Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01014
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness Fla
Publication Date: September 23, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01014

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FORECAST:
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PAGE 4A


SEPTEMBER 23, 2007


THE FARCE IS WITH YOU:
'Family'
'Wars'
FOX's
"Family
Guy" car
toon
series
pays
tribute ir
parody to
the movie
Wars" .jH -
tonight./Page 6B

GOING TO JUDICIARY:
Iraq video
Iraqi investigators have
videotape that shows
Blackwater USA guards
opened fire without
provocation./Page 12A
HOMEFRONT EXTRA:
Sikorski's
Attic
The owner of this
Martin Co. guitar,
model 1-21, is
curious about the
value of the
instrument.
Read about it
and more
collectibles
with advice
from the
expert, John
$ikorski.
/Page 9A

TRULY PRIVATE ROAD:
Governor's idea
A plan floated by Gov. Charlie
Crist would lease some
Florida toll highways to
private vendors./Page 3A
PASSIONFLOWERS:


--


I: owners shouldn't concern themselves with Fed


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Water transfers coming?


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle file
Lake Rousseau, in the northwest corner of Citrus County, is at the center of a controversy. St. Johns Water Management District officials have listed the lake and
the Withlacoochee River as possible "other sources" of water for their district.

St. Johns officials say drawing fom Withlacoochee River, Lake Rousseau not in plans


TERRY WITT
terrywitt@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
For many years, Citrus County lead-
ers fought against water transfers to
the Tampa Bay region, but some won-
der if the latest threat might come
from the east
The St. Johns River Water
Management District came under
scrutiny last week in Hernando
County when it was accused of back-.
ing a plan to transport water from the
Withlacoochee River and Lake
Rousseau in northern Citrus County


to cities within its boundaries.
St. Johns officials denied they ever
had such a plan.
But Jack Sullivan, executive direc-
tor of the Withlacoochee Regional
Water Supply Authority, said the
potential for such a transfer was dis-
cussed July 18 at a meeting of 37 cen-
tral Florida cities hosted by SJRWMD
in Orlando. The meeting was an
attempt by SJRWMD to identify alter-
nate sources of water for cities within
its boundaries. Ground) L a ter su pplieis
in central Florida are being stressed
by population growth.
Sullivan produced a chart from a


summary of the meeting showing 15
local governments in Lake, Marion,
Orange, Seminole and Volusia coun-
ties were interested in pumping 40
million gallons of water per day
(GPD) from the Withlacoochee. The
chart showed three governments had
an interest in drawing 9.2 million
GPD from Lake Rousseau.
St Johns officials said Friday the
agency has neither approved nor pro-
posed a project to withdraw water
from the Withlacoochee River for
transport across district lines. They
Please see WATER/Page 4A


Chronicle graphic
The north-flowing Withlacoochee River
borders much of Citrus County, with
Lake Rousseau near the end.


Pretty vine
Jane Weber details the Florida
native maypop, Passiflora
incarnate./Page 10E
EVANGELICALS REGROUP:
Swing state
Christian right returns to
grassroots./Page 3A

NEW LOOK, BETTER FORMAT:


CH IPQ)l�

Web upgrade
Fall is in the air and the Citrus
County Chronicle online team
is turning over a new leaf as
of Oct. 1./Page 1D
ONLINE POLL:
Share your view
Do you feel University of
Florida campus
@police were justi-
fied in using a
Taser to subdue
student Andrew
Meyer?
A. Yes. He was out of control
and a danger to police.
B. No. The punishment did
not fit the offense.
C. Yes. Tasers are an accepted
form of non-lethal deterrents.
D. No. He needed to be
spanked.
To vote, simply access the
Chronicle Web site,
www.chronicleonline.com.
Results will appear in the
Sept. 30 edition.
Last week's results./Page 2A

Annie's Mailbox ....... 20A
Classified ............ 6D
Crossword ......... . . 20A
Entertainment ......... 6B
Horoscope .......... 20A
Lottery Payouts ........ 6B
Movies .. . ..... . . 20A
Obituaries .......... . 6A
Together ............ 19A
Eight Sections


6 I lllll84578 2007 o


Senior


triathlete


competes at


Disney meet


Swim club affords

chance to train, chat
KERI LYNN MCHALE
kmchale@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Connie Tice said it's a real thrill to
pass younger men - in the water. The
65-year-old Inverness woman is a com-
petitive triathlete.
Tice is at Walt Disney World today
participating in an Olympic-distance
triathlon. She'll swim 0.9 miles, bike 36
miles and run 6 miles.
"My goal is to finish without killing
myself," Tice joked. Last year, Tice won
first place, out of her age group, at the
Disney triathlon. She is amazed she can
withstand the physical and mental
exertion, she said.
When Tice was 60 years old, her
friends, who are younger athletes, con-
vinced her she was strong enough to
race. Since, Tice has participated in
about 20 triathlons, both Olympic and
sprint distance. Sprint distance usually
includes a 0.25-mile swim, 15-mile bike
ride and 3-mile run. On average, Tice
places within the top three for her age
group, she said.
Tice plans to compete well into her
80s and 90s, if her body allows, like
many male triathletes she has encoun-
tered, she said. Her inspiration is an
older female triathlete, Jackie Yost,
who beat her in past competitions, she
said.
Tice loves to push herself, but being a
triathlete is only one of her accom-
plishments. She is a speech professor
at Central Florida Community College
and came to Florida from California
eight years ago as a traveling speech
pathologist. Tice is a wife, mother and
grandmother, and her husband of 25
years, Jerry, is her motivator, she said.
"Oh, he's my major encourager ... he


Mucking about


Special to the Chronicle
Connie Tice, 65, will compete today at
the Walt Disney World Olympic-distance
triathlon. She'll swim 0.9 miles, bike 36
miles and run 6 miles.
rides bikes with me," Tice said. Her
drive stems from her husband's support
and constant encouragement from her
swim coaches and teammates, she said.
"It's just a wonderful group of peo-
ple," Tice said about fellow members of
the Inverness masters swim team, an
adult recreational swim team. Tice reg-
ularly swims with the team three times
a week
The masters swim team, comprised
of Citrus County residents 18 years of
age and older, is led by Citrus County
Please see "'-;-'; ; .:'.-Page 5A


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Alex Lampinen and Jacob Boiling muck around in the lake Saturday at Fort Cooper
while students from the Marine Science Center set up a net to catch small crea-
tures for observation at the "Muck About." The activity is a part of the 12th annu-
al Save Our Waters Week activities.

Students teach residents of marsh resources

KErRi LYNN McHALE ronmental Science students teamed up
kmchale@chronicleonline.com with park rangers to entertain and edu-
Chronicle cate Citrus County residents.
Participants had the opportunity to
Residents got down and dirty in attend one or both of the scheduled ses-
Citrus County this past weekend. sions, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. and 12 p.m. to 2


On Saturday, Fort
Cooper State Park
rangers and Academy of
Environmental Science
students hosted "Muck
About," an educational
event for local environ-
mental enthusiasts.


DID YOU
* On Wedne
Academy
Environme
Science st
beat Citrus
School ant


The event wrapped up River Hig
the list of "Know Where It students
Flows" scheduled activi- Waters ir
ties for the 12th annual an intera
Save Our Waters Week, about wa
which lasted from Sept
14 to 22. This year was the
third year "Muck About" took place at
Fort Cooper State Park in Inverness
and the second year Academy of Envi-


-h
ir
ct
itE


p.m. The students and
KNOW? park rangers led groups
through the muck and
sday, marsh of Lake
of Holathlikaha. The 160-
ntal acre lake is spring-fed
udents and is home to many
s High plant and animal species,
d Crystal according to a Fort
School Cooper State Park pam-
n "Our phlet
Jeopardy," Eager students and res-
tive game idents put on their rub-
er issues. ber boots and followed
Diane Otten, Fort Cooper
park ranger of three years, to the water.
Along the way, Otten pointed out dif-
Please see y:!uCsit-/J.:,'i Page SA


LMRE


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. I








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLED


]Beat the Sheriff


helps Jessie's Place


Special to the Chronicle

The annual Beat the
Sheriff race, Citrus County's
longest-standing community
road race, is in its 11th year.
-Sponsored by the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office and
Citrus Road Runners, a local
runners club, the race will
start at 7:30 a.m. Saturday
from Courthouse Square.
The USA Track & Field-
certified 5K (3.1 mile) course
takes runners through scenic,
historic downtown Inverness.
The route is all asphalt, with
slightly rolling hills.
Runners may pre-register
by mail or by visiting the
Citrus Road Runners' Web
site . at www.
CitrusRoadRunners.org.
Simply download and print
an application, fill it out and
include a check for $15 (or
$13 if you're a club member)
made payable to Citrus Road
Runners. Make sure that reg-
istrations are postmarked no
later than Monday, and mail
them to Citrus Road
Runners, PO. Box 94,
Inverness, FL 34451-0094.
Online registration via
www.active.com is open until
midnight Thursday. All pre-


registered runners will
receive a commemorative
Beat the Sheriff T-shirt.
Registration on the day of.
the race will run from 6:15 to
7:15 a.m. at Stumpknockers
restaurant just off the;
square. Same-day registrants'
will pay $20 to compete.
The 5K race will be fol-
lowed at 8:15 a.m. by a spe-
cial Kids Fun Run.
All proceeds will benefit-
the Citrus County child advo-"
cacy center. Known asO
Jessie's Place, the center isl'
named for 9-year-old Jessica'
Marie Lunsford, who was
kidnapped from her home&
and murdered in 2005.
Those runners who beat'
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy to the fin-
ish line will receive a special"
award. Other awards will bev
presented for first-placev
overall and masters (40-plus),
for winning males and1
females, plus the top three
runners in five-year age'
groups, starting from 9-underl
to 75-up.
For more information, calf
James Martone at the sher-,
iff's office, 726-4488. Or call?
Citrus Road Runners' Chris'
Moling at 637-2475.


Local BRIEFS.


Hospice group to host
Alzheimer's seminar
A seminar for health care profes-
sionals, family members or those
who are caring for individuals
affected by Alzheimer's disease will
be from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday
at the Citrus team office of
Hernando-Pasco Hospice (HPH),
3545 N. Lecanto Highway, in
Beverly Hills' Park Plaza shopping
center.
There is no charge to attend.
Jerry Hall, MSW, program spe-
cialist for the Alzheimer's
Association, Gulf Coast Chapter,
will be the guest presenter. Lunch
is included for all attendees. Pre-
registration is requested by calling
Wendy Hall, HPH Citrus staff mem-
ber, at 527-4600.
Food ministry sponsors
food distribution
EI-Shaddai food ministries will
sponsor a "brown bag of food" dis-
tribution from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Wednesday at the Crystal River
Church of God, 2180 W. 12th Ave.,
behind the Lincoln Mercury dealer-
ship.
This food giveaway is the last
Wednesday of every month. For
information, call 795-3079 or 628-
9087. They deliver to homebound.
The USDA is an equal opportunity
provider.
New applications
needed for lunches
Citrus County School District
officials warn if an application was
approved for free or reduced-price
meals last year (2006-07), the sta-
tus of that application will expire


Friday.
Once the application expires, the
child will be required to pay full
price for meals until a new applica-
tion has been approved.
Families may prepay online at
http://cafe.citrus.k12.fl.us.
Golf tourney aids
Lecanto band
The Lecanto High School Band
Boosters plans the second annual
Lecanto High School Band Golf
Tournament Saturday for $50 per
player at the Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club/Oaks Golf Course,
510 E. Hartford St., Hernando.
Registration is 7:30 a.m. and tee-
off is at 8:30.
Enjoy a complete program of
special events, 18 holes of golf
(including cart), lunch, door prizes
and an awards banquet. Mulligans
will be available at $5 each or
three for $10. Sponsor a hole for
$100.
Win a Harley Davidson with a
hole-in-one, and participate in the
longest drive contest, closest to the
pin challenge and straightest drive
contest.
Call Geri OBrien at 228-3901 or
Marilyn Rowe at 628-5191.
EOC director to
address TOO FAR
Capt. Joe Eckstein, the
Emergency Operations Center
director, will address the TOO FAR
mem-bership at the TOO FAR
General Meeting at 7 p.m.
Thursday at the East Citrus
Community Center. The Center is
on State Road 44, approximately 4
miles east of Inverness. All meet-
ings are free and open to the pub-


lic. For information, call 726-5004
or visit toofarinc.com. Office hours
are from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday
through Thursday.
TOO FAR is a grassroots organi-
zation concerned with improving
the quality of our water, main-tain-
ing water levels, preventing water
transfer to other areas, and educat-
ing the public about these issues.
Please show your support for these
issues by attending this meeting.
AARP TaxAide
volunteers needed
AARP-TaxAide of Citrus County
is looking for Tax Counselor volun-
teers to assist in electronically filing
federal tax returns for the upcom-
ing tax season. It also needs client
facilitators to greet taxpayers and
to help control the efficient flow of
clients at the tax site. Technical
coordinators are needed to install
software and train team members
in computer support. This time-lim-
ited opportunity is a wonderful way
to give back to others in our
unique, Nature Coast community.
Disabled volunteers are welcome
to join our team and participate in
the training and provision of servic-
es that the TaxAide program pro-
vides.
TaxAide is a free service of the
AARP Foundation and is support-
ed by a grant from the IRS. An
information session will be at 9
a.m. Oct. 16 at the
Homosassa/Crystal River Moose.
Lodge on U.S. 19. To register and
for additional information about the
TaxAide program and how to
become a member of our team,
contact pat.citrus.taxaide
@gmail.com, or call 257-8848.


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Gina Widener's second-grade class lived history Friday during their wax museum at Rock
Crusher Elementary School. "It is an opportunity for the students to-kind of get a feel for all
the different greatest Americans in American history," said Widener. "It really helps make a
connection for them." Parents and students walked through the mock museum and heard
each character tell about their importance in history. Lori Ringheisen couldn't resist a photo
opportunity with her daughter Nycole Hartwig, 7, who dressed as Florence Nightingale.


SOUND OFF
* Call the anonymous Sound Off line at 563 0579. Be prepared to leave a message.


ONL INE-- OLL__ SUL- TS.

* QUESTION: Is $65,000 an appropriate salary for Mosquito Control's helicopter pilot?
* YOUR ANSWERS:
A. No. The sheriffs office only pays its two full-time and four part-time pilots a total of
$112,000. (55 votes, 17 percent.)
B. Yes. Flying helicopters is dangerous and requires special skills and training.
(143 votes, 45 percent.)
C. No. The position is part-time. (58 votes, 18 percent.)
D. Where can I sign up for that job? (65 votes, 20 percent.)
* To vote in this week's Online Poll, simply access the Chronicle Web site, www.chronicleonline.com.



b y m Vft )
Ankh


Are you not having fun anymore?
Are you irritable or have trouble sleeping?
If so, call today. If you have been suffering from these or other symptoms of
depression. You may be eligible for a research study of an investigational
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For more information about this research study,
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Participation is completely voluntary


11 S%.- 0/31 0, 7V. www,newstudyinfo.net
Mildred V. Farmer, MD, 12144 Cortez Blvd. (Route 50) Between US 19 & Mariner Blvd., Brooksville, FL 34613


Citrus County residents can call the

Department of Water Resources

at 527-7650 to request a free
indoor water audit kit


This kit walks you through the ABC's of identifying ways to reduce your indoor water usage.
Within 24 hours you will be able to determine the amount of water that you can save by:
* Installing a water-efficient toilet.
* Installing a high-efficient showerhead.
* Installing a high-efficient faucet aerator.
Replacing older toilets with low flush models can save 350 gallons of water per week. (A
much cheaper technique is to install a toilet displacement device inside those older toilets
which will save an average 1 gallon per flush.)
Replacing a regular showerhead with a low-flow showerhead can save 230 gallons of water
per week.
Typically the older the toilet, the showerhead and/or the faucet, the more likely it is to
consume large volumes of water.
Upgrade Your Plumbing
If your home was built before 1992, then have we got a deal for you! Complete and return
the water audit and we will provide you with free water saving devices like low-flow shower
heads, toilet tummies and faucet aerators.

Protecting Florida's water is everyone's job.
Each of us can play a role by decreasing water consumption.
The Department of Water Resources, in partnerships with various expert affiliations, offers public
education and outreach programs, which are funded jointly by the Citrus County Board of County
Commissioners (BOCC) and Withlacoochee Regional Water Supply Authority (WRWSA).


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Environmental enthusiasts


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Vicki Villanova, Kate Sobelman and Tiffany Davenport from the Academy of Environmental Science were the winners over Citrus
High School and Crystal River High School on Wednesday during the "Our Waters in Jeopardy" game at the Jerome Multi-Purpose
Room at the Lecanto Campus of Central Florida Community College. The interactive game, based on the long-running game show
"Jeopardy," was a part of the 12th annual Save Our Waters Week activities.


Living history


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SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 23, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


. I


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around

THE STATE

Boca Raton

Baby's crib death may
be linked to recall
A 2-year-old girl died after
getting her head caught
between in her crib, a couple of
days before a national recall
was issued because of safety
concerns.
The girl was found with her
head caught between a broken
rail and the frame of the crib at
her family's condo west of here
on Wednesday. She was rushed
to West Boca Medical Center
where the girl, named Serenity,
was pronounced dead.
The baby's mother, Connie
Bergey, said the crib was a
Simplicity Crib N Changer
Combo, one of a dozen models
listed in a recall issued Friday
by the Consumer Product
Safety Commission.
Simplicity Inc., of Reading,
Pa., manufactured the cribs in
China. The recalled cribs were
sold under the Simplicity or
Graco brands, from January
1998 through May 2007. The
recall involves multiple models
4nd model numbers. The com-
pany's president, Ken Waldman,
told The Associated Press
Fnday that "we feel comfortable
that our products are safe."

Sunrise

Two dead after fight


outside nightclub
Authorities are investigating
the shooting deaths of two men
outside a Sunrise nightclub
! Sunrise Police spokesman
Robert Voss said Fort
Lauderdale residents Jonas
jlosephrand Enold Antenor were
killed when a fight in Peppers
ta[e spilled into the parking lot
and gunfire erupted.
' Alorities are pursuing leads
6n t unmen and their motive.



Men charged after posting
, manatee abuse video
Two men who videotaped
themselves hooking and fighting
, manatee were charged with
attempting to harass, capture
and kill the animal, authorities
said Friday.
! Karl F. Kuhn, III, 19, and
Charles V. Podesta Jr., 20, face
up to a year in jail and a
$100,000 fine for violating the
Endangered Species Act,
according to a statement from
U.S. Attorney R. Alexander
A0costa's'office
S"odesta posted videotape
clips on MySpace on March 13
showing he and Kuhn hooking
and fighting a West Indian
Manatee in a Fort Lauderdale-
area canal, the statement said.
t They were both released on
$50,000 bond. An arraignment
is scheduled for Sept. 27.
i Last year, 417 manatee deaths
vere recorded, the deadliest year
rn record for the animal.
Killer gets life in prison,
claims to be God
An admitted Satanist convicted
of brutally killing a romantic rival
Ond then butchering him was
sentenced to life in prison Friday.
: Lazaro Galindo, who repre-
Sented himself, told the court he
4as God and would unite the
(atholic and Satanic religions.
He also maintained his inno-
cence, saying he felt "the actual
killer is still loose on the street."
I A jury deliberated for just
over two hours before convict-
ijtg Galindo of second-degree
murder.
: In a nearly 40-page confes-
Sion, the 26-year-old detailed how
Iie stabbed and beat Argelio
Ponzalez and then spent two
days inside his trailer home dis-
membering the man. Police
found an altar and a cauldron
killed with knives and metal
weapons .
Galindo had initially petitioned
e court to wear his Satanic garb
to trial, but said he'd found God
the day it was scheduled to
Olegin.
' Galindo is serving a 45-year
sentence for molesting a 13-year-
ol1d. His life term will start after
that sentence concludes.
- From wire reports


Plan could privatize roads


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE - One of
the many ideas under consid-
eration as a way to help the
state save money without rais-
ing taxes is a vague plan float-
ed by Gov. Charlie Crist to lease
some Florida toll highways to
private vendors.
Among the roads that could
be leased are the Alligator
Alley stretch of Interstate 75
across the Everglades, the
Sunshine Skyway Bridge
across Tampa Bay and others.
Crist envisions the possibili-
ty of a long-term lease that
would allow private companies


to run the toll plazas and do the
maintenance on the highways.
The companies would then be
allowed to raise tolls, although
there would be a limit.
Records of discussions on
the issue cited in a story
Saturday in the Orlando
Sentinel show that Alligator
Alley between Naples and Fort
Lau&ferldatl would probably be
among the ,most likely candi-
dates for such a lease. The
state has estimated it could
raise between $504 million and
$1.3 billion by leasing it to pri-
vate investors.
Crist has said repeatedly it
could be a good deal for the state.


I'm just trying to be innovative and
not raise taxes.


"I'm just trying to be innova-
tive and not raise taxes," the
governor said.
The Department of
Transportation has also
pushed two other toll roads as
"most likely candidates" for
privatization: the state-owned
stretch of the BeachLine
Expressway in Orange and


'i-c.'ta Crist
governor.
Brevard counties, and the
Sunshine Skyway bridge.
Florida's DOT has predicted
that leasing the easternmost
nine miles of BeachLine could
net the state between $139.9
million and $321 million,
according to the documents
cited by the newspaper.
The five-mile Skyway bridge


Evangelicals regrouping Jury


Swing state's Christian right returns to grassroots convicts


Associated Press


BRANDON - Headed into
the 2008 election season,
Christian, conservatives are
weary Their movement has
lost iconic leaders and the
Republican presidential field
is uninspiring. But they may
have found hope in a trailer
on the campus of Bell Shoals
Baptist Church.
There, in Annex Room No.
3, Ruth Klingman nods as a
leader in Florida's pro-family
movement describes how gay
marriage would open the door
to other "aberrant forms of
marriage." He holds up a
printout of "polygamy pot
lucks" as evidence.
Yes, Klingman says after-
ward, she will do her part to
pass a constitutional amend-
ment cementing marriage as a
union between one man and
one woman in this presiden-
tial swing state.
The first Family Impact
Summit minted a new activist
- tangible results from three
days of talks and workshops
meant to replenish the roots
of the Christian right.
"I just feel the opposition is
growing so strong, I need to
grow stronger," said
Klingman, 34, who drove two
hours from the one-stoplight
town of Hawthorne to join
activists.
Organized by a scarcely
known Tampa-area Christian
group, the summit sounded a
back-to-basics theme:
Evangelicals are called to be
active citizens to combat
threats from the left; that the
work must involve not just
national advocacy groups but
local people and pastors; and
the fight requires patience
and persistence.
That last sentiment is a
reminder of the challenges
facing the Christian right.
Activists lost key allies in


Associated Press
A Christian activist attends a workshop during the Family Impact
Summit on Friday at the Bell Shoals Baptist Church in Brandon.


Congress when the Democrats In a sig
retook Congress in 2006, Christian
movement pioneers Jerry blood, thi
Falwell and D. James of the
Kennedy died this year, and weights,
there's apathy over the cur- GOP pre
rent crop of GOP presidential Gary Bau
candidates.
Even this
weekend's sum- The old
mit had its disap-
pointments. saying is all
Organizers
hoped 350 peo- politics is local
ple would
attend, laying the It gets people
groundwork for a .
new activist net- involved.
work.
But only 104, Terry "' - -:
nearly all from Christian Coalition operativ
Florida, regis-
tered. A workshop on the Commun
basics of grassroots activism previous
drew a handful of people - a local bi
and one was a spy, an activist sole full-t
for Americans United for mer state
Separation of Church and operative
State. Such
"There will be peaks and nerships
valleys, but I don't know if peo- right now
ple understand the depth and means mr
breadth of our movement," ground an
said Gary Cass, former execu- streets.
tive director at Kennedy's "The ol
Center for Reclaiming tics is lc
America for Christ. involved.'


gn of just how much
activists want new
e summit drew some
movement's heavy-
including former
residential candidate
uer, Richard Land of
the Southern
Baptist Conven-
tion's Ethics and
Religious Lib-
erty Commission
and Tony
I. Perkins of the
Family Resear-
ch Council.
However, the
organizing
group was a
Tampa-area
e. shoestring oper-
ation: the
ity Issues Council,
y known for fighting
kini bar The group's
ime employee is for-
Christian Coalition
Terry Kemple.
national-local part-
are the way to go
v, Kemple said: "It
iore troops on the
nd more feet on the

ld saying is all poli-
ocal. It gets people
"


teen of


murder

Associated Press
FORT MYERS -A teenager
was convicted of murdering a
17-year-old honor student and
setting her on fire after more
than three hours of jury delib-
eration Friday.
Joshua Henninger, 19, of
Cape Coral, cried as the verdict
was read. He was charged with
the 2005 kidnapping, rape and
murder of Annamarie Cruz
Randazzo.
Henninger and Jeremy
Chapman, 25, were arrested in
2005 after Randazzo's burned
remains were found by
campers in a wooded area.
Randazzo had stopped at
Henninger's home in July 2005,
but got into an argument with
the men and one of them struck
her The men tied her up, drove
her to an unknown location and
killed her, then put her body in
an abandoned refrigerator and
set it ablaze, police said.
Public Deputy Defender Ken
Garber told the jury that
Chapman, not Henninger, had
plotted the attack
"This isn't the movie of the
week where the hero rises to
the occasion. This is a boy who
was expected to be a man,"
Garber said. "He used bad
judgment and perhaps he was
cowardly in what he did, he just
wasn't strong enough to stop it"
Chapman pleaded guilty to
Randazzo's murder and anoth-
er murder in June. Henninger
will be will be formally sen-
tenced Oct 24.
"We're just happy with the
outcome," Randazzo's stepfa-
ther Jeff Walter said. "We feel
that justice, as much as could
be done, was served."


along Interstate 275 could bring
in $477 million to $1.3 billion,
according to the state estimates.
But in all those scenarios,
the tolls would likely go up.
The estimates envision compa-
nies providing more revenue to
the state if they are allowed to
raise tolls more. For example,
if the state wants the maximum
$1.3 billion return on the
Skyway lease, it would have to
allow a vendor to raise the toll
from the current 75 cents to $5.
State Transportation
Department spokeswoman
Pam Griffis called all the pro-
posals "very,'very, very prelim-
inary."


Disney

training

airport

employees
Associated Press

LAKE BUENAVISTA-Walt
Disney World calls its workers,
from actors to laundry workers,
"cast members" to make them
feel part of the show. There's a
garbage can every 25 steps, so
litter will be tossed, not
dropped. There's a polite way to
answer one of the park's most
asked questions: "What time is
the 3 o'clock parade?"
These nuggets are part of cor-
porate customer service train-
ing offered by Disney Institute,
a unit of the Walt Disney Co.
that has coached thousands of
executives
and front-
line workers
from other
companies Just think
and organi-'
zations since Of the
1986.airport
Now the airport
Institute has business.
taken anoth-
er client: The reality
Miami Inter-
national Air- is both
port, which
many travel- businesses
ers will tell
you needs have
customer
service millions
training like pope
an airplane people
needs wings. each year
The air-
port's termi- waiting in
nal opera-
tions emp- line for a
loyees are
taking class- ride.
es taught by
Institute
instructors,
learning Bruce
leadership Jones
practices, programming
team build- director,
ing, staff Disney Institute.
relations and communication
skills.
"Walt (Disney) clearly put us
on a path toward things like
quality, great guest service, cre-
ativity and innovation," said
Bruce Jones, programming
director of the Disney Institute.
Part of Disney's lure is the
feelings generated by its films
and parks - wonderment for
children, escapism for adults.
Disney takes great pride in
ensuring repeat business, main-
ly by emphasizing customer
service while not appearing
sterile or robotic.
"Many organizations think
they're different from Disney,
and therefore can't learn from
an entertainment or a parks
and resorts business," Jones
said. "But then when they get
here and work with us a little
bit, they find out... these princi-
ples and similarities are trans-
ferrable across industries,
across cultures, and across dif-
ferent sizes and shapes of
organizations.
'lust think of the airport busi-
ness. The reality is both busi-
nesses have millions of people
each year waiting in line for a
ride."
Among 18 U.S. airports with
30 million or more passengers
per year, only three airports
performed worse that Miami's
in J.D. Power and Associates'


2007 North America Airport
Satisfaction Study.










4A SUNDAY SrF-,MB--23,-200kGi-usCUN.Y.....CHRONICL


WATER
Continued from Page 1A

said the chart Sullivan mentioned
didn't identify water projects. It mere-
ly showed entities with an interest in
alternative water supply projects
involving the Withlacoochee,
Ocklawaha and St. Johns Rivers.
"This is not one of our projects,"
said Hal Wilkening, director of the
Department of Resource Manage-
ment for SJRWMD. "There are no
plans for the St. Johns Water
Management District to transport
water from the Withlacoochee River"
Wilkening said it is true that with-
drawals from the Withlacoochee were
discussed conceptually at the meet-
ing, but he said the idea for a transfer
from the Withlacoochee originated
with the authority, not with the dis-
trict. He said the authority has identi-
fied the Withlacoochee as a potential
future water supply source in its long-
range planning documents.

Sullivan: 'Overjoyed'
Sullivan responded that he was
happy to hear there would be no
water transfers to SJRWMD.
"We're overjoyed," he said.
He confirmed the Withlacoochee
River has been identified as a poten-
tial source of water, should any mem-
ber county run out of water. Citrus,
Sumter and Hernando counties, and
all their cities, plus the city of Ocala,
belong to the authority.
Sullivan said his comments about
water transfers at Wednesday's meet-
ing were a reaction to what he heard
at the July 18 meeting in Orlando.
He said he had been asked if the
authority would host a meeting of 14
governmental entities interested in
tapping the Withlacoochee as an
alternate water supply source, but he
declined the offer until he could talk
to his board. Sullivan relayed his
request to the board Wednesday. The
board rejected the request and
instructed its attorney, Larry Haag, to
begin researching legal options for
challenging future inter-district water
transfers.


There are no

plans for the St. Johns

Water Management

District to transport

water from the

Withlacoochee

River.

Hal Wilkening
director, Department of Resource
Management, SJRWMD.

Wilkening said SJRWMD district
sent no one to the water supply
authority meeting because it has no
project involving the Withlacoochee
River. However, he said the district
has discussed the concept of partner-
ing with the authority and the
Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District, commonly called
Swiftmud.
Michael Molligan, spokesman for
Swiftmud, said he has heard of no
project involving the transfer of water
from the Withlacoochee to the St.
Johns district.
He said any entity wishing to with-
draw water from the Withlacoochee
River would first be required to
obtain a water use permit from
Swiftmud, and that includes the
authority.
"We've certainly been in discus-
sions with water management dis-
tricts where we overlap, but I haven't
heard of anything about moving water
from the Withlacoochee River out of
our district," Molligan said.
Molligan described the authority as
a wholesale water distributor, much
like a large utility. However, he said
the authority also is developing its
own regional water supply plan.

Protection from raids
When the authority was created in
1977, the purpose was to thwart poten-
tial water transfers from the south,
according to Citrus County
Commissioner Gary Bartell, who sits


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER
n PR I !I n


City , H
Daytona Bch. 88
Ft. Lauderdale 87
Fort Myers 90
Gainesville 89
Homestead 88
Jacksonville 88
Key West 90
Lakeland 91
Melbourne 87


on the authority's board along with
Commissioners Dennis Damato and
Joyce Valentino, the chairwoman.
Bartell said Citrus County has no
water supply plan of its own. He said
Citrus would lack the power to fend
off water raids by large governmental
entities, and relies on the authority
for protection.
"The whole idea is not for individ-
ual counties to try to fend off attempts
to raid their water," Bartell said. "It's
a regional approach, not an individ-
ual approach."
Sullivan said the authority's long-
range water supply plan does more
than identify the Withlacoochee River
as a potential alternate water supply
source for member governments, it
also identifies desalination as a
potential source.
The authority's water supply con-
sultant, Pete Hubbell, former
Swiftmud executive director, said a
25-million GPD de-
salination plant at
Progress Energy
north of Crystal River
is under considera- The
tion as an alternative.
However, Hubbell whole
said Progress Energy a
has not been consult- idea is
ed. not for
Sullivan said the not for
desalination proposal individual
is contained in a doc-
ument Hubbell is to try to
drafting called the
Withlacoochee Re- attempts
gional Water Supply
Authority Planning their watt
and Implementation
program. He said the regional a
technical memo
refines the authority's not an in
regional water supply approach
plan by looking at approach
what projects may be
feasible. Desalina- GE
tion, reclaimed water Citrus Count
and conservation
projects are part of
the mix.
"We haven't really contacted


Progress Energy. If it looks like a rea-
sonable thing to do, we may contact
them to see if there is some solid plan

FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


If there was a city or a county

that ran out of water, we couldn't say

you can't have water. But they have to

look at alternatives first - desalination,

re-use, reservoirs, conservation - and -

they have to exhaust all those alternatives

before they can look at transfers.

Nancy Argenziano
Florida Public Service Commission, author of Local Sources First law.


we could do," Sullivan said.
Bartell said he talked to Florida
Power Corporation several years
about the potential for co-locating a
desalination plant at the Crystal
River site and the
company was inter-
ested.
He said he believes
Progress Energy, the
. . t! successor to Florida
. ,- Power, also would
- ' c have an interest.
Water generated
from the desalination
plant would be used
counties exclusively within the
boundaries of the
fend off water supply authori-
ty, Bartell said.


sto raid Argenziano:

er. It's a Local Sources
One of the issues
Approach, raised at Wednesday's
a authority meeting
individual was whether SJR-
WMD believes Local
Sources First applies
to surface waters.
ary .: .-: Local Sources First is
ty commissioner, a state law requiring
governments to ex-
haust alternatives
within their political boundaries
before looking to transfers.
A memo summarizing the July 18
meeting in Orlando said inter-district
transfer law relates to groundwater,


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


MARINE OUTLOOK


- Mi- The Weather Channel 90 72 trace
weather.com race

THREE DAY OUTLOOK
S' TODAY Exclusive daily forecast by:
*..le. High: 90 Low: 72
Partly Cloudy; 50% Chance of Storms


MONDAY
High: 91 Low: 73
Partly Cloudy. 40% Chance of Storms

TUESDAY
High: 90 Low: 72
Sun & Clouds, 40%, Chance of a Storm


East winds from 10 to 15 knots. Seas 2 to
4 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a
moderate chop. Partly sunny with scattered
thunderstorms today.



LAKE LEVELS


Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.59 28.58 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.54 34.58 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 35.01 35.04 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 36.90 37.00 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data, If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year


83/72
95/63
70/89
78
-1

0.03 in.
2.19 in.
36.49 in.
44.15 in.


*As of 6 p.m.from Hernando County Airport
UV INDEX: 9
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder-
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE


Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.04 in.
DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 74
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 79%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees and grasses were light and
weeds were absent.
**Light - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Saturday vn ,.flJ i w th nilit


uriiay vtwas goo wuu vvi Lp
ants mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES


DATE DAY

9/23 SUNDAY
9/24 MONDAY


MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING)
3:06 9:19
3:52 10:04


MINOR M
(AFTERNO
3:32 9:
4:17 10


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
C SUNSET TONIGHT.......................
SUNRISE TOMORROW................
MOONRISE TODAY.....................
SEPtB.8 13 ICet1 CtEi MOONSETTODAY.......................

BURN CONDITIONS

Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.


For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. F
Information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's WA
http://flame,.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness reside
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 car
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; adi
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on t
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on

TIDES


City
Chassahowitzka
Crystal River
Withlacoochee
Homosassa


Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers.
Sunday
High/Low High/Low High/Low
4:39 a/11:36 a 3:39 p/- 5:08 a/12:3C
3:00 a/8:58 a 2:00 p/9:52 p 3:29 a/9:50
12:47 a/6:46 a 11:47 a/7:40 p 1:16 a/7:38
3:49 a/10:35 a 2:49 p/11:29 p 4:18 a/11:27


Monday
H


rru>- City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
IAJOR Atlanta
ION) Atlantic City
SAustin
45 Baltimore
0:30 Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
. 7:26 P.M. Buffalo
.720 A.M. Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
.5:33 P.M. Charleston, WV
.3:44 A.M. Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
or more Dallas
Veb site: Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
dents, Houston
in 2 or 3, Indianapolis
water Jackson
dresses Las Vegas
Little Rock
their day Los Angeles
their day. Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
igh/Low Nashville


0a 4:36 p/12:28 p
a 2:57 p/10:32 p
a 12:44 p/8:20p
7 a 3:46 p/--


Saturday
H L Pop.
78 61 .07
83 61
83 63
78 72trace
82 65 .08
91 63
87 69
84 53
87 73
70 55
79 63
78 71
81 67
88 71 .83
87 65
90 68
73 56
93 61
75 67
91 67
88 66
79 54
91 70
87 51
74 50
77 66
89 61
92 64
87 65
77 64
93 67
81 64
83 72 .04
77 63 .32
88 66
68 60 .25
92 70
91 72
73 54
76 50
85 721.18
88 73
91 67


Sunday
Fcst H L
sunny 76 47
tstrm 75 55
ptcldy 85 57
tstrm 86 69
sunny 74 56
pteldy 93 66
sunny 81 51
shwrs 61 42
ptcldy 88 71
shwrs 59 38
sunny 78 53
sunny 74 48
sunny 72 43
ptcldy 88 73
sunny 87 58
ptcidy 91 65
sunny 82 66
sunny 86 59
sunny 76 53
ptcldy 92 67
sunny 81 59
sunny 77 42
ptcldy 90 70
tstrm 81 47
ptcldy 84 68
sunny 77 56
tstrm 86 65
sunny 90 67
sunny 79 52
sunny 79 48
tstrm 88 72
sunny 85 65
tstrm 88 68
sunny 79 60
tstrm 87 70
sunny 72 57
sunny 91 67
ptcldy 89 73
sunny 75 62
ptcldy 82 67
tstrm 87 74
ptcldy 89 69
ptcldy 90 68


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=wlndy.
@2007 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY
Saturday Sunday
City H L Pop. Fcst H L
New Orleans 87 74 tstrm 88 74
New York City 75 65 .31 sunny 82 60
Norfolk 86 71 sunny 83 65
Oklahoma City 90 67 ptcldy 86 67
Omaha 77 46 ptcldy 87 67
Palm Springs 81 61 sunny 90 63
Philadelphia 83 66 .18 sunny 82 57
Phoenix 93 82 .07 sunny 89 70
Pittsburgh 85 63 sunny 78 52
Portland, ME 65 57 sunny 75 46
Portland, Ore 67 53 .01 ptcldy 67 46
Providence, R.I. 79 62 sunny 79 53
Raleigh 91 72 sunny 90 64
Rapid City 94 45 tstrm 84 50
Reno 64 53 .13 ptcldy 67 38
Rochester, NY 82 66 sunny 74 48
Sacramento 61 58 .02 sunny 79 54
St. Louis 84 70 ptcldy 88 69
St. Ste.,Marie 63 50 .20 sunny 74 53
Salt Lake City 79 61 .09 shwrs 61 46
San Antonio 91 68 sunny 91 69
San Diego 70 62 .05 sunny 73 62
San Francisco 63 57 .13 sunny 70 54
Savannah 83 71 .58 tstrm 87 72
Seattle 60 52 ptcldy 60 52
Spokane 65 50 sunny 62 39
Syracuse 85 66 sunny 74 48
Topeka 83 58 ptcldy 88 68
Washington 83 72 sunny 82 59
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 97 Wink, Texas LOW 29 Fraser, Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/LISKY
Acapulco 87/77/ts
Amsterdam 70/52/s
Athens 76/54/s
Beijing 84/64/s
Berlin 74/53/pc
Bermuda 81/75/pc
Cairo 84/63/s
Calgary 49/36/sh
Havana 88/76/ts
Hong Kong 87/76/ts
Jerusalem 88/68/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


84/63/s
72/54/pc
84/59/pc
73/52/ts
72/46/s
69/49/sh
73/56/pc
87/72/s
76/56/s
61/42/s
83/69/sh
73/49/s
63/45/pc


not to surface water.
Former state senator Nancy
Argenziano, now a member of the
Florida Public Service Commission,
disagrees. Argenziano, who authored
the Local Sources First law, said
Thursday the law applies to both
groundwater and surface waters.
Argenziano said Local Sources
First was written to give local govern-
ments an opportunity to have "first
dibs" on their water. She said that's
the reason every county should have a
water supply needs plan of its own.
She said a needs plan would prove
they need their water and it shouldn't
be transferred to other places.
She said she thinks it was a good
move for Citrus County to join the
Withlacoochee Regional Water
Supply Authority to protect the coun-
ty from raids by outside counties, but
she believes it would be wise for the
county to have its own water supply
plan.
"It can't hurt Citrus County to have
a plan that shows it has future needs,"
he said.
She said Local Sources First does-
n't prohibit water transfers.
"If there was a city or a county that
ran out of water, we couldn't say you
can't have water," she said. "But they
have to look at alternatives first -
desalination, re-use, reservoirs, con-
servation - and they have to exhaust
all those alternatives before they can
look at transfers."


Floridla's Best Comrsanity'NIelspvqarer Servinrg Felorida'sBest


Lb
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.Wh ~0 .... I crg
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Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429




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106 W. Main
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4ASUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2007


CHRUS COUN7Y (FL) CHRONICLE


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SUNDAY, SIEPTI-EMBiR 23, 2007 5A


CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Waterspout


*i-* ".-.


Associated Press
California State Parks lifeguard Daniel Carr points toward
one of several waterspouts that spawned offshore
Saturday as he warns Lee Lee Perry, center, and Isabella
Kamrath, both 9, about swimming in the strong currents at
Cardiff State Beach in Encinitas, Calif.


TRIATHLETE
Continued from Page 1A

Sheriff's deputy Kurt Lynn and
Sumter County teacher Sissy
Ashley. The swimmers train
together at Whispering Pines
Park in Inverness and individu-
ally compete at masters' meets
across the state.
Lynn and Ashley also coach
the Stingrays; a recreational
team out of Inverness com-
prised of children ages 7 to 17
from all over the county. In July,
the young team of swimmers
won second place at a district
championship meet
In 2000, Lynn began the
Inverness swim program. He
wanted to introduce Citrus
County residents to a "lifelong
sport" that teaches self-confi-
dence. Lynn said the program
brings families together
because parents, who once
watched their children practice,
are now hopping in the pool
with them. League participants
even get together to swim down
local rivers and have barbeques.
"I enjoy getting people in bet-
ter physical shape and building
a relationship with them," Lynn
said.
He started competitive swim-
ming when he was 8 years old
and knows the sport's advan-
tages. It's a mental and physical
activity, which promotes health
and personal growth. Also, peo-
ple are less prone to injuries,
Lynn said. He has swam in
marathons, meets and
triathlons across the United
States and internationally. Lynn
derives knowledge from his


SWIMMING
PROGRAMS
* The masters swim team
practices from March to
November. The Stingrays
begin practice at the end
of April or beginning of
May and eri. in August.
Members ,of both teams
regularl, swim three times
a week. During the sum-
mer months, members
'wirri five times a week.
* The program costs $30 a
monrith per person for chil.
dren aid adults For fami.
lies, $5 is deducted trom
the price for each add,.
tironal child.
* More information is avail-
able at the fiont office of
Whispering F'ines Fark in
lrivernes's.

experiences and trains others.
Tice values her coaches'
advice, she said. In order to pre-
pare Tice for her triathlon, Lynn
and Sissy had her wear a weight
belt while she swam to help
with endurance, strength and
speed, she added.
"She's awesome," Lynn said.
She'll climb out of the water and
hop onto a bike for the next leg
of the race with a smile on her
face, he added. Her attitude
pushes her to the finish.
People will line the perimeter
of the triathlon today to cheer
for the athletes. Tice said she
will zone in on Lynn's encourag-
ing voice in her head and if she
needs another reminder to keep
going there's always the words
on the back of her happy face
water bottle, "You can do it!"


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New Orleans prepares for storm


Heavy rainfall likely

Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - An hour after city of-
ficials opened shelters, warned of possible
power outages and urged calm ahead of a
threatening tropical depression, the system
moved inland hundreds of miles away, and
forecasters canceled the tropical storm
warning that had authorities on alert.
Under partly cloudy, pale-blue skies
Saturday, some in this city devastated by
Hurricane Katrina two years ago won-
dered if it was a bit much.
"I can understand them taking precau-
tions and all," Gus Paschos said over cof-
fee at a French Quarter shop.
But he said the preparations and news
coverage surrounding the unnamed storm


MUCKING
Continued from Page 1A

ferent types of birds along the
shoreline and talked about the
low water level in the lake
resulting from the lack of rain.
Although droughts can be
detrimental, a low water level
can provide a great opportuni-
ty to look out on the marshland,
Otten said.
Simply enjoying the scenery
wasn't enough for some resi-
dents who wanted to gear up
and face the detritus, known as
muck. Bodies of dead organ-
isms, fecal material and plank-
ton, drifting organisms in the
water, form muck.
"The rotting vegetation that
sits on the bottom of the lake,"
Otten said, describing muck.
The idea of trudging through
foul-smelling muck may not


al


system were "ridiculous."
"People are overly sensitive since
Katrina," he said. "People are scared."
After the storm and levee breaches that
left 80 percent of New Orleans underwa-
ter, all levels of government were criti-
cized for their preparation and response
to Katrina.
For several days this week, weather
reports on local newscasts keyed on an
area of low pressure that, on Friday,
became Tropical Depression No. 10 -
and, potentially, the region's first major
brush with tropical weather since hurri-
canes Katrina and Rita, which hit in
August and September 2005, respectively
The system also developed the week
after Humberto morphed from tropical
depression to hurricane within just 18
hours. Humberto affected parts of the
state after making landfall in Texas and
"served as a wonderful lesson," said Mark


appeal to some residents, but
participants jumped right in.
"It's an area of the marsh
and the lake that people most
often do not go into," Otten
said. Yet, it is full of small ani-
mals whose habitats are the
grasses. During this time of the
year, wild flowers are blossom-
ing and birds are migrating to
the area from the North, Otten
added.
The academy students
dragged a net in and out of the
water and allowed local chil-
dren to sift through the muck to
find wildlife. They helped the
participants identify plants
and animals.
"I found a shrimp," yelled 9-
year-old Forest Ridge
Elementary student Anna
Lampinen. She said she found
"lots of shrimp and fish" and
came to the event to learn
about wildlife. Her mother,
Carolyn, bought her to the lake.


Smith, a spokesman for Louisiana's office
of emergency preparedness.
"When it boils down to safety, or we
believe there's the possibility that Louisi-
ana may be impacted, we have to start get-
ting things ready to move," he said, noting
that models had shown the more recent
system also affecting Louisiana.
While the system wasn't predicted to
strengthen beyond perhaps a weak tropi-
cal storm, local officials expressed con-
cerns about the safety of the thousands of
people still living in federally issued trail-
ers. Several parishes declared states of
emergency as a precaution. The potential
for strong winds prompted the city of New
Orleans to open three shelters until any
threat had passed.
By Saturday, forecasters said the main
threat was heavy rainfall, possible in parts
of the Florida Panhandle and southwest
Alabama.


"We live here and we need to
know about where we live,"
Lecanto resident Carolyn
Lampinen said. She brought
her three children and friends
to many Save Our Waters Week
educational activities,
Lampinen added.
Participants in the afternoon
group also found an alligator
gar, white spider, tadpole and a
fully-blossomed fragrant water
lily. Academy students helped
two young boys use a small
orange net to find fish.
"I plan on helping the kids if
they need to know anything
about the environment," 17-
year-old Academy of Envi-
ronmental Science senior
Tiffany Davenport said. She
chose to come to educate the
children and get dirty,
Davenport added.
"I work with the (Academy)
seniors and this is part of their
outreach for education,"




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Academy of Environmental
Science teacher Kristen
Russell said. "They do a lot of
(volunteer) activities on the
weekends."
In the morning, Academy
students and park rangers
helped participants identify
and tag plants in the water.
They also saw Great Blue
Herons, deer, ducks, butterflies
and dragonflies, Otten said.
She planned to point out dif-
ferent species to afternoon
participants during their tour.
"After they're finished play-
ing in the muck, we're going to
walk through the muck," Otten
said. "It's a fun thing to do ... to
get mucky."


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purchase must be before tax. Normal exclusions apply, purchase must be before tax. Normal exclusions apply. * purchase must be before tax. Normal exclusions apply.
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CITRUS COUNrIY (1;1) CHRmON'ICLE


6A SUNDAY, SiPri'M.ER 23, 2007


____s_ _- Obituaries


Kathryn
Ayers, 88
HERNANDO
Kathryn J. Ayers, 88,
Hernando, died Friday, Sept.
21, 2007, at The Hospice
House, Lecanto.
Born Jan. 24, 1919, to Josh
and Lillie Johnson in
Brasstown, N.C., she came
here 37 years ago from
Cornelia, Ga.
.She was a homemaker.
For many years, she worked
in the family business at
Gator's Sporting Goods in
Crystal River. She was the
caregiver of her family
She was Baptist.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, H.J. Ayers.
Survivors include: her son,
Malcolm Ayers, Hernando; her
grandson, Henry R. Ayers,
Hernando; her granddaughter,
Linda L. Jones, Marathon; and
her great-grandson, Rory
Ayers.
Funeral services and burial
will take place in Demorest,
Ga., with arrangements under
the care of the Whitfield
Funeral Home, (706) 778-1700.
Memorial contributions may
be given to Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464.

Donald
Beaudin, 77
DUNNELLON
Donald W. Beaudin, 77,
Dunnellon, died Saturday,
Sept. 22, 2007, in Lecanto.
An avid pilot, he owned and
operated Cooperstown-
Westville, N.Y, Airport until
his retirement in 1989. He was
a pilot and glider instructor
and examiner. He also held an
aviation maintenance license
and shop in New York state. He
also held an airline transport
license and was honored for 35
years of service by the New
York State FAA, and he was a
member of the AOPA for 51
years.
He was a life member of the
Inverness Elks Lodge 2522 and
a member of the Dunnellon
Moose Lodge 2308.
Survivors include: his wife
of 39 years, Rayella Beaudin;
his daughter, Gail Pierce and
her husband, Leslie,
Cooperstown, N.Y; grandchil-
dren, Gerald Brown and his
wife Heather, Milford, N.Y,
Holly Alcott and her husband
Joe, Shevlin, Minn.; five great-
grandchildren; sisters-in-law,
Dorothy Freer and Betty
Collins and her husband Jerry,
Dunnellon.
Roberts Funeral Home,
Dunnellon.

Vicky Gootee, 50
HOMOSASSA
Vicky Lee Gootee, 50,
Homosassa, died Friday, Sept
21, 2007, at the Hospice Care
unit of Citrus Memorial hospital.
Born Aug. 28, 1957, she came
to the area eight years ago from
Stuart. She was a cashier at the
Circle-K convenience store.
Mrs. Gootee enjoyed counted
cross stitch embroidery, musi-
cal movies, country music and
line dancing and, when she
was younger, acted in plays.
She collected unicorns and
milk glass items.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 15 years, Thomas
Gootee of Homosassa; two sons,
Steven Cummins and fiance
Erin Russell of Homosassa and
Richard Cummins of Vero
Beach; two daughters,
Christina Jeanne Cummins of
Stuart and Michelle Yvonne
Cummins of Homosassa; broth-

HEINZ
FUNERAL HOME
& Cremation






David Heinz & Family
341-1288
Inverness, Florida


er, Michael and wife Cheryl
Holder of Hobe Sound; two sis-
ters, Joyce and husband Doug
Androsiglio of Stuart and
Brenda and husband Charles
Kelly of Jensen Beach; and
eight grandchildren.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.
Donald
Northrop Sr., 58
INVERNESS
Donald Ray Northrop Sr. 58,
Inverness, died Thursday,
Sept. 20, 2007, in Inverness.
Born Nov. 1, 1948, in Sidney,
N.Y., he was
the son of
Theresa Lillian
Wormuth and
the late James
Everett -et
Northrop. He
came here 11
years ago from
Sidney, N.Y. He Donald
was the man-
ager of an auto
parts store.
A veteran of
the U.S. Navy,
he served dur-
ing the Vietnam War.
He was a member of the Paul
Harris Foundation of Rotary
International.
He attended First Christian
Church.
He was preceded in death by
his brother, Robert Northrop.
Survivors include: his wife of
four years, Debra Northrop,
Floral City; his son, Donald
Ray Northrop Jr and his wife
Cathy, Sidney Center, N.Y; four
daughters, Theresa Couzzo and
her husband Tony, Oneonta,
N.Y, Kathy Niendorf, St.
Petersburg, Elizabeth
Niendorf, Orlando, and
Amanda Niendorf, Inverness;
his mother, Theresa Elliott,
Franklin, N.Y; brother, Bill
Northrop and his wife Joan,
New York; three sisters, Dolly
Goodrich, Marge Platt and
Sharon Madsen, New York; and
four grandchildren, Megan,
Lindsey, Chase and Paige.
Inverness Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes.

Funeral

Thurman Butcher and Betty
Butcher. Funeral services for
Thurman N. Butcher, 82, and
Betty L. Butcher, 79, of
Dunnellon will be at 11 a.m.
Monday at the First Baptist
Church of Dunnellon, with the
Rev. Bob Brown officiating.
Entombment will follow in the
Dunnellon Memory Gardens
Mausoleum. The family will
receive friends from 2 to 4 p.m.
today, Sunday, at the Roberts
Funeral Home, 19939 E.
Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon.
Thurman and Betty were mar-
ried for 60 years. Survivors
include their daughter, Yvonne
Greely, Oviedo; their son, Monty
Butcher, Dunbar, W.Va.; and
four grandchildren.
Donald Northrop Sr. The
service of remembrance for
Donald Ray Northrop Sr., 58, of
Inverness will be at 6 p.m.
Monday, Sept 24, 2007, at the
Inverness Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes, with Pastor
Todd Langston officiating.
Friends may call from 5 to 6
p.m. Monday, Sept, 24, 2007, at
the Inverness Chapel. Crem-
ation will be under the direction
of Hooper Crematory, Inverness.

1Ca0 . E. ' w.
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* Burial
* Shipping
* Cremation
Member of

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and costs, call
726-8323


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The last words? They hope not


Researchers seek to document endangered languages


Los Angeles Times

WOODFORDS, Calif. - In a classroom
amid the dusty hills southeast of Lake
Tahoe, an unlikely duo sit across from
each other and conjugate the verb "to
sleep." They are working in Washo, a lan-
guage with, at best, an uncertain future.
"Elshim," to sleep. "Lelshimi," I am
sleeping. "Elshimi," he is sleeping.
"Shelshimi," they are sleeping.
On one side of a yellow plastic table sits
Ramona Dick, a 74-year-old elder of the
Washo tribe, a great-grandmother and
retired cook whose formal education
ended at the eighth grade but who has a
deep knowledge of the American-Indian
language she learned as a child.
Facing her is Alan Yu, 30, a Hong Kong-
born linguist who immigrated to
California as a teenager, earned a doctor-
ate at the University of California,
Berkeley and now is an assistant professor
at the University of Chicago.
Despite differences in age, culture and
education, the two have bonded in a way
that they hope will yield lasting results.
What brings them together is their
mutual interest in Washo, a tongue that
tribe members estimate is spoken fluently
by no more than 20 or 30 people. The big
picture is even grimmer: Half of
California's 100 American-Indian lan-
guages no longer have fluent speakers and
many of the rest have just five or six hang-
ing on, experts say.
Attempts to document, if not revive,
many of those languages have been going
on for years. The goal is to preserve more
than just conversation and literature; a
vital part of cultural identity - what it
means, for example, to be a Washo - slips
away when a language becomes extinct.
Now, Yu and Dick are part of newer
efforts applying contemporary technology
worldwide.
Last year, Yu was awarded a $160,000
federal grant to compile an online diction-
ary of 5,000 Washo words and phrases,
complete with the digitally recorded pro-
nunciations by Dick and other Washo eld-
ers. Scheduled to be finished in 2009, the
dictionary is designed partly as a tool to
help younger Washos learn the language
- even if just a few words, such as "da'aw"
(Lake Tahoe), "gewe" (coyote) and "gu'u"
(maternal grandmother).
"It's going to be lost, I think, if nobody
tries to teach them," Dick said of Washo,
which had no written form until 20th cen-
tury scholars began transcribing it phonet-
ically "If the young people could learn,
maybe they can tell their children down
the line a bit that it's important to our
tribe. Because we are not a very big tribe."
Washo (some spell it Washoe) leaders
estimate that there are about 1,500 tribal
members, mainly in the eastern Sierra
region on both sides of the California-
Nevada border. Dick lives in Woodfords, in
an isolated Washo community known as
"Hung-a-lel-ti" (Southern Washoes) on
rolling ranchland with stunning mountain
vistas. Its 350 or so residents can walk to
the lime-green education center, where Yu
and Dick meet, but must drive 10 miles
north into Nevada for most shopping.
Yu, who spoke only Cantonese until he
started elementary school, stressed that his
goal is to document Washo, not to save it
"I think the consensus these days is for a
language to be revitalized," he said. "It's
really a community effort. It's something
that a outsider can't come in and force it
onto people."
The Washos have a better chance at
revitalization than many other tribes,
scholars say About 60 adults and teens
attend several Washo-language classes
and teachers introduce Washo words and
phrases to young children in pre-K and
.after-school programs. Besides, Yu said it
"is a gift" to meet fluent volunteers for the
dictionary project like Dick; her cousin,
Steven James; and his cousin, Eleanore
Smokey.


before they


disappear


CATHLEEN ALLISON/Los Angeles Times
Washo tribal elder Ramona Dick, 74, speaks at the Woodfords Indian Education Center
in Diamond, Calif., near South Lake Tahoe. Dick is working with linguist Alan Yu to docu-
ment the Washo language, which is spoken by only a handful of people.


Nevertheless, everyone agrees
it will be a steeply uphill effort
against assimilation and English-
language television. Another for-
midable obstacle: the educations
of many middle-age and elderly
tribe members, who were sent
away from Washo-speaking homes
to government boarding schools
that discouraged the use of Washo.
Dick learned the language from
a grandmother and great-grand-
mother, neither of whom had a
full grasp of English. A widow,
Dick says that none of her five
children, 18 grandchildren and
seven great-grandchildren really
speak Washo, although some are
trying to learn and most under-
stand when she speaks at home or
at a class she is leading.
Lynda Shoshone, the tribe's
language and cultural preserva-
tion coordinator, said she could
"kick myself in the rear for not
paying more attention" in her
childhood when her grandmother
spoke Washo. Shoshone said she
knows Washo words but has trou-
ble putting sentences together.
However, her 22-year-old son, she
said, attended a now-defunct
immersion school and is quite flu-
ent. So, she said, the language has
a shot at survival.
James, 74, is pessimistic.
"There's too much competition
from the present-day world," said
James, a retired electrical con-
struction worker from
Dresslerville, Nev "Everyday liv-
ing, your job, just trying to survive
in this world is difficult."
On a recent day, Dick visited the
classroom leaning on the cane
she now requires and sat in front
of the microphone. A full-faced,
vivacious woman with a graying
ponytail and gold hoop earrings,
she paused only when she was
unable to pull a word from the
memory of her late grandmoth-
er's kitchen or when her voice got
froggyy" from overuse. After all,
"Dr. Yu," as she calls him despite
his pleas for informality, "comes
from far away and, when he does,
it's always nice to sit down and
talk with him."


