Title: Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01035
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness Fla
Publication Date: October 14, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028315
Volume ID: VID01035
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035

Full Text













FORECAST:
Mostly sunny
and warm
PAGE 4A


s: Pileup snarls traffic for hours in California


Fifteen


KER1 LYNN MCHALE
kmchale@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Citrus County School officials have
big building plans for the future.
The 2007-08 five-year district facilities'
work plan, approved by board members
in September, outlines necessary facili-
ty projects and projected costs.
The projects are divided into two cat-
egories, maintenance projects and
capacity projects. Maintenance projects
involve renovations and remodeling for
reasons other than addressing growth,
such as replacing an old roof. Capacity
projects, such as new schools, are based
on population growth and projected stu-
dent enrollment.
"It's healthy for everyone to see this
information," Planning and Growth
Management Director Chuck Dixon
said. Both maintenance and capacity
projects are paid for by money raised
through taxes for the schools' capital
budget
Dixou.-.explained the extensive
process of developing the five-year
plan.
. Officials prioritize the projects using
facilities assessment studies and


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 750 VOLUM 9 No. 287


ovif


OCTOBER 14, 2007 Florida's Best Communit:


KENTUCKY ON TOP:
Football upset
No. 1 LSU
loses to
No. 17
Kentucy,.
in SEC
show-
down.
/Page
1B :.L i


TAKE TWO:
Burglar caught
A Crystal River store is robbed for
the second time since August,
police nab a suspect./Page 3A
COMMENTARY:


School board plans for future


Tragic inspiration
In the first of a three-part
series, former Chronicle
employee Tim Hess shares his
tragic saga and sage
advice./Page 1C
THINK YOUR JOB IS BAD?
Depressing jobs
People who tend to the elderly,
change diapers and serve up
food and drinks have the highest
rates of depression among U.S.
workers./Page 12A
SPREAD A LITTLE SUNSHINE:
Mimosa, anyone?










Columnist Jane
Weber explains
some alterna-
tives to turf
grass, such as
this sunshine
mimosa; or
perennial
peanut,
Asiatic jas-
mine, low-
growing
junipers and
English ivies.
/Page 18E
COMMUNITY CONCERN:
Veterans Forum
Columnist
Larry
MacMillan
invites veter-
ans and their
families to
participate in
the Veterans
l Forum next
Saturday.
/Page 14A
ONLINE POLL:
Share your view
Is global warming a real
threat?
B. Yes. Coastal
areas will be dev-
astated.
C. No. It's a reality
but it's cyclical.
D. Yes. And I'd vote for AI
Gore for president.
To vote, simply access the
Chronicle Web site,
www.chronicleonline.com.
Results will appear in the
Sunday, Oct. 21 edition.
Last week's results./Page 2A


Annie's Mailbox ....... 18A
Classified ........... 6D
Crossword ...... . . 18A
Entertainment .......... 6B
Horoscope .... . ... .10A
Lottery Payc'ut. ........ 6B
Movies ........... .9A.
Obituaries ......... . . 6A
gather . . . . . 17A
Eight Sections


6 84578 20075 o


PROJECTS FOR 2007-12


The only capacity-related project in
this year's five-year work plan is the
construction completion of Central
Ridge Elementary, $17 million. The
total cost of maintenance projects dur-
ing the next few years is $91 million.
Some of those projects include:
2007-08
(already included in capital budget)
Parent pickup area and cov-
ered walkway a: Citrus
Springs Elemertary.
Covered walkway at Floral
City Elementary.
New bus loop/parent pickup
at Hernando Elementary.
New roof at Citrus Springs
Middle School.

administrative input. For maintenance
projects, officials walk through schools
annually with a checklist to make sure
conditions are satisfactory according to
a 2006 baseline, countywide facilities
condition study Principals also have
access to project request forms.
Once the maintenance projects are


New bus lane and parent
pickup at Lecanto High
School.
New replacement fuel tanks
at all three bus garages.
Renovations at the Marine
Science Station.
Renovations to vocational
labs to meet new program
needs at Withlacoochee
Technical Institute.
Renovation projects at
Crystal River Primary and
Crystal River High School
(2007-08 through 2011-12).'
Purchase of new land for
future growth needs (2007-
08 through 2011-12).

identified, officials look at the immedi-
acy of those projects. They also deter-
mine whether projects can be covered
by the current maintenance budget or if
the projects can be looked at as future
capital projects.
Please see SCHOOLS/Page 5A


Impact


fees not


to blame


Commissioner:

Slow growth isn't

related to fees
MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Commercial construction
may be slowing,' but impact
fees are not to blame.
So :says
Citrus A'Cunty
Commissioner
Joyce Vale-
ntino, who said
last week that
impact fees
have not pre-
vented any -
developer Joyce
from opening a Valentino
store or restau- said fees
rant in. the haven't hurt
county. economy.
Valentino
said big-name chains will
locate in Citrus County
regardless of the impact-fee
cost. She said any commercial
slowdown is the result of a
slow building economy over-
all, not the county's impact
fees.
"When growth comes back,
things will be fine," she said.
The county was scheduled
to review its impact fees in
January. However, Valentino
said that discussion might be
delayed as the county awaits
results of an economic impact
study
In recent weeks, rumors
have swirled about big-name
chain stores or restaurants
that were planning Citrus
County locations, but pulled
out because of impact fees.
Clark Stillwell, an Inverness
attorney who represents the
interests of developers, said
he knows of no one who used
impact fees as the sole reason
for skipping Citrus County.
But impact fees are making
those decisions easier, he said.


Please see IMPACT/Page 4A



Friends of woman in motorcycle crash pick up pieces


Susan Rudd has been

in a coma since Sept. 8


SHEMIR WILES
swiles@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Susan Rudd laid on the
side of the road, unconscious
from a severe injury to her
head.
While others worked to
save her life, her boyfriend
of four years, Roy Sheppard,
knelt in the grass and prayed.
Rudd slipped into a coma
that Saturday evening, and
Sheppard doesn't know if she
will ever be the same.
"I was in shock,"


Sheppard, 46, said of that
day Sheppard and Rudd, 49,
were riding on their Honda
Rebel motorcycles at around
5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8, going
east on State Road 44, when a
man making a right turn from
County Road 490 collided
with Rudd, ejecting her from
the motorcycle. She was not
wearing a helmet. She was
airlifted to Shands Hospital
in Gainesville where she has
remained in a coma ever
since. Recently, she was
moved to Citrus Memorial
hospital. Neurosurgeons are


not quite sure if she's going to
come out of it.
"She's made no voluntary
movement and she's been on
full life support since the
accident," Sheppard said.
Rudd suffered a skull frac-
ture and head trauma. She is
on a ventilator and she has
had part of her brain
removed because of a large
blood clot. Sheppard says
that if they can get her to get
up and even dress herself
that would' be a start, but chi-
ropractic physician Cheryl
McFarland-Bryant, a close
friend of Rudd, feels that
even if her friend wakes up
she won't be the same.
"I already feel like I've lost
a friend," she said.


I already feel
like I've lost a
friend.

Cheryl McFarland-
Bryant
about her friend in a coma.

Rudd was a high-end cabi-
netmaker and Sheppard is a
mechanic. He has been rid-
ing motorcycles for 35 years.
After overcoming personal
obstacles, Rudd moved to
Citrus County three years ago
to start a new life.
"She's been the happiest
she's ever been in five


years," Sheppard said.
"When she came to Citrus
County, she absolutely loved
the area."
McFarland-Bryant met
Rudd at a women's support
group meeting. They lived in
the same neighborhood and
shared the same interests, so
they became fast friends.
After McFarland-Bryant
began mentoring Sheppard's
teen daughter, their relation-
ship grew closer.
"She was a happy, outgo-
ing, energetic person,"
McFarland-Bryant said. "She
was just like a bucket of sun-
shine. She used to jokingly
call herself a chipmunk."
Please see CRASH/Page 7A


CLo


.:hrorlicieonline corn


HIGH
88
LOW
62


. ,"Copyrighted Material.



SSyndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"
.__,__--~~~~~O p op~i *af 11 lll .li -'W11 W. -


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
The newly named Central Ridge Eementary School is under construction in Citrus Springs and is scheduled to open in the Fall of 2008.

20-year outlook includes lansm for multi-million dollar buildings


* >,, A., 2 -. ii.









A SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2007/ .,r



Chili helps charity


WALTER CARLSON/For the Chronicle
Stephen Spicer of Rajun Cajun Chili from Sarasota cooks up a batch of chili Saturday for the Sixth
Annual Homosassa Chili Championship at Nature's Resort in Homosassa. There were 21 competitors
from the Chili Appreciation Society International and 15 local competitors. Competition will contin-
ue today from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.


Construction begins Monday
Special to the Chronicle

Turn lane construction will begin Monday along Grover
Cleveland Boulevard and Grand March Avenue in Homosassa.
Art Walker Construction will construct a left-turn lane heading
west on Grover Cleveland and a right-turn lane heading east
onto Grand March Avenue, home to the new Homosassa Library.
In addition, Grover Cleveland Boulevard from U.S. 19 to Grand
March Avenue will be milled, resurfaced and restiped during
the construction process.

Customer service workshop at CFCC


Special to the Chronicle

Central Florida Community
College will offer a customer
service workshop Wednesday,
Oct 24, with the Citrus County
chapter of SCORE, Counselors
to America's Small Business.
The class will meet from 1 to
5 p.m. in Building L2, Room
103, on the Citrus Campus, 3800
S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
The fee is $30 and includes lec-
tures by an experienced
SCORE counselor, demonstra-
tions and role-playing.
Participants will learn how


to improve customer service by
decreasing language barriers,
understanding customers,
using the telephone effectively
and using nonverbal communi-
cations. Instructor Beverly
O'Brien has years of customer
service and sales-training
experience and has devoted
several years to telephone
sales training.
For more information or to
register for the workshop, call
249-1210 or visit enrollment
services at the Citrus Campus.
You can also enroll online at
www.CFCCtraining.com.


VERTICAL BLINDS
-OF HOMOSASSA, Inc.
We're More Than Just Verticals
Complete Interior Design & Decorating '
-ul"' TO) S"At ".
0oR Too LARGE
S Whole House Discounts Lorrie
15% OFF Shutters and ADO Wrap
eTop Treatments
*.P 2" Faux Wood
Custom Drapery
e Decorative & Plain PVC Verticals
Cellular Shades
Plantation Shutters Thousands Of Satisfied Customers...
Plantation Shutters NOT ONE COMPLAINT!


SERVOS PLAZA 5454 S. Suncoast Blvd.
(Hwy 19, next to Sugarmill Family Rest.)
www.verticalblindsofhomosassa.com r
S E : :: III


UFESOUTH COMMIT


Dates
0 Today
0 10/15
10/16
10/17
10/17
0 10/18
S10/19
m 10/19
R 10/20
E 10/20
m 10/21
: 1021
0 10/22
0 10,23
0 10/24
10/25
0 10/26
m 10/26
9 10/27
m 10/27
m 10/28
m 10/28
0 10/29
0 10/30
0 10/31
M 10/31
11/1


CRISTY LOFTIS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Having a drip of chili on the front of your shirt
is inevitable when you're sampling spoonfuls of
steaming chili but nearing the end of the after-
noon Saturday is was almost a badge of honor.
The Rotary Club of Homosassa Springs began
its sixth annual Homosassa Chili Championship
Saturday an event that continues today.
From spicy hot to sweet and salty, the recipes
of chili enthusiasts can be sampled by all.
While the cooks are working to win contests for
their work, the public can taste the leftovers.
For $2, people can buy small cups to take to
chili booths to try to find just the right chili for
their taste buds.
Saturday, people got a chance to meet the 2006
Terlingua International Chili Championship
first-place winner, Dana Plocheck Her winning
chili is nicknamed "Lady Bug Chili," and is a
variation of an old family recipe.
Plocheck, who has been competing in chili
contests for nearly 20 years, said winning was a
combination of skill and luck
Conditions were perfect last year, she said.
The moon was full and the international cham-
pionship in Texas coincided with her husband's
birthday.
So far this year, she has spent more than 35
weekends on the road in 11 different states at
chili cook-offs. She swaps recipes and even gives
out a printed card with her "Lady Bug" recipe -
just minus a few special ingredients.
"I didn't give up a few of my secrets," Plocheck
said. "I have to keep some of those for myself."
People such as Plocheck, who compete year-
round in Chili Appreciation Society
International Inc. (CASI) competitions, like the
one in Homosassa, do it for the "charity, chili and
fun," she said.
CASI is a nonprofit organization that awards
college scholarships. The Homosassa event also
raises money for local charities through the
Rotary Club.
In addition to securing event sponsors,
Homosassa Rotarians are selling raffle tickets,
50/50 tickets, chili paraphernalia and, of course,
homemade chili, chili dogs and burgers to raise
money for local charities. Some of the charities


UNITY BLOOD CENTERS IS PLANNING 1


Name
Harley-Davidson of Crystal River
Homosassa Springs Post Office
Stoneridge Landing Clubhouse
Bealls Department Store
All Saints Council Knights of Columbus
Citrus Memorial Hospital
Citrus Health & Rehab
Citrus Memorial Hospital
Wal-Mart Inverness
Rotary Club ot'Crystal River
St. Elizabeth An n Seton Catholic Church
Rock Crusher Road FirstChurch o' God
Rock Crusher Elementary School
Crystal River High School
Crystal Chevrolet
Withlacoochee Technical Institute
Citrus County Tax Collector's Office
Hunted House
VFW Post 4864 Citrus Springs
Movie Gallery Beverly Hills
Huddle House Crystal River,
Blockbuster Crystal River
Food Ranch
Publix Homosassa
Halloween Party Lecanto Center
Halloween Party Inverness Center
Gus's Gold and Gems


CATARACT &
Mik "i'LELASER INSTITUTE
(Excellence... with loved

FREE

HEALTH SCREENING
In Association With:
Anne Mane Newcomer, OD
Friday, Oct. 19'
Vision Cataract
Glaucoma
Blood Pressure
*..--, Eyeglass Adjustments

Homosassa Eye Clinic
4564 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
For an appointment call: 352-628-3029

THE PATIENT ANDANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY. CANCEL
PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICES, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT
IS PERFORMEDAS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THEADVERTISEMENT FOR THE
FREE DISCOUNTED FEE. OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION. OR TREATMENT.


TERLINGUA INTERNATIONAL CHILI
CHAMPION DANA PLOCHECK'S
"LADY BUG CHILI" RECIPE:
In a 4-quart pot, brown 2 lbs. coarse-ground beef
(chili grind) in a skillet After browning, drain meat. Add:
a 1 can (14.5 ounces) Swanson beef broth
N 1 can (8 ounces) Hunt's no-salt tomato sauce.
Float one jalapeno pepper and one Serrano pep-
per Bring to a boil then add Packet 1.
a Packet 1:
1 Tbsp. onion powder (rounded)
2 Tsp. garlic powder
1 Tbsp. Mexene Chili Powder
Cover and simmer at a medium boil for one
hour. Remove peppers, squeeze juice and set
aside. Replace lid and continue medium boil for
additional 15 minutes, and then add Packet 2.
Packet 2:
2 1/2 Tbsp. light chili powder
2 1/2 Tbsp. dark chili powder
2 Tsp. cumin
1/4 Tsp. black pepper
1/4 Tsp. white pepper
1/4 Tsp. cayenne pepper
t/2 cube Knorr's beef bullion
1/2 cube Knorr's chicken bullion
1/4 Tsp. brown sugar
1 pack Sazon Goya
Continue boiling with lid for 30 minutes. Then
add juice from peppers and Packet 3.
N Packet 3:
2 Tsp. Mexene Chili Powder
1 Tsp. cumin
1/2 Tsp. salt
Leave covered and simmer an additional 15 min-
utes and serve.


include the Boys & Girls Clubs, Upward Bound,
The Family Resource Center, Lecanto High
School's Project Graduation and Homosassa
Elementary School.
While chowing down on chili, people also can
enjoy live music, drink beer, buy and peruse
crafts and booths and enjoy the cooler fall
weather outside.
The chili championship is today from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. at Nature's Resort, located 2 miles west of
U.S. 19 on Halls River Road.


THE FOLLOWING BLOOD DRIVES:


Address Time
1785 U.S. 19, Homosassa 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
4610 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa Springs 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Clubhouse. Inverness 8 a.m. to noon
346 N. Suncoast Blvd.. Crystal River 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
9020 W. Atlas Drive, Homosassa 2 to 5:30 p.m.
502 Highlands Blvd., Inverness 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
701 Medical Court E., Inverness 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
502 Highlands Blvd., Inverness 3 to7 p.m. '
2461 W Gulf-to-Lake Highway. Inverness 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
1619 .W Gulf-to-Lake Iighvla,. Lecafto 5to 9 p.m.
1460 W. St. Elizabeth Place, Citrus Springs 8 a.m. to nooe.;, a
419 N, Rock Crusher Road, Crystal River L 1 to 4 p.M aJ -"
814 S. Rock Crusher Road, Homosassa !8 am. to 4 p.m.
1205 N.E. Eighth St.. Crystal River 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River .... 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
1201 W. Main St, Inverness 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
110 N. Apopka Ave, Inverness 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Inverness Fair Grounds 4 to 7 p.m.
10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs 7:30 to 11:30 a.m.
3621 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills 12:30 to 6 p.m.
1208 N.E. Fifth St(S.R.44), Crystal River 8 a.m. to noon: ,
6824 W Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River 1 to 5 p.m.. : ,,
40 N. U.S. 19, Inglis 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
3942 S. Suncoast Plaza,Homosassa 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
1241 S. Lecanto Highway (C.R. 491), Lecanto 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.,
301 Main St, Inverness 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
2637 Forest Ridge Blvd., Hernando 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.


High Blood Sugar?

Type 2 Diabetes?
Meridien Research is conducting a 12 week study of
an investigational medication for the control of blood
sugar. You may qualify if:
You have Type 2 diabetes
You are between the ages of 18 and 70
You are looking for better control of your blood sugar
You are already taking Metforminor
Your blood sugar is uncontroled by diet alone
Qualified participants will receive initial consultation,
study medication, study related laboratory tests,
physical exams, EKG, and compensation up to $485
for time and travel. We are located on Route 50
between Hwy. 19 and Mariner Blvd. in Spring Hill.

For more information about this research study, 4,
please call 352-597-8839 (352-59-STUDY) Meridien*'
Participation is completely voluntary
www.newstudyinfo.net Type2 diabetes arch
09111/07 V.2
Mildred V. Fanner, MD, 12144 Cortez Blvd. (Route 50) Between US 19 & Mariner Blvd., Brooksville, FL 34613


PAID ADVERTISEMENT



Hidden energy leaks could be costing you a bundle


rm SAVE THE
EM 3 WATTS GUY
TIPS ANO HINIS FOR SAVING ENERGY


Dear STW Guy: Because our
family lives in an older home, we
make exlty llr i (0to bei as inc ten
as possible. From changing out
air filters n:gulamly. to setting
the thermostat at a reasonable
temperature, to cooking with the
microwave instead of the stove,
we do what we can to cut out
w\a teful lhaibis \V\''- im ade omne
progress, but we'd love to get our
bills even lower. Any thoughts?
- Not Efficient Fnough

Dear Not: First otr kudos on
the efficient habits! They're a


great start to a lifetime of saving
major watts. Since you live in an
older home and aren't getting the
results you want, I suspect your
problem may be deeper inside
your walls, that is. And by that, I
mean that your ductwork may
have leaks that allow hot or cold
air to escape which can waste
up to one-third of your heating
and cooling costs. To find out
if your home's duct system has
leaks, the first step is to sign up
for a free Home Energy Check,
where Progress Energy will
provide you with customized


efficiency recommendations for
your home. If it's determined that
you need a Duct Check, they'll
even pay half the cost of the test,
plus the first $150 toward any
repairs needed. To get the savings
started, visit savethewatts.com
or call 1.888.302.8348.

Dear STW Guy: My wife and I
want to build a new house, and
want to make sure it's as energy-
efficient as possible before we
move in. I'm tired of wasting
energy and money! Any tips?
- Moving On Up


Dear Moving: So, you're looking
for lower monthly energy costs
in your new home? I suggest you
look for homebuilders who are
part of Progress Energ ', Home
Advantage program. When you
work with a Home Advantage
builder, you get a home that is not
only beautiful, but is also specially
constructed tosaveenrpg). mono,.
and the environment, too. With
features like upgraded insulation.
high-efficiency windows, and a


tightly sealed duct system, a Home
Advantage-built home offers you
improved comfortand potential for
higher resale value. And because of
the monthly savings, you can even
get more house for your money. Go
to savethewatts.com today, and
click on Savings Programs to find
out more about energy-efficient
new construction and get a list of
qualified builders who can help
you create the energy-efficient
home of your dreams.


Progress Energy SAVE THE WATTS
2007 Progress Energy Florida, nc.


Wood Faux Wood Vinyl
Many Styles
Lifetime Warranty

--- -AL Now


Cmus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


L OLr"-AT


4% A& .-- ....













3A
SUNDAY
OCTOBER 14, 2007-
www.chronicleonline.corl.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


I "asaIVIM



now
wl ammmm
%WN- m-
m-om --od


qopd--


-a. du
swl- 4mupmm





fm- ow-mo, lu

-.1 lb qmssw. .
O- -AMsow-o o w
OUP m 1f os





0. om -mdw- s
a.- ftdom -





Mmu-w o mv -
qow b- oms-Ift 0.
'm 41,41.w -oo
4smm lo AP a


fa--esm-mum s0om


m-001,- 4140 0 o-9n




40 0. 40.- qjj
- doom- -b a



- -411

4W -8om,4 -m.mm 0




40.=mdo 010 410


-d- Osomoo Om

40 d0lwoo.010 .

qw wol, 0MIEW am

0. 0.mi s. qw -soo
4m- 400- sm,40.--a 4W
se, a-mlepsf momm
40. ebomm G0.-o


Store robbed a second time


LAURA ISAACS
lisaacs@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

The Crystal River BP Food
Mart, at 809 Citrus Ave., saw its
second robbery since August
late Friday night.
At about 11:59 p.m., Crystal
River Police Department offi-
cers responded to the burglary
call. According to a news
release prepared by CRPD
Chief Steven Burch, an
unknown person threw a rock
through the store's window and
then stole cigarettes and a cash
register. A witness was able to


provide a description of the
suspect sought for the burglary
and the blue-and-white conver-
sion van he used to flee the
scene.
According the release,
Saturday morning at about 3
a.m., CRPD Officer Michele
Cirone found debris of a cash
register matching the register
stolen hours earlier from the
BP station in the roadway
while patrolling southeast
Eighth Avenue, less than two
miles away from the scene of
the burglary. She then saw a
conversion van matching the
suspect's turn into a nearby


apartment complex, so she
called for backup. The van
drove away before other offi-
cers arrived, but was stopped
about block away, the news
release said.
Chief Burch's release said
Ted Lee O'Brien, of 2850 Crede
Avenue, was driving the van.
O'Brien matched the suspect's
description and Officer Cirone
found cash register parts and
cartons of cigarettes in the van.
Patrol Sgt. David DeCarlis,
who had viewed the BP sta-
tion's surveillance tapes, con-
firmed that O'Brien had com-
mitted the burglary, and he


was arrested for burglary,
grand theft, criminal mischief
and driving on a suspended
driver's license. O'Brien's
bond was set at $8,000.
According to the release pre-
pared by Burch, the CRPD and
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
are investigating several other
burglaries and are now work-
ing to see if O'Brien is also
responsible for these crimes.
Anyone with information
should call CRPD Detective
Craig Reese at 795-4241.
The same BP Food Mart, on
the corner of Citrus Avenue
and Crystal Street, was robbed


Aug. 5 at gunpoint by Matthewy
Alphonse Jay of Homosassa...
Reports say during the robbery,;
Jay was in possession of a-
black-and-silver semiautomat-
ic handgun, with which he::
threatened the storeowner-
while demanding cash fromn-
the register. The arrest report-
also said two people, who were:
later able to identify Jay'
through a photo lineup, wit--
nessed the robbery. Jay was.
also involved in two other-
armed robberies in Homosassa;
that day. Friday's burglary and-
the Aug. 5 robbery don't seem-
to be related, officials said.


Key West embracing tattoo parlors


Assoclateda ress


removed


that," Noergaard said.
A Fort Lauderdale native, McAlhany,
50, didn't get interested in tattoos until
four years ago.
"Things change as generations get
older," McAlhany said, wearing a
sleeveless T-shirt to show his arm tat-
toos. "When I was growing up, I would
never get a tattoo. I thought it was a
biker thing. You change your thinking
as you get older You get wiser."
McAlhany recruited Mencarelli, 50,
to join him in the business. Mencarelli,
who started "slinging ink" after getting
out of the military in the mid-1980s,
jumped at the moneymaking opportu-
nity, calling the shop his "pension
plan." He is recruiting visiting artists
and the shop has reservations stretch-
ing into next year
'This place could become an attrac-
tion, actually," Mencarelli said. 'This is
Key West There's always something
happening."


Associated Press


KEY WEST Tattoo artist Bo
Mencarelli chills on a sidewalk chair
near Duval Street's fish restaurants
and beer-soaked bars, dragging on a
cigarette and saying, "What's up, broth-
er," to those who recognize the thin
man with ink paintings on his arms.
On an island with its own cadre of
celebrities 6-foot cross-dressing
Swedes, Ernest Hemingway imperson-
ators, even wandering chickens -
Mencarelli and friend Jim McAlhany
are a hip attraction.
They operate Key West Ink, one of
two tattoo parlors that opened in late
August on Duval, the island's main
drag. The owners sued the city to erase
a Navy-backed, four-decade ordinance
that banned tattoo parlors an anom-
aly in a town where outrageousness is
prized and the biggest festival features
topless women covered in body paint


Key West Ink now attracts a stream of
customers and visiting artists from
around the country. Artists also say the
change is another sign of the growing
acceptance of tattooing as a form of
expression.
"This Key West and this is Duval. He-
llo," Mencarelli said. "You can do any-
thing you want here, and you can see
just about anything. Come on ... This
town is ready for it"
One would think that getting tattooed
in Key West would be as natural as
finding a piece of Key lime pie. But in
the 1960s, Key West was a bustling Navy
port, with some 10,000 sailors and
another 10,000 family members help-
ing fuel the economy, historian Tom
Hambright said. Sailors got tattoos in
places with dirty needles leading to
hepatitis and other illnesses,
Hambright said.
"Tattoo parlors at that time were
found in a sleazy area of town ... pool


halls, the backs of bars," Hambright
said. "The same needles were used
over and over again. It was not sani-
tary."
The shop blows away all conceptions
of a backroom tattoo parlor, with
tourists flashing photos outside and
folks relaxing on comfy chairs inside.
"When you come in, you melt into the
atmosphere and you become part of
us," McAlhany said.
Among McAlhany's first customers
was a drag queen named Inga the
Swedish Bombshell. Since, he has got-
ten visits from an 82-year-old woman
who got a conch shell tattoo and a man
who flew in from Fort Myers on a pri-
vate jet for a quick inking
One recent afternoon, it was Jesper
Noergaard, of Denmark, getting an Ace
of Spades and King of Hearts on his
inside forearm.
"They finally got tattoos on Duval
Street and I wanted to be a part of


nowa *w 0o
q0w. 4 ob 4
0. sm 4IP1 0
0. t 40. 0.
Qb 0.. 4oft .
a 'llw 01. 40.
agomw_ 0--mv 0.
0.
-4w


7arm AirForce


DW66M v b i m,


_ --<-. -- - --_




.."Copyrighted Material


1 "- ,,"4 "


-a lw -- 0.0


- S4-0


- -.0.- .0... -


- -.-- ---l- nyiUICaLU e oUIILn IIL : _.. i



-Available from Commercial NewsProviders'
0.. f- 010,- 4w- 0 %1%6


440. 0w. -AND.







o- -go 4 .1


4w- 4 0


--law


- "D


- -


0 0


* a -


- 5 0


- -S - a 0


* QUESTION: Has the county overreached on impact fees?
* YOUR ANSWERS:
A. Yes. The impact fees are unreasonable and stifle growth. (360 votes, 70.4 percent.)
B. No. We need the money to keep pace with infrastructure needs. (71 votes, 13.8 percent.)
C. No. We pay enough in taxes without paying impact fees. (59 votes, 11.5 percent.)
D. Yes. The numbers are skewed because of sprawl. (21 votes, 4.1 percent.)


(*~~


Carrie Wood of Colorado Springs, Colo., left, gets a tattoo Thursday of a palm tree at sunset by tattoo artist Todd Kirkland at Key West Ink.

Customers and artists flock to skin art businesses after a longtime city ban is


- .0


- 4= 9rp -


b


-0 -


o


ow










4A SUNDAY. OCTOBER 14. 2007 Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD


Citrus County Sheriff
Domestic battery
arrests
Helen N. McAllister, 30, Beverly
Hills, at 9:47 p.m. Monday on charges
of domestic battery, battery and
assault or battery on a law enforce-
ment officer. A 42-year-old woman
said McAllister was breaking things
inside a house and shoved her in the
chest. A 22-year-old man said he tried
to get in between the two women and
McAllister shoved him, too. The
deputy noted McAllister as being
intoxicated, belligerent and uncooper-
ative. When she was arrested, the
deputy said she began kicking the
windows of the patrol car from the
inside. When he opened the door to
get her to stop, she kicked him and
later another deputy. She told one
deputy she would kill him, and while
they tried to restrain her she contin-
ued to kick, so they used a Taser gun.
McAllister said she was hurt, so EMS
responded, but said she had no
injuries. Bond $5,500.
Bryant Aubrey Haney, 28,
Homosassa, at 4:17 a.m. Tuesday on
charges of domestic battery and pos-
session of a controlled substance. A
27-year-old woman said Haney and
she were arguing when he grabbed
her by the neck and choked her and
hit her in the head several times.
-aney said while they were arguing,
he never hit her. In his pocket, the
deputy found methadone crushed up,
which Haney did not have a prescrip-
tion for. No bond.
Patricia Nichole Hall, 18,
Hemando, at 10:32 p.m. Tuesday on
an aggravated battery charge. A 48-
year-old woman said she and Hall
were arguing when Hall pushed her,
causing her to fall backward and frac-
ture her wrist. No bond.
Joseph Paul Wichgers, 44,
Crystal River, at 8:51 p.m.
Wednesday on a domestic battery
charge. A 48-year-old woman said
Wichgers pushed, hit and threatened
to kill her. Wichgers told a deputy that
he only helped her get up off the
ground because she was drunk all
day and denied all that she claimed.


No bond.
Richard A. Plaugher, 39,
Crystal River, at 9:36 p.m.
Wednesday on a domestic battery
charge. A 49-year-old woman said
Plaugher punched her in the face and
pulled her around the house. The
deputy noted that Plaugherwas intox-
icated and was unable to provide any
information. No bond.
DUI arrest
Linda Marie Earley, 35, 29 S.
Tyler St., Beverly Hills, at 2:20 a.m.
Friday on a charge of driving under
the influence. She was pulled over for
not using a turning signal. A deputy
smelled alcohol on her breath. Early
failed field sobriety tests and her blood
alcohol concentration was 0.166 per-
cent and 0.172 percent. The legal limit
is 0.080 percent Bond $500
Other arrests
Heather Nicole Mackey, 27,
2420 12th St., West Bradenton, at
12:10 p.m. Thursday on a Marion
County warrant charge for a worth-
less check. Bond $450.
William Michael Wieland, 30,
9636 N. Quany Drive, Dunnellon, at
11:56 a.m. Thursday on a failure to
appear charge in reference to a felony
theft charge. He was additionally
charged with grand theft. Wieland
took items such as a pressure wash-
er and laptop to trade for drugs. No
bond.
Guy Leslie Ketelhut, 44, of an
unknown address, at 4:35 p.m.
Thursday on a charge of violation of
probation in reference to an original
felony case of possession of a con-
trolled substance. No bond.
Jimmy Darrell Hall, 21,1570 E.
Salmon Drive, Floral City, at 4:57 p.m.
Thursday on a grand theft charge in
reference to a stolen rifle. Bond
$1,000.
Darrin Lee Hamman, 19,1017
Mossy Oak Drive, Inverness, at 6
p.m. Thursday on a Citrus County
warrant charge of petit theft. Bond
$500.
Nicholas Wayne Pharr, 25,
1361 S. SkywayAve., Homosassa, at
9:06 p.m. Thursday on a Citrus


County warrant charge of burglary
with battery. Bond $25,000.
Michael Edmon Lawhead, 23,
1075 N. Suncoast Blvd., Lot 14,
Crystal River, at 12:34 a.m. Friday on
charges of burglary of a structure and
petit theft. Lawhead took three kegs of
beer from the Homosassa River
Resort.
Jason Dale Anderson, 19,
12204 Knotty Pine Loop, San Antonio,
at 2:07 a.m. Friday on charges of pos-
session of a controlled substance and
drug paraphernalia. When a deputy
pulled Anderson over, he saw a bag
with white powder inside on
Anderson's lap. When Anderson
noticed it, he grabbed it quickly and
tried to tuck it into his waist band.
Inside the bag was methampheta-
mine and more was found in the car.
Bond $5,500.
Crystal River Police
Domestic battery arrest
Christopher Matthew Tolbert
27, Homosassa, at 2:32 p.m.
Wednesday on a domestic battery
charge. A woman said Tolbert came
into her house and wanted to go down
a hallway. When she tried to stop him,
she said he pushed past her and later
shook her, choked her and hit her in
the face. Tolbert denied that anything
physical happened. No bond.

State Probation
Arrests
William John McMurray, 37,
899 S. SnappAve., Invemess, at 8:40
a.m. Thursday on a violation of proba-
tion charge in reference to an original
felony case involving driving with a
suspended/revoked license and pos-
session of a controlled substance.
McMurray violated when he missed a
curfew. No bond.
Richard Lee Carmichael, 35,51
S. Fillmore St., Beverly Hills, at 3:15
p.m. Thursday on a violation of proba-
tion charge in reference to an original
charge of felony battery. Carmichael
was serving three years of probation.
Traces of cocaine were found in his
urine during a drug test. No bond.


-Now ---
o _
q


411b


-0 -


IMPACT
Continued from Page 1A

"On a lot of deals, it's a much
bigger issue than it ever was
previously," he said. "All of a
sudden, that issue becomes a
bigger issue than it was five
years ago or 10 years ago."
That's because the cost of
doing business has shot up, he
said. Construction costs, land
costs, insurance when
impact fees are added to those
costs, companies begin looking
elsewhere, Stillwell said.
Valentino said she wouldn't
say if she supports increasing
impact fees until after seeing
the economic impact study But
she said that the county would-
n't need the additional 6-cent
gasoline tax to pay for road
projects if it had higher impact
fees.
"Growth is going to come.


- -'- "Copyrighted Material --

Syndicated Contentc -"N


- Available from Commercial News Providers"


- .'~ -


-~- ~-


am - .


- 0.- - 0-m
4m -o


- m -
-~ ~.- ~ U


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER


FLORIDA TCMPCEATURES


j CIT R U S.- ..C 0U N T Y


City H
Daytona Bch. 85
Ft. Lauderdale 86
Fort Myers 89
Gainesville 84
Homestead 86
Jacksonville 82
Key West 87
Lakeland 88
Melbourne 85


F'cast
ptcldy
tstrm
ptcldy
sunny
tstrm
ptcldy
tstrm
sunny
ptcldy


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
tstrm
sunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
ptcldy
ptcldy


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds from 10 to 20 knots. Seas 2 to
4 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a
moderate chop. Mostly sunny, breezy and
warm.



LAKE LEVELS


THREE DAY OUTLOOK
TODAY Exclusive daily forecast by:
l High: 88 Low: 62 4
Mostly Sunny; Warm breeze

MONDAY
High: 89 Low: 65
Mostly Sunny; Warm breeze


l~l


TUESDAY
High: 88 Low: 68
Partly Cloudy; 20% Chance of a shower


Gulf water
temperature


81
Taken at Egmont Key


Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.54 28.54 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 35.12 35.12 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 35.33 35.31 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.04 38.06 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year


87/59
91/47
64/84
73
-1

0.00 in.
3.51 in.
40.10 in.
46.60 in.


"As of 6 p.m.from Hernando County Airport
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder-
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE


DATE DAY

10/14 SUNDAY
10/15 MONDAY


Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.91 in.
DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 62
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 45%
POLLEN COUNT**
Grasses and weeds were mod-
erate and trees were light.
"Light only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollut-
ants mainly particulates.


MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING)
8:10 1:58
9:04 2:51


MINOR MAJOR
(AFTERNOON)
8:34 2:22
9:29 3:16


O SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:02 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW..................... 7:31 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY.........................10:36 A.M.
NOV.1 NOV. 8 MOONSET TODAY........................... 8:54 P.M.


BURN CONDITIONS

Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi

WATERING RULES

The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.

TIDES


Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers.
Sunday Monday
High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
7:12 a/3:23 a 8:43 p/4:00 p 7:40 a/3:52 a 9:25 p/4:35 p
5:33 a/12:45 a 7:04 p/1:22 p 6:01 a/1:14 a 7:46 p/1:57 p
3:20 a/11:10 a 4:51 p/11:02 p 3:48 a/11:45 a 5:33 p/11:33 p
6:22 a/2:22 a 7:53 p/2:59 p 6:50 a/2:51 a 8:35 p/3:34 p


Saturday
City H L Pcp.
Albany 59 36
Albuquerque 75 51
Asheville 69 37
Atlanta 72 49
Atlantic City 67 39
Austin 88 55
Baltimore .- 68 43
Billings 60 47
Birmingham 81 49
Boise 67 42
Boston 60 44
Buffalo 55 41
Burlington, VT 52 32 .02
Charleston, SC 78 50
Charleston, WV 67 40
Charlotte 72 42
Chicago 59 40
Cincinnati 69 39
Cleveland 57 40
Columbia, SC 78 45
Columbus, OH 65 39
Concord, N.H. 59 39
Dallas 88 66
Denver 58 462.11
Des Moines 59 53 .34
Detroit 59 35
El Paso 87 61
Evansville, IN 71 42
Harrisburg 64 39
Hartford 62 40
Houston 86 60
Indianapolis 64 38
Jackson 81 46
Las Vegas 80 60
Little Rock 80 52
Los Angeles 66 57 .37
Louisville 72 45
Memphis 82 55
Milwaukee 60 39
Minneapolis 61 40
Mobile 80 51
Montgomery 80 45
Nashville 77 45


Sunday
Fcst H L
cldy 58 41
ptcldy 69 46
ptcldy 75 46
sunny 79 56
sunny 69 50
ptcldy 88 73
sunny 70 45
ptcldy 61 37
sunny 83 59
ptcldy 68 48
ptcldy 61 45
ptcldy 58 45
cldy 51 39
sunny 80 57
ptcldy 68 44
sunny 77 50
shwrs 63 53
ptcldy 72 54
ptcldy 61 46
sunny 80 52
ptcldy 65 51
ptcldy 56 36
ptcldy 86 70
rain 45 33
tstrm 70 53
ptcldy 61 48
sunny 75 54
sunny 80 56
sunny 67 44
ptcldy 61 42
ptcldy 86 74
ptcldy 72 54
sunny 84 60
sunny 80 58
sunny 81 63
sunny 70 57
ptcldy 77 58
sunny 84 64
rain 58 52
rain 49 46
sunny 85 62
sunny 85 56
sunny 82 58


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY
Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 80 56 sunny 83 66
New York City 63 45 ptcldy 65 50
Norfolk 69 60 sunny 72 54
Oklahoma City 85 60 tstrm 80 64
Omaha 63 55 .55 tstrm 67 52
Palm Springs 82 62 sunny 89 62
Philadelphia 63 44 sunny 68 48
Phoenix 82 66 sunny 85 63
Pittsburgh 58 37 ptcIdy 64 43
Portland, ME 59 37 .01 ptcldy 57 39
Portland, Ore 65 48 ptcldy 66 47
Providence, R.I. 62 38 ptcldy 62 44
Raleigh 75 43 sunny 76 48
Rapid City 53 46 .13 rain 46 33
Reno 67 38 sunny 71 41
Rochester, NY 58 37 cldy 57 43
Sacramento 72 46 sunny 74 51
St. Louis 64 53 sunny 81 60
St. Ste. Marie 48 42 .31 ptcldy 56 40
Salt Lake City 59 49 .01 ptcldy 64 44
San Antonio 87 62 ptcldy 87 73
San Diego 67 60 .21 sunny 70 61
San Francisco 68 51 sunny 69 54
Savannah 76 50 sunny 81 59
Seattle 63 42 ptcldy 62 48
Spokane 61 36 ptcldy 65 42
Syracuse 57 42 .01 cidy 56 42
Topeka 70 571.30 tstrm 78 59
Washington 72 53 sunny 71 48
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 103 Wink, Texas LOW 21 Pagosa Springs, Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 88/78/ts
Amsterdam 65/50/s
Athens 74/49/sh
Beijing 68/49/s
Berlin 58/45/s
Bermuda 80/72/pc
Cairo 84/62/s
Calgary 57/45/s
Havana 87/77/ts
Hong Kong 85/76/ts
Jerusalem 81/62/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


78/58/pc
70/51/pc
75/54/pc
77/55/pc
49/38/sh
47/38/sh
64/47/s
85/72/pc
74/54/s
65/47/s
66/51/sh
57/42/pc
51/37/s


F


RONICLL
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:

Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: (352) 563-5655 Marion County: 1-888-852-2340
or visit us on the Web at www.shop.naturecoastcentral.com/chronicle
.html to subscribe.
13 wks.: $34.00* 6 mos.: $59.50* 1 year: $105.00*
*Plus 6% Florida sales tax ,-i
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks

To contact us regarding your service:

563-5655
Call for redelivery: 6 to 11 a.m. Monday through Friday
6:30 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday
Call with questions: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday
6:30 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 563-6363. Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion
County residents, call toll-free at 1-888-852-2340
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 563-5966
Marion 1-888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 563-5592
To place an online display ad: 563-3206 or e-mail us at
nccsales@chronicleonline.com
I want to send Information to the Chronicle:
MAIL IT TO US The Chronicle, P.O. Box 1899, Inverness, FL 34451
FAX IT TO US Advertising- 563-5665, Newsroom 563-3280
E-MAIL IT TO US Advertising: advertising@chronicleontine.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Where to find us:
Meadowcrest
44 ; office
1624N.
Norvell BryanliHwy Meadowcrest
Dunkenfield n i Blvd., crystal
A Cannondale Dr River, FL 34429
Ave.
A \. Meadowcrest
N Blvd.

Inverness
Courthouse office
To mpkins St. 0 -- square
..- o 106 W:'Main
0c St., Inverness,
__ AFL 34450
44 C-
- A


Who's in charge:
Gerry Mulligan ....................................... Publisher, 563-3222
Trina Murphy ........................... Operations Manager, 563-3232
Charlie Brennan ........................................ Editor, 563-3225
John Provost ................. Advertising/Marketing Director, 563-3240
Tom Feeney................................ Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart ......................... Circulation Director, 5655
John Murphy ................. ............. Online Manager, 563-3255
Neale Brennan ...... Promotions/Community Affairs Manager, 563-6363
Jennifer Wall ............................. Classified Manager, 564-2917
Jeff Gordon ................................ Business Manager, 564-2908
Deborah Kamlot ................. Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ..................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken ....................... Linda Johnson, 563-5660
News and feature stories ........................ Mike Arnold, 564-2930
Community/wire service content ............... Cheryl Jacob, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ........................... John Coscia, 563-3261
Sound Off .......................... ............. .................. 563-0579
Founded in 1891, The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint.
Please recycle your newspaper.
Visit us on the World Wide Web www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing, Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone (352) 563-6363
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
POST OFFICE BOX 1899, INVERNESS, FL 34451-1899
106 W. MAIN ST., INVERNESS, FL 34450
PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


-no -41 4mb- - -

q p .-. boam


SOLUNAR TABLES


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


C
NTIS


OCT. 29


City
Chassahowitzka
Crystal River
Withlacoochee
Homosassa


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02007 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Everybody understands that,"
she said. "I think big business
will come regardless of impact
fees."
Commission
Chairman
D e n nis
Damato, a
builder by '
trade, agreed
with Stillwell
that impact -
fees raise a
barrier for Dennis
builders in Damato
Citrus County. said impact
"Don't you fees raise
think a county barriers.
of 140,000 peo-
ple is lacking a lot of things that
other counties of this size
have?" Damato said. "When
companies do their business
plans, they have to finance all
these costs. When you put the
impact fees on top of that,
you're getting a lot of no-build
decisions."


Commissioner John
Thrumston said he believes
impact fees are stopping small
businesses from starting up,
particularly in existing shop-
ping centers.
"Is it hurting small mom-
and-pop businesses?
Absolutely," he said. "It's taken
the American dream away
from our younger generation.
The big businesses, they're
going to pay it Wal-Mart obvi-
ously doesn't care about
impact fees. But people who
are trying to make a living are
the ones being hurt by it"
Valentino said she does have
a concern for small businesses,
but she believes the impact
fees are fair.
"That's why I think we
should handle those on a case-
by-case basis," she said. "I'm
really concerned about small
businesses that want to main-
tain and grow in Citrus
County."


-- -


4ASUNDAY, OCTOBFR 14, 2007


CiTRus CouNry (FL) CHRoNicLE


Q *


I


t -











CIRSCONY(L) /. UNAY O'1BF 1, 00


SCHOOLS
Continued from Page 1A

An advantage of having to
submit the five-year work
plan for officials is their abili-
ty to predict and program
maintenance projects into the
work plan based on the aver-
age lifespan of materials. For
example, school officials can
anticipate when an air condi-


tioning unit
will stop
working and
prepare for
the financial
burden by
including
that item in
the work plan
so the money
is not allocat-
ed to other
items.
To identify
and prioritize
capacity proj-
ects, officials
annually
study popula-
tion growth at
each school.
Also, they
have to plan
according to
the class-size
reduction
amendment.
In 2002, a
v other -
approved
constitution-
al amend-
ment passed
in Florida


2008&09 P
* Relocating OL
areas to impr
at Inverness I
School.
* Relocate sew
plant at Flora
Elementary.
* Re-roof the 1
at Inverness I
2009-10 P
* Relocating ou
areas to impr
at Inverness I
School.
* Relocate sew,
plant at Flora
Elementary.
* Re-roof the 1
at Inverness I
2010-11 P
* New roof for
and 300 at R
Elementary.
M Replace ports
permanent cl
Florida City E


and called for no more than 18
pupils in a classroom in
kindergarten through third
grade, no more than 22 pupils
per class in grades four
through eight, and no more
than 25 students per class in
high school classes. In Citrus
County, the class-size reduc-
tion amendment and popula-
tion growth are two reasons
more buildings are needed
now and in the near future.
Schools have to be at capac-


ity or above before officials
can do anything about it,
Dixon said. Florida
Department of Education offi-
cials track capacity by looking
at the number of buildings or
student stations and the num-
ber of students enrolled at
each school. Although one of
Citrus County Schools offi-
cials' long-term goals is to
reduce portables, they have to
prove facilities are at full uti-
lization before they are per-
mitted by
ROJECTS state officials
to build new
itdoorplay facilities.
rove drainage Therefore,
Primary portables
have to be
age treatment used as tem-
i City porary loca-
tions to ease
00 building overcrowding
Primary. while perma-
nent locations
'ROJECTS are built.
Jtdoor play The only
rove drainage ways to
Primary address space
issues are to
add onto
age treatment add onto
age treatment y schools, build
new schools,
change atten-
00 building dance bound-
Primary. aries or a
PROJECTS combination
of more than
buildings 100 one solution,
ock Crusher Dixon added.
Officials
ables with from the DOE
assrooms at also provide
-lementary. enrollment
projections
for Citrus
County Schools, which factors
into the six-to-10-year and 10-
to-20-year sections of the five-
year work plan. The DOE's
statistics allow officials to
project beyond the five-year
period, to plan for large
capacity projects requiring
land acquisition and new
buildings.
The Web-based five-year
work plan forces officials to
financially plan so they are
not blindsided by foreseeable


Holidays are coming soon!
A, r..al utm aier ,,CutrTp


PROJECTS FOR
2011-12 TO 2016-17
* The capacity projects are a new elementary school- $40
million on the west side of the county and an additional
wing to Citrus Springs Middle School, $9 million.
* The total projected cost of the maintenance projects is $62
million. Some of those projects include renovations at
Lecanto Primary School, Inverness Primary School,
Hernando Elementary School, Inverness Middle School,
Lecanto Middle School, Citrus High School and Lecanto High
School.
PROJECTS FOR
2016-17 TO 2026-27
* The capacity projects are a new high school $121 million
in Citrus Springs; a new elementary school $65 million
and middle school $85 million in locations not yet
decided
* The total projected cost of the maintenance projects is $25
million. Some of those projects include renovations at Citrus
Springs Elementary School, Homosassa Elementary School.
Pleasant Grove Elementary School, Rod' Crusher Elementary
School, Citrus Springs Middle School, Crystal River Middle
School, CREST School, Withlacoochee Technical Institute and

PLEASE NOTE
* Only the projects scheduled for the first year of the plan,
2007 08, have been approved; the others have to be
approved by board members annually. The first year of the
five year work plan is the school district's capital outlay
budget. Therefore, projects outlined in the first year of the
work plan cannot be changed because the Citrus County
School Board already has approved the capital budget. For
large projects, such as the Crystal River High School renova
tion project, funds are allocated across a few years. The proj-
ects in years following are tentative.


projects. The prioritization of
those projects, based on stud-
ies and inspections, forces
discipline on how resources
are allocated, Dixon said.
After school board mem-
bers approve the plan, it is
submitted electronically to
the DOE. Before it reaches
the school board, many
administrators and staff from
different departments analyze
the plan. Then, they pass it to
members of the district's Long
Range Planning Committee.





Unlimited Hours, No Contracts!


9.95..o
Instant Messaging Keep your buddy list[
10 e.nmail addresses with Webmaill
FREE Technical Support
*Custom Start Page News, Weather & more!

Surfup to 6Xfster!
just s3 more
Sign Up Online! www.LocalNet.com
ia-Sh Call Today & Savel
LocaNef 795-7691
,m.RalaInHternet.... ess. ince...


The plan cannot be approved
and submitted to the DOE if it
is not fiscally balanced.
"You have to work within
your means to show how you
are going to accomplish those
projects," Dixon said.


