Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01021
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness Fla
Publication Date: September 30, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01021

Full Text











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SEPTEMBER 30, 2007


Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community


COMMENTARY:


Pinellas transitional sex offender housing:


odel


community?


A recent proposal to lease
mobile homes to sex offend-
ers initially sent Citrus County
officials scrambling. Is all this
really necessary?/Page 1C
ECO-DISASTER IN JAPAN:
Deadly mercury
Fifty years after it began in
Japan, the tragedy known as
Minamata Disease is only a
dim memory to the rest of the
world./Page 11A
THE NAME SAYS IT ALL:
Good
call
"Friday Night
Lights," a
critical
hit,
begins itsi
second
season -
finally on
Friday
nights.
/Page 6B
GENDER BENDERS:
Lassoing lass
More young women are in the
saddle in the male-dominated
rodeo circuit./Page 8A
Avon calling
Hard-hat wearing cosmetics
salesman successfully peddles
his goods to construction
workers./Page 3A
NOT A CROCK:
C4 Hot


NO NEWT IN 2008:
Gingoich bows out
The former U.S. House speak-
er has announced he won't
seek a presidential bid in
2008 election./Page 10A
FOOTBALL FEVER:


Panthers
The Tampa Bay Buccaneers
take on Steve Smith and the
Carolina Panthers at 4 p.m.
today./Page 1B
ONLINE IMPROVEMENTS:
Check it out
The Chronicle's redesigned
Web site launches
. Monday. To com-
ment, e-mail
webadmin@chron-
� icleonline.com.
Please include "New
Web site" in the subject line.
Readers can also call 563-
5655. For more about the Web
site, see story Page 3A.


Annie's Mailbox . . . . . . .20A
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . .6D
Crossword . . . . . . . . . . .20A
Entertainment . . . . . . . . 6B
Horoscope . . . . . . . . . . 18A
Lottery Payouts . . . . . . . . 6B
Movies . . . . . . . . . . 18A
Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . .6A
Together . . . . . . . . . . . . 19A
Eight Sections


14578 20075 o


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Pinellas County Sheriff's Office Sexual Predator/Offender Tracking Unit Cpl. John Jewett keeps a close eye on many of the sex offenders
living at the Palace Mobile Home Park in St. Petersburg. One of the 90 sexual offenders living in the park spoke with a reporter Thursday.


Actual recidivism


rate varies from


public's perception


CRUSTY LOFTIS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Perceptions have become as
good as fact in Citrus County.
When the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office learned of pos-
sible plans to
turn seven JUST TH
Inverness
mobile homes * According t
in Inverness chological r
into housing to 14 pierce
for sexual offenders re
offend ers, to six years
local officials
sounded the alarms.
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy met with
the media detailing plans of
HAR-COR Inc. and said the
company was working to
import sexual offenders into
the county. The sheriff's office
and county government
announced they were working
together to thwart plans for the
mobile home park, which


would house 21 offenders.
There was fear that about 17
children would catch the
school bus less than a 10th of a
mile from the sexual offender
housing. There was fear that
another child could be hurt
like Jessica Lunsford.
But one
IE FACTS thing left out
of presenta-
o a recent psy- tions to the
report, about 5 media and
nt of of sexual public were
e-offend three figures show-
after release. ing the proba-
bility that sex-
ual offenders re-offend.
According to a 2007 report
called "Public Perceptions
About Sex Offenders and
Community Protection
Policies" from the Society for
the Psychological Study of
Social Issues, about 5 to 14 per-
cent of sexual offenders re-

Please see RE-OFFENSE/Page 4A


Sgt. Judy Vovan comments on the Palace Mobile Home Park in St.
Petersburg. The notebook In front of Sgt. Vovan contains page
after page of information on Pinellas County's sexual predators,
Including an aerial view of the Palace Mobile Home Park.


State has little control over transitional housing


Privately-owned transitional mobile home

parks are not supervised sanctioned by the state


TERRY WITT
terrywitt@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The Florida Department of Corrections
says sex offender mobile home parks, like
the one that had been proposed for the
Inverness area, tend to offer high rent
and crowded living quarters for the resi-
dents, sometimes making them unattrac-
tive, even to offenders.
As a consequence, the offenders, who
often find themselves living with multiple
tenants in the same mobile home, fre-
quently begin looking for another place
when they grow weary of the accommo-
dations, according to Jo Ellyn Rackleff,
spokeswoman for DOC.
Sex offender mobile home parks are
known as transitional housing because
the offenders live there after their


release from prison or jail, but the pri-
vately owned facilities are not sanc-
tioned, supervised or operated by the
state.


offender is prohibited from living within
1,000 feet of a school, day care center,
park, playground or other place where
children regularly congregate. A Chuck E.
Cheese Restaurant or McDonald's restau-
rant would be considered places where
children congregate, Rackleff said.
But Rackleff said the law does not pro-
hibit sex offender mobile home parks
from being established next door to resi-


If a mobile home dences where chil-
park for offenders dren live.
were to operate in It's worse in a way. The facility's
Citrus County, owner said Friday
Rackleff said state It's constant new ones. he no longer
probation and intends to rent to
parole officers sex offenders.
would visit each Sharon Manning Resident Sharon
r didet of teahe about the difficulties tied to Manning who is
resident of the transitional sex offender housing. Manning, who is
facility to deter- organizing a 10 a.m.
mine their address rally Saturday, Oct.
and to assess whether the conditions of 6, at Trail 10 and Pleasant Grove Road to
their probation require them to live at demonstrate community opposition to a
least 1,000 feet from places where chil- sex offender mobile home park at that
dren congregate. location, said she wants the Florida
State law says if the victim of a sex
crime was younger than 18, the sex Please see CONTROL/Page 4A


Transitional

housing saves

deputies time,

provides options

for offenders

CRISTY LOFTS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
ST. PETERSBURG - Since
Amber Wiley moved into her
home a year, ago, she has
allowed her 7-year-old son to
freely roam their neighbor-
hood.
Up until Thursday, she had
no idea the mobile home park
that backs up to her property
serves as transitional housing
for sexual offenders.
Other than a sign at the
entrance that reads "Palace
Mobile Home Park," there is
nothing to
suggest that
more than THE
90 sexual PALACE
offenders g More than
live just 1,260 sex-
b e y o n d ual offend-
Amber Wil- ers live
ey's back- throughout
yard fence. Pinellas
The maj- County. In
ority of resi- Citrus
dents at County,
The Palace there are a
are sexual little more
offenders. 'than 200.
HAR-COR UThe Palace
Inc. has in St.
rented out Petersburg
properties at houses
Palace for more than
almost three 90 sexual
years, offenders.
HAR-COR
is the same
company linked to the rental
of seven rundown mobile
homes south of Inverness in a
community it would call The
Meadows.
Ten days ago, Citrus County
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy produced a
PowerPoint presentation
about what he said was HAR-
COR's plans for residential
streets off County Road 581:
Mobile homes, rented three
apiece to sexual offenders who
need a place to live.
A town hall meeting fol-
lowed that announcement,
where nearly 200 people
expressed outrage at the
plans.
HAR-COR president Harris
Dobkin, who differed with
Dawsy's account of the plan,
said Friday he was ditching
altogether the idea of renting
to sexual offenders.
Still, Citrus County officials
admit Dobkin's plan caught
their attention. They say it is
legal for a similar park to open
elsewhere and officials are
preparing a residency ordi-
nance.
If they want to see how a
mobile home park for offend-
ers operates, officials need
look only a few counties south.
MEN
Sgt Judy Vovan heads up the
Pinellas County Sheriff's
Office's Sexual
Predator/Offender Tracking
Unit, SPOT. Her office tracks
the more than 1,200 sex offend-
ers who live in Pinellas.
When Vovan started with the
unit about two years ago, there
were about 50 to 55 sexual
offenders living at Palace.
Now there are more than 90.
About 70 offenders are on
parole and are supervised by
the Department of
Corrections. Many are on cur-
fews and some cannot have
access to the Internet
Throughout each week,
Department of Corrections,
patrol deputies and SPOT unit
officials make their way into
the neighborhood.
Please see THE PALACE/Page 5A


Election


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LOW
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CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


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3A
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 30, 2007
www.chronicleonline,com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around

THE STATE

Fort Lauderdale

Pilot who crashed on 1-95
tells near-death story
The pilot of a small cargo
plane that crashed along
Interstate 95 shortly after taking
off said he is surprised he sur-
vived the impact.
Robert "Bob" Robertson, 34,
crashed the twin-engine
Beechcraft he was flying shortly
after leaving Fort Lauderdale
Executive Airport on Sept. 21.
"I knew that I was going to
die. The idea at that point is to
try not to take a lot of people
with you," Robertson said.
Robertson said he decided to
try to land on a grassy piece of
land near Interstate 95 after an
engine shut down.
"I was shocked I survived," he
said. "There was nothing left of
the airplane, nothing except me
and the seat. Everything else
was debris. There was no pain,
but I realized my injuries were
severe."
Doctors have predicted a full
recovery, Robertson said.
Robertson said he has kept
busy, despite casts on his left
leg and arm. His girlfriend
accepted his marriage proposal
Thursday.

Orlando

Charge against Orange
County deputy dropped
Prosecutors on Friday
dropped a perjury charge
against an Orange County sher-
iff's deputy accused of lying to a
jury in a drug case.
The decision not to pursue
the charge against Kevin Carter,
46, was made because two
important witnesses could not
be located, Randy Means, exec-
utive director of the Orange-
Osceola State Attorney's Office
told the Orlando Sentinel.
Carter was arrested in May
2005 because he told a jury that
an anonymous person at a bus
stop tipped him off to drug deal
behind a liquor store. A sheriff's
investigation determined the
person was a suspected prosti-
tute Carter had threatened to
arrest if she did not cooperate.
Carter said Friday he wants to
return to his job. He has been
on unpaid leave since being
charged.
Sheriffs officials had not got-
ten official notice of the decision
and do not know whether they
will allow Carter to retum to
work, spokesman Capt. Mark
Strobridge told the Sentinel.

Pinellas Park

Mother, boyfriend
charged with abuse
A 12-year-old boy was physi-
cally abused and kept alone in
an empty room with only a buck-
et for a toilet, and his mother
and her boyfriend were behind
bars Saturday on neglect and
child abuse charges, authorities
said.
The boy, found lying in his
own feces and dried blood, said
his arm was burned on a stove
and he was struck with fists, an
extension cord and an aerosol
can, Pinellas Park police said.
The boy's scars show his
injuries - bums, a skull fracture
arid a broken nose - were heal-
ing in various stages, suggesting
the abuse happened over an
extended period, police said. He
was hospitalized Friday.
As the boy recovers, his moth-
er and the man who lived with
them, Reginald Neil Carr, are
being held at Pinellas County Jail.
The mother, who was not
identified, was charged with four
counts of child neglect with bail
set at $80,000. Carr, 42, was
charged with four counts of
aggravated child abuse, with bail
set at $400,000.
Police said the boy was pulled
out of school last year and told to
read the Bible every day. If he
tried to come out of the room, an


ironing board propped up against
the door would fall and sound an
alert, police said.
Carr, who is legally blind, was
known by the boy and his mother
as "Bishop," Haworth said.
- From wire reports


Chronicle Online 2.0


New Web site launches tomorrow
Chronicle the topic. For example, clicking
on "sports" will take users to a
Tomorrow the Citrus County page full of high school, college
Chronicle online team will and national sports stories and
launch an updated, improved, standings. Also on the home
more user-friendly version of page, visitors can type in a key-
the existing Chronicle Web word into the search bar of an
site, ChronicleOnline.com. advanced engine to look for spe-
.The new format and layout cific content
will allow users to easily navi- "If they (visitors) will just give
gate the site, meet the needs of us a moment... they'll find we're
advertisers and call for active delivering a much better prod-
reader participation. uct than we have in the past,"
On the home page, clicking on John Murphy, Chronicle Online
separate, broad categories will manager said. The site was last
take visitors to all news, both redesigned six years ago.
locally and nationally, related to On the new site, all print


advertisements will be in an
accessible database so users
can use keywords to search for
products and services. For the
first time, the ads will be dis-
played on the Web site exactly
as they are in the newspaper.
Many visitors have given
feedback about their inability
to easily find content. They
love the content, but have a
hard time locating what they
want to read, Murphy said.
The majority of the site's vis-
itors are not print readers,
Murphy said. Therefore, pro-
viding an up-to-date, easily
navigable site, full of informa-
tion, advertisements and
minute-to-minute breaking


TELL US WHAT
YOU THINK
* To comment on the
Chronicle's redesigned
Web site, e-mail
webadmin
@chronicleonline.com.
Please include "New Web
site" in the subject line.
* Readers can also call
563-5655.

news is essential.
Space is limited in the news-
paper, but there is more room
for content on the site. The
new home page is wider to fit
current computer monitors. It


is also more colorful, with a
Chronicle blue header.
Murphy said, "We are no
longer just a newspaper."
Visitors can watch Chronicle
TV: daily webcasts about news,
entertainment and sports by
Chronicle reporters and staff.
Implementing technological
advancements helps Chronicle
staff achieve their goal of mak-
ing news readily available to
users.
"I want folks, if they walk out
of their house and see smoke
in the air," Murphy said, "to be
able to turn around, turn their
computer on, log onto
Chronicle Online and find why
there's smoke in the air."


Birth of a salesman


Associated Press
ORLANDO - This Avon rep
wears a hard hat and carries a
pile of company catalogues to
his day job on a construction
site, encouraging the men to buy
their ladies a little something
Perfume and lingerie are his
top sellers. Oh, and he won't go a
day without-wrinkle cream.
Meet Bobby McKinney: your
local Avon man.
"Forget the product, forget it's
Avon. This is a very viable busi-
ness," says the 58-year-old
Winter Haven man, who along
with his wife made about
$800,000 in sales last year and
has 170 sales reps under him.
Jovial and stocky with a
blonde goatee, McKinney's a
Mailne Corps vet who says he
twice took shrapnel in Vietnam
and wrestled professionally
under the name "Cowboy Bobby
Steel." He's no David Beckham-
styled metrosexual.
Neither is Sal D'Amico, a cor-
rections lieutenant in
Levittown, Pa., who finds a way
to work Avon into every conver-
sation - at the gym between


bicep curls, at his kid's soccer
games, standing in line.
Sure he gets a little rousing
from his fellow officers, but he
shrugs it off.
'"A lot of those guys that were
willing to mock Avon ended up
buying Avon in the future from
me," said the 34-year-old.
At first, he just helped his
wife, Katrina, stick labels on her
brochures. Then after he joined
her four years ago, their sales
figures doubled. Now the par-
ents of two have turned their
garage into an Avon office and
make between $30,000 and
$50,000 a year.
The two are among a growing
number of men selling products
from the multibillion-dollar
beauty company.
McKinney entered the Avon
world three years ago when he
realized his wife Joy, a 20-year
Avon veteran, was doing six-fig-
ures a year in sales. With some
experience in network market-
ing already, McKinney started
teaching sales courses to new
reps, passing out brochures and
filling orders. Today, about 80
percent of his clients are men.


* QUESTION: Were University of Florida campus police
justified in using a Taser to subdue Andrew Meyer?
* YOUR ANSWERS:
A. Yes. He was out of control and a danger to police.
(91 votes, 30 percent.)
B. No. The punishment did not fit the offense.
(133 votes, 44 percent)
C. Yes. Tasers are an accepted form of non-lethal deterrent.
(40 votes, 13 percent.)
D. No. He needed to be spanked.
(41 votes, 13 percent.)


Sales to men and an increas-
ing number of products for them
has helped Avon's bottom line,
with sales growing from about
$6.2 billion in 2002 to $8.7 billion
in 2006.
Yankees star Derek Jeter
partnered with the company to
create Driven, his own line of
products that includes
cleansers, cologne, aftershave
and deodorant. His cologne
became Avon's best-selling
men's fragrance of all time, and
the second best-selling fra-
grance overall.
The McKinneys credit the
boom in men's business to baby
boomers worried about wrin-
kles and experimenting with
anti-aging products.
'Anti-aging is very intriguing
to (men)," said Regina Dinisio,
public relations manager of
Avon fragrance. "They want no-
hassle products, but they want to
see the real benefits."
Industry experts say the
men's market is ripe, though still
in it's early stages.
"We have seen that men are
more interested in pampering
themselves and taking better


Associated Press
Bobby McKinney gets set for a delivery June 23 as an Avon sales-
man in Orlando. He's one of a growing number of men supple-
menting their income selling products from beauty company.


care of themselves overall," said
Karen Grant, senior beauty ind-
ustry analyst at market research
company NPD Group Inc.
She's seen an increase in
sales in the men's beauty mar-
ket, along with a host of new
products since 2003.
U.S. sales of men's skincare
products totaled $68.9 million in
2006, up from $45.8 million in
2000. In comparison, women's
skincare sold about $2.1 billion
in 2006 and $1.7 billion in 2000,
according to NPD.
Fewer' than 13,000 of Avon's


650,000 representatives in the
U.S. are male, though that figure
is rough because gender is not a
check-box required by appli-
cants. In comparison, competi-
tor Mary Kay says 5,738 of its
700,000 sales reps are men.
Women love the Avon man
too. He coos over their babies
and isn't afraid to talk makeup.
His gender is irrelevant, said
longtime McKinney customer
Rhonda Bryant
"Not in today's world," she
said. "Men and women do
everything."


Meat recall expanded


Associated Press
TRENTON, N.J. - The
Topps Meat Co. on Saturday
vastly expanded its recall of
frozen hamburger patties that
may be contaminated with E.
coli after federal inspectors
discovered inadequate safety
measures at its plant
The company said it's recall-
ing 21.7 million pounds of
ground beef products, up from
332,000 pounds of ground beef
initially recalled Tuesday.


Investigators think 25 people
may have been sickened in
eight states, including Florida.
The recall represents all
Topps products with a "sell by"
date or "best if used by" date
between Sept 25 this year and
Sept 25,2008. The company said
this information could be found
on a package's back panel.
All recalled products,
according to Topps, will have a
USDA establishment number
of EST 9748, which is located
on the back panel of the pack-


age and/or in the USDA legend.
Elizabeth, N.J.-based Topps
said products affected by the
expanded recall were distrib-
uted to retail grocery stores
and food service institutions
throughout the United States.
The company said it believes
most of the recalled product
has been consumed, but it was
imperative that customers look
for the products in the freezers.
A full list of the recalled
products is available at
http://wwmwtoppsmeat.com.


Going the distance


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Runners pass the Old Courthouse in Inverness Saturday morning during the annual Beat The Sheriff 5K run. Proceeds from the race benefit the Citrus County
Children's Advocacy Center (Jessie's Place). Lee Stephens of Tampa won the event.


t


loci










4A SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 30. 2007 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Suspect sought



for questioning


Girl reported suspicious incident

Special to the Chronicle I . - --- -


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
The mobile home pictured above is the first stop for many offenders at The Palace, a transitional mobile home park for sexual offenders.


RE4-FFENSE
Continued from Page 1A

offend from three to six years
after they're released.
Contrast that to the commu-
nity's perception that the
recidivism rate is closer to 75
percent
Even at a similar mobile
home park for sex offenders in
St Petersburg, Pinellas County
Sheriff's SgL Judy Vovan said
in the past three years only one


resident committed a sex
crime.
But in a community torn by
the 2005 murder of
Homosassa's Jessica Lunsford,
everyone knows all it takes is
one sexual offender gone bad to
hurt a child.
Sgt Dave DeCarlo said the
community fears just one sex
offender who lives in a neigh-
borhood.
"You could just times that
fear factor by 21 for the people
living off of Trail 10," DeCarlo
said.


Having a high concentration of sexual

offenders in any part of the county

compromises the quality of life of those

living nearby, DeCarlo said.


Having a high concentration Dawsy said that while zoning
of sexual offenders in any part issues prevent the sexual
of the county compromises the offender transitional mobile
quality of life of those living home park in Inverness, other
nearby, DeCarlo said. existing mobile home parks
"There's going to be fear in legally could be used for sexual
that community," DeCarlo said. offenders to congregate in.


Citrus County Sheriff's
Office detectives are looking to
identify a subject involved in a
suspicious incident reported
on Friday morning.
An 11-year-old Floral City
girl said that shortly before
8:30 a.m., while she was walk-
ing to her bus stop in the area
of East Salmon Drive and
South Marlin Drive, she
noticed an unknown white
male following her. When she
became frightened and started
to run, he did the same, and at
one point attempted to grab
her. The young girl was able to
get to a friend's house safely,
and the subject fled the scene.
The girl described the man
to detectives, saying he was
between 15 and 25 years of age;
slender, with muscular arms
and rough hands; 5'7" to 5'11"
tall; 150 to 175 pounds; straight,
dark-brown hair; blue/green
eyes; clean shaven; with a
freckled face and no notice-
able scars, markings or tattoos.
When last seen, he was wear-
ing a black tank top, dark blue
jeans, and dirty white sneakers
with a blue stripe. The subject
was on foot, and no vehicle was
seen in the vicinity.


Special to the Chronicle
The composite sketch above
shows the man sought for ques-
tioning. Anyone able to identify
the subject is asked to call
(352)726-1121.

The sheriff's office issued a
CodeRED notification to resi-
dences in the area, and put out
a BOLO (be on the lookout) to
all officers Friday evening.
Starting today, fliers were
being distributed by hand to
residents living in the area.
Anyone who may be able to
identify the subject is asked to
call (352) 726-1121, or the sher-
iff's office toll-free crime tips
line at (888) ANY-TIPS (269-
8477).


SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS
* Follow the instructions on today's Opinion page to send a
letter to the editor.
* Letters must be no longer than 350 words, and writers will
be limited to three letters per month.


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


, - 0C I T R U S..


,-C 0 UlN T Y


" -n-----,


City H
Daytona Bch. 82
Ft. Lauderdale 84
Fort Myers 89
Gainesville 83
Homestead 85
Jacksonville 79
Key West 89
Lakeland 87
Melbourne 83


F'cast
ptcldy
shwrs
ptcldy
ptcldy
shwrs
ptcldy
tstrm
ptcldy
ptcldy


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
shwrs
ptcldy
ptcldy
sunny
ptcldy
sunny
ptcldy
ptcldy
shwrs


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds from 15 to 20 knots. Seas
2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland waters will be
choppy. Mostly sunny to partly cloudy and
breezy.


THREE DAY OUTLOOK
TODAY Exclusive daily forecast by:
High: 88 Low: 69
Mostly sunny, warm and windy.

MONDAY
High: 88 Low: 70
Mostly sunny, warm and windy.


TUESDAY
High: 90 Low: 70
Partly cloudy and breezy with a 20% chance
of a shower.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year


91/69
95/56
68/87
80
+2

0.00 in.
2.29 in.
36.59 in.
45.22 in.


*As of 6 p.m.from Hernando County Airport
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder-
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE


Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.09 in.
DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 67
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 57%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees were light, grasses were
moderate and weeds were
absent.
*Light - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was moderate with pol-
lutants mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES


DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING)
9/30 SUNDAY 9:19 3:04
10/1 MONDAY 10:27 4:11


MINOR MAJOR
(AFTERNOON)
9:49 3:34
10:58 4:42


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
C - SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:18 P.M.
) ) SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................7:23A.M.
y MOONRISE TODAY......................... 10:06 P.M.
OCT. 3 OCT.I11 OCT.I19 OC 26 MOONSET TODAY..........................11:44A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS

Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES

The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending In 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending In 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.
" .TIDES .. .
Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers.
Sunday Monday
City High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka 7:56 a/4:04 a 9:41 p/4:57 p 8:34 a/4:39 a 10:45 p/5:53 p
Crystal River 6:17 a/1:26 a 8:02 p/2:19 p 6:55 a/2:01 a 9:06 p/3:15 p
Withlacoochee 4:04 a/12:07 p 5:49 p/11:49 p 4:42 a/1:03 p 6:53 p/--
Homosassa 7:06 a/3:03 a 8:51 p/3:56 p 7:44 a/3:38 a 9:55 p/4:52 p


Gulf water
temperature



840
Taken at Egmont Key


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.77 28.79 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.78 34.78 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 35.17 35.17 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.35 37.38 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


Siyl


- a- , - M_ roe 90s. - -- _,-'-- ' ,,
S . . . .
Honolulu - 8*91' .3
* * i90a%

FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday
City H L Pcp.
Albany 71 52
Albuquerque 82 63
Asheville 77 41
Atlanta 85 62
Atlantic City 78 54
Austin 90 62 .18
Baltimore 78 53
Billings 64 50 .04
Birmingham 85 60
Boise 56 38 .01
Boston 74 59
Buffalo 68 48
Burlington, VT 66 50
Charleston, SC 82 64
Charleston, WV 76 46
Charlotte 81 53
Chicago 80 50
Cincinnati 81 47 .01
Cleveland 72 47
Columbia, SC 84 63
Columbus, OH 76 49
Concord, N.H. 71 54
Dallas 90 68
Denver 84 53
Des Moines 79 58
Detroit 73 48
El Paso 87 63
Evansville, IN 82 52
Harrisburg 73 53
Hartford 75 56
Houston 92 67
Indianapolis 80 54
Jackson 89 59
Las Vegas 78 62
Little Rock 85 58
Los Angeles 72 60
Louisville 82 55
Memphis 88 60
Milwaukee 71 49
Minneapolis 69 54 .04
Mobile 89 66
Montgomery 87 60
Nashville 84 51


Sunday
Fcst H L
sunny 69 46
sunny 80 56
sunny 76 46
sunny 80 58
sunny 70 60
tstrm 90 71
sunny 75 49
ptcldy 67 42
sunny 83 57
ptcldy 69 49
sunny 61 48
sunny 75 54
sunny 69 46
sunny 77 65
sunny 79 52
sunny 77 54
sunny 81 58
sunny 82 57
sunny 76 58
sunny 80 57
sunny 81 56
sunny 69 38
cldy 92 74
sunny 71 47
tstrm 76 52
sunny 79 56
cldy 89 65
sunny 84 58
sunny 74 50
sunny 69 43
tstrm 89 73
sunny 83 58
sunny 86 62
sunny 86 63
ptcldy 86 64
sunny 75 60
sunny 82 59
sunny 88 67
sunny 79 59
tstrm 69 53
sunny 86 63
sunny 85 56
sunny 83 57


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 91 74 ptcldy 87 73
New York City 76 58 sunny 69 56
Norfolk 73 64 sunny 75 58
Oklahoma City 86 63 tstrm 86 60
Omaha 83 65 tstrm 72 46
Palm Springs 86 60 sunny 95 64
Philadelphia 77 58 sunny 75 54
Phoenix 93 75 sunny 99 74
Pittsburgh 70 45 sunny 77 53
Portland, ME 70 53 sunny 63 41
Portland, Ore 60 45 rain 59 49
Providence, R.I. 76 58 sunny 67 45
Raleigh 79 50 sunny 77 52
Rapid City 90 49 ptcldy 67 40
Reno 58 34 ptcldy 75 45
Rochester, NY 67 48 sunny 74 52
Sacramento 75 47 ptcldy 76 51
St. Louis 84 55 ptcldy 85 60
St. Ste. Marie 61 42 ptcldy 71 55
Salt Lake City 69 35 .51 sunny 69 49
San Antonio 87 70 tstrm 88 73
San Diego 70 65 sunny 73 61
San Francisco 71 50 ptcldy 68 54
Savannah 90 66 sunny 78 63
Seattle 57 46 rain 58 51
Spokane 54 32 shwrs 53 42
Syracuse 68 50 sunny 70 50
Topeka 85 65 tstrm 80 52
Washington 78 57 sunny 76 57
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 94 Laredo, Texas LOW 19 Lakeview, Ore.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/IL/SKY
Acapulco 88/79/ts
Amsterdam 61/46/pc
Athens 80/61/s
Beljing 77/60/sh
Berlin 63/44/pc
Bermuda 85/74/ts
Cairo 88/71/s
Calgary 55/36/c
Havana 88/77/ts
Hong Kong 87/77/pc
Jerusalem 85/65/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


77/62/ts
61/44/pc
78/59/s
74/54/ts
69/43/s
66/49/pc
67/45/pc
75/62/sh
75/52/s
70/45/pc
75/55/ts
73/48/s
61/42/pc


I


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106 W. Main
St., Inverness,
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KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy; dr-drizzle;
f-falr; h-hazy; pc-partly cloudy; r=raln;
rs-raln/snow mix; s-sunny; sh-showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02007 Weather Central, Madison, Wl.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4ASUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007


- I


<











__=_____ News NOTES


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Pinellas County Sheriff's Office Sexual Predator/Offender Tracing Unit Cpl. John Jewett, left, and Deputy Tammy Nixon interview Al, a
convicted sexual offender, Thursday. The two law enforcement officers frequent the mobile home park several times a week to kep
track of the nearly 100 sex offenders residing there.


THE PALACE
Continued from Page 1A

"There's a lot of law enforce-
ment presence there," Vovan
said.
From a policing standpoint,
having all the offenders in one
area makes monitoring them
easier, Vovan said.
Before Palace became a safe
haven for sexual offenders, the
mobile home park was just that
- a regular mobile home park
The neighborhood surrounding
Palace is considered high-
crime, Vovan said. That is not a
result of the sexual offenders.
The majority of arrests at
Palace during the past two years
did not relate to offenders' orig-
inal crimes. Instead, the crimes
were trespassing, possession of
drugs and domestic violence,
Vovan said.
Only one offender, Samuel D.
Matthews, 54, who was arrested
in May, had a charge relating to
his sex-offender status.
According to Vovan, Matthews
had told another offender in the.
park that he was looking to "get
with" a child. The other offend-
er reported Matthews, and law
officials were able to arrest him
during an undercover sting.
But regardless of statistics,
having a high concentration of
sex offenders in one area is
unsettling.
"I don't know of any commu-
nity that wants that," Vovan said.
"It's a very emotional topic."
Palace does not allow sexual
predators residency in the park,
only sexual offenders. But peo-
ple should be aware that only a
few offenders in Pinellas County
fall into the Romeo and Juliet
category, which refers to people
who had consensual sex with a
minor who may just be a few
years younger, Vovan said.
"Some of them have commit-
ted some horrific offenses,"
Vovan said.
One man living in the park is
classified as an offender after
being convicted of a crime relat-
ing to making a 7-year-old girl
and 13-year-old girl lie on the
ground. Then he pulled his
pants down and rubbed himself
on the girls. Then, there's anoth-
er offender in the park who
befriended five girls ages 9 to 12
and later molested them.
"Those are some very con-
cerning offenses. Many people
think that those two people
should be classified as sexual
predators," Vovan said.
She reminded that John
Couey, the man convicted of kid-
napping, raping and killing
Jessica Lunsford, was classified
as a sexual offender.
mNE
While Palace mobile homes
are mostly decades-old sin-
glewides, the grounds are well
maintained. Residents care for
their homes by planting flowers
and shrubs and decorating with
wind chimes and lawn orna-
ments.
The park is surrounded by an
Interstate, businesses and a
neighborhood.
SPOT team members Deputy
Tammy Nixon and Cpl. John
Jewett often patrol Palace.
On most days, they try to make
direct contact with as many
offenders as possible. They veri-
fy phone numbers, where
offenders work, who their
friends and family are and if an
offender has plans to move.
S '"As soon as you pull in, the
cell phones start ringing," Nixon
Said, explaining that she
believes there is a phone tree
Residents use to warn people of
a law enforcement presence.


When Jewett and Nixon
arrived Thursday, a few resi-
dents met them at their patrol
car
While there may not be a scar-
let letter marking who is a sexu-
al offender and who is not, a lot
of the offenders can be identi-
fied because they wear black
electronic monitoring devices
on their ankle.
Mobile home 451 is usually
the first stop for offenders enter-
ing Palace, Nixon said. It's one
of the few doublewides in the
park and gives Palace staff a
chance to figure out where to
best place each person.
Nixon has patrolled the
Palace area for about six years
and has seen the effects of the
high concentration of offenders.
"There's definitely pros and
cons," Nixon said.
Having them all at Palace
saves time. Often times she
parks in one spot and then walks
throughout the park as she
makes her rounds rather than
driving from home to home
through traffic. She said Palace
staff is always cooperative and a
variety of law enforcement
agencies are in and out of the
park basically on a daily basis.
HEN
Al, 46, was one offender will-
ing to talk to a reporter While he
didn't give his full name, Nixon
and Jewett have known Al for
years and listened in during the
conversation.
Al was arrested on two counts
of sexual battery for crimes
against his stepdaughters. He
served 20 years and later was
arrested by Sgt. Jewett for not
registering his address - put-
ting him back in prison for
another five years.
"I know I've got society point-
ing a finger at me," Al said.
Because of legislative restric-
tions, many offenders may not
live within 1,000 feet of a school,
day care or park This leaves
few options.
"One of the problems is find-
ing housing," Al said.
He said Palace manager
Nancy Morias tries to find
offenders jobs and helps to keep
them on track to meet the terms
of probation.
Al said there is nothing unsafe
with having all the offenders in
one area, but having a constant
law enforcement presence
reminds many of his neighbors
to follow the rules.
EM.
Nearby mother Amber Wiley
said she wished there had been
a sign letting her know that
Palace served as transitional
housing for sexual offenders.
Had Wiley known, she said she
never would have moved there.
"I just thought it was a regular
mobile home park," she said.
HAR-COR president Harris
Dobkin said if the law required
him to post a sign explaining
that sexual offenders live there,
he would comply. Until then, he
believes the offenders have
served their time and should
have some privacy.
"The individuals who live
here also have rights," Dobkin
said.
He said the people accepted
into Palace are carefully
screened and are people the
staff believes can successfully
transition back into society He
called Palace a spectacular pro-
gram, which has a population
with low recidivism rates, com-
pared to people who commit
other crimes.
"People are limited in where
they can live, especially in
urban areas," Dobkin said. "It's
a hardship on them just to find a
place to live at all."
Wiley's next-door neighbor,


Dana, wasn't so confident that
her 3-year-old son is safe. She
didn't want her last name in the
media to protect her son's iden-
tity.
She keeps all the windows in
the house covered so people


can't look in and keeps a con-
stant watch on her son. Even
with police cars going in and out
of the park daily, she doesn't feel
completely safe.
"He's not allowed in the back
yard without us," Dana said.


EPA to treat
Lake Rousseau
During the period of Oct. 8
through 26, the Department of
Environmental Protection will be con-
ducting aquatic weed control opera-
tions in Lake Rousseau using EPA-
approved herbicides. Water hyacinth
and water lettuce will be maintained
using the herbicide Reward. Boat
trails will be maintained using the
herbicides Glypro, Aquathol K and
Reward.
People using these areas of Lake
Rousseau for domestic purposes or
for irrigation are cautioned that treat-
ed water should not be used for a
period of five days in Reward-treated
areas and 14 days in Aquathol-treat-
ed areas. No livestock watering for
one day in Reward-treated areas.
Water shall not be used for drinking
(does not apply to tap water) for
three days in Reward-treated areas.
There are no restrictions in
Glypro-treated areas.
Signs displaying treatment dates
and restrictions will be posted in
treated areas. Scheduled treatments
may be canceled due to environ-
mental conditions.
The management and treatment
of nuisance exotic vegetation is nec-
essary to maintain recreational activi-
ties and protection of native plant






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populations in Florida waters.
For further information, call (352)
726-8622.
Dream Society
hosts yard sale
The Dream Society, a non-profit
organization assisting those with
physical challenges, will host a yard
sale to benefit its programs. It will be
from 7 a.m. until 2 p.m. Oct. 12 to
14, at 4002 East Beck Street,
Inverness.
For information, call the Dream
Society at 400-4967.
PR group's president
to speak at meeting
Citrus County's Nature Coast
Chapter of The Florida Public
Relations Association will host state
President Suzanne A. Sparling at
noon Friday, Oct. 5, at the Citrus Hill
Country Club.
Cost is $15 for members and
$18 for guests. Meetings begin at
11:45 a.m. For information, check
www.fpra-naturecoast.org.
- From staff reports


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, SP'TEMj3ER 30, 2007 SA


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-" - -- /




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GA SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007


Happy birthday!



Levittown, N.Y., turns 60


Associated Press
This aerial file photo shows a portion of Levittown, N.Y., in 1948 shortly after the mass-produced sub-
urb was completed on Long Island farmland in New York. Levittown, a prototype development for the
Baby Boom, celebrates its 60th anniversary today with a parade featuring high school bands, floats,
community organizations, veterans groups and the fire department. Nearly two dozen original
Levittown homeowners will be the grand marshals.


Associated Press

LEVITTOWN, N.Y. - In
1951, 7-year-old Louise
Cassano couldn't imagine a
better life than the one here,
where she rode her bicycle
past rows of cookie-cutter
houses, kids held backyard
campouts in makeshift tents
and nobody locked their front
doors.
"It was an absolute ideal
community," said Cassano,
whose love affair with
Levittown never waned -
she still lives in the Long
Island town dubbed by some
as America's first suburb.
Cassano is among the
organizers of a huge 60th
birthday party for the Nassau
County town, set for Sunday
and featuring high school
bands, floats, local groups,
war veterans and the fire
department. Nearly two
dozen original Levittown
homeowners will serve as
grand marshals.
It was October 1947 when
developer William Jaird
Levitt opened the first of
what became 17,544 Cape
-Cod and ranch houses rising
from blighted potato fields 40
miles east of New York City,
handing post-World War II
GIs the keys to their
American Dream.
It was an instant success, a
prototype widely chronicled
and duplicated nationwide.
Cape Cods originally sold
for $6,990; ranches were
slightly more expensive.
Each house had four rooms, a
bath, an unfinished attic and
amenities - steel kitchen
cabinets, Bendix washer, GE
refrigerator, Hotpoint elec-
tric range.
None had basements, since
excavations would have
slowed the almost assembly
line construction.
Today, "you can't get a
house in Levittown for less
than $400,000," Cassano said
almost incredulously.
Virtually all the original
houses have been renovated,
in some cases making the
original structure nearly
invisible.
"It's to the point they're
almost McMansions," said
Polly Dwyer, president of the
Levittown Historical Society.
Levitt initially prohibited
blacks from joining the sub-
urban exodus. After Supreme
Court rulings and the civil

SHARE YOUR
THOUGHTS
* Follow the instructions on
today's Opinion page to
send a letter to the editor.


Associated Press
ABOVE: The original appliances of a Levitttown house kitchen are
on display at the Levittown Historical Society museum.
BELOW: New residents move into their Levitt homes in Levittown,
N.Y., in this file photo of early October 1947.


It was an
absolute ideal
community.

Louise Cassano
Levittown resident.

rights movement, minorities
were eventually permitted to
purchase homes, but
Levittown remains a largely
white community.
"I think black people were
hurt and offended by the bla-
tant rejection, and simply
when given the opportunity
chose to go elsewhere," said
Barbara Kelly, former direc-
tor of the Long Island Studies
Institute at Hofstra and
author of "Expanding the
American Dream: Building
and Rebuilding Levittown."
Levitt also built "village
greens" that featured a gro-
cery store, pharmacy and


other shops - all within
walking distance for women,
since their husbands typical-
ly drove the family car to
work.
Since those days of stay-at-
home wives, Cassano has
worked as a reporter for a
local weekly for several
years, started her own public
relations company and
served as president of the
chamber of commerce. She
and her husband, Mauro
Cassano, have two sons, one
of whom still lives nearby
and sends his children to
Levittown schools.
"There is a real genuine
hometown feeling here and I
think our generation was so
involved and so enthusiastic
about school, about the com-
munity," Cassano said. "We
were all, every one of us, was
very involved in activities in
school, and for that reason I
think that we all feel that we
did something in terms of
community."


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Clifford
Christ, 80
HERNANDO
Clifford J. Christ, 80,
Hernando, died Saturday, Sept.
29, 2007, at the Hospice House
of Citrus County, Lecanto.
Born May 23, 1927, in
Coaldale, Pa.,
he was the son
of Clifford and
Ester Christ.
He served in
the U.S. Army
during World War II as a heavy
machine gunner.
He was an engineer. He
retired from Vulcan Industries
as general manager. His last
construction project was in
Saudi Arabia. He moved to
Citrus Hills in 1987 from
Daytona.
He was a member of the
Panther Valley Mason Lodge
677 in Tamaqua, Pa., the
Inverness Elks Lodge 2552, the
Inverness Moose Lodge 2112
and the VFW Post 6982.
Survivors include: His wife
of 60 years, Mary E. Christ,
Hernando; four children,
Clifford C. Christ and his wife
Anne Marie, Glendora, Calif.,
Gail Hofmeister and her hus-
band Craig, Hernando, Bruce
T. Christ, Lecanto, and Dale R.
Christ and his wife Karyn,
Navarone; one brother, David
Christ, Pittsburgh, Pa.; and
three grandchildren, Jacki
Semple and her husband
Steve, Brooksville, Brad Christ,
Glendora, Calif., and Brooke
Christ, Lecanto.
Heinz Funeral Home and
Cremation, Inverness.

Norma Helm, 75
HERNANDO
Norma Perez Helm, 75,
Hernando, died Friday, Sept
28, 2007, at her residence,
under the care of her family
and Hernando-Pasco Hospice.
Born Sept. 13, 1932, in
Tampa, she was the daughter
of the late Ramon and
Hermina (Gonzalez) Ares, and
moved here four years ago
from Tampa.
She was a licensed practical
nurse for several physicians
and home health care. Her
enjoyments in life were going
to the beach and flea markets.
She was Catholic.
Survivors include: her hus-
band of 23 years, James L.
Helm; two stepsons, David W
Helm and his wife Debbie,
Brooksville, and James L.
Helm II, Wesley Chapel; one
stepdaughter, Janet Helm,
Zephyrhills; seven stepgrand-
children; and three stepgreat-
grandchildren.
Chas E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.

Frances
Melodia, 93
BEVERLY HILLS
Frances Melodia, 93, Beverly
Hills, died Friday, Sept. 28,
2007, at the Life Care Center of
Citrus County.
Born is New York, N.Y, she
moved to Florida from
Clintondale, N.Y. in 1989. She
worked as a seamstress.

HEINZ
FUNERAL HOME
.,r Crernnti-sn


She was an avid reader and
crocheter.
She was Pentecostal.
Survivors include: her
daughters, Barbara Cacioppo,
Flushing, N.Y, and Constance
Cacioppo, Beverly Hills; four
grandchildren; nine great-
grandchildren; and three
great-great-grandchildren.
Fero Funeral Home, Beverly
Hills.

Josephine
Perino, 88
INVERNES'S
Josephine L. Perino, 88,
Inverness, died Friday, Sept
28, 2007, at Arbor Trail Rehab
and Nursing Center, Inverness.
Born Sept. 18, 1919, in
Boston, Mass., she was the
daughter of the late Joseph and
Margaret Camaro, and moved
here from Randolph, Mass., in
1993.
She was a retired seam-
stress. She worshipped at the
Inverness Kingdom Hall of
Jehovah's Witnesses.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, Nicholas
Perino, on Jan. 28, 1992, and
her brother and sister, Samuel
and Santa.
She is survived by nieces
and nephews, including
Barbara Weigold, Inverness.
Chas E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.

Donald Porter, 71
LECANTO
Donald E. Porter, 71, Lecanto,
died Friday, Sept 28,2007.
Born Aug. 10, 1936, in Des
Moines, Iowa, to Orville and
Millie Porter, he moved to
Lecanto in
1984 from Des
Moines, having
retired from
Pick Quick
International


Jack, Des Moines, Iowa,
Margaret Purdy and her hus-
band Dennis, Pleasantville,
Iowa, Sylvia Holcomb,
Rochester, Minn., and Lisa
Michael, Adel, Iowa; two broth-
ers, Rodney Porter and Robert
Porter, Des Moines, Iowa; five
sisters, Mona Rhiner, West Des'
Moines, Iowa, and Donna
Folsom, Eloise Gardner,
Beverly Ostreko and Sheilai
Roberts, Des Moines, Iowa; 14i
grandchildren; nine great-
grandchildren; and several!
nieces and nephews.
In lieu of flowers, donations,
may be made to Hernando-,
Pasco Hospice of Citrus:
County.
Heinz Funeral Home and
Cremation, Inverness.

Lois Wilhelm, 74
SUGARMILL WOODS,
HOMOSASSA
Lois J. Wilhelm, 74,
Sugarmill Woods, Homosassa,.
died Friday, Sept. 28, 2007, at
the Citrus Memorial Health
System Hospice care unit,
Inverness.
Born March 28, 1933, in
Aliquippa, Pa., to Raymond
and Jean (Orr) French, she'
moved to Sugarmill Woods 13;
years ago fro Aliquippa, Pa.
She was a homemaker.
She was a member of theL
West Citrus Elks Lodge 2693,'
Homosassa.
Survivors include: her hus-
band, Richard Wilhelm,
Homosassa; two sons, Mark,
Wilhelm, Wooster, N.Y, and
Scott Wilhelm, Baldwinsville,;
N.Y; and four grandchildren,'
Nicole, Laura, Jessica and'
Hannah.
Brown Funeral Home and'
Crematory, Lecanto.

Funeral NOTICES


in Des Moines H Clifford Christ The service
after 30 years of remembrance will be con-
of service. He ducted at 10 a.m. Wednesday,
worked for sev- Donald Oct. 3, 2007, at the Heinz,
eral employers, Porter Funeral Home, 2507 State
including the Road 44 W, Inverness. Hospice:
Beverly Hills Piggly Wiggly, the Chaplain Daniel Lyman will"
Beverly Hills Pharmacy, Jones preside. Interment with mili-'
Restaurant, Crystal River, and tary honors will follow at the'
the Heritage Hospital Rehab Florida National Cemetery in'
Center. Bushnell. In lieu of flowers,'
He loved helping elderly donations may be made to'
people, and was .known for Hospice of Citrus County'
delivering groceries to the Envelopes will be available at'
homebound and ' providing the funeral 'home. Heinz
transportation for their Funeral Home and Cremation,/
appointments. Inverness.
He was a member of the Josephine Perino. A funeral'
Heritage Baptist Church in service will be conducted at 3)
Beverly Hills. As a church p.m. Monday, Oct 1, 2007, ate
member, he served in many the Chas. E. Davis Funeral
facets, including Sunday school Home, with Mr. Ronald
superintendent, janitor, bus Vickers officiating. Burial will
driver, usher, missionary board follow in Knollwood Cemetery2
member, founder of the Jewish in Canton, Mass. Friends mayA
ministry "Friends of Israel," call at the funeral home from 2
and he helped the youth in the p.m. Monday until the hour of
church's AWANA Club. service.
He was preceded in death by Donald Porter. The service
his parents and two brothers, of remembrance will be held at
Orville Cooney and Raymond 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct 2, 2007, at^
Porter. the Heritage Baptist Church,
Survivors include: his wife of Beverly Hills. The Rev. Davidl
38 years, Shirley J. Porter, Hamilton will preside. The'
Lecanto; two sons, Mark Porter, family will receive friends at�
Lecanto, and Kurt Porter, the church from 5:30 p.m. until
Beverly Hills; four daughters, the hour of service. Heinz
Julie Enos and her husband Funeral Home and Cremation.






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SUNDAY, Sirl'.IMIAnlr 30, 2007 7A


Astronaut's son buys ticket to space


Famed game designer follows in his father's contrails


Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL - The
son of a retired astronaut is
about to follow his father into
orbit, after buying a $30 million
ticket for a seat on a Russian
rocket
Richard Garriott, who made
his fortune in computer games,
is scheduled to blast off aboard
a Soyuz rocket from
Kazakhstan in October 2008 on
a one-week trip to the interna-
tional space station.
His father, Owen Garriott, 76,
spent 59 days aboard Skylab,
America's first space station, in
1973 and flew aboard the space


shuttle Columbia in 1983.
It will be the first time a child
of an American astronaut rock-
ets into space. In Russia, sons
have followed their fathers into
the cosmonaut corps three
times, and one is slated to go to
the international space station
next spring.
"My dad was an astronaut so
I grew up believing that space
was going to be available for
everyone at some point in the
future," Richard Garriott told
The Associated Press in a tele-
phone interview Friday. "But I
realized that the NASA
method was a statistical
improbability. If I was going to


get a chance to go myself, it
would have to be through pri-
vate space travel."
Garriott is 46 and lives in a
medieval-style mansion in
Austin, Texas, complete with
its own dungeon and secret
passages. The house is mod-
eled after the setting of his
"Ultima" video games.
He plans to dedicate much of
his time in space to science,
engineering and educational
projects. A biotechnology com-
pany co-founded by his father,
who has a Ph.D. in electrical
engineering, will send up pro-
tein experiments for him to
work on.


"Because of my career, it was
almost natural for Richard to
be interested in space and
exploration," Owen Garriott
said in a statement issued
Friday by Space Adventures
Limited, the Virginia company
that brokered the trip.
Space Adventures has
organized orbital flights for
five previous millionaires,
including the first paying
space tourist, California busi-
nessman Dennis Tito, in 2001.
The early trips went for a
reported $20 million each, but
in July, Space Adventures
President Eric Anderson said
the weak dollar had spiked the
price to a minimum $30
million.
Richard Garriott, a


University of
Texas dropout,
developed the -
"Ultima" ser-
ies, a computer
game fran-
chise, and with
his brother,
Robert, found- Richard
ed Origin Garriott
Systems, a com- Utima series
puter game creator.
developer and
publisher. He also co-founded
the North American arm of
NCsoft, an online game devel-
oper and publisher. His newest
game, "Tabula Rasa", is due
out in October.
In Russia, Sergey Volkov, 34,
a pilot, is set to fly to the inter-
national space station, as com-


mander, next spring. His father,
Aleksandr, rocketed into orbit
in the 1980s and early 1990s.
And Roman Romanenko, 36,
trained as a cosmonaut but has
never flown in space. His
father, Yuri, flew as a space
commander in the 1970s and
1980s.
Neither of the father-son cos-
monaut combo of Aleksandr
Skvortsov Sr. and Jr. has flown
in space.
On the U.S. side, space has
proven to be a family affair for
identical twins Scott and Mark
Kelly, both shuttle pilots, and
several married couples. One
couple, now divorced and mar-
ried to other people, even flew
on the same shuttle mission in
1992.


Atlanta museum showcases Louvre's antiquities


Associated Press

ATLANTA - Eight Roman
muses stand aloof, their drap-
ery delicately painted against
a burning gold background. In
the next room, a landscape
frames a portrait of
Napoleon's wife Josephine,
who is wearing virtually the
same dress and hairdo as the
muses.
About 1,700 years separate
the. works of art, from the
Roman Empire to the Empire
style of early 1800s France -
but they are brought together
in a powerful new set of
exhibits that trace the story of
famed antiquities from their
creation to their discovery and
influence in the modern
world.
"We live with the classical
past, whether it's pop culture
or this (museum's) architec-
ture," said High Museum cura-
tor David Brenneman. "These
objects have lives."
It's year two of the three-
year Louvre Atlanta partner-
ship, and this time the High
Museum gets about 130 antiq-
uities from the Paris power-
house, including delicate
Greek vases, Egyptian
papyrus, a 3,000-year-old stat-
ue from the Middle East and
muscular Roman statues.
"The Lou're. and. the
Anhient World," with its sister
exhibit "The Eye of
Josephine," both opening on
Oct. 16, pack stunning art-
works that are rarely seen in


the Southeast and provide an
overview of ancient civiliza-
tions from Mesopotamia to the
late Roman Empire.
But instead of focusing on
those ancient times, the
exhibits draw links to their
modern lives: The archaeolog-
ical digs that the Louvre led in
the early 19th century and the
magnetic personalities who
adorned their palaces with the
priceless artifacts.
It was during their time that
classical antiquities became
hip, -and these objects
spawned scholarly revelations
about how people lived in
ancient Egypt and popular
fashions like empire waist
dresses that endure today.
Those links are especially
evident in the "Eye of
Josephine" show, Which gath-
ers the objects that Napoleon's
wife got as a present from the
King of Naples in 1802 and
exhibited at her palace,
Malmaison. They include nine
small frescoes portraying the
muses and Apollo, which had
then just been excavated from
Pompeii after being buried in
volcanic ash for 1,700 years.
The larger show focuses on
the riches the Louvre gathered
from Napoleon's conquests
and through its own excava-
tions in the Middle East, which
started in the 19th century and,
in some places, still continue.
From ancient Mesopotamia
comes one of the oldest objects
in the exhibits, a two-foot-tall
statue of a local prince that


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dates to 2120 B.C. A brightly
painted papyrus covered in
hieroglyphs from 1075-715 B.C.
brings to life the Egyptian
kingdoms.
Ancient Greece shines, liter-
ally, through lucid painted
vases, including an amphora
from 550 B.C. that portrays
Hercules (Herakles for the
Greeks) sporting his lion skin
and fighting a three-headed
monster The Roman empire is
represented by virile statues,
including a towering personal-
ization of the river-god Tiber
and the bust of a second-centu-
ry emperor with a detailed
chiseled beard and shaggy hair.
The High and the Louvre
inaugurated their three-year
partnership last year with
exhibitions focused on paint-
ings and sculptures collected
by French kings in the 17th
and 18th centuries. That cycle
drew nearly half a million visi-
tors to the Atlanta museum.
The partnership, heralded
as a new kind of collaboration
that goes well beyond the occa-
sional hosting of masterpieces,
started with an exchange of
high school students between
Atlanta and Paris in early 2006
and will continue with yearly
exhibits at the High Museum
through 2009.
"The Eye of Josephine" will
be on view until' May 18, 2008.
"The Louvre and the Ancient
World" will be at the High until
Sept. 7, 2008.


K.- a,






I:,


Associated Press
LEFT: "Statue of Prince
Gudea in Prayer," a two-
foot-tall statue of a
Mesopotamian prince
dating to 2120 B.C. The
statue is included in the
exhibition, "The Louvre
and the Ancient World"
at the High Museum of
Art in Atlanta.
RIGHT: The piece
"Apollo," a fresco por-
traying Apollo. The piece
is included in the exhibi-
tion "Eye of Josephine."
BELOW: In this undated
photo released by High
Museum of Art, Sophie
Descamps, the Louvre's
chief curator in the
Department of Greek,
Etruscan, and Roman
Antiquities, unpacks a
bronze sculpture of
Mercury.


4

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SA SUNDAY, SEI'PTMBER 30, 2007


Rodeo girls get in the saddle


BREANNE GILPATRICK
The Miami Herald
DAVIE - Seconds before
the red iron rodeo gate
swings open, 17-year-old
Leanne Hamrick holds her
breath and tries to focus on
the calf she's about to rope.
She's been awake since
5:30 a.m., and the adrenaline
is pumping so hard she can't
even hear her mother cheer-
ing. She thinks about keeping
her roping elbow high, push-
ing her hip out of the way
and keeping her eyes on that
calf.
Then, less than a minute
later, it's over.
"I don't even remember
half of it," Hamrick said.
Throughout Florida, young
women like Hamrick, of Fort
Pierce, have been swinging
their lassos at rodeo events
long dominated by men. To
compete in steer riding and
calf roping, they say, takes
strength, bravery - and a
high threshold for pain.
"In calf roping . . . if you
jump off your horse and twist
your ankle, you have to be
able to handle the pain,"
Hamrick said.
Traditional women's rodeo
events include barrel racing
and pole bending, in which
riders guide their horses
around a series of barrels or
between a line of poles. And
many women compete for
Rodeo Queen honors, win-
ning a satin sash and a silver
crown to perch atop their
cowboy hats.
More than 100 women are
members of the Homestead
Everglades Posse Mounted
Drill Team, whose riders
lead their horses through dif-
ferent formations each year
at the Homestead
Championship Rodeo.
But in the past few years,
some have decided that
rodeo should be an equal


CONTROL
Continued from Page 1A

Legislature to'pass a law for-
bidding sex. offender- on pro-
bation to have contact with
each other.
Manning, who owns a rental
mobile home next door to the
mobile home park off Trail 10,
said offenders who have sex
crimes in common would have
an opportunity to exchange
information if they lived
together.
"If you hang together, you
talk about what you have in
common," she said.
She said she is not comfort-
ed by the fact that sex offend-
ers might not reside for long
periods of time in transitional
housing.
"It's worse in a way It's con-
stant new ones," she said, mak-
ing it difficult to keep track of
who comes and goes.
Manning said judges already
have the discretion to set vari-
ous requirements for proba-
tion, including having no con-
tact with victims, no contact
with witnesses and no contact
with others who have commit-
ted similar crimes. She wants
to make it mandatory in sex
crimes cases for offenders on
probation to stay away from
other offenders on probation.


opportunity sport.
"Girls are just as competi-
tive as men," said Dolli
Lautaret, a member of the
Women's Professional Rodeo
Association who competes
along with her 32-year-old
daughter. "We like to com-
pete as much as they do. And
we want to win just as much."
Nationally, the Women's
Professional Rodeo
Association is looking at
ways to promote the sport's
rougher events.
In Davie, women from
around the state competed
this summer in the Tiffany
Doctor Memorial All-Girl
Rodeo series. For three
weekends, competitors sur-
rounded the Bergeron Rodeo
Grounds with pickup trucks
and horse trailers. Riders
stood on the grass outside
and practiced roping saw-
horses or plastic dummies,
the afternoon heat baking
riders in their jeans, long-
sleeved, collared shirts and
cowboy hats.
Others focused on coating
their ropes with baby powder
- to reduce friction as the
rope glides through the
hands - and keeping them-
selves and their horses cool
as pens full of steers, calves
and goats kicked up dirt
nearby.
When Gwen Roberts, of
Davie, started competing in
rodeos more than 20 years
ago, few women were taking
the reins, especially in calf
roping and steer riding.
"That's something that sur-
prises me now, how many
(female) steer riders you
see," said Roberts, from the
saddle of her brother's horse.
"Eight years ago, you didn't
see any girls ride steers. And
so that's something that's
becoming noticed. These
women ride the bulls."
Most of the new female
competitors are younger, like


She said many states require
offenders to live in halfway
houses after they are released
from incarceration. She thinks
that would also be a good idea.
State Sen. Charles Dean, R-
Inverness and State Rep. Ron
Schultz, R-Homosassa, said
they have no plans to intro-
duce legislation addressing
the issue of sex offender
mobile home parks, but they
said they would be receptive to
any proposals that might come
their way at the annual leg-
islative delegation hearing on


Hamrick. At the professional
level, only a handful of
women are registered to
compete in traditionally
male events, according to the
Professional Rodeo Cowboys
Association.
But girls outnumber boys
in the Florida Junior Rodeo
Association, which includes
youngsters through middle
school, said Ron Westberry,
the association's president
and father of three daughters
who ride rodeo.
Fifteen-year-old Kelsea
Nodal decided she wanted to
try roping a couple of years
ago, after seeing other girls
do it at one of Davie's
Wednesday night rodeos.
"I was like, 'Where'd she
learn to rope? I want to
rope,"' said Nodal, who has
been competing since she
was 8.
Pamela Noakes, executive
director of the National
Association of Girls and
Women in Sport, said girls
often try a new sport after
female superstars lead the
way. Mia Hamm is soccer's
prime example, and Lisa
Leslie is an inspiration for
women in basketball.
"I think that really con-
tributes to the success of the
sport," Noakes said.
Kaila Mussell is rodeo's
Mia Hamm.
Mussell, of Stephenville,
Texas, became a professional
bronco rider in 2000. She is
the only professional woman
bronco rider registered in
the United States and
Canada.
And although some people
still watch her in disbelief,
others send. her e-mails say-
ing they want to follow in her
bootsteps.
"More than anything, it's
the challenge of the event
and to go out there and prove
that you're just as capable as
anyone else," said Mussell,


Nov. 15.
Schultz and Dean will join
State Sen. Mike Fasano, R-
New Port Richey, and U.S.
Rep. Ginny Brown-Waite, R-
Brooksville, for the 8:30 a.m.
hearing in the Citrus County
Commission chambers on the
first floor of the Citrus County
Courthouse.
The meeting was originally
set for Oct. 15 but had to be
changed when the Legislature
scheduled a special fall ses-
sion to make $1 billion in state
budget cuts.


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Associated Press
LeAnne Hamrick, 17, gets ready to lace a calf during the break away competition Sept. 8 at the KSAj
Rodeo in Kissimmee in this image from taken from video.


29. "It's an equality thing."
The rougher events can be
painful. As a calf and goat
roper, Hamrick has torn open
the palms of her hands with
her rope and loosened a


NEED A REPORTER?
* Approval for story ideas
must be granted by the
Chronicle's editors before
a reporter is assigned.
* Call Milke Arnold, manage.
ing editor, at 563.5660.
* Be prepared to leave a
message with your name,
phone number and brief
description of the story.


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tooth as she grabbed her
tying string from her mouth.
But she grew up surround-
ed by boys and wasn't about
to let them try something
without her.


"When I was little, my monf-
and dad's friends all had'
boys," Hamrick said. "So I
always looked at it as I had t6
do what they did. I couldn't,
show any weakness."


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CITRUS COUMY (H) CHRONIC-Lit'


I -









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE NATION SUNDAY, Sto'TItMnvrc 30, 2007 9A


President Bush's


daughter launches


first book tour


Story based on

her time at

UNICEF

Associated Press
ANNAPOLIS, Md. - Jenna
Bush looked poised as she
stepped to the podium, but
couldn't quite hide the butter-
flies as she stood before an
eager bookstore crowd
Saturday to introduce her new
book, "Ana's Story: A Journey of
Hope."
"This is my first day, so I'm a
little nervous," the 25-year-old
first daughter admitted.
Her face lit up, though, as
soon as she started talking
about the subject of her nonfic-
tIon narrative - a teenage
mother with HIV whom she met
during an internship with
UNICEF in Latin America.
"Ana changed my life. She's
:only 17 years old, but she's lived
the life of somebody so much
Older," Bush said. "Despite her
hardships, Ana is so much like
the teenagers here in the
United States. She reminds me
of myself at that age."
1 Bush, who embarks this
weekend on a two-month
national book tour, appears far
different than the college stu-
dent America knew during her
father's early years in the White
House. The young woman who
Was famously cited for under-
age drinking and once pho-
tbgraphed sticking her tongue
out is gone - replaced with an
author who is passionate about
her writing project
If her work as a writer makes
people realize she's more than
a social butterfly, Jenna, who
also has worked as an elemen-
tary school teacher, is fine with
that
: "The people that know me
and love me, my students and
colleagues, never had that per-
ception of me," she told The
Associated Press in a brief


interview before her reading of
"Ana's Story" at a Borders
bookstore in Annapolis.
While her sister Barbara,
who works at the Cooper-
Hewitt National Design
Museum in New York, main-
tains a low profile, Jenna has
begun to reveal her devotion to
education and helping the
underprivileged. She said she
never had a reason to interact
with the media until she had
something important to say -
and now she does.
"I didn't have something that
I was passionate about," she
said.
Jenna Bush said the book
came together quickly She saw
the potential in the teenager as
soon as she saw her last fall at a
community meeting for women
and children living with HIV
and AIDS. (Ana's name was
changed to protect her privacy,
and Bush does not reveal
which country she lives in
beyond saying it's in Central
America.)
Bush began meeting with
Ana several times a week,
speaking with her - entirely in
Spanish - about her difficult
upbringing.
Ana was infected with HIVby
her mother, and both of her
parents died of AIDS. She was
raised by relatives who beat
her and molested by her grand-
mother's boyfriend. She ended
up in a juvenile detention facil-
ity after running away from
home. She became pregnant by
her first boyfriend, who was
also HIV-positive.
Bush was struck by Ana's
positive outlook She was vigi-
lant about taking her medica-
tion and did not pass on the
virus to her daughter, and she
recently returned to school.
By the time Bush went home
for the holidays last December,
she had written several sample
chapters and began shopping
around her book proposal. She
wrote most of "Ana's Story"
between January and April,
working with editors at
HarperCollins over e-mail.


Melissa forms in Atlantic


expected to gradually turn west-
northwest
Meanwhile, Tropical Storm
Karen continued weakening in
the open Atlantic. Karen's cen-
ter was about 590 miles east of
the Leeward Islands and the
storm was moving west-north-
west near 12 mph. Its maximum
sustained winds had decreased
to 40 mph.
The remnants of Hurricane
Lorenzo were bringing rain to
central Mexico. Lorenzo hit
Mexico's Gulf coast early R-iday


as a hurricane but quickly weak-
ened to a tropical depression as
it charged inland. Forecasters
said 4 to 7 inches of rain was pos-
sible Saturday and warned of
possible flash floods and mud-
slides.
Forecasters expect this year's
Atlantic hurricane season to be
busier than average. Last month,
they said as many as 16 tropical
storms were likely to form, with
nine strengthening into hurri-
canes. The season runs from
June 1 to Nov 30.


Associated Press
MIAMI - Tropical Storm
Melissa formed in the far east-
ern Atlantic early Saturday,
becoming the 13th named storm
of the hurricane season, but
posed no immediate threat to
land, forecasters said.
At 5 a.m. Saturday, Melissa


had maximum sustained winds
near 40 mph, and slight strength-
ening was forecast during the
next 24 hours, according to the
National Hurricane Center.
The center of the storm was
located about 260 miles west-
soutwest of the Cape Verde
Islands. Melissa was moving
west near 3 mph and was


Nation BRIEFS


Police charge woman
in decades-old killing
BOISE, Idaho - Police arrested a 61-year-
old woman and charged her with a killing
they say took place nearly three decades ago
but went undiscovered until now.
Judy Gough, 61, was charged with first-
degree murder and felony use of a firearm on
Friday, then moved to a jail in Boise, said
police spokeswoman Lynn Hightower.
Authorities spent Saturday searching the
woman's former home, where they say the
slaying took place.
Officers learned of the killing recently, and
police officials refused to release the name of
the person killed, saying it was an ongoing
investigation and that family members had
not yet been notified.
"This is a case that is a brand-new investi-
gation," Hightower said. "This is not related to
any case that BPD has ever investigated."
She declined to say how police learned of
the slaying.


911 tapes related to missing
woman to be released
SEATTLE -A sheriff has ordered a review
of the 911 calls made about a woman who
spent more than a week missing before search
crews found her trapped in the wreckage of her
sport-utility vehicle.
King County Sheriff Sue Rahr's order comes
after Tanya Rider's husband complained that he
had to fight to get authorities to launch a search
for his wife.
Tom Rider said he asked the sheriff's office
last weekend to use cell phone technology to
try to find his wife.
He said he was told she couldn't be catego-
rized as a missing person because she wasn't
a minor, suicidal or mentally ill.
Authorities found the Maple Valley woman
after detecting the general location of her cell
phone Thursday morning, then searching along
a highway southeast of Seattle.
Rahr said her department gets up to 700 miss-
ing persons reports a year.


Girl seen being sexually
assaulted on tape is found safe
PAHRUMP, Nev. - When a homemade
videotape showing a young girl being sexually
assaulted surfaced, authorities took the unusual
step of releasing information about the child in
hopes that someone would recognize her.
They gave the media a first name for the girl,
whose haunting face could be seen in the video
in which she was raped. They also released a
photograph of her.
The plan worked. On Friday, the girl was
found safe in Las Vegas and a fugitive who
knew her family was named a suspect in the
case, authorities said.
"She looks like a very happy 7-year-old girl,"
Nye County sheriffs Detective David
Boruchowitz said at a news conference late
Friday.
The girl, who was 3 when the tape was
made, was with relatives and sheriff's officials,
he said.
- From wire reports


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Tropical storm poses

no immediate threat to land


NATION


SUNDAY, Sm,-i-jimmut 30, 2007 9A


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


pow

NINO







AlO SUNDAY, SEI IIMBEiR 30, 2007


Gingrich bows out of 2008 race


Former House speaker won't seek presidential bid


The Washington Post
CARROLLTON, Ga. -
Former U.S. House speaker
Newt Gingrich on Saturday
decided against running for
president in 2008, less than a
day after the Republican indi-
cated publicly that he would
spend the next month explor-
ing the viability of a White
House bid.
Gingrich said the last-
minute change of heart, which
came as aides readied the
NewtNow.org Web site and
prepared to file campaign:
papers, was the result of legal
advice that running for presi-
dent would require stepping
down as chairman of his non-
profit organization, American
Solutions.
That group is the latest
vehicle for Gingrich's musings
about politics and policy, and
opened its first-annual "ideas
summit" Saturday at a
Georgia college an hour west
of Atlanta and with webcasts
on the Internet.
"American Solutions is in
the early stages, I think, of
becoming a genuine national
citizens movement," Gingrich
told reporters. "To walk out of
it just as it's getting launched
struck me as absolutely irre-
sponsible."
Gingrich has spent the bet-
ter part of a year teasing the
media and his supporters.
with the idea that he might
run for president. He has con-
demned the political process
that requires candidates to
start campaigning years


VACATION


TIME!


ahead of the election and to
raise tens of millions of dol-
lars.
At times, his criticism of the
American electoral process
made it sound unlikely that he
would run. But more recently,
he said he would run if he
received $30 million in
pledges toward a presidential
campaign.
Aides had scheduled a news
conference for Monday morn-
ing in which Gingrich was set
to announce the formation of
an exploratory committee.
Randy Evans, Gingrich's
lawyer, said they had pre-
pared the papers, opened a
bank account and severed
Gingrich's ties as a consultant
for Fox News.
Evans said that since word
leaked out a week ago,
Gingrich had received
pledges "in the millions, I'll
make no bones about it."
But at about 11 a.m.
Saturday, Gingrich said,
Evans told the former law-
maker that the McCain-
Feingold campaign finance
laws would make it a criminal
offense for Gingrich to form
the presidential exploratory
committee while continuing
to run the American Solutions
organization.
"The McCain-Feingold act
is a very anti-middle-class
act," Gingrich said. "There
are such severe penalties. I
would have to have stepped
down and resigned. ... That
basically ended the conversa-
tion."
Gingrich has been a fiery


newspaper


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figure since he burst onto the
national stage in 1994 with the
"Contract With America," a
list of 10 pledges that helped
Republicans seize control of
the House and launched
Gingrich into the speaker's
office.
From that perch, he became
a larger-than-life figure,
espousing conservative prin-
ciples and battling with then-
President Bill Clinton.
Gingrich helped lead the cam-
paign to impeach Clinton but
resigned himself in 1998 after
midterm elections that disap-
pointed the GOP
In recent years, however,
Gingrich has tried to rehabili-
tate his reputation. He has
become a conservative gadfly,
writing novels and policy pre-
scriptions, .sometimes to
Republicans' chagrin.
He has said the American
Solutions organization is
intended to be a bipartisan
effort aimed at finding "real
solutions" to the nation's prob-
lems. The summit featured
sessions from conservatives
such as former representative
Dick Armey, R-Texas, and for-
mer Colorado Democratic gov-
ernor Roy Romer.
A video played at the begin-
ning of the summit said: "Red
Country? Blue Country?


Associated Press
Former U.S. House speaker Newt Gingrish speaks Sept. 21 to the National Rifle Association In
Washington. Gingrich will not run for president in 2008 after determining he could not legally explore
a bid and remain as head of his tax-exempt political organization, a spokesman said Saturday.


Americans are tired of Red vs.
Blue. We need a Red, White
and Blue country."
Whether that sentiment
would have translated into
votes in a possible presiden-
tial campaign is anyone's
guess. Several of the 100 or so


summit attendees said they
admire Gingrich's creativity
but are not sure he would be a
good president.
Jim Bourland, 50, a general
contractor from Columbus,
Miss., drove 3 1/2 hours to
spend the day in western


Georgia with Gingrich. But he
arrived wearing a T-shirt pro-
claiming former
Massachusetts governor Mift
Romney "Mr. President." .
"We're looking for a good
vice president," Bourland
explained.


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CITRUS COUN'IY (III) CIIRONIC14."


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'ITRVus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Victims of Japan's worst eco-disaster struggle for redress


Associated Press

SHIRANUI SEA, Japan -
The dawn is still only a faint
Iglow beyond distant moun-
tains, but fisherman Akinori
* Mori and his wife, Itsuko, are
already hard at work on their
boat, reeling in nets of squid,
fish and crabs.
Nothing about Mercury
i this placid scene
* reveals that Minamata Diseas
reveals worst 50 years ago in
Japan's worst thousands of vici
environmental fighting for comp
disaster unfold- company that du
:ed here. mercury into their
Starting 50 |IIOutbreak of
i4 ears ago, whole ,;
,neighborhoods -rrau- '
were poisoned "i ma
by mercury-con- , .' , *'
taminated fish ,.- s*a-
'from these wat- sea .
ers. Thousands Nrgama
of people were \,.�I
crippled, and KAGOSI-
'hundreds died
ago n i z i ng CHRIJ * R-
dseaths. Babies nneI Minar
tvere born with . ou br
i0orrifying defor- ' in 1ni.g
-mities. 5s .cRE -
. Today, the -
tragedy known -
as Minamata
Disease is only a .,
dim memory to SOURCES: ESRI; Ja
the rest of the of Environment
^world, and few
outside Japan would recognize
C hisso Corp. as the company
that polluted Minamata Bay
.nd the Shiranui Sea with
deadly methylmercury. But for
Akinori, 62, and Itsuko, 58, and
-iAany of the people living along
hese craggy coasts, the disas-
fer never ended.
The Moris' parents - his
father, both her parents - suf-
Ifered the ravages of the dis-
lease: blinding headaches, crip-
Ipling loss of sensation in their
'limbs, insomnia and dizzy
,spells. Both Akinori and Itsuko
increasingly feel the disease in
their own bones as they age, in
,painful hand and leg aches and
loss of feeling and coordination


Pilr

pn
mii



-irf
Min






ma


ea


from eating tainted fish as chil-
dren.
"Now it's starting in my
hands and fingers," said Itsuko
as she picked strips of seaweed
from her fishing nets in the
morning sun. "They're turning
white and are all bent"
Like the Moris, Japan has
never fully re-
woisoning covered. Indeed,
the disease
e was identified played a large
apan, but
ms are still role in creating
nation from the the Japan of
nped lethal today. It gave
fishing grounds, birth to the Jap-
namata Disease anese environ-
ionoura mentalist move-
-.' an ment, and like
Ku OTOu" the Chernobyl
-MChisso nuclear melt-
plant down and the
SMinamata Union Carbide
--.""*.""'"- chemical disas-
,w ,:, i,,1i. ter in Bhopal,
MA 0 10km India, it became
, . an international
.A cause celebre.
a' -It forced the
-e " country to face
ta ,- up to the price of
S"JAPN the industrial
_�.,vtoKyo miracle it built
Pacific ocean out of the wreck-
So 2oomi age of World War
0 200 km II, encouraged
anese Ministry AP other victims of
such negligence
to sue for
redress, and forced authorities
to be much more attentive to
protecting the public from the
mistakes of Japhn.
But the struggle over
Minamata is far from finished.
At least 2,000 victims have
died. Even now, courts are forc-
ing the government to recog-
nize more victims, which some
estimate at as many as 30,000.
Many are confined to wheel-
chairs or bed, complaining that
diagnosis and treatment are
haphazard and inadequate.
Lawsuits for further compen-
sation continue.
The government still refuses
to conduct an epidemiological
study to determine the full


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scope of the poisoning.
"Minamata Disease has been
going on for 50 years, but it still
hasn't been resolved," said
Takeko Kato, managing direc-
tor of Hotto Hausu, a vocation-
al aid center for victims in
Minamata. "The country isn't
helping these people enough."
Chisso first offered "sympa-
thy money" to small numbers of
victims and fishing coopera-
tives in 1959, though it denied
culpability. After the govern-
ment declared it at fault, the
company had to pay much larg-
er compensation packages in


the 1970s. Additional victims
received money in the 1990s.
The legal battle continues. In
a landmark decision, the
Supreme Court ruled in 2004
that the government was re-
sponsible for the spread of the
disease. Since then, an addi-
tional 12,000 people have be-
come eligible for medical assis-
tance, though not full certifica-
tion, and the government is
working on a plan to expand
compensation to more than
5,000 additional people de-
manding recognition.
Nobody knows what danger


still lurks at the bottom of the
sea.
As part of the cleanup,
Chisso and the government
covered the worst-contaminat-
ed areas with landfill, dredged
mercury from the water and
capped mercury-soaked por-
tions of the seabed with a steel
and cement barrier. The gov-
ernment declared the area safe
for fishing in 1997.
But some fish have been
found with high concentrations
of methylmercury, and unusu-
ally high rates of contamina-
tion are still found in sediment


I E(ONNE(ION


in Minamata Bay, though offi-
cials say they are within safety
standards.
Environmental authorities
say inspections of the barrier
are carried out every year, with
detailed studies every five
years. But Yoshiaki Yasuda, a
scientist at the Minamata insti-
tute, says researchers there
were refused permission some
years ago to do their own inves-
tigation.
"I guess this is quite a deli-
cate issue that we are not
allowed to delve into," Yasuda
said.


SUNDAY, Sm,,jj-,mm:jt 30, 2007 IIA


WO ,lo











*~''^,^ " \^
/,, ,-v' _ AJ,


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation


Gen. Lee



.- -









ederate Gen. Robert E. Lee is
part of the 440 Confederate
letters and documents sold
at auction Saturday in
Columbia, S.C. Rare letters
collected by Thomas Willcox
' - -" " - ^ -C


/-.; '"*~~-^''.5-*^







went for an estimated
$400,000 total.
Civil War-era letters
at auction Saturday in
Columbia, S.C. Rare letters




months, 11 folders of old papers
rescued from his parents' closet
sat in Thomas Willcox'sports
utility vehicle. Then he realized

some were signed by Confeder-
ate Gen. Robert E. Lee and
might be vtotale.
They were: The three letters

written by Lee during the Civil
War sold at auction Saturday for
$61,000LUMBIA, S
That was far off the record
$630,000 a Lee item sold for ins
2002. But it was an improve-
ment from last year, when twor
letters from the general who sur-
rendered in 1865 sold for s

$5,000 and $1,900, said Patrick
Scott, director of rarthe books and
special collections at the f

University of South Carolina's
Thomas Cooper Library.
The letters far off the recamong more
than 400 documents Willcox put
up for auction aft an improtracted
fight with the state, which
claimed ownership of the docu-
ments that had been in Willcox's
family fdiretor years. Neither Willcox
nor the auction house had spe-
Thomas: figure but estimates
lTh- d te lolal sale among less
than $40,000 documents Willcox put

Wup for auction after a protracted
family for years. Neither Willcox


Beauty


Associated Press
A Sphynx cat is held before a
referee while being evaluated
Saturday at an international
cat beauty contest in
Bucharest, Romania. Rare-
breed cats sell for prices
ranging from $426 to more
than $1,420. The average
monthly income in Romania
is about $284.


Troops forcing
people from homes
MOGADISHU, Somalia -
Somali and Ethiopian troops
have ordered thousands to va-
cate their homes in Somalia's
capital to allow the forces to
search for arms and insurgents,
a local human rights group said
Saturday.
The order was issued Thurs-
day after an insurgent attack
earlier in the week against a
government base, said Sudan
Ali Ahmed, chairman of the ind-
ependent group Elman Human
Rights.
Government officials declined
to comment on the reported
evictions from Mogadishu.
Ahmed said most of those evict-
ed had either left the city or
sought refuge with relatives or
friends elsewhere in Mogadishu.
The evictions this week were
the first reported since April,
when hundreds died in heavy
fighting in Mogadishu, Ahmed
said.
- From wire reports


Afghan leader poses talks


Loss of lives prompts

appeal to Taliban

Los Angeles Times

KABUL, Afghanistan -' President
Hamid Karzai, expressing horror at a
suicide bombing here in the Afghan cap-
ital that killed at least 30 people and
wounded dozens more, offered Saturday
to meet with Taliban leader Mullah
Mohammed Omar to stop the carnage.
Karzai spoke at an emotional news
conference hours after an early morning
blast tore through a bus carrying sol-
diers to their posts. The explosion was so
powerful it ripped the roof and sides


from the bus, scattering body parts and
debris along a street in the city center.
Nearly all the dead were thought to be
soldiers, but at least two were civilians
who were near the bus when it blew up.
A purported Taliban spokesman call-
ing himself Zabibullah Mujahed
claimed responsibility for the attack in
text messages sent to Western news
agencies.
Several times in recent weeks, Karzai
has suggested direct talks with the
Taliban, the austere Islamic militia driv-
en from power by a U.S. invasion nearly
six years ago.
But Saturday's appeal, aimed directly
at fugitive Taliban leader Mullah Omar
and warlord Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, car-
ried more raw urgency than the U.S.-


backed president's previous
overtures.
"If I find their address, there is
no need for them to come to me
- I'll personally go there and get
in touch with them," Karzai told
reporters at his presidential
palace.
Apparently paraphrasing the
question he would put to them,
he asked: '"Esteemed mullah,
sir, and esteemed Hekmatyar, sir,
why are you destroying the coun-
try?"'


Han
Kar
Afgh
preside


U.S. diplomats and military officials in
Afghanistan would not comment directly
on Karzai's appeal, although one
American official, speaking on condition
of anonymity, cautioned against taking


Hope wanes among protesters


Associated Press
People holding pictures of Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi demonstrate Saturday in support for democracy in
Myanmar on the Trocadero plaza in Paris. Myanmar's main political and economic allies, China and Japan, on Saturday urged
the country's military leadership to use peaceful means to restore stability following a deadly crackdown on protesters.

United Nations sends envoy to negotiate with Myanmar government


Associated Press

YANGON, Myanmar -
Die-hard protesters waved
the peacock flag of the
crushed pro-democracy
movement on a solitary
march Saturday through the
eerily quiet streets of
Myanmar's largest city,
where many dissidents said
they were resigned to defeat
without international inter-
vention.
Housewives and shop own-
ers taunted troops but quick-
ly disappeared into alley-
ways. According to diplomats
briefed by witnesses, resi-
dents of three neighborhoods
blocked soldiers from enter-
ing the monasteries in a
crackdown on Buddhist
monks, who led the largest in
a month of demonstrations.
The soldiers left threatening
to return with reinforce-
ments.
The top U.N. envoy on
Myanmar, Ibrahim Gambari,
arrived in the country but
many protesters said they
were nonetheless seeing a
repeat of the global reaction


Cut off and in chaos
The ongoing protests in Myanmar began Aug 19
with demonstrations against an overnight mue
price hike. When last counted in 2000. me popu-
lation living below poverty was 25 percent.


301 million
78 years
6.37 per 1,000
950,000 (2003)
233 million
208 million
$43,800
4.8%
2.5%


Population
Life expectancy
Infant mortality
HIV/AIDS
Mobile phones
Internet users
GDP per capital
Unemployment
Inflation


MYANMAR
47 million
62.5 years
50.68 per 1,000
330,000 (2003)
183,400
31,500
$1,800
10.2%
21.4%


o 200mi
S 0 200 km



- JMYANMARK
Naypyidawn. "

Bav oy an
Bengal : ' %

SAndaman
Sea *"
NOTE: Last
updated
Sept. 2007


SOURCE: CIA World Factbook


to a 1988 pro-democracy
uprising, when the world
stood by as protesters were
gunned down in the streets.
"Gambari is coming, but I
don't think it will make much
of a difference," said one
hotel worker, who like other
residents asked not to be
named, fearing retaliation.
"We have to find a solution
ourselves."
Soldiers and police were
posted on almost all corners
in the cities of Yangon and


Mandalay Shopping malls,
grocery stores and public
parks were closed and few
people dared to venture out
of their homes.
A young woman who took
part in a massive demonstra-
tion in Yangon Thursday said
she didn't think "we have any
more hope to win." She was
separated from her
boyfriend when police broke
up the protest by firing into
crowds and has not seen him
since.