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Endangered language

Only about 20 or 30 people can speak
Washo fluently and many of them are
clustered in the tribe's traditional
territory near Lake Tahoe. Efforts are
underway to document the language.


lAke
Tahoe


Some Washo words
English Washo
one lak'a'
two hesge'
three heime'
four ha'wa' a
five dubaldi'
six dubaldi' ida lak'a'
seven dubaldi' ida hesge'
eight ha'wa'wa
nine ha'wa'wa ida lak'a'
ten lak'a' muc'im
7- ........... -- --- - - -- ... :,, ; -....-:*- -- ---.... -
red ilelegi
blue ip'ilp'ii..........................
yellow/green ilc'ac'imi
black ilc'ic'ishi
brown ilshoshongi
Source: Professor Alan Yu, University of Chicago.
Graphics reporting by LARRY GORDON
LORENA I tiOEUZ Los Angeles Times


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SUNDAY, Siui'TiiMnmi 23, 2007 7A


Dowry used as bounty in India


HENRY CHU
Los Angeles Times
PATNA, India - The beatings stopped
only after she fled the house. For four
years after she married a local shopkeep-
er, Rubi Devi's in-laws constantly bullied
her for not bringing a bigger dowry, then
tortured her when she failed to pony up
more gold, more cash, more goods.
"My mother-in-law and sister-in-law
would beat me up. They would grab me by
the hair and drag me around. They used to
hit me with whatever they could lay their
hands on (while her father-in-law pinned
back her arms)," Devi said, her henna-pat-
terned hands trembling and her cheeks
hot with tears.
In January, she decided she could
;endure no more, and bolted for her par-
ents' home here in eastern India, another
;victim of dowry harassment and violence
-in this country
Yet Devi, 27, is one of the lucky ones:
r:Her name was not added to the list of thou-
sands of wives who are beaten to death,
burned alive, electrocuted, poisoned,
,,pushed out windows or otherwise killed
Shorrifically every year because their hus-
.bands' families are dissatisfied with the
!:dowries they bring to the marriage and
.continue to demand more.
In 2005, the most recent year for which
:figures are available, a woman was killed
,over dowry every 77 minutes in India,
according to the National Crime Records
Bureau. The total of such homicides was
"6,787, but experts suspect that the true fig-
ure is much higher, because many dowry
killings are not reported. Even when they
are, most of the killers go unpunished.
The practice of dowry in India goes back
thousands of years. Its original intent,
scholars say, was to protect women, who by
bringing property and belongings to the
marriage could enjoy some creature com-
forts and not have to depend entirely on
their husbands.
But somewhere along the line, what was
supposed to be security for the bride came
to be seen as a bounty for the groom and
his family, a way for them to augment their
wealth.
India's vaunted economic boom since
the mid-1990s, which has seen incomes
grow and living standards rise for many
people, has not stemmed the tide of
dowry-related violence.
If anything, some observers say, it has
exacerbated it, as a new acquisitiveness
permeates society, with more consumer
and luxury goods showing up on store
shelves and in TV commercials. From 1995
to 2005, the number of recorded dowry
deaths jumped by 46 percent
'"India rising' has added to 'dowry ris-
ing,"' said Ranjana Kumari, director of the


Center for Social Research, a New Delhi-
based think tank devoted to women's
issues. "It's getting worse."
Demanding dowry has been illegal in
India since 1961, but the prohibition
rarely has been enforced. The problem
cuts across all social and class lines,
affecting rich and poor, educated and illit-
erate, urban and rural.
In July, a senior government minister,
Arjun Singh, was caught up in a scandal
when his grandson was accused of
demanding a Mercedes and an apartment
from his in-laws, who said they already
had shelled out $150,000 for the wedding.
Last year, former cricket star Manoj
Prabhakar was forced to appear in court
after his wife accused him of repeatedly
battering her because he considered her
dowry of cash, jewelry and a car to be
insufficient.
"The trend is set by the rich and
famous," Kumari said. "They're the ones
who start with, 'Nothing less than a
Mercedes or an apartment or (money) in
the bank,' and it percolates down."
The increasingly high cost of weddings
and demand for large dowries is a con-
tributing factor in the high incidence of
abortion of female fetuses, experts say
The government has banned sex determi-
nation tests, but the practice continues,
leading to an alarming shortage of young
girls in parts of the country
Dowry killings, too, are so common that
there is even a commonly used term for
the phenomenon, "bride burning,"
because many newlywed women die from
being doused with kerosene and set on
fire. The husband's family then reports the
death as a "kitchen accident," as many
households use kerosene stoves.
A generous dowry, critics say, has
become the price a girl's parents must pay
to land her a "good" husband in India,
where most marriages are still arranged.
Kumari said the search for a suitable boy
nowadays often resembles a bidding
process in which the young man's parents
weigh competing offers and play interest-
ed families off each other.
A few years ago, the Times of India list-
ed the expected price on grooms from dif-
ferent professions; the more prestigious or
lucrative the job, the bigger the dowry a
man's family could demand. A business-
man with an MBA could fetch 1.5 million
rupees (about $37,500 at today's exchange
rate), and a member of India's storied civil
service could ask for 2 million rupees
($50,000).
And what used to be simple dowries of
livestock and everyday household furnish-
ings have given way to packages of cash,
jewelry and big-ticket items, often just to
help the groom and his relatives keep up
with the neighbors. In many cases, the


bride is hounded for more well past the
wedding day
"Whatever the latest consumer goods
are in the market is what gets demanded,"
said Neelu, a women's rights advocate
here in Patna, the capital of Bihar state,
who goes by only one name. "Cars, refrig-
erators - now there's a demand for com-
puters, too."
Rita Kumari's lower middle-class par-
ents scraped together 75,000 rupees
($1,875) for her bridal sendoff three years
ago - a fortune in a country where annu-
al per capital income hovers around $500
and even more so in Bihar, one of India's
poorest states. They threw in jewelry and
furniture as well, and celebrated her
betrothal to a Patna salesman.
But after only a month or two of mar-
riage, said Kumari (no relation to Ranjana
Kumari), her in-laws began harassing her
for an additional 100,000 rupees, nearly
$2,500, saying they needed it to fix up the
family home and set up their son in busi-
ness. When she told them that her parents
could not afford such an amount, Kumari's
husband, his parents and two brothers, who
all live under the same roof, began pum-
meling her with their bare hands, she said.
When complaints do get filed, whole
families often are named as abusers. In
fact, the central Tihar Jail in New Delhi is
home to a "mothers-in-law wing" full of
women accused of murdering or torturing
their daughters-in-law over dowry.
But convictions are sporadic. In 2003,
Delhi courts registered a conviction rate
of just 28 percent in dowry-related deaths;
by contrast, the rate in sexual harassment
cases was triple that figure.
"There are now prosecutions, but
(dowry) is so rampant that only some peo-
ple complain," said Kiran Walia of the
Delhi Commission for Women.
Many victimized wives see no alterna-
tive but to stay in their husbands' house-
holds, the only option they believe is avail-
able to them in a society that stigmatizes
divorce.
"The culture is such that whenever a
girl gets married to a man, however bad he
may be, her inclination is to stay with him
till the end," activist Neelu said.
Devi, who fled her in-laws' home in
January, said she would be willing to be
reunited with her husband, as long as they
lived separately from his family.
Kumari feels the same. Although her
husband joined in beating her, she blames
his parents, especially his mother, for
instigating the violence and egging him on.
But Kumari is firmly aware of the real
issue at the root of her troubles.
"This is all because of dowry," she said.
"And the only solution is for the dowry sys-
tem and practice to be abolished once and
for all."


Associated Press
An undated image made available Saturday shows the key
to the binoculars store on the Titanic, which fetched
90,000 pounds ($181,000) at auctioneers Henry Aldridge
in Devizes, southern England, Saturday. The key, marked
with the tag "Crows Nest Telephone Titanic" was not on
the ship when she set sail from Southampton on her maid-
en voyage Wednesday, April 10, 1912. As a result, the
lookouts could not open the cabinet and had to rely on the
naked eye as the ship navigated a treacherous ice field. A
postcard (rear) sent home by a passenger sold for 17,000
pounds ($34,200).


- -� World

Pakistan police arrest Former leader Fujimori
opposition leaders in Peru for trial


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - With
President Pervez Musharraf facing
an election in just two weeks,
police on Saturday night arrested
key opposition leaders who had
vowed to try to block the general's
plans for winning a new term.
Opposition party spokesmen said
more than 20 leaders were rounded
up at their homes and served with
30-day detention orders or were
being sought for arrest.
Several are members of Parlia-
ment, the body that will vote along
with the provincial assemblies Oct.
6 in a hotly contested attempt by
Musharraf to extend his reign for
another five years.
"This just shows that Musharraf
has gone berserk," said Ahsan
Iqbal, spokesman for a faction of
the Pakistan Muslim League led by
former Prime Minister Nawaz
Sharif. "He wants to arrest all the
opposition leaders and then get
himself elected. But what kind of
election is that?"
lqbal said that he was also being
sought by police but that he and
others had gone into hiding.


LIMA, Peru - Former President
Alberto Fujimori returned to Peru
on Saturday to face charges of
corruption and sanctioning death-
squad killings, a grim homecoming
for the strongman who fled the
country seven years ago as his
government collapsed in scandal.
The plane carrying the 69-year-
old former ruler landed in a heavy
mist at Lima's Las Palmas air force
base, a day after Chile's Supreme
Court authorized his extradition.
He was then flown by helicopter to
a police base.
Some 700 supporters who gath-
ered outside the police air terminal
across town to greet him were
frustrated when his plane was
diverted to the air base.
Fujimori's followers and foes
alike were stunned in November
2005, when he landed in a small
plane in Chile and revealed his
ambition to run for president in the
2006 elections, even though Peru's
Congress had banned him from
seeking public office until 2011. He
was promptly arrested.
- From wire reports


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ICITRUS COUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE












Plumbing industry split about hot-water tanks


Q Dear Mr. Del Grande:
* We are installing a
* new bathroom that
will use a separate water
heater from the rest
of the house. Since
we're starting from
scratch we can use
any type of water
heater and we are
stumped with
regard to using or
not using a tankless
water heater.
We have spoken to Ed Del
plumbers who ASK
would not recom- AS
mend them and said PLUI
we would not be
happy with the water flow out-
put We have also spoken to.
neighbors who flip houses and
say that tankless water heaters
are all they install now since
they are "the new thing" that
potential homebuyers are look-
ing for to save energy. Please
help us settle this dilemma
since we can go no further at
this point. Who's right and
who's wrong, should we go with
a tankless or conventional stor-
age tank water heater?
Thanks for your expert
advice on this matter. Judy -
Illinois
A: Judy, Judy, Judy (in the
words of Cary Grant), this ques-
tion is so loaded that I need to
use the entire column on it!
You raise a topic that is cur-
rently splitting the plumbing
industry as to the best method


L
[(


to supply hot water to a home.
First, keep in mind that tank-
less water heaters have been
around since the '40s and
maybe longer than
that So, contrary to
^.l popular belief, this
':* is not a "new" idea
to heat water that is
sweeping the indus-
try by storm, and
they have been pop-
ular in Europe for
decades. However,
Grande due to applying new
technology to an old
THE idea, and a current
IBER push to market
them, lately tank-
less water heaters have been
getting a lot of attention.
Basically, a tankless water
heater works by rapidly heat-
ing the water as it passes
through a piping coil rather
than putting it in a big pot,
heating it slowly and then stor-
ing it like a conventional water
heater does. Even though a tan-
kless water heater may use
more BTU's (energy) while it's
running than a standard stor-
age tank water heater, the
mindset is that when there is
no need for hot water, you're
not paying to heat the same
water over and over as a stor-
age water heater might if it sits
idle all day.
However, the plumbers you
spoke to have a point. Since
basic tankless water heaters
may have to restrict the water


EACH WEEK IN HOMEFRONT
M The Ch/rortile'i HomeFront section today had so many
ntere.ting columns this week, we couldn't fit them all in!
_..o-' on trese two pages for samples of what appears
each w-eek in HomeFront, and find more in that section.



101 pretty good


ideas from HGTV


Home & Garden Television
Getting organized:
1. Hang a clear plastic shoe
organizer on the back of a foyer
closet door to store mittens,
gloves, hats and scarves for
easy access.
2. Collect the cleaning items
you use most, such as paper
towels, bottles of cleaning solu-
tion and rags and place them
in a single handheld bucket or
basket.
This allows for easy trans-
port of cleaning products from


room to room, saving you time
and hassle.
3. When siblings share a
room, it is important for each
child to have a sense of his or
her own personality and space
in the room. Have each child
pick a color they like and shop
for storage bins and boxes in
that color for each child.

For thousands of other ideas
visit www.hgtv.com.
Distributed by Scripps
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HGTVPro.com/Special to the Chronicle
If you're installing a new bathroom that will require a separate
water heater, the advice you get may vary. Some plumbers may
recommend tankless heaters while others may recommend a con-
ventional water heater.


flow to heat the water quickly
and constantly, usually having
two or more fixtures running at
the same time could draw
more water than the tankless
heater can supply and hot
water flow may slow down to
the fixtures.


HAIR

''


before
ROSACEA


.. . 7



PIGMENT LESIONS




Before


To put it simply, the general
rule of thumb between tankless
and storage water heaters is: A
basic tankless water heater
should give you an unlimited
hot water supply with a limited
hot water flow, depending on
the number of fixtures being


After
2nd Treatment:


used. For example, if the tank-
less heater supplies three gal-
lons per minute of hot water
and you use two fixtures at the
same time that draw more than
four gallons per minute of hot
water, things may slow down to
a trickle at each fixture.
While under the same condi-
tions, a basic 50-gallon storage
water heater should give you a
full flow to each fixture,
depending on your house
water pressure, with a limited
supply of hot water, because
once the tank is drained of hot
water, it will need time to
recover. Also, tankless water
heaters are generally more
expensive than storage water
heaters, but in many cases may
save energy and last longer
than standard tank heaters.
Confused and unsure of the
choice, Judy? Welcome to the
club. I know plumbers who rec-
ommend tankless heaters and
some plumbers who will only
recommend conventional wat-
er heaters.
Now you can see why the
industry is split; each has its


r
advantages and disadvantages.
Me? I always look at both
sides to a story.
My advice is to completely
research the expected hot
water draw of your new bath-
room, find the equivalent mod-
els of a tankless vs. a storage
tank water heater, add up the
total costs to see what best fits
your budget and, most impor-
tantly, will work best with your
family's lifestyle. ,,1
This all gets down to persoa-
al choices, and you may find
that after all your hard world,
finding the right water heater
could be a tankless job!

Master Contractor/Plumber1
Ed Del Grande is known "
internationally as the author
of the book "Ed Del Grande6
House Call" and for hosting,
TV shows on Scripps -,;
Networks and HGTVPro.coml
For information visit ,
eddelgrande.com or write :o
eddelgrande@hgtvpro.com.
Always consult local
contractors and codes. ,


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SASUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2007


144C)MEFH4DN'r ]ExY'RA













Guitar in original case intrigues reader More ideas from HGTV


Dear John: I have an old
Martin Co. guitar,
model 1-21, that I have
been told was pro-
duced in the late
18B00s. It is stamped
"'Martin & Co. New
York." Evidently it
-*as made before the
company moved to
Nazareth, PA. There
are no serial num-
bers, as it was made
before the guitars John &
-*ere numbered. It is SIKOR
in fairly good condi- 511(01
tion, but missing one AT
tuning key and the
bridge is slightly
pulled up. Addi-
tionally, I have the
original wooden
"coffin case." Inside
the case there is a
sticker from the
company, giving
instructions on how
to store the guitar It
appears to be signed
or initialed.
I am attaching
some pictures. I
would like to sell the
4strument, but
rave had no luck
ending out what it is ,
orth. I called /
Sartin & Co. but
ey were unable to
Selp. - N.F.,
nternet
Dear N.F.: One of
the big boys on the
block in the stringed The own
instruments catego- Martin C
y is Mandolin model 1-2
Brothers Ltd. I sug- ous about
gest you contact of the insi
em about your gui-
tar. Martin guitars are one of
their specialties. Their address
is 629 Forest Ave., Staten
.Island, NY 10310-2515. The
phone number is (718) 981-3226
or (718) 981-8585. The Web site
1is www.mandoweb.com. Good
Luck and let us know what you
1 discover.
Dear John: I have been
watching your column in the
citrus Chronicle for years now.
,. have attached several pic-
tures of a wooden child's high-
chair that came to me from my
father's estate. I would like to
know the approximate value.
The marks on the bottom, pic-
ttire enclosed, read Patented
and then the dates, Apr 7 1868,
Dec 6 1870, Aug 15 1871, and
Dec 12, 1871. On the back there
is also "Design Patent Feb 29,
1876". I therefore assume this
was built sometime after that
date. -E.T., Internet


Ti
M1


e

21
itI
trL


Dear E.T.: You have a won-
derful American Renaissance
Revival child's highchair, circa
1870s to '80s as
marked. In the cur-
rent marketplace it
would sell in the
$150 to $300 range.
Dear John: I
bought the cute lit-
tle pixies in the
photo on my honey-
moon in Miami.
ikorski They are now just
>SKI'S as cute but their
only claim to fame
riC is they were made
in Occupied Japan.
They are 3 1/2 to 4
inches tall with
"occupied Japan"
on their feet Since I
purchased them in
1950, I doubt they
would be fakes. Is
there a collector's
club that might be
interested? Thank
- you for your help
for things in the
past and perhaps
with this question.
-B.T.,Lecanto
Dear B.T.: From
the end of World
~' ( War II until 1952
while the United
States occupied
Japan all products
made for export
were supposed to
be marked
Occupied Japan.
r of this Occupied Japan has
o. guitar, been a category of
1, is curi- specific collector
the value interest for several
rument. decades.
Your cute little
group of figures has a story-
book look to them. Perhaps one
of our readers will recognize
them. Instead of selling them,
consider keeping them for nos-
talgic reasons. Current poten-
tial dollar value is $50 to $100
for the group.
New collectors and casual
buyers should be aware that
Occupied Japan reproductions
and fakes have flooded the
marketplace. Always ask for a
receipt stating that the item
was made during the original
era.
Dear John: The lighting
device in your last article is
categorized as a Flemish
example oCa spout lamp. It was
designed to burn animal fat
either solid or fluid oil. Close
observation shows a metal tube
lining between the slightly
longer trough. The tube
encased a piece of twisted


Special to the Chronicle
This collection of figurines, made in "occupied Japan," could sell
for $50 to $100 for the group.


, . .: .- . * .-.i: *
This American Renaissance
Revival child's highchair, circa
1870s to '80s, would sell in the
$150 to $300 range.

cloth or wick and also conduct-
ed heat back up the font to melt
the animal fat, if that was what
was being used. The trough
would return any excess oil to
the font and of course would
prevent any oil from dripping
to the table top or floor.
Unfortunately, most antiques
are only important because of
their artistic qualities instead
of representing what they
mean in the steps of time and
age, to show the improvements


tirelessly made from crude to
perfection. I believe today's
society calls
it progress. -
J.S., Hom-
osassa
Dear J.S.:
Wow, what a
fantastic, in-
depth re-
sponse. Now
we are all reader
moreawa A reader
more an itware responds to a
that might previous col-
havet mightone umn to explain
have gone un- the likely origin
recognized. I of this spout
really appre- lamp.
ciate your
educational
letter. As always, any comment
on subjects covered in the col-
umn are welcome.

John Sikorski has been a pro-
fessional in the antiques busi-
ness for more than 20 years.
He hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1
FM) Saturdays from 11 a.m.
until noon. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, c/o The Citrus
County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River FL 34429.


Home & Garden Television

Allergies:
* When dealing with a mold
problem in your home, first
repair any obvious water leaks
in the basement or the roof. To
help lower the airborne mois-
ture that feeds molds, add a
dehumidifier to damp rooms,
turn up the heat in the winter
and open doors to unused
rooms.
You will also likely need to
ensure that the attic and walls
have been properly insulated
and that all appliances with a
vent have been vented outside.
Use bath and kitchen fans
and clean the drain pan under
the refrigerator. Heating and
cooling ducts should also be
cleaned, sealed, insulated and
checked annually for leaks.
* Plants have pollination
cycles that are consistent from
year to year, which is no sur-
prise to allergy sufferers.


Weather conditions affect the
amount of pollen in the air at
any given time.
The pollination season
occurs earliest in the South
and progressively later in
northern regions. Trees polli-
nate first, followed by grasses
and then weeds. Pollens are
the small, round male cells of
plants. They can travel as far as
400 miles and up to two miles
in the air. Thankfully, they van-
ish after the first frost
* Insect stings induce severe
allergic reactions in at least 1
to 2 million people in the
United States. An estimated 3
percent of the population is
susceptible to allergic reac-
tions caused by insect stings,
including those of yellow jack-
ets, honeybees, paper wasps,
hornets and fire ants.

For thousands of other ideas,
visit www.hgtv.com.


EACH WEEK IN HOMEFRONT
N The Chronicle's HomeFront section today had so many
interesting columns this week, we couldn't fit them all in!
Look on these two pages for samples of what appears
each week in HomeFront, and find more in that section.


Master Gardeners slate

fall plant sale Oct. 13


Special to the Chronicle

Marion County Master
Gardeners' annual Fall
Gathering - Plant Sale is fast
approaching. On Saturday, Oct.
13, the sale will begin at 8 a.m.
and continue until 2 p.m. or
until the plants are sold out
A multitude of plants are
available for purchase:
natives, perennials, butterfly
attractors, ground covers,
native trees as well as gourds,
tubers and bulbs.
If you like to start from seed,


there is a huge variety of seeds
on our famous seed board.
New this year are garden
crafts. Always offered are
expert advice and garden
tours.
Location is the Marion
County Cooperative Extension
Service Center, 2232 N.E.
Jacksonville Road in Ocala
(next to the livestock pavilion).
Admission and parking are
free. Sorry, no pets.
For more information about
the sale or the group, call (352)
671-8400.


/
~/


Goodwill "
has it all for fall.

Spooky Halloween decor
Creepy costumes - Fall fashion
Home accents for autumn
Brand-new to nearly new


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Ocala Superstore 2830 S W. 27th Avenue

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONIC I.I


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Atlas


Iraqis: Blackwater fired first


Associated Press
Chris Jones, 16, left, Joshua
Jones, 15, back center, and
Dontarious Thompson, 15,
toss an inflatable replica of
the Earth on Saturday during
"World Fest," an event in
Little Rock, Ark., celebrating
cultural diversity.

GM, UAW return
to bargaining table
DETROIT - Negotiators for
General Motors Corp. and the
United Auto Workers returned to
the bargaining table Saturday
after progress was made a day
earlier on transferring retiree
health care costs from the com-
pany to the union, two people
briefed on the talks said.
GM, which has $51 billion in
unfunded retiree health care
costs on its books and 540,000
UAW retirees and spouses, badly
wants to pay the union to form a
trust and take on much of the
expense. The UAW is seeking
guarantees of new vehicles to be
built in U.S. plants in exchange.
Bargainers haven't settled on a
number for how much GM would
put into the trust, but both people
briefed on the talks said they are
dose. Both requested anonymity.
Bargaining now is focused on
other economic issues that hinge
on the trust including pensions,
wages, profit sharing, and who
manufactures company parts,
said one of the people.

World BRIEFS


Associated Press
A boy from Nam Dinh Province
fixes his hat Saturday before
his group's dance perform-
ance on stilts, part of events
for the Mid-Autumn Lunar
Festival at Vietnam Museum
of Ethnology in Hanoi
Traditionally, Vietnamese peo-
ple celebrate the Mid-Autumn
Lunar Festival on the 15th day
of the eighth lunar month,
which falls on Tuesday.

Ahmadinejad rails
U.S. before N.Y. trip
TEHRAN, Iran -A day
before flying to New York to
speak directly to the American
people, Iranian President
Mahmoud Ahmadinejad struck a
confrontational tone Saturday
with a parade of fighter jets and
tough warnings for the United
States to stay out of the Mideast.
Three new domestically man-
ufactured warplanes streaked
over the capital during the
parade marking the 27th
anniversary of the Iraqi invasion
of Iran. The parade also fea-
tured the Ghadr missile, which
has a range of 1,120 miles,
capable of reaching Israel.
Some of the missile trucks
were painted with the slogans
"Down with the U.S." and "Down
with Israel." The parade also fea-
tured unmanned aerial surveil-
lance drones, torpedoes, and
tanks.
- From wire reports


Attack that killed

Associated Press

BAGHDAD - Iraqi investiga-
tors have a videotape that
shows Blackwater USA guards
opened fire against civilians
without provocation in a shoot-
ing last week that left 11 people
dead, a senior Iraqi official said
Saturday. He said the case was
referred to the Iraqi judiciary.
Iraq's president, meanwhile,
demanded that the Americans
release an Iranian arrested this
week on suspicion of smuggling
weapons to Shiite militias. The
demand adds new strains to
U.S.-Iraqi relations only days
before a meeting between
President Bush and Iraq's
Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki.
Interior Ministry spokesman
Maj. Gen. Abdul-Karim Khalaf
said Iraqi authorities had com-
pleted an investigation into the
Sept. 16 shooting in Nisoor
Square in western Baghdad and


11 civilians was unprovoked investigators claim; case referred to judiciary


concluded that Blackwater
guards were responsible for the
deaths.
He told The Associated Press
that the conclusion was based
on witness statements , as well
as videotape shot by cameras at
the nearby headquarters of the
national police command. He
said eight people were killed at
the scene and three of the 15
wounded died in hospitals.
Blackwater, which provides
most of the security for U.S.
diplomats and civilian officials
in Iraq, has insisted that its
guards came under fire from
armed insurgents and shot back
only to defend themselves.
Blackwater spokeswoman
Anne Tyrrell said Saturday that
she knew nothing about the
videotape and was contractual-
ly prohibited from discussing
details of the shooting.
Khalaf also said the ministry
was looking into six other fatal


These six cases will support the case against Blackwater,
because they show that it has a criminal record.

Maj. Gen. Abdul-Karim Khalaf
spokesman, Iraqi Interior Ministry.


shootings involving the
Moyock, N.C.-based company
in which 10 Iraqis were killed
and 15 wounded. Among the
shootings was one Feb. 7 out-
side Iraqi state television in
Baghdad that killed three
building guards.
"These six cases will support
the case against Blackwater,
because they show that it has a
criminal record," Khalaf said.
Khalaf said the report was
"sent to the judiciary" although
he would not specify whether
that amounted to filing of crimi-
nal charges. Under Iraqi law, an
investigating judge reviews


criminal complaints and
decides whether there is
enough evidence for a trial.
Government spokesman Ali
al-Dabbagh denied that author-
ities had decided to file charges
against the Blackwater guards
and said Saturday that decision
had been taken whether to seek
punishment
"The necessary measures
will be taken that will preserve
the honor of the Iraqi people,"
he said in New York, where al-
Maliki arrived Friday for the
U.N. General Assembly session.
"We have ongoing high-level
meetings with the U.S. side


Associated Press
Melissa Bell, second from left, leaves Friday after a hearing for her son Mychal Bell at LaSalle Parish Courthouse in Jena, La.
A relative of one of the group of black teenagers known as the "Jena Six" said a judge denied bail Friday for Mychal Bell, the
only one of the teens who is jailed in the December beating of a white classmate.





Retracing the path of Khan


Austrailian adventurer follows the footsteps of Mongolian maurader


Associated Press

BUDAPEST, Hungary - He
scared off wolves with fire-
crackers in Mongolia and res-
cued his dog from hungry min-
ers in Kazakhstan. But after
three years on horseback, Tim
Cope has retraced the route of
Genghis Khan and other Asian
nomads who crossed into
Europe over the centuries.
The 28-year-old Australian
arrived in Hungary on
Saturday, ending a 6,200-mile
trek through Mongolia,
Kazakhstan, southern Russia
and Ukraine.
"I'm very happy to be here,"
Cope said in the Hungarian
town of Opusztaszer, surround-
ed by his traveling companions
- his dog and three horses.
"Sometimes I didn't think I
would ever arrive."
A former law student who
decided to dedicate his life to
adventure, writing and film doc-
umentaries, Cope was inspired
to make the horseback journey
during a bicycle trip from
Moscow to Beijing. Trying to
push his bike through the sands
of the Gobi desert, Cope
watched in frustration as
nomad horsemen appeared out
of nowhere and disappeared
over the horizon.
That got him interested in
nomad life on the steppes and
the journey made over the cen-
turies by the Avars, Mongols
and Huns, among other Asian
groups. He set off from
Mongolia in 2004 for a trip he
thought would take 18 months.
It ended up taking three years,
and in late 2006, he had to
return to Australia for several


.. . .
i," ,* _ ."': . ,: -
% ^K^,' --; ''.. - -, t


Associated Press
Australia's young adventurer Tim Cope pets his horse Saturday as
they arrive at the national historical memorial park, near
Opusztaszer, 100 miles south of Budapest, Hungary.


months when his father died.
According to Hungarian tra-
dition, Magyar tribal leaders
arriving from Central Asia at
the end of the 9th century met
in Opusztaszer, 90 miles south of
Budapest, to divide the land
among themselves.
"Here at the Danube River is
where the Eurasian steppe
ends, with its beginning in
Mongolia and Manchuria,"
Cope said. "So Opusztaszer is
the perfect ending symbolically
and geographically"
Cope, 28, traveled with three
horses and black hunting dog
named Tigon that he received
as a gift in Kazakhstan. Twice,
he had to get his horses back
from thieves. In the Kazakh
steppes, it became so hot that
he added a camel for a while.
Cope, who speaks Russian,
quickly learned to trust the wis-
dom of locals.


"In Mongolia, the nomads
always told me that wolves were
the most dangerous things on
the steppe and I didn't believe
them, at first," he said.
Then one night he found himself
surrounded by howling wolves.
"When you hear that howl
alone at night in the forest, it's
one of the most frightening
sounds you'll ever hear," Cope
said. "After that I took their
advice and threw firecrackers
out my tent door every night to
keep the wolves away"
In the Kazakh village of
Akbakai, Tigon was snatched by
unemployed gold miners look-
ing for a meal. Villagers found
Tigon seven days later, locked
in a mine shaft and nearly
frozen to death. He had to be
nursed back to health with
vodka and raw eggs.
When he was ready to move
on, the villagers tried to help


with some directions: "Go left to
the old well. Turn right to the
red mountain. Take a right until
you see an old grave, and then
take the road to the old hut ..."
"Problem was ... there were
hundreds of red mountains, old
graves, not to mention roads,"
Cope wrote on his Web site.
When he finally made it to the
next town, Ulanbel, he encoun-
tered more of the Kazakh hospi-
tality he had relied on.
'At passing the first house, a
man spotted me from the win-
dow and came bolting out in his
silky green gown and fur hat He
probably looked out this win-
dow all his life, and on this
morning spotted a pretty dirty,
unshaven Australian with a
string of horses," Cope wrote.
"Soon my horses were tied in
his backyard and I was drinking
tea with his family"
Cope says he probably spent
half of his nights in his tent and
the rest in farm houses and huts
of strangers along the way
"In Kazakhstan, once you're
someone's guest, it's really hard
to get away, everyone wants you
to stay," he said. "They believe
that if you invite a guest, luck
will fly into your house."
Cope brought gifts from
Australia and gave away hun-
dreds of photographs. "Ex-
changing gifts is an important
thing in the steppe culture, a way
for them to feel you have become
a part of their lives," he said.
Cope is already envisioning
future adventures in northwest
China and the Middle East
"It's my way of life, it was not
just a trip," Cope said. "I'll be
back in the saddle as soon as I
can."


about this issue."
Al-Maliki is expected to raise;
the issue with Bush during '
meeting Monday in New York
It is doubtful that foreign
security contractors could be
prosecuted under Iraqi law. A
directive issued by U.S. occupa�
tion authorities in 2004 granted
contractors, U.S. troops and
many other foreign officials
immunity from prosecution
under Iraqi law.
Security contractors are also
not subject to U.S. military law
under which U.S. troopers face
prosecution for killing or abus-
ing Iraqis.



Japan's






spark


dignity


dialog

Los Angeles Times

TOKYO - The annual
autumn sumo tournament con-
cludes Sunday in Tokyo, a two-
week-long sporting pageant
loaded with ceremonial tradi-
tions but this time missing its
Mongolian born superstar
Asashoryu. The ferocious
grand champion, or "yokozu-.
na," was in seclusion at a"
Mongolian hot spring, having
slipped out of Japan to seek
treatment for what is officially'
being called depression.
The "yokozuna's" reputation
has taken a beating over his
flight from public scrutiny. He,
has been derided for playing
hooky and his disappearance
has given rise to a new verb:
"Asashoryu-suru," roughly
meaning to shirk responsibility
by faking an illness.
Pulling an 'Asashoryu-suru"
is also how some here have
described the unusual resigna-
tion of Prime Minister Shinzo
Abe, who quit his job without
warning on Sept 10. After a ram-
bling farewell news conference
where he never gave a complete
explanation for his departure,
Abe checked into a Tokyo hospi-
tal where he has remained
throughout the short campaign,
to pick his successor, reportedly
suffering from stress and a
chronic intestinal ailment
His condition has been no
protection from the storm ot
public ridicule that hit him for.
walking away from his respon-
sibilities. To many people here,
throwing in the towel seemed
more than a bit hypocritical
given Abe's political mantra of.
cultivating a "beautiful country
(that) respects discipline anc,
has dignity." i,
The opprobrium directed
toward Asashoryu and Abe
springs, in part, from a sense'
that they have acted without.
suitable dignity.
"Hinkaku," as it is called in
Japan, has long been a venerat-
ed cultural value. But the con-
cept of dignity is currently
enjoying a public moment,
spurred by loud protests from
those who believe the Japanese
people are losing it
"The prime minister liked to
use the term 'hinkaku,' but he
took the least dignified way of
resigning," said political com-
mentator Hirotaka Futatsuki.
The dignity boom can be
traced to the publication in
2005 of the best-selling lament
for a lost Japan called "The
Dignity of The Nation," in
which author Masahiko
Fujiwara blasted the Japanese
faith in western values.


I .


A mother amid media


I








* I."^ ^


A2


Travel BRIEFS

In the footsteps
of Jesse James
KEARNEY, Mo.- Hollywood
offers a new spin on the legend
of Jesse James with "The
Assassination of Jesse James
by the Coward Robert Ford,"
starring Brad Pitt as James.
If the movie sparks your inter-
est in the famous outlaw, there
are plenty of places in Missouri
where you can learn more about
his life, his gang and the era in
which they lived.
In the countryside just outside
Kearney, you can visit the
James family home, where his
mother, Zerelda, began giving
tours not long after he was
assassinated in 1882. Today it's
known as the Jesse James
Farm and Museum.
Ten miles away, in Liberty, you
can visit the Jesse James Bank
Museum, where a bank robbery
was carried out by James' gang
in 1866. The museum is
designed to look like the bank
looked the day of the crime.
- In Stanton, you can take a
guided tour of the Meramec
Caves, reputed to be a hideout
fpr James. And in St. Joseph,
you'll find the house where
James was killed, and the court-
house where two men were
tried for his murder.
L A covered wagon historical
tour with stories about the
James gang is also offered
through December around
Independence by Pioneer Trails
Adventures.
For details about visiting any
of these sites, go to www.visit
mo.com and type "Jesse
James" in the search box.
Cedar Point
HalloWeekends
SANDUSKY, Ohio--"
Haunted houses, four outdoor
haunted walk-through attrac-
tions, shows, and a new parade
are all part of the Halloween cel-
ebration at Cedar Point
Amusement Park.
The newest addition to the
holiday fun is the Monster
Midway Invasion Celebration
Parade, in which more than 70
characters, six floats, a hearse,
gypsies, a giant spider, and a
coffin roadster will entertain
guests around the park begin-
ning at 4 p.m. on Saturdays and
Sunday. The parade is
designed to be fun for the fami-
ly, so you don't have to worry
about scaring your little ones.
The park's HalloWeekends
events will run 6 p.m. to mid-
night Fridays, noon to midnight
Saturday and 10 a.m to p.m.
Sunday, (and until 10 p.m. on
Oct. 7) to Oct. 28. Some rides
will be closed Friday nights, and
the haunted outdoor attractions
will be closed on Sundays
except for Oct. 7.
For details, go to halloweek-
ends.cedarpoint.com or call
(419) 627-2350.
National volunteer
effort in parks
WASHINGTON -
Thousands of volunteers are
expected to help build trails,
plant trees and remove trash on
the 14th annual National Public
Lands Day, scheduled for Satur-
day. Last year 100,000 people
turned out to join the effort.
This year, organizers are
making a special effort to weed
out invasive plants that take
over habitats and squeeze out
native species.
SEvents are scheduled in
parks, nature preserves and
other outdoor areas all over the
country. To find a site near you,
go to www.publiclandsday.org,
then "Get Involved" and "Find a
Site," where you'll see a click-
able map.
' National Public Lands Day is
a public-priVate partnership
involving many federal, state,
arid local land agencies, which
work with business partners and
nonprofit organizations on local
events. The National
Environmental Education
Foundation manages the overall
project with Toyota, the Leave
No Trace Center for Outdoor
Ethics, and the Girl Scouts of


America among the sponsors.


- From wire reports


Recreation goes underground


BETSY TAYLOR
Associated Press


BONNE TERRE, Mo. - Rather than
head outside for a recreational adven-
ture, athletes in Missouri can head
underground - to scuba dive, play ten-
nis and, if one man has his way, even try
their hand at subterranean ice skating
or kayaking.
Missouri is often called the Cave
State, with an international reputation
for its natural marvels. But it's the
state's mining history that has created
huge manmade caverns that have been
recast as underground recreational
areas.
Businessman Tom Kerr has a $50 mil-
lion plan to convert an eight million
square-foot sand mine into an athletic
complex housing extreme, recreational
and Olympic-level facilities near
Crystal City, Mo.
The concept might sound far-fetched
elsewhere, but doesn't seem impossible
in these parts. In southwest Missouri
people play tennis on courts carved out
from limestone caverns.
And Kerr is planning the facility
about a half-hour drive from Bonne
Terre Mine, a billion-gallon under-
ground scuba diving site in a former


lead mine that a suburban St Louis
couple, Doug and Cathy Goergens,
bought in 1979. They converted the
now-partially flooded mine into an
attraction that National Geographic
Adventure magazine placed in the Top
10 of its one hundred best adventures in
America earlier this decade, calling it
"part Pompeii, part Lara Croft"
Step down a set of stairs at the site
and a whole new chilly world, smelling
of wet dirt and with the sound of drip-
ping water, opens up. It resembles a
"Phantom of the Opera" set - if
"Phantom of the Opera" were set in a
lead mine.
Huge caverns have been carved out,
where lead ore was removed using the
room-and-pillar method of mining.
They are supported by enormous stone
columns that miners left behind. The
caverns are now lit with motion-sensi-
tive path lights. The underground
waters are surprisingly blue.
Temperatures here remain fairly
constant, at 62 degrees for the air and
58 degrees in the water year 'round.
"When it's snowing outside, we're
scuba diving," Doug Goergens said.
The divers don't see fish - well,
there's one, a largemouth bass named


Associated Press
Donna Jones, manager at Bonne Terre Mine, gives a tour by boat of the now par-
tially flooded former mine that has become an attraction for scuba divers in Bonne
Terre, Mo. Missouri is often called the Cave State, with an international reputation
for its natural marvels including this attraction that National Geographic Adventure
magazine placed in the Top 10 of its one hundred best adventures in America earli-
er this decade.


"Bonnie Bass of Bonne Terre Mine,"
who mine manager Donna Jones says
often comes when called.
But there are plenty of unusual sights


for divers here, Jones explains as she
steers a pontoon boat through the
Please see .-',t 'i/Page 18A


Pretty. in pastel


ANDREA KISH/Special to the Chronicle
Andrea Kish took a spring break cruise to the Caribbean. The photo was taken at Atlantis, Nassau, before going in to the casino and losing money - thus the smiles. From
left are: Patti Martin, Diane Schnoover, Laura Sterling and Ellen Bowran.


DREAM
VACATIONS
r'ota Contest
The Chronicle and The Accent Travel
Group are sponsoring a photo contest for


readers of the newspaper.
Readers are invited to send a photo-
graph from their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a winner, it will be
published in the Sunday Chronicle.
At the end of the year, a panel of


judges will select the best photo during the
year and that photographer will win a
prize.
Please avoid photos with computer-
ized dates on the print.
Photos printed on home printers do
not reproduce well; submit the digital


Tasmania: No place like it on Earth

here are lots of beautiful describes Australia, a country
places on earth to visit that captures the imagination
and getting with faraway
there is usually a - places, surprising
prime considera- mountains, caverns
tion. Los Angeles to and deserts - home
Sydney is a direct . of the kangaroo and
17-hour flight, so ' koala. After tripping
don't forget those l' k around on the
leg stretches and Australian main-
walks up/down the land we ventured -:
aisle. Upon arrival on to Tasmania, an .
in Sydney we took a island state, one of �z
taxi into town and Neil Sawyer the southernmost
had the usual dis- SPONTANEOUS bits of arable land
cussion, "Where TOUR GUIDE in the Southern .
are you from, etc." Hemisphere, and
and when we responded, home to significant colonies of '
"Crystal River, Florida," the fairy penguins.
cab driver said, "Oh, that's just We departed Melbourne at .,,.o . 'A
up the road from Weeki sunset on the Abel Tasman, a ..,
Wachee - my favorite vacation large overnight ferry bound for
place." He has been here sev- Devonport, a northern seaport
eral times, he said. Special to the Chronicle
Geographic diversity best Please see GUIDE/Page 18A This is one of the many beautiful bays near Port Arthur, Tasmania.


image via disk or e-mail.
Please make sure photographs are in
sharp focus.
Photos should be sent to the Chronicle
at 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429 or dropped off at any
Chronicle office or any Accent Travel office.


Travel

scam tips

Special to the Chronicle
A recent AARP survey esti-
mated that 32 million
Americans believed they had
been the victim of a major
fraud in the past year - that's
one in six consumers. As tech-
nology has become a part of
everyday life, resourceful
scam artists are finding more
ways to target victims. They
are using fax machines, the
Internet and e-mail as well as
traditional mailings to entice
unsuspecting consumers. And
unfortunately they've proven
quite successful.
"Beware of travel offers that
are big on pictures and prom-
ises of great deals, but are
Please see -t'C.i/Page 18A







CITRUS CoUN'Y (FL) ClRONICi.-


14A SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2007


* Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary, 906 E.
State Road 44, Inverness; tele-
phone 344-3495; fax 344-3514,
announce daily activities schedule
for the week of Sept. 23 to 29:
Today: Pool tourney 2 p.m.; Wild
Willy karaoke 5 p.m.
Monday: Bar bingo 3 p.m.
Tuesday: Chicken wings four for
$1, 9 flavors 4:30 to 7 p.m.; Mark
B. karaoke 6 to 9 p.m.
Wednesday: Ladies Auxiliary bar
bingo 6 p.m.
Thursday: Bar bingo 3 p.m.
Friday: Fish fry (southern fried
chicker1 available) $6.50 4:30 to 7
p.m.; Debi G. karaoke 6 p.m.
Saturday: No dinner, no enter-
tainment. VFW established.
Our Post is named the Eugene
Quinn VFW Post 4337 and is so
named in honor of Eugene Quinn
who was born Nov. 1, 1922, in
Tampa, son of Virgil and Alva
(Allen) Quinn, youngest brother of
V.A. Quinn, Clara Quinn, Irma
Quinn Conklin, Dorothy Quinn
Gates and Herbert F. Quinn.
Eugene graduated in 1940 from
Citrus High School. Shortly there-
after he enlisted in the Army Air
Corps. Following basic training he
was then stationed at Savannah,
Ga., then sent to the University of
Chicago for Airplane Mechanic
instruction. From there he was sent
to the Philippines and was there
when the Japanese bombed Pearl
Harbor. Later he was captured and
held as a Prisoner of War, some-
how he survived the Bataan Death
March only to be on an unmarked
Japanese Prisoner of War ship,
which was torpedoed by our own
Navy, and he went down with the
ship on Sept. 7, 1944. Survivors
and comrades of young Quinn
wrote the Quinn family "if ever
there was a Christian boy -
Eugene Quinn certainly fitted the
role."
VFW Post 4337 mustered in
Nov. 14,1945.
* VFW Post 4252 and The
Ladies Auxiliary in Hernando on
State Road 200 serves dinner
every Friday from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
This week's menu is fish or chick-
en. Music by the Carriers from 6


LEND

US

YOUR

EARS!







Participants
Sought for

Hearing Aid

Field Study
My audiology clinics have
received a generous grant
from Magnatone to conduct
an important field study on
a new model of open ear
hearing aid. It is smaller
and more comfortable than
traditional hearing aids. We
are seeking people with mild
to moderate hearing loss to
participate in the study. Both
current hearing aid users and
non-users are needed.
In exchange for completing
a pre-and post-fitting ques-
tionnaire, the participants
will earn the free use of this
hearing aid for thirty days. My
audiologists will provide the
exams and lab services at
no charge through the grant.
At the end of this thirty day
trial, participants will return
the aids to one of my clinics
or purchase the aids at a
discounted price.
For information or to
schedule a free candidate
screening, call us at
795-5700 or visit our
Latest News Link at
www.gardneraudiology.com


to 10 p.m. $6.50 donation.
Post 4252 Ladies Auxiliary host
bingo at 10:30 a.m. every Saturday
with food available.
Post 4252 has bar bingo every
Sunday at 2 to 5 p.m.
Post 4252 Ladies Auxiliary has
"Show Me The Money" card game
every Monday at 5 to 7:30 p.m.
Lots of fun and chances to win.
Food is available.
Post 4252 Ladies Auxiliary has
bar bingo every Tuesday at 2 to 5
p.m. Profits go to local charities.
This month is for CREST School.
Post 4252 Dart League is at 7
p.m. every Tuesday. Come in and
sign up.
Post 4252 has chicken wings
every Wednesday from 2 to 6 p.m.
Post 4252 Cooties dinner is held
on the first Sunday monthly from 5
to 6:30 p.m. Cooties Jam is from 5
to 9 p.m.
Post 4252 is hosting a Bonanza
Bingo on Saturday, Oct. 6.
Packages are $30 with a buffet
lunch. This event is for Cancer Aid
and Research.
Post 4252 Ladies Auxiliary is
having a flea market on Sunday,
Oct. 21. Flea market items will
include biker apparel, household
items, clothes, books, movies,
odds and ends and a whole lot
more. Inside tables are $10.
Outside tables are $5. Donations
are also accepted.
Please see VETS/Page 15A


15th anniversary
-. :7 1.0. - m~


Special to the Chronicle
Marine Corps League (MCL) Citrus Detachment 819 celebrated its 15th anniversary at the monthly meeting at VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. Bob Deck, commandant, cut the anniversary cake and presented the first slices to Ralph Nardone, Walt
Clevenger and Alfred Giausanti, who are charter members of the detachment. Detachment 819 is well noted for the military
ball held during Veterans Appreciation Week each year. Tickets for the ball are a hot item, with sell-outs every year. Members,
not in order, are: Ted Archambault, Clevenger, Deck, Tom Fisher, Raymond Gaumont, Giausanti, Richard Grier, Carl Knudsen,
John Koser, Fred Lightell, Lenny Martin, Paul Mauer, Nardone, Paul Pilny, Paul Salyer, William Squire III, James Stauts, Bion
St. Bernard and Robert Torri.


Thank You
Dan Gardner, M.S.
35 years experience
President








Gardner Audiology
700 S.E. 5th Ter.
Crystal River 7


VEYiEaAN's N40rES







Cri u ounry ( S)DY ETMER2,20 5


VETS Annual Veterans Golf Tournament
Continued from Page 14A
�e in effect on Oct. 1.
! Post 4252 Ladies Auxiliary goes
to nursing homes four times a
Month to play bingo with the resi-
dents Everyone is welcome
S Post 4252 anid The Ladies
Auxiliary announces a $10,000
Youth Essay Contest and a
$30,000 High School Scholarship
Competition. Call Judy at 726-3339
for details.
All eligible persons are invited to _ -.-.c
Oin our Post or Ladies Auxiliary.
Stop by the post or call for further .
information. ' ,
Send e-mails to
yFW452@tampabay.rr.com.
2008 Dues can be paid now. We
are o)~ percent. Please send - ..
,our ments as soon as, possi
ble. Life Members Cancer Special to the Chronicle
nsuraie of $4.95 can be paid The third Annual Veterans Golf Tournament organized by the Citrus County Veterans Service
now fot'2008. office for the benefit of the Citrus County Veterans Foundation netted $10,000. The nonprofit
I Pot Honor Guard is available Foundation provides emergency financial assistance to needy honorably discharged veterans
for fuherals, fiagraisdingsand nurs- and their r. driving spouses. From left are: Sam Dinnino, assistant Citrus County Veterans
ring fherans. , tllgPiosts anmd nrService Officer and tournament director; Cindy Greene, PETCT Services volunteer; J.J.
ing homes. Call Post Cmdr. Bob Kenney, Citrus County Veterans Service Officer; L. Paul Longtin, Foundation treasurer; Mike
Prive at 212-3393 or Ladies King, assistant Citrus County Veterans Service Officer; and Carlton McLeod, Foundation pres-
Auxiliary President Judy Prive at dent.
726-3339 for information. Post
4252 is at 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway (State Road 200), forum and you can make arrange- community's involvement. Oct. 12, at the VFW Post. Dinner
Blnanton-Thompson Amen- ments at the Sept. 27 open busi- The program will accept any will begin at 5:30 p.m. followed by
SantLegion Auxiliary Unit 155, ness meeting or by contacting make or model phone. You may the show at 7. Tickets are $10 and
crystal River, meets at 7:30 p.m. Chairman Ray Michael, First Vice drop off phones and attached bat- may be purchased at the VFW
the fourth Tuesday monthly at Chairman Fred Daniels, Second series as well as accessories at any Post Lounge. For further informa-
American Legion Post 155, Crystal Vice Chairman Joel Smoyer or Citrus County School or the DAV at tion, call 746-0440.
American Legion Post 155, Crystal Forum Chairman Richard Floyd. North Independence Highway and Return to the golden years of
Rivef'The auxiliary is dedicated to Their phone numbers are listed on U.S. 41 North. The phones are Rock & Roll. Joel Stone will be pre-
helping the veterans, their families the CCVC Web directory at then recycled for cash to purchase sending Elvis. He is a master at
Anyone interested in joining orget-www.ccvcfl.org. cards or unlimited free video phone portraying the King. Wear your
n e addinterionaested in joining or get- All local veterans are invited to calls. If you have any questions blue suede shoes and come join
the un it, cal l membership chair-bt the speaker program, free of regarding this program, call the fun at this first class presenta-
woman Barbara Logan at 795 charge, at 12:30 p.m. in the main Annamarie Perrigo at the DAV at tion.
woman233. Barbara ogan a - auditorium. The speakers will field 344-3464 between 9 and 11 1 Public invited to a number of
SThe Citrus County Veterans questions after the program is a.m.Tuesdays or Thursdays, or activities at Dunnellon VFW Post
Coalition will resume its regular completed in a one-on-one basis. 344-5675. 7991, State Road 488/West
open business meetings at 6 p.m. U Landing Ship Dock (LSD) 1 VFW Post 7122 Sept. 23-29: Dunnellon Road:
Thursday at the Citrus County Sailors meet at Denny's in Crystal Friday: AUCE fish dinner or 3 Every first and third Tuesday:
Resource Center next to the VA River at 2 p.m. the fourth Thursday piece chicken dinner is served from steak dinner, 6 to 8 p.m., reserva-
clinic in Lecanto. All veterans and monthly. Call Jimmie at 621-0617. 3 to 7 p.m. for $6.75. Jannie tons needed. $9. Call post at (352)
veterans' organizations are urged n The American Legion Riders Faye's karaoke starts at 7 p.m. 489-177135 Ron Audetr.te at (352) 465-
tb attend as the Coalition makes of Post 155 will serve breakfast Saturday: Strip steak or filet mi- 41.35, Ron Audette at (352) 465-
final preparations for the Citrus Sunday, Sept. 30, at the American gnon served from 3to 7 p.m. for $9 5647 or Billy Ellis at (352) 465-
County Veterans Coalition forum Legion Post 155 Hall, 6585 W. " Ladies Auxiliary to Harry F. 6429. If no answer, eave message
duledycSaturda... 20 Gulf-to-LakeJ-ighway,-Crypstal ..---.NesbittVFW-Post 10087 plarrn-a-on answering machine .
The "Veterans Forum" will be River. Cost is $4. Monies are Chinese auction Thursday, Oct. 11, Wednesday bingo begins at 5:30
from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Citrus raised by the Legion Riders to help at the post home. Doors open at p.m.
County Board of Realtors building military based charities. 11:30 a.m. and the auction starts at Every second and fourth Friday:
On State Road 44 in Lecanto, fea- c Cmdr. Martin P. Murphy and 1 p.m. Hot dogs are $1, cake and fish1fry from 4 to 7 p.m., fish, hush
tJring national, state and local leg- The Disabled American Veterans coffee are free. Donation is $2.50,' puppies, fries and coleslaw. $6.
islative speakers, plus representa- (DAV), Chapter 70, in coordination raffle tickets available at the post 8 Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
ties from the North Florida/South with the Superintendent "Sam" canteen and from auxiliary mem- 8189 serves dinners each month
Georgia Health Care System to Himmel of the Citrus County bers. on Fridays at 4:30 p.m. Italian night
bring all veterans up to date about School District, ha re become an . Dinner & A Show: The erts igs thefirst Friday ($5 donation), fish
pending legislation and changes in official Cell Phone for Soldiers Auxiliary of VFW Post 1 .0087 o t- seca. h Frieda $5 Frid a
VA benefits. A c&tt 6 tion lunch- D ' p-Off Site. This program was Beverly Hills will prese.nt"Dinnr tiona, s teak night ioaf the thrd Friday
eon will be served in the patio area started by two teenagers to help A Show" staring Elvis on Friday,
from 11 a.m. to,1230 p.m. with buy pre-paid calling cards to send
lical talent rendering familiar patri- to our service people overseas. For
otic music. There will be door each cell phone that is donated, 72|
prizes and 50/50 tickets will be minutes of talk time is given to our
sold. troops to call their loved ones back INSIDE F
Veterans organizations are invit- home. It is a great program, and
ed to set up table displays at the we would really appreciate the s A sHearing Aid Repairs
all makes and models
Crystal River Mall an.f...p=al. ,m ...sp......
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9-23 � 2007 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.


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fourth Friday.
The dinners are open to the pub-
lic as well as members. For more
information, call Cmdr. Ron
Houlihan at 628-3160 or VFW Post
8189 at 795-5012 during its can-
teen hours from 1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
* VFW Edward W. Penno Post
4864, 10199 N. Citrus Springs
Blvd., Citrus Springs. (352) 465-
4864, weekly activities:
Sunday: Darts at 2:30 p.m.
Monday: Cribbage at 7 p.m.
Tuesday: Bingo at 1 p.m.
Wednesday: Shuffleboard at 7
p.m.
Thursday: Darts at 7 p.m.
Friday: Dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m.
Saturday: Shuffleboard at 7.p.m.
VFW general meeting first
Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m.
Ladies Auxiliary meeting second
Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m.
Men's Auxiliary meeting third
Monday of the month at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 27: Ladies
Auxiliary Rent A Space Yard Sale,
pancake breakfast and bake sale.
Also, post blood drive on Opt. 27
with a free pancake breakfast to all
who donate.
* The Veterans Appreciation


Week Ad Hoc Coordinating
Committee will conduct its annual
Veterans-in-the-Classroom pro-
gram, Oct. 29 to Nov. 9 .
Coordinated by the Citrus County
Chapter of the Military Officers
Association of America (MOAA),
the Veterans in the Classroom pro-
gram brings living history to the
classrooms of the county's public
and private schools, as well as
homeschool groups. Veterans
share with students their first-hand
military experiences and travels
while serving our country in uniform
around the world in peace and war.
Call Gary Runyon at 563-5727,
Mac McLeod at 746-1384 or Bob
Truax at 860-1630.
* Floral City American Legion
Auxiliary Unit No. 225 (also
known as Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225) would like to
invite the women in Citrus County
to feel free to join us. We meet at
7:30 p.m. every Thursday at the
Floral City VFW Post on U.S. 41,
Floral City. We are very proud to
belong to this organization. Call
Pat Whitman, membership chair-
man at (352) 793-9091.
Please see VETS/Page 16A


The Beverage c^ enter
e a q


S Smoking ,s ) Kendall
SLoon Jackson Grand
(Cabemet, Chardonnay, Reserve
Merlot, Pinot Noir) (Cabernet or Merlot)

$10 0 $19.99
750 ML 750 ML
Robert i . . -. 06
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n t Absolut Smirnoff Twists
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$19.49 $17.99 F
1.75 Liter 1.75 Liter
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16A SUNDAY, Si',:MB-iR 23, 2007


= Sept. 24-28 MENUS


ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Monday: Breakfast - Sausage
biscuit, cereal (variety), mixed fruit,
seasonal fruit, grits, milk variety,
orange juice. Lunch - Pepperoni
pizza, beanie weenies, salad shak-
er, garden salad, corn, peas and
carrots, peaches, fresh fruit, crack-
ers, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Breakfast -
Breakfast wrap, sweet potato muf-
fin, seasonal fruit, peaches, grits,
tater tots, milk variety, orange juice.
Lunch - Taco burger, chicken pot
pie, vegetarian plate, garden salad,
lima beans, apple slices, fresh fruit,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast -
Breakfast bar, cereal (variety), sea-
sonal fruit, pineapple, toast/jelly,
milk variety, orange juice. Lunch
- Barbecued rib hoagie, fish scrib-
bles, salad shaker, garden salad,
broccoli, baked french fries, fresh
fruit, crackers, milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast - Cheese
grits, apple muffin, seasonal fruit,
pears, tater tots, milk variety, orange
juice. Lunch - Turkey on a bun,
macaroni and cheese with ham,



VETS
Continued from Page 15A

* Hunger and Homeless
Coalition - Anyone who knows of
a homeless veteran in need of
food, haircut, voter ID, food
stamps, medical assistance or
more blankets is asked to call John
Young at the Hunger and
Homeless Coalition at 628-4357, or
pass along this phone number to
the veteran.
* The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter 192
meets at 1 p.m. the first Tuesday -
monthly at VFW Post 10087, 2170
W. Vet Lane, Beverly Hills.
All military veterans who honor-
ably served within Korea, including
territorial waters and airspace
(Sept. 3, 1945, to June 25, 1950)
and within or without Korea (June
25, 1950, to Jan. 31, 1955) or who
served honorably in Korea from
Feb. 1, 1955, until present, are eli-
gible for membership in the KWVA.
Any Medal of Honor recipient for
service during the Korean War is
eligible for free life membership.
Any prisoner of war by the North
Koreans, Chinese of Russian
forces during or after hostilities
from June 25, 1950, forward is eli-
gible for free life membership.
Call Cmdr. Hank Butler at 563-


vegetarian plate, garden salad,
turnip greens, carrots, apple crisp,
fresh fruit, pineapple, milk, juice.
Friday: Breakfast - Cheese
toast, ham slice, oatmeal, seasonal
fruit, applesauce, milk variety,
orange juice. Lunch - Burrito,
corn dog nuggets, salad shaker,
garden salad, green beans, fresh
fruit, mixed fruit, gelatin, crackers,
milk, juice.
MIDDLE SCHOOL
Monday: Breakfast - Sausage
biscuit, breakfast sausage pizza,
cereal (variety), seasonal fruit,
peaches, toast/jelly, tater tots, milk
variety, orange juice. Lunch -
Chicken stir fry, hot ham and
cheese on bun, chef salad plate,
crackers, garden salad, corn, veg-
etable blend (Italian), rice, fresh
fruit, pineapple, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Breakfast - Ham,
egg and cheese bagel, cheese
grits, cereal (variety), seasonal
fruit, applesauce, pineapple muffin,
toast/jelly, tater tots, milk variety,
orange juice. Lunch - Chili,
turkey salad sandwich, breaded
chicken combo plate, garden

2496; Vice Cmdr. Paul Salyer at
637-1161; or Director Neville
Anderson at 344-2529.
* The American Legion Riders
of Post 155 will serve a spaghetti
dinner from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednes-
day, Oct. 3, at the American Legion
Post 155 hall, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River. Cost
is $4 for all you can eat. Take out
also available. Monies are raised
by the Legion Riders to help mili-
tary based charities.
* Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet at 6 p.m. the first
Thursday monthly behind the Key
Training Center in Inverness at 130
Heights Ave. We kick off our meet-
ings with a potluck dinner, then
meet at 7:30, with the auxiliary
breaking off to its separate meeting
room. Bring a covered dish if you
can. Interested in being member,
call Post Cmdr. Fabio Sanservino
at 637-9285 or Auxiliary President
Sandy Scott at 860-2090. Visit the
Web site at www.ALPost77.org.
* U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI) Sturgeon Base meets at
11 a.m. the first Saturday monthly
at American Legion Post 155, 6585
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway in Crystal
River.
Visitors and interested parties
are always welcome. For more
information, call Base Cmdr. Billy
Wein at 726-5926.


salad, pasta salad, vegetable
blend-Calif. Normandy, cornbread,
gelatin, fresh fruit, applesauce,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast-
Waffle sticks, bagelers, cereal
(variety), seasonal fruit, pears,
grits, tater tots, milk variety, orange
juice. Lunch - Chris P Chicken
bites, corn dog, garden salad, tuna
combo salad plate, green beans,
baked beans, baked french fries,
fresh fruit, apple slices, milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast - Ham
and cheese grits, grilled cheese,
cereal (variety), seasonal fruit,
apple slices, toast/jelly, tater tots,
milk variety, orange juice. Lunch
- Pepperoni pizza, beanie wee-
nies, chicken Caesar salad plate,
garden salad, broccoli, pasta salad,
cake, crackers, fresh fruit, peach-
es, milk, juice.
Friday: Breakfast - Breakfast
wrap, cereal (variety), seasonal
fruit, pineapple, sweet potato muf-
fin, grits, tater tots, milk variety,
orange juice. Lunch - Baked
chicken, taco burger, garden salad,
Spanish rice, peas and carrots,


* Military Officers Association
and Reserve Officers
Association -A special com-
bined meeting of the Florida West
Central Chapters of the Military
Officers Association of America
(MOAA) and Reserve Officers
Association (ROA) will be at noon
Thursday, Oct. 11, at the
Silverthorn Country Club, Barclay
Street, Brooksville. All current and
former military officers and their
guests are invited to attend. The
guest speaker will be retired Adm.
Leroy Collins Jr., son of former
Gov. Collins, who is the current
executive director of the Florida
Department of Veterans Affairs, to
discuss important veteran matters
and concerns. For more informa-
tion, directions and reservations,
retired Lt. Col. Alex Jenkins at
(352) 686-9306.
* The Marine Corps League,
Department of Florida under the
sponsorship of Holiday
Detachment 567 will hold their Fall
Conference at the Quality Inn and
Suites at 5316 U.S. 19, New Port
Richey. The dates will be: Oct. 11,
12 and 13. Reservations may be
made by calling (727) 847-9005 or
(800) 4CHOICE. Ask for the MCL
conference rate. For further infor-
mation and dinner selections, go to
the Department Web site.
.m Island X-18 Sea Bee
Veterans of America Upcoming


refried beans, fresh fruit, juice bar,
milk, juice.
HIGH SCHOOL
Monday: Breakfast - Sausage
biscuit, cheese grits, cereal, scram-
bled eggs with cheese, doughnut,
tater tots, toast/jelly, mixed fruit,
seasonal fruit, milk variety, orange
juice. Lunch - Chicken pot pie,
chili, hamburger and hoagie bars,
salad plate, pizza bar, garden
salad, corn, crackers, island veg-
etables, turnip greens, pasta salad,
applesauce, fresh fruit, fries, milk.
Tuesday: Breakfast - Ham,
egg and cheese bagel, biscuit and
gravy, cereal, doughnut, toast/jelly,
grits, apple muffin, tater tots, sea-
sonal fruit, peaches, milk variety,
orange juice. Lunch - Meatloaf,
salad plate, chicken and hoagie
bars, chili, pizza bar, salad, corn,
mashed potatoes, peas and car-
rots, crackers, cornbread, pineap-
ple, fresh fruit, fries, milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast - Ham
and cheese toast, scrambled eggs
with cheese, cereal, doughnut,
toast/jelly, tater tots, pineapple muf-
fin, grits, seasonal fruit, apple-


Events:
Oct. 12:11 a.m. meeting: VA
Office, 2804 Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto.
Oct. 19: 1:30 p.m. luncheon:
Joe's Family Restaurant, 911 W.
Main St., Inverness.
Please note the change of meet-
ing date and place. As always all
Sea Bees, Honey Bees, relatives,
and friends are welcome to our
events. The meetings are at 11
a.m. second Wednesday, and
luncheons are at 1:30 p.m. third
Wednesday. We have a short
meeting, about one hour, at the VA
Office in Lecanto, then we will eat
lunch at a local restaurant decided
at the meeting. Luncheons are
third Wednesday picked by
Charley Rhodes, if you have an
idea of a place to go let Charley
know. If you have any questions,
call Cmdr. David Puffer at 746-
9327.
* The Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World War II
meets at 11:30 a.m. the second
Saturday monthly at the Boston
Cooker, 5375 Spring Hill Drive,
Spring Hill. The next meeting is .
Oct. 13.
* Navy Seabee Veterans of
America Island X-23, Crystal
River, conducts regular meetings at
11:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at the Crystal Paradise


sauce, milk variety, orange juice.
Lunch - Mac and cheese with
ham, hamburger and hoagie bars,
salad plate, pizza bar, chili, garden
salad, green beans, winter mix,
corn, pears, crackers, fresh fruit,
,fries, milk.
Thursday: Breakfast -
Breakfast wrap, biscuit and gravy,
cereal, doughnut, toast/jelly, tater
tots, sweet potato muffin, grits, sea-
sonal fruit, sliced apples, milk vari-
ety, orange juice. Lunch - Rotis-
serie chicken, chicken and hoagie
bars, pizza bar, salads, chili, gar-
den salad, broccoli, black eyed
peas, corn, crackers, scalloped
potatoes, roll, fresh fruit, fries, milk.
Friday: Breakfast - Breakfast
sausage pizza, scrambled eggs
with cheese, doughnut, cereal,
grits, tater tots, toast/jelly, pineap-
ple, seasonal fruit, milk variety,
orange juice. Lunch - Lasagna,
pizza bar, hamburger and hoagie
bars, salad plate, chili, garden
salad, corn on cob, spinach, roll,
crackers, baked apple, cake, fresh
fruit, fries, milk.
Menus are subject to change


Restaurant, 508 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. We also have break-
fast at 8 a.m. on the last Sunday of
the month and a luncheon on the
second Tuesday at a location
decided by the group and the
social director, Gordon Levins at
795-7662.
We welcome new members,
who are veterans, who served
under the command of the U.S.
Naval Construction Forces/Naval
Facilities Engineering
Command/Bureau of Yards and
Docks.
For additional information, call
Cmdr. John Kister at 527-3172.
* Dan Campbell Airborne
Association will meet at 6:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly at
American Legion Post 155, Crystal
River. All current and previous
Airborne members and their wives
are welcome to join. For additional
information,.call Steve Leonard at
726-3693.
* Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 County Road 40
E., Inglis (one mile east of U.S.
19). Men and LAVFW meet at 7:30
p.m. the third Wednesday monthly
at the post. Men's Auxiliary meets
at 7 p.m. the second Monday
monthly. Call Randy Sutton at 447-
3495.
* The Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
will conduct its regular meeting at 7


without notice.
CONGREGATE DINING
Monday: Macaroni, turkey, ham
and cheese casserole, garden
green peas, stewed tomatoes,
whole wheat bread with margarine,
mixed fruit cup, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Mojo chicken quarter,'
fiesta rice, green beans, whole
wheat bread with margarine,
spiced peaches, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Pork cutlet with
brown gravy, broccoli cuts, lima
beans and corn, whole wheat
bread with margarine, pear chunks,
low-fat milk.
Thursday: Chef salad with
turkey, ham, cheese and ranch
dressing, pickled beet salad, whole
wheat bread with margarine, fresh:
apple, low-fat milk.
Friday: Swedish meatballs over
rotini noodles, California medley,
carrots, dinner roll with margarine,
brownie, low-fat milk.
Congregate dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal River,'
Homosassa Springs, Inverness and
South Dunnellon. For information,
call Support Services at 527-5975.,

p.m. on the third Wednesday
monthly at DAV Post 70 in
Inverness at the intersection of
Independence Avenue and U.S. 41
North. All former Marines are wel-
come. Call Tom Heron at 637-2724
or Joe Spoto at 746-3315.
* Fleet Reserve Association,
Branch 186 will meet at 3 p.m. the
third Thursday monthly at the DAV,
Building, Independence Highway i
and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at 344-
0727.
* The Fleet Reserve
Association Branch 186 and its
Ladies Auxiliary hosts a "Pearl
Harbor Remembrance" luncheon
each year on Dec. 7 to honor those
who served at Pearl Harbor during-
the attack in 1941.
A few years ago, Citrus County )
awarded a Proclamation that
reads: "Whereby, commemorating"
the attack on Pearl Harbor will
instill in all people of Citrus County"
a greater understanding and -
appreciation of the selfless sacri-
fice of the individuals who served
in the Armed Forces of the United
States during World War II," and
furthermore "The Board hereby j
recognizes Dec. 7 of each year as)
Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day"
in Citrus County.
The Fleet Reserve and Auxiliary,
are proud to host an annual lunch-
eon in their honor.
r


-,In


Kuruc completes
Marine training
Marine Pfc. Steven Kuruc is
returning home Wednesday from
military school.
Kuruc gradu-
ated from Crystal
River High in
2004 and joined I . '
the marines in ; .
January 2007. .
He spent 13
weeks training at
Parris Island, Seve
S.C., then three weeks training in
military combat at Camp Lejeune,
N.C. From there, Kuruc began his
training for his occupational spe-
cialty, driving 1- to 7-ton vehicles,


at Fort Leonard, Mo.-
His family is anxious to spend
time with him before he begins his
military service and wants him to
know how proud they are of him
for serving his country.
Harbison graduates
from basic training
Pvt. 2 Logan T. Harbison gradu-
ated with honors from basic train-
ing in the infantry at Fort Benning,
Ga., on April 27.
He earned expert status in rifle
marksmanship and was a platoon
leader. Due to his shooting ability,
he was offered to join the sniper
squad and javelin school.
Immediately following basic train-
ing, he joined javelin school at Fort
Benning. After a brief visit home,


he was transferred to Fort Lewis in
Washington State where he scored
the highest in his platoon on the
physical
endurance test.
From there, he
was sent to
. Kuwait on July 1
and is now serv-
ing in Iraq.
He is the son
Logan of Danita and
Harbison Shannon
Heathcock and
Russell Harbison. He is the grand-
son of Bob and Nadine Humphries.
He is the brother of Jordan
Harbison.
He graduated from Citrus High
School in 2005.