"Am0 6 40


--S


me d
dmt ado


"Copyrighted Material -

Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


- - a


- w d- a -

..Now

-

d. _
40 4a -


V


* -
~ -~ ~- m

- 0 S


- -- -
410P -


The CrYTsal River Marmeee Bracclet captures h-
Florida, M.)naee that dwellei5In itS eXbaOrdinarv"
habits!. The letter "C" is t.,rred in the hikene-ss of a
muanatee hco~.k- he "~R" that is washed b) the nver.
The seen 14 kam-t geold ropes signify the seven
r fcea ro %eriaCam; ~County.




GEMS
I t E H.//,, r ia F,.

(352) 795-5900


,, r -i~ T "^ ^r v s \ ++II
|rnnnrT inrnr3: ,E
I mnnriK. a

7i .- '0 r WI




-Payments


As LowAs


'sisc**


Per Month P&I
Limited number being
offered at this price.




Fabulous Homes & Lots!
* 3 Charming Bedrooms

* Two Full Baths with Master Bath
Deluxe Option Available

Beautiful Kitchen Overlooking
Great Room

Great Lots Available

A Great Place to Grow!
* No Deed Restrictions

* Minutes from Beautiful Area
Beaches and Rivers

Golfers Paradise with over
50 Golf Courses in the Country
730o11


Comeron rendering tor ifusthoti E r'utposes only

Build Your Dream on

Your Lot or Ours

Call (352) 527-9003
5618 N. Lecanto Hwy. (Hwy. 491)
Open 10-6


The Cameron*
$109,900
1,404 sq. ft. of Living
3 Bedrooms 2 Baths
2-Car Garage


'See a sales representative for a standard features sheet associated with these homes.
"Payment is based on pridnple and Interest for a 30-year fixed mortgage at 6.375% with a 6.637% APR, 5% down and does
not include taxes, Insurance, or closing costs. Prcing, programs and rates are subject to change without notice. Financing
through preferred lender only. See a Mercedes Homes Sales representative or details.


U ~ i


800.238.8681



CONVENIENT LOCATIONS IN YOUR AREA:
1000 SE US Hwy 19, Crystal River ...................... 352.563.2264
2080 Highway 44 W Inverness 352.637.1266


www.bankmercantile.com



2437 SE 17th Street, Unit 101, Ocala ....................352.629.8996
1 1250 SW 93" Court Road, Ocala .........................352.291.2450


*Minimum daily balance requirements apply. Mercantile Bank will automatically refund the competitors' domestic ATM fees (up to $2.50 per ATM withdrawal)
for an unlimited number of transactions. Mercantile Bank is a division of Carolina First Bank. Member FDIC
730778


.m-


MERCANTILE BANK

We take your banking personally.


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2007 SA


I-mnt ic rr)r w7v fT7T I (-"Pc)wirr r7


.


.


O


.


-


OF









fl 01SUNDAY, UCITOBER14,ZUU I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IRA TW"N' rc-rmR14 200A7


Leesa Adcock, 74
INVERNESS
Leesa Adcock, 74, Inverness,
died Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2007,
at the hospice Care Unit at
Citrus Memorial Health
System, Inverness.
Born Oct 11,
1932, in
Michigan, she
was the daugh-
ter of Archie
and Rebekah
(Phillips) Rousseau. She
moved here in 1999 from Lake
City. She and her husband,
James, were married on
December 29, 1978. She was a
homemaker.
She served out country during
the Korean War and was a mem-
ber of the U.S. Marine Corps.
She was a member of St.
Margaret's Episcopal Church,
Inverness, where she was active
with the Vestry and Daughters
of the King. Her enjoyments in
life were crocheting afghans, e-
mailing uplifting spiritual mes-
sages to shut-ins, reading and
collecting books. She was dedi-
cated to her children and
grandchildren.
Survivors include: her hus-
band, James E. Adcock; two sons,
John Fought, St Peteersburg,
and James E. Adcock II, Conyers,
Ga; one daughter, Deborah Lee
Brown, Conyers, Ga.; seven
grandchildren; and two great-
grandchildren.
Chas E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.

Martha
Cooke, 60
FLORAL CITY
Martha Faye Cooke, 60,
Floral City, died Thursday, Oct.
11, 2007, at her residence.
Born Aug. 12, 1947, in
Detroit, Mich., she moved to St.
Petersburg in 1968 from
Michigan, and them to Citrus
County in 1971.
She was a caregiver in the
home health industry and
worked for Interim Health
Care for 15 years. She enjoyed
taking care of her pet dogs.
She was preceded in death by
her father, George W Carter Jr.,
her brother, George E. Carter,
and her sister, Candace Estes.
Survivors include: her son,
Jack and Brenda Cook,
Brooksville; her mother, Golda
M. Carter, Floral City; her sis-
ter, Clara E. and Paul Curry,
Inverness; and her grandson,
Joshua Cook
Chas E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.

Milton 'Milt'
Hostottle, 89
HOMOSASSA
Milton M. "Milt" Hostottle,
89, Homosassa died Tuesday,
Oct 9, 2007, at Cypress Cove
Care Center in Crystal River.
Born March 10, 1918, in
Beaver County, Pa., to Horace
and Nellie (McDole) Hostottle,
he came to Homosassa 12 years
ago from
Pomeroy, Ohio.
He worked as
an electrician
for the Light
and Water
Department,
Woodville,
Ohio, and later
retired from Milton
the Western Hostottle
Reserve
Academy, Hudson, Ohio, in
1983, as maintenance superin-
tendent
He had a great sense of
humor, enjoyed life and was
known for his spontaneous fun
and well planned pranks. He
loved to travel and spend time
visiting with family and friends.
He was a member of the
First Christian Church of
Homosassa Springs.
He was preceded in death by
a son, James Lee Hostottle and
a sister, Olive Smith.
Survivors include: his wife of
35 years, Agusta "Gussie"
Hostottle, Homosassa; three
daughters, Sharon and Richard
Kern, Bradner, Ohio, Sharyl
and Ron Koller, Homosassa,
and Nancy and Marshall Hill,
Helena, Ohio; daughter-in-law,
Brenda Hostottle, Bradner,
Ohio; three sisters, Laura and
Jim Slaughterbeck, Neebish
Island, Mich., Thelma Pate,
Cleveland, Ohio, and Violet and
Daryl Williams, Findlay, Ohio;


cousin, Eileen Welker of


Pomeroy, Ohio; 13 grandchil-
dren; 24 great-grandchildren;
many niecesand nephews; and
many friends throughout the
states.
Loyless Funeral Home, Land
O' Lakes.

Norma
Hudson, 86
DUNNELLON
Norma Nash Hudson, 86,
Dunnellon, died Friday, Oct.
12, 2007, in Lecanto.
Born Sept. 3, 1921, in St.
Petersburg, she was the daugh-
ter of Lawrence and Rebecca
Lorena Leonardi Nash. She
came here in 1979 from
Gulfport She was a homemaker.
She was a continuous 55-
year member and had held
every office in the American
Legion, originally at Gulfport
Post 125, and then Crystal
River Post 155.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, James Hudson
Sr, who died in 1993, her par-
ents, nine bothers and sisters
and a great-granddaughter,
Courtney Bonsett.
Survivors include: her son,
James Hudson Jr. and Betty, St
Petersburg; her daughter,
Martha Morrow, Dunnellon;
three grandsons, Jason, Kenny
and Billy; two granddaughters,
Monica and Brenda; five great-
grandchildren; one great-
great-grandchild; and many
nieces and nephews.
Those who wish may make
donations in Mrs. Hudson's
memory to the Hospice of
Citrus County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464.
Hooper Funeral Homes,
Inverness Chapel.

Vit.celio
Lofaro, 79
LECANTO
Vincenzo Lofaro, 79, Lecanto,
died Thursday, Oct 11, 2007, at
Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center, Crystal River.
Born Sept. 8, 1928, to
Carmelo and Carmela Lofaro
in Ceramida per Pellegrina,
Italy, he moved to Lecanto in
1992, from Bethlehem, Pa. He
was a retired restaurateur and
owner of Naples Pizza &
Restaurant in Bethlehem, Pa.,
and he was a member of the
Notre Dame Catholic Church.
Survivors include: his wife,
Maria Lofaro, Lecanto; two
daughters, Carmela Steinmetz,
Potomac Falls, Va., and
Annunziata Ippoliti of
Broomall, Pa.; sister, Rosa
Spoleti, and brother, Giuseppe
Lofaro, Hamilton, Ontario,
Canada; sister-in-law, Rosetta
Lofaro, Fort Lee, New Jersey;
three grandchildren, Nicholas,
Alexis, and Alexander; and sis-
ter-in-law, Antonina Luvera,
and brother-in-law, Vincenzo
Luvera, Allentown, Pa.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto.

Funeral NOTICES

Leesa Adcock A celebration
of life memorial service will be
conducted at 11 a.m. Monday,
Oct. 22, 2007, from St.
Margaret's Episcopal Church,
Inverness, with Fr. Eugene
Reuman officiating.
Inurnment will follow in the St
Margaret's Episcopal Church
Memorial Garden. There will
be no viewing hours. In lieu of
flowers, memorials are
requested to the St. Margaret's
Episcopal Church Memorial
Fund.
Martha Cook. A celebration
of life memorial gathering will
begin at 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct
20, 2007, at the family resi-
dence in Floral City.
Donald Beaudin. Donald W
Beaudin, 77, Dunnellon, died
Saturday, Sept. 22, 2007. A
funeral service will be at 10
a.m. Monday, Oct 22, 2007, at
the Roberts Funeral Home
Chapel, with the Rev. Dennis
Hamill officiating. Private
inurnment will be in
Dunnellon Memory Gardens.
Roberts Funeral Home, 19939
E. Pennsylvania Ave.,
Dunnellon, Fla.
Milton M. "Milt".Hostottle. A
celebration of life will be at 4
p.m. Tuesday, Oct 23, 2007, at
First Christian Church of
Homosassa Springs, conducted
by Pastor Bob Miller and


Pastor Bob Jordan.


Ready for some football


Associated Press
Fans brave rainy weather Saturday before a football game between Kansas and Baylor in Lawrence, Kan. A series of storms
passed through northeast Kansas dumping heavy rainfall on Lawrence and delaying the start of the game.





China tight Intere cot


a- M


so 1 sa s -
ows n -m19SO4M0


-- -- "Copyinghted Material


- 1-- Syndicated Content


- a .a a
- -.~
- -
* - -
*
~-.. -a--
-a
- -~.
* ~. ~- -
a

B -


Available from Commercial News Providers" -


- a -
~0 -
- a -
- a- -


- -


. -.e a.


- ~a


- 4 -


- -. ,. -.,. 4. a.
a a -


a -4q- -


- 41. 'a


- -a ~ a


. -


a -


- l.


- 4


- -- a .~ -
0 - -a


-e


a a -
- a
a
- C -
- ,a a
- a .- -

a a
-


a- - a 0
-- -~ -
a -
a -



a a


-
O
- -


Act Now...

Deadline is

October 31,2007

LEND*US

-YOUR EARS...
m "el


~0. -


-a- -~


- -


S __- -


- -


= -


- -


- a


- - 0 - -
a..- -. -a--- 0

- a


a... *a-


-


S a -


0 -- - ~0


a - a--


'rid tt:,-eJ ,j6 litt -iat" m


- '

,,- -


"-c d,


HEINZ
FUNERAL HOME
& Cremation


David Heinz & Family
341-1288
Inverness, Florida


Ca, E. l cav
Funeral Home
With Crematory

Burial
Shipping
Cremation
Member of
tnrloernaionI Order of the




For Information
and costs, call
726-8323


Family


Funeral Home and Crematory
Since 1962


www.stricklandfuneralhome.com
352-795-2678 1901 SE .Hw. 19 CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34423


~foopeT'
LgHFNERALI I it P1L',

;.;-,628-323-"
v. 'etu r[i~ii


6--t, el11
H -, P, ;
1'. ku'
H,'" /,


uill


P1,t'' -~



A


DONATE

YOUR PAPERS

AND WATCH

STUDENTS

REACH

NEW HEIGHTS.
The Newspaper
In Education
Program improves
literacy and
test scores.

Next time you put your
newspaper delivery on
hold, ask that the value
of those papers be
donated to the Newspaper
In Education Program.

To donate the value
of your newspaper to
NIE while you're on
vacation,

Call 563-5655









NEWSPAPER
IN EDUCATION
7T Q7


for a Hearing
Aid Field Study

My audiology clinics have
received a generous grant
from Magnatone to conduct
an important field study on
a new model of open ear
hearing aid. It is smaller
and more comfortable than
traditional hearing aids. We
are seeking people with mild
to moderate hearing loss to
participate in the study. Both
current hearing aid users and
non-users are needed.
In exchange for completing
a pre-and post-fitting ques-
tionnaire, the. participants
will earn the free use of this
hearing aid for thirty days. My
audiologists will provide the
exam and lab services at no
charge through the grant.
At the end of this thirty day
trial, participants will return
the aids to one of my clinics
or purchase the aids at a
discounted price.
For information or to
schedule a free candidate
screening, call us at
795-5700 or visit our
Latest News Link at
www.aardneraudiology.com
Thank You
Dan Gardner, M.S.
35 years experience
President


1.







Gardner Audiology
700 S.E. 5th Ter.
| Crystal River


Obituaries


4


.


.


- -


- *


lurls t.unkjl o'l







Cimus COIJN7Y (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY. OcToesisee 14. 2007 7A


Surfpon VA hpiNtal


"Co


Material


Syndicated. ontf

Available from Commercial Ne%
m -w 0"M4 f


- a -


- .~ a
- -


CRASH
Continued from Page 1A
Sheppard said Rudd rode
motorcycles before, but she
hadn't ridden in awhile.
Eventually, Rudd asked him
to get a bike, so he purchased
two Honda Rebels so they
could cruise together.
Sheppard said he would
occasionally wear a helmet,
but Rudd didn't because she
said it.restricted her view. No
doctors have said that Rudd
would have been better off if
she had worn a helmet.
However, McFarland-Bryant
says she believes a helmet
could have made a differ-


ence.
"She probably wouldn't be
in a coma today," McFarland-
Bryant said.
Since two close friends of
McFarland-Bryant have been
in motorcycle accidents, she
says she rides her motorcycle
less often. She also says the
group of friends she and
Rudd rode with are now
wearing their helmets regu-
larly.
Sheppard doesn't know if a
helmet would have helped
his girlfriend, but he says he
still believes that wearing a
helmet should be a choice.
At this time, though,
Sheppard is not focusing on
the "what ifs" and "maybes."
He said his main priority is


Your free


taking care of Rudd. Even
though they are not married,
Sheppard said they lived like
husband and wife. However,
not being legally married has
made things harder for
Sheppard to accomplish.
"The financial part is disas-
trous. The legal part is disas-
trous. I can't even hire a
lawyer for her because we're
not married," Sheppard said.
McFarland-Bryant has set
up an account at Regions
Bank for Rudd to help with
medical expenses. Anyone
seeking to make a donation
can do so at any Regions


Bank branch in the county.
Sheppard says he would like
to thank all who helped Rudd
at the scene of the accident
and the medical staff at
Shands who have been look-
ing after her.
However, right now all
Sheppard and McFarland-
Bryant have are their memo-
ries of Rudd before the acci-
dent.
"She was a free-spirit and a
very happy person,"
Sheppard said.
"She was so cheerful,"
McFarland-Bryant said. "She
was beautiful inside and out."


10-piece gift -


Choose 2 lipsticks
Free with any Est6e Lauder purchase of 26.50 or more. This exciting collection
includes your choice of 2 lipsticks from 4 irresistible options. Plus, take home an
eyeshadow quad, Projectionist Mascara (10 day supply), Advanced Night Repair
Protective Recovery Complex (10 day supply), and more.


For your purchase, may we suggest:
New. Idealist
Pore Minimizing Skin Refinisher
Re-invented to deliver our most dramatic skin resurfacing benefits faster, more
efficiently than ever before. See more clarity, smoothness and luminosity as it helps
free your skin from dry, dulling skin cells. Enjoy more highly refined, virtually poreless
skin as potent technology significantly shrinks the look of enlarged pores. This is the
skin you want. Feel it. See it. Have it now. 1oz. 46.50, 1.7oz. 73.00


The Beverage Center



sJacob' Kendall Jackson
ise Creek VRChardonnay
(Cabernet, Chardonnay, Merlo, or Korbel
Shiraz, Shuaz-Cabermeat Champagne
S Cb)/ (Brt, Brut Rose, Extra Dry)
S$1000 $11.9
/50NIL750ML

Carlo E & J Gallo
Rossi Twin Valley
Rossi ICabernet Care Zinfandel,
IBlush, Burgundy. Chardonnay, Merlol,
Chablis. Chardonnay, 4 Sauignon Blanc, While
Pai3ano, Rhinel Zinfandel

$8.49 $6.99
3 Liter 1.5 Liter
S2.00D0
Jack Daniel's B. 'u" Three Olives
Black or Vodka
S an ta p1, 5 lisnrd,,r
Margherita Baileys Irish
Pinot Grigio ',B Cream

* $19.99 $16.99
75u .f- u
*i W 7 L 750 MIL
Sauza Tequila n( Johnnie Walker
ISilver or Gol or L. Red Label J
Smimoff a Scotch or
Twists Kahlua Coffee
o-, Choi,,e, Liqueur I F

$11. 99$28 $28.99 9
5- 0 5 L i 1.75 I Liter t.
L" Mt. Gay Rum r Bacardi Rum
i a ,u (Superior, Gold, Selecti or
or Svedka / Paul Masson
Vodka Grande Amber
IRegular or Citroen,

19.9 $919
7 e L iter 1i te
Canadian a Black Velvet pite
Mist or Canadian or upto has,
Early Cla_9
Tm MacGregor ai

$15.99 $14.99
S 15Liter 175Liter

0 Gordon'sK "' ) Riva Gin or
in* r Vodka or
Ac G in Or ^ Lady Velvet
l, t V odk a -hS"-o.P"- ,4

i1.99, $10.49


Heineken Milwaukee's |
Best
$1 99 Regulr L ghi w
-- 1 11 -QB'
18 Pack l2 0z. Btls. $ 19 ;1 J
or5LiterlKeg j ak 120Z n< L


Budweiser' ,~. Corona
IRegular. Lighl Selecll I I s i
A1 q f Landshark
$7.99 ($6.99
12Pack120z: "7
btlk Lr ..ns' k l20i P U
Alcoholic beveragesnotavailable at all Walgreens locations.
To find a location near you call 1-800-925-4733.
Rebates subject to the conditions of the manufacturer. VISA
Right reserved to limit quantities on all items.
*Rebate details in store
FL-REG Good 10/14 thru 10/20/07
'v; T:%7 .;T ,, >a' ; ; ;( ','i. -- ].' ," .0",' f-' ;'*" .'T'. /'/",^ .


in vtm. m' &aths


nt -

is Providers"


Do Your Feet Hurt With ..
Painful Diabetic Neuropathy?
Meridien Research is conducting a 5-week research study
of a topical investigational cream for diabetics who are
suffering from painful diabetic neuropathy of the feet. To
qualify you must be:
Aged 18 75 years
Diagnosed with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes
Diagnosed with DPN (diabetic peripheral neuropathy
Qualified participants will receive study medication, study
related laboratory tests, physical examination and
compensation up to $150 for time and travel.
. For more information about this research study,
I .[,' Id..] ,- \, please call 352-597-8839 (352-59-STUDY)
IRBApproved Participation is completely voluntary
CrCh. 09118107V.1 www.newstudyinfo.net
Mildred V. Farmer, MD, 12144 Cortez Blvd. IRoute 50) Between US 19 & Mariner Blvd., Brooksvllle, FL 34613


90 AY -NOPAMENS N ITEES
729038 BLINDS

WE'LL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE*
The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours!
FAST DELIVERY PROFESSIONAL STAFF

FREE www.72-hou"bllnds.com
*In Home Consulting
Installation
Sh. *Valances --


ESTEE LAUDER


GIFT

TIME


0
wnd2n-iwd


I


Cmus CouN7-Y (FL) CHRoNicix


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2007 7A


o


*





BA SUNDAY. OcIoBER 14. 2007 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* 0 0 0
Sutomore




J, -oC) C. i
/,_n-....
/!


The Carrier Infinity" System is
the most energy-efficient
heating & cooling system you
can buy.* It can save you up
to 56% on cooling costs."
And it features Puron
refrigerant, Carrier's proven
solution to Freon phase-out.
For all the details, call Senica
Air Conditioning, Inc., your
Factory Authorized Dealer.
Get Instant Cool Cash Up To
$1,325 on the Five Star Edition
of the Carrier Infinity' System!
* 1 Year 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
* Daily Self-adjusting System
* 25% Guarantee Cooling Cost Savings
* 12-Year Parts & Labor Guarantee
* 10 Year Lightning Protection Guarantee
* 10 Year Rust Proof Guarantee
* Up to 30 Times More Moisture Removal Than A
Standard Fan Coil


-


.l i!- Il^lI i
,1muiinhiilU IIHIIH 4



..... ,11 t
" --.1 r
... :-,;..^


---------


$10 OFF

SERVICE CALL


I I


Coupon. Has No Cash Value. Not Valid With Any Other Offers. Expires 11/16/2007
- nSn m m m

Of THEf
VOTI ON


ANNUAL -
AINTENANCE'


SI Coupon Has No Cash Value. Not Valid With Any Other Offers. Expires 11/16/2007
State License CFC57025 State License CAC0082268


FACTORY
AUTHORIZED
DEALER


www.senicaair.com


Puron is a registered trademark and Infinity is a trademark of Carrier
Corporation. Freon is a registered trademark of E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co.
See Factory Authorized dealer for details on offer, guarantees, claims and
qualifying equipment. Five Star Edition is optional. Offer ends 11/16/07.
Homeowner/occupants only. *Based on total energy costs of comparable
systems.** Compared to previous Carrier models.


'. Turn to the Experts


- -


352=621=0707 352=795=9685
Toll Free.m 1=800=897=2335


SASUNDAY, OCTOBFR 14, 2007


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


E I #
Carrier







SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2007 9A


CITRUS cOUN'1Y (FL) CHRONICLE CcMMtJNITY


State park to host

moonlight tours


Special to the Chronicle
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's
Crystal River Archaeological
State Park is hosting the "Moon
over the Mounds" program
through the winter. Visitors
will be escorted by experi-
enced guides, offering inter-
pretive talks on the various
elements of the park grounds.
Crystal River Archaeological
State Park is at 3400 N.
Museum Point, Crystal River
Follow West State Park Street
off U.S. 19, north of the inter-
section with State Road 44.
The Friday evening tours
will begin at the museum at 8
p.m. with the exception of Jan.
25, which will start at 10 p.m. If
any Friday tour is cancelled
due to inclement weather, it
will be held the following
evening.
The events will take place at
8 p.m.:
Friday, Oct 26.
Friday, Nov. 23.
Friday, Dec. 21.
Friday, Jan. 25 (10 p.m.
start).
Friday, Feb. 22.
Friday, March 21.
All trails are paved and well
marked. Refreshments will be
provided. Admission donations
will be accepted by the Friends
of Crystal River State Parks
Inc.
For more information, call


the park museum at 795-3817,
or visit www.FloridaState
Parks.org/crystalriver.
State parks expand
boat tour schedule
The Ancient River Dwellers
Heritage-Eco River Tours
offered by the Crystal River
Archaeological State Park and
the Crystal River Preserve
State Park have become so
popular that they are expand-
ing the schedule. Trips now
run at 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.
Monday, Wednesdays and
Friday.
This hourlong tour offers
visitors a closeup look at the
Crystal River as it winds its
way through the Preserve
State Park, to the Gulf of
Mexico. Ranger interpretation
relates the current river condi-
tions and activities to that of
the Pre-Columbian Indians
who inhabited this area many
years ago. Chance encounters
with wildlife make every trip a
new and exciting experience.
River tours leave from the
Preserve State Park Visitor
Center at the end of State Park
Road off U.S. 19 north of
Crystal River Price for adults
is $10, $8 for children age 7 to
12 and those 6 and younger are
free. Tickets go on sale at 9 a.m.
the day of the tour only For
group sales, or general infor-
mation, call the park office at
795-3817 or 563-0450.


Happy birthday


Special to the Chronicle
One hundred years of timeless beauty was the theme for
the celebration of Blanche Stark's birthday Sept. 4. The
staff and residents of Crystal River Health and Rehab and
the Hospice of Citrus County joined with the family in com-
memorating this momentous occasion.


October 20 3 to 5:30 p.m.
Doors open at 2 p.m.
Curtis Peterson Auditorium, Lecanto
Featured performers include:
~ Maestro Miguel Arrabal Argentine Orchestra
~ Nelson Avila dances Tango with Madalyn I I
~ Fabio Zini featured Concert Guitarist I
~ Curra Alba and Cecilia De Oriente perform Flamenco
~ Ronnie's fine Academy of Ballet, "Swan Lake" excerpts
~ Kevin Coward and Merry Williams romantic Gershwin Melodies
~ Tom BQva's Choir honoring Country and troops.
SExhibits of Spain's Lladro collections and
Russia's master crafts Faberge style eggs,
Kazantseva.
Show to benefit the Citrus County's United Way,
Hospice and scholarships
For more information and tickets call 382-1929 clik dr(;LLF


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness
Box Office 637-3377
"Tyler Perry's: Why Did I Get
Married?" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:15
p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"We Own the Night" (R) 1
p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m. Digital.
"The Heartbreak Kid" (R) 1:05
p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No
passes or super savers.
"The Seeker: The Dark Is
Rising" (PG) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.
"The Game Plan" (PG) 1:25
p.m., 4:25 p.m. 7:45 p.m.
"The Kingdom" (R) 7:05 p.m.
"The Jane Austen Book Club"
(PG-13) 1:35 p.m., 4:35 p.m.
"3:10 to Yuma" (R) 7:10 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Elizabeth: The Golden Age"
(PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:50
p.m., 10:30 p.m. Digital.
"Tyler Perry's: Why Did I Get
Married?" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:20


p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:20 p.m. Digital.
"We Own the Night" (R) 1:20
p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10 p.m.
Digital.
"Michael Clayton" (R) 1:30
p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:10
p.m. Digital.
"The Seeker: The Dark Is
Rising" (PG) 1:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:45 p.m.
"The Heartbreak Kid" (R) 2
p.m., 4:40 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
Digital. No passes or super savers.
"The Game Plan" (PG) 1:45
p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:45
p.m. Digital:
"The Kingdom" (R) 1:10 p.m.,
4:05 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Good Luck Chuck" (R) 4:50
p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"The Brave One" (R) 1 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"Mr. Woodcock" (PG-13) 10:15


SO YOU KNOW
* Obituaries must be submitted by licensed funeral homes.
* Obituaries and funeral notices are subject to editing.
* Recent photos are welcome.

A ~A F.--_ .!


Brighten
Dark Rooms.
Naturally!
* Go Green And Save $$
* No Leaks, No Moss. No U.V.
* Professional Clean Installation In Just 2
hours
Great for:. t


THE SOLAR GUYS
Premier Solatube Dealer
13624 S. US HWY. 441, STE 1
Summerfield, FL 34491
866-767-6527
www.1hesolaruuys.com
CGC057209


STI


LEY STEE


ElRO


AIR DUCT CLEANING
CC&SS, INC LIC #CMC044828
Call Stanley Steemer today for a free video inspection of your heating,
ventilation and cooling (HVAC) system. And get rid of the dust and debris
in your home's air ducts to help you breathe more easily.


CARPET AND UPHOLSTERY / Lni UE

CLEANING B STANLY STE MER
Residentially or commercially, Stanley Steemer's carpet and upholstery I ARPET CLEA.NE -


cleaning services are backed by 50 years of proven cleaning methods,
proprietary equipment and high quality standards.


24EMERGENCYWATER EXTRACTION AND RESTORATION
ATER 'AMAEt At the first sign of flooding call the Water Extraction experts at Stanley Steemer. Our trained technicians use
O u state-of-the-art equipment and proven techniques to get your home dry in the quickest possible time.


TILE AND GROUT CLEANING
Dirt doesn't stop where the carpet ends. And neither do we. The same experts you know and trust
to care for your carpet are also experts at cleaning your tile floors. Our fully trained technicians will
restore the beauty of your tile and grout, safely and gently.


TIll&GROUT
CLEANING EXPERTS


Call 726-4646

or for outlying areas 1-800-STEEMER. (783-3637)


You can also schedule appointments 24 hours a day at www.stanleysteemer.com
Locally owned & operated.


Today's MOVIES


Need to improve your overall health?
Meridien Research is looking for men and women for a four
week research study to assess the tolerability of omega-3
fatty acid. Participants need to be:
Men or Women with waist size of 37-40 inches or more
Between the ages of 35 and 64
All study-related office visits, medical evaluations and study
medication will be provided to qualified study participants at
'no cost. Participants will receive compensation for time and
travel up to $150.00. We are located on Route 50 between
Hwy 19 and Mariner Blvd. in Spring Hill.
For more information about this research study,
please call 352-597-8839 (352-59-STUDY) MerIdiCd il
Participation is completely voluntary omegaed 3
www.newstudyinfo.net 1o5107o.2 Qc. a ch
Mildred V. Farmer, MD, 12144 Cortez Blvd. (Route 50) Between US 19 & Mariner Blvd., Brooksville, FL 34613


CC)MMUNITY


CITRus Coumy (FL) CHRoNicLE


VIS4









.miwpr unD Cims COUNTY (-FL) C1,k N-c11


Oct. 15 to 19 MENUS


amp


ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
All meals include milk and juice.
Monday: Breakfast Sausage
patty, cereal (variety), yogurt
(assorted), seasonal fruit, peaches,
toast/jelly.
Lunch Cheese pizza round,
chicken nuggets, salad shaker,
garden salad, crackers, corn, turnip
greens, fresh fruit, pineapple.
Tuesday: Breakfast Cheese
grits, ham slice, seasonal fruit,
applesauce, toast/jelly, tater tots.
Lunch Tacos, turkey on a
bun, vegetarian plate, garden
salad, cabbage, black eyed peas,
pudding, fresh fruit, peaches.
Wednesday: Breakfast -
Waffle sticks, chicken breakfast
biscuit, seasonal fruit, pineapple.
Lunch Country fried steak,
hot dog, salad shaker, garden
salad, cornbread, vegetable blend
(Italian), baked french fries, fresh
fruit, crackers.
Thursday: Breakfast Scram-
bled eggs with cheese, oatmeal,
seasonal fruit, mixed fruit, toast/
jelly, tater tots.
Lunch Chicken patty on bun,
carrot sticks, fresh fruit, cookie.
Friday: Breakfast Breakfast
sausage pizza, bagelers, seasonal
fruit, apple slices, grits.
Lunch Corn dogs, celery
sticks, fresh fruit, cookie.
MIDDLE SCHOOL
Monday: Breakfast Waffle
sticks, bagelers (assorted), cereal
(variety), seasonal fruit, apple-
sauce, toast/jelly, tater tots, milk
variety, orange juice.
Lunch Turkey melt, ravioli,
breaded chicken plate, vegetarian
plate, garden salad, corn, green
beans, pretzel rod, fresh fruit,
chocolate pudding, peaches, milk,
juice.
Tuesday: Breakfast Scram-
bled eggs with cheese, cheese
grits, cereal (variety), seasonal
fruit, pineapple muffin, peaches,
tater tots, milk variety, orange juice.
Lunch Chicken and yellow
rice, barbecued chicken on bun,
tuna plate, garden salad, vegetable
winter mix, carrots, fresh fruit,
apple crisp, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast -
Breakfast sausage pizza, cereal
(variety), seasonal fruit, mixed fruit,
toast/jelly, tater tots, milk variety,
orange juice.


Lunch Hamburger, hot dog,
chicken Caesar plate, vegetarian
plate, garden salad, coleslaw,
peas, baked french fries, fresh fruit,
baked beans, crackers, milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast Coun-
try ham and potato, ham and
cheese toast, cereal (variety), ap-
ple muffin, seasonal fruit, pineap-
ple, tater tots, milk variety, orange
juice.
Lunch Corn dog, carrot and
celery sticks, fresh fruit, cookie,
milk variety, fruit juice variety.
Friday: Breakfast Chicken
breakfast biscuit, French toast,
cereal (variety), seasonal fruit,
apple slices, toast/jelly, tater tots,
milk variety, orange juice.
Lunch Chicken patty on bun,
carrot and celery sticks, fresh fruit,
cookie, milk variety, fruit juice vari-
ety.
HIGH SCHOOL
Monday: Breakfast Sausage
biscuit, cheese grits, cereal, scram-
bled eggs with cheese, doughnut,
tater tots, toast/jelly, mixed fruit,
seasonal fruit, milk variety, orange
juice.
Lunch Chicken Alfredo, ham-
burger and hoagie bars, salad
plates, pizza bar, chili, green
beans, corn, garden salad, crack-
ers, winter mix vegetables, peach-
es, fresh fruit, fries, milk.
Tuesday: Breakfast Ham,
egg and cheese bagel, biscuit and
gravy, cereal, doughnut, toast/jelly,
grits, apple muffin, tater tots, sea-
sonal fruit, peaches, milk variety,
orange juice.
Lunch Beef-a-roni, chicken
and hoagie bars, salad plates,
pizza bar, chili, peas and carrots,
garden salad, corn, crackers, corn-
bread, mixed fruit, fresh fruit, fries,
milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast Ham
and cheese toast, scrambled eggs
with cheese, cereal, doughnut,
toast/jelly, tater tots, pineapple muf-
fin, grits, seasonal fruit, apple-
sauce, milk variety, orange juice.
Lunch Tacos, salad plates,


vrolet Motor Car Company
itructors, Inc.
n Zane, CFP
ty Chronicle*
Company Advertising*
energy

Distributing*
irial Health System
ral Credit Union
ties
s Regional Medical Center
3.


hamburger and hoagie bars, pizza
bar, chili, salad, Spanish rice, lima
beans, refried beans, crackers,
corn, applesauce, gelatin, fresh
fruit, fries, milk.
Thursday: Breakfast -
Breakfast wrap, biscuit and gravy,
cereal, doughnut, toast/jelly, tater
tots, sweet potato muffin, grits,
seasonal fruit, sliced apples, milk
variety, orange juice.
Lunch Chris P Chicken on
bun, pizza bar, garden salad, veg-
etable blend Italian, corn, french
fries, fresh fruit, milk.
Friday: Breakfast Breakfast
sausage pizza, scrambled eggs
with cheese, doughnut, cereal,
grits, tater tots, toast/jelly, pineap-
ple, seasonal fruit, milk variety,
orange juice.
Lunch Corn dog, pizza bar,
garden salad, green beans, french
fries, mixed fruit, fresh fruit, milk.
Menus are subject to change
without notice.
CONGREGATE DINING
Monday: Meatballs with mush-
room gravy, green beans, carrots,
whole wheat bread with margarine,
fresh orange and low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Oven fried chicken,
brown rice, spinach, biscuit with
margarine, peach crisp and low-fat
milk.
Wednesday: Pork patty with
brown gravy, mashed potatoes,
broccoli cuts, whole wheat bread
with margarine, fresh apple and
low-fat milk.
Thursday: Lima bean and
turkey ham, winter vegetable med-
ley, warm strawberry applesauce,
large cornbread with margarine
and low-fat milk.
Friday: Egg salad, sliced beet
and onion salad, tossed salad with
dressing, whole wheat bread with
margarine, vanilla pudding and
low-fat milk.
Congregate dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal River,
Homosassa Springs, Inverness
and South Dunnellon. Call Support
Services at 527-5975.


Bronze
Best Buy Water*
CFCC Foundation Members
Copp Winery*
Joe's Deli*
Merrill Lynch
Mom's Heavenly Chocolates*
Sandpiper Signs*
Wal-Mart of Inverness*
Ellen Zane
Scholars Friend
Edward Serra, CPA
Excel Printing*
Graphic Elite Printing
Marker Graphics*
Village Cadillac
In-Kind*


2nd I
26


- ~ .


- - *
-
.D o


____ ~ .
a.


qm swam 0 -


dw do&


PHOTO REQUEST GUIDELINES
* Chronicle photographers will consider requests to take photos ot community events. Call
563 5660 for details.
Be prepared to give information about the time, date and location of the event, and list a
contact name and phone number.


Due to a proofing error, the
35" x 35" Framed Art featured on
page 24 of the 10/14 "Biggest Sale"
was mistakenly listed at the
sale price of $17.99.
We intended to advertise the
35" x 35" Framed Art at $71.99.
We apologize for any
inconvenience this may cause.

BEI/LLS
beallsflorida.com
oM48 Live the Florida lifestyle*


S" INSIDE |
SSEARS Free
Hearing Aid Repairs I
I all makes and models'
Crystal River Mall In om irpa....n. coupon
795-1484 Battery Sale l
* Paddock Mall, Ocala .89
237-1665 Ic (Limit2packs


VERTICAL BLIND FACTORY
2968 W. Gulf to Lake (Hwy. 44) Lecanto FL
00 746-1998 -or- 1-877-202-1991
ALL TYPES OF BLINDSISa",,,r,


Citrus County Craft Council 18th Annual

WINTER WONDERLAND


SCraft Show
A i November 17
9 a.m. 3 p.m.
SCrystal River National Guard Armory
(Across from Home Depot)
Proceeds will benefit Shop With A Cop
Accepting un wrapped new toys for local children.
Free parking and adt-, 0sn
CHTloN7 if Rtic rr ,,silahl tfroughoUtl1w1 6d.
........ For more ml crmatiin please call Maria oi Gene a j52 j 621 3608




TASTEOFCITRUS200


Ato





0





TASTE OF
CITRUS

Participating
Restaurants
Barrington Place
CiCi's Pizza
Citrus Memorial Health System
Club House Deli
COPP Winery Sustaining
Dairy Queen of Crystal River D.AB. Chens
Denny Lynn's Fudge Steve & Elle
Denny's Restaurant Silver
Citrus Count
Doing Dinner Crowley & C
Fuji Asian Bistro Progress En
Full Belly Deli & Eatery WYKETV*
Havanna House Palladium
Koffee and More Kafe Bernie Little
Citrus Memo
Misty River Seafood House Martin Fede
Olive Tree Restaurant Publix Chari
Oysters Restaurant Seven River
Terry Long
Pizza Hut Homosassa WXCV 95.3,
Plantation Inn
Publix Homosassa
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center This ev
Sonny's Real Pit Bar-B-Q stu
Sweet Bay Crystal River For mo
The Gourmet Affair Catering
Timely Dinners
Two Guys From Italy
Van der Valk Restaurant


ANNOUNCING THE 2007


Citrus County



P EfTrI*GiL.








1st Place Winner -
52 week
subscription
to the Chronicle




PRINCESS REDR








Place Winner 3rd Place Winner -
week subscription to the Chronicle 13 week subscription to the Chronicle

rhank
1y(O6 to all who participated

and donated to our NIE program
Newspapers In Education


-~ U
S -


%-" nw .Copyrighted Material


-- Syndicated Content -


- Available from Commercial News Providers"


= -


- '


. a- o 41*


- *


- .*


4w -Ar. 400 da a4
b 41- - am. 0400- a


, *


Sunday, October 28
from 6 to 9 p.m.
at the CFCC Citrus
Campus, Lecanto

$30 advanced
$35 at door
Proceeds to Benefit Scholarships Through:


CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE


SPONSORS


'ent raises scholarship money for local
dents to attend CFCC in Lecanto.
re information call, MaryLou Shevlin at
352-613-4290
C -^ ... ...... InUT T-
CHP\QCL


WHO WILL BE THE 2008 PET-IDOL?
;09)D73


COMMUNITY Y


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLo


SCIA STINT)AY OCTOBER 14. 2007


,*o


- -4p


* * *


e






(Cirmis (ThuNn' (FL) CHRONICIF SUNDAY. OCTOBER 14, 2007 hA


SUPERMARKET
www.SweetbaySupermarket.com


Saving s '
oileny Pricest S

Locked-I


Locked-In Low Prices...Great Savings on Great Brands Every Day


'_ 1.- -- - : 4- - .


Tide Liquid Laundry Detei ent
100 oz. 2X or 200 oz. Regular

$9.99
Locked-in Low Price


Arizona Iced Tea with Lemon
128 oz.- All Varieties

$1.99
Locked-In Low Price


Maxwell House Coffee
34.5 -39 oz. Excludes Decaffeinated
$4.99
Locked In Low Price


Keloqq's
Pop-Tarts
14-15.2 oz.
All Varieties
3/$5
Locked-In
Low Price


~-._





4-Pack Kraft
Handi-Snacks Pudding
14 oz.- All Varieties

Locked-in
rc& LowPrice
^- .-"*


Yoplaft Yogurt
6 oz. All Varieties
2/$1
Locked-in
Low Price


Totino's
Party Pizza
9.8 -13S oz. Frozen
6/$6
Locked-in
) LowPrce
''*T r'r-


CK 2Jdanqet Meals
6.5-12 oz.L
2 Select Varieties
77C
P Locked-in
LowPrice


Hunt's
SpaqheU Sauce
25.75- Z6.5oz
All Varieties
79C


4


Locked-In
LowPrice


And this week's Hot kSpot items...


... CHOI E

HotASpot
Boneless New York
Strip Steak
USDA Choice Beef

$5.79 Ib.
YOU SAVE $5.70 LB.


HotASpot
Red Vine Cluster
Tomatoes
Flavorful

$1.29 lb.
YOU SAVE $1.70LB.


HotkSpot
Sweetbay Chicken
Drumsticks or Thighs
3-4 LB. Jumbo Pkg.- Grade A
79C lb.
YOU SAVE 70C LB.


Hot spot items on sale until October 16, 2007.
Quality and variety are two great reasons to come see what all the fuss is about. From the
abundance of our fresh picked produce, top quality meats and diverse ethnic offerings to the
well stocked grocery aisles, you'll never have to shop anywhere else again!


SUNDAY, OCTOBFR 14, 2007 11A


RTIC US COUNTY (FL E


L








12A
SUNDAY
OCTOBER 14, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


Ag*
V^ f w JT|


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


ewm eas 4 #.-&ae** rf


emw -*A a4 4


at IrS WN TY4 f H&Sp


f


s Putn


-e mommo a em an
o0m gol bA a
a s e a
ag .e..m


Pileup


.-mmu mt -m-mmmOh


,fW..


Site


brt-ks
reif-rvk


traffic


.. ..e m

- "Copyrighted .aterial..

-'- .. Syndicated Conten


Available from Commercial News Providers'i


%4 -a a Imob
"Mww e e mmWMW l
a Sok*d


MAsmmolmpi* smme gp
ww oo mft
* a* a as m
a O a
a aa



....... .....
-4W .=:


a n 11mmm 41 ,*AMNMO a--Nr
a a a ab w wmommo S 5'.i


auo a ii a


I fthtv9 "AMl


rit


t i:i rv b.fa fu


e ew


. a


a,-


%.wmm &***


e:,,, ,,


- `0


-. .-.


eII-:


**** -#-


.t .t*


:jtii






















South Pacifi paradise


~.
~i1
fi
1-


aJ-.. .4
'I'
I..
7. .


OV- 4 m-mm


Special to the Chronicle
Frank and Cathy Uvanni, Crystal River, recently took a trip to the French Polynesian Islands. They visited Tahiti, Moorea,
Huahine, Raiatea and Bora Bora on a 10-day cruise aboard the Tahitian Princess.


DREAM,
\ACATJONS
ko(o Conlst (


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are spon-
soring a photo contest for read-
ers of the newspaper.
Readers are invited to send a
photograph from their Dream
Vacation with a brief description
of the trip.
If it's selected as a winner, it


will be published in the Sunday.
Chronicle.
At the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select the
best photo during the year and
that photographer will win a
prize.
Please avoid photos with
computerized dates on the


print.
Please make sure photo-
graphs are in sharp focus.
Photos should be sent to the
Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429 or dropped off at any
Chronicle office or any Accent
Travel office.


Why go to Gila Bend? Because...


Associ
Devin Selby, 12, of Herrick, III., aims his slingshot machine
the "Pumpkin Shooter," Aug. 21, 2006, at the Morton, III., I
Chunkin' contest.


( ( ila Bend, why would
** I -anyone go there?"
VG the car rental atten-
dant asked in a condescending
tone, when we called to notify
the agency that the car had quit
on us.
Gila Bend, in the
minds of the locals
(Phoenix), is a place .
to avoid. Apparently
the rental cars also
harbor disdain for ,'
this blot on the map
known far and
wide as Gila Bend.
"They went to Gila Neil
Bend" she said Neil S
we'll never do that SPONTA
again! TOUR
Leaving the Phoe-
nix airport, we connected with
Highway 85, which bisects
Buckeye, a place where we
were told that Jeb, going to a
wedding of his cousin Daisy
and uncle Berquist, would not
be an unusual event Not know-
ing the local "lore" we chose
this route because it's the.
shortest way to Gila Bend,
through which one must pass if
they wish to go to Ajo, the town
of Why, and finally the Organ
Pipe Cactus National Monu-
ment our destination. In-
cidentally, early October is one
of the best times to go there.
Approaching Gila Bend, our
air conditioning turned into a
ated Press hot-air tsunami next, the
a called power steering lost its power,
Punkin' then lights on the instrument
panel started flashing.


Muscling the car off the high-
way I headed for the lone tree
near a dry gulch, the only patch
of shade within miles sud-
denly we felt lucky or what?
Our ride back to Phoenix in a
rescue truck, with
car on board,
offered a quick
replay of territory
that, looked amaz-
Singly familiar,
never mind we're
S' wasting the first
day of our arrival.
Day two: New car,
lawyer Buckeye, Highway
85, Gila Bend it
ANEOUS all looked, well,
GUIDE familiar but we
were determined to
see the magnificent Organ Pipe
Cactus.
Down the road a bit from
Gila Bend is the town ofAjo, an
old copper mining town with
mine tailings visible for miles.
Ajo was a surprising oasis with
several beautiful mission-style
churches, a gorgeous town-cen-
ter park, and a schoolhouse
that would .be the pride of any
town or city. Picture taking and
a picnic lunch prepared us for
the next leg of our journey.
The Organ Pipe Cactus' habi-
tat is the Sonoran Desert, a
small portion of which is in
southwest Arizona, in the
Organ Pipe Cactus National
Monument, and is not a barren
place, as one would expect
The area is subject to high tem-
peratures, extreme sunshine


Special to the Chronicle
We traveled through Gila Bend to get to Ajao to see the cactuses
in the Sonoran Desert, Arizona.


and little rainfall. The cactus is
soQ named because of its resem-
blance to organ pipes, a beauti-
ful flowering plant (in season),
and second in size only to the
more familiar Saguaro cactus.
It sprouts many stems from the
base that can grow to 23 feet in
height Like many cactus vari-
eties, the Organ Pipe bears edi-
ble fruit and is widely used by
the locals who eat the pulp,
make jellies or ferment it to
make a drink.
A desert is an ecosystem that
supports a vast array of plant-
and animal life and uniquely
offers rewards far beyond what
the casual observer antici-
pates. There is a surprise
beyond every bush or tree,
under every rock and in the


dry gulches. If you are the curi-
ous sort, you will find excite-
ment in the desert and no
better place than the Sonoran
Desert, just a bit south of Gila
Bend. Given a second chance,
we would go there again.


Neil Sawyer is a 22-year
Crystal River resident and
businessman. He and
his wife, Karyn, are
extensive travelers, venturing
to foreign countries
two to three times a year in
addition to taking several
domestic excursions annually.
They prefer independent
travel or with small-group
guided tours. E-mail him at
gobuddy@tampabay.rr.com.


Pupkn Copyrighted Material

,.,-,t. u. <'Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content.. -


Available from Commercial News' Providers"


S. ';", ; .


Tr


a dip

.....


kp


*:


-mom








VETERANS CilEus COUNTY ~FL~) CHRONICLE


14A SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2007


Veterans, families invited


to forum Saturday


Our concerns continue for
our troops in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The death
toll continues to rise weekly, but
for the past month the media
hasn't been publishing the run-
ning totals. To date, it far
exceeds 3,800 and this certainly
is distressing, particularly for
those families who
have lost a loved one. .:
If this isn't bad
enough, think about
the families and '
loved ones who have
returning husbands, : .
wives, sons and -.
daughters, with life- '
altering injuries
incurred while fight-LarryM
ing in the war against Larry
terrorists. The num- VETE
bers are far more VoI
staggering than you
might realize. The estimate at
this point is in excess of 80,000
who will need not only physical
but mental rehabilitation. Many
will go through extensive surgi-
cal procedures to replace limbs
and body parts that will take
years to get them back on track
to where they can continue a
career that may not even be
close to the career they left
when they volunteered to serve
their country.
Let's face it these returning
troops are by no means the same
individuals who left their fami-
lies and jobs. Their experiences
while in combat have left indeli-
ble memories that will be with
them for the rest of their lives. It
also takes its toll on those who
have anxiously awaited their
return.
Many have served more than
one, two and three rotations, and
the family goes through another
readjustment on each return.
Not only is there a personality
change, but those who have suf-
fered serious injuries have to go
through total readjustments to
compensate for their disabili-
ties.
Korea, Vietnam, Desert Storm
and even the cold war have
brought on many cases of post-
traumatic stress disorder and
claims for treatment and com-
pensation have been denied. It
has finally been recognized as a
-..legitimate concern and many
v' veterans who have been batt i ng
this disorder for years are final-,
'ly getting treatment Our current


returnees are being tested
before and after their rotation to
a war zone.
It has become of such con-
cern that any veteran who has
been diagnosed with (PTSD) is
at risk of being barred from pur-
chasing firearms if the Veterans
Disarmament Act legislation
that is pending in
Congress gets enact-
ed. With the recogni-
tion of this disorder
and other claims vet-
erans can benefit if
they go through the
proper channels and
avoid those letters
from the VA that they
cannot confirm that
acMillan this was a service-
RANS connected disorder
EW Local veterans
organizations are
concerned about the welfare,
treatment and rehabilitation of
our returning troops, as well as
veterans currently on VA health
care. In an effort to bring Citrus
County veterans up to date about
changes and new benefits now
under consideration by the legis-
lature and the Veterans Admin-
istration, the Citrus County
Veterans Coalition is inviting all
veterans and concerned organi-
zations to the "Veterans Forum"
scheduled from 10:30 a.m. to 2
p.m. this Saturday at the Citrus
County Realtors Association
Building on State Road 44 in
Lecanto.
There will be a contribution
luncheon in the patio area, with
local talent providing patriotic
music from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Representatives from the
Veterans' Administration, the
state Legislature, county com-
missioners and city commission-
ers have been invited to attend
to answer questions pertaining
to Veterans Affairs after the
speakers session, scheduled for
12:30 until 2 p.m. in the main
auditorium. If you are one of the
more than 28,000 veterans in
Citrus County, you don't want to
miss this very important forum
for valuable information on your
benefits.
The Veterans Coalition, in
cooperation with member or-
ganizations, is continuing their
program to create a "Veterans
Re-Education Center". in Citrus
County to provide living facili-
ties, transportation, employment


opportunities and educational
classes to help in the rehabilita-
tion process of our current and
future veterans.
A progress report and an
appeal for help in accomplish-
ing this goal is one of the top pri-
orities of their "Veterans
Helping Veterans" philosophy.
Another project that needs assis-
tance is the Veterans Food Bank
which is currently serving 32 vet-
eran families in the county. They
are also in need of furniture,
appliances, linens, clothing and
monetary tax-free contributions
to assist in this effort.
In conjunction with the 15th
annual Veterans Appreciation
Week, the Veterans in the
Classroom program gets under
way Oct. 29 -and continues
through Nov. 9. More than 100
classrooms will be visited by
local veterans, sharing their
experiences while in service
with the students. If you would
like to participate in this
informative program, call 563-
5727 or e-mail:
laserger@infionline.net
The Veterans Appreciation
Week gets under way with the
Veterans Fair from 10 a.m. until
3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, at the
Crystal River Mall and contin-
ues with nine other events
through Nov. 11. Check the
Citrus County Chronicle for the
full schedule and participate in
all the events you can.