"The monks are the ones
who give us courage," she
said. Most of the clerics are
now besieged in their monas-
teries behind locked gates
and barbed wire.
Gambari was taken imme-
diately to Naypyitaw, the
remote, bunker-like capital
where the country's military
leaders are based. The White
House urged the junta to
allow him to have access to
Aung San Suu Kyi - the
Nobel Peace Prize laureate
who is under house arrest -
and ordinary Myanmar resi-
dents.
The demonstrations began
last month as people angry
over massive fuel price hikes
took to the streets - then
mushroomed into the tens of
thousands after the monks
began marching.
The junta, which has a long
history of snuffing out dis-
sent, started cracking down
Wednesday, when the first of
at least 10 deaths was report-
ed, and then let loose on
Thursday, shooting into a
crowd of protesters and club-
bing them with batons.


the offer to talk to the insurgents
himself too literally.
Taliban fighters have re-
sponded to the president's pre-,
vious overtures by demanding
that all foreign forces leave
Afghanistan before any talks
could take place. NATO, in turni,
nid has said it would consider nego- J
zai tiations only with fighters who'
han were willing to lay down their
lent. arms.
In intensified fighting in the
last 18 months, the insurgents have
made little headway against a vastly
superior U.S.- and NATO-led force but(
have extracted a heavy toll in civilian
lives and rendered large swaths of the
country unsafe.


Physicians'


often delay


own care


Newsday

MELVILLE, N.Y - Every
year at one of the largest meet-
ings of physicians who special-
ize in the treatment of cancer,
doctors can be seen puffing cig-
arettes during breaks.
While the sight might strike
many as shocking, it is only a.
snapshot of a broader picture
involving doctors and health'
issues. Doctors, as reluctant as
they are to admit it, suffer from
the same bad habits and seri-
ous health concerns as every-
one else.
The difference between
physicians and the populations
they serve is that it might take
them longer to acknowledge-
something is amiss.
Dr Jeffrey Trilling, chief of
family medicine at Stony Brook?
University Medical Center, said'
physicians can readily recog-
nize health problems in others.'
but find the task tougher when
it comes to themselves. 6
Cancer, heart attack, stroke,,
alcoholism, smoking, obesity
and drug abuse affect physi-
cians just as they affect profes-
sionals in other lines of work. d
"Physicians are more aware
- and afraid - of the cascade
effect of medicine," Trilling.,
said. "That is, you order onel
test, it comes back equivocadl
and then you order another and'i
it's more invasive, more painful
than the previous, and that may i
be equivocal as well."
Trilling added that much of,
what is known about the way)
physicians handle personal
health issues is anecdotal. But
he said there are often common
threads that link one physi-
cian's health story to another's.
"There are a couple of inter-,
esting things," Trilling said.?
'The first one is denial. And there
other one is that physicians
know too much. They know the'
symptoms that they're having
may be significant, and it's just
human nature to procrastinate f
and deny."
The American Medical!
Association does not maintain:
statistics on the number of
physicians who have chronic or"
life-threatening conditions..'
Most physicians confronting a
health issue, Trilling said, seek
the opinion of a colleague.
Doctors might lose sight of their
own health because they are so
focused on their patients, said
Dr. Diana Fite, immediate past
president of the Harris County-
Medical Society in Houston.


Candidates getting chatty


Talk circuit shows appeal

Los Angeles Times

NEW YORK - As the 2008 race steams for-
ward, Illinois Sen. Barack Obama is not the only
presidential candidate carving out time to banter
on television entertainment talk shows. Long
regarded as less venerable venues than their
hard-news counterparts, daytime gabfests and
late-night comedy programs have emerged this
year as essential'stamping grounds for those seek-
ing the White House.
September alone saw former Tennessee Sen.
F-ed Thompson break the news of his Republican
presidential candidacy to Jay Leno, Sen. Hillary
Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y, visit a diner with Ellen
DeGeneres, Clinton's husband swap healthy eat-


ing tips with Martha Stewart and Elizabeth
Edwards, the wife of former North Carolina Sen.
John Edwards, confide in Rachael Ray.
Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., who announced his
own bid on "The Late. Show With David
Letterman" in February, made his 10th appear-
ance on "The Daily Show" in August And Obama
got arguably the biggest boost from a talk-show
appearance when he scored an endorsement
from Oprah Winfrey in May.
"I think the talk shows will decide who is in the
White House in 2008," said Bill Geddie, executive
producer of "The View," who has lined up visits
from Clinton, Obama and McCain. "There have
been a hundred debates, and who's seen them?
Voters operate on two fronts: 'Do I like this per-
son?' and 'Do I agree with this person?' A talk
show is the first step toward helping them decide
if they like a person."


Associated Press
Oprah Winfrey welcomes first-time guest David Letterman to her
22nd season premiere Sept. 10 at WaMu Theater at Madison
Square Garden in New York.


N .1. "~~'*** -'


SEIPTEIMBER 30, 2007
wvwW chionicloeonlino coil


- "*V*
















SPTEM'Nto O OO1


- ~i A


Family finds Big Ben, small wonders


JACK LEONARD
Los Angeles Times
LONDON -Just days into our long-
awaited dream vacation - a trip to
London to show my two children the
city where I grew up - my 6-year-old
son was bored.
We were dashing through the city's
Science Museum, a place I had visited
as a child on school trips, and Sam
wasn't impressed.
"I hope we don't spend our whole
day here," he moaned. My wife,
Karen, and I exchanged worried
looks.
Sightseeing in a major city is always
daunting, and I felt a particular pres-
sure to pack all of my childhood expe-
riences into our first family trip
"home." I wanted Sam and my 9-year-
old daughter, Clare, to experience for
themselves all the sights they had*
read about in books and seen in'
movies: Big Ben, Trafalgar Square,
the Tower of London.


Los Angeles Times
A trip to Kenwood in north London gives kids a place to play and glimpse swans,
rabbits and even parrots.


I desperately wanted them to love
the city as much as I do. Armed with a
list of must-see attractions, we took
the underground into London. It was


raining, so the museum, a quick walk
from South Kensington Tube station,
was an easy choice.
Entry to the museum was free, but


there were flashy advertisements for
a spy exhibit that promised hands-on
fun for kids. The $50 exhibit fee for
the four of us was sickening, but worth
it if it made our kids like London.
Clare managed to sustain mild inter-
est, but our son was hopelessly bored.
Not having learned our lesson, we
threw more money at the problem ($8
on a flight simulator and $14 more for
a dinosaur simulator ride) before
admitting defeat and heading for the
toy wing at Harrods.
As we took the kids across the city
over the next few days, my wife and I
peppered them with questions meant
to reawaken the giddiness they had
felt in the months they had waited for
this trip.
Their flat responses made us won-
der whether we should have waited a
year:
"What do you think?"
"Cool."
"How is . this different from
California?"


Shrug.
This was their big chance to know
what being "half English" meant
beyond having a dad who talks obses-
sively about soccer and calls the toilet
the "loo." Clare had told us she want-
ed to "learn about the English way of
life." Weren't we living it?
Perhaps they needed more excite-
ment, we thought. How about a bus
tour? A river cruise?
We tried to keep their interest by
promising treats along the way. So the
next few days, we mixed snacks with
sights.
Across the street from Big Ben, the
kids ate soft-serve ice cream in a cone
with a chocolate stick known in
England as a "99" stuck in it - a child-
hood favorite of mine. They drank
freshly squeezed orange juice on a
ferry up the Thames, but complained
all the way about the sun in their eyes.
It was clear that more than one day

Please see WONDERS/Page 18A


Fliers pay for


the FAA-but


have little say


JANEE ENGLE
Los A ngeles Time

As " Congress d
whether to radically
how the, Federal A
Administration is funded
spend billions of doll
update our air-traffic
system, it's get-
ting- an earful
from airports,
airlines and
business-jet
owners.
Guess who has
little clout on
this issue?
America's mil-
lions of fliers, grC
who foot much of
the FAA's bills by
paying various fo
taxes - which


can add 15 percent or more -
on air fares.
Under the FAA's funding
proposal, most ticket taxes and
fees would disappear, replaced
in large part by higher taxes on
jet fuel and new fees assessed
on commercial and private
jets. For details, visit
www.faa.gov and click on
"NextGen Financing Reform
Act of 2007 (Reauthorization)."
"There are not highly organ-
ized passenger groups that I'm


aware of," said former FAA
s Administrator Marion Blakey,
who left this month after five
ebates years in the agency's top post
change As', a. result, she added, she
aviation knew of "nothing major ... in
ed and the way of consumer input" on
lars to the funding proposal.
control Neither Blakey nor the Air
Transport As-
sociation, which
There are represents air-
linies, could say
not highly whether passen-
gers would pay
organized more or less for
air travel under
passenger the FAA plan
than they do now.
)ups ... Blakey was
right about one
Marion Blakey thing: There is
former FAA administrator, no well-funded,
broadly based


group that represents the aver-
age flier on Capitol Hill.
"The regular consumer
groups are not focused on air
travel," said Paul Ruden, sen-
ior vice president for legal and
industry affairs for the
American Society of Travel
Agents, a trade group based in
Alexandria, Va.
That's why passengers, he
said, can get outgunned by
"very formidable adversaries"
in the affected industries.


Transportation from the past


Special to the Chronicle
On a recent trip to Oregon, Jeri and Grover Lewis drove to the airport in Portland via the Columbia River Gorge. The Lewises
stopped to tour the Bonneville Dam, one of the Pacific Northwest's major sources of power. Old paddleboats, above, cruise the
Columbia, which is still used to transport many goods by barge.


DREAM
VCAT ONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are spon-


scoring a photo contest for read-
ers of the newspaper.
Readers are invited to send a
photograph from their Dream
Vacation with a brief description
of the trip.
If it's selected as a winner, it
will be published in the Sunday


Chronicle.
At the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select the
best photo during the year and
that photographer will win a
prize.
Please avoid photos with
computerized dates on the print.


Please make sure photo-
graphs are in sharp focus.
Photos should be sent to the
Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429 or dropped off at any
Chronicle office or any Accent
Travel office.


Day Trip


DOLORES KENNY/Speclal to the Chronicle
This horse In front of the Civic Theatre In Ocala is one of many
"Horses In Motion," life-size painted horses that are a symbol
of the city.

Appleton Museum and Ocala


DOLORES KENNY
Special to the Chronicle
Many things in life can be
learned outside a classroom,
and the best place to begin
your studies is at a museum.
From antiquities to modern
times, a whole world at your
doorstep, learning on your
own time, at your own pace
and enjoying every minute
of it


Within one hour of easy
driving time is a hidden gem
known as the Appleton
Museum of Art in Ocala. The
Appleton Museum sits on a
44-acre complex, which
includes the Ocala Civic
Theatre and the Pioneer
Garden Club.
Turning into a long drive-
way, one is suddenly sur-
Please see TRIP/Page 18A


Cruses offer many activities
As a new guest columnist for the pool, climbing wall and various other
Chronicle, my "Excursions" have activities, such as crafts and group lessons
centered on land travel, whether of various sorts, to burn off those calories
independent or guided tours. you've gathered during the
An inquiry was made as to nonstop eating opportunities
cruising and why I haven't .,-., that hijack one around every
written about it So for you corner. I've often thought -
aspiring cruisers, here's some harness all that energy - it
general information.* ' may be sufficient to power the
Cruises are so convenient U * ship! Movies, floorshows, game
and fun that it is difficult to .' -' rooms, shopping and casinos
resist the daily, and enticing, '- abound, so that there is never
offers made by cruise lines. ' an opportunity to be bored.
Cruising provides good value Neil Sawyer Most cruises include ports of
for the dollar Think of a cruise SPONTANEOUS call offering opportunities to go
ship as an all-inclusive holiday TOUR GUIDE ashore for shopping, sightsee-
or vacation place - a floating ing and to take advantage of


resort - a place where you
don't have to pack and unpack every day,
and where you have a wide range of enter-
tainment right outside your cabin door.
Cruises can also be a good travel option
for those with physical challenges. What
could be more convenient?
Generally speaking, however, land trav-
el puts the traveler in closer touch with a
geographical region, especially the oppor-
tunity to experience different cultures
close up. But let's stick with cruises today.
If your cruise is to be a quiet, relaxing
get-away, you can simply kick back, eat,
drink, be pampered in a spa or hang out in
a variety of isolated, comfortable settings.
That's the venue lots of travelers desire, as
they simply want to "get away from it all."
You can opt to stay in your cabin or go to
the library if you wish, as those are not
known to be the most crowded places on
the ship.
Conversely, there's a gym, swimming


aquatic fun such as snorkeling,
parasailing and boating. Whatever your
interests, you will find plenty of options
and the cruise company can assist in those
activities - all "optional" and usually at
additional cost - as they want to maxi-
mize your fun, satisfy your exploratory
interests in foreign places and feed you
like you've never been fed before. Their
motive: They want a satisfied client who
will cruise with them again. Cruise ships
rank high on the scale of satisfied cus-
tomers.
Cruise lines cater to select categories of
travelers, as well as embracing various
.themes. A "star" classification system
rates cruise ships just as hotels are rated;
for example, Crystal Cruises is a five-star
line, Holland-American is usually four-
star, while Carnival and Disney are three-
star This information is available on-line
where you can learn about each ship, if
you want detailed information.


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
Photo of a cruise ship from a private Island
In the Caribbean owned by a cruise line.
Cruise ships depart Florida daily from
ports all around the state - one to fit prac-
tically every taste or need. Book early for
the best choice of cabin, and happy cruis-
ing!

Neil Sawyer is a 22-year Crystal River
resident and businessman. He and his
wife, Karyn, are extensive travelers,
venturing to foreign countries two
to three times a year in addition to taking
several domestic excursions annually.
They prefer independent travel or with
small-group guided tours. E-mail him
atgobuddy@tampabay.rr.com.







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----VEi-E-iIAN s Nc3TEFs


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* The Veterans Appreciation
Week Ad Hoc Coordinating
Committee will conduct its final
coordination meeting for Citrus
County's 15th Annual Veterans
Appreciation Week at 1:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 17, in the
Conference Room of the Citrus
County Chronicle at 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River.
All veteran service organizations
are welcome and encouraged to
send representatives to participate
in the planning process.
Additionally, individual veterans
are cordially invited to attend and
participate in the planning process.
Any organization or person
desiring additional information
should contact Chairman Chris
Gregoriou by e-mail at
allpres@infi.net or by phone at
795-7000.
* The American Legion Riders
of Post 155 will serve breakfast
today at the American Legion
Post 155 Hall, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River. Cost
is $4. Monies are raised by the
Legion Riders to help military-
based charities.
* CMidr. Martin P. Murphy and
The Disabled American Veterans
(DAV), Chapter 70, in coordination
with the Superintendent "Sam"
Himmel of the Citrus County
School District, have become an
official Cell Phone for Soldiers
Drop-Off Site. This program was
started by two ,teenagers to help:;
buy pre-paid calling cards to send.
to our service people overseas. For
each cell phone that is donated, 72
minutes of talk time is given to our
troops to call their loved ones back
home. It is a great program, and
We would really appreciate the
9,Mopmuity's involvement,
' programm will accept any
make or model phone. You may
'drop off phones and attached bat-
'.l -e.ries as well as accessorie'sat any
;,.Citrus County School or the DAV at
North Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North. The phones are:
then recycled for cash to purchase
cards .or unlimited free video phone
calls. If you have any questions
regarding this program, call
Annamarie Perrigo at the DAV at
344-3464 on Tuesdays or
Thursday between 9 and 11 a.m.,
or 344-5675.
* The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter 192
meets at 1 p.m. the first Tuesday
monthly at VFW Post 10087, 2170
W. Vet Lane, Beverly Hills.
All military veterans who honor-.
ably served within Korea, including
territorial waters and airspace..
(Sept. 3, 1945, to June 25, 1950)
and within or without Korea (June
25, 1950, to Jan. 31, 1955) or who
served honorably in Korea from
Feb. 1, 1955, until present, are eli-
gible for membership in the KWVA
Any Medal of Honor recipient for
service during the Korean War is
eligible for free life membership.
Any prisoner of war by the North
Koreans, Chinese or Russian
forces during or after hostilities


from June 25, 1950, forward is eli-
gible for free life membership.
Call Cmdr. Hank Butler at 563- Post 77 i
2496; Vice Cmdr. Paul Salyer at
637-1161; or Director Neville : lH lH
Anderson at 344-2529.
* The American Legion Riders . r.
of Post 155 will serve a spaghetti
dinner from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday 7
at the American Legion Post 155
hall, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Cost is $4
for all you can eat. Take out also
available. Monies are raised by the - A
Legion Riders to help military
based charities.
* Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday of
every month behind the Key
Training Center in Inverness at 130
Heights Ave. At 6 p.m., meetings
kick off with a potluck dinner, and
at 7:30 p.m. for the business meet- Barbara Mills accepts a chec
ings, the auxiliary breaks off to Legion Post 77 Cmdr. Bob Sc
another room. Bring a covered dish coming home local veterans
if you can. Interested in being a servicemen and women retu
member, call Post Cmdr. Bob Scott months, Mills hopes that the
the first. To see how your sto
at 860-2090 or Auxiliary President donations can help with welci
Sandy Scott at 860-2090. For more at 422-6236.
information, visit our Web site at
www.ALPost77.org.
. 0 American Legion Post 166 * Cooties dinner is from 5 to
will meet atj1:30 p.m., Saturday at 6:30 p.m. on the first Sunday
the Homosossa Lions Club on monthly. Cooties Jam is from 5 to 9
Homosassa Trail (County Road p.m.
49Q). All former and current post * Bonanza Bingo will be
members, Os well as all interested Saturday. Packages are $30 with a
veterans, are cordially invited to be buffet lunch. This event is for
a part of A~erican Legion Post Cancer Aid and Research.
16 :For more information, call 0 Ladies Auxiliary State
Sam at 382-4222. Meeting Fall Round Up will be on
* U.S. Submarine Veterans Saturday, Oct. 13, in Ocala at the
(USSVI) Sturgeon Base meets at Hilton. Meeting starts at 9 a.m. All
, 11 I.m. the first Saturday monthly members welcome.
at Atnerican Legion Post 155, 6585 * Ladies Auxiliary is having a
W. (3ulf-to-Lake Highway in Crystal Flea Market on Sunday, Oct. 21.
SRivet ; Flea market items will include biker
Visitors and interested parties apparel, household items, clothes,-
are always welcome. For more books, movies, odds and ends and
Information, call Base Cmdr. Billy a whole lot more. Inside tables are
Wein at 726-5926.. $10. Outside tables are $5.
S' VFW Post 4252 and The Donations are also accepted.
Ladies Auxiliary in Hemando on 4* Halloween Party at 5 p.m.
State Road 200 serves, dinner Friday, Oct. 26. There will be cash
every Friday from 5 to 6:30 p.m. .prizes for the best top three cos-
This week's menu is baked or fried tumes.
fish or ham. Dinner includes a * Post and Ladies Auxiliary
salad bar. Music by Starburst will collect donations for Poppies at
from 6 to 10 p.m. $6.50 donation. Wal-Mart and Publix on Oct. 27
The post winter hours of opera- and 28. We need volunteers for an
tion will be in effect on Monday, hour or more on either day or loca-
Oct. 1. tion. There is a sign-up sheet at the
* Ladies Auxiliary hosts bingo post or you can call for the times
at 10:30 a.m. every Saturday with available.
food available. * Chicken barbecue Saturday,
* Bar bingo at 2 to 5 p.m. Nov. 10, starting at 1 p.m. with
every Sunday. music arid drink specials. Tickets
* . Ladies Auxiliary has 'Sbow-. - are-now available at $7 or $8 at the
Me The Money" card gi4i4 New, --loor . -
start'time 6 t6 7 3~l .m:,ft*" ' ' "�
Monday. Lots of fun and chances
to win. Food is available.
* Ladies Auxiliary has bar
bingo at 2 to 5 p.m. every Tuesday.
Profits go to local charities. This
month is for Salvation Army Pantry
and Operation Uplink.
* Dart League is at 7 p.m.
every Tuesday. Come in and sign
up.
S . Chicken wings from 2 to 6
'p.m. every Wednesday.
^B * 'U~sS^'V1


JAY CONTI/Special to the Chronicle
k from Allen Rawls American
cott, to help support her wel-
program. With more than 12
rning home in the next few
last basket will be as full as
ore, organization or personal
ome home baskets, call Mills


* Ladies Auxiliary goes to
nursing homes four times a month
to play bingo with the residents.
Everyone is welcome.
* Post and Ladies Auxiliary
announces a $10,000 Youth Essay
Contest and a $30,000 High
School Scholarship Competition.
Call Judy at 726-3339 for details.
All eligible persons are invited to
join Post 4252 or Ladies Auxiliary.
Stop by the post or call for further
information. Send e-mails to
VFW4252@tampabay.rr.com.
2008 Dues can be paid now. We
are over 80 percent. Send pay-
ments as soon as possible. Life
Members Cancer Insurance of
$4.95 can be paid now for 2008.
Post Honor Guard is available
for-funerals, flag raising and nurs-
ing homes. Call Post Cmdr. Bob
Pnve at 212-3393 or Ladies
Auxiliary President Judy Prive at
726-3339 for information. Post
4252 is t 3190 N. Carl G Rose
Highway (State Road 200),
Hernando.
* Ladies Auxiliary to Harry F.
Nesbitt VFW Post 10087 plans a
Chinese auction for Thursday, Oct.
S11, at the post home. Doors open
"at 11:30 a.m, and the auction starts
.".at 1 p.m. Hot dogs are $1, cake
and coffee are free. Donation is
$2.50, raffle tickets available at the
post canteen and from auxiliary
members. -


donation


=S. In SERVICE----------


Zuchelkowski finishes
leader's training
, Stacey M. Zuchelkowski has
'graduated from the Army ROTC
(Reserve Officer Training Corps)
Leader's Training Course at Fort
Knox, Ky.
The four-week course is a lead-
ership internship for cadets that
can lead to the ultimate goal of
becoming an Army officer. College
students experience and examine
the Army without incurring an obli-
gation to serve in the Army or
ROTC, and are eligible to receive'
two-year college scholarship offers i
and attend the Advanced ROTC
Course at their college.
Cadets are observed and evalu-
ated during classroom and field
'training exercises to determine their
officer potential in leadership abili-
ties and skills. The cadets are
trained to have a sound under-
standing of traditional leadership'


values dunng the challenging, moti-
vating gaining that develops well-
disciplihed, highly motivated, physi-
.gJy. ,nditioned students, and
helps improve the cadets' self-con-
fidence, initiative, leadership poten-
tial, decision-making and collective
team cohesion. The cadets receive
training in fundamental military
skills, rifle marksmanship, small
arms tactics, weapons training, drill
and ceremony, communications,
combat water survival training, rap-
pelling, land navigation and squad-
level operations field training.
The cadet is a student at Boise
State University, Idaho.
She is the daughter of Clifford L.
Burdette II of Hurricane, W.Va.,
and Patricia R. McCallister of
Homosassa.
Her husband, Dennis, is the son
of Dennis W. and Erika
Zuchelkowski of Fayetteville, N.C.
In 1997, she graduated from
Nitro High School, W.Va.


= Sunday's PUZZLER ANSWER =

PIuzzle Is on Page 20A.
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BREAK TERRY TR I E CLARO 0
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CENRA RHODNAE RECALL AIDA
RAVE IDEAS HUNT LOUNGED
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PA T E R A T R C E SS FET
SONG NEPHEW BOONE ELDER

9-30 � 2007 United Feature Syndicate.USA
RINSE TITAN ALINE EARLS
HEART RATHER TWEET THESE
9-30 C 2007 United Feature Svndicate.


* Dinner & A Show: The Men's
Auxiliary of VFW Post 10087 of
Beverly Hills will present "Dinner &
A Show" starring Elvis on Friday,
Oct. 12, at the VFW Post. Dinner
will begin at 5:30 p.m. followed by
the show at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10
and may be purchased at the VFW
Post Lounge, For more informa-
tion, call 746-0440.
Return to the golden years of
rock 'n' roll. Joel Stone will present
Elvis. He is a master at portraying
the King. Wear your blue suede
shoes and come join the fun.
* Public invited to a number of
activities at Dunnellon VFW Post
7991, State Road 488/West
Dunnellon Road:
Every first and third Tuesday:
steak dinner, 6 to 8 p.m., reserva-
tions needed. $9. Call post at (352)
489-1772, Cmdr. Chester at 564-
4135, Ron Audette at (352) 465-
5647 or Billy Ellis at (352) 465-
6429. If no answer, leave message
on answering machine.
Wednesday bingo begins at 5:30
p.m.
Every second and fourth Friday:
fish fry from 4 to 7 p.m., fish, hush
puppies, fries and coleslaw. $6.
* Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189 serves dinners at 4:30 p.m.
Friday monthly at its facility on
Veterans Drive, Homosassa. Italian
night is the first Friday ($5 dona-
tion), fish night the second Friday
($5 donation), steak night the third
Friday ($8 donation); and meatloaf
the fourth Friday.
The dinners are open to the pub-
lic as well as members. For more
information, call Cmdr. Ron
Houlihan at 628-3160 or VFW Post
8189 at 795-5012 during its can-
teen hours from 1 to 10 p.m.
* VFW Edward W. Penno Post
4864, 10199 N. Citrus Springs
Blvd., Citrus Springs. (352) 465-
4864, weekly activities:
* Sunday: Darts at 2:30 p.m.
* Monday: Cribbage at 7 p.m.
* Tuesday: Bingo at 1 p.m.
* Wednesday: Shuffleboard at
7 p.m.
* Thursday: Darts at 7 p.m.
* Friday: Dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m.
* Saturday: Shuffleboard at
7.p.m.
* VFW general meeting first
Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m.
* Ladies Auxiliary meeting
second Tuesday of the month at 7
p.m.
* Men's Auxiliary meeting third
Monday of the month at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 27: Ladies
Auxiliary Rent-A-Space Yard Sale,


Please see VETS/Page 17A


pancake breakfast and bake sale.
Also, post blood drive on Oct. 27.
with a free pancake breakfast to all
who donate.
* The Veterans Appreciation
Week Ad Hoc Coordinating
Committee will conduct its annual
Veterans-in-the-Classroom pro-
gram, Oct. 29 through Nov. 9 .
Coordinated by the Citrus
County Chapter of the Military
Officers Association of America
(MOAA), the Veterans in the
Classroom program brings living
history to the classrooms of the
county's public and private schools,
as well as homeschool groups.
Veterans share with students their
first-hand military experiences and
travels while serving our country in
uniform around the world in peace
and war.
Call Gary Runyon at 563-5727,
Mac McLeod at 746-1384 or Bob
Truax at 860-1630.
* Floral City American Legion
Auxiliary Unit No. 225 (also
known as Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225) would like to
invite the women in Citrus County
to feel free to join us. We meet at
7:30 p.m. every Thursday at the
Floral City VFW Post on U.S. 41,
Floral City. We are very proud to
belong to this organization. Hope
the following info will help you to
decide to join us. Contact Pat
Whitman, membership chairman at
(352) 793-9091for information.
* Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who knows of
a homeless veteran in need of
food, haircut, voter ID, food
stamps, medical assistance or
more blankets is asked to call John
Young at the Hunger and
Homeless Coalition at 628-4357, or
pass along this phone number to
the veteran.
* Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189 will meet at 7 p.m., Monday
at its facility on Veterans Drive,
Homosassa, west of U.S. 19. Turn
on to Veterans Drive from U.S. 19
at Dixon's Auto Sales across from
Harley Davidson.
Veterans interested in joining
VFW Post 8189 should bring a,
copy of their DD 214 or a Transfer
Request.
For more information, call Cmdr.
Ron Houlihan at 628-3160 or VFW
Post 8189 at 795-5012 during its
canteen hours from 1 to 10 p.m.
* Military Officers Association
and Reserve Officers
Association - A special com-
bined meeting of the Florida West





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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007 17A


Oct. 1 to 5


MENUS


ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Monday: Breakfast - Sausage
patty, cereal (variety), yogurt
(assorted), seasonal fruit, peaches,
toast/jelly, milk variety, orange
juice.
Lunch - Sausage pizza, ham-
burger, salad shaker, garden salad,
crackers, corn, spinach, fresh fruit,
pears, milk/juice.
Tuesday: Breakfast - Cheese
grits, ham slice, seasonal fruit,
applesauce, toast/jelly, tater tots,
milk variety, grange juice.
Lunch - Tacos, chicken and
rice, vegetarian plate, garden
salad, carrots, broccoli, apple
slices, fresh fruit, milk/juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast -
Waffle sticks, chicken breakfast
biscuit, seasonal fruit, pineapple,
milk variety, orange juice.
Lunch - Quesadilla, ravioli,
salad shaker, vegetable blend
Normandy, garden salad, crackers,
baked french fries, fresh fruit, cook-
ie, milk/juice.
Thursday: Breakfast -
Scrambled eggs with cheese, oat-
meal, seasonal fruit, mixed fruit,
toast/jelly, tater tots, milk variety,


orange juice.
Lunch - Baked chicken, barbe-
cued pork sandwich, vegetarian
plate, garden salad, green beans,
fresh fruit, cornbread, rice with
gravy, peaches, milk/juice.
Friday: Breakfast - Breakfast
sausage pizza, bagelers, seasonal
fruit, apple slices, grits, milk variety,
orange juice.
Lunch - Beef-a-roni, hot ham
and cheese sandwich, salad shak-
er, garden salad, peas, roll, baked
beans, crackers, fresh fruit, apple-
sauce, milk/juice.
MIDDLE SCHOOL
Monday: Breakfast - Waffle
sticks, bagelers (assorted), cereal
(variety), seasonal fruit, apple-
sauce, toast/jelly, tater tots, milk
variety, orange juice.
Lunch - Chicken patty on bun,
meatball hoagie, turkey plate, veg-
etarian plate, garden salad, mixed
vegetables, scalloped potatoes,
fresh fruit, apple slices, milk/juice.
Tuesday: Breakfast -
Scrambled eggs with cheese,
cheese grits, cereal (variety), sea-
sonal fruit, pineapple muffin,
peaches, tater tots, milk variety,


orange juice.
Lunch - Spaghetti with meat
sauce, combo hoagie, tuna plate,
garden salad, green beans, corn
on cob, spice bar, fresh fruit, mixed
fruit, milk/juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast -
Breakfast sausage pizza, cereal
(variety), seasonal fruit, mixed fruit,
toast/jelly, tater tots, milk variety,
orange juice.
Lunch - Chicken nuggets, bur-
rito, chef salad plate, vegetarian
plate, garden salad, baked french
fries, spinach, baked beans, fresh
fruit, pears, cake, crackers,
milk/juice.
Thursday: Breakfast -
Country ham and potato, ham and
cheese toast, cereal (variety),
apple muffin, seasonal fruit,
pineapple, tater tots, milk variety,
orange juice.
Lunch - Tacos, barbecued
pork on bun, breaded chicken
plate, vegetarian plate, garden
salad, winter mix, Spanish rice,
coleslaw, refried beans, fresh fruit,
peaches, milk/juice.
Friday: Breakfast - Chicken
breakfast biscuit, french toast,


cereal (variety), seasonal fruit,
apple slices, toast/jelly, tater tots,
milk variety, orange juice.
Lunch - Manager's choice.
HIGH SCHOOL
Monday: Breakfast - Sausage
biscuit, cheese grits, cereal, scram-
bled eggs with cheese, doughnut,
tater tots, toast/jelly, mixed fruit,
seasonal fruit, milk variety, orange
juice.
Lunch - Chicken stir fry, ham-
burger and hoagie bars, salad
plate, pizza bar, chili, garden salad,
corn, peas and carrots, green
beans, rice, pineapple, crackers,
fresh fruit, fries, milk.
Tuesday: Breakfast - Ham,
egg and cheese bagel, biscuit and
gravy, cereal, doughnut, toast/jelly,
grits, apple muffin, tater tots, sea-
sonal fruit, peaches, milk variety,
orange juice.
Lunch - Country fried steak,
chicken and hoagie bars, pizza bar,
chili, salads, garden salad, island
vegetables, baked beans, peas,
corn, rice, peaches, roll, crackers,
fresh fruit, fries, milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast - Ham
and cheese toast, scrambled eggs


with cheese, cereal, doughnut,
toast/jelly, tater tots, pineapple muf-
fin, grits, seasonal fruit, apple-
sauce, milk variety, orange juice.
Lunch - Spaghetti with meat-
balls, hamburger and hoagie bars,
pizza bar, chili, salads, garden
salad, Italian vegetables, corn,
crackers, gelatin, mixed fruit, pret-
zel road, fresh fruit, fries, milk.
Thursday: Breakfast -
Breakfast wrap, biscuit and gravy,
cereal, doughnut, toast/jelly, tater
tots, sweet potato muffin, grits, sea-
sonal fruit, sliced apples, milk vari-
ety, orange juice.
Lunch - Manager's choice.
Friday: Breakfast - Breakfast
sausage pizza, scrambled eggs
with cheese, doughnut, cereal,
grits, tater tots, toast/jelly, pineap-
ple, seasonal fruit, milk variety,
orange juice.
Lunch - Burrito, salad plate,
hamburger and hoagie bars, pizza
bar, chili, crackers, corn, refried
beans, winter mix, Spanish rice,
pasta salad, salad, pears, spice
bar, fresh fruit, fries, milk.
Menus are subject to change
without notice.


CONGREGATE DINING
Monday: Chicken marsala over
rice pilaf, carrots, broccoli salad,
whole wheat bread with margarine,
mixed fruit cup and low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Sliced turkey and
gravy, mashed potatoes, green
beans, whole wheat bread with
margarine, fresh banana and low-
fat milk.
Wednesday: Barbecued pork
riblet, mashed potatoes, spinach
with onion, hamburger bun, mar-
garine, applesauce and low-fat
milk.
Thursday: Crispy baked chick-
en, California blend vegetables,
Spanish stewed tomatoes, whole
wheat bread with margarine, fresh
orange and low-fat milk.
Friday: Pizza casserole, green
peas, spiced peaches, whole
wheat bread with margarine, cook-
ie and low-fat milk.
Congregate dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal River,
Homosassa Springs, Inverness
and South Dunnellon. For informa-
tion, call Support Services at 527-
5975.


VETS
Continued from Page 15A

Central Chapters of the Military
Officers Association of America
(MOAA) and Reserve Officers
Association (ROA) will be at noon
Thursday, Oct. 11, at the Silverthorn
Country Club, Barclay Street,
Brooksville. Current and former mili-
tary officers and their guests are
invited. Guest speaker will be
retired Adm. Leroy Collins Jr., son
of former Gov. Collins, who is the
current executive director of the
Florida Department of Veterans
Affairs, to discuss important veteran
matters. For information, directions
and reservations, retired Lt. Col.
Alex Jenkins at (352) 686-9306.
* The Marine Corps League,
Department of Florida under the
sponsorship of Holiday Detach-
ment 567 will hold their Fall
Conference at the Quality Inn and
Suites, at 5316 U.S. Highway 19,
New Port Richey. The dates will
be: Oct. 11, 12 and 13.
Reservations may be made by
calling (727) 847-9005 or (800)
4CHOICE. Ask for the MCL confer-
ence rate. For further information-


and dinner selections, go to the
Department Web site.
* Island X-18 Sea Bee Vete-
rans of America upcoming events:
* Oct. 12:11 a.m. meeting: VA
Office, 2804 Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto.
* Oct. 19:1:30 p.m. luncheon:
Joe's Family Restaurant, 911 W.
Main St., Inverness.
Please note the change of meet-
ing date and place. As always all
Sea Bees, Honey Bees, relatives,
and friends are welcome to our
events. The meetings are at 11
a.m. second Wednesday, and
luncheons are at 1:30 p.m. third
Wednesday. We have a short
meeting, about one hour, at the VA
Office in Lecanto, then we eat
lunch at a local restaurant.
Luncheons are third Wednesday
picked by Charley Rhodes, if you
have an idea of a place to go let
Charley know. If you have any
questions, call Cmdr. David Puffer
at 746-9327.
E The Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World War II
meets at 11:30 a.m. the second
Saturday monthly at the Boston
Cooker, 5375 Spring Hill Drive,


Spring Hill. The next meeting is
Oct. 13.
* Navy Seabee Veterans of
America Island X-23, Crystal
River, conducts regular meetings
at 11:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at the Crystal Paradise
Restaurant, 508 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. We also have break-
fast at 8 a.m. on the last Sunday of
the month and a luncheon on the
second Tuesday at a location
decided by the group and Gordon
Levins, social director (795-7662).
We welcome new members who
are veterans, who served under
the command of the U.S. Naval
Construction Forces/Naval
Facilities Engineering Command/
Bureau of Yards and Docks.
For additional information, call
Cmdr. John Kister at 527-3172.
* Dan Campbell Airborne
Association will meet at 6:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly at
American Legion Post 155, Crystal
River. All current and previous
Airborne members and their wives
are welcome to join. For additional
information, call Steve Leonard at
726-3693.
* Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 County Road 40


E., Inglis (one mile east of U.S.
19). Men and LAVFW meet at 7:30
p.m. the third Wednesday monthly
at the post. Men's Auxiliary meets
at 7 p.m. the second Monday
monthly. Call Randy Sutton, (352)
447-3495.
* The Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
will conduct its regular meeting at 7
p.m. on the third Wednesday
monthly at DAV Post 70 in
Inverness at the intersection of
Independence Avenue and U.S. 41
North. All former Marines are wel-
come. Call Tom Heron at 637-2724
or Joe Spoto at 746-3315.
* Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
Sailors meet at Denny's in Crystal
River at 2 p.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly. Call Jimmie at 621-0617.
* Fleet Reserve Association,
Branch 186 will meet at 3 p.m. the
third Thursday monthly at the DAV
Building, Independence Highway
and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at 344-0727.
The Fleet Reserve Association
Branch 186 and its Ladies Auxiliary
hosts a "Pearl Harbor Remem-
brance" luncheon each year on Dec.
7 to honor those who served at Pearl
Harbor during the attack in 1941.


A few years ago, Citrus County
awarded a Proclamation that
reads: "Whereby, commemorating
the attack on Pearl Harbor will
instill in all people of Citrus County
a greater understanding and
appreciation of the selfless sacri-
fice of the individuals who served
in the Armed Forces of the United
States during World War II," and
furthermore "The Board hereby
recognizes Dec. 7 of each year as
Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day"
in Citrus County.
The Fleet Reserve and Auxiliary
are proud to host an annual lunch-
eon in their honor.
M Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary is at 906
E. State Road 44, Inverness; tele-
phone 344-3495; fax 344-3514.
The Post is named the Eugene
Quinn VFW Post 4337 and is so
named in honor of Eugene Quinn
who was born Nov. 1, 1922, in
Tampa, Florida, son of Virgil and
Alva (Allen) Quinn, youngest broth-
er of V.A. Quinn, Clara Quinn, Irma
Quinn Conklin, Dorothy Quinn
Gates and Herbert F. Quinn.
Eugene graduated in 1940 from
Citrus High School. Shortly there-
after he enlisted in the Army Air


Corps. Following basic training he
was then stationed at Savannah,
Ga., then sent to the University of
Chicago for Airplane Mechanic
instruction. From there he was sent
to the Philippines and was there
when the Japanese bombed Pearl
Harbor. Later, he was captured and
held as a Prisoner of War; some-
how he survived the Bataan Death
March only to be on an unmarked
Japanese Prisoner of War ship,
which was torpedoed by our own
Navy and went down with the ship
on Sept. 7, 1944. Survivors and
comrades of young Quinn wrote
the Quinn family "if ever there was
a Christian boy - Eugene Quinn
certainly fitted the role."
VFW Post 4337 mustered in
Nov. 14,1945.
* Veterans of Foreign Wars,
Post 7122, in Floral City announce
the week's schedule:
* Monday: House Committee
meets at 7 p.m.
* Thursday: VFW and Ladies
Auxiliary meet at 7:30 p.m.
* Friday: AUCE Fish or three-
piece chicken dinner for $6.75.
Jannie Karaoke starts at 7 p.m.
* Saturday: Prime Rib dinner for
$9 from 2 to 7 p.m.


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- 18A SUNDAY, SI-'I'MBER 30, 2007


WONDERS
Continued from Page A2

at a time of concentrated sight-
seeing was becoming torture.
, Their brains would not soak up
.* the architecture and ambience
as we had hoped. ("Do you see
:that building?" "Yeah." "It's St.
.Paul's Cathedral. It was
Designed by Christopher Wren
and it's been standing here for
.300 years." Yawn.)
, It was time for Buckingham
^ Palace, which meant chocolate
muffins from a kiosk across the
* street in St James' Park.
And then a strange thing
" happened.
The kids appeared to be
enjoying themselves.
Clare savored her muffin,
watching late-afternoon com-
muters amble through the
park. Sam ran between
London plane trees. The trees
cast shadows over the path-
ways and a breeze cooled us as
we lolled in the shade. This
seemed far more like the
London that Londoners expe-
rience.
Karen and I agreed that we
needed to allow more time to
let the kids act like kids. So we
retreated to my parents' house
in a suburb of north London,
the same home where I grew
up.
The children and I scram-
bled up the stairs to find all of
my old toys crammed into
boxes and shelves, just where I
had left them. We marched
down triumphantly with crick-
et equipment and rugby and
soccer balls. The kids were
smiling.
The next day was mercifully
sunny, so I took them for a
familiar walk to a massive park


where I had played as a child. I
taught the kids how to hold a
cricket bat and pass a rugby
ball, just as my dad had done
with me.
"You're pretty good, for an
American," a boy told Sam as
they kicked the soccer ball
around during a pickup game.
Ecstatic, Sam bounded over to
tell me about his first cultural
exchange.
With plenty of hotels, the
suburbs make a convenient
base for travel, as long as you
are close to a bus stop and
underground station. The out-
skirts of London are an easy
train ride to the city, but there's
also a lot to do nearby.
Waterlow Park , a short bus
ride from Archway station, was
bequeathed to the public in
1889 as "a garden for the gar-
denless." It includes a stately
house that overlooks ponds, a
young children's playground
and tree-lined walkways dot-
ted with colorful flower beds.
Nearby Hampstead Heath, a
short but steep walk from
Hampstead Tube station,
offers nearly 800 acres of wild-
flowers, ponds and ancient
woodland. Its southern section,
Parliament Hill, has a play-
ground, tennis courts, an open-
air swimming pool and a
sprawling, grassy area for ball
games.
One glorious late-spring
afternoon, we climbed
Parliament Hill. At the top was
a dazzling view of the city's sky-
line. Clare gazed down the
other side toward a slope cov-
ered in buttercups. "Oh, Mama,
I love it!" she said before she
galloped down, arms out-
stretched like Julie Andrews
singing "The hills are alive .... "
Our daughter was inspired to
walk more than a mile to the


other side of the heath where
Kenwood House, an 18th-cen-
tury mansion turned art
gallery, sits on manicured
grounds with a cafe, kitchen
garden, gift shop and more
panoramic views of London.
Kenwood was definitely
worth more than one trip.
During one of our visits, we
spotted bunnies hopping on a
lawn surrounded by blooming
rhododendrons, and Sam
pointed out green parrots fly-
ing between the trees.
On a rainy day, the kids and I
headed on a 10-minute walk to
East Finchley to visit the his-
toric Phoenix Cinema, a movie
theater built in 1910. The cine-
ma puts on a children's mati-
nee at noon every Saturday. We
arrived in time to see "Chicken
Little."
Of course, the kids wouldn't
have missed the Tower of
London, the city's medieval
fortress and royal home, conve-
niently located near an ice
cream stand. Inside the stone
walls, a Beefeater regaled
them with tales of murder and
executions.
"If we stay here much longer,
I think I'm going to throw up,"
Clare said after one story about
a beheading gone awry.
"Can we see the ax?" Sam
asked.
But in the late afternoons,
the kids invariably asked when
they were going "home." By
now, they didn't mean L.A.
As our departure drew clos-
er, the children were so upset
about leaving they couldn't
sleep. My wife tried to staunch
the tears by reminding them of
their friends and beloved beds
waiting for them at home. But
they couldn't be consoled. They
said they wanted to stay They
already felt at home.


Today's HOROSCOPE


Your Birthday: In the year ahead, you might be
required to bear a heavier load than that to which
you're accustomed, but it won't be without rewards.
Greater returns for work well done will also be much
more substantial.:
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Be mindful of situations
or conditions that could cause you complications, but
don't get carried away to the point of being negative
about things that will never happen. Remain upbeat.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - Try to make it a point
not to buy things on a whim or something that you'll
never use. If your need isn't urgent, forgo shopping so
you won't be tempted to splurge.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -A friend who has a
habit of taking it upon him/herself to think for others
might try to do so for you. It's best you put a stop to it,
or you'll be overrun by this person's interference.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - Now and then, you
have a tendency to see problems as big as mountains,
when they are merely molehills. Chances are you'll be
tempted to use that magnifying glass once again.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - When in social
involvements, don't take the activity or yourself too seri-
ously, especially if there is competition involved. You'll
have a much better time if you're laid back and easy-
going.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - Neither you nor your


mate is likely to achieve your intentions if each is striv-
ing for an opposing objective. A successful day will be
denied you unless you find a way to agree on things.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -All that time you waste
procrastinating over what you should be doing will be
taken from your hours of productivity tomorrow. Get
over it now, so tomorrow won't be so hectic.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - It's best not to volun-
teer handling the funds for a group endeavor, because,
no matter how you spend the dollars, someone is apt
to say you should have done it differently. You can't win.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Don't be too intent on
having your own way. Chances are things will turn out
in ways where the ideas of fellow companions would
have worked out better. Go along with another's idea
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - Sadly, any restrictive
conditions you may experience will be the byproduct of
your own negative thinking. For good or ill, your mode,
of operation will be determined by your attitude.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Being short on funds
shouldn't stop you from engaging in the great variety of
fun things that you can do. In fact, many activities that
are free can provide the greatest pleasure.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - If an associate who sel-
dom gives you a nod of hello makes a big fuss over
you, be on guard. This generous greeting is apt to be a
mask for covering up something devious or tricky.


TRIP
Continued from Page A2

prised and impressed by a two-
story classical travertine mar-
ble building, preceded by a
cascading marble reflecting
pool and fountain (see photo).
The Appleton Museum was a
dream come true for Arthur I.
Appleton, an ingenious inven-
tor in the field of electronics
with more than 160 patents to
his name. Appleton and his
wife Martha traveled exten-
sively throughout Europe,
Africa and Asia collecting art
and antiquities, which have
become the permanent collec-
tion for this museum. Included
in this collection is also an
impressive collection of pre-
Columbian and American
antiques.
The Appleton Museum has
continuous cultural events,
educational programs, and
traveling exhibitions year
round, changing every quarter.
Some exhibitions are docent-
led or an audiotape can be
rented for a nominal fee.
Beginning Oct. 12, a royal
celebration of the "Diana,
Princess of Wales - Dress for a
Cause" Pink Ribbon Crusade
exhibition begins; including a
"High Tea" for those who want
a full English experience.
Please call, as reservations are


1. Write about a day trip to a
town or attraction within,three
hours' drive of Citrus County.
2. Include your name, home-
town and phone number (the
phone number will not be pub-
lished -- it's for our reference).
3. Submit a photo or photos
of the place you visit. Drop off
copies at the Chronicle offices
in Inverness or Crystal River, or
e-mail the images as separate.
high-resolution jpeg (.jpg)
attachments to
community@chronicleonline.co
m. Include information about
what's in the pictures. Photos

needed for this show.
Getting to know Ocala can be
a pleasant experience, as it is
known as horse country with
rolling hills, beautiful farms,
and many historic homes.
Spend time around the old
town square and catch "Horses
in Motion" with the many life-
size painted horses that are a
symbol of Ocala. There were
originally 52 horses in the'i
"Horse Fever" 2000-01 exhibi-F'
tion, which are now spread
around town.
Several nice pubs around
the town square are a good
place for lunch or a cool brew.
The town square is on State
Road 40. Work your way back to


cannot be returned without a
stamped, self-addressed enve-
lope. .
4. Include the name of the
area, the county it's in, the
major roads leading to it, its '
main attractions and pnces. Ytif
can include a list of fayd'ite ;
restaurants, or upcornipg pIeys'.
planned in that area, -
5. Limit reports to $,0 wiils..
The Chronicle willi:wlt.any..
reports chosen fopiBlicatic#
6 Pay attention, the d
triporeported by.*the1 ers
"--duplicate reptts wiliDeelim-
inated

1-75 and get off exit 350 on to
S.R. 200 North for a great shop-
ping experience and more
restaurants - Italian,
Mexican, Thai, Indian, Chinese
and the all-American chain
cuisine abound.
Getting to the Museum: S.R.
200 North to Ocala, 1-75 North
to exit 352, S.R. 40, go seven
miles to museum.
The address and phone num-
ber :are 4333 N.E. Silver
Springs Blvd.. (352) 291A-4455.
Museum hours are'10,a.m. to 5
p m. Tuesday through Satur-
day, noon to 5 ;p.m. Sunday.
Admission is $6, seniors. 55 and
older - $4. students - $4 and
free for members.


Travel BRIEFS


Gambling cruise
Citrus Singles offers the follow-
ing to the members and the public:
Sunday, Nov. 8: Gambling cruise at
Cape Canaveral. Includes bus and
buffet. Deadline is Oct. 10.
Call Sol at 795-1336.
Trip to Biloxi
The New Jersey and Friends
Club of Citrus County are having a
bus trip to a resort in Biloxi. The
dates are Jan. 27 to 30.
For more information and/or
reservations, call Mary Anne at
746-3386.


Caribbean cruise
Join the Inverness Elks Lodge
for a seven-night cruise to
Labadee, Haiti; Ocho Rios,
Jamaica; George Town, Grand
Cayman; Cozumel, Mexico; April
27 through May 4, 2008. Round
trip motorcoach to Miami included
in price. Open to the public, Elks
and Red Hatters. Book before
Oct. 22. Call Betty or Chuck
Osborn at 860-1140 for details.
Carriage museum
Join the Beverly Hills Recreation
Center Thursday, Oct. 11, for a trip


to Austin Carriage Museum in
Weirsdale
Cost includes transportation to
-tnd from the muselim, lunch and
guided tour of three galleries fea-
turing more than 135 carriages
from Europe and America.
See an authentic "horseless"
carriage and the classic 1928 Rolls
Royce. Seating is limited. Buy tick-
ets from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday to Friday at the office at
77 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Call
746-4882. Advance ticket sales
only for this event.


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness
Box Office 637-3377
"The Game Plan" (PG) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m. 7:40
p.m.
"The Kingdom" (R) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m. Digital.
* No passes or super savers.
"Resident Evil: Extinction" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40
p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"The Brave One" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15
p.m.
"3:10 to Yuma" (R) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Mr. Bean's Holiday" (G) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:50
p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Feast of Love" (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:10 p.m. Digital.
"The Game Plan" (PG) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30


p.m., 10:30 p.m. Digital.
"The Kingdom" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
9:50 p.m. Digital. No passes or super savers.
"Sydney White" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:05
p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Resident Evil: I'xirinction" (R) 1:4ff p.m:, 4!50
p.m., 7:55 p.m., 10:15 p.m. Digital.
"Good Luck Chuck" (R) 2 p.m.,-4:40 p.m., 7:50
p.m., 10:25 p.m. Digital.
"The Brave One" (R) 1:20 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:15
p.m., 10 p.m. Digital.
"Mr. Woodcock" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:35
p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"3:10 to Yuma" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:35 p.m.,
10:20 p.m. Digital.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


T IITY V'AIP I TR"EL~?ELO~


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10/14
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Imperial Palace Every Sunday
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4 meals, $25 slot play - no casinos
Surfing Oct. 2nd. $
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no casinos, Trinity bs 1 5 9 (Pe


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Dec. 3
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Branson
11/7/07
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Cedar Key
Seafood Fest
10120/07
Homosassa Pick Up Only
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Beau Rivage
Biloxi
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$189
Call for Dates &
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Sterling Cruise
Inverness & Homosassa
10(11,10/26

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Seminole
Hard rock
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Pick Up 10/18 & 11/15

120
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tualit ne 100% DIGITAL
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T ri county Hearing Aid
fwww.ri-counrty-neaonrig cm Beverly Hills 746-1133 Dunnellon 489-6565


Meridien Research is conducting a clinical research study of an oral
investigational medication for Birth Control. Participants must be sexually active
with regular menstrual cycles and must want birth control. If currently on an oral
birth control method, participants may, after entering the study, "switch" to the
investigational study medication. Participants will receive study medication, pap
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For more information about this research study, please call
Meridien 352-597-8839 (352-59-STUDY)
Participation is completely voluntary
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f~i j
* ~


Saturday, October 13, 2007
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club

Call for -eservailons


352.527.2020
www.hospiceofcitr.uscounty.org
All proce' s our.'eft Hn ,pice of Citrus County


The only Bermuda
cruise from Florida.
Set sail April 6 - 13, 2008,
to Nassau, Bahamas, and
Kings Wharf, Bermuda.
Staterooms from only
$68774 per guest!
JUST CBU.IS 726-2889
& Travel (800) 306-7477
3802 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. - Inverness
www.Justcrulseandtravelcom


Complimentary Cocktails at Six
Fine Dining of Seven
Dancing unLil Midnight


Coimiplhrien, toryv 'ale P.ark;ng

Limrncuine Ser. ,ic- Ho'T,e
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HO SIc E
OF CITRUS COUNTY INC.
Licensed 985 cd b
Licensed 1985 rre. ecwc.T.ww.


TO SUBMIT A DAY TRIP:


Isle of Capr/Uiloxi
4 Days/3 Nights
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$179
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SUNDAY, SiErPTIiMBIRi 30, 2007 19A


==50th ANNIVERSARY-===50th v:,. ... . . -


The Bartletts


The Velezes


.- .- Wedding

Norman/Judge


Family and friends gathered
to celebrate 50 wonderful
years of marriage of Dr and
Mrs. Peter W. Bartlett of
Inverness. All of their eight
children attended, as well as


"Dan" Robert Daniel
("Crow") and Rosie Jean
Carmichael celebrated their
25th wedding anniversary
Aug. 31,2007, by renewing their
wedding vows at the Wedding
Chapel in Inverness. Chaplain
Sal Viglione performed the


Act Now...
Deadline is
October 31,2007

LEND

US YOUR

EARS...








for a

Hearing Aid

Field Study
My audiology clinics have
received a generous grant
from Magnatone to conduct
an important field study on
a new model of open ear
hearing aid. It is smaller
and more comfortable than
traditional hearing aids. We
are seeking people with mild
to moderate hearing loss to
participate in the study. Both
current hearing aid users and
non-users are needed.
In exchange for completing
a pre-and post-fitting ques-
tionnaire, the participants
will earn the free use of this
hearing aid for thirty days. My
audiologists will provide the
exams and lab services at
no charge through the grant.
At the end of this thirty day
trial, participants will return
the aids to one of my clinics
or purchase the aids at a
discounted price.
For information or to
schedule a free candidate
screening, call us at
795-5700 or visit our
Latest News Link at
www.gardneraudioloqy.com
Thank You
Dan Gardner, M.S.
35 years experience
President








Gardner Audiology
700 S.E. 5th Ter.
Crystal River ...


most of their 18 grandchildren
and friends.
The celebration was in
Clearwater and a weekend of
celebration was enjoyed at the
waterside home of daughter
Brenda and husband Lauren.
Mrs. Bartlett (Marilyn) con-
tinues to work at Publix in
Citrus Hills and her husband
stays active with his poetry,
ministry and tending to their
farm. Peter was a local substi-
tute teacher for a few years as
well as a consultant and train-
er for auto claims insurance.
Trips to Alaska and Branson,
Mo., will top off this wonderful
year.


ceremony.
The Carmichaels are resi-
dents of Heatherwood Estates
in Inverness and were origi-
nally married in Waukigan, Ill.
Both services were at 11 a.m.
Friends of the couple,
Deanna Carver stood up as
best woman and Tara Carver
was their maid of honor. Rosie
was escorted down the aisle by
Luna, the couple's 2-year-old
black Lab.
For their second honey-
moon, the couple spent the
weekend in St Augustine.

FORGET
TO PUBUCIZE?
N Submit photos of suc-
cessful community events
to be published in the
Chronicle. Call 563-5660
for details.


Edward "Ed" and Smirna
Velez celebrated their 50th
wedding anniversary on Sept.
28 surrounded by children and
grandchildren.
Married in the Bronx, N.Y,
Sept 28, 1957, they moved to
Long Island in 1967 and then
later moved to Crystal River in
the summer of 1979.
Ed remains active as a com-
mercial artist and technical
illustrator, self-employed


Mr. and Mrs. William and
Lillian Smith of Hernando cel-
ebrated their 50th wedding
anniversary Sept. 14 with their
children, family and friends in
Manasquan, N.J., Fire House
No. 1.
They were married Sept 14,
1957, at St. Josephs Church in
North Plainfield, N.J.
William is a retired electri-
cian with IBEW
Lillian retired from Manas-
quan Board of Education.
They have three children,
William Jr., Donna and


since 1979. Smirna is a retired
ward secretary from Citrus
Memorial after 25 years of
service.
They have three children,
Lizette Souder of St. Peters-
burg, Ed Velez Jr. and wife
Debbie of Homosassa and
Kimberly Ulseth and husband
Bob of Citrus Hills, and seven
grandchildren, Josh, Mark,
Krystina, Jacquelyn, Trey,
Alexis and Zachary.


Thomas, and 10 grandchildren.
The Smiths have lived in
Citrus County since 2003.


Brian Judge and Amanda
Norman were united in mar-
riage Saturday, May 26, 2007, at
the Sugarmill Woods Country
Club. Rita Birch performed the
service.
The bride is the daughter of
Harold and Karen West of
Homosassa.
The groom is the son of Leon
Franklin and Marylyn Judge of
Beverly Hills.
The bride was given in mar-
riage by Mike Kriener and Don
Kriener, bride's uncles. She
wore a satin A-line gown with
cap sleeves, side draping with
beaded embroidery and a
chapel train. Her bouquet con-
sisted of calla lilies and ivy.
Maid of honor was Tracy
Taylor from Richmond, Va.
Best man was Buddy Weigelt
from Crystal River. Bridesmaid
was Heather Ray from Homo-
sassa. Groomsman was Mike
Kriener from Homosassa.
The bride's attendants wore
ruched satin embroidered
gowns and carried bouquets of
calla lilies.
Flower girl was Shaylyn
Judge, daughter of groom, and
ring bearer was Austin Judge,
son of bride and groom.
The wedding reception fol-
lowed the ceremony at 2 p.m. at
Sugarmill Woods Country Club.


Out-of-town guests included
Kelly and Al DerAshodian, aunt
and uncle from Las Vegas, Nev.,
Donna Nance and Vern
Matterson, aufit and uncle from
Baycliff, Texas, and Tracy Taylor
(maid of honor) from Richmond,
Va. Also attending was the
bride's grandmother, Nancy
Kriener from Homosassa.
The bride is a graduate of
Crystal River High School and
is a teller at SunTrust Bank
The groom is a graduate of
Lecanto High School and is a
store manager at Dollar
General.
Bride and groom have been
together for 5 1/2 years. The
couple honeymooned in New
Smyrna Beach and they will
live in Homosassa.


PET SPOTUGHT
* The Chronicle invites readers to submit photos of their pets
for the daily Pet Spotlight feature.
* Photos need to be in sharp focus. Include a short description
of the pet and owners, including names and hometowns.
Photos cannot be returned without a self-addressed,
stamped envelope. Group photos of more than two-pets can-
not be printed.
* Send photos and information to Pet Spotlight, c/o Citrus
County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
FL 34429.


2.49


PUBLIC


8-Piece Mixed
Fried Chicken. ... 6.59
Hot or Cold, Includes 2 Breasts,
2 Thighs, 2 Drumsticks, and
2 Wings, Fried in trans fat
Free Oil, Fresh From the
Publix Deli, each box
SAVE UP TO .40


Large:
Florida
Pink Shrimp ......
Previously Frozen,
21 to 25 per Pound
SAVE UP TO 4.00 LB


8.99,,


WHERE HOPPIN G IS A P EAS U R ,


Zephyrhills
Natural
Spring Water ...... 4.99
24-pk. .5-L bot.
SAVE UP TO 1.00


18-Pack
Bud Light Beer..1299
Or Budweiser or
Budweiser Select, 12-oz can or bot.
(12-Pack Moosehead Lager,
12-oz bot. ... 8.99)
SAVE UP TO 1.00


Prices effective Thursday, September 27 through Wednesday, October 3, 2007.
Only in the Following Counties: Sumter, Lake, Hernando, Collier, Citrus, Polk, and Osceola.
Prices not effective at Publix Sabor. Quantity Rights Reserved.
www.publix.com/ads


25th A N ? s-;v-ERSARY-

The Carmichaels


The Smiths
iL ne I


Fresh Chicago Hard Rolls,
Broccoli ..................... ..... . . Y 8-C ount .................................
Great Steamed or Raw, High in Vitamin C, each bunch Handmade Each Day in the Store, Crispy Crust,
SAVE UP TO 1.20 Fresh From the Publix Bakery, 12-oz pkg.
SAVE UP TO .40


A T P U, B L I-X S A V t N G IS PARTOF THE- P L E A S U R,


TOGETHER


,'� CirRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICI.I.


oz.. IV








Crntus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Leaf sight-seeing to tourists


We have been stuck behind Mr. and Mrs.
Leaf Peeper for 45 minutes. Sue and I
are on our way home from the grocery
store -they are on vacation. It's nice
to be on vacation, to not have a worry
in the world, to take the time to smell
the roses, to wander wherever the
wind blows you, to be awed by the
wonder of nature, to drink in the
majestic beauty of this country, to
slow down and admire every new .i
vista in brilliant, flaming colors. But
do you have to do it in front of us?
"Let's ram them," Sue said.
I'm not sure she knew she was J||
thinking aloud, but she had read my MUL
mind. Dumb, stupid nature. Dumb,
stupid beauty. We've got things to do.
It must be swell to have the time to look at dead
leaves, but we've got gutters to clean, bulbs to
plant, patio furniture to stow away for the winter,
storm windows to install. Most of all, I've got a
lawn full of beautiful leaves to rake. Not so beau-
tiful when they're knee-deep on your front lawn
are they, Mr. and Mrs. Foliage Connoisseur?
They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder,
and I guess I'll be holding about 20 giant leaf
bags before the day is through - if I ever get
home. The leaf-lovers ahead of us are now stuck
behind other leaf-lovers, who are even slower
than they are. Where do these drivers come
from that have never seen leaves before? If they
live within driving distance, they must certainly
have their own leaves.
Oh, they want to see them at their peak Nothing
but the best for them. Two days before peak, why
even leave the house? Two days after peak? What
kind of chump would want to look at leaves two
days after they peak? It would be like going to a
museum and finding all the Rembrandts were out
being cleaned. The rest of the paintings are just a


bunch of Van Goghs and Picassos. Why bother to
even leave the house for that?
Or maybe our leaves are different from their
leaves. Our leaves turn red and yel-
low; maybe theirs turn pink with pur-
ple polka dots. C'mon people, they're
just dead leaves. If you look at them
close up, they're dirty, they're spotted,
they're misshapen, they're full of bugs
- they're not very pretty at all. Is yel-
low a better color than green? Is rusty
brown a better color than green? I
think green can hold its own with all
the other colors, I don't think we have
V� to get all dramatic about a bunch of
LEN leaves losing all their chlorophyll.
Whoa! What's this, the leaf-huggers
have their right blinker on. Finally!
Praise the Lord! There's a pull-off for the over-
look up ahead. Yes, get off the road and take your
leaf-peeping friends with you!
As we follow them with our eyes, making sure
this isn't some leaf-peeping trick - that sud-
denly they'll change their minds and swerve
back in front of us at 20 mph - we get a view of
the hills and valleys below us.
It was as if a bright red and gold rainbow had
fallen to the ground so we could see what it
looked like close-up. We slowed down and fol-
lowed the leaf-peepers into the overlook
It turned out the "tourists" were from the next
town. They didn't know why, but they'd decided
to take the day off and drive around. We decid-
ed to take the rest of the day off, too. The storm
windows could wait; who wants to clean gutters
on a day like this anyway? I may not rake the
leaves at all this year.
--m-

Reach author Jim Mullen
atjim mullen@myway.com.


CITRUS COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL

PET PROFILES


The Citrus County Animal
Control Shelter has online
listings of impounded ani-
mals. Go to the Web page
animalcontrol.citrus.fl.us and
click on "Impounded
Animals" to begin a search.
To enquire about the ani-
mals listed here, refer to the
type (cat or dog), age group


and gender in a search.,
The shelter can help you
save an innocent pet.
The shelter is in Inverness
near the airport. The shelter
is open for adoptions from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
through Friday and from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.
Call the Citrus County


Animal Shelter at 726-7660
for more information.
Financial assistance for
spaying and neutering of
your adopted pet is avail-
able through the Humani-
tarians of Florida at 563-
2370, or from the Humane
Society of Citrus County at
341-2222.


See on-again-off-again,



but continue to look


Dear Annie: Jerry and I were co-workers
for several years while we were both
married to others. I divorced my hus-
band, and Jerry's been separated for three
years. At some point, we decided to start dating
and have had an on-and-off relation-
ship ever since. We always have a
great time together, talk almost
every day on the phone and see each
other once or twice a week
Jerry said from the start that he
didn't want our relationship to be
exclusive. He thought he owed it to
himself to "see what else is out
there," as he'd been married to the
same woman for 20 years. I begrudg-
ingly accepted his terms.
Periodically, Jerry will think we
are talking and seeing each other too ANN
much. Of course, this breaks my MA|L
heart because I am in love with him.
We'll stop seeing each other but are
usually calling again within the week He tells
me he has feelings for me, but he doesn't think
he's as "madly in love" as he believes he should
be. So we end up in this on-again-off-again
cycle, content and comfortable for several
months until he steps back
The last time, I made an effort to date other
men. I'm doing the Internet thing, but without
much success. I really believe Jerry is scared of
another marital disaster and just heeds more
time to figure out what he wants. His divorce is
dragging. I want to hang in there but don't want
to be a doormat. Any advice? - Feeling! My
Heart Ripped Out Again in California
Dear California: Jerry is still married and has
let you know he's not as "in love" as he thinks he
ought to be. So when he eventually figures out
what he wants, it might not be you It is foolish
to put all your eggs in his wobbly basket. Let
Jerry know you are interested in seeing him;,but
you are both free to date others. Keep looking.
Dear Annie: There is a morbidly obese man in
his mid-60s in my neighborhood who is con-
stantly outside working in his yard with no shirt
on. He's sweaty and wears mid-length shorts so
low that his "plumber's crack" shows. He cer-
tainly could wear a bigger bra than I do. How do
I go about letting this man know how gross he


looks? Evidently his wife is oblivious. -Arizona
Dear Arizona: Sorry. Unless he's working in
your yard, you have no say in how he looks, how
he dresses and what size bra he ought to wear.
He may not be pretty, but this is one of those
things neighbors put up with. If you
don't want to see him, close your
blinds.
Dear Annie: This is in response to
"Desperate in Texas," whose hus-
band spends his paycheck on booze
while she ends up paying all the
bills, including putting aside gas
money for his car. I could have writ-
ten that letter 23 years ago.
I have been in the same situation,
and, believe me, things will not get
better. There will be no Christmas,
IE'S birthday or Mother's Day cards
BOX because he "has no money" to buy
these things. When both of you go out
for a meal, you will be the one pay-
ing. If we had done better with our finances, we
could have owned our own home by now, but
because he drank up most of our assets, our
credit is ruined.
Please tell her to take some positive action. If
he has no money for gas, let him find another
mode of transportation. If she doesn't pay his
personal bills, he just might smarten up. He has
to take responsibility for his own actions. I did
not makelhimr doithis. and no\\ I find myself-
Heading for Divorce Court in Montreal
Dear Montreal: Thanks tfor your words of
experience. Of course, for "Texas," there is
more going on than mone.\ mismanagement,
and \ve hope she will get some help soon


Anmnie's. _ailbox is written by Kathy Mllitchell
and Marcy Sugar. longtime editors
Soft'e .Inn Landers column.
. E-mail questions to
anniesmailbox@comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, P.O Box 118190, Chicago, IL
60611. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox, and read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists,
visit the Creators Syndicate Web page
at www.creators.com.


Sunday PUZZLER


NAME: (none)
AGE: YA
SEX: F
ID #: 85481


N: Scrappy Doo
AGE: Adult
SEX: M
ID #: 85483


NAME: Do Joe
AGE: ?
SEX: M
ID #: 66202


GENTRY


For Tickets:
Fancy's Pets -
669 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, 352-563-5100
Wishful Thinking
Western World
(Ocala, Gainesville, Leesburg)
352-629-7676
Log onto
Ticketmaster.com
or call
1-800-370-8669


NAME: Monkey
AGE: YA
SEX: F
ID #: 85493


NAME: Sunday
AGE: Adult
SEX: F
ID #: 85444


Puzzle answer is on Page 15A.


Lightning
AGE: Adult
SEX: M
ID #: 85446


TRACE



ADKINS


Tickets can be ordered from the following organizations:
-Key Training Center Melissa Walker ~ 634-4660 or 527-8228
-Nature Coast Volunteer Center Heidi Blanchette ~ 527-5952 or 220-3962
-Storm Football Annita Moore - 400-5002
-Dunnellon Little League-Greg Grybko - 489-5341
-Central Citrus Little League Larry Swain ~ 258-0633 or 527-4224
-Boys And Girls Club Lori Pender - 621-9225 or 341-2507
-Lecanto High School Football Boosters Faye Mobley - 613-3649
-Crystal River High School Athletic Department Tony Stukes ~ 795-4641x4
-Crystal River Little League Tom Salute ~ 795-6486x3795 or 302-8824
-Habitat For Humanity Bonnie Peterson - 563-2744
-Mid-Florida Community Services Linda Graves - 796-8117
-Marion County Senior Services Gail Cross ~ 620-3501


ACROSS
1 Flavor
6 Charley horse
11 Neck scarf
16 Synagogue leader
21 Sprite in
Shakespeare's
"Tempest"
22 Boring tool
23 Market
24 Cargo vessel
25 Shatter
26 Cloth for bathrobes
27 Hackneyed
28 Mild cigar
29 Fall behind
30 State in India
31 "- go bragh!"
32 Playing card
34 London's Big -
35 A good look
38 Hank the baseball
great
40 Stylish
41 Rds.
42 On the ocean
44 Dwell
45 Generation -
47 Destiny
49 Household job
52 - Island
54 Bring to mind
56 Opera by Verdi
60 Talk like a madman
61 Notions
62 Go after game
63 Took it easy
65 Holiday time
66 - and butter
67 After-dinner candy
68 Daybreak
69 Youngster
70 - diem
71 Monthly expense
72 Stop
73 Scot's cap, for short
74 Ring-shaped island
76 Competitor
78 Boundless
79 Bird found in marshes
80 Penned
81 Frost
82 Role
83 Ink stain
84 - alai
85 Protect from the sun
88 Rank and -


89 Shade of blue
90 Greatest
94 Raze
95 Sheltered side
96 Kind of strip or race
97 Musical sound
98 Mil. address part
99 Boxing great
100 Mild oath
102 Goad
103 Pumps and loafers
104 Uncooked
105 Material for a cast
107 Say grace
108 Board game
109 Party
110.Ditty
111 Male relative
113 American pioneer
Daniel -
114 Church officer
115 Child
117 Peculiar
118 Grain used in brewing
119 Alliance acronym
121 Drench
124 Sky or navy
126 Picture
128 Picturesque
132 Simian creature
133 Plane
134 Wound mark
135 Walk heavily
139 Neighbor
of Can. and Mex.
140 Wash lightly
142 Giant god
144 Skirt shape (hyph.)
145 Noblemen
147 Caper
148 One of the Muses
149 Broad comedy
150 Something valuable
151 Core
152 Appraiser
153 Whistle sound
154 The ones here


DOWN
1 Arrangement of data'
in rows and columns
2 Dress in finery
3 Blockade
4 Oolong, e.g.
5 Wapiti
6 Popular pets
7 Regrets
8 City in India
9 Mythical
sea creatures
10 Snoop
11 Texas player
12 Very strict
13 Invent
14 Table scrap
15 Molars and bicuspids'
16 Ornate art style
17 Trouble
18 Spills the beans.
19 Flat cap
20 Presses
30 Cakes and -
31 Before
33 Tree that yields
osiers
36 Travel charge
37 Employ
39 - Maria
40 Books expert (abbr.)
43 Passionate
44 Burden
46 Play a part
48 Sunbather's goal
49 Thin pancake
50 Refuge
51 Not hidden
53 Prepare leftovers
54 Litter's smallest
55 Andes animal
57 Dome-shaped
dwelling
58 Distributed cards
59 Make confused
61 Peace goddess
62 Sword handle
64 Without any warning
66 Charm or ankle
67 Pole on a ship
68 Flit
72 Rabbit
73 Implement
75 Math branch,
for short
77 Midway attraction
78 Dell


79 Scoria
82 Parti-colored
83 Droplet
84 Austen and Fonda
85 Hits with open hand
86 A greeting
87 Of birds
88 Fiery signal
89 Helen of -
90 Unfasten
91 Kind of seal
92 Outpouring
93 Minaret
96 Sketch
97 At that time
101 Quiet and soothing
102 Base (with "on")
103 Gun pellets
106 Mil. rank
107 Advanced degree
(abbr.)
108 Cabbage salad
109 Floating ice mass
112 "Raven" writer
113 Satchel
114 Common abbr.
116 Be opposed
118 Impair
120 Snake
121 Mother of Isaac
122 Express a belief
123 Five (prefix)
125 Say
127 Noble's house
and land
129 Clinic employee
130 British -
131 Social class
134 Immediately,
medically speaking
136 Retread
137 A single time
138 Encounter
141 "Dear - or Madam..."
143 Nest egg letters
144 Toward the back
of a plane
145 Consume
146 Fire residue


ZVA% SUNDAY, -�)EPTEMBER --M, &VV / k---/ �-


- ----- - ------ ----


IMA qTT�nAV SFlITFMBFR 30- 2007


4


MIA.


IF










0 College Football/2B
m MLB/3B
* NFL/4B
* Scoreboard/5B
* Entertainment/6B


B
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 30, 2007
www.chronicleontine.com


oles


turn


FSU defeats

Alabama, 21-14,

in Jacksonville
Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE - There is
no quarterback controversy at
Florida State: Xavier Lee's the
quarterback - at least until
Monday.
The 6-4, 235-pound redshirt
junior with a cannon arm came
off the bench Saturday to throw
a pair of touchdown passes to
Rorida State quarterback
Xavier Lee, left, throws a third-
quarter pass Saturday as
Alabama defender Keith
Sanders attempts to defend, in
Jacksonville. FSU won, 21-14.
Associated Press


De'Cody Fagg and lead Florida
State to a 21-14 victory over
No.22 Alabama in a showdown
between one-time powers look-
ing to regain elite status.
"He gave them a spark,"
Alabama coach Nick Saban
said. "His ability to run made
us play different."
Bowden said the Lee he saw
perform Saturday before the
largest crowd to see a game in
this city was the one he's been
looking for since 2005.
"He gave us some mobility at
quarterback and offensively he
won the game," Bowden said.
"He did what we've always
wanted him to do. Xavier has
always been a young man with
great potential and I thought
tonight he began to use that
potential."
Lee, who entered the game
in the second quarter, hit Fagg
with a 7-yard pass for the
game's first touchdown on the


opening drive of the second
half. The two then teamed up
on a 70-yard TD pass with 4:46
left to give the Seminoles a 21-
7 lead.
That play came immediately
after Alabama scored its first
touchdown.
Lee completed 12 of 19 pass-
es for 224 yards after making
his first appearance of the year
and ran for a game-high 59
yards in what began as a defen-
sive struggle for both teams. He
replaced Drew Weatherford,
who couldn't produce any first
quarter points despite having
good field position and a brisk
wind at its back
Bowden said offensive coor-
dinator Jimbo Fisher would
make the decision on a starter
for next week's game against
North Carolina State.
"If he doesn't make the right
one (decision), I'll correct
him," Bowden teased.


Fisher, however, sounded
like he was leaning to sticking
with Lee.
"I'd say right now, 'you'd
think so,"' Fisher said. "(But)
we don 't want to make any
rash decisions after a game."
Weatherford, who is also a
redshirt junior, has started 27
games and Lee just three since
.they began their careers
together. Despite continual
speculation that Lee would
transfer, he didn't.
"No athlete likes to wait and
sit around and wait for their
chance but patience pays off
and patience is a virtue," Lee
said.
"He showed some persist-
ence there," Bowden said. "I
betcha it's gonna pay dividends
for him."
Florida State (3-1) gave
Bowden, who grew up in
Please see NOLES/Page 5B


Americans


headed for


road victory


in Montreal

Associated Press
,MONTREAL - Phil Mickelson
showed Woody Austin ho%% to stay dry,
and the Americans blew the
International team out or the water
Saturday in the Presidents Cup to
build the largest lead in seven years.
The United States pitched a
shutoutin five alternate-shot matches
in the crisp morning, then turned
back an International rally with one
of its own to split the afternoon four-
balls and build a 1412-7' - lead eoine
into the 12 singles matches Sunday
- Mickelson and Austin combined to
birdie their last two holes to steal a
half-point, Tiger Woods recorded tro
blowouts with different partners, and
Stewart Cink made all the clutch putts
to turn a loss into another point that
filled the scoreboard with American
red numbers.
It now appears that for the second
time in three weeks, the Sunday
chase for a cup will be anticliniactic
Woods essentially wrapped up the
FedEx Cup at East Lake before the
weekend arrived, and only the great-
est comeback in Presidents Cup histo-
ry will keep this event from turning
into a snoozer at Royal Montreal.
"It's not over," International cap-
tain Gary Player said. "But things
don't look too good. The egg is not
sunny-side up."
Indeed, the International squad
looked fried.
Mike Weir and Ernie Els had the
only easy time in the afternoon for
their team, and the deflating day
ended with Vijay Singh curling in a 4-
foot par putt that kept another
International team from a collapse.
� U.S. captain Jack Nicklaus nodded
his head and clapped his hands with
each point moving the Americans
closer to their first outright victory on
the road in the Presidents Cup, and
Please see .. /Page 5B


Associated Press
Auburn quarterback Kodi Burns (18), left, gets by Florida's Moise Paul (33) to score Saturday on a seven-yard run during the first quarter in Gainesville.
Auburn kicked a field goal with three seconds left in the fourth quarter to win the game. Look for the full story in Monday's Chronicle.



