425.
1 BR.1 BA, $350 Incl.
water 352-476-4964




100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
*Low income applicants can
quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or no credit
OKAY
*recent bankruptcy
OKAY*
CAll TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
*Credit and income
restriction apply*
Florida licensed mortgage
lender






3/2 HUD Home! $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705

BANK
FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181
Floral City 3/2
Double wide.
Excellent condition. 1973
model. 24x66. $5,000.
(352) 344-1521
For Sale or Rent 2 bed/2
bath in Singing Forest
MHP
Floral City, 55+ park
DW, on corner lot
$550 a month includes lot
rent
352-637-2854 after 6pm
INVERNESS 55 +
1/1, 34 Ft. on lake. Good
condition. $2,900
(352) 419-6043 Jack
(352) 476-4964 Jim
INVERNESS
55+ Waterfront Park,
1BR, water incl. A/C
$3,500 + $270 mo. lot
rent. 352-476-4964
REPOS!
REPOS!REPOS!
(352) 621-9181




312, DW '/a acre, excel
cond. Green Acres, Own
fin. avail $79,900
813-503-8594
3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for lisitings 800-366-9783
x5705I

[ BANK
FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2,sw,on 1/2 acre,new car-
pet& stoveroof
over,10x14work shop,very
clean.$38k o.b.o.
813-792-1355
CRYSTAL RIVER
5 Acres + 1600 sq ft., '99,
Doublewide
352-212-8794
HERNANDO/off 200 2/2/1
carprt, cov por. Lg. encl.
lanai,fenced bk yard
130x129, 2
sheds,W/D,$59,900
MOVE IN READY
(352) 341-4520
HOME-N-LAND
New Home 3/2
10 Yr. Warranty
Sacrifice $3,000 down
$676.43/mo.


Call to Qualify
352-621-3807
HOMOSASSA
3/1.5, Scr rm w/con-
crete firs. nice shade
trees, over level 1+ ac.
approx 1 mi E. of 19
$49,900(352) 564-4598
Homosassa
3/2 W/Porch, 2 Lg. lots.
Extra Ig. Separate. 2 car
garage. Discounted.
3379 S. Alabama
(352) 628-3908
INVERNESS 3/2
Lots of Room, '08
Cust.Ad/ons. Beautiful
Interior to much to
mention.1,550 Sq. Ft.
Fenc'd, 1/2 ac. on hill.
Deck, Quiet. $63,000
(352) 302-7451
LECANTO 3/2
DW, Vbacre, new
paint/carpet. Appls,
CHA, rfovers, porches,
shed. GOOD CONDI
$44,900. 352-746-0714


CLASSIFIED




TRIPLE WIDE
High end home on
2 % Acres, 2150 sq ft,
3/2, glamour kitchen,
marble In bathroom, ap-
pliance pkg.
Must Sell $179,900 or
$787/mo. Call
(352) 621-9181
Nice 3BR, 2BA
doublewide on 1 acre,
w/garage or barn.
East Inverness
$650 mo, WAC
(352) 726-9369

REPOSI
REPOS! REPOS!
(352) 621-9181




55+ Open Floor Plan,
2/2, cathedral ceilings,
14 x 56, lots of
upgrades, low rent
$13,500
(352) 527-3821
CRYSTAL RIVER 55+
55FT 2/1, 50 x10vinyl prch,
deck, shed, carport. Part.
furnished. All appls. $24k.
Lot rent only $235 mo. Call
Cindy, 352-563-5502
CRYSTAL RIVER
55+ Park, '98, 2/2
14 x 66, Carport, screen
porch, beautiful new
wood floors, apple , excel.
cond. lot $235 -mo.
$32,500 352-563-2865
Floral City, Singing For-
est, 2 BR, 1-% BA
Exc. cond., lot rent $154
mo. 352-344-2420
518-598-2248, cell
FOREST VIEW ESTATES
Great Loc. Pools, clbhs.
& more, Move-In ready,
comp. furn. 2/2 DW,
wheelchair acc., shed
& sprinkler. New heat
, pump. $39,900
563-6428/563-1297
Inverness 2/1/Carport
Nicely furnished,
remod. kit., ba &
windows,scrrm.$17,500
shed (352 344-1380
(614)226-2336
LECANTO 55+
3/2, furn'd. Lot rent $215.
352-601-7406:
352-422-7621
NEWER DBLWIDE
In 5 star park, 3/2
Vinyl Fl. room, shed,
carport. Exc. cond.
$37,500
(352) 382-2356
Trade: 2006 DW Mobile
24x56 Skyline w/garage
Like New-Adult Park.
Trade for house in
Dunnellon 352-628-3363
WALDEN WOODS
55+ 3yrs. old, turn. 2/2,
scrn. porch, carport,
shed, good cond.
Reduced to $39,500
Call (352) 697-2779
WEST WIND VILL 55+
(3) NEW 2005's 2/2
Below cosa Carport, shed,
scrn prch, furn'd, pet ok.
Park rent $256mo. :e:
sales avail. 352-628-2090




3/2 HUD Homel $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
HOMOSASSA &
CRYSTAL RIVER 3
bedroom. 2 bath.
Homosassa custom 3/2
waterfront home on 4
ac with 2 docks private
and quiet $1000.
Crystal River 3/2 near
Plantation $650.
Homosassa waterfront
2/1 furnished $900.
Property Management
& Investment Group
Broker/Realtor
352-628-5600.
POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - Waterfront
homes, Wkly priv. rms, RV
lots.352-628-0011




FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


a -I -- -

1& 2 BEDROOM
APARTMENTS
Avail. for Immed.
Occupancy.
CANDLEWOOD
COURT
APARTMENTS
& KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
for information call
(352) 344-1010
MON. thru FRI,.
9am - 4pm
Ask About our Move

1BRsec.dep.$150
1st mo. Rent $150.
2BR sec. dep. $200
1 ist mo. Rent $200.
HUD Vouchers
Accepted
foreclosures
Welcome
SEqual Housing Op

CRYSTAL RIVER
Call Mon-Fri 10-5 for app
& info on our $00 Sa-
c/al. 1&2 bd avail.
Section 8 Welcome.
Cindy 352-257-8048
www.crystalpalm
apts.webs.com
FLORAL CITY
2BR 1/V2 BA, MH, just 150
yards from fishing dock,
$475. + $300 dep. Near
Floral City, 10 min. from
Inverness.
Trails End Camp
352-726-3699

GATEHOUSE
APARTMENTS


Now accepting
applications for 1,2 &
3 bdrms. Rent starting
at $462. Occasionally
handicap units
become available.
Pet friendly. Some
restrictions apply.
Background
screening.
For information call
352-726-6466,
9:00 am-4:00 pm
Mon. thru Fri.
Equal Housing
Opportunity

INGLIS VILLAS
Is now accepting
applications for our
1,2, 3 BRApts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Crys. Riv.
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: M,W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglis Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity


LE CAN
I BR Apartment (352)
746-5238/613-6000
ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2 dplx,
all ktchn appis, patio, W/D
hook-up, nice yard, Exc.
Cond. $625 (352)
634-1341

Pinewood Villas
Is now Accepting
applications for our
1, 2, 3 BR Apts.
Located in Bronson
RentalAsst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-486-2612
Or Apply Tues & Thur
7291 NE 92nd Ct. #17,

Equal Housing
Opportunity




3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705


-I^

3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705





PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronlcleonline.com
and click place
an ad
THE HEDICK GROUP
Real Estate Services
Beverly Hills Area
Lynn Davis, Agent
352-422-2522
hedickgroup.net
We Have Rentals
Starting at $425/mo +
Many others LAND-
MARK
REALTY
352-726-9136
Kathy or Jane
311 W Man St. Inv




3/2 HUD Homel $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507
PINE RIDGE
1000 sqft unit, (currently
beauty
salon) 352-527-9013




�* 2nd MONTH FREE!
SUMMERHILL AT
MEADOWCREST
Limited time! Call agent
for details. 352-563-5657
V us out zoomcitrus.com
3/2 HUD Homel $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705
Citrus Hills
2/2, patio W/D, pool, Unf.
No Dogs $699 (718)
833-3767
CITRUS HILLS
2/2, pool x-tra clean
(352) 613-5655
CITRUS HILLS
Home, Villa, Condo
GREENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-5921
(888) 446-5921
oreenbriarrental.com




CITRUS SPRINGS
New, 2/2, all appl.
Wash/Dry. $600.-$625.
(954) 557-6211
INVERNESS 2/1/1
Lawn Maint, $550 mo
352-359-5241





LOOK
A1VALUEINN.com
Hernando: New Renvt'd
Effic" $45dly; $250wk.
Pool. Trair s $185wk.
Homes 3bd - $450 wk.
352-726-4744




OLD HOMOSASSA
Lrg 1/1, Iv & fam rm,
scr prch, lots of stor-
age, newly remodl'd,
dock w/access to
gulf. $975 furnished,
incis all utils. or $800
unfurnished Incis H20
& garbage 1st/L/Sec.
352-628-2261

SUNSET VILLAS
Senior Community
Chiefland Fl.
Accepting
Applications for
1 & 2 BR APTS
Please Apply
M, W, F, 8am-12p
124 SW 14th Ave.
(352) 493-0220
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.
WANTED!I
3BR/2BA Rent to own.
Can put $5,000 down &
pay taxes & insurance
(352) 726-9369


BEVERLY HILLS
1/1/1 furn'd,, W/D,
fenced, incis all utils/
cable, Pets neg. $765 +
sec. 352-249-1127
FURNISHED RENTALS
Crossland Realty
352-726-6644
NEW HOMES 3/2/2
1st, last, sec. & ref
$800 mo. (352) 302-3927




1,2 & 3 Bedrooms
Rent to own, No credit
ck352-484-0866
jademission.com
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2 + Bonus Rm.
$750 mo.(352) 212-5894
Beverly Hills
2Br poss 3 Br. C/H/A
First Month Free. $650
352-422-7794


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



WO DY UY TRICKYRICKYANE

1. Former spouse inspects (1) Everyansweris a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT

B 0 - and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. "Psycho" motel room charges (1) they will fit in the letter
11111- 11_ - 1 squares. The number after the
S| 11/ definition tells you how many
3. Canon rival desktop graphic (2) syllables in each word. To win
----/T $10, send your original rhymes
with your definitions to this
4. Cheeky pipsqueak (1) newspaper. All entries become
11110 111- -1- the property of UFS, Inc.
5 c t� 2009 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
5. Actress Witherspoon's tenant papers (2)
IIII-- __l _I/_ _ Thanks and $10 to
Wayne Bruce of
6. Be a bother to a feudal tenant (2) Amityville, NYfor
#2. Send your entry
lI I to this newspaper.

7. On-the-job advancement ruckus (3)



NOILOWIODO NOLOWOL d 'L 'VSSVA 'ISSVH'9 SaSV3'I SaSaHH'9
LtIfiS ~iad 't N03I NO}XIN M' S AI V V SHSVa SOHD Xa'"
4-7-06 sLaMSNV


Lg. 1/1, scr. rm. EZ terms
$490 mo. 382-3525
BLACK DIAMOND
3/2/2. Gated
community. $1100/mo
352-804-9729
CITRUS HILLS
2/2/2, on Golf course
$750. mo.352-422-4298
CITRUS HILLS
PRESIDENTIAL
3/2/2 $850 mo.
(352) 212-5812
CITRUS SPRINGS
1/1 Newly Rem'd. on
quiet street. Fen'cd. bk.
yd. 775 Sq. Ft. All apple.
Carport & shed. $485.
Mo. Fst./Sec.lyr
lease.(352)302-7864
Citrus Springs
4/2/2, New, Split Plan,
Cath.ceilings,2,150sq. ft.
$900.Mo.352-341-1859
CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 3/2/2, Near Sch.
$900mo 352-816-0010
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $850/mo
795-6299 697-1240
HOMOSASSA
3/2/2 Fenced yard, W/D
hookups. $795 Mo.
(352) 382-1373
HOMOSASSA

6368 Gross AveSpacious
2/2/2car. Big yard. Con-
venient location. $850
month. 561-459-6247
HOMOSASSA
Beautiful, 3/2, 2/2
Pool on 1 acre
Lease Opt .Flexible
Financing Imm. Occ
352-795-0088
INVERNESS 3/2/1. Gospel
Island area. On cul-de-sac
by lake. $850/mo,
1st/last/sec. NO PETS.
352-860-2146.
INVERNESS
Highlands, 21/11,
$600/mo lIst/Ist/Dep.
(352) 344-2560
INVERNESS
Nice 2/2, garage, screen
porch, 813-973-7237
PINE RIDGE
3/2'/2/2, Screen Pool
5310 Yuma $1100/mo .
(352) 302-6025
Spacious 3/212
golf course, serene
One mo Free. $900.
908-322-6529
SUGAR MILL
WOODS
2Masters/2/2, Remodeled,
new appliances, new A/C
$900 mo. 352-302-4057

SUGARMILL
3/2/2 $900 .
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $900.
(352) 400-0230

SUGARMILL
New 5/4. $1150 mth.
813-300-7929




3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705
3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705
Inverness Lakefront!
2/2/2home. 9108 Gospel
Island w/Florida room and
lanaidock, fenced yard.
$700. 344-8532




INVERNESS
Highlands 2/1 Block
Home. Nice & quiet
$400, 1st, last, + sec.
deposit. Ask for Jim
(727) 542-0127



3/2 HUD Homel $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
CITRUS Springs
4/2/2 Rent $900/mo.
F/L/S. Sale $130K
423-404-0903
INVERNESS
Highlands 3/2/1
totally remolded, new gran-
ite kit & Bath$850/mo rent
$#69K Own finances
avail(352) 726-2523




CRYSTAL RIVER
$75 wkly/lst/L. Incis utils.
& satellite. (352)
563-1465: 212-1960;
HOMOSASSA
Own entrance & Bth.
everything incld.
furnished Must pay 1/2
elec. wash/dryer avail
$400.Mo. (352) 860-1426

LOOK
A1VALUEINN.com
Hernando: New Renvt'd
Effic: $45daily; $250wk.
Pool. IafI6a $185wk.
Homes 3bd - $450wk.
352-726-4744