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding n.rd engagement announcements, anniver
s..?rie:. bii th nrir,ouLr,, erienrit. and first bir th I .:L ,.
* Call Linda Johnson at 563-5660 for copies.


Cocktails

Fine Dining

Dancing



Valet Parking
Lirnoi_.1sine
Service Home
L-pon req,..,&e'


Saturday,
Citrus Hills


October 13, 2007
Golf & Country ClI


Call for reservations


352.527.2020
www.hospiceofcitruscounty.orgi
All proceeds benefit Hospice of Citrus County


ub





H >o 1'I .
OF CITRUS COUNTY INC.
Licensed 1985


Who will be the next

Citrus County


/ To enter, simply fill out the form below and return it with your
favorite pet photo and a $10 Entry Donation.
/ Deadline for entries is 5:00 PM, Sept. 26, 2007.
/ Voting begins Oct. 1 through Oct. 7, 2007.
/ Votes are 25� each or 5 for a $1.00. Vote as many times as you like!
Pictures will not be returned


Please Print


I Owner's Name_

Pet Name

Address_

Phone
i I--n--


I - U


69936


Please mail to:
Citrus County Chronicle
Attn: NIE
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429

---C - - - i " k"N i * E


Cial riis thUNy (Fl.) CIIR()NcIi�i


11- -1. 1


It








SUNDAY, SEPTEMBIl It 23, 2007 17A


ue is not a morning per-
son. She's not a noon per-
son. Doesn't really like
the late afternoons much
either. She tolerates the
evening, and, as I get ready for
bed, she is wide-
awake.
"You go ahead,
I've got some e-mail
to catch up on, some ,-.
laundry to do, I want
to clean the oven, (-.
can some tomatoes,
order some seeds,
hem those slacks I
just bought." It's
been like this for 35
years. MUL
I'm almost used to
it
About three years ago, I went
to the pet rescue place to get a
replacement cat. I didn't want
a kitten, I wanted a full-grown,
housebroken cat. There were
hundreds of cats trying to out-
cute one another. I'm not a cat
expert, I just like low-mainte-
nance pets.
My last cat used to like it
when - after dinner parties -
I would pick him up like a ven-
triloquist's dummy and put
words in his mouth.
'"Jim, does this fur make me
look fat?" "Jim, was I adopt-
ed?" '"Jim, can I take a person-
al day off tomorrow?" '"Jim,
let's talk about my 401K plan."
So, feeling good in general
about cats, I picked up the first
one that rubbed up against my
leg and let me pet her.
The pet rescue people didn't
warn me by saying anything as
direct as, "You've just decided
,to bring Satan into your home,"
or "Sir, think about it, why do
you think this beautiful cat
doesn't already have a home?"
Or "Don't do it, mister! It will
wreck your marriage, you'll
lose your job, you'll lose your
house!" No. No one was that
direct. One guy did cough into
his hand and said casually,
"Most people don't like to
adopt older cats." Lights
should have flashed, buzzers
should have sounded, security
doors should have automati-
cally slammed shut to keep this
cat from escaping. Instead, I
took it home in a cardboard
cage they provided for free.
I was so naive. For a few
days, we called out names to
the cat to see what she would
respond to. If someone had
owned her before, she must
:have a name. Betty? No
response. Linda? No response.
;Missy? Wynonna? Imelda?
,Leona? Moon Unit? Ephigene?
,Camilla? Mary Jane? Apple?


L


VACATIONING?
SRemember to take photos during the trip, to submit to the
Dream Vacation Photo Contest.
* Send in a photo with a brief description of the trip. Include
the names of anyone pictured, and include a contact name
and phone number on the back
[ Weekly winners will be published in the Sundcl% Chronicle.
* At the end of the year, ,- panel of judges will select the best
photo during the year and that photographer will win a prize.
* Avoid photos with computerized dates on the print.
* Make sure photographs are in sharp focus.
* Submit photos to the Chronicle at 1624 rj. Me.idowcrest
Blvd.. Crystal River, FL 34429.


in town


; /. , ..:> .. , - ,-. y, - .. t



' Maint,MD
Surgery
�s^ f)la Colon
rrhoid. *.Breast
. General Surgery


" �- Medical Degree
1:i Unlverslty of Alabama School of Medici,,ne
i'^ - Residency
, t . System, Birminghram. Alabama


Worth NOTING


One cat is not


like another


Salt? Pepa? Fergie? Nothing.
Lucy? Sue swears she turned
her head when I said Lucy
Lucy it was. Of course she
turned her head. It's short for
her real name, Lucifer. Even
scarier is when we
realized the cat was
deaf. You can vacu-
um right beside her
s and she won't wake
up. She won't wake
up until you are
deep into pleasant
7. REM sleep.
I am flying in the
clouds, the sky is
, blue, there is gleam-
,LEN ing white city below
me, an island in the
middle of peaceful
ocean, waves of relaxation
wash over me
EYOWWWWW! Lucy is sitting
on my pillow screaming into
my ear at the top of her lungs.
She sounds like a fork caught
in garbage disposal - only
louder. Why not? She can't
hear herself. One of her claws
is digging into my shoulder. I
shoo her off, but five minutes
latter: EYOWWWWW! This
goes on five times a night for
weeks. 4:30 a.m. 5:30 a.m.
There are bags under Sue's
eyes. Did I mention Sue's not a
morning person? She's not
even a night person, now. Her
slacks go unhemmed. I started
doing the laundry. Her e-mail
is stacking up.
A friend says get yourself a
squirt bottle with water and
keep it beside the bed. The cat
misbehaves you squirt it. After
a few nights, Lucy will be
trained, end of problem.
"This works on your cats?" I
ask.
"I don't have any cats," he
says. "But it works on my chil-
dren."
So I buy the squirt bottle and
fill it full of water.
EYOWWWWW! I fumble for
the squirt bottle in the dark
and find it and wrap my hand
around it, index finger on the
long trigger. I can't see the cat
in the dark. EYOWWWWW!
There she is, I quickly fire
three times and squirt myself
in the face all three times. Sue
turns on the light and looks at
me holding the squirt bottle
backwards and Lucy innocent-
ly washing her face at the end
of the bed.
"Please," she says. "Some-
one come rescue me."


Reach author Jim Mullen
atjimmullen@myway.com.


future home of the post on the cor-
ner of County Road 581 and Amy
Lane, one block south of Anna Jo.
We anticipate breaking ground for


a 2,400- to 3,600-square-foot build-
ing early in 2008.
Anyone interested in becoming
members or have items to donate


may contact Post Cmdr. Fabio
Sanservino at 637-9285, Auxiliary
President Sandy Scott at 860-2090
or visit www.ALPost77.org.


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10/14
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Allen-Rawls Post
to host yard sale
Allen-Rawls American Legion
Post 77 will hold a yard sale for its
charity fund 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday
and Saturday. All proceeds from
the yard sale will go to the
American Legion Post 77 Charity
Fund. Charities that American
Legion Post 77 covers are ongoing
and include Boy's State, oratorical
contest, scholarships, school
awards program, ROTC program,
children and youths, as well as vet-
erans help and many more pro-
grams.
The yard sale will be at the


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www.aibotursc


I













Having a sand blast


HUGO MARTIN
Los Angeles Times

FLORENCE, Ore. - The
polished board strapped to my
feet feels fast and light I shift
my weight forward and launch
myself down a 50-foot sand
dune, through a wide curvy
path bordered by spiky
European beach grass.
Bend your knees, I was told.
Point your lead arm in the
direction you want to go. Cal it
be that easy?
It's a cloudy but warm sum-
mer afternoon along the cen-
tral Oregon coast, and this is
my third attempt at sandboard-
ing. To the south, the nation's
largest expanse of coastal
dunes stretches to a horizon of
honey-colored mounds, sprin-
kled with bunches of gold and
green beach grass. To the west,
-white-crested waves lap on the
beach. To the east, the Suislaw
River cradles the town of
Florence, home of the nation's
first sandboarding park.


Surfing down the dune, I'm
gaining speed and cruising at a
nice clip, the wind blowing back
my hair I'm probably traveling
less than 20 mph, but it's an
adrenaline jolt nonetheless. As I
reach the bottom of the hill a few
seconds later, I shift my weight to
my heels and, for the first time
that day, come to a graceful stop.
A geological phenomenon
made Oregon's central coast a
paradise for sand-sport enthusi-
asts, and that's the reason an
estimated 2 million people each
year lug sandboards and trans-
port ATVs, motorcycles, quads
and dune buggies to these parts.
The hub of this sand play-
ground is Florence, once rated
the nation's top retirement
town. Now the streets rumble
with trucks, RVs and trailers-
loaded with knobby-tired
motorcycles, ATVs and dune
buggies, nearly all plastered
with a bumper sticker that
reads: "Got Sand?" Whether
it's on fat tires or waxed
boards, sand is the attraction.


And there's tons of it here.
Three rivers - the Coos, the
Umpqua and the Suislaw -
dump stream sediment into the
ocean off a gently sloping sand-
stone terrace, stretching about
40 miles, from Coos Bay to the
iconic Heceta Head lighthouse.
Ocean currents and offshore
winds toss the grains back onto
the long, flat shelf, where it
piles up in waves, bowls and
flat plains. Author Frank
Herbert visited this vastness of
sand in 1953 and was inspired
to write "Dune," his classic sci-
ence-fiction novel.
The winds, tides and cur-
rents that wash and rewash the-
sediment grind out what might
be the. softest and cleanest
sand on the coast
Just ask Lon Beale.
He came to Florence, a for-
mer logging community on the
north end of Oregon's dunes, 10
years ago looking for the best
sand on which to popularize
sandboarding, a craze he hopes
will surpass snowboarding and


................ ..SPENCER WEINER/ Los Angeles Times
Sandboarder Matt Walton, 19, kicks up sand and catches air in Florence, Ore.


skateboarding.
S'"All you need is the board
and a dune."
That's why 19-year-old Matt
Walton, one of-Beale's employ--
ees, says he loves sandboard-
ing. I've joined Walton and
Beale and a few others at a
moderate-size dune for a mini-


symposium on the sport, which Josh Tenge, a two-time sand-
begins with its sheer simplicity. boarding champion and Beale
It's a Ielatively inexpensive employee, I'm shushing down:
pastime; they explain. You can the dune with relative ease. I
-ride-in. shorts and a.T-shirt. No. wipe out a few times, flipping -
padding, or helmets needed, head over heels, but Beale
and your bare feet fit into smiles and says: "If it's not fast
padded bindings. enough to hurt yourself, it's not
After a few pointers from fun."


SCAM
Continued from Page A2

skimpy on details," warned
Amy Virgo, CTA of Nature
Coast Tourism Development
Inc./NCTD Travel Center. "This
is a red flag to alert you of a
possible scam. If it sounds too
good to be true, it probably is."
Typically, scam operators
won't include the complete
details of their offer until their
victim has paid for the trip.
Once they've received the
information, the consumer
learns there are restrictions
and conditions that make it


GUIDE
Continued from Page A2

in Tasmania. Local ferries are
often a good option to consider
when traveling in locations
that offer ferry service. Upon
arrival in Devonport, we
booked a hotel for the night
and the next day rented a car
and freewheeled for several
days, ending up across the
state in Hobart, the capital and
largest city in Tasmania.
Our favorite destination was
Port Arthur on a peninsula in
the southeast that was the orig-
inal port of embarkation for
the British and where the first
penal colony was established.
There are several national
parks, interesting colonial
towns and beautiful beaches,
all within a day's drive from
anywhere in Tasmania.
Tasmania was named after
the explorer Abel Tasman who
was employed by the East
Indies Company, and was put
in command of an expedition
to the South Pacific in search
of a place known only as the
"Unknown Southland." He


DOWmvtOWWN limSC Wl V'LOMW.
September 29
Old Courthouse
Downtown Inverness
-This-year's-race will -wind
through scenic downtown
Inverness. It begins at the
Old Courthouse.
Race start - 7:30 a.m.
Kids fun run - 8:15 a.m.
Several businesses will be
providing services the
morning of the race.
All proceeds will be donated
to the Citrus County
Children's Advocacy Center
(Jessie's Place).
Visit www.citrusroadrunners.org
to print registration form.
Register early, save $5.
SFor more information
call 637-2475
N ,CHI ONICl


in

-E


more costly or even impossible
to take the trip. This is often
the case with vacation pack-
ages advertised as "free" or
"discounted." Many consumers
discover their trip doesn't
include food, taxes, surcharges
or deposits when it's too late
and they are hit with addition-
al - and often excessive -
charges. What's worse, scam
operators have been known to
use deceptive language in
brochures luring consumers
into signing a contract, think-
ing they've simply signed up for
more information.
The best protection against
scams is to use a professional
travel agent, who is a member


unwittingly circled New
Zealand and Mauritius and
then rode the favorable winds
west and landed on an island
known as Van Diemen's Land;
named for a Dutchman who
was governor-general of
Australia. Tasman planted the
Dutch flag on Tasmania on
Dec. 3, 1642, and took formal
possession, but then nothing
happened there for about a
hundred years.
The British, wanting to
expand their military presence
in Australia, colonized
Tasmania and" -established
penal colonies there. Convicts
from England became the pre-
dominant populace at that
time, providing most of the
labor to build Tasmania's infra-
structure and contributing
greatly to the country's settle-
ment.
Yes, there really is a
Tasmanian Devil, so named by
early settlers because of their
blood-curdling screams, yet


of the American Society of
Travel Agents (ASTA). ASTA-
members are required to
adhere to a strict code of ethics
and are required to respond to
consumer complaints filed
against them with ASTA at the
risk of expulsion. For further
information on filing a com-
plaint or to determine a com-
pany's membership status, call
ASTAs Consumer Affairs
Department at 800-ASK-ASTA,
or visit www/astanetcom.
Being an educated consumer
is the best way travelers can
arm themselves against swind-
lers. Nature Coast Tourism-
Development Inc./NCTD Tra-
vel Center offers the following


they are rarely seen except in
the form of "road kill," as they:
are nocturnal marsupials -
the largest on earth. They are'
also reported-to have.a bad dis-
position, a trait probably
shared by the convicts who
were .sent to Tasmania from
England.
Tasmania is not easy to get
to, and only 3 percent of travel-
ers who visit Australia also
visit Tasmania. That leaves
room for you - there isn't any
place else like it on Earth.


Neil Sawyer is a 22-year
Crystal River resident and
businessman. He and his wife,
Karyn, are extensive travelers,
venturing to foreign countries
two to three times a year in
addition to taking several
domestic excursions annually.
They prefer independent trayv-
el or with small-group guided
tours. E-mail him atgobud-
dy@tammpabay.rr.com. -


recommendations to help its
clients avoid the hassle and
heartache of travel scams:.
* Be very skeptical about
postcard, fax and phone solici-
tations, which say you've been
selected to receive a fabulous
vacation but which provide few
details about the trip.
* Never give your credit card
number to a company unless
you know the company and are
confident about its legitimacy.
Be sure you receive complete
information in writing before
giving any form of payment.
These details should clearly
indicate total price, cancella-
tion and change penalties and
information on all components


CAVES
Continued from Page A2

waters in the underground cav-
erns. "For them, it's going back
in history. They see ore carts,
drills left in the Wall, time-
keeper shacks, where the guys
would clock in," she said.
She said divers encounter
optical illusions, like an area
that resembles an upside down
waterfall, another known as
the ','Redwood Forest, ' for the
way' it looks when light hits
submerged stone pillars.
The Bonne Terre Mine with
24 dive trails draws 15,000
divers annually and. another
30,000 tourists who tour and
learn the mine's history, said
Doug Goergens.
Kerr's recreation complex
called Crystal City Under-
ground is being planned to
draw thousands of visitors.
- Though it would -seem to be


of the offer
* Understand that calling
900-numbers is often.costly and
risky.
* Companies offering to
make people instant travel
agents so they can receive dis-
counts are extremely suspect.
Suppliers such as airlines, car
rental companies, hotels or
cruises are under no obligation
to provide such discounts..
* Prepaid timeshares are
risky investments. Membership
and maintenance fees can
increase, or the company could
go bankrupt before you have a
chance to take advantage of,
your vacation offer. Time-
shares can be difficult to resell


more challenging to create a
recreation complex under-
-ground, Kerr said otherwise.
"You could never do it above
-ground,_Yqu could never build
all the buildings to do it"
Kerr, who owns St Louis-
based Fiesta Corp., is propos-
ing a host of underground
recreation from rock climbing
to skating to swimming, with
individual operators renting
out venues in the complex,
with an attached convention
center Above ground, he envi-
sions softball fields, football
fields, an equestrian center
and more. Food and shopping
will be part of the mix, he said.
He said work is under way to
bring utilities to the caverns.
He said most people haven't
gotten caught up in the fact the
facilities will be largely under-
ground, he said.
"The immensity of it is
appealing to athletes. Athletes
like to cross train. Athletes like
to play," he said. .


and rarely appreciate in value:
* Don't be pressured into
accepting limited-time offer;
from pushy salespeople. Choos-
ing a vacation is a big decision
and legitimate deals won't
expire after a night's sleep.]
When in doubt, always say no.
* Avoid telemarketers. They
have no further responsibility
to consumers after the sale has*
been finalized. Therefore,
never give your credit card
number or bank information
over the phone, not even for so-
called verification purposes.
According to a recent study byi
Congress, Americans lose $40(
billion annually to fraudulent,
telephone sales. A

The manmade caverns serve-
different recreational purposes,
than their natural counterparts"
Cave enthusiasts usually,
_take precautions tL protect.the .--.
life and natural formations;
they encounter in caves, but
caving organizations didn't se%
a problem with efforts to trans-
form manmade caverns into
recreational facilities.
"We try to teach people con9
servation. Don't hurt the cave
and don't hurt yourself," said.
Bill Torode, librarian for the
National Speleological Society
based in Huntsville, Ala.
But, "We're more concerned
about natural caves. The man-
made things, like mines, are
different from caves," he said.
Even so, the caverns provide
a unique environment for a
workout. In southwest
Missouri, tennis players hold
matches underground on two
illuminated courts in an under-
ground cavern owned by
AmeriCold Logistics, Inc.


GET THE WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news releas-
es about upcoming community events.
._-Write the name of the.event, who.sponsors it, when and
where it will take place and other details.
* Include a contact name and phone number to be printed
in the paper
* News releases are subject to editing
* Call 563.5660 for details.

Ltr, w*.





L aIiPflhU? 3S


,'will donate my
pers to NIE when
go out of town."

gll 563-5655

Donate Your Papers.

_ That Easy!



m Newspapers In
/Educati/6b (NIE)
iteracy Program of The
it4s County Chronicle
provides FREE
',.newspapers to

classrooms as a
supplemental
teaching tool.


For more information about NIE,

Call 563-5655


XISA SUNDAY, SEPTEMER45,ZkU


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE)


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SUNDAY, SI'EPTjIMI:R 23, 2007 19A


,== 60th AN IVESARY --- =====50th

The Boones


," 's _.. . -. . Engagements -

The Carusos Moseley/Kramer


Billie Jean and Elmo Walter
Boone of Hernando celebrated
their 60th wedding anniver-
sary. They were married Aug.
P5, 1947, in Valdosta, Ga. They
are the parents of Dona Boone
6f Hernando and Denise
4ntonewitz of St Petersburg
and they have two grandchil-
dren. Prior to retirement Billie
as an office manager and
Ilmo was a nurseryman. They
ve lived in Citrus County 22
ars.

4=: 58th ANNIVERSARY== =

The Aiamendingers


f Ray and Jo Allmendinger of
IJecanto are celebrating their
58th ! wedding anniversary.
They were married in 1949 at


Annette and Matteo Caruso
of Beverly Hills celebrated
their 50th wedding anniver-
sary Sept. 22 at Citrus Hills
Golf and Country Club with
friends and family, who had
arranged a surprise party.
The Carusos were married
Sept. 14, 1957, at St. Joseph's
Roman Catholic Church in
Rosebank, Staten Island, N.Y.
They have four children,
Matthew Caruso of Orlando,
Michele Tierney of Orlando,


the University of South Dakota.
The Allmendingers have six
children, seven grandchildren
and three great-grandchildren.


; J






John Caruso of Ocala and
Jennifer Parrish of Valrico,
and they have seven grandchil-
dren.
Annette's past occupations
included legal secretary in
Manhattan and administrative
assistant for King Financial
Services. Matteo worked for
the Department of Sanitation
in New York and as a Citrus
County school bus driver. They
are both retired and have-lived
in Citrus County 33 years.


== 50th AN N IW." -4-!


The Keenans


Engagement

Walley/Lamorand


Mr. and Mrs. Greg Walley are
pleased to announce the
engagement of their daughter
Alissa Ann Walley to Clint
Allen Lamorand.
Alissa received her bache-
lpr's degree from the
University of West Florida and
will receive her master's
degree in education leader-
ship in December from the
University of South Florida.
She currently teaches first
gade. Clint is gainfully
employed in the computer
industry as a lead engineer.
(The wedding will take place
on Dec. 31 at the First
Qhristian Church of Dunedin
With the bride-elect's grandfa-
ther officiating. A reception
v :q -, :-' 7 ,' - .,.


will follow at Ruth Eckerd Hall
in Clearwater.
After a honeymoon trip
stateside the couple will reside
in Tampa Bay.


WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS
� Photos need to be in sharp focus.
' Photos need to be in proper exposure: neither too light nor
too dark.
* Include your name, address and phone number on all pho
tos.
,* When identifying persons in your photo, do so from left to
right.
.M If desired, include the name of the photographer for credit.
* Photos cannot be returned without a sell-addressed,
stamped envelope.
* For more information, call Linda Johnson, newsr.oomn coordi.
nator, at 563 5660.


William E. "Bill" and Louise
Keenan of Hernando celebrat-
ed their 50th wedding anniver-
sary Sept. 21. They were mar-
ried in New York City in 1957 at
the Church of the Epiphany.
They 'made their home in
Titusville. In 1971 they moved
to Hernando. They have two
sons, one daughter and five
grandchildren. As part of their
golden celebration they
cruised to Bermuda.


Sandra and Eddie Lovett
and Rick and Anita Moseley,
all of Homosassa, are pleased
to announce the engagement of
their daughter, Candi Moseley,
to Daniel Kramer, son of Holly
and Bob Kramer, also of
Homosassa.
The bride-elect is a graduate
of Lecanto High School and
Central Florida Community
College and is employed in
sales with White Aluminum.
The future groom is a gradu-
ate of Crystal River High
School and Central Florida
Community College and is
owner of Precision Piling
Foundations.
The wedding will take place
on Tuesday, Sept. 25, at
Sandals Resort, Antigua.


Wiech/Douglas

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Wiech of
North Olmsted, Ohio,
announce the engagement of
their daughter Jennifer Lee to
Mr. Andrew Douglas, son of Mr.
and Mrs. H. Daniel Douglas of
Dunnellon.
The bride-elect is a graduate
of North Olmsted High School.
She received her bachelor of
fine arts degree in theatre per-
formance from Ohio University
and is currently employed by
Cathedral Arts Project in
Jacksonville. ly employed by Giles-McIvor
The future groom is a gradu- Inc. in Jacksonville.
ate of Lecanto High School and The wedding ceremony will
received his bachelor of arts talre place on Saturday, Oct 6,
degree in theatre performance at the Plantation Inn and Golf
and production. He is current- Resort in Crystal River.


Firstfy " '" -' ...
;t� !*t�?S tltM~:^-"^ ff / y ; ' - ' , ' -' l *,- - . 4 ''. k '.a-


Chase Hayden celebrated
his first birthday on Aug. 2. His
grandmother, Sandy Hayden
from Hernando, was there in
Cambria, Calif., to enjoy this
wonderful day.


A celebration was held in
Daytona Beach with family
and friends recently. Friends
from Florida, Georgia, North
Carolina and Tennessee came
to the event. Daughter LuAnn
along with grandsons Joey,
Justin and Christopher gifted
the couple with a cruise to be
taken in January. Their 18-
year-old grandson Joey is cur-
rently in the Marine Corps,
engaged in combat training.


New :' "


Congratulations to the fol-
lowing new parents:
* To Amanda J. and Edward
A. Lindsey Jr., Homosassa, a
daughter, Haley Rae Lindsey,


born at 7:42 p.m. Saturday,
Sept. 15, 2007, at Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center,
Crystal River. She weighed 5
pounds, 12 ounces.


Tristin Alexander McDonald
celebrated his first birthday on
Sept 18. Tristin is the son of
Nicole Joyce and Justin
McDonald of Crystal River.
Paternal grandmother is
Donna McDonald of Inverness
and paternal great-grandmoth-
er is Mary McDonald of
Monroe, La.


Submit your video for a

chance to win a


... .Chronicle TV will be announcing
the winner of an iPod nano on
October 31, 2007. The
video with the most votes
wins. Voting starts on
Sept 28, 2007. Submit today!
. . -,' '"s - See Chronicleonline tv for contest rules







choicenin.t


I YourName _Phone_
List of Names
Name_ Phone_
-Name __Phone_
0Name Phone___
S-PL


m mmmm
Please mail to: m
Citrus County Chronicle *
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429 I
Fax to: 563-5665
or |
Call: 563-3295

- -m - - - m


*


4


6TRUS COUNIY (FIJ CIIIONI(.'[.I-.'


TC)C.1E'FJHER









2fa uNUJfAXV SFPI MPR2 20 CTRSCQJ ---I CRNIL


Your Birthday: Unattached Libras have a strong
possibility of developing a new romantic relationship
with someone that can be beautiful and lovely.
However, there is also a chance you could deceive
yourself, so take care to be realistic.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Some interesting
changes could be in the offing in your social life at this
time. New friends may enter the picture breathing new
life into what was a sour period.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - You're exceptionally
capable of handling a difficult situation with kindness
and considerable skill. But you must be careful that
once you resolve a ticklish matter, you don't reopen it.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - Success is possi-
ble with some proper revisions, so if you're smart, you'll
disengage yourself from nonproductive concepts.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - Strive to be futuris-
tic in your finances. If you don't think only of gratifying
your immediate desires, you could fare quite well later.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - It may be necessary
to assert yourself without aggression where you are try-
ing to overcome something that has been problematical.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - Your compassionate


The Citrus County Animal
Control Shelter has online
listings of impounded ani-
mals. Go to the Web page
animalcontrol.citrus.fl.us and
click on "Impounded
Animals" to begin a search.
To enquire about the ani-
mals listed here, refer to the
type (cat or dog), age group


instincts are easily aroused, and persons who need
your assistance will readily receive it. However, some-
one you help may not treat you as considerately.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - Positive elements are
trying to elevate your hopes and expectations, so don't
be negative and put limitations on your possibilities.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - It can be a new ball
game for you, so don't hesitate to pursue some large
and constructive objectives that you might not have
dared to attempt previously.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Do not let some recent
obstacles bring you down. If you stay on top of things
and strive toward your objective, you'll succeed.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - When it comes to your
financial dealings with others, be realistic about the
value of what they are offering. If you can't see the
worth in it, you could fool yourself into feeling taken.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Circumstances may pro-
duce a partnership arrangement, but a good attitude
will be needed to sustain it. Let go of unrealistic ideals.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - You'll be far more pro-
ductive if you use tried-and-true methods or proce-
dures based on past experience.


Today MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness
Box Office 637-3377
"Resident Evil: Extinction" (R) 1:30 p.m., 4:30
p.m., 7:30 p.m. Digital.
"The Brave One" (R) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"3:10 to Yuma" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Halloween" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Mr. Bean's Holiday" (G) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:50 p.m.
"Rush Hour 3" (PG-13) 7:40 p.m.
"Becoming Jane" (PG) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Sydney White" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m. Digital.


"Resident Evil: Extinction" (R) 1:50 p.m., 4:50
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:25 p.m. Digital.
"Good Luck Chuck" (R) 1:35 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m. Digital.
"Dragon Wars" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:10
p.m., 9:45 p.m. Digital.
"The Brave One" (R) 1:20 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:20
p.m., 10:05 p.m. Digital.
"Mr. Woodcock" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:55 p.m., 10 p.m.
"3:10 to Yuma" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:35
p.m., 10:205 p.m. Digital.
"Halloween" (R) 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Balls of Fury" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m, 4 p.m., 7:15
p.m, 9:40 p.m.


and gender in a search.
The shelter can help you
save an innocent pet.
The shelter is in.Inverness
near the airport. The shelter
is open for adoptions from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
through Friday and from 10
a-m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.
Call the Citrus County


Animal Shelter at 726-7660
for more information.
Financial assistance for
spaying and neutering of
your adopted pet is avail-
able through the Humani-
tarians of Florida at 563-
2370, or from the Humane
Society of Citrus County at
341-2222.


Grandmother must



regain control of choices


Dear Annie: When I retired, I wanted to
move closer to my only grandchildren.
However, my daughter said I couldn't
live in "her town" unless I divorced my second
husband. After thinking about my difficult mar-
riage, I decided to get the divorce,
although I have stayed friends with
my ex.
After I moved, my ex came to visit
every few months. My daughter was
livid. She wouldn't allow me to see
my grandsons for weeks at a time. -
She said she's afraid the ex will mur-
der her family. I don't know why she
believes this. My ex has never been
physically violent.
Now he is planning to move to "her
town," and I haven't told her. I worry *.
she will never let me see the boys
again. Annie, I can't control where he ANNI
lives and don't know why I should be MAUIL
forced to give up a friendship
because of her paranoia. I will never
live with him again, so what business is it of
hers?
I am handicapped and on a limited income, so
I can't keep moving away, but I am desperate
enough to consider suicide if she cuts off my
access to those boys. They are all I live for. I
asked my daughter to go to a therapist with me,
but she refused, saying I am the one with the
problem. Please help. - Suicidal in California
Dear Suicidal: Did something happen
between your daughter and your ex that is caus-
ing this reaction? If so, she should tell you about
it. If not, it would be nice if she were more com-
passionate. You have given your daughter con-
trol over your choices, and it's making you
depressed and miserable. Go for counseling
without her. A counselor will help you take
charge of your life again and find other reasons
to get up in the morning besides your grand-
children. Please call today.
Dear Annie: Every year I receive several grad-
uation announcements, and generally, I am
pleased to send a card and checkto the graduate.
Recently, I received a preprinted thank-you
postcard that was addressed in the familiar
handwriting of the graduate's mother. Is this
acceptable now? Is it old-fashioned to think the
student should be part of this process? I know I
will receive another announcement in four
years when this young man graduates college,


and I may be less eager to send a gift then. -
Grow Up and Write Your Own Notes
Dear Grow Up: Of course the recipient should
acknowledge the gift personally, although too
many parents don't bother teaching their chil-
dren the importance of expressing
gratitude, and when those children
are adults, they haven't the vaguest
sense of obligation to do so. At least
you received an acknowledgement
.4 of your gift, no matter how inappro-
priately done.
Dear Annie: I just finished read-
ing about "John and Alice," the
annoying neighbors. My husband
also stares and can say very inappro-
priate things. We also do not have
any friends. It's heartbreaking to see
this wonderful man judged and
IEe'S shunned by people who have not
LBOX taken the time to find out if there is
a problem. They think he's strange.
He has Asperger's.
My husband is intelligent and loving, but has
poor social skills, lacks empathy and comes
across as emotionally immature. Yet he has the
biggest heart and gentlest soul. Every time
someone makes a negative comment about him,
it tears my heart up. I wish people would walk
in someone else's shoes before assuming some-
one isn't worth knowing. I admit it isn't easy at
times, but the joy and love he gives me is worth
it. - Indiana
. Dear Indiana: We realize you may be reluc-
,tant to let people know your husband has
Asperger's, but then you cannot expect them to
be understanding when he behaves in socially
'inappropriate ways. If there are people you
would like to spend more time with, tell them
what's going on and give them the opportunity
to appreciate your husband's good qualities the
way you do.


Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell
and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. E-mail questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, P.O. Box 118190, Chicago, IL
60611. To find out more about Annie's Mailbox,
and read features by other Creators Syndicate
writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.


Sunday PUZZLER

Puzzle answer is on Page 15A.


NAME: Vader NAME: Devin NAME: Missy
Hamster AGE: Adult AGE: Adult
SEX: M Adult SEX: NM SEX: SF
ID #: 84858 ID #: 85355 ID #: 85319


MONTOOMI




GENTRi

For Tickets:
Fancy's Pets - 669 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, 352-563-5100

Wishful Thinking
Western World
(Ocala, Gainesville, Leesburg)
352-629-7676


NAME: Trixie
AGE: YA
SEX: F
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NAME: Max
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PITCHING-IN FOUNDATION
352-527-3297


ACROSS
1 "-, I'm Adam"
6 Countrified
11 Quick
16 Moisten
with pan drippings
21 Martini fruit
22 Cordial flavoring
23 A Muse
24 Higher
25 Wrinkled
26 Lukewarm
27 Doctrine
28 Put away for later
29 Playing card
30 Split or black-eyed
31 Culture medium
33 Interlock
35 Sea monster
36 Begin anew
39 Run-down
urban dwelling
43 Poor grade
44 Dead lang.
45 Overlook
47 Army chaplain
49 Sprite
51 Surprise greatly
54 Certain relative
57 Followed
59 The rudiments
63 Backtalk
64 Whitney or Wallach
66 Rabbit
68 "Kiss Me -"
69 Authentic
70 Help in wrongdoing
72 Shade tree
74 Lose strength
76 Learning
78 Actress
- Lollobrigida
79 Distance around
82 Tidy
84 Gaseous element
86 Layered rock
87 Leap or fiscal
89 Cudgel
91 - -de-vie
92 Unit of work
93 Tax agcy.
95 Barber's specialty
97 Direct
99 Fleur-de- -
101 Pub order
104 Laughing or natural
106 Sour


108 Flat-bottomed boat
110 Place near India
114 Rumple,
117 Before long
119 Chart used
in predictions
121 Gen. Bismarck
122 Cheese variety
124 Love god
126 Kid
127 Grow weary
128 - there, done that
129 Seize
131 Handle roughly
133 Nervous twitching
135 Knight's title
136 Gaelic
137 Demons
139 Low shrubby plant
141 Parts of shoes
143 Old French coin
145 Texas landmark
147 Hot dog
149 Go team!
152 Lair
154 Crying out loud
157 Canopy
161 Lawyers' org.
162 School in England
164 Stepped on
165 Kind of fever
167 Mongrel
168 Group of witches
170 The.Pentateuch
173 Chairs
175 Dwelling
177 Makes regular
178 Baton -
179 Insert mark
180 Burn superficially
181 Stupid
182 Stage direction
183 Texas player
184 Put forth,
as a question


DOWN
1 Back tooth
2 Juvenile heroine
3 Wines and -
4 - Maria
5 Shirt size (abbr.)
6 Appraise
7 Like leftovers
8 Tear
9 Chinese
or Japanese, e.g.
10 Shelf
11 Secluded place
12 Have being
13 Skillet
14 Particular
15 Was overly fond
16 Dry measure
17 Fitting
18 Bobbin relative
19 - firma
20 Build
30 Pay- - -view
32 Elec. unit
34 Sowing need
37 Alien's craft
38 Additional
40 Engrave
41 State near Minn.
42 Courtroom event
46 Jury's verdict
48 Rock's - John
50 Wells -
51 Wing parts
52 Defame in print
53 "Aida" is one
55 Statute
56 - go bragh!
58 Not of this world
60 Tan
61 Maker of wicker
furniture
62 Nonstandard speech
65 Sheltered side
67 Energy type (abbr.)
71 Small monkey
73 Encounter
75 Lofty
77 Abbr. in footnotes
80 Combine
81 - avis
83 Calendar abbr.
85 Archeologist's find
88 Costa -
90 Great composer
94 Rescue
96 Source of ore


98 Movable barrier
100 Denomination
101 Sun-dried brick
102 Metric measure
103 - Park, Colorado
105 Wetland plant
107 Campus building,
for short
109 Squirm
111 Balance
112 Spring time
113 Casts a
sidelong glance
115 Sharpens
116 Insect stage
118 Ark builder
120 Kimono sash
123 Posts
125 Take legal action
130 Low in spirits
132 Grassy ground
134 Masticate
137 Twosome
138 Suffocate
140 More snug
142 Sea eagle
144 City in Denmark
146 "- Town"
148 Certain vote
149 Went quickly
150 Overhead
151 Refuge
153 - Dame
155 Opera by Puccini
156 Notions
158 Religious pictures
159 Little push
160 Cupidity
163 Midday
166 Concerning (2 wds.)
169 Print measures
171 Furrow
172 Ripen
174:Skill
175 Deadly snake
176 Life story, for short


Today's HOROSCOPE


CITRUS COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL

PET PROFILES


Cimus Coumy (FL) CHRoNia.


20A SUNDAY. SEPTFMBER 23, 2007










c4~~


* College Football/2B
* MLB/3B
* Scoreboard/4B
* NFL/5B
* Entertainment/6B


B
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 23, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


Bucs wary of Rams' ground attack


Tampa Bay expects

St. Louis to regroup

aroundRBJackson

Associated Press
TAMPA - The Tampa Bay
Buccaneers don't have any illusions
about what the St Louis Rams will try
to do to jump-start their season.
Marc Bulger still directs a potent
passing attack featuring big-play
receivers Torry Holt and Isaac
1ruce. However, the Bucs feel that
the player who really makes the
Rams go on offense is running back
Steven Jackson.


Bonds,


Giants


ponder


futures

Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Barry Bonds
insists he holds no ill will toward the
d iants.
A day after they announced he
wouldn't*be back next season, Bonds
said his 15 years in San Francisco
were the best of his life and that he's
ready to move on to another team.
"I can walk out of here with my
head high and I'm very proud," Bonds
said Saturday "I
know that when I was
in left field in San
Francisco there was
All eras no one better. ... We
had fun. For 15 years
Come to we had a great time."
Bonds' absence will
-an end be evident all over
the Giants' ballpark
at some From the corner of
point. the clubhouse that
has been his domain
all these years, to the
missing kayakers in
McCovey Cove who
Peter will have no mile-
Magowan stone homers to
San Francisco chase, to the empty
Giants. seats after years of
sellouts, it will be a
new era in San Francisco.
S The biggest void will be in left field
and the cleanup spot in the lineup,
where Bonds anchored the Giants for
so many years.
1 "All eras come to an end at some
Iloint," owner Peter Magowan said.
"Everybody had to go at some point,
Whether it was Hank Aaron or Ted
Williams or what It didn't mean that
toe Red Sox went bye-bye or the Cubs
went bye-bye when Ernie Banks left
We've been around a hundred years
a;d we expect to be around another
hundred years."
The question remains how long will
Please see DOLPHINS/Page 4B


"He's a beast," Tampa Bay coach
Jon Gruden said.
"In my opinion, one of the great
backs - not good backs, but great
backs - in the league," 10-time Pro
Bowl linebacker Derrick Brooks
agreed. "He does a lot for them."
Not the past two weeks.
Jackson has averaged 3 yards per
carry during St. Louis' 0-2 start, and
the Rams also have struggled to get the
fourth-year pro involved in the passing
game. He has four receptions for 39
yards after leading all NFL running
backs with 90, while ,also rushing for
1,528 yards and 13 touchdowns, in 2006.
The Bucs (1-1) expect the Rams to try
to get him back on track when the teams
meet today at Raymond James Stadium.
"He's a great receiver- no one talks
about that enough. He can take a 2-yard


ON TELEVISION
* St. Louis Rams at Tampa Bay
Buccaneers: 1 p.m. on FOX.

check-down 70 yards. I've seen him do
it He's a tremendous football player.
He's a power runner, he's an elusive
back, he's a complete package,"
Gruden said.
"He's not off to the start, I think, that
he's accustomed to being off to, but


he's one or two plays away from
exploding right back onto the scene."
Jackson carried 18 times for 58
yards during St -Louis' season-open-
ing loss to Carolina, then gained 60
yards on 21 attempts last week when
the Rams had nearly 400 yards total
offense to San Francisco's 186 - and
still lost 17-16.
Turnovers hurt St Louis in both
games, but so did the lack of produc-
tion from Jackson, who's been running
behind an offensive line missing
injured Pro Bowl tackle Orlando Pace.
"You don't want this to be the week
that he gets out of the gate," Bucs
defensive tackle Chris Hovan said.
"A couple weeks now he has been
frustrated with some of the runs that
he has had. Hopefully, we are going to
be up to the task to stop him. ... First


Road scholars


Associated Press
Florida defenders Kyle Jackson (3) and Joe Haden (12) break up a first quarter pass intended for Mississippi wide
receiver Mike Wallace (2) on Saturday in Oxford, Miss.

Sleepy Gators muster win over Ole Miss in first away game


Associated Press
OXFORD, Miss. -
Florida coach Urban
Meyer was right to be
worried about his young
Gators' first road trip.
Tim Tebow set a school
record for quarterbacks
with 166 yards rushing
and accounted for four
touchdowns Saturday to
lead the third-ranked
Gators to a difficult 30-24


win at Mississippi.
Despite Tebow's big
numbers, it took a late
Tony Joiner interception
and a pair of time-con-
suming drives to put the
pesky Rebels away in the
defending national cham-
pions' first challenge of
the season.
Meyer was concerned
the Gators (4-0) weren't
ready to travel after three
home wins in which they


averaged 55 points. Thirty-
five players, including 18
true freshmen, were mak-
ing their first road trip and
Florida made a one-hour
bus drive from nearby
Tupelo before the game's
early start.
The effects of the trip
showed most notably in
Florida's 14 penalties for
127 yards, which Meyer
called "just awful."
While many of the


Gators seemed lethargic,
Tebow did not He ran the
spread option offense in
workmanlike fashion, tak-
ing what Ole Miss (1-3)
gave him underneath and
never forcing the deep
pass. The sophomore led
the Gators to their 11th
straight win and 19th in
their last 20.
The victory also snapped
Please see GATORS/Page 4B


Seven Rivers runner impresses at invitational


CR boys win title
LARRY BUGG
For the Chronicle
BROOKSVILLE - To many a
,girls cross country runner, the
question was, Who is that little girl
and why couldn't she keep up with
the little one?


The little girl is Chloe Benoist, a
seventh-grader who runs on the
Seven Rivers Christian girls cross
country team.
On Saturday, Benoist finished sec-
ond in the Fifth Annual Zak Lucas
Invitational Cross Country Meet at
Hernando High School. She had a
20:22 time. Pasco High's Leeann
Eble, a two-time district and
Sunshine Athletic Conference cham-


pion, won with a time of 20:14.
Eble said Benoist came out of
nowhere to push the Pasco junior at
the finish line.
Benoist was running despite some
nagging injuries. Her coach, Kerri
Kitchen, has her own theory.
"She is from another planet,"
Kitchen said jokingly. "She is an
alien. She was third and fourth and
then pulled ahead. The other girls


later pulled ahead of her. She kept
steady throughout I told her not to
push too hard because of her
injuries. She had a groin pull and a
strained hamstring. She won the
women's varsity at Mount Dora the
previous week"
Benoist is getting into this business
of threatening top area runners.
Please see 7iUN! .!;-/Page 4B


and foremost our focus is to stop
(Jackson), and then get after Bulger."
The Bucs rebounded from a season-
opening loss at Seattle to beat New
Orleans 31-14, with Jeff Garcia show-
ing what kind of difference he can
make at quarterback and a revamped
defense containing Brees, Reggie
Bush and Deuce McAllister.
Garcia threw for 243 yards, Joey
Galloway had four receptions for 135
yards and two touchdowns, and
Carnell "Cadillac" Williams scored on
a pair of 1-yard runs for his first TDs
in nearly a year.
"He is a much better quarterback,
no disrespect to anyone else we have
had here; than we have played with.
He just is a better player," said
Please see : . /Page 4B



Dolphins,


Jets seek


first win

Associated Press
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -
Jason Taylor loves winning, especially
when he beats the New York Jets. The
Miami Dolphins defensive end has
even more motivation than usual for
this game.
"There's no bigger way to get ready
for the next week than to have the Jets
coming up," Taylor
said. "It's obvious-
ly a big game for
both teams and
the rivalry is
there. The
need to get a
win on both
teams is there,
so it adds that
much fuel to an already fiery situa-
tion."
That's because the winner of
today's game will be 1-2, while the
loser will fall into an early season
hole at 0-3.
"Anytime that we play the
Dolphins, I don't care if we're 0-10
and they're 0-10, it's going to be a
good game because that's the way the
Jets and Dolphins play each other,"
Jets wide receiver Laveranues Coles
said. "You know that you have to be
ready to play."
The Jets are 0-2 for the first time
since 2003, and have twice bounced
back from similar starts to make the
playoffs. The last time was in 1998,
when New York finished 12-4 and lost
to Denver in the AFC championship.


Flesch takes


3-shot lead


at PGA Tour

Associated Press
VERONA, N.Y. - Steve Flesch shot
a 6-under 66 on Saturday to take a
four-shot lead over Carl Pettersson
and Charles Warren after three
rounds at the inaugu-
ral Turning Stone
Resort Championship.
Flesch, seeking his
second victory in two
under 197, tying the
PGA Tour's lowest 54-
hole score in relation St
to par this year. pFlesch
Pettersson (66) briefly
tied for the lead after consecutive
birdies on the back nine, but Flesch
rallied with four of his own over the
final five holes to keep the top spot to
himself.
Warren (68), who finished second to
Flesch at Reno in early August,
birdied his final hole to tie Pettersson
for second. They were two shots in
front of Parker McLachlin (65).
Michael Allen (68) and Bill Haas (69)
were another stroke back at 12 under.
Justin Leonard and Sean O'Hair
shot 66s and were tied at 11 under
with Jarrod Lyle (68), John Mallinger
(68), Joe Ogilvie (68), Bart Bryant (69),
Johnson Wagner (69), Craig Bowden
(70), Mathew Goggin (70), and Charley
Hoffman (71).









2BSNASPEBR2,207C LE EF OBL iu Co n (F)CIIoJf


Orange end Cardinals' flight


Syracuse stops

Louisville streak;

USF gores UNC

Associated Press.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. - Andrew
Robinson threw for a career-
high 423 yards and four touch-
downs as Syracuse stunned No.
18 Louisville 38-35 on Saturday.
Taj Smith caught four passes
for 173 yards and two touch-
downs for the Orange (1-3, 1-0
Big East) as Syracuse ended
Louisville's 20-game home win-
ning streak by dominating the
listless Cardinals (2-2, 0-1).
The victory was Syracuse's
first road conference win and
first victory over a ranked team
since beating Boston College at
the end of the 2004 season.
Brian Brohm completed 45-
of-65 passes for a career-high
555 yards and four scores for
Louisville, but the Cardinals'
defense allowed Syracuse -
which entered the game
ranked near the bottom nation-
ally in every offensive category
- to pile up 465 yards and
make big play after big play.
Syracuse, a 36 1/2 point
underdog, built a 17-point lead
in the fourth quarter before try-
ing to make it interesting late.
The Orange turned the ball
over twice in the final minutes
allowing Louisville to get with-
in three with 56 seconds left
Louisville, which entered
the game leading the country
in yards per game, had little
trouble moving the ball, but
had several drives sputter in
Syracuse territory and turned
the ball over four times.
Louisville's troubles extend-
ed beyond the defense. The
Cardinals committed 12 penal-
ties for 105 yards, had punts of
11 and seven yards and were
booed heavily by the sellout
crowd, most of which headed
for the exits with plenty of time
left on the clock
No. 2 LSU 28, No. 12
South Carolina 16
BATON ROUGE, La. - LSU put
one over on the ol' ballcoach.
The No. 2 Tigers used a fake
field goal to score one touchdown
and piled up 288 rushing yards to
defeat Steve Spurrier and No. 12
South Carolina 28-16.
Midway through the second
quarter, the Tigers set up for a field
goal attempt from 32 yards.
However, the holder, quarterback
Matt Flynn flipped the ball over his
shoulder to kicker Colt David, who
ran it in for a touchdown run and a
21-7 halftime lead
Jacob Hester's power and
Trindon Holliday's speed were key
for LSU on the ground and its dom-
inant defense did the rest with two
interceptions and a pair of stops on
fourth-and-short yardage situations.
The defense unsettled Spurrier to
the point he switched quarterbacks
several times.
Holliday wound up with a career-
high 73 yards rushing, including a
33-yard touchdown, while Hester
finished with 89 yards and a score.
No. 5 West Virginia 48,
East Carolina 7
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. - Pat
White threw for two touchdowns
and ran for two more as No. 5
West Virginia overpowered East
Carolina 48-7 on Saturday.
Steve Slaton rushed for 110
yards and a score to match a
school record for career touch-
downs, and the Mountaineers (4-0)
rolled up 599 total yards against
the Pirates (1-3), who suffered their
most lopsided loss under third-year
coach Skip Holtz.
West Virginia's defense didn't
allow a score until the final two
minutes, limiting the Pirates to nine
first downs and 160 total yards.
West Virginia scored seven of
the first eight times it had the ball in
beating East Carolina for the sev-
enth straight time. The team's last
two meetings weren't decided until
the fourth quarter, but this one
wasn't close.
East Carolina entered the game
allowing 86 yards rushing per
game, and had been the only team
to hold West Virginia under 200
yards rushing in each of the past
two seasons.
No. 6 California 45,


Arizona 27
BERKELEY, Calif. - Justin
Forsett rushed for 117 yards and
two touchdowns, and No. 6
California settled another year-old.
score with a 28-point first quarter in
* a 45-27 victory over Arizona on
Saturday.


Associated Press
Syracuse quarterback Andrew Robinson (9) celebrates .Saturday with teammate Patrick Shadle after
throwing a 79-yard touchdown pass on the first play of their game against Louisville in Louisville, Ky.


South Florida defensive back Trae Williams (21) knocks the ball away from North Carolina wide
receiver Hakeem Nicks (88) on Saturday during the third quarter in Tampa.