Title race gets facelift as ranked teams fall


Associated Press
The national title race received a
major makeover in an upsetting
weekend for several top-ranked
teams.
No. 3 Oklahoma, No. 7 Texas, No. 10
Rutgers and No. 13 Clemson were all
handed their first losses Saturday ...
all by unranked opponents.
Add to that No. 5 West Virginia's 21-
13 loss to No. 18 South Florida on


Friday night, plus No. 6 California
knocking off No. 11 Oregon 31-24, No.
21 Penn State falling to Illinois 27-20,
and No. 22 Alabama getting knocked
off by Florida State 21-14, and it's
pretty obvious the polls will have a
very different look Sunday.
Oklahoma was first to go down,
falling to three-touchdown underdog
Colorado on Kevin Eberhart's 45-yard
field goal on the last play of the game.
"They outplayed us and outcoached


us," Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops said.
"They fought their way to a heck of a
win."
The Sooners had looked all but
unbeatable through four games, scor-
ing at least 50 points in each and
never being tested.
In the second year of rebuilding
under coach Dan Hawkins, the
Buffaloes took the Sooners' best shot
and didn't back down in Boulder.
Oklahoma led 24-7 in early in the sec-


ond half and didn't score again.
Oklahoma redshirt freshman Sam
Bradford, who had been close to per-
fect in the first four starts of his
career, was 8-for-19 for only 112 yards
and two interceptions against a tough
Colorado defense that Stoops had
praised all week.
Cody Hawkins, the coach's kid, led
the Colorado rally, throwing for 220
yards and two touchdowns.
Please see RACE/Page 5B


Panthers' Smith could trouble Buccaneers


pa Bay hashad
Shutting down
ly Carolina star

Associated Press


CHAR LOTTE, N.C. - Don't expect
[nyone in the Tampa Bay secondary
pull a DeAngelo Hall today against
(arolina's Steve Smith.
Veteran Buccaneers cornerback
ionde Barber knows better.
) "I've played against Steve a lot and
I know one thing: making him mad is
not the right thing to do," Barber said,
laughing.
. Smith, a three-time Pro Bowl pick


motivated by the smallest perceived
slight, was held to one catch for 10
yards against Atlanta. But he got so far
under Hall's skin the bombastic cor-
nerback committed 67 yards worth of
penalties - including two personal
fouls - on the Panthers' game-tying
touchdown drive.
Carolina (2-1) seized the momen-
tum from there in a 27-20 win, setting
up an early showdown with surpris-
ing Tampa Bay (2-1) for the NFC
South lead.
For the Bucs to continue their turn-
around from a 4-12 season and take
early control in a weakened division,
they'll have to stop Smith and the
Panthers. Carolina has won seven of
the past eight meetings, and Smith
has four straight 100-yard receiving
games against Tampa Bay


much more positive than in
Carolina, where the defense is
under fire. The Panthers' high-
priced line has two sacks in three
games. Julius Peppers didn't have a
tackle last week as Joey Harrington
threw for 361 yards. Carolina is also
without an interception.
"We know we can be a good
ON TELEVISION defense," said rookie linebacker Jon
Beason. "We looked at stats of when
* Tampa Bay Buccaneers at we were good and we just need to
Carolina Panthers: 4 p.m. on FOX. start faster. That has just been our
focus this week is going out and play-
Hence, the Bucs are avoiding a ing faster."
trash-talk contest with No. 89. The Bucs have been reinvented
"When he's playing angry, he's very under Jeff Garcia, who has completed
hard to deal with," Barber said. "So, 66 percent of his passes and hasn't
you won't see me or any of my DBs thrown an interception. And while the
approaching him in that manner." Bucs have struggled against the
The mood surrounding the Bucs is Panthers, Garcia has won three


straight starts against Carolina,
including a Monday night game in
Philadelphia last season.
"They're still a good defense, quali-
ty players on the defensive side of the
ball," Garcia said. "We have to expect
the best out of them. This is a big
rivalry."
With DeShaun Foster leading the
way, the Panthers have averaged
more than 180 yards rushing in their
two wins, presenting a compelling
matchup with the Bucs' improved
defense.
Tampa Bay ranks fifth in the NFL
in total defense and is giving up 12.3
points per game, as players have been
repeating a "hustling and hitting" slo-
gan in the locker room.
Please see BUCS/Page 5B


t


Stupor at the Swamp: Auburn 20, Florida 17


r''.ts









2 B SUNDAY, SEVrEMBER 30, 2007 COLLEGE FOOTBALL Cnm;s CouN'n' (FL,) CHRONIC!.!;


Buffs say C-U later, Sooners


Colorado downs

Oklahoma, 27-24,

tops day of upsets

Associated Press

BOULDER, Colo. - Just as
Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops predict-
ed, the third-ranked Sooners couldn't
run it up on Colorado. In fact, the
Sooners couldn't even beat the
Buffaloes.
Kevin Eberhart kicked a career-
long 45-yard field goal as time expired
to send Colorado past the stunned
Sooners 27-24 Saturday.
It was the Buffaloes' first win over
a top-five team since Dec. 1, 2001,
when they bested Texas in the Big 12
title game.
After Eberhart's kick cleared the
crossbar, the fans stormed the field as
the dejected Sooners, who had blown
a 24-7 second-half lead, walked off,
their hopes of a national champi-
onship having taken a major hit
The Sooners (4-1, 0-1) came in aver-
aging a whopping 61.5 points to lead
the nation. But behind a tough
defense, the Buffs (3-2, 1-0) earned
their biggest win under Dan Hawkins,
who went 2-10 in his inaugural season
last year.
The Buffaloes trailed 24-7 after
Allen Patrick scored from 17 yards out
following safety D.J. Wolfe's second
interception of Buffs quarterback
Cody Hawkins. His first one led to
Juaquin Iglesias' 13-yard TD catch in
the first half.
But Oklahoma, which had scored
50-plus points in each of their first
four games, was stifled after that, and
Colorado outgained the Sooners 219
yards to 46 in the second half.
Colorado began its comeback with
Eberhart's 41-yarder to make it 24-10
in the third quarter.
The Sooners gave the Buffs a huge
assist in their comeback when Reggie
Smith muffed a fair catch and
Colorado's Justin Drescher recovered
at the OU 16.
Four plays later, Colorado tied it on
Hawkins' 15-yard touchdown strike to
Dusty Sprague with 4:05 remaining.
The Buffs forced another punt and
Chase McBride's 33-yard return set up
Colorado at midfield. Hawkins drove
the Buffs to the 27, where Eberhart
made the the game-winner to give
Colorado its biggest upset in years.
No. 2 LSU 34,, Tulane 9
NEW ORLEANS - One good half was
more than enough for second-ranked LSU
to crush Tulane's early notions of an upset.
Jacob Hester's second touchdown of
the game and Charles Scott's pair of scor-
ing runs helped LSU (5-0) amass 24 unan-
swered second-half points in a 34-9 victory
on Saturday.
Matt Flynn shook off six sacks to throw
for 258 yards. His passing was inconsis-
tent in the face of constant pressure and
he was intercepted once, but he kept fight-
ing to eventually lead the Tigers to the lop-
sided triumph everyone expected.
Still, it wasn't as easy as expected for
the Tigers, whose average margin of victo-
ry coming in was 35.5 point and who were
favored by almost six touchdowns.
Tulane (1-3) trailed only 10-9 at halftime
and didn't fall more than one score behind
until Hester's 1-yard touchdown run gave
LSU a 20-9 lead with 5:53 remaining in the
third quarter.
No. 6 California 31,
No. 11 Oregon 24
EUGENE, Ore. - DeSean Jackson had
11 catches for 161 yards and two touch-
downs, while Justin Forsett ran for 101
yards and another two scores to lead No.
6 California to a 31-24 victory over No. 11
Oregon on Saturday.
The Golden Bears (5-0, 2-0 Pacific-10
Conference) snapped a seven-game losing
streak at Autzen Stadium - they hadn't won
there since 1987 - and needed a close call
to go their way to hang on to the victory.
With 22 seconds to go, Oregon's Dennis
Dixon hit receiver Cameron Colvin, who
fumbled trying to reach the ball into the
end zone when he was hit by Marcus
Ezeff. The loose ball went through the end
zone and was ruled a touchback and pos-
session for Cal. The play was reviewed,
the call stood and time ran out for Oregon.
(4-1, 1-1).
Nate Longshore completed 28 of 43
passes for 285 yards and two scores for
the Golden Bears.
Oregon's Dennis Dixon, who was the
only Pac-10 quarterback who had not
thrown an interception, threw a pair of
picks late in the game. Dixon was 31-of-44
for 306 yards and a touchdown.
Kansas State 41, No. 7 Texas 21
AUSTIN, Texas - Kansas State did it to
Texas again, this time with spectacular
special teams.
Two kick returns for touchdowns and an


interception return for another score pro-
pelled the Wildcats to a 41-21 win
Saturday over the No. 7 Longhorns, hand-
ing Texas its worst home defeat in 10
years under coach Mack Brown.
Linebacker Ian Campbell scored on a
41-yard interception return in the second
quarter and James Johnson took a kickoff


Associated Press
Colorado's George Hypolite (86), top, celebrates Saturday with teammates Ryan Walters (15), Jake Duren (57) and Brad Jones
(40) after holding Oklahoma during the second half at Folsom Field in Boulder, Colo. Colorado beat No. 3 Oklahoma, 27-24.


Georgia Tech's Jonathan Dwyer (21) celebrates with fans Saturday after
Georgia Tech defeated Clemson, 13-3 in Atlanta.


85-yards for a 21-14 lead moments after
Texas had tied the score.
Jordy Nelson's 89-yard punt return in
the third put the Wildcats up 34-21 and all
but sealed the their second consecutive
victory over Texas.
Kansas State (3-1, 1-0) scored on its
opening drive then didn't need another
offensive touchdown until the fourth quar-
ter to put up the most points scored
against Texas (4-1, 0-1) in Austin since
1997, the Longhorns' infamous "Rout 66"
loss to UCLA, 66-3.
No. 9 Wisconsin 37,
Michigan St. 34
MADISON, Wis. - P.J. Hill ran for 155
yards and two touchdowns and No. 9
Wisconsin extended the nation's longest
winning streak to 14 by holding off
Michigan State 37-34 on Saturday.
The Badgers (5-0, 2-0 Big Ten) seemed
in complete control late in the third quarter
after Hill ran for his second touchdown from
a yard out to give Wisconsin a 34-24 lead.
However, Michigan State (4-1, 0-1)
answered with 10 straight points, first off
Brian Hoyer's 3-yard TD pass to Mark Dell
to cap a 13-play drive with 13:54 to play.
Tyler Donovan, who finished 17-of-24
for 247 yards and two scores, had been
sharp to that point leading the Badgers,
but he didn't see safety Travis Key, who
went right to the spot Donovan was look-
ing for an easy interception. Brett
Swenson kicked a 35-yard field goal to tie
the game at 34-all with just over 12 min-
utes to play.
Wisconsin, which has now won 22 of its
last 23 at home, retook the lead after
Michigan State had three costly penalties,
the final one a defensive holding call in the
end zone. Hill, who had 34 carries, could-
n't punch it in from inside the 1 and Taylor
Mehlhaff kicked a 22-yard field goal, his
third of the day, to give the Badgers a 37-
34 lead with 6:15 left.
Maryland 34, No. 10 Rutgers 24
PISCATAWAY, N.J. - Rutgers appar-
ently doesn't like being in the Top 10.
Backup quarterback Chris Turner led
three second-half scoring drives, Keon
Lattimore rushed for 124 yards and a
touchdown and Maryland's defense shut
down Ray Rice and No. 10 Rutgers' high-
powered offense in a stunning 34-24 victo-
ry on Saturday.


It marked the second straight year that
Rutgers was upset after getting into the Top
10. Last year, Cincinnati surprised the Scarlet
Knights a week after they reached No. 7 fol-
lowing an upset of then-No. 3 Louisville.
Maryland squandered a 14-3 lead late in
the second quarter in this one, but rallied in
the second half behind Turner, getting field
goals of 26 and 37 yards from an erratic
Obi Egekeze, a 2-yard TD run by Lattimore
and a late 14-yard dash by Lance Ball, who
rushed 90 yards and two touchdowns.
The last touchdown came after Rutgers
quarterback Mike Teel was sacked and
fumbled on a fourth-and-10 play from the
Scarlet Knights 20 with about two minutes
to play.
No. 12 Boston College 24,
Massachusetts 14
BOSTON -Andre Callender ran for
115 yards and two touchdowns and Matt
Ryan threw for one TD to lead No. 12
Boston College past feisty cross-state rival
Massachusetts 24-14 on Saturday and
give the Eagles their best start in more
than 50 years.
Ryan was 24-for-42 for 204 yards, help-
ing BC (5-0) open a 17-0 lead before
slumping in the third quarter as UMass (4-
1) closed within a field goal at 17-14. But
Ryan answered with a 61-yard drive, com-
pleting 5-of-7 passes and adding a 14-yard
scramble before Callender scored from the
4 to make it 24-14.
Georgia Tech 13,
No. 13 Clemson 3
ATLANTA-- Thunder and Lightning
were nothing special, and Clemson's spe-
cial teams were downright horrible.
Georgia Tech stifled the dynamic run-
ning duo of James "Thunder" Davis and
C.J. "Lightning" Spiller and took advantage
of a stunningly poor performance by Dean
Buchholz and the rest of Clemson's kicking
game, upsetting the 13th-ranked Tigers
13-3 Saturday.
The Yellow Jackets (3-2, 1-2 Atlantic
Coast Conference) snapped a two-game
losing streak and avoided their first 0-3
start in league play since 1994. It wouldn't
have been possible if not for Clemson's
woes in a phase of the game that often
gets overlooked.
The Tigers (4-1, 2-1) missed four field
goals, had a punt blocked to set up the
only touchdown and fumbled on a kickoff


return, setting up a field goal that gave
Georgia Tech a 10-point lead with 11�/
minutes remaining.
No. 14 Kentucky 45,
Florida Atlantic 17
LEXINGTON, Ky. -Andre Woodson
threw for a career-high five touchdowns
but had his NCAA-record streak of consec-
utive passes without an interception
snapped at 325 as No. 14 Kentucky domi-
nated Florida Atlantic 45-17 Saturday.
Four different receivers caught scoring
throws from Woodson, who completed 26
of 33 passes for a season-high 301 yards
in just over three quarters.
Woodson would have had a sixth TD,
but his toss to fullback John Conner was
picked off by Tavious Polo as the two play-
ers battled for the ball near the goal line. It
was the seventh interception of the year
for the freshman cornerback, who came
into the game as the national leader.
The Owls did reach the end zone twice,
in the second quarter on a 20-yard pass
from Smith to Cortez Gent, and in the
fourth on a one-yard plunge from Charles
Pierre set up by a long kickoff return.
No. 15 Georgia 45, Mississippi 17
ATHENS, Ga. - Thomas Brown ran for
180 yards - the most for Georgia in six
years - and three touchdowns as No. 15
Georgia beat Mississippi 45-17 on
Saturday.
The game was tied 17-17 early in the
third quarter before Brown, who scored
earlier on a 50-yard run, took over. The
senior had four carries and one catch for a
combined 45 yards on a seven-play touch-
down drive that ended with his 4-yard
scoring run. He added a 41-yard touch-
down run early in the fourth quarter.
Brown's rushing total was the high for
Georgia since 2001, when Verron Haynes
ran for 207 yards against Georgia Tech.
He matched his career high with the three
touchdown runs.
Georgia's total of 328 yards rushing was
its most in seven years under coach Mark
Richt, topping its 280 yards against
Louisiana-Monroe in 2005.
No. 16 South Carolina 38,
Mississippi St. 21
COLUMBIA, S.C. - Freshman Chris
Smelley threw for a career-best 279 yards
and two touchdowns to lead No. 16 South
Carolina to a 38-21 victory over Mississippi
State on Saturday.
Smelley was given the starting job by
coach Steve Spurrier before the
Gamecocks (4-1, 2-1 Southeastern
Conference) left the locker room at LSU's
Death Valley last week after a 28-16 loss.
And Smelley's play made Spurrier look
like a genius - again.
Smelley, who replaced fifth-year senior
Blake Mitchell, connected with receiver
Kenny McKinley on touchdown passes of
20 and 27 yards, the latter which put
South Carolina ahead for good, 24-21,
with 3:43 left in the third quarter.
Mike Davis added two of his three rush-
ing touchdowns (3, 2 and 12 yards) for
South Carolina in the final quarter.
No. 17 Virginia Tech 17,
North Carolina 10
BLACKSBURG, Va. - Tyrod Taylor,
Branden Ore and Virginia Tech still can't find


their offense, but the defense made two
more big plays Saturday and the No. 17
Hokies opened Atlantic Coast Conference
play with a 17-10 victory over North Carolina.
Taylor scored on a 5-yard run and
Ore scored on a 1-yard dive for the
Hokies (4-1, 1-0), who managed just
241 yards of offense. Ore's touchdown
was set up by an interception that
Xavier Adibi returned 31 yards to the Tar
Heels 12 yard-line.
North Carolina (1-4, 0-2), which closed
to within a touchdown on Anthony Elzy's
1-yard TD run with 5:34 left, had an earli-
er drive end at the Hokies goal line when
Orion Martin forced Ryan Houston to 7
fumble and Kam Chancellor recoverecd'n
the end zone.
The Tar Heels got the ball for the last -
time at their own 14 with just over 4 min,
utes left, and moved quickly to midfield phn
Elzy's 25-yard run. But on third-and-2 from
the Hokies 44, T.J. Yates was sacked by;
Cam Martin for the third time for a 5-yard
loss. On fourth down, Yates' pass for
Brandon Tate was broken up.
No. 19 Hawaii 48, Idaho 20
MOSCOW, Idaho - Colt Brennan cer-
tainly wasn't at his best. Hawaii's defense
picked up for its star quarterback.
Adam Leonard and Myron Newberry"
returned interceptions for touchdowns and
No. 19 Hawaii overcame a career-high five
interceptions by Brennan as the Warriors
routed Idaho 48-20 on Saturday.
Hawaii improved to 5-0 - 2-0 in the ',
Western Athletic Conference - for the first
time since 1981, when the Warriors stated
7-0 and moved up to 16th in the ranking,
the highest in school history.
Brennan was a spectator last week,
resting a sprained right ankle while backup
Tyler Graunke kept Hawaii's offense rolling
in a 66-10 win over Charleston Southern'of
the Football Championship Subdivision[,
Illinois 27, No. 21 Penn St 20
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -Arrelious Benn ,
returned a kickoff 90 yards for a touch-
down and caught a pass for another andi
the Illinois defense intercepted three pass-
es for a 27-20 upset over No. 21 Penn -
State on Saturday.
The Illini (4-1, 2-0 Big Ten) forced Nittany
Lions' quarterback Anthony Morelli into .,
three interceptions and a fumble, all in the
second half and all deep in Illinois territory.
Penn State fell to 3-2, 0-2 with upcorh-
ing games against Iowa, Wisconsin and
Ohio State.
Morelli completed 21 of 38 passes for 298
yards and a touchdown, but he was picked
off by linebacker J Leman and defensive'
backs Vontae Davis and Kevin Mitchell. ,
Benn returned a first-quarter kickoff fqr a
score and caught six passes for 84 yards.
The Nittany Lions drove deep into Illiniis
territory four times in the second half, and
all but one ended with a turnover.
The last, with 27 second left, sealed 6fie
win for Illinois.
No. 25 Nebraska 35, Iowa St. 17
LINCOLN, Neb. - I-back Marion Lucky
passed and ran for touchdowns and BoK
Ruud scored on an interception return for
the second straight week, leading No. 25
Nebraska to a 35-17 victory over Iowa 4
State on Saturday.
Sam Keller and Thomas Lawson also'
teamed up for two touchdowns as the
Huskers (4-1, 1-0 Big 12) won their confer-
ence opener for the 11th time in 12 years.
A week after being booed for giving up
610 yards in a 41-40 win over 23-point 1
underdog Ball State, the Huskers looked'
ripe for more catcalls early against the ,-
Cyclones (1-4, 0-1).
But the Huskers scored 28 straight
points to wipe out a 10-0 deficit and won
their eighth straight against a Big 12 North
opponent.
Miami 24, Duke 14
MIAMI - Kyle Wright returned from an
injury to throw a game-sealing touchdown
pass to DajLeon Farr with 2:15 left, and'
Miami escaped an upset bid by Duke for
the second straight year by beating the.
Blue Devils 24-14 on Saturday.
Wright was 19-of-23 for 230 yards and
two touchdowns for the Hurricanes (4-1 ,'1-
0), who won their Atlantic Coast ;
Conference opener for the first time in ,
three years.
Thad Lewis completed 18 of 27 passes
for 241 yards and two touchdowns for
Duke, which dropped a 20-15 decision to
the Hurricanes last year - and gave Miami
fits again, all the way to the final minutes.
Lewis' 31-yard pass to Eron Riley got
Duke (1-4, 0-2) within 17-14 with 9:46'
left, and Duke was driving deep in Miami
territory later in the final quarter. But Eric
Moncur's sack - one of nine by Miami
- ended a drive with 3 minutes left, and
two plays later, the Hurricanes' offense'.
sealed the win.
UCF 37, Louisiana-Lafayette 19
ORLANDO - UCF relied on three
touchdowns and a career-high 223 yards
on 33 carries from running back Kevin


Smith in the Knights 37-19 win over
Louisiana-Lafayette on Saturday night.:i
Smith, who is the nations second
leading rusher averaging 178 yards a
game, has six touchdowns in two games
and 10 for the season. He left the game
in the fourth quarter when he suffered an
apparent right shoulder injury on his
33rd carry.
.7, , ' r. *:- * : ;- ' "


Criwits Coumy (FL) CHRONICLE


2BSUNDAY, SEP-rFm]3F,,R 30, 2007











'ifZnxus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE MAIOR LEAGUE BASEBALL SUNDAY~ SEI'rJiMrJJ u 30, 2007 3B


1.L


WILD CARD GLANCE
National League
,- W L Pct GB
San Diego 89 72 .553 -
Philadelphia 88 "73 .547 1
New York 88 73 .547 1
AMERICAN LEAGUE
-i> Friday's Games
, Boston 5, Minnesota 2
Baltimore 10, N.Y. Yankees 9, 10 innings
Toronto 5, Tampa Bay 4
qCleveland 5, Kansas City 3
' Chicago White Sox 5, Detroit 2
Seattle 6, Texas 4
L.A. Angels 2, Oakland 0
Saturday's Games
Tpronto 5, Tampa Bay 3
,.L.A. Angels 3, Oakland 2
Boston 6, Minnesota 4
q'iGhicago White Sox 3, Detroit 2
N.Y. Yankees 11, Baltimore 10
Kansas City 4, Cleveland 3
'Texas at Seattle, late
Today's Games
Tampa Bay (Hammel 2-5) at Toronto
(Burnett 10-7), 1:07 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Henn 2-2) at Baltimore
(Burres 6-7), 1:35 p.m.
Minnesota (Garza 4-7) at Boston (Tavarez
-7-10), 2:05 p.m.
Detroit (Robertson 8-13) at Chicago White
"'ox (Contreras 10-16), 2:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Laffey 3-2) at Kansas City
(Hochevar 0-0), 2:10 pm.
SL.A. Angels (Jer.Weaver 13-7) at Oakland
,i,(audin 11-13), 4:05 p.m.
.-Texas (Galarraga 0-0 or Murray 1-1) at
Seattle (F.Hernandez 13-7), 4:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
St. Louis 6, Pittsburgh 1
Philadelphia 6, Washington 0
-.Florida 7, N.Y. Mets 4
"Chicago Cubs 6, Cincinnati 0
C-Atlanta 7, Houston 2
Srizona 4, Colorado 2
'an Diego 6, Milwaukee 3
L.A. Dodgers 8, San Francisco 3
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Mets 13, Florida 0
i-14Milwaukee 4, San Diego 3, 11 innings
-,Zhicago Cubs 4, Cincinnati 0
W.t'ashington 4, Philadelphia 2
!'- Rouston 3, Atlanta 2
St. Louis 7, Pittsburgh 3
Anrizona at Colorado, late
Ian Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, late
Today's Games
Florida (Willis 10-15) at N.Y. Mets (Glavine
13-7), 1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Lilly 15-8)' at Cincinnati
(Bailey 3-2), 1:15 p.m.
t. Louis (Looper 12-12) at Pittsburgh
-iBullington 0-2), 1:35 p.m.
Washington (Bergmann 6-5) at
Philadelphia (Moyer 13-12), 1:35 p.m.
Atlanta (Carlyle 8-6) at Houston (Paulino
,--1), 2:05 p.m.
'"San Diego (Tomko 4-11) at Milwaukee
(Suppan 11-12), 2:05 p.m.
,Arizona (Davis 13-12) at Colorado
-4Jimenez 4-4), 3:05 p.m.
.San Francisco (Zito 10-13) at L.A.
dodgerss (Stults 1-3), 4:10 p.m.
End of Regular Season

LEADERS
.,'- . AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-MOrdonez, Detroit, .360;
4lSuzuki, Seattle, .350; Polanco, Detroit,
.341; Posada, New York, .337; DOrtiz,
Boston, .333; Figgins, Los Angeles, .332;
Lowell, Boston, .325:
f RUNS-ARodriguez, New York, 142;
BAbreu, New York, 121; Granderson,
1~etroit, 119; Sizemore, Cleveland, 118;
-:iDOrtiz, Boston, 116; MOrdonez, Detroit,
16; Rios, Toronto, 112.
*.',RBI-ARodriguez, New York, 155;
MOrdonez, Detroit, 137; VGuerrero, Los
A .ngeles, 125; CPena, Tampa Bay, 120;
l'.owell, Boston, 118; DOrtiz, Boston, 117;
Morneau, Minnesota, 111; VMartinez,
Cleveland, 111.
1 " HITS-ISuzuki, Seattle, 235;
-MOrdonez, Detroit, 213; Jeter, New York,
,*',205; MYoung, Texas, 201; Polanco,
"betroit, 198; OCabrera, Los Angeles, 192;
Rios, Toronto, 189; Lowell, Boston, 189.
-,'DOUBLES-MOrdonez, Detroit, 53;
[Ortiz, Boston, 52; AHill, Toronto, 47;
MiGuerrero, Los Angeles, 45; THunter,
Minnesota, 44; Markakis, Baltimore, 43;
Rios, Toronto, 43.
TRIPLES-Granderson, Detroit, 23;
Iwamura, Tampa Bay, 9; DeJesus, Kansas
City, 9; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 9; CGuillen,
Detroit, 9; MeCabrera, New York, 8;
,gTeahen, Kansas City, 8; MByrd, Texas, 8.
4 HOME RUNS-ARodriguez, New York,
"54;. CPena, Tampa Bay, 45; DOrtiz,
,Boston, 35; Thome, Chicago, 34;
Morneau, Minnesota, 31; Konerko,
Chicago, 31; MOrdonez, Detroit, 28;
THunter, Minnesota, 28; Dye, Chicago, 28.
STOLEN BASES-Crawford, Tampa
Bay, 50; BRoberts, Baltimore, 49; Figgins,
Los Angeles, 41; ISuzuki, Seattle, 37;'
CPatterson, Baltimore, 37; Sizemore,
Cleveland, 33; Owens, Chicago, 32.
.1 PITCHING (16 Decisions)-Verlander,
,,Detroit, 18-6, .750, 3.68; Beckett, Boston,
2j2-7, .741, 3.27; Wang, New York, 19-7,
.731, 3.70; Sabathia, Cleveland, 19-7, .731,
3.21; Bedard, Baltimore, 13-5, .722, 3.16;
KEscobar, Los Angeles, 18-7, .720, 3.40;
Carmona, Cleveland, 19-8, .704, 3.06.
Il STRIKEOUTS- Kazmir, Tampa Bay,
�'39; JoSantana, Minnesota, 235; Bedard,
baltimore, 221; JVazquez, Chicago, 213;
Sabathia, Cleveland, 209; Matsuzaka,
Boston, 201; Beckett, Boston, 194.
":' NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Holliday, Colorado, .339;
CJones, Atlanta, .339; HaRamirez, Florida,
.334; Utley, Philadelphia, .332; Renteria,
Atlanta, .332; Pujols, St. Louis, .328;
;Wright, New York, .325.
SRUNS-Rollins, Philadelphia, 137;
HaRamirez, Florida, 125; JBReyes, New
York, 119; Holliday, Colorado, 117; Wright,
New York, 113; Uggla, Florida, 112;
Fielder, Milwaukee, 109.
RBI-Howard, Philadelphia, 133;
9 olliday, Colorado, 133; Fielder,
Milwaukee, 119; MiCabrera, Florida, 118;
CaLee, Houston, 117; Hawpe, Colorado,
'112; Beltran, New York, 112.
.,, HITS-HaRamirez, Florida, 212;
Holliday, Colorado, 211; Rollins,
Philadelphia, 210; Wright, New York, 195;
Pierre, Los Angeles, 193; JBReyes, New
York, 191; Rowand, Philadelphia, 189;
CaLee, Houston, 189.
. DOUBLES-Holliday, Colorado, 49;
Uggia, Florida, 48; HaRamirez, Florida, 48;
;Hiltley, Philadelphia, 48; AdGonzalez, San
Diego, 45; Rowand, Philadelphia, 45;
Greene, San Diego, 44.
..i.t TRIPLES-Rollins, Philadelphia, 19;
JBReyes, New York, 12; Johnson, Atlanta,
to; Pence, Houston, 9; Amezaga, Florida,
9; OHudson, Arizona, 9; DRoberts, San
Francisco, 9.
,'a HOME RUNS-Fielder, Milwaukee, 50;
Howard, Philadelphia, 46; Dunn, Cincinnati,
40; Holliday, Colorado, 36; Braun, Milwaukee,
34; MiCabrera, Florida, 34; Berkman,
'Houston, 33; Beltran, New York, 33.
STOLEN BASES-JBReyes, New York,
78; Pierre, Los Angeles, 63; HaRamirez,
Florida, 51; Byrnes, Arizona, 50; Rollins,
Philadelphia, 39; Victorino, Philadelphia,
37; Wright, New York, 34.


PITCHING (16 Decisions)-Penny, Los
Angeles, 16-4, .800, 3.03; Peavy, San
Diego, 19-6, .760, 2.36; Hamels,
'Philadelphia, 15-5, .750, 3.39; Harang,
'* Cincinnati, 16-6, .727, 3.73; Billingsley,
,Los Angeles, 12-5, .706, 3.09; BSheets,
Milwaukee, 12-5, .706, 3.82; Oswalt,
Houston 14-7 .667, 3.18.
STRIKEOUTS-Peavy, San Diego, 234;
Harang, Cincinnati, 218; Smoltz, Atlanta,
197; Webb, Arizona, 194; RHiII, Chicago,
183; Maine, New York, 180; Hamels,
-Philadelphia, 177; Snell, Pittsburgh, 177;
CZambrano, Chicago, 177.


x-Boston
y-New York
Toronto
Baltimore
Tampa Bay



New York
Philadelphia
Atlanta
Washington
Florida


East Division
GB L10
- 6-4
3 z-6-4
13 z-7-3
27 z-5-5
31 2-8

East Division
t GB L10
' - 4-6
- 6-4
4 z-6-4
15 5-5
18 5-5


Home
51-29
52-29
49-31
35-45
37-44


Home
41-39
46-34
44-37
40-41
36-45


Away
45-36
41-39
34-47
34-47
28-52


Away
47-34
42-39
40-40
33-47
34-46


Intr
12-6 x-Cleveland
10-8 Detroit
10-8 Minnesota
6-12 Chicago
7-11 Kansas City


x-Chicago
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Houston
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh


i t.Associated Press
New York Yanke designated hitter Jason Giambi watches his dou-
ble Saturday against the Baltimore Orioles during the fourth inning of
in Baltimore. The'Yankees won, 11-10.

Yankees 11.. Orinles 10 NEW YORK BALTIMORE


BALTIMORE - Shelley Duncan
homered to cap a l10run fourth
inning, and a host of New York
Yankees backups feasted on
Baltimore Orioles pitching in an 11-
10 victory Saturday night.
The Yankees trailed 6-1 before
nine straight batters reached to
open the fourth. Duncan, Melky
Cabrera and Robinson Cano each
had two RBIs in the inning.
Because New York had already
clinched the wild card and was out
of the AL East race, Yankees man-
ager Joe Torre rested shortstop
Derek Jeter, third baseman Alex
Rodriguez and outfielders Johnny
Damon and Hideki Matsui.
There was no drop-off in produc-
tion by baseball's highest-scoring
team: Each of the starters scored at
least once, and shortstop Alberto
Gonzalez was the only one who
failed to get a hit.
Yankees starter Andy Pettitte (15-
9) struggled in his tuneup for Game
2 of the divisional series at
Cleveland. The left-hander yielded
nine runs and eight hits - including
two home runs - in five innings.


Mets 13, Marlins 0
NEW YORK - What a way to
stop a late-season slide!
John Maine flirted with the first
no-hitter in Mets history before
allowing an infield single to Paul
Hoover with two outs in the eighth
inning, and New York snapped out
of its September doldrums by rout-
ing the Florida Marlins 13-0 in a
fight-filled game Saturday.
Maine finished with 14 strikeouts,
the most by a Mets pitcher in eight
years, and departed to a raucous
ovation long after Florida catcher
Miguel Olivo charged across the
diamond and threw a punch at Jose
Reyes in the fifth - setting off a
bench-clearing brawl.
Once order was restored, the
Mets stayed alive in the playoff race
by snapping a five-game skid that
cost them their NL East lead.
Maine (15-10) gave them the
dominant pitching performance
they've desperately needed for the
past two weeks.
FLORIDA NEW YORK
ab rhbi ab r hbi
HaRmzss 2 00 0 JBRyes ss 5 1 1 0
Andino ss 2 00 0 AHernandez ssl 0 0


0
Uggla 2b
Carvjl p
Abrcrb ph
Hrmida rf
MiCbr 3b
Amzga 3b
Jacobs lb
Linden If
Zarate p
Wood 3b
Olivo c
Hover c
De aza cf
Seddon p
Wolf p
Garcia p
Carroll If


1 00 0 LCstillo 2b
0 00 0 Gotay 2b
1 00 0 Wright 3b
3 00 0 Newhn 3b
2 00 0 Beltran cf
1 00 0 Munizp
3 00 0 Alou If
2 00 0 Gomezlf
0 00 0 CDIgdo lb
1 00 0 ShGren lb
1 00 0 RCstro c
2 01 0 Mlldge rf
3 00 0 Maine p
0 00 0 Collazo p
1 00 0 MrAnd lf
0 00 0
2 00 0


4232
1 0 1 0
4 331
1 0 1 1
6 0 1 1
0.0 0 0
4022
1 000
5 022
0000
5 22 1
5 333
2 1 00
0000
0 1 00


Totals 270 1 0 Totals 44131913
Florida 000 000 000- 0
New York 233 021 11x-13
E-Carvajal (1), Zarate 2 (2). DP-New
York 1. LOB-Florida 2, New York 12. 2B-
JBReyes (36), LCastillo 2 (7). HR-RCastro
(11), Milledge 2 (7). CS-Uggla (1). S-
Maine.
IP H RERBBSO
Florida
Seddon L,0-2 12-3 7 5 5 1 0
Wolf 2-3 4 3 3 1 0
Garcia 2 2 2 2 1 3
Zarate 12-3 2 1 1 0 1
Carvajal 2 4 2 1 1 1
New York
Maine W,15-10 72-3 1 0 0 2 14
Collazo 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Muniz 1 0 0 0 0 1
WP-Garcia.
Umpires-Home, C.B. Bucknor; First, Joe
West; Second, Ed Rapuano; Third, Ed
Hickox.
T-3:03. A-54,675 (57,343).


ab rhbi ab r hbi
MeCbr cf 5 11 2 BRbrts 2b 4 0 1 1
Btemit 3b 5 12 1 Mora 3b 4 1 0 0
BAbreu rf 4 12 0 Mrkkis rf 5 3 3 2
Giambi dh 3 12 1 Tejada dh 3 1 0 0
Cano 2b 5 22 2 Millar lb 4 1 1 0
Posada c 4 12 1 RaHrdz c 4 2 24
JMolna c 1 00 0 Payton If 3 2 1 1
Duncan lb 422 2 Redmn cf 3 0 00
Srdinha If 3 11 1 LHrndz ss 3 0 1 1
Gnzalez ss 4100 House ph 1 0 00
Fahey ss 0 0 00
Totals 38111410 Totals 3410 9 9
New York 010(10)00000- 11
Baltimore 222 030 010- 10
E-Sardinha (1), LHernandez (3). DP-
New York 2, Baltimore 3. LOB-New York
4, Baltimore 3. 2B-MeCabrera (24),
Betemit (3), Giambi (8), Cano (41),
RaHernandez (18). HR-Duncan (7),
Markakis (23), RaHernandez (9), Payton
(7). SB-BRoberts (50). S-Redman.


IP
New York
Pettitte W,15-9 5
Ramirez 1
Villone 2
Veras S,2 1
Baltimore
DCabrera L,9-18 3
Birkins 1-3
Santos 21-3
Hoey 12-3
FCabrera 12-3


H RERBBSO


10 7 6
23 3
1 1 1
0 0 0
1 0 0


DCabrera pitched to 6 batters in the 4th.
PB-RaHernandez.
Umpires-Rome, Dana DeMuth; First,
Tony Randazzo; Second, Greg Gibson;
Third, Larry Vanover.
T-3:10. A-47,616 (48,290).


Nationals 4, Phillies 2
PHILADELPHIA- The
Philadelphia Phillies spent all sea-
son trying to overtake the New York
Mets. And once they took the lead,
they gave it away.
So now, the NL East race comes
down to this: The Phillies and Mets
are tied with one game left.
Matt Chico pitched six solid
innings Saturday and the
Washington Nationals got in the
Phillies' way, winning 4-2 to leave
the division all even.
New York beat Florida 13-0 at
Shea Stadium to put pressure on
the Phillies, who moved into sole
possession of first place for the first
time Friday night.
If Philadelphia and the Mets are
still tied after today, there will be a
one-game playoff Monday at
Citizens Bank Park to determine the
East winner.
WASHINGTON PHILA


FLopez ss
Blliard 2b
Zmrmn 3b
DYong lb
Mxwell pr
Fick lb
Kearns rf
Church cf
Logan cf
Rauch p
Jimnz ph
CCrdro p
WPena If
Schndr c
Chico p
Rivera p


ab rhbi
4 12 1 Rollins ss
4 11 0 Utley 2b
2 12 1 Burrell If
4 00 1 Howard lb
0 00 0 Rwand cf
1 00 0 Werth rf
5 02 0 Helms 3b
4 00 0 Dobbs3b
0 00 0 Ruizc
0 00 0 Eaton p
1 00 0 Gearyp
0 00 0 Mesa p
4 11 0 Lohse p
3 01 0 Rmero p
3 01 0 Vctrno ph
0 00 0 Gordon p


r h bi
0 1 0
0 1 0



000
1 1
1 1 1
0 1 0






000
000
0 1 0






00 0


Lngrhn cf 1 01 0 BMyers p 0 0 0 0
Totals 36411 3 Totals 31 2 6 2
Washington 100 100 200- 4
Philadelphia 000 000 110- 2
E-Howard (12), Ruiz (2). DP--
Washington 1, Philadelphia 1. LOB-
Washington 11, Philadelphia 6. 2B-
FLopez (25), Zimmerman (43), Werth (11).
HR-Howard (46), Rowand (27). S-
Belliard. SF-FLopez.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
Chico W,7-9 6 4 1 1 3 4
Rivera 1-3 1 0 0 1 0
Rauch 12-3 1 1 1 0 1
CCorderoS,37 1 0 0 0 0 1
Philadelphia
Eaton L,10-10 21-3 5 1 1 2 0
Geary 1 2 1 1 0 0
Mesa 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Lohse 21-3 2 2 1 1 3
Romero 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Gordon 1 1 0 0 0 1
BMyers 1 1 0 0 1 1
Chico pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WP-Romero.
Umpires-Home, Bruce Dreckman; First,
Phil Cuzzi; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Gary
Darling.
T-3:09. A-44,532 (43,647).


Central Division
Pct GB L10 Str
.590 - z-6-4 L-1
.540 8 4-6 L-2
.484 17 z-4-6 L-2
.447 23 z-7-3 W-4
.429 26 z-4-6 W-1

Central Division
Pct GB L10 Str
.528 - 6-4 W-2
.509 3 4-6 W-1
.478 8 6-4 W-4
.447 13 z-7-3 W-1
.441 14 2-8 L-7
.422 17 2-8 L-3


Home
52-29
45-36
41-40
38-42
35-45


Home
44-37
50-30
43-38
41-39
38-42
37-43


Red Sox 6, Twins 4
BOSTON - J.D. Drew connected
' for a go-ahead, three-run homer one
day after missing the celebration of
Boston's first division title in 12 years.
Continuing his surge after a long
slump, Drew lined a full-count pitch
from Nick Blackburn into the right-
center field stands to lift the Red
Sox over the Minnesota Twins 6-4
Saturday night.
Boston beat the Twins 5-2 on
Friday night then waited nearly an
hour and a half before clinching the
AL East title when the New York
Yankees lost to the Baltimore
Orioles 10-9 in 10 innings.
Drew had left Fenway Park while
most of his teammates stayed to
watch that game on television and a
few thousand fans viewed it on the
center-field scoreboard. When it
ended, Boston players poured onto
the field, danced around and
sprayed champagne.
Drew was fully involved from the
start on Saturday.
He singled in the second, tripled
and scored in the fourth and finished
3-for-4 with his 11th homer. He is
batting .393 in his last 18 games,
raising his average from .252 to
.270 in the first year of a five-year,
$70 million contract.
MINNESOTA BOSTON
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Bartlett ss 4 000 Crisp cf 4 1 2 0
Tyner If 4 11 0 Cora 2b 4 1 1 0
Mauer c 4 13 2 MRmrz dh 4 0 1 0
LFord pr 0 00 0 Lowell 3b 4 22 2
THnter cf 4 01 0 JDrew rf 4 2 3 3
Mrneau lb 4 00 0 Yukilis lb 4 0 3 1
Cddyer rf 4 1 1 0 Ellsbry If 4 0 1 0
RoWhte dh 3 11 1 Mrbelli c 4 0 0 0
Bscher 3b 3 01 1 Clayton ss 4 0 0 0
LRdrgz 2b 3 00 0 Pedroia 2b 0 0 0 0
Totals 334 8 4 Totals 36 613 6
Minnesota 001 111 000- 4
Boston 000 101 40x- 6
E-Clayton (8). DP-Minnesota 1, Boston
3. LOB-Minnesota 2, Boston 6. 2B-Crisp
(28), MRamirez (33), Youkilis (35). 31B-
JDrew (4). HR-Mauer (7), RoWhite (4),
Lowell (21), JDrew (11). SB-Crisp (28).
IP H RERBBSO


Minnesota
CSilva 6
Blackburn L,0-2 1
DePaula 1
Boston
Wkfield W,17-12 7
Lopez .. 1
Okajima S,5 1
WP-Wakefield.
Umpires-Home,


9 2 2 0 3
4 4 4 0 1
0 0 0 0 1

. 6 4 3 0 1
0 0 '0 (0 9-0
2 0 0 0 1

Bob Davidson; Fil


Hunter Wendelstedt; Second,
Holbrook; Third, Randy Marsh.
T-2:17. A-36,619 (36,525).


Brewers 4, Padres 3,
11 innings
MILWAUKEE - The San Diego
Padres are still waiting to clinch a
playoff spot - and they can blame
a familiar name.
Tony Gwynn Jr. hit a tying, two-
out triple off Trevor Hoffman in the
ninth inning, and the Milwaukee
Brewers went on to beat the Padres
4-3 in the 11th on Saturday.
The Padres are assured of at least
a tie for the NL wild-card spot, and
they can wrap it up with a win today.
San Diego would've been head-
ing back to the postseason for the
third straight year, except for the hit
by Gwynn.
SAN DIEGO MILWAUKEE
ab rhbi ab r hbi
BGiles rf 5 130 Weeks 2b 5 1 1 1
Hrston If 5 00 0 Hardy ss 3 0 0 0
Kzmnff3b 5 01 0 Stocker pr 0 0 0 0
AdGnIz lb 5 13 3 King p 0 0 0 0
KGreen ss 501 0 FCdero p 0 000
Bardc 501 0 Dillonph 1 000
Blum 2b 4 01 0 Spuring p 0 0 0 0
BClark cf 4 01 0 Stetter p 0 0 0 0
CYoung p 2 00 0 Braun 3b 5 1 1 0
Roblesph 1 01 0 Fildrib 2 1 0 0
Macias pr 0 10 0 CHart cf 4 1 1 0
Hmpsn p 0 00 0 Gross rf 2 0 0 0
Brocail p 0 00 0 Mench If 1 0 0 0
HBellp 0 00 0 Nix cf 1 0 0 0
Ensbrg ph 1 00 0 Rottino ph 1 0 1 1
Hffman p 0 00 0 Jenkins If 2 0 1 1
Merdth p 0 00 0 BHall cf 1 0 0 0
Sledge ph 0 00 0 Gwynn If 1 0 1 1
Lane ph 1 00 0 Rivera c 3 0 0 0
Thtcher p 0 00 0 Bush p 2 0 0 0
BShse p 0 0 0 0
McClng p 0 0 0 0
Cunsell ss 2 0 0 0
Totals 43312 3 Totals 36 4 6 4
San Diego 100 001 100 00- 3
Milwaukee 010 010 001 01- 4
One out when winning run scored.
DP-San Diego 1, Milwaukee 1. LOB-
San Diego 9, Milwaukee 7. 2B-BGiles 3
(26), Braun (25), CHart (33). 3B-Jenkins
(2), Gwynn (2). HR-AdGonzalez (28),
Weeks (16). SB-Stocker (4), Fielder 2 (2).
CS-BGiles (6).
IP H RERBBSO
San Diego
CYoung 6 2 2 2 4 7
Hampson 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Brocail 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
HBell 1 0 0 0 1 1
Hoffman 1 2 1 1 0 2
Meredith 1 0 0 0 0 2
Thatcher L,2-2 1-3 2 1 1 1 0
Milwaukee
Bush 62-3 10 3 3 1 3
BShouse 0 1 0 0 0 0
McClung 11-3 0 0 0 0 1
King 1 0 0 0 0 1
FCordero 1 0 0 0 0 2
Spurling 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Stetter W,1-0 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
BShouse pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by Bush (Blum).
Umpires-Home, Bruce Froemming;
First, Mark Wegner; Second, Brian Runge;
Third, John Hirschbeck.
T-3:30. A-40,946 (41,900).


Away
43-37
42-38
37-43
34-47
34-47


Away
41-39
32-49
34-46
31-50
33-48
31-50


West Division
W L Pct GB L10 Str Home Away Intr
x-Los Angeles 94 67 .584 - z-5-5 W-2 54-27 40-40 14-4
Seattle 86 74 .538 71/2 z-6-4 W-3 47-32 39-42 9-9
Texas 75 85 .469 18% 5-5 L-1 47-34 28-51 11-7
Oakland 75 86 .466 19 1-9 L-5 39-41 36-45 10-8
x-clinched division, y-clinched playoff spot, z-first game was a win


x-Arizona
San Diego
Colorado
Los Angeles
San Francisco


West Division
L Pct GB L10
70 .563 - 6-4
72 .553 1% z-5-5
73 .544 3 z-9-1
79 .506 9 2-8
90 .438 20 3-7


Angels 3, Athletics 2
OAKLAND, Calif. - The Angels
already locked up the AL West and
know they are headed to Boston to
open the first round of the playoffs.
So with manager Mike Scioscia
resting many of his banged-up regu-
lars, Kelvim Escobar eamed his
career-best 18th victory and Los
Angeles still won 3-2 at Oakland on
Saturday. It was the defending divi-
sion champion Athletics' fifth straight
defeat and 10th in 11 games.
Juan Rivera and Erick Aybar
each hit RBI singles and Jeff Mathis
added a sacrifice fly for the Angels,
who saw Bartolo Colon make his
first relief appearance in 10 years.
Colon came out of the bullpen for
only the third time in his career and
first since Sept. 27, 1997, against
Minnesota in the first game of a
doubleheader with the Twins. He
pitched twice in relief that year.
He pitched a perfect seventh with
two strikeouts, Scot Shields allowed
Dan Johnson's RBI single in the
eighth, then Francisco Rodriguez
finished for his 40th save and sec-
ond in as many games.
Angels slugger Vladimir Guerrero
sat out to rest sore triceps muscles
on both arms, the left one hurting
after getting hit by a pitch Friday.
LOS ANGELES OAKLAND
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Figgins rf 310 0 ShStwrt If 5 1 2 0
Willitscf 4'01 0 Barton 1b 4 1 20
JRivra dh 4 01 1 Swisher cf 4 0 1 1
Morleslb 4 01 0 Custrf 3 000
Kndrck 2b 4 11 0Tmpsn rf 0 0 0 0
Quinlan If 3 12 0 DJnson dh 4 0 2 1
Hynslf 1 01 0 Hnnhn 3b 4 00 0
Mathis c 3 00 1 Scutaro ss 4 0 1 0
Aybar ss 4 01 1 Suzuki c 2 0 0 0
BWood 3b 3 01 0 Frmik2b 2 0 0 0
Piazza ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 333 9 3 Totals 33 2 8 2
Los Angeles 100 200 000- 3
Oakland 001 000 010- 2
DP-Los Angeles 1, Oakland 1. LOB-
Los Angeles 5, Oakland 8. 2B-Quinlan (9).
CS-Haynes (2). S-Suzuki. SF-Mathis.


IP
Los Angeles
KEscobar W,18-7 6
Colon 1
Shields 1
FrRodriguez S,401
Oakland
Braden,, 3
D.Nardo L,8-10 42-3
RLugo 11-3
WP-Shields.


H RERBBSO


3 1 1 1 3
5 2 .2 0 4
1 0 0 0 2


Umpires-Home, Tim McClelland; First,
Fieldin Culbreth; Second, Marty Foster;
Third, Paul Schrieber.
T-2:23. A-26,480 (34,077).


Cubs 4, Reds 0
CINCINNATI - With their regu-
lars resting after a late-night cham-
pagne party, Rich Hill and the
Chicago Cubs reserves kept the
momentum going.
Hill allowed only one hit in six
innings - a suitable tuneup for the
playoffs - and Matt Murton and
Ronny Cedeno hit solo homers
Saturday, leading the NL Central
champions to a 4-0 victory over the
Cincinnati Reds.
Hill (11-8) gave up Buck Coats'
two-out double in the sixth -
Cincinnati's only hit of the game -
then left for a pinch-hitter in the bot-
tom of the inning. The left-hander
had his way with a lineup that took
a get-it-over-with approach.
The Reds lost for the 90th time
even though top starter Aaron
Harang (16-6) was facing a lineup
missing most of its regulars.
Cincinnati has dropped a season-
high seven in a row.
A day after clinching with a 6-0
victory in front of thousands of rau-
cous Chicago fans, the Cubs got a
championship tribute on the road.
This ready-to-party crowd was
rewarded with a couple of keep-
sakes and Chicago's 85th win.


CHICAGO


CINCINNATI


ab rhbi ab r hbi
Theriot ss 5 00 0 Hopper cf 0 0 0 0
Fontnt 2b 4 01 0 Coats cf 4 0 1 0
Murton If 4 22 1 Kppngrss 3 0 0 0
Soto c 4 13 1 Vottolf 4 0 0 0
Piecf 4 02 1 BPhllps2b 4 0 0 0
Cedeno 3b 4 11 1 EEcrcn 3b 2 0 0 0
HBIncolb 401 0 Cantulb 3 0 0 0
Fuld rf 300 0 Ross c 2 0 0 0
RHill p 2 00 0 Ellison rf 3 0 0 0
Kendall ph 1 00 0 Harang p 2 0 0 0
Marshall p 0 00 0 Bellhrn ph 1 0 0 0
Monroe ph 1 000 Wthers p 0 0 0 0
Eyrep 0 00.0
Totals 36410 4 Totals 28 0 1 0
Chicago 112 000 000- 4
Cincinnati 000 000 000- 0
E-Ross (5). DP-Cincinnati 1. LOB-
Chicago 6, Cincinnati 4. 2B-Murton (13),
Soto 2 (6), Coats (4). HR-Murton (8),
Cedeno (4). SB-Pie (8).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
RHill W,11-8 6 1 0 0 1 4
Marshall 2 0 0 0 1 3
Eyre 1 0 0 0 0 1
Cincinnati
Harang L,16-6 8 9 4 4 0 13
Weathers 1 1. 0 0 1 1
HBP-by Eyre (Keppinger). WP-
Harang.
Umpires-Home, Tim Welke; First, Jim
Reynolds; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third,
Lance Barksdale.
T-2:19. A-38,936 (42,271).


Home
50-31
47-34
48-31
42-37
39-42


Away
40-39
42-38
39-42
39-42
31-48


Blue Jays 5, Devil Rays 3
TORONTO -Adam Lind hit a
three-run homer, John-Ford Griffin
added a solo shot and the Toronto
Blue Jays beat the Tampa Bay Devil
Rays 5-3 on Saturday.
The Blue Jays have won 10 of 15,
while Tampa Bay has lost 13 of 17.
Toronto broke a 1-all tie with a
four-run eighth against reliever
Dan Wheeler (0-5). Reed Johnson
started the rally by reaching base
on a throwing error, Matt Stairs
walked and Russ Adams, pinch hit-
ting for Frank Thomas, bunted
down the third base line. Wheeler
fielded the ball and threw to Joel
Guzman, but he couldn't find first
base with his foot.
With the bases loaded, Hill hit a
sacrifice fly and Lind connected to
right-center.
It was the second homer in as
many games for Lind, who hit a two-
run shot in Friday's 5-4 victory.
Scott Downs (4-2) earned the win
by getting pinch-hitter Jonny Gomes
to ground into an inning-ending dou-
ble play in the eighth.
TAMPA BAY TORONTO


Iwmra 3b
Vlndia 2b
CPena dh
Upton cf
DYong rf
Norton rf
Gomes If
Nvarro c
JGzmn lb
Ruggno If
JoWlsn ss
Casnva ph
BHarrs pr


ab rhbi
4 02 2 Jhnson cf
4 01 0 Stairs ib
1 00 0 Thmas dh
4 00 0 Adams dh
301 0 AHill 2b
0 00 0 Lind If
1 00 0 Griffin rf
4 12 0 Rios cf
4 00 0 Thgpen c
4 00 1 Luna 3b
1 10 0 Olmedo ss
1 01 0
0100


ab r h bi
3 1 00
2 1 00
3000
0 1 00
3 0 1 1
4 1 1 3
3 1 1 1
00000
3 010
3000
2000


Totals 313 7 3 Totals 26 5 4 5
Tampa Bay 000 010 002- 3
Toronto 000 100 04x- 5
E-JGuzman (1), JoWilson (17), AHill
(14). DP-Tampa Bay 2, Toronto 3. LOB--
Tampa Bay 7, Toronto 5. 2B-Iwamura (21),
Navarro (19). HR-Lind (11), Griffin (1). S-
Adams. SF-AHill.
IP H RERBBSO


Tampa Bay
EJackson
Wheeler L,0-5
Toronto
Litsch
League
JKennedy
Frasor
Downs W,4-2
Wnlfe


3 1 1 5 6
1 4 0 1 1


6 4 1 1
1-3 0 0 0
2-3. 00 0
1-3 00 0
2-3 00 0
1- 3 2 2 9


JKennedy pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Umpires-Home, Adam Dowdy; First,
James Hoye; Second, Larry Poncino; Third,
Jerry Meals.
T-2:34. A-37,681 (48,900).


Cardinals 7, Pirates 3
PITTSBURGH -Adam
Wainwright recovered from a shaky
start to pitch seven sharp innings
and Rick Ankiel homered and had
three RBIs, leading the St. Louis
Cardinals to a 7-3 victory over the
Pittsburgh Pirates on Saturday
night.
Wainright only retired two batters
while giving up four hits and three
runs in the first inning, but then
allowed only two baserunners the
rest of the contest. He gave up six
hits, walked one and struck out four.
Ankiel, Albert Pujols and Gary
Bennett each had three hits for the
defending World Series champions,
who have won four in a row enter-
ing their season finale Sunday.
Ronny Paulino reached base
three times for Pittsburgh, which
has lost three in a row and 12 of 14.
The Pirates made it 3-0 in the first
on doubles by Nyjer Morgan, Adam
LaRoche and Jose Bautista and an
RBI single by Steve Pearce. But
Wainwright (14-12) would face the
minimum through the next five
innings, retiring 15 of the next 16
batters.

ST. LOUIS PITTSBURGH
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Eckstin ss 5 02 1 Morgan cf 4 1 1 0
Tguchi If 5 12 1 Kata 2b 3 0 0 0
Pujols lb 5 13 1 LaRche lb 3 1 1 1
Ludwck rf 3 10 0 Nady If 4 0 0 0
Cairo 3b 3 11 0 JBtsta 3b 4 1 1 1
Barden 3b 2 00 0 Palino c 3 0 2 0
Ankiel cf 4 13 3 Pearce rf 4 0 1 1
GBnntt c 4 13 1 JWlson ss 2 00 0
Wnwrgt p 2 00 0 Izturis ss 1 0 0 0
Schmkr ph 1 000 Grzlny p 2 0 0 0
Flors p 0 000 Snchez p 0 0 00
RFrkln p 0 000 Phelps ph 1 0 0 0
Fknbrg p 0000 STorres p 0 0 0 0
Miles 2b 2 100
Totals 36714 7 Totals 31 3 6 3
St. Louis 020 211 001- 7
Pittsburgh 300 000 000- 3
E-STorres (2). DP-St. Louis 1,
Pittsburgh 3. LOB--St. Louis 7, Pittsburgh
4. 2B-Taguchi (15), Pujols (38), Morgan
(3), LaRoche (42), JBautista (36). HR-
Ankiel (11). S-Ludwick, Wainwright, Kata.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
WnwrgtW,14-12 7 6 3 3 1 2
Flores 2-3 00 0 0 0
RFranklin 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Falkenborg 1 0 0 0 0 2
Pittsburgh
Grzlny L,14-10 6 11 6 6 3 1
Sanchez 1 0 0 0 0 1
STorres 2 3 1 1 0 1
HBP-by Flores (LaRoche).
Umpires-Home, Gerry Davis; First, Brian
Gorman; Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Mike
DiMuro.
T-2:32. A-35,169 (38,496).


SUNDAY, Siip'n.,mim-lit 30, 2007 3B


.., CITRUSS COUN'IY (FL) CHRONICIX


NIAJ43OR ILEA4GuE 13ASEBA-LL _


I


I "I Inwwo .16.161 kfl NPNF.-F .16%F









4B SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007 NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE _CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE-




Culpepper makes Miami return


Associated Press
MIAMI - By halftime of his
first home game last season with
the Miami Dolphins, Daunte
Culpepper was already hearing
catcalls from the stands.
He'll surely hear them again
today
Culpepper makes what's sure
to be a contentious return to
South Florida this weekend,
and is the likely starter at quar-
terback for the Oakland'Raiders
(1-2) in their matchup against
the winless Dolphins (0-3).
He played in only four games
with Miami before being shut
down by injuries last season,
his only one with the team. But
his mere presence adds consid-
erable intrigue to a game
between teams off to struggle-
filled starts.
"I know he would love to get
a shot to play in this game,"
Oakland coach Lane Kiffin
said. "Not because it's Miami,
but just because he'd love to



Jags use


bye week


to recover

Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE - Jaguars
defensive tackle John
Henderson vaguely remem-
bers the hit - and only
because he's watched the
replay several times since.
Henderson tackled Atlanta's
Jerious Norwood with the
crown of his helmet on Sept 16
and sustained a concussion
that sent the Pro Bowl player
to the bench.
Henderson sat out last week's
game at Denver - the first one
he's missed since college - and
is spending Jacksonville's bye
week getting back to normal.
In fact, the early off week
turned out to be beneficial for
the Jaguars (2-1), who have sev-
eral key injuries.
Linebacker Clint Ingram,
who missed three games with a
sprained ankle, has returned
to the starting lineup in prac-
tice. Center Brad Meester, who
has been sidelined since early
in training camp with a broken
ankle, is running again and
nearing a return.
Running back Fred Taylor
(knee), defensive end Kenny
Pettway (quadriceps), left tack-
le Khalif Barnes (ankle),
defensive tackle Tony Mc-
Daniel (knee) and receiver
Matt Jones (heel) also used the
extra downtime to get healthy.


Cardinals

coaches take

on old team

Associated Press
GLENDALE, Ariz. - Ken
Whisenhunt was the early
favorite to replace coach Bill
Cowher in Pittsburgh. Then
Russ Grimm thought he had
the job.
It was not to be.
Now both former Cowher
assistants are in Arizona,
Whisenhunt as head coach,
Grimm as his top assistant
They are trying to transform a
long-suffering Cardinals fran-
chise into what might be called
"Steelers West."
Today, Arizona (1-2) faces the
real thing when first-year coach
Mike Tomlin brings the unbeat-
en Steelers (3-0) to the desert
The game has ho special
meaning, Whisenhunt insists,
even though he spent six seasons
as a Steelers assistant, the last
three as offensive coordinator
Grimm is Arizona's assistant
head coach and offensive line
coach, the same post he had
the last three of his six seasons
in Pittsburgh. He probably has
the most reason to carry some
resentment He thought he had
the job, only to find out a short
time later that Tomlin had


been hired.
"It's one of those things,"
Grimm said. "You work to get a
chance to get in that position
and, if you put your neck out
there, it's not always, going to
turn out the way you want it."


get a shot to start and he has
great confidence that he would
play extremely well."
Culpepper was released by
the Dolphins this past offsea-
son after Miami acquired Trent
Green from Kansas City and
landed another quarterback,
John Beck, in the second round
of the draft.
The breakup was bitter, as
breakups tend to be.
Oakland wound up signing
Culpepper for depth, as talks
between the Raiders and No. 1.
pick JaMarcus Russell were
stalled for weeks. Culpepper
has already come through once
for Oakland, taking over in the
second half last week when
Josh McCown got hurt and
helping the Raiders beat
Cleveland.
Now he gets a chance at the
ultimate comeuppance: win-
ning in Miami.
"I think it's just important to
try and start fast," said
Culpepper, who heard his first


Associated Press
Oakland Raiders quarterback Daunte Culpepper (8) celebrates
Sept. 23 after the Raiders defeated the Celeveland Browns, 26-24,
in Oakland, Calif.


boos from Dolphins fans early
in their home-opening loss to
Buffalo last season. "Whenever
you get a chance to go out and
play you want to be productive,
be efficient and always put
your team in position to be suc-
cessful. That's my goal."
Culpepper has tried to
downplay the Dagunte vs.
Dolphins story line, yet deep


down, this game certainly has
at least a twinge of extra sig-
nificance for him.
It might also carry something
extra for Green, who was asked
this week if he's better than
Culpepper.
"To answer that question in a
confrontational, debate kind of
way that will just stir the pot
would be silly on my stand-


Spurned former Dolphin likely

starter for Oakland in Miami


Associated Press
New York Giants linebacker Mathias Kiwanuka (97) celebrates sacking Washington Redskins quarterback Jason Campbell, on
the ground, Sept. 23 during the fourth quarter at Fedex Field in Landover, Md. The Giants won, 24-17.



Eagles-Giants: Momentum key


Associated Press


EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. - While
Steve Spagnuolo didn't circle the date
on his calendar, the New York Giants
defensive coordinator has known the
importance of Sept. 30 for eight months.
Tonight's the night the Giants (1-2)
face the Philadelphia
Eagles (1-2) at Giants ON TEL
Stadium, when Spagnuolo
goes against his old team 0 Philadel
and his longtime mentor, at New'
Eagles defensive coordina- 8:15 p.r
tor Jim Johnson.
"I said this way back I think when I
first came here, that it is like playing a
.pickup basketball game outside with
your brother," said Spagnuolo, who was
an Eagles assistant for eight years
before being hired by the Giants in
January. "Sometimes you try harder to
beat them than in a real deal. I am look-
ing forward to it."
So is Johnson, who wants nothing but
the best for his 47-year-old former assis-
tant - except for the weeks the Eagles
play the Giants, their bitter NFC East
rivals.
"He's a very intelligent guy that
worked at his job and coached different
positions," Johnson said of Spagnuolo,


J


rT


who spent his final three seasons as
Eagles linebackers coach. "I think that
helped more than anything else. He
coached linebackers; he coached
safeties; he coached corners. So, that
really helped him to learn the overall
scheme."
Spagnuolo will have to come up with
something special if the
EVISION Giants hope to stay in the
NFC East race.
phia Eagles Philadelphia and New
'ork Giants; York trail Dallas (3-0) by
n. on rNBC. two games in the division
and whoever loses could
find themselves three games back.
Stopping the Eagles won't be easy
Philadelphia is coming off a 56-21
thrashing of the Detroit Lions.
Brian Westbrook rushed for 110 yards
and two touchdowns, and caught five
passes for 111 yards and another score.
Receiver Kevin Curtis had 11 catches
for a career-best 221 yards and three
touchdowns. Donovan McNabb threw
for 381 yards and four TDs.
It was the first game in Eagles history
that had a 100-yard rusher, a 200-yard
receiver and a 300-yard passer in the
same game.
"In my opinion it was only a matter of
time," Spagnuolo said. "I know they


struggled those first two games but you
could see it; they were just missing here
and just missing there. You knew it was
going to happen, but I was hoping it
would be like three weeks from now."
If there is any good news for the
Giants, the defense last week mastered
Spagnuolo's pressure system, which has
many similarities to Johnson's - the
players not being one.
After giving up 80 points in losses to
Dallas and Green Bay, New York
blanked the Redskins in the second half
in a 24-17 win that ended with a tremen-
dous goal-line stand.
If the Giants want to beat the Eagles
for only the second time in nine games,
they are going to have to slow down
Westbrook
In his past eight games against New
York, Westbrook, who has been both-
ered by an abdominal strain this week,
has averaged 126.4 yards from scrim-
mage (rushing and receiving) and
scored 10 TDs.
The Eagles will see one change in the
Giants' offense this season. With the
retirement of Tiki Barber and a knee
injury to Brandon Jacobs, Derrick Ward
is the starting halfback.
Ward has gained 273 yards on 54 car-
ries, a 5.1-yard average.


Favre approaches TD, INT records


Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS - With
Brett Favre on the verge of set-
ting another NFL passing
record, the Minnesota Vikings%
welcome their longtime rival to
break it this weekend on their
home field.
Wait. What?
"Three away from it. He has a
great chance to make history,"
Vikings safety Darren Sharper
said slyly, feigning ignorance of
the career touchdown mark
Favre tied last week
Instead, Sharper took a light-
hearted swing this week at his
former teammate, focusing on
the career interception record
that Green Bay's indestructible
quarterback can also establish
today.


With 420 touchdown ,
passes, Favre is even h."
with Dan Marino. With
275 interceptions,
Favre is near the 277
throws George Blanda
had picked off over his
26 seasons.
It's fitting that Brett
Favre's opportunity to
set the touchdown and inter-
ception records comes at the
Metrodome, where he's had
some of his worst performanc-
es - but also enjoyed plenty of
recent success.
He doesn't care where he's
playing, though.
"If I have to throw five, that
would be awesome. If we win
and I don't throw any, that
would be great," Favre said. "I
just want to win the game."


U IThe 37-year-old quar-
terback is 5-10 in the
"' din of this dingy place,
thanks to three wins in
his last four tries.
Favre went 24-for-42
with 347 yards, two
scores and no intercep-
Favre tions last season. Two
years before that, he
helped the Packers rally for a 34-
31 victory on Christmas Eve that
clinched the NFC North with
365 yards on 30-for-43 passing,
three touchdowns and one inter-
ception.
In 1993, the first season he
made the playoffs, Favre
passed for only 150 yards and
was picked off twice in a 15-13
loss when receiver Eric
Guliford was wide open down
the sideline in the closing sec-


onds to set up the winning field
goal by Fuad Reveiz.
In 1999, the first year the
Packers didn't make the play-
offs with Favre running their
offense, Minnesota escaped
with a 24-20 victory when
Robert Griffith's interception
in the end zone ended the
game.
Favre's only positive thought
about playing at the Metrodome,
aside from those recent wins, is
Ragnar He's the red-bearded
guy that rides around on a
motorcycle and dresses up like
an ancient Viking warrior to stir
up the crowd. After the game in
2004, Ragnar - played by Joe
Juranitch, the dean of students
at a local high school -
approached Favre and told him
how much he respected him.


point," Green said. "To play the
position, you have to have con-
fidence in what you are doing,
so that is probably the most
politically correct way I can
answer that without making
headlines in some mariner."
Green didn't have to be
brash. He's got .
enough teammates iON TELE
taking care of that. I
Linebacker Joey / * Oakland
Porter has guaran- ' at Miami
teed the Dolphins 1 p.m. or
will win this game, I
and fellow linebacker Chan-
ning Crowder :said the
Culpepper he's seeing on film
still hasn't fully; recovered
from the devastating right
knee injury he suffered with
the Minnesota Vikings in
October 2005.
"He's still limping around.
He's not 100 percent. He's not
the Daunte Culpepper who
was back in Minnesota,"
Crowder said. "But he's mak-
ing plays and winning some
games, .so we'll see what he
can do."
If the first three games are
an indicator, Culpepper could
do well.
Miami's defense, the peren-


team he's torched for nearly ]
1,800 yards and 12 touch-',.
downs in seven gamet�
Manning's passer rating.
were higher than 138 in eact
of the last two Denver games,'
when the Colts scored a totat,'
of 83 points.

4.
* Denver Broncos at
Indianapoiis Colts:
4 p.m. on CBS. "*'


nial cornerstone of the frai-
chise, has allowed 68 points
over the past two games, a4'
already has some players queg '
tioning the Dolphins' schemes'
and personnel decisions.
Kiffin, the Raiders' first-yeg,'
coach, can appreciate Miamk_9
sense of urgency.
VISION "I had lost two in
a row here and it
Raiders felt like it had been
Dolphins: a long time," Kiffi-;
n CBS. said. "Well, the.rM,
are people in thii
building who hadn't won in 32g.,'
days. So it was important fpr
everyone in the building. We-,
have to build off it" <:,.
Even without a win, the
Dolphins have something 1to&c
build off, as well. 'i
Miami's offense had i-
breakout game of sorts froi,
running back last week froi "
Ronnie Brown, who had W
touches (23 carries) for 211
total yards and three touch6
downs. It still wasn't enough ,
as the Dolphins lost 31-28 to
the New York Jets. ;,;,
"We know there's things v,
can do better," Brown said,
"And I think we'll get there."



Broncos


hope to


end Colts


mastery,

Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS - The2
Denver Broncos have pulled ,
out their old script this weeI-
Stop Peyton ManniMg
Contain Indianapolis' Pro;-'
Bowl receiving tandem. Pliig
holes against a strong Colts.
feature back i!:-
Forgive Denver if the meq:,
mention of Manning and the
Colts rekindles some horrible
images: Marvin
Harrison get .- .
ting up between

defenders and
sprinting for a
touchdown;
back-to-back
playoff routs;
even Mike Van- Tony.
derjagt's two Dungy
field goals in a Colts coact4'"'
snowstorm. is 4-2 versuA
All the Bron- Broncos.'
cos really want ;'
is another chance at the~f
nemesis.
"When I got here, that wa~s'
the first question I was asked;'l
'Do you think you were drafted'-
to stop Peyton Manning?'."'
Denver cornerback Domo-
nique Foxworth said. "Whether
I was or I wasn't, it's important"
That's why we're all here, to
knock off the champs." ' .
Today marks the seventh
time under Tony Dungy that
the Colts (3-0) have faced
Denver. The scoreboard reads
Colts 4, Broncos 2, although
the last Denver win in 2004
was tainted by Indy's decisio-n
to yank the starters after one
series.
A third straight 3-0 start anid
a league-best 17-2 September
record under Dungy has th'e
Colts recognizing the advan-
tages of a quick start
Denver quarterback Jay
Cutler has taken over at qua-
terback and returns to his home
state, and the site where he won
a high school football champ
onship, albeit with a sore ankle:
Defensively, the Broncos (2-
1) are struggling for answers.
They have yielded 166 yards
rushing per game to the likes bo
Buffalo, Oakland and Jack-
sonville, a task that could
become more complicated if
safety John Lynch (groin) cannot.
play If Lynch is out, Foxwoi.
would likely Lynch's spot "
And while run defense is 1
the obvious weakness, All-Pro.:
cornerback Champ Bailey fig$:
ures Manning will still thrdIr1
his share of passes against a-









Gimus CouN'n' (FL) CHRONICLE SPORTS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBFR 30, 2007 5B


ROAD
Continued from Page 1B

their first in any cup since win-
ning the Ryder Cup at The
Belfry in 1993.
. Mickelson provided the most
eritprtaining moment when his
btl caromed off the hill and
ino a shallow spot in the water



RACE
1, Continued from Page 1B

*'You guys all think I'm jok-
.ing, but there wasn't anybody
inside that locker room that
thought we were Igoing to lose
that game," Hawkins said.
-,As if Oklahoma losing wasn't
efibugh to take the juice out of
next week's Red River Rivalry
gaome against Texas, the
Longhorns followed the
Sooners' loss with one of their
own to another team from the
Big 12 North, the conference's
weaker division for the past
several years.
"Kansas State beat the
Lhnghorns for the second
straight season, this time in
AufStin.
.The Wildcats had three
touchdown returns - lIan
CtiWnpbell's 41-yard intercep-
tion, James Johnson's 85-yard



NOLES
Continued from Page 1B

Birmingham, Ala., his 369th
coaching win in his first game
against Alabama. Bowden has
three more coaching wins than
Pein State's Joe Paterno.
'"When it will be emotional is
when I go home this summer
up to Birmingham and we go
out to Roebuck (golf course)
and we tee that thing up on the
first tee box and I say 'We
whipped y'all,"' Bowden said.
Antone Smith scored on a 5-
yard run to give Florida State a
14-0 lead early in the fourth
quarter.
Smith's touchdown, which
catne on a play after Letroy
Gkfion recovered a fumble by
Aabama's John Parker Wilson,
gae Florida State a 14-0 lead
with 9:03 left. Wilson lost the
baff as he was being sacked by
F-6rida State's Everette




Continued from Page 1B

S"t's just something that's
beihig emphasized, and thank-
tfgll we've been able to go out
there and do it the past couple
weeks," linebacker Derrick
Brooks said.
brooks is one of the few
holdovers on this new-look
defense that hasn't been able
to1top Smith and the Panthers.
Since Tampa Bay won the
Super Bowl in the 2002 season,
Carolina has averaged nearly
24, points a game against the
Bucs.
.'"From then on it seemed like
tiey had a sixth sense on how
we-were going to play football,"

WEEKLY LINEUP
l Nearly a dozen medical
. protessi rivals contribute
...their expertise to
i..columrns in Health &
,.. Life. ."Tuesdays
H Read up or all things
' "school-related in the
Chroncle's Education sec
,i"tlon. Wednesday
.1l ,Plan menus for the week
.'.from the tempting recipes
in the Flair for Food sec-
tion.'Thursdays
* Get a jump on weekend
*.entertainment with the
S'stories in Scene 'Fridays
i'See what local houses of
worship plan to do for the
week in the Peligion sec
tion. Saturday
* Pead about area business
Ses in the Business sec
,.tion.. Sunday


left of the 15th green. Austin,
his partner in the fourball
match, walked over to look at
the situation and shrugged his
shoulders as if to say, "Your
turn to give it a try." A day ear-
lier, Austin lost his balance try-
ing such a shot and wound up
face-first in the water.
BWeir had said winning a
Presidents Cup in Canada
might rival his 2003 victory in

kickoff return and Jordy
Nelson's 89-yard punt - and
they knocked around
Longhorns quarterback Colt
McCoy in a 41-21 victory.
Call it an upset, but Texas had
looked primed for a beating
during its 4-0 start, with shaky
victories against Arkansas State
and Central Florida.
The Wildcats and second-
year coach Ron Prince handed
Texas its most lopsided loss in
10 years under coach Mack
Brown.
"We're not used to losing like
that around here, especially
like that," Brown said. "We've
got to regroup."
Rutgers moved into the top-
10 for the second time in school
history this week and just like
the first time, when the Scarlet
Knights lost to Cincinnati last
season, they couldn't live up to
their lofty status.
Maryland (3-2) had dropped
two straight and was coming off

Brown.
Alabama (3-2) cut the lead to
14-7 with 5:04 left on DJ Hall's
leaping grab in the back of the
end zone on a pass from
Wilson, who added a 17-yard
TD pass to Keith Brown with
1:06 left.
Wilson completed 28 of 53
passes for 240 yards with Hall
catching seven for 83 yards.
Alabama's leading rusher,
Terry Grant, was held to just 36
of the team's 89 rushing yards.
"The only thing that we had
was underneath," said Wilson,
who was sacked three times
and had little time to throw
deep.
Alabama had 78 total yards
and three first downs in a
scoreless first half while
Florida State was only margin-
ally better with five first downs
and 89 total yards.
Saban said the Seminoles'
defense was one of the best
he's seen over the years.
"I've been part of some great

Barber said. "Probably one of
the best things that have hap-
pened to us is that we do have
a lot of young guys that don't
really understand this rivalry,
although they definitely will at
the end of Sunday."
It's been a series full of phys-
ical football, war of words and
odd finishes. From Carolina
blocking an extra point on the
final play of regulation in 2003
in an overtime win, to Chris
Simms playing with a ruptured
spleen last season before
undergoing emergency surgery
that night, something bizarre
always seems to happen.
"As a lineman, we know it's
going to be real physical,"
Panthers tackle Travelle
Wharton said. "We know come
Monday morning when we


the Masters. But he isn't getting
much help from the rest of the
International team, which
looks a lot like the United
States in the Ryder Cup.
The other team is always
making the key putt, as Jim
Furyk did on the 13th hole in
his fourball match. The
momentum always seems to be
on the Americans' side, even
when they are trailing early

a disheartening 31-24 overtime
loss to Wake Forest in which
the Terps blew a 21-point lead.
Like Oklahoma, however,
RutgerI had not been chal-
lenged and couldn't respond
when it was.
The Terps jumped out to a
14-3 lead, withstood a Rutgers
comeback, and wrapped it up
as backup quarterback Chris
Turner led three second-half
scoring drives. Rutgers star
Ray Rice managed 97 yards on
21 carries and touchdown.
"This feels nothing like the
Cincinnati loss," said Rice of
last year's blowout "We fought.
today They were just the better
team at the end. They just exe-
cuted when they needed to
execute and we didn't exe-
cute."
The Big East started the sea-
son with three teams -
Rutgers, West Virginia and
Louisville - all considered
national title contenders.

defensive teams as a coach and
I've played against quite a few
and they're up there with the
best of them," Saban said.
No players benefited more
from Lee's presence that
Florida State's two tallest
receivers, 6-foot-6 Greg Carr
and 6-3 Fagg, who caught nine
passes for 202 yards between.
them. Carr had five catches for
107 yards and Fagg, who has
been troubled with dropped
passes for much of his career,
had 95 yards on four catches.
It was Florida State's first
victory in four tries against
Alabama in the first meeting
between the schools since 1974
when Alabama won 8-7 by scor-
ing a safety and field goal in
the final 1:27:
The 85,412 fans at Saturday's
game was the most to see a
game in Jacksonville, exceed-
ing attendance at the 2004
Super Bowl game or any of the
annual Georgia-Florida rivalry
games.

wake up, we're going to be real
sore."
Who wakes up Monday
happy and alone atop the divi-
sion could depend on Smith.
He had 15 catches for 261 yards
and a touchdown in two
Carolina wins against Tampa
Bay last season.
The moody Smith said
Thursday he wasn't talking to
reporters the rest of the sea-
son. And after Hall lost his
composure trying to cover him
last week, Barber vows no
Buccaneer will engage Smith
in conversation today.
"I'm not going to say it's just
Steve Smith," safety Jermaine
Phillips said. "But when you
look at it offensively, he's the
one who's hurt us."


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On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
11 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA- Lucas Oil Sportsman Series.
2 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) NASCAR Nextel Cup - LifeLock 400.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Tampa Bay Devil Rays at Toronto Blue Jays.
2 p.m. (TBS) Atlanta Braves at Houston Astros.
2 p.m. (WGN) Detroit Tigers at Chicago White Sox.
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) Women's U.S. Open.
EQUESTRIAN
4 p.m. (ESPN) Jockey Club Gold CupNosburgh Stakes.
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
1 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) Oakland Raiders at Miami Dolphins.
4 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) Denver Broncos at Indianapolis Colts.
4 p.m. (13, 51 FOX) Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Carolina Panthers.
8:15 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) Philadelphia Eagles at New York Giants.
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA - Seve Trophy - Final Round.
12 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) The Presidents Cup - Day 4.
3 p.m. (GOLF) Navistar LPGA Classic - Final Round.
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA-- Viking Classic - Final Round.
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE
12 p.m. (VERSUS) Anaheim Ducks vs. Los Angeles Kings. From London.
RODEO
2:30 p.m. (13, 51 FOX) PBR Built Ford Tough Mohegan Sun
Invitational.
RUGBY
11 a.m. (IND1) IRB World Cup 2007 -Argentina vs. Ireland.
FIFA SOCCER
7:55 a.m. (ESPN2) Women's World Cup Final - Brazil vs. Germany.
COLLEGE SOCCER
1 p.r (SUN) Women's - North Carolina State at Florida State.


AUTO RACING
Nextel Cup
Kansas 400 Lineup
Race today at Kansas Speedway, Kansas
c)ty, Kansas.
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (48) Jimmie Johnson,- Chevrolet,
175.063 mph.
2. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 174.284
3. (10) Scott Riggs, Dodge, 173.963
4. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 173.695
5. (11) Denny Hamlin, Chevrolet, 173.684
6. (8) Dale Eamhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 173.633
7. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 173.617
8. (5) Kyle Busch, Chevrolet, 173.483
9. (1) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 173.455
10. (07) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 173.338
11. (55) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 172.983
12. (2).Kurt Busch, Dodge, 172.916
13. (44) Dale Jarrett, Toyota, 172.756
14. (41) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, 172.623
15. (19) Elliott Sadler, Dodge, 172.557
16. (25) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 172.463
17. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 172.458
18. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 172.436
19. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 172.386
20. (26) Jamie McMurray, Ford, 172.353
21. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Dodge, 172.062
22. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 172.046
23. (15) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 171.734
24. (78) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet, 171.717
25. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 171.576
26. (36) Jeremy Mayfield, Toyota, 171.576
27. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 171.467
28. (49) John Andretti, Dodge, 171.450
29. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 171.439
30. (70) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet, 171.434
31. (18) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 171.429
32. (43) Bobby Labonte, Dodge, 171.287
33. (45) Kyle Petty, Dodge, 171.119
34. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 171.016
35. (21) Ken Schrader, Ford, 170.989
36. (40) David Stremme, Dodge, 170.428
37. (66) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, Owner Points
38. (88) Kenny Wallace, Ford, Owner Points
39. (01) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, Owner Points
40. (96) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, Owner Points
41. (7) Robby Gordon, Ford, Owner Points
42. (12) Ryan Newman, Dodge, 174.893
43. (22) Dave Blaney, Toyota, 171.114


GOLF
Presidents Cup Results
Saturday
UNITED STATES 14%, INTERNATIONAL
71/2
Foursomes
United States 5, International 0
Steve Stricker and Hunter Mahan, United
States, def. Trevor Immelman and Rory
Sabbatini, International, 2 up.
Phil Mickelson and Woody Austin, United
States, def. Stuart Appleby and Retief
Goosen, International, 5 and 4.
Tiger Woods and Jim Furyk, United
States, def. Adam Scott and Ernie Els,
International, 4 and 3.
Lucas Glover and Scott Verplank, United
States, def. Vijay Singh and Mike Weir,
International, 2 and 1.
David Toms and Zach Johnson, United
States, def. Nick O'Hern and Geoff Ogilvy,
International, 2 and 1.
Fourball
United States 2%,, International 2%V
Furyk and Stewart Cink, United States,
def. Angel Cabrera and K.J. Choi,
International, 1-up.
Mickelson and Austin, United States,
halved with Scott and Goosen,
International.
Weir and Els, International, def. Glover
and Charles Howell 111l, United States, 4
and-2.
Singh and Appleby, International, def.
Stricker and Mahan, United States, 1 up.
Woods and Toms, United States, def.
O'Hem and Ogilvy, International, 5 and 3.
.Today
Singles Pairings
(U.S. players listed first)
12:10 p.m. - Verplank vs. Sabbatini.
12:22 p.m. - Glover vs. Els.
12:34 p.m. - Mickelson vs. Singh.
12:46 p.m. - Woods vs. Weir.
12:58 p.m. -Austin vs. Cabrera.
1:10 p.m. - Johnson vs. Scott.
1:22 p.m. - Toms vs. Immelman.
1:34 p.m. - Cink vs. O'Hern.
1:46 p.m. - Stricker vs. Ogilvy.
1:58 p.m. - Mahan vs. Choi.
2:10 p.m. - Howell vs. Appleby.
2:22 p.m. - Furyk vs. Goosen.


FOOTBALL
Florida St. 21,
No. 22 Alabama 14
Alabama 0 0 0 14 - 14
Florida St. 0 0 7 14 - 21
Third Quarter
FSU-Fagg 7 pass from Lee (Cismesia
kick), 10:50.
Fourth Quarter
FSU-A.Smith 5 run (Cismesia kick),
9:03.
Ala-D.Hall 7 pass from Wilson (Tiffin
kick), 5:04.
FSU-Fagg 70 pass from Lee (Cismesia
kick), 4:46.
Ala-Brown 17 pass from Wilson (Tiffin


kick), 1:06.
A-85,412.
First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
30-1
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
37.6
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Ala FSU
19 15
27-8935-82
240 266
28-53-0 19-
10 9
10-36.9 8-
2-1 0-0
4-20 9-54
28:58 31:02


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Alabama, Grant 9-36,
Coffee 5-31, Wilson 10-21, Upchurch 3-1.
Florida St., Lee 11-59, A.Smith 12-15,
Parker 2-9, Holloway 1-5, Carr 1-2,
Edwards 4-2, Richardson 1-(minus 1),
Team 2-(minus 3), Weatherford 1-(minus
6).
PASSING-Alabama, Wilson 28-53-0-
240. Florida St., Lee 12-19-1-224,
Weatherford 7-11-0-42.
RECEIVING-Alabama, D.Hall 7-83,
Caddell 5-41, Grant 3-38, Brown 3-34,
Coffee 3-21, McCoy 3-12, N.Walker 2-11,
Upchurch 2-0. Florida St., Carr 5-107,
Fagg 4-95, Parker 4-35, Goodman 2-10,
A.Smith 2-10, Piurowski 1-8, Edwards 1-1.
- . .i -,i f

Astros 3, Braves 2
HOUSTON - Brandon Backe
pitched six strong innings and hit a
home run Saturday night as the
Houston Astros, with Craig Biggio
catching up on old times, beat the
Atlanta Braves 3-2.
Backe (3-1), who missed most of
the season after Tommy John sur-
gery, made his fifth start of the year.
He allowed a run on four hits and
struck out four while walking none.
ATLANTA HOUSTON
ab rhbi ab rhbi
YEscbr ss 4 01 0 Andrsn cf 4 0 1 0
Jhnson 2b 4 01 0 Biggio c 4 1 2 0
CJones 3b 3 01 0 Rnsm ss 0 00 0
Wdwrd3b 1 00 0 Brkmnlb 2 1 1 2
Txeira 1lb 3 00 0 Lamb lb 1 000
Thrmn lb 1 00 0 CaLee If 4 0 0 0
Frncur rf 3 22 0 Lidge p 0 0 0 0
Mahay p 0 00 0 Pence rf 4 0 0 0
Moylan p 0 000 Wggntn 3b 3 0 1 0
Prado ph 0000 AEvrtt ss 1 000
Acosta p 0000 Burke ss 2 0 0 0
Jones If 3 01 0 Asmus 2b 3 0 1 0
BPena c 4 01 1 Backe p 2 1 1 1
Harris cf 3 00 1 Sarfate p 0 0 0 0
Bennett p 2 00 0 Brntlttph 0 00 0
Diaz rf 2 01 0 Qualls p 0 0 0 0
Scott If 0 000
Totals 332 8 2 Totals 30 3 7 3
Atlanta 010 000 100- 2
Houston 200 010 00x- 3
LOB-Atlanta 7, Houston 5. 2B-
YEscobar (25), Francoeur (40), Biggio
(30). HR-Berkman (34), Backe (1). CS-
BPena (1). S-Bruntlett. SF-Harris.
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
Bennett L,2-1 6 6 3 3 1 5
Mahay 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Moylan 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Acosta 1 0 0 0 0 1
Houston
Back W,3-1 6 4 1 1 0 4
Sarfate 1 3 1 1 0 2
Quails 1 1 0 0 1 2
Lidge S,19 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Backe (Jones).
Umpires-Home, Mark Carlson; First,
Angel Hernandez; Second, Derryl
Cousins; Third, Ted Barrett.
T-2:35. A--43,624 (40,976).