OLD HOMOSASSA
1BR turn, cottage
$750 mo. /$200 wkly
(352) 795-0553

LOOK
AIVALUEINN.com
Hernando; New Renvt'd
Effic: $45 dly; $250 wk.
Pool. Trailers $185 wk.
Homes 3bd. - $450 wk.
352-726-4744


3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705
OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507



3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705

LOOK
AlVALUEINN.com
Hernando. New Rent'd
Effic" $45 dly; $250 wk.
Pool. Trailed $185 wk.
Homes 3bd - $450 wk.
352-726-4744



3/2 HUD Home! $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704

AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50

Ad includes 20 lines of copy
w/ photo.
BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714
Crystal River
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
Wa~ttBeautitulomplet
renovated inside
and out,must see. Owner
financing. 300K
727-798-7077
Picture Perfect Homes
NEW HOMES STARTING
At $75,000 On Your Lot
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lc if CBCO59685

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
' newspaper is
subject to Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to
advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
discrimination.
" Familial status
includes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing
custody of children
under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
*Low income applicants can
quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or No credit
OKAY
*recent bankruptcy
OKAY'
CAll TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
'Credit and income
restriction apply*
Florida licensed mortgage
lender



. .. . ,














of up to 2500
Loan Modifications
On The House






April 6 -

April 12
Register to be one
of up to 2500
homeowners to
receive free
loan modification
representation and
negotiation
services. For details
visit the web site.
www.RealtyRight.com
Loan modification
provided as a service of
" Realty Right, Inc.
Restrictions apply, See
web site for details


2 Great Commercial lo-
cations, $650 to
$850/mo .Perfect for any
small business/ office etc.
Call Lisa 352-634-0129
Plantation Realty
BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714
BEVERLY HILLS 491
Great Loc 1500sf Spac.
Bus. Office/Home + 800sf
updated out bldg. Comm.
Easy Acess.Can live in.
$150K (352)795-6282
CRYSTAL RIVER -GREAT
LOCATION! Citrus Ave.
Remodeled. 1353sqft
w/security fence &
parking. Over t/acre.
Zone GNC. $250K. Call
Gary, 352-564-4228




2/2/1 CB,
Tile, New Carpet,
Newer Appl.Lg. shed,
Fen'cd back yd, Patio,
1,600 Sq. Ft. CHA
$68,900(561) 313-5308
(561) 313-5291

ATTENTION!!
BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
$37,900. Delivered
and Set, $0-Down
Land/Home $650. mo.
Repos Available
Kinder Mobile
Home
(352) 622-2460

BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for-lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714




RealtySelect
Citrus.comI


BETTY MORTON

2.8% COMMISSION

Reltyi Slect

(352) 795-1555




1,2 & 3 Bedrooms
RENT TO OWN- NO
CREDIT CHECKII
352-484-0866
iademission.com
312 HUD Homel $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
FOR SALE BY OWNER
88 SJ Kellner, Bev. Hills
2/2'/22, FP, OPEN HOUSE
on SUNDAYS
11A-3P $120K firm
(352) 746-6093


Home s
Crystal Oaks 3/2/2
For Sale
By Owner
Price Reduced
Split plan. Pool home
w/private back yard, on
cul de sac, move in con-
dition. Asking $170,000
(352) 746-7088




BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714




CANTERBURY LAKE ES-
TATES 4 bedroom, 2 bath.
2004 on small lake, commu-
nity pool
and rv/boat storage availa-
ble
$199,000 352-7261354
CITRUS HILLS
Emerald Estates
Spectacular Homel
4/3/3L Pool, 1 acre,
PRICED REDUCED
$50K for Quick Sale to
$319K. Built 2004.
UPGRADES GALORE
352-464-1316
To View: www.
1605wredding.com




3/2 Inverness Villa
w/ indoor pool;C.R.
4/2.5 fireplace, fenced
yard 352-795-9773

Foreclosures
& Deals
Everywhere


CALL ME NOW!


Deb Infantine
EXIT REALTY
LEADERS
(352) 302-8046




















BRAND NEW VIC MCDONALD Business/Home 3/2 Great
For Sale, 3/2 w/alot (352) 637-6200 location on Trout Ave. Inver-
of upgrades . . ness $165,000. Rhema
Beck St. Inverness Realty 228-1301
352-637-4138
Lic# CBS059685 L Sl
INVERNESS, FL 3 bed-
room, 2 bath. Garage, 3 S 7 Rivers Golf & C.C.
New carpet, Wood floors, priv. member owned.
Frig, Dishwasher, Range, corner lot 1 ac (mol)
Microwave, $30K (813) 766-9354 or
Washer/Dryer, Attic. R tr sweetscaDeauest@
($99K)Realtor sweetsaaaes
352$400-5178My Goal is Satisfied
3524Customers
OWNER FINANCING A
3/2/2/ Pool & spa. RE, I A3S
Village Green Gospel Is- REALTY ONE 3/2HUDHome$225/mo
land, $60K below Outtangen 3/2 HUD Homel $225/mo!
market. 1800 sqft. Outlslalndi (ts 5% down @ 8% apr. For
Purchase w/$13,700 dn. Listings 800-366-9783 X
$1050 mo. or no $$$ 5704

credit.727-992-1372

RealtySelect
Citrus.com For &al31t 4 9.9HP YAMAHA
CRONlE 3 4 stroke, elect. start,
-Mah CITRONELLE 3 bed- tiller handle. $695
room, 2 bath. Mini Farms FT ISLAND MARINE
2.5 Acres, Trailer, Water SUPPLY
with softener, septic. As 3524364179
is $49,000.00. 3 64
813-695-0853
For Sale By Owner
3 BR, 2 BA, 2-car gor.,
Cement block, north JET SKI
Dunnellon Low down, '96, Excel. cond. w/ trailer,
BETTYMORTON doE terms w/$3,500 75 runs exceptional well
Tdown ( 575mo. $1,900. (352) 795-9847
(352) 726-9369
2.8% COMMISSION OWNER FINANCING
4/2/office, 2.5 ac, 2005
Rea Seled Doublewide
�� w�,*� Like new. 1800sqft, 14 ft JON BOAT
352 795-1555 9,700/dn, $882/mo. or w/traller 9.8 Mercury
(352)795-1555 $23,700 down, $582/mo. motor, & electric motor
727-992-1372 $1,025 (352) 419-4478
M li or cell 352-563-8807
S24 FT CRESTLINER
PONTOON
OWNER Financing 14 passenger w/traller
Handyman, 2/2, 1981 $65,000 obo
Dbwd, 1/3 acre, $40K, (352) 382-7039
below market, needs 1993 17' Sylvan
mostly cosmetic repairs. Boat & trallor
Purchase $4,472 dn & 85h.p. Yamaha motor
$364 mo. Good cond. $3,500
727-992-1372 (352) 344-0457
IAAA FLORIDA JUMBO
BNNIE SHRIMP 13/15 ct
R i$6.00 lb Mon-Sat
PTESON Call (352) 628-9590
Realtor, GRI 4 Sale By Owner, AIR BOAT
Crystal River 1 BR, 1 BA, AIR BOAT
Your SATISFACTION completely Big 13 Ft. haul,
Is My Futurell remodeled, heated comm. 2 seats. Approx. 375-400
pool, wd firs. HP. 8 blade warp drive.
(352) 586-6921 $74,600. (352)563-5844 2-1 reduction gear box.
or (352)795-9123 Used 100 hrs.+ Trl.
or (352)795-9123 FLORAL CITY $18,500 invest. Sell
2/1, all apple. stay, plus a for $10,000 firm.
Charlotte G Realty shed & water access, (352) 302-4535
& Investments LLC Move in cond., Reduced (352) 302-4535
to $49,995 (352) AIRBOAT
RealtySelect 746-0850 1996, 15', 500cubic Inch,
Cadillac engine
Citrus.com MARYVILLE, TN completely rebuilt
Brick 3/2/2, fireplace (32) 560-3019
encisd sunrm & deck, ft of (352) 5603019
Smokies, low txs & maint. AIRSTREAM
$189,900 (865) 773-2232 25ft. Safari, Unused,
stored 4 yrs. as new
t loaded SAVE 30K
Tel (352) 563-2668
Cell (352) 308-1431
AQUA SPORT '05
3/2/2 175 Osprey, 90hp Yam,
Inoernes, Fl VHF, depth finder, dual bait.
SinVrneSS, Erl. w/switch, bimini, easy load
BETTY MORTON Must See I trailer. Low hours.
Open Lakefront, Breath- $10,800/obo 352-860-0277
2.8% COMMISSION taking View, AQUA SPORT
on Lake Henderson. 190 Osprey, 2001
Rea SIect 538 San Remo 115 hp Johnson just
, ,,, Circle. Vaulted rebuilt 5 yr. war. Ready to
ceilings, oak floors, trav- fish. Reduced $10.500I
(352) 795-1555 ertine counter tops. 352-746-5856
Caged pool, spacious la- BANK FORECLOSURE
Snai, dock, & board- 6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
walk. for lisitngs
$395,000 800-366-9783 x 5714
Barb Malz
3/2, DW ' acre, excel (352) 212-2439 abn Cruiser 24 f
cond. Green Acres, Own Keller Williams Owner died, 6 cyl. 10.
fin. avail $79,900 Realty alpha one/OD. used in
813-503-8594 1 fresh water, tan. gal. trl
FLORAL CITY. TWO incl.'d $2,500 464-0316
HOUSES ON ADJ. CAPE HORN

$215,000 Newly reno- C/C. Merc.90 HP. outboard
vated. CHA. Screened, W/Trailer
in ground pool. Dock, $4,100(352)634-4793
seawall. For sale by
owner. 352 586 - 9498 BCENTURY
HOMOSASSA - '01- Bay, 21ft.
SHOMOSASSA .'02, 150HP Yamaha w/
3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to trir., custom cover
head spring. 163'wfrt, dep/l nduVHF,Iwm s.,
dep/find, VHF, Iw brs.,
dnuock/slipi. d like new, $13,950.
(new/unoccupied. 352) 442-7772
2 frpls, granite. $579K - (352) 442-7772
727-808-5229 Deck Boat
$8000 Tax 95' 19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ ra-
Ta Inverness, FI. dio & fishfinder. New Bat-
Rebate Lake Henderson tery switch. 2 batteries,
f 3/2.5/2 on 1/2 acre. power pk.
for if y home buy- Exclusive Beautiful prop./hub.$7,000
ers ,if you have not Home w/open water view, (352) 726-0838
owned a home in 3 years. on Private HURRICANE
Call for info Waterfront Peninsula. URRICANE
Phyllis Strickland Tile floors, travertine '01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
(352) 613-3503 countertops, dock, ga- 115HP, stroke Yamaha,
Kellers Williams RIty z c ountertops. w/ dock, gtrIr. $15,900. will
$395,000 trade (352) 503-3778
BANK FORECLOSURE Must See 11 MAY CRAFT
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000 1170 S. Estate Pt. '02.,Center console,19

800366-97r stngs x 5714 Barb Malz Ft. 115 Yam. 50 Hrs.
800-366-9783 x 5714 (352) 212-2439 Showroom cond. Color
Keller Williams elec.,trim tabs. VHF,
Realty Bimini, alum. trailer + ex-
tras. Beige, deep V, shal-
LET OUR low draft, high free board
OFFICE hull. Must sell
OFFICE $11,900.
GUIDE YOUI (352) 563-5628
NEW 2021 Tahoe
Boat Trailer Disc brakes
on both axles. Never
BONNIE had a boat on It.
PETERSON $2,475. (352) 527-3555
Realtor, GRI OSPREY
1994 - 16ft, CC, bay boat.
Your SATISFACTION 88 HP Evinrude, Garmin
Is Mv Futurell GPS/recorder $4500.

(352) 586-6921 POLAR 2310, 2006
or (352)795-9123 sr 23FT. POLAR BAYBOAT
Charlotte G Realty " -" 250HP YAMAHA
& Investments LLC 4-STORKE, CUSTOM
_ _ = Plantation Realty. Inc TRAILER,
R OATCUNTRY (352) 795-0784 T-TOP,GPS,VHS, GAR-
GREAT UNCell 422-7925 AGE KEPT $25,000
PLACES! Lisa VanDeboe FIRM 352-795-7766
Broker (R)/Owner PONTOON
F' "l' "m See all of the , 50 HP Joon
, "' & S listings in Citrus County '85 JC, 50 HP Johnson
www.olantation No trailer. $3,000
realtvinc.com (352) 621-0987
PONTOON BOAT
RealtySelect 08' 20 Ft. To many
Citrus.com options to list. $13,000
OUR SPECIALTY Call for info. 628-7926
SICE 989 Pontoon Boat
1996, 18 ft., 40HP Yamaha,
www.crossland 4 stroke, $8,500
I(352) 860-1490
Crossland PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
Realty Inc. TLRC Engine Like New
(352) 726-6644 40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras $12,000
I. (352) 628-0281


BETTY MORTON PROLINE
03 32ft center console,bunk
2.8% COMMISSION under, twin OB 160 hrs. like
new, loaded, incl trlr may
consider newer Corvette
Reea y ele-t as trade $48K (352)
L � Y|, w 201-1833
(352) 795-1555 PROLINE 20.5' Bay 2002
Mercury 150-$9950
352-331-5204


REALTOR Merc. Dep/find.
"Simply Put- INVESTORS NEEDS Radio, fish rigging
P'll Work Harder" Homes Any: Size, cond, Includes trailer. Good cond.
352-212-5097 location, price, situation.5,900.Call
thorn@atlantic.net Over finac'd, dblwide Pete @$5,
Craven Realty, Inc. & mobile homes okay. ( 6-
352- 655 1-727-992-1372 (352) 74-4
352-726-1515 T-CRAFT
Picture Perfect Homes mtr. w fuel enj. like new, tdr.
NEW HOMES STARTING. w/brks
At $75,000 Oin Your Lot nHOMOSASSA $7750 352-489-3661
Construction 1.2 acres, fenc'd, water, TWO KAYAKS
352-637-4138 elec., sewer, sprinkler sys. Eddyline 12' plus access.
Lic.# CBC059685 (2) out bldgs. Deadend st. lke now $1700 for both
$44K. 352-302-5775 (352) 341-1702


