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Citrus County chronicle
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01600
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: April 5, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01600

Full Text


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67 PAGE A4


IIRONICL
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APRIL 5, 2009 Florida's Best Community


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VOLUME 114 ISSUE 241


DOT: $10M for Citrus roads


Bidding on projects slated for summer,
construction for second halfofthe year
Special to the Chronicle County officials had feared the
share for Citrus might be much
Florida Department of Trans- less.
portation officials have approved Based on its population, the
$10 million in stimulus funds for county's minimum share was
Citrus County. about $2.7 million.


The Citrus projects DOT is rec-
ommending to the Florida Leg-
islative Budget Commission for
funding through American Recov-
ery and Reinvestment Act money
include more than a dozen resur-
facing and repair projects from
Ozello Trail to Turner Camp Road,
as well as a traffic light at the land-
fill on State Road 44.
The county is going to need that


light for its new solid waste trans-
fer station but, like the other proj-'
ects, it does not have the money,
and so it wasn't even in the Capi-
tal Improvement Program.
After the budget council reviews
the projects, which is expected to
be done by April 15, the DOT rec-
ommendations will then go to the
Federal Highway Administration
for review and approval.


Citrus officials feel fairly confi-
dent their projects will make it
through the process after being
approved by DOT officials. Bid-
ding on the projects- could be
early this summer, and construc-
tion could take place in the sec-
ond half of the year.
The stimulus money would be
in addition to the $6.4 million the
See ROADS/Page A5


A hero's homecoming


BRIAN LaET�Chro ice
Romulo "Romy" Camargo Is all smiles during a visit Tuesday with veteran supporter Barbara Mills and other Citrus County I b lde ts
at the James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital in Tampa. Camargo is recovering from a Sept. 16 ambush In Afghanistan that left him mo tly
paralyzed. Camargo said visitors always lift his spirits and that his door Is open to anyone wishing to stop by.

Cr'ist Lofiis I cloftis@chronicleonline.coin I Chronicle


Ranger beamed as a group of strangers filtered into his hospital room. In fact, he
smiled for almost an hour as he made new friends with the 20 Citrus Countians
who traveled to the James A Haley Veterans' Hospital in Tampa on Tuesday.


"Citrus County wants to welcome you
home," Lecanto resident Barbara Mills
said.
Camargo, 33, was humbled as baskets.
gift bags and cards were presented to
him.
"It's a blessing," Camargo said "I
haven't been to Citrus County in a couple
ofyears and they still have that cama-
raderie..."
Citrus roots
Romulo "Rom.y" Camargo moved to
Citrus County as a third-grader with his
parents. Dr. Romulo and Betzaida Ca-
margo. The Family lived in Lecanto for
two years and in Crystal River for 13.
Growing up. Camargo attended Crystal
River Primary, Middle and High Schools.
He was captain of the swim and
wrestling teams.
He graduated in 1993 and eventually
made his way into the Army.
Serving his country
For the past 14 years, Camargo has
served in the Army - eight with the Spe-
cial Forces. He was second in command
of his team in Operational Detachment'
Alpha 7115.
Last year marked Camargo'sthird tour
in Afghanistan.
His service was cut short after an am-
bush left him mostly paralyzed.
Camargo's team was northeast of
Kandahar when a bucket loader being


Betzalda Camargo and other family members decorated her son Romulo's room at the
James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital in Tampa with pictures and memorabilia.


used to clear a roadway malfunctioned.
Because team members couldn't
recover the machine, they were
directed to destroy it. Later, the
soldiers took photos of the destroyed
bucket loader so their commanders
could be reimbursed.
As Camargo headed back to their vehi-
cle with an American civilian inter-


preter, the first rocket-propelled
grenade exploded.
He told the interpreter to get in the
front of the truck and keep her head
down. He got in the back of the truck
where the gun mount was.
That's when he was shot in the back of
the neck.
See HOMECOMING/Page A8


Community

facing utility

rate hikes of

118 percent

Meadows residents
were not informed of
proposed increases
MIKE WRIGHT *
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The Meadows is not one of Citrus
County's largest communities, nor its
most affluent
At about 144 homes, it isn't small ei-
ther. And it's not poor
But it could soon have a distinction


* WHAT: . . .
Citrus County
Water and
Wastewater
Authority meeting.
* WHEN:
1 p.m. Monday
* WHERE:
.Lecanto Govern-
ment Building,
Room 166.


that residents
there would
rather not
have: Citrus
County's high-
est water and
sewer rates.
Water rates
could be going
up 58 percent
Sewer rates,
about 168 per-
cent Most resi-
dents of the


Meadows have both water and sewer.
Combined, base rates could climb 118
percent
See RATES/Page A4


CMHS official

responds to

physicians

Handful ofprivate
practices are hurting

hospital COO says

CHRIS VAN ORMER
cvanormer@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The concern of some physicians
about the financial well being of Citrus
Memorial Health System needs to be
focused, an officer at the hospital said
this pastweek.
"First and foremost, we must fulfill
our mission to help all we serve in Cit-
rus County," said Jerry DeLoach, chief
operations officer. "In order to do that,
we must be financially viable both now
and in the future."
DeLoach was responding to five
physicians who recently addressed the
Chronicle Editorial Board to raise
awareness about their view of the hos-
pital's business model and patient
care. The physicians compared CMHS
to other hospitals in Citrus and sur-
rounding counties, finding that, in
some cases, other hospitals seemed to
be performing better in some areas,
and they questioned why CMHS had
See CMHS/Page A5


-.. ..; .TSimas nmB! sseaa


Annie's Mailbox ............A16
Classifieds ................... D4
Crossword ..................A16
Editorial....................... C2
Horoscope ..................A16
Lottery Numbers ............B4
M ovies ........................ A14
Obituaries ................... A6
Together...................... A15


No lottery WO
Because of early
production deadlines,
Saturday's lottery num-
bers were not available.
To see if you won, go
to www.flalottery.com.


Springtime spreads
Martha and her panel of foodies share the season's secrets./Inside
Fisher kings Bass Challenge reels in fun and funds./A3

5,000 Obama gets troop commitment from European allies./A10
Details emerge N.Y. shooter's life was falling apart./A10


Another tragedy
An armed and armored gun-
man "lying in wait" ambushes
police in Pittsburgh./AlO


III El l11111 III


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CITRUS MEMORIAL



At the Heart of Our Community

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Page A3 SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009



TATE


SOCIAL
CITRUS CO()LIN' IY CHRONICLE


Around
Fine day for fishing


Citrus County
Landfill closes early
Good Friday
The Citrus County Central
Landfill will close at 2:30 p.m.
on Friday, April 10, in obser-
vance of Good Friday.
For information on landfill
hours, call 527-7672 during
office hours our go to the
county's Web site at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us. Click
on Departments, then Public
Works, then Solid Waste.
Museum presents
cooking program
The Old Courthouse Her-
itage Museum will host a free
public program in its Coffee &
Conversation Speaker Se-
ries.
Chef Haywood "Hap"
Hough, the culinary chef/in-
structor for the Withla-
coochee Technical Institute in
Inverness, will present "Cook-
ing on a Shoestring," 10:30
a.m. Thursday, April 9.
Chef "Hap" Hough has
been an executive chef/in-
structor at Withlacocchee
Technical Institute for many
years; prior to coming to WTI
he was the chef for Country
Oaks Inn in Lecanto. Even
though this program is free,
call the Museum at 341-6436
to reserve a seat. In addition,
menus and recipes will be
provided as handouts at this
program.
Coffee and light refresh-
ments will be served.
This program is open to
the public.
NAMI-Citrus to meet
April 13
The monthly meeting of
NAMI-Citrus, locally char-
tered group of the National
Alliance on Mental f jes.. will
meet at 6:30 p.m.-ntnday
April 13 at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church on County
Road 486. Meeting day has
changed to the second Mon-
day of the month. Dr. Para-
manand Gurnani, who has
been a long time friend of
NAMI, will speak.
All those with an interest in
mental health issues are wel-
come. There will be a ques-
tion-and-answer and social
time following the speaker.
Fundraiser on
tap in Inverness
The Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County and the city of
Inverness will host Music on
the Square from 6 to 10 p.m.
Saturday, April 18, in down-
town Inverness.
Performing will be blues-
rock band Mocassin Slough,
whose repertoire will appeal
to both classic rock fans and
friends of the blues.
This is a free event. Bring
your lawn chairs.
For more information call
621-9225.

Ocala
Alumni of St. Leo
invited to celebration


Kevin Hanna shows the 9.04-pound bass he caught while fish-
ing in the Fifth Annual Citrus County Bass Challenge Saturday
at the city boat ramp in Dunnellon. Fifteen cash prizes were
handed out and Hannah and his partner Hank Reese took
fourth largest catch and biggest fish for this year's challenge.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Jimbo Denton and Mike Crosby landed the biggest catch, with a total weight of 23.70
pounds. Proceeds from the Citrus County Bass Challenge go to benefit the Key Training Cen-


Fisherman pictured won prizes at the Citrus County Bass Challenge. Fifteen cash prizes were handed out Saturday, including awards for first through
tenth place winner and several specialty prizes, including $250 for the smallest legal, live limit of bass and the Lucky 13 award.


Pants size leads to blows


VAN ORMER
cvanormer@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

An argument about pants size led to an in-
cident resulting in an inmate in the Citrus
County detention facility being
charged with battery on correction
officers.
A deputy from the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office reported that he was
called to the jail at about 3:30 p.m. .
Friday, where he spoke to two staff
members.
One staff member said the two of '
them had attempted to detain the in- -
mate, but he refused all verbal coin- Ma
mands. He was identified as Martin cutuis
Curtis Carr Jr, 24, of 2650 W Wood-
land Ridge Drive, Lecanto. Carr was alleged
to have punched a staff member in the right
shoulder, according to the report, and to have
punched the other staff member in the left
shoulder.
The second staff member was reported to
have grabbed a can of pepper spray and


began a two-second burst in Carr's face, al-
lowing the corrections officers time to gain
compliance and handcuff Carr He was trans-
ported for medical treatment because of the
pepper spray.
When the deputy spoke with Carr, he said
he got into an argument over the size of his
pants. He said the first staff member
began cursing at him, so he refused to
put his hands behind his back when
told to do so. Carr said he told the staff
. member to leave him alone, accord-
ing to the report
Carr further stated that correc-
tional officers went into his cell and
pulled him toward them by his shirt
tin He said he placed his hands out in
Carr front of him and that would have been
the only time he would have struck
them, according to the report. Carr said after
they pulled him by his shirt, they tackled him
to the ground and started spraying him with
pepper spray
Carr was placed under arrest for two
counts of felony battery against correctional
staff. His bond was set at $10,000.


Proposed public hearing

on ordinance postponed
Special to the Chronicle citrus.fl.us. Click "Depart-
ments" at the top of the page,
A public hearing that had and then on the pull-down
been proposed for the menu click "Development
county commission on April Services," then '"Animal
14 regarding the county's re- Services." The ordinance is
vised Animal Services Ordi- under "Latest News." Addi-
nance will not be held as tions to the draft are under-
proposed. lined and deletions are
Instead, the county com- struck through.
mission has directed county The date and time for the
staff to hold a second public workshop will be announced
workshop at the Lecanto soon and posted on the
Government Building on a county Web site.
date yet to be determined. Public input regarding the
The commission felt another draft is still welcome and
workshop was necessary to can be mailed to Develop-
inform interested members ment Services Director Gary
of the public on changes that Maidhof at the Lecanto Gov-
have been made to the origi- ernment Building; 3600 West
nal draft of the revised ordi- Sovereign Path; Lecanto, FL
nance. 34461 or e-mailed to:
The revised draft is avail- gar y.maid ho f@ b oc c.
able on line at www.bocc. citrus.fl.us.


St. Leo Unive
Central Florida
College have at
than 1,600 colleic
since forming th
tional partners
The two scho
Leo alumni to jo
alumni and friend
rating their 15
gether April 17,
Webber Center
Campus of CFC
The event be
ception at 6:30
Webber Center
will be a student
case in the Wet
Art Gallery. At 7
and program be
Cost is $20. F
tion is required
To register, gi
alumni.saintleo.
events/event sc
on the Ocala AlL
tion, and then fo
steps to register


ersity and
Community
warded more
ege degrees
heir educa-
in in 1994


Sebring

Man faked anthrax
letters as April Fool's joke


lp ... I . . A central Florida man has told
Dols invite St. police he put dozens of en-
din ellow velopes containing a white pow-
rids in cele- der resembling anthrax on cars
years to- at a hospital as an April Fool's
at the prank.
on the Ocala Jerron Mario Moffitt was ar-
C. rested at his home Friday night.
�gins with a re- The Highlands County Sheriff's
p.m. on the Office said he confessed that he
patio. There bought the envelopes and baby
t art show- powder and placed them on the
bber Center windshields of nearly 50 cars
, the dinner Florida Hospital Heartland Divi-
Dgin. sion in Sebring. He also placed
Pre-registra- some envelopes in mailboxes
by April 9. on nearby residential streets.
o to Moffitt said it was all in good
edu. Click on humor and even placed an en-
hedule. Click velope in the mailbox of his own
umni Celebra- residence to fool his father.
Moffitt, who is on probation for
)llow the burglary and grand theft, faces
r. 79 counts of committing a possi-
-From staff reports ble hoax and violating probation.


State'


Wellington

9 arrested after
food court fight
Authorities said nine people
were arrested after a brawl at
Wellington mall food court.
Palm Beach County sheriff's
deputies were called to the Mall
at Wellington Green on Thurs-
day evening.
They reported finding nearly
two dozen people fighting and
kicking each other. They were
also throwing chairs and food
trays, which nearly hit other
mall customers.
The group ignored orders to
stop, and additional deputies
had to be called in. The nine
suspects arrested ranged in
age from 16 to 20 years old.
One 17-year-old boy was
charged with pulling a knife on
a mall security guard, and the
rest were charged with disor-
derly conduct.


Hilliard


Pensacola


Officer jailed after
inmates smuggle drugs
HILLIARD -A Nassau
County corrections officer has
been arrested after authorities
say he let inmates smuggle
drugs into the county jail.
The sheriffs office said sur-
veillance video shows Deputy
Cody Wayne Flint-Davis allowing
inmates to place a bag of drugs
into a mop bucket which they
brought into facility. The sheriffs
office said he also tipped in-
mates off about shakedowns
and distributed illicit photos.
Sheriff Tommy Seagraves
said inmates tried to bring in
about 50 ecstasy pills. Only 19
were recovered.
Twenty-one-year-old Flint-
Davis was arrested Friday on
several charges including official
misconduct and failure to perform
the duty required by an officer.


PE teacher
saves mom, two girls
A Pensacola area phsyical ed-
ucation teacher is being hailed as
a hero after he jumped in front of

plowed
through a stop
sign to shield
a mother and
- r*. her two chil-
- , dren.
' o Pat Judd,
who also
works as a
crossing guard at the elementary
school, rolled onto the hood of
the car Friday moving, taking the
full impact of the crash.
He was hospitalized for a leg
injury, but is listed in good condi-
tion. Grateful mother Laura
Richards said Judd saved the
lives of her 2- and 4-year-old
daughters.


Orlando
Disney confirms
1,900 layoffs
The Walt Disney Co. has
confirmed it eliminated 1,900
jobs across its U.S. parks divi-
sion, including 1,400 in Florida.
The cuts announced Friday
include 1,150 layoffs, 50 volun-
tary buyouts and 700 open po-
sitions that were not filled.
The Florida cuts include 900
layoffs and buyouts and 500
open positions eliminated.
Disney said the cuts began
Feb. 18, the same day it first
announced a plan to consoli-
date back-office functions be-
tween Disney World and
Disneyland.
Disney saidthe cuts were
aimed at executive, manage-
ment, professional and admin-
istrative positions.
The company employs about
62,000 people in Florida.
-From wire reports


I~









oWC uCO Y L:,)Ioc


RATES
Continued from Page Al

Customers who use 2,000
gallons of water a month will
see their monthly water/
sewer bills jump from $61.12
to $150.94 - a 147 percent in-
crease.
Residents are shocked by
the proposal.
"I don't understand how
things like this are allowed to
happen," said Laurel Verlek,
president of the Meadows of
Homosassa Homeowners As-
sociation.
Paul Gadke, who has lived
in Meadows for 15 years, was
stunned when a reporter told
him of the rate proposals.
"This place will be a ghost
town," he said. "People here
can't afford that"
They may have little choice.
The Citrus County Water and
WastewaterAuthority is sched-
uled to hear the rate case at 1
p.m. Monday at the Lecanto
Government Complex
The county staff is recom-
mending approval of the new
rates, but also that they be
placed on hold for 120 days to
give utility owner Paul La-
Fond time to consider other
options. What those options
might be, no one knows.
Utilities regulation opera-
tions director Charles
Howard also is suggesting
that the rates be phased in
over three to five years, eas-
ing the immediate impact
The increases, Howard
said, are a direct result of
state-ordered improvements
LaFbnd made to the system.
Specifically, LaFbnd said he
spent about $1 million adding
pipes from Meadows to con-
nect into the county's waste-
water station.
LaFbnd, who could not be
reached for comment, told
county regulators that he had
no choice, Howard said. It
was either that or shut down


the system altogether
The water increases oc-
curred because LaFond con-
nected Meadows to the
Homosassa Special Water
District in an agreement that
required the Citrus County
government to act as an agent
for the community, Howard
said. In doing so, the county
required LaFond to comply
with its land-development
code for fire protection, in-
cluding installing four fire
hydrants, he said.
Residents complain that
LaFond should have pre-
pared for the improvements,
especially with his sewer
plant, rather than waiting for
an order from state agencies.
"When they first bought
this, they knew this was com-
ing," Gadke said. "They knew
this was coming all along.
They snowballed everybody,
saying the county was going
to buy it They've told us that
for years and years."
'They're going to
give it a fight'
Meadows is a quiet com-
munity off Grover Cleveland
Boulevard between U.S. 19
and County Road 491. The
most recent excitement oc-
curred in January when a
squirrel chewing into a
power line sparked a brush
fire that raced through the
neighborhood.
The community is a mix of
homeowners and renters,
workers and retirees.
LaFond bought the utility
in 1995 for $6,500, according
to county records. Like many
small communities in Citrus
County, the utility and devel-
opment went hand in hand.
Last year the Department
of Environmental Protection
told LaFond the wastewater
plant was nearing capacity.
He had two choices: Either
expand the plant or find an-
other means to dispose of the
utility's wastewater.
Howard said LaFbnd didn't


Meadows Utility Co.'s current and proposed rates


(gallon charge includes base)
Water Sewer
Base: Base:
8 $20.31 now;
$32.06 proposed
58 percent increase J16

First 2,000 gallons: First 2
S $25.39 now;
$40.44 proposed
S percent increase

Citrus County Utilities
(base only, in order of monthly rates)
Water Apach(
Pine Ridge: $5.84 Oak Fr
Sugarmill Woods: $5.86 Point
Pair
Spring Gardens: $8.96 Pak
Lakes
Citrus Springs: $8.97
Golden Terrace: $11.06 Rosen
Eldorado Estates: $11.20 $25


8


$24.33 now;
$65.32 proposed
percent increase


2,000 gallons:
9 $35.73 now;
$110.50 proposed





he Shores: $11.58
rest: $11.64
O'Woods iLaguna
ms: $14.56
ide: $19.81
Il Island: $20.33
nont/Rolling Green:
5.87


Both
Base:
118 $44.64 now;
$97.38 proposed
A.8 percent increase

First 2,000 gallons:
S$61.12 now;
$150.94 proposed
1 percent increase




Sewer
Sugarmill Woods: $9.15
Spring Gardens: $9.88
Apache Shores: $11 26
Point O'Woods/Laguna
Palms: $20.12
Citrus Springs: $22.59


Water
Rolling Oaks: $6.19*
Aqua: $7.98 (average)
Sunshine Utilities: $8.95
Cinnamon Ridge: $10.69
Tarawood: $12.13

have enough property to ex-
pand the plant, so he reached
an agreement with the county
to connect Meadows to the
county's main pipes along
Grover Cleveland Boulevard.
LaFond said he asked
Howard if the costs could be
reimbursed through a rate in-
crease and Howard said they
could. The exact amount of
reimbursement, however,
would not be decided until
after the work was done be-
cause LaFond wasn't entitled
to recoup all the costs.
LaFobnd filed for a rate hear-
ing in October Because Mead-
ows is considered a small
utility - gross revenue of less


Forest Hills: $12.33
WellAqua: $12.81
Indian Springs: $18.14
Dunnellon Hills: $19.50
Meadows: $20.31 "
Meadow Wood: $24.10"'*

than $75,000 for water and
sewer - the county hired a
consultant to conduct the rate
study The cost of the study,
about $6,800, is picked by up
customers in the new rates.
Howard's office received
the report only Tuesday and
had just a day to review it be-
fore including it in the agenda
book for Monday's waste-
water authority meeting.
Residents, unless they call
Howard's office, wouldn't
know of the proposed rates
prior to Monday's hearing.
The utility is required to no-
tify customers that a rate case
is pending, but it isn't re-
quired to tell customers of the


Sewer
Rolling Oaks: $11.16"
Tarawood: $13.04
Meadows: $24.33**


proposed rates.
And, Howard said, county
ordinance says LaFond could
pass those sewer costs onto
customers without a rate
hearing because the costs are
associated with an agreement
with the county.
"They wanted to bring this
to the customers," Howard
said, referring to Paul La-
Fond and his son, Gerry
Verlek, the homeowners as-
sociation president, said she
expects a full turnout at Mon-
day's hearing.
'They're not justgoingto sit
back and let this happen," she
said. "They're going to give it
a fight"


For the RECORD

Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
* Curtis Wayne Butzer,
29, 449 N. Robinhood Rd.,
Inverness, at 6:54 p.m. Fri-
day, on a felony charge of
possession of a controlled
substance. According to the
report, Butzer had several
hydrocodone pills without a
prescription. Bond $5,000.
* Joshua J. Ulloa, 23, 39
S. Monroe St., Beverly Hills,
at 10:11 p.m. Friday, on a
misdemeanor charge of driv-
ing knowingly while license
suspended. He was released
on his own recognizance.
* Santin-Manglio Remirez,
42,2404 S. ShellyAve., Inver-
ness, at 10:04 p.m. Friday, for
violation of a city of Inverness
ordinance regarding public
consumption of alcohol. Ac-
cording to the report, Remirez
was on the Rails to Trails west
of Lakeview Drive consuming
a natural light beer. A deputy
attempted to issue him a no-
tice to appear citation, but
Remirez refused to sign. He
was arrested and transported
to the county detention facility.
His bike was taken to his res-
idence, and his alcohol con-
tainers were emptied and
discarded. Bond $250.
Burglaries
* A burglary, reported on
March 16, occurred at ap-
proximately 10 p.m. Sunday,
March 15, to a conveyance
in the 5300 block of W. Rich-
land Lane, Homosassa.
* A burglary, reported on
March 17, occurred at ap-
proximately 11:28 p.m. Mon-
day, March 16, to a residence
in the 4000 block of S. Fire-
side Way, Homosassa.
* Sometime between
12:01 a.m. and 4 a.m. on
Tuesday, March 17, a burglary
to an un-occupied residence
is alleged to have occurred in
the 4500 block of N. Jade-
moore Drive, Beverly Hills.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
S"R /I LO PR Hi L
0.00 A R.I R nnn . 183 51


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc


ts
pc
ts
pc
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc

pc

ts
pc
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


South winds from 5 to 15 knots. Seas
2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a light chop. Partly to mostly
sunny today.


86.- 51 0.00 88 52 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 82 Low: 67
More humid. A sea breeze with a few
showers will form and move inland.
- MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 73 Low: 43
Cold front moves through bringing a line of
showers and a few storms.
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 64 Low: 38
Windy and chilly

ALMANAC
TEMPERATURE* DEW POINT
Saturday 85/45 Saturday at 3 p.m. 46
Record 91/37
Normal 81/57 HUMIDITY
Mean temp. 65 Saturday at 3 p.m. 27%
Departure from mean -4 POLLEN COUNT**
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in. Trees were heavy, grasses were
Total for the month 0.03 in. moderate and weeds were absent.
Total for the year 3.49 in. "Ught - only extreme allergic will show symp-
Normal for the year 11.18 in. toms, moderate -most allergic will experience
As of 6 p.m. at Inverness symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
UV INDEX: 10 symptoms.
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, AIR QUALITY
7-9 high, 10+ very high A QUALITY
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Saturday was moderate with pollut-
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.98 in. ants mainly ozone.
SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
4/5 SUNDAY 2:49 9:01 3:14 9:26
4/6 MONDAY 3:32 9:44 3:56 10:08


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


3 e^ ^ SUNSET TONIGHT.
SUNRISE TOMORR
*I O MOONRISE TODAY
WB 17 AP 24 MAY I MOONSET TODAY.


............................7:51 PM .
OW ................... 7:14 A.M .
...........................4:10 P.M .
...........................4:38 A.M .


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. A burn ban is in effect.
For mqre information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more Information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

. WATERING RULES
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.


TIDES


*From mouths
CRy
Chassahowltzka'
Crystal River"*
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa"*


of rivers "**At King's Bay
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
2:40 a/11:39 a 4:22 p/11:47 p
1:01 a/9:01 a 2:43 p/9:09 p
12:30 p/6:49 a -- /6:57 p
1:50 a/10:38 a 3:32 p/10:46 p


***"At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
3:58 a/12:27 p 4:53 p/--
2:19 a/9:49 a 3:14 p/10:03 p
12:06 a/7:37 a 1:01 p/7:51 p
3:08 a/11:26 a 4:03 p/11:40 p


Gulf water
temperature


72�
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.21 28.16 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.48 33.48 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 35.21 35.21 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.56 37.54 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
Albany 48 39 pc 49 35
Albuquerque 58 37 s 56 32
Asheville 68 41 pc 71 48
Atlanta 75 42 pc 76 46
Atlantic City 63 51 s 65 49
Austin 87 48 s 75 37
Baltimore 64 45 s 68 53
Billings 34 30 pc 43 25
Birmingham 75 43 ts 73 42
Boise 56 30 s 61 35
Boston 53 45 pc 54 38
Buffalo 40 33 .18 pc 48 39
Burlington, VT 52 34 .52 c 45 33
Charleston, SC 74 49 pc 78 63
Charleston, WV 61 43 pc 75 51
Charlotte 75 37 pc 75 57
Chicago 50 31 sh 39 30
Cincinnati 62 31 ts 70 42
Cleveland 51 35 pc 50 41
Columbia, SC 78 43 pc 78 62
Columbus, OH 56 35 ts 66 43
Concord, N.H. 49 39 .09 pc 55 30
Dallas 82 53 s 62 37
Denver 37 25 .02 c 37 23
Des Moines 60 43 sn 39 27
Detroit 54 34 sh 45 32
El Paso 74 57 s 68 37
Evansville, IN 64 34 ts 69 39
Harrisburg 57 44 s 63 45
Hartford 55 47 pc 55 37
Houston 80 52 pc 75 47
Indianapolis 58 33 ts 60 37
Jackson 77 46 ts 75 41
Las Vegas 62 46 s 70 51
Little Rock 74 43 pc 66 34
Los Angeles 66 49 s 74 53
Louisville 63 37 ts 71 42
Memphis 75 47 ts 68 39
Milwaukee 49 33 rs 34 29
Minneapolis 46 27 sn 33 24
Mobile 72 51 ts 81 51
Montgomery 78 44 ts 79 49
Nashville 68 37 ts 77 38
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy; dr-drizzle;
f.fair; h=hazy; pc.partly cloudy; r.raln;
rs=ralnslanow mix; s-sunny; sh=showers;
an=snow; ts.thunderstorms; w=wlndy.
02009 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 75 54 ts 83 53
New York City 52 47 s 61 44
Norfolk 70 52 s 75 58
Oklahoma City 81 54 pc 52 27
Omaha 53 44 .07 sn 37 25
Palm Springs 75 52 s 78 52
Philadelphia 60 49 s 64 49
Phoenix 72 52 s 80 55
Pittsburgh 54 35 pc 63 45
Portland, ME 54 43 pc 51 36
Portland, Ore 63 31 .02 s 69 43
Providence, R.I. 54 46 pc 55 36
Raleigh 74 47 s 75 60
Rapid City 30 22 .36 c 33 18
Reno 51 24 s 66 35
Rochester, NY 39 34 .21 pc 47 38
Sacramento 69 40 s 74 47
St. Louis 66 38 ts 62 31
St. Ste. Marie 34 28 c 36 28
Salt Lake City 47 32 .04 pc 51 36
San Antonio 87 59 s 77 43
San Diego 66 54 s 73 55
San Francisco 64 41 s 67 50
Savannah 77 48 pc 77 65
Seattle 56 33 s 64 42
Spokane 50 28 pc 57 32
Syracuse 39 34 .44 pc 48 36
Topeka 73 47 .01 rs 40 25
Washington 66 47 s 70 53
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 99 Laredo, Texas LOW 3 Stanley, Idaho


WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 88/70/s
Amsterdam 52/40/pc
Athens 66/47/sh
Beijing 64/45/s
Berlin 56/39/pc
Bermuda 73/65/s
Cairo 83/65/pc
Calgary 48/28/s
Havana 87/76/pc
Hong Kong 78/70/ts
Jerusalem 71/54/c


Lisbon 72/57/c
London 56/44/pc
Madrid 71/46/pc
Mexico City 85/55/pc
Montreal 47/33/c
Moscow 40/28/pc
Paris 61/42/pc
Rio 82/70/ts
Rome 67/48/c
Sydney 74/58/pc
Tokyo 56/41/pc
Toronto 46/32/c
Warsaw 66/38/c


Private utilies
(regulated by county; base only, in order of monthly rates)


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0A, a


________ _________


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A4 SUNDAYArms5 2009


A


LOCAL


-�1








CrnUs CuIN'IY (FL) CHRONICLE


CMHS
Continued from Page Al

been building a horizontal
business model for some
time, which involves develop-
ing clinics and services away
from the main campus.
The physicians said they
need CMHS for acute care for
their-patients, and their ob-
jective is to ensure the future
of the hospital.
DeLoach agreed that
CMHS needs the physicians.
"The fact is that we have a
great relationship with the
majority of our medical staff,
whom we are able to work
collaboratively with to meet
the medical needs of the res-
idents of Citrus County," he
said.
But he pointed out that
conflict arises with other out-
patient-services facilities.
'"There are a handful of en-
trepreneurial physicians who
don't want competition," De-
Loach said. 'They have cho-
sen to compete with the
hospital in some of the most


ROADS
Continued from Page Al

county received from DOT
last year in Transportation
Regional Incentive Program
funds for widening County
Road 486 to State Road 44
and County Road 491 south
of C.R. 486.
An elated County Commis-
sion Chairman John Thrum-
ston welcomed the stimulus
funding news late last week
and said there were three
reasons the county got $10
million. The first was the
hard work by county staff in
getting qualified projects in
under the very tight dead-
lines, he said: The projects
had many requirements and
had to be shovel ready
The second reason, he
said, was the good relation-
ship the county has built with
DOT District 7 officials in the
last few years. The third rea-
son was Citrus' commitment
to regional transportation
planning since joining Dis-
trict 7.
Citrus left District 5, which
includes Ocala, to join
Tampa Bay's District 7 a few
years ago, and there were
fears the county would be


LOCAL


profitable services that are
available to us and that have
traditionally been provided
by the hospital."
This gives CMHS a greater
burden for funding indigent
care, he said.
"Citrus Memorial doesn't
have the luxury of being se-
lective about who we serve,"
DeLoach said. "We must
make our services available
to patients in accordance
with our mission, so when our
competitors selectively com-
pete for only the profitable
portions of healthcare, it
leaves us at a disadvantage."
DeLoach responded to a
reported comment by Dr PS.
Bikkasani that physicians'
outpatient clinics save the
hospital costs.
"One of the physicians in a
recent article spoke about
'helping the hospital by tak-
ing outpatients away from
us.' That did not help; in fact
it actually had the opposite
effect because they carved
out one of the most profitable
segments of our business
which has contributed to a
greater dependence on tax


forgotten among the more
populous county to the south.
Thrumston represents the
county on the Tampa Bay
Area Regional Transporta-
tion Authority (TBARTA). He
said he has sat through
"tons" of meetings with DOT
and TBARTA and spent
much time building relation-
ships as a partner with the
bigger counties and DOT.
He said the stimulus fund-
ing shows all the work paid
off and the partnership is
worth it
"I think this will give the
community a sense of relief
that it did not get into this re-
gional system without some
benefits," he said.
He said DOT District 7
Secretary Don. Skelton de-
served credit for paying at-
tention to Citrus County's
needs. Thrumston said Skel-
ton listened to his argument
about the what the county
should get back for its com-
mitment to being part of the
regional planning system
and came through with the
funding.
Thrumston noted that
there was another project
that also got recommended
for funding, one in the city of
Crystal River It was a
$289,000 multi-use trail along


Medical

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GENESIS
COMMUNITY CHURCH


invites
everyone to enjoy an




Sunrise Service

on Lake Hernando

April 12, 2009 * 7:00am
Rain or Shine
Light Refreshments and Snacks
Enjoy the message of Jesus' resurrection in an
.:informal outside setting by Pastor Brian Baggs
"Come as you are"


www.genesiscommunity
500 yards North of 486
3580 E. Lemon Drive, I
Parking and facilities provided by Ij
For more infohationA


rch.org


ds Elks Lodge,
7-4253


support," DeLoach said.
The performance compar-
ison with other area hospitals
was another issue DeLoach
wanted to address. The group
of doctors questioned how
other hospitals made a profit
without taxes, while CMHS
did not seem to be as prof-
itable.
"That's comparing apples
and oranges," DeLoach said.
"Most of those facilities are
owned by for-profit corpora-
tions. Consequently, their cost
structure is entirely different,
there are greater economies
of scale, and the income is
distributed to their stockhold-
ers as opposed to being rein-
vested in the community."
CMHS should be compared
to the many similarly struc-
tured hospitals in the state, he
said.
"There are numerous free-
standing, tax-supported pub-
lic hospitals in Florida that it
would be more appropriate to
compare Citrus Memorial to,
and I am confident that we
compare very favorably," De-
Loach said.
He referred to studies pro-


U.S. 19 from N.W 19th Street
to State Park Road.
In addition to all those
funds, Citrus Will also bene-
fit from $2.45 million in other
projects, Thrumston pointed
out DOT also recommended
a $2.14 million resurfacing of
the Suncoast Trail from
Pasco to Citrus, and a
$320,000 Withlacoochee Trail
River Crossing multi-use
bridge over the Withla-
coochee River from Marion
County to Citrus.
While some things are still
changing, Citrus officials feel
fairly confident the list will
see final approval. Citrus En-
gineering Services Director
Charles Balut said that with
some states saying they won't
take stimulus money be-
cause of the cost to maintain
new infrastructure, or some
projects not qualifying for
stimulus money, Citrus may
have a chance for even more


duced late last year for Ryan
Beaty, chief executive officer
of CMHS, that compared the
hospital to five other not-for-
profit hospitals in Florida
and supported the position
that CMHS compares favor-
ably in costs and services with
similarly structured hospi-
tals.
Difficulty in gaining infor-
mation was another com-
plaint against the hospital.
DeLoach said, "Citrus Me-
morial does operate 'in the
sunshine,' and we have re-
peatedly expressed our will-
ingness to sit down with these
physicians, or anyone else,
and answer questions and
share -information on the fi-
nances of the hospital."
In addition, DeLoach said
financial information soon
would be available online.
"We are currently taking
steps to enhance our Web site
so that it includes monthly fi-
nancial statements, as well as
our annual audited financial
statements, and this should
be completed by the end of
the month," he said.
The physicians' concern


funds in the near future -
and is ready to submit more
projects.
Balut said the county is
currently brainstorming
about how to handle the proj-
ects all at once. Some will be
bundled together and bid out
that way, but he figured there
would be seven or eight sepa-
rate projects, which would
spread the work out to a
number of companies.
Thrumston said that would
have a good economic im-
pact locally.
"The residual effect of the
money will have deeper ef-
fects in the county," he said.
"It's fantastic that the
county has been able to posi-
tion itself to receive this stim-
ulus money that everyone is
vying for," he said. "We've
done a really good job of
building bridges to the re-
gional concept Now we're
seeing the fruits of that labor"


about quality of care also is of
concern to CMHS, DeLoach
said, and it is monitored reg-
ularly.
'The quality of care at Cit-
rus Memorial is extremely
good and continues to im-
prove," he said. "There are
multiple tools available to
hospitals for measuring qual-
ity, the most comprehensive
of which is supplied by the
Joint Commission, which is
the independent body that
credentials most hospitals in
the United States."
DeLoach explained how
the tool works.
'"The overall score by the
Joint Commission is referred
to as their S3 score, and it is
updated quarterly," he said.
'The lower the score, the bet-
ter the quality indicators are
for that institution. Citrus
Memorial's latest $3 score is
148 compared to the national
average of 247 and the
Florida average of 246."
He also addressed the
physicians' concern about
employee morale.
"We place a great deal of
importance on employee


PROJECT UST
1. Fort Island Trail Resurfacing,
US 191 Di..i SoresV $ .926'
2. Ozello Trail Resurfacing,
US 19? l.5 W, ircet $303 6'
3. Turner Camp Road Resurfacing.
Ella tO Tin Lt.e, l}250 514.
4. Cardinal Streel Resurfacing.
L S 19T.:,CF .19i 1.20 '-5
5. CR 491 Resurfacing. Pine Ridgt
BiEd to 5 R. 200., $1 2E6 6K1,
6. Withlapopka Causeway Repairs.
,50.0ouc
7. C.R. 480 Resurfacing, C R 491
toCF 5.8i. S .600000C
8. Pilot Point Crossing Bridge Repair,
$25- 592
9. Traffic Signal Installation. S F. 44
W1 Hgn2cW Lurdti I, $133,000
10. Graver Cleveland Blvd. Resurfacing,
Te(rna Terr. Ico CR J19l, $600.000
11. Halls River Road Resurfacing,
Hansi R(,vr Brdge 1o Fi1hbuwI
or $52 000
12. C.R. 480 (Stagecoach Road)
Resurfacing, iafdoriinal
$1.086.57:
13. Croft Lane Resurfacing, S ? 44
SCHa, ~ES t $49 500
14. CR 491 Resurfacing S, F 41 Ic,
,:' 48A. 150301,:,0
15. Pilot Point Crossing Bridge Re-
pair. ad.l.t'or,,1 146.,800


morale because we don't
want anything to detract from
their focus on providing high-
quality patient care," De-
Loach said.
Likewise, tools can be used
to measure employee morale.
"We contract with an inde-
pendent firm to conduct em-
ployee opinion surveys on a
periodic basis," DeLoach
said. "The latest surveys con-
ducted over a three-year pe-
riod show that the morale of
our employees has increased
each year"
The percentage of ques-
tions answered in a favorable
manner rose from 65 percent
in the first survey, to 70 per-
cent the following year, to 73
percent in the most-recent
survey, showing a continuous
improvement in morale.
In contrast, the employee
turnover rate has been de-
clining, he said, supporting
the position that staff morale
is good.
"It was 24.11 percent in
2005, 23.64 percent in 2006,
21.06 percent in 2007 and
19.34 percent in 2008," he
said.





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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


S JIUNDAYII RL


Ruling increases gay marriage states
Iowa joined Massachusetts and Connecticut on Friday as states
that allow same sex-marriage.
Same-sex relationship laws
C.1 Domestic partnership I- Civil union III Marriage











SOURCE: National Conference of State Legislatures


Iowa gay marriages expected to begin April 24


Associated Press


DES MOINES, Iowa - Gay mar-
riage, seemingly the province of the
nation's two coasts, is just weeks away
from becoming a reality in the heart-
land and apparently it will be years
. before social conservatives have a
chance to stop it.
The Iowa Supreme Court on Friday
unanimously upheld a lower-court
ruling that rejected a state law re-
stricting marriage to a union between
a man and woman. Now gays and les-
AP bians may exchange vows as soon as


April 24 following the landmark deci-
sion.
The county attorney who defended
the law said he would not seek a re-
hearing. The only recourse for oppo-
nents appeared to be a constitutional
amendment, which couldn't get on the
ballot until 2012 at the earliest.
"I would say the mood is one of
mourning right now in a lot of ways,"
said a dejected Bryan English,
spokesman for the Iowa Family Policy
Center, a conservative group that op-
poses same-sex marriage.
In the meantime, same-sex marriage


opponents may try to enact residency
requirements for marriage so that
gays and lesbians from across the
country could not travel to Iowa to wed.
U.S. Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, urged
the Legislature to do so, saying he
feared without residency require-
ments Iowa would "become the gay
marriage mecca."
Only Massachusetts and Connecti-
cut currently permit same-sex mar-
riage. For six months last year,
California's high court allowed gay
marriage before voters banned it in
November.


Obituaries


Homer
Brown, 87
SUMTERVILLE,
GA.
Major Homer A. Brown,
U.S. Army, (Ret) , age 87,
died April 3, 2009 at the
Lane Purcell Hospice
House in Sumterville.
Graveside military honors
and burial in Florida Na-
tional Cemetery will be an-
nounced at a later date.





Robert 'Bob'
W. Cook, 83
Bob was born in Philadel-
phia and grew up in South
Philly on Reedland Street.
He graduated from John
Bartram High school in 1944
and enlisted
in the US
army imme-
diate after.
He served
from 1944-
1946 in the
U.S. Army's
86th In-
fantry Divi- Robert
sion (the "Bob"
B 1 ac k- Cook
hawks) dur-
ing WWII. Bob served as an
infantryman in Germany
participating in combat op-
erations in the Rhine and
Ruhr Valleys and Bavaria.
He also served on occupa-
tion duty in the Philippines.
He earned the WWII:
Bronze Star Medal, Euro-
pean - African - Middle
Eastern Campaign Medal
with campaign star, Asiatic
-Pacific - Campaign
Medal, American Campaign
Medal, WWII Victory Medal,
and Combat Infantryman's
Badge.
Bob returned to Philadel-
phia after the war and at-
tended Penn State
University, graduating with
a Bachelor's degree in Ac-
counting in 1950. He worked
for Conrail in Philadelphia
following his graduation for
over 30 years. He was also
an active member of Lulu
Shrine Temple, Philadel-
phia, PA, a Scottish rite
32nd Degree Mason and a
member of the Thomas R.
Patton Lodge.
After Bob retired, he
moved to Lecanto Florida,
in Homosassa Springs. He
became an active member
of American Legion post
166. Bob was also an active
member of his community
association and could be
found on most Friday nights
at the community center
shooting pool or playing
poker with his friends. Bob
loved dogs and there was
not a canine in his neigh-
borhood that didn't look for
a treat from Bob's bottom-
less pockets. Bob also en-
joyed traveling to all his
Blackhawk reunions until
his health began to fail. He
was an active and generous
person and much loved by
the members his commu-
nity.
He leaves behind two
Nieces, Debra Kassing of
Winchester, VA, and Kim-
berly Cook of Washington,










* Burial
* Cremation
* Pre-Planning
Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
1352-795-2678
lwww.stricklandfuneralhome.com


DC. Bob always called us his
"Two Hoodlums" and we
knew him as the "The
worlds prettiest Uncle."
Uncle Bob was a true char-
acter, kind and generous
and he will be much missed
by family and friends.
Bob will be interred in Ar-
lington Cemetery and
awarded the military hon-
ors that he deserves.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Mary
Freeman, 49
CRYSTAL RIVER
Mary G. Freeman, age 49,
of Crystal River, FL, died
April 3, 2009, at her home.
She was born on November
27, 1959, in Bainbridge, GA,
to Walter and Catherine
(Marino) Freeman. Mary
moved to Crystal River 8
years ago from Tarpon
Springs, FL. Mary went to
Grammar School in Tangier,
Morocco, and Bangkok,
Thailand, and she gradu-
ated High School from the
American International
School in Thessaloniki,
Greece. She was a Medical
Biller and a member of St.
Scholastica Catholic Church
in Lecanto, Florida.
Survived by her husband,
Rolland Leutert; two chil-
dren Hannah Leutert and
Stefan Leutert, both of Crys-
tal River, FL; her parents
Walter and Catherine Free-
man of Homosassa, FL; two
sisters, Cathy Yosha of Ar-
vada, CO, and Susan Cham-
pion of Tampa, FL; two
sons, Walter Freeman, Jr. of
Littleton, CO, and William
Freeman of San Clemente,
CA.
Family will receive
friends on Tuesday from 6
until 8 p.m. at the Brown Fu-
neral Home in Lecanto, FL.
Mass will be offered at 10:00
a.m. on Wednesday at the St.
Scholastica Catholic Church
in Lecanto, FL with Father
Mike Smith as celebrant In-
terment will follow the
Mass. In lieu of flowers do-
nations can be made to the
Pregnancy and Family Life
Center.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline. com.

Neil
Gebhard, 50
CLERMONT
Neil Gebhard, age 50, of
Clermont, FL died April 1,
2009.
Visitation and Services
will be in Indiana.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto, Florida
in charge of arrangements.

Anthony
Logothetis, 77
HERNANDO
Anthony Nicholas Logo-
thetis, age 77 of Hernando,
died Saturday, April 4, 2009
at the Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center in
Crystal River. Private cre-
mation arrangements are
under the care of the Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory, Inverness.


Celia
Michael, 65
HOMOSASSA
Celia Michael, 65, of Ho-
mosassa died Friday April 3,
2009,at the Hospice of Citrus
County Care Unit at Citrus
Memorial hospital in Inver-
ness.
She was born September
18,1943,in Sucre, Bolivia,and
was of the Catholic fath. As a
young woman in Bolivia, she
was a music teacher. She
came to America in 1968 and
met her husband Herman on
Christmas eve of that same
year and they were married
for 40 years. In 1976, Celia
and Herman, moved their
family from Riverdale, Mary-
land to Homosassa where
they co-owned and worked
side by side in the Open Air
Produce Market until retire-
ment She is survived by her
husband Herman of Ho-
mosassa, a son Chet Michael
(Melanie) and a daughter
Sonya Brown (Greg) both of
Tampa, two brothers Angel of
Spain and Nereo of Bolivia,
sisters Delina and Susana of
Bolivia and sister in law
Eileen of Tampa, four grand-
children and 26, nieces and
nephews. The Funeral Mass
will be celebrated Wednes-
day April 9,2009 at 11:00 AM
at St. Benedict Catholic
Church in Crystal River with
Father Michael Suzysinski
the celebrant Visitation will
be on tuesday from 6:00 pm
to 8:00 pm at the Strickland
Funeral Home Chapel in
Crystal River. For those who
wish, memorial contribu-
tions may be made to the
Cancer Center at Shands
U.F You may contact them at
www.shandsgiving.org

Helen
Jaehing, 84
LEESBURG
Helen Anna Jaehing
passed away on Friday,
March 27th the age of 84. She
was employed for many
years by American Airlines
as a tour group planner, and
was the chief travel agent for
the State of Connecticut She
later worked as a free lance
writer, writing a column
known as 'Helen's Travels'.
Helen is survived by her lov-
ing husband Arthur Jaehing
of Leesburg, FL. one son P
Andrew (Brenda) Jaehing of
Rutherfordton, N.C., one
daughter Robin A. (Dr.
Leonard) Orban of Ho-
mosassa, FL, and two grand
children Sterling and Dori-
anna. A Memorial Service
will be held at Lake Port
Square, Leesburg, FL on
Sunday, April 5h at 3:00 p.m.
with interment in Florida
National Cemetery to take
place on Monday Page-Theus
Funeral Home, Leesburg.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline.com.

Bessie
Springer, 90
HERNANDO
Bessie Law Springer, age
90 of Hernando, died Tues-
day, April 2, 2009, at her
daughter's home in Ft.


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Pierce, under the care of
her family and Hospice of
the Treasure Coast. Born on
December 24, 1918, in Cape
May Courthouse, New Jer-
sey, to the late Harry and
Clara Law, she came here in
1971 from Pennsville, New
Jersey Mrs. Springer was a
homemaker, member of the
Inverness Does Drove #232
and Apache Shores Club.
Her enjoyments in life were
playing bingo and cards and
fishing.
She is survived by her son
Joseph E. (Mary Ann)
Springer, Jr., Hernando; her
daughter, Carol (Henry)
Scholz, Ft. Pierce, FL; 5
Grandchildren and 6 Great-
Grandchildren. She was
preceded in death by her
husband, Joseph E.
Springer, and her brother,
Lewis Law.
Funeral services for
Bessie will be conducted on
Monday, April 6,2009, at 3:00
pm from the Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home of Inverness
with Rev. Kevin Ballard of-
ficiating. Burial will follow
at the Memorial Gardens
Cemetery in Beverly Hills.
Friends may call at the fu-
neral home on Monday from
1:00 pm until service time.
In lieu of flowers, memori-
als are suggested to Treas-
ure Coast Hospice, 2500
"Virginia Ave., Suite #202, Ft
Pierce, FL 34981.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

Marvin
Sutton, 57
INGLIS
Marvin Randal Sutton,
57, of Inglis, Fl. Died Wed.
April 1, 2009 at his resi-
dence. A memorial service
was held at the VFW Post in
Inglis. Roberts Funeral
Home of Dunnellon.





Robert Vick, 69
CAPE CANAVERAL
Robert C. Vick, 69, passed
away peacefully on Wednes-
day, April 1, 2009, in Cocoa
Beach.
Bob was
born in Ft.
Bragg, NC, .
to the late
Robert C.,
Sr. and
Willie T.
Vick on Au-
gust 30, Robert Vick
1939.
He served his country
honorably during the Viet-
nam War
He is survived by his chil-
dren, Greg (Susan) Vick and
Cameron (Thomas) Hae-
seker; grandchildren,
William, Samantha, Andrew
and Ethan; brothers,
William, David, Carl; sister,
Mary Vick.


Bob's life will be cele-
brated and remembered
with a private service.
He was truly loved and
will be missed.
You may send condo-
lences to Bob's online guest-
book at www.beckman
williamson.com.

Corine
Wells, 81
CRYSTAL RIVER
Corine Wells, 81 of Crystal
River died Thursday
evening April 2, 2009, at
Hospice
House in
Lecanto.
She was
born July "
14, 1927, to
Andy and /<
Alice Boyd
in Crystal
River and Corine
was a life- Wells
long resi-
dent. Mrs. Wells was a
retired Supervisor of
Housekeeping at the Crystal
River Geriatric Center. She
enjoyed cooking and family
gatherings. ,
She was preceded in
death by her sister Essie
Mae Purcell. She is survived
by a son Daniel "Peck" Wells
(Cathy) of Holder, daughters
Ludy Norcross (Lewis) and
Virginia Gail Kurz (Dennis)
both of Crystal River, eight
grandchildren and 12 great-
grandchildren, numerous
nieces and nephews.
The Funeral Service will
be conducted Monday April
6, 2009, at 11:00 AM at the
New Hope Baptist Church
in Homosassa with Rev. Eric
Justice presiding. Burial
will follow at the Old Crystal
River Cemetery. Visitation
will be at the Church from
10:00 AM until service time.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
donations are requested to
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464.
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.


Barry Wool, 67
HOMOSASSA
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr. Barry Wool,
age 67, of Homosassa,
Florida, will be held at
6:00pm on Monday, April 6,
2009 at the Homosassa
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
. 782075

BROWN
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY
- - - 5430 W Gulf to Lake Hiiy
SLec'sato, Florida 34451
(352)
795-0111


Homes with Pastor Alan
Ritter officiating. Crema-
tion will be held under the
direction of Hooper Crema-
tory, Inverness, FL. Friends
may call be-
tween e
5:00pm and
6: 0 0 pmr,
Monday at
the Ho-
mosassa
Chapel.
Those who
wish may Barry Wool
send memo-
rial donations to Pancreatic
Cancer Action Network,
2141 Rosecrans Ave., Suite
7000, El Segundo, CA 90245
or online at
www.pancan.com. Online
condolences may be sent to
the family at www.Hooper-
FuneralHome.com.
Barry was born on June
24, 1941 in-Springfield, MA
then moved to Homosassa,
FL when he was 55 years
old. He was the son of the
late Joseph and Marion
(Raichelson) Wool. Barry
loved working for the US
Postal Service for 35 years
before retiring and moving
to Florida.
Survivors include wife,
Deborah A. Wool of Ho-
mosassa, FL; 4 sons: Jeffrey
Wool of Springfield, MA;
Thomas and Marcia Wool of
Pittsfield, MA; Greg Wool of
Pittsfield, MA; Daniel Wool
of Homosassa, FL; and 1
daughter, Heidi Beuree of
Chicopee, MA; 8 grandchil-
dren and 2 great grandchil-
dren.
Arrangements are under
the, direction of the Ho-
mosassa Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes.


OBITUARIES
* The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
both free and paid obit-
uaries.


&.*E. h bal
Funeral Home
With Crematory

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THE CITRUS COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY,
V"" IN PARTNllESHi WITh "
S nAAG. ,AAG, & RIEVRIHe PA AND THe
IM-: tltit$ Otl rOWNI ASSOCIATION ..


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CITRUS CouN'n' (FL) CHRONIC LI~ SUNDAY APRIL 5, 2009 A7


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Cockadoodles Restaurant:
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April 7 - 10 AM


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1601 SE Highway 1
Crystal River
April 14 - 2 PM


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Carmela's
12169 S Williams St
Dunnellon
April 10,17 - 2 PM


Ref #:CCC040509

Quality Health Plans is an HMO with a Medicare contract available to anyone enrolled in
Part B and entitled to Part A of Medicare through age or disability. You must continue to
pay your Medicare Part B premium if not otherwise paid for under Medicaid or by another
third party. Members must use network providers except for emergency, urgently
needed, or out-of-area dialysis services. Limitations and Co-payments may apply. A
Sales Representative will be present with information and applications. For
accommodation of persons with special needs call 1-866-747-2700, 8;30AM to 5:00PM,
Monday - Friday. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or
co-payments/co-insurance may change on January 1, 2010. Please contact Quality
Health Plans for details. H5402 QHP1080 FU (03/09)


SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009 A7


CITRUS CouNTY (FI.) CHRONICLE


."" R


i | i '









sUNDAY, PRIL ,


HOMECOMING


He was taken to two hospi-
tals in Afghanistan before he
was transported to Germany.
Camargo's brother Daniel,
who lives in Denmark, met
Camargo in Germany. The
military allowed him to fly
with his brother to the
United States.
"It meant a lot to me," Ca-
margo said.
Back in the States
Camargo arrived in the
United States on Sept 19 -
his wife Gabriela's birthday
Fiom the moment she saw
her husband at Walter Reed
Medical Center, Mrs. Camargo
decided to personify the
strength her husband needed.
She stayed by his side.
She instructed friends and
family members not to cry in
front of him.
It's all about faith for Mrs.
Camargo. In her heart, she
knows her husband will be
OK
"I'm very confident," she
said. "I trust in God 100 per-
cent"
Most of Camargo's body is
paralyzed.
"It's been a hard and slow
recovery," Camargo said.
Swelling near the wound
has gone down. As that contin-
ues, Camargo may regain
more movement and feeling,
He can move his shoulders
up and down.
He has some feeling in his
chest
When he concentrates, he
can move a few toes.
Another major success: Ca-
margo is spending about 12
hours without a ventilator
Doctors initially said he would
need the breathing aid for
three years, and possibly for
the rest of his life.
Every day, Camargo works
with physical and occupa-
tional therapists.
Doctors have told him to be
patient


Continued from Page Al
For the past five months, he
has been recovering at the
James A Haley Veterans' Hos-
pital in Tampa.
The bullet doctors pulled
from his body is kept in a cor-
ner of the hospital room, along
with the blood-stained vest he
wore the day he was shot
The items are a reminder of
just how lucky he is.
"I know what could have
happened," Camargo said.
Since coming home, he has
been awarded the Purple
Heart.
Camargo's mother, wife,
and 2-year-old son, Andress,
are staying at the Fisher
House, which provides free
housing to families who want
to stay near their loved ones at
the VA hospital.
Having support
Camargo and his wife mar-
ried in 2006. Because of the
nature of his work, the couple
didn't get to spend long peri-
ods of time together
Since the attack, that. has
changed.
Mrs. Camargo has taken on
the role of nurse in addition to
wife. She stays with her hus-
band each day and considers
helping him recover to be her
full-time job.
His spirit constantly
amazes her She said he has-
n't allowed the situationto de-.
stroy his positive nature.
"His attitude is like, 'I'm on
vacation,"' she said. "He's un-
believable."
The walls of his hospital
room are covered with cards
from children in his cousin's
school in Miami, as well as
photos of Camargo's team,
flags, letters and other me-
mentos to keep his spirits up.
His 13-year-old daughter,
Alina, visits from Orlando.
The VA., along with a group
called Operation Support Our
Troops, bought the family a
2009 van equipped with a


."..





BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Romulo Camargo shares a laugh with his wife Gabriela, left, Barbara Mills, and his mother
Betzaida on Tuesday in his hospital room at the James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital in Tampa.


wheelchair lift Lofreddo's husband began
"We have been receiving a serving in Afghanistan in
lot of support, thank God," 2005 that she learned Ca-
Mrs. Camargo said. margo was also deployed
The days he has visitors are there.
better. He likes being with She learned about the at-
people. tack from Doug Lambo - also
"My door's always open," a CRHS graduate.
he said. "I love visitors." Lambo and Camargo have
been close since grade
The word spreads school. When Lambo learned
Since the injury, friends in his friend was in a critical
Citrus have been inspired by state, he flew to Walter Reed.
their former classmate. He doesn't like thinking
Julie Lofreddo was the about how Camargo looked
manager of the Crystal River back them.
High School wrestling team. "It was devastating seeing
"He was always one of the him," Lambo said.
nicest kids," Lofreddo said. Wanting to help the family
Over the years, the two lost in any way he could, Lambo
touch. It wasn't until forwarded e-mail messages to


contacts in Camargo's ad-
dress book
Lofreddo and Lambo have
visited Camargo many times
since then. They saw how
much each trip meant to their
friend - and how much see-
ing Camargo meant to them.
That's what prompted
Lofreddo to contact the
Chronicle about Camargo's
story.
"He is such an amazing in-
spiration," Lofreddo said.
Eventually, a group of locals
dedicated to welcoming home
local members of the military
heard about Camargo.
Things came together
quickly.
Within a few days, veterans


organizations, clubs, busi-
nesses and people simply in-
terested in supporting
members of the military col-
lected about $1,000 worth of
gifts, including locally grown
strawberries and oranges,
Harley-Davidson gear, gift
cards and get-well cards.
Nick Nicholas Ford paid for
an oversized SUV rental so
the volunteers could deliver
the gifts in person. The rental
vehicle led a caravan of cars
and motorcycles to the VA
hospital.
Local representatives from
the Daughters and Sons of the
American Revolution, the
Fleet Reserve Association,
Rolling Thunder, the Sub-
mariners, the VFW and the
American Legion traveled to
Tampa to welcome Camargo
home. Also, in attendance
were Citrus High School
graduate Kevin Mills, who
serves in the Navy and on
Special Forces teams, and the
Citrus County family of de-
ceased Amy Sgt. Allen
"Bobby" Surber, who was
killed in Iraq in 2007.
"We care - that's why
we're here," said Ray Thomp-
son of Rolling Thunder
Camargo's mother, who
lives in Tallahassee, was
amazed by the support.
"We send our love to Citrus
County," she said.
Camargo was also thankful.
Recovering has been
painful, and the process has
been slow.
"It's not easy, but I deal with
it," Camargo said. "It hap-
pened doing what I love doing..
I was serving my country."


318-0405 SUCRN

NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
TO REVIEW PROPOSED AMENDMENTS
TO THE TEXT OF THE LAND DEVELOPMENT
CODE OF THE TOWN OF INGLIS, FLORIDA.

BY THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE TOWN
OF INGLIS, FLORIDA SERVING AS THE LOCAL
PLANNING AGENCY OF THE TOWN OF INGLIS,
FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
pursuant to Section 34 -42, of the Town of Inglis Land
Development Code, comments, objections ahd
recommendations regarding the following described
proposed amendments to the text of the 'Land
Development Code, Town of Inglis, Florida, will be
heard by the Planning Commission of the' Town of
Inglis, Florida, at a public hearing on Tuesday. April
21, 2009 at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as. these
matters can be heard. The public hearing will be
conducted in the Town of Inglis, Town Hall'located at
135 Highway 40 West, Inglis, Florida.

(1) LDC09-2, an application by the Town of Inglis to
amend the text of the Land Development Code
amending Article IV Zoning, by revising the list of
permitted uses and uses permitted by special
exception in various zoning districts; and revising
the special exception review process.


At the public hearing, all interested parties may appear
to be heard with respect to the proposed amendments.
Copies of said proposed amendment are available for
public inspection at the Office of the Town Clerk,
located at Inglis Town Hall 135 Highway 40 West,
Inglis, Florida,

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation to
participate in this meeting should contact the Town
Clerk at (352) 447-2203 (TDD) at least three days in
advance.

All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any
decision made at a public hearing, they will need a
record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose,
they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made; said record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. ,no40


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wugi iandJ PAiavt'miw ain HaIa jnd.b Allen Ridge
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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A8 A 5 2009








CIrnus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009 A9


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NPage A10 - SUNDAY, APRIL 5,2009



NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Obama hails 5,000 more NATO forces for Afghanistan


Military trainers, police to help

with upcomingAfghan elections


Associated Press
STRASBOURG, France
- President Barack Obama
hailed "strong and unani-
mous support" from NATO
allies on Saturday for his
stepped-up anti-terror
strategy in Afghanistan and
Pakistan and welcomed
their "down payment"
promises of 5,000 fresh
forces.
The allies rebuffed U.S.
appeals for more combat


Nation BRIEF

1 dead, 27 injured
in bus accident
RENO, Nev. -A ski re-
sort's employee shuttle bus
crashed on the main highway
through California's Sierra
Nevada on Saturday, killing a
passenger and injuring 27
others, authorities said.
The bus operated by the
Resort at Squaw Creek
veered off the road, "struck a
guardrail and rolled several
times" before stopping in a
ditch along Interstate 80,
about 20 miles west of Reno,
said California Highway Pa-
trol Officer Steve Skeen.
Some of the 30 or so peo-
ple aboard were thrown from
the bus, Skeen said. One
was pronounced dead at the
scene.
The driver suffered "mod-
erate to major" injuries and
was being interviewed by offi-
cers, he said.

World BRIEFS

Winds may, have
delayed launch
SEOUL, South Korea -
Strong winds may have done
what a flurry of diplomacy
couldn't: stop North Korea
from launching a rocket the
U.S. and other nations sus-
pect is a cover for a long-
range missile test, at least for
a day.
Preparations for sending
"an experimental communica-
tions satellite" into space
were complete, North Korea's
state-run media said Satur-
day morning, announcing:
"The satellite will be launched
soon."
But winds around the
launch site in northeastern
North Korea were "relatively
strong," state radio an-
nounced at midday, possibly
too high for the launch of the
long-range Taepodong-2
rocket, analysts said.
"Apart from being very cau-
tious, North Korea may have
put off the launch purely due
to weather factors such as
strong winds," said Atsuhito
Isozaki, an assistant profes-
sor of North Korean politics at
Japan's Keio University.
Kidnapped U.N.
worker freed
ISLAMABAD -An Ameri-
can U.N. worker abducted
more than two months ago
turned up unharmed Satur-
day, lying alongside a road in
western Pakistan with his
hands and feet bound and
pleading "Help me, help me,"
the man who found him said.
John Solecki was discov-
ered Saturday evening aban-
doned in a village some 30
miles south of Quetta near
the Afghan border after his
captors called a local news
agency to tell them where to
look, officials said. At one
point, the kidnappers had
threatened to behead him.
Mohammed Anwar, the
owner of a restaurant along-
side the main Quetta-Karachi
highway, told The Associated
Press that he found a bound
Solecki lying in the dirt near a
wall. Anwar said he heard a
voice in the gloom saying
"Help me, help me" in Eng-
lish,.
Solecki made no public
comment.
-From wire reports


forces to join the war, but
the backing Obama did gain
at a European summit al-
lowed him to claim an early
victory on the world's for-
eign policy stage.
NATO allies agreed to
send up to 5,000 more mili-
tary trainers and police to
Afghanistan, including
forces to help protect can-
didates and voters at up-
coming elections.
Obama called that "a
strong down payment" on


both Afghanistan and NATO
itself at the end of a gather-
ing celebrating the 60th an-
niversary of the North
Atlantic Treaty Organiza-
tion.
He waved off questions on
whether the size and
makeup of the commit-
ments were disappointing
in light of an anti-terrorism
struggle he himself por-
trayed as daunting. Since
becoming president, Obama
has begun switching Amer-
ica's anti-terror emphasis to
fighting al-Qaida in the
Afghanistan-Pakistan area
as the war in Iraq winds
down.