-J


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SUNDAY, SF.ln'FMBIIR 30, 2007 5B


SPORTS












Enterta M


CITRUS COUNTY


Spotlight on
PEOPLE=

Coen brothers to
film in Minnesota
MINNEAPOLIS - Will
the Coen brothers ever
return to their native
Minnesota to film another
movie?
Yeah sure, you betcha!
Joel and Ethan Coen
haven't made a movie in
Minnesota since their 1996
Oscar-winning "Fargo," but
come March they plan to roll
cameras for "A Serious
Man," set in their home
town of St. Louis Park, a
Minneapolis suburb.
The brothers helped scout
locations this summer, said
Lucinda Winter, executive
director of the Minnesota
Film and TV Board.
"They looked in Richfield,
Brooklyn Center, maybe
Hopkins - neighborhoods
that would match the one
they grew up in," she said.
The film is about a Jewish
college professor during the
1960s. According to the
online entertainment jour-
nal FilmJerkcom, the main
character is bedeviled by
children who lift his wallet,
a wife who wants a divorce,
an intense grad student and
a hot neighbor who sun-
bathes in the nude. With all
of that, "he starts to question
the value of life."

Actress accused of
violating probation
LOS ANGELES - Actress
Michelle Rodriguez violated
probation again in a drunk-
en driving case by failing to
complete her community
service and not following an
alcohol education program,
prosecutors said.
Rodriguez went to court
Friday to answer to the lat-
est claims by
the city attor-
ney's office,
which said
the former
"Lost"
actress sub-
mitted a doc-
ument stat-
uir .e p ing she per-
L..c: I --formed com-
munity serv-
ice on Sept. 25, 2006, but
later admitted she was actu-
ally in New York City that
day.
The document was
required as part of the 30
days of community service
Rodriguez was ordered to
serve for violating probation
in a 2003 drunken driving
case, according to court
papers filed Thursday in
Los Angeles County
Superior Court.
If she is found to have vio-
lated terms of her probation,
Rodriguez could face
between 477 to 537 days in
county jail and a $2,000 fine.
Rodriguez, 29, kept quiet
in court as her attorney,
Richard Beale, argued that
she performed 30 days of
community service and said
"a clerical error" caused the
discrepancy in the paper-
work.

New band features
System of a Down
LOS ANGELES - Scars
On Broadway may sound
like the name of an avant-
garde theater production,
but it's really a new band
featuring members of
Grammy-winning rock group
System of a Down.
Guitarist Daron Malakian,
32, and
drummer
John
Dohnlmayan,
35, have
begun
recording the
new group's
debut album,
Daron Dolmayan
IVMalakian announced
Friday on the
band's official MySpace site.
System of a Down is on
hiatus, according to its own
official Web site.
Singer Serj Tankian's solo
debut album, "Elect the


Dead," is scheduled for
release Oct. 23. Bassist
Shavo Odadjian's side proj-
ect Achozen is set to release
an album next year, accord-
ing to System of a Down's
site.

- From wire reports


SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 30, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CHRONICLE


'Brotherhood' comes backLOTTERIES


Showtime

drama returns

for new season

FRAZIER MOORE
AP television writer

NEW YORK - Fans of
"Brotherhood" last season
might consider Michael Caffee
a thug, a brute, a force of evil.
Jason Isaacs, who plays him,
has a different take.
"Michael's always been a
good guy," Isaacs says. "He has
an absolute sense of what right
and wrong is, and in his head,
he's doing the right thing, all
the time. And when occasional-
ly he does the wrong thing, he
carries the weight of it in his
conscience."
Or maybe not Reasonable
people can disagree about
such things, especially as they
unfold in this Showtime
drama, which has a splendid
way of keeping moral issues in
flux and its characters off-kil-
ter.
Granted, "Brotherhood" be-
gan with what seemed like
high-concept symmetry. Fo-
cused on a working-class Irish-
American family in Provi-
dence, R.I., it had "good" broth-
er Tommy Caffee (played by
Jason Clarke), an ambitious but
idealistic state legislator. It also
had the "bad" one, Michael, a
small-time mobster whose
return to town after a seven-
year disappearance spelled
trouble - especially for
Tommy as he scrambled to pre-
serve his clean-cut image as a
public servant and family man.
However formulaic that may
sound, "Brotherhood" was any-
thing but. And back now for its
second season (at 10 p.m. today,
following "Dexter"), this
Peabody Award-winning series
has given the kaleidoscope
another twist.
Tommy's family life and pub-
lic spiritedness are both in
steady decline.
As for Michael? Well, on last
season's finale he got what
many viewers might agree was
overdue: a savage, nearly fatal
beating.


Associated Press
This undated photo, provided by Showtime, shows Jason Isaacs as
Michael Caffee In an episode of the Showtime series
"Brotherhood," which begins Its second season today.


"Last year, Michael was an
unstoppable force and utterly
fearless," says Isaacs. "Now,
'with his head smashed to
pieces like a watermelon,
there were three choices for
where to go next: one, kill him
off; two, ignore the injuries and
let him pop out of the shower
this season like Bobby Ewing;
or three, deal with what would
really happen after that kind of
beating - brain damage."
Having come out of his coma
and gone through rehab,
Michael emerges not just
morally repellent, but also -
wow! - sympathetic as he
struggles to pick up where he
left off (and figure out who
attacked him).
Sympathetic? Just check out
how Michael's icy blue eyes,
which used to penetrate the
world with a clarity of purpose,
are now clouded by doubt
Standing in his mother's
kitchen, he can't remember
where the PowerBars are kept.
For a moment he can't even
think what PowerBars are
called.
But PowerBars are the least
of Michael's problems. Power
is.
"The worst thing in the world
for a man like Michael is to
show weakness," says Isaacs.
"He is prey to fits and emotion-w
al instability. He has lost his
ability to strategize. His short-
term memory, too. Michael has
to write everything down.
That's not a great thing for a


criminal."
Researching Michael's con-
dition was "fascinating and
moving," says Isaacs, who met
with a number of people who
have suffered brain damage.
They included a woman who
told him: "I'd love to be witty
again, just to make a joke."
Isaacs presumably holds
answers to many questions the
"Brotherhood" faithful will
soon be stewing over.
But it's the uncertainty that
he loves best about this unpre-
dictable saga. He recalls that
when he first got the bid to play
Michael, he asked, "Where's
the story going?"
The producers' reply: "We
don't know."
"Then I asked, 'Where has
Michael been for seven years,
and why has he come back to
Providence? Because that's
the key to the whole show.'"
"They said, 'We don't know.
What do YOU think?'
"Some part of me thought I
should run a million miles
away from this project," says
Isaacs with a smile of wonder-
ment "But some part of me
thought, 'Take a leap!'"
Along with his viewers, he's
still happily aloft
'Dexter' too
_-LOS ANGELES - Show-
time's "Dexter" returns at 9
p.m. today, one of those dark,
complex cable dramas with a
tragic, yet appealing antihero -
the sociopath we love to root for.


"The days of 'Magnum, PI.'
are gone," says executive pro-
ducer Clyde Phillips. "Part of
what we love in our antiheroes
now is that shadow side, that
;part of what we love in our-
selves because we all have that
shadow."
As the second season opens,
it's some 38 days after Dexter
(Michael C. Hall) saves the city,
and foster sister Debra Morgan
(Jennifer Carpenter), by mur-
dering his only brother, the
notorious Ice Truck Killer.
"For all that was resolved
(last season), there are some
really open, wounds for
Dexter," says Hall in his trailer
during a break as he fusses
with the laces on his sneakers.
"I mean Dexter, on all fronts,
has people closing in on him."
What with Sgt. Doakes (Erik
King) stalking him around
every corner, even leading
Dexter's ally, Lt. Maria
LaGuerta (Lauren Velez), to
believe that Dex may have
something to hide. And his girl-
friend; Rita Bennett (Julie
Benz), suspects him of framing
her ex-husband and sending
him to prison.
The noose
tightens even.
more when evi-
dence of Dex-
ter's killing
sprees surface,
bringing FBI
serial-killer
MIichael hunter Frank
C. Hall Lundy (Keith
stars in Carradine), out
"Dexter." on the prowl.
He's teaming
with Dexter's own comrades
on the force, Angel Batista
(David Zayas), Vincent Masuka
(C.S. Lee) and Debra.
Now Dexter finds himself
unable to relax or kill.
"I cant believe how stressful
this guy's life is," Hall says,
"and he can't talk about it with
anybody."
Except with those closest to
him - the viewers.
"I'll tell you, if you couldn't
hear his internal dialogue I
think it-would be a very differ-
ent story," Velez says of Hall's
haunting voice-overs, which
offer glimpses into the mind of
this madman. "That's the
genius of the show."


TV LOOKOUT


Bright 'Lights': Football series moves to Fridays


FRAZIER MOORE
AP television writer


Last fall, NBC made a big miscalcula-
tion with "Friday Night Lights," airing it
on a night that wasn't Friday.
This confused many viewers. After all,
"Saturday Night Live" airs on Saturdays
- not on, say, Thursdays.
The season wore on, and "Friday Night
Lights," a critical hit, was praised as a
splendid depiction of small-town Texas
life where high school football is king.
At the end of last season, "Friday Night
Lights" won the prestigious Peabody
Award (whose judges were able to watch
the show on DVDs, so they didn't have to
track it down on the schedule). Ratings
still weren't good.
Even so, NBC renewed the series for
another year. Better yet, it slotted "Friday
Night Lights" on Friday nights. And that is
where "Friday Night Lights" can be found
this Friday at 9 p.m. with its second-season
premiere.
As summer comes to an end in Dillon,
Texas, all thoughts are on the upcoming
football season for the defending state
champ Panthers. Meanwhile, the coach
who guided the team to that champi-
onship, Eric Taylor (the superb Kyle
Chandler), is starting his new job at a col-
lege out of town, which separates him
from his family just as wife Tami (Connie
Britton) goes into labor with their second
child.
There's a lot of action, feelings and
good-looking young people on "Friday
Night Lights," but there's a dose of truth,
as well. Maybe that was putting off some
viewers last year.
Or maybe they just couldn't find the
show.
Now they can. (It's right in the title.)
And, with any luck, they will.
Other shows to look out for:
* There isn't a funnier show on the air
than "30 Rock." Even Emmy judges (who
seem to make most choices throwing darts
with their eyes closed) made the right
decision this year, naming "30 Rock" the
year's outstanding comedy series. Now
Bravo is giving latecomers a chance to
catch up, with a mini-marathon of this
comedy about a beleaguered variety show
producer (Tina Fey) who's forever butting
heads with her ever-meddling network
exec (Alec Baldwin). Six episodes from
last season air Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. It's


the perfect warmup to the show's second
season premiere, 8:30 p.m. Thursday on
NBC, with Jerry Seinfeld as guest star.
N Starting to feel spooked.that you won't
be ready for your Halloween observances
in time for the big night? DIY network
wants to calm your fears. Starting Monday
at the stroke of, um, noon, the daily
"Witching Hour" will
help you get a head . .
start on costumes,
decorating and
party ideas. This
ghoulish initiative
begins with a five-
part series. "Witch
Crafts," with co-
hosts Cathie Filian -
and Steve Piacenza
providing instruction
on costume-making for
both adults and children.
There will also be how-
to tips on party-giv-
ing* (Hot glue
spider w'ebs
and deco-
rative ,%;e
tomb-
stones.


anyone?)
* "Artland" is back for a second season
of showing how American art just might be
the most freewheeling, vital and diverse
on the planet On 12 one-hour episodes,
the series journeys from Miami to
Anchorage to capture not only unusual art
but also the experiences that accompany
this "art road trip." Destinations include
major hubs as well as remote outposts -
like the tiny Texas tol n called Art. Along
the way. hosts Mamne McCutchin and
Toby Amies interview collectors, cura-
tors, academics and art-loving locals in
many of the 50-odd destinations. The
series premieres 8 p.m. Thursday on
SVoom's Gallery HD cable channel.


Here are the
winning numbers
selected Saturday
in the Florida
Lottery:


CASH 3
8-4-4
PLAY 4
0-9-2-4
LOTTO
11- 17 - 26 - 29 - 47 - 48
FANTASY 5
5-7-14-15-18
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28
Cash 3:1-9-0
Play 4:1 - 8 - 7 - 4
Fantasy 5:2 - 13 - 20 - 28 - 29
5-of-5 1 winner $262,376.56
4-of-5 279 $151.50
3-of-5 9,996 $11.50'
Mega Money: 1 - 3 - 6 - 42
Mega Ball: 1
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 4 $2,426
3-of-4 MB 88 $241.50'
3-of-4 1,769 $35.50
2-of-4 MB 2,044 21.50
2-of-4 42,778 $2
1-of-4 MB 14,827 $3
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27
Cash 3:6-4-6
Play 4: 5- 1 - 1 -3
Fantasy 5:3 - 7 - 13 - 22 - 34 :
5-of-5 4 winners $ 59,195..12
4-of-5 364 $104.5,0,.
3-of-5 11,582 $9

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
N To verify the accuracy of'":
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check--
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially posted-!
by the Florida Lottery. On the
Web, go to www.flalottery.
.com; by telephone, call (850)
487-7777,


Today in
HISTORY
Today is Sunday, Sept. 30, the
273rd day of 2007. There are 92
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Sept. 30, 1846, Boston den-
tist William Morton used ether as
an anesthetic for the first time as
he extracted an ulcerated tooth
from merchant Eben Frost.
On this date:
In 1949, the Berlin Airlift came to
an end.
In 1954, the first atomic-pow-
ered vessel, the submarine USS
Nautilus, was commissioned by
the Navy.
In 1962, black student James
Meredith was escorted by federal
marshals to the campus of the
University of Mississippi, where he
enrolled for classes the next day.
In 1982, the situation comedy
"Cheers" premiered on NBC-TV.
Ten years ago: In an unprece-
dented act of repentance, France's
Roman Catholic Church apolo-
gized for its silence during the sys-
tematic persecution and deporta-
tion of Jews by the pro-Nazi Vichy
regime.
Five years ago: New Jersey
Sen. Robert Torricelli abruptly
ended his scandal-tainted re-elec-
tion campaign just five weeks be-
fore the election, leaving Demo--
crats scrambling for a candidate.
One year ago: Five people
were killed when an overpass near
Montreal collapsed.
Today's Birthdays: Actress
Deborah Kerr is 86. Author Elie
Wiesel is 79. Actress Angie Dickin-
son is 76. Singer Cissy Houstorfis
74. Singer Johnny Mathis is 72.
Actor Len Cariou is 68. Singer
Marilyn McCoo is 64. Pop singer
Sylvia Peterson (The Chiffons) is
61. Singer Deborah Allen is 54.
Actor Barry Williams is 53. Singer
Patrice Rushen is 53. Actor Vondie
Curtis-Hall is 51. Actress Fran
Drescher is 50. Country singer
Marty Stuart is 49. Actress Debrah
Farentino is 48. Rock musician Bill
Rieflin (R.E.M.) is 47. Actress
Crystal Bernard is 46. Actor Eric
Stoltz is 46.Country singer Eddie
Montgomery (Montgomery-Gentry)
is 44. Rock singer Trey Anastasio
is 43. Rock musician Robby Takac
(Goo Goo Dolls) is 43. Actress
Lisa Thomhill is 41. Actress Mon-
ica Bellucci is 39. Actor Tony Hale
is 37. Actress Jenna Elfman is 36.
Actor Ashley Hamilton is 33. Actor
Mike Damus is 28.
Thought for Today: 'Afler three
days without reading, talk be-'
comes flavorless." - Chinese ,
proverb.

REMEMBER WHEN
* For more local history, visit
the Remember When page
of ChronicleOnline.com.


Rodft Loft",














ary


C
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 30, 2007
wWA ch",,,.i,', (-Ci''l'dn^z ,Cumr


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


I


Charlie Brennan
SHADES
OF GRAY


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
A homemade sign warns sexual predators they are not welcome in the neighborhood off Trail 10 and County Road 581 south of Inverness.


Laws restrict sex offenders, but experts are not convinced those laws really work


MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
- he caller didn't leave a name,
but he made his point
"They already have housing.
It's called state and federal prison,"
he snarled into the phone. "That's
where they should go. That's where
they should stay. They shouldn't be
10,000 feet from any kid."
"They" are sexual offenders and sexual pred-
ators.
The caller was reacting to news stories about
plans to develop an ordinance in Citrus County
that would keep sexual offenders and predators
at least 2,500 feet - nearly a half-mile - from
schools, day-care centers, playgrounds, parks
and churches.
The call came a week after a town hall meet-
ing brought out about 200 people to protest a
company's reported plans to lease seven mobile
homes off County Road 581 south of Inverness
to sexual offenders. The proposed community,
Dawsy said, is called The Meadows.
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy and Citrus County officials
promised to do what they could to prevent
HAR-COR Development Inc. from leasing the
rundown mobile homes.
For one, officials say, as a group, the homes
constitute a mobile home park and would need
rezoning. County Attorney Robert "Butch"
Battista said he thinks the regulatory hurdles
will prevent The Meadows from ever occurring.
And Friday, HAR-COR president Harris
Dobkin told the Chronicle he wouldn't be rent-
ing those mobile homes to sex offenders.
Still, the proposal initially sent Citrus County
officials scrambling to prepare laws aimed at
residency requirements for sex offenders.
It begs the question:
Is all this really necessary?
Studies would suggest it isn't
Jill S. Levinson, Ph.D., said in an October
2005 report to the Florida Legislature that data
doesn't back up claims by local governments


Housing restrictions
appear to be based largely
on three myths that are
repeatedly propagated by the
media: 1. all sex offenders
reoffend; 2. treatment does
not work; and 3. the concept
of 'stranger danger.'

Jill S. Levinson. Ph.D.
October 2005 report to the Florida Legislature.

that residency requirements provide a safer
environment from offenders.
"Housing restrictions appear to be based
largely on three myths that are repeatedly prop-
agated by the media: 1. all sex offenders reof-
fend; 2. treatment does not work; and 3. the con-
cept of 'stranger danger,'" Levinson wrote.
In 2006, Levinson, assistant professor of
human services with Lynn University in Boca
Raton, led a study based on interviews with res-
idents in Melbourne. Residents were asked
whether laws designed to inform the public
about the location and identity of sex offenders
were effective in reducing sex crimes.
The data.was collected in August 2005, just a
few months after Jessica Lunsford's kidnapping
and murder by John Couey, a sex offender. The
study notes that Jessica's father, Mark Lunsford,
was actively seeking increased penalties and
monitoring for sex offenders. ,
The results suggested that public perception
flies opposite of actual data.
For example the study, citing several sources,
said:
"Though the public and lawmakers are sup-
portive of sex offender policies, scholars


remain skeptical about the potential of these
laws to protect children or prevent sex crimes.
They suggest that community notification laws
are driven by emotional responses to sexual
violence rather than by empirical data, and that
they provide misguided reassurance to citi-
zens."
The public, however, doesn't trust that data.
"Those surveyed appeared to believe that sex
offenders have high recidivism rates, that many
sex offenses are committed by strangers, and
that nearly half of sex offenses are reported to
authorities," the study said. "They appeared to
be somewhat skeptical about the value of psy-
chological therapy in preventing recidivism,
were concerned that sex crime rates are rising,
and viewed sex offenders as more likely to reof-
fend than other types of criminals."
Sexual offenders nationwide, who believe
they are being unfairly targeted by ordinances
and laws, are fighting back
Groups such as SOhopeful International Inc.
and SO-Clear Media Productions, both out of
Portland, Ore., are trying to rally support for
legislation changes they say are needed to
change perceptions.
"We have to take public policy away from this
hysteria and fear that drives this category," SO-
Clear Media CEO Tom Madison said in a phone
interview.
Madison, a convicted sexual offender who
said his crime involved a 16-year-old prostitute,
blamed the media - particularly TV news -
for creating an atmosphere where the public
automatically fears registered sex offenders
regardless of what they did to receive that label.
"They hear about the absolutely worst cases,"
he said. "The offender registry is clogged with
too many people who have long paid their debt
to society and just want to get on with their
lives."
Sharon Manning knows this. Manning, who
was pictured on the front page of the Sept 22
Chronicle wearing a hand-made "Sex offenders
NOT welcome" T-shirt, said the state should do
Please see '"/Page 4C


Taxes make taxpayers change their habits


he county recently The county increased
hiked gasoline taxes impact fees to cover govern-
to pay for infrastruc- ment services to an expand-
ture. At first glance, 6-cents- ing population. Beyond the
a-gallon added tax should fact that who pays how
bring in revenue about equal much is irrational and illog-
to the number of gallons sold ical (reading the details of
in an average year times 6 how they are determined
cents. risks melting your brain!),
But many Citrus drivers they will be unlikely to pro-
will buy cheaper gas from Dr. William duce the revenues expected.
surrounding counties, thus Dixon Some potential homes
reducing the number of gal- OTHER and businesses will not get
lons sold in Citrus below VOICES built because the impact
what was anticipated. OCES fees are too high or unjust,
Worse, consumers buying compared with surrounding
gas will purchase goods at the attached counties. Potential jobs in construction
"Jiffy" store, depriving Citrus County and new or expanded businesses will
merchants of profits and the county of be lost along with lost sales tax rev-
sales tax revenue! enues. Will the county actually gain net


revenue from these fees?
Congress plans to eliminate the
"Bush" tax cuts (raise taxes) to pay for
"universal" government-sponsored
health insurance. Congress knows the
cuts have forced "the wealthy" to pay a
larger share of taxes than ever before.
They know tax collections, after the tax
cuts, have increased to record highs. The
annual budget deficit has been falling
dramatically despite military expenses.
The economy is the best in decades.
Unemployment is at all-time lows. No
matter. Some complain that people who
pay little or no income tax (while still
enjoying the many services and bene-
fits of government!) did not gain as
much from the tax cuts as "the wealthy"
who actually pay the taxes. So they will
once again, oblivious to history and eco-


nomics, go after the wealthy
One example of taxes meant to "soa
the rich" is the "Luxury Tax" passed b
a prior Congress on purchases o
expensive cars and boats. The "rich
simply refused to buy new luxury item
in America, purchasing used and for
eign goods instead. Congress seeme
shocked when sales of yachts and high
end autos fell off, causing job losse
among their supporters in auto an
boat industries! The tax was repealed.
The Alternative Minimum Tax (AMI
was passed in 1969 to snare about 15
families which, using tax deduction
approved by Congress, paid no taxes o
income over $1 million. As the result o
inflation, 35 percent of families wit
Please see VOICES/Page 4


End to plan

no reason

to end talk
B ack a few years - oh,
man, OK ... 30 years ago'
- when I was a very,
young adult living in Sarasota,'
I found myself questioning
why sheriff's deputies routine-
ly broke up large groups of'
young people gathered in the
public beach parking lot.
As a newcomer to that area,
I didn't have any friends at
those evening gatherings, but
it seemed a logical place for
them to hang out From an out-
sider's perspective, there were
cliques and people from rival
high schools. As I recall, there
were some fights and there
was definitely some drinking
and drug use going on.
To me, it made sense that
deputies could just stroll
through the crowd during any
given evening and cite people
for open containers, bust peo-
ple for dope and head off or
break up fights.
These people were sitting
ducks, but, like clockwork,
deputies would break up the
parties and send people on
their way.
My assumption was that
those who were going to get
drunk, drugged or into a fight
just relocated to a place where
law enforcement was less like-
ly to catch them in the act
I hadn't thought about those
days for a long time, but recent
Please see SHADES/Page 4C


Lou Frey
OTHER
VOICES


Students

urge


media


, awareness,
he following is another
report from the projects
of the students who
attended the Frey Civic
Leadership Academy this sum-
mer. Please understand that
these are not my ideas, but,
| those of the students, and no:
wording in the report has beer,
changed. I was impressed as I
hope you will be with the work
and depth of the thinking that'
went into these reports. "
Today, too many people lack:
a true understanding of what'
effect the media have on them.
They believe that they under-
stand the role the media play
k and the effect the media have
y on their way of life, their way
f of thinking, and even the man-
" ner in which they vote. But this
s is far from the truth. The mass-
r- es are moderately unaware
d about this subject, putting
- them in a position where they
s are easily influenced by those
d who misuse the power of the
media.
r) Fewer issues that affect our
0 lives are getting the coverage
s they deserve and therefore we
s are less informed about sub-
n jects that affect our jobs, in-
A come, children, parents and
more.
C Please see OTHER/Page 4C


Ili IN











2C
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 30, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


6- "The reformative effect of punishment
is a belief that dies hard, chiefly, I
think, because it (punishment) is so
satisfying to our sadistic impulses."
Bertrand Russell


COMPLEX ISSUE


Proposed park for


sexual offenders


raises questions


motions run high and
opinions are flying
regarding possible zoning
changes that would allow a
Pinellas County businessman to
rent out several vacant mobile
homes in a contiguous area to
sexual offenders who have been
released from prison.
The area off County Road 581
near Inverness is a quiet, rural
neighborhood of mobile homes
that is zoned residential. The
purchase of the vacant homes by
one individual would be consid-
ered a mobile home park and
would require a zoning change.
Since the zoning change would
have to go through the public
hearing process, it's not likely to
happen and the current uproar
may even discour-
age HAR-COR THE Ij
Development Inc.
from pursuing the Sexual :
plan at all. mobile ho
The question still
remains: What does OUR 01
society do with the Not i
increasing number back
of sexual offenders
and predators who YOUR OPIt
have served their chronic leon
time and are being ,eornment at
released? Where do C hCro,: Ile
they go? What do


they do? What rights do they
have as human beings and
Americans?
It is unfortunate that violent
sexual predators and sexual
offenders are all lumped into
one category when the offenses
can be quite different. One
example is the "Romeo and
Juliet" element, where young
men have sexual relations with a
girlfriend who is under age.
They are prosecuted as adults
and labeled sexual offenders.
They will carry that stigma for
their entire lives.
There are other sexual offens-
es, typically the result of bad
decisions that do not result in a
life of deviant, sexual crime.
Many of these individuals can be
rehabilitated and returned to
society to live full, productive
lives. They are not a danger and
that distinction needs to be
made.
It's the John Coueys - those
violent, dangerous criminals
who look for children to abuse or
women to rape - who are the
prime concern. It's the stalkers
who thrive on demeaning, harm-
ful, even murderous acts that
society most needs to guard
against. Many professionals
believe these individuals cannot
be rehabilitated or cured.


Can't stop them ol
I feel sorry for all of you
that are going through the
front page of "Not in our
neighborhood," because
we have them in our neigh-
borhood. What you will
find is that you are going
to lose because there's no
one that can stop them. 563
They are going to be there. 563.
And if you harass them,
you'll go to jail and they'll
be smiling at you as you go away.
Good luck. You would think in Citrus
County with what happened to
Jessica Lunsford, this would not be
happening, but it is. I hope Sheriff
Dawsy stands behind this. It's time
to stand up, Sheriff Dawsy.


Our society is not equipped to
handle these people. There is no
proof that it is better to spread
them out through a community
or locate them all together so
law enforcement can keep an
eye on them. There is no evi-
dence that the current laws work
at all to reduce this kind of sexu-
al crime.
The only protection is a
requirement that all offenders
and predators communicate
with law enforcement including
their residence, changes of
address, records and mug shots.
But it is difficult to keep track if
they fail to comply. And because
the requirement applies to
offenders and predators, the
load is huge and unwieldy.


ISSUE:
predator
rme park.

PINION:
n our
yard.

UNION: Go to
'lne.com to
"bout toas 's
editorial.


The problem has
not been dealt with
correctly. The con-
versation must take
place at the state
and federal levels.
The distinction
must be made
between offenders
and predators and
the laws should not
be applied equally
to both groups. The
smaller number of
predators can be


dealt with much more efficiently
if separated from offenders. The
laws and requirements for both
groups should be refined.
Solutions must be included in
the refinement.
If there is no hope for rehabil-
itation, the sexual predator
should remain incarcerated. If
rehabilitation is possible, they
should be placed in a restrictive
program that ensures that reha-
bilitation before the individual
is released into society. Those
programs should be located in
areas where treatment and
resources are readily available,
not in the neighborhoods of
small counties that are not
equipped to handle them.
No one wants criminals in
their back yard. But the fact
remains that criminals who have
completed their punishment
and paid their debt have a right
to. live in our society. They have a
right to move on with their lives.
It is our responsibility to make
sure that the laws are in place
and the resources are available
to ensure that their return to
society is productive and safe for
them anid for those who live near
them. But right now, there just
isn't enough of that protection in
place to allow HAR-COR's solu-
tion to come to Citrus County.


Water transfer
It's funny that the
Chronicle's front page on
Sept. 20 makes Mr. Dean
appear a really big player
in the meeting on the
water transfer to the St.
Johns Water Management
District.


0In reading St. Pete's arti-
05 cle on the same meeting,
Dean's name does not
even appear. Why is that? Are you
accurately reporting what Mr. Dean
says or not?
Editor's note: The Chronicle reports
from the perspective of Citrus County.
Other newspapers report from the per-
spective of their circulation area.


Good, bad, and necessary deficits


C TRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ............................ publisher
Charlie Brennan ................................. editor
Neale Brennan ...... promotions/community affairs
Kathie Stewart .................circulation director
. Mike Arnold ........................ managing editor
Founded in 1891 Curt Ebitz ..... ................ citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Mac Harris ........................... citizen member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


Other VOICES


the Internet, military preeminence,
and leaps in medical science).
On the other hand, budget surplus-
es, which are generally viewed as
preferable to debt, are actually a co-
equal tool. Debt can be good or bad;
surplus can be good or bad. A surplus
such as witnessed during the Clinton
administration, was helpful because it
came during boom times and paved
the way for future tax cuts. The Hoover
administration's balanced budgets,
coming on the heels of the 1929 stock
market crash, was in hindsight an
obviously awful idea because they
deprived the economy of money when
the opposite medicine was clearly
required.
Separate from the timing factor is
the issue of allocation into services,
investments, and waste.
The first two are often related.
Police and fire protection are services
that not only provide safety, but also an
environment conducive to economic
growth. Education is a service that is
actually an investment in innovation.
Health care is a necessary service that
our government has yet to embrace.
The primary burden of health care has
fallen to businesses, where it does not
belong and which is incapable of cov-


ering all citizens.
The best example of waste is excess
interest on the national debt When
deficits and surpluses are properly
employed and inflation is kept under
control, interest rates fall.
Conversely, when interest rates rise,
both the government and the individ-
ual are saddled with an extra and
unnecessary expense that is tanta-
mount to an inflation tax, except that it
is being paid to bondholders rather
than the government. And since much
our debt is in foreign hands, any
excess interest is nothing less than a
tax paid to them because excess inter-
est may be defined as inflation.
The higher a nation's inflation, the
higher the interest it must pay on its
debt.
These are the basic reasons why
simplistic approaches such as the bal-
anced budget amendment or balanced
budget orthodoxy not only cannot
work, but can instead lead to econom-
ic disaster.

Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift
author the Washington
Merry-Go-Round column, founded
in 1932 by Drew Pearson.


LETTERS \to the Editor


Water sources
One of my proudest moments dur-
ing the 10 years I spent as a Florida
State Senator was when Gov Jeb
Bush signed my legislation establish-
ing local sources first for preserving
one of our most precious natural
resources; fresh clean water.
That is why I was alarmed to read
recent stories about efforts to divert
water from Hernando and Citrus
counties and send it to Lake and
Marion counties. We all know that our
growing state needs adequate water
supplies, but robbing Citrus to pay
Marion is just not the right way to go.
It makes absolutely no ns e to me
that water from Hernando County or
Citrus County would be piped all the
way over to Lake County, especially
when there is a serious need for fresh
water within these counties them-
selves. The Withlacoochee River is
one of our region's treasured natural
resources, and should not be sucked
dry to satisfy the construction needs
of a region more than 100 miles away.
Given that local sources first is still
state law, I honestly have no idea how
officials can say with a straight face
that building a 100-mile pipeline
meets the current letter or intent of
the law.
I would encourage residents living
in Hernando and Citrus counties to
contact their state senators, state rep-
resentatives and officials at
Swiftmud. If enough local residents
fight these plans to overturn Local
Sources First, we can achieve victory
and preserve the Withlacoochee
River and other local water sources.
Ginny Brown-Waite
member of Congress

Rhetorical noise
Let's get real, people. As long as we
are stuck with this presidency and
this useless, enabling Congress, noth-
ing is going to change in Iraq.
Everything that is said by every politi-
cal talking head will lead to nothing
new but the familiar, give it more
time.
The date of the actual change in


OPINIONS INVITED
i The opinions expressed in Chronicle edi-
torials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
" Viewpoints depicted in political car-
toons, columns or letters do not neces-
sarily represent the opinion of the edito-
rial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited to
express their opinions in a letter to the
editor.
* Persons wishing to address the editorial
board, which meets weekly, should call
Linda Johnson at (352) 563-5660.
" All letters must be signed and include a
rhone number and hometown, including
letters sent via e-mail. Names and
hometowns will be printed; phone num-
bers will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit letters for
length, libel, fairness and good taste.
a Letters must be no longer than 350
words, and writers will be limited to
three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to (352) 563-3280; or e-
mail to letters@chronlcleonllne.com.

Iraq will be November 2008. That will
be the date that every incumbent in
this sorry Congress gets voted out of
office. Also, hopefully, we will elect an
honest defender of the Constitution,
(president). We cannot have another
Bush Boy as a president (John
McCain comes to mind.)
Ask your representative who and
how Bush's war in Iraq is being paid
for. I asked Ginny Brown-Waite and
her response was: "Congress author-
ized the funds." Dah!! When is this
bill coming due? How high are taxes
going to be increased? When? By
January 2009, a trillion dollars will
have been wasted and untold suffer-
ing incurred by Bush and his enabling
regime in Congress.
If we had a trillion dollars to waste,
what could have been done in this
country? Health care for 46 million
citizens without insurance? New
Orleans?
Remember, disregard the rhetorical
noise on Iraq and vote in 2008 and
eliminate this spineless Congress and
all incumbents.
Les H. Burdick
Inverness


Crimes rising
Well, no surprise here! As usual, the
article in Saturday's (Sept 15)
Chronicle on "assault rifles," penned
obviously by the usual gun ban crowd,
is full of lies and innuendo.
If the writer knows where you can
buy an AK47 for $200, I wish he'd let
me know. I'll take a dozen. And as far
as buying one through the mail, don't
hold your breath waiting for it to
arrive; unless you're a licensed
firearm dealer, it ain't a-comin'.
The writer would have you believe
that firearms are easier than ever to
obtain. Nothing could be further from
the truth. The sale of firearms is
strictly regulated by federal law.
When I was a youth, all you needed
to purchase a rifle was proof that you
were at least 16 years old; you could
buy a pistol at 18. At that time, you
could buy a gun through the mail. All
you had to do was send along a signed
statement to the fact that you were
older than 21 and not a felon or a
lunatic. Now you have to pass a NICS
background check Yet, in the face of
all the current restrictions, crime has
increased. In England and Australia,
where firearms have been virtually
banned, violent crimes have tripled.
So why the increase in crime?
Current laws have made it almost
impossible to discipline our children.
Parents have been arrested for
administering a badly needed slap on
the butt, teachers and school adminis-
trators suspended for so.little as put-
ting a hand on a student's shoulder to
restrain him or her. Morals have dete-
riorated, thanks in part to the teach-
ing of "situation ethics" in our
schools. The mention of God or Jesus
in our schools, or in public displays,
has been forbidden by the same gov-
ernment that is supposed to protect
those rights. People who grow up with
no discipline have no respect for
authority. Those who grow up with no
religious and moral teaching have no
respect for human life. We're reaping
what we've sown.


Don Francisco
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift
ot all budget deficits are bad.
Some are necessary; others
are beneficial. The trick is to
distinguish between the good, the bad,
and the necessary.
The classic example came in the mid-
dle of World War II, when the deficit hit
an all time inflation-adjusted record.
The necessity was obvious. Less obvious
was the economic benefit Conventional
wisdom held that the nation would
plunge back into a replay of the prewar
Great Depression. Instead, World War II
deficit spending spurred the economy
into the greatest era of prosperity in the
nation's history - a prosperity that con-
tinues to this day.
And what is prosperity? Disposable
income? It is much more.
Prosperity, spent properly, begets
more prosperity. Unlike the 1920s
when it was misspent, the World War II
generation invested in education (a
majority of their children went to col-
lege compared to an elite few who had
college degrees before the war), infra-
structure (The interstate highway sys-
tem was built and airports were
expanded and increased, all of which
facilitated the growth of commerce),
and innovation (which spawned the
computer age, which led to satellites,


I


I







Cu7PWS COUNTY '(FL.) CHRONICLE


COMMENTARY


Big wheel keep on turning, cautious mama keep on squirming


W while flipping TV -. The poignant picture of a
channels trying to . mother's nature brought to
find something my mind a time when my
that looked interesting . 4, sweetheart's motherly
enough to watch, my atten- | ""- , instinct was sorely tested.
tion was grabbed by a docu- ., Her young son was in
mentary about mothers in -. danger and for a short
the wild - lions, ducks, ele- [ while she was at a loss as to
phants, etc. It centered on how to protect him. No, he
the mothers' efforts to pro- Fred Brannen wasn't about to be eaten by
tect their young. Fred Brannen a crocodile or mauled by a
Portions of film made me A - L . -. L --- tiger. The "Big Wheel" was
sad because there were I E about to do him in.
occasions when the mother If you,have children any-
was unable fend off dangers too where between the ages of 5 and 35,
numerous or too great The maternal you know about Big Wheels. For those
instinct to protect the young, even at of you who don't, here's a brief
the cost of the mother's own life, was description:
touching. A Big Wheel is a vehicle that looks


very much like a tricycle on steroids.
It has one huge wheel in the front
with pedals, it has two smaller back
wheels.
With a small child at the controls, it
will travel at almost the speed of
sound - especially if there's a hill for
the tyke to drive it down.
Santa Claus brought our son Fred a
Big Wheel for Christmas when the boy
was 3 years old.
My wife watched in horror as he
careened down the driveway and
then on down the hill to the street.
She quickly saw to it that he no longer
went to the street. He was allowed to
ride the monster trike only with prop-
er supervision.
Nonetheless, her protective instinct


was still not satisfied. She feared
bumps, bruises, skinned elbows and
scraped knees. She addressed these
dangers by insisting the boy be fully
padded - dressed in long pants and
long-sleeved shirts -to keep his flesh
from being exposed to the pavement
when this contraption turned over -
and believe me, it would turn over.
With everything Cheryl put on him,
the little guy looked like a cross
between the Pillsbury doughboy and
a miniature sumo wrestler. She still
wasn't satisfied. His head was unpro-
tected. She brooded about this. She
even considered banning the Big
Wheel altogether. It was quite the
dilemma. Fred enjoyed the toy very
much, but his mother had not yet per-


fected protection to her own satisfac-
tion.
I arrived home from work one after-
noon at the same time big sisters Beth
and Becky were bringing their little
brother outside to play. He was set to
ride his Big Wheel.
What was this?
My ingenuous wife had finally com-
pleted the boy's riding ensemble. Son
Fred zoomed down the driveway on
the Big Wheel, dressed in his full
array of protective clothing and wear-
ing a pee-wee football helmet!
Motherhood had prevailed!


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle columnist


Letters to the '-".


Not the issue
In response to Mr Hagaman's letter, I will
say he does not encompass the basis of most
people's complaint about the handling of Tom
Dick's termination. Regardless of whatever he
was accused of doing, he should have been
assured a fair and impartial hearing with only
the facts presented to the hearings officer.
Then each side has a chance to rebut the oth-
ers claims and then a decision would be made
on the merits of each side's case.
A hearing by the person who fired him and a
follow-up appeal to the person who provided
her with the legal opinion that he had violated
the law could never be fair in anyone's mind.
The matter has gone through two steps of
review by other branches of state government,
and both times they have come down on Dick's
side. One stated he had not violated the
Sunshine law and the other says he was fired
"without just cause," so therefore is entitled to
unemployment compensation. You can look at
this with all the political slant you may wish to
apply, but Dick was not afforded the most mini-
nial degrees of justice or fairness.
June Fisher's ability to manage is in ques-
tion when she used such a poor method to
make it happen. By any government employee
standard, she would have been required to
counsel Dick on his action or lack of action,
with each matter being well documented. This
requirement is an attempt to prevent govern-
ment workers from being turned out at every
change of management. And in this case it
truly shows why it is in place and back by law.
He was denied those legal rights.
His actions no doubt saved many thousands
of dollars over the life of the loan for the
Emergency Operations Center. His intent was
for the best outcome for the taxpayers, and he
was rewarded by being fired. I hope people
who serve on any jury are better informed and
are better versed on what is proper and basic
decency when it comes to employer/employee
relations than Mr. Hagaman might be.
John Cassell
Homosassa

Picking poor pockets
Most Democratic presidential candidates
advocate raising taxes on upper-income tax-
payers. While this may sound like a popular
approach, one result is overlooked.
Keep in mind that the high-income taxpayers
are usually in a position to increase their
income to offset a tax increase.
Guess where that money comes from. It
comes right from the pockets of the poor and
middle class in the form of higher prices for
goods and services.
For the low-income person, it means less buy-
ing power. For the middle class who may be
able to itemize on their tax return, it is a double
whammy The higher prices mean less money to
spend on tax-deductible items as well.
Charity and home purchases suffer. No one
should be penalized for the ability to earn a
higher income than someone else. Those with
excessive income that is not earned should be
the target. Drug dealers, those in the under-
ground economy, etc., are the ones who should
be targeted. However, when have you ever
heard any "tax the rich" politician discuss
going after them?
If the "Fair Tax" plan were implemented,
everyone would pay his or her fair share. Then
everyone would be a winner.
Remember, taxing the rich always means
less buying power for those of us with lower
incomes.
Robert E. Hagaman
Homosassa

Wild spending
My, my Mr. Goody-Two-Shoes (the gentleman
who responded to my recent letter) seems to be
very uncomfortable discussing matters of
immorality, especially when it involves those in
high places in the Republican Party
Let me remind him that my emphasis was
not solely directed toward immorality, but to
the excessive spending by this Republican
administration.
The Bush group is spending our money as
though there will be no tomorrow, and, if it
continues to spend like it is, there will, indeed,
be no tomorrow.
* We're deep in debt to China and its mili-
tary grows each and every day. We import
faulty merchandise from them and apparently
we are not in the position to discontinue their
services.
* Gen. Colin Powell said we would be pur-
chasing the country of Iraq if we go there. And
he was right: The price is $3 billion a week.
* Alan Greenspan tells us in his newly-
released book that we went into Iraq for the
oil. But most of us knew that, didn't we?
"When at first we do deceive, what a tangled
web we weave."


Ruth J. Anderson
Homosassa


Less than pristine
We read the article on Texas, the manatee -
nice job.
The thought comes to mind, though: Just
where have you seen pristine water around
here lately? My point being, our government is
constantly touting the fact that we attract
tourists.
How long do you think that will last? I don't
think it will be long at all due to the water con-
ditions. On any given day in Kings Bay, you can
maybe see bottom at low tide. We live off Kings
Bay on a natural lagoon and this week it
looked to me as though someone had emptied
a septic tank truck somewhere up-water from
us.
We used to let our kids and dogs swim it it.
Wouldn't think of it now. We thought it was
bad when it was grayish-green, now it's just
plain brown! It's disgusting and the public
must insist we move faster to get Crystal River
sewered properly! These septic tanks are get-
ting old and leaking into our "pristine" water.
Merlyn Nergaard
Crystal River

Willing to sacrifice
I'm one of the people who stands in support
of our troops, country, flag and what it stands
for on Thursday evening in Inverness.
The group that is in support of nothing but
hate for our country, flag and what it stands for
was out yesterday (Thursday) with signs that
read "Remember Dennis Flannagan,"
"Remember Aaron Weaver" and a few other
names of young men who sacrificed all so we
can be free.
We wonder how the parents feel about their
sons' names being used by this hate-filled
group. We know we would be outraged if they
used our son's name.
We feel it would be a disgrace to his memory
because he believed in what he was doing and
gave all because he was a proud American. He
would make the sacrifice all over again.
Carole Jones
Inverness

Time to move on
Enough already! It seems that every other
day, your paper has yet another one-sided arti-
cle or editorial in support of Tom Dick while
lambasting County Administrator June Fisher.
What mysterious (at least to me) collusion
must there be between your publisher, editors
and Dick to allow such a protracted endorse-
ment of Dick and his flagrant insubordination
many weeks ago.
The enormous cost of Dick's use of your
paper as his personal sounding board would
deny most citizens of Citrus County this same
opportunity when they likewise lose their jobs.
With all the problems that exist in this county
and country, will you make Dick the center-
piece of your intellectual thrust in perpetuity?
Your paper has repeatedly appeared to act as
some superior court e.g. "County's 'cause' for
terminating Dick was inappropriate and fabri-
cated, etc."
Your "findings" apparently overrule or repu-
diate those of the county administrator and
attorney I have absolutely no connection in
any way to anyone involved in this endless (it
seems) saga and only ask that eventually Dick
can be a man, accept the will of the county and
move on. This opinion, by the way, is embraced
by many
James Willis
Homosassa

Why use coal?
I am not a nuclear power plant engineer
Therefore, I do not understand the operation
of a nuclear power plant. I have been shown
on TV that nuclear power plants consist of
such things as radiation active rods, heavy
water and containment buildings that turn
water into steam and thereby run generators.
I know that this is a very simplified explana-
tion of the system. But the object seems to be
that electricity is being generated in a clean,
safe and economical manner.
My humble question is: If all of this engi-
neering and construction to build a nuclear
plant is so productive, why is coal still being
burned, the atmosphere being polluted, and
now there is talk of installing "scrubbers" to
clean the contaminants from the burning coal
at a cost of millions of dollars and the use of
millions of gallons of water?
When does the nuclear part kick in? When
do we see that clean, safe and economical elec-
tricity?
Many of these nuclear power plants are
using coal all over the country ever since the
first plant was built. Why?
There is also talk of building another coal-
fired nuclear plant in Levy County. Makes
sense? Can someone enlighten me?
Robert Des Camps
Citrus Springs


Sliding-fee scale
This is for the young preg-
nant womap who was denied
Medicaid: You should be proud
that you are able to support
yourself and that you don't
qualify for government assis-
tance. Why would you want the
taxpayers to support you and
your baby? And by the way, the
health department offers a slid-
ing-fee scale.
Limited resources
This is for the Sound Off
where the person says that
they are upset about the young
pregnant woman denied med-
ical treatment ... and they said
that our health care system is
corrupt. That's not true. I'm a
nurse and I'll tell you right now,
the reason that she can't get
health care is because there's a
limited amount of resources
and doctors in high-risk spe-
cialties like pregnancies, OB.
And surgeons are leaving the
profession, and you know why?
It's because of malpractice
lawsuits. It's because every-
body is sue happy and they
cannot afford to be doctors
anymore. And I'll tell you right
now, if we go to socialized
medicine, I won't be a nurse,
either. And there's already a
nursing shortage and the prob-
lem is that all these people are
abusing their Medicare. They
come in for everything. They


just come in like they don't
have to pay for it. It's not a cor-
rupt health care system. The
health care system works long
hours and we work for not very
much money. All the technolo-
gy and all the drugs and all the
health care cost money. It's a
business and we have to get
paid for our work. If you go to
socialized medicine, like in
Canada, you will wait and you
will be denied and you will pay
exorbitant taxes ... Do some
research. It's out there. You just
don't want to hear it. You want
the.government to take care of
you and pay for everything.
And I'll tell you what; I'm
against it and it's wrong.
Reasonable policy
To the pregnant young lady
without health insurance: You
could have gotten a reasonable
individual policy with Blue Cross
of Florida, provided you are in
good health ... America can only
afford to offer her .dream to sen-
ior citizens, to highly skilled,
cheap illegal scab laborers, and
young families of Citrus County
who blow their insurance money
on dope...
Help available
This is for the young woman
who is pregnant and has no
health insurance: I suggest she
contact the county Health De-
partment.' I believe she can get
her prenatal care through them.


Go to Canada
This is to the people of
Sound Off who say that
Canadians have better medical
care. Well, why don't you go to
Canada? ... I don't understand
why there's such a high per-
centage of Canadians who
come down to the U.S. to have
their knee surgery and their hip
surgery. Just check your facts.
Go to any Detroit hospital..
Anything that's up on the bor-
der, they come down and flood
our hospitals to have their knee
and hip surgeries because they
don't want to wait for it up in
Canada.
No free lunch
I'm so tired of people com-
plaining that they have no
healthcare. Most of them, I'll
bet, never tried to better them-
selves or (get an) education to
get a decent job that has
health care. And by the way,
health care of any sort is not
free. It's taken out of your pay-
check one way or another. And
national health care will not be
free, either.
In other countries, 40 per-
cent or more of your take-
home wage is for government
and health care. Hello out there
- do you hear me? No free
lunch. My husband is a 27-year
military veteran and we paid
$3,000 in co-pays this year.
Hello out there.


Sound OFF


Ready for restaurant
Does anybody know if they're
going to start rebuilding
Chicken King in Hernando?
Everybody is getting mighty
hungry.
Bump still there
Today's Wednesday, Sept. 19,
and I read in the paper some-
one called about the paving on
Halls River Road and the bump
in the road at U.S. 19 and Halls
River Road. Do you know that
it's been three weeks and that
bump still has not been fixed?
They were out there yesterday
working on the new sidewalk in
front of Hardee's, and there's a
3- to 4-inch gap in the road and
they still have not fixed that.
Several times I've driven over
the bump and I basically stop
to ride over it because it's wear
on the tires. And people are
going to rear-end someone
sometime. I just can't believe
it's been three weeks and
they've left that bump there. I
wish the commissioners would
drive out there and see and feel.
the bump themselves.
Hyped-up racing
It's kind of sad the way
NASCAR is these days ... Based
on the old days, when it was
basically goodhearted racing
with the good-ol'-boys in the
South and everybody else that
was involved, it was interesting
to go and watch those races 20,
25, 30 years ago. Today's it's all
based on money and notoriety
and glamour. It reminds me a
lot of the World Federation of


Wrestling - it's a big show.
People spend more time looking
at the drivers and the sponsors
and everything else about it.
Now we've got Kasey Kahne,
who's going to pick up the Bud-
weiser commercial. He doesn't
even look old enough to drink. I
don't understand Budweiser's
intent or why they're doing that,
but it's basically money - and
money talks. I wish they'd get
back to the good-old days where
they went in and raced, enjoyed
themselves, and the winner took
home the purse and everybody
waited to the next week for the
next race to start. Now we have
to listen to them, day after day,
about the race, of the glamor,
the horn blowing and all the
other things that go along with
winning or trying to win this
coveted Nextel Cup. I hope we
get back to the good old days.
Identify yourself
Why do people phone other
people and start talking without
ever saying who's calling? I've
even had people leave mes-
sages on my answering ma-
chine telling me to call them
back when I get in, without even
telling me who it is. I'm not a
mind reader, nor do I always
recognize a voice, nor does my
Caller I.D. always identify peo-
ple. Cell phones do not show a
person's name on a Caller I.D. It
only shows the phone number
of who's calling and says
"Florida Call." Ninety-nine per.
cent of the calls I receive are
from Florida. So "Florida call"
means nothing to me and I
refuse to answer it, figuring it's


just another telemarketer. When-
ever I call anyone, I always start
my conversation with, "Hi, this
is so-and-so," whether it's some-
one I call every day or someone
I call once a year. I always iden-
tify myself, so they know who it
is. This is the proper etiquette I
was taught as a child before
Caller I.D. ever existed. But to-
day I feel that etiquette is just a
thing of the past. It's just
thrown out the window, which is
a shame.
Restaurant choice
We don't need an Olive Gar-
den and we don't need a Red
Lobster. We need a Boston
Market.
Home business
... I have a neighbor who is
running a business from home
without permits. I would like to
know: To whom do you go to
turn this person in? Is it code
enforcement? Is it the county
business license bureau? I have
tried to contact the people, but
they did not want to listen to
me.
Power outage
Well, folks, here we go again.
It's Friday, Sept. 21, five min-
utes after 7, Heatherwood.
Guess what? The power's off
again. Sun's shining, clear sky,
no rain, no power. It's getting
to be an awful, awful headache.
When you call, they expect it
not to be on 'til 8 o'clock. But
when you call at 8 o'clock,
somehow then they'll go to 9
o'clock. Absolutely disgusting
in the modern world.


r CAN IGET EAIILER7


Hot Corner: HEALTH CARE


30, 2007 3C








4C SL't DAY,' Z IrrITEMI1i�30, 2007 ; MN INI Y us (ivIV()(JnNC '


Don't be cheap
I'm just reading the Sunday
Commentary about the Hot
Topic about waitressing and
some people won't tip.
You know, all your retiree
people don't want to pay any-
thing - nothing to cut grass,
nothing for tipping, nothing for
anything. You think everybody
owes you because you're old.
It's us younger people who are
starting their lives out, trying to
raise their families, and you
guys are (complaining) about
the tips. Well, you know what?
If you guys wouldn't order
the Blue Light Special and tip
$1 to a woman making $3.50,
all right, then don't go out and
eat. Cook for yourself. You can
have your meals. Don't go out


there and think that we need to
cater to you. I'm not even in
the service field as waitressing
or waitering. I'm an adult in
another field - lawn care. And
you guys want your grass cut
for $10? Come on, man. I'm 40
years old; I'm not 10. You guys
got to buck up and start paying
for what you deserve, all right?
I don't care if you're old.
Reward for service
In response to Charlie
Brennan's "Shades" column on
tipping: The dictionary defini-
tion of a tip is a small sum of
money given for service per-
formed ... Other people are
supposed to be paid appropri-
ate wages. I'm rather tired of
everyone holding their hand
out.


Seen as insult
Charlie Brennan, in your
"Shades of Gray" on this
Sunday, in your article about
tipping, you neglected to men-
tion points made in an article I
read in the Chronicle a while
back, whereas tipping is con-
sidered an insult in many parts
of the world. In Japan,
Australia, it's considered an
insult, suggesting that the per-
son is not doing their job well
enough and correctly enough,
that you have to pay them extra
money to get them to do a job
they've already been hired to
do and being paid by some
employer.


Cook at home
I'm calling in reference to the
Hot Corner about tips, and
everyone saying it's poor atti-
tude and bad service and they
need to go to junior college.
Well, if all waiters and wait-
resses went to college and
weren't waiters and waitresses,
then I guess everybody would
just have to cook at home and
then they wouldn't be able to
go out to eat.
Decent wage
I was calling in about the tip-
ping, which I think has been
fine, but it's getting out of
hand now. A person can't even


Hot Corner: *' :


Letters to the E IT


Callous driver
I just read the article by Terry Witt: "Hit and
Run driver avoids prison."
Judge Ric Howard should be going to prison
for stupidity. If he had a brain, he would be
dangerous.
This person who cares more about a head-
light than he does a life doesn't deserve the
special treatment he got.
No wonder we have no respect for our judi-
cial system.
Herbert Graham
Chiefland

Quoting leaders
Mr. Spoto likes quotations. Here are good
ones.
John Quincy Adams, July 4, 1821:
"She has, in the lapse of nearly half a centu-
ry, without a single exception, respected the
independence of other nations while asserting
and maintaining her own.
"She has abstained from interference in the
concerns of others, even when conflict has
been for principles to which she clings, as to
the last vital drop that visits the heart. She has
seen that probably for centuries to come, all
the contests of that Aceldama the European
world, will be contests of inveterate power, and
emerging right.
"Wherever the standard of freedom and
Independence has been or shall be unfurled,
there will her heart, her benedictions and her
prayers be.


FEAR
Continued from Page 1C

a better job identifying the
types of sex offenders who
truly are a public concern.
"I definitely think it needs to
be defined a little better," she


SHADES
Continued from Page IC

concerns about an out-of-coun-
ty man buying a group of
mobile homes near Inverness
to be rented to sexual offend-
ers who've been released from
jail poses a similar dilemma.
While the Pinellas County
man who had that plan now
says he's not going forth with it,
it's a good time to have the dis-
cussion about how to deal with
these people.
The county is drafting an
ordinance to keep released
sexual offenders away from
places where children gather,
as well as other requirements.
Ultimately, though, someone
could establish a community
specifically for released of-
fenders and it would be diffi-
cult to do much, if anything,
about it.
Is it best to allow them to be
grouped or to keep them sepa-
rated?
To me, it makes sense to
throw up barriers to discour-
age such residential communi-
ties. At some point, though,
there is a question of civil lib-


said. "That's a p
why there are s
list."
Manning, w
Inverness and
town hall meet
Meadows proje
Road 581, said
not allow da
offenders to live

erties and rights
have served the
While we hav
creeps living thr
County (far few
upstanding pe
the greatest con
importing child
who otherwise
gravitated else
If they're alre
and/or moving h
it preferable to
tered throughout
hoods or lumped
On one hand, t
at-the-Sarasota-i
which it's best
grouped. On the
worry that the as
make in that coi
inspire convers:
people who h
minds and boc
minds and bodi(
To that end,
scattered may b
to go, but then t
cern about wi
which house o:
and who has ci
neighborhood,
again, that's ur
- realistically-
in Citrus Count
out most of the c


"But she goes not abroad, in search of mon-
sters to destroy.
"She is the well-wisher to the freedom and
independence of all.
"She is the champion and vindicator only of
her own.
"She will commend the general cause by the
countenance of her voice, and the benignant
sympathy of her example.
"She well knows that by once enlisting under
other banners than her own, were they even
the banners of foreign independence, she
would involve herself beyond the power of
extrication, in all the wars of interest and
intrigue, of individual avarice, envy and ambi-
tion, which assume the colors and usurp the
standard of freedom.
"The fundamental maxims of her policy
would insensibly change from liberty to force ...
"She might become the dictatress of the
world. She would be no longer the ruler of her
own spirit ...
"(America's) glory is not dominion, but liber-
ty Her march is the march of the mind. She
has a spear and a shield: but the motto upon
her shield is, Freedom, Independence, Peace.
This has been her Declaration: this has been,
as far as her necessary intercourse with the
rest of mankind would permit, her practice.
And President Lincoln:
"You can fool all the people some of the
time, and some of the people all the time, but
you cannot fool all the people all the time."
Marilyn J. Day
Beverly Hills

problem . That's "It's like I wouldn't want a
3o many on the bunch of murderers just out of
jail," she said.
protest at a "If I've got one next door to
ing about The me, I can keep watch. I don't
ting a T want 20 of them next door to
ect off County me because they're murderers.
the law should
dangerous sex "The only thing they have in
in groups. common is that one thing."

s for those who It doesn't please me to note
ir sentences. that in my little neighborhood
'e a number of I've learned through the years
roughout Citrus of three individuals I'd never
ver than good, want associating with children:
ople, though), 0 The former tenant of the
icern for me is house across the street was a
molesters here convicted sexual offender who
would have was convicted of selling heroin
here. to a youth. I learned that short-
ady living here ly after moving in. He's since
here, though, is died.
have them scat- 0 A family a short way down
it our neighbor- the street drove one adult son
d together? off after he was accused of
there's my kids- inappropriate behavior with a
beach view, in young female family member.
to keep them 0 The guy I bought the house
e other hand, I from killed himself in Floral
associations they City a couple of weeks ago
immunity would amid allegations of molesting
nations between stepdaughters.
iave let their Other than that, it's a nice
dies go where neighborhood!
es shouldn't go. There's a dark side to our
keeping them society, and if we don't shine a
)e the best way light on it and discuss options
there's the con- for dealing with it, there's little
ho's living in reason to think the situation
n which street will improve.


children in that
etc. But, then
avoidable and
-the status quo
y and through-
country.


Charlie Brennan is editor of
the Citrus County Chronicle.
E-mail him at cbrennan
@chronicleonline. corn


Site of Sandusky
I'm reading about the prosecutor who at-
tempted suicide and they say it's in Sandusky,
north of Detroit. When I drove through San-
dusky, it was west of Detroit, not north. Some-
body correct me, or is there another Sandusky?
Inflated prices
I'm calling about the guy who was complain-
ing about his property taxes going up on a
cement slab, over 18 percent. What I have never
seen printed in here is the reason why the taxes
have gone up on everything. It's because
remember about a year and a half or two years
ago when there was a 10-month window that
property just went through the roof and every-
body was going, "Oh goody, goody, we can just
double the price on this house and sell it," and
all the land was being bought up because they
were going to build houses on spec, and then
10 months later the bottom fell out of every-
thing. Well, during those 10 months, that's
when - surprise, surprise - the property
appraisers came around again to appraise us.
So we were appraised on that inflated price of
the property. I think we, as people, need to


OTHER
Continued from Page 1C

By increasing our knowledge
of what is going on in our com-
munities, our state, our coun-
try and in our world, we can
improve our quality of life. It is
clear that the problem is
already here, 64 percent of
people believe quality of life is
declining. Where do we begin
to improve our quality of life?
We can first start with an edu-
cation reform in our public
schools that creates effective
and efficient ways to become
informed of what is going on in
our community. We have to cul-
tivate a new learning environ-
ment for our future generation,
and educate them on this area
of importance. Therefore, we
propose starting in our educa-
tion system. This would be the
ideal place to create a change
in our society, because this is
the place of our future genera-
tions.
Currently in The Florida
Department of Education
Sunshine State Standards,
mass media is categorized as a
language art elective. Included
in this education reform is the
proposal to incorporate the
mass media elective offered in
the Sunshine State Standards


VOICES
Continued from Page 1C

combined income between
$50,000 and $100,000 may now
be forced to pay the added
AMT taxes meant for the
"rich." The hardest hit will be
families living in big cities and
in states with high taxes like
New York, New Jersey and
California - strongholds of the
"Progressives" who support
big government spending.
My point: Rational people
will alter their economic
behavior to reduce the impact


go out and eat without having
to tip $3 or $4 on top of it.
These people are on fixed
incomes. The people who own
the restaurants should be pay-
ing these people a decent wage
so they can make a living and
they don't get to hate the peo-
ple when they come in.
Some people cannot afford
to pay their paperboy, their
garbage man, their everybody,
like you're saying the $10 to
$20, $50 a year. That's
unheard of. People do not have
that kind of money to be giving
out. If you add up all these
things that they call soliciting
on the phone, coming to your
door, coming through your
mail. This should all be
stopped. The people should
have to pay the wage that


demand that the reappraisals are done aga
now at the present actual price of our prop
ties. That is the problem. That is the whole
problem and I think it was done deliberately
and maliciously.
Indoor rain gauge
I'm looking at Friday, Sept. 21's newspap
and looking at the weather statistics on pag
4A. It says yesterday that we had a trace of
rain. I know it rained at my house all day ai
we had strong rain and wind and thunderst
last night. They must have the rain gauge s
in their living room somewhere.
Fair game
Regarding property tax: What this county
needs is - the county and the state - for
undeclared property, home improvement ai
additions, after a certain date, such proper
and additions would be fair game for the co
to assess.
Luck of the draw
Sept. 21's Sound Off titled "Fantasy 5" -
your point is? The balls jump the way they


into currently required
English 1 course offered in
ninth grade. By doing this, stu-
dents will be able to learn
about media earlier; whereas,
before, they had to wait until
12th grade or take an elective
class that in most cases stu-
dents were not even aware of.
Benefits of this reform
include more knowledgeable
individuals, increase in inter-
est in community involvement,
and the desire to analyze infor-
mation and come up with a
probable solution or new out-
come. This will have a long-
term effect in our society. By
making the people more inter-
ested in news that affects their
lives, we can help them have a
larger impact upon society,
whether it is by increasing
voter turnout or acquiring a
larger donation to a charity.
People will be able to express
their opinion in a manner that
can be heard and consequently
improving all of our lives in the
process.
Essentially, this reform will
create awareness, interest and
the knowledge needed to find
answers and resolutions with-
out adding to the school's budg-
et. Since this is already an elec-
tive class in some schools and a
required part of government
class, there will be no need to
get new books or materials,

of any new taxes.
Specifically targeting "the
wealthy" for tax increases is
foolishness. With the exception
of the truly super-rich, who
earn so much that taxes at any
level cannot affect their
lifestyles, the 10 percent of
Americans who pay more than
60 percent of all the taxes will
resist. Whether by working
less, buying less or trading less,
they will reduce their tax lia-
bilities. Collections will be less
than anticipated and growth of
the economy will slow.
If this leads to higher unem-
ployment rates and wage com-
pression, it will hurt those


which makes it easier to i
porate into classes, espec
in schools with small ex]
ing accounts which migi
driven away since they
only stretch their budget s
This reform effect is
going to have an imme
effect upon people's lives;
ever, it is a good step tow
more conscious America
proposing a small yet effe
reform, we can success
change the way people
ceive and understand
information that is upon t
People do not know that
of the decisions are b
influenced by things
thought of as safe, whe
reality, they are only the
influence their decision
profit entities that are loo
only after themselves.
In safeguarding against
media manipulating the n
es, we can insure that
endurance of the republic
be protected. After all
informed society is
enhanced society.


Lou Frey Jr. is a politic
analyst, commentator a
newspaper columnist a
former Florida represent
in Congress. Send e-mai
lou.frey@lowndes-law.co


Americans who pay few
most of all.
Not the outcome Con
seeks!


Dr. William Dixon is a
Inverness resident and re
surgeon. He earned his I
degree from New Yor
Medical College, an MBA
University of South Flori
and his bachelor's froi
Columbia College. He sei
11 years in the U.S. Arm
achieving the rank ol
lieutenant colonel. He ca
e-mailed at dixonbilld
chronicleonline. coin.


in


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y



er
ge

nd .
:orms
hitting "





nd
ty
county



-and:
are.

ncor- '
cially 4
pend- :
ht be -
can
o far.
not
diate '
how-
ard a
a. By,
active
fully
per-
the
them.
many
being
they
.n in
re to
ns to
king

t the
mass-
the
c will
, an,
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nd
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taxes

gress


n
tired j
M.D. '
k ;
from
ida

rved *
2y, ,
f i*
nbe
a)


these people can afford to live
on. I feel sorry for them, but
some of them are very rude
and nasty and unhelpful and
don't care about you, either,
and then they expect a nice,
big tip.
Give a dollar
Regarding tipping waitresses
in Citrus County: These people ,
work for a living. They deserve
a few extra bucks and it won't
cost you much. Give them an .'
extra dollar. She may have that '/
job instead of another because ,,
of the flexible hours. Maybe
she has small children at
home, or a husband who works -
and she has to work her hours
around him. Don't be so dog-
gone cheap, Citrus County. Give;, "
these people a break.



ir:


I--


CITRUS COUNTY (FI) C11RONICLE


(')MMI'N'I AhRY


Sound










C,7srs (?otNm' (FL) CHRONICLE COMMENTARY SUNDAY SPPTEMIiLR 30, 2007 5C


Hot Corner: SQUAD CAR


Think it through
This is Sept. 12. Recently,
somebody called in
complaining about
the sheriff's deputies S
having their patrol
cars going to and
from work. He needs
to think things
through. Has he con-
sidered how large a
parking lot would be
required to park all of cA
the deputies' cars? 56
And also, you'd have 56
to have additional Rea
space for them to to
park their personal Off
cars when they drove subj
it to get their squad nee
ca'. It would have to nan
be a fenced, secure, to
lighted space. It reo
w6uld take up a huge wi
amount of space and lei
would require a great att
deal of money to tas
maintain it every year.
I think the sheriff has ma
chosen a much more e
economical way to
take care of the cars. c
Think about it.

Area deterrent


knows that that officer is
armed? Just a thought.


i3-0579
'ders are invited
call the Sound
f line about any
ject. You do not
'd to leave your
me and have up
30 seconds to
ord. Comments
II be edited for
ngth, personal
tacks and good
ste. Editors will
cut libelous
trial. Opinions
expressed are
purely those
of the callers.


Always on call
There's not a thing
wrong with these
deputies taking their
cars home. This way
it's part of their
salary. They can also
go to a call immedi-
ately and they don't
have to go anywhere
else if there is a call.
Also, they do not have
to have two cars -
one to drive home
and leave sit all night.
Get off of their
backs. These people
do a good job.
School lineup
Responding to
"Squad car use,"
Sept. 25: How can
you say Dawsy has a
strict protocol regard-
ing driving squad cars
for personal use? I
emphasize "strict."
Every day, I arrive at
Inverness Middle
SSchool to pick up my


child. I get there anywhere
orf m 40 minutes to one hour


Sept. 13, to the person who before let-out time. Waiting in
thinks deputies shouldn't take front of me in his squad car is
their squad cars home: Have an off-duty deputy with the
yop ever considered how much engine running, air conditioner
of a deterrent it is when a on. I have his car number.
criminal is in the area and he Dress code? Hah! Does a tank
sees a squad car parked there? top and cut-off jeans constitute
Hcw he's going to avoid that proper dress code? Think not.
particular area because that Also, with his daughter in the
officer might be home and he car, how can he respond to a


call? Isn't this putting his
daughter in danger or harm's
way? He is not the only deputy
dbing this. There are more -
one at PGE and one at Citrus
High School. The one at the
high school waits at CVS in
unmarked cars, engine run-
ning, air conditioner on. If the
cars are GPS equipped, then
Dawsy knows all this is going
on and he approves of it. I am
not the only one who is taking
note. Off-duty and on-duty
deputies are seen all over the
county going to Home Depot,
Lowe's, Wal-Mart, doctors'
offices, restaurants, on person-
al business. Why should they
own their own vehicle when
Dawsy pays for the car pay-
ments, gas and insurance?
What a deal. Free car, free gas,
free insurance. I want to sign
up.
Lax dress code
This is in response to today's
Sound Off titled "Squad car
use." Very good article, the
gentleman or lady who called it
in. They must be working for
the sheriff's (office). They state
that you should have your facts
straight. Fact is, last week I
was traveling southbound on
(U.S.) 41 between (State Road)
200 and (County Road) 491
and there was a deputy who
had a vehicle pulled over in the
parking lot at a nearby bar. He
was in a T-shirt, sandals and
shorts. He wasn't your ordinary
road deputy; he was up in the
higher echelon because I have
seen him on the road before.


Also, there is a deputy who
lives in my community and I
see him from time to time leav-
ing in his shorts and T-shirt
and sneakers. So as far as their
strict dress code - either
they're not strictly enforcing it
or there is none. So once
again, if you're going to have
facts, get them right.

Slow response
I'm calling in regards to
everybody complaining about
Sheriff Dawsy letting his men
take their cars home. I believe
it's absolutely ridiculous the
money that we're spending on
that. I've watched one officer
and it's supposed to be limited
on his off time, but he comes
every week ... and then goes to
shop.'Plus, my home was bro-
ken into and it took two calls to
911 and the response time was
an hour and a half. Something
has to be done.

Night and day shifts
To the apologist for the sher-
iff's (office) in Sound Off Sept.
25: How can you justify a
department to have enough
squad cars in order that people
have a car to take home,
including people who work in
the office? Do you realize that
policy requires providing cars
for those officers who work the
night shift because the day
shift took their car home? This
increases a department's budg-
et unnecessarily. That's looking
at the facts. Well, it's only tax-
payer money anyway.


Grocery shopping
This is in reply to the "Squad
car use" section. Just for the
person who called: The facts
are that the sheriff's office
does not have a strict protocol
with regards to driving a vehi-
cle. They're allowed to use
those vehicles to go grocery
shopping if they want to.
Unmarked vehicles do not have
GPS equipped. So detectives,
lieutenants, the sheriff, the cap-
tain, anybody in that division,
are allowed to drive wherever
they want anytime, and nobody
knows what they're doing or
where they're going. So those
are the facts. And as far as if
they are near a call and they
have to answer it - no, they do
not. That is not true. They do
not have to answer that call. If
they're off duty and if they see
an accident, that's their job as
an officer to stop and render
aid. So regardless of any sher-
iff's offices that they're working
for, they should naturally stop
at an accident and see if
they're OK. And those are the
facts.

No protocol
This is in reference to the
sheriff's deputies and the sher-
iff and fellow law enforcement
personnel who take their squad
cars home and use them for
personal use. The person who
called in today, Tuesday, Sept.
25, in reference to sheriff's
squad cars, he must be or she
must be a law enforcement offi-
cial or administrator. They


seem to be well informed about
it, but the point that I'd like to
make is, if the cars have GPS
on them or they're allowed to
use them, it's (not) very, very,
very limited personal use. I've
seen them take their spouses
shopping using the squad cars.
If they have GPS on them, how
many of us have seen two and
three squad cars together and
the deputies just sitting there
talking? I've seen the squad
cars behind shopping centers.
So this person ought to get the
facts. This person who seems
to be well informed really isn't
well informed. The personal use
of those cars should be illegal.
No very, very, very, very limited
(personal use). Either you do or
you don't. I've seen them
abused, and they're still being
abused.
Use and abuse
This is in reference to the
"Squad car use." I'd like to
speak about a detective who
moved into our neighborhood
in December of 2004. This is
waste in its entirety, abusing
the use of a patrol car or a
detective's car.

SHARE YOUR
THOUGHTS
* Follow the instructions on
today's Opinion page to
send a letter to the editor.
* Letters must be no
longer than 350 words,
and writers will be limited
to three letters a month.


30
Playhouse 19 -
Threepenny Opera
ACT-Mouse Trap


Habitat Golf
Tounament


Playhouse 19 -
Threepenny Opera


Playhouse 19 -
Threepenny Opera
ACT-Mouse Trap
Friends Book Sale
Oktoberfest


Playhouse 19 -
Threepenny Opera
ACT-Mouse Trap
Friends Book Sale
Oktoberfest


7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Three Penny Opera WCE Card Party Chili Cook Off
ACT-Mouse Trap Columbus Day Fine Arts Show
Friends Book Sale Night of the Heron
Oktoberfest Refuge Week
Bike Ride Parade of Homes


14
Chili Cook Off
Fine Arts Show
Parade of Homes
Light Shine
Sock Hop


15


Parade of Homes


16


Parade of Homes


Pumpkin Patch
Parade of Homes


18


Parade of Homes
Pumpkin Patch
Black Magic Jazz


19


Parade of Homes
Pumpkin Patch
Artisian Boutique


J. L


f2 Cattle Drive
u20 Lions BBQ
Parade of Homes
Pumpkin Patch
Artisian Boutique
Arts de Fall
K of C Craft Fair
Arts Festival
Spotlight on Theater


Friends of the Library


S

0 0


FALL BOOK SALE
Fundrniser

October 5-5

Citrus County Auditorium
US 41 S., Inverness
Sale Hours
Fri. 5-8 p.m. with $5 donation
No admission charge for the following
Sat. 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Sun. 1 p.m. - 4 p.m.
Mon. 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. (half price day)
Tue. 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. ($3 a bag)
Great bargains in recycled reading!

Thousands of best sellers, Westerns,
romance, computer, large print, history,
crafts,.cooking, health & fitness, children's,
travel, foreign language, vintage &
collectible, etc.
Proceeds benefit Friends of Coastal Region,
Central Ridge and Lakes Region Libraries and
Citrus County Library System.


For book sale information call
746-1334 or 527-8405


Cl ii1~ .11-E


* Citrus Springs Concert Series -
* Playhouse 19-Assassins
* Salute to our Community
* Citrus Jazz Society
* Manatee Festival
* Sports/Celebrity Auction/Dinner Dance
* Flanagan Memorial Golf Tournament
* Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration
* Martin Luther King, Jr. Parade
* CFCC Performing Arts -Mac Frampton
* Cattle Barons' Ball
* West Citrus Elks Parade of Fashions
* Tractor Pull & Show
* ACT - Pygmalion
* Parade of Fashions
* Galaxy of Stars
* Gulf-Island Theater-Knock Em Dead


* ACT - Pygmalion
* Altrusa Monte Carlo Night
* Junior Achievement Bowl-a-thon
* Crusin' At The Hop
* Light Shine-A Social History of Florida
* Fitness in Citrus begins
* Citrus County Jazz Society Jam
* NAMI - Walk of Hope
* Citrus Springs Conceit Series -Rich Natole
* Barbershoppers Singing Valentines
* CFCC Performing Arts-
* Playhouse 19 - Assassins
* Beverly Hills International Festival
* Celebration Fashion Show
* 'School'astic Golf Tournamnet
* CCBA Parade of Homes
* Grand Ole Opry
* Purple Heart Ceremony
* African-American History Month
* Spring Fling
* Savor The Art
* GCUSBCA Women's Bowling

* Playhouse 19 - Songs for a New World
* Strawberry Festival
* Manatee Car & Truck Show
* WCE Card Party
* CR Historic Home Tours
* Citrus County Jazz Society Jam
* Fourth Annual Car & Truck Show
* Italian Street Festival
* Steak & Steak
* Charity Ball
* Irish Variety Show
* CFCC Performing Arts
* Plant & Garden Expo
* Citrus Memorial Health Systems Salute to
Our Community
* CS Concert Series
* Fashion Cares


* Homosassa Kotary - New uoyssey
* St. Pat's Golf Tournament
* Citrus County Fair
* Crazy For Quilting
. Mickey Finn Show
* Fort Cooper Days
" Springs Fashion Show
* Luminary Art Night
* Corvettes In The Sunshine
" Walk For Life
* Marble Expo
* Captivating Styles
* Clean Air Ride
* Wood Wind & Water
* SCORE Golf Classic
* ACT - Wife Begins at Forty
* Fitness in Citrus
* Inverness Relay For Life
* United Way Awards Luncheon
* Power Boat Races
* Black Tie & Blue Jeans
* Friends of the Library Book Sale
* Citrus Community Concert Choir
" Sugamill Chorale Concert


* Power Boat Races
* Friends of the Library Book Sale
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Citrus Community Concert Choir
* Engaging Mature Workers Week
* Friends of the Library Book Sale
* Swing For A Cure
* Christians United In Christ Golf
" Citrus Springs Concert Series .
* Dinner and a Song
" Nature Coast Dog Walk
* Zeke Lapinski Golf Tournament
* Playhouse 19 - Proof
* Market Days and Garden Show
* Run With The Mayor
* Am Irish Club Golf Tournament
* Friends of Dunnellon Library Book Sale
" Bowl For Kids Sake
* Me and My SK8 Contest
" Week of the Young Child
" Citrus County Bass Challenge


* Superintendent's Golf
* Volunteer Fair
* Earth Day Bird-A-Thon
* ACT- Curtain Up On Murder
* Car Wash and Bazaar
* Playhouse 19 - Godspell
* Swing Into Spring
* CCBA Fishing Tournament
* Hurricane/Disaster Expo
* Ozello Adventure Race
" Central Ridge Relay For Life
* Panther Golf Tournament
* Casting For Kids
" Gonne oandI ~rvipac lDinner/AuMtinn


* Citrus County Bass Challenge
* Playhouse 19 - Godspell
* Nereids Cards & Games Party
* Cool Springs Ranch Balloon Classic
* Sheriffs Summer Safety Expo
* Gospel Jubilee
* Greater Gas Association Fishing Toum.
* Lecanto Relay For Life
* Informational Fiesta
* Flag Day
* A Day of Fine Arts
* World's Greatest Baby Shower
* Rotoract Kickball Tournament
Swing With The Breez
* Mother's Tea
* ACT - Curtain Up On Murder
* Gulf Island Civic Theater-Look, No Hans
* Citrus Memorial Ball
* Spring Greek Festival
* Fly-In
* LHS Project Graduation
" CHS Project Graduation
* Hurricane/Disaster Expo
" Comedy Show


* HurricanelDisaster Expo
* Fiesta Tropicale
* An Affair To Remember
* Inverness Flag Day Ceremony
* Homosassa Fireworks Show
* Cobia Big Fish Tournament
* Hernando Heritage Yard Sale
* Gulf Island Civic Theater-Look, No Hans
* Rolling Thunder Golf Tournament
* ACT- Music Man


* Patriotic Evening
* See It My Way Exhibit
* Crystal River Fireworks
" ACT- Music Man
* Run For The Money Auction
* Key Run For the Money
* Key Center Telethon
* Boys & Girls Club Car Raffle Drawing
* Stuff The Bus
* Citrus Community Concert Choir


* Stuff The Bus
* Kids Take Me Fishing Clinic
* Business Women's Luncheon
* Ovarian Cancer 5K Run
* CRHS Pirates Golf Tournament
* United Way Kickoff
* Back To School Workshop
* Senior Foundation Devil Rays Trip
* Citrus Radiology Golf Tournament
* Gulf Island Theater - One Hundred Years
* CHS Reunion


* Harvest Moon Craft Show
* Sell Your Own Treasures
* Veterans Golf Tournament
* Save our Waters Week
* CCH Annual Fundraiser Banquet
* AKC Responsible Dog Ownership Day
* Manatee Masters Golf Tournament
* Sertoma Sock Hop
* ACT- The Mouse Trap
* Sunset Festival
* Playhouse 19 - Threepenny Opera
* Spanish American Golf Tournament
* What A Day To Be A Scout!
* Beat The Sheriff 5K Run
* Christmas in September
* Sweet Adelines Beyond The Music
* Senior Foundation Devil Rays Trip
* Knights of Columbus Card Party
* German Club Oktoberfest
* Women's Health & Fitness Expo
* Big Yard Sale
* E-Nini-Hassee Spaghetti Dinner
* 832 K-9's Deputy Dog


* Habitat For Humanity Golf
* ACT- The Mouse Trap
" Rails to Trails Bike Ride
* Playhouse 19 - Three Penny Opera
* West Citrus Elks Annual Card Party
* Realtors Benefit Golf Tournament
* Night of the Heron
* Sertoma Oktoberfest
* Day of Caring/Make a Difference Day
" Friends of the Library Fall Book Sale
* St. Scholastica Men's Club Craft Show
* E-Nini-Hassee Pumkin Patch
" That Old Black Magic Jazz Concert
* Fabulous '50s and '60s Show and Sock Hop
* Columbus Day Memorial Service
* National Wildlife Refuge Week
* Homosassa Chili Cook Off
* Light Shine - A Short History of Florida
* CCBA Parade of Homes
Nature Coast Fine Arts Show
* Artisans Boutique
*Arts De Fall
* Knights of Coumbus Craft Fair
* CRWC Arts and Crafts Festival
* Spotlight on Theater and Art
* Cattle Drive
* BH Lions Chicken Barbecue
* Greek Festival
* West Citrus Elks Arts & Crafts Show
* CRWC Arts and Crafts Festival
* Great American Cooter Fest
* CCBA Golf Tournament
* Veterans Appreciation Show
* Cooterween Family Fall Festival
* Cooter Triathalon
* Taste of Citrus


* Women of Sugarmill Woods Fashion Show
* Festival of the Arts Wine Tasting
* Rotary Blood Screening
Support Staff Workshop
* BH Lions Arts & Crafts Show
* Festival of The Arts
* CCBA Home and Outdoors Show
* One Man Show
* Playhouse 19 - Rumors
* Healthy Living Fair
* Dodge For Dollars
* ACT- The Gingerbread Lady
* Blues & Barbecue
* Friends of the Homosassa Library Book Sale
* Light Shine - Twilight at Monticello
* CMH Concert Series - One-Man Variety
* St. Scholastic CCW Fall Fashion Show
* Festival of the Arts
SSt. Scholastica Golf
* Continuity of Care Wine Auction
* Veterans Fair
* Homosassa Lions Christmas Square
* Rotary Radio/TV Auction
* 4th Annual Dinner and Auction
* Knights of Columbus Nickle Social
* Veterans Day ParadelMemorial Service
* Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast
* Humane Society Ride For Rescue
* Caruth Camp Challenge
* Citrus Stampede Rodeo
* Parade of Trees
* Veterans Appreciation Show
* West Citrus Elks Annual Craft Show
* Winter Wonderland Craft Show
* Ozello Arts & Crafts Festival
* Floral City Heritage Days


" Floral City Heritage Days
* CMH Concert Series-The Amazing Crooner
" CRWC Silver Bells
* Jazz For the Holidays
* Playhouse 19 - Rumors
" IWC Aunt Sarah's Kitchen
* Father Christmas Ball
* Light Shine - The Messiah by Handel
* Crystal River Christmas Parade
* Inverness Winter Celebration
* Crystal River Christmas Parade
CFCC Performing Arts
* Crystal River Christmas Parade
* BH Holiday Parade
* Sugarmill Chorale Concert
* Celebration of Lights
* Chronicle/Pines Tennis Tournament
* Country Rocks the Canyon
* Inverness Christmas Parade
* Citrus Jazz Society
* Beverly Hills Parade
* Citrus Springs Parade
Homosassa Boat Parade
SMinht nf I i:.kt


-~


CC)MMENTA-RY


USE_


L I


---i r


SUNDAY, Sm-nwm-ut 30, 2007 SC


RTIC US COUNTY (FL CLE





GC SUNDAY, SEPrTEMBFaR 30, 2007


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I










CHAMBER CONNECTION


sN's


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE






Technical and creative


D
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 30, 2007
wwwchronicleonline.com


Ron DeSerranno, CEO of Mobiform, recently moved his software company from Canada to his new Meadowcrest facility.