-Mn �. . -


BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for listings
800-366-9783 x 5714
BONAIR '01
19FT.5th wheel. n bed,
microwave, Irg refrig. Like
new. $9,995.
352-489-3661
FIFTH WHEEL
30 Ft. Alijo W/slide-out.
Good cond. Moving must
sell. $5,200 or trade.
Obo. (352) 214-3688
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO
07 Jay Flight
28' used twice, smells &
looks new, green
clean, sips 6S 16.800
(352) 503-7431
KODIAK
'04, Hybrid Travel Trlr. AC,
Heat, Micro. Tub/ Shwer.
toilet exc cond $9,500.
352-564-4151


L


. rmlwwpr9lpmmpmk7


TUESDAY, APMRI. 7, 2009 C13


Ultimate Scallop
Boat 03, 25' Sun Tracker,
05 Merc 90hp, lo hrs. tan-
dem trail. like new exc. value
$11,500.
352-586-1676
VINTAGE PROLINE
24 ft RESTORED
175HP Mariner w/Jack
plate, $7000/obo.
404-557-5628




05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
26inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
'07 NEW MAR
Cypress 32ft 5th wheel.
2 slides. Separate bath.
Extras. 3 yr ext. war-
ranty $39,900/obo
352-794-3534
3/2 HUD Hornme $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
38FT BOUNDER '96
Class-A - basement
model. 49K mi. 14mpg,
new tires & brakes. (4)
TV's. Ready for long trip.
$22.100. 352-563-0615
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 38 K Mi.
Dual air. $36,000 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
ALLEGRO
'85, New motor,
generator, 27 ft.,
Al cond. $6,350
352-634-4793

*&RV*
DONATIONS
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
(352) 795-9621
* Tax Deductible *

CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane 30Q, class
A motor home, 31'/ ft., 22k
mi. V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed, etc.
Saturn tow Avail. $35,000.
Lets talk (352) 397-5007
GEORGIE BOY
'05, Pursuit, Class A,
30ft.
Excel. cond. 8k mi.,
2 slide outs, 2 TV's, back
up camera, all the bells
and whistles and much
more, must see this
coach, Asking $50,000.
obo (352) 746-7626

GULF STREAM
'07 BT Cruiser, 22' 8K.Mi.
Hitch & tow bar. Like new.
$45,000
(352) 875-8890
GULF STREAM
BT Cruiser 03, 22' fully
loaded, ready to travel
$29,800....
(352) 341-1297
GULF STREAM
BT Cruiser 03, 22' fully
loaded, ready to travel
$29,800...
(352) 341-1297
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool, club-
house etc.
$29,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
Holiday Rambler
'03, By Monico, 300 Cum-
mins, 2 slides, incl. tow
vehicle,
mint cond: $84,900.
(352) 302-7073
Holiday Rambler
Admiral Motor Home 36' 2
slides, 340hp, gas eng. all
options transf ext. warr.
$51,900
352 795-3970
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$55,995. 352-464-0371
JAMBOREE
29',2005, V-10 Class C
12,400 mi., Loaded! Pert.
Condition! Ready to go!
$39,000 (352) 465-2138
Keystone 07
Big Sky 5th Wheel Prem.
Pkg 340RLQ every option.
Center Island Kit. incls
sep.W/D, added 2nd a/c in
bedroom
Price to Sale $52K firm
352-794-3068
PACE ARROW
04, 38' 3 SLIDES
21k mi fully loaded
3 tv's $92,500 abo
352-302-0743
Winnebago
'94 32' class A,
Clean no pets/or smoke.
$9,500 Or Obo.
(352) 746-1169



Want to Buy
Small Motor home
good gas mileage a
must (20 mpg) approx
$5000 cash
(352) 795-9728




2000 EAGLE 26'
TRAVEL TRAILOR
New refrig. plus CD, TV, &
AC. $5800
(352) 795-1780


08 CUSTOM BUILT
Pontiac Convertible
Show Car. Invested over
$15k See to appreciate
Only valid offers I
(352) 382-7039
1992 BUICK REGAL
4-door, one owner
34k ml., will need a little
body work $4,800
after 4pm (352) 563-1893
2001 Chevy Lumina 91k,
V6, new tires & breaks..
No rust. Very good cond.
Asking $2,500 firm
(352) 503-6666 ask for
Joe
'97 MAZDA MX5
Miata - Only 72k miles.
New tires. f NfCE$4500.
352-382-9004
BMW
'03, 745 LI, NAV, black, sun
roof. all options $29K Mint
(352) 746-2696
BUICK
2005, Lacrosse
Fully Loaded w/Leather
$11,988 or $209 mo
1-800-733-9138
BUICK Century 1995
Looks and runs like new!
Lots of extras. 117K Miles
$1,700 Call Andy at
352 344-2125
CADILLAC '01
Catera, 34k mi, MINT!
White w/leather. $6300/obo.
845-282-3504
CADILLAC
1997, Deville
Extremely Clean, Low
Mileage, Only $6995
1-800-733-9138
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715


CHEVROLET Corvette
1967 coupe, $3500, 8
cylinder, exterior
color: Yellow, interior
color: White, 93,655
miles, manual, rare
and great muscle car,
for details e-mail me
trshashansen@gmalLcom
orcallme
(702)548-7707
CHEW
2007 IMPALA LS
Bronze, excellent cond.
full power, 9.000mi.
$11,000
(352) 637-4317
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Conv. rare
5 spd, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
bik, depend.
$4700 352- 563-0615
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CORVETTE
02, Z06,
Black, low mi., over
30 mpg hwy. $24,400.
(352) 613-5355
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 miles
on this rare silver on sil-
ver on silver vette, power
convertible top, 6 sp
auto, paddle shift, heads
up display, magnetic F55
suspension, navigation
system, all options availa-
ble are on this gorgeous
vette, Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
included, Your's
for only, $49,000.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, 86K mil.
T -top roof, Excellent con-
fition $12,000., will trade
for truck. 352-563-6428
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, 86K
mil. T -top roof, Excel-
lent condition $12,000.,
will trade for truck.
352-563-6428
DODGE CALIBER
'07 Ocafa Volvo.$12,995
(352) 629-7299
FORD
'03 Mustang Conv. auto,
V-6. leather, all pwr, 80k,
great cond. $6,999.
352-382-2755
HONDA
'01, Civic Alloy Wheels
Sunroof & More $7990
or take over pmts $190
mo. 1-800-716-2219
HONDA
'06 Civic,$10,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
HONDA
2003, Accord Great
Sedan, Gotta See!
$11,988 or $199 mo
1-800-733-9138
HONDA CIVIC 97
$5001 Police
Impounds! For listing
800-366-9813 x4246
HONDA Civic, 1998
Mechanic's
Special...Great wheels
and tires, rebuilt transmis-
sion. Well
maintained...but won't
start. $630 firm.
352-503-7064


(J 11 ,' (()VCOUNT"lY (FI.) CHRONICLE


TOYOTA
1994, 4 Runner SR5
3.liter, V6 Tow pack-
age 114,803 ml. $3500
OBO(352) 621-6892


FORD '06 F-150
Crew cab XLT. Tow pkg
& topper, 47K mi.
Exc cond. LOADED/
$18,900/obo. (352)
634-1378; 795-2053
JEEP
'05 Wrangler,
Unlimited. $15,995 Ocala
Volvo
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA '94
Pickup, cold A/C, diamond
plate toolbox, topper,
$4,000. obo.352-621-3764


CLASSIFIED




5th Wheel, 2000 Excel-
lent. Photos at
httppiocasaweb.google.com
meadowbrook.Glenn
-$13,995.00 (352)302-6055
or (727)692-9045
Montana
'03. 5th wheel. 3 slides
like new,S34,000.
Truck avail also for tow
(352) 422-5731
TRAIL CRUISER '04
17FT, light weight,
fully loaded. Used
10 times. $6800.
352-628-4522












$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CASH BUYER
Buin Used Cars
Trucks & Vans
For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333


2002, S-Type Leather,
Sunroof, 39k Orig Miles
1 Owner - Calll
1-800-716-2219
LINCOLN
2000, Continental
Loaded. Low Miles
$6995 or $129 mo
1-800-733-9138
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well main- tainted.
$2650. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
MAZDA 3
'07, $11,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'01 CLK,$16,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'05, $25,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCURY
200 Grand Marquis
Low Miles, Fully Equipd
$8995 or $189 mo
1-800-733-9138
MERCURY
'98 Grand Marquis LS
100K. Mi. Very nice.
Senior owned. $2,995
OBO. (352) 795-0122
MGB
Convertible 1977, 57k mi.
Blue, many extras Excellent
Condition
$10,500 (352)628-0281
NISSAN
'07 Altlma, $13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
PLYMOUTH
Acclaim 90, 4 cyc.
cheap on gas
First $1000 Buys
(352) 563-2021
SMART CAR 08
Passion Loaded 40mpg
red/black only 2700mi
352-341-0316
SUBARU '94
Legacy L series sedan,
4dr. 110k mi, Fair cond.
$1200. 352-746-4202
SUZUKI
'07 Forenza. 30K mi, w/100k
warr. LOADED w/touch
scr nav. $12,800.
352-613-6613
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 mi.
warranty. $23,000.
(352) 382-1857
TOYOTA
'08 Corolla $13,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'04 S-60 $8,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'05 S60,$13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-60, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC 70, $21,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC90,$22,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 S-60, $18,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S40, S$20,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S-80, $28,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
2007, S40
Drive luxury for less
$13,988 or $229 mo
1-800-733-9138


'73, New paint, tires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$13,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122
Volkswagen
'78 Super Beetle cony.
runs well, $3500 or will
consider trade
(352) 212-4477
VOLKSWAGON '68
bus/transporter. Con-
verted to camper. Runs
well. New brakes.
$5,000. 352-726-5926



'97 FORD F350
XLT pwr strk diesel. Loaded,
5th wheel, Apprs $15,500;
sell $8000. 352-503-7188
CHEVY
2006, 1500 Crew Cab,
Z71 4x4, Only $14,990
or $279 mo
1-800-716-2219
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
conslgnmentusa.org
DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awesome
Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded every
special feature. Sr. own,
gar. kept., 27K mi, $40K
invested Sale $21,750 See
online ad photos
www.autotrader.com/atca
rld/at-f3fd39f
John (352) 726-1076
DODGE DAKOTA
'05 $11,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
FORD
'03 Ranger XLT. Super
Cab. 4.0 Eng.1 owner
14K Mi. Like new.
$10,300 (352)341-3292
FORD 04
Ranger, REDUCED
X-cab. Exc. cond.
38k mi. $9,700/obo
(352)746-3919
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway, serve.
van. 41KMi./5.4 L. Eng.
Auto.Knapheide Serv.
body/dble lock drs. $20.000
Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
2003, F-150 XLT
Crew Cab, 51k Orig mi-
les $11,990 or $199 mo
1-800-716-2219
FORD
'85, F250, rebuilt motor.,
new carborator,
runs good , must sell
$1,200 obo 613-4033



3/2 HUD Homel $225/mol
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
AZTEK
Pontiac' 04 Low
miles, loaded!
Reduced price
$8,500b obo352-726-5715
CHEVY
2005 Trailblazer LT
One Owner, Don't MissI
$9988 or $199 mo
1-800-733-9138
CHEVY
2006, Equinox LT
Only 14k Miles, 1 Owner
Hurry! Call!
1-800-716-2219
CHEVY
BLAZER '99 LS 4dr. 126k
mi. loaded, great cond. sun-
roof, $4k obo
352-422-0065
CHEVY
TRAILBLAZER
'06 $12,995. Ocala
Volvo. (352) 629-7299
DODGE
2002, Durango LT,
4x4, Must Seel NIcel
$7995 or $169 mo
1-800-733-9138
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air &
exhaust, Exc. Cond.
$6,000 abo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl drive,
class 3 hitch, Orig owner.
Great shape & price.
$8,750. 352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
GMC SUBURBAN
1993 4 WD, 454 rebuilt
eng., new transm., great ti-
res, good cond. $3,700
obo
(352) 201-1413
HONDA
2007, CR-V, EX
24K MIles, 1 Owner,
Sunroof $299 mo, WAC
1-800-716-2219
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, $9,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, V6,
Like new. $9,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
KIA
2008, Rondo V6 Auto,
Crossover Only $13,988
or $239 mo
1-800-733-9138
MAZDA
2007, CX-7 Low Miles -
7 to choose from
$12,990 or $219 mo,
WAC 1-800-716-2219
MAZDA
2008, Tribute
9k Orig Miles, 1 Owner
A Dlamondl $299 mo
1-800-716-2219
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG. Silver
W/black int. Loaded,
57K.Mi. New $64K.Ask
$20K. (352)489-7674
PLYMOUTH
1999, Voyager
7 Pass, Perfect for
Family Only $5995
1-800-733-9138
TOYOTA
'03. 4-Runner SR5, 6 cyl
leather, moon roof
tow pkg. $9,850 firm
(352) 563-9834


1996 DODGE CARGO
VAN $1,800 obo
(352) 572-7984
1997 DODGE CARAVAN
Runs and Looks Great!
New Parts,Rebuilt Tranny
$1450.00 OR Best Offer!
4 Cyclinder 176,000 Miles
(352)476-7185

CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996

CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872

DODGE
'94, Ram 350,
Full size, work Van

(352) 527-2241
Ford
1996 Windstar GL V6,
112k, ml. loaded, cold
a/c, great shape, 8
pass .$2500
(352) 422-2611

MAZDA
'06 MPV.$9,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299

ALAN NUSSO
Licensed Broker









LIFE & HEALTH
INSURANCE
* ANNUITIES
* LONG TERM CARE
* DISABILITY
* LIFE SETTELMENTS
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com





HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains & tows
heavy loads. $4700/or
trade. 352- 563-0615
Crystal River




1995 HONDA HELIX
Motorscooter Exc.
cond. under 11k mi.
LOTS OF DELUXE
EXTRAS I! $2,195 obo
(352) 621-0248
2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900mi. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237