The new president in-
sisted that "terrorists
threaten every member of
NATO," but he also said he
had no intention of trying to
dictate to European coun-
tries the scope of their con-
tributions.
"This was not a pledging
conference," he told a wrap-.
up news briefing packed
with both American and for-
eign journalists. "We came
expecting consensus and
we're gratified getting that
consensus."
He said more help of all
kinds will be needed. But he
also said, "I am pleased that
our NATO allies pledged


their strong and
unanimous support
for our new strat-
egy."
Among countries
resisting U.S. ap-
peals for more com-
bat troops were
France, which on
Saturday rejoined Pres
the alliance as a full Oba
military partner
after decades of being a
nonmilitary member, and
Germany.
Obama weighed in on a
controversial new law in
Afghanistan, his remarks
underscoring his adminis-
tration's shift away from a


U.S. focus on build-
ing democracy in
the country.
Asked about the
law, which a United
Nations agency says
makes it legal for
men to rape their
wives, Obama called
dent it "abhorrent." He
acka also noted that
Afghan President
Hamid Karzai has said the
law will be studied and pos-
sibly sent back to parlia-
ment for review - and that
the NATO conference's clos-
ing statement specifically
states that human rights
should be respected.


Officers shot in standoff


Officers shot in Pittsburgh
neighborhood standoff


Paul Er
Sciullo Ke

Associa ted Press

Information about the,Pitts-
burgh Police officers shot and
killed Saturday after respond-
ing to a domestic disturbance
call:
* Paul Sciullo III, 37, is sur-
vived by his parents. Sciullo
was the first officer who en-
tered the home and was shot
in the head.
a Stephen Mayhle, 29, is


tic
lly


Stephen
Mayhle


survived by a wife and two
children. Police said Mayhle
was the second officer to
enter the home and was shod'
in the head.
1i Eric Kelly, 41, a 14-year
veteran, is survived by a wife
and three daughters. Kelly
had just finished working on
the overnight shift and was on
his way home when he re-
sponded to the shooting.
Source PinsDurgh Police
Cnier Nate Harper


Police officers in tactical gear rush towards the house during a standoff as dozens of other
local and state police officers stand at the ready to respond Saturday in the Stanton Heights
neighborhood of Pittsburgh. A man opened fire on officers during a domestic disturbance
call Saturday morning, a police official said.


"This is a solemn day and
it's a very sad day in the city
of Pittsburgh," Harper said.
"We've seen this kind of vi-
olence happen in Califor-
nia. We never would think
this kind of violence would
happen in the city of Pitts-
burgh."
At 7 a.m., Sciullo and
Mayhle responded to a 911
call from Poplawski's
mother, who remained
holed up in the basement
during the entire dispute
and escaped unharmed,
Harper said.
When they arrived at the


home, Sciullo was immedi-
ately shot in the head.
Mayhle, who was right be-
hind him, was also shot in
the head.
"It appears he was lying
in wait for the officers,"
Harper said.
Kelly, who was on his way
home after completing his
overnight shift when he
heard the call for help,
rushed to the scene and
was killed trying to help
Sciullo and Mayhle, Harper
said. SWAT teams and other
officers arrived and were
immediately fired on


as well.
Don Sand, who lives
across the street from
Poplawski, said he was
woken up by the sound of
gunfire. Hunkering down
behind a wall in his home,
he saw the first two officers
go down and then saw Kelly
get shot.
"They couldn't get the
scene secure enough to get
to them. They were just
lying there bleeding," Sand
said. "By the time they se-
cured the scene enough to
get to them it was way too
late."


Horror visits an immigrants'place ofsolace


Associated Press
BINGHAMTON, N.Y. -
In an all-American city that
has seen better days, they
are true strangers from
lands as far apart as Laos,
Mexico, Somalia and the
former Soviet republics.
The American Civic As-
sociation was the place
they turned to for help nav-
igating their journey. But
their bridge to a better life
is now a monument of im-
migrant sorrow, the site of
a shooting rampage that
killed 14 people, including
the gunman.
Perhaps most implausi-
ble of all is that the killer
was one of their own , as
well as a son of one of their
own. The gunman's father
was known for his own
work with immigrants in
the area.
'"That this tragedy should
have happened in our com-


munity, to our friends who
only wanted to advance
their knowledge and love
of America, is almost un-
bearable," the association's
board president, Angela
Leach, said Saturday.
The volunteer-based
civic group, a member
agency of the United Way
of Broome County, was
founded in 1939 by 11 im-
migrants. It helps roughly
60 to 100 people a day with
finding housing, food,
clothing, medical care and
jobs, as well as offering
English classes, inter-
preters, personal counsel-
ing and more.
"It's like having a mini-
United Nations in your
community," said Mark
Kachadourian, a Bingham-
ton attorney who has been
on the association board
since 2001. He became in-
volved with the group after
it helped his wife, a Cana-


dian, get U.S. citizenship.
Some victims of Friday's
shooting left violent home-
lands only to be slain in a
quiet, industrial city at the
confluence of the Susque-
hanna and Chenango
rivers.
Layla Khalil, an Iraqi
woman in her 50s, came to
the United States after sur-
viving three car bombings
in Iraq, said Imam Kasim
Kopuz, leader of the Is-
lamic Organization of the
Southern Tier.
"To think that would
happen here," Kopuz said.
She had three children,
including a son who is a
doctoral student at the Sor-
bonne in Paris, a daughter-
who is a Fulbright scholar
at Binghamton University
and a son in high school.
The daughter declined
an interview because she 2
was planning her mother's
funeral.


Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - A gun-
man wearing a bulletproof
vest and "lying in wait"
opened fire on officers re-
sponding to a domestic dis-
turbance call Saturday.
killing three of them and
turning a quiet Pittsburgh
street into a battlefield, po-
lice said.
Police Chief Nate Harper
said the motive for the
shooting isn't clear, but
friends said the gunman re-
cently had been upset about
losing his job and feared the
Obama administration was
poised to ban guns.
Richard Poplawski, 23,
met officers at the doorway
and shot two of them in the
head immediately, Harper
said. An officer who tried to
help the two also was killed.
Poplawski, armed with an
assault rifle and two other
guns, then held police at bay
for four hours as the fallen
officers were left bleeding
nearby, their colleagues un-
able to reach them, accord-


ing to police and witnesses.
More than 100 rounds were
fired by the SWAT teams
and Poplawski, Harper said.
The three slain officers
were Eric Kelly, 41, Stephen
Mayhle, 29, and Paul Sciullo
III, 37. Kelly had been on
the force for 14 years,
Mayhle and Sciullo for two
years each. Another officer,
Timothy McManaway, was
shot in the hand and a fifth
broke his leg on a fence.
Poplawski had gunshot
wounds in his legs but was
otherwise unharmed be-
cause he was wearing a bul-
letproof vest, Harper said.
He was charged with three
counts of homicide, aggra-
vated assault and a weapons
violation.
The shooting occurred
just two weeks after four po-
lice officers were fatally
shot in Oakland, Calif.,. in
the deadliest day for U.S.
law enforcement since
Sept. 11, 2001. The officers
were the first Pittsburgh
city officers to die in the
line of duty in 18 years.


As N.Y gunman's life fell

apart, he took others'


Associated Press
BINGHAMTON, N.Y. -
Jiverly Wong was upset
over losing his job at a vac-
uum plant, didn't like peo-
ple picking on him for his
limited English and once
angrily told a co-worker,
".\InU-lIca sucks."
It remains unclear ex-
actly why the Vietnamese
immigrant strapped on a
bulletproof vest, barged in
on a citizenship class and
killed 13 people and him-
self, but the police chief
says he knows one thing for
sure: "He must have been a
coward."
Jiverly Wong had appar-
ently been preparing for a
gun battle with police but
changed course and de-
cided to turn the gun on
himself when he heard
sirens approaching, Chief
Joseph Zikuski said Satur-


day
"He had a lot of ammuni-
tion on him, so thank God
before more lives were lost,
he decided to do that," the
chief said.
Police and Wong's ac-
quaintances portrayed him
as an angry, troubled 41-
year-old man who strug-
gled with drugs and job loss
and perhaps blamed his
adopted country for his
troubles. His rampage "was
not a surprise" to those
who knew him, Zikuski
said.
"He felt degraded be-
cause people were appar-
ently making fun of his
poor English speaking," the
chief said.
Wong, who used the alias
Jiverly Voong, believed
people close to him were
making fun of him for his
poor English language
skills, the chief said.


Gunman 'lyin- in wait'kills

three Pittsburg police officials













E Page All. . - 5,


EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE





'Island' bird(er)'s delight


Sparrows nest inside a Texas-
shaped birdhouse on High Is-
land.

Best bird

watching occurs

during or after

storm front

HuGoo MARTIN
Los Angeles Times
HIGH ISLAND, Texas - As
my airliner approached George
Bush Intercontinental Airport
in Houston, the pilot declared
the weather in southeastern
Texas sunny, warm and mild.
Great, I thought, blue skies
and gentle breezes.
My final destination was High
Island, about 80 miles southeast
of Houston on the Texas Gulf
Coast's Bolivar Peninsula.
This mound of trees and
shrubs, only a mile in diameter,
has a reputation as one of the
U.S.'s top birding sites. As an
occasional bird watcher, I was
drawn here by this reputation.
But I was rooting for a storm be-
cause, according to bird afi-
cionados, the best bird
watching on High Island takes
place during, or just after, a
storm front with strong
northerly winds. Migrating
birds - warblers, orioles,


LUIS SINCO/Los Angeles Times
With migration season in full swing, thousands of birds, including roseate spoonbills, will land at Clay Bottom Pond.


thrushes and others - struggle
against the gusts as they fly
north from the Yucatan Penin-
sula, 600 miles across the Gulf
of Mexico.
When the exhausted birds
reach the Texas shore and spy
the hospitable habitat, they
sometimes fall from the sky.
High Island is geographically
suited for this phenomenon,
known as a "fallout" From the
air, High Island looks like a pro-
trusion of trees and shrubs in
the middle of flat, salty marsh-
lands - an ideal resting spot


This mound of trees and shrubs, only a
mile in diameter, has a reputation as one
of the U.S.'s top birding sites.


for migrant birds.
After a storm, the wind-bat-
tered birds are so exhausted by
the trans-Gulf flight that they
become almost oblivious to bird
watchers. Enthusiasts who have
seen a fallout said you can al-
most pick up and pet the ex-
hausted birds. But texas'


unpredictable weather makes
it difficult to plan to see a fall-
out. Still, the abundance of
wildlife here - from pink
spoonbills to toothy alligators -
makes the trip worthwhile.
Technically speaking, High
Island is neither an island nor
very high.


It rises 30 feet or so above sea
level and is surrounded by
water only after a storm surge.
The town of High Island, with
oaks, mulberry, cypress and
hackberry trees, sits atop a salt
dome, or "island," that has
pushed the soil up from thou-
sands of feet below the surface.
Fewer than 500 Texans call
High Island home, but at the
height of migration season -
early March through mid-May
- thousands of birds rest and
See BIRD/Page A14.


Sails in the sunset


Special to the Chronicle
Don Cox said they always share their vacations with relatives from Europe, and
this year, their dream vacation was to stay in the Keys for a week and take day
trips to Key West. They spent several days seeing the beautiful treasures of old
Key West, especially the exceptional gardens and Victorian gingerbread Conch
houses that surround Duval Street and the Island shoreline. As per Conch tradition,
they had their dinner on the waterfront, drinks at Sloppy Joe's and, later, watched
the local entertainment before sunset at Mallory Square. As they watched the set-
ting sun, several old Florida schooners and sail boats came into view.


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to send
a photograph from their
Dream Vacation with a brief
description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a panel
of judges will select the
best photo during the year
and that photograph will


win a prize.
Please avoid photos with
dates on the print.
Photos should be sent to
the Chronicle at 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429 or
dropped off at the Chroni-
cle office in Inverness,
Crystal River or any Accent
Travel Office.


How to use stock market for cruise discount


Associated Press
DES MOINES, Iowa - A
Web site that sells cruises is
promoting a little-known
way to get a discount on
your next trip at sea: Using
the stock market
If you own stock in a
cruise company, you may
qualify for an onboard
credit. For example, says
Bob Levinstein, CEO of
CruiseCompete.com, if you
own 100 shares of stock in
Carnival (CCL) or Royal
Caribbean (RCL) at the time


of your cruise, you can qual-
ify for an onboard credit of
$50 to $250.
"Anyone traveling on a 14-
night Royal, Celebrity, or
Azamara sailing can get a
$250 onboard credit just for
buying $800 worth of stock,"
Levinstein said in a press
release. With RCL stock
selling at about $8 a share at
the end of March, "that's
better than a 30 percent re-
turn on investment, and
there's no requirement to
hold the shares for any par-
ticular length of time."


In other words, Levin-
stein is suggesting that you
could buy the stock, get the
credit and sell the stock Un-
less the stock price went
down, you'd be ahead of the
game.
As with many companies,
shares of Carnival and
Royal Caribbean are down
from a year ago. The $8
share price for Royal
Caribbean (RCL) is down
from a 52-week high of $36,
and Carnival (CCL) was

See (, . .: .L, Page A14


Fantasy Island meets


German engineering

Hygienic requirements

in spa and sauna area

could be of-putting

to some visitors
SCOTT VOGEL
The Wasbington Post
It was never supposed to be the largest a
indoor water park in the world, much less
a parable for our times, a cautionary tale
on the perils of dreaming big. No one was
clamoring, for an artificial biosphere so
enormous that the Statue of Liberty could
stand upright in it or the Eiffel Tower lie
on its side. And even if they had been
clamoring for it, no one would have built it
here, in the German countryside some-
where between Berlin and Dresden.
This was land that the Nazi Luftwaffe
once used as a training ground for pilots,
that the Soviet Union later turned into anT
East German military base. It was flat and Tropical IslandsThe Washington Post
treeless and abandoned in 1998 when a The Statue of Liberty could stand upright
German firm called CargoLifter pur- inside Tropical Islands, a German water
chased it with the stated intention of park built Inside a massive airplane
building a massive hangar. The Kublai hangar.
Khan-worthy plan: to construct a heavy-
lift aircraft, "heavy-lift" as in having a a home there.
loading bay capable of carrying "a diesel Instead, in 2004 it became a German
locomotive engine (120 tons) and a hump- water park with an English name, Tropi-
back whale (40 tons)," according to the cal Islands, the moniker apparentldlend-
book "International Logis- ing an extra touch of the
tics" by Douglas Long, which There before us exotic for the hordes of
unfortunately does not go on Berliners who patronize it.
to explain why you might stood hubris The snow might be piling up
want to transport both of against the building's base,
those at once. of a rare order: but inside is 75 million cubic
"Wow." That's all my son 14,000 tons of feet of air kept at a temper a-
could say as the bus roundedEture of 79 degrees round-the-
a bend and an enormous el- steel supporting clock, 365 days a year, not to
liptical dome appeared in the mention eight football fields
distance. a 700,000- of landscaping made bare-
"Yeah, um, wow," I replied suare-oo foot-friendly by an under-
my voice a mixture of awe square-foot floor heating system.
and profound confusion. structure 32 "Wow," I said, gazing at the
There before us stood acres of palm trees and then
hubris of a rare order: 14,000 stories high, up, up past the building's
tons of steel supporting a massive steel ribbing, way up
700,000-square-foot structure, an aviation to the umbrella-spoke ceiling.
32 stories high, an aviation "Yeah, um, wow," said my 8-
Xanadu. Sure, CargoLifter Xanadu. year-old.
went belly-up in 2002, its busi- Just beyond the turnstiles,
ness plan disintegrating faster than the there was a bridge over a swamp heavily
several Hindenburgs you could fit inside stocked with mangroves, and paths lead-
its stately pleasure dome, but still: You'd ing past thousands of specimens of tropi-
expect that a scheme equally grandiose, or
at the very least sinister, would have found See ISLAND/Page A14


I


IY1 _









l U , AA , AC


* American Legion Post
155 events for the week of April
5 to 11:
Today: Breakfast 8:30 to 11
a.m., $5. Dart tournament 6
p.m.
Tuesday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Bingo 1 to 4 p.m. SAL
meeting 7 p.m.
Wednesday: Chicken "hot
wings" noon to 3 p.m. Special
Italian Dinner Night 5 to 7 p.m.,
$5. Live music 6 to 10 p.m. Le-
gion Riders meeting 6 p.m.
Thursday: Lunch 11 a.m. to3
p.m. Bingo 1 to 4 p.m. Show
Me the Money 5 p.m. 40/8
Voiture 1219 and Cabane 1219
meeting 7 p.m.Friday: 40/8 fish
fry dinner 5 to 7 p.m., $6. Live
music 6 to 10 p.m.
Saturday: 4th District CPR
Report meeting 9 a.m. at Post
16, Gainesville. Pool touma-
ment 2 p.m.
Call Cmdr. Jim Woodman at
795-6526 or visit
www.postl55.org.
* Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 on Veterans Drive in
Homosassa, across from
Harley Davidson dealership,
announces events forApril.
Mixed pool league every
Sunday at 3 p.m.
Bingo every Wednesday at 2
p.m. Lunch available. Women's
pool league at 7 p.m. Wednes-
days.
Bar bingo all day, every day.
Friday April 10 - Shrimp
scampi at 5 p.m.
Friday April 17 - Pork and
sauerkraut; Polish sausage and
potatoes at 5 p.m.
Friday April 24 - baked ziti
at 5 p.m.
All events open to members
and guests.
For more information, call
795-5012.
* Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City, 637-
0100, April 5 to 12:
Sunday: Hobo Dinner $5 2 to
5 p.m. Or bring in $5 worth of
canned foods. Music by
Hoosier Band. (Dinner is a
fund-raiser for the Veterans
Food bank.) Silent Art Auction
for the paintings of Patty Marsh
starts at 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Pro-
ceeds to the Post Honor Guard.
Tuesday: Bingo starting at 3
p.m. sponsored by the Ladies &
Men's Auxiliaries. Guests wel-
come.
Wednesday: Wings three for
$1, served from 4 to 7 p.m. with
music by D.L.
Thursday: Men's Auxiliary
meeting and elections 7 p.m.
Friday: All-you-can-eat fish
(fried, baked or blackened) for
$7 or a three-piece fried
chicken dinner, served from 4 --
to 7 p.m. Guests welcome.
Karaoke at 7 p.m. by Jannie
Faye.
Saturday: Liver and onions
$6.50, 4 to 7 p.m. Guests wel-
come. To Go orders are avail-
able for 25 cents extra. Call
637-0100.
Sunday, April 12: Victor's fa-
mous two for $1 wimpy burg-
ers, served hot and fresh, 2 to 6
p.m.
Canteen opens at 9 a.m.
Monday through Saturday and
at 1 p.m. on Sunday. Members
only, but guests are allowed
with a member in good stand-
ing.
* VFW Post 7991, 3107 W.
Dunnellon Road, Dunnellon,
(352) 489-1772.
Post offers breakfast from
8:30 a.m. to noon the second
and fourth Sundays monthly.
Full breakfast menu for $5.
Open to the public.
Friday: Bingo starting at 1
p.m. Hot dogs or sandwiches
are available.
Sunday, April 12: Easter
breakfast, serving from 8:30
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Full break-
fast menu, all for $5.
* Eugene Quinn VFW Post,
4337, 906 State Road 44 E., In-
verness, phone 344-3495.
Karaoke is presented each
Sunday, Tuesday and Friday
evenings. Bar Bingo is played
Monday and Thursday after-


noons and Wednesday
evening.
We serve Wings each Tues-
day evening and fish or chicken
on Friday evenings.
"Show Me The Money" is
played each Saturday from 1 to
3p.m.
* The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58,10730
U.S. 41, Dunnellon, has its reg-
ular meeting of the Post and
Auxiliary on the first Wednes-
day of the month starting at 7
p.m.
Ounnellon Young Marines
meet every Tuesday evening
from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
AARP Tax-aide will be given
on Wednesday from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. until April 15.
Bingo is held every Thursday
evening. Doors open 4 p.m.
Games start at 6 p.m. Food
available.
Outdoor Flea Market and
pancake breakfast is every third
Saturday monthly from 7:30
a.m. to 10:30 a.m. All you can
eat for a $4 donation.
* Ladies Auxiliary to Harry
F. Nesbitt VFW Post 10087 will
meet at 2 p.m. Thursday at the
post home.
* The H. F. Nesbitt VFW
Post 10087 in Beverly Hills off
County Road 491, across the
street from ROC's 491 Sports
Bar and directly behind the new
Superior Bank will host a '50s
Sock Hop on Friday, April 17,'
featuring the band, "Blast Kats."
The Blast Kats will take you all
the way back to the '50s and
'60s with some great music. For
a donation of $10 per person,
your VFW Post will provide you
with a great spaghetti dinner to
go along with some great
music. Tickets are available in
'the canteen and tables with a
party of eight can be reserved
in advance.
Today: Bingo in the big hall
beginning at 1 p.m.
Monday: The VFW Golf
League plays at different
courses. Contact Dick Sorrells
or Jim Freiheit at the post for
tee times and locations. The
Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at 9 a.m. at
Twisted Oaks G.C. Check with
Lou Kempf for available tee
times. Dart tournament in the
canteen beginning at 7 p.m.
Tuesday: Pool tournament in
the canteen beginning at 1 p.m.
House Committee meeting and
staff meeting every third Tues-
day and post general meeting
every fourth Tuesday.
Wednesday: Bar bingo in
the canteen at 1 p.m. Wednes-
day is Ladies Night from 5 until
8 p.m. Cookout for a nominal
donation from 5 until 7 p.m.
Karaoke at 7 p.m. with a differ-
ent host each week.
Thursday: VFW Mixed Golf
League alternating between
Twisted Oaks Golf Club and
Pine Ridge Golf Club with an 8
a.m. tee time. Check with Dave
Nealey or Ray Galinski for
available tee times. Pool tour-
nament in the canteen at 7 p.m.
Friday: Dart tournament at 7
p.m.
Saturday: Karaoke in the
canteen from 7 to 11 p.m. fea-
turing a different host each
week.
* The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Anyone who has honorably
served within Korea or outside
Korea from June 25,1950, to
Jan. 31,1955, and anyone
serving within Korea from 1955
to present is eligible to join the
Korean War Veterans Associa-
tion (KWVA). Call Hank Butler
at 563-2496, Paul Salyer at
637-1161 or Neville Anderson
at 344-2529.
* Seabee Veterans of
America Island X-18 All
Seabees, Honeybees, relatives
and friends are welcome to our
meetings and events. Meetings


90 years for Legion


Special to the Chronicle
On March 15, American Legion Post 55 observed the
American Legion's 90th birthday with a party. The oldest
Legionnaire In attendance, Louis Carmer, a 65-year con-
secutive member of the American Legion, had the pleasure
of cutting the cake after dinner. For more information
about this and other American Legion family programs, call
American Legion Post 155 Cmdr. Jim Woodman at 795-
6526, or visit online at www.Posti55.org. From left,
Carmer, World War II Navy submarine veteran and Legion
member, and Larry Rivlere, American Legion Post 155
third vice commander, cut and serve cake.


are at 11 a.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at the VA
Office, 2804 Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto. We have a
short meeting, about one hour,
at the VA Office, then we will
eat lunch at a local restaurant
decided at the meeting. On the
third Wednefsdayrifonthly, we- .-
have a luncheon.
Call Cmdr. David Puffer at
746-9327 or e-mail
puffels@tampabay.rr.com
* Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219.conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Richard Gannon
at 637-1236; for.the Cabane,
call La Presidente Debi Gan-
non at 637-1236 or visit
www.Postl55.org.
* The Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II will conduct its next
meeting at 11:30 a.m. the sec-
ond Saturday, April 11, at Kally
K's, 3383 U.S. 19 in Spring Hill.
* Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call John Young at the
Hunger and Homeless Coali-
tion at 628-4357, or pass along
this phone numbertothe vet---
eran.
* Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shonk Chap-
ter 70 and Auxiliary 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Invemess, at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41.
DAV Chapter 70 and Auxil-
iary meetings are at 2 p.m. on
the second Tuesday of each
month.
The DAV Chapter is open
from 9 a.m. to noon every
Tuesday to assist disabled vet-
erans. A service officer is avail-
able by appointment. Contact
Bill Geden at 341-6875.
For the Chapter, call Richard
Floyd, adjutant at 726-5031.
For the Auxiliary, call Lynn Ar-
mitage, adjutant at 341-5334.
* Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 11:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Crystal Paradise
Restaurant in CrysTal River:
Luncheons will be at 1 p.m.
April 14 at Margarita Grill in Ho-
mosassa and at 1 p.m. May 12
at The Supper Club in Crystal
River.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.

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* Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40
East, Inglis (352) 447-3495.
Men's meeting is at 7:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly.
Ladies Auxiliary meets at 5
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
- -Men's.Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the sec6niRM-rday -
monthly.
House Committee meets at 6
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 members, Men's
and Ladies Auxiliaries would
like to honor our young patriots
and active duty military person-
nel with a free chicken barbe-
cue from noon to 3 p.m.
Saturday, April 25, at VFW Post
8698, 520 E. Highway 40 (1
mile east of U.S. 19), Inglis.
Free chicken barbecue for any-
one in uniform: Boy Scout, Girl
Scout, Sea Cadet, Young Ma-
rine, ROTC Cadet, Civil Air Pa-
trol Cadet, Army, Navy, Marine,
Air Force, or Coast Guard, mili-
tary personnel. Family mem-
bers welcome for a $3
donation. Public $5.


* The Dan Campbell Air-
borne Association meets at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 Gulf-to-Lake
Highway (State Road 44), Crys-
tal River. All current and previ-
ous Airborne members and
their wives are welcome to join
us. Call Steve Leonard at 726-
3693.
* The Marine Corps
League, Samuel R. Wall De-
tachment 1139 will conduct its
regular meeting at 7 p.m. the
third Wednesday monthly at
DAV Post 70 in Invemess at the
intersection of Independence
Avenue and U.S. 41 North. All
former Marines are welcome.
Call Tom Heron at 637-2724 or
Joe Spoto at 746-3315.
* Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 344-
0727.
* Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets the
third Thursday monthly at the
Floral City VFW Post 7122, call
to order 7:30 p.m. The mem-
bership invites all eligible veter-
ans to join.
* The Herbert Surber
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 225 meets at 7:30 p.m. the
third Thursday monthly at the
Floral City VFW Post 7122 on
U.S. 41, Floral City. Contact
Marcia Gallagher, membership
chairwoman, at 860-1629. New
members welcome.
* The Beverly Hills Memo-
rial American Legion Post
237 is seeking eligible veterans
and sons as members. Visit or
phone the post home at 4077
N. Lecanto Highway, in the
Beverly Plaza, 746-5018.
Transferring members are al-
ways welcome.
* Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
Sailors meet at Denny's in
Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 621-0617.
* Marine Corps League,
Citrus County Detachment
819 will meet at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. Call
Commandant Robert Deck at
527-1557.
* VFW Post 4252 and
Ladies Auxiliary.
All eligible persons are in-
vited to join. Stop in at the post


or call for information. Post
4252 is at 3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road
200, Hemando; phone 726-
3339. Send e-mails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
* The William Crow
AmVets Post 447 is at 33
Risher Ave. in Inglis. For more
information call 447-4473.
* U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 726-5926.
* American Legion Post
166 will meet 1:30 p.m., Satur-
day, May 2 at the Dumas-Hart-
son VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility located on Vet-
erans Drive, Homosassa, on
the west side of U.S. 19 at
Dixon's Auto Sales across from
Harley Davidson.
All former and current post
members, as well as all inter-
ested veterans, are cordially in-
vited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For more in-
formation call Bill at 382-1119.
* Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Key Training
Center, 130 Heights Ave., In-
verness. Potluck dinner at 6
p.m., meeting starts at 7:15.
Auxiliary Unit 77 meets at the
same time and place. Call Post
Cmdr. Paul Miller at 344-8277
or Auxiliary president Alice
Brumett at 860-2981.
* Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart (MOPH) meets bi-
monthly at 1:15 p.m. on the third
Tuesday of May, July, Septem-
ber and November at the Citrus
County Resources CenterNA
Clinic, 2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto (west side of
County Road 491 approximately
1 mile north of C.R. 486).
All combat wounded veter-
ans and lineal descendants of
Purple Heart recipients are in-
vited to attend a meeting. Life
memberships for combat
wounded veterans and lineal
descendants of Purple Heart
recipients are.$50. Thereare
no chapter dues. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit www.cit-
ruspurpleheart.org or call
382-3847.


In the SERVICE

Boleware, Key graduated from basic combat training


* Army National Guard Pvt. Michael
G. Boleware has graduated from basic
combat training.at Fort Jackson, Colum-
bia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of training, the
soldier studied the Army mission, history,
tradition and core values, physical fitness,
and received instruction and practice in
basic combat skills, military weapons,
chemical warfare and bayonet training,
drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marks-
manship, armed and unarmed combat,
map reading, field tactics, military cour-
tesy, military justice system, basic first
aid, foot marches, and field training exer-
cises.
He is the son of Earl Boleware of Dun-
nellon and Deborah Boleware of
Nashville, Tenn.
The private is a 2008 graduate of Cit-


rus High School, Inverness.
* Army Pvt. Steven S. Key has gradu-
ated from basic combat training at Fort
Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of training, the
soldier studied the Army mission, history,
tradition and core values, physical fitness,
and received instruction and practice in
basic combat skills, military weapons,
chemical warfare and bayonet training,
drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marks-
manship, armed and unarmed combat,
map reading, field tactics, military cour-
tesy, military justice system, basic first
aid, foot marches, and field training exer-
cises.
He is the son of James Key of Inver-
ness and Dawn Lamm of St. Petersburg.
Key is a 2008 graduate of WTI Techni-
cal Institute, Inverness.


Join us in celebrating the


2009 Citrus County Fair Winners

CIl ONIL

. w Cmronicleon ine.com
Call for More Information

Advertising Deadline: Wednesday, April 8, 2009
Publication Date: Saturday, April 25, 2009
For more information, contact your sales representative at (352) 563-5592
702675


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


Ai2 SNIRYAPIUL 5 2 9


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CITRUS CouNry (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009 A13


VEDC hopes program


will help create jobs


Special to the Chronicle
The objective of the Veterans Economic Development Council is to create new jobs. From left are: Barbara Logan, Amer-
ican Legion Auxiliary Unit 155 vice president; Jay Conti Sr., American Legion Post 155 adjutant and fourth District pub-
lic relations officer; Jimmy White, American Legion Post 155; Tom Cooper, American Legion Post 155; Larry Pink,
American Legion Post 155 first vice commander; Jim Woodman, American Legion Post 155 commander; Dick Floyd,
DAV Chapter 70; and Bob Scott, fourth District sergeant-at-arms.


Special to the Chronicle

The Veterans Economic
Development Council
under the auspices ofAmer-
ican Legion Post 155 Crystal
River is now actively en-
gaged in recruiting Dis-
abled American Veteran
(DAV) and veteran-owned
businesses to obtain state
and federal contracts. Reg-
ulations permit other non-
vet.�,all businesses to team
up with the vets. A DAV is
defined as a veteran receiv-
ing at least 3 percent dis-
ability from the VA.
The VEDC does not assist


in resume preparation or
business plans. It provides
registration, training and di-
rect marketing to the govern-
ment. The prime objective is
to create jobs using the gov-
ernment marketplace. It is
not funded by the county,
only by donations, and the
staff are all volunteers.
If you are a DAV or vet-
eran small business owner,
contact us. There is no
charge to you. Your disabil-
ity payment is not affected.
Call 527-5957 for informa-
tion and registration and
see us on the web at
www.CitrusVEDC.org.


ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Monday:
Breakfast - Mini cinnamon
pancakes, General Mills cereal,
tater tots, toast, milk variety,
juice variety.
Lunch - Cheese pizza, un-
crustable grape PB&J, PB dip-
per, garden salad, carrots,
Italian pasta salad, pears, milk,
juice.
Tuesday:
Breakfast - Egg baked
omelet, General Mills cereal,
tater tots, toast, milk variety,
juice variety.
Lunch - Tacos, chicken ten-
ders, salad shaker, garden
salad, green beans, mixed fruit,
crackers, apple crisp, milk,
juice.
Wednesday:
Breakfast - Breakfast bar,
General Mills cereal, toast, milk
variety, peach cup.
Lunch - Baked chicken,
corndog, PB dipper, garden
salad, turnip greens, cornbread,
peaches, Minute Maid juice bar,
milk, juice.
Thursday:
Breakfast - Breakfast
sausage pizza, General Mills
cereal, toast, milk variety, juice
variety.
Lunch - Chicken nuggets,
turkey sandwich, salad shaker,
garden salad, peas and carrots,
applesauce, crackers, gelatin,
milk, juice.
Friday: Holiday
MIDDLE SCHOOL
Monday:
Breakfast - Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, MVP break-
fast, General Mills cereals,
grits, toast, milk variety, juice
variety.
Lunch - Pepperoni pizza,


corndog, chef salad plate, gar-
den salad, corn, seasoned noo-
dles, sweet potato bake,
peaches, crackers, milk, juice.
Tuesday:
Breakfast - Mini cinnamon
pancakes, MVP breakfast, tater
tots, grits, milk variety, juice va-
riety.
Lunch - Tacos, chicken ten-
ders, tuna salad plate, garden
salad, broccoli, Spanish rice,
mixed fruit, crackers, apple
crisp, milk, juice.
Wednesday:
Breakfast - Egg and cheese
biscuit, MVP breakfast, General
Mills cereals, grits, toast, milk
variety, juice variety.
Lunch - Orange chicken
plate, hamburger, breaded
chicken salad plate, garden
salad, green beans, pears,
Minute Maid juice bar, crackers,
combread, milk, juice.
Thursday:
Breakfast - Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP breakfast,
tater tots, grits, milk variety,
juice variety.
Lunch - Sausage pizza,
turkey melt, turkey salad plate,
garden salad, carrots, black-
eye peas, applesauce, gelatin,
crackers, milk, juice.
Friday: Holiday
HIGH SCHOOL
Monday:
Breakfast - Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, MVP break-
fast, General Mills cereals,
toast, tater tots, grits, toast, milk
variety, juice variety.
Lunch - Chicken & yellow
rice, hamburgers, pizza,
hoagie, breaded chicken salad
plate, garden salad, mixed veg-

See I-: '. /PageA15


Mergers and admonitions: Costly graphic fix


IG, the company that aways or undeserved
broke the world by bonuses that kills them, but
. selling fake insur- the corporate culture itself.
ance policies, removed One place I worked at
their name from the front of changed their logo seven
their New York times in two
City skyscraper. years. It used to
How much did be Big Corp Inc.,
that cost? The and then it
letters were, like, bought Colossal
5 feet tall. You Brands so it be-
just can't send came Big Colos-
down Al from the sal Brands. They
mailroom with a hired the most
screwdriver and e x p e n s i v e
a ladder and take graphic designers
them down. They JiM in the world to
probably had to MULLEN come up with a
use a few guys logo for the new
with cherry pick- company. The
ers. They took them down in highly paid designers and
the middle of the night so the highly paid executives
we're talking golden time went on spa retreats to-
for the crew. But is taking gether, they went to trust-
down the sign really going to building camps together,
solve any of AIG's prob- they went deep-sea fishing
lems? together off Cabo San
I'm sure that as the Lucas. After millions of dol-
months go on we'll learn lars and countless hours of
that the million-dollar confabbing, faxing and e-
bonuses they gave to the mailing, the new logo was
guys who lost billions are revealed. It consisted of the
chump change. They are letters "B" and "C" inter-
probably spending your twined to look as if they
bailout money right now, on were having some kind of
focus groups to find out if kinky alphabet sex with
AIG should change their each other. A business
name to "Warm and Fuzzy school triumph! The execu-
Financial," "Huggy Bear tives who had spent so much
Enterprises" or "Insurance time and money on it all
'n' Things?" agreed it was a work of ge-
Anyone who's worked for nius and they were all ge-
a big corporation knows it niuses.. Then they spent
isn't the stock-option give- millions more changing


every piece of corporate sta- half-buried in the sand. The
tionery, every notepad, new format won an "Edgy"
every handout baseball cap, Award. Sales tanked. Some
every tote bag and every other magazine stole our
giveaway pen to the new new art director. They went
logo. All the old stuff was out of business, too. They
thrown out. Two months won an "Edgy" posthu-
later Big Colossal Brands mously.
merged with Humongous Of course all the sta-
Products becoming Big, Hu- tionery, baseball hats, etc.,
mongous & Colossal Inc. had to be tossed out once
The new company more. This time, the "B" and
adopted Humongous Prod- the "C" performed their
ucdt'corporate motto which kinky sex game inside a
was "Something you ate large "H." Changing the logo
today, we touched." It did not improve the bottom
worked fine for most of the line as expected. I never
company, but I was in their once heard anyone say,
magazine division and it "Hey, nice new logo. I'm giv-
didn't get us much business. ing you all my business."
We had our own problems. executives
Once a year the editor While the executives
would decide to redesign were busy picking logos and
the whole magazine to make mottos, the stock price of
it "edgier." Incredibly, the BHC steadily dropped. A
magazine-buying public Wall Street raider bought
didn't seem to appreciate the whole company for a
the significance of our font song, fired all the high-
change from Times New priced executives and
Roman to Courier, that we'd resold the company a year
spent millions going from a later for a gazillion-dollar
three-column format to two profit. Members of the logo
columns, that the "edgy" team were all quickly hired
new art director (we had to by other big corporations,
buy out the old one) did not and are now busy spreading
like to read the stories he their management magic to
was designing. On the head- other lucky offices. If we all
line for a piece about adop- chipped in and paid them a
tion, the letters looked like bonus to leave, we'd all be
shards of broken glass. For better off.
the article about the top ten
beach vacations, the pic-
tures were of rotting -fih: Reach author Jinfi tlue7rat"'
and evil-looking pop-tops jim mullen@mywaycom.n


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April 6 to 10 ws







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ai4 S Aut52009


ISLAND
Continued from Page All
cal flora. Densely planted
coffee bushes and banana
trees conspired to create a
remarkably realistic jungle,
the effect spoiled only by
the sound of flip-flops and
the occasional bad Euro-
pean bathing suit
Deep and dark it was, the
palms overhead eventually
obscuring the sky, until they
stopped obscuring it and a
great cerulean-ness came
into view. A cerulean
screen, of course, dotted
with Magritte-style clouds
and mounted over a tropical
sea called Tropical Sea.
Germans of all ages frol-
icked in the sand nearby,
while others camped
overnight in canvas tents
(just $30 a person for a pal-
let with high-thread-count
sheets). The attraction, in
addition to the sea itself,
with its stainless-steel
ocean floor, is the pair of
sandbars floating on it. Both
are magically transformed
each evening from enter-
taining schmaltz islands to
islands of schmaltz enter-
tainment. (Past offerings
have included the show
"Myths of the South Seas,"
which "tells the story of
man's bitter struggle for sur-
vival and his desire for im-
mortality," in terms that
Cirque du Soleil fans will
instantly understand.)
Around showtime, three-
course meals of guinea fowl,
blue marlin and blueberry
mousse can be procured at
the adjacent Paradiso
restaurant, but "we can
make you a cosmo or an-
other cocktail right now,"
said the faux Samoan be-


hind the bar. And so it was
that I warmed to the idea of
Tropical Islands in spite of
myself, its Borneo long-
houses and Balinese huts
and indoor hot-air balloon
ride much easier to take
after a martini in the man-
groves.
Alas, one martini pro-
vided insufficient ballast for
the park's spa and sauna
area, which oc-
cupies a gener- Alas, o
ous one-third
of Tropical Is- tini pr
lands' real es- insuff
tate. Like the
Frontierlands ballast
and Toon-
Towns of other park's
parks, this cen-
ter of "well- sauna
ness" repre- which o
sents a clear
departure from a gen
the adjacent
neighborhood. One-th
As a bonus, it
also provides Tropical
the occasion real e
for a teachable
moment on
American prudery.
"It's like Naked Town,"
my son said.
"I don't think there's any-
thing wrong with it," I speed-
ily replied, my delivery oddly
listless, owing to the e6ncur-
rent sighting of a naked'15-
year-old man bounding
happily into a steam bath
patterned after the. Ele-
phanta Temple in India.
"Then why don'tL.;3 o
it?"
"We just don't do it."
At that moment, I found
myself locking eyes with a
middle-aged woman wear-
ing an irritated, just-take-
'em-off-already stare but
nothing else. For my part, I
countered with a Jane


Goodall look of detached
curiosity and a pair of hibis-
cus-print trunks. There
would be no common
ground here, I concluded,
slipping away to the temple
as a trio of naked children
my son's age streamed past.
We were stopped at the
door. Not only was wearing
anything more than a towel
in the temple a fashion faux
pas, an atten-
ne mar- dant told us, it
was also unhy-
ovided gienic and dis-
ent allowed.
CIenI Now, admit-
for the tedly, I've
never been a
spa and big fan of this
particular pair
area, of hibiscus-
ccupies print trunks,
butthey hardly
erous seemed awful
enough to in-
lird of spire such a
I level of chau-
Island's vinudism. And
state. since when did
body shame
become a bar-
rier to the enjoyment of
wellness?
"We prefer that you expe-
rience the spa as nature in-
tended," said a gentle-
voiced young man when we
sought explanation.
"As nature intended," I
said.
"Yes."
And with that, we stum-
bled back to the jungle, past
the Angkor Wat stone sauna,
the herbal sweat lodge in-
spired by Lakota shamans,
the New Zealand Waiotapu
Thermal Reserve hot tubs.
The palm trees in the dis-
tance were glowing in the
setting sun, and the low hum
of stadium lights was just
becoming audible.


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"Fast and the Furious" (PG-13) Noon, 2:30 p.m., 5
p.m., 7:45 p.m. No passes.
"The Haunting in Connecticut" (PG-13) 12:20
p.m., 2:40 p.m., 5:05 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Monsters vs. Aliens" (PG) 12:10 p.m., 2:35 p.m.,
4:55 p.m., 7:20 p.m. No passes.
"Knowing" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Duplicity" (PG-13) 12:40 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"Race to Witch Mountain" (PG) 12:15 p.m., 2:45
p.m., 5:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Fast and the Furious" (P-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.


or

I


*i





14
h


"The Haunting in Connecticut" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:50., 10:15 p.m.
"12 Rounds" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40
p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Monsters vs. Aliens" (PG) 1 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 4
p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:25 p.m., 9:55
p.m. No passes.
"Knowing" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"Duplicity" (PG-13) 1:05 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.
"I Love You Man" (R) 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:25
p.m.
"Race to Witch Mountain" (PG) 1:10 p.m., 4:10
p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:35 p.m.


Beck's job is to clear the
trails and pull out aggres-
sive nonnative plants, such
as Chinese privets, that can
dominate the vegetation
and replace berry-produc-
ing trees that feed birds
year round.
After Ike wiped out habi-
tat and fresh-water sources
along much of the Texas
coast, Beck said the remain-
ing trees and fresh-water
ponds on High Island be-
came even more attractive
to alligators, snakes, ar-
madillos and, more impor-
tant, birds. Audubon
officials have conducted no
surveys to confirm this
claim, but have counted
more than twice the number
of alligators - 30-plus -
than at any time in the past.
As Beck explained this,
his attention was drawn to
the treetops by the tweet-
tweet-tweeting of a yellow-
crowned warbler.
"Each week, we will be
seeing more and more until
mid- to late May," he said.
At Boy Scout Woods, we
walked along dirt trails,
stopping at several wood
benches and small grand-
stands strategically placed


in front of small fountains
and ponds where birds
splashed and sipped water.
It's no wonder the island
draws up to 10,000 visitors a
year At the height of the
spring migration, up to 1,000
birders swarm the sanctuar-
ies, pointing binoculars and
scopes at the feathered in-
habitants.
Smith Oaks Bird Sanctu-
ary, High Island's largest
refuge with 145 acres of
woods, fields, wetlands and
ponds, is only a few blocks
from Boy Scout Woods.
We hiked to the banks of
the artificial Clay Bottom
Pond.
As Beck and I approached
the water's edge, we trig-
gered a panic.
The sky was a kaleido-
scope of color and move-
ment.
"Don't worry," Beck said.
"They'll come back."
And they did.
The spring migration was
just beginning, but the trees
were already bursting with
sound.
I asked Beck what it's like
at the height of the season.
"Loud," he said.


CRUISE
Continued from Page All
trading at about $21 at the
end of March, down from
$43.
Royal Caribbean, which
owns Celebrity and Aza-
mara, also offers share-
holder credits on shorter
cruises: $200 credit for 10-13
nights; $100 credit for six to
nine nights; and $50 credit
for sailings of five nights or
less.


Carnival owns Princess,
Holland America,
Seabourn, Cunard. and
Costa, and offers $250 cred-
its on sailings of 14 days or
longer, $100 on sailings of
seven to 13 days, and $50 on
sailings of six days or less.
Credits can be used for a
variety of purchases and
services onboard, including
specialty restaurants and
spas.
Applications to get the
credits must be made prior
to cruise departures, restric-
tions apply, and certain re-


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For example, Royal
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along with your name, ad-
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Royal Caribbean also ad-
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BIRD
Continued from Page All
feed here before setting off
to the Midwest and the East-
ern United States. Some fly
as far as Alaska.
Packing a pair of binocu-
lars, a digital camera and a
field guide to North Ameri-
can birds, I drove to the
Louis B. Smith Bird Sanctu-
ary, a 45-acre patch of woods
surrounded by residential
neighborhoods. It's also
known as "Boy Scout
Woods," because it was
home to a Scout camp
decades ago. The Houston
chapter of the Audubon So-
ciety owns four sanctuaries
on the island, and the Texas
Ornithological Society owns
a fifth refuge.
Andrew Beck, an Audu-
bon sanctuary steward, gave
me a tour of the island.
It had been six months
since Hurricane Ike, a Cate-
gory 2 storm, tore into the
Texas coast, and the sanctu-
ary was still a tangle of up-
turned trees, broken
branches and snarled un-
derbrush.


I I!�� l lIII, J II l


I


I









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


=-50th ..AN2VTe FesE

The Foxes


25th



The Diamonds


Marian and Gene Fox re-
cently celebrated their 50th
wedding anniversary. They
were married in Spring-
field, Va., on Feb. 28, 1959.
Gene was born in Louisville,
Ky., and Marian was born in
Yonkers, N.Y. They met
when both were working in
Washington, D.C.
For 30 years, Gene was a
Public Utilities Specialist
for the Rural Electrification
Administration, U.S. De-
partment of Agriculture.
After retirement he served
as manager of Suwannee
County Electric Coopera-
tive, and then staff assistant
at the Withlacoochee River


Mr. and Mrs. Adam and
Mary Jablonski Sr. were
married on April 4, 1959, at
Holy Child Church (now Our
Lady of Hope) in Philadel-
phia, Pa.
Adam retired from BOC
(oxygen co.) after 40 years of
service, and Mary is retired
from Medical Collections.
They have lived in Citrus
County 14 years.
The Jablonskis have a


Brant Tyler Eldridge cel-
ebrated his first birthday on
March 30. Brant is the son of
Bret and Cheryl Eldridge of
Inverness. Brileyann Laurel
Eldridge is his big sister.
Maternal grandparents are
Lewis and Kathy Smith of
Inverness. Paternal grand-
parents are Willie and Pat
Eldridge of Inverness.




MENUS
Continued from Page A13
tables, corn, Minute Maid juice
bar, french fries, crackers, milk.
Tuesday:
Breakfast - Mini cinnamon
pancakes, MVP breakfast, tater
tots, grits, milk variety, juice va-
riety.
Lunch - Orange chicken
plate, chicken sandwich, pizza,
chef salad plate, garden salad,
carrots, corn, baked beans,
french fries, pears, crackers,
milk.
Wednesday:
Breakfast - Egg and cheese
biscuit, MVP breakfast, General
Mills cereals, tater tots, grits,
toast, milk variety, juice variety.
Lunch - Broasted chicken,
hamburger, combo hoagie,

I BikiniWe


Electric Cooperative.
Marian was the director
of Visual Resources for the
Colleges of Fine Art and Ar-
chitecture, University of
Florida, and later taught art
and Humanities at P-HCC in
Dade City and Brooksville.
After moving to Citrus
County, she taught at the
CFCC, Lecanto Campus and
drawing and painting in her
studio.
The Foxes have lived in
Florida for 41 years and in
Citrus County for 13. They
have three children, three
grandchildren and one
great-granddaughter. They
are both now retired.


daughter, Betty Dennis and
husband Tom in Powhatan,
Va., and two sons, John
Jablonski of Bethlehem, Pa.,
and Adam Jablonski and
wife Shelly also of Bethle-
hem, Pa. They also have
three grandchildren and
one great-grandchild on the
way.
An anniversary party will
be given by their children in
Philadelphia.


pizza, PB dippers, turkey salad
plate, garden salad, corn, broc-
coli, mixed fruit, french fries,
roll, crackers, milk.
Thursday:
Breakfast - Breakfast pizza,
MVP breakfast, tater tots, grits,
milk variety, juice variety.
Lunch - Spaghetti with
meat sauce, chicken sandwich,
pizza, breaded chicken salad
plate, garden salad, green
beans, corn, french fries, apple-
sauce, apple crisp, crackers,
milk.
Friday: Holiday
Menus are subject to change
without notice.
CONGREGATE DINING
Monday: Meatballs with Ital-
ian tomato sauce, Italian blend
vegetables, carrots, whole
wheat hot dog bun, chocolate
brownie, low-fat milk.


Mr. and Mrs. Tony and
Cindy Diamond, of Floral
City, celebrated their 25th
wedding anniversary They
were married on March 24,
1984, in Jacksonville.
They have one daughter
and three grandchildren.
Cindy works for Michael's
Flooring in Inverness and
Tony works for Cemex in
Brooksville.
They have lived in Citrus
County 24 years.


Engagement


Pass/Jackson


Mr. and Mrs. David Jack-
son of Inverness are pleased
to announce the engage-
ment of their son Eli Davis
Jackson to Cameron Smith
Pass.
Eli, who is also the son of
the late Sharon Davis Jack-
son, is a former Citrus High
School teacher and basket-
ball coach. He is a graduate
of University of Florida and
is now pursuing a masters
degree in history at Auburn
University at Montgomery.
Cameron, the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Marshall
Adams Pass of Newnan, Ga.,
is a senior in early child-
hood education at Auburn
University.
The wedding will take
place April 25 in Auburn
and the couple plans to set-
tle in Alabama.

Tuesday: Chicken quarter
with Spanish sauce, fiesta rice,
green beans, 1 slice whole
wheat bread with margarine,
fresh banana, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Orange juice,
pork chop patty with brown
gravy, broccoli cuts, corn, 1
slice whole wheat bread with
margarine, fruited yogurt.
Thursday: Chef salad
(turkey, ham, cheese and
boiled egg) with ranch dressing,
two slices whole wheat bread,
applesauce, low-fat milk.
Friday: Good Friday. All sites
closed.
Congregate dining sites in-
clude: Lecanto, East Citrus,
Crystal River, Homosassa
Springs, Inverness and South
Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 527-5975.


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582 SE 7th Ave., Crystal River, FL 34429 0 www.scottredrickmd.com


TheJablonskis


I i


SFirst O a'. - -y


tn


SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009 A15


TOGETHER









A16 SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


00Uo


Both need 1



chores on


Dear Annie: My husband's job re-
quires him to travel several days dur-
ing the week We have two teenage
daughters still at home. When he first took
the job, there was some adjusting, but the
girls and I quickly settled into a routine.
I work a 40-hour week I look forward to
not being the cook and chauffeur on the
weekends, but my husband, who enjoys
cooking, refuses to help. He says
he doesn't want to be "the but-
ler" when he is home from his
travels.
I understand being on the road
is not a vacation. I know he looks
forward to a home-cooked meal,
and I make every effort to
arrange it, but it feels like I never
get a break Can you give us some
advice? - Not the Butler's Wife
Dear Wife: Both of you need a
break Every couple handles this
in their own way. Some do all the ANN
chores together, so each person MAIL
only has half as much to do.
Some divide the weekend, giving
the husband one day's tasks and the wife
the other Many couples let the housework
go and order takeout.
You have two teenage girls who should be
quite capable of helping. Since your hus-
band wants a home-cooked meal, either let
your girls get creative with the food, or make
a little extra when you cook during the week
and freeze it. That way your husband can
have his preferred meal and you don't have
to spend the weekend preparing it
Dear Annie: My husband and I moved
across the country and now see our fami-
lies only once or twice a year I have been
encouraging both families to exchange
newsy e-mails, copying everyone. I thought
it was a good way for the cousins to keep up
with one another.
Well, my sister-in-law recently sent back a
nasty response, ridiculing and lambasting
me for bragging about my sons. She copied
everyone on her response, and I was totally
embarrassed, even though I honestly try to
balance my e-mails with the good, the bad
and the ugly, while keeping them light.
I don't want to give up on this idea of
sharing news, but I also don't want to be
seen as boastful. Should I just leave this sis-
ter-in-law out of the loop and continue to
communicate with the others? No one else
seems to have her strong negative feelings.


break from



weekend

- Hurt and Feeling Harassed
Dear Hurt- Your sister-in-law is reacting
the way some people do to Christmas
newsletters that are incessant brag sheets.
If you truly are balancing each e-mail (and
showing an interest in the other relatives),
her response seems petty. Don't leave her
out of the loop. Instead, make her part of
the light tone you want to achieve. When
you are about to say something
positive about your family, pref-
ace it with: "Brag Alert" or some
other self-deprecating remark.
' Then, if she continues to object,
the rest of the family will con-
sider her a spoilsport.
Dear Annie: This is the first
time I have written, but "Not
Trying to Be Burly About Kim-
berly" struck a nerve. I am 61
years old and rarely speak to my
older sister or her children. My
lIE'S name is Virginia, but my sister
rOXY always took great delight in call-
, O ing me Jenny because my grand-
father had one surviving mule,
and female mules were called "jennies." I
grew up hating that nickname.
After we were grown, I asked my sister
and her husband to call me by my proper
name t they laughed and refused. Natu-
ra eir children wouldn't call me any-
thi ut Aunt Jenny. Their refusal to do
something so simple is characteristic of the
little esteem they have for me.
Kimberly, if you love those relatives and
they love you, accept being Kim for a few
days each year. The alternative is not to
have a relationship - like me. - Virginia
in Kentucky
Dear Virginia: It seems to us that your
nickname should have gone to your stub-
born mule of a sister. How sad for both of
you.


Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers column.
Please e-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, PO. Box 118190, Chicago,
IL 60611. To find out more aboutAn-nie's
Mailbox, and read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate
Web page at www.creators.com.


Sunday PUZZLER

Puzzle answer is on Page A12.


ACROSS
1 Gorge
'6 Rains icy rain
11 Large (prefix)
16French painter
Edouard -
21 Variety show
22Bar legally
23Fjord
24Superior to
25Silly
26Buffet table item
(2 wds.)
28Log house
29Chem., e.g.
30Set of tools
32Split
33Wharves
3501d language
(abbr.)
: 36Lucre
38- Lisa
41 Play the lead
43Arid
44Animal enclo-
sures
45 Keep down

tyrannically
48Cat- - -tails
50Cup handle
52Drive
55Read in haste
57Shoe part
58Printing meas-
ures
62Cut off
63Ex - facto
65Show of assent
67Light meal
69Not more than
(2 wds.)
70Elec. unit
71 Poem
72Angry dispute
74Dreary .
76Poker stake


77Gas used in . 14? Poadside inn
signs 7-: - 4l,5eRipntaestan
79Shade tree - 1l7Cr) ip.e a3 lnr


81 City in Germany
83Dross
85A pronoun
86 Doughnut shape
88Soft candy
90Dylan or Marley
92Reseller of tickets
94Federal agent
(hyph.)
96Cup
97Cudgel
99Jai -
100 Considered
to be unlikely
103 Holiday drink
105 Award of a kind
107 Wall hanging
110 Sprint
111 "- go bragh!"
113 Of warships
115 Ump's cousin
117 Art movement
118 Particular
120 Meat for stew
122 Liquor
123 One of the
States
(abbr.)
125 Summit
126 Serious crime
128 Political
acronym
130 "The Raven" au-
thor
132 Inland sea in
Asia
133 Kimono sash
1 QAT-+ - - ,'�


key
150 Low
152 Times
154 Vetch seed
155 Approach-
159 Kindled
160 Coagulated milk
162 Little bit
164 Single (prefix)
166 Cakes and -
167 Form of quartz
169 Act of copying
173 LustroL. taobric
175 Gannet
176 George or T.S.
177 Angry
178, peace goddesI
179 -.,er n,-, England
180 ies
181 render rriimiaps
182 -lard.vare 't i'v
DOWN
1 Crunchy
2 From now
3 Benefit
4 Calendar abbr.
5 Timid
6 Trojan War hero
7 Cigarette residue
8 Call---day '
9 Place for hay
10 Secret agents
11 Traveling worker
12Plus
13Cut
14Dwell
15Different


134 Test a garments
fit 16Some computers,


(2 wds.)
135 Contemptuous
cry
137 Bellow
139 Traveled
141 Poor grade


for short
17Lawyers' org.
18Aristocratic
19Bottled water
brand


20Pavilions
27Alliance acronym
31 Burst inward
34Cereal grass
37Dandy
39Bird habitat
40Inquire
42Read the - act
44- donna
46Fruit with a hard
rind
47Transgression
49Requirement
51 Fitting
52Faciory
53Lover in a play
54At an appropriate
time
56Code name
59Ploner
60- - crow flies'
61 Direct
.64The 'l"
66- and don't
68"- longa..."
69Manila hemp
73Delicate trap
75Hirt and Pacino
78Unfeeling
80Not talking
81 Encourage (2
wds.)
82Prize name
84 Festive
87Glut
89Demand payment
from
91 Naughty
93Fat
95Brash
98Seaman
100 General mean.
ing
101 External
102 "- Fledermaus"
104 Joke
105 Landed estate


106 Nonsense poet
108 Sun-dried brick
109 Flavorful
112 Pester
114 Big shot (abbr.)
116 Raze
119 Temperamental
121 Timber wolf
124 Succulent plant
127 Opp. of S.S.W.
129 Spread for
crackers
131 Dawn goddess
132 Field
136 Recluses
138 Play part
140 Samovar
142 Big Australian
bird
143 Spjc:ec:rat ec-

144 Secular
146 Does a gar-
dener's job .
147 Explosion
148 Severity
149 "--of Two
Cities"
151 Command
153 Sober and
steady'
156 Trencherman
157 Skirt shape
(hyph.)
158 Extend a sub-
scription
160 Penny
161 Whirl
163 Raison d'-
165 Egyptian god-
dess
168 Light brown
170 Destiny
171 Writer - Flem-
ing
172 Mel of baseball
174 Bow


The Citrus County Animal
Control Shelter has online list-
ings of impounded animals at
animal control.citrus.fl.us. Select
"Animal Type," etc. and search.
The shelter is in Inverness
near the airport. The shelter
phone hours are 8 a.m. to clos-


Today's HOROSCOPE .....


Your Birthday: In the year ahead,
it'll prove to your advantage to in-
vestigate situations that have pos-
sibilities for making some of your
dreams a reality. You have what it
takes; you merely need to find an
avenue that leads you to success.
Aries (March 21-April 19)- You
are likely to be more susceptible to
flattery than usual, so take care.
Should someone with an ulterior
motive recognize this, you could
be manipulated.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -
You're in for a shocking surprise if
you think it will be easy to achieve
a significant objective. Success is
possible, but only if you are pre-
pared to do battle.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - If a
promise is considered essential to
those who ask for one, you must
be prepared to stick with your
commitment until completion - or
don't agree to do it. It's too impor-
tant to those depending on you.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -


Untested areas where you're bet-
ting on the unknown can be risky,
especially with regard to money
matters. If you're looking for ways
to generate a return on invest-
ments, stick to your usual sources.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - When it
comes to a partnership arrange-
ment, make certain that the other
individual is as competent as you
are; otherwise, this person could
be more hindrance than help.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -A crit-
ical project assigned to you will be
more competently handled when
you are left to your own resources.
Even those who offer to help could
unwittingly prove a hindrance.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)-
Someone a trifle envious might try
to make you look bad in front of
mutual friends if he or she sees an
opening. Make certain that you
don't give this person any ammu-
nition to play this game.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - Be
on your toes as to how you con-


duct yourself in front of others.
Your image may be a trifle fragile,
and anything you do out of line will
be blown out of proportion.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)-
Stick to tested and tried methods
and procedures in all you strive to
do. Trying something new may
prove to be an exercise in futility.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)-
There's a good chance that your
expectations with regard to your
compensation may be unrealistic.
Don't invite disappointment.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -
Companions will be resentful if
they feel you're hanging out with
them simply for the purpose of
using them to serve your interests.
If you want a favor, level with them.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -A
negative mood will only make you
worry about a lot of imaginary.
things. Just to establish that you're
right, you may even operate in
ways that will prove to be self-ful-
filling prophecies.


ing, and it is open for adoptions
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday and Fri-
day, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Thursday and from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday.
For more information, call
the Citrus County Animal Shel-


ter at 726-7660.
Financial assistance for
spaying and neutering of an
adopted pet is available
through the Humanitarians of
Florida at 563-2370 or from
the Humane Society of Citrus
County at 341-2222.


Mr. Biggles Simon (Calvin Lumpy Allie Max
AGE: ? AGE: ? AGE: ? AGE: 6 mos. AGE: ? AGE: 7 yrs.
SEX: M SEX: M SEX: M SEX: NM SEX: SF SEX: NM
ID: 7263378 ID: 7361723 ID: 7361746 ID: 6929094 ID: 7244200 ID: 7393457




S-Z"-- 4-- . '



0 . "... , , , ( . . . j


Many homes suffer from leaky air ducts. Is yours
one of them? Ask the energy experts from Progress
Energy. We'll help assess the problem and provide
rebates to help offset the repair. It's an easy,
low-cost way to lower your energy bills. Call
1.866.712.3409 or visit savethewatts.com today.




It's your wallet. It's your world.
Save the watts.


Q PtrossEmgy

ETHEWATII


A Home Energy Check is a prerequisite to qualify for the duct
check and repair rebates. Home Energy Checks and rebates
available to Progress Energy customers only.


2DO09 Progress Energy Florida, Inc.


CITRUS COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL PET PROFILES


/-9


~pp~ ~


-i~


Ll













Section B - SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009



PORTS


Tanipa Bay pitcher Matt
Garza attempted to lead
the Rays by the Phillies
in exhibition baseball
Saturday./Page B3



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


SLocal tennis, golf/B2
* MLB/B2, B5
* NHL, NBA/B3
* College Basketball/B3
* Scoreboard/B4
* Auto racing/B5
* Sports briefs/B5
* Entertainment/B6


Powers paces Presidential field


BKIAN. LUrP I IER/.rIUIonilAl
Rick Powers, seen here in this March file photo, currently
leads the Presidential Tournament at Seven Rivers Golf &
Country Club on Saturday by three strokes.


JOHN COSCIA
jcoscia@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

For the past 42 years Seven Rivers
Golf & Country Club has been a regu-
lar stomping ground in early April for
some of the state's best amateurs. And
over the past four decades, no name
has found its way to the top of the
Presidential Invitational leaderboard
more often than Bob Bleakley's.
Saturday was no different
The 14-time champion isn't leading
going into Sunday's final round but
he's close enough to make everyone
else nervous.. including Rick Powers,
the leader after the opening round.