Software development company founded in Canada .now calls Crystal River home


CHERI HARRIS
charris@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Imagine playing a favorite computer game, hit-
ting the keyboard and commanding characters
on the screen to do your bidding.
With a good laptop, you can play this game any-
where - at home in bed in your pajamas, or even
lounging on a beach in Maui.
Now imagine that controlling a cleverly
designed graphic image on your monitor is an
important part of your job.
Making computer graphics do real work is what
Mobiform Software Inc. is all about.
Mobiform Software Inc. creates graphics design
products for Web developers and software devel-
opers working in Microsoft's new Windows
Presentation Foundation and Microsoft XAML.
Mobiform products include Aurora, an XAML
design product for developing user interfaces and
graphics for Windows desktop and Web applica-
tions, and VantagePoint WPF Controls, a suite of
user interface components for software develop-
ers and designers who use Microsoft .NET 3.0 as
the platform for their software products.
Applications include industrial control systems
for manufacturing, medical applications including


... Citrus County is near the
apex of a developing technolo-
gy corridor that spans from
Orlando and Tampa to Ocala
and beyond.

medical imaging, and mapping, simulations, and
"anything that's very visual," Mobiform CEO Ron
DeSerranno said.
One example of an industrial control system is a
robotic arm used in automobile man-
ufacturing. A Mobiform graphics
design product showing the robotic ON TI
arm on a computer monitor would w
relate more to the image of the I www.mo
robotic arm on the screen than what
happens on the assembly plant floor.
Mobiform Marketing Manager Debbie Gardner
said, "We take words and turn them into pictures."
While some people might think of software
development as hard science,' DeSeranno said it
is actually a more creative industry with more
in common with architectural design than


Decoding 'VBR encoding


ROB PEGORARO
The Washington Post
Q. What is the "variable bit rate
encoding". option in my music soft-
ware good for?
A The so-called "VBR" encoding
available in most major digital-music
formats lets you copy music more effi-
ciently. Instead of using the same disk
space for each second of a song ("con-
stant bit rate encoding"), it will let a
more complex passage take up more
space than a simpler interlude.
The -results should sound a little
better, at least when Heard through a
good set of speakers - not that non-
audiophiles should feel compelled to
,re-rip every CD after selecting this
:option.
The only real downside to VBR is
that a few ancient devices may not
play these files.
To change your bit-rate setting in
*iTunes, go to the iTunes menu (in Mac
IOS X) or the Edit menu (in Windows)
land select Preferences. Then click the
Advanced icon, followed by the
Importing heading; select "Custom"
from the Settings drop-down menu
:and click the checkbox next to "Use
Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)."
SWindows Media Player doesn't offer
,a VBR option for MP3 files, but you
lcan choose one for Microsoft's
Windows Media Audio format: Go to
,the Rip menu, select the Format sub-


--= Help FILE -==--

menu and pick "Windows Media
Audio (Variable Bit Rate)."
Q. Google Desktop wastes my time
with Web searches when I need to find
a file on my computer. How can I keep
this program focused on my PC?
A Click the small, downward-facing
triangle at the top of Google Desktop's
sidebar (or, if you don't use that, at the
right of its search box) and select
"Preferences."
When that page opens in your
browser, click the "Display" heading.
Scroll down to "Default Search Type
for Search Boxes," select "Search
Desktop" and then click "Save
Preferences."
Q: Most of the online mapping sites
can't find my home address. Is there a
company I can contact to fix this?
A Two firms, Tele Atlas and Navteq,
supply data to the big mapping sites.
Both have Web pages where a user
can report errors:
mapfeedback.teleatlas.com and
mapreporter.navteq.com.
A correction takes time to publish,
however. Dan Adams, Tele Atlas' vice
president of operations, said the com-
pany gets about 2,500 reports a week
for the United States and Canada
alone, and each has to be checked out.
Please see HELP FILE/Page 4D


H
)b


mathematics.
DeSerranno, 41, started the company in 2003 in
Vancouver, Canada, and in 2005, he brought it to
the United States.
In June, Mobiform came to Citrus County, locat-
ing in a small office space next to Manatee Lanes
in Crystal River
DeSerranno chose to bring his business to
Citrus County partly through the process of elimi-
nation: He decided South Florida was too expen-
sive and the North is too cold. He also said Citrus
County is near the apex of a developing technolo-
gy corridor that spans from Orlando and Tampa to
Ocala and beyond.
He also cited reasons such as: His father win-
ters in the area, and he also likes
the natural beauty, quality of life,
IE NET affordable real estate and the rela-
tively light traffic.
iform.com. DeSerranno noted that in his
business, he doesn't need to be in a
metropolitan center because his customers are
international, and so he relies on e-commerce.
After raising $3.25 million in capital during the
summer, DeSerranno was able to hire more full-
time employees - he has nine now with plans to


Business I

Hypnotist opens
Lecanto practice
Certified Hypnotist, Diane Valent, has
recently opened a practice at 2067 N.
Lecanto Hwy. in Lecanto. Specializing in
weight loss sessions, golf
enhancement and mind
and body relaxation, Valent
is ready to take appoint-
ments. She is a certified
member of the National
Guild of Hypnotists, a mem-
ber of the American Heart
Association, a Hernando- Diane
Pasco Hospice volunteer Valent
and a student of Healing
Touch. Classes in smoking
cessation and weight loss are about to begin
and private sessions are always available by
appointment. If you are ready to make a
change in your life using hypnosis as a tool,
call Valent at (352) 419-0126 for registration
or information.
Enrollment open
for B.E.S.T. careers
One Stop Workforce Connection is now
recruiting 120 individuals, 18 and older, inter-
ested in careers in healthcare or manufactur-
ing. Through the agency's new B.E.S.T. Grant,
qualified individuals can receive free career
training, individualized coaching and job
placement services. Participants can choose
from more than 11 career-training tracks.
During the first week of October, B.E.S.T.


Please see SOFTWARE/Page 4D


staff will host orientations. After orientation,
participants take the free 40-hour, weeklong
introductory bridge into either healthcare or
manufacturing.
The B.E.S.T. program is open to all Citrus,
Levy and Marion County residents. Interested
candidates are asked to contact Leisa Miller
at (352) 873-7955 or e-mail best@clmwork-
force.com to get more information and to sign
up for an orientation.
New homeowner welcoming
service now available
Finding one's way around town just got a
whole lot easier for new homeowners thanks
to Welcome Wagon and its time-honored tra-
dition of introducing new neighbors to the
local business community.
For more than 79 years, Welcome Wagon
- the nation's largest homeowner welcoming
program - has been making it easier for new
homeowners to discover the goods and serv-
ices offered in their community by introducing
them to local merchants and business own-
ers. Recently, Welcome Wagon's keepsake
Gift Books began mailing to new homeown-
ers in Citrus County. In addition to listings of
area sponsors, each Gift Book contains
pages of important phone numbers, valuable
information about the community and special
offerings, exclusively for new homeowners.
"The Gift Book is received with great enthu
siasm by new homeowners," said Nancy
Edwards, account executive for Citrus

Please see DIGFST/Page 4E


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY



Pay


yourself


first
DEAR BRUCE: You
have said "pay yourself
first" several times in
your column. I'm not sure
exactly what you mean. I know
it has something to do with sav-
ings, but how do you pay your-
self? - Reader, via e-mail
DEAR READER: "Pay your-
self first" simply means that
when you receive a paycheck,
remove a certain amount and
put it into a savings account or
an investment. Do this right
away before you pay any bills
(mortgage, car payment, etc.).
If you wait, often there is noth-
ing left, because money target-
ed for an. emergency or the
future just got spent at the
local watering hole. If you dis-
cipline yourself and put 10
percent into your savings,
before long you don't count
that 10 percent when it's time
to pay the bills. Perhaps you
can arrange to have the money
deposited directly into anoth-
er account before you even see
it This way, it becomes even
less of a temptation to spend
the money before you save.
Ten percent is a reasonable
expectation for savings, and
that includes your retirement
accounts and similar invest-
ments. The difference
between the people who build
up a sizable estate and those
who don't, many times, is noth-
ing more than discipline.
DEAR BRUCE: Please tell
me how to get a list of foreclo-
sures from bankruptcy or
other properties. I've called
several banks and realtors,
and they don't seem to have
this information. I'm interest-
ed in purchasing these proper-
ties for rental purposes. -
Reader, via e-mail
DEAR READER: Buying
foreclosures is a very risky
enterprise. HUD publishes
lists of properties in your area
that can be forwarded to you
upon request The classified
section of the newspaper lists
where foreclosure sales are to
be held. You can also check
with the local government; in
my area, it's the county office.
With foreclosures on the rise,
there should be a wealth of
information out there. Just be
aware that there are profes-
sionals who do this sort of buy-
ing, and they are extremely
competent. Amateurs fre-
quently get burned. If you are
looking for investment proper-
ty, at least at the beginning,
why not follow the traditional
route and check with local
real-estate brokers and agents,
watch the classified, visit
neighborhoods in which you
might be interested and look
for homes sold by the owner.
This is a far less risky
approach, and you will likely
achieve your goal more quick-
ly.
DEAR BRUCE: What is the
difference between a living
and a revocable trust? -
Reader, via e-mail
DEAR READER: Living
trusts are revocable. In other
words, you can name yourself
Sthe trustee and dissolve the
trust at any time. An irrevoca-
ble trust offers, in some cases,
a tax advantage, but once it is
established, you are out of the
loop and the trustee has cer-
tain responsibilities to carry
forward under the terms of the
trust. These are simple
answers. If you want to estab-
lish a trust, see a competent
attorney in your area. Have
- him or her define not only
what these instruments are
but the advantages and the dis-
advantages in your circum-
Sstance. You owe it to yourself.


CLASSIFIEDS









Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


21

SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 30, 2007


hbumber


connectionn


Help the


Humane Society


find banks


Home Instead Senior Care


Members of the Humane
Society of Citrus County
(HSCC) were recently con-
tacted concerning some
donation banks at area busi-
nesses. Evidently a past
member placed these banks
with businesses but did not
make a record of where they
were located.
We appreciate If anyo
those business-
es who have informati
allowed us to
leave these the loci
donations
banks on their these
premises and
are very sorry pleaSe
for not tending at 34
them on a reg- at 341
ular basis. If
anyone has
information about the loca-
tion of these banks please
call us at 341-2222. The HSCC
shelter is full of dogs and cats
waiting for new loving
homes. We have several dedi-
cated volunteers who come to
walk the dogs once or twice a
week. But we have more dogs
than volunteers and more
exercise would benefit them
greatly If anyone happens to


i<

a
b


L-1


have an electric treadmill
that they are no longer using
and they would be willing to
donate it to our shelter, the
resident canines would very
much appreciate such a gift.
If you can help with this spe-
cial request please call 341-
2222.
The next gen-
ne has eral meeting
for the
on about Humane
Society of
tion of Citrus County
will be held on
)anks, Thursday, Oct.
c US 4 at 7 p.m. at
Call US the commer-
2222. cial building;
-2 Paws-itively
Pets located at
751 South
Smith Avenue, Inverness.
Plans are being finalized for
the 2nd annual fundraiser
being held on November 4th.
Anyone interested being
involved in this event or just
getting involved in helping
the animals in and around
Citrus County is encouraged
to come. If you have any
questions please call 341-
2222.


.: �
JIM SHIELDS/Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for Home Instead Senior Care. Pictured front row: Chamber
Ambassador Rhonda Lestinsky, Kim Henick, Carolyn Quintanilla - Owner and Chamber Ambassador Jackie Marx. Pictured back row:
Chamber Ambassadors Janet Mayo, Wendy Hall, Chamber Executive Director Kitty Barnes, Chamber Ambassadors Chuck Morgan,
David Heinz and John Porter. Home Instead Senior Care is the world's largest and most trusted provider of comprehensive companion-
ship and home care services for seniors. Our services are designed for practically any living arrangement where an older adult simply
needs human interaction and help with day-to-day activities. For more information about Home Instead Senior Care call Carolyn
Quintanilla at (352) 249-1257 or visit their location 3770 W Gulf to Lake Hwy Lecanto.

Earnest Mail Consulting Corp.


www.citruscountychamber.com



Chamber of Commerce

Board of Directors


Carl Flanagan ................
Nature Coast Bank
President
Joyce Brancato ...........Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Cenetr
President-elect
Kevin Cunningham ............
RE/MAX Realty One
Past President
Leanne Hadsell ................
Citrus Management Services
Secretary
Rob Wardlow .................
Williams, McCranie, Wardlow & Cash
Treasurer
Richard Bradtmnuller...........
Publix Super Market
Pete Burrell . . . . .............
Citrus County Chronicle
Jim R. Crosley ................
Rusaw Homes Inc.
Charles E. Davis ...............
Charles E. Davis Funeral Home
Karen Dixon ..................
Center State Home Loans


Dick Dolbow ..................
Citrus County School District
Mike Fitzpatrick...............
Embarq
Jim Harvey ..............
Central Florida Community College
Rocky Hensley ................
SunTrust Bank, Nature Coast
James Holder .................
AmSouth Bank of Florida
Mike Moberley ................
Tropical Window Inc.
Gerry Mulligan................
Citrus County Chronicle
Jim Neal.................James
A. Neal, Jr. PA
Jack Reynolds .................
Homosassa Springs Bank
Don Sutton ...................
Associate Member
Don Taylor . . . ............... .
Progress Energy Florida Inc.
Janice W arren .................
Tax Collector
Rick W elch ............... . ...
Welch Cabinet & Appliances
Chet W hite ...................
Stanley Steemer
Janet Yant ....................
Nature Coast Charters


JIM aMHILUDS/peclal to tme nronicae
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for Earnest Mail Consulting Corp. Pictured front row: Chamber
Ambassadors Rhonda Lestinsky, Nancy Coffey, Debbie Rogers of Graphic Elite Printing; Marshall Earnest and Theresa Earnest; De
McDade and Chamber Ambassador Reyna Bell. Pictured back row: Tom Rogers of Graphic Elite Printing, Chamber Ambassador Janet
Mayo, Chamber Executive Director Kitty Barnes and Chamber Ambassador John Porter. Earnest Mail Consulting Corp. has 30 years of
postal experience and offers various mailing options for your small or large business. If you are looking to streamline your businesses
mailing needs visit or call Marshall Earnest for a free quote or consultation. He can be reached at (352) 344-9490 or (800) 344-9499
mee6@earthlink.net. They have a new location, be sure visit Earnest Mail at 320 N Pine Ave. in Inverness.


Disaster planning workshop slated


Are you looking for a meaningful way to
help children and families after disas-
ters? Do you have a warm heart,
patience, team spirit, a sense of adven-
ture and time to give? If so, we are look-
ing for you! The public is invited to attend
a 27-hour "Level I Children's Disaster
Services Training Workshop" scheduled
at the Citrus County Resource Center,
2804 W Marc Knighton Ct., Lecanto, just
off County Road 491, on Oct. 19 and 20.
The workshop is being sponsored by
RSVP of Citrus County, a program of the
Nature Coast Volunteer Center and will
be conducted by the Church of the
Brethren Disaster Response Ministries.


This training event begins at 5:00 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 19 and'ends at approximately
7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20. The registra-
tion fee, which includes curriculum,
meals and lodging, is $45 if registered
three weeks prior to the date of the train-
ing event or $55 if registered less than
three weeks.
For further information, visit www.chil-
drensdisasterservices.org or to reserve
your place in the training, call Barbara
Eyler, local On-Site Coordinator at 352-
527-5955 or email to
barbara.eyler@bocc.citrus.fl.us. You can
also contact the CDS Office at 800-451-
4407 Ext. 5 or CDS gb@brethren.org.


Open house on tap
Alpine Pools and Spas Inc., at 1101 N. Paul
Dnve in Inverness, is hosting their OPEN
HOUSE on Saturday, Oct. 6 from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. They are celebrating the opening of their
new show room. Their knowledgeable staff
will also assist you with any questions you
may have with your existing pool or pool you
may have been thinking of building all sum-
mer; even if you already have a pool, this is
the perfect time to start thinking of winterizing,
upgrading or renovating! They will also be
offering pool service/renovations, lawn service,
backyard renovations and landscaping. Let
them handle all you outdoor needs! Call (352)
860-1235 for more information.


Member News


School Of Dance Arts will be pre-
senting "The Nutcracker" at Curtis
Peterson auditorium in Lecanto,
Florida on December 16, 2007.
Dancers interested in taken part in
this production please contact the
school at (352)637-4663.
ME=
Birding expert Dick Blewett will
be offering his popular Birding
Basics class in the Florida Room at
the Visitor Center of the
Homosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park. The six-week course begins
on Tuesday, October 16, from 3:00
to 5:00 p.m. Besides the classroom
work, students will have opportuni-
ties to put their new birding skills to
work on Saturday morning field
trips to a variety of birding trails
around Citrus County. Blewett will


provide bird watching basics on
Florida bird life and explain the
basic tools of the trade. If students
already have binoculars, they
should bring them to the first class.
If not, Blewett will give advice on
purchasing the most suitable binoc-
ulars for birding. National
Geographic Field Guide to the
Birds of North America, Fifth Edition
is the required text that will be used
for the course. Students will also
need a small spiral-bound notebook
(similar in size to the field guide). If
you are interested in attending the
Birding Basics class, please contact
Susan Strawbridge at (352) 628-
5343, ext. 1002, as soon as possi-
ble since space is limited. For more
information about Florida's award-
winning state parks, visit


www.FloridaStateParks.org.
emo
The Citrus County Center
Theatre for the Performing Arts
Foundation will present an
International Dance and Music
Review on Saturday, Oct. 20 from
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm at Curtis
Peterson Auditorium located in
Lecanto, FL. Doors will open at
2:00 pm. An added bonus will
include art exhibits from Spain and
Russia. Additional highlights of the
event include Maestro Miguel
Arrabal performing his exquisite
Argentine music along with the
great concert guitarist Fabio Zini
and a host of other musicians and
dancers. Also featured will be Curra
Alba the "Soul of Spain's Flamenco
Dancing", along with noted Tango


Dancer Nelson Avila. Local artists
include Ronnie's Fine Academy of
Dance, and singers Kevin Coward
and Merry Williams. The perform-
ance will benefit United Way of
Citrus County and Hospice of
Citrus County. General Admission
tickets are $20 and may be pur-
chased by calling 352-382-1929 or
are also available by visiting the
Hospice of Citrus County Beverly
Hill Clinical Office located at 4005
N. Lecanto Hwy in Beverly Hills.
The event is sponsored by the
Citrus County Chronicle. A number
of door prizes will be given away to
lucky ticket holders in recognition of
their support. For additional infor-
mation, call the Citrus County
Center Theatre for the Performing
Arts Foundation at 352.382.1929.


If you are unhappy with your missing teeth
or unstable dentures, this seminar is for you!

, FREE SEMINAR!
A.._l_... Wed., October 17 at I

'. Citrus Hills Country Club
I3Garden Room I
Learn about the latest
innovative techniques in
dental implants.
S-. Refreshments Served -,
SI MITED SEATING I

Implants... the best CALL FOR YOUR
replacement option , RESERVATIONS NOW!
for missing Teeth. I 564-0325 I
e- . - - - - - - - - -
SMichael Hashemian, DMD, -D M
Board Certified Oral & Maillofacial Surgeon T4E
Piplomate, Amric:an Board, 0 . A
r Oal A-MaxilotacalSurgery
S. Fellow oa mrncan Association. Q0
Oral & Maxallofacial Sugery S
352-564-0325 ac it T
� . ,"Hwy 19- w "s G iilll .pi.


m W�f
fir I A
CM R, N,
4-u- �Ill








Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


(hbmber


EonnEction


SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 30, 2007


;n ye onbb0


The Vine Cafe


JIM SHIELDS/Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for The Vine Caf6. Pictured front row: Trudy Simmons, Marilyn Stowe,
Liz McGinley - Owner, Shirley Adkins and Ryan McGinley. Pictured back row: Chamber Ambassadors John Porter, Janet Mayo;
Chamber Executive Director Kitty Barnes and Chamber Ambassador James Segovia. The Vine Cafe6 is serving breakfast and lunch with
daily specials and also bagels straight from Bronx, NY, HOMEMADE soups and finish your meal with creamy Gelato Ice Cream. The
Vine Cafe6 adds warmth and comfort to your meal by being a faith based restaurant offering Bible Study on Thursday nights from 7 pm
until 8:30 pm. Their hours of operation are Monday - Friday 7 am to 4 pm and on Saturday from 9 am to 3 pm. They are located at
105 S Line Ave. In Inverness. For more Information please call Liz at (352) 637-0151.


County gea


SWhat is Make a

Difference Day and

Day of Caring?
i Make A Difference Day is the most
encompassing national day of helping
others - a celebration of neighbors
,helping neighbors and communities
working together for the common good.
A collaboration of Citrus County Solid
Waste Management, Citrus County
Parks and Recreation, Keep Citrus
County Beautiful, Adopt a Highway
Program, Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, the Nature Coast Volunteer
Center and United Way of Citrus County
Ihas been formed in support of "Day of
SCaring on Make a Difference Day!" For
this year's event on Saturday, Oct. 27, we
plan to focus on a major highway and
parks clean up project in Citrus County,
Themedd "Don't Mess With Citrus
County!" There will be two opportuni-


Irs up for annual event


ties for volunteering:
* Project No. 1 - Highway
Cleanup on State Road 44 corridor (for
those 12 years of age and older)


* Project No. 2 - Cleanup and
planting on Fort Island Gulf
Beach (for families with chil-
dren under 12 years old)
Anyone can volunteer! Get the ball
rolling by becoming a team leader! Get
everyone involved; neighbors, family,
friends and co-workers. Teams can
range in size from 2 to 22!
Register today by sending in your
team registration form or calling the
United Way at 352-527-8894.
Registration form is available at
www.citrusunitedway. rg.
The first 300 volunteers who register
will receive a free t-shirt and other give-
aways!
The 4-hour project begins at 7:30 a.m.
at the Citrus County Resource
Center.Afterward, all volunteers are
invited back for lunch. For more infor-
mation please call the United Way of
Citrus County office at (352) 527-8894.
Remember: Don't Mess with Citrus
County!


Opportunities for education abounds at CFCC


New name,


same funny faces

Volunteer clowns, now known as Citrus Clowns, serve
Citrus County citizens and organizations countywide.
Previously known as Nature Coast Clowns "Serving With a
Smile!" the group is now an independent all-volunteer clown
organization. Formerly overseen by the Nature Coast
Volunteer Center the clown program has become a sustain-
able, stand-alone, volunteer program through the commend-
able efforts of volunteers. Citrus Clowns will remain an RSVP
site, in the Citrus County
Retired and Senior Volunteer For the clowns
Program of the'Nature Coast
Volunteer Center (NCVC). request for service
Eligible volunteers will contin-
ue to receive the benefits like form, or more
partial mileage reimburse-
ment, supplemental insurance, Information please
and recognition offerings that
come with belonging to RSVP contact: Citrus
and NCVC. Clowns
Though the name has
changed, the clowns are the Coordinator,
same. This lively group of
clowns will entertain as usual Mary K. Hall at
- at festivals, fairs, parades,
special community events, (352) 628-3414
nursing homes, assisted living
facilities, hospitals and charita- after 6 pm, or
ble fund raisers.
Volunteer clowns donate email: mhaIl016@
their time; however, the cost of
clowning can be prohibitive. tampabay.rr.com.
When requesting the services
of Citrus Clowns, a donation is
encouraged. Donated funds are utilized to purchase clown
supplies such as make-up, stickers, balloons, giveaway items
and face painting materials. The Friends of Nature Coast
Volunteer Center accepts monetary donations, on behalf of
Citrus Clowns, to purchase clowns supplies. Donations are
welcome at any time and may be sent to Citrus Clowns, C/O
Mary K. Hall, PO Box 500, Homosassa, FL 34487-0500. Checks
should be made payable to the Friends of NCVC.
When your organization needs special, unusual entertain-
ment or a fun warm welcome for your event's participants,
Citrus Clowns are a great element to add.
Please allow at least a month in advance of your event when
requesting clowns. For the clowns request for service form, or
more information please contact: Citrus Clowns Coordinator,
Mary K. Hall at (352) 628-3414 after 6 pm, or email:
mhall016@tampabay.rr.com anytime.






^itruscountychamber.com


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College and Career
Night
The Citrus Campus of Central
Florida Community College
will host the Citrus County
College and Career Night this
fall from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Monday,
Oct. 8 in room L2-103. This
event features representatives
from nearly 40 colleges, univer-
sities and other recruiting enti-
ties that are able to provide
information regarding their
institutions or companies. Area
high school students, their par-
ents, and community college
students are invited to attend.
For information, call 352-249-
"1202 or email bairdm@cf.edu.


Guardianship
Training
Central Florida Community
College will offer
Guardianship Training at
3800 S. Lecanto Hwy.,
Lecanto. The training will be
from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 2 and Thursday,
Oct. 4, in Bldg. 91-Rm 102. The
cost of the training is $79.
This course is an 8 hour court
mandated training course
concerning guardianship
issues, duties and responsi-
bilities. For information and
registration, call 352-249-1210
or visit
www.CFCCtraining.com


History of Citrus
County
Wouldn't it be great to
amaze your potential clients
with your knowledge of
Citrus County? Citrus County
is full of so much history, not
only the big events but the
small tidbits - like who lived
in what house and how they
helped to develop this county.
Mr. Tom Franklin will discuss
and answer questions about
the history of any part of the
county that interest the class.
Mr. Franklin can discuss the
History of Citrus County from
prehistoric times through the
formation of the county in


1887, the orange boom, the
phosphate boom, and the real
estate boom. He can also
cover the history of the Cross
Florida Barge Canal, the
coming and departing of the
railroads, and the Post World
War II development of the
county. The History of Citrus
County lecture class will be
held at Central Florida
Community College Citrus
Campus, 3800 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto, from 6 to 8
p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16
through Nov.13 in room 91-
102. The cost is $30. For more
information or registration,
call 352-249-1210 or visit
www.CFCCtraining.com


Take Stock in Children seeks volunteers


Take Stock In Children
(www.takestockinchildren.com)
is an award-winning school-
based mentoring program that
assists deserving youth from
low-income families by provid-
ing the opportunity for a better
education and a brighter future.
Founded in 1995, the mission
of Take Stock in Children is to
provide deserving qualified
children in our community with
scholarships to college and
guidance from caring mentors.
Since 1995, Take Stock in
Children has provided over
12,000 children with scholar-


ships (totaling over 90 million
dollars) and mentors in the
state of Florida. All money
raised in Citrus County is used
to provide scholarships and stu-
dent-mentor services to Citrus
County middle and high school
students.
All scholarship contributions
are raised locally through com-
munity partnerships and are
used to purchase Florida
Prepaid 2+2 scholarships (2
years at a community
college/two years at a universi-
ty) through the Florida Prepaid
College Foundation.


Scholarship contributions are
matched dollar for dollar by the
Florida Prepaid College
Foundation. Community part-
nerships and local area busi-
nesses make it possible to be
able to provide scholarships
and "the promise of hope" to
middle and high school stu-
dents. All monies raised in
Citrus County are used to pro-
vide scholarships and student-
mentor services to Citrus
County students.
Take Stock in Children of
Citrus County is seeking indi-
viduals interested in becoming


a positive influence in a young
person's life by becoming a
mentor for the Take Stock in
Children Program. Mentors
meet one hour per week in a
school-based setting only at
local Citrus County middle or
high schools
For further information on
how you can make the differ-
ence in the life of a Citrus
County child by providing
"scholarships, mentors, and
hope," please call Janet E.
Clymer, Program Coordinator
(352) 746-6721, ext. 6148 jely-
mer@clmworldorce.com.


NEW ISSUE





* GE Capital

General Electric Capital Corporation was incorporated in
1943 in the State of New York. The company is wholly owned
directly or indirectly by General Electric Company. GE Capital
operates in four separate financial services businesses:
GE Commercial Finance, GE Equipment Management,
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services primarily throughout the United States, Canada,
Europe and the Pacific Basin.
1 6.15% due October 15, 2026*
Si "AAA" Rated by Standard & Poor's
i "Aaa" Rated by Moody's

Edward D. Jones & Co., L.P. is pleased to be a selling agent
for this offering. For further information and a copy of the
prospectus, call or stop by today.
*Callable at 100.00% on 10/16/11 and every coupon date thereafter,
InterNotes are being Issued off a shelf registration and are offered only by the prospectus. This ad shall
not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation or an offer to buy, nor shall there be any sale of these
securities In any state in which such an offer, solicitation or sale would be unlawful prior to regaitretion
or qualification under the securities laws of such state,


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CI''Ili (COUNTY (FL) CII RONICI;i


BUSINESS


4D SIINDAY, Si'PTItMBIR 30, 2007


DIGEST
Continued from Page 1D

County. "Along with exclusive
offerings for new homeowners, it
proves to be an invaluable
resource for learning one's way
around and finding goods and
services in one's new community.
We also find that most people
start a new telephone directory
when they move into a new
home, which makes our Gift Book
extremely timely and appealing."
Local business owners also
praise Welcome Wagon's Gift
Book Program as a way to reach
out and connect with new home-
owners, one of their strongest
revenue sources. "New home-
owners are a highly valuable tar-
get market," said Edwards. "The
Welcome Wagon Gift Book is a
unique way of keeping the mer-
chant's name in front of potential
new customers for an average of
five to seven years."
Since 1928, Welcome Wagon
has been helping new homeown-
ers get to know the businesses
and service providers in their
communities. Through its New
Homeowner Gift Book program,
Pinpoint Mail product and Wel-
come Wagon offers multiple mar-
keting opportunities for business-
es seeking to build new relation-
ships with consumers.
Welcome Wagon products are
currently available in nearly 3,000
different communities across the
United States. Welcome Wagon,
a division of Move (NASDAQ;
MOVE), the world's largest mov-
ing community, provides home-
buyers and renters with the real
estate and community informa-
tion, and professional connections
they need before, during and after
a move.

Citrus County welcomes
Dr. Felix Agbo
Dr. D. St. Martin and the staff of
Pedimhealthcare are pleased to
join the Citrus County citizenry to
welcome Dr Felix Agbo to its
dynamic and vibrant team.
Dr. Felix has enjoyed the
rare advantage of exposure to
intercontinental practice experi-
ence as a certified physician both
in Europe, the Caribbean and
now in the U.S.
In Dr. Felix's childhood
eyes, the concept-of a physician


was that of a person that takes
care of myriad of human ailments
typified by the practice of medi-
cine as a primary care physician.
This philosophy has continued to
guide Dr. Felix in his quest for
professional excellence as reflect-
ed in the comprehensive and well
rounded training and board certifi-
cations across the globe.
His M.D. degree was
earned with honors in the
University of Nigeria, Enugu
which was an affiliate of the
University college Hospital
London. He proceeded with board
certification in reproductive health
from the Royal College of
Obstetricians and Gynecologists
in England after primary care
practice in the Caribbean. Dr.
Felix received his internship at
the North General Hospital in
Manhattan N.Y. and completed
his residency training in combined
Internal Medicine and Primary
care program at the Mount Sinai
School of Medicine, New York,
N.Y.
Dr. Felix distinguished him-
self during Internship by winning
the prestigious "Best Intern of the
Year" award in recognition of his
tireless dedication in the care of
patients. He was appointed as
Acting Chief Resident in Senior
year-testimony to his leadership
prowess and consistent ability in
the application of evidence-based
medicine in the care of his
patients. He has continued to
make multiple scientific presenta-
tions and published papers in the
areas of Internal Medicine and
Reproductive health. Dr. Felix is a
firm believer in the value of the
application of evidence based
medicine in patient care. He has
actively participated in various
research and also in the teaching
of medical students and resi-
dents.
He has multiple hobbies includ-
ing SCUBA diving, snorkeling,
Christian charity activities, tennis
and soccer.
CFCC hosts
planning meeting
Central Florida Community
College will host an Informal
Planning Meeting at 4 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 1, at Central Florida
Community College, Enterprise
Center, Foundation Office, 3001
S.W. College Road, Ocala.
The purpose of the meeting is
general business of the CFCC
Foundation.


Also, the CFCC Foundation
Executive Committee will meet at
4 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2, Central
Florida Community College,
Enterprise Center, second floor
board room, 3001 S.W. College
Road, Ocala. The purpose of the
meeting will be to discuss general
business of the CFCC Executive
Committee.
The CFCC Foundation Board of
Directors will meet at 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 16, at Central
Florida Community College's
Hampton Center at 1501 W. Silver
Springs Blvd.,,Ocala. The purpose
of the meeting is to discuss gener-
al business of the CFCC
Foundation Board of Directors.
State park seeks help
for Halloween event
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's
Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park and the Friends of
Homosassa Springs Wildlife
Park are seeking area business-
es and organizations to partici-
pate in their annual Haunted
Tram Rides community event
scheduled for Friday, Oct. 26,
and Saturday, Oct. 27. The .
event is the biggest fundraiser of
the year for the park, last year
helping raise nearly $13,000.
Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park is looking for area
businesses and organizations to
help design and decorate a
spooky location on the Haunted
Trail. For groups who are unable
to decorate a site, the park is
also looking for organizations to
fund a location on the Haunted
Trail. There is no charge to
sponsor a haunted location and
all locations will be judged for a
variety of awards.
This is the third year the
Friends of Homosassa Springs
Wildlife Park has organized
Haunted Tram Rides at the park.
In addition to the Haunted Tram
Rides, the event includes family
fun such as clowns, face paint-
ing, a Halloween costume con-
test, refreshments and treats for
the children. A special Haunted
House for children ages 2
through 8 will be set up in the
Florida Room.
If your business, club, group
or family is interested in partici-
pating, call Susan Strawbridge at
628-5343, ext. 1002.
For more information about
Florida State Parks, visit
..www.floridastateparks org.


SOFTWARE
Continued from Page 1D

hire two to three more soon -
and move into large offices in a
more appealing building in
nearby Meadowcrest
His 24-month plan includes
doubling his work force.
Mobiform recently qualified for
a "Quick Response Training"
grant through Enterprise
Florida and CLM Workforce
Connection to help pay for train-
ing new employees.


To be

both technical
and creative is a
joy.

about his career and company.
The Citrus County Economic
Development Council also
recently voted to recommend
that the Citrus County


Commission award Mobiform a
job growth incentive grant
Finding qualified employees
is a challenge because the soft-
ware Mobiform uses is new and
because the jobs require a spe-
cific skill set
He said he offers flexible work
hours and, since the company is
small, team members celebrate
small successes achieved by
individual employees or by the
group.
"Its a very exciting-~Gstry to
x'ork in*," DeSerranua s~id.-;"To
be both teciiucal aud&.ce�& ie is
a joy." -


HELP FILE
Continued from Page 1D

The company first tries to
address glitches that would
endanger drivers - say, a map
that puts an interstate off-
ramp in the wrong spot.
Adams said it aims to correct
those within 90 days.
Navteq spokesman Joe Fox
said the company resolves
most user reports within 90
days, though he said some
don't require research in the


field and can be dealt with
more quickly
At each site, revised infor-
mation must be rolled into the
quarterly updates it provides
to mapping sites. Fox noted
that it can take another few
months for new data to show
up on a Web page.
While a correction works its
way through this process, you
can create a custom map on
Google's site to point people
in the right direction. Sign
into your Google account (or
create one if you don't have
one), visit maps.google.com


and click on the "My Maps"
link.
Q: I just got a message on
my Verizon cellphone telling
me to call *228 to update my
service. Is that legit?
A: Yes. Dialing that number
- it's a free call - and then
pressing 2 will update your
phone's "Preferred Roaming
List" database. Verizon's Web
site says this will help your
phone stay on Verizon's digital
signal instead of roaming on
another carrier's service. It
suggests repeating this update
every three months.


Pay for your
C I T R US -COUNT Y


The


Once a


)EZway!

month, we will automatically


debit your credit card!


NO MORE V Hassles!
It's easy, it's convenient and it's safe! EZ Pay will
automatically debit your credit card for $6.75 each V C hecks!
month. That pays for a FULL YEAR of the Chronicle
and you will never receive another reminder notice V Reminders!
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It's all 563-5655 for details.!

Just call 563-5655 for details.


When You Use The Advertising Power Of

The Chronicle And Add Chronicle Direct Mail,

You Will Reach Over



68,000 Households!



For more information call

352-563-5592.

CI0 Ui TITRU S CO - TU


DIRCT CHIONIE
724774


Gagle returns from trip to Asia













Special to the Chronicle
Merlin Gagle with Abacus Financial Group, of Crystal River, returned to Florida on Sept. 6,
after spending six weeks in Asia. While visiting the Philippines, he took tours of resort hotels
that he and his associates are marketing in the Davao City area, as well as looked at prop-
erty in Cebu City and Mactan, on the island of Cebu. Gagle flew from Quezon City, Manila to
Tacloban, where he visited the memorial to Gen. Douglas MacArthur. Then he traveled by van
five hours South in Leyte to San Francisco, a small island, where he stayed a week in a prim-
itive village, being the guest of a city councilman there. Then he drove to Ormoc, where he
took a fast watercraft to Cebu City, a 2 1/2-hour trip. After a week in the Cebu-Mactan area
looking at real estate, he flew to Davao City for a three-day meeting with his partner there,
Ricardo T. Casino. Then he returned to the Manila area for the rest of his stay in the
Philippines. He returned to the States by way of Hong Kong, where he had a long layover.





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EDS CRU_ COUN'IY (FL) CHRONICLE



To place an ad, call 563-5966
"mmm.. I


Classifieds


EARLY 60'S Active Lady
Loves conversation,
people, current events,
travel, small towns,
community involve-
ment, reading and the
outdoors. Seeking
gentlemen. Eastern
Citrus County. Reply
Blind Box 1380-P
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 106 W. Main
St., Inverness, FL 34450
Young Male Doctor
looking for girlfriend
18 - 28 for travel &
good exp's. Looking for
someone different, not
something. Please send
photos & information to
Drtomas17@
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rE-- -- -- n

RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com
kmmmiid



r-- -- -- -
$$CASH FOR CARS$
No Title Needed,
Gene(352) 302-2781
$$CASH WE BUY TODAY
Cars, Trucks, Vans - rt
FREE Removal Metal,
Junk Vehicles, No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Receiot
2 Dogs: BOXER MIX
Fern. 1 /2 yr. Old. Great
w/kids. SHETLAND/MINI
COLLIE 1 MIX. 10 mos.
female. Moving!
804-6839/489-9295
4 Wood Slot Wall
Displays w/storage.
Must take All
352-266-2020

I TOP DOLLAR I
SFor Junk Cars
$ (352) 201-1052 $
L I��onmmi m
$$$ ATTENTION $$$
I WANT YOUR JUNK
CARS, TRUCKS, ETC.
Tommy 352- 302-1276
CASH PAIDI No title ok
$$ CASH PAID $$
Having Code
Enforcement problems
w/ Junk vehicles in your
yard? (352) 860-2545
$ CASH $
PAID FOR
Unwanted Vehicles
352-220-0687
CAT
Female 6 mos. old,
Long hair
(352) 637-1401
COCKER SPANIEL
PUPS Fern. 9 mons..
unique markings. Good
home only.
(352) 476-8106
COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service.
(352) 560-6163 or
(352) 746-9084
Leave Message
DOG, Pointer BIk Lab
Mix 1-1.5 Years old,
Free to good home
AKC/Shots incl. Food &
Dog Hse 352-795-7833
Free
Horse Manure
In time for fall garden
Lecanto/Hernando
area. 352-249-9296
Free Male Puppy
to good home
black/white
(352) 746-5088


Your World

aof alage da s4




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ww.cr.ronmadeon1irne.cnm


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and


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'A I0II I I


FREE PALM TREES
all sizes, you dig. and fill
hole. (352) 341-2484
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
Free Removal - Scrap
Metal, Appl.'s, A/C,
Mowers, motors, etc.
Brian (352) 302-9480
FREE TV TOWER
(no Antenna)
you take away
Gene, (352) 726-1500
HORSE
9yr old paint mare. to
good home. Cannot
be ridden, companion
only. 352 795-9647
HORSES
1/4 Horse companion
only & Thoroughbred,
wil be ridable, needs
TLC.(352) 503-3909
LG. ELEPHANT EAR
PLANTS
You dig 'eml
. (352) 637-4645
SUGAR GLIDERs
Adult Marsupials
to good home
Do Research. Lrg Cage
Needed 628-3537
The Path Shelter
will pick up.your
unwanted vehicle
Tax deductible
receipt given
(352) 746-9084
TINTED SLIDING GLASS
DOORS 48" X 78"
W/out Track.
(352) 637-6618
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645



HUSKIES
Puppy & DAD
VIC. Timberiane Estates
Adult - Grey & White
W/blue eyes. Puppy
reddish brown/white
reward 352-400-0545
SIAMESE CAT, 10mo
old. Lost Southern St.
Lecanto area.
(A9 1 TMe S1 A


CHIHUAHUA FEMALE
Vicinity Burma,
Rainbow & Cardinal.
(352) 503-3597
or (352) 628-7504
DOG
Cocker/Beagle
VIC. Tyrone Ave & Bis-
mark St. (352) 637-4559
PITBULL Female Bilk
VIC. West Fox Lane
(352) 795-4384
Small Dog
red, white tip tale,
Hernando
(352) 489-6323




r DIVORCES
BANKRUPTCY
*Name Change I
*Child Support
*Wills
SWe Come To You
S637-4022.795-5999 '

--- -1--, E

Act Now
-'---.-~ --
GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over Items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week after your
Garage Sole just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902
****** " " "


Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service
Starting at $20,
Low cost vaccines,
Heartworm test,
Heartworm treat-
ment,
Cat Declawing. Call
for prices and appt.
(352) 726-8801
I Need my kitchen
counter tops replaced
by someone well
experienced. Gene
(352) 726-1500

RENTAL FINDER
| www.chronicle |
rentalfinder.com

* SOD . SOD * SOD.
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032
West Coast
Christian School
Needs Donations
of Computers
Working or Not
Donations are
Tax Deductible!
Please Contact Kathy
(352) 795-8099
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM
I CAT ADOPTIONS I


Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open 8:00 A
M till 4:00 P M
Monday-Friday.
Week-end and
evenings by
appointment.
All Cats and Kittens
are altered, tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date on vac-
cines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofspha.gor.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant
Ave. Corner of 44
and Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw prints.

C=

HAIRCARE In your home
by Licensed Hairdresser
Curts/Perms/Wash/Style
Call Gall 352-422-6315





( and read

1,000's of Items sold
everyday using the
Chronicle classified,
Call today and we'll
help you get rid of
your unwanted stuff.

CHRpNCLE
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-1441







Chronicle Website
Directory in print
I and online.
Our search engine
will link customers
directly to your site.
In Print
+ Online
= One Price
$51.95
(3 lines of copy
for 30 days)
Header and
Website Address
Call Today:
(352) 563-5966
L - --- El


A free report of your
home's value
www.naturecoast
living.net


www.naturecoast
wheels.cam

NEWSPAPERS
www.chronicle
online.com


www.naturecoast
homefront.com


www.chronicle
rentalflnder.com

WHOLESALE
SHOPPING
www. 1282.onetouch
shopDina.biz





TEACHER
Faith based pre school
& school age program
In Floral City
(352) 726-2309





ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Seeking organized
person with strong
computer experience
for marketing/sales
center of major area
developer located
near Inverness. Must
be multi-tasking
oriented. Full-time
w/benefit package.
Fax resume to
352-746-4456

SECRETARY F/T
Strong computer
& organizational skills
necessary. Construction
office experience
desirable. DFWP/EOE
Winkel
Construction, Inc.
Fax resume: 860-0700






























HAIR STYLIST
F/T-P/T, Immed.
openings Call Sue
352-628-0630

Nr ail Technician
SExp. w/acryllcs & 1
* gels RENEE'S
(352) 628-4404

STYLIST
Now taking applica-
tions, in Hernando
for Opening mid Oct.
(352) 746-0335
WANTED
STYLIST/BARBER

For immediate position,
High commission pd.
Thur./Fri. 95, Sat. 9-2
(352) 201-6017





$1500.00

Sign on Bonus!
LICENSED NURSES
3-11
If you possess above
average skills, are
dedicated to the
higher standards of
elder care, good
documentation and
a genuine caring
attitude, we have a
place for you. We
offer a salary range
comparable to your
experience and
great benefits.
Crystal River Health
and Rehab Center
136 NE 12th Ave.
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 795-5044
HR/ConnIe
(M,.T,Th.,&F9-3)
DFWP/ EOE


A Skilled Facility has
an opening for:

F/T & P/T
RN/LPN All shifts

Excellent Health &
Dental Blue Cross/
Blue Shield of FL &
paid vacation. Come
loin our Exceptional
Nursing Teaml
Fax Resume
(352) 746-0748 or
Apply in person
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
(352) 249-3100


-- --- Eu
I ADMISSIONS
COORDINATOR

CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
is looking for
an energetic
professional to
handle admissions.
Marketing or
healthcare exp. is
preferred. People
skills are a must.
Competitive Salary
& Benefits are
available.
Please fax resume
to: (352) 795-0490



Buildings
Maintenance
Coordinator
The Centers
is seeking a
hands-on, working
coordinator to plan,
manage &
implement buildings
maintenance
projects & upkeep for
institutional type
setting. Ideal
candidate has
demonstrated
knowledge of
building trades
(electrical, plumbing,
carpentry, etc.).
Submit Salary Req.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE Fax or
e-mail resume to
HR, the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
Iobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us


CARE
Coordinator

The Centers
is recruiting for a
bachelor level case
manager to
coordinate mental
health services for
children enrolled in
Behavioral Health
Network. Extensive
travel in Citrus &
Hernando counties.
Work hrs dictated by
case load. Salary:
$15.00 -$16.00 per hr.
Full benefits pkg
DFWF EOE Fax or
email resume to
HR, the Centers, Inc.
352-291-5580,
lobs@thecenters.us
For more Info visit
www.thecenters.us



COME GROW
WITH US!


,, i ; ' ,




Join our team
of caring
professionals.

FT Registered
Nurse
Field Staff
Inverness
Crystal River
FT Registered
Nurse
Hospice House
3-11 shift
Chaplain
Coordinator
Masters degree re-
quired
CPE's required
PRN Staff
RN's
LPN's
CNA's

Apply Today
Telephone:
352.527.2020
Fax: 352.527.9366
Ithacher@hosolceof
citruscountv.org
Hospice of Citrus
County
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, Fl 34464
hosolceofcltruscoun-
dwf/eoe


Billing Specialist

F/T, Experience
necessary, computer
literate, benefits
Fax Resume
352-726-8193







Case
Manager
180-bed Sub-acute
Nursing home looking
for experienced Case
Manager. Candidate
must have 3 years
Social work experi-
ence, preferably in a
SNF/Rehab setting.
This Mon-Fri, day shift
position requires a
BA/BS degree.
If Interested apply in
person to:
TimberRidge Nursing
& Rehab Center
9848 SW 110th St,
Ocala, FL 34481
Tel: (352) 854-8200
Fax: (352) 854-9730
rickcastillo@mrhs.org
eoe


COOK

Long term care
experience preferred,
Varied hours. Please
apply in person
Health Center @
Brentwood
352-746-6600
ext. # 8533
EOE D/V/M/F
Drug-free facility


DENTAL ASSISTANT &
HYGIENISTS
Crystal River &
Inverness
HYGIENE ASSISTANT
Spring Hill
RECEPTIONIST
Hudson
$250 Sign-On Bonus!
Coast Dental is the
Southeast's leading
provider, with 115
neighborhood dental
practices and
growing. You'll be
rewarded with a
lucrative compensa-
tion package that
Includes competitive
wages, monthly
bonuses, medical, life
& disability insurance,
paid time off, 401(k),
dental discounts, and



CoastDental.c
om
Cal (877)
COAST-17
ext. 139
Fax (813)
289-4500





CoastDental
www.CoastDental.
corn
EOE/M/F/D/V
Drug-free workplace


EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/Cell 422-3656


EXP'D MEDICAL
RECEPTIONIST/
FRONT DESK


F/T position.
Computer literate.
Benefits. Reply to:
P.O. Box 207,
Crystal River, FL 34429

EXPERIENCED
MDS LPN
NURSE

Position requires a
reliable positive
team player.
Mall or Fax Resume:
Att: Laurie Coleman
136 NE 12th Ave.
Crystal River, FL
34429
OR FAX RESUME to:
(352) 795-5848
CONTACT Laurie Via
Mail or FAX ONLYII
DFWP/EOE
L m i i �
F/T Med. Asst.
GYN experience
required, good
benefits, salary based
on experience based
Please send resume to:
PO Box 711,
Crystal River, FL 34423

Licensed
Therapist/
LCSW

The Centers
is seeking an LCSW
for our Citrus County
program. Duties
include maintaining
a caseload &
providing OP therapy
to clients referred as
well as providing
assistance/support to
the Director & clinical
supervision to staff as
needed. Florida
Licensed Clinical
Social Worker & min 5
yrs exp with this
population reqd.
Submit Salary Req.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE Fax or
e-mail resume to HR,
the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
iobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us

LPN NEEDED

Must have strong
computer skills for
clinical research
position.
Research experience
desirable.
Please call
(352)563-1865 or
email rwood@encore
docs.com

MEDICAL BILLING
SPECIALIST
Therapy
Management
Corporation,
a leader In the
Rehabilitative
Services Industry has
full time position for
Medical Billing
Specialists at our
Homosassa location.
Qualified
candidate will have
1-2+ yrs medical
billing exp., strong
data entry and good
communication skills.
TMC offers
competitive
compensation and
benefits including
medical, dental, life
and PTO.
FAX RESUMES TO:
352-382-0212 or
Apply online @
www.
theraovmamt.com


Critical Care

MedSurg

Telemetry
Emergency (per diem)


Other Opportunities:
Director of Rehab Services
Blood Bank Supervisor
Medical Technologist
Histology Technologist
Physical Therapist
Physical Therapy Assistant
Radiology Technologist
Respiratory Therapist
Patient Account Representative
Coder
Inquire about our sign-on bonus
for select FT positions!
SRRMC is part of the HMA family of hospitals
For information about these and other
opportunities, please apply to:
Human Resources
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34428
Fax # 352-795-8464
Job Line # 352-795-8418
Email:
Linda.M acaulay@srrmc.hma-corp.com t
Web Site: www.srrmc.com "' Q
EOE/DRUO FREE WORKPLACE .ooo. �is�ol. 42i
SEVEN RIVERS
19 REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER


LPN

We are a residential
program for 96 high
and maximum risk
males committed to
the Dept. of Juvenile
Justice. We are
currently looking for
an LPN to work
11 am-7pm M-F and
one weekend a
month
Competitive pay rate
Benefit package
Apply in person at:
Cypress Creek
2855 W Woodland
Ridge Dr.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Or fax resume to
352-527-2235
Drug Free Workplace
/EEO

MEDICAL CLERK
FIT

Detail Oriented
Position. Requires
excellent data entry,
organizational & filing
Skills. Prev. Medical
Exp preferred. Clerical
Exp. Required
Fax Resume to
352-746-0720

NOW HIRING
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable

CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
Flexible schedules
offered. $10.00/hr.
CALL LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

NURSE RECRUITER

Requires a Bachelor's
degree (additional
coursework in
Human Resources
Management,
Business
Administration or
Psychology
preferred). Ideal
candidate must be a
Registered Nurse or :
Licensed Practical
Nurse with current FL
licensure; and be
proficient with
computer
applications. A
minimum of 2 years
recruiting experience,
preferably in an
acute setting
required. Please
apply online at
www.citrusmh.com.
CMHS is an equal
opportunity employer




































F/T, P/T, PRN
R I
LHave experience

Depression or
Psychiatric Nursing?
Great New Rates!!!
(352)564-2700
564-0053 Fax
L = - mm,

RN * LPN
Arbor Village
Nursing
A 210-bed skilled
nursing facility seeks
RNs / LPNs
To join our team &
promote quality
care & services
7-3+ 11-7 avail.
GREAT SALARY
SUPER WORK
ENVIRONMENT
Call 800-442-1353
Fax 877-571-1952
JOBS@CQcare.com
490 South Old Wire Rd

RN, LPN, CNA,
CMA NEEDED
*" ALL STAR *"
Professional
Staffing Services
352-560-6210
r RN/LPN II

* CNA/HHA'S
I Interim Health Care
(352) 637-3111


EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/Cell 422-3656
Therapists &
Counselors

The Centers
is seeking Master's
level Therapists &
Bachelor's level
Counselors with
substance abuse
and/or mental health
exp. Submit Salary
Req. Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE Fax or
e-maill resume to
HR, the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
lobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us




Animal Services
Director
Announcement
#07-99
Develops and
monitors standard
operating
procedures for
Animal Services
Division and
coordinates the
implementation of
policies necessary for
its operation. Recruits,
trains, supervises and
evaluates personnel;
makes work
assignments and
schedules and deals
with employee
problems, issues and
concerns. Prepares
and submits written
and oral reports to
the Public Safety
Director, Board of
County Commission-
ers, citizen groups,
general public and
the media. Requires
Bachelor's degree
In Business
Administration,
Criminal Justice or
Veterinary Care or
education and/or
training equivalent to
four years of college.
Must possess a valid
Florida Driver License.
Must possess or
obtain within one
year Florida Animal
Control Officer,
Euthanasia
Certification,
Chemical Capture
Certification.
Starting Salary
$1,912.02 bi-weekly.
Excellent Benefits.
Send resume or
apply at the
Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Florida
34461
by Friday, October 12,
2007. EOE/ADA.

Aquatic
Operations
Manager
Announcement
#07-101
Management and
supervisory work in
the daily operation of
the Aquatic Services
Division. Prepares GIS
and detailed maps.
Inspects, surveys and
repairs all regulatory
signs and buoys to
ensure proper
maintenance,
obtains proper
permits, supervise
and schedule
* contractors on
special projects,
design, distribute and
monitor manatee
sign problem report.
Prepares contracts
and bid documents,
assures compliance
with specification.
Fills In as acting
director. A.S degree
or training that Is
equivalent to two
years of college
education.
Supervising and
contract compliance
preferred. Must have
good knowledge of
the aquatic plant
control Industry, be
able to trailer, launch
and operate boats.
Ability to work
outdoors under
demanding weather
conditions. Computer
experience. Must
have, or willing to
obtain within 6
months. Department
of Agriculture and
Consumer Services
Restricted Pesticide
License with Aquatic
Endorsement and
must be willing to
obtain scuba
certification. Current
valid Florida Driver
License required.
Starting Pay
$1,255.32 Bl-weekly.
Send resume
or apply at the
Citrus County Office
of Human Resources,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto FL 34461
no later than Friday,
October 12, 2007.
EOE/ADA.


Central Florida
Community
College
Multiple teaching
opportunities are
available in the
faculties of:
Communications -
English
(Composition I & II)
and
Communications -
English
(College-Prep &
Composition I)
Both pqsltlns require
a Master's.egree in
English or' aster's
degree With a
cod6 entration In
English (a-minlmum of
18, graduate semester
,6p-qrs irr English
required). Two years
of full-time teaching
experience at the
high school,
community college
or university level or
a combination of the
three required.
Open until filled.
Communications -
Reading/English
(College-Prep):
Bachelor's degree
in Communication
or Education with
significant
coursework and/or
training in Reading
required. Two
years of teaching
experience at the
high school,
community college
or university level or a
combination of all
three preferred.
Open until filled.
Physical Sciences -
Chemistry:
(TEMPORARY ONE
YEAR APPOINTMENT
FROM SPRING :
2008 - FALL 2008):
Master's degree in
Chemistry or Master's
degree with a
minimum of 18
graduate semester
hours in Chemistry
required. Doctorate
preferred. Two years
c.f fuii-iirn le ia,-- 1r,
SaeIbenefor he 200
rsgn s.tli,
: .mirmunit rcoli'ea,
:,r urii.'.er,r,Fl[el :.r
a c,:,rnlhIrlf or..1o
-r.e thr.?e prelrI;.3
C'per urii reiil-
ADJUNCT
available for the 2008
Spring Term at the
Marion, Chiefland &
Lecanto campuses in
the disciplines of:
Health Information
Management; English;
Humanities; Speech
and many more!
Please visit our
vacancy Web page
for additional
information.
Part-time
Public Safety Officer -
Appleton Museum
of Art
Part-time Cultural
Center's Assistant III -
Webber Center
Application
instructions:
Mail Application and
Transcripts to:
Human Resources
Central Florida
Community College
P. 0. Box 1388,
C'calo FL 4-F'S-1?78
SDoriloaa
applcator: l ir .r, .-:.ui
lAeb sile ,1
:-..i rmr'Ir/odmir nl'r.
, iolomenl-thtB,
F.r addrlfor,.]l
iri,rrTirafoi n .1i-I1
www.GoCFCC.com
Cr rnTall l ri'.: e-.3u
,FCC ,: -.3. � E,
'AA/DFW employer,


















YOu
au





















i the Class

quickly!




(352) 563-5966

Ciii leNi +coi
www.chroniclcontine.com :


Need a GED?




Concerned




about childcare?


Call for Information about Even Start, a family
literacy program 795-7887





SUNDAY, SiwrnMInImn 30, 2007 7D


r.nwi. CnuNtry /(F) unnArOICrL


FLORIDA'S FASTEST GROWING MITSUBISHI DEALER


08 LANCER

PER MONTH*





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2008 ECLIPSE


- -----


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
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l 6,888


I/


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, $288
PER MONTH*


-'a--.
S ~ ~ I
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07 OUTLANDER
$268
- PER MONTH*


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FIND OUT EXACTLY WHAT YOUR CAR IS WORTH,
NO MATTER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUY!
CALL THE
INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE... IT'S FREE!
800-342-3008


OCAL


A


MITSUBISHI


2200 SR 200 (352)622-4111 * (800)342-3008
0% FINANCING FOR UP TO 72 MONTHS IN LIEU OF ALL REBATESINCENTIVE8 ON SELECT MODELS W.A.C. PRICES NET 2000 TRADE EQUITY. CUSTOMER RESPONSIBLE FOR TAX TAG, DESTINATION AND FEES NET REBATES (LOYALTY) FOR 63 MONTH ADVANTAGE LOAN (740 BEACON REQUIRED) WA.C. PHOTOS FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. ALL
VEHICLES SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE. OFFERS CANNOT BE COMBINED. SALES TAX, LICENSE FEE, REGISTRATION FEE, FINANCE CHARGES, EMISSION TESTING FEES AND COMPLIANCE FEES ARE ADDITIONAL TO ADVERTISED PRICES." . .


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(,ITRUS UOUNI Y (,VL) I-HRUNIf-Lb.


1-1.


1�


I7M4da


u














-* * 0 * nal Pofes sinl


YouLworld first

Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?

This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classifieds


.Net Senior
Developer

with C+ + and .NET 2.0
experience. Design &
development of .NET
based components
and features for our
Aurora XAML product
line for WPF. Other
desirable experience
- Web Services,
ASP.NET, XML, SVG,
3D dev, Flash,
Graphic Design,
XBOX, Please forward
Resume to:
lnfo@moblform.com


N our , i.rldtr fr ,t

CI lIq1

ACCOUNTANT

Part-time full charge
accountant for
accrual based firm.
Quickbooks and
Microsoft Office a
must. Fax resume to
JCM 352-746-0816
or email to
mceparano@joseph
capltal.comr

COMPUTER
PROGRAMMER

COBOL AS/400,
3yrs. exp. desired.
Send Resume to.
Sumter County School
Board. 2680 WC 476
Bushnell, FL 33513
EXPERIENCED
HEALTH & LIFE
PRODUCER

To work for large
P & C agency In
Citrus Co. Strong
company & great
commission payouts.
Send resumes to:
Blind Box 1379P
Citrus Co. Chronicle
106 W. Main St.
Inverness, Fl 34450

SITE MANAGER

P/T, Candlewood/
Knollwood, Inverness,
FL FAX RESUME TO:
(727)447-5516
jobs@flynn
management.com




SCHIANO'S
IMMED. OPENING

Exp. Server. Contact
Monica (352) 344-0024


SERVERS - BAR
KITCHEN
Now Hiring
Mcleod House Bistro
Mon thr. Thurs. 11-2
207 N Apopka Ave
(352) 637-4300




$$ GOT CASH $$
Earn great money by
setting appts. for busy
local company.
Call Steve:
352-628-0187

*** Great ***
**Opportunity**
Local Company
needs Highly
Motivated Sales
People w/strong Ph
Skills. In office
Mon-Frl. 9-5.
NO Wknds. On Job
Training provided.
Career Minded
applicants only.
Phone weekdays.
10a-12p or lp-4p.
1-866-777-1166 or
352-560-0056



SAE

FT/P

EXEIEC
A+U


SedReue


CLASSFIEDSCITiRUS CouJNr'I(FL) CHiRONIGJ.E


3--



Exp. Sales Person
NEEDED
Sun Country Homes
Rapidly Becoming
the areas, premiere
dealer of manufac-
tured & modular
homes, Is seeking,
an exp. Sales Person.
Competitive com-
pensation & benefits
plan,
Fax Resume or Apply
In Person DFWP Fax
352-794-7310
SUN COUNTRY HOMES
1710 S. Suncoast Blvd.

P/T RETAIL SALES
Send Resume to:
Blind Box # 1383P
Citrus County Chronicle
106 W. Main St.
Inverness, FL 34450

SALES/
TELEMARKETING
Best Job In Town,
Guaranteed salary &
commission. Medical,
& dental. Great
future. Call Barbara
352-726-5600





CERTIFIED OR
HIGHLY EXP'D
SPRAY TECH
Apply In Person at:
920 E Ray Street
Hernando

COMMERCIAL
PLUMBER
Evenings. 9P-7A. Start
Immediately. Apply @
Suncoast Plumbing
6938 W. Grover
Cleveland, Homosassa.


r:%


Fleet Repair
Coordinator
The Centers
Is seeking a
coordinator to
schedule & perform
routine care
maintenance on
company vehicles.
(change oil, check
fluids, tire pressure,
etc.) Salary $9.00 -
$9,75/hr. Full benefits
pkg DFWP/EOE Fax
or e-mail resume to
HR, the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
lobs@thecenters.us
For more Info visit
www.thncenters.us



INSTRUCTORS
WANTED
HEAVY EQUIP.
OPERATOR
SCHOOL
Located In Lecanto
Patience, punctuality,
ability to work w/
other Instructors,
min. 3 yrs. exp. In c
construction required.
Training provided.
Fax Resume to:
352-628-7686
or e-mail: atsdebble
@yahoo.com




NOW HIRING
Exp'd Production
Supervisors,
Ind. Mechanics &
Ind. Electrlans
MKT
Employment Services
(352) 748-0045


NO SATURDAYS
LUBE TECH

Light line, Busy Indep.
Shop. Must have own
tools. 352-464-7033


Temporary
Seasonal
Driver Needed
Must have Class B
CDL, w/ air brakes,
tanker and Hozmat
endorsement,
No experience
necessary. Will train,
must be able to pass
extensive background
check.
Apply In Person
HERITAGE PROPANE
4275 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto


TOWER HAND
Starting at S9.00/hr
Bldg Communication
Towers, Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017 Mon-Frl
TRUCK DRIVER

P/T, Clean record, Class
A CDL. Background
check. & drug test,
(352) 344-8989

WANTED
Exp. Pipe Layer
Water, Sewer & Storm
CALL (352) 726-3074

PROFESSIONAL PEST
CONTROL
Needs pest control &
termite tech.
Exp. a plus. Hourly pay,
commission, benefits,
co. vehicle. 344-3444


C-."reneral


Animal Shelter
Manager
Announcement
#07-102
Responsible position
coordinating the
daily functions and
operation of the
animal shelter and
office. Supervises,
trains and directs
employees; assists
general public;
provides education
concerning
procedures, legal
ordinances and
general education
of pet ownership
responsibility.
Oversees and assists
with care of animals,
maintaining facilities,
equipment and
supplies. Performs
record keeping.
Graduation from
H.S or equivalency
certificate and formal
training or special
courses that is
equivalent to one
year of college.
Must possess within
six months of hire a
Euthanasia and
Chemical Capture
Certification and be
able to lift 20-50 lbs.
on a dally basis.
Minimum of six
months management
experience.
$13.07 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
Apply at the Citrus
County Human
Resources Office,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Florida
34461
no later than Friday,
October 5, 2007.
EOE/ADA


A/C Tune up w/ Free
permanent filter +
Termite/Pest Control
Insp. Lic & Boned Only
$44.95 for both.
(352) 628-5700
caco36870




ADVERTISE YOUR
BUSINESS IN THE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
TODAY!
SSSSSSSSSSSSSS$$ I
Its Less than
Pennies per day
per household.
S$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
IF WE DON'T HAVE
YOUR BUSINESS
CATEGORY
JUSTASK. I
WE CAN GET
IT FOR YOUil

CALL TODAY
(352) 563-5966


"DEBRIS HAULING"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898
3rd Generation Service
Fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
Lawn, Trees, Landscap-
ing, FREE Est., 10% off
any job. Ic 99990257151
& Ins. (352) 201-0658
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
COLEMAN TREE SERVICE
& trim. Lic. Ins. FREE EST.
Lowest rates guarant.
726-8010 727-421-3636
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
- & Sod: 352-563-0272
FREE CONSULTATION
To hurricane ready your
A trees. Prof. Arborist,
Action Tree 726-9724
R WRIGHT TREE SERVICE,
tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Lic
#0256879 352-341-6827
TREE REMOVAL
I Stump grinding, land I
* clearing, bushhog.
352-220-5054
A TREE SURGEON
.Uc. & Ins. Exp'd friendly
-serv, Lowest rates Free
estimates,352-860-1452




All Computer Repair
We come to you. I
S21 yrs. exp. 7 days.
S(352)212-1165 I
L am m A. g


ALAS
COMPUTER
Over 15 Years Exp!
NEVER Diagnostic
Fee! NO Charge if NO
Repair! Senior Disc.
This Week FREEBIE
1 Gig USB Drive!
MICROSOFT CERT.
Free Pickup /Delivery!
586-3636
Citrus County
Computer Doctors
Repairs In-Home or
Pick-Up, Delivery, avail,
Free quote, 344-4839
Cooter Computers Inc.
Repair, Upgrades, Virus
& Malicious software
removal (352) 476-8954


U.

REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch * Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-128




VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
fully coated. 30 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Ins. Lic#001721
352-795-6533/464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Lic, & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
3rd GENERATION SERV
fencing, Gen, home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
lawn trees, & landscap-
ing FREE Est., 10% off
any job. lic 99990257151
& Ins. (352) 201-0658
CHEAP/CHEAP/CHEAP
Husband & Wife DP
Press.Cleaning & Paint-
ing. Lic.&Ins. 637-3765







FERRARO'S
PAINTING SERVICE
Interior, Exterior.
Free Estimates.
'enlor Discount.
(352)465-6631
George Swedlige
Painting- Int./Ext.
Pressure Cleaning- Free
est. 794-0400 /628-2245
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic,/Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Dave Rodgers Painting
20 + yrs. exp., Int./ext.
satisfaction guarantee
lic./Ins. (352) 726-5698
* RUDY'S PAINTING *
Int./Ext., Free Estimates
Pressure Wash., Lic./Ins.
24/7, (352) 476-9013




Affordable Boat Malnt.
& Repair, Mechanical,
Electrical, Custom Rig.
John (352) 746-4521


Carort


Ideal Carports
Custom Build Your Dream
* Carport


' Barn
* RV Cover
* Any Metal Bldg.
e'" " hater you need,
we've got you covered"
352-795-6568
7958 W. Gulf to Lake Hw ., (Hw. 44 Crystal River
wwi^eIca.p s c m


DOCKS, SEAWALLS,
Boat Lifts, Boat Houses,
New, Re decks, Repair
& Styrofoam Replace.
Lic.CBC060275. Ins.
(352) 302-1236
MORRILL MARINE
Outboard Repairs,
Dockside Service. Elec.
Installed (352) 628-3331



AT YOUR HOME Res.
mower & small engine
repair. Lic#99990001273
352-220-4244




BATHTUB REGLAZING
Old tubs & ugly
ceramic tile is restored
to new cond. All colors


FREE ESTIMATES
FREE P.U. & DELIVERY
Furniture & Cornices
(352) 628-5595



ASSISTANCE FOR SRS.
Driver, shopping, appts.
meals, laundry, respite
relief. 352-746-5666
Caregiver in Private
Christian Home, live In,
must be ambulatory.
CNA 35 yrs. exp. Call
Mary (352) 795-9045
Caregiving, If you need
a care giver Call Sheila
25 yrs. exp., cert. & ref.
(352) 572-3576
HEAVEN SENT
Prvt. rm. of home. 1 on
I care. CNA & Med.
Tech. (352) 621-3337




STAINED GLASS
REPAIRS & WINDOW
REBUILDS 352-637-6255
www.moonfly
alassworks.com
-Windows & Doors
-Storm Shutters
-Board-Up Service
-Resident/Commercial
CRC 1326431
(352) 746-9613


VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcoverlng.All work
fully coated. 30 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Ins. Lic#0017231
352-795-6533/464-1397


EXP. HOUSECLEANER �
Will work weekends too,
Call Monica for more
info. 352-795-7905
FINAL DETAILS, LLC
CLEANING SERVICES,
New Const.,Vacant
Prop.,Offices, Residen-
tial 352-400-2772 Up. Ins.
HAUTER & CLARK
HANDYMAN & MORE
Home, Office & Floor
Cleaning, Lawn Serv.
. Pressure Washing,
(352) 860-0911
HOME CLEANING
Homosassa, Lecanto
& Crystal River
Weekly, bi-weekly,
1 time cleaning,
moves, rentals, real
estate sales /models.
Ryanna, 586-7919
Ucensed, Ins., Ref.
House Cleaning
Call Mary
(352) 503-6300




DOTSON Construction
25 yrs. In Central FL. Our
own crews! Specializing
in additions, framing,
trim, & decks.
Lic. #CRC1326910


FL RESCREEN
352-563-0104/257-1011
I panel or comp cage
Family owned & oper'd
Screen rms,Carports,
vinyl & acrylic windows,
roof overs & storm
panels, garage screen
doors, siding,
soffit fascia, Lic#2708
(352) 628-0562




CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST, (352) 586-2996
AUGIE'S PRESSURE
Cleaning - Quality
Work, Low Prices. FREE
Estimates: 220-2913






PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING

exp. Lic./Ins. 341-3300




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash & Gutters
Lic.5863 (352) 746-0141


ROOIN


B o uleric e ...""A. ' Cun

CCC025464 QB00002180 R 16 HI
& SUPPLY INC.
Family Owned & Operated Since 1967
NEW ROOFS - REROOFS - REPAIRS
FREE ESTIMATES
- r.. . . . i


171 '1'A"j
CO PLT ROOF
Mut egiena tm *o cnrat.Oe opo prrof


(352) 628-5079 * (352) 628-7445


I Call does It Alli Noob
too sm. Remod., Home
Repairs, Press. Clean.,
etc. CRC 1326431
(352) 746-9613
Andrew Joehl
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
pressure & cleaning.
Lawns, gutters. No Job
too small Reliable. Ins
0256271 352-465-9201
3rd Generation Service
Fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
Lawn, Trees, Landscap-
ing, FREE Est., 10% off
any job. lc 99990257151
& Ins. (352) 201-0658
-�---- U
H AFFORDABLE, a
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
PROMPT SERVICE |
STrash, Trees, Brush
Appl. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages |
352-697-1126 0
L .. .. - . mmJ
ALL AMERICAN
HANDYMAN Free Est.
Affordable & Reliable
Uc.34770 (352)302-8001






FAST AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs.
Free Est., Uc # 0256374
(352) 257-9508
HANDYMAN
If its Broke , Jerry
Can Fix it. Llc#189620
352-201-0116,726-0762
HAUTER & CLARK
HANDYMAN & MORE
Home, Office & Floor
Cleaning, Lawn Serv.
Pressure Washing,
(352) 860-0911
NEW IN AREA
Ask for Jim or Iv. msg.
352-344-5213
217-201-2962 Llc34868
THE IRISH WAY
Home or Estate Malnt,
& Security. Ref. Avail.
.R.9-JAA.-AA1O


FULL ELECTRIC SERVICE
Remodeling, Lighting,
Spa, Sheds Lic. & Insur.
#2767 (352)257-2276
MALLEY's Elect. Service
Resid. & Comm.
Ins. & Uc. #EC0001840
Rob @352-220-9326
Mel 352-255-4034




"DEBRIS HAULING"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898

"DEBRIS HAULING"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898

All of Citrus Hauling/
Moving Items delivered,
clean ups.Everything
from A to Z 628-6790


AFFORDABLE,
HAULING CLEANUP,
PROMPT SERVICE
Trash, Trees, Brush,
Apple. Furn, Const,
Debris & Garages I
352-697-1126

S AFFORDABLE, a
HAULING CLEANUP, I
PROMPT SERVICE
Trash, Trees, Brush
SAppl. Furn, Const,
SDebris &Garages1
352-697-1126

C.J.'S TRUCK/TRAILERS
Fum., app, trash, brush,
Low $$/Professlonal
Prompt 7 day service
726-2264/201-1422
WE MOVE SHEDS
266-5903




Carpet Factory Direct
Sales * Install* Repair
Laminate, tile, wood Sr.
disc. (352) 341-0909
Mosaic Tile & Remodel
Marble, porcelain &
ceramic. Remodel
more A oles 9R7-317n


All kinds of fences
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
Free estimates.
(352) 527-3431

ROCKY'S FENCING
Working In Citrus County
for 25 yrs.
Free Estimate, Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279
3rd GENERATION SERV
fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
lawn trees, & landscap-
ing FREE Est., 10% off
any Job. lic 99990257151
& Ins. (352) 201-0658
25 Years In County
Free Est., Res./Comm.
FENCES BY DALLAS
Uc./Ins (352) 795-1110
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencinga.
All types. Free estimates
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BARNYARD II FENCING
Serving Citrus Co, Since
1973. Free Estimates
(352) 726-9260
GARY JOE ROSEBERRY
Fence Company
Specializing In vinyl
(362) 621-0929


#1 in Service
Hise Roofing
New const. reroofs &
repairs, 25 yrs. exp, leak
spec. #CCC1327059
(352) 344-2442
John Gordon Roofing
Reca Rates Free est.FProudto
Serve You.
ccc 1325492.
795-7003/800-233-5358


RE-ROOFS & REPAIRS
Reasonable Rates!!
Exp'd, Uc. CCC1327843
Erik (352) 628-2557
ROOFOVERS - MH
2' insul, lifetime warr. no
leaks, colors avail. Do it
yourself kits avail. Lic
1983. 352-746-1600


_2% Concrete

All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. FREE EST.
Llc#2579 /Ins. 746-1004
Concrete Slabs, Pavers
Remove & Haul Debris
Demolit. 352-746-9613
Uc# CRC1326431
Concrete Staining,
Garage & Driveway,
House pressure washer,
Free Est., 20 Yrs. Exp.
(352) 422-8888
CONCRETE WORK
Sdewaks, Diveways Patios,
Free est. Lic. 2000. Ins.
795-4798
Decorative concrete,
River rock, curbs, Stamp
concrete Fuston's River
Rock (352) 344-4209
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
driveways & tear outs


ALL AMERICAN
HANDYMAN Free Est.
Affordable & Reliable
Llc.34770 (352)302-8001
DOTSON Construction
25 yrs. In Central FL. Our
own crews Specializing
In additions, framing,
trim, & decks.
Llc. #CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708
FAST! AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs,
Free Est., Lic #0256374
(352) 257-9508
W. F. GILLESPIE
Room Additions, New
Home Construction,
Baths & Kitchens
St. Lic. CRC 1327902
(352)465-2177
www.wfglllespie.com
We do it ALLI Big or Sm.i
Additions, BA & Kitch.,
Drywall,Crown molding,
Demo. CRC 1326431
(352) 746-9613




CERAMIC TILE INSTALLER
Bathroom remodeling,
handicap bathrooms.
LIc/Ins. #2441 795-7241
CUTTING EDGE Ceramic
Tile. Lic. #2713, Insured.
Showers. Firs. Counters
Etc. (352) 422-2019
Mosaic Tile & Remodel
Marble, porcelain &
ceramic. Remodel
more 4 less, 287-3170


Hurricane Builders
Unlimited, LLC. 30yrs.
exp. Drywall Specialty
New or Restoration. LiUc
1329305 (352) 563-2125
ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs,
Texture, Additions,
Homeowners, Builders
Free est. (352) 220-9016
Lic.#SCC131149747
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Tile Work,
Framing. 35 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263




FILL, ROCK, CLAY, ETC.
All tvoes of Dirt Service
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572
AFFORDABLE Top soil,
fill, mulch,rock. Tractor
work. No job too small.
352-302-7325 341-2019
ALL AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins, 795-5755
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Servn/.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
FLIPS TRUCK & TRACTOR,
Landclearing, Truck &
Tractor work. House
Pads, Rock, Sand, Clay,
Mulch & Topsoil.
(352) 382-2253
A TOP SOIL SPECIAL *
Screened, no stones.
10 Yards $150; 20 Yards
$250 � 352-302-6436




ALL AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 795-5755
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways

LANDCLEARING
I Site prep, Tree Serv., I
SDump Truck, Demo
352-220-5054
M.H. Demolition &
Salvage. Land clearing,
tree brush removal
(352) 634-0329
TRACTOR SERVICE
Tree/Debris Removal
Driveways/Demolition
Line Rock/Fill Dirt
Sr. Disc. 352-302-4686
TURTLE ACRES
Bushhog, Grading,
Stumpgrinding,
Removal No job too
small. (352) 422-2114




3rd Generation Service
Fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
Lawn, Trees, Landscap-
ing, FREE Est., 10% off
any Job. Ilc 99990257151
& Ins. (352) 201-0658
- SOD * SOD * SOD-
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032


I-YARD VAC




Dethatching Lawns
Vacuum Leaves & Thatch,
Tree Trimming
(352) 637-3810 or (352) 287-0393
FREE ESTIMATE Licensed & Insured


D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272


DOG GROOMING
In your home or mine.
10 yrs. exp. Stephanle
@ (352) 503-3435
POOL DECKS
CLEANED & RE-STAINED
Larry (352) 279-7513
WILL DO ERRANDS
For Elderly & Others
Call for Details
(352) 628-1036
' MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY


-"
ci!Prfesioal


C"M isclaeu


Roof Cleaning Specialist
The Only Company that can Keep Mold & Mildew Off
Siding - Stucco - Vinyl - Concrete Tile & Asphalt Roofs

GUARANTEED!
Restore * Protect Beautify - Residential & Conmmercial

Suncoast

- Exterior
Restoration Service Inc.

877-601-5050 * 352-489-5265


RENT-TO-OWN
Attention:
- College Graduates - Restaurant - Retail Electronics -
- Sales Managers - Collections People -
WANT A CHANGE?
Individuals age 21 or older, with a clean driving record,
knowledge of the city that are detail oriented,
COLORTYME wants to talk with you.
WE HAVE IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
FOR THE FOLLOWING:
* Management Candidates
Field and Phone Collectors
* Sales and Delivery Drivers
WE CAN OFFER YOU:
* A good starting Income
Company paid training
Benefits
* Opportunity for advancement
Forward your resume to:
rutledgerm@hotmail.com
or mail to Mike Rutledge
3751 SE 44th St.
Ocala, FL 33480
Pre-employment drug screen, background check and
MVR required. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer.


I


ALUMINUM


CLASSIFIEDS


$$ GOT CASH $$

Earn great money by
setting appts, for busy
local company.
Call Steve @
352-628-0187

DELI PERSON &
CASHIER
Exp/Nights/ Wknds. a
MUST 352-527-9013














How
To Make
Your
Dining
Room
Set
Disappear...

Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!



(352) 563-5966


"www.chronicleonlnet, om


"Mo iving
/Hauling


Pool
CA
c.n Service


-I


1.


I


i


i


.I:












CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE.