1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's
Dream. $6500.obo
352-228-0597
1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's
Dream. $6500.obo
352-228-0597
'53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, 350 V-8, auto,
May trade in part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door se-
dan. 6 cyl auto. $9,500.
Will consider trade for
travel trailer of equal
value.
(352) 628-4053
CAMARO IROC Z
'88 Red, LT -1 eng.
PS./PB. Cold A.C.
62,000 Mi. Great
Condition. $6,900.
Camaro Z 28, '79
Black 4 spd. super
T-10 Tran. Cam.more,
Must see $6,900.
(352) 422-5663
CHEVROLET
Camaro '68,coupe, 107K
miles, auto, white with
black interior $4,000
stevystewart@gmail.com
CHEVY
'69 Classic C10 SHT BD
350/350 AC, PS,
$15K or trade
(352) 746-9212
CORVETTE
'87 Convertible, Drives,
looks great, 2nd owner, new
top & paint, $9,000 obo
(352) 302-1524
DODGE
Challenger 383/335 HP,
77K mi, manual trans, 8
cyl, interior green, black
interior, $2,900 Contact
angelalansing@
gmail.com(253)276-4784
EL CAMINO
'81 305 auto. All new
interior, & paint. Crager
mags & tires. 4" raised
hood.$3,250.
(352)341-3613.
FORD
'66, F100, V8, auto, org.
California truck, org.
paint, no rust, $7,500.
obo, 726-6864
GM El Camino
'84, 1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint; 63K
mi., $8,900 abo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MERCEDES BENZ
1985 380SL, 2 top roadster.
Drives, looks great. Many
new Mercedes parts.New
A/C. Must see! $8,500. Da-
vid 352-637-6443.
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
trans. & parts. $4,000.
(352) 621-0126


'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. Hi pert.
Over $43,000 in receipts.
17k mi. $12,000
352-563-0615
Crystal River
'04 KAWASAKI
800 Vulcan Classic Hwy &
Sissy bars, windshield,
cover. $3200.Reduced.
352-419-5819

Harley Davidson
2005, XL1200 Custom. Un-
der 7k mi.Screamin Eagle
Performance Pkg & more.
Gar.kept $7500 (352)
209-7495
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80", com-
pletely serviced, good
shape. Ex.
access. $5,895. obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 MI.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
HONDA 04
1300 VFX, thousands in
options, mint condition
$6900 obo
(352) 302-7073
HONDA
Shadow Arrow 06, 714K
,mi. garage kept, not in
rain, floorboard $6200 obo
(347)223-7269 aft 3:30
SCOOTER
S'06 Suzuki, 400
Bergman. 4,200 Mi. Like
new cond. $4,500
(352) 382-2715
SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic inch
S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered Hooker
headers. New Gangster
white walls, seat in all
leather blk ostrich skin,
Paint by Jesse James
painter of Calf., w/Double
Damon signature, House of
Color paint, Bik w/colored
ghost flames on all sheet
metal. 2" Carlini handle
bars. Chrome to max. Thisb
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for nice
tractor w/bucket or bobcat
etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
SUZUKI '06
Boulevard, C50, mint cond.
Only 600 miles.
Call Gary 352-563-5502
VENTO PHANTOM
Scooter, 318 miles, 150CC,
Like new. $2,190/obo.
352-422-2433
YAMAHA
'05 YZ125 DIRT BIKE
Race ready. Many ex-
tras. $2500. 352-
586-1683: 586-9349


967-0407 DAILYCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN,
I purchased a Ski-Barge type boat hull, from Robert
Hutchinson who purchased It from Rodney McRae. �
Anyone with an interest In this boat hull please
contact Oliver Kelley at P.O. Box 489, Homosassa, FL
34487 or call 352-302-3306
Published seven (7) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
April 1,2,3,4,5,6 and 7,2009.

545-0407 TUCRN
5/13 sale Homosassa Storage, Inc.
PUBUC NOTICE
By reason of default, Homosassa Storage, Inc., 8787 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, Florida 34446, will sell the per-
sonal property stored in:
Unit C2, a 10 x 10 unit, containing personal goods of
Gregory Coudriet to be sold at public auction on May 13,
2009 at 10:00 AM.
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
March 31 and April 7, 2009.


547-0407 TUCRN
2009-CP-246 Mildred A. DeVack Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COURT OF FLOR-
IDA, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY
IN PROBATE FILE NO.: 2009-CP-246
IN RE: ESTATE OF MILDRED A. DeVACK, a/k/a
MILDRED ARLYNE DeVACK,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of MILDRED A. DeVACK,
a/k/a MILDRED ARLYNE DeVACK, deceased, whose date
of death was March 7, 2009, and whose Social Security
Number was 044-16-0512, File Number 2009-CP-246, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Ave-
nue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The name and address of the
personal representative and the personal representative's at-
tomey are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against the decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a
copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is 3/31/2009.
Is/ JAMES WILLIAM DeVACK.
Personal Representative
DEAN AND DEAN, L.L.P.
BY: /s/ Susan E. Dean. Esquire Florida Bar No. 746827
230 Northeast 25th Avenue, Ocala, Florida 34470
(352) 368-2800
Attorney for Personal Representative
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
March 31 and April 7, 2009.


546-0407 TUCRN
2009-CP-189 Stephen Sathmary
Notice to Creditors, Summary Administration
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 2009-CP-189
IN RE: ESTATE of STEPHEN SATHMARY,
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Adminis-
tration has been entered in the Estate of
STEPHEN SATHMARY, deceased, File Number
2009-CP-189, by the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that the decedent's
date of death was DEC. 4, 2008: that the total value of the es-
tate is $10,031.25 and that the names and address of those to
whom it has been assigned by such order are:
Stephanie Ann Decker, 10888 Aderman Avenue, Unit
178, San Diego, CA 92126
Stephen Andrew Sathmary, 130 Piney Woods Drive, Jim
Thorpe, PA 18229
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons hav-
ing claims or demands against the estate of the decedent
other than those for whom provision for full payment was
made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY
LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME
PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is 3/31/2009.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ Stephanie Ann Decker
10888 Aderman Avenue, Unit 178
San Diego, CA 92126
Attorney for Person Giving Notice
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A.
/s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esq. Florida Bar No.: 157310
209 Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450
Telephone: (352) 726-1211
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
March 31 and April 7, 2009.












CTrmwUS COUNT (FL) CHRONICLE


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A weekly advertising supplemenT of the Citrus County Chronicle
Autos, Trucks, RVs, ATVs, Motorcycles, Campers & More!


The latest in intelligent auto technology


can help avoid accidents with active


safety measures that all but take the


wheel out of a driver's hands.

By JIM GORZELANY CTW FEATURES


Automotive safety has fast progressed far
beyond air bags and crash-energy ab-
sorbing "crumple zone" construction.
Advanced features such as rear backup cameras
and stability control systems are already relatively
common among all but the least-costly cars. The
next wave of auto safety advancements comes in
the way of so-called driver assistance systems that
help a motorist avoid getting into a collision in
the first place. Some can even take over the con-
trol of a vehicle if necessary.


Research conducted by the German Ministry
of Transport have shown that, if and when they
become widespread, such systems can have a pre-
ventive influence on more than 50 percent of all
accidents. While many current systems remain
available only in higher-end models, expect them
to become more widespread in coming years, ac-
cording to Stephen Lovett, director of the auto-
motive and transportation research practice with
the market research firm Harris Interactive in
Rochester, N.Y. "It's just getting to the tipping


A few luxury autos offer what are dubbed collision

mitigation systems, in which the car takes

precautionary measures like priming the brakes

to full force and tightening the seatbelts if it

determines a crash is unavoidable.


point where within the next two to three models
years, these types of features will be offered on
midsize sedans and become available for the av-
erage consumer.
Such is the case with the blind-spot monitor-
ing system, which is now being offered on a
wider array of models. This uses rear- and or
side-mounted cameras to detect the presence of
vehicles just to the side and rear of a vehicle and
gives visual and audible notifications to alert a
driver to their otherwise unseen presence. Ford
debuted its own version of the technology this
year that further includes " hat the automaker
calls Cross Traffic Alert; this notifies drivers
backing out of a parking space when traffic is
approaching from a vehicle's sides .
Another driver assistance feature that's just
finding its way into additional autos is the lane
departure warning system, which helps keep
inattentive drivers from inadvertently veering
into another line of traffic and causing a colli-
sion. The system looks for highway lane mark-


ings and generates an audible signal if it deter-
mines the vehicle is about to cross them. Nis-
san's latest twist on the technology, available on
the Infiniti EX crossover SUV and FX sedan,
"gently" engages the vehicle's stability control
system, selectively applying the brakes to the ap-
propriate wheel to help nudge it back into the
lane.
Further keeping a watchful eye on a car's
human element to help prevent accidents is Mer-
cedes-Benz's new Attention Assist system. De-
buting later this year, it scrutinizes a car's
steering-wheel input to determine if the driver is
becoming sleepy (or is otherwise impaired), and
will sound an alert and illuminate a "coffee cup"
icon on the dashboard to advise him or her that
it's time to take a break.
A few luxury autos offer what are dubbed col-
lision mitigation systems, in which the car takes
precautionary measures like priming the brakes


SEE SAFER, PAGE 6





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THIS W EEK WITH ANY TEST DRIVE


0


GO ONE YEAR WITHOUT
A CAR PAYMENT

No

Paymbents
TIl


Citrus County Residents Only
Limit (1) Per Family Before 4/30/09


OR


APR

Financing


TOLL FREE
1-866-32-SUZUKI
(1-866-327-8985)


15265 Cortez (S.R. 50)
Just East of Suncoast Pkwy. Exit 46
In Beautiful Brooksville


CRYSTAL RIVER
I-
SR 50 x
TAMPA


Local
352-799-9999


All offers with approved credit. Some offers cannot be combined. All offers must be requested at time of original negotiation. All previous deals or negotiations excluded. All vehicles in limited supply, some may require factory order. All prices based on Dealer retaining all rebates and incentive that customer must
qualify for.All prices plus tax,tag, title and include $499 Dealer deliver fee. No payments til 2010/One Year and 0% Financing offers on select models w/740 Beacon Score and dealers select Lenders final approval. Dealer may elect to compensate Buyer/Customer for normally scheduled payments during No Payment
Period., Customer/Buyer may elect to waive or shorten no Payment period in lieu of further discount or financing incentive. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Test Drive offer limit (1) per family per month,limit 25 maximum thru 4/30/09. Scheduled Test Drive appointment suggested. Please see dealer for complete
details.Test Drivers must be at least year old with valid Drivers License and proof of insurance.


TUESDAY, APRIL 7,
.. 1


D2 ITnv Ai 20097 O


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CITRUS GouNrl' (FL) ClIRoVIcLF %PDF-1.3 TUESDAY, Arnr 7, 2009 D3


,JL]


N1w


it,,


confidence


PAYMENT
PROTECTIbON
GM will pay up to 9
Months on your new
loan or lease"


VEHICLE VALUE VEHICLE WARRANTY
PROTECTION PROTECTION


Your vehicles' retail value
at trade-in will remain
strong when you are ready
to purchase your next GM
vehicle*t


GM Provides:
- 5 Year/100,000 Mile Transferable Warranty
* Roadside Assistance
* Courtesy Transportation
* One Year OnStar 'Safety and Security' Package


GM Certfeds Used
SUPER SALE


'08 CHEVY COBALT
STK#C1034, Super Clean, Automatic
'Slow A~.


Certified
USED VEHICLES


Gm Certified Vehicles Are Carefully
Inspected With Limited Warranties &
Vehicle History Reports.


?6 CHEVY AVALANCHE
STK# C1027

se998


*EXAMPLE: '09 TRAVERSE. STK#95054. $16.67 PER $1000 FINANCED. PLUS TAX, TAG AND TITLE. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. t$14.71 PER $1000 FINANCED. WITH APPROVED CREDIT -BUY FOR $399 PER MO. FOR
72 MOS. WITH $10,000 DOWN. 1.9% APR. WITH APPROVED CREDIT DEALER RETAINS ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TAG, TITLE AND $549 DEALER FEE.


ADVERTISED OFFERS CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH EACH OTHER OR ANY OTHER ADVERTISED OFFER. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY.


ANON


%PDF-1.3


TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 D3


CInRus COUNnT (FL) CHRONICLE


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IJ T UESDAY, APRIL I,209


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- . . " . . '"'":' -,

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If you lose your income in the first year of ownership,


During these uncertain economic times, Hyundai Motor Corporation is offering PEACE OF MIND for America's drives.
For a limited time, the company that protects your car with a 10 YEARI 00,000 MILE WARRANTY is now protecting YOU.
A decade ago, Hyundai pioneered America's Best Warranty to show people the faith we have in our cars. Today, in addition to our warranty,
we are introducing HYUNDAI ASSURANCE, to show you the faith we have in our customers. HYUNDAI ASSURANCE is the first and only
automotive manufacturer vehicle return program. It lets you return your vehicle in case of certain life altering circumstances.


2010 GENESIS COUPE


-IL Lease'

"0 ACCENT -


up 41 MP









200 TIBURON
UP3 MP
TO jHWY" _^ ^^^ ^


20"09SONATA


2008 ELANTRA GLS


it 4.14,
$1NiUMUJI-
F10i~MB1918 S


2000 SANTA FE GLS


g""eTUCSONGLS


2009 GENESIS


.1iJaJIJ


up30mpo

$..a.,


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I ilred....
,\V'rin 4m. fini Cr t he 'I/ iEfjr
- Lh 5ht) ,,,6.o


AMERICA'S BEST WARRANTY 5 s Year 160,000 Mile IDENTITY THEFT
PROTECTIONTPIAN
0 YEAR/I O O MILE Bumper To�Bumper Coverage'
I0 I5 Year Unlimited Miles ( RHYunDRI
POWERTRAIN24 H Roadside Assistance "Car of theYear"
POWERTRAININ WARRANTY 20 Genesis


Advertised prices are plus tax, tag and $599 dealer fe
offers with approved credit and can not be combined.
.anitv nine av. tan &, t00 alel fr te ae at daninRe


WELL


e, are before any dealer installed options and include all available manufacturer rebates & incentives. 0% apr on select models, may affect final offer. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Vehicles subject to prior sale. All
. *Expected range for most drivers, your actual mileage may vaEryiepeudifig 6ff how you drive-and.maintain your vehicle. As listed on Monroney sticker. �Genesis; $399 mo, 36 month lease requires $2599 cash and/or trade
12k miles/year, with approved credit., f 2010 Genesis Coupe, $259 mo. lease x 36 months requires $1999 cish and/or trade due at signing, with approved credit. Some vehicles may require finance through H.M.FC.