Nate Longshore passed for 235
yards and a touchdown, while
Jahvid Best and James
Montgomery made scoring runs for
the Golden Bears (4-0, 1-0), whose
24-20 loss in Tucson last season
denied them an outright Pac-10
championship and a probable trip
to Cal's first Rose Bowl in nearly a
half-century.
Three weeks after the Bears
avenged last year's season-open-
ing loss to Tennessee, they flat-
tened the Wildcats (1-3, 0-1) by
taking a 25-point lead in the first 13
minutes. The Bears were sloppy
after their fast start, committing 14
penalties for 121 yards, but Forsett
did more than enough to secure
Cal's 10th straight win at Memorial
Stadium.
Willie Tuitama set school records
for pass attempts and completions,
going 42-of-61 for 309 yards, but
Arizona couldn't escape its huge
early hole despite a strong second
half. Mike Thomas had a career-
high 12 catches, second-most in
school history, for 105 yards and a
score, but Arizona's final drive
ended on downs with 3:46 left.
No. 8 Ohio St. 58,
Northwestern 7
COLUMBUS, Ohio - It took 95
years for Ohio State to play 500
games at Ohio Stadium - and
less than two quarters to put up 45
points against Northwestern.
Todd Boeckman tossed three
touchdown passes to Brian


Robiskie in the first half to lead the
eighth-ranked Buckeyes past the
Wildcats 58-7 on Saturday.
Just about everything went
wrong for the Wildcats (2-2) in the
first half. The Buckeyes (4-0)
could've had their starters leave at
halftime for some tailgating outside
the Horseshoe. They've won 15
straight at home.
Robiskie, son of former NFL
player Terry Robiskie, scored on all
three of his receptions, which cov-
ered 42, 28 and 19 yards.
Boeckman finished 11-for-14 for
179 yards and four scores, also
throwing a 48-yard TD pass to Ray
Small.
Chris Wells gained 100 yards on
12 carries with a touchdown and
Maurice Wells, who had scored
twice in 25 career games, matched
that with touchdown runs of 1 and
3 yards.
Michigan 14,
No. 10 Penn St. 9
ANN ARBOR, Mich. - Mike
Hart ran for 153 yards on a career-
high 44 carries and scored early in
the fourth quarter, leading Michigan
to a 14-9 win over No. 10 Penn
State on Saturday.
The Wolverines (2-2, 1-0 Big
Ten) have climbed back to .500
and pumped life back into a sea-
son that looked dead after two
weeks.
The Wolverines were the fifth-
ranked team in the country when
they were stunned by Appalachian


State in the opener. The next week,
they were blown out of the Big
House by Oregon.
But Michigan always seems to
get well against Joe Paterno's
Nittany Lions (3-1, 0-1). Penn State
has lost nine straight games to
Michigan, the longest winning
streak by one team over the famed
coach and almost doubling the
second-best run against him.
Michigan held Penn State's lack-
luster offense to three field goals
and after the final one, midway
through the fourth quarter, fresh-
man quarterback Ryan Mallett con-
verted a pair of third downs on
passes to take 42 minutes off the
clock and force JoePa to use all of
his timeouts.
No. 14 Boston College 37,
Army 17
BOSTON - Matt Ryan threw for
356 yards and accounted for four
touchdowns before leaving the
game midway through the fourth
quarter and leading No. 14 Boston
College to a 37-17 victory over
Army on Saturday.
Ryan moved into third place on
BC's career passing list behind
Doug Flutie and Glenn Foley with
6,147 yards. The senior quarter-
back finished 35-for-51 with three
touchdown passes and a TD run,
and connected with Kevin
Challenger nine times for 104
yards before being replaced by
Chris Crane for garbage time.
Ryan also threw two intercep-


huge play near the end of the sec-
ond quarter. Arkansas appeared to
be moving toward at least a field
goal when third-string running back
Michael Smith fumbled. Kentucky's
Trevard Lindley recovered and
went 66 yards for a touchdown
with 26 seconds remaining.


tions, one of them caught by Brian
Chmura and returned 11 yards for
a touchdown that made it 29-17
with 9:22 left in the game. But on
the second play of the ensuing
possession, Andre Callender went
through the line and down the left
sideline for a 66-yard touchdown.
Army (1-3) had some success
on special teams, with a fake field
goal that set up its first touchdown,
but didn't do much offensively. The
Black, Knights managed seven first
downs to 34 for Boston College
and they were outgained 573-259
from scrimmage.
No. 15 Clemson 42,
N.C. State 20
RALEIGH, N.C. - C.J. Spiller
and James Davis each caught a
touchdown pass and rushed for
another to lead No. 15 Clemson to
a 42-20 rout of North Carolina
State on Saturday.
Davis rushed for a season-high
166 yards with a 3-yard touchdown
catch and a 1-yard scoring run,
while Spiller - a week after
Furman held him to minus-1 yard
- finished with 114 yards with an
11-yard TD catch and a 44-yard
scoring run.
The Tigers (4-0, 2-0 Atlantic
Coast Conference) dominated from
the opening kickoff, scoring on four
of their first five possessions and at
one point outgaining the Wolfpack
220-1.
Cullen Harper was unshaken
and efficient in his first career road
start, completing 25-of-39 passes
for 268 yards -,2 yards shy of his
career high - with touchdown
passes to both tailbacks.
Mark Buchholz kicked four field
goals for the Tigers.
Darrell Blackman returned a
kickoff a school-record 99 yards for
a touchdown and caught a 9-yard
scoring pass from Daniel Evans,
and Andre Brown ran 17 yards for
a TD for N.C. State (1-3, 0-2).
No. 17 Virginia Tech 44,
William & Mary 3
BLACKSBURG, Va. - Brandon
Flowers returned an interception
49 yards for a touchdown and
Eddie Royal scored on a 60-yard
punt retum as No. 17 Virginia Tech
defeated William & Mary 44-3
Saturday.
The Hokies (3-1) dominated
from the beginning against the
Tribe (2-2) of the Championship
Subdivision (formerly Division I-
AA), scoring three touchdowns and
two field goals in the first quarter.
They turned to Beamerball tactics
for their most lopsided victory of
the season.
Flowers intercepted a pass by
Jake Phillips and brought it all the
way back in the first quarter to
make it 20-0. Royal's return came
with 13:56 to play in the second
quarter, giving the Hokies a 34-0
lead.
Virginia Tech had 287 total
yards, with 133 yards rushing.
Freshman Tyrod Taylor was 6-for-
13 for 72 yards in the first half,
including a 34-yard touchdown
pass to Branden Ore. Sean
Glennon was 5-for-9 for 49 yards
as coach Frank Beamer emptied
his bench in the third quarter. Cory
Holt went 4-of-5 for 33 yards in the
last period.
No. 21 Kentucky 42,
Arkansas 29
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. -Andre
Woodson and Kentucky have the
comeback down pat.
Woodson threw a 32-yard touch-
down pass to Keenan Burton with
4:02 remaining to give the Wildcats
the lead, and No. 21 Kentucky ral-
lied past Arkansas 42-29 Saturday
night.
The Razorbacks led 29-22 after
Felix Jones returned a free kick
82 yards for a touchdown early in
the fourth quarter. But for the sec-
ond straight week, Arkansas
couldn't hold on late and
Kentucky came from behind in the
fourth quarter. Derrick Locke's 2-
yard touchdown run made it 29-
27, and although the 2-point con-
version attempt was stopped, the
Razorbacks couldn't move the
ball and had to punt.
The Razorbacks (1-2, 0-2) out-
gained Kentucky 373-131 in the
first half but lead only 20-14 after a


No. 23 South Florida 37,
North Carolina 10
TAMPA - So much for the
notion that No. 23 South Florida
might get caught looking ahead.
The rapidly rising Bulls validated
their first Top 25 ranking Saturday
with a dominating 37-10 victory
over North Carolina, setting them-
selves up for next week's much-
anticipated Big East showdown
against No. 5 West Virginia.
Matt Grothe led long touchdown
drives on USF's first two posses-
sions, while the Bulls' swarming
defense forced four turnovers and
kept the young, rebuilding Tar
Heels out of the end zone until just
over a minute remained.
Grothe completed 17 of 30 pass-
es for 230 yards and one touch-
down before being replaced by
backup Grant Gregory in the fourth
quarter. The Bulls (3-0) also rushed
for 194 yards and outgained North
Carolina (1-3) 428-164 overall.
The Bulls, in only their 11th sea-
son, cracked the Top 25 for the first
time, largely on momentum gener-
ated by last year's 9-4 finish and a
26-23 overtime victory at then-No.
17 Auburn two weeks ago.
No. 24 Nebraska 41,
Ball St. 40
LINCOLN, Neb.- Sam Keller's
third touchdown pass finally put
Nebraska in the lead with 3:13 left
in the game, and the 24th-ranked
Cornhuskers survived an upset bid
by Ball State with a 41-40 victory
on Saturday.
The Cardinals moved in ..position
to win the game, but Jake Hogue's
55-yard field goal attempt was wide
left with 17 seconds left, allowing
Cornhuskers fans everywhere to
breathe a sigh of relief.
Keller passed for a school-
record 438 yards, and Nebraska
(3-1) needed every one of them
against the 23-point underdog
Cardinals (2-2).
Ball State played on even terms
with the Huskers all day, but the
Cardinals, who nearly upset a sec-
ond-ranked Michigan team a year
ago, couldn't finish the job.
No. 25 Missouri 38,
Illinois St. 17
COLUMBIA, Mo. - Chase
Daniel threw three touchdown
passes and No. 25 Missouri had
581 yards of total offense Saturday
in a 38-17 win over Illinois State.
Daniel was 21-for-34 for 294
yards and two interceptions. He
has thrown 13 touchdown passes
this season after setting a school
record with 28 in 2006 in his first
year as a starter.
Jeremy Maclin scored on a sec-
Ond-quarter pass and a 67-yard
punt return in the fourth quarter.
Tony Temple also scored twice, on
a first-quarter pass and third-quar-
ter 1-yard run, and rushed 18 times
for 101 yards.
Luke Drone was 22-for-37 for
242 yards, one touchdown and one
interception for Illinois State (2-2) of
the Football Championship
Subdivision - the former Division
I-AA. Geno Blow gained 116 yards
on 21 carries. Eyad Salem caught
seven passes for 106 yards and a
fourth-quarter touchdown.
Missouri (4-0), worked quickly on
offense. The Tigers scored on
drives lasting 17 seconds, 3:11,
2:40, 3:33 and 2:04, and on
Maclin's punt return. On 24 scoring
drives this season, the Tigers' aver-
age time of possession is 2:08.
Central Florida 56,
Memphis 20
ORLANDO - Central Florida's
Kevin Smith ran 22 times for 124
yards and three touchdowns, then
took most of the second half off as
his Knights rolled past Memphis
56-20.
UCF coach George O'Leary
used two quarterbacks - with
explosive results. Backup Michael
Greco, a 6-foot-3 junior college
transfer taking his first snaps for
UCF, completed 11-of-12 passes
for 151 yards. He ran 10 times for
77 yards and scored twice on the
ground.
Starter Kyle Israel was 6-for-9 for
137 yards and a touchdown - a
72-yard pass to Kamar Aiken that
put UCF (2-1, 1-0 Conference


USA) ahead 49-0 early in the third
quarter.
The Knights held Memphis (1-2,
0-1) to 290 yards - including just
57 in the first half. Greco's 50
yards rushing at halftime was bet-
ter than the Tigers' whole team,
which had 41 at the break.


2BSUNDAY, SFPTEMBER 23, 2007


C40LLEC-IE IF4o(3T]BALL


Cf77?us Cotimy (FL) Cimomcu.









CITRU COUIY (L) CRONILE I4ATC LEA UE BAEBAL SUNAY,-EPT-B-R-3,-207--


East Division
GB L10
- z-5-5
2% z-7-3
13% 6-4
26 4-6
29 2-8


East Division
Pct GB L10
.558 - z-4-6
.545 2 8-2
.523 5% 7-3
.442 18 3-7
.426 20% z-4-6


Home
47-28
51-28
47-31
32-42
35-42


Home
40-34
43-32
43-37
39-40
33-44


Away
45-35
38-37
31-45
33-46
28-50


Away
46-34
41-38
38-37
29-46
33-45


Intr
12-6 Cleveland
10-8 Detroit
10-8 Minnesota
6-12 Chicago
7-11 Kansas City


x-Boston
New York
Toronto
Baltimore
Tampa Bay



New York
Philadelphia
Atlanta
Washington
Florida


Central Division
Pct GB L10 Str
.591 - z-7-3 L-1
.542 7% z-6-4 L-1
.487 16 z-4-6 L-2
.439 23% z-7-3 W-2
.435 24 z-5-5 W-1

Central Division
Pct GB L10 Str
.529 - z-8-2 W-3
.513 2% 5-5 L-1
.468 9% 3-7 W-1
.461 10% z-6-4 W-2
.439 14 5-5 L-1
.426 16 z-2-8 L-8


Home
50-29
42-35
40-40
34-41
34-44


Home
43-37
47-27
42-38
38-37
40-38
35-40


Away
41-34
42-36
35-39
34-46
33-43


Away
39-36
32-48
30-44
33-46
28-49
31-49


Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland
Texas




Arizona
San Diego
Colorado
Los Angeles
San Francisco


W L
91 64
83 71
75 81
71 83



W L
87 67
85 68
82 72
79 75
67 87


West Division
Pct GB L10
.587 - 5-5
.539 7% z-7-3
.481 16% 4-6
.461 19% 2-8


West Division
t GB L10
5 - z-6-4
6 1% 7-3
2 5 z-7-3
3 8 z-4-6
5 20 z-2-8


WILD CARD GLANCE
American League
W L Pct GB
New York 89 65 .578 -
Detroit 84 71 .542 5
National League
W L Pct GB
San Diego 85 68 .559 -
Philadelphia 84 70 .545 2
Colorado 82 72 .529 4Y2
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Chicago White Sox 8, Minnesota 3
N.Y. Yankees 12, Toronto 11, 10 innings
Seattle 3, L.A. Angels 2
Oakland 9, Cleveland 3
S Kansas City 7, Detroit 4
Boston 8, Tampa Bay 6
Baltimore at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Today's Games
Oakland (Braden 1-7) at Cleveland
(Westbrook 5-9), 1:05 p.m.
Toronto (McGowan 11-9) at N.Y. Yankees
(Mussina 10-10), 1:05 p.m.
Kansas City (De La Rosa 8-11) at Detroit
(Verlander 17-6), 1:05 p.m.
Boston (Wakefield 16-11) at Tampa Bay
(Jackson 4-15), 1:40 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (G.Floyd 1-4) at
Minnesota (Slowey 3-0), 2:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Leicester 2-2) at Texas
(Millwood 9-13), 3:05 p.m.
Seattle (Weaver 7-12) at L.A. Angels
(Lackey 17-9), 3:35 p.m.
Monday's Games
Toronto at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Texas, 8:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 9, Pittsburgh 5
N.Y. Mets 7, Florida 2
Atlanta 4, Milwaukee 3, 11 innings
St. Louis 7, Houston 4
Philadelphia at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Francisco, 9:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
S Colorado at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Today's Games
Philadelphia (Hamels 14-5) at Washington
(Hanrahan 4-3), 12:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Maine 14-10) at Florida
(Seddon 0-1), 1:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Capuano 5-12) at Atlanta
S (Reyes 1-2), 1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Gorzelanny 14-8) at Chicago
Cubs (Zambrano 16-13), 2:20 p.m.
Colorado (Francis 16-8) at San Diego
(Maddux 13-10), 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Harang 16-4) at San Francisco
(Blackley 0-0), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 11-5) at Arizona
(Gonzalez 8-2), 4:40 p.m.
Houston (Oswalt 14-7) at St. Louis
(Wellemeyer 3-3), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Washington at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Milwaukee, 8:05 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-MOrdonez, Detroit, .358;
ISuzuki, Seattle, .351; Polanco, Detroit,
.340; Posada, New York, .337; Lowell,
Boston, .326; VGuerrero, Los Angeles,
.323; DOrtiz, Boston, .322.
RUNS-ARodriguez, New York, 137;
Granderson, Detroit, 117; Sizemore,
Cleveland, 116; BAbreu, New York, 114;
MOrdonez, Detroit, 113; ISuzuki; Seattle,
109; DOrtiz, Boston, 108.
RBI-ARodriguez, New York, 146;
MOrdonez, Detroit, 133; VGuerrero, Los
Angeles, 123; CPena, Tampa Bay, 112;
DOrtiz, Boston, 111; Lowell, Boston, 110;
Momeau, Minnesota, 109.
HITS-ISuzuki, Seattle, 226;
MOrdonez, Detroit, 207; Jeter, New York,
195; MYoung, Texas, 1931 Polanco,
Detroit, 191; OCabrera, Los Angeles, 188;
Crawford, Tampa Bay, 184.
DOUBLES-MOrdonez, Detroit, 50;
DOrtiz, Boston, 47; VGuerrero, Los
'Angeles, 45; AHill, Toronto, 44; THunter,
Minnesota, 44; Markakis, Baltimore, 42;
Rios, Toronto, 41; BRoberts, Baltimore, 41;
Posada, New York, 41.
TRIPLES-Granderson, Detroit, 22;
DeJesus, Kansas City, 9; Crawford, Tampa
Bay, 9; CGuillen, Detroit, 9; Iwamura,
Tampa Bay, 8; MeCabrera, New York, 8;
Teahen, Kansas City, 8.
S, HOME RUNS-ARodiguez, New York,
52; CPena, Tampa Bay, 40; DOrtiz,
Boston, 32; Thome, Chicago, 32;
Morneau, Minnesota, 30; Konerko,
Chicago, 29; THunter, Minnesota, 28.
STOLEN BASES-Crawford, Tampa
Bay, 50; BRoberts, Baltimore, 46; Figgins,
Los Angeles, 40; ISuzuki, Seattle, 37;
' CPatterson, Baltimore, 37; Sizemore,
, Cleveland, 33; JLugo, Boston, 30.
PITCHING (16 Decisions)-Beckett,
Boston, 20-6, .769, 3.14; Verlander,
Detroit, 17-6, .739, 3.70; Bedard,
Baltimore, 13-5, .722, 3.16; Wang, New
York, 18-7, .720, 3.72; Sabathia,
Cleveland, 18-7, .720, 3.19; KEscobar, Los
Angeles, 17-7, .708, 3.46; Carmona,
Cleveland, 18-8, .692, 3.03.
STRIKEOUTS-JoSantana, Minnesota,
231; Kazmir, Tampa Bay, 229; Bedard,
Baltimore, 221; Sabathia, Cleveland, 205;
JVazquez, Chicago, 204; Beckett, Boston,
188; Matsuzaka, Boston, 186; Haren,
Oakland, 186.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-CJones, Atlanta, .341;
Holliday, Colorado, .337; HaRamirez,
Florida, .333; Utley, Philadelphia, .333;
Renteria, Atlanta, .333; MiCabrera,
Florida, .323; DYoung, Washington, .323.
RUNS-Rollins, Philadelphia, 132;
HaRamirez, Florida, 117; JBReyes, New
York, 115; Holliday, Colorado, 113; Uggla,
Florida, 106; Wright, New York, 106;
BPhillips, Cincinnati, 106.
RBI-Holliday, Colorado, 131; Howard,
Philadelphia, 124; CaLee, Houston, 113;
Fielder, Milwaukee, 112; MiCabrera,
Florida, 112; Dunn, Cincinnati, 106;
Beltran, New York, 105.
HITS-Holliday, Colorado, 205;
HaRamirez, Florida, 203; Rollins,
Philadelphia, 201; JBReyes, New York,
186; Pierre, Los Angeles, 185; BPhillips,
Cincinnati, 184; MiCabrera, Florida, 183.
DOUBLES-Holliday, Colorado, 48;
Uggla, Florida, 47; Utley, Philadelphia, 46;
HaRamirez, Florida, 45; Rowand,
Philadelphia, 43; KGreene, San Diego, 42;
AdGonzalez, San Diego, 42; FSanchez,
Pittsburgh, 42.
TRIPLES-Rollins, Philadelphia, 18;
JBReyes, New York, 12; Johnson, Atlanta,
10; Pence, Houston, 9; Amezaga, Florida,
9; OHudson, Arizona, 9; DRoberts, San
Francisco, 9.
HOME RUNS-Fielder, Milwaukee, 47;
Howard, Philadelphia, 42; Dunn,
Cincinnati, 40; Holliday, Colorado, 36;
MiCabrera, Florida, 33; Braun, Milwaukee,
31; CBYoung, Arizona, 31; Pujols, St.
2 Louis, 31; Berkman, Houston, 31;
ASoriano, Chicago, 31.
STOLEN BASES-JBReyes, New York,
78; Pierre, Los Angeles, 61; HaRamirez,
Florida, 50; Bymes, Arizona, 45; Victorino,
Philadelphia, 37; Rollins, Philadelphia, 37;
Wright, New York, 33; Taveras, Colorado, 33.
PITCHING (16 Decisions)-Harang,
Cincinnati, 16-4, .800, 3.61; Penny, Los
Angeles, 168-4, .800, 2.93; Peavy, San
Diego, 18-6, .750, 2.36; Hamels,
Philadelphia, 14-5, .737, 3.59; BSheets,
Milwaukee, 12-5, .706, 3.82; Billingsley,
Los Angeles, 11-5, .687, 3.15; TGlavine,


New York, 13-6, .684, 3.97.
STRIKEOUTS-Peavy, San Diego, 233;
Harang, Cincinnati, 198; Smoltz, Atlanta,
189; Webb, Arizona, 186; RHill, Chicago,
179; Snell, Pittsburgh, 171; OlPerez, New
York, 170.


Associated Press
New York Yankees catcher Jorge Posada, left, waits to tag out
Toronto Blue Jays' Matt Stairs attempting to score Saturday at
Yankee Stadium in New York.


Yankees 12, Blue Jays 11,
10 innings
NEW YORK - After two long
days of seemingly endless baseball,
Melky Cabrera and the New York
Yankees finally nudged a little closer
to a playoff berth.
Moments after starting a strong
relay that cut down the potential go-
ahead run at the plate, Cabrera sin-
gled home the winning run in the
10th inning for his fifth RBI to give
New York a 12-11 victory over the
Toronto Blue Jays on Saturday.
Cabrera's third big hit of the day
ended a wild, messy, back-and-forth
game that lasted exactly 5 hours -
after the start was delayed 92 min-
utes by rain. Plus, it came one day
after the teams played 14 innings, a
game Toronto won 5-4 after New
York rallied for four runs in the ninth.
The Yankees used a team-record
10 pitchers and again took advan-
tage of a defensive misplay by Blue
Jays second baseman Aaron Hill.
They began the day 2� games
behind first-place Boston in the AL
East and 4% ahead of Detroit in the
wild-card race. Both those teams
played later Saturday night.
The surging Yankees trimmed
their magic number to four for clinch-
ing the wild card and their 13th
straight postseason appearance.
They have won 13 of 16 overall.


Cardinals 7, Astros 4
ST. LOUIS - Rick Ankiel home-
red for the first time in 17 games
and Albert Pujols delivered a key
pinch-hit, leading the St. Louis
Cardinals over the Houston Astros
7-4 Saturday night.
Ankiel got three hits, including his
10th home run. He had been in a 7-
for-55 slump since a Sept. 7 report
linking him to human growth hor-
mone in 2004 - that came the
morning after his two-homer, seven-
RBI salvo against Pittsburgh.
Ankiel's skid coincided with the
Cardinals' September collapse. St.
Louis lost its first nine games, the
franchise's worst rut since 1980,
after the report.
Fill-in starter Brad Thompson (7-6)
threw six sharp innings and Jason
Isringhausen got his 30th save.
The Cardinals broke it open with
five runs in the seventh, two on
Pujols' single on two on Ankiel's
homer off Woody Williams.


HOUSTON


ST. LOUIS


ab rhbi ab r hbi
Andrsn cf 3 11 0 Eckstin ss 5 2 3 1
Burke 2b 4 12 1 Ankiel cf 5 1 3 2
Brkmn lb 4 000 Ludwck rf 4 1 3 1
CaLee if 4 00 0 Schmkrlf 5 0 2 0
Pence rf 3 11 3 Cairo lb 5 1 2 0
Loretta ss 3 01 0 Isrnghs p 0 0 0 0
WWImsp 0 000 Miles 2b 4 1 2 0
Mehlerp 0 00 0Stnetc 3 0 1 0
Biggio ph 1 01 0 Pujols ph 1 0 1 2
Wggntn 3b 4 01 0 Reyes pr 0 0 0 0
Towles c 3 11 0 GBnntt c 0 0 0 0
Albers p 2 000 Thmps p 1 0 0 0
Rnsm ss 1 00 0 Edmnd ph 1 0 1 0
Pineiro pr 0 0 0 0
Percivl p 0 0 0 0
Tguchiph 1 0 1 1
Fknbrg p 0 0 0 0
TJhnsn p 0 0 0 0
Brnyan lb 0 0 0 0
Ryan 3b 4 1 1 0
Totals 324 8 4 Totals 39 720 7
Houston 000 001 003- 4
St. Louis 000 020 50x- 7
DP-Houston 3, St. Louis 2. LOB-
Houston 3, St. Louis 10. 2B-Towles (4),
Eckstein 2 (21), Ludwick (20), Cairo (2).
HR-Pence (15), Ankiel (10). SB-Ryan (6).
CS-Pence (5), Ludwick (4). S-Thompson.
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
Albers L,4-10 6 11 2 2 1 1
WWilliams 1-3 6 5 5 0 0
Moehler 12-3 3 0 0 0 0
St. Louis
Thompson W,7-6 6 4 1 1 0 2
Percival 1 0 0 0 1 0
Falkenborg 1 1 0 0 0 0
TJohnson 2-3 3 3 3 1 1
IsmghsS,30 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
WP-Moehler.
Umpires-Home, Tim Timmons; First,
Alfonso Marquez; Second, Chuck
Meriwether; Third, Rick Reed.
T-2:43. A-46,237 (43,975).


TORONTO


NEW YORK


ab rhbi ab r hbi
Jhnson rf 4 20 0 MeCbr cf 7 1 35
Stairs lb 6 02 0 Jeter ss 6 1 20
Rios cf 6 22 1 BAbreu rf 3 2 0 0
Thmas dh 3 020 ARod 3b 5 24 3
Griffin dh 0 10 0 Matsui If 6 0 3 3
Zaun dh 2 01 1 Posada c 5 1 3 1
AHill2b 5231 Damonpr 0 1 00
Adams3b 4112 Giambidh 5 000
Luna3b 1 01 1 Cano 2b 4 2 0 0
Lindlf 5 122 Mntkwlb 2 1 20
Thgpen c 5 022 Srdinha pr 0 1 0 0
Olmedo ss 522 0 Btemitl b 2 0 0 0
Totals 46111810 Totals 45121712
Toronto 000 300 530 0- 11
New York 010 014 320 1-12
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Cano (13). DP-New York 1. LOB-
Toronto 9, New York 14. 2B-Rios (41),
AHill (44), Adams (3), Lind (13), Thigpen
(3), Olmedo (3), ARodriguez 2 (30), Posada
(41), Mientkiewicz (8). 3B-Matsui (4).
SB-Thigpen (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
Marcum 3 5 1 1 1 2
Tallet 2 1 1 1 2 4
JKennedy 2-3 0 1 1 1 0-
Frasor 0 2 3 3 1 0
Downs .0 1 0 0 01 0
League 1 2 3 3 1 0
Wolfe 11-3 3 2 2 2 0
Towers L,5-10 12-3 3 1 1 1 1
New York
Hughes 5 7 3 3 1 3
Villone 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Ohlendorf 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Veras 2-3 24 4 2: -2_.2
Ramirez 1-3 2 1 1 0 0-
Farnsworth 1-3 3 3 3 1 0'
Britton 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Igawa 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
MRivera 1 1 0 0 0 2
KarstensW,1-3 1 2 0 0 0 0!
Frasor pitched to 3 batters in the 6th,
Downs pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
HBP-by Tallet (Mientkiewicz). WP-
Veras, Ramirez. PB-Posada.
Umpires-Home, Angel Hernandez; First,
Derryl Cousins; Second, Ted Barrett; Third,
Rob Drake.
T-5:00. A-54,887 (56,937).


Braves 4, Brewers 3,
11 innings.
ATLANTA - The Milwaukee
Brewers bobbled a chance to stay
close in the NL Central.
Second baseman Rickie Weeks
made an error on a routine
grounder in the 11th inning and
Mark Teixeira followed with an RBI
single, giving the Atlanta Braves a
4-3 win Saturday that left the
Brewers with a 2�1-game deficit.
The division-leading Chicago
Cubs beat Pittsburgh 9-5 earlier in
the day. Needing to win, the
Brewers were one out away in the
10th when closer Francisco Cordero
gave up a tying home run to pinch-
hitter Scott Thorman.
MILWAUKEE ATLANTA
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Weeks2b 3100 Jhnson2b 4 100
Hardyss 5122 Rnteriass 3 01 0
Braun 3b 4 00 0 Harris pr 0 1 0 0
Spuringp 000 0 CJones3b 4 1 2 2
FCdero p 0000 0Txeira lb 5 01 1
Suppan ph 0 00 0 McCnn c 3 0 0 0
McCIng p 0 000 Frncur rf 4 0 0 0
BShse p 0000 AJones cf 4000
Fildrilb 3 00 0 Diaz If 4 000
CHart rf 511 1 Smoltz p 2 0 0 0
Jenkins If 4 00 0 YEscbr ph 0 0 0 0
JEstda c 3 01 0 Orr pr 0 0 0 0
Gwynn pr 0 00 0 RSrano p 0 0 0 0
Rivera c 1 01 0 Moylan p 0 0 0 0
Stocker pr. 000 0 Ringp 0 0 0 0
DMiller c 1 00 0 Dotel p 0 0 0 0
BHall cf 4 01 0 Thrmn ph 1 1 1 1
Glrdo p 2 00 0 Mahay p 0 0 0 0
Gross ph 1 00 0 Devine p 9 0 0 0
Turnbw p 0 00 0
King p 0 00 0
Cunsell 3b 1 00 0
Totals 373 6 3 Totals 34 4 5 4
Milwaukee 000 002 000 10- 3
Atlanta 101 000 000 11- 4
No outs when winning run scored.
E-Weeks (13). DP-Milwaukee 1.
LOB-Milwaukee 7, Atlanta 6. HR-Hardy
(26), CHart (22), CJones (27), Thorman
(11). SB--Stocker (3), Orr (1). S-Suppan.
SF-CJones.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
Gallardo 7 3 2 2 2 7
Turnbow 0 0 0 0 1 0
King 1 0 0 0 1 1
Spurling 1 0 0 0 0 0
FCordero 1 1 1' 1 0 1
McClung L,0-1 0 0 1 0 1 0
BShouse 0 1 0 0 0 0
Atlanta
Smoltz 8 2 2 2 3 8
RSoriano 1 0 0 0 0 2
Moylan 1-3 3 1 1 0 0
Ring 1-3 00 0 0 1
Dotel 1-3 00 0 0 1
Mahay 1-3 1 0 0 1 0
Devine W,1-0 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
Turnbow pitched to 1 batter in the 8th,
McClung pitched to 1 batter in the 11th,
BShouse pitched to 2 batters in the 11th.
Umpires-Home, Marvin Hudson; First,
Ed Montague; Second, Jerry Layne; Third,
Chris Guccione.
T-3:28. A--42,378 (49,583).


Mariners 3, Angels 2
ANAHEIM, Calif.- The Mariners
again put the Angels' celebration on
hold, with Miguel Batista pitching
into the sixth inning and Ichiro
Suzuki scoring a run and driving in
another to lead Seattle to a 3-2 vic-
tory over Los Angeles on Saturday.
The Angels had clinched at least
a tie for the AL West title when they
beat the second-place Mariners in
the opener of their four-game series,
but Seattle has bounced back to win
the next two.
Los Angeles ace John Lackey
takes the mound in Sunday's series
finale, facing former Angel Jeff
Weaver.
Batista (15-11) allowed only one
run despite giving up six hits and
five walks in 5 1-3 innings. He struck
out four.
Oft-injured Bartolo Colon (6-8)
gave up three runs and eight hits in
eight innings to lose for the eighth
time in nine decisions. He got the
start because Kelvim Escobar was
pushed back because of inflamma-
tion in his shoulder.
SEATTLE LOS ANGELES
ab rhbi ab r hbi
ISuzuki cf 4 12 1 Figgins rf 4 0 3 0
Beltre dh 4 11 1 OCbera ss 4 0 2 0
Ibanez If 4 01 0 VGrero dh 4 00 1
AJones If 0 00 0 GAndsn If 4 1 0 0
JGillen rf 4 00 0 Ktchm lb 4 0 2 0
Brssrd lb 4 01 1 Izturis 3b 4 0 2 1
Jhjima c 4 01 0 Mathws cf 2 0 00
JoLpez 2b 4 11 0 Kndrck 2b 4 0 0 0
Blmqist 3b 2 02 0 Mathis c 2 0 0 0
YBtcrt ss 3 00 0 Morles ph 0 0 0 0
JRivra ph 1 0 0 0
Napoli c 0 0 0 0
Willits ph 1 1 1 0
Totals 333 9 3 Totals 34 210 2
Seattle 000 210 000- 3
Los Angeles 000 001 001- 2
E-Kendrick (9). DP-Seattle 2, Los
Angeles 3. LOB-Seattle 4, Los Angeles 11.
2B-ISuzuki (21), Broussard (8), Figgins
(24). CS-Figgins (12). S-Bloomquist.
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
MBatistaW,15-1151-3 6 1 1 5 4
Green 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
O'Flaherty 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Baek 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 ,
Rowland-Smth 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Sherrill 1-3 0 0 0 1 1
PutzS,39 11-3 2 1 1 0 2
Los Angeles
Colon L,6-8 8 8 3 3 0 3
Oliver 1 1 0 0 0 0
O'Flaherty pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WP-MBatista. Balk-Sherrill.
Umpires-Home, Doug Eddings; First,
Mike Everitt; Second, Dana DeMuth; Third,
Kerwin Danley.
T-2:54. A---43,583 (45,257).


Cubs 9, Pirates 5
CHICAGO -Alfonso Soriano hit
two of Chicago's four homers and
had five RBIs as [he Cubs contin-
ued their late-season power display,
beating the Pittsburgh Pirates 9-4
Saturday to solidify their lead in the
NL Central.
The Cubs began the day with a
1�-game lead over Milwaukee,
which played later at Atlanta.
Soriano hit a solo shot to tie the
game-in the second and a two-run
blast in the fifth for his team-leading
31st homer. The Cubs' star has four
home runs in three games and 13 in
the 25 games since he came off the
disabled list Aug. 28. He added a
two-run double in the seventh.
Aramis Ramirez, who had two
homers Friday, added another and
Derrek Lee also went deep as the
Cubs hit four homers for the second
straight game, this time with the
wind blowing in at Wrigley Field.
The Pirates lost their eighth straight,
their longest losing streak of the
season.


PITTSBURGH


CHICAGO


ab rhbi ab r hbi
Morgan cf 401 0 ASrano If 4 2 3 5
JBtsta 3b 3 11 0 DeRosa2b 5 0 0 0
FSnchz2b 4 01 1 DeLee lb 5 24 1
Phelps lb 3000 ARmrz 3b 5 222
Nady If 4 00 0 Murton rf 3 0 1 0
Palino c 4 11 0 Fuld rf 0 0 0 0
Pearce rf 3 11 0 Soto c 5 0 1 0
VnBscn p 0 00 0 Monroe cf 1 0 0 0
Castillo ph 1 00 0 JJones cf 2 1 1 0
Kata ss 4 11 1 Theriot ss 4 2 3 0
Duke p 1 01 2 RHill p 2 0 0 0
Izturis ph 1 000 CFloyd ph 1 0 0 0
STorres p 0 000 Mrmlp 0 0 0 0
McLth If 1 11 1 Eyre p 0 0 0 0
Ward ph 1 0 0 0
Howry p 0 0 0 0
Dmpstr p 0 0 0 0
Totals 335 8 5 Totals 38 915 8
Pittsburgh 030 000 011- 5
Chicago 212 020 20x- 9
E-FSanchez (9). DP-Pittsburgh 1,
Chicago 2. LOB-Pittsburgh 5, Chicago 9.
2B-JBautista (34), Kata (7), ASoriano (39).
3B-FSanchez (4). HR-McLouth (13),
ASoriano 2 (31), DeLee (19), ARamirez
(26). SB-Morgan (6), Theriot (28).
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
Duke L,3-8 4 9 5 4 3 4
STorres 1 2 2 2 0 3
VanBenschtn 3 4 2 2 1 4
Chicago
RHillW,10-8 5 5 3 3 2 4
Marmol 1 0 0 0 1 2
Eyre 1 0 0 0 1 0
Howry 1 2 1 1 0 1
Dempster 1 1 1 1 0 1
Umpires-Home, Tom Hallion; First,
Bruce Dreckman; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third,
Tim McClelland.
T-2:35. A-41,271 (41,160).


Royals 7, Tigers 4
DETROIT - Mark Grudzielanek
again got the best of Kenny Rogers,
collecting four hits and scoring three
times as the Kansas City Royals
moved the Detroit Tigers to the
verge of elimination with a 7-4 victo-
ry Saturday night.
The loss dropped the Tigers 51%
games behind the New York
Yankees in the AL wild-card race
with seven games left, while
Cleveland's magic number in the AL
Central was reduced to one. The
Indians lost to Oakland 9-3.
Grudzielanek is hitting .647 in his
career against Rogers and .355
against Detroit this year, and this
time provided plenty of support for
starter Kyle Davies.
Magglio Ordonez had four hits,
including an RBI single off Joakim
Soria in the ninth that got the Tigers
within 7-4. But Soria ended it by
getting Carlos Guillen to ground out
to first.
KANSAS CITY DETROIT


ab rhbi
EGrmn If 3 21 0 Grndsn cf
DJesus cf 1 11 0 Planco 2b
GrdzIn 2b 5 34 2 Shffield dh
Butler lb 3 02 0 MOrdz rf
Gload lb 0 00 0 CGillen ss
MiSwy dh 5 12 2 IRdrgz c
Teahen cf 5 00 0 TPerezIlf
Brown rf 4 02 2 Raburn If
Gordon 3b 5 00 0 Casey lb
LaRue c 4 00 0 Inge 3b
TPena ss 4 01 0


ab r hbi
5 231
5000
4000
5 041
5 1 1 0
4 120
3022
1 000
4 030
4 000


Totals 39713 6 Totals 40 415 4
Kansas City 320 000 '110- 7
Detroit 100 200 001- 4
E-Brown (6), Gordon (13), Inge (18).
DP-Kansas City 1, Detroit 2. LOB-
Kansas City 9, Detroit 10. 2B-EGerman
(14), Grudzielanek 2 (32), Granderson (37),
MOrdonez (50), CGuillen (34), TPerez (8),
Casey (30). 3B-DeJesus (9). HR-
Granderson (23).
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
DaviesW,3-6 51-3 9 3 3 1 1.
Bale 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
JoPeralta 1 2 00 0 1
Gobble 1 1 0 0 0 1
;'Soria 1 2 1 1 0 1
Detroit
Rogers L,3-3 6 8 5 3 2 6
Grilli 0 3 1 1 0 0
Seay 1 0 0 0 1 0
Miner 1 2 1 1 1 1
Rapada 1 0 0 0 0 2
JoPeralta pitched to 1 batter in the 8th,
Grilli pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
WP-Davies, Bale, Gobble.
Umpires-Home, Andy Fletcher; First,
Eric Cooper; Second, Mike Reilly; Third, Jeff
Kellogg. ...
T-3:13. A-41,792 (41,070).


Red Sox 8, Devil Rays 6
ST. PETERSBURG - The
Boston Red Sox became the first
team in the majors to clinch a
playoff spot this season, rallying
on ninth-inning home runs by
Jason Varitek and Julio Lugo to
beat the Tampa Bay Devil Rays
8-6 Saturday.
The victory assured the Red
Sox of at least the AL wild-card
spot. They held their 2�-game
lead in the AL East over New
York, which beat Toronto 12-11
in 10 innings.
Boston trailed 6-5 when
Varitek led off the ninth with an
opposite-field homer to left off
closer Al Reyes (3-3). Eric
Hinske then doubled and scored
one out later when Lugo home-
red.
Eric Gagne (4-2) pitched a
perfect eighth for the win.
Jonathan Papelbon worked the
ninth for his 36th save in 39
opportunities.


BOSTON


TAMPA BAY
ab rhbi ab r hbi


Ellsbry If 5 02 1 Iwmra 3b 4 1 1 0
Pedroia 2b 5 00 0 Vindia 2b 4 1 0 0
DOrtiz dh 4010 CPena lb 3 224
Clayton dh 0 00 0 Upton cf 4 1 00
Lowell 3b 4 22 0 DYong rf 4 1 1 0
JDrew rf 4 22 3 Norton dh 4 0 32
Varitek c 3 13 2 Gomes If 3 0 0 0
Hinskelb 4 11 0 Nvarro c 4 0 00
Crisp cf 4 11 0 JoWlsn ss 3 0 00
JLugo ss 3 11 2 Casnva ph 1 0 00
Totals 36813 8 Totals 34 6 7 6
Boston 001 202 003- 8
Tampa Bay 000 201 300- 6
DP-Tampa Bay 2. LOB-Boston 5,
Tampa Bay 5. 2B-Ellsbury (6), DOrtiz (48),
JDrew (28), Hinske (12). HR-JDrew (10),
Varitek (15), JLugo (8), CPena 2 (42). SB-
Upton (20), DYoung (9). CS-DOrtiz (1),
Varitek (2). S-JLugo.
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
Matsuzaka 62-3 6 5 5 3 7
Lopez 0 1 1 1 0 0
Timlin 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
GagneW,4-2 1 0 0 0 1 2
Papelbon S,36 1 0 0 0 0 0
Tampa Bay
Sonnanstine 51-3 8 5 5 2 1
Switzer 11-3 1 0 0 0 0
Dohmann 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Wheeler 1 0 0 0 0 2
Reyes L,2-4 1 4 3 3 1 0
Lopez pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WP-Matsuzaka, Sonnanstine.
-Umpires-Home, John Hirschbeck; First,
Laz Diaz; Second, Mike DiMuro; Third, Bill
Welke.
T-3:32. A-34,626 (43,772).


Associated Press
New York Mets pitcher Oliver Perez of Mexico, left, listens to pitch-
ing coach Rick Peterson (51) on Saturday as they meet with catch-
er Ramon Castro of Puerto Rico, center rear, during the eighth inning
against the Florida Marlins at Dolphin Stadium in Miami.


Mets 7, Marlins 2
MIAMI - The New York Mets
made themselves at home in Miami
- again.
Oliver Perez pitched eight
innings, Moises Alou extended his
hitting streak to a team record-tying
26 games and the Mets strength-
ened their hold on the NL East by
beating the Florida Marlins 7-2
Saturday.
Following a brief September
swoon, the Mets won for the second
time in 19 hours and increased their
division lead to two games over
Philadelphia, which played later at
Washington. New York's magic
number to clinch division was seven
with eight games to play.
Hand-held noisemakers were the
day's promotional giveaway, which
allowed the many transplanted New
Yorkers in the stands to create quite
a din. The Mets improved to 7-1 in
Miami this year.
Alou singled leading off the ninth
inning, matching David Wright's
mark set in 2006-07. Alou also tied
Cleveland's Casey Blake for the
longesthitting streak in the majors
this year.


NEW YORK FLORIDA
ab rhbi ab r hbi
JBRyes'ss 5 11 0 HaRmz ss 4 0 1 0
LCstillo 2b 301 1 Uggla 2b 4 1 20
Wright 3b 5 23 1 Hrmida rf 4 0 0 0
Beltran cf 3 11 0 MiCbr 3b 3 0 0 1
Chavez cf 0 000 Jacobs lb 4 0 1 0
Alou If 4 01 0 Linden If 4 0 2 0
Gomez If 0 00 0 Tranor c 4 0 0 0
CDIgdo lb 4 00 1 Carroll cf 3 1 1 0
ShGren rf 3 11 0 BKim p 1 000
RCstro c 4 22 3 Abrcrb ph 1 0 0 0
OlPrez p 3 00 0 Knsng p 0 000
MrAnd ph 1 00 0 Tnkrsly p 0 0 00
Heilmn p 0000 Wolfp 0 0 00
Andino ph 1 000
Carvajal p 0 0 00
Totals 35710 6 Totals 33 2 7 1
New York ' 200 300 110- 7
Florida 000 100 010- 2
E-Wright (21), Alou (3), HaRamirez (23).
DP-New York 1. LOB-New York 11,
Florida 5. 2B-JBReyes (35), Uggla (47),
Jacobs (27), Carroll (1). HR-RCastro (10).
SB-Wright 2 (33), Gomez (12). CS-
LCastillo (2). S-LCastillo, OIPerez. SF-
MiCabrera.
IP H RERBBSO
New York
OIPerezW,15-9 8 6 2 1 0 8
Heilman 1 1 0 0 0 1
Florida
BKim L,9-8 5 3 5 4 2 5
Kensing 12-3 3 1 1 2 1
Tankersley 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
Wolf 1 3 1 1 0 1
Carvajal 1 1 0 0 1 0
HBP-by Kensing (Alou), by BKim
(ShGreen).
Umpires-Home, Jim Wolf; First, Tim
Tschida; Second, Jim Joyce; Third, Adam
Dowdy.
T-3:15. A-22,517 (36,331).


Chicago
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Houston
Pittsburgh


W L
86 68
84 70
81 74
68 86
66 89


Home
53-27
44-31
39-39
43-33



Home
49-30
47-32
48-30
41-34
36-40


Away
38-37
38-36
34-42
38-41
31-47


SUNDAY, SrP'I'FMBI-.R 23, 2007 3B


CITRus CouN7y (FL) CHRoNicLE


NlAj4c)iR ILEAc-uE BASEBALL









4B Sl IN)AY SliP l'lMBF 23, 2007


Lec:
Citr


S. , L

Citrus 42, Lecanto 0
anto 0 0 0 0- 0
us 15 17 10 0-42
Lec Cit


Total Yards 164 403
Rushing 164 227
Passing 0 176
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING, - (Attempts, Yards)
Citrus: Scnven 16-139-1; West 5-19; Allen
5-33; Lloyd 1-4; Paqueette 1-1; Jackson 7-
31; Paul 5-0. Lecanto: Mobley 7-50;
Powers 11-86; Scales 7-21; Kaufman 1-7.
PASSING - (Comp, Att, yards, TDs, Int)
Citrus: West 8-9-139-2-1; Paul 2-2-37-0-1.
Lecanto: Scales 0-8-0-0-1.
RECEIVING - (Catches, Yards, TDs)
Citrus: Paquette 2-54; Carlson 2-29-1;
Payne 2-19; Scriven 2-37-2.
SCORING SUMMARY
First quarter
Citrus: Scriven 5-yd run. Lloyd two-point
conversion. 6:53.
Citrus: West 31-yd. touchdown pass to
Scriven. Watkins PAT. 1:26.
Second quarter
Citrus: West 31-yd pass to Carlson.
Watkins PAT. 9:11.
Citrus: Hamrick returns blocked punt 12
yards for touchdown. Watkins PAT. 5:54.
Citrus: Watkins 37-yd. field goal. 1:33
Third quarter
Citrus; Paul 31-yd pass to Scriven.
Watkins PAT. 7:30.
Citrus: Watkins 38-yd. field goal. 1:11.

.. ff7. , i...


No. 3 Florida 30,
Mississippi 24
Florida 0 14 13 3 - 30
Mississippi 3 3 18 0 - 24
First Quarter
Miss-FG Shene 40, 5:02.
Second Quarter
Fla-Harvin 19 pass from Tebow (ljjas
kick), 14:52.
Miss-FG Shene 32, 11:57.
Fla-Tebow 9 run (Ijjas kick), 7:08.
Third Quarter
Fla-Tebow 6 run (Ijjas kick), 10:05.
Miss-FG Shene 22, 8:03.
Fla-Murphy 37 pass from Tebow (kick
failed), 5:17.
Miss-Hodge 19 pass from Adams
(Shene kick), 2:47.
Miss-Wallace 77 pass from Adams
(Green pass from Adams), :07.
Fourth Quarter
Fla-FG Ijjas 25, 4:59.
A-55,032.


First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int


Fla Miss
28 18
45-24621-80
261 310
20-34-0 19-


32-1
Return Yards 0 0
Punts-Avg., 4-39.5 3-
41.7
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-0
Penalties-Yards 14-12710-70
Time of Possession 35:21 24:39
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Florida, Tebow 27-166, Moore
11-62, James 2-21, Harvin 4-(minus 1), Team
1-(minus 2). Mississippi, Green-Ellis 11-37,
Hall 4-33, Green 2-6, Adams 4-4.
PASSING-Florida, Tebow 20-34-0-261.
Mississippi, Adams 18-31-1-302, Sparks 1-
1-0-8.
RECEIVING-Florida, Harvin 11-121,
Murphy 2-57, Ingram 2-41, Moore 2-18,
James 1-13, Henry 1-6, Nelson 1-5.
Mississippi, Hodge 7-81, Green 5-36,
M.Hicks 3-89, Lane 2-15, Wallace 1-77,
Cook 1-12.



PGA Turning Stone
Par Scores


Saturday
Third Round
Steve Flesch 66-65-66
Carl Pettersson 69-66-66
Charles Warren 68-65-68
Parker McLachlin 70-68-65
Michael Allen 69-67-68
Bill Haas 69-66-69
Sean O'Hair 71-68-66
Justin Leonard 68-71-66
Jarrod Lyle 73-64-68
John Mallinger 67-70-68
Joe Ogilvie 70-67-68
Bart Bryant 68-68-69
Johnson Wagner 69-67-69
Craig Bowden 70-65-70
Mathew Goggin 66-69-70
Charley Hoffman 69-65-71
J.B. Holmes 72-67-67
Kirk Triplett 70-68-68
Tommy Armour III 70-68-68
Robert Allenby 67-70-69
John Senden 66-70-70
Tag Ridings 67-69-70
Briny Baird 69-66-71
Jeff Maggert 71-64-71
Chris Tidland 69-71-67
Andrew Buckle 69-71-67
Ryan Armour 70-70-67
Tim Herron 69-70-68
Vaughn Taylor 71-66-70
Craig Lile 69-67-71
Jeff Overton 70-65-72
Brendon de Jonge 66-66-75
Robert Garrigus 73-67-68
Nick O'Hern 71-68-69
Kyle Reifers 69-69-70
Chris Stroud 69-65-74
Jeff Gove 65-67-76
Jay Williamson 70-70-69
Jeff Quinney 69-71-69
Bob Estes 70-70-69
Steve Lowery 68-72-69
Tim Petrovic 69-70-70
David Branshaw 68-71-70
Stuart Appleby 70-67-72
Chad Campbell 65-72-72
John Rollins 67-69-73
Joey Sindelar 68-68-73
Matt Hendrix 67-67-75
Nick Flanagan 72-68-70
Rocco Mediate 70-70-70
D. Maruyama 71-69-70
S. Gutschewski 72-68-70
C. Beckman 69-71-70
Cliff Kresge 69-70-71
Bubba Dickerson 69-70-71
Shaun Micheel 69-70-71
Charlie Wi 69-68-73
Alex Cejka 71-68-72
Corey Pavin 70-68-73
Eric Axley 69-66-76
Kent Jones 70-70-72
Nathan Green 70-68-74
Robert Gamez 68-68-76
Brian Davis 69-71-73
Fred Funk 70-69-74
Mark Hensby 68-69-76
Todd Hamilton 70-70-74
Jerry Kelly 68-71-75
D.J. Brigman 69-67-78
Billy Andrade 70-68-77


197 -19
201 -15
201 -15
203 -13
204 -12
204 -12
205 -11
205 -11
205 -11
205 -11
205 -11
205 -11
205 -11
205 -11
205 -11
205 -11
206 -10
206 -10
206 -10
206 -10
206 -10
206 -10
206 -10
206 -10
207 -9
207 -9
207 -9
207 -9
207 -9
207 -9
207 -9
207 -9
208 -8
208 -8
208 -8
208 -8
208 -8
209 -7
209 -7
209 -7
209 -7
209 -7
209 -7
209 -7
209 -7
209 -7
209 -7
209 -7
210 -6
210 -6
210 -6
210 -6
210 -6
210 -6
210 -6
210 -6
210 -6
211 -5
211 -5
211 -5
212 -4
212 -4
212 -4
213 -3
213 -3
213 -3
214 -2
214 -2
214 -2
215 -1


On the AIRWAVES


AUTO RACING
1:30 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) NASCAR Nextel Cup - Dodge Dealers 400.
2 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) CORR Off Road Racing.
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing - O'Reilly Fall Nationals -
Final Eliminations.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Florida at Mississippi. (Taped)
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
1 p.m. (13, 51 FOX) St. Louis Rams at Tampa Bay Buccaneers.
4 p.m. (6,10 CBS) Jacksonville Jaguars at Denver Broncos.
4 p.m. (13, 51 FOX) New York Giants at Washington Redskins.
8:15 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) Dallas Cowboys at Chicago Bears.
CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE
1 p.m. (47 FAM) Edmonton Eskimos at Montreal Alouettes.
4 p.m. (47 FAM) Winnipeg Blue Bombers at Toronto Argonauts.
GOLF
10 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA- Quinn Direct British Masters -
Final Round.
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Champions Tour - SAS Championship -
Final Round.
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGA - Turning Stone Resort Championship -
Final Round.
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Nationwide Tour - Albertson's Boise Open
- Final Round.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (TBS) Milwaukee Brewers at Atlanta Braves.
1:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Boston Red Sox at Tampa Bay Devil Rays.
2 p.m. (WGN) Pittsburgh Pirates at Chicago Cubs.
8 p.m. (ESPN) Houston Astros at St. Louis Cardinals.
MOUNTAIN BIKING
3 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) Jeep King of the Mountain World Pro
Championships.
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) Women's U.S. Open.
MOTORCYCLE RACING
8 p.m. (47 FAM) FIM Motocross of Nations.
RODEO
8 p.m. (VERSUS) PBR Johnsonville Brats Invitational.
RUGBY
8:30 a.m. (IND1) IRB World Cup 2007 -Australia vs. Fiji.
11 a.m. (IND1) IRB World Cup 2007 - New Zealand vs. Scotland.
6 p.m. (VERSUS) IRB World Cup 2007 - France vs. Ireland.
SOCCER
7:55 a.m. (ESPN2) Women's FIFA World Cup Quarterfinal -
Australia vs. Brazil.
TENNIS
12 p.m. (VERSUS) Davis Cup Semifinal - Sweden vs. United States.
COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
2 p.m. (SUN) Women's - Kentucky at Georgia.


BASEBALL
White Sox 8, Twins 3


CHICAGO

Owens cf
Flds If
Terrero rf
Thome dh
Knerko lb
Erstad rf
Przyns c
Uribe ss
Richar 2b
AGnzlz 3b
Cintron 3b


MINNESOTA


ab rhbi
6 15 3 Tyner If
2 11 0 Kubel dh
1 00 0 THnter cf
4 12 2 LFord cf
4 00 0 Mrneau lb
5 23 2 Cddyer rf
5 12 0 Bscher 3b
4 01 1 Heintz c
5 22 0 LRdrgz2b
3 00 0 Puntoss
1 00 0


ab r h bi

4 1 1 2
4 01 0
0000
3 01 0
4 1 00
4 01 0
4 01 0
3 021
4000


Totals 40816 8 Totals 34 3 8 3
Chicago 031 112 000- 8
Minnesota 000 002 001- 3
DP-Minnesota 1. LOB-Chicago 12,
Minnesota 6. 2B-Pierzynski (23),
Buscher (1). 3B-Richar (3). HR-Thome
(32), Erstad (4), Kubel (13). SB-Owens
(29). S-Fields. SF-Uribe.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
JVazquezW,14-87 5 2 2 2 11
Logan 2 3 1 1 0 3
Minnesota
Baker L,9-9 2 5 3 3 1 1
Bonser 3 8 5 5 2 3
DePaula 2 2 0 0 2 1
Perkins 1 1 0 0 0 0
JRincon 1 0 0 0 0 2
Bonser pitched to 3 batters in the 6th.
Umpires-Home, Jim Reynolds; First,
Brian Knight; Second, Lance Barksdale;
Third, Tim Welke.
T-2:57. A-31,737 (46,632).
Phillies 4, Nationals 1,
10 Innings
PHILA WASHINGTON
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Rollins ss 501 0 Logan cf 5 0 1 0
Utley2b 5 23 1 FLopez ss 5 0 0 0
Burrell If 401 0 Zmrmn 3b 5 1 1 0
Bourn If 0 00 0 Kearns rf 5 0 0 0
Howard lb 5 11 1 Church If 4 02 0
Rwand cf 5 14 0 Blliard 2b 4 0 2 0
Dobbs 3b 3 00 0 Fick Ib 4 0 1 0
Nunez3b 0 00 0 Schndrc 3 0 1 0
Vctrno ph 1 01 0 CGzmn pr 0 0 0 0
Helms 3b 0 00 0 Flores c 1 0 0 0
Werth rf 4 01 1 Reding p 2 0 0 0
Coste c 5 00 0 Munoz p 0 0 0 0
Kndrck p 1 00 0 Batista ph 0 0 0 0
Lforest ph 1 00 0 Mxwell pr 0 0 0 0
Rmerop 0000 Rauchp 0 000
Geary p 0 00 0 CCrdro p 0 0 0 0
Gordon p 0 00 0 Jimnz ph 1 0 0 0
Iguchi ph 1 00 0 Schrdr p 0 0 0 0
BMyers p 000 0 Colome p 0 0 0 0
Ruiz ph 1 01 1 Albldjo p 0 0 0 0
Cndry p 0 00 0
Totals 414134 Totals 39 1 8 0
Philadelphia 100 000 000 3- 4
Washington 000 001 000 001 000 0- 1
E-Utley (9), Burrell (10), Rowand (3).
LOB-Philadelphia 11, Washington 9.
2B-Rowand (44). HR-Utley (21). S-


Kendrick.

Philadelphia
Kendrick
Romero
Geary
Gordon
BMyers W,5-7
Condrey S,2
Washington
Redding
Munoz
.Rauch
CCordero
Schroder L,2-3
Colome
Albaladejo


IP H RERBBSO


6 6 1 0
2-3 1 0 0
1-3 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
1 1 0 0

62-3 8 1 1
1-3 0 0 0
1 1 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 2 3 3
1-3 1 0 0
2-3 1 0 0


Schroder pitched to 3 batters in the 10th.
Umpires-Home, Chad Fairchild; First,
Gary Darling; Second, Jerry Meals; Third,
Larry Poncino..
T-3:55. A-26,412 (46,382).


AUTO RACING
NASCAR Nextel-Dodge
Dealers 400 Uneup
Race today at Dover Downs
International Speedway, Dover, Del.
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
154.765.
2. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Dodge,
153.833.
3. (11) Denny Hamlin, Chevrolet
153.571.;
4. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 153.518:
5. (1) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet,
153.211.
6. (10) Scott Riggs, Dodge, 152.931.
7. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
152.879.
8. (43) Bobby Labonte, Dodge, 152.439.
9. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 152.413.
10. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 152.362.
11. (84) AJ Allmendinger, Toyota,
152.362.
12. (19) Elliott Sadler, Dodge, 152.284.
13. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
152.066.
14. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 152.008.
15. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 151.796.
16. (45) Kyle Petty, Dodge, 151.771.
17. (25) Casey Mears, Chevrolet,
151.713.
18. (78) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet,
151.694.
19. (44) Dale Jarrett, Toyota, 151.668.
20. (96) Tony Raines, Chevrolet,
151.643.
21. (8) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
151.515.
22. (5) Kyle Busch, Chevrolet, 151.477.
23. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 151.464.
24. (12) Ryan Newman, Dodge,
151.407.
25. (70) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet,
151.381.
26. (21) Ken Schrader, Ford, 151.197.
27. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
151.178.
28. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
151.172.
29. (49) John Andretti, Dodge, 151.051.
30. (26) Jamie McMurray, Ford, 151.013.
31. (01) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
150.912.
32. (18) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 150.880.
33. (41) Reed Sorenson, Dodge,
150.880.
34. (66) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, 150.804.
35. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 150.628.
36. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 150.420.
37. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 149.782.
38. (15) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
149.564.
39. (88) Kenny Wallace, Ford, Owner
Points
40. (40) David Stremme, Dodge, Owner
Points
41. (7) Robby Gordon, Ford, Owner Points
42. (07) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, Owner
Points
43. (55) Michael Waltrip, Toyota,
150.345.

MOVES
Saturday's Sports Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
TORONTO BLUE JAYS-Purchased the
contract of OF John-Ford Griffin from
Syracuse (IL). Placed OF Vemon Wells on
the 60-day DL.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
DALLAS MAVERICKS-Signed G Devin
Harris to a five-year contract extension
through the 2012-13 season.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS-Signed F
Michael Ruffin.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL-Fined Tennessee QB Vince Young
$7,500 for an unsportsmanlike conduct*
penalty in a Sept. 16 game against
Indianapolis. Fined Cleveland S Brodney
Pool $5,000 for a helmet-to-helmet hit on
Cincinnati WR Glenn Holt in a Sept. 16 game.


BUCS
Continued from Page 1B

Gruden, who has used eight
different quarterbacks since
arriving in Tampa Bay in 2002.
"He's a barbed wire kind of
guy. He's not the biggest, most
menacing guy, but he has a bite
to him. He's not afraid to say
what he thinks. He's a great
competitor. He's a charismatic
guy. He's demanding of himself
and demanding of the players
around him. He wants to win
and I think it's a genuine, sin-



GATORS
Continued from Page 1B

a three-game losing streak in
the state of Mississippi, but it
was the first time since last
year's Southeastern Conference
championship game that
Florida failed to score 38 points
or more. It was the third straight
loss for Ole Miss.
"It was a fourth-quarter
fight," Tebow said. "It's a huge
win. There's a lot to learn and
get better, but you can do that
in a more positive fashion
when you win."
Percy Harvin had a career-
high 11 catches for 121 yards
and a touchdown, a 19-yarder
in the second quarter that
helped the Gators to a 14-6
halftime lead.



BONDS
Continued from Page 1B

it take the Giants once again to
become a contending team.
After finishing first or sec-
ond in nine of Bonds' first 12
seasons in San Francisco and
making the playoffs four times,
the Giants have had losing
records for three straight sea-
sons as injuries and age have
slowed Bonds down.
San Francisco has been out
of contention most of this sea-
son and is assured of its first
last-place finish since 1985.
The Giants were able to give
their fans the chance to watch
Bonds set the all-time home
run record this season, but lit-
tle else from their decision to.
bring back Bonds.
S."If we'd all known this sea-
son was going to be as bad as it
turned out to be, we might have



RUNNER
Continued from Page 1B

"I led a little before the two
and a half mile," Benoist said.
"I have run 20:04. I think I did
pretty well."
The Crystal River High boys
won the boys team title with 50
points. Pirates sophomore
Brandon Kempton was the top
Crystal River finisher. He had
a time of 17:11. Teammate
Blair Beeler was seventh with
a clocking of 17:19. Eric
Hughes was eighth with a time
of 17:21.
"I did good," Kempton said.
"I left it all out there. I just was
in a zone. I had my best time."
"Both our varsity and JV
boys ran well today," said
Crystal River coach Tim
Byrne.
The Crystal River High girls
team was second with 83
points.
Crystal River High runner
Melissa Schmidt said she had a
personal record of 20:55 and
finished seventh. She dropped
11 seconds.
"We earned it," said
Schmidt.
The Lecanto boys were sev-
enth with 192 points.
Jon Junkins led Lecanto with
a fifth place finish (17:07).
"They worked really hard,"
said Lecanto boys coach Suzy
Verhelst. "I'm very proud of


cere, competitive edge he
brings to our football team that
we need here."
Holt, who has averaged nine
receptions and 142 yards per
game in four regular-season
meetings with the Bucs, said
the Rams also are trying to
establish a new identity on
offense under second-year
coach Scott Linehan.
"The Greatest Show On Turf
stuff, to me, is gone, it's past,"
said Holt, referring to the
moniker attached to St. Louis'
high-scoring offense in recent
years.
"We've moved on to a new


Tebow gave Florida some
separation at the start of the
second half when he engi-
neered a pair of touchdown
drives. He scored on a 6-yard
run, then hit Louis Murphy
with a 37-yard pass down the
center for a 27-9 lead with 5:17
left in the third quarter.
Florida appeared to be
pulling away after the Rebels
had to settle for field-goal
attempts for much of the first
three quarters.
However, Ole Miss quarter-
back Seth Adams, whose avail-
ability was in question because
he sprained his right shoulder
against Vanderbilt last week,
led the Rebels back with the
deep pass.
Adams threw a 19-yard
touchdown pass to Shay Hodge
with 2:47 remaining in the
third, cutting Florida's lead to

gone in a different direction
with a number of decisions we
made in the offseason,"
Magowan said. "But I don't
think we can blame Barry for
what he did, how he per-
formed. He performed at least
up to our expectations."
Despite turning 43 this sea-
son, Bonds remained San
Francisco's best offensive play-
er. Not quite the imposing hit-
ter he was earlier this decade
when he began rewriting the
record books, Bonds has still
managed to hit .279 with 28
homers and 66 RBIs.
In a sign of the fear he
instills in the opposition,
Bonds still leads the majors
with 132 walks, his .483 on-base
percentage is the best among
players with at least 50 at-bats,
and he is slugging .570.
And his presence helped the
Giants top 3 million in atten-
dance for an eighth straight
season despite being mired in

them. They all did better times.
They keep getting better. That's
all we want them to do."
Lecanto High girls coach
Lindsay Clark said five of his
girls had personal records.
Lecanto finished ninth with
225 points. Paige Cooke was
27th with a 22:34 time.
"They were fast today," said
Clark "They ran hard and did
well for themselves. She
(Cooke) was tired at the end."
Land 0' Lakes High's Felix
Soto won the boys race with a
time of 16:21. Hernando High's
Tyler Maier was second with a
time of 16:51. Ridgewood
High's Steven Landreth was
third with a time of 16:58.
Soto improved his time by 11
seconds over his time at last
week's Gator Invitational.
The Gulf High girls won the
team title with 56 points.
Crystal River was second with
83 points. Wesley Chapel was
third with 98 points.
Girls team scores
New Port Richey Gulf 56,
Crystal River 83, Wesley
Chapel 98, Wiregrass Ranch
113, Land O' Lakes 127,
Inverness Citrus 185, Spring
Hill Springstead 193, New Port
Richey Mitchell 222, Lecanto
225, New Port Richey
Ridgewood 244, Brooksville
Central 247, Brooksville
Hernando 262, Dade City Pasco
275, Zephyrhills 323.


era of offense, a new era of
guys. We're still fine-tuning and
kind of finding ourselves and
what we're all about."
Meanwhile, Linehan is not
dwelling on the Rams wasting
a solid defensive effort last
week.
"It's very disappointing. But
you can't be devastated or
crushed by it or you'll never -
recover," Linehan said. "It's "
still early in the year. You've
got to look at the positives, the ;
fact we did feel we were in con-
trol and were much improved
defensively from Week 1."