"I know it will be tough sleeping
tonight," Powers admitted. "Espe-
cially knowing that Bob is right there.
This is his place. Nothing's ever safe.
It would be nice to have an even big-
ger lead but I'll take it
"I think the key to today's round for
me was that I was able to maintain my
concentration throughout the day,"
said Powers, who shot a pair of 36's,
with three birdies and three bogeys,
for an even-par round of 72. "I hit a lot
of really good, solid shots (Saturday).
It's nice to be in contention again. It's
been awhile."
But Powers knows if he is going to
be the one hoisting the championship
trophy later on this afternoon, he'll


have to outlast several very talented
golfers. Joining Bleakley and Powers
in the final group will be Denny Allen
and Andy Padova, who also shot a pair
of 75's on the day.
"My round today was about normal
for me. I was all over the place," ad-
mitted Padova as he laughed while
recollecting his round. "But I had a lot
of good up and downs today. I scram-
bled well and that saved me. I hit a lot
of good recovery shots.
"But the shot of the day today was by
Kelly Brady," Padova explained. "On
one of the par fives, he hit the cart
path and it bounced all the way down

See GOLF/Page B4


Mich. St. knocks

off UConn, 82-73

Associated Press

DETROIT - The Michigan
State players walked to the edge
of the floor and held up their
index fingers, basking in the
love of an entire state.
Laid low by the economic cri-
sis, Michigan desperately
needed something to rally
around. The Spartans were
more than happy to oblige.
"It means so
much, so much. NCAA t
It's been all bad NAA
news the. last .0 MichiganS
'cople"of years," play the wi
said Magic John- UNC and \
son, who sat just 9:21 p.m. i
a few rows be-
hind the Michi-
gan State bench. "This was the
right time, the right coach, the
right team, the right mind-set"
Raymar Morgan broke out of
his late-season slump with 18
points, Kalin Lucas added 21
and the smaller Spartans ran
roughshod over Hasheem
Thabeet and Connecticut in an
82-73 upset in the Final Four on
Saturday night. The Spartans
will now play the winner of Vil-
lanova-North Carolina for the
NCAA title Monday night, giving
the city and state at least two
more days to forget all the bad
news and revel in their Spar-
tans' success.
It's Michigan State's first ap-
pearance in the title game since
2000, when the Spartans won
their second title.
How's this for some karma?





Connecticut's
Jeff Adrien (4)
grabs a loose
ball in front of
Michigan
State's Raymar
Morgan, right,
Saturday in
Detroit. P'
Associated Press


Johnson, Spartan-in-chief since
leading Michigan State to its first
title in 1979, will present the
game ball before Monday's title
game along with Larry Bird.
"Detroit's been unbel ievable
to us," Michigan State coach
Tom Izzo said. "We've had some
great games here, and the best
is yet to come."
Flashbulbs were popping as
the final seconds ticked down.
The crowd of 72,456 was the
largest-ever for a Final Four,
and about two-thirds of it was
wearing green.
"It was a memorable game
that I won't forget," Izzo said.


tie game
State will
nner between
'illanova at
on Monday.


"Except we've
got another one."
The loss is the
latest blow f6i
UConn, the best
team in the coun-
try until Jerome
Dyson went


downwitha knee injury in mid-
February. The Huskies have
been dealing with distractions
since last May, when coach Jim
Calhoun was diagnosed with his
third bout with cancer, and are
now facing questions about al-
leged recruiting violations.
The loss snapped Calhoun
and Connecticut's perfect run
in the Final Four. They'd made
it twice before - 1999 and 2004
- and went on to win the title
each time.
The UConn players walked
slowly off the court, looking
shell-shocked that their season
had ended.
"I've got a lot of kids in there
crying right now," Calhoun
said. "But they had a great sea-
son. It hasn't been that easy to
See MSU/Page B4


Associated Press
Michigan State's Kalin Lucas reacts during the Spartans' NCAA Final Four semifinal against Connecti-
cut on Saturday In Detroit. Michigan State will play for the national championship on Monday.


Busch wins at Texas


Race was third

straight triumph

at track for Kyle

Associated Press
FORT WORTH, Texas -
Kyle Busch made it a Texas
trio in the NASCAR Nation-
wide Series.
Busch won his third con-
secutive Nationwide race in
Texas with another domi-
nating performance Satur-
day, leading a race-record
178 of 200 laps to win the


O'Reilly 300 even though he
insisted it wasn't as easy as
it looked.
"I was uncomfortable be-
cause of the handling of the
car, just inconsistent at
times," Busch said. "My feet
got hot. My body was fine,
my back was OK, my head
was fine."
Still not enough problems
to keep him from returning
to Victory Lane.
Busch finished 1.447 sec-
onds ahead of Tony Stewart,
who made a late charge
from seventh with four new
tires after a caution on lap
188. Brad Keselowski,
forced to start 42nd in a


backup car, finished third.
The winning streak at
Texas began with Busch
sweeping both races last
year when he led 300 of 400
laps. This time, he became
the first polesitter to win
any of the 17 Nationwide
races at the 1V2-mile, high-
banked track
Busch led the first 56 laps
in his Joe Gibbs-owned Toy-
ota, building a 6-second lead
over Jeff Burton before the
first pit stop. Before a cau-
tion a dozen laps later,
Busch had already regained
a 7-second lead.
The only time Busch was
See BUSCH/Page B4


McPhers

Golfer sits at

8-underpar

Associated Press
RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif.
- Kristy McPherson's first
LPGA Tour victory might
just come in a major.
McPherson shot a 2-under
70 on a hot, calm Saturday
to take sole possession of
the lead in the Kraft
Nabisco Championship at 8-
under 208. Fellow American
and 2007 U.S. Open winner
Cristie Kerr (70) was one
shot back at Mission Hills.


;on up at

The 27-year-old McPher-
son, with six career top-10
finishes but no victories, is
playing in the Kraft
Nabisco for the first time.
On Friday, McPherson and
Christina Kim teed off be-
fore strong wind raked the
Coachella Valley and
jumped into a tie for the
lead in the LPGA Tour's
first major of the season.
Kim faltered in the third
round Saturday with a 75
and was five shots back
Brittany Lincicome,
whose 66 topped the first
round, also shot a 70 to re-
main in contention, two
strokes behind McPherson.
McPherson got a nice


Nabisco

round of applause from the
gallery - and playing part-
ner Kim - as she crossed
the bridge to the 18th green.
McPherson had a birdie
putt for a two-shot lead but
ran it just to the left of the
cup.
On a day when nobody
ran off with the lead,
McPherson at least stepped
up and put her name atop
the leaderboard by opening
the back nine with three
straight birdies.
Defending champion
Lorena Ochoa needed a
birdie on 18 to shoot her
best round of the tourna-
ment, a 72. She was tied for
15th at 2 over.











D2 C.-...... A .... c


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


big cu NlAy,A 9IuLS,20





Ray slip Phillies, 9-7


Yankees bomb

Cubs, 10-1

Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA - Pa
Burrell hit his first homer a
Citizens Bank Park since he
left the Philadelphia
Phillies in the offseason anc
Carlos Pena also went deei
to lead the Tampa Bay Rays
to a 9-7 victory on Saturday
Rays manager Joe Mad
don put Burrell in the lead
off spot to get him an at-ba
and took him out after his
first-inning homer off Cole
Hamels. Pena also hit a
three-run drive in the first
Raul Ibanez, Greg Dobbs
and Jason Donald homered
for the Phillies.
Matt Garza allowed foui
runs and six hits in four in
nings with the Rays.
Hamels gave up six runs
and six hits in five innings
for Philadelphia.
Burrell signed with the
Rays in the offseason aftei
helping Philadelphia beat
Tampa Bay in the World Se
ries last year
Yankees 10, Cubs 1
NEW YORK - Mark Teixeirs
is feeling right at home in his
new house.
Flashing the power stroke
that earned him a $180 million
contract with the Yankees, Teix-
eira homered twice and drove
in four runs to lead New York
over the lethargic Chicago
Cubs 10-1 on Saturday.
Derek Jeter added a three-
run shot and the Bronx
Bombers opened their glitzy
new ballpark by sweeping a
pair of exhibition games from
Chicago. They made the $1.5
billion palace look like a Little
League band box, hitting seven
home runs in two days.
Red Sox 9, Mets 3
NEW YORK- Citi Field will
be neither a pitchers' nor a hit-
ters' park if no one throws strikes
Oliver Perez made his first
appearance at the New York
Mets' new home and was as in-
consistent as he was at Shea
Stadium.
The left-hander failed to
make it out of the first inning,
walking four and giving up a
grand slam to Jed Lowrie in a
9-3 loss to the Boston Red Sox
on Saturday that completed a
two-game exhibition series.
Boston's Daisuke Matsuzaka
also walked four, including two
in a 35-minute first inning, but
won the spring-training finale
for both teams by allowing one
hit in four innings.
Marlins 1, Blue Jays 1
JUPITER -Anibal Sanchez
finished his first healthy spring
training in three years on a
strong note.


-.---..
, , ..

Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays' Jon Weber breaks his bat hitting an RBI to score Gabe Gross in the seventh inning against the Philadel-
phia Phillies on Saturday In Philadelphia. Tampa Bay won 9-7.


Sanchez threw three score-
less innings as the Florida Mar-
lins tied the Toronto Blue Jays
1-1 in their final Grapefruit
League game. Florida's No. 4
starter allowed two hits, struck
out one and walked one.
Sanchez, who threw a no-hit-
ter as a rookie in 2006, made
his 2008 debut on July 31 after
recovering from right shoulder
surgery. He went 2-5 with a
5.57 ERA.
Left-hander Ricky Romero,
who will be Toronto's No. 4
starter, allowed one run and
. four hits in five innings. He was
1-2 with a 3.91 ERA in five
spring games.
Tigers 8, Braves 4
ATLANTA- Rick Porcello,
making a bid to be more than a
-.,fill-in starter for Detroit, pitched
two scoreless innings and the
Tigers beat the Atlanta Braves
8-4 on Saturday in each team's
final exhibition game.
The 20-year-old Porcello,
making the jump from Class A,
gave up only one hit. He has
been named Detroit's No. 4
starter with Jeremy Bonderman
opening the season on the 15-
day disabled list.
Armando Galarraga followed
Porcello and gave up two runs,
one earned, in 5 2-3 innings.
Carlos Guillen hit a two-run
homer for Detroit.
Atlanta's Kenshin Kawakami


walked seven batters and gave
up four runs in 2 2-3 innings.....
He issued bases-loaded walks
in the second and third.
Atlanta's Jeff Francoeur had
two hits, including a homer.
Indians 4, Astros 3
HOUSTON - Lance Berk-
man is healthy and ready for
the regular season.
Berkman hit a go-ahead RBI
double in the sixth inning for the
Houston Astros but the Cleve-
land Indians scored three runs
in the ninth for a 4-3 win in the
final exhibition game for both
teams on Saturday.
Berkman's health had been a
concern after he missed almost
a week with tendinitis in his left
biceps. But he has looked good
in the three games since his re-
turn. Houston limited his work
by using him as the designated
hitter on Saturday after he
played five innings in the field
the day before.
Cleveland's Trevor Crowe
had a tw o-run sirigTe in the . ...
ninth inning.
Twins 7, Pirates 6
FORT MYERS - Justin
Morneau wrapped up a big
spring, doubling and driving in
three runs Saturday as the Min-
nesota Twins beat the Pitts-
burgh Pirates 7-6.
The former AL MVP hit .394
with three home runs in 14 exhi-
bition games for the Twins. He


also went 4-for-9 for Canada in
the World Baseball Classic.
Moreau showed no ill ef-
fects from the back soreness
that hampered him this past
week. He hit .300 with a team-
high 23 home runs and 129
RBIs last season.
The Twins finished spring
training with a 19-13 record.
The Pirates went 17-15.
Royals 5, Rangers 4
ARLINGTON, Texas - Kris
Benson appears ready to make
his long awaited return to the
big leagues.
Benson made his final exhi-
bition tuneup for the Rangers
and pitched five innings in
Texas' 5-4 loss to the Kansas
City Royals on Saturday.
Kansas City's Mike Jacobs
and John Buck each hit solo
homers, and Alberto Callaspo
had an RBI triple in the eighth
that broke a 4-all tie.
Benson, the No. 1 overall
pick by Pittsburgh in 1996, has-
n't pitched in a regular-season
game since"2006 after under-
going surgery for a torn rotator
cuff. He made six appearances
this spring and is slated to start
Friday against Detroit.
Benson allowed three runs,
one earned, and struck out five in
both teams' final exhibition game.
Cardinals 7,
Triple-A Redbirds 3
MEMPHIS, Tenn.- Rick


Ankiel and Khalil Greene each
hit a two-run homer and the St.
Louis Cardinals beat the Triple-
A Memphis Redbirds 7-3 on
Saturday.
Joel Pineiro allowed three
runs, two earned, and three hits
in seven innings for St. Louis.
He only allowed one hit after
the first inning and retired the
last 14 batters he faced.
Rockies 6, Mariners 5
LAS VEGAS - Seth Smith
hit a bases-loaded RBI single
off the left-field wall in the bot-
tom of the ninth inning to give
the Colorado Rockies a 6-5 vic-
tory over the Seattle Mariners
on Saturday in the spring train-
ing finale for both teams.
Mike Wilson's RBI single for
the Mariners in the seventh
had tied it at 5 after Matt Tuia-
sosopo's two-out RBI single in
the fifth cut the Rockies' lead
to 5-4.
Kenji Johjima and Yuniesky
Betancourt homered for the
Mariners, while Ken Griffey Jr.
went 1-for-2 with an RBI, end-
ing spring training on a nine-
game hitting streak.
Athletics 3, Giants 2
OAKLAND, Calif. - Brett
Anderson allowed two runs on
six hits in 6 2-3 innings, and
Eric Chavez and Jack Cust hit
back-to-back home runs as the
Athletics beat the San Fran-
cisco Giants 3-2 on Saturday.


Anderson, scheduled to
make his major league debut
against the Los Angeles Angels
on Thursday, walked one and
struck out five. He finished the
spring with three wins and a
2,83 ERA.
Chavez and Cust led off the
sixth inning with home runs off
Ramon Ortiz, who has allowed
13 runs in his 6 1-3 innings.
Reds 9, Futures 6
DAYTON, Ohio--Alex Gon-
zalez proved his fitness in the
field and at the plate.
The Cincinnati Reds short-
stop made an outstanding play
in the field and doubled in a run
in a 9-6 victory over the club's
top minor leaguers.
Gonzalez, who also turned
two double plays, missed all of
last season with a compression
fracture in his left knee and
strained his right hamstring in a
Grapefruit League game on
March 23.
Edwin Encamacion and Jerry
Hairston Jr. each hit a two-run
homer for Cincinnati, which lost
12-4 to the prospects on Friday
night. Johnny Cueto allowed one
run and four hits in four innings.
White Sox 2, D-backs 0
PHOENIX - Jose Contreras
threw four shutout innings and
Bartolo Colon followed with five
more, leading the Chicago
White Sox over the Arizona Di-
amondbacks 2-0 on Saturday
at Chase Field.
Contreras gave up one single
while throwing 55 pitches, and
Colon gave up three singles
and walked one while throwing
72 pitches. Question marks en-
tering the spring, the two have
made Chicago's starting rota-
tion behind Mark Buehrle,
Gavin Floyd and John Danks.
Contreras, who underwent
surgery after suffering a sea-
son-ending Achilles' injury Aug.
8, was 3-0 with a 5.82 ERA in
17 innings. Colon (0-2, 6.60)
hasn't pitched a full season
since winning 21 games and
the AL Cy Young Award in 2005
because of shoulder, elbow and
oblique muscle injuries. He had
surgery to remove bone chips
in the offseason.
Nationals 5, Orioles 4
WASHINGTON - Given one
last chance to make a good
preseason impression, Josh
Willingham hit a grand slam
and later drove in the go-ahead
run in Washington's 5-4 victory
over Baltimore in the teams' ex-
hibition finale Saturday.
Vying for playing time in a
crowded outfield, Willingham
homered off Alfredo Simon in
the first inning. He broke a 4-4
tie in the seventh with an RBI
fielder's choice off Jim Johnson.
Willingham also contributed
a diving catch in the sixth,
sprinting to Felix Pie's sinking
liner in foul territory. Willing-
ham started in left field for
Adam Dunn.


Skyview tourney sees huge
T he 2009 Skyview Char- in Beverly Hills and it is den Hoogen, 3-6,6-4,1-0; Leslie
ity Tennis Tournament now a reality. McCue / Joe Hoover def. Carol
had the largest open The work is 99 percent Hirsch / Steve Barnes, 6-7,6-
field (18 teams) ever for Cit- complete and the ribbon- 4,1-0; Michielle Sherman /
rus County. The mixed dou- cutting is scheduled for Jorge Privat def. Denise
bles-only event at April 18th. For Schoenwald / George Schollen-
the Skyview Ten- more informa- berger, 6-0,6-0; Kar Yee Fran-
nis Center, bene- tion, take a look sham/Andy Belskie def.
fitting the Boys & at their web site: Katarina Mazachova / Eric
Girls Clubs new http://burnthe- Able, 6-3,6-4; Melsa Statorn/'-
Central Ridge mortgage.com/ Kyle Staton def. Kie Nyborg /
Unit, attracted 86 Special thanks Kyle Staton def. Kie Nyborg
players. go out to the gen- Frederick Nyborg, 6-1,6-2.
Almost all the erous sponsors of 2nd round: Pat Hoover /
top players from the tournament: Pedro Mena def. Kristin Tringali
Citrus County, Ted Williams Mu- / Donny Simmons, 6-3,7-6;
adults as well as Eric van den seum, LKQ Auto Leslie McCue / Joe Hoover def.
juniors, were Hoogen Parts, Don Poss Denise Lyn / Tommy Saltzman,
present, together ON TENNIS Roofing, Inc., Sig- 6-4,7-5.
with some play- nature Dental Consolation: Sarah Labrador
ers coming from Care, PA, 7 Rivers / Eric van den Hoogen def.
as far away as Orlando. Be- Regional Medical Center, Carol Hirsch / Steve Barnes, 6-
cause of the large number of The Travel Club / Gerry 3,6-1; Heidi Miller / Philip
players, tournament direc- Jones, Nature Coast Physi- Castillo def. Robbie Lamparelli /
tor Bruce Payne decided to cal Therapy, Suncoast Der- Karl Sanger, 6-7,6-3,1-0.
play two sets and a super tie- matology and Skin Surgery
break in case of split sets. Center, West Coast Eye Insti- Mixed Doubles B (3.5)
All the finals will be tute, Dr. Mark C. Rogers, Annie Slick / Tom Slick def.
played with best two-out-of- Wexler Orthodontics, CMH Sally deMontfort I Frank
three sets. If you ever won- Orthopedic and Joint Spe- Savino, 6-3,7-5; Antoinette van
dered what kind of cialists and Central Florida den Hoogen / David Watson
competition there is in Cit- Urology Specialists. def. Joan Eve / Lindsay Eve, 7-
rus County, come out today Mixed Doubles Open 6,6-2; Betty Sanger / Jerry
and watch some of the ac- (4.0 and up) Delvecchio def. Candace
tion. Matches start at 8:15
am, you will not be Kristin Tringali Donny Sim- Charles / Vinnie Tremante, 3-0,
disappointed. mons def. Shu Sha Mu / Chuck ret. injury; Josephine Perrone /
The Skyview Charity Ten- Cooley, 6-7,7-6,1-0; Nancy Lay/ Ron Krul def. Lindsey Spafford
nis Tournament is part of Truc Duong def. Tracy Wise / / Eric Spafford, 6-2,7-6; April
the Burn The Mortgage Victor Espinoza, 3-6,6-4,1-0; Pat Manley / Paul Hibbard def.
campaign headed up by the Hoover / Pedro Mena def. Heidi Judy Long / Gary Zolnierz, 6-
Central Ridge Steering Miller / Philip Castillo, 6-1,6-2; 3,7-5; Linda Martin / Bob Al-
Committee, Boys & Girls Kristin Tringali / Donny Sim- bright def. Pranathi Rao / Mike
Clubs of Citrus County. For mons def. Robbie Lamparelli / Walker, 6-0,6-3; Kayla Papp /
the past nine years, the Karl Sanger, 4-6,6-3,1-0; Alex Papp def. Hermi Thadhani
Committee has been fund- Denise Lyn / Tommy Saltzman / Rishi Gumani, 5-7,6-3,1-0;
raising for a new clubhouse def. Sarah Labrador / Eric van Sue Barry / John Hawley def.


turnout

Zeel Patel / Brandon Papp, 6-
1,1-6,1-0.
2nd Round: Josephine Per-
rone / Ron Krul def. Betty
Sanger / Jerry Delvecchio, 6-
0,6-2; Antoinette van den
Hoogen / David Watson def.
Annie Slick / Tom Slick, 0-6, 6-
4, 1-0; April Manley/ Paul Hib-
barddef,-Linda Martin / Bob
Albright, 6-3, '' . ..
Consolation: Judy Long /
Gary Zolnierz def. Pranathi Rao
/ Mike Walker, 7-6,6-4; Hermi
Thadhani / Rishi Gumani def.
Zeel Patel / Brandon Papp, 6-
1,1-6,1-0.
Mixed Doubles C
(up to 3.0)
Michel Jones / Joe Caran-
nante def. Vivien Amabile / Ed
Goodhart, 6-4,6-0; Leila
Pinkava / Dick Redlon def.
Gapal Tatambhotla / Mahima
Tatambhotla, 6-1,6-4; Carly
Howell / Tyler Jordan def. Jaya
Gumani/AJ Glenn, 6-3,6-1;
Kathy Lockhart / Bill Mayo def.
Morgan Clark / Michael Clark,
6-2,6-2.
2nd Round: Karen Riske /
Scott Keeler def. Leila Pinkava /
Dick Redlon, 1-6,6-1, 1-0; Alicia
Savino / Don Schoen def. Cariy
Howell / Tyler Jordan, 6-1,6-3.
Consolation: Jaya Gumani /
AJ Glenn def. Morgan Clark /
Michael Clark, 5-7,6-1,6-0.

Eric van den Hoogen,
Chronicle tennis columnist,
can be reached at
hoera@juno.com.


Van Pelt leads


at Shell Open


Play suspended

due to darkness

Associated Press
HUMBLE, Texas - Bo
Van Pelt moved to 11-under
par to take a one-shot lead
through eight holes of his
third round at the Shell
Houston Open just before
play was suspended Satur-
day because of darkness.
Fred Couples, Paul Casey,
Colt Knost and Tommy Ar-
mour III were all at 10
under when the horns
sounded at 7:34 p.m. The
players will resume the
round early Sunday, then
immediately tee off for the
final 18.
Van Pelt, winless in eight-
plus years on the PGA Tour,
shot a 67 in the second
round, then birdied three of
the first seven holes in his
third round.
Knost, playing with Van
Pelt, was leading at 11
under until a three-putt
bogey at the par-5 eight Van
Pelt hit a pitch to 3 feet and
sank the birdie putt to
switch places with Knost
and take the outright lead.
Couples, fourth at Red-
stone last year, had birdies
on both par 5s on the front
nine, then sank a 6-foot


birdie putt on the 10th to
join the group at 10 under
Casey, who shared the sec-
ond-round lead at 8 under,
birdied the par-5 fourth and
holed a 37-footer on No. 7.
Robert Karlsson, Lee
Westwood and Geoff Ogilvy
were among the group at 9
under Padraig Harrington
and Justin Leonard were
among six players at 8
under.
Greg Norman, making a
rare appearance on the reg-
ular tour to prepare for next
week's Masters, played 36
holes Saturday and was 6
under par after three com-
pleted rounds.
The tournament will re-
sume on Sunday without
Phil Mickelson, who missed
the cut at 9-over par.
Mickelson followed a
first-round 77 with a 76 on
Saturday that included two
triple bogeys. But Mickelson
didn't seem worried about
his game heading into next
week's Masters. He hadn't
played since winning the CA
Championship on March 15
and said he needed to play
some tournament rounds,
regardless of the scores.
"It was really good that I
played here, cause I made
some mistakes during these
first two rounds that you just
can't do competitively,"
Mickelson said.













Isles triple Lightning's output


Associated Press

UNIONDALE, N.Y. -
Yann Danis is taking advan-
tage of his starts in goal for
New York Islanders as they
play out another lost season.
Danis made 29 saves, and
the Islanders snapped a
three-game losing streak
with a 3-1 victory over the
Tampa Bay Lightning on
Saturday night
"You go through stretches
where the puck doesn't hit
you," Danis said. "It hap-
pens to all goalies, so I just
have to battle through it."
Coach Scott Gordon was
pleased with Danis' play.
"It definitely was a
bounce back game for him,"
Gordon said. "He felt pretty
good."
Richard Park, Radek
Martinek and Josh Bailey
scored for the Islanders,
who took three of four meet-
ings this season against
Tampa Bay. Jesse Joensuu
and Bruno Gervais each
had a pair of assists.
Matt Pettinger had the
only goal for the Lightning,
losers of six straight (0-4-2).
Mike McKenna made 18
saves for Tampa Bay
The Islanders scored 23
seconds after the opening
faceoff. From the left side,
Park spun around and sent
a quick wrist shot past
McKenna for his 14th goal of
the season.
"I went down in a butter-
fly," McKenna said. "It was
just a technical error on my
part."
Tampa Bay came out fir-
ing pucks at Danis to start
the second period, but he
turned everything aside.
Later in the period, the Is-
landers capitalized on a
power play to take a 2-0 lead.
Off a faceoff, Martinek
wound up with the puck at
the right point. He moved to
the top of the right circle


'I


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning's David Koci (33) fights with New York Islanders' Mitch Fritz (49) during the first period Saturday
at Nassau Coliseum In Uniondale, N.Y. The Islanders defeated the Lightning, 3-1.


and blasted a shot over
McKenna's glove-side
shoulder at 14:52.
Bruins 1, Rangers 0
BOSTON - Tim Thomas
helped the Boston Bruins wrap
up the Eastern Conference reg-
ular-season title, making 31
saves for his fifth shutout of the
season in a 1-0 victory over the
New York Rangers on Saturday.
One day after signing a four-
year, $20 million contract exten-
sion and 5�2 minutes after
being hit in the back of his hel-
met by Sean Avery, Thomas
backstopped the Bruins to their


sixth straight victory.
Boston clinched the best
record in the East for the first
time since 2001-2002. And it
might have been a preview of
the first playoff round, with the
Rangers holding the eighth
and final playoff spot in the
conference.
Blake Wheeler scored his 21st
goal at 9:04 of the first period.
Avery hit Thomas as the
goalie was stretching in front of
his net during a television time-
out with 5:24 left. Thomas
chased Avery to center ice as
Avery kept skating with his
back to the goalie. Thomas


pushed Avery then was hit from
behind by New York's Frederik
Sjostrom. Thomas turned and
swung at Sjostrom before offi-
cials separated players. Avery
and Thomas received minor
penalties.
Hurricanes 3,
Penguins 2, OT
RALEIGH, N.C. -Anton
Babchuk scored at 1:11 of over-
time, and Carolina clinched its
first playoff berth since winning
the Stanley Cup in 2006.
Cam Ward stopped 33 shots
and matched a club record with
his 38th win, helping the Hurri-


canes extend their franchise-
record home winning streak to
11. Their eight-game overall
winning streak is their longest
since they won nine in a row in
2005-06.
Chad LaRose and Eric Staal
both scored for the second
straight game, and Ray Whit-
ney added two assists for Car-
olina. Tyler Kennedy had a goal
and an assist for the Penguins,
and Jordan Staal also scored.
Devils 3, Sabres 2
BUFFALO, N.Y. - Martin
Brodeur stopped 35 shots -
including 21 in the third period


alone - and Jamie Langen-
brunner had a goal and assist
for New Jersey.
Zach Parise and David
Clarkson also scored to help
the Devils snap a six-game
road skid (0-5-1) and move on.
the verge of clinching the At-
lantic Division title. New Jersey
(49-26-4) also matched a fran-
chise record for victories set in
2006-07.
Jochen Hecht and Clarke
MacArthur scored for the
Sabres, who had a 4-0-1 skid
snapped and squandered a
great opportunity to put them-
selves firmly in the hunt for the
Eastern Conference's eighth
and final playoff berth.
Canadiens 6,
Maple Leafs 2
TORONTO - Jaroslav
Halak made 34 saves, and Alex
Kovalev had a goal and three
assists to help Montreal close
in on a playoff spot.
After dropping a 5-2 decision
to Toronto two weeks ago in
Montreal, the Canadiens have
gone 5-0-1 to move five points
clear of ninth-place Florida in
the race for one of the eight
Eastern Conference playoff
spots.
Guillaume Latendresse, Alex
Tanguay, Chris Higgins, Maxim
Lapierre and Josh Gorges also
scored for Montreal. John
Mitchell and Boyd Devereaux
scored for Toronto.
Senators 4, Flyers 3, SO
OTTAWA- Mike Fisher
scored on Ottawa's fifth
shootout attempt to lift the Ser6
ators past Philadelphia.
Jason Spezza scored his
31st goal 3:47 into the third to
draw Ottawa even at 3. Nick
Foligno and Chris Kelly also
scored for the Senators. Darroll
Powe scored on a penalty shot,
and Mike Richards and Simon
Gagne added goals for
Philadelphia.


Howard, Magic ground Hawks

Associated Press


ATLANTA - Dwight Howard
scored 21 points and tied a season
high with 23 rebounds, helping the Or-
lando Magic beat the Atlanta Hawks
88-82 on Saturday night to pull within
a half-game of tying for second place
in the Eastern Conference.
Howard's performance marked the
ninth time this season, and 23rd of his
five-year career, that he's had at least
20 points and 20 rebounds in a game.
Coming off a blowout home victory
over East-leading Cleveland on Friday,
the Magic have won of two straight,
eight of nine and 11 of 13. They are
four games behind the Cavaliers and
trail the second-place Celtics by per-
centage points.
Joe Johnson scored 21 points for the
Hawks, who have dropped three
straight and six of eight Atlanta
dropped to 29-10 at home, where it has
lost three of four
A pair of free throws by Johnson gave
Atlanta its biggest lead at 57-47 at the
5:45 mark of the third quarter
Howard hit two free throws with
2:32 remaining for a 13-point lead, Or-
lando's biggest.
Rashard Lewis finished with 16
points, and Rafer Alston had 14 for the
Magic, who improved to 13-2 overall
and 7-1 on the road against the South-
east Division.
Josh Smith had 19 points and 11 re-
bounds for Atlanta. Al Horford, who
spent most of the night trying unsuc-
cessfully to guard Howard, finished
with 13 rebounds and 13 points.
Heat 118, Wizards 104
WASHINGTON - Dwyane Wade
scored 33 points, and the Miami Heat
broke a franchise record with eight 3-point-
ers in the fourth quarter to put away the
Washington Wizards.
Wade and James Jones each made
three 3-pointers in the final period, finally
blowing open the game after the last of sev-
eral Wizards comebacks. Miami made a
season-high 14 3-pointers in 32 attempts,
including going 8-for-13 in the fourth.
The last two times the Heat made the
previous franchise mark of seven in a quar-
ter came at Washington - the last time ex-
actly a year ago on April 4, 2008.
Miami completed a 4-0 season sweep of
the Wizards, who finished 1-15 against the
Southeast Division.
Caron Butler scored 27 points to lead
the Wizards, who played without Gilbert
Arenas as part of the three-time All-Star's
plan to play selected games during his
comeback from knee surgery.
76ers 95, Pistons 90
PHILADELPHIA-Andre Iguodala
scored a season-high 31 points, Andre
Miller had a triple-double with 21 points, 12
assists and 10 rebounds, and the Philadel-
phia 76ers clinched a playoff spot.
Detroit led 88-87 with 2:17 left after Rod-
ney Stuckey made two free throws. Miller


Associated Press
Orlando Magic's Dwight Howard (12) and Atlanta Hawks' Solomon Jones (44)
fight for a rebound in the first half Saturday in Atlanta.


made three free throws and Reggie Evans
added two more with 39 seconds left for a
92-88 lead. Stuckey made two foul shots
with 22.7 seconds left, cutting the lead to 92-
90, but Miller answered with two foul shots.
Stuckey scored 23 points for Detroit, and
Kwame Brown added a season-high 15
points.
Raptors 102, Knicks 95
NEW YORK--Andrea Bargnani scored
23 points, Chris Bosh had 17 points and 13
rebounds, and the Toronto Raptors ex-
tended their winning streak to six.
Shawn Marion added 12 points and 13
boards for the Raptors, who stayed alive
for an Eastern Conference playoff spot in a
run that is almost certain be too little, too
late. Toronto would have been eliminated
with a loss and a victory by Chicago.
Instead, the Raptors eliminated the
Knicks, who haven't made the postseason
since 2004.
Jose Calderon scored 15 points for
Toronto, on its longest winning streak since
its Atlantic Division championship team
won six in a row in April 2007.


Al Harrington and Chris Duhon each
scored 22 points for the Knicks, who tum-
bled out of playoff contention with a disap-
pointing finish to Mike D'Antoni's first
season. New York has lost four straight
and 10 of its last 11.
Bulls 103, Nets 94
CHICAGO - Ben Gordon scored 12 of
his 18 points in the fourth quarter, John
Salmons added 17 and the Chicago Bulls
beat the New Jersey Nets for their eighth
win in 11 games.
Gordon missed his first 10 shots and
was just 3-for-14 overall, but he hit a key 3-
pointer and two free throws during a game-
ending 10-0 run.
Brad Miller put Chicago (37-40) ahead
for good, 95-94, with two free throws.
Brook Lopez led the fading Nets (31-45)
with 20 points and 10 rebounds. Ryan An-
derson scored 17 and grabbed 10 boards,
but it was a rough afternoon for Vince
Carter. He was favoring his left leg and
wound up with just four points on 2-for-10
shooting.


USF claims



women's NIT


Associated Press

LAWRENCE, Kan. -
1 Jazmine Sepulveda scored
18 points and Shantia Grace
Shad 16, leading South
:Florida to a 75-71 victory
over Kansas on Saturday in
the WNIT finals, giving the
school its first postseason
championship of any kind.
Jessica Lawson added 13
points for South Florida, in-
cluding a key free throw in
the final minute as the Bulls
(27-10) held off a late Kansas
run and won their third game
in three different states in six
days. South Florida had to
win three straight road
games to win the tourney.
Danielle McCray had 24
points for Kansas (22-14)
and pushed her tournament
total to 147, a WNIT record.
The game attracted 16,113
fans, the largest home crowd
for a women's game in Big 12
history. The Jayhawks aver-
aged only 2,555 at home in
the regular season.
The record crowd got a
quick-paced, hard-fought
game. In one furious posses-
sion in the first half, the Jay-
hawks-missed four straight
shots from point-blank
range but each time got the
offensive rebound. Finally,


McCray got a put-back.
Sade Morris had 19 points
for Kansas, which won nine
of its last 11 to reach the
school's first national cham-
pionship game in women's
basketball. Aishah Suther-
land had 12 and Kyrsten
Boogaard 10.
Janae Stokes, as the time
clock was about to expire,
drilled a long 3-pointer with
5:27 to go that gave the Bulls
what looked like a safe lead
at 65-53.
But then in a game of al-
ternating streaks, the Jay-
hawks unfurled a 13-2 run,
seeming to gather energy
from their record crowd,
and shaved the lead to 67-66
on a bucket by Boogaard.
But Lawson banked home
a shot and then added a free
throw to make it 70-66.
The Jayhawks had the ball
with about 1 minute left
needing a 3-pointer to tie, but
Sutherland threw it away
and the Bulls inbounded
with 51 seconds to go.
Grace, South Florida's
All-Big East point guard,
dribbled around the Kansas
defense and fed Sepulveda,
whose 10-footer from the
baseline -putthe Bulls. on
top 72-67 with less than 30
seconds to play.


Associated Press
South Florida guard Shantla Grace (3) is congratulated by
head coach Jose Fernandez after South Florida beat Kansas
in the women's NIT championship Saturday in Lawrence,
Kan. Grace was also named the game's MVP.


SINr My, AmrUL 5, 2009 B3


SPORTS


CrnTRs COUNTY (FI:) CHRONICLE












B4 SI--�Y APRIL .C CL


BASEBALL
MLB Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet
Los Angeles 25 8 .758
New York 24 10 .706
Texas 21 14 .600
Minnesota 19 13 .594
Boston 20 14 .588
Kansas City 18 14 .562
Oakland 17 18 .486
Tampa Bay 15 16 .484
Seattle 16 18 .471
Detroit 15 17 .469
Chicago 16 20 .444
Toronto 13 17 .433
Baltimore 13 21 .382
Cleveland 12 20 .375
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet
Milwaukee 21 10 .677
Atlanta 21 12 .636
St. Louis 19 12 .613
New York 18 15 .545
Pittsburgh 17 15 .531
San Francisco 20 19 .513
Chicago 18 18 .500
Colorado 17 17 .500
Washington 15 17 .469
Los Angeles 15 20 .429
Philadelphia 13 19 .406
Cincinnati 13 20 .394
Florida 12 19 .387
Houston 12 20 .375
San Diego 10 20 .333
Arizona 11 23 .324
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the
standings; games against non-major league
teams do not.
Friday's Games
Minnesota 4, Pittsburgh 4, tie, 10 innings
Baltimore 6, Washington 3
N.Y. Mets 4, Boston 3
Toronto 10, Florida 4
N.Y. Yankees 7, Chicago Cubs 4
Philadelphia 3, Tampa Bay 2
Atlanta 3, Detroit 1
Texas 7, Kansas City 2
Houston 2, Cleveland 0
Chicago White Sox 6, Arizona 3
Colorado 6, Seattle 3
L.A. Angels 6, San Diego 5
Milwaukee 7, L.A. Dodgers 2
Oakland 2, San Francisco 1,10 innings
St. Louis at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Toronto 1, Florida 1, tie
N.Y. Yankees 10, Chicago Cubs 1
Tampa Bay 9, Philadelphia 7
Minnesota 7, Pittsburgh 6
Boston 9, N.Y. Mets 3
Detroit 8, Atlanta 4
Cleveland 4, Houston 3
Kansas City 5, Texas 4
Oakland 3, San Francisco 2
Colorado 6, Seattle 5
Chicago White Sox 2, Arizona 0
Washington 5, Baltimore 4
San Diego at L.A. Angels, late
Milwaukee at L.A. Dodgers, late

GOLF

LPGA Tour
Kraft Championship
Saturday
At Mission Hills Country Club, Dinah Shore
Tournament Course
Rancho Mirage, Calif.
Purse: $2 million
Yardage: 6,673; Per 72
Third Round
a-amateur
Kristy McPherson 68-70-70-208 -8
Cristie Kerr 71-68-70-209 -7
Brittany Uncicome 66-74-70-210 -6
Jimin Kang 71-70-71-212 -4
Lindsey Wright 70-71-71-212 -4
Christina Kim 69-69-75-213 -3
Meaghan Francella 72-73-69-214 -2
KatherineHull .69-74-71-214 -2
Helen Alfredsson 72-70-72-214 -2
PatHartt "71-71-73-215 -1
Angel! Stanford. .,67-75-74-216 E
Karrie Webb 73-72-72-217 +1
Michele Redman 72-73-72-217 +1
Suzann Pettersen 71-72-74-217 +1
Jane Park 74-76-68-218 +2
Allison Fouch 76-73-69-218 +2
Brittany Long 67-80-71-218 +2
Lorena Ochoa 73-73-72-218 +2
In-Kyung Kim 70-73-75-218 +2
Jiyai Shin 72-76-71-219 +3
Song-Hee Kim 69-78-72-219 +3
Nicole Castrale 71-75-73-219 +3
a-Tiffany Joh 71-75-73-219 +3
Alina Sharp 76-69-74-219 +3
SakuraYokomine 72-73-74-219 +3
Candle Kung 72-73-74-219 +3
YaniTseng 69-75-75-219 +3
Joo Mi Kim 73-70-76-219 +3
Paula Creamer 70-72-77-219 +3
Seoon Hwa Lee 74-77-69-220 +4
Hee-Won Han 75-73-72-220 +4
Yuri Fudoh 71-76-73-220 +4
Natalie Gulbis 71-75-74-220 +4
NaYeon Chol 75-75-71-221 +5
Jee Young Lee 69-80-72-221 +5
Sun Young Yoo 70-78-73-221 +5
Wendy Ward 75-72-74-221 +5
a-Alexis Thompson 72-72-77-221 +5
Janice Moodie 75-73-74-222 +6
Young Kim 76-71-75-222 +6
a-Azahara Munoz 71-74-77-222 +6
Shi Hyun Ahn 75-69-78-222 +6
Momoko Ueda 76-72-75-223 +7
Eun-Hee JI 75-72-76-223 +7
Morgan Pressel 74-73-76-223 +7
Se RI Pak 71-75-77-223 +7
Ji Young Oh 67-78-78-223 +7
Inbee Park 71-79-74-224 +8
Hye Jung Chol 73-75-76-224 +8
Teresa Lu 72-76-76-224 +8
Laura Diaz 76-76-73-225 +9
Angela Park 74-78-73-225 +9
Mi Hyun Kim 73-77-75-225 +9
Diana D'Alessio 72-76-77-225 +9
Soo-Yun Kang 78-74-74--226 +10
HeeYoung Park 75-76-75-226 +10
Giulia Sergas 74-76-76-226 +10
Becky Morgan 72-78-76-226 +10
Moira Dunn 70-79-77-226 +10
Jennifer Rosales 73-79-75-227 +11
Al Miyazato 75-76-76-227 +11
Silvia Cavalleri 74-77-76-227 +11
JI-Hee Lee 69-82-76-227 +11
Gwladys Nocera 76-74-77-227 +11
II Mi Chung 75-77-78-228 +12
Rachel Hetherington 75-76-77-228 +12
Sophie Gustafson 72-79-77-228 +12
Stacy Lewis 73-78-78-229 +13
HeatherYoung 75-77-78-230 +14
Michelle Wie 71-81-81-233 +17
Nationwide Tour
Stonebrae Classic
Saturday
AtTPC San Francisco Bay at Stonebraee
Hayward, Calif.
Purse: $600,000
Yardage: 7,118; Par: 71
Third Round


Michael Sim
Matt Every
Dustin Risdon
Martin Piller
Cameron Percy
John Kimbell
Chad Ginn
Ryan Armour
Brian Smock
Craig Kanada
Craig Barlow
Nick Flanagan
Jeff Gallagher
Todd Demsey
Doug LaBelle II
Clay Ogden
Andrew Scott
Rob Grube
Esteban Toledo
David Branshaw
J.J. Killeen
Jeff Brehaut
Brad Elder
Andrew Buckle
Jim McGovern
Grant Waits
Wil Collins


71-64-67-202
69-63-71-203
69-73-62-204
74-67-63-204
73-67-64-204
69-70-65-204
67-72-65-204
71-69-65-205
68-69-69-206
71-71-65-207
68-72-67-207
72-68-67-207
70-68-69-207
65-71-71-207
73-70-65-208
69-69-70-208
71-66-71-208
70-68-71-209
72-70-68-210
72-70-68-210
72-69-69-210
74-68-68-210
72-71-67-210
71-72-67-210
69-72-69-210
71-70-69-210
71-69-70-210


For the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning
numbers selected
Saturday in the
Florida Lottery:


CASH 3 (early)
8-3-0
CASH 3 (late)
4-2-4
PLAY 4 (early)
3-5-3-0
PLAY 4 (late)
7-5-9-3


Due to early deadlines, the Fantasy 5,
Powerball and Florida Lottery numbers
were unavailable at press time. Please
see Monday's Chronicle for results.


On the AIRWAVES=


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1:30 p.m. (13, 51 FOX) Sprint Cup - Samsung 500
2 p.m. (VERSUS) IndyCar Racing: Honda Grand Prix of St.
Petersburg
4 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing: SummitRacing.com
Nationals Final Eliminations (Same-day Tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
9 a.m. (SUN) Florida at Vanderbilt. (Taped)
MLB BASEBALL
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Atlanta Braves at Philadelphia Phillies
HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
12:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Girls Rise National Invitational Final -
Teams TBA
3 p.m. (ESPN) Boys Rise National Invitational Final -
Teams TBA
NBA BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) San Antonio Spurs at Cleveland
Cavaliersr
3:30 p.m. (9,20, 28 ABC) Phoenix Suns at Dallas Mavericks
2:30 a.m. (ESPN) San Antonio Spurs at Cleveland Cavaliers
(Same-day Tape)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN) NCAA Tournament Semifinal - Louisville
vs. Oklahoma
9 p.m. (ESPN) NCAA Tournament Semifinal - Connecticut
vs. Stanford
BICYCLING
5 p.m. (VERSUS) 2009 Tour of Flanders (Taped)
BILLIARDS
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Mosconi Cup (Taped)
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Lumber Liquidators U.S. Open
GOLF
10 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: Estoril Open de
Portugal - Final Round
3 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) PGA Tour: Shell Houston Open -
Final Round
3 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) LPGA Tour: Kraft Nabisco Championship
- Final Round
7 p.m. (qOlFQ Nationwide tour: Stone lrae Cla'rM:..,,
Final Round , -
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) Minnesota Wild at Detroit Re~d Wings
5 p.m. (FSNFL) Pittsburgh Penguins at Florida Panthers
OUTDOORS
9 a.m. (ESPN2) Fishing Mad Fin Shark Tournament (Taped)
RODEO
7 p.m. (VERSUS) Bull Riding PBR Nampa Invitational (Taped)
SOCCER
5 p.m. (62 UNI) Santos vs. Pachuca
9 p.m. (47 FAM) English Premier League: Bolton Wanderers
vs. Middlesbrough (Taped)
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Virginia Tech at Florida State
2 p.m. (SUN) Tennessee at LSU
TENNIS
1 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) Sony Ericsson Open - Final


Robin Freeman
Richard Johnson
Gavin Coles
Willie Wood
Ian Leggatt
Gary Christian
Steve Pate
Tommy Gainey
Josh Broadaway
Bob May
Omar Uresti
Scott Gardiner
Tjaart van der Walt
Fran Quinn
Jason Schultz
Dennis Paulson
Chad Collins
Garth Muiroy
Aaron Watkins
Jin Chol
David Hearn
Jim Rutledge
Nick Malinowski
Roger Tambellini
Craig Bowden
Kris Blanks
Trevor Dodds
Jeff Gove
Michael Sims
Bubba Dickerson
Daniel Summerhays
Michael Walton
Kim Felton
Jeff Wood
Andrew Johnson
Steven Bowditch
Michael Putnam
David Morland IV
Dustin White
Gabriel Hjertstedt
Miguel Angel Carballo


75-68-68-211
74-67-70-211
69-74-68-211
71-69-71-211
74-68-70-212
71-71-70-212
72-69-71-212
74-67-71-212
73-67-72-212
72-68-72-212
73-71-68-212
70-72-71-213
76-67-70-213
73-70-70-213
71-70-72-213
68-75-70-213
72-72-69-213
68-71-74-213
74-70-69-213
72-71-71-214
74-70-70-214
73-69-73-215
73-70-72-215
76-68-71-215
77-67-71-215
72-72-71-215
74-70-71-215
75-69-72-216
73-66-77-216
74-70-72-216
70-74-72-216
72-70-75-217
73-70-74-217
71-70-77-218
72-72-74-218
74-69-76-219
73-71-75-219
72-70-78-220
73-71-76-220
74-70-76-220
75-68-79-222


PGA Tour
Shell Houston Open


Saturday
At Redstone Golf Club, Tournament Course
Humble,Texas
Purse: $5.7 million
Yardage: 7,457; Par: 72
Completed Second Round
Note: The third round was suspended due
to darkness. Bo Van Pelt leads by one shot
at 11-under.
Paul Casey 66-70-136 -8
Geoff Ogilvy 67-69-136 -8
John Senden 65-71-136 -8
Tommy Armour III 66-70--136 -8
Colt Knost 66-70-136 -8
Bo Van Pelt 70-67-137 -7
Jonathan Byrd 67-70-137 -7
Henrik Stenson 70-67-137 -7
Scott Piercy 66-71-137 -7
Fred Couples 68-69-137 -7
Briny Baird 65-73-138 -6
Stuart Appleby 70-68-138 -6
Scott Verplank 68-70-138 -6
D.A. Points 66-72-138 -6
Justin Leonard 68-70-138 -6
Ryan Moore 70-68-138 -6
James Nittles 66-72-138 -6


Vaughn Taylor 67-72-139
Robert Garrigus 71-68-139
Jarrod Lyle 71-68-139
Lee Westwood 69-70--139
Charles Howell Ill 71-68-139
Padraig Harrington 72-67-139
Brian Davis 71-69-140
Nicholas Thompson 65-75-140
Dudley Hart 68-72-140
Kevin Sutherland 69-71-140
Anthony Kim 72-68-140
Hunter Mahan 71-69-140
Sergio Garcia 69-71-140
Ted Purdy 71-69-140
Jason Bohn 69-71-140
Rory Mcllroy 67-73-140
Heath Slocum 73-67-140
John Mallinger 75-65-140
J.B. Holmes 71-69-140
Greg Norman 71-69-140
Martin Kaymer 71-70-141
Kirk Triplett 72-69-141
CamiloVillegas 69-72-141
Ernie Els 75-66-141
John Rollins 68-73-141
David Berganio, Jr. 68-73-141
Robert Karlsson 70-71-141
Jason Dufner 68-73-141
Kevin Na 73-68-141
Scott McCarron 68-73-141
Marc Leishman 68-73-141
Michael Letzig 71-71-142
Justin Rose 68-74-142
Ryan Palmer 70-72-142
Mark Calcavecchia 69-73-142
Ben Curtis 70-72-142
Tom Pernice, Jr. 70-72-142
Billy Mayfair 70-72-142
Steve Marino 69-73-142
Steve Elkington . 71-71-142
Webb Simpson 71-71-142
Brendon Todd 71-71-142
Brendon de Jonge 73-69-142
Brandt Jobe 73-69-142
Peter Lonard 73-69-142
Alex Cejka 73-69-142
Paul Goydos 71-71-142
Brian Gay 69-73-142
Davis Love III 73-69-142
Lucas Glover 74-68-142
John Huston 72-70-142
Tim Wilkinson 68-75-143
Shaun Micheel 71-72-143
John Merrick 71-72-143
Charley Hoffman 71-72-143
Daniel Chopra 72-71-143
Chad Campbell 72-71-143
Bob Estes 70-73-143
Nick O'Hem 72-71-143
J.J. Henry 72-71-143
Bart Bryant 71-72-143
Chris Stroud 68-75-143
Failed to Qualify
Nathan Green 73-71-144
Michael Allen 72-72-144
Ben Crane 73-71-144
Marc Turnesa 72-72-144
Johnson Wagner 70-74-144
Brad Adamonis 72-73-145
Notah Begay III 74-71-145


Jason Gore
Rick Price
Troy Matteson
Bill Haas
David Toms
Joe Durant
Rich Beem
Glen Day
Casey Wittenberg
Parker McLachlin
Tim Thelen
Luke Donald
Angel Cabrera
Steve Stricker
Charlie Wi
Jeev M. Singh
Derek Fathauer
Steve Allan
Dustin Johnson
Greg Owen
Aaron Baddeley
Tim Petrovic
Kevin Stadler
Spencer Levin
Gary Woodland
Vijay Singh
David Duval
Darren Clarke
Eric Axley
Joe Ogilvie
Chez Reavie
Jeff Maggert
Aron Price
Tim Herron
Martin Laird
Fredrik Jacobson
Andres Romero
Harrison Frazar
Kent Jones
Ricky Barnes
Alvaro Quiros
Brian Bateman
Jay Williamson
Chris Riley
K.J. Chol
Matt Bettencourt
Peter Tomasulo
Jonathan Kaye
Phil Mickelson
Brad Faxon
Keoke Cotner
David Mathis
Jimmy Walker
James Oh
Jeff Overton
Michael Bradley


73-72-145
71-74--145
75-70-145
72-73-145
73-72-145
75-70-145
71-74-145
73-72-145
75-70-145
73-73-146
74-72-146
73-73-146
74-72-146
72-74-146
72-74-146
76-70-146
72-74-146
75-72-147
75-72-147
73-74-147
73-74-147
76-71-147
76-71-147
77-70-147
74-73-147
73-75-148
70-78-148
71-77-146
74-74-146
76-72-148
78-70-148
74-74-148
72-76-146
78-71-149
70-79-149
77-72-149
73-76-149
75-75-150
76-74-150
75-75-150
83-68-151
80-72-152
80-72-152
77-75-152
75-77-152
77-75-152
76-76-152
74-79-153
77-76-153
73-81-154
77-78--155
78-79-157
83-75-158
77-83-160
74-WD
78-WD


BASKETBALL

NBA Standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
y-Boston 58 19 .753 -
x-Philadelphia 40 35 .533 17
New Jersey 31 45 .408 261Y
Toronto 30 45 .400 27
NewYork 29 47 .382 28Y1
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
y-Orlando 57 19 .750 -
x-Atlanta 43 34 .558 1410
x-Miami 41 36 .532 16%
Charlotte 34 42 .447 23
Washington 18 60 .231 40
Central Division
W L Pct GB
y-Cleveland 61 15 .803 -
Chicago 37 40 .481 24�
Detroit 36 40 .474 25
Indiana 32 44 .421 29
Milwaukee 32 45 .416 29%
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-San Antonio 49 26 .653 -
x-Houston 48 28 .632 1�
New Orleans 47 28 .627 2
Dallas 45 31 .592 4Y�
Memphis 21 54 .280 28
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-Denver 50 26 .658 -
Portland 48 27 640 1�
Ulah 4f. 3j0 Iis 4
Mlrineso'a'-g'' - - 22- %4J.289 �8
Oklahoma Ciy 21 54 280 28�
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
z-LA LaKers 60) 16 789 -
Phoenix 42 34 553 18
Golden Slate 27 49 355 33
LA Clippers 18 57 240 41�
Sacramento 16 59 213 43�
x-clinched playoff spot, y-clinched division,
z-clinched conference
Saturday's Games
Toronto 102 New York 95
Cnicago 103. New Jersey 94
Pniladelphia 95. Detrol 90r
Orlando 88, Allanta 82
Miarri 118. Washingor, 104
Memphis at Milwaukee arie
'L.A. Clippers at Denver, late
. Today's Games
San Antonio at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 3:30 p.m.
New York at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Charlotte at Detroit, 6 p.m.
Utah at New Orleans, 7 p.m.
Denver at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Portland at Houston, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Sacramento, 9 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL Standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L OTPts GF GA
x-New Jersey 49 26 4102 237 201
Philadelphia 42 25 11 95 255 229
Pittsburgh 42 27 9 93 247 229
N.Y. Rangers 40 30 9 89 201 213
N.Y. Islanders 26 43 9 61 196 255
Northeast Division
W L OTPts GF GA
z-Boston 51 17 10112 260 181
Montreal 41 27 10,92 241 233
Buffalo 38 31 9 85 235 227
Ottawa 34 34 10 78207 225
Toronto 32 34 13 77 240 287
Southeast Division
W L OTPts GF GA
y-Washington 47 23 8102 254 230
Carolina 44 28 7 95 227 218
Florida 38 29 11 87219 221
Atlanta 34 38 6 74 243 265
TampaBay 24 37 18 66202 263
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L OTPts GF GA
y-Detroit 49 19 9107283 230
x-Chicago 42 24 11 95 249 208
Columbus 40 29 8 88 214 212
St. Louis 38 31 9 85 220 226
Nashville 38 32 8 84 198 214
Northwest Division
W L OTPts GF GA
x-Vancouver 42 25 10 94 236 210
x-Calgary 44 28 6 94 244 237
Minnesota 37 32 9 83 200 189
Edmonton 36 33 9 81 222 238
Colorado 31 44 2 64 193 250
Pacific Division
W L OTPts GF GA
y-San Jose 51 15 11113247 189
Anaheim 40 32 6 86 230 225
Dallas 34 34 10 78 218 244
Phoenix 34 37 7 75 197 236
Los Angeles 31 35 11 73 194 224
Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss or shootout loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Saturday's Games
Boston 1, N.Y. Rangers 0
New Jersey 3, Buffalo 2
Carolina 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT
Montreal 6, Toronto 2
Ottawa 4, Philadelphia 3, SO
N.Y. Islanders 3, Tampa Bay 1
St. Louis at Dallas, late
Columbus at Nashville, late
Anaheim at San Jose, late
Vancouver at Edmonton, late
Phoenix at Los Angeles, late


BUSCH
Continued from Page B1

passed on the track was
when he got loose and Bur-
ton went by him on the 90th
lap. By lap 106, Busch was
back in front to stay.
Keselowski, who wrecked
the primary No. 88 Chevro-
let owned by Dale Earn-
hardt Jr. in qualifying,
worked his way through the
field and by lap 170 was sec-
ond. And he was closing the
gap when rookie John Wes
Townley's accident brought
the final caution.
"The 88 was coming there
at the end. He was catching
me there," Busch said. "If
we did not get a caution like
we did, it probably would
have been a whale of a
show."
Busch didn't go into the
pit , during the caution,
shooting back on to the
track after initially acting
like he would. Keselowski
stayed right behind him.
But Stewart did pit be-



NCAA
Continued from Page B1

stay focused the past few
weeks. But I give (Izzo) a
great deal of credit"
This was expected to be a
battle of big men. UConn's
Thabeet had been a one-
man swat team, averaging a
double-double and winning
defensive player of the year
in the burly Big East for a
second straight year. Michi-
gan State's Goran Suton led
the equally gritty Big Ten in
rebounding and had aver-
aged a double-double in the
NCAA tournament
But the matchup never de-
veloped, with neither a fac-
tor. Izzo had said all week the
Spartans planned to make
the game a sprint to keep
Thabeet out of his comfort
zone.
"That's one thing we've
been doing since Day 1: We
just rebounded and we ran,"
Lucas said.
And Thabeet couldn't
keep up. He led the Huskies
with 17 points and six re-
bounds, but it was the qui-
etest 17 points anyone's ever
had. The 7-fbot-3 center
looked gs 4 the
opening tppff'YeaSi ver,
tugging on his shorts and
gasping for air not even six
minutes into the game.
The most aggressive he got
was at the end of the first
half getting in Marquise
Grap's face after Jeff Adrien
and Travis Walton got tan-
gled up under Connecticut's
basket There was some
pushing and shoving,
prompting Calhoun to come
all the way from the other
end of the floor to calm his
players. But the dust-up fiz-
zled quickly, and no techni-
cals were even called.
Suton, who had the main
job of corralling Thabeet,
didn't score his first field
goal until early in the second
half and finished with four


GOLF
Continued from Page B1

the path. It bounced at least
11 times. He out-drove us by
at least 100 yards on that
hole.
For Powers, however, his
best shot of the day came on
the final hole with the last
stroke of his putter when he
sank a 20-foot slick-breaking
birdie putt to finish the day
at even-par.
Brady would finish the
day with a 78 and is lead-
ing the Championship B
Flight. He finds himself six
shots behind Powers for
the overall lead. Also tied
with Brady six shots back
are last year's Presidential
champion Mike Sanderson
and one of the country's
top amateurs, Kelly Gosse.
"I didn't play very well
today," Gosse admitted. "I hit
a few bad shots and it cost
me. The course is in good
shape. The greens are fast
and bumpy which is a dou-
ble challenge. That had
nothing to do with me hitting
a 78 today, though, I just did-
n't hit it well."
Allen got off to a quick
start with a few early birdies
but then as he described it,
"had to get a few bogeys on
my card so that I would rec-
ognize it at the end of the
day. We had a blast today in
our foursome (which in-
cluded Kelly, Padova and
Gosse). I'm really looking
forward to tomorrow's four-
some as well."
That lead group will tee


cause he still had a new set
of tires, and that was almost
enough.
When the race restarted
with seven laps left, Busch
charged ahead while Ke-
"selowski and Joey Logano
wound up side-by-side bat-
ting for second. But it was
Stewart taking over second
three laps later, though he
didn't have enough laps left
to catch Busch without an-
other caution.
"I got a good restart," Ke-
selowski said. "I was doing
all I could to keep up with
him."
Logano fell back after
making contact with series
points leader Carl Edwards
and finished 12th. Edwards
was running fourth at the
final caution, and main-
tained his points lead de-
spite dropping to an
18th-place finish.
David Ragan ended
fourth, followed by Paul
Menard, Matt Kenseth, Mike
Bliss and JeffBurton. David
Reutimann, on the pole for
the Sprint Cup race Sunday,
was ninth.

points and seven boards.
Stanley Robinson and AJ.
Price had 15 each for Con-
necticut, and Robinson
added 13 rebounds.
Morgan was Michigan
State's best player early on,
but he's struggled to find his
groove since missing three
games in February with
walking pneumonia. He had
just seven points in Michi-
gan State's last three games
- that's combined - and
was 0-for-2 in the big win
over Louisville in the Mid-
west Regional final.
Granted, he's playing with a
broken nose and a plastic
mask, but Izzo has been all
over him to be more aggres-
sive.
Apparently, he finally got
the message.
"I said Raymar Morgan
was a kid that I feared was
gonna bust out," Calhoun
said. "Unfortunately, I was
too much of a
prophet"
Morgan scored 11 in the
first half, including a couple
of big buckets when UConn
was threatening to take off.
Little Korie Lucious, the
back-up point guard who's
never met a shot he: didn't
like, was a key contributor
early on, too, scoring nine
points in a 12-m inute span
at the end of the first half.
And it was Morgan again
in the second half, stripping
Craig Austrie to start an 8-2
run that caught UConn flat-
footed, all' but ended the
game and threatened to
bring down the roof at Ford
Field.
Morgan stripped Austrie
and dished to Draymond
Green, who lumbered down
the floor for an easy layup.
Austrie missed a shot at the
other end. Lucas - gener-
ously listed at 6-feet -
grabbed the rebound and
sprinted upcourt, splitting
two Connecticut defenders
with a shake-and-shimmy
that gave him a wide-open
layup.


off at 10:15 a.m. this morning
and when they do, no one
figures to be more in their
comfort zone than Bleakley.
"I just feel at home here.
This is my home," Bleakley
admitted. "I'm a little bit
rusty right now. Hopefully I
can do better (Sunday). We'll
see how it goes. I know I've
got to play better if I want to
win."
But for Bleakley, where
winning at the Presidential
Invitational has become a
rite of passage, no one is
counting him out
Presideial Leadeboard
Championship Flight A
Rick Powers 72
Bob Bleakley 75
Denny Allen 75
Andy Padova 75
Championship Flight B
Kelly Brady 78
Bret Baliszewski 79
Senior Championship
Larry Vander Bie 71
Neil Carter 74
Craig Oliver 76
Truman Libby 77
First Flight
Glen Abbott 75
Billy Hooker 78
Second Flight
Michael Kemp 79
Third Flight
Chris Brown 82
Fourth Flight
Warren Aamodt 83
Cliff Ledbetter 83
Fifth Flight
Mike Manning 84
Green Tee Flight
Frank Wade 84
Don Eddy 85
Len Oakeson 86
Preston John 89


CTRous COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS


B4 SUNiwYAPlUL 5 2009
















Roush Racing wants results in Texas


Associated Press
FORT WORTH, Texas -
Roush Fenway Racing could
sure use another backflip in
Texas.
The team is six races into a
season that began with Matt
Kenseth becoming the first
NASCAR Sprint Cup driver
in 12 years to win the first two
races. But it already needs
another boost, and there's no
place to do that like Texas.
"We could run here every
week, that'd be fine with me,"
Carl Edwards said. "Yeah, I
couldn't be happier to be
coming to Texas."
Edwards twice got to do his
trademark celebratory back-
flip at Texas last year after
becoming the first driver to
sweep both races. That also
made him the first three-time
winner at the 1/z-mile high-
banked track
Even without winning a
pole in Texas, Roush Fenway
has won seven of the 16 Cup
races at the track where no
other team has won more
than twice. Roush has 34 top-
10 finishes in 76 starts, and all


five drivers finished in the
top 11 last November
David Reutimann earned
the pole for Sunday's Sam-
sung 500 in his No. 00 Toyota
for Michael Waltrip Racing.
Series points leader JeffGor-
don starts second at one of
the two active tracks where
the four-time Cup driver for
Hendrick has never won a
race.
Kenseth and teammate
David Ragan make up the
second row. Edwards and
Greg Biffle also share a row,
starting 13th and 14th, while
Jamie McMurray, the other
Roush driver, qualified 36th.
Since winning the first two
races, Kenseth hasn't even
led a lap. His bid for three
victories in a row was done
only seven laps into the race
at Las Vegas.
"It has been really a miser-
able four weeks," Kenseth
said. "The first two weeks
couldn't have been any better,
and the last four couldn't
have been really much
worse. So we definitely need
a good finish here, hopefully
get things rolling in the right


Associated Press
Carl Edwards won twice at Texas last year and Roush Fen-
way wouldn't mind seeing it happen again today.


direction."
That goes for the entire
team, especially after con-
secutive races on tight half-
mile tracks. Roush drivers
had an average finish of 30th
at Bristol and McMurray's
10th at Martinsville was the
only better than 23rd.
Before the short tracks, Ed-
wards was third at Atlanta -
another Bruton Smith-owned
track with a similar layout
where he has also won three


times. That is Edwards' best
finish this season after win-
ning a Cup-high nine times
last year, and the best for a
Roush driver since Daytona
and California to open the
season. ,
. "We are the same team, I'm
the same driver Everything's
fine," Edwards said. "Liter-
ally, we could win here and
win the next 10 in a row. Or
we could run second the next
10, the difference could be six


inches in each race. ... It's
been six races since we won.
I don't think we're in any sort
of trouble."
Still, Edwards feels
"hugely fortunate" to be
eighth in season points and
the highest-ranked Roush
driver. He rolled to a 17th-
place finish in Las Vegas de-
spite a blown engine and got
caught up in a wreck at Day-
tona.
"It could have been way
worse," Edwards said. "I'm
OK with where we're at I'm
OK with how we've per-
formed."
After holding off Jimmie
Johnson by four-tenths of a
second to win at Texas last
spring, Edwards posted an
eight-second victory over
Gordon in November
Kenseth and Biffle both
have Cup victories at Texas,
where the Roush dominance
began with- former team
members Jeff Burton and
Mark Martin won the first two
races after the track opened
in 1997.
'Feff Burton and Mark
Martin, they can win any-


where, and really they're the
ones that really should have
all the credit for us even run-
ning good still today,"
Kenseth said.
Burton, who won the inau-
gural Texas race, became the
track's first two-time winner
two years ago when he was
driving for Richard Chil-
dress.
"The mile-and-a-halves
have been a strong point for
the Roush teams, no question
about that," Burton said.
"Some of it is a plan, and
some of it is luck."
Reutimann, the pole-sitter,
has made a quite a rise for
the Waltrip team, so much in
fact that he's been lightheart-
edly referred to as "The
Franchise."
Already this season, Reuti-
mann has his best career fin-
ish (fourth at Las Vegas),
three top 10s - one short of
his career total in 63 races
before this year- and is 11th
in season points.
"I feel like, don't enjoy it
too much, because it can go
the other way really quickly,"
Reutimann said.


Title defense time


Phillies open

2009 MLB year

at home vs. Braves

Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA - The
championship banner that'll
hang above Ashburn Alley and
those shiny rings they'll soon re-
ceive will be a constant re-
minder that the Philadelphia
Phillies are 2008 World Series
. champions.
Once Brett Myers throws the
first pitch Sunday night against
the Atlanta Braves in the 2009
major league opener, last year
won't matter anymore.
"It's time for us to go out there
and defend our title, and play the
game," center fielder Shane Vic-
torino said. "I'm not going to look
back at '08 once I get the season
started on Sunday. You have to
move forward. You're definitely
going to be talked about as the
world champs, and we want to go
out there and keep winning."
Since the first day of spring
training, players have stressed
the importance of focusing on
this season instead of reflecting
on their magical run last October.
The goal is to repeat. That's no
easy feat, considering it hasn't
been done this decade.
The New York Yankees were
the last team to win consecutive
championships, capturing three
straight titles from 1998-2000.
The Cincinnati Reds were the
last NL team to win two in a row
in 1975-76.
"Guys personally want to have
better years, and that can only
help us to repeat," shortstop
Jimmy Rollins said. "Guys
aren't satisfied with finally win-
ning a championship. We want
to be good for a number of
years, and you have to stay hun-
gry to do that."
The outspoken Rollins kept a


Associated Press
Philadelphia Phillies starting pitcher Cole Hamels was the MVP of the
NLCS and World Series in 2008.


low profile this spring. Now that
the Phillies are champions, his
days as a prognosticator are
over. It's too bad because Rollins
went 2-for-2 with his bold pre-
dictions.
Before the 2007 season,
Rollins claimed the Phillies
were the team to beat in the NL
East. Helped by a historic col-
lapse by the New York Mets,
Philadelphia overcame a big
deficit and captured the division
title. Rollins backed up his
words by having an MVP season.
Last year, Rollins said the


Phillies would win 100 games.
They got 92 of them in the regu-
lar season and 11 more in the
playoffs.
"Retirement," Rollins said
when asked for another pick.
"I've said it five times."
The Phillies are favorites to
win another division crown be-
cause they have nearly the same
team that breezed through the
postseason, going 11-3 against
Milwaukee, Los Angeles and
Tampa Bay.
Every starter except left
fielder Pat Burrell returns and


four-fifths of the starting rota-
tion is the same. Raul Ibanez re-
placed Burrell and Chan Ho
Park took Kyle Kendrick's spot
in the rotation.
Cole Hamels, the MVP of the
NLCS and World Series, isn't
pitching the opener because he
had minor elbow problems. So,
Myers gets his third straight
opening day assignment.
Myers was 10-13 with a 4.55
ERA last year. He pitched so
poorly the first half that he was
demoted to the minors, but was
outstanding down the stretch.
Myers lost 25 pounds in the off-
season, and hopes for a bust-out
year as he enters the final season
of a $25.75, three-year contract
"I think Brett Myers has had
that potential his whole career,
and this year has the potential
to a big year for him," manager
Charlie Manuel said. "I think
he's ready to go and he spent a
lot of time this winter working
out and getting in shape and he
came to spring training that
way. He's looking forward to
having a big season for us, and
we need him to have a big sea-
son to repeat."
Myers will be opposed by
Derek Lowe, who was lured
away from the Dodgers by a $60
million, four-year contract Lowe
was 14-11 with a 3.24 ERA last
year. The Phillies beat him in
Game 1 of the NLCS and he had
a no-decision in Philadelphia's
victory in Game 4.
Lowe anchors an overhauled
rotation that includes newcom-
ers Javier Vazquez and Kenshin
Kawakami. Atlanta has missed
the playoffs three straight years
after winning an unprecedented
14 consecutive division titles.
The Phillies were 14-4 against
the Braves last year, including 9-
0 in Atlanta.
"We just need to be us, and not
try and look at last season to put
more pressure on ourselves. It's
2009 now," Phillies slugger Ryan
Howard said.


Zambrano


thinks


Wrigley


should go


Cubs ace asks for

a new ballpark

Associated Press

NEW YORK - Standing in
the plush visitors' clubhouse of
Yankee Stadium, Carlos Zam-
brano made a plea for Chicago to
replace Wrigley Field.
"You come into a ballpark like
this and you see great things,"
the Cubs ace told The Associatd,
Press on Saturday before his
team's 10-1 exhibition loss at the
sparkling ballpark in the Bronx.
"You wish that Chicago'd
build a new stadium for the
Cubs," he said.
Built in 1914 and home to the
Cubs since 1916, Wrigley Field is
the second-oldest major league
stadium, trailing only Boston's
Fenway Park (1912). Fans in
Chicago still flock to see the ivy-
covered walls and keep alive
Harry Caray's tradition of
singing "Take Me Out to the Ball
Game" during every seventh-in-
ning stretch.
In 2008, their 100th season
without a World Series title, the
Cubs drew a Wrigley record of
3,300,200 fans, and thousands
more peered into the field from
rooftops near the neighbor-
hood park.
Zambrano wasn't just being
his unpredictable self Saturday
As a player he wants a relaxing
environment to work in, and he
understands Wrigley's appeal
for fans despite the lack of
amenities - who needs a mar-
tini bar, as there is in the new,
$1.5 billion Yankee Stadium,
when you can go loopy just try-
ing to figure out the wind direc-
tion for that day's game?


- Sports BRIEFS-


Bowlen sends letter
explaining Cutler trade
ENGLEWOOD, Colo. -
Denver Broncos owner Pat
Bowlen has sent a letter to sea-
son ticket holders explaining
why the organization had to
trade Pro Bowl quarterback Jay
Cutler to the Chicago Bears.
Bowlen preached a message
of team unity in the e-mail, reiter-
ating that he and new coach
Josh McDaniels had reached out
many times to Cutler, who didn't
respond to their overtures to re-
pair the strained relationship.
Bowlen, who remained
largely silent during the six-
week rift that ended with Thurs-
day's blockbuster trade, wrote:
"It has never been about one
player and it never will be." He
added that anybody who puts
himself above the team gets a
ticket out of town.
Sunderland out as
PSU wrestling coach
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -
Penn State wrestling coach
Troy Sunderland has resigned
after the team dropped to sev-
enth place in the Big Ten this
season.


Athletic director Tim Curley
said Saturday the resignation
took effect immediately. The
school will begin a national
search for a replacement.
Sunderland coached 11 sea-
sons at his alma mater, with
four top 10 finishes at the
NCAAs, including a third-place
finish in 2008. The Nittany
Lions slipped to 17th at nation-
als this season.
Winslow's missing
father-in-law found safe
ANAHEIM, Calif. - The fa-
ther-in-law of Tampa Bay Buc-
caneers tight end Kellen
Winslow was found safe at a
U.S.-Mexico border crossing on
Saturday, three days after he
vanished, police said.
Anaheim police were notified
at about 9 a.m. Saturday that
Enrique Guzman, who has
Alzheimer's disease, was found
at the Calexico border crossing,
Anaheim police Sgt. Rick Mar-
tinez said.
The 67-year-old Guzman, of
Montebello, was last seen
Wednesday at an Anaheim
gas station in his blue Chevy
Camaro.


Team & Individual Games...12:noon Shotgun Start
For information call Ed Serra at 352-446-6191 C ^@l p.^ ^A
or e-mail - ed@edserra.com


SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009 B5


CrrRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


SPORTS










E Page B6 - SOUND M APRIL 5, 2009



ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Josh Hartnett
out of hospital
LOS ANGELES - A
publicist says actor Josh
Hartnett has been re-
leased from a Los Ange-
les hospital after
recovering from gastroin-
testinal problems.
Publicist Susan Patri-
cola said
Friday
that the
30-year-
old Hart-
nett was
released
earlier
this week
Josh after un-
Hartnett dergoing
tests to determine the
cause. He had been trans-
ported Monday to Cedars-
Sinai Medical Center.
Patricola says Hartnett
had a flare-up of a gas-
trointestinal issue last
year that affected him
while he was starring in
an onstage production of
"Rain Man" in London.

Suspect caught,
actor slain
AUSTIN, Texas - A
man police say told them
he stole a car and be-
lieved the owner was
dead is charged with
killing a Texas actor.
Austin police Friday
identified the victim as 67-
year-old Lou Perryman.
Perryman appeared in
"The Blues Brothers,"
"Boys Don't Cry" and
"When Zachary Beaver
Came to Town."
Police charged 26-year-
old Seth Christopher
Tatum with capital mur-
der, plus aggravated as-
sault with a deadly
weapon in another attack
Sgt Joseph Chacon says
Tatum showed up at a jail
facility Thursday and said
he was "pretty sure" he
had killed the owner of a
vehicle he had stolen. Po-.
lice later found Perry-
man's body at a home.
Investigators say they do
not believe Tatum and Per-
ryman knew each other

Coolio pleads not
guilty in drug case
LOS ANGELES -
Rapper Coolio has
pleaded not guilty to
drug possession and
battery charges.
The 45-year-old rap-
per, whose real name is
Artis Leon Ivey, entered
his plea during an ar-
raign-
ment in
Los An-
geles on
Friday.
He was
arrested
last
Coolio month at
Los Ange-
les International Airport,
and later charged with
felony cocaine posses-
sion and battery and pos-
session of drug
paraphernalia, both mis-
demeanors. Coolio al-
legedly grabbed a
screener's arm to prevent
a search of his luggage.
The "Gangsta's Para-
dise" rapper remains
free on bail.

McCartney, Starr
meditate on trip
NEW YORK -Paul
McCartney and Ringo
Starr are still meditative
about their trip to India.
The two remaining Bea-
ties are sharing the stage
Saturday night when Mc-
Cartney headlines Radio
City Music Hall.
McCartney said at a
press conference Friday
that the Maharishi had
given the band a "great
gift." He said it came at a
time "when we were look-
ing for something to kind
of stabilize us toward the


end of the crazy 1960s."
Saturday's concert, called
"Change Begins Within,"
benefits the David Lynch
Foundation. The organiza-
tion's initiative is to teach
one million at risk youths
mediation techniques.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
Pyrotechnic equipment spouts flames from the windows of a brownstone Jan. 29 as a camera crew, center, shoots actors
jumping from a fire truck during filming for an upcoming episode of the television show "Rescue Me" in New York. "Res-
cue Me" returns for its fifth season Tuesday at 10 p.m., kicking off an extra-long run of 22 episodes.



'Rescue Me' rekindled

Hit FX drama returns for a fifth, extra-long season Tuesday night


FRAZIER MOORE
Associated Press

NEW YORK - "Rescue
Me" has been playing with
fire since the start.
This FX drama has dared
to picture New York City
firefighters as loutish, mad-
cap and self-destructive -
not just heroic. At its core is
Denis Leary, whose titles on
the show include co-creator,
co-executive producer and
writer, plus his starring role
as Tommy Gavin, a flawed
champion among New
York's Bravest
After much too long, "Res-
cue Me" returns for its fifth
season Tuesday at 10 p.m.,
kicking off an extra-long run
of 22 episodes.
As always, it's a volatile
mix of action, heart, raci-
ness and dark humor.
While the series has a raw
topicality, it's rooted in the
ruins of 9/11. Among
Tommy's fellow firefighters
who lost their lives that day,
a cousin (and Tommy's best
friend) died at ground zero,
later haunting him in visions.
This season, Tommy's
wounds are reopened (and
his hackles raised) when a
sexy French journalist ar-
rives at the firehouse, re-
searching the tragedy for a
coffee table book to mark
the 10th anniversary of the
terrorists attacks.
Guest stars have always
sparked "Rescue Me," and
this season is no different.
First up: Michael J. Fox in a
multi-episode arc gets
under Tommy's skin as the
obnoxious guy dating
Tommy's estranged wife.
But there are also fires to
put out. of course. This ex-
plains why production crew,
equipment and firefighters
(some real, some maje-be-
lieve) have descended on a
block of Manhattan's West


Actor Dennis Leary, center, takes a break with other cast
members Jan. 29 during filming for an upcoming episode of
the television show "Rescue Me" in New York.


121st Street on a frigid Jan-
uary night
This sequence, from an
episode to air late this sea-
son, will show the men of 62
Truck responding to a call at
a blazing brownstone. It will
also introduce a character
played by guest star Maura
Tierney, who pulls up in a
cab to find her home on fire,
then defies Tommy's efforts
to bar her entry with a swift'
kick to his privates. (Can ro-
mance be far behind?)
Tierney isn't around. Her
scenes were shot the night
before. The entire location
shoot will span three nights.
"We haven't even gone in
the building yet," says
Leary, clomping around in
his full firefighting outfit,
"and we've been here half
the evening already."
The block is bathed by
lights mounted high on a
cherry-picker, dousing the
brownstone's exterior. The
street is barricaded so the
fire engine (this one is
owned by the show) can
rush to its destination unim-
peded. Meanwhile, a "real,"
on-duty NYFD truck is
parked out of sight around
the corner. Every step of this
fire scene has been author-
ized and is now being su-


George Harrison to get star

on HollywOod Walk of Fame
Associated Press Although once known as
"the quiet Beatle" for his
LOS ANGELES - Paul shy, retiring nature, Harri-
McCartney may have a son was one of the group's
knighthood, but it's George most powerful forces.
Harrison who is receiving His rockabilly-influenced
the royal treatment from playing gave the Beatles'
the Hollywood Walk of early recordings their dis-
Fame this month. tinctive guitar-driven sound
Harrison will receive a and his voice provided many
star on the fabled walk on of the group's most arresting
April 14, the Hollywood vocal harmonies. His fasci-
Chamber of Commerce an- nation with Eastern music
nounced Friday His widow, also helped broaden the
Olivia Harrison. and his band's sound on such classic
son, Dhani, are expected to albums as "Sgt Pepper's
attend the unveil ing. Lonely Hearts Club Band"
Harrison, who died inm2001, and "The White Album."
already shares a Walk of Although overshadowed by
Fame star with all four of the the more prolific songwriters
Beatles, but only he and John Lennon and McCartney, Har-
Lennon, who died in 1980, rison composed several of
will have their own stars. the Beatles' finest songs, in-
Harrison's, to be unveiled cluding "While My Guitar
in front of Hollywood's Capi- Gently Weeps," "Here Comes
tol Records building, will be the Sun," "Something" and
the 2,382nd on the Walk "Within You, Without You."


pervised by the department
"Even though it's fake
fires that we're creating, it's
real flame and smoke, with
safety issues," Leary notes.
The guy in charge of play-
ing with fire is the show's
special effects coordinator,
Conrad ("Connie") Brink
"My responsibility is to
make sure this house does-
n't burn down," he says. "My
second responsibility is to
make fire."
With 48 years in the busi-
ness, Brink (with, more re-
cently, sons Jeff and Conrad
Jr.) has had a hand in many
of New York's best cine-
matic pyrotechnics. Listing
a few credits, Brink cites the
films "American Gangster"
and "War of the Worlds,"
and the series "The Sopra-
nos." (Don't blame the mob
for all those nasty explo-
sions; blame Brink)
As Brink oversees from
the icy sidewalk outside the
brownstone, smoke from a
smoke machine is issuing
from a window, and raging
flames (which are actually a
row of propane-fueled jets)
erupt from a couple of other
windows. In postproduc-
tion, the blaze will be fur-
ther enhanced digitally,
then copied-and-pasted into


the brownstone's unignited
windows.
"This is a simple job,"
Brink says. "We've done
warehouses with 30 windows
all burning atthe same time."
You might think that
when "Rescue Me" needs to
make a dwelling look like
it's on fire, a vacant struc-
ture would be chosen out of
simple convenience. Not in
this case, as Brink demon-
strates with a brief tour in-
side. This lovely brownstone
is someone's home, with the
furniture and other posses-
sions carefully moved aside
and covered, to free up
space for equipment, tech-
nicians and cables snaking
everywhere.
"Everything in here is
beautiful," says Brink, ad-.
miring the owner's renova-
tion efforts. "He's restored
all the woodwork And
how's that for a bathroom!"
Later, after the exterior
shots are done, Tommy
Gavin and his fellow fire-
fighters will be filmed burst-
ing in from the street to face
the smoke-clogged front
hall. But the rest of the ac-
tion inside the apartment
will be shot a few days later
under more controlled con-
ditions: on a set in a studio
across town.
By then, the only evidence
of the made-to-order in-
ferno on West 121st Street
will exist on film.
"When we're finished,"
says Brink, "we'll pull all
our stuff out, everything will
be cleaned up, the paper
will be taken off the walls
and floors, and the guy can
have his place back"
But that seems far away
as the shoot drags on.
"It's starting to get old
now," Leary declares. '"After
10, 11, midnight, it gets RE-
ALLY old. You really want
to go home and go to sleep."


Bristol Palin's ex-fiance cites

tension with Gov.'s daughter


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Levi
Johnston says ex-fiance
Bristol Palin, daughter of
Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, al-
lows him to visit their 3-
month-old son but won't let
him take the baby out
In an interview to air
Monday with talk show host
Tyra Banks, Johnston, 19,
said he and 18-year-old Bris-
tol don't always get along.
"Some days we can have
regular conversations without
fighting," Johnston said. "Most
of the times, I don't know
what's wrongwith her She's in
a pretty bad mood, she's short,
she doesn't want me around, I
don't think She says that I can
come see the baby and that
kind of thing, but wont let me
take him anywhere."
The two are the parents
of a son, Tripp, born Dec. 27.


Palin family spokes-
woman Meghan Stapleton
has said Bristol Palin isn't
preventing anyone from
seeing the baby Stapleton
has said Johnston sees his
son "whenever he wants,
the family sees the baby
whenever they want"
In the interview, Johnston
said the Alaska governor
probably knew he and Bris-
tol were having sex. "Moms
are pretty smart," he said.
Sarah Palin announced her
daughter's pregnancy Sept 1,
days after Sen. John McCain
picked herto be his vice pres-
idential running mate. John-
ston later appeared at the
Republican National Con-
vention with the Palins.
Johnston told Banks he
wentto the convention atBris-
tol's request, but he wasn't
thrilled to attend. "I felt out of
place," he said.


Florida
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Today in
HISTORY

Today is Palm Sunday,
April 5, the 95th day of 2009.
There are 270 days left in the
year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On April 5, 1621, the
Mayflower sailed from Ply-
mouth Colony in present-day
Massachusetts on a month-
long return trip to England.
On this date:
In 1614, Pocahontas,.
daughter of the leader of the
Powhatan tribe, married Eng-
lish colonist John Rolfe in Vir-
ginia. (A convert to
Christianity, she went by the
name Lady Rebecca.)
In 1792, George Washing-
ton cast the first presidential
veto, rejecting a congres-
sional measure for apportion-
ing representatives among
the states.
In 1887, in Tuscumbia,
Ala., teacher Anne Sullivan
achieved a breakthrough as
her blind and deaf pupil,
Helen Keller, learned the
meaning of the word "water"
as spelled out in the Manual
Alphabet.
In 1951, Julius and Ethel
Rosenberg were sentenced
to death following their con-
viction in New York on
charges of conspiring to com-
mit espionage for the Soviet
Union; co-defendant Morton
Sobell was sentenced to 30
years in prison. (He was re-
leased in 1969.)
In 1964, Army Gen. Dou-
glas MacArthur died in Wash-
ington at age 84.
In 1975, nationalist Chi-
nese leader Chiang Kai-shek
died at age 87.
In 1976, reclusive billion-
aire Howard Hughes died in
Houston at age 70.
In 1988, a 15-day hijacking
ordeal began as gunmen
forced a Kuwait Airways
jumbo jet to land in Iran.
Ten years ago: In
Laramie, Wyo., Russell Hen-
derson pleaded guilty to kid-
napping and felony murder in
the death of Matthew Shep-
ard, a gay college student.
(Henderson was later sen-
tenced to life in prison.)
Five years ago: A U.S.-
Canadian task force investi-
gating the massive power
blackout of Aug. 14, 2003,
called for urgent approval of
mandatory reliability rules to
govern the electric transmis-
sion industry.
One year ago: Actor
Charlton Heston, big-screen
hero and later leader of the
National Rifle Association,
died in Beverly Hills, Calif., at
age 84.
Today's Birthdays: For-
mer Secretary of State Colin
Powell is 72. Country singer
Tommy Cash is 69. Actor
Michael Moriarty is 68. Singer
Agnetha Faltskog (ABBA) is
59. Rock musician Mike Mc-


Cready (Pearl Jam) is 43.
Country singer Troy Gentry is
42. Singer Paula Cole is 41.
Thought for Today: "Time
was invented by Almighty
God in order to give ideas a
chance." - Nicholas Murray
Butler, American educator
(1862-1947).


6;�i ;;?;~ZS~JPWT~e~nrlla


i 7�.
















COMMENTARY____
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Former Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. Chief Executive Richard S. Fuld Jr., testifies Oct. 6 before the House Oversight and Government Reform Com-
mittee on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.










From the economy's ills, a new cast of American villains rises


TED ANTHONY
Associated Press

Alfred Hitchcock said,
"the better the
. mnyie." And in the
e epic production that
is the United States of
America, we have followed that
advice since the earliest settlers
landed. For every hero the Amer-
ican story factory produces, a
vivid new villain comes off the as-
sembly line in short order.
We love bad guys in America -
even when they're not really bad.
Demonizing helps define the best
in us. Here's an incomplete list
from the history books: Indians,
Quakers, witches, Englishmen,
the federal government, South-
erners and Northerners, Chinese
"Celestials," Tammany Hall De-
mocrats, Germans, Jews, Japan-
ese, North Koreans, communists,
socialists, Vietnamese, liberals,
conservatives, gays, lesbians and
Muslims. The Evil Empire and the
Axis of Evil.
Now, a fresh group has been
dropped into the cultural dunk
tank Bin Laden? Back-burnered,
at least for now. Saddam? Gone
and forgotten. Instead, in these
jumbled days of economic uncer-
tainty, fairly or unfairly, America's
newest Snidely Whiplashes bear
faces like those of Bernie Madoff,
AIG executives and the private jet-
flying heads of the Big Three au-
tomakers.
Just look at the March 2 cover of
New York magazine, which doc-
tored a picture of Madoff into the
grinning, bloodshot-eyed Joker,
the diabolical supervillain who
delights in terrorizing Batman's
Gotham City. "Bernie Madoff,
Monster," it says. Or consider Gen-
eral Motors Corp. Chairman and
CEO Rick Wagoner, eviscerated by
a congressional committee in No-
vember and lampooned on "Sat-


Auto industry executives, from left, General Motors CEO Richard Wagoner; Chrysler CEO Robert Nardelli; and
Ford CEO Alan Mulally, testify on Capitol Hill Nov. 19 In Washington, D.C., before a House Financial Services
Committee hearing on the automotive Industry bailout.


urday Night Live" before he was
forced out by the Obama adminis-
tration over the weekend.
And in October, when the for-
mer CEO of the freshly bank-
rupted Lehman Bros., Richard
Fuld, sat down before Congress,
he was promptly informed by
Florida Rep. John Mica: "If you
haven't discovered your role,
you're the villain today."
"Someone always needs to get
dragged into the hot seat. It's part
of the American process," says
Imad Hamad, who would know.
He is regional director for the
American-Arab Anti-Discrimina-
tion Committee and is based in
Dearborn, a town just outside De-
troit where Arabic script is ubiq-
uitous and more than 30 percent


of the population is of Arab de-
scent.
In the eyes of some Americans,
Muslims and Middle Easterners
became the cultural bogeymen
after 9/11, and Hamad's organiza-
tion and community are still deal-
ing with the fallout. Even with a
new president whose grandfather
was Muslim, he says, suspicion
continues to make life difficult for
people stereotyped by anti-Mus-
lim sentiment. "In the Middle
East, they cut you one time,"
Hamad says. "In America, they
put you in the death machine over
and over."
The minting of villains, justified
or otherwise, is a time-tested
human response to threat and
fear. When something horrible


happens, it's easier to blame a
group than to blame a process or
to look inward. But in America,
where big narratives have always
ruled the day, it seems especially
pronounced. You'd think a nation
of immigrants might be warier of
demonizing outsiders, but history
says otherwise.
Yet there's something different
about this crop. Most denizens of
American history's rogues' gallery
were cast as evil "others" who rep-
resented threats to the American
way of life. Now, though, it is more
complicated. These finance folks
are the darker side of American
ideals - getting rich, succeeding,
living large, the pursuit of happi-
ness.
See VILLAINS/Page 03


Honoring the veterans in Congress


I once again was the
chairman of the An-
nual Statesmanship
Award Dinner (No. 12) put
on by the U.S. Association
of Former Members of Con-
gress.
This dinner honored all
the members of Congress
who went from service in
uniform to service on Capi-
tol Hill.
Those accepting the
award were: Rep. Steve
Buyer (R-Ind.), who served
in Operation Desert
Shield/Desert Storm (the


first Gulf War); of all members
Rep. John Cony- who served in
ers Jr. (D-Mich.), our armed
who served in the V forces.
Korean War; Rep. Two hundred
Jack Murtha (D- and twenty
Penn.), who years ago on
served in the Viet- March 14, 1789,
nam War; and the first United
Sen. John McCain States Congress
(R-Ariz.), who Lou Frey assembled at
served in the Viet- OTHER Federal Hall on
nam War. Sen. Wall Street in
Daniel Inouye (D- VOICES New York City.
Hawaii), who Among the men
served in World War II, ac- who were elected to that
cepted the honor on behalf first congress were veterans


from the war for Independ-
ence. For example, there
was Richard Basset from
Delaware. During the
American Revolution, he
organized the state's mili-
tary and assembled 800
men to face the British on
their march toward
Philadelphia. He helped
form the largest battalion in
the Continental Army from
one of the smallest
colonies; completely uni-
formed, supplied and
armed.
There was also James


Jackson, a representative
from Georgia who served in
the State's militia at the de-
fense of Savannah and the
Battle of Cowpens.
Theodore Sedgwick from
Massachusetts was a major
in the Continental Army
and later served as the fifth
speaker of the House of
Representatives. Suffice it
to say, nearly every member
in that first Congress fought
for our independence and
our rights for self-determi-
See FREY/Page C3


Charlie Brennan
SHADES
OF GRAY

Non-issue

garners a lot

of interest
We ran a couple
guest columns
Friday from agri-
cultural interests asserting
that Sen. Charlie Dean's
barn is a barn and not
something worth question-
ing simply because it has
certain home-like ameni-
ties (bed, bath, kitchen).
The editorial board did
not dispute that the barn
is a barn, regardless of
certain home-like ameni-
ties. In agreeing to run
one of the guest columns, I
did respond to the writer
by saying:
"We simply gave cover-
age to a complaint brought
to county government ques-
tioning whether a structure
that includes bedrooms,
kitchen and bath is exempt
from the Florida Building
Code under the Right to
Farm Act
"The story drew consid-
erable public response.
Our editorial board's posi-
tion (separate from news
coverage) was that the
barn is well within the
law, yet questioned if the
intent of the law was for
such amenities to be ex-
empt from safeguards re-
quired of residential
structures.'
He responded, perhaps
correctly, that we've de-
voted too much ink to the
issue.
In his guest column he
wrote, 'There was never a
'real' issue in this case..."
And "... We can only hope
those who continue to
choose to make something
out of nothing will finally
move on to the truly im-
portant issues facing our
state and nation."
It's always interesting
when we're told that is-
sues that garner broad
public interest are non-is-
sues. The only thing is, the
citizens have a right to
question if "what is" is
necessarily what they
want It's kind of an Amer-
ican thing.
* Speaking of unwel-
come coverage, Property
Appraiser Geoff Greene
got his share when first
taking office.
In his first meeting with
the Chronicle Editorial
Board this past week,
Greene wore a bullet-
proof vest Very funny.
He did a good job of de-
tailing accomplishments
during his initial months
in his position and es-
caped unharmed,
* We do need to clarify
an inaccuracy: There was
never a plan to halt swim-
ming at Hunter's Spring
in Crystal River. Our
apologies.
* News that William
Thornton IV will not be
serving 30 years for an ac-
cident that resulted in two
fatalities is good news.
That's not to diminish the
tragic loss of two young
lives. That's horrible.
The fact that the initial
30-year sentence was
handed down to Thorn-
ton, who was a juvenile at
the time of the accident,
remains perplexing. In
Thursday's and Friday's
Sports sections, we ran
stories about the Cleve-
land Browns' Donte Stall-
worth facing DUI-
manslaughter charges in
Florida involving a case in
which a man was killed.
Stallworth reportedly had
a blood-alcohol level of
.126. Florida's legal limit
is .08. If convicted, he
faces a maximum of 15
years in prison.
See SHADES/Page C4


i IMENAR










0Page C2 - SUNDAY, APRIL 5,2009



PINION


"The 'teen-ager' seems to have replaced the
Communist as the appropriate target for
public controversy and foreboding."
Edgar Z. Friedenberg, 1959


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
-' * Gerry Mulligan................... .............. publisher
Charlie Brennan ....................................... editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold .... ...................managing editor
Cheri Harris......... ...................features editor
' - Curt Ebitz.... ......................... citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ................................. citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson .......................... guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


IT'S A L - '. )AFTER ALL




Teens will be



teens; parents



must be parents


T eenagers do stupid
things. Not all of them.
Not all the time. But
more than enough to earn a
reputation for making some
spectacularly bad decisions.
Put their penchant for prob-
lems on a collision course with
cell phone cam-
eras in idle hands, THE IS
and sexting -
transmitting sexu- Sexting a
ally explicit pho-
tos and videos via OUR OP1
text message - Tchn
was nearly in- stupid dechnolo
evitable. stupid d
The unfortunate span th
nationwide trend
among teens can also come
with felony charges, the kind of
charges that don't go away, that
can lead to a label more infa-
mous than any scarlet letter:
registered sexual offender.
This is because sexting in-
volving minors falls under fed-
eral and state obscenity and
child pornography laws. These
laws do not exempt those
younger than 18 who send and
receive sexually explicit mate-
rial of minors, even if the trans-
mission is consensual.
The first documented case of
sexting in the Citrus County
School District a few weeks ago
involved nude photos of Citrus
Springs Middle School eighth-
grade students on several con-
fiscated student cell phones.
Two students could have faced
charges related to transmitting
obscene material to minors, but
the state attorney decided not to
file charges due to the lack of
malicious intent. The two stu-
dents were suspended and offi-
cials contacted the parents of
everyone involved.
Whether or not teens who
take nude photos of themselves
ever face criminal charges,
they are still putting their fu-
tures at risk. Today's technol-
ogy takes stupid decisions to a
global stage, and cyberspace is
forever. This means a teen
could ruin a future in public


service with one push of a but-
ton. It could also mean humili-
ation and worse when the
photos, inevitably, wind up in
unfriendly hands.
In a national story that made
headlines, Jesse Logan of Cin-
cinatti, Ohio, committed suicide
after a nude photo
SSUE: of her was sent via
e-mail to other
nd teens. high school stu-
dents who ha-
2INION: rassed the
gy allows 18-year-old.
gy allows To help spread
visions to the word about
e globe. the seriousness of
this ubiquitous
practice, school resource offi-
cers have started going into
Citrus County middle and high
school classrooms to talk to the
students about sexting and its
consequences.
School board members are
also in the process of adapting
the Student Code of Conduct to
address it.
The sheriff's office and
school officials deserve credit
for addressing this problem.
And the state attorney made a
wise decision when he decided
not to pursue charges against
the pair of unfortunate eighth-
graders.
Because teens and common
sense often don't go together,
elected leaders might also
want to consider changing the
laws so that minors don't face
the same consequences as
hardcore pornographers for
sexting compromising photos
of themselves to their peers.
But law enforcement, legisla-
tors and schools can only do so
much. It's up to parents - the
ones paying the cell phone
bills - to keep tabs on how
their children are using these
little marvels of technology, to
explain how dangerous they
can be. And if that's too much
trouble, remember that no one
ever transmitted a racy photo
with a pair of tin cans and
some string.


s
ar



)E
ac
IE


community. We are so fortunate
to have such fine people and
business owners to support our
children. It is not a given that
they need to be there; they want
to be there. And if the price was
low, that is the true reflection of
the state of our economy. Thank
you for your time. Grandma, do
the big-girl thing.
Great buyers
I'm calling about the Sound Off
that was in the paper on Wednes-
day (April 1) called "Cheap-
skates" ... I have a daughter that
showed a steer at the fair this
year. It was her fourth year show-
ing. All of the kids understood
about the situation with the econ-
omy, that it was going to be
rough this year. But seriously, I
thank every single buyer that
came to that fairgrounds and
placed a bid on a person's steer
or pig or did add-ons because if
wasn't for them, these kids would
not be able to do these projects. I
don't see the economy getting
any better next year...As far as
I'm concerned, those buyers were
great that came out there and
supported those kids. They did
the best they could with the econ-
omy the way it is.


Life lessons
As a previous 4-H and FFA mem-
ber and livestock exhibitor at the
Citrus County Fair, I was appalled
to read "Cheapskates" in April 1's
paper. The beef projects are not
about bringing home big bucks,
but are designed to teach students
about hard work, discipline, lead-
ership and the beef industry.
Eighty steers were spld at the
2009 fair and I was thrilled to see
every exhibitor with a buyer. So
thank you to every individual fam-
ily and business that came out to
support the steer livestock ex-
hibitors ...
Be gracious, grandma
I'm calling in regard to the arti-
cle from the grandma about the
Citrus County Fair and our buy-
ers. I have to say that I am so
pleased that we had enough buy-
ers to buy each and every steer
of the children's projects.
Grandma, you have the opportu-
nity to be a big girl ... and do the
right thing and teach the grand-
children a lesson in life, that not
everything is guaranteed and we
should be gracious to the buyers,
which are our parents and small
business owners of our little local


Economic freedom is the key


DOUGLAS COHN
AND ELEANOR CLIFT
resident Obama is a con-
ciliator, a listener - handy
qualities to have when Eu-
ropean leaders are about to give
him an earful. In his first ex-
tended foreign trip since taking
office, Obama will confront first-
hand the antagonism, the jeal-
ousy and even the smugness that
colors the European view of
America. Preparing for this
week's summit meeting in Lon-
don of the G-20, the world's lead-
ing economies, Europe's leaders
presented a unified opposition to
further stimulus spending, insist-
ing it is not needed because their
populations and their economies
are cushioned by strong safety
nets.
Demonstrations in London and
elsewhere in advance of the G-20
gathering suggest that European
leaders are underestimating the
anger that people feel at the re-
cessionary grip that has taken
hold. Blaming America's cowboy
capitalism for the global down-
turn won't address the concerns
of protesters who are looking to
Obama to exert leadership and
bring his vaunted campaign of
change across the ocean to the
hidebound capitals of Europe. It
has always been the irony of the
U.S. relationship with Europe
that in the midst of resentment
there is the hope, indeed the be-
lief, that America will lead the
way
The U.S. economy is the key to
world recovery. If Obama fails in
his efforts to revive the engine of


Other VOICES


capitalism, everybody fails, and
the Europeans know that in their
heart of hearts, however much it
pains them to admit it. The 20th
century was America's century,
with two wars fought in Europe
and the timely introduction of the
U.S. military responsible for
turning the tide toward victory.
America's strong economy made
possible the military superiority
displayed in those wars, and that
dual advantage of economic
strength and military might con-
tinues unchallenged today.
The Europeans will want to
lecture Obama on the virtues of
European-style socialism and
where American capitalism went
wrong. Obama should listen pa-
tiently - it's his nature - but he
should not give any ground. He
can explain, as he has time and
again here at home, that the cur-
rent crisis was precipitated by
manmade actions, by unbridled
greed and lack of government
oversight, and that these prob-
lems can be remedied. The steps
he has undertaken are designed
to save America's capitalist sys-
tem, not to dismantle it.
This is a time of testing. Euro-
pean leaders playing to their
home audiences will want to
show how they can counter
Obama and his crazy capitalist
ideas. The conclusions they draw
after face-to-face meetings will
influence their dealings with
Obama for the duration of his
presidency. It's not unlike the
time early in John F Kennedy's


LETTERS


Ticketing for safety
Currently, there is a trend by
the State Legislature that should
be a cause of concern for all
Floridians.
The Florida Legislature has
expanded the use of the traffic
citation fines as an alternative
funding source for many govern-
ment functions. Traffic tickets
have been an abused govern-
ment tool for many years; how-
evet; federal regulations had
been able to keep them in check
until recently.
In the early days of highway
development and the expanded
use of the automobile, the tick-
ets' intended use was to bring
about conformity to traffic laws
and thus bring about safe high-
ways. Many counties and towns
saw it as a way to fund the local
police or other special interests.
These practices were eventually
outlawed.
In the 1970s, I was involved in
developing one of the first selec-
tive-enforcement programs in
the country The federal grant
required that we show how the
enforcement was going to be ap-
plied and the expected accident
reduction. The main thrust of
the program was to reduce fatal-
ities and other accidents in high
accident areas through the en-
forcement of specific accident-
causation factors.
Unfortunately, in Florida
today the emphasis often is on
the number of tickets issued, not
accidents prevented.
The Florida Legislature has
increased the fines to the point
that they often create a hard-
ship on many citizens. I fully re-
alize they should not have been
violating traffic law, but the re-
ality of life is that people get


presidency when he met with So-
viet leader Nikita Khrushchev in
Vienna. Khrushchev sized up the
handsome, smooth son of privi-
lege as a weak leader who could
be pushed around. That false
reading of JFK persuaded
Khrushchev to proceed with a
plan to install Soviet missiles in
Cuba, bringing the world danger-
ously close to nuclear conflict be-
fore Kennedy's tough-minded
handling of the situation proved
Khrushchev's initial assessment
wrong.
The American economy has
gone off the rails, and Obama
must and should acknowledge
that, but he should make no
apologies for the capitalist sys-
tem. He can politely listen to the
arguments of the Europeans and
then take the opportunity to do a
little lecturing of his own. He can
assure America's European
friends that the current crisis
does not signal the demise of
America, that as a country we
have been through serious chal-
lenges and emerged strong, that
America is resilient And we owe
that resilience not only to the po-
litical freedom we enjoy - of
which Obama is a living symbol -
but to the economic freedom that
is at the core of our system of gov-
ernment

Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift
author the Washington Merry-
Go-Round column, founded in
1932 by Drew Pearson.


>\ to the Editor


OPINIONS INVITED
0 The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the editorial board of the newspa-
per.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
0 Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Mike Arnold at
(352) 563-5660.
M All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
e-mail. Names and hometowns
will be printed; phone numbers
will not be published or given out.
W We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
H Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

distracted or are trying to do
many things at once. The ticket,
at half of the current fine,
would get that person's atten-
tion. Traffic citations need to
come out of the revenue mental-
ity and go back to the original
intent of reducing or preventing
accidents. The idea of randomly
issuing high numbers of tickets
has never been proven to re-
duce accidents, only generate
revenue.
The state Legislature may find
the funds they need by applying
sound budgeting practices like
working toward core functions,
prioritizing expenditures, reduc-
ing staff and expending funds


based on sound need - not po-
litical advantage.
Roger B. Krieger
Beverly Hills

Bad experience
Last week, I had a beloved
member of my family go into res-
piratory distress. I was frantic,
as she was only 15 years old. I
called the local hospital that I
have used for the past 20 years
only to be told by a receptionist
that "I highly doubt the doctor
has got time to see a sick bird."
Yes, this was a double yellow-
headed Amazon parrot that we
had in our home since she was 4
months old.
Suzie was gasping for air; I
had found her at the bottom of
the cage when I awoke Wednes-
day morning. My husband
rushed home to help try and get
her to another veterinary hospi-
tal; unfortunately, Suzie took
three very painful breaths and
passed away
This hospital claims to pro-
vide the most modern medicine
science offers. However, my
Suzie was not important to that
receptionist and precious time
was lost in attempting to get
medical attention.
Life is precious and Suzie was
the life of our home. She
brought laughter, talked to us
when we were feeling down and
brightened everyone's life who
knew her.
This receptionist had no com-
passion and certainly shouldn't
be allowed to continue employ-
ment at a business that is sup-
posed to provide medical
assistance in an emergency
Denise and Fred Fuqua
Citrus Springs


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Hot Corner .'.- TEE SALE


___I








CITRUS COUNT' (FL) CHRONICLE




Getting thet

Back when we were for box tops. Truth is most of
kids, my good brother the sellers of such devices
William and I got the don't want wampum or cash
most marvelous stuff with either; they much prefer a
box tops. Box tops were a credit card. The 21st-cen-
medium of exchange which tury, state-of-the-art "get
fit somewhere between there from here" tool is a
wampum and cold hard global positioning system,
cash. With enough of 'em, commonly known as a GPS.
you could acquire a toy sub- I'm slow to jump on such
marine which, if you filled bandwagons. I never really
its tank with baking soda, learned to use Dick's handy
would dive and resurface, dandy compass, but my wife,
making bath time exciting, aided and abetted by daugh-
And, of course, we had to ter Becky, cajoled me into
have a genuine Dick Tracy buying her a GPS for Christ-
compass ring in order not to mas.
get lost during the 100-yard Just in case there are any
trek from home to the post of you who know no more
office - it was a lifesaving than I did about such things
device which could be had prior to my wife deciding it's
for just a few box tops. what she wanted Santa to
Nowadays, gadgets avail- put in her stocking, here's
able to guide you from one the very brief skinny: By
place to another are more using satellites and high-
sophisticated than a com- tech communication, a GPS
pass, but they can't be had knows where you are at all


'e from here using a GPS


times; and, if you tell it
where you want to go, it
knows where that is, too.
Then, you can tell it to get
you from where you are to
where you want
to go.
The model I
selected (I se-
lected?) - cor- .
reaction - the
model Cheryl
and Becky se-
lected, for which
I eventually paid
after the credit Fred BE
card bill was re- A S
ceived, is a mid-
level version, OF
complete with a
moving map and a voice
which provides driving in-
structions. The client is al-
lowed to select a guide
whose voice is pleasing to
them and Cheryl chose
Richard. I would have se-


elected Melissa, but after all,
it was my sweetheart's
Christmas present. Richard
sounds like one of those fel-
lows I hated to see move into
town - smooth,
debonair, and he
. . never commits a
grammatical
error. Melissa
sounds the way a
mixture of hon-
eysuckles and
magnolia blos-
soms smells -
rannen but, again, it's
LICE not my toy.
Cheryl had
LIFE given Richard a
few test runs,
but, a few days ago, we
needed to go to an address
in Ocala where we'd not pre-
viously been - the Social
Security office. Cheryl broke
out her GPS, woke Richard
up and told him to take us to


217 SE 1st Avenue, Ocala,
Florida. Richard began to
do his thing, but I protested,
"No way, Richard."
He wanted us to take State
Road 44 to Interstate 75, but
as a local, I'm certain the bet-
ter way to go to Ocala is via
State Road 200. I immedi-
ately started arguing with
Richard as he insisted we
turn right when I knew we
wanted to turn left. After we
turned left, he begged us to
turn again in order to circle
the block, but we maintained
a straight-ahead course.
Eventually, once we were
safely headed north on U.S.
41, Richard accepted that we
were taking another route
and after turning onto State
Road 200, we didn't hear a
peep out of him until we
reached the intersection of
U.S. 301. From there on, he
gave precise instructions, in-


eluding interjecting with
great enthusiasm that we
should turn quickly when we
headed the wrong way on a
one-way street Ultimately,
when we pulled into the
parking lot of the Social Se-
curity office, Richard proudly
announced, "You have ar-
rived at your destination!"
Our experience at the So-
cial Security office? Quite
pleasant, actually. We'd
called ahead for an appoint-
ment, were seen without
delay at the appointed time
and a young man named An-
thony, with a voice every bit
as appealing as Richard's,
answered all of our ques-
tions without once saying
"turn right."


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
Chronicle columnist


Chronicle's characterization ofCHMS inaccurate


SANDY CHADWICK
Special to the Chronicle

I have followed with great in-
terest the columns in your
paper regarding the status of
Citrus Memorial hospital. As
chairperson of the Citrus Memo-
rial Health Foundation Board, I
feel obligated to both answer
questions that have been raised
and to correct inaccuracies.
After nine years of serving on
the Citrus Memorial hospital
board and now the foundation, I
feel qualified to make an accurate
and fair assessment of the current
status of CMH and its standing in
the medical community. Receiving
no pay for my service, and having
both health care and finance cre-
dentials, I would like to set certain
pertinent factual matters straight.


Independent data has proven time and time again that CMH is
among some of the very best hospitals in Florida. Having served as
an ICU nurse for many years, I speak with considerable knowledge
and with an ability to discern what is accurate and what is not.


Independent data has proven
time and time again that CMH is
among some of the very best hospi-
tals in Florida. Having served as an
ICU nurse for many years, I speak
with considerable knowledge and
with an ability to discern what is ac-
curate and what is not Let's be clear
... improving the health care for all
of Citrus County is at the core of
what is important to me and to the
rest of the foundation.
As a certified public accountant,
my concern for accuracy is second
to none and my appraisal, as well


as that of the majority of the rest
of the foundation, is that CMH has
operated in the sunshine and has
been completely transparent in all
of its dealings. Our board meet-
ings are publicly noticed and open
to the public. Information is avail-
able and all requests from physi-
cians have been responded to in a
timely and complete manner -
with no exceptions.
On another significant point, it
was reported in the editorial of
Monday's edition of the Chronicle
that Citrus Memorial lost $1.5 mil-


lion last year. This is not even close
to the truth. The fact is that CMH
made $2.5 million last year per its
audited financial statements. The
statement made in the Chronicle re-
garding the hospital's profitability is
materially inaccurate. CMH this
year is on its way to another prof-
itable year To place this figure in
proper perspective, CMH's total net
patient revenues for 2008 were $160
million, its tax revenue was
$10,050,000 and its documented in-
digent and uncompensated care
was $27 million. All operating prof-


its are retained for needed capital
expansion and to meet its commu-
nity indigent care responsibility.
The real irony is that the efforts
of the hospital, its management
and the foundation board will al-
ways be to provide the latest tech-
nology, equipment and
professional staff to continue to
bring you, the community, the best
health care CMH can provide. I, for
one, am proud of our excellent
board that is comprised of your
friends and neighbors, our profes-
sional staff and an incredibly gifted
group of credentialed physicians
who are loyal to you and our com-
munity hospital.

Sandy Chadwick is chairperson
of the Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation Inc. board of directors.


VILLAINS
Continued from Page C1

"It's a little tougher when it
comes closer to home," says J.
Dennis Murray, a community
psychologist at Mansfield
University in Pennsylyania.
"It's harder to define the
'other.' But we do. We say
they're rich Wall Street fat
cats or Detroit moguls who
don't think like us."
Dan DiDio, who knows
villainy, recognizes this
shift. As the executive editor
of DC Comics, DiDio over-
sees a stable of heroes and
villains who distill Ameri-
can culture's best and worst
traits into a mythology that
plays out on comic-book
pages and licensed charac-
ter products across the land.
The DC line's most promi-
nent supervillain, Super-
man's archenemy Lex
Luthor, spent five decades
as a power-hungry mad sci-
entist before being recast in
recent years as an amoral
industrialist and business-
man who dabbles in politics.
Sometimes, after all, the
wolf comes to us in sheep's
clothing, immaculately tai-
lored though it may be.
"We can dress folks up in
crazy costumes and give
them crazy powers," DiDio
says, "but when you see
someone who has the ability
to work above the law, above
the government, and create
their own set of rules, that
resonates. Because people
have a level of frustration
with that."
The obstacle that DC's


FREY
Continued from Page C1

nation in uniform, then later
they served our country
again as the people's repre-
sentatives in making laws to
protect those freedoms out-
lined in the freshly inked,
newly ratified Constitution.
Duty to country comes in
many forms, but our history
shows that many fine indi-
viduals who wear the uni-
form of the armed forces,
either in the ranks or as an
officer, seek to continue that
service to our country as
lawmakers.
I had the opportunity to
introduce Sen. Inouye.
However, because of the
vote on the stimulus bill in
the Senate, he was unable to
attend. I had the privilege of
accepting the award on his
behalf.
Sen. Inouye was born on


Former CEOs of American International Group Robert Willumstad, left, and Martin Sullivan
take the oath Oct. 7 before testifying to the House Oversight and Government Reform Com-
mittee on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.


Associated Press
Besieged money manager Bernard Madoff, accused of mas-
terminding a $50 billion Ponzi scheme, arrives Jan. 14 at
Federal Court in New York.
artists and writers often face footage of congressional tes-
in their very visual medium timony and folks like Madoff
plays out the same way in being led off to jail in flak
America's very visual culture. jackets pushes the demoniza-
Usually, says DiDio, '"A char- tion process along, too, elicit-
acter in a suit and tie doesn't ing comments like this one
make a great villain in a from Chris Forbes of Edge-
comic book" But the econ- wood, Pa., in a letter to the
omy is so battered today, and editor of the Pittsburgh Post-
so many people are hurting Gazette about AIG's leader-
and suspicious of power bro- ship: "This has to be the
kers, that the diffuse ache of equivalent of terroristic trea-
bad numbers and bad banks son. They should be given the
becomes easier to'personify full pre-2009 treatment in the
All the repeatedly aired brig at Guantanamo."


Oahu, the son of Japanese
immigrants.
Three months after his
17th birthday, the Japanese
attacked Pearl Harbor, on
Dec. 7, 1941. Young Dan In-
ouye was head of a first-aid
litter team for his Honolulu
neighborhood and spent a
week helping the many vic-
tims of the attack Interest-
ingly enough, soon after that
service, some officials came
to the Inouye house and
ripped out their new short-
wave radio. The officials
took the radio outside and
smashed it in front of the In-
ouye house in accordance
with the orders of the mili-
tary government. Despite
that, when the War Depart-
ment decided to accept
1,500 Nisei (first-generation
Japanese Americans) volun-
teers to join a full-fledged
combat team, Daniel Inouye
volunteered.
Unfortunately, he did not
make the first go-around,


Not a surprising connec-
tion to make. Because Amer-
ica was built upon a notion
of being imperiled. Our
founding mythology is
largely protective - protect-
ing communities from In-
dian attacks, protecting good
Christians from religious
dissidents and witches, pro-
tecting the colonies from
British usurpations.
Trouble is, not too many
examples of American bad-
guyism in history are still our
enemies today. And for some
of them, even having been
cast as enemies at all seems
kind of ridiculous from the
vantage point of 2009.
"You see these waves of
changing villains - now
they're a villain, now they're a
friend. We can talk ourselves
into anything," says Michael
Barson, author of'"Red Scared:


Duty to country comes in many
forms, but our history shows that
many fine individuals who wear the
uniform of the armed forces, either
in the ranks or as an officer, seek
to continue that service to our
country as lawmakers.


but was able to get in on the
next round. He was part of
the 442nd Regimental Com-
bat Team made up of Japan-
ese-Americans, except for
the officers who were haole
(white). Their slogan was
"Go for broke." They
shipped out in May 1944. In-
ouye was promoted to buck
sergeant, and later received
a battlefield commission.
The 442nd became the
most highly decorated unit
in the Army in World War II.
During World War II, Inouye
received the Bronze Star,


the Purple Heart and the
Distinguished Service Cross
(which was later upgraded
to the Medal of Honor). In-
ouye served in Italy in 1944,
and was transferred briefly
to France. He returned to
Italy, where he was nearly
killed in an assault in 1945.
Inouye survived a bullet
wound to the abdomen and
a point-blank attack by a
German grenade during a
mission where he advanced
alone toward a German gun
post to protect his sur-
rounded men.


The Commie Menace in Prop-
aganda and Popular Culture."
"We were exhorted by no
less a figure than FDR to
embrace the Russians as
our fighting brethren during
World War II," Barson says.
"Stalin was the devil - no,
now he's 'Uncle Joe' Stalin.
No, wait - now he's an-
nexed half of Europe."
Ultimately, the problem
with our latest villains is that
in some cases, they are dis-
torted, outsized representa-
tions of the same problems
we've faced in our own homes.
We're overextended with our
credit We're buying into mort-
gages we know are expedient
at best and unstable at worst
Some of us even cheat on our
taxes. The difference between
us and our villains, some-
times, is that they screwed up
on a much larger canvas.

Inouye recovered from
the wounds in Percy Jones
Army Hospital in Michigan
and became friends with
fellow patient Bob Dole.
In 2003, the hospital was
renamed the Hart-Dole-
Inouye Federal Center in
honor of the two World War
veterans and another U.S.
senator and fellow war vet-
eran who stayed in the hos-
pital, Phil Hart.
Inouye, before the war,
had wanted to be a doctor,
but the loss of his arm and
his 20-month rehabilita-
tion in an Army hospital
changed his mind. He
graduated from the Uni-
versity of Hawaii and ran
for the U.S. House of Rep-
resentatives in 1958. This
was during my last year
with my squadron at Bar-
bers Point Naval Air Sta-
tion on Oahu.
Today Daniel K. Inouye
is the third most senior
member of the U.S. Senate


"You can't fantasize about
sending out Arnold
Schwarzenegger to blow
them into little-bitty
pieces," Barson says. "You
can't use anti-tank guns to
blow up a bunch of idiotic
bankers who ruined it for
everybody. But they're the
villains now. They're who
everybody is going to go to
sleep hating, and they're
who everybody's going to
wake up tomorrow hating."
Until, of course, the angry
zeitgeist cranks out our next
set of villains. For now, these
are the demons we have re-
cruited to help us cope with
our lot They exist some-
where between two-dimen-
sional caricatures and the
reality of the bad things they
did, and we condemn them
and, maybe, just maybe, learn
something along the way.

and chairman of the Senate
Appropriations Committee.
Sen. Inouye wrote in
2003 to a girl who had vis-
ited him in his Washington
office, "Please remember
that the story of my experi-
ences during WWII is by it-
self not important. Much
more significant are the
values that the 442nd Regi-
mental Combat Team and
other segregated units rep-
resented, that patriotism
and love of our great Coun-
try are not limited to any
ethnic group, and wartime
hysteria must never lead
us to trample on our Dem-
ocratic principles."

Lou Frey Jr served.as a
Florida representative in
Congress from 1969-79. He
is a partner with Lowndes,
Drosdick, Doster, Kantor &
Reed, PA, Orlando; and
can be e-mailed at
lou.frey@lowndes-law.com.


COMMENTARY


I

L
L










COMMNTAR CH


The climate crisis is really a control crisis


"Only two things are infi-
nite, the universe and
human stupidity and I'm
not sure about the former."
- Albert Einstein.
With that quote in
mind, consider the
current attempts to
counteract global warming.
Assume, for discussion's
sake, that the Earth is
warming at an unusual rate
due to our use of coal, oil
and natural gas. And let's
allow that computer models
can handle the enormous
variables related to climate
and can predict tempera-
tures of the Earth 50 years
from now. (But not next
week in Citrus County!)
Of the many variables that
determine average tempera-
ture, release of carbon diox-
ide into the atmosphere by
humans is the only one hu-
mans can influence. Radia-


tion from the sun, water
vapor from the oceans, cloud
cover, volcanic eruptions
and ocean currents are well
beyond our ability to man-
age. But for planting trees,
we cannot even reduce the
amount of carbon dioxide al-
ready in the atmosphere.
So, reduce carbon dioxide
emissions we must, if the
world as we know it is to be
saved! So says the Intergov-
ernmental Panel on Climate
Change (IPCC) in a series of
reports sponsored by the
United Nations. We'll ignore
the fact that most of the
panel of scientists had de-
grees in social and political
sciences, not climate sci-
ences. And we will, for dis-
cussion's sake, overlook the
fact that the report was al-
tered by a group of politi-
cians to make the "crisis"
appear worse before being
released to the public.


According to the IPCC
"experts," we must reduce
the output of carbon dioxide
to 50 percent of the levels of
the 1990s in the next few
years, or all is
lost. Global
warming will spi-
ral out of control,
causing the
oceans to rise,
prolonged 4.
droughts, massive
floods and the ex-
tinction of many
plant and animal Dr. Willii
species. (None of
them seems trou- OTH
bled by the fact VOI
that there has
been no warming recorded
in the last five years.)
Fear not! Our political
class has a solution. Presi-
dent Obama and the Con-
gress want to pass a law that
limits and taxes carbon
dioxide emissions. This


I


"Cap and Trade" law would
create pollution rights and
auction them off to compa-
nies that emit carbon diox-
ide or just want to trade the
rights in the com-
modities market
for profit Bottom
line, the govern-
ment collects
$600 billion in
new taxes over 10
years. The aver-
age family spends
an additional
Lm Dixon $3,000 dollars a
year for electric-
IER ity and products
CES that require en-
ergy in their man-
ufacture or production.
In addition, our leaders
will require you to buy
smaller, lighter, fuel-effi-
cient cars (little "green"
coffins!) And you are going
to install "smart meters,"
which reduce your use of


power during peak condi-
tions (think air conditioning
at noon on a hot day) all to
save the planet
Just one small problem
with all this. Dig deep into
the IPCC research data and
look at the computer models
predicting the results of re-
ducing carbon dioxide out-
put to half the 1990s levels.
(They are no less accurate
than the models predicting
warming.) After 50 years of
restrictions on the use of en-
ergy at a cost of tens of tril-
lions of dollars, we might, at
best, reduce average tem-
peratures by one half de-
gree. By century's end, less
than one degree would be
saved. Our leaders would
have us sacrifice our
progress, safety and com-
forts to achieve - nothing!
Even true believers in
global warming should be
able to agree that what our


president, both senators
and governor are proposing
is useless, self destructive
and expensive. Apparently,
they all drank the green
Kool-Aid. Or is it more about
leftist ideologies and gov-
ernment control?

William Dixon graduated
from Columbia College in
New York City from New
York Medical College and
from the College of Busi-
ness Administration at the
University of South
Florida. He was an assis-
tant professor at the Uni-
versity of Georgia and he
has worked in the veterans
administration system. He
served 11 years in the Army
as a surgeon and as special
forces officer, achieving the
rank of lieutenant colonel.
Dr Dixon can be reached
at Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


When it comes to Three


Sisters Springs, Dr. Dixon


is wrong on all counts


JAMES L. GREEN
LACE BLUE-MCLEAN
Special to the Chronicle
he Chronicle recently ran a column
by Dr. William Dixon discussing
many of the problems inherent in
the practice of congressional members
earmarking appropriations for their con-
stituents. Their use is particularly objec-
tionable when, as is often the case, the
majority party enacts earmarks without
affording the minority an opportunity to
voice objections, as part of the normal leg-
islative process.
However, it should also be noted that
during the recent national debate over
earmarks, it was acknowledged that there
are also "good" earmarks. That is, ear-
marks that would have undoubtedly leen
successful, even if they had been hub-
jected to complete legislative scrutiny.
Unfortunately, Dr. Dixon attempted to
use the rest of the commentary piece to at-
tack the broad local coalition of individu-
als, civic groups and business entities -
as well as all levels of government - for'
their support concerning
public ownership of the Dr. Dixon
Three Sisters Springs
property. that if th
In general, this coalition
prefers public ownership become
rather than seeing the onued, t
springs locked behind the wned,
gates of a pending housing will be "1
development. The spring-
board for Dr. Dixon's com- of public
plaints centered around
the fact that the 2009 fed- and ign(
eral budget included an It seems
earmark of $1.5 million as
the federal contribution to conscie
the effort to purchase the
springs from developers. aware p
Perhaps the grievances in
the column would benefit the con
from further examination, that the
Dr. Dixon urges close ex-
amination of the Three Sis- of apat
ters Springs appropriation
"...as it is so typical." He al- ignorance
leges that U.S. Rep. Ginny
Brown-Waite requested the be the
earmark "under the cover a vital sp
of dark."
The facts are that all ap- to anoth
propriations must start in
the House of Representa- COmm
tives. The Friends of the
Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge
requested that Congresswoman Brown-
Waite initiate the request. The group also
requested support of the appropriation
from Sen. Bill Nelson and U.S. Rep. Deb-
bie Wasserman-Shultz.
All agreed that the purchase was indeed
in the public interest and offered their as-
sistance. Congresswoman Brown-Waite is
a Republican and Sen. Nelson and Rep.
Wasserman-Shultz are Democrats. There-
fore, this was a bipartisan effort, initiated
by a minority party member and sup-
ported by members of the majority party.
It is puzzling how this coordinated ap-
proach could be viewed as occurring
under the "cover of dark."
Equally puzzling is the characterization
of the earmark as "so typical," unless of
course good earmarks are considered as
typical.
With regard to the springs property, the
column asserted "few Citrus citizens ... re-
ally care much about it," and "...a very
small group of citizens who likely own
boats, perhaps own homes on King's Bay
and have time to play with and be con-
cerned about the manatees, asked for and
got this piece of pork."
In view of the unprecedented breadth of
support within the city and county, it is
difficult to understand this assertion. The
Crystal River City Council and the Board
of County Commissioners held well at-
tended public hearings. Response for the
purchase of the springs has come from as
little as $1 bills donated by local residents
prompted by a Chronicle editorial to a
$10,000 fundraiser sponsored by the Crys-
tal River Rotary Club. Not only have local


swimmers collected donations that were
forwarded by commercial boat operators,
fundraising events sponsored by local gar-
den clubs have also recognized the im-
portance of the Three Sisters Springs
purchase. The list of local supporters is
too long to enumerate.
Perhaps a more concise answer to the
assertion would be to note that in addition
to the much appreciated federal support,
government at all levels has responded
positively to citizen concerns. In stark
contrast to the assertion of little commu-
nity interest, the city, the county and the
Tourist Development Council have each
pledged $100,000 toward the purchase.
Additionally, citizens and private groups
to date have raised 90 percent of the $2.7
million in matching funds required by the
city's receipt of a $6.3 million Florida For-
ever grant.
Dr. Dixon's column also raises concerns
about costs, pointing out that taxes on the
property will no longer be collected un-
less it remains privately owned. This issue
was carefully considered in the early
stages of the project. The Crystal River
City Council addressed the
Believes matter in public hearings,
before lending its support
e springs and agreeing to submit its
successful grant request to
publicly the state of Florida. The
he result economic benefits to the
:he r U city and county through in-
the price creasing income from
tourism will offset the re-
? apathy duced property tax rev-
r c enue, and may even exceed
)rance. the projected reduction.
to many Finally, with regard to fu-
ture costs should the pur-
ntiously chase effort be successful,
Dr. Dixon stated, "... tax
people in money will be needed to
m nil_ maintain it. For whom?"
imuniiy The answer is that main-
, 6rcrie" tenance costs, (born princi-
" price pally by the U.S. Fish and
thy andK Wildlife Service with lesser
amounts by state, and even
e" wo ld much lesser amounts by the
city) would be used for the
loss Ow support of visitors who
iringhead want to see one of the most
beautiful Florida springs;
er gated hikers and bicyclists using
the trails; parents teaching
unity. their children to fish; fami-
lies picnicking; and visi-
tors, both local and from around the world,
coming to learn about and view manatees
without needing a boat or being a strong
swimmer. Citrus County schoolchildren
using an educational facility would learn
how estuaries like King's Bay work and
perhaps help solve future environmental
problems. These activities are but a sam-
ple of what is being planned. One can only
imagine the future possibilities.
Change is coming to the Three Sisters
Springs property. It could be a closed res-
idential community further polluting the
area, or it could be a publicly owned treas-
ure, preserved for the enjoyment and ed-
ucation of future generations.
Dr. Dixon believes that if the springs be-
come publicly owned, the result will be
"the price of public apathy and igno-
rance." It seems to many conscientiously
aware people in the community that the
"price of apathy and ignorance" would be
the loss of a vital springhead to another
gated community.
If you want to become knowledgeable
and active, please visit www.friendsofc-
hazz.org and join in the effort to save the
Three Sisters Springs.