ILE YOUR CASH ANDIOR TRADE EQUITY UP TO $5000


1993 Chevrolet Cavalier RS $kA
H8492B....................................... *9 9 0
1996 Dodge Intrepid ES $QQ990
H8653B....... ........ ...............
1997 FordTaurus LX $QQ9
H8949A................ ...... 9
1996 Chrysler Concorde Lxi $990
H8903A................ ........ .
1998 Chevrolet Cavalier $J 1990
H8974C.................................... * ,1
2002 Ford Taurus SE $4 QQ
H9120A.................................. . ....
2002 Hyundai Elaontro GLS $ 990
H8953B................................. . . ....
2000 Ka Sephia $.1 990
H9108A....................................


1992 Ford Thunderbird LX $J 990
H9119B.................................... I v
2000 Mazda 626 LC $q . . .
H8661 B.................................... '"
1999 Oldsmobile Silhouette $ Q
H9130A....................................2 ,9 9 0
2003 Chrysler PT Cruiser $
H9047A................................. .....
2001 Toyota Camry XLE $2,990
H8908B................................. . .....
2003 Buick Century $4 Q0
H9042B...................................
2001 FordTaurus LX 4,990
H8830C ....................................
2003 Ko Sedon EX $........ .. 990
H9070A ...................................." '


I -- W U
LIST PRICE ........ *6,990
YOUR CASH OR TRADE ... *2,500
DOUBLE ............ 2,500
YOU PAY l.*C.-.
jar..i~jjj J^ yJ


f(III


2001 Honda Civic LX $4 990
H8923B........ ................ ........
2001 Chevrolet Blazer LS $4 990
H8875B .................................... 9
2006 Hyundai Elantra LIMITED $ ,990
H9143A ....................................
1999ToyotaRAV4 $ 5,990
H 90 10B ....................................
2003 Chevrolet Tracker LT $ 990
H9050A .... ................................
2002 ChryslerTown and Country LTD $ 990
PH2277A.................................. $,, 9 w
2005 Hyundai Sonata GLS $ 9 QQ 0
H8960A.................................. |
2005 Hyundai Elantra GLS $. . $ 990
H8926B...........................5.....


2002 Chrysler Town and Country LTD
H8996B...................................
2007 Chevrolet Grand Caravan LS
H9066A ................ ..... .........
2006 Hyundai Elantra GLS
H9104A ...................................


i


SALES HOURS: MON-FRI: 9 00AM . i 00PM * ~.AT 9 0(iAM - 8 0PPM
SUN 12 00PM - 6 00PM
SERVICE HOURS: MON.FRI 7 30AM . 7 00PM * SAT 0041M - 5 L00PM
COLLISION CENTER- MON-FRI 7 30AM - 5 30P.M


S Please cdfidadpreea coupon upon sen,9e wnra-up Exp 091W90 v APi usp oSn a0 ', o uporw ..,i& co -F Eo sil, 1 I
I Jenkins Hyundai * 1602 SW College Rd * SR 200 * Ocala I I Jenkins Hyundai * 1602 SW College Rd * SR 200 * Ocala _
278L -i


Itrduc the w


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$5,990
$6,990
*6,990


2003OLDMOBIL
ALERO I***************


Add' I~'it ioa
5' YEA/10,000 MII~H LEII



NO Model Year 31h' R1 stri io


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CrITRS Co 'NiY (FL.) (CIRON.I:C


auto club events information to

wheels@chronicleonline.com

for publication every Tuesday in

the Wheels Section of the




IC I T RU 0 U N T V
C www.chroncleonline.com
awww.chronicleonline.com


TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 DS






the


Auto events listings and cruise events are subject tochange without our knowledge.
Always doublecheck with your favorite event before you decide to attend.

TUESDAY, APRIL 7
CITRUS MODEL A FORD CLUB meets at 7:30 p.m. the first Tuesday
monthly at the Floral City Community Building on County Road 48, Floral City.
Call President Lena Smallwood at 637-6053 or Secretary Karen Thompson at
344:-4232
GWfRRA CHAPTER T, INVERNESS, meets for its monthly meeting on
th ihisi tuesday monthly at B&W Rexall Drug Store, 214 S. U.S. 41,
Inverness, 6 p.m. to eat, 7 p.m. to meet. Call chapter directors Rachel and J.R.
- Harris at 726-6128.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8
- INVERNESS "BIG DOGS" MOTORCYCLE CLUB meets for breakfast
at 8 a.m. Wednesday at rear of B&W Rexall Drugs. Ride follows, all bikes
welcome. Call J.R. and Rachel Harris at 726-6128.
NATURE COAST CORVAIR CLUB meets at 7 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at B&W Rexall Drugs, Inverness. Dutch treat dinner at 6
p.m. Call 344-4210.
THURSDAY, APRIL 9
CITRUS COUNTY CRUISERS car club conducts monthly business
meetings at 7 p.m. the second Thursday monthly at ABC Pizza, U.S. 19,
Crystal River. Call Jim Moran of 527-0024 or Lester at 628-7021.
GOLD WING ROAD RIDERS CHAPTER FL1-R of Dunnellon meets at
6:30 p.m. on the second, third and fourth Thursday of each month at
McDonald's in Dunnellon. Monthly gathering is the first Thursday at the Charlie
Horse Restaurant, 20049 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, 6 p.m. to eat and
7:30 to meet. Call chapter director Bruce Schlimme at (352) 465-1228.
GOLD WING ROAD RIDERS ASSOCIATION CHAPTER T of
Inverness kick tire at 6 p.m. Thursday at Burger King parking lot, corner of
U.S. 41 and S.R. 44 East. Call directors Rachel, JR Harris at 726-6128 or Ken
and Jackie Smith at (352) 476-7151.
FRIDAY, APRIL 10
NAT[.JlE COAST MUSTANGS meets at 7 p.m. Friday at the Wendy's on
U.S. 19'ih Homosassa across from the wildlife park. Bring your car and enjoy a
fun evening. Call Bob at 860-2598.
SATURDAY, APRIL 11
CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY: Curry Roofing 100 Lops Mini Stock,
Open Wheel Moddied, Sportsman, Pure Stock, V8 Thunder Stock, 4 Cylinder
Bombers, Fig 8. Any additional questions please contact the speedway of
,3521 726-9339
CITRUS COUNTY CRUISERS car (lub invites you to its cruise-in from 6 to
9 p m Saturday at Kings Bay Plaza (next lo Wendy's) in Crystal River Conned
good are collected for local chanties (all Jim Moran at 527-0024 or Lester
Bames 628-7021
NATURE COAST ENGLISH CAR CLUB meets at 8 a.m. the second
Saturday monthly at Silverthorn Country Club, 4550 Country Club Lane,
Brooksville.:Call Bob Shutler, president, at (352) 597-7564.
NATURE .COAST RETREADS meets at 8 a.m. Saturday at Horrington's
Restaurant, 4135 S. Suncoost Blvd., Homosasso. A ride follows. All styles of
motorcycles are welcome. Call Jacque at 637-4693 or Dove at 628-2401.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15
INVERNESS "BIG DOGS" MOTORCYCLE CLUB meets for breakfast
at 8 a.m. Wednesday at rear of B&W Rexall Drugs. Ride follows, all bikes
welcome. Call J.R. and Rachel Harris at 726-6128.
THURSDAY, APRIL 16
GOLD WING ROAD RIDERS CHAPTER FL1-R of Dunnellon meets at
6:30 p.m. on the second, third and fourth Thursday of each month oat
McDonald's in Dunnellon. Monthly gathering is the first Thursday at the Charlie
Horse Restaurant, 20049 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, 6 p.m. to eat and
7:30 'o iTiel. Call chapter director Bruce Schlimme at (352) 465-1228.
GOLD .1 G ROAD RIDERS ASSOCIATION CHAPTER T of
riv0iis.i(r. rue at 6 p.m. Thursday at Burger King parking lot, corner of
i S 4tr-dnd S P 44 East. Call directors Rachel, JR Harris at 726-6128 or Ken
and Jackie Smith at {352) 476-7151.
SATURDAY, APRIL 18
CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY:Street Stock, Pure Stock, V8 Thunder
Stock, 4 Cylinder Bombers, Bass Champions Challenge Series, FOWL, Desoto
Champ Karts, Mini Cup. Any additional questions please contact the speedway
at (352) 726-9339.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22
INVERNESS "BIG DOGS" MOTORCYCLE CLUB meets for breakfast
at 8 a.m. Wednesday at rear of B&W Rexall Drugs. Ride follows, all bikes
welcome. Call J.R. and Rachel Harris at 726-6128.
THURSDAY, APRIL 23
GOLD WING ROAD RIDERS CHAPTER FL1-R of Dunnellon meets at
6:30 p.m. on the second, third and fourth Thursday of each month at
McDonald's in Dunnellon. Monthly gathering is the first Thursday at the Charlie
Horse Restaurant, 20049 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, 6 p.m. to eat and
7:30 to meet. Call chapter director Bruce Schlimme at (352) 465-1228.
GOLD WING ROAD RIDERS ASSOCIATION CHAPTER T of
Inverness kick tire at 6 p.m. Thursday at Burger King parking lot, corner of
U.S. 41 and S.R. 44 East. Call directors Rachel, JR Harris at 726-6128 or Ken
and Jackie Smith at (352) 476-7151.
SATURDAY, APRIL 25 _____
CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY: Checkered Flag Sprints, Sportsman, Mini
Stock, Street Stock, 4 Cylinder Bombers, Bass Champions Challenge Series.
Any additional questions please contact the speedway at (352) 726-9339.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29 ____
INVERNESS "BIG DOGS" MOTORCYCLE CLUB meets for breakfast
at 8 a.m. Wednesday at rear of B&W Rexall Drugs. Ride follows, all bikes
welcome. Call J.R. and Rachel Harris at 726-6128.
THURSDAY, APRIL 30 _____
GOLD WING ROAD RIDERS CHAPTER FL1-R of Dunnellon meets at
6:30 p.m. on the second, third and fourth Thursday of each month at
McDonald's in Dunnellon. Monthly gathering is the first Thursday at the Charlie
Horse Restaurant, 20049 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, 6 p.m. to eat and
7:30 to meet. Call chapter director Bruce Schlimme at (352) 465-1228.


Send us your automotive and









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Steering


;, ..� ,- .� . ,-' ' ' i


MINI DRIVER I/Fmll
TTT nrrmA rTA TAFXT'rTmI


Q: I've been interested in the MINI Cooper for a time. But I live
in New Hampshire and I think the closest dealer is in Peabody or
Danvers, Mass. This means every time I'd need to service the car, I'd
have to go to Massachusetts. I did talk to one lady here who drove
one and she told me about a repairperson in Concord, but the serv-
ice prices are too steep. Have you heard of any dealer who might be
in New Hampshire or might be coming to the state?
A: I found a couple of options for you that don't require you to
go to Massachusetts. There's BMW of Stratham, N.H. not that far
from you - they also sell MINIs, and, of course, provide service.
And then there's Independent BMW and MINI Cooper in Chichester
- again, not that far away - which is a dealer and service of pre-
owned BMWs and MINIs.
You can check them out, and also, ask about usual and customary
charges for the routine service you'll have to get. Good luck

Many people swear by STP. I've never seen anything
proving enough of a benefit that I'd buy it. But if it makes
you feel like you're doing something special for your
vehicle, it's a pretty cheap way to give yourself a boost.

Q: A few weeks back you answered a question about "Slick 50."
Now I would like you to comment on STP oil additive. I have used
it faithfully for many years. My mechanic keeps telling me, "it's just
oil." Does STP really do what it says in the advertising?
A: I rarely try to dissuade someone from buying a product they've
used successfully for years, provided it's not dangerous or woefully
overpriced. Many people swear by STP. I've never seen anything
proving enough of a benefit that I'd buy it. But if it makes you feel
like you're doing something special for your vehicle, it's a pretty
cheap way to give yourself a boost.
Q: I have a 2003 Oldsmobile Silhouette van that has moisture in
the headlight lens assembly. How did this happen? Can I get rid of
the moisture or do I have to replace them? How do I prevent this
from ever happening again.
A: It may be condensation that will disappear on its own as the
temperatures change or if the air gets less humid. Or it could be rain
or highway water that seeped in as a result of the lens seal being de-
fective (or just not as effective as it once was) or because of a loose
dustcap.
There's very little agreement on whether you should tackle this as
a do-it-yourself job (provided the moisture doesn't disappear on its
own). Some really, really handy people say that on some vehicles
(but not all) it's possible to get in there, let it air dry (don't touch the
headlight lens because it's treated with an anti fog substance that you
don't want to disrupt), put everything back together, use a good
sealant to create the proper barrier, and you're set. Others say that on
most vehicles, this is a task similar to dismantling and rebuilding the
Parthenon, and tackling this makes about as much sense as cobbling
your own shoes.
Start by calling your dealership's service department to see what
information they can give you about dissembling the unit on your
particular model. That can inform your decision about whether you
want to move ahead with on your own.
As to keeping it from happening again, make sure the seal job is
excellent. If you've had the job done professionally, run the van
through a car wash a couple of times soon after you pick it up so you
can discover early on if it's still a problem and if it is, take it back im-
mediately for more work. � CTWFeatures

What's your question?

Sharon Peters would like to hear whal's on your mind when
it comes to caring for. driving, repairing and making the
most of your chicle. Send .,our questions to
sharoni_'c,.c featrurs.com


Safer
Continued from Page 6
to full force and tightening the
seatbelts if it determines a crash
is unavoidable. The Pre-Colli-
sion System offered in the hy-
brid-powered Lexus LS 600h L
luxury sedan goes a step further
by actually helping a driver
avoid hitting obstacles - even
pedestrians - in the vehicle's
path. Here, two video cameras
monitor the road ahead, while
another is focused on the driver's
face. If the system de-
termines that the driver
isn't keeping his or her -
attention on the road . .'
while it also "sees" an

While such technol-
ogy paves the way
for future cars that
are able to drive
themselves on sen-
sor-embedded
"smart" highways,
industry analysts
remain uncon- .'
vinced that many
motorists will be
willing to relinquish
control of their vehi-
cles any time soon.


object or pedestrian in the car's
path it will not only set off audi-
ble and visual alerts but will also
apply the brakes and reprogram
the steering for maximum quick-
ness to help the driver steer clear
of the obstacle.
Meanwhile, Volvo's latest ac-
cident avoidance system, called
City Safety, is being offered in
the new XC60 crossover SUV. It
works to prevent fender benders
at speeds up to 18 mph by auto-
matically applying the brakes if
the system determines the driver
isn't reacting fast enough to avoid


II1Nruia llIVIIN I ;


THE LATEST AUTOMOTIVE
GADGETRY CAN GO A LONG
WAY TOWARD MAKING THE
TIME SPENT BEHIND THE
WHEEL MORE ENJOYABLE.