Larry MacMillan is an 11-year
veteran of the United States
Air Force during the Korean
and Vietnam era and current-
ly serves as the public infor-
mation officer for the Citrus
County Veterans Coalition.


Veterans NOTES


The Veterans Appreciation
Week Ad Hoc Coordinating
Committee will conduct its final
coordination meeting for Citrus
County's 15th Annual Veterans
Appreciation Week at 1:30 p.m.
Wednesday in the Conference
Room of the Citrus County
Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River.
All veteran service organizations
are welcome and encouraged to
send representatives to participate
in the planning process.
Additionally, individual veterans are
cordially invited to attend and par-
ticipate in the planning process.
Contact Chairman Chris
Gregoriou by e-mail at
allpres@infi.net or by phone at
795-7000.
2007 Veterans Appreciation
Week Commemorative Pin:
Disabled American Veterans,
Gerald A. Shonk Chapter 70 of
Inverness once again is sponsor-
ing the Citrus County Veterans
Appreciation Week
Commemorative Pin. In keeping
with this year's theme, "Purple
Heart Recipients Saluting Our
Wounded Warriors," the design of
the pin is the U.S. Flag the shape
of Citrus County, superimposed
with the Purple Heart Medal.
These pins honoring Citrus
County's wounded warriors are
available at all area Chamber of
Commerce offices, Veterans
Service Office in Lecanto, and at
The Ice Cream Dr. and Career
Choice Uniforms in Inverness. The
pins will also be available at the
DAV booth during the Veterans
Fair on Nov. 3 at the Crystal River
Mall, Nov. 10 to 12 at the Golden
Corral, and Nov. 10 at the Old
Courthouse in Inverness following
the Veterans Day parade.
The pins may also be obtained
by calling John Seaman, commem-
orative pin chairman, at 860-0123.
A $2.50 donation is requested.


"WTere Quality
and Customer Satisfaction
Comes First."
"'m


The Veterans Appreciation
Week Ad Hoc Coordinating
Committee will conduct its annual
Veterans-in-the-Classroom pro-
gram, Oct. 29 through Nov. 9.
Coordinated by the Citrus
County Chapter of the Military
Officers Association of America
(MOAA), the Veterans in the
Classroom program brings living
history to the classrooms of the
county's public and private
schools, as well as homeschool
groups. Veterans share with stu-
dents their first-hand military expe-
riences and travels while serving
our country in uniform around the
world in peace and war.
Call Gary Runyon at 563-5727,
Mac McLeod at 746-1384 or Bob
Truax at 860-1630.
N Commander Martin P. Murphy
and The Disabled American Vet-
erans (DAV), Chapter 70, in coordi-
nation with the Superintendent
"Sam" Himmel of the Citrus County
School District, have become an
official Cell Phone for Soldiers
Drop-Off Site. This program was
started by two teenagers to help
buy pre-paid calling cards to send
to our service people overseas.
For each cell phone that is donat-
ed, 72 minutes of talk time is given
to our troops to call their loved
ones back home. It is a great pro-
gram, and we would really appreci-
ate the community's involvement.
The program will accept any
make or model phone. You may
drop off phones and attached bat-
teries as well as accessories at
any Citrus County School or the
DAV at North Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. The
phones are then recycled for cash


to purchase cards or unlimited free
video phone calls. If you have any
questions regarding this program,
call Annamarie Perrigo at the DAV
at 344-3464 between 9 and 11
a.m. Tuesday or Thursdays, or
344-5675.
VFW Post 7122 calendar for
Oct. 14 to 20:
Today: Make A Difference Day.
The Post will host veterans from
Avante with a USO Show at 2 p.m.
and a luncheon at 3.
Friday: AUCE fish or three-piece
chicken dinner for $7 served from
3 to 7 p.m. Jannie's karaoke starts
at 7.
Saturday: Prime rib dinner is
served from 3 to 7 p.m.
VFW Post 7122 is at 8191 S.
Florida Ave., in Floral City. Phone:
637-0100.
Island X-18 Seabee Veterans
of America will meet for a lunch-
eon at 1:30 p.m. Oct. 17 at Joe's
Family Restaurant, 911 W. Main
St., Inverness. Please note the
change of meeting date and place.
As always all Sea Bees, Honey
Bees, relatives, and friends are
welcome to our events. The meet-
ings are at 11 a.m. second
Wednesday, and luncheons are
at 1:30 p.m. third Wednesdays. We
have a short meeting, about one
hour, at the VA Office in Lecanto,
then we will eat lunch at a local
restaurant decided at the meeting.
Luncheons are third Wednesday
picked by Charley Rhodes, if you
have an idea of a place to go let
Charley know. If you have any
questions, call Cmdr. David Puffer
at 746-9327.

Please see NOTES/Page 15A


.' ,S, 0 ,tMa-- poW




Qum a 4*w *01




'"Copyrighted Material
O* V A = *
Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"






-o _L A ef j t-n yUldldLI


OVER STOCKED LIQUIDATION CLEARANCE SPECIAL I
UNDER-THE-SINK arng as lw as
DRINKING WATER, 299
SYSTEMS Model Preferred 250

Z.= 'betterwater, pure and simple: 866-490-8171


INTRODUCTORY OFFER
3-Month
Rental Special
9I per month
*I for the first
990 3 months
Try any Culligan Wale' Fi rmion Sytern inducding
I conditioners. softeners or reverse osmosis drinking water
I syse for 99c pf month fo the list 3 manMth


better water. pure and simple:
'866-490-8171
IV n* .w- -. ,.n


Water Softeners
& Conditioners
Make sure your water
system is working properly.
Inspect-n-Check

$14 95
Any make or model


better water, pure and simple."
866-490-8171


F H)arn, MoerExna I Diesel HevyDuy. 29HP
23 HP J tnaelDre O' eTurming Radius
3 Year W anty 0% Financing Available Industry Leading Technology

Sun-Ray Tractor Co. Inc. of Ocaia
F 800-845-775t 352-629-4774 2017 N.E. JacksonviJle Rd. Ocala, FL


1 1; rsw,.,


Crinus CouNTY (17L) CJIRONICLE


VETERANS


[
!|









CITRUS CooN-n' (FL) CHRONICLE VETERANS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2007 15A


NOTES
Continued from Page 14A

Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189 and Ladies Auxiliary is
located on Veterans Drive, Hom-
osassa, west of U.S. 19. Turn on to
Veterans Drive from U.S. 19 at
Dixon's Auto Sales across from
Harley Davidson.
Weekly activities:
Today: Mixed pool league, 3
p.m.
Tuesday: Post sponsored pool
league, 7 p.m.
Wednesday: Women's pool
night, 6:45 p.m.
Friday: Dinner from 4:30 to 6:30
p.m. Menu will be posted in the
canteen.
Saturday: Bar poker, 3 p.m.
Every second and fourth
Saturday, 3:30 p.m., meat raffle
with Rick & Rick the "Kabosa
Boyz." Win fresh meats.
Every third Tuesday, 4:30, tacos
and nachos. Play Mega Money
while having your taco or nachos.
Open to the public.
The Silver Dollar Sale will begin
at 2 p.m. Oct. 27.
Halloween party at 4 p.m. Oct.
27. Food, music, games, prize
money for the best costumes.
Judging at 5:30.
For more information, call the
post at 795-5012 from 1 p.m. to 10
p.m.
VFW Post 4252 and The
Ladies Auxiliary in Hernando on
State Road 200 serves dinner
every Friday from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
This week is your choice of baked
or fried fish or roast beef. Dinner
includes a salad bar. Music by
Country Swing from 6 to 10 p.m.
$6.50 donation.
Ladies Auxiliary host bingo at
10:30 a.m. every Saturday with
food available.
Bar bingo at 2 to 5 p.m. every
Sunday.
Ladies Auxiliary has "Show
Me The Money" card game every
Monday. New start time 6 to 7:30
p.m. Lots of fun and chances to
win. Food is available.
Ladies Auxiliary has bar bingo
from 2 to 5 p.m. every Tuesday.
Profits go to local charities. This
month is for Salvation Army Pantry
and Operation Uplink.
Dart League is at 7 p.m. every
Tuesday. Come in and sign up.
Chicken wings from 2 to 6
p.m. every Wednesday.
Cooties dinner is from 5 to
6:30 p.m. the first Sunday monthly.
Cooues Jam is,from 5 to.9 p.m.
Ladies Auxiliary is having a
Flea Market Sunday, Oct. 21. Flea
market items will include biker
apparel, household items, clothes,
books, movies, odds and ends and
a whole lot more. Inside tables are
$10.. Outside tables are $5.
Donations are also accepted.
Halloween Party at 5 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 26. Cash prizes for the
best three costumes.
Post and Ladies Auxiliary will
be collecting donations for Poppies
at Wal-Mart and Publix on, Oct. 27
and 28. We need volunteers for an
hour or more on either day or loca-
tion. There is a sign-up sheet at the
post or you can call for the times
available.
Chicken barbecue on Satur-
day, Nov. 10, starting at 1 p.m. with
music and drink specials. Tickets
are now available at $7, $8 at the
door.
Ladies Auxiliary goes to nurs-
ing homes four times a month to
play bingo.with the residents.
Everyone is welcome.
Post and Ladies Auxiliary


announces a $10,000 Youth Essay
Contest and a $30,000 High
School Scholarship Competition.
Call Judy at 726-3339 for details.
Post winter hours of operation
are now in effect.
All eligible persons are invited to
join our Post or Ladies Auxiliary.
Stop by the post or call for further
information.
Send e-mails to
VFW4252@tampabay.rr.com.
2008 Dues can be paid now. We
are over 80 percent. Please send
your payments as soon as possi-
ble. Life Members Cancer
Insurance of $4.95 can be paid
now for 2008.
Post Honor Guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and nurs-
ing homes. Call Post Commander
Bob Prive at 212-3393 or Ladies
Auxiliary President Judy Prive at
726-3339 for information. Post
4252 is at 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway (State Road 200),
Hemando, FL 34442.
Navy Seabee Veterans of
America Island X-23, Crystal
River, conducts regular meetings at
11:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at the Crystal Paradise
Restaurant, 508 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. We also have break-
fast at 8 a.m. on the last Sunday of
the month and a luncheon on the
second Tuesday at a location
decided by the group and the
social director, Gordon Levins at
795-7662.
We welcome new members who
are veterans, who served under
the command of the U.S. Naval
Construction Forces/Naval
Facilities Engineering
Command/Bureau of Yards and
Docks.
Call Commander John Kister at
527-3172.
Dan Campbell Airborne
Association will meet at 6:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly at
American Legion Post 155, Crystal
River. All current and previous
Airborne members and their wives
are welcome to join. For additional
information, call Steve Leonard at
726-3693.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 County Road 40
E., Inglis (one mile east of U.S.
19). Men and LAVFW meet at 7:30
p.m. the third Wednesday monthly.
at the post. Men's Auxiliary meets
at 7 p.m. the second Monday
monthly. Call Randy Sutton, (352)
447-3495.
The Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
will conduct its regular meeting at 7
p.m. the third Wednesday monthly
at DAV Post 70 in Inverness at the
intersection of Independence Ave-
nue and U.S. 41 North. All former
Marines are welcome. Call Tom
Heron at 637-2724 or Joe Spoto at
746-3315.
Fleet Reserve Association,
Branch 186 will meet at 3 p.m. the
third Thursday monthly at the DAV
Building, Independence Highway
and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at 344-
0727.
Blanton-Thompson Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary Unit 155,
Crystal River, will hold its monthly
dinner from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, Oct.
19, at the Post home, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. They will be serving a roast
pork dinner with potato and veg-
etable for a $5 donation. The
members and the public are wel-
come to come and enjoy a deli-
cious dinner with their friends and
families. Call President Sandy
White at 795-9109.
Public invited to a number of
activities at Dunnellon VFW Post


In SERVICE

Adler receives promotion in U.S. Army
Charles D. Adler, a 1994 graduate of Crystal
River High School, has been serving in the ,
U.S. Army since 1995, and has recently been ,
promoted to Staff Sergeant. He is deployed
overseas in Afghanistan as a section chief
until April 2008. t
Charles' wife, Misty, currently resides in I'
their home near Fort Bragg, N.C. i
If you would like to write him, his overseas
address is: SSGT Charles D. Adler, 11th Charles
Quartermaster CoJLC, APO AE 09354. Adler
He is the son of Marcia and Dan Adler of
Crystal River.
Johnson graduates from combat training
Army Pfc. Daniel J. Johnson has graduated from basic com-
bat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the
Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical fit-
ness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat
skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet train-
ing, drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marksmanship, armed
and. unarmed combat, map reading, field tactics, military
courtesy, military justice system, basic first aid, foot marches,
and field training exercises.
Johnson is the son of James and Gayle Johnson of
Homosassa.
The Private is a 2007 graduate of the Withlacoochee
Technical Institute, Inverness.


7991, State Road 488/West Dun-
nellon Road:
Every first and third Tuesday:
steak dinner, 6 to 8 p.m., reserva-
tions needed. $9. Call post at (352)
489-1772, Cmdr. Chester at 564-
4135, Ron Audette at (352) 465-
5647 or Billy Ellis at (352) 465-
6429. If no answer, leave message
on answering machine.
Wednesday bingo begins at 5:30
p.m.
Every second and fourth Friday:


fish fry from 4 to 7 p.m., fish, hush
puppies, fries and coleslaw. $6.
Floral City American Legion
Auxiliary Unit No. 225 (also
known as Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225) would like to
invite the women in Citrus County
to feel free to join us. We meet at
7:30 p.m. every Thursday at the
Floral City VFW Post on U.S. 41,
Floral City. We are very proud to
belong to this organization. Hope
the following info will help you to


decide to join us. Contact Pat
Whitman, membership chairman at
(352) 793-9091 if you have any
questions.
Hunger and Homeless Co-
alition Anyone who knows of a
homeless veteran in need of food,
haircut, voter ID, food stamps,
medical assistance or more blan-
kets is asked to call John Young at
the Hunger and Homeless Coali-
tion at 628-4357, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
Sailors meet at Denny's in Crystal
River at 2 p.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly. Call Jimmie at 621-0617.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday of
every month behind the Key
Training Center in Inverness at 130
Heights Ave. At 6 p.m., meetings
kick off with a potluck dinner, and
at 7:30 p.m. for the business meet-
ings, the auxiliary breaks off to
another room. Bring a covered dish
if you can. Interested in being a
member, call Post Cmdr. Bob Scott
at 860-2090 or Auxiliary President
Sandy Scott at 860-2090. For more
information, visit our Web site at
www.ALPost77.org.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI) Sturgeon Base meets at
11 a.m. the first Saturday monthly
at American Legion Post. 155, 6585
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway in Crystal
River.


Visitors and interested parties
are always welcome. Call Base
Commander Billy Wein at 726-
5926.
The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter 192
meets at 1 p.m. the first Tuesday
monthly at VFW Post 10087, 2170
W. Vet Lane, Beverly Hills.
All military veterans who honor-
ably served within Korea, including
territorial waters and airspace
(Sept. 3, 1945, to June 25, 1950)
and within or without Korea (June
25, 1950, to Jan. 31, 1955) or who
served honorably in Korea from
Feb. 1, 1955, until present, are eli-
gible for membership in the KWVA.
Any Medal of Honor recipient for
service during the Korean War is
eligible for free life membership.
Any prisoner of war by the North
Koreans, Chinese or Russian
forces during or after hostilities
from June 25, 1950, forward is eli-
gible for free life membership.
Call Cmdr. Hank Butler at 563-
2496; Vice Cmdr. Paul Salyer at
637-1161; or Director Neville
Anderson at 344-2529.
The Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World War II
meets at 11:30 a.m. the second
Saturday monthly at the Boston
Cooker, 5375 Spring Hill Drive,
Spring Hill. Next meeting Nov. 10.

Please see NOTES/Page 16A


Saturday, October 20 -~ Sugarmill Woods
Registration begins at 9 a.m. ~ Walk starts at 10 a.m.
Meet at 96 Cypress Blvd. W. (Coldwell Banker and SunTrust Building)
Lunch provided by: Grannies, Cody's Roadhouse and Popz Deli & Bakery
For more information call, 382-2700 or visit
http://main.acsevents.org/goto/sugarmillwoods
C y :* ee S. a n-
Ciru outyCro-il, rane', oy', oz el
Bakery Afla and ornosasa Prnting


A vance.


6qutie


A 5-week course is being offered for individual
investors who want to learn more about investing
in stocks. This course will discuss how to research
companies that meet your investment portfolio
needs. Classes meet one afternoon per week.

During this course, you will learn:
I What drives stock market prices
I how to evaluate a stock
I How stocks fit your portfolio needs
I When to sell a stock
I And much more

October 16, 23, 30 November 13 & 20
2:00 4:00 pm
Central Florida Community College
Call 352-860-2839 to reserve a seat.
Seating is limited and will be on a first-come,
first-served basis.
p Scott L. Lee, CFP
-. f109 W. Main St.
Inverness, FL 34450
(352) 860-2839
www.edwardjones.comrn
Member SIPC

EdwardJones
Making Sense of Investing


Promotional offers available only at these locations.
AlItel Retail Stores Shop at a participating retailer: Homosassa WAL*M r
* These Retail Stores Now Open Sunday. Equipment & promotional offers at these Charles Pope Cellular I (352) 628-2891
locations may vary.
Brooksville Inverness
grnoknviltv Comer I 13527 544-0114 Beverly Hills Charles Pope Cellular I (352) 341-4244


Crystal River
* North West Hwy. 19, inside Kmart 1 (3521563-5340


ATA Computer I (352) 527-1363
Crystal River
Charles Pope Cellular 1 (352) 795-7048


Inverness Charles Pope Cellular ]352)795-4447
* Citrus Shop Ctr. 1(352) 860-2241
For Business & Government Accounts call 1-866-WLS-BIZZ or visit alltelbusiness.com


Lecanto
Charles Pope Cellular 1 (3521 564-2355


Way to Go GatorsI Alltel Wireless is the
Official Telecommunications Sponsor
of the National Champion Florida Gators


*Free Add Lines: Offer valid on newly activated secondary lines only. New & existing postpaid customers may add up to four (4) new secondary lines at no additional charge for three (3) months to any qualifying primary
line of service $59.99/mo & higher. Customer must remain on a qualifying plan throughout duration of three-month promotional period. Free Add Lines refers to the waived monthly access charge for each qualifying line,
according to your rate plan. Upon the fourth month following activation, each additional line reverts to the applicable monthly access charge, according to your rate plan. Limit of 4 secondary lines per primary account.
New 2-year service agreement & $25 activation fee required for each line in conjunction with phone promotion. Offer valid as of 9/7/2007 & may be discontinued at the discretion of Alltel. Federal, state & local taxes apply.
In addition, Alltel charges a monthly connectivity, regulatory & administrative surcharge up to $1.70; federal & state Universal Service Fund fees (both very by customer usage); & a 911 fee of up to $1.94 (where 911
service is available). These additional fees may not be taxes or government-required charges & are subject to change. My Circle: Available to new and existing customers on current select rate plans $59.99/mo & higher.
My Circle applies to ten numbers per account, which must be shared among all lines on the primary account. Not available on prepaid plans. Customer may not designate own wireless or voice mail number, Directory
Assistance or 900 numbers as any of the ten available numbers. Calls must begin & end in your plan's calling area. Designated numbers must be within the U.S. Program may be discontinued at the discretion of Alftel.
Phone Promotions: Phones at sale prices & applicable rebates available to new customers & eligible existing customers through participating locations for a limited time, while supplies last, with activation of a qualifying
rate plan. Contact Alltel to determine if you are eligible. Limit 1 rebate per qualifying purchase. Phone cannot be returned once mail-in rebate certificate has been submitted. Customer pays applicable taxes. See rebate
form for details. Bluetooth Wireless Technology: The Bluetooth features of these handsets may not be compatible with all devices that are Bluetooth enabled; Alitel cannot be responsible for compatibility
with devices not sold by Alltel. Largest Network Claim: Based upon analysis by an independent research company in July2007, which compared marketed coverage patterns at the time of their creation of '''"
each wireless carrier withoutallowance forvariations due to electrical interference, customer equipment, topography& each carrier's translation & defined preferences of their own internal engineering '
data. Risk Free: If you're not completely satisfied with your postpaid service within the first 15 consecutive days of purchase, you can end your agreementwith no early termination fee & pay onlyfor the consumer
service used. Undamaged equipment can also be returned or exchanged. Activation & phonebook transfer fees are non-refundable. See shopalltel.com for complete details. Additional Information: This information
offer may be limited due to time, supplies, coverage or participating locations. $25 non-refundable activation fee & possible $200 early termination fee applies per line. Service is according to the Terms Code
& Conditions for Communications Services & other information available at any Alltel store or alitel.com. All product & service marks referenced are the names, trade names, trademarks & logos of their
respective owners. Screen images are simulated. 2007 Alltel. All rights reserved.


Osteoarthritis of the Knee?
Meridien Research is conducting a research study for
arthritis of the knee.
Research participants must:
Be at least 40 year of age
Have symptoms of pain, and stiffness in the knee for
at least 3 months.
Require use of anti-inflammatory agents or Tylenol
Participants will receive compensation for time and
travel up to $350.00


Meridien

Qeoearch
For more information about this research study,
please call 352-597-8839 (352-59-STUDY)
Participation is completely voluntary
www.newstudyinfo.com IRBApproval
5/14/07 V.2
Mildred V. Farmer, MD, 12144 Cortez Blvd.,
(Route 50) Between US 19 & Mariner Blvd. Brooksville, FL 34613


Dates:
Time:
Place:


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2007 15A


Onus Coumn, (FL) CHRONICLE


I


VETERANS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


;LGA SUNDAY, OcrTOBi'


Associated Press
Jeff Webb of Ellendale, Del., ties a chicken foot to the end of the
"Little Blasters" pumpkin cannon before. a competition Friday,
'Nov. 3, 2006, in Millsboro, Del.


NOTES
Continued from Page 15A

0 Christmas Military Ball -
iorean War Veterans Citrus
chapter 192 announces it will be
Saturday, Dec. 1, at the
'vemess Elks Lodge 2522 in
$lemando. Prime rib or baked
chicken, music by Jackie Branson
'and. $27.50 each. Open to the
public. For information call Paul at
'637-1161 or Hank at 563-2496.
The Fleet Reserve
Association Branch 186 and its
Ladies Auxiliary hosts a "Pearl
Harbor Remembrance" luncheon
each year on Dec. 7 to honor
those who served at Pearl Harbor
during the attack in 1941.
A few years ago, Citrus County
awarded a Proclamation that
reads: "Whereby, commemorating
the attack on Pearl Harbor will
instill in all people of Citrus County
a greater understanding and
appreciation of the selfless sacri-


SO YOU KNOW
Submit Veterans Notes
by 4 p.m. Wednesday for
publication Sunday.

fice of the individuals who served
in the Armed Forces of the United
States during World War II," and
furthermore "The Board hereby
recognizes Dec. 7 of each year as
Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day"
in Citrus County.
The Fleet Reserve and Auxiliary
are proud to host an annual lunch-
eon in their honor.
VFW Edward W. Penno Post
4864, 10199 N. Citrus Springs
Blvd., Citrus Springs. (352) 465-
4864, weekly activities:
Sunday: Darts at 2:30 p.m.
Monday: Cribbage at 7 p.m.
Tuesday: Bingo at 1 p.m.
Wednesday: Shuffleboard, 7 p.m.
Thursday: Darts at 7 p.m.
Friday: Dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m.
Saturday: Shuffleboard at 7.p.m.
VFW general meeting at 7 p.m.


PUMPKIN
Continued from Page A2

in Bridgeville, Del., about 30
miles from Lewes and 90 miles
from Washington. The event
began in 1986 and bills itself as
the oldest and largest competi-
tion of its type. Last year mroe
than 50,000 spectators turned
out to watch 100 teams com-
pete, organizers said.
Launching machines at the
Delaware event will include
air compressors, catapults,
centrifugal machines that spin
the pumpkins before hurling
them, and trebuchets. (The tre-
buchet design dates to the
Middle Ages, using a counter-
weight to power its missile.)
There is also a "theatrical" cat-
egory in which the rules state
that "distance is not the goal;
ability to ham it up is the goal."
"People start out thinking
they have to see some idiot
who's built a machine to throw
a pumpkin a mile," said Frank
Shade, president of the World
Championship Punkin
Chunkin' Association. "Then,
after spending a weekend
grilling and cooking out with
70,000 of their newest best
friends, they find out this is
really a good time."
The contest's record for dis-
tance was set in 2003, when a

first Tuesday monthly.
Ladies Auxiliary meeting at 7
p.m. second Tuesday monthly.
Men's Auxiliary meeting at 7:30
p.m. third Monday monthly.
Saturday, Oct. 27: Ladies
Auxiliary Rent A Space Yard Sale,
pancake breakfast and bake sale.
Also, post blood drive on Oct. 27
with a free pancake breakfast to all
who donate.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary, 906
E. State Road 44, Inverness; tele-
phone 344-3495; fax 344-3514,
announce daily activities schedule
for the week:
Sunday: Pool tourney 2 pm;
karaoke 5 pm.
Monday: Bar bingo 3 pm.
Tuesday: Chicken wings three
for $1, nine flavors 4:30 to 7 p.m.;
karaoke 6 to 9 p.m.
Wednesday: Ladies Auxiliary bar
bingo 6 p.m.
Thursday: Bar bingo 3 p.m.
Friday: Fish fry (southern fried
chicken available) $6.50 4:30 to 7
p.m.; karaoke 6 p.m.


Tim Foley, left, and team captain Rich Foley survey their trebuchet
Pumpkin Hammer before firing it in the Punkin Chunkin 2006
World Championship in Millsboro, Del., in this Nov. 3, 2006, photo.


pumpkin went 4,434 feet.
Another well-known event,
the Morton Punkin Chuckin'
contest, takes place Oct. 20 to
21 in Morton, Ill., where 85 per-
cent of the world's canned
pumpkin is manufactured.
The contest was nearly can-
celed this year when the town's
Chamber of Commerce with-
drew sponsorship, saying that
there are now so many fling-
and-smash events that Morton
was no longer attracting the big
air cannons and monster cata-
pults needed to draw crowds.
But the Morton event got a
reprieve when five organiza-
tions the local Jaycees,
Kiwanis and Knights of


Columbus, along with the
Morton Hospitality Association
and the Morton Business
Association agreed to staff
the event
Over the years several of
Morton's winners have landed
on late-night television with
David Letterman and Jay
Leno. Morton's Punkin
Chuckin' began in 1996 and typ-
ically attracts a few thousand,
visitors.
The Morton contest is at the
Uhlman family farm on the cor-
ner of Springfield' and
Allentown roads, about 10
miles southeast of Peoria.
Details at www.morton-il.gov.
For those lacking the engi-


neering skills to build a mighty
pumpkin-throwing machine,
there are also hand-tossing
contests.
Other contests are held at
pumpkin farms, and fal~ festi-
vals around the country, A few
take place early in the season
but many are held the week-
ends before and after
Halloween.
They include:
Pumpkin Chuckin in
Moab, Utah, Oct. 27,
www.youthgardenproject.org,
on Old Airport Runway, 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m.
The Bristol Pumpkin
Festival, Bristol, Conn., Oct 28,
noon to 2 p.m., at Roberts
Orchards on Hil<'Street.;
www.bristolpumpkinfestival.co
m. Contestants are invited to
power their 'pumpkins 'with
"springs, rubber bands;- air,
muscle, centrifugal force, brute
strength, power architecture
and bicycles." .
Pumpkin-chucking week-
end, Nov. 3 to 4, in Ellicott City,
Md., at Clark's Elioak Farm,
10500 Clarksville Pike,
wwc1aelarkland farm.com.
Pumpkin Chuck, Nov:3. in
Cincinnati's Stanbery Par~k on
Oxford Avenue. noon td 5 )p.m.
Buy a pumpkin on site orbring
one from home for t "flTo
Buck Chuck," where f'orp you
can launch your gourd sky-high
from a trebuchet:


.1 .~


Are you not having fun anymore?
Are you irritable or have trouble sleeping?
If so, call today. If you have been suffering from these or other symptoms of
depression. You may be eligible for a research study of an investigational
medication for depression for men and/or women who are 65 years of age or
older. Qualified participants will receive study medication, study related
laboratory tests, physical examination, and compensation for time and travel.


PACKAGE INCLUDES:

$3000 FREE PLAY
Plus $5 Meal Voucher &
Roundtrip Trdi1sporLation


YOU PAY


25oo00


Meridien
lec ea


For more information about this research study,
1 please call 352-597-8839 (352-59-STUDY)
IRBApproved Participation is completely voluntary
l d.L 05/311o07v.1 www.newstudyinfo.net
Mildred V. Farmer, MD, 12144 Cortez Blvd. (Route 50) Between US 19 & Mariner Blvd., Brooksville, FL 34613


Call Lamers Bus Lines For More Information
1.888.315.8687 ext.3
Monday-Friday, 9AM-5PM

PICK-UP LOCATIONS & TIMES
Service from Crystal River/Inverness Areas

MNASTEDY&TUSA


WINN DIXIE
Crystal River
Meadowcrest Blvd. and
HWY. 44


MCDONALD'S
Inverness
Croft Rd. and
HWY. 44


- For group charter information, please call the Seminole Hard
S877.529.7653


c~u~'/wa&naf
Ce~aam~


COME OUT & PLAY.


If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call 1-888-ADMIT-IT.
1-4 at North Orient Road
813.627.ROCK (7625) I SEMINOLEHARDROCK.COM


BURGER KING
Inverness
HWY. 41 and
HWY. 44


Rock Hotel & Casino



Hfrd cA
(HOTEL&CASINO)

TAMPA


* Must join Players Club in order to receive the free play. Management reserves the right to change or cancel this offer without notice. Offers are non-negotiable, non-
transferable and must be redeemed in person at SHR Tampa. Offer is fo" the Gaming Machine of your choice, not valid for Poker, No cash value. Valid ID will be required.
Must be 18 or older to join.'O 2007 Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. All rights reserved.


Becky's wave StoreT,4
Calling All Snowbirds!
Great Weekend Getaway
Royal Caribbean
Enchantment of the Seas
Jan. 17,2008 -4-Day
Cococay & Key West
S^ Inside Starting at $309'
-. .._A Oceanview Starting at $359'
*Per Person Double Occupancy
3557 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465
352-527-8855


If you want
to advertise
here in the
Great
Getaways
call 563-5592


Sail Alaska on the 5 Star
ms Amsterdam
May 23 30, 2008,
Seattle Junea Glacier Bay Nat'l
Park Sitka Ketchikan Victoria
Staterooms from only
$111011 per guest
JUSTCRUSE 726-2889
S Travel (800) 306-7477
3802 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. Inverness
www.justcruiseandtravel.com I


S- Capt. ke's -
Swim with
the Manateesj
MANATEE TOURSz
1 O1pp "
FREE Under water Camera .-
352-628-3450 -

Capt. Stu's- -
Custom Airboat Tours -
352-302-9207
M6


A Learn more about cruising at the
World's Largest Virtual Cruise Night
presented by Trumpet Travel Agency
Visit our web site at www.trumpettravel.com and
Vil- click on the icon or go to:
http://wlcn.cruising.org/trumpettravelagencyinc
cWiru^L on your web browser beginning October 15.
Book a Princess Cruise or a Cunard Cruise with our agency
between October 15h and October 21s' and be eligible for
special savings on selected voyages.*
Valid for new bookings only; other exclusions apply.
Visit our web site for details and call at 1-352-746-1207
72.022 for details and reservations. Florida ST 35162


730039


14, ZOU


EAT tuiETA)VAYS:


TRAVEL.


14 20 0


D(D 27(t)


Lai v E sm-l



BUS GUS







TOGETHER


Five generations x 3










Special to the Chronicle
Mary Mondello Speranza, now the matriarch of her family,
which consists of the Mondello and Bondi clans, submitted
these pictures of her three five-generation
families. ABOVE: From left are: Anthony
Bondi, great-great nephew; Anthony Bondi
Jr., great-great-great nephew; Michael.
Bondi, great nephew; and Joseph Bondi,
nephew. ,, From left are: Damien
Albano, great-great-great nephew; Lisa
.* Albano, great-great niece; Terry Navarro,
* great niece; and Thomas Bondi, nephew.
:,. i ..: From left are: Alexis Navarro,
great-great-great niece; David Navarro, great-great
nephew; Terry Navarro, great niece; and Thomas Bondi,
nephew.


Engagements- 50th titwks....Y


McClure-Herchenrider


Philip 0. and Gail V McClure
of Crystal River are pleased to
announce the engagement of
their daughter, Jennifer R.
McClure, to Robert W
Herchenrider. The prospective
bridegroom is the son of
Robert S. and Diane M.
Herchenrider of Roanoke, Va.
A Lake Helen native, the
prospective bride is a 1997
graduate of DeLand High
School and earned a bachelor
of arts in special education and
a masters of education in early
childhood education from the
University of Florida in 2001
and 2002, respectively. She is
employed by Habitat of
Humanity in Knoxville, Tenn.,
as development coordinator.
The prospective bridegroom
graduated from Cave Spring
High School in Roanoke, Va., in
1996 and earned a bachelor of


science in civil engineering
from Virginia Tech in 2000. He
is currently an environmental
engineering consultant with
Strata Environmental Services
in Knoxville.
An April wedding is planned
at the Museum of Appalachia
in Norris, Tenn.


Wontor-Kellogg


Michael and Maelene
Wontor of Homosassa, former-
ly of Key West and Eaton
Rapids, Mich., announce the
engagement of their daughter,
Allison Renee Wontor, to
Terrance Lee Kellogg Jr., son of
Terrance, Kellogg Sr. of
Summertown, Tenn., and
-lDorthea Morris of Eaton
1 RRapids, Mich.
The bride-elect is the grand-
daughter of the late Shirley
and late Hampton Walterson of
Key West.
The future, groom is the
grandson of Roma and Larry
Robinson of Summertown,
Tenn.
The bride-elect is a 2003
Eaton Rapids High School
graduate and 2007 Lansing
.* Community College graduate
With an associate's degree in
business for paralegals. She is
employed at a law firm in East

CITRUS COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL

PET PROFILES


The Citrus County Animal
Control Shelter has online
listings of impounded ani-
mals. Go to the Web page
animalcontrol:citrus.fl.us and
click on ,,'lmpounded-......
Animals" to begin a search.
To enquire about the ani-
mals listed here, refer to the
type (cat or dog), age group


and gender in a search.
The shelter can help you
save an innocent pet.
The shelter is in Inverness
near the airport. The shelter
is open.for adoptions from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
through Friday and from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.
Call the Citrus County


Animal Shelter at 726-7660
for more information.
Financial assistance-for
spaying and neutering of
your adopted pet is avail-
able through the Humani-
tarians of Florida at 563-
2370, or from the Humane
Society of Citrus County at
341-2222.


NAME: '(none) NAME: (none) NAME: (rone) NAME: Bear NAME: Joser,
AGE: kitten AGE: kitten AGE: kitten AGE: adult AGE: adult
SEX: F SEX: M SEX: n/a SEX: M SEX: M
ID #:85952 ., #. 5'.:7 ID *< :.5. 9 ID #85969


NAME: Kosha
AGE: adult
SEX: F'
ID #:85966


Pay for your










The )[way'


Once a month, we will automatically
debit your credit card!


NO MORE V Hassles!
It's easy, it's convenient and it's safe! EZ Pay will Checks!
automatically debit your credit card for $6.75 each Ch0
month. That pays for a FULL YEAR of the Chronicle
and you will never receive another reminder notice R m i d
and never have to write another check. V Rid




It'sE'Z!


Just call 563-5655 for details.


The Triccas


Chester and Virginia Tricca
celebrated their 50th wedding
anniversary on June 16 at
Raphael's in Walpole, Mass.,
surrounded by children,
grandchildren, relatives and
friends.
They were married in East
Boston, Mass., on June 16, 1957,
in a military wedding. Chester
Tricca graduated from the U.S.
Naval Academy on June 7,
1957.
They have four daughters,
Andrea Pecuch of North Royal-


-. sri -- J*g -
ton, Ohio; Karen Brokken of
Sacramento, Calif.; Susan Col-
lins of Franklin, Mass.; and
Regina Polito of Hanson, Mass;.
They have 10 grandchildren,
PJ. and Katie, Melissa and Cas-
sandra; Evan and Justin; and
Anthony, Lea, William and
Michael.
They have been residents of
Citrus Hills for the past 13
years.


Wedding -

Schulez- Tress


Lansing, Mich.
The future groom is a 1999
Eaton Rapids High School
graduate, employed as a metal
fabricator in Holt, Mich.
The wedding is set for May
31, 2008, in Eaton Rapids,
Mich.

SO YOU KNOW
N See a photo frorn the cel-
ebration of a Crystal
River resident's 100th
birthday on Page 9A of
today's edition of the
Chronicle.


Joseph R. Tress and Jenne
Lynn Schulez were united in
marriage Saturday, May 5,
2007, at Christ Lutheran
Church, Lansdale, Pa. The Rev.
Dr. Thomas E. Kadel and the
Rev. Richard Stephens officiat-
ed.
The bride is the daughter of
George and Lucy Schulez of
Lansdale, Pa. She attended
Lancaster High School and
works for Walter Reed
Hospital in Maryland.
The groom is the son of
James and Margaret Tress of
Beverly Hills. He attended
Eastern High School and
Camden County College, and
served in the U.S. Army.
The bride was given in mar-
riage by her father, Mr. George
Schulez.
Man of honor was Jared
Schulez, brother of the bride.
Best man was Michael Tress,
brother of the groom.
Bridesmaids were Shanna


Coyle, Lara Ditty and Meg
Schulez, and flower girl was
Madison Drake. Groomsmen
were Chad Amato, Brandon
Godshall, Christopher God-
shall and Scott Ridgeway and
acolyte was Michael Drake.
The groom is a staff sergeant
in the Army National Guard in
Maryland with more than 21
years of service..
They will live in North East,
Md.


join Suncoast.


5.0% Annual Percentage Yield on

48 and 6o-month certificate accounts.

At Suncoast, high yields are simple.

With just a $500 minimum deposit and

credit union membership, you can get

great rates and flexible terms without a

lot of other requirements buried in fine

print. And unlike some other institutions,

early withdrawal doesn't result in loss

of initial investment; just the interest

accrued to date. This rate is accurate


as of October I, 2007, but is subject to

change, so hurry. That's it. No fine

print; just a great rate from Suncoast.

Where smart people keep their money.

Call 8oo00-999-5887 or visit joinsuncoast.org.



Suncoast Schools Federal Credit Union
WHERE SMART PEOPLE KEEP THEIR MONEY.
......www.joinsuncoast.org
NCUA 7


WHO'S ELIGIBLE TO
JOIN SUNC OAST?

Children attending public school
in Citrus County, employees
of schools and many local businesses,
hospitals, cities and counties and
people age 55 and over. Immediate
family members can join too.


SUNDAY, OcrOBER 14, 2007 17A


CITRUS COUNTY(TI.) CHRONICLE


0 ANNUAL
PERCENTAGE
0 YIELD
5160y

High Return.

No Fine Print.








IS UDY CTBR1,20 CrwsCONT ()CROIL


he sportswriters said he was surly and
egotistical. He doesn't deserve a baseball
batting record. If he breaks the record,
they should put an asterisk next to his name. Of
course, I'm talking about Barry B... I mean,
Roger Maris.
It was a sportswriter who first sug-
gested that an asterisk be put behind
Roger Maris' name after he broke
Babe Ruth's record of 60 home runs
because the season became eight
games longer in 1961. As if it was
Maris who changed the rules, not
Major League Baseball.
Other things had changed in base-
ball through the years, too. Babe Ruth j
never had to face a black or Hispanic
pitcher. How many home runs would MfULl
he have had against a Satchel Paige
fastball? Babe Ruth rarely had to face a relief
pitcher. In his day, one pitcher was expected to
last the entire game. Where is the hue and cry
from sportswriters for an asterisk behind Babe
Ruth's all-white, no-relief-pitching home run
record?
The carousing, hard-drinking, glad-handing,
sportswriter's-best-friend Babe Ruth's record
lasted 34 years. The shy, introverted, "surly"
(only to reporters, his teammates didn't seem to
have a problem with him) Roger Maris' record
lasted 37 years. Guess which one is still not in
the Baseball Hall of Fame?
And now, the consensus among white, oft-
divorced, skirt-chasing, binge-drinking, bulked-
up sportswriters is that Barry Bonds is not moral
enough to deserve the honor of breaking Hank
Aaron's home run record without an asterisk
attached to it. There is actually talk of putting an
asterisk on the record-breaking ball itself. After
all, wouldn't this world be a much better place if
only Bonds had the high moral standards of ...
sportswriters.
You'd never know it from the press, but Barry
Bonds has never been charged, tried or convict-
ed of any wrongdoing. His major crime seems to
be that he is "surly" to sportswriters. His fans
and teammates seem to get along with him very
well. But then, there is that shadow of steroids. A
ballplayer using steroids? It sullies the good
name of sports!
A rich ballclub owner can blackmail an entire
city into building him a hew stadium on the


backs of taxpayers or he'll move the team. But at
least the owner's not on steroids! There are hun-
dreds of semi-pro college football teams out
there masquerading as "amateurs," but at least
they're not on steroids! School districts are
building million-dollar stadiums for
high school football teams as test
scores plummet, while we continue to
graduate kids who can't read, but at
least those kids aren't on steroids!
What message does that send the
kids, Dad? That it's OK to do some-
thing illegal as long as it's not steroids!
"Are you blind? Can't you see that
Barry Bonds 'bulked up.' He must be
M on steroids." It's funny, I've been to a
lot of baseball games, and I've seen a
-LEN lot of bulked-up fans. Some really
huge guys that were probably skinny
years ago. Is it steroids or French fries? I mean,
just look at them! It must be steroids!
Maybe if a sportscaster has ever done, or been
accused of doing something, let's put an asterisk
behind his name. A speeding ticket taking his
pregnant wife to the hospital put an asterisk
behind his name. Cheated on his wife? An aster-
isk Didn't pay child support? An asterisk An
asterisk if he wears a toupee or dyes his hair. If
a grossly overpaid sportswriter has ever written
a story about overpaid athletes, let's give him an
asterisk No, for that, he deserves two.
There are several topless bars in New York
and Los Angeles that would go out of business if
sportswriters and sportscasters and pro athletes
stopped going to them. Shouldn't they get a few
asterisks for that, or is steroids the only problem
in sports?
Should all the fans that place illegal bets on
games get asterisks behind their names for
moral turpitude? What about the newspapers
that print the point spreads? Is there some legit
reason for that?
Why are we restricting asterisks to sports fig-
ures? Certainly they would come in handy in a
lot of places. Wouldn't it be nice if overpaid, tax-
cheating CEOs had asterisks on their vanity book
covers? And politicians. And talk-show hosts. If
it's good for the goose, it's good for the gander.
m
Reach author Jim Mullen
atjim_mullen@myway. com.


Frf uhaboud have


-A -
mpw-cwa pn-vc-y

if \m -L-


- -


* -


a -.


- a.- ..


* -


- 401- -


- a 5 -


5 -


- -=- -


-5- - -- ON- -000-

di --mob~
-M - -coo-0- al
a. ~ ~ S40 S


-duo WD -w 5
* 4


: -"Copyrighted Material


.. Syndicated Content.


Available from Commercial News Providers"


h .a. ,---


- ~.-- --
h. 0 0


- 41o- ~ --


SO YOU KNOW
* Find Citrus County Animal Control Pet Profiles on Page 17A.
* Find today's movie listings on Page 9A.
* Find public school and congregate dining menus and today's horoscopes on Page 10A.


SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS
* Follow the instructions on today's Opinion page to send a letter to the editor.
* Letters must be no longer than 350 words. and writers will be limited to three letters per
month.
* Call the anonymous Sound Off line at 563-0579.


m -


dom-


- a sm o


- a
U


* a -
-
-
ta.55
* --~

* .
* 0- 55
~0~



*


a

* ~ -
-9





7--

: a..x


~0


0


* S -
* -


NTGOMERY TI


GENTRY AD


Tickets can be ordered from the following organizations:
-Key Training Center Melissa Walker ~ 634-4660 or 527-8228
-Nature Coast Volunteer Center Heidi Blanchette ~ 527-5950
-Storm Football Annita Moore 400-5002
-Sharks Football Dan Baldner 564-1223 or 302-9603
-Dunnellon Little League-Greg Grybko ~ 489-5341
-Central Citrus Little League Larry Swain ~ 258-0633 or 527-4224
-Boys And Girls Club Lori Pender 621-9225 or 341-2507.
-Citrus Youth Basketball Ed Buckley ~ 726-6000 or 422-2367
-Crystal River High School Athletic Department Tony Stukes ~ 795-4641x4
-Crystal River Little League Tom Salute ~ 795-6486x3795 or 302-8824
-Habitat For Humanity Bonnie Peterson 563-2744
-Mid-Florida Community Services Linda Graves 796-8117
-Marion County Senior Services Gail Cross 620-3501


The unquestionable



integrity* of sportswriters


..w--


4 . 4 0M


-~- ~.- -
-. -


4 -.%


- ..


_ -- .


S.- m
-~~~4b a- -a -.~


- 41


3'
0 5
-
a





- S
-~
* ~-
S.-
a


0
*
S
* 0
.9
a

'S..
S.
-- a
a


ISASUNDAY, C)c-irOBFR 14, 2007


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


. .


agmus"


..


- - .


I -


.


11
Ll







* College Football/2B
* Scoreboard, High School
Football Box Scores/3B
SGl-.: 4B
* rJHL 4B
" MLBL 4B
" IJFL Previevds 5B
* Enter tainmernt 6B1


B
SUNDAY
OCTOBER 14, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


Bucs' D


braces


for QB ,Copyrighted Material


Young Syn icated ontent


"--Available from.Commercial News Providers'.


ommom~m bRIM qmwm.oo.oolw A 49 _00mb oo4m 4 -o 4 kt 4 w IND-Iwlf .oS mm4


Benoist, CR shine at meet


LARRY BUGG
For the Chronicle
McKETHAN LAKE If
there was any question about
the strength of the Crystal River
High boys and girls cross coun-
try teams, the question was
answered Saturday morning.
The Pirates boys and girls
took "his" and "hers" team
titles on the fast course at
McKethan Lake in the
Hernando-Citrus Classic.
The girls won their team title
with 43 points. Spring Hill
Springstead High was second
with 50 points. Citrus High was


fifth with 112 points. Lecanto
was sixth with 125 points.
The Crystal River girls were
running without one of their
top runners. Danielle Dixon,
who missed the race because
of a chest cold. Despite that,
the Pirates won convincingly.
"They got PRs (personal
records)," said girls coach Lisa
Carter "We had a lot of PRs. The
weather is perfect for running.
They have been working hard."
The Pirate boys won the
team title with 38 points.
Brooksville Central was sec-
ond with 56 points. Lecanto
was fifth with 128 points. Citrus


was sixth with 132 points.
"It was a good race for us,"
said Pirate boys coach Tim
Byrne. "We can't close the gap
unless we have a good strong
five."
Actually, the Lecanto and
Citrus High teams earned
some meet asterisks as both
schools had homecomings
Friday night and many of the
Panthers and Canes runners
were not at their best
"We had four of our top run-
ners not here today," said
Citrus girls coach Billy Bass.
Please see MEET/Page 3B


Patriots-Cowboys matchup has hype to spare
.. .......


.NW-- kw 4o omb- f
496-4DO UqW dftAnM
,No .- -.Cai*0Am*-
d= -WA w w NO
4bm 9w m-. lsom -


o'm m.m 4W


4A...~~

* Q& AWVMNO-












Bulls crush Knights, 64-12


, ~i


'%4V M& i I" s"*amw


4ba ft4b m0


mm f


40


.. ~.


g opyrighted Material


indicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers""


f~molwda~ 6M40- -I - w


* ,,..


ft .0
41 I**


ft .4me a mes


gA W 4 40 a 4


,4 MH a 4 Gom.


a II-


ab w-.


lb a me ammm


Sm w mw p a


ft w


af o=4 o as


ba an a
eommos *


..;, .~


-== rm


lb1a dou a
UP mmo


. -.


2BSUNDAY, OCTOBFR 14, 2007


C4oiur-EciE Fc3c3yBAj-iL


CiT7?us CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


HfS::"


..::. I.F


ill!" ::. M8S-


1-idHE' xdfflF-


ftm- m4b


-.ma,,,


I ...MH C *Kt.


*W" .jt/f


IISP


...m.. ..sy.