James L. Green and Lace Blue-McLean
are on the Three Sisters Springs commit-
tee of the Friends of the Chassahowitzka
National Wildlife Refuge. Blue-McLean
is president of the Friends of the Chassa-
howitzka, which is leading the charge to
raise funds for the purchase of the land
surrounding Three Sisters Springs. Green
lives in Homosassa and Blue-McLean
lives in Inverness.


Well done, fellas
I'd like to give the sheriff's (office) a "well
done" for getting them drug dealers out of
Apache Shores there...I wonder how many
other people were involved in that over
there in that area. I think the sheriff's (of-
fice) is doing a very good job of weeding
these people out. Now all they've got to do
is get a couple of more over there in the
Tanglewood subdivision and then they
would clean up the whole area. Thank you
very much, Sheriff Dawsy. You done a very
good job. And to the officers that
was involved in that case: Well
done, fellas. 0
Outrage outrage
I am totally disgusted with all
the outrage over the AIG bonuses,
especially with, I think the guy's
name was Mitch McConnell, say-
ing that the people that took the
bonuses should commit suicide. CAL
Where on Earth has been all the
outrage for the past eight years 563-
when all of the CEOs of all these
big corporations have been receiv-
ing enormous bonuses. For eight long
years, nobody has said a peep. Now all of a
sudden everybody's outraged. There's out-
rage all over the place - outrage, outrage.
You know, I mean, what, are people lem-
mings or what? You know, these guys have
been ripping the companies and the people
off for eight long years. Where was the out-
rage then?
Late to the party
I've been reading the Chronicle and look-
ing for some report on these tea parties
that are occurring. I hear so much about
them on television. These tea parties are
the common people letting the govern-
ment know that they think the tax situa-
tions are being made almost impossible to
live with, and yet I find no mention of this


SHADES
Continued from Page C1

Locally, Kimberly Wooten
faces the potential of a sim-
ilar sentence for a similar
crime.
And a sober teenager gets
30 years for running a stop
sign at an admittedly poorly
marked intersection. Amaz-
ing.


in the Chronicle. I'm just disturbed be-
cause I really want to be informed .on what
the rest of our population is thinking and I
heard that this is spreading throughout
the country. I do know that you cover all
the war in Iraq whenever somebody gets
bombed and I notice you cover anything
that the president says but whenever the
people speak...
No way
When President Bush left office after j
eight years of service, we were fighting a
war, health care was a mess and


UND


0579


we were in a depression. President
Obama was elected to office. He is
trying to get our soldiers back
from the war, trying to straighten
out our health care system and
trying to get us out of a depres-
sion, and all the Republicans are
doing is nitpicking about every-
thing he does. Is this any way to
run a country?
FHP info


This is in response to Sunday,
March 22's Sound Off, "Abuse of author-
ity." To the person who called that in: They
need to know that the Florida Highway Pa-
trol is a state-certified law enforcement
agency and they have the authority to travel
the state. If their papers were in order and
their vehicle was up to par as far as safety,
they would have no problem with this. In
other states they are considered state
troopers, which work directly under the
government of the state that they are in.
They also respond to other calls other than
just highway. So as far as the abuse of
power, all they are doing is, they are keep-
ing the roads safe, as previously said in the
article, but they're also doing it on county
roads and city roads. They are state-certi-
fied officers that work directly under the
authority of the government of the state of
Florida.


M I wiped out on my mo-
torcycle this past week.
Macho, huh? Not really. I
was trying to back the bike
off my pickup bed via a cou-
ple of aligned 2-by-8 ramps
when it decided to go side-
ways instead of backward.
I've been limping around
the office with sprained
wrist and ankle and bruised
backside - and ego.
On the bright side, I've
been angling to get one of


those little trailers used for
hauling riding mowers and
bikes. Fortunately co-Lowes
cardholder Neale witnessed
the ugly incident and has
grown somewhat sympa-
thetic to my cause.

Charlie Brennan is editor
of the Citrus County
Chronicle and can be
e-mailed at cbrennan
@chronicleonline. com.


C4 SUNDAY APRIL 5. 2009


The WILDEST Egg Hunt in Town!!!

7 ^ Easter Egg Hunt
S. HOMOSRSSR



WILDLIFE FRRK F
:. .? . ..' On the Green next to Visitor Center on U.S. 19
Chdrenshouldbnngtheirownbaskets, Saturday, April 11 , 2009
Arrive at 8:30 a.m. - The first egg hunt begins promptly at 9:00 a.m.
All children welcome up to age 12
Take your child's photo with the Easter Bunny,
,FRIENDS Rocky, the Manatee and Terrence the Turtle
Thousands of colored eggs will be redeemed for Easter goodies.
[F J $5.00 per child... suggested donation (includes park admission). Ci O MTI E
Adults will be given a 33% discount on admission to park \ ro~jene


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COMMENTARY


c




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e



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is (�, iN iv (FL) CHRONICLE COMMENTARY SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009 C5


Body count
Soldiers are still dying in
Iraq and Afghanistan. So
what happened to the daily
body count the news media
kept tallying? Is a dead sol-
dier no longer important
when the president is a De-
mocrat? No, there's no
media bias, is there?
Food facts
This is for the gentleman
who wrote in wondering why
restaurants were crowded
when he attempted to eat
out, and doubting that the
economy was so bad be-
cause of that. If he would
look around, he would see
that half of the restaurants
in Citrus County have closed
in the last year. Therefore,
fewer restaurants equates
more customers for those
who still exist for those who
are blissfully unaffected by
this current economic re-
cession and can afford to go
out to eat.
We hope so too
As an 86-year-old veteran,
when I hear that they say
newspapers are going to be
like a dinosaur, a dying
breed, a dying thing, I really
get real shook up, because
to me a newspaper is some-
thing you cannot replace
with television, computers or
anything else. It's personal.
It's private. You could take it
in the bathroom, you could
take it into bed, or you could
take it eating your breakfast
or your dinner or whatever.
Newspapers, I hope, are
here to stay, because there
are articles I see in the
newspapers all the time that
you will never see on televi-
sion. How can they do that
to us? Hey, what about the
comics? I can't lose those.


R6sum6
This is in reference to
Schembri's severance pack-
age ... For the first thing,
how can you get vacation
time when you haven't even
worked a full year? What's
wrong with that? Every job I
had to work at, I had to
work at least one year be-
fore I got any vacation time.
If you consider the vacation
time and sick time and he's
got $80,000, if you de-
ducted even $20,000 for
both of those - which
would be ridiculous- for
six months' salary, he's
making $60,000. For an an-


nual salary, that would
equal to $120,000...Why
don't they just have people
submit bids and
take the lowest bid ft
that the people will I
work for for that -
job?...As a Citrus
County taxpayer, I
feel that everybody
should be informed
before hiring the
replacement ad-
ministrator, of CAL
what the salary is 5Q6
going to be, special JUU-
bonuses, vaca-
tions, everything pertaining
to our costs. And I said
"our costs" because we're


paying for it, not the good-
ol'-boys, us poor boys...I'd
like to apply for the county
administrator's
IND job. I think that
$60,000 would
tl probably be fair. I
could maybe come
down to maybe
$55,000. I require
no severance pack-
age and for my va-
cation time, I will
accept two weeks
79 after a full year. I
U I cannot do any
worse than what
somebody else has already
done, so why not give me a
chance?


Legalize it
Some 13 states now have
medical marijuana being al-
lowed in the state for sick
people to help them. And
President Obama this week
has given the heads up to
allow the federal government
to kind of look the other way
and let the states have med-
ical marijuana. And New Jer-
sey legislators passed a bill
and they're considering it. I
think it's time that Florida,
with all its sick people, older
people, all the nursing
homes, it's time for us to le-
galize medical marijuana.
Be nice if former Gov. Mar-


tinez, your guest columnist
who used to be a drug czar
under the first President
Bush, would maybe take his
Ounce of Prevention Fund
and help families.
Spot on
I just wanted to say that the
editorial in Sunday's (March
22) paper was right on. In
fact, I don't see how they can
hire outside the county when
any applicants see or hear our
history of county administra-
tors here and the terms they
last. We better hire from
within somebody who's willing
to take the job.
Had to close
This is in regards to the in-
quiry about Crystal Cobbler
in the March 15 issue of the
newspaper. Whoever inquired
can reach either Tina or
Richard at tinadaugherty
@rocketmail.com. I am one
of the previous owners of
Crystal Cobbler and we did
have to close down for eco-
nomic reasons. Any of our
customers that need to reach
us can use that address.
A must-see
If you want an economic
eye-opener, go to Google and
type in zeitgeist. Then click
on the listing. The presenta-
tion starts slowly, but it ex-
plains our present economy.
Then there's a video on how
we got here and how to fix it.
A must see for every Ameri-
can. A fascinating piece.
Prove it
Regarding "800-pound go-
rilla," the writer says that
the new administration,
Obama's, is donating almost
$1 billion to Hamas. Of
course, I would .like to know
if they could print how to
prove that statement is true.


SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009 C5


COMMENTARY


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US.1IN )ESS


Of mutual interest
Volatile markets have a way of mak-
ing seemingly academic investment
strategy discussions hit home.
Columnist Mark Jewell compares
growth and value funds./Page D4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Roy Brown auto dealership closes


. CHRIS VAN ORMER
cvanormer@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Too bad it's no joke.
April first, Roy Brown
Lincoln-Mercury closed its
service department after al-
most two and a half decades
of serving customers in
Crystal River.
"We opened April 1,


1985," Roy Brown said. "It's
been 24 years to the day"
Many repeat customers
have been moved to tears to
learn that the dealership
would be closing.
"This is the last month,"
Brown said. "We're shutting
the doors forever."
Current customers are
advised to go to Crystal
River or Inverness Ford
dealers for service.


It's been a family busi-
ness, where Brown's two
sons and daughter-in-law
have worked.
"A year ago, I had 20 em-
ployees," Brown said. "We
had as many as 28 in its hey-
day, the mid '90s. Then we
were selling 60 to 80 cars a
month."
But Brown said the auto-
mobile industry changed
after Sept. 11.


Even so, this year,
Brown's dealership won the
Ford Motor Company's
President's Award.
"Only 58 dealers got this,"
Brown said. "It shows we've
been really outstanding to
customers and the company
has had virtually no com-
plaints."
Through the years,
Brown's dealership has been
a large part of the commu-


nity, supporting Cub Scouts,
Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts,
baton twirlers, Sertoma and
the Florida Sheriffs' Boys
Ranch, to name a few of the
groups and charities that
have awarded Brown
plaques of appreciation that
hang in his office. And he
has been president of differ-
ent clubs, such as the Little
League and Rotary.
See El- "!"- '-Page D4


Where the wings





have no name.


.'-�'4,


IRFAN KHAN/Los Angeles Tiines
Nearly 200 planes are being stored at the Southern California Logistics Airport in Victorville, Calif.

As travel declines, plane boneyards expand to store grounded aircraft


-ET -. PAE
Los Angeles Times
-VICTORVILLE, Calif.
With the U.S. economy in a tail-
spin, aircraft "boneyards" across
the country are filling up with
Boeing 747s and other jetliners
no longer needed to ferry passen-
gers. Call it airline limbo.
Air carriers are grounding air-
planes at a rate not seen since
the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11,
2001, and industry experts expect
2009 figures to set a record for
planes sitting on the ground
rather than flying.
That has meant job security for
Richard Robertson, an aircraft
mechanic at the Southern Cali-
fornia Logistics Airport in Vic-
torville, formerly George Air
Force Base, now one of the na-
tion's busiest boneyards.
Robertson has perfected the
art of "pickling" airplanes, avia-
tion jargon for disassembling
parts and draining fluids from
aircraft so they can be stored for
a long time.
"It's unfortunate, but when the
economy is bad we're doing
good," Robertson said as he
pulled a cockpit instrument off a
Boeing 727 last week so it could
be stored for later use.
The jet, its windows covered in


Mechanic Richard Robertson works on a Boeing 727. Preparing planes
for storage - taking them apart and draining their fluids - is called
"pickling."


aluminum foil and engines re-
moved, will be towed to a sprawl-
ing lot that resembles a used-car
dealership. It is filled with rows
of planes that months earlier had
crisscrossed the Pacific Ocean or
hopped across the American Mid-
west.
High fuel costs last summer
drove many airlines to ground
older, gas-guzzling planes. Since
then, a recession-induced travel
slump has led carriers to take
even more planes out of the sky.
The latest rush of airliners to


Victorville began in October. Be-
fore long, there were 100 aircraft
on the tarmac, then 150, and by
last week the roster had swelled
to nearly 200, making the Vic-
torville outpost more crowded at
times than Los Angeles Interna-
tional Airport.
Located about 80 miles north-
east of Los Angeles, Victorville is
home to one of three major com-
mercial boneyards in the United
States. The others are in Arizona
and New Mexico, where
grounded planes are also piling


up. Mothballed military aircraft
such as fighters, bombers and
cargo planes end up at Davis-
Monthan Air Force Base in Ari-
zona.
"We're seeing consistent
growth and anticipate growth for
another six months," said Steve
Coffaro, vice president of market-
ing for Evergreen Maintenance
Center in Marana, Ariz.
The Victorville airport is not
bursting at the seams yet but is
getting closer to its maximum ca-
pacity of 300 aircraft, said Jeff A.
Lynn, general manager for South-
ern California Aviation, which
provides "transitional parking"
for grounded planes.
Based on recent airline in-
quiries about available space, an
additional 50 planes or more
could arrive at the airport by
summer, Lynn said, adding that
"we could run out of room" if the
facility gets more 747 jumbo jets,
which take up two spaces.
Airlines like to park their
planes in the desert because the
dry weather prevents corrosion
and helps preserve aircraft
longer.
"Boneyards are purgatory for
airliners," said aviation consult-
ant Michael Boyd, who estimates
that only about 10 percent to 20
See ' A.:: ',. Page D4


Lending problems still hamper small business sales


NEW YORK - Andrea
Edmunds got a great deal
when she decided to buy a
small business. But that still
didn't make it easy.
Edmunds recently bought
back PoshTots and PoshLiv-
ing, two linked retail compa-
nies she had co-owned until
three years ago. The firms'
new parent company was in
bankruptcy court and Ed-
munds wanted to buy the
businesses back, even though
the companies' sales were
way down and financing is
hard to get
"I had enough confidence
and faith that it's going to
turn around," Edmunds said
of her businesses and the
economy
Edmunds managed to ac-
complish what many would-


be entrepreneurs
are hoping for in a
troubled econ-
omy: to buy a
small business de-
spite the many ob-
stacles that are
making deals hard
to complete.
Business bro-
kers, who bring Joyce R
buyers and sellers ;. ,
together, say there
are a growing
number of people who want
to buy, including many who
have lost their jobs over the
past year and need to make a
living. And there are plenty
who want to sell, including
baby boomers hankering for
retirement
Getting financing for deals
is still tough, although the


osenberg
� ,TALK


government has
taken steps to
make Small Busi-
ness Administra-
tion loans easier
to obtain. The bro-
kers say banks are
not only uneasy
about borrowers;
they're also ques-
tioning the health
of the companies
up for sale.
"Even with


those changes, we feel that it
seems as if the money may
never reach the small busi-
ness owner," said Jeff Hoops,
senior vice president of The
Haley Group in Paso Robles,
Calif.
Small businesses have
found it hard to borrow from
banks for years, long before


the recession; a neophyte
owner or company has been
too risky for many banks to
take on. The recession and
banks' unwillingness to lend
in general over the past six
months have made it that
much harder.
Edmunds said her financ-
ing came from a private, lo-
cally owned bank that was
supportive of her plans. The
fact that she knew her busi-
nesses so well was a plus, and
the purchase price was down
dramatically - $735,000,
compared to the $12 million
she and two partners got
three years ago. The compa-
nies, based in Glen Allen, Va.,
sell upscale home furnish-
ings.
Brokers are seeing lower
prices in general along with


fewer transactions. Mean-
while, deals are taking longer
to complete while banks give
prospective borrowers and
companies much closer
scrutiny.
Hoops expects the climate
for buying and selling to start
picking up perhaps as early
as June, "when people get
comfortable with the fact that
they're going to have to live
with this (economy) for a
while."
He expects prospective
buyers to say, "Things are
bad, but I've got to plan for
what I'm going to do next, no
matter what happens in the
economy."

Joyce M. Rosenberg is an
AP business writer.


out or



run?

DEAR BRUCE: We
have a home that
my parents built in
1941. It has been rented for
about 10 years but most of
the income goes to pay
taxes, insurance and up-
keep. We are in the process
of fixing it up again. My
husband and I are differ on
whether we should rent it
again (at $950 a month) or
sell it The neighborhood is
still nice but not what it
was. My husband says that
it will go up in value. I con-
tend that it has most likely
peaked. He believes that
selling would be too much
of a loss because the capi-
tal gains would be too
much on the $120,000 that
we could sell it for. What
advice would you give? -
J.L, via e-mail
DEAR J.L: Consider
selling this property. At
$120,000, if that's the accu-
rate price, it should at least
be renting for $1,200 a
month and preferably
more. Given that, it seems
that this money could be in-
vested elsewhere, giving
you a decent return with-
out the hassle of being a
landlord. I would never be
happy with less than 1 per-
cent of the value of the
house ($1,200 a month), you
might have to sell it for less
if you can't sell the prop-
erty. In this down economy,
if you can get the $120,000, I
would take it and run.
DEAR BRUCE: I have
been told that I haven't es-
tablished enough credit
even though I am a mature
person. I have a mortgage,
but if I sell my house, I will
owe no one anything. On
the other hand, I will have
no credit with anyone. Is
there something that I
should do? - B.S., via e-
mail
DEAR B.S.: What you
are telling me is that you
have no credit cards or any
similar instruments. If true,
it would be to your advan-
tage to get a couple of
credit cards. Don't go out
and build up credit card
debt, but there is no reason
why you shouldn't use the
credit card to pay for pur-
chases that you ordinarily
would pay for in cash.
Then, when the bills come,
pay them promptly. This
way you have the use of
their money for a few days
and you will pay nothing
for the privilege. The time
to establish credit is when
you don't need it, and that
time seems to be now.
DEAR BRUCE: I am 30
and I have $50,000 in term
life insurance and would
like to increase that to
$250,000. With all of the dis-
count brokers and Internet
companies, is there some-
thing that I should look for
when comparing compa-
nies? - Reader, via e-mail
DEAR READER.: There
are more than 1,000 com-
panies writing term life, in-
surance, and the premiums
vary from company to com-
pany Do the appropriate
shopping, and don't limit
your search to just these
companies. I know that this
is a bit of a bore, but there
is substantial money to be
saved, and the shopping
time is well spent

Write to: Smart Money
PO. Box 2095, Elfers, FL
34680. E-mail bruce@
S brucewilliams.com.


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY



Rent


-'rk:�;i.:. x�,~ry;:ia8�"~i~�~,L:ii~:







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


D2 SUNDAY. APRIL 5. 2009


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Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce"


WI


[humber Connection=UND


Likwid Communications


Sunflower Springs Assisted Living


4 . . . ... . 1 W,&- . . . . 1,
Likwid Communications Inc. is excited to be a member of the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce. Pictured above are: Ambassadors John Porter, Jessica Holcomb, Owner Christo-
pher Smith and Ambassadors Jackie Marx and Rhonda Lestinsky. Likwid Communications
is a local telephone company that offers business telecommunications monthly savings of
up to 40 percent when compared to traditional telephone service. Likwid Communications
prides itself on being Local, Affordable, Reliable and Flexible. As a locally owned and oper-
ated company we have limited our focus geographically to provide customers with a higher
level of service than competitors who you have to call out of state or out of country to
speak with. Our prices are set with small businesses in mind. We are the most affordable
phone system and service and we back that up with our 10 percent price match guaran-
tee. With the reliability of a traditional phone company and the flexibility of a small business
we provide our customers with the excellent reliable service they deserve. The flexibility of
our company can be best be defined by our out of the box methods. With our custom de-
signed systems options are virtually limitless. If you have needs that are outside the box
we work hard to make them a reality. Likwid Communications Inc. can be reached by mail
at PO Box 1927. Inverness, FL 34451, by telephone at 352-726-1236, Toll free at 888-854-
5943 or on the web at www.golikwid.com. Please feel free to contact us for any reason we
are happy to help.


The community of Citrus County gathered on February 24th 2009 to celebrate the Ribbon
Cutting Ceremony for Sunflower Springs Assisted Living Community located on Yulee Drive
in Homosassa. Representing Sunflower Springs was Michelle Arevalo, Community Rela-
tions Director; Delma Lord; Evelyn Schere; Laura Messier, Executive Director. Also present
were Chamber Ambassadors John Porter, Jennifer Duca, Diane Smith, Tammy LaVelle,
Rhonda Lestinsky and Wendy Hall. An estimated 400 people came to welcome Sunflower
Springs to the area. Enjoyment was apparent by all in attendance, be it the gourmet style
hors d'oeuvres, the enchanting entertainment, or tours of the lavishly appointed community
with the striking architecture, the pleasure of seeing a community like Sunflower Springs
become a reality for seniors of Citrus County was embraced with delight and satisfaction.
Several healthcare organizations were represented at the ceremony including members of
staff at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, Senior Home Health Care, and Life Care
Center of Lecanto. Numerous physicians attended to extend their support for the premier
resort style living that Sunflower Springs has to offer. This community brings to life the sen-
ior lifestyle so many have always imagined, providing unique lifestyles with independent
and active assisted living. Sunflower Springs is the perfect place to enjoy the best times
of your life. Give us a call today at 352-621-8017.


Hampton's Edge Trailside Bicycles


.... I


4.r in~


The UPS Store


4 "..


V. t








The Citrus County Chamber recently held a ribbon cutting ceremony, welcoming the UPS
Store in Crystal River as new members. Representing the UPS Store is Deb Shackelford,
Greg Rodrick, Marjorie Pulcini, Deanna Rodrick, Owner Jerillyn Clark, Manager Dan Allen,
Martika Dominguez. Also present are Ambassadors Janet Mayo, Rhonda Lestinsky, Wendy
Hall, Nancy Hautop, James Segovia and John Porter. The UPS Store located at 6752 W. Gulf
to Lake Hwy in the Crystal River in the Publix Shopping Plaza, offers shipping (pick-up avail-
able), printing, copying, notary services, office supplies and mailbox services with 24 hours
access and a street address. Give us a call today at 352-795-0033. We are here to offer
you excellent customer service while fulfilling your business needs.


American


Legion Post 155


Recently, the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce welcomed Hampton's Edge Trailside Bi-
cycles as new members! Pictured above are owners Regis Hampton & Cindy Messer with
friends and customers. Also present were Ambassadors Lillian Smith and John Porter. Hamp-
ton's Edge has been in business in Citrus County since 1995. Moving to their new location
in downtown Floral City on the bicycle Trail in Oct. They specialize in High Performance
Trikes, Recumbent, Comfort and Hybrid bicycles, along with bicycle repair, service and
rentals plus a good selection of cycle related clothing and accessories. www.hamp-
tonsedge.com Open: Wednesday thru Sunday. Visit us today at 8294 East Orange Ave. in
Floral City or give us a call at 352-419-4809.



Courses on tap at CFCC


CFCC will be offering Senior Computers
IV a continuation of the Microsoft Office
Suite of Products with an introduction to
Powerpoint. Learn basic uses of spread-
sheets, such as how to automate a check
book register. Look at how to use the many
templates in MS Office to make your com-
puter a valuable tool.
This class will be on Fridays, April 10
through April 24, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. in
Building L2, room 201B.
CFCC is offering a Basic Digital Camera
class. Learn how to manipulate, transform
and rotate images and to transfer images
from a digital camera or disk to a hard
drive or other storage medium. Bring your
digital camera and instruction manual.
Class will be on Thursdays, April 30 - May
71' from 5:30 pm to 8:30 pm. For more infor-
mation or to register, call Continuing Edu-
cation at the Citrus Campus, 352-249-1210,
or visit www.CFCCtraining.com., ,
Have you thought of getting your Real Es-
tate License? CFCC is offering a Real Es-
tate Sales Associate - Pre License class.
This course is required for all persons
seeking Real Estate Certification with the
Florida Real Estate Commission. Class will
be on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday
from 9am to 5pm starting 4/27 - 5/14.


Wall re


American Legion Post #155 Jim Woodman Commander cuts the Ribbon as The "American
Legion #155 Family" joins Citrus County Chamber of Commerce on President Lincolns
200th Birthday! Included in the Legion Family is American Legion Post #155, American Le-
gion Auxiliary Unit #155, Sons of The American Legion Squadron #155, Legion Riders Chap-
ter #155 and Citrus 40/8 Voiture & Cabane #1219. Commander Jim Woodman cuts the
Chamber Ribbon; included in the photo are: American Legion Post #155 Vice Commanders
Larry Pink and Larry Riviere, Adjutant & 4th District Public Relations Officer Jay Conti Sr.,
Sgt @ Arms John Garvey, American Legion Auxiliary Unit #155 President Sandy White, Vice
President Barbara Logan, Secretary Marie Pink, Chaplain Johnnie Hair, Legion Riders Chap-
ter #155 Cindy Heather, Citrus 40/8 Voiture & Cabane members Chef de Gare Richard
Gannon, Rick Logan, Tom & Cheryl Smith with the award winning American Legion Post
#155 Honor Guard with Captain Joe Barry, Jimmy White, Neal Colbath and Harold Beville.
Representing the Chamber Ambassador Program is Janet Mayo, Wendy Hall, Diane Smith,
Betty Murphy, Tammy LaVelle and John Porter. For more information, visit our website at
www.Postl55.org.


Course fee is $300. For more information or
to register, call Continuing Education at the
Citrus Campus, 352-249-1210, or visit
www.CFCCtraining.com.
CFCC is offering "Red Flags, Property
Inspection Guide". This class will help one
learn what is considered a "red flag". Learn
to look at soils, cracks, drainage, ventila-
tion, mold and other residential issues.
Find out who you contact in regard to red
flags. Class will be held on Thursday, April
16th from 9am - 1pm. Class fee is $50.00. Of-
fered in partnership with the Ponds Insti-
tute. For more information or to register,
call Continuing Education at the Citrus
Campus, 352-249-1210, or visit www.CFCC-
training.com.
Learn about property management when
you attend CFCC's class "Property Man-
agement & Managing Risk" This class is an
introduction to professional property man-
agement. It will explore the manager -
owner relationship and leasing and tenant
issues. Class is held on Thursday, April 21
from 9am - 1pm. Class fee is $50.00. Of-
fered in partnership with the Ponds Insti-
tute. For more information or to register,
call Continuing Education at the Citrus
Campus, 352-249-1210, or visit www.CFCC-
training.com.


raising



Bank of
America
employees:
Rick La-
- boda, Jose
Correa,
Amy
Charley,
Sarah Wren
and Julio
Garbalosa,
join with
Habitat for
.Humanity
' homeown-
ers Scott
and Krystal
Kartune at
the wall-
raising of
their new
S( home in
Inverness.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


D4 Sr NDN~, APRII 5, 2009 BUSINESS


Growth investors lived relatively large in 1Q


-BOSTON

W ho doesn't want j
a good value?
At a time when
stocks have been hard-
hit, many investors have
assumed now is the
time to shop in the bar-
gain bin, making value
funds look that much --
more attractive than A
pricier growth funds. OF
But you may be in for
a surprise when you
check the performance
of your mutual fund or 401(k)
the latest quarter. Your gr
funds are likely to have done
ter than your value funds.
On the value side, you can c
piece of an established com]
whose stock may be battered
boasts a long-term record of n
steady profits and possibly
dividend payouts. If you go
growth, you're willing to pay a
mium for the greater likelil
that the company's profits -
its stock - will climb.
In the first quarter, you prol
ended up losing no matter w
approach you favor. After all
Standard & Poor's 500 i:
closed down 11.7 percent, de




BROWN
Continued from Page Dl

"We've donated hundreds
of thousands of dollars to
local charities," Brown said.
He donated a car to the
Lions Club, he said.
Back in February 2005,
the dealership won a cham-
pionship at the Citrus Coun-
try Speedway with a Ford.
"This was the first Ford
that did it," Brown said.
"Everyone runs Chevys out
there. It may be the only
Ford that's won."
For a time, Brown had a
showroom for his cars in the
Crystal River Mall. Back
then, he started out calling
his dealership Suncoast Lin-
coln-Mercury. Then it be-
came Roy Brown Suncoast
Lincoln-Mercury. But he
dropped Suncoast because
the title became too long to
fit on checks.
That's just one of his sto-
ries as he looks back at his
business.



WINGS
Continued from Page Dl

percent of the planes will
ever leave the boneyard.
"They sit there for a while
before they're turned into
beer cans."
Or until they're sold.


Mark Jewell
F MUTUAL
INTEREST


March's rally
But that loss was
much more painful if
you put your faith
mostly in value stocks. If
you started the year
with $10,000 in a large-
cap value fund, you
ended up losing an av-
erage of $1,315 in just
three months, according
to fund tracker Lipper
Inc. Your loss in the av-
erage large-cap growth
fund? An easier-to-


stomach $373.
The same gap held for the stocks
of smaller companies, where
growth funds lost an average of
about 8 percent to 15 percent for
value funds.
Growth's current bragging rights
mark a shift from recent history -
growth stocks have trailed value
stocks for eight of the past nine
years.
Growth's dominance in this
year's first three months "kind of
explains the quarter," said Tom
Forester, manager of the Forester
Value Fund (FVALX). "It's just a
huge disparity."
Forester is especially familiar
with the changing dynamic. His


Brown points to a spot
near U.S. 19 where he said a
550-pound concrete cougar
once stood.
"He got up one night and
walked away," Brown said.
"We never found out who
stole our cougar."
In 1993, the dealership
survived the "no-name"
storm. The property was
high enough that the water
didn't flood his parking lot
Brown shows a snapshot
of that parking lot in Decem-
ber 1986, when the cars
were covered in a light dust-
ing of snow. In 2004, because
of the hurricane winds, he
moved all his cars to the
mall.
"We've been lucky with
storms," he said.
Brown sold his first car
when he was 14, and learned
the business from his father.
His son Randy has been gen-
eral manager and his son
Ryan has been service man-
ager, while his daughter-in-
law has been office manager.
All three will be working at
other jobs in the county.


Older aircraft no longer
wanted by the U.S. carriers
often find their way to coun-
tries in Africa or Latin
America. Buyers are ex-
pected to see some of the
lowest prices for used air-
planes in decades.
Last year, nearly 1,200
planes worldwide were
grounded, making 2008 the


fund was last year's top performing
large-cap value fund - when
nearly every other fund was losing
big-time, Forester Value eked out a
0.4 percent gain in 2008. The fund's
play-it-safe strategy emphasizes
stocks like Walmart Stores Inc. and
McDonald's Corp. that draw
budget-conscious consumers. But
through the first quarter, the fund
lost nearly 9 percent - and that
was better than nearly nine out of
10 of that fund's large-value peers.
That's in sharp contrast to the
nearly 8.4 percent gain recorded by
the first quarter's top-performing
large-cap growth fund: Van Kam-
pen Equity Growth (VEGAX),
whose top holdings include recent
growth stars such as Apple Inc. (up
23 percent for the first quarter) and
Google Inc. (up 13 percent).
The reason why growth is beat-
ing value? Most bank and financial
stocks fall in the value category,
and those stocks continued to
founder. Financial services funds
lost nearly 24 percent on average
in the quarter, according to Lipper.
Real estate funds, another value
category standby, did even worse,
losing 30 percent.
Meanwhile, most technology
stocks are classified as growth, and


Brown also served for two
years in the U.S. Army, and
has been married for 43
years. His whole family lives
in Citrus County, and he
plans to retire and enjoy his
grandchildren.
The staff may be gone, but
Brown remembers the fam-
ily-like atmosphere.
"One salesman was here
the whole time," he said.
"He was here three years
with the previous owner."
One man Brown hired to
wash cars became a me-
chanic and worked for him
for many years, bringing in
his young son when he was
old enough to work The son
became a mechanic, too, so
they had a father-and-son
team in the service depart-
ment. Another couple met
while working at the dealer-
ship and married. So it also
had a husband-and-wife
team.
"I'd like to thank my cus-
tomers for their 24 years of
loyalty," he said.
Loyalty well describes his
customers, who were sorry


worst year for fleet cutbacks
since 2001, according to
London-based aviation con-
sulting company Ascend
Worldwide. An additional
675 aircraft could be parked
this year. If that happens, a
record percentage of air-
planes will be sitting on the
ground rather than flying.
Each airline has its pre-


they prospered, relatively speak-
ing. Science and technology funds
gained nearly 4 percent on average
last quarter, while telecommunica-
tions funds lost less than 2 percent
And the technology-heavy Nasdaq
was the first quarter's standout
among major market indexes,
falling just 3 percent
Some argue growth's edge will
prove fleeting, since history shows
that out-performance by either cat-
egory is usually brief, despite
value's dominance this decade.
Others argue growth stocks are
set for the long run to reclaim the
performance edge they held in the
go-go late 1990s. That was just be-
fore the dot-com boom deflated
early this decade, which ushered
in a more conservative approach to
investing that gave value stocks an
edge.
Shawn Price, co-manager of the
Touchstone Large Cap Growth
Fund (TEQAX), argues a long list of
financial measures - from earn-
ings expectations to how much
companies are reinvesting in their
businesses - now generally favor
prospects for growth stocks.
Price also argues that the value
category's "huge out-performance
between 2000 and 2006 set the


to learn that the dealership
would close.
"One lady in her 80s was
crying when she found out,"
Brown said. "She's bought
six cars here. She asked me
to give her a stuffed cougar
to remember us by."
Brown remembers all his
regular customers. One re-
tiree, he said, "bought a car
here every year. He bought
20 cars from me. I've had
plenty who've bought five or
six cars, easy."
In addition to being re-
peat buyers, some cus-
tomers have come in with
treats, even when they
weren't shopping for a car.
"One customer from Sug-
armill Woods would bring in
grapefruit that was huge and
sweet," Brown said. "We
liked to see him come in."
The dealership also en-
joyed the visits from the
Brownie Lady.
"One lady baked fresh, hot
brownies for the guys in the
service department," he
said. "It's great we have cus-
tomers like this."


ferred way of storing air-
craft, which could include
draining the fluids, covering
the windows and moving it
slightly by tow truck every
14 days to even out the tires.
Planes that are not ex-
pected to return to service
are stripped of parts or
"chomped" into pieces to be
recycled as scrap.


stage for growth to have the better
fundamentals now, and a better
chance at outperforming."
Meanwhile, tech companies gen-
erally have plenty of cash now and
little debt, which could fuel
growth's continued edge, said
Morningstar Inc. fund analyst John
Coumarianos.
With so many factors favoring
growth, how could value regain its
edge? The government's steps to
ease the credit crunch could lift
battered financial stocks, and the
value category.
Value also could benefit from
changed investor thinking. The re-
cent market slump has left many
wary of growth stocks' risks, and
searching for the bargains.
Investors "have a more jaun-
diced view," said Jonathan Vyorst,
manager of the Paradigm Value
Fund (PVFAX). "The good part is
that stocks in almost every area -
whether it's technology, or indus-
trials, or financial - are very, very
cheap. And for a value manger, that
presents a good opportunity."


Mark Jewell is the AP personal
finance writer Questions? E-mail
AP at investorinsight@ap.org.


=Business DIGEST

New hygienist Microsoft expert to
at Citrus Dental speak at CITA mixer


Citrus Dental Association
and Gary S. Padgett, DDS, an-
nounce the addition of Susan L.
Mitchell, RDH, to the staff in
their Lecanto office. Mitchell is
in her 16th year as a dental hy-
gienist and is active in her pro-
fessional association, the
Florida Dental Hygiene Associ-
ation (FDHA). Currently,
Mitchell serves FDHA as the
chair of the Council on Public
Affairs. In 2007, shortly after
moving to Citrus County, she
founded the nonprofit group
Nature Coast Friends of Blues
Inc. Citrus Dental Association's
Lecanto office is in the Allen
Ridge Medical Mall, 746-3800.


Citrus Information Technol-
ogy Alliance will host its next
mixer at 7 p.m. Thursday at the
Citrus Hills Grill Garden Room
at the Citrus Hills Golf and
County Club.
The speaker will be Blain
Barton from Microsoft, who will
discuss the company's prod-
ucts and relate his experiences
from his many years of working
in IT.
CITA would like all busi-
nesses in Citrus County to net-
work with IT companies.
A charge of $5 will be made
at the door. For information, e-
mail CITA at info@citrusit
alliance.net.


ED SERRA OaD (352) 560-6130
Certified Public Accountant www.edserra.com
Certified PublicAccountant 6118 W. Corporate Oaks Dr., Crystal River, FL


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Fax:( i 35)5 3565 olFe :(8)F. 82 4 E iT'I6a.m6B -i *. Iw w *tin


Your world first


Need a job

or a

qualified

employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!


CHONsIiCedsf


iHBHBHI


Retired Caucasian
Gentleman seeks
companionship with an
attractive, Intelligent
Lady. Ethniclty/Age Is no
problem. Will consider
sharing my home with
an acceptable person.
Blind Box 1540p
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429
S.W.M. Christian Looking
for female,husky, prefers
burnetts & blondes . Age
43-59 yrs. mature honest &
loyal. Likes all
indoor-outdoor
activities, concerts
flea-markets, loves music,
animals. Please Call
(352) 746-1421 Ask for Ken
Hogan 1657 N. Carib Pt.
Lecanto, FL
34461

Your World





CHIuCNI.I.F
) ,()ni(oI.- 0

w. chranicleonin, ce..m


Senior Dating Bureau
SAFEST since 1977 Ages
45-90. 1-800- 922-4477
(24hrs) or
log onto: Respected
Dating.comr
SWM, 57, Looking for a
lasting relationship.
Enjoys outdoor
activities and boating
& flshing.making crafts,
flea markets,
Looking for a SWF
slim to medium 45-57.
Bob (352) 563-0627
Widower, Male, 60's,
would like to meet nice
lady for long term
relationship.
Respond to:
Blind Box 1541P
Citrus County Chronicle
106W. Main St.
Inverness, Florida 34450



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for your junk
car,truck or van
(352) 634-5389


CASH PAID all
vehicles.Trades welcome
Used PARTS avail
352-628-9118
WANTED
Junk Lawn Mowers
& Power Quip.
Free Pick-up (352)
564-8014/601-5053
3Us out zoomcitrus.com
We Buy Junk Cars
Running or Not
Cash Paid, $150 & Up
(352) 771-6191


Double Bed,
truck topper, lounge
chair, soap bars, file cabi-
net & more
(352) 621-3434
Excell. Home for any
unwanted birds, poultry
U-R unable to care for
726-9874
HAVE SOMETHING TO
GIVE AWAY?
Place your
ad 24 hrs a day.
Go to:
chronicleonllne.com
1 Select Place an Ad
2 Create an Account
3 Select Cust. type
4 Select Heading of
Special Notices
5 Select Free
6 Create Ad


FREE CEDAR WOOD
Freshly Cut
(352) 344-5213
LAB/BOXER MIX
Female, very good with
kids, appx. 1 year old.
(352) 410-6381 or
352- 601-0722
PITBULL & LAB MIX
Female, 1 yr old.
Very friendly, good
w/kids. 352-287-1364
Sugar gliders
FREE to a good home.
teddybearokay@
tampabay.rr.com
(3521 628-0645


$400 REWARD
Lost Yellow Lab
male. March 20th
Citrus Springs - Deltona
& Elkam
352-228-7893


Parrott, gRWAKY
last seen Hwy 488

Riley still missing 7 mos.
old, male orange & White
stripped white stocks,
chest & belly neut. blue
collar lost 2/28 Hwy 44 &
Rock Crusher Rd near
Connell Heights Crystal
River REWARD
(352) 422-1220
MINIATURE POODLE
3 yrs old Apricot with
blondhlsh hints. Her
name is Foxy. Lost in
Beverly Hills corner of
Harrison & Roosevelt.
(352) 601-0279
Miracle Ear
Hearing Aid,
right ear,
(352) 621-7242


Your World

a( tem44te4




Classif'ieds

,. , f.nrnnicln" ;.l-ilnfn ,.. f.


FEMALE GOLDEN
RETRIEVER
Found on Luary Terrace
Highlands in Inverness
(352) 344-1528
Found, medium sized
black male dog found in
inverness by race track.
please call and describe.
352-201-9083







www.adopta
rescued oet.com
View available pets on
our website or call
(352) 795-9550
Adoption Locations
PET SUPER MARKET
every Saturday 11-2p
Inverness
MERCANTILE BANK
Inverness
April 20th Monday
12-2pm


SBank Probate
|Divorces /Evictions
352-613-3674
312 HUD Homel $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
Top Hot Airport
Serv.352-628-4927
Rates for Tampa Int.
$75 & Orlando $85
w/some restrictions
/us out zoomcltrus.com
ALAN NUSSO
Licensed Broker



I!,



LIFE & HEALTH
INSURANCE
ANNUITIES
* LONG TERM CARE
* DISABILITY
* LIFE SETTELMENTS
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com


CAT
ADOPTIONS


Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A till 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4
All Cats and Kittensare al-
tered, tested for Feline Luk
and Aids. Up to date on
vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
wwwhofsha.org.
or stop by our offices at
1149 N Conant Ave. Comer
of 44 and Conant.
Look for the big white build-
ing with the bright paw
prints.


Classifieds


Get Results

ClcassSfieds! i


BUSINESS


D4 SUNDAY, APmI. 5, 2009














CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I 0 C







at Fero's Memorial


Value $12,300 asking
$9,800. Call Bob
I-(718) 894-6804

Hills of Rest Cemetery
in Floral City. Value of






Home's Value
www.naturecoast
livina.net



TEACHER ASST'S
F/T & P/T
Exp., CDA preferred.
Substitutes needed.
Bright Beginnings
Preschool. 795-1240









































F/T BARBER
Experience needed, for
� New Busy Barbershop
(352) 527-3030
HAIR STYLIST
F/T, Immed.
Openings Call Sue
352-628-0630



Live-tn Caretaker
Hernando area for eld-
erly blind man light
housekeeping & meals
(352)560-3153/aft 5pm



BECOME A CNA
For career & test prepara-
tion call 352-564-8378
BUSY GYN OFFICE
LOOKING FOR:
Medical
Receptionist
Medical Assistant
One year experience
Proactive, skills to
work under stress
Please fax resume to:
352-564-8201
CHIROPRACTIC
ASSISTANT

Responsible, caring
individual needed to
provide TLC to patients
in chiropractic office.
(352)726-1557
CNA PREP CLASSES
For Information 352-
586-2715; 586-2716
3us out zoomcitrus.com
CNA TEST PREP
Now Offering Day
& Evening Classes
352-341-2311
Scholarships Available
CNA/HHA/
Caregiver
Friendly & Cheerful
people needed
to provide
CNA, HHA or
Caregiver Services
Part time. Must be
avail, days, evenings
& weekends
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
3770 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto
10am-2p, Mon.-Fri.


Confiare'e
Is looking for
a dynamic
RN
DIRECTOR OF
CLINICAL SERVICES

Must have at least 1
year home health
supervisory experi-
ence. Assure clinical


compliance with
all necessary
standards and regu-
latory requirements
on a timely basis to
maintain agency's
licenses, certifica-
tions, accreditations
and all operating
activities.
Must have good
knowledge of HHrg
coding.
Coordinate clinical
services, make clini-
cal visits as needed,
Coordinate On Call
Excellent compen-
sation package,
Including 401K
Fax resume to
352-291-9423
Call 352-291-9422
or email
msavage@conficare.
coam
visit our website for
more info.
www.conflcare.com
EOE


HOME
ADVANTAGE
HEALTH CARE

Has openings for Field
RN's. Exc. pay, bene-
fits, flex. schedule.
Fax. App. to (352)
245-6046 or Apply at
4849 S.E. 110th. St.
Suite 57 Bellview FI.
34420.
Ph. (352) 247-9700
Lic.HHA299991526

Home Health
Agency needs
RN & LPN

Eip. preferred.
Excellent pay.
352-596-4205

LPNIMEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Experience needed.
Please send resume to
P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447

MDS
Coordinator
Great opportunity to
join an exciting team.
Candidate must
have a FL RN or LPN
license, MDS and
care plan
experience, PPS
knowledge, and be
detailed oriented.
Excellent benefits.
Apply In person
or send resume to:
dlspangler@
southernltc.com
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, FL EOE

MEDICAL
RECEPTIONIST
F/T for busy office.
Experience req'd.
Knowledge of.
Visionary Medical
Systems Is a plus
Must possess
excellent customer
service skills & have
ability to muti - task,
Salary based upon
experience.
Non-Smoking
Environment
Mail Resume to:
Blind Box 1512P
C/O Citrus County
Chronicle, 106 W.
Main St. Inverness, FL
34450

NURSES
Part-time
11-7 WEEKENDS
If you are dedicated
to the higher stand-
ards of elder care,
good documenta-
tion and a genuine
caring attitude, we
have a place for you.
We offer a salary
range comparable
to your experience
and great benefits.
Crystal River Health
and Rehab Center
136 NE 12th Ave.
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 795-5044
EU HR/Connie c
(M. T, Th. & F 9-3)
DFWP/EOE

NURSING
SUPERVISOR
HOME HEALTH
We are seeking a
Nursing Supervisor for
Home Health. Ideal
candidate will have
a current FL RN
license, completion
of an accredited
school of professional
nursing, BSN
preferred. Current
FL driver's license and
automobile liability
insurance. One-two
years current
med/surg experi-
ence, one year prior
home health
experience.
Supervisory experi-
ence preferred.
Please apply online
www.citrusmh.aom.
CMHS is an EOE.



FULL TIME

Crystal River Health
and Rehab currently
has a position open
for a FL Licensed RN
that has a min. of 2
years exp. in MDS.
This position
requires a working
knowledge of RUG
rates, State of
- Florida guidelines
and developing
Resident Care
plans. Computer
literacy, good
communication skills
and a strong clinical
background are a
requirement,
SCompetitive salary
based on verifiable
experience with
great benefits. On
Scall every 4th week.
I Mail or fax resume;
Aft: Laurie Coleman
1 36NE 12th Ave.
34429
Fax (352) 795-5848
CONTACT Laurie Via
I Mail or Fax ONLY!I
DFWP/EOE





Childhood
Development
Services
Head Start Program In
Citrus County


* Early Intervention
Monitor (40 hr/wk)
requires HS diploma
& 6 mo. classrm
exp. working with
children with
disabilities
* Head Start
Substitute Teachers
Requires HS diploma
& min 6 mo. exp.
working with
preschool children
Visit our website
www.childhood
develooment.org
for more details and
an application form
or
Call (352) 629-0055
ext 305
Fax: (352) 351-4279
Attn: HR
1601 NE 25th Ave.
Suite 900
Ocala, FL 34470
EOE/AA/DFWP


COLLECTOR
Immediate fulltime opening
for experienced 3rd party bill
collector. Salary plus com-
mission, great benefits.
Please Fax 352-560-0212
COME
GROW
WITH US!




I' ( i'1 '_' _
11, P h - 1. -

Grief Specialist
Full Time M-F
This position Is
responsible for
providing grief
support services to
patients, families
and friends of
Hospice of Citrus
County. Requires
Bachelors In Social
Work or related field,
Masters is preferred.
Previous bereave-
ment exp and
training is necessary.
A full description this
position as well as a
downloadable
application can be
found at our webslte:
www.hosplceofcltrus
county.org
Fax: 352.527.9366
hrt@hosplceofcitruscou
nty.org
Hospice of Citrus
County
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, Fl 34464
DFWP/EOE



EXP. LUNCH COOK
& COUNTER HELP
Apply In Person 2492 N.
Essex Ave., Hernando.
352-746-5026



REAL ESTATE
BROKER

National Real
Estate
Company is look-
ing for
Exp. Broker to
handle
listings &
sales.
Offering
national lead
generation
through a
network of
50,000 +
referral
sources.
Call for more
info.
(888)
831-1919
Ext.64.

Sales
Maintenance &
Service Co., Ofc in
Crystal River.
Seeks people to sell /
market company to
commercial &
retail chains.
resumes:
flamaintenance@
hotmall.com
Base Pay + bonuses.
(0)352-794-0412 /
(f)352-794-0417

SALES/
TELEMARKETING
Great Opp. Great
Future, Guar. Salary
Call Barbara
(352) 726-5600




A/C SERVICE
TECHNICIAN

With Florida's Lead-
Ing Carrer Residential
-Dealer. Must have
experience In
-residential service &
replacement,
Benefits Include:
Health Insurance
401K, vacation & sick
days, commissions.,
Apply at BAY AREA
AIR CONDITION
8021 W, Gulf to Lake
Hwy Crystal River
Phone 352-795-2665
COMMERCIAL
PLUMBER
Experienced only
Travel & night work re-
quired. (352) 628-6608
Electrician
Short term 6-8 wks.
Fax resume 726-7723
GENERAL
MECHANIC
Oil Changes, Tire
Repair, Front Align-
ment, Service Calls,
Must Have
Valid Driver's Ucense
(352)447-3174
PLASTER &
TENDER


Call between 9a-4p
352-302-1240
ROOFERS NEEDED
Immed. Own tools.
(352) 564-1242



Your World









CH kNIC E



.wwvchronicleonline corn


$$600 Weekly
Potential$$$
Helping The
Government PT.
No Exp., No Selling.
Call:1-888-213-5225
Ad Code A-73


APPOINTMENT
SETTERS
Want to join a
winning team? Very
busy office looking for
serious minded people.
Call Steve @
352-628-0254
FT FAITH BASED
MEN'S SHELTER
Evening hrs, $9/hour
after 90 days. Diverse
skills for demanding
people needed.
FAX Resume to:
352-746-6746
PRIVATE HOME
CARETAKER
Live in Required.
Honest, Reliable,
Dependable.
Great Future for
the Right Person.
Exp. a must.
Cooking, cleaning,
a multitude of tasks.
Must love animals.
Must be available
7days per week.Home
Owner furnishes eve-
rything. References
Req.& Must Pass
Background check.
Have Good
Transportation.
Call Between 6:00
P.M. & 9:00 P.M. Only.
Call back if bu

usnsNr GUARDse
Secure Your Future.
Call your local recruiter!
SSG Rodney Medina
(352)-586-8526
RODNEY.MEDINA@
US.ARMY.MIL
1-800-GO-GUARD.COM























ICI tru C1un




















Hair Salon, Gift Shop
Retiring, 8 yrs. exc.
Low rent S30K all
(352) 422-7190

Restaurant For SaeIR
Worried about
the Economy?
Sun ported by
a $10 billion+
Global Company,
you Can be in
business for Yoursel
Cbut not by Yourself
Minimal start up
Cost 50% Commis-

Unlimited earning
It potential S
Join Gina on
Thurs, April 9th
From 6pm-8pm
Citrus County
Chronicle 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL
Any questions?
I Calmoeall me or e-mail:
glna.starr@live.com
AVON Rep.
352-228-2648



Restaurant For Sale
An established
profitable franchise in
Crystal River. $240K.
(352) 746-6596



MERLE NORMAN
COSMETIC STUDIO
Crs. Riv. Sweetbay PIz
(352) 795-9542



LADIES CLASSIC
CRUISER Vintage ladies
Cruiser bikeready to ride
$40 615-668-1633
CitrusCount
hroie 1624 N.E


25x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry Door. 2 Vents,
4" Concrete Slab,
$14,895. INSTALLED
30x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$16.795. INSTALLED
35x50x12(3:12 pitch)
Roof overhang,
2-10x10 Rollup Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$30.995 Installed
* Fl. Engineered Plans
* A local Fl Manufact.
+ Meets or exceeds
Florida wind codes.
* Conc/lnst by others.
+ Many sizes avail,
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC 1256991
www. metal
structuresllc.com


CLASSIFIED



Flex Space 400+Sq. ft.
areas of warehouse/
affordable & secure. (352)
400-4295

Any Size I
S*SHEDS NOW* I
SWe Move & Buy
I Used Sheds I
I Independence/41 I
(352) 860-0111




Wooden Hangers
(50)
advertising hangers
obo(352) 726-3631




A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
4 2 Ton $780.00
4 2-/2 Ton $814.00
4 3 Ton $882.00
* Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Free Del. LIc,#CAC
057914 746-4394
ABC Briscoe Appl.
Refrig., washers, stoves.
Serv. & Parts
(352) 344-2928
GE REFRIGERATOR,
SIDE BY SIDE, $350.00 Ice
& Water In the Door, Al-
mond, Excellent Condition.
527-7110
KENMORE REFRIGER-
ATOR SIDE BY SIDE.
ALMOND. RUNS
GREAT! $100.00
628-5312
RANGE
Gas, 30" very clean,
works great $135
(352) 563-2385
REFRIGERATOR
Hot Point, side by side,
24 c.f., white Indoor, Ice
& water rmaker. Brand
new w/warranty. Exc,
cond. $350
(352)527-2408
Refrigerator
Kenmore, Almond side
by side, ice maker. 25 cu.
ft. 8 yrs. old. $300.
Stove, Whirlpool almond,
black ceramic cook top,
self cleaning w/range
hood. 8 yrs. old. $200.
(352) 795-0918
STAINLESS STEEL
REFRIGERATOR Amana
25 cubic foot with bottom
freezer $200
352-503-6570
WASHER
like brand new apartment
size washer-$60.
419-4634




OFFICE DESK Has cast-
ers for easy moving, 2 file
drws and 2 reg drws.
$125 352-860-0444




SOUTHERN
AUCTION
MARKETING I
& APPRAISAL
AUCTION I
Mon, Apr. 6,
6:30 PM
Temple Stuart DR
table, Murano art
glass. Fender Squier
Strat guitar & amp,
dual reclining sofa,
dual recliner
loveseat, tools,
collectibles...
See weekly pictures
and descriptions @1
www.southern
auctlonmktg.net:
15991 NE Hwy 27Alt.
Williston, FL,
352-528-2950
Col. Joel Kulcsar I
AU1437-AB2240
10% BP on all sales

Sun. April 5 Antique
& Collect. Auction
Preview 10 AM
Auction 1 PM
Incredible Est. Jewelry
Incl. diamonds & emer-
alds. Gold coins, silver
dollars Over 50 Ibs. of
vintage sterling silver
incl. Tiffany, Catier.
Ant. turn., carpets,
sports memorb., +++
4000 S. 41, Inverness
dudleysauction.com
AB1667-AU2246 12%BP



2 bench grinders,
1-3/4HP, $35. I box
hand tools, $30
Call 8-10AM or 6-8PM
(352) 344-1310
110/20 GAL. AIR COM-
PRESSOR Horizonal On
Wheels $95.00 464-0316
220/20 GAL. HORI-
ZONAL AIR COMPRES-
SOR With Hoses
$140.00 464-0316
ANTIQUE HAND
TRUCK Wood & Steel
With Heavy Duty Rubber
Tires $45.00 464-0316
CORDLESS RYOBI SET
saws all, brad nailer, skill
saw. Part of estate sale
$150. obo 352-232-7790
CRAFTSMAN 10" RA-
DIAL SAW & DELTA
ROCKWELL BANDSAW
,RADIAL SAW WITH 10
GALLON WOOD
VACCUM, AT-
TRACTMENT AND VER-
TICAL BAND SAW
BOTH FOR $120.00


542-7110
DeWalt 1/2" SR drill, like
new, $35. Milwaukee
saws all, exc. cond.,
new blade, $35
Call8-10AM or 6-8PM
(352) 344-1310
ELECTRIC SAWS
Craftman miter. Delta
Band 9" both on stands
$60. each
(352) 527-9415
HUSKEE CONCRETE
MIXER - Like new. $200
352-628-6585
RADIAL ARM SAW 9"
DeWalt 3/4 hp radial arm
saw. $75.00
(352) 634-0241
TABLE SAW
Taskforce 10" $150.00
352-503-6570
TOOLS Delta 16" var
speed Scroll Saw, Model
SS350, $150. Delta 1"
Belt/5" Disc Sander, $50.
810-569-4061


ENTERTAINMENT CTR
Light wood w/Glass cab.
below and tape/dvd stor-
age on both ends. $75
352-860-0444
ONE VISONIK 10 INCH
SUBWOOFER works
great, well kept, no box,
just speaker.$20
795-6481
Television
32' Sony, HD. Needs
repair. $200. Make offer.
(352) 637-0654
TV 25 inch Magnavox
color TV. $99.00
352-726-2278
YAMAHA SUBWOOFER
2 EPI and 2 KLH
speakers. All work great
for surround sound, good
for stereo.$100 795-6481



2-5 GAL. CONTAINERS
OF FLOOR ADHESIVE
$20.00 each or $35.00
for both 464-0316
GALVANIZED
CORRUGATED STEEL
5 avail. 33" x 115". You
remove $10 each. Joe
352-465-5828



ATARI 2600 RARE, very
good cond, with 17
games $45 invemess
864-283-5797
COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
Computer
New. $299
7" GPS System. $200.
(352) 628-2007
DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
Intemet service, New &
Used systems, parts & up-
grades. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
www.rdeeii.com
GUITAR HERO III LEG-
ENDS OF ROCK for
PS2.works great.comes
with disc and wireless
guitar.$30 795-6481
LEXMARK FAX MA-
CHINE works great with
phone on the side.$20
795-6481
MINI CAM SAMSUNG
hi-8 used once tripod,
part of estate sale
$125.obo 352-232-7790
PS2 bigger black ver-
sion, works great.$40
795-6481



SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic inch
S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered Hooker
headers. New Gangster
white walls, seat in all
leather blk ostrich skin,
Paint by Jesse James
painter of Calf., w/Double
Damon signature, House of
Color paint, Bik w/colored
ghost flames on all sheet
metal. 2" Carlini handle
bars. Chrome to max, This
bad boy Is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for nice
tractor w/bucket or bobcat
etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815


2 Window Air
1 Sump water pump
$50.
(352) 344-2062 or
(352) 344-8905
5 pc. wrought Iron
Patio Set grape design
$400. Ozlte Carpet,
12 x 30 green $35.
(352) 344-2062 or
(352) 344-8905
PATIO FURNITURE Ce-
ramic round table, 4
chairs, 1 chaise, 2 ce-
ramic side tables, um-
brella all for $200.
352-503-6570
PATIO FURNITURE
Weather and fade resist-
ant woven resin loveseat,
2 chairs, coffe table and
matching cushions. $375
352-860-0444




(2) RECLINERS
Heat/vibration. Like new.
Tan color. $150 ea/obo.
352-382-0849
2 Couches w/end
recliners, & match, chair.
Futon. (352)795-7513
4 Dinette Chairs
Floral design
on casters
$125.
(352) 854-8598
6 BAR STOOLS part of
estate sale 2 white
wicker,4 wrought iron and
wicker $175.obo
353-232-7790


C i CHRYSLErR
.. 4 '.k,,,


SUNDAY APRIL 5, 2009 D







W MIRROR, MATCHING Dining Room Set
set 352-23746-7790 4 chairs. $95.00
NIGHT TABLE $80 for Pine w/tile top, bench +

ANTIQUE BEVELED Bedroom Set Queen, 6
OVAL MIRROR IN GOLD pce. wood, marble look.
ROSETTE FRAME 42" X $95.(352) 249-6800
30" EX COND $95.00 DINING SET FOR 4
516-656-9653 AND BAKERS RACK
BEAUTIFUL LEATHER neutral, modem glass &
COUCH, LOVESEAT metal like new $175
& Recllner. Dark green 352-613-2712
from Grace NIcole. DINNING ROOM SET
KITCHEN SET Solid Wood 5 foot table
42" rd oak w/ 18" leaf & with 2 leafs, 6 chairs and
4/chairs. All $500.00 brand new cushions.
352-527-4108 Light brown pine.
BEDROOM SET Queen Build to last. $350.00
white headboard, with Cell phone 802-578-7932


802-578-7932 352-527-3463
BEDS Electric Bed
King mattress, box spr- After 10am (352)
ing. Complete & clean. 382-4456
$99. Queen mattress,
box spring. Clean. $99 ELEGANT WINE
352-794-3826 BUFFET wrought iron
and marble, part of estate
BEVELED GLASS sale new $200. obo
DINING ROOM TABLE 352-232-7790
72" X 42" W GLASS
BASE, FEW CHIPS, Entertainment Center
$100 516-656-9653 light wood, 3 shelves,
cabinet underneath
royhilmatching Sofa for CD's $80.
& Love Seat, excel. cond. (352) 302-7824
$375. Custom oak Enter- (352) 302-7824
taiment Center, like four poster full size bed
new, will hold 42" cream color $170. phone
flatscreen cost $1,500 352-257-9462
asking $525. 795-0494 FULL MATTRESS &
CRAFTMATIC BED BOXSPRING
twinsize, excellent condi- Good cond. moving.
tion $200. phone bed rails include
1352-257-9462 $140.00 352-410-0891


SKick Off

Spring

With a New

,/Career


At Seven Rivers Regional, we're dedicated to helping patients get back
to doing the things they love to do. Be an important part of our success.
Rehab Nurse Manager
Rehab Staff RNs
PCAs
Physical Therapists
Experience in the area of physical rehabilitation preferred.
Other Opportunities:
RNs: MedSurg, Telemetry
PACU, ICU, OB and ER
Pharmacist
Electrician
Coder
We offer flexible scheduling, competitive wages
and a comprehensive benefits package.
For these and other opportunities, visit our web site at
www.srrmc.com and click 'Career', email
Linda.Macaulay@hma.com or apply in person to Human
Resources, 6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34428.
EOE/Drug and Tobacco-Free Workplace



Inpatient Rehabilitation Your Life.


SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER


*Our Story. 7814


''I.
KY'
aoDa.


CRYSTAL DRIVING ONE


LOOK AROUND. EVERYONE'S DRIVING ONE.


CHEVY


Our Business






Continues






To Grow!






Come Join Our Team







Sales Help Needed



NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED


Salary While Training


Paid Vacation


Best Commission Structure


Longevity Bonus







See Scoff Ming


1005 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa

(352) 726-1238


T















D6 SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009

-E-tF7|


the 70's. $100 795-6481 New burners
Futon Bed tank part of
Black Metal, $75.00 $75. obo 35
OBO. (352) 249-6800 LAWNI
Micro Wave Cabinet. Briggs and
$35.00. (352) 249-6800 Lawnmo
HUTCH WICKER AND 352-50
STEEL GLASS part of PRESSURE
estate sale very nice. DEK Comm
$200. obo 352-232-7790 line Powere
KITCHEN SET 6.5 horse
Oak tbi w/20" leaf & 4 352-50
upholst. swivel chairs on Qualil
castors $300. TV/Printer Mainta
Stand, Lt wood, at an afford
w/1 shelf 2-door storage Will maintain
$65 (352) 697-9906 mon
MODERN IKEA BIRCH Licensed
AND COTTON SOFA Call Chr
cream, easycare cush- estima
ions $150 352-465-6551 (352)22
Modern Key West Style Riding
RATTAN & PRINT SOFA Murrary 42
$275 352-613-2712 w/bagge
PAUL'S FURNITURE Riding
Wants Your Business Murray 42"
Tues.-Fri. 9-5 Sat. 9-1 14.5 Hp
Homosassa 628-2306 (352) 8
Preowned Mattress Sets Riding mc
from Twin $30; Full $40.Qn battery &
$50; Kg $75. 628-0808 Call 8-0A

LQek TORO RIDII
4QU T U T Zero turn, 42
QUALITY FURNITURE Like new
from estate. Sofa, loveseat, $1499. 35
endtable, dining table, king
& full bed all in excellent TRAC
condition, great prices. call Iseckl, 2500,
527-0031 3.3PTH, PTO
new 4' box I-
RECLINER/MASSAGE rack 100 hrs.,
CHAIR Blue, with full 726-
control panel.
Great buy $80. TRIMMERBF
352-410-0891 TroyBit
Model TB9
SET OF 3 DREXEL Tables 352-50
$200
(352) 794-0316 Weed
YOUR FURNITURE Try Built, im
DONATIONS Used 3 tim
DONATIONS (352)62
SUPPORTS THE PATH (352) 6
HOMELESS SHELTER
Call (352) 746-9084


4 weed wackers, $10
2 prs. loping cutters,
$10 ea.
Call 8-10AM or 6-8PM
(352) 344-1310
4 x 5' Box Trailer
Street legal
with running lights
$350. aobo
(352) 726-6864
22" Husqvarna,
High wheel 6.5 HP self
propelled with bagger
$175.
4 wheel edger, 3 HP
$150, (352) 489-4687
battery charger, $20.
small drill press, USA
made, $20. Push
mower, 22" exc., cond.,
$35. Call 8-10AM or
6-8PM (352) 344-1310
CRAFTSMAN LAWN
TRACTOR 18.5 HP, 42"
cut, Auto Trans, Only used
2 years. Includes tow behind
poly cart. $850. Cash.
Also, WEIDER 8525
WEIGHT STATION
. $60.Cash 352-527-8238
Lawn Tractor 42" cut
V Twin eng, auto.trans.
w/dump cart, good
cond. $595. 10FT
wood ladder, $20.
(352) 341-3949


DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Repairing gas & diesel en-
gines. No job too big or
small. 352-228-2067





A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd friendly
serve. Lowest rates Free
est.
352-860-1452

All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
V us out zoomcitrus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Haullng,Cleanup, Mulch,
Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design. Bob-
catwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272
OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Work Free Est.
LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins
R WRIGHT TreeService
Tree removal, stump grind,
trim, Ins.& Lic 0256879
352-341-6827




At Home Computer Re-
pairs & custom comput-
ers.
Call(352)228-7823
COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839

On-Site Same Day
Service Available
*All Computers
*Affordable Rates
* Certified Tech's
* Networking
*Virus/Spyware/
Pop- Removal
(352) 341-4150
www.fastteks.com





BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714



Your World


49e9ewae4 II


CHotNKioein



WW.C ",rmnicleonllne oom


I iIIra


s, grates and
f estate sale
53-232-7790
MOWER
Stratton 22"
wer $75.
13-6570
E WASHER
ercial Gaso-
-d 2650 PSI,
power $150
I3-6570
ty Yard
finance
able price.
in weekly or
ithly.
& Insured
ris for free
sites @
20-7365
Mower
2" Cut. Auto.
er. $700.
Mower
cut. Stand.
p. $350.
60-2505
power, new
Sol., $300
1 or 6-8PM
44-1310
FNG MOWER
2" cut, 16hp.
condition.
Q-503-7565
CTOR
4 x 4 loader,
,4ft. bushhog,
blade, 4' york
$8,500. (352)
6864
RUSHCUTIER
2 Cycle
9OBC $150
3-6570
I Eater
Sas powered.
ies. $75.00
21-0778


-CRYSTAL RIVER -
821 NE 4th Avenue
MOVING SALE Side by
side fridge, china cabi-
net, couch, table &
chairs, dishes, many
other household items.
Nice clean items.
Friday-Sunday.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sunday ONLYI 8-?
WAREHOUSE SALEl
Pinevlew Plaza Hwy 44
across from Bay Area.
HOLDER
Quail Run, Sat & Sun 8-4
7425 Redbird Terr.



2 WEDDING DRESSES
2 Wedding dresses for
sale. Gently used. 50.00
a piece, phone
352-419-4720
25 PAIRS Hi-heels, san-
dals, dress shoes.sizes 6
-8 ladies, part of estate
sale $125. all or $5. pair
352-232-7790
MINK STOLE, ERMINE
Brown, part of estate
sale, ladies medium
$100.obo 352-232-7790


REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch *.nstallatlon
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-.128




RV CARPET &
FLOORING
REPLACEMENT
(352) 628-1164




Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
work fully coated. 30 yrs.
Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-795-6533
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ALL HOME REPAIR
painting, drywall flooring,
pwr. wash Malley's Home
Maint
220-9486 (lic0259169)
4us out zoomcitrus.com
DAVID RODGERS
Int/Ext. repaints. Satisfaction
Guar, 20 yrs exp. lic/Ins
212-3160
3us out zoomcitrus.com







FERRARO'S
Painting Service
Int/Ext. Free Est. Press
Cleanin 352 465-6631
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714




AFFORDABLE Mobile
Boat Maint. & Repair
Technical/Electrical
Custom Rigging
John (352) 746-4521
V us out zoomcitrus.com
BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714


4 MOTORCYCLE HEL-
METS 2 Motorcross & 2
Street $35.00 Each
464-0316
4 TOYO TIRES
Radial 225-R70-16. Match
Set. $100.
(352) 270-3386
5th Wheel RV Frame
for Sale
$500.
(352) 726-1585
'94 Club Car golf cart,
elec. or gas, top, side
curtains, many spare
parts, $1,495.
(315) 783-7196
ALUMINUM RUNNING
BOARDS For Small
Bronco or Blazer $35.00
464-0316
Bamboo Straight
cut 16ft 12 ft 8ft
680 If $100 obo
(352) 726-3631
BEANIE BABIES
All in boxes.
352-344-1557
Birdcage
Med. size. $45.
Treadmill, Image, dig.
read out, pow. incline.
Folds up. $150 obo
(352) 341-6920
BOOKS of ROMANCE
$.50 ea- read once
362-746-3971
BOXSPRING Queen
size new in plastic $75.00
352-270-3909
COVER FOR POPUP
CAMPER New in Box
12x14 $45.00 464-0316
DIGITAL CAMERA
FUJIFILM 5.1 mega
pixels. Exc. cond. Bought
new one. $50
352-746-4160
DINING LIGHTS Chan-
delier,5 glass globes
$30,16" white drop light
$10 352-746-2434
Double Sink
Almond, $25.
Micro wave
White, 1.4 cu. ft. w/turn
table. $50.
(352) 795-0918
Down Sizing Sale
Couches, chairs, enter-
tainment center, glass ta-
bles, TV, & accent pieces
All contemporary Furn.
(352) 382-7418
EURO-PRO
Sewing machine.
Model 7130, 48 stitch.
Like new. $185.
352-746-4202


- Act Now


ITS FREE
Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad for FREE on
our all new
CLASSIFIED SITE.
5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 Items totaling less than
$100.00 each.

Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an Ad In the top right
hand corner.


PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
27 yrs. expo. Certified
Best prices/guarnted
352-220-9435
3us out zoomcitrus.com




AT YOUR HOME
Mower & Generator Repair.
352-220-4244
Llc#99990001273

DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Gas / Diesel Engines No
iob too bia or small.
352-228-2067






The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




ELDER CARE
Cleaning, handyman,
transport, & more
Call Chris (352) 270-0371
PRIVATE DUTY
CAREGIVER
Looking for work.
(603)661-9054
THERE ARE OTHER
SOLUTIONS Besides
Nursing Home.Private.
Home 1 on 1 care
Alzheimer/Dementia, No
problem, References
503-7052




* SEE THROUGH
Window Washing
All Aspects (352)
489-4189; 322-0962
/ us outzoomcitrus.com




Certified Chlldcare
12 yrs. experience
Newborns & Up
(352)201-2344




HOME SERVICES
Serving Citrus Co. for 10
yrs. Cell. (727) 642-7757


Debt Holding You Down?

Pay off Bills, Improve your
Home, Solve all your


R.- t'i, Apply for a

' loan today.


Call Now

1-888-964-7111


Selling all fishing equip-
ment. Rods & Reels.
$495. 352-249-1187
Hitch
For RV, Blue Ox, $100.
Water Softener
For Rv, $75. Both In
exc.cond.(352)503-3154
INCONTINENT BRIEFS
18 pkgs., over 300 pairs,
size med., all for $95.
(352) 628-2340
Kohler, bypas shower
door, max 55 x 70, clear
glass 10mm thick
$75 obo, excel cond.
2 Chase lounges, white,
pvc, foldable lawn
chairs, excel, cond $80
obo (352) 527-0347
Like new HONDA
LAWNMOWER,Self pro-
pelled with bagger,5.5
horsepowerNew $549 ask-
ing $325,00 352-341-4847.
OAK BUTCHER BLOCK
6'x3' TABLE w/6 chairs,
$475/obo. BOSE sur-
round sound. Model
SP-PWM505 + JVC
sub-wolfer incl. $450/
obo. 352-726-1991
Printer
Cannon Pixma, MP530
All in one. Brand new.
$125.(352) 382-5550
Recliners
2 matching, pink & rose col-
ored. $80.
Electric Stove
used, scratched. Works per-
fectly. $100.
(352) 201-9004
REMOTE CON-
TROLLED HUMMER H2
great for kids. working
horn and changes
gears.$40 795-6481
RYOBI TRIMMER
w/edger. Like new. $75
Weber BBQ w/stand,
Cost $260 for $100.
352-249-1187
SECURITY LIGHT On @
dusk, off @ dawn. Great
for back yard. $25,
352-746-4160
Small Sears Washer
$125.
15 windows $75 for all
new & used
(352) 726-3093
STEREO HEADSET RA-
DIO Great for JOGGING
or enjoy @ beach,comes
w/clip & head set. Exc re-
cep. $25 352-746-4160


THREE WHEEL BIKE
tri-ton pro three wheel re-
cumbent
bike in excellent condition
cost
$450 asking $350 call
352-436-0065 leave mes-
sage and
number
TRUCK TOPPER Fiber-
glass full size Tonneau
cover for P/U $99.00 call
352-527-9303
Van Shelves
Steel, 3 sets. 4 Ft. Long.
Good Cond. $150. for all.
(352) 263-1011
Wanted
your left over yarn , so,I
can crochet blankets
for homeless animals
(352) 465-8938


MAIDS ON CALL
Serving Citrus 3Yrs.
Windows/Free Est.
(352) 726-8077
Malou's House
cleaning, $12.00 Per hr. 2
hr. min. Homosassa area.
(352) 476-9676




Affordable CABINETS &
COUNTER TOPS
New & Remodel
352-586-8415




Dotson Construction
Decks, Remodeling Etc.
#CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708
3 out zoomcitrus.com
ROGERS Construction
New Homes & All
Construction (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872
We will beat any price
by far without com-
promise. Dunham Con-
struction roofing, re-
modeling, home maint.
painting, press. wash,
etc. talk to owner
422-6575 (crco452543
/us out zoomcltrus.com




SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla rms,
windows, garage scrns
(CBC1257141) 62-0562




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996











#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash &
Gutters Lic. 5863
(352) 746-0141


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over" Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions TooT!?
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-S85-8827
BATHFITTER.COM


CLASSIFIED




CAT FOR PET. 628-5312
ALAN NUSSO
Licensed Broker









LIFE & HEALTH
INSURANCE
* ANNUITIES
* LONG TERM CARE
* DISABILITY
* LIFE SETTELMENTS
352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com




8 Zone Radio Shack
Burglar/Fire Alarm
system, complete $100
(352) 628-5606



2 MANUAL WHEEL
CHAIRS Good condition
without foot rests Only
$55.00 464-0316
4 PRONG CANE Fully
Adjustable $25.00
464-0316
GOGO TRAVEL
SCOOTER GoGo Ultra
X by Pride travel
scooter. Less than 6
months old, like new.
$600.00. (352)
563-0097

HOVEROUND MPV5
MOBILITY VEHICLE
MPV5 Power Wheel-
chair like new. Joystick
controller, adjustable
armrests, anti-tip
wheels. $1200. Phone:
(352) 563-0097


PRIDE LIFT/RECLINER
CHAIR - Tan. Fully elec-
tric, Good condition.
$450. 352-249-1127
ROLLING SHOWER
CHAIR/ TOILET CHAIR
Like New with Locking
Foot Rests only $75.00
464-0316
TUB CHAIR & BEDSIDE
COMMODE $25.00 Each
464-0316




Buying Silver Coins
$.10, .25, .50, $1.00
Pre- 1965,
352- 302-8159
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676




ACCORDIAN
Acmette-ltaly
$100 Good Cond,
Books & stand Included!
(352) 464-1304


All repairs, painting,
gutter & yard clean-
ups. 352-382-3647
vius out zoomcitrus.com
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repalrs Pres-
sure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job too
small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271352-465-9201

NATURE COAST
HOME REPAIR
& MAINT. INC.
* Offering a Full
Range of Services
Est. March '04
Chamber mem.
Lic. 2776/Ins.,
352-634-5499
Visa/MC/Discover





L --m==--. .






SSheds & Garages of 0
Any Size
S*SHEDS NOW*
We Move & Buy
S Used Sheds
I ndependence/41
(352) 860-0111

--- --- El


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash &
Gutters Lic.5863
(352) 746-0141
#1 AT SERVICE
MALLEY's ELECTRIC
352-220-9326 or
255-4034. #ec0001840
V us out zoomcitrus.com
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
ECI 300269
SALTMARSH ELECTRIC
Comm/Resid. & Sign
Lighting. ER13012391
352-344-3810
/us out zoomcitrus.com


12 POINT STAR BURST
MIRROR decorator style
wrought iron. $75.obo
352-232-7790




ULTRAAB LOUNGER &
PROFORM X BIKE Both
like new. $200 or will sep.






w/ bar & bar light, sticks &
rack, excel. cond., clear
glass & reg. pool balls
$1,000
(352) 476-8577
AMMO FEDERAL 357
MAG $65/bx Inverness
864-283-5797
Basket Ball Hoop
Free Standing like new.
$125.00 (352) 249-6800
Bike Built
for 2 (TTrail mate)
$100.
(352) 795-2323
Cobra Irons new $799
sell for $350 4-AW,
Graphite., Cobra Driver,
3, 5, 7 woods graphite
like new $225.
(352) 860-0048
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
CORE TRUCKS, ZERO
WHEELS, BEARING,
AND HARDWARE trucks
scratched but work good.
$40 795-6481
PRIVATE COLLECTOR
Buying Guns,
Ammunition&
reloading supplies
(352) 586-7516
SPORTSCRAFT
Tread Mill TX 50 RC
$100.00
WesI Tursult E25 exercise
bike $60. 352-628-9485
TOP OF THE LINE CASEY
PRO PITCHING MACHINE
Paid $1900, asking $1500.
Top speed 105 mph.
Used only 3 times
(352) 726-0514
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




8x24 ENCLOSED
Cherokee trailer. ULike
new condition. $4700
For more Information
call 352-270-0258
CAR HAULER
'06, 32 Ft. Dominator XT
By Classic C. Trpl.
axels. $14,800. Like
new.(352) 835-4273
Dual axle, 7x16
utility trailer, 7,000 Ibs.,
needs work, $200 firm
cell, (315) 783-7196


C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,

726-2264/201-1422




PAVING & SEAL COAT
VIGLIONE LLC-lic/Ins
www. TAR-MAX.com
Free Est(352)726-3093




AARON'S FENCE
All Types, Best Price
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
24/7(352) 795-7373
3us out zoomcitrus.com
ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencina.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BARNYARD II Fencing
Serving Citrus Co.
Since 1973. FREE Est.
(352) 726-9260
OSBORNE'S
Latwn/T me/Shrub
Quality Fence Work Free
Est. LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED!
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins




John Gordon Roofing
WE'VE MOVED New
Location - Same Great
Service (ccc1325492)
352-382-7003




BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Estimates
Lic#2579/lns, 257-0078
Decorative concrete,
Landscape curbing
River rock resealing
344-4209 (Lic.6960)
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete tex-
tures, Stamp,spray crack
repairstaining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Acrylic Decking
i 352-464-3967 �r


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Snap-N-Go Carrier
Stroller $25! NEW
crib/toddler mattress $20!
352-726-3327 or
305-915-0486.





PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY AT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad




2 FIVE FOOT HIGH
BUBBLE GUM Machines
road runner series,part of
estate sale $200.obo
352-232-7790




Used Travel Trailer
Must be clean & in good
cond. Under $1,000. Will
trade, or sell Pride Go Go
scooter. For $500.
(352) 382-1232
Wanted
4 ft. Disc
For Tractor
(352) 341-4152




MTD 22" MOWER MTD
22" 4 HP side extraction
mower, like new $60
615-668-1633




ANOTHER NEW
LITTER
Shih -Tzu & Shih- Poo
PUPS. $300/up
Call (352) 270-8827
Boston Terrier Pups
CKC Reg. 2 females,
1 male, ready w/health
cert. April 17 $500.
(352) 212-8111 Iv.msg.


EXOTIC HIPPIE
BUNNY RABBITS

Order Now For
Easter & 4-H

New small breed, $15.- $35
ea.
All colors, adults
2 to 3.5 Ibs.


ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




Additions, Garages
Decks, Bathrooms &
Handyman
Services, 40 Yrs Exp
Lic. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




A Cutting Edge
Tile Job
Showers. Firs etc
(352) 422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




REPAIRS
Wall & Ceiling Sprays
Int./Ext. Painting
Lic/Ins 73490247757
352-220-4845
ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cart. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs, Tex-
ture, Additions
Free est.220-9016
Lic.#SCC131149747




Fill, Rock,Stone Drives
Land clearing, Demo.
All Kinds of Tractor Wk
564-1411-302-9023
3us out zoomcltrus.com
Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone Drive-
ways & Tractor work
341-2019 or 257-1562
ATOP SOIL SPECIAL*
3 Yd -$60/ 5 Yd $85
10Yd $175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436




All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris re-
moval. 352-302-6955
V us out zoomcitrus.com




BANG'S LANDSCAPE
Sod, grass plugs,
plants, trees. Please
Lv. Msg.352- 341-3032


BOXER PUPPIES
9 wks, reg. health
cert./shots, tail,
dewclaws done.
$500 (352) 563-1479
COCKATIEL BREEDERS
80 Beautiful males &
females $450 takes alll
(352) 628-6390
FAWN PUG male 8wks old
first shots ACA registered
500.00 call 352-503-6942
GERMAN SHEPHERD
FREE to good home. 5yo
Female. 464-4876
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip, tested,
shots some declawed
$85-$150 352-476-6832
MIN PIN PUPS, AKC
3 females, tails crop
H. cert/shots. $300-$350
352-726-9730
SHI-A-POO &
YORKI-POO
SHIH-TZU multi
colored. $350/up
YORKIES: Males $600;
Females, $800
Paper trained, CKC
reg.'d, health cert.
NO SHEDDING
(352) 489-6675
Shih-Tzu Sale
Shih-poo @$300 & up.
Up to date on shots.
Open Mon, Wed
& Fri 1:30 to 4pm
3902 N. Lecanto Hwy.
352-270-8827 or
cell (305)-872-8099
WEIMARANER
PUPPIES
Born 1/7, ready now,
H/C, Tails Cropped,
M/$350. F/$400.
(352) 628-0206




GOING HOME SALE
Saddles & Tac, new &
used, something for
everyonel(352) 873-6033
Pretty Paint Filly
Coming 2 yrs, old. $450.
Registered
Buckskin Colt.
$750,No reasonable
offer refused. Quiet & gen-
tle. (352) 873-6033




Chickens,production
Red's, polish purebred
bantans, different types of
duckling, quail, guinea pigs
& pigeons $4/up
795-6381/476-3319




2/2, NEAR
CINNAMON RIDGE
Water, sewer, garbage
Lawn maint incl., Pets
neg. $450. mo. + $500.
sec. 352-746-7595
3/2 NEAR
SUGARMILL
WOODS
Water, Sew. Garb.
Lawn Maint. incl.No
pets. $650. Mo.+ $700.
Sec.(352) 302- 0822


D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design. Bob-
catwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272




Affordable Lawn Care
Dependable Service
Professional Quality
352- 601-7086
3us out zoomcitrus.com
Andersen's Lawn Serv
Mowing, Trimming, Clean
Up , Low Rates
352-277-6781
BARKERS LAWN SERV-
ICE Guaranteed to beat the
current price you pay for
service. 352-232-8166
Basic to Full Serv
Tree & scrub trimming
clean-up & hauling.
wkly/biwkly 613-7934
3 out zoomcitrus.com
Bob's Pro Lawn Care Re-
liable, Quality Work Resi-
dential / Comm. Lic./lns.
352-613-4250
C.R /Homosassa
mowing, beds, brushes,
mulch/haul
Commrl & Resdntl since
1991 220-6761
/ out zoomcitrus.com
Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Specials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
/us out zoomcitrus.com
DUN-RITE LAWN SERV
Clean up, tree trim,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681
3 out@zoomcitrus.com
FINISHING TOUCH
Quality lawn care. CagL
Great Todayv
352-527-2719
3us out zoomcitrus.com

HEDGE TRIMMING,
HAULING(ANY KIND),
LAWN MOWING,
MULCH. FREE ESTI-
MATES. 352-344-9273
OR 352-201-9371

OSBORNE'S
Quality Work - Free
Est. LOWEST RATES
352-400-6016 Lic/Ins

STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up. Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
& LANDSCAPE
SINCE 1999 (Lic/Ins)
628-9848 or 634-0554
V us out zoomcitrus.com


Cope's Pool & Pavers
Pool Refinishing
Interlocking Brick Paver
Patio & Driveways

- ORDER YOUR
POOL TODAY
& BE SWIMMING
BY SUMMER
"FREE QUOTES"
S Lic. & Insured
CPC1456565
726 ... 352400.3188


I Pet


AQUA AZURE
Cert. Pool Operator
All Citrus County
352-344-4796
EVERCLEAR POOL
SERV. & Maint.
Concrete Pools Only
(352)344-5122
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Acrylic Decking
� 352-464-3967 m
PURDY POOLS
St. Certified, Serv. & Main.
(352) 220-7301




--- --- a
MOBILE RV
S SERVICE |
WE COME TO YOU Motor
Homes I
5th WhIs/Rv's
Master Tech
S 352-586-5870
SStorage Available




WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard




Alan's Seemless 5"
Residential Gutter &
Gutter Cleaning. Soffett &
Facia 30 yr. exp.
352-637-1457




ELITE PAVING &
SEAL COATING
All types - Res/Comm
352-302-3030 LIc/lns
/us out zoomcitrus.com




Circle T Sod Farms. Inc.
Tired of your dead lawn?
Replace it with
Bahia. Delivery
Avail (352)400-2221

SOD
Cut Outs, All Varieties
Installed/Rolled
Irrigation (352) 422-0641
/ out zoomcitrus.com
Tear out your lawn and
replace. Comm/
Res. Free est. J & J Sod
352-302-6049


Installations by
Brian CBC1253853


352-628-7519





ww.advancedalu Sid.ing,

www.advancedaluminum.info


1st Choice
PEST CONTROL, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE


LAWN GOT

PROBLEMS?
Call 503-6821f
Owner/Operators j ,
Lloyd Smith - Bill Bledenstein - Jim Cu
782263 5340W. Glenbrook St.


m


FLORAL CITY
2/1, Big yard, big shed,
$550 + sec. South Old
Oaks (352) 726-6197
Free 1st Mo Rent
1& 2 Br furn & Unfurn No
Pets Details
Homos.352-628-4441
HOMOSASSA
Lg. 2/1 Addition + deck.
Fenc'd yd. & shed,
$575 352-628-5244
INVERNESS
3/1, $500, 1st, last,
sec. No Pets
(352) 287-9268
Inverness
3/2, DW scm. por., W/D,
Great Loc. Nice & clean.
$650 mo. (352) 560-3355
INVERNESS
Close In, clean , quiet
& comfortable. Call for
Info. 352-212-6182
INVERNESS
Extra Irg. Doublewide
3BR/2BA CH/A,
kitch.equip. good
neighborhood.
Convenient to every-
thing 352-344-8313
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park,
2BR, 1-/2BA, $425.
1 BR,1 BA, $350 Incl.
water 352-476-4964




100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
*Low income applicants can
quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or no credit
OKAY
*recent bankruptcy
OKAY"
CAll TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
"Credit and income
restriction apply*
Florida licensed mortgage
lender






3/2 HUD Homet $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705

BANK
FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181

For Sale or Rent 2 bed/2
bath in Singing Forest
MHP
Floral City, 55+ park
DW, on comer lot
$550 a month includes lot
rent
352-637-2854 after 6pm


to Sam
w ^F m^L^


SL













CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Double wide.
Excellent condition. 1973
model. 24x66. $5,000.
(352) 344-1521
INVERNESS 55 +
1/1, 34 Ft. on lake. Good
condition. $2,900
(352) 419-6043 Jack
(352) 476-4964 Jim
INVERNESS
55+ Waterfront Park.
1BR. water Incl. A/C
$3,500 + $270 mo. lot
rent. 352-476-4964
REPOSI
REPOSIREPOSI
(352) 621-9181




3/2, DW % acre, excel
cond. Green Acres, Own
fin. avail $79,900

3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for llsitings 800-366-9783
x5705


FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2,sw,on 1/2 acrenew car-
pet& stove,roof
over,10xl4work shop,very
clean.$38k o.b.o.
813-792-1355
CRYSTAL RIVER
5 Acres + 1600 sq ft., '99,
Doublewide
352-212-8794
HERNANDO/off 200 2/2/1
carprt, cov por. Lg. encl.
lanaifenced bk yard
130x129, 2
sheds,W/D,$59,900
MOVE IN READY
(352) 3414520
HOME-N-LAND
New Home 3/2
10 Yr. Warranty

$676.43/mo.
Call to Qualify
352-621-3807
HOMOSASSA
3/1.5, Scr rm w/con-
crete firs. nice shade
trees, over level 1+ ac.
approx 1 ml E. of 19
$49,900(352) 564-4598
Homosassa
3/2 W/Porch, 2 Lg. lots.
Extra Ig. Separate. 2 car
garage. Discounted.
3379 S. Alabama
(352) 628-3908
INVERNESS 3/2

Interior to much to
mention.1,550 Sq. Ft.
Fenc'd, 1/2 ac. on hill.
Deck, Quiet. $63,000
(352) 302-7451
LECANTO 3/2
DW, a/2cre, new
paint/carpet. Appis,
CHA, rfovers, porches,
Sshed. GOOD COND!
$44,900. 352-746-0714
NEW JACOBSEN
TRIPLE WIDE
High end home on
2 1/2 Acres, 2150 sq ft,
3/2, glamour kitchen,
marble in bathroom, ap-
pliance pkg.
Must Sell $179,900 or
$787/mo. Call
(352) 621-9181
Nice 38R, 2BA
doublewide on 1 acre,
w/garage or barn.
East Inverness
$650 ma. WAC
(352) 726-9369
REPOS!
REPOS!REPOS!
(352) 621-9181




55+ Open Floor Plan,
2/2, cathedral ceilings,
14 x 56, lots of
upgrades, low rent
$13,500
(352) 527-3821
CRYSTAL RIVER 55+
55FT 2/1, 50 x 10 vinyl prch,
deck, shed, carport. Part.
furnished. All appls. $24k.
Lot rent only $235 mo. Call
Cindy, 352-563-5502
CRYSTAL RIVER
55+ Park, '98, 2/2
14 x 66, Carport, screen
porch, beautiful new
wood floors, apple , excel.
cond. lot $235 -mo.
$32,500 352-563-2865
Floral City, Singing For-
est, 2 BR, 1-% BA
Exc. cond., lot rent $154
mo. 352-344-2420
518-598-2248, cell
FOREST VIEW ESTATES
Great Loc. Pools, clbhs.
& more. Move-in ready,
comp. turn. 2/2 DW,
wheelchair acc., shed
& sprinkler. New heat
pump. $39,900
563-6428/563-1297
Inverness 2/1/Carport
Nicely furnished,
remod. kit., ba &
windows,scrrm.$17,500
shed (352 344-1380
(614)226-2336
LECANTO 55+
3/2, furn'd. Lot rent $215.
352-601-7406:
352-422-7621
NEWER DBLWIDE
In 5 star park, 312
Vinyl Fl. room, shed,
carport. Exc. cond.
$37,500
(352) 382-2356
WALDEN WOODS
55+ 3yrs. old, furn. 2/2,
scrn. porch, carport,
shed, good cond.
Reduced to $39,500
Call (352) 697-2779
WEST WIND VILL 55+
(3) NEW 2005's 2/2
8elw cstl Carport, shed,
scrn prch, furn'd, pet ok.
Park rent $256mo. Re-
sales avail. 352-628-2090


CITRUS RENTAL
MANAGEMENT &
REALTY LLC
527-2428
Full Service
Full Time
www.citruscounty
rentgai.com
Beverly Hills
2/1/1 Carport......$475
2/1/1 .....................$S565
2/1/1 Carport....550
2/1.5/1 ...................$550
2/2/2 pool ...... $ 650
Citrus Hills
2/2 Condo furn....$850
3/2/2 Pool...........$1000
Pine Ridge
3/2/2 Upgraded...S850
3/2/2 Pool, furn..S1 100
Canterbury Lakes
3/2/2............$1000
Crystal River
900 s rle owers$800
1160sf Office,..,$800
Jennifer Foreman
Realtor PRM
Alex Griffin Realtor


3/2 HUD Homel $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704

POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - Waterfront
homes, Wkly priv. rms, RV
lots.352-628-0011

SINGLE FAMILY
HOMES,
DUPLEXES,
WATERFRONT,
MOBILE HOMES

WE HAVE THEM ALL
THROUGH OUT THE
COUNTY GIVE US A
CALL..From
$475/mo to
$1350/mo

Alexander
Real Estate, Inc.
Crystal River
352-795-6633 ph
352-795-6133 fx





CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Br.,1Br., & Effic.
(352) 422-3112

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




-�,----
& 2 BEDROOM
APARTMENTS
Avail. for Immed.
Occupancy.
CANDLEWOOD
COURT
APARTMENTS I
& KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
for Information call
(352) 344-1010
MON. thru FRI.
9am - 4pm
Ask About our Move
In Specials|l
1BR sec. dep. $150
1st mo. Rent $150.
2BR sec. dep. $200
1st mo. Rent $200.
HUD Vouchers
Accepted
foreclosures
Welcome I
Equal Housing Op

CRYSTAL RIVER
Call Mon-Fri 10-5 for app
& info on our $100 Spe-
cagL 1&2 bd avail.
Section 8 Welcome.
Cindy 352-257-8048
www.crystalpalm
apts.webs.com

INGLIS VILLAS
Is now accepting
applications for our
1, 2, 3 BRApts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Crys. Riv.
Rental Assf. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: M,W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglis Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity

LECANTO
1 BR Apartment (352)
746-5238/613-6000

ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2 dplx,
all ktchn appis, patio, W/D
hook-up, nice yard, Exc.
Cond. $625 (352)
634-1341

Pinewood Villas
Is now Accepting
applications for our
1, 2, 3 BR Apts.
Located in Bronson
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-486-2612
Or Apply Tues & Thur
7291 NE 92nd Ct. #17,
Bronson, Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity





3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705




3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for lisitings 800-366-9783
x5705





PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad

THE HEDICK GROUP
Real Estate Services
Beverly Hills Area
Lynn Davis, Agent
352-422-2522
hedickgroup.net

We Have Rentals
Starting at $425/mo +
Many others LAND-
MARK
REALTY
352-726-9136
Kathy or Jane
311 W Main St. Inv





312 HUD Homel $225/mo!


5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704

OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507

PINE RIDGE
1000 sqft unit, (currently
beauty
salon) 352-527-9013




* 2nd MONTH FREE
SUMMERHILL AT
MEADOWCREST
Limited time! Call agent
for details. 352-563-5657
V us out zoomcitrus.com

3/2 HUD Homet $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704


5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for Ilsitings 800-366-9783
x5705
Citrus Hills
2/2, patio W/D, pool, Unf.
No Dogs $699 (718)
833-3767
CITRUS HILLS
2/2, pool x-tra clean
(352) 613-5655
CITRUS HILLS
Home, Villa, Condo
GREENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-5921
(888) 446-5921
areenbriarrental.com
INVI MOONRISE
2/1, lanai,clean move in
now $555/mo.
(352) 603-0345
Inverness 2 2-1/2
Townhouse w/balcony &
new screen porch, fresh
paint, end unit on canal.
Clean comm. pool, 2 min.
to town.$700 + sec. dep.
(305) 915-0486.


CITRUS SPRINGS
New, 2/2, all appl.
Wash/Dry. $600.-$625.
(954) 557-6211
INVERNESS 2/1/1
Lawn Maint, $550 mo
352-359-5241
LECANTO
2/1, cha, H20 incl.
$525/m 352- 382-1344
Lecanto
Newer 2/2, dsh/Wsh.
W/dry, H20 incl. No pets.
Lg.Yd. (352)628-2815





LOOK
A1VALUEINN.com
Hernando: New Renvt'd
Effic: $45dly; $250wk.
Pool. Traitles $185wk.
Homes 3bd - $450 wk.
352-726-4744




At_-A IOlW

352-795-7368

NEED AN
...AFFORDABLE
RENTAL?

HOMES
MOBILES
APARTMENTS

Featured Properties

BLACK DIAMOND
$1000.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Duplex $550
HOMOSASSA
3/2, DW $725.
INVERNESS
2/2 Townhouse $650.
Call for information
OVER 40 TO CHOOSE
FROM.....CALL TODAY
INVERNESS
Rentals Available
*3/2/2 2100 sq.feet,
BRAND NEW, $825
*3/2/2 1786 sq.ft.
like new, $775
*2/1/1 Gosp.lsl. water-
frnt. fully re-mod. $Z50
3/2 Townhm Whispering
Pines, brand new $725
352-212-3412
OLD HOMOSASSA
Lrg.1l/Llv&fam rm,
scr prch, lots of stor-
age, newly remodl'd,
dock w/access to
gulf. $975 furnished,
Incis all utils. or $800
unfurnished incls H20
& garbage lst/L/Sec.
352-628-2261

SUNSET VILLAS
Senior Community
Chiefland Fl.
Accepting
Applications for
1 & 2 BR APTS
Please Apply
M, W, F, 8am-12p
124 SW 14th Ave.
(352) 493-0220
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.
WANTED
3BR/2BA Rent to own.
Can put $5,000 down &
pay taxes & insurance
(352) 726-9369



BEVERLY HILLS
1/1/1 furn'd., W/D,
fenced, Incis all utils/
cable. Pets nag. $765 +
sec. 352-249-1127
FURNISHED RENTALS
Crassland Realty
352-726-6644
NEW HOMES 3/2/2
1st, last, sac, & ref
$800 mo. (352) 302-3927



1,2 & 3 Bedrooms
Rent to own, No credit
ck352-484-0866
jademission.com
BEVERLY HILLS
16 Donna St. 2/1, $595.
mo. (352)
527-8432: 697-1907
Beverly Hills
2Br pass 3 Br. C/H/A
First Month Free. $650
352-422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
Clean 2/2/2, near
school. Avail 5/1/09
$800 mo, w/purchase
options. (352) 726-7543
BEVERLY HILLS
Lg. 1/1, scr. rm. EZ terms
$490 mo. 382-3525
BEVERLY HILLS
Why rent? Own this
2/2/1For $365. Mo. w/5%
dwn. (352) 476-4179
BLACK DIAMOND
3/2/2. Gated
community. $1100/mo
352-804-9729
CITRUS HILLS
PRESIDENTIAL'
3/2/2 $850 mo.
(352) 212-5812
CITRUS SPRINGS
1/1 Newly Rem'd. on
quiet street. Fen'cd. bk.
yd. 775 Sq. Ft. All apple.
Carport & shed. $485.
Mo. Fst./Sec.tyr
lease.(352)302-7864
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/1, $850mo. $1000 sec.
352-746-9436
Citrus Springs
4/2/2, New, Split Plan,
Cath.ceilings,2,150sq. ft.
$900.Mo.352-341-1859
CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 3/2/2 , Near Sch.
$900mo 352-816-0010


3/2 Clean, $850/mo
795-6299 697-1240
CRYSTAL RIVER N.
Country Club Dr.
(PLANTATION GOLF
COURSE) 3/2 w/2.5
garage, screen porch &
fireplace. All
appliances incl.
First/Last/Deposit
352-563-1149
HOMOSASSA
3/2/2 Fenced yard, W/D
hookups. $795 Mo.
(352) 382-1373
HOMOSASSA

6368 Gross AveSpacious
2/2/2car. Big yard. Con-
venient location. $850
month. 561-459-6247
HOMOSASSA
Beautiful, 3/2, 2/2
Pool on 1 acre
Lease Opt .Flexible
Financing mm. Occ
352-795-0088
INVERNESS
3/3 Log home, 1,700 Sq.
ft. Huge garage. Lg. lot.
$850. Mo. $750. Sec. No
dogs. (352) 746-5744
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1/1,
$600/mo IsVlst/Dep.
(352) 344-2560
INVERNESS
Nice 2/2, garage, screen
porch, 813-973-7237
LECANTO
3/2/2, 1,900 Sq. Ft. in
Gated Comm. $1,500 Mo.
Incl. appl. window treat. &
lawn care. 1 Yr. lease. (352)
527-0663
PINE RIDGE
3/21/2/2, Screen Pool
5310 Yuma $1 100/mo
(352) 302-6025
Spacious 31212
golf course, serene
One mo Free. $900.
908-322-6529
SUGAR MILL
WOODS
2Masters/2/2, Remodeled,
new appliances, new A/C
$900 mo. 352-302-4057
SUGARMILL
3/2/2 $900.
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $900.
(352) 400-0230
SUGARMILL
New 5/4. $1150 mth.
813-300-7929
SUGARMILL
WOODS
2/22 +Lanai,1600 sq.ft.
$875.mo + util.
(727) 804-9772

SWater. front

-I
3bd 2ba Only $199/MoI
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for lisitings 800-366-9783
x5705

5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for Ilsitings 800-366-9783
x5705
CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1 Water. front, urn.
$875Mo 352-302-9504
INV. LAKEFRONT
2/2/2, Super clean,
tiled great area,
two avail. 1@$650.
1@$750 mo.
352-476-4896
INVERNESS
3/2/1, Super clean,
tiled, great area,
Irg. Bdrms. $800. me. -
352-476-4896


lanaidock, fenced yard.
$700. 344-8532



INVERNESS
Highlands 2/1 Block
Home. Nice & quiet
$400, 1st, last, + sec.
deposit. Ask for Jim
(727) 576-7407



3/2 HUD Home! $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
INVERNESS
totally remolded, new gran-






CRYSTAL RIVER
$75 wkly/lst/L. Incls utils.
& satellite. (352)
563-1465:212-1960;
HOMOSASSA
Furn, kit privs, cbl-TV,
utils incl, g yd. single
ocup.$90wk.628-5244
HOMOSASSA
Own entrance & Bth.
everything incld.
furnished Must pay 1/2
elec. wash/dryer avail
$400.Mo. (352) 860-1426

LOOK
AIVALUEINN.com
Hernando: New Renvt'd
Eftc: $45daily; $250wk.
Pool. Trails $185wk.
Homes 3bd - $450wk.
352-726-4744



CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1 Water, front, turn.
$875Mo 352-302-9504
OLD HOMOSASSA
1BR turn. cottage
$750 mo. /$200 wkly
(352) 795-0553

LOOK
AlVALUEINN.com
Hernando; New Renvt'd
Efficr $45 dly; $250 wk.
Pool. Ira/lts $185 wk.
Homes 3bd. - $450 wk.
352-726-4744


3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705
OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507



3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705

LOOK
AlVALUEINN.com
Hernando. New Renvt'd
gEftic $45 dly; $250 wk.
Pool. railts $185 wk.
Homes 3bd - $450 wk.
352-726-4744


CLASSIFIED





Couch

rRealty
& Investments, Inc.


Richard (Rick)
Couch
Lic. Real Estate Broker


1045 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
Office: 352 344-8018
Cell: 352 212-3559
www.Rcouch.com S
3/2 HUD Home! $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704

AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50
Ad includes 20 lines of copy
w/ photo.

BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714
Crystal River
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
WateratBeautiul,completely
renovated inside
and out,must see. Owner
financing. 300K
727-798-7077

Picture Perfect Homes
NEW HOMES STARTING
At 575.000 On Your Lot
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Li. it CBC059685

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is
- subjectto Fair-
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to
advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
discrimination.
Familial status
includes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing
custody of children
under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.










CITRUS HILLS
SUNDAY ONLY 1 - 4
Bright & Cheery,
2nd floor End Unit,
Too Many amenities to
mention! Terra Vista
Membership Avail.
Was $135,000, reduced to
$90,000 - ONE DAY
ONLY115 E Hartford St.
Bldg 9 Unit 5A
(352) 527-3831




100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
'Low income applicants can
quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or No credit
OKAY
*recent bankruptcy
OKAY*
CAII TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
*Credit and income
restriction-apply*
Florida licensed mortgage
lender






Loan Modifications
On Thte House






April 6 -

Register to be one
of up to 2500
homeowners to
loan modification
representation and
negotiation
services. For details
visit the web site.

provided as a service of
Realty Right, Inc.
Restrictions apply. See
web site for details




2 Great Commercial loca-
tions, $650 to $850/mo
.Perfect for any small busi-
ness/ office etc. Call Lisa


352-634-0129
Plantation Realty
3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705


SUNDAY. APRIL 5, 2009 D7


6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714
CRYSTAL RIVER -GREAT
LOCATION Citrus Ave.
Remodeled. 1353sqft
w/security fence &
parking. Over '/2acre.
Zone GNC. $250K. Call
Gary, 352-564-4228



2/2/1 CB,
Tile, New Carpet,
Newer Appl.Lg. shed,
Fen'cd back yd, Patio,
1,600 Sq. Ft. CHA
$68,900(561) 313-5308
(561) 313-5291
ATTENTION!!
BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
$37,900. Delivered
and Set, $0-Down
Land/Home $650. mo.
Repos Available
Kinder Mobile
Home
(352) 622-2460
BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714




RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Rai ilect

(352) 795-1555




1,2 & 3 Bedrooms
RENT TO OWN- NO
CREDIT CHECK!
352-484-0866
jademission.com
1BDRM. 1 Ba
w/ Florida Rm screen room,
utility rm
Cen. Ht/Air, $59, 500.
7 W. Golden St
(352) 527-0160
3/2 HUD Homet $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
FOR SALE BY OWNER
88 SJ Kellner, Bev. Hills
2/21/2, FP, OPEN HOUSE
on SUNDAYS
11A-3P $120K firm
(352) 746-6093




Crystal Oaks 3/212
For Sale
By Owner
Price Reduced
Split plan. Pool home
w/private back yard, on
cul de sac, move in con-
dition. Asking $170,000
(352) 746-7088



BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI
Your SATISFACTION
Is My Futurell
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123

Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC

RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Raltyect
Sea'ftwiw~i
(352) 795-1555




3/2 + Office Home
Remod. W/fireplace,
on 1 acre, fenced. Large
oaks, workshop. No
floodzone $169,000
Owner/Broker.
(352) 634-1764
3/2, DW '% acre, excel
cond. Green Acres, Own
fin. avail $79,900
813-503-8594
Ciru out


$8000 Tax

Rebate
for first time home buy-
ers ,if you have not
owned a home in 3 years.
Call for info
Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
Kellers Williams Rlty




n I=a1' -'-"



$75,000
ON YOUR LOT
ir,.:ljd ...3 ,ll I , ,p,.:t -

plans available.
Atkinson
Construction, Inc.
352-637-4138
www.atkinsonconstruct
LicY#"t 85

BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714


For Sale % "
CITRONELLE 3 bed-
room, 2 bath. Mini Farms
2.5 Acres, Trailer, Water
with softener, septic. As
is $49,000.00.
813-695-0853

For Sale By Owner
3 BR, 2 BA, 2-car gar.,
Cement block, north
Dunnellon Low down.
EZ terms w/$3,500
down $575 mo.
(352) 726-9369
OWNER FINANCING
4/2/office, 2.5 ac, 2005
Doublewide
Like new. 1800sqft,
$9,700/dn, $882/mo. or
$23,700 down, $582/mo.
727-992-1372




OWNER Financing
Handyman, 2/2, 1981
Dbwd, 1/3 acre, $40K,
below market, needs
mostly cosmetic repairs.
Purchase $4,472 dn &
$364 mo.
727-992-1372







pool, wd firs

By Owner, $112,000 Re-
$74,600. (352)563-5844

duced from 114 K
Beautiful Citrus Hills
Greenbriar II 2/2 end unit




FLORAL CITY

shed & water access,
Move in cond., Reduced
to $49,995 (352)
746-0850
MARYVILLE, TN
Brick 3/2/2, fireplace
enclsd sunrm & deck, ft of
Smokies, low txs & maint.
$189,900 (865) 773-2232




---3/272 ---
Inverness, FI.
Must See !!
Open Lakefront, Breath-
taking View,
on Lake Henderson.
538 San Remo
Circle. Vaulted
ceilings, oak floors, trav-
ertine counter tops.
Caged pool, spacious la-
nai, dock, & board-
walk.
$395,000
Barb Malz
(352) 212-2439
Keller Williams
Realty

FLORAL CITY. TWO
HOUSES ON ADJ.
LOTS, ONE PRICE!!!
$215,000 Newly reno-
vated. CHA. Screened,
in ground pool. Dock,
seawall. For sale by
owner. 352 586 - 9498
HOMOSASSA
3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to
head spring. 163' wfrt,
dopk/slip. Brand
new/unoccupied.
2 frpls, granite. $579K
727-808-5229
Inverness, Fl.
Lake Henderson
3/2.5/2 on 1/2 acre.
Exclusive Beautiful
Home w/open water view,
on Private
Waterfront Peninsula.
Tile floors, travertine
countertops, dock, ga-
zebo.
$395,000
Must See II
1170 S. Estate Pt.
Barb Malz
(352) 212-2439
Keller Williams
Realty

LET OUR
OFFICE
GUIDE YOU!


Plantation Realty. Inc
(352) 795-0784
Cell 422-7925
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner
See all of the
listings in Citrus County
at
www.olantation
realtvinc.com

RealtySelect
- C-itrus.com


BETTY MORTON

2.8% COMMISSION

Ree~i elect

(352) 795-1555




INVESTORS NEEDS
Homes Any: Size, cond,
location, price, situation.
Over finac'd. dblwide
& mobile homes okay.
1-727-992-1372


HOMOSASSA
1.2 acres, fenc'd, water,
elec., sewer, sprinkler sys.
(2) out bldgs. Deadend st.
$44K. 352-302-5775



Business/Home 3/2 Great
location on Trout Ave. Inver-
ness $165,000. Rhema
Realty 228-1301



7 Rivers Golf & C.C.
priv. member owned.
comer lot 1 ac (mol)
$30K (813) 766-9354 or
sweetscaoeauest@
verizon.nel



Withlacoochee River -
Dunnellon
$79,000.
(727) 544-9350









--I-
312 HUD Homel $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704




9.9HP YAMAHA
4 stroke, elect. start,
tiller handle. $695
FT ISLAND MARINE
SUPPLY
352-4364179




JET SKI
runs exceptional well
$1,900. (352) 795-9847



14 ft JON BOAT
w/trailer 9.8 Mercury
motor, & electric motor
$1,025(352) 419-4478
or cell 352-563-8807
24 FT CRESTLINER
PONTOON
14 passenger w/traller
---$65;00 bobon
(352) 382-7039









AIR BOAT
1993 17' Sylvan




2 seat & trao 35-400
85h.p. Yamaha motor








HP 8 blade warp drive.
2-1 reduction gear box.
Used 100 hrcond. $3,500






for $10,000 firm.
(352) 302-4535
AAA FLORIDA JUMBO
$6.00 Ib Mon-Sat










1996. 15', SO0cubic Inch.
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
Call(352) 560-3019959
AIRSTREA
Big 13 Ft. haul,
2 seats. Approx. 375-400
HP. 8 blade warp drive.





2-1 reduction gear box.
Used 100 hrs.+ as .
$18,500 invest. Sell





Tel (352) 563-2668
for $10,000 firm.
(352) 302-4535
AIRBOAT















AQUA SPORT
197 Osprey, 20h Yam,
199615', o500cubic inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt





(352)560-3019
AIRSTREAMy, 20







SCabin Cruiser 24 Jrufe.
stOred, yrs. as oew
loaded SAVE 30used
Tel (352) 563-2668
Cell (352) 308-1431








AQUA SPOR'05
175 Osprey, 90hp Yam,wi
VHF, depth finder, dual batL
w/switch, bimini, easy load
trailer. Low hours.
$10,800/obo 352-860-0277
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson just
rebuilt 5 yr. war. Ready to
fish. Reduced $13,95001
352-746-5856
Cabin Cruiser 24 ft.
Owner died, 6 cyl. 10,
alpha one/wav, used In
fresh water, tan. gal. td
incl.'d $2,500 464-0316
CAPE HORN
'94 17'2, 8ft. wide.
C/C. Merc.90 HP. outboard
W/Trailer
S4,375(352)634-4793
CENTURY
'01- Bay, 21ft.
'02,150HP Yamaha w/
trIr., custom cover
dep/find, VH, INew hrs.,
like new, $13,950.
(352) 442-7772

CRUISERS
YACHTS
3370 Esp115 Yat 1992 33'
Twin 454 gas, beam 11'10"room cond Color
Garmin electronics, 19"
TV,stereo am/fim xcd
player, microwave oven,
refrig,water heater V, and
too much to list Good












352) 563-5628
95' 19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ra-
io & ishinders. Neverw Bat-
tery switch. 2 batteries,












GPS/recordower pk$4500.
352) 726-08384711











352-621-4711


PONTOON
'85 JC, 50 HP Johnson
Low hrs. needs TLC,
No trailer. $3,000
(352) 621-0987


Move In Special
1-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $150
2-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $200
Exp. 4/30109
Call Monday Through Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm
We accept HUD Vouchers, Foreclosures ted.


(352) 489-1021 B


Crysal ive


I Ounnellon


is-1f

l Citrui s t'


WEarSta
9 shoj


Inverness^f
Homes 1,^















UL 5, 2009


6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714
PONTOON BOAT
08' 20 Ft. To many
options to list. $13,000
Call for Info. 628-7926
Pontoon Boat
1996,18 ft., 40HP Yamaha,
4 stroke, $8,500
(352) 860-1490
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras $12,000
(352) 628-0281
PROLINE
03 32ft center consolebunk
under, twin OB 160 hrs. like
new, loaded, incl trir. may
consider newer Corvette
as trade $48K (352)
201-1833
PROLINE WICUTTY
'95, 20'120 HP
Merc. Dep/find.
Radio, fish rigging.
Includes trailer. Good cond.
REQUCEDQL$5,900.Call
Pete @
(352) 746-4969
Ski Boat/Trailer
Upholstery is torn.
Boat runs perfect.
$1,200.(352) 201-9004
T-CRAFT
23'L, 6' W,'02150H Evin.
mtr. w fuel enj. like new, trr.
w/brks
$7750 352-489-3661
TWO KAYAKS
Eddyline 12' plus access.
like new $1700 for both


Boat 03, 25' Sun Tracker,
05 Merc 90hp, Io hrs. tan-
dem trial. like new exc. value
$11,500.
352-586-1676
VINTAGE PROLINE
24 ft RESTORED
175HP MVriner w/jack
plate,'S7000/obo.
404-557-5628

WE NEED

BOATS
SOLD AT NO FEE
Selling Them As Fast
As They Come Inl
352-795-1119
Mercury Auth Parts
and Service




US 19 Crystal River
(just north of the Mall)




05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
26inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
'07 NEW MAR
Cypress 32ft 5th wheel.
2 slides. Separate bath.
Extras. $39,900/obo
352-794-3534
3/2 HUD Homel $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
38FT BOUNDER v.:.
Clo:: - j ,:T,'er.i.t'-
mod- i : ,'rab, .
new re. y"gilSt'74T,*'
TV's. -.'0 .3. ic or .I , hip
$22,000. 352-563-0615
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 38 K Mi.
Dual air. $36,000 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
ALLEGRO
'85, New motor,
generator, 27 ft.,
Al cond. $6,350
352-634-4793
CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane 30Q, class
A motor home, 31 % ft., 22k
mi. V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed, etc.
Saturn tow Avail. $35,000.
Lets talk (352) 397-5007
GEORGIE BOY
'05, Pursuit, Class A,
30ft.
Excel. cond. 8k mi.,
2 slide outs, 2 TV's, back
up camera, all the bells
and whistles and much
more, must see this
coach, Asking $50,000.
obo (352) 746-7626

GULF STREAM
'07 BT Cruiser, 22' 8K.Mi.
Hitch & tow bar. Like new.
$45,000
(352) 875-8890
GULF STREAM
BT Cruiser 03, 22' fully
loaded, ready to travel
$29,800....
(352) 341-1297
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool, club-
house etc.
$29,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
Holiday Rambler
'03, By Monico, 300 Cum-
mins, 2 slides, incl. tow
vehicle,
mint cond. $84,900.
(352) 302-7073
Holiday Rambler
Admiral Motor Home 36' 2
slides, 340hp, gas eng. all
options transf ext. warr.
$51,900
352 795-3970
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$55,995. 352-464-0371
JAMBOREE
29',2005, V-10 Class C


12,400 mi., Loadedl Perf.
Condition! Ready to go!
$39,000 (352) 465-2138
Keystone 07
Big Sky 5th Wheel Prem.
Pkg 340RLQ every option.
Center Island Kit. incls
sep.W/D, added 2nd a/c in
bedroom
Price to Sale $52K firm
352-794-3068
O AUTO. BOAT &

DONATIONS
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
(352) 795-9621
0 Tax Deductible 0
PACE ARROW
04, 38' 3 SLIDES
21k mi fully loaded
3 tv's $92,500 obo
, 352-302-0743


Vehicleagso
'94 32' class A,
Clean no pets/or smoke.

(352) 746-1169




Want to Buy
Small Motor home
good gas mileage a
must (20 mpg) approx
$5000 cash





2000 EAGLE 26'
TRAVEL TRAILER
New refrig. plus CD, TV, &
AC. $5800
(352) 795-1780
BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714
BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig. Like
new. $9,995. 352-489-3661
FIFTH WHEEL
30 Ft. Aljo W/slide-out.
Good cond. Moving must
sell. $5,200 or trade.
Obo. (352) 214-3688
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO
07 Jay Flight
28' used twice, smells &
looks new, green
clean, sips 6 $16,800
(352) 503-7431
KODIAK
'04, Hybrid Travel Trir. AC,
Heat, Micro. Tub/ Shwer,
toilet exc cond $9,500.
352-564-4151
MEADOWBROOK
5th Wheel, 2000 Excel-
lent. Photos at
http:,casaweb.googileconV
meadowbrook.Glenn
- $13,995.00 (352)302-6055
or (727)692-9045
Montana
'03,5th wheel, 3 slides
like new,$34,000.
Truck avail also for tow
(352) 422-5731
TRAIL CRUISER '04
17FT, light weight,
fully loaded. Used
10 times. $6800.
352-628-4522





Auto Paors /
99 Mitsubishi Eclipse,
wrecked, for parts, exc. 2.0
16 val eng. auto. trans. 2
sets of wheels /tires 117km .
302-2781 464-0220
Chevy
'96, Camaro,
V6, auto, good running gear
& front end, t-tops, alumn.
wheels w/ new tires, hit in
the rear corner $800 obo
(352) 726-6864




$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
i D*'ad '1' AI.A I
. Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
CARS, TRUCKS,
.RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CASH BUYER
Buvina Used Cars
Trucks & Vans
For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333




08 CUSTOM BUILT
Pontiac Convertible
Show Car. Invested over
$15k See to appreciate
Only valid offers I
(352) 382-7039
1992 BUICK REGAL
4-door, one owner
34k ml., will need a little
body work $4,800
after 4pm (352) 563-1893
2001 Chevy Lumina 91k,
V6, new tires & breaks.
No rust. Very good cond.
Asking $2,500 firm
(352) 503-6666 ask for
Joe
'97 MAZDA MX5
MIata - Only 72k miles.
New tires. NICEI $4500.
352-382-9004
BMW
'03, 745 LI, NAV, black, sun
roof. all options $29K Mint
(352) 746-2696
BUICK
2005, Lacrosse
Fully Loaded w/Leather
$11,988 or $209 mo
1-800-733-9138
BUICK Century 1995
Looks and runs like new!
Lots of extras. 117K Miles
$1,700 Call Andy at
352 344-2125
CADILLAC
1997, Deville
Extremely Clean, Low
Mileage, Only $6995
1-800-733-9138
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Conv. rare
5 spd, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
blk, depend.
$4700 352- 563-0615

CONSIGNMENT USA
| Clean Safe Aufo's-


Financing Avail.
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmenlusa.org

CORVETTE
02, Z06,
Black, low ml., over
30 mpg hwy. $24,400.
(352) 613-5355
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 miles
on this rare silver on sil-
ver on silver vette, power
convertible top, 6 sp
auto, paddle shift, heads
up display, magnetic F55
suspension, navigation
system, all options availa-
ble are on this gorgeous
vette , Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
included, Your's
for only, $49,000.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, while, 86K mil.
T -lop roof, Excellent con-
dition $12,000., will trade
for truck. 352-563-6428


Catera, 34k mi, MINT
White w/leather. $6300/obo.
845-282-3504
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, 86K
mil. T -top roof, Exal-
lent condition $12,000.,
will trade for truck.
352-563-6428
FORD
'03 Mustang Cony. auto,
V-6, leather, all pwr, 80k,
great cond. $6,999.
352-382-2755
HONDA
'01, Civic Alloy Wheels
Sunroof & More $7990
or take over pints $ 190
m. 1-800-716-2219
HONDA
2003, Accord Great
Sedan, Gotta Seel
$11,988 or $199 mo
1-800-733-9138
HONDA CIVIC 97
$5001 Police
Impounds! For listing
800-366-9813 x4246
HONDA Civic, 1998
Mechanic's
Special...Great wheels
and tires, rebuilt transmis-
sion. Well
maintained...but won't
start. $630 firm.
352-503-7064
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, $9,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
JAGUAR
2002, S-Type Leather,
Sunroof, 39k Orig Miles
1 Owner - Call]
1-800-716-2219
LINCOLN
2000, Continental
Loaded, Low Miles
$6995 or $129 mo
1-800-733-9138
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well main- trained.
$2650. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
MAZDA 3
'07, $11,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'01 CLK,$16,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'05, $25,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCURY
200 Grand Marquis
Low Miles, Fully Equlpd
$8995 or $189 mo
1-800-733-9138
MERCURY SABLE
1994, very good cond..
cold air. $1,700.
(352) 726-6432
MGB
Convertible 1977, 57k mi.
Blue, many xtras Excellent
Condition
$10,500 (352)628-0281
NISSAN
'07 Altima, $13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
PLYMOUTH
Acclaim 90,4 cyc.
cheap on gas
First $1000 Buys
(352) 563-2021
SMART CAR 08
Passion Loaded 40mpg
rei'~i. cI :ni, 2'7uTm
35. .?41.0311.
. SUBARU '94
ea-10 1 1 'erie-s Teaor,
4Or. I Ok Tll., FOa cond.
$1200. 352-746-4202
SUZUKI
'07 Forenza. 30K mi, w/100k
warr. LOAQQEw/touch
scrn nav. $12,800.
352-613-6613
TOYATA
'07 Avalon, XLS. Garage
kept. 28.5K. Mi. 17" alloy
wheels, sun roof.
$19,500.(352) 382-5941
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 mi.
warranty. $23,000.
(352) 382-1857
VOLVO
' 04 S-60 $8,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'05 S60,$13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-60, $17,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S-80, $28,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC90,$22,995.
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 S-60, $18,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
S VOLVO
' '08 $40, S$20,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
' VOLVO
2007, S40
Drive luxury for less
$13,988 or $229 mo
1-800-733-9138




1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's
Dream. $6500.obo
352-228-0597
1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's
Dream. $6500.obo
352-228-0597
'53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, 350 V-8, auto,
May trade in part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door se-
dan. 6 cyl auto. $9,500.
Will consider trade for
travel trailer of equal
value.
(352) 628-4053
AUTO/SWAP/CAR
CORRAL SHOW


Sumter Co.
Fairgrounds
Sumter
Swap Meets
April. 5th 2009
1-800-438-8559
CAMARO IROC Z
'88 Red, LT-1 eng.
PS./PB. Cold A.C.
62,000 Mi. Great
Condition. $6,900.
Camaro Z 28, '79
Black 4 spd. super
T-10Tran.Cam.more,
Must see $6,900.
(352) 422-5663
CHEVROLET
Camaro '68,coupe, 107K
miles, auto, white with
black interior $4,000
stevystewart@gmail.com
CHEVY
'69 Classic C10 SHT BD
350/350 AC, PS,
$15K or trade
(352) 746-9212


'87 Convertible, Drives,
looks great, 2nd owner, new
top & paint. $9,000 obo
(352) 302-1524
DODGE
Challenger 383/335 HP,
77K mi, manual trans, 8
cyl, interior green, black
interior, $2,900 Contact
angelalansing@
gmail.com(253)276-4784
EL CAMINO
'81 305 auto. All new
interior, & paint. Crager
mags & tires. 4" raised
hood.$3,250.
(352)341-3613.
FORD
'66, F100, V8, auto, org.
California truck, org.
paint, no rust, $7,500.
obo, 726-6864
GM El Camino
'84, 1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of stor-
age $25K or trade (352)
621-0666
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint; 63K
mi., $8,900 obo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MERCEDES BENZ
1985 380SL, 2 top roadster.
Drives, looks great. Many
new Mercedes parts.New
A/C. Must see! $8,500. Da-
vid 352-637-6443.
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
trans. & parts. $4,000.
(352) 621-0126
THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$13,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122
Volkswagen
'78 Super Beetle cony.
runs well, $3500 or will
consider trade
(352) 212-4477
VOLKSWAGON '68
bus/transporter. Con-
verted to camper. Runs
well. New brakes.
$5,000. 352-726-5926



'97 FORD F350
XLT pwr strk diesel. Loaded,
5th wheel, Apprs $15,500;
sell $8000. 352-503-7188
CHEVY
2006, 1500 Crew Cab,
Z71 4x4, Only $14,990
or $279 mo
1-800-716-2219
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US 19 Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awesome
Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded every
special feature. Sr. own,
gar. kept., 27K mi, $40K
invested Sale $21,750 See
online ad photos
www.autotrader.com/atca
rldlat-t3fd391
John (352) 726-1076
DODGE DAKOTA
- *05 511,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
FORD
'03 Ranger XLT. Super
Cab. 4.0 Eng.1 owner
14K Mi. Like new.
$10,300 (352)341-3292
FORD 04
Ranger, REDUCED
X-cab. Exc. cond.
38k mi. $9,700/obo
(352)746-3919
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway, serve.
van. 41K Mi./5.4 L. Eng.
Auto.Knapheide Serv.
body/dble lock drs. $20.000
Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
2003, F-150 XLT
Crew Cab, 51k Orig mi-
les $11,990 or $199 mo
1-800-716-2219
FORD
'85, F250, rebuilt motor.,
new carborator,
runs good , must sell
$1,200 obo 613-4033
FORD
'93, F250, utility body, V8,
auto, no rust needs fuel
pump $850 obo
(352) 726-6864




3/2 HUD Homel $225/mol!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
AZTEK
Pontiac' 04 Low
miles, loaded!
Reduced price
$8,500 obo 352-726-5715
CHEVY
2005 Trailblazer LT
One Owner, Don't Mlssi
$9988 or $199 mo
1-800-733-9138
CHEVY
2006, Equinox LT
Only 14k Miles. 1 Owner
Hurry! Call!
1-800-716-2219
CHEVY
BLAZER '99 LS 4dr. 126k
mi. loaded, great cond. sun-
roof, $4k obo
352-422-0065
CHEVY
TRAILBLAZER
'06 $12,995. Ocala
Volvo. (352) 629-7299
DODGE
2002, Durango LT.
4x4, Must Seel Nice!
$7995 or $169 mo
1-800-733-9138
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air & ex-
haust, Exc. Cond. $6,000


obo
(352) 344-0505
FORD
'01 Expedition, perfect
cond. Exc. tires.96K.Mi.
$5,800.(352) 465-7961
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl drive,
class 3 hitch, Orig owner.
Great shape & price.
$8,750. 352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
GMC SUBURBAN
1993 4 WD, 454 rebuilt
eng., new transm., great ti-
res, good cond. $3,700
abo
(352) 201-1413
HONDA
2007, CR-V, EX
24K Miles, 1 Owner,
Sunroof $299 mo, WAC
1-800-716-2219
HYUNDAI
'04 Santa Fe, V6,
Like new. $9,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299


CLASSIFIED




'06 Civic,$10,995
Ocala Volvo
(352) 629-7299
KIA
2008, Rondo V6 Auto,
Crossover Only $13,988
or $239 mo
1-800-733-9138
MAZDA
2007, CX-7 Low Miles -
7 to choose from
$12,990 or $219 mo,
WAC 1-800-716-2219
MAZDA
2008, Tribute
9k Orig Miles, 1 Owner
A Diamond! $299 mo
1-800-716-2219
PLYMOUTH
1999, Voyager
7 Pass, Perfect for
Family Only $5995
1-800-733-9138
TOYOTA
'03, 4-Runner SR5, 6 cyl
leather, moon roof
tow pkg. $9,850 firm
(352) 563-9834
VOLVO
'06 XC 70, $21,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299



FORD '06 F-150
Crew cab XLT. Tow pkg
& topper, 47K mi.
Exc cond. LOADED
$18,900/obo. (352)
634-1378; 795-2053
JEEP
'05 Wrangler,
Unlimited. $15,995 Ocala
Volvo
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA '94
Pickup, cold A/C, diamond
plate toolbox, topper,
$4,000. obo.352-621-3764




1996 DODGE CARGO
VAN $1,800 obo
(352) 572-7984
1997 DODGE CARAVAN
Runs and Looks Great!
New PartsRebuilt Tranny
$1450.00 OR Best Offer!
4 Cyclinder 176,000 Miles
(352)476-7185
04'CHEVY
EXPRESS EXT. VAN LS
3/4 ton 60 V-8, tow pkg,
doors ea. side & rear.
$11,600
(352) 795-2975
CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872
DODGE
'94, Ram 350,
Full size, work Van
$1,500 obo
(352) 527-2241
Ford
1996 Windstar GL V6,
112k, mi. loaded, cold
a/c, great shape, 8
pass .$2500
(352) 422-2611
DODGE CALIBER
'07 Ocala Volvo.$12,995
(3521 629-7299
MAZDA
...... MPV.S9,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
- TOYOTA
'08 Corolla $13,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
ALAN NUSSO
Licensed Broker









LIFE & HEALTH
INSURANCE
* ANNUITIES
LONG TERM CARE
* DISABILITY
* LIFE SETTELMENTS
352-422-6956
.A. comus AMI


AT V
08' Honda, 4x4
W/reverse. 500 CC
15 Hrs. New $6,800
(352) 302-8852
HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains & tows
heavy loads. $4700/or
trade. 352- 563-0615
Crystal River




1995 HONDA HELIX
Motorscooter Exc. cond.
under 11k mi. LOTS OF
DELUXE EXTRAS II TRYKE
KIT ALSO AVAILABLE
$2,395 obo (352)
621-0248
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. Hi perf.
Over $43,000 in receipts.
17k mi. $12,000
352-563-0615
Crystal River
'04 KAWASAKI
800 Vulcan Classic Hwy &
Sissy bars, windshield,
cover. $3200.Reduced.
352-419-5819
Harley Davidson
05 Road King Classic
Lots of chrome, stage 1 kit,
8K, many X-tras $14,500
352-613-6215
Harley Davidson
2005, XL1200 Custom. Un-
der 7k mi.Screamin Eagle
Performance Pkg & more.
Gar.kept $7500 (352)
209-7495
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80", com-
pletely serviced, good
shape. Ex.
access. $5,895. obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 Mi.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic inch
S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered Hooker
headers. New Gangster
white walls, seat in all
leather bik ostrich skin,
Paint by Jesse James
painter of Calf., w/Double
Damon signature, House of
Color paint, Bik w/colored
ghost flames on all sheet
metal. 2" Carlini handle
bars. Chrome to max, This
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for nice
tractor w/bucket or bobcat
etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815


-77
Shadow Arrow 06, 714K
,mi. garage kept, not in
rain, floorboard $6200 obo
(347)223-7269 aft 3:30
KAWASKI
'00 1100 CC,15K.
Mi. Very fast many
extra's. $4k
obo.(352)621-3764
SCOOTER
'06 Suzuki, 400
Bergman. 4,200 Mi. Like
new cond. $4,500
(352) 382-2715
IT'S TAX T E!
There's Still Time Left
STo Place YourAd Call
563-5592 i



319-0405 SUCRN
4/8 meeting
Academy of
Environmental Science
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Board of Directors
for the Academy of Envi-
ronmental Science will
hold a regular monthly
meeting at 2:30 pm on
Wednesday, April 8, 2009
at the Academy of Envi-
ronmental Science, a
Charter School sponsored
by the Citrus County
School District, located at
12695 West Fort Island
Trail, Crystal River, Florida,
The purpose of the meet-
Ing Is to discuss and act
upon any business that
needs to come before
the Board of Directors. A
copy of the Agenda Is
available for public re-.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
(352) 527-0679
SUZUKI '06
Boulevard, C50, mint cond.
Only 600 miles.
Call Gary 352-563-5502
VENTO PHANTOM
Scooter, 318 miles, 150CC,
Like new. $2,190/obo.
352-422-2433
YAMAHA
'05 YZ125 DIRT BIKE
Race ready. Many ex-
tras. $2500. 352-
586-1683: 586-9349



view at the Academy of-
fice.
if any person decides to
appeal a decision made
by the Board of Directors
with respect to any mat-
ter considered at this
meeting, that person may
need to Insure that a ver-
batim record of the pro-
ceedings is made, which
record should include tes-
timony and evidence
upon which that person's
appeal Is based.
Steve Farnsworth
Chair, Board of Directors
Academy of
Environmental Science,
Inc
Published one (1) time In
Citrus County Chronicle,
April 5, 2009.


967-0407 DAILYCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN,
I purchased a Ski-Barge type boat hull, from Robert
Hutchinson who purchased It from Rodney McRae.
Anyone with an Interest In this boat hull please
contact Oliver Kelley at P.O. Box 489, Homosassa, FL
34487 or call 352-302-3306
Published seven (7) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
April 1,2, 3, 4, 5. 6 and 7, 2009.

320-0405 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote Notice- Supervisor of Elections
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given:
Tom Asselln
Last Known Address of
4156 East Lake Park Drive
Hernando, Florida 34442
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote Is In
question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of
Elections, in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond
will result In a determination of Ineligibility by the Super-
visor and your name will be removed from the state-
wide voter registration system. If further assistance Is
needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections at the
below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 North Apopka Avenue
Inverness, Florida, 34450

Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle
April 5, 2009.


321-0405 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote Notice- Supervisor of Elections
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given:
Ryan Sharp
Last Known Address of
2090 West Howard Place
Citrus Springs, Florida 34434
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote Is In
question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of
Elections, In Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond
will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Super-
visor and your name, will be removed from the state-
wide voter realstrationr system. If further assistance Is
-.ee 3 :: rin.i: i ir.s supervisor of Elections at the
. -,. 11.1 3 :1 :re: callal 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 North Apopka Avenue
inverness, Florida, 34450

Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle
April 5, 2009.

309-0412 SUCRN
Lecanto HS- Main Electrical Service Improvement
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and per-
forming all work necessary and incidental to
LECANTO HIGH SCHOOL - MAIN ELECTRICAL SERV-
ICE IMPROVEMENT will be received by the Citrus County
School Board prior to 2:00 P.M. local time 21 APRIL 2009 in
the Purchasing Department, Citrus County School Board,
Building 300, 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida,
34450-4698. Immediately following all bids received will be
opened and read aloud in Building 300, Purchasing Depart-
ment.

Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid
bond in the amount of not less than five percent (5%) of the
maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee that the Bidder, if
awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after
written notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a
written Contract with the Citrus County School Board, in ac-
cordance with the accepted Bid, and give a surety bond satis-
factory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hun-
dred percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30)
days after the date set for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School
Board Certificate of Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County
School Board construction projects. Prime contractors must
be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to
submitting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the
bid limits specified on their pre-qualification certificate. For
contractor pre-qualification information call the Citrus
County School Board Facilities and Construction Depart-
ment at 352/726-1931, ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime
Contractors, and optional for sub-contractors, will
start at LECANTO HIGH SCHOOL MAIN OFFICE IN
LECANTO EDUCATION COMPLEX.
B. Conference will occur: 02 APRIL 2009, 10:00 A.M.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract
Documents from VERRANDO ENGINEERING CO., INC.,
1111 NE 25th AVENUE, SUITE 401, OCALA FL 34470,
PHONE (352) 854-2664 upon deposit of a check made paya-
ble to the Citrus County School Board in the amount of
$50.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will be made upon the
return of these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten
(10) days after the opening of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right
to award the Bid to the lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive
any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to reject any and
all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination
of the best interests of the School District.
CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVERNESS, FLORIDA
BY: Sandra Himmel
Superintendent of Schools

Published there (3) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
March 29, April 5 and 12, 2009.


322-0405 SUCRN
4/15 Special Master Hearing
PUBLIC NOTICE

The public Is hereby notified that the Citrus County
Code Enforcement will conduct its monthly Special
Master Hearing on Wednesday, April 15, 2009 @ 9:00
A.M. In the Lecanto Government Building,
Multi-purpose Room 166. 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any
and all persons Interested are invited to attend. The
following case(s) will be heard by the Code Enforce-
ment Special Master; however cases may abate prior
to hearing date. If you have questions, contact Code
Enforcement at (352) 527-5350.

Baker, William and Hackman. David
2265 S. Rock Crusher Rd. Homosossa, FL
It shall be a violation to keep, dump, store, place or de-
posit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disa-

of Ordinances, Section 20-41.
Brannen Bank
9435 N. Milam Way Citrus Springs, FL
Enclosed two (2) room additions without a valid Devel-
opment Order In violation of LDC 2020
Butler Estate, Helen ATiN: Carol Ann Kelly
8182 W. Vick Ct1 Crystal River, FL
it shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of abandoned property, junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(b). To Wit: Mobile home
frame, insulation, framing and siding
Crawford, William


5141 S. Polnte Dr. Inverness, FL
Failure to build a single family dwelling to approved site
plan LDC 4245.

Digulseppl. Stanley & Dana
3314 N. Carl G. Rose Hwy. Hernando, FL
Violation of LDC 2020 Failure to obtain Development
Order for building storage area on existing concrete
slab & approval for grading of site.

Downing, Gregory Scott
1110 N. Crescent Dr. Crystal River, FL
Installation of carport without a Development Order
LDC 2020
Fleming Jr., John Lamar
5800 W. Green Acres St. Homosassa. FL
Installing a shed without a valid Development Order
LDC 2020

Uanos, Juana
2603 W. Fairfax Ct. Lecanto, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have on accu-
mulation of abandoned property. junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: Trash, junk & de-
bris

Massey, James & Maire M.
8346 W. Rainbow Oaks Ct. Crystal River, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of abandoned property, junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: Ironing board,
wheel barrow, lawnmower, gas can, furniture cushions,
Christmas tree, household furniture, bookcases, tapes
and misc. debris.

Myers, Richard D.
7051 N. Castiebury Rd. Hernando, FL
Violation of LDC 2020 Failure to obtain Development
Order
Myers, Richard D.
7051 N. Castlebury Rd. Hernando, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of abandoned property, junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above property. Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: Building materi-
als, roofing, furniture, household garbage, shelving & 2
trailers full of junk.

Myers, Richard D.
7051 N. Castlebury Rd. Hernando, FL
It shall be a violation to keep, dump, store, place or de-
posit abandoned, unlicensed Inoperable, junked, disa-
bled, wrecked, discarded, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles
on any property, street or highway, Citrus County Code
of Ordinances, Section 20-41. Old boat and trailer
Myers, Richard D.
7051 N. Castlebury Rd. Hernando, FL
Violation of LDC 4422 E Prohibits the use of storage
containers as storage units.
Pechan. Edward
3850 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. Bay 8 Inverness, FL
Opening a business without a valid Development Or-
der LDC 2020, To Wit: Bear's Den.
Qwlk Pack & Ship of Homosassa, LLC ATTN: David
Fenwick
5664 S. Ocelot Pt. Homosassa, FL
Appealing a demolition order
Schwleckert, Robert & Hannigan, Wendl
111 W. Harvard St. Inverness, FL
Construction of an enclosed accessory structure & an
open-sided accessory structure w/out a valid Develop-
ment Order LDC 2020.
Schwieckert.:Robe, Robert & Hannlgan, Wendi
111 W. Harvard St. Inverness, FL
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm
or- corporation to keep, dump, store, place or deposit
abandoned, unlicensed, Inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on
any property, street, or highway, Article IV, Section
20-41. Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Box
van with no valid tag & a fiat tire.

Sinclair, Ilse H. & David Alien
6941 W. Crosbeck Ct. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to keep, dump, store, place or de-
posit abandoned, unlicensed, Inoperable, junked, disa-
bled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles
on any property, street or highway, Citrus County Code
of Ordinances, Section 20-41.
Sinclair, lise H. & David Allen
6941 W. Crosbeck Ct. Homosassa, FL
Installation of a deck without a valid Development Or-
der LDC 2020

Sinclair, Ilse H. & David Alien
6941 W. Crosbeck Ct. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of abandoned property, junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: Trash, tires, appli-
ances, mattresses and debris
* -Tiir, i:,t:,.n H El: obeth Ann
i ,' ( '..,'-,-i-ir ir -1-rnando. FL
. ioiarl.:.r. tr LD.- 0i_ Failure to obtain 'Developrfint
Order and 4420 D Oversize accessory building.

Staslo, Joseph
6714 S. Frankfurter Way Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of abandoned property, junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: Plastics, metals,
glass, furniture and appliances

Stretch, Bernard A.
6267 S. Natascha Pt. Homosassa, FL
Utility hookup and occupancy of a travel trailer In ex-
cess of 14 days In a 12 month period, LDC 2030.C.1.(c).
Strelch, Bernard A.
6297 S. Natascha Pt, Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of abandoned property, junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: Boxes, card-
board, pieces of wood
Stretch, Bernard A.
6267 S. Natascha Pt. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of abandoned property, junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(b). To Wit: Abandoned
construction matedals/failure to furnish on-site litter re-
ceptacles, etc. Wood, bricks, plastic materials, chain
link fencing

Strelch, Bernard A.
6297 S. Natascha Pt. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to keep, dump, store, place or de-
posit abandoned, unlicensed, Inoperable, Junked, disa-
bled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles
on any property, street or highway, Citrus County Code
of Ordinances, Section 20-41.
Stretch, Bernard A.
6297 S. Natascha Pt. Homosassa,. FL
Installation of a shed without a valid Development Or-
der LDC 2020 and Installation of a porch enclosure
without a valid Development Order LDC 2020
Stretch, Bernard A.
6267 S, Natascha Pt. Homosassa, FL
Installation of a porch without a valid Development
Order LDC 2020

Thomas. Octavia M.
521 W. Duquet PI. Citrus Springs, FL
Installation of retaining wall without a valid Develop-
ment Order LDC 2020

Tubman. Glen
8279 W. Homosassa Trail Homosassa, FL
Construction to a building without a valid Develop-
ment Order in violation of the LDC 2020

Wells Fargo Bank NA Trustee
6958 S. Sorrell Ave. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of abandoned property, junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above property. Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(b). To Wit: Abandoned
construction materials/failure to furnish on-site litter re-
ceptacles, etc. A roof, plywood and 5 gallon bucket
Wells Forgo Bank NA Trustee
6958 S. Sorrell Ave. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of abandoned property, junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above property. Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(o). To Wit: A Tire.

Wright, Russell J.
3624 E. Delight St. Hernando, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of abandoned property, junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above property. Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: Buckets, crates.
appliances, furniture, windows and household
garbage
Yates, James E. & Patty


1888 N. Scenic Way Crystal River, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accu-
mulation of abandoned property, junk & debris (as de-
fined) on the above property. Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. Section 20-31(b). To Wit: Abandoned
construction materials/failure to furnish on-site litter re-
ceptacles, etc. Buckets, trash cans, Insulation, con-
struction debris.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the Code Enforcement Special Master with
respect to any matter considered at this public hear-
ing, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record
of the proceedings made which record shall Include
the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is
to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office.
Citrus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450, phone: (352) 341-6560, 15
least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352)
341-6580.
MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE ENFORCEMENT

Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle.
April 5, 2009.





CIRuS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE.


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k'Adiinl' ; 2' k,
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'AR$3A995


A FEW EXAMPLES ABOVE * MOST MAKES & MODELS AVAILABLE!
DON'T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY TO $AVE THOUSAND$!


SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009 D9















CHEVY CH SLRDOG E eep
.M-ddlh- * * w �lfsay


:I w


I l-si


'07 GRAND MARQUIS
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 4153
$10,988


'07 COROLLA
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 6145
$10,988


'07 TAURUS
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 4154
$8,988


'06 TOWN CAR
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 3152
$13,998


'07 LUCERNE
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
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'06 CTS
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
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'04 RANGER
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special pricing and info on this vehicle
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'05 MUSTANG
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special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 4150
$9,998


CALL 800-584-8755 Ext. 5000 FREE


HR. RECORDED


ht0 sUNDAYAPRIL 5 2009


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'06 F-150
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 4152
$15,998


'06 SENTRA
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 6139
$7,988


'05 FOCUS
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 4149
$6,998


'05 CARAVAN
Free 24 hour recorded message with
special pricing and info on this vehicle
800-584-8755 ext. 3149
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E2 SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009


Malz tapped as
Culture Icon
What is a Culture Icon? A
Culture Icon
is someone
that makes
decisions that
are right for
the market
center re-
gardless of
individual im-
pact. Doing Barb Malz
something Keller Williams
right without Realty.
wanting to be recognized or ac-
knowledged for it. Being part of
the solution and not part of the
problem. Who is this person?
Debbie Rector, team. leader,
Keller Williams Realty of Cit-
rus County is pleased to an-
nounce our Culture Icon for
April, Barb Malz. She can be
reached at 212-2439 or the
Keller Williams office 746-7113
for all your real estate needs.
Latiff
named
top
agent A"
again - -
Steve Lat- L
iff, a Realtor .......
with ERA Latiff
Suncoast ERA Suncoast
Realty in Realty.
Crystal River,
was recently recognized by the
Realtors Association of Citrus
County at its annual Awards


Breakfast as the top agent in
Citrus County in closed sales
volume in 2008. This is the 14th
straight year that Latiff has
been the number one agent in
Citrus County.
In addition, Steve, a real es-
tate professional since 1983,
has earned other recognition on
a state and national basis for
his accomplishments in 2008.
At its annual International Busi-
ness Conference held recently
in Orlando, Latiff was honored
by ERA Real Estate Systems
as the number three selling
agent in the state of Florida.
This feat gave Steve member-
ship in ERA's Leader's Circle,
its most prestigious group, hon-
oring only the top agents world-
wide.
Steve was also recognized at
the ERA International Business
conference as being ranked
57th in closed sales in the
United States, out of 20,000
agents with ERA.
ERA American
welcomes Swihart


ERA American Realty and
Investments
is pleased to
announce
that Ken Swi-
hart has re-
joined the . '
"American
Team" at ERA [
American in Ken
Inverness. Swihart
Ken began ERAAmericar
his real estate Realty.


n


8- - ^

Dawn
Theroux
ERAAmerican
Realty.


Davis
ERAAmerican
Realty.



S-'-



Lou Miele
ERAAmerican
Realty.


career at
ERA in 2001.
Ken, his
wife Stacey,
who is a guid-
ance coun-
selor at
Lecanto High
School, and
daughters
Janelle and
Jessica are
residents of
the Inverness
Highlands.
Ken can be
reached at
726-5855 or
kenswihart@
yahoo.com.
ERAAmer-
ican Realty is
also proud to
recognize
Dawn Ther-
oux as the
Top Listing
associate and
Jackie Davis
as the Top
Sales associ-
ate for March
for the Inver-
ness office.
Dawn and
Jackie would


be delighted to help you with all
your real estate needs and they
can be reached at the ERA
American Realty office in Inver-
ness at (352) 726-5855.
For our Beverly Hills office,
Top Listing honors go to Lou
Miele.


S� Top Sales
and Top
r- , Sales Volume
-. honors go to
Rob Hard for
March.
Lou and
Rob can be
Rob Hard reached at
ERAAmerican ERAAmeri-
Realty. can Realty's
office in Bev-
erly Hills at (352) 746-3600.

DIGEST PHOTOS
N Headshots of real es-
tate agents and associ-
ates submitted for the
Real Estate Digest are
kept on file in the
Cnroncle Editorial De-
partment. It is the re-
sponsibility of the
individuals submitting
news notes to ensure
headshots have been
sent to the newsroom,
and to advise staff of
any name changes.
* Photos need to be in
sharp focus. Photos
need to be in proper ex
posure: neither too
light nor too dark.
* Photos submitted elec-
tronically should be in
maximum resolution
JPEG (.jpg) format.
* Email headshots to go
with the Real Estate Di-
gest to newsdesk@
chronicieon line.com,
attn: HomeFront.


CFCC Citrus


to offer courses


in real estate


Special to the Chronicle

Central Florida Commu-
nity College is accepting
registration for real estate
courses in April at the Cit-
rus Campus, 3800 S. Lecanto
Highway in Lecanto.
* Real Estate Taxes:
What Every Agent Should
Know: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.Thurs-
day, April 9. The fee is $50.
* Brokers Exam Cram:
April 10 to 12. The class
meets 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fri-
day and Saturday and 1 to 5
p.m. on Sunday. The fee is
$105.
* Sales Associate Exam
Cram: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Satur-
day and Sunday, April 11
and12. The fee is $99. This
class will meet in Building


L3, Room 202.
* Red Flags Property In-
spection Guide: 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Thursday, April 16. The
course fee is $50.
* Property Management
and Managing Risk: 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Tuesday, April 21.
The fee is $50.
* Real Estate Principles
and Practices, Sales Associ-
ate Prelicense: From 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Monday, Wednes-
days and Thursdays, April
27 through May 14. The fee
is $300.
These classes meet in
Building L2, Room 201A,
unless otherwise indicated.
For information or registra-
tion, call 249-1210. Register
online any time at
www.CFCCtraining.com.


AWARD WIMI ...Nm
MULTI-MILLION SSS
PRODUCER 0
* 35-30ao-3179 l-j,:LtJ B~- j
Bring mnl . :IJJrn JIL] . z -1 i
o��er.. R I....v g. l. *., i " ',1


S. . .Spectacular
. water view at
The Landings
.:. *' ' of Inverness
3/2/2
w/private,
heated pool.
Paradise Found!
P" riced to sell
ew 50 pc sideshow at ghrealty.com fast at
View 50 pic slideshow at ghrealty.com $229,900


the link between plans and reality ,

Dennis amato
State Certified CGC-0043444

GENERAL CONTRACTOR, INC.
A TRADITION OF QUALITY SINCE 1972
t * Consultation & Project/Plan Review
- * Design Services
D *Cost Estimating * Design-Build Construction
* Custom Crafted Homes * Waterfront Homes
S * "Cracker-Style" Homes & Buildings
* Residential Renovations
- * Commercial Construction & Remodeling
* Adaptive Re-Use & Restoration of Buildings C ,


Real Estate DIGEST


1 I


I~ 1 ACRE CORNER LOT. BLUE JAY.........................$110,000
PINE RIDGE
S4.5 ACRES, 5200 DEPUTY................................. $99,900
7059 LECANTO HWY.
Ij RESIDENTIAL, 10ACRES ...............................$100,000
INVERNESS
F 42" ML M ^^m 1/4 ACRE, 829 GREAT PINE...............................$17,000
I n 4a n.mYmHSr. I______________


~







Cimus Cou~vrr (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY APRIL 5,2009 E3


Get your home


clean while


being green


It's almost spring. It's
time to get your cleaning
and organizing plans
under way. Get an early
start, and you can
incorporate new
green-living tips
into your life, too.
When spring ar-
rives, you can
enjoy the nice
weather instead
of cleaning in-
doors. Don't try to
tackle it all in a
weekend. Break Sara
your home into F
sections, and LIV
work on one area
at a time.
Here are a few green-
cleaning suggestions to get
you started.
HOME SCENTS: Air
fresheners mask smells. To
make your home smell good,
open windows and let the
fresh air in. Bring in house-
plants, and empty trash
daily. If you enjoy scents,
you can combine a few
drops of essential oil and
water in a spray bottle and
use as a room mist. You can
simmer natural items such
as apple and citrus peels,
cinnamon or fresh mint
leaves and water in a slow
cooker, place an open box of
baking soda in a room, or
soak a cotton ball with
vanilla or essential oil, too.
LAUNDERING: When
you wash clothing, bedding
and linens, consider a green
detergent such as Seventh
Generation, choose concen-
trated laundry detergents,
or make your own.
Use vinegar as a fabric
softener, and hang-dry
clothing at least part of the
time. Keep in mind that sun-
shine bleaches naturally.
And most clothing and tow-
els don't have to be washed
after a single use.
Before tossing out worn


or outgrown clothing, con-
sider ways to reuse it. Can it
be mended? Can it be re-
constructed/upcycled? A
pillowcase or
button-down
dress shirt can
become a toddler
dress. Visit Ev-
erything Sewing
(www. every-
S thingsewing.net)
for a free pillow-
case dress pat-
tern and Crafts-
Noel ter (www.craft-
:. L ster. org) for a
ING free tutorial on
transforming a
dress shirt. There are a lot
of possibilities for reusing
fabric. So reuse or donate
before you toss.
The age of entitlement is
over. Can you feel the shift?
The majority of Americans
are gaining perspective and
realizing there are many
products and services they
can live without. This de-
crease in consumer spend-
ing equates to an increase in
savings, which leads to an
increase in investments. In
other words, frugality isn't
causing the recession or
worsening the economy. It's
creating infectious self-re-
liance that benefits us all.
Frugality empowers you
to make consistent choices
that are best for your family.
It begins with you. Let's face
it: We've been overspending
for a long time. The econ-
omy will adjust. You only
need food, clothing and
shelter. You can see how
much more you've chosen to
believe you need. It's ironic
that as a society, we can
judge others who complain
about money problems, and
pinpoint all the ways they
overspend. Maybe you know
See FRUGAL/Page E7


Follow these guidelines to help en-
sure timely publication of submit-
ted material. The earlier Chronicle
editors receive submissions, the
better chance of notes running
more than once.
* Community notes: At least one
week in advance of the event.


* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday
for publication Sunday.
* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday
for publication Sunday.
* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednes
day for publication Sunday.
* Chalk Talk: 4 p.m. Monday for


publication Wednesday.
* Health Notes: 4 p.m. Friday for
publication Tuesday.
* Religious events : 4 p.m. Tuesday
for publication Saturday.
* Real Estate Digest: 4 p.m. Thurs-
day for publication Sunday.


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SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009 E3


CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-s


':






E4 SUNDAY. APRIL 5. 2009


Reduce storm damage "


by preparing property "

.- FosDiCK


Associated Press

Effective storm proofing borrows a
page from football: Offense is the best
defense.
A little well-timed prevention goes a
long way toward reducing weather-re-
lated damage.
And landscaping is the place to
start. Although many tasks are storm-
specific, some pruning, raking, plant-
ing and picking up will save property
owners big bucks when any kind of
gale blows through.
"It's all about the plants," said
Leslie Chapman-Henderson of Talla-
hassee, Fla., president and chief exec-
utive officer of FLASH, the Federal
Alliance for Safe Homes.
"One of the most meaningful things
we can do is change the landscape, no
matter what we're facing. That will
make a big difference."
Trees and drainage always play a
role. Take a long, slow walk around
your property. Notice how rainwater
flows through the yard. Ensure that
any runoff moves well away from the
house, to prevent a damaged founda-
tion or flooded basement Add berms
and rain gardens where needed.
Prune any overhanging or damaged
tree limbs that might cause trouble in
high winds.
If the threat is wildfires, remove
potential organic fuels from around
the house: Shop around for weather-
resistant landscape materials, such as
pebble mulches and succulents, plants
that retain water in their fleshy leaves,
stems and roots.
"You can do some basic things to
keep costs down," Chapman-Hender-
son said. "Get the neighbors together
and involved."
Prioritize. Take on the biggest proj-
ects well before any storm watches are
posted.
"A distressing number of homes
have had trees fall through them over
the past few years, so have them in-
spected," said Dan Gill, a horticultur-
ist with Louisiana State University's
AgCenter. "If there's any question
about a tree leaning too much, or
branches too close to the house, get
them taken care of."
Large trees can fall on your neigh-
bor's property, too, so include that on
any potential hazards' list, Gill said.
"Smaller trees as a group hold up
See STORMS/Page E7


A look at some kinds of severe
weather and how to prepare for them:
* Hurricanes: Use plants that are
wind and salt tolerant. Natives are
best for wetter areas, such as palms,
cypress and magnolia trees. Con-
tainerized plants can be moved in-
doors quickly. Prune overhanging
limbs from large trees; stake smaller
ones Pick up or secure any garden
debris or ornaments that can become
projectiles in high winds.
* Flooding: Lawns take a beating
from floods. Grass can survive several
days underwater in early spring, while
the ground is still thawing and before
growth has begun But standing water
on hot summer days will cause signifi-
cant damage. Ponding generally oc-
curs in low, poorly drained areas after
the high water has receded. Take note
of those locations and re-shape them.
Reseed or re-sod where the grass has
been killed. Quickly and carefully re-
move any silt dropped by floodwaters.
* Tornadoes: Soften your land-
scaping Unless you re in a wildfire-
prone zone, replace crushed rock and
pebbles used as protective mulch with
shredded bark. That could lessen
structural damage should it be thrown
into the air.
a Wildfires: The amount of cleared
space around a home is directly re-
lated to the home's ability to survive a
wildfire, the Colorado State Forest
Service says. Create fire-safe vegeta-
tion. Mow grasses low around struc-
tures. Plant flowers in widely separated
beds. Shrubs can be "ladder fuels," en-
abling fires to spread, so plant them
well away from one another and far
from trees. You don't need to clear-cut
your property, but prune branches at
least 10 feet above the ground and dis-
tance trees from structures.
a Hail: Protect prized plants with a
shelter or cover. Plants that the hail
has stripped of leaves generally will
grow back. Plants with pounded
stems, however, may not. Wait a few
days to see if they appear to be recov-
ering before re-planting or calling it a
season. Hail-damaged fruit should be
picked and discarded before it rots
and attracts insects and other garden
pests. Flowers hammered by hail may
survive, especially if they're among
the varieties that need deadheading.


INj�


1336 N. Chance Way 3197 N Sherlock Pt
$239,000 $179,000
Brand New 3/2/2 home has a great entry w/ Nice 3/2/2 home on cul-de-sac street. Local
10' ceilings & 8' drs thru out. Bright & cheery pool/clubhouse, amenities. Great rm, split
w/upgrades. Kit. has granite counters, island plan, all appl. included. Enclosed lanai,
& crown molding. MBA w/jetted tub, dual concrete paver oatio and beautiful, relaxing
sinks & walk in shower. view - priced to sell.
352-527-1820 MLS# 323136 352-746-0744 MLS# 330722


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E SNA, API 520


r a ]n
vs
IF vour
Go "lance







SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009 E5


*Updated 2BD / 2 BA
* Golfing Community
SBright & Cheery
* Glassed In Lanai
* Overlooks Heated Pool
* Carport
DEBRA PILNY (352) 637-6200
HomelnCitrusCounty.com


2500' NEARLY NEW 4BR, 3BA, 3 car gar
home w/huge kitchen w/center island, office,
screened lanai built 2005.
Din Cypress Blvd W to Cypress Blvd. E, left on
Corkeood L Glrindge nghl on Maidenbih hi. o
lcil on Boalaf l 30.
NANCY BOWDISH * (352) 628-7800
Direct: (3521) 422-0296
Visul Tours at www.b.uydtVnsounlv.rm o


WATERFRONT HOME
WITH 200' ON CANAL
2BR, 2BA stilt home with floating dock. Huge screened
r-:.,-.., f&.-^ ;,= b tife l ,..tf , l ?i jrut;


NANCY BOWDISH - (352) 628-7800
Direct: (3521422-0296
Visual Tours at vww buytoenrscbnty.com


*2.5 ACRE SPREAD * 2 LARGE PORCHES
* 2/2 with carport/sheds - Zoned for horses
* Nice wildlife area
* South of Inverness
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997
Email: elliesutton@remax.net


Spacious Arthur Rutenberg Pool Home
3BR Split Plan w/Office
Large breakfast Nook w/Bay Windows
Lg. Walk-in Closet in Master
Huge Solar-Heated Pool
Oversized 22x27 Garage
JEYTE GILSON 352-302-8936
Email: Joyte.Gilson@remax.net
Virtual Tours at www.llveyourdreamteam.net












LIKE NEW - MUST SEE!!
Move right in, This 2/2 home offers you a formal dining
room, eat-in kitchen, large living room. Outdoor utility shed
with power (14 X 17). 2 master bedrooms
with full baths, beautiful professionally
landscaped, well kept mobile.
JOE LOPEZ
(352) 637-6200
Direct: (352) 220-8405


JUST REDUCED TO $736,000, this awesome
riverfront home in historical Dunnellon, 4/3 has
all the special features including a wood-burning
fireplace, vaulted ceilings, separate
office, formal dining and
large master suite.

LINDA BARNES * (352) 239-4844
Email: lbarnes@remax.net












INGLIS - 3/2 WATERFRONT ON THE
WITHLACOOCHEE RIVER
1853 sq. ft. of living area, wonderful dock,
beautiful landscaping, with many
updates inside and out.
COME TAKE A LOOK! r
Kevin & Karen Cunningham
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcneingham@remax.not


LARGE HOME + XTRA BLDG. LOT!
Huge reduction on this beautiful home featuring over
92 sq. ft. of living space. 3/3/2 w/2 family rooms,
fireplace remodeled w/tile throughout; new windows in
O" C-'i,'fi. p.nt" n~~-i.er A'O 'rind r -

Vicki Love 352-697-0712
Email: Vicklovea"Remax.tne l
www.Vic klo EHomes.com









,,-v-I -a'N ll


LOVELY 2BR/2BA/1 CAR GARAGE
in desirable Windermere complex is
fully furnished if
buyer desires.
Susan Knowles
(352) 228-9015
Email: susanaknowles@remax.net


SELLER MOTIVATED. Make an offer I This is a 2 ;
bedroom, 2 bath, detached Rosewood Villa in Sugarmill
Woods with an EXTRA LOT included. This villa has an
11 a ''o-. p t.c - .d C ,.,-d ,t.: A,

DAWN WRIGHT ,
(352) 400-1080 ' '
Email: daonwright.4taompabay.rr.com


LOOKING FOR A RESORT FEEL BUT IN A QUAINT SETTING'
Remodeled 2'2 * New Kchdien Cabinets
SUpdated Kitden Ceram Tile in Bolth Baths

THIS ONE IS A MUST SEE!!! -
Cheryl Lambert
352-637-6200
Email: heryllambert'femax.net


i


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHIRONICLIJ





ES Sunday, April 5, 2009





HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
It is also distributed to approximately
300 business locations throughout Citrus County.


Display advertising information.................. .......... 56;


c s o n:::::::::::: :


teCws mi o n nan on................ .................. ........... .................................


3-5592


-"ooU


. - ........................ ;..............................newsdesk iclronicleonline.com
Online real estate listings.......................... www.naturecoasthomefront.com
Sign up for www.naturecoasthomefront.com ..................................... 563-3206
Advertise online..................................................................................563-3206
.........................................................NCCsales@chronicleonline.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

_ CHikOMCIE


To have your news in the Chronicle's HomeFront section, you may mail, fax or email the
infonnation to the Chronicle, 1624 North Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. The
newsroom fax number is 563-3280 and email is newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.
You may also drop off your information at the Meadowcrest office or the newspaper's
Inverness office at 106 W. Main Street.
When submitting information, please make sure it is printed or typed, is concise and includes a
contact telephone number.
If you have any questions or comments, contact the section editor, Mike Arnold, at 563-5660
e-maill - newsdesk@chronicleonline.com).
HOW TO GET YOUR PHOTOS INTO THE PAPER:
-Weaccept color and black and white photos. We also accept negatives. We do not accept Polaroid prints.
- All photos need tlo cropped tightly. That means no wasted space in your photo.
- Photos need to be in sharp focus. We do not accept photos that am out of focus.
-Be sun that photos or negatives you submit are laken usitng 35 min film. Others will not be accepted.
-Please include your address and phone number on any photos or negatives submitted.
- Pntos negatives submitted will be returned if supplied with a return envelope and postage.
- When identifying please do o so from left to right, front to back.
- For more information, please contact Matt Beck. photo team leader, at 563-5660.


Wasp can help fight



pesky mole crickets


M ole crickets are inva-
sive pests whose night-
time feeding can
damage landscape plants. Mole
crickets have a broad diet, in-
cluding vegetables, bedding
plants and Bahia, Bermuda and
St. Augustine grass. Luckily,
there is a powerful, inexpen-
sive and natural solution for
controlling mole crickets: the Audre
Larra wasp.
The Larra wasp controls
mole crickets naturally, and you
can easily attract the wasp to your yard by
planting two special plants. Adult wasps
feed on the nectar of larraflower and par-
tridge pea.
Once attracted to your yard, each wasp
lays up to 100 eggs on mole crickets. Once
hatched, the young wasp feeds off the
mole cricket's blood, eventually killing it.
Each generation of wasps kills about 25
percent of the local mole cricket popula-
tion - and there are three generations of
wasps per year compared to only one gen-
eration of mole crickets.
The mole cricket accidentally migrated


here from South America and
populations were able to ex-
pand unchecked due to the lack
of natural enemies in the U.S.
The Larra wasp is a natural
enemy of the mole cricket and
it has been released throughout
Florida to control mole cricket
populations. The wasp is pres-
ent in at least 31 Florida coun-
y Durr ties, including Citrus County.
Mole crickets lay their eggs in
April and May, so now is the
time to add the plants that at-
tract the wasp to your yard, before mole
cricket damage peaks in August through
October. A limited number of free lar-
raflower seed packets are available by
calling (352) 527-5708.
Traditionally, pesticides have been used
to control mole crickets.
One downside to using pesticides to con-
trol any insect is that insects that survive a
pesticide application may have a higher
resistance to the pesticide. As these in-
sects reproduce, the pesticide resistance


See ' - .,'Page Ell


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


Mirror images
PAGE E10
Jane Weber
PAGE E15
Ask the Plumber
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E2
For current. property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the Web site for the Citrus
County Property Appraiser's Of-
fice, www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Sikorski looks at two clocks - which one is most collectible?


Dear John: My mother bought
this clock years and years ago
from an antiques shop in
Maine. The clock is made of white
onyx with a beautiful enamel face. It


measures 17
inches high by
13 1/2 inches
long and 5 7/8
inches wide.
The inside
works appear
to be original
and are
marked "Bost-
on Clock Co.
Boston Pat Dec
26,1880." I dou-
ble-checked
the mark and
1880 is correct.


John Sikorski
SUKORSKI'S
ATTIC


I have a key, but not the original, to
wind it It winds clockwise for the
time and backwards for the strike. It
strikes on the quarter-hour and has a
very pretty chime. It is not running at
this time because I have not wound it
in years, but when cleaned and ad-
justed it keeps time perfectly


I found some general information
about the Boston Clock Co. It was or-
ganized May 29, 1884, in Chelsea,
Mass. It primarily produced wall
clocks, often similar in style to some
of the Howard models, but of lesser
quality. The firm was a large pro-
ducer of good-grade imitation French
carriage, crystal regulator clocks,
and mantel clocks, often in style and
onyx cases. In 1894, the Boston Clock
Company failed.
I could find nothing regarding cur-
rent value, which I would like to
See, . Page E9
This clock was manufactured
by the Boston Clock Company. Al-
though the company closed in 1894,
it is a recognized name among col-
lectors. It could potentially be worth
between $1,000 to $2,000.
- ; :: ; This grandfather clock
was manufactured in the early
1960s. Though it might have some
resale value, it would not be of inter-
est to collectors because it is a re-
production.
Special to the Chronicle


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHfRONICLE


STORMS
Continued from Page E4

better in storms, particularly hurri-
canes," Gill said. "Hurricane winds
generally are stronger higher off the
ground. I encourage people to use
smaller species closer to their homes
and taller trees farther away so if they
do drop branches or go over, there's
less damage."
Continue your yard maintenance as
the storm approaches.
"Batten down the hatches, land-
scape wise," Gill said. "Gather up your
birdbaths, birdfeeders, doghouses,
garden art and children's play equip-
ment. These things can become pro-
jectiles - major issues - once winds
start hitting 100 miles an hour or more.
Store them in the garage."
Anyone growing edible crops should
harvest what they can, even if they
aren't completely ripe.
"There won't be much left after a
storm moves through," Gill said. "Any-
time produce is touched by floodwa-
ter, whether it's a storm surge or water
off the street, discard it. It may be con-
taminated."
Make a list of things that will have to
be tied down, brought inside or other-
wise dealt with in case of a severe
storm. "Then buy the necessary equip-
ment, including the anchors or tie-
downs, now," he said.



FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

a first-time mom who has the perfect
nursery and every baby gadget known
to man or a young couple that has new
furniture, fancy electronics and
credit-card debt, but there's no food in
the fridge. But what about you? Maybe
your overspending or lack of saving
isn't as obvious. No one wants to live
the absolute bare minimum, but most
people would like to be less wasteful
and at least build an emergency fund
and still enjoy life and occasional in-
dulgences. You can without the daily
excess! Wants and needs have become
blurred. We're like gluttonous kids on
Halloween with a big pile of candy.
Every single day you can vote with
your wallet. Nothing changes if you
keep giving your money away So what
are the things you can live without?
Plenty.
SHOPPING: Remember a time
when stores weren't open 24 hours a
day? Increased accessibility gives you
greater options, such as the choice to
shop less often. Do we need to buy
clothing as often as we do? What hap-


Some other Gill-recommended pre-
storm chores:
* Store pesticides and motor fuels
in secure areas and higher than any
potential floodwaters. You don't need
chemicals and toxins coating your
lawn, trees and plants.
* Aquatic gardens need attention.
Potted plants resting on bricks or
blocks to keep them above the water
should be set on the bottom of the
pond until the gales pass. Transfer ex-
pensive fish inside, and in water taken
from the pond.
* Secure fountains and statuary.
Unplug any that require electrical
power and coil up and remove the
cords.
* Water all indoor plants if you in-
tend to evacuate.
* Drag out your garden hose and
spray plants, grass and ornamentals
that were covered by saltwater during
the storm. Rake up any sediment that
collected on shrubs and lawns.
Weather and storm conditions vary
by region, so be sure to contact your
county extension agent for more in-
formation, or look for home improve-
ment stores that offer storm-proofing
workshops.
"The worst feeling you can get in
this business comes from talking with
people afterward who tell you they
had great landscaping but did all the
wrong stuff," Chapman-Henderson
said.
"This is stuff you can control."

opened to patching jeans or having
fewer than five pairs of shoes?
RESTAURANTS: What was once a
special treat has become a way of life
for some people. Replace the extra
large coffee or soda with water once in
a while. Do we really need a few hun-
dred more fast-food restaurants to
open this year? If you can make the
choice to opt out from pricier restau-
rants, you can make the choice to eat
from the comfort of your own home,
too. It's easy. Drive on by. Making pizza
at home tastes great and is rewarding.
BOTTLED WATER: It's like fur
coats, plastic grocery bags and smok-
ing. Save your dignity Grab a reusable
container, and fill it at home.
PARTIES: Ice cream and cake with
family and a couple of friends has
been replaced with expensive cele-
brations with caterers and entertain-
ment. More, more, more. Expectations
grow. Placing some limits (creative
spacing) increases appreciation. This
applies to many areas of life.
HOMES: The money-go-round goes
'round and 'round. Parking in the
driveway because your garage is filled
with stuff you don't have time to enjoy


See FRUGAL/Page E9


a �1~ ~ ~ ~~ U 2ril?3 A~ CIA r W &I ID I~ I jlll w .Traite alt irupco


Single Family I 4Bd- 2.5 Bath-
3 Car / Woodside
Spectacular Cordova model loaded with
upgrades. Priced to sell.
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S ..



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Golf course frontage & a full array of
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TVRG# 1031 $364,900.


-r


Single Family i 3Bd-2Bath-
2Car+Pool / Brentwood
Citrus Hills built home in Brentwood with
high elevation. Very well maintained.
TVRG# 1093 $214,900.

- .

IW. ..'. * . ...- . . ,

Single Family / 4Bd+Den-
2.5Bath-2.5Car / Foxfire
Immaculate pool home loaded With up-
grades. Meticulously landscaped comer lot.
TVRG# 1058 $574,900.


Single Family / 4Bd-3.5Bath-
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Spacious home features upgraded Kitchen
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TVRG# 1014 $549,000.


Detached Villa I 3Bd-2Bath-
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Fully furnished. Oversized preserve
homesite.
TVRG# 1038 $269,900.


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 * (800) 323-7703


SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009 E7


Detached Villa I 3Bd-2Bath-
2Car / Hillside Villas
Absolutely gorgeous furnished villa over-
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TVRG# 1017 $349,999.





Detached Villa / 3Bd-2Bath-
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Oversized garage, enclosed lanai and
select tile floors.
TVRG# 1041 $259,900.





Single Family I 3Bd-2Bath-
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Expanded Avalon model sits on the 3rd Hole
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Detached Villa / 3Bd+Den-
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Bright home w/Guest BR Suite. Tile in wet
areas, Bay Window in Master.
TVRG# 1018 $329,000.


Office in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center


I


I


111PNI( _ � I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E8 SUNnA, APRt. 5, 2009


Questions about 'pressure toilets,'


and a clever conservation tip


GET THE WORD OUT
. Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news re-
leases about upcoming community events. Write the
name of the event, who sponsors it, when and where it
will take place and other details. News releases are
subject to editing. Call 563-5660 for details.


Ed Del Grande
ASK ...
PLUr -;"


Q I read your arti-
cles online and re-
* ally appreciate all
the easy-to-follow informa-
tion. Recently you wrote
about "air-pressurized" toi-
lets that deliver a very pow-
erful flush. We have a
basement toilet where the
drain line has what the
plumber called a "negative
pitch problem" and the toi-
let constantly backs up with
every flush. We've snaked
the line and checked the
main drain with no luck.
Would this type of turbo-toi-
let work for us? If so, could
you install it for us? Also, I'd
like to install a pedestal sink
while you're at it. - Pat in
Mississippi
A: Thanks, Pat. With the
slow economy, it's nice to
know that I can still get
work out there! Unfortu-
nately, I'll have to decline
the job offer due to prior
commitments. But, I'll be
happy to answer your ques-
tion on "air-assisted" toilets.
Air-assisted toilets are also
referred to as "pressure-
lite" toilets because they
use compressed air pres-
sure to add more flushing
power.
The cool thing about
these toilets is that they use
no electricity. The water
pressure in the house
plumbing system is the
force that compresses the
air. Inside the special tank
of a "pressure-lite" toilet is
a closed chamber that gets
filled with water after every
flush. Since the chamber is


I


,*
.


-- ~r7-r


BEAUTIFUL 2003 HEATED POOL HOME!
* 3/2/3 on quiet cul de sac
* Living room has double tray ceiling
* Corian kitchen features 18" tile
* Raised panel cabinets - walk-in pantry
* Family room could be 4th bedroom or office
* Three car garage!
#331155 $234,900


"Always There For You"
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Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
Cell: (352) 634-4346
OFFICE: (352) 382-1700x309


JUST LIKE NEW!
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* Side entry garage with sink
* Real wood floors in living/dining
* Spacious family room off kitchen
#331158 $179,900


SeemV ml , A leoeJI4 l ... l


SHNS file photo courtesy Kohler Company
Be sure to check your drain lines if you are having water-flow problems before you decide
to install a new toilet.


sealed the air cannot es-
cape, so that pocket of air
gets trapped at the top of the
chamber and is compressed
by the water filling the tank.
Because two forces are
now at work (gravity pulling
the water and compressed
air pushing the water) at the
same time, these toilets will
create a very powerful "jet-
like" flush. Under normal
conditions, it is unlikely
these toilets will clog up.
That's why they are becom-
ing popular. Plus, with all
the extra power, they use
less water per flush, saving
thousands of gallons of
water per year.
However, you mention
that your basement-bath-
room drain line has a "neg-
ative pitch," and this creates
a whole new set of rules. Re-
member, toilets are de-

See P:l ; :i T/Page E18


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CITRUS _ CONY(L HOIL UNAARL5 09E


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

because you're working all
the time to pay for it all? Re-
living Groundhog Day isn't a
life. Consider decluttering
and selling or giving away a
few things. Luxuries are
nice, but often, your happy
factor is the same with less
stuff. For example, are mul-
tiple televisions or house-
hold cleaners necessary?
We've become a country
filled with air fresheners.
Baking soda, water and vine-
gar can replace many of your
store-bought cleaners. Con-
sider refillable products, too.
Less chemicals, packaging
and waste. Experiences and
connections with others
make a house a home. Hav-
ing choices is a luxury Hav-
ing time is wealth.


Velcro attracts lint and
miscellaneous debris. Be-
fore long, it doesn't work
well and looks terrible.
Picking the lint out with
your fingernails takes a long
time. You can try using
tweezers, duct tape, metal
pet brushes or a hair comb.
According to a Velcro repre-
sentative, using another
piece of Velcro to clean the
dirty piece works well.
Imagine that! The first tip
offers another method.
Once you get it clean, use an
antistatic spray to prevent
attracting more lint.
CLEAN VELCRO: I was
sitting with my jacket on
and looking at the Velcro
patches that seal the front
shut after you zip it. They
were disgusting. They


barely


Lou Miele, Re
4511 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly
Office: 352-746-31
Cell: (352) 697-1
AME
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU� REALTY &
' * . ... ' -,PINE RIDGE BEAUT



-F .. FABULOUS TERRA
S . . HOME - hi. ),:

u . ,' '. .......... ' "'. ....53
St__ _.. -. | SELLER HIGHLY MO
















MLS#326201: 0.23 Acre, Citrus Springs.....
MLS#329512: 1+ Acres, Hwy. 41, Floral Cit
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MLS#326201: 0.23 Acre, Citrus Springs .....
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MLS#331076: 7+ Acres, Crystal River ........


ATTIC


Continued from Page E6


know so I can insure it. Any help you
could offer would be appreciated. -
D.H., Inverness
Dear D.H.: You have a good-looking
clock made by a widely recognized
company among clock collectors. I
think it would sell in the $1,000 to
$2,000 range.
Dear John: We would like to know if
this clock in the photograph has any
value. The silver globe above the clock
face says Tempus Fugit. It was pur-
chased in the early 1960s. It has West-
ern Germany in small letters at the
bottom and also Barwick in the gold
circle on the face. -D.H., Lecanto
Dear D.H.: Your grandfather clock
was new when purchased in the 1960s.
The clock case style replicates clocks


made in the last quarter of the 18th
century. Clock collectors would not be
interested in it because it is a repro-
duction. There is some dollar value,
but only at the catch-as-catch-can level.
Dear John: Years ago, I inherited a
Roger Troy Peterson cardinal picture
and am wondering if it has any value.
It is a 21 inch by 28 inch picture of two
cardinals on a magnolia branch with
"Copyright 1942 Quaker State Litho-
graphing Company Inc." written below
the picture. It has a couple of water
spots near the frame but none near
the art and the colors appear to be
somewhat faded. I tried to research
this on the Internet but information
was available only to registered deal-
ers. I would appreciate knowing if I
should toss it, keep it, or sell it. I enjoy
listening to your Saturday morning
program. -J.L.S., Crystal River
Dear J.L.S.: Roger Troy Peterson,
1908-96, was born in Old Lyme, Con-


necticut. He was an illustrator whose
specialty was birds. Peterson was the
author and illustrator of "A Field
Guide to the Birds," which sold 3 mil-
lion copies in 1985. He won numerous
awards, including the Presidential
Medal of Freedom. His paintings have
sold in the $5,000 to $10,000 range, wa-
tercolors from $1,000 to $3,000 and
prints in the $100 to $300 range. Due
to the poor condition of your print, it
would likely sell for less than $100.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the antiques business
for more than 20 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Sikorski's Attic, on
WJUF (90.1 FM) Saturdays from 11
a.m. to noon. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, c/o The Citrus
County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429,
or e-mail asksikorski@aol.com.


vork because they're _ I

See JPage E16


altoe t2s 4653000 nir 746-9000
Hills, FL 34465 9542 N Citrus Springs Blvd., 3521 N. Lecanto Hwy.
600 E Citrus Springs . Beverly Hills, FL 34465
685 *li .- .- .. . - , . . t, I.L UI, 1.
INVESTMENTS 1866-465-3500 1-888-789-7100
EQUAL. HOUSING
� OPPORTUNITY


VISTA COURTYARDICABANA

299'9 229 000 $169,000 $169.900




'iSl9.J - 139900 . . ,, .. ...I.] *. ~- 132,900 l . . 129 9l : 125900 ' : '$122900






$ 59. 00 I....., , - ,: " ' '' 2900 : ' $2$1290001.i '- '. r : $1 S9,00 Ii : 19,900
Y,. ... .,0 .C7US SPRINGS 149000 499 .00 .2209,9000 i ...509500
. . . .. I. , H.11 115 900 ..$6.0.. $690








........... $ 0 :: ....... $ 500
...." ...... 1$20,000 Ida.


I '


SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009 E9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EiO Snrnndv Anuil i 20309


NA


RROR,


The fairest mirrors add visual delight
KIM COOK


Associated Press
When Louis XIV decided that
the royal palace at Ver-
sailles should have a huge
Hall of Mirrors, his minister of fi-
nance saw an opportunity.
Jean-Baptiste Colbert was deter-
mined that Paris be able to compete
with Venice in producing luxury
products like silk, lace and mirrors.
He recruited Venetian artisans to
come to Paris to craft all 357 of the
hall's mirrors. They devised a
method of pouring hot glass onto an
iron table that allowed them for the
first time to make really big mirrors.
With its elaborate ceiling art and
solid silver tables, lamps and orange
tree pots, the magnificent 17th-cen-
tury hall was the setting for balls,
births, even the signing of the Treaty
of Versailles.
We don't live in glittering palaces,
but many of us do tend to think of
mirrors as a tad gaudy, a bit Vegas,
and not a material we can decorate
with easily.


A www.horchow.com - 79-inch
floor mirror, $459; Porcupine
Quill mirror, $539.
*www.potterybarn.com -
�"Channing" round beveled
glass mirror, $299; Cherry
Bark mirror, $149.
*www.lumens.com - "Rain-
drops" mirror, $458.
*www.mirrormate.com - "Piz-
zazz" mirrored squares, 12-14
inches, $34.95-$38.95.
*www.seura.com - Liquid
Crystal TV in mirror, various
models and sizes available.
Awww.sundancecatalog.com -
Factory Mirrors, $245-$295.
*www.areaware.com - "Song-
bird" mirror, $35.
None of which need be true.
We might consider mirrors the
way feng shui practitioners do. They
see mirrors as serving three pur-
See MIRRORS/Page Ex


EJLO sum. 'A-Al 5 2009�


By uw. 4.1t.. J -vv/


M


,,q








Cimus ('ouwry (FL) CHRONICLE5UNDA~ Ami. 5,2009 ElI


MIRRORS
Continued from Page E10

poses: expansion, reflection,
deflection.
A well-placed mirror, partic-
ularly one that reflects an
open doorway or window, can
open up a small space. It dou-
bles the feeling of space and,
in feng shui, serves an even
greater function: It's believed
that when a mirror reflects
something good - such as a
family portrait, pleasing
scenery or symbolic object -
its positive effects are dou-
bled. Bagua mirrors, on the
other hand, are seen in feng
shui as bad-energy deflectors
used on the outside of the
home.
A mirror clad in a pretty or
unusual frame will enliven the
most basic room.
"They're a focal point in
bathrooms, functional in bed-
rooms and closets, can serve
as accent pieces on dining
room walls and in foyers, and
add height and light to small,
dark spaces. When designing a
room, it's the one thing I al-
most always use," says de-
signer and HGTV celebrity
Will Smith.
Notes New York designer
Geoffrey Bradfield, "mirrors
give a room an illusion of in-
finity."
Round mirrors can be espe-
cially smart looking. Pottery
Barn has an Art Deco-style
beveled glass beauty that
hangs on a faux leather strap.
Another is wrapped in sustain-
ably harvested cherry tree
bark
In Rocky Mount, Va., Utter-
most has a stable of artists cre-

WEEKLY UNEUP
* Nearly a dozen medical profe!
sionals contribute their expert
to columrn in Health &
Life./Tuesdays
* Read up on all things school r
lated in the Chronicle's Educa
section./Wednesdays
* Plan menus for the week frorr
tempting recipes in the Flair fi
"Food section./Thursdays
* Get a jump on weekend enter,
ment with the stories in
Scene./Fridays


A well-placed
mirror, particularly
one that reflects an
open doorway or
window, can open
up a small space.

ating mirror designs, such as
Grace Feyock's "Raindrops," a
constellation of tiny mirrored
circles orbiting a larger one.
Her "Kellan" is a swirl of sil-
ver leaf around a beveled mir-
ror, and "Tamryn" boasts a
headdress of woven palm tree
fibers.
Horchow offers a hand-
painted, wood-framed mirror
designed by Janice Minor that
looks like its bristling with por-
cupine quills.
And mirrors don't have to be
hung. Prop one on a dresser or
console with a few favorite ob-
jects placed in front of it;
you'll enjoy your things from
two vantage points.
A large mirror placed at
floor level in an entryway
comes in handy. Horchow's
version features a mirrored
frame, which helps bounce the
light around.
Sundance Catalog has a
casement style framed in steel,
reminiscent of old warehouse
or country mill windows.
MirrorMate, in North Car-
olina, offers groupings of "Piz-
zazz" custom-framed mirrored
squares, with a personalized
look Use them as artwork run
up to the ceiling, or as a deco-
rative headboard.
The company also custom
frames existing "raw" mirrors,
such as bathroom vanities.
The frames attach directly to


the mirror Do the perimeter
or, on an especially large mir-
ror, frame just the area over
the sink to add a dramatic,
"finished" look
Lisa Huntting, the creative
brain behind the concept, says
it was her own move to a new
home in Charlotte, N.C., that
sparked the idea.
"Though I was decorating
the bathrooms with acces-
sories and pictures, they just
never looked 'done' because
that huge mirror remained
naked!" she says.
The frames also help solve
issues like edge-silvering, or
unattractive mirror clips, she
says. They run about $100 to
$200, depending on size and
style.
Seura, a Green Bay, Wis.,
firm, has adapted new technol-
ogy to create a sleek
mirror/televisiori\combination.
Turned off, you have an attrac-
tively framed mirror, but press
a button and the mirror
morphs into an LCD TV
screen.
Featured on some home de-
sign programs, the product
found its way into upscale ho-
tels before interior decorators
took notice of it as a way to
"hide" the TV
Tim Gilbertson, Seura's >
president, says that even given
today's ravenous appetite for
technology, "we still may not
be willing to compromise at-
mosphere, or give up the com-
fort of a calm, sophisticated
environment"
Mirrored finishes also are
turning up on dressers, shelv-
ing, backsplashes, candle-
sticks, even fireplaces as a
relatively inexpensive way to
add glamour and light-play to
a space.


Homes from $120,900 on your lot


' 0icoke T ome9C., 2
www.encorehomesofcitrus.com (352) 726-2179

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY!
(If you haven't owned a home in 3 years or
you have never owned a home.)
YOU CAN RECEIVE up to $8,000 back from the IRS.
CALL US NOW TO HEAR MOREl
Call Debbie Rector's Teanj
S_ (352) 746-9924 �


WASP
Continued from Page E6

is passed to successive generations,
and this can result in resistance to the
chemical, possibly rendering it inef-
fective.
Release of the Larra wasp is an ex-
ample of biological control (or biocon-
trol), a completely natural method of
pest management using beneficial
species.
Biocontrol is inexpensive, safe for
humans and animals, does not create
pollution and does not present a risk
of chemical resistance by the targeted
pests. The wasps are not territorial
and they should not sting unless cor-
nered.
The Larra wasp is just one of the
millions of beneficial insect species in
existence. New research suggests that
biocontrol of mole crickets with the


Visit the

Sweetwater

Homes

Model

Center


For A


Guided

Tour.


.t .sweetwaterhomes.com


wasps maybe more effective than pes-
ticides.
Citrus County UF/IFAS Extension's
Florida-friendly Landscaping pro-
gram is a free public education pro-
gram, funded jointly by the Citrus
County Board of County Commission-
ers and the Coastal Rivers and With-
lacoochee River Basin Boards of the
Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District
For more information, visit the Uni-
versity of Florida's Web site at
www.SolutiornsForYourLife.org or coP
tact the Citrus County UF/IFAS Ex-
tension at 527-5700.
All programs and related activities
sponsored for, or assisted by, the Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
are open to all persons with non-dis-
crimination with respect to race,
creed, color, religion, age, disability,
sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions or
affiliations.


P p 'Ur - Cypress Blvd. W.

OF CITRUS, INC.


,"- "-- "_, *,r A. 20 years of excellence!
Located on Hwy. 19,4.5 miles south of Homosassa Springs.
8016 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, Fl 34446 (352) 382-4888 Email: swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
T� A Q4 oll= 1111111.1111 ,' .


06 A




The Newest Concept in
Sugarmill Woods!


: ? i ,, ' Tr7'
. /, -' '-. - " _ , - . ,� - ' ' , ;",, ,- S B - �'

Maintenance-free condo living
with the privacy of a villa

3 Bedroom * 2 Bath * 2 Car Garage
Over 2,100 sq.ft. of Living Area / o
Linder Dr/ -4. Pint _ a


SUNDAY, APRuL 5, 2009 Ell


CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








E12 sUNDAYAlan. 5 2009


R l, Et


Real Estate


Classifieds









: -4...
V A,; -b . T _ . ,. , , , .