By JIM GORZELANY I CTW FEATURES
{J ""oday's cars no longer just carry their occupants from Point
( A to Point B. Thanks to advancements in automotive "in-
P fotainment" technology they can inform and entertain pas-
. sengers along the way like never before.
"The best of the latest infotainment systems are the ones that are
the most relevant to driving situations," says Stephen Lovett, direc-


tor of the Automotive and Transportation Re-
search Practice with the market research firm
Harris Interactive in Rochester, N.Y. "These are
systems that can actually make you more produc-
tive when you're behind the wheel."
To that end, this year Ford rolled out the new
Sirius Travel Link service on various Ford, Mer-
cury and Lincoln models that is ideally suited to
road warriors. It provides weather conditions and
forecasts, sports scores, traffic information,
nearby gasoline prices and even movie times both
locally, along a route and at a destination. Typi-
cally bundled with an optional GPS navigation
system, the service requires a $6.99 monthly sub-
scription.
Not to be outdone, BMW is incorporating
Google maps into the 3 Series' available BMW
assist-enabled navigation system via a wireless
Internet connection. This subscription-based serv-
ice allows motorists to search for restaurants, ho-
tels, service stations, banks, supermarkets,
cinemas and public facilities by keyword, then at


In the latch
the typi(
had few(
35 butto
levers wi
driver's
Today, lux
boast mc
100 - and!
Some wonf
are becor
difficult
average r
to ope


the push of a button initiate route guidance and place hands-free calls
to the selected site via a Bluetooth-enabled cell phone.
For those seeking even deeper in-car Web access, Chrysler LLC
is offering the dealer-installed connectt web" accessory on its 2009
Chrysler, Dodge and Jeep models. The device enables laptop com-
puters and other Wi-Fi-enabled devices such as Apple's iPhone and
iPod Touch and the Nintendo DS portable gaming system to connect
to the Internet via a wireless network. The Wi-Fi module costs $499,
with Autonet Mobile assessing a $29 per month subscription fee (in
one, two or three-year plans) for Internet connectivity.
The jury remains out, however, on whether tomorrow's cars will
feature dashboard-mounted PCs with complete Internet and e-mail
capability. "I'm still not sold on the idea of a driver having full ac-
cess to the Internet," says Mike Marshall, director of automotive
emerging technologies at the research firm J.D. Power and Associ-
ates, Westlake Village, Calif. "I just don't see that happening from a


hitting a stopped vehicle in its
path.
While such technology paves
the way for future cars that are
able to drive themselves on sen-
sor-embedded "smart" highways,
industry analysts remain uncon-
vinced that many motorists will
be willing to relinquish control of
their vehicles any time soon.
"When we start to look at
technologies that can take the
helm and steer the vehicle, we
have to understand we could be
infringing on drivers' comfort
zones, which is the exact oppo-


site of the technology
explains Harris's Step
According to Mik
director of automotive
technologies at the re
J.D. Power and As
Westlake Village, Ca]
matter of consumers
coming to trust the t
"When they first cam
ple didn't trust antilo
they still pumped the
took a long learning
build the trust that A
work as advertised."


y's intent,"
)hen Lovett.
e Marshall,


legal standpoint because of driver distraction issues."
Meanwhile, on the entertainment front, automakers are finding
novel ways to intelligently integrate and control various components.
Ford made a splash last year when it launched the innovative Sync
system it developed in collaboration with Microsoft. Now offered
across the Ford, Lincoln and Mercury models, Sync makes it possi-
ble to operate multiple devices, from cell phones to an iPod, navi-
gation system and audio array, in a car or truck on a hands-free basis.
Devices can be connected either via a standard audio input, USB
port or Bluetooth wireless interface. Next year the system will be
upgraded with traffic updates, turn-by-turn directions, weather con-
ditions and personalized news reports, all enabled via the driver's
Bluetooth-enabled cell phone.
Hoping to refine such systems a step further, Lexus will introduce
a new "casual voice recognition" system in its 2010 RX crossover
SUV that acknowledges conversational commands instead of the
typical menu-based directions most voice-acti-
e 1960s, vated automotive systems employ.
cal car While backseat DVD entertainment systems are
now routinely offered on most minivans, SUVs
er than and large sedans to keep the kiddies entertained on
ns and car trips, select Chrysler, Dodge and Jeep models
go a step further by making available in-car satel-
thin the lite TV. The Sirius Backseat TV system currently
reach. delivers three channels of satellite-beamed kids'
programming on a subscription basis from Cartoon
(ury cars Network, Disney Channel and Nickelodeon, with
re than additional channels on the way, including a mobile
version of ESPN.
counting. Several new models today integrate an iPod-like
der if cars hard-disk drive into their premium audio systems
for in-car storage and playback of digital music
ning too files. But the Cadillac CTS midsize luxury sedan
for the goes a step further by including a hard drive that
not only stores music but also acts like an in-car
motorist TiVo, automatically buffering radio broadcasts
rate. while the audio system is muted (such as when the
driver is taking a cell-phone call).
While all of this in-dash gadgetry can make the most of a long
commute or road trip, there's the worry that today's function-packed
cars are simply becoming too difficult for the average motorist to
operate. "In the late 1960s the typical cabin had less than 35 buttons
and levers within the driver's reach. By the mid-1980's, there were
less than 50. Today a typical luxury car can feature over 100 buttons
or levers within the driver's reach," Marshall explains. "The question
is whether the rate at which we can master such systems is greater
than the rate at which these things become more complex."
Analysts say that the best way they can ensure consumers will ac-
cept and embrace high-tech infotainment features is for automakers
to make them inherently effortless to operate.
"As we provide more information to the driver and passengers we
have to make sure they can access it in a user-friendly manner,"
Lovett says. "Like everything in the automobile business, execution
is key." � CTWFeatures



TALK THE TECH


ie emerging * Adaptive Cruise Control: Automatically maintains both a maxi-
search finn mum speed and minimum distance from the traffic ahead, slow-
sociates in ing down and speeding up the vehicle as necessary
lif., it's all a * Antilock Braking System: Prevents wheel lockup and a loss of
eventually control when braking or cornering while braking by rapidly
technology. pumping the brakes when wheel slippage is detected
ne out, peo- * Brake Assist: Automatically applies maximum braking power in
ck brakes - a panic-stop
e brakes. It * Electronic Brakeforce Distribution: Adjusts braking pressure
g curve to front to rear to for sure stopping power.under heavy braking
ABS would * Hill Descent Control: Automatically maintains a smooth down-
hill descent without the driver having to apply the brakes.
SCTUr'F.eaiu * Hill Start Assist: Keeps braking pressure engaged for a short
period after the driver lifts his or her foot off the pedal to keep a
vehicle from rolling back when facing uphill.
S , * Intelligent Headlamps: High-intensity headlamps that aulomati-
- . cally pivot in relation to a vehicle's steenng angle to help light the
way at night through curves, some automatically adjust their light-
ing intensity on a straight road so as not to blind oncoming traffic.
S ,* Rear Backup Camera: Provides a bumper-height view of the
area immediately behind a vehicle when the transmission is
shifted into reverse, displaying it on a monitor incorporated into
the dashboard or rearview mirror
* Stability Control: Allows a driver to maintain control n extreme
handling situations, based on wheel slippage, via selective
braking and reduced throttle input; many SUVs and crossovers
add a feature that reacts similarly if the system detects a vehi-
. cle is in danger of rolling over.
r . . * Tire Pressure Monitor: Alerts the driver when air pressure in
one or more tires is too low; some vehicles give individual pres-
sure readouts for each wheel
* Trailer Sway Control: Uses selective braking to reduce trailer
sway and maintain optimal handling while towing


D6 TuISol)AY, APln. 7, 2009









TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 D7


B hold the 2010 SRX, otherwise
known as the incredible shrinking
Cadillac.
The SRX represents yet another new direc-
tion for General Motors and its premium divi-
sion. Its mission statement would now appear
to read: keep it small, keep it lively and above
all keep it fuel efficient.
Focusing on those points was likely a chal-
lenge in itself, but the new SRX also had some
pretty big shoes to fill. The outgoing model was
a compelling alternative to some of Caddy's
bigger rigs, in particular the XXL-sized Es-
calade.
The first-generation SRX, which was intro-
duced for the 2004 model year, owed its popu-
larity to providing plenty of Cadillac-style
amenities in a wagon package that could ac-
commodate up to seven passengers. All-wheel-
drive and a 4.6-liter V8 were offered as options.
The upcoming edition that arrives this sum-
mer will be a scaled-down version of the origi-
nal, which is surprising since most automakers
- including Cadillac - have been heading in
the opposite direction with successive editions
of their products.
What this car really
delivers is improved
fuel economy and
lively performance
in a trimmer, more
tasteful wrapper.


The tale of the tape reveals the incumbent
SRX to be close to five-inches shorter overall
and the distance between the front and rear
wheels has been significantly reduced by half a
foot. It's only in width where the new model
outpoints the old by 2.5 inches.
As well, cargo volume behind the rear seat
and with the second row folded flat has de-
creased by about 10 percent. That's not a huge
amount, but the previously optional third-row
bench is no longer offered.
The new SRX is a significant departure
when it comes to design. The previous boxy --
and even top-heavy - look is now sleeker and
is fronted by a much bolder grille that provides
a major point of differentiation from the other
wagons in this Caddy's class.
On the inside, Cadillac's stylists have dis-
played admirable restraint in fashioning the
cabin. The wood and alloy trim are tasteful and
the neatly stitched leather (and leather-like)
dashboard and seat coverings appear as crisp as
an expertly tailored suit.
What lies beneath the business end of the
SRX clearly displays further evidence ofCadil-
lac's restraint. The vehicle's original base 3.6-
liter V6 has been scaled back to 3.0 liters of
displacement, although horsepower has been
slightly increased to 265 fiom 255. Optional is
an all-new 2.8-liter turbocharged V6 that ham-
mers out an estimated 300 horsepower. That's
20 ponies less than the outgoing V8, but Cadil-
lac is broadly hinting that uiel economy will be
significantly better without any major power
disruption. Additionally, the automatic that
functions with the 3.0 comes with an "eco"
mode that adjusts the shift points for maximum
fuel economy.


B, MALCOLM GUNN

Each engine receives its own six-speed au-
tomatic transmission, both of which feature
control paddles for those who prefer the hands-
on approach to shifting.
Though the V8 is history, all-wheel-drive
(AWD) returns as an option, but in an im-
proved package. Up to 100 percent of the
torque can now be seamlessly transferred to
the rear wheel -just one rear wheel - that
has the most grip, or the outside rear wheel
when turning at high speeds. AWD also
comes with shock absorbers that can instantly
adjust for varying road conditions to improve
ride quality. Bear in mind that the standard
SRX drives the front wheels where most
Cadillacs favor the rear. Whether this is a
shift in Cadillac culture remains to be seen.
Of course, being a Cadillac, a lengthy list of
comfort/convenience items comes with the
nameplate. Additional items for purchase in-
clude: larger 20-inch wheels (18s are standard);
three-dimensional-imaging navigation system
with a pop-up screen; adaptive headlights that
swivel in sync with the vehicle steering; up-
graded audio system with hard-disk-drive stor-
age capacity; and dual-screen entertainment
units.
Of course there are the requisite six airbags
(including full-length side-curtains), but safety
is augmented by special high-strength steel in
the rocker-panel area that adds extra side im-
pact protection.
The new SRX should make converts of
those who believe that big size and an equally
brawny V8 are luxury-model mainstays. What
this car really delivers is improved fuel econ-
omy and lively performance in a trimmer, more
tasteful wrapper.


* *** *^ ~ ~ ~ g ~ -

., ~ I "*. 2.~fi
� i

''Sib,.. '',"-


Base price: $39,000
Refreshed for 2010, offers comfort, quality.
Optional hybrid.


Audi Q5


Base price: $38,000
New-for-2009 wagon with sporty handling.
AWD standard.


Lincoln MKX


Base price: $38,500
Superior styling with decent power and fuel economy.
Well priced.


CITI.is C('()l \n) (Fl,) CnIIi(W)\i(.iE


What





should


know



2010


Cadillac SRX


Type Four-door, front- /all-wheel-drive five-passen-
ger mid-size wagon
Engines 3.0-liter DOHC V6 (265 hp); 2.8-liter DOHC
V6, turbocharged (300 hp)
Transmissions
Six-speed automatic with optional manual-shift
controls.
Market position
Up-level wagons are all the rage these days,
which makes the SRX desirable and politically
correct as larger sport-utility vehicles have
fallen out of favor.
Points 'Great design vastly improved over original. '
V6 engines tuned to deliver power and fuel
economy. V8? What V8? A front-wheel-dnve
Caddy? Is this a sign of the things to come?
No more third-row seating Enhanced al-.
wheel-drive system engineered to provide bet-
ter traction.' SRX represents new direction for
Cadillac in developing smaller, more efficient
luxury vehicles.
Safety Front airbags; side-impact airbags; side-curtain
airbags; anti-lock brakes;
traction control; stability control.
The numbers MPG (city/hwy):
18/26 (3.0, FWD, est.)
Base price: $40,000 (est., incl. destination)

By comparison



Lexus RX350









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


D8 TUESDAYAPRIL ? 20 9


BIG DEALS


IN THE USED-CAR MARKET, BIGGER IS BETTER WHEN
IT COMES TO FINDING BARGAINS THESE DAYS.