27-16. Then he hit Mike ,q
Wallace in stride on the next
series for a 71-yard score. His
2-point conversion pass to
Marshay Green made it 27-24
with a quarter to play.
Joiner intercepted Adams on
the Rebels' next drive, and
Tebow followed with 37 yards ^
rushing on a 12-play, 53-yard
drive that took 5:55 and ended -'
with Joey Ijjas' 25-yard field
goal.
That score took the oomph ,.
out of the Rebels' rally and they
failed to make a first down with <
a fake punt on their final drive.
Tebow, who was the nation's. -
No. 2 passer coming into the
game, finished with 261 yards
passing. In addition, he was the
first quarterback to go over 100
yards at Florida since 1977
when Terry LeCount had 108
against Georgia.

last place in the NL West for
most of the season.
"My understanding as far as
business and corporations go is
if you bring value to a company,
you normally have a job. I
believe I brought value to the
company," Bonds said. "Like I
told Peter, 'This is your busi-
ness and I respect your deci-
sion.' You don't have to let me
in your car, it's your car. That's
business and that's life. I'm not
disappointed in that at all. I'm
not mad at that, I'm not angry
Like I always said, baseball is a
business."
The Giants are building
around their young pitching
staff, led by Matt Cain, Noah
Lowry, Tim Lincecum and
Barry Zito. General manager
Brian Sabean has talked of sur-
rounding the rotation with
younger and more athletic
players in hopes of being able
to manufacture runs in the
pitching-heavy NL West.

Girls Top 10 Individuals
1. Leeann Eble, Pasco, 20:14;
2. Chloe Benoist, Seven Rivers,
20:22; 3. Ariel Grey, Wiregrass
Ranch, 20:32; 4. Jaci Pustelnik,
Gulf, 20:35; 5. Shelby DeLoach,
Wesley Chapel, 20:42; 6. Jessica
First, Wesley Chapel, 20:55.32;
7. Melissa Schmidt, Crystal
River, 20:55.95; 8. Brittinie
Bennett, Gulf, 20:57; 9. Jillian
Browne, Ridgewood, 21:02; 10.
Courtney McAuliffe, Gulf, 21:07.
Boys team scores
Crystal River 50, Land 0'
Lakes 61, New Port Richey
Ridgewood 106, Brooksville
Central 108, New Port Richey
Mitchell 135, Brooksville
Hernando 149, Lecanto 192,
Brooksville Nature Coast 248,
New Port Richey Gulf 262,
Zephyrhills 270, Wesley Chapel
285, Wiregrass Ranch 329, New
Port Richey River Ridge 343,
Citrus 382, Dade City Pasco 387,
Tampa King 441, Hudson 472,
Sunlake 494.
Boys Top 10 Individuals
1. Felix Soto, Land O' Lakes
16:21; 2. Tyler Maier, Hernando, -
15:51; 3. Steven Landreth,
Ridgewood, 16:58; 4. Matt
Schwartz, Land 0' Lakes 17:04;
5. Jon Junkins, Lecanto, 17:07; 6.
Brandon Kempton, Crystal
River, 17:11; 7. Blair Beeler,
Crystal River, 17:19; 8. Eric
Hughes, Crystal River, 17:21; 9.
Joe Wright, Hernando, 17:22; 10. -
Justin Sblano, Lecanto, 17:30. .


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SPORTS


CITRUS COUNIY (FL) CHRONICLE


I








NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2007 5B


('7Rs uRTO oul Y (r ) R _ (UYI




Can Chicago stop Cowboys?


Associated Press
LAKE FOREST, Ill. - He followed a path
to stardom that seems as long as the 80 miles
separating his hometown of Burlington,
Wis., and Soldier Field. Yet, Tony Romo
won't take time to reflect on his journey
when the Dallas Cowboys visit the Chicago
Bears tonight
It's not his style.
"I don't sit back and look at myself in the
third person and go, 'Wow, look at what I'm
doing,"' said Romo, a Pro Bowl quarterback
last year who was undrafted in 2003. "I think
new challenges and new goals keep getting
set along the way. You reach one, you set a
new one."
His most immediate task is to maintain
the momentum he and the Cowboys (2-0)
have and beat the defending NFC champi-
ons. The Cowboys have 82 points - their
most through two games since 1971 - after
beating the New York Giants 45-35 and
Miami 37-20. And a win today would give
Dallas its first 3-0 start since 1999.
Meanwhile, the Bears hope to get their
offense in sync after sputtering the first two
games.
There was progress in the running game


* WHAT: Dallas Cowboys at Chicago
Bears
* WHEN: 8:15 p;m. tonight
MTV: NBC 2,8

in last week's 20-10 win over Kansas City,
with Cedric Benson running for 101 yards,
after a miserable 14-3 loss at San Diego.
Now, the Bears (1-1) would like to get their
passing game going.
They spent the preseason touting their
depth and versatility and vowed things
would be different now that Rex Grossman
had a full season'as a starter This, they said,
was when the offense was going to emerge
from the long shadow of the defense.
"We know we've been the little brother
around here for a long time," tight end
Desmond Clark'said. "Last year, we felt like
we were finally getting over that But com-
ing out this season, we're not doing what is
expected."
What they did not envision was this:
- Two catches and 15 yards for two-time
Pro Bowl receiver Muhsin Muhammad.
- Breakdowns against the blitz.
- More maddening inconsistency from


Grossman.
After leading the team with 863 yards
receiving last season, Muhammad simply
has not been able to break free. If that con-
tinues, this could be a difficult season for
the Bears.
"I'm going to keep working and doing
what I do, and when they start coming my
way, I'm going to start making some plays,"
the 34-year-old Muhammad said. "I'm ready
to make some plays."
Only two Bears have more than three
receptions: Bernard Berrian (10) and Clark
(seven). Although Berrian has 148 yards, he
and Grossman haven't connected on any big
plays after hooking up for four touchdowns
that were 34 yards or longer last season.
The passing game might get some help
this weekend, if rookie tight end Greg Olsen
makes his debut after missing the first two
games because of a sprained knee. A bigger
concern, though, is getting Muhammad
involved and settling Grossman's
inconsistencies.
Dallas Cowboys running back Marion
Barber III is part of a running back tandem
with teammate Julius Jones.
Associated Press


Texans have upset in mind


Houston hoping

to shock Colts

again today

Associated Press
HOUSTON - The Colts'
last trip to Houston ended
with a 27-24 loss that denied
them a chance for a first-
round playoffbye.
Nine months later, unde-
feated Indianapolis returns
to the site of the shocker to
face an upstart Texans team
that is 2-0 for the first time in
franchise history It's a
matchup for the early lead in
the AFC South.
The Colts haven't lost since
and went on to win the Super
Bowl. Houston started its first
extended winning streak with
that victory and has now won
four in a row.
Indianapolis coach Tony
Dungy remembers that last
meeting well.
"They just outplayed us,"
Dungy said. "They were more
physical than we were. They
got the takeaways ... we just
have to try to match their
intensity this year, tackle a lit-
tle bit better and control the
ball when we have it"
In that game, the Texans
used a Ron Dayne-led attack to
gain 191 yards rushing and
control the time of possession
by more than 10 minutes to
keep Peyton Manning and the
Colts' offense off the field.
Veteran center Steve
McKinney said that win, which
broke a streak of nine straight
losses to the Colts, should help
Houston today.
"I think the fact that we beat
them last year gives you that
little bit of confidence know-
ingthatyou can beat them," he
said. "They had had our num-
ber nine straight games, so you
finally get that monkey off
your back and now we can go
and prepare for this game,
knowing that we've already


The Colts' Kelvin Hayden (26) looks on as Houston Texans' Kris Brown (background) celebrates
his game-winning 48-yard field goal during the closing seconds of the fourth quarter in Houston, in
this Dec. 24, 2006 file photo. Indianapolis hopes to avoid a similar fate today versus the Texans.


done it and knowing what it
took to do it"
To be successful today, the
Texans will likely use a simi-
lar game plan because Pro
Bowl receiver Andre Johnson
said he won't play as he recov-
ers from a knee sprain. This
year, Houston has the combi-
nation of Dayne, the 1999
Heisman Trophy Winner, and


starter Ahman Green to run
the ball.
"The way they beat us is, I
think, the way they plan to
play us, and we've got to do
something to try to control
the running game and con-
trol the intermediate pass-
es," Dungy said.
Some Texans are calling it
their first big game in the NFL


and the most important game
in team history. But Matt
Schaub wants his team to
keep perspective, reminding
the players it's only one game.
"It's a divisional opponent,
we're both 2-0, but at the same
time, it's one game and we
have to just prepare the best
we can so we can go out
Sunday and play well," he said.


Broncos' Cutler to


face stout Jaguars 'D'


Associated Press
DENVER - From one snap to
the next, baby-faced Jay Cutler
can go from making a bonehead
blunder befitting his youth to
showing a poise way beyond his
24 years.
One moment, Denver's sec-
ond-year signal-caller - and
last of the "Big Three" quarter-
backs drafted last year behind
Vince Young and Matt Leinart
- tosses a dangerous backward
lob that rookie running back
Selvin Young has to chase down
and swipe out of bounds to save
the day.
The next, he's calmly leading
the Broncos down the field for
the game-clinching field goal as
time expires in Buffalo to win his
first NFL season opener
A week later, Cutler watches
an interception returned for a
touchdown and gets sacked
for a safety as the. Broncos
blow a big second-half lead
against Oakland. Then, he
coolly leads Denver to another
win at the wire.
"He has a lot of poise," said
Broncos coach Mike
Shanahan, who handed Cutler
the keys to his offense with five
games to go last season. "Like
most rookies, he's going to
make some mistakes but he
doesn't usually repeat the
same mistake twice. He enjoys
football. He loves his study and
I think he has a great future."


And maybe a pretty good pres-
ent, too.
Asked about the uncommon
composure he shows at crunch
time on the football field, Cutler
displays that same mature-
beyond-his-years poise on the
podium, too.
"My supporting cast has a lot to
do with it," Cutler said. "It helps
when you have the big receivers
outside, some good receivers
running out of the slot and
Daniel Graham playing better
than ever. And Travis Henry
Getting 120 or 150 yards a game.
It makes things easy on me."
What Cutler wants to do now is
turn that poise into more points.
The Broncos have piled up a
league-leading 911 yards so far
but they have just three touch-
downs to show for it
Why?
They're working in seven new
offensive starters, have commit-
ted costly penalties, two of which
negated TDs, guard Ben
Hamilton has been out for six
weeks with a concussion, tight
end Tony Scheffler is still work-
ing his way back from a broken
foot The list is long.
And Cutler shares some of the
blame, too, but he's also a major
reason Denver is 2-0.
The Jacksonville Jaguars (1-
1) believe they'll be able to rat-
tle the "rookie," who has just
seven NFL starts under his
belt, when they visit Invesco
Field today.


Redskins' Gibbs respects winless Giants


Associated Press
LANDOVER, Md. - The
Washington Redskins know a
trap game when they see one. A
couple of brutal experiences
from the last two years have
made them experts.
The Tennessee Titans
arrived at 0-5 a year ago and
left with a win. Two years ago,
the downbeat Oakland
Raiders pulled an upset that
nearly derailed Washington's
playoff run.
So this week, with the win-
less, bashed-by-everybody New
York Giants (0-2) coming to
town, coach Joe Gibbs has done
his usual best to make the men
in blue sound like superstars
from a superior dimension of
the space-time continuum.
'All of us know the Giants,"
Gibbs said. "First of all, that
team beat us twice last year
with most of the same players.
We've got a short work week
You can. imagine how hard
they're going to play Right now
they're sitting there at 0-2 a real,
real good football team. I know
what we're going to get"
Well, the first hole in Gibbs'
case is that the Giants no longer


have Tiki Barber, whose fran-
chise-record 234 yards rushing
day almost single-handedly
accounted for New York's 34-28
at Washington in last year's
finale.
The Giants haven't won a
game since.
Secondly, the Giants aren't
adjusting well to new defensive
coordinator Steve Spagnuolo.
They've allowed 80 points in
their first two games for the first


time since 1966, and Justin Tuck
is the only player with a sack
The Big Apple media horde
already has a job watch on
coach Tom Coughlin.
"You hate to use the word
desperation, but we've put our-
selves in a bad position, let's put
it that way," guard Chris Snee
said. "We know what we have to
do and what the score is."
The score is such that a loss
to the Redskins (2-0) will put


the Giants in a three-game
hole just three weeks into the
season.
'The mood is what it would
be like with an 0-2 team," line-
backer Antonio Pierce said.
"You're looking for something
positive to happen."
As 2-0 teams go, the Redskins
are understandably apprehen-
sive. They didn't exactly over-
whelm their first two oppo-
nents, Miami and Philadelphia.


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Associated Press
Jacksonville Jaguars receiver Reggie Williams, right, celebrates
with quarterback David Garrard following his touchdown reception
in the fourth quarter against the Atlanta Falcons last Sunday.
Jacksonville faces the Denver Broncos today.


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SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 23, 2007
www.chronicleonlinecom


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE=

In fashion


TV LOOKOUT


Florida
I OTTERIrES


'Family Guy' goes for the farce '

FRAZIER MOORE -
AP television writer


Here are the
winning numbers
selected Saturday
in the Florida
Lottery:


Associated Press
A model wears a creation by
Andrea Turchi as part of the
New Upcoming Designers
Spring/Summer 2008
women's fashion collection
unveiled Saturday in Milan,
Italy.


Actor returns
to home state
MILWAUKEE - Willem
Dafoe returned home to
Wisconsin, where he said
seeing childhood friends
reminded him of the impor-
tance of old ties.
"That's
what
remains the
most impor-
tant," said
Dafoe, 52.
"That's what
started the
most impor-
Willem tant, and
Dafoe then I think
everybody
goes away from that for a lit-
tle while. And then they
come back to that It's like a
primitive impulse."
The two-time Oscar nomi-
nee, known for roles in the
"Spider-Man" trilogy and
"Platoon," spoke briefly at
the Milwaukee International
Film Festival on Friday
night after the world pre-
miere of his new movie,
"Anamorph."
Dafoe said he had to "get
out of town" after adoles-
cence, so he moved to
Milwaukee upon graduating
from Appleton East High
School. He studied drama at
the University of Wisconsin-
Milwaukee before joining
the avant-garde theater
group, Theatre X.

Widow sues over
film footage
LOS ANGELES - Rodney
Dangerfield's widow says
that even in death the come-
dian can't get any respect.
Joan Dangerfield filed a
lawsuit
- Thursday in
D.g Los Angeles
County
Superior
Court to stop
the airing of
a videotape
of Danger-
Rodney field in his
Dangerfield later years
that his wid-
ow says was never intended
for the public.
The comedian, whose
catch phrase was "I don't get
no respect," was 82 when he
died in October 2004.
The suit claimed that pro-
ducer David Permut, a for-
mer friend, has more than
200 hours of video footage of
Dangerfield taken at his
home during the last few
years of his life. The materi-
al is "highly private, ex-
tremely sensitive and very
personal," according to the
lawsuit

Clooney and friend
injured in accident
WEEHAWKEN, N.J. -
-George Clooney and a com-
panion were injured on
Friday when their motorcy-
cle collided
with a car on

Sroad across
River from
New York
City.
Clooney
George suffered a
Clooney broken rib
and scrapes
while his passenger, Sarah
Larson, broke her foot in the

were treated at Palisades
Medical Center in North
Clooney's spokesman, Stanr
Rosenfield, said.
"He's doing fine," he said.


Now hear this, all you "Star Wars" fans!
Listen up, all of you who think the "Star
Wars" saga is a big, silly crock!
That covers nearly everyone, right? And
none of you should think of missing this
week's "Family Guy," the Fox cartoon satire
that, in a special one-hour season premiere,
does a wickedly funny spoof of "Star Wars."
Episode IV, of course.
In this retelling, portly patriarch Peter
Griffin is transformed into Han Solo. Wife
Lois is Princess Leia. Their tyrannical
infant, Stewie, is Darth Vader. Dim-bulb
teenage son Chris is Luke Skywalker, and
suave family dog Brian is Chewbacca.
And it goes from there, in a dead-on hom-
age that hilariously picks apart "Star Wars,"
along with much of real life. And all in just
40 minutes, if you take your lightsaber and
zap the commercials.
This very special "Family Guy" airs at 9
p.m. But that's not all the funny business on
Fox Sunday night
At 8 p.m., the 19th-season premiere of
'The Simpsons" finds Homer learning how
the other half lives, in the person of his
wealthy, evil boss Mr Burns, who treats him
to a fancy trip on the corporate jet This
sends Homer into a tailspin. After such lux-
ury, how can he accept going back to being
poor?
Then, on "King of the Hill" at 8:30 p.m.,
Hank and his buddies take his son Bobby to
a Texas-Nebraska college football game to
formally indoctrinate him as a Longhorns
fan. But Hank fumbles the ball.
Other shows to look out for:
* Starz is introducing a series of original
specials about people, trends and culture in
movie entertainment Hosted by film critic
Richard Roeper, "Starz Inside" kicks off
with "Fog City Mavericks: The Filmmakers
of San Francisco," which looks at biggies in
the film biz who call the Bay Area home:
George Lucas, Francis Ford Coppola, Clint
Eastwood, Chris Columbus and producer
Saul Zaentz. "Fog City Mavericks" pre-
mieres 9 p.m. Monday.
* A half-century ago, "Little Rock"
became shorthand for both racism and the
civil rights struggle. In September 1957,
Arkansas Gov. Orval Faubus defied the
Supreme Court's Brown vs. Board of
Education ruling and ordered the National
Guard to bar nine black teenagers from
Little Rock's Central High School.


Associated Press
This image was provided by Fox TV to promote its "Family Guy" cartoon series episode
that parodies the movie "Star Wars," airing at 9 p.m. today.


President Eisenhower responded by send-
ing troops to protect the students as they
entered the building. It was a key event in
the civil rights movement But what about
Central High today? "Little Rock Central: 50
Years Later" premieres 8 p.m. Tuesday on
HBO.
* Former President Clinton is scheduled
to join Martha Stewart for the full hour of
her syndicated talk show on Wednesday
(check local listings).


* Get this party started with the party ani-
mals who populate "Back at the Barnyard,"
a new CGI-animated series on Nickelodeon.
Based on last year's feature, "Barnyard,"
the series takes place at a farm where ani-
mals make merry whenever the farmer's
back is turned. The show, created by Steve
Oedekerk ('Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius,"
'Ace Ventura: Pet Detective"), premieres 9
p.m. Saturday After that, it will air
Saturday at 10:30 a.m.


'Kid Nation' cheats viewers, exploits children


FRAZIER MOORE
AP television writer


NEW YORK - Yes, you
heard right This year's prime-
time Emmys really were award-
ed a few days ago. Lots of
winged statuettes were present-
ed. A hardcore audience (the
second-smallest on record) saw
it happen.
Now the 2007 Emmy Awards
are history.
But why dwell in the past?
Let's get a jump on the season
that's just begun, and look
ahead to the 2008 Emmys.
Watch out! The competition is
already fierce, with early
favorites emerging.
Like "Cavemen." As every-
body knows, this new ABC sit-
com is based on the Geico cave-
men characters, and though it
doesn't even premiere until
next month, already it's got
solid Emmy prospects.
If it's a flop (which TV handi-
cappers universally predict), it's
a slam-dunk Emmy winner for
Most Idiotic Series Concept
Since "My Mother the Car."
On the other hand, if it's a hit,
count on "Cavemen" to land a
special Emmy signifying the
Apocalypse is imminent
"Cavemen" just can't lose!
Odds are excellent, too, for
CBS' "Kid Nation." No kidding.
Maybe not for best reality
show. That might be a stretch.
Instead, "Kid Nation" deserves
its own new category:
Outstanding Achievement in
Double-Speak Promotion and
Cynical Exploitation of
Underage Talent
Did the series break labor


- r


- From wire reports


Associated Press
This photo provided by CBS shows some of the 40 kids, without
adults or modern comforts, who have 40 days to build a new world
out of a real-life ghost town outside Santa Fe, N.M., in the net-
work's new reality show "Kid Nation," at 8 p.m. Wednesday.


laws or put its cast of youngsters
(ages 8 through 15) in harm's
way during .production in a
deserted New Mexico mining
town? Despite such accusations
lodged against the show before
its premiere this week, the folks
at "Kid Nation" and CBS have
insisted that everything was A-
OK
Their explanation goes some-
thing like this: The grown-up
production crew was constantly
on hand to oversee the kids'
assigned mission - setting up a
new society free from meddling
by grown-ups - even as those
dutiful adults stayed out of cam-
era range so CBS could keep
billing the show as "40 kids for
40 days with no grown-ups."
Maybe it would have been
more honest to hype "Kid
Nation" simply as a kiddie
game-show stranded in the mid-
dle of nowhere.
Or as a squeaky-clean, bunny-
slope "Survivor" clone, com-
plete with reward challenges


(or, in "Kid Nation" parlance,
"showdowns"), the prize for
which on the first episode was
an interesting either-or choice:
additional outhouses ... or a tel-
evision. (Toilets or TV? Fill in
your own punch line.) It was
Port-A-Potty by a landslide.
The show also has the equiva-
lent of "Survivor" tribal coun-
cils, led by "Kid Nation's" four-
member town council.
But. just how did this four-
some get to serve as the unelect-
ed leadership? They were
hand-picked by the show's pro-
ducers, is how! And, besides
other things, these little- power
brokers rule on who among the
kiddie rank-and-file will get a
$20,000 "gold star" each week
Or are they nothing more
than pint-sized puppets of the
real powers that be?
Of course, such thoughts of
adult-world dirty-dealing fly in
the face of what "Kid Nation"
pretends to stand for (as over-
seen by host Jonathan Karsh, a


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grown-up who seems to have
attended Jeff Probst University,
minoring in Keep Things Warm-
and-Fuzzy).
On the first episode, kids
staged fleeting displays of dis-
cord, frustration and tears. But
nobly, they rose above it, in serv-
ice to the show's predictably
wholesome-and-uplifting
facade. "Kid Nation" wasted no
time exposing itself as overpro-
duced, over-orchestrated and
generally over-finessed - all
the better to guarantee that it
meets its preconceived narra-
tive demands
And it meets them. Dead on.
With rarely a threat of authen-
ticity. Just an underlying creepy
vibe: What's the truth with this
show? And who, if anyone,
would choose to keep watching
it?
So start clearing off a place
on your mantle, CBS. You really
did it this time!
But one thing needs to get
decided: On next fall's
Emmycast, would whoever
accepts the trophy for "Kid
Nation" be accepting it for all
the grown-ups who had no role
in this show (but really did), or
on behalf of all the kids, who in
exchange for TV face time and a
crack at some prize money,
allowed themselves to get used?
Frazier Moore writes for The
Associated Press. He can be
reached atfmoore@ap.org.


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Play 4: 8-4-3-3
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4-of-5 300 $126
3-of-5 9,267 $11

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
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the numbers printed above
with numbers officially posted ,
by the Florida Lottery. On the
Web, go to www.flalottery
.cornm; by telephone, call (850)
487 7-7. 7


Today in


Today is Sunday, Sept. 23, the
266th day of 2007. There are 99
days left in the year. Autumn
arrives at 5:51 a.m. Eastern time.
Today's Highlight in History:
Fifty years ago, on Sept. 23,
1957, nine black students who had
entered Little Rock Central High
School in Arkansas were forced to
withdraw because of a white mob
outside.
On this date:
In 1806, the Lewis and Clark
expedition returned to St. Louis
more than two years after setting
out for the Pacific Northwest.
In 1846, Neptune was identified
as a planet by German astronomer
Johann Gottfried Galle.
In 1938, a time capsule, to be
opened in the year 6939, was
buried on the grounds of the
World's Fair in New York City.
In 2001, 13 coal miners were
killed in explosions at the Blue
Creek Mine No. 5 in Brookwood,
Ala.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
Mickey Rooney is 87. Actress
Margaret Pellegrini ("The Wizard
of Oz") is 84. Singer Julio Iglesias
is 64. Actor Paul Petersen ("The
Donna Reed Show") is 62.
Actress-singer Mary Kay Place is,
60. Rock star Bruce Springsteen is
58. Actor Jason Alexander is 48.
Actor Chi McBride is 46. Actress
Elizabeth Pena is 46. Country
musician Don Herron (BR549) is
45. Actor Erik Todd Dellums is 43.
Actress LisaRaye is 41. Singer Ani
DiFranco is 37. Rock singer Sarah
Bettens (K's Choice) is 35. Re-
cording executive Jermaine Dupri
is 35. Pop singer Erik-Michael
Estrada ("Making the Band") is 28.
Thought for Today: "Education
is hanging around until you've
caught on." - Robert Frost,
American poet (1874-1963).


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Good feelings created by the Fed's rate cut could recede as quickly as they rolled in


BY JEANNINE AVERSA
.4Asociated Prcss
L ike the tides, the wave
of good feelings that
si ept over Wall Street
and Main Street with
tie Federal Reserve's
big rate cut could ebb
lust as quickly
Homeowners opening uip state-
ments for their adjustable-rate mort-
gages come October will experience
a jolt when the rates jump, but not as
severe a jolt as it could have been
And, Wall Street's mood s%% ines -
reflecting bouts of panic and then
some relief- are expected to linger.
That's because the Fed's action,
while perhaps providing some help.
%\on't cure problems in the ailing
housing market, which are still
expected to drag well into next year.
It will take time for builders to
\work offa glut of unsold homes. That
means the housing slump will con-
tinue to hold back the economy and
probably lead to more job cuts in
construction, manufacturing and
other industries
The Fed's action also won't stop
home foreclosures and late mort-
gage payments from rising in the
months ahead
In a bold move. Fed Chairman Beni
Bernanke and his colleagues on
Tuesday sliced a key interest rate by
one-half a percentage point to 4 75
percent. It %\as the first rate cut in
more than four years
Their aim is to prevent the econo-
my from being thrown into a reces-
sion by a housing meltdown and a
credit crunch. Lower rates should
induce people and businesses to
boost spending and investing. which
would help energize economic acti\-
Ity
Wall Street investors were
cheered by the move. sending the
Dow Jones industrial average zoom-
ing 33597 points. It \\as the Dow's
biggest one-day point jump in nearly
five years.
Sonime ofthe buoyancy carried over
into Wednesday, w ith investors push-
ing up the Dow by around 90 points
in morning t rad ing.
OCer the short term. the rate cut


Please ree -


/Page 3C


A home is advertised for sale at a foreclosure auction last month in Pasadena, Calif. The number of foreclosure
filings reported in the U.S. last month more than doubled versus August 2006 and jumped 36 percent from July, a
trend that signals many homeowners are increasingly unable to make timely payments on their mortgages or sell
their homes amid a national housing slump. The Federal Reserve slashed a key interest rate by a half percentage
point on Tuesday and left the door open to further rate cuts to prevent a painful housing slump and jarring credit
crunch from driving the country into recession.


Steady fed rate
Trie federal funds rate has
remained at 5 25 percent since
June 2006


rc n


98 00 02


5.25







04 06


SOURCE" Federal Reserve Board AP


Cut won't affect majority
SB DvAN THANH DANk3 more easily or finance a shopping
The' Baltimore Sun spree on plastic. Experts warned
-- - that consumers will not feel and
The Federal Reserve lowered should not expect a drastic change
its benchmark interest rates in their pockets anytime soon.
Tuesday by one-half percent, a "It isn't going to make a hill of
larger-than-expected reduction beans difference to consumers
that gave an immediate lift to the today, tomorrow or even a month
stock market and is expected to fri'om now" said David A.
boost an economy rattled by rising Stepherson. senior portfolio man-
mortgage defaults and tforeclo- ager at Hardesty Capital
sures. Management. an investment advi-
But don't expect the first rate sory company in Baltimore. "The


cut in ouri years to help you
instantly refinance your mortgage


Please see :'.,:- . '/Page 3C


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Rats

overboard!

W hen you are the cap-
tain of a boat, there
are many privileges
that come your way.
You get to make the toasts at
all official dinners.
You get the nicest cabin.
And in the best of times, you
might be asked to officiate at a
wedding of some firefighter
and his fiancee who decided to
elope.
In the worst of times, you are
also in charge of all disasters.
They were not the best of
times last Saturday morning.
I was the captain of my aging
pontoon boat as we chugged
out the Crystal River with a
group of volunteers who were
participating in the annual
Save Our Waters Week Adopt-
a-Shore cleanup.
We had three kayaks
attached to the pontoon so we
could gain access to the river
shoreline and get at the trash.
We had rakes, nets and other
tools that would help us get the
job done.
As we traveled out the river
toward our destination west of
the Salt River bridge, Paul
Perregaux, a member of the
Crystal River Rotary Club and
a cleanup volunteer, was
telling us a story about growing
up in the northeast.
All of a sudden Paul's story
concluded with the comment
"Hey, that's a big rat."
As I was driving the boat and
dragging three kayaks behind,
I wasn't paying absolute atten-
tion to every detail of Paul's
story and I thought the "rat" in
question was just part of the
story.
Then Paul said again,
"That's a really big rat"
' Paul was not reminiscing
: about his childhood, he was
Stalking about a big rat that
Climbed out from under his
seat and scurried to the front
of our 20-foot pontoon boat.
That's about when the
Please see .' ,:/.'Page 4C


Hot Corner: TIPS


Calls were just the



tip of the iceberg


Corruption in govern-
ment, crime in the
streets....
Forget all that What people
are passionate about is tip-
ping!
On last Sunday's Opinion
page, a self-professed waitress
lit into comments from a previ-
ous Sound Off caller.
In part, last week's Sound Off
read: "I work in the restaurant
business and I'm fed up with
cheap tips. If nobody has
informed you, tips should be at
least 20 percent of your total
-bill including tax. If you cannot
-figure that out, that's $2 every
$10 you spend.... Many people
Sdo hot realize that waitresses
go through a lot for only $3.50
an hour...."
The issue is a sensitive one,
as the Sound Off calls accom-
panying this column indicate.
When it comes to sit-down,
napkin-on-the-lap restaurants,
I think I do my part, thanks to a
' handy tip guide I clipped from
ran airline magazine. In even
numbers, from $2 to $100, it
gives 15 percent totals and 20
percent totals. Depending on
service and the "yum factor,"
_I'll generally tip within that
range.
I will admit that my tip chart
has annoyed some friends who
plop down $1 for a meal
Whether it cost $5 or $10, or $2
whether it's $10.01 or $20.
Curious about the subject, I


went on the old com-
puter to check out
"tipping etiquette."
The Web site I went
to said 15 to 20 per-
cent is fair in restau-
rants but that doesn't
necessarily mean
tipping on the taxes,
too. That's the cus- Charlie
tomer's call, not pro- Charlie
tocol. SHA
It also offered OF 4
some advice. If the
service and/or food are awful,
talk to the manager. Don't stiff
the waitress because the only
thing you'll accomplish is leav-
ing the next customer with one
agitated server.
Another good bit of advice
was not to pick up the check
and let someone else cover the
tip. It recommended suggest-
ing that the other person cover
the next meal, then you won't
be left wondering if the staff is
giving you the hairy eyeball on
the way out for an insufficient
tip.
The Web site also unveiled a
world tipping that I hadn't
thought too much about.
Don't bother tipping at a buf-
fet, it said - unless they bring
the food to you or fill up your
drinks.
Tip 10 to 15 percent on the
booze portion of a dinner bill,
vs. the 15 to 20 percent.
Hmmm, after a few drinks I'd
like to see customers calculat-


II
LI


ing the booze por-
tion vs. the food por-
tion.
For takeout, a
buck or two is fine
S but none is neces-
sary. The way I fig-
ure it is if the food
looks good, the serv-
ice is fast and it's
Brennan somewhere between
DES $5-$10, a buck is an
RAY investment in future
good service and a
means to stall price increases.
One of the interesting tip
suggestions was $1 to $5 for
lounge musicians. While I have
no personal anecdotes about
tipping lounge musicians, I do
remember my mother being
embarrassed by an occasion
when my father offered to tip a
lounge musician if he stopped
playing.
In some miscellaneous
areas: About $20 each is what
the Web site suggested tipping
movers for a "basic move,"
whatever that may be. One
entry on the site, from a former
mover, encouraged people to
tip movers individually rather
than giving the boss the wad of
cash. He said he'd never seen
any tips and didn't think too
highly of his ex-boss.
They say $1 is sufficient for a
coat check tip or a restroom
attendant Frankly, I prefer being
left alone when in a restroom.
Please see SHADES/Page 4C


Bad service
This is to the waitress com-
plaining about cheap cus-
tomers in the Sunday Sound
Off: First of all, let me set you
straight about something. We
don't owe you anything; you
earn a tip. Why should we tip a
waitress who puts a plate of
food in front of you and then
walks away and the food is
cold, it's not cooked and the
way I ordered? You just throw a
plate in front of us and you
walk away and we never see
you again until it's time to tip
you. I can't count how many
times I have pushed my plate
aside waiting on you to notice,
meanwhile I sit and watch my
husband eat. So if you're get-
ting lousy tips, maybe you
should re-evaluate the way you
do service.
Go to college
In Sunday's paper there's a
person saying about tips, that
they don't get enough on tip-
ping. Well, I'm not here to sub-
sidize anybody's income. If you
don't make enough money, it's
time for you to go to a junior
college and take some kind of
courses where anybody can
almost afford one at a time.
Find new job
Quit complaining about how
little you make per hour. If you
don't think you are being paid
enough, become worth more
and get a better-paying job.
Career choice
The last thing I need is to
pick up the Sunday morning
edition of the Chronicle to get
lectured to by a waitress on
tipping. If nobody has


informed you, the word "tips"
means "to ensure proper serv-
ice." If you are receiving less in
tips than you think you should,
then you ought to take an
introspective look at the service
you're providing. You might get
a surprise. It sounds to me
that you want customers to
compensate you for a poor
career choice that pays only
$3.50 an hour...
Just deserts
Concerning the waiter or
waitress complaining about low
tips: Gratuities are a way of
saying that your food-prep
quality and service is adequate
or better. Perhaps you should
look toward your cook or your-
self and self-inspect your serv-
ice. It may be lacking. It is your
responsibility to educate your-
self. If you have failed in this
respect for whatever reason,
then you must look to yourself
to elevate your employment.
This is the life you chose. Quit
complaining and motivate your-
self. Everyone gets what they
deserve. Check out the first 15
minutes of the movie
"Reservoir Dogs;" Mr. Pink is of
the same opinion as I.
Before sales tax
I was calling in regards to
the item about waiters and
waitresses, about people being
cheap tippers and they say it's
supposed to be 20 percent of
the bill. I believe 20 percent of
the bill is right, but they have
on there it was 20 percent of
the bill including the tax. I
believe it's supposed to be 20
percent before the sales tax is
attached to the bill. I think
somebody should check that


out. And also, as a serviceper-
son - I'm not a waitress, but I
do service other people - I
work on other people and just
because I happen to own the
business, people seem to think
that you don't have to tip. Well,
if I'm the one doing the serv-
ice, I definitely should be
tipped regardless of whether I
own it or whether I just happen
to work there.
Poor attitude
This is in reference to the
waitress job and how bad the
tips are. Well, with an attitude
like she had when she called in
her comments about how small
her tips were, I can see why
they were small. She really
needs to get out and get into
another line of work because it
doesn't seem to me that she
has the personality to be a
waitress. And some people are
on Social Security and they can
only afford so much. She ought
to think about that. So do
something else, honey, because
that isn't your line of work.
Take courses
In the Sunday paper there
was a person complaining
about tips, not getting enough
tips. Well, John Q. Public is not
out to subsidize anybody. That
person not making enough
money needs to go to the jun-
ior college and take a few
courses and go get a job that
they can earn a living and not
have to rely on tips. It's not my
problem that you don't have
enough energy and wherewithal
to go better your own self. This
is not a handout area. This is a
"work and do better on your
own" area.


- -,. - ' - ,~-- ~ ~ ~ 9. -l


ILENDERFOR CLOSUREJ


10 1'-. F -


C
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 23, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com










2C
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 23, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


" "One must remember that both
wild things and men are animals,
but wild things are not people."


Helen Hoover


C TRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .......................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ............................. editor
Neale Brennan ...... promotions/community affairs
Kathie Stewart ...................circulation director
. Mike Arnold ...................... managing editor
Founded in 1891 Curt Ebitz .......................... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Mac Harris .......................... citizen member
"You may difer with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

DANGEROUS ANIMALS




Irresponsibili ty



should come at



a steeper price


Re sidents shouldn't have to
live in fear of dangerous
dogs. They shouldn't have
to worry about walking through
their neighborhood or the safety
of their pets in their own yard.
But they do.
Case in point: In March, two
pit bulls knocked down and bit a
Holder woman as she walked
through her neighborhood. Her
wrist was broken during the fall.
The owner of the dogs had left a
gate open, clearing the way for
the attack.
Those dogs were quarantined
by the county and declared "dan-
gerous" - a status that necessi-
tates the owner to
annually purchase
a certificate of reg- THE If
istration and, in this Pit bull
case, pay $220 in
fines. The owner OUR OI
didn't see fit to do
that and the dogs Gre
.'iTwere euthanized. accouur
Why should he needed fo
have bothered? He
has plenty more pit YOUR OPIe
chrtnicleor
bulls. comment a
In fact, in late Chronr,:c,
May - just a couple
months after the
first incident - the same man
allowed four of his pit bulls to
roam the neighborhood, three of
which mauled a poodle that was
on its owner's porch. Those pit
bulls are now in quarantine, but
county ordinances dictate that
dogs are not to be deemed "dan-
gerous" until they severely
injure or kill additional domes-
tic animals. One attack on a per-
son earns them that distinction.
Earlier this month, County
Judge Mark Yerman fined the
owner $600 for allowing the four
dogs to run loose.
Under county ordinance, a
person can be charged with a
first-degree misdemeanor if
their dog has previously been
declared dangerous, then bites a
person or attacks a domestic ani-

Three cheers 0!
Sept. 15's Chronicle
Opinion section; three !
cheers for Charley Reese,
and I second your com-
ments. I'm sick and tired
of going to war for other
countries, having legals
marching for rights they CALL
have no right to and lobby-
ists controlling our elected 563.-
officials. This is not the
America I grew up in. The
American people need, want and
deserve better. I wish I knew how to
get better. I do know the system
needs a major overhauling.
Irksome wunderkinds
Some of these ads on TV that use
young kids to discuss a product
that you should buy make me sick.
In fact when I watch them, I make a
decision to never buy or use that
product. Some examples are: 1.
Kids talking about high blood pres-
sure, etc., that eating the wrong
foods can do to you, but to eat a
certain brand turkey instead. 2. A
carpet cleaner having a real young
boy say over and over again the
word "beautiful," which he doesn't
even know the meaning of. 3. A
hardware store has a teenage girl
telling her father what they need for


mal. That's the only escalating
measure that owners face. If an
owner allows his dogs to roam,
each incident is considered sep-
arate from the last, with no
cumulative penalty for the irre-
sponsible owner.
In response to attacks, munici-
palities in Colorado, Rhode
Island, Missouri, Kansas and
elsewhere have adopted and/or
considered ordinances banning
pit bulls and other animal
breeds deemed as dangerous. In
the case of Denver, Colo., the
ordinance banning pit bulls was
appealed, but upheld by a higher
court. Then, state legislation was
enacted overriding
municipal ordi-
SSUE: nances regarding
attacks. dangerous animals,
but the state
PINION: supreme court
ruled on the side of
after municipalities, and
stability the ban stands. - :
Dr owners. In Citrus County,
irresponsible own-
NION: Go to ers of dangerous
line.comn to
bout today 's animals need to be
editorial, dealt with as crimi-
nals. Penalties
should increase
exponentially with each offense,
similar to DUI laws. Liability
insurance should be required.
The right of ownership - like
driving privileges in DUI cases
- should be taken from repeat
offenders.
Given Citrus County's still-
semi-rural nature, it would be
premature to ban pit bulls and
other dogs that are bred over
generations to be fighters. In
many respects, the animals are
magnificent.
Still, responsible owners who
respect the power of their pets
must understand the threat unre-
strained, roaming pit bulls pose
to other pets, children and
strangers. It is the irresponsible
owners who need to pay the
price for endangering the public.

~ their house. It's a big joke
when these kids aren't
I even old enough to know
what they're talking about.
Maybe these ads attract
some dummies, but they
only turn me off.
Flicking ashes
To all who smoke while
0579 driving: I readily will admit
057 d ryou have the right to
smoke in your own car.
The problem arises when
you flick your ashes out of your
open window. It does not take a
genius to realize that when your
speed is 30 or 40 mph that the
ashes are not going to drop to the
ground. Where do they go? Should I
be behind you, they come into my
open window and, at times, into my
eyes. If you are going to smoke
while driving, please use your ash-
tray.
Helicopter rescue
I'm calling in regards to the heli-
copter. I wish people would stop
complaining. It might save their life
one of these days, like it did mine. I
had an accident on (State Road) 44
and had I not been flown to Shands
Hospital, I would have died. So
they'd better stop and think twice. It
could be them.


Mercenaries undermine forces


BY DOUGLAS COHN AND
ELEANOR CLIFT
The decision by the Iraqi govern-
ment to ban the U.S. contractor,
Blackwater USA, from operating
in the country and providing security to
American officials lifts the curtain on
the unseemly practice of relying on an
army of private contractors to perform
duties previously carried out by the
military Private contractors working
for the U.S. in Iraq outnumber coalition
forces, 180,000 to 165,000, and at least a
quarter of these contractors of varying
nationalities are armed and can fairly
be described as mercenaries.
The U.S. government has no control
over them, and the Iraqi government
lacks the power to enforce its threat-
ened ban. Under the terms of Iraqi sov-
ereignty, as negotiated by the United
States, companies working inside Iraq
have immunity from Iraqi law. The Iraqi
people have long chafed under the
aggressive, Wild West ways of private
contractors who are answerable to no
one and rarely held responsible for
their acts. The episode that sparked out-
rage occurred when Blackwater securi-
ty guards in A diplomatic convoy opened
fire and killed as many as 20 unarmed
civilians, according to the Iraqis.
A State Department spokesman said
it was unclear who started the firefight
and whether the guards were responsi-
ble for the deaths. It's a distinction with-
out a difference because the guards are
* untouchables. The U.S. military has no


Other VOICES


jurisdiction over them, so they can't be
court-martialed. The Iraqi government
is powerless, and has no real stake any-
way in ousting Blackwater The North
Carolina-based company provides secu-
rity for all the top diplomats and admin-
istration officials in Iraq, and sending
the bodyguards home would hamper
the U.S. effort.
But the larger point remains. This is
an army of people operating with their
own rules and answerable to nobody
but the company they work for As the
details of this latest incident emerge,
and if it becomes clear that the
Blackwater guards acted improperly,
they will not be prosecuted. The worst
that can happen is they might be fired.
The use of civilian contractors during
wartime is not new. They are normally
brought in for specific reconstruction
projects, like building bridges. What is
new is the Bush administration's dra-
matic expansion of outside contracting
to reward certain favored corporations
like Halliburton and to assume func-
tions traditionally performed by the
military The way it used to work, the
U.S. military protected civilian contrac-
tors working for their government in a
war-torn country. Now it's the other way
around. Civilian contractors are shoul-
dering the security when Bush admin-
istration officials visit Iraq or diplomats
housed in the Green Zone venture out-
side the protected area. Until the cur-


rent crisis is resolved, the U.S. embassy
in Baghdad announced there would be
no ground travel off the grounds by the
thousand Americans stationed there.
The U.S. Army is already stretched to
the breaking point and unable to take
over the myriad duties performed by
this adjunct army of civilian contrac-
tors. The military can't recruit enough
people to meet current quotas, and they
can't offer enough money to make a mil-
itary career attractive enough to people
who can earn far more in the private
sector. And there's the rub. The growth
of private contracting is a huge entice-
ment for soldiers not to re-enlist Why
sign up for another tour with the mili-
tary in Iraq when you can make at least
$100,000 working for a private contrac-
tor doing the same job with better ben-
efits, more personal freedom and some-
what less risk
The growth of private contracting is a
morale-buster for the military, and if we
add up how much the military is paying
former soldiers and marines now act-
ing as contractors, the sum is surely
comparable to the cost of the coalition
forces in the country. It's hard to see
how that's a bargain.

Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift
author the Washington Merry-Go-
Round column, founded in 1932 by
Drew Pearson.


LETTERS to the Editor


Religion in schools
This is an important time for the cit-
izens of the state of Florida, because
the "Science Education Standards for
Florida Public Schools" are coming up
for review.
Evolution (because it is not a verifi-
able science) is not taught in Florida
public schools - and that IMO is as it
should be.
Unfortunately, we're not looking at
the full story, because while evolution
has attracted our attention, the prob-
lem is still with us because (unknow-
ingly) the public schools are still teach-
ing evolution through K12.
This takes us back to the 1950s and
'60s and how previous disputes culmi-
nated in evolution being introduced in
textbooks. At the same time, tectonics
was introduced into the science, geolo-
gy and geography books.
Evolution found itself in trouble and
the promoters backed away - leaving
the schools unwittingly teaching the
silent second tier of evolution called
tectonics.
Tectonics, even though it has no sci-
entific basis (see below), serves its pur-
pose by establishing the long-term geo-
logical mindset required of evolution.
As a follow-on, and through other
media, evolution is quietly superim-
posed on an unsuspecting public.
It was a devious scheme that worked
to perfection. Schools teach the long-
term geological tier, and the media
superimpose the long-term biological
tier.
Tectonics is taught under the belief
that it represents the most advanced
science available, but nothing could be
further from the truth.
1. Subduction: Oceanic crust is said
to subduct below the continents, but
how does a jagged thousand-mile
spherical slab of crust manage to fold
inward without interfering with itself?
Where does the subducting material
go? Isn't it true that subsequent layers


of any spherical form (an onic
larger in volume than any low
2. Sea floor spreading: Tect
claims the sea floors spread 1
from the influx of magma. Bu
magma dead? Hasn't magma
expanded as far as it ever wil
ing thermal expansion and ph
change? How can it expand a
their to move crust?
Tectonics is not a science -
silent second tier of evolution
Jame


Teach your child
In the aftermath of the Vir
tragedy, parents listen up!
Tell your children you love
every day. Show them you lov
Encourage them. Teach them
ference between right and wi
their best role model. Put you
dren first Teach them proper
ners. Teach them respect! Be


on) is
wer layer?
tonics
laterally


example for them.
Teach them the proper way to talk
to adults. Yes sir, no sir, yes ma'am, no
ma'am are not just terms that should
be used in the military Help them
with their schoolwork Get involved in
their lives. Get involved in their
school. Do not rely on the school sys-
tem to raise your children. That's your
job. Teachers teach!
Know who your child's school prin-
cipal is. Get to know their teachers. If
your children get into trouble at
school, know the facts of the situation
before you go storming in to the
school making demands.
Support the school's decision.
Teach them to respect their teachers.
Explain to them that they may not
like all of their teachers, but that
should not interfere with being a
good student Teach them the impor-
tance of good grades. Praise them
when they do well. Punish when they
do wrong.
Here's a crazy idea: Don't do drugs!
The drugs will take over and ruin you
and your family More importantly, it
can ruin your children's lives.


it isn't Know who your children's friends
already are. Get to know their friends, as well
11 follow- as their friends' parents. Don't let
hase them run wild in the neighborhood.
any fur- Know where they are at all times. Just
because your children hit puberty
- it is the doesn't mean thay are an adult
1! Remember, if they are younger than
18 years of age, then they are still
es Bowles juveniles, and thus still youryesponsi-
Inverness ability.
Teach your children a good work
lren ethic. Teach them to work hard for the
things worth having. Teach your sons
gina Tech to respect girls. Teach your daughters
to respect themselves. Teach them
them that sometimes life isn't fair. Teach
ve them. them to adjust well to changes. They
the dif- can still make good decisions when
rong. Be things don't go their way.
ir chil-
r man- Steven Casada
a good Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


OPINIONS INVITED
I The opinions expressed in Chronicle edi-
torials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
* Viewpoints depicted in political car-
toons, columns or letters do not neces-
sarily represent the opinion of the edito-
rial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited to
express their opinions in a letter to the
editor.
" Persons wishing to address the editorial
board, which meets weekly, should call
Linda Johnson at (352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and include a
phone number and hometown, including
letters sent via e-mail. Names and
hometowns will be printed; phone num-
bers will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit letters for
length, libel, fairness and good taste.
" Letters must be no longer than 350
words, and writers will be limited to
three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to (352) 563-3280; or e-
mail to letters@chronicleonline.com.


0
fN


t












Keeping frustration at bay a key to raising kids


owadays, I have dupli-
cate keys stashed in
strategic locations. I do
this for my health - it helps me
avoid frustration and anger,
thereby keeping my blood pres-
e sure down. But I haven't always
done this; no, I had to learn the
hard way.
Children and grandchildren
are marvelous gifts from God,
gifts you must entertain. Often,
especially in places such as a
' doctor's office or church, you
find toys any place you can,
places such as your purse or
your pocket if you don't carry a
purse. (I don't carry a purse.)



IMPACT
Continued from Page 1C

Fed move is much more
important to the stock mar-
ket and the bond market than
it will mean for the average
consumer."
The Fed controls two
important rates: First, the
discount rate, the rate that
Federal Reserve banks
charge commercial banks for
loans and second, the more
closely watched federal
funds rate, which is the rate
that banks charge each other
for overnight loans. The lat-
ter can affect rates on some
types of consumer loans. The
Fed cut both rates Tuesday.
But many other rates are
influenced by the bond and
other markets rather than
the Fed.


You try to find some-
thing shiny - some-
thing that rattles -
something to hold
their attention. Keys! '
Yes, keys work very
well, but you're look-
ing for trouble when "
you mix kids and keys. f
Once they know about Fred B
keys, they'll get 'em Fred
without telling you. A SLI
Our middle child, LI
Becky, is a 30-some-
thing, SUV-driving soccer mom.
She now likes keys because
without them, she'd be unable
to transport die Kinder, Emily


Br
IC
IF


That's not to say the cut to
the federal funds rate, to 4.75
percent, is irrelevant to con-
sumers. It is expected to help
bolster consumer confi-
dence, which could give the
economy a boost, which, in
turn, eventually would reas-
sure jittery lenders. A num-
ber of large banks quickly
followed the Fed's lead by
cutting their prime rate,
which they charge their best
borrowers, from 8.25 percent
to 7.75 percent.
"It's all tied together and
it'll take a while to sort out,"
Stepherson said. "We think a
half a percentage point cut
will be better at getting the
economy, particularly the
consumer, spending again."
Peter Morici, a professor at
the University of Maryland
School of Business and for-
mer chief economist at the
U.S. International Trade


- and Eric, to and from
elementary school.
A long, long time
,_ ago, Becky liked keys
-' because they were
. shiny and rattled.
One Sunday morning
^ in 1972, I found
-. _ myself searching for
keys. It was time to
rannen go church. Frust-
6E OF ration crept in, and I
FE shouted, "Has any-
body seen my keys?"
I felt toddler Becky hanging
onto my back pocket Ashamed
of my outburst, I smiled down
and whispered, "Becky, sweet-


heart, have you had Daddy's
keys?"
Picture this child:
She had enormous blue eyes
and virtually no hair Her moth-
er usually taped a bow to her
head to help identify her as
female. She had to stand on her
tiptoes to be tall enough to
reach my pocket
She didn't have a great com-
mand of the English language,
but she understood I was look-
ing for my keys and she knew
where they were! To the best of
her ability she responded,
"Inna pocket, Da-dee."
I ran my hands into my front


All this does is make it easier for

you to borrow money. You should not
wake up tomorrow and suddenly decide
everything is more affordable now.

Steven Isberg
associate professor of finance at the University of Baltimore.


Commission, went further.
He said, "My bet is that this
move, along with other rate
cuts later, as needed, will
avert a recession."
What the cut does not do,
however, is create an instant
change of fortune for con-
sumers, experts cautioned.
"All this does is make it
easier for you to borrow
money," said Steven Isberg,
associate professor of
finance at the University of


Baltimore and senior
research fellow at the
Columbia, Md.-based Credit
Research Foundation. "You
should not wake up tomor-
row and suddenly decide
that everything is more
affordable now."
One change consumers
might see quickly. is. lower
rates and better financing
options on car purchases.
"It will depend on how
badly they want to sell you a


pockets, turned them inside
and said, "No, baby, my keys
aren't in my pocket"
She said it again, "Inna pocket"
In a stern voice I replied, "My
keys are not in my pocket!"
She shrugged her little shoul-
ders and walked away.
At that moment, Cheryl came
to the rescue. She'd found
another set of car keys. I would
still have to deal with the other
misplaced keys, but at least we
could go to church.
It was a little country church
with unpadded, wooden pews.
Once we arrived, I sat down,
then I stood back up. I'd been

car," Isberg said. "Most deal-
ers want to sell cars pretty
badly so you could see an
immediate affect there."
Consumers likely will see
more mixed results in hous-
ing and mortgages, experts
said.
Homeowners with very
low-rate adjustable rate
mortgages still will see
monthly payments increase
after the rates reset, but the
increase won't be as large,
because ARM rates are
somewhat sensitive to Fed
moves.
"It could mean a little less
pain for the homeowner who
is facing a reset on their
adjustable mortgage rates,"
said Greg McBride, senior
financial analyst at
Bankrate.com.
ARM rates are usually tied
to the one-year U.S. Treasury
bill, which usually stays in


stabbed in the behind by some-
thing in my back pocket. I
reached in and pulled out my
keys. Becky looked up at me,
smiled, put her little palms out
face-up and said, "Inna pocket."
It all became very clear.
Becky had been playing with my
keys when I screamed, "Has
anybody seen my keys?" When
I'd felt her hanging onto my
back pocket, she was slam-
dunking the evidence!

Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist

close proximity to the federal
funds rate. Fixed mortgages,
however, are tied to the 10-
year Treasury bill, which
hasn't moved that much from
a year ago.
"Mortgage rates are
already low," Stepherson
said. "The Fed cut isn't going
to do much for fixed rate
mortgages."
With home prices values
flat or falling after a five-
year boom, a spike in late
payments and a record num-
ber of loan defaults, one cut
will do little to lessen the
current pain.
"This is not a panacea to
cure all ills in the housing
and mortgage markets,"
McBride said. "Nor is it
designed to be. This is a step
to make sure that the down-
turn in housing doesn't drag
the rest of the economy down
with it."


RATE CUT
Continued from Page 1C

can provide an important psycholog-
ical boost It could make investors,
businesses and others less inclined
to clamp down or make drastic
changes in their behavior that would
hurt the economy.
"This does not heal the financial
Markets, but it can help in the
process of healing. But we're not
there yet," said Ken Mayland, econo-
mist at ClearView Economics.
The improved mindset, though,
* could turn out to be fleeting.
"I think the honeymoon is going to
be pretty short for the euphoria of
this Fed cut," said Greg McBride,
* senior financial analyst for
Bankrate.com. "A half-point cut can
only do so much. It doesn't transform
the housing market into sunshine
and daffodils."
The housing market is suffering
through its worst slump in 16 years.
Home sales are expected to keep on
sagging. Home prices, which saw
double-digit gains in many areas
during the boom, have cooled off sig-
nificantly. Affordability is still an
issue for would-be home buyers,
experts say.
Pain will continue to be felt by
borrowers, lenders and investors of
"subprime" mortgages - higher-risk
loans made to people with spotty
credit or with low incomes.
Analysts estimate that 2 million
adjustable-rate mortgages will jump
from very low initial teaser rates to
higher rates this year and next
Steep prepayment penalties have
made it difficult for some to get out
of their mortgages. Some over-
stretched homeowners can't afford
to refinance or even sell their
homes.
The Fed's action does provide a
bit of relief. For owners facing a
reset on Oct 1, their new rate will
rise to 6.75 percent, versus 7.50 if it
had reset a few months earlier,
McBride said.
"The payment is still going up by
hundreds of dollars a month. So peo-
ple are not going to feel warm and


fuzzy," he said.
The subprime mortgage meltdown
has forced some lenders out of busi-
ness, and whacked investors.
Congress, meanwhile, is working
on plans to help struggling home-
owners avoid foreclosure, although
it could take a few months for a final
package to be approved.
For consumers, whose confidence
has been rattled by the housing and
credit problems, much turns on
whether employment conditions
continue to deteriorate.
The economy lost 4,000 jobs in
August, the first decline in four
years. The unemployment rate, now
at 4.6 percent, is expected to cliInb
close to 5 percent by the end of the
year. A softening job market eventu-
ally will probably mean slo%% er wage
growth.
Howard Chernick, economic pro-
fessor at Hunter College, doesn't
think the Fed's rate cut will make
people rush to the malls.
"Consumer spending is influenced
by employment and wages,"
Chernick said. 'Aside from the
euphoria some might now feel, I don't
think there is going to be a big effect"
It will take months for the Fed's
rate cut to ripple through the econo-
my, with the hope that it will bolster
activity.
Analysts expect the economy to
slow to a rate of about 2 percent in
the July-to-September quarter. That
would be just half the pace of the
previous three months. Growth in
the final three months of this year
could turn out even weaker.
Ex-Federal Reserve Chairman
Alan Greenspan, in an interview
Monday with The Associated Press,
said the odds of a recession are
growing.
"Obviously, the odds have moved
up to more than a third, but I doubt
if we are anywhere near 50 percent
yet" Earlier this year, his prediction
of a one-in-three chance of a reces-
sion caused Wall Street to nosedive.

Jeannine Aversa has covered eco-
nomics and the Federal Reserve for
The Associated Press since 1999.


Hot Corner: HOMELESS


Sitting on tables
I'd like to comment on this one
Sound Off about Hernando Park with
the homeless people down there. I
agree with the person that you can't
go down there and have a good time.
There's about 20 homeless people sit-
ting on all the picnic tables ... I wish
the sheriff's (office) would do some-
thing about them because the whole
park is ruined with them there.
Patrol park
Well, in reference to the note con-
cerning the homeless at Hernando
Beach Park: Now they got the mes-
sage, but the police aren't doing a
thing ... I was assaulted and the police
won't do anything unless they see a
crime in commission. All they can do
is take a report. They need constant
police patrol or they need to get rid of


the people out of the park. They sit
there and drink all day and nobody
does anything about it ... They're there
almost all day, on and off. Why don't
they do anything about it? I was
assaulted and nothing was done about
it ... I'm sick and tired of it. Things will
change soon.
Buying alcohol
In Sound Off on Sunday, I read the
article about the drinking and the
homeless problem in Hernando Beach
Park. I want to know why the homeless
people are allowed to stay at Her-
nando Beach and where do they get
their money for the alcohol and the
cigarettes? One man wrote to Sound
Off that he works, he's homeless and
he showers at the beach. Why is this
allowed and who pays for this? I'm
sure the homeless don't. I'm really
tired of them. I wish they would get


out of our town and go somewhere
else where they can buy their alcohol
and their cigarettes.
Taking showers
Why is a homeless person allowed to
take showers at the Hernando Beach
Park? Homeless people are harassing
people at the beach. Close the beach
to these people. They have no right to
be there. Who is paying for the shower
- the taxpayers? If they don't work
and they have nowhere to live, they
have no right to be able to buy ciga-
rettes or alcohol. They use this on the
beach. I'm just curious how they get
this money. Please stop the showers.
I'm tired of paying for you people. This
is a public area. Showers - why?
Cigarettes and alcohol - why? Let's
clean up the beach. Put these people
to work and even if they have to live in
a tent, get them off the beach.


NUJVE 1VRD Tk4. PW31PRT ANIPN


~R~t5' TIRI\~ASM AT


Students learn pipeline of oil-drilling bill


he students who attend-
ed the Lou Frey Institute
of Politics and
Government's Civic
Leadership Academy at the
University of Central Florida
came up with a plan regarding
oil drilling:
In America today, the debate
about oil drilling often dictates
a choice between saving the
environment or securing the
economy. Fortunately, the right
policy could accomplish both
of those goals. The current
Florida moratorium on oil
drilling increases costs to
Floridian and American con-
sumers, while it neglects and
directly harms our state's frag-
ile environment.
The current moratorium
doesn't adequately address the
controversy It neither commits
to cease the drilling nor does it
commit to decreasing our


dependency on for-
eign oil. This leaves
our country at a
standstill. By not
taking a stance, we
are enabling the
environmental and
economic costs
incurred by the
drilling process. We
need to make a deci-
sion, a decision that
will forever affect
the future of


Lou Frey
OTHER
VOICES


Florida. Thus, we propose that
the Florida Legislature pass a
law that implements a full ban
on all oil drilling within
Florida's territory.
For this project to succeed,
we will need the support of
major players in Florida poli-
tics, including senators, repre-
sentatives, special interest
groups, and the state cabinet
members. The main focus of


our lobbying
attempts would be
the State House and
Senate. Because
Democrats tend to
disfavor oil drilling,
we seek their sup-
port and sponsor-
ship for our bill.
Some important fig-
ures are Reps.
Edward Bullard,
Frank Peterman
and Scott


Randolph, as well as Sens.
Gwen Margolis and Ted
Deutch.
Not to exclude the
Republican Party, we will seek
the backing of local
Republicans, such as Sen.
Daniel Webster, who could act
as our liaison with the party.
This strategy will increase the
likelihood for a majority in
both houses. As with all other


policies, the blessing of the gov-
ernor is absolutely necessary
for successful passage, and,
with the governor's support, we
can avoid a veto. The Cabinet
members usually have signifi-
cant influence over the gover-
nor's decisions; thus, to obtain
that influence, we will lobby
them.
The support of statewide and
national government-spon-
sored organizations such as the
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection and
Environmental Protection
Agency would serve to further
advance our efforts toward a
ban on oil drilling in its entire-
ty. To achieve a triumph in
implementing our policy, sup-
port from grass-root, special
interest, political action com-
mittees and citizen committees
would be necessary.
Groups particularly impor-


tant in recruiting to our cause
would be the League of
Conservation Voters, Clean
Water Network, Florida Public
Interest Research Group and
Gulf Coast Environmental
Defenses. All of these entities
have specific purposes to play
in the law-making process in
Tallahassee, and enrollment of
most, if not all, is the key to a
successful campaign. If all else
fails, we wouldundertake a cit-
izen petition, gaining enough
signatures to place a constitu-
tional amendment on the next
possible ballot
All in the entire situation at
hand is not benefiting our com-
munity, environment, con-
sumers or economy We pro-
pose a policy that will elimi-
nate all oil drilling off the coast
of Florida. By talking to con-
servation groups, citizens and
our representative we are


ready to save our ecologies and
way of life.
As was pointed out to the stu-
dents in the question period,
this is not just a state but also a
federal problem. State jurisdic-
tion over drilling is limited.
Furthermore, when gas prices
get above $3 per gallon, there
will be very little support for a
ban on drilling in Florida from
many states that are not impact-
ed by oil spills, but are impact-
ed by high gasoline prices.
Finally, Florida ought to seek
the best "deal" it can in the
near future before the oil situa-
tion gets even worse.

Lou Frey Jr. is a political
analyst, commentator and
newspaper columnist and for-
mer Florida representative in
Congress. Send e-mail to
lou.frey@lowndes-law.com.


SUNDAY, SF11117MMit 23, 2007 3C


COMMENTARY


RTIC US COUNTY (Fl E


k








CITRUS COUtNTY (FL.) CIHRONICI.I-E


Hoping history won't repeat once more


It is like Chinese water tor-
ture. drip drip drip.
"Four Marines died in
Iraq today," drip, drip.
"Eleven Army soldiers were
killed when a helicopter was
brought down over Baghdad by
insurgents," drip, drip.
"The milestone of 1,000 mili-
tary deaths was reached this
month when a wounded sol-
dier died in Walter Reed Army
Hospital from injuries
received last month in Iraq."
Drip, drip.
Day by day, the media report
the slowly rising toll. Drip, drip,
"a suicide car bomber killed 19
civilians and wounded 54 oth-
ers in a busy market today."


Now, each drip
seems less bearable.
Americans are losing
the will to prevail.
But it was not 0
always so. In our own
Civil War, we lost
nearly 500,000 of our
young men at the rate
of 147 deaths a day
Both sides fought Dr. Willi
on with heart and OTI
valor, despite the VOI
casualties. Pres-
ident Lincoln suffered wither-
ing criticism from many on the
Union side who demanded an
end to the war and peace at
any cost. Lincoln prevailed.
About 1.5 percent of the popu-


H
iK


nation died in that
conflict, but the
nation was pre-
served.
War-related casu-
alties in Iraq and
Afghanistan have
reached more than
3,800 in four years of
combat. By way of
Lm Dixon contrast, World War
IER II saw more than
DES 400,000 American
military deaths, 214
per day More Americans died
in one month on Iwo Jima than
have died in four years of com-
bat in Iraq. We fought through
the sorrow and the pain and
personal loss. The "Greatest


Generation" prevailed. Europe
and much of Asia were spared
the yoke of totalitarian
enslavement.
Consider this: More young
men ages 21 to 44 die in alco-
hol-related crashes in Florida
each year than die fighting for
us in Iraq! AIDS kills as many
or more in Florida. Somehow,
these deaths do not seem to
provoke us enough to take even
simple actions to reduce their
numbers. But the numbers
coming out of Iraq, small by
way of all comparisons, seem to
be sapping the will of America,
dividing us and hampering our
ability to fight. Drip, drip.
Will we lose this first deci-


sive battle in the war to pre-
serve Western values and free-
doms to a brutal enemy who
considers us weak and unable
to stomach casualties? Have
we become, in fact, unwilling to
send our sons and brothers into
battle for this nation?
Could we support any war in
the face of a mounting death
toll and 24/7 media coverage of
the horrors?
The men and women who
volunteer to defend us have the
courage and will to prevail.
Our enemies cannot defeat
them in battle. They are relying
on self-centered partisan poli-
tics and the "useful idiots" in
the media who assisted an


American defeat in Vietnam to
help them win this war. Our
enemies are counting on histo-
ry repeating itself. I pray they
will be proven wrong.


Dr. William Dixon is an
Inverness resident and retired
surgeon. He earned his MD
degree from New York
Medical College, an MBA from
University of South Florida
and his bachelor's from
Columbia College. He served
11 years in the U.S. Army
achieving the rank of
lieutenant colonel. He can be
e-mailed at dixonbill
@chronicleonline. com.


Hot Corner: HAMPTONS


Chased away
I was just reading in the
paper about Mike Hampton
leaving .... Thank you, com-
missioners. You know, you
charge too much tax, you
charge so much permits, and
you have so much going on
that you just chase people
away out of here. Pretty soon
we'll be a barren place with
nothing. I know we don't want
big condos and we want to
keep it nature wise, but you
people don't even keep our
lakes and everything clean. If
you kept them clean, the peo-
ple could use their boats and


all that and just have nice
places to go. But you don't
even keep up what you have
and then when you have
somebody that will donate
and help out, you chase them
away.
Losing people
I was wondering, why did
we lose Mike Hampton out of
Citrus County? Here we have a
guy that wanted to help build
up this county, and everything
he tried to do, we said "No,
no, no." What is the problem?
Is anybody even talking with
him to see if there's any
enticement for him to stay in


the county? We're losing good
people. What is going on?
Red tape
I read in the paper this
morning that the Hamptons
are pulling up stakes and
moving to (Arizona). I think
we can lay a lot of the blame
for that on our county com-
missioners, the building and
zoning, and all the bureau-
crats. The Hamptons were try-
ing to do some big things for
the county and they immedi-
ately ran into a lot of red tape
and baloney kind of stuff. So
thank you, county bureau-
crats.


=----Hot Corner: WELCOME HOME


Patriotic music
I want to give a big "hooyah"
to Jeff from Chili's in Crystal
River for being such a nice guy
and playing patriotic music for
our soldiers' returning-home
party. It was a great welcome-
home party for Jason Godwin
and Clark Driggs. "Hooyah" to
Jeff from Chili's for making it
such a great party. Thank you.


Year in Iraq
We want to say welcome
home to Jason Godwin and
Clark Driggs - fresh home
from the National Guard.
They've been in Iraq for a
whole year. And thank Chili's
for giving them such a wonder-
ful reception and the American
Legion, also. These boys
deserve all kinds of praise and


wonderful things, as they left
their little families just to serve
us in Iraq.
Kudos to Jeff
Barbara Mills was at it again
Thursday night with a wel-
come-home party for two
reservists returning from Iraq.
Kudos to Jeff at Crystal River
Chili's for accommodating this
party.


Who gets bombed
You have a Sound Off titled
"Air strike victims," where the
caller is accusing you of being
insensitive by showing a pic-
ture of women and children
getting bombed. Who do you
think is getting bombed in
Iraq? Civilians and more
women and children than any
enemy combatants. Wake up
and smell the coffee.
Killing innocents
I'm calling about the "Air
strike victims." Whoever called
in, they complained about the
picture in the newspaper show-
ing women and children getting



WINDOW
Continued from Page 1C

screaming started.
All of my boat occupants -
excluding the rat - had the
same irrational reaction.
Somewhere deep in the human
brain, it's been hardwired that
if you are trapped on a 20-foot
boat with a rat that you should
stand up on your seat and
scream.
Everyone stood and
screamed.
That didn't turn out to be an
effective defense.
No. 1, rats are used to
screaming. And No. 2, if the rat
wanted to jump up on a pon-
toon boat seat, he could do so
pretty easily
The first lesson I learned as
captain of this rat-carrying
boat was that you should never
abandon the post behind the
wheel to go after the rat unless
you first put the boat engine
into neutral.
I picked up a rake to try to
swat the rat and the boat decid-
ed it was time to do a right-
hand turn and head for the
shoreline. Running aground
was not going to make it that
much more fun to be stuck on a



SHADES
Continued from Page 1C

There are Christmas tip sug-
gestions for everyone from
maids to mail carriers to mani-
curists. All are in the $15 to $20
range, but some - including
Fed-Ex and U.S. Postal Service
folks - aren't to take cash, so
gifts and gift cards are
suggested.
The site advised that $25 to
$100 annual tips are appropri-
ate for teachers. While I have
great respect for good teachers,


bombed: What do you S Af
think happens when
we bomb cities or
countries? Innocent V2s
people die.. For you to
call an Iraqi a terrorist
just shows how igno-
rant you are and it's
extremely insensitive.
I've just had it with CAL
this war. I've had it C6
with the ignorance. 563
Everyone claims that if
we fight them over
there, we don't have to fight
them over here. But who are we
really fighting and what are we
actually doing by staying in this
war that's cost us over $.5 tril-


.4


boat with a rat
I got back behind the wheel.
We all suddenly realized that
we had a secret weapon on
board this particular pontoon
boat. Our two Yorkshire
Terriers - Wilson and Duffy -
were on board and Yorkies
were originally bred as "rat ter-
riers."
Their genes are filled with
rat-hunting tendencies. As far
as rats are concerned, Yorkies
are trained killers.
I looked at the Yorkies and
ordered them to "Go get the
rat!"
The two Yorkies looked at
me and simultaneously had the
same reaction. If they could
have said, "Get a life," they
would have. But since the
Yorkies can't speak, they did
the next best thing and jumped
up on the seat by my wife and
got in her lap.
If they could have screamed,
they would have.
By this time the rat had
climbed under another boat
seat and my helpful crew
decided the best thing they
could do was abandon ship.
My wife and the Yorkies got
into the first kayak and pushed
off.
Paul, realizing that nowhere
in the Rotary Four-Way-Test is


tipping them seemed like some-
thing only Californians would
do. (I remember my formerly
Californian sister talking about
tipping her daughter's teacher
and I thought that to be unusu-
al.) The Web site did note that
gift certificates are suitable, too.
If tipping teachers is the way
to go, so be it and I'm glad
appreciation is being shown.
I'd be negligent if I didn't
mention that $25 to $50 is the
suggested holiday bonus for
those who deliver your newspa-
per daily, providing the service
is good (if it's not, please call
the circulation department).


t' lion to date? Yet
there's no end in sight.
Anyway, I'm just total-
ly frustrated and this
k person is just beyond
educating, obviously.
, Sweet life
This is for the poor
misguided person
0 579 who phoned in the
0579 Sound Off titled
"Vision taken:" Yes,
you can bet your
sweet life we're happy. The rea-
son you have a sweet life is
because we're trying to disal-
low mushroom clouds on our
own soil. Have a good day.


there a line about abandoning
ship, volunteered to stay
aboard and fight the rat.
Using our rakes and nets we
beat about the boat until the
rat realized he was trapped.
The rat looked at the crazed
boaters with rakes and then at
the Gulf of Mexico. He decided
he had a better chance in the
Gulf of Mexico so he simply
took a running leap off the end
of the pontoon and swam away.
It was a very graceful rat
dive and to my surprise the rat
never again surfaced. Paul sug-
gested that rats swim underwa-
ter, which could produce a
whole new set of anxieties
along with new rounds of
yelling and screaming.
As luck would have it, the
next boat over contained one
Dr. KC. Nayfield, the Crystal
River veterinarian and animal
lover extraordinaire.
As we cheered our victory
over the rat, Dr. Nayfield point-
ed out: "I'm going to have to
report this to the SPCA They
do have rules about cruelty to
rats."


Gerry Mulligan is the pub-
lisher of the Chronicle. His
e-mail address is gmulligan
@chronicleonline.com.


For weekend delivery only, the
annual recommendation is $10.
Coincidentally, I hope, annu-
al tips for garbage collectors
aren't much different. It's
$15 to $30.
About the only tips not
detailed on the Web site were
news tips. Not unlike waitress-
es needing gratuities to make
ends meet, news tips are a
reporter's bread and butter.


Charlie Brennan is editor of
the Citrus County Chronicle.
He can be e-mailed at cbren-
nan@chronicleonline.com.


4C Sit'NI)A, SiTI'IE'MBER 23, 2007


926-0923 TU/F/SUCRN
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
ON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENTS
AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND IN
YANKEETOWN, FLORIDA
TOWN OF YANKEETOWN, FLORIDA
ORDINANCE NO. 2007- 10
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT (CPA

2007-01)

AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF YANKEETOWN AMENDING TOWN
OF YANKEETOWN COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; AMENDING THE
YANKEETOWN COMPREHENSIVE PLAN TEXT, GOALS, OBJECTIVES,
POLICES AND MAPS, INCLUDING THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP;
AMENDING FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT, TRAFFIC CIRCULATION /
TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT, HOUSING ELEMENT, PUBLIC FACILITIES
(SANITARY SEWER, SOLID WASTE,DRAINAGE, POTABLE WATER, AND
NATURAL GROUNDWATER AQUIFER RECHARGE) ELEMENT,
CONSERVATION AND COASTAL MANAGEMENT ELEMENT
RECREATION/OPEN SPACE MANAGEMENT ELEMENT,
INTERGOVERNMENTAL COORDINATION ELEMENT, CAPITAL
IMPROVEMENTS ELEMENT, CAPITOL IMPROVEMENTS PLAN,
MONITORING AND EVALUATION PROGRAM OF THE YANKEETOWN
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR TRANSMITTAL TO THE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AFFAIRS, PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE AND LEGAL
STATUS OF THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT.

The Town of Yankeetown is preparing amendments to its Comprehensive Plan affecting the Town of
Yankeetown in its entirely and will hold a public hearing to be conducted by the Yankeetown Planning and
Zoning Commission, acting as the local planning agency, on Tuesday, September 11, 2007 at 10:00am at the
Inglis-Yankeetown Lion's Club located at 22 59th Street in Yankeetown, Florida. This public hearing will be
followed by the first public hearing by the Yankeetown Town Council on Friday, September 28, 2007 at 7:00
p.m., or soon after, at the Inglis-Yankeetown Lion's Club located at 22 59th Street in Yankeetown, Florida for
the purpose of transmitting the proposed Comprehensive Plan Amendments to the Florida Department of
Community Affairs and other state and regional agencies for any objections, recommendations and comments.
Once convened, the Public Hearing(s) may be continued to one or more future dates: any interested party shall
be advised that the dates, times and places of any continuation of the Public Hearing shall be announced during
the Public Hearing and that no further notices regarding these matters will be published.
The purpose of the hearings is to conduct a public hearing to consider and take public comment on
amendments to the Town of Yankeetown Comprehensive Plan, including the Future Land Use Map affecting the
entire Town of Yankeetown in its entirety:

- '- �.I. " .
I **

C-r













All interested parties may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance and Comprehensive
Plan Amendments at each of the public hearingss. A copy of the proposed Ordinance and Comprehensive Plan
Amendments is available for public inspection at the Office of the Town Clerk, located at Yankeetown Town
Hall, 6241 Harmony Lane, Yankeetown, Florida, Monday through Friday, during regular Town Hall business
hours (9:00 am till 12 noon).
All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hearing,
they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based, pursuant to Fla. Stat. Section 286.0105. There will also be a sign up sheet available at the Town Council's
public hearing by which members of the public who sign and provide contact information on the sheet can stay
informed during the adoption process.
Any handicapped or person with disabilities requiring reasonable accommodation to participate in this
meeting are encouraged to attend and should contact the Town Clerk at (352) 447-2511 at least 48 hours (if
possible) prior to the meeting so arrangements can be made pursuant to Fla. Stat. Section 286.26 and the
Americans with Disabilities Act.
720515


I

*



p


COMMENTARY








CrrR1fUS COUNTY1V (~L )ffUFAL HROlf1 E 1A1 UDASPEBR 3 07


Obey or leave
This is in reference to the
two people that were caught
with the pipe bombs in their
car and they're from Iran. Well,
if they don't want to mind the
laws here, they need to go
home. The lady on the news
was saying that Islams aren't
treated equally in the United
States. Well, if she doesn't like
it here, she can go home to all
the fighting and killing in her
own country.
Check-cashing fee
I'm calling in reference to (a
bank's)'$5' check-cashing fee
for payroll checks - their own
payroll checks. Anyone that's
cashing their checks should
ask for a receipt. Because if
you think about it, you cash 52
checks a year, multiply that
times 5 and that's $260 a year
the (bank) is profiting. And with
no receipts or anything, they
could be pulling a scam and
making that free money and
not reporting to the IRS. Well, if
you ask her for a receipt and
you fill out your taxes and you
use that $5, that $260 per year
that you're paying to cash your
own paycheck on your taxes,
it's a payroll deduction. And if
you figure out how many cus-
tomers they're doing that to, I
think it's a little ridiculous.
Beyond the pale
To the person who called
Sound Off in an attempt to
equate President Bush's visit
to Iraq to the sheriff joyriding
around Citrus County in his
multimillion-dollar helicopter
at $420-plus an hour: This ref-


erence is so far out of the
pale. The president, as com-
mander in chief of the military
forces, was Pxtending leader-
ship as he visited our troops in
a battle zone. What was the
sheriff doing? This remark was
made by a person who would
be the first to complain if our
president neglected visiting
our troops and encouraging
the morale of our military
forces.
Mowing trash
The other day I observed
either county or city workers
on tractors with bush hogs cut-
ting the grass along Elkcam
Road here. And I think it's
appalling that, you know, they
cut the grass, but you mean to
tell me they can't carry
garbage bags on the back of
their tractors or whatever to
get up (the trash)? They leave
all that trash there and it's an
eyesore. I don't see why it's so
hard for them ... I'm not talk-
ing about little pieces of trash;
I'm talking about big pieces of
trash. Why can't they just pick
it up and throw it in the bag
and just take it with them? I
mean they cut the grass and it
looks more of an eyesore
because now the trash that
they ran over is scattered all
over the place. So I hope
someone in the county or city
can read this and maybe
they'll say hey and take.the ini-
tiative and take a garbage bag
with you to work and pick up
the extra trash along the side
of the road while you're there.
Why just leave it there? It's just
a waste of manpower and it's
a waste of work.


Bridge failure
I'm calling about the bridge
that fell into the Mississippi
River. I can tell you why these
bridges are no good. I remem-
ber as a teen, the Silver Bridge
fell into the Ohio River. Well,
they built the new bridge back
with Japanese steel. And three
or four times, my sister was
going to come and visit my par-
ents and me. She would get to
that bridge and it would say,
"Closed due to structural
cracks," and she would have to
backtrack anywhere from 50 to
75 miles to get into
Kentucky and then
cross from Kentucky 0 l
into Huntington, S
W.Va., to get to our
home. Also, when I
moved to Florida, the
dining room table I
ordered had a 60-inch
glass top and I waited
months for that to
come in. They said it CALL
had to come from 563-
Japan and I said,
"Well, what's wrong
with...any other glass compa-
nies in the United States?" You
know, this is not fair that we
have good companies in the
United States and almost all
steel mills were closed down. I
think we should reopen them
and make our own steel and
we'll be a lot safer. Because
anything made after '58,
believe me, with Japanese steel,
these bridges are no good.
Check all drivers
Carelessness is a misjudg-
ment of all ages. For someone
to say it's only younger kids,


it's wrong. People of all ages
use the phone while they're
driving. It's part of today's fast
world. You find kids speeding
around, rolling through stop
signs. But you also see older
people ... pulling out in front of
you as you drive down (State
Road) 44 while doing 15 under
the speed limit. The percentage
of accidents between older and
younger people is about equal.
It's a proven fact ... Throughout
people's lives, they should have
their vision checked, hearing
checked and driving skills, not
just one age group.
Kill mosquitos
I see in the paper
where they're having a
lot of trouble making
decisions about the
mosquito control hir-
ing that guy with the
helicopter. Why don't
they use the sheriff's
S(office) helicopter and
put it to some good
0579 use? They're sure not
doing a very good job
catching these crooks,
according to the paper. I think
it would be ideal if some nice
community work by Sheriff
Dawsy himself were to spray
for mosquitoes instead of
going out harassing bikers and
old people who run stoplights.
Why don't they just get in the
little helicopter and fly around
and try to kill a few mosqui-
toes? That would be a good
deed for Citrus County.
Get cable fixed
Just wanted to leave a little
Sound Off for the person with
the deteriorating cable ... That


person needs to call the cable
company and call every single
time it happens, over and over
and over again, and get a track
record going and demand to
have it fixed. It's happened to
me. I've had them over here 12
times and after a while, they'll
actually fix it for her or him.
Valet parking
I wonder what Citrus
Memorial Hospital paid a bot-
tom-liner to come up with the
idea of discontinuing the serv-
ice of valet parking at the hos-
pital. Do they realize that the
patients that use that part of
the hospital are elderly and
often handicapped? The person
who thought of this must have
been out in the sun too long
and had his or her parking
space revoked.
Dogs in trucks
There is a law in Citrus
County for dogs that are placed
in the back of trucks, requiring
them to be tethered in the mid-
dle, from both sides. Obviously,
people cared about the safety
of dogs to have the law
passed, to protect the animals
that can't protect themselves.
Most people know how danger-
ous and how easily a dog can
be thrown out of the back of a
truck, leap out and attack
someone, or some other ani-
mal. Why isn't it enforced?
By the rules
I'm responding to Sunday,
Sept. 16's Sound Off, the Hot
Corner, "Speak English." My
father did two tours in
Vietnam. My uncle is a com-
bat veteran, wounded veteran,


from Korea. My grandfather
went over to Europe and
fought the Germans in World
War II1. All of these men fought
courageously for the rights of
every person who comes to
the United States of America
to be part of this great cul-
ture. Every one of those men
deserves the respect earned
them on helping the other
countries around the world.
English is the language spoken
in this country. Show every
veteran who has fought and
died for your right to come
here the respect they earned,
by speaking the language that
they used in providing this for
you.
In a letter I wrote to the edi-
tor concerning my wife, I under-
stand the immigration system.
My wife is an immigrant from
Europe - the Czech Republic,
more directly. She spent two
years in school learning the
American language, the history
and the culture before she ever
stepped on an airplane and
came here. We're going through
the process of immigration,
which is lengthy and costly
from the red tape and bureau-
cracy. But that's the system.
That's what we're supposed to
do. We're playing by the rules.
She didn't sneak in, isolate her-
self to a little community and
refuse to speak the language
and be part of this culture.
Everybody is welcome here in
the United States of America.
We have an open-door immigra-
tion system. But play by the
rules and show the respect
earned for the people that gave
you the chance to come here.


%EirdaL1


. 1


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBrR 23, 2007 SC


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SEPTEMBER 23, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Web site set to take off


New Chronicle

Online to launch

Oct. 1
KERI LYNN MCHALE
kmchale@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Fall is in the air and the Citrus
County. Chronicle online team is
turning over a new leaf.
On Monday, Oct. 1, the team will
launch an updated, improved, more
user-friendly version of the existing
Chronicle Web site,
www.ChronicleOnline.com.
Chronicle, publisher Gerry
Mulligan said, "The launch of this
new Web site reflects the Chronicle's
intent on remaining the top Web site
for local news and information in
Citrus County.
"Back in
1993, the
' Times Chronicle
was the first
are changing, player in this
community
and the with a Web
site. In fact,
Chronicle will because so,
many people
be changing didn't have
access to
with those online serv-
times. ices, the
Cimehronicle
established
S...Gerry Mulligan one of the
.. ' '. ' about the first dial-up
ChronicleOnline online serv-
redesign ices using
ne telephone
. rihes.,,
The new format and layout will
)-Iallow users to easily navigate the
sit6, meets the needs of advertisers
and calls for active reader participa-
tion.
On the home page, clicking on sep-
arate, broad categories will take visi-
tors to all news, both locally and
nationally, related to the topic. For
example, clicking on "sports" will
take users to a page full of high
school, college, and national sports
stories and standings. Also on the
home page, visitors can type in a key-
word into the search bar of an
advanced engine to look for specific
content.
"If they (visitors) will just give us a
moment ... they'll find we're deliver-
ing a much better product than we
have in the past," John Murphy,
Chronicle Online manager said. The'
site was last redesigned six years
ago.
On the new site, all print adver-
tisements will be in an accessible
database so users can use keywords
to search for products and services.
For the first time, the ads will be dis-


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The above screenshot shows the Chronicle Web site redesign set to launch Oct. 1. Visit www.ChronicleOnline.com.


played on the Web site exactly as The majority of the site's visitors
they are in the newspaper. are not print readers, Murphy said.
"What's driving the design is feed- Therefore, providing an up-to-date,
back from users," Murphy said. "The easily navigable site, full of informa-
key to all of this tion, advertise-
... it will be so TALK BACK ments and
much easier to minu t e - to -
find informa- 0 Online Manager John Murphy minute breaking
tion." encourages site visitors to e-mail news is essen-
Many visitors feedback to webadmin@ tial..
have given feed- chronicloneline.com. Murphy and
back about their his online team
inability to easily find content. They want to bring online readers into the
love the content, but have a hard Chronicle family, he said, which is
time locating what they want to read, why the new site is designed to
Murphy said. encourage interaction.


"We are actively looking for read-
ers' submissions of content," Murphy
said. Readers and visitors will be
able to send pictures, post messages
on the boards and write comments in
blogs.
"We might have reader content
show right on the front page of the
Web site," Murphy said.
Space is limited in the newspaper,
but there is more room for content
on the site. The new home page is
wider to fit current computer moni-
tors. It is also more colorful, with a

Please see WEB/Page 3D


'Key employees: Protect yourself from loss


Ken Parrott
ASK
SCORE


I recently worked with a new
client, a start-up business in a
specialty trade. The client
had a well-designed business
plan, financing in place, jobs
lined up, and was ready to hit the
ground running. However, the
client was still employed and
needed to terminate with his
existing employer first But before
he quit, the client felt obligated to
stay long enough to teach the
employer his job, the specialty
trade that is the company's core


business. As the existing employ-
er is a small owner-operated busi-
ness, it seems absurd that he did
not possess the skill set necessary
to perform the core business func-
tion.
Yet many small businesses con-
sist of multiple persons focusing
on different aspects of the busi-
ness, and not necessarily on the
core business function. In these
situations, the business may be
dependent on a key employee
who has specific skills necessary


in the business's core function.
A key employee is one who has
special skills and knowledge that
are critical and contribute signifi-
cantly to the financial success of
the business. Losing a key
employee would likely have sub-
stantial financial consequences.
If you are in a situation where
your business depends on a key
employee, you must be prepared
to deal with losing that employee
to another competitor or to death
or disability.


Protecting yourself trom the
loss due to death or disability can
be accomplished with insurance.
Key employee insurance can pro-
vide money to recruit, hire and
train a replacement It can also
replace lost profits in the interim,
and bridge the cash flow gap
caused by losing the key employ-
ee. Cross insuring between a key
employee and owner can provide
protection for both if either is lost


Please see SCORE/Page 2D


Local news station celebrates 10th anniversary


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Chronicle's televi-
sion partner, Bay News 9, celebrates its
'10th anniversary on Monday Bay
News 9 is the Tampa Bay area's
first and only 24-hour news sta-
tion.
The channel, available only to
subscribers, was born at 6:59
'p.m. Sept 24, 1997.
i At the time, the main studio
!was in Pinellas Park and the sta-
tion operated three bureaus in
;Hillsborough, Manatee and Polk Jona
!counties. Today, Bay News 9 is in Petra
'the Carillon Office Park in St Coun
Petersburg. Bay N
"It's hard to believe that we
!are celebrating our 10th anniver-
sary," said general manager and vice.
president Elliott Wiser "It seems like
I


t
II
ti
e


only yesterday that we were frantically
trying to hire people and prepare for a
launch."
Since its launch, Bay News 9 has
grown tremendously. There's
now a bureau in the seven coun-
ties Bay News 9 serves, a full-
t i me bureau in Tallahassee, and a
fleet of 10 live trucks and a heli-
copter to cover news in the region.
Locally, Bay News 9 on-air
reporter Jonathan Petramala and
photojournalist Jack Dambach
han are based at the Chronicle's
mala Meadowcrest office.
Citrus The Chronicle and Bay News 9
t for frequently partner on stories and
ws 9. have a cooperative
relationship, which includes
periodic on-air appearances of
Chronicle reporters.
Two dozen original employees still


work at the channel, two of whom are
with Catch 47, the all-sports station com-
ponent of Bay News 9.
"I don't think any of us thought we
would grow to be the powerhouse that
we are," said anchor Al Ruechel,
who with fellow anchor Leigh
Moody, has been there since the
inception. "There hasn't been a
day since we launched that F
someone hasn't come up to me
and said how much they enjoy
watching Bay News 9," Ruechel
said.
The station has earned many honors,
including awards from the Florida
Associated Press and the Society of
Professional Journalists. In 2006, Bay
News 9 earned a first-place award from
the Florida Associated Press for continu-
ing coverage of the Couey case.
Bay News 9 has also added several


I

9
I


new components to its operation, includ-
ing:
* the country's first 24-hour local
Spanish news channel.
* the all-sports station.
* an on-demand channel that
offers local venues and entertain-
ment 24 hours a day.
0 news, sports, politics,
weather, Spanish, and health
categories, free of charge.
"Who would have guessed
that not only would Bay News 9
become a household name, but that we
would have a trend-setting Web site, 24-
hour groundbreaking Spanish local
news channel, a 24-hour sports chan-
nel, a travel weather channel, and three
local on-demand channels?" said Kate
Fox, director of enhanced program-
ming. "It's hard to believe it's only been
10 years since we flipped the switch."


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Deed rules


a cause for
concern


D EAR BRUCE: We
moved into a deed-
restricted community
with full understanding there
were some things we couldn't
do. One of those things: no
parking motor homes, campers
and boats on the residences.
We understand why this is
objectionable, and concur.
After living here, we have
found the association is very
generous in allowing people to
park - up to a week - in their
friends' driveways when they
visit from the north. We feel
this diminishes the value of
our home and certainly dimin-
ishes the ambience for which
we paid a great deal of money
to enjoy. What do you suggest?
- R.B., Crystal River
DEAR R.B.: I understand
precisely where you are com-
ing from. I, too, live in a deed-
restricted community. I moved
here deliberately because I
didn't want boats, motor
homes and work vehicles
parked in the front yard. While
I understand'these are perfect-
ly worthwhile "guest" vehicles,
they should be kept separate
from the residences. Check
your documents. I am confi-
dent that you, as an individual
or homeowner, can file a com-
plaint with the court against
these folks and require them
to move on. I am sure they
were told specifically about
these restrictions before they
made the investment. You
might wish to discuss it with
them prior to filing, but it takes
somebody with a hard nose in
these situations to get the
areas cleaned up. Everyone
benefits when the deed restric-
tions are enforced. Property
values increase and the quali-
ty of life improves. If you don't
like these restrictions, you
shouldn't buy into a deed-
restricted community. It's that
simple.
DEAR BRUCE: I'm consid-
ering relocating to the gulf side
of Florida. I am currently self-
employed. I'm wondering
about your opinion on the area
that is growing the quickest
We are considering a fran-
chise, and we'd like to be in a
place that's not overdevel-
oped. I would also be interest-
ed in finding a business to
operate for someone else. -
RILK., via e-mail
DEAR R.K.: As you may
know, I live on the gulf side of
Florida and I think it's a won-
derful place. That said, like
everything else, there are good
areas arid bad areas. What
does overdevelopment mean?
One man's overdeveloped area
is another's idea of living in
the country. Rather than focus-
ing on a narrow geographic
area, you would be wise to con-
centrate on what you do well,
what kind of business you want
to get into and where the capi-
tal will come from, etc. Of
course, there is nothing better
than visiting an area for a time,
learning firsthand what it is all
about I happened to enjoy this
part of the world. There are
others who would find the con-
stant warm weather very cloy-
ing. Others might find the pace
not to their liking. This is truly
a case of "different strokes for
different folks." Come on down
and look around.
DEAR BRUCE: For years,
everything I have - annuities,
stocks, etc. - has been in both
my name and my son's. I have
recently changed brokers, and
he said I should take my son's
name off and sign a power of
attorney in his name for every-
thing. I am concerned - will
my entire estate be depleted if
Please see MONEY/Page 2D


ilkgm, -2 17.'


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2D SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 23, 2007


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


State ranks third for training


Special to the Chronicle

TALLAHASSEE - Florida
ranks among the top three states
with the best workforce training
programs in the nation, accord-
ing to a new poll by Expansion
Management magazine.
The national business publi-
cation announced the results of
its 2007 poll of top site selection
experts on August 16, in con-
junction with an article that
appears in its latest issue.
Florida is ranked No. 3 for the


overall quality of its workforce
training programs, behind only
Georgia (No. 1) and Alabama
(No. 2) in the 50-state rating.
"What an honor and a great
recognition of the ability of
Florida's workforce system to
deliver a highly skilled work-
force," said Workforce Florida,
Inc. Chairman Katherine E.
Wilson. "This No. 3 ranking is
attributable to the innovation
and strong partnerships that are
hallmarks of Florida's workforce
system and demonstrates our


commitment to sustain the
Governor's vision that Florida is
indeed a state welcoming to
business."
This is the ninth year
Expansion Management has
conducted its poll of more than
80 site selection consultants and
the first time in the poll's history.
that any state has made a one-
year advance of seven places in
the rankings. Florida was
ranked No. 10 in the 2006 poll.
Contributing to Florida's top
ranking and highlighted in the
magazine coverage are three of
the state's leading initiatives
that are often tapped by newly
relocated and expanding busi-
nesses-the Quick Response
Training (QRT), Incumbent


Since 2000, Florida's three programs
have combined to award $85 million to
train more than 158,000 workers.


Worker Training (IWT) and
Employed Worker Training
(EWT) grant programs. All three
programs are aimed at improv-
ing workers' skills and the com-
petitiveness of Florida busi-
nesses. The QRT and IWT pro-
grams are administered by
Workforce Florida. At least 16 of
Florida's 24 regional workforce
boards administer EWT pro-
grams. All three programs pro-
vide grants to help business


upgrade the skills of their entry-
level or experienced employ-
ees, often resulting in industry
certifications and higher wages
for workers. Each program
requires a matching investment
from the businesses for their
employees' training.
Since 2000, Florida's three
programs have combined to
award $85 million to train more
than 158,000 workers. This
investment has been matched


by businesses with more than
$1 billion to cover the cost of
wages for those being trained,
curriculum development;
equipment and other expenses
related to training, according tq
figures compiled by Workforce,
Florida.
Florida's workforce system
partners include Workforce
Florida, the Florida Agency for.
Workforce Innovation, 24
Regional Workforce Boards and
nearly 100 one-stop centers:
Collectively, they make up th6
Employ Florida network that
provides workforce programs
and services, often in collabora]
tion with education, economic
development and industry part
ners.


Learn more about
Homestead Exemption
The public is invited to attend a tax
reform education session from 7 to 8
p.m. Tuesday at the Realtors
Association of Citrus County at 714 S.
Scarboro Ave., Lecanto.
John Sebree, vice president of
public policy for the Florida
Association of Realtors, will discuss
recent tax reforms passed by the
state legislature during its special ses-
sion. Included will be the
Constitutional Amendment that will be


on the Jan. 29 ballot to create a
Super Homestead Exemption.
Sebree was appointed to his posi-
tion about four years ago. According
to the Odando Business Journal,
Sebree spent 13 years as a senior
lobbyist with the National Association
of Reactors. Prior to working as a lob-
byist, Sebree was involved in political
campaigns, fundraising and analysis
of legislation.
For more information, e-mail
Dorothy@raccfl.com or call 746-7550.

- From staff reports


SAVNG RTE


MONEY 3-MONTH 6-MONTH 12-MONTH 24-MONTH
MARKET C.D. C.D. C.D. C.D.


30-MONTH
C.D.


36-MONTH 60-MONTH
C.D. C.D.


S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APYr

EDWARD JONES 4.40 4.50 5.05 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 4.75 4.75 4.75 4.75 4.75 4.75 4.75 4.75
(352)527-3700- -N
STATE FARM 1.64 1.65 4.74 4.85 4.88 5.00 4.88 5.00 4.88 5.00 N/A N/A 4.88 5.00 4.88 5.00'
Call your local agent
RAYMOND JAMES N/A 4.70 4.66 4.77 4.66 4.77 4.68 4.90 4.68 4.79 N/A N/A 4.68 4.79 4.92 5.04
(352) 527-3700
Please note: Banks and other financial institutions offer a wide variety of investment opportunities. Each institution has its own set of
requirements to qualify for the rates listed above. Contact these financial institutions directly for up-to-date information on the '
options listed above, or inquire at your bank for other investment opportunities. Financial institutions interested in listing their rates
can call the Citrus County Chronicle at 563-5660.


SCORE
Continued from Page 1D

It can be used to repurchase
stock within a corporation
when key employees are also
shareholders.
Protecting yourself from a
loss of a key employee to a
competitor is much harder.
This is especially true in a
small owner-operated busi-
ness where opportunities for
advancement may be limited
by the size of the company.
Since cream rises to the top,
the brightest, the key
employees, frequently leave
to find better opportunities
with a larger competitor or to
start up on their own.
Since key employees con-
tribute significantly to the
financial and long-term suc-
cess of your business, retain-
ing them is critical.
Financial incentives such as
competitive salaries, stock
options, bonuses, and perks
such as additional vacation
days or vehicles provide
immediate rewards. But
many small businesses can-
not afford the financial
reward approach.
Another approach is to
keep replacement talent in
training. If your business is


MONEY
Continued from Page 1D

I become incapacitated and
require nursing-home residen-
cy? Or is it better with joint
tenancy? - Reader, via e-mail
DEAR READER: The only
way you can protect your
estate is to have everything
transferred into your son's
name AT LEAST 30 months
prior to your need. Then you
will be eligible for welfare -
but is that what you want?
Would you rather throw your-
self on the tender mercies of
the government to preserve a
legacy for your children? I
doubt that. The only way you
can protect yourself is to have
everything transferred beyond
what is called the "look back"
period. If, for example, you
transfer everything into your
kid's name and three months
later enter a nursing home,
your assets would have to be
depleted before you would be
eligible for Medicaid and that
includes the assets you had
transferred into your son's
name.
DEAR BRUCE: You recently
advised a reader to close
unneeded credit-card
accounts. I agree with your
reasoning and have done that
for years. However, many
financial advisers advocate
leaving older accounts open,
even if unused. They say it
increases the length of your
credit history and can
increase your credit score.
What do you think? - Reader
in Illinois
DEAR READER: There are
all manner of things that are
included in your credit score
and if you're concerned with a
couple of points, it certainly
doesn't cost you anything to
keep the older accounts open.


large enough to warrant a
backup, when the need aris-
es, a replacement is ready.
This might not be a practical.
If it were, there would proba-
bly be constant turnover at
that position as the opportu-
nity for advancement is lim-
ited until the key employee,
if ever, leaves. A better solu-
tion is to keep your key
employees motivated and
loyal.
Studies have found that of
all the employee retention
factors, pay was the least
important to employees.
This, however, is contingent
on them having obtained a
certain level of material
comfort. Once their basic
needs are met, employees
care more about who they
work with, and what they do
for a living.
The most important factors
that make employees want to
stay are the ones that you as
an employer can easily con-
trol: career growth and
development, exciting and
challenging work, ability to
make a difference and con-
tribute, great co-workers and
boss, being part of a team,
recognition for work well
done, autonomy, flexible
hours and dress, fair pay and
benefits.
Even greatly motivated

However, if you have too much
available credit, it can defi-
nitely make you a less accept-
able credit risk. If you have
three or four accounts and
each account has $5,000 avail-
able, the lender is going to fig-
ure that you could all of sud-
den go out and max your cred-
it cards, and you'd be over your
head. This makes lenders
understandably gun-shy.
DEAR BRUCE: I have read
in your column many times
that it's often cheaper to rent
than to own, but I just don't get
it. Can you explain it to me one
more time? - Reader in
Florida
DEAR READER: Many
times, one can rent a single-
family home for considerably
less than one can purchase it.
By the time you add your
expenses - principal, inter-
est, taxes, insurance, utilities,
maintenance and all the other
things related to homeowner-
ship - that same home can be
rented often for hundreds of
dollars a month less, net. If you
had the discipline to invest the
difference every month, at the
end of a five-year period, you
most likely would have more
money in the investment
account than you would have
in equity in the home. In most
parts of the country, single-
family homes rent for less than
they can be owned. I can't give
you a reason why, but it is a
fact
DEAR BRUCE: I have never
seen this question come up in
your column. I am single with
no immediate family and won-
der how to ensure that my
estate will go to the proper
beneficiaries. I own a house
and expect there will be some
proceeds from its sale in the
event of my death, which I
would like distributed
between my favorite charities.
In addition, I w6uld like some


and loyal employees some-
times leave for other person-
al reasons. If you have a
. small business dependent on
a key employee, it would
behoove you to know enough
of the business function that
person performs so that you
could either help in the
training or hiring of a
replacement.
The former employer of my
new client had part of the
solution. Although he did not
do enough to keep his key
employee, the employee was
loyal enough to not leave
until he was sure the employ-
er was trained in his skilled
trade - the core function of
that company.
For help with your busi-
ness, call SCORE at 352-621-
0775 or visit our Web site at
www.scorecitrus.org. It just
takes a moment to register
and ask a question. One of
our counselors with experi-
ence in your area of concern
will contact you. All SCORE
counseling is free and confi-
dential.
SCORE is a non-profit vol-
unteer organization, and is
always looking for qualified
members. I invite those
interested to call and attend
one of our meetings. I'm
Kenneth Parrott wishing you
a great month in business.

jewelry and other tangible
assets to be distributed to
friends who would like them. I
have an IRA with two charities
designated as beneficiaries.
My friends know of my wishes,
but I have no other documen-
tation. What would be the most
efficient way to see that, upon
the sale of my home and pay-
ment of outstanding debts, the
correct beneficiaries are noti-
fied? I do not have a lawyer
and wonder with whom I
should leave this information.
Who would take charge of my
estate? Would there be pro-
bate? I have friends who
would take my dogs, but I
would like money set aside to
take care of them. I also want
to make sure the money left is
to be used expressly for their
care and expenses. Can you
give me some advice? -
Reader, via e-mail
DEAR READER: With the
minutia that you have outlined
in your letter, the answer is
apparent: You should have an
appropriately drawn will left
in the care of your attorney,
who will be your executor for a
fee. He will see that your char-
ities are remembered and
your residual assets are given
to the appropriate people and,
of course, perhaps most impor-
tant, that your pets will be
. properly cared for. There
should be some kind of detail
on your person, in your home,
etc., that, in the event of an
incident, your attorney should
be notified.

Send your questions to:
Smart Money, P.O. Box 2095,
Elfers, FL 34680. E-mail to:
bruce@brucewilliams. com.
Questions ofgeneral interest
will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume
of mail, personal replies can-
not be provided.


When You Use The Advertising Power Of

The Chronicle And Add Chronicle Direct Mail,
-?
You Will Reach Over



68,000 Households!




For more information call

352-563-5592.
C 1 U 'rOU- C 0U
I ,C I T R U U OU Ts Y


/ ,..,6.w.7 J1 I' J.IJIJ,
2*


Florida recognized for

Workforce Training Programs


Business BRIEF








Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE BIJSINES S SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 23, 2007 3D


Business DIGEST


Citrus Memorial
welcomes doctors
Citrus Memorial Health System
welcomes Albert Kabemba, M.D.,
to its active medical staff. He is
board certified in
anesthesiology.
Kabemba
received his
doctor of medi-
cine from Ross
University,
Edison, N.J. He
iid his residency
i general sur- Albert
gery at Kabemba.
Columbus/Saint M.D.
Joseph Hospital
in Chicago, Ill., and residency in
anesthesiology at University of
illinois at Chicago in Chicago, Ill.
-. Kabemba is a member of
American Society-of - --. -
Anesthesiologists and American
College of Chest Physicians.
., CMHS also welcomes Frank
Oono, D.O., to its active medical
,staff. Bono completed his medical
education at
Nova
Southeastern
university in
lFort Lauderdale I.
,where he
earned his
degree in osteo-
pathic medicine.
!His internship Frank
,and residency Bono, D.O.
were both per-
Iformed at Botsford General
Hospital in Farmington Hills,
Mich., and his neurosurgical and
orthopedic surgery fellowship was
.completed at St. Joseph Mercy
'Hospital in Ann Arbor, Mich.
SBono is a member of the
American Osteopathic Academy of
Qrthopaedics and American
Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons.
- e is-currently-practicing-with Dr.
|mes Ronzo at Gulfcoast Spine
Institute.
Citrus Memorial is a 198-bed,
iot-for-profit, private community
hospital that provides health care
servicess to residents of Citrus
county and surrounding commu-
ities. More than 150 physicians
nd 1,000 employees provide a
!ide range of services at our
verness campus and at medical
offices and clinics in eight loca-
ions in Citrus and Sumter
counties. Citrus Memorial is fully
creditedd by the Joint
commission andis fully licensed
.Wt1r'Stat" bf Florida.
; Seven Rivers
appoints new doctor
Marion T. Chirayath, M.D., has
een appointed to the medical
taff at Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center with privileges in
fmatology/oncology. The hospi-
Il's governing board confirmed
1er appointment
August.
i Dr. Chirayath,
board certified in
|htemal medi-i
'P.ie, hematology
ind oncology,
iceived her
medical degree
oom St. John's Marion
medicall College Chirayath
nd Hospital in
angalore, India. She completed
her residency in internal medicine
Nt State University of New York in
Buffalo, New York, and her fellow-
lAhip in hematology/oncology at
,ichigan State University in East
-ansing, Michigan. Dr. Chirayath



SFox-Apple

Los Angeles Times

SBeginning this week, season
premiere episodes of seven Fox
Broadcasting programs will be
ifade available for free through
Aple's iTunes store, a move
at highlights the TV indus-
's race to harness the
internet and try out potential
business partners.
The Fox-Apple deal is
designed to expose iPod users
to the upcoming season of new
nd returning prime-time
shows. Executives with the
ews Corp.-owned network
ope that free downloads of
such shows as "Prison Break,"
"Bones," 'American Dad" and
,K-Ville" will entice viewers to
vatch later installments on TV


or pay to download them from
the iTunes store.
, The deal underscores the tel-
pvision networks' predicament:
They are trying to protect their
lucrative businesses at a time
when more viewers are catch-
ing their favorite shows when
they want, thanks to TiVo and
digital video recorders.
In a similar move, Walt
Pisney Co. said Thursday that it
would make full-length ABC
prime-time shows available on
AOL. And Wednesday, three
Weeks after a well-publicized


joined the practice of V. Upender Homosassa Springs Wildlife State
Rao, M.D.; Sunil G Gandhi, M.D.; Park and the Friends of
and Gustavo A. Fonseca, M.D., in Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park
Lecanto. are seeking area businesses and
Speech therapist organizations to participate in their
annual Haunted Tram Rides com-
attends seminar munity event scheduled for
Emily Robertson Miranda of Friday, Oct. 26, and Saturday,
Superior Therapy Services Inc. Oct. 27. The event is the biggest
attended the Fall Conference for fundraiser of the year for the park,
the Florida Association of last year helping raise nearly
Speech-Language Pathologists $13,000.
and Audiologists on Sept. 7 and Homosassa Springs Wildlife
8 in Maitland. She received six State Park is looking for area
hours of continuing education on businesses and organizations to
"Modifying Teachers' help design and decorate a
Communication Style to Improve spooky location on the Haunted
Students' Performance." The Trail. For groups who are unable
course provided elements of to decorate a site, the park .is also
"good service delivery" and looking for organizations to fund a
strategies to link speech-lan- location on the Haunted Trail.
guage pathology therapy with There is no charge to sponsor a
otherle.achers, paEents-and -----haunted loation d-at-locatifor-
providers, such as OT/PT. It also will be judged for a variety of
taught strategies on how to edu- awards.
cate others on how to modify This is the third year the
home, therapy and classroom Friends of Homosassa Springs
learning strategies to create con- Wildlife Park has organized
tinuity and carry-over of the tech- Haunted Tram Rides at the park.
niques that have been learned In addition to the Haunted Tram
during speech-language therapy. Rides, the event includes family
Also, she received six additional fun such as clowns, face painting,
hours in "Coding, a Halloween costume contest,
Reimbursement and refreshments and treats for the
Documenting." This course children. A special Haunted
addressed all Medicaid/Medicare House for children ages 2 through
accepted codes for speech and 8 will be set up in the Florida
language services and how to Room.
legally document all services If your business, club, group or
provided. It also taught how to family is interested in participat-
properly handle all patients' ing, call Susan Strawbridge at
plans of care. 628-5343, ext. 1002.


Training for food
service workers on tap
The University of Florida/IFAS
Citrus County Extension Service
is providing training for foodser-
vice workers. This is a compre-
hensive training that provides the
most up-to-date information and
current regulations. The ServSafe
Manager's exam is given at the
end of the training, which pro-
vides a National Certification that
is good for five years.
Certification is required in Florida
for food managers of all estab-
lishments licensed by the
Department of Business and
Professional Regulation, the
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services and selected
licenses of the Department of
Health.
The next class is on Oct. 17 at
the Citrus County Extension
office at 3650 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 1, Lecanto.
The brochure/registration form
can be downloaded from
http://foodsafety.ifas.ufl.edu or
call the toll-free hotline (888) 232-
8723 to register by credit card.
Preregistration is required. Cost
for the course and test is $100.
Manuals may be purchased in
English or Spanish for $40.
For more information call
Gloria at the extension office,
527-5700.
All programs and related activi-
ties sponsored-for,-or-assisted byT-
the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences are open to
all persons with non-discrimina-
tion with respect to race, creed,
color, religion, age, disability, sex,
or sexual orientation, marital sta-
tus, national origin, political opin-
ions, or affiliations.
State park seeks
involvement for event
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's


Hernando chamber
slates academy


a silver annual performance
award in recognition of 12 consec-
utive months of optimal compli-
ance to GWTG-Coronary Artery
Disease (CAD) performance
measures. SRRMC also received
a bronze initial performance
award for successful implementa-
tion of GWTG-Heart Failure (HF)
and completing three consecutive
months of optimal compliance as
mandated by the AHA's GWTG-
HF performance measures.
Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center is a 128-bed general, med-
ical/surgical acute care facility that
opened its doors in 1978 and
serves the communities of Citrus,
Levy and South Marion counties.
NCTD Travel Center
opens headquarters
N" -tureCoasTourTsmn
Development Inc./NCTD Travel
Center announces the grand
opening of its all-new headquar-
ters at the Specialty Gem office
center, 600 S.E. U.S. 19, Suite
C., Crystal River, FL 34428. The
new location provides easy
accessibility combined with
increased visibility for tourists and
visitors to Citrus County.
NCTD specializes in travel and
tourism development, primarily
Eco Tourism and Heritage. The
agency provides services in
advertising, marketing, special
events, trade shows, public rela-
tions, special events and promo-
tions.
NCTD is registered with the
state of Florida as a Seller of
Travel and specializes in full cus-
tomized itinerary planning for


The Greater Hernando County groups and FITs. NCTD u provides
Chamber of Commerce is excited hotels, vacation houses, attrac-
to announce the third annual tions, eco heritage and adventure
Entrepreneurial Academy. Sign up tours, at a discounted rate. NCTD
now for the 10-week course that is your one-stop tour booking
-ocal-smalLbusiness-owners-are----agent.-
raving about. Enhance your busi- NCTD was founded in 1999 by
ness skills and learn from the pro- veteran travel and eco-tourism
fessionals in their fields. Seating professional Amy Virgo, with its
is limited. Classes will be at unique niche toward strategic
Career Central in Spring Hill planning for eco tourism. NCTD
beginning Jan. 8, 2008. For addi- promotes sustainable commerce
tional information, call Carla through education and attraction
Hayes at (352) 796-0697. of visitors to the nature coast's
Seven Rivers natural assets and ecology.
Seven Rivers For more information about
recognized nationally cruise lines, ships, itineraries and
Seven Rivers Regional Medical worldwide cruise destinations,
Center is one of 277 hospitals in visit Nature Coast Tourism
the United Stats one of 2 th77 hospitals rein Development Inc./NCTD Travel
the United States that was recog- Center at 600 S.E. U.S. 19, Suite
nized in the July 23, "Top 100 C C s Rie. C toda a
Hospitals" issue of US News & C, Crystal River. Call today at
World Report for its performance 564-9197 to speak with one of
achievement-in cardiac and stroke our cruise vacation experts.
patient care. Seven Rivers Bank announces
Regional was recognized in a employee appointment
three page promotion sponsored Mercantile Bank has announced
by the American Hearthas announced
Association/American Stroke that Debbie Muir has been appoint-
Association (AHA/ASA) for dili- ed business
gently implementing and adhering banker-vnt ce pres-
to its Get With the Guidelines SM Muir joined the
(GWTG) program. bank in 2007 and
The AHA/ASA's GWTG pro- - currently serves
gram is a quality-improvement ini- as wice president
tiative that helps hospitals insure in the Business .- .'
that patients consistently receive_---anking - . , __ .H
cardiac and stroke care in accor- Department for
dance with the most up-to-date Citrus County. Debbie
guidelines and recommendations. Prior to joining
GWTG has three modules.to help Mercantile Bank,
hospitals use evidence-based she was employed as vice presi-
guidelines to treat patients with dent and branch manager with
coronary artery disease, stroke AmSouth Bank.
and/or heart failure. Hospitals that Mercantile Bank is a subsidiary
continually meet or exceed the of The South Financial Group and
nationally accepted standards, or offers a full line of financial services
guidelines, improve their quality and products. The company Web
patient care by turning guidelines site is www.bankmercantile.com.
into lifelines.
Seven Rivers Regional earned - From staff reports


deal tries new lure for iPod crowd


breakup with Apple, NBC
Universal announced that it
would offer free downloads of
such shows as "Heroes" and
"The Tonight Show With Jay
Leno" for one week after their
air date through a new service
called NBC Direct
"What we are seeing is a
rather messy and inelegant
fumbling into the future of
video distribution," said Tim
Hanlon, executive vice presi-
dent of Denuo, a consulting
arm of the advertising giant
Publicis Groupe.
"It's also an admission that
the television networks' time-
honored, top-down manner of
distribution is not the way that
people are watching video any-
more," Hanlon said.
"Programmers are having an
interesting time trying to figure
out how to adjust"
Fox's William Bradford, sen-
ior vice president of content
strategy, said, "I wouldn't call it
fumbling around. We are trying
a lot of different things and
there is a lot of learning that the
TV industry is going through."
The networks are still trying
to determine whether they can
make enough money by selling
downloaded shows without
commercial messages or
whether they should focus


more on offering advertising-
supported programs free to
viewers.
So far, TV companies have
not raked in big money on their
Internet offerings, at least not
the enormous sums they have
become accustomed to from
their current customers: adver-
tising sponsors, TV stations and
cable channels.
However, TV executives are
convinced that the Internet is
an increasingly lucrative deliv-
ery system that will become a
bigger part of their businesses,
particularly as consumers who
grew up using computers
become the majority of the pop-
ulation.
"They are trying to figure out
what consumers really want
and how they can make money
from that," said David
Sanderson, head of private
equity firm Bain & Co.'s global
media practice.
That's why there has been a
flurry of deals and partner-
ships among the various media
companies since Disney
announced its landmark deal to
offer ABC shows on iTunes
nearly two years ago.
"It's not surprising that these
networks are all casting around
and winding up with different
partners," said Josh Bernoff,


principal analyst with
Forrester Research. Internet
portals and services such as
iTunes "want their premium
content, and so the networks
might be playing one site off the
other"
Until this week, Disney exec-
utives had believed that the
popularity of such ABC shows
as "Lost" and "Grey's Anatomy"
and the high-quality cinema
experience offered by their
online media player would
draw millions of viewers to the
company's own website, at
abc.com.
Thursday's deal with AOL,
owned by Time Warner Inc.,
marked a shift in emphasis.
Albert Cheng, executive vice
president of digital media for
the Disney-ABC Television
Group, said the partnership
with AOL would provide ABC
broader online distribution of
such popular returning shows
as "Lost" and new programs
like "Dirty Sexy Money" and
"Pushing Daisies" that pre-
miere this fall. He downplayed
the switch.
"All we're doing is exporting
the ABC experience to another
website," Cheng said.
"ABC.com is a platform. That
platform can be distributed
anywhere.'


Governor Crist



appoints



board member


Veeramaneni 'Upender' Rao to

join Citrus County Hospital Board


Special to the Chronicle

Gov. Charlie Crist recently
appointed Veeramaneni
"Upender" Rao, M.D., to the
Citrus County Hospital Board.
Dr. Rao, of the Cancer and,
Blood Disease Center in
Lecanto, is board certified in
medical oncology, and has
been practicing hema-
tology and oncology in
Citrus County since
January of 1983. Rao's
extensive educational
background includes
medical school in
India, residency train-
ing in internal medi-
cine at Kings County Veerarn
Hospital in Brooklyn, Rao,
N.Y, George Town hast
University program at appoir
DC General Hospital hospital
in Washington, D.C.,
and a fellowship in hematol-
ogy and oncology at the
University of Connecticut in
Farmington. Rao participated
in colorectal cancer genetic
research at Hertford College
and Institute of Molecular
Medicine in Oxford, England,
in June 2000.
Rao established an oncology
service in Citrus County and
trained the first generation of
oncology nurses in Citrus
County hospitals. In addition
he collaborated with other
physicians and community
leaders to bring radiation ther-
apy and hospice services to
Citrus County. Rao served as


WEB
Continued from Page 1D

Chronicle blue header
"The launch of redesigned
Web site," Mulligan said, "is
another step in our compa-
ny's cominmitment to provide
local news and advertising
information to the residents
of our community. While our
print newspaper circulation
is still growing, we also rec-
ognize that each day nearly
10,000 different people visit
our Web site to get their
news and information. We've
got to be prepared to pres-
ent information to that
growing segment of our com-
munity.
"Times are changing, and
the Chronicle will be chang-
ing with those times."
Murphy said, "We are no
longer just a newspaper."


r

I


Chief of Medicine at Seven
Rivers Regional Medical
Center in 1991 and was a mem-
ber and Chairman of their
Governing Board from 1998 to
2000. Rao was chief of the
medical staff at Citrus
Memorial Health System from
1999 to 2000 and is currently
chairman of the Medical
Quality Assurance
Committee and a mem-
ber of the Medical
Executive Committee
S at Citrus Memorial.
Rao has been active
in the community as
past president of the
Citrus County Medical
naneni Society, and past
M.D. board member of both
ieen the American Cancer
ted to Society and Hospice
board. of Citrus County, as
well as creating and
sponsoring several fundrais-
ers for the two non-profit
organizations. Rao is also a
member of the AMA, FMA,
Citrus Medical Society,
American College of
Physicians, American Society
of Clinical Oncology and the
American Association of
Cancer Research.
Succeeding Sandra
Chadwick, Rao's term began
Aug. 7 and will end July 3,
2011. He is also now a member
of the Citrus Memorial Heath
Foundation Board. Rao is mar-
ried to Sandhya Rao and has
two children, Anuradha Rao,
17 and Ahayla Rao, 21.

Visitors can watch Chronicle
TV: daily webcasts about news,
entertainment and sports by
Chronicle reporters and staff.
"One of our commitments,"
Mulligan said, "is to do a daily
job of providing immediate
news to those who use our Web
site. If something significant is
happening in our community,
you're going to be able to find
out about it at
ChronicleOnline.com.
"The full story will continue
to be published in the morn-
ing's paper."
Implementing technological
advancements helps
Chronicle staff achieve their
goal of making news readily
available to users.
"I want folks, if they walk out
of their house and see smoke
in the air," Murphy said, "to be
able to turn around, turn their
computer on, log onto
Chronicle Online and find out
why there's smoke in the air."


WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS
* Photos need to be in sharp focus.
* Photos need to be in proper exposure: neither too light nor
too dark.
* Include your name, address and phone number on all pho
tos.
* When identifying persons in your photo, do so from left to
right.
" If desired, include the name of the photographer for credit.
* We discourage the use of Polaroid prints.
* Photos printed on home printers do not reproduce well; sub-
mit the digital image via disk or e-mail. Staff will color cor-
rect and otherwise "work up" the image to Chronicle public.
tion standards.
* Photos submitted electronically should be in maximum-reso-
lution JPEG (.jpg) format.
* Photos cannot be returned without a self-addressed,
stamped envelope.
* For more information, call Linda Johnson, newsroom coordi-
nator, at 563-5660.


Mark Mileti


S"-- Citrus County
On Helping Me Achieve
Salesperson Of The Month


It's been great coming back to Eagle Buick Pontiac GMC and
seeing all the friends I've made throughout the years! If you
haven't been in lately, I personally wish to invite you for a cup
of coffee, good conversation and allow me to show you the
great 2007 model year end clearance deals we have going on,
as well as the new 2008's in stock with more coming in daily!
The selection has never been greater. See you soon!


t


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2007 3D


BUSINESS


CJTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


a.L[M7r77i= .-]








Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 23, 2007


([h


hEr


onnection


maR~~v ' , -:r... ....,. -r-.:....... :,, ..., ; -
.., . _',.:', - e":,- t� " � - -" ',. '"-- " - . - �.". " .2 . .


Congratulations

Industry Appreciation

week winners
We would like to congratulate the winners recognized at this
year's Industry Appreciation Week luncheon. Each year, the
Citrus County Economic Development Council, in cooperation
with the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce recognizes those
businesses and individuals who have stood out amongst their
piers in local business. We would also like to recognize and con-
gratulate those that were nominated.

Outstanding Small Business
Winner: Citrus Networking Solutions Group Inc.
Nominated: Citrus County Life Magazine, Community Oxygen
& Medical, Inc., Earnest Mail Consulting Corp., Williams,
McCranie, Wardlow & Cash, PA.

Outstanding Employer or Corporate Citizen
Winner Suncoast Plumbing and Electric Inc.
Nominated: Citrus Memorial Health System, Nature Coast
Bank, Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center

Person of the Year
Winner Katie Lucas
Nominated: Kitty Barnes and Rocky Hensley



Don't miss this free event!

Women's Health & Fitness Expo 2007
* Withlacoochee Technical Institute.
* Saturday, Sept. 29.
* 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.


Credit Data Reports Inc.


JIM SHIELDS/Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for Credit Data Reports Inc. Pictured front row: Chamber
Ambassador Reyna Bell, Lori Colin - Owner; Ambassadors Lillian Smith and John Porter. Pictured middle row: Chamber
Ambassadors Jennifer Duca, Rhonda Lestinsky, Crystal Jefferson. Pictured back row: Chamber Ambassadors David Heinz, Chuck
Morgan, Janet Mayo, Julie Vaughan, Bonnie Hardiman with grandson and Nancy Coffey. Credit Data Reports (CDR) provides you,
as a business owner, property manager, or landlord, information services and products about prospective employees, clients, and
tenants. CDR uses the latest technology and accesses the most reliable nationwide information data bases to generate accurate
and up-to-the-minute reporting giving you unsurpassed customer service to meet your needs. To learn more about Credit Data
Reports visit Lori on the web at www.creditdatareports.com or call (352) 249-1159.


Baker's Auto Repair Inc.


Never feel self-cc-


cilous again.


p.:'- ,'


/ 'OR"


Dr./ H ashemian, with Nobel
Biocare, will present a free dental
implant seminar. Learn about the
cutting-edge implant options and
functional technologies that can
enhance your smiles.

The free dental implant seminar
will be held at the Citrus Hills
Country Club in the "Garden
Room" on Wednesday, October
17, 2007 at 6:00 PM.


0:


Dr.,,.
DALD.
Board - .


Seating is limited. Please call
for your reservation today.

(352) 563-5111

Refreshments will be served.


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Edwar~oneI


JIM SHIELDS/Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for Baker's Auto Repair Inc. Pictured above are: Chamber
Ambassadors Chuck Morgan, Kandy Kremnetz, Rhonda Lestinsky, Nancy Coffey, David Baker, Dave Baker, Chamber Executive Director
Kitty Barnes, Brain Buchanan; Chamber Ambassadors Lillian Smith and John Porter. Baker's Auto Repair is a family owned and oper-
ated business and has been in their new location since 2006. They are ASE Certified for quality assurance and are also members of the
Better Business Bureau of Central Florida. Baker's Auto Repair offers general repair, computer diagnostics and specializes in alignment
of extended cab trucks. If you are looking for a "trustworthy", reputable auto repair company visit Baker's Auto Repair at 7147 E
England Blvd. in Inverness or call (352) 637-1088.


Member News


Whether you're cooking a gour-
met meal or ordering food from your
favorite take-out place, rest assured
what your kids really want at the din-
ner table is YOU!!! Family meals are
the perfect time to talk to your kids
and to listen to what's on their mind.
Family Day - "A day to eat dinner
with your children" is a national
movement launched in 2001 that
encourages parents to frequently eat
dinner with their kids.
CASA (The Center on Addiction &
Substance Abuse) found that com-
pared to kids who have fewer than
three family dinners per week, chil-
dren and teens who have frequent
family dinners are at 70% lower risk
for substance abuse, half as likely to
try cigarettes or marijuana, and one
third less likely to try alcohol.
The Drug Coalition of Citrus
County, along with our partners:
Timely Dinners, The Citrus County
Clergy Association and Oysters
Restaurant are urging parents to
take the time on September 24th &
eat dinner with your kids and to
make this a regular routine. Turn off
the TV, don't answer the phones and
enjoy your family. The payoff will be
big.
For more information on this event
and our partners, please contact
Alida Langley at 341-6720.


MEN
Certified Hypnotist and new cham-
ber member, Diane Valent, has
recently opened a practice at 2067 N
Lecanto Hwy in Lecanto. Specializing
in weight loss sessions, golf enhance-
ment and mind & body relaxation,
Diane is ready to take appointments.
She is a certified member of the
National Guild of Hypnotists, a mem-
ber of the American Heart Association,
a Hemando-Pasco Hospice volunteer
and a student of Healing Touch.
Classes in smoking cessation and
weight loss are about to begin and pri-
vate sessions are always available by
appointment. If you are ready to make
a change in your life using hypnosis
as a tool, contact Diane at 419-0126
for registration or information.
Saturday September 29th from noon
until 4:00.
Thanks to a grant made possible
by J.C. Penney and through Boys &
Girls Clubs of America, Citrus County
Boys & Girls Clubs has been selected
to receiving funding for youth to
become members of the local clubs.
In addition to the scholarship, each
new member will receive a JC
Penney Gift Card. 'We are so excited
to be able to offer families this oppor-
tunity" states Lori Pender, Executive
Director. "We want all youth to be able
to attend and participate in our many


activities and programs without it
being a financial burden. The Boys &
Girls Clubs has three Clubhouses that
are now accepting new members.
Clubhouses are located in Inverness,
Crystal River and in Homosassa. We
offer a morning program from 6 to 9
a.m. and then after school until 6p.m.
Some of the activities include FCAT
"Target Practice," Karate, Dance and
our new Triple Play Fitness Program.
To get additional information on these
scholarships, call 621-9225.
ONE
Members of the Humane Society of
Citrus County (HSCC) were recently
contacted concerning some donation
banks at area businesses. Evidently a
past member placed these banks with
businesses but did not make a record
of where they were located. We
appreciate those businesses who
have allowed us to leave these dona-
tions banks on their premises and are
very sorry for not tending them on a
regular basis. If anyone has informa-
tion about the location of these banks
please call us at 341-2222. The
HSCC shelter is full of dogs and cats
waiting for new loving homes. We
have several dedicated volunteers
who come to walk the dogs once or
twice a week. But we have more dogs
than volunteers and more exercise
would benefit them greatly If anyone
happens to have an electric treadmill


that they are no longer using and they
would be willing to donate it to our
shelter, the resident canines would
very much appreciate such a gift. If
you can help with this special request
please call 341-2222.
son
Budget Print Center graphic
designer Jo Ann Manna recently
attended the Conference for
Photoshop Users in Orlando. The
information-packed event motivates
designers to unleash their creative
power and produce high quality
images using Adobe Photoshop soft-
ware. Budget Print Center relies on
Adobe Photoshop and other design
software to create eye-catching
designs for printed material. As well,
Photoshop allows Budget Print Center
designers to color correct photo-
graphs, improve grayscale images
and add fascinating special effects -
all of which lead to a higher quality
printed product. The Conference for
Photoshop Users is an annual event
that shares the newest tips, tricks and
special effects with designers all
around the nation. By attending, Jo
Ann gained access to the same tech-
niques used by top industry profes-
sionals. Budget Print Center, part of
Mackler Graphics, Inc., is located at
912 N.E. 5th Street (Hwy. 44) in
Crystal River. For additional informa-
tion, please call (352) 795-1232.


-- .2


A








Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


ConnEction


5.


)


SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 16, 2007


It's a Shore Thing


JIM SHIELDS/Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for It's A Shore Thing. Pictured front row are: Chamber
Ambassadors Rhonda Lestinsky, Jackie Marx, Los and Pam Foster - Owners; Ambassador Wendy Hall. Pictured back row:
- Chamber Ambassadors Chuck Morgan, David Heinz, Chamber Executive Director Kitty Barnes, Ambassadors Janet Mayo and
John Porter. It's A Shore Thing features quality, luxury outdoor and indoor furniture with various fabrics and frames to choose
from. If you are in search for that "casual florida living" style, "It's a Shore Thing" that you'll find it there. They are conveniently
located at 1914 S Suncoast Blvd. in Homosassa; you can't miss the bright green and blue building on the west side of Hwy. 19!
Call Les and Pam at (352) 795-7665.




SCounty gears up for annual event


What is Make a

Difference Day and

Day of Caring?
Make A Difference Day is the most
encompassing national day of helping
others - a celebration of neighbors
Helping neighbors and communities
working together for the common good.
, A collaboration of Citrus County Solid
Waste Management, Citrus County
FParks and Recreation, Keep Citrus
h County Beautiful, Adopt a Highway
"Program, Citrus County Chamber of
- Commerce, the Nature Coast Volunteer
Center and United Way of Citrus County
has been formed in support of "Day of
SCaring on Make a Difference Day!" For
this year's event on Saturday, Oct. 27, we
plan to focus on a major highway and
parks clean up project in Citrus County,
- themed "Don't Mess With Citrus
-County!" There will be two opportuni-


OIN GOOD
VOIN ,. 0 1-1 . . -
ties for volunteering:
* Project No. 1 - Highway
Cleanup on State Road 44 corridor (for
those 12 years of age and older) 0


* Project No. 2 - Cleanup and
planting on Fort Island Gulf
Beach (for families with chil-
dren under 12 years old)
Anyone can volunteer! Get the ball
rolling by becoming a team leader! Get
everyone involved; neighbors, family,
friends and co-workers. Teams can
range in size from 2 to 22!
Register today by sending in your
team registration form or calling the
United Way at 352-527-8894.
Registration form is available at
www.citrusunitedway.org.
The first 300 volunteers who register
will receive a free t-shirt and other give-
aways!
The 4-hour project begins at 7:30 a.m.
at the Citrus County Resource
Center.Afterward, all volunteers are
invited back for lunch. For more infor-
mation please call the United Way of
Citrus County office at (352) 527-8894.
Remember: Don't Mess with Citrus
County!


Opportunities for education abounds at CFCC


Get ready



to run with



the Sheriff


Join Sheriff Jeff Dawsy on a
3.1-mile run through scenic
downtown Inverness as he
proudly presents the 11th
annual Beat the Sheriff! 5K
run.
Saturday, September 29,
2007
* 6:30 a.m.
Registration _
and Packet a
Pick-up
* 7:30 a.m.
5K Race
* 8:15 am '7,
Kids Fun Run '
* at P , V
Courthouse 'G ,
Sq uare RACEa
Downtown ",-""
Inverness
* Awards *wVreow aV ,
(T-Shirts guar-
anteed to pre-registered only)
Overall Individual Male /
Female
Overall Masters (40+) Male /
Female
Medals 3-deep in 5 year Age
Groups (9-under thru 75-up)
* Entry Fee Register on-
line: www.active.com
$15 Pre-Registered (by Sept.
26th)
$13 CRR Club Member
(Advanced Registration Only)
$20 Race Day Registration
(All Athletes)
$ 2 Special Fun Run for the
Kids
For more information, call
James Martone at (352) 726-


VI


4488 or Chris Moling at (352)
637-2475.
Sponsorships are still being
accepted for this event. The
Beat the Sheriffi 5K charity
event has been tremendously
successful for the past ten
years and has
raised thou-
_ , sands of dol-
,T"., . lars for worthy
causes. This
p. year, all pro-
_ ceeds from the
race will be
donated to
Jessie's Place.
Jessie's Place,
named in
honor of
Jessica
I* -S. l'" AJ"A Lunsford, will
be a children's
advocacy center for the abused
children in our community.
This year's race will take place
Sept. 29, winding through sce-
nic downtown Inverness. It
begins at the Old Courthouse
promptly at 7:30 am, with a
kid's fun run beginning at 8:15,
and with post race activities
immediately following the 5K
Several downtown businesses
will be providing services the
morning of the race. We wel-
come you to join us in partici-
pating or to simply just enjoy
the activities. If you are inter-
ested in being a sponsor this
year, please call James
Martone at (352) 726-4488.


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College and Career
Night
The Citrus Campus of Central
Florida Community College
will host the Citrus County
College and Career Night this
' fall from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Monday,
Oct. 8 in room L2-103. This
event features representatives
from nearly 40 colleges, univer-
sities and other recruiting enti-
ties that are able to provide
information regarding their
institutions or companies. Area
high school students, their par-
ents, and community college
students are invited to attend.
For information, call 352-249-
1202 or email bairdm@cf.edu.


Guardianship
Training
Central Florida Community
College will offer
Guardianship Training at
3800 S. Lecanto Hwy.,
Lecanto. The training will be
from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 2 and Thursday,
Oct. 4, in Bldg. 91-Rm 102. The
cost of the training is $79.
This course is an 8 hour court
mandated training course
concerning guardianship
issues, duties and responsi-
bilities. For information and
registration, call 352-249-1210
or visit
www.CFCCtraining.com


History of Citrus
County
Wouldn't it be great to
amaze your potential clients
with your knowledge of
Citrus County? Citrus County
is full of so much history, not
only the big events but the
small tidbits - like who lived
in what house and how they
helped to develop this county.
Mr. Tom Franklin will discuss
and answer questions about
the history of any part of the
county that interest the class.
Mr. Franklifi can discuss the
History of Citrus County from
prehistoric times through the
formation of the county in


1887, the orange boom, the
phosphate boom, and the real
estate boom. He can also
cover the history of the Cross
Florida Barge Canal, the
coming and departing of the
railroads, and the Post World
War II development of the
county. The History of Citrus
County lecture class will be
held at Central Florida
Community College Citrus
Campus, 3800 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto, from 6 to 8
p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16
through Nov.13 in room 91-
102. The cost is $30. For more
information or registration,
call 352-249-1210 or visit
www.CFCCtraining.com


Vi
I"-


Take Stock in Children seeks volunteers


Take Stock In Children
(www.takestockinchildren.com)
is an award-winning school-
based mentoring program that
assists deserving youth from
low-income families by provid-
ing the opportunity for a better
education and a brighter future.
Founded in 1995, the mission
of Take Stock in Children is to
provide deserving qualified
children in our community with
scholarships to college and
guidance from caring mentors.
Since 1995, Take Stock in
Children has provided over
12,000 children with scholar-


ships (totaling over 90 million
dollars) and mentors in the
state of Florida. All money
raised in Citrus County is used
to provide scholarships and stu-
dent-mentor services to Citrus
County middle and high school
students.
All scholarship contributions
are raised locally through com-
munity partnerships and are
used to purchase Florida
Prepaid 2+2 scholarships (2
years at a community
college/two years at a universi-
ty) through the Florida Prepaid
College Foundation.


Scholarship contributions are
matched dollar for dollar by the
Florida Prepaid College
Foundation. Community part-
nerships and local area busi-
nesses make it possible to be
able to provide scholarships
and "the promise of hope" to
middle and high school stu-
dents. All monies raised in
Citrus County are used to pro-
vide scholarships and student-
mentor services to Citrus
County students.
Take Stock in Children of
Citrus County is seeking indi-
viduals interested in becoming


a positive influence in a young
person's life by becoming a
mentor for the Take Stock in
Children Program. Mentors
meet one hour per week in a
school-based setting only at
local Citrus County middle or
high schools
For further information on
how you can make the differ-
ence in the life of a Citrus
County child by providing
"scholarships, mentors, and
hope," please call Janet E.
Clymer, Program Coordinator
(352) 746-6721, ext 6148 jcly-
mer@clmworkforce.com.


Lance Armstrong, who beat cancer and has
won the Tour de France numerous times, does
everything he possibly can to keep in the best
of shape That includes getting regular chiropractic
care. He recently stated, "Chiropractic Is an
indispensable part of any athlete's career...
it includes leading-edge manual techniques,
modalities and nutrition strategies that promote
prevention performance and recovery. Athletes
who don't avail themselves of these technologies
will never consistently put in top performances
or have long careers."
Ow.During the race itself, the Doctor of Chiropractic's
role is to optimize the neuromusculoskeletal
. component of the rider's training and, in the event
of a crash, minimize down time and get the
competitor back in the race as quickly as possible.
e chiropractor adjusts the bikers as needed and
Sides them in choices ol diet and supplements,
,�thich helps reduce the likelihood of injury.
Moday, keeping in top condition is more important
Man ever. For many, this means relying on
chiropractic treatment. Doctors of Chiropractic
tcan give athletes a natural edge: improving their
:athletic ability by keeping them healthy and in
-'excellent form throughout their sports career.


Let the caring professionals at
Neck and Back Care Center help you
regain the joy's of living life, pain free! �


Neck Back


Anthony B. Oliverlo DC
C&12 rinr


Jeffery S. Kinnard DC


Care Center o,0-oUo3 o, I -'Mto
"Un,.,,sanng and C , ing Crystal River Beverly Hills
the Source jfYour Pain" nextto a Boys& Gtrs Club in the Winn Die Shopping Center
Ciropractic Car Fitness Center OccupatonatRenhab Therapy Massage AquaBed Therapy


Impovngth .Qalty fYu ie


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AITAQn PAIA S Day Spa Salon
Hwy. 44 * Crystal River * Next to Publix Plaza * 563-0011


ps! LX-- I - -

ga�w


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I Im










C CLASSIFIED Cmi 'us CouN'rs' (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


7. a.:(6.)56.65 olS re:(88. 5 2-2340 1 Emal:.c*ssi (j*) * ncloni. com0 *esit:0wwchoiceolie So


EARLY 60'S Active Lady
Loves conversation,
people, current events,
travel, small towns,
community involve-
ment, reading and the
outdoors. Seeking
gentlemen. Eastern
Citrus County. Reply
Blind Box 1380-P
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 106 W. Main
St., Inverness, FL 34450




r7--4-m
r RENTAL FINDER
Swww.chronicle I
rentalfinder, com

-= =


$$CASH WE BUY TODAY
Cars, Trucks, Vans - rt
FREE Removal Metal,
Junk Vehicles, No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Receiot
r 9$$$$$$$$$$ 9
TOP DOLLAR
I For Junk Cars
L (352)201-1052 $

$$$ ATTENTION $$$
I WANT YOUR JUNK
CARS, TRUCKS, ETC.
Tommy 352- 302-1276
CASH PAID! No title ok
$$ CASH PAID $$
Having Code
Enforcement problems
w/ Junk vehicles in your
yard? (352) 860-2545

$ CASH $
I PAID FOR I
Unwanted

* 352-220-0687 I
L =1mm. 1
$CASH FOR CARS$
No title needed
352-302-2781
352-489-2925
BLACK LAB 4 yr. old,
male. All shots, tags, lic.
& health up to date,
Would prefer home
w/kids. (352) 621-0909
COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service.
(352) 560-6163 or
(352) 746-9084
Leave Message
Free Kittens
different colors
(352) 503-3488
FREE KITTENS wormed,
and litter box trained
gray tabbies.
352 563-0493
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
Free Removal - Scrap
Metal, Appl.'s, A/C,
Mowers, motors, etc,
Brian (352) 302-9480
GUINEA PIGS
Free to good home.
(352) 795-9148
Jack Russel/Pekinese
Mix 12wks.
Free to Good Home.
(352) 637-0993
MAGIC KITTENS
Born Aug. 12th on new
moon, Sam.
"Love Is all you need."
(352) 563-2179
RED TABBY CAT
1 yr. old, Male, neut.,
micro-chipped. ,
abandoned by owner.
"Clyde". (352) 229-3327
Sofa Bed, queen,
(352) 628-4441
The Path Shelter
will pick up your
unwanted vehicle
Tax deductible
receipt given
(352) 746-9084
Three
"WONDERFUL CATS"
each w/own person-
ality. Spayed and
nuetered-Can be sep-
arated. Need loving
homes please. Deb
(352)302-8046
Yellow Labs, 1 Male &
1 Female, outside
dogs. Free to good
home. (352) 726-9570
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J,W.
(352) 228-9645






Your World



















ww chr0onicleo0nline cornm


CAT - IYR. OLD MALE,
all grey, "Mischief". W.
Highland Blvd. Inv.
(352) 341-3499
CHIHUAHUA, miniature
Brown w/black & grey
nose. Vicinity Sunny
Days Plaza, Homosassa
(352) 621-1293
COCKER SPANIEL
BIk & wht. female. 9/14
Vic. 495, Emerald Oaks
Dr. (352) 302-8195




Puppy, Tan,
Floral City area
(352) 726-7417
US Marine Corp Ring
David
(352) 344-2372




Dr FORCES
BANKRUPTCY
S Name Change 3
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We Come To You
S637-4022 795-5999 1










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FLRealEstateSale.Com







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left over items from
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AnswFREE Homer Wfoar Oranty








The week offer your
LEFT OVERS AD




your Garage sale?




We hav e the
Answer or Only
(3512-0.95
SpayThe week afNeuter our
Garage Sale just give
us a catFemale $50,will
Dogrun a 6 lne $60ad
for 5 days.





Dog Female Society0.





offerices including spayt
orSpay & Neuter, 3 Yr. Rabies
Appointments avail.
shCat Annual Vaccines$40,
Dog Male $60,






Call for appt.
(352) 344-5207
Humane Society$









of Inverness
offers Low Costp
Spay & Neuter










Service
Starting at $20.
shot Annual Vaccines

Micro chip reg.
Call for appt.
(352) 344-5207

Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service
Starting at $20,
Low cost vaccines,
Heartworm test,
Heartworm treat-
ment,
Cat Declawing. Call
for prices and appt.
(352) 726-8801


www.adoota
rescued pet.com
View available pets
on our website or call
(352) 795-9550
Need help rehoming
a pet - call us
Adoptive homes
available for small
dogs
Requested donations
are tax deductible
Pet Adoptions
Thursday
September 27
12pm - 2pm
Merchantile Bank
- Rt. 44, Inverness


HORSE BOARDING
State Forrest Acces.,
lit arena, $300/mo
SCENIC TRAIL RIDES
$35; LESSONS $25
(352) 628-1472

r -RE - - -l --
RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com

- SOD * SOD * SOD-
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032

MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY




\. -.- .



ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM

CAT ADOPTIONS










Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open 8:00 A
M till 4:00 P M
Monday-Friday.
Week-end and
evenings by
appointment.
All Cats and Kittens
are altered, tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date on vac-
cines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofsoha.ora.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant
Ave. Corner of 44
and Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw prints.





HAIRCARE In your home
by Licensed Hairdresser
Curts/Perms/Wash/Style
Call Gail 352-422-6315






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1,000's of Items sold
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Chronicle classified.
Call today and we'll
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(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-1441





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lowest price in Citrus
Cty. Prime local in
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in Homosassa. Only
$2300 for both side by
side plots. 352-382-3623




A free report of your
home's value
www.naturecoast
living.net

Boost Traffic To
Your Website
Chronicle Website
Directory In print
and online.
Our search engine
3 will link customers j
directly to your site.
I I
In Print

= One Price
S $51.95
(3 lines of copy
for 30 days)
Website Address
Call Today:
(352) 563-5966 I


AR SALES
www.naturecoast
wheels.com

NEWSPAPERS
www.chronicle
onlne.com


REAL ESTATE
www.naturecoast
homefront.com

RENTALS
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com

WHOLESALE
SHOPPING
www.1282.onetouch
shoppin,bliz




EXP. TEACHERS
Quality childcare hiring.
(352) 795-5862
INFANT/TODDLER
TEACHER NEEDED
(352) 795-6890
Seeking
Mature Person, to
watch young Infant
preferably in our
Homosassa home, Ref.
Needed (352) 503-5295



ACCOUNTS

PAYABLE CLERK

Seeking energetic
individual w/exp. in
Accounts Payable,
Excel & Lotus. Needs
to be dependable
& willing to learn. F/T
w/benefits. Apply
in person.
Pro-Line Boats
I 1520 S. Suncst Blvd.
I HOMOSASSA
DFWP/EOE
--- -- J
SECRETARY F/T
Strong computer
& organizational skills
necessary. Construction
office experience
desirable, DFWP/EOE
Winkel
Construction, Inc.
Fax resume: 860-0700
SECRETARY/
Real Estate Asst.

RE Lic. required. Must
have computer skills.
Hourly salary & bonus.
Kingsbay Realty
(352) 795-8080






























HAIR DRESSER
Exp a plus or will train
new tLic. Professional.
(352) 628-4888

HAIR STYLIST

openings Call Sue
352-628-0630
STYLIST
Now taking applica-
tions, in Hernando
for Opening mid Oct.
(352) 746-0335
WANTED
STYLIST/BARBER
High commission pd.






No weekends req d.
(352) 201-6017
(352-628016307






$1500.00
Sign on Bonus!
LICENSED NURSES
3-11
If you possess above
average skills, are
dedicated to the
higher standards of
elder care, good
documentation and
a genuine caring
attitude, we have a
place for you. We
offer a salary range
comparable to your
experience and
great benefits,
Crystal River Health
and Rehab Center
136 NE 12th Ave.
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 795-5044
HR/ConnIe
(M, T, Th., & F 9-3)
DFWP/ EOE


of Citrus County
A Skilled Facility has
an opening for:
MDS Coordinator
F/T RN

Salary comensurate
with experience.
11-7 F/T & P/T
RN/LPN

Excellent Health &
Dental Blue Cross/
Blue Shield of FL &
paid vacation. Come
loin our Exceptional
Nursing Team!
Fax Resume
(352) 746-0748 or
Apply in person
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
(352) 249-3100




ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVES
HOME HEALTH
CARE SALES
CITRUS COUNTY

We offer a
competitive base
salary, exceptional
incentive and
compensation plan,
and a
comprehensive
benefits package.
You must have
extensive
Healthcare sales
experience, Home
Health preferred,
knowledge of
referral sources in
the area, outstand-
ing presentation,
commication skills
and a proven new
business sales track
record.
WWW.TLCATHOME.
COM
(P) (352) 564-2700
(F) (352)564-0652











Child Welfare
Workers
The Centers
is seeking State
Certified Child
Welfare Workers for Citrus
County. This posion works
with
corrmuity based care i-
fia-
tive in
providing conlmiy of
care,
withgod ofpermaent
place-
ment for children
through care
management model that
cludes
developing, expndnhg,
acces-
sing &
inkhg resources h the
conmu-
nityto needs of the chid,
whie
documenting progress.
Bache-
brs degree h field of
Humnan
Servicesreqed with mi
1yr
socidd services exp working
with
chddren &famres. Current
(PDC) Child
Protection
Professional
Certification
Preferred. Send
Salary Requrements. Fu
bene-
fispkg DFWP/EOEFoeor
e-ma
resume to
HR,the Centers, nc., (352)
291-550, obsee
ters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us




Crisis
Response
Workers

The Centers
is seeking Therapists
& Case Mgrs to pro-
vide emergency
Intervention therapy
to Individuals &
families in crisis. Some
on-call. MA to BA
degree in Human
Svc field reqd w/
min lyr exp.
Submit salary req.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE Fax or
e-mail resume to
HR, the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
iobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www,thecenters.us


Billing Specialist


F/T, Experience
necessary, computer
literate, benefits
Fax Resume
352-726-8193

CNA or CMA
With phlebotomy Exp.
fulltime position
Fax Resume
(352) 564-4222

EXP. BILINGUAL
OFFICE MANAGER

Needed for MD
practice. Please CV
c/o Box 1378M
Citrus Publishing
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, Fl
32229.

EXP'D MEDICAL
RECEPTIONIST/
FRONT DESK

F/T position.
Computer literate,
Benefits. Reply to:
P.O. Box 207,
Crystal River, FL 34429
r------1
SEXPERIENCEDn
MDS LPN
NURSE

Position requires a
reliable positive
team player.
Mail or Fax Resume:
Att: Laurie Coleman
136 NE 12th Ave.
Crystal River, FL
34429
OR FAX RESUME to:
(352) 795-5848
CONTACT Laurie Via
MailorFAXONLYII
DFWP/EOE


FRONT DESK
TEAM LEADER
Check in/out,
insurance ver.
Ophtal/Bushnell.
Fax resume to
813-960-0042


Join Our Team!
Openin for a
P/T LAUNDRY/
HOUSEKEEPING
SPECIALIST
Days & Nights
Apply in person @
Citrus Health
And Rehab Center
701 Medical Court E.
Inverness
(352) 860-0200
Drug Free
Workplace
*------ U

LPN NEEDED

Must have strong
computer skills for
clinical research
position.
Research experience
desirable.
Please call
(352)563-1865 or
email rwood@encore


MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

For busy doctor's office,
Must know phlebotomy
Mon-Frl, 8am-3pm,
Salary negotiable.
Fax resume: 628-1620.


NURSE RECRUITER

Requires a Bachelor's
degree (additional
coursework In
Human Resources
Management,
Business
Administration or
Psychology
preferred). Ideal
candidate must be a
Registered Nurse or
Licensed Practical
Nurse with current FL
licensure: and be
proficient with
computer
applications. A
minimum of 2 years
recruiting experience,
preferably in an
acute setting
required. Please
apply online at
www.citrusmh.com.
CMHS is an equal
opportunity employer








RIs


upto$3






LPi ;

upt 02


C .
Center


NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
at Life Care Center
of Citrus County
You have the
opportunity to
improve your career
and your life when
you join our team.
By offering
competitive pay
and benefits,
including excellent
PTO time and
insurance.
We make YOU
our first priority.

RNs/LPNs
Full-time positions
available.
3 p.m,-11 p.m.
& 11 p.m. - 7 a.m.

CNAs
PRN positions
available for all
shifts.
Apply in person:
Contact:
Hannah Mand
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
Visit us online@
www.LCCA.com
EOE Job #1 181
L Am-- J


RNs:
Director of
Surgical Services
/.- Critical Care
MedSurg
Telemetry
S . Emergency (per diem)

Other Opportunities:
Director of Rehab Services
Blood Bank Supervisor
Medical Technologist
Histology Technologist
Physical Therapist
Physical Therapy Assistant
Radiology Technologist
Respiratory Therapist
Security Guard
Patient Account Representative
Coder
Inquire about our sign-on bonus
for select FT positions!
SRRMC is part of the HMA family of hospitals
For information about these and other
opportunities, please apply to:
Human Resources
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34428
Fax # 352-795-8464
Job Line # 352-795-8418
Email: /--.
Linda.Macaulay@srrmc.hma-corp.com , r'lCln I I
Web Site: www.srrmc.com 1
EOE/DRUG FREE WORKPLACE i om 2' o

O SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
728495


EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/ Cell 422-3656

NOW HIRING
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable

CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-In,
Flexible schedules
offered. $10.00/hr.
CALL LOVING CARE


RN * LPN
Arbor Village
Nursing
a Wildwood SNF seek
caring nurses to join
our quality team of
dedicated caregivers
P/T-3-11 + 11-7
GREAT SALARY
STRONG BENEFITS
SUPER WORK
ENVIRONMENT
Call 800-442-1353
Fax 877-571-1952
JOBS@CQcare.com
490 South Old
Wire Rd.


CMA NEEDED
A ALL STAR *
Professional
Staffing Services
352-560-6210

RN/LPN
CNA/HHA'S
I Interim Health Care
(352) 637-3111 �
L= = i = =


Central Florida
Community
College
Multiple teaching
opportunities are
available in the
Communications -
English
(Composition I & II)
and
Communications -
English
(College-Prep &
Composition I):
Both positions require
a Master's degree in
English or Master's
degree with a
concentration In
English (a minimum of
18 graduate semester
hours in English
required). Two years
of full-time teaching
experience at the
high school,
community college
or university level or
a combination of the
three required.
Open until filled.
Communications -
Reading/English
(College-Prep):
Bachelor's degree in
Communication or
Education with
significant course
work and/or training
In Reading required.
Two years of teaching
experience at the
high school,
community college
or university level or
a combination of all
three preferred.
Open until filled.
Administrative
and Professional
opportunities:
Director - Institutional
Effectiveness:
Master's degree
required. Two years
full-time experience in
planning, research, or
assessment related
activities required.
Open until filled.
Coordinator -
School Relations:
Bachelor's degree
required. One or more
years, In progressively
responsible
supervisory positions
preferred.
Background in
community college
advising or
marketing/public
relations Is desirable.
Open until filled.
Additional ooen until
filled positions:
Programmer
Analyst III
Skills Lab Specialist
Part-time Public
Safety Officer
at the Appleton
Museum of Art
For additional
information visit
www.GoCFCC.com
or e-mail hr@cf.edu.
Mail application and
transcripts to: CFCC,
Aft: H.R. Dept,
P.O. Box 1388, Ocala,
FL 34478-1388.
CFCC Is an EOE/
AA/DFW employer.


BOOKKEEPER

Needed. Permanent
position. Computer
literate. Familiar with
Accounts Receivable
& Accounts Payable.
Good communica-
tion skills. Must have
experience. Pay
depends on
experience & ability.
Send Resume to:
PO Box 426
Crystal River, FL 34423


EXPERIENCED
HEALTH & LIFE
PRODUCER

To work for large
P & C agency In
Citrus Co. Strong
company & great
commission payouts.
Send resumes to:
Blind Box 1379P
Citrus Co. Chronicle
106 W. Main St.
Inverness, FIl 34450


INSURANCE
Pers./Commi. Lines
CSR w/220 ULic.,
looking for agency
partnership. Call
(207) 730-2636


OFFICE
MANAGER

For Homosassa.
Prefer experience in
a Healthcare/Social
Services setting.
Marketing exp.
also desirable.
Requirements: AA
Degree (BA Degree
Pref'd) in business or
related field. Also
requires up to 6 mos.
Apprenticeship @
Home Office in
Leesburg. Pays
$400/wk. salary
+ commission &
benefits.
(352) 314-0500

SUBSTANCE ABUSE
COUNSELOR
Provides in-home sub-
stance assessment and
counseling services to
at-risk families in Her-
nando County; pos-
sesses knowledge of
chemical dependency,
AA/NA 12-step philoso-
phy, community CD re-
sources and Marchman
Act; 2 yrs relevant sub-
stance abuse treatment
experience and a MA in
Human Svcs. required.
Licensed and /or CAP
preferred. Apply
LifeStream Behavioral
Ctr. 515W. Main St.
Leesburg or online at
www. lsbc.net

Tax Accountant

For Crystal River area.
Permanent position.
Computer literate.
Must have Income
tax experience.
Pay depends on
experience & ability.
Send Resume to:
PO Box 426
Crystal River, FL 34423






Bartender & Cook
Apply in Person
9a - 3p, Mon - Fri
HICKORY ISLAND
RESTAURANT
Inglis (Old Port Inglis
Restaurant) Hwy.. 19

COOK
Line Cook/Prep Cook
Exp. nec. Apply Tues.-
Fri. at Black Diamond
HR, 3073 W. Shadow
Creek Loop, Lecanto,
FL. EOE DFWP

F/T Bartender
Nights & Wknds.
Sports knowledge
a plus, Also need.
Cocktail Server
Experience a plus.
Apply In person.
Manatee Lanes,
Crystal River DFWP

OPENING SOON
*SERVERS
*BARTENDERS .COOKS
Call for interview with
David (352) 628-4311

PT COOKS
Open oat 5:30am
Sabina's Diner & Ice
Cream (352) 637-1308






$$ GOT CASH $$
Earn great money by
setting appts. for busy
local company.
Call Steve:
352-628-0187


ATTENTION
Real Estate Agents,
Brokers, and
Salesmen of all fields.
Are you tired of long
hours with no
compensation?
My agents make
$5,000 to $7,000
a month. We have
joined a national
effort to assist in the
enrollment of the new
Medicare Advantage
plans for Retirees on
Medicare
You will work In
Pharmacies,
Senior Centers and
Local area.
My Agents enjoy
* Monthly Bonuses
* We take trips all
over the world
* We advance Ist
commissions
* Vested Renewals
* We have Preset
appointments
* TV Leads
* Seminars
* Pre approach letters
Please call Mr. Buck
at 1-352-726-7722
for an interview or
Fax Resume to
1-352-726-6813

Crystal Motor Car
Company
of Homosassa &
Inverness

Are Looking for
experienced Sales
Professionals. If you
are self motivated
with a proven track
record and desire
a position that offers
more than just an
average living.
JOIN OUR TEAM
TODAY. We offer paid'
Auto Sales Training for,
qualified individuals,
Medical/Dental, 401K,
and a Holiday savings
plan. EOE/DFWP.
Please call Diane at
(352)795-1515
or Fax resume to
(352) 564-1952

Exp. Sales Person'
NEEDED

Sun Country Homes
Rapidly Becoming
the areas, premiere
dealer of manufac-
tured & modular
homes, Is seeking,
an exp. Sales Person.
Competitive com-
pensation & benefits
plan,
Fax Resume or Applyi
in Person DFWP Fax
352-794-7310
SUN COUNTRY HOMES
1710 S. Suncoast Blvd.

LOCAL PLUMBING
WHOLESALER

Looking for inside
Counter/Sales person.
Plumbing & computer
knowledge a plus.
401K & Insurance
Apply in person @:
Morgan Bros. Supply
7559 W. Gulf to Lake
Crystal River

SALES ASSISTANT
For model
home sales center,
Saturday required.
No experience
necessary. Must be
personable, eager to
learn, able to follow
directions, aggressive,
energetic and
conscientious
Salary plus bonus.
Email resume to
izahrinaer@acme
homesfia.com
or fax to 352-382-4514





The Cedar Key Water'
& Sewer District
Is accepting
applications for the
following positions.
Each includes Health
& Dental Ins,,
Retirement Plan &
good fishing. DFW
OPERATION &
MAINTENANCE
TECHNICIAN
Ability to perform light
operational duties at
Water & WWTP as
well as sludge
hauling, meter
reading and other
maintenance duties
as assigned. Double
C operators license
desired, high school
diploma and valid
CDL driver's license
required. Up to
26K to start.
MAINTENANCE
Technician
Ability to assist with
light operational
duties, as well as
sludge haulling,
meter reading,
mowing and other
maintenance duties
as assigned. High
school diploma and
valid CDL driver's
license required.
Up to 21K to start.
Email or Fax Resume
to 352-543-6024
jackhh@bellsouth.net


6D SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2007


CI-ASSIFIEDS


CITR


*us COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICI.E


AUTO BODY
WORK/PAINT
ExD'd. must have Drivers


lic


:. 352-613-4532


Need aGED?


Concerned


about childcare?










Call for Infoirration about Even Start. a family
lltoracy program 795-7887


CABINET BUILDER/
FINISHER


Custom wopd cabinet
shop. Exp, top pay,
drug free. Call anyday
352-489-9072 or fax
resume 352-465-6098

CERTIFIED OR
HIGHLY EXP'D
SPRAY TECH
Apply in Person at:
920 E Ray Street
Hemando

CLRIA


Trades
4�b
cm /Skills


EX.lFM


FIRE/SECURITY
SYSTEM TECH

Al Alarm Systems is
seeking experienced
FT Technicians,
Company vehicle
provided, Will pay Top
$S for experience.
352-795-5179 or
Fax 352-795-7082


LOCAL
UNDERGROUND
UTILITY CO.
Exp'd Pipe Crew
& Laborers
Croft Contracting,
Inc. 2271 N Hwy41
Hernando.
(352) 860-1202
DFWP


EXP. FRAME
CARPENTERS
(352) 634-0432

- PLUMBERS
ONLY I
Experienced
Rough Tubset Trim
Service.
621-7705
--**- -- ***
TOWER HAND
Starting at $9.00/hr
Bldg Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017 Mon-Fri





$$ GOT CASH $$

Earn great money by
setting appts. for busy
local company.
Call Steve @
352-628-0187


A/C Tune up w/ Free
permanent filter +
Termite/Pest Control
Insp. Lic & Boned Only
$44,95 for both,
(352) 628-5700
caco36870



ADVERTISE YOUR
BUSINESS IN THE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1 TODAY!
s $$$$$$$S$$$$$$$$ $
Its Less than
'I Pennies per day
$per household.
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
IF WE DON'T HAVE
1 YOUR BUSINESS
CATEGORY.
S JUST ASK.
WE CAN GET
SIT FOR YOUII

CALL TODAY
(352) 563-5966
L



"DEBRIS HAULING"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898
i 3rd Generation Service
Fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,



r -AFFORDABLE,
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
PROMPT SERVICE
Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages u
352-697-1126
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
S& Sod: 352-563-0272
FREE CONSULTATION
To hurricane ready your
trees. Prof. Arborist,
Action Tree 726-9724
R WRIGHT TREE SERVICE,
tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Lic
#0256879 352-341-6827



Your world first.
Evern Da\


CHRpN iLE
V L lailr.IlI


.r -TREE R A - A * RUDY'S PAINTING *
TREE REMOVAL Int./Ext., Free Estimates
SI tump grinding, land I Pressure Wash., Lic./Ins.
clearing, bushhog. 24/7, (352) 476-9013
" 22 '5054 - -4-
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd friendly -
serv. Lowest rates Free L-i lU
estimates,352-860-1452 Affordable Boat Maint.
& Repair, Mechanical,
Electrical, Custom Rig.
John (352) 746-4521
DOCKS, SEAWALLS,
All Computer Repairs Boat Lifts, Boat Houses,
We come to your home New, Re decks, Repair
or office. 21 yrs. exp. & Styrofoam Replace.
7 days (352) 212-1165 Lic.CBC060275. Ins.
Citrus(352) 302-1236
Computer Doctors
Repairs In-Home or
Pick-Up, Delivery avail. II I
Free quote, 344-4839


Carpet Factory Direct
Restretch,clean, repair
Vinyl, Tile, Wood, (352)
341-0909 Shop at home
REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch * Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-1728


v rnns Saucne rPamning
& Wallcovering.All work
fully coated. 30 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Ins. Lic#001721
352-795-6533/464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Lic. & ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
3rd GENERATION SERV
fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
lawn trees, & landscap-
ing FREE Est., 10% off
any job. lic 99990257151
& Ins. (352) 201-0658
CHEAP/CHEAP/CHEAP
Husband & Wife DP
Press.Cleaning & Paint-
ing. Lic.&lns. 637-3765
A# 1 L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small[ 24/7
Lic3008 352-341-1440






FERRARO'S
PAINTING SERVICE
Interior, Exterior.
Free Estimates.
Senior Discount,
(352)465-6631
George Swedlige
Painting- Int./Ext.
Pressure Cleaning- Free
est. 794-0400 /628-2245
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Dave Rodgers Painting
20 + yrs. exp., int./ext.
satisfaction guarantee
lic./Ins. (352) 726-5698


.Dethatching Lawns
Vacuum Leaves & Thatch,
Tree Trimming
(352) 637-3810 or (352) 287-0393
FREE ESTIMATE Licensed & Insured




Handyman Tom
* All Phases of Home Repair
* Window and Door Replacements
* Drywall Repair
* Pressure Wash
* Deck and Dock Repair
* Interior Trim
� Painting

637-7250 or
(352) 442-7772
713968 Lic. & Ins.


AT YOUR HOME Res.
mower & small engine
repair. Lic#99990001273
352-220-4244.



BATHTUB REGLAZING
Old tubs & ugly
ceramic tile is restored
to new cond. All colors
avail. 697-TUBS (8827)


rKCC CiIV]0IICI4
FREE P.U. & DELIVERY
Furniture & Cornices
(352) 628-5595



ASSISTANCE FOR SRS.
Driver, shopping, appts.
meals, laundry, respite
relief. 352-746-5666
CNA for in home care,
20yrs exp. Can live In.
(352) 860-1982 (352)
613-4618. 613-4614
FT ADULT CARE IN
Private home has
opening. $4.50 hr. Eden
Alternative Practice,
Please call 563-0434
HEAVEN SENT
Prvt. rm. of home. 1 on
1 care. CNA & Med.
Tech. (352) 621-3337
9Y LOVING CARE
That makes a
difference. Will care
for elderly person in
my home or yours 24 hr.
care. Louisa, 201-1663



-Windows & Doors
-Storm Shutters
-Board-Up Service
-Resident/Commercial
CRC 1326431
(352) 746-9613



IN HOME, except, 1
child, lots of TLC & exp.
Off US 19, Wkee Wach./
Homa. (352) 263-1860


New In Home Mother
& Daughter Day Care
in Citrus Springs,
caring environment
352-302-3105, 489-2709
O REG HOME DAY CARE
Openings NOW FT/PT
* Infants Welcome f,
e 352-726-5163 i


VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.All work
fully coated. 30 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Ins. Lic#001721
352-795-6533/464-1397


-E
FINAL DETAILS, LLC
CLEANING SERVICES,
New Const.,Vacant
Prop,,Offices, Residen-
tial 352-400-2772 LUc. Ins.
HAUTER & CLARK
HANDYMAN & MORE
Home, Office & Floor
Cleaning, Lawn Serv.
Pressure Washing,
(352) 860-0911
HOME CLEANING
Homosassa, Lecanto
& Crystal River -
Weekly, bi-weekly,
1 time cleaning,
moves, rentals, real
estate sales /models.
Ryanna, 586-7919
Licensed, Ins., Ref.
House Cleaning
Call Mary
(352) 503-6300



Splffy Window Cleaners
Special Introductory
. offer 20% Discount
lic. & Ins. (352) 503-3558



DOTSON Construction
25 yrs. in Central FL. Our
own crews Specializing
in additions, framing,
trim, & decks.
Lic. #CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708
PRICE Finish Carpentry
Wood molding & doors
30+ yrs. Lic. 17510184057
352-860-0675/302-4389
ROGERS Construction
New HomesAdditions
Florida Rooms.
637-4373 CRC1326872




FL RESCREEN
352-563-0104/257-1011
I panel or camp cage
Family owned & oper'd
Screen rms,Carports,
vinyl & acrylic windows,
roof overs & storm
panels, garage screen
doors, siding,
soffit fascia, Llc#2708
(352) 628-0562


Bathtubs + Tiles+ Sinks + Counter Tops
All can be Resurfaced at a fraction
of the cost to replace! - 5yr Warr


Brand New Look =

call for FREE
Estimate or Info

352-797-5597


HUGE HAVING $
-SALE-
' $225.00
most std tubs
reg. $250.00
\ Exp. 10/31/07 1


BATHJIWLJ�RKS
hf Firli -,INOj -,rRU �'TQKWIUN
721 , ReSitdernlnl C.-,mrmerciai - lnsurp~d


ROOFN


Bouterice

CCC025464 QB0002180
& SUPPLY INC.
Family Owned & Operated
NEW ROOFS - REROOFS - REPAIRS

FREE ESTIMATES---
I . . . I


$~100 OFF
COPLT ROOF


(352) 628-5079 * (352) 628-7445


CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
A# I L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small 24/7
Lic3008 352-341-1440
AUGIE'S PRESSURE
Cleaning - Quality
Work, Low Prices. FREE
Estimates: 220-2913


PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING
Roofs w/no pressure,
houses.driveways. 25 yrs
exp. Lic./Ins. 341-3300
* ROLAND'S *
PRESSURE CLEANING
Mobiles, houses & roofs
Driveways w/surface
cleaner. No streaks
24 yrs. Uc. 352-726-3878




#1 A+TECHNOLbGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash & Gutters
Lic.5863 (352) 746-0141
1 Call does it AIII No lob
too sm.l Remod., Home
Repairs, Press, Clean.,
etc. CRC1326431
(352) 746-9613
Andrew Joehl
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
Pressure & cleaning.
Lawns, gutters. No job
too small! Reliable. Ins
0256271 352-465-9201
3rd Generation Service
Fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
Lawn, Trees, Landscap-
ing, FREE Est., 10% off
any job. lic 99990257151
& Ins. (352) 201-0658
A# I L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small! 24/7
Lic3008 352-34 1-1440

AFFORDABLE
I HAULING CLEANUPS, I
Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages |
352-697-1126 J
ALL AMERICAN
HANDYMAN Free Est.
Affordable & Reliable
Lic.34770 (352)302-8001






FASTI AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs.
Free Est., Lic # 0256374
(352) 257-9508


HANDYMAN
If its Broke , Jerry
Can Fix It. Lic#189620
352-201-0116,726-0762
HAUTER & CLARK
HANDYMAN & MORE
Home, Office & Floor
Cleaning, Lawn Serv.
Pressure Washing,
(352) 860-0911
Inside Out Handyman
Service, Inc. Home re-
pairs, remodeling & Rm.
additions #CRC039323
352-220-8136
NEW IN AREA
Ask for Jim or Iv. msg.
352-344-5213
217-201-2962 Lic34868



FULL ELECTRIC SERVICE
Remodeling, Lighting,
Spa, Sheds Lic. & Insur.
#2767 (352)257-2276
MALLEY's Elect. Service
Resid. & Comm.
Ins. & Lic. #EC0001840
Rob @352-220-9326
Mel 352-255-4034




"DEBRIS HAULING'"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898
ri----
I AFFORDABLE
I HAULING CLEANUP,
PROMPT SERVICE |
STrash, Trees, Brush
Appl. Furn, Const, I
| Debris & Garages |
352-697-1126
A-I Hauling cleanup,
garage clean outs,
trash turn. & appl. Misc.
Mark (352) 344-0034
All of Citrus Hauling/
Moving Items delivered,
clean ups.Everything
from A to Z 628-6790
C.J.'S TRUCK/TRAILERS
Furn., apple, trash, brush,
Low $$$/Professional
Prompt 7 day service
726-2264/201-1422
WE MOVE SHEDS
266-5903




All kinds of fences
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
Free estimates.
(352)
527-3431
ROCKY'S FENCING
Serving Citrus Co. for 25
yrs. "Call the Best, Forget
the Rest." Free Est., Lie.
& Ins., 352 422-7279
3rd GENERATION SERV
fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext, Painting,
lawn trees, & landscap-
ing FREE Est., 10% off
any job. lic 99990257151
& Ins. (352) 201-0658


25 Years In County
Free Est., Res./Comm,
FENCES BY DALLAS
Lic./Ins (352) 795-1110
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All types.Free estimates
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BARNYARD II FENCING
Serving Citrus Co. Since
1973, Free Estimates
(352) 726-9260
GARY JOE ROSEBERRY
Fence Company
Specializing in vinyl


1 i in Service
Hise Roofing
New const. reroofs &
repairs. 25 yrs. exp. leak
spec. #CCC 1327059
(352) 344-2442
John Gordon Roofing
Rem Rat es.Freeest, Proudto
Serve You.
ccc 1325492.
795-7003/800-233-5358
RE-ROOFS & REPAIRS
Reasonable Rates!!
Exp'd, Lic. CCC1327843
Erik (352) 628-2557
ROOFOVERS - MH
2" insul, lifetime warr. no
leaks, colors avail. Do it
yourself kits avail. Lic
1983. 352-746-1600



All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. FREE EST.
Lic#2579 /Ins. 746-1004
Concrete Slabs, Pavers
Remove & Haul Debris
Demolit. 352-746-9613
Lic# CRC1326431
Concrete Staining,
Garage & Driveway,
House pressure washer,
Free Est., 20 Yrs. Exp.
(352) 422-8888
CONCRETE WORK
Sdewals, Diveways Patios,
Free est. Lic. 2000. Ins.
795-4798
Decorative concrete,
River rock, curbs, Stamp
concrete Fuston's River
Rock (352) 344-4209
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
driveways & tear outs
Lic. 1476 726-6554



ALL AMERICAN
HANDYMAN Free Est.
Affordable & Reliable
Lic.34770 (352)302-8001
DOTSON Construction
25 yrs. in Central FL. Our
own crews! Specializing
in additions, framing,
trim, & decks.
Lic. #CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708


FASTI AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE! Most repairs.
Free Est., Lic # 0256374
(352) 257-9508
Inside Out Handyman
Service, Inc. Home re-
pairs, remodeling & Rm.
additions #CRC039323
352-220-8136






We do it ALLI BIg or Sm.l
Additions, BA & Kitch.,
DrywallCrown molding,
(352) 746-9613




CERAMIC TILE INSTALLER
Bathroom remodeling,
handicap bathrooms.
Lic/Ins. #2441 795-7241
CUTTING EDGE Ceramic
Tile. Uc, #2713, Insured.
Showers. Firs. Counters
Etc. (352) 422-2019
STONE MASON
Outdoor Fireplaces,
Waterfalls & Ponds,
Walks & Patios, Etc.
(352) 592-4455



ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs,
Texture, Additions,
Homeowners, Builders
Free est. (352) 220-9016
Lic.#SCC131 149747



FILL, ROCK, CLAY, ETC.
All typoes of Dirt Service
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572
AFFORDABLE Top soil,
fill, mulch,rock. Tractor
work. No job too small.
352-302-7325 341-2019
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955.
FLIPS TRUCK & TRACTOR,
Landclearing, Truck &
Tractor work. House
Pads, Rock, Sand, Clay,
Mulch & Topsoil.
(352) 382-2253
A TOP SOIL SPECIAL A
Screened, no stones.
10 Yards $150; 20 Yards
$250 B 352-302-6436



All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
Lr ANDCLEARING
I Site prep, Tree Serv., I
I Dump Truck, Demo
352-220-5054
L am 1 m Im ad=


Residential -,,
Cal Commercial Seia


| 628-4282 Member |
M :1101A 111 (AmbIF-


New & Re-Roofs * Flat & Low Pitch
Douglas L. Bruns Services *Roof Repairs.Commercial *Residential
Shingle - Metal - Built Up Roof
STorchdown - Shakes

(all makes and models)



Lawn Maintenance Ck b O#

CalInwnr10 DX s allations

3522209492 (352) 628-2557
352 -220e9bl te & ILucksroof.com
Roof Inspections Available Drug Free Workplace
28317 Reasonable Rates Lc. & InS. Slate Certlified Lic. #CCC1327843


M.H. Demolition &
Salvage. Land clearing,
tree brush removal
(352) 634-0329
TRACTOR SERVICE
Tree/Debris Removal
Driveways/Demolition
Line Rock/Fill Dirt
Sr. Disc. 352-302-4686
TURTLE ACRES
Bushhog, Grading,
Stumpgrinding,
Removal No job too
small. (352) 422-2114



3rd Generation Service
Fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
Lawn, Trees, Landscap-
ing, FREE Est., 10% off
any job. lie 99990257151
& Ins. (352) 201-0658
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
. design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272
� SOD * SOD * SOD.
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032



"El Cheapo" cuts $10 up
Beat any Price. We do
it All. Call 352-563-9824
Or 352-228-7320
3rd Generation Service
Fencing, Gen. home
repairs, Int/Ext. Painting,
Lawn, Trees, Landscap-
ing, FREE Est., 10% off
any job. lic 99990257151
& Ins. (352) 201-0658
A TROPICAL LAWN
Family owned & oper.
Satisfaction Guaran.
352-257-9132/257-1930
ANDERSEN'S YARDMAN
SERVICES, Mowing, Pres.
Washing, Trash Hauling,
Low rates!352-277-6781
C & R LANDSCAPING
Lawn Maintenance
clean ups Mulching,
We Show Up
352-503-5295, 503-5082
G. Nelson & Son, Lawn
Service, mowing, trim-
ming, etc, dependable
lic. & ins. (352)563-2118
LAWN SERVICE
We do re-sodding
and patching.
Free Estimate 795-4798.
Steve's Lawn Service
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166



POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Acrylic Decking
e 352-464-3967 i
A POOL LINERSI A
* 15 Yrs. Exp. A
Call for free estimate
S (352) 591-3641 J
POOL REPAIRS?
Comm. & Res,. & Leak
detection, lic. 2819,
352-503-3778, 302-6060


WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs on all makes
& models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard




"DEBRIS HAULING"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898
DOG GROOMING
In your home or mine.
10 yrs. exp. Stephanie
@ (352) 503-3435
Doll Repair done in my
Home, Pick up/delivery
avail, prices quoted
(352) 464-1399
WILL DO ERRANDS
For Elderly & Others
Call for Details
(352) 628-1036
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM


0 PAI'NAJANlE.I
6" Seamless Gutter
Best Job Availablell
Lic. & Ins. 352-860-0714




Form Direct Rolls
Sod Installation
Seeding & Mulching
352-812-4345/817-4887


Roof Cleaning Specialist
The Only Company that can Keep Mold & Mildew Off
Siding - Stucco - Vinyl - Concrete Tile & Asphalt Roofs

GUARANTEED!
Restore * Protect* Beautify - Residential & Commercial

Suncoast

Exterior
Restoration Service Inc.

877-601-5050 * 352-489-5265


Seio Serice


AT HOME 'pinq 9:

ELDERLY Vand

SERVICES, LLC
Providing a helping hand to our seniors

Offering ALL Services
In ALL surrounding areas.

Reasonable Rates

(352) 586-4265

. or 637-1123


-w


iv"1


Low"




^,11U


Installations by
Brian CBC1253853
Wee w 4y l-Nited Wy u imaginati '
352-628-7519
' , , l
.\.i\jj.:rr'dju -iiiniif: �

Hi~m~r n ha'^ w .3 . -�.~ ^ cRls


ApplinceRepir


*SEVEN RIVERS

Security

Guard
(per diem)
Please apply to:
Seven Rivers
Regional Medical
, Center
Human Resources
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd,
Crystal River, FL 34428
Phone:352-795-8462
Fax: 352-795-8464
Email:
careers@srrmc.hma-
corp.com
Web Site: www.srrmc.com
O728496 EE/DFWP
724


w d


CUSTOMER SERVICE
18-27 hrs per week,
computer experience
helpful, will train.
Collections work.
2-3 days a week
In Inverness. Room for
advancement.
Call Mike, 352-637-1428

Exp. Construction
Laborers Wanted
Must be 18 or over,
Transportation
preferred. Call for
Interview, 860-2055



CARE PRSONNE
Copttv0 ae


an.bnfis
Apyin ero


CILASSI[F]IIEIDS


FRONT DESK
Hotel experience
required. Great
benefits. Full-time.
Apply in person:
BEST WESTERN
614 NW Hwy 19,
Crystal River.



INGLIS DELIVERY
ROUTE AVAILABLE
Must have two
vehicles available
and able to work
early morning hours
7 days a week.
Call 563-3201
and leave, name,
phone number and
the best time to call.

CH RpN'(l�


SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 23 2007 7D





Serving the Developmentally
Disabled Since 1966.

$ Increased pay rates and $

competitive benefit package for
all F/T employees after 90 days

Positions Available:

Residential - F/T & P/T

Supported Living Coach - F/T

Transitional Living Coach - F/T

DRUG FREE WORKPLACE

Apply at the Key Training Center
Business Office
130 Heights Ave., Inverness
352-341-4633
(TDD: 1-800-545-1833 ext. 347)
*EOE*
729518


d


I


-1


�71k


NI


I-,






SDlSITNDAY, SIPTFMBER 23,. 2007


4


INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE.


* 0


IT'S FREE!


800-342-3008


2008 ALTIMA

SAVE
;5,000 ...


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIALPRICING ON
THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT. 1511


A t 16,999 or 239*


2008 TITAN


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIALPRICING ON,
THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT. 1512


Starng 18,999or
at I F99


2008 VERSA


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 1513
*1 2. 999
$1 89 Mo.-
2007 IMPALA



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 956
*14,999


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 963
$13,999
2005 SILVERADO


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 971
1 2,999
2004 TITAN


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT. 1559
$11.999
$199 MO.*
2002 F150


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 989
$8,999


2007 FRONTIER



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 1516
s15.999
$239 MO*
2007 DURANGO



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 957
*16,999
2006 TITAN



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 964
$14,999

2005 TRAILBLAZER



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 973
$12,999


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 979
*12,999
2002 ALTIMA



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 992
C8,999


2007 MURANO



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 1518
$23.999
$399 MO.-
2007 SENTRA



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 958
210,999
2006 SONATA


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 965
~11,999
2005 GRAND CARAVAN



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 974
*.11,999
2004 DAKOTA



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 980
m8,999
2002 QUEST


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 1568
$7.999
$159 mo*


2007 GRAND MARQUIS



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 951
*13,999
2007 YUKON



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 959
$26,999
2006 COROLLA



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 966
$12,999
2005 FRONTIER



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 975
8,999
2003 SILVERADO



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 983
$9,999
2001 FRONTIER


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 1569
$6.999
'-149 mo.*


2007 CAMRY



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 953
$1 6,999
2006 F150


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 961
$13,999
2006 TACOMA



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 967
12,999
2005 ALTIVIA


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 1555
$12.999
$1 99 mo.*
2003 MUSTANG



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 986
$9,999
2001 RAM


2007 CIVIC



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 955
*13,999
2006 ACCORD



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 962


2006 ODYSSEY



FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 968
$21,999


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 1558
$9.999
$179 MO.*
2003 SENTRA


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 1565
$6.999
$1 29 MO.*
2001 COROLLA


OCALA NISSAN 10

(800) 342-3008 2200 SR 200 OCALA (352) 622-4111
ALL PRICES WITH *1,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY PLUS SALES TAX, LICENSE FEE AND '395 DEALER FEE. ALL INVENTORY PRE-OWNED AND SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY.
L: 36 MONTH LEASE W/P2,999 DUE AT SIGNING. RESIDUALS: ALTIMA '12,876, TITAN '13,421, VERSA *8,648, SENTRA: '8,221 AND MAXIMA '16,670. WITH APPROVED CREDIT.
*PAYMENTS @ 72 MONTHS & 6.9% APR, W.A.C. PICTURES FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY.


C'ITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MO.L


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 994
$8,999


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL
PRICING ON THIS VEHICLE.
800-325-1415 EXT. 995
$5,999


I


FIND OUT EXACTLY WHAT YOUR CAR IS WORTH,
NO MATTER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUY!