O- m V COYvINTY (I! C-WNC! Scir UDA,-COBR-4 207I


HS FOOTBALL
Friday's Box Scores

Citrus 20, Tavares 0
,Citrus 0 0 713-20
Tavares 0 0 0 0- 0
Cit Tav
Total Yards 270 300
Rushes-yards 33-209 52-295
Passing 61 5
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING- (Attempts, Yards, TDs)
Scriven 23-178-2; West 1 -1; Lloyd 3-10;
Paquette 2-14; Paul 5-13. Tavares:
Howard 4-31; Sims 20-123; Yawn 2-11;
Smart 4-33; Lanier 11-57; Barrett 2-12;
Calloway 9-28.
PASSING: Citrus: Paul 4-5-57-0-0;
Scriven 1-4-0-0. Tavares: Calloway 1-3-5-
2-0.
RECEIVING-(Catches, Yards, Tds),
Citrus: Paquette 1-49; Sims 1-4; Baran 2-
8. Tavares: Howard 1-5.
Scoring summary
Third quarter
Citrus: Scriven 2-yd run. Watkins PAT.
38.5.
Fourth quarter
Citrus: Scriven 41-yd. run. Watkins PAT.
9:12
Citrus: Robert Baran 12-yard fumble
recovery. PAT failed. 8:18.
Leesburg 45, Lecanto 0
Leesburg 3 14 21 7-45
Lecanto 0 0 0 0- 0
Lee Lec
First downs 12 7
Total Yards 389 80
Rushes-yards 38-351 36-59
Passing 38 21
Comp-Att-Int 5-9-0 2-9-0
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0
-Penalties-Yards 2-15 1-5
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING- (Attempts, Yards, TDs)
'Leesburg: Graham 15-157-2; Singleton 4-
55-1; Austin 1-45-1; Lightfoot 4-39-0;
Trevathan 7-33-0; Cosgrove 5-19-0;
Stinson 2-3-1. Lecanto: Schwartz 16-45-0;
Kaufman 5-25-0; Adams 3-16-0; Powers 1-
2-0; Mobley 4-(-7)-0; Hamrick 1-(-1)-0;
Scales 6-(-13)-0.
PASSING-(Comp, Att, yards, TDs, Int)
Leesburg: Cosgrove 5-9-38-1-0. Lecanto:
Scales 2-7-21-0-0; Adams 0-2-0-0-0.
RECEIVING-(Catches, Yards, Tds),
Leesburg: Graham 2-28-1; Singleton 2-6-
0; Sellars 1-4-0. Lecanto: Pinter 2-21-0.
KICKING- (FG, FGA, XP, XPA)
*Leesburg: Williams 1-1-6-6.
Newbenry 42, Dunnellon 3
New Dun
Total Yards 366 228
Rushing yards 330 214
Passing yards 36 21
Comp-Att-Int 2-2-0 3-11-1
Fumbles-Lost 2-2 3-1
'-Penalties-Yards 6-70 8-63
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING- (Attempts, Yards, TQs)
Dunnellon: Black 12-75-0, Cabrera 7-41-0,
Peacock 9-36-0, McCray 7-30-0, Stichter
3-14-0, Young 4-16-0, Brown 1-2;
Newberry: Ivey 22-236-4, Woods 12-61-1,
Hadley 10-30-0, Ryan Brown 3-3-0, Guy
Brown 2-(-1)-0
PASSING-Dunnellon: Stichter 3-11-21-
0-1; Newberry: Guy Brown 2-2-36-1-0
RECEIVING-(Catches, Yards, Tds),
Dunnellon: Young 1-8-0, Quezada 1-5-0,
Peacock 1-3-0; Newberry: Ryan Brown 1-
26-1, Robinson 1-10-0
KICKING- (FG, FGA, XP, XPA)
Dunnellon: Quezada 0-0, 1-1; Newberry:
Warner 0-1, 6-6



FOOTBALL

Major Scores
EAST
Albany, N.Y. 38, Sacred Heart 7
Brown 33, Princeton 24
Buffalo 43, Toledo 33
Cent. Connecticut St. 16, Robert Morris 10
.Cornell 17, Colgate 14
Delaware 30, Northeastern 20
Duquesne 24, St. Francis, Pa. 17
Fordham 38, Georgetown, D.C. 31
Harvard 27, Lafayette 17
Hofstra 20, Towson 3
Holy Cross 41, Dartmouth 15
James Madison 44, Rhode Island 27
Marist 24, La Salle 10
Massachusetts 32, Villanova 24, OT
New Hampshire 49, Iona 21
Penn 59, Columbia 28
Penn St. 38, Wisconsin 7
Rutgers 38, Syracuse 14
Wagner 45, Monmouth, N.J. 16
William & Mary 21, Maine 20
,Yale 23, Lehigh 7
SOUTH
Alabama 27, Mississippi 24
Chattanooga 39, W. Carolina 21
Coastal Carolina 51, Chowan 0
Delaware St. 27, N. Carolina A&T 0
E. Illinois 27, Murray St. 24
E. Kentucky 44, SE Missouri 17
Elon 36, Georgia Southern 33, OT
Georgia 20, Vanderbilt 17
Georgia Tech 17, Miami 14
Jacksonville 34, Morehead St. 24
'Kentucky 43, LSU 37, OT
Morgan St. 36, Howard 33, OT
N. Dakota St. 58, MVSU 7
N.C. Central 17, North Greenville 14
Norfolk St. 20, Hampton 19
Northwestern St. 27, SE Louisiana 24
Prairie View 17, Alabama St. 6
Presbyterian 45, VMI 21
Richmond 42, Stony Brook 0
S. Carolina St. 49,, Florida A&M 14
South Carolina 21, North Carolina 15
South Florida 64, UCF 12
Tenn.-Martin 31, Samford 21
Tennessee 33, Mississippi St. 21
The Citadel 54, Furman 51, OT
Virginia 17, Connecticut 16
Virginia Tech 43, Duke 14
Wofford 52, Gardner-Webb 17
MIDWEST
'Ball St. 35, W. Kentucky 12
Boston College 27, Notre Dame 14
Cent. Michigan 47, Army 23
Dayton 38, Davidson 28
Illinois St. 69, Indiana St. 17
Iowa 10, Illinois 6
Kansas 58, Baylor 10
Miami (Ohio) 47, Bowling Green 14
Michigan 48, Purdue 21


N. Iowa 30, S. Illinois 24
Northwestern 49, Minnesota 48, OT
Ohio 48, E. Michigan 42
Ohio St. 48, Kent St. 3
Oklahoma St. 45, Nebraska 14
,Temple 24, Akron 20
Texas 56, Iowa St. 3
Valparaiso 42, Butler 37
*W. Illinois 31, Missouri St. 10
W. Michigan 17, N. Illinois 13
Youngstown St. 23, S. Utah 22
SOUTHWEST
Alcorn St. 22, Texas Southern 20
Grambling St. 30, Ark.-Pine Bluff 24
Houston 56, Rice 48
Texas Tech 35, Texas A&M 7
FAR WEST
Air Force 45, Colorado St. 21
E. Washington 35, Montana St. 13
Fresno St. 37, Idaho 24
Montana 17, Sacramento St. 3
N. Arizona 45, Idaho St. 24
New Mexico 20, Wyoming 3


NY"


othe record


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2 p.m. (SPEED) ARCA Hantz Group 200.
2:30 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) CORR Off Road Racing.
MLB BASEBALL
8:30 p.m. (TBS) National League Championship Series Game 3 -
Arizona Diamondbacks at Colorado Rockies.
BILLIARDS
2:30 p.m. (ESPN) 2007 Cuetec Cues U.S. Open-9 Ball
Championship Semifinal.
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) 2007 Cuetec Cues U.S. Open-9 Ball
Championship Semifinal.
4:30 p.m. (ESPN) 2007 Cuetec Cues U.S. Open-9 Ball
Championship Final.
5:30 p.m. (ESPN) 2007 3-Cushion Challenge.
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) Women's U.S. Open.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m. (ESPN) Nevada at Boise State.
NFL FOOTBALL
1 p;m. (6 CBS) Miami Dolphins at Cleveland Browns.
1 p.m. (10 CBS) Tennessee Titans at Tampa Bay Buccaneers.
1 p.m. (51 FOX) Washington Redskins at Green Bay Packers. ,
4 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) New England Patriots at Dallas Cowboys. /
4 p.m. (13 FOX) Carolina Panthers at Arizona Cardinals.
8:15 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) New Orleans Saints at Seattle Seahawks.
CANADIAN FOOTBALL
4 p.m. (47 FAM) Winnipeg Blue Bombers at Calgary Stampeders.
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) HSBC World Match Play Championship Final Day.
1 p.m. (GOLF) European PGA Open de Madrid'- Final Round.
4 p.m. (2,8 NBC) LPGA- Samsung World Championship Final Round.
4 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Frys.com Open Final Round.
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Champions Tour Administaff Small
Business Classic Final Round.
RODEO
2:30 p.m. (13 FOX) PBR Built Ford Tough Rocky Boots Invitational.
4:30 p.m. (51 FOX) PBR Built Ford Tough Rocky Boots Invitational.
RUGBY
5 p.m. (VERSUS) IRB World Cup 2007 Semifinal England vs. France.
FIGURE SKATING
4 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) Frosted Pink.
COLLEGE SOCCER
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Women's Florida at Mississippi State.
1 p.m. (SUN) Women's Boston College at Florida State.
3. p.m. (SUN) Women's Tennessee at Vanderbilt.


40 e a


- .~

-- -


- 0** -


- .4 I*0 -


a - -
- .0


.0 ____


- dw


. b U. -- --


a - -
- - 0.~ -
0 .~ 0 0 ~ 0


- 0 ~
-.- 0 =


- 0 -


-- ** -


- a - ~ 0*
.~ ~
- ~ 0.- -~ ~.- -
- .-~ 0- -








- ~ -
*1. 0
0.- o
-a
0~


- -900



---on

-go


..~ S -
- ~. -~ 0
* .0 e- --
- -- ~ 0 -

~0
- -
-. 0


. .m -


a. 40 MEM

a 0 ~o -- a0

a .~ a4w


". - -

._. T"Copyrighted Material _



-_- -. Syndicated Content -


Available from Commercial News Providers"


ft a.qw 41b


-4 0.


w 0. -
~.- 0-a 0.. o. ~-
-a *00 -~


PON- a


Oregon 53, Washington St. 7
Southern Cal 20, Arizona 13
TCU 38, Stanford 36
Utah 23, San Diego St. 7
Weber St. 23, N. Colorado 0

GOLF

LPGA Samsung
World Championship
Par Scores
Saturday
Third Round
Suzann Pettersen71-69-64 204 -12
Lorena Ochoa 68-67-69 204 -12
Mi Hyun Kim 68-70-67 205 J11
Jeong Jang 69-68-68 205 -11
Angela Park 67-69-69 205 -11
Paula Creamer 67-69-71 207 -9
Jee Young Lee 70-70-70 210 -6
Se Ri Pak 69-71-70 210 -6
Angela Stanford 70-66-74 210 -6
Cristie Kerr 75-66-70 211 -5
Seon Hwa Lee 73-73-66 -. 212 -4
S. Prammanasudh72-70-70 212 -A
Morgan Pressel 68-72-72 212 -A
Sarah Lee 72-72-69 213 -3
Maria Hjorth 72-70-71 213 -3
Brittany Lincicome74-70-72 216 E
Nicole Castrale 73-70-75 218 +2
Ai Miyazato 75-68-76 219 +3
Bettina Hauert 76-81-74 231 +15
Michelle Wie 79-79-77 235 +19
PGA Frys.com Open
Par Scores
Saturday
Third Round
George McNeill 66-64-67 197 -18
Robert Garrigus 71-63-68 202 -13
D.J. Trahan 65-65-72 202 -13
Kent Jones 68-67-68 203 -12
Bo Van Pelt 66-69-68 203 -12
John Huston 66-65-72 203 -12
Garrett Willis 68-62-73 203 -12
C. Beckman 65-71-68 204 -11
Stephen Leaney 67-68-69 204 -11
Jeff Gove 67-67-70 204 -11
Bob May 63-70-71 204 -11
Mathias Gronberg 69-64-71 204 -11
Mark Wilson 66-67-71 204 -11
Jason Gore 63-68-73 204 -11
Colt Knost 67-69-69 205 -10
Mike Weir 69-67-69 205 -10
Phil Tataurangi 67-70-68 205 -10
Billy Mayfair 69-64-72 205 -10
Kevin Na 67-70-69 206 -9
Steve Lowery 66-67-73 206 -9
Ben Crane 66-67-73 206 -9
Joe Ogilvie 71-65-71 207 -8
Jeff Overton 65-71-71 207 -8
Jesper Pamevik 68-69-70 207 -8
Tom Pernice, Jr. 69-65-73 207 -8
Duffy Waldorf 66-08-73 207 -8
M. Calcavecchia 69-67-72 208 -7
Bubba Watson 69-67-72 208 -7
Jeff Quinney 69-67-72 208 -7
Bill Lunde 69-68-71 208 -7
Ken Duke 70-65-73 208 -7
Bill Haas 67-67-74 208 -7
Kirk Triplett 68-71-69 208 -7
Carlos Franco 68-71-69 208 -7
Nick Watney 67-65-76 208 -7
Pat Perez 71-65-73 209 -6
Jason Dufner 66-70-73 209 -6
Marco Dawson 65-70-74 209 -6
Daniel Chopra 66-70-73 209 -6
Arjun Atwal 68-69-72 209 -6
Rich Beem 64-71-74 209 -6
Chris Stroud 71-64-74 209 -6
Mark Brooks 69-68-73 210 -5
Grant Waite 66-69-75 210 -5
Greg Owen 72-66-72 210 -5
Kevin Sutherland 71-67-72 210 -5
D. Maruyama 67-67-76 210 -5
Tim Herron 70-64-76 210 -5
Mathew Goggin 68-67-76 211 -4
Matt Hendrix 69-66-76 211 -4
Brian Davis 70-68-73 211 -4
Frank Lickliter II 69-69-73 211 -4
Bryce Molder 70-69-72 211 -4
Jarrod Lyle 70-66-76 212 -3
Shigeki Maruyama 69-68-75 212 -3
Billy Andrade 73-65-74 212 -3
Ted Purdy 69-69-74 212 -3
Ryuji Imada 67-71-74 212 -3
Kevin Stadler 69-70-73 212 -3
Ryan Moore 68-69-76 213 -2
Craig Lile 66-72-75 213 -2
Brian Gay 68-70-75 213 -2
Gavin Coles 69-65-79 213 -2
Alex Cejka 68-70-75 213 -2
J.P. Hayes 69-69-75 213 -2
Darron Stiles 72-67-74 213 -2
Brendon de Jonge 66-73-74 213 -2


John Daly 74-63-77 214 -1
Michael Boyd 66-68-80 214 -1
Ryan Armour 68-68-79 215 E
Chad Campbell 75-63-77 215 E
Steve Wheatcroft 68-71-76 215 E
Jay Williamson 69-70-76 215 E
Glen Day 69-70-76 215 E
Brent Geiberger 69-70-76 215 E
Richard Green 71-66-79 216 +1
Will MacKenzie 67-71-78 216 +1
Paul Trittler 67-71-78 216 +1
Aridres Gonzales 68-71-77 216 +1
Michael Allen 67-70-80 217 +2
Jeff Brehaut 66-73-79 218 +3
Jaco Van Zyl 70-69-80 219 +4
Bart Bryant 70-69-80 219 +4


NHL Standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Philadelphia 3 1 0 6 17 10
N.Y. Islanders 3 3 0 6 14 20
Pittsburgh 2 2 0 4 14 15
New Jersey 2 3 0 4 13 16
N.Y. Rangers 2 3 0 4 10 10
Northeast Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Ottawa 6 1 0 12 22 14
Montreal 2 1 1 5 10 11
Toronto 2 3 1 5 22 24
Boston 2 2 0 4 13 13
Buffalo 2 2 0 4 19 12
Southeast Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Carolina 4 1 1 9 21 11
Tampa Bay 3 1 0 6 14 10
Washington 3 2 0 6 11 12
Florida 2 3 0 4 13 15
Atlanta 0 5 0 0 9 23
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Detroit 3 1 1 7 16 13
St. Louis 3 1 0 6 15 8
Columbus 2 1 0 4 9 3
Chicago 2 2 0 4 8 8
Nashville 2 2 0 4 13 11
Northwest Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
Minnesota 3 0 0 6 6 2
Colorado 2 2 0 4 11 13
Vancouver 2 2 0 4 12 16
Edmonton 2 3 0 4 12 16
Calgary 1 2 1 3 10 13
Pacific Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 2 1 1 5 9 11
Dallas 2 2 1 5 15 14
Anaheim 2 3 .1 5 13 18
Phoenix 2 2 0 4 10 11
Los Angeles 1 4 0 2 15 23
Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss or shootout loss.
Saturday's Games
Buffalo 7, Washington 3
New Jersey 6, Atlanta 5
Carolina 3, Montreal 1
Ottawa 3, N.Y. Rangers 1
Florida 6, Tampa Bay 4
Pittsburgh 6, Toronto 4
Philadelphia 3, N.Y. Islanders 1
Calgary at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Columbus at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Edmonton at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Boston at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Today's Games,
Minnesota at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Los Angeles, 8 p.m.

MOVES
Saturday's Sports Transactions
BASEBALL
National League
PHILADELPHIA PHILLES-Signed Jimy
Williams, bench coach; Rich Dubee, pitch-
ing coach; Milt Thompson, hitting coach;
Davey Lopes, first-base coach; Steve
Smith, third-base coach; Ramon
Henderson, bullpen coach; and Mick
Billmeyer, catching instructor, for the 2008
season.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS-Waived
F Carlos Powell.
NEW YORK KNICKS-Waived G
Roderick Wilmont.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL-Fined Tennessee DE Kyle Vanden
Bosch $7,500 for a low hit on Atlanta QB
Joey Harrington in an Oct. 7 game.


nab p 0 0 --EMO
4D a. 00 f
aqd S 40



"m- a 0-


-- FIP 0-."0
-ft 41


"Nap- go ftw ob.

ral. a



0911.. to&.

how b -- -amp -

0ft-D -- o-l


MEET

Continued from Page 1B

"We had homecoming. It
(running Saturday) was not
mandatory. Brandi Nichols had
her personal best She took 40
seconds off of Disney. Almost
everybody had their personal
bests. Nice weather. Fast
course. We are progressing like
we want to towards district"
"Four girls had their best
time of the year," said Lecanto
coach Lindsay Clark "It was a
good run. We had homecoming
last night We had six here. We
had one out with a hip injury
and a senior didn't make it"
Seven River Christian
School seventh grader Chloe
Benoist won the girls race with
a time of 20:05, one second
slower than she ran here last
year The 4-foot-7 12-year-old
led from start to finish. Crystal
River High's Kristen Hall was
second with a 20:10 time.
Melissa Schmidt, Hall's team-
mate, was third with a 20:43.
Citrus High's Brandi Nichols
was fourth with a 21:01 time.
Benoist felt her time could
have been better.
"I did well because last year,
I ran 20:04," she said. "Last
year, I had people pushing me.
This is one of my favorite
courses because it is flat and
shaded."
Her coach was happy with
her star harrier.
"She (Benoist) did exactly
what she is supposed to do,"
said Seven Rivers coach Kerri
Kitchen. "She wanted to do 19
minutes but it's very difficult to
do unless there is someone
ahead of you pacing you. She
led the whole way. I am proud
of her. She will get the 19 one of
these days. The girl keeps get-
ting better and better. She is
leading the pack"


41 mm0. 'd
Of m 0


Hall was happy to take a per-













boys race with a time of 16:31.










also a Piratea a t










time of 16:39. Lecanto High's
a 17:06 time.
L eanto High's Jonathan











-Junkins was ill with a stomach
virus and could not run.-
Hall was happy to take a per-
sonal record and second place.
"I just felt good," said Hall.
"This is a beautiful course. It's
all covered."
Brooksville Hernando
High's Tyler Maier won the
boys race with a time of 16:31.
Crystal River High's Blair.
Beeler was second with a
clocking of 16:37. Eric Hughes,
also a Pirate, was third with a
time of 16:39. Lecanto High's
Justin Sblano was seventh with
a 17:06 time.
Lecanto High's Jonathan
Junkins was ill with a stomach
virus and could not run.g
Junkins was a likely top three
finisher if he were healthy and
able to run.
The Pirate runners were
happy with their efforts.
"This is my best finish over-
all," said Beeler. "It's my PR.
The weather was fantastic. It
felt like it was downhill the
whole time."
"I tried to stay up with Blair,"
said Hughes. "It is a PR for
me."
"Justin Sblano did very
well," said Lecanto boys coach
Suzy Verhelst "All of our team
did really well. We had a lot of
PRs. We did have homecoming
last night for hI'm really proud of
the way the boys did. They had
a mission to get a personal
record today and most of them
did. It's a beautiful course. It's
cool. The cool weather is a
refreshing change from the hot
weather we have trained in
since August"
The Citrus boys were able to
get their best times at
McKethan.
"We had PRs full spread all
the way across," said Citrus
High coach Chris Moling.
"Brandon Hardy ran a 17:45,
his best of the season. He ran a
really good time here. We are
looking for him to improve
that My top seven were there.


1W- (n- o ma s






hip -. 0--r b b
M t







































Deavone (nd a sec-









great ability. We are looking
forward to next year with those








































Hernando-Citrus
*.































Girls team scoe .s













Springstead 60, Brooksville
Nature Coast 84, Brooksville















Central 92, Inverness Citrussec-

My 112,two freshmen125, Brooksville
HeMartone and Austin Toxe152.n,
pulled into my four and fivels
ChI told those guys 'you









Rivers, 20:05; 2. Kristen Hallose
guCrystal River, 20:10; 3. Melissand

guySchmidt, Crystal River, 20:43; 4.
rnd i Nichols, Citrus, 21:01; 5.








Jaclyn White, Springstead, 21:19;Country
6. Sasha Jauith, Crystal RiverHigh

21:41; 7. Anna DeAngelis, Nature
















Coast, 21:52; 8. Caroline Monzo,
Springstal River 43, Spring Hlia

















Orrell, Central, 21:58; 10. Mirelys
Pizarro, Springstead60, 22:04.Brooksville
. Crystal92, Inverness Citrusiver 38,









112, Lecanto 125, Brooksville Central 56,
HeBrooksville Henando 1576,2.

GiBoyrls Top 10 Individuals
1. TyChloe Benoister, Heveando




















16:31; 2. Blair Beeler, Crystal
River, 2016:3705; risten Hallughes,
Crystal River, 2016:3910; Melissa
Wrighmidt, Crystal Riverndo, 2016:43; 5.
Robert DaviNichols, Ctrusal, 16:4901; 6.












Alex21:41; 7. Anna DeAngelis, Nature Coast,
Coast16:56; 7. ustin Sblano,
SpriLecantoead, 17:0652; MeliBrad









HOell, Centralson, 21:58;Central, 17:07; 9.Mirelys
Pizarro, Springstead, 22:04
Boys team scores









BrooksvillAlex Yettaw, Central, 17:10; 10.56,
Brandon Kempton, Crystal76,
River, 1ille Na7:12.ture Coast 101,
Lecanto 128, Citrus 132.
Boys Top 10 Individuals
1. Tyler Maier, Hernando
16:31; 2. Blair Beeler, Crystal
River, 16:37; 3. Eric Hughes,
Crystal River, 16:39; 4. Joe
Wright, Hernando, 16:43; 5.

Alex Mason, Nature Coast,
16:56; 7. Justin Sblano,
Lecanto, 17:06; 8. Brad
Henderson, Central, 17:07; 9.
Alex Yettaw, Central, 17:10; 10.
Brandon Kempton, Crystal
River, 17:12.


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2007 3B


S Portrs


Cmms CouNTY (FL) C E


I


-


* i -


P


- *







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-pqw


ow -as-
a -a4
quo qmma.:40 40
-a-Ma-a 4P l -*-
WNW a

,opyrigh


ited Material


-a.Syndicated[Content



Available from Commercial News Providers"-


Panthers give Lightning first km of


- 0
41b~


00- a mb

- a. -


4w aAmo aOW


ft m -IA


a~op b -.10

a4MORM- -


db aaq a a
as
ft 0
-a-a m -


a910-W -. ~

4w wa& 0a- ml



ab


-0 a b


- a a -0
--M 41
4a.Ma -a
low a. 410

40 eda* q-. 4w


dom -Mmm- 4 a.w o
4. 0 a- -mW4


MNM- a-. a -
= a


a- a ___ 0.-a

qu b--=wa a.


-0 a a.

-4400- qa--

.490. =lo
4m-- a


4w ft 1p D

-i -M a 00aonim

a --O b4 m41


40- -

~ 4M da-M
a-- a a ____



dma. *
.w d- a


&A"m kaynhig, &n$~m~ft bgtbob w whuw


* a
- a- -


4b -lb -a .


ft 40 Nw.
= 411M


at


IS
. -. [
- h,-sF


-.40


..if



O *

-

42
a -g


S--


- a.
a .


S. -
-a a -a
a- '-I
a ~- - -a a-
a -
a. a- a. S
a L)
a a-- -~
a.- -
a a -~
a- -a~ 5.4


Urology Center of Florida
in conjunction with the Cancer Treatment Center
is pleased to announce a


New Office
in Citrus County


Cal 7450


Beverly Hills Lions Foundation


Craft Fair
November 3 9 a.m to 3 p.m.
72 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills
wl nI tiurL. A-v- L i J -iEjm L


tree admission

$20 reserves table
Crofters- Sandwiches
a Bake Sale

A good time to
purchase for Christmas
Raffles- prizes from crafters


ft


For information/
reservations call
527-1943


- -a -

- --a


- -


amm *map. oSpQ 0 qwE
- 41b4 o D w %
- 404f mmpsor0ome ol


CffiwgQ


415 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2007 l!Pillp"iml -10 11 -


SPCwriT<


AIM Q......I. 3(n-7


A





SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2007 SB


towm1 -A "
-.4L I A


fl ait bottom


- -amittttmb a ,.. i n n fl"aMN a .....Ul mmmoo
-,aR -.eb UMSU --MM-- .a -t ---W W N ,
VOaAtttttt0 - ab.. A MMM M
- a eo k a Ma-0-


Tamx,,n
atrn.#


Pass-happy Packers


,t, 'a ._-T_
1m"s "CopyrightedMaterial
t un SyndicateConent

Available from Commercial.News Prov


*Rahder


wvcek


here fir


riders"


tt,,,eab .4,w. .- a .ab easm,,, SmW ,ti
'ftv a m 0. S 4o ...dfl 0 -ae D aNOM 4 a-W. eqi ipS -
iwmqmtai aft *AD., j -w-,.o 4b 44m --,,,--,----Ato 0 m, .- 4 mwmomumopw


Sm tS *m uwh... ..d.ut
^H ~MkMENEWT k^^kk^.^^ 19~.^^^ for^^j 9k^ "* =PC"^^^^ft^.


tr


Cri'Rus Coumy (H) CHRONICLE


NFL PREVIEWS









0n


SUNDAY
OCTOBER 14, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


'Run


R u 9Florida
LOTTERIES
O W Here are the
R u n rfA winingni bmharc


*-- *.- p *ram


4M- A.-"-.I~blhM
Sdh #AN4


m.mmm Ak.. N 41w- a.-.4 MAIM mw M~ts _..__0


m i nmm


*'..


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


*-mo- --mn


Wf$n IXl0 0:I hrtot 9-N A


** 'Air~1~bt.


-. N.V41


..si *-mom w m 1%. lam., a m u. .w wam"
AM- a.. - -a- *
-" --mm -0 wmiw- ..mw-v dl-N
-NIIPWR -:W- : -.M M. Oft 40.
0--ma ON--- .-.m a.... .t. -m..~-mm


.. .-,........ -
-... ...w-W... a

.m..m.. ...

.-......... /A.-a.


rnos.


selected Saturday
in the Florida
Lottery:


......


~J.


lb ,.:::: : ..:..


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CASH 3
5-9-2
PLAY 4
0-3-1-6
LOTTO
5-14-25-30-33-46
FANTASY 5
11-20-28-29-31
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12
Cash 3:0-7-8
Play 4: 4-8 5- 5
Mega Money: 5 13 16- 20
Mega Ball: 19
4-of-4 MB: 2 winners $500,000
4-of-4: 11 $862
3-of-4 MB: 72 $288.50
3-of-4: 1,509 $41
2-of-4 MB: 1,810 $23.50
2-of-4 41,424 $2
1-of-4 MB 14,638 $2.50
Fantasy 5: 4-7- 13-25-36
5-of-5 1 winner $264,864.31
4-of-5 381 $112
3-of-5 12,001 $9.50
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11
Cash3: 3-0-0
Play 4:5-8-4-7
Fantasy 5:4 8 29 33 36
5-of-5 4 winners $59,173.18
4-of-5 297 $128.50
3-of-5 9,348 $11

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially posted
by the Florida Lottery. On the
Web, go to www.flalottery
.com; by telephone, call (850)
487.7777.


Today in
HISTORY
Today is Sunday, Oct. 14, the
287th day of 2007. There are 78
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Oct. 14, 1947, Air Force test
pilot Charles E. ("Chuck") Yeager
broke the sound barrier as he flew
the experimental Bell XS-1 (later
X-1) rocket plane over Muroc Dry
Lake in California.
On this date:
In 1066, Normans under William
the Conqueror defeated the
English at the Battle of Hastings.
In 1944, German Field Marshal
Erwin Rommel committed suicide
rather than face execution for
allegedly conspiring against Adolf -
Hitler.
In 1960, the idea of a Peace
Corps was first suggested by
Democratic presidential candidate
John F. Kennedy to students at the
University of Michigan.
In 1968, the first successful live
telecast from a manned U.S.
spacecraft was transmitted from
Apollo 7.
Ten years ago: The Florida
Marlins won the National League
championship, defeating the
Atlanta Braves 7-4 in Game 6.
Five years ago: Another shoot-
ing linked to the Washington-area..
sniper attacks: FBI analyst Linda
Franklin was killed in a mall park-
ing lot in Falls Church, Va.
One year ago: A sideline-clear-
ing brawl interrupted the third
quarter of Miami's 35-0 victory
over Florida International.
Today's Birthdays: Former
Surgeon General C. Everett Koop
is 91. Actor Roger Moore is 80.
Movie director Carroll Ballard is 70.
Former White House counsel John
W. Dean III is 69. Country singer
Melba Montgomery is 69. Fashion
designer Ralph Lauren is 68. Sing-
er Cliff Richard is 67. Actor Udo
Kier is 63. Singer-musician Justin
Hayward (The Moody Blues) is 61.
Actor Harry Anderson is 55. Actor
Greg Evigan is 54. TV personality
Arleen Sorkin is 51. Golf Hall-of-
Famer Beth Daniel is 51. Singer-
musician Thomas Dolby is 49.
Singer Karyn White is 42. Actor Jon
Seda is 37. Country musician Doug
Virden is 37. Country singer Natalie
Maines (The Dixie Chicks) is 33.
Actress-singer Shaznay Lewis (All
Saints) is 32. Singer Usher is 29.
Actor Jordan Brower is 26.
Thought for Today: "It is amaz-
ing how complete is the delusion
that beauty is goodness." Leo
Tolstoy, Russian author (1828-
1910).

REMEMBER WHEN
For more local history, visit
the Remember When page
of ChronicleOnline.com.


w *-090w mp- al. -A


.~

.5 -~ ~m











C
SUN DAY
OCTOBER 14, 2007
A ,h..ll i-, l ,rilro ,irA ,


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Tragedy brings inspiration


Editor's note: This is the first in a series of
columns about the Citrus County Teen Driving
Task Force. The second installment will appear
in next Sunday's Commentary section.


M memorial Day weekend start-
ed out as a joyous occasion.
Our daughter Melissa had
just graduated from Citrus
High School and had the
world at her fingertips. As
graduates who just made a
giant step toward independence, Melissa and
her classmates were on top of the world.
It was a weekend of graduation parties and
euphoria.
And it ended abruptly
in the worst way imagina-
ble.
It was a Sunday after-
noon of relaxing by the
pool for my wife Lori and
me. We felt good. We were
so proud of Melissa as she
graduated with nearly a C
3.5 grade point average Tim Hess
and was already enrolled Te
to begin college in the rall.
She wanted to be a HO UIbRS
teacher She loved work-
ing with kids and it was something %%e encour-
aged her to do. Everywhere Melissa went, a trail
of smiles w\as left in her wake.
The dedicated stallff with the Citrus County
Schools Food Service Division loved her She
was offered full-time work over the summer,
after completing a successful internship. She
was also in love with her boyfriend Tyler Horton,
who graduated with her
Melissa and all her friends were good kids.
They knew how to have fun. Her best friend
since they were toddlers. Molly Paquin. also
interned for the school system anrd was continu-
ing over the summer.
After Melissa and Tyler went to church with
my wife's parents that Sunday morning, they
decided to meet later on after she and Molly
went to Ocala to buy new clothes for work with
their mgaduation winnings.
They never came home.
Tyler came by around 6:30 p.m. or so and was
worried He had talked to Melhssa while she was
on her ~ ay back 'rom (hala and the' %%ere all to
meet up around 7 at the local bowling alley. The
conversation ended with Mehlisa telling T\ ler
she loaed him.
When the girls were late in returning. Tyler
tried calling Melissa and could not get an ansbter
It did not make sense. She was responsible and
normally on time. We tried to call her No answer.
We called Molly's monm. MaryJo Fallinske, who
%%as beginning to get frantic as she ngas having
the same result calling her daughter.
A friend had just arrived at her home from
Ocala and told her that lie was detoured because
of a bad accident that forced the closure of State
Road 200
No. this could not be. W"hy would they not
answer their phones? We were hoping they were
detoured and in a weak cell phone signal area
and maybe that boas it"
I called 911 and asked for information about
the accident I was referred to the Florida
Highway Patrol in Ocala.e AI they could tell me
was that there was a bad accident and a white
truck towing a boat was involved.
This can't be happening
Lori and I got in my Jeep and took otf for the
scene. At the river bridge oln State Road 200 a
Citrus deputy 'vas rerouting traffic I told him we
were afraid that our daughter and best friend
%\ere involved in the wreck He asked me what
type of car they were in. I told him it was a silver
Honda Ci ic sedan He waved us through.
Not a good simgn, at all
About a quarter-mile fartherdowin the road. on
the Marion County side, was the scene. We
parked and walked utip and first saw this large
pickup truck and boat trailer on the side of the
road, .ith the large boat no longer sitting on the
trailer
Then we saw it. The scene that no parent ever
should see. Our daughter's vehicle was a t listed
chunk of metal without a root. The white Medical
Examiner's 'an was parked in front of the vehicle.
They were both dead My wife collapsed next


To.:.a ir. ri C r:r r,.cle
Citrus High School students Jake Bergeron and Eric Tortorici are part of a group of Citrus High students
who have volunteered their talents after school in Art Teacher Karol Kusmaul's classroom to work on
the safe driving mosaic.

A group of Citrus High School students is working on the creation of a 6-foot by 4-foot mosa-
ic that will contain a safe driving message and when completed, be displayed on the side of
the school in the student parking area. The tragic deaths of 2007 CHS graduates Melissa Hess
and Molly Paquin in a May automobile accident inspired art teacher Karol Kusmaul to ask stu-
dents to come up with an idea to remind young drivers of their responsibilities when they are
behind the wheel. Photos and a few personal belongings of the girls and lan Morrill are part
of the mosaic. Morrill, too, is a former CHS student who was killed in an automobile crash. He
was a 2004 graduate and was killed in the spring of 2006 in Orlando. Other students who are
working on the project are Jessica Yoakam, Katie Platt, Krissy Wagner, Justine Fox, Susanna
Hwang, Adrena Wallace, Kayla Steuber and Brooke Kingsbury. Local businesses have also
offered their assistance with the effort. Don Smith, owner of Affordable Tile Designs, has
helped with supplies, tools and expertise. Also, Pro-Line Tile of Citrus County, Tile
Contractors Supply Company and Mid-State Glass have donated supplies.

to her car I had to call Mary Jo and tell her that standpoint, we don't want Melissa and Molly to
our girls were gone. die in vain. This must mean something.
They were on this earth enjoying life and in a From a non-selfish standpoint, we don't want
split second everything changed and they were any more parents in our community to join this
gone. Forever. We are still struggling with the club that has way too many members already. It's
finality of it Not Melissa! Not Molly! Why them? the club of parents whose children died before
Why us? them. We don't want to be a
It seems everybody thinks CITRUS COUNTY TEEN member Nobody does. bou can
that tragedies happen to some- DRIVING TASK FORCE never quit the club.
one else not them I was Every 64.5 minutes in our
always afraid of that. It has to be U The task force is country another teenager loses
somebody comprised of community their life and another family is
During my career at the leaders and parents left without that child. Every 55
Chronicle, I covered way too dedicated to implementing seconds a teenager is injured in
many teen fatalities. They several strategies with the a car crash.
always seemed to be right at goal of providing training When my daughter learned to
graduation time. In Marion and education to teenage drive. I did not know that car
countyy that weekend, there drivers in our community. accidents were the No. I killer
%were two other accidents that of teenagers. We did not spend
resulted in live more teenagers dead. Five more enough time training our daughter how to drive
families going through what we are defensively. I know that now. I can't change it.
Teenagers feel indestructible I did at that age. But if'you are a parent with a teen w\ho is driving
We have to educate them. We have to educate or will be soon, there is so much wou can do so
parents. your child does not become another statistic.
As discussions continued the idea hit us that
we can help fix this problem From a selfish Pleasee F." i,;. 'iY/Page 3C


Students seek crackdown on illegal immigrants


Author's note: The follow- "Since 1990, the number of
ing is another proposal from illegal immigrants in
the students who attended Florida has grown exponen-
the Lou Frey Institute of I tially. Currently, 3.8 percent
Politics and Government i of Florida's population are
Civic Leadership Academy. illegal immigrants. This pop-
Remember, this is their idea. ulation is larger than that of
, Ilegal immigration Tampa and St Petersburg.
is a crux problem in This is unacceptable, as they
our society, one cost us billions of dollars,
ever-present, but ignored Lou Frey billions that could be used to
until now. As time has pro- OTHER help the homeless, improve
gressed, we have opened our VOICES our schools and help solve
eyes to the presence of ille- the problem of over-crowd-
gal immigrants, and the ed public hospitals.
degenerative effect they have on our "The current laws in place to stem,
state. We see this problem, we feel its deal with and stop illegal immigration
presence. are lax and not enforced. We call for


immigration reform to fix the problem
before it gets uglier. As federal legisla-
tion fails to solve the problem, we must
take it in our own hands to solve these
issues. Although there may be immedi-
ate costs, in the long term, it will bene-
fit our state and our nation.
"We cannot allow these people to
deter the advancement of our nation, to
take away opportunities from those
who wish to come here legally They
may say that they do the jobs that
Americans do not wish to do. But with
three million homeless and thousands
of immigrants that could be brought in
legally to fill those spots, this is phony
As citizens, we cannot continue to keep
a blind eye as so many people enter the


country unchecked and unconstrained.
We hope to appeal to both sides of the
political spectrum, and although we are
taking a tough stand on illegal immigra-
tion, we are allowing some concessions
to current illegals in Florida. We hope
state representatives such as State Rep.
Flores and House representatives such
as John McCain or Mel Martinez see the
concessions we provide and help drive
forth to help solve the problem that is
illegal immigration.
"The center of the issue lies within
the increasing number of illegal immi-
grants entering Florida, whether it is
Mexicans smuggled in through the
Please see FREY/Page 3C


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Heroes earn

special

rights

t is the unscripted
moments in life that can
) Sometimes produce the
greatest clarity
I found myself sitting last
Monday morning under a
beautiful Florida sky enjoying
a ceremony that was designed
with a dual purpose. First, the
j Citrus County community had
come together to celebrate
Columbus Day under the lead-
ership of the Knights of
Columbus organization.
The second purpose of the
ceremony was to give recogni-
tion to a true American hero -
Steve Raymond, a 91-year-old
survivor of the Bataan Death
March.
Raymond, of Lecanto, was
one of 30,000 Americans taken
captive in the Philippines
after Gen. Douglas MacArthur
was forced to flee the islands
as Japanese troops closed in
on him. The captured
American and Philippine
troops were then forced to
march 60 miles across the
island to an abandoned base
where they were held captive.
The Americans were
exhausted and starving after
the long siege by the Japanese.
But in what became known as
the Bataan Death March, they
were forced to march until
. they dropped. And when they
dropped, the Japanese simply
Please see /. Page 4C


Charlie Brennan
SHADES
OF GRAY


Perceptions

can make a

big difference
W e recently ran a fea-
ture story about a
local Realtor who has,
been honored by her company
for some pretty impressive.
charitable efforts.
It was a nice story.
There are a lot of nice sto-
ries to be told.
Through no fault of the
writer, much of the feature
story revolved around busi-
ness-related activities, and the;
name of the business she.
works for was sprinkled:
throughout the piece.
We in the newsroom find it
necessary to distance our-
selves from our advertising
counterparts on the other side
of the building. Our decisions
about which stories to run are
not based on who advertises
with us or how much they
advertise.
Unlike quasi-news TV shows
where commercials so often
not-so-coincidentally deal with
products highlighted on show
segments, mainstream news-
papers have an obligation to
be objective in the quest for
credibility
Perceptions, however, vary
from best intentions and
perceptions need to be fac-
tored into the equation.
It was not our intention to
overtly plug the company with
which the Realtor is affiliated.
Because of the honor she
Please see : :./Page 4C


i -" ',- -








"Study sickness while you are well."

Thomas Fulleir


2C
SUNDAY
OCTOBER 14, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


ii


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


EDITORIAL BOARD


Gerry Mulligan ............................publisher
Charlie Brennan ..............................editor
Neale Brennan ...... promotions/community affairs
Kathie Stewart ...................circulation director
Mike Arnold ........................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz ............................... citizen member
Foby Albertin 91 Mac Harris .............................. citizen member
Williamson Norm Wagy ...........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

HEALTH & HAPPINESS




Awareness



the key to



saving lives


O october marks the 24th
year of National Breast
Cancer Awareness Month,
a program where agencies, com-
munities, organizations and
medical facilities join forces to
spread the message that early
detection of breast cancer, fol-
lowed by prompt treatment
saves lives.
The pink ribbon is
easily recognized as THE I
the symbol for Citrus
breast cancer support
awareness and the Cancer a
color pink has mor
become well estab-
lished with the OUR 01
cause. It will be seen Incre
in great numbers aware
throughout our com- early d
munity this month, can sav
on everything from
bumper stickers to YOUR OPIt
M&Ms to glittering chr.)ncieon
jewelry. The symbol .r.n.m,,.rint 3
may be dainty, CLrr,-n:.,,.:
almost fragile, but
the message is powerful. And it is
one that must be heard.
Cancers are a group of dis-
eases that cause cells in the body
to change and grow out of con-
trol. Causes and cures for this
horrific disease are still prayers
away; however, physicians and
medical experts are in agree-
ment that continued progress
against breast cancer is depend-
ent on the application of existing
knowledge of risk reduction,
early detection and treatment,
as well as continued research
into how to prevent, detect and
treat the disease.
After decades of focused
research and awareness cam-
paigns, it's true that breast can-
cer isn't the death sentence it
used to be. Mortality rates in the
United States are currently 24
percent lower than they were 17
years ago, thanks in large part to
recent advancements in diagnos-
tic and treatment tools. Still, in
2007, 178,480 new cases of inva-
sive breast cancer are expected
among women, with an antici-
pated 40,460 deaths due to this

Crowded animals S 01
I would like to speak
about the animal lovers
who try to keep as many
animals as they can in a
limited space or area or
acreage. I have seen peo-
ple who own cats, dogs,
goats and horses, etc., in a
confined area without daily CALL
care. The only animals to 5634i
have accessibility to shel-
ter in inclement weather
are the pigs or hogs, and some of
them even have A/C.
Messy manatees
I agree with Mr. DeBusk's letter
about the manatees. I have been in
Crystal River since the early '70s
and have seen a big change in our
Crystal River. I guess the manatee
lovers think that the manatees are
potty trained.
Necessary service
I'm just responding to the Sound
Off call about the uneducated wait-
ers and waitresses getting tips ... By
the way, I am not a waiter and I do
have an education. And if they didn't
have waiters and waitresses to wait
on (them), then what would they do?


disease.
Many strides have been made
in breast cancer awareness and
treatment, but there are steps
ahead that must be taken. Every
woman must take charge of her
own breast health, practicing reg-
ular self-breast exams, making
sure to schedule an annual mam-
mogram, adhering
to prescribed treat-
SSUE: ment and knowing
County the facts about
s Breast recurrence.
awareness It is this challenge
nth. that continues to be
the focus of Breast
PINION: Cancer Awareness
ased Month.
ess and It is this aware-
etection ness and under-
'e lives, standing that needs
to permeate Citrus
NION: Go to County.
ime :orm to Breast cancer is
bout t.:.a's not something that
eaitorial, will only happen to
someone else, it is
not something that can be put
off, it is not something that will
go away if ignored.
Breast cancer affects too many
of our mothers, sisters, daugh-
ters and friends. For the one in
eight women who will develop
breast cancer in their lifetime, it
is of critical importance that our
support continues toward breast
cancer research, education,
screening and treatment not just
during October and Breast
Awareness Month, but every day.
During this month, show your
support for those suffering,
recovering and celebrating their
victory over the disease. Join in
the fundraisers and events that
raise awareness to steps that can
be taken for early detection and
treatment. Big, or small, the
events will raise awareness of
what only 20 years ago was spo-
ken about only in hushed tones,
when many women were too
embarrassed or just plain
unaware of how important it was
to get any signs of possible
breast cancer checked out soon-
er rather than later.

t Dogs, not smokes
Concerning the Sound
Off in the paper about
dogs at the flea market: I
went to the flea market
last week and was over-
come by smoke. Yes, there
are restaurants in there,
but I would rather sit in a
0579 restaurant with a dog than
0 have to smell the disgust-
ing smell of somebody
smoking. It's close quar-
ters in there. Someone could get
burned, so they should not allow
smoking inside the flea market. It's
dangerous, it stinks, it's nasty, and
I'd rather have the dogs.
Dangerous junction
There is a very dangerous situation
at (U.S.) 41 and (County Road) 491.
The gas station on the north side of
(C.R.) 491 allows traffic to make a
left coming across three lanes of
traffic at the red light. This morning
- and I travel this every day at 7:45
- a garbage truck was trying to
come across. Someone's going to get
killed there because there's lots and
lots of traffic and there's no disci-
pline coming out of that gas station.


A history of rope and shame


his will be a history
ofrope.
It strikes me that
such a history is desperate-
ly needed just now. It seems
the' travesty in Jena, La.,
has spawned a ghastly -
trend. Remember how
white students at Jena High
placed nooses in a tree last
year to communicate
antipathy toward their Leonan
African-American class- OTI
mates? Now it's happening VOI
all over.
A noose is left for a black
workman at a construction site in the
Chicago area. In Queens, a woman
brandishes a noose to threaten her
black neighbors. A noose is left on the
door of a black professor at Columbia
University. And that's just last week.
Go back a little further and you have
similar incidents at the University of
Maryland in College Park, at a police
department on Long Island, on a Coast
Guard cutter, in a bus maintenance
garage in Pittsburgh.
Mark Potok, the director of the
Intelligence Project of the Southern
Poverty Law Center told USA Today,
"For a dozen incidents to come to the
public's attention is a lot I don't gen-
erally see noose incidents in a typical
month. We might hear about a handful
in a year"
The superintendent of schools in
Jena famously dismissed the original
incident as a "prank" It was an aston-
ishing response, speaking volumes


r1
Hc


about the blithe historical
ignorance of people who
have found it convenient not
to peer too closely at the
[7 atrocities of the past lest they
be accidentally... moved.
But watching this trend
unfold, it occurs to me that
maybe what we need here
is the opposite of ignorance.
Maybe what we need is
d Pitts information. Maybe what
IER we need is a history of rope.
DES A history of rope would
have to include, in 1904,
Luther Holbert and his wife,
who had their fingers chopped off and
handed out as souvenirs. Holbert was
beaten so badly one of his eyes came
out. It hung by a thread. A large
corkscrew was used to bore into the
couple's flesh. It tore out big chunks of
them each time it was withdrawn. A
rope was used to tie them to the tree.
A history of rope would have to
include, in 1917, Rufus Moncrief, who
was beaten senseless by a mob. They
used a saw to cut off his arms and oth-
erwise mutilated him. The mob
hanged Moncrief. Then, for good
measure, they hanged his dog. Ropes
were used for both.
A history of rope would have, to
include, in 1918, Mary Turner, burned
alive in Valdosta, Ga. A man used a
hog-splitting knife to slash her swollen
stomach. The baby she had carried
nearly to term tumbled out and man-
aged two cries before the man crushed
its head beneath his heel. A rope was


used to tie Turner upside down in a
tree.
A history of rope would include thou-
sands of Turners, Moncriefs and
Holberts. It would range widely across.
the geography of this nation and the.
years of the last two centuries. A histo-
ry of rope would travel from Cairo, Ill..,.
in 1909 to Fort Lauderdale in 1935 to
Urbana, Ohio, in 1897 to Wrightsville,-
Ga., in 1903, to Leitchfield, Ky., in 1913
to Newbern, Tenn. in 1902. And beyond.
You might say the country has
changed since then, and it has. The
problem is, it's changing again.
It feels as if in recent years we the
people have backward traveled from
even the pretense of believing our
loftiest ideals. It has become fashion-
able to decry excessive "political cor-
rectness," deride "diversity," sneer at,
the "protected classes." Code words
sanding down hatred's rough edge.
"State's rights" for the new millenni-
um. And now, out come the nooses.,
Just a prank, the man says.
Mary Turner would argue otherwise.
I find it useful to remember her, useful
to be reminded of things we would,
rather forget. To remember her is to
understand that there is no prank here.
A history of rope would drown your
conscience in blood.

Leonard Pitts is a columnist
for the Miami Herald,
1 Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla., 33132.
Readers may contact him via e-mail
at lpitts@miamiherald.com:


LETTERS, wto the Editor


What Greenspan said
In an attack on the Administration
and the Republican Party by Ruth J.
Anderson in the Sept. 30 edition, she
stated: "Alan Greenspan tells us in his
newly released book that we went
into Iraq for the oil. But most of us
knew that, didn't we?"
She made it sound so simple. Like
so many others on the left who would
have left Saddam in power and then
complained when he proved to us
that he had weapons of mass destruc-
tion, she only told us what she wanted
us to hear.
Bob Woodward, in an article in The
Washington Post on Sept. 17, reported
that Greenspan said in an interview
"that the removal of Saddam Hussein
had been 'essential' to secure world
oil supplies." He added that
Greenspan, in clarifying that sen-
tence in his 531-page book, went on to
say that while securing the global oil
supplies was "not the administration's
motive," he had presented the White
House with the case for why remov-
ing Hussein was important for the
global economy
The article also stated that "as for
Iraq, Greenspan said that at the time
of the invasion, he believed, like
(President) Bush, that Iraq had
weapons of mass destruction." He
added that he was "reasonably sure
he did not have an atomic weapon,"
but added, "My view was that if we
did nothing, eventually he would gain
control of a weapon."
Anderson appears to have a great
deal of time to write letters. Her
many letters might be better if she
made sure her statements were cor-
rect and complete and if she didn't
work so hard to make up things to
attack our president and the
Republican Party.
At the same time, it might be well
for her to remember that George W


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chronicle edi-
torials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
Viewpoints depicted in political car-
toons, columns or letters do not neces-
sarily represent the opinion of the edito-
rial board.
Groups or individuals are invited to
express their opinions in a letter to the
editor.
I Persons wishing to address the editorial
board, which meets weekly, should call
Linda Johnson at (352) 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and include a
phone number and hometown, including
letters sent via e-mail. Names and
hometowns will be printed; phone num-
bers will not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit letters for
length, libel, fairness and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than 350
words, and writers will be limited to
three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to (352) 563-3280; or e-
mail to lettors@chronlcleonllne.com.