Delivery Driver/
Sales & Service
To our customers In
Florida, mechanical
ability, some lifting a
must. Self motivated
work Independently,
Valid Driv. Lic/good dri.
record. Apply In Person
Btw. 9-4pm, 5722 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Homosassa

EXP'D TRIMMERS &
LAWN PERSONNEL
(352) 228-7472










HEAD LIFEGUARD
Announcement #
07-104

Provide routine
lifeguard services at
aquatic facilities;
surveillance;
administering first aid;
perform rescues;
provide emergency
care as needed;
teach swimming
classes. Perform
facility maintenance
Including actual
cleaning, minor
repairs. Must possess
a current Lifeguard,
CPR for the
Professional Rescuer
with AED, Emergency
Response, Waterfront,
Head Lifeguard
and Oxygen
Administration Water
Safety Instructor.
$11.53 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
Apply at the
Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
no later than Friday,
October 12, 2007.
EOE/ADA


kmart.

OPERATIONS
SUPERVISOR
2ND SHIFT

o Attention Recent
College Grads-
Training Provided
o Must be able to
work any shift
* Minimum 4-year
college degree
preferred
o 1-2 years
supervisory
experience
preferred
Coordinate and
monitor operations
within the functional
areas to ensure
performance
production rates are
consistent with
business plan and
pattern, reducing
irregularities and
damages.
Apply online at:
Searsholdlngs.
corn/careers
(Reference)
Requisition # 45228BR
EEOE


C.""- General
= Hoelp ^


F/T MAINTENANCE
For senior apartment
complex. Skilled In
electrical, plumbing,
HVAC, painting,
carpentry,
Competitive wage
plus 2BR apartment
and meals.
Call (352) 726-5682

LABORERS
Evenings, full or part
time, starts at $7.50
an hr. Apply at:,
SHRIMP LANDING
12645 W. Fort Island
Trail, Crystal River
(352) 795-1916





OPPORTUNITIES
FOR A NEW
CAREER!
Stanley Steemer
Will train, FT, benefits.
Must have FL Driver's
IIc. and be at least
21 yrs of age. Drug
Free. Apply at
911 Eden r., inv.

PRO TECH PEST
Is Hiring
TECHNICIANS

$8.00/hr. bonuses +
benefits & training.
(352) 527-0092

UPHOLSTERER
Auto upholsterer needed
for part time work. Must
have experience in work-
ing with vinyl and leather.
Call 352-428-0031.

WILL TRAIN

Willing to work long
hours, for position In
well drilling operation
& pump repair. Must
have clean driving
record. Benefits;
Apply @
Citrus Well Drilling
2820 E Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando




CLEANING
POSITION
Inverness. Exp'd w/ ref.
Will train right person,
Must have trans. DFWP
352-637-0611 10a-2p

CUSTODIAN
Announcement
#07-103
Part time (20 hours)
position performing
janitorial duties
maintaining County
buildings and
facilities. Sweeps
and mops floors,
vacuums carpets
and polishes furniture.
Cleans restrooms,
windows, blinds, air
conditioning vents,
etc. Graduation
from H.S or GED
certificate. Some
knowledge of
building
maintenance and
custodial require-
ments. Knowledge of
floor care such as
stripping, waxing and
buffing. Must have
janitorial experience
and/or experience
as a semi-skilled
handyman.

$7.69 hourly to start.
Apply at
the Citrus County
Human Resources
Office, 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Suite
178, Lecanto, FL 34461
no later than Friday,
October 5, 2007.
EOE/ADA.


Serving the Developmentally
Disabled Since 1966.


$ Increased pay rates and $

competitive benefit package for

all F/T employees after 90 days

Positions Available:

Residential - F/T & P/T

Supported Living Coach - F/T

Transitional Living Coach - F/T

DRUG FREE WORKPLACE

Apply at the Key Training Center
Business Office
130 Heights Ave., Inverness
352-341-4633
(TDD: 1-800-545-1833 ext. 347)
*EOE*
722225


SNOW HIRING
LOCALLY
Large national
organization.
Avg. Pay $20/hr.
Over $55K annually.
Including full
benefits & OT, paid
training, vacation.
S F/T &P/T
1-866-515-1762
L - .-. ..




Prime Business
Opportunity
Underground Boring
Equip, Grundomat,
Pneumatic, missiles,
compressors, trailers
etc, Too much to list.
$7,500. best offer or
trade (352) 726-2211





ESTABLISHED SALON
FOR SALE. Exc. location.
352-341-5043 or
352-212-0514/637-5078
LAWN SERVICE
Established 23 yrs.
w/ 1990 F450 Dump,
2007 Toro mower & all
lawn equip. + chain
saws, hedge trimmers,
approx. 75 accounts
make your money
back in less than 2 yrs.
will train, $87,900 Cash
(352) 637-6718

POOL ROUTE
HERNANDO Net $84K +
year. Will train. Guar-
antee accounts $67K
full price. 877-766-5757
www.Poolroutesales,
com NPRS Inc. Broker


-one


COMMERCIAL LOANS
Prime, Sub-Prime, Hard
Money, REHAB, Private.
Also, equip. loans.
Mark (352) 422-1284




ALL STEEL BUILDINGS
------^


25x25x7 (2:12 Pitch)
1- 9x7 garage door,
2 vents,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED-S15.995
25x30x9 (3:12 Pitch)
Roof Overhang
2-9x7 garage doors,
2 vents, entry door,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED- $16.495
Many Sizes Avail.
We Custom Build
We Are The Factory
Fl. Engineered Plans
Meets or Exceeds
Florida Wind Code
METAL STRUCTURES
LLC.COM
1-866-624-9100
metalsfructuresllc.com

FACTORY DIRECT
METAL BUILDINGS
CARPORTS, SHEDS
Custom Installation,
Upto 140MPH
Wind Rating
Gulf to Lake Sales
(352) 527-0555





Antique Fair
& Auction
1st SUNDAYS, Oct. 7
thru April, Beville's
corner market 2 mli
N. of Webster, SR 471,
Rent a booth for the
fair, sell remainder at
Auction or Just
come to sell at
Tailgate Auction.
AU3347, Col, B. Weller
For Info. 407-832-0100
We buy Full estates


CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Our CAREER OPEN HOUSE is to recruit new team members
for Branch Management, Branch Sales and Teller positions.
Needing candidates with strong customer service focus and
previous sales experience. Professional appearance a must!
Minimum of HS diploma or equivalent required.






















regions.com * (Career Section) EOE
profile and submit your resume online at. """


4 MONTHS NEW
FRIGADAIRE SIDE BY
SIDE REFRIG. 26cu. ft.
Wtr/ice in door. Black
w/SS drs, Under warr.
$700/obo 352-503-4733
A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
-h 2 Ton $780.00
-- 2-/2 ton $814.00
- 3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Also Available
Free Delivery!
Call 746-4394
ABC Briscoe Appliance
Refrigerators, washers,
stoves. Service & Parts
(352) 344-2928
AC SYSTEMS
HEAT PUMPS, MH UNITS
ALL SIZES, 13 SEER, FROM
$475. 352-400-4945
AIR CONDITION
Carrier. Ext. Unit W/OUT
Air Handler. Model #
38CKC024330
2 yrs. old. Never Used.
$135 (352) 637-6618
Elec. stove, 30" white,
3 yrs old, self cleaning
oven with manual, like
new, $250.
(352) 586-1566
ELECTRIC STOVE
Exc. cond. Kitchenaid,
convection oven,
bisque, glass top,
$150/obo.
(352) 746-3933
FREEZER
15 Cu Ft. FF Upright, wht
$125 REFRIDGE. 18 Cu.
Ft. FF wht, $50
(352) 637-2788
KENMORE 36" Side by
side, water & ice in
door, 36 cu. ft. White
showroom clean,
$550
(352) 464-0602
KENMORE
WASHER & DRYER
Both in exc. working
cond. $300
(352) 527-6639
Kenmore Washer,
white, excellent shape,
$85 cash
(352) 344-2752
REFRIGERATOR
Side by Side 22 cu. Ft.
Kenmore. Ice/Water on
Door. Bisque color,
$100 Fair Cond.
(352) 563-2803
SEARS DISHWASHER
& Above Range
Microwave, both. gd.
cond, $50 each.
(352) 564-2413
(352) 302-9261
Set of Appliances,
white, whirlpool, very
clean work well, $300.
(352) 746-3410
WASHER & DRYER
Both run well
$150.
(352) 344-4182
Washer & dryer, exc.,
like new, $295/set,
w/1-yr. Guar. Free Del,
& set-up 352-754-1754
WASHER/DRYER
Brand New "Stacked"
Extra Duty. Reg. $1,000;
Selling $550 firm.
(352) 563-5022
WASHER/DRYER
Kenmore, white. Will
deliver. Good cond.
$350 OBO
(352) 220-0105
WHIRLPOOL DRYER
Very good condition,
$100
(352) 220-4082
Whirlpool Refrigerator
21 cu.ft. like new cond.
3-1/2 yr warranty, white,
$500 abo
(352) 476-7252




2 Day Art &
Antique Auction
Oct. 6 & 7
SAT. PREV: NOON
AUCTION: 5 PM
250 lots, art, sculp-
tures, incl. Joyce
Ballantyne, pin-up
artist, Oils, comm.
advert, sports field,
Jonathan Winters
orig. Erte several signs,
pcs. by listed artist.
EXCITING SALEII
SUN. PREV: 10 AM
AUCTION: IPM
Antique furn., sterling,
jewelry, additional
artwork, oriental car-
pets, crystal, china,
400+ lots.
4000 S. Hwy. 41
INVERNESS
See web site www.
dudleysauctlon.com
(352) 637-9588
AB1667 AU2246
12%BP 2%Dlsc ca/ck


M-.


4 x 8 Sheets of
Slot Wall 10 for $50.
Glass Shelves for slot
wall, all pegs, in glass,
holders, new products,.
lots of glass & hardware
$200. 352-266-2020

8' Ext. & Int. DOORS
Variety of Szs & Styles
(352) 302-4027
MH Roofover Kits Avail.
do it yourself, will dellv.
Used roofing material
also avail 352-746-1600
STANDARD GARAGE
DOOR 16 FT.
genie opener and all
hardware included.
$600. 352-302-2716





COMPUTERS
Internet ready. Comp.
systems. Delivered &
setup, (352) 270-3779
Dell Computer
model Dimension
L600CX, incl. monitor,
printer, speakers, good
working cond. $75.
(352) 795-4908

DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service. New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
http://www.rdeell.com

FASTI2000MHZ
HP-60GB H/D CD Burn.
K/B, Mouse, Spkrs
W/ Win XP $290 w/
CD's (352)613,2958

New Logitec, speakers
for computers
$89.
(352) 634-0301





BACKHOE
'89 John Deere Hoe
4 Wheel Drive
$19,500 Firm
(352) 860-1617





Aluminum patio set
38x66 glass top table, 6
chairs, 9FT umbrella with
stand & one end table.
Sage green color, $200
(352) 860-2015





2 Beds for Sale
White metal day bed/
w/ pop up trundle,
$250. White twin Bed,
w/ 3 storage drawers
$75. (352) 746-7232
All Leather Sofa,
as new, top quality,
chestnut brown,
basset, 89" Long,
perf. cond. for office or
home must sell $1,250.
obo (352) 746-7745
Bargain HuntersI
Browse 6,000 sq.ft.
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Tues-Sat. 9am- 1pm
Homosassa 628-2306
BEDS 4 BEDS 4* BEDS
The factory outlet store
For TOP National Brands
Fr.50%/70% off Retail
Twin $1190 7Full $159
Queen $199 / King $249
Please call 795-6006


""Employment
C"
cmlnfo

COSMETOLOGY
BARBER
ESTHETICS/
SPA TRAINING
Nail Technology
Massage Therapy
Sept. 17 Cosmeto)Qg
' Days
Sept. 24 Barbering
- Nights
Oct. I Massaae Thoy
Nights
Oct. 22 Cosmetology
Nights
Dec. 8 Massage Thpy
'Weekends
Skin & Nail Sneclaltv
classes *Form Monthly
(727) 848-8415
Bene's International
School of Beauty,
Barber & Massage
Therapy
7127 U.S. Hwy. 19
New Port Richey, FL
34652


Antique Dresser
& Vanity
w/ fancy mirrors, very
good cond. $300 ea
obo, $500. both
(352) 249-8161
Antique Safe
First $175. takes It
(352) 341-5247



















UNIQUE DOLL IN
CARRIAGE, 2' TALL
Composition Head,
moving eyes, $500
Call for details.
(352) 637-6310




Twin Pumps Good
Condition, $1000
352-302-8529
NEVER USED SEATS 51
3 hp., extra jets.
Light, lounger. Under
$4.395/acriflce $2.295
(352)287-9266
SPA HEATER - GAS
Teledyne LAARS I series,
good working cond.
$200/obo


g]

Craftsmen Radial
Armsaw, $75; Delta
Commerlcal 10" table
saw, $75. (352)
564-2413/302-9261

Sander
Rigid, oscillating,
edge/belt, spindle
sander, $150.
(352) 628-6335
WHEEL OF A
DEAL









GUARANTEED
S RESULTS FOR
ONLY $63.95
Sell your car today
with a Wheel of a
Deal Ad.Run a 30
day ad and we will
continue to run your

you sell the car.

(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902
"Ad will not be
automatically
scheduled. The
customer must call
each month to
reschedule.

Woodworking
Table Band Saw $30
and
Table Drill Press $25.
(352) 726-8719





Magnavox 26"
older TV
$50.
(352) 621-3131

-
r iiiiiiiiii


PRE OWNED FURNITURE
Unbeatable Prices
NU 2 U FURNITURE
Homosassa 621-7788
BROYHILL WOODEN
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
65"LX22"WX51 "H, fits 32"
TV, 3 drawers, 4 shelves
in glass cabinet. $400.
SMW (352) 382-4795
BUICK
'97, Skylark, Runs Greati
New Air & Brakes, Tires
Reliable Transportation
Looks Good $2,600.
Must See 527-86421
Bunk Bed, white metal
frame, w/mattress, $175
3 pc. Liv. Room Set,
bamboo, sofa, chair
& table $150.
(352) 726-0708
CHAIRS (2)
& Matching OTTOMAN
La-Z-Boy, microfiber
light green. New cond.
$250/set OBO
(352) 560-7693
CHERRY OFFICE DESK
w/topper, 62"L X23"W
$150. (352) 726-9183
CURIO 5 glass shelves,
mirrored back, 3 glass
sides, locking door.
$200.
(352) 464-0602
Dining Room Hutch
Solid oak, led glass
doors, lighted top
EXCELLENT COND.
$650 OBO.
(352) 527-1399
DINING ROOM SET
4 Chairs, Table, Hutch
Excellent Condition
$400 obo
352-422-3995
DINING ROOM SET
large hutch w/ gold
leaf Inlaid, table w/
gold leaf, 2 leaves
and 6 chairs, $700.
(352) 746-9470
DINING SET
TABLE (washed white)
42X42 w/18" leaf. With 4
club chairs on castors,
$100/obo. Call
(352) 382-8701
DRAFTING OFFICE
CHAIR, $50;
LEATHER
OFFICE CHAIR $40
(352) 726-9183
END TABLES &
COFFEE TABLE
SOLID OAK, Glass Top
$400
(352) 637-1061

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
3 Pc, SOUD OAK, w/
smoked glass doors.
$775.
*352-637-1061*


CIO Garage
W
c= /Yard S


I


I


CITRUS HOME DECOR @
Wal-Mart Plaza,
Conslanment, like new
furniture (352) 621-3326
LOVESEAT, rocks &
reclines, teal/brown
tones, like new, $75;
TABLE w/2 chairs, sides
extend, It, brown, $60
(352) 634-2592
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
QUEENSIZE BED
inflatable. $65. Dinette
set w/4 chairs.$75.
220-4270 or 726-5708.
Rattan Glass top table,
$25.
Full sz. box spring &
mattress
$25.
(352) 341-5247
RECLINER
Micro-Fiber, Creme
Color. Brand NewI $135.
Must Sell, sacrifice.
Invern. (919) 538-2933
RECLINER/SWIVEL
ROCKER, Cream color
Leather, good cond.
$125; GLASSTOP Coffee
tbl,. & 2 end tbis. $75,
like new (352) 382-8701
---E--m il
RENTAL FINDER
www.chronlcle
rentalfinder.com
ROLL-AWAY BED
Twin size w/cover. $45;
WICKER CHAISE
W/CUSHIONS $35
Exc. Cond.
(352) 746-0488
ROLLTOP DESK
Solid oak, $300.
(352) 382-0817
The Path's Graduates,
Single Mothers,
Needs your furniture.
Dining tables, dressers
& beds are needed.
Call (352) 746-9084
WOOD FUTON
full size $125. Wing back
chairgold. $25.
352-220-4270 or
726-5708.




Dyna Mark Rider
older model
8 HP, B&S eng., 36" cut.
$150. (352) 302-6069
*FREE REMOVAL OFI
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
LAWNMOWER
'05 Toro (0 Turn Radius)
$1100 , PRESSURE
WASHER 2200psi like
new $200 (352) 257-9597
MOWER
Murray Select Riding '05
12.5 HP, 30" Cut $525
Eve (352) 746-0084
MULCH 5-6 Yrd. Loads
$95 Deliv'd. Citrus Co.
Gravel $75 + Materials.
352-563-9979/400-0150
ROTOTILLER
New, w/new spare tires.
$350; 25 GAL. YARD
TREE, SHRUBS & LAWN
SPRAYER $100
(352) 746-7684
Sears Craftsman riding
mower, mulching deck,
12.5 Briggs & Stratton
I/C Gold, $295
(352) 628-2769




Huge Nag Fern basket
plant, asking $500
(352) 726-7266
leave message




BEVERLY HILLS
Fri-Sat-Sun 9-6
43 South Melbourne St.
(off US. 491 near SAL'S)
FLORAL CITY
Sunday 8 - ?
Furn. Prntr, Misc. Items
4610 East Stoer Ln.
(Just off 58I1)


2ActNow7

GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week offer your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902

HOMOSASSA
Estate Sale. Entire
contents of home.
Including house &
garage. (352) 628-4339


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TYPEWRITER
IBM Selectric very good
cond.$60
(352) 382-1830
vinyl rack, for 12ft
flooring, Island type,
holds 8 rolls, on rollers
$125. (352) 341-0787
Wheelchair,
lightweight,
excel, cond. $150.
Ladder, aluminum
32' extension
$175. (352) 746-9012
Wood stove $100
Large lift chair $50
(352) 637-1965
Woodburning Fireplace
free standing, glass drs,
brick liner, $75; 80 Gal.
Elec. Hot water heater,
1 yr. old, $75. (352)
564-2413/ 302-9261




BRAUN
WHEELCHAIR LIFT
Side mounted, fits full
sz. van. $750/obo
(352) 382-8970 Lv. Mess.
HANDICAPPED
VAN FOR SALE
Handicapped van with
Braun llfft,hand
controls, six way power
seat, fully loaded,
wood package with
TV,VCR, Ford E250,1993-
with under 40,000 miles.
Asking $18.000 or best
offer.. 352-270-3883.
LEGEND SCOOTER
$425.00.
SHARP RIDER
Sx75 n.


37 gal. Aux.
FUEL TANK
$100
(352) 302-2254

2007

SPECIALS
6 lines - 10 days
Items totalling
$1-$150...........$7.95
$151-$400......$12.95
$401-$800.......$17.95
$801-$1,500....$22.95
CALL CHRONICLE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
726-3983 OR
563-5966
Two general
merchandise Items
per ad,
private party only.
(Non-Refundable)
Some Restrictions
May Apply
17" SANYO COLOR TV,
w/remote, Works great,
$25; OVAL DINING
ROOM TBL W/Leaf, 4
castor chairs. $25
(352) 232-9516
32' ALUM. LADDER $100
LADDER RACK FOR 6'
TRUCKBED $200
352-634-5152
BATHROOM SINK
1 yr, old, bone, oval &
Chrome Faucet Set.
$40/set. BATHROOM
MIRROR 145" W X 47"H
$45.(352) 382-0619
BURN BARRELS
Heavy duty w/ out tops
$7.50 EA (352) 344-9752
Carpet Factory Direct
Sales *Install * Repair
Laminate, tile, wood Sr.
disc. (352) 341-0909
CHRYSLER PACIFICA
Towing Hitch, $65.
I2HP, KOHLER CI
Horizontal Shaft, $75.
(352) 795-6639
DOG CAGE
Large, Very Good
Condition, $40obo
(352) 637-3488
Electric Fire Place, new
in box w/ accessories
$550. Running Boards
new in box use for
Truck, SUV or Van,
$375. (352) 465-6558
FREEZER, Upright 1 cu.ft
Whirlpool, almond, exc.
cond. $125/obo.
2 TWIN BEDS, oak,
camp. w/all bedding.
Exc. cond. $600/obo.
(352) 746-9737
GE CHEST FREEZER,
energy saver,
27'WX48LX34"H
$60; GRANDFATHER
CLOCK, 6', Resin, $40.
(352) 341-0787
Hess Trucks
'93 - '02
$150. for all,
will separate
(352) 382-1191
IRON FILTER SYSTEM
Whole House $60;
WATER SOFTENER
SYSTEM
(Whole House) $60
(352) 563-2803
Janome Embroidering
mach. many attach.
thread, memory cards,
$2,200 abo 746-7191
Kenmore canister
sweeper, exc. cond.,
$25. Sears electric
typewriter, $25 obo
(352) 746-0559
RECLINER
Large pwr lift, green
$100 Wheel Chair Elect.
Like new $200
(352) 503-5125
after 6pm
Round Pool
24 x 52, filter, pump,
ladder & access.
$600.
(352) 464-0602
ROYAL KENT, Poland
Very pretty!
Service of 8. Mint Cond.
Platters, Veg. Bowls,
Cream, Sugar. $125
8a-3p (352) 621-3696
S.S. FULL SZ. BEER KEG
DISP., COMMERCIAL
w/all accessories,
$550
(352) 302-4027
SALON HAIR
CUTTING CHAIR
$150,
(352)464-1513 or
(352) 382-2662
SOD. ALL VARIETIES
Bahia, $80 pallet,
St Augustine, $150
pallet. Install & Del.
Avail. 352-302-3363
The Spot Family Center
Needs Donations
For Community
Family/Youth Events
Land, Storage Racks,
Containers, Folding
Tables, Event Tents, Bus,
Box Truck. Please call:
Brian (352) 220-0576


KING BED, Complete
frame, base, foam mat-
-tress, 5 sets of sheets,
bedspread. $550.
(352) 527-0560
KING SIZE RESONIC




Round glass top table
with four chairs.
Asking $300.00. Call
400-1331
La Z Boy Recliner,
$35.
Book Case
$15.
(352)341-5247
La Z Boy Recliner,
Big man's size
excel cond.
$125
(352) 249-9275
La-Z-Boy Leather
Reclining Loveseat
hunter green,
retail $2,100.
Asking $450.like new
(352) 746-2842
Leather Recliner Chair,
deep blue, excel.
cond., 6mas. old
$750. obo,
Must Sell

LIVING ROOM SET
3pc. American Country
Style Sofa, Loveseat &
Chair. $200 obo
352-527-3463/249-8004
Loveseat
6 mos. old, burgundy,
leather, $450.
Dining Set, Iron & glass,
like new, must see. $400
(352) 527-4488
LOVESEAT
Both sides recline.
Deep teal color, velvet
type material. Comfy,
clean. 5 yrs. old $125
(352) 220-6823


10' X 5' HEAVY DUTY
MTL. FRAME / WD.
FLOOR/ VG CONDITION
$750 OBO 352-795-6693
6' x 12'
single axle trailer
$750.
(352) 465-2271
Dual axle 16' lawn
trailer with 18" sides, like
new 2"x10" PT deck,
electric brakes, LED
lights, frame 8yrs old,
excellent condition,
$1,600 invested, asking
$800., 352-634-4558
HORTON
HAULER 2001
7' X 14'
4 NEW TIRES $2600.00
352-634-5152
PACE AMERICAN
'04 Journey, 6 x 12
Single Axle Cargo Sport
Trailer. Safe, durable,
EZ to tow. $2,00aobo
(352) 270-3304
TRAILER!
Utility, Enclosed,
Car Haulers, Dump,
Equipment Haulers &
More. We Have A Great
Selection of Trailers
In Stock Nowl
Gulf to Lake Sales
352-527-0555
UTILITY TRAILER
17 X 6 Heavy Duty
w/tool boxes.
$900 (352)697-1705
UTILITY TRAILER
5x7, 2 Steal ramps $350
PORTABLE A/C 10k BTUs
$300 352-257-9597




EXERSAUCER
Evenflo Exersaucer,
rarely used, $40
352-794-3081




BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676
Tony Little Type
Life Strider,
Cheap
(352) 564-4284
USED METAL
DETECTOR
(352) 447-6281




NOTICE
Pets for Sale
In the State of Florida
per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certificate per
Florida Statute.
AKC Chow Chow pups
8/7/07 Cinnamon, Blue,
Cream M/F $550 & $650
Appt./Iv. msg 637-6655
Beagle Puppies
8 wks. tn colored. Shots/
wormed. $125. cash
(352)447-2018
BEAUTIFUL CHOCOLATE
LAB PUPS AKC 9wks.
Old. Parents on prem-
ises, $400. ea. Health
cert. (352) 465-6535
BIRD CAGE
Large on wheels.
28 X36 X 55"
Needs paint. $75.
(352) 628-3736
BOXER PUPPIES
Purebred, 12 wks.,
Male & Female
Brindles & Fawns. $325
352-344-5712/978-3202


IBER 30, 2007 9D



*FREE REMOVAL OF-
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
GOLF CART BATTERIES
THE BATTERY MEDICS
36V & 48V Sets were
$245 Now $200 Pricing
Extended till 9/30.
Contact Mark @
727-375-6111
GULF CLUB SET
AMF Hybrids w/bag
used twice, like new,
$325, (352) 795-4405
MARLIN 336RC
Lever Action, 35 Rem.,
4X Weaver Scope, Hard
Case, VG Condition,
$275.00 (352) 382-3948
Smith & Wesson
357, 4 Inch barrel,
excel shape, highway
patrolman $450.
(352) 795-0818
Tennis Racket Stringing
Machine, Prince P200,
$300; Full Set of Golf
Clubs w/Bag & Bag
Boy, $75.
(352) 746-4063
WE BUY GUNS
On site Gun Smithng
(352) 726-5238


BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676




A Model Rover
Mandolin
Acc/Elec, w/case,
perfect cond.
$150; (352) 746-4063
AMPLIFIER/SAMPSON
10 Channel, Pwrd.
Mixer, 900 watts, studio
quality/stereo, EQ for
mains/EQ for monitors,
effects. New in box!
$395 (352) 628-7251
(352) 586-8503 Cell
Baldwin Piano
$350.
(352) 615-6146
after 3pm
COUNTRY GROUP
Needs Fiddle or Banjo
player. Call Jersey Jim
352-422-2187
ORGAN
Hammond Console Ex-
cellent Condition $500
(352) 382-0771
UPRIGHT PIANO
1940's Vintage All keys
work. You move it! $75
(352) 249-1149




MATTRESS SET w/ Frame
Simons Back Care $125
Vertical Blinds (set of 6)
off white Vinyl $150
(352) 637-2788
STOVE
w/ self cleaning over
$50, Refridg. w/top
Freezer $75
(352) 503-5125




BMI Nautilus
Weight Machine
190lbs. great cond. call
$50.
(352) 489-8348
BOFLEX EXTREME 2
310LB. UPGRADE,
leg attachment, $700.
352-302-8529
HOME GYM
Weights and Aerobic
Conditioning. Wiener
Master Trainer, $65.
(352) 489-5355
PRO-FORM EXERCISE
MACHINE, with all
gadgets, like new,
exc. cond. Only $300.
(352) 382-0022
Tanning Bed
Sun Quest Pro 16 SE
Wolff System
$500.
352-302-2437




BIKES
FUJI- COST $340
sell $2.Q_Mountaln bike
Gary Fischer cost $600-
Sell $300. LIKE NEW
(353) 270-8074
FIREARMS
Cabinet, Safe, Cases,
Misc. ID req.
(352) 637-1617


QOA .











10D SUNDAY Sm


-S
CHIHUAHUA Puppies
10wks, long & short
haired, M &Fem, shots
$225-$250..
352-628-3959, 586-0124
DACHSHUND - 1 male,
neutered, pie cream,
7 mos., Microchlpped,
shots. $250,
(352) 621-4553
Dachshund,
3 mos old, male, black,
needs good home.
Health cert. $350.
(352) 613-5816


XAct NoW

GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over Items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week after your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902

GERMAN SHEPHERD PUP
Male.
(352) 489-7031
Humane Society
of Inverness
Has a New Vet
Who Has Joined
Our Team
We offer Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Starting at $20,
Low cost vaccines,
Heartworm test,
Heartwdrm
treatment, Cat
Declawlng. Call
for prices and appt.
(352) 726-8801
Humanitarians
of Florida
Low Cost Spay &
Neuter by Appt.
Cat Neutered $20
Cat Spayed $25
Dog Neutered &
Spayed start at $35
Low cost shot clinic
Tues, Weds & Thurs
10am-4pm
(352) 563-2370
JACK Russell
AKC Fem. 1 Year all
shots, $400 abo
(352) 201-0731
Japanese Chin, 1 yr.
old not registered but
can be, trade for Mal-
tese puppy, female or
for sale (352) 564-0387
Loving Maltese Puppy
male, 4 months old
$400.
(352) 382-2523
MINI DACHSHUNDS
Reg., Shots, Health
Cert., MUST SEEI $400
(352) 563-1479
PARROTLET
10 mos. old female.
American Yellow.
Breeder. $80
(352) 613-4180
POMERANIAN PUPS
Pure bred. 12 wks.,
male & female. Party
color. Reg., papers,
Health Cert. & Shots.
$400 (352) 628-0469
POMERANIANS
Tiny fur ball puppies
AKC, 8 wks, 4M, 3F
Shots, wormed, $500
-$600. (352) 746-6437
POMERIANS
Cute, tiny pups, AKC,
Male, Black & white,
Female orange/sable
Shots, Health Cert. $600
(941) 286-1112 or
(352) 465-3785
POODLE - Tiny Male
CKC, Apricot, 8wks.
Health Cert. Shots,
adorable. $550
(352) 422-4500
Quality Home Raised
Pups Maltese, Yorkle,
Chihuahua, poodle,
Designer breeds,
Pekingese/Chin
Cavaller/poo,
Yorkle/poo, malte/poo
Maltese/shih tzu
352-347-5086
RAT TERRIERS
Male, Female, various
ages, colors and sizes.
Shots, Health Certs,
$250-500(352) 621-3110
ROTTWEILERS
Fern, pups AKC,
Health Cert. Shots, Tails
& Dew Claws done,
Beaut. Big Blk Hds, $700
352-476-2209/726-8751
SCOTTISH TERRIER PUPS
Reg. ACA Males &
� females Small. Ready
Son 9/30 $500 & $550
(352) 726-0133
SHIH TZU PUPPIES
10 wks, CKC reg. Brwn
& wht. Male $450,
Female $500. Health
Cert. (352) 564-2865
SIAMESE KITTENS
Seal Pt., blue Pt.,
chocolate, pure bred,
consumers warranty
shots, $200-$250
(352) 228-1906
YORKIES
10wks. Fluffy Pups,
Male, Female. Shots,
Health Cert. $800
(941) 286-1112 or
(352) 465-3785


-U
FISH AQUARIUM
NEW 55 GALLON
With cabinet stand, 2
filters, all accessories.
$300/obo.
(352) 302-7725


""-


CIRCLE Y
WESTERN SADDLE
Exc. Cond. Pad &
Stand Incl. MUST SELLI
$450obo (352) 860-2491
or 464-0161 Cell
HORSE SHOEING/
TRIMMING, AFA, Cert,
Farrier, Richard Iversen
(352) 628-9186
Nice Registered
4 yr. old App. Gelding
15H, been trail ridden
up'to date on everyth-
ing
$1,200. (813) 967-5580



Ihelfer,Hereford/Angus
3 Hereford bull calves,
$300 each. You pick
up. (352) 341-2484
MALE PYGMY GOAT
2 years old, Blue eyes,
$150/obo; 2 MALE
PYGMY'S 6wks old. $55
each. (352) 463-8110


I EMUI3E 30 2007



PIGLETS
(4) sale
(352) 212-3385
(407) 466-6449




4 Mud Tires,
44 x 18.5 x 15 Tires,
$400. obo
(352) 279-4860
7.5 Johnson Outboard,
runs excel.
great shape, $300.
25HP Mariner,
foot. froze up $150.
(352) 279-4860
MERCURY
2005 50HP, Like new
w/controls,
Repowerlng, $2550/
obo (352) 795-1243




YAMAHA
'96 Wave Venture, 3
seat, low hrs, Exc. cond.
I n i /. n .. ... . m.r a ....


12FT FISHING BOAT
Rod holders, deep sides
wide, flat bottom,
heavy, $150
(352) 341-0787
24ft. Prollne
S10 Pick Up,
Race Car
(352) 621-3420


AllOver 2007 Centsry Boat Packages
ReceivSundane Sk FREEiffsTrail











StNow Inand SAVESAVtockE
'07 2001 CENTURY
F150 & Trailer, T-Top & manyotor,


'07 OUTER BANKS
$13,595

SS Cuddy Mersser & Ta a
Fasta & Clean$23j990





2007

CLEARANCE


Ovean250 w & Used Boats
Sundance Skiffs








owTHREE RIVERStck
AIRBOAT 16'
Panther. Alum. w/trlr,
$5,500
(352)489-3-5510
Area's Largest
Selection of
Clean Used Boats










SELECTION
OF PONTOONS
& DECK BOATS
Crystal River
Marine
(352) 795-2597
BAYLINER
26', Rendezvous Deck
Boat. 140 Suzuki, 4 str.
mtr., bath, fresh H20
Syst., top w/rearencl.,
Good tandem trir. 518K
(352) 422-4095
CAROLINA SKIFF
2004, 19DLX, 90HP
Yamaha 4 stroke
MInkotta trolling motor,
bimlnl top, depthfinder,
radio, onboard battery
charger, rod holders, all
In very good cond.
$9,500 (352) 344-5006
COMPACT 16
Sailboat, new bottom
paint, complete rigg-
ing, extras, dinghy, trr.,
great starter boat,
$2,500. (352) 563-1327
(352) 795-0678
DURACRAFT
15' 6hp Yamaha, Low
Hours, Wesco Trir, 2
swvl fishing seats. $1895
352-634-3679/628-5419
FLOATING DOCK
Cov'd Floats, Across
from Airport US. 19
Cryst. Rvr 352- 486-5836
GATOR
G3 '06 Welded Alum
1756 CC, 60 HP 4-Stroke
Yamaha w/Warranty,
Trolling Motor, Seats,
Fish Finder, Galv Trailer,
Less than 50 hrs use.
$10,995 080,
352-465-7240
JON BOAT
16' w/30 hp Merc. T/T,
Bimlni, CC,TrIr, Mtr.&
Acc. Exc. 4 flats. $4,350
obo (352) 746-4160
LOWE
17' Bass Boat/Trailer
50HP Yamaha engine
$6500. (352) 795-9873
Nature Coast Marine
New, Used &
Brokerage
We Pay Cash for
Clean Used Boats
www.BoatSuper
Center.com
352 794-0094
ir -- -ii
I Nature Coast Marine
SSales & Service |
Present this Ad for
10% Off on all
I Parts & Service i
S 1590 US 19,
Homosassa
352-794-0094

NEW & USED
Boat trailers at great
prices. Llmlted supply.
Let's make a Deall
352-527-3555


9-5 Mon thru Fri


CnRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


rIN Ii
2003 G3 LX CRUISE, 20'
PONTOON, 03 YAMAHA
F50 4-STROKE W/LESS
THAN 30 HRS; '03 PER-
FORMANCE TLR: NEW
525 HUMMINGBIRD
DEPT/FISH FINDER;
STEREO; LG BIMINI;
CHANGING/POTTY
ROOM; ALL CG EQUIP-
MENT; LIKE NEWIII CAN
EMAIL PICS, COST OVER
$20,000 NEW; ASKING
$11,900 OBO.
(352) 212-5179
Pontoon Boat
18 ft. Crestliner Sport,
refurbished In '07, 40HP
Honda, live well, GPS,
Dep, find. port a pottle,
VFH Radio & more.
Will send picture by
email, (352) 382-4909
PONTOON BOAT
20FT, '98, 4 stroke 50HP
Honda motor, trailer,
$6,000 (352) 341-2019
PONTOON BOAT
25', 85 HP Yamaha,
New tandem axle trir.
$4,300 obo,
352-634-4021
PROLINE
'04, 24 ft., 225 Honda,
Donzl Hull, black, low hrs,
lift kept, NICE $32,000.
(352) 795-1598
ROW BOAT 12'
ALUM. V-HULL
Blmini top, 14' ProLine
Trir., 3 hp. OB, Extras,
$1,500 (352) 382-1193
STARCRAFT
14FT Classic 1960's
Runabout, 35HP, 1976
Evinrude motor, trailer
$1,200 (352) 794-0070
TREMBLY
'93 17�' Tunnell Hull Flats
Boat, 90HP Yamaha,
CC, Leaning post,
$4,000 (352) 746-9296
Wanted: Boats in Need
of Repair, also motors
and trailers, Cash Paid
(352) 212-6497




A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951*
*2 weeks In the
*2 weeks Onlnel
*Featured In Tues.
"Whee" SectionI
Call Today

(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
"$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply

BIG - RV

SALE
By
COMO
RV & Truck Sales
& Service
Everything Goes
No reasonable
Offer Refused
All this at
-FOOD RANCH-
Hwy. 19, Inglls
Fri. Sept 28
to Sun. Oct. 7
or call
352-422-1282
www.comorv.com

DODGE
'80 Mobile Traveler
20' Class C, 52K ml.,
$2,700 OBO8
(352) 563-2896
FLEETWOOD
'92, 29ft,, Coronado,
454 Chevy, Corlan
cntertop. new toilet, TV.
elec. steps, good cond.
A bargain at $10,900.
obo (352) 220-1607
FOUR WINDS 31'
'04, Slide out, levellers,
backup cam, V-10 Ford
No smk/Pets. Loaded
$40K (352) 422-7794
GULF STREAM '04
Ford BT Cruiser, 28' Tow
pkg. 13K ml 1 slide, walk
arnd qn. bd. very clean
$44,000. (352) 344-5634
SOUTHWIND
'84,30' Class A, 40K ml.,
sleeps 4-6 people. Fully
equipped. $4,900 obo
352-220-6077/270-3649




COLEMAN
1993 Pop-up, air,
awning, needs some
canvas work, $600.
SMALL BOAT $165.
(352) 346-8668
FLEETWOOD
'06, 5th Wheel Gearbox
toy hauler, king bed
over garage, full bd.
In front, generator,
twin LP's, sport decor.
Can be seen In
storage, behind
Beverly Hills Liquor store
$25,000. (352) 746-2699
I BUY RV'S
Travel Trailers, 5th
wheels etc. Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
OPEN ROAD
36', '03, 5thWhl, Islnd kit.,
3 slides. No pets/smkng.
Used & pulled very little.
$21,500 (352) 563-9835
PALOMINO PONY
Pop-Up. Sleeps 5,frig.,
AC, stove for Inside/
outside, Good Cond,
$3,000(352)746-0839
TERRY
29 ft., sleeps 6, great
cond. Inside & out
$5,500. (352) 344-9241
352-585-3079
VIKING
'86, Pop Up, Hard top,
Good Shape. Sleeps 8,
AC, Ice Box, range, sink
$975 (352) 628-0221


4 CORVETTE ZR-I Style
Chrome wheels & tires.
91/2X17" wheels, 275/40
ZR17 Kumho Tires, will fit
'88-'96 Covette. $500/
obo. (352) 489-8120
6' ALUMINUM CAP
for Toyota Tundra
Access Cab SR5 P-Up.
$250
(352) 527-3710
CARGO CARRIER
Roof-top
$75
(352) 382-1193
CHEVY TRUCK TOPPER
Tan 6.5 Ft Bed, Used
once, Pd. $1250 sell for
$600 352-726-2646
after 5pm


CUSTOM TOPPER
Fits Ford or GM 8' beds,
Built in pipe rack &
tool box. $175. obo
352-341-1809
Mickey Thompson
33x12.5x17 Baja Claw
Radials with only
-10,000 miles mounted
on 17" American
Racing ATX Mojave
Black Teflon wheels (fit
Dodge) Paid $1,800
brand new, asking
$1,300., 352-634-4558
Tow Dolly
Stehl, 2003, like new
$700.
(352) 628-6335





TOP DOLLAR
I For Junk Cars |
$ (352)201-1052 $
CASH BUYER-No Junk
for Trucks, Vans & Cars
Larry's Auto Sales
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333





*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, Jet skis
mowers, golf carts, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J,W.
(352) 228-96456




r -'.00, VW Jea
Automatic Sunroof
and more, HURRY
At Only $5,990,
1-866-838-4376
L man . m um an.
r --- ss �O
'02, Mazda Millenla
Leather Roof Rare I
and a Steal At
$12,999
1-866-838-4376

'02, Mercury Grand
| Marquis LS
SLeather Roof Must
See $7,990. Call
i Before It's Too Late
1-866-838-4376
L i I miL
r '03, Hyundai Sonato=
Very Low Miles Don't i
Hesitate at $6990.
Call Now i
1-866-838-4376

'03,Saturn Vue
Sunroof Alloy Wheel
Can Tow Me
Only $13,990.
1-866-838-4376

A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951"
*2 weeks In the
Chronicle
.2 weeks Onlinel
*Featured In Tues.
"Wheel" SectlonI
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
*$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
ACURA MDX '04
Sport w/ navigation, 59K
ml. Exc. cond. Garage
kept. $24,800
352-746-7402, Iv msg.

AL SAVE AUTO
AFFORDABLE CARS
100+ Clean
Dependable Cars
FROM $450- DOWN
30 MIN. E-Z CREDIT
1675 US HWY 19
HOMOSASSA
352-563-2003

AUTOMOBILE*
DONATIONS
Tax Deductible
Maritime Ministries
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
(352) 795-9621
* Tax Deductible *





BUICK
1989 Regal, 100K ml.
great shape,

BUICK
Century 2001, 4dr,
Good cond. Air,
Loaded. $a2800
(352) 382-2631
CADILLAC
2000, Caddy Catera,
70K, Tan, Leather. Super
Shape, sunroof, new
batt., brakes, tires &
hitch. $7,100 Avail, Oct.
5th. (352) 795-8801
CADILLAC
'97 Sedan Devllle,
signature series, 25mpg,
north star, beautiful
dependable 90k ml,
$4,700. (352) 795-7876
CADILLAC
ELDORADO '00
44,700 miles, 2 Door,
Loaded, Garage kept,
A-1 Condition. $12,900.
352-586-4134
CHEVY
'99, Mallbu,
low mileage
$4,600. obo
(352) 746-0283
CHEVY
Lumina, '94, 118K ml,
4dr, 2nd owner,
Asking $2,500
(352) 628-0029


CHEVY
MONTE CARLO
2004. 43330, $18,500,00
Dale Earnhardt Sr
Edition 352 249-6825
CUTLASS
OLDS 1999
Only 66k miles, One
Owner, Excellent
Condition, Great Gas
Mileage, $5100- Call
352-344-1646
DODGE
'02, Intrepid,
Low ml., white,
Make offer, Call
(352) 560-7251
DODGE
1987 CONQUEST 2.6,
turbo, 5spd, runs very
good. $1200/obo,
(352) 795-8968
DODGE
Intrepid '98, V6, AC, CD
player, Heat. P/W $1600
352-563-2125 or
352-302-6377


FORD
'01 Taurus SES
White, A/C 4dr, V6, 41k
MI. Exc. Cond, $8800
(352) 341-4805
FORD
2005 Taurus, 21K ml.,
Like Newl Sunroof,
$11,000 Citrus H/ills
(352) 746-1321
FORD
'93 Taurus GL Station
Wagon, Loadedl $3,300
OBO (352) 563-1181
(813)244-3945
HONDA
'04, Civic EX, coupe,
16k org, ml., sunroof,
CD player 1 owner
showroom cond,
$14,990 (352) 746-1862
HYUNDAI
'04 Sonata 35k Mi.
33MPG Pwr all, A/C,
Cd, Wrnty, Exc Cond.
$8,900 489-1433
INFINITY G35 '06
Coupe, 10K mi. Blue/
creme, beautiful &
perfect $30,800
(352) 860-1239
LEXUS
SC430 2005, Red cony.
29,500ml, Like newly
$42,600. Homosassa
(702) 306-3929
MERCEDES g
1987, 560 SL, 126K,
White, Both tops,
REDUCED $9.999
352-586-6805/
382-1204


, - =
Lm- -m- m lZ
MITSUBISHI
'90, Mirage, cold AC,
49K ml. New tires. A-1
Cond, 40+ MPG $2,500
(352) 344-9141
MUSTANG
2001 Convertible, Red,
V-6, auto, leather,
$7,000 or take over
pymnts. (352) 266-6726
MUSTANG
'99 GT Conv,Exc cond
39K ,V, auto Mach460
elec am/fm, Ster. Cass
$9,000 (352)341-1660
OLDS AURORA
2001, V-6 Sedan, 48K,
Exc. Cond. Leather,
Dual Pwr Seats/Wndws/
Drs., Radio/Cass./CD,
Chrome Wheels,
Pearl White. $10,995
(352) 746-2001
TOYOTA CAMRY LE '96,
Exc. Cond./AIIl pwr.,
Mntc. Rcds., Grgd.
$3,500 (352) 422-5685
Your Donation of
A Vehicle
Supports Single,
Homeless Mothers
& Is Tax
Deductible
Donate your vehicle
TO THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500
$5W Poke Irpounds For
sdel
Casfrom $I1 For iMocdi
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




AUTO/SWAP/CAR
CORRAL SHOW
Sumter Co.
Fairgrounds
Sumter Swap Meets
October 7,
1-800-438-8559
CHEVY EL CAMINO
'65 $8,500, worked 350,
turbo 350 tranny, Needs
some finishing touches.
352-489-8633
DODGE
1965 Dart 440 6pack,
500 HP, auto trans.
Tubbed rear, way too
much to list, $13,500.
Must seel Will trade
(603) 860-6660
FORD
'64, Galaxy, 4 DR, all
original, runs good,
$4,500. (352) 344-8401,
Cell (352) 476-4496
FORD
'76 F-100 P-Up. 302 V-8,
Auto, Pwr, String, All
orig. Low mis. $2,500
obo (352) 400-0191
FORD
Super Charged '89
Thunderbird 3.8, 5 spd.,
showcar. $10K or trade
for land? (352)542-9393
MERCEDES 1984
380SL, 69K orig. ml,. 2
tops w/stand, garage
kept. $13,500
(352) 302-5698
MG MIDGET
1978. mint, low mile-
age, red, All Original
$7500. OBO.
(352) 302-5321/John
PONTIAC
'85 FIERO GT-V-6, Auto,
AC, 97K mL, Great
Cond. & Starter Collect,
$3,900obo352-628-5513
TRIUMPH
'78 Spltfire
Many extras
call for details $4000
(352) 302-8529
$5001 Police Impounds
For salel Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




"'00, Dodge Dakota �
Club Automatic and
Only $5,990.
Call Now
1-866-838-4376
---a ---n a ml
F -----5""
� '04, Toyota Tacoma
I Prerunner, V8, SR5
S Call Now
1-866-838-4376
Am WHEE mO l
A WHEEL OF


A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951*
*2 weeks In the
Chroniciel
*2 weeks Onllnel
*Featured In Tues.
"Wheels" Sectlonl
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
15 per additional line
Some Restrictlons
May Apply





CHEVY
'97. 1500 Sllverado, 3 dr.
fiberglass bdcvr., 120K,
auto, power windows.
$4,400 (352) 795-5735


DODGE
'01 Dakota, LST 4X4
Quad cab, exc. cond.
59,000 ml, too many ex-
tras to lilstl $12,500/obo
(352) 795-4410
DODGE
Dakota '96, Std. cab.
Topper, 128K, gd. cond.
Nice bodyl $2,700/obo
(352) 527-4590
DODGE RAM 1500
1996, needs engine,
body exc., tires good,
will sell for parts $3,000
obo (352) 287-9561
FORD
'04, HD 4 WD, crew
cab, Duramax diesel,
94k ml., $21,000. firm
(352) 634-2462
FORD
'84 F-350 1 Ton
460 motor, Elderbroch
Carb/Manlfold, 3" Lift
Kit, Runs Great
$900 obo 352-563-6626
FORD
'90, F250,4 X 4,302,
V8, cold AC, grannylow
4 spd, $2,500. obo
(352) 560-7324 aft. 3pm
FORD
'92, Ranger,
$1,250. obo
(352) 746-1087
FORD
'99, Super Duty V10,
66,17 7m1, $7,000.
Call after 6pm
(352) 697-3220
FORD
F-150 XLT '97, Super
Cab, 4wd, auto, exc,
cond. $7,495,
(362) 302-3048
FORD
F-280 1995. 7.3 Diesel, I
owner, 116,500ml. Exc.
shape, asking $7,500
352-465-4892 or
674-596-5212
GMC
1992 Sierra, 6 cyl.,
runs good, $1,500
(352) 726-8299
NISSAN
'03, Frontier, 43k ml.,
stereo, CD, tinted win.,
tow pkg, alarm, $14,500
(352)257-1173
NISSAN
Frontier XE '04, Ext. Cab,
auto, cruise, 1 Owner.
Exc. Cond.
$9,500 (352) 302-7073
TOYOTA
'06 Tacoma
4 Cyl, Auto, 41k, Exc.
Cond, 7yr. 100k Wrty
$12,900 (352) 697-1200
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale I Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




'03, Suzuki Garn
Vltara Gas Saver l
SUV Low Miles
Only $9,980 HURRY |
1-866-838-4376

03,Honda CRV EX
I AWD and A Sunroof I
oNLY $14,990.
1-866-838-4376

CHEVY BLAZER
1993 S-10 Tahoe LT new
A/C, exhaust, EGR,
stereo. Needs repair to
fuel system $850 obo
Trade? 352-860-2347
FORD
'97 Explorer Sport. 2 dr.
V-6, Auto, All Pwr., AC,
$3,495
(352) 382-7632
FORD EXPLORER
'97 XLT, V-8, 129K ml.,
Exc. Cond. $4,000 obo
(352) 563-2399
FORD EXPLORER
SPORT '02, AC, runs
great, 57K ml., exc,
cond. $10,000/obo
(352) 637-2582
HYUNDAI
'03 Santa Fe V6, Pwr all.
sun-roof, 25k MI. Trir
Leather. Hitch $11,900
(352) 489-1433
JEEP
2004 Wrangler, low
miles, 4 X 4. Gator logo.
$14,500
(352) 795-4920
$5001 Police Impounds
For salel Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374





A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951*
*2 weeks In the
Chronicle
*2 weeks Onlanil
*Featured In Tues.
"Wheel" SecflonI
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
"S5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
CHEVY P-UP
Not Street Legall
'87, 56" Tractor Tires, 454.
Runs Greatl $5,500
628-4878 Dave Jr. or
352-302-5885
DODGE
'98 Ram1500, Ext. Cab,
V-8, topper. 100K. 1
owner. Well malnt'd,
$6,990 (352) 302-5698
FORD
1997, Ranger, 5spd,
A/C,31/10,50 A/T, man-
ual hubs, 155K, $3500.
(352) 613-4149
FORD
BRONCO '94, 4x4
12,000LB Winch, cold
AC, new tires, 108Kml
$3600 (352)447-1540
$5001 Police Impounds
For salel Cars from
$5001 For listings call


'00, Honda Odyssey
Loaded and Low |
Miles Don't Miss This
One At $8,988,
1-866-838-4376
---- -- ml
CHEVROLET
Van, runs great, body
good, asking $1,000
Call (352) 476-4661
DODGE
'94, Ram 250.
AM/FM/CD, V8,
runs good, $1,200.
(352) 746-9012
DODGE
'97, Grand Caravan,
99k ml., new tires,
battery, excel, cond.
$3,900. (352) 637-9694


DODGE
'98 Ram 2500
Jayco Camp Convers,
5.9 Ltr, fully loaded,
refdg, mlcrowv, sink, TV,
VCR, fact, Instl roof A/C
for camping, 70k Mi., 1
owner $10,500
(727) 647-8135
DODGE
'99, Conversion Van,
64k ml., 1 owner,
$6,000 obo
(352) 628-4943
DODGE
RAM B2500 '96 conv/
dual air, 4 capt chrs &
bed, looks/ runs great,
$2500, 352-341-4306
GMC
'91 Vandura. TV/VCR,
AC, 4 Captain's Chairs,
Bench Bed $5,000 (352)
419-0054
LINCOLN
'97, Continental 1I owner,
leather, loaded, 109k ml.
non smoker, $2,950 firm
(352) 341-0004
PLYMOUTH
'99, Voyager, espresso
edition, 3.8, V6, loaded,
cold AC 151k ml. 8 pass
$2,250. firm 341-0004
HANDICAPPED
VAN FOR SALE
Handicapped van with
Braun lifft,hand con-
trols, six way power
seat, fully loaded,
wood package with
TV,VCR, Ford E250,1993-
with under 40,000 miles,
Asking $18.000 or best
offer.,. 352-270-3883.
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY







IRA
ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




BOMBARDIER
'04, Cam 400 4x 4,
auto, only 800 ml.,
great cond. $3,200.
(352) 249-8161
*FREE REMOVAL OF-
ATV's, bikes, cars, Jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HONDA
2000, 00 Sport EX, Red,
Pwdr. ctd frame.
352-382-0596 or
609-668-2006
HONDA
400 2002, 2WD Racing
BlIke. Yellow
Great condition. $3200.
(352)465-3785



'04 MINI CHOPPER 97cc
70mpg. Must seel $1000
Gas Golf Cart, runs
gmeat $1200 795-4770

A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951"
*2 weeks In the
Chroniclel
*2 weeks Onlinel
Featured In Tues.
"Wheels" Sectioni
Mall Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
*$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
DAELIM
ROADWIN 2005 125CC
Great starter street.
bike. Low ml, Clear title,
$2200/obo 352-628-7442
*FREE REMOVAL OF'
ATV's, bikes, cars, Jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HARLEY DAVIDSON
.90 Softtall, extra clean,
custom paint. Fin. avail.
$5500. Lucky U Cycles
(352) 330-0047
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'00 Fatboy, loaded
w/xtras. Good or Bad
credit $11,500. Lucky U
Cycles (352) 330-0047
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'00, Touring, electra
glide, classic, (FLHTCI)
20k ml, mint cond. gar.
kept, many extras,
$12,995. obo
(352)220-1414 evenings
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'07, Heritage Softall, 18
mo. left on warr. Low
miles, Exc. cond,
$16,900
(352) 560-7168
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2005 Softtall. 103 Cl w/
flat pistons, high Comp
heads w/pop offs. 51
mm CV carb. Thunder
Header. Chrome slider,
19" front wheel, La Pera
Seat, Chrome Bullet
Headlight, Carllnl
Handlebars. $20,000
352-746-2699/422-1313
HARLEY DAVIDSON
HERITAGE 1988
$8500 obo eng. rebuilt
approx. 15000 ml, ago.
Bike Is in very good
cond, 352-628-5422
leave message,
HARLEY DAVIDSON
SPORTSTER 883
'99, Loaded w/extras,
low miles, Mint Cond.
$4,500(352) 634-5450
HONDA
2005, CRF 150, runs
good, but smokes, looks
new, $1,000. obo
(352) 422-3113


HONDA
'98 Shadow 1100, Amer-
Ican Classic Edition
Tourer, New tires, $5,000
Loaded. (352) 344-3898
KAWASAKI
1981, ridden daily,
$1000
(352) 400-0310
(352) 270-3571
MOTO GUZZI
BREVA 7501E 2004
12,000, $4,900.00 Beauti-
ful silver bike, garage
kept, touring wind-
shield, hard bags, low
profile seat. Great Ride,
(352) 637-6345
Scooter
New 150CC,
Road Legal,
Call (352) 201-6008
850-242-9343


F~-1

SUZUKI
'04 GSXR 1000. Low
miles, fast Fin. Avail.
$7,300. Lucky U Cycles
(352) 330-0047
SUZUKI
'06 M109R. 2700ml,
Good or Bad Credit,
Fin. Avall.,$9,500. Lucky
U Cycles (352) 330-0047
SUZUKI
2003 Burgman 400
Scooter, Royal blue,
14,900+ml. $3900
(352) 419-0053
SUZUKI
650cc, 1980,
$800/obo
(352) 572-7984
SUZUKI
'93 1400 Intruder, Ready
to Go. 2,0000.
Lucky U Cycles
(352) 330-0047


345-0930 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Pursuant to FL St. 713.585,
Auto Lien & Recovery,
Inc., with Power of Attor-
ney, will sell the following
vehicles to the highest
bidder to satisfy lien. All
auctions held with re-
serve, as Is where Is, Cash
or Certified funds, Inspect
1 week prior at Ilenor fa-
cility, Interested parties
call 954-893-0052. Sale
date 10-1-2007 @ 10:00
am, at Llenors facility.
Auction will occur where
each vehicle Is located
under License A80000538.
Be advised that owner or
Ilenholder has a right to a
hearing priorto the
scheduled date of sale by
filing with clerk of courts,
Owner/Llenholder may re-
cover vehicle without In-
stituting judicial proceed-
ings by posting bond as
per FL Stat. 559,917; Net
proceeds In excess of tlen
amount will be deposited
with the Clerk of Court.
25% Buyers Premium
#CITD734: Lien amt:
$4989.74 2002 FORD PK
VI# 1RFTRW07682KE23836
Llenor: Nick Nicholas
Ford, Inc. 2901 Highway
44 W., Inverness, FL, 34453
(352) 726-1231
Auto.Uen & Recovery
Experts, Inc., P.O. Box
813578, Hollywood, FL
33081-0000, 954-893-0052.
Published one (1) time In
Citrus County Chronicle,
September 30.2007.
341-0930 SUCRN
SHADER BROTHERS CORP.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF
THE FOLLOWING TENANTS
WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH
TO SATISFY RENTAL LIENS
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
'FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF
STORAGE FACILITY ACT,
SECTIONS 83-806 AND
83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
200
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE
KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS, BEDDING, LUG-
GAGE, TOYS, GAMES,
PACKED CARTONS, FURNI-
TURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING,
TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE IS NO TITLE FOR THE
VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN
SALE.
OWNERS RESERVE THE
RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
Unit #107 B. RHETT WATERS
Unit #231 B. RHETT WATERS
Unit #232 B. RHETT WATERS
LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON
THE PREMISES:
10/10/2007 at 2:30 P.M.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE
TIME OF THE SALE ONLY.
@ 7742 CARL G. ROSE
HIGHWAY, HERNANDO, FL
34442
Published two (2) times In
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, September 23 and
30,2007.
342-0930 SUCRN
SHADER BROTHERS CORP.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF
THE FOLLOWING TENANTS
WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH
TO SATISFY RENTAL LIENS
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF
STORAGE FACILITY ACT,
SECTIONS 83-806 AND
83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
DUNNELLON F/k/a 41
STORAGE
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE
KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS, BEDDING, LUG-
GAGE; TOYS, GAMES.
PACKED CARTONS, FURNI-
TURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING,
TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE IS NO TITLE FOR THE
VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN
SALE.
OWNERS RESERVE THE
RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
Unit #187
DEBRA PENNINGER
LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON
THE PREMISES:
10/10/2007 at 2 P.M.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE
TIME OF THE SALE ONLY,
@ 11955 N FLORIDA AVE,
DUNNELLON FL
Published two (2) times In
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, September 23 and
30,2007.
346-1007 SUCRN
2007-CP-590 Estate of
Rudolph Francis Nickel, Jr.
Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN
AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2007-CP-590
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RUDOLPH FRANCIS
NICKEL, JR.,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of
the estate of RUDOLPH
FRANCIS NICKEL, JR., de-
ceased, whose date of
death was April 25, 2007;
File Number 2007-CP-590,
Is pending In the Circuit
Court for Citrus County,
FlorIda, Probate DIvision,
the address of which Is
101 N. Apopka Avenue.
Inverness, Florida 34450,
The names and addresses
of the personal represent-
ative and the personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against
decedent's estate, on
whom a copy of this no-
tice Is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM,
All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against


decedent's estate must
file thelr claims with thIs
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE,
ALL CLAIMS NOT FIELD
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS' OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tion of this notice Is:


September 30, 2007.
Personal Representativl
Michael A. Nickel
3504 Swallow Drivo
Melbourne, FL 32934
David A. Yergey, Jr., Esq.
Yergey and Yergey, P.A.
Florida Bar No.: 374288
211 North Magnolia Ave,.
Orlando, FL 32801
Telephone 407-843-0430
Facsimile 407-843-0433
Attorney for Personal
Representative
Published two (2) times In
Citrus County Chronicle
September 30 & October
7, 2007.


938-0930 F/SA/SUCRN i
Abandoned Mobile Home
PUBUC NOTICE
ATTENTION: ANTHONY YANNAZZO, JOE HICKEY
AND GERALDINE ALDEN
You are hereby notified that Jeannette Petiey haA
declared that a certain Mobile Home (1987 14'x561
Fleetwood) located at 7589 Hunterhll Street,
Dunnellon, FL 34433 and 07600 W. Copenhagen Street!
Dunnellon, FL 34433), is a abandoned mobile,home
within my property line and within the meaning of the
Abandoned Mobile Home Act, Unless the mobile
home Is moved 15' off my property line and all delln-.
quent taxes (Including penalty and Interest) are paid,
and electric and water are restored to this mobile
within 30 days of the said date of this letter (09-12-07), S
I, Jeannette Petley shall move, sell or dispose of sal(
mobile home free and clear of any existing lelno
against It. If you have any questions regarding this noi
tice you should contact me at the address and phone
number below,
Jeannette Petle
7939 Lazy Lano
Hudson, Florida 3466
(727) 226-4160
PLEASE ACT ACCORDINGLY
Published there (3) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
September 28, 29 and 30, 2007.

347-0930 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
For the purpose of Section 147(f) of the Internal
Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, notice Is hereby
given that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus
county, Florida (the "Board"), will conduct a public
hearing on Tuesday, October 23, 2007, at 2:00 p.m. or
as soon thereafter as practicable, at 110 N. Apopka
Ave, Room 100, Inverness, Florida 34450, to consider
the approval of a plan of finance to provide capital Ir,
cluding the Issuance from time to time by thq
Escambia County Housing Finance Authority (the
"Authority), on behalf of Citrus County, Florida and
other participating counties, of not exceeding
$150,000,000 Single Family Mortgage Revenue Bonds.
The proceeds of such bonds together with fund
from other sources available to the Authority, will be!
used to finance, or refund outstanding obligations, the
proceeds of which will be used to finance the pur,
chase of single family residences to be occupied pr-,
marily by first-time home buyers of moderate, middle or
lesser income within Citrus County, Florida and Various
other counties In the State of Florida. i
The bonds and Interest thereon shol not constitute
a debt or Indebtedness of the Authority within the
meaning of any provisions or limitations of the statutes
or Constitution of the State of Florida, Citrus County!
Florida, or other particIpating counties or housing ,fl
nance authorities, but will be payable solely from pay,
ments made from the revenues generated from th
housing program,
All persons are advised that, If they decide to ap$
peal any decision made at this public hearing, they wlg
need a record of the proceedings, and for such pur
pose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record
of the proceedings Is made, which record Includes -r.e
testimony and evidence upon which the appeal Is To
be based.
At the time and pace ted for sod pubic hrc '
persons who appear will be given an opportunity to exy-
press their views for or against the proposal to Issue sald'
bonds, and any written comments received by the,
Clerk of the Circuit Court, ex-officlo clerk to the Board,
will be considered.
Any person reqing resonle acconmmodataion
at this meeting because of a disability or physical Im-1
pairment should contact the County AdmInistrator's'
Office, 110 N. Apopka Ave, R:,c.rm 102 i'-,e.inesj Flor-
Ida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at leair Two aas Deftore.rme
meeting. If you are hearing or .peecn Impairea. use
the TDD telephone (352) 341-65o0.
Board of County Commissioners
Citrus County, Florida
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle-
September 30, 2007.

343-0930 SUCRN
Cfty of Inverness
PUBUC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
The CIty of Inverness Invites established
Contractors/Firms to submit sealed bids for the CIty of
inverness WWTP Reclaimed Water Transmission Main
described below. Four (4) originals of the bid proposals,
must either be hand delivered or mailed to Debble Da-
vis, City Clerk, City of Inverness, 212 West Main Street,
Inverness Florida 34450, no later than 1:00 P.M. on Thurs-
day October 25, 2007. Sealed envelopes containing-
proposals must bear the name of the contractor/firm,
making the proposal, and clearly state "Proposal foa
City of Inverness WWTP Reclaimed Water Transmissioi
Main" written on the face of the envelope. A bid secui
rity In the amount of 5% of the bid price Is required
Sealed bids will be opened In a public meeting and
read aloud, beginning at 1:30 P.M. Thursday Octobei
25, 2007, In the Inverness Government center, 1st RFoo
Conference Room 105, 212 West Main Street. Invernes
Florida.
BID NO: DPW-2007-03
DEPARTMENT: PUBUC WORKS
ITEM: Construction of the CITY OF INVERNESS WWTP
RECLAIMED WATER TRANSMISSION MAIN Project consist-
ing of the following major components:
Approximately 13,200 linear feet of 16-Inch reclaimed
water main
Approximately 555 linear feet of 16-Inch reclaimed
water main casing
Approximately 2,910 linear feet of 12-Inch reclaimed
water main
Approximately 950 linear feet of 8-Inch reclaimed
water main
Approximately 1.850 linear feet of 6-inch reclaimed
water main
Approximately 300 linear feet of 6-Inch reclaimed
water main by-pass i
Reclaimed water pump station upgrades
Miscellaneous earthwork, paving, grading, and surface
restoration activities
Miscellaneous pipeline casings, valves, fittings, and
pipeline appurtenances
Miscellaneous electrical equipment
Hydraulically Operated Butt Welding Machine
Hydraulic Trailer Mounted Valve Exerciser
All sealed bids are to be submitted on the Bid Form
and envelope marked to Indicate bid number and
vendor name. Proposals submitted via facsimile will be
considered non-responsive and will not be accepted.
DELIVER BY: 1:00 om on Thursday October 25. 2007 toI
City of Inverness
Attn.: Debble Davls. City Clerk
212
West Main Street
Inverness, Florida 34450
Bids to be opened at 1:30 pm on Thursday. October 25
2007
Drawings and specifications will be available starting
September 24. 2007 and may be examined In the of-
fices of:
City of Inverness Public Works
212 W. Main Street
Inverness, Florida 34450
Hoyle. Tanner & Associates, Inc.
2424 N, Essex Avenue
Hernando, Florida 34442
A copy of the Documents may be obtained from
Hoyle, Tanner & Associates, Inc., 2424 N. Essex Avenue,
Hernando, Florida 34442 upon payment of 0200,f
for each Document (Florida sales tx Is Included). Re'
turn of the documents Is not required, and the amount
paid for the documents is non-refundable.
A Pre-Bid Conference will be held at 10:00 am on Tues~
day October 2, 2007 by the City of Invemess Departt
ment of Public Works - Public Meeting Room lt Flooa
Room 105, at 212 W. Main Street, Invemes, Florida. AtI
tendance at the Pre-Bid Conference Is not mandatory1
but Is recommended.
The City of Inverness reserves the right to waive formall-
ties, waive any technical defects, reject any and all
bids, and accept any bid which represents the lowest
and best offer to the City.


Frank DIGlovanhl, City Manager
City of Inverness, Florida
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle;
September 23 and 30, 2007.





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CrriwS COUN'n' (FL) CHRO~NJICL


12D SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007


New


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In Horn osassa


omning Soon...


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Homosassa, FL 34448
(352) 628-4300


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.,- YOUR

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LITTLE A, ,

LEWIS at r,, ,

(352) 302-6082 4,s" .
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LOOIUNG FOR PRIVACY , , .. i ~ * ...' [


GULF ACCESS. r . LI4 jroi ~~.a.H H
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ABSOLUTELY BEAUTIFUL HOMESITE 1... C,1',a L a.
E, 1 al-, * i., e . , i ] 1,',,r . *. .~. I iI- . u l, I - r'ai: I ar .) a.:
E .1. u:, i -u .. r . . Ir, I r.| I I.[ .| a r ,,] pnI .u1. . Trn.
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F.., H.- :on,�~z ,ini:i:..


GRaT I;LACE ;V ilUIL; YOL;; _K;KEAM 'HOME.
i.5c �lej :,.i in� ..I -:y in.: :.p4o,
iii, 011�. Inc


77� '7
120 N. POINT LONESOME - $175.000
F C., In.:
In.: 17 N. ARCHWOOD
ad 1.1 3 U., IWI.LIM TO W 111MPRESSEDU I.:.. i 3 .5, r-� Bur, COMESEEI
LYN HILLIS (352) 212-6920 LYN HILLIS (352) 212-6920

42i




8431LNICHOLAS #315180
ROOM FOR HORSES, 2 finished workshops, greenhouse, 80 S. LINCOLN #318056
rinkler� finrina 9nd NO nEED Pe�!trirfln- 13�auflfiil Spectacular renovations with LJR. D/R. F/R with a
j %.in 1_1� i:-F, C-,r. ]--I� io -Aru �n.:i :r-1 1_3f-14 :-Ofnz iii-A up!-5-14.
H-iii CI#ECXTMSOUV CAU. TO SEE!
LYN HILLIS (352) 212-6920 LYN HILLIS (352) 212-6920







405111,11.1111111HEELER #3182"5'- 4245 L ARLINGTON #316416
Move right in and enjoy all the upgrades this home has to Looking for UR, D/R, F/R, fireplace and eat-in kitchen?
offer. On 2 gorgeous lots with shed and fencing in private Need 3 bedrooms, 2 baths and an oversized 2 car
Z pretty area. TAJW A POW garage? Like a 1/2 acre with a new shed? LOOKAT WIMS1
LYN HILLIS J3521212-6920 LYN HILLIS 13521212-6920
X;0
---- -- -- . . .

"PEGGY PIUCE
REALTOR,-,..
Cell (352) 302-5633

CHARLENE ANGELO
REALTOPL-1
T
Cell (352) 464-4179 muo
GREAT OPEN FLOOR PLAN! biiin
H ardwood flo , screened porch all on over,112-an
www.ckmscou" omesandland.com acre. PRICEDOWIGHTM .32,1347


Cmus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


+_


BE T
Of [HE
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9TS

L�Zr tD X� 9Al 57 V V Fk 527-1112


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WATERFRONT WUH WATER


BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME
IT In
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Linz


CANAL FRONT LOT -.rT I~


RD

,BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME -n in r..A�uwui
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EXCELLENT CONDITION.
loo onr.
r-j R�sm,


BIG-PRICE REDUCrION111 I." r. iino i..�
ln� #-ic.r.j� iaLji�iil bi.gni N ..n3 rji.


V1 is W -AA-- I V_ V
COME BUILD YOUR DREAM vus ilwwq' .:., L-51 z.
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341-1233







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CFIRcNICLE


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728908


DIPLOMAT MODEL 22 1.5 , .:

i,". 1j -. r. ir,,:. ,T. 1.-,: ,:l. ,
,3 i3 3 r. i,.r .3

CALL BARBARA STONE
(352) 586-3072


. 4... i.






INCREDIBLE 2/1.5/1 HOME. Upgrades include new
30-year roof, appliances, bathroom sinks, fixtures,



CALL BARBARA DEE
& ROY CAWLEY
(352) 220-1607


SPECIA. FEATURES .,: iI i I,: ...il ,r1 ,, ,,,-
. * r . l 1 ' r I": W .


CALL NANCY AYRES
(352) 279-5058










4 ACRES, b ...I [i ill, i rl :.TI- i j ir
, _, i ,, ,-,, , r :.r .: . - . . I .-, ..I.31,:r, h, * , ]. :r, ie

CALL MARGARET BAKER
|/ I (352) 422-0877
[ j OR (352) 563-2963
baker- exicrealyleaders.com










WANT TO BE NEAR THE CITY BUT NOT IN MI


i ',,,i a i ,1 ,
CALL HEATHER COOK
(352) 257-5117


BEAUTIFUL 3 2 POOL HOME IN PINE RIDGE
ESTATES ,.:' ai. .-, .,,- a e,1..: .. : ." iti a
r.:,r .- : r.:..i..T. iT.jr.r, r.1 n, 3n r a'.] ' 1 'c -1
TRISHA HARRELSON
527-1112









2/2 IN CITRUS SPRINGS is just like it has never been
lived in. New appliances, carpet, ceramic tile, doors,

.'. , . i , r 4.1:. : .3 ,- : .: . -.


CALL DICK HILDEBRANDT
(352) 586-0478








GREAT HOUSE - : - . , u -
t .i i ..iir. .:..a- 3r a
1 CALL PEGGY PRICE
(352) 302-5633
OR CHARLENE ANGELO
(352)464-4179
www.cjguscountyhomesanidlanid.com


WOW. c-.,,rii- n,... Ki E.-- PL.-&�C ii-L'E T� Ti-E


..it. ~"~~a~7l.1' -, .s~a,..., . 4 ~ - - *.- - -
a


IT WONT TAKE LONG r.:.. .u ,: , . ., i,



CALL JOHN P. MAISEL III
(352) 302-5351
www.flaMLSonline.com


-SWEET & CLEAN" 3 2'2 EtJ rI,-. ,:.. L r,,: ,- .,
31, a ., ' 1 ,-1- , r,:..-..:. :,] . :.r r,.:., .: ,, [ r , :.r r.
1,-. u,;1, -, .I-,: l .. lA ,l ' . ": T - ' I
I ".a. - - I .. ...: ":.I.: .." a .-.] ' ;al , ":-'" ;


CALL HARLEY W. HOUGH
(352) 400-0051
_ houI extrealtyeaders.com


S16INDAY, SEPrFMBER 30, 2007 3E


V4







4E SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007


hAY


LN


7*


_ 1_& Direct 212-2611 -
8 N. MELBOURNE ST. - BEVERLY HILLS
.'V 777QA') Q O5 "2BR/1BA Zoned mixed use
Office J527-784 Toll Free 888-573-5050 Newer roof Near small businesses
* T n, . . 1 -i ii
$385,000 r.. , ~| I. $200,000 mi: i






1551 W. PEARSON ST. - HERNANDO 10338 MCCLUNG LOOP - HOMOSASSA
*4BFP 6 G :,i . is., i.i. i ,. ,- [' .'--n :
SLR/ .Ch Lar., * ; n ..,ie � r.I,-.,il, ., r, n -,-
* C agc r r.::-________ 1 -* E I.:.;. r. . .:...r. * :,T. iii .: r.. i;r.,


KELLY
GODDARD
DIRECT. 476-8536

SUTTON
DIRECT: 287-3997
AWARD-WINNING AGENTS!
Toll Free: 1-877-866-9784
Email - KellvG' 'remrn x not
. � *^ i i i � ' _l"J|l I~ ~


1 $9 ,90 IWRIS ML


. ! I 1


0 ,.L ,,^ I $265,






POINT - CRYSTAL RIVER 4918 LONG
.* , ...3 *, .' ,l * e,. 1 -i
* br ,iin i C ar * .'..-II i **. j?


.000 L'- ,, 1.4_;___




,. " - - - -.-.. ..

BOW LOOP - HERNANDO
* L , 1t ::.
* L 4,.5-11


E-mail - lenpalmer@remax.net


Peter & Marvia Korol $274,50C
Realtors'
(352) 527-7842

1,' (352) 422-3875
Pine Ridge
Specialists FAIRVIEW ESTATES.
e-mail: - 3/2/2
: Heated Pool & Spa
petemarviaaol.com citrus Hills Membership
I $253,900 MLS #318640 I $ 274,91


UIKU
* Brand nev
* Over 200(
* Corian/Wc


U W.W UULUUArb . PL LAUREL RIDGE - 4
* Formal dining, Screened Lanai * 3BR12BA/2CG
* Gt. Rm plus Den/Office � Great Rm. & Family Rm.
* Close to new School � Bonus/Office/Hobby Rm.


$ 348,000 MLS #319062






4241 N. HATCHET CIR., PINE RID4
* 2003 Built 3/2/3 Car -2174 sf Living Ai
* Den w/Wood Cabinets - Heated Pool/Fol


Peggy Wolf 352422.3042I $2
Realtor@ Direct

Take the Virtual tour on "
PeggyWolf.Remax-Florida.com
& select Featured properties.


1130 N. INDIANHEAD RD.
* Nearly 2100 sf living
* Enclosed Garden Rm
* Home Warranty
00 MLS #317820


* N. JADEMOOR DR.
r Spacious 2700 sf LA
* Formal Dining or Den
* Screened Lanai


]I $462,500 MLS


5826 N. CALICO DR., PINE RIDGE ESTATES
2005 3/2.5/2.5 Electric gate entry
n * Den/Office One acre
S * Pool with waterfall *Upgrades galore

etemarvia@aol.com 0


Email: PeggyWolf@tampabay.rr.com
352-527-Office


I $148,800 M


LI.- 1775 W. SHANELLE PATH - BRENWOOD VILLA
S3/2/2 Maintenance Free � Citrus Hills Country Club
Detached Villa membership required
* Wood cabinets & lots of upgrades * Year 'round swimming in heated
- Nestled in quiet cul-de-sac indoor & outdoor pools


__________ .1. -


1%/2 528 W. ANDEE PL. - CIRUS SPRINGS
- 3/2/2 Open Split Floor Plan - Central vacuum
* Built 1991, 1716 liv. sf Screened lanai
* Eat-in kitchen Golf Course Country Club
* Master BR suite Community
$ 388,800 MLS#318413


AT, R -.'te-i -... Rill-



VW 5358 N. LENA DR. - PINE RIDGE
S3/2/3 Golf Course (13th Tee) home * Extra 24x32 Heat &A/C
* Coran countertops - Pantry workshop/hobby bldg.
* Self-cleaning, gas heated pool & spa Outdoor summer kitchen


Email - p


$119,800 MLS #314177






- 53 S. FILLMORE - BEVERLY HILLS
* 2/2/1 w/Master BR suite, 1424 liv. sf Den plus bonus screened
* Freshly painted and new carpeting sunroom
* All appl. inc. new glass top stove Vinyl siding over block
& dishwasher Fenced yard
$348,800 MLS #319325






2202 W. BEGONIA DR. - PINE RIDGE
* 3/2/2 split floor plan with den/office 24x32 extra garage w/electric &
* Fireplace, tile and wood floors water
* Solar healed pool, hot tub/spa - Boat/RV parking, Fenced yard


IV.rr.com


L.U EU V.1 LI 'IlL I'


LEN

PALMER
REMAX REALTY ONI


3190 N.
*2BF I :,e-
* Firepiac ,
* 1 act,


$14 ,90 i �s s 391


Ernrnr'


MLS #319827


7e


�$133,900 $48 SUNSIT SMP MLS #320029


,


Caws CouN7Y (FL) CHRONICLE


Pro





+ , ,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IF.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007 SE


LX


DIANNE

MacDONALD
Multi-Million Dollar Producer
BROKER/REALTOR�
Cell: (352) 212-9682
Office: (352) 795-2441
Home: (352) 628-5354
Email: djmfl@yahoo.com


BEVERLY HIUS!!I
2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, block, well maintained,
completely remodeled, new roof, kitchen, central heat/air,
move-in condition, located on oversized lot, level, fenced
backyard, shed, family room.


I_ INGLIS!!
3 bedroom, 2 bath block home, located within a mile to town
and shopping. 1.6 acres, large 2 car detached garage, open
floor plan with great room, separate dining area.


2 bath doublewide mobile with


NANCY

BOWDISH
Multi-Million Dollar Producer
(352) 628-7800
Direct:
(352) 422-0296


Visual Tours at www.buvcitruscounty.com

S135.900 MLS #317719


LECANTO!!U
4 bedroom, 2 bath home, new roof, privacy fenced backyard
with above ground pool, open floor plan, newer kitchen
appliances and cabinets, split plan, lots of tile, dining room.


I 9 j",UUU MLS #309907






THE ULTIMATE GETAWAY!
Compact, well maintained cabin on an island in the
Homosassa River. Sleeps 8 and has new dock and floating
dock.


CHARM AND COMFORT SUGARMILL WOODS BEAUI
Close to town. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, oversized 2 car gar. Large Spacious rooms, 2/2/2 PLUS large den, generous lanai with
EIK, Fam Rm, LR, and Den, two bonus rooms, landscaped new vinyl windows on oversized lot across from Oak Village
corner lot. Pool and Tennis Club.


I $198,500


ISLANDS CONDO!!
Immaculate
2 bedroom, 2 bath
townhouse.
New upgraded
appliances, custom
hickory wood
cabinetry
throughout,
screened balcony,
community pool,
tennis and
clubhouse.


MLS #309115


QUIETLY ELEGANT IN SUGARMILL
What lovely d6cor. 3 BR, 2 baths, screened 2 car gar., new
kit. w/nook, large FR, enclosed lanai w/H&A, crown molding,
custom touches everywhere.


MLS #319332


ENJOY THE PEACE AND QUIET OF YOUR OWN
1 acre property. This great 3 BR, 2 bath, 1997 doublewide is
new to the market and has a fenced front yard, 2 sheds, Ig.
kit. w/breakfast nook and a formal dining area. Room for a
pool.


www.buycitruscounty.com


I


Office:
628-7800

"Your
Sugarmill
Experts"


SUGARMILL WOODS - SUGARMILL WOODS
Royal Coachman Built 2007, 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath W/Office, Custom Pool Home/Summer Kitchen, 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath w/
Great Room Plan, Loads of Tile, Central Vac, Home Office, Solar Shades Throughout, Many Extra's. MOTIVATED
Appraised $20,000 more than Current List Price. SELLER.


MLS #314745 $169,500

A-^B ~---


MLS #319928


Jennifer

Stoltz
Realtor Associate
Multi Million
Dollar Producer


Office: 352-637-6200
www.CitrusCountyHomes.com
$109,900 MLS #319302








6045 E. ELGIN LANE
2/1/1 on quiet street in IHW. Large lanai, shed.


$149,900 MLS #319139


Very nice 2/1/1 home on
boat parking.
I fla3..-aa


'3 acre. Room for RV and

MLS #317915


5222 L LIVE OAK LANE
3/2 home in immaculate condition. Lots of tile, fenced
yard. I


SUGARMILL WOODS
New Construction, Charming 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Spacious SUI
Kitchen, Split Floor Plan, Double Sided Stone Fireplace, Wonderful Condo, 2 Ma
MOTIVATED SELLER. Open Floor Plan w/Neuti


Suites, Overlooks 2nd Fairway,
6cor, Loads of Storage Space.


6122 E. DEVON LANE 6461 E. SENECA ST.
2/2/2 home estate sale. Newer roof, room for RV and Beautiful 3/2 w/den and indoor utility. Large lanai, shed,
boat parking. workshop.