CALL THE










SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2007 9D


CLEANING PERSON
-Part time, Call 9a-10a &
7p-8p (352) 637-0585
HOUSECLEANER
P/T Must have car. Drug
& Background Check.
Christian Org 212-4851
KEY PINE VILLAGE
Training Instructor
II - P/T
Primary duty is to
enter data into
standardized
computer program.
Must be able to
perform Direct Care
duties in absence of
staff. Saturday and
Sunday nights,
11:15pm .- 7:15am .
Apply within the
HR Dept.
1-352-341-4633
(TDD: 1-800-545-1833
ext 347) *EOE*


CH ipNICLE

TEMPORARY
DISTRIBUTION
ASSISTANTS
Needed. Must have
reliable vehicle. Able
to work odd days
and early morning
hours. Must'work
Call 563-3256







, CLEANING
POSITION
Inverness. Exp'd w/ ref.
Will train right person,
Must have trans. DFWP
352-637-0611 10a-2p
Evangelical
Church
Looking for Volunteer
Accompanist.
- Reply to Box 1377P
c/o Citrus Publishing
1634 N Meadowcrest
Br,, Crvn DwR r lF 13400


NOW HIRING-
S LOCETy"'
I Large national
organization.
SAvg. Pay $20/hr.C
SOver $55K annually.
| Including full
I benefits & OT, paid
I training, vacation.
i F/T & P/T
S 1-866-515-1762
------ .



ESTABLISHED SALON
FOR SALE. Exc'Iocation.
352-341-5043 or
352-212-0514/637-5078
POOL ROUTE
vHERNANDO Net $84K +
Year. Will train. Guar
' antee accounts $67K
full price. 877-766-5757
www.Doolroutesales.
, com NPRS Inc. Broker


-S
COMMEL I ML LOANS

Also, equip, loans.
Mark (352) 422-1284



ALL STEEL BUILDINGS



- 25x25x7 (2:12 Pitch)
y 1- 9x7 garage door,
2 vents,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED-I$15.995
25x30x9 (3:12 Pitch)
Roof Overhang
2-9x7 garage doors,
2 vents, entry door,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED- $16.495
Many Sizes Avail.
We Custom Build
We Are The Factory
Fl. Engineered Plans
Meets or Exceeds
Florida Wind Code
METAL STRUCTURES
LLC.COM
1-866-624-9100
metalstructuresllc.com
FACTORY DIRECT
METAL BUILDINGS
CARPORTS, SHEDS
Custom Installation,
Up to 140MPH
Wind Rating
Gulf to Lake Sales
(352) 527-0555

LOCALLY MFG.
30 X 30 X 9
Vertical Roof w/(2)
8 X 7 Garage Doors
& (1) 36" Walk Door
& 4" slab.
Installed $14,995
(352) 489-9397




"LIVE AUCTIONS"
,www.charllefudge.com
,For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877
ARMOIRE
6'X4' wide, double
doors, Cherry,
$575.
(352) 637-1161


UNIQUE DOLL IN
CARRIAGE, 2' TALL
Composition Head,
moving eyes, $500
Call for details.
(352) 637-6310



VINTAGE TOASTERS
Irons, Cassette Player,
National Geographics.
some tools. All $75
Beverly Hills
352-257-3793



SPA HEATER - GAS
Teledyne LAARS I series,
good working cond.
$200/obo
(352) 503-3973




A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
2 Ton $780.00
-- 2-/2 ton $814.00
-3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
* Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Also Available
Free Delivery!
Call 746-4394
ABC Briscoe Appliance
Refrigerators, washers,
stoves. Service & Parts
(352) 344-2928
AC SYSTEMS
HEAT PUMPS; MH UNITS
ALL SIZES, 13 SEER, FROM
$475. 352-400-4945
ALMOST NEW
FRIGADAIRE SIDE BY
SIDE REFRIG. 26cu. ft.
Wtr/ice in door. Black
w/SS drs, 68V'/4"H 35
5/8"W
$700/obo 352-503-4733
Dryer
Mint condition
$100. obo
(352) 302-7985
Freezer for sale, 16
cu.ff., exc. cond., too
big for family, $125.
(352) 344-5299
KENMORE 21CU. FT.
side by side, water &
ice in door, white, good
clean cond. $150.
352-621-4721
REFRIGERATOR
Bottom Freezer, White
$75;
STOVE 30" Electric
White $75
(352) 726-1868
Refrigerator
w/ Ice maker, bisque,
very clean, $135.
(352) 726-6224
WASHER & DRYER
Both run well
S$150.
(352)344-4182
WASHER & DRYER
GE, White, Newer
Super Capacity.
$275/pr. Inverness
(919) 538-2933 Cell
Washer & Dryer
Good condition
$250. obo, pair
(352) 634-2527
WASHER & DRYER
Hotpoint, New
$350/pr.
(352) 503-6099



'LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.chariefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877
On Site Estate
Auction
Thursday 9/27
9am
Dir; From Hernando,
Go N. on SR200, Rt.
on Delight, Left on
Gloria to Sale on Left.
Living Estate of CR
Northcut - WWII Pilot,
Alaskan Hunting
Guide & Men's Sr
Gold Medalist Archedr
Game Mounts, Books,
Sterling Set, Misc. Any
& All Furn. + House-
hold Items, John
Boat, Mower & Misc
Items
see photos @
www.dudlevsauctlon.
com
AB166712BP 2dsc chk

SOUTHERN
AUCTION
MARKETING &
APPRAISAL

AUCTION
Monday Sept 24th
7:00 PM
Super nice 1993
Mercedes 190E,
gold cart, Electric
scooter, tools,
furniture,
collections...
Pics at
www.auctionzio.com
#4341
15991 NE Hwy 27 Alt.
Williston, FL
352-528-2950
Col. Joel Kulcsar
AU1437-AB2240
10% BP on all sales




PAINT SPRAYER
Graco Magnum XR7
w/2 spray hds, 2 shields.
Used once. Undr. Warr.
$350 (352) 522-0807
(727) 688-4020
WHEEL OF A
DEAL
-
ijS �


GUARANTEED
RESULTS FOR
ONLY $63.95
Sell your car today
with a Wheel of a
Deal Ad, Run a 30
day ad and we will
continue to run your
ad every month until
you sell the car.

(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902
*Ad will not be
automatically
scheduled. The
customer must call
each month to
reschedule.
Ls mmmmm �


" c177?us Coumy (FL) CHRONICLE


CURIO CABINET
White Oak
w/5 glass shelves.
72" X 15" $175obo
(352) 637-9575
DBL. RECLINER SOFA
Navy Leather $500;
MICRO-SUEDE CHAISE
(Mocha) $250
Like Newl(352)522-0807
(727) 688-4020
Din. Rm. Table &
4 Chairs, beautiful
traditional oak,
Queen Anne style legs
$600.obo
(352) 503-3144
DINING RM. SET
8 upholstered chairs, 7'
table w/leaf & glass
top. $150.
(352) 527-9876
Dining Room Hutch
Solid oak, led glass
doors, lighted top
EXCELLENT COND.
$650 OBO.
(352) 527-1399


Air Driven Underground
Boring Equipment
Best offer or Trade
(352) 726-2211
Sander
Rigid, oscillating,
edge/belt, spindle
sander, $150.
(352) 628-6335
TOOLS, MECHANIC'S
3 Boxes, Loaded. Many
Craftsman. Citrus Sprgs.
(352) 342-1922



28" Sony TV
1 yr. old, $200.
and Magnavox 26"
older TV $50.
(352) 621-3131
PANASONIC 27"
PIP TV Amazing Picturel
Guest Bedroom TV.
Hardly used. $125
(352) 344-3485


-UB

FIREPLACE
New Adobolite Chimenea
type w/ 18' chimney pipe
kit. Use inside or on lanai.
Paid $4500 will sell for
$2800. 352-344-4811
MH Roofover Kits Avail.
do it yourself, will deliv.
Used roofing material
also avail 352-746-1600



BROTHERS LAZER
PRINTER $50/obo
SHARP FAX MACHINE
like new, $50/obo
(352)637-1173
Citrus County
Computer Doctors
Repairs In-Home or
Pick-Up, Delivery, avail.
Free quote, 344-4839
Dell Computer
model Dimension
L600CX, incl. monitor,
printer, speakers, good
working cond. $75.
(352) 795-4908
DELL DESKTOP
COMPUTER, LCD flat
screen WinXP comp,
like new $400. DRESSER,
solid oak was $795 sell
$200. (352) 726-5310
DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
http://www.rdeeii.com
FASTI2000MHZ
HP-60GB H/D CD Burn.
K/B, Mouse, Spkrs
W/ Win XP $290 w/
CD's (352)613-2958



CATERPILLAR
Loader Backhoe
1995, $25,000.
1584 N. Marion Way
(352) 634-1728



"BOMBAY" BUFFET
(Cherry) $100;
LG. COFFEE TABLE w/2
drawers 3' X 4' $175
(352)522-0807
(727) 688-4020
2 LEATHER RECLINERS
Ivory C:i.:., n-0
or " .. L..:.ir.
2 BRASS Bedroom Table
Lamps $25/both
(352) 726-4689
4 Rattan Bar Stools
$80.
4 matching chair $50.
Must See.
(352) 621-0300
5 PC. BEDROOM SET
Triple Dresser, Hdbd,
Hi Boy, Nt. Stands $350
EXECUTIVE OFFICE
FURNITURE (New)
Buttermilk/Cherry Top
$400 (919)538-2933 Cell
PRE OWNED FURNITURE
Unbeatable Prices
NU 2 U FURNITURE
Homosassa 621-7788
3PC STANLEY WALL UNIT
Solid, light colored
wood. Exc. cond. $250/
obo. SECT. CORNER
COUCH lyr old. Exc.
cond. $250
352527-8578/464-4133
Bedroom Set,, king, 6
pc. solid maple $450.
Black sofa & love seat
$225. excel. cond.
(352) 621-0300
BEDS *:. BEDS *: BEDS
The factory outlet store!
For TOP National Brands
Fr.50%/70% off Retail
Twin $119 *. Full $159
Queen $199/ King $249
Please call 795-6006
BR SET California KG
Waterbed, Triple
Dresser, Hi-Boy, Lighted.
Solid Oak. Pd. $4,000
$400.352-503-6169
Cell 453-6362
BROYHILL WOODEN
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
65"LX22"WX51"H, fits 32"
TV, 3 drawers, 4 shelves
in glass cabinet. $400.
SMW (352) 382-4795
CHINA CABINET
Older, solid wood $100
VINTAGE 50'S HI-FI
$25
(352) 344-4580
CITRUS HOME DECOR @
Wal-Mart Plaza,
Consignment, like new
furniture (352) 621-3326
Coffee & 2 end table
set, Cherry wood color,
$50. Glasstop coffee &
sofa table set, $70
(352) 270-8178
COMPLETE TWIN BED
Wood Hdbrd. Comp.
w/bedspread. $50
COFFEE TABLE
Lg, Wood $25
(352) 746-5031
CURIO CABINET
3 Glass Shelves
72 X 23 $75
Very Good Cond.
(352) 726-9684


(-'Act Now 'S

GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over Items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week after your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days,
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902


3 PC. WALL UNIT
Solid oak, $775.
352-637-1061
DINING ROOM SET
Dark Pecan Set,
oval table with
6 chairs, server $250
352-249-1132
DINING ROOM SET
Mahogany, table w/
2 leaves and 6 chairs,
w/ large Hutch
$800.
(352) 746-9470
DINING ROOM SET
Table w/ 4 chairs. Solid
wood, drop-leaf. Extra
leaf & pads. $225
(352) 464-4694
DINING ROOM SET
Table w/4 side chairs
$250
(352) 560-3279
END TABLES &
COFFEE TABLE
Solid Oak, Glass Top
$400
(352) 637-1061
EXECUTIVE
METAL DESK & CHAIR
60"x30". Exc. cond.
$150/obo
(352) 628-0941
KING BED COMPLETE
w/headboard &
comforter set. $375.
(352) 726-4394
La-Z-Boy Leather
Recliner
hunter green,
retail $2,100.
Asking $450.11ke new
(352) 746-2842
La-Z-Boy Recliner/
Rocker, like new,
antique map pattern,
$380, Computer
desk/hutch/ filing table
set, $150 (352) 270-8178
Loveseat
6 mos. old, burgundy,
leather, $450.
Dining Set, Iron & glass,
like new, must see, $400
(352) 527-4488
LOVESEAT, rocks &
reclines, teal/brown
tones, like new, $75;
TABLE w/2 chairs, sides
extend, It. brown, $60
(352) 634-2592
Poplar wood writing
desk, $50. Kroehler
American Signature
kakhi green sofa,
loveseat, 2 side tables,
slip covers, set, $500
(352) 270-8178
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
QUEENSIZE BED
Inflatable. $65. Dinette
set w/4 chairs.$75.
220-4270 or 726-5708.
RECLINER "BERKLINE"
1 yr. old. Pd. $400+
Showroom Cond.
$90
(352) 382-1088
r ;----
r RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalflndercom
ROLLTOP DESK
Solid oak, $300.
(352) 382-0817
SOFA
16ft, Corner Sectional
Pullout Bed, Each End
is recliner chair,
good condition,
$480. (352) 746-7127
Solid pine natural and
cream dining set, $250
Cream & burgundy
La-Z-Boy recliner
rocker, $150.
(352) 270-8178-
TAN LOVESEAT
W/SLEEPER 16'
Exc. Cond. $100;.'
RECLINING GREEN SOFA
17.5' Fair Cond. $50
(352) 228-3685
Tempur-Pedic BRAND
NEW Matt. Set in plastic,
Pd. $2,399/Sell $1,800
(352) 503-5305
The Path's Graduates,
Single Mothers,
Needs your furniture.
Dining tables, dressers
& beds are needed.
Call (352) 746-9084
TWIN BEDS, COMPLETE
& Bedding, $200;
DR SET, table w/4 up-
holstered chairs, $200.
(352) 228-7775
WOOD FUTON
full size $125. Wing back
chairgold. $25.
352-220-4270 or
726-5708.



42" RIDING MOWER
131/2HP, with bagger,
$300.
(352) 795-6639
Craftsman ZTR, 40" cut,
15H, All attach., $1,100.
Yard Machines, 42"
$450. (352) 362-7832
Dyna Mark Rider
older model
8 HP, B&S eng., 36" cut.
$150. (352) 302-6069
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HUSQVARNA
Rotary Mower, power
propelled, $100
10 HP CHIPPER/
SHREDDER, $250.
(352) 795-9873
MULCH 5-6 Yrd. Loads
$95 Deliv'd. Citrus Co.
Gravel $75 + Materials,
352-563-9979/400-0150
Riding LAWN MOWER
Craftsman, Elec, Start, 6
spd. Transaxle., 17 hp,
42" cut. Like New!
$1,200 Negot.
(352) 637-2375
Stihl grass edger,
model FC-55, bought
new Aug. 2004,
like new, $100 firm
(352) 726-2645
TRACTORS (2) Int. Cub
LowBoy belly mower.
$1,400; 414 Int. Diesel
w/loader, $2,000
(352) 726-6864


So
























Name



Address-



City



Phone(



Bill me: 4


Name



Address



City-



Phone(



Bill me:





gE


"LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.charliefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877
INVERNESS
Moving Sale, Fri. - Sun.
(919) 538-2933, Hshld./
Tools, 1125 Lehigh Ter.
SUGARMILL WOODS
MOVING SALE
Sat. Sun. 9-1
FURNITURE
2 queen bdrm sets
I Cherry - 1 Ash
Brn leather Sofa & Chair
Glass DR Tbi & Bkrs Rack
Other Misc.
4 BR House for Sale/rent
4 Matricaria Ct.
(813) 781-1341

C0113

3 Various sizes area
rugs, burgundy print,
$50. Others $25 each
(352) 270-8178
300 ft. roll of Bubble
Wrap & 11 bundles
of brand new
packing boxes, $380.
(352) 746-5293

2007
SPECIALS
6 lines - 10 days
Items totalling
$1-$150...........$7.95
$151-$400......$12.95
$401-$800.......$ 17.95
$801-$1,500....$22.95
CALL CHRONICLE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
726-3983 OR
563-5966
Two general
merchandise items
per ad,
private party only.
(Non-Refundable)
Some Restrictions
May Apply

9,000 lb. WARN WENCH
$500;
37 gal. Aux. FUEL TANK
$100
(352) 302-2254
17" KDS Computer
Monitor $40;
Men's NEXT Mountain
Bike $40
(352) 726-9183
61" RCA GREYTV
Works well $900.
SUZUKI DIRT BIKE JR80
2 stroke. Great shape.
$600. (352) 422-6911


-pSortig
W *icA3M^


Above Ground Pool
FENCE
.24 ft., brand new
$150 obo
(352) 527-4171
AWNING - NEW
Cost $395 Now $150
7' quarter moon on iron
frame, Fax Machine,
$20 (352) 382-1191
CCTV
ALADDIN CLASSIC
Black & white in exc.
cond. $1500
(352) 637-1173
CHRYSLER PACIFICA
Towing Hitch, $65.
12HP, KOHLER CI
Horizontal Shaft, $75.
(352) 795-6639
Complete gas log fire-
place & ducting cost
$1,500,
Sell $300
(352) 746-3319
Desk Top Sign Maker
Roland 24" Comm 1
PNC-1100, soft ware in-
cluded, works great
$1,000. (352) 726-0979
after. 6pm
DIGITAL SLR PKG
Nikon D70s,1G,Tamron
18-200
$800. 634-1315
Electric Fire Place, new
in box w/ accessories
$550. Running Boards
new in box use for
Truck, SUV or Van,
$375. (352) 465-6558
ELECTRIC HUSKY
5 cu. ft. Cement mixer.
Like new. $200
NEW CB WEATHER
Alert Radio, $35.00
(352) 795-9873
GAS PORCELAIN GRILL
Brinkman model 2400
3 burner, with side
burner, cover. Good
cond. Tank avail. $85.
(352) 527-9860
GOLF CART BATTERIES
THE BATTERY MEDICS
36V & 48V Sets were
$245 Now $200 Pricing
Extended till 9/30.
Contact Mark @
727-375-6111
HOME SECURITY SYSTEM
"Laser Shield"
Advertised on Limbau
talkshow & Circuit .City.
Still in box. Cost $200/
Sell $75(352)382-1088
KENMORE FLAT TOP
ELECTRIC RANGE
$175/obo GLASSTOP
DINNETTE SET w/4 chairs.
$100/ obo. Both nice
cond. (352) 746-7689


BURN BARRELS
Heavy duty w/ out tops
$7.50 EA (352) 344-9752
KNITTING MACHINES
Brother 280 & 260
Inc. Ribber & Stand
$500/ea.
352-563-6371/422-4630
ROYAL KENT, Poland
Very pretty
Service of 8. Mint Cond.
Platters, Veg. Bowls,
Cream, Sugar. $125
8a-3p (352) 621-3696
SEWING MACHINES
New Home $65
Kenmore $45
Excellent condition
(352) 527-0424
SOD. ALL VARIETIES
Bahia, $80 pallet,
St Augustine, $150
pallet. Install & Del.
Avail. 352-302-3363
The Spot Family Center
Needs Donations
For Community
Family/Youth Events
Land, Storage Racks,
Containers, Folding
Tables, Event Tents, Bus.
Box Truck. Please call:
Brian (352) 220-0576
Wheelchair,
lightweight,
excel, cond. $150.
Ladder, aluminum
32' extension
$175. (352) 746-9012
Wicker Tables
& Planter, 36" TV,
Refrigerator,
(352) 726-7159




& Misc. store items.
$300
(352) 422-5985



BRAUN
WHEELCHAIR LIFT
Side mounted, fits full
sz. van. $750/obo'
(352) 382-8970 Lv. Mess.
INVACARE
WHEELCHAIR
Good Cond. $75
(352) 628-6901
LEGEND SCOOTER
$425.00.
SHARP RIDER
$375.00
(352) 628-9625
PRIDE GOGO 3 WHEEL
SCOOTER like new,
used very little,
Cost $949.
Sell $395/obo
(352) 726-7537


BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676




AMPLIFIER/SAMPSON
10 Channel, Pwrd.
Mixer, 910 watts, studio
quality/stereo, EQ for
mains/EQ for monitors,
effects. New in box!
$450 (352) 628-7251
(352) 586-8503 Cell
CELLO - Full size, with
softbag, bow & prac-
tice chair, superior
tone, 10 years old.
$3500. (352) 794-0495
Hammond
Console Organ
$1,000.
(352) 476-3355




ELLIPTICAL EXERCISE
MACHINE by Horizon
Fitness Ltd. Series.
Model #LS625E
Used very little. $595.
(352) 465-1698
PRO-FORM EXERCISE
MACHINE, with all
gadgets, like new,
exc. cond. Only $300.
(352) 382-0022
Treadmill
$300.
Exercise Bike
$10.
(352) 628-1739
TREADMILL
Like new, $300 firm.
(352) 746-1060




2 SETS USED GOLF
CLUBS, exc. cond.
(1) Hogan Apex- Edge
CFT w/steel shafts.
(2) Callaway Steel
Head X-14 pro series
w/rifle-lite shafts, both
3-PW $250 each obo
(352) 564-1717
8' POOL TABLE
Custom built 8'. 1"
Slate. New Felt. Ex.
Cond. $1195.
228-2608.
BERETTA SEMI-AUTO
AL391 URIKA, 12ga, 28"
RBL, Chokes, Case, NIB
$795.00 (352) 382-3948


m


uthern






;10,000


HOLE


N ONE


Rules: 4-person scramble, individual and couple entries
You can now pay in two payments of $37.50 billed through RACC on your quarterly bill.


_____State Zip___


Once Two Payments


1*


State Zip_



)



Once Two Payments






I ^ *-<''^^Ta


.,- 5'


'I

't


Name



Address



City State Zip___



Phone( )



Bill me: Once Two Payments


Name



Address



City State Zip___



Phone( )



Bill me: Once Two Payments

Mail or fax entries to:
REALTORS Association of Citrus County, Inc.
714 S. Scarboro Ave., Lecanto FI 34461
Fax (352) 746-3223


For more information call

746-7550
Sponsored by the REALTORS Association of
Citrus County, Inc. and the Citrus County
Chronicle.
Ci,�1 MP .nKIE

CrevtagowEw


Woods Golf Club




Monday,



October 1, 2007



12 p.m. Shotgun start


$75 per person

Includes cart, beverages, lunch and greens fees


SttIZp


----


Cl-ASSIFI]EIDS


BOW FLEX SPORT
Home Gym
$400
(352) 563-0043
CLUB CAR, Golf Cart,
Very clean, like new,
new batters, charger
$1300/obo 795-4770
COLT VEST POCKET
25cal. $375
COLT POLICE POSITIVE
22cal. Revolver $425
Old/Looks New.
(352) 344-9502
*FREE REMOVAL OF-
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts, We sell
ATV parts 628-2084
GOLF CART BATTERIES
THE BATTERY MEDICS
36V & 48V Sets were
$245 Now $200 Pricing
Extended till 9/30.
Contact Mark @
727-375-6111
GULF CLUB SET
AMF Hybrids w/bag
used twice, like new,
$325. (352) 795-4405
Have Management
area permits to trade -
Half moon & RIchloam
Baird. Call 941-457-7014
HUNTING DUCK
DECOYS
24 Blue Bills w/lead rope
& anchors. 7 Mallard/
teals. Camo Decoy
Tote Bag. 352-563-1814
$100. Will split up.
NRA
Certified Instructor
to Teach Concealed
Carry Classes
Monday thru Sundays
352-270-3902/601-3573
On Site Estate
Auction
Thursday 9/27
9am
Dir: From Hernando,
Go N. on SR200 , Rt.
on Delight, Left on
Gloria to Sale on Left.
Living Estate of CR
Northcut - WWII Pilot,
Alaskan Hunting
Guide & Men's Sr
Gold Medalist Archerl
Game Mounts, Books,
Sterling Set, Misc. Any
& All Furn. + House-
hold Items, John
Boat, Mower & Misc
Items
see photos @
www.dudlevsauction.
cam
AB166712BP 2dsc chk
WE BUY GUNS
On site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238


10' X 5' HEAVY DUTY
MTL. FRAME / WD.
FLOOR/ VG CONDITION
$750 OBO 352-795-6693
6' x 12'
single axle trailer
$750.
(352) 465-2271
PACE AMERICAN
'04 Journey, 6 x 12
Single Axle Cargo Sport
Trailer. Safe, durable,
EZ to tow. $2,oo000obo
(352) 270-3304
Trailer Frame
28 ft., electric brakes,
dual wheels,
$400.
(352) 726-3182
TRAILERS (2)Tandem Util,
TrIr. 16' $900; Tandem
Equip Trlr. 6 tn. $1,400
(352) 726-6864




CRIB, Blonde Wood
Rainbow Fish Set, Pooh
Swing, Reclineable Seat
w/music, Activity
Walker, Playpen/Bass./
Changing Table (Pooh)
Infant Car Seat.
All like new! $250
(352) 860-2585




BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676
Travel Trailer
for Storage, Urgent
I will remove insides
(352) 341-3071




NOTICE
Pets for Sale
In the State of Florida
per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certificate per
Florida Statute.

2 LOVEABLE
FERRETS
& 3 Cages $250
Moving Up Northi
(352) 302-2254


THE 14th ANNUAL








Benefit- Golf Tou ament



To Benefit Habitat For Humanity


.















BOXER PUPPIES
Purebred, 12 wks.,
Male & Female
Brindles & Fawns. $300
352-344-5712/978-3202
CHIHUAHUA Puppies
10wks, long & short
haired, M & Fem. shots
$225-$250..
352-628-3959, 586-0124
CHIHUAHUAS
Shots, Vet checked
health cert, M $250 &
F $275. 352-563-0826,
352-220-9751 cell.
DACHSHUND - 1 male,
neutered, pie cream,
7 mos., Microchipped,
shots, $250.
(352) 621-4553


Act Now

GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sale?

We have the
- Answer for Only
$12.95
The week after your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902

GERMAN SHEPHERD PUP
Mole.
(352) 489-7031
HANS MACAW
5 mos. old w/Ig. cage &
cage toys. $600
352-220-6325/220-9532
Humane Society
of Inverness
Has a New Vet
Who Has Joined
Our Team
We offer Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Starting at $20,
Low cost vaccines,
Heartworm test,
Heartworm
treatment, Cat
Declawing. Call
for prices and appt.
(352) 726-8801

Humanitarians
of Florida
Low Cost Spay &
Neuter by Appt.
Cat Neutered $20
Cat Spaved $25
Dog Neutered &
Spayed start at $35
Low cost shot clinic
Tues, Weds & Thurs
1st & 3rd Saturdays
10am-4pm
(352) 563-2370
Japanese Chin, 1 yr.
old not registered but
can be, trade for Mal-
tese puppy, female or
for sale (352) 564-0387
MASTIFF, English
Male, AKC, 15 mos. Big
Boned Beauty! Pick of
the litterl MUST SELL!
$800 (352) 621-0848
MINI DACHSHUNDS
puppies, AKC, 2 male, 2
female, 8-wks, $425
(352) 726-4007
MINI DACHSHUNDS
Reg., Shots, Health
Cert., MUST SEE! $400
(352) 563-1479
PETS
Breeding parakeets
.$40 pr; 1 pr canaries
$150;2 finches w/cge
$50; many cages
628-3393
PIT PUP
$150.00 white female
4 mo. call 4 Info
352-854-9663
POODLE - Tiny Male
CKC, Apricot, 8wks.
Health Cert, Shots,
adorable. $550
(352) 422-4500
Quality Home Raised
Pups Maltese, Yorkle,
Chihuahua, poodle,
Designer breeds,
Peklngese/Chin
Cavaller/poo,
Yorkie/poo, malte/poo
Maltese/shlh tzu
352-347-5086
ROTTWEILER
Male, 14 mos. AKC, in
tact, beautiful dog.
Pick of litter. MUST SELLl
$500 (352) 621-0848
SHIH TZU PUPPIES
10 wks, CKC reg. Brwn
& wht, Male $450,
Female $500. Health
Cert, (352) 564-2865
SIAMESE KITTENS
Seal Pt., blue Pt.,
chocolate, pure bred,
consumers warranty
shots, $200-$250
(352) 228-1906
YORKIE PUP
$350, parents on
premises.
352-400-4913/476-1208
Yorkshire Pupples
2 8wk old males
(352) 637-9543




FISH AQUARIUM
NEW 55 GALLON
With cabinet stand, 2
filters, all accessories,
$300/obo,
(352) 302-7725


a-
HORSE BOARDING
State Forrest Acces.,
lit arena, $300/mo
SCENIC TRAIL RIDES
$35; LESSONS $25
(352) 628-1472
HORSE SHOEING/
TRIMMING, AFA, Cert.,
Farrier, Richard Iversen
(352) 628-9186


M-
2 HEFERS, 1 In 4H, $900
eoa. 1 Bull $800, grain
fed, Char. & Angus
352-634-4542, 637-1085
BULLS 5-6 mos. old
White Face Hereford &
Red Angus,
(352) 344-5895




15HP Merc. '07 Outbrd.
4 strk. Elec strt. Long shft
Brand new in box $1800
352-302-0100/563-2459
15HP MERCURY
4 stroke, 2007, SS prop.
Under warranty.
$1400
(352) 795-1816


PTEMBER 23, 2007




PONTOON BOAT
TRAILER
Tandem axle. 13' tires,
galv, 31 ft.adjustable.
$1,400. (352) 447-0572




YAMAHA
'96 Wave Venture, 3
seat, low hrs. Exc. cond.
Lk Nw trir new batt/cvr.
$2995. (352) 563-6080


AIRBOAT 16'
Panther, Alum, w/trlr.
New prop & motor.
$5,500
(352) 489-3440
ALUMINUM FISHING
BOAT 14'
Boat, 18 hp. mtr. & trlr.
$999 OBO
(352) 726-2286
Area's Largest
Selection of
Clean Used Boats
THREE RIVERS
MARINE



(352) 563-5510



AREAS LARGEST
SELECTION
OF PONTOONS
& DECK BOATS
Crystal River
Marine
(352) 795-2597
COMPAC 16
Sailboat, new bottom
paint, complete rigg-
ing, extras, dinghy, trir.
great starter boat,
$2,500. (352) 563-1327
(352) 795-0678
GRADY '89
24' Offshore. 2000-225
Yamaha, trailer. Exc.
$18,000
352-628-3551/302-7816
LOWE
17' Bass Boat/Trailer
50HP Yamaha engine
$6500. (352) 795-9873
Nature Coast Marine
New, Used &
Brokerage
We Pay Cash for
Clean Used Boats
www.BoatSuper
352 794-0094

Nature Coast Marine
New, Used &
Brokerage
We Pay Cash for
Clean Used Boats
www.BoatSuper
352 794-0094

_ Nature Coast Marine _
| Sales & Service |
I Present this Ad for
10% Off on all I
I Parts & Service
1590 US 19,
Homosassa
352-794-0094 .










NEW T-TOPS &
CUDDY CABIN
TOPS
Super Closeout Salel
Won't Last LongI
Call for Pricing
Mon-Frl. 9am-5pm
(352) 527-3555
NITRO 18'
1994,150 Mercury
w/Trailer. Ready to fishI
$6,500 OBO
(352) 465-7209






WE NEED

BOATS!!
SOLD at NO FEE
Selling them as fast







POLAR 2300
2005, Twin 150 Yamaha
4 strk, all electronics,
$43,000
(352) 302-2240
PONTOON 16'
2003 Sylvan 16' w/02
40hp 4-stroke and 02
galv trailer. Bimini
toptrolling motor,
livewell, depth finder,
much more. VERY NICE
$8950. 212-5179
PONTOON
24' 1999 Landau DX-24
w/75HP Yamaha OB
Bimlni, PortaPottl, Lad-
der $6900 352-564-1049
Pontoon Boat
18ft. Crestllner Sport,
refurbished In '07,40HP
Honda, live well, GPS,
Dep. find, port a pottie,
VFH Radio & more,
Will send picture by
e-mail. (352) 382-4909
PRALINE
'04, 24 ft., 225 Honda,
Donzi Hull, block, low hrs,
lift kept, NICE $32,000.
(352)795-1598
ROW BOAT 12'
ALUM. V-HULL
BImini top, 14' ProLine
Trlr., 3 hp. OB, Extras.
$1,500(352)382-1193
Wanted: Boats in Need
of Repair, also motors
and trailers, Cash Paid






A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
.2 weeks In the
.2 weeks Onlinel
*Featured In Tues.
"Wheels" SectlanI
Call Today
(352) 726-3983


or (352) 563-5966
For details.
'$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply


FOUR WINDS 31'
'04, Slide out, levellers,
backup cam, V-10 Ford
No smk/Pets. Loaded!
$40K (352) 422-7794
GULF STREAM '04
Ford BT Cruiser, 28' Tow
pkg. 13K mi 1 slide, walk
arnd qn, bd. very clean
$44,000. (352) 344-5634
THOR Windsport
'00, 31 FT., V10 Ford,
like new, no pets, no
smoke, 16k mi. $28,000.
(352) 621-1655




COLEMAN
1993 Pop-up, air,
awning, needs some
canvas work, $600.
SMALL BOAT $165.
(352) 346-8668
I BUY RV'S
Travel Trailers, 5th
wheels etc. Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
PALOMINO PONY
Pop-Up. Sleeps 5,frig.,
AC. stove for inside/
outside. Good Cond.
$3,000(352)746-0839

ON *


CARGO CARRIER
Roof-top
$75
(352) 382-1193
GOOSE NECK
HITCH
For Chevrolet dually.
$150
(352) 302-5698
MUSTANG SET
OF 4
Set of 4 Mustang
Cobra Tires on Rims
17" fits
1994-2003 Mustang
$300 OBO
352-502-0014
RED FIBERGLASS
TOPPER
For Reg. Cab Ranger.
$400
(352) 746-5441
Tow Dolly
Stehl, 2003, like new
$700.
(352) 628-6335





TOP DOLLAR
SFor Junk Cars
$ (352)201-1052 $ A
CASH BUYER-No Junk
for Trucks, Vans & Cars
Larry's Auto Sales
Hwy 19S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333





*FREE REMOVAL OF*
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645



-iii-iEu
r 02, Mazda Tribute
I Great Goa- T '. I

866-838-4376





'02 TOWN & COUNTRY VAN
V6, Dualkr,Loaded......... $7,995



I '98,Cadillac Sedan
Deville Custom Grille |
+ Morell Low Miles
$6,990.
1-866-838-4376

'99,MercuryGrand
S Marquis
Don't Hesitate
Won't Last $3,990.
= 1-866-838-4376

A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
.2 weeks Onlinel
*Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" SectionI
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
'$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
ACCENT -HYUNDAI
1999, AC, AM/FM Cass.
5spd. well maint. Gas
saver, 35/45mph. $1900
obo. (352) 860-2517
ACURA MDX '04
Sport w/ navigation, 59K
mi. Exc. cond. Garage
kept. $24,800
352-746-7402, Iv msg.

ALL SAVE AUTO1
AFFORDABLE CARS
100+ Clean
Dependable Cars
FROM $450- DOWN
30 MIN. E-Z CREDIT
1675 US HWY19
HOMOSASSA
352-563-2003
L m---m-m- mill
* AUTOMOBILE*
DONATIONS
Tax Deductible
Maritime Ministries
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
(352) 795-9621
* Tax Deductlble *





BUICK PARK AVE.
'86, 4dr, V-6, auto, AC,
fully loaded, Sr. owned.
Either Int. Great cond.
$1300. (352) 249-8059
CADILLAC
1996 DeVille, 119K ml.
Minor TLC, $599,
(352) 563-4169
CADILLAC
'97 Sedan Deville,
signature series, 25mpg,
north star, beautiful
dependable 90k ml.
$4,700. (352) 795-7876
CUTLASS
OLDS 1999
Only 66k miles, One
Owner, Excellent
Condition, Great Gas
Mileage, $5100- Call
352-344-1646


DODGE
'02, Intrepid,
Low mi., white,
Make offer, Call
(352) 560-7251
DODGE
1987 CONQUEST 2.6,
turbo, 5spd. runs very
good. $1500/obo,.
(352) 795-8968
FORD
2005 Taurus, 21K ml.,
Like Newl Sunroof,
$11,000 Citrus Hills.
(352) 746-1321
FORD
'93 Taurus GL Station
Wagon, Loadedl $3,300
OBO (352) 563-1181
(813)244-3945
HONDA ACCORD
'99, EXL, 6 cyl., very low
miles. Pristine Cond.
$11,000 (352) 634-5665
HYUNDAI
2001 Accent, 5-spd, PS,
PB, A/C, am/fm CD
radio, 70K, good cond
$2,850 (352) 795-1933
INFINITY G35 '06
Coupe, 10K mi. Blue/
creme, beautiful &
perfectly $30,800
(352) 860-1239
LINCOLN
'89 Limo, W/title, '89
Lincoln Towncar. V/G
Cond. Parts only. Both
have mtr. & trans.
$500/both. Will
separate. Great
project!(352) 628-2613





MERCEDES
1987, 560 SL, 126K,
I White, Both tops,
New tires, $10,500
S 352-586-6805/
a 382-1204

MERCURY
'98, Sable, V6, 3.0 eng.
repair or for parts, right
front end damage. U
haul $500/obo
(352) 628-0608
MITSUBISHI
'90, Mirage, cold AC,
49K ml, New tires. A-1
Cond. 40+ MPG $2,500
(352) 344-9141
OLDS AURORA
2001, V-6 Sedan, 48K,
Exc Cond. Leather,
Dual Pwr Seats/Wndws/
Drs., Radio/Cass./CD,
Chrome Wheels,
Pearl White. $10,995
(352) 746-2001
PLYMOUTH
'94, Sundance, 4 cyl.,
auto, 2 dr, hatch back,
runs good, cheap on
gas $550. (352)302-4535
SATURN
'99, 4 Dr. 5 spd., w/
complete, BlueOx tow
set up, leather cover.
71k, $3,500, 746-5477
TOYOTA
'98, Camry LE, 146K,
Hwy. ml., 1 own., Splr.,
Grn./Slvr. ext., Lth. Int.
Ally whis, Great Cond.
$3,200. (352) 794-0054
TOYOTA CAMRY LE '96,
Exc. Cond./All pwr.,
Mntc. Rcds., Grgd.
$3,500 (352) 422-5685
Your Donation of
A Vehicle
Supports Single,
Homeless Mothers
& Is Tax
Deductible
Donate your vehicle
TO THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500
$500 Poke Inpounds For

Cas from $500 F listingscd
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374

I-A


24ft. Proline
S10 Pick Up,
Race Car
(352) 621-3420
CHEVY
'84, Stepslde. Many
new parts, A/T, AC
$4,500 (352) 447-0909
CHEVY EL CAMINO
'65 $8,500, worked 350,
turbo 350 tranny. Needs
some finishing touches.
352-489-8633
DODGE
1965 Dart 440 6pack,
500 HP, auto trans.
Tubbed rear, way too
much to list, $13,500.
Must seel Will trade
(603) 860-6660
DODGE
'71, Dart Swinger, 6 cyl.
auto, daily driver $2,950
obo (352) 447-3842
(352) 978-0658
FORD
'64, Galaxy, 4 DR, all
original, runs good,
$4,500. (352) 344-8401,
Cell (352) 476-4496
MERCEDES 1984
380SL, 69K orig. mi. 2
tops w/stand, garage
kept. $13,500
(352) 302-5698
MG MIDGET
1978, mint, low mile-
age, red, All Original
$7500, OBO.,
(352) 302-5321/John
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374





I 00X MC Sanoma
X-Cab, Auto, |
47K org. miles.
$4,990. i
1 86-838-4376
---m ---m am l
' 02, FORD F-150, XLT .
I SUPERCAB Soortslde I


I $11,990. i
1-866-838-4376
r-0--5,-m
'05,Toyota Tacoma
Low miles
1 Owner, MUST SEEII
| $199. mo.WAC |
= 866-838-4376 =


A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks In the
Chroniclel
*2 weeks Onlinel
*Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" Sectloni
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
'$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply


CHEVY
ext. cab, 84k m.,
call for particulars
352-476-3355
CHEVY
'97, 1500 Sllverado, 3 dr.
fiberglass bdcvr., 120K,
auto, power windows.
$4400 (352) 795-5735
CHEVY
Chevy Silverado 2006
Uke newly Club Cab,
V8, Leather, Dual Ex-
haust, Loadedl Hard
Cover Bed. Chrome
Rims, 32K MI, $20,999
OBO Call 352-464-1411
DODGE
'01 Dakota, LST 4X4
Quad cab. exc. cond.
59,000 ml. too many ex-
tras to list $12,500/obo
(352) 795-4410
DODGE
1984 Power RAM, 4x4,
LB, 140K mi. no radio,
A/C, strong work truck
$1,400 obo 212-8211 .
DODGE DAKOTA
'01 SLT
44K, $8500, Tinted Glass,
Bedilner, Exc Cond,
Call 352-726-0156
DODGE
Dakota '96, Std. cab.
Topper, 128K, gd. cond.
Nice bodyl $2,700/obo
(352) 527-4590
F-150 XLT '97
Super Cab, 4wd, auto,
exc. cond. $7,495.
(352) 302-3048
FORD
'04, HD 4 WD, crew
cab, Duramax diesel,
94k ml., $21,000. firm
(352) 634-2462
FORD
'90, F250, 4 X 4, 302,
V8, cold AC, grannylow
4 spd, $2,500. obo
(352) 560-7324 aft. 3pm
FORD
'91, F150, 4 wheel drive,
runs good, lots of
new parts, $1,500.
(352) 216-1211
FORD
'99 E-350 Box Truck
AC, Ramp, $4,000 abo
352-341-4848/400-1327
NISSAN
'03, Frontier, 43k ml.,
stereo, CD, tinted win.,
tow pkg. alarm, $14,500
(352) 257-1173
F NISSAN
Frontier XE '04, Ext. Cab,
auto, cruise, 1 Owner.
Exc. Cond.
$9,500 (352) 302-7073
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




S '01, Isuzu Axiom
i 3rd Row Seat,
Leather and MORE I
Low miles
$199. mo WAC
866-838-4376

'03, Saturn VUE
Low miles.
- You Can Tow Mell
866-838-4376

CHEVY Blazer S10
'88, 4.3, Low miles, A/C
Sr. owned, very sharp.
$2,700,00 (352)
465-0721
FORD
"97 Explorer Sport. 2 dr,
V-6, Auto, All Pwr., AC,
$3A495
(352) 382-7632
FORD EXPLORER
'97 XLT, V-8,129K ml,,
Exc, Cond. $4,000 abo
(352) 563-2399
FORD EXPLORER
SPORT '02, AC, runs
great. 57K ml., exc.
cond. $10,000/obo
(352) 637-2582
JEEP
2004 Wrangler, low
miles, 4 X 4. Gator logo.
$14,500
(352) 795-4920
TAHOE LT
LT 2002 Loaded.
Leather, Sunroof, All
Power. $14,900 OBO.
352-228-2608
TOYOTA Highlander
'05 Limlted. Wht, 10K,
Loaded, warr. Exc. New
$36K Now $24K Firm
352-341-4313/212-0615
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374





A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951"
*2 weeks in the
*2 weeks Ojnline
*Featured In Tues.
"Wheels" SectlonI
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
*$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
DODGE 1500
'97 Magnum, Ext. Cab,
5.9 L, Loadedl After
mkt. Chrome,
$7,500firm352-422-7279
DODGE
'98 Ram1500, Ext, Cab,
V-8, topper. 100K. 1
owner. Well malnt'd,
$6,990 (352) 302-5698
$5001 Police Impounds
For salel Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374


E---- -E
'00, Honda Odyssey
LX, #1 Van In
America, Better
Hurry, Only 47K org.
miles $8,990.
1-866-838-4376

'03, Kla Sedona
Mini Van Bring i
the Family,
$7,990.
866-838-4376

CHEVY VENTURE
1999, synthetic oil, new
brakes, dual oc, pwr
door, red color $3100.
352-564-1390


DODGE
'88 Ext. Van, Just Tuned
Up, Rear Brakes, new
tires. Asking $2,000obo
352-341-4848/400-1327
DODGE
'94, Ram 250.
AM/FM/CD, V8.
runs good, $1,200.
(352) 746-9012
FORD WINDSTAR
2000 SEL, All optlonsi
Leather Interior
$2,500 firm
(352) 257-1864
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY









ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
SUZUKKI, DIRT BIKE,
80cc, very good shape,
runs great, $750.
4 WHEELER, SUZUKKI,
185, runs great, $750.
(352) 302-5321/John
WOLF
'06, 150cc 4 wheeler,


A WHcEL ,jr
A DEAL
5 lines for only
S .. $37.951*
*2 weeks In the
Chronicle
.2 weeks QOnlinel
.Featured In Tues.
"Wheels" Sectioni
SCali Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966_
For details.
"$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
DAELIM
ROADWIN 2005 125CC
Great starter street.
bike. Low ml. Clear title,
$2200/obo 352-628-7442
*FREE REMOVAL OF*
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HARLEY CHOPPER
Will Turn Headsl '71 Old
School Iron Head
Springer. All redonel
A steal @ $5,500
352-308-2570/586-1917
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'07, Heritage Softail, 18
mo. left on warr. Low
miles. Exc. cond.
(352) 560-7168
HARLEY DAVIDSON
SPORTSTER 883
'99, Loaded w/extras,
low miles, Mint Cond.
$4,500(352) 634-5450
HARLEY HERITAGE
CLASSIC '04
Too many extras to llsti
Low miles $18,000 obo
(352) 634-5665
HARLEYS
'92, FB, $8,000. '03, FB
$15,000. '79, Custom,
'92, Ford Ranger $1,000
352-634-4542,637-1085
HONDA
'00, Scooter, Elitfe, 80CC,
black, approx 2k ml.
$1,000.
......(352)A48S-181L_.
HONDA
2005, CRF 150, runs
good, but smokes, looks
new, $1,000. abo
(352) 422-3113
HONDA
'98 Shadow 1100. Amer-
ican Classic Edition
Tourer, New tires, $5,000
Loaded. (352) 344-3898
HONDA
NIGHTHAWK 1993
18k mi, $650 New Paint,
Tires, 250CC. Great
condition..Citrus Springs
352-359-0508
HONDA SHADOW
'06, 750, 2,600 MI.,
Gray Flame, CB, BR.
ULike New l $5,000
Ed. (352) 465-1124
KAWASAKI '04
Vulcan, 2000cc, mint
cond. Many extras.
$8,500/obo
352-628-7403
MOTO GUZZI
BREVA 7501E 2004
12,000, $4,900.00 Beauti-
ful silver bike, garage
kept, touring wind-
hileld hard bag" low .
P ,r,:. li ; a r i , *o - ,a i 'i e ,
(352) 637-6345
Scooter
New 150CC,
Road Legal,
Call (352) 201-6008
850-242-9343
SUZUKI
'05, S83, 1400 CC,
2,400 ml. Lots of custom
extras. Fasti Garaged,
Sr. owned, like new,
must sell. First $5,000.
takes all 352-382-0403
SUZUKI
2003 Burgman 400
Scooter, Royal blue,
14,900+ml. $3900
(352) 419-0053
YAMAHA
'02, Warrior, 1700 CC,
4,900 ml.,
Uke Newl $6,900
(352) 726-6128
YAMAHA
'04, V Star 650, Siverado
windshield, sattlebags,
many extras, like new
2,060 mi. $4,795.
(352) 422-4335
YAMAHA
'04, V Star 650, Slverado
windshield, sattlebags,
many extras. like new
2,060 ml. $4,795.
(352) 422-4335
YAMAHA
'05, Roadstar Sllverdo,
650 CC, 7,400 ml.,
Like Newl $4,900
(352) 726-6128
YAMAHA
1979 400 SX, runs good
great starter bike
must sell $800 obo
(352) 464-2735,
after 3:30PM


YAMAHA SCOOTER
125cc, 1989 RIVA, 2970
ml. Recent tune-up, gd.
tires, $650.
(352) 563-5387


336-0923 SUCRN
2007-CP-797 Estate of
Audra Maureen Hanna
McKlm Notice to Creditors
PUBUC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS
COUNTY,FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2007-CP-797
Division: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
AUDRA MAUREEN HANNA
MCKIM A/K/A
SAM MCKIM A/K/A
MAUREEN H. MCKIM
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of
the estate of Audra
Maureen Hanna McKIm
a/k/a Sam McKIm a/k/a-
Maureen H. McKIm,., de-
ceased, whose date of
death was September 5,
2007, Is pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of
which Is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, Florida 34450. The
names and addresses of
the personal representa-
tive and the personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this no-
tice is required to be
served must tile their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER'BARRED;
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publi-
cation of this notice Is
September 16, 2007.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Thomas E. Slaymaker
2218 Highway 44 West
Inverness, FL 34453
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
/s/ Thomas E. Slaymaker.
Esquire
Florida Bar No. 398535
Slaymaker and
Nelson, P.A.
2218 Highway 44 West
Inverness, Florida 34453
Telephone: (352) 726-6129
:,jii. . '- 1..: ,': ii.,T,,-es in
"-wa. Woun , C r,.c-.icle,
- .perr-, c.c , . Z. ;' I -',07
337-0923 SUCRN
2007 CP 675 Estate of
Daniel Lee Huckins
Notice to Creditors
Summary Administration
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2007 CP 675
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DANIEL LEE HUCKINS,
SDeceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CL.AIMS. ..OR ... DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE:
You are hereby notified
that an Order of Sumary
Administration has been
entered In the estate of
DANIEL LEE HUCKINS. de-
ceased, File Number 2007
CP 675, by the Circuit
Court for Citrus County,,
Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which Is
110 N. Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450;
that the decedent's date
of death was May 11,
2007; that the total value
of . the estate Is
$128,000.00 for home-
stead property and that
the names and addresses
of those to whom It has
been assigned by such or-
der are:
Rae Huckins
9358 N. Citrus Springs Blvd
Citrus Springs, FL 34434
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the es-
tate of the decedent and
persons having claims or
demands against the
estate of the decedent
other than those for
whom provision f6r 'full
payment was made In
the Order of Summary Ad-
ministration must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED,
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENTS
DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tion of this Notice Is Sep-
tember 16, 2007.
Person Giving Notice:
RAE HUCKINS
9358 N. Citrus Springs Blvd
Citrus Springs, FL 34434
Attorney for Person Giving
Notice:
LEWIS E. DINKINS, P.A.
LEWIS E. DINKINS
Florida Bar No. 019741
201 N.E. 8th Avenue


CLASSIFIED :

= I N


LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON
THE PREMISES:
10/10/2007 at2 P.M.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE
TIME OF THE SALE ONLY.
@ 11955 N FLORIDA AVE,
DUNNELLON FL
Published two (2) times In
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, September 23 and
30,2007.


931-0924 SU/M CRN
Citrus County School Board
PUBLIC NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
INVITATION TO SUBMIT STATEMENT
OF QUALIFICATIONS
The School Board of Citrus County, Florida will receive
Statement of Qualifications for the selection of
Architecture, Engineering & Surveying Firms Interested
In contracting services for the following Projects:
1. Heating, ventilating, air conditioning and Electrical
projects
2. -Re roofing projects
3. Site drainage and development projects
4. Architectural projects
5. Site Selection projects
6. Structural Engineering projects


Ocala, FL 34470
(352) 622-4176
Published two (2) times in
Citrus County Chronicle,
September 16 & 23, 2007.
338-0923 SUCRN
2007-CP-673 Estate of
Dorothy K. Clark
Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE FIFTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 2007-CP-673
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DOROTHY K. CLARK,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of
the estate of DOROTHY K.
CLARK deceased, whose
date of death was June
20, 2007 and whose Social
Security Number Is
148-09-5496, is pending In
the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of
which Is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, Florida 34450. The
names and addresses of
the Co-Personal Repre-
sentatlve- - and " the
Co-Personal
Representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All Creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against
decedent's estate, on
whom a copy of this no-
tice Is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate, must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publi-
cation of this notice Is
September 16, 2007.
.. Co-Personal
Representative:
Bruce B. Clark
115 Alabama Trail
Browns Mills, NJ 08015
Co-Personal
Representative
Glenn W, Clark
21 RIdgmount Ave.
Mariton, NJ 08053
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
/s/ AVONELLE
R. MACKEREL, P.A.
Florida Bar # 521980
20743 W.
Pennsylvania Ave.
P.O. Box 717
Dunnellon, FL 34430
352-489-2264
FAX 352-489-6890
Published two (2) times In
Citrus County Chronicle
September ' -: :_. '.

341-0930 SUCRN
SHADER BROTHERS CORP.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF
THE FOLLOWING TENANTS
WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH
TO .SATISFY RENTAL LIENS
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF
STORAGE FACILITY ACT,
SECTIONS 83-806 AND
83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
200
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE
KITCHEN,- -HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS, BEDDING, LUG-
GAGE, TOYS, GAMES,
PACKED CARTONS, FURNI-
TURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING,
TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE- IS-NO-TITLE FOR THE
VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN
SALE.
OWNERS RESERVE THE
RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
Unit #107 B. RHETT WATERS
Unit #231 B. RHETT WATERS
Unit #232 B. RHETT WATERS
LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON
THE PREMISES:
10/10/2007 at 2:30 P.M.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE
TIME OF THE SALE ONLY.
@ 7742 CARL G. ROSE
HIGHWAY, HERNANDO, FL
34442
Published two (2) times In
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, September 23 and
30, 2007,.


342-0930 SUCRN
SHADER BROTHERS CORP.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF
THE FOLLOWING TENANTS
WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH
TO SATISFY RENTAL LIENS
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF
STORAGE FACILITY ACT,
SECTIONS 83-806 AND
83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
DUNNELLON F/k/a 41
STORAGE
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE
KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS. BEDDING. LUG-
GAGE, TOYS. GAMES,
PACKED CARTONS, FURNI-
TURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING,
TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE IS NO TITLE FOR THE
VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN
SALE.
OWNERS RESERVE THE
RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
Unit #187
DEBRA PENNINGER


Drawings and specifications will be available starting
September 24. 2007 and may be examined In the of-
fices of: j
City of Inverness Public Works ,
212 W. Main Street
Inverness, Florida 34450
Hoyle, Tanner & Associates, Inc.
2424 N. Essex Avenue
Hernando, Florida 34442
A copy of the Documents may be obtained from
Hoyle, Tanner & Associates, Inc., 2424 N. Essex Avenue,
Hernando, Florida 34442 upon payment of $S200,
for each Document (Florida sales tax Is Included). Re-
turn of the documents Is not required, and the amount a
paid for the documents Is non-refundable. ,
A Pre-BId Conference will be held at 10:00 am on Tues- I
day October 2, 2007 by the City of Inverness Depart- i
ment of Public Works - Public Meeting Room Ist Floor I
Room 105, at 212 W. Main Street, Inverness, Florida. At-
tendance at the Pre-Bid Conference is not mandatory, a
but is recommended.
The City of Inverness reserves the right to waive formall-
ties, waive any technical defects, reject any and all
bids, and accept any bid which represents the lowest
and best offer to the City.


Frank DIGlovanni, City Manager
City of Inverness, Florida
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
September 23 and 30, 2007.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




7. Site Utility projects
8. Construction Materials. Testing & Inspection,
Threshold Inspection & Geotechnical Services
9. Surveying projects
These services will be utilized as required for small
projects as defined by F.S. 287.055(2) g. continuing
contract. Firms may be selected for projects, as the
District deems necessary. The District reserves the right
to select multiple firms in each category, to eliminate
categories and/or to combine categories. The firms
selected shall provide proposals on a per project basis
for a period of one year with the option of the District
to renew for up to two additional one-year periods. The
District may require a unit price master Agreement for
Construction Materials, Testing & Inspection, Threshold
Inspection & Geotechnlcal Services.
The District will accept statement of qualifications until
2:00 P.M. on October 9, 2007. Please submit three (3)
copies of statements, which must be completed on
forms provided by the Citrus County School Board.
Submittal forms and the Request for Statements of
Qualifications can be obtained from the Facilities and
Construction Department (352) 726-1931, extension
2478: Final selection will be made In accordance with
the policies and administrative directives of the Citrus
County School Board and other statutory provisions.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the right to
.reject any or all Statement of quallfications,- 1.
to waive any Informality In any Statement of
Qualifications received.
All questions concerning this request shall be made to
the Director, Facilities and Construction, Citrus County
School Board, 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida
34450, Telephone (352) 726- :' e r-. J-". LJ
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
on September 16, 17, 23 and 24, 2007.-

344-0923 SUCRN
Citrus County OMB
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
accept sealed proposals for:
BID NO.: 132-07
PROJECT TITLE: Spring Gardens Wastewater Collection
System Interconnection
PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The prci-: .: ::,'.Ti. fr the com-
missioning of the spring garde.'. ..a-ie,.lear treatment
plant and Interconnection .-.Mr. ih- Ciiui County
wastewater system Including the construction of an es-
timated 1200 linear feet of 6" force main and new lift
station.
Citrus County will hold a non-mandatory Pre-Bid meet-
ing at 2:00 P.M. on Thursday, October 4, 2007, at the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida, Suite 219. Attendance is recom-
mended but not required to submit a bid for this proj-
ect. A site visit will also be conducted Immediately fol-
lowing the Pre-Bid meeting. No additional site visits will
be provided.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodations at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the Management & Budget Of-
fice at the Lecanto Governmen- 6ui 3ing .'ca.e- + .
low, or by calling (352) 527-5203 ati easT r,., aa,,. rr.
meeting. If you are hearing or .p.- r.,n impair.- i
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
Submittal Date: October 22, 2007 at 2:00 PM to:
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners
Attn: Pamela L Paulk
3600 W. Sovereign Path
Lecanto Government Building, Suite 266
Lecanto, FL 34461
Public Opening of Bids: October 22, 2007 at 2:15 P M.' :
The Bid Opening will be held at the. Lecanto :-:. err
ment Building.
The Bid Documents may be examined i iE re. iI::. .ir- I
locations:
� Mid-state Builders Exchange, Inc., Ocala, Florida
- McGraw Hill Construction Dodge, Tampa, Florida
- McGraw Hill Construction Dodge, Olando, Florida
- Citrus County Builders Association, Lecanto, Florida
Copies of the Bid Documents may be obtained from I
the office of Hoyle & Tanner & Associates, Inc. for a
non-refundable fee of $75.00, plus postage and handl-
Ing as applicable. Checks shall be made payable to
Hoyle, Tanner & Associates, Inc.
Hoyle, Tanner & Associates, Inc.
2001 W. Old Highway 441, Suite 4 ,.
Mount Dora, Florida 32757
Telephone: (352) 735-6664
Fax: (352) 735-6668
Hoyle, Tanner & Associates, Inc.
2424 N. Essex Avenue'
Hernando, Florida 34442
Telephone: (352) 527-2055
Fax: (352) 527-2655
DENNIS DAMATO, CHAIRMAN
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle
on September 23 ,2007.

343-0930 SUCRN
City of Inverness
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
The City of Inverness Invites established
Contractors/Firms to submit sealed bids for the City of
Inverness WWTP Reclaimed Water Transmission Main
described below. Four (4) originals of the bid proposals
must either be hand delivered or mailed to Debble Da-
vis, City Clerk, City of Inverness, 212 West Main Street,
Inverness Florida 34450, no later than 1:00 P.M. on Thurs-
day October 25, 2007. Sealed envelopes containing
proposals must bear the name of the contractor/firm
making the proposal, and clearly state "Proposal for
City of Inverness WWTP Reclaimed Water Transmission
Main" written on the face of the envelope, A bid secu-
rity In the amount of 5% of the bid price Is required.
Sealed bids will be open iIt. r.ubiiK n.eir j ard
read aloud, beginning at 10 .1 rr.,.aoy C..:'Cr,, '
25. 2007. in the Inverness G: .,-.'r c.r ce'.i '. 1:1 .,,:r
Conference Room 105, 212 West Main Street, Inverness
Florida.
BID NO: DPW-2007-03
DEPARTMENT: PUBLIC WORKS
ITEM: Construction of the CITY OF INVERNESS WWTP
RECLAIMED WATER TRANSMISSION MAIN Project consist-
Ing of the following major components:
Approximately 13,200 linear feet of 16-iir. i,..-:iT..
water main ... �
Approximately 555 linear feet of 16-Inch claimedd
water main casing
Approximately 2,910 linear feet of 12-Inch reclaimed
water main
Approximately 950 linear feet of 8-inch reclaimed.
water main
Approximately 1,850 linear feet of 6-inch reclaimed
water main
Approximately 300 linear feet of 6-Inch reclaimed
water main by-pass
Reclaimed water pump station upgrades
Miscellaneous earthwork, paving, grading, and surface
restoration activities
Miscellaneous pipeline casings, valves, fittings, and
pipeline appurtenances , - -
Miscellaneous electrical equipment . , ;
Hydraullcally Operated Butt Weldlng Machine *
Hydraulic Trailer Mounted Valve Exerciser . '
All sealed bids are to be c.-raea. or,. the Bid Form
and envelope marked to i',a:i:.oe c1.0 number and
vendor name. Proposals submitted via facsimile will be
considered non-responsive and will not be accepted.
DELIVER BY: 1:00 om on Thursday October 25. 2007 to."
Clty of Inverness
Attn.: Debble Davls, City Clerk
212
West Main Street
Inverness, Florida 34450
Bids to be opened at 1:30 pm on Thursday. October 25.
200z





SUNDAY, SiE'TIiMBI;j- 23, 2007 11D


NEW 217; 1 1 "-.i
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bi FOR0
r rat and 000lr innti60 MONTHS


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Concerned about
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Call the service
department with your
ID # and see what your
recall status is with any
Ford, Mercury or Lincoln.
726-1231


Ad i4


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SEE Us AT OUR CURRENT LOCATION:


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Homosassa, FL 34448
(352) 628-4300


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