Bush and the Republican Party won
the 2000 and 2004 elections by greater
than 50 percent of the popular vote.
The only Democrat to attain a higher
percentage than President Bush since
World War II was President Kennedy
R. E. Cofran
Inverness

SCHIP skip
Congratulations, Congress. A bipar-
tisan vote for a bill that is good for
some of our poor people. If the presi-
dent vetoes it, we will find out
whether or not that means at least a
two-thirds-vote in favor won't we?
President Bush says that he oppos-
es it for two reasons. In my opinion,
neither reason is valid. They are:
1. "It is the first step toward social-
ized medicine."
Actually, it is just what it is.
Apparently, the program has been
working very well and how can the


USA not want to continue, and
expand, a program that assures the
good health of children who have no
other way to get it?
Medicaid and Medicare were the
first steps. The next, and last step
should be to include adults and fami-
lies, who can't afford health insur-
ance, in Medicaid. The insurance
companies should not fight either of
these steps because they can't sell
these people anything anyway.
2. "It is too expensive."
President Bush says "We are the
richest country in the world." So, how"
can he also say that we can't afford to
do what is right for our people...
when other countries apparently can?
There are three ways to pay for it: -
The Democrat way raise taxes.
The Republican way borrow the
money.
The right way cut wasteful gov-
ernment spending.
Why does our government never
consider this option? We, the people,
pay our members of Congress, the cab-
inet and the president a lot of money
to manage our business and the man-
agement of business that is losing
money would normally look here for
money We hear of many possibilities:
Not give themselves raises what
have they done to earn them?
Reduce the number of employees
in most departments.
Charge more for employees' health
care and pension.
Eliminate all pork earmarks not
needed.
Terminate unnecessary subsidies.
Negotiate Part D drug costs it
would save the government big money.
Rework big-profit and "no-bid" con-'
tracts, such as paying security guards'
in Iraq $100,000 per year.
Collect all taxes legitimately owed .
under the existing tax code.
Jack Ritchey
Crystal River-


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


is
c





ei

re


(












SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2007 3C


Moving past
C heryl and I recently cel- enjoyed the major
ebrated our 41st wed- parks Epcot,
ding anniversary Some MGM Studios and
anniversaries are supposed to the Magic Kingdom.
be more memorable than oth- There's no doubt
ers, for instance the 25th or Walt Disney was .,4
50th. But the 41st is considered America's most fan-
sort of "ho-hum" or, as some tastic artist. In my
would say, a Mickey Mouse opinion, a close sec-
event. ond is Norman
With this in mind, the love of Rockwell. The dif- Fred Bra
my life and I decided to ference between A SLIC
become little kids and go to Disney and LIFI
Disney World to celebrate. Of Rockwell is you
course, we are now big kids know without a
and have grown to appreciate doubt Mickey, Donald and r
creature comforts. We spent a Goofy are fantasies, while the b
couple of nights at the Grand Rockwell subjects all appear to d
Floridian Hotel and leisurely be real. I


the imperfections of life


Rockwell paint-
ings are perfect -
almost too perfect.
Kids are usually
A scrubbed, with every
hair in place. He
even makes dirty
kids look good. Our
. children looked bad
and smelled bad
innen when they were dirty
E OF ditto the grand-
E children.
A Rockwell dog is
always sitting at his
master's feet after having
broughtt in a newspaper. Our
dog never brought in the paper
Most often, Whiskers, may he


rest in peace, ignored the paper
placed on the floor for his use.
A Rockwell cat sleeps peace-
fully Our long-since-departed
cat, Samantha, sharpened her
claws on curtains, shed hair all
over the furniture and sat on
the windowsill meowing in the
middle of the night.
A Norm mother is in the
kitchen baking homemade
pies. She wears an apron that
is never soiled. There's never a
TV dinner in the microwave or
dirty dishes in the sink.
For the first few years of
married life, I expected our
home to look like a Rockwell
painting everything in its


place with pretty little babies
in footy-pajamas in perfectly
appointed bedrooms.
My sweetheart loved me in
spite of my unrealistic expecta-
tions. She kept the babies
healthy and happy and ignored
my assertion that Norm would-
n't be pleased with our abode.
News flash! Life isn't perfect.
There are mosquitoes, cooties,
flies and fleas. Garbage smells
and bee stings hurt.
I once referred to my expec-
tations as "The Norman
Rockwell Syndrome." Then, I
had an epiphany: Rockwell
wasn't trying to paint a perfect
world. He had a knack for see-


ing the good and painting what
he saw.
Walt didn't think we would
believe a mouse can do all the
things Mickey does, but he
knew our world would be
brightened by a bit of fantasy.
I've come to realize waxing
Rockwellian is being able to
crack the shell to find the meat
of the nut, getting beyond the
thorns to smell the rose and
moving past the imperfections
of life to enjoy living.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist


Closing library
1 just wanted to comment on the
new Homosassa library. I think it's
great that we're getting one in
Homosassa Springs, but I think it's
really sad that the one in Old
Homosassa is going to be closing
because they don't have enough
funds to have a library in there, or
enough volunteers to have a library
in there. Every child who went to
Homosassa Elementary, anywhere
from kindergarten to first
or second grade, got his or f1
her first library card there. 0
They would walk across
the street and it was a big
deal to kids. Since the
early 1970s if not before
- that's been going on. It's
really sad that children in
that town who don't have
access to get to CALL
Homosassa Springs aren't 56Q
going to have a way to be LU 3
educated when they close
that down and give it to the Civic
Center, I guess, from what I under-
stand. Something should be done
because those children need
access to do their homework when
they don't have a way at home.
Some children don't have the
Internet at home and some chil-
dren don't have encyclopedias at
home and the library was a really
good way that they could do their
book reports and their different
things for school to get a greater
education. We should have some-
body who would step in there and
say, "I want to volunteer," or, you
know, "I want to help keep this
place going even if it's just open a
few days a week." But to give it to
the Civic Center When children can
b .gaining knowledge, I think it's
really sad.
Damaging impact fees
;What's wrong with this county?
I'ye been reading in the paper, and
know from firsthand experience
about all this impact fees for the
new businesses wanting to come
in. We need jobs desperately. The
people are leaving this area.
Everybody better wake up and real-
ize these commissioners are screw-
ing this county big time. We're
pushing people away because of
impact fees. Houses are being
repossessed because nobody.can
build. There are just no jobs. They
better wake up. They better wake
up and let this county grow and go


I


on with the new businesses wanting
to come in. It would be a blessing
for the county. We need more busi-
nesses for more jobs. Wake up,
commissioners. Pay attention.
Harvest weeds
This is to notify the public of what
is going on with the DER The DEP is
going to start spraying Lake
Rousseau again. The DEP should not
be called the Department of
Environmental Protection, it should
be called the Department
l of Environmental
Destruction. In the notice in
today's Chronicle, they say
and I quote "It is nec-
S -essary to maintain recre-
ational activities and pro-
tection of native plant pop-
ulation in Florida waters."
w,. Nothing could be further
from the truth. The only
0579 recreation on Lake
. Rousseau is fishing. I'm a
paid fishing consultant who
actually had environmental chem-
istry in college. Any student in basic
biology knows if you spray plant life,
it falls to the bottom, blocking the
photosynthesis, which depletes the
oxygen level that, consequently, kills
the fish. The decaying plant life falls
to the bottom and creates a muck
bottom, which interferes with the
natural bedding process. If it is not
poisoning the water, then why is it
necessary to post signs for the
humans? The animals, the deer, the
coons, etc., drink from these waters.
I worked out of Lake Rousseau until
the DEP and the hurricanes in 2004
killed everything. Mother Nature is
repairing the lake and now the
Department of Environmental
Destruction is going to kill everything
again. When this happened before, I
took my clients to the Rainbow River,
and guess what? They were spraying
Aquathol on the Rainbow River. This
is outrageous behavior from a gov-
ernment agency that is supposed to
protect the environment. The only
proper way to remove weeds and
muck is a mechanical harvester.
When we had our last drought, I
asked Jim Fowler why we didn't take
front-end loaders and remove the
muck. He said he couldn't get the
permits. It is strange to me that they
cleaned up Lake Kissimmee and are
now working on Lake Okeechobee
and they are doing it the right way
with bulldozers and front-end load-
ers. Please, someone stop the
destruction.


LETT -RS to the Editor


Political hype
Sincere congratulations to Gerry
Mulligan for his decision to not edito-
rially endorse any candidate in the
presidential election. I, too, am
appalled at the hatred that has devel-
oped and grown between the two
major parties. It is rapidly destroying
the democratic process and is
demeaning to the public.
Congress is so busy playing
"gotcha" that important legislative
matters only seem to matter when one
side or the other feels that there are
some hometown votes to be gained,
regardless of the ramifications of the
bill.
I am 81 years old, and have voted
for both parties at one time or other,
depending who seemed to me to have
the best agenda for the future of our
country. Now I see a great disintegra-
tion of principle on both sides of the
aisle. Politicians seem to be spending
the majority of their time in their
obsession with raising money any way
they can to be well financed for their
next election.
We are all guilty of allowing this to


continue, and, unfortunate
power we have is at the po
hope and pray that citizen
time to make their choices
ied manner. Maybe we sho
smart enough to ignore th(
wild promises, and try inst
what each candidate really:
Maybe this should not be t
expect.
Ja


Kind and hell
Recently, I decided to ha
brother disinterred from tl
Memorial Cemetery in Ho.
Hawaii. He was killed in ti
years of World War II at th
and having him so far rem
dened me. I simply wanted
my brother home."
This was a difficult deci:
since I did not know how t
delicate task.
I contacted Hooper Funi
& Crematory here in Inver
Dwight was so helpful, not


dly, the only fessiorally, but also with great under-
)lls. I would standing and knowledge of the paper-
s take the work it entailed. He took care of
s in a stud- everything, always keeping in mind
)uld be our concerns.
e hype and Friday, Sept 21, a memorial was
tead to see carried out with dignity and respect
y stands for. Lowell conducted a prayer for the
too much to family before we proceeded to the
Florida National Cemetery at
ck FasnachtBushnell.
k asnact An honor guard of Marines met us
Homosassa to complete the service fitting for all
f of our veterans that have -made the
pful supreme sacrifice. This was a cher-
ished moment, not only for me, but
hve my also for all of my family and friends
e National who were there. It was a solemn
nolulu, moment for me to reflect and give
te early thanks. The military is and should be
e age of 22, revered always for its dedication and
oved sad- valor.
to "bring My thanks and gratitude to all of
. o the staff of the Hooper Funeral
sion for me, Homes for their kindness and profes-
o begin this sionalism.
ST, May God bless you.
~ci' UlR H


erai -iomes
ness.
only pro-


Robert "Bob" Ekker
Inverness


TRAGEDY
Continued from Page 1C
In the weeks after the
tragedy discussion continued
and the timing was right. The
sheriff's office was about to
introduce the Teen Driving
Challenge, a course designed
to educate and train our young
drivers so they understand the
capabilities of their vehicle,
how to handle it properly and
understand the dangers of
driving. It's a pilot program
and will be tweaked and
expanded with the goal of
making it available to all stu-
dents.
This is one component of
several that the newly formed
Citrus County Teen Driving
Task Force will be working on.
Our group is comprised of me
and Molly's mom, along with
some of the top county officials


TEEN DRIVING STATISTICS
* Since March 2003, more than 3,800 U.S. troops have been
killed in Iraq. During that same time period, approximately
28,000 teenagers have been killed in auto-related crashes.
* In 2003, 28 percent of teens who died in collisions were
intoxicated. Seventy-seven percent of those intoxicated
teens were not wearing seatbelts.
* Approximately two-thirds of teen passenger deaths occur
when another teenager is driving.
* Every 64.5 minutes, a teenager is killed in a car accident.
* A teenager is injured in a car crash every 55 seconds.
* One in three teen drivers has an accident during the first


year of licensure.

and business leaders in our
community.
In subsequent columns you
will learn more about our
group and what our goals are. I
will also share some ideas that
you can implement with your
own children who drive.
With strong parental involve-
ment and education of our


Source. Auto Ieek illagazne
young drivers, this trend can be
reversed.
Start by sharing this column
with your teenager.


Tim Hess is the retired
Director of Operations for the
Chronicle. His e-mail address
is thess@tampabay.rr.com


_______ _'_ '__ _ I
Special to the Chronicle
Once completed, the safe driving mosaic message will be "With privilege comes responsibility."


FREY
Continued from Page 1C

state's northern border, or the
huge numbers of the illegal
immigrants coming from the
Caribbean and even Central
and South Americans who
overstay their visas, and those
who come to the nation just to
have childbirth, to take advan-
tage of our system. We hope to
lobby the federal government
to:pass legislation that would
guarantee visa renewal, keep-
ing almost 40 percent of the
state's illegals legal. By making
it simpler to enter the states
legally, we hope to somewhat


slow the entrance of illegal
immigrants.
"Along with this, we hope to
furthermore lobby the federal
government to expedite the
legal process of receiving a
visa, and creating a separate
visa for labor workers. This
will deter illegal immigration
and make it easier and more
appealing to enter the nation
legally.
"Because of the Wet Foot Dry
Foot Act, once Cubans touch
ground they are free. Not only
is this unfair, it makes it easy
for Cubans to come to our
nation and receive amnesty. To
combat this, we hope to work
with federal government and
the Coast Guard to make a


Maritime National Guard. We
would use this to patrol the
Florida Straits to catch
Cubans, Haitians and all other
immigrants attempting to enter
the nation illegally. To fund
this, we plan on raising sales
taxes minutely and heavily tax
tobacco products. Prevention
is our best defense against ille-
gal immigration.
"Illegal immigrants cost the
state of Florida billions yearly
But these illegals pay a total of
only $910 million annually
This does not nearly cover
their costs. They cost the coun-
try even more as a whole, since
they can in no way pay federal
income taxes.
"Millions are lost on their


incarceration and health care
services. So far in 2007, 4000
illegal immigrants have been
arrested and many deported.
By making state legislation, we
can give jurisdiction to the
state troopers to make illegal
immigrant arrests. We also
plan on requiring proof of
legality when enrolling stu-
dents into public schools.
"Our policies, if implement-
ed correctly and funded ade-
quately, would be extremely
effective. We understand that
we cannot solve the problem of
illegal immigration in Florida
immediately, but we can take
great strides with our policies.
'These policies are reason-
able; we hope to give those who


have overextended their visas a
chance to safely and legally
extend their stay, with no penal-
ty. At the same time, we will
impose staunch policies, such as
our Maritime National Guard
that will stem the exponential
growth of illegal immigrants.
"Divisions between parties
may be the greatest deterrent
to implementing our policies,
but we are sure that we can
appeal to both sides. The costs
can be covered and the policies
implemented. To. every crisis,-
there is a plausible and reason-
able solution. The key players
should react positively to our
policies, both on the national
and state level."
Immigration is getting like


Social Security: It is a third rail
of politics and no one wants to
touch it I have just returned
from a wonderful Former
Members of Congress'
Congress to Campus visit at
Central Michigan University.
Outstanding professors and
really great students. I am on
the way to Ireland for a
Congress to Campus visit and
will have more on both of these
in the next several weeks.


Lou Frey Jr. is a political
analyst, commentator and
newspaper columnist and for-
mer Florida representative in
Congress. Send e-mail to
lou.frey@lowndes-law.comrn:


,1-11KUl 1-UUIYI I (FLj tHKUIVI(,Ll,


COMMENTARY


rC'TRs Co)nW7 P(FI ) fCaHROnL K









4C ',I NI)V, ()( I0131R 14, 2007 C~MMENTARY Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


'Times' coverage dangerous and suicidal


Each morning, I read the
Wall Street Journal, the
Chronicle and The New
York Times online edition. It
helps me to understand differ-
ent viewpoints of world events
and government. Of late, I won-
der whether the Times has
become suicidal, a danger to
itself and the country.
Historically, the Times has
been the recipient of choice for
leaked classified government
information. Any disgruntled
underling in the State
Department, CIA or FBI can
bring top-secret material to the
Times with assurances that
identities will be protected and
that the material will be pub-
lished no matter how damaging
it might be to the government,
even to the war efforts. The
Times always justifies this on
the basis of free speech and the


public's need and
right to know.
There may be '
something to that
when the govern-
ment is doing some-
thing illegal and
likely to harm the
country. But what
about releasing
secrets that help Dr.
our enemies? Is that Di:
good journalism or OTI
just pursuit of a VO1
political agenda?
Just last week, the
Times reported on secret
memos from the Justice
Department which, they said,
authorized "torture" in the
interrogation of terrorists.
They, in effect, accused the
president and the Justice
Department of lying to the pub-
lic and to Congress about how


i
x
HI
I
(


prisoners were
treated. Headlines
went -round the
world, and interna-
tional spokesmen
proclaimed their
shock and indigna-
tion.
Damage done.
Mission accom-
iliam polished!
on Many of our con-
IER gressmen expressed
DES outrage and have
demanded to see
the secret memos.
They apparently think it's OK
for our sworn enemies to find
out what they can expect, if
captured, and train to resist it
Wow! Turns out, after the
damage has been done, that
prominent members of
Congress of both political par-
ties were fully briefed on inter-


rogation methods and signed
off on them!
The Times, you will recall,
alerted our enemies to the fact
that we were able to intercept
and monitor their telephone
calls worldwide and their e-
mail as well. The administra-
tion pointedly told the Times
that valuable information to
prevent attacks on us had been
gained through the phone taps,
and they asked the Times not to
publish the secret techniques.
Didn't matter. The Times
thought you and I needed to
know that to protect ourselves
from the government It appar-
ently considers the Bush
administration a greater threat
to us than al-Qaida. And I sup-
pose, Times editors think the
fact that there has been no fol-
low-up terrorist attack on our
mainland just good luck, rather


than a result of the interroga-
tion and spying methods they
have exposed. Personally, I'd
feel safer if The New York
Times put aside its political
agenda and overt dislike for
the current administration in
favor of defeating our nation's
enemies.
The reason I wonder about
the Times being suicidal is that
its reportage and obvious bias
has cost it readership and
money. Its stock price is falling
to new lows, and it has had to
lay off staff. But things could
get worse. Suppose America
sustains a series of destructive
terrorist attacks with the loss of
thousands of people and shut-
down of our economy
Everyone knows that the
Times has been giving away the
nation's secret defenses. When
calls arise to shut down the


media, the Times will be first
on the list And our personal
freedoms, supposedly of great
concern to the Times, will be
lost in the rush to monitor the
movements of virtually every-
one in the country. Those in
Congress working to hamstring
our ability to defend ourselves
will be accountable, as welL

Dr. William Dixon is an
Inverness resident and retired
surgeon. He earned his M.D.
degree from New York
Medical College, an MBA from
University of South Florida
and his bachelor's from
Columbia College. He served
11 years in the U.S. Army
achieving the rank of
lieutenant colonel. He can be
e-mailed at dixonbill
@chronicleonline.com.


=- Hot Corner: SEX OFFENDERS


LEI

USA defends
I'm appalled that you would print
the outrageous, untruthful implica-
tion in Charley Reese's column
Saturday that the United States
"destroy(s) whole countries, kill(s)
millions of people."
When has this ever occurred?
Perhaps Mr. Reese and the Chronicle
editors have never studied history,
because if they had, they would find
that the United States has gone to the
aid of other countries again and
again, and that many thousands of our
people have given their lives in the
defense of others.
Charlene Dawe
Inverness

Are we better off?
In the 1960s, following a suit filed
by Madalyn Murray O'Hair, the U.S.
Supreme Court, in an eight-to-one
decision, voted to ban prayer in our
schools.
The Ten Commandments have been
removed from public buildings, and
the motto "In God We Trust" is in dan-
ger of extinction. Teachers are forbid-
den to carry personal Bibles in view
of students.
My question, to this brain-dead gen-
eration, is: '"Are we better off in our
schools and country as a result? Are
schools safer? Are fewer kids on


TTERSR to the

drugs? Are fewer kids engaged in
promiscuous sex? Are fewer crimes
committed by school-age kids?
Wake up and smell the coffee.
There are none so blind, as those that
refuse to see!
Braulio Esquilin
Beverly Hills

Stop the speeders
I just read on the first page of the
"Wheels" section (Oct 2) an article by
Holly Ocasci Rizzo, "Your speeding
heart."
A very good article; however, the
practical reality of it escapes me. One
can be advised of increasing fines for
speeding. One can be aware of other
costs entailed with being caught And,
one can be cognizant of the reality of
increased risk to life and limb. But,
without law enforcement, and a sup-
portive court system to see that
speeding violators are, indeed, caught
and prosecuted, nothing really hap-
pens. Not really.
Violators continue to exceed the
speed limit maximum speed limit;
and, they do so with impunity. Living
in Floral City, my wife and I often
drive U.S. 41 into Inverness. We hold
to the 45 mph speed limit, or a bit
less. Nine out of 10 other vehicles in
our vicinity, going our way, pass us at
speeds obviously above that 45 mph
speed limit.


Editor


County and/or state law enforce-
ment, in the area, virtually ignores
those speeders unless they are going
a significantly excessive speed as to
be so very obvious and blatant Still,
even one or two miles per hour over
the speed limit is still breaking the
law. Isn't it?
And, what are we? A nation of laws,
or a nation of men? Do we affirm our
laws are made to be enforced equi-
tably to all persons; or, do we affirm as
George Orwell suggested in his book,
'Animal Farm": "All are equal; but,
some are more equal than others."
Fred A. Stock
Floral City
Tangled web
If Ms. Anderson wishes to utilize
quotes in her frequent essays, then
she should make sure that the quote
is correct
"When at first we do deceive, what
a tangled web we weave" is what she
quoted. The correct quote is: "Oh
what a tangled web we weave, when
first we practice to deceive," and is
from the epic poem, "Marmion," by
Sir Walter Scott.
Ms. Anderson seems to be awash
"with just enough of learning to mis-
quote" English Bards and Scotch
Reviewers, by Lord Byron.
Leslie Ostergard
Homosassa


Roaming homeless
In the paper, I was reading about
an ordinance being reviewed so that
convicted sex offenders will need to
carry a special ID to live a half mile
from where children gather. We've
noticed in Inverness we have home-
less men roaming around the streets
and the park. I think this ordinance
should apply to them, so we can
know who they are and if they
should be near our children.
Imported perpetrators
I see that Sheriff Dawsy wants to
import offenders from other coun-
ties... Why in the world would he
want to bring more sex offenders to
Citrus County? If he needs more work
for his people, he can have them clean
up the side of the roads or something.
We don't want more sex offenders in
Citrus County. That's crazy.
Editor's note: The sheriff has sought
to stop a Tampa Bay area man from
providing local housing for out-of-coun-
ty sex offenders.
More than hurt
I'm sitting here on Sunday morning
not enjoying my Chronicle, reading
this article about the perverts that


they want to move into the communi-
ty. And the most shocking thing of
this entire article by Cristy Loftis is
where she says the residents don't
want anybody hurt ... It says there
was a fear that another child could be
hurt like Jessica Lunsford. Does any-
body that has an ounce of sense
describe the Jessica Lunsford incident
as being hurt when she was raped in
every way ... terrorized and buried
alive? And our inept officials couldn't'
find her when she was just across the'
street. If that's being hurt, how would
you describe anything else? We need
to wake up and face the facts. Sexual
offenders do re-offend. If we know
who they are, we need to keep them
away from our children.
Feeling better
This is about the article "Fear fac-
tor" in Sunday's Commentary about
the sex offenders. Experts are not
convinced these laws really work.
But the only two experts they talked
to: One of them was so hopeful -1-
which makes me feel hopeful -
because the sex offenders them-
selves say that they're not a threat,
and then somebody from the
University of Florida, who makes me
feel so much better.


= Hot Corner: LEAVE PEOPLE ALONE =


Not predators
Regarding the caller on today's
paper, Oct. 8, "Leave people alone,"
regarding sex predators against gay
people. Predators are predators; gay
people are not predators. So please
make it clear. Just because you're
gay, doesn't make you a sex predator.
No comparison
I'm calling about a Sound Off on
Monday, Oct. 8, and it says "Leave
people alone." This person's writing
in comparing sex predators with gay
people. This person has no idea of
what he or she is talking about. Why
would you compare these two? I'm
not gay, by the way. But you can be
gay and of course you're not going
to hurt anybody. But sex predators
are known for doing these bad things
to children. This person has no idea
what she or he is talking about.
Own kind
This is in response to "Leave peo-
ple alone." The person wrote that
they have gay people living around
their neighborhood. They're not sexu-
al offenders OK? Sexual offenders
are usually all your straight people,
all right? Yes, sexual offenders do not
need to even live in our county or on
our planet. Once they do it, they'll


always do it. Something needs to be
done. I am so grateful reading ini the
Chronicle one guy got 45 years in
prison. You go! And Jeff Dawsy, you
are awesome. But, no, gay people
aren't the sexual offenders. They
stick to their own kind. They don't
bother anybody. But we do need to
do something with these sexual
offenders.
Lacking connection
I'm calling in regarding the article
"Leave people alone." They're writing
about the people who are against the
sex predators coming into their
towns and their villages, and then
they go on to say that they live in a
settlement with seven gay people liv-
ing in "my settlement and they ain't
bothering us." Could they please
explain what gay people have to do
with sex predators? You're not com-
paring apples to apples there, folks.
Making assumption
This is in response to "Leave people
alone." Honey, your heart's in the right
place but I'm not really sure where
your mind's at. You say that you live in
a settlement and you've got seven gay
people there and you don't under-
stand why people are against sexual
predators. So are you assuming that
gay people are sexual predators?


WINDOW
Continued from Page lC

killed the prisoners of war
where they fell. The Americans
were hacked to death, shot and
humiliated by their captors.
Thousands died along the
way The news of their savage
treatment helped rally the
American public to gear up
our manufacturing war
machine at home to fight the
Japanese.
Raymond survived the long
march and his time in the
camp under brutal conditions.



SHADES
Continued from Page 1C

received, it was wholly appro-
priate to name the company
and more power to them for
honoring those employees who
give back to society.
But there's a double-edged
blade here: There are a lot of
Realtors and others who
give back to their community.
We're happy to note their
accomplishments yet that
news most often lands in the


He was later transferred to
Japan where he was forced
into slave labor working on the
docks in one of that nation's
major cities.
The very fact that he sur-
vived the ordeal was a miracle.
Several years ago he finally fin-
ished writing a book about his
captivity called "Too Dead to
Die."
So there we were last
Monday morning paying trib-
ute to Raymond and his patri-
otic efforts. Retired Army Col.
Curt Ebitz gave a stirring
speech recounting Raymond's
accomplishments. Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy was in attendance. So


Business or Homefront sec-
tions or on our Community
pages. This story was on Page
1A.
Since we're unable to pro-
vide Page 1A coverage for
everyone in the community
who is recognized for their
charitable efforts, it's appro-
priate to weigh where in the
newspaper such stories
appear and the degree to
which the business affiliation
should be mentioned.
People have questioned
whether this was Page 1A
news. That's fair. Since we


were County Commissioner
Vicki Phillips and School
Superintendent Sam Himmel.
The students from the Citrus
Springs Middle School band
were on hand to play patriotic
songs.
The Knights of Columbus
presented Raymond with a
nice award for his sacrifices for
our country. Then it was time
for U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson to pay
his tribute. While Nelson was-
n't in attendance because of his
senatorial duties, he sent an
aide to Lecanto to participate
in the event and he presented
Raymond with an official reso-
lution from the United States


made the decision to place it
there, my opinion is a firm
"maybe." In hindsight, though,
the half dozen references to
the Realtor's company do stick
out and there's no denying the
perceptions of other Realtors
that there was a commercial-
plug edge to the piece.
That wasn't our intention,
but if that sticks out to me upon
re-reading the story, I certainly
can respect the sensitivity of
Realtors to whom name recog-
nition is significant.
As mentioned, we can't and
won't be doing front-page fea-


Senate.
It was a heady moment as the
aide to Sen. Nelson read the
legal verbiage of the official
proclamation.
As you might remember, Sen.
Nelson is pretty well known as
he had volunteered to blast off
into space on one of our space
shuttle launches in 1986.
Raymond, who is small in
stature, needed assistance to
step up and accept the official
U.S. Senate proclamation from
Sen. Bill Nelson.
The Bataan March survivor
said thanks and sat down next
to his wife.
He got a standing ovation


ture stories on everyone who
is heralded by their employer
for accomplishments of note.
We will do those stories and
put them on Page 1A when
deserving but what's of pri-
mary interest is the accom-
plishments, not the affilia-
tions.
Speaking of editorial
departments being independ-
ent from advertising depart-
ments, I really made myself
popular a couple decades ago
when I wrote a short feature
story about "time."
I was working in Venice,


from the crowd. Heck, he got
two standing ovations.
The crowd grew quiet as
Raymond took his seat and
looked upon his official procla-
mation from U.S. Sen. Bill
Nelson.
He then turned to his wife -
while looking at his Sen.
Nelson proclamation and
said: "I'm not familiar with the
guy."
And that, ladies and gentle-
men, was the moment of clarity
for the day.
Everyone giggled while the
representative from Sen.
Nelson's office was temporari-
ly speechless. .


Fla., and it was a pretty slow
news day, but there was space
in the paper that needed to be
filled.
My photographer friend and
I stopped by a clock shop
where she took pictures of
clocks of various shapes and
sizes while I spoke with the
store owners about what's on
people's minds when they're
looking to buy a clock.
It turned out to be a more
interesting photo/story spread
than I initially imagined.
When the publisher and
advertising director saw our


Steve Raymond is a real-life
American hero and it doesn't
really matter if Sen. Nelson,
President Bush or even the late
Gen. MacArthur gave him
recognition.
He's got things in perspec-
tive.
He survived the Bataan
Death March and is here in
2007 to talk about it
In my book, he can say any-
thing he wants.

Gerry Mulligan is the pub-
lisher of the Chronicle. His e-
mail address is gmulligan
@chronicleonline.com.


full-page spread, they took
notice, too.
Somehow we managed to do
a big, bold, full-page feature on
a store that owed my then-
newspaper a bundle of cash.
They were months behind in
advertising payments.
The store was out of busi-
ness a few months later. For
them, time ran out.

Charlie Brennan is editor of
the Citrus County Chronicle. He
can be e-mailed at cbrennan
@chronicleonline.com. "-


,l^ I

,4*"'"Copyrighted Material --_


S*Syndicated Conten

Available from Commercial News Providers"


IW III .. ____


4CStiNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2007


COMMENTARY


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNtcLE








RTI US O ( ) HRONICLE


Risky entry
I also calling in regards to the
ent ndb off Winn-Dixie that's off
ColRtyIROad 491. The caller today
sal someone could get killed. Well, I
am that someone, as yesterday a vehi-
cle drove directly towards me and we


c6uld have had a head-on
collision. He was trying to
make a left turn into the
entrance of the Winn-Dixie
complex. Something needs
tobe done before someone
gets killed, and that some-
one could be any one of us.
Worried mother


sot

I


I'm new in the neighbor- CALL--
hood .-a single mom with a 5A6
couple kids and I didn't 5 "
want to call the law, but
there's this guy who keeps
riding around the neighborhood with a
golf.-art. He's a young guy, mid-30s
... Like I said, I'm a single mom and
I'rti kind of scared, you know? Do we
have-any crime watch around here?
I'm not sure, but please print this.
-Editor's note: Call the sheriff's office
non-emergency number, 726-1121, and
ask for the number of your local commu-
nity resource office, which can tell you
about crime watch operations in your
neighborhood.
Leave them alone
I'm going to be like the little boy on
TV about Britney Spears. Please leave
Sheriff Dawsy and his deputies alone.
They're just doing their job. That's all
I'vp, got to say.
Sewer project
JJ liveJpn Chbassahowitzka where the
water and sewer is being placed now.
I would like to know why, at the end of
a dead-end street, there is a gated-in
yard and the street is actually on
paper as 80 feet into that property,
and I would like to know why nothing
is being graded there, nothing is
being planted there, nothing is being
done, I want to know why 80 feet of
the'street is not being considered as
part of the water and sewer, project.


.'


I'm paying taxes and I expect other
people to pay the fair share of their
taxes.
Switched off
This is to the person who wrote in
about the fact that they have a
burned-out light bulb and want to
know if they're being
I charged for electricity. I can't
imagine anybody not know-
ing the answer to that ques-
tion that even lives in the
United States. They must
come from an area where
they still use kerosene
lanterns and wood fires
' because I guess it's very
obvious that when you turn a
579n Q switch off, there's nothing
0t5iU flowing. If you don't have a
light bulb on, there's nothing
flowing. I don't see where
'the confusion lies that if a bulb is
burned out, that they feel that there's
electricity flowing. If that's the case,
then every switch in your house would
be totally useless.
Learn to swim
I'm a Citrus County school bus driv-
er. I just took the Crystal River
Elementary students to the Centennial
Pool for their third-grade swim.
They're all learning how to swim and I
think that's a fabulous idea. The $2 it
costs for this program is money very,
very well spent. With the amount of
water we have in this county, state
and the world, I think it's a wonderful
thing. These students should learn
how to swim. It should be part of the
FCAT or whatever, that before they
graduate, they need to know how to
swim. It's a great program.
Thanks for veto
Thank you, Mr. President for using
the power of a veto. A person who
makes $83,000 a year can't afford
health insurance? How absurd. A per-
son like myself, who only makes
$20,000, is disabled and sits in a
chair all day should have Medicare,
not a person making $83,000. Get rid
of your Escalades and your Excursion


Available


and such. Be more frugal. One more
time: Thank you, Mr. President, for
vetoing that bill. I'm disabled. I sit
here all day long in a chair or in the
bed. It took me five years to get
Medicare, five years to get my Social
Security after seven back operations.
And someone, how dare they say they
need medical coverage by the govern-
ment when they make $80,000 a year
and drive a luxury vehicle while I drive
a 1992 Chevrolet. Thank you, Mr.
President.
Sad-looking dog
Why bother? Why do you have a
beautiful dog tied up on a short
chain in the far corner of your back
yard? Give it to someone who can
provide love .and affection. This dog
looks so sad sitting out in the pour-
ing rain. I cannot go to the library
here in Inverness anymore. I can't


1 4



copyrighted NMaterial


Syndicated Coitent

from Commercial News Proi


r JT


look at these sad eyes. The more
people I know, the more I love my
dogs.
Open the channel
This is just a "thank you" to state
Sen. Charlie Dean for getting involved
in our water problems. I've always
respected the sheriff for his forth-
reaching view to the future, and it
seems that he hasn't changed. Give
'em hell, Charlie. And if you could get
the Orange State Channel open, I
can't understand why only the Leslie
Heifer is open. Now is the height of
rainy season. Pretty soon, it's going to
stop raining and they don't even have
the Orange State Channel feeding the
Floral City pool of lakes. That's ridicu-
lous. Somebody needs to get on them
and, senator, you have a lot of power.
I certainly don't have any power.
Thank you once again. Please see


viders"


V.


U. -
whtyucnd, n epu h


what you can do, and keep up the
good work.
Valet service
I'm calling in regard to the (valet)
services that have been provided by
the hospital. I am in just total shock
that the hospital can take this away
from the adjoining building. They
don't realize what it's like for some
of us that have to walk with oxygen
to try and find a parking space and
walk from there into the building.
This is one of the main reasons why
I go to the doctor there, or the doc-
tors there I have two. Why they can
take this away is more than I can
understand and it just burns me to a
fare-the-well. I don't care how it's
phrased, but just please continue to
put this in the paper. It's not only me
that's disgusted, but other people, as
well.


SUNDAY, OCTOBFR 14, 2007 SC


COMMENTARY


C CUNTY FL C


e


"(






CiTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SC SUNDAY. OCTOBER R14, 2007


Think About It-I

,et ome AMERICA'S BEST WARRANTY

10 YEAR/100,OOO MILE WARRANTY

5 Year/60,000 Mile Bumper To Bumper Coverage 5 Year Unlimited Miles 24 hr Roadside Assistance
*See dealer for LIMITED WARRANTY details."The Hyundai AdvantageTM"


2 008 SONATA GLS
A/C Power Windows & Locks
Stereo w/CD* Airbags* Electronii
Stability Control





OWN FOR ,,mw _,_i_


SEATS 7 ADULTS
IN 3 ROWS


I A ASYAA IFI01AewprAAscae


2008 Accent: $99 per me. x 6 mos, remaining 69 mos. at $249 moe. 2007 Elantra: $149 per me. x 6 mos, remaining 69 mos. at $299 mo. 2007 Tiburon: $169 per mo. x 6 mos, remaining 69 mos. at $319 me. All E-Z Pay
2007 TUCSON I 2007 SANTA FE GLS 12007 ENTOURAGE I


a-ift- NTA


Model #80423 Model #61423 Model #90522 2 5 1
Air Conditioning 2 0 Power Windows & 2 World's Most
Power Windows & Locks .- Locks* AM/FM/CD Equipped
AM/FM Stereo CD I Stereo Minivan M
Nicely Equipped


|Ni, 990 S16,990 18,990
All offers with approved credit and cannot be combined. Prices shown are before any dealer installed options and plus tax, tag & $599 dealer fee. All prices include all manufacturers rebates and incentives. Veracruz G
due at signing. EZ Pay Payments are based on 75 months @ 7% apr, with approved credit. Requires 720+ Beacon. Advertised vehicles are subject to prior sale. Program subject to change without notice. ** This poli
anfun.eod uith return nnliiv


NE


& AIAB


i vy




EW 2007 VERACRUZ



























i E-Z PAY



ments require only tax, tag & $599 doc fee down.
2007 AZERA







Model72402del

Beautifully Equipped ABS* Auto
SFull Power* Air* Traction & i
Stability Control Alloy Wheels b
More



LS lease x 24 mos. requires $2995 plus tax, tag & dealer doc fee
cy Is in place to ensure customer satisfaction and should not be


SALE PRICE ..................$5,990
YOUR CASH OR TRADE ,,.$2,500


SALEPRICE.................$12,990
YOUR CASH OR TRADE ...$2,500
H5563A DOUBLE..................... $2,500
w lAls f I.V1/:,


1990 FORD ESCORT
H6000A $990
1995 JEEP 4X4 GRAND CHEROKEE
H5483B $990
1997 KIA SPORTAGE
H57268 $990
2001 KIA SPECTRA
H59388 $990
1994 HONDA ACCORD
H4378B $990
1997 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY
H5717A $1,990
1999 BUICK REGAL
H5936A $1,990
2001 CHEVEROLET BLAZER
PHi900A $1,990
2003 PONTIAC GRAND AM
H5918B $2,990
2000 DODGE INTREPID
H5882A $3,990


2000 TOYOTA RUNNER
H6043A
2001 MAZDA TRIBUTE
PH1883
2004 NISSAN SENTRA
PH1857A
2002 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA XL
H6004A
2005 HYUNDAI ACCENT G
H5584A
2005 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
H5754A
2005 CHRYSLER SEBRING
H5833A
2007 FORD TAURUS
H5561A
2005 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
PH1863A
2003 DODGE CARAVAN
PH1868


$4,990
$4,990
$6,990
$6,990
$7,990
$7,990
$8,990
$8,990
$8,990
$8,990


2003 FORD RANGER
H5677A
2004 HYUNDAI SONATA
H5824A
2004 HYUNDAI XG350 4D
H5915A
2004 NISSAN FRONTIER
PH1865
2002 FORD F-150 4D
PH1870
2005 HYUNDAI SONATA G
H5546A
2004 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
H5338B
2004 CHEVY SILVERADO X-CAB
H5647A
2004 MERCURY MONTEREY
PH1869A
2005 CHEVY IIVMPALA L
H5117A


$8,990
$9,990
$9,990
$9,990
$9,990
$10,990
$11,990
$11,990
$11,990
$11,990


2005 HONDA ACCORD DX
PH1887A
2005 FORD RANGER
PH1885
2005 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
PH1825
2004 LINCOLN LS ULTIMATE
H3701A
2006 HYUNDAI TUCSON L
H5641A
2006 MITSUBISI ENDEAVOR
PH1830
2007 TOYOTA CAMRY XL
H5917A
2006 HONDA ODYSSEY
H5976A
HUNDREDS
TO CHOOSE


All prices shown are after doubling your $2500 cash or trade equity down and are plus tax, tag & dealer fee of $599. Cash doubling comes In the form of price reduction. Limit one trade-in per purchase. Jenkins Hyundai will match your cash down up to a combined total of $5000;
Artwork Is for illustration purposes only All oilers are with approved credit and expire close of business date of publication. Offers can not be combined. You have the right to exchange your vehicle. If you return your vehicle to the dealership within 3 days from purchase date and with
Less than 300 miles from the mileage at time of delivery. This exchange policy is in place to guarantee customer satisfaction and should not be confused with return policy. Programs subject to change without notice.


$11,990
$12,990
$12,990
$13,990
$15,990
$16,990
$16,990
$21,990
MOM
FROM!


qmp znouNt.)AY, %-pt-l"ur-K -, / -1,,,-- 111, k-/


5.Star Safety Rating NHTSA,


***16 star-Safiet A N
yl ating HTSA


Ll


IP-V









CHAMBER CONNECTION 2D
BUILDER CONNECTION 4D
BUSINESS DIGEST 5D
CLASSIFIEDS 6D


D
SUNDAY
OCTOBER 14, 2007
www.chronicleonline.corn


AACITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Scott Toomey has a mobile massage unit, a traveling spa, with a massage chair and water massage machine. Misty McMann gets instructions on operation of
the water pressure and how to start and stop the machine from massaging.

Mobile massage business brings rest and relaxation to area workplaces and homes
NANCY KENNEDY
nkennedy@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle k.


Scott Toomey, owner of My Time moblie
machine massage, has touched on one of the first
rules of business: Identify a need and find a way to
fill it.
The need in this case is for busy, stressed-out
people to experience 15 minutes of relaxation
through massage.
With a touch-free Aqua Massage machine, a full-
body massage chair and a foot massager, soothing
music, relaxing video nature scenes and a natural,
organic "spa-like" decor all inside an air-condi-
tioned trailer, Toomey offers a brief respite for
busy people delivered to their
For further door.
information "People are running all over
about the place or they can't get out or
My Time don't want to travel, so I thought
mobile it might be neat to bring this to
machine them," he said.
massage, Ideally, he wants to offer this
call Scott service to local businesses. He
Toomey at drives up, opens the doors of his
586-6955. trailer and customers or employ-
ees can enjoy 15 minutes of
touch-free massage.
In his first few days of taking his business on the
road, he drove up to Citrus Motor Sports in Crystal
River where he met Anne Pope, retired local busi-
nesswoman.
"I was so impressed with the 'portable massage'
and the way he put everything together and
Scott's enthusiasm, to bring relaxation directly to
individuals and businesses," she said.
Pope's son, Alan, owns Citrus Motor Sports.
Pope said as a former businesswoman, she saw
the benefit of an employer using this service as a
motivator and a morale boost for employees.
'"As I talked with Scott, we kicked around ideas
for marketing, like taking it to the EDC barbecue
and things like that," she said.
One of the biggest draws to his business, Toomey
said there's no disrobing and no touching
involved, the two things many people shy away
from when it comes to traditional massage.


Water is pounded down across the back of the person receiving the massage. A thick barrier between the
person and the water allows the person to stay dry and come out refreshed.


My Time massage is done completely by
machine.
As Toomey offered a guest a seat in his massage
chair, he said, "I love that chair! I knew that mas-
sage chairs had come a long way, and I wanted the
best. I sat in about 12 different chairs and this one
gives the best chair massage that I've experienced."
The chair cost him $5,000.
A person begins the spa experience with a chair
massage and a leg massage, then goes on to the
main event the Aqua Massage machine.
Using dry hydrotherapy, a person lies on his or
her stomach inside the machine (it looks like a tan-
ning bed) while 36 spray water jets travel the full
length of the body, massaging three sides of the body
- without the person getting wet A nylon barrier
keep the person dry, while still benefitting from the


pressure of the jet spray.
The unit cost $35,000.
"I was at a fitness trade show in Vegas in
November and saw it," Toomey said. The vendor
had the unit on display in a white trailer, which
Toomey described as cold and clinical, but it gave
him the idea for his mobile salon, or traveling spa.
"I wanted to make it so you don't even know
you're in a trailer," he said, pointing out the details
in the decor the bamboo on one wall, the amber
track lighting controlled by a dimmer switch, the
pumpkin- and cream-colored fabric panels, the con-
temporary Asian-influence wall sculptures, the
breeze provided by floor fans, the instrumental
music.
Please see PRESSURE/Page 5D


Checking in on Wal-Mart's discount drug programs


, JA r,
Stephanie Nelson
COUPON
MOM


Last year, I wrote about the
new discounted generic
drug program introduced
by Wal-Mart. The original pro-
gram provided $4 prescriptions
for a 30-day supply of about 300
drugs. At the time, Wal-Mart had
tested the program in Florida and
then expanded it nationwide.
Other national drugstore chains
and regional grocery store chains
responded by offering their own
discounted drug programs. Some
retailers, such as Publix, began
offering free prescriptions for
selected drugs. The winners of


this pricing competition were the
shoppers who took advantage of
these programs.
Although Wal-Mart pharmacies
would automatically extend the
$4 prescription price to any quali-
fying prescription, many compet-
ing pharmacies would only
extend the price if the customer
knew to ask for a price match. I
am sure that many customers did
not know that their pharmacies
had price matching available, and
they most likely paid more than
they needed to for qualifying pre-
scriptions. It pays to ask your


pharmacy what their generic drug
policy is.
Critics of Wal-Mart's program
pointed out that many of the drugs
on the list were not commonly
used, or they were available in a
form that was not commonly used.
However, Wal-Mart reports that
even though the original list of
drugs was limited to about 300
generic choices, the original ver-
sion of the program saved con-
sumers $610 million in prescrip-
tion costs in its first year. I believe
that number is actually higher if
we consider the additional sav-


ings realized by shoppers who
took advantage of competitors'
pricing responses.
There are two improvements to
Wal-Mart's second phase of their
program. First, the expanded list
of participating drugs in Phase 2
includes drugs for glaucoma,
attention deficit disorders, fungal
infections and acne. Fertility and
prescription birth control will
also be included at $9, compared
to national average prices ranging
from $24 to $30 per month, accord-
Please see COUPON/Page 5D


Rental


car gas


racket
DEAR BRUCE: We just
returned from vacation
and will be taking
another short trip in a couple
of months. On our last trip, we
rented a car. Among all of the
tacked-on extras: Buying a full
tank of gas. What do you think
about purchasing gas from the
rental agency? Oftentimes, try-
ing to find a gas station at the
major airports is nearly impos-
sible, and it is also a bit more
expensive. Reader, via e-
mail
DEAR READER: It can be a
good deal, but usually it is not.
The genius who thought this
up should be rewarded with a
million-dollar bonus from the
rental companies. They are
selling the same gallon of gas
for many times the actual
price, so the profit has to be
remarkable. In other words,
you'll probably have at the
very least a couple of gal-
lons remaining in the tank
when you return the car. Who
wants to drive with an empty
tank in a strange city? If you
are not driving great distances,
there is a good chance you
might leave a half of tank in
there, which will be sold to the
next traveler. If, on the other
hand, you know you are going
to be driving substantial dis-
tances and you want to chance
driving it down to near empty,
it's much more convenient
when returning the car. It is
only a good deal if you are
going to burn at least a full
tank of gas and you have the
ability to track what you need
so you don't run out on some
busy highway approaching the
airport.
DEAR BRUCE: I know that
a filed will is public knowl-
edge, but can a person get a
copy of the will after the pro-
bate is finalized? Reader,
via e-mail
DEAR READER: In most
cases, the answer is yes. I am
reluctant to say this is true in
every instance. Check with the
surrogate in the county where
the will has been probated. It
is on file for a number of years
with the surrogate's court.
Wills, as you know, are public
documents and can be pur-
chased for a modest fee.
DEAR BRUCE: My mother
is thinking about buying a new
home. After listening to you on
the radio for years and reading
your column every week, I
have told her to use an inde-
pendent inspector and a pri-
vate lawyer for the closing, and
not to let the lending bank use
whomever they choose. She
said not to worry she "trusts
them." Could you please go
over the reasons why NOT to
use what the bank offers?
Maybe then she will listen to
me. T.P., via e-mail
DEAR T.P.: There are
dozens of reasons not to trust
these folks. Which is not to say
they are all dishonest; nothing
is further from the truth.
However, their interests and
your mom's are not necessarily
parallel. She should have the
building appropriately
inspected and use an attorney
who ONLY represents her.
Indeed, it's incumbent on her
to be certain that she is pro-
tected as much as possible.
There are obviously no
absolutes, but to walk into a
deal with the idea that she
"trusts them" is the height of
folly
DEAR BRUCE: Some time
ago, I worked for a company
and have a small pension com-
Please see MONEY/Page 5D


* ., 2~' 1~.







Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


SUNDAY
Oc' 1OBER 14, 2007


(hUmber


EonnEction


~'~~'L


S'.n R e t.ur-. an-.;; '. -L-. .. ":, ..T .
..*- - .--. .r : ,,',%;,' ;^-.... ^'.:. ?<^y ,L .^ ;"': J '*t ,,: '' =J'.i :%' .:


Cha ber Schiano's Restaurant
Chamber




members




mix it up


Monthly mixings with
members....that's
something you can
take to the bank. Literally.
Summer is over, vacations are
finished and it is time to get


back to business.
mixer of the sea-
son will be held
from 5:30 to 7
p.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 16 at Nature
Coast Bank in
Hernando.
After hour mix-
ers provide a
focused, struc-
tured networking
opportunity for
Chamber mem-
bers in a casual
and friendly
atmosphere.
These events are


Our first


low business professionals.
Attend one of the Chamber's
most popular networking
events. Relax after work, meet
friends and establish new con-
tacts each month.
Nature Coast Bank is locat-


* WHAT: Chamber
mixer.
* WHEN: 5:30 to
7 p.m. Tue-day, Oct.
16.
* WHERE: Nature
Coast Bank in
Hernando
* GET INFO: Call on .
of the Chamber
offices at 795.3149
or 726-2801.


great for new members, as
well as long-standing mem-
bers; to make strategic con-
tacts and enjoy time with fel-


ed at 2455 N
Citrus Hills Blvd
in Hernando.
They recently
renovated and
moved into the
old Ted Williams
Museum. Come
out, welcome
them to the
neighborhood
and see the
great new design
of their building.
There is no
charge to attend
this event. For


more information, please call
one of the Chamber offices at
795-3149 or 726-2801. We look
forward to seeing you there.


JIM SHIELDS/Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for Schiano's Restaurant. Pictured front row left to right: Not Pictured
Antimo Schiano Owner, Chamber Ambassador Lillian Smith, Carlo D'Alesio Chef/Co-Owner, Monica Trebing, Chamber
Ambassadors Jennifer Duca and Rhonda Lestinsky. Pictured back row: Chamber Ambassador John Porter, Chamber Executive Director
Kitty Barnes, Chamber Ambassadors David Heinz and Wendy Hall. Schiano's is family owned and operated and open for business serv-
ing lunch from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and dinner from 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. Monday Saturday and Sunday is dinner only. They have mouth-
watering Italian cuisine from gourmet pizzas to classic pasta dishes. They are conveniently located at 1546 US Highway 41 N. in
Inverness. For more information, call (352) 344-0024.


Homosassa Airboat Tours


JOIN THE FUN
* WHAT: Fall Costume Ball (No scary costumes please).
* WHEN: 8 to 11 p.m. Friday, Oct. 27.
* WHERE: School Of Dance Arts, 301 North Apopka Ave.,
Inverness
* PRICE: Tickets are $10. Must be purchased by Friday, Oct..
19. Parents are free.
. GET INFO: (352) 637-4663.AII proceeds will go towards the
*.-school's pro.Juction of the "Nutcracker".







www.citruscountychamber.com q



Shepherd of the Hill's Light

Shine slates presentation


Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church's Light
Shine presents "A Short
History of Florida," present-
ed by Dr. Michael Gannon,
Professor Emeritus, Dept. of
History, University of Florida.
The presentation will be at 4
p.m. Sunday, Oct. 14, at the
Beverly Hills Recreation


Association Center. The pres-
entation covers 500 years of
Florida history in a most
engaging and entertaining
way. From the early Spanish
colonists to German sub-
marines off the Atlantic coast,
Dr. Gannon makes Florida
history come alive in 60 min-
utes. Admission is free.


If you are unhappy with your missing teeth
or unstable dentures, this seminar is for you!


;?b~5 ~


-"4e


S- - - - - -

FREE SEMINAR!
I Wed., October 17 at I
6:00pm
Citrus Hills Country Club .
I Garden Room I
Learn about the latest
innovative techniques in
dental implants.
, Refreshments Served -
LIMITED SEATING I
|


Implants... the best CALL FOR YOUR
replacement option ESERVATIONS NOW!
for missing Teeth. I 564-0325
1- -- -- -- -- --
j Michael Hashemian, DMD, MD
Boasd Certified Oral &I Muillofaaal Surgeon T-IE
1 plormnua imL>an fio-r. 10 Ren
Oral & lailnh).la ii Surgery /t ,
I r1 1 'i.4 u 1m1 0,Ln '1o, lH on' O N r

352-564-0325 \ ,-,
S 16EH.,lIu __..352 -564-325 COSMETIC -SURERY INSTITU
163 SE Sw 19 Crvyral ver n'w t a nsc=l ***-., ,


I
I
I


JIM SHIELDS/Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for Homosassa Airboat Tours. Pictured bottom row: Chamber
Ambassadors John Porter and David Heinz. Pictured middle row: Chamber Ambassadors Jennifer Duca, Chuck Morgan and Rhonda
Lestinsky. Pictured top row: Tina Rogers and Capt. Chuck Dean. Homosassa Airboat Tours have one of the most modern and biggest
single-party airboats on Florida's Nature Coast. Capt. Chuck is a native Floridian and has been exploring this area for over 40 years. He
knows all the neat places of interest on the Homosassa River and adjacent waterways. He has held a U.S.C.G Master License for over
20 years. The airboat is a one-of-a-kind custom built airboat, built by Floral City Airboats and is equipped with many safety features. Ear
protection is also provided to everyone on the boat. Their tours are private and exclusive in the waters of Homosassa, Ozello and Crystal
River. The minimum cost is $200 for 11/2 hour trip for up to six people. Sunset tours are also offered. To schedule an appointment,
call (352) 634-0785 or for more information visit them on the web at www.homosassaairboat.com.



Member News


ERA American Realty &
Investments is proud to announce
the latest production levels
achieved by several of its agents
through September 2007. In the
company's Inverness office, Kathy
Varga has'achieved the over $1
million dollar mark. Annie Adams
has reached over the $1 million
dollar mark for the company's
Homosassa office. Alan DeMichael
of the Beverly Hills office has also
reached the over $1 million dollar
mark. Jackie Davis, Inverness
office, has achieved the over $4
million dollar mark thus far in 2007.
ERAAmerican Realty is proud to
recognize the achievements of
these fine Real Estate
Professionals.
ERA American Realty and
Investments, a fixture in downtown
Inverness since 1980, has
announced an expansion of its
business hours. Effective immedi-
ately, the real estate office, located
at 117 S. Highway 41, will be open
until 8 p.m. Monday through
Thursday. This is in addition to its
regular business hours which are
8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday and 10 a.m. to


3 p.m. Sunday.
"In extending our weekday busi-
ness hours until 8 p.m., we hope to
better serve the needs of our cus-
tomers," stated John Finley, sales
manager. "As we know that many
people, due to work and family
considerations, are not available
during daytime hours. We invite
those people to stop by or call our
office now as their schedules per-
mit."
ERA American Realty, a Top 50
ERA Company nationally, has
served the real estate needs of
Citrus County since 1980. The
office is located in downtown
Inverness at 117 S. Highway 41 or
may be reached by phone at 726-
5855.
Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park will be offering two more
in its popular series of Gardening
with Native Florida Plants
Workshop on Wednesday, October
10 and on Wednesday, October
17, 2007. Marion Knudsen, a Park
volunteer, will be presenting the
program at the Wildlife Park in the
Garden Pavilion in the Garden of
the Springs, from 9:30 a.m. until
noon. If you are interested in


attending the gardening workshop,
please call the park's office at (352)
628-5343, ext. 1015, Monday
through Friday. Space is limited, so
be sure to register early. Regular
park admission will apply. Current
season pass holders may use their
season's pass to be admitted to
the park, but must still call to regis-
ter.
ME
Birding expert Dick Blewett will
be offering his popular Birding
Basics class in the Florida Room at
the Visitor Center of the
Homosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park. The six-week course begins
from 3 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16.
Besides the classroom work, stu-
dents will have opportunities to put
their new birding skills to work on
Saturday morning field trips to a
variety of birding trails around
Citrus County. Blewett will provide
bird watching basics on Florida bird
life and explain the basic tools of
the trade. If students already have
binoculars, they should bring them
to the first class. If not, Blewett will
give advice on purchasing the most
suitable binoculars for birding.
National Geographic Field Guide to
the Birds of North America, Fifth


Edition is the required text that will
be used for the course. Students
will also need a small spiral-bound
notebook (similar in size to the field
guide). If you are interested in
attending the Birding Basics class,
please contact Susan Strawbridge
at (352) 628-5343, ext. 1002, as
soon as possible since space is
limited. For more information about
Florida's award-winning state parks,
visit www.FloridaStateParks.org.
M E
The JCPenney Afterschool Fund
is awarding grants to Boys & Girls
Club of Citrus County in an effort to
increase access for youth currently
without access or on the verge
of losing access to after school
programs due to a lack of financial
resources. Recent studies show
that 14.3 million children in the
U.S. are unsupervised between the
hours and 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. each
day. These grants will allow chil-
dren, who could otherwise be at
risk for destructive behavior,
access to safe, enriching and edu-
cational after school programs. The
three locations in the Citrus County
serve more than 700 youth each
year. For more information, visit
our web site at www.citrusbgc.com


wwwaanywagiannsmumcom


ET[
H







Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


([hmber


connectionl


SUNDAY
OCTOBER 14, 2007


E ,,I* I, I, J M '111911 1 11 F l


Wireless Zone


Masons find



new home


JIM SHIELDS/Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for Wireless Zone. Pictured above: Chamber Ambassador, Nancy
Coffey, Jerod Shay Manager, Chamber Ambassadors, Jennifer Duca, David Heinz, Chuck Morgan, and John Porter (not pictured Kim
Shay Owner). Wireless Zone is a family owned and operated Verizon Wireless authorized retailer. They excel in customer service by
offering one-on-one personal assistance for all of your wireless service needs. Visit Kim or son, Jarod Shay at their new location at 2418
N. Hwy 44 in Inverness or call (352) 637-1234.


Ridge Masonic Lodge
No. 398 was started
because several of our
members had trouble driving
at night. We solved that prob-
lem by starting a Day-Light
Lodge in "Beautiful Down-
Town Beverly Hills," the epi-
center of "senior" Masons in
Citrus County. We got off to a
rather good start, what with
several members
being "Past We are
Masters" and
having a good our eight
idea of how
things should as a Loc
work One of the are now
minor difficul- are now
ties we had to at Sp
overcome was
that the Florida Lodg
Ritual is a little
different than Homo
what most of us
were used to, Spril
each state having
its own method.
It wasn't anything we couldn't
overcome, it was a slight hin-
drance to some of us, but we all
managed to get around fairly
well and can now hold a candle
to the best of them.
We are now in our eighth
year as a Lodge and are now
located at Springs Lodge in
Homosassa Springs. Our first


)r

I
S
n


meeting place was the Rev. Dr.
Jack Steele Hall at the Beverly
Hills Community Church
where several of our members
attended. Things were fine
there until they expanded
their youth program and need-
ed the storage room where we
kept our paraphernalia. They
offered us an outside storage
shed, but we felt that it would
be too much of a
nOW in burden on the few
that were physi-
th year cally able to carry
ie and the equipment
ge and d back and forth, so
located we decided to
look for another
rings meeting place.
Springs Lodge in
e in Homosassa
seemed to fit the
iassa bill and so it was
voted by all to
Igs. move. It was a
most fortuitous
move for both
Lodges, we needing a home
and they were looking to utilize
their building a little more.
We now have our meetings at
9:30 a.m. on the first Monday of
the month, except June, July
and August Coffee and dough-
nuts are in ample supply and
all Masons, young and older
are welcome.


Chamber is ready Make a Difference Day: Don't Mess with Citrus County!
On Saturday Oct 27 Hi hwa 44 from dis la will encoura e local drive s


for Christmas


Your Citrus County Chamber' White & Blue Christmas," hon-,
of Commerce is already fi the boring those that served and are
holiday season. Get ready for serving our country.
two patriotic Christmas Applications for both events
parades. The first one of the are now available at the
season will take place at 3:30 Chamber offices. Those that
p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1 in Crystal were in the parade last year
River. The theme of this year's will automatically be mailed
parade is "A Stars & Stripes an application. If you would
Christmas." The downtown like an application emailed to
Inverness Christmas parade you, please email us at ccom-
will take place at noon mercel@tampabay.rr.com. For
Saturday, Dec. 8. The theme for more information, call the
this year's parade is '"A Red Inverness office at 726-2801.



Chamber thanks


Adams Homes


Thank you to this month's
Chamber Breakfast sponsor
Adams Homes of NW Florida.
Adams Homes of NW Florida
business office is located at
6103 Deltona Blvd., in Spring
Hill. For more information on
Adams Homes, they can be
reached at 352-382-4955. The
Chamber breakfast will be
held at 7:45 a.m. Wednesday,
Oct. 17, at Golden Corral in
Inverness. Call 352-726-2801


* WHAT: Chamber breakfast.
* WHEN: Wednesday, Oct.
17.
WHERE: Golden Corral in
Inverness.
GET INFO: Call 352-725-
2801 or 352 795-3149 to
make reservations.

or 352-795-3149 for your
reservation.


Center Theatre



to hold review


The Citrus County Center
Theatre for the Performing
Arts Foundation will present
an International Dance and
Music Review from 3 to 5
p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 20 at
Curtis Peterson Auditorium
located in Lecanto.
Doors will open at 2 p.m.
An added bonus will include
art exhibits from Spain and
Russia. Additional high-
lights of the event include
Maestro Miguel Arrabal per-
forming his exquisite
Argentine music along with
the great concert guitarist
Fabio Zini and a host of
other musicians and
dancers,
Also featured will be
Curra Alba the "Soul of
Spain's Flamenco Dancing,"
along with noted tango
dancer Nelson Avila. Local
artists include Ronnie's


Fine Academy of Dance and
singers Kevin Coward and
Merry Williams.
The performance will ben-
efit United Way of Citrus
County and Hospice of
Citrus County. General
admission tickets are $20
and may be purchased by
calling' 352-382-1929. They
are also available by visiting
the Hospice of Citrus County
Beverly Hill Clinical Office
located at 4005 N. Lecanto
Hwy in Beverly Hills. The
event is sponsored by the
Citrus County Chronicle.
A number of door prizes
will be given away to lucky
ticket holders in recognition
of their support. For addi-
tional information, call the
Citrus County Center
Theatre for the Performing
Arts Foundation at (352) 382-
1929.


V11 OULUJ Y, VUL 611, J g I 11-U111
Crystal River to Inverness and Ft Island
Gulf Beach will be filled with hundreds of
volunteers cleaning up the environment on
Make a Difference Day The organizers of
this event are not only hoping to clean up the
litter along the main thoroughfare in the
county but also provide education to drivers
on how litter and cigarette butts make a
mess of our beautiful county. Educational
signs will be posted along the highway for
local residents. Also eco-green bags of litter
will be piled at the gates of the county land-
fill so the public can see how much litter is
thrown onto our roads. Hopefully this visual


ptUlziptJ vyW iULl ..urgt l.Vca.t Ut A v V. W tJkj
in keeping litter off the roadways. Native
trees will also be planted at Ft Island Gulf
Beach to beautify and someday provide
shade to future beach goers.
The four-hour cleanup will begin at the
Citrus County Resource Center in Lecanto
at 7:30 AM on Saturday, October 27 with a
continental breakfast provided by Publix.
After a welcome from the organizing com-
munity partners and a safety briefing, volun-
teer teams will be dispatched by buses to
assign sections of the Highway 44. Families
with children will go by bus to Ft Island Gulf
Beach. The first 300 volunteers to register


SHARE News


The Share Club is a social
group that provides members with
free or low cost health screenings,
area discounts, travel and so much
more. Since the club's motto is
"Promoting Good Health," there
i are many local doctors, nurses and
healthcare professionals scheduled
to speak to members on a variety
of subjects in October.
SHARE offers blood
pressure screening
From 10 to 11am every Friday in
the Share Club Auditorium, a vol-
unteer nurse will be available to
check your blood pressure. Share
Club members only. No appoint-
ments.
Swallowing difficulties
discussed in program
Swallowing problems may often
result from medical conditions
including stroke,
Parkinson's dis- Anyone iI
ease and cancer.
A new speech in joini
therapy program
is helping patients Share C
regain their ability
to swallow. call 34
Please join us to to bec
learn more about
this disorder from mem
1 to 2 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 16,
in the Share Club Auditorium. The
program will be presented by
Bruce Getz, who has a bachelors
degree in Health Education from
the University of Florida and a
masters degree in Health and
Physical Education.
Alzheimer's Disease
session slated
Alzheimer's is a disease of the
brain that causes problems with
memory, thinking and behavior. It
is not a normal part of aging.
Although symptoms can vary wide-
ly, the first problem many people
notice is forgetfulness severe
enough to affect their ability to
function at home or at work. Jerry


n
ii





4


Fisher, an Alzheimer's Association
program specialist, will join us for
an informative session on this
topic. He will discuss causes and
risk factors, how to find out if it's
Alzheimer's, stages of the disease,
treating the symptoms and much
more. From 10 to 11 a.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 23, in the Share Club
Auditorium.
Heart healthy eating
discussion to be held
Penny Davis, RD LD, a dietitian
at Citrus Memorial will discuss the
healthy way to eat to prevent heart
disease and improve your general
health. This is an on-going monthly
presentation. Reservation only. At
2 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 17, in the
Share Club Auditorium. Please call
our reservation line at 560-6266.
Helpful SHINE Volunteers
The SHINE Volunteers are at
the Share Club
interested office every
Monday morning
ng the to counsel and
assist Florida's
lub can Medicare benefici-
aries with addi-
4-6513 tional information
omne a regarding their
ome a claims and
ber. Medicare ques-
tions. Reservation
only. Please call
our reservation line at 560-6266.
Program to offer
diabetes answers
Many patients and families have
questions about diabetes. This is
your chance to ask a professional
questions such as: "Can I avoid
getting diabetes?" and "How do I
deal with cooking?" This hour is for
anyone with questions. No reserva-
tions are needed. The program is
at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24,
at the CMHS Administration build-
ing (old high school) in the Cypress
Room. Call 344-6513 for directions.
Anyone interested in joining the
Share Club can call 344-6513 to
become a member.


County!" tee shirt, a voucher for a tree
sapling, and an eco-friendly shopping bag
that shoppers can use in place of using plas-
tic bags that fill our landfill or paper bags
that cut down our trees. At noon, Wal-Mart
Super Center will roast hot-dogs for the vol-
unteers back at the Citrus County Resource
Center WYKE will also be interviewing and
filming volunteers making Citrus County a
better place to live!
Volunteers are still being accepted!
Registration forms may be down loaded
from the United Way web site: www.cit-
rusunitedwayorg.


AVEDA
At Aveda Concept Salons,
fresh new talent connects
you with the latest trends
in cut, color and style.
Personalized service with
pure plant based
products care for you
and the Earth.
Awarded TOP 200 Salon
in U.S. 2007.
As seen in Marie Claire
Magazine.


ABITADE DPADIS Day (Spa &eSalon
Hwy 44 Crystal River Next to Publix Plaza 563-0011 |




ALABAMA POWER COMPANY
Insured Monthly Notes due October 15, 2037*

Alabama Power, a wholly-owned subsidiary of The Southern
Company, is a regulated public utility engaged in the generation,
transmission, distribution and sale of electric energy within an
approximately 44,500 square mile service area comprising most
of the State of Alabama.
I Expected Yield: 6.00%
1 AAA/Aaa Rated by Standard & Poor's/Moody's
Edward Jones is pleased to be a selling agent for this offering.
For further information and a copy of the prospectus, call your local
financial advisor today, or visit us at www.edwardjones.com.

TCallable at 100.00% on or after 10/15/12.
These notes are being offered only by the prospectus. This ad shall not constitute an offer
to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy, nor shall there be any sale of these securities
in any state in which an offer, solicitation or sale would be unlawful prior to the registration
or qualification under the securities laws of such state. Subject to availability and
price change.
No offer to buy the securities can be accepted and no part of the purchase price can be -
received until the registration statement has become effective, and any such offer may be
withdrawn or revoked, without obligation or commitment of any kind, at any time prior to
notice of its acceptance given after the effective date.


Karl Purcell Cralg
Wllams O'D1ll
46M. Sa-e"e fV. 3I SO. Il.& I4.
e28-3466 798-1811


Stephen John Wann Van Jason
Kuhn Breese Roblnson Worley
795-1811 527.0606 344-8189 344.8189


ScottL.
Lee
IN W A
k,-
8W60230


M AK I N G S UEN S [6o r IN V S T N


connect with style.


www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC


9









Promotional information from the Citrus County Builders Association


4D

SUNDAY
OCTOBER 14, 2007


Builders


Honn Etion


S :'" Citrus County Builders Associdt, '. '


President installed


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Builders Association welcomes new President Michael Moberley. The Installation Banquet was Sept. 29 at Black
Diamond Ranch. Commissioner John Thurmston did the honor of installing Moberley into his term as President of the CCBA.
For many years, Michael Moberley has been an active and vocal supporter of the local, state and national home building indus-
try. Here in Citrus County, Tropical Window President Mike Moberley is well known by his peers having served as President of
the CCBA (Citrus County Builders Association) for the 2002-03 period, and currently President of the Association, was chosen
as the Builder of the Year for 2002, a Lifetime Director and has achieved "Life Spike" status within the CCBA. On a state level,
Mike serves on the State Board for Governmental Affairs for the FHBA (Florida Home Builders Association). He is Past President
of the Citrus County chapter of the AAF (Aluminum Association of Florida) and currently serves as State President for 2006 and
2007 of the Aluminum Association of Florida. Mike Moberley has a passion for our water and waterways. He has been appoint-
mented by the Governor to serve as the Chairman of the Citrus Waterway Restoration Tax Force.




Lecanto business receives award

Schlabach Security and Sound Inc. earns Electronic Lifestyles Designer

award fom International Trade Association


Plan to visit the


Parade of Homes

Event will run through Oct. 28
Come see more than 25 new homes and innovations in
home building as you tour through beautiful Citrus
County. Enter for a chance to win 1 of more than 25 door
prizes valued at more than $100 each.
Even hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday
and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday


CCBA upcoming events
Oct. 20 Fall Parade of Homes. Awards Banquet
Oct 25 GMM6pm
Nov. 3 and 4 Home and Outdoor Show
Nov. 29 General Membership Meeting. 6 p.m.



Home and Outdoor Show

coming soon to Crystal River
The CCBA's annual Home and Outdoor Show will be 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3 and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday Nov. 4 at the
Crystal River National Guard Armory. Advertising and booths
are still available for the event
The event is free, open to the public and will feature indoor
and outdoor displays.Home Depot will offer workshops for both
children and adults and a special home remodeling seminar is
also scheduled for a full day of hands-on learning experiences.


Thank you, sponsor


INDIANAPOLIS The
Custom Electronic Design &
Installation Association
(CEDIA) has honored
Schlabach Security and Sound,
Inc. for excellence in the design
and installation of electronic
systems. CEDIA's Electronic
Lifestyles Designer Awards are
considered the most presti-
gious awards program for the
$10 billion residential electron-
ic systems industry.
Work submitted for the
Electronic Lifestyles Designer
Awards is completed in con-
sumer homes around the world
in the following categories:
home theaters, integrated
homes, media rooms, hidden
installations and more.
Submissions range from
$40,000 single-room projects to
whole-house integration sys-
tems that carry price tags top-
ping $3 million.
Schlabach was selected as a
Bronze Award winner for Best
Technical Design in a Large
Home Theater, Level II. The
Home Theater was installed in
a newly built residence in
Citrus Hills during 2007. The
client envisioned a stylish, sim-
ple to operate theater that
would contain the sound within
the room. The huge viewing
screen and 7.1 surround sound
audio, combined with two rows


Jarey Schlabach is pictured above.


of seating, allows a comfortable
and enhanced cinematic expe-
rience.
Winners were selected by
two qualified panels which
evaluated submissions based
on both the technical merits
and the design/aesthetics. The
technical panel consisted of
five CEDIA residential elec-
tronic systems contractor mem-
bers and the design panel
included members from the
American Institute of
Architects and the American
Society of Interior Designers.
The winning project submit-


ted by Schlabach Security and
Sound is published in the
Electronic Lifestyles Designer
Awards Book with color images
and essay explanations of the
project's challenges and prod-
ucts used. Schlabach will also
be featured in an upcoming
issue of CEDIA's Electronic
Lifestyles magazine. Electronic
Lifestyles magazine is a high
quality publication that pro-
vides architects, builders and
interior designers as well as
consumers a great resource to
learn about residential elec-
tronic systems.


"Being recognized by CEDIA
and receiving an Electronic
Lifestyles Designer Award is a
great honor," said Jarey
Schlabach, company president
"We are grateful for the support
of our trade association and the
wonderful support of this com-
munity. Citrus County is a great
place to live and work."
Schlabach Security and
Sound Inc. is based in Lecanto
and installs home theaters and
audio video systems in homes
throughout the Citrus County
and surrounding area. Jarey
Schlabach was also awarded an
advanced electronics system
certification at the same
CEDIA conference.
CEDIA is an international
trade association of companies
that specialize in designing and
installing electronic systems
for the home. The association
was founded in September 1989
and has more than 3,500 mem-
ber companies worldwide.
CEDIA Members are estab-
lished and insured businesses
with bona fide qualifications
and experience in this special-
ized field. For more informa-
tion on CEDIA, visit the associ-
ation's Web site at
www.cedia.org. Schlabach
Security and Sound, Inc. has a
very informational web site at
www.sssonline.biz.


2007-08 Board of : TOR =-


President
Michael Moberley, Tropical
Window .
President Elect
Randy Clark, Clark Construction
Immediate Past President
Ron Lieberman, Nu-Era Homes
N First Vice-President
Larry Tate, Sweetwater Homes
Associate Vice-President
Mathew Baillargeon, Marketing
Solutions
Second Associate V.P.
Richard Gelfand, Sherwin Williams
N Immediate Past Associate V.P.
Joe Bell, Surfaces Flooring
Treasurer
Gaston Hall, Hall Brothers
Secretary
Barbara Vargo, SunTrust Mortgage
Builder Directors
Edward Johnston, Edward R.
Johnston Inc.
Jim Crosley, Rusaw Homes
Susan Hadley, Summerwind
Homes, Inc.
Thomas Long 111, Long Enterprises
of the Nature Coast


Associate Directors
Eric Swart, Citrus Pest Mgmt.
John Hanna, Dirt Boys Inc.
Cyndi McRee, Progress Energy
Sarah Fitts, First American Title
N Life Directors
George Rusaw, Rusaw Homes
Lorie Mills-Clark, Clark
Construction
John Osborne, Pinecrest Building
Corporation
Gaston Hall, Hall Brothers of Citrus
County
Jim Loos, Schlabach Security and
Sound
Chuck Sanders, Sanderson Bay
Fine Home
Gerry Gaudette, Gaudette Electric
Dick Dolbow,
Citrus County Schools
Lloyd Myer, Sherwin Williams
Chris Ensing,
Southern Exposure Construction
Mike Moberley,
Tropical Windows Inc.
Todd Workman, Suncoast
Plumbing and Electric
Greg Conard, Gold Crest Homes


Fed rate cuts are no
quick fix for the
mortgage market
The Sept. 18 rate cuts by the
Fed have had some positive
effects in financial markets pri-
marily by stimulating the stock
market and relieving liquidity
problems in short-term credit
markets.
Although the Federal Open
Market Committee (FOMC) state-
ment made no commitment
regarding the future course of
monetary policy, we expect addi-
tional quarter-point cuts at each
of the two remaining FOMC
meetings in 2007.
Unfortunately, rate cuts by the
Fed cannot immediately stabilize
mortgage and housing markets, a
point recently stressed by
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke in an address entitled,
"Housing, Housing Finance and
Monetary Policy."
The financial markets still are
focused heavily on credit quality,
and only those components of
mortgage markets having explicit


or implied government backing
are functioning well.
The subprime and Alt-A
adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM)
markets have shrunken dramati-
cally, the prime jumbo market has
not yet thawed out and yield
spreads have widened out even
in the prime conventional con-
forming market loan sizes up
to $417,000.
Attend the Fall
Construction"
Forecast Conference
Plan to attend NAHB's
Construction Forecast
Conference on Oct. 24 at the
National Housing Center in
Washington, D.C. The confer-
ence brings together the nation's
premier housing economists and
finance experts for an in-depth
examination of the economic out-
look for the housing industry.
Can't attend? Watch the con-
ference Webcast live.
For more information, or to
register for the conference or
Webcast, visit www.nahb.org/cfc.


CCBA Staff Members

Linda Thompson . . . . . . . . . . Executive Officer
Erik Stellmach ................. . . Director of Member Services
Karen Balzanti .................. ............ Office Manager


Special to the Chronicle
Thank you Cyndi McRee and Marie Brotnisky from
Progress Energy, who was the proud sponsor of this year's
Installation Banquet on Sept. 29.


S Updates


Event sponsors


Special to the Chronicle
Pictured above are Heide Feildman-Giles and Ron Knight
from Home Depot, major sponsor of the CCBA's Home and
Outdoor Show. The event Is open to the public, admission
Is free and displays are both Inside and outside. Home
Depot will offer workshops for both children and adults,
and a special home remodeling seminar Is also scheduled
for a full day of hands-on learning experiences.







SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2007 5D


PRESSURE
Continued from Page 1D

Onp-on-one sessions are
videotaped for protection, an
idea from Toomey's mother.


Not count-
ing the Toyota
Sequoia he
prchased as
a tow vehicle,
his $ total
investment'
was $70,000.
,The tracer is
sel f c tn -


With his mobile unit, he
brings massage to them, with
the machines giving similar
results in a shorter time and
for less money. A 15-minute
session runs $15.
While he does go to individ-
ual homes he would like to


* A 15-minute mobile mas-
. sage session costs $15.
* For further information
about My'Time mobile
machine massage, call
Scott Toomey at 586-6955.


toined, powered by a genera-
tor. He keeps it at a local stor-
age fa-cility when he's not on
the road with it.
A certified fitness trainer,
prior to opening this business,
T. o o m e, y
worked at Oak
Village in I'V
S-u'ga f-m ill
Woods; at the been co
sports com-
plex. He was about we
'there for trwo
years. the need
Be re that,
he and his to take
wife and two t
daughters thnmselv
lived in
Massachusetts cg
where Toonwy about his desi
owned' a couri- rn
erfservice.


carry about
100 regular
month ly
clients -
Toomey pri-
marily wants
to market his
service to
local Citrus
County busi-


nesses.
"My goal is to have 20 to 30
companies where, one day a
week, I come into your park-
ing lot and the company
doesn't even have to incur the


ve always
)ncerned
liness and
for people
care of
ves.

ott Toomey
re to run a mobile
massage business.


expense," he
said. "All the
company has
to do is let go
of their
employees for
15 minutes."
However,
Toomey said
this is an ideal
way for
employers to
show employ-
ee apprecia-
tion. He
charges $250
for four hours;
$450 for eight


He came to Citrus County hours.
on vacation four years ago He was recently at the
and decided to stay He and Plantation Inn in Crystal
his family live in Sugarmill River for their Housekeepers
Woods. Appreciation Day.
'"I've always been con- "Secondly, I want to be at
cerndd about wellness and functions and festivals. I hope
the need for people to take to be at this year's seafood
time fbr themselves," Troomey festival," he said.
said. He came up with the Right now, his business is
name of his business, My still new and he's been out
Time, after reading a maga- making cold calls pulling
zine article about that same up to car dealerships, retail
subject, about people rushing plazas, utility companies -
around and not taking time to anywhere there are people in
care for themselves. need of relaxation and stress
He said that few people are release.
able to take the time out of "You're never going to
their busy schedule to drive to duplicte the human touch,"
a spa, then spend a half-hour Toomey said, "but this comes
6r an four getting a massage.#close."


Consultant
awarded contract
Michael G. Czerwinski P.A.,
Environmental Consultants (MGC)
have been awardeil a 3-year con-
tract for Bi-Monthly Wellfield Data
Collection by the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District (SWFWMD). MGC began
gathering the required data in the
first week of October 2007 at the
Starkey and Morris Bridge well-
fields.
Michael G. Czerwinski, P.A.,
Environmental Consultants, a
Florida Corporation, began busi-
ness in 2001 to service the envi-
ronmental needs of the west cen-
tral Florida Area. The firm's princi-
.pal has over 20 years of environ-
mental consulting experience.
MGC Environmental's services
include: Wetland Jurisdictional
Delineation, Phase I
Environmental Site Assessments,
ERP Permit Assistance, Gopher
Tortoise Surveys / Permits and
Relocation, Resource Protection
Area (RPA) Assessments, Habitat
Projection Plan (HPP)
Development, Biological Surveys
for Protected Species,
Environmental Monitoring,
Wetland Mitigation Design and
Monitoring, GIS Analysis,
Archaeological Studies, Land
Cover Mapping and Water Quality
Assessments for Lakes and
Rivers.
MGC can be found on the Web
at www.mgcenvironmental.com;
or call (352) 249-1012 for more
info.


Dealer plans party
this weekend
Join us for our seventh
anniversary party today at
Harley-Davidson of Crystal River,
1785 S. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal
River. Hours are 9 to 5 Saturday
and 10 to 5 Sunday. There will be
bands, "Elvis" in the building as
emcee, many vendors, raffles,
giveaways, 50/50 drawing, a spe-
cial kid zone, players poker tour
and event T-shirts. Bike blessing
by the CMA on Sunday. Bands
will include Big Engine,
Chameleon, Ryan Weaver, Slick
Tracey, and Emerald Gypsy.
Official charities are Big
Brothers/Big Sisters and Citrus
United Basket.
Call 563-9900, toll free (866)
563-9900,
www.hdcrystalriver.com.
Property manager
receives award
Chris A, Ensing of Ensing
Properties LLC, a local real estate
developer and property manage-
ment company was honored to
receive the 2007 Crystal River
Mayor's Award. Mayor Ronald E.
Kitchen Jr. presented the award
to Ensing as the city of Crystal
River's Oct. 8 city council meet-
ing. The award is given yearly to
individuals and businesses cho-
sen by the Mayor. "In appreciation
for generous support and dedica-
tion to the city of Crystal River."
Ensing Properties LLC was cho-
sen because of various properties
they have purchased, remodeled


and rehabilitated within Crystal
River, many of which are within
the city's Historic District.
"It was quite an honor, we love
Crystal River and are proud to
call it home, we believe in this city
and what it can become," said
Ensing. "It's a great feeling to
take what many might consider to
be a dilapidated building and
bring it up to its full potential."
Ensing Properties LLC owns
and operates apartments and
commercial buildings within the
city of Crystal River and in Citrus
County, including Crystal River
Landings and 5th Avenue
Apartments.
Surgeon tours Europe,
gives lectures
Dr. Michael A. Pikos, board cer-
tified oral and maxillofacial sur-
geon and founder of Coastal Jaw
Surgery The Center for Dental
Implants, Facial and Oral
Reconstruction and the Pikos
Implant Institute recently toured
Europe lecturing to hundreds of
dental professionals on advanced
bone grafting and dental implan-
tology in Switzerland, Spain and
Italy.
In the field of oral implantology
and implant dentistry, Dr. Pikos is
both a clinician and educator. His
scientific lectures and presenta-
tions of advanced live surgical
courses over the past 17 years
are part of an ongoing commit-
ment to share his dental and sur-
gical expertise to professionals
both nationally and internationally.


Taste of Citrus
event on tap
Taste of Citrus 2007 will be from
6 to 9 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 28, at the
CFCC Citrus Campus in Lecanto.
Tickets are $30 advanced, $35 at
door. Proceeds to benefit scholar-
ships for local students to attend
Central Florida Community College
in Lecanto. For more information
call MaryLou Shevlin at (352) 613-
4290.
Event sponsors include:
Sustaining: Crystal Chevrolet
Motor Car Company, D.A.B.
Constructors Inc., Steve and Ellen
Zane, CFP. Silver: Citrus County
Chronicle, Crowley & Company
Advertising, Progress Energy,
WYKE TV. Palladium: Bemie Little
Distributing, Citrus Memorial Health
System, Martin Federal.Credit
Union, Publix Charities, Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center,
Terry Long, WXCV 95.3. Bronze:
Best Buy Water, CFCC Foundation
Members, COPP Winery, Joe's
Deli, Merrill Lynch, Mom's Heavenly
Chocolates, Sandpiper Signs, Wal-
Mart of Inverness, Ellen Zane.
Scholars Friend: Edward Serra,
CPA, Excel Printing, Graphic Elite
Printing, Marker Graphics, Village
Cadillac.
Participating restaurants include:
Barrington Place, CiCi's Pizza,
Citrus Memorial Health System,
Club House Deli, COPP Winery,
Dairy Queen of Crystal River,
Denny Lynn's Fudge, Denny's
Restaurant, Doing Dinner, Fuji
Asian Bistro, Full Belly Deli &
Eatery and many more.


..., '., i .


"a
.~ ~1


MONEY
Continued from Page 1D

lng. If I collect it now at 55, I
can get $175.a month. If I wait
until I'md65, that amount will
increase to $375. There is
quite a reduction here and I
have to make a decision. -
T.P. in Pennsylvania
DEAR T.P.: It bolls down to
how.long you think you are
going to live. If you take the
$175 a mofith,' you will be
ahead of the game from age 55
to about age 73. After age 73,
you will be down $200 a month.
If you don't live to ..that age,
then.you've beaten the system.
If you live past 73, every month
you will Have lost $200. What
do you ,think your chances are
for longevityy' This is what
insurance companies are all
about: .betting that you are
goingtob make it for'so many
years. Now the bet is yours.
DEAR BRUCE: I am an 83-
year-old widow and have only
$2,009 in my 'savings. I own
nothing and five with one of
my children. If something
should happen to me, will my
children be responsible for my
tills? I have enough life insur-
ance to cover burial and final
expends. I don't want.my kids
to 'have tQ be responsible for
ne after my death. -M.G., via
e-ma.l
,DEAR'M.G.: Not to worry.
Unless your children were to
sights responsible individuals
in th.event of hospitalization,
yoVu Medicare and possibly
C


COUPON
Continued from Page 1D

The second improvement to
Pliase 2 reported by Wal-Mart's
Web site is that consumers will
realize faster savings on new-
to-market generics. For exam-
ple, one month ago,/the anti-
,fungal "Lamisil had an average
priv. of $337.26. The generic
equivalent, terbinafine, is now
available through Wal-Mart
Aid .Sam's Club pharmacies
'for $4 for z30-day supply, sav-
ing customers $333.26 per
resciption. Carvedil 1, the
neric for Coreg, wWch a
nth ago cost $119, will now
st $4 for a 30-day supply,
ving customers $115 per
month, or approximately
$1,300 per year."
I suggest shoppers pay
close Attention to their own
pharmacies,' responses to
al-Mart's expanded pro-
a.m. We' may see other
3ores match Wal-Mart's
iprov6ment!, or we may see
1en more attractive dis-
iar4s offered by competing


Medicaid benefits would take
care of your expenses. Given
the small amount of assets, you
should be eligible for any arid
all public aid for a person such
as yourself.
DEAR BRUCE: My husband
and I have applied for a mort-
gage andpaid for the apprais-
al and credit report. A few
days before the closing, the
mortgage company informed
us that we .needed a road-
maintenance agreement on
the private road, but the other
property owners would not
agree to this. We had to pay for
an attorney for the sales con-
* tract, title search and the sur-
vey, which cost $400. Had the
bank notified us in a timely
manner, we would not have
ordered the survey. Also, we
did not expect the appraisal
and credit-report fees to be
nonrefundable. This has left
,us with a sour taste and $1,000
poorer. Reader, via e-mail
DEAR READER: Welcome
to the real world. In all likeli-
hood, I think they probably did
you a favor. Living on a private
road without an agreement
with the other people can be
nothing but an ongoing
headache. All of the other
expenses unhappily are yours.
I realize a number of those
expenses would not have been
undertaken and I do think they
should have told you about
their conditions earlier, but
nonetheless, this is the hazard
one undertakes when buying.
You have $1,000 worth of value
in not buying into a very bad
situation.

pharmacies. The key is to be
familiar with your pharma-
cy's policies or to consider
switching to Wal-Mart or
Sam's Club pharmacies if you
have prescriptions covered
by Wal-Mart's program. If you
see that you'll be able to save
hundreds of dollars a year on
one prescription, it may be
worth taking the time to
transfer your prescription.
To find out more about your
specific drug coverage by
Wal-Mart's new program, you
can read more details at
www.walmart.com in the
pharmacy section of the Web
site. You can also call or visit
your local Wal-Mart pharma-
cy to ask questions in person.
-u
Stephanie Nelson shares
her savings tips as a regular
contributor on ABC News'
"Good MorningAmerica." You
can find more ofher savings
tips in her book "The Greatest
Secrets of the Coupon Mom"
and on her Web site at
www.couponmom.com. She
can be reached at shopping-
mom@unitedmedia.com.


~- '~" ~ia


.5,,' *- .
"... ..:.-:.:.. ke'
.:v.. :;'"
:" .. :"- {': '


Running my business is


exciting enough without the


added thrill of check fraud.


SunTrust understands how hard it is to run a business while you're dealing
with day-to-day financial challenges like spotting suspicious checks before
they become fraudulent. Online Cash Manager with Fraud Inspectors"
is one of a range of proven solutions we offer to help you manage your
business securely and cost-effectively. So, if you'd rather focus on running
a business than running an investigation, talk to us now, and find out why
SunTrust is the winner of a 2007 Greenwich Award for distinctive Cash
Management Services.


Call 866.442.1370, visit us at suntrust.com/solution, or talk
"8' -" ' to a SunTrust Banker. We'll send you a free copy of "The
,/ Business Owner's Playbook" a guide to solving today's
top business challenges.












SuNTRUST


Cash Management


Financing Solutions


Merchant Services


Seeing beyond money


SunTrust Bank, Member FDIC. 2007 SunTrust Banks, Inc. SunTrust and Seeing beyondmoney are federally registered service marks of SunTrust Banks, Inc.


Business DIGEST


CITRUS COUNn'(FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


A4


*",-: "-.*V.-""i' :,









EDS CITS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa: 35)'6-5651 ol re: 88) 5-2401 mal casifed~hrnilenln~dm- wbst: wwchonceolie~o
a ituaions- esoa
Free I = *.s 0o-/-0 ty 0c- Medica
coOfr OAnuceet =W ne


I


.


/















Putting





you in





touch





with the





Nature





Coast


I


tk


(~
~ a


JA ~




I












RC ~


-r


Our family of newspapers


reaches more than 1 70,000


readers in Citrus, Marion,


Sumter, Levy, Dixie and


Gilchrest counties.



* Citrus County Chronicle The Visitor

* Homosassa Beacon Inverness Pioneer

* Crystal River Current Sumter County Times

* Williston Pioneer Sun-News South Marion Citizen


* Riverland News

* Chiefland Citizen


* Riverland Shopper

* Tri-County Bulletin


The best way to reach the

growing Nature Coast market is

through our award-winning,

growing newspapers.


C I T R U S C O U N Y







1 624 North Meadowcrest Boulevard

Crystal River, FL 34429

(352) 563-6363

www.chronicleonline.corn


NICE LADY, 62 Not Into
Golf, Spectator Sports,
Couch Potatolng, seeks
Gentlemen who has
similar non-interests.
Inverness/Lecanto area
Reply to Box 1391P
c/o Citrus Publishing
106 W Main St.
Inverness FI, 34450
WIDOWED W/F, 55,
Attractive & Intelligent,
would like to meet a
Christian Gentleman to
spend the holidays with
& for possible future
time. No negative or
criminal past history
Please write a letter
about yourself to:
Citrus County Chronicle
Blind Box #1393M
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429
Young Male Doctor
looking for girlfriend
18 28 for travel &
good exp's. Looking for
someone different, not
something. Please send
photos & information to
Drtomas17@
yahoo.com



r7--4-E
RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder com


-L


"SAM"
June 4, 1993 -
October 4, 2007
Beloved member
of our family. Loved
by everyone he met.
Sammy was faithful,
loyal, loving and
gentle. He loved
outdoor adventures,
swimming, car rides
and neighborhood
walks. He played well
with all kids and other
animals. We will miss
you. Your spirit will
always live in our
hearts and we will
always remember
you. Loved and
cared for by
Gabrielle, Danlelle,
Michelle, Nana,
Papa and John.




$$CASH WE BUY TODAY
Cars, Trucks, Vans rt
FREE Removal Metal,
Junk Vehicles, No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Receiot
2 DOGS Labs
Beige, male. Black,
Female. Fixed. Great
health (352)442-9314

TOP DOLLAR
I For Junk Cars
$(352)201-1052 $
$$ CASH PAID $$
Having Code
Enforcement problems
w/ Junk vehicles in your
yard? (352) 860-2545
$ CASH $
PAID FOR
Unwanted Vehicles
352-220-0687
r --- -
S$$CASH FOR CARS$$
I No Title Needed.
SGene(352) 302-2781
L e m m, m
CALLAHULLA
LEOPARD/CURR/PLO
mix, Exc. hunting/pet,
(352) 628-9456
COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service.
(352) 560-6163 or
(352) 746-9084
Leave Message
COY FISH
Lg. Pond Fish (4 or 5)
(352) 726-7106
FREE 10 mo, old female
spayed black & white
pitbull, )o good home
(352) 563-1643
FREE KITTENS
Black & Tiger Striped.
Good w/kids. Loveable
& friendly. 621-4870
FREE KITTENS
to good home.
Homosassa
(352) 228-9166
FREE KITTENS
TO GOOD HOMES.
Just call & take one
home. (352) 637-0849
FREE Pickup Unwanted
Furniture Garage
Sale & Household Items
Call (352) 476-8949
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084


Show Type. To good
home, 352-220-3947
Free Removal Scrap
Metal, Appl.'s, A/C,
Mowers, motors, etc.
Brian (352) 302-9480
Gas Stove 4 Burners,
Computer Monitors(4)
(352) 795-3394
KITTENS
Free to good home
(352) 344-5255
KITTENS
Free to good home
(352) 344-5255
Loving Gray Male Cat.
3 i/2 yrs. old Needs
comfortable lap. Mom
is in Nursing Home.
Please help. 726-3306
PIGLET
Female Black
(352) 527-4990
Qtr HORSE
Appendix Mare, big,
grey 10yrs, needs big
pasture, pasture pet,
(352) 621-7699
The Path Shelter
will pick up your
unwanted vehicle
Tax deductible
receipt given
(352) 746-9084
Twin Female Kittens
Black & white, desper-
ately needing a loving
home. Crystal River
(352) 563-2179
WATER Softener & Iron
Filter (Kinetico)
(352) 795-6693
WE PAY CASH
FOR
JUNK CARS
Top $$ paid $$
352-523-4357
YOUNG BLACK LAB
male. Great disposition,
Not hyper. Very good
w/children &
animals. 352-419-4344
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645



CHIHUAHUA
Children's Lost Dog
Vic. HWY 200 Hernando
10/9 352-419-4105
MIXED, BIk & Wht., Long
Hair Dog w/cut tail,
male. Vic. Bev. Hills,
10/10 (352) 476-5546
PITBULL
Female Puppy- child is
Heartbroken VIC. of
Croft & Crown Dr.
352-277-8518/400-3110
POODLE
Small, Brown,7 yrs old.
VIC. off Truck Ave,
Hernando 10/6.


BULLDOGS
Vic, CR 116, Wildwood,
10/7. To Identify.
Call 305-666-8870
CHIHUAHUA MIX
Found near Parsons Pt.
PO, Please call to iden-
tify. (352) 726-1006 or
795-3260
Miniature Schnauzer
Gobbler Dr. Area
Call to identify
(352) 344-5438
TABBY CAT, grey stripe,
found mid Sept. May
be Pt. Siamese/Bangal.
Found near Citrus Cty.
Fair Grounds. Please
call to identify. (352)
726-1006 or 795-3260
Young Male
Shepherd Mix
on 486
Call (352) 341-5108



DIVORCES
H BANKRUPTCY H
.Name Change |
*Child Support
*Wills I
We Come To You
637-4022795-599
:.7 9.-9.9








HOME OWNER
SPECIAL
SELL YOUR HOUSE
TODAY

ONE CALL
ONE PRICE
ONE MONTH
ONLY $126.00
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

appears in the
-Citrus County
Chronicle
S*Beverly Hills Visitor
*Riverland News
*Riveriand Shopper
*South Marion
Citizen
*West Marion
Messenger
*Sumter County
Times
CALL TODAY
(352) 563-5966
LiJ


1


-Ac Now'

GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD
Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week after your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902


RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder coam
L -- -- .N
SOD SOD SOD-
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032
TRANSPORTATION
S SPECIAL
SELL YOUR CAR
S TODAY
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
ONE CALL
ONE PRICE
S 2 WEEKS
ONLY $99.99

Your Ad will
aooears in the
*Citrus County
Chronicle
*Beverly Hills Visitor
*Riverland News
H *Riverland Shopper
*South Marion
Citi2en
*West Marion
Messenger
*Sumter County
Times
CALL TODAY
(352) 563-5966
West Coast
Christian School
Needs Donations
of Cmte
Working or Not
Donations are
Tax Deductiblel
Please Contact Kathy
(352) 795-8099
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY







ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM

CAT ADOPTIONS

of






Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open 8:00 A
M till 4:00 P M
Monday-Friday.
Week-end and
evenings by
appointment.
All Cats and Kittens
are altered, tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date on vac-
cines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www hofsoha org
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant
Ave. Corner of 44
and Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw prints.




HAIRCARE in your home
by Licensed Hairdresser
Curts/Perms/Wash/Style
Call Gall 352-422-6315




Sand read

1,000's of Items sold
everyday using the
Chronicle classified.
Call today and we'll
help you get rid of
your unwanted stuff,


(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-1441


STYLIST
Now taking applica-
tions, in Hernando
for Opening mid Oct.
(352) 746-0335
STYLIST/BARBER
Great opp. Busy. FT/PT
Family Headquarters
628-2040/ 249-0833,


PERS. ASSISTANT for Hire
Can help elderly, kids,
or office work $12. hr.
40. cents mile. 465-7888



A free report of your
home's value
www.naturecoast
living.net
g.- - .E
SB-OOS Traffic To
Your Website
Chronicle Website
Directory in print
and online.
Our search engine
will link customers
directly to your site.
In Print
+.Online
= One Price
$51.95
(3 lines of copy
for 30 days)
Header and
Website Address
Call Today:
(352) 563-5966
CAR SALES
www.naturecoast
wheels.com

Limited Edition Prints
SNautical Civil War
Wildlife
internationol.co
NEWSPAPERS
www.chronicle
online.com

REALESTATE
www.naturecoast
homefront.com

RENTALS
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com
WHOLESALE
SHOPPING
www.1282.onetouch
shooaina.biz




Childcare Center
Director
Must have creditials
for position. Also
looking for people
w/CDA Credential.
352-286-4110




PT PAYROLL ASST.
NEEDED
Exp. in Human
Resources, Insurance,
Employee file
maintenance &
knowledge of Labor
Laws preferred.
Computer skills a
must, This Is part time
with possibility of full
time when needed.
Please Fax Resume
352-795-0134

SECRETARY
NEEDED
Excellent comrmuni-
cation skills, hourly
plus commission
Call for interview:
(352) 795-1484



























HAIR STYLIST
F/T-P/T, Immed.
openings Call Sue
a I I






352-628-0630

Licensed Skin
Care Specialist

(352)860-0633


----- ml
RENEE'S
(352) 628-4404
STYLIST & NAILTECH
Some following
pretf.(352) 746-7166


BILLER/
COLLECTOR
Exp'd only need
apply Charge entry,
electronic claims
processing, cash
mgmt., insurance &
patient collection,
aged A/R follow-up.
Fax resume to:
(352) 527-1827
or Apply in person @
110 N. Lecanto Hwy.