Email: info@citruscountyhomes.com


Is L


E-Mail - djmfl@yahoo.com I


www.realeskrteinchmscourfy.com


I


rANDING RESULTS*


klr�






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


6E SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007


HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
It is also distributed to approximately
300 business locations throughout Citrus County.
Display advertising information........................................................ 563-5592
Classified advertising information ............................................... 563-5966
News information.................................................................................. 563-5660
........................................................................ newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listings.............................www.naturecoasthomefront.com
Sign up for www.naturecoasthomefront.com.....................................563-3206
Advertise online..............................................................................563-3206
.................................................................NCCsales@chronicleonline.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CHRiONCLE



To have your news in the Chronicle's HomeFront section, you may mail, fax or email the
information to the Chronicle, 1624 North Meadowerest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. The
newsroom fax number is 563-3280 and email is newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.
You may also drop off your information at the Meadowcrest office or the newspaper's
Inverness office at 106 W. Main Street.
When submitting information, please make sure it is printed or typed, is concise and includes a
contact telephone number.
If you have any questions or comments, contact the section editor, Mike Arnold, at 563-5660
(email - newsdesk@chronicleonline.com).
HOW TO GET YOUR PHOTOS INTO THE PAPER:
- We accept color and black and while photos. We also accept negatives. We do not accept Polaroid prints.
- All photos need to e cropped tightly. That means no wasted space in your photo.
- Photos need to be in sharp focus. We do not accept photos that are out of focus.
- Be sure that photos or negatives you submit are taken using 35 mm film. Others will not be accepted.
- Please include your address and phone number on any photos or negatives submitted.
- Photos or negatives submitted will be returned if supplied with a return envelope and postage.
- When identifying persons in your photo, please do so from left to right, front to back.
- For more information, please contact Matt Beck, photo team leader, at 563-5660.


Realtors to host


charity golf tourney


Since its inception back in
1993, Habitat for Humanity
of Citrus County has built
an average of two houses per year
for local deserving families.
Because of the prevalent need
in our county, this year
Habitat volunteers
hope to build between
seven and nine homes
and will strive to build
12 tol5 in 2008.
This cannot be done
without support from
local benefactors from
churches, businesses
and other organiza-
tions, as well partners Barr3
and volunteers from . -
our community. :::
During the past 14
years, the Realtors Association of
Citrus County has raised more
than $100,000 for this worthy
organization. In 2007 alone, the
Realtor's Association has held a
number of fundraisers including
a Bowl-a-Thon in April that raised
approximately $3,500, and at our
annual Chili Cook-Off, we held


both a live and silent auction and
raised more than $9,000.
Presently, the Association is
partnering with Habitat to spon-
sor a new home for a needy fami-
ly In order to help raise the funds
for this home, we will
be having our 14th
annual Habitat for
Humanity Golf
Tournament. This
year's event is sched-
uled for Monday, at
Southern Woods Golf
and Country Club.
We would like to
extend an invitation to
Cook the public to join us
for this worthwhile
.. . cause. The tourna-
ment begins with a
shotgun start at noon.
The cost is $75, which includes
cart, beverages, lunch and green
fees.


Barry Cook is president of
the Realtors Association of
Citrus County.


Inside...


PAGE 16E
Jane Weber
PAGE 25E
Extension Service
PAGE 14E
Real Estate Digest
PAGE 10E
For current property transactions,
use the search features on the
Citrus County Property Appraiser's
Web site, www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Antique chocolate pot a focus of collector interest


Dear John: The dish and
pitcher that I have
photographed were left
to us by my husband's grand-
mother. The pitcher is about 8
inches tall and about 4 inches
wide at the base. The dish is
about 10 inches
long, about 6 inches
wide and 3 deep.
I tried to photo-
graph the markings
and the bottom of
each. They are in
very good condition.
Any information
you can give me
about them will be John E
most appreciated.
- C.M., Hernando '
Dear C.M.: The AT
chocolate pot was
made by the Reinhold
Schlegelmilch Porcelain Com-
pany, circa 1900. The collecting
category is known as RS
Prussia, which has been a hot
spot for decades. If there is no
damage, potential dollar value
is in the $250 to $500 range.
The photograph of the
tureen is out of focus and the
mark on the underside is also.
Alt. I can see of the mark is a


11


unicorn. The unicorn was in-
corporated into many British
makers' marks, as well as
American pottery companies.
The potential dollar value is
decorative, unless it was made
by a notable English maker.
Dear John: My
husband and I are
new residents from
Long Island, N.Y.
First let me say I
V really enjoy your
column, it is very in-
"} formative.
Second, enclosed
are three pictures
ikorski of a vase. My broth-
i er always thought it
* was valuable. What
1C can you tell me
about it? - M.AR.,
Hernando
Dear MAR.: Your Satsuma
ware jar is missing its lid.
Satsuma is a cream-colored
pottery decorated with gilding,
enamel colors, and often peo-
ple. It has been produced in
the Satsuma Province of Japan
since the early 17th century.
Large quantities were pro-


Please see ATTIC/Page 26E


Special to the Chronicle
. : .This pitcher was made by the Reinhold Schlegelmilch Porcelain Company, and is of
interest to collectors. An undamaged example could be worth $250 to $500. � . This is
an example of Japanese Satsuma pottery. It's probably worth less than $50.


-*. - *




. , .


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007 7E


Long/Short Term Rentals & Property Management Services Available


*anger Doug Wlasiuk Pauline Davis Maria Carter Wayne King Janice Holmes-Ray
TOR REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR






Bell Mary Oesterle Carol Scully Kim Schleitwiler Paul Tegen Charlene Pilgrim
LTOR REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR
ik+ . L


WELL ESTABLISHED AUTO REPAIR SHOP located
on Highway 19 in the ever popular town of Inglis. Bring
PRIME COMMERCIAL LOCATION on east side of your tools and start working. Big plans for this area
Hwy 19 in downtown Crystal River. Zoned CIA, with possibly a new nuclear power plant to be built. 5
Hwy 19 in downtown Crystal River. Zoned C1A bays, two 9,000 lb. 4 post lifts, one 2 post lift, roof new
Professional Service building. Large 200x400 lot with 2-3 years ago, new overhead bay doors, new
4461 square foot building. Great for Medical Office. insulation in ceiling. Complete list of everything that
MLS#320002 $849,999 comes with the sale on request. MLS#317162 $399,900


ROOMY AND BRIGHT, this home features over 2100
GREAT INVESTMENT PROPERTY square feet of living space. The home is placed on two lots
located in Crystal River with possible owner with lots of space on each side of house. The home has a
financing available. Close to Shopping, Beach, modern kitchen with upgrades galore. The home welcomes
financing available. Close to Shopping, Beach, you with double doors with leaded glass that opens into a
Schools, Downtown. Room on Lot for 3rd Duplex. large living room. Features his and her closets in master
MLS#315062 $294,900 suite and large master bath. How could you help but like
MLS# 6 $294,900 this! MLS#314865 $293,500

|^^*^|Lhl_>ri* -------- :-- - N O W^----- ^ \-'*-H^^


GREAT FOR A FAMILY! 3/2 with 2,160 living square
foot home on nearly an acre of land. Caged inground
pool, large summer kitchen/lanai. 3 car garage and 3
car carport! STORAGE GALORE MLS#318500
$247,000


SECLUDED, just like new country home with oak plank
floors, new appliances and tiled lanai. Detached building
perfect for boat or RV storage and/or workshop. Doggie
doors and fenced backyard for your pets. MLS#318109
$254,900


WATERFRONT LIVING AT ITS BEST! Enjoy
maintenance free lifestyle. Pretty water view, tile floors,
dock, laundry/storage room. Furnished. This waterfront
community offers tennis, heated swimming pool
surrounded by state nature preserve waters and land.
MLS#318765 $229,000


HOME FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE. This home has
been treasured. Now available to you. Large great room
with fireplace. Well equipped kitchen, grand master bath
with spa and shower and twin sinks. Located dose to shopping
in one of Homosassa's premier locations. MLS#313366 $159,000


.--- : - a
THIS HAS TO BE ONE OF THE NICEST MANUFACTURED
HOMES YOU' LL EVER SEEI Over 1800 square feet of
impeccably upgraded living space. Stainless appliances in
the large kitchen that opens to the Family room with
fireplace. Vaulted ceilings throughout the home and in the
living room. Big decks on front and side too. 25 x 30 metal
garage included also. MLS#316015 $159,900


-s^
1 ,


a


VERY NICE 4 BEDROOM, 2 bath doublewide home built in
2005 situated on 1 acre (mol). Beautiful kitchen with lots of
cabinets, breakfast bar, wood burning fireplace in family
room. Nice open floor plan. Located on a paved road and
convenient to hwy 19 and shopping. MLS#316986
$138,500


NEARLY 5 ACRES of partially cleared and completely
fenced property located on a paved, dead end road. Zoning
will allow for 1 home or 1 mobile and horses. Included in L
sale are two 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath cottages. 1 has no value QUIET COUNTRY SETTING adds to this 3/2 ranch north
and the other is comfortable and quite cute. Large garage of Crystal River. Open floor plan featuring kitchen with
between the 2 with concrete floors and electric. Great lots of storage, breakfast bar and new appliances.
property w/a fenced pasture area and small horse stall. Tranquil, screened lanai allows you to just sit and watch
MLS#317974 $140,900 Florida nature. MLS#315083 $149,900


~:y7w~


- " .. * . ..S. . � " .::.

HOME WARRANTY. Jewel box snug 3 bedroom, 2 bath home,
kitchen bonus-dishwasher, disposal, central water a plus. Clean
as a whistle, just waiting for you. MLS#316903 $127,700


HERE'S A GREAT OPPORTUNITY to have your home and
a vacant lot available next door for your friends or family to
put their new home, or live in one and build on the other.
This listing also includes a rear lot at this price. Come
check it out and build a family compound. Close to all of the
amenities, plus boating, swimming, and fishing.
MLS#308796 $124,900


GREAT TRIPLE WIDE 3/2/2 with open floor plan, large
kitchen with a lot of cabinets, eat-in area. Living room with
fireplace, inside laundry, ceiling fans, 14x30 screened
porch, covered RV parking. Front yard has sprinkler
system.MLS#315542 $144,500


GREAT STARTER OR RENTAL HOME. Has been a
rental for numerous years. Needs some updating. Priced
to sell. MLS#304108 $99,350


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


David A. Bramblett
REALTOR


i 1


I I


d


835 NE Hwy. 19 Crystal River, FL 34429 VIRTUAL rV VIRTUAL Visit us at L www.c2l naturecoast.com
Open 7 Days - Sun. 11-4 TOUR TOURU]R e-mail: c2lnature@aol.com


352-795-0021 81010-624-5634
NATURE COAST


low







. SUNDAY- SEPTEMBER 30. 2007.CIRUSC


Citrus Rid/

465-3000




Ul Avenus & Hal Steiner Kathy Shaw Cathy Mehl Art Paty Carol Gillig Dorri Spoto



REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR
Citrus Springs * 9542 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.


746-9000


Beverly Hills * Winn Dixie Plaza


CIRU SPIG HOME


Brand
neigh
groun
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home
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in th
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S169,900


983 W. HOMEWA LOOP 1530 W. EVERGREEN 3448 N. CENTURY BL1D. Bull with superior quality by Preision Builders, this new St.
new home at a great price. Wonderful Brand new home still under construction. Will have STILL TIME to pick colors. This under construction Croix Model 3/2/2 home is located in Citrus Springs. This home
borhood pets welcome, bike path, play oak cabinets in the kit. & self cleaning glass top 1095 W. NEWBURY ST. 3/2/2 home offers smooth top range, microwave, has an open floor plan featuring a spacious screened lanai w/
d, tennis court, golf course in an area near range. Nice sized bedroom & oversized great room 2007 Built 3-2-2 home with complete dishwasher, washer, dryer, sprinkler system and much summer kitchen area, plant shelves, a great m w/gas
ls and shopping. 315357 make this house very user friendly. 317649 appliance package. 318603 more!! 311358 fireplace and much, much, more. 318491




� ,' ile ,B 853 34. MERRIMAC WAY ~1600 W ELDER LANE Suenor quality by precision buders, this is a SLucia Model 3-2-2
*Pride of ownehip is evident in this exceptional 322 home. i a .. .. � pla,-,,, , ', nome features loads eof u S ng o anoenr oussLna 11346N ANGELTERR
N. TURF WAY e Ie S is raised p wd vsi khpn ngs3S amebaarWEDsuorsnn aopac uss 11346 N. ANGEL TERR.
7807 N. TURF WAY Features ind a great rm., frml./din rm, eain kitchen. A spacious . . i ..... ' /raised panel wood l an h rat r was f dim ki w/breakfast bar nook
supenorqualtybyPrecision Builders, thisnewMartiniqueModel3 lana & completely fenced yard. Amenities galore such as all cab. Plenty of counter space & plant shelves. Amen incl an ra nterps woodcabmaster sutehaa trayceiingBeautiful 2004 custom built home in Citrus Springs
s located in Citrus SpringsThis home has a spacious screened lanai, ... . . - -r ., lighted plant shelves, oversized MA. BA w/dble vanities, a garden tub & large shower, & in closets garden tub tiled shower & dual vanites Fully landscaped on almost 1/3 acre. Home has many upgrades &
shelves, a family room w/gas fireplace, sepidindrm, and separate livIrm up,.. J I, : .:. 3 j ... Exterior Ights &a 42" plasma wall a walk-in closet. NIA ceiling fans & lighting inc. along w/a complete oversized side entry gar., dbl paned windows, apple. pkg include amenities including custom wood kitchen and too
area, large t. breakfast barTo much to enon 318490 mounted flat screen TV. All this along wa home warranty. 319108 appl. pkg, scm lanai, spnnkler sys. & ful landscaping. 318602 319077. much to mention.316988


sreaned ~f Welanba Too much tometon. 3138 alc t m. l3168

. 1 . E A 8272 NW POCONO 1929 W GOLFCART
M: .-NO E Rom on 3a.sot Exceptional 3-2-2 home in a very desirable location. Features Super Golf course pool home. This 3-2-2 home is like R8228 N.2 . GOLF'VIEW
9929 N. S1lAIORD include large kitchen/formal diningfliving & family room & a brand new w/newer appl., flooring, cabinets & counter 2529 W. FAIRWAY GOLF COURSE Lovely view of the 7t green comes with this charming golf
3 MITCH UNDERWOOD HOME on 1 /3 acre huge lanai. Home amenities include loads of beautiful tile. lots tops. Great oversized lanai looking out over the pool and SUPER GOLF COURSE 222 pool home overloolding the course home. Wait 'til you see the master bath with its
corner lot. 3/2/2 home. Great rm, kit/nook. of cabinets, & storage, a master bath, dressing room & all the 7th green of Citrus Springs Golf Course. Don't miss 17th green on Citrus Springs Golf Course. Sit on the lanai oversized jetted tub. Could be purchased furnished so bring
screened lanai and much more. 313689 appiances. 317867 this onell 314889 and enjoy this spectacular view. 315131 _your clubs & start living! 316894




S350,000 PO O L S135.500 $164 , 00 $E9au0 0
7247 N FAIRLAWN TERR - , ....'
new 2005 built 3-2-2 home. This home is currently a 9930 N CHERR LAKE 9693 N SANDREE DRea 4 8342 N.Spring Sme ANTOS 9390 N. CAESSA WAY
frm. living rm, family rm, dining area& a spacious Come and see Florida living atits best This wonderful 3/22 poo/home 2 bedroom, 2 bath. Backs to Withlacoochee Trail for appliance including upgraded glass top range, microwave bedroom has a full bath and a walk-in doseL Bonusrom
Swa eakfast bar. Appliances are in. All the additional features soaring cathedral ceilings, an open & airy floor plan, large kitchen, additional privacy. Fenced-in yard for child or apet hood, washer, dryer & more. Home features a living rm., in back has A/C & slider to back yard. Pretty landscaping.
ings are negotable. 319214 pantry, breakfast bar and upgrades galore and much more 31240 security. 319021 an open kitchen & family rm. & dining area. 317696 Floors are commercial grade, vinyl tiles. 319432




9711 N. EMELLIA AVE 2282 W GARDENIA 198 W . AUSTIN DR. E
er 3-2-2 home on oversized comer lot & fully Nice 3-.5-1 Citrus Spng pool home wfenced yard EXCEPTIONALLYMAINTAINED 222 home in Citrus Spngs. 1848 W. FREEMAN 2244 W. DEVON DR.
d property. This home is prced to sell. Located Home has a living rm. & separate fam. am. w/woodbumin Home features include large kitchen, living rom, dining area, 31 HOME that is ready to move into. Everything Beautiful 2-1 home in the community of Citrus
e golf course community of Citrus Springs. All fireplace. Newer roof, newer ac and new pool liner. Pool is laundry room and screened lanai. Amenites ind beautiful il, is brand new: carpet, paint, ceiling, double pane Springs. Close to 2 golf courses, tennis court, bike
lian included plus hot tub on the lanai. All 15x30 and is in great cnditin (Is nt caged Beng sold t apples , fenced yar and shed Air handler replaced windows, blinds RS fenced yard, stove, trail, 25 miles to Ocala or Crystal River. Do not miss
furniture negotiable. 317107as is" with ght to insp. 31 th spe 317997 n 1999and compressor placed in 2004.318039 refrigerator, water heater 31584 this opportunity to see this one. 310284
S75.000 $109,000 $- WA _'____ CARSSA
r . 1F j "WA

9 Wj A 2174 W. DEVN Bneutral tile thru-out the kit, din/liv, rm., Ig. laundry nm. w/
9330 k . SANTOS 1i85 W FR'EEMAN PLACE 31 wcarport home All the new amenities included in 2224 N. HOWARD ecktwal herldryeter, s pa s & rinw b.asr
ome with parkview. This 3 or 4 bedroom home is light & Updated 1 bedroom, 1 bath Citrus Springs home this home, such as new roof, new heat & air/heat hot GREAT PRICEI 3/1.5 home features inc: 28x12 Through the sliding glass doors off the living rm. you'll
with I & 1/2 bathrooms. Famy rm. or bonus mw. w b
ceiling and skylight, also a pvae separate enrnce with carport. New roof and water heater in 2004, water tank, cabinets, carpet & flooring, bathroom family room, large BR's. New A/C, new dual pane view a beautiful park like setting. Sit back & relax in the
fenced backyard Home has man wonderful upgrades new refrigerator and range in 2005 and new kitchen vanity and toilet, all new appliances. The exterior and windows & a motivated seller. Take a look today! newly enclosed 18x7 porch or dive into the cool water of
advantage of this exception deal. 19882 sink in 2007. Great home for a great price! 319019 interior have all been painted. 316095. __306199 __ the 27x17 inground pool 319989_____________


..,- " ' ' , ..115 E. HARTFORD ST.



4609 W. OSAGE PLACE " - " -_ ,._.h c.n 4781 W RYEFIELD
URY LIVING ON A 1.5 ACRE CORNER SPACOUS 1045 BLUEBIRD CTA . 1 ;:, 1 Nice 2000 single wide w/2 bedrooms & 1.5 baths,
NE RIDGE, equestrian delight, gofer's wPACIOUS 4/2/2 2004 home on an acre + Property 255 W. NATIONAL, 1 ACRE :,,..,,-,. .,-,r, . located on great 2.5 acre homesite (horses allowed)
m. 2 FP home w/large sq. ft., huge master Communi w/club house pl & I tens cus GREAT 3-2-2 home, tile in living area, dining ., : inc. refrigerator, range/oven, dshwasher,
uite. Impressive family room, great for Enjoy the gourmet kitchen with stainless appliances & room, kitchen, bath. beautiful stone fireplace AO* e, ,, .:.- ,. microwave, washer & dryer, and s partially cleared
entertaining. 315353 wood Oscabinets 306111 all on 1 acre in popular Citrus Hills. 314052 -, , - - butw/plenty of trees remaining. 318498;

WWW.CITRUSRIDGEREALTY.COM TOLL FREE (866) 465-3500


Cn-Rus Coumy (FL) CHRONICLE


$154,900


139,900




. , 4


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-SUNDXY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007 9E


728890



pUltHOSus Rid
. 465-3000
OPPORTUNITY 'lb 5-3000




Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Kathy Shaw Cathy Mehl Art Paty Carol Gillig Dorri Spot
REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR
Citrus Springs * 9542 N. Citrus Springs Blv(


74ge l6-9000
746-9000


Ken & Michelle Cavalleri Tom Balfour
REALTORS REALTOR
Beverly Hills * I


Walter Engelken Amanda & Kirk Johnson
REALTOR REALTOR- REALTOR, GRI
Ninn Dixie Plaza


PINE RIDGE * PINE RIDGE * PINE RIDGE * PINE RIDGE * PINE RIDGE





1938 W. LABONTE 4076 W. ALAMO DR. 5725 N. LENA 5518 N. ELKCAM 5298 N. PEPPERMINT DR. 3744 W. PROMONTORY
3/2/3, built 2007, pool. 318716 3/2.5/2 pool home. 316956 3/2/3, pool, 2003 built. 313815 3/2/3, golf course. 150892 4/2.5/3 pool. 319085 2/2/2, 1.3 acres, pool. 303517
PINE RIDGE INVERNESS * INVERNESS EL DIABLO GOLF COURSE





4850 N. MAPLEVIEW WAY 8383 E. TURNER CAMP 9485 BRIAR CT. 10174 N. LANGDON RD. 10232 N. LANGDON RD.
3/2/2, corner lot. 317939 2/1.5/2, waterfront, 1 AC. 313252 3/2 carport, .5. 314864 2400 sq. ft. living. 317993 3 sided fireplace. 318058
WITHLAC00CHEE RIVER TERRA VISTA CRYSTAL OAKS BEVERLY HILLS

kiNi / I f . FE E= !



.:.D,169 16 . SUGARMAPLE
3527 E. LAZY 499 W. DOERR PATH 100 N. CRYSTAL MEADOW PATH , . -- p I. i., 54 S. ADAMS 309 JEFFERSON
4/4, extra lot. 318828 4/2/2. 319443 4/3/2, pool. 317988 316263 2/1/1. 319211 2/2/2. 314191
BEVERLY HILLS * BEVERLY HILLS * BEVERLY HILLS CITRUS SPRINGS




322 . ADAMS . .." . . 5...
510 S. BARBOUR 2 - .:.,., ,,::.. c.ro~ .1. 32 N. ADAMS 439 SUGARBERRY 9018 TRAVIS 9686 N. LANGDON
2/2/1, fam. rm., shed. 305433 313381 2/1/1. 309002 3/2/2, 1825 sq. ft. living. 314162 3/2/2. 319375 2650 sq. ft. living. 318376
CITRUS SPRINGS * CITRUS SPRINGS COMMERCIAL




.. '' ..5349 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
q eu..r | ..r, , .I 4 2 .r: -,, U r; US HWY 19
2504 W. GARDENIA 2849 W. LEEWARD 7640 N. OASIS PT. 8416 N. IBSEN Car Lot, Stereo Installation. .7 of an acre commercial lot.
2/2/1. 309512 2/2/1. 319754 3/2/2. 2005 built. 319072 3/2/2. 319429 317861 317856

www.CitrusBestBuy.com * Toll Free 1-888-789-7100







IFO SLINnAY SEPTEMBER O 2007


'.



Santo
Dovi
Exit Realty
Leaders.


Deb
infantine
Exit Realty
Leaders.


Dovi, Infantine
tops in August
Exit Realty Leaders is proud to
announce the top producers for the
month of August in the Inverness
office. Top-selling agent is Santo
Dovi, and top-listing agent is Deb
Infantine. Reach Santo Dovi at
476-4687 or Deb Infantine at (352)
302-8046.


Larry
Scinta
Coldweli
Banker Next
Generation


Coidwell
Banker Next
Generation


Coidwell
Banker Next
Generation


Chris

Coldwell
Banker Next
Generalion


three years' experience and exten-
sive knowledge of both Citrus and
Hernando counties.
Also joining the team are Steve
Donofrio, Suzanne Smith, John
Hoffmeister and Pat Lehman. All
these agents can be reached at
the Homosassa Coldwell Banker
Next Generation Realty office at
382-2700.


JoAnn

Cridland &
Cridland.


Bonnell
Cridland &
Cridland.


Cridland honors
top producers

Linda and Mickey Cridland of
Cridland & Cridland PA, GMAC
Real Estate are proud to
announce the top producers for the
month of August.


Pailm


SIHoe:I


IVMike

Cridland &
Cridland.


Debr'a
Kilburn
Cridland &
Cridland.


V.<,. -, , ,




Parn Ski
Stachurski Stachurski
Cridland & Cridland &
Cridland. Cridland.
In the Inverness office, JoAnn
Lilly was our top-listing sales part-
ner and Dennis Bonnell our top-
selling sales partner. They can be
reached by phone at 344-5535 by
e-mail at Inverness@Cridland.com,
or at the new Inverness office at


728323


1-29011-622-2832


Coidwell
Banker Next
Generation


;'- -I . -
Coidwell
Banker Next
Generation


Newest team
members welcomed
Coldwell Banker Next
Generation Realty is pleased to
welcome Larry Scinta and Chris
Virgilio to our team Larry brings
wth him over 10 years' real estate
experience and Chnris Virgilio brings


Anne

Cridland &
Cridland.


". .


*Ii




Horton
Cridland &
Cridland.


957 S. Lois Terrace, on the corner
of Lois Terrace and State Road 44.
In the Beverly Hills office, the
honor of top-listing sales partner
goes to Mike Laughlin. The top-
selling sales partner was Debra
Kilburn: They can be reached in
the office at 4 Carl Court or by
phone at 527-8100 and e-mailed at
BeverlyHills@ Cridland.com.
In the Crystal River office, Pam
and Ski Stachurski were our top-
listing sales partners. They and all


the agents can
be reached in
our office at 7660
ga Gulf-to-Lake
Highway (State
Road 44) or by
phone at 564-
8331 and e-
Phil mailed at Crystal
S . River@Cridland
Cridland & .com. In the
Cridland. Ocala office, con-
gratulations go to
Anne Seymour as the top-listing
sales partner The honor of top-
selling sales partner goes to Kathy
Horton. They can be reached in
the office at 5861 Highway 40 or
by phone at (352) 629-2620 and e-
mailed at Ocala@Cridland.com.
In the Dunnellon office, the top-
listing sales partner was Phil
Scorgie. The top-selling sales part-


Please see


/Page 12E


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
If2'SIMBk Office: (352) 726-5855 _.1,.
mNE Toll Free: (800) 476-2590
SCell: (352) 634-2371 Y "
ERA For a Visual Tour of all of our home listings '"..
REAL ESTATE visit www.bidavis.com


WHAT A GLORIOUS. PANORAMIC
VIEW . 6,. .r,. , [ .-- ,, :,, : lu . :
..�, i"h ra, r.rT I r,: 3 B .e ,-- .:.n,.:. :, , p ,.:r,r-.
.... ' r . .. :..:.. . . \ .:: i.:.. :.:... : n . -.....
























i 'IC .* . I .r & r... .
S" CHEERFUL. SUNNY. D A .TN,, L , .C...
,-. or.. -c AoL

IAa',,' 3 ,. B EDROOM ,*, 2 B ,H ,.:,,,u;


*iih ^SS~tb: *SasTHIS 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, 2-.: , .ir..r



* [ r ,, 1 . :.1 . si ,h. . _-. .:., r.- . 1-.. .:. r

1 �ii^l $182,000
* ^W^ I l"""-. s CATHEDRAL CEILINGS ,a Ir,,! .,11,



" 1 ^ ';7,', $139,900
HI .., ,' ADORABLE AND AMAZINGLY COMPACT.
_V T ,: , . r.. .. 1 . .....- .. :.. ... , , ... .-.
I.- ,1 ,' . miM ...-.^.a.^ j i.]..

. I:^1 S59,900


- - . Real Estate


CITRUS COUN'IY (FL) CHRONICLE


0 SUNDAV SEPTEMBER 30 2007


91'� tift




.* ,� .


CnIRus COUNTY (FL) GJ1RoNcIE








I. e
Citu Ridg ReClty
954 N. Ciru Sprng BldCtu -pigF 43


S$166,700






s - - . . ,B., , " .
M om.. ". , ...,.'


8075 N. VOYAGER
CITRUS SPRINGS
' NEW ' 3 2 2
'Open floor plan 'L.rge
screened lanai
'DLal Pane winlowS
Upgraded catnets
'Stainless steel appliances
- Stone trim
MLS#317780


$188,700 . ' " 1980 W. ARBUTUS DR.
*;, . CITRUS SPRINGS
-'NEW ' 3.2.2
Dual Pane Large lanai

wfw/ St high door
W- ooden cabinets
'Dimensional shingles
MLS#319036


2702
139900 - W. ANDROMEDAE DR.
- .CITRUS SPRINGS
-- -"" 'NEW "Great room
S '"3,'2 2 'Breakfast bar
S. - '-'Formal dining room
SOpen floor plan
'Dual pane windows
MLSn319177

' 3700 W. COGWOOD
$289,700 PooL PINE RIDGE
7 , POOL ON 1 acre
'3 2, 2 POOl home
r 1 lJx 28 Pool
.1 acre 'Ceramic tile in L R.
SDin. Rm ' Nook
i '- "Laundcry " Large lanai
.D i LR ti- r, 1 r rr 2.r , .r . P icar.
e61vO C ,, Lett_ on ,rm a r r Pl.r fnt
Crg,,CC,Oi _rri, C.-, H.,Jjj .1 r, L~rt


$13 450 0 I- .M


S .7939 N. GOLFVIEW Dr.
3305 W. VIKING CITRUS SPRINGS
CITRUS SPRINGS 'Famni room
3 2 2 Great starter nome 'AnlorE C Fin-
'SecLIrjty .sVtem Fernceo back ara Pen- ' I~' ,ari
" Gaze o 1 Fr" pit - L31i Vi W tintedCI 01i. .'* 1 . WlinOcW
MLS -3S1 1 ML.,3iF_,.9-


$209,00





7987 N. GOLFVIEW DR.
CITRUS SPRINGS
.- r rn * : r.:.r -.'..r *. : " .r ar.3jr -
IF'lrr I L' ".: - ,*'i:.ijC' [ ,hr in',or


I17t, 00


513 N. DUQUET PLACE
CITRUS SPRINGS POOL HOME
"3 2 2 '14x29 pool - Open floor plan
"Acpliances ne iri c -' " 2 If,:,l0- '.1 i
'Tefni co' iiTrC S'c r,,S "-ii.'e ri.-iii
iylL.-�; iZJL.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007 11E

*Home Finder* *Home Finder*



3521 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 3446S 1-888-789-7100


.:i Realty '







1FSnr6ArswisiSrnPTEMBuF'I 30. 2007CrusCJNY(LCHNJF


DIGEST
Continued from Page 10E

ner was Deborah Anderson. They
can be reached in our location at
11563 Williams St. (U.S. 41) or by
phone at (352) 465-7035 and e-
mailed at Dunnellon@
Cridland.com.
- i .


Kirk
Johnson
Citrus Ridge
Realty.


Amanda
Johnson
Citrus Ridge
Realty.


Johnsons pass the
$10 million mark
Citrus Ridge Realty is proud to
announce Kirk and Amanda
Johnson have passed $10 million
in sold transactions so far this year.
Callthem at 746-9000 or stop by
the office in the Beverly Hills Winn-
Dixie plaza. Visit www.citrusbest-
buy.com.
Scully, Bramblett are
tops at Century 21
Carol Scully, broker associate
with Century 21 Nature Coast,
was named the office's top produc-


* . ,



Carol

Century 21
Nature Coast.


; , : . -) A.
Bramblett
Century 21
Nature Coast.


ing sales associate in the month of
August. She can be reached at
302-6912.
David A. Bramblett, broker
associate, was named the office's
top-listing sales associate in the
month of August. He can be
reached at 302-0448.

Realtor marks
30 year anniversary


Dixie Parsley,
Broker-Realtor,
Auctioneer, GRI,
ASP, recently
celebrated 30
years in the real
estate business.
Parsley is the
owner of Parsley
Real Estate Inc.
and Auction
Company on
State Road 200
in Hernando.


Dixie

Parsley Real
Estate and
Auction.


She has a
branch office in Ocala. Parsley was
recently accredited as an ASP real


estate agent in "Home Staging."
Call her at (352) 220-4355.
Anderson-Moore
tops in sales

greaves, broker,
Charlotte G.
Realty &
Investments
LLC congratu-
lates Realtor '-
Kathi Anderson-
Moore for being
the top lister for Kathi
the month Anderson-
the month of July Moore
2007. She can Charlotte G
be reached at Realty &
our downtown Investments.
Crystal River
office at 425 N. Citrus Ave., 795-
9123.
Debi Beltz joins
Coldwell Banker
Debi Beltz has joined Coldwell
Banker Investors Realty of


;. R ._ / Citrus County
' as a full-time
sales associate
working out of
St hthe Inverness
office. Coldwell
Banker Investors
,. Beltz Realty of Citrus
Coldwell County Inc.,
Banker. located at 314 W.
Main St., Inver-
ness, can be reached at 726-9533.
Horizon honors
Crowe, Yuelling


Steve
Crowe
Inverness
Horizon Realty.


Inverness
Horizon Realty
at 856 Hwy. 41
South, Inverness,
congratulates the
top sales associ-
ates for August.
Top selling sales
associate for
August was
Steve Crowe.
He can be


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
Fclljow these guideline.r . to help ensure timely publication of
submitted material
* Community notes: At least one week in advance of the
event.
* Business Digest: - p.m. Wednesday fo:r publication
Sunday.
* Health Notes: 4 p.m Friday tr:r publication Tuesday
* Real Estate Digest: .4 p mr Trhurz.day for publication
Sunda',.


ONE Frances Perez .
ERA CALL DIRECT: REALTOR� '
AMERICAN REALTY Cell: (352) 586-8885
& INVESTMENTS franprealtor@yahoo.com
4511 N. Lecanto Hwy. www.eraamericanrealty.com .
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Office: (352) 746-3600


ADORABLE AFFORDABLE POOL HOME in Beverly
Hills!! Come and beat the heat! This home is in move-
in condition, just waiting for your personal touch. You
can sit out on your screened-in porch that overlooks
the caged pool. Take a dip and enjoy the coolness.
Must see to appreciate!! #315434. $99,900


GORGEOUS KEN LANE QUALITY BUILT 3BR,
2.5BA home w/office. Gourmet kitchen w/granite
countertops, Corian in bath. Beautiful bar for
entertaining. Caged inground pool
w/spa and summer kitchen Property abuts horse
trail. Must see!! #316172. $449,900


BEAUTIFUL 2BR, 2BA, 2 car gar., move-in GNC ZONING. Presently a well-known feed store with an
condition! New 25 year warranty roof in 2002. All excellent potential for growing business. Seller will hold
updated windows Z , screened windows aper with a substantial down payment. Seller would like
new heat pump. A truly adorable home. Screened to lease a portion of land In the rear of property fr his
in patio - nothing to do but ust move in. This equipment. Price Includes all inventory Inside store.
home was well taken care of. Come and take a What a deal!! If you ever wanted to own a business w/
look. #317870. $119,000 great potential - now is the time! #315655. $249,000


' #313470A 3751 N. Muscadine,
Beverly Hills ................ $39,900
- - _ _ " . 553 #313474A 158 W. Clifton, Laurel
THIS 4BR, 4B,, 3 CG POOL HOME. . .-..I Ridge......................... $39,900
Impeccably clean & bright & airy. Home sits on 5.65 # 4 .
acres and features a large in-law suite overlooking #315012A 4880 W. Maverick Ct.,
gorgeous caged heated inground pool with spa. Pine Ridge .................. $59,900
Large workshop, shed 14x21 as well as a boat
carport. Property backs up to the horse trails of Pine #316041 A 6989 S. Peach Pt., 5
Ridge. Must see to really appreciate It! #318216. ACRES ...................... $95,000
$59,00 10_____............. . __


Inverness
Horizon Realty.


reached at 637-
4280 or 201-
2255. Beverly
Yuelling was
named the top
listing sales
associate for
August. Call
Beverly at 637-
4280 or 212-
0416.


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms
available for wedding and
engagement announce
rents, anniversaries,
birth announcements and
tirst birthdays. Call 563-
5660 for copies.


Cri*Rus Coumy (FL) CffRONICLE




. , �,


RTIC US COUNTY (FL E


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007 13E


"III"""


N i iFIuWk1-


V


7�EST7
BEST."
" ;' , t,& , '-;


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Austin C * 4/2/2 - $155,400


Highridge Village * Georgetown B
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* 4/2/2 - $166,400


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Citrus Springs, Citrus County - From the $120s. 1-75 north to 44 west to 41 north, 12 miles on right. (352) 465-7255
Crystal Manor, Citrus County - Acre + lots! From the $170s. North of Crystal River on US19 4.5 miles, right on
Basswood. Model on left. (352)795-2329
Sugarmill Woods, Citrus County - From the $160s. Veterans Expressway to 98 west to 19 north .5 miles.
8915 S. Suncoast Blvd. (352) 628-4116
High Ridge Village, Citrus County - From the $130s. North on S.R. 491 (S. Lecanto Hwy.) N. to Roosevelt Blvd.
East 1 mile. Entrance on right. (352) 527-6461
Springhill, Hernando County - From the $150s. Veterans Expressway north to Exit 41 (Spring Hill Drive); west
1.5 miles to model center on right. Turn on Dothan Street to enter parking lot. (352) 688-1156 or (353) 683-0336
Royal Highlands, Hernando County - From the $140s. Veterans Expressway north to Exit 41 (Spring Hill Drive),
follow to Mariner and turn right. Model center is located at the intersection of Mariner and Landover Blvd.
(352) 683-0336 or (352) 688-1156


*Jtr~4


g , b H e _ - $198,900
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* 4/2/2 - $169.900


Royal Highlands Durham C


www.maronda.com
Sales Center Hours:
Mon. 12-7 * Tues., Wed., & Sat. 10-7 * Sun. 11-5 CGC060496


US CUNTYfFT)CHROICL


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Stress ips for caregivers


early 44 million Ameri-
cans provide unpaid
care for their relatives,
friends, and neighbors accord-
ing to the U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services.
The emotional impact of caring
for a loved one can be
more difficult than
the physical aspects.
The emotions can
range from resent-
ment, anger, guilt,
shame, anxiety to
feelings of loss and I
isolation. When care-
giving goes on for a _<
long period of time, is Monica
unexpected due to a
sudden illness, or if CONS
the care is provided SCIE
to a person with
Alzheimer's or other form of
dementia, the stress increases.
Seventy-five percent of care-
givers report feelings of emo-
tional stress and 83 percent of
caregivers are women. Not sur-
prisingly, caregivers who felt
they had no choice but to be a
caregiver experienced higher
levels of emotional stress. With
so many people in this impor-
tant role, how can the helpers
be helped to deal with the
stress of their situations?
Probably the best way to


.I


ward off stress is to be on the
look out for stress symptoms
and be ready to practice stress
relievers. Some of the stress
symnptonis include:
* Crying more than usual.
* Changes in sleep patterns.
i Changes in eat-
W ing.
N Irritability.
* Fidgeting/need-
' ing to move all the
time.
SDifficulty con-
centrating/focusing.
* Unmotivated to
do anything.
Bonsett a Having "physi-
cal complaints."
UMER Make a plan that at
NCE the first sight of any
of these stress symp-
toms that a specific stress
reliever will be used to combat
the stress, such as taking a
walk, listening to music, or talk-
ing to a friend. Scheduling
respite on a regular basis to get
away from the caregiving situa-
tion to do something fun is very
important
But there are some things
caregivers can do everyday to
help create a buffer to protect
them from the stress around
them. A lot of times, the care-
giver is so busy caring for the


other person, they forget to
take care of themselves. The
caregiver needs to take time to
eat nutritiously and get enough
sleep so that he/she can handle
the stressors better. In addi-
tion, these stress buffers used
daily can create a stress shield.
The caregiver needs to:
* Have some quiet time to
reflect, meditate or pray.
* Practice deep, slow relaxing
breaths and other relaxation
techniques.
* Do something that gives
him/herself joy.
* Exercise regularly.
* Set limits.
* Smile and laugh more.
* Create and maintain a per-
sonal support system of trusted
people.
* Seek out friends or profes-
sional help when he/she feels
unable to cope.
Following the above guide-
lines will help the caregiver to
manage stress and prevent
burnout, which is all too com-
mon. In its severest forms, the

RENEE'S

BEST BUYS






Affordable 3/2 in nice area of Gospel
Island. Seller to pay up to $3000 toward
buy her's closing costs. #319228.
$124,000


caregiver becomes depressed or
physically ill. Burnout has three
stages - frustration, isolation,
and then despair It is a very seri-
ous condition, in which the care-
giver becomes unable to care for
their loved one. The caregiver
needs respite and professional
help at this point
Ideally, prevention is key!
There are many resources in the
community that provide respite
and support, so don't be afraid to
seek outside help. Joining a sup-
port group can also be very help-
ful. Finding these resources
before they are needed is impor-
tant To learn more about servic-
es under the National Family
Caregiver Support Program,
contact the nearest area agency
on aging. ElderCare Locator can
help to find the nearest one. Call
(800) 677-1116 or visit www.elder-
care.gov or call 211 for a referral.
For more information about


stress management call
Monica Bonsett at 527-5713.
Citrus County Extension links
the public with the University of
Florida/IFAS' knowledge,
research and resources to
address youth, family, communi-
ty and agricultural needs. All
programs and related activities
sponsored for, or assisted by, the
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences are open
to all persons with non-discrim-
ination with respect to race,
creed, color, religion, age, dis-
ability, sex, sexual orientation,
marital status, national origin,
political opinions or affiliations.
----

Monica Bonsett is the.Family
and Consumer Sciences
Program Assistant for Citrus,
County University of
Florida/IFAS Cooperative
Extension Service.


CRYSTAL RIVER. 1 T,.... OLD HOMOSASSA. . . .. .... -.
bedrm, 1 bath; carport, appliances, carpet, tile, vinyl, bedrm,2 bath, 1 car detached garage, w/huge eat-in
HVAC, interior/exterior paint, fenced comer lot. Public kitchen w/skylight, beautiful & abundant cabinets in
sewer/water, fam. rm., din. rm., & office. Close to kitchen, tile firs, Berber carpet, new roof 2006, all
shopping/medical/school etc. #311665 $84,900 close to river. A must see.! #319830 $108,000


'5 acres,
*W '' v. ' h-- 19803/2
/ .l... - ' . '* D/W ,
, .- - ' " - - partially
' . fenced,
/ . ', . . , s .privacy;
! paved road;
4 .-- :._ i 24x42
- -t'- t - galvanized
domed workshop with concrete fir.; bring your
horses & livestock; close to fishing #315138,
PRICE REDUCED $220,000


a


ki Nt I a ng -"





HERNANDO. Small lot on corner with older
singlewide. on it..Mobile has. no value. Well and
-'. .i ..: ., ....n , i+ , ' , . , ,,i , i.." : $31,000'


07'Rus Coumy (FL),CHRONICLE







SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007 15E


II


s224,900 $210,000
l'. c ell .: r r.i n.:.m, ,:, . a ruII . ,. :, r- I, nr I ,. i, r, rr.arjral * ,riari.3 nei ; ne .. r li.Li i n Irl, rr
. 1 1 - q Pr - :.r I.. . . .-- L - :-:r- r-n . 3 la., -,? C1 rT ' i- C .. r -.a r E t r iQ E r.a o r . 3 -.h ': e r 3. -_ ' -. . . -
i�. u. rn.ar. ..:,ir I.r.:r,I- r, . r r.-. I ..i, . . [, r , I' t, r ur. r r r tu G r L 'Iorati
352-527-1820 a319902 352-746-0744


$184,900
Well iTme 3riraint d 3 2 hrm on rlade' G..lr C.urie.
.e. 3 2 2, W ri.rlpoul F 'an.l, riT. ifr pl3Cj . vi vi ,:arr-jt cerar Hii: , 1il -
E 3auLiful Ceilin r. i ari. iinC.., l rmn- , n . - I . :li.;c-IO 3 aria, -..e rl.:.- king c'uric
on" rluIt -e " 'Ee a Qrear ., lr lemrner7.h4i6 0. 3 lal
#319995 352-746-0744 #319953


I




$169,900 $149,900 5189,000
1,:,.E r. iqh to n-,i I ,: . , ar i . 15 i a t. : .art 1j i, [li, r rII ,.l , Urri: n,3 .: a I a - r' . 1-n ..- Lr- r' Cbr,:,., , " 3, r, , 3 , r e ,.:. , 'i; t . .. 1
t al L iT . fl d ,i, p 'n .i _: .a,-,,u: n . 2 r l r. rr k,[,-ir. a L.,r h.L5" 1 .-_ n l . ri,- .,..d . r , , II n.r, . " 5 r_ .n.. la 'l ',r n, IT. r.-r , '.:.'_:ul,3niC , I ' i.21 a l, r
ari nr.i 4 area3 , r.IdE. ,[. Til-e * Ci [r. E. P 3 .ai -: ,.,r ,-r, -In - i: r .-: r ltr,. r r . r --i r la.3 . n. , Ji hrj r -. f rI,, i ti .r .. j i .T3[ . k , .ar L,-* .- nr r,-.,:
_r.-I,,:l d FL rrn w -n,[,r.:hrl- p Kcqu~r",3 . ..-
Er, aIr . r d.FL 1 - l-, l r-h:-[[u,,,' I.nrrc�. rj,1r, . curb . ,pp 31.
352-746-0744 n#319906 352-746-0744 316995870 352-746-0744 #310541










$595,000 $397,000 $259,900
Er, ri, -' o u -i,.m - , 5 c 3 ri.:. r'�n , m urmr kii. ",iSu-ijj u ..r 'eP ..a i r. .rf. I c . . ` r I - : ur.1" -l r.ri r.l:. 1 2 r, r . 1 2 , p. l
. - lan :1.: -. "r-in r.. .. n . . . - k rr L .r .:k r k . r r.. p la , -n . kit ' r. l
r.ain.[^ .:.:urint rr.p-, [f I 16 n rn m rbil .*" �Urea rub Lj . 1 L-. Kit %,j :iw .�.) ai i- - a dr-. ':�rr .-: : Cur ap. l Ck I . f, l.*.-i ti- .- anai -r.- , i.n- . Frar iJi
I. rn .. ..r . ..ar rmf . i-n , p .:..:. are. , dar .: r ,* r. r ...-, r . :..r n c r I-r ..r hi .
352-527-1820 sr 313837 352-527-1820 .f 316879 352-746-0744 #312699


$133,000
irj,-, Cia, iTp.-.ial I r n,, -, i- , n 0o..r.,i:-.d C':,n-:,.ir
I[t. ' .en rl.:.: l..-: an .,tr. - I-, : , _; i , *.:*nd- -.. , iy
Flori.]a r.j -iTi and aIr- - '~ nre-_i- n p,.r:h ,h.:i- l .:l.ar,
arind rnEa. rne r,.:.-rn. 1i:-c t.: rl-U pQark.
352-527-1820 a317808


$279,900
- p.ooli hun-i- in minr c.o:r.drion LOtU
nihiati pool -I , pa. -riEcurir, ,-, ntrn i-rer.
5 Tiij.: mh r E -r, rmn, -r:' lani ra, for .:-ff'ce
Hilli r 6mr.-r:.rip Req1uired
352-746-0744 #31046


:. u-,.jra.e- :n
v:.i :* CC a pl.a,_r
- .:.rae- Cir'u-:.
3


, .Ik ... - . ,W..4:






$179,000
[1. l5" a ,'_: ,j,,r C,.ur_,:- ; l_;t hr..le , ";' 2 * ir.el..: 1-1
li. -oi rn , E i- l. 3 FL r nm I.:..: :; .ujr in th. y.:.il :.:. -r -
Hn.:.nm .- (- r.:. ., L _. , not t.:..:. -"i.all. CL-ut ju:. r . g :r .r
tn s.:,.:- rhat i.-;ait i :, r ,e in ii(ruj: Hill:.
352-746-0744 v309304


For a Visual Tour or Multiple Photos,



Go to:www.floridashowcaseproperties.com


r


Cmus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE






16E SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Great room lives up to its name


SHNS photo courtesy HGTV
By adding modem finishes, dramatic focal points and enough furniture for a whole water-polo team, a young couple with a growing family now has a space that really
makes a splash!


'xi. .~'-'~
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x =.-?-., ,. - , e ^- - s . 1 i.
P-


Vast space becomes focal point

for growingfamily's home


CANDICE OLSON
HGTV
Peter and Anna have had a
busy four years: They met (on a
blind date), got married,
bought their first house, and
had a baby girl. Their home,
while lovely, was just too small
for their growing family, so
they decided to undergo a full-
scale renovation and double
the amount of living space.
For the past year, they have
lived with dust, drywall and a
whole lot of debris; and just
when they thought the end was


near, they ran out of steam (and
ideas) while attempting to fin-
ish the last room -their "great
room."
They wanted this combina-
tion living/dining room to be
the focal point of their house -
a hip, modern space in which
they could relax, entertain and
have some fabulous dinner
parties. (Peter plays water polo
and is still tight with his pals
from the team, so there are a
lot of hungry men to feed!)
The room was uninviting
Please see ROOM/Page 17E


The room before its stunning transformation. The couple wanted their spacious living/dining room to
be the focal point in their house so they could relax, entertain and have fabulous dinner parties.







RTI S OUN Y (


ROOM
Continued from Page 16E

and bland, with walls that were
still covered in primer because
the couple could not decide on
a color. So, I decided to put an
end to Peter and Anna's reno-
vation woes and turn this
"great" room into a "fantastic"
room, with heaps of style and
substance.
The room is open-concept in
nature, so the challenge was to
seamlessly "connect" the living
and dining areas to one anoth-
er - and to the adjoining
kitchen. I started by painting
the whole room in a subtle,
neutral shade. I then got busy
creating "zones" that would
differentiate the living and din-
ing areas, but have them work
together in their shared space.
In the living area I created a
stunning feature wall. On one
half of this wall I put up rich,


cherry-toned wood cabinetry
that discreetly incorporates a
media center and matches the
cabinetry in the kitchen; on the
other half, I installed a stream-
lined gas fireplace with a mod-
ern facade of back-painted
glass and a surround of river
stone tiles.
I then anchored the space
with a gorgeous faux sheepskin
area rug and brought in some
comfortable furniture: two cot-
ton-striped club chairs, a
caramel-colored, L-shaped sec-
tional, and a variety of modern
and traditional accent pieces
with wood and mirror finishes.
I then moved on to the dining
area. I generally only use one
feature wall per room, but this
large space required more
drama, so I added a second.
Along this wall I created a
super-sized upholstered ban-
quette and seating bench in a
dreamy shade of pool
blue/green. Next to the ban-
quette I placed a dark wood


dining room table with new tan
and green upholstered chairs
that speak to the furniture in
the living room.
The space had one long wall
of windows. To create a seam-
less flow between the two
zones, I put up a whole wall of
light, gauzy sheers in a soft
striped pattern; these are
flanked by luxurious, hand-
crafted cream-colored drapes.
The ceiling in the room was
already full of recessed lights, so
I simply added small puck lights
near the banquette and a chan-
delier over the dining room
table for some added pizzazz.


After a few final accents and
accessories, reno-weary Peter
and Anna had a great room that
was finally worthy of its name.
By adding some modern finish-
es, dramatic focal points, and
enough furniture for a whole
water polo team, the couple
now has a space that really
makes a splash! How divine!


Interior decorator Candice
Olson is host ofHGTV's
"Divine Design. "For more
ideas, information and show
times visit www.HGTVcom or
www.divinedesign.tv.


The room is open-concept in nature,

so the challenge was to seamlessly
"connect" the living and dining areas

to one another - and to the
adjoining kitchen.


7 .. ,-


4 . W - -, W


AH L.
DINING.


EIrACE...h
TOTAL .- 04


7- X- *1
6" .*.
W- - 'c.. -7-


We also specialize in Room Additions & remodeling

U.S. Hwy 19 * 2 miles north of the Crystal River Mall
Open Mon.-Friday 8am-6pm; Sat. 9am-3pm

Call today for more information 352-37-3912


,C ROI


11145 W. Bentbow Path,U y LUII - LUCrystal RiverI, FL 34428

11145 W. Bentbow Path, Crystal River, FL 34428


-' 4IIFC GARAGE .
I -







DIN NG .
IRM 12X13
... ..... ...... .- . . " -"
1I*II* I u * I.* - . l Ill I-- ..





. . I I ' '


.1.


'LINt.,


*-6Z' ______


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Roxv ~'


WEEKLY
LINEUP
* Nearly a dozen medical
professionals contribute
their expertise to
columns in Health &
Life. /Tuesdays
* Read up on all things
schooj;related in the
Chronicle's Education sec-
tion.,'Wednesdays
* Plan menus for the week
from the tempting recipes
in the Flair for Food sec-
tion./Thursdays
* Get a jump on weekend
entertainment with the
stories in Scene./Fridays
* See what local houses of
worship plan to do for the
week in the Religion sec
tion./Saturdays
* Read about area business
es in the Business sec
tion., Sundays


J r �%


SUNDAY, SEPT]EMBER. 30, 2007 17E


C C T Fl CHRONICLE


BD


I


,!
I
i


N






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1RF STINnAY SFPTEMRER ?jO. 2007


Proper way to seal


a window frame

We recently pur- seen water running down the
* chased a two-story window or pooling on the win-
* brick veneer home in dowsill. I am curious as to how
Mo ngomery, Texas. I could stop this
The home was built e -al leakage to prevent
in 1994, I believe, i ruining the drywall.
and since we moved Please try to give
in about nine me some sugges-
months ago, we ' ' tions as to whom I
have noticed that might call or what I
some chips of dry- ' could do myself to
wall/paint that have . cure the problem. -
fallen from the ' J. J., Montgomery,
inside top of the two Dwight Barnett Texas
windows onto the A. The flaking
windowsill. . , drywall from the
I am assuming _'" ' ' Z inside top of the two
that the window windows indicates
must be leaking somehow from the windows most likely have
the outside, causing this to
occur, but have never actually Please see HOME/Page 27E

Darrell & Debbie Fields
REALTOR@-Associates
The Full Time Realtor-Associates@ Team * Multi-Million Dollar Producers
25 Years Combined Experience & Personalized Service!
,%; www.debbiefields.com
KELLER WILIAMS. 352-637-1500 Direct 352-212-9450 cel
2008 Hwy 44 West, Invemesss, FL 3450 352-344-1113 omce 352-344-5513 Residence
Inverness Inverness
Waterfront 2 Story. 4BR/3BA Pool Home, Waterfront 2BR/2BA Home. Private Dock
wood fireplace, tile floors, carpet in BRs, tile w/lake access, Florida room w/view of
lanai. Asking: $285,499 MLS# 310509 Water. Asking: $179,000 MLS# 312831
Floral City Floral City
Waterfront get-away. Singlewide w/ Cute, affordable 2BR/1 BA home. Perfect
additions. Asking: $48,000 get-away home. Move in immediately
MLS# 318878 Asking: $85,000 MLS# 318207
Inverness Inverness
2BR/2BA Home. Easy waterfront access, 4BR/2BA Home (Pre-Foreclosure).
close to community facilities Located in city limits, qualify for short
� Asking: $119,900 sale. Asking: $129,500 MLS# 313438
Hernando Hernando
4BR/2BA Doublewide, 20 x 12 work 2005 One owner home, 3BR/2BA split
shop, over 2000 Sq. Ft. living, floor plan, bonus room 8x22, stainless
Screen Porch. Asking $96,000 steel appliances. Asking: $340,000
MLS# 314348 MLS# 319844
To view pictures of homes visit www.debbiefields.com


C -Se,. .~a.
F~C t4~'~


HERNANDO - beautiful 3/2 on 1,17
acre fenced with storage shed.
$74,900 #319456


INVERNESS - awesome 2 story 32 x CITRUS HILLS - 3/2/2 split plan. 1
28 garage with gorgeous 2/2 mobile! acre. Great price!
$165,000 #317946 $179,900 #319056
At A*, .

,,.J 0. . ' ..


Our Team Serves Your Dream!
Keller Williams Realty of Citrus County
2008 Hwy 44 W Inverness. FL 34453
www.CitrusSold.com
352-637-2777 / 1-866-691-2777


FLORAL CITY - 2/2 with lots of
updates. 20,000 less than appraisal.
$109,900 #319487


PINE RIDGE - 3/2.5/3 caged pool
home. Former model. Many upgrades!
$399,000 #319921


lW ..- . ..' .._- -_ . ,
PINE RIDGE - 4/3.5/2 caged pool with
study & game rm. Entertainers delight.
$479,000 #319750 -


Your

SA+ -= Home
REALTOR� ACCREDITED SOLD!
STAGING
PROFESSIONAL*
Call Merry Teller 212-3329
j*Only 132ASP Realtors in Florida

- ERA American Realty
5 4511 N. LECANTO HWY. 491, BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465


STEAL THIS HAMPTON HILLS
POOL HOMEII HURRY
HURRYI ONLY $309,000111
Corporate owned. Appraised at
$375,000 in 7/06. Roof 2004. AC
replaced 2002. Beautiful. Great floor
plan. 3/2,2500 sq. ft. under heat & air.
One acre lot Gorgeous kitchen with
new maple cabinetry. Stainless steel
appliances. Large neutral tile
throughout home. Fam. room, LR.,
formal dining. HEATED POOL & SPA!!
MUST SEEI CALL ME! I live close by!


4 Asparagus Ct.
Sugarmill Woods
HARD TO PLEASE BUYERS WANTED
Perfect floorplan. Looks fabulous.
Great room with fireplace.
Professional home office. 3
Bedrooms. 3 Car garage. Heated
pool/spa.
Asking $259,900


-7re


U


Would you like to ow39n this home?

Would you like to own this home?


But don't think you can? Bad Credit?


Lease to own - a program to help
KEL wants to hi


make your dreams come true!!!


$1200* / month for over 3000 sq ft/ 4 bed 2 1/2 bath
Credit repair specialist
1 or 2 year lease-whatever YOU need we work around YOU
and when YOU are ready.


111hn D ?o s ?omffmoilr.ft yov nS-wer direarned posb&sis

BECOME A HOMEOW0NERY!!

L866-KEL-3308
SK E L C oiinap i, "Tr,,: p wr,, .:. iuir,- r.qur.x r ,rni p i. ,: all i. : "* . "


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SUNDAV SEPTEMBER-30 2007


.


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* 4 +


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY 'SEPTEMBER 30, 2007 19E


Money tips for the math-challenged


he only reason I never
failed a math class in high
school and college was
because I didn't take any courses
past the mandatory algebra and
geometry classes. Math makes my
skin crawl and my brain freeze.
Ask me to add the same column of
numbers three times, and I'll come
up with three different results.
And that's using a calculator.
To think that I have found my
life's work in personal finance is


downright comical given the fact
that money and math are pretty
much in the same category. The
only reason I can pull this off is
that I've discovered tricks for
understanding and using, very
complicated mathematical princi-
ples and rules. Here's one: the
rule of 72.
To make this rule useful, you
need to understand compounding
interest. It's a simple principle.
Let me show you.


Imagine you have $1,000 in the
'bank earning 5 percent interest,
compounded annually. That
means that at the end of the year,
the bank multiplies $1,000 by 5
percent. ($50) to determine the
amount of interest you have
earned on your $1,000.
What happens to that $50 is crit-
ical. If you take the $50 and spend
it on a new pair of shoes, you still
have $1,000 in the bank, and next
year you'll get another $50. You


are earning "simple interest."
However, if you leave that $50 in
your account, the balance
becomes $1,050. Now the interest
has compounded, or become pp r,
of the principal. Next'year, you
will earn 5 percent of $1,050
($52.50), bringing the balance to
$1,102.50. Do you see the principle
behind compounding interest?
If you sit back and allow the


Please see ' -/Page 24E


0 *gH H


Mary Hunt

Co :. -,, '& Mi l:,


7S4PS UNVE W PT


OPEN HOUSE 1-4 PM
231 ENTRY OAKS








20 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30. 2007 CTU ONI F)~IO1L


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Real Estate


i C.lassirieds


:.fif-

IMk


Classified


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fax: tg,801�, 01 Emall CfA f� 0 om�:I Vkb.
C." C". 2mo newc W.wWw brahlollowHrie can:
co Mobile Homes C= Mobile Homes Mobile Hornlass!" Mobile Homes. I C. bile HorriesJT Mobile Home, &.Mobile Homesic" tate
co for Rent c= for Rent citfor Sale j�air ad. Land 4;bb andland.... ch.in Park rc".n in Park,',
ar I- I
1 11, - - c=fbr R6nt


5 BDRM HUD $6;,500!
Only $298/mo! 5%/ dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
1BR Furn. Carpt Scrn
rm. $550: 1BR unfurn.
$400 1 BR RV furn $325.
No pets. 628-4441
3/2 $199/mo HUD Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
BANK FORECLOSURE
4BR,. $46,000. 2BR
$12,000. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5714
BEVERLY HILLS
Furnished,1 BR, IFull BA
Park Model, ncl. util. &
basic cable, $165. wk.
sec. dep (352)465-7233
CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR $475/mo incl cable,
1 BR mini $425/mo incl
electric & cable, 55+,
352-795-9049
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 $450; NO PETS!!
(352) 563-2293
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, $500. mo. + Dep.
No pets. (352) 795-0061
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2, nice lot, $700mo
No pets. 1st, last & Sec.
(352) 697-2432
HERNANDO 1/1
No smoke/pets, $475 +
Ist Ist. sec 352-746-6477
HERNANDO
12 X 60 unfurnished,
2/1hA, 4219 E. Lake Park
Dr. No Pets, ref. needed
$500 mo., $500. dep.
352- 795-9475/586-7540
HERNANDO
Inv. area. SW 2/2 Newly
dec. Priv pk. $550/mo.
1st, Ist, sec 813-468-0049
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA. No pets.
$500 (352) 628-4002
HOMOSASSA
2/2 CHA, No pets. $520
+ $520 (352) 621-3980
HOMOSASSA
Lg 3/1/2, strg bldg. Y2ac
$750mo (352) 560-3355
Homosassassa/Inglis
2/1 $450. C/H/A
352-563-0964
HUD HOMES! 4 BR
$366/mo. 5%down,
20yrs. 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5711
INVERNESS
2/1 Furn, nice quiet, no
pets, on canal $550/mo
Ist/Ist/sec 352-860-2452
INVERNESS
2/2, 14X20 rm. addition
,1st, last, sec. 637-3371


INVEKNESS
55+ Lakefront park
Exciting oppt'y, 1or 2BR
Mobiles for rent. Screen
porches, appl., water
incl. Fishing piers.
Beautiful trees
$350 and up.
Leeson's 352-476-4964




5 BDRM HUD $37,500!
Only $298/mol 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $199/mo HUD Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
BANK FORECLOSURE
4BR, $46,000. 2BR
$12,000. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5714
BUY AT INVOICE!
All 2007 Horton/Dynasty
Models @ Invoice.
Modular &
Manufactured.
New Cape Cod
Modular Was $163,900
NOW $148,900 Call us
@ Impressive Home
Builders (352) 746-5912
HUD HOMES! 4 BR
$366/mo. 5%down,
20yrs. 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5711
INVERNESS
55+ Lakefront park
Exciting oppt'y, 1or 2BR
Mobilesr.Scr porches,
apple , water incl. Fishing
piers. $7,000-$15,000.
Leeson's 352-476-4964
Lake Front
OPEN HOUSE 11 A - 3P,
8618 E. Gospel Is. Rd.
Lot 59, Beautiful DW,
2/2, on Lake Front Lot,
totally remodeled, scrn.
porch, lots of extras,
mostly furn., Sr. Park,
$50,000. (352) 560-7893
NEW CONDITION 4BR,
Paved Rd. Rockcrusher
area, F. Place, reduced
$78,900.(352) 621-9181
Cell (352) 302-7332

SUN COUNTRY
HOMES And
PALM HARBOR HOMES
Names you can Trust
for Manufactured,
Modular and
Two Story Homes
Save Thousands
GREAT Financing
Complete Set Up
Packages
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
ALL Sizes ALL Prices
1710 SSuncoast blvd.
352-794-7308


SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
NEW 5BR - 3 BTH
Large Designer
Kitchen, $73,900
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
ALL Sizes ALL Prices
1710 S Suncoast Blvd.
352-794-7308

VERY NICE RE-PO
2001 Homes of Merit,
Drywall finish,
All Ceramic tiled
floors, fireplace, black
appliances, W/D
Delivered & Set Up
$43,500.
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
1710 S Suncoast Blvd.
352-794-7308






I RENTAL FINDER
Swww.chronicle
rentalfinder.com
R= r =11 .. 1 . .11




3/2 Manu. Home
2003 on .44 Ac.
(352) 726-7533
www.Reliance-RE.com
Reliance Realty

3/2 SW on Two V2 AC
Lots. Scrn porch.
BY OWNER, $44,500
1592 S Lookout Pt
2 blocks off US19
352-503-4142


New kit & appli's. Cvrd
prch, huge inground
scrnd pool 2/2 ac. lot
w/fruit trees, 1600sf
wrkshp. Fenced. $179K.
Crawford 352-212-7613
4/2, 2280SF on 11/2AC
Pool, Trip. wd. HOLDER,
Horse Corral, Close to
bike/ horse trail. Many
upgrds, Scrn in sunrm.
$119,000. 352-522-1901
BUY OWNER+
2005 4/2 MFG Home,
2356SF, 2 wooded ac.
Many amenities!
$199,900/reas. offer
(727) 457-9567
By Owner, 2 V/ Acres,
2000, DW, 3/2,
Homes of Merrit
$120,000. obo
(352) 621-3974

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 SW on /2 Ac. Fl. Rm.,
Scrmnd Frnt Prch, 10 X 14
Wrkshp, Roof-over,
3010 Deerhaven. $46K
obo (813) 792-1355

CRYSTAL RIVER 5/2
Bonus room, FP, wood
floors & tile, V2" drywall
thruout, 9x42 scrn,
country prch. on 1 ac.
$115,000 (352) 200-8897

HERNANDO
2/1 '/ 2 scrn. porches, 1
wood deck, all new in-
side, Quick sale $43,900.
at 3199E. Buffalo Ln.
West side of Hwy 200
INVERNESS
Huge Dbl Wide, 1,968'
under roof, 1295 S
Golddust Ter. $69.900.
Day 344-3444
Evening 344-3084


strg bldg. /2ac, fenced.
Concrete drv, above
grnd pool, $69,900.
Owner fin. w/15% down
(352) 560-3355

LAND & HOME
2 Acre Lot
with 2085 sq. ft.,
3/2 NEW HOME
Garage, Concrete
driveway & walkways,
Carport. Beautiful
Must See 10% down
No closing cost
$848.90/mo
WAC
Call 352-621-9182

LAND & HOME
Move In Now!!
5 HOMES
For Sale from
$79,900. to$149.900
Ist time homebuyers
program. Must have
no collections or judge-
ments, no bade credit.
CALL 352-621-9181

NEW JACOBSEN
2008 MODEL
28 X 48, 3/2, 2 x 6 con-
struction 18" ceramic
tile, 30-19-11 insulation
$10,000 in upgrade
options, buy for only
$49,900. delivered
& set up on your lot
352-621-3807

No Money Down!
FHA
Land & Home
3/2 on Fenced 1/2 Acre
Deck, Nice Trees
and Quiet
Only $769.90/mo. P & I
WAC
Call 352-621-9183


4 NEW MODELS
Excellent Amenities
Gated Community
5 * , 55+
RESALES
$64,900.-$100,000.
Phone 352-795-7161

2006 DW IN INVERNESS
55+ park. 2/2 strge
shed. C/H/A, Furnished,
Incl. all appliances. Like
new cond. $75,000
352-344-1002 or
207-732-3743

2007, 3/2, 1,056 SF.
Lg. Screen Rm.
Decorative Drive-Way
Painting.Private Setting.
Low Lot Rent. $65,900
(352) 422-2187
3/2 $199/mo HUD Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
BIG PINE ACRES, 55+
Pool, 2/1/Carport
Screened Porch, Shed,
2 ACs, W/D, Sm. Pet OK,
$8,800 obo
(352) 212-6706
CRYSTAL RIVER VILLAGE
Fully furnished, 2/2
dollhouse, must see.
Large double carport,
REDUCED $75,000.
(352) 795-6895
Inverness Sr. Park
Nice Mobile. 2/1, liv.
rm., din. rm., kit., nice
scrn porch, part. furn.
$9,000. (352) 419-4200

SINGING FORREST
14 X 64, 2/2, furn. like a
model home. New
lanai, roofover, Fl. rm.,
carport. $149 Lot rent.
$38K (352) 726-2446


2/2/2 DW, New items:
Ceramic Tile, Carpet,
2 decks, Sunporch,
Bathrm fixtures, appli's
Move in cond. on
Lakeside (352) 634-4360
WALDEN WOODS
55+ park, 2yrs. old, DW
2/2, carport, porch, until
shed, Exc. cond.
$58,000. (352) 697-2779




CHASSAHOWITZKA
Waterfront Doublewides
2/2 Dixie Crt $155,0000
2/2 Bounty Crt $159,000
2/2 Peacock $165,000.
3/2 McClung Lp$169900
Houses
2/1 Tropical Ln, $89,500
3/1 Tropical Ln, $99,000
Owner Finon.10% Down
Or Rent 2/2's @ $600 mo
Onr/Agnt 352-382-1000
CHASSAHOWI1ZKA
Waterfront Doublewides
2/2 Dixie Crt $155,000
2/2 Bounty Crt $159,000
2/2 Peacock $165,000.
3/2 McClung Lp$169900
Houses
2/1 Tropical Ln, $89,500
3/1 Tropical Ln, $99,000
Owner Finan.10% Down
Or Rent 2/2's @ $600 mo
Onr/Agnt 352-382-1000

RENTE7AL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com


'Your world first.
Ei er) Da).

CHRO Cl)\ T


KENSINGTON ESTATES
243 E. Lancaster St.
- $875-

3/2/2- 55eW.Cisco St.
---$800 --
BEVERLY HILLS
I/I- 8 Plaza St.- $500
CITRUS SPRINGS
Variety of 3 & 4
bedroom homes
3/2/2 starting at $800 -
4/2/2 Brand New
starting at $975 -
INVERNESS
3321 Anderson St. $B50 -
3/2/2/1- 1045 N.FitzpatrickAve.
--$950--
2/1/I-Waterfront
1220 Mossy Oak Dr. $725 -
HERNANDO
2/1- Mobile home w/bonus
room
2820 N. Lakefront Dr. $475 -
2/2-Waterfront
5877 N.Whisper Pt. $75 -
Inventory Changes
Daily. Call For
Updated Rentals



r ---
RENTAL FINDER
Swww.chronicle
rentalfinder.com



SUGARMILL WOODS
$850 W/Lown SVC, 6 Irg
Rms, Gr Cond. Pets Ok,
VeryPrvt.352-634-4921


�- A

. * t..* . PUT YOUR BUSINESS HERE. t11,, anr, ...:r on
CITRUS COUNTY BAR FOR SALE .'.ir, -4 i-, i . ' r, , .,r r:: .i .i .- . :.r'. , J' . 'I.:.r r.:, 1.1 H.., 1,
I0 :,IuIi. . - r ull 6d ur. -*. ai-e .:.l |..T| pr.:. - ri r, , - r. r -an r:.- 1 Ih., r . 3 .a F. . .r C.u-.r..- 5 .*3|..4:r
Vi& t l.IT, h .r ll.. . : , ir.fi .. 5 1 ,7 5 0 ,0 0 0 U.l L S : -19 :. , 'F..:.1, T I7 rn,:.,1 r,d rI , : ,,,.: .:.,,- Ir,:.. , ir, t.,llt:. r, .:.r,
Call 795-0784 and ask for Cindy or Lisa Tr,.- .:.:,rr,-r ,,:.r,.-,C , 1 5S495,000 r.L ., s" l .," 1


2 . -

IA


Cimus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




. , e


(O -- CriNTY FI CHRONCLiE


SUNDA-Y, SiiPIEMBFR 0 O, 2007 21E


AVAI1ABLEI~TA

Septmbe 29 , 207
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Bed 1 BathhApts. $550-$600
2r2 WF Fumished Condo $1200
2/1 Furnished $1100
2/2 WF Furnished Home $1550
1 Bedroom/I Bath $600
2/1 House $575
cmus SPRINGS
3Bed, 2 Bath New Home $900
2/2 Home $800
HOMOSASSA
2/2 Home Sugarmill Woods $795
3/2/2 New Home S rmill Woods $1200
412 Mobl. R.om. $775
3/2 Meadows $850
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 UnTumished $595
Stor..ge U.nit
12x12x20 $100.70 per no.
See additional rentals at



Lileli :il il


RESIDENTIAL:
BEVIERLY HILLS
2/1 ........................ $625/MO
Z/2/Z, FURN. L 1nL INC..$1250/MO
2/ ... ........................ $625/M O
2/1 ............................. $600/M O
ROCK CRUSHER
4/2.5/2..................... S:L250/MO
YSTL RIVE
2/2. D/W. /F F ONO$O0/MO
2/1.5/1, FURN .......... $1150/MO
3/2, DW ..................... $650/MO
I/I, S/W ...................$450/MO
312. W/F . O/MO
2/2, S/W ................... $550/MO
INVERNESS
//2, W/F OOL.. $1200/MO
2/ 1 1/ W/F ................ $9 /MO





3o t
SUGABMIILL WOODS
3/21 . $180 /Mo



CRYSTAL RIVER


-T, in n ... .
54 5. c. ... .........
4/2 NEW . . ................... ................ $1100
HOMOSASSA








",/ / - lar., am M rm ,





s17er st $ ta Ria.
CI I ...T.U.. S I lllN l















(5 5PN er 80 7565
67 u con cek � eta $ 0
- - i .. . H . , ,- ,





B vEIR Y HILL S











CA l~ftMLL 813-94-7762
245 -W,.,,,, . .. i-eyoc s , -, -;1
4/J Extr Large ...-.-................ ...� �.� S11OO






2/ /Polslari heater



26 S, Osceola St $00 0
2/1 /et 1, fuiied n ed rna vilePy c l., i
















aorwnrl mairnt
www.Citmsounaty myntrm.,






26 S. Joeff lonrsoSt $650
2/1.75 o, L so& am Rm, She d
2564 . Osrceofl P1 ...... $8700
3/2/21/it , feus&odn . ryms.,
225 W. Devon SDl....... $675
2/1/1 Polvn &oa lmielym,
26 SC. PoaSt......$0
524 S. Jeffeson St ........$675

2/1.5,Liv & Fam. Rm., Shed
CITRUS SPRINGS
5964 N. SummerfieldPI.$800
3/2/2 Liv., faro. & din. rms.
2252 W. Devon Dr.....$650
2/2, Screened patio, shed
6718 N. Nantucket Way. $900
3/2/2, new home, new appisI




SUGARMILL WOODS
BRAND NEW 4BR/2B
HOME
$1000 MTH + DEP.
CALL 813-994-7762

(I tI I , ,IOI I '
You/ world d firs,.
Li -i( x Do v

(Cn ),, l(-.E


Property
Management &
Investment
Group, Inc.
Licensed R.E. Broker
> Property & Comm.
Assoc. Mgmt. is our
only Business
>� Res.& Vac.
Rental Specialists
O� Condo & Home
owner Assoc, Mgmt.
Robbie Anderson
LCAM, Realtor
352-628-5600
Info@oropertv
manaamentaroup.
corn





CRYSTAL RIVER
Condo. Unique 1/1.5 on
the water. Furn., $900.
no pets. (352) 302-5972
CRYSTAL RIVER
Newly Renovated
1 bedroom efficiencies
w/fully equip, kitchens.
No contracts
necessary. Next to
park/ Kings Bay
Starting @ $35
a day for a week or
more. (Includes all
utilities & Full Service
Housekeeping)
(352) 586-1813
CRYSTAL RIVER
NICELY FURNISHED 1/1
Great neighborhood.
No pets. 7 months
minimum. 352-795-7261
FLORAL CITY
Lakefront IBR, Wkly/Mo
No Pets. (352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1/1, sec. quiet, clean
No smoke/ Pets, $600.
352-220-9063
HOMOSASSA Canal
1 BR w/boat dock, scm.
porch, util. incl. $700/
mo.+ sec.(352)628-6537




3/2/2 Rent-to-Own
New Home Citrus Spgs.
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (407) 227-2821
CRYS. RIVER
2/11/2, 838 5th NE Ave.
Nice, CH/A $600./mo +
Sec. (727) 341-2955,
(727) 455-8998
Crystal Palms Apts.
1 & 2 BEDROOM
Crystal River.634-0595
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 BR, laundry/premises,
$500 mo.+ sec. deposit,
352-465-2985

CRYSTAL RIVER
Seven Rivers Apts.
1 & 2 bedrooms,
clean, quiet. Close to
mall & hospital.
Complete laundry
facilities,
No application fees.
(352) 795-1588
Equal Housing
Opportunity

INVERNESS
1/1, Water &Trash incl.
$500. mo. 352-726-3849


INVERNESS
2 BR, W & D. Hkup,
close to hospital,
$525. mo. first Ist, Sec.
(352) 212-6002
INVERNESS 2/1
$575mo. $862 sec. Call
9am-6pm 352-341-4379
INVERNESS
2/1 No Pets. Scrnd, Prch
320 Davidson Ave.
$525/mo. + $500 dep.
352-860-2026
INVERNESS 2/1
W/D, quiet, no smoking
/pets. $575/mo. Ist/last/
sec. (352) 212-4661
INVERNESS
2/1, water, trash, incl.
$595,, 1st & Sec. Dep.
Req. (352) 860-2262
INVERNESS
2BR, Washer/Dryer
Corner 581 & Anna Jo,
No Pets, No smoking,
$600./mo, 1 yr. lease,
credit check req'd.
ALL CITRUS REALTY INC.
(352) 726-2471
INVERNESS
Large 2/1, CHA, w/d
hook-up Garage acre.
Private Spotless $695.
3575A E. Theresa Ln,
352-422-3217
INVERNESS, 2nd Fir.
Near hospital & dwntn.
2/1 Comp. remod. &
spacious, all apple. inc.
Prvt. parking & ent.
$1,075/ mo. 1st/Ist/$500
sec. No smoking/pets.
(352) 726-8512 x. 2808
LECANTO
1 Bedroom Apartment
352-613-2989/746-5238






APARTMENTS FOR RENT
2/1 Duplex $600 moves you in!
Inc. washer & dryer hookup,
water, trash pickup
Call Nancy atAction Rental
Management Realty, Inc.
417 NE 2nd St, Crystal River, FL
(352) 795-RENT
www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com


APARTMENTS FOR RENT
Crystal River

Centrally action mental
417NE 2nd SLt, Crystal River, FL
www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com

Crystal Palms Apts.
Crystal River. 634-0595






Eo Rent. 700 st.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Centrally located,
Professional Office
For Rent. 700 sf.
352-563-2550

CRYSTAL RIVER
OFFICE SPACE
Near hotel/resort
within high profile
established Real Estate
Co. Great Location!
Brk/ownr352-422-7925


Lecanto Tree Tops
Plaza, 1661, W. Hwy 44
Retail-Office-Storage
1,000 to 1,125 sq. ft,
Store front/ Warehouse
$800. mo. 954-609-2780

LOCATION 9
IS EVERYTHING!
I Now Leasing
Office/Retail
@I Colonial Plaza
Hwy 44 Inverness
See by Appt,.
352-344-1888





CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Beautifully turn.
$850/Annual or $1,200/
Seasonal, $114K Sale
352-726-7543/201-0991
CITRUS HILLS 2/2
Greenbriar /l,st fIr, turn.
Near pool. $113,500
$1,000mo. 352-249-3155
CITRUS HILLS
2/2, den, Fully furn.
W/D, $800/mo.,1st/Ist/
sec. (352) 344-4464

INVERNESS 2/2
W/D, New carpet,
appl.'s, comm, pool.
garb, incl. $750.mo.
1st, Ist. $500. sec.
(352) 746-4611

INVERNESS
3/2, heated pool,
covered dish dinners.
W/D Rm. Ist/Ist/sec.
$595/mo. Avail. Immed.
(352) 637-5200
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, Completely furn,
$850. mo,, - Year Lease
$1,600.- seasonal all util.
3 mo. min. 352 746-4611
SUGARMILL WOODS
Villa 2/2 on Glf Crs.
Very clean, W/D.
Unfurn, $795mo. 1st,
Ist+sec 352-382-5040




CITRUS SPRINGS
New, 2/2, all apple ,
W/D $650.-$700.
(954) 557-6211
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 & 3/2 Clean $625-
$650/mo. 352-228-0525
INVERNESS
1/1 Avail. Immed.
W/D hk-up. Comm. Ctr.
1st/isft$300sec $445/mo.
(352) 637-5200
INVERNESS
1/1 w/scrnd prch.
Remod. Near dwntwn.
$550/mo. 274-1594
INVERNESS
2/1, $550, mo.,
No pets, 1st, last +sec,
352-344-8389, 860-2418
INVERNESS
2/1, CHA, w/d hu. Grg.
Very Lg, ac. Priv. Sptlss
$695. 352-422-3217

LECANTO 2/2/1
New Unit! Fully furn.,
Short term lease
excepted $900. mo.
352-344-2155 ext. 305


INVERNESS, Ist Fir.
Near hospital & dwntn.
Comp. remod., W/D
stack, util. incl. (except
phone & cable) $585/
mo. Ist/lst/$500 sec.
No smoking/pets.
(352) 726-8512 x. 2808





2 GREAT LOCATIONS
Lg. 2/2/1 Ing. Pool, Lg.
2/1/1. BOTH: Fl. rms.
spotless. Lots of xtras.
Furn/unt352-302-1370
5 BDRM HUD $37,500!
Only $298/mo! 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $199/mo HUD Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
BANK FORECLOSURE
4BR, $46,000. 2BR
$12,000. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5714
CRYS RIVER 3/2/2
Pool, Lease/OTB. $1300
Avail 10/1 352-563-9913
CRYSTAL RIVER
Very priv, 3/2. 7 Rivers
Golf Crs. area. Please
call 352-257-1034
HOMOSASSA
Rent to Own, Brand
New 3/2/2, $800/mo
3844 S. Swan Terrace
(813) 781-5252
HUD HOMES! 4 BR
$366/mo. 5%down,
20yrs. 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5711

RENTAL FINDER
I www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com
**--- - -- E
Rentals COUNTYWIDE!
GREAT AMERICAN
REALTY
Call:352-422-6129
or see ALL at
www.chooseaar.com
SEVERAL HOMES AVAIL
From $600-$950/mo
Move in now!
352-601-4582
Sugarmill Woods
Brand New Sweetwater
Custom. 3/2/2 + Den.
2,400 SF., Upgraded.
$1,600 (352) 634-0127
SUGARMILL WOODS
Spacious New Home!
4/2/2 Scn. lanai, DR,
No smoking; Sm. pet
okay, Ref., $975,/ mo.
Ready NOW,
(386) 569-6777




5 BDRM HUD $37,500!
Only $298/mo! 5% dwn.
20yrs. al 8% For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $199/mo HUD Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr, For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
BANK FORECLOSURE
4BR, $46,000. 2BR
$12,000. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5714
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5,Garb.,H20,cable,el
ec. $1,100/MO.
(352) 527-0260


Citrus Ridge Realty 3521 N. Lecanto Hwy., Bever�y Hills, FL 34465 , .1-888-789,7100]


FLORAL CITY
Lovely 3/2, C/A, W/D,
scrn porch,lown care
ncl., bike trl. $1100.
352-726-0793

HOMAS. 2/1, MH Util.
incl. Nice clean, quiet
park. short/long term.
$695 (352) 628-9759

HUD HOMES! 4 BR
$366/mo. 5%down,
20yrs. 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5711

INVERNESS
2/112/1 Clean, W/D HU,
CHA $650; 4/2/2 3500sf
NEW, Lawn/grbg incl
$1400; (352) 464-4211

LECANTO 3/2/2
Upscale, furn./unfurn on
2'/2 park like Ac's, $1,000
FURN. APT. 2/1
CRYS. RVR $500.
(352) 795-2204


SUGARMILL WOODS
2/2/2 +Lanai, cul de
sac, turn, 1600 sq.ft.
$1,100mo + util. Owner/
agent Short or long
term. (727) 804-9772




2 Great Renter Rewards
Low Move In, Last Week
RENT FREE! HOMOSASSA
2/1/1 Refurnished $625
3/2/2 Meadows $725
2/2/1/2 SMW Villa $795
2/2 SMW Condo $795
River Links Realty
628-1616/800-488-5184
3/2/2 Rent-to-Own
New Home Citrus Spgs.
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (407) 227-2821
w BETTER THAN RENT
or RENT TO OWN
NO CREDIT CHECK!!
352-484-0866
jademission.com


3/2/2 BRAND NEW
homes starting @
$800/month, Many
homes pet friendly.
aAction Prop
Mgt-LicRE Broker
386-931-6607 or
866-220-1146
www.CitrusSrins
Rental.net
BEV. HILLS 1/1/1
Fam. Rm.2 E. Golden St.
$600/mo IST/LAST/SEC.
(352) 795-8888
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $675. mo. corner
lot, C/AC 352-422-0058
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, Fam. rm. scrn.por
32 N. DeSoto, $625/mo.
2/1/1, 28 N. Barbour
$600. (352) 249-3228


Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated

J. W. MORiON REAL ESTATE, INC.
Property Management
1645 W. Main Street 1
Inverness, FL 34450
(352) 726-9010






INVERNESS
NEW PAINT, NEW CARPET, 2 bedroom, 1 bath apartments
conveniently located ............................................... $550
2 bedroom, 2 bath condo off of Gospel Island Rd. New paint,
new carpet ............................ ............................ $650
2 bedroom, 2 full baths, garage, corner lot ................. $675
Sunroom with French doors off the Master bedroom, 2nd
bed and bath on other side of house, washer/dryer
included, 1 car garage ............................................ $750
Spacious 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car garage,
fenced yard ........................................ $750

PRICE REDUCED
Large corner lot, very roomy 2 bedroom, 2 bath,
2 car garage home ........................ ................... $750
Great location 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, new paint,
new carpet, new appliances, fenced backyard ......... $850
3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage home ...................... $875
Tile floor, new paint, 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
2 car garage hom e ............................ .................. $895
Roomy 1 bedroom, 1 bath apartments ....................... $475

Nice 2 bedroom, 2 bath, new paint, nice yard ............ $650

BRAND NEW VILLAS FROM $775 TO $875

PRITCHARD ISLAND
2 bedroom, 2 bath, screen room, upstairs sitting room,
com m unity pool.......................... ......................... $750

STORAGE UNITS:
$50 Security Deposit.
$84.80 per month includes tax.

COMMERCIAL OFFICE SPACE

Norvell Bryant Hwy, 2 units, 800 sq. ft.,
Professional Office Space on Zephyr St., 1800 sq. ft.
Hwy 44 Commercial Spaces
Floral City Commercial Garage Space Available
Executive Office Space Close to Post Office


7252 Home Finder* *Home Finder* *Home Finder*


w ' .47252B608u I.co m


GouNTY (F CHRONICLE


I







2-2E SUNDAY, SEPTEMBUR 30, 2007


BEVERLY HILLS
10 N.Desoto 2/1
$650.mo
8 N.Fillmore 1/1
$625.mo
CRYSTAL RIVER
9 N.Candle 2/1
$550.mo
INVERNESS
237 N.Croft 2/2
$750.mo
352-637-2973
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, Int. redone. I.E.
new carpet+, Fl. Rm,
$600/mo.; 1st+ Sec.
(352) 527-7842 Jennifer
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1CG+ fm.rm.,
LARGE, CHA $675 +
$1,000. dep. 795-1722
BEVERLY HILLS
2Br/2Ba/Gar + xtra rm
Newer side of town. Very
clean. New Tile/Fresh
paint I/S+out. 4 SJ Kellner
$725/mo 352-302-4006
BEVERLY HILLS
3 BR I1'2B, IGar., fncd
yd., $650. mo. &
3 BR, 2B, Den, $700.
mo.+ deposits,
352-795-8770/563-0964
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2, CHA, Fam. Rm.,
new apple, Reduced
price $725 + Dep. No
pets. 23 N. Wadsworth
Ave. (813) 205-8705
(352) 794-0211
BEVERLY HILLS
Cozy 2/1, quiet
cul-de-sac.Over-
looking pond. $625/mo.
(352) 257-9378
BEVERLY HILLS
Good Tenants
Lg. 2/1, Tiled Fl. Rm.,
$695. mo., 352-527-7119
BEVERLY HILLS
Very clean 3/2 children
OK. $745, 1st, last, sec.
352-400-1501 527-2888
BEVERLY HILS
FIRST MO. FREE! 2/1 w/
Fl. Rm. CHA, new appl.
$725 352-422-7794
CITRUS HILLS
3/2/2 w/pool. Pets OK
$1,250mo 352-860-1245
(954) 600-9395
CITRUS HILLS
Pool, 671 Olympia 3/2/2
10/31. $1175. 563-4169
CITRUS HILLS/HERN.
3/2/2 home on '2 Ac.
on CH G.C. Rent to
own poss. $850/mo.
dep., first & lt. Myriam
(352) 613-2644
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/1, $725/mo
2/2/1, $725. mo
INVERNESS 2/1/1 $700
401-692-6966
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/1, w/ Big caged,.
inground Pool $795. mo.
(352) 586-4105
CITRUS SPRINGS
Many Available
$875, mo. 2 -4 wks
FREE Rent if Qualify.
(352) 795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investment LLC
CITRUS SPRINGS
New 2/2/1,tile firs, space
kit., din., scrn. porch,
$725.mo. 352-465-7563
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/1, tam. rm., water,
gar. & pest, ncl. $800.
+ sec. (352) 464-2716
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 Near hosp. $750
(727) 631-2680
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $850/mo
352-795-6299/697-1240
CRYSTAL RIVER
4/2, $825/mo. + $1000
dep, ,Nc pts:. 795-62 �.


CRYSTAL RIVER
4/2/1, 2,400 sf., fncd.
yrd. Centrally located
off Hwy 44. Avail. Oct. 1
$1,000 mo Call Alan
(352) 584-1584
CRYSTAL RIVER
Connell Hghts. 3/2/1 1/2
Scrn Rm, fncd bkyard.
$850+1st, Ist, sec.
(352) 302-6025
CRYSTAL RVR 4/2/2
Pool, 7 Rvr, G.C. $1,550.
mo. (813) 299-9959
DUN/Rainbw Spg
REDUCED $150!i
Rent-Buy-Lease Opt.
Lg. exec. styled 2/2/2
Treed /2 Ac. G-course
view. Lg. FP Spotless!
$895. 352-527-3953
352-427-7644
FLORAL CITY S.
2 OR 3/1, New appl.
Real Nice! $750/mo
1 st/last/$600 dep.
352-637-0475/400-1438





Forest Ridge Village
2/2/2 $825.00
Please Call:
(352) 341-3330
For more info. or
visit the web at:
citrusvillaaes
rentaLscom
HIGHLANDS
2/1/1 + scrn. rm. Beaut.
Pool/Yd. $825. 464-2825
HOMOSASSA 2/1
CHA, No pets $575.
Ist/lost/sec 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
2/1/2 $650 1st & Sec.
Tiled, W/D HU Screen
area. Meadows Deed
Rest. Comm. Credit/
Ref. No Pets. (Sec 8 OK)
352-686-0539
HOMOSASSA
2/2/2 homes only area,
new air & apple's. $825m
Must See. 352-628-7526
HOMOSASSA 3/2
Country Home. FP,
water & sewage.
$950/mo, negot.
(352) 628-5752
HOMOSASSA
3/2 Pool Home, SMW
$1,190., 614-598-1888
HOMOSASSA
Fresh 3/2/den,. Shed
$850/mo (352) 302-4057
Homosassa Springs
WOW! 2/2 CHA, Fncd
yard. 2 lots. Near
shopping; $750/mo.
(352) 302-3319 Iv. msg.
INVERNESS
2/1 Downtown $595
(352) 341-3131
INVERNESS 2/2/1
Highlands, scrn porch,
$700/mo (813) 973-7237
INVERNESS
2/2/2 Detached home,
Royal Oaks upgrades.
Club house/pool/lawn.
serv. $850/mo. incl.
Cable & water. Avail
11/5 (949) 633-5633
INVERNESS
2/2/2, Fl. Rm. appli's
Highlands W. $750/mo
352-860-0464
INVERNESS
3/2 House $795/mo.
3/2 Condo $795/mo.
(352) 341-3131
INVERNESS 3/2/2
Lake Area, $820/mo.
(352) 341-1142
INVERNESS
Modern clean 2 /1.
Fenced backyard
-carport $625. mo. 1st/
last/sec. Some pets ok.
352-302-3046


INVERNESS
55+ Lakefront park
Exciting oppt'y, lor 2BR
Mobiles for rent. Screen
porches, appl., water
inc. Fishing piers
Beautiful trees. $350
and up. Leeson's
352-476-4964

INVERNESS
Pool, Spacious 3/2/2,
1 acie. No Pets $1,000.
mo. 908-322-6529

INVERNESS
Rent/Ls. Option. 2/2/2
Sm. Office/3rd Bed.
$800/mo.+ F/L/$500
352-422-3571/464-5640
LECANTO
3/2, remodel, kit., 28 x
18 scrn rm., $850 mo. +
sec. (352) 746-5693
PINE RIDGE
3/3/2 Pool Home, 1 ac.
Owner agent, $1200/
mo. 212-5913/ 527-2486




INVERNESS
Cute 2/1 Canal 715 S
Marlene Pt $650 F/S refs
(352) 243 5589





CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, fully turn, floating
dock, boathouse, no
bridges, minutes to
Gulf, $850 wk, $2500
month, includes utilities.
Call 352-266-1346
CRYSTAL RIVER
Condo. Unique 1/1.5 on
the water. Furn., $900.
no pets. (352) 302-5972
CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/2 condo.
Beautiful waterfront
view w/dock. Recently
updated, partially
furnished. Pool, tennis
cts., cable TV. $900/mo
(414) 690-6337
HOMOSASSA
10085 Halls River. 2/2
w/pool, lanai, FR,
office, dock $1,400 mo.
(352) 527-9733
HOMOSASSA
Riverfront 2/2, Stilt
AC, (813) 312-9076
INVERNESS, 3/2
1 acre, dock, clean
$850 (352) 586-1505




3/2/2 Rent-to-Own
New Home Citrus Spgs.
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (407) 227-2821
Bev. Hills, Seller Finan.
2 to choose from EZ
terms, "0" DP, Starting at
$85.K 352-201-0658

FISHING IN FRONT
YARD
3/2 ON 10.8 Acres!!
Detached 14.X 28
office, pool, fncd., pond,
$325K Ownr. Finan.
(352)621-3135
*
INVERNESS
2/2 CONDO $94,000
OR $650/MO + deposit.
(352) 461-6973

Rent or Rent to Own
Many Good Deals wait
for you! Get yours now
while $$ are lowlGwen
Cridland & Cridland
(352) 220 -40 1


SALE OR RENT
SMW OAK VLG. SOUTH
Very Nice, near new.
3BR+ Den or 4 BR
$186K or $1000-1500/mo
Furnished or Unfurn.
(813)781-1341




BEVERLY HILLS
Room For Rent
325-270-8162
CRYSTAL RIVER
$350, Share elec.
No smoking/drugs.
(352) 634-0708
HOMOSASSA
Own entr. $350,1st dep.
Incl. until. (352) 860-1426
INVERNESS
Pool, washer/dryer,
$125 wk, $100 dep. Refs.
(352) 726-7753





CONDOS, HOUSES
SEAS, MONTHLY
Furn & Unfurn.
Heated pool.AII
new!! 352-302-1370
L-- -iiiiii mi
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5,Garb.,H20,cable ,el
ec. $1,100/MO.
(352) 527-0260
FLORAL CITY
2/2 Mobile home, Scr
porch, nice lot, no pets,
no smoking. Long or
Short Term352-344-8213
FURN. Villas Condos
Waterfrnt & Pool Homes.
Crys. River - Homosassa
River Links Realty
628-1616/800-488-5184
Hernando/Ocala
2/2/1, Near Lake, $800,
+ sec. (352) 634-6340
HOMAS. 2/1, MH Util.
incl. Nice clean, quiet
park. short/long term.
$695 (352) 628-9759
INGLIS 5/2 +DEN
10.59 acres, wrkshp.
$1,800/mo.
Broker/owner
352-422-7925
WATERFRONT 2/2
Crystal River Condo
Furn. $1600/mo
See it now at
www.vrbo.com #126616
Broker/Owner
352-422-7925




CONDOS, HOUSES
SEAS, MONTHLY
Furn & Unfurn.
Heated pool.AII
new!! 352-302-1370

RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com










Your World

04 9--ie zeli-


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention, to make
such preference, limi-
tation or discrimina-
tion." Familial status
includes children un-
der the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby Informed that
all dwellings
advertised in this
newspaper are avail-
able on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



.. . . ,


MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY









ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM


Real Estate Auction
Oct. 4 @ 11am
3/2 Manu. Home
(352) 726-7533
www.Reliance-RE.com
Reliance Realty





Every Sunday 11 -2
Price Reduced Again
$485k 5/4'A/3
3645 W. Brazilnut Road
Go to www.lcpi.com\fl
Fri., Sat., Sun. 1-5
Cute Ocala home
3/2,2.36 Ac. $169K
2510 SW 48th St.
Ocala, FL
OPEN HOUSE
Sat/Sun Sept. 29 & 30
10- 3pm.
NEW! Construction
2111 W. Linden Dr.
Citrus Springs
$139,900 3/2/2
1900 + Total Sq./Ft.
David (813) 966-1846


SSunday, I - 4
3186/ W. Birds


* 352-586-1558 1

OPEN SUNDAY 1-4
5 DONNA ST.
BEST VALUE IN BEVERLY
HILLS $75,900 1/1/Crprt
Ig. fam rm.352-212-9783





COMMERCIAL LOANS
Prime, Sub-Prime, Hard
Money. REHAB, Private.
Also, equip, loans.
Mark (352) 422-1284


.CN UTO HA BEUN


AT MEADOWCREST
Please pardon our dust as we build Crystal
River's premier Resort-Style Community.
Our sales center will remain open daily.
1875 N. Macvicar Road
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-563-5657
www.mysummerhill.com

'-'7 F _- -** - . 3.. _


CRYSTAL RIVER
2,300 sf. Zoned GNC,
4/2/1(AC garage), 2 Liv.
Areas. Perfect for sm.
business/live-in
residence: Drs,
Real Estate, etc,
$1,500 Contact Alan
(352) 584-1584
HERNANDO
Office & storage space
for rent. (352) 637-1739




3/2 CB House + Duplex
Crystal River. Great
Shapel $189,900
352-427-5574
FIX ME UP! $72K
4/2 SFH Block .
Must Sell for CASH!
John (352) 228-7523
INVESTORS
Palm Harbor Modular
Homes from $53 sf,
Finished on your lot.
3 Color brochures.
Call John Lyons
863-860-3062





$139,900 W/100% FIN.
AVAIL. New const 3/2/2
1344sfia, Kit w/brkfst bar
Util. rm.On bike trl, near
School. 8115 N Merri-
mac Way. Call Gerry
Realtor (352)816-0010
2/1 CB, Great Starter or
Invest, home. New
Carp. fresh paint, New
Cabs.New appl.Ready
to move in! Must Sell!
$79,900 352-613-2855
3/2/2 Rent-to-Own
New Home Citrus Spgs.
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (407) 227-2821
3/2/2 CITRUS SPRINGS
AREA. New Home
under construction.
Can move in within 90
days. Pick your own
colors. For more info.
Call Pastore Custom
Bldrs. (352) 684-1500
Lic. # CRC057945
3/2/2 HOME
Built 2005. Priv fence,
scr porch, upgraded
kit. 7955 N. Galena Ave.
$155,00 or OBO.
352-302-3103
LOOK NO MORE!
A Fantastic Value!
Reduced to $144,900.
2/2/2 Fam. Rm, DR, LR,
hardwd firs. Ready to
move in! Must see!
Call 352-464-2094


M-N











Citrus Springs





S129,900
REDUCED FOR QUICK SALE
ONLY ONE HOME LEFT!!
U.S. 41 2.5 mi. N of SR
491, East on Country
Club Blvd., Quick right
on Quarry Dr., Left on
Owen Way, Right to
8928 N. Spikes Way
www.peterpav.com
PETER PAV
1-800-780-7409 J

BEING TRANSFERRED
MUST SELL!
3/2/2, Cathedral
ceiling, open floor plan
on 13th hole. Split plan,
W/I closet. Fncd. yrd,
sprinkler, Ig. srnd. Fl. Rm.
Below mrkt @ $220K
(352) 489-1055

CITRUS SPRINGS
Lease to Own in CS
3/2/2 w/appl. 1500sf
Up to 4/2.5/2 w/appl.
2700sf. Prices range
from $850-$1200 mo
15 in stock just waiting
for your Furnishings!
Call KEL Homes @
352-527-0726 today







PRICED TO SELL NOW!
Beau. Mercedes 3/2/2
Built '06. Lg corner lot,
2000sf Upgrades -
Appliances Near trail,
$162,900 (727) 793-4948


STILT HOMES
Molular Stilt Homes
140 mph. zoning.
We build, sell,.deliver
We do it all!
Eliminate builder
mark-up. Call the
factory. John Lyons
800-622-2832 xt. 210


� �










CARTER STREET APARTMENTS
CONVENIENTLY LOCATED IN INVERNESS
NEWLY PAINTED AND CARPETED
1 AND 2 BEDROOM UNITS
STARTING AT $475.00
J. W. MORTON REAL ESTATE, INC.
Property Management
1645 W. Main St., inverness, FL 34450
SEf i In(352) 726-9010 nt
Each Office t� independently Owned and Operatred


Crmus Coumry (FI,) CiiRoNicv..,





. 8 *


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007 23E


nme

3/2/2 POOL HOME
2237 sq.ft living space.
Backs to Black
Diamond 3186 W Birds
Nest Dr. MLS#315839
352-586-1558 CALL
NOW! $289,700
3/3/2 POOL HOME
lac. Shed w/elec.
$189,777. Owner/agent
Brian Murray,
Remax Realty One
352-212-5913
BETTY MORTON







:-4

Lic. Real Estate Agent
20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

Reaityl'ect

(352) 795-1555
Every Sunday 11-2
Price Reduced Again
$485k 5/41/2/3
3645 W. Brazilnut Road
Go to www.Icpi,com\fl
MOVING! MUST SELL!
3.4 Beautiful Acres
r * $149,000 * *
(352) 746-0348

OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, 1 - 4
3/2/2, Pool Home I
3186 W. Birds I
Nest Dr $289,700.
352-586-1558 I








$99,900!! 2/1; 1,100 sf.
9 Polk Lease Opt. or
Owner Financing Avail.
Greg Younger,
Coldwell Banker 1st
Choice. (352)220-9188

















- BETTER THAN RENT
or RENT TO OWN
NO CREDIT CHECK!!
352-484-0866
jademission.com
ONLY $75,900 1/1/Crprt
Lg. Fam. Rm. 5 Donna St
BEST VALUE IN BEVERLY
HILLS! 352-212-9783

jem onco
H ome


3/2/2 CRYSTAL GLEN
$179,900 SELLER WILL
PAY $5K IN CLOSING
COSTS! Ron Egnot Ist
Choice Coldwell Bnkr.
... 352-287-9219_ - .


4/3/2 POOL HOME
Crystal Oaks 2,075 sf.,
Prof. Remodeledl
Everything NEW! S. S.
appl., granite $299,900.
727-254-2534/492-6679


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI

Your SATISFACTION
Is Mv Futurel!!

(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC
NICE MINI FARM 2/2 on
3.69ac. Barn and Out
buildings Incl. just bring
your horses. $229K
Alex Choto, Fl. Realty &
Auction. (352) 628-0968
NO EXPENSE WAS
SPARED on this beautiful
3/2 custom built home,
featuring stacked stone
in/out, gas FP, gourmet
kit, granite & all wood
cabinets, 10' ceilings,
alarm & sprinkler sys.
2 built-in 220 gal saltwtr
fish aquariums. 2 story
barn, 2 car detached
garage. Too many ex-
tras to list!! $449,000
Owner/Agent call for
appt. 352-302-2300
REDUCED! 2/2/2, /2 Ac.
1490 sf, appl., scrn.prch.
1868 Hoy Lake
$149 9900 352-476-1456




BY OWNER - VILLA
2/1/2/1 New Roof 2005,
New carpet & Pergo
floors. Great amenities.
Priced to sell $137,900
(352) 257-1431




BRENTWOOD VILLAGE
MOTIVATED! For Sale By
Owner. No monthly
maint. fees. Comp,
updated. Lots of tile,
new appl., & much
more. Don't miss out!
$154,900(352)422-4086
FOR SALE BY OWNER
1049 W PEARSON ST.
3/2/2 Pool Home, well
maintained & land
scared, 2158sf under
air. $298,000. For more
into visit: www.
infotube.net #1841941
(352) 527-4225
MEADOWS G.Course
POOL HOME 3/2/2.5
12 X 20 S.C. Pool.
Many upgrades!
Memb. Avail. $264,900
MUST SEE1352-270-3536
TERRA VISTA/HILLSIDE
SOUTH - 1800sq ft. 3/2/2
10,000sf lot. Brand new.
Possible Lease/Option
$279,900. 617-816-1230

- a
;c Homes


ARBOR LAKES 3/2/2
1580 sf., Gated 55+
comm. Reduced $164K
Make Offer. Norm
Overfield 352-586-8620
...-- Keller Wilifarams.ealty. -


Hernando Forest Lake
North, Newer 1 Lg.
Bedroom 1000 sq. ft.., on
1 acre fenced, 12 x 24
shed w/ electric 110 x
220V, very good cond.
Reduced $20,000.
Must See! $100,000.
(352) 344-5448
SPOTLESS 2 BDRM. 2BA
HOME 2 car gar, caged
in-ground pool, situated
on 2.5 ac. landscaped
estate. Fenced for
horses & spotted w/
mature oaks. Everything
new, If you are looking
this is a must see!
(VACANT - MOVE TO-
DAY) Asking $269K
Contact D Crawford for
details. (352) 212-7613




0 DOWN TO BUY!!
$720/mo. + taxes &
insurance. 3/2/2
located in Highlands
Large home, very clean
Needs nothing.
(352) 601-5600
1006 Princeton Ln
$119,900 3/2/2, IHW,
2,000 sq.ft. under roof,
upgraded kitchen &
bath, minor TLC
352-563-4169





3,500 La, 5,000 Total Sf
4.8 Ac. Adj. 4.8 Avail.
3/2.5/2.5 Near all
amenities. Priced well
below appr.@ S399K!
(352) 726-0321
2/2 SPILT PLAN
2 Garages, Master suite
w/sitting Rm. Recently
Renovated. Paint
inside/out, New roof &
appliances. Many
Extras! $149,9k
1719 Old Floral City Rd.
(352) 860-0408
MLS 318166 RIts Inv.
2/2/1 INGROUND POOL
Fl Rm, Scrn prch, Quiet,
clean, must see! Priced
to sell. (352) 637-9591
2/2/1 WHISPERING
PINES VILLAS, all appli,
W&D, scrn prch, pool in
complex, near park
J79.900 (813) 995-3728
3/2/1 Gospl Is. $169,900
>1,800 s.f. Fl. Rm., Scrnd
Porch, Util. Big. on
approx. 3/4 Ac. Room
to build pool or add.
home on inc. adj. lot.
(352) 726-3481
3/2/2 BRYANT ST.
2050 Living area - 2 car
attached garage,
Separate detached
garage incl. Fenced in
w/decorative entry
way. $225,000
(352) 637-4138

BETTY MORTON


Lic. Real Estate Agent
20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

Rea( )Seect5

(352) 795-1555


M-
CHARMING 2BR/2BATH
HIGHLANDS, corner lot,
circular driveway,
prequallified only
Must See. $124,900
(352) 201-1663
DIVORCED Need To Sell!
3/2/2 Updated, shaded
tree corner. $125,900
Cheryl Scruggs,
Century 21 J.W. Morton,
R.E., Inc. (352) 697-2910
Golf & Country Club
Area. Beautiful 3/2/2,
w/lanai, cath. ceilings,
CBS, built 2002, $203,900
352-726-6075
HIGHLANDS 2/1/1
PRICED TO SELL!! Tile
floors, CHA, $87,000
Pleasant Grv. School.
Franklin Realty
352-464-4211
HIGHLANDS 3/2/2
1420SFLA, Non smoking
Org. owner, Fireplace,
Large bdrms, $145,000
Franklin Realty
352-464-4211
HOME FOR SALE
On Your Lot, $110,900.
3/2/1 w/ Laundry
Atkinson Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685
LUXURY TRI-LEVEL
3/1.5/1.75 IHW Updated
1,648 sf la $179,900
726-7241 For photos,
virtual tour and info go to:
www.buvowner com
/tpa64355
New Townhomes for
sale Close to Shopping
& Downtown Inverness,
Owner financing
(352) 860-1981
PRICED TO SELL
2/2/1, w/den, LV/DR
and eat-in kchn. 1245
sq.ft., fenced BY, H20
filter, concrete patio,
wood deck, shed /elec
$129,000. Call 201-9368
REDUCED $10,000
2003, 3/2/2 plus det, 1
car gar/wrkshp.Loaded
w/extras!! $168,000
Cheryl Scruggs,
Century 21 J.W Morton,
R.E., Inc. (352) 697-2910
Reduced, Moving 3/2/2
New roof, FP tile, 25X25
LR, Immac. cond.
2100SF. Was $176K, now
$159K (352) 586-7685
BUY OWNER T.P.A.61665
MLS313017
SELL YOUR HOME
Place a Chronicle
Classified ad
6 lines, 30 days
$51.95"
Call
726-3983
563-5966
Non-Refundable
Pnvale Party Only
~d per aartInal line
'Some rna rtrfrlho:


2/2/1 NEWLY UPDATED
The boater in you will
love this location!

John Maisel III Exit
Realty(352) 302-5351
GREAT DEAL 2/2
With screen porch.
Reduce to $36,900. Call
Sheila Bensinger at
Keller Willams Realty
(352) 476-5403
PRICE REDUCED 1/1
Fixer upper on nice lot.
$42,900 352-860-2075
PRICE REDUCED
MUST SELL! Well
maintained home,
great location. 3/2,
new C/H/A & roof
_C132900Q.352.860e20Z5..


CHECK OUT THESE
BEAUTIFUL FARMS!
1 Ac., E. Pinto, 1515 sf.
la., bkt 2006, $159,900;
2.8 Ac. on the TRAIL,
1240 sf., la., bit '63
updated $189,900;
4 Ac. Istchatta 1531 sf,
la. bit '84, updtd $275K;
4.6 Ac. Lkfrnt., E.
Cloverdale, 1680 sf
3/2 bit '61, $525K;
4.7 Ac. E. Zephyr Wing,
2474 sf., la. 3/2
bit '04 $369K;
6.46 Ac. Bushnell Rd.
1900 sf la 3/2 bit '93,
updtd $495K;
10 Ac. Brightstar, 2330 sf
la,, 3/2/2 bit '04, pool
$690K;
10 Ac. E. Lake Bradley
.2138 sf 4/3 bit '00, $530K
25 Ac. S. Zepplin.
3912 sf la, bit 06
4/3/3/ $1,200,000;
25 Ac. Corner Hwy 480
& 581. 2351 sf [a.,
bit '46 3/2 $999,000
www.crossland
realty.ctom
Crossland Realty Inc.
(352)726-6644





3/2, 2 Car Detach Gar.
2 yr. old AC, new re-
model. bthrms. Close to
shopping. Good Area[
$130K (352) 302-0246

BETTY MORTON








� - ,
Lic. Real Estate Agent
20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

Rea(2i7Se5ect

(352) 795-1555


BONNIE PETERSON
Realtor, GRI

Your SATISFACTION
Is My Futurell

(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC


*
FISHING IN FRONT YARD
3/2 ON 10.8 Acres!!
Detached 14 X 28
office, pool, fncd.,
pond. $325K Ownr.
Flnan. (352)621-3135
*


KINGS BAY DRIVE
4/2/2 on canal, immac.
Pool home, separate
suite, gated, $825,000
(352) 634-1805





'01, Jacobsen Modular
Home 1891 sq. ft., on
12 Ac. fenced 2, sheds
$132K Buyer Pays
Closing Cost
352-628-4513
Good Family Home
3/2 SW on Two i/2 AC
Lots. Scrn porch.
BY OWNER, $44,500
1592 S Lookout Pt
2 blocks off US 19
352-503-4142
3/2/2 CAGED POOL
Great Deal in Great
Community! New Appl.
$169,900 Harley Hough,
EXIT Realty Leaders
352-400-0051
4/2.5/2 on 2.5 ACRES
Hg. 2 Story Cape Cod.
Home shows well loved.
$299,900 Sharon Levins.
Rhema Realty
(352) 228-1301
BUY OWNER
2005 4/2 MFG Home,
2356SF, 2 wooded ac.
Many amenities
$199,900/reas. offer
(727) 457-9567


BUY OWNER - 3/2/2,
Pool Home, approx.
1875 sq. ft., cul-de-sac,
location, plus bonus
computer room, open
floor plan. Built 2003. 14
x 28 Heated Pool w/ ex-
panded deck. Asking
$242.000, No agents
(352) 382-8914
Exceptional Value,
for a New Home, never
lived in. The floor plan is
excellent w/ 4 Bd. Rm's
Formal Din. Eat in Kit. &
a separate Den or Of-
fice, situated on a quiet
St. w/ Greenbelt and
open area to the rear.
located in Oak Village
section of Golf commu-
nity Sugarmill Woods
(239) 394-4167

LOST JOB! MUST SELL
NEW 4/3/3 + BONUS
ROOM, POOL,
WOODED LOT.
GOURMET KITCHEN, ALL
UPGRADES $414,000
OBO 813 967-7192


October 4 @ 11am Ch ot details and
Well Maintained www.Rellance-RE.com
Manufactured Home on c(352) 726-7533
One Acre. RV Barn, Septic .
& Private Well ...
P.. review gLPL0am


* New *
Sugarmill Special
Spacious, 2380 liv.,
4/2/2, Home, scrn.
lanai, priv. lot, many
upgrades, BLOWOUT!
$209,900. Owner,
(386) 569-6777




5 BDRM HUD $37,5001
Only $298/mol 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
$10,000 Cash Back
At closing
Brand new homes.
Only $995. down.
Call (352) 694-2900


3/2 $199/mo HUD Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
3/2/2 on 1.3 ACRES
Borders State Park
7102 Smith Ter., HOLDER
ForSaleByOwner.com
Listing # 21030419
$219,900, 352-465-5233
BANK FORECLOSURE
4BR, $46,000. 2BR
$12,000. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5714


FISHING IN FRONT
YARD
3/2 ON 10.8 Acresl
Detached 14 X 28
office, pool, fncd., pond.
$325K Ownr. Finan.
(352)621-3135

FIX ME UP! $72K
4/2 SFH Block
Must Sell for CASH!
John (352) 228-7523
HOME FOR SALE
On Your Lot, $110,900.
3/2/1 w/ Laundry
Atkinson Construction
352-637-4138
Uc.# CBC059685
HUD HOMES! 4 BR
$366/mo. 5%down,
20yrs. 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5711


1 and 2 Bedroom

Unfurnished Apartments

Call Monday Through Friday
8:00am - 5:00pm

(352) 489-1021


013Oil Citrus County
d= Homes







CrrRUs COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


24E SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 30. 2007


m
SELL YOUR HON
Place a Cnronlcl
Classified ad
6 lines. 30 day
$51.95"
Call
726-1441
563-5966
Non-Refundable
Private Party Onli
r.13' .3ppl, ,

Vic McDonald
(352) 637-6201







Realtor
My Goal is Satisfii
Customers
WA
REALTY ONE 4
Ou()anding Agests
Oitsisading Resu
(352) 637-6200
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY


ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALE
COMMERCIAL SAL
(352) 422-695
ANUSSO.COM



5 BDRM HUD $37,5
Only $298/mol 5% c
20yrs. at 8%. For list
800-366-9783 Ext 9
3/2 $199/mo HUD H
5% down 20yrs
8%apr. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5:
3/2 $199/mo HUD H
5% down 20yrs
8%apr. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 5:
BANK FORECLOSU
4BR, $46,000. 2B1
$12,000. For listing
800-366-9783 Ext 5
CUSTOM
POOL HOME
on 2.09 acres.
Beautiful 3/2/2
custom pool hom
on 2.09 fully irrigat
acres. Located i
Rolling Hills
Subdivision. 3142
ft. paved circular
drive. Home secure
system, built-in 50"
gas fireplace in liv
rm. Must see hom
Please call and lea
message
@352-572-3079 ar
we will get right ba
Asking $375,000. A
below appraisal


[-P


AllA R


* INVERNESS LET OUR OFFICE FARMS Continued from Page 19E
e FISHING IN FRONT Villa 2BR, 2.5 baths, LET OUR OFFICE &
S 32 ON 10.8 Acres P . 75000 464099 GUIDE YOU! WATER FRONT interest to compound year
Detached 14X28 * .'" after year, you will eventually
ofee poo fncd, pond..-'d,'
$325K Ownr. F nan double your money And that's
(352)621-3135 .. where the rule of 72 becomes
HU HOMES! 4 BR useful. It is a method for esti-
$366/mo. 5%down, mating the doubling time of
y 20yrs. 8%. For listings I www.crossland money You can do this in your
S 800-366-9783 Ex 5711 Plantation Realty, Inc. n money You can do this in your
_NORTH CAROLINA 1352) 795-0784 head to impress your friends
Extraordinary Riverfront Cell 422-7925 Crossland and neighbors
P* & &j RiverAccess sit Ri ve and neighbors.
t BUMr River Lisa VanDeboe Realty Inc.
the Broad River Broker (R)/Owner Since 1989 Simply divide the number
0 Starting at $39,900. See all of the listings 72 by the interest rate. In the
5 BDRM HUD $37,500! 828-652-8700 in Citrus County at (352) 726-6644 raaeo y le
Only $298/mo! 5% dwn. www.plantation above example, you would
20yrs. at 8%. For listings M realtyinc.com Lecanto, Centrally divide 72 by five. The result is
800-366-9783 Ext 9845 Located, 2 cleared a 1
BANK FORECLOSURE 9845 c2acelots sirable about 14, right? (Remember,
4BR, $46,000. 2BR neighborhood, paved this is a method for estimat-
$12,000. For listings 2/2/1 WOODLAND EST. roads, city water, huge ing.) At 5 percent interest, it
800-366-9783 Ext 5714 Fixed dock w/gulf -- - oak trees, corner lot, ing.) At 5 percent interest, it
HUD HOMES' 4 BR access. 1yr. old AC, DR, i. . $35,000. Interior lot, will take about 14 years to
$366/mo. 5%down, Fm.Rm. Scrnd Garden $32,500. W Laurel St.
20yrs, 8%. For listings lanai. $369,000 Owner Agent double your money - for
ed 800-366-9783 Ext 5711 (352) 564-0759 352-302-2300 your $1,000 to grow to $2,000.
4/3.5/2 In YANKEETOWN Ln adR t ... At 7 percent, it will take
.3,514 s. Formal areas, about 10 years (72 divided by
Guesthouse 1,285,000 - seven) for your money to
Nancy Lewis, EXIT -
5 BDRM HUD $37,500! REALTY(352) 302-6082 BB HUNTING LAND IN LEVY double; at 10 percent, about
Its Only $298/mo! 5% dwn. H CO., 10 Acres of Hard- seven years.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings BETTY MORTON wood trees & pine, bar-
2 y__3_ orst_ BETTYMORTON ______ _ - Look, I don't know why this
800-366-9783 Ext 9845 der Wacassa Preserves Look, I don't know why this
3/2 $199/mo HUD Home S. A. a 600ft. on Hwy. 19,15 works. I'm sure there is a
Y 5% down 20yrs at !T u5 lBf. min. N. of Inglis, owner
8%apr. For listings call fin. w/30% down. asking long and complicated mathe-
800-366-9783 Ext 5704 - L i $135,000. (734)834-2004 matical formulation behind
3/2 $199/mo HUD Home 1-15 HOUSES WANTED --- it. I bless the person who fig-
5% down 20yrs at Cash or Terms
8%apr. For listing ca ll John (352) 228-7523 ured it out, because it sure
800-366-9783 Ext 5704 . ' -, wwwFastFioridaHouse - saves me one big headache. I
BANK FORECLOSURE ,' . Buyer.com
4BR, 2BURE " m A estor 1 ACRE PINE RIDGE know the principle, and this
$12,000. For listings Lic. Real Estate Agent Looking toBuyv Res. or 2106 Huntington Near simple rule helps me esti-
800-366-9783 Ext 5714 20 Years Experience Commercial Properties $ , 32Sacrifice90 mate the time it takes for
HUD HOMES! 4 BR 2.8 Percent CA $49,900., 352-527-9390 mae e ime it takes for
$366/mo. 5%down, Commission 1.15 Ac, Crystal Manor money to double.
ES 20yrs. 8%. For listings W 5711 .HOUFastES Hi & Dry. Briar Patch. S E
6 Real; 1S eC 3s52-637-2973 Surveyed. $55,000 U ni
6 06 -9 -E lhomeso7idom 352-795-2567/228-3747 Unless you live as a hermit
- LiIiIS 1 (352) 795-1555 CITRUS LOTS PRICED TO in the backwoods, you know
* = SELLl FINANCING AVAIL. something about social obli-
5 BDRM HUD $37500 BUY NOW -800-840-4310 gations - events and situa-
Only$298/mol 5% dwn. Bargains LECANTO tons that invite participa-
20yrs. at . For sngs Everywhere ACREAGE FOR SALE LECANTO 1/2 Ac +
20yrs at 8% For listings Everywhere! 0.5 - 2.5 Zoned for MH Well, septic, power tion whether we can afford
00 800-366-9783 Ext 9845 or home. Priced to sell! pole. Impact fees pd. them or not.
wn 3/2 $199/mo HUD Home By Owner Ownr fin. 2775 Rennet Ct.
tings 5% down 20yrs at avail. Low dwn, flex $25K obo(813)792-1355 Social obligations run the
845 8apr. For listings call terms.Se Haba Espanol SUGARMILL WOODS gamut from fundraisers to
t BANK FORELOSURE (800) 4660460 Oak Village, Balsam St. family celebrations and
704call 4BR, $46,000. 2BR (352) 613-2855 everything in between:
ome 800-366-9783 Ext 5714 . Sugarmill Woods, Oak Office collections, pools and
at HUD HOMES! 4 BR Village Lot 28, Iberis Ct., lunches; charity drives;
Call $366/mo. 5%down, Deb Infantine 10 ACRES Homosassa, Build your
704 20yrs. 8%. For listings EXIT REALTY LEADERS Close to shopping. Dream home, culdesac church and school functions;
RE .800-366-9783 Ext 5711 (352) 302-8046 Great price of $149,900 lot 1/4 Acre $49,900. impromptu invitations; polit-
gs CRYSTAL SHORES 2/3 Keller Willams Realty ical, sports, charity and com-
714 den. Dock, boat slip. on (352) 476-5403 unity events.
2 lots, porch w/ vinyl 20 ACRES HI DRY - The problem for most of us
windows, overlook MUST SELL $194,900 The pr m
2/2V2, gorgeous lagoon min. Sheila Bensinger at jis that we see social obliga-
On water, to gulf, excel. cond. Keller Willams Realty BEST DEAL ON WATER tions as one big category We
Make offer REDUCED (352) 476-5403 Halls River, 2 WF Lots
e Call (352) 560-7251 352-795-7593 42 Acres side by side, deep feel guilty if we don't buy
ed CITRUS HILLS * cleared & fenced, canal. Parklike setting. something from every school
n 2/2 Beautifully turn. FISHING IN FRONT rolling hills, high & dry Cleared & ready to
$850/Annual or $1,200/ YARD close to everything build. $89,900. ea. fundraising catalog. We feel
sq. Seasonal. $114K Sale 3/2 ON 10.8 Acres!! $575k 352-302-9140 Owner/agent poor and envious when we
;r 352-726-7543/201-0991 Detached 14 X 28 3/2 SW on Two /2 AC (352) 302-2300 see the rich fancy
rity CITRUS HILLS 2/2 office, pool, fncd., pond. LoT.see the rich neighbors' fancy
Ing (32)233 4T Salet sstuff. We grumble silently but
TV, Greenbriar II,1st fir. furn. $325K Ownr. Finan BY OWNER, $44,500 ,.tuff. We grumble silently but
ing Near pool. $113,500 (352)621-3135 1592 S Lookout Pt still show up for all the home
e.. $1,000mo. 352-249-3155 2 blocks off US19
av $1 RTmo. 352-249-3155RR 352-503-4142 parties, school events, office
CRYSTAL RIVER KINGS BAY DRIVE -- gatherings and family occa-
nd 2BR, 2BA conveniently 4/2/2 on canal, immac TERRA VISTA HILLSIDE RENTAL FINDER gatherings and family occa-
ck. located, amenities Pool home, separate GOLF COURSE LOT #9 www chronicle sions.
ay $85,900. Agent Owned suite, ated, $825,000 Skyview CC, $77,000 rentalfinder.com Whether it's an overpriced
Call 352-270-3190 (35 ) 634-1805 Call (352) 638-0905 L - - - - bucket of cookie dough from
Ope_---- Hossari --a --r-a school fund-raising cata-
-o p or- ami uni r sho w w at's log, another home party
4om the wwma-iet- where you end up with ran-
: ctdyo om overpriced stuff that
c saLes e r...se"-a.v... .. -..., - . doesn't look nearly as great
,_ foar _more nf__o_ _wation. -_ _-_._ :_ ,'_1._" _I k ___ _J_._'_' ' as it did in the catalog or full-


24 SUNDAY, SEPTEMB�zn-30 2007


m


I


on participation in an expen-
sive wedding, you may know
something about the
expense of feeling obligated
to participate. Social obliga-
tions can become a horrible
drain on any household
budget. But they don't have
to be. You just have to know
how to manage them.
The very first thing you
need to do when faced with a
social obligation is to decide
into which of these three cat-
egories it falls. Then you will
be ready with the appropri-
ate response.
OBLIGATIONS TO KEEP
UP WITH THE JONESES:
Whether it's the sudden
need to get a new car or a
certain brand of shoes for
the kids, if the true motiva-
tion is to impress others, it
falls into this category.
Your only response should
be to create a special account
that you rightly name: Things
I Need to Impress Others.
Begin to fund this account
each time you feel obligated
to keep up. Spend the vast
amount of money you will
save here for the sole pur-
pose of keeping up appear-
ances. Don't be surprised
when your need for this
account passes quickly.
OBLIGATIONS TO KEEP
FROM LOOKING POOR: It
is this social obligation' that
finds you sitting with co-
workers in an overpriced
restaurant, searching madly
for $5 appetizers on the
lunch menu. Or maybe you
are sitting in a friend's living
room where you are expect-
ed to buy a $25 candle you
just saw at Wal-Mart for $2.19.
Don't even go there.
Instead, when invited to any
event in which you are not
fully prepared to fund with-
out overspending, say simply:
"Thanks for the invitation,
but, unfortunately, the money
I've earmarked for (eating
out, fun stuff for the house) is
all spoken for But catch me
again next time, OK?"
OBLIGATIONS THAT
REQUIRE PARTICIPA-
TION: There are times you
must participate out of
respect for a boss, parent,
friend or colleague. To do
otherwise will be harmful or
just not right.
Make sure you are setting
aside money into a contin-
gency fund for unexpected
expenses so you are not
caught off guard. Just
remember, social obligations
that fall into this third cate-
gory are not routine. They
are rare and should be
respected as such.




, � ,*


RTIC US COUNTY (FL) C E


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007 25E


Oh! What a day for a day lily!


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Evergreen repeating day lilies are well-suited to Central Florida,
though they prefer a little afternoon shade.


Modern garden day lilies
are almost always cul-
tivated hybrids of the
genus Hemerocallis, native to
temperate China and East Asia.
None are native to North
America, though some natural-
ize and spread by themselves.
Hemerocallis means "beau-
tiful for a day" They are not
true lily bulbs at all but grow
from thick, fleshy roots. These
clump-forming perennials are
bred to produce flowers of a
specific color, size and shape.
All are cloned vegetatively,
because seed-grown daylilies
do not have either parent's
characteristics.


O (� "Nancy Knows Sugi

NAN
�PONTI
Direct: 352-(

� Always




INCREDIBLE HOME ON GOLF COURSE!!
6 * 4 Bed / 3 Bath / 3 CAR garage
* New summer kitchen at POOL
* Open island kitchen - Corian / wood
* Fireplace * Central Vac * Alarm
MLS #306020 $399,900
Take my virtual tous


Some day lilies are 1 from spring through
evergreen or semi- to fall, depending on
evergreen, while the M the cultivar. The
foliage of others dies H . . . flowers follow the
back during winter's sun, so site them
shorter days and appropriately
cooler temperatures. , r Your soil should
All need a few . be well drained, yet
months of dormancy , enriched with natu-
to rest before the ral material and all
next season. Each Jane Weber the beneficial soil
flower lasts only a . organisms that live
day, but many buds in live compost.
sprout on the same " Bagged stuff from
tall stem, or scape, to big box stores is ster-
make a long-lasting display. ilized to kill all live critters
Cut off the spent scape and your garden needs. It will help
the plant may produce another.
day lily blooming season is Please see /Page 28E


3nnui Woods111"' �_'"


C Y Alwal
ERAN
$34-4225 09*g


lulti-Million
dollar Realtor
ys There For You
Key I Realty Inc.
805 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosssa, FL
382-1700


FLORIDA LIVING AWAITS YOU!!
* 3 Bed / 2 Bath / 2 Car garage has screen
* Roof re-shingled 2000 * Neat as a pin!
* Kitchen & bath cabinets / counters new 2000
* Glass enclosed Florida room has AC
MLS #316223 $162,000












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"K r 'E V ' Fax: (352) 382-5580 8015 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446
2 A Your Sugarmill Woods Specialists H
Office 382-1700 * 1-800-237-1112 NoTRANSACTION FEES
No TRANSACTION FEES

S GAIL COOPER C CAROLYN LISTER E
, Multi-Million Dollar Realtor ... L..
REvY Multi-Million Dollar Realtor Cell: 422-4620 OFFICE # 382-1700
Cell: 634-4346 OFFICE #382-1700
Email. homes4u3@mindspring.comr



L Of , ... j_ f -

WHAT A DEAL! Custom 4 bedroom, 2 bath home with VIEW THE GOLF COURSE from your glass enclosed lanai NEW LISTING! Many extras included in ths NE LISTING Expans e golf course vew from
heated 13x30 pool. Hardwood floors & carpet. Two walk- 3 bedrooms, 2 baths and 2 car, side-entry garage. Vaulted Cathedral ceilings fireplace, hot tub, jetted ba th Desirable Rosewood model with convenient kitchen
in closets, jetted tub & Ig shower in Master Suite. Huge ceilings. Family room w/entertainment center is open to tub arched windows, glass front doors & newer open to great room. Large pantry, lots of closets,
kitchen w/wood cabinets & lots of storage space. kitchen. Murphy bed & built-in office. Two walk-in closets in appliances. Also included: pool table & work bench, breakfast bar, ceiling fans, laundry room & all
Security system, ECU & more! #317569 $219,900 Master. Nice location in Oakleaf Villas. #316890 $179,900 Private cul-de-sac location. $233,000 #319747 appliances. Extra parking pad. $142,000 #319520
w wrslh ms uco Emi:pwruIomi~o


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Crrius COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


26E SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 30, 2007


Special to the Chronicle
This old pressing iron might not look like much, but it's a col-
lectible that was made by a well-known iron maker.


f iKAREN E. MORTON A.
Hall of Fame Centunon Memb~r 1994- 2006
�" tft f I& Website: Lt I.,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,:-

J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE (352) 726-6668
1645 West Main Street Inverness, FL 34450 (352) 212-7595
� and I Century 21 Real Estate Corporation TO L FREE
Equal Housing Opportunity TOLL FREE
INDEPENDENTLYOWNED AND OPERATED 1-800-543-9163






Y SOUTH HIGHLANDS
SELLER WILL PAY 54,000 CHARMER "'" SUPER
BUYER CLOSING COSTS ** BEST BUY IN THE WEST LOCATION!!! Spacious living
Remodeled and updated HIGHLANDS!!! room and formal dining room!
*2 BR 2 BA * Garage tile floors REDUCED!! 3 Br 2 Ba family room * 2 BR 2 BA * Large
* new roof * WONDERFUL * FAMILY ROOM with built-in eat-in kitchen * Screen lanai
OPEN KITCHEN WITH NEW entertainment center * Oversized ' lush landscaping " Workshop
STAINLESS STEEL APPLIANCES garage * Open kitchen *All *1 block from RaiTs to Trails and
* * PRIVATE BACK YARD ON appliances including washer and close to Eden Dr. Boat ramp
QUIET STREET * City water dryer * BUYERS 1 YEAR * City water & Sewer PLUS
*THIS HOME IS A STEAL AT WARRANTY * Priced for FAST well!!! Priced right at
$99,900. #316153 SALE $99,900. #318890 $125,900. #319845





,, '- ---._-----___ ' --- .- OLDIE BUT A GOODIE!!!
o ,"4Wa FOREST RIDGE " CITRUS HISTORIC 1900 CARRIAGE
--- - HILLS COMMUNITY " HOUSE " Ii.-l ..J-,, i,rh-
BEVERY HILLS BEAUTY " MAINTENANCE FREE huge oaks on 1.78 acres!!
CONVENIENT TO PARK, SINGLE FAMILY HOME Incredible opportunity for
LIBRARY, DOCTORS AND * 2 BR 2 BA * Wood and tile someone who can appreciate
SHOPPING * WONDERFUL floors * kitchen appliances * Eat the history and charm of this
SEASONAL OR 1 ST TIME in kitchen with bay window 4 bed, 2.5 both country form
HOME BUYER!! H Enclosed Florida room * 2 car home * Pole barn * Boat dock
2 Bed, 1 Bath, 1 Car * Open garage * Oversized homesite * on Lake Henderson belongs to
Country kitchen * Florida room Membership to Terra Vista not property * Convenient location
* A great value at $107,500. required * Great price at *Great opportunity!!
MLS #318192 $169,900. #319944 MLS 317140. $214,900




,^. . ---."-".^' LEASE WITH OPTION 0TO
. ,- .. PURCHASE FAIRVIEW MAKE ME AN orrERIIII
...ESTATES REDUCED SS0000 HISTORIC
CITRUS HILLS GOLF l: ., , I i ,l SAVANNAH HOUSE
MEMBERSHIP AVAILABLE " *;,;.i: i, i :, DOWNTOWN INVRNESS ,:
:, , - I . , -,_ 1:
BA 2 CAR GREAT ROOM kitchen area Good Mornn room " Grandalher oaks tower over his gem
�Fully equipe kitchen with overlooking CAGED IN-GROUND in the City of Inverness * Herdwoed
lareq ka/intchen aa SWIMMING POOL with summer floors 2 fireplaces *Updated kitchen
hlarEe breaktst/dning area ktche Ever with new appliances * T'ravene floors
opening to spacious lanai Lush oversized icraie Great re Mster suite wih updated btlee
gardens * nestled in the woods Nihorho" OW ONLY dressing area bSunroeoms Sleep
for privacy. DEED RESTRICTED 28,5O. OPTION TERMS - reakasi with zoning approval � Trulya
COMMUNITY Central water 5,000. DOWN $1200. MO) rareindand realoEportunily
#3181r93 $243,500. '#310503 $449,000 #316154 .S


it� i Bn. -,r, .g,.s', Ho,t ,uebc ,t,J O.-i-----
L Ii ,U. 'it Fl). j -r.n~ Our,. A'
F 041


:-: E ,rr,, t_ i- -c,-" ; r-j . LK r. i B.: B.. A.1, 0 '1
i ~. u c l h" ,,,,"
. li, Ie l'n,5_lo, [o iehl ans,:, u5 C5. ,

__(_(352)

S..... . -. 382-5700


ATTIC
Continued from Page 6E

duced for export during the
19th and early 20th century.
The Foo dog handles on your
jar are a popular motif.
Potential dollar value, as is, is
below $50.
Dear John: I found this old
iron and would like to know
about the time it was made and
if it has any value. --J.T.,
Beverly Hills
Dear J.T.: You have a col-
lectible iron made by a well-
known maker among iron col-
lectors. I suggest you contact
iron aficionado David Irons at
233 Covered Bridge Rd.,


* II1-1" 4 i L~hjc rsll Lt'.ig
Arc.,i ins] F.-rch[
* I12 Hi-h li eilusrt at FT<.-it Ecstr.


_-N , 1 .. 1 FC1 ~ tl .LJ'C' D uble I r s%


* Ilirm 5t rIr1. se-r cr (Sbifln!
II .,.r nl Ls -ur Frunlc
[. L.rin Liclsors: in KilttenD

NI..k[r Il. I,r %il Waluk-in L,..
3rsd FL. *nd Her '% 3ahie�
%c iitits Nler.-" 1r c



* pririkle r ". tet IT ' Li' r. I
L, a
FlI n arn ipeo 1i o,% ' tri - ,
I It 1a .1 '' q slI pssts'


* � -
e Q y

S~ya ~ w


SUGARMILL WOODS


The Royal Chelsea
3 Bedrooms * 2 Batis * 2 Car Garage


26E SUNDAY, SEPTEMBFR 30, 2007


Northampton, PA 18067, or call
him at (610) 262-9335. The web-
site is www.ironsantiques.com.
He is author of several books
on collecting irons including
"Irons by Irons," "Pressing
Iron Patents" and "More Irons
by Irons."
Dear John: Enclosed is a pic-
ture of an oak flax wheel
marked S. Barnum. It has been
in my family for many years. I
would love some information
on how the wheel works and its
value. My great aunt had it
appraised many years ago and
all they could tell her was it
was 19th century and it was in
excellent condition. Thank you
for any advice you can give me.
- J.B., Hendersonville, North
Carolina


Dear J.B.: Currently market
interest in spinning wheels is
very soft, as are potential dol-
lar values. For specific infor-
mation about history and oper-
ating, contact your local
library. Potential dollar value
is $150 to $300.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the antiques
business for more than 20
years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on
WJUF (90.1 FM) Saturdays
from 11 a.m. until noon. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic,
c/o The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River FL 34429.


,7




*

CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007 27E


HOME
Continued from Page 18E

either metal or vinyl frames. A
wood window frame is gener-
ally the same thickness of a
standard two-by-four wall stud
and would not have drywall
inside the window's frame.
Wood windows have wood
sides, headers and sills,
whereas a metal or vinyl win-
dow has a drywall return on
the header and sides with a
laminated, marble or wood
windowsill.
Wood windows have a
greater resistance to thermal
transfer than the typical metal
or vinyl windows, and in cold-
er weather you might find con-
densate water and even ice
buildup on the cold window
frames. The reason I'm refer-
ring to thermal transfer and
condensate is that your prob-
lem may be one of a lack of
insulation in the area around
the windows rather than a leak
above the windows.
To repair a leak, simply
caulk and seal the exterior
frame of the window using a
good quality silicone caulking.
If, however, the drywall is cold
due to a lack of insulation,
then condensate water, pres-
ent in humid indoor air, can
collect on the drywall's sur-
face, causing the paint and the
drywall structure to fail and to
flake.
You can check the wall for
insulation by removing the
faceplate of any electrical out-
let or switch located on an
exterior wall. With the electri-
cal power turned off at the
main electric panel, remove
the slotted screw, which
secures the cover to the outlet,
and then remove the cover
The exposed electrical out-
let will hbe mounted inside a


VMl1G. Vic McDonald
REALTY ONE ...........
1100I W. Main St, W fI
Inverness, FL 34450 ...
"Serving Citrus County 29 Years" ulti-Million
"Serving Citrus County 29 Years" Dollar Producer


~,J,


PRICED FOR FAST SALE
2BR, 2BA, garage, interior freshly H
painted, central H/A, Florida room,
screen porch, Nicely landscaped lot, 2
outbuildings, immediate occupancy! 2
adjacent lots available. NOW
$109,900 #313045


S.il. c 4 panel wwwnabhomescorn Licensed & Insured






4> Remodeling 4> Kitchens n Baths 4 Windows
n Storm Shutters 4' Concrete Slabs .0 Pavers
.0 Demolitions 0 Excavating . Roofing
""W Wil WokWthY u


Lou Miele, Realtor AMVERICAN
4511N. LecantoHwy. BeverlyHills, FL34465 NNE REALTY & INVESTMENTS
Office: 352-746-3600 ERA ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU
_ Cell: (352) 697-1685 E RAL ESTATE LWAYS THERE FOR YOU


S-. " .. . ' -



BEAUTIFUL PINE RIDGE ,..
POOL HOME. Tr I. TIMBERLANE ESTATES POOL
r'. :.I T I ", , l.r':l .' - HOM E i '


S339,999 .-.. : S 255,900 i.


S. _ . GORGEOUS NEW HOME . :i
BEVERLY HILLS - C:"':'' ".*" . ..11 r ,,, , ,. ,,'.r-',"..', ..r,,r
well maintained 2/2/2 has new carpet & pain, attention to details. I ns ine e aeroom
home sits on an oversized comer lot, has
newer range w/microwave hood & newer beautiful 18 in tile, stainless appliances,
refrigerator, air conditioned FL room overlooking an oversized 2 car garage, and so much
backyard with Citrus & Fig trees. A must see!! more. This home must be seen to be
MLS#310189 $124,900. See More at appreciated. Fabulous, come see for
www.visualtlour.com tour #0085-4408 yourself! $192,000 MLS#319047


CURB
APPEAL
R= _3Y.'V


BEVERLY HILLS BEAUTY
,,., , , CRYSTAL RIVER
.:. - . , ,

ii i ONLY S149,900 $.....3- 2.2. 229,900
40 ACRES 4.5 ACRES
in Otter Creek IN CRYSTAL RIVER
If you're looking for a ' --- Iu Ir r
a eav this is it. .M costly . C luun : 0r ,,,m . or.n. ^lk
Tuf- uri T r.- r ,lll r'
creekls fields, and a ru it- . r, ,l� r-�
small pond. Roads cut on fe nd several outbuildings.
property. On a well- Needs some work but the land and
maintained private dirt building possibilities are worth the
road. Lots of wildlife! price. MLS#315475 $129,900.


Call Today To Experience The Curb Appeal Advantage.
George E. LHeureux Ffcl ]
George EHeureux 2619 East Gulf toLake Hwy,
(352) Inverness, FL 1i
637 - CURB (2872) www.curbannealcitrus.com -,7555


Please see /Page 28E 8149 N. VOYAGER 1923 W. JENA Ci. 4340 MUSTANG . -... . you've d t h
Builders Custom home. OpeNsalit floor plan Great room, dnnm nom, island 9,-,.. . , ICl: I34 2 bedroom/I bath home with
ichen w breakfast nook aun room, 3 BR, 2 BAwl a Great aster Bath 2 Brentwood Villa 2 BR 2 BA, quet cul-de-sac, newly This custom built home is a must see. 3 bedroom, 3 baths, , . & mature trees. Spacious living
Screened porches-eny lanaithhree sets of sliding glass doors off rear of qu porcelain and ceramic tile throughout with some area, open kitchen inside laundry room. New well pump &
U s home. LandscapedFenced on the sides & rear. 6 person hot hbm nuded h painted outside, tie/carpet, new refrigerator, glass-top granite, porcelain and ceramic tile throughout with some area p a been noe aun ry oe New ll pump &
L 1nre Beve~rly carpeting Large theater room with 70 HDTV & surround sound. septic syste dhas been pumped, ready to go All appliances
S K.I I IR U1I S tiis lovely home $164,500. nHe 491 Iron m Beey Hills Trmn left onto stove, central VI/A/C. Living Water by Bass water filter. PLUS caged ingr found pool & spa aI on 325 acres in a private eluded. Ready to move in. don't wait on this one. Dir: Hwy 44
S h lItcl d I I I I I I ' \ Social membership required. $159,900 setting Don't miss out call today $579,900 Le, s o n.




6595 N. TURQUOISE [- 2400FORESTDR.
Baion 2 a; in inr Mwii rFanis is nisn a urrnnio oMe Wop r JLR aII
2 BA& many upgrades Enjoy this split plan home having room 360 E. KNIG TSBRIDGE 3553 SUZIE LANE
& great room wa never used fireplace. This home is set back from the Beautiful, custom-built 3/2/2 pool home in desirable Kensington UNITS 1 4 & 242 Here is a great property zoned GNC in an awesome area. This
Sroad for added privacy This home has upgraded cabinets, higher Estates This gorgeous home boasts a brick exterior, decorator Great 2/2 Condo in a beautiful setting Priced to building has been completely remodeled and will lend itself to
sidewalls, & is paially furnished. This home was moved to this location circular dve huge workshop wl 220 amp, beautifully landscaped IlT . I r i 00 n m mmri1. e Thi pers., h'u qnro j tqurn f oolte
S.ooo1 ' . 510I' I Co l ,I 1 fl..r ni .9 i.n ' 59.1 so
... . ..... . ... . . ...... ........ , u . . .1 . $6 9 0 0 . . . .S, 0


. th .. . " CKS"ON e a on 0 .. ... n d594 W. MILKWEED
of, AC & beuetifei a . dto at, A upgraded et 3071 BRAZILNUT Beattoyeantained Impaen Eeutive, on a large r . RED ROBIN
ention has been given to keepg hout th i rea hoe y 5/33 Pine Ridge Builders custom home has many extras, many trees including fruit trees. Must see. Dir 491 to Roosevlt Offered by Value Homes re 3 new near
a no h s oe n te a o s ove-in d ing a guestpool la site. $395, hom e to Leep adMmlldeeed H � yo ru uod u a rpe
fenced backyard /a shed or allths ama ha f AThm- 0 5 0 onButtoRbush to Left on Milkweed, House on Coe upgraded models, pick your tile & carpet. (I


a


Cimus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


\ �







28E SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007


HOME
Continued from Page 27E

plastic or metal utility box
located inside the drywall. The
utility box will be secured on
one of its sides to an exterior
wall stud and the other side
will be exposed to the wall's
cavity. Using a strong flashlight,
inspect the open cavity next to
the box for the presence of an
insulating material. If the
opening is too tight to visually
inspect the wall cavity, you can
use a small piece of wire or a
paper clip with the end bent



JANE
Continued from Page 25E

hold moisture and eventually
harbor essential soil organisms.
Live, working, hot compost is
readily available by the truckload
or you can fill your own bags.
In Central Florida, our sum-
mer sun is intense. Day lilies
grown in a little afternoon
shade fare better and their
color is brighter. Mine are
happy under tall turkey oaks a
few feet from the lawn and
driveway Every three or four
years, I dig them up to prevent
the middle from being crowd-
ed to death by the offspring.
Day lilies thrive in acidic to
slightly acidic soil. Our sandy
soil is naturally acidic and real
compost averages 5.5 pH. Bear
in mind that nearly all our water
comes from the aquifer - in
limestone rock up to 100 feet
below sea level - so it is alka-
line, at about 8 pH. The excep-
tion is where a shallow well taps


into the shape of a hook.
Slide the hooked end of the
probe between the utility box
and the drywall and try to
snare any insulation that
might be inside the cavity. If
there is no insulation in this
one wall cavity, then try anoth-
er wall cavity away from the
window.
A home built in 1994 should
have more than 3 inches of
insulation in all the exterior
wall cavities, but the installer
may have overlooked the tight
spaces that surround a window
or door. I know of only three
ways to check these smaller
cavities for insulation: Use an

groundwater or the homeowner
is recirculating water from a
nearby water source. Both are
usually acidic. Even unpolluted
rainwater is slightly acidic.
Once day lilies are estab-
lished, they need no supple-
mental irrigation and will take
nourishment from the decom-
posing humus, so fertilizing is
unnecessary. A top mulch of an
inch or two of pine straw or
leaf litter will shade the soil,
help retain moisture, trap
ground heat in winter and
house a host of little animals.
Day lilies are relatively dis-
ease and pest free, drought tol-
erant xericc) and hardy peren-
nials. They make an ideal flow-
ering plant gardeners will
enjoy all season long.


Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and nursery owner.
She welcomes weekend visi-
tors to her Florida Friendly
Yard and Wildlife Habitat at
5019 W. Stargazer Lane,
Dunnellon. Call (352) 465-0649.


FORGET TO PUBLICIZE?
* Submit photos of successful community events to be pub-
ihted in the I ht,-.n.:le ( ll '563-5660 for details.


ERA
ERA
BEAl. EBrTTE


Alan DeMichael
AMERICAN 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
REALTY & INVESTMENTS Beverly Hills, FL 34465
"Always There For You" (352) 746-3600 - Office
728864 (352) 613-5752 - Cell


Realtor�


0, d 1 10, 0, Iy FIN ' "
A ld L I J. 1111


Citrus Springs Pool Home - BeauIijll ri. .

r~ 'r, .-~ -a .,r ija ur. Tri,,I Tc-, 4&e rr.r.-r, .. ,-
I.Orriv. .1r . In rip i' us.i ltcu r~ ..url lour
Bc.-ti.r .8.i sjruri- 11 ic.da, in,
- per:zor.' $1�2,�94 MLS#3 111271 DI r From
H.-.hJ,tr lJ .:-,~ 41 L ..4I I/ Caw:u Sprruict bli,.1
ci Iuirilain P :- r L0,111ori R~ .-.r, *4hr, L or,
Roeboro Drive. House on left.


infrared camera that can prac-
tically see though the walls, use
an infrared thermometer to
check the surface tempera-
tures of various walls, or cut or
drill small inspection openings
in the wall. If the smaller cavi-


ties are empty, insulation can
be injected into the inspection
openings before patching.
---9---
Dwight Barnett is a certified
master inspector with the


4481 N. Bacall Lp.

II- II d [- ' 1 1


I t*.,', , . S.J Al.*u J
16 , m-1,1


�e '" " .-."l"l.*:- i-
4728 N. Cresdine Dr.


!'-', j \t .t,,,i r. t t p',J _ . (lI,,J ' *.',, ii . i,
i ., ,. , A , ., I . l11i- .'. ,I i I. i-' ll .: 1 'I,
I I . I . .A 1, 1 - htL I


CTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
American Society of Home
Inspectors. Write to him with
home improvement
questions at C. Dwight
Barnett, Evansville Courier &
Press, P.O. Box 286,
Evansville, Ind. 47702.


tR]L'u ~ �$229,OO
..-5192 N. EllPaso Terr

'1Pot
I-I.,,, t: t,


4757 N. Jademoor Dr.


i-i . . .r.8 i t .i 1. 1 Is~ . :


ExtRat edr
AWINNN j * )


6195 N. Silver Palm Way




* 4 4


(TrTNrrc ofrjTMv mn Cruwnr.rric i


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007 29E


Prudent pruning


he key to a tree's good
health, growth and
development is proper
care and maintenance. Main-
tenance pruning is the most
common type of
pruning.
In urban land-
scape situations,
pruning is necessary, --
not only for the
health of the tree, but
for the safety of our
homes and property.
Maintenance pru-
ning consists of Kerry
removal of dead,
dying or cross
branches. To get rid ..
of any parasites on


the tree, thinning out trees and
selective removal of interior
branches is also very beneficial.
Thinning out trees allows
greater air and light penetra-
tion. It also reduces weight,
therefore helping the stability
of the structure of the tree in
windstorms. However, remov-
ing too much foliage from a
tree is not recommended.
Understanding how or why a
tree needs pruning is very
important for the health of a


I


tree. A commonly asked ques-
tion is "When is the best time
to prune?" The answer
depends of what species of tree
we are talking about.
If your trees have
1 not been properly
7 " pruned in a few
years, or have never
been pruned at all,
S.n now would be a
good time.
'. "If your trees are
in need of regular
maintenance prun-
Kreider ing, this can be
year for most
* species. To help
ensure the survival
of our trees, they must be prop-
erly cared for.
Did you know ...The Birch
tree is the tree of wisdom?

Kerry Kreider is a profes-
sional arborist, a member of
International Society of
Arboriculture, a tree preserva-
tionist and president of Action
Tree Service. He can be
reached at 302-2815 or action-
proarborist@yahoo.com.


352-79-S-7357, * H-795-7356* e~ %% m %hema real t).com
Visit Our %Vgebsite To N-iew% Nigire Properties


8740 W. Mayo Dr., Suite 3
Crystal River
Hwy 19N to right on Mayo - Across from Regions Bank











�^


- ( "Nancy Knows Sugannill Woods"TM Multi-Million
. I Dollar Realtor
N A N C Y Always There For You
SK 1 Realty Inc.
-.- - I A --- T^ i *NE 8". S.uncot Blvd.
ERA \ r Homosassa, FL
P N t IC4 S 382-1700
Direct: 352-634-4225


INCREDIBLE HOME ON GOLF C
* 4 Bed / 3 Bath / 3 CAR garage
* New summer kitchen at POOL
* Open island kitchen - Corian /
* Fireplace * Central Vac * Al
MLS #306020 $399,900


Always There For You
S#f REALTOR "
. IN SUGARMILL.L "
- WOODS -


OURSE!! FLORIDA LIVIN
* 3 Bed / 2 Bath / 2 Cai
* Roof re-shingled 2001
wood * Kitchen & bath cabin
arm * Glass enclosed Florid


G AWAITS YOU!!
r garage has screen
0 * Neat as a pin!
ets / counters new 2000
da room has AC
3 $162,000






0





(@


~ 7 (c ~2096 sq. ft. LA
0t Wo0mes,9ac. 185,000
2271 South Olympic Hills Terrace, Inverness ON YOUR LOT
(352) 726-2179 Mon-Fri 10-4 3 Bed Den, 2 Bath
[i9e] L a o 0 Ce 1 tr1 alo IWaV Inve s A r-el
Large Lot, Pool, Central Water, Inverness Area

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1-M-11c CnfTNTY tFT) CHRONICLE


MLS #31622






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


30E SUNDAY, SEPTEtBELR 30, 2007


NEED A REPORTER?
* Approval for story ideas must be granted by the Chronicle's editors before a reporter is
assigned. Cal Mike Arnold, managing editor, at 563 5660


Inverness
Beverly Hills
Dunnellon
Crystal River
n-III'Q


352-344-5535
352-527-8100
352-465-7035
352-564-8331


rkndpp Rea l*].lsta[1t*-


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1st Choice Realty * 352-794-SELL (7355)
7394 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River


4320 N. WEEWAHI, CRYSTAL RIVER
Directions: Hwy. 19 North, right on Ashburn Ln. (at Oarhouse),
left on Weewahi.
SUPERBLY MAINTAINED Lovely 3/2 on 1/2 acre landscaped lot in
quiet neighborhood. REDUCED TO $129,900.315482


(4/ L


-s. www.firstchoiceinrealestate.com
BEST,
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK! E ,
E-mail - 1stchoice@coldwellbanker.com _,,


the link between plans and reality

Dennis ) amato
-State Certified CGC-004344

GENERAL CONTRACTOR, INC.
A TRADITION OF QUALITY SINCE 1972
S * Consultation & Project/Plan Review
* Architectural/Design Services
* Cost Estimating * Design-Build Construction
* Custom Crafted Homes * Waterfront Homes
* "Cracker-Style" Homes & Buildings
S * Residential Renovations
� -A Commercial Construction & Remodeling
- Adaptive Re-Use & Restoration of Buildings


IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY!!
Brand new 3BR/2BA 2079 sq.ft.under roof!
Inside laundry. $157,750 MLS#313189


COUNTRY CHARM!!
23 acres with winding drive to 3 BR/2 BA 2005 pool home. 24x24 steel
building.Close in location. $384,900 MLSt319493


,_L .. � .. . ...


FORMER MODEL HOME FIRST TIME OFFERED!!
Never lived in 3 BR/2BA/2 Car Garage. New carpet! Brand New family sized 4BR/2BA/2 Car garage.
Central water/sewer. $212,000 MLS#317058 1/2 acre. Central water. $234,900. MLS #317293
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 3521302-6714 M I


P&-R lV id-Florida
Realty Services, Inc.
1- 746-9770 *- 1-800-329-7002
|- "| I- 3 W. LEMON ST, BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465
Visit us on the Web at: p-rrealty.com * E-mail: pandr639@earthlink.net
CITRUS SPRINGS NEW LISTING BEVERLY HILLS
3 bedrooms. 2 baths, PINE RIDGE N'ce upd.died BEZrl,. M.Sdei
2 car garage and ,._, .. I - ba LpcaI d . Upie i.n d Tilea
buil Jn 2003 h 1, i . : , ',,. th i1c.r Above ground pool
',ILS 1r ,l ' . T.u. :r, ,T,r ,.,. wiih de .tn.3 ar d tii bar
IIL.,. $147,000 , , �:,5 $315.000 MLS 9317456 S89,900
Gloria Bonner 607-0375 Elaine Brightman 2239314 Rose Leone 634-0570
REDUCED PINE RIDGE BEVERLY HILLS
BEVERLY HILLS .. Lr hea i,: .l . :,. e - Le.3r,,:.rr, 1 tr,
.arq. r. *, ' .>'r, dra,', .3 1,,subi,.1 Formal u .5 Iicr,1da ',..:,ri a d r .:ro., d
.,r 1 Fr:.. .ii,,- r. , C,r, L R Slori,r fir, la r in lamii pali :- rp,:,rl icr,:,. o Ir.r:,m
r l , ,.' 1 i.,- ,..0Im T r,: hOTn.. rI;1-," ,hur.-., sr. d -r I.. .i.
li ,.:o,.i 4 $125,000 T...ar,., fea r, T menori r.1L, l 3165i $89,900
Gloria Bonner 697.0375 ML 1 359000 a Bonner 69.0375
Rose Leone 634-0570 69 075


CALL FOR FORMATION ON OUR OTHER LISTINGS


RENTALS S PWINE RIDGE BE.VERL HILLS
K R E, ,NT A L S_ $ 1 0 0 " - " , ,- . r.. - 1 1 .. , i-, .i . , 1 10 s 5 7 5
, , s, p3hjurc $2 000 11 $550


Cridland& GMAC

- CridlandA Real Estate


United Country 2"m 1 FI, J. i ...*, I
MNarge and Bob Malm Pulsar Realty Group
Re..i,.'. . Office: 352-637-3010
I r a ul,.M.i.lr..L E,-,lar Club Toll Free: 866-637-3010
- I i "'"ir. ., ,. ,., . '."... Fax: 352-637-3020


>2~441


ACROSS FROM GOLF COURSE and better than new 3/2/2! Open/
split plan, tile thru-out, kitchen w/breakfast nook, formal living &
dining, family rm., lanai, newer appliances, roof & A/C. Enjoy the
screened & heated inground pool & sunken spa!
$239,900 319765


GULF ACCESS 2/2/1 WATERFRONT HOME! Living rm., dining rm.,
Florida rm., newer A/C, water heater & carpet. Boat house, on canal
to spring-fed river & Gulf. Great fishing & nature at its best!
$150,000 319530


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


M ulti-M million Dollar Sales Team Bob & Downy Hedick Ellen Aroneo Dea Kershaw Lynn Davis Jason Morgan Pat Wadsworth Steve George
Brokar/OwneF tl%/0fflkC(onlorr PieRgeSlesSpedohst ProperyMManmaemet LuxuryHomeSpedh nVyHsSesSl Homesled Bmldersm
(800) 874-9322 * (352) 746-3390 (352)634-4286 (352)634-2345 (352)270-2015 (352)422-2522 (352)422-8095 (352) 634-2209 (352) 422-4012


Wh


You Wa


It SOLD


NT S


L


S


SOLD


1909 W. Freeman 8
Citrus Springs I
$69.900
SOLD E


N Barbour
leverly Hil
$60,000


St. 31 S. Washingt
Is Beverly Hi
$75.000
E SOL


on St. 37 S. Desoto
lls Beverly Hills
$80,000

EL SOLDa


9 Clifford Dr.
Beverly Hills
$82,000


79 Regina Blvd
Beverly Hills
$89,500
SOLD


23 N Wadsworth St 95 Desoto St. 713 Windy Ave. 9909 N. Caravel Ter.
Beverly Hills Beverly Hills Inverness Citrus Springs
$84,900 $90,000 $132,000 $175,000
SOLD SSOLD SOLD


SOLD


305 E. Foster Court
Citrus Hills
$207,000


3759 W.Augusta 3180 NV. Bermuda
Path Way 3695 W.Treyburn Path Dunes Dr.
Black Diamond Black Diamond Black Diamond
$243,000 $285,000 $321,250


3019 Caves
Valley Path
Black Diamond
$445,000


12070 Broadjump
4671 Pine Valley Court
Black Diamond Homosassa
$475,000 $850,000


R


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SUNDAY, SFvrEmi3ER 30, 2007 31E


7-11 sow 11 mixim I


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11111m ) 11111" i
EXCEPTIO'N'mAm `R0HSS1&ftNAL SERVICE

COMMIMOV'RON RATIES" A aA6 L 0 WA " OL
,am AM _111ro ;5W
G9 ALL' US T`tGAY `502w,6%3Www4"2m2`86





i l | KENSINGTON ESTATES.

FLORAL CITY - Spacious 2/2/2 split plan with Fla. ,',o,T. ,, i.rylr a, t.v '
Room located on full one/half acre site on quiet cul-de- kitchen, screened room, hot tub, attached 2 car garage,
sac street. New roof 2005. You'll love this beautifully fenced-in backyard washed. 1 acre lot. Very clean and
landscaped backyard. Fruit trees and plenty of room to ready to move in with a fast closing. This is a great, buy for
add a pool. 319491. ASKING $143,800. the area. JUST REDUCED TO $175,900. #303350.
Pat Davis, Agent Call Deb Thompson for your showing. Cell: 634-2656


professional landscaping. Hydro-Jet pool and spa. Dock
on Floral City pool of lakes. $725,000. #310967. Visual
Tour on www.CitrusCountySold.com
Ask for Jeanne or Willard Pickrel aft. Hrs. 352-212-3410


AMAZING
LAKEFRONT
OPEN. 3 BEDROOM, 2 .
BATH, 3 car garage
home. Enormous master suite. Kitchen totally remodeled. BEST BUY IN TOWN. A lovely 2 bedroom, 2 bath,
Family room with view of pool & lake. Views of the lake LR, DR, FR, 2 car garage and nice screened porch. All
area from all living areas. Clay tile lanai and pool decking, appliances stay. Lots of extras. $129,900.
Must see. #319702. ONLY $319,000. Call Martha Snyder at 352-476-8727.
Call Doris Miner at 726-6668 or 344-1515. Ask for file #316009


bath brick home. Dock and large wood deck overlooking
a Million $ View. 2480 sq. ft. of living area. All appliances.
Spacious bedrooms, split plan with tray ceilings. Vaulted
ceiling in open living room. Breakfast nook with a great view.
Tile flooring, garden tub, and so much more. $425,000.
MLS #319979. www.CitrusCountySold.com
Ask for Jeanne or Willard Pickrel aft Hrs. 352-212-3410


_ -1 -7 - - f- . - I k". --n
CONNELL LAKES - E.,.iiriai s. .:. ,Ir.. ..:ii GREAT COMMERCIAL (ZONED C)! This 6,000
course from this 3/2/2. Don't miss out on this beautiful SF building could be made into several businesses or
spacious home featuring large living room, dining a strip mall Add MLS #317585 and you'll own a BIG
room, breakfast nook, great enclosed lanai all CORNER of Inverness located on a busy section of
overlooking the 17th green. Nicely landscaped lot, HWY 41, next to a large plaza (K-Mart, Publix)
nice kitchen with all appliances and more. PRICED LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION! $1,200.000
TO SELL @ $220,000. MLS #318633
Call Tammy Chamberlain for showing 634-1202 Call Walt Pulcini 352-228-7020


ACREAGE IN QUIET COUNTRY SETTING -
You'll love this custom built 3/2/2 country style home.
Caged, inground pool. Over 3100 sq. ft. under roof &
situated on 5 acres of beautiful pasture land. Fenced
and ready. Bring the horses. Conveniently located
between Brooksville and Floral City. Don't miss this
exceptional buy!l #319890. $389,000.
Pat Davis, Realtor


AUU4 fwlKerfll :,n r. ,,.Ni, nIIInI m-rcc
LIVING RESORT STYLE! Great community w/pool,
clubhouse, RV & boat storage, golf course & lake
access! Shows like a model. $179,900. Bring offers!
#311064. With warranty.
Call Teri Paduano 212-1446






/_640 sra-:^ �


HERNANDO: OPEN
WATERFRONT.Crc
tr,. Out 2. a
baths, eat-in kitchen, dining area w/built-in hutch, large
living room, Florida room, overlooking lake, inside laundry,
RV carport, nice dock looking over the open water.
Everything stays, just bring your clothes. NEW PRICE OF
ONLY $149,900. Won't last at this price. #303002.
Call Deb Thompson 634-2656 Cell


BEAUTIFUL PINE RIDGE PROPERTY - Caged
pool & lanai, 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, formal dining, large
kitchen with nook. This home also features detached,
outdoor kitchen, fenced area for pets & super
playhouse/fort for the kids. Beautifully landscaped, full
1 acre lot. Seller anxious to relocate. Will seriously
consider all offers. 10200. ASKING $388,900.
Pat Davis, Agent


SINGING FOREST MOBILE HOME GREAT
WINTER HOME or low cost year 'round housing! Two
bedroom, 1V/ baths, 14x60, 1983 Palm Harbor.
Oversized carport and shed.
Call Doris Miner 352-726-6668 (office)
or 352-422-4627 (cell)


INCREDIBLE FAMILY HOME IN PINE RIDGE,
Decorated.with impeccable taste 3 bedrooms, 2 bath plus
office in 2,824 sq. ft of living area. Lifetime metal roof,
22x24 great room w/wood-buming fireplace. 17x32 heated
pool. Quality hardwood flooring. Fireplace, open living area.
Stunning master suite. Separate workshop. $388,000. MLS
#319959. Visual Tour www.CitrusCountySold.com
Ask for Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 352-212-3410


I


I m


|


--I


Onus Cowry (FL) CHRONICLE


J.W. IWMORTON


OfAl t UOUSIN REAL ESTATE, INC.

! . L645 W. MAIN ST., INVERNESS, FL


L____� I SALES: (352) 726-6668

Email: cent21 @infionline.net, www. jwmortonrealestate.com m 1800m543-9163
__ _ _ _ _ _ Em __________________ 1




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