By JAY KOBLENZ
CTW FEATURES


With a gallon of gas still
bouncing around the $4 mark,
many drivers are reacting by un-
ceremoniously dumping their in-
efficient SUVs and pickup trucks.
After all, keeping the fuel tank
filled is an owner's biggest auto-
motive outlay, right?
Wrong. The largest ownership
expense with most any new car,
truck or SUV is its depreciation -
the amount in which its value as a
used vehicle falls over time.
According to the October 2008
issue of Consumer Reports maga-
zine, "on average, depreciation ac-
counts for a whopping 45 percent
of a new vehicle's ownership costs
over the first five years." That's an
amazing number and often
amounts to far more than the cost
of the fuel going into a vehicle's
tank.
Consumer Reports analyzed
ownership costs for new and used
versions of the
same vehicles. Since th
Comparing the
five-year own- "sticker'
ership costs in-
volved in pre-own
buying a three-
year-old car or trucks, th
truck, versus a
comparable supply a
brand-new
model, the mag- dictate wl
azine found a
difference that ket will
varied from a
low of $8,250 given mal
for a compact
Ford Escort vehic
sedan to a high
of $25,500 for a
full-size Chevrolet Tahoe SUV.
Choosing a used vehicle instead of
a new one can,save buyers a con-
siderable amount of money and,
according to the magazine, will be
nearly as reliable in most cases.
What are currently the best
deals out there among the current
inventory of used models? Since
there are no "sticker" prices for
pre-owned cars and trucks, the
forces of supply and demand dic-
tate what the market will bear for
a given make, model or vehicle
type. Not surprisingly, smaller and
more fuel-efficient models are in
the greatest demand these days
and are selling at a premium on
used-car lots. Meanwhile, the val-
ues of used trucks and SUVs are
plummeting at an increasing pace.
Fuel prices are having a direct
and profound affect on resale
prices at both ends of the spec-
trum. "We estimate that for every
one dollar increase in gas, large
pickups decline in value by
$2,200, on average," says Ter-
rence W. Wynne, director of edi-
torial and data services for the
National Automobile Dealers As-
sociation Used Car Guide. "By
contrast, for intermediate and
compact cars, a one dollar increase
in fuel costs lifts resale prices by
an estimated $980."
As fuel prices rose during the
first quarter of 2008, the average
wholesale price of used vehicles
sold at auctions declined among
SUVs, pickup trucks, CUVs
(crossover utility vehicles) and
vans. Used pickup truck and SUV
prices fell 11.2 and 9.6 percent, re-
spectively, on one- to five-year-old
vehicles, according to NADA


e






n



h





k


CIO


data.
For those who still require a
pickup or SUV for purposeful-
needs like hauling, towing and
carrying passengers comfortably,
that just means it is now bargain-
hunting season. This is particu-
larly true as we head into winter
when the peak buying period
winds down. "A large inventory
overhang of aging pre-owned
trucks and SUVs in dealer stocks
threatens potential major whole-
sale losses," according to analysis
of nearly 200,000 vehicles in a
study by FirstLook Analytics, a
firm offering analysis software,to
auto dealerships.
Those blindly following the
crowd and looking to trade-in a
gas-guzzler for a more fuel-effi-
cient car without first running the
numbers can easily fall into the
oxymoronic trap of "saving
money at any cost," especially
given the low trade-in values most
trucks and SUVs currently com-
mand. "While it might be tempt-
ing to
ere are no trade-in
your big
prices for suv after
spending
d cars and $1o00 to fill
its gas tank,
e forces of it is impor-
tant you take
id demand everything
into consid-
iat the mar- eration be-
fore you
bear for a decide to
change ve-
e, model or hicles or you
may end up
e type. spending
thousands of
dollars to
save hundreds," says Jack R.
Nerad, executive editorial director
and executive market analyst for
the car-pricing service KelleyBji,,,
Book.
Along those lines, buying a
used vehicle that's in less demand,
and thus has a depressed resale
value - even a large and thirsty
SUV - might save a motorist
enough on the initial purchase to
pay for several years' worth of
fuel. By comparison, having to
pay a premium to drive a trendy,
high-demand used car that has a
low rate of depreciation - Con,
summer Reports cites the Toyota
Prius and MINI Cooper in this re-
gard - might negate any advan-
tages of buying used versus new.
And it's no bargain to trade-in a
vehicle that's already paid for and
assume a monthly car payment,
just to save what might wind up
being only a nominal amount of
money on gasoline.
And be aware that while depre-
ciation is the biggest cost element,
maintenance and insurance can
vary widely among vehicles.
Newer, more expensive models
tend to cost more to insure than
older ones, for example, and
sporty cars are generally the costli-
est to cover, overall. Maintenance
costs are generally higher for older
cars, but not by much. Late-model
used cars tend to be far more reli-
able than they once were, accord-
ing to Consumer Reports. "When
properly maintained, many vehi-
cles can now reach 200,000 miles
or more without a major prob-
lem," according to the magazine.

0 CTW Featuresm,


2. Buick trim feature
3. Tasty fruit, or used-car
description
4. DaimlerChrysler's high-output
brand
5. Esteem replacement
6. Foldaway rear seat, once
7. Power feature first offered in '46
8. Honda's variable valvetraln
10. McLaren-made Mercedes
11. XLR or SRX
12. Vin Diesel's "XXX" Pontiac
13. Oil gauge
16. Flywheel shroud
17. Before fuel injection
19. Common to Caddy STS-V,
XLR-V and Jaguar S-Type R
COPYRIGHT WHEELBASE


JET SKI
'96, Excel. cond. w/ trailer,
runs exceptional well
$1,900. (352) 795-9847




24 FT CRESTLINER
PONTOON
14 passenger w/traller
$65,000 obo
(352) 382-7039
1993 17' Sylvan
Boat & trallor
85h.p. Yamaha motor
Good cond. $3,500
(352) 344-0457
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic Inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
AIRSTREAM
25ft. Safari, Unused.
stored 4 yrs. as new
loaded SAVE 30K
Tel (352) 563-2668
Cell (352) 308-1431
AQUA SPORT'05
175 Osprey , 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual bat.
w/switch, bimini, easy load
trailer. Low hours.
$10,800/obo 352-860-0277
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
.115 hpJohnson just
rebuilt 5 yr. war. Ready to
fish. Reduced $10.5001
352-746-5856
Cabin Cruiser 24 ft.
Owner died, 6 cyl. 10,
alpha one/OD, used in
fresh water, tan. gatri
Incl.'d $2,500 464-0316
CAPE HORN
'94 17'2, 8ft. wide.
C/C. Merc.90 HP. outboard
W/Trailer
$4,100(352)634-4793
CENTURY
'01- Bay, 21ft.
'02, 150HP Yamaha w/
trlr., custom cover
dep/find, VHF, Iw hrs.,
like new, $13,950.
(352) 442-7772
Deck Boat
95' 19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ra-
dio & fishfinder. New Bat-
tery switch. 2 batteries,
power pk.
prop./hub.$7,000




w/ trlr. $15,900. will
trade (352) 503-3778
MAY CRAFT
'02.,Center console,19
Ft. 115 Yam. 50 Hrs.
Showroom cond. Color
elec.,trim tabs. VHF,
Bimini, alum. trailer + ex-
tras. Beige, deep V, shal-
low draft, high free board
hull. Must sell
$11,900.
(352) 563-5628
NEW 2021 Tahoe
Boat Trailer Disc brakes
on both axles, Never
had a boat on it.
$2,475. (352) 527-3555
PONTOON BOAT
08' 20 Ft. To many
options to list. $13,000
Call for info. 628-7926
Pontoon Boat
1996, 18 ft., 40HP Yamaha,
4 stroke, $8,500
(352) 860-1490
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras $12,000
(352) 628-0281
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras $12,000
(352) 628-0281
PROLINE W/CUTTY
'95, 20' 120 HP
Marc. Dep/find.
Radio, fish rigging.
Includes trailor. Good cond.
REDUCED $5,900.Call
Pete @
(352) 746-4969
TWO KAYAKS
Eddyllne 12' plus access,
like new $1700 for both
(352)341-1702


175HP Mariner w/jack
plate, $7000/obo.
404-557-5628



05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
26inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.

38FT BOUNDER '96
Class-A - basement
model. 49K ml. 14mpg,
new tires & brakes. (4)
TV's. Ready for long trip.
22 352-563-0615
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 38 K Mi.
Dual air. $36,000 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane 30Q, class
A motor home, 31 ft., 22k
mi. V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed, etc.
Saturn tow Avail. $35,000.
Lets talk (352) 397-5007
GEORGIE BOY
'05, Pursuit, Class A,
30ft.
Excel. cond. 8k mi.,
2 slide outs, 2 TV's, back
up camera, all the bells
and whistles and much
more, must see this
coach, Asking $50,000.
obo (352) 746-7626

GULF STREAM
'07 BT Cruiser, 22' 8K.Mi.
Hitch & tow bar. Like new.
$45,0000
(352) 875-8890
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool, club-
house etc.
$29,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$55,995. 352-464-0371
Winnebago
'94 32' class A,
Clean no pets/or smoke.
$9,500 Or Obo.
(352) 746-1169



BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig. Like
new. $9,995. 352-489-3661
FIFTH WHEEL
30 Ft. Aijo W/slide-out.
Good cond. Moving must
sell. $5,200 or trade.
Obo. (352) 214-3688
KODIAK
'04, Hybrid Travel Trir. AC,
Heat, Micro. Tub/ Shwer,
toilet exc cond $9,500.
352-564-4151
MEADOWBROOK
5th Wheel, 2000 Excel-
lent. Photos at
httpl/picasaweb.google.conm
meadowbrook.Glenn
- $13,995.00 (352)302-6055
or (727)692-9045
TRAIL CRUISER '04
17FT, light weight,
fully loaded. Used
10 times. $6800.
352-628-4522



99 Mitsubishi Eclipse,
wrecked, for parts, exc. 2.0
16 val eng. auto. trans. 2
sets of wheels/tires 117km .
302-2781 464-0220



08 CUSTOM BUILT
Pontiac Convertible
Show Car. Invested over
$15k See to appreciate!
Only valid offers !
(352) 382-7039
1992 BUICK REGAL
4-door, one owner
34k mi., will need a little
body work $4,800
after 4pm (352) 563-1893


V6, new tires & breaks.
-No rust. Very good cond.
Asking $2,500 firm
(352) 503-6666 ask for
Joe
'97 MAZDA MX5
Miata - Only 72k miles.
New tires. NICEI $4500.
352-382-9004
BUICK
2005, Lacrosse
Fully Loaded w/Leather
$11,988 or $209 mo
1-800-733-9138
BUICK Century 1995
Looks and runs like new!
Lots of extras. 117K Miles
$ 1,700 Call Andy at
352 344-2125
CADILLAC '01
Catera, 34k mi, MMNTi
White w/leather. $6300/obo.
845-282-3504
CADILLAC
1997, Deville
Extremely Clean, Low
Mileage, Only $6995
1-800-733-9138
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715
CHEVY
'96 camaro, Conv. rare
5 spd, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
blk, depend.
$4700 352- 563-0615
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, 86K mil.
T -top roof, Excellent con-
d1tion $12,000., will trade
for truck. 352-563-6428
HONDA
'01, Civic Alloy Wheels
Sunroof & More $7990
or take over pmts $190
mo. 1-800-716-2219
HONDA
2003, Accord Great
Sedan, Gotta Seel
$11,988 or $199 mo
1-800-733-9138
HONDA Civic, 1998
Mechanic's
Special...Great wheels
and tires, rebuilt transmis-
sion. Well
maintained...but won't
start. $630 firm.
352-503-7064
JAGUAR
2002, S-Type Leather,
Sunroof, 39k Orig Miles
1 Owner - Call!
1-800-716-2219
LINCOLN
2000, Continental
Loaded, Low Miles
$6995 or $129 mo
1-800-733-9138
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well main- tainted.
$2650. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
MAZDA 3
'07, $11,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'01 CLK,$16,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'05, $25,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCURY
200 Grand Marquis
Low Miles, Fully Equipd
$8995 or $189 mo
1-800-733-9138
MERCURY SABLE
1994, very good cond.,
cold air, $1,700.
(352) 726-6432
MGB
Convertible 1977, 57k mi.
Blue, many xtras Excellent
Condition
$10,500 (352)628-0281
NISSAN
'07 Altima, $13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
SATURN
'06 Vue, Auto.
$11,995. Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
SMART CAR 08
Passion Loaded 40mpg
red/black only 2700mi
352-341-0316
TOYATA
'07 Avalon, XLS. Garage
kept. 28.5K. Mi. 17" alloy
wheels, sun roof.
$19,500.(352) 382-5941
VOLVO
' 04 S-60 $8,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299


'05 S60,Sharp
$14,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-60, Low miles.
$17,995 Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC90,$22,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 S-60, $18,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S40, S$20,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
2007, S40
Drive luxury for less
$13,988 or $229 mo
1-800-733-9138



'53 MERCURY
May trade in part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door se-
dan. 6 cyl auto. $9,500.
Will consider trade for
travel trailer of equal
value.
(352) 628-4053
CAMARO IROC Z
'88 Red, LT-1 eng.
PS./PB. Cold A.C.
62,000 Mi. Great
Condition. $6,900.
Camaro Z 28, '79
Black 4 spd. super
T-10 Tran. Cam.more,
Must see $6,900.
(352) 422-5663
CHEVROLET
Camaro '68,coupe, 107K
miles, auto, white with
black interior $4,000
stevystewart@gmail.com
CHEVY
'69 Classic C10 SHT BD
350/350 AC, PS,
$15K or trade
(352) 746-9212
CORVETTE
'87 Convertible, Drives,
looks great, 2nd owner, new
top & paint, $9,000 obo
(352) 302-1524
DODGE
Challenger 383/335 HP,
77K mi, manual trans, 8
cyl, interior green, black
interior, $2,900 Contact
angelalansing@
gmail.com(253)276-4784
EL CAMINO
'81 305 auto. All new
interior, & paint. Crager
mags & tires. 4 " raised
hood.$3,250.
(352)341-3613.
FORD
'66, F100, V8, auto, org.
California truck, org.
paint, no rust, $7,500.
obo, 726-6864
GM El Camino
'84, 1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint; 63K
mi., $8,900 obo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MERCEDES BENZ
1985 380SL, 2 top roadster.
Drives, looks great. Many
new Mercedes parts.New
A/C. Must see! $8,500. Da-
vid 352-637-6443.
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
trans.& parts. $4,000.
(352) 621-0126
THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$13,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122
VOLKSWAGON '68
bus/transporter. Con-
verted to camper, Runs
well. New brakes.
$5,000. 352-726-5926