COME GROW
WITH US!




I i

Join our team
of caring
professionals.
Chaplain
Masters degree
required
CPE's required
FT Field Nurse
Nursing Home
Team
FT Patient
Care Coordinator
RN
Hospice House
7am 7pm
Sat/Sun
FT Registered
Nurse
Hospice House
3-11 shift
11-7 shift
PT LPN
10am- 10pm
Sat/Sun
PRN Staff
RN's
LPN's
CNA's
Apply Today
Telephone:
352.527.2020
Fax: 352.527.9366
jthacher@hosoice
ofcitruscounty,org
Hospice of Citrus
County
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, Fl 34464
hospiceofcitrus
dwf/eoe


HealthSouth
Rehabilitation
Hospital of
Spring Hill

Marketing
Inpatient Rehab
Liaison -
Citrus County
Responsibilities
Include providing
Marketing Support,
Business
Development and
performing Clinical
Evaluations.
Marketing
experience and
abilities required.
RN, LPN, or
individuals with a
medical back-
ground preferred.
Please apply in
person or send
resume to:
HealthSouth
Rehabilitation
Hospital of
Spring Hill
Human Resources
12440 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville, FI 34613
or fax to
352-592-4283
email
ava mclellan@health-















u tlol" 1l



Lie -Ins


r --!--- -

BAYCARE
HomeCare
BayCare HomeCore
is a full-service home
care agency
affiliated with
BayCare Health
System, one of the
largest not-for-profit
healthcare networks
in the nation.

SERVICE
TECH II
(F/T) DRIVER
BayCare HomeCare,
a home health
medical company,
is currently seeking
a self-motivated
DRIVER to deliver
and set up medical
equipment for our
home health
patients in Pasco
County. DME
experience
preferred. Valid
Florida Driver's
License required.
For consideration,
please apply via fax.
Attn: Herb Jackson
@ (727) 394-6544
or e-mail
herb.jackson@
baycare.org
Please visit us @
www.baycc-:
homecare.com

CBC
Transporters

The Center's
Is seeking
Community Based
Care Transporters for
our Marion Service
Center. Duties
include coordinating
& providing the
necessary transporta-
tion for children &
families. HS diploma
or GED equiv. &
related exp working
children & families
prefened out not
requied Must be
able to work flexible
hours, have clean
driving record &
criminal background
history, Salary range
$8-$10.00/hr.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE Fox or
e-omril resume to HR,
the Centers, Inc..,
(352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters us
For more Into visit
www thecenters.us











SUNDAY OCTOBER 14. 2007 7


C"-Medical
EXPERIENCED
MDS LPN
NURSE

Candidate must
understand the Long
Term Care plan
process and
enjoy meeting
w/families. This
candidate must be
computer literate
and be able to
assess patients.
Position requires a
reliable positive
team player!
Mail or Fax Resume:
Aft: Laurie Coleman
136 NE l2thAve.
Crystal River, FL
34429
OR FAX RESUME to:
(352) 795-5848
CsDFWP/EOE


S Classifieds


DENTAL
ASSISTANT
PT or FT. Digital office.
Must have
experience and be
certified. Top Pay for
the right person.
Call (352) 746-3525

F/T CNA
Positions
(1) 3-11
(2) 11-7

For Assisted Living
Facility. Pay by
experience.
Sign on bonus!
Insurance after 60
days Vacation
After 90 days.
Apply in Person:
Brentwood Retirement
Community
Commons Build.
1900 W. Alpha Ct.
Lecanto 352-746-6611
DFWP/EOE


IT Specialist
The Center's
is seeking an IT
professional to work
in a dynamic
environment,
Necessary skills:
Windows XP and
Server 2003. Active
Directory, network-
ing. SMS. SQL, or
Exchange exp a plus.
Applicant must be a
motivated self-starter
with excellent
communication and
documentation skills.
Submit Salary req.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE Fax or
e-mail resume to
HR, the Centers. Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters us


C-IIR)Ni(LE
Classifieds


CITRUS COUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE


LCSW

The Center's
is seeking a Florida
Licensed Clinical
Social Workers for our
Marion & Citrus
County programs.
Ability to Supervise
desired. Must have 5
yrs related exp with a
broad knowledge of
psychotherapeutic
theory & practice.
Submit Salary req.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE Fax or
e-mail resume to
HR, the Centers. Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters us
For more info visit
wwwthecenters us

IWomIottve
Your world first.
Ever) Da\

CII ONICiE
Classifieds


Licensed
Practical
Nurse/Certified
Medical Assistant

We are seeking an
LPN/CMA for a
fast-paced medical
practice located in
Crystal River. Ideal
candidate must have
previous physician
office experience to
be responsible for
performing EKGs,
PFTs, vital signs and
phlebotomy. Will also
assist the physician
and be responsible
for front desk duties.
Please apply online
at www citrusmh com
CMHS is an equal op-
portunity employer.



ClaCrieds


Exp. Medical
RECEPTIONIST

Needed, for busy
surgeons office.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-6328

LPN
We are a residential
program for 96
high and maximum
risk males committed
to the Dept. of
Juvenile Justice.
Competitive pay rate
Benefit package
Apply In person at:
Cypress Creek
2855 W Woodland
Ridge Dr.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Or fax resume to
352-527-2235
Drug Free Workplace
/EEO


t=-- I


I


3atht-i


A/C Tune up w/i ree
permanent filter +
ITerimlte/Pest Control
iInsp. Lic k Boned Only
$44.95 for both.
(352) 628-5700
caco36870




ADVERTISE YOUR
BUSINESS IN THE

DIRECTORY!
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
ONE CALL
ONE PRICE
ONE MONTH
ONLY $200.00
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

appears in the
*Citrus County
Chronicle
*Beverly Hills Visitor
*Riverland News
S*Riverland Shopper
S South Marion
Citizen
*West Marion
Messenger
-Sumter County
Times

CALL TODAY
S(352) 563-5966

--- ---



"DEBRIS HAULING"
i & Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
i352.447-3713/232-2898

All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
;OLEMAN TREE SERVICE
& trim. Lic. Ins. FREE EST.
Lowest rates guarant.
726-8010 727-421-3636
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Haullng,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
'design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
,& Sod: 352-563-0272
R WRIGHT TREE SERVICE,
tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Lic
#0256879 352-341-6827
A TREE SURGEON
iUc. & Ins. Exp'd friendly
'serv. Lowest rates Free
estimates,352-860-1452




Citrus County
Computer Doctors
Repairs In-Home or
Pick-Up, Delivery. avail.
Free quote, 344-4839
Computer Pro, Lw Fit Rt.
In-House Networking,
virus, Spyware & more!
352-794-3114/586-7799

Cooter Computers Inc.
Repair, Upgrades, Virus
& Malicious software
removal (352) 476-8954


SENIOR DISCOUNT
Srs' pay Only $59.95
Flat Rate No Hourlyl
Will we repair
ANY PCI
Atlas Computer
Service. 15 Years Expl
586-3636




REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-1728




VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
fully coated. 30 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Ins. Lic#001721
352-795-6533/464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CHEAP/CHEAP/CHEAP
Husband & Wife DP
Press.Cleaning & Paint-
ing. Lic.&Ins. 637-3765
3rd GENERATION SERV
fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
lawn trees, &
landscaping FREE Est.,
10% off any job. lic
99990257751 & Ins. (352)
201-0658







FERRARO'S
PAINTING SERVICE
Interior, Exterior.
Free Estimates.
Senior Discount.
(352)465-6631
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Dave Rodgers Painting
20 + yrs. exp,, int./ext.
satisfaction guarantee
lic./Ins. (352) 726-5698
RUDY'S PAINTING *
Int./Ext.; Free Estimates
Pressure Wash., Llc./Ins.
9 A/7I".A"=rM A7'/on f,%


Affordable Boat Maint.
& Repair, Mechanical,
Electrical, Custom Rig.
John (352) 746-4521
DOCKS, SEAWALLS,
Boat Lifts, Boat Houses,
New, Re decks, Repair
& Styrofoam Replace.
LIc.CBC060275. Ins.
(352) 302-1236
MORRILL MARINE
Outboard Repairs,
Dockside Service. Elec.
Installed (352) 628-3331




AT YOUR HOME Res.
mower & small engine
repair. ic#99990001273
352-220-4244


FREE ESTIMATES
FREE P.U. & DELIVERY
Furniture & Cornices
(352) 628-5595




ASSISTANCE FOR SRS.
Driver, shopping, appts.
meals, laundry, respite
relief. 352-746-5666
HEAVEN SENT
Prvt. rm. of home. I on
I care. CNA & Med.
Tech. (352) 621-3337
W LOVING CARE WV
That makes a
difference. Will care
for elderly person in
my home or yours 24 hr.
care. Louisa, 201-1663




We do it ALL Big/Small
HOME REMODELING
SPECIALISTSIII
Concrete slabs, Brick
Pavers, Windows,
Doors, Storm Panels,
Kitchen Cabinets, Tile
& MOREII Lic. & Ins.
CRC 1326431,
References.
(352) 746-9613


.... ---. --- .. .-,
v'Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
fully coated. 30 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Ins. Lic#001721
352-795-6533/464-1397




Artistic Housecleaning
Wonderful detailed &
exc. jobi Yrs. exp. & ref.
Ellie (352) 586-5968
FINAL DETAILS, LLC
CLEANING SERVICES,
New Const.,Vacant
Prop.,Offices, Residen-
tial 352-400-2772 Lic. Ins.
HAUTER & CLARK
HANDYMAN & MORE
Home, Office & Floor
Cleaning, Lawn Serv.
Pressure Washing,
(352) 860-0911
HOME CLEANING
Homosassa, Leconto
& Crystal River
Weekly, bi-weekly,
1 time cleaning,
moves, rentals, real
estate sales /models.
Ryanna, 586-7919
Licensed, Ins., Ref.

PARTNERS IN GRIME
Senior disc. 20 yrs exp.
Lic. & Ins. Free Estimates
Call (352) 628-4898


Touch of Class Cleaning
Service, 15 Yrs. Exp.
Also If you Need Help?
With Errands, Things
Arincdi the Hnous I tf


REFACE YOUR CABINETS
& COUNTERTOPS
Much Less Than New! I
Nature Coast Cabinets
Uc. & Ins. (352)400-5861




DOTSON Construction
25 yrs. in Central FL. Our
own crews! Specializing
In additions, framing,
trim, & decks.
Lic. #CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708
ROGERS Construction


FL RESCREEN
352-563-0104/257-1011
I panel or camp cage
Family owned & oper'd
Screen rms,Carports,
vinyl & acrylic windows,
roof overs & storm
panels, garage screen
doors, siding,
soffit fascia, Uc#2708
(352) 628-0562




CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
AUGIE'S PRESSURE
Cleaning Quality
Work, Low Prices. FREE
Estimates: 220-2913





860-0085


PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING
Roofs w/no pressure,
houses,driveways. 25 yrs
exp., ULic./Ins. 341-3300
ROLAND'S *
PRESSURE CLEANING
Mobiles, houses & roofs
Driveways w/surface
cleaner. No streaks
24 yrs. Lic. 352-726-3878




Andrew Joehi
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
lRessure & cleaning.
Lawns, gutters. No job
too small Reliable. Ins
0256271 352-465-9201
1A Home Repairs Paint,
gutter & roof clean,
press. wash.Lic&Ins.
#0169757 344-4409
ALL AMERICAN
HANDYMAN Free Est.
Affordable & Reliable
Lic.34770 (352)302-8001


ora Gaeneranon Service
Fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
Lawn, Trees,
Landscaping, FREE Est,,
10% off any job. lic
99990257151 & Ins. (352)
201-0658
r AFFORDABLE
HAULING CLEANUP, I
| PROMPT SERVICE '
STrash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages
352-697-1126







FASTI AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs.
Free Est., LIc # 0256374
(352) 257-9508
FASTI AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs.
Free Est., Lic # 0256374
(352) 257-9508
HANDYMAN
If its Broke Jerry
Can Fix It. Lic#1 89620
352-201-0116,726-0762
HAUTER & CLARK
HANDYMAN & MORE
Home, Office & Floor
Cleaning, Lawn Serv.
Pressure Washing,
(352) 860-0911
NEW IN AREA
Ask for Jim or Iv. msg.
352-344-5213
217-201-2962 Lic34868
We do it ALL Big/Small
HOME REMODELING
SPECIALISTS
SConcrete slabs, Brick
Pavers, Windows,
Doors, Storm Panels,
Kitchen Cabinets, Tile
& MOREII Lic. & Ins.
CRC 1326431,
References.
(352) 746-9613




FULL ELECTRIC SERVICE
Remodeling, Lighting,
Spa, Sheds Lic. & Insur.
#2767 (352)257-2276
MALLEY's Elect. Service
Resid. & Comm.
Ins. & Lic. #EC2001840
Rob @352-220-9326
Mel 352-255-4034


"DEBRIS HAULING"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898
"DEBRIS HAULING"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898

AFFORDABLE,
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
1 PROMPT SERVICE |
Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages I
352-697-1126
A-I Hauling cleanup,
garage clean outs,
trash turn. & appl. Misc.
Mark (352) 302-4130
WE MOVE SHEDS
352-637-6607


All of Citrus Hauling/
Moving Items delivered,
clean ups.Everything
from A to Z 628-6790

AFFORDABLE, v
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
I PROMPT SERVICE |
Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const.
Debris & Garages
352-697-1126
Lm m m = m =il
C.J.'S TRUCK/TRAILERS
Furn., appi, trash, brush,
Low $$$/Professional
Prompt 7 day service
S726-2264/201-1422
TOWING TRAV. TRLR*
OR BOAT, ACROSS
TOWN OR COUNTRY
REAS. i (352) 746-0802




Carpet Factory Direct
Sales Install Repair
Laminate, tile, wood Sr.
disc. (352) 341-0909
Mosaic Tile & Remodel
Marble, porcelain &
ceramic. Remodel
more 4 less. 287-3170





All kinds of fences
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
Free estimates.
(352) 527-3431

ROCKY'S FENCING
Working In Citrus County
for 25 yrs.
Free Estimate, Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279
3rd GENERATION SERV
fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
lawn trees, &
landscaping FREE Est.,
10% off any job. lic
99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
25 Years In County
Free Est., Res./Comm.
FENCES BY DALLAS
Lic./Ins (352) 795-1110
A 5 STAR COMPANY'
Go Owens Fencing.
All types. Free estimates
Comm/Reg. 628-4002
BARNYARD II FENCING
Serving Citrus Co. Since
1973. Free Estimates
(352) 726-9260
GARY JOE ROSEBERRY
Fence Company
Specializing In vinyl
(352) 621-0929




#1 in Service
Hise Roofing
New const. reroofs &
repairs. 25 yrs. exp. leak
spec. #CCC1327059
(352) 344-2442
John Gordon Roofing
Recs Rates Free est. Proud to
Serve You,
ccc 1325492.
795-7003/800-233-5358

RE-ROOFS & REPAIRS
Reasonable Ratesll
Exp'd, Lic. CCC 1327843
Erik (352) 628-2557


All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. FREE EST.
Llc#2579 /Ins. 746-1004
Concrete Staining,
Garage & Driveway,
House pressure washer,
Free Est., 20 Yrs. Exp.
(352) 422-8888
CONCRETE WORK
Sdewk, Driveways Pats,
Free est. Uc. 2000. Ins.
795-4798
Decorative concrete,
River rock, curbs, Stamp
concrete Fuston's River
Rock (352) 344-4209
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
driveways & tear outs
Lic. 1476 726-6554
We do it ALL Big/Small
HOME REMODELING
SPECIALISTSIII
Concrete slabs, Brick
Pavers, Windows,
Doors, Storm Panels,
Kitchen Cabinets, Tile
& MOREII Uc. & Ins.
CRC 1326431,
References.
(352) 746-9613




ALL AMERICAN
HANDYMAN Free Est.
Affordable & Reliable
Lic.34770 (352)302-8001
DOTSON Construction
25 yrs. in Central FL. Our
own crews Specializing
in additions, framing,
trim, & decks.
Lic. #CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708
W. F. GILLESPIE
Room Additions, New
Home Construction,
Baths & Kitchens
St. Lic. CRC 1327902
(352) 465-2177
www.wfgillesple.com
We do it ALL Big/Small *
HOME REMODELING
SPECIALISTS111 .
Concrete slabs, Brick
Pavers, Windows,
Doors, Storm Panels,
Kitchen Cabinets, Tile
& MOREII Lic. & Ins.
CRC'1326431,
References.
(352) 746-9613




ALL TYPES
OF TILE INSTALLED
ATLAS TILE
Remodl./New Const.
352-697-2591/628-4049
Ins/Lic#1704
Bathroom Remodeling
Repairs, Qual. Installer
Lic 106120. Insured.
(352) 382-4621
CERAMIC TILE INSTALLER
Bathroom remodeling,
handicap bathrooms.
LIc/Ins. #2441 795-7241
CUTTING EDGE Ceramic
Tile. Lic. #2713, Insured.
Showers. Firs. Counters
Etc. (352) 422-2019
Mosaic Tile & Remodel
Marble, porcelain &
ceramic. Remodel
more 4 less. 287-3170


Hurricane Builders
Unlimited, LLC. 30yrs.
exp. Drywall Specialty
New or Restoration. Lic
1329305 (352) 563-2125
ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs,
Texture, Additions,
Homeowners, Builders
Free est (352) 220-9016
Lic.#SCC131149747
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Tile Work,
Framing. 35 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263




FILL, ROCK, CLAY, ETC.
All types of Dirt Service
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572
AFFORDABLE Top soil,
fill, mulch,rock. Tractor
work. No job too small.
352-302-7325 341-2019
ALL AROUND TRACTOR
Landcleoring, Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 795-5755
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear. Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
FLIPS TRUCK & TRACTOR,
Landclearing, Truck &
Tractor work. House
Pads, Rock, Sand, Clay,
Mulch & Topsoil.
(352) 382-2253
TOP SOIL SPECIAL *
Screened, no stones.
10 Yds $150; 20 Yds $225
u 352-302-6436




ALL AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 795-5755
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
TRACTOR SERVICE
Tree/Debris Removal
Driveways/Demolition
Line Rock/Fill Dirt
r. Disc. 352-302-4686
TURTLE ACRES
Bushhog, Grading,
Stumpgrinding,
Removal No job too
small. (352) i22-2114


3rd Generation Service
Fencing. Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
Lawn, Trees,
Landscaping, FREE Est.,
10% off any job. lic
99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272
SOD SOD SOD*
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032




"El Cheapo" cuts $10 up
Beat any Price. We do
It All. Call 352-563-9824
Or 352-228-7320


3rd Generation Service
Fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
Lawn, Trees,
Landscaping, FREE Est.,
10% off any job. lic
99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
A TROPICAL LAWN
Family owned & oper.
Satisfaction Guaran.
352-257-9132/257-1930
ANDERSEN'S YARDMAN
SERVICES, Mowing, &
Trimming, Trash,
hauling, Low rates
1-352-277-6781
Bob's Pro Lawn Care
Reliable, Quality work
Residential / Comm.
Lic./Ins. 352-613-4250
C & R LANDSCAPING
Lawn Maintenance
clean ups Mulching,
We Show Up
352-503-5295, 503-5082
G. Nelson & Son. Lawn
Service, mowing, trim-
ming, etc, dependable
lic. & Ins. (352)563-2118
Lawn Patrol of Citrus
Lawn maint. Sm. Land
Clearing. Sign 12 mo.
Get 13th Mo, Free.
Free est. (352) 464-3343
LAWN SERVICE
We do re-sodding
and patching.
Free Estimate 795-4798.
RIDGE MOWING
Dependable, Owner
Operator. Lic. & Ins.
Kevin (352) 270-8081
RITTER LAWN CARE
Lawn Maint., Press.
Clean.,Storm Cleanup
Free Est.352-257-6001
Steve's Lawn Service
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, ic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166




POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Acrylic Decking
a 352-464-3967 u
POOL LINERS *
15 Yrs. Exp. *
Call for free estimate
*(352) 591-3641 a
POOL REPAIRS?
Comm. & Res., & Leak
detection, lic. 2819,
352-503-3778,302-6060
SERVICE & REPAIR
Full Service $88/mo.
Cheaper rates avail.
16 yrs. Exp. Licensed
Michnal (n3521 7-6i61


DRY OAK FIREWOOD
4 X 7 Stack
$80 delivered.
(352) 344-2696




WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs on all makes
& models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard




CHEAPEST AROUND
Mobile detailing service
Home/office. Free est.
Frankle (352)220-6760


"DEBRIS HAULING"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898
DOG GROOMING
In your home or mine.
10 yrs. exp. Stephanie
@ (352) 503-3435
LISA'S SIMPLE
ORGANIZATION & MORE
Floors to ceilings
Inside/Out & In b'twn
(352) 362-6452
WE MOVE SHEDS
352-637-6607

MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM


RAINDANCER @
6" Seamless Gutter
Best Job Avallablell
Lic. & Ins. 352-860-0714
r ----- Eu
ALL EXTERIOR
S ALUMINUM
Quality Price!
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 621-0881





CIRCLE T
SOD FARMS INC.
Res/Com. Installations
LUc.(352) 400-2221 Ins.

aglorive

Your world first.
Ever' Day


5NFOMATI


e^ Bruce
Kaufman
Construction




* Small Jobs Welcome Porch Enclo'ures
* Remodeling Soffit & Facing
* Room Additions \ inyl Siding
* Garages Doors & windows

(352) 628-0100
if ~ L ( riL.ff / tr/-

Roof Cleaning Specialist
The Only Company that can Keep Mold & Mildew Off
Siding Stucco Vinyl Concrete Tile & Asphalt Roofs

GUARANTEED!
Restore Protect Beautify Residential & Commercial

Suncoast

Exterior
Restoration Service Inc.

S877-601-5050 352-489-5265






Installations by '
Brian CBC1253853
-4We 628d 751te imfg4n
352-628-7519 o a


Starting is Important

Stopping is CRITICAL





WE DO

BRAKES!
Citrus Tire &
Automotive Center
2302 W. Hwy. 44 Inverness, FL
729543 MV-9761



Boulerice: 5en-irig All ofCitrus Cowi*t


CCC0254S. QB0002180 JR0j I IQ
& SUPPLY INC.
Family Owned & Operated Since 1967
NEW ROOFS REROOFS REPAIRS
FREE ESTIMATES






I (352) 628-5079 (352) 628-7445


me T'o Spruce UyF or The q oicfays

2/1 & 9 Painting, nc.

Interior-Exterior Painting

Pressure Washing

634-5152 or 860-1184

Call today to get that one room'4ja
or whole house freshened up!
We use Porter Paint
7292 Lic. #139587





INFORMATION


..^Gi^ Sl -'r W


[-i0', 6 Seior


Medical


lc.n Medical


PI


F/T LPN
Seeking outgoing,
energetic
individual.
Apply at:
BARRINGTON PLACE
(352) 746-2273


** LPNs **

We are seeking
energetic, caring
Individuals to work
full-time in a dynamic
team environment.
Competitive wages
& benefits,
Apply in Person @
MARION HOUSE
HEALTH CARE CENTER
3930 E. Silver Springs
Blvd. Ocala
fax resume to
352-236-0888 or email
hr-marlonhouse@senlQ
rsmgnagement coam
EOE


[


. . .


il


LPN NEEDED

Must have strong
computer skills for
clinical research
position.
Research experience
desirable.
Please call
(352)563-1865 or
email twood@encore
docs.com



NURSE
PRACTIONER
Do you want to work
In an environment
where your work is
respected and your
role is valued? Yes?
Then fax your
resume to:
352-746-1972.
P/T women health a
plus Busy PC/Pain
Medicine office.


CLASSIFIED


NURSING
ASSISTANT
Do you have nursing
exp. but are not
certified? If you're
willing to work hard
and have a positive
attitude, come
apply at Barrington
Place. Strong
communication and
customer service skills
a must.
Excellent benefits.
Fun olace to work
and Call Homell
A Apply at: m
BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W. Norvell
Bryant Hwy. Lecanto
No Phone Calls


Your world firsi
Eiery Day

CH )NI:l-E
--.'.. m ,/;7 ,7-





3D SUNDA~, OCTOHI R 1 I~*, 2007 CTRaS COUNTY (FL) ~HRONICLI


YOU NEED TO KNOW EXACTLY WHAT YOUR CAR IS WORTH,
NO MATTER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUY!
CALL THE
INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE... IT'S FREE!


800-3


3008


2
SAVE
3,000


REE 2





'lD
DOc


100





24 HOUR R


7 VERSA

P""v-


RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFORMATION


2007 ALTIMA
VE ____


Jfw REE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFORMATION


2007 FROl
SAVE
24,50O


fJiA4REE 24HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE


ITIER





3E WITH INFORMATION


AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE : (JT l AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE : U AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT. 425 800-325-1415 EXT. 426 800-325-1415 EXT. 427


1 999 $16 999 15,999

WN 199 MO.' DOWN 249MO.' DOWN 249MO.


20



--FRE
Wl


13,88

200



FREI
WI


'9,888

200



FREI
6WI

$8,888

2001



& .-. FREE


'16,88


)07


E 24 HOUR
TH INFORM.
PRICING O
800-325


6 SE


E 24 HOUR REC
TH INFORMATION
PRICING ON TH
800-325-141


5TAI
acffH


E 24 HOUR REC
TH INFORMATION
PRICING ON TH
800-325-141r


CIVIC



RECORDED MESSAGE
ATION AND SPECIAL
)N THIS VEHICLE,
-1415 EXT. 445

SAVE '4,500


NTRA



ORDED MESSAGE
)N AND SPECIAL
HIS VEHICLE
5 EXT. 453

189m0.


URUS



ORDED MESSAGE
IN AND SPECIAL
HIS VEHICLE
5 EXT. 461

'l69Mo.


I CADILLAC


E 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
TH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT. 470


2007 CC


---, FREE 24 HOUR I
WITH INFORM
PRICING O
800-325-

s13,888


2006 Ml


FREE 24 HOUR F
WITH INFORM
PRICING O
800-325-

'19,888


2005 EU


---, FREE 24 HOUR RE(
WITH INFORMATI
4('/ PRICING ON 1
-1 800-325-14

'8,888


2003 L


-. FREE 24 HOU
v -WITH INFOI
PRICING
6210-11 800-1


SAVE '12,000 13,888


IROLLA



RECORDED MESSAGE
NATION AND SPECIAL
N THIS VEHICLE
-1415 EXT. 446

SAVE'4,500


URANO



RECORDED MESSAGE
NATION AND SPECIAL
N THIS VEHICLE
1415 EXT. 454

SAVE 7,500


INTRA



CORDED MESSAGE
ION AND SPECIAL
THIS VEHICLE
15 EXT. 462

'169Mo.'


.INCOLN



UR RECORDED MESSAGE
RMATION AND SPECIAL
3 ON THIS VEHICLE
325-1415 EXT. 471

SAVE 11,000


2007 Di


-- FREE 24 HOUR I
WITH INFORMAL
PRICING 0
800-325-

'12,888


2005 01


,-----FREE 24 HOUR
WITH INFORM
(S\ 1 PRICING
CAMP- ,800-325

'18,888


2005


FREE 24 HOUR I
SWITHINFORM
PRICING O0
e'z1 ~800-325.

'13,888


2002 U


.--- FREE 24 HOUR REC
.r<-J WITH INFORMATI(
OF d! "PRICING ON T
u" J 800-325-141

'9,888


AKOTA



RECORDED MESSAGE
NATION AND SPECIAL
N THIS VEHICLE
-1415 EXT. 447

SAVE'6,000


FREE 24 HOUR I
WITH INFORMAL
li PRICING O
800-325

'18,888


ODYSSEY 2005



RECORDED MESSAGE FREE 24
ATION AND SPECIAL WITH INF
)N THIS VEHICLE : I f PRII
-1415 EXT. 455 8

SAVE 1'8,000 '12,888


F150



RECORDED MESSAGE
NATION AND SPECIAL
N THIS VEHICLE
-1415 EXT. 463

SAVE'6,500'


I!


HOUR
FORM
CING 0
00-325


FREE 24 HOU
WITH INFOR
PRICING
800"3

'8,888


WMRY 2001



CORDED MESSAGE FREE
ON AND SPECIAL WIT
rHIS VEHICLE
15 EXT. 472

s189mo '6,888


FF


E 24 HOUI
H INFOR
PRICING
800-32


IRANGO



RECORDED MESSAGE
ACTION AND SPECIAL
)N THIS VEHICLE
-1415 EXT. 448

SAVI '8,88


MPALA



RECORDED MESSAGE
ATION AND SPECIAL
)N THIS VEHICLE
-1415 EXT. 456

SAVE 7,00


[ANGER



R RECORDED MESSAGE
MATION AND SPECIAL
SON THIS VEHICLE
25-1415 EXT. 464

1690.o

IONTIER



R RECORDED MESSAGE
MATION AND SPECIAL
ON THIS VEHICLE
25-1415 EXT. 473

'179m.o


OCALANISSAN S
(800) 342-3008 2200 SR 200 OCALA (352) 622-4111 TomGHt
ALL PRICES WITH '1,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY PLUS SALES TAX, LICENSE FEE AND '395 DEALER FEE.
ALL INVENTORY PRE-OWNED AND SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. *PAYMENTS @ 72 MONTHS @ 6.9% APR, W.A.C.


11-1 .-


I


U


A


CiTR,,js CouN7y (FL) CHRomcv.'


14,2007


SDSUNDAY, OCTOBER


I











SUNDAY. OCTOBER 14, 2007 9D


C-I
1lC= Profess'nll


EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/Cell 422-3656
Occupational
Therapist
FT opening for an
OTR in skilled nursing
facility; beautiful
lakeside setting in a
growing community.
Come join our stable
and experienced
rehab staff and
growing programs;
$5,000 sign-on bonus
and great benefits,
Life is short,
have fun at work!

Please email your
resume to: cbacree
@southernltc com ,
or Call 352-637-1130,
or Fax Resume to
352-860-7751 or
apply In person to
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness, FL 34453

PA or Nurse
Practitioner
F/T or P/T, For Busy
Medical Office.
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2512
PA/NURSE
PRACTIONER
Needed for busy
medical practice.
Competetive
salary & benefits.
F/T or P/T Please call:
(352) 746-0600 or
FAX RESUME TO:
(352) 746-0607
Part Time
Billing Personnel

Needed w/ exp.
Fax Resume to
352-563-5069

RECEPTIONIST/
OFFICE MANAGER
DENTAL/
SURGICAL ASST.
For Oral Surgery
Office. Experience
preferred, excel.
pay & benefits.

Fax Resume To:
352-688-6238

REGISTERED
DENTAL HYGIENIST
PT, Must be Energetic
Please call
Vicky/Peggy at:
(352) 746-0330

RN SUPERVISOR
Ever, otner we sernd
& PRN 3.11 We offer
compareite wage-..
sh,Ht differential &,
esceilent benefits Ws
are looking for Ihe
right Inai.ldual to
c:orr,rpllment our
dedicated team LiC
super.lisory e'p req
Appi ;r, person 4
MARION HOUSE
HEALTH CARE CENTER
3930 E. Sliver Springs
Blvd. Ocala or fax
resume to
352-236-0888 or e-mail
hi-marion-'seniors
manapement.con.. -
EOE

RN, LPN, CNA,
CMA NEEDED
ALL STAR *
Professional
Staffing Services
352-560-6210

RN/LPN
CNA/HHA'S
Interim Health Care
(352) 637-3111

Substance
Abuse
Counselors

The Center's
is seeking SA
counselors to work
with our adult and
child/adolescent
populations in Citrus
County. Bachelors
Degree In a field of
Human Svcs and 1 yr
exp req Salary range:
$13-$14.28/hr
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/IEOE Fax or
e-mailresume to
HR, the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
iobs@thecenters us
For more info visit
www.thecenters us




CUSTOMER
SERVICE

QUICK TEMP
EMPLOYMENT
is looking for
Customer Service
Representative to
work full-time
Mon Fri from 9:30am
to 5:30pm
Contact 204-887-4734


EXECUTIVE
HOUSEKEEPER
For Resort Hotel in
Citrus County. 3 years
prior experience in
position required.
Health Insurance, 401,
Vacation & Holidays.
Mail resume with
salary requirements
to: Citrus County
Chronicle Blind Box
#1395M, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429

Plantation Inn
& Golf Resort
Crystal River
Is currently accepting
applications for
talented people
with personality and
strong work ethics.
Open positions
include:
Banquet Server
Cook
Server Asst.
Room Attd.
Front Desk Clerk
Kitchen Utilities
We offer excellent
benefits and friendly
atmosphere.
Please Apply
In person at
Human Resources
DFWP. EOE. M/F. D/V.

SRE STATE CAREER
Sales Lic. Class $249 I
I Start 10/30/07
CITRUS REAL ESTATE I
/ SCHOOL, INC. I
1 (352)795-0060* N

YMCA
PROGRAM
DIRECTOR

Opportunity for
experienced
professional with
strong leadership and
relationship skills. Must
have budgetary,
administrative and
supervisory
experience. YMCA of
the Suncoast -
Citrus County
www.suncoast
YmXa..rg
Resumes to
sballf@suncoast
ymca.org
EOE DFWP
Salary $33,000-$36,000





Bartender
Apply in Person
9a 3p, Mon Fri
HICKORY ISLAND
RESTAURANT
Inglis (Old Port Inglis
Restaurant) Hwy., 19

Exp'd LINE COOK
Apply in person at:
CRACKERS
BAR & GRILL
Crystal River

HUNGRY HOWIE'S
PIZZA & SUBS
Hiringnrirds r,.ip &
dell.er., dr,.ers.,
Great way to earn
extra Holiday cash I
FT/PT available.
Retirees welcome.
Must have valid FL.
License and proof
of insurance.
Please apply at
3601 N. Lecanto Hwy.,
Beverly Hills. Please
ask for Diana.






C~ipNiiE


Advertising
Ad
Coordinator

The Citrus County
Chronicle
Is now accepting
applications.
Assist sales reps and
designers to coordi-
nate print advertising,
manage work flow,
ensure accuracy of
ads, oversee billing
and proofread.
Computer
proficiency a must.
Excellent organiza-


Fax cover letter and
resume to HR at:
352-564-2935
or Apply in Person @
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429
Qualified
applications must
undergo drug
screening, EOE


I impact

tomorrow.

At the American Cancer Society, we impact
tomorrow by answering the concerns of
individuals today. That's why we hire
enthusiastic people who can use their energy
to connect with the community, People who
can create and secure important relationships
while meeting day-to-day challenges. Join us
now and make things happen,

Community Representative
Citrus County
Execute our biggest and most successful
special events. Recruit and manage a team of
informed, prepared volunteers while working
to secure corporate sponsorships, keeping
an eye on financial goals and leading us in
reaching them, andidentifying new financial
contributors.
Position requires a Bachelor's degree and
experience in outside sales, fundraising and/or
community development Travel expected
within assigned area. Exceptional benefits
and career growth potential provided.
Apply online now:
www.ACScareers.org



i Driven with a purpose.

0oe
729545


IC"-edca


BUILDING
MAINTENANCE
WORKER
Unskilled and semi-
skilled manual labor
performing general
maintenance tasks In
the building trades.
Work assignments
consist of painting,
carpentry, plumbing
and electrical.
Working knowledge
of building
construction tools
and equipment.
Some experience
in general building
maintenance
and construction.
Ability to lift and carry
construction
materials.
$7.69 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
Apply at
the Office of
Citrus County Human
Resources, 3600 West
Sovereign Path,
Suite 178, Lecanto,
Florida 34461
no later than Friday,
October 19, 2007
EOE/ADA

DRIVER NEEDED

Class A or B Preferred
Contact:
Dicks Moving Inc.
(352) 621-1220
IMMEDIATE
OPENING
Looking for a new
career? We are a local
screen enclosure com-
pany needing good,
hard working team
players to join our team.
We offer competitive
pay and the ability to
move up. Call
352-748-6655
LOOKING FOR A
NEW TRADE?
We need energetic,
team players to join our
team. All phases of
concrete and masonry-
will train. 352-748-2111
PRO PAINTER/
MAINT. Needed
Must have car.
Drug & Background
Check. Christian
Ministry Organization.
(352) 220-1188













How
To Make
Your
Dining
Room
Set
Disappear...
Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!



(352) 563-5966

wchroncleo 1 ne1.
www.chronicleonline.com


C-A en


ATTENTION
Real Estate Agents,
Brokers, and
Salesmen of all fields.
Are you tired of long
hours with no
compensation?
My agents make
$5,000 to $7,000
a month. We have
joined a national
effort to assist in tne
enrollment of the rew
Medicare Advantage
plans for Retirees on
Medicare
You will work In
Pharmacies,
Senior Centers and
Local area.
My Agents enjoy
Monthly Bonuses
We take trips all
over the world
We advance 1st
commissions
Vested Renewals
We have Preset
appointments
TV Leads
Seminars
Pre approach letters
Please call Mr. Buck
at 1-352-726-7722
for an interview or
Fax Resume to
1-352-726-6813

REAL ESTATE CAREER
SSales Lic. Class $249 I
S Start 10/30/07
CITRUS REAL ESTATE
SCHOOL, INC. I
(352)795-0060 .* 1

Z, TradesB
dn/SkllsH


BUS DRIVER
Opening for over the
road motor coach
drivers. Must have
experience, current
DOT cards & clean
record 352-382-3808

COOK F/T
for Healthcare Facility
Phone for
appointment.
Ask for Cary or Patty.
(352) 344-5555

DECKHAND
Exp. Stone crab
deckhand for Crystal
River, Drug free Boat,
(352) 398-7775

.--AWN
TECHNICIAN

F/T clean Dri. Lic.,
Lawn experience
preferred.
Will train; benefits
Apply In person
CITRUS PEST MGT.
5 N. Melbourne
Beverly Hills, FI 34465

MALE
CAREGIVER
NEEDED
Friendly & Cheerful
person needed
to provide
companionship
services for senior.
From midnight to Sam,
On Sat. No
Certification Needed.
Call Home Instead
Senior Care at
352-249-1259

MARKETING
AGENT
Opportunity w/major
Country Club,
Community
Developer to join
marketing team,
responsible for
cultivating leads from
national advertising
program...
Program Includes:
aggressive phone
efforts and
attendance at
promo events, in &
out of Florida. Choice
of Salary and bonus
or Salary and
commissions must
have RE License for
commission plan. Fax
Resume to Nancy @
352-746-4456

POSTAL JOBS

$17.33 $27.58/HR,
NOW HIRING. for
application & free
government job Info.
call
AMERICAN ASSOC.
OF LABOR
1-913-599-8226, 24HRS
emp. serve.


Serving the Developmentally
Disabled Since 1966.

$ Increased pay rates and $

competitive benefit package for

all F/T employees after 90 days


Positions Available:

Residential F/T & P/T

Supported Living Coach F/T

DRUG FREE WORKPLACE

Apply at the Key Training Center
Business Office
130 Heights Ave., Inverness
352-341-4633
(TDD: 1-800-545-1833 ext. 347)
*EOE*
729546


TOWER HAND
Starting at $9 00/hr
Bldg Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017 Mon-Fri

Utilities Operator I
Advanced
technical work In
water/wastewater
treatment plant
operations. Performs
tasks relative to the
repair and
maintenance of
county water/
wastewater facilities.
Certification as a
Florida Water &/or
Wastewater class "C"
Operator. Preference
will be given to
Wastewater class "C"
Operator. Dual
certification
preferred. Must have
or obtain a Florida
CDL class "B" within
one year of
employment.
Starting pay Is
$12.30 hourly.
Excellent Benefits.
Apply at or send
resume to
Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
no later than
Friday, Oct. 26, 2007.
EOE/ADA.

WANTED
Exp. Pipe Layer
Water, Sewer & Storm
CALL (352) 726-3074

WANTED
Swimming Pool
Construction Trainees
We will teach you a
trade that you can
build upon. Already
have experience?
Come join our team
where you have the
opportunity to
advance. Laborers
needed also.
PAY BASED UPON
EXPERIENCE.
Wildwood 352-748-3987

W"H^^
c^lBenra


- -- -













NOW HIRING
LOCALLY

Large ntonhal
Or 1aizagtio. I



benefits &Taid
training,







Accounting
Manager

We are seeking an

to be responsible for
preparing financial
reports for audit;
Smaintainingft
















compliance with
state and federal reg-
ulations; and prepar-
ing monthly financial
statements for our
Board of Directors,
Ideal candidate must
be a CPA in the State
of Florida with 5 years
experience in health-
care preferred.
TPlease apply online












at wwwcltrusmh.com
CMHS Is an equaler
opportunity employer


HORSE FARM HELP
Exp, stalls, turn out,
groom. Inglis area.
F/T/ EOE
352-447-1008




PRODUCTION
COLLATOR

The Citrus County
Chronicle's
Packaging
Department is
currently accepting
applications for a
part time Collator.
Must be able to work
nights, weekends
and holidays. Heavy
lifting and bending
required. Must
possess good
organizational,
communication and
writing skills.
Qualified candidates
may fill out an
application at the
Citrus County
Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River
EOE
PT Staff Associate
Professional, reliable,
ability to work w/ pub-
lic, phone answering
skills, & computer skills a
must. Heavy lifting req.
EOE-M/F/D/V-DFWP
Fero Funeral Home
352-746-4551
RECREATION
SPECIALIST
Assists Recreation
Supervisor with
personnel
responsibilities
of seasonal
staff:Interviews,
personnel records,
evaluations. Performs
routine office duties.
Performs life guarding
Including
surveillance, first aid,
performing rescues
and emergency
care. Picks up and
disposes of biohazard
waste. Requires
certification in
Lifeguarding, CPR
for the Professional
Rescuer & First Aid,
Emergency
Response, Waterfront
and Head Guard.
Certified pool
operator preferred.
Must possess a
current valid Florida
driver license.
Starting pay
$11.53 hourly.
Full time working a
flexible schedule.
Excellent benefits.
Apply at the Citrus
County Human
Resources Office,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
no later than Friday,
October 19, 2007
EOE/ADA

Veolia Water
North America

Has an opening for
a Field Service
Technician at our
Crystal River project.
Duties include:
Repairing water and
wastewater lines,
installing/replacing
water meters and
other associated
duties. Applicants
must possess good
driving record. We
offer an excellent
benefit plan including
401K. Call 795-3199
for an application,
EOE -M/F/D/V.
We conduct
applicant drug
testing.
WAREHOUSE
PERSON/DRIVER
Fulltime, D-class driver's
license needed. No
weekends. 726-2300


"LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.charliefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877





4 PERSON SPA
Leisure Bay, Cover &
steps. Pd. $5,000/Sell
$2,500 Exc. Cond.
(352) 465-6051





A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
-' 2 Ton $780.00
-* 2-/2ton $814.00
-* 3 Ton $882.00
Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Also Avail. Free
Delivery! 746-4394

ABC Briscoe Appliance
Refrigerators, washers,
stoves. Service & Parts .
(352) 344-2928

AMANA
Washer & Dryer, 3 yrs.
old. Stainless drum,
Dryer works great,
washer makes noise
but works. $175/obo
GAS GRILL, $50/obo
(352) 344-9663

APT. SIZE CLOTHES
WASHER, new. $45
(352) 860-2434

DISHWASHER
Whirlpool, Excellent
Condition'$75
(352) 527-9876

FREEZER
7.5 Cu. Ft.
Upright, white. $100
Evenings only.
(352) 563-0642

GAS STOVE
Magic Chef $125;
DRYER, Kenmore
$25
(352) 344-4182

GE Washer
2 yrs old, good
condition, $125
(352) 341-5182

HOT WATER HEATER
"State" 40 gal. $75;
HOT WATER HEATER
Whirlpool, 30 gal. $75
(352) 344-4182

KENMORE APPLIANCES
MICROWAVE, Wht.,
Above Range $50;
DISHWASHER, Wht. $99.
Both 1 yr. Exc. Cond.
(352) 560-7730

WASHER & DRYER
KENMORE
Washer less than lyr.
Both work exc. $300
(352) 527-6639

Washer & dryer, exc.,
like new, $295/set,
w/l-yr. Guar. Free Del.
& set-up 352-754-1754





SOUTHERN
AUCTION
MARKETING &
APPRAISAL

AUCTION
Monday Oct 15th
7:00 PM

3-pc diam-plate tool
box, marble-top DR
table set, Calif. king
cannonball bed,
salt-water reels......
Pics at
www auctionzlo coam
#4341
15991 NE Hwy 27 Alt.
Wllllston, FL
352-528-2950
Col. Joel Kulcsar
AU1437-AB2240
10% BP on all sales


WANTED SHORT TERM
LOAN SEC. BY OWNER
Occ, home. $10K, int.
only, Balloon 860-2347





POOL ROUTE
HERNANDO Net $84K +
year. Will train. Guar-
antee accounts $67K
full price. 877-766-5757
www ooolroutesaoles
cam NPRS Inc. Broker




GREAT INCOME
OPPORTUNITY
PT/FT Earn free travel,
(847) 815-3224
thetravelarouD@yahoo.
corn





ALL STEEL BUILDINGS



25x30x9 (3:12 Pitch)
Roof Overhang
2-9x7 garage doors,
2 vents, entry door,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED- $16.495
35x50x12 (2: 12 pitch)
2 10x10 Roll-up Doors
2-Gable Vents, Entry Dr.
4" Concrete Slab
$29 795 INSTALLED
Many Sizes Avail,
We Custom Build
We Are The Factory
Fl. Engineered Plans
Meets or Exceeds
Florida Wind Code
METAL STRUCTURES
LLC.COM
1-866-624-9100
metalstructuresllc coam

FACTORY DIRECT
METAL BUILDINGS
CARPORTS, SHEDS
Custom Installation,
Up to 140MPH
Wind Rating
Gulf to Lake Sales
(352) 527-0555

WE MOVE SHEDS
352-637-6607


Citrus County
Computer Doctors
Repairs In-Home or
Pick-Up, Delivery. avail.
Free quote, 344-4839
CANNON COPIER
Business Type; Works
Great $35;
OLD LAPTOP $15
Both for $45
(352) 860-2434
DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
http://www.rdeeii.com
MONITOR
Runs like new,
$25
(352) 341-4449

PRINTER
Dell Laser mdl 1700 $50
Xerox scanner mdl 6400
$30 (352) 382-0380





Backhoe $2,500
Landscape
(352) 634-1728
or (352) 527-0403


TRACTOR
John Deere model 420,
Hydra-Static Drive
Onan 20hp Engine 570
hours, 50" Mid-mount
Deck, pwr Str. HydroLift.
Runs Great $2500 obo
352-249-4456/586-6861




OUTDOOR TABLE
W/Large umbrella/
stand, w/4 chairs
$95. (352) 637-0440
Patio Set
Martha Stewart
Collection Sofa, coffee
table 2 rockers,
excel cond. $295.
(352) 628-5186





2 Recliners
$150. ea.or best offer
Hand Painted Victorian
Lamp 28" Tall, $75. obo
(352) 637-4645
2 Swivel Recliner Chairs,
mocha color,
new in 2004 $399 ea..
Now $150 ea.
Call (352) 628-1971
5 Piece Solid Oak
Dining Room Set
w/ Custom Cover
$350.
352-628-6075
All Leather Sofa,
as new, top quality,
chestnut brown,
basset, 89" Long,
perf. cond. for office or
home must sell pd over
$2K $950(352) 746-7746


B-4
CAinancEial


DIESEL TRACTOR (Sm.)
3 cyl., 49 hrs., Very
economically Yanmar,
22 hp. made by Deere.
Bush & grader blade
inc. $3,950. 344-1093
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
SNAPPER Riding Mower
exc. cond. Rear engine
$500; SEARS Push Gas
Mower, rarely used,
$100. (352) 746-0230
TORO (2)
Self propelled mowers
22" 6.5hp recycler
bagger, like new
$165ea (352) 794-5099
URBAN GARDEN
COMPOSER
$125;
HD WAGON $50


LARGE ORCHID
CACTUS
Ready to bloom,
$60/obo
(352) 344-0283



"LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.charllefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-642-3877


-Garage
L C4~n~


"LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.charliefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877




Craftsman 12" Band
Saw 2 yrs. old paid
$300. + tax will sell for
$190. no. tax, very little
use, need smaller saw
(352) 228-2207

WHEEL OF A
DEAL









GUARANTEED
RESULTS FOR
ONLY $63.95
Sell your car today
with a Wheel of a
Deal Ad, Run a 30
day ad and we will
continue to run your
ad every month until
you sell the car.

(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902
'Ad will not be
automatically
scheduled. The
customer must call*
each month to
reschedule.