' ' "" - * .... '".i" 0


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


' j.
. . ... "�.* ,
�t. �


Fo RentI I I I I Fo Ren


2/2, NEAR
CINNAMON RIDGE
Water, sewer, garbage
Lawn maint incl., Pets
neg. $450. mo. + $500.
sec. 352-746-7595
3/2 NEAR
SUGARMILL
WOODS
Water, Sew. Garb.
Lawn Maint. incl.No
pets. $650. Mo.+ $700.
Sec.(332) 302- 0822
FLORAL CITY
2/1, Big yard, big shed,
$550 + sec. South Old
Oaks (352) 726-6197
Free 1st Mo Rent
1& 2 Br turn & Unfurn No
Pets Details
Homos.352-628-4441
HOMOSASSA
Lg. 2/1 Addition + deck.
Fenc'd yd. & shed.
$575 352-628-5244
INVERNESS
3/1, $500, 1st, last,
sec. No Pets
(352) 287-9268
Inverness
3/2, DW scrn. por., W/D,
Great Loc. Nice & clean.
$650 mo. (352) 560-3355
INVERNESS
Close in, clean, quiet
& comfortable. Call for
info. 352-212-6182
INVERNESS
Extra Irg. Doublewide
3BR/2BA CH/A,
kitch.equip. good
neighborhood.
Convenient to every-
thing 352-344-8313
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park,
2BR, 1-A2BA, $425.
1 BR.1 BA, $350 Incl.
water 352-476-4964



3/2 HUD Honmel $225/mol
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705

BANK
FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181


100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
*Low income applicants can
quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or no credit
OKAY
*recent bankruptcy
OKAY*
CAII TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
*Credit and income
restriction apply*
Florida licensed mortgage
lender





Floral City 3/2
Double wide.
Excellent condition. 1973
model. 24x66. $5,000.
(352) 344-1521
For Sale or Rent 2 bed/2
bath in Singing Forest
MHP
Floral City, 55+ park
DW, on corner lot
$550 a month includes lot
rent
352-637-2854 after 6pm
INVERNESS 55 +
1/1, 34 Ft. on lake. Good
condition. $2,900
(352) 419-6043 Jack
(352) 476-4964 Jim
INVERNESS
55+ Waterfront Park,
1BR, wate, incl. A/C
$3,500 + $270 mo. lot
rent. 352-476-4964
REPOS!
REPOS!REPOSI
(352) 621-9181

- I

312, DW % acre, excel
cond. Green Acres, Own
fin. avail $79,900
813-503-8594
3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for lisitings 800-366-9783
x5705


BANK
FORECLOSURES
(352) 621-9181
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2,sw,on 1/2 acre,new car-
pet& stove,roof
over,10xl4work shop,very
clean.$38k o.b.o.
813-792-1355
CRYSTAL RIVER
5 Acres + 1600 sq ft., '99,
Doublewide
352-212-8794
HERNANDO/off 200 2/2/1
carprt, cov por. Lg. encl.
lanaifenced bk yard
130x129, 2
sheds,W/D,$59,900
MOVE IN READY
(352) 341-4520
HOME-N-LAND
New Home 3/2
10 Yr. Warranty
Sacrifice! $3,000 down
$676.43/mo.
Call to Qualify
352-621-3807
HOMOSASSA
3/1.5, Scr rm w/con-
crete firs. nice shade
trees, over level 1+ ac.
approx 1 mi E. of 19
$49,900(352) 564-4598
Homosassa
3/2 W/Porch, 2 Lg. lots.
Extra Ig. Separate. 2 car
garage. Discounted.
3379 S. Alabama
(352) 628-3908
INVERNESS 3/2
Lots of Room, '08
Cust.Ad/ons. Beautiful
Interior to much to
mention.1,550 Sq. Ft.
Fenc'd, 1/2 ac. on hill.
Deck, Quiet. $63,000
(352) 302-7451
LECANTO 3/2
DW, acrer, new
paint/carpet. Appls,
CHA, rfovers, porches,
shed. GOOD COND!
$44,900. 352-746-0714

NEW JACOBSEN
TRIPLE WIDE
High end home on
2 'A Acres, 2150 sq ft,
3/2, glamour kitchen,
marble in bathroom, ap-
pliance pkg.
Must Sell $179,900 or
$787/mo. Call
(352) 621-9181


Nice 3BR, 2BA
doublewide on 1 acre.
w/garage or barn.
East Inverness
$650 mo. WAC
(352) 726-9369

REPOS!
REPOSIREPOS!
(352) 621-9181




55+ Open Floor Plan,
2/2, cathedral ceilings.
14 x 56, lots of
upgrades, low rent
$13,500
(352) 527-3821
CRYSTAL RIVER 55+
55FT 2/1, 50 x 10 vinyl prch,
deck, shed, carport. Part.
furnished. All apples. $24k.
Lot rent only $235 mo. Call
Cindy, 352-563-5502
CRYSTAL RIVER
55+ Park, '98, 2/2
14 x 66, Carport, screen
porch, beautiful new
wood floors, apple , excel.
cond. lot $235 -mo.
$32,500 352-563-2865
Floral City, Singing For-
est, 2 BR, 1-% BA
Exc. cond., lot rent $154
mo. 352-344-2420
518-598-2248, cell
FOREST VIEW ESTATES
Great Loc. Pools, clbhs.
& more. Move-in ready,
comp. turn. 2/2 DW,
wheelchair acc., shed
& sprinkler. New heat
pump. $39,900
563-6428/563-1297
Inverness 2/11/Carport
Nicely furnished,
remod. kit., ba &
windows,scrrm.$17,500
shed (352 344-1380
(614)226-2336
LECANTO 55+
3/2, furn'd. Lot rent $215.
352-601-7406:
352-422-7621

NEWER DBLWIDE
In 5 star park, 3/2
Vinyl Fl. room, shed,
carport. Exc. cond.
$37,500
(352) 382-2356


WALDEN WOODS
55+ 3yrs. old, turn. 2/2,
scrn. porch, carport,
shed, good cond.
Reduced to $39,500
Call (352) 697-2779
WEST WIND VILL 55+
(3) NEW 2005's 2/2
Beow cost Carport, shed,
scrn prch, furn'd, pet ok.
Park rent $256mo. Re-
sales avail. 352-628-2090



3/2 HUD Homel $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
CITRUS RENTAL
MANAGEMENT &
REALTY LLC
527-2428
Full Service
Full Time
www.citruscountv
rentlserl Hillco

2/1/1 Carpo......V. 475
2/1/1..................... 565
2/1/1 Carport.....$550
2/1.5/1.... ....... $550
2/2/2 pool........... $ 650
Citrus Hills
2/2 Condo furn.,..$850
3/2/2 Pool...........$1000
3/2/2 Upgrade. S850
3/2/2 Pool, furn..$ 100
Canterbury Lakes
3/2/2............$1000
Crystal River
Commrical
900 s Tr Tow- s800
1160 sf Office,,..,. $800
Jennifer Foreman
Realtor PRM
Alex Griffin Realtor
POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - Waterfront
homes, Wkly priv. rms, RV
lots.352-628-0011




Your world first.

Every Day




Classifieds


SINGLE FAMILY
HOMES,
DUPLEXES,
WATERFRONT,
MOBILE HOMES

WE HAVE THEM ALL
THROUGH OUT THE
COUNTY GIVE US A
CALL..From
$475/mo to
$1350/mo
Alexander
Real Estate, Inc.
Crystal River
352-795-6633 ph
352-795-6133 fx





CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Br.,1Br., & Effic.
(352) 422-3112

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025





I & 2 BEDROOM
APARTMENTS
Avail. for Immed.
Occupancy.
CANDLEWOOD
COURT
APARTMENTS
& KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
for information call
(352) 344-1010
MON. thru FRI.
9am - 4pm
Ask About our Move
IBR sec. dep. $150
1st mo. Rent $150.
2BR sec. dep. $200
1st mo. Rent $200.
HUD Vouchers
Accepted
foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op
L-- --

LECANTO
1 BR Apartment (352)
746-5238/613-6000


CRYSTAL RIVER
Call Mon-Fri 10-5 for app
& info on our $100 Spe-
cial. 1 &2 bd avail.
Section 8 Welcome.
Cindy 352-257-8048
www.crystalpalm
apts.webs.com

INGLIS VILLAS
Is now accepting
applications for our
1,2,3 BR Apts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Crys. Riv.
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: M,W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglis Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity
ONE MONTH FREE!
LECANTO newer 2/2 dplx,
all ktchn appis, patio, W/D
hook-up, nice yard, Exc.
Cond. $625 (352)
634-1341

Pinewood Villas
Is now Accepting
applications for our
1,2,3 BRApts.
Located in Bronson
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-486-2612
Or Apply Tues & Thur
7291 NE 92nd Ct. #17,
Bronson, Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity




3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705









Real Estate Services
Beverly Hills Area
Lynn Davis, Agent
352-422-2522
hedickgroup.net


PLACE YOUR AD
ALL NEWEBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad
We Have Rentals
Starting at $425/mo +
Many others LAND-
MARK
REALTY
352-726-9136
Kathy or Jane
311 W Main St. Inv




3/2 HUD Home! $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507
PINE RIDGE
1000 sqft unit, (currently
beauty
salon) 352-527-9013



-, 2nd MONTH FREE
SUMMERHILL AT
MEADOWCREST
Limited time! Call agent




5704
3bd 2ba Only $199/Mo!
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705
Citrus Hills
2/2, patio W/D, pool, Unf.
No Dogs S699 (718)
833-3767
CITRUS HILLS
2/2, pool x-tra clean
(352) 613-5655
INVI MOONRISE
2/1, lanai,clean move in
now $555/mo.
(352) 603-0345


CITRUS HILLS
Home, Villa, Condo
GREENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-5921
(888) 446-5921
greenbriarrental.com
Inverness 2 2-1/2
Townhouse w/balcony &
new screen porch, fresh
paint, end unit on canal.
Clean comm. pool, 2 min.
to town.$700 + sec. dep.
(305) 915-0486.




CITRUS SPRINGS
New, 2/2, all apple.
Wash/Dry. $600.-$625.
(954) 557-6211
INVERNESS 2/1/1
Lawn Maint, $550 mo
352-359-5241
LECANTO
2/1, cha, H20 incl.
$525/m 352- 382-1344
Lecanto
Newer 2/2, dshlWsh.
W/dry, H20 incl. No pets.
Lg.Yd. (352)628-2815





LOOK
AIVALUEINN.com
Hernando: New Renvt'd
Effic: $45dly; $250wk.
Pool. Trailers $185wk.
Homes 3bd - $450 wk.
352-726-4744




INVERNESS
Rentals Available
.3/2/2 2100 sq.feet,
BRAND NEW, $825
*3/2/2 1786 sq.ft.
like new, $775
*2/1/1 Gosp.lsl. water-
frnt. fully re-mod. $750
3/2 Townhm Whispering
Pines, brand new $725
352-212-3412

WANTED!!
3BR/2BA Rent to own.
Can put $5,000 down &
pay taxes & insurance
(352) 726-9369


Chronicl










CITRUS COUNTY (FL.) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009 E13


352-795-7368

NEED AN
AFFORDABLE
RENTAL?

HOMES
MOBILES
APARTMENTS

Featured Properties

BLACK DIAMOND
$1000.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Duplex $550


2/2 Townhouse $650.
Call for Information
OVER 40 TO CHOOSE
FROM.....CALL TODAY

OLD HOMOSASSA
Lrg 1/1, Iv & fam rm,
scr prch, lots of stor-
age, newly remodI'd,
dock w/access to
gulf. $975 furnished,
incis all utils. or $800
unfurnished Incis H20
& garbage 1st/L/Sec.
352-628-2261

SUNSET VILLAS
Senior Community
Chiefland Fl.
Accepting
Applications for
1 & 2 BR APTS


(352) 493-0220
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.




BEVERLY HILLS
1/1/1 furn'd., W/D,
fenced, incis all utils/
cable. Pets neg. $765 +
sec. 352-249-1127
FURNISHED RENTALS
Crossland Realty
352-726-6644
NEW HOMES 3/2/2
1st, last, sec, & ref
$800 mo. (352) 302-3927




1,2 & 3 Bedrooms
Rent to own, No credit
ck352-484-0866
jademission.com
BEVERLY HILLS
16 Donna St. 2/1, $595.
mo. (352)
527-8432: 697-1907
Beverly Hills
2Br pass 3 Br. C/H/A
First Month Free. $650
352-422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
Clean 2/2/2, near
school. Avail 5/1/09
$800 mo, w/purchase
options. (352) 726-7543

BEVERLY HILLS
Lg. 1/1, scr. rm. EZ terms
$490 mo. 382-3525


BEVERLY HILLS
Why rent? Own this
2/2/1 For $365. Mo. w/5%
dwn. (352) 476-4179
BLACK DIAMOND
3/2/2. Gated
community. $1100/mo
352-804-9729
CITRUS HILLS
PRESIDENTIAL
3/2/2 $850 mo.
(352) 212-5812
CITRUS SPRINGS
1/1 Newly Rem'd. on
quiet street. Fen'cd. bk.
yd. 775 Sq. Ft. All appl.
Carport & shed. $485.
Mo. Fst./Sec.lyr
lease.(352)302-7864
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/1, $850mo. $1000 sec.
352-746-9436
Citrus Springs
4/2/2, New, Split Plan,
Cath.ceilings,2,150sq. ft.
$900.Mo.352-341-1859
CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 3/2/2, Near Sch.
$900mo 352-816-0010
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $850/mo
795-6299 697-1240
CRYSTAL RIVER N.
Country Club Dr.
(PLANTATION GOLF
COURSE) 3/2 w/2.5
garage, screen porch &
fireplace. All
appliances incl.
First/Last'Deposit
352-563-1149
HOMOSASSA
3/2/2 Fenced yard, W/D
hookups. $795 Mo.
(352) 382-1373
HOMOSASSA

6368 Gross AveSpacious
2/2/2car. Big yard. Con-
venient location. $850
month. 561-459-6247
HOMOSASSA
Beautiful. 3/2. 2/2
Pool on 1 acre
Lease Opt .Flexible
Financing Imm. Occ
352-795-0088
INVERNESS
3/3 Log home, 1,700 Sq.
ft. Huge garage. Lg. lot.
$850. Mo. $750. Sec. No
dogs. (352) 746-5744
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1/1,
$600/mo lstllst/Dep.
(352) 344-2560
INVERNESS
Nice 2/2, garage, screen
porch, 813-973-7237
LECANTO
3/2/2, 1,900 Sq. Ft. in
Gated Comm. $1,500 Mo.
Incl. appl. window treat. &
lawn care. 1 Yr. lease. (352)
527-0663
PINE RIDGE
3/2/2/2, Screen Pool
5310 Yuma $1 100/mo
(352) 302-6025
Spacious 3/2/2
golf course, serene
One mo Free. 900.
908-322-6529
SUGAR MILL
WOODS
2Masters/2/2, Remodeled,
new appliances, new A/C
$900 mo. 352-302-4057
SUGARMILL
New 5/4. $1150 mth.
813-300-7929


SUGARMILL
3/2/2 $900.
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $900.
(352) 400-0230

SUGARMILL
WOODS
2/2/2 +Lanai,1600 sq.ft.
$875.mo + util.
(727) 804-9772




3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705
3bd 2ba Only $199/Mo!
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705
CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1 Water. front, turn.
$875Mo 352-302-9504
INV. LAKEFRONT
2/2/2, Super clean,
tiled great area,
two avail. 1 @$650.
1 @$750 mo,
352-476-4896
INVERNESS
3/2/1, Super clean,
tiled, great area.
Irg. Bdrms. $800. mo.
352-476-4896
Inverness Lakefront!
2/2/2home. 9108 Gospel
Island w/Florida room and
lanai,dock, fenced yard.
$700. 344-8532




INVERNESS
Highlands 2/1 Block
Home. Nice & quiet
$400, 1st, last, +sec.
deposit. Ask for Jim
(727) 576-7407




3/2 HUD Homel $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
INVERNESS
Highlands 3/2/1
totally remolded, new gran-
ite kit & Bath$850/mo rent
$#69K Own finances
avail(352) 726-2523




CRYSTAL RIVER
$75 wkly/Ist/L. Incls utils.
& satellite. (352)
563-1465: 212-1960;
HOMOSASSA
Furn, kit privs, cbl-TV,
utils incl, Ig yd. single
ocup.$90wk.628-5244
HOMOSASSA
Own entrance & Bth.
everything incld.
furnished Must pay 1/2
elec. wash/dryer avail
$400.Mo. (352) 860-1426


LOOK
A1VALUEINN.com
Hernando: New Renvt'd
Eftic: $45daily; $250wk.
Pool. ETrailes $185wk.
Homes 3bd - $450wk.
352-726-4744


CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1 Water. front, turn.
$875Mo 352-302-9504
OLD HOMOSASSA
1BR furn. cottage
$750 mo. /$200 wkly
(352) 795-0553

LOOK
AIVALUEINN.com
Hernando; New Renvt'd
Effic: $45 dly; $250 wk.
Pool. Trailers $185 wk.
Homes 3bd. - $450 wk.
352-726-4744




3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705
OFFICE 600 SQ FT
AND 10X20 UNITS
Hwy 44 East of Inv.
352-726-5507


-I-

3bd 2ba Only $1991Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705

LOOK
AIVALUEINN.com
Hernando. New Renvt'd
Effigc: $45 dly; $250 wk.
Pool. Tra/le $185 wk.
Homes 3bd - $450 wk.
352-726-4744





Couch

( Realty
& Investments, Inc.
For All Your
Real Estate Needs.


Richard (Rick)
Couch
Lic. Real Estate Broker


1045 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
Office: 352 344-8018
Cell: 352 212-3559
www.Rcouch.com
3/2 HUD Homel $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704

AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50
Ad indudes 20 lines of copy
w/ photo.

BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714


Crystal River
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
WaterfirontBeaulifulpompletely
renoated inside
and outmust see. Owner
financing. 300K
727-798-7077
Picture Perfect Homes
NEW HOMES STARTING
At $75,000 On Your Lot
Atklnson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic # CBCO59685

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to
advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
discrimination.
" Familial status
includes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing
custody of children
under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.









CITRUS HILLS
SUNDAY ONLY 1 - 4
Bright & Cheery,
2nd floor End Unit,
Too Many amenities to
mention! Terra Vista
Membership Avail.
Was $135,000, reduced to
$90,000 - ONE DAY
ONLY1 15 E Hartford St.
Bldg 9 Unit 5A
(352) 527-3831



Your World






CHRONIcLE
Cassr fledi,


100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
*Low income applicants can
quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or No credit
OKAY
*recent bankruptcy
OKAY*
CAII TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
*Credit and income
restriction apply*
Florida licensed mortgage
lender

















Regisler to be one
of up to 2500
homeowners to
loan modifications
representation and
negotiation
services. For details
Rister the web site

proved as a service of
Restrictions apply. Section



web visite foweb site




2 Great Commercial loca-
tions, $650 to $850/mo
.Perfect for any small busi-
ness/ office etc. Call Lisa
352-634-0129
Plantation Realty
3bd 2ba Only $199/Mol
5% dn 15 yrs @8% apr
for listings 800-366-9783
x5705
BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714
CRYSTAL RIVER -GREAT
LOCATION! Citrus Ave.
Remodeled. 1353sqft
w/security fence &
parking. Over V/2acre.
Zone GNC. $250K. Call
Gary, 352-564-4228




2/2/1 CB,
Tile, New Carpet,
Newer Appl.Lg. shed,
Fen'cd back yd, Patio,
1,600 Sq. Ft. CHA
$68,900(561) 313-5308
(561) 313-5291

BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714


ATTENTION!!
BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
$37,900. Delivered
and Set, $0-Down
Land/Home $650. mo.
ReposAvailable
Kinder Mobile
Home
(352) 622-2460





RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON

2.8% COMMISSION

ReialtySelect
Rmlf.-yVfwtf
(352) 795-1555




1,2 & 3 Bedrooms
RENT TO OWN- NO
CREDIT CHECK!I
352-484-0866
iademission.com
IBDRM. 1 Ba
w/ Florida Rm screen room,
utility rm
Cen. Ht/Air, $59, 500.
7 W. Golden St
(352) 527-0160
312 HUD Home! $225/mo!
5% down @ 8% apr. For
Listings 800-366-9783 X
5704
FOR SALE BY OWNER
88 SJ Kellner, Bev. Hills
2/2%/2, FP, OPEN HOUSE
on SUNDAYS
11A-3P $120K firm
(352) 746-6093




Crystal Oaks 3/2/2
For Sale
By Owner
Price Reduced
Split plan. Pool home
w/private back yard, on
cul de sac, move in con-
dition. Asking $170,000
(352) 746-7088




BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714




CANTERBURY LAKE ES-
TATES 4 bedroom, 2 bath.
2004 on small lake, commu-
nity pool
and rv/boat storage availa-
ble
$199,000 352-7261354


CITRUS HILLS
Emerald Estates
Spectacular Home!
4P313+ Pool, 1 acre,
PRICED REDUCED
$50K for Quick Sale to
$319K. Built 2004.
UPGRADES GALORE
352-464-1316
To View: www.
1605wredding.com




BRAND NEW
For Sale, 3/2 w/ alot
of upgrades
Beck St. Inverness
352-637-4138
Lic # CBS059685

Foreclosures
& Deals
Everywhere

CALL ME NOW!


Deb Infantine
EXIT REALTY
LEADERS
(352) 302-8046
INVERNESS, FL 3 bed-
room, 2 bath. Garage,
New carpet, Wood floors,
Frig, Dishwasher, Range,
Microwave,
Washer/Dryer, Attic.
($99K)
352-400-5178
OWNER FINANCING
3/2/2/ Pool & spa.
Village Green Gospel Is-
land, $60K below
market. 1800 sqft.
Purchase w/$13,700 dn.
$1050 mo. or no $$$
down w/620
credit.727-992-1372


RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON

2.8% COMMISSION



(352) 795-1555


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI
Your SATISFACTION
Is Mv Futurell

(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC


Your World

e4 94Y49. J.14m

BETTY MORTON

2.8% COMMISSION
CH RoMCLE


w F aioo ntTlne. I (352) 795-1555







Move In Special
I-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $150
2-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $200
Exp. 4/30109
Call Monday Through Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm
We accept HUD Vouchers, Foreclosures Acceted.


(352) 489-1021 M I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009 E13








E1 UDY API. 5,20 IRSCUNY(L HOI


3/2 + Office Home
Remod. W/fireplace,
on 1 acre, fenced. Large
oaks, workshop. No
floodzone $169,000
Owner/Broker.
(352) 634-1764

3/2, DW '/ acre, excel
cond. Green Acres, Own
fin. avail $79,900
813-503-8594


Ciru C u


$8000 Tax
Rebate
for first time home buy-
ers ,if you have not
owned a home in 3 years.
Call for info
Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
Kellers Williams RIty







$75,000
ON YOUR LOT
Includes all impact
fees. Several other
plans available.
Atkinson
Construction, Inc.
352-637-4138
www.atkinsonconstruct
ioninc.com
Uc # CBC059685

BANK FORECLOSURE
6 BR $25,000 2 BR $10,000
for lisitngs
800-366-9783 x 5714


Picture Perfect Homes
NEW HOMES STARTING
At $75,000 On Your Lot
Atkinson
Constructon -
352-637-4138
Uc.# CBC069685


For Sale II
CITRONELLE 3 bed-
room, 2 bath. Mini Farms
2.5 Acres, Trailer, Water
with softener, septic. As
is $49,000.00.
813-695-0853

For Soale By Owner
3 BR, 2 BA, 2-car gar.,
Cement block, north
Dunnellon Low down,
EZ terms w/$3,500
down $575 mo.
(352) 726-9369

OWNER FINANCING
4/2/office, 2.5 ac, 2005
Doublewide
Like new. 1800sqft,
$9,700/dn, $082/mo. or
$23,700 down, $582/mo.
727-992-1372


a Antyii~i~


OFFICE Gas, electric, push: Which
OFFICE
GUIDE YOU!

. Imower is right for you


OWNER Financing
Handyman, 2/2,1981
Dbwd, 1/3 acre, $40K,
below market, needs
mostly cosmetic repairs.
Purchase $4,472 dn &
$364 mo.
727-992-1372



4 Sale By Owner,
Crystal River 1 BR, 1BA,
completely
remodeled, heated comm.
pool, wd firs.
$74,600. (352)563-5844
By Owner, $112,000 Re-
duced from 114 K
Beautiful Citrus Hills
Greenbriar I 2/2 end unit
(no stairs) fully fum./ equip.
Glassed patio. Beautiful
heated community pool.
(352) 527-2524
FLORAL CITY
2/1, all apple. stay, plus a
shed & water access,
Move in cond., Reduced
to $49,995 (352)
746-0850
MARYVILLE, TN
Brick 3/2/2, fireplace
enclsd sunrm & deck, ft of
Smokies, low txs & maint.




3/2/2
Inverness, Fl.
Must See !!
Open Lakefront, Breath-
taking View,
on Lake Henderson.
538 San Remo
Circle. Vaulted
ceilings, oak floors, trav-
ertine counter tops.
Caged pool, spacious la-
nai, dock, & board-
walk.
$395,000
Barb Malz
(352) 212-2439
Keller Williams
Realty
FLORAL CITY. TWO
HOUSES ON ADJ.
LOTS, ONE PRICE!!!
$215,000 Newly reno-
vated. CHA. Screened,
in ground pool. Dock,
seawall. For sale by
owner. 352 586 - 9498
HOMOSASSA
3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to
head spring. 163' wfrt,
dock/slip. Brand
new/unoccupied.
2 frpls, granite. $579K
727-808-5229

Inverness, Fl.
Lake Henderson
3/2.512 on 1/2 acre.
Exclusive Beautiful
Home w/open water view,
on Private
Waterfront Peninsula.
Tile floors, travertine
countertops, dock, ga-
zebo.
$395,000
Must See II
1170 S. Estate Pt.
Barb Malz
(352) 212-2439
Keller Williams
Realty


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Rea&Ilect

(352) 795-1555



INVESTORS NEEDS
Homes Any: Size, cond,
location, price, situation.
Over finac'd, dblwide
& mobile homes okay.
1-727-992-1372



HOMOSASSA
1.2 acres, fenced, water,
elec., sewer, sprinkler sys.
(2) out bldgs. Deadend st.
$44K. 352-302-5775



Business/Home 3/2 Great
location on Trout Ave. Inver-
ness $165,000 . Rhema
Realty 228-1301



7 Rivers Golf & C.C.
priv. member owned.
corner lot 1 ac (mol)
$30K (813) 766-9354 or
sweetscaoeauest@




Withlacoochee River -
Dunnellon
$79,000.
(727) 544-9350


1i
Plantation Realty. Inc
L352) 795-0784
Cell 422-7925
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner
See all of the
listings in Citrus County
at
www.plantation
realtyinc.com

RealtySelect
Citrus.com


Associated Press

Love it or loathe it, lawn care
season is upon us.
And after decades of making
lawnmowers bigger, more pow-
erful and easier to push, manu-
facturers now are touting
self-powered mowers and elec-
tric models just big enough to
get the job done.
Why? Many customers want
to cut the grass without cutting
a bigger hole in the ozone layer.
"There's a little bit more
work involved," said Lou Man-
fredini, Ace Hardware's
Chicago-based spokesman.
"People who are more environ-
mentally conscious understand
that it takes a little bit more
work"
To satisfy green customers,
companies have made changes
to electric mowers, such as im-
proving the engines and devel-
oping battery-operated
equipment. The manufacturers
of gas-powered mowers also
have addressed concerns by
creating engines that run
cleaner.
"The green initiative is more
evident and more pronounced
in a lot of products," said Joe
Newland, group product man-
ager for Black & Decker in
Towson, Md.
With the current economic
downturn, Peter Sawchuk,
lawnmower expert for "Con-
sumer Reports" magazine, ex-
pects more homeowners will be
in the market for a mower this
spring. The industry saw an
uptick in sales in the fall, which
many attributed to homeown-
ers cutting their lawn care serv-
ice to save money
Here's how some experts
rated the pros and cons of vari-
ous styles of mowers:
Push reel mowers
History: This non-motorized
mower is the original lawn cut-
ter. It cuts the grass by pulling it
up and snipping off the top.
Cost: about $100
Tip: Sharpen blades regu-
larly to make mowing easier for
the operator.
PROS:
Good for the environment be-


cause it does not burn fuel or
produce emissions.
Does not require gas, oil, fil-
ters or spark plugs.
The snipping motion of the
blades keeps lawns healthy.
Quiet.
Lightweight.
Little annual maintenance,
although blades should be
sharpened annually.
CONS:
Will have difficulty cutting
long or wet grass.
Won't run over leaves or yard
debris.
Won't cut close to flower beds
and other landscape features.
Requires the most effort from
operator.
Corded electric
mowers
History: Corded electric
mowers have been in use for
about 40 years. They have a fan-
like blade that tears off the top
of grass blades.
Cost: around $199 to $249
Tip: Look for one with a re-
versible handle to make it eas-
ier to accommodate the cord
while mowing.
PROS:
Easy to start.
No gas to buy or store.
No polluting emissions.
Quiet.
Unlimited mowing time.
Will mow over some twigs
and yard debris.
Little annual maintenance,
although blades should be
sharpened annually.
CONS:
The cord is a potential safety
hazard.
The user is limited by the
length of an extension cord.
If operator uses the wrong
type of extension cord, it can
harm the engine.
Less power than a gas engine.
Runs on energy produced by
fossil fuels.
Not designed for lots larger
than 1/3-acre.
Will have trouble with wet or
long grass.
Battery-powered
electric mowers
History: Developed about 15
years ago to address safety is-


sues created by lawnmower
cords. They have a fanlike
blade that tears off the top of
grass blades.
Cost: Average ranges from
$349 to $399
Tip: Consider buying a
backup battery that can be
charged and ready in case the
original loses power before the
job is complete.
PROS:
Easy to start.
No gas to buy or store.
Runs clean and does not pol-
lute the air.
No cord.
Only takes about 10 cents
worth of electricity to charge.
Quiet.
Little annual maintenance,
although blades should be
sharpened annually.
CONS:
Less power than a gas engine.
Runs on energy produced by
fossil fuels.
Not designed for lots larger
than 1/3-acre.
Will have trouble with wet or
long grass.
Battery charge only lasts 45
minutes to an hour.
Battery will lose its charge
more quickly when cutting long
or wet grass.
Gas-powered
mowers
History: Gas-powered mow-
ers have been around for
nearly 100 years. They have a
fanlike blade that tears off the
top of grass blades.
Cost: Average around $300
Tip: Choose one with a com-
fortable grip.
PROS:
No limits on yard size.
Offers the most power.
Wide variety of prices.
Numerous manufacturers.
Can cut long or wet grass.
Requires less physical effort.
Does a better job of mulching
grass.
CONS:
Pollutes the air.
Requires purchase of gas, oil
and spark plugs.
Noisy.
Annual maintenance in-
cludes blade sharpening, oil
changes and tune-ups.


E14 SUNDAY, APRIL. 5, 2009


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










Fabulous fringe flower needs space to thrive


any homeowners have prun-
able shrubs planted close to
their house foundation. Low
budget landscape packages at the
front of new homes are often hastily
installed in the sandy fill dirt trucked
in to level and
raise the build- "'
ing site.
Larger con-
struction debris
is picked up
and thrown in
the Dumpster,
but often there
are chunks of -
alkaline stucco, --
cement and Jane Weber
lime rock, rusty JANE'S
nails and bits of GARDEN
wood left be-
hind. After a
quick grading, the landscaper plops
nursery stock into the sand, waters it
once, piles on some wood mulch
product and the poor plants must
then fend for themselves. Instant
lawns are usually installed on
straight sand, too.
How plants that need soil nutrients
can be expected to grow well and
flourish in sand mystifies me. Home-
owners must amend soil with organic
humus or compost for most plants to


JANE WEBER/For the Chronicle
ABOVE: Loropetalum, a flowering shrub or small tree, is a popular plant in home
landscapes. .-.:' ": Loropetalum produces masses of flowers with dangly,
twisted petals in red through pink to white colors in fall, winter and spring.


grow well. Otherwise select plants
such as cactus, agaves, aloes, counties�
and natives that tolerate sandy soils.
Frequently a lovely evergreen
shrub called loropetalum or fringe
flower, Loropetalum chinense, is
used as a foundation plant because
the small oval leaves have a burgundy


tinge when young. There may be two
or three species, but it is more likely
a single, variable Asian species rang-
ing naturally from the Himalayas
across China to Japan.
The masses of flowers have dangly,

See JANE/Page E16


Al~~ ~~ WM -11hl 1 Mi 0 NN K IM-& l i A n I


a









How
To Make
Your
Washer
Disappear...
Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!



(352) 563-5966
CiI 1n1 10\ ICle iJ E
-wwxhron -iceonl -e 5


"'F2 Fax: (352) 382-5580 8015 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446

S Your Sugarmill Woods Specialists L1J
Office 382-1700 * 1-800-237-1112 No TRANSACTION FEESPPORTUNTY
No TRANSACTION FEES


CAROLYN LISTER gr
PAr,% Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
B"m cell: 422-4620 KEY
ERA
-1 -.1. Office: 382-1700 RC LT, NC
View virtual tours @ www.listerljstings.com



. , , :




DON'T WORRY ABOUT HURRICANE MOVE RIGHT IN this updated 2/2/2 with
SEASON! This 3/2/2 pool home has new family room. New carpet & tile. New
hurricane resistant windows over all. kitchen & bathroom cabinets & counter
Enclosed Florida room and large family tops w/pass-thru to outdoors. Covered
room all make this home perfect for
entertaining. Upgraded appliances and patio and screened porch. All
expanded lot with side entry garage. appliances. New interior paint. New
,#333138 $193,000 ceiling fans. #332983 $147,500


IjU Uit lFro Ou Experie


9 BYRSONIMA LOOP $180,000 OLD HOMOSASS WATERFORNT
* Free standing villa; no outside work 5561 S. ISLAND DRIVE $225,000
* 3 split bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage * Level vacant lot, 85' frontage x 123'
* Vaulted ceilings; enclosed lanai * Seawall protected on Little Piney Bay
* Overlooks community pool * Deep water will take large boat
Directions: Hwy. 19 @ main entrance of * Only a few lots off main river
Sugarmill Woods go E on Cypress Blvd. to Directions: Yulee Dr. to left on Mason Creek; rt.
Cypress Cir. on rt.; turn rt. on Byrsonima Cir to on Garcia Rd. to rt on Island Dr. to sigh on right.
"The Hammocks: on the left. Walk lot.


I m RL K I I T - T I nZ"LI " - T I E hi 4 I MEI I I MC


I a


i


SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009 E15


C;jTRUS COUN'IY /FI.) CHRONIC~E


#,|k | i" �|- I& H t I I �|,-i II





lll~ m l n m q. I


I


I






CIRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E16 SUNDAY APRIL 5, 2009


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E9

so full of lint, hair and bits of fluff. I
started to pick it all out by hand, which
I usually give up on after a few min-
utes because it's so annoying. This
time, I looked over at the table and
saw the little pink Barbie comb that I
picked up to save the vacuum cleaner
after some small child left it on the
floor. It worked! It neatly and easily
combed all that guck right out of the
Velcro. The plastic "tines" of the comb


JANE
Continued from Page E15

twisted petals in red through pink to
white colors. With constant pruning,
some forms can be kept in a horizontal
spreading shape and are suitable for
espalier and topiary specimens. Plant
breeders and growers have developed
several named varieties.
The older 'Burgundy' and 'Ruby'
loropetalum have more upright grow-
ing habits and will need constant
pruning to keep them small. As the
roots spread in search of nutrients,
they become sturdy plants. 'Burgundy'
can spurt 6- to 7-foot leggy canes over
one summer.
If you have this plant it would be
best to relocate it to a shrub border
away from the house so it has room
grow to its normal size. Putting the
right plant in the right place is a wise
gardening practice.
Fully frost-hardy loropetalum is
evergreen most years, but long freezes
may defoliate the plant. The stems will
usually sprout new leaves in spring.
'Ruby' is shorter with denser, smaller
foliage. It can be pruned several times
a year into a round ball or small col-
umn. Tip-prune young shoots to en-
courage denser foliage. It flowers best
and grows well in full sun with weekly
irrigation once established
In the last few years, 'Plum Delight'
has become a popular plant because
its leaves remain a dark burgundy
plum color all year. Its showy clusters
of fragrant flowers are deep pink. Sev-
eral bloom flushes brighten the gar-
den in fall, winter and spring.
Two tablespoons of 70 percent time-
released 12-2-14 fertilizer with minor
elements can be broadcast in mid
March, June and September. After
flowering has finished, prune for size
and shape.
Judicious pruning can emphasize
the horizontal spreading habit. 'Plum
Delight' can be kept as a 2- by 3-foot


are small enough to comb the plastic
part of the Velcro easily but not stiff
enough to damage it. - Vail, Washing-
ton
EASY DEVILED EGGS: Instead of
mixing everything in a bowl, I use a Zi-
ploc bag. Put the ingredients in, and
zip it shut. Mush it around, and then
snip off one corner. Pipe filling into
eggs. Less clean up. -Laurie, Florida
BUTTERMILK POWDER: I just
wanted to mention that for those of
you who might be like me and only
need buttermilk once in a blue moon,

See FRUGA Page E17


WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS
* Photos need to be in sharp focus. Include your name, address and phone number on all pho-
tos. When identifying persons in your photo, do so from left to right.
* Photos submitted electronically should be in maximum-resolution JPEG (.jpg) format.
* Photos cannot be returned without a self-addressed, stamped envelope.


JANE WEBER/For the Chronicle
Give loropetalum space to grow up and
out. Fully frost-hardy loropetalum is
evergreen most years, but long freezes
may defoliate the plant. The stems will
usually sprout new leaves in spring.

ball for 10 years or more.
Loropetalum is a good choice when
sited to allow it to grow to maturity.
The rangier, taller shrubs are more
suited to perimeter borders and pri-
vacy screens. Be sure the soil is a rich,
well-drained mix of half sand and half
compost resulting in a slightly acidic
soil. Loropetalum prefers acid and
will not thrive in alkaline soil or limy
contamination.


Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and nursery owner She
welcomes weekend visitors to her
Florida Friendly Yard and Wildlife
Habitat at 5019 W Stargazer Lane,
Dunnellon. Call (352) 465-0649.







CITus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


People both friends,



enemies of trees


SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009 E17


* Clubs are invited to submit information about regular meetings for publication in The Meeting
Place each Thursday. Send in information attn: The Meeting Place, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River, FL 34429, or fax to 563-3250, attention The Meeting Place.
* E-mail to community@chronicleonline.com. Include "The Ileeting Place" in the subject line.


MA RALTY


rees have played a
major role in the
quality of life since
the beginning of time. How- .
ever, time can take a toll on
everything, especially with
the help of man. .
In the days of our pio-
neers and early settlers, it
would have been hard, if
not impossible to survive Kerry I
without the lumber from .:
trees. In those days, man re-
spected the trees and the
land which they harvested
from. Today, neither the trees nor the
land seem to be respected.
Unlike the early days, today greed is
a motivating force in the disappear-
ance of our trees and forests. "Take all
we can today without any regards for
future generations," seems to be the
motto. Man is one of tree's major
pathogens. Yes, man is definitely a
tree pathogen. Sometimes good, some-
times not. We need more goods than
nots.
Trees have a big impact on the en-
tire globe; without organizations and
educators geared toward tree preser-
vation, would we destroy the forests
still standing? Being a tree preserva-
tionist, I take my hat off to these or-


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E16

there is a dried, powdered buttermilk
that is excellent to keep around. I
found mine in the baking aisle of my
local Walmart. It has a 4-1/2-year shelf
life, but once opened it will need to be
refrigerated. For 1 cup of buttermilk,
you use 4 tablespoons powder to 1 cup
of water. You can add the powder to
any of your dry ingredients, then just
add the water in with the wet ingredi-
ents. - Michele, Tennessee
EASY FIRE STARTERS: I stuff
dryer lint in an empty toilet paper or
paper-towel tube and light that. -
Heather, New York
Take some cotton balls, put them in
one of those Altoid mint tins, and pour
some melted Vaseline over them. Let
them soak and use them to start a fire.
- Misti, New Mexico
EMPTY PRESCRIPTION BOT-
TLES: I fill them with water and
freeze them. Then I use them as mini


'I


Sganization. Education is a
key factor to the health and
survival of trees and
forests.
Practicing tree care for
more than 30 years, it has
been and still is a reward-
ing and educational career
for me. My 10 year old son,
Austin seems very inter-
Kreider ested in being a tree care
professional. Before bed-
time some night, I read him
stories out of a book called
"The Talking Tree," and ed-
ucational book for children.
Maybe someday he, too, can hear
the trees talking. Through science and
research, professional arborists have
come a long way in caring for trees
with a great amount of success.
Let's put education back into trees
and tree care.


Kerry Kreider is a practicing -
arborist, a member of the
International Society ofArboricul-
ture, a tree preservationist and presi-
dent of Action Tree Service. Ifyou
have any questions he can be
reached at 302-2815 or e-mail
actionproarborist@yahoo. corn

ice packs for lunches and small boo-
boos. - Denise, Illinois
We keep toothpicks in a medicine
bottle in the glove compartment. -
Shirley, e-mail
SOAP TIPS: I take all small slivers
of bar soap and put them in a quart
canning jar and add water. The soap
melts, and if I run out of liquid hand
soap, I use that. I also have one for
Fels Naptha soap. It melts down by it-
self, and then I use that for stain re-
moval. Just dip an old toothbrush in,
and scrub the stain before washing. -
TE, West Virginia
MEN
DEAR SARA: Do I really need to
cook pasta shells beforehand when
making stuffed shells? I never cook my
lasagna noodles when I make lasagna.
-Julie, Florida
DEAR JULIE: Pasta shells are frag-
ile. Sometimes you'll discover some
are broken in the box. They would be
too hard to stuff without breaking.
They won't bake up as easily as

See FR.. ..,'IJPage E18


r..
P 352-795-7357 .

www.rhemarealty.com



PROPERlES FOR SALE & RENT


@ er


*S' a-- ---








O FABULOUS POOL HI
* 3 Bedroom + Study/ 2 E
S* Granite & Stainless Kitc
$235,000

IJ�iTaI^em!y irtual to


( "Nancy Know

NAN4

PONTI'
Dikct: 352-6
nr,1a=i1iig


fir,0


OME HAS 3 CAR GARAGE!
lath * Heated 15 x 30 POOL
hen * Well for Yard
MLS#325939


ys Sugarmill Woods"' @

CY 0"" 6 �
Multi-Million Dollar Realtor 7

_44225 H8 EM Homosan \�



S . . . - .



2006 HEATED POOL HOME HAS MANY UPGRADES!
* 3 Bed/ 2 Bath/ Larger 2 Car Garage * Well for Yard
* Snail Shower & Jetted Tub in Master * Corian Kitchen
$264,000 MLS#327468 k�:�


ntu KAREN E. MORTON
S 1 Hall ol Fame Cen luon Member
1645 WatMsin ,ol Inne1 , `1 344WJ (5
, .,a P c . (352) 726-6668 * (352) 212-7595
J' 1fiMI,_l . * 1,.r , .'.-f de . APr1'i , I TOLL FREE 1-800-5BOO 43-9163


. OAKS -'

Stfflt LIht PAK - LANE tFliM LLATII'lO LA[t NA lhu1
* 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car gar.
Home has been discounted 50% due to sinkhole
* Owner financing - $30,000 down.
MLS #331815. S8B900
I A


CITRUS HILLS DEED RESIRICIED COMMUNITY

Si ... ... i . r. , In . .n
,i, .. l ..u ,




CONUENIlENI 0T SHOPPING, BANKS AND HOSPITAL
* 2BR, 28A, I car garage, family room, city water and sidewalks.
* Fully equipped, ready for Immediate occupancy! GREATVALUE!
MLS #326200. $79,900


-B' Ito


ENJOY THE LAKE WITHOUT PAYING LAKEFRONT PRICES
* COMMUNITY BOAT LAUNCH TO LAKE TSALA APOPKA
* 3BR, 2A 2 car gar., built in 2006, upgraded appls., rm. for pool.
* Lush landscaping, win. treatments, 1/2 AC deed restricted comm.
MLS #333409. S220,B00




GOLF IIOURSE HIUME ON ThE CIFRUS HILLS l[i OAKS

. 4BR, 2BA, 4 car gar., pnvate office with storage.
MLS #326554. S530,000


2007o CUSIOM OBUl IN CINIUS HIUS - 220 SO fI LA
* 3BR, 2BA 3 car gar., whole house gen., energy effic. upgrades.
* Brazilan walnut floors & porcelain tiles and granite countertops.
* Free-formed, caged pool /fountain and brick pavers.
MLS #333236. $329.,00


GENEW . .1r
EEE3 1011*PLS11 E33SSNOEa


Paved road * Centrally located in Citrus County on paved road
only minutes from Intersection of 486 and 491 Ideal
location for business in need of parking space for vehicles"
Lease can be canceled with 60 days notice " This one's a
sleeper! Incredible price at 319,800. MLS #332083.

FLORAL CITY ACREAGE " BEAUTIFUL 5.60 MOL HIGH AND
DRY ACREAGE HAS AN OPEN VIEW FROM THE HILL The
land has been cleared, fenced. Near Withlacoochee State
Trail and horses are O.K. Close to Floral City Park. Land has
275 ft of road frontage, bring your horse and saddle as this
property is tamr-key ready to use. MLS #326101. 899.900.
BANK FORECLOSURE 1.89 Acre multi-family corner lot with
central water. Uses indude multi-family residential. Start
your project here. MLS #328215. S77,900.
LECANTO ACREAGE WITH 1300+ FT ON LECANTO HWY.
33 Acre property cleared and ready to build * Zoned PSO
and LDR** Fenced " County water available Estate sale "
MLS 8332982. S300,900.
FLORAl CITY ACREAGE * 16 Acres backs to Rails to Trails
* Property has many possibilities and a great opportunity.
Great property w/city water. MLS #316527. PRICE
RBFUCEIt $239,91100.
POTTS PRESERVE ACREAGE " 20 Acres * Wild and wooly
Property adjoins state lands * Some high. Some low "
Florida wildlife roam this land! * Near utfall Canal * Owner
finance available * Reduced * MLS #322430. $195.,00110.
LEVY COUNTY ACREAGE " PROGRESS ENERGY PEOPLE,
CHECK THIS OUT! "20 Acres in Goethe Forest * County
mad 326 " Paved road " 5 Miles to Black Prong
Equestrian Center " PRICED RIGHT AT 3200,000. MLS
#159808


Irs . S n


R 21. .. R . E ..


CETR 21- .. . MOTO REA ESAT CETR 21 -.OTN ELETT


l







E18 SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009


PLUMBER
Continued from Page E8

signed to pass the wastewater
into the house drain lines.
Once in the drainage system,
the toilet has done its job and
now it's up to the drains to re-
move the wastewater from
the home. Drains work with
gravity because the pipes are
constantly pitched down-
ward, causing the water to
fall away from the fixture. A
"negative" pitch means that a
section of the drain line is
pitched backward, prevent-
ing the wastewater from
draining away from the fix-
ture properly
So, I'm sorry to say that as
long as you have drain lines
tilted in the wrong direc-
tion, no matter what toilet
you install, it may not over-
come your negative pipe
pitch. I'm also sorry to say
this will probably be a bit of
a project to fix this problem
since it is a basement drain
line. Your plumber will most
likely have to break up the
concrete floor to get access
to the drain line to make the
necessary repairs.
The good news is that
after the drain line is re-
paired, your present toilet
should work fine and that
will save you a bit of money.
Unless you're so excited to
hear about these air-pow-
ered turbo-toilets that you
go like a "jet" to your local


home center to buy one for
the job.
Q: I always enjoy the way
you educate the public on
water conservation. Please
let me share one of my fa-
vorite conservation tricks.
Instead of letting my shower
water run for several min-
utes down the drain while it's
warming up, I keep a 5-gallon
bucket in the shower and let
it fill up before getting in.
This has cut down on
wasted shower water by 2
gallons per shower. After-
ward, I have a bucket of
water with which to water
my balcony plants or .gar-
den. Just a couple gallons a
day really adds up and
makes me feel better. Guests
who visit my bathroom al-
ways ask, "What's up with
the bucket?" When I tell
them, they say they may do
the same. Just another little
way of saving our valuable
water. Thanks for listening,
Ed, and keep up the great
work! - Larry in California
A: Well, thanks for the
great tip!


Master Contractor/Plumber
Ed Del Grande is known
internationally as the
author of the book "Ed Del
Grande's House Call" and
for hosting TV shows on
Scripps Networks and
HGTVPro.com. For
information, visit
eddelgrande.com or write
eddelgrande@hgtvpro. com.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E17

lasagna noodles if they
aren't partially cooked be-
fore stuffing them. Boil a
pan of water, and add a bit of
salt and oil. Carefully place
the shells into the boiling
water to prevent breaking.
You want your shells to be
firm and not overcooked, or
they'll fall apart when you're
stuffing them.
DEAR SARA: My hus-


Assurance
N P(GROUP REA LTY
AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT


MLS#306906. Forest Ridge for
RENT or PURCHASE. 2/2
near library, golf course and
clubhouse w/pool S170,000


band and I have an opportu-
nity to buy Shaw laminate
flooring inexpensively,
which is a big deal to me
considering we need to re-
place almost 1,000 square
feet of carpeting. If you have
laminate flooring, do you
like it? Does it seem
durable? - Melody,
Arkansas
DEAR MELODY: I have
hardwood floors through
the majority of my home,
but have laminate flooring
in the kids' playroom. I have
been happy with it. It's easy


328 S. Kensington Ave.,
Lecanto, FL
Located in Kensington Plaza
726-2246


seA.'
A.


MLS#329093. Never lived in
Terra Vista 3/2/2 villa, split floor
plan, across from golf course
fairway. $889,900


RENTALS Furnished & COMMERCIAL OFFICE
Unfurnished & WAREHOUSE SPACES
Short; & Long Term FOR LEASE
TOWNHOUSES, VILLAS, SINGLE Great Location Hwy. 44 &
FAMILY Kensington


For all your real estate needs call Betty 352-422-6417 or call the office directly
352-726-2246 BE ASSURED, WE ARE HERE TO SERVICE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS


I "H Peter.& RVMI I
S,,, Marvia REALTY ONE
I& L I KOROL Office:352-527-7842
r i Reaor *Cell: 352-422-3875
.. ...-- . ... ..-... :a .... www.TheKorolTeam.com


$95,000 MLS#319930



228 W. HOLLYFERN PL
BEVERLY HILLS
*2BD/2BA/1CG Y Screened Patio
* Family Room * All Appliances
* Kitchen Skylight * Great Location


$115,900 MLS#328288



202 W. CASURINA PL
BEVERLY HILLS
S2BD/2BrN2CG * All remodeled/new
Nearly 1200 SF � Screened porch
SGreat room � Reedy to move in


$499,000 MLS#325899 I



PINE RIDGE -
3505 W. VILLANOVA CT.
Elegant Estate � Almost 3000 sf liv.
On the Golf course * Heated Pool/Spa
* 3BD/2BA/2.5 CG * Private Tennis court


$159,900 MLS#328295



8826 N. GOLFVIEW DR.
CITRUS SPRINGS
S2BD/2.5BA/2CG � New Roof & A/C
Sits on 2 lots, .66 ac. Solar Heated Pool
* Close to Golf Course * Fam. Room/3rd BD


to clean, and I can barely
tell it's laminate by looking
at it. It's beautiful. It's
durable and looks just as
great as when we moved
into this home six years ago.
It can be a little slippery, but
it doesn't scratch, dull or
dent like hardwood can. It's
kid- and pet-proof. Don't for-
get to ask about the length of
the warranty on the flooring
if you do decide to buy it.


COUNTRY CLUB ATMOSPHERE
Original owned 3BR/2BA home w/over 2,500 sq.ft.
under roof. Double lot, circular driveway
& central water. $149,900 MLS#330452
VACANT LOTS
OAKS GOLF COURSE
1/2 Acre Lot ............ $69,900
CITRUS HILLS
1 Acre with Central Water .. $29,900
KENSINGTON ESTATES
1 Acre Lot .............. $24,899


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

DEAR SARA: When I was
14 years old, the Home Eco-
nomics teacher ran a holi-
day store out of the
classroom. The money went
toward projects and other
stuff. They sold a drink mix
that was awesome. I have
been thinking about it for
the past eight years. The
funny thing is, the drink mix

See FRUGAL/Page E19


FIVE MINUTES FROM TOWN!!
Original owned 3BR/2BA home with fireplace on
Gospel Island. 1 acre, fenced rear yard
$152,500 MLS#326641


RIDE YOUR GOLF CART!
Inverness Country Club close by for this well
located 3BR/2BA with Florida room.
$117,500 MLS#331547


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-247
Email:roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours se 302-6714


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
117 S. Hwvy. 41 Inverness, FL
OM (352) 634-2371 Cell %
Ill (800) 476-2590 Toll Free
ER KA For a Visual Tour of our listings .
REAL ESTATE and all MLS: bidavis.corn


AN INVERNESS GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB
| . .A" TREAT: 3 Bedrooms, 2 baths, 2.5-car garage,
S. ' al owner, built by Rusaw. What's unique
L d;it '' '^-",- i ' ^ K - - "i j ,j,,ui this spacious home is its 26' bow-shaped
r :,- capped accessible, with newer interior
,Sk carpet, range, dishwasher. Good golfing
s: . the street and close to historic, downtown
, -, m-less and our 46-mile Rails-to-Trails.
#333416 $135,000

WINDERMERE A - 2 E.,,,.:.,,, -
r,_i ' I, I l I t 1 . '3 1' . ,r ', t' . I i. l ls r.:..

i.i r' l ri, 0,-,,,J,' .I,,T. , ,. I


FA F S


BEAUTIFUL LANDSCAPED
3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car gar. $115,900
"Move in Feb. 28th BANK SAYS YES!"
Closing cost paid when using preferred lender.
Call today for details.

S ITRUS License # RB0033452
SBUILDER 352-527-8764
BUILDER SAVE THOUSANDS
"gi't hWit*A you Sn AMind" T
VISIT OUR WEBSIFE: www.cilmsbuilderonIine.com
- 7....7202


1S8-8


P


,


'


� E


-- I


I- ,







CI0 US COUNT' (FL) CHRONICLE


Frog ponds can help


endangered species
EP Pd hFSCRHOO \


SO YOU KNOW
* News notes tendI to run one week prior to the date of an event During the busy season, expect
notes to run no more than twice.Submit information at least two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of tinrel material is appreciated, but multiple publications cannot be guaran-
teed. Submit rnaterial at Chrnri.: Ie offices in Inverness or Cr ystal River; by fax at 563 3280; or
by e mail to newsdesk@ chronicleonlhne.com.


Associated Press


When you hear about animals in dan-
ger of extinction, you probably picture
exotic places from nature shows. But
Brent Brock saw the problem closer to
home when he returned to a city park
pond in Topeka, Kan., that was home to
thousands of frogs when he was a kid.
"It looks the same, but there are no
frogs," he says. "Finally after about an
hour of searching I found one lonely
little bullfrog."
Amphibians are currently in crisis,
and it's not just due to habitat loss.
Climate change and disease seem to
be playing a role, but whatever the
reason, about 46 percent of the 277
species of amphibians in the United
States are at risk, according to Brock,
program director for Tree Walkers In-
ternational, an organization that en-
courages private individuals to get
involved in amphibian conservation.
The bright side is that it's unlike the
plight of pandas and polar bears in
that you can help in a hands-on way.
Because frogs and salamanders are


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E18

had the recipe included, and I threw
it away at the time thinking that it
wouldn't matter. What is the recipe? I
can describe a few details. I know that
one of the ingredients was Tang. It was
instant, and I think served warm, but it
could have been cold. There was the
taste of cloves, but that could have
been another powdered drink mix
thrown in. - D.S., Minnesota
DEAR D.S.: Sounds like Russian
tea. You can adjust the ingredients to
suit your taste.
N 2 cups orange powdered break-
fast-drink mix
0 2 cups granulated sugar
* 1 cup instant powdered tea
E 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
* 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
* 1 package (3 to 4 ounces) sweet-
ened lemon-flavored powdered drink
mix
Combine all ingredients. Store in
airtight container. To serve, place 2 ta-
blespoons mix in mug, add 3/4 cup
boiling water, and stir well.
DEAR SARA: How do I keep stock-
piled cans from rusting? I do not have


secretive and nocturnal creatures, you
may not see them - but they're out
there, and probably quite nearby.
One way you\can help is to build a
pond - or if you've got one, modify it to
make it more amphibian-friendly Or-
namental fish ponds are usually not
well suited for amphibians, says Brock,
and they may be lured away from more
appropriate habitat to lay eggs, only to
have them eaten by your fish.
Some simple modifications may
help your existing pond work as am-
phibian habitat, and if you want to
build one from scratch, it doesn't have
to be elaborate - Brock installed one
about half the size of a bathtub that
cost less that $100.
Even without a pond, your yard can
provide habitat for adult amphibians,
many of which are less dependent on
bodies of water outside breeding sea-
son. Perhaps the most important step is
to minimize your use of pesticides and
other chemicals, which not only affect
amphibians directly - they absorb tox-
ins through their delicate skin -but kill
off the insects that they need for food.

space for a stockpile inside our living
space. We tried setting up shelves in
the basement, but the canned goods
rapidly rusted. So we started using a
shelf my husband cleared off in the
garage. The cans rusted there, too!
They were continually rotated, and
some were there for only a few months
before they started rusting. - Polly,
Pennsylvania
DEAR POLLY: The humidity is too
high. For the basement, I'd run a dehu-
midifier and add a couple of boxes of
baking soda to absorb moisture. I
wouldn't store canned goods in a garage
because of extreme temperatures. Ac-
cording to USA Emergency Supply
(www.usaemergencysupplycom), you
can prevent corrosion by wiping the
outside of the can with food-grade min-
eral oil. But you have to remove the la-
bels to coat the entire can.

Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal Vil-
lage (wwwfrugalvillage.com), a Web
site that offers practical, money-sav-
ing strategies for everyday living. To
send tips, comments or questions,
write to Sara Noel, c/o United Media,
200 Madison Ave., 4th Floor, New
York, NY 10016, or e-mail sara@
frugalvillage.com.


SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009 E19
















REALTY LEADERS


Crystal River 794-0888


Inverness 341-1233


Beverly Hills 527-1112


M NANCY

SlunTLE LEWIS
4 REALTOR'
LOO IG FOR A WONIDERUrL IHOME' :




I' z. .. i .'r, L-. ... .4, $2 ? .000




m-nd new 2o007 o1i .'. ,: r*e.. .. .


nh.. " . . , r......-... :. . ..i. n'
!..- - )1 r � L, ' N r -,1 N.4





Xfr: j- 1 1 .


(352) 302-6082

THIS 1 A BEAUFUL CUSTIO




B... .- .. .. . ea ,.N
I .r

1 r ' Ir .3 - : r':n i'9
--= ML : : 1S298.500
SETTING :-:.- T.


V H r I.., 1~ , 1 -

"1,J $189,900


Brad and
Sherry
Potts
bradfordpottssr@aol.com � sherylpotts@aol.com


.: 3- ll rn.
350,000


ONCE EVERY FEW YEARS .'.
Ir, r i. r . -,, I : , :: :.
S *.:.. -h 1.1:,: .3 r. : hir, :, , d nr,. ,jil .,,,


had I : 3 - ir
w . .", ,-.


SPECTACULAR NEW POOl. HOME
1rt r. E.13 4 L
i .: .. l .l .., A h . ,1 L. n i



$339,900 . . . '.
$339,900


www.pottsteam.com
77 (352) 697-1368

S (352) 697-5500
NEW POOL SCREEN r,. in,.
E* r,4.. I.,. [ h . jar..I . Ic
ir %, t..1. gr , ,:r.T. l- . ,,-,C i



j ~ l .- r N' S, .
$i.: $ .,. 189.900


WHEN YOU DESERVE THE VERY
BEST



I N-l . . . . : .m . I

ll:rh .a.uh .r II.i I .h . rI :r L i . ' 7 $299500


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
(352) 476-8579
REALTORi







':,F 1 , n nr . r , , ' _


2t. , 'W mobile r-:
AX ::.r.. .-... l 1,:1 -, :
hSll, r.: :,rl:n' 1,i".,l


Karen
Kennedy
(352) 422-8656
REALTORS'


~~F-~a cg-- ~ a


ALISON (352) 697-0761 - SEVE
MARKHAM (352) 422-3998 MCCLORY
REALTOR I A LR
www.naturecoastliving.com * info@naturecoastlvng.com






EMONT HILLS SUGARMILL WOODS I ..
S30 000 l - 1 $200.000


CONVENIEN LY LOCATED I .: . . .-1 ,-, .,, :,,.
ll: . rn. q ,: I: :I F, , I'' G , . l . l .l,_ .''. . : . ,1, ,


MOTIVATED SELLER! ,.- w,
SUN APIRIL5, 1:00-3:00 |,-T,.p-, ,',,] ' Ir:.Tr, . ir, e r,,r.,
4185 W. GORGE LN. da .. -C.I .- .hr..,, :,r,.:.. ... - i-] . -.1gri :
Dir: Pine Ridge Blvd. to N on Flagstaff Enjoy the open floor plan, large enclosed
Ave. to Rt on W Gorge Ln.-House on lanai, eat in kitchen and fenced yard with
Left. MLS #324654. fruit trees. MLS 327678
CHARLENE ANGELO 352-464-4179 CHARLENE ANGELO 352-464-4179


lip at end of street, solid oak floors, hickory fire
cabinets, stainless appliances, wrap around Go
porch, fenced comer lot, and much more. coi
ALS 331348. Su
BIM A HANNIGAN 352-257-9B5


SHORT SALE . . : I ' : .
$159.000


, ENJOY THE PEACEFUL VIEW


BREATHTAKING OPEN WATER VIEW I : :I L, :I- Y5" .-..1 ..: . . .' i.
the St. Martin's River! 3/2 home with a Seller is offering a $2000 flooring allowance
wraparound porch with a water view from at closing. Close to the Country Club and
every room Paradise! MLS 327740. Golf Course. MLS 330817.
CHARLENE ANGELO 352-464-4179 CHARLENE ANGELO 352-464-4179

OE HC I F


MDERFUL COUNTRY ESTATE ,
9>7 a(rc L......P,, :..n , rn D.r,,ng R.,T, ", " '' dl
ed stone fireplace. Great room has stone SUNDAY APR. 5TH 1:00-3:00 37
place and views of pool/lanai area. W. COGWOOD CIRCLE $267,900
urmet kitchen features corian Directions: From Pine Ridge Blvd ft
untertops, stainless steel appliances. South on Allamandra - LEFT on Cogw
mmer kitchen on lanai. MLS 333061 Circle - First home on LEFT. MLS 325
OE STOOlaEY 352-206-9096 NANCY AfRES 352-279-5058


-.L h ,h 4


I4 HLUHUUPI s B rIM LAB WW U b - iA ljl c-
-I-- - r.LS --S<196.

I~' 7.


SERENE & PRIVATE RIVERFRONT
PARADISE!! . .:r, ,.:. .: -
r,.i,, , J,., , ,J.h .r. .,- L. h!i,:i5-- 'i. ... , I.
features include a fireplace, vaulted ceilings,
workshop in garage, greenhouse and great
views! MLS 327148
MARY GULLING 352-422-2994


--------- ..........
03 1 i 'i'u r h1, " hh '"r... . L .h . ,r.S '.h.,fi

0 BEAUTInfUMY DECORATED 3/2/1 in oakwood ooring. Enjoy an active, adult
Arbor Court on a quiet cul-de-sac. New roof lifestyle in this lake community with boat
S| in 2006, large lanai under air. Split plan ramp, fishing pier, swimming pool, tennis
d I with eat-in kitchen, dual sinks in master courts, shuffleboard, exercise area and
'4 bath. Great value MLS 331083. much, much morel MLS 333235
NANCY AYRES 352-279-5058 NANCY AYRES 352-279-5058


WANT A QUIET SECLUDED RETREAT
r, l : , . Ir,,. ; i ,.a. '. ; . .:.m.I I9 .'l . :iI.:r.. r
p i r, 3,',, , .: ..N. .,T-i . i .., , :.: .rin,

screened porch. Privacy and nature are
yours on this lovely 2.5 acre property jusi
outside Pine Ridge. MLS 326129.
MARY GULLING 352-422-2994





MEADOWCREST VILLA ,r. F ..rr,,,.rh
'.,llgJ � 1 i s ar. Ai ,r, .,,a irE l ,..,iing P ',.O
plt, i,-,i r l.e - . . 1,, - .l rC 1 N ra ump , anrc
9a,'a,, ,3 ,:,r ,,p Nr,' all ',eA .n 2007,
microwave new in 2006, refrigerator new in
2008. Indoor laundry, new ceramic tile in
entry and in kitchen, dual sinks in master
bath with large walk-in closet. Furniture
negotiable. MLS 322995.
NANCY AMRES 352-279-5058


E20 SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2009


CCITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I I I I �r � -


El