CHEVY
2006, 1500 Crew Cab.
Z71 4x4, Only $14,990
or $279 mo
1-800-716-2219


DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awesome
Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded every
special feature. Sr. own,
gar. kept., 27K mi, $40K
invested Sale $21,750 See
online ad photos
www.autotrader.com/atca
John (352) 726-1076
DODGE DAKOTA
'05 $11,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
FORD
'03 Ranger XLT. Super
Cab. 4.0 Eng.1 owner



'06 E 350, Cutaway, serve.
van. 41K Mi./5.4 L. Eng.
Auto.Knapheide Serv.
body/dble lock drs. $20000
Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
2003, F-150XILT
Crew Cab, 51k Orlg mi-
les $11,990 or $199 mo
1-800-716-2219
FORD
'85, F250, rebuilt motor.,
new carborator,





AZTEK
Pontiac' 04 Low
miles, loaded
Reduced price
$8,500 obo 352-726-5715
CHEVY
2005 Trailblazer LT
One Owner, Don't MissI


2006, Equinox LT
Only 14k Miles, 1 Owner
Hurry! Call
1-800-716-2219
CHEVY
TRAILBLAZER
'06 $12,995. Ocala
Volvo. (352) 629-7299
DODGE
2002, Durango LT,
4x4, Must Seel Nicel
$7995 or $169 mo
1-800-733-9138
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air &
exhaust, Exc. Cond.
$6,000 obo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl drive,
class 3 hitch Orig owner.
Great shape & price.
$8,750. 352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
GMC SUBURBAN
1993 4 WD, 454 rebuilt
eng., new transm., great ti-
res, good cond. $3,700
obo
(352)201-1413
HONDA
2007, CR-V, EX
24K Miles, 1 Owner,
Sunroof $299 mo, WAC
1-800-716-2219
ISUZU
'04 Rodeo, automatic,
FWD. $10,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
ISUZU
'04 Rodeo, V-6 Auto.
$10,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
KIA
2008, Rondo V6 Auto.
Crossover Only $1 3,988
or $239 mo
1-800-733-9138
MAZDA
2007, CX-7 Low Miles -
7 to choose from
$12,990 or $219 mo,
WAC 1-800-716-2219
MAZDA
2008, Tribute
9k Orig Miles, 1 Owner
A Diamond! $299 mo
1-800-716-2219
PLYMOUTH
1999, Voyager
7 Pass, Perfect for
Family Only $5995
1-800-733-9138
TOYOTA
'03.4-Runner SRS, 6 cyl
leather, moon roof
tow pkg. $9,850 firm
(352) 563-9834


FORD '06 F-150
Crew cab XLT. Tow pkg
& topper, 47K mi.
Exc cond. LOADED
$18,900/obo. (352)
634-1378; 795-2053
JEEP
'05 Wrangler, Unlimited
AT $15,995 Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
JEEP
'05 Wrangler,
Unlimited. $15,995 Ocala
Volvo
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA '94
Pickup, cold A/C, diamond
plate toolbox, topper,
$4,000. obo.352-6213764



1996 DODGE CARGO
VAN $1,800 obo

1997 DODGE CARAVAN
Runs and Looks Great!
New Parts;Rebuilt Tranny
$1450.00 OR Best Offer!
4 Cyclinder 176,000 Miles
(352)476-7185
CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872
DODGE
'94, Ram 350,
Full size, work Van
$1,500 obo
(352) 527-2241
MAZDA
'06 MPV, 7 passenger. LX
$10,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MAZDA
'06 MPV.$9,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
Saturn
'06 Vue, Small van.
$11,995. Ocala Volvo.


'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains & tows
heavy loads. $4700/or
trade. 352- 563-0615
Crystal River



1995 HONDA HELIX
Motorscooter Exc. cond.
under 11k mi. LOTS OF
DELUXE EXTRAS II TRYKE
KIT ALSO AVAILABLE
$2,395 obo (352)
621-0248
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. Hi perf.
Over $43,000 in receipts.
17k mi. $12,000
352-563-0615
Crystal River
'04 KAWASAKI
800 Vulcan Classic Hwy &
Sissy bars, windshield,


2005, XL1200 Custom. Un-
der 7k mi.Screamin Eagle
Performance Pkg & more.
Gar.kept $7500 (352)
209-7495
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 Ml.
124S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
KAWASKI
'00 1100 CC,15K.
Mi. Very fast many
extra's. $4k
obo.(352)621-3764
SCOOTER
'06 Suzuki, 400
Bergman. 4,200 Mi. Like
new cond. $4,500
(352) 382-2715
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
SUZUKI '06
Boulevard, C50, mint cond.
Only 600 miles.
Call Gary 352-563-5502
VENTO PHANTOM
Scooter, 318 miles, 150CC,
Like new. $2,190/obo.
352-422-2433


20. Thelma and Louise car star
21. Rear-suspension piece
22. Chevy straight-six nickname
25. Bentley sedan
26. Italian brake company named
after this river
28. Stability or traction
29. Riding in the passenger seat
(slang)
31. NASCAR legend Roberts
32. Police van (slang)
34. Ignites fuel/air mixture
36. Miles indicator
39. General Motors founder
41. Mid-engined Pontiac
42. Early car makers John and
Horace
COMMUNICATIONS


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a puzzle dedicated to the automobile enlhusiasti

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auto-related people from all over the world Good luck'




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1 Mid-engine Lotus
3 Stated in positive or negative
* terms
9.4x4 - case
13 Dodge's Duster
S14. First FWD Olds
1 5 Locates the floor shifter
1 8 Used to be chrome-plated meta
21 Pickup part or driving offense
22. An "intelligent" DaimlerChryster
choice
23 Spring or ignition component
24 Tire-maintenance procedure
S27 Chuck Berry's Mabeline
machine
30 Corsair or Citation
33 Big-rig body style
34 Bigger rims in back than front
35 Running, but not moving
37 Beetle-spotting game
38. Navigation or entertainment
source
40. Brand retired in 2001
43. SVT pickup
44 Firebird model
4 5 Mitsubishi sedan
I46 Spark-plug measurement
47. Veyron constructor
48. Smokey and the Bandit co-star


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S'/ TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 D9


Cred i '


QUALIFIERS

Car buyers face a different set of questions when
they visit a dealer's showroom these days.


By JAY KOBLENZ CTW FEATURES

S crL's a once-popular phrase that's lost
n actionn in the current economic down-
i* lu "What will it take for you to drive
home this car today?" Salespeople and well-in-
formed shoppers at any new-car dealership know
that the issues of financing and credit mean it can
simply take longer to complete the deal.
In the "good old days" - circa 2007 - a cus-
tomer could pretty much choose any car within
reason and the dealership would work out a way to
make the sale happen, even if it involved a lengthy
finance term, sometimes as long as eight years.
However, since the economic meltdown began to
take its toll on the financial market, the flexibility
to offer such accommodating financing terms and
conditions has evaporated. "The customer's abil-
ity to be financed is more cut and dried," reports
Brad Lawson, a group consultant for the National
Automobile Dealers' Association.
When a shopper walks into a showroom these
days, rather than talking about the great lineup of
cars available, the salesperson is more likely to
beginrasking some personal financial questions.
Buyers can expect to be sized up more carefully
based upon their ability to finance and pay for a
car. In the past, a dealership would work hard to
arrange financing for its customers because of the
added profit involved. Now, however, finding fi-
nancing is more difficult and shoppers are greeted
with increased cordiality by saying, "I'll be paying
cash."
Since few people are in the position of paying
cash for a car, pre-qualifying is becoming the first
step at the dealership. The price question used to
come later in the process, but now it is the most
important issue. And there are fewer shortcuts
when it comes to getting a car loan. "Financial in-
stitutions are being especially vigilant in checking
a person's qualifications," says Lynne Strang, vice-
president of communications at the American Fi-
nancial Services Association.
It helps if car buyers do their homework ahead
of time. "Check your credit report for accuracy and
correct errors," advises Strang. This can take time.
Free reports are available by telephone at (877)
322-8228 and can be obtained from each of the
three major reporting companies: Equifax, Exper-
ian and TransUnion. Even those who are not im-
mediately in the market for a car (or anything
requiring financing) within the coming months are
still urged to check their records. Credit report er-
rors are surprisingly common and the reporting
companies can be very slow to respond when there


are errors, regardless of who made the mistake.
Having this information in hand may take only
a small portion of the surprise out of being fi-
nanced. It is still possible that an optimistic sales-
person might try to put a buyer into a vehicle for
which he or she won't qualify for financing. A
more conservative salesperson will listen carefully
when asking a customer about such issues as a
trade-in ("How much do you owe on your current
vehicle?"), down payment ("Is the cash on hand?")
and income (specifically, what's left over after
other debt-servicing payments).
Shoppers should expect to spend quite a bit of
time getting financing arranged, whether it's at
the dealership or through a local bank or credit
union. "Even though it's all automated, the addi-
tional scrutiny can add time to the process," says
Strang.
Shoppers are also likely to be steered toward
buying more affordable cars if their credit ratings
are sketchy than might have been the case a year or
more ago. For reasons that may have as much to
do with consumers' fiscal prudence as with their
credit issues, one Indiana Chevrolet dealer reports
that her dealership is selling more used cars these
days to customers who formerly would have qual-
ified to purchase costlier new vehicles.
There's another change regarding financing that
is taking place at the dealership, namely the so-
called red flag rules. This is a set of regulations in-
tended to reduce identity theft issued by The
Federal Trade Commission, the federal bank regu-
latory agencies, and the National Credit Union Ad-
ministration. Although the new rules were
originally scheduled to go into effect by November
1, 2008, implementation has been delayed until
May 1, 2009.
Although the rules apply to the dealership,
specifically its finance and insurance department, it
will have an impact upon consumers. Car buyers
will be scrutinized more carefully about who they
are and will be required to provide more paperwork'
as proof.
With the closer oversight, some tactics question-
able dealerships may once have employed will likely
go by the wayside. These include the illegal practice
of filling out paperwork for a potential buyer and
"fudging" the numbers to present a better case to the
financial institution. Now, dealership personnel who
engage in such practices are more likely to be pun-
ished.
Financing may not be as easy to obtain as in the
past, but the money remains out there for those
who qualify, and do so honestly. 0 CTwIV Yauvs


'08 ALTIMA
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 6131







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'07 MURANO
Fiee 24 hour recorded mess3ge with specIal prifiig arid
inf0 on thi vehicle 800-5848755 ext. 6137
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'07 SENTRA
Free 24 hour IN rtdd message with [ c, ial p iiill and
info on thi vehicle 800-584-8755 ext. 6139
, - - .
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'06 TITAN
Free 24 hour recorded mes.saqe with special pricing and
if ori this vehi 8005848755 ext. 6141
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'04 MAXIMA
FREE 24 hour recorded
message with special pricing
and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 6156


CALL E, xt, 5000
FREE 2 n1 r> I 4ilnE&


'04 SENTRA
FREFE 24 hour reuu r ,.i,] ,'.-* . q- C. e A i ' [. C ,1 p : i, ard *,.,'f ,
,.c.,in,. 800-584-8755 ext. 6157
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'05 ALTIMA
Free 24 hour recorded message with special icing and
irfo on this vehicle 800-584-8755 ex 6140

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'05 FRONTIER
Free 24 houi recorded message with spe:al pncing and
ifo ori this vehicle 800-584-8755 ext. 6142

S ._ ... . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CONTINUED SATISFACTION AND
CONFIDENCE IN SALES AND
ICE FOR YOUR LINCOLN/MERCURY
IS ONLY A SHORT DRIVE AWAY!


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gA OR UEE OCALA
HA ER 1862NCOLN MERCURY
407 S. Magnolia Ave.TOLL FREE 17-78
SALE HOURS: MON-FRI 8AM-6:3,34471PM * SAT 9AM-TOLLPM * SREE 866HOURS 1:3AM-6P7814
-^ ----- - - --- * --- 'SALE HOURS: MON-FRI 8AM-6:30PM 9 SAT 9AM-5PM e SERVICE HOURS 7:30AM-6PM


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CITRus COUNTY ((FL) CHRONICLE TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 2009 D11


MEGA EN SAL E ENT
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nly At Jenkins Acura & Auto USA


PUBLIC NOTICE
Jenkins Acura & Auto USA brings you a gigantic tent event
offering hundreds of new Acura's and quality pre-owned vehicles,
both imports and domestic available for immediate delivery.
$$$ FINANCING AVAILABLE $$$


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Addition
5 YER/106 000MIL
'WARRANTYS
Avai abl O reOne Vhcls


A FEW EXAMPLES ABOVE * MOST MAKES & MODELS AVAILABLE!


APPRAISERS ON SITE
Y YOUR CAR EVEN IF _t
ON'T BUY FROM US! ' �
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'08 MALIBU
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 1131
'0 Down or 1154 Mo.'
$85988




'08 IMPALA
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 1132
40L44iO11 9 8 � N
A'j f~i (g i iX� hl^


'08 PT CRUISER
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 3131
0 Down or $159 Mo.*
$8,988
,Ti '-- .. .. A RM.. . . . ...... n . * n i i in


'08 CHARGER '08 WRANGLER
Free 24 hour recorded message with Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 3132 800-584-8755 ext. 3133
S16,988 13,988
(jigiP^^^^^^^BM^mi $13 ,988^^^^^^^


'08 CARAVAN
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 3135


'08 PATRIOT
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 3136

$16,988


'08 SILVERADO
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pncing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 1133
0 Down r '194 Mo.*
$0,988


'08 TRAILBLAZER
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 1134
0 Down or "14f , v.

-3,


'08 TOWN & COUNTRY
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 4131
0 Deowni or '247 Mo*
$13,9881
$JI!MJJlHll.yl.l�l^ !^~m
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'08 DAKOTA
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 4132
10 Down or 1247 Mo.*
;13,988
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'08 LIBERTY
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 4133

$12,988


'08 RAM 1500 '08 CHEROKEE
Free 24 hour recorded message with Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle special pncing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 4136 800-584-8755 ext. 4134


$16,988


Il


CALL 800-584-8755 Ext. 5000 FREE


RECORDED MESSAGE


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'08 300
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 3134


'08 ASPEN
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 4135


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$12,9881


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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