57" High Definition TV
Hitachi Ultravision wide
screen, High Def, tuner,
2 memory card slots,
See the picture,
Cost $2899, Sell $900.
(352) 563-5921

CAR STEREO DECK
Alpine AM/FM/CD &
XM Sat. Radio + Subwfr,
Great sound Like New
only $150 352-208-4428
TV, Sanyo, 19",
excellent, $65 firm
(352) 726-2269





2 x 6 x 12PT
$6.00 each.
(352) 447-2238
45 Aluminum Metal
Pan Roofing Panels,
Styrofoaminsulation 12ft
long, 1 ft..W, 3"D, $850;
Many alum windows
w/ scrns. & Door, $750
(352) 220-6820
LUMBER
Misc. Fence Posts,
landscape timbers,
boards, cattle gates,
cement block. Lg. Load
$300/all (352) 621-0848
QUALITY LUMBER
Romantic Red Cedar.
3,000 bd. ft. @ $2.50/bft.
Cherry IK bd. ft. $3/bfft.
Pecan 300 bd.ft. $3/bft.
352-522-0724/229-1302


Wood burning
fireplace, $150.
Kitchen table, 4 chairs,
wooden & hutch, $50.
(352) 344-9633


-I

HANDICAPPED
VAN FOR SALE
Handicapped van with
Braun llffthand
controls, six way power
seat, fully loaded,
wood package with
TV,VCR, Ford E250,1993-
with under 40,000 miles.
Asking $18,000 or best
offer... 352-270-3883.
LIFT CHAIR
Rose, exc. cond,
Paid S950 Sell S400
(352) 563-5239


Power Chair Jazzy Ultra,
model, motorized
org. $6,000.
asking $1,500.
(352) 344-1820
POWER WHEELCHAIR
(Pronto) w/Batt. &
Chrgr. easy to operate


PRE OWNED FURNITURE
Unbeatable Prices
NU 2 U FURNITURE
Homosassa 621-7788
Audio, video console,
traditional walnut finish.
24 x 72 x28H, adjustable
shelves, 4 doors, 2 glass,
2 scm. w/ panels, excel
cond. $500. obo Citrus
Hills (352) 270-8028
BEDROOM SET
Girl's Full Sz. Canopy,
Dresser w/mirror, night
stand & desk. $175obo
(352) 489-8633
BEDS :* BEDS + BEDS
The factory outlet store!
For TOP National Brands
Fr.50%/70% off Retail
Twin $119 .* Full $159
Queen $199 / King $249
Please call 795-6006
CITRUS HOME DECOR
Like new Furniture
Buy, Sell, Consignment,
Homosassa, 621-3326
COFFEE TABLE
Ashley 2-/2' x 3-/2' w/Stg
& 2 End tables 24"X 24"
w/shelf Hvy Oak $150
(352) 341-1915
COMPUTER DESK
73x45, enclosed, lite
finish$ 125 7pc. Patio Set
PVC w/cushlon, good
condition $125
352-476-3388
CURIO CABINET
Cherry, Brass Hardware
lighted, exc. cond. $175
352-628-5949, msg.
Curio Cabinet,
oak, lighted, $75.
48" Round Glass
Table top, $30.
(352) 344-1820
Dinning. Rm. Table &
4 Chairs, w/ leaf
traditional oak, Ivory
upholstered seats.
Queen Anne style legs
$600.obo (352)
503-3144
Double bed set with
frame (JC Penney
Posture Supreme), ask-
ing $90; 4 drawer metal
filing cabinet, $45
Call (352) 726-6237
DRESSER, Oak
64", 8 drawer.
w/mirror;
Night Table
Both for $150
(352) 344-4182
Entertainment Cntr
w/crown-dnti mldg.
slidg. TV Tray, $700
LazyBoys(2) Lthr Reclnr
$300/ea. (352) 382-7074
GLASS-TOP DR SET
Wicker w/4 chairs $100
obo; Designer GLASS
TOP Table w/massive
stone base. $100 obo.
(239) 246-0284 Cell
KITCHEN TABLE
w/Chairs, white w/tile
top, beautiful ocean
inlay $275
(352) 637-0440
La-Z-Boy Leather
Reclining Loveseat
hunter green,
retail $2,100.
Asking $385 obo.like
new(352)746-2842
LEATHER SOFA, Recliner
Chair, 3 tables,
$450/obo
Can e-mail photos
dm82444@aol com
(352) 382-2294
Lovely Solid Mahogany
King size bed
complete, dresser,
chest of drawers & side
tables, $600.
(352) 637-0440
Modern Sofa &
Loveseat, neutral color
excel. cond., $575.
Rattan Glass top,
breakfast set. 2 chairs,
$50. (352) 746-9453
New load of furniture
just arrived
Browse 6,000 sq.ft.
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Tues-Sat. 9am-1pm
Homosassa 628-2306
Oak Dining Room Set,
Table w/inlaid glass
panels. 8 chairs, like
new cond. $500. obo
(352) 464-0032
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
Queen Size Bed
Spring Air, head & foot
adjustable, w/ vibrating
head & foot, excel.
cond., 2yrs. old $1,200.
(352) 628-2965
RECLINER
Teal Color.
Good. Cond. $75;
SEWING MACHINE
Kenmore, Multi-Stitch
$45 (352) 527-0424
r -;--ni
RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
Srentalfinder, corn
SOFA & LOVESEAT
Tapestry, pastel
brocade. $300 obo.
8 X 12 RUG, taupe
floral. $50. Both, good
cond. (352) 563-1265
TABLE W/4 CHAIRS
Sm. Maple & White W/
Matching Microwave
Cart. $150; PATIO RD.
TABLE W/4 CHAIRS
$100 (352)489-1878
The Path's Graduates,
Single Mothers,
Needs your furniture.
Dining tables, dressers
& beds are needed,
Call (352) 746-9084


GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week after your
Garage Sale Just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902

HOMOSASSA
ESTATE ILSALE
Sat. & Sun. 8-6
Motorized Wheel Chair
5223 W. Starburst Ln.
(352) 628-4339




2 TWIN BEDS, wood
headboards, complete
$175/set; .
QUILTING FRAMES $50.
(352) 634-0932
1/2HP Well
pump/motor $30
(352) 400-0489
29'HOBART
230AMP Welder.
(352) 628-4776
or (352) 228-1939
5th WHEEL HITCH
(Reese) $150 Lawn
mower TORO quick
starter, runs good $100
352-726-0094
ABOVE GROUND POOL
18' Round. New pump
& filter. All equip. Incl.
Steps & Ladder.
$250obo (352) 270-3183
--- ----



ADVERTISE YOUR
BUSINESS IN THE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY!

ONE CALL
ONE PRICE
ONE MONTH
'ONLY $200.00
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

appears In the
*Citrus County
Chronicle
*Beverly Hills Visitor
*Riverland News
*Riverland Shopper
*South Marion
Citizen
*West Marion
Messenger
*Sumter County
Times

CALL TODAY
(352) 563-5966

BICYCLES(2)
Mns R600 Cannondale,
Women's eros
Bianchi$600/ea
Cntr-top Ice maker
$100t352Z2Z6--878
BURN BARRELS
Heavy duty wl out tops
$7.50 EA (352) 344-9752
Carpet Factory Direct
Sales Install Repair
Laminate, tile, wood Sr.
disc. (352) 341-0909
CERAMIC TILE 17"x17"
Neutral Color, Retail
$1.32 pay only .79
352-613-7670
COLOR TV
27" $30, 5 Florida Style
pier/end tables all for
$125 (352) 382-7074
SMG
DINING ROOM TABLE
W/4 chairs, $75;
REFRIGERATOR, $75
(352) 270-3641
FOOTBALL TABLE
Sears. great condition.
$75.
352-628-5949, msg.
Generator bought
2005, never used.
5550 watts/8550, Briggs
& Stratton, $500
(352) 637-0440
HOMEOWNERS If you
would like to sell your
home or mobile for
cash quickly, call
.Fred Farnsworth
(352) 726-9369
JUKE BOX (Rowe)
200, AMI, Circa 1983.
Takes & is full of 45s.
Not working due to
turn-table. $450 OBO;


(352) 503-3936
Oak Entertainment
Center, M & F Bicycles,
Strg. Carts. Wk. Table,
JBL Speaker & Woofer,
Baby Items. 860-2675
POOL TABLE
42"x72" $125
Electric (Yamaha)
Guitar+ amp $225
(352) 795-0149
Pressure washer 2300
PSI, 6HP engine, $225
obo. Dining rm table,
6 chairs, extra leaf,
old, $200 obo
(352) 344-2984
SLOT MACHINE
'84 Bally's $875
Mounted Longhorns
$75 (352) 795-0149
The Spot Family Center
Needs Donations
For Community
Family/Youth Events
Land, Storage Racks,
Containers, Folding
Tables, Event Tents, Bus,
Box Truck. Please call:
Brian (352) 220-0576
Vinyl rack, holds 8 rolls,
on rollers, will deliver
$150. (352) 341-0787


E--------


BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676




GUITAR
Schecter Electric,
$350. (352) 795-7766
GUITARS
Takemine Accoustic,
$200; Ovation
Accoustic/electric,
$250; (352) 795-7766
PIANO
40X24X56, Wurlitzer
Spinet, carved legs.
Cherry, heater, exc.
$650. GUITAR, Hoener
Never played, $175;
(352) 795-0636




DUAL FLUSH TOILET
contemp. Ipc. new
porc/ivory 1.6/.8 gal.
Comfort Height. Seat
Incl. retl.$350 1st $175
gets it 352-726-3680




35 Piece Welder
Exercise Workout Set.
$135 firm
(352) 746-7679
ADJUSTABLE TREADMILL
$150/obo
(352) 628-0588
Earthlite Avalon Mas-
sage Table with head
rest & carrying case,
like new, $245
(352) 637-5026
Schwinn Exercise Bike,
Exc. cond. $300/obo
Ab/Back Lounger
$75/obo.
(352) 637-0440




Assault Shotgun
12 go., 8 shot,
Semi-auto
$575.
(352) 697-1200
BOW (Fred Bear)
Super Kodiak recurve,
AMB 60" draw wt 451bs,
RH w/leather qvr.wood
arrow & target $475obo
.(352) 637-2890
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
GOLF CART BATTERIES
THE BATTERY MEDICS
36V & 48V Sets $245
Contact Mark @
727-375-6111
PITCHING MACHINE
Iron Mike. Throws
baseballs & softballs.
$1,800 352-302-0569
Smith & Wesson
Model 5906 SS w/3 clips
Sam Brown Basket
Weave Police Holsters
& Belt. Exc. cond. $700
(352) 382-2899
WE BUY GUNS
On site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




'06 CARGO TRAILER
Good shape $875.
352-860-1106
EQUIPMENT TRAILER
16' dual axle. 10K lbs.
w/ramps & rails. $1,200
(352) 726-5601
TRAILER
Utility, Enclosed,
Car Haulers, Dump,
Equipment Haulers &
More. We Have A Great
Selection of Trailers
In Stock Nowl
Gulf to Lake Sales
352-527-0555




Infant Car Seat $25.
Cosco Pack & Play $40.
Both like new
Call
(352) 436-4109




BUYING US COINS'
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676
Handyman Special
Sale Boat
20 to 30 ft.
(352) 447-6281
Male Rottweiler
Puppy no papers nec.
39 yr. old home-bound
woman looking for
companion. Free or
cheap chest freezer
(352) 621-0909
WANTED
Very OLD Jade,
emerald green,
yellow, red, lilac
I/e'Y, Ah ,' _Aehl


NOTICE
Pets for Sale
In the State of Florida
per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certificate per
Florida Statute.
6' RED TAIL BOA
W/cage, light, etc. incl.
$180. 2/2' ALBINO
BURMESE W/cage, light,
etc. incl. $250/obo
(352) 302-0489
BEAUTIFUL CHOCOLATE
LAB PUPS AKC 9wks.
Old. Parents on prem-
ises. $400. ea. Health
cert. (352) 465-6535
BICHON FRISHE PUPPIES
11 vwks. 1 male, 1 fern.
AKC reg. White. Shots &
health cert. Home
Raised. 90% house
broken. $600 each.
(352) 344-3586


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


,:f;


CLASSIFIED


I


I










IOD SUNDAY, OCOBER 14, 2007

.P--f1 e- r
[-cz Lau^


BLUE & GOLD MACAWS
Pair, "SITTING'.
Includes Newer $1 000
cage w/Breeder boxi
$1.675 (352) 628-7542
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES
2 male, 2 female, fawn
color, shots, health
certificates $350.
(352) 527-2315
English Bull dog, male,
16 months old, all shots
up to date. $600
(352) 569-4121
Humanitarians
of Florida
Low Cost Spay &
Neuter by Appt.
Cgt Neutered $20
t Spaed $25
Dog Neutered &
Spaed start at $35
Low cost shot clinic
Tues, Weds & Thurs
1st & 3rd Saturdays
10am-4pm
(352) 563-2370
LAB PUPS
Bread for loveable
smart pups, AKC,
Health Cert, Vet.
Appr'd, Chocs. & Blks
$250 up. (352) 795-1902
MACAW PARROT
Blue & Gold, w/ large
cage & play pin
$850
Call 464-0520
MALTI-POO'S
Absolutely adorable,
tiny, tail wagging
Peach pups. $400
352-465-9305/423-3282
PET SITTING
Your home or mine.
Call Terrn
(352) 628-1036
POMERANIANS
Tiny fur ball puppies
AKC, 8 wks, 4M, 3F
Shots, wormed, $500
-$600. (352) 746-6437
Quality Home Raised
Pups Maltese, Yorkie,
Chihuahua, poodle,
Designer breeds,
Pekingese/Chin
Cavalier/poo,
Yorkle/poo, malte/poo
Maltese/shlh tzu
352-347-5086
RAT TERRIERS
Male, Female, various
ages, colors and sizes.
Shots, Health Certs,
$250-500 (352) 621-3110
SCOTTISH TERRIER PUPS
Reg. ACA. M or F.
Cute Ilttle Teddy BearsI
H. Cert. $500 & $550
(352) 726-0133
SHIH TZU PUPS
8 weeks old all shots &
health Certificate.
Black & White & Brindle
Cute Loving Fur Balls
Fem. $500 Males $450
(352) 637-9241
TOY POODLE
male, 11 mo. old
medical papers, AKC,
reg. not neutered
$300. csh. 352-637-1814
(352) 212-1546
WEIMARANER PUPPIES
10 wks old, Males, Shots
& Health Certificates.
$350 (352) 628-0206
WEST FLORIDA
AVIAN SOCIETY
16th Annual BIRDMART
Hernando Fairgrounds
Sunday Oct 14th 9-4
(352) 212-6879
YORKIE, Male
12 wk. old.
AKC & CKC Reg. $650
(352)726-2295 After 10A




Gentle Healthy Horses
(2) Gelded 3 yr. olds
(1) Arabian Mare
(1) Reg. Paint Mare, Qtr
(1) TN WIker/Mustang
Gaited Trail Horse
(1) Gelded Thoro./Qtr.
Asking $1,000 EA. OBO
MUST SELLI(Health Reas)
Coggins Tested
(352) 529-0898
Nice Registered
4 yr. old App. Gelding
15H, been trail ridden
up to date on everyth-
ing
$1,200. (813) 967-5580




Goats for sale
Male, 2 months old
(352) 563-1643
WANTED
Livestock Panels
For Round Pen
(352) 628-4121




BOAT TRAILER
'04 Continental. Galv.
fit. on. For 17/21' boat.
Exc. Cond. $950
352-726-3730/422-0201
MERCURY
8HP Outboard, fresh
water use only, Needs
tune up from strg. $450.
(352) 637-6345




Pair of
'01 Sea-Doos
GTX, 3 seaters, w/trailer
$8,000. obo
(352) 601-4594
WAVERUNNERS
SEA-DOOs(3) '98-'00
new trailers 2w/ new
engines, need
clean-up and tuning.
"Empty my Garage"
$4200/Trade Cryst. RIv
(352) 795-7876


POLARIS
'96 SLT780 w/Trlr('97
Shorelander) low hrs.
Exc. cond. $3100 obo
(352) 746-1635




12FT FISHING BOAT
Like Stumpknocker,
baltwell, rod holders.
needs trailer, $150
(352) 34T-0787






BOATS
SOLD AT NO FEE
Selling Them As Fast
As They Come In!






AIRBOAT
10 ft. Aluminum, single
person, cust. built,
1BHP, B/S motor, w/
good propella $600.
(352) 266-2020
ALUMACRAFT
16' All welded Jon boat
25HP 4strk Yamaha,
galv trlr, All '03. Swivel
seats. Many extras.
Always garaged, Exc.
cond, $5,495/obo
(352) 382-8701
AQUA PATIO
25' Pontoon Boat,
11.5 HP Yamaha. low
hrs. exc. cond. Boat has
alum. diamond pit
deck carpeted, new
25" diom. pontoons.
Recently replaced
seating, console,
running & docking
lights. New custom
bimini, new Garmin
nav. sys. Hummingbird
FF. All powder coat rails
& gates, incl. anchor
lines, boarding ladder,
& fenders. Very fast
boat, Will pull water
killers, 2 yrs. old tandem
galv. Trailer, new tires.
Must sell for health
reasons, $17,900/obo
(352) 201-9524
Aqua Sport
1995, 20 ft., electronics,
trir., blmini, 140 Johnson,
excel, cond. $7,500.
(352) 302-0001.
AQUASPORT Osprey
25', C.C., T-Top,
Electronics, w/300 hp
Yamaha '04.
MECHANIC'S SPECIAL
$10,000 Inc. Alum. TrIr.
(352) 621-0848
Area's Largest
Selection of
Clean Used Boats
THREE RIVERS
MARINE



(352) 563-5510

****-** **
AREAS LARGEST
SELECTION
OF PONTOONS
&.PECK QATS...
Crystal River
Marine
(352) 795-2597
BAYLINER
17 ft., bowrider & trailer,
runs excel., 85HP force
eng., many new parts,
$2,995 (352) 598-5616
CANOE
16ft. Mohawk Fiberglass
$450 Sailing Skif 15ft
Alum. mast&boom full
sale $250(352) 726-0094
CAROLINA SKIFF
17' 40Hp Yamaha,
Good Fishing Boat
$2900 (352) 795-3795
DURACRAFT
15' 6hp Yamaha, Low
Hours, Wesco Trir, 2
swvI fishing seats, $1895
352-634-3679/628-5419
GRADY WHITE 22'
'81 Cuddy, 200hp Evnrd,
SS prop. New Biminl,
Alum, Trlr, New tires
.$8000(352) 447-1244
KEY WEST
19' fishing boat, fish
finder, GPS, Canvas,
115Hp Yamaha, Trlr incl
$7000obo 352-302-3614
LOWE
17' Bass Boat w/Traller
50HP 4 stroke Yamaha.
Exc. cond. $5900.
(352) 795-9873
Nature Coast Marine
New, Used &
Brokerage
We Pay Cash for
Clean Used Boats
www BoatSuper

352 794-0094

Nature Coast Marine
l Sales & Service l
Present this Ad for
10% Off on all I
Parts & Service
1590 US 19,
I Homosassa
352-794-0094

NEW & USED
Boat trailers at great
prices. Limited supply.
Let's make a Deall
352-527-3555
MONROE SALES
9-5 Mon thru Frli


PONTOON
2003 G3 LX CRUISE, 20'
PONTOON. 03 YAMAHA
F50 4-STROKE W/LESS
THAN 30 HRS; '03 PER-
FORMANCE TLR; NEW
525 HUMMINGBIRD
DEPT/FISH FINDER;
STEREO; LG BIMINI;
CHANGING/POTTY
ROOM; ALL CG EQUIP-
MENT; LIKE NEWIII CAN
EMAIL PICS. COST OVER
$20,000 NEW; ASKING
$11,900 OBO.
(352) 212-5179
PONTOON
'86 1i8ft Fiesta 92Hp
Yamaha $1600 obo
352-628-1340/422-3123
PROLINE
'03 Sport 30, Immac,
32'6" CC AC cabin un-
der, Merc's 225 150hrs.
All electronics, 2000 KW
Gen, loaded, w/traller,
$79,000 (352) 201-1833
PROLINE
'04, 24 ft., 225 Honda,
Donzl Hull, black, low hrs.
lift kept, NICE $32,000.
(352) 795-1598
REGAL 20'
Ski Boat, 5.7 Merc I/O
Runs Greati W/trlr.
$2,800 (352)621-0848
SUNBIRD
17' 90HP Johnson
w/traller, $2200.
(352) 726-8716
TREMBLY
'93 17/2'Tunnell Hull Flats
Boat, 90HP Yamaha,
CC, Leaning post,
$4,000 (352) 746-9296
Wanted: Boats In Need
of Repair, also motors
and trailers, Cash Paid
(352) 212-6497
WELLCRAFT
1987. 250 Sportsman,
25', Gas eng., 30" draft,
350 hp I/O, alum, trr,.
$9,000(352) 344-9651




DAMON 32', 1992
454 Chevy eng, 27K, 2
ACs, queen bed.Non
Smoking, No pets, Lots
of extras & Exc. Condl
$18,500 (352) 527-8247
DODGE
'80 Mobile Traveler
20' Class C, 52K ml.,
$2,700 OBO
(352) 563-2896
FLEETWOOD
'92, 29 ft, Coronado,
454 Chevy, Corian
cntertop, new toilet, TV,
elec. steps, good cond.
A bargain at $10,900.
obo (352) 220-1607
FOUR WINDS 31'
'04, Slide out, levellers,
backup cam, V-10 Ford
No smk/Pets. Loaded
$40K (352) 422-7794
GULF STREAM '04
Ford BT Cruiser, 28' Tow
pkg. 13K ml 1 slide, walk
arnd qn. bd. very clean
$44,000. (352) 344-5634
SHASTA
'86, 35 ft. 5th Wheel,
all new, AC & Ht., Must
Seel 11 .i j -' ,:
. $3,500. (352) 257-1575




CAMPER
'05 Starcraft pop-up,
model 2407, slide-out
14' awning RVQ
screened room, heat,
hot water, outside
shower ref. A/C, king &
Queen beds sleeps 7
many
extras $8000 obo
(352) 746-9656
CAMPER TRAILER
'71 Timberline
18ft, Good Condition
$800 (352) 257-3070
CARRILITE
1989 30' Travel trailer,
rear bdrm. $4500/obo
(352) 489-3503
Iv. message.
COACHMAN
5TH Wheel 26'/ needs
work. $1.,000/obo
(352) 634-1728
(352) 527-0403
COLEMAN
'97 Pop-up, 2 qu, beds,
gas stove, kit. CHA,
raged, great cond.
3,000 (352) 746-0230
FLEETWOOD
'06, 5th Wheel Gearbox
toy hauler, Incl slider,
king bed over garage,
full bd.in frnt, genera-
tor, twin LP's, sport de-
cor. Can be seen in
storage, behind
Beverly Hills Liquor store
$22,500. (352) 746-2699
KEYSTONE
2005, 32' Bunkhouse
w/master. Sleeps 8,
microwave. MintI Value
$18K, Sell for $12K OBO
941-626-3951
OPEN ROAD
36', '03, 5thWhl, Islnd kit.,
3 slides. No pets/smkng.
Used & pulled very little.
$21,500 (352) 563-9835
TOWING TRAV. TRLR *
OR BOAT, ACROSS
TOWN OR COUNTRY
REAS. (352) 746-0802
UTILITY TRAILER
Homesteader '97 8' x 4'
Enclosed $700
(352) 746-4558


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ALUM. TRUCK BED 8 X 9
w/Gooseneck H.U. Off
2005, F-350, $2,800 obo
352-212-3655
CAR STEREO DECK
Alpine AM/FM/CD &
XM Sat. Radio + Subwfr,
Great sound Uke New
only $150 352-208-4428
Sell or Trade Cheap
S10 Pick Up, Parts,
Race Car, Parts
(352) 621-3420
TRUCK CAP
ARE Brand w/built In
lockable compart-
ments & double doors.
Fits Ford w/8' bed.
$650obo (352) 726-5601





I TOP DOLLAR
I For Junk Cars |
I$ (352)201-1052 $ J
L .. = ..--= =
. CASH BUYER-No Junk
for Trucks, Vans & Cars
Larry's Auto Sales
Hwy 19 S, Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333





*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084

WE PAY CASH
FOR
JUNK CARS
Top $$ paid $$
(352) 523-4357

$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W,
(352) 228-9645



--- --

ALL SAVE AUTO
AFFORDABLE CARS
100+ Clean
Dependable Cars
FROM $450- DOWN
30 MIN. E-Z CREDIT
1675 US HWY 19
HOMOSASSA
352-563-2003

AUTOMOBILE*
DONATIONS
Tax Deductible
Maritime Ministries
*43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
(352) 795-9621
Tax Deductible *





BUICK
'05 Century, Custom
pwr, all tilt, CC, CD plyr.
ONLY 3100 MII $14,900
(352) 212-0750
BUICK
1989 Regal, 100K ml.
great shape,
$1500/obo
(352) 586-0417
BUICK
rLaSabre '00 Custom '
whl-mnt, carriage top,
clean, Must see/drive
$4500 352-527-6802
CADILLAC
'95 Deville, Needs work.
$499 1006 Princeton Ln
Inverness 352-563-4169
CADILLAC
'97 Sedan Deville,
signature series, 25mpg,
north star, beautiful
dependable 90k ml.
$4,700. (352) 795-7876

Cadillac
'98, Sedan Deville,
Rise In style
$3,998.
* 1-866-838-4376

CADILLAC
Deville '92 cold A/C,
New tires, well mntnd,
runs exc. A Must Seel
$1800 (352) 613-5869
CHEVY
Corvette '92 Red 140k
mi. Runs Great, Custom
Sound, $9800 obo
352-228-0421
CHRYSLER
1997, Concord, 72K,
garage kept, female


EGAL TALON
'94, aka Mitsubishli
Eclipse, auto, cold air,
10k ml. per yr. sporty,
dependable $1,500,
(352) 628-6207
FORD
'01 Taurus SES
White, A/C 4dr, V6, 41k
MI, Exc. Cond, $8800
(352) 341-4805
FORD
2005 Taurus, 21K mi.,
Like Newl Sunroof,
$9,500 Citrus Hills.
(352) 746-1321
FORD
'93 Taurus GL Station
Wagon, Loadedl $2,900
OBO (352) 563- 1181
(813) 244-3945
FORD ESCORT
'97 ,30mpgl Auto., ICE
COLD alr, 153K miles,
good cond,, $1,995
obo (352) 584-2464


- ---4
* HONDA
'03, Civic EX,
67k miles call before
It gone
1-866-838-4376
I ""= ""
HONDA
'99, Accord LX
one owner low miles
Only $8,998 I
1-866-838-4376

INFINITY G35 '06
Coupe, 12K ml. Blue/
creme, beautiful &
perfect! $29,800
(352) 860-1239
LINCOLN
'97, Continental 1
owner, leather, loaded,
109k ml, non smoker,
$2,950 firm
(352) 341-0004
LINCOLN
MK VIII '96, 2dr., sunroof,
300HP dohc 4.6L, V-8
looks good, runs well
$2,900 352-586-8620
LINCOLN
TOWNCAR
1990 5.0 lItre motor,
new transm, Needs
power window motors,
$800 Will trade for
mtrcyle. (352)637-1845
LINCOLN
Towncar '89, Runs &
Looks Good, Only $650
Quick Salel Dunnellon
(352)489-1624
MAZDA
1994 MIata, black,
5-spd., A/C, PS, am/fm
49K ml,, $4,200
(352) 726-9157
F- -- *
I MERCEDES1
'87, 560 SL, 126K,
White, Both
tops,
| REDUCEDI! $9,999
352-586-6805/
I 382-1204



L i
L------ J
MITSUBISHI
'90, Mirage, cold AC,
49K ml, New tires. A-1
Cond. 40+ MPG $2,500
obo (352) 344-9141
MITSUBISHI
Eclipse Spyder '03 Cnv
red/blk Sharpl 4 cyl.
auto, 30+mpg $11,600.
Susan (352) 527-8739
SCION
'05 XA by Toyota
5dr, 22k ml. 31/38 mpg
Am/FM/CD, Auto, pwr,
garg. kept, xtra cin,
$11,700 (352) 382-5191
TOYOTA
'00 Avalon, Low MI.
Exc. Cond. Gargd, Sr.
Owned, All opts, $9,600
352-726-3730/422-0201
TOYOTA
'05, Corrolla LE I
29K ml. save gas |
& money Call for I
the best price
"1-866-838-4376
--i -- =- JI
TOYOTA
'79 Celica GT sun-roof,
5spd, 139k ml. 1 owner,
runs good need carb.
$800 firm
352-795-0147/220-8497
TOYOTA
'97, Tercel 108k ml,. Runs
Great, cold air and
32mg. $2,499 obo,
352-563-2476or.
352-212-7961
TRANSPORTATION
SPECIAL
SELL YOUR CAR
TODAY
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
ONE CALL
ONE PRICE
2 WEEKS
ONLY $99.99.
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

aDoears In the I
*Citrus County
Chronicle
S*Beverly HillsVisitor
*Rlverland News
*Riverland Shopper
*South Marion
Citizen
*West Marion
Messenger
*Sumter County
Times

CALL TODAY
(352) 563-5966

WHEEL OF A
DEAL
I I








GUARANTEED
RESULTS FOR
ONLY $63.95
Sell your car today
with a Wheel of a
Deal Ad. Run a 30
day ad and we will
continue to run your
ad every month until
you sell the car.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902
'Ad will not be
automatically
scheduled, The
customer must call
each month to
reschedule.
I=,==m m l


TOYOTA CAMRY LE '96,
Exc. Cond./AII pwr.,
Mntc. Rcds., Grgd.
$3,500 (352) 422-5685
TRANSPORTATION
SPECIAL
SELL YOUR CAR
TODAY

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
ONE CALL
ONE PRICE
2 WEEKS
ONLY $99.99
S$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

appears In the
*Citrus County
Chronicle
*Beverly Hills Visitor
*Riverland News
S*Rlverland Shopper
*South Marion
Citizen
*West Marion
Messenger
*Sumter County
Times

CALL TODAY
(352) 563-5966

Your Donation of
A Vehicle
Supports Single,
Homeless Mothers
& Is Tax
Deductible
Donate your vehicle
TO THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500
S" "TOYOTA'"
S-03, Corolla, I
I Don't hesitate I
S at $9,990.
* .1-866-838-4376




CHEVY EL CAMINO
'65 $8,500. worked 350,
turbo 350 tranny. Needs
some finishing touches.
352-489-8633
DODGE
1965 Dart 440 6pack,
500 HP, auto trans.
Tubbed rear, way too
much to list, $13,500.
Must seel Will trade
(603) 860-6660
FORD
Mustang Conv. '89,
New int. & roof. Great
sound system $4,000
(352) 220-1349
FORD
Super Charged '89
Thunderbird 3.8, 5 spd.,
showcar. $10K or trade
for land? (352)542-9393
TRIUMPH
'78 Spitfire
Many extras
call for details $4000


CHEVY
S10 LS'00 Ext'd Cab
4Cyl. Auto. A/C, PS,
New Cooper Trs., bd
liner, Tow pkg. $6,335
352-422-2025
CHEVY
.:i L.'01 V6 Ext. Cab,
Crz. Cntl. A/C, Alloy
Whls. 90k Mi. Runs Exc.
Exc. Tires $7,695 obo
352-527-1432
DODGE
'01 Dakota, LST 4X4
Quad cab. exc. cond.
59,000 ml. too many ex-
tras to list $12,500/obo
(352) 795-4410
DODGE
'05 Dakota, ST Club
cab, 29k ml. V8, white
$12,000. 352-382-4547
352-382-4888
DODGE
1500 SRT 10'04 PwrAll,
6 speed, bed -liner,
spir, Exc Cond. 9k ml.
$33k (352) 503-6300
DODGE
'98 Ram 1500, 4WD Ext,
Cab, V-8, topper. 100K,
1 owner. Well malnt'd.
$6,990 (352) 302-5698
DODGE RAM
'96 1500 Club Cab,
$2,900/obo Rebuilt
Engine & Trans.Runs gd.
352-465-2087/697-2357
--M- U'
FORD
* '02, F-150, XLT, super
i crew 4x 4, better I
I hurry at $12,988.
1-866-838-4376 '
FORD
'06, Econollne 150 Van,
10,950 ml., V8, balance
of warranty, white,
$14,000. 352-382-4547
352-382-4888
FORD
2001, F-550, Turbo
4 X 4, Crew Cab.
7.3 Diesel flatbed.
Gooseneck & reese,
auto trans. Only 130K
mi. Great Cond.
$19,995 OBO
(352) 726-0046/
(352) 316-0372
FORD
F-150 1985
5000 miles on motor
4WD, lifted. $2,000
352-302-6377/563-2125
FORD
F-700 16' DUMP BED twin
cyl. 210 Cummins Diesel
14K on motor, 5+2 tran
$6500. (352) 302-4535


FORD
Ranger '98, auto, cold
AC, 110K, airbags, grn
w/ topper, CD system
single cab, runs great.
$2500. 352-476-9544
GMC
'94, Super Cab w/
topper, exc. cond.
$4900/obo
(352) 563-6618
NISSAN
'03, Frontier, 43k ml.,
stereo, CD, tinted win.,
tow pkg. alarm, $14,500
(352) 257-1173
TOYOTA
'06 Tacoma
4 Cyl, Auto, 41k, Exc,
Cond,7yr. 100k Wrty
$12,900 (352) 697-1200
T TOYOTA
S'06, Tacoma crew
| double cab 8900 ml.
trd only $23,990
S1-866-838-4376




CHEVROLET
'05 TRAILBLAZER, 2WD
Sunrf, XM Radio, Bose
prem. snd sys. w/6 disc
chngr, Trlr. pkg. 28K mi
$13,900. 352-465-9233
CHEVY
1990 SUBURBAN 8 pass.
frnt/rear air, Frnt capt
chrs, $2300.
(352) 726-8716
CHEVY
'87 S10 Blazer Tahoe 4X4
BIk on red, all orig. &
clean, needs mtr wrk.
$800/bo (352) 212-2067
CHEVY
'94 Blazer S-10, 4X4, 4
dr.,, 4,3 auto, All pwr.
opts. Cold AC. 124K mi.
$2,450 (352)453-6870
FORD
1998, Explorer Sport,
1 owner, no damage,
everything works, clean
$3,950., (352) 527-9161
FORD
2001, Explorer Sport,
all options except. 4x4 ,
leather & 6 CD Radio
$5,950. (352) 527-9161
FORD
'94 Explorer, Eddie
Bauer, 4 dr. 4 X 4,. Exc.
Body, Needs Mtr. Wk.
$800obo (352)341-1486
HONDA
I '05, CRV, consumer n
i reports best buy |
Ia steal at $13,988
L 1-866-838-4376 m
HONDA
'97 CRV exc. Cond. 70k
ml. Loaded, 4wd,
spoiler, Alloy Whis, CD
$8200 352-344-2321
JEEP
'85 Grand Cherokee
Ltd. 4Wd, 23k ml new
motor, new tires,
brakes, shocks,
looks/runs great $1400
obo/trade
352-795-0147/220-8497
JEEP
Grand Cherokee '03
loaded, leather, 78k
mi. full-time, 4whl dr.
$15,900 352-586-8981
JEEP
Grand Cherokee SRT8
'06, Red, loaded, Hemi


CHEVY
'04 Slverado 1500, Ext.
Cab, 4 X 4,5.3, V-8, 27K,
Pwr Wdw, AC, bedliner.
Exc. Shape.$18,500obo
(352) 726-5840




CHEVY
'86, runs good. Good
work van. $1,000
(352) 205-6053
CHEVY
Astro, AWD '95 $2600.00
Rebuilt motor, new alt
& battery, Custom ex-
haust, wheels, Pioneer
CD 352-642-4009
DODGE
2000, Conversion Van,
1500 Ram, 83k ml.,
loaded, excel, cond.
$10,500. (352) 637-4123
DODGE
'91 Caravan Cargo
Runs good. $300.
352-726-8388
DODGE
'94 Caravan, Runs
Great Ice Cold AC,
117K $1,200 obo
(352) 341-1486
DODGE
'98 Ram 2500
Jayco Camp Convers.
5.9 Ltr, fully loaded,
refdg, mlcrowv, sink, TV,
VCR, fact. Instl roof A/C
for camping, 70k Mi., 1
owner $10,500
(727) 647-8135
DODGE
'99, Conversion Van,
64k ml., 1 owner,
$6,000 obo
(352) 628-4943
DODGE
RAM B2500 '96 conv/
dual air, 4 capt chrs &
bed, looks/ runs great,
$2500, 352-341-4306
FORD
F-150 Econollne
Conversion Van, '94,
174K, Mint Cond.!
$6,000obo 382-7888
FORD
Windstar '98
Cold A/C, 120k ml.
.Good Condition $2600
(352) 613-5869
NISSAN
S '04, Quest
bring the family
Only $199 a month
1-866-838-4376 "
It= .mm m g


DODGE
'94, 1-Ton Work on,
Ex Painters Van, $1,200.
obo (352) 201-0658
---n E
SPlymouth
'02, Voyager SE
I take that vacation I
Only $4,990 |
1-866-838-4376

TOYOTA
1998 Sienna Mini van
1-owner, well main-
tained, $4,700 (352)
228-9052 or 527-3211
HANDICAPPED
VAN FOR SALE
Handicapped van with
Braun lifft,hand con-
trols, six way power
seat, fully loaded,
wood package with
TV,VCR, Ford E250,1993-
with under 40,000 miles.
Asking $18.000 or best
offer... 352-270-3883.
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANMIl.O.CM


ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HONDA
1995,650 Shadow, lots
of chrome, saddle
bags, helmets, $3,000
obo (352) 212-3144
MONGOOSE
4 Wheeler, 3 mos. old, 2
yr. warranty. Pd. $4,300.
will sacrifice $3,800.
obo (352) 302-3262
POLARIS
'06 Sportman X2
500esl,21 hours,
like new $7500
352-601-2421
Polaris
'06, Sawtooth 250, fully
automatic, low hrs,
$2,500. obo
352-637-5915,697-1281
POLARIS
200 '06
Low Hours $2000
Dunnellon
727-239-6771
POLARIS
2005 330 Magnum ATV
Exc, cond, $2500
(352) 795-7766
SUZUKI
250 '06 $2500 low hours
Dunnellon
727-239-6771



*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, Jet skls
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HARLEY
'01 Custom Sportster
1200, reri" bi bac.- re-t
&,windst.'h a.aa :c -

$5000obo 352-302-8136
HARLEY
1200 Sporster Custom
'99, BIk, Drag pipes,
back rest, great shape
15k ml. $5000
352-613-2023
HARLEY
'92 Heritage Softail
Teal/Crm, Chrome,
New Tires, Top end
Batt., leat. bags, Exc.
Cond. Homosassa
$9500 (727) 430-2379
HARLEY CHOPPER
Will Turn Headsl '71 Old
School Iron Head
Springer. All redone
A steal @ $5,500
352-308-2570/586-1917
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'01 FXDWG2 Vance &
Hines detach, wndshld,
New tires, 11,500mi.
$14,900. (352) 220-2126
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'07, Heritage Softall
Classic, low miles. Best
offer above $16,000
(352) 560-7168
HARLEY DAVISON
'93, 1200 Sportster,
many extras, only
8800 ml. $4,800.
(352) 400-4889
HONDA
1985. 650cc, Classic
motorcycle, Rare, $450.
Good winter project
(352) 795-1333
HONDA
2002 Rebel, 250CC,
Saddlebags & tool
pouch. 2,100 ml. $2,350
(352) 637-5676
HONDA
'98 Shadow 1100, wind
shid, stck/drag pipes,
Sissy bar, bckrst, xtras.
$4200/obo 352-422-6495
KAWASAKI
'95, KLX 650 Dual Sport,
Street Legal. Kick Start,
Good Cond. $2,000
(352) 726-6224
MOTO GUZZI
BREVA 7501E 2004
12,000, $4,900.00 Beauti-
ful silver bike, garage
kept, touring wind-
shield, hard bags, low
profile seat, Great Ride.
(352) 637-6345
SUZUKI
2003 RM 85. Low hours.
$1,200
(352) 726-5601
VL 800
'02 Boulevard, 13k ml.
full lugg. new tires, cd,
windshld, & more $4600
obo/trade 621-7832


Facility, Bicycle Trail, Canoe/Boat Launch, Fishing Pier,
Nature Trail. Hiking Trail, Restroom, Lighting, Parking,
and Road Renovation.
Phase II Improvements: The construction of a
Multi-Purpose Trail. Picnic Facility. Observation Deck,
Fishing Pier, Restroom, and Road Renovation.
Phase III Improvements: The construction of a
Multi-Purpose Trail, Picnic Facility. Observation Deck,
Restroom, and Road Renovation.
Some of the above listed Improvements combine
phases and other Improvements require a separate Im-
provement for each phase as listed. The following sum-
marizes Individual items to be constructed: (3) Picnic
Facilities, (1) Bicycle Trail, (1) Canoe/Boat Launch, (1)
Fishing Pier, (1) Nature Trail, (1) Hiking Trail, (1)
Multi-Purpose Trail, (2) Observation Decks, (3) Restroom
Activities, (1) Lighting. (2) Parking Areas, and (1) Road
Renovation.
The CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be examined at the
following locations: Town of Yankeetown, 6241
Harmony Lane, Yankeetown, Florida 34498,
(352) 447-2511 and MIttauer & Associates. Inc.,
Consulting Engineers, 580-1 Wells Rood, Orange Park,
Florida 32073, (904) 278-0030.
Copies of the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be ob-
tained at the offices of Mlffauer & Associates, Inc.
upon payment of a non-refundable charge of $100.00
for each set. Only complete sets of plans and spectfl-
cations will be distributed.
The Owner reserves the right to waive technical errors
and Informalities and to reject any or all bids.
Published five (5) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
on October 10, 11, 12,13 and 14, 2007.

352-1014 SUCRN
Citrus County Construction Licensing
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
THE CITRUS COUNTY CONSTRUCTION LICENSING AND
APPEALS BOARD WILL CONDUCT A MEETING ON
OCTOBER 24, 2007 AT 2:00 P.M., AT THE LECANTO
GOVERNMENT BUILDING, 3600 W. SOVEREIGN PATH,
RM 166 LECANTO, FLORIDA. 34461.
SCHEDULED TO MEET THE BOARD:
1. GEREMY J CROUCH TO MEET THE BOARD FOR AP-
PROVAL FOR CARPENTRY CONTRACTOR COMPETENCY
CARD.

2. MICHAEL W EMBREE TO MEET THE BOARD FOR AP-
PROVAL FOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR COMPETENCY
CARD.
3. SHAD SANDERS. TO MEET THE BOARD FOR APPROVAL
TO TAKE EXAM FOR TILE AND MARBLE CONTRACTOR.

4. STEVEN G ROBERTS TO MEET THE BOARD FOR AP-
PROVAL TO TAKE EXAM FOR WINDOW & DOOR CON-
TRACTOR.
5. WESLEY R ANTILL TO MEET THE BOARD FOR
RE-APPROVAL TO TAKE EXAM FOR CONCRETE CON-
TRACTOR.
6. GREGORY C BURKE TO MEET THE BOARD FOR AP-
PROVAL TO TAKE EXAM FOR WINDOW & DOOR CON-
TRACTOR.
7. RANDALL K HART TO MEET THE BOARD FOR AP-
PROVAL TO TAKE EXAM FOR DRYWALL CONTRACTOR.
8. JOSHUA R DUGAN TO MEET THE BOARD FOR
APPROVAL TO TAKE EXAM FOR ALUMINUM WITH CON-
CRETE CONTRACTOR.
9. LAURENCE W, CLEMENS TO MEET THE BOARD FOR
APPROVAL FOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR COMPE-
TENCY CARD.


1. RUSSELL POLICASTRO CITATION#0779- "ENGAGE
IN THE BUSINESS OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CON-
TRACTOR OR ADVERTISE HIMSELF OR HERSELF OR A BUSI-
NESS ORGANIZATION AS AVAILABLE TO ENGAGE IN THE
BUSINESS OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CONTRACTOR
WITHOUT BEING DULY REGISTERED OR CERTIFIED OR
HAVING A CERTIFICATE OF AUTHORITY."
ADMINISTRATIVE COMPLAINTS:
1. MURPHY BALKCOM d/b/o- COMPLETE CONCRETE
FINISHING, INC. ,
1 COUNT CASE #2007-104.
2. DAVID NICKERSON d/b/a MONTE CARLO
SWIMMING POOLS, INC.
1 COUNT CASE #2007-119
OLD/NEW BUSINESS:
-r. %,;1:.:r, -- L i-t-,:C T0o APPEAL A DECISION
yi-L-t -. I t t .'.*Cir:rLCI-,J LICENSING & APPEALS
BCPDWiTH IES'ECT TC. rji, MATTER CONSIDERED AT
THIS PUBLIC HEARING, HE/SHE WILL NEED TO INSURE
THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS
MADE, WHICH RECORD SHALL INCLUDE THE TESTIMONY
AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE
BASED. (SECTION 286.0101, FL. STATUTES.)
ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMO-
DATION AT THIS MEETING BECAUSE OF A DISABILITY OR
PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE COUNTY
ADMINISTRATOR'S OFFICE, MASONIC' BUILDING, 111
WEST MAIN STREET, 3RD FLOOR, and INVERNESS, FL.
34450, (352) 341-9801 AT LEAST TWO DAYS BEFORE THE
MEETING. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR SPEECH IMPAIRED,
USE THE TDD TELEPHONE (352-341-6580) OR LECANTO
GOVERNMENT BUILDING (352-527-5312).
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
on October 14, 2007.


351-1014 SUCRN
City of Crystal River
PUBLIC NOTICE
SECTION 00020
REQUEST FOR BIDS
16" Effluent Transmission Main Replacement
BID NO. 07-B-04
The City of Crystal River will receive sealed Bids In
triplicate for 16" Effluent Transmission Main Replace-
ment Project. You are hereby Invited to submit a bid on
the above referenced project:
OWNER: City of Crystal River
123 NW Highway 19
Crystal River, FL 34428
Bids will be received until 11:00 AM, on Thursday,
November 8, 2007, at which time they will be opened
and read aloud In Council Chambers at Crystal River
City Hall.

DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Perform all work and furnish all
necessary labor, equipment, material, and transporta-
tion necessary to complete the work as called for in
the Contract Documents for the construction of the 16"
EFFLUENT TRANSMISSION MAIN REPLACEMENT. Either the
existing or a temporary main must be kept operational
during construction. Bidding of the TRANSMISSION
MAIN PROJECT includes, but is not limited to, the follow-
Ing:
Option A: Replacement of 16" Transmission System
Approximately 3,150 feet (16') force main
Approximately 110 feet (18') HDPE Directional drill
Approximately 110 feet (12") HDPE directional drll
All Associated Valves, Fittings, and Bypass Une
Roadway Replacement and Repaving (asphalt -
FDOT Standards)
Sodding/Seeding. Regrading
Testing and Flushing
Option B: Rehabilitation of existing 16" Transmission
System
Lining Approximately 3,150 feet (16") effluent main
Bypass LIne
Sodding/Seeding, Regrading
Testing and Rushing

The Owner will evaluate the bids and the awards) will
be made to the bidder with the best combination of
qualifications, experience, cost and other criteria at
the City's discretion,

ALL BIDDERS must be qualified for the type of work for
which the BID Is submitted. Three (3) copies of each BID
must be enclosed In an opaque envelope and plainly
marked:
"BID FOR 16 INCH EFFLUENT TRANSMISSION MAIN.
BID NO. 07-B-04" AND THE NAME OF THE BIDDER
AND HIS ADDRESS
BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO:
CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
CAROL A. HARRINGTON, CITY CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428


944-1014 W/TH/F/SA/SUCRN
Town of Yankeetown
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
WITHLACOOCHEE GULF-PATHWAYS PARK -
PHASE 1, II & III
FRDAP PROJECT NOS. F5135,
F7093 & F7100
TOWN OF YANKEETOWN, FLORIDA
Sealed BIDS will be received by the Town of Yan-
keetown, Florida at the office of the Town Clerk until
12:00 p.m, (Noon) local time on October 31, 2007, at
which time and place they will be publicly opened
and read aloud.
The work consists of furnishing all labor, materials and
equipment for the construction of park recreational
and recreational support amenlfles at the Town of Yan-
keetown, Withlacoochee Gulf-Pathways Park, whlch In-
clude the following:
Phase I Improvements: The construction of a Picnic


All contract documents may be examined at City Haill.
No BIDS may be withdrawn for a period of SIXTY (60)
days after closing time scheduled for receipt of BIDS.
The OWNER reserves the right to reject any and all BIDS
for any reason whatsoever and waive all Informalities.
THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SELECT THE
BID RESPONSE THAT IN ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST
MEETS ITS BUSINESS NEEDS,
A mandatory Pre-Bid conference will be held Monday,
October 29th, 2007 at I1100 am, at Crystal River City
Hall,
Bid documents, Including plans and specifications,
may be obtained after October 15th, 2007 upon pay-'
ment of a non-refundable fee of $30, by contacting
the DRMP, Inc. at:
3611 St. John's Bluff South. Suite 14
Jacksonville, FL 32224
Phone 904-493-6500 Fox 904-493-6501
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle
on October 14,.2007.


CLASSIFIED





SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2007 11D


4- ~ 11'1 *h.


I


mla


*


1 00 GJXZL


FREE 300,000 Mile Engine Warranty
FREE Lube, Ol & Filter
FREE lire Rotation
FREE External Belts & Hoses
FREE Battery
FREE Air & Fuel Filters
FREE Wiper Blades
FREE Tires
FREE Brake Pads
FREE Front End Alignment
VMR) flo gIv t 4,MI-C O O A AOAk R1 A
SiC C d.,i '1 coI'-t denk-


7YER110O0OILEWq


WARRANTY AUTOMATIC AIR CONDITIONING
Bj~Sslim^B&! %yaS E ^hf~R^S~iB^~ E^j3iik^^ Ib~^^s


I


if


I lk


.- ,


ID I


ivi


cI


ON SIGHT INSTANT LOAN APPROVAL


EVENT HEADQUARTERS.
Johnson Bros. Tent Event
800 SE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FL


ToThe
Order Of:


UnTof Four


VOID AFTER 10/14/2007


Valued Customer


I.


F - -V 028


1284
1874-485977

$4,400100o


Thousand, Four Hundred Dollars and 00/100


[0799814041 [1010046228417


A,iJHr.,RIZFO 1CirATI F'f


1284


DIRECTLY ACROSS THE
STREET FROM CITRUS KIA
"LOOK FOR THE GIANT TENT"


3M1K1ei


YOU'VE WON UP TO $3,500 CASH!!
644091
Simply stop by Johnson Bros. Unauthorized
Tent Event or call
352-795.000 to reserve your prize.

America's #1 Warranty
w~ss ssJR]lgl.3T^


17 1 l


/ 1' .


$r


a ~ a


9


IV;


A -


CITRUS COUNIY(FL) CHRONICTI:


!


Mlkv,


m


;.I 11fil 17


LO i


vp


ILM111,11113,


I T
VIHA I I I I


qt$oz,


ILI lt ILI


p Ilft]


Ili I


a-
-ik *4
41b :4


:4. i


I ::$h








12[> sUNDAY Ocronna 14. 2007


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


''al




* ~ ~ -_''r i.~r r w r~ nr r

AtA


V ,. *.'ci ~ ~ A
. ~ vv'~ 4v~$~rLi*i.~~ 4
A sm'S ~'.t:4~~;,Ic*x,
-cc- 9 S. W."."c~~-~% *'c
a .9


I'M


"-i l .. *'







HELL TIM PAT GREG WILL BRAD Ra
Russo PELESHOK PEARSON TOLAND LANGE DEXTER uLi a ViAS.


-cc,,


m .. ..... 